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Industry Wage Survey:
Contract Construction
September 1972
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

1975




Industry Wage Survey:
Contract Construction
September 1972
U.S. Department of Labor
John T. Dunlop, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Julius Shiskin, Commissioner
1975
Bulletin 1853

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Preface
This bulletin summarizes the results of a September 1972 Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of
wages and related benefits in the construction industries in 21 areas. Based on experience from a
1971 pilot study, BLS launched this study as its first occupational wage survey in over 35 years of
both union and nonunion contractors engaged in residential and commercial building construction
and in highway, street, and other heavy construction.
Separate releases on the 1972 survey were issued earlier for the following areas: Atlanta; BiloxiGulfport and Pascagoula; Boston; Buffalo; Chicago; Dallas; Denver; Des Moines; Hartford; Indiana­
polis; Kansas City; Los Angeles-Long Beach and Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove; Memphis;
Miami; Minneapolis-St. Paul; New York and Nassau-Suffolk; Philadelphia; Portland, Oreg.; San
Francisco-Oakland; St. Louis; and Washington, D.C. Copies are available from the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or any of its regional offices.
This study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations. Martin E.
Personick of the Division of Occupational Wage Structures prepared the analysis. Field work for the
survey was directed by the Bureau’s Associate Assistant Regional Directors.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well as the
addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.




Ill




Contents
Summary.............................................
Industry characteristics •............................
Employment....................................................................... ........................................................................................
Unionization.................................................................................................................................................................
Occupational composition..............................
Occupational earnings.........................................................................................
Union-nonunion differentials.....................................................................................................................................
Commercial-residential differentials..........................................................................................................................
Construction-maintenance trades differentials ...................................., ...............................................................
Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions ..................................................................................
Overtime pay provisions ............................................................................................................................. ..
Employer contributions to specified union funds .................................................................................................
Insurance and pension fu n d s...............................................................................................................................
Vacation and holiday funds . ............................................................................................................................
Combination and other benefit funds .................................................................................................................
Employee benefits not provided by specified union funds ..................................................................................
Paid holidays .........................................................................................................................................................
Paid vacations.........................................................................................................................................................
Health, insurance, and retirement plans ...........................................................................................................
Text tables:
1. Distribution of nonsupervisory construction workers by
industry branch, 21 areas, September 1972 ............................................................................................
2. Average number of workers by size of firm and industry
branch, September 1972
3. Percent of nonsuperdsory construction workers in firms
operating under labor-management agreements, September 1972 ........................................................
4. Percent distribution of onsite man-hours for selected types of
construction, by occupation, various years ............................................................................................
5. Workers and average hourly earnings by union status and type of
construction, selected occupations and areas, September 1972 .............................................................
6. Average hourly earnings for selected construction crafts as percents
of maintenance worker pay, 7 areas, August-December 1972 .............................................................
7. Percent of workers covered by provisions for weekday work outside of
regularly scheduled hours, selected occupations in the
New York area, September 1972........................................................................................
..
8. Average union wage rates and employer contributions to
specified union funds, selected occupations and areas,
September 1972 ................................................
9. Distribution of areas by size of average employer contributions
to union insurance and pension funds, selected occupations,
September 1972 .................
10. Distribution of areas by size of average employer contributions to
union vacation funds, selected occupations, September 1972 .............................................................
11. Percent of workers covered by insurance and retirement plans
not provided by union funds, selected occupations and areas,
September 1972 .....................................................




Page
1
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5
6
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7
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9
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11
11
12
12
12
12
2
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4
5
^
®
9
10
11
12
13

Reference tables:
Occupational averages:
1. Union and nonunion combined .......................................................................................................... 14
2. Union .................................................................................................................................................... 19
3. Nonunion ............................................................................................................................................... 24
Occupational earnings:
Atlanta, Ga.:
4. Union and nonunion combined ........................................................................................................... 27
5. Union .................................................................................................................................................... 29
6. Nonunion ............................................................................................................................................... 3Q
Biloxi-Gulfport and Pascagoula, Miss.:
7. Union and nonunion combined ...................................................................................................... 31
8. Union .................................................................................................................................................... 32
9. Nonunion .............................................................................................................................................. 33
Boston, Mass.:
10. Union and nonunion combined ........................................................................................................... 34
11. Union .................................................................................................................................................... 36
12. Nonunion ............................................................................................................................................... 37
Buffalo, N. Y.:
13. Union and nonunion com bined............................................................................................................ 3g
14. Union and nonunion separately............................................................................................................ 39
Chicago, 111.:
15. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................. 40
16. Union ......................................................................................................................................................42
17. Nonunion .......................................................................................................................................................43
Dallas, Tex.:
18. Union and nonunion combined .............................................................................................................. 44
19. Union ..............................................................................................
45
20. Nonunion ................................................................................................................................................... 47
Denver, Colo.:
21. Union and nonunion combined ..................................................................................................................49
22. Union ..........................................................................................................................................................51
23. Nonunion ....................................................................................................................................................... 52
Des Moines, Iowa:
24. Union and nonunion combined .................................................................................................................. 53
25. Union and nonunion separately.................................................................................................................. 54
Hartford, Conn.:
26. Union and nonunion combined .................................................................................................................. 55
27. Union .......................................................................................................................................................... 57
28. Nonunion
.............................................................................................................................................58
Indianapolis, Ind.:
29. Union and nonunion combined.................................................................................................................... 59
30. Union ...........................................................................................................................................................61
31. Nonunion
.............................................................................................................................................62
Kansas City, Mo .-Kan.:
32. Union and nonunioncombined..............................
63
33. Union ........................................................................................................................................................... 64
Los Angeles-Long Beach and AnaheimSanta Ana-Garden Grove, Calif.:
34. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ 65
35. Union and nonunion separately................................................................................................................ 66
Memphis, Tenn.-Ark.:
36. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ 67



Contents—Continued

8

37. Union ............................................................................................................................................................59
38. Nonunion ...................................................................................................................................................... jq
Miami, Fla.:
39. Union and nonunion combined ...................................................................................................................7j
40. Union ...............................................................................: ......................................................................... 73
41. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 74
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.:
42. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ 75
43. Union and nonunion separately................................................................................................................ 7^
New York and Nassau-Suffolk, N. Y.:
44. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ 77
45. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 79
46. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... gQ
Philadelphia, Pa.-N. J.:
47. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ gj
48. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... g3
49. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... g4
Portland, Oreg.-Wash.:
50. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ g5
St. Louis, Mo.-Ill.:
51. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ g^
San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.:
52. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 37
Washington, D. C.-Md.-Va.:
53. Union and nonunion combined ................................................................................................................ gg
54. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 90
55. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 91
Pay provisions for time worked outside regular schedule:
Atlanta, Ga.:
56. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 93
57. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 94
Biloxi-Gulfport and Pascagoula, Miss.:
58. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 95
59. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 96
Boston, Mass.:
—
60. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 97
61. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 98
Buffalo, N. Y.:
62. Union and nonunion separately................................................................................................................ 99
Chicago, 111.:
63. Union and nonunion separately................................................................................................................... 100
Dallas, Tex.:
64. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 101
65. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 102
Denver, Colo.:
66. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 103
67. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 104
Des Moines, Iowa:
68. Union and nonunion separately................................................................................................................ 105
Hartford, Conn.:
69. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 106
70. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 107
Indianapolis, Ind.:
71. Union ......................................................................................................................................................... 108



72. Nonunion
..............................................................................................................................................109
Kansas City, Mo .-Kan.:
73. Union ...........................................................................................................................................................110
Los Angeles-Long Beach and AnaheimSanta Ana-Garden Grove, Calif.:
74. Union andnonunion separately....................................................................................................................H I
Memphis, Tenn.-Ark.:
75. Union ........................................................................................................................................................... H2
76. Nonunion ...................................................................................................................................................... H3
Miami, Fla.:
77. Union ........................................................................................................................................................... H 4
78. Nonunion ...................................................................................................................................................... H5
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.:
79. Union and nonunion separately.................................................................................
H6
New York and Nassau-Suffolk, N. Y.:
80. Union ............................................................................................................................................................117
81. Nonunion .......................................................................................................................................................Hg
Philadelphia, Pa.-N. J.:
82. Union ............................................................................................................................................................119
83. Nonunion .......................................................................................................................................................120
Portland, Oreg.-Wash.:
84. Union ............................................................................................................................................................121
St. Louis, Mo .-111.:
85. Union ............................................................................................................................................................122
San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.:
86. Union ............................................................................................................................................................123
Washington, D. C.:
87. U nion..............................................................................................................................................................124
88. Nonunion .............................................................
125
Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime:
Atlanta, Ga.:
89. Union ........................................................................................................................................................... 126
90. Nonunion
............................................................................................................................................. 126
Biloxi-Gulfport and Pascagoula, Miss.:
91. Union ........................................................................................................................................................... 127
92. Nonunion
.............................................................................................................................................127
Boston, Mass.:
93. Union ...........................................................................................................................................................128
94. Nonunion
.............................................................................................................................................128
Buffalo, N. Y.:
95. Union and nonunionseparately..................................................................................................................129
Chicago, 111.:
96. Union and nonunionseparately.................................................................................................................130
Dallas, Tex.:
97. Union .........................................................................................................................................................131
98. Nonunion
.............................................................................................................................................132
Denver, Colo.:
99. Union ...........................................................................................................................................................132
100. Nonunion
............................................................................................................................................. 133
Des Moines, Iowa:
101. Union and nonunionseparately..................................................................................................................133
Hartford, Conn.:
102. Union ........................................................................................................................................................... 134



Contents—Continued

F age

103. Nonunion ....................................................................................................................................................135
Indianapolis, Ind..
104. Union .........................................................................................................................................................136
105. Nonunion ....................................................................................................................................................137
Kansas City, Mo.-Kans.:
106. Union .........................................................................................................................................................13g
Los Angeles-Long Beach and AnaheimSanta Ana-Garden Grove, Calif.:
107. Union and nonunion separately................................................................................................................ 139
Memphis, Tenn.-Ark.:
108. Union .........................................................................................................................................................140
109. Nonunion .................................................................................................................................................... 141
Miami, Fla.:
110. Union .........................................................................................................................................................141
111. Nonunion ....................................................................................................................................................142
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.:
112. Union and nonunion separately................................................................................................................143
New York and Nassau-Suffolk, N. Y.:
113. Union .........................................................................................................................................................144
114. Nonunion ....................................................................................................................................................145
Philadelphia, Pa.-N. J.:
115. Union .........................................................................................................................................................146
116. Nonunion ..................................................................................................................................................... 147
Portland, Oreg.-Wash.:
117. Union .........................................................................................................................................................147
St. Louis, Mo.-Ill.:
118. Union .........................................................................................................................................................148
San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.:
119. Union .........................................................................................................................................................149
Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va.:
120. Union .........................................................................................................................................................150
121. Nonunion ....................................................................................................................................................150
Employer contributions to specified union funds:
122. Atlanta, Ga.................................................................................................................................................... 151
123. Biloxi-Gulfport and Pascagoula, Miss.........................................................................................................152
124. Boston, Mass................................................................................................................................................. 153
125. Buffalo, N. Y................................................................................................................................................ 154
126. Chicago, 111.................................................................................................................................................... 155
127. Dallas, Tex.....................................................................................................................................................157
128. Denver, Colo................................................................................................................................................. 158
129. Des Moines, Iowa .....................................................................................................................................159
130. Hartford, Conn............................................................................................................................................. 160
131. Indianapolis, Ind...........................................................................................................................................161
132. Kansas City, Mo.-Kans.................................................................................................................................162
133. Los Angeles-Long Beach and AnaheimSanta Ana-Garden Grove,Calif....................................................................................................................163
134. Memphis, Tenn.-Ark.....................................................................................................................................164
135. Miami, Fla..................................................................................................................................................... 165
136. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn..........................................................................................................................166
137. New York and Nassau-Suffolk, N. Y.........................................................................................................167
138. Philadelphia, Pa.-N. J................................................................................................................................... 169
139. Portland, Oreg.-Wash.................................................................................................................................... 170
140. St. Louis, Mo.-Ill................................................................................................. ........................................171




Page
141. San Francisco-Oakland, Calif...................................................................................................................... 173
142. Washington, D. C.-Md.-Va........................................................................................................................... 175

Employee benefits not provided by specified union funds:
143. Selected areas..................................................................................................................................................176

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of survey.......................................................................................................................... Igg
B. Occupational descriptions............................................................................................................................... 192




Contract Construction, September 1972
cents in Memphis for plumbers’ insurance and truckdrivers’ pensions. Separate vacation funds, on the other
hand, were common in only one-third of the areas
Average straight-time hourly earnings of union and studied and separate holiday funds applied to two survey
nonunion construction carpenters ranged from $5.19 an occupations or more in only three areas.
hour in Biloxi to $8.41 in New York, based on a
“Other” fund contributions not studied separately,
September 1972 study in 21 areas.1 The range for con­ such as for dental care, apprenticeship training, and
struction laborers was from $2.80 in Biloxi to $6.88 in industry advancement, were provided in almost all union
St. Louis. These were numerically the largest skilled and situations. These payments typically averaged 20 cents
unskilled job classifications in the Bureau’s study of 19 an hour or less in all areas studied.
occupations. Differences in job averages among areas
Employee benefits not provided by specified union
were due to a number of factors, including variations in funds were available to nonunion workers in most
the extent of unionization and the general level of wages occupations covered by the survey. Where holiday and
in individual localities.
vacation provisions were reported for these workers, 5 or
Construction workers earning rates set by labor- 6 holidays a year and 1 week’s paid vacation after 1 year
management agreements enjoyed substantial, although of service were the most common. The incidence of
widely varying, wage advantages over their nonunion health and insurance plans was usually equal to or higher
counterparts. Typical union-to-nonunion wage differen­ than that for holiday/vacation benefits—both commonly
tials within the areas studied were: 35 to 50 percent for covering 50 percent or more of area workers in some
carpenters and cement masons; 40 to 65 percent for jobs studied. Pension plan coverage, in contrast, rarely
construction laborers; and 55 to 70 percent for electri­ exceeded 25 percent in the occupations surveyed, and
cians and plumbers.
was, in fact, nonexistent in five areas where health and
Primarily reflecting their high degree of unionization, insurance provisions not provided by union funds were
construction workers on commercial building projects usual.
typically received higher wages than those on residential
sites, where nonunion rates commonly prevailed. Thus,
Industry characteristics
when only union or nonunion wage rates were
compared, the average differential between commercial
and residential construction was much less pronounced.
The Bureau’s survey was limited to contract construc­
Overtime pay provisions for work outside of regular tion firms (Industries 15, 16, and part of 17) and opera­
schedules were also largely dependent on union status. In tive builders (those building for sale on their own
all or virtually all 21 areas studied, double-time pay for account—Industry 656) employing eight workers or
weekend work, for example, applied to union workers in more.2 Special trade contractors, those primarily en­
a majority of the occupations reported; time and one- gaged in one type of construction activity, such as elec­
half premiums prevailed for nonunion workers in most trical work or carpentry, employed half of the nonsuperareas, although straight-time pay for such work was also visory construction workers covered by the survey;
found. Pay provisions for other overtime situations, such
as for weekday work outside of regularly scheduled
hours and weekly hours in excess of those regularly
^ ee
scope and
Wage data
scheduled, usually followed a similar pattern of more exclude appendix A forfor overtimemethod of survey. weekends,
premium pay
and for work on
liberal premium pay for workers under labor- holidays, and late shifts. Except for Biloxi, all areas studied
management agreements.
conform to Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area definitions
Employer contributions to specified union funds established by the Office of Management and Budget through
were, by far, the predominant method of providing con­ November 1971.
struction workers with insurance and pensions in nearly
^Industries are defined in the 1967 edition of the Standard
all areas. Average payments contributed to these union Industrial Classification Manual, prepared by the Bureau of the
funds varied widely, ranging from a high of $2.75 per Budget, now the Office of Management and Budget. For more
hour for pensions of New York bricklayers to a low of 5 details of industrial scope, see appendix A.



Summary

Text table 1.

Distribution of nonsupervisory construction workers by industry branch, 21 areas, September 1972

Area
Total, 21 areas . . .
Northeast:
Boston ............................
Buffalo .........................
Hartford.........................
New York and NassauSuffolk ..................
Philadelphia..................
South:
Atlanta .........................
Biloxi-Gulfport and
Pascagoula ............
Dallas...............................
Memphis.........................
Miami ............................
Washington ..................
North Central:
Chicago .........................
Des Moines ...................
Indianapolis...................
Kansas C it y ..................
Minneapolis-St. Paul. . .
St. L ouis.........................
West:
Denver .........................
Los Angeles-Long Beach
and Anaheim-Santa
Ana-Garden Grove .
Portland.........................
San Francisco-Oakland .

Total
numbers of
workers

Percent distribution by industry branch
All
branches

General contractors
Heavy
Building
construction

Selected
special trades
contractors

Operative
builders

530,700

100

27

19

51

2

26,500
8,200
5,800
86,400
40,800

100
100
100
100
100

35
30
27
17
27

15
21
25

50
49
48
63
51

—
(l)
—

20,400

100

34

2,300
26,400
9,000
15,800
52,800

100
100
100
100
100

57,500
3,400
10,800
12,200
21,200
19,200

20
21

( 1)

1

48

1

30
33
30
24
25

17
24
26
24
17
17

46
38
44
55
53

1
3
2
4
6

100
100
100
100
100
100

25
28
30
32
30
34

19
22
16
21
19
20

55
50
52
47
50
46

2
2
(1)
1
1

20,600

100

43

12

44

56,900
8,700
25,800

100
100
100

27
35
34

19
28
21

52
36
41

2
1
4

1 Less than 0.5 p ercent.

NOTE:

Because of rounding, sums of mdividual items may not equal totals.

general building contractors accounted for slightly over noted in Bureau studies of hospital and elementary/
one-fourth; heavy construction contractors, for about secondary school construction conducted in the sixties.3
one-fifth of the workers; and operative builders, for only
Some general contractors direct their energies to the
2 percent of the total. (See text table 1.)
managerial responsibilities of coordinating, financing,
Historically, the importance of special trades contrac­ and purchasing while subcontracting certain types of
tors primarily has reflected the extensive use of their work previously done by them, such as carpentry, to
services by general, or prime, contractors in perform­ specialty contractors.4 Growth of masonry, concrete,
ing most of the specialized processes (excavating, and electrical contractors, which reflects increased
plumbing, masonry, etc.) on construction sites. How­ demand for such features as patios, fireplaces, baseever, special trades contractors are increasingly perform­
ing these services on their own account. The Bureau’s
DLahor Requirements for Hospital Construction, BLS Bull.
ongoing surveys of construction labor requirements, for 1340, 1962; Labor and Materials Requirements for Hospital and
example, show that onsite man-hours performed by Nursing Home Construction, BLS Bull. 1691, 1971; Labor and
Requirements for Construction of Private Single-Family
general contractors on construction of private single­ Material BLS Bull. 1755, 1972; Labor Requirements for School
family houses fell dramatically from 46 percent of the Houses,
Construction, BLS Bull.
total in 1962 to 31 percent in 1968, while the share of Requirements for School 1299, 1961; and Labor and Material
Construction, BLS Bull. 1586, June
special contractors rose. To a somewhat lesser degree, 1968.
4See Construction of Private Single-Family Houses.
similar shifts to special trades contracting were also



ments, and electrical work, also points to the relative
decline of general contractors as a direct source of
employment.
Employment

Text table 2.
firm

and

Average number of workers by size of

industry branch, September 1972

Industry
branch
Total1. . . .

8 to
All
50 to
250
49
size
249
workers
classes workers workers or more
14
26
84
382
14
84
26
371
92
422
39
17
14
23
80
370

The 21-area survey covered one-sixth of the approxi­ General building
mately 3,162,000 construction workers estimated to be Heavy construction. .. ..
employed nationwide in the contract construction indus­ Selected special trades.
tries at the time of the study.5 Construction employ­
1 Includes operative builders not shown separately.
ment, according to the survey, ranged from 2,000
workers in Biloxi-Gulfport and Pascagoula (the only
nonmetropolitan area studied) to 86,000 in the com­ majority of construction workers were paid rates set by
bined area of New York and Nassau-Suffolk. The next labor-management agreement in all areas surveyed
three largest concentrations of construction workers except Biloxi, Dallas, and Washington. The proportion
studied were in Chicago (57,500), Los Angeles6 of union workers was highest in the North and West (90
(57,000), and Washington (53,000).
percent or more in nine areas studied there) and lowest
Eighty-seven percent of the contractors within the
scope of the study individually employed fewer than 50
5Nationwide employment, based on the Bureau’s establish­
construction workers. Together, however, these small ment survey as reported monthly in Employment and Earnings.
contractors shared almost half of the survey’s 531,000
nonsupervisory construction workers. Small contractor and6Refers to the combined areas of Los Angeles-Long Beach
Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove.
work forces in the industry have traditionally reflected
for high turnover rates and
such factors as division of work activities (subcon­ the7For a discussion of some reasons construction (for example,
vigorous state of competition in
tracting) on individual projects among specialty firms; low capital requirements, negligible “economies of scale” and
fluctuating demand for most construction work; and the the little cost advantage of established firms over potential en­
relative ease with which firms enter into and exit from trants), see Peter J. Cassimatis, Economics of the Construction
the construction business.7 Firms with between 50 and Industry (New York: National Industrial Conference Board,
1969), pp. 29-41. Discussions of other important
influ­
249 employees accounted for only 12 percent of the encing the expansion and contraction of constructionfactors forces
work
contractors covered by the study, but employed 40 per­ are found in William Haber and Harold M. Levinson, Labor Rela­
cent of the construction work force. At the upper end of tions and Productivity in the Building Trades (Ann Arbor:
the establishment-size scale, less than 1 percent of the University of Michigan, 1956) pp. 42-47 (the union’s role), and
contractors employed 250 workers or more (rarely Daniel Q. Mills, “Factors Affecting Patterns of Employment and
Unemployment in
(ph.D. thesis,
exceeding 1,000); their proportion of the industry’s Harvard University, the Construction Industry”Federal govern­
1967), pp. 187-233 (the
work force, however, was 12 percent. Firms in the ment’s role).
largest size group did not employ a majority of the
Proportionately more firms in heavy construction (22
workers in any area studied—in contrast to the pattern percent) than in either general building (13 percent) or special
found in most other Bureau occupational wage studies. trades contracting (12 percent) had work forces of 50 employees
Text table 2 presents the average (mean) employment or more in the 21 areas combined. Nationwide relationships
size for firms within the scope of the 21-area construc­ from County Business Patterns (U.S. Department of Commerce,
tion study. It illustrates that average employment in Bureau of the Census, 1972), although not strictly comparable,
firms tends to fall near the lower end of the size class. also show that heavy construction firms tend to be the largest.
Heavy construction contractors had the largest average
9This 21-area estimate is higher than the national estimate of
work force in each size category,8 while those of general
60-70 percent for the
by
builders and specialty contractors differed little overall unionized establishments proportion of workers employed the
in the construction industry
and were, in fact, about equal at the lowest and highest sixties suggested in Compensation in the Constructionduring
Industry,
ends of the establishment-size scale.
BUS Bull. 1656, 1970, pp. 9-10. The 1972 BUS construction
Unionization

Contractors with collective bargaining agreements
covering a majority of their nonsupervisory construction
workers employed about four-fifths of the work force
covered by the survey.9 As shown in text table 3, a



survey, designed to measure occupational wage differentials, was
heavily weighted toward large metropolitan areas and excluded
contractors with fewer than 8 workers -both factors that may
bolster the degree of unionization estimated. Other variables that
influence composite estimates of union coverage (on a national
or subnational basis) include the relative importance of branches
of the industry and of geographic areas-both exhibiting differ­
ences in degree of union organization.

Text table 3.

Percent of nonsupervisory construction workers in firms operating under labor-management agree­

ments, September 1972

Area
21 areas, total .
Northeast:
Boston ..................
Buffalo .....................
Hartford..................
New York and
Nassau-Suffolk . .
Philadelphia............
South:
Atlanta ..................
Biloxi-Gulfport and
Pascagoula . . .
Dallas.........................
Memphis..................
Miami.........................
Washington ............
North Central:
Chicago .....................
Des M oin es...............
Indianapolis...............
Kansas C ity ...............
Minneapolis-St. Paul .
St. Louis......................
West:
Denver ......................
Los Angeles-Long Beach
and Anaheim-Santa
Ana-Garden Grove
Portland...................
San Francisco-Oakland

All
firms1
80-84

Industry branch
Selected
General contractors
special
Heavy
trades
Building construction contractors
80-84
80-84
75-79

70-74

85-89

95+

75-79
90-94
70-74
90-94
75-79

85-89
90-94
80-84
85-89
60-64

80-84
85-89
65-69
95+
75-79

70-74
95+
65-69
90-94
80-84

55-59
85-89
55-59
80-84
70-74

95+
90-94
90-94

95+
95+
95+

95+
70-74

95+
95+

50-54
40-44
30-34
60-64
75-79
40-44

40-44

20-24

65-69

35-39

65-69

95+

35-39
50-54
80-84
85-89
45-49

10-14
0-4
5-9
60-64
20-24

55-59
4044
70-74
75-79
55-59

4549
4044
50-54
70-74
30-34

25-29
35-39
65-69
80-84
4549

95+
95+
70-74

95+
85-89
65-69
95+
95+
95+

95+
80-84
80-84
95+
95+
95+

95+
85-89
95+
95+
95+
90-94

95+
90-94
4549
95+
95+
95+

90-94
80-84
4549
95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
85-89
95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
95+

70-74

80-84

60-64

65-69

60-64

90-95

65-69

95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
95+

95+
95+
95+

1 Includes data for workers employed by operative builders
not shown separately.

in the South—a pattern found in an earlier BLS study of
construction wage rates.10
The degree of union organization by region and
industry branch was mixed, but by size, the tendency
was clearly for the largest contractors to be the most
unionized. Among most of the highly unionized north­
ern and western areas studied, none of the industry
branches seemed consistently more unionized than the
others; in the southern areas, however, heavy construc­
tion contractors were by far the least organized. By size
of establishment, the organized work force ranged from
about three-fourths of the total in firms with 8 to 49
workers to well over nine-tenths in those with 250
workers or more.



8 to 49
workers

Contractor size
50 to 249 250 workers
or more
workers

—

_

95+
—
_

NOTE: Dashes indicate no data reported.

Union workers in the construction industries are
organized into craft groups that claim jurisdiction over
specific types of work, such as carpentry or plumbing, in
their local areas. Workers in all but one occupation
(truckdrivers under Teamster contracts) covered by this
survey were organized by unions affiliated with the
Building and Construction Trades Department of the
AFL-CIO. As measured by membership in construction,
the largest of these affiliates is the United Brotherhood
10See Edward P. Sanford, “Wage Rates and Hours of Labor
in the Building Trades,” Monthly Labor Review, August 1937,
pp. 284-87.

of Carpenters and Joiners.11 Estimates of union workers
by craft from this wage survey are intended only as a
general guide to the size and composition of the work
force under labor-management agreements rather than a
precise measure. (See table 2.)

struction contractors usually made use of the largest
number of occupations; they utilized more often than
other contractors the equipment operator classifications
studied. However, the occupations employed by a con­
tractor rarely exceeded 6 of the 19 classifications
covered by the survey. Limited occupational staffing by
individual contractors chiefly reflects the highly special­
ized nature of construction processes and the prolonged
construction time for completion of projects. According
to BLS surveys conducted in the sixties,12 average con­
struction time required, for example, was 91 weeks for
hospitals, 64 weeks for public housing projects, and 52
weeks for elementary and secondary schools. Construc­
tion processes such as foundation and grading, erection
of structure frames, electrical and mechanical work, and
finishing work are performed by many different contrac­
tors in various phases over extended periods of time.

Occupational composition

Workers in the 19 occupational classifications for
which wage data were developed accounted for slightly
over two-thirds of the nonsupervisory construction
employees within the scope of the survey. Among these
selected classifications, carpenters were numerically the
largest skilled occupation in all areas studied except
Buffalo and Biloxi; the proportion of construction
worker employment held by carpenters in an area fell
most commonly between 8 and 12 percent, reaching a
high of 22 percent in Los Angeles. Construction laborers
were the most populous unskilled group studied, ac­
11For nationwide membership estimates by building and con­
counting for one-fifth to three-tenths of the work force struction trade, see Directory of National Unions and Employee
in 13 of the 21 areas studied. The relative employment Associations, 1973 (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1974), pp. 28-59
of laborers tended to be highest in the South and lowest and p. 126. For a basic description of union organization and the
collective bargaining structure in construction, see Daniel Quinn
on the West Coast. (See tables 1 and A-l.)
Occupational staffing primarily reflected the level and Mills, Industrial Relations and Manpower in Construction
kinds of skill required for the construction projects (Cambridge, Mass: The MIT Press, 1972), pp. 18-55.
19 Labor and Material Requirements for
Housing Con­
underway at the time of the survey. Staffing patterns struction, BLS Bull. 1821, 1974; Hospital PublicNursing Home
and
within establishments visited in the 1972 survey revealed Construction; and Labor and Materials Requirements for School
that individual contractors typically employed workers Construction. See phasing pattern of onsite work, as expressed
in no more than three of the survey jobs. Heavy con­ by deciles of construction time, in these studies.
Text table 4.

Percent distribution of onsite man-hours for selected types of construction, by occupation, various years

Occupation
All occupations
Supervisory, professional,
technical, and clerical
Skilled trades1 ................
Bricklayers . . . .
Carpenters . . . .
Electricians . . . .
Operating engineers
Plumbers................
Semiskilled and unskilled
workers1 ......................
Helpers and tenders
Laborers................
Truckdrivers . . .

Residential
Private
Public
single­
housing,
family
1968
houses,
1969
100
100

Commercial
Elementary
and secondary Hospitals,
schools,
1965-66
1964-65




Heavy construction
Civil works,
land projects,
1959-60

Sewer
lines,
1962-63

100

100

100

~100

100

6
47
6
1
25
(2)
47
34
11

10
41
6
24

10
27
1
(2)
2
20
(2)
63
2
43
4

3
69
6
35
3
2
4

4
64
8
20
6
3
9

4
64
9
17
7
3
10

3
70
5
13
10
2
16

28
14
14
1

32
7
23
.2

32
7
24
1

26
6
19
1

1 May include data for workers in occupations not shown
separately.
2 Less than 0.5 percent.

Federally
aided
highways,
1970

—

—

—

—

____

49
1
22
14

NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not
equal totals.

From the same surveys, the average number of contrac­
tors reported per project was 19 on public housing and
26 each on hospitals and schools.
Text table 4 provides some insight into the staffing
pattern by type of construction project studied in the
Bureau’s ongoing surveys of construction labor require­
ments.13 Such studies conducted during the 1960’s, for
example, show the proportion of onsite man-hours
attributable to skilled trades ranging from about 70 per­
cent in the construction of private single-family houses
and hospitals to slightly over 25 percent in sewer line
construction.
Variations in the types of individual occupations
required also reflect the nature of the construction. The
relatively large demand for plumbers in hospital con­
struction, for example, reflects the extensive need for
sanitation, laboratory, and therapy installations, and
lavatory and toilet facilities. Similarly, the demand for
electricians results from a widespread use of electrically
operated surgical and medical machines and communi­
cation equipment.
Occupational earnings

Tables 4 through 55 present earnings data for nonsupervisory employees in 19 occupations selected to
represent wage levels of journeymen, equipment opera­
tors, and helpers/laborers in the construction industries.
Data are shown separately, where possible, for union and
for nonunion situations, and also for specified types of
construction, that is, commercial, residential, street and
highway, and other heavy construction.
Within the areas studied, the highest pay levels
reported were usually for journeyman crafts, especially
the electrical and certain mechanical trades (for exam­
ple, plumbing, pipefitting, and sheet-metal work).
Hourly averages for electricians, who topped occupa­
tional pay levels in six areas studied, ranged from $5.40
in Dallas to $9.71 in Buffalo. Pipefitters had the highest
pay levels in four areas, sheet-metal workers and struc­
tural iron workers in three areas, and bricklayers and
plumbers in two areas each. Only in the San FranciscoOakland area did pay levels of back-hoe operators
exceed those of all other classifications studied.
The top-paying areas for the construction occupa­
tions studied14 were, as expected, highly unionized:
Buffalo (six jobs); New York and Nassau-Suffolk (five
jobs); Chicago (three jobs); and St. Louis (two jobs).
Conversely, the lowest paying areas were among the least
unionized—Atlanta, Biloxi, and Dallas. Interarea pay
differences varied substantially by occupation. For
example, union pipefitters in the New York area aver­
aged only 4 percent more than those in Atlanta, while




the corresponding spread was 36 percent for union struc­
tural iron workers; similarly, in the nonunion sector of
those two areas, New York’s advantage was 19 percent
for carpenters compared to 66 percent for construction
laborers.
Union-nonunion differentials

Construction workers earning rates set by labormanagement agreements enjoyed substantial, although
widely varying, wage advantages over their nonunion
counterparts. Union carpenters typically earned between
35 and 50 percent more per hour than their nonunion
counterparts during the fall of 1972; the gap, however,
ranged from 25 percent in Boston to 84 percent in
Hartford. For construction laborers, the union-tononunion wage advantage was usually somewhat larger—
40 to 65 percent; at the extremes for laborers, the
union-nonunion wage differential was 6 percent in
Chicago compared with 77 percent in Dallas. Although
comparisons for electricians, plumbers, and cement
masons were limited by BLS publications standards to
fewer than half of the areas studied, these showed wide
margins in favor of union electricians and plumbers—
typically 55 to 70 percent above nonunion rates for
both jobs—and usually spreads of 35 to 50 percent for
union cement masons. (See tables 2 and 3.)
Variations in bargaining power held by union locals
within and among areas explain, to some extent, the
wide differences in union wage advantages. Other poten­
tial factors contributing to the average union-nonunion
wage relationship for an occupation in an area include
the degree of craft unionization and, hence, the influ­
ence of rate-setting decisions on nonunion contractors;
the amount of federally funded construction activity15
13Because the September 1972 construction wage survey was
conducted at one point in time, it cannot reflect the total
staffing mix over the life of individual construction projects.
1insufficient data were developed for elevator constructors
and their helpers, and electricians’ helpers, to warrant interarea
comparisons.
15The Davis-Bacon Act provides that any contractor per­
forming construction work on a project of $2,000 or more that
is federally funded or federally assisted must pay each employee
working on the project no less that the prevailing area wage rate
for the occupation, plus the prevailing value of fringe benefits. In
an area where a majority of the workers are unionized, the pre­
vailing rate and benefits usually coincide with the union rate and
benefits for that occupation. For purposes of this study, workers
of nonunion contractors were not considered as receiving a
union rate even though the rate for the federally funded project
was set (or determined as prevailing) at the union rate for the
occupation in the area. Nonunion workers at federally funded
projects will often be paid more than the basic union rate since
their wage rates will include the prevailing value of fringe
benefits.

requiring the payment of “prevailing” rates and benefits;
and the distribution of workers by type of construction
project, especially residential versus commercial
building.
Commerical-residential differentials

Survey results substantiate the common belief that
construction workers on commercial building projects
typically receive higher wages than those at residential
sites. The primary influence on this relationship, how­
ever, is the disproportionately large share of the com­
mercial work force that is unionized compared with that
for smaller residential buildings (those under five
stories). For example, on the Washington area’s com­
mercial construction projects, nearly nine-tenths of the
carpenters and three-fourths of the laborers were paid
union rates whereas, on that area’s residential con­
struction sites, all carpenters and nine-tenths of the
laborers were paid nonunion rates. (See text table 5.)
While the average wage rate for all construction
workers was generally higher on commercial than resi­
dential projects, the difference was much less pro­
nounced when only union or nonunion wage rates were
compared. In the Washington metropolitan area, for
example, the commercial-to-residential average wage rate
spreads for all carpenters and laborers of 41 and 53 per­
cent in September 1972 were reduced to 3 and 5 per­
cent, respectively, when only nonunion rates were
compared. A similar comparison in the union sector also
Text table 5.

revealed relatively small or no differentials in commer­
cial and residential rates.
Construction-maintenance trade differentials

Although substantially below union construction
rates in most areas studied, average earnings of nonunion
construction carpenters and electricians were typically
above those of such employees performing maintenance
work in private industry outside of construction. (See
text table 6.) In 6 of 7 areas surveyed by the Bureau in
the second half of 1972, the average wage advantage of
nonunion construction carpenters over maintenance
carpenters ranged from 2 percent in Denver to 29 per­
cent in Boston; in Memphis, however, the differential
favored maintenance carpenters by 6 percent. Similarly,
earnings of nonunion construction electricians averaged
3 percent more than maintenance electricians in Boston,
12 percent in Denver, 19 percent in Philadelphia, and 32
percent in Miami; but both had about the same average
in Dallas. (Comparisons were not possible for Indiana­
polis and Memphis.)
Wage advantages for nonunion construction over
maintenance work also varied within the same area for
the two trades presented. For example, the differential
between Boston construction and maintenance car­
penters was considerably greater than between construc­
tion and maintenance electricians; the reverse was true,
however, in Denver, Miami, and Philadelphia. Part of this

Workers and average hourly earnings by union status and type of construction, selected occupations

and areas, September 1972

Union status and type
of construction
Commercial:
Workers ............................
Earnings............................
Residential, under 5 stories:
Workers ............................
Earnings............................
Commercial as percent of
residential:
Earnings............................

Atlanta

Carpenters
Dallas

1,416
$6.27
217
$4.95

2,097
$6.33
796
$4.79

127

132

Construction laborers
Washington
Dallas
Atlanta
Union and nonunion combined
4,512
2,981
3,045
$3.91
$3.76
$7.47
774
2,205
979
$3.63
$5.28
$2.95

Washington
5,898
$5.41
4,176
$3.41

104

141

133

153

Nonunion
Commercial:
Workers ............................
Earnings............................
Residential, under 5 stories:
Workers ............................
Earnings............................
Commercial as percent of
residential:
Earnings............................




721
$5.19

543
$5.38

374
$5.44

2,473
$3.21

1,343
$3.01

1,415
$3.60

177
$4.40

736
$4.75

2,205
$5.28

: 504
$3.11

839
$2.64

4,642
$3.54

118

113

103

103

114

105

Text table 6.

Average hourly earnings for selected construction crafts as percent of maintenance worker pay,

7 areas, August—December 1972

Electricians

Carpenters
Area and date
of maintenance
worker survey1
Boston (August 1 9 7 2 )............
Dallas (October 1 9 7 2 )............
Denver (December 1972) . . .
Indianapolis (October 1972) .
Memphis (November 1972) . .
Miami (November 1972) . . .
Philadelphia (November 1972).

Maintenance
worker
average

Percent of
maintenance average2
Nonunion
Union
construction construction

$5.02
4.46
4.72
5.28
4.49
4.98
5.06

161
148
139
155
153
159
171

129
110
102
109
94
115
104

Maintenance
worker
average
$4.91
4.46
5.07
5.32
4.85
5.31
4.93

Percent of
maintenance average2
Nonunion
Union
construction construction
175
166
159
154
141
160
189

103
101
112
(3)
(3)
132
119

1 Data developed from the Bureau’s area wage surveys

September
construction hourly average for workers
covered establishments with 50 workers or more in manufac­ paid2 rates set or 1972set by labor-management agreement as a
not
turing; transportation, communication, and other public utilities;

percent of maintenance worker average hourly earnings. The
wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; information for maintenance workers includes employees in
and selected service industries. In Boston and Philadelphia, em­ both union and nonunion establishments.
ployment minimums of 100 workers are required for firms with­
3 No data reported for nonunion construction electricians.
in scope of survey in manufacturing; transportation, communi­
cation, and other public utilities; and retail trade.

variation reflects differences in the relative importance
of various industries employing maintenance workers,
their degree of unionization, and differences in the local
bargaining conditions affecting union and nonunion con­
struction earnings.16
Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions

Information is also presented by occupation and type
of construction on overtime pay provisions for workers
whose wage rates are set or not set by labor-management
agreement; amounts of employer contributions to union
benefit funds, for example, insurance and pension funds,
and the incidence of such payments; and, for benefits not
provided through union funds, the proportions of
workers covered by paid holidays, paid vacations, and
various health, insurance, and retirement plans.
Overtime pay provisions

More liberal premium pay provisions for overtime
usually were reported for workers under labor-manage­
ment agreements than for nonunion workers. (See tables
56 through 121.) Doubletime pay for work on Sundays




and holidays, for example, applied to union workers in a
majority of the survey occupations reported in each area
studied; time and one-half for such work was the most
prevalent for nonunion workers, although straight-time
pay was also found.
Pay provisions for other overtime situations studied,
such as weekday work outside of regularly scheduled
hours and daily or weekly hours in excess of those
regularly scheduled, also followed the union-nonunion
relationships of weekend and holiday work. To illus­
trate, union employees on the jobsite before or after
scheduled daily hours (without working all of the shift)
most commonly were paid double time in 15 areas and
time and one-half in 6 areas; nonunion workers, in a
majority of the survey occupations, typically were paid
premiums (time and one-half) for such work in only 4 of
13 areas providing data for such analysis.17 Similarly,
union workers most commonly received double time
effective after completing their daily or weekly shifts in
about three-fourths of the surveyed areas and time and
16For a detailed comparison of union contract rates in con­
struction and maintenance earnings, see Lily Mary David and T.
P. Kanninen, “Workers’ Wages in Construction and Main­
tenance,” Monthly Labor Review, January 1968, pp. 46-49.
17For purposes of this analysis, only areas with publishable
data for 3 or more occupations are discussed.

Text table 7.

Percent of workers covered by provisions for weekday work outside of regularly scheduled hours,1

selected occupations in the New York area, September 1972

Occupation and type of
construction
Carpenters, total ...................
Residential (less than 5
stories) .........................
Plumbers, t o t a l.........................
Residential (less than 5
stories) .........................
Construction laborers, total
Commercial...................
Residential (less than 5
stories)............................

Straight
time

Union
Time and
one-half

Double
time

Straight
time

96
96

100
100
100
100
2
1

26
68
27
43
73
40

57
26
55

95

—

89

11

_____
_____

____

2
4
5

Nonunion
Time and
one-half

____

17
32
73

Double
time
58

. . . .

5
—

1 Without also working the regularly scheduled shift.
NOTE: Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal totals. Totals for occupations may include data for
workers in types of construction not shown separately.

one-half in the others; nonunion workers, however,
typically received straight-time pay for “daily” overtime
in 8 areas, and time and one-half in 5 areas, and, of
course, the legally required time and one-half for
“weekly” overtime in all areas.
Within an area, the incidence of specific overtime
provisions commonly varied among occupations and
within the same occupation by union status and type of
construction. Text table 7 illustrates such differences for
three occupations by showing the percent of union or
nonunion workers covered by provisions for weekday
work outside of regularly scheduled hours in the New
York and Nassau-Suffolk area.

Text table 8 presents the average employer contribu­
tion to specified union funds19 as a percent of the
average union hourly rate plus union fund contribution
for the most populous skilled and unskilled occupations
studied in the fall of 1972. The relative importance of
these fund contributions was greatest in Buffalo, Los
Angeles, New York, and San Francisco—all highly
unionized. In contrast, such payments usually made up
less than 10 percent of wages plus employer contribu­
tions in the Southern areas studied—typically the least
unionized and lowest paying.20
As presented here, the sum of wages plus contribu­
tions for union workers is not meant to reflect total
employer costs or employee compensation; total cost
Employer contributions to specified union funds
would include legally required employer payments for
social security, unemployment benefit programs, and
Tables 122 through 142 present information on the workers’ disability compensation as well as overtime
amount and areawide incidence of employer contribu­
tions to union funds providing insurance, pensions, vaca­
1Variations in contributions are
tions, holidays, combination benefits (such as pensions multi-county areas such as New York,found particularly in large,
and vacations), and all “other” benefits, such as dental divided among several locals or wherewhere union jurisdiction is
care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry by type of construction, especially union jurisdiction is split
between residential and
advancement. Data are presented by occupation and commercial. (See table 137.)
type of construction on average hourly contributions to
19The average fund contribution is based on all union
these funds, as well as the minimum and maximum workers in the classification. Included were workers for whom
amount reported throughout each area. Differences in zero employer contributions were reported for one of the union
the minimum and maximum contributions usually funds or more.
20In the Bureau’s July 1972 survey of union wage rates in
reflected variations in contract provisions for 2 local
building trades for cities of 100,000 inhabitants or more,
unions or more covering the same occupation in an area employer contributions to insurance, pension, and vacation
rather than discretionary payments by employers above funds averaged 15 to 16 percent of wages plus these fund contri­
the amount stated in a particular labor-management butions for all building trades combined and carpenters and
agreement.18
laborers, separately.



Text table 8.

Average union wage rates and employer contributions to specified union funds, selected occupations

and areas, September, 19
7*2

Area
Northeast:
Boston ........................
Buffalo ........................
Hartford.........................
New York and
Nassau-Suffolk. . . .
Philadelphia...................
South:
Atlanta ........................
Biloxi-Gulfport and
Pascagoula ...............
Dallas...............................
Memphis........................
Miami...............................
Washington ..................
North Central:
Chicago ........................
Des Moines ..................
Indianapolis..................
Kansas C it y ..................
Minneapolis-St. Paul
St. L ouis.........................
West:
Denver ........................
Los Angeles-Long Beach
and Anaheim-Santa
Ana-Garden Grove. .
Portland........................
San Francisco-Oakland .

Average
union
hourly
rate

Carpenters
Average
Contribution as
hourly
percent
fund
of rate
contribution plus contribution
—

$8.09
8.11
8.12
8.58
8.65

$0.66
1.91
.66
2.63
1.48

8
19
8
24
15

7.40
6.08
6.62
6.85
7.94
7.76

.72

9

.01
.50
.53
.75
.61

8.32
7.01
8.17
8.00
7.13
* 7.79

Construction laborers
Average
Contribution as
Average
union
hourly
percent
hourly
fund
of rate
rate
contribution plus contribution
—
$6.36
$0.79
11
6.43
26
2.21
9
6.39
.'66
7.04
20
1.76
10
6.11
.66
.28

6

(1)
7
7
9
7

4.49
3.92
4.64
3.97
5.74
5.66

.01
.40
.17
.72
.55

(1)
8
4
11
9

1.07
.35
.62
.54
1.16
1.00

11
5
7
6
14
11

6.22
5.73
5.51
6.23
5.93
6.89

.95
.46
.47
.94
1.10
.92

13
7
8
13
16
12

6.57

.96

13

4.36

.64

13

6.76
6.78
8.10

2.15
1.36
1.94

24
17
19

5.50
5.10
5.47

2.05
.97
2.36

27
16
30

1 Less than 0.5 percent.

premium pay and other expenditures not covered by this
study. Such omitted items accounted for about 10 per­
cent of the union worker compensation in the Bureau’s
1969 study of special trades contractors and its 1971
study of heavy construction contractors.21
Insurance and pension funds. Employer contributions to
union funds providing insurance or pensions applied to
almost all union workers studied. Hourly contributions
varied widely, averaging from a high of $2.75 for pen­
sions of New York bricklayers to a low of 5 cents in
Memphis for plumbers’ insurance and truckdrivers’ pen­
sions. No consistent pattern emerged, however, when
contributions were compared within an area by occu­
pation. Text table 9 shows the distribution of areas by
size of average contributions to insurance and pension




funds for carpenters and construction laborers. It shows
that such contributions were most commonly under 50
cents an hour for carpenters and laborers, with those for
carpenters’ insurance clustered at 30 to 50 cents. Similar
concentrations were noted for other jobs in the survey.
Average payments to insurance and pension funds
varied somewhat for workers on different types of con­
struction projects. For example, the average pension
contribution for union carpenters in the New York area
21 For a detailed report on employer expenditures for com­
pensation of construction workers (nonoccupational data), see
Employee Conpensation and Payroll Hours, Heavy Construction
Industry, 1971, BLS Rpt. 428, 1974, and Employee Compensa­
tion and Payroll Hours: Construction-Special Trade Con­
tractors, 1969, BLS Rpt. 413, 1972.

was $1.23 per hour; by type of construction, it ranged
from 97 cents for carpenters working on residential
buildings of under five stories to $1.40 for those on
larger residential structures. Moreover, within the smaller
residential building sector, the minimum pension contri­
bution reported for carpenters was 40 cents an hour; the
maximum was $1.40. Differentials among and within
sectors were also widespread for many occupations in
New York and the other areas studied.
Vacation and holiday funds. Employer contributions to
separate vacation funds were less prevalent than those to
insurance or pension funds. In about one-third of the
areas, vacation fund contributions were made for a
majority of the occupations presented in tables 122
through 142. These areas were Chicago, Kansas City, Los
Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul, New York, Portland, St.
Louis, and San Francisco-Oakland—all highly unionized.
In contrast, vacation funds for three or fewer occupa­
tions were reported in each of eleven areas—six of them
in the South.
Among all areas studied, average hourly payments to
vacation funds for the occupations reported ranged from
6 cents for cement masons, back-hoe operators, and
truckdrivers in Philadelphia to $1.25 for plumbers in
Minneapolis-St. Paul. Only in New York and Portland
were vacation funds established for all occupations
reported. Average payments in New York ranged from
31 cents an hour for bricklayers to 98 cents for struc­
tural iron workers; and in Portland, they spread from 15
cents for truckdrivers to 75 cents for plumbers and pipe­
fitters.
Vacation fund contributions were reported in less
than half the areas for any single occupation studied.
Text table 10 provides the distribution of areas by size
of average employer contributions to these funds. The
contributions fell within a relatively narrow range,

among areas, for electricians, sheet-metal workers, and
laborers, but not for plumbers.
Holiday funds were rarely found, with none reported
by establishments visited in twelve areas and only one
occupation covered by such funds in six other areas.
Data were insufficient to analyze differences among
areas or occupations.
Combination and “other” benefit funds. Employer con­
tributions to union combination funds (instead of
separate funds), such as for vacations and holidays or
pensions and vacations, can be presented for only 9 of
the 21 areas studied. Partly reflecting the specific bene­
fits combined under these funds, such payments varied
widely by occupation and area. Payments averaged 5
cents an hour or less for several jobs in Boston and
Chicago, for sheet-metal workers in Des Moines, and for
laborers in Philadelphia; they were $1 or more for
plumbers and pipefitters in Los Angeles and
Minneapolis-St. Paul and for structural iron workers in
New York. For carpenters in five areas, average pay­
ments to combination funds ranged from 40 to 75 cents
per hour; for laborers in seven areas, average contribu­
tions ranged from 4 cents to 70 cents, but clustered
between 20 and 40 cents in four areas.
Hourly payments to “other” union funds, such as
those providing dental care, apprenticeship training, and
industry advancement, were made for nearly all union
workers in each area; these contributions averaged 20
cents or less for a majority of the occupations. Average
hourly payments for carpenters, for example, came to 7
cents or less in 17 of the 20 areas reporting such fund
contributions. Similarly, payments to “other” funds for
laborers averaged 10 cents or less in 17 of 19 areas.
Buffalo reported the largest hourly contribution to
“other” funds for carpenters (60 cents) and laborers (70
cents).

Text table 9. Distribution of areas by size of average employer contributions to union insurance and pension funds,
selected occupations, September 1972
C o n s t r u c t io n la b o re r s

C a r p e n te r s
A v e ra g e c e n ts -p e r -h o u r

T o t a l n u m b e r o f areas c o m p a r e d ............................................

In s u ra n c e

In s u ra n c e

P e n s io n

fu n d s

c o n t r ib u t io n

P e n s io n
fu n d s

fu n d s

fu n d s

120

21

120

21

1 0 a n d u n d e r 3 0 c e n t s ............................................................................................

4

8

7

9

3 0 a n d u n d e r 5 0 c e n t s ............................................................................................

13

8

9

7

5 0 a n d u n d e r 7 0 c e n t s ............................................................................................

2

2

3

1

7 0 c e n ts o r m o r e

1

3

1

4

....................................................................................................

R a n g e o f a v e ra g e c o n t r ib u t io n s

1

....................................................

No insurance contributions were reported in Biloxi.




$ 0 . 2 0 —$ 0 . 7 9

$ 0 . 2 0 —$ 1 . 2 3

$ 0 . 1 5 —$ 0 . 7 6

$ 0 . 1 0 —$ 1 . 1 0

Text table 10. Distribution of areas by size of average employer contributions to union vacation funds, selected
occupations, September 1972
A v e ra g e c e n ts -p e r -h o u r
c o n t r ib u t io n

E le c tr ic ia n s

P lu m b e r s

T o t a l n u m b e r o f areas c o m p a r e d ............................................

10

10

jS h e e t-m e ta l
w o rk e rs

C o n s t r u c t io n
la b o re r s

9

8

1 0 a n d u n d e r 3 0 c e n t s ............................................................................................

2

2

3

2

3 0 a n d u n d e r 5 0 c e n ts

....................................................................................

1

3

3

5

5 0 a n d u n d e r 7 0 c e n ts

....................................................................................

7

1

3

1

7 0 c e n ts o r m o r e

4

....................................................................................................

R a n g e o f a v e ra g e c o n t r ib u t io n s a m o n g a r e a s ............................

Employee benefits not provided by specified union funds

Table 143 indicates the proportion of construction
workers covered by paid holidays, paid vacations, and
health, insurance, and retirement plans not provided by
specified union funds.22 Some or all of these benefits
were provided to nonunion workers in most areas and
occupations within the scope of the survey. The incidence
of health and insurance plans was usually equal to or
higher than that for holiday or vacation benefits. Retire­
ment plan coverage, however, was less frequent than for
holidays or vacations. Although varying among establish­
ments in an area, provisions for leave time and the
presence or absence of insurance/pension benefits rarely
differed by occupation within nonunion establishments.
All such benefit plans, except those legally required,
were included in the study when at least part of the cost
was paid by the employer. No attempt, however, was
made to determine the cost of benefits not provided by
union funds.

$ 0 . 1 0 —$ 0 . 6 5

$ 0 . 1 7 —$ 1 . 2 5

$ 0 . 1 8 —$ 0 , 6 5

$ 0 . 1 0 —$ 0 . 5 0

of a second week after 5 years of service varied widely
among and within areas by occupation. In Atlanta, for
example, slightly over half the truckdrivers received 2
weeks’ vacation pay after 5 years compared to only onetenth of the sheet-metal workers. Nonunion contractors
usually reported a maximum of 2 weeks of vacation pay
after qualifying periods of service.23 (See table 143 for
instances of more liberal vacation provisions in Miami,
New York, and Philadelphia.)
The proportion of workers under vacation plans not
provided by union funds was commonly below the per­
cent of nonunion workers in a given occupation and
area. For example, only one-half of the nonunion car­
penters and one-fifth of the nonunion construction
laborers in Washington were in firms with formal vaca­
tion provisions.

Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Some form of
health and insurance plan not provided by union funds
applied to workers in a large majority of the occupations
presented in 17 or the 21 areas studied. As was the case
Paid holidays. Most nonunion workers in the occupa­ for vacation plans, worker coverage by health and insur­
tions presented in table 143 were provided paid ance plans often fell well below the proportion of non­
holidays, usually 5 or 6 annually. More liberal provisions union workers in the jobs. An estimated 40 to 50 per­
of 7 or 8 holidays were found for equipment operators cent of the carpenters in Atlanta, Biloxi, Dallas, and
(and occasionally for electricians and plumbers) in Memphis, for example, were nonunion but only 7 to 16
Buffalo, Dallas, Hartford, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and percent were covered by health or insurance plans.
Washington; and 9 to 11 holidays applied to some
equipment operators in Boston and New York. In
contrast, only 1 paid holiday was provided to one-third
of the sheet-metal workers in Philadelphia and onefourth of the carpenters in Des Moines. (See table 143
99
^Includes
situations and a
for examples of workers provided 4 or fewer holidays in where benefits nonunion were not provided few union situations
reported
through union funds.
other occupations and areas.)
(See footnote 23 on elevator constructors.)
Paid vacations. Paid vacations not provided by union
funds applied to at least some workers in most of the
occupations and areas. The provision typically found
was 1 week’s pay after 1 year of service. The availability




23A nationwide labor-management agreement for union
elevator constructors and their helpers provides for vacation pay
of 6 percent of the straight-time hourly rate, or 3 weeks
annually, as reported in all survey areas where these occupations
are presented.

Compared to health and insurance benefits, private
retirement plans24 not provided by union funds usually
applied to fewer occupations and to smaller proportions
of workers. Table 143 shows, for example, that in
Biloxi, Buffalo, Chicago, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and
Portland, health or insurance provisions not provided by
union funds applied to most occupations, while retire­
ment plans covered none in the Bureau’s sample. In
Dallas, the least unionized area studied, retirement plans
were found for 10 of 14 occupations reported but the
proportion of workers covered was less than for health
and insurance plans in 9 out of 10 instances. Retirement
plan coverage in Dallas was highest for plumbers and

their helpers—22 percent for each—which was less than
half the percentage of plumbers under health and insur­
ance provisions. Text table 11 indicates the proportion
of all carpenters and laborers who were under health or
insurance provisions and retirement plans not provided
by union funds for areas where both benefits were
reported. It shows a consistently higher coverage for
health or insurance plans than for retirement benefits.
24Nearly all retirement plans reported provided pensions
rather than severance pay to employees on retirement. (See
appendix A for definition of terms.)

Text table 11. Percent of workers covered by insurance and retirement plans not provided by union funds, selected
occupations and areas, September 1972
C o n s t r u c t io n la b o re r s

C a r p e n te r s
A re a
In s u r a n c e 1

A t la n t a

................................................................................................................................

16

D a l l a s ....................................................................................................................................

6

R e tire m e n t

In s u r a n c e 1

R e tire m e n t

1

25

13

C)

35

6

....................................................................................................................

32

27

15

2

H a r t f o r d ............................................................................................................................

27

9

18

10
3

D es M o in e s

............................................................................................................................

5

1

13

P h i l a d e l p h i a ....................................................................................................................

M ia m i

6

2

7

5

25

5

34

11

W a s h in g to n

....................................................................................................................

1 Percentages were based on an unduplicated total of
workers covered by at least one of the health and insurance
plans shown separately in table 143.




2

Less than 0.5 percent,

(Number and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly ea rn in g s1 of w orkers in construction industries, 2 selected occupations and a r e a s, 2 September 1972)
Northeast
Occupation3 and type
of construction

Journeym en:
B rick lave rs _
.....
C o m m e rcial
......
.... .. . _ .
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ...........
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries}
Other heavy construction ....
C a r p e n te r s ___ _______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__
____________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 storn.es)_________
Street and highway
..... ..
Other heavy construction
Cem ent m ason s
C o m m e rcia l
.
_ _ ____
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction
........
e le c tr ic ia n s
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esidential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
E levator c o n str u c to r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P ip e fitte r s _______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l
...........
_.
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Other heavy construction _______ _________
P lu m b e r s ______________________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l_____________ __________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)
R oofers __________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s ___________ _____________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay____________________ __ _
Other heavy construction
_ _ _
_
Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s_____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o re ) _ -------- _
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction _____
.
-----B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction __________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ______________________ ___________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and highway
Other heavy construction




Boston
Number
of
w orkers

1, 141
1, 121
2 ,4 3 2
1, 964
284
109
485
377
-

2 , no
2 , no

712
712
990
510
480
660
660
770
728
684
684
"

267
88
161
125
88
27
337
54

A verage
hourly
earnings

$8.08
8.06
7.91
8.09
6.50
8.14
8.23
8.70
8.08
8.08
9.12
9.12
8.23
8.32
8.13
8.00
8.00
7.88
7.9 6
7.89
7.89
-

8.11
8.71
7.72
7.96
8.02
7.53
6.08
5.41

Buffalo
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Hartford
Number
of
w orkers

South
New Y o r k 4

A verage
hourly
earnings

247
238
62 9
499
56
42
2 63
228
872
872
174
174
770
604
142
.- _
371
371
408
336
“

$8.66
8.6 5
7.83
8.09
5.03
8.34
8.8 9
9.05
9.71
9.71
9.30
9.30
9.14
9.30
8.4 6
8.50
8.50
8.71
8.71
"

274
274
1, 130
965
74
53
11
484
3 92
175
161
588
281
307
111
111
138
138
100
98
~

$ 8 .56
8.5 6
7.0 8
7.4 6
8.7 6
8.78
8.57
7.75
8.28
8.35
8.5 9
6.84
8.33
5.47
8.01
8.01
8.70
8.7 0
9.30
9.30
-

140
29
66
80
21
58
99
71
-

8.58
8.60
8.5 9
6.26
8.47
5.41
7.3 6
7.22
-

107
8
63
103
29
248
83

7.20
7.3 4
7.73
6.24
5.05
5.03
5.55

_

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Phila<lelphia
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Atlanta
! Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

3, 665
2 ,2 7 4
3 92
10, 309
4, 784
1, 846
2 , 062
1, 023
1, 545
660
231
6, 571
5, 794
737
40
4, 168
3, 957
161
4 ,2 2 7
2 , 749
758
720
692
597
1, 999
1, 859
827
706
“

$8.41
8.40
8.33
8.41
8.61
8.63
7.78
8.6 0
7.8 9
8 .0 6
8 .0 6
8.48
8.4 8
8.50
7.43
8.07
8.07
8.12
8.11
8.38
7.88
7.3 4
7.4 6
7.8 5
9.81
10.19
9.25
9.23
“

2 , 699
2 ,2 1 5
4 ,2 8 4
2 ,7 7 6
991
213
1, 059
83 6
1 ,4 3 9
1 ,3 2 6
412
160
1, 331
1 ,2 9 8
2 ,2 9 2
1 ,4 2 4
868
1 ,4 61
1, 143
841
841
“

$8.41
8.4 9
8.02
8.43
6.84
8.68
7.1 6
7.3 5
8.3 5
8.70
9.15
9.15
8.6 9
8.73
7.31
8.42
5.49
9.1 6
9.15
8.6 0
8.60
'

454
187
1, 666
1 ,4 1 6
217
853
780
1 ,4 3 0
1 ,4 1 6
432
407
538
140
140
593
155
438
274
274
“

$7.77
7.8 0
6.12
6.27
4.9 5
6.53
6.82
8.20
8.23
7.57
7.7 6
7.3 4
5.39
5.39
4.61
6.70
3.87
6.80
6.80
-

886
3 66
20
33
247
220
367
50
176
100
1, 598
775
212

9.33
9.26
9.25
9.26
9.41
9.3 6
8.77
9.23
8.72
9.06
6.61
6.75
6.41

715
249
389
412
195
216
1, 189
518
491
122

8.67
7.38
9.45
8.3 9
8.42
8.3 6
5.41
5.31
5.59
5.47

214
64
105
221
31
80
61

4 .9 0
5.83
4.87
4.8 6
3.45
3.0 6
2.8 0

B iloxi 5
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

30
184
96
73
36
27
209
171
102
90
42
42
“

$5.23
5.19
6.09
4.37
5.11
5.64
6.05
6.32
4.50
4.62
5.88
5.88
-

20
12
26
12
35
32

5.07
5.97
4 .6 9
3.42
2.5 8
2 .3 4

~

(Number and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly ea rn in g s1 of workers in construction industries, 2 selected occupations and a r e a s, 2 September 1972)
Northeast
Boston

Occupation3 and type

Number
of
w orkers

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ick la y e rs' helpers
......... ....... . _
C o m m e rcial
Residential (le s s than 5 sto ries)
C arpen ters' h elp ers
C o m m e rcia l
.
............ .
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and highwav
Construction la b o rers
... .......
C o m m e rcial .......
R esidential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esidential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction ,
E le c tr ic ia n s' helpers ....
C o m m e rcial
........
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
.....
E levator c o n str u c to r s' helpers
. .... _
P lu m b ers' h elp ers
C o m m e rcial
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)

180
180
177
33
5,8 4 3
3, 652
279
801
899

Buffalo

A verage
hourly
earnings

$6.47
6.47
3.66
5.26
6.14
6.41
5.05
5.99
5.83
-

-

-

147
-

3.24
-

"

~

Number
of
w orkers

36
1, 173
715
99
-

South

Hartford

A verage
hourly
earnings

$4.92
6.38
6.41
6.50
-

-

-

■

Number
of
w orkers

160
160
81
1, 186
602
41
238
305
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

$6 .25
6.25
3 .5 9
5.73
5.77
2.8 5
5.30
6.38
-

-

-

-

45
-

■

New Y o r k 4

2.81
-

“

“

Number
of
w orkers

1, 923
1 ,0 41
_
no
1 3 ,4 6 8
5 ,2 9 8
383
1 ,2 7 4
3, 682
2, 831
-

339
194
85

A verage
hourly
earnings

$7.42
7.3 6
3.8 4
6.86
7.0 9
6.35
5.83
6.88
6.94
-

3.5 8
3.3 8
3.57

Philadelphia
Number
of
w orkers

447
3 90
_
358
167
9 ,8 9 7
5 ,2 0 5
764
2 ,3 4 6
1 ,4 0 7
147

A verage
hourly
earnings

$6.17
6.30
_
3.63
3.93
5.81
5.92
4 .1 0
6.0 6
5.93
3.62

Dallas

Journeym en:
B rick laye rs
.......................................
C om m e rcial
Residential (5 sto ries or m ore l
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s!
Other heavv construction
Carpenters
C om m e rcial
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le s s than 5 sto r ie s!
Street and highwav
Other heavv construction
C em ent m ason s
C om m e rcial
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s to r ie s!
Street and highwav
Other heavv construction
E lectrician s
C o m m e rcial
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e !
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
E levator c o n str u c to r s ......
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e l
Residential (le s s than 5 sto r ie s!
P ip efitters
C o m m e rcial
Residential (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
Other heavv construction




580
560
-

3 ,0 2 4
2 ,0 9 7
-

796
94
37
72 9
204
-

2 60
240
-

1, 056
682
-

374

M emphis

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Number
of
w orkers

Washington

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

-

6.41
-

$7.87
8.15
7.41

2, 029
1, 770

$8.95
8.9 6

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.82
6.33
-

4 .7 9
3.4 0
5.20
4.87
6.00
-

5.29
3 .5 9
-

5.40
6.04
-

4 .2 4

1 ,2 1 7
695
-

522
-

190
109

$5.72
6.85
-

4.21
-

5.49
6.48

-

2 ,2 5 9
824
270
1, 121
37
-

227
140

-

-

35

-

-

-

908
883
-

-

6.74
6.83
-

-

-

1, 354
991
-

180

$8.01
-

7.77
7.89
7.9 5
7.70
6.10
-

7.4 6
8.10
-

7.46
-

8.33
8.50
-

7.2 5

3 ,3 9 0
1, 835
1, 160

5, 663
2, 981
146
2 ,2 0 5
269
62
1 ,4 8 4
661
-

120
619
-

1, 648
1 ,4 2 4
-

188
42 6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

304
260
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

-

242

6.88
7.20
-

73
73
-

7.21
7.21
-

147
92
-

_
$3.80
3.93
_

3.5 4
3.7 6
3.63
2.3 5
2 .7 6

-

-

-

-

9.16
9.16
-

951
951
-

Des Moines

Number
of
w orkers

-

-

Chicago

A verage
hourly
earnings

-

$7.16
7.18

_
282
217
6 ,3 8 6
4, 512
774
504
596
-

B iloxi 5

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

_
14
_
622
165
196
215
46
30
-

82
72
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

_
_
$2.68
-

_
2.8 0
3.86
_
2.53
2.2 6
2.63
2.77
-

2.72
2.7 4
-

North Central
M iam i

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
wo rkers

-

-

240
-

South— Continued

Number
of
workers

Atlanta

6.49
7.47
5.73
5.28
5.70
7.62
6.00
7.0 4
-

5.18
5.05
-

7.83
8.1 9
-

5.54
8.46
_
-

8.5 9
8.5 9
_

_
_

6
8 ,4 6 8
3, 611
739
3, 888
48
182
1, 982
1, 142
110
346
360
24
5, 671
4 ,4 2 5
478
768
258
_
_
_

2 , 813
2 , 644
_

_
_

9.07
8.32
8.31
8.30
8.33
8.22
8.3 6
8.88
8.90
8.91
8.83
8.8 9
8.57
8.98
9.04
8.77
8.76
8.75
_
_
.

8.98
8.99
_

Number
of
w orkers
_
_
_
_
_

2 94
201

A verage
hourly
earnings
_
_
_
_
_

$6.18
7.01

_
_

_

_
_

_
_

29
21
_

_

6.80
7.2 4
_

_

_

_
_

_

206
156
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_

7.47
8.02
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_

Indianapolis
Number
of
w orkers

223
179
_
_

1, 162
851
_

187
_
_

163
98
_

A verage
hourly
earnings

$7.87
8.36
_
_
_

7.69
8.11
_

5.70
_

6.82
7.21
_

29

6.61
_

373
316
_
_
_
_

7.97
8.20

_

_
178
154

_
_

_

_

_

7.15
7.59

(Number and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings 1 of w orkers in construction industries, 2 selected occupations and a r e a s, 2 September 1972)
North Central— Continued

South— Continued
Occupation3 and type
of construction

Dallas
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Washington

M iam i

Memphis
A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Chicago
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Des Moines
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Indianapolis
Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

Journeymen— Continued:
P lu m bers ..... _
_
C om m e rcial
Residential (5 stories or m ore ) ,
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
R oofers
C o m m e rcia l
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
S h eet-m etal w ork ers
C om m e rcial
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Structural iron w ork ers
C om m e rcial
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries) ,
Street and highway
Other heavv construction

736
3 93
343
220
336
300
"

$5.62
6.40
4.73
4.21
6.06
6.30
-

431
416
_
234
219
-

$7.18
7.30
6.87
7.1 0
-

776
400
228
215
135
80
195
165
89
-

$8.39
9.17
6.54
6.61
7.77
4 .6 5
8.67
9.20
8.25
"

2, 509
1, 934
114
461
277
231
2, 390
2, 066
320
118
115
"

$6 .89
7.3 4
6.3 4
5.13
6.24
6.43
6.73
7.0 8
4.5 2
8.2 8
8.37
~

3, 302
1, 524
1, 598
1, 173
801
312
2 ,2 8 1
1, 671
583
1 ,3 4 8
1 ,2 3 9
34
-

_

$8.69
8.76
8.6 4
8.62
8.62
8.60
8.5 4
8.5 6
8.4 6
9.30
9.31
9.26
“

2 90
184
153
153
112
112
■

$7.05
7.0 9
7.5 0
7.50
6.98
6.98
-

341
165
328
147
181
277
274
"

$5.80
7.11
6.10
7.13
5.25
8.25
8.25
-

Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s___________________________
C o m m e rcial
R esidential (5 sto ries or m ore)
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Street and highway
Other heavv construction
B ulldozer op erators
C om m e rcial
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Street and highwav
Other heavv construction
T ru ck d rivers
........... .
C o m m e rcia l
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)
Street and highwav
Other heavy construction

322
89
49
176
166
85
43
38
102
53
-

3.58
4.51
3.75
3.01
3.54
3.55
3.47
3.59
2.7 6
2.6 5
-

109
23
25
32
29
79
19
15
17
71
-

4 .1 5
5.82
3.17
4 .3 0
3.52
3.9 6
5.55
3.6 5
3.97
3.11
-

57
14
9
265
108
50
38
-

6.25
7.71
7.62
5.4 9
4.53
3.3 9
3.1 9
-

648
225
61
58
2 92
443
70
163
49
93
703
371
109

6.20
6.65
5.43
5.93
5.98
5.87
7 .2 9
5.00
5.73
5.58
4 .0 5
3.81
3.91

743
301
86
88
258
695
241
122
251
1 ,4 6 4
52 9
194
632
109

8.68
8.73
8.5 0
8.62
8.73
8.52
8.63
8.41
8.51
5.98
5.9 9
6.4 6
5.83
5.97

73
14
96
209
-

5.91
6.73
5.94
5.10
-

156
75
39
42
133
59
681
606
66

7.01
6.69
6.96
7.64
7.29
7.95
4.94
4.87
5.47

220
808
355
32
5, 916
3 ,0 4 5

4.04
3.91
4.2 6
2.7 3
3.25
3.91

2 ,5 6 1
1 ,3 9 4

120
75
3 ,3 8 7
1, 785
197
1, 122
222
79
303

4.21
4.0 6
5.31
5.71
5.85
5.12
2.91
4.6 0
4.21
4.13
3.23
3.23

1, 342
963
343
982
202
689
15, 333
5, 895
961
4, 642
2 ,2 3 9
1, 596
316
150
584
456
113

4.3 7
4.4 7
4.11
4.0 2
5.09
3 .6 6
4.3 3
5.41
4.3 7
3.5 4
3.5 4
3.7 6
3.39
2.9 4
4.4 4
4.8 4
2.89

1 3 ,5 1 9
7, 300
624
1, 861
1, 900
1, 834
2 50
-

6.21
6.21
6.1 9
6.11
6.27
6.28
6.13
-

827
445

5.12
6.13
3.17
3.98
4.9 4
5.92

1, 812
1, 069
482
157
-

4.82
5.21
3.80
5.10
-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' helpers
C o m m e rcial
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) ..............
C arp e n ters' helpers
................. ............
C o m m e rcial _______________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
... ___
Street and h ighw ay________________________
C onstruction lab orers
C o m m e rcia l __ ____________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) _________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) ....
Street and highwav
Other heavy construction _________________
E le c tr ic ia n s' helpers
... . ...............................
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
R e s i d e n t i a l (le ss than 5 sto ries)
E levator c on stru ctors' helpers
P lu m b e r s' helpers
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______

See footnote at end of table,




-

979
1 ,0 9 2
800
554
190
364
499
126
373

-

2 .9 5
2.33
2.3 5
2.87
2.8 8
2.87
3.10
3.32
3.03

~

-

605
351
211
-

3.21
3.8 9
-

2.4 3
2 .4 8
2 .1 6
-

-

210
-

214
-

214

-

99
163
61
40

(Number and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly earn ing s1 of workers in construction industries, 2 selected occupations and area s, 2 September 1972)
North Central— Continued
Occupation3 and type

Kansas City
Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

Minneapolis—
St. Paul
Number
A verage
hourly
of
earnings
w orkers

W est
St. Louis
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Denver

Los A ngeles 5

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Journeym en:
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) ---------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------Other heavy construction __________________
C o m m e rcia l --------------------------------------------------R esidential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ---------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction --------------------------Cem ent m a s o n s -------------------------------------------------C o m m e rcia l -------------------------------------- --------Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ---------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction __________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------- ----------------- ----------------Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ---------------R esidential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------E levator c o n str u c to r s__________________________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------R esiden tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------P ip e fit te r s ----------------------------------------- --------C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
Other heavy construction __________________
P lu m b e r s _____________ — ------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l__ _______________________________
R esidential (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
C o m m e r c i a l ...__________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s --------- ------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l_____ ___________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________ ______
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _____ __
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction ______________ ____
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries) __ --------Street and h igh w ay--------------------------------------Other heavy construction __________________
Bulldozer o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l---------- -------------------__ —
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) --------- __
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy con stru ction ---------------------------Tru ck d rivers -----------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------- -------------------R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay--------------------------------------Other heavy c o n s t r u c tio n ___
___________




San F ran cisco—
Oakland
Number
Average
hourly
of
w orkers
earnings

7.6 6
7.67
7.9 9
8.00
7.97
7.35
7.3 5
7.34
7.35
7.34
7.78
7.78
“

376
275
4 , 363
2, 113
2, 182
683
574
72
27
1, 120
949
407
212
886
3 64
482
554
446
523
500
~

$8.21
8.25
6.29
6.56
6.03
6,43
6.45
6.36
5.95
7.6 4
8.03
7.70
7.70
7.5 0
7.70
7.47
8.17
8.17
7.2 5
7 .2 5
“

1 ,2 58
983
270
1 2 ,3 0 0
7, 178
4 ,2 1 7
225
416
2 ,8 7 5
1, 600
431
570
208
4, 488
3, 908
420
1, 139
983
156
3, 532
1, 440
2, 092
1 ,0 5 0
670
2 , 480
1, 463
1 ,0 1 7
365
272
~

$7.78
7.77
7.7 9
6.76
6.75
6.78
6.75
6.75
6.16
6.17
6.16
6.16
6.17
9.09
9.08
9.18
8.31
8.31
8.30
8.19
8.12
8.23
7.02
7.03
8.80
8.88
8.68
8.58
8.58
“

1, 618
835
541
202
100
943
697
246
307
86
497
212
285
339
165
10
10
"

$ 6 .78
6.78
6.78
6.81
6.81
7.50
7.50
7.5 0
6.61
6.61
6.61
6.61
6.61
6.83
6.83
7.31
7.31
-

134
134
4, 113
2 ,4 8 6
647
816
158
801
633
48
63
1,7 66
1,4 84
427
3 53
1, 141
593
539
273
1, 188
1, 102
2 64
175
89

$8.50
8.50
8.10
8.10
8.10
8.10
8.10
7.18
7.1 9
7.13
7.13
8.03
7.97
8.43
8.44
8.29
8.31
8.26
7.92
8.11
8.11
8.57
8.57
8.58

7.57
7.54
7.5 9
7.51
7.71
7.38
7.4 8
7.48
7.48
7.20
6.53
6.60
6.46
6.55

308
179
41
68
129
48
81
2 98
135
150
"

7.8 6
8.0 4
8.08
7.06
8.06
8.03
8.08
6.67
6.54
6.80
“

374
136
76
54
106
795
215
685
328
244
64

5.64
5.64
5.29
5.85
5.79
5.56
5.62
4 .6 5
4.62
4.5 8
5.25

686
37
26
76
531
553
198
22
228
203
92

7.87
7.81
7.8 6
7.90
7.8 8
7 .8 9
7 .9 0
7.7 6
7.8 8
6.34
6.20

42
13
215
8
185
22

6.86
6.74
6.18
5.93
6.22
5.96

324
121
66
106
337
127
112
88
489
149
2 52
60

8.59
8.56
8.67
8.67
8.27
8.2 6
8.26
8.29
6.89
6.85
6.98
6.97

$7.61
7.61
7.61
7.61
7.12
7.12
7.13
7.13
7.6 6
7.65

763
662
366
356
“
216
53
49
418
23
342
37
231
103
-

8.50
8.50
8.50
8.48
8.50
8.47
8.50
7.07
6.56
-

462
261
75
67
59
519
116
47
174
182
948
378
403
149

~

A verage
hourly
earnings

$7.81
7.70
8.24
7.7 9
7.78
7.71
7.73
8.13
8.2 4
7.24
7.22
7.28
7.51
7.85
7.87
7.81
7.7 4
8.18
8.17
8.20
7.9 5
7.9 5
8.05
8.05
8.07
”

93
655
61
215
2 , 510
1, 742
515
149
745
466
99
57
1, 821
1, 515
306
439
328
1, 169
3 62
7 57
962
918
"

"

Portland
Number
of
w orkers

519
401
115
3, 132
1 ,4 8 5
82
1, 328
129
108
554
437
82
35
1 ,3 3 4
914
192
184
1, 075
702
373
249
208
911
867
44
“

$7.73
7.73
8.00
8.00
8.02
8.00
8.14
7.78
8.91
8.91
7.81
8.30
8.62
8.62
8.71
8.75
8.80
8.65
8.70
8.75
8.50
8.50
■

345
260
1, 308
1, 468
170
32
237
138
57
9
1, 185
847
225
217
659
2 92
93
274
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

(Number and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly ea rn in g s1 of w orkers in construction in du stries, 2 selected occupations and a r e a s, 2 September 1972)
North Central — Continued
Occupation3 and type
of construction

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B rick la y e r s' h e lp e r s__________________________
C o m m e rcial
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
C arp e n ters' h elpers
C o m m e rcial
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Street and hiehwav
Construction lab orers
C o m m e rcia l
........
Residential (5 stories or m o re l
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Street and hiehwav
Other heavv construction
E lectrician s ' h elp ers
C o m m e rcia l
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Elevator con stru ctors' helpers
P lu m b ers' helpers_„___________________________
C o m m e rcia l
..................
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)

Kansas City
Number
of
w orkers

314
2 64

A verage
hourly
earnings

$5.93
5.94

Minneapolis—
St. Paul
Number
A verage
of
hourly
workers
earnings

105
102

$6.05
6.05

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2, 381
1 ,4 82
-

56
601
242
-

138
58

-

6.24
5.72
-

6.66
7.10
7.20
-

5.78
5.81

-

4, 174
2, 493
127
410
470
674
-

-

5.91
5.94
5.90
6.03
5.70
5.87
-

W est
Denver

St. Louis
Number
of
w orkers

161
106
55
-

3 ,4 2 2
1 ,8 0 0
-

500
887
168
-

258
223

A verage
hourly
earnings

$7.23
7.18
7.34
-

6.88
6.82
-

6.72
7.17
6.45
-

7.32
7.33

Number
of
wo rkers

303
145
158
142
-

4, 092
2, 367
-

996
318
343
215
-

108
-

335
-

Los Angeles 5

A verage
hourly
earnings

$4.74
5.10
4.41
4.1 9
-

4.23
4.33
-

4.01
4.2 6
4.1 9
3.31
-

3.48
-

3.71
-

Number
of
w orkers

779
597
182
-

8, 135
4 ,2 62
-

1 ,2 7 8
1, 159
1 ,3 1 0
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

Portland
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

$6.00
6.00
6.00
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.50
5.50
-

5.50
5.50
5.50
-

-

1 ,2 7 7
544
-

274
215
244
-

San Francisco—
Oakland
Average
Number
hourly
of
earnings
w orkers

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$5.01
5.27
-

4.8 0
5.2 5
4.43
-

-

2 ,4 5 4
1 ,2 60
187
322
244
441
-

-

$5.47
5.49
5.44
5.43
5.45
5.45
-

1 E xcludes prem iu m pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on w eekends,
holidays, and late sh ifts. Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union headquarters and the
construction site) are included in stra ig h t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work force,
rather than a p r e c ise m e asu re of em ploym ent.
2 F or definition of industries and areas studied, see appendix A and footnote 1, tables 4 through 55. With the exception of B iloxi-G ulfp ort and P ascagoula, M is s ., area definitions conform to
SMSA boundaries established by the U .S . O ffice of Management and Budget through Novem ber 1971.
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in types of construction not shown separately.
4 R eference month of su rvey was October 1972.
5 Shortened term s for B iloxk-G ulfport and Pascagoula and for Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim -Santa Ana—
Garden G rove.
N O TE :

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not m eet publication crite ria .




(Number and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings
Northeast
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Boston
Number
of
w orkers

Journeym en:
871
B r ic k la y e r s ____ _________________________________
851
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Other heavy construction __________________
C a r p e n te r s ______________________________________ 2, 156
C o m m e r c ia l____________ __________________
1, 960
R esidential (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h ighw ay_______ __________________
Other heavy construction ---------------------------98
404
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
377
C o m m e r c ia l____________ __________________
Residential (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction ____ __________ ___
E le c tr ic ia n s _____________________________________
1 ,8 0 8
C o m m e r c ia l__________ ____________________ 1 ,8 0 8
_
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ___ ____
E levator c o n str u c to r s _____
_________________
C o m m e rcia l
_
___ ____________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
712
P ip efitters __ _
_ _ _________________________
712
C o m m e rcia l
_
_
_
R esid en tial (5 stories or m ore l
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
P lu m bers
...
_
494
C o m m e rcia l
224
Residential (5 sto ries or m ore) ..
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Roofe r s
_ ____
_
660
C o m m e rcia l
660
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s ___________________________
588
C om m ercial
588
_
R esidential (Jess than 5 sto r ie s!
Structural iron w orkers
6 84
C o m m e rcia l
.... .
684
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and highway _________________________
Other heavy construction
“
Equipment op erators:
B ack-h oe op erators
__________
C o m m e rcia l
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m ore l
Residential (le ss than 5 sto riesl
Street and highwav
Other heavv construction
Bulldozer op erators
C o m m e r cia l
__________
R esidential (5 sto r ie s or m o re l
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and highwav
______
Other heavv construction




185
88
-

Buffalo

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Atlanta

Philadelphia
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Biloxi 5
Number
of
workers

247
238
573
499
42
253
228
872
872
174
174
760
604
371
371
408
336
~

$ 8.66
8.65
8.11
8.09
8.34
9.04
9.05
9.71
9.71
9.30
9.30
9.20
9.30
8.50
8.50
8.71
8.71
-

264
264
813
793
74
53
11
346
346
149
149
247
247
Ill
111
138
138
100
98
”

$8.71
8.71
8.12
8.12
8.76
8.78
8.57
8.72
8.72
8.84
8.84
8.65
8.65
8.01
8.01
8.70
8.70
9.30
9.30
-

3, 625
2, 274
9, 639
4 , 754
1, 806
1 ,4 6 2
1, 023
1 ,3 7 7
650
231
6, 246
5 ,4 9 0
716
40
4 , 168
3, 957
161
3 ,7 8 7
2, 689
598
510
510
1, 802
1, 802
827
706
-

$8.41
8.40
8.59
8.62
8.70
8.56
8.60
8.09
8.09
8.06
8.49
8.49
8.51
7.43
8.07
8.07
8.12
8.43
8.46
8.33
8.30
8.30
10.33
10.33
9.25
9.23
-

2, 240
2, 075
3, 501
2 ,6 3 6
213
878
750
1 ,0 4 3
1 ,0 4 3
412
160
1, 227
1,2 0 3
1 ,2 3 4
1, 174
1, 266
975
841
841
-

$ 8 .72
8.71
8.65
8.64
8.68
7.52
7.53
9.30
9.30
9.15
9° 15
8.98
8.99
8.98
8.98
9.70
9.70
8.60
8.60
-

443
187
767
695
747
744
1 ,2 72
1 ,2 5 8
407
407
84
84
274
274
-

$ 7 .8 0
7.80
7.40
7.40
6.95
6.95
8.67
8.70
7.76
7.76
5.65
5.65
6.80
6.80
-

96
81
17
17
179
143
-

8.71
8.71
-

134
29
-

8.59
8.60
8.59
8.53
8.47
-

46
8
53

8.01
7.34
-

847
366
20
247
191
339
50
176
100

9.32
9.26
9.25

623
165
389

9.37
9.22
9.45
8.39
8.42
8.36

59
37
-

7.03
7.05
-

9
-

-

-

-

A verage
hourly
earnings

New Y o r k 4

$ 8 .33
8.32
8.09
8.09
8.20
8.63
8.70
8.58
8.58
9.12
9.12
9.35
9.35
8.00
8.00
8.73
8.73
7.89
7.89
'

-

1 17
88
_
_

Number
of
worke r s

South

Hartford

8.16
8.02

-

66
38
21

-

-

-

_

-

-

“

-

-

-

"
-

6.83
-

-

"

-

9.41
9.15
8.98
9.23
8.72
9.06

-

412
195
216

Average
hourly
earning s

$6 .0 8
6.10
6.02
6.02
6.37
6.76
-

6.55
-

Northeast
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Equipment operators— Continued
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
C om m ercial
_ .
.......
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction..
.. ..
Helpers and la b o rers:
B ric k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
C arpenters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) ---------------R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction __________________
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s________________________
Elevator co n stru c to rs' h e lp e r s _______________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s ____ _____ ____________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

Buffalo

Boston
Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

-

-

Number
of
w orkers

63
-

"
$6.47
6.47
5.29
5.29
6.36
6.48

180
180
25
25
4, 883
3, 460
-

-

-

-

801
541
-

5.99
6.12
-

-

~

“

-

1, 124
704

Average
hourly
earnings

6.5 0
-

"

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

1 ,0 50
404
491
122

$ 5 .5 9
5.62
5.59
5.47

-

-

$6.61
6.75
6.4 4

160
160
756
445

6.25
6.25
6.3 9
6.25

1 ,9 2 3
1,0 41
12,301
5, 127
303
458
3 ,6 8 2
2, 731
-

7.42
7.36
7.0 4
7.1 9
7.05
7.16
6.8 8
6.96
-

417
390
8 ,6 6 6
4, 646
180
2, 338
1, 327
240
-

6.30
6.30
6.11
6.19
5.73
6.06
5.98
6.41
-

"
2 ,4 0 1
2, 039
"

-

-

6.60
-

193
-

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Residential (5 stories or m ore) .
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 stories)
Other heavy construction ------------C a r p e n t e r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l-----------------------------------R esid en tial (5 stories or m ore) .
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and h ighw ay-----------------------Other heavy construction ------------Cement m a s o n s ----------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l-----------------------------------Residential (5 stories or m ore) .
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and h ighw ay-----------------------Other heavy construction ------------E le c tr ic ia n s ----------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l-----------------------------------R esidential (5 stories or m ore) .
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
Elevator c o n str u c to r s-----------------------C o m m e r c ia l-----------------------------------Residential (5 stories or m ore) .
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
P ip e fitte rs -------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l-----------------------------------R esidential (5 stories or m ore) .
Other heavy con stru ction -------------




465
465
-

Average
hourly
earnings

$7 .3 8
7.38

Number
of
workers

*

A verage
hourly
earning s

-

_
_
_

695
695
_
_
_
68
68
_
_
_

$ 6 .8 5
6.85
_
_
_
_
6.57
6.57
_
_
_
_

332
332
_
_

7.40
7.40
_
_

883
883
_
_

6.83
6.83
_
_

159
159

Number
of
w orkers

170
"

$ 8 .1 0
-

1 ,7 23
991

2, 083
797
270
993
_
_
200
140
_
_
_
_
1 ,2 0 4
991
_
_

7.94
7.9 4
7.95
7.95

2, 774
2, 607

-

"

6.62
6.67
_
_
_
_
6.50
6.50
_
_
_
_

1 ,6 1 4
1 ,5 5 4
_
_
_
-

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Chicago

Washington

Miami

Memphis

Dallas

Biloxi 5

A verage
hourly
earnings

“
■
$ 4 .4 4
4.4 4
“
-

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

“
-

"
-

■
■
123
123
_
~

-

_
7.71
8.10
_
_
_
8.50
8.50
_
_

-

59
523
474
_
_
_
1, 172
1, 090
_
426

A verage
hourly
earnings

$8 .3 2
8.62
7.76
7.76
-

7.77
7.52
7.54
_
_
_
8.72
8.89

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

2, 029
1 ,7 7 0

$8 .9 5
8.96

6
8 ,4 6 8
3, 611
739
3, 888
48
182
1 ,9 0 0
1, 142
110
264
360
24
5, 500
4, 380
478
642
258

9.07
8.32
8.31
8.30
8.33
8.22
8.36
8.89
8.90
8.91
8.89
8.89
8.57
9.05
9.04
8.77
9.31
8.75

"
“
201
201
-

29
21
-

A verage
hourly
earning s

"
“
$7 .0 1
7.01
-

6.80
7.2 4
-

Number
of
workers

260
260
_

7.20
7.20
"

69
69
-

-

8.46

-

7.17
7.17
-

_
'

147
92
-

"

$8.55
8.55

_

:
8.17
8.23
7.07
7.21
6.61

931
807
127
98
29
-

9.16
9.16
-

803
803
-

8.87
8.87
-

2, 813
2, 644
-

8.98
8.99
-

-

-

-

346
316
-

-

-

-

-

-

206
156

7.47
8.02

Average
hourly
workers

162
162

-

-

$3.92
3.92
"
“
_
~

Indianapolis

Des Moines
Number
of
w orkers

-

“

-

"
"
"

North Central

South---- C ontinued

Number
of
w orkers

Number
of
w orkers

1 ,5 8 9
775
203

6.43
6.45
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

Atlanta

Philadelphia

$ 5 .56
-

158
-

-

"

Number
of
w orkers

$ 7 .1 9
-

-

99
-

South
New Y o r k 4

Hartford

138
138
-

-

8.20
8.20
7.90
7.90
-

North C entral

South
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Journeymen— Continued
Plum bers ________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) ---------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 stories) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy c on stru ction __________________

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esidential (5 stories or m ore) _________
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy c on stru ction __________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______
Street and h ig h w a y ________________________
Other heavy c o n stru ction ________________ _
T r u c k d r iv e r s __________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay________________________
Other heavy construction
.... ...

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
C arp e n ters' h elp ers ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C onstruction la b o r e r s ____ ___________________
C o m m e r c ia l_____________ __________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy c o n stru ction __________________
E le ctr icia n s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
E levator c on stru c tors' h e lp e r s _______________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s _____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________




M emphis

Dallas
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

_
"

~

334
334
209
209
_

-

-

17
16
17
16
-

-

-

-

"

"

"

1, 842
1,702
_
-

$ 4 .6 4
4.6 2
-

1,3 01
1 ,2 8 8
-

Washington

Miam i

Number
of
w orkers

Chicago
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 7 .4 4
7.4 4
7.22
7.22
"

572
400
135
135
171
165
89
-

$ 9 .1 6
9.17
7.77
7.77
9.20
9.20
8.25
~

1, 127
1 ,0 5 2
1 ,3 57
1, 357
115
115
“

$8 .7 6
8.76
8.05
8.05
8.37
8.37
“

3, 216
1 ,5 2 4
1 ,5 1 2
1, 173
801
312
2 ,2 8 1
1,6 71
583
1, 348
1 ,2 3 9
34
“

$ 8 .75
8.76
8.75
8.62
8.62
8.60
8.54
8.56
8.46
9.30
9.31
9.26
-

6.08
6.28
5.79
5.9 8
-

36
14
9
191
36
-

7.22
7.71
7.62
6.03
5.42
-

"

“

248
62
38
136
201
63
21
424
67

6.91
7.90
6.05
6.61
7.01
7.57
6.95
4.2 9
3.88

743
301
86
88
258
695
241
122
251
1 ,4 3 7
502
194
632
109

6 ,0 6 4
4 ,4 8 0
341
466
309
468
-

5.66
5.98
4.8 6
4.63
5.10
4 .5 8
-

1 3 ,0 8 7
7, 246
624
1 ,4 8 3
1 ,9 0 0
1, 834
250
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

3.97
4.0 0
-

2, 751
1, 678
179
802
93
-

"

5.74
5.79
5.85
5.80
4.3 9
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

Indianapolis

Des Moines
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

283
184
153
153
112
112
“

$ 7 .0 9
7.09
7.50
7.50
6.9 8
6.9 8
-

116
116
112
112
277
274
-

$8.15
8.15
7.93
7.93
8.25
8.25
-

8.68
8.73
8.50
8.62
8.73
8.52
8.63
8.41
8.51
6.01
6.06
6.46
5.83
5.97

49
14
84
209
-

6.2 8
6.73
6.13
5.10
-

128
47
39
42
117
59
651
585
57

7.48
7.76
6.96
7.64
7.57
7.95
4.95
4.8 8
5.57

6.22
6.21
6.1 9
6.19
6.27
6.2 8
6.13
-

622
437
—
40
40

1, 106
856
157
-

5.51
5.62
5.10
-

■

-

5.73
6.1 9
-

5.92
5.92

“

We st

North Central— Continued
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
Other heavy construction ___________________
C a r p e n te r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l __________________________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
Street and h ighw ay___________________________
Other heavy construction ___________________
Cement m a s o n s __________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 stories) _________
Street and highway ...
Other heavy construction ___________________
E le c tr ic ia n s_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ___________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
Elevator c o n str u c to r s________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
R esidential (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
P ip e fitte rs ________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
Other heavy construction -----------------------------Plum bers
..
__ ______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
R esidential (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
R o o fe r s ____________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ---------------Structural iron w orkers
_
... .
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
Street and h igh w ay------------------- ------------------Other heavy construction ____________________

Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s ___________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l----------------------------------------------------Residential (5 stories or m ore) ----------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
Street and h ighw ay___________________________
Other heavy construction ___________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ---------------Street and h ighw ay----------------------------------- __
Other heavy construction ___________________




Kansas City
Number
of
w orkers

345
260
_
_
_
1, 790
1 ,4 6 8
_
152
32
204
138
_
_
57
9
1, 113
847
225
217
659
292
93
274
_
763
662
366
356
-

A verage
hourly
earnings

$7 .73
7.73
_
8.00
8.00
_
8.00
8.00
8.14
7.78
_
8.91
8.91
7.87
8.30
8.62
8.62
8.71
8.75
8.80
8.65
8.70
8.75
8.50
8.50
"

216
53
-

_
49
_
418
23
-

342
37

8.50
8.50
-

8.50
8.48
8.50
8.47
8.50

Number
of
w orkers

931
655
61
215
2 ,4 8 3
1 ,7 1 5
515
149
745
466
99
57
1, 801
1,5 1 5
286
439
328
1, 127
362
715
962
918
“

442
241
75
67
59
509
116
37
174
182

A verage
hourly
earnings

$7.61
7.61
7.61
7.61
7.13
7.13
7.13
7.13
7.66
7.65
7.66
7.67
8.00
8.00
8.00
7.35
7.35
7.32
7.35
7.31
-

7.78
7.7 8
-

“

7.57
7.55
7.59
7.51
7.71
7.3 8
7.4 8
7.48
7.4 8
7.20

Denver

St. Louis

Minneapol s—St. Paul

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

519
401
115
3, 132
1 ,4 8 5
82
1, 328
129
108
554
437
82
35
1, 334
914
192
184
1 ,0 75
702
373
249
208
911
867
44

$7.81
7.70
8.24
7.79
7.78
7.71
7.73
8.13
8.24
7.24
7.22
7.28
7.51
7.85
7.87
7.81
7.74
8.18
8.17
8.20
7.95
7.95
8.05
8.05
8.07

275
275
3, 669
2, 073
638
550
27
930
918
407
212
751
364
387
554
446
523
500
-

“

290
179
-

41
50
129
48
81

8.08
8.04
8.08
8.06
8.06
8.03
8.08

Los Angeles 5

A verage
hourly
earnings

$ 8 .2 5
8.25
6.57
6.57
6.43
6.45
5.95
8.04
8.08
7.70
7.70
7.70
7.70
7.70
8.17
8.17
7.25
7.25
"

233
56
54
106
653
215

5.73
5.69
5.85
5.7 9
5.59
5.62

Number
of
w orkers

1 ,2 5 8
983
270
1 2 ,271
7, 169
4, 197
225
416
2, 875
1 ,6 0 0
431
570
208
4, 488
3, 908
420
1, 139
983
156
3, 027
1 ,0 3 8
1, 989
850
470
2 ,4 8 0
1 ,4 6 3
1,0 1 7
365
272
-

1San F ran cisco—Oakland

Portland

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

$ 7 .7 8
7.77
7.7 9
6.76
6.75
6.7 8
6.75
6.75
6.16
6.17
6.16
6.16
6.17
9.09
9.08
9.18
8.31
8.31
8.30
8.34
8.36
8.33
7.0 9
7.16
8.80
8.88
8.68
8.58
8.58
-

1 ,6 1 8
835
541
202
100
943
697
246
307
86
497
212
285
339
165
10
10
-

7.87
7.81
7.86
7.90
7.8 8
7.8 9
7.9 0
7.76
7.8 8

-

A verage
hourly
earnings

$ 6 .7 8
6.7 8
6.7 8
6.81
6.81
7.50
7.50
7.50
6.61
6.61
6.61
6.61
6.61
6.83
6.83
7.31
7.31
-

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

134
134
4 , 113
2 ,4 8 6
647
816
158
801
633
48
63
1, 766
1 ,4 8 4
427
353
1, 141
593
539
273
1, 188
1, 102
264
175
89

$8 .5 0
8.50
8.10
8.10
8.10
8.10
8.10
7.18
7.19
7.13
7.13
8.03
7.97
8.43
8.44
8.29
8.31
8.26
7.92
8.11
8.11
8.57
8.57
8.58

324
121
66
106
337
127
112
88

8.59
8.56
8.67
8.67
8.27
8.26
8.26
8.29

'

686
37
26
76
531
553
198
22
228

-

North Central
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Equipment op erators— Continued
T r u c k d r iv e r s ___________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________________

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h elp ers ..
.........
_
C o m m e rcia l
.
......................
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
C arp en ters' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Construction la b o rers ............
_ _ _
.
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m ore )
_
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and h ig h w a y _________________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________________
E le ctr icia n s' h e lp e r s __________________________
Elevator con stru c to rs' helpers
P lu m b ers' h elp ers
............... .
_ _ .
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________

1
2
3
4
5

See
See
See
See
See

NOTE:

footnote
footnote
footnote
footnote
footnote

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

table
table
table
table
table

Kansas City
Number
of
w orkers

231
103
"

314
264
_
2 ,3 4 3
1 ,4 82
-

5 86
242
-

138
58

Average
hourly
earnings

$7 .07
6.56
-

Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

St. Louis
Number
of
w orkers

$ 6 .5 6
6.60
6.52
6.55

298
135
150

"

933
378
388
149

5.93
5.94

105
102

6.05
6.05
5.93
5.93
5.90
6.03
5.90
5.87

161
106
55
3 ,4 1 3
1 ,8 0 0

-

6.23
5.72
_
-

7.10
7.20
-

5.78
5.81

-

4 ,0 2 5
2 ,4 5 3
127
410
393
642
-

-

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

D ashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication crite ria .




W est

Minne apo li s—St. Paul

Denver

Average
hourly
earnings

-

-

258
223

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

Portland
Number
of
w orkers

A verage
hourly
earnings

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

519
196
64

$4 .9 3
4.97
5.25

203
92

$ 6 .3 4
_
6.20

-

7.23
7.18
7.34
6.89
6.82

145
145
3, 542
2 ,2 4 9

5.10
5.10
_
4.3 6
4.37

779
597
182
8, 135
4 , 262

6.00
6.00
6.00
5.50
5.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.72
7.17
6.60
-

7.32
7.33

_

583
299
343
_

_

4.46
4.33
4.1 9
-

_

1 ,2 7 8
1, 159
1, 310
_

_

5.50
5.50
5.50
-

_
1,2 27
544
_

224
215
244
_
-

-

San Francisco—
Oakland

$6 .6 7
6.54
6.80

"

500
887
159

Number
of
w orkers

Los A ngeles 5

$ 5 .1 0
5.27
-

5.27
5.25
4.4 3
-

489
149
_
252
60

_
_
2 ,4 5 4
1,2 60
187
322
244
441
_
_

$6 .8 9
6.85
_
6.98
6.97

_
5.47
5.49
5.44
5.43
5.45
5.45
_

South

Northe ast 4

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s ---------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries) —
Carpente r s ----------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
Street and highw ay__________________
Other heavy construction___________
Cement m a s o n s _________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
Street and h ighw ay__________________
E le ctr icia n s---------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
P ip efitte rs-----------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________
P lu m b e r s -------------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
R o ofers___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries) —
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s ___________________
C om m e r c ia l---------------------------------------R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries) —
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators-------------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
Street and highway---------------------------Other heavy construction___________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s -----------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries) —
Street and highw ay---------------------------Other heavy construction___________
T r u c k d r iv e r s------------------------------------------C omm e r c i al---------------------------------------Street and highw ay---------------------------Other heavy construction___________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ----------------------------C o m m e rcia l---------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
C arpenters' h e lp e r s ------------------------------Com m e r c ia l---------------------------------------R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
Street and highw ay---------------------------Construction la b o r e r s ---------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------R esidential (less than 5 sto ries) —
Street and highw ay---------------------------Other heavy construction-----------------




Number
of
w orkers

267
_
261
_
_
_
_
_

302
302

_

_
_

496
286
210

_
_
-

^ New Y o r k 5

Hartford

Boston

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Average
hourly
earnings

$6.46
_
6.46

Number
of
workers

A verage
hourly
earnings

317
_
_

$4.41
_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
.

_

_

5.07
5.07

_

_
_

7.11
7.52
6.55
_
_

_
_
138
_
_

26
_

341
_

307

5.32
_
_

5.54
_

5.52
_

5.47

_

_

_

_

"

-

_
_

61

-

6.60

Number
of
w orkers

670
_
600

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 6 .00
_
5.8 8

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

Philadelphia
Number
of
w orkers

783
140
529
_
_
181
_

_

_

_
_
_

_

396
283

_
-

-

104
95
1 ,0 5 8

440
-

220
182
_
_
-

39

5.40
_

5.03
5.1 0
_
_

_

_

Average
hourly
earnings

$5 .2 4
4 .6 4
5.33
_
_
5.3 7
_
_

5.86
6.52
-

5.3 0
5.3 7
5.36

Number
of
w orkers

899
721
177
-

_
106

-

-

-

-

-

483
438

9.54

155
27

"

_

_

_

_

I

_

_

_

5.62

_
_

_

_

_

_

83
139

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

90
_

-

“

-

-

-

_

960
192
266
358

_
_

_

5.04
5.00
5.03
5.39

_

_

430
157
41
_

'

$4.91
5.38
4.75
3.40
5.20
4.41
5.29
3.59
4.49
4.24

58
-

3.91
3.8 7

_
_

-

83
71

-

“

4 .1 0
4 .1 7
_

4 .3 0
3.85

12

_
-

17

-

-

-

_
_

-

-

-

4.1 1

_
_

_
_

139
114

4 .0 4
4.2 2

_

43
-

3.45

11

_

_

2.97
-

3.25
_
.

4 .5 7
4 .4 0
2.85
_

"

-

_
_

_
_

1, 167
171
816
_

4 .9 7
4.0 8
5.08
_

-

551
208
343
220
-

-

5.09
5.69
4.73
4.21
-

76
40

3.81
3.55

293
60

3.29
3.56

49
176
166
85

3.75
3.01
3.54
3.55

32
-

3.71
-

3.25
_

2.34
-

300
_

1,311
_

584
_

-

2.34

53

-

-

-

-

43
38
102

32

"
-

-

_

-

31

3.98

_

_
_

-

-

3.99
4.0 5
-

_
_

-

-

-

-

-

4 .1 5

-

_
_
_
_

-

-

_
4 .2 9

_
_
_

_

3.96

_
19

_

-

71

_
_

1 ,4 1 0
543
736
94
37
570
260
240
724
3 74

_

5.05

"

-

-

-

-

_

$4.23

-

-

-

29

-

-

-

50

88

30

_

5.68
5.93

Average
hourly
earnings

-

-

195
168

Number
of
w orkers

-

Dallas

Average
hourly
earnings

_

-

_

$5.03
5.19
4.4 0
_
_
3.61

Number
of
w orkers

_

-

_

Average
hourly
earnings

_

-

-

B iloxi 6

Atlanta

-

-

-

-

-

3.8 0
3.93

14

2.68

-

2.65

-

-

-

3.47
3.59
2.76

3.14
_

3.74
-

3.60
_

282
217
-

3, 985
2 ,4 7 3
504
482
526

_

3.0 0
3.21
3.11
2.33
2.55

-

499
42
196
215
46

-

2.52
3.69
2.53
2.26
2,63

613
160
-

32
4, 074
1,3 4 3
839
1 ,0 9 2
800

-

3.65
3.69
-

2.73
2.62
3.01
2.64
2.33
2.35

South

Northeast 4
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Helpers and la b o rers— Continued
E le ctr icia n s' h e lp e r s-----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s ______________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ---------------

Number
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$3.24
_

_
147
_

-

Numbe r
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

45
-

$2.81
-

299
85

Number
of
w orkers

$3 .35
3.5 7

-

Atlanta

Philadelphia

New Y ork 5

Hartford

Boston

Average
hourly
earnings

-

Number
of
w orkers

“

"

“

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s ---------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------C a r p e n te r s _______________________________________
C omm e r c ia l___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ---------------Street and highw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction----------------------------Cement m a s o n s __________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ---------------Street and highw ay__________________________
E le ctr icia n s______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------P ip efitte rs________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------P lu m b e r s _________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------R o ofers____________________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p erators-------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction___________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ---------------Street and h ighw ay---------------------------------------Other heavy construction----------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction-----------------------------




_
522
_
522
122
_
_
_
_
_

Average
hourly
earnings

$4.21
4.21
4.88
_
.
-

Number
of
w orkers

176
27
128

27
11
150
150

204
204
80
80

92
25
31
29
62
15
16
36
-

-

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 5 .75
6.32
5.72
5.5 8
3.95
7.00
7.00
6.23
6.23
4.6 5
4.6 5
-

3.80
3.17
4.35
3.52
3.46
3.65
4.05
2.76
-

74

72
43
38

Chicago

W ashingt'on

Miam i

Memphis

4.1 1
4 .0 8
3.21
3.19

Average
hourly
earnings

Number
of
w orkers

-

Number
of
workers

~

Number
of
w orkers

Number
of
w orkers

Average
hourly
earnings

1 ,6 6 7
844
716
2, 889
3 74
2, 205
961
120
606
4 76
334
108
148
148
1 ,3 8 2
882
431
71 ’
1, 033709
320

$7 .41
7.60
7.11
5 .2 7
5.44
5.2 8
5.18
5.1 8
5 .0 0
5.64
5.92
4 .9 0
7.06
7.06
5.3 6
5.65
4 .8 8
4 .5 7
4 .9 9
5.2 0
4 .5 2

82
82
171
-

5.7 5
5.43
5.71
5.4 4
4.9 3
5.00
4 .8 2
3.6 8
3.53
3.95

-

400
61
20
156
242
163
28
2 79
185
42

$ 8 .6 0
8.60
6.63
-

$ 2 .87
2.88
2.87
3.10
3.32
3.03

W e st4

Indianapolis

Average
hourly
earnings

Average
hourly
earnings

554
190
364
499
126
3 73

$ 2 .7 7
2. 72
2. 74
“

30
82
72

"

Dallas

Average
hourly
earnings

North C e n tr a l4

South— Continued

Number
of
w orkers

B iloxi 6

Number
of
w orkers

-

231
187
225
216
181

-

-

Average
hourly
earnings

Denve r
Numbe r
of
workers

Average
hourly
earnings

$ 5 .7 7
5.7 0
4.5 9
5.14
5.25

694
654
45
190
-

$4.81
4.73
6.41
5.68
"

-

141
-

5.50
-

(Number and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly e a rn in g s1 of w orkers paid rates not set by lab or-m anagem ent agreement in construction in du stries,
South— Continued
O ccupation3 and type
of construction

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C omm e r c i al__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Street and highw ay----------------------------------------Construction la b o r e r s --------------------- ---------------C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________
Street and highw ay___________________ —
Other heavy c o n str u c tio n --------------------E lectrician s 1 helper s_________ ________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esidential (less than 5 sto r ie s) ------------P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s ______________ _______ _____
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------- --------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------

Number
of
w orkers

-

_
1 ,2 6 0
_
605
338
211
-

Average
hourly
earnings

$2 .42
_
2.43
2.51
2.16
-

Number
of
workers

108
75
-

636
107
320
168
210

-

-

-

_
-

-

"

“

210
214
214

North Central 4— Continued
Chicago

W ashington

Miam i

Memphis

Average
hourly
earnings

$4 .1 4
4 .0 6
-

3.4 7
4 .4 9
3.41
2.81
4.1 3
-

4.1 3
3.23
3.23

Number
of
w orkers

1,0 3 6
657
343
831
68
689
-

9, 269
1 ,4 15
4 , 176
1 ,9 3 0
1, 128
316
-

150
393
265
113

Average
hourly
earnings

$3 .9 5
3.86
4.11
3.68
3.51
3.66
-

3.4 7
3.60
3.42
3.29
3.42
3.3 9

Number
of
w orkers

-

432
378
-

-

-

2.94
3.68
4.0 1
2.89

“

W est 4— Continued
Denver

Indianapolis

Average
hourly
earnings

-

-

$5.85
5.80
-

Number
of
w orkers

706
213
482
"

Average
hourly
earnings

$3 .7 4
3.5 6
3.8 0
-

Number
of
worke r s

158
158
135
550
413
215
108
-

Average
hourly
earnings

$4.41
4.41
4.16
3.41
3.37
3.31
3.48
-

“

1 See footnote 1, table 1.
2 See footnote 2 , table 1.
3 See footnote 3, table 1.
4 Occupational averages publishable for areas not shown separately in this table include:
Buffalo— 56 carpenters (all r esid en tia l-le s s than 5 stories) at $ 5 .0 3 ; Des M oines— 205 construction
Santa
lab orers at $ 3 .2 7 ; M inneapolis—St. Paul— 149 construction laborers at $ 5.46 (77 of these in heavy construction other than street and highway at $ 4 .6 8 ) ; and Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Kansas City; Portland, O re g .; St. Louis; and San
Ana^Garden G rove— 445 p lum bers at $ 7.3 5.
No publishable data are available for the nonunion sector in the following areas covered by the survey:
F ran cisco.
5 See footnote 4 , table 1.
6 See footnote 5, table 1.
NO TE :

Dashes indicate no data reported or data that do not meet publication c rite ria .




(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction in d u s tr ie s ,2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiv ing straight -time hourly earnings 5 / o f----

S
Num
ber
Avera ge
$
3 .2 0 3 .4 0
of
hourly
workers 4 / earnings 5/ Under and
$3.20 under

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

$

$

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

$
4 .2 0

$
4 .4 0

$
4 .6 0

$
4 .8 0

$
5 .0 0

$
5 .2 0

$
5 .4 0

$

$

$

$

$

$

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

$
6 .4 0

$

3 .8 0

$
4 .0 0

6 .6 0

7.00

7 .4 0

%
7 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

41
41

776

$
8 .2 0

and
over

JOURNE YM EN
$
7 .7 7
7 .8 0

1

187
2

2

^ *2 17

6 .1 2
6 .2 7
4 .9 5

2

2

r c u c l i r u A fj UPlo
L c n c i i 1 n t n k ir
r u u u c K r r a il
tn n n tn tia

853

6 .5 3

50

3

c i L c r T I K tlrb A AVMd
ti M C
C C v D
r nn H N
ai
b u M n ccin rL ii A L

1 *4 30

P I P t F 1 1 T C l>
r T r P r T T 1 F P 9)
r n M n cP t br r m il
b u n H ip t a

432
407

rn u u c n rt

1 *6 66

m u nuD C K o
rL i i d c o c

. ...

ai

UJnnCKU 1 At
n et c l U N 1 u uc c n
1 U nK
K

c
j

—

c
otodv i
1U K Y 1

————

6 .8 2

■—

r\n n r c o r . .
K U U rC K o
rn u u rn rfn
LU nM cKH A L

CUCCT U C TA I
L in O l/ C B C
j n u C 1 PIC 1 A C n U K A C K o
rn u u rn rtai
tU n n c K t 1AL
occ
n iK in r n c c r n n u i
l\ C o • \ U l i U t n j o 1 U K T 1
C T o u rm n ai
rn n k i
O l “ VIC 1 U K A L l KU m
r n M n c i N U i aa l
eun M F Pr r i

u n n i/ c n c
vVUKVVCKo

7 .5 7
7 .7 6

1

52

it

_

at

ll«
168

3

10

*

125
124

1 52

27

13

51

6 .7 0
3 .8 7

~

~

274
274

10
10

27
27

6

1

1

747

4

744

1200
11200

10

27

132
132

6 .8 0
6 .8 0

84

32

70

84

32

in
130

11
21

*

1

5

275
275

~

1

47

~

58

453

13

6
84
84

56

70

1

40

14

66

-

13
13

23

1

7 .3 4

4 .6 1

15
9

In

37

5 .3 9
5 .3 9

438
... ...

55
39

64

140

.

*

182

20

593

. . ..
.

*
”

39

8 .2 0
8 .2 3

538
....
...

10

107
107

3

3

274
274

EQUI PM EN T OP ER AT OR S
Q A Cr v . u n C U o C D A T n o c
D A IS n U c n r c K A 1
r Un M F P t a i
wn M n C K v *r I A L
O Tn c n
u i H FP

M FA V Y
n c M WT

e unv 1

m U L i U U l c d U D t nDA T U ltO . . . . . . .
D u L n n 7 CI> n r C A 1 n o c
c iac c
A kin niunivAT
o t d cc ti Anu u t t . u u a v . . .

TRIirKHR TWFR^
1A U v n U A 1 T C i> J
CTDCCT Anu UfCUUAV . . . . . . . . .
jt iv c c i Akin niunwAT
“

See footnotes at end of table,




214

4 .9 0

10

15

64

5 .8 3
4 .8 7

10

I

31

4 86
3 l4 5

7
2

t
4

80

3 .0 6

6 £*7

•

21

?o
19

10

21

33
_

10

6

3

3

1
12
30

.
3

21

1

58

f n

it
14
10

1

0

20

22
82

1
1

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction in d u str ie s,2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f—
Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Number
Average
of
hourly
workers 4 / earnings 5 /

$
j$
$
$
$
$
t
$
*
S
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60
$

t

$
S
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

Under and
$2.50 under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.80

4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
282
217

3.80
3.93

-

-

~

-

-

*

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS ------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ------------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------------------

6*386
4,512
774
504
596

3.54
3.76
3.63
2.35
2.76

879
245
61
7 350
8 223

763
605
64
61
33

150
62
58
16
14

401
145
36
35
185

82
44
2
20
16

22

CTftccT
o lK C C I

inn n i b n N A Y
Liiruiiiu

ANU

OTHER HE AV Y CONSTR.

1
2
3
4
5
and the
6
7
8

-----------------------

79
74

49
28

_

9

-

9

10
10

13
10
1

165
125
35

77
28
49

8
3
3

70
19
49

2

5

~

2

2

$

CARPENTERS* HELPERS -----------------------------CO M M E R C I A L -------------------------------------------

-

2
6
14

30
19
638
549
56
13
20

28
"

"

40
33

191
124
54

-

2
5

13

9
9
24
20
2
1
1

-

21
21

_

603
591
9

34 2206
14 1878
20
270

17
17

3

58

32
32

3
3

6
6

3

-

-

6
6
"

3

The Atlanta Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Clayton, Cobb, D eK alb, Fulton, and Gwinnett Counties.
F or the industrial scope of the su rve y, see appendix A .
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work force rather than a p recise m easure of em ployment.
Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, h olidays, and late sh ifts.
Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union headquarters
construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
W orkers were distributed as follow s: 8 at $ 2 to $ 2 .2 0 ; 8 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .4 0 ; 8 at $ 2 .4 0 to $ 2 .6 0 ; 6 at $ 2 .6 0 to $ 2 .8 0 ; and 37 at $ 3 to $ 3 .2 0 .
W orkers w ere distributed as follow s: 7 at $ 1 .8 0 to $ 1 .9 0 ; 84 at $ 2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; 48 at $ 2 .1 0 to $ 2 .2 0 ; 117 at $ 2 . 2 0 to $ 2 .3 0 ; 47 at $ 2 .3 0 to $ 2 .4 0 ; and 47 at $ 2 . 4 0 to $ 2 .5 0 .
W ork ers were distributed as fo llo w s: 51 at $ 2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; 36 at $ 2 .1 0 to $ 2 . 2 0 ; 109 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .3 0 ; 12 at $ 2 . 3 0 to $ 2 .4 0 ; and 15 at $ 2 .4 0 to $ 2 .5 0 .







Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings 5/ of$
$
$
t
%
%
$
$
1
$
i
(
$
$
5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20
and
and
under
8.00 8.20 over
5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80

Number
of
workers 4/

Avera ge
hourly
earnings 5/

BR IC KL AY ER S ------------CO MM E R C I A L ----------

443
187

$
7.80
7.80

CARP EN TE RS -------------C O M M ER CI AL ----------

767
695

7.40
7.40

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

766
694

CEMENT MASONS ---------C O M M ER CI AL ----------

747
744

6.95
6.95

-

-

-

-

-

_

747
744

-

-

-

“

"

ELECTR IC IA NS ----------C O MM ER CI AL ----------

1,272
1,258

8.67
8.70

14

PI PEFITTERS ------------CO MM E R C I A L ----------

407
407

7.76
7.76

-

RO OFERS -----------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

84
84

5.65
5.65

84
84

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
CO MM E R C I A L ----------

274
274

6.80
6.80

-

59
37

7.03
7.05

Occupation 3/ and type
of construction

_

JOURNEYMEN
443
187

-

-

”

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

~

1200
1200
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

-

-

58
58

-

“

264
264

11
11

-

-

132
132

-

~

274
274

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK -H OE OPERATORS
CO MM ER CI AL ----

1
1

58
36
$
$
S
$
$
%
t
$
$
$
$
t
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.30 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20

S
$
$
4.40 4.60 4.80

Under and
$2.50 under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40

4.60 4.80 5.00

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS
CO MM E R C I A L --------

2/

3/
4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

footnote
footnote
footnote
footnote
footnote

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

2,401
2,039

table
table
table
table
table

4.

4.
4.
4.
4.

4.44
4.44

97
97

24
24

11
11

26
5

9
8

12

2205
1877

17
17

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction 1 du stries, 2 September 1972)
in

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Number
Avera ge
hour ly
of
workers 4 / earnings 5 /

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / of —
$
i
%
$
1
%
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
%
$
I
4
2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 < .60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

$
$
$
$
$
5.80 6.20 6.60 7.00 7.40

Under! and
$2.40 j
under

4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.80
2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 -

6.20 6.60 7.00 7.40 7.80

JOUR NE YM EN
899
177

4.40

CEMENT MASONS -------------------------

106

3.61

SH EE T- ME TA L WORKERS -----------------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

483

_

$
5.03

3.91
3.87

CA RP EN TE RS ---------------------------RES.

(UNDER 5 S T O R Y l --------------

.

2

2

4

39

_

-

2

2

4

39

-

26

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

-

_

_

74
22
52

15
15

99
94
5

23
23

27
27

41
41

10
10

-

4

*

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

"

-

182
130
52

125
124

71
58
13

1

3

4

4

-

10

27

-

-

3

51
51

70
70

84
84

32
32

150
130

12
2

32
21

51
47

1
1

15

_

15
9
6

170
168
2

6
3

33

-

14
14

21

10
10

23
10
12

-

30

-

10

EQ UI PM EN T OP ER AT OR S

_

PA CK— HOE OPERATORS ____ ____
CO MM E R C I A L ------------------------OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. --------------

83

4.17
4.30

B U LL DO ZE R OP ERATORS -----------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y — — --------—

139
31

3.85
3.45

-

T R U C K D R I V E R S ----- --------------------

43

2.97

6 16

_ 1 10
*

—

10

-

-

~

-

-

5
2

4
4

39
19

55
6

3

8

! 6

-

-

-

-

3

-

21

10

*

3

1

21

1

20

~

'

-

i
$
$
$
$
%
$
%
$
$
%
*
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

$
i
$
S
(
$
$
$
$
3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

Under and
$2.50 under

i

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.80

4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
CA RPENTERS* HE LP ER S -----------------CO MM E R C I A L -------------------------

282
217

CO N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS --------------C O MM ER CI AL ------------------------RES. (UNOER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. --------------

3,985
2,473
504
482
526

3.00
3.21
3.11
2.33
2.55

_

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

§J
V

See footnote 1, table 4.
See footnote 2, table 4.
See footnote 3, table 4.
See footnote 4 , table 4.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and ha:
8
Workers were distributed as follow s:
Workers were distributed as follow s: 7




7 782
148
61
350
223

739
581
64
61
33

_

*

3.80
3.93

-

-

-

30
19

139
51
58
16
14

375
140
36
14
185

73
36
2
19
16

10
2
6
2

638
549
56
13
20

"
40
33

-

28
-

9
9

191
124
54

24
20
2
1
1

2

-

5

13

79
74

49
28

13
10
1

165
125
35

77
28
49

2

5

“

9
9

10
10

32
32

21
21

8
3
3

70
19
49

603
591
9

34
14
20

-

2

2

3

~

i work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s h ifts .
52.20; and 8 at $2 .2 0 -$ 2 .4 0 .
1 a+ <to. on-<to.

59 at $ 2 .30 -S 2.40 ; and 108 at $ 2 .4 0 -$ 2 .5 0 .

1
1

_
_
-

3
3

6
6

3
3

-

_
-

”

~

'

'

-

-

-

6
6

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings _5/ o f----

s

i

3.4 0

3 .6 0

t

$

$

$

s

3

t

$

$

5.00 5.20 5.40

$

$

$

$

*

$

$

&

$
7.40

5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20

1

20 under

JO UR NE YM EN

$

3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80
|

3.20 3.40

i

O
o

(

Average
hourly
earnings 5/

*

Num
ber
of
workers 4 /

00
o

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

4 .2 0

BR IC KL AY ER S ---------------------------

30

$5.2 3

1

_

1

6

CARP EN TE RS ---------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ---------------- •
-------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------------

184
96
73

5.19
6.09
4.37

_

32

_

32

-

18

CE ME NT MASONS ------------------------C O M M E R C I A L -------------------------

36
27

5.11
5.64

3

-

4

EL EC TR I C I A N S -------------------------CO MM E R C I A L -------------------------

209
171

6.05
6.32

-

-

4

~

~

4

PLUMBERS ------------------------------CO M M E R C I A L -------------------------

102
90

4.50
4.62

4

2

~

S H E E T- ME TA L WORKERS ----------------CO M M E R C I A L -------------------------

42
42

5.88
5.88

-

BA CK -H OE OP ERATORS ------------------CO MM E R C I A L -------------------------

20
12

5.07
5.97

BU LL DO ZE R OPER AT OR S ----------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y ---------------

26
12

4.69
3.42

T R UC KD RI VE RS -------------------------ST REET AND HIGHWAY ---------------

35
32

4 .6 0

4..8 0

5 .0 0

5.2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .8 0

8

_

-

-

_

7,.2 0

6 .4 0

_

_

_

_

6

96

_

4

-

_

_

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

6 .6 0

16

_

_

7 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .0 0

6

1

4 .4 0

5

6

86

5

-

10

_

15

-

-

32

-

-

_

_

2

_

-

12

8

_

4

12

8

-

4

6

16

35

13

_

_

*

4

14

35

13

-

-

-

12

4

8

12

4

7 .4 0

10

-

_

_

-

_

2

_

_

5

“

“

_

_

~

5

"

“

_

_

132

_

_

-

_

_

19

-

_

-

-

-

2

-

2

_

-

-

-

19

-

"

~

“

_

_

_

_

18

_

15

-

-

-

11

-

132

_

~

-

-

_

10
36

-

_

_

“

8

8

7 .8 0

11

18

EQUI PM EN T OPER AT OR S
1

~

3

2

6

3

2

_

6

32

-

4

_

_

_

6

_

_

1

-

_

HE LP ER S ----------

EL ECTRICIANS'

HELPERS

PLUMBERS* HELPERS
C O M M E R C I A L ----

1

_

-

_

_

3

_

3

_

_

-

_

5

-

-

5

-

_

-

_

1
2

Number
,
of
workers 4 /

$

$
2 .7 0

10

20

$
3 . 30

$

3 .0 0

$
3.

$

80

$
3.

$

2.

$
2 .9 0

$

2 .6 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

%
4 .0 0

4 .2 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2.

90

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3.

20

3 . 30

3 . 40

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

■*
P

CARPENTERS*

_

*

32

4 .2 0

' over

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

»

18

_

-

_

108

17
14
-

_

3

_

$

$

Average
Under and
hourly
$2.50 under
earnings 5 /
2 .6 0

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS —
CO M M E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 ST0RY)ST RE ET AND HI GH WA Y —
OTHE R HE A V Y CONSTR. -

-

*

_

_

_
$
2 .5 0

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS

5

3

6

_

2

"

14

$ 2 .6 8

6

1

-

2

-

-

622

2 .8 0
3 .8 6
2 .5 3
2 .2 6

7201

85
71

109

17

_

_

102

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

7

-

“

13
4

-

4

~

-

6
8
22

165
196
215
46

2 .6 3

17
168
16

$

and

1
36
-

30

2 .7 7

-

14

-

-

-

-

2 .7 2
2 .7 4

6

23
23

4
4

29
27

-

_

~

”

14
14

-

-

-

20
20

17

_

108

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

5

_

-

1

_

-

_

4

_

2

_

_

16

82
72

o
o

2.58
2.34

3

“

4

-

6
6

_
~

1 The B iloxi—
Gulfport and P ascagoula area consists of H arrison , Jackson, and P earl River Counties.
2 F o r the industrial scope of the su rvey, see appendix A.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work force rather than a p recise m easure of em ployment.
5 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, h olid ays, and late sh ifts.
Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union headquarters
and the construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 W ork ers were distributed as follow s:
20 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 . 4 0 ; 9 at $ 2 .4 0 to $ 2 .6 0 ; and 3 at $ 2 . 6 0 to $ 2 .8 0 .
7 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 1 at $ 1 .7 0 to $ 1 .8 0 ; 86 at $ 2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; 67 at $ 2 . 1 0 to $ 2 .2 0 ; 46 at $ 2 . 2 0 to $ 2 . 3 0 ; and 1 at $ 2 .3 0 to $ 2 ,4 0 .







(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations, construction industries , 2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / of —
Number
of
workers 4 /

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

$
$
$
%
S
$
S
$
S
%
$
*
4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00

$
7.20

and
under

and

5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20

over

JO UR NE YM EN
CA RP EN TE RS ---------------------------------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ------------------------------- •
------------

96
81

$
6.08
6.10

CEMENT MASONS --------------------------------------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------------------------------------------

17
17

6.02
6.02

143

9

6.55

_

6* 76

fcLcL 1K1L1 AIN
o
rniiucDr i ai
LUWMfcKL1AL

_

5

_

_

'

_

6
6

81
71

15
15

-

'

36

—

_

-

-

2
2

4
4

_

_

“

_

~

“

*"

-

-

-

-

-

11
11

132

EQ UIPMENT OPERATORS
BU LL DO ZE R OP ERATORS --------------------------------

Number
of
workers 4 /

5

3

X

$
$
$
(
$
$
S
3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10
Average
hourly
and
and
~
earnings 5/ under
“

—

3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10

over

H E LP ER S AND LABORERS
$

CO NS T R U C T I O N LABORERS ---------------------------CO MM E R C I A L ----------------------------------------------

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

f o o t n o t e 1,
f o o t n o t e 2,
f o o t n o t e 3,
footn ote 4,
f o o t n o t e 5,

table
table
table
table
table

7.
7.
7.
7.
7.

123
123

3.92
3.92

9
9

_

10
10

98
98

2
2

4
4




(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations, construction in d u str ie s,2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving s traight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f—
Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Number
Average
of
hour ly
workers 4 / earnings 5/

S

$
i
$
%
%
$
%
%
$
$
$
S
2 . 2 0 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60

$
$
4.80 5.00

C A RP EN TE RS ------------------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST OR Y) -----------------------

and

2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80
JOURNEYMEN

and
under

over

58

$
4.23
3.96

-

88

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

32
18

“

-

8
8

-

-

615
*
*

”

2

-

4

-

-

-

-

2

-

10

-

4

-

-

12

8

-

4

-

2

2

2

6

16
14

-

13
13

-

-

-

“

35
35

-

"

~

7
5

1

-

2

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

-

-

~

"

”

“

“

19

4.29

-

30

4.15

-

PLUMBERS ----------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ----------- ------------

83
71

3.99
4.05

_

BA CK-HOE OPERATORS -----------------

12

3.98

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

BU LL DO ZE R OPERATORS ---------------STREET AND HIGHWAY -------------

17

3.71
3.25

_

_

3
3

_

-

2
2

6
6

1

-

-

32
32

-

CE MENT MASONS -----------------------------------------EL EC TR IC IA NS --------------------------------------------

-

-

*

5.00

_

2

4

~

~

-

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

11

*

~

_ ,,

t d iiri/no twcftp

2 34

STREET AND H I G H W A Y --------— ------ ------

20
(

$

$

$

%

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60
Under and
$2.50 under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60

HELPERS AND LABORERS
CARPENTERS* HELPERS -----------------------------

14

2 .6 8

76

1

-

2

8201

85

109

17

17
168
16

71

102

-

10

7

13
4

14

-

-

6

23
23

4
4

29
27

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS ------------------------C O M M ER CI AL — — — — — — —
RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) ----------------------STREET AND HIGHWAY ------------------------OTHE R HEAVY CONSTR. -----------------------

499
42
196
215
46

2.52
3.69
2.53
2.26
2.63

ELECTRICIANS* HELPERS -------------------------

30

2.77

PLUMBERS* HELPERS ---------------------------------commercial

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/
7/
8/
j)/

------------------------------------------

and

“

82
72

2.72
2.74

4

-

over

-

1

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

-

5

-

20
20

9

-

-

-

-

5

“
~

I
17'
9 14
I_

“

1

3

~

6
8
22

-

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14
14

-

4
4

-

-

2

-

-

-

See fo o t n o t e 1, ta b le 7.
See fo o t n o t e 2, ta b le 7.
See fo o t n o t e 3, ta b le 7.
See fo o t n o t e 4 , ta b le 7.
Excludes premium pay fo r overtime and hazardous work and f o r work on weekends, h o lid a y s , and la t e s h i f t s .
A ll workers were a t $ 6 -$6 .20
A ll workers were at $ 2 .2 0 -$ 2 .3 0 .
Workers were d is t r ib u t e d as fo llo w s :
1 a t $ 1.70 to $ 1 .8 0 ; 86 a t $ 2 -$ 2 .1 0 ; 67 a t $ 2 .1 0 -$ 2 .2 0 ; 46 at $ 2 .2 0 -$ 2 .3 0 ; and 1 a t $ 2 .3 0 -$ 2 .4 0 ,
Workers were d is t r ib u t e d as fo llo w s :
10 at $ 4 -$ 4 .1 0 ; 2 a t $ 4 .2 0 -$ 4 .3 0 ; and 2 a t $ 4 .4 0 -$ 4 .5 0 .

g

(Number and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f w o r k e r s i n s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s ,

Number
of
worke rs 4 /

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of co n s tr u ctio n

c o n s t r u c t i o n : in d u strie s, 2 September 1 972)

i
1
T
“ i
1
A ve r ag e
5 .0 0 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 .8 0
hour ly
e a r n i n g s 5 / Under
and
$ 5 . 0 0 under
5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

e
Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y < a r n i n g s 5 / o f ----5
*
$
*
*
$
$
t
i
i
T
7 .4 0 7 .6 0 7 .8 0 8 .0 0
6 .0 0 6 .2 0 6 .4 0 6 .6 0 6 .8 0 7 .0 0 7 .2 0

6 .2 0

6.4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7.0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

i

1
1
8 .6 0 8 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .4 0

8 .6 0

8 .8 0

40

75

566

1 ;T3
84

1463

10
10

12
12

1
9 .0 0

1
9 .4 0

9 .4 0

o v er

20

i 90
1o n

7.8 0

8 .4 0

150
150

7 .6 0

8 .2 0

8 .0 0

9 .0 0

JOURNEYMEN
$
1,1 4 1
1 , 121

n"n*
0.0G

n^

2 423
1,9 6 4
OTHER HEAVY

CONSTR.

---------------------------

r c u r M u A c UFNo
L c n c ru r “ Mo n u r
rU H u t K L v1 Ai L —
.................
l n u nrn r a

fl nn

100

6 ^0
8 . 14

7 10
27n
34

42

34
-

/ ->
-

1-9

21

20
7*;
75

tij
52

~
20

21

21

“

P I P E F I T T E R S -----------------------------------------------------r HHHPnrT A t
\>U"r»C i\v 1 A 1
*
"

377

8 .0 8

712

20

98

8*70

9
n
2 , 1i 1i 0

—

9 .1 2
9 « 12

r LUrl Dt Ko
^ n Hnf n r r a i
L Uu u cc K t l A L
DEC# r 1tAin CD 5 o TOOV \
K to
\UNUcH K C 1 UKT #

660
660
770
728

f T n i i r T1iUKAL 1 KUN li n o 1 c n c
tAAi
T n n n HUKACIti
/
0 1 KUU
r nuu
Lu n nt c n r r1 AL
Kv # a i

684
684

-

-

-

635
635

~

7* 8 9

-

66
66

10
10

60
60

494
224
270

7*96

— ——
—

equ ipm en t

niii 1 n m c n Urf cKAI n n c
o U L L U U t r K n n c o A T UrO
r n M Mc K rt 1 a l
t u n n F o TAI

—

OTHER HEAVY C O N S T R .

20
20

94
10
84

145

20
20

20
20

20
20

10
10

21

105

21
657
657

80

20

40

“

3
3

42

588
588

684

267
- m—- — . . . . . . . .

26

——

—

---------------------------

table.

1 2D
I OR
88
27

26

7 .5 3

4

6 .0 8

20

4

7 .9 6

337
54

—— —

185

4

18

79

26

26

I ti
7.7 2

4

18

s

161

Cu n i o T D *
t HKIC I in

See f o o t n o t e s a t end o f




10
10

operators

0 A t N n n c U r C n M 1U^ o
D A C v _uu L DOPDATHDC
tU n n tK U 1a l
n 1 nfcK n t AV T rnucTD
U r u c o u c a \iw v Ur io l tt«

TDI I I D T VCAo
P fn
1 KUvI' UKI UCOC
nrUCD U c A V T
uinCK nC A U V

8*23
8.3 2

*
238
231

1768
1768
77
77

8.0 0

CMCCT- n t l A L m UKACI'O
o n C C I MPTAI UflDkPfiC
r UPIu r Kt 1 AL
.
t n u nC n r r a i

124
124

40
40

1 AC
1UD

40

480

n n u rc t Fvo
K u n r dc
rHMMFRrT M t
t u n n c i t t i AI

i 57
1

96
96

126

2
81

r-t r r r n r r f
C L u L 1 K i L i ANo
r u n n c o ri 1 AL
t nuy tK tai

^

126

4
-

-

£

-

10

~

4

-

4-7

256

4

42
-

-

-

29
~

-

'

-

46

19

-

-

-

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - time h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 /
$
2 .5 0

%

3 .00

3 .2 0

3.6 0

3 .8 0

i
3.8 0

i

$
3 .6 0

*|

2 .6 0

$
3.40

S
4 .20

$

t

of —

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 . 60

i
4 .8 0

$
5 .0 0

$
5 .2 0

$
5 .40

S
5 .6 0

$
5 .8 0

$
6 .0 0

$
6 .2 0

%

i

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

1 ----6 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5.4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6.2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

4
4

$
4 .0 0

o
co

2 .8 0

and
u nder

S
3.2 0

"

-

-

-

-

176
176

4
4

8
8

_

2
2

90
90

10

78

-

-

1

S
3.0 0

o
o

2 .6 0

$
2 .8 0

1

A ver ag e
hourly
earn ings 5/

*
O

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of construction

Number
of
orker s 4 /

HELPERS AND LA BO RE RS
BR ICKLAYERS* HELPERS —
CO M M E R C I A L ----------

180
180

6 .4 7
6 .4 7

CARPENTERS* HELPERS --CO MM E R C I A L ----------

17 7
33

3.66
5.26

_

17

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS CO M M E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HE AV Y CONSTR.

5 ,8 4 3
3,6 5 2
279
801
899

6 .1 4
6.41
5.05
5 .9 9
5.8 3

_

_

-

-

147

3.2 4

PLUMBERS' HELPERS ------1
1
2
3

and

5
th e

-

17

51

38

21

_

7
7

_

22

55

_

_

-

-

-

10
10

-

-

10
10

22

55

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

4
4

211
4
63

126
24

54
4

-

-

102
60

-

-

21

11

-

-

-

22

50

2
2

-

-

10

-

-

78

_

_

4
-

408
50

934
32

-

-

-

4

235
123

566
336

_

6
6

3600
3393
129

23
3
-

-

10

20

82

-

94

-

-

126
32
-

-

_

82

33

T h e B o s t o n a r e a f o r p u r p o s e s o f t h i s t a b u l a t i o n c o n s i s t s o f S u f f o l k C o u n t y , 15 c o m m u n i t i e s in E s s e x C o u n t y , 30 in M i d d l e s e x C o u n t y , 2 0 in N o r f o l k C o u n t y , a n d 9 in P l y m o u t h C o u n t y .
F o r the i n d u s t r i a l s c o p e o f the s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d ix A .
O v e r a l l o c c u p a t i o n m a y i n c l u d e d a t a f o r w o r k e r s in t y p e ( s ) o f c o n s t r u c t i o n in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
E s t i m a t e s o f the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e in te nd ed as a g e n e r a l g u i d e to the s i z e and c o m p o s i t i o n o f the w o r k f o r c e r a t h e r than a p r e c i s e m e a s u r e o f e m p l o y m e n t .
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s w o r k and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la t e s h i f t s .
Z o n e r a t e s ( u s u a l l y b a s e d on d i s t a n c e b e t w e e n l o c a l u nio n h e a d q u a r t e r s
c o n s t r u c t i o n s i t e ) a r e i n c l u d e d in s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e s f o r p u r p o s e s o f t h i s s u r v e y .




Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h ou rly earnings _5/ o f ---Number
of
workers 4 /

O ccupation 3/ and type
o f c o n s tru c tio n

1 ------- 1 ------- S
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20

Average
h ourly
earnings 5 /

Under and
$ 7.20 under

7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40
JOURNEYMEN
$

BRICKLAYERS ------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

871
851

8.33
8.32

CA RPENTERS -------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------OTHE R HE AV Y CONSTR.

2,156
1,960
98

8.09
8.09
8.20

CEMENT MASONS ---------C O MM ER CI AL ----------

404
377

8.63
8.70

EL ECTRICIANS -----------C O MM ER CI AL ----------

1,808
1,808

PI PEFITTERS ------------C O MM ER CI AL ----------

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

95

_

52

75

-

52

-

_

20

~

-

-

8.58
8.58

~

~

-

712
712

9.12
9.12

_

-

PLUMBERS ---------------C O M M E R C I A L ----------

494
224

9.35
9.35

ROOFERS -----------------C O M M ER CI AL ----------

660
660

8.00
8.00

SH EE T- ME TA L WORKERS --C O MM ER CI AL ----------

588
588

8.73
8.73

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
C O M M ER CI AL ----------

684
684

7.89
7.89

BACK-HOE OPERATORS
CO MM ER CI AL ------

185
88

8.71
8.71

BU LLDOZER OPERATORS
COMMER CI AL ------

117
88

8.16
8.02

-

96

-

"

“

“

"

40

566

_

190

103

1620

-

96

-

190

84

1463

-

-

20

98

“

_

-

-

566

75

10

12

-

10

12

_

40

_

-

_

~

-

75

40

_

_

-

40

-

-

'

150
150

40

-

_

124
124

_

_

2 38

-

-

231

“

“

1768

_

-

-

1768

_

-

-

-

“

-

77

_

_

_

_

_

635

77

-

-

-

-

**

-

635
494
224

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

3

657

-

657

3

-

-

-

-

“

~

~

_

_

-

588

-

-

-

588

-

-

-

_

-

684

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

684

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

_

185
88

46
46
“
"
S
$
»
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
S
(
%
$
(
4.10 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80

-

and
under

42
42

_

_

-

-

_

-

_

~

-

29
"

C
O

o

4.20 4.40 4.60

5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00

HELPERS AND LABORERS
180
180

BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS CO MM ER CI AL ---------

6.47
6.47

CARPENTERS* HELPERS -CO MM ER CI AL ---------

25
25

5.29
5.29

C O N S TR UC TI ON LABORERS
CO MM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

4,883
3,460
801
541

6.36
6.49
5.99
6.12

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

ta b le
ta b le
ta ble
ta b le
ta b le




10.
10.
10.
10.
10.

7
7
_

-

_

-

4
4

_

_

2
2

_

4
4
_

-

4
4
10

_

“

“

-

6
6

32 3464
32 3393
-

3
3
-

82

-

2
2

_
"

-

_

358

934
32
566
336

235
123

176
176
~

-

-

-

-

82

(Number and a v e r a g e

s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f w or k e r s i n s e l e c t e d

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of c o n s t r u c t i o n

Number
of
w or k e r s 4 /

occupations,

construction

in d u strie s,2 Septem ber

19 72 )

$
$
$
$
$
$
X
X
(
%
$
$
4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60

Aver ag e
hourly
earnings 5 /

5/ of —
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.20 8.60

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s

$

and
under

4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80

7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.20 8.60 9.00

JO UR NE YM EN

$

CA RP EN TE RS ---------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------ei.er-rnT/'TAMC
t l x l 1K 1U 1 Mlii
Z *
rn u u c n r t ai
uunntivwiAL

_.

267
261
302
302

PL UM BE RS ------------------------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------------nrc
t UINUCK c O 1UKT 1
it tc
Kl
li ir rn D PTnnwt

_

6. 46
6.46
5.07
5.07

496
286
210

20
20

7.11
7.52
6.55

-

17
17

17
17

_

19
17

21
21

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

"

-

40
40

137
137
-

42
42

21
21

4

.

'

'

10
10

-

126
126

~

”

66
66

70
70

105
10
10

20
20

-

-

-

94
10

145
40
IU3

i
---- 1
%
$
1 ---- I —
1 ---- “J---- - ---- 1 ---- ~
$
$
$
S
2.50 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80

20
20

20
20

20
20

-

21
_

21

s
$
$
$
$
t
»
$
$
5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60

and
under

2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00

5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS -------------------------CO M M E R C I A L ------------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------- --— — —
OTHE R HEAV Y C O N S T R . ------------------------

960
192
266

----------------------------------

147

PLUMBERS'
1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

HELPERS

5.04
5.00
5.03
3.24

_

”
60

_

-

-

55

22

55

21

See f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 1 0.
See f o o t n o t e 2 , t a b l e 10.
See f o o t n o t e 3 , t a b l e 10.
See f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 10.
E x c l u d e s premium pay f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s wor k and f o r wor k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s ,




_

10
10

11

and l a t e

-

10
10

4

54
50

4

_

90
90

_

78

63
22

shifts.

211

126
24
102

22

33

78

4

50
50

_
-

94

*

94

136

-

20

"

20

O ccupation 3 / and type
o f co n s tru c tio n

Number
of
workers 4 /

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

Number of workers i
receiving straight- time hourly earnings 5 / of—
$
%
$
S
$
$
S
$
t
S
$

7.60 7. 80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60
Under and
$7.60 under

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.80 8. 00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60 9.80
JOURNEYMEN
$
-

BRICKLAYERS ------------COMM ER CI AL ----------

247
238

8.66
8.65

-

CARPENTERS -------------COMMER CI AL ---------RES- CUNDER 5 STORY)
OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR.

629
499
56
42

7.83
8.09
5.03
8.34

CEMENT MASONS ---------CO MM ER CI AL -----------

263
228

8.89
9.05

10
-

EL EC TR IC IA NS -----------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

872
872

PI PE FI TT ER S ------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

174
174

9.30
9.30

PLUMBERS ----------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

770
604
142

9.14
9.30
8.46

34

_

-

-

SH EET-METAL WORKERS --CO MM ER CI AL ----------

371
371

8.50
8.50

_

_

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
CO MM ER CI AL ----------

408
336

8.71
8.71

_

_

BACK-HOE OPERATORS --CO MM ER CI AL --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

140
29
66

8.58
8.60
8.59

-

-

BU LLDOZER OPERATORS —
CO MM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY

80
21
58

6.26
8.47
5.41

6 32
32

_
-

_
-

13
3
10

_
-

TR UCKDRIVERS ---------COMM ER CI AL ---------

99
71

7.36
7.22

7 27
27

68
44

_

4

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

"

239
217

_

_

_

-

-

9.71
9.71

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56

_

_

-

-

119
90

10

-

444
409

-

3

29

10

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

14
11

-

223
223

22
15

2

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

56
~
_

-

-

872
872
_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
*

_
-

364
364

7
7

_

-

"

-

_

_

_

_

408
336

_

6

_

34

-

-

11
2
9

123
27
57

-

10
9
-

25
9
16

-

_

_

_

-

_

*

-

17
11
6

_

_

_

174
174

_

_

-

-

719
593
102

_

_

-

-

"

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_
-

_

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

Number

of
wor kers 4 /

-

-

-

-

average
hou rly
earnings 5/

Under

-

-

-

_
'

_

_

_

_

_

%
$
$
$
$
$
6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70
and

$6.20 under

6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70 6.80
HELPERS AND LABORERS
$
7C
.

CARPENTERS* HELPERS —
C O NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS
CO MM ER CI AL --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

1, 173
715
99

20

16

A .Ifl
6 •^
6*!5 0

49
11

986
599
66

_
_

_
_

_
_

10
10

128
105
23

1 The Buffalo Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of E rie and Niagara C ou n ties.
2 For the industrial scope of the su rvey, see appendix A .
3 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work force rather than a precise
m easure of em ployment.
Zone rates (usually based
5 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, h olidays, and late sh ifts.
on distance between local union headquarters and the construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 A ll w orkers were at $ 3 to $ 3. 20.
7 A ll w orkers were at $ 6 .4 0 tc $ 6 .6 0 .




—
$
S
t
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y 5 / e a r n i n g s o f
O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of co n stru ctio n

Number
of
workers 4 /

A ve r a g e
hourly
earnin g s 5 /

and
Under
$ 7 . 6 0 under

7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60 9.80
JOURNEYMEN

UNION SITUATIONS

$
8.66
8.65

_

-

BRICKLAYERS -----------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

238

CA RPENTERS — ---------COMM ER CI AL ---------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

499
42

8.11
8.09
8.34

CEMENT MASONS ---------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

253
228

9.04
9.05

ELECTRICIANS -----------COMM ER CI AL ----------

872
872

PIPEFITTERS ------------COMM ER CI AL ----------

174
174

9.30
9.30

_

PLUMBERS ---------------COMM ER CI AL ----------

760
604

9.20
9.30

24

SHEET-METAL WORKERS --COMM ER CI AL ----------

371
371

8.50
8.50

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
COMMER CI AL ----------

408
336

8.71
8.71

BACK-HOE OPERATORS --CO MM ER CI AL --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

134
29
66

8.59
8.60
8.59

BU LL DO ZE R OPERATORS —
COMM ER CI AL ---------

38
21

8.53
8.47

_

TR UC KD RI VE RS -----------

63

7.19

62 7

_

_

_

_

9.71
9.71

247

573

_

-

-

-

444
409
3

-

22
15

10
10

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

239
217

_

-

14
11

_

-

119
90
29

-

2

-

223
223

-

-

872
872

_

_

_

-

-

-

17
11

_

_

_

-

-

174
174

_

719
593

_

_

_

-

_

-

_

-

*

-

_

_

_

-

_

7
7

-

~

-

-

364
364

_

_

_

_

_

_

408
336

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

11
2
9

123
27
57

_

3
3

10
9

25
9

-

"

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

36

Number
of
workers 4 /

A v e r ag e
h ou r l y
ear n in g s 5 /

S
t
t
$
$
$
6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70
and
u nder

~

6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70 6.80
UNION SITUATIONS

HELPERS AND LABORERS
C O NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS
COMMER CI AL --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

1.124
704
99

$
6.43
6.45
6.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

986
599
66

-

10

10

128
105
23

t
*
$
$
$
$
4. 40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40
and
under

_

-

-

-

4. 60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60
NONUNION SITUATIONS

JOURNE YM EN
CARPENTERS -------------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/

See
See
See
See
See
A ll

footnote 1, table 13.
footnote 2, table 13.
footnote 3, table 13.
footnote 4, table 13.
footnote 5, table 13.
workers were at $6.40




56
56

5.03
5.03

12
12

28
28

4
4

12
12

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction in d u str ie s,2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5.f o f Number
of
workers 4 /

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Average
hourly
earnings 5/

S
s
t
i
t
i
S
1
$
i
i
s
%
S
t
1
i
t
t
%
5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.80
$

Under and
$5.60 under

and

5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00

8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.80

over

JO UR NE YM EN
:
8
uinci\ ncMV t uuno ii •
s

""

1-

"1 "
™

74
53

8.32
8.31

10 9
lo2
19 9
13 f

7793
44 3217

39

3637

182

8.33
8.22
8.36

1,982
1,142
110
346
360
24

8 88
8.90
8.91
8.83
8.89
8.57

(UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------------

5,671
4,425
478
768

8.98
9.04
8.77
8.76

EL EV AT OR CO NS TR U C T O R S ---------------

258

8.75

258

2,813
2,644

8.98
8.99

54
35

9Q9
111

14

EL EC TR IC IA NS -------------------------RES.

DT rcr A 1 1CI\o
r 1 DPP TTTPDC
r DMMPDr Ia l
uu nn cK L i A1

3,302
PL UM BE RS ------------------------------------------- 8.69
rn
uurnr i
ta
1,524
8.76
V/UnntKU 1 A L
1,598
8.64
RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ------------------a uur t
f\r\r\c corn o
r nu rrn a
u
T •
r

vUnfltnv iAL
D pJ* lUltUClV A O T UKT I1
IIIMOPD 3 C 1H D V
Kt C

—

—

—

Purr
t
u t ta i
i.ifioi/coc
1 nt 1 AL nUiVhCit O
r riMMCDrAf Ai
LunntKL, AL
prc lllM
nPD
^
TflQ
KC J* |UrMUCK j5o 1
UI\T fYl
PTfinrm aa tnrui i.in i/co
n
n
C
O K UL 1UK AL 1 KUIN n U K ^ C “0
1
rnuurnrr i
a

vUnrltKL 1 AL
nrc M
ikin
co c crnov)
HtO* 1UINUuK D O 1UKT 1

1,173
801
312

6

i ft
18

In
20

ZO

42

-

-

21

-

42

-

21

-

-

-

-

-

42

-

-

21

-

42

-

21

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

28

-

-

10

-

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
1A
1U

1,348
1,239
34

1
14
9
£

05

_

*

z

64

1 *

69
69
-

!
:

7

6
l

2

5 4027
1
3254
4 182

250
175

271
86

381
249

75

185

132

~

-

-

2510
2A2 0

83
83

2
1

-

59 2854

74

204

15

-

-

55 1307

28

8.54
8.56

10

15

542
254

-

-

9
12

1AK
-

20

4

~

15
12

20

1f
t
io

166

30

105

15

-

-

8.62
8.62
8.60

2,281
1,671
583

*
2

Aft
168

218
140

8,468
3,611
739
3,888

22

:
165
4

9*07

1129
757
A0
A0
156

44
44

A0
A0

1534
387
141

9* 31
9« 26

EQ UIPMENT OP ER AT OR S
743
BACK-HOE OPERATORS —-—----------—-—
301
C O MM ER CI AL
n r P /IIM C
D D C Cm
R S • (UliUtK 5 j 1
k
UKY Iow 1
P Keel T A A T/ _ J L A \
fJPC ANU in | L J
*i
/
88
S iT
nlurlWAY
OTHE R HEAVY CONSTR. ------------------------ 258
BU LL DO ZE R O P E R A T O R S - - - ----------- ---- -—
- - C O M M E R C I A L --------------------- — ■
— ----------------STREET AND HIGHWAY ---------------------------OTHE R HEAVY CONSTR. -------- —
---------------

241
122
251

5.98
5.99
6.46
5.83
5.97

T R U C K D R I V E R S -------------------------------- —
COMM ER CI AL --------------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y ---------- ---------- —
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. — — — — — —
— — — — — —
See footnotes at end of table.




8*
62
8*73

-

-

105
27

364
87

11
3

78

240
37

8

-

-

COQ
50 7

1 CO
IDO

1 Of)
ioU

57

13
214
40

48
98
10

76
2
i4

57

-

-

-

369
92

10

40

-

272
94
54
26
88

146
43

8. 52
8 . 63
8.41
8.51

1,464
529
194
632
109

7j
40
13
18

8.68
8 73

150

10

-

29
29

371
138
19
AA
170
128
91

-

25

-y

21

_

“

9
9

Table 15. Occupational earnings (union and nonunion combined):

Chicago, III.1 Continued
—

Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h ou rly earnings 5 / o f ---Number
of
workers 4 /

O ccupation 3 and type
of construction

Avera ge
hourly
earnings 5 /

s

$

%

$

$

$

%

4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20

$
S
S
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20
_

and
under

5.60

_

20
20

-

-

_

-

20

-

-

-

o
C
O

6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60

5.20 5.40

o

Si
°.!
Ii
T

o
C
O
tf\

4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80

_

7.00 7.20 7.40

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
$

CO NS T R U C T I O N LA BO RE RS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------CO M M E R C I A L -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

13,519
7,300

6.21
6.21

24

RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------STREET AND HIGHWAY --------------------------------------------------------OTHE R HE AV Y CONSTR. -------------------------------------------------------

1,861
1*900
1,834

6.11
6.27
6.28

24

250

.

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

18

6. 13

pi C V A tU n
t U pva l h p

1
2
3
4
5
and the

rnNKTPiirTnp*
V U llO 1 K U v 1 U K o •

wpi r CiNO
n C L pppc

•

*

The Chicago Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Cook, D uPage, Kane,
F o r the industrial scope of the survey, see appendix A .
O verall occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) of construction not shown
E stim ates of the number of workers are intended as a general guide to the size and
E xcludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and
for work on weekends,
construction site) are included in straight-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.




_

_
_
_

_

66
_

66

18

~

-

_
_

"

—

20

10246
5974
1333
1225
1192
250

Lake,

M cH enry,

452 2326
304 789

212
167

23
4

347
610
479

_

18

43
2

35
22
91

-

'

109
40

3
2

_

-

-

-

69

1

and W ill Counties.

separately.
composition of the work force rather than
ap recise m easure
of em ployment.
h olidays, and late shifts. Zone rates (usually
based ondistance between local union headquarters

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 /
O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y pe
of construction

Number
workers 4/

earnings 5/

o f -----

S
%
$
$
S
S
$
$
S
$
$
%
7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60 9.80

Average

Under and
$7.60 under

and

7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60 9.80
JOURNEYMEN
BRICKLAYERS ----------------COMM ER CI AL --------------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. ----

2,029
1,770
6

$
8.95
8.96
9.07

CARPENTERS -----------------CO MM ER CI AL --------------RES. (5 STORY +) -------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ---STREET AND HIGHWAY ----OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. ----

8,468
3,611
739
3,888
48
182

CEMENT MASONS --------------COMMERCIAL --------------RES. (5 STORY ♦) -------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) ---STREET AND HIGHWAY ----OTHER HE AV Y CONSTR. ---ELECTR IC IA NS ---------------COMMER CI AL --------------RES. (5 STORY +) -------RES. (UNDER 5 S T OR YI----

“

-

8.32
8.31
8.30
8.33
8.22
8.36

_
-

182
137
39
6

1,900
1,142
110
264
360
24

8.89
8.90
8.91
8.89
8.89
8.57

-

_
-

5,500
4,380
478
642

9.05
9.04
8.77
9.31

-

-

-

8
8
-

- 1854
- 1597
4

44 7793
44 3217
- 731
- 3637
42
- 166

74
53
3
18
-

36
20
4
12

_
-

15
15
-

-

_
-

_
-

497
209
224
64

-

-

-

-

258

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

218
140

- 2510
2420

over

145
165

"

22
2

54
35
3
14
2

293
111
168
14

10
10
-

_
-

-

2 1610
- 980
105
168
- 350
7
2

235
142
5
81
6
1

_
-

~

2
2

_
-

5 4027
1 3591
- 254
4
182

250
175
75

269
84
185

2
2
-

381
249
132

-

-

-

-

83
83

-

2
1

_

18
4
2
12
-

69
69
-

-

_
-

EL EV AT OR CO NS TRUCTORS -----

258

8.75

PIPEFITTERS ----------------C O MM ER CI AL ---------------

2,813
2,644

8.98
8.99

-

PLUMBERS --------------------COMM ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T OR Y)----

3,216
1,524
1,512

8.75
8.76
8.75

_
-

_
-

_
-

10
10

59 2854
4 1367
55 1307

74
44
30

204
99
105

15
15

_
-

_
-

_
-

ROOFERS ---------------------CO MM ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) ----

1,173
801
312

8.62
8.62
8.60

_
-

_
*

_
-

_
-

_ 1129
- 757
- 312

_
-

44
44
"

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

SHEET-METAL WORKERS -------COMM ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) - —
-

2,281
1,671
583

8.54
8.56
8.46

_
-

_
-

255
97
156

40
40

40 1946
- 1534
40
387

_
-

"

_
-

"

_
-

_
-

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS --COMMER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ----

1,348
1,239
34

9.30
9.31
9.26

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

743
301
86
88
258

8.68
8.73
8.50
8.62
8.73

.
-

71
40
13
18
-

272
94
54
26
88

-

371
138
19
44
170

BU LL DO ZE R OPERATORS -------CO MM ER CI AL --------------STREET AND HIGHWAY -----OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. ----

695
241
122
251

8.52
8.63
8.41
8.51

_
-

146
43
46
40

369
92
65
150

10
10

128
91
7
30

TR UCKDRIVERS ----------------CO MM ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) ----STREET AND HIGHWAY -----OTHER H E AV Y CONSTR. -----

1,437
502
194
632
109

6.01
6.06
6.46
5.83
5.97

-

_
-

_

1207
- 1239
34

_
-

141
-

27
27
-

2
2
-

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK-HOE OPERATORS --------COMM ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) ---STREET

A N D H I G H W A Y ------

OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. ----

-

.
-

.
-

_

_

-

-

.

-

25
4
21

8
6
-

9
9
~

_
-

'

-

_

_

-

~

6 1437
502
194
632
109
$
S
%
$
$
$
%
$
$
%
$
$
6.00 6.10 6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70 6.80 6.90 7.00 7.10
Under and
$6.00 under

HELPERS AND LABORERS

C O N S TR UC TI ON LABORERS --------------CO MM ER CI AL -----------------------RES. (5 STORY ♦) ----------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T OR Y)— ----------STREET AND HIGHWAY --------------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. -------------ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS*

_1/
See f o o t n o t e
2/
See f o o t n o t e
3/
See f o o t n o t e
4/
See f o o t n o t e
5/
See f o o t n o t e
6/
Wor ker s we re
and 57 a t $ 6 . 6 0 - $ 6 . 8 0 .

HELPERS ----

1, t a b l e 15.
2, t a b l e 15.
3, t a b l e 15.
4 , t a b l e 15.
5 , t a b l e 15.
d i s t r i b u t e d as f o l l o w s :




and

6.10 6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70 6.80 6.90 7.00 7.10
13,087
7,246
624
1,483
1,900
1,834

6.22
6.21
6.19
6.19
6.27
6.28

40
20
20
-

250

6.13

-

78 a t $ 5 . 4 0 - $ 5 . 6 0 ;

364 a t $ 5 . 6 0 - $ 5 . 8 0 ;

over

-10003
- 5920
- 522
- 1144
- 1225
- 1192
-

269
222
35
12

183
82
22
79

-

-

250

11 a t $ 5 . 8 0 - $ 6 ;

739 1506
269
520
101
89
177
165 445
27 452
-

589 a t $ 6 - $ 6 . 2 0 ;

-

89
64
25
-

123
103
18
2

1
1
-

22
4
18
-

109
40
69

3
2
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

158 a t $ 6 . 2 0 - $ 6 . 4 0 ;

-

1

180 a t $ 6 . 4 0 - $ 6 . 6 0 ;

(Number and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e

hourly earnin g s

of workers in s e l e c t e d

occupations,

construction

in d u s tries ,2 Septem ber

19 72 )

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of c o n stru ction

Number
workers 4 /

earnin g s 5/

%
S
$
$
$
S
$
%
6 . 2 0 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8 . 0 0 8 . 2 0

$

A v er ag e

$

$

5/ of

t
S
$
$
8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00

Under
and
$ 6 . 2 0 under

6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8 . 0 0

8 .2 0

8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20

JOURNEYMEN
CEMENT MASONS ----------------DEC
JUnuC K DO 1UKT I
ItfcinCD c CTnDV\
\
p i kVlMvlAliJ
CL prTDiriAMc

— _____
•

82
82
171

$
8.60
8.60

_

b63

*

_

42

_

21

_

$
S
S
4.00 4.20 4.40

_

_

_

20
20

_

20
20

-

45

-

_

31
31

_

11
11

_

i
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
S
$
4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6.40

and
under

4.20 4.40 4.60

4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6.40 6.60

HELPERS AND LABORERS
rrn ic T D i i r r m u i aono cdc
v U N o 1 K U w 11 UN L A o U K t K j
nrr
e t t mncn c f Tnnw \
K cdt
1 UNU CK !> a 1 UKT J

J./
2/
^3/
4/
5/
6/

432

5.85
5.80

24
24

See f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 15.
See f o o t n o t e 2 , t a b l e 15.
See f o o t n o t e 3, t a b l e 15.
See f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 15.
E x c l u d e s premium pay f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s wor k and f o r wor k on we ek e n d s ,
Wor ker s we re d i s t r i b u t e d as f o l l o w s :
42 a t $ 5 - $ 5 . 2 0 and 21 a t $ 6 - $ 6 . 2 0 .




46
46

h olidays,

18
18

and l a t e

sh ifts,

20
20

243
189

81
81

$

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 . 40

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4

3 .4 0

3 . 60

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

$

S

$

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

$

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

$

S

%

%

$

$

$

$

$

i

$

o
o

$

*

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

~

480

$

3 .2 0

w
t

Under and
$3. 00 under
o
o

earnings 5/

$

o
00

workers hi

1

o
o

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

S

o

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f---$

Average

JO UR NE YM EN
$

BR IC KL AY ER S ------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------C A RP EN TE RS -------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GH WA Y OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

580

7 .1 6

60

20

10

560

7 .1 8

60

20

~

_

76

378

150

-

47

2

44

118

-

28

10

334

32

-

1

~

-

-

~

22
-

18

_

-

-

-

15

122
-

-

-

-

-

47

112

22

8

19

24

53

103

56

240

52

20

_

2

-

-

-

20

178

-

20

19

22

53

-

103

36

62

52

-

2 ,0 9 7

6 .3 3

9
_

8
_

24
_

35
-

26
-

796

4 .7 9

-

-

-

4

-

94

3 .4 0

9

8

24

26

26

37

5 .2 0

'

*

'

5

CEMENT MASONS ---------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GH WA Y -

729

4 .8 7

1
-

14
-

46

72

5

14

36

ELECTR IC IA NS -----------C O MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

3 ,0 2 4

5 .8 2

12

-

352

130

84

40

-

-

41

14

1565

-

80

88

42

40

20

-

-

41

10

1565

-

80

-

252

88

44

-

-

-

-

4

12

“

~

20

•

-

~

“

100

25

145

5

-

-

-

6 .0 0

1

1 ,0 5 6

5 .4 0

_

_

682

6 .0 4

_

_

374

4 .2 4

-

PI PE FI TT ER S ------------C O MM ER CI AL ----------

304

6 .8 8

260

5

-

-

-

736

5

2

10

-

-

30

-

-

-

-

20

-

2

10

-

-

—

159

-

-

159

-

-

5

-

-

332

-

-

-

332

-

110

-

“

“

_

42

2

-

5

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

260
260

5 .6 2

_

_

393

6 .4 0

_

-

343

4 .7 3

-

ROOFERS ------------------

220

4 .2 1

-

-

-

SHEET- ME TA L WORKERS --CO MM E R C I A L ----------

336

6 .0 6

_

22

2

300

6 .3 0

~

-

5

2

48

37

25

65

15

60

11

20

-

-

-

-

-

20

15

-

7

25

35

15

60

11

20

2

5

2

28

31

82

75

10

48

30

~

30

~

'

20

-

-

120

20

10

10

10

30

2

13

-

9

8

14

6

-

-

-

-

260

5

4

4

-

260

37

14

4

25

4

25

4

2

7

20

28

31

102

90

10

-

-

-

-

_

185
185

~

-

-

-

-

EQ UIPMENT OPER AT OR S
BACK -H OE OP ERATORS --CO MM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

322

3 .5 8

61 0 5

5

3

53

55

89

4 .5 1

5

-

20

35

-

B U L L DO ZE R OPERATORS —
C O MM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

166

TRUCKD RI VE RS ----------ST RE ET AND HIGHWAY




49

3 .7 5

-

176

3 .0 1

105

3 .5 4

17

3

7

20

12

7

~

26

-

5

30

5

4

5

4

5

7

12

80

53

85

3 .5 5

5

5

5

25

45

43

3 .4 7

-

2

5

28

8

38

3 .5 9

-

~

2

27

~

102

2 .7 6

62

38

1

-

1

53

2 .6 5

44

7

1

-

1

10

~

140

110

-

7 .2 0

PLUMBERS ---------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

10

5 .2 9
3 .5 9

5
20

204
260
240

485

5

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f---Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

%

$

%

S

$

$

%

$

t

$

$

$

»

i

$

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 . 30

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 . 90

4 .0 0

4 .1 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

2 .6 0

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Number
of
workers 4 /

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 . 40

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 . 00

4 .1 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

over

_
-

87

4

20

_

_

20

20

195

40

9

-

20

-

-

-

20

195

40

4

1 ------2 .5 0

1 -------- i

T

1 -------

"5-------- i

Under and
$2.50 under

H E LP ER S AND LA BO RE RS
$

BR IC KL AY ER S*

HE LP ER S —

220

4 .0 4

CA RPENTERS* HE LP ER S --CO M M E R C I A L ----------ST REET AND HI GH WA Y -

808

3 .9 1

14

74

2

26

355

4 .2 6

10

35

-

20

_
-

32

2 .7 3

4

9

2

6

-

~

7

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS CO M M E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
ST RE ET AND HI GH WA Y O T HE R HE AV Y CONSTR.

5 ,9 1 6

3 .2 5

81697

1079

45

418

4

23

319

13

22

1

3 ,0 4 5

3 .9 1

371

350

12

-

259

206

-

13

150

-

120

2 .9 5

-

50

979

190

-

10

-

1 ,0 9 2

2 .3 3

671

331

26

45

4

3

9

-

-

1

800

2 .3 5

505

139

19

117

-

20

EL EC TRICIANS* HELPERS CO M M E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

554

2 .8 7

40

169

2

101

9

6

74

15

34

_

190

2 .8 8

-

110

-

-

-

-

20

-

20

-

-

-

364

2 .8 7

40

59

2

101

9

6

54

15

14

"

10

42

PLUMBERS* HE LP ER S -----C O M M E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY) 1

499

3 .1 0

-

94

6

67

-

148

6

36

38

126

3 .3 2

-

4

6

-

21

-

-

45

-

15

-

-

15

-

10

373

3 .0 3

-

4

94

6

46

-

4

103

6

21

4

6

23

8

36

10

1 The D allas Standard Metropolitan Statistical area consists of C ollin , D a lla s, Denton,
2 F o r the industrial scope of the su rvey, see appendix A .
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) of construction not shown
4 E stim ates of the number of workers are intended as a general guide to the size and
5 E xcludes prem ium pay for overtim e andhazardous work and for work on w eekends,
and the construction site) are included in straight-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 A ll w orkers w ere at $ 2 . 4 0 to $ 2 .6 0 .
7 W ork ers were distributed as follow s:
1 at $ 2 to $ 2 .2 0 ; 4 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .4 0 ; 22 at
8 W ork ers we re distributed as follow s: 4 at $ 1 .6 0 to $ 1 .7 0 ; 6 at $ 1 .7 0 to $ 1 .8 0 ; 45
to $ 2 . 4 0 ; and 65 at $ 2 . 4 0 to $ 2 . 5 0 .




E llis ,

15

Kaufman,

60

_
-

10

40
24

_

_

2

-

4

-

-

56

_

_

-

-

_

10

_

~

-

10

8

46

11

125

45

-

125

10

10

-

1

80

15

_

22

260

-

_
-

_

_

177

-

-

-

-

1

42

40

177

1304

302

250

70

1300

302

110

70

4

-

140

_

2

_

_

-

-

40

-

2

-

-

2

_

-

8

20

6

_

_

-

-

_

_

20

-

_

_

-

8

2

-

-

6

-

-

_

and Rockwall Counties.

separately.
composition of the work force rather than a p recise m easure of em ployment.
holidays, and late sh ifts.
Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union headquarters

$ 2 .4 0 to $ 2 . 6 0 ; 15 at $ 2 .6 0 to $ 2 .8 0 ; and 2 at $ 2 .8 0 to $ 3 .
at $ 1 .9 0 to $ 2 ; 433 at $ 2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; 216 at $ 2 .1 0 to $ 2 .2 0 ; 842 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .3 0 ;

86

at $ 2 .3 0

( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s ,
S e p te m b e r 1972)

c o n s tr u ctio n in d u s tr ie s ,

2

Number o f w o rk e rs r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e
h o u r ly e a r n in g s 5 / o f -O c c u p a tio n 3 / and ty p e
o f c o n s tru ctio n

Number
of
w orkers 4 /

A vera g e
h ou r ly
e a r n in g s 5 /

_

-

-

j

-

|

5

___

6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40

Under
$ 6 .2 0

and
under

_

_

_

_

6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60
JOURNEYMEN
$

BRICKLAYERS ---------------------------------CO MM ER CI AL -------------------------------

465
465

7.38
7.38

-

-

-

-

-

-

CARPENTERS ----------------------------------COMMERCIAL --------------------------------

1,614
1,554

6.62
6.67

60
-

CEMENT MASONS ------------------------------COMMERCIAL --------------------------------

159
159

6.50
6.50

-

-

ELECTRICIANS --------------------------------CO MM ER CI AL -------------------------------

332
332

7.40
7.40

-

-

-

-

-

-

PIPEFITTERS ---------------------------------CO MM ER CI AL -------------------------------

260
260

7.20
7.20

-

-

-

-

-

-

1554
1554

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

159
159

-

$
Number
of
w orkers 4 /

465
465

A v era g e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s 5 /

-

-

-

-

332
332
260
260

$

$

$

4. 50 4.60 4.70 4.80
and
under

4. 60 4.70 4. 80 4.90

HELPERS AND LABORERS
$

CONS TR UC TI ON LABORERS
CO MM ER CI AL --------1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

f o o t n o t e 1,
f o o t n o t e 2,
f o o t n o t e 3,
fo o tn o te 4 ,
f o o t n o t e 5,




t a b l e 18 .
t a b l e 18 .
t a b l e 18 .
t a b l e 18 .
t a b l e 18 .

1,842
1,702

4.64
4.62

1290
1290

10
10

292
292

250
110

Number o f w o rk e rs r e c e i 'v in g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 5 / o f -

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Number
of
w o rk e rs 4 /

A verag e
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s 5 /

$
3 .0 0

S

S

$

$

$

%

%

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

$
5 .0 0

S

4 .0 0

$
4 .4 0

S

3 .8 0

$
4 .2 0

S

3 . 40

$
3 .6 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

%
6 .4 0

$
6 .6 0

3 .4 0

3 . 60

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

over

26
-

12
2
10

378
44

150
118
32

-

352
88
252

70

84

47
28

42
28

40
44

40
20

-

-

41
41

t

%

3 .2 0

Under

and
$3.00 under
3 .2 0

JOUR NE YM EN
CARP EN TE RS -------------CO MM E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GHWAY O T HE R H E AV Y CONSTR.

1 ,4 1 0
543

$
4 .9 1
5 .3 8

736
94
37

4 .7 5
3 .4 0
5 .2 0

CE ME NT MASONS ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND H I GH WA Y -

570
260

EL EC TR IC IA NS -----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

9

8

24

35

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

9

8

24

26

“

26
5

-

“

“

-

“

~

12

■

-

20

4 .4 1
5 .2 9

1

14

46

72

122

22

18

_

_

_

-

100
100

25
20

145
140

5

_

-

-

-

240

3 .5 9

1

14

36

47

112

22

8

724

4 .4 9

19

24

103

110

19

22

-

103

-

10
10

_

-

2
2

_

4 .2 4

53
53

_

374
551

5 .0 9
5 .6 9

_

-

-

5
-

28

-

2
-

2

-

-

-

-

25
25

2

5

2

28

31

"

-

-

120

20

-

-

-

9
5

8

4

4

14

4

PLUM BE RS ----------------CO M M E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

208
343
220

4 .2 1

S H EE T- ME TA L WORKERS --C O M M E R C I A L ----------

76

3 .8 1
3 .5 5

_

4 .7 3

RO OF ER S ------------------

-

40

-

76

_

_

-

-

20

22
20

2

2

3
-

53

55

17

37

20

3

7

35
20

12

56
36

240
62

52
52

20

31

102

90
15

10

48

37

20

-

-

82

75

10

48

7
30

10

10

10

30

14

6

7

13
7

_

EQ UIPMENT O P ER AT OR S
BA CK-HOE OP ER AT OR S --CO M M E R C I A L --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHE R H E AV Y CONSTR.

293

3 .2 9

6 105

5

60
49

3 .5 6
3 .7 5

-

5
-

176

3 .0 1

105

-

-

26

-

5

30

B U LL DO ZE R OPER AT OR S —
CO M M E R C I A L --------STREET AND HI GH WA Y
O T HE R H E AV Y CONSTR.

166

3 .5 4

53
45

4

-

2

5
5

80
25

5

-

“

2

28
27

8

38

3 .5 5
3 .4 7
3 .5 9

7
5

12

85

5
5

5

4

TR UC KD RI VE RS ----------STREET AND HI GH WA Y

102
53

2 .7 6
2 .6 5

76 2

38

1

-

7

1

1
1




43

44

-

-

14

91

10
4

91

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

l

-

334

10

"

30
10

65
35

15
15

60
60

30

*

_
11
11

5
5
20
20

"

-

_

-

-

-

r
Number of w orkers : eceiving straight-■time hourly earnings 5 / of—

$
$
$
s
3.70 3.80 3.90

$
*
i
i
S
4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60

Under and
$2.50 under

and

3.80 3.90

*

2.60 2.70 2.80 2. 90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70

o
o

(

1
1
1
S
$
$
1
S
S
*
$
2.50 2.60 2.70 2. 80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60
S

o
o

Average
hourly
earnings 5/

*

O c c u p a tio n 3 / and ty p e
of co n s tru ctio n

Number
of
workers 4 /

4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60

over

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
613
160
32

$
3.65
3.69
2.73

A, 074
1,343
839
1,092
800

2.62
3.01
2.64
2.33
2.35

ELECTRICIANS* HELPERS CO MM E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)-

554
190
364

2.87
2.87

40

PLUMBERS* HELPERS -----CO MM E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)-

499
126
373

3.10
3.32
3.03

_
-

CARPENTERS* HE LP ER S --CO MM E R C I A L ----------STREET AND HI GH WA Y —

00

CO NS T R U C T I O N LA BO RE RS C O M M ER CI AL ----------RES. (UNOER 5 STORY)STREET AND HI GH WA Y —
OTHE R HE AV Y CONSTR. •

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/
7/
8/

2 .8 8

14
10
4

74
35
9

2
2

26
20

81697 1079
371 350
150 259
671
331
139
505

45

40
-

“

-

-

4

23

26
19

418
50
206
45
117

169
110
59

2

101

9

101

9

6

67
21
46

_
-

-

-

94

-

6

-

-

4
-

'

See f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 18 .
See f o o t n o t e 2 , t a b l e 1 8 .
See f o o t n o t e 3 , t a b l e 1 8 .
S ee f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 1 8 .
E x c lu d e s premium pay f o r o v e r t im e and h a za rd ou s w ork and f o r work on w eek en d s , h o l i d a y s ,
See f o o t n o t e 6 , t a b l e 1 8 .
See f o o t n o t e 7 , t a b l e 1 8 .
See f o o t n o t e 8 , t a b l e 1 8 .




319
120
190
9

13
13

74
20
54

15

6

94

4

-

2

87
9
7

6

-

-

6

-

3
20

4
4

148
45
103

and l a t e

-

20
20

-

-

22
2

22
12
10

1

-

1

_
-

56
45
10
1

11

-

34
20
14

_
-

10

42

-

24
4

-

-

125
125

_
-

-

20
20

40
40

14
10
4

70
70

-

-

-

-

“

~

-

-

20
-

-

-

177
177

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

-

260

4

-

-

15
6

6

s h ifts ,

36
15
21

-

10
1

10

_

2

-

40
40

_

-

10

42

“

-

10

-

2

4

6

-

46
10
36

-

2

-

38
15
23

8

-

-

-

4

6

8
8

8

2

-

_

_
-

_

20
20

4

2

-

-

4

2

-

-

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f----

workers 4 /

$
S
$
$
4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60
%

$

o
o

Average
hourly

N1
J

$
$
t
$
t
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.40

Under
and
$4.00 under

4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80

o
o

of

o

Number

.*
»
0
0

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.40 8.80

JO UR NE YM EN
BRICKL AY ER S ------------C O MM ER CI AL ----------

376
275

$
8.21
8.25

l

23
8
15

2

1

11

**

4

45

1

-

-

-

-

4

45

1

~

317
275

39

1

-

-

-

1

“
“

-

3

2

CE ME NT MASONS ---------C O M M ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY -

683
574
72
27
1,120
949

7.64
8.03

PIPE FI TT ER S ------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

407
212

~

886
364
482

7.50
7.70
7.47

SHEET- ME TA L WORKERS --CO MM ER CI AL -----------

554
446
523
500

374
136
76
54
106

5.64
5.64
5.29
5.85
5.79

BU LL DO ZE R OP ER AT OR S --STREET AND HIGHWAY -

795
215

5.56
5.62

_

_

-

-

TRUC KD RI VE RS -----------CO MM E R C I A L ---------STREET AND HI GH WA Y OTHE R HE A V Y CONSTR.

685
328
244
64

4.65
4.62
4.58
5.25

48

104
104

25

12

273

12

319
279
40

41
22
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

19

4
4

4

4
4

8

4

-

-

”

”

12
4

~

“

918
918

~

-

-

-

751
364
387

-

5

—

7.25
7.25

BACK -H OE OPERATORS ---C O M M ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GH WA Y OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

228

8.17
8.17

ST RU CT UR AL IRON WORKERS
C O M M ER CI AL -----------

3

9
3

3
3

7.70
7.70

PLUMBERS ----------------C O M M ER CI AL ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

-

21

17

6.43
6.45
6.36
5.95

EL EC TR IC IA NS -----------C O MM ER CI AL -----------

-

25

3668
2081
1531

407
212

6.29
6.56
6.03

228

25
8
17

11
27

4,363
2,113
2, 182

3

34
16
18

38

CA RP EN TE RS -------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

143

28

12

143

28

12

_

_
-

_

_

_
-

_

_

_
-

73

21

73

-

15

15

12

_

_
"

_

-

-

18
18

-

105

_
"

-

11

_

9

~

-

-

40

18
18

9

-

27

-

-

-

18
18

27

-

~
“

5
554
446

523
500

-

-

-

-

-

-

EQUIPMENT OP ER AT OR S




1

-

1

-

-

48

-

“

_

_

-

35
-

16

-

9

338
212
117
9

"

-

9

42
-

94
12
66
16

223
131

-

27
65

~

~

21
-

7

-

3

24
-

-

45

-

-

_

9
-

24
-

500
141

83
11

13

30

4
9

30

49

-

137
63

.

72
5
27
38
4

1

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f---Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Number
of
workers 4 /

Avera ge
hourly
earnings 5 /

1 ---- 1 ---- %
2.50 2. 6 0 2.70

RES.

(UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------

303
158

3. 00

3. 20

4.40

4.60

$
4.74
5. 10
4.41

3.i60

3.70

-

7

3

-

3

-

-

42

9

31

-

7

-

7

3

-

3

-

-

42

9

31

-

7

7

-

1

17

10

29

13

34
34

3
3

2
2

250

1661
1034
488
106
33

1

38
36
176

1 715
1241
108
164
134

142

4.19

-

3

-

1

-

-

9

1

11

-

-

11

-

4,092
2,367
996

17
17

40
28
12

6
6

63
63

2
2

8
8

76
24
52

4
4

70
16
54

-

22
22

70
44
26

11
8
3

343

4.23
4.33
4.01
4 . Zo
4.19

EL EC TRICIANS' HELPERS -----------------------RES- (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ---------------------

215
108

3.31
3.48

12
~

39

-

PLUMBERS' HE LP ER S --------------------------------

335

3.71

9

9

-

20

-

~

19

-

”

27

-

-

27
15

-

16
16

4
4

-

~

12
“

_

“

53
30

_

~

"

-

8
8

-

8
8

36

-

36

-

-

54

-

27

-

9

50

-

28

_

T h e D e n v e r S ta n d a r d M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a c o n s is t s o f A d a m s , A r a p a h o e , B o u ld e r , D e n v e r , and J e f f e r s o n C o u n t ie s .
F o r t h e i n d u s t r i a l s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d ix A .
O v e r a l l o c c u p a t i o n m a y i n c l u d e d a t a f o r w o r k e r s in t y p e ( s ) o f c o n s t r u c t i o n
not sh ow n s e p a r a te ly .
E s t i m a t e s o f th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e i n t e n d e d a s a g e n e r a l g u i d e t o th e s i z e a n d
c o m p o s i t i o n o f th e w o r k f o r c e r a t h e r th a n
ap r e c i s e m e a s u r e
o fe m p lo y m e n t .
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d h a z a r d o u s w o r k an d
f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d la t e s h i f t s .
Zone
r a t e s (u s u a lly
based
ond is ta n c e
b e tw e e n lo c a l
c o n s t r u c t i o n s i t e ) a r e i n c l u d e d in s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e s f o r p u r p o s e s o f t h is s u r v e y .




5. 00 5 . 2 0

3. 50

CA RPENTERS' HE LP ER S ----------------------------

1
2
3
4
5
a n d th e

3. 90 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0

3. 40

7

3.10

3.30

7

2.80

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS ----------------------C O M M E R C I A L ----------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------------------crn c cT Aim uvruuAv
dlKCCl AIN rl i brlnAT
U
nTucn u ciw v PniiCTn
U 1ncK HfcAVY l*(Jrlj IK*

3.80

0
0

rnMHFDr t A
t
tu n n c K tiA L

2.90

X
1 ----- $
*
1 ---- 1---- 1 ---- *
$
$
1 ---- T
3.i50 3 . 6 0 3 . 7 0 3. 80 3 . 9 0 4 . 0 0 4 . 2 0 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4. 80 5 . 0 0 5 . 2 0

o

BR ICKLAYERS' HE LP ER S --------------

1 ---- T ~
$
$
1 ---- ~ T
2. 90 3 . 0 0 3. 10 3 . 2 0 3. 30 3. 40

Under
and
$2.50 under
2.60 2.70

H E LP ER S AND LABORERS

$
2.80

1
“

over

180
145
35

14

-

21

8

_
_

37

~
~

_

14

37
”
4

-

9

-

12
8

36

5

-

u n io n

h e a d q u a rte rs

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction industries, 2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / of —
Number
of
workers 4/

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

$
4.80

S

S

S

%

6.20

6.60

$
7.00

$
7.20

7.40

$
%
7.60 7.80

$

6.00

$
6.80

$

5.60

$
6.40

%

5.40

$
5.80

%

5.20

8 .00

8.20

5.20

5.40

5.60

5.80

6.00

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

7.00

7.20

7.40

7.60

7.80

8 .20

8.4 0

t

Under and
$4.80 under
5.00

JOURNEYMEN

$
5.00

275
275

$
8.25
8.25

3.669
2,073

6.57
6.57

63 8
550
27

6.43
6.45
5.95

E L E C T R I C I A N S --COMMERCIAL ~

930
918

8.04
8.08

PIPEFITTERS —
COMMERCIAL

407
212

7.70
7.70

407
212

P L U M B E R S ------------------C O M M E R C I A L ----------- R E S . ( U N D E R 5 S T O R Y )-

751
364
387

7.70
7.70
7.70

751
364
38 7

SHEET-METAL WORKERS
C O M M E R C I A L -------

55 4
446

8.17
8.17

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
C O M M E R C I A L -------------

523
500

7.25
7.25

B A C K - H O E O P E R A T O R S ----C O M M E R C I A L ----------STREET AND HIGHWAY O THER H E A V Y CONSTR.

233
56
54
106

5.73
5.69
5.85
5.79

BULLDOZER
STREET

653
215

5.59
5.62

519
196
64

4.93
4.97
5.25

8.00

B R I C K L A Y E R S — ---------- ------------- -- --------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ------------------------ --------------- ------------M n n C iN T r n cj
vAKrc i I t K
r U n M K l ai
L n u u cto rUv A t

....

......

r ccn C aii l
t u c l t MACHMC
r lflj u n o
r n u u c n r i ai
U U n rlu K v 1A u

...

AND HIGHWAY

—

— —

“

~

38

~

~

3612
2073

6

273
273

295
255

32
22

“

”

45

~

~

~

~

~

~

OPERATORS —
AND HIGHWAY

BR ICKLAYERS' HELPERS ----------CO M M E R C I A L --------------------

~

“
“

“

~

“
“

~

523
500

-

_
-

72

3

143
51
27
65

~

-

_
-

-

15

-

_
-

-

500
141

11
11

137
63

13
4
9

30

_

_
-

44
9
-

-

338
117
9

94
66
16

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

_

_

_

-

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

See footnote 1, table 21.
See footnote 2, table 21.
See footnote 3, table 21.

_
_

_

_
_

_ __

4/
5/

See footnote 4 , table 21.
See footnote 5, table 21.

_
_

_
_

30

145
145

$
5.10
5.10

3,542
2,249
583
299
343

_

_
_

_

5

27
38

*
$
$
$
t
$
$
$
%
4. 00 4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60 4.80 5.00
and
under

4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS ---------CO M M E R C I A L -------------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) --------STREET AND HIGHWAY ---------OTHE R H E AV Y CONSTR. ---------




~

554
446

H E LP ER S AND LABORERS

3/

~

918
918

Number
of
workers 4 /

21

~

OPERATORS

T R U C K D R I V E R S ------------STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEA V Y CONSTR.

1/

-

4.36
4.37
4.46
4.33
4.19

_

_
-

181
-

5
176

_
_

31 1327
- 1161
98
31

"

_

_

“

_

"

364
66
164
134

99 1540
- 1022
- 485
99
33

0
0

EQUIPMENT

— —

6

~

o

STREET

275
275

_

5.00 5.20

_

~

145
145

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

(Number and average s t r a ig h t -t im e h ou rly earnings of workers in se le c te d o ccu p a tion s, co n s t r u c tio n in d u s t r ie s , 2 S e p te m b e r 1972)
o
Number of workers receiving straight--time hourly earnings 5 / < f —
Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

$
$
$
$
$
$
t
$
$
$
$
$
3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20
workers 4 /

earnings 5 /

and
under

$
$
$
$
%
5.40 5.60 5.80 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0

*
$
%
%
$
6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20
and

-

3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

5.60 5.80 6 . 0 0 6 . 2 0 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20

over

JOUR NE YM EN
694
654

$
4.81
4.73

CE ME NT MASONS ------------------------

45

6.41

ELECTR IC IA NS -------------------------

190

5.68

141

5.50

CA RP EN TE RS --------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T OR Y)-------------

79
79

21
21

17
17

11
11

15
15

28
28

12
12

73
73

21
21

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

15

228
228

25
25

23
15

-

-

105

9

9

42

11
11

3
3

-

34
18

_

4
4

25
17

56
48

12

3
3

-

24

9

-

~

~

-

19

4

4

4

8

16

3
3

2
2

EQ UIPMENT OP ERATORS
BACK-HOE OP ERATORS ------------------

i

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
S
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60
Under
$2.50

80

$
%
$
%
$
%
$
$
t
t
3.70 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

and
under

and

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70

3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

over

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------

158
158

4.41
4.41

_

_

_

“

~

"

_

CARPENTERS'

HE LPERS ----------------

135

4.16

-

3

-

1

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS -------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------

550
413

3.41
3.37

17
17

40
28

6
6

63
63

ELECTRICIANS* HELPERS -------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------

215
108

3.31
3.48

12

39
19

-

20

_

_

_
-

-

7
7

_
-

7
7

-

-

9

1

11

2
2

8
8

76
52

4
4

70
54

-

_

_

27
15

16
16

4
4

_

_

3
3

-

3
3

-

42
42

9
9

31
31

-

7
7

35
35

14
14

-

-

11

-

7

1

17

10

29

6

-

21

8

-

22
22

70
26

11

34
34

5
5

38
38

24

22

10

3

1
1

-

37
37

-

-

53
30

_

12

_

~

8
8

4
4

4

_

3

~
'

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

See fo o t n o t e 1, ta b le 2 1.
See fo o t n o t e 2, ta b le 21.
See fo o t n o t e 3, ta b le 2 1.
See fo o t n o t e 4 , ta b le 2 1.
Excludes premium pay f o r overtim e and hazardous work and f o r work on weekends, h o lid a y s , and la te s h i f t s .




8
8

4
~

8

Number
of
workers 4 /

Occupation _3/ and type
of construction

$

$

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g

$

$

$

$

$

s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly earnin g s 5 /

$

$

$

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0 6 .6 0

_

_

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

o f -----

$

$

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

4 .8 0

Under
and
$ 4 . 8 0 under
5 .0 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

_

5 .2 0

_

5 .4 0

_

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .6 0

_

5 .8 0

_

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

_

_

6 .6 0

_
6 .8 0

_
7 .0 0

i

S---- $

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

-

A v er a ge
hourly
earnin g s 5 /

149
149

_
7 .2 0

7 .4 0

JOUR NE YM EN
$

CA RP EN TE RS --CO MM E R C I A L

6 .1 8
7 .0 1

294

201

CEMENT MASONS
C O MM ER CI AL

193
193

6 .8 0
7 .2 4

29

21

7 .4 7

EL EC TR IC IA NS CO MM E R C I A L

206
156

PLUMBERS -------CO MM E R C I A L ~

290
184

SHEE T- ME TA L WORKERS
CO MM ER CI AL ------

153
153

7 .5 0

ST RU CT UR AL IRON WORKERS
C O M M ER CI AL -----------

112
112

6 .9 8

73
14

5 .9 1
6 .7 3

96

5 .9 4

8 .0 2
-

283
184
153
153

7 .5 0

112
112

6 .9 8

EQ UIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK-HOE OPERATORS
CO MM E R C I A L ----BU LL DO ZE R OPERATORS
TR UC KD RI VE RS --------

5 .1 0

209

Number

of
workers 4 /

17
14

$
%
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00

Average
h ourly
Under and
earnings 5 / $3. 00 under

o
o

3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.80

4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 ,

H E LP ER S AND LABORERS
C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS --------------C O M M E R C I A L -----------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ------------OTHE R HE A V Y C0NSTR. -------------PLUMBERS* HE LP ER S —
CO M M E R C I A L

—

— —

—

—

827
445
99
163

5.12

42

24

-

44

-

48

6

3

-

32

6

160

-

-

-

16

6

-

3

3.17
3.98

42

16

-

24
20

-

48

6

3

-

8
24

6

40

-

-

-

16

6

-

3

437
437
-

61
40

5*92

6
6

25
25

'

‘

'

9
9

'

1 The Des M oines Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Polk County.
2 F or the industrial scope of the survey, see appendix A.
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ate s of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and com position of the work fo rc e, rather than a p rec ise m easure of employment.
5 E xcludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union
h eadquarters and the construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
3 at $ 3 .4 0 to $ 3 .6 0 ; 6 at $ 3 .6 0 to $ 3 .8 0 ; 9 at $ 4 to $ 4 .2 0 ; 27 at $ 4 .2 0 to $ 4 .4 0 ; 24 at $ 4 .4 0 to $ 4 .6 0 ; and 21 at $ 4 .6 0 to $ 4 .8 0 .




Number o f w o r k e r s

Occupation 3 / and type
o f co n s tru c tio n

Number
of
workers 4 /

A v e r ag e
hourly
earnin g s 5/

r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t -tim e h o u r ly earnin g s 5/

o f -----

$
$
(
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.80
$

S

t

$

S

and
under

5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.80 8.20
JOURNEYMEN
UNION SITUATIONS

CARPENTERS -------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------CEMENT MASONS ---------CO MM ER CI AL --------- ELECTRICIANS -----------COMM ER CI AL ---------PLUMBERS ---------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------SHEET-METAL WORKERS --CO MM ER CI AL ---------STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
CO MM ER CI AL ----------

201
201

$
7.01
7.01

29
21

6.80
7.24

206
156

7.47
8.02

283
184

7.09
7.09

_

153
153

7.50
7.50

_

112
112

6.98
6.98

_

49
14

6.28
6.73

-

84

6.13

209

5.10

_

193
193

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

_

_
-

8
-

50

7
7

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

32
"

-

-

-

-

42

24

26

84

-

-

_

21
21

_

"

-

_

_

_

_

_

283
184

-

_

8
8

_

-

_

112
112

_

-

_

_

_

_

149
149

_

153
153

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

_

_

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK-HOE OPERATORS --------CO MM ER CI AL --------------BU LL DO ZE R OPERATORS ~ ------TRUCKDRIVERS ----------------

1

96

Number
of
workers 4 /

A v e r ag e
hour ly
ea rnin g s 5 /

"

17
14

-

-

-

-

18

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

$
$
$
(
S
$
$
%
$
$
4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00

4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20
UNION SITUATIONS

HELPERS AND LABORERS
$
C O NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS
CO MM ER CI AL --------

622
437

PLUMBERS* HELPERS --CO MM ER CI AL --------

40
40

9
5. 0 2

16

160

3

6

437
437

6
6

25
25

6.19

_

_

_

_

_

9
9

_

S
(
$
$
$
%
$
$
%
t
2.50 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20

2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40
NONUNION SITUATIONS

HELPERS AND LABORERS
205

CO NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

ta b le
ta b le
ta b le
ta b le
ta b le

24.
24.
24.
24.
24.




$
3.27

42

'

24

44

54

3

32

6

Occupation 3 /and type
of construction

Number
workers 4 /

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings 5/ of-$
i
*
%
$
$
$
$
t
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
t
$
4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.40 7.80 8.20 8.60 9.00
i

Average

earnings 5 / Under and
$4.00 under

4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.40 7.80 8.20 8.60 9.00 9.40
JO UR NE YM EN
BRICKL AY ER S ------------CO MM E R C I A L -----------

274
274

$
8.56
8.56

CARP EN TE RS -------------CO M M E R C I A L -----------

I, 130
965

7.08
7.46

CE MENT MASONS ----------CO M M E R C I A L ----------O T HE R H E A V Y CONSTR.

74
53
11

8.76
8.78
8.57

EL EC TR IC IA NS -----------C O M M E R C I A L -----------

484
392

7.75
8.28

PIPEFI TT ER S ------------CO MM E R C I A L -----------

175
161

8.35
8.59

PL UMBERS ----------------CO M M E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

588
281
307

6.84
8.33
5.47

ROOFERS -----------------CO MM E R C I A L -----------

111
111

8.01
8.01

SHEE T- ME TA L WORKERS --C O M M E R C I A L -----------

138
138

8.70
8.70

ST RUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
C O M M E R C I A L -----------

100
98

9.30
9.30

BACK-HOE O P E R AT OR S ------------------C O M M E R C I A L ------------------------O T HE R H E A V Y CONSTR. --------------

107
8
63

7.20
7.34
7.73

BU LL DO ZE R OPER AT OR S ----------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------------

103
29

6.24
5.05

TRUC KD RI VE RS -------------------------OTHE R HE A V Y CONSTR. --------------

248
83

5.03
5.55

75
25

86
36

264
264

10
10

9
9

43
33

22
22

_

-

26
26

21
21

10

25

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

808
792

-

~

4

4

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

4
4

_
-

_

_

-

_

_

6
6

16
4
_

10

20
2
-

12

20

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

10
10
-

119

72

44

-

-

-

-

12

-

12

119

72

_

6
6

_

-

-

“

40

9

-

-

24
24

40

_

44

-

“

-

70
53
7

-

-

-

-

334
334

12
12

-

-

149
149

-

247
247

-

-

-

-

~

9

~

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

71
71

11

_

68
38

“

5
1

40
40

138
138

“
-

-

100
98

E Q U I PM EN T OP ER AT OR S

See footnotes at end of table,




2

_

_

2

-

-

4
4

28
“

17

4

4

4

4

_
-

-

30

-

11
11

4
4

4
4

4
4

15
7

5
“

1
"

_

“

_

148
76

21
-

_

1
1

6

_

23
2

1
-

-

4
_

“

42
7
35
31
-

38
-

-

-

28

*

“

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s
O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of c o n s t r u c t i o n

Number
of
workers 4 /

Av er ag e
h ou r ly
earnings 5 /

$

$

$

$

$

j

$

%

i

$

3.00

3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20

Under
and
$ 3 . 0 0 under

$

$

$

_

5/ o f -----

%

_

i

$

t

$

$

%

5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60
_

_

3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80
HELPERS AND LA BO RE RS
$

BRICKLAYERS' HELPERS
CO MM ER CI AL ------CA RPENTERS'

HE LPERS

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS CO MM E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OT HE R HEAVY CONSTR.
PL UMBERS
1
2
3
4
5
and th e
5

HELPERS

160
160

160
160

6.25
6.25

81

3.59

3

48

1* 186
602
41
238
305

5.73
5.77
2.85
5.30
6.38

55
35
20

34
23
11

45

2.81

23

-

-

10

-

10

3
1
2

60

15

-

30

-

-

-

-

2
2

1
1

4

17
13
4

-

-

-

60

15

-

30

-

-

4
-

26
26

15
-

-

-

4
4

13
13

375
258

41
39

-

491
187

-

15

-

-

-

-

5
112

2
-

-

Ill
193

22

T h e H a r t f o r d a r e a f o r p u r p o s e s of th is ta b u la tio n c o n s i s t s of the c i t y of H a r t f o r d a n d 20 to w n s in H a r t f o r d C o u n ty , C r o m w e l l to w n in M i d d l e s e x C ou n ty, and 5 t o w n s in T o l l a n d County.
F o r th e i n d u s t r i a l s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d ix A .
O v e r a l l o c c u p a t i o n m a y i n c l u d e data f o r w o r k e r s in t y p e ( s ) of c o n s t r u c t i o n in a d d i t io n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
E s t i m a t e s o f th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e in te n d e d as a g e n e r a l gu ide to th e s i z e a nd c o m p o s i t i o n o f the w o r k f o r c e , r a t h e r than a p r e c i s e m e a s u r e o f e m p l o y m e n t .
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s w o r k and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la te s h if ts .
Z o n e r a t e s ( u s u a l l y b a s e d on d i s t a n c e b e t w e e n l o c a l u n io n h e a d q u a r t e r s
c o n s t r u c t i o n s it e) a r e i n c l u d e d in s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e s f o r p u r p o s e s o f th is s u r v e y .
W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d as f o l l o w s :
6 at $ 2 . 4 0 t o $ 2 . 5 0 and 17 a t $ 2 . 7 0 t o $ 2 . 8 0 .




(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction industries, 2 September 1972)
Number o f wo rke r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e ar n i n g s 5 /
Number
of
w orkers 4/

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y pe
of construction

A v e r ag e
h ou r ly
earnings 5 /

$
S
$
$
$
$
S
$
%
$
$
%
5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7 .40 7.60 7.80

of-

S
$
$
$
$
8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20
t

%

Under
and
$ 5 . 6 0 under

5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7 .60 7.80 8.00

8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40

JOUR NE YM EN
$

CO MM E R C I A L

———————— ——

32
32

——

CARPEN TE RS ---------------------------CE ME NT MASONS ------------------------CO MM ER CI AL — — — — — — — — — — —— — — ——
ELECTRICI ANS — —
CO MM E R C I A L — —

—

—

— —

—

—
— —

l
*

n*in
0 r7

^

—

29

-

792

1
l

7

41
31
-

3A6

8* 72

1A9

8* 84

2A7
247
111
111

8*01
8*01

1 aa

138

8.70
8« 70

^98

9* 30

BACK-HOE OPER AT OR S -----------------------------------------------------------C O M M ER CI AL -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

46
8

8.01
7.34

_

_

-

-

BULL DO ZE R OP ER AT OR S --------------------------------------------------------

53

6.83

-

158

5. 56

10

12
12

8.65
A• A5
O 03

—

—

—

PIPEFI TT ER S —
— --- -------- ----- —
C O MM ER CI AL — —— — —
—— — —
m UMd c K o
PL iiuoroc
— .
CO MM ER CI AL — — — — — — — — — — — — —
RO OF ER S — — — — —
r n u u rtr i t t
C u Hn rcR CI AL

— —

SHEET- ME TA L WORKERS
U u n M bK lI AL — — —

—

—— —
__

—

J
-

— ——

— —

....

—

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
CO MM E R C I A L — — — — — — — — — ---------- — ---------------— —

138
138

EQUI PM EN T OP ER AT OR S

T n iU ^ lI /nHU D T V C fKt o
1K lL
K 1 u b f

_

_

21

_

_

~

“
-

~

1

1
1
-

_
-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

31

_

-

7
7

-

-

-

-

38

-

148
Number
of
workers 4 /

Average
hourly
earnin g s 5 /

$
$
$
%
$
%
$
6.00 6.10 6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60
and
under

6.10 6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70

H E LP ER S AND LABORERS
$

BRICKLAYERS' HELPERS -------------------------------------------------------------------------CO MM E R C I A L -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

160
160

6.25
6.25

_

CO NS T R U C T I O N LABORERS ---------------------------------------------------------------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. ------------------------------------------------------------------

756
445
193

6.39
6.25
6.60

259
254

1/
2/
3/
4/

See
See
See
See
See




fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e
fo o t n o t e

1,
2,
3,
4,
5,

ta b le
ta b le
ta b le
ta b le
ta b le

26,
26.
26,
26,
26

_

_

4
4

2
-

-

_

_

160
160

-

-

-

-

491
187
193

(Number and s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s

of workers

in s e l e c t e d

occupations,

construction

i n d u s t r i e s , 2 S e p t e m b e r 1 9 72 )
w or k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e

Number o f
Number
of
wor kers 4 /

£
3 .4 0

Av er ag e
hour ly
earn ings 5/

h ou r ly earnin g s 5 /

£

$
6.0 0

$

5 .2 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

*
6 .4 0

$
6 .6 0

£
7.0 0

£
7 .4 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6.2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

25

$
4 .4 0

£
4 .6 0

$
4 .8 0

$
5 .0 0

*

3 .8 0

£
4 .2 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

9

£

of—

$
^
5 .4 0 5 .6 0

£
4 .0 0

$
3 .6 0

3 .6 0

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of construction

.

ana
Under
$ 3 . 4 0 under

JOURNEYMEN

317

$
4.41

6

10

34

25

86

43

22

-

26

21

10

------------------------------------------------------

138

5 .32

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

68

16

20

---------------------------------------------------------

26

5 .5 4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

2

P L U M B E R S — -------------------------------- --------------------------R E S . ( U N D E R 5 S T O R Y ) -----------------------------

341
307

5.5 2
5.47

_

_

_

_

10

_

-

-

-

-

11
11

“

~

12
12

119
119

72
72

-

-

-

-

2

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

4

6

-

_

_

_

_

_

4
4

4
4

4
4

_

-

-

11
11

_

-

4
4

23
2

CARPENTERS

— ---------------------------------- --------------------

ELECTRICIANS
PIPEFITTERS

EQUIPMENT

BACK-HOE

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

20

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

6

-

-

-

-

-

44
44

-

40
40

9
9

24

-

-

-

'

'

“

"

OPERATORS

OPERATORS

6 .6 0

50
29

5 .6 2
5.0 5

TRUCKDRIVERS

90

4.11

-

2

-

“

-

4
-

35

-

-

~

61 6

6

6

-

17

4

30

-

7

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$
2.7 0

$
2.8 0

$
2 .9 0

$
3 .00

$
3 .2 0

£
3.40

£
3.6 0

£
3.80

£
4 .0 0

$
4 .2 0

$
4 .4 0

$
4 .6 0

$
4 .8 0

$
5 .0 0

£
5.2 0

£
5.40

$
5.6 0

£
5 .8 0

£
6.0 0

£
6 .2 0

2.7 0

------------------------------------------------------

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3.2 0

3 .4 0

3 .60

3.R 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .60

vn

61

-6

----------------------------------------

B U L L D O Z E R O P E R A T O R S ------------------------------------R E S . ( U N D E R 5 S T O R Y ) -----------------------------

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5.8 0

6 .0 0

6 .7 0

6 .4 0

3

48

35
35

38
23
15

17
13
4

3
l
2

60

30

2
2

4
4

13
13

112

39
39

$
2 .6 0

HELPERS

C O N S T R U C T I O N L A B O R E R S ----------------C O M M E R C I A L ---------------------------R E S . ( U N D E R 5 S T O R Y ) -------------- -

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/

HELPERS

— — -----------------

71

3.25

430
157
41

4 .5 7
4 .4 0
2.8 5

8

12

8

12

45

2.81

6

-

17

See f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 2 6 .
See f o o t n o t e 2 , t a b l e 2 6 .
See f o o t n o t e 3 , t a b l e 2 6 .
See f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 2 6 .
E x c l u d e s premium pay f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s wor k and f o r work on w e ek en d s, h o l i d a y s ,
Wo rk er s we r e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
4 a t $3 t o $ 3 . 2 0 and 12 a t $ 3 . 2 0 t o $ 3 . 4 0 .




o
o

AND LABORERS

CARPE N T E R S 8 HELPERS

PLUMBERS*

00
o

Under
and
$ 2 . 6 0 under

"

22

and l a t e

10

10

shifts.

-

15

-

*

1
1

26
26

15

-

-

(Number and a v e r a g e

s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f w o r ke r s

01

(D

See f o o t n o t e s




a t end o f

table.

in s e le c t e d

occupations,

c o n s t r u c t i o n i n d u s t r i e s , 2 S e p t e m b e r 1 9 72 )

(Num ber and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction industries, 2 September 1972)

o

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90

* *

Average
hourly
earnings 5/

^ 4*

Number
of
w orkers 4 /

o
o

Number o f workers r e c e iv in g st r a ig h t -t im e h ourly earnings 5 / o f ---O ccupation 3 / and type
of c o n s t r u c tio n

$
%
$
S
t
$
$
$
%
%
4.20 4.30 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80

Under and
$3.00 under

and
o

o

3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3,70 3.80 3.90 4.00

139
38
101

12

4.30 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.2Q. L.4Q 5.60 5.80

over

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS ------------rniiycor t a
u u n n c K t i a il _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ----------OTHER H E AV Y CONSTR. ----------1
2
3
4
5
and the

1.812
1,069
482
157

$
4.82
5.21
3.80
5.10

61
14
47

94
45
49

55
55

46
7
39

_
_

_
_

135
67
68

_

9
7
2

14
14

_
_

12

5
5

_
_

9
7
2

31
5
26

158
_

76

62
2
24
36

12

51
2

12
45

849
804
45
-

70
52
_

-

The Indianapolis Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Boone, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Marion, M organ, and Shelby Counties .
F or the industrial scope of the survey, see appendix A.
O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) ofconstruction not shown separately.
E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and com position of the work fo rc e, rather than
ap rec ise m easure
ofem ployment.
Excludes prem iu m pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts.
Zone rates (usually
based ondistance
between local union headquarters
construction site) are included in straight-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.




Number of workers receiving straight--time hourly earnings 5/ o f ---'lum
ber
of
-kers 4 /

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t yp e
of construction

Average
earnings 5/

S
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
%
S
$
4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00
and
under

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

S
$
$
$
$
$
7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40
$

-

-

5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60

JOURNEYMEN
$

BRICKL AY ER S ------------C O M M ER CI AL -----------

162
162

8.55
8.55

CARP EN TE RS -------------C O M M ER CI AL -----------

931
807

8.17
8.23

CE ME NT MASONS ----------CO MM ER CI AL ----------STREET AND HI GH WA Y -

127
98
29

7.07
7.21
6.61

EL EC TR IC IA NS -----------CO MM ER CI AL -----------

346
316

8.20
8.20

PIPEFI TT ER S ------------CO MM E R C I A L -----------

138
138

7.90
7.90

PLUMBERS ----------------CO M M E R C I A L -----------

116
116

8.15
8.15

SHEE T- ME TA L WORKERS --C O MM ER CI AL -----------

112
112

7.93
7.93

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
C O MM ER CI AL -----------

277
274

8.25
8.25

BACK-HOE OP ERATORS ---CO MM E R C I A L ----------STREET AND HI GHWAY OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. •

128
47
39
42

7.48
7.76
6.96
7.64

B U LL DO ZE R OP ERATORS --CO MM ER CI AL -----------

117
59

7.57
7.95

T R UC KD RI VE RS -----------STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. -

651
585
57

4.95
4.88
5.57

162
162
124

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

“

_
-

16
8
8

8
4
4

-

-

17
-

17

_
-

86
86
~

“

-

”

138
138

112
112

“

-

~

~

“

-

-

-

~

~

116
116

_

-

307
307

346
316

_

500
500

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

~

277
274

-

“

“

-

-

“

“

EQ UI PM EN T OPERATORS
19
-

_

552
534
18

-

_
3
3

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

16
56
48

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

10
9

5

-

_

29
7
11
11

_

17
5
12

-

"

~

4

-

-

63
35
-

28
92
59

“

-

3

27

Number
of
workers 4/

27

16
3

3

Average
hourly
earnings 5/

S
$
i
S
$
$
$
%
*
%
$
$
4.80 4.90 5.00 5.10 5.20 5.30 5.40 5.50 5.60 5.70 5.80 5.90
and
under

and

4.90 5.00 5.10 5.20 5.30 5.40 5.50 5.60 5.70 5.80 5.90

over

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
It 106
856
157

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS
CO M M E R C I A L --------O T HE R HEAV Y CONSTR.




1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

f o o t n o t e 1,
f o o t n o t e 2,
f o o t n o t e 3,
f ootnote 4,
f o o t n o t e 5,

table
table
table
table
ta b le

29.
29.
29.
29.
29.

$
5.51
5.62
5.10

123
-

76

24

49

36

-

-

~

~

-

36

-

-

-

-

“

45

804
804

-

10
10

"

60
42
'

(Number and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f w o r k e r s i n s e l e c t e d

occupations,

construction

i n d u s t r i e s , 2 S e p t e m b e r 1972)

Number of workers r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t- time hourly earnings 5 / o f —
Number
of
workers 4 /

O ccupation 3 / and type
o f co n s t r u c tio n

$
3 .6 0

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

1

$

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

(
5 .4 0

$
5 . 60

$
5 .8 0

$
6 .0 0

$
6 .2 0

6 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 . 00

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 . 80

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

over

6
6

6
6

42
14

37

_

_

_

37

-

_

32

7

14

_

16

7

_

7

7

*
4 .2 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

_

_

4
4

2
2
84

and
under
3 .8 0

S

$

4 .6 0

$
4 . 80

$

4 .4 0

1

----- i
3 .8 0 4 .0 0

and

JO UR NE YM EN
$
T A D D C K IT C D C
occ
i \j iiu c D
r>L
\n u n u r v

c
J

231
187

D 1 l i M D C D C _______________________ _____
c u C t . nC1i
u
wl cL 1 c t a L
lc
A

D CO #
I'C C

u n o Vc o i
n vt C
UM
n iK U C K " C 1 Ul>T \
l U l lin C D R ^ T H D V | .

*

^

*^ * •
“ “* *
•

^I ~ mm h
II i m
r
.

• * “ * '*

Number
of
workers 4 /

Avera ge
hour ly
ea rnin g s 5 /

2

5 .7 0

2

4 .5 9

216
181

_______________________________

5 . 77

225

c rl n o w \ _____________________________________
J
urv v #---

5 . 14

_

35

28

76

22

_

5 .2 5

_
22
15

76

15

116

_
_

16
-

2

_

_

15

.

7

116

15
15

64 5
45

15

1 ---- t
5 ---1 ----1
1 ---- i
$
$
* ... ~---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- i
i
i
%
$
$
i
$
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60
and
under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80
HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
$

CO N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS —
C O M M E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)-

706
213
482

3.74
3.56
3.80

52
7
45

9
7
2

94
45
49

55
55

46
7
39

\/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/

See f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 2 9 .
See f o o t n o t e 2, t a b l e 2 9 .
See f o o t n o t e 3 , t a b l e 2 9 .
See f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 2 9 .
E x c l u d e s premium pay f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s wo rk and f o r wo rk on w ee ke n ds , h o l i d a y s ,
A l l w o r k e r s we r e a t $ 7 . 4 0 - $ 7 . 6 0 .




-

-

and l a t e

shifts.

-

-

'

-

'

135
67
68

9
7
2

14
14

151
38
113

5
5

9
7
2

31
5
26

11
~

26
2
24

12
12

2
2

45
45

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction in d u s tr ie s ,2 September 1972)
Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 / o f -----

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of c o n stru ction

Number
of
workers 4 /

$
$
Average
6.40 6.60
h ou r ly
Under and
earnin g s 5 /
$ 6 . 4 0 under

$
$
$
$
s
$
$
$
$
$
6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60

and

6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80
JOURNEYMEN
345
260
» 808
I

32
237
138
57

$
7.73
7.73
8.00
8.00
8.02
8.00
8.14
7.78

~

-

~

“

-

“

*

-

”
_

“
—

“
—

~

345
260

-

“

~
~
~

~
~

~
“

$
8.80 9.00
S

“

1789
1467
152
32

“

-

~

18

1

1
18
66

33

138
138

-

~

57
9

0* 91
i-i rr 1 tr t Akic
.
.
.
tLtO mKi U IAn|j
COMMER CI AL ------------------------

over

~

“

~
-

9.00

1 ,185
847

7.81
8.30

PI PEFI I T E R S ______ — ___ — __________ — *
COMMER CI AL ___ _________ ___ —_______

225
217

8.62
8.62

PLUMBERS ______________________________
COMMER CI AL _________ ___ ____ ______
RES. (5 STORY +) — ------------ —
RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) ----------- —

659
292
93
274

8.71
8.75
8.80

SHEET-METAL WORKERS -------— -------CO MM ER CI AL ________________________

763
662

8.70
8.75

77

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS -----------COMMER CI AL ________________________

366
356

8.50
8.50

_

11.C

BACK— HOE OPERATORS __________________
rnMMPRTiTa l
v u n n c A1
STREET AND H I G H W A Y --- — ____ *— —*

216
53
49

8.50

BU LLDOZER OPERATORS — ----- — --- --C O M M E R C I A L ---- ---- ----- --------STREET AND HIGHWAY — ----- --- -—
OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. --------- -— -

418
23
342
37

8.48
8.50
8.47
8.50

19

-

399

19

-

323

Tnuri/nnTiicnc
1KUblsUK 1 VC Kj
bunnti\b i « l

231
103

7.07
6.56

36

36

266

847
847
40
40

177
5

577

677
52
25

5
274
686
662

1

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

49

8* 50

4
4

72
72

27
27

22

“

106

6 .0 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

-

174
124

140
140

22
22
_

9
_
9
_

-

-

_

_
-

S

$

$

$

$

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

over

-

and
under

%
6 .2 0

and

o

«•
*

HELPERS AND LABORERS

$

5 .8 0

$
5 .6 0

i

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

$

5 .8 0

Number
of
workers 4 /

$
BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS -----------------------------------------------------------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------------------------------------------------------------------------C O N S TR UC TI ON L A B O R E R S ---------------------------------------------------------------COMMER CI AL ----------------------------------------------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------------------------------------------------------------STREET AND HIGHWAY ----------------------------------------------------------------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. ---------------------------------------------------------------PLUMBERS* HELPERS ----------------------------------------------------------------------COMM ER CI AL -----------------------------------------------------------

314
264

5 .9 3
5 .9 4

2 ,3 8 1
1 ,4 8 2
56

1469
1451
18

601
242

6 .2 4
5 .7 2
6 .6 6
7 .1 0
7 .2 0

138
58

5 .7 8
5 .8 1

25

113
58

~

-

-

-

-

_

11
-

32
_

583
-

72 4 4
-

_
_

11
_

11
9
-

-

-

2

32

438
145

18
129
97

_

"

_

_

“

“

_
_

_
“

~

1 The Kansas City Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of C a ss, Clay, Jackson, and Platte Counties, M o .; and Johnson and Wyandotte
Counties, Kans.
2 For the industrial scope of the survey, see appendix A.
3 Overall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ates of the number of workers are intended as a general guide to the size and com position of the work fo r c e , rather than a p recise
m easure of em ployment.
5 Excludes p rem iu m pay for
overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. Zone rates (usually
based o
distance
between local
union headquarters andthe
construction site) are included
in straight-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 W ork ers w ere
distributed as follow s: 25
at $ 9 to $ 9 .2 0 and 52at $ 9 .2 0
to $ 9 .4 0 .
7 W ork ers w ere
distributed as follow s: 88
at $ 7 .2 0 to $ 7 .4 0 ; 109 at $ 7 .4 0 to $ 7 .6 0 ; 17 at $ 7 .6 0 to $ 7 .8 0 ; 8 at $ 7 .8 0 to $ 8 ; 20
at$ 8 to
$ 8 .2 0 ; and 2 at $ 8 .2 0 to $ 8 .4 0 .




5
O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of constru ctioi

Number
of
nrkers

$

A v e r ag e
6.40
hourly
s , Under
and
e a r n i n g s 2 $ 6 . 4 0 under

$

6.60

6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40

t

-

-

$

-

I

-

$

i

-

-

$

1

-

-

I

5

-

$

$

8.60 8.80 9 . CO

-

-

- a n d

6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00

over

JOURNEYMEN
$

BRICKLAYERS COMMERCIAL

345
260

CARPENTERS -------------CO MMERCIAL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY -

1,790
1,468
152
32

ELECTRICIANS ■
COMMERCIAL

1789
1467
152
32

8 .0 0

8.00
8 .0 0
8 .0 0

204
138
57
9

-1 38
-1 38

8.14
7.78
8.91
8.91

1,113
847

CEMENT MASONS --------CO MM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHER HEAVY C0NSTR.

345
260

7.73
7.73

-

-

7.87
8.30

PIPEFITTERS CO MMERCIAL

225
217

PLUMBERS ---------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (5 STORY +) --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

659
292
93
274

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

185
177

366
356

577
240
63
274

77

8.70
8.75

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
CO MM ER CI AL ----------

9

847
847

8.71
8.75
8.80
8.65

763
662

5
7

-

-

8.62
8.62

SHEET-METAL WORKERS
CO MM ER CI AL ------

66

-

8.50
8.50

-

-

40
40

5
-

5
-

67 7
52
25
-

686
662

365
356

1

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK-HOE OPERATORS --CO MM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY

216
53
49

BULLDOZER OPERATORS —
COMMER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

418
23
342
37

8.48
8.50
8.47
8.50

TRUCKDRIVERS ---------CO MMERCIAL ---------

231
103

-

8.50
8.50
8.50

7.07
6.56

-

4
4

72
72

27
27

-

Number
of
workers 4 /

-

22

Av er ag e
h ou r ly
ea rnin g s 5 /

19

-

-

19

-

216
53
49
399
23
323
37

106
%
%
t
%
$
$
(
$
$
5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20
and
under

and

5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20

over

HELPERS AND LABORERS
BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS COMM ER CI AL ---------

314
264

$
5.93
5.94

CONS TR UC TI ON LABORERS
COMMER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

2,343
1,482
601
242

PLUMBERS' HELPERS ---CO MM ER CI AL ---------

138
58

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/
7/

-

174
124

140
140

-

-

6.23
5.72
7.10
7.20

1469
1451

22
22

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.78
5.81

25
“

113
58

_

_

_

“

-

-

-

11
9
2
-

32

-

-

583 7 226

-

-

-

32
"

438
145

129
97

_

_

-

-

_

_
-

See f o o t n o t e 1 , t a b l e 3 2 .
See f o o t n o t e
See f o o t n o t e
See f o o t n o t e
See f o o t n o t e
See f o o t n o t e
Wo rke rs wer e

2 , ta b le 32.
3, t a b l e 3 2 .
4 , t a b l e 3 2.
5 , t a b l e 3 2.
6 , t a b l e 3 2.
distributed ,




$ 7 . 2 0 - $ 7 . 40;

109 a t $ 7 . 4 0 - $ 7 . 6 0 ;

17 a t $ 7 . 6 0 - $ / . 80;

8 at $7.80-$8; 2 at $8-$8.20;

and 2 a t $ 8 . 2 0 - $ 8 . 4 0 .

(Number and average stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations, construction in du stries, 2 September 1972)

$

t

S

$

$

$

»

$

$

S

S

$

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .4 0

8 .6 0

8 .8 0

9 .0 0

9 .2 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

8 .8 0

9 .0 0

9 .2 0

over

-

1258

-

~

270

~

Under
and
$ 6 .6 0 under
6 .8 0

and
o

e a r n in g s 5 /

o f -----

f

*

w o rk e rs 4 /

O c c u p a t io n 3 / and ty p e
o f c o n s tru ctio n

r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - -tim e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 5 /

t

A v erag e

00

Number o f w o rk e rs
Number

JO U R N E Y M E N

983

7 .7 7

-

-

-

-

270

7 .7 9

“

~

~

~

1 2 .3 0 0

6 .7 6

-----------------------------------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ------------------------------------------------RES.
( U N D E R 5 S T O R Y ) --------------------------

1 ,2 5 8

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 S T O R Y ) -------------------------A N D H I G H W A Y -------------- -------------H E A V Y C O N S T R . -------------------------

B R IC K LA Y ER S

7 .7 8

983

-

“
~

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

37

43

9

-

3

-

-

3

C O M M ER C IA L

7 ,1 7 8

6 .7 5

9

7119

30

20

RES.

4 ,2 1 7

6 .7 8

20

3926

6

153

17

37

43

9

**

3

“

~

3

6 .7 5

225

416

6 .7 5

416

•

2U

CARPEN TERS

(U N D ER

STREET
O TH ER
CEM

~

e

NF

~ ~ — ————

m a s o n s

STREET

EL ECTR IC
C

u

Mh E

RES*

----------A N D H I G H W A Y ------------— --------- -HEAVY CO N STR.
--------------------------

IA
k

N S

C IA

l

6 .1 6

STO RY)

5

6 . 16
6 . 17

—

--------------------------

CONSTR.

156

8 .1 9

—

5

—

— —

—

-

~

18

-

-

-

-

~ •

•

406

-

60

-

226

-

60

-

1 ,4 4 0

8 .1 2

2 ,0 9 2

8 .2 3
7 .0 2

100

460

7 .0 3

100

210

8 .8 0

632

1413

160

15

260

O • DO

135

893

160

15

260

8 .6 8

497

520

—

—
—

—

932

180

1809

10

—
—

2741

490
360

365

8 .5 8

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 S T O R Y ) -------------------------A N D H I G H W A Y ----------------------------H E A V Y C O N S T R . --------- ----------------

686

7 .8 7

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 S T O R Y ) -------------------------CONSTR.
---------------------------

553

_

_

272

—

W O RKERS

— —

—

—

—
—

O PERATO RS

O PERATO RS

_

_

~

-

7 .8 8

~

“

~

7 .8 9

-

-

-

10

C O M M ER C IA L

37

7 .8 1

RES.

26

7 .8 6

76

7 .9 0

531

(U N D ER

O PERATO RS

(U N D ER
HEAVY

-

198

7 .9 0

22

7 .7 6

228

7 .8 8
6 .3 4

7 20 1

92

6*20

92

f
CQ7
>7 f

6*00

HEAVY

HELPERS

182

AND

Of 1 35

5*50

16

-

515

16

8

-

508

25

2

-

187

11

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

“

*■
“
~
”

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

76

8

-

_
“

37
26

*
~

~
**
-

”

“

-

~

~
-

”
-

98 1 3 5

4 t 262

670

5* 5 0

10

14

-

202

2

LABORERS

B R IC K LA Y ER S '
HELPERS
r U M MM K Lt1 A L
ai
v n i i fc C

—
—

—

f U N U CD c o THDV t - - - - t iim h c K
5 C 1U K Y 1
i A qhocdc
L a o U K tK j

C O M M ER C IA L

-

-

182

l iQ

----------- --------------

CONSTR.

_
-

8 779

6*00

TR U C K O R IV £ R S

p O N St 1R UiC T f hki
C n m r o i r 91 U N

_

203

C O M M ER C IA L

nES*
Ret

-

-) A o n
2 , HoU

—

— — —

5TU R Y I—

E Q U IP M EN T

OTHER

-

_

8 .5 8

IR O N

C O M M ER C IA L

O TH ER

159

28

272

STRUCTURAL

RES.

_

1 ,0 5 0

-

"

(U N D E R

BULLDO ZER

159

1 ,4 6 3

—

W O R K ER S

C O M M ER C IA L

STREET

70

670

-------—------------—

O THER

1 AS
1o?

138
45
93

CO M M ERC X AL

B A C K -H O E

121

42
156

8 .3 0

3 ,5 3 2

191

3136

42

8 .3 1

HEAVY

------------------------------------------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ------------------------------------------------RES.
( U N D E R 5 S T O R Y ) ---------------------------

RES.

10 0 7

O# 51

3461

651

STORY)

------------------------------------------------------

S H E E T -M E T A L

836
9 .0 8

P LUM BERS

R O O FER S

208

185

—
—

C O M M ER C IA L
OTHER

20
431

A 1488

------------------------—
---------------------- —

{UNDER

P IP E FIT TE R S

173

6 . 17

5

(U N D ER

OTHER

36

—

COM M ERCX A L
R ES.

20 1 1 9 5 0

—

—
—

-

M

OCC
f HkinCD c CTHDV 1
R e S* \ U N U fc K 5 a 1 U K T I * * * * * * * * * * *
C I R e e l ANO UTflUUAV
S TfiCCT Akin n ib n i iA T
n t H e K HfcAVY LUIM MK.
uC AViv rnKlCTD
O T u fcn

a

6*00

11 278

5*50

1*310

5*50

5*50

1 77H
1 1 ®
1310

1 The Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa Ana—Garden Grove Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea s consist of Los A ngeles and Orange
Counties.
2 F or the industrial scope o f the survey, see appendix A .
3 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and com position of the work fo rc e, rather than a p rec ise
m easure of em ployment.
5 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Zone rates (usually based on
distance between local union headquarters and the construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 2 ,8 4 5
at $ 6 to $ 6 .2 0 and 10 at $ 6 .4 0 to $ 6 .6 0 .
7 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 14 at
$ 5 .6 0 to $ 5 .8 0 ; 84 at $ 6 .2 0 to $ 6 .4 0 , and 103 at $ 6 .4 0 to $ 6 .6 0 .
8 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 10 at
$ 5 .8 0 to $ 6 and 769 at $ 6 to $ 6 .2 0 .
9 A ll w orkers w ere at $ 5.40 to $ 5.60.




T a b le 36.

O c c u p a tio n a l e a rn in g s {union and n o n u n i o n s e p a r a t e l y ) :

Los A n g e l e s — L o n g B e a c h

and A n a h e i m — S a n t a A n a — G a r d e n G ro v e , C a lif.'

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e
Number
of
arkers f

O c c u p a t i on 3/ a nd type
of c o n s t r u e t i o n

Avera ge
hourly
irnings 5

T

s

s

6.40 6 . 6 0

“ s~

$

s

i

J

6.80 7 . 0 0 7.20 7.40 7.60

h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 / o f -----

$

i

$

8 .2 0

7 .8 0 8 . 0 0

8.40 8.60 8 . 8 0

$

*

*

*

9 .0 0

9.20

Under
an;
$ b . A0 und<

ind

6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7 .60 7 .80 8. 0 0 8.20 8. 40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 o v e r
UNION J3 R A T I O N S

JOURNEYMEN

BRICKLAYERS — — — — — —
C O M M E R C I A L --------—
RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

1258

-

1,258
983
270

7.78
7.77
7.79

12,271
7,169
4,197
725
416

6.76
6.75
6.78
6.75
6.75

2,875
1,600
431
570
208

6.16
6.17
6.16
6.16

ELECTRICIANS —
-—
— *
----- COMMERCIAL - —
RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y )--------

4,488
3,908
420

9.09
9.08
9.18

PIPEFITTERS —
CO MM ER CI AL *
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. —

1,139
983
156

8.31
8.31
8.30

■ 1097
■ 941
156

3,027
1,038
1,989

8.34
8.36
8.33

• 2741
■ 932
■ 1809

CARPENTERS ------------—
C O M M E R C I A L ---------- —
RES. {UNDER 5 S T OR Y)— ---- STREET AND HIGHWAY — --OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. —
—
CEMENT MASONS ------ --C O M M ER C IA L

-------------------

RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

—

--- ------ -

PLUMBERS -----CO MM ER CI AL RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) -------ROOFERS ------- —
CO MMERCIAL -SHEET-METAL W O R K E R S -------- C O M M E R C I A L ------- —
--RES. (UNDER 5 STORY I----- —
STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS
CO MM ER CI AL --- ----

6 . 17

850
*70

j

983

-

-

270

-11950
- 7119
- 3926
225
- 416
2845
1580
431
570
198

36
30
6

173
20
153

10

17

37

43

17

37

-

9

43

-

-

3

9

3

20
20

10

1

191
121
70

836 3461
651 3136
185
165

360
110

7.09
7.16

-

-

-

_

_

-

42
42

-

-

60
60
-

-

-

-

226
46
180

-

490
360
632 1413
135 893
497 520

8 .58
8.58

365
272

8.80

365
272

-

3

8.68

2,480
1,463
1,017

3

160
160
-

15
15

-

-

-

260
260

-

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK-HOE OPERATORS ---COMM ER CI AL ---RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

686

37
26
76
531

7.87
7.81
7.86
7.90
7.88

BU LLDOZER O P E R A T O R S ---COMM ER CI AL ------- —
RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

553
196
22
228

7.89
7.90
7.76
7.88

-

-

TRUCKDRIVERS --- -----OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

203
92

6.34
6.20

98

103

86

BRICKLAYERS' HELPERS ---- -----C O M M E R C I A L ----- ---------- —
RES. (UNDER 5 ST OR YS—
----

779
597
182

6.00
6.00
6.00

8,135
4,262
1,278
l, 159
1,310

5.50
5.50
5.50
5.50
5.50

16

16

-

508
187
14
202

25
11

2
“

_

14

2

-

8 779
597
182

CO NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS — — ---C O M M E R C I A L ----— ----RES. (UNDER 5 STORY) —
STREET AND HIGHWAY — — -- OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.
----—

670
37
26
76
515

6

81 35
4262
1278
1159
1310

-

-

-

-

"

_

-

-

-

10

“

-

-

-

8

10
-

-

~

-

-

-

~

“

“

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

HELPERS AND LABORERS

$
hour1>
i rn i n g s c; /

$

6.00

6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.20

$

$

$

S

$

$

7.60 8.00

$

8.40

and
under

6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.20 7.60 8.00 8.40 8.80
JOURNEYMEN
NONUNION SITUATIONS

505
402

PLUMBERS —
CO MM ER CI AL
1/
2/
3/

4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

f o o t n o t e J., t a b l e 34.
f o o t n o t e 2- t a b l e 34,
f o o t n o t e 3, t ab le 3 4.
f o o t n o t e 4 , f a b l e 34.
f o o t n o t e 5, t a b l e 34.




6/
7/
8/
9/

See
See
See
See

£ootnote
f o -otnote
f o ■otnote
f o otnote

ft.
7,
8,
9,

Lab lee
t a bl e:
t a bl e i
=
tab l e,

34.
34.
34.
34.

7.28
7.50

57
27

10
18

63
-

159
159

28
18

180
180

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 /
O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of construction

Number
of
workers 4 /

$
A ve r ag e
3.00
hourly
e a r n i n g s 5/ Under
and
$ 3 . 0 0 under

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
(
3.20 3.AO 3.60 3.80 A . 00 A . 20 A.A0 A . 60 A . 80 5.00 5.20
_

_

_

of-

$
$
$
$
$
$
% $ $
5.A0 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.A0 6.60 7.00 7.A0 7.80

_

3.20 3.A0 3.60 3.80 A.00 A . 20 A.A0 A . 60 A . 80 5.00 5.20 5.A0

5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.A0 6.60 7.00 7.A0 7.80

over

JO UR NE YM EN
5.72
6.85
A . 21

1,217
695
522

CEMENT MASONS --------------C O M M E R C I A L ----------------

190
109

5.
6.

ELECTR IC IA NS ----------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------------

908
883

6.7A
6.83

PI PE FI TT ER S -----------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------------

73
73
A31
A16
23A
219

6.87
7.10

BACK-HOE OP ERATORS --------CO MM E R C I A L --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ---STREET AND HI GH WA Y -----OTHER HE AV Y CONSTR. ----

109
23
25
32
29

A. 15
5.82
3.17
A . 30
3.52

BULL DO ZE R OPERATORS -------C O M M ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y } ---STREET AND HI GH WA Y ------

79
19
15
17

3.96
5.55
3.65
3.97

1

3.11

7 AO

6

_
-

“

-

2

6

-

10
10

-

-

“

-

1A

22

31

1A

22

1A

-

2
2

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

-

_

_

~

-

“

883
883

7.18
7.30

SH EE T- ME TA L WORKERS -------CO MM E R C I A L ---------------

2

_

31

_

_

_

7.21
7.21

PLUMBERS ---------------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------------

_

_

-

$

CA RP EN TE RS ------------------C O M M ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----

32

A9
A8

16

29

53

-

155

32

99

31

32

16

29

53

-

155

32

99

31

_

_

_

12

A9

6

_

_

-

10

5

-

5

-

5

87
87

695
695

_

“
69
69

12
12
10
10

18
18

2
2

2
2

12
12

336
336

1A
1A

209
2 09

_

-

EQ UIPMENT OPER AT OR S

TRUCKD RI VE RS -----------------

See f o o t n o t e s a t end o f




table.

12

-

6 10

5

2

13

1

1

11

2

-

-

(Number and a v e r a g e

s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly ea r n in g s of workers in s e l e c t e d

occupations,

c o n s t r u c t i o n i n d u s t r i e s , 2 S e p t e m b e r 1972)
Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 / o f --

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of construction

Number
Avera ge
of
hourly
worke rs 4 / ea rnin g s 5/

S
$
$
$
$
1
$
$
$
$
$
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60

$
$
S
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10 4.20 4.30 4.40 4.60 4.80

Under
and
$ 2 . 5 0 under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70

3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10 4.20 4.30 4 . 40 4.60 4.80 5.00

H E LP ER S AND LABORERS
r nfcirrnnrTT hki i Aonnroc
C U m ) inUL 1 1 Uni LA D U K C iaJ
r nuurnr t AL —— — — — — — — — ——— ——— — —— —
.. .
.
LUHMtKtI ai
pcc
niunpft c o 1UrvT / "
;
l>C
IUNUCK DCTPIPY 1
f 1K C l 1 AMD n 1UnNAT
i
—
w TDCCT ANU Hir.HUAY
d t h p p ncAVT Lunoii>«
uinci' m p a v /v rnwcTR

2 561
1,39 A
Ill

$
3.21
3.89
2.43
2.48
2.16

8 706
48
328
143
187

277
30
122
105
20

14
~

14

101
12
42
43
4

28
15
13

1
~

1

95
6
63
26

14

14
10

14
4

23

” 1 1 CQ
1159

68

61

21
2

1 The M em phis Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Shelby County, Tenn.; and Crittenden County, A rk.
2 F or the industrial scope of the survey, see appendix A.
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ates of the number of w ork ers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work force, rather than a p recise m easure of em ployment.
5 Excludes prem iu m pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Zone rates (usually based on distance between local unionheadquarters
and the construction site) are included in straight-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 A ll w orkers w ere at $ 2 .4 0 to $ 2 .6 0 .
7 W ork ers w ere distributed
as follow s:
7 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .4 0 ; 12 at $ 2 .4 0 to $ 2 .6 0 ; 18 at $ 2 .6 0 to $ 2 .8 0 ; and 3 at $ 2 .8 0 to $ 3 .
8 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
32 at $ 1 .7 0 to $ 1 .8 0 ; 35 at $ 1 .8 0 to $ 1 .9 0 ; 1 at $ 1 .9 0 to $ 2 ; 183 at $2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; 32 at $ 2 .1 0 to $ 2 .2 0 ; 279 at$ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .3 0 ;
137 at $ 2 .3 0 to
$ 2 .4 0 ; and 7 at $ 2 .4 0 to $ 2 .5 0 .







(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations, construction industries, 2
September 1972)
or
Number of w kers receiving straight -time hourly earnings 5 / o f ----Number
Average
of
hourly
workers 4 / earnings 5/

Occupation 3/ and type
of construction

S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40

$

Under and
$5.60 under

~

'

5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60

JO UR N EY ME N
$

695
695

c i c r x n t r t amc
C L t v I K l v I APIo
r n u u c n r r ai
LUnP ltRU 1 A L
r»r r tc r it r r1r n r
r l n r
1 tK o
r n u n tcK L t A L
UUnu o r 1at
m iiu orn r
rLU nbtKo
C O M ME R CI

7.17
7.17

334
334

7*22
7.44

...

_

__

— -* — *
■
"
. . .

A L

6.83
6.83

69

....

6.57
6.57

883

r n u u m r u i
L U n n t K L 1 AL

. .

-------------* -----------------------------* --------

Cu c c t u r T A i
i.m ni/cor
o n c e I PIC 1 A L WUKIVl K o
r n u u c o r t ai
uunneiN U i a l

695
695

6.85
6.85

68
68

L A K r L Pi 1 L K j

.

209

..

16

. .. ..
———————————————

17

2
2

56
56

10
10
883
883
69
69
334
141
141

7.22
7.22

68
68

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
o A L i/ u n c n n C K A x1 n o c
D A r fS rlUC U r r o A UKo
r nuucor vai
LUPintKL I AL
Dil i LUU Z.e o
n r c o A UKO
OUL i n m CK U o C K A r1n o r
r n u u c D r i1 A L
uUPIPICKL a i

—
. .

“

lO

6.08
6.28
5.79
5.98

16
16

i

i

g

g
g

8
$

%

$

$

$

$

$

t

S

$

3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10
Under
and
$3.20 under

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 3.90 4.00 4.10

and
over

HELPERS AND LABORERS
r U N C T UL i UN L a d h d c K o
L n M o 1 Ro n r T iI nki • A d u K c d c
r U n R t K 1 ai
b n y y c o rL i A L

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/

See
See
See
See
See

f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e
f o o t n o t e 2, t a b l e
f o o t n o t e 3, t a b l e
f o o t n o t e 4, t a b le
f o o t n o t e 5, t a b le

It 301
1,288
36.
36.
36.
36.
36.

4*00

_

_

1159
1159

68
68

61
61




Table 38.

Occupational earnings (nonunion):

Memphis, Tenn.—Ark.

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction' in d u strie s, 2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f---Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Num
ber
of
workers 4 /

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

_

-

;

2.40

2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60

$

s

$

$

$

$

%

$

$

i

2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4. 80

$

$

$

$

5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60

over

JOUR NE YM EN
$

CARPEN TE RS -------------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

522
522

4.21
4.21

CE ME NT MASONS

122

4.88

BACK -H OE OP ER AT OR S ---RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GH WA Y OTHER H E A V Y CONSTR.

92
25
31
29

3.80
3.17
4.35
3.52

B U LL DO ZE R OPER AT OR S --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GH WA Y -

62
15
16

3.46
3.65
4.05

TRUC KD RI VE RS

36

2.76

32
32

16
16

29
29

53
53

-

-

-

12

18
5

-

4
4

-

155
155

32
32

49

6

15

16
4
6
6

31
31

-

-

31
31

14
14

22
22

-

-

-

14

-

-

17
17
-

9
1
l
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

99
99

8
8
641

EQUI PM EN T OP ERATORS
12
10

1
1

-

-

13

-

-

-

-

27

2

7
8

7
4
-

-

11
2
7

9
9
-

-

1

7

-

-

-

-

1

7

-

-

-

-

1
12

18

-

-

2

3

Number
of
workers 4 /

-

$
$
$
S
%
$
t
$
%
$
$
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50

Average
Under and
hourly
earnings 5/ $2.50 under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60
H E LP ER S AND LABORERS
C O N S T R U C T I O N LA BO RE RS -------------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ------------------------------ ------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y ------------------------------- ------------OTHER H E AV Y CONSTR. ------------------------------ 1 ----------1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/
7/

1,260
605
338
211

$
2.42
2.43
2.51
2.16

'7 693
328
130
187

277
122
105
20

14
-

14

101
42
43
4

28
15
13

1
1

95
63
26

See footnote 1, table 36.
See footnote 2, table 36.
See footnote 3, table 36.
See footnote 4 , table 36.
Excludes premium pay for overtime and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late s h ifts.
Workers were distributed as follow s: 10 at $ 5 .80-$6 ; and 31 at $ 6 .4 0 -$ 6 .6 0 .
Workers were distributed as follow s: 24 at $ 1 .7 0 -$ 1 .8 0 ; 31 at $ 1 .8 0 -$ 1 .9 0 ; 183 at $2 -$ 2 .1 0 ; 32 at $ 2 .1 0 -$ 2 .2 0 ; 279 at $2.20-$2.30s

and 7 at $ 2 .4 0 -$ 2 .5 0 .

_

-

14
14
-

-

-

14
4

137 at $ 2 .3 0 -$ 2 .4 0 ;

23
21
2

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f---Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Number
w o rk e rs 4 /

$
$
A v erag e
3 .6 0 3 .8 0
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s 5 / Under
and
$3.60 under
3 .8 0

4 .0 0

t

$

$

$

$

%

$

$

$

$

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

$
5 .0 0

$

4 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

$
6 .20

$
6 .6 0

$
7 .0 0

$
7 .4 0

$
7 .8 0

8 .2 0

$
8 . 60

$
9 .0 0

$
9 .4 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

9 . 00

9 .4 0

9 .8 0

197

27

5
_

_
-

-

-

5

-

2056
785
270
99 3
1

_
-

_

_

_
-

-

-

-

“

-

“

_

_
-

_
-

_
-

JO UR NE YM EN
BR IC KL AY ER S ------------------------C A R P EN TE RS -------------------------CO M M E R C I A L ---------------------RES. (5 STORY + J --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ----------ST RE ET AND H I GH WA Y -------------

242

$
8 .0 1

9

_

_

_

_

-

-

5
5

2 ,2 5 9
824
270
1,12 1
37

7 .7 7
7 .8 9
7 .9 5
7 .7 0
6 .10

227
140
35

7 .4 6
8 .10
7 .4 6

E L EC TR IC IA NS -----------------------CO M M E R C I A L ---------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------

1 ,3 5 4
991
180

776
400
228
215
135
80

6 .6 1
4 .6 5

SHEET- ME TA L WORKERS --------------C O M M E R C I A L ----------------------

195
165

8 .6 7
9 .2 0

STRU CT UR AL IRON WO RK ER S ----------

89

57

6 .2 5
7 .7 1
7 .6 2

7

14
9

B U LL DO ZE R OP ERATORS —
STREET AND HI GH WA Y

265
108

5 .4 9
4 .5 3

6 24

4

_

24

4

-

50
38

3 .3 9

7 39
34

_

~

5

48

16

-

“

"

-

2

17

12

8
4

2
2

23
2

19
12

8 .2 5

BA CK-HOE OP ER AT OR S C O M M E R C I A L -------RES. (5 STORY ♦) -

17
20

8 .3 9
9 .1 7
6 .5 4

RO OF ER S -----------------------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------

16
_

9
27
11

9 .1 6
9 .1 6

PLUM BE RS ----------------------------CO M M E R C I A L ---------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------

50
2

8 .5 0
7 .2 5

147
92

7
2

8.33

PI PE FI TT ER S ------------------------C O M M E R C I A L ----------------------

41
4

_
-

CE ME NT MASONS ---------------------CO M M E R C I A L ---------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

1

_

_

1

_

_

3

7

7

4

-

21
-

16

7

-

_

_

_

2

_

-

"

2

-

176
140
26

29

12

63

18

18

10

2

-

-

10

-

29

12

63

18

18

-

-

_

-

1204
991
30

-

_
-

_
-

_

-

-

-

147
92
114

_

12

_

_

_

64

14

_

_

_

_

24
24

_
-

-

11

12

-

24

11

12

_

12

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

171
165

“

“

"

-

12

_

_

12

_

21

_

_

_

-

-

*

12

-

21

-

-

1

-

24

14

-

_

135
135

64

114
_

548
376
24

-

_

_

7.77
_

_

12

_

-

t
H

-

-

6

83

“

-

EQ UI PM EN T O P ER AT OR S

TR UC KD RI VE RS -------- STREET AND HI GH WA Y

See footnotes at end of table.




3 .1 9

2

4

17
17

2

2

14
14

_

4

_

7

~

4

9
9

4
4

_

-

7

6
6

4

2

20

146

20

8

-

_

3

-

20
14

3
-

-

-

-

3

7

3

3

-

-

-

-

_

6

11

_

-

Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h ou rly ea rnings 5 / o f —
O ccupation 3 / and type
o f c o n s t r u c tio n

Number
of
w orkers 4 /

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

S
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
S
$
$
*.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3. 80 4.00
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2
Under

and

$2.50 under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4. 00 4.20

H ELPERS

AND

4.40 4.60 4. 80 5. 00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00

°ver

LABO RERS

CA RPENTERS* H E LP ER S --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

120
75

$
4.21
4.06

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS CO MME RCI AL ---------RES. (5 STOR Y ♦> --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GHWAY OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR.

3,387
1,785
179
1,122
222
79

5.31
5.71
5.85
5.12
2.91
4.60

EL ECTRICIANS' HE LPERS RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

303
210

4.21
4.13

PLUMBERS* HELPERS -----RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)- 1

214
214

3.23
3.23

1
2
3
4
5
and the
6
7

$
1 ---- 1 ---- $
%
$
$
$
$
4.20 4.40 4. 60 4. 80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00

*

5
5

5
5

-

23

20
_

25
_

69
6

31
_

23
-

2
18
-

25

34
29

31
-

17
11

4
2

14
14

8
6

12
10

6
6

2

-

13
-

6
-

101
-

21
11

7
-

104
77

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

25
3
7

6
~

84
8
9

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

36 2538
36 1550
167
- 802

2

7

27

“

_

24
24

30
30

6

51
51

98
20

15
15

-

-

31
16

-

12
12

7

_

-

35
35

-

7
7
'

'

‘

~

5
5

-

7
-

11
11

11
-

12
_

123
6

16
-

76
14

49
2

46
11

2
10
-

78
38
1

2
7
7

56
6

29
18
-

"

12
12

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

"

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

_

_

"

~

“

“

"

12
12
165
165

_

7
'

6

“

_

“
84
72
12

19

“
6
6

6
6

‘

The M iam i Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Dade County.
F or the industrial scope of the su rvey, see appendix A.
O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
E stim ates of the number of w ork ers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work force, rather than a p recise m easure of em ployment,
E xcludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late sh ifts.
Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union headquarters
construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
2 at $ 3 to $ 3 .2 0 ; 4
at$ 3 .2 0 to $ 3 .4 0 ; and 18 at $ 3 .4 0 to $ 3 .6 0 .
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
3 at $ 2 .6 0 to $ 2 .8 0 ; 12 at $ 2 .8 0 to $ 3;6 at $ 3 to $ 3 .2 0 ; 4 at $ 3 .2 0 to $ 3 .4 0 ; and 14 at $ 3 .4 0 to $ 3 .6 0 .




1

1

«o

1

o
o

1 ----------- i --------o
00

8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60

« 00

1 --------- 1 --------- T --------- 1 ---------o
00

7.80

1* f -




Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings 5 / o f —
---------------- i
-----------

Number
Average
7.60
of
hourly
workers 4 / earnings 5/ Under and
$ 7.6 0 under

Occupation 3 / and type
o f co n s tru c tio n

9.20 9.40
-

and

8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 over

JOURNEYMEN
170

$
8.10

2,083
797
270
993

7.94
7.94
7.95
7.95

16

200
140

7.71
8.10

31

1,204
991

8.50
8.50

147
92

9.16
9.16

—» _ l jx. .

572
400

9.16
9.17

**

135
135

7.77
7.77

"

171
165

9.20
9.20

89

8.25

_

5

36
14
9

7.22

613

20

3

7.62

3

3

3

191
36

6.03
5*42

7 174

u L k t 1K 1 L i A N o

h in p rT T trn f
H i r e r 11 1 f cKo
rnuurnrT *i
t u n n c K L 1 AL
n a i rl q c d j
r L U i uD C l Nc
p n u u rn rrn
L U r l n t K L 1 AL

..

nnnccnr
KUUrCKO

.

***

COMMERCIAL
ur t ai
u n oi/cn r
Of lCC 1 Pit 1 A L M U K A c K o
rnu u rnrr a i
v u n n t K v &a l
pucct

C 1 o n v UKA
o T KU r r fi i D A iL

vonki
1 KUN

"

ui n o iK c Kc
l UK / co o

170
12
12

2055
785
270
993
169
140
_

_

1204
991

_

147
92

„
_

-

_
_

_

_

_

135
135

_
_

548
376

_

_
_

_

24
24

_

_

_

_

_

171
165

83

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
D MU ^ " n U C
D irif u n c

n n C n iA I n n rj
Ur c K T UK
— —
—
f m ow
a. \
0 1 UKT + 1

COMMERCIAL
nrc
Kco«

—

——

fc
ID

Dial i n o 7 c o
DULLUUZ. CK

•

—

— —

*

nnco A m or
U r C K M I UlNO

STREET AND HIGHWAY

— —

—

— —

6

it.

11

$
$
$
$
%
%
$
$
S
$
4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00

Under and
$ 4.20 under

HELPERS AND LABORERS
2,751
1,678

r n * K f t i i r T UN L a a U r C n )
LUIMoT1 ItUvT1 1 d m i A D p iI tf o ^
r n u u r n m i
.....
L U n H tK L 1 AL

RES*
dcc
f\Co •

(5 STORY

1 1itinco
VUnlUCK

k
?

♦) — — — —
e 1 Un v \
Or n o T }
“

ELECTRICIANS' HELPERS
1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/
7/

See fo o t n o t e
See fo o tn o te
See fo o t n o t e
See fo o tn o te
See fo o tn o te
Workers were
Workers were

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

and

4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00
C 7A
r4

54

75
56

C •o 5
-> 8c

— —
■

802

-----------------------------------

93

1, ta b le 39.
2, ta ble 39.
3, ta ble 39.
4, ta b le 39.
5, ta b le 39.
d is t r ib u t e d as f o l l o w s :
d is t r ib u t e d as fo llo w s :

!>•

1550
167
802

80

4.39

78

-

-

-

15

-

-

4 a t $ 5 .6 0 -$ 5 .80; 2 a t $ 6 -$ 6 .20; 4 a t $ 6 .2 0 -$ 6 .4 0 ; and 3 a t $ 7-$7 .20 ,
8 a t $ 4 .4 0 -$ 4 .6 0 ; 20 a t $ 5 .6 0 -$ 5 .80; and 146 a t $5., 80-$6.

-

-

over

72
12
-

Number o f w o rk e rs r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 5 / o f -----

O c c u p a t io n 3 / and ty p e
o f co n s tru ctio n

Number
of
w orkers 4 /

A vera g e
h ou r ly
e a r n in g s 5 /

i
$
$
T
$
$
i
$
i
t
$
$
(
%
$
*
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.40 6.80 7.20 7.60 8.00
! and
un d er

2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60

5.80 6.00 6.40 6.80 7.20 7.60 8.00 8.40

JOUR NE YM EN
$
5.75

CARPEN TE RS -------------CO MM E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

176
27
128

CE ME NT MASONS ---------STREET AND HI GH WA Y -

27
11

5.58
3.95

E L EC TR IC IA NS -----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

150
150

PLUMBERS ----------------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

204
204
80
80

4.65
4.65

BULL DO ZE R OP ER AT OR S STREET AND HIGHWAY

74
72

4.11
4.08

*

T R UC KD RI VE RS --------STREET AND HIGHWAY

43
38

3.21
3.19

3
3

50
48

-

7

“

3
3

_

-

-

25
11
14

-

-

_

“

16

_

11
4
7

16

5

6.23
6.23

ROOFERS -----------------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

7

17

8
4
4

~

41
-

7.00
7.00

5

5.72
_

-

5

-

~

-

2
2

1

_

1

-

1
1

-

5

-

5

1
1

_

2
2

1
1

-

-

7

1

7

“

“

2
-

-

7

-

_

18
18

_

-

“

10
10

41
41

63
63

18
18

57
57

21
21

-

_

_

_

”

-

114
114
_

-

_

_

_

-

2
2

4
4

18
18

4
4

-

12
12

6
6

4
1

14
12

_

_

_

24
24

11
11

12
12

_

_

17
17

2
2

6
6

9
9

4
4

12
12

21
21

6
6

12
12

_

-

_

-

_

_

~

_

_

-

“

-

2

EQ UI PM EN T OP ERATORS

-

4
4

i
t
$
(
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
*
$
i
t
$
$
S
%
%
2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80

Under and
$ 2 .5 0 under

“

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80

and
over

HE LPERS AND LA BORERS

-

5
5

5
5

23

16

25

23

2
14

4.13
4.13

_

-

-

-

3.23
3.23

_

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

”

~

“

and f o r

work

CARPENTERS* HELPERS --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

108
75

4.14
4.06

CO NS TR U C T I O N LABORERS CO MM E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GH WA Y -

636
107
320
168

3.47
4.49
3.41
2.81

ELECTRICIANS' HELPERS RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

210
210

PLUMBERS' HELPERS -----RES. (UNDER 5 STORY) 1

214
214

1
2
3
4
5

S e e f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 3 9 .
S e e fo o t n o t e 2, ta b le 39.
S e e f o o t n o t e 3, t a b l e 3 9 .
S e e f o o t n o t e 4, t a b l e 3 9 .
E xcludes p r e m iu m pay for




overtim e

and h a za rd o u s

-

work

-

-

-

23

12

25

69
6
34
29

23

2
10

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

~

on w e e k e n d s ,

7
•

11
11

11
“

10
3
7
■

47
2
29
16

44
11
25
1

-

~

12
12

24
24

30
30

-

~

7
7

-

~

5
5
99
6
78
14

16

12
12

-

165
165

holidays,

2
7

62
11
49
2

“

and la te

shifts.

15
11

2
2

14
14

6
6

97

7

_
-

29
21

84
4

21
11
8
-

6
6

51
51

20
20

15
15

-

35
35

_

7
7

“
-

“

-

-

10
10

6
6

_

_

_

_

_

•

_
_

~

-

-

-

_

_

_

16
16

-

"

_

_

_

-

-

_
-

11

_
_

36
36

_
_

-

-

-

12
12

6
6

6
6

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

( N u m b e r and a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n in

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of con stru ction

workers in selected occupaticms, c anstru ction :n dust r ie ° 2 Septe m b e r 1972!
<
i

Number
workers 4/

Average
hourly
earnings 5/

Number of workers recelv ing straight -1ime hourly earni ngs of —
$
$
*
%
$
$
%
$
$
S
$
6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20
Under and
$6.20 under
6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40

JOURNEYMEN
BRICKLAYERS -----------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (5 STORY +) --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

931
655
61
215

$
7.61
7.61
7.61
7.61

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

CARPENTERS -------------CO MM ER CI AL ------ ---RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

2,510
1,742
515
149

7.12
7.12
7.13
7.13

_
“

27
27
-

_
“

_
-

_ 2461
- 1703
- 506
148

19
10
9

CEMENT MASONS ---------COMMER CI AL --- ------STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

745
466
99
57

7.66
7.65
7.66
7.67

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

ELECTRICIANS -----------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

1,821
1,515
306

7.99
8.00
7.97

_

_

_

_

_

10

-

-

“

-

-

10

PIPEFITTERS ------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------

439
328

7.35
7.35

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

PLUMBERS ---------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

1,169
362
757

7.34
7.35
7.34

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

SHEET-METAL WORKERS --COMMER CI AL ----------

962
918

7.78
7.78

_

_

_

_

BACK-HOE OPERATORS ---COMMER CI AL ---------RES- (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

462
261
75
67
59

7.57
7.54
7.59
7.51
7.71

-

-

-

-

BU LLDOZER OPERATORS --COMMER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR.

519
116
47
174
182

7.38
7.48
7.48
7.48
7.20

TRUCKDRIVERS -----------CO MM ER CI AL ---------STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR.

948
378
403
149

6.53
6.60
6.46
6.55

929
655
61
213

1
1

1
1

-

_
-

1
1

2
2
“

_
“

_
-

_
-

_
*

728
466
99
55

15
-

1
1

1
1

_

_

_

_
-

-

-

_ 1811
1515
- 296

231
170

-

_

_

_

-

208
158

-

-

-

-

817
187
580

310
175
135

_
-

42
42

_
-

-

-

_

_

_

-

962
918

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

320
189
45
60
26

116
72
30
7
7

26

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

460
116
47
174
123

15
15

715
224
356
117

50
13
21
16

135
109
11
15

_
-

-

-

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

-

_
-

44
44

15
-

33
32

15

-

-

1

_
-

$

$

%

_
S

-

-

*

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

.
.

$

_

_
-

-

$

$

_

_

-

„
*

-

26

-

S

$

5.80 5.90 6.00 6.10 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80
Under and
$5.80 under

and

5.90 6.00 6.10 6,20 6.40 6.60 6,80

over

HELPERS AND LABORERS
BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS -COMMER CI AL ----------

105
102

6.05
6.05

C O NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS COMMER CI AL ---------RES. (5 STORY ♦ ) --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. 1

4,174
2,493
127
410
470
674

5.91
5.94
5.90
6.03
5.70
5.87

1
2
3
4

“

69
-

45
24

“

913 2501
23 2028
127
9 264
46
320
36
561

95
92

“

2
2

8
8

285
228

142
82

196
92

20
20

-

-

-

-

31
17
9

24
36

86
18

•
-

48
20
-

20
-

8

-

T h e M i n n e a p o l i s —St. P a u l S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s i s t s o f A n o k a , D a k o t a , H e n n e p i n , R a m s e y , a n d W a s h i n g t o n C o u n t i e s .
F o r the i n d u s t r i a l s c o p e of the s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d ix A.
O v e r a l l o c c u p a t i o n m a y i n c l u d e d at a f o r w o r k e r s in ty p e ( s ) of c o n s t r u c t i o n not s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
E s t i m a t e s of the n u m b e r of w o r k e r s a r e in ten d ed as a g e n e r a l gu ide to the s i z e and c o m p o s i t i o n of the w o r k f o r c e ,
r a t h e r th an a p r e c i s e

m e a s u re of em p loym ent.
5 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s w o r k and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la te s h i f t s .
Zone
d i s t a n c e b e t w e e n l o c a l u n io n h e a d q u a r t e r s and the c o n s t r u c t i o n sit e) a r e in c l u d e d in s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e s f o r p u r p o s e s of th is




ra te s (usually
survey.

based

on

$

$

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e
hourly e
:arnings 5 / o f ---S
$
*
$
%
$

and
under

r-

6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80

o
o

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

$

<*

Number
of
workers 4 /

-

-

-

7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00
-

-

and

-

-

over

6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00
JOURNEYMEN
UNION SITUATIONS
$

931
655
61
215

7.61
7.61
7.61
7.61

-

CARPENTERS -------------COMMER CI AL ----------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y )*
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. *

2*483
1,715
515
149

7.13
7.13
7.13
7.13

_

_

-

-

-

-

CEMENT MASONS ----------CO MM ER CI AL ----------STREET AND HIGHWAY —
OTHE R HEAVY CONSTR. •

745
466
99
57

7.66
7.65
7.66
7.67

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

ELECTR IC IA NS -----------COMMER CI AL ---------RES. (UNOER 5 STORY)

1*801
1,515
286

8.00
8.00
8.00

_

_

_

-

-

-

PIPEFITTERS ------------COMMER CI AL ----------

439
328

7.35
7.35

_

_

PLUMBERS ----------------COMMER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)-

1,127
362
715

7.32
7.35
7.31

_

_

-

-

-

-

~

962
918

7.78
7.78

_

_

_

_

_

$ACK-HOE OPERATORS -----COMM ER CI AL -----------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) —
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HE AV Y CONSTR. —

442
241
75
67
59

7.57
7.55
7.59
7.51
7.71

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

BU LLDOZER OPERATORS ----CO MM ER CI AL -----------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) STREET AND HIGHWAY —
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. -

509
116
37
174
182

7.38
7.48
7.48
7.48
7.20

44

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

»RUCKDRI V E R S ------------COMM ER CI AL -----------STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. —

933
378
388
149

6.56
6.60
6.52
6.55

BRICKLAYERS ------------COMM ER CI AL ----------RES. (5 STORY
--RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)*

$H EET-METAL WORKERS --COMM ER CI AL ----------

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

“

-

-

2461
1703
506
148

-

929
655
61
213

1

1

-

-

1

1
-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

"

19
10
9

1

1

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

*

-

_

_

_

_ 61801

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

_

-

-

728
466
99
55

15

2

-

-

"

2

1515
286

_

208
158

231
170

_

-

-

_

310
175
135

_

_

-

817
187
580

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

962
918

-

-

300
169
45
60
26

116
72
30
7
7

26

450
116
37
174
123

15

_

_

-

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

-

_

-

-

-

26
_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44

-

-

-

-

33
32

715
224
356
117

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

1

-

135
109
11
15

50
13
21
16

-

-

-

15

-

-

$
$
i
$
%
i
S
$
5.80 5.90 6.00 6.10 6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50
and
under

HE LPERS AND LABORERS

-

-

-

-

-

and

-

5.90 6.00 6.10 6.20 6.30 6.40 6.50
105
102

BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS
COMM ER CI AL --------

Average
and
hourly
earnings 5/ under

1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/
7/

See footnote 1, table 42.
See footnote 2, table 42.
See footnote 3, table 42.
See footnote 4, table 42.
See footnote 5, table 42.
A ll workers were: at $ 8 -$ 8 .20.
Workers were distributed as follows




2501
2028
127
264
46
36

_

95
92

2
2

273
228

142
82

58
-

138
92

-

-

-

-

31
5
9

-

56
2

30
16
-

24
36

$
$
$
$
5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80

8
8

_
-

_

20
-

20
-

-

"
$
$
$
6.00 6.20 6.40

_

3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00

HELPERS AND LABORERS
C O N S TR UC TI ON LABORERS
STREET AND HIGHWAY

_

“

893
4,025
5.93
23
2,453
5.93
127
5.90
9
6.03
410
300
393
5.90
561
642
5.87
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00

C O NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS ~
COMM ER CI AL ----------RES. (5 STORY +) ---RES. (UNDER 5 STORYISTREET AND HIGHWAY —
OTHER HE AV Y CONSTR. Number
of
workers 4 /

_

6.05
6.05

over

and

6.20 6.40 over

N N N N SITUATIONS
O U IO

149
77

$
5.46
4.68

20 a t $ 6 . 4 0 - $ 6 . 6 0;

30
30

20 a t $ 6 . 8 0 - $ 7 ;

_

15
15

_

_

~

~

and 8 a t $ 7 . 4 0 - $ 7 . 6 0 .

8

-

1

6

_

20
20

12
12

_

748

( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n in g s o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s ,

Occupation 3/ and type
of construction

Number
of
workers 4/

c o n s t r u c t io n in d u s t r ie s , 2 O c t o b e r 1972)

S
$
$
s
%
S
*
$
$
t
$
$
$
S
$
i
$
$
$
$
$
$
5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.20 9.60
Under and
earnings o/
and
$5.00 under
Average

5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.20 9.60

over

J O UR NE YM EN
BRIC KL AY ER S ------------C O M M ER CI AL ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)*

10,309
4,784
1,846
2,062
1,023

8.41
8.61
8.63
7.78
8.60

CEMENT MASONS ----------C O MM ER CI AL ----------STREET AND HIGHWAY -

1,545
660
231

E L E C TR IC IA NS -----------C O M M ER CI AL ----------RES. (5 STORY +) --RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y )
Xl

$
8.41
8.40
8.33

CA RP EN TE RS --------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------RES. (5 STORY * ) --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)*
OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. -

■ vl

3,665
2,274
392

20
~

244
200
44

-

-

-

945
270

_
-

-

-

-

166
111

-

-

_
-

_
-

-

104 1277
32 616
72
149

-

-

-

2
2

226
210

138
138

-

-

622 3398
572 3237
161

_

_

-

20

-

90
-

20

_
-

_
-

60
-

_
-

-

90

20

-

-

60

-

50
10

-

60

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

42
42

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
50

220
220

20
20
-

80
20
60

_
-

_
-

30
30

-

-

7.89
8.06
8.06

_
-

20
-

_
-

20
-

_
-

6,571
5,794
737
40

8.48
8.48
8.50
7.43

2
-

_
-

5
-

4
-

1
-

5

4

1

PI PE FI TT ER S ------------CO MM ER CI AL ----------RES. (5 STORY ♦) ---

4,168
3,957
161

8.07
8.07
8.12

PLUM BE RS ----------------CO MM E R C I A L ----------RES. (5 STORY +) --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

4,227
2,749
758
720

8.11
8.38
7.88
7.34

140
40
100

50
20
30

30
30

RO OF ER S -----------------C O MM ER CI AL -----------

692
597

7.46
7.85

114
38

19
19

S H EE T- ME TA L WORKERS --C O M M ER CI AL -----------

1,999
1,859

9.81
10.19

80

60
-

STRU CT UR AL IRON WORKERS
CO M M E R C I A L -----------

827
706

9.25
9.23

BACK-HOE OP ER AT OR S ------------------CO MM E R C I A L ------------------------RES. (5 STORY +) ----------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------------OT HE R HE AV Y CONSTR. --------------

886
366
20
33
247
220 ‘

9.33
9.26
9.25
9.26
9.41
9.36

BULL DO ZE R OP ERATORS ----------------CO M M E R C I A L ------------------------ST RE ET AND HIGHWAY --------------OTHE R HEAV Y CONSTR. --------------

367
50
176
100

8.77
9.23
8.72
9.06

-

TR UC KD RI VE RS ---------------- --------STREET AND HIGHWAY --------------O T HE R HEAV Y CONSTR. --------------

1,598
775
212

6.61
6.75
6.41

“

2

~

-

-

16

70

-

20

-

40
30

-

20

19
19

-

_

19
19

19
19

60
10

-

-

-

60
19

70

60

-

-•

“

_

~

~

-

*

-

-

_

-

-

_

130
130

-

3381
- 2074
~ 308

-

-

20
20

19 1918 6841
19 827 3624
1804
- 1008 388
884
28
“

16
14
2
-

_
-

_
~

_
-

188 1949
124 1830
64 107
12
“

68
22
46

12
2
10
“
_
“

_
-

_
-

_ 3805
- 3365
440
-

267
197
70
-

_
-

10
10

470 1654
355
978
115
331
345

19
19

_
-

~

~

_ 1237
- 996
86
155

426
360
66
-

_
-

-

11
11

_

_

165
165

-

-

_

_

_

“

215
215

112
112

- 6 1493
1493

-

750
629

300
118
10

58
154

47
47

-

_
-

470
248
10

30
30

_
-

_
“

197
197

-

-

14
2
10

-

151
66

150
26
49
95

87
54
~

_

EQ UIPMENT OP ER AT OR S

See footnotes at end of table.




10
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

28

-

-

-

_

“

~

100
100

69
60
9

“

- 1038
- 291
193

-

71
34
10

-

-

-

-

|
5

-

12

-

20

12

-

-

20

318
290

70
24
41
5

-

-

-

-

23
38
-

-

-

-

-

_

2

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(Num ber and average stra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations, construction industries, 2 October 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f---Occupation 3/ and type
of construction

Number
of
workers 4 /

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

S
S
S
$
$
$
$
$
%
S
»
$
3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4,80 5.00 5.20

S
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
t
5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20
$

Under and
$3.00 under

3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40

H E LP ER S AND LABORERS
BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS —
CO M M E R C I A L ----------

1,923
1,041

$
7.42
7.36

117
117

206 1600
185 739

Vl

00

HELPERS ---

110

3.84

10

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS CO M M E R C I A L ---------RES. (5 STORY ♦ ) --RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GHWAY OTHER H E AV Y CONSTR.

13,468
5,298
383
1,274
3,682
2,831

6.86
7.09
6.35
5.83
6.88
6.94

61

PLUMBERS* HE LPERS -----CO M M E R C I A L ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

339
194
85

3.58
3.38
3.57

86
76
10

CARPENTERS'

30

20

-

92
51

20

20
41

-

-

41

20

70
30
20
20

90
20

-

_
-

210
21
20
169

20
165

10

20
10
10

52
2
20
30

11
11

_

_

-

-

-

-

31
11

20

28
18
10

50
40
10

45
20
25

25

_

-

165

10

10

10

10

-

40

5

_

-

_

_
_
_

20

-

70

20

_ 2015
-

296
70
18
1158
473

_

70
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

70

-

-

-

-

815 5470 4266
516 2183 2147
144
89
165
66 469
134 1112 1278
2020 228

40

40
5

5

1 The New York and N assau —
Suffolk A r e a s consist of New York City, Rockland, and W estchester Counties and N assau and Suffolk Counties,
2 For the industrial scope of the survey, see appendix A .
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type( s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work forc e, rather than a p recise m easure of em ploym en t
5 Excludes p rem iu m pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union headquarters and
the construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
1 ,4 8 8 at $ 1 0 .6 0 to $ 11 and 5 at $11 to $ 1 1 .4 0 .




c o n s tr u c tio n in d u s t r ie s , 2 O c to b e r 1972)

( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s ,

Number o f w o rk e rs r e c e i v in g s t r a i g h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s 5 /
Number
of
w o rk e rs 4 /

O c c u p a t io n 3 / and ty p e
of c o n s tru ctio n

$
7 .6 0

A vera ge
h o u r ly
e a r n in g s 5 /

$

$

o f -----

S

7 .8 0

$
8 .00

$
8 .2 0

$
8.40

$
8 .60

8 .80

$
9 .00

$
9 .20

9 .4 0

$
$
9.601 9 .8 0

8.00

8.20

8.40

8.60

8.80

9 .00

9 .20

9 .4 0

9 .6 0

9.801

3624

i f

? !
*
34

12

Under
and
$ 7 .6 0 under
7.80

and
over

JOURNEYMEN
$
3,625
2,27 4

o K 1U K L A Y tK j

3381
8 .40

200

9 ,6 3 9
l\CO«
I tCO*

o* t o

4,75 4

vUr^rlL KL 1 AL
IP dIUKT
lUPIUCIt ?

T /
dlU ltl

-

IQ
19

270

1 ,8 0 6
n

1,46 2

*Q2 7
8 97

9

*

'■ f

66

388

1,02 3
1,37 7
650
231

8.09
*tl A
8.0 6

6,24 6
)
d 1 UftT #

"

t

8.49

7 / 3
8.07
8 .07

8 . 1 2

l D

n
0

267

64

12

16

138
138

57Z

1200

188

*7n
70

I f?
6 7K

* * 39
92

*1

12
n
10

12

9 9 9 7

in
10

161

8 .30

.........

*Q7fl

fin

331

130

86

165

115

510

f U P T T UC T A u n O i / C O C
a
5 n t t 1 n t 1 A L HUKI \tK b
rnuurnr r a i
t U n n t K L 1 AL

3480

210

33

——————

n UU rtn b
Kn n r c Kr
r n MiMC K L 1 A L
L U r n F p r i Ai

226

419

2
2

7 is

598
510

^ 1 UH T * |
t*

54
42

3 ,78 7
2 ,68 9
KCd«

l 2

149

n*

161

(!) o IUKY
I UHUCW 3

5 ,49 0
716
40
4,16 8
3,95 7

K tb«
KC O«

72

^66

215

1493
1493,

1,8 0 2
. ...

—

—

1 0 .3 3

827
706

9 .2 3

847
366

P T niirrnn *i
Tnnu iinni/Pnr
O 1 KUL 1 U K AL A KUN WUKI a C K j
r nu ncor r i
a
L U H u t K L 1 AL —
—
—
—

1,80 2

1 12

9*26

——

197

9.25
30

629

47

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
D i i/ u n t U r C D i 1 U Ko
B Arl K ^ n U c n n t K A T n o c
r n u u c n r t aa
L U n n t K L 1 AL
npp
ic
rrnnw
« I
Kcb*
I D o 1 UKY T i

STREET AND HIGHWAY

nrucn
U 1l i t K

ucittw
HtAVY

339
50
176
100

8.98

12

20

Q* 7 9

12

~

~
20

9 0 6

1,589

6.61

-----------------------------------

diii a n n 7 c o
d ULLU Ul c K

n ntK AT n o c
U r c D i 1UKo
—
r n u u r n r ta a
L U n n t K l 1 AL
r r K c c T ANU Hv r u i J A w —————————————
n cbl
A i m u 1 b HW AY
bi
n r u c n u c awv rniiCTD
U 1l i t K r l t A V Y v U N 5 1 K «

T ftiiri/n n tw cn f
1 K U L Iv U Kl V t K b
r T n r f cT
au n
5r Kcr l
AND u vlr H W A Y ——— ———
H l i u u a\/
n r u r n u r aiiw r o n e t n
U I H t K H t A V Y L U N b 1K*

I t ?

9.25
9.41

rnuc rn
v U N b 1 K«

77

55

20
247
191

'■

-

-

-

-

-

-

:

32

150

:

^10
58

87

9t
f Q

41
5

10
119

:

38

~

54

95

6
. .
—— .—

775

485

C U J

6.44

2

290

203

-------------

$

$

$

6 .10

6 . 2 0

6 .20

6 .30

6.30

$
6 .40

$
6 .50

6 .40

6 .5 0

6.6 0

$
6 .60

$
6 .7 0

—

6 .7 0

6 .8 0

$
7.0 0

(
7.10

%
7.20

t
7 . 40

S

6.80

%
6.9 0

6.90

7.0 0

7.1 0

7 .20

7 . 40

7 . 60

over

117
117

$
6.0 0

“

”

206
185

”

1600
739

681

134

609
26

4852
2148
89

*

3764
2141

S

and
under
6.10

,

7 . 60

and

HELPERS AND LABORERS
o n T r w iL A w e n o a u c i r tcK b
BKILK a Y tK r
htL n nc
r u u u n r t a■
L n n n crK L 1 A L — — ——

— ——— ——— ———

r n n f r n i i r r i nil a A o n n e n c
L U N o 1 K U L i 1 UN L A d UK c K b
r nUr uH tn r i a iL —————————————————————
V/ u l r nL 1 A
Dec
f c C 1 l R Y 4> 1
nCOa 13 O T fUni T 1

nrr
niunrn r rrnnw i
.
Kcb« 1UNUtK ! o 1UKY 1
)
r m c c T a i m HIbHWAY
olKttl ANU utruuiv — — —— ——— — — —— — —
nrurn ur auwvUlib t K«
r nilc 1 o
UIHtK HtAVY
1/
2/
3/
4/
5/
6/

See footnote
See footnote
See footnote
See footnote
See footnote
Workers were

1, table 44.
2, table 44.
3, table 44.
4, table 44.
5, table 44.
di stributed as follows:




1,92 3
1 ,04 1

1
5* 12 7
303
3

682

2 ,73 1

7*36
7.04

2015
296

70

18
1158

“

“

“

t of
*

473

100 at $ 5 .6 0 -$ 5 .80; 60 at $5 .8 0 -$ 6 ; 1038

“

516

7.05

”

~

_
“

165

”

134

70

t $ 6 .4 0 -$ 6 .6 0 ; and 71 at $ 6 .6 0 -$ 6 .8 0 .

583

66
529

2020

176

‘

16

209
”

'

1278

8

160

( N u m b e r a n d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f w o r k e r s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s ,

c o n s t r u c t i o n i n d u s t r i e s , 2 O c t o b e r 1972)
Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 /

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of c o n s tr u ctio n

Number
of
workers 4 /

Av er ag e
hourly
earnings 5 /

i

(

S
4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

o f -----

$

$

*

4 .8 0

$

t

t

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

o v er

_

60

_

_

_

100

_

_

-

-

"

11

and
under
4 .2 0

and
4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

220

20

80

JO UR NE YM EN
$
CARPEN TE RS --------------------------------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ---------------------------

670

6 ., on

40

5 .8 8

40

_

RO OF ER S -------------------------------

'

10

_

30

90

20

90

60

220

'
PLUMBER S —————— ——————— -----------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) — — — — — — —

_

'

10

600

20
60

100

60

'

440

5 .4 0

10

50

50

30

50

30

70

20

70

220

5 .0 3

10

30

30

30

30

30

30

20

10

182

5 .1 0

19

19

19

57

19

19

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

19

-

-

-

-

EQUI PM EN T OP ER AT OR S
DJtri/ unc nnrn i 1 n r
oALlv^nUt UPfcKA m UKo — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

29

10

9 .5 4

$

(

$

S

$

$

S

$

S

$

$

S

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

S

S

$

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

.

70

_

90

210

165

10

52

11

_

-

-

-

-

51

-

-

30

-

20

21

-

10

2

11

-

-

11

15

-

-

-

41

-

20

*

169

165

~

30

-

-

-

“

260

_

18

10

50

_

_

10

10

40

-

-

-

-

10

10

10

5
5

-

10

*

‘

'

'

*

'

and
Under
$ 2 . 6 0 under

and
o ve r

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
CO N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS -------------C O MM ER CI AL ----------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ------------PLUMBERS' HELPERS ----------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------------------

1
2
3
4
5
6

1 ,1 6 7

4 .9 7
4 .0 8

-

816

5 .0 8

41

299

3 .3 5

58

85

3 .5 7

.

61

171

18

10

_

“

10

20

92

~

-

_

-




_

25

S e e f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 4 4 .
S e e f o o t n o t e 2, t a b l e 44.
S e e f o o t n o t e 3, t a b l e 4 4 .
S ee f o o t n o t e 4, t a b l e 44.
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s w o r k an d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and l a t e s h if t s .
W o r k e r s w e r e d istribu ted as fo ll o w s :
20 at $ 5 . 6 0 t o $ 5 . 8 0 ; 9 at $ 7 t o $ 7 . 2 0 ; 6 0 a t $ 7 . 2 0 t o $ 7 . 4 0 ; 2 6 0 a t $ 7 . 6 0

-

70

20

45

_

25
5

_
'

to $ 7 .8 0 ;

a n d 6 at $ 7 . 8 0

'

to $ 8 .

31

6355

Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -tim e h ourly earnings 5 / o f ---Occupation 3_/ and type
of construction

Number
of
workers 4 /

Average
hourly
earnings 5/ Under

S

%

$

$

$

$

%

%

S

$

S

$

$

*

$

5

%

S

t

i

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

9 .0 0

9 .4 0

9 .8 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

9 .0 0

9 .4 0

9 .8 0

over

60

300

296

14

1761

169

60

*

296

14

1596

169

-

40

_

2951

305

219

80

2289

267

40

522

-

-

80

-

-

-

104

38

65

-

-

-

-

1

1

and

and

$ 4 ,4 0 under
4 .6 0

JOUR NE YM EN
$

BR IC KL AY ER S ------------CO MM E R C I A L -----------

2 ,6 9 9

8 .4 1

80

2 ,2 1 5

8 .4 9

80

CA RP EN TE RS --- ----------CO MM ER CI AL ----------RES. {UNDER 5 STORY)STREET AND HI GHWAY -

4 ,2 8 4

8 .0 2

230

2 ,7 7 6

8 .4 3

60

C E ME NT MASONS ----------CO MM ER CI AL -----------

1 ,0 5 9

7 .1 6

836

7 .3 5

E L E C T R I C I A N S ----- -----C O MM ER CI AL -----------

1 ,4 3 9

8 .3 5

101

21

95

1 ,3 2 6

8 .7 0

21

21

62

E L EV AT OR C O NS TR UC TO RS C O M M ER CI AL -----------

412
160

PIPE FI TT ER S ------------C O MM ER CI AL -----------

1 ,3 3 1

8 .6 9

1 ,2 9 8

8 .7 3

41

-

PLUMBERS ----------------CO MM E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)

2 ,2 9 2

7 .3 1

149

69

SHEE T- ME TA L WORKERS --COMM ER CI AL ----------STRUCTURAL IRON WO RKERS
CO MM ER CI AL -----------

991

6 .8 4

213

19

3

3

_
-

-

*

“

16

2

38

16

-

2

22

8 .6 8

170

3

23

-

20

42

96

20

_

20

9

-

_

_

-

-

_

76

44

38

-

9

-

146

6

-

19

7

2

14

14

12

-

_

2

857

-

17

5

6

2

6

14

8

“

-

2

731

*

16

5

60
48

16

42

_

96

22
22

*

-

-

_
-

_
-

80

17

809

217

80

17

809

217

99
99

9 .1 5

412

_

_

9 .1 5

160

_

_

-

22
22
“

1266

41

9

_

-

_
-

40

17

119

-

272

79

20

_

120

160

_

_

-

218

1017

-

-

“

1 ,4 2 4

8 .4 2

40

20

-

-

40

-

20

-

868

5 .4 9

109

49

40

-

79

272

59

20

1 ,4 6 1

9 .1 6

68

21

21

6

21

4

-

_

8

218

957

9 .1 5

41

21

21

6

21

4

-

~

8

8

56

1168

2

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

5

-

-

“

~

-

60

"

“

“

“

975

38
38

-

_

10

130

8

1 ,1 4 3

_

-

60

40

-

60

-

120

-

-

1161

5

40

_

-

56

40

“

841

8 .6 0

77

114

649

1

841

8 .6 0

77

114

649

1

-

“

165

-

239

10

28

-

_
-

_

_

-

-

“

-

-

EQ UI PM EN T OP ER AT OR S
BA CK-HOE OP ERATORS --------------—
CO MM ER CI AL -----------------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------------

715

8 .6 7

80

249

7 .3 8

80

389

9 .4 5

BU LL DO ZE R OP ERATORS ---------------CO M M E R C I A L ----------------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------------

412

TRUCKD RI VE RS ------------------------CO MM E R C I A L ----------------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y -------------OT H E R H E AV Y CONSTR. -------------

1 ,1 8 9

5 .4 1

110

9

13

13

8

51

101

788

62

10

14

10

518

5 .3 1

85

5

12

-

2

2

73

278

27

10

14

10

491

5 .5 9

-

4

1

13

6

1

28

406

32

122

5 .4 7

~

"

~

~

74

See footnotes at end of table.




4

4
4

-

4

“

6

8 .3 9

4

14

195

8 .4 2

4

-

216

8 .3 6

4

2

4

2

~

•

6

471

394

48

184

7

"

7

209

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 /
O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t y p e
of c o n s tru ctio n

Number
of
worke rs 4 /

A ve rag e
hour ly
ea rnin g s 5 /

$

_

_

j

2.50 2.60 2.80

$

$

— $

*

%

3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60

$

$

l

$

$

3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80

$

of-

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60

Under
and
$ 2 . 5 0 under

2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60
HE LPERS AND LABORERS
$

BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS
CO MM E R C I A L --------

447
390

6.17
6.30

CARPENTERS* HE LPERS
CO MM ER CI AL ------

358
167

3.63
3.93

9,897
5,205
764
2,346
1,407

5.81
5.92
4. 10
6.06
5.93

147

3.62

240

6.41

CO NS TR U C T I O N LABORERS CO MM E R C I A L ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HI GHWAY OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR.
ELECTRICIANS*

HELPERS

E L EV AT OR CONSTRUCTORS'

1
2
3
4
5

HELPERS

417
390
32
20

3
-

_
-

4
4

-

-

21

53
30
41
20
21

60
60
29
2
27

76

20

56

94
8
86

556
441
115

84
2
82

73
6
67

57
57

76

20

-

52
4
44
4

10

106
98
8

26
2
8
16

64
4
44
-

12
2
10
-

16

-

46
-

46
-

16
16

75
65
10
-

805
186
10
206
403

80
60
20
-

331
126
14
16

2773
212
1801
760

4136
3567
130
259
180

423
423
-

71
71
-

20

T h e P h i l a d e l p h i a S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a c o n s i s t s of B u c k , C h e s t e r , D e l a w a r e , M o n t g o m e r y , and P h i l a d e l p h i a C o u n t i e s , P a . ; and B u r l i n g t o n , C a m d e n , and G l o u c e s t e r
C ou n ties , N .J .
F o r the i n d u s t r i a l s c o p e o f the s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d ix A .
O v e r a l l o c c u p a t i o n m a y i n c l u d e d a t a f o r w o r k e r s in t y p e ( s ) o f c o n s t r u c t i o n
not s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
E s t i m a t e s o f the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e in ten d ed as a g e n e r a l gu ide tothe s i z e and
c o m p o s i t i o n o f t h e w o r k f o r c e r a t h e r t h an
ap r e c i s e m e a s u r e
ofem p loym en t.
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s w o r k and f o r w o r k
on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la te s h i f t s . Z o n e
rates(usually
based
o nd i s t a n c e
b e t w e e n l o c a l unio n h e a d q u a r t e r s
a n d t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n s i t e ) a r e i n c l u d e d in s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e s f o r p u r p o s e s o f t h i s s u r v e y .




Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s

O c c u p a t i o n 3 / and t yp e
of con stru ction

Number
workers 4 /

5/

o f -----

S
$
i
$
$
S
$
$
$
%
*
S
7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60 9.80
%

A ve r ag e

%

%

and
e a r n i n g s 5 / Under
$ 7 . 0 0 under

a nd

7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80 9.00 9.20 9.40 9.60 9.80

over

JOURNEYMEN
BRICKLAYERS --------------------COMMER CI AL ------------------

2,240
2,075

$
8.72
8.71

CARPENTERS ---------------------CO MM ER CI AL -----------------STREET AND HIGHWAY ---------

3,501
2,636
213

8.65
8.64
8.68

6

CEMENT MASONS -----------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------

878
750

7.52
7.53

ELECTRICIANS -------------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------

1,043
1,043

9.30
9.30

ELEVATOR CO NS TR UC TO RS --------COMM ER CI AL ------------------

412
160

9.15
9.15

PIPEFITTERS --------------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------

1,227
1,203

8.98
8.99

PLUMBERS -----------------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------

1,234
1,174

8.98
8.98

SHEET-METAL WORKERS ----------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------

1,266
975

9.70
9.70

841
841

8.60
8.60

BACK-HOE OPERATORS --COMM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY

623
165
389

9.37
9.22
9.45

-

-

-

2

-

4

BULLDOZER OPERATORS —
COMMER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY

412
195
216

8.39
8.42
8.36

_

_

-

-

4
4
-

TRUCKDRIVERS ---------COMM ER CI AL --------STREET AND HIGHWAY
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR.

1,050
404
491
122

5.59
5.62
5.59
5.47

7
1050
404
491
122

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS ------COMM ER CI AL ------------------

296
296

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

“
_

-

-

-

6

-

-

1
-

_

-

-

853
727

2
2

973
837

788
759

169
169

2891
2289
104
-

10
10
-

295
257
38

219

_

_

-

14
14

_

5
5

_

17
16

-

-

20
20
-

20
20

*

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

"

-

_

809
809

46
46

171
171

_

-

65

17
17

-

_

412
160
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

_

17

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

1
1

1
1

_

_

-

77
77

4

_

2
2

-

-

_

114
114

-

_

_

56 1154
56 1147

_

_

-

-

217 1003
217 943

12
12

_

_

-

1
1

_

285
61
218

186
102
21

649
649

-

40
40

-

_
-

_

_

_

_

-

_

-

1266
975

_

_

-

_

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
2

6
-

-

6
_
-

_

14
7
7

S
$
$
%
%
4.40 4.50 4.60 4.70 4.80

-

-

-

-

"
126
-

126

268
184
83

_

"

-

-

_

5

5

128

5

_

-

_

5

6128

_

_

_
_

•

-

-

-

-

$
$
$
$
t
$
$
S
$
(
4.90 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60

and
Under
$ 4 . 4 0 under

4.50 4.60 4.70 4.80 4.90

5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6.40 6.60 6.80

HELPERS AND LABORERS
BRICKLAYERS* HELPERS ----------COMM ER CI AL --------------------

417
390

6.30
6.30

C O NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS ---------CO MM ER CI AL -------------------RES, (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) --------STREET AND HIGHWAY ---------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. ---------

8,666
4,646
180
2,338
1,327

6.11
6. 19
5.73
6.06
5.98

ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS' HELPERS-

240

6.41

42

_

_

_

-

-

30
12

-

-

-

-

-

~

*

-

_

46
46
-

417
390

-

-

-

32
32
-

-

-

-

“

-

795
186
206
403

80
60
20
-

-

315 2757 4136
126
212 3567
- 130
14 1801 259
180
- 744

-

-

423
423

40
40

-

-

-

-

240

\/
2/

See f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 4 7 .
See f o o t n o t e 2, t a b l e 4 7 .
.3/
See f o o t n o t e 3, t a b l e 4 7 .
4/
See f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 4 7 .
5/
See f o o t n o t e 5 , t a b l e 4 7 .
6/
Workers wer e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
2 a t $ 9 . 8 0 - $ 1 0 and 126 a t $ 1 0 . 2 0 - $ 1 0 . 4 0 .
7/
Wo rk er s we re d i s t r i b u t e d as f o l l o w s :
9 a t $ 4 . 4 0 - $ 4 . 6 0 ; 13 a t $ 4 . 6 0 - $ 4 . 8 0 ; 13 a t $ 4 . 8 0 - $ 5 ;
788 a t $ 5 . 6 0 - $ 5 . 8 0; 62 a t $ 5 . 8 0 - $ 6 ; 14 a t $ 6 . 2 0 - $ 6 . 4 0 ; and 10 a t $ 6 . 4 0 - $ 6 . 6 0 .




6

it $ 5 - $ 5 . 2 0 ;

49 a t $ 5 . 2 0 - $ 5 . 4 0 ;

86

t $ 5 . 4 0 - $ 5 . 6 0;

-

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 /

Occupation 3/ and type
of construction

Number
of
workers 4 /

o f -----

~f
---- 1 ---- ---- $
1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- 1 ---- $
1 ---- $
t
$
%
$
3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.40 6.80 7.20 7.60 8.00 8.40 8.80 9.20
%

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

%

Under and
$3.80 under

and

4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.40

6.80 7.20 7.60 8.00 8.40 8.80 9.20 oven

JO UR NE YM EN
$

CARPEN TE RS --------------------------RES.

(UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------------

CE ME NT MASONS
c i c r m i r * i kir
c L c l 1K IL I ANo

------------------------------------------------------—

C O M M E R C I A L -------------------------------------- —---------- —

783

5.24

529

5.33

181

5* 37

16

396
283

5m 86

9

32

111

38

9

6 i l l

38
-

-

o ft
c u

95

**

5.

1

38

146

16

96

76

38

9

20

-

40

-

42

96

38

“

9

20

~

40

'

16

95

42

48

-

-

22

19

6

16

26

-

4

-

60

-

-

-

-

60

-

-

-

-

7 99

80

99

9i

20

---------------------------------------------------------------------

1,058

5.36

A0

SHEE T- ME TA L WORKERS -------------------------------------CO MM E R C I A L -------------------------------------------------------

195
168

5.68
5.93

20
20

-

1
114

4. 04
4. 22

1A

69

-

65
A0

PL UM BE RS

2
21

-

A8

21

23
onsJ
C
3

3

C X

rtf r t t c v T T m r
r 1P e r 1 I TcRo

CO MM E R C I A L

3

72
60
12

69

48
21

-

119
6

21
21

~

79

6

-

272
21
21

4
4

2
2

-

40

21
21

A0

2
2

20
-

280

-

15
15

-

2

-

8

-

8
8

-

-

“

8

"

2

22

-

_

~

“

38
38

4

-

-

-

“

~

-

EQ UIPMENT OP ERATORS
rniiri/ftn iiicn p
1 K U L R U K 1 VC K o
f ' n u u r n r f ai

........

%

i

39
39
S

5
t

t

$

%

$

%

$

10
10
$

S

$

1 ---------- $

t

S

i

$

$

S

»

2.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4 . 80 5.00 5.20 5.40
and

Under and
$2.50 under

2.60 2.70 2.80 2.90 3.00 3.10 3.20 3.30 3.40 3.50 3.60 3.70 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40

over

HE LP ER S AND LABORERS
CARPENTERS'

HELPERS

--------------------------------------

C O N S T R U C T I O N LABORERS --------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -----------------------------1/

2/
3/
4/
5/
6/
7/
8/

300

3.14

1 231
584

3 72
3.60

32
-

3

29

24

4

6
6

35
15

60

9
9

20

18

81
77

56

20

13
9

115
115

441
~

48
48

28

48

36
34

2

41

48

“

37

44

‘

See f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e 4 7 .
See f o o t n o t e 2 , t a b l e 4 7 .
See f o o t n o t e 3, t a b l e 4 7 .
See f o o t n o t e 4 , t a b l e 4 7 .
E x c l u d e s premium pay f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s work and f o r wor k on w e e ke n ds , h o l i d a y s , and l a t e s h i f t s .
Wo rk er s wer e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
33 a t $ 2 . 7 0 - $ 2 . 8 0 ; 21 a t $ 3 - $ 3 . 2 0 ; 18 a t $ 3 . 2 0 - $ 3 . 4 0 ; 27 a t $ 3 . 4 0 - $ 3 . 6 0 ; and 12 a t $ 3 . 6 0 - $ 3 . 80.
A l l w o r k e r s w e r e a t $ 9 . 8 0 - $ 1 0 . 20.
Wo rk er s w er e d i s t r i b u t e d a s f o l l o w s :
3 a t $ 2 - $ 2 . 1 0 ; 20 a t $ 2 . 2 0 - $ 2 . 3 0 ; 3 a t $ 2 . 3 0 - $ 2 . 4 0 ; and 6 a t $ 2 . 4 0 - $ 2 . 5 0 .




98
98

26

64
44

12
10

-

16

43

10

73
10

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / of —
%

t

*

$

$

$

$

5 .8 0

Average
hourly
earnings 5 /

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

and
under
6 .0 0

_

_

6 .2 0

_

_

_

$

$
7 .2 0

_

7 .4 0

_

_

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

_

_

1618

-

-

_

835

-

-

-

_

-

541

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6 .8 0

o
o

Number
of
workers 4 /

•J

Occupation
and type
of construction

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

JO URNEYMEN
$

CA RP EN TE RS ----------------------CO MM ER CI AL -------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------CE ME NT MASONS -------------------C O MM ER CI AL -------------------EL EC TRICIANS --------------------COMMER CI AL -------------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) --------PIPEFITTERS ---------------------COMM ER CI AL -------------------PLUMBERS -------------------------COMMER CI AL -------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------SH EET-METAL WORKERS ------------COMMER CI AL -------------------STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS -------CO MM ER CI AL --------------------

6 .7 8

_

835

6 .7 8

_

_

5*1

6 .7 8

-

“

202

6 .8 1

_

_

_

_

_

100

6 .8 1

-

-

-

-

-

1 ,6 1 8

_

202
100

943

7 .5 0

943

7 .5 0

697

246

7 .5 0

307

6 .6 1

_

_

_

86

6 .6 1

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

497

246

6 .6 1
_

212

6 .6 1

285

6 .6 1

339

6 .8 3

_

165

6 .8 3

-

10

7 .3 1

10

7 .3 1

-

_

..
-

497

215

-

.

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

'

_

'

339
165

*

-

-

_

10

~

IQ

_

6 .1 8

_

-

285

_

6 .8 6

-

212

'

42

-

_

86

-

—

_

-

307

_

‘

'

_

_

-

-

-

10

30

2

34

46

135

-

-

-

S

$

%

$

$

$

$

S

$

>

S

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

*

TRUCKDRIVERS ------

_

697

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK-HOE OPERATORS

_

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

o
o

*

3 .8 0

*
o

Under and
$3.60 under

. H E LP ER S AND LABORERS
C O NS TR UC TI ON LABORERS CO MM ER CI AL ---------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)
STREET AND HIGHWAY OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. 1

1 ,2 7 7

5 .0 1

544

170

5 .2 7

274

4 .8 0

215

5 .2 5

244

4 .4 3

1021

80

479
50

59

203

21

6
6

_

215
120

124

~

1 The Portland Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of C lackam as, M ultnomah, and Washington Counties, O r e g .; and
Clark County, Wash.
2 For the industrial scope of the su rvey, see appendix A.
3 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and com position of the work force rather than
a p recise m easure of em ployment.
5 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on w eekends, h olidays, and late sh ifts.
Zone rates (usually
based on distance between local union headquarters and the construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
NO TE :
In establishm ents v isited , all w orkers in occupations studied were paid rates set by labor-m anagem ent agreem ent,
for 50 construction la b o rers.




except

Number o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s 5 /
Aver a ge
hourly
ea rnin g s 5 /

o f -----

JOURNEYMEN
BR ICKLAYERS -----------------COMMER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T OR Y)-----

519
401
115
3, 132
1,485
82
1,328
129
108
554
437
82
35

ELECTRICIANS ---------------COMM ER CI AL ---------------

-

and

9.00

over

*
T

7.79
7.78
7.71
7.73
8.13
8.24

CEMENT M A S O N S ---- *
----------CO MM ER CI AL --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T OR Y)----STREET AND HIGHWAY ------

8.80 9.00

$
7.81
7.70
8.24

CARPENTERS ------------------CO MM ER CI AL --------------RES. (5 STORY +) -------RES. (UNDER 5 ST OR Y)----STREET AND HIGHWAY -----OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. -----

^
c

$
»
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6.40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40

6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.60 7.80 8.00 8.20 8.40 8.60 8.80

O c c u p a t i o n 3/ and t yp e
of c on stru ction

Number
of
workers 4 /

32

334
296
38
-

-

12
12

-

-

-

2691
1303
82
1255
48
3
-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

7.24
7.22
7.28
7.51

474
382
68
24

1
1

1,334
914

7.85
7.87

_

-

PIPEFITTERS -----------------CO MM ER CI AL ---------------

192
184

7.81
7.74

86
86

“

PLUMBERS --------------------C O M M E R C I A L --------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) ----

1,075
702
373

8.18
8.17
8.20

_
-

-

-

SHEET-METAL WORKERS -------C O M M E R C I A L ----- ---------

249
208

7.95
7.95

_

_

STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS --CO MM ER CI AL --------------STREET AND HIGHWAY ------

911
867
44

8.05
8.05
8.07

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

BACK-HOE OPERATORS --------COMM ER CI AL --------------STREET AND HIGHWAY -----OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. ----

308
179
41
68

7.86
8.04
8.08
7.06

BU LLDOZER OPERATORS -------COMMER CI AL --------------STREET AND HIGHWAY -----

129
48
81

8.06
8.03
8.08

TRUCKDRIVERS ---------------CO MM ER CI AL --------------STREET AND HIGHWAY -----

298
135
150

6.67
6.54
6.80

_

14
14

-

-

56
32

48
48

_

142
134
8

933
568
365

249
208

-

-

805
769
36

_

_

76

-

-

68

-

-

-

-

1214
818

_

18
16

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

"

-

58
81
105

-

-

_

-

15

-

16

-

-

414
170

45
24
14
7

-

-

_

150
105
45

32

-

12

-

64
64
40
32

“

-

30
30

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
233
142
41
50

22
22

129
48
81
31
27
-

8
8

14

55

14
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
»
$
$
$
6.40 6.50 6.60 6.70 6.80 6.90 7.00 7.10 7.20 7.30 7.40
55

and

~

"

$6.40 under

“

“

6.50 6.60 6.70 6.80 6 .90

HELPERS AND LABORERS

81
57
24

BRICKLAYERS' HELPERS --COMMER CI AL ----------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y )-

161
106
55

7.23
7.18
7.34

-

C O N S TR UC TI ON LABORERS —
COMM ER CI AL ----------RES. (UNDER 5 STORY)STREET AND HIGHWAY ~
OTHER HEAV Y CONSTR. -

3,422
1,800
500
887
168

6.88
6.82
6.72
7.17
6.45

83
32
14
37

119
119
-

258
223

7.32
7.33

-

”

'
city

of St.

-

“

“

-

-

-

-

6 76

4
4
-

-

-

and
over

-

-

45
31

340
60

46

-

2 80

26
26
_
_

-

537
180
42
290
25

-

-

~

"

15
15

24
24

189
154

30
30

- 2258
- 1489
- 325
- 317
60

-

13
13
-

-

-

-

-

~

~

~

Loui s;

7.10 7.20 7 .30 7.40

_
-

_

-

"

~

“

o
o

190
108
73

Under

PLUMBERS' HELPERS -----CO MM ER CI AL -----------

35
15

Fr anklin, J efferson ,

46
-

-

St.

-

~

Charles and

St.

Louis

C o u n t i e s , M o . ; a n d M a d i s o n a n d S t. C l a i r C o u n t i e s , 111.
2 F o r the i n d u s t r i a l s c o p e o f the s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d i x A .
3 O v e r a l l o c c u p a t i o n m a y i n c l u d e d a t a f o r w o r k e r s in t y p e ( s ) o f c o n s t r u c t i o n n o t s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 E s t i m a t e s o f the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e in ten d ed as a g e n e r a l g u id e to the s i z e and c o m p o s i t i o n o f the w o r k f o r c e r a t h e r than a p r e c i s e
m e a s u re of em ploym ent.
5 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and h a z a r d o u s w o r k and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la te s h i f t s .
Z o n e rates (u su ally ba s e d
o n d i s t a n c e b e t w e e n l o c a l u n i o n h e a d q u a r t e r s a n d t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n s i t e ) a r e i n c l u d e d in s t r a i g h t - t i m e r a t e s f o r p u r p o s e s o f t h i s s u r v e y .
6 W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d as f o l l o w s :
16 at $ 8 t o $ 8 . 1 0 ; a n d 6 0 at $ 8 . 1 0 t o $ 8 . 2 0 .
NOTE;
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s v i s i t e d ,
o p e r a t o r s and 9 c o n s t r u c t i o n l a b o r e r s .




a ll

w orkers

o ccu p a tion s studied

were

p a id

rates set

by

lab or-m a n a g em en t

agreem ent,

except

18 b a c k - h o e

(Number and average stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations, construction in d u s tr ie s ,2 September 1972)
Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h ourly earnings 5 / o f —
Number
of
workers 4 /

O ccupation 3 / and type
o f c o n s t r u c tio n

Avera ge
hour ly
earnings 5 /

$

S

6

$

$

S

%

S

S

s

S

S

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .4 0

8 .6 0

8 .8 0

9 .0 0

9 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .4 0

8 .6 0

8 .8 0

9 .0 0

9 .2 0

9 .4 0

-

-

-

Under and
$ 7.00 under
7 .2 0

JOURNEYMEN
$
134

COMM ER CI AL -----------------------RES, (5 STORY «•) -------------------------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) -------------------------

8 .5 0

134

8 .5 0

4 ,1 1 3

COMM ER CI AL ---------------------------------------------

8 .1 0

2 ,4 8 6

8 .1 0

647

8 .1 0

816

8 .1 0

158
801

134

4092

-

7 .1 8

-

8 .1 0

633

7 .1 3

j

i

21

2465

21

647

1

i

816

708

48

—

48

—

45

-

63

8 .4 4

“

~

8 .2 9
8 .3 1
8 .2 6
7 .9 2

-

1 ,1 8 8

8 .1 1

1 ,1 0 2

8 .1 1

~

264

8 .5 7

26%

175

8 .5 7

175

89

8 .5 8

89

324

8 .5 9

121

8 .5 6

66

8 .6 7

106

f o n u u n o v C D C _____— _______
C O MM ER CI AL -------------------- —
P incft n F A V I rnisKTRu T H F R H c M i V v u n o i a • — __ _ _ _ _

8 .4 3

353

273

C TDI ir TliO At

-

539

f n c r i- n c m u h u i / n a
j u c c r_u p tia• u A aim c c mco _____________
-----— ------------^ U * n t K r t aL
v n u u c c w 1A i
*
*

-

593

ROOFERS -------------------------- —

7 .9 7

1 ,1 4 1

m aiaioc o f
rLUrlOCK^
r n M M F o r ri a l
bunnci>w ai
acf
auiiucn c c t \J \if
iiikinro j J in o u i
T

8 .0 3

1 ,4 8 4

■ ii w m m b w m
i

j

48

427

v U n n L l\w i A L

-

45

540

1 ,7 6 6

COMM ER CI AL ------------------ —

i

158

7 .1 3

63

-

7 .1 9

48

STREET AND HIGHWAY ---------------- —
OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. --------------

li#

8 .6 7

337

8 .2 7

127

8 .2 6

112

8 .2 6

88

8 .2 9

~

489

822

74

138

682

10

822

66

30

556

10

“

5

“

“

8

48
48

4

366

4

“

12

301

—
”
~

24

-

“

~

”

201

173

230

526

11

80

30

230

242

11

~

“

~

~

119

141

“

279

-

-

-

123

-

~
-

150
36

151

883

38

36

114

834

38

“

61

19

61

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

~

’

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS
BACK-HOE OPERATORS -------------- —
li unne nu i m u
c iftcci Alan nivnviAf
) t o c c t M d u HTCHUAY
ftTMFR Up A\/Y rnw cTk.
w i n c f n c M i i vunoift•
t
Bin a n n i c B n n c a a m A C • - • • • • • • • • • • • • •
D U L L U U l c K UrtKAIUKd
a nu u r n r 1» a i
u u n n c M u &m l
STREET AND HI GHWAY ---------- —
rttuen lic a w w r nAir t o
U1nfcK nCAYY vUMo1 ft•
TRUCKHQ 1 VCI\f ™— ™
1ftUU^UlN TUFP^
■■■■".
CO MM ER CI AL — ------------------ - - —
CTBPFT AM MffiMWAY
O
)1ACC1 RHU n|UnPMI
OTHER HEAV Y C O N S T R . - - - -—
- -* -

-

-

-

-

-

56

-

263

5

93

28

66
1 At
lUl
~

•

•

-

~

~

337

-

-

112

*

-

“

“

~

127

~

6 .8 9

6l 1 A
11 5

149

6 .8 5

56

6 .9 8

26

226

60

6 .9 7

6

*

*

*

-

88

* ■

~

-

93

252

-

54

3f3

•

*

—

—

HELPERS AND LABORERS
4f
& t COv

uunncftuiAL

RES. ( 5 STORY ♦ ) ------------------RES. (UNDER 5 ST O R Y ) --------------STREET AND HIGHWAY ----------------OTHER HEAVY uunv»a «
uincft ncMi! m N ^ T R .

-——

5 .4 7
5 .4 9

187

5 .4 4

322

5 .4 3

244

5 .4 5

4£1

5 .4 5

?1260
187
322
244
441

—

-----

1 The San F ra n cisc o —
Oakland Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of A lam ed a, Contra C osta , M arin , San F r a n cisc o , and San Mateo
Counties.
2 F or the industrial scope of the su rvey, see appendix A .
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
4 E stim ates of the number of workers are intended as a general guide to the size and com position of the work force rather than a p recise
m easure of em ploym ent.
5 Excludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on w eekends, h olid ays, and late sh ifts.
Zone rates (usually based on
distance between local union headquarters and the construction site) are included in stra igh t-tim e rates for
purposes of this survey.
6 W orkers were distributed as follow s:
28 at $ 6 to $ 6 . 2 0 ; 79 at $ 6 .4 0 to $ 6 .6 0 ; and 9 at $ 6 . 6 0 to $ 6 . 8 0 .
7 W orkers were distributed as follow s:
2 ,3 3 4 at $ 5 . 4 0 to $ 5 .6 0 ; and 120 at $ 6 to $ 6 . 2 0 .
NO TE :

In

establishm ents v isited ,




all workers in occupations studied were paid rates set by lab or-m anagem ent agreem ent.

Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings 5 / o f ----

o
o

in

4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80

5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6.20 6. 40

S
»
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
6 . 40 6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.80 8.20 8.60 9.00

and

6.60 6.80 7.00 7.20 7.40 7.80 8.20 8.60

o
o

workers 4 /

$
i
i
$
i
%
$
1 -------- $
%
»
%
Average
4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.00 6. 20
hourly
earnings 5 / Under and
$4.00 under

<
0

O ccupation J3/ and type
o f c o n s t r u c tio n

Number

over

J O UR NE YM EN
$

B R I C KL AY ER S --------------------C O M M E R C I A L ------------------RES. (UNOER 5 S T O R Y ) --------

3,390
1,835
I, 160

7.87
8.15
7.41

78

9
9

18

C A RP EN TE RS ---------------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------RES. (5 STORY +) -----------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. --------

5,663
2,981
146
2,205
269
62

6.49
7.47
5.73
5.28
5.70
7.62

4

108
7

84

CE M E N T MASONS ------------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------STREET AND HI GH WA Y ---------

1,484
661
120
619

6.00
7.04
5.18
5.05

28
28

52
8
44

30
10
20

E L E C TR IC IA NS -------------------C O MM ER CI AL ------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------

1,648
1,424
188

7.83
8.19
5.54

_
-

46
38
4

5

18

78
-

-

4
-

69
20

9
1

3

2

3

3

“

372
46
46
262
18
-

615
10
•

120

701
76

“

181
61

11
10

16
8
4

11

267
39
20
208

49
14

273
36
20
133
81
3

4
4
~

693
56
28
587
22
“

2
2
-

8
2
2
4

18
18

172
20
104

396
2
10
384

72
10
62
“

142
136
6
-

56
38
14

40
16
18

20
4
12

_
-

66
54
12

92
50
40

26
20
4

34
22
4

_

_

_

_

6
6

4
4

6
6

2
2

_

8
4

314
76
22
216

62
33
9
20

168
105
1
62

38
38

2
2

_

-

_

-

24
6

_

~

-

-

173
138
35

91
83
4

59
59

_
-

33
26
7

-

“

-

-

•

101

36
48

-

-

-

-

49
-

-

-

-

-

-

1

“

-

35

123
112
11
18
4
10
4

2
-

-

2
29
19

_
-

70
66
4
36
-

780 1166
380
262
400 618

_

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

36

2753
2586
22

-

-

86
59

“

-

“

“

-

30
26

7
7

2
2

_

-

1
1

1
1

287
238

-

4

~

“

-

13

-

6
6

2
2

80

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

"

~

3
3
-

114
16
10

993
991

3
3

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“■
-

80

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

236
236

-

-

4

4 1024
4 1022

-

-

148
148

18

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

402

1

-

22
22

12
12

10
10

_

5
5

_

10
10

_

71
71

_

761
761

42
42

329
329

16
16

8
8

2
2

3

-

-

_ 1123
- 1048
45

4
4

"

76
76

-

EL EV A T O R C O N S TR UC TO RS ---------

426

8.46

P I PE FI TT ER S --------------------C O M M ER CI AL -------------------

951
951

8.59
8.59

_

_

-

"

PL UMBERS ------------------------CO MM ER CI AL ------------------RES. (5 STORY ♦) -----------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------

2,509
1,934
114
461

6.89
7.34
6.34
5.13

4
4
-

92
28
8
56

64
32
12
20

115
86
8
21

83
45
7
31

ROOFERS -------------------------CO MM E R C I A L -------------------

277
231

6.24
6.43

6
6

30
12

2
2

7
7

_

S H E E T- ME TA L WORKERS -----------C O MM ER CI AL ------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) --------

2,390
2,066
320

6.73
7.08
4.52

60
60

56
28
28

104
62
42

57
50
7

93
37
56

32
29
3

210
132
78

STRUCTURAL IRON WO RK ER S ------CO MM ER CI AL -------------------

118
115

8.28
8.37

_

_

_

1

_

_

2

BA CK-HOE OPERATORS ------------COMM ER CI AL ------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. --------

648
22 5
61
58
292

6.20
6.65
5.43
5.93
5.98

2

15

14

46

10

21

37

9

10

2

2
8

14
1

-

-

1

1

15

12

22

22

9

1
9

4

-

1
8
12

-

-

18
6

-

-

-

16
12

2

BU LL DO ZE R OPERATORS -----------C O MM ER CI AL ------------------RES. (UNDER 5 S T O R Y ) -------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. --------

443
70
163
49
93

5.87
7.29
5.00
5.73
5.58

13

6

18

34

37
7
15
4
11

2

28

35

70

-

6

2
“

12
16

24

70
-

TRUC KD RI VE RS -------------------STREET AND HI GH WA Y --------OTHER HEAVY CONSTR. --------

703
371
109

4.05
3.81
3.91

6334
268

_
-

99
3

-

-

-

4
_

-

*
_
-

_

-

-

2
1

51
51

_

_
-

_
-

-

_ *
_

~

“

-

-

30

50
40

10
10

_

_

-

-

*

“

“

-

*

4
4

_
-

_
-

1291
1291

58
58

12
12

_
-

55
55

6
6

_

146
146

-

50
50

-

10
10

-

-

-

EQ UI PM EN T OPER AT OR S

See fo o t n o t e s a t end o f ta b le ,




12

1
“

65

-

-

4

18

2
~

-

~

108
42
11

148
58
22

-

8
4
22
14
-

11

-

11

-

51
15
9
1
26

104

3

-

-

6

3

1

127
126
-

-

51

22

14

-

-

87
66
4

14

l

1

84
4

_
-

_
-

51
43

19
16

-

-

_
-

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

2

-

-

12
92

-

42

35

1

1
34

1

9

1

5

22

6
6

5

-

4

1

-

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f ---Number
of
workers 4 /

O ccupation 3 / and type
o f c o n s t r u c tio n

1

Average
3 .0 0
hourly
earnings 5/ Under and
$3.0 0 under
3 .1 0

H ELPERS

ANO

R ES.

R ES.
O THER

ANO
HEAVY

ELEC TR IC IA N S*
R ES.

IU N D ER

PLUM BERS*

982

IU N D ER

t

$

$

$

S

$

i

»

»

s

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

over

10
6

255

14

224

4

7

283

26

14

21
12

23

162

23

5

281

2

~

89

5

•

2

-

2 nd

4 .0 2

-

6

-

85

28

•

4

-

71

28

2

~

14

—

94

7

35

4

4

8
6

176

108

96

84

4

23

4

116

~

2

72

2

3

4

98

40

162

58

4

2

149

2

33

-

1

-

19

“

5

23

-

*

2

2

•

•

~

3 .6 6

40

143

8

52

2
2

101
20

25

5 .0 9

11
10

152

202
689

2

126

2

33

“

1

83

91

81

24

1

-----------------------

1 5 ,3 3 3

4 .3 3

500

1922

216

1660

91

94

2175

71

1197

37

31

626

437

154

313

-----------------------------------------

5 ,8 9 5

5 .4 1

961

4 .3 7

5

----------------------------

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

5

♦ )

----------------------------

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

H IG H W A Y

4 ,6 4 2

3 .5 4

2 ,2 3 9

3 .5 4

142

3354

23

17

13

988

141

3290

17

199

9

-

87

31

47

21

-

74

1

31

-

-

14

161

262

35

140

40

-

1

885

43

601

4

4

411

137

391

9

100

-

-

-

284

4 22

76

290

38

26

439

19

195

80

107

25

45

19

-

-

-

151

17

373

14

28

207

5

171

12
12

11

322

16

34

1

184

7

7

2

2

79

108

18

10
10

2

40

-

20

-

2

-

2

3

-

-

20

2

19

2

-

48

5

15

37

24

-

76

-

-

-

191

8

24

14

“

76

“

~

-

191

1

2

30

1
1

14

4

1
1

-

37

64

32

50

82

-

38

2

10

42

~

40

18
)A J
C
\

*

40

2 . 89

1247

36

3

2 .9 4
4 .4 4

93

-

150

4 .8 4

”

19

36

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

113

~

63

48

234

10
10

584

119

715

2

96

456

119

“

-

77 0

—

-

”

121

95

3 .7 6

—

17

*

76

3 .3 9

—

-

*

1007

316

STO R Y )—

32
2

~

14

60

1 ,5 9 6

--------------------------------

5

-

136

---------------------

-----------------------------------------

6

868
6

-----------------------

CONSTR.

5

-----------------------

8

6

HELPERS

H ELPERS

C O M M ER C IA L
R ES.

4 .1 1

STO RY

IU ND ER

STREET

343

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

LABO R ER S

C O M M ER C IA L
15

4 .4 7

-----------------------------------------

IU N D ER

CO N STR U CTIO N
R ES.

4 .3 7

963

HELPERS

C O M M ER C IA L

i

3 .5 0

r\
f

CARPENTERS*

1 ,3 4 2

5

1 -------

3 .4 0

0

IU N D ER

S

3 .3 0

1

RES.

-------------------------

-----------------------------------------

HELPERS

C O M M ER C IA L

%

3 .2 0

T ------- $

LABO RERS

$
B R IC K LA Y ER S *

1 ------- 1 ------- 1 ------- %

3 .1 0

i

14

2

4

570

3

58

64

6
1

20

7

1

1 The Washington Standard Metropolitan Statistical A rea consists of Washington, D . C . ; M ontgom ery and P rince G eorges C ounties, M d. ; A lexan d ria, F airfax and Falls Church cities and
A rlin gton , F a ir fa x , Loudoun, and Prince W illiam Counties, V a.
2 F o r the industrial scope of the su rvey, see appendix A .
3 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 E stim ates of the number of w orkers are intended as a general guide to the size and composition of the work force rather than a p rec ise m easure of em ploym ent.
5 E xcludes prem ium pay for overtim e and hazardous work and for work on weekends, h olidays, and late sh ifts. Zone rates (usually based on distance between local union headquarters
and the construction site) are included in straight-tim e rates for purposes of this survey.
6 W orkers were distributed as follow s: 18 at $ 3 to $ 3 .2 0 ; 42 at $ 3 .2 0 to $ 3 . 4 0 ; 85 at $ 3 . 4 0 to $ 3 . 6 0 ; 46 at $ 3 .6 0 to $ 3 .8 0 ; and 143 at $ 3 . 8 0 to $ 4 .
7 W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s: 10 at $ 2 to $ 2 .1 0 ; 10 at $ 2 .2 0 to $ 2 .3 0 ; 40 at $ 2 . 7 0 to $ 2 .8 0 ; and 10 at $ 2 . 8 0 to $ 2 . 9 0 .




(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction in d u s tr ie s ,2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings 5 / o f---Number
workers 4 /

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

*

earnings 5/

%

%

S

S

*

S

$

$

S

S

$

$

%

$

6 .2 0

Average

6 .4 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .4 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .4 0

8 .6 0

8 .8 0

9 .0 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .0 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

8 .8 0

9 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

10

2743

3

_

_

_

_

_

_

2586

3

1 -------

9 .4 0

9 .4 0

over

Under and
$6.20 under
6 .4 0

%

9 .2 0

and
7 .4 0

8 .4 0

9 .2 0

JO U R N E Y M E N

------------------------------------------- -- -------------------------------------- — ------------------------

It 723

8*32

991

8 .6 2

-

CA R PEN TER S

2 ,7 7 4

7 .7 6

15

CO M M

----------------------------------------- ------ ------------E R C I A L --------------------- ------------------- — - — -

2 ,6 0 7

7 .7 6

15

C O N S T R . ----------------- -----------------

59

7 .7 7

-------------------------------------------------------

474

7 .5 4

---------------------------------------------------------

1 ,1 7 2

8 .7 2

C O M M E R C I A L ------------------------------------------------------

1 ,0 9 0

8 .8 9

-------------------------------------

426

8 .4 6

-----------------------------------------------------------

803

_

_

8 .8 7

B R IC K LA Y ER S

C O M M E R C IA L

O THER

HEAVY

730

ELECTR ICIA N S

ELEVATO R

CONSTRUCTORS

P IP E FIT TE R S

C O M M ER C IA L

---------------------------------- ------ —

---------

C O M M ER C IA L

-------------------------------------------------------

991

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

—

-

-

-

-

_

1002

-

88
88

_

-

-

_

-

3

236

287
-

-

-

238

-

236

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

402

80
-

1

8 .7 6

1 ,3 5 7

8 .0 5

1287

33

25

1 ,3 5 7

8 .0 5

1287

33

25

---------------------------------

115

8 .3 7

55

-------------------------------------------------------

115

8 .3 7

55

-

50

32

41

22

34

_
_

_
_

-

-

16

_

_

16

-

IRO N

C O M M ER C IA L

W ORKERS

E Q U IP M EN T

B A C K -H O E

--------------------------------------------

248

6 .9 1

-------------------------------------------------------

62

7 .9 0

STREET

OPERATO RS

H IG H W A Y

O THER

HEAVY

BULLO O ZER

-------------------------------------

38
136

O PERATORS

201

22

63

21

TRUCKDRI VERS
O THER

—

—

HEAVY

—

—

CONSTR.

—

—

—

—

--------

-----------------------------------

5

-

-

84

~

35

2

1

“

12

_
_

14
14

12
12

_

3
_
-

_

50

_

-

—

43
39

4

”

1
2

2

-

-

_

4

-

_

_

~

•

10
10

_

_

4

~

8

3

_

_

_

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

_

_

_
-

-

2

6. _ -

4 .2 9
67

31

70

11

6 .9 5

—

6
6

1

1

7 .5 7

H I G H W A Y ---------------------------- —

_
_

5

31

_

26

7 .0 1

-------------------------------------------------------

STREET

_

70

27

6 .6 1

------------------------------------------

22

6 .0 5

-----------------------------------

CONSTR.

C O M M ER C IA L
AND

3

O PERATORS

C O M M ER C IA L
AND

-

_

1048

------------------------------------------

-

1
1

1123

8 .7 6

W O RKERS

-

-

8 .8 7

1 ,0 5 2

C O M M E R C I A L --------------------------------------------------*
—
STRUCTURAL

42

18

1 ,1 2 7

S H E E T -M E T A L

-

59

7 .5 2
C O M M ER C IA L

993

3

"

424

3 .8 8

67

$

i

s

$

$

%

$

S

S

$

$

*

S

*

$

S

S

$

$

4 .3 0

4 .4 0

4 .5 0

4 .6 0

4 .7 0

4 .8 0

4 .9 0

5 .0 0

5 .1 0

5 .2 0

5 .3 0

5 .4 0

5 .5 0

5 .6 0

5 .7 0

5 .8 0

5 .9 0

6 .0 0

6 .1 0

5 .1 0

5 .2 0

5 .3 0

5 .4 0

5 .5 0

5 .6 0

5 .7 0

5 .8 0

5 .9 0

6 .0 0

6 .1 0

over

_

_

89

_

_

1203

140

l

3352

-

-

-

10

-

-

985

140

-

3288

Under and
$4.30 under
H ELPERS

ANO

and

LABO RERS
4 .4 0

CO N STR U CTIO N

L A B O R E R S -------------------------------------

C O M M ER C IA L
R ES.

15

R ES.

(U N D E R

STREET
O TH ER

1/

2/
3/
4/
5/
6
/

------------------------------------------------------

HEAVY

4 .7 0

4 .8 0

4 .9 0

5 .0 0

124

102

22

799

29

20

164

2

_

4 ,4 8 0

5 .9 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

40

-

-

64

341

4 .8 6

-

-

-

262

-

15

466

4 .6 3

-

-

-

366

-

-

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

309

5 .1 0

-

101

7

2

29

-

17

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

151

-

C O N S T R . -----------------------------------

468

4 .5 8

124

1

15

169

~

67

1

5

> --------------------------------------- --

S T O R Y ) --------------- ----------------- --

♦

H IG H W A Y

See footnote
See footnote
See footnote
See footnote
See footnote
Workers were




4 .6 0

5 .6 6

-------------------------------------

STO RY
AND

4 .5 0

6 ,0 6 4

1, table 53.
2, table 53.
3, table 53.
4 , table 53.
5, table 53.
distributed as follow s:

5

7

—

—

79

14 at $ 3 .4 0 -$ 3 .6 0 ; 22 at $ 3 .60-$3 .8 0; 129 at $3.80-$4; 9 at $ 4 -$ 4 .2 0 ; 148 at $ 4 .2 0 -$ 4 .4 0 ; 3 at $ 4 .4 0 -$ 4 .6 0 ; and 99 at $4 .80-$5 .

-

17
17
“

~

“

(Number and average straight-tim e hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations, construction in d u str ie s,2 September 1972)
Number of workers receiving straight - time hourly earnings 5 / o f ---Number
of
workers 4/

Occupation 3 / and type
of construction

(

Average
hourly
earnings 5/

i

i

*

t

S

J

i

%

*

S

%

$

i

i

4 .2 0

6 .6 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .6 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

1 ------6 .2 0

$

6 .0 0

6 .6 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

9 .0 0

4 .6 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .6 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .0 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

6 .6 0

6 .8 0

7 .0 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 •60

9 .0 0

9 . AO

16

2

780

636

114

_

66
6

380

262

16

600

174

10

1

1 ------- T ------- $

T

Under and
$4.00 under
6 .2 0

JO U R N EY M E N

$
B R IC K LA Y ER S

----------------------------------

C O M M ER C IA L
RES*

1*667

(U N O E R

5

C O M M E R C I A L -------- --------------------R ES.
CEM ENT
RES*

AND

ROO FERS

-

3

3

-

5 .2 7

6

108

86

69

273

9

693

372

686

181

5 .6 6

-

7

-

20

36

56

66

61

61

.

5 .2 8

6

101

36

69

133

587

262

615

120

5 .1 8

28

52

30

8

18

172

396

72

162

10
20

2
6

20

10

62

18

106

386

66

56

60

66

92

26

36

56

50

12

60

20
6

22
6

123

_

112

6

-

11

2

11
10

267

69

18

29

39

16

19

1

208

35

6
6

30

7

2

6

-

-

6
6

2
2

22
22

12
12

10
10

-

5

-

329

16

8

2
2

3

_

_

S T O R Y ) ---------- —

5

120

5 .1 8

606

------------ —

5 .0 0

676

5 .6 6

----------------- --------—

336

5 .9 2

-

38

38

16

20
6

S T O R Y ) ----------

108

6 .9 0

-

6

16

18

168

7 .0 6

_

_

168

7 .0 6

-

1*382

5 .3 6

92

_

12

5

------------------------------

------ ---------------------------------------------

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

66

115

83

1
-

_

-

_
_

_

6
6

6
6

6
6

2
2

316

62

168

36

_

38

_

-

882

5 .6 5

6
6

28

32

86

65

8
6

76

33

105

S T O R Y ) ----------

631

6 .8 8

-

56

20

21

31

6

216

20

62

-------------------------------------------

71

6 .5 7

6

30

2

7

-

-

2

-

26

-

-

1*033

6 .9 9

56

106

57

93

32

210

173

91

59

_

------------------------------—

(U N D ER

S H EE T —M ETA L

5

W ORKERS

—

---------------- -----------

329

16

33

6

26

6

51

28

62

50

37

29

132

138

83

59

_

60

28

62

7

56

3

78

35

6

*

-

600

5 .7 5

15
_

66

37

12

18

1

16

9
_

10

2

2
2

13

5 .6 3

2
2

16

61

20

5 .7 1

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

O TH ER

HEAVY

BULLOOZER
R ES.

ANO

TRU CK O R IV ER S
STREET
O TH ER

_______

S T O R Y ) --------------------—

C O N S T R . -----------------—

5

------------ ---- —

AND

H IG H W A Y
CONSTR.

-----------—

-----------------

See footnotes at end of table,




5 .6 6

-

15

12

22

-

6 .9 3

13

36

37

5 .0 0

18

_

6 .8 2

8
6

15

28

12
1

6
6

18

163
-

--------------------------------

HEAVY

1

6

156

S T O R Y ) ----------

H IG H W A Y

_

262

O P E R A T O R S ------------ —

(U N D ER

STREET

5

H I G H W A Y ----------- -— —

AND

_
_

_
-

-

_

_

_

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

4

4

20
20

60

-

-

36

1

1

_

5

-

_

_

_

_

10
10

_

A

71
-

71

_

76

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

4

-

-

-

6
A

60

76

-

_
_
-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

A

-

_

_

OPERATORS

O P E R A T O R S -------------- —
(U N O ER

STREET

-

-

5 .2 0
6 .5 2

R ES.

-

51

320

E Q U IP M EN T

8

-

709

B A C K -H O E

36

_

-

R ES.

S T O R Y ) - --------

_

_

-

C O M M E R C I A L -------- --------------------5

10

-

60
-

(U N D E R

70

-

6

28

8
66

2
2

11

8
-

961

---------------------------------- --------

C O M M ER C IA L
R ES.

-

2*205

—

C O M M ER C IA L
PLUM BERS

2

-

376

-------------------------------------------

(U N D E R

P IP E FIT TE R S

3

18

S T O R Y ) ----------

5

H IG H W A Y

C O M M ER C IA L
RES-

5

9

------------------------------

(U N D ER

ELECTR ICIA N S

18

78

1
6

(U N D E R
MASONS

STREET

9

7 .1 1

2*889

C A R P E N T E R S --------------------------------------------—

78

7 .6 0

716

S T O R Y I ----------

7 .6 1

866

------------------------------------ —

6

-

279

3 .6 8

61 6 9

99

185

3 .5 3

62

3 .9 5

26

5

2
_

-

11
11

12
_

_

126

_

22

9

9

28

35

70

12

26

26

36

9

20
9

12
22

_

22

_

_

_

1A
A

_

70

16

.11

-

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

Number o f workers r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings 5 / o f ----

i - %-- *-- s- $ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - -- -- -- -- 5 $ 1 $ $ $ 1 - *- % - %-- $ 1 - r
- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - - -- - Number
O c c u p a t io n
of

3/

and

ty p e

c o n s t r u c tio n

A verag e

of

h o u r ly

w o rk ers

4/

e a rn in g s

2 .5 0
5/

U nder

AND

(U N D E R

CARPENTERS'

(U N D ER

STREET
OTHER

AND
HEAVY

ELEC TR IC IA N S '
d e c

m uncD
1U N U C H

PLUM BERS'

y
2/

3/
4/
5/
6/

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0

(U N D ER

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4 .1 0

$ i- -r
-

i

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

over

4 .6 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

168

8

94

7

35

4

86

96

-

84

4

23

4

43

64

8

2

3

4

“

39

98

86

25

1

-

2

5

-

-

-

1

“

4 .0 0

4 .1 0

_

_

_

_

6

_

85

28

-

-

-

—

4

-

71

28

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

255

14

224

4

162

14

108

4

8
6
2

343

4 .1 1

----------------------------

831

3 .6 8

68

3 .5 1

-

“
_

8

-

-

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

689

3 .6 6

-

8

-----------------------

9 ,2 6 9

3 .4 7

10

117

-----------------------------------------

1 ,4 1 5

3 .6 0

-

—

8
8
96

4 ,1 7 6

3 .4 2

10

1 ,9 3 0

3 .2 9

-

-----------------

1 ,1 2 8

3 .4 2

-

H ELPERS
-----------------------c OT n oT I •
7 c 9U n v I

316

3 .3 9

-

150

2 .9 4

20
20

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

H IG H W A Y
CONSTR.

----------------------—

32
32

2

“
_
-

-

14

-

-

89

-

116

-

33
-

.

162
-

8

58

4

2

149

2

19

-

5

-

23

-

2

126

2

33

“

1

25

143

-

8

52

2
2

-

11
10

2

9
-

74

9

91

81

24

143

-

45

302

6

20

1880

216

1660

79

91

2161

66

1193

34

335

47

105

147

139

-

-

95

234

3

4

570

3

199

9

65

6

58

16

1007

715

36

36

885

43

601

4

401

137

25

9

7
-

47

2

4

22
10

31

55

2
121

15
-

576

52

45

180

4

4

422

76

290

38

26

439

19

195

12

11

78

2

6

16

16

280

17

373

2

25

193

-

167

-

-

18

-

“

96

10
10

18

10

2

40

-

20

-

2

-

-

2

14

10

6
40
34

--------------------------------

393

3 .6 8

20

24

-----------------------------------------

265

4 .0 1

-

4

6
6

S T O R Y ) ---------------------

113

2 .8 9

20

20

-

~

10

1n
1U

_
—

_
-

32

_

_

38

2

48

5

15

1

42

-

18

-

-

37

4

1

40

-

20

2

-

7

1

8
2

82
-

6

-

-

-

2

-

45

3

-

-

43

20

See fo o t n o t e 1, ta b le 53.
See fo o t n o t e 2, ta b le 53.
See fo o t n o t e 3, ta b le 53.
See fo o t n o t e 4 , ta b le 5 3.
E xcludes premium pay f o r ov ertim e and hazardous work and f o r work on weekends, h o lid a y s , and la t e s h i f t s .
Workers were d is t r ib u t e d as fo l lo w s :
18 a t $ 3 -$ 3 .2 0 ; 42 a t $ 3 .2 0 -$ 3 .4 0 ; 71 a t $ 3 .4 0 -$ 3 .6 0 ; 24 a t $ 3 .6 0 -$ 3 .80; and 14 a t $ 3 .8 0-$4 .
A ll workers were a t $ 5 -$ 5 .2 0 .




3 .8 0

3 .9 0

10
6

_
-

5

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .6 0

_

5

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .5 0

-

5

3 .5 0

3 .4 0

3 .9 5

5

3 .4 0

an d

3 .8 6

H ELPERS

C O M M ER C IA L
R ES.

3 .3 0

657

LABO RERS

C O M M ER C IA L
R ES.

3 .2 0

1 ,0 3 6

-----------------------------------------

(U N D E R

CO N STR U CTIO N

3 .1 0

--------------------------

HELPERS

C O M M ER C IA L
R ES.

3 .0 0

-----------------------------------------

HELPERS

C O M M ER C IA L
R ES.

2 .9 0

LABORERS
$

B R IC K LA Y ER S '

2 .8 0

under
2 .6 0

H ELPERS

2 .7 0

an d

$ 2 .5 0

2 .6 0

-

_
-

35

2

24

1

14

-

7 76

28

2

24

1

14

-

76

1

-

-

-

-

-

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h ou rs2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olid ays, September 1972)
Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Journeym en:
B rick la y e rs
____ ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Cem ent m a s o n s ______________________________
C o m m e r cia l
_______________________________
E le ctricia n s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l______________________________ __
P ip e fitte rs______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l ______________________________
R o o fe r s _________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Structural iron w ork ers
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

Sundays

Saturdays
Straight
tim e

-

47
48
3
3
-

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

100
100
53
52
70
70
65
65
100
100
19
19

100
100
27
27
35
35
81
81

-

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

-

100
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s :
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

17
19

83
81

Tim e and
on e-h alf

-

5
66
67
86
86
19
19

100
100

100
100

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Double
time

100
100
95
100
100
100
34
33
100
100
14
14
81
81

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
34
33
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100

100
100

93
92

100
100

-

_
66
67
-

_

-

7
8

Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2 .
R e fe r s to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Holidays

Double
tim e

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holid ays, Septem ber 1972)

O ccupation 3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work <
sn—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 13
2
Straight
time

Tim e and
one - half

Sundays

Saturdays
Straight
tim e

Journeym en:
C arp en ters___ ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)__________
C em ent m a so n s__________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o rk ers____________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s )__________

56
58
48
63
83
84

44
42
53
37
17
16

2
2

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s _____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
B ulldozer o p erators_____________________________
S treet and highway___________________________
Truckd r iv e r s _____________________________________

74
100
52
87
42
100

27
_
48
13
58

.
_
_

-

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s :
C arp e n ters' h elp ers____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C onstruction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 s to r ie s )............ ......
S treet and h igh w ay...---------------- -------------------O ther heavy con stru ction ------------------------ . . .

72
94
57
55
38
64
77

28
7
43
45
62
36
23

9
12
2
3
2

_
_

_
-

_
_

_

Tim e and
one -h a lf

Double
tim e

97
97
98
100
98
100

1
1
2
_
2

92
100
86
100
100
93

8
_
15

91
88
90
97
69
100
69

-

_
_

7

.

8
_

29
_

31

T im e and
one -h a lf

Holidays
Double
tim e

Double
time

2
1
6
5
23
14

8
.
15

93
92
98
100
77
86

23
14

98
99
94
95
77
86

90
89
86
87
42
79

10
11
15
13
58
21

92
100
86
100
100
93

100
100
82
90
69
72
69

.

18
11
29
28
31

100
100
87
94
62
100
69

7
8
2
_

1 Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100, Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3,
2 R e fe r s to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM — PM) without also working a ll the regular shift h ours,
4
3 O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.




T im e and
one -h a lf

-

7

-

13
6
36
.

31

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h ours2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olid ays, September 1972)

Straight
time

Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________ __ __
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C em ent m a s o n s __________________ _____
___
C o m m e r cia l
___
E le ctrician s
_
_ _
C o m m e rica l

-

1
2
3

Tim e and
oh e-h alf

Double
time

-

-

29
29
17
21

100
100
24
24
83
79

67

_

....... . _
_ ..... .

47
47

-

Straight
time

53
53

Tim e and
o n e-h alf

Sundays
Double
time

Tim e and
one- half

-

"

33
33

-

Double
time

29
29
17
21

100
100
71
71
83
79

-

44

56

16
16

72
72

29
29

-

-

Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2 .
R e fers to any hours outside of regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM ) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.




Tim e and
on e-h alf

44

50
50

Holidays
Double time
and o n e-h alf

95
100
100
100
100
100

56

33

-

-

Saturdays

47
47
-

Equipment o p erators:
B ulldozer op erators
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C onstruction la b o rers
C o m m e rcia l
_

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 13
2

O ccupation3 and type
of construction

5
-

-

-

Double
time

95
100
100
100
100
100

100

64
64

36
36

Double time
and one-half

5

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 13
2
Straight
tim e

Tim e and
one-half

Straight
tim e

Journeym en:
C a r p e n te r s ___ _________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __ _____
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
E le ctr icia n s______________________________________
P lu m b ers __ -------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________

55
59
42
100
100
100

46
41
58
_
_

41
38
32
7
2

-

-

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators____________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s____________________________
Street and highw ay--------------------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s____________________________________
Street and highw ay---------------------------------------

58
53
82
81
81

42
47
18
19
19

33
12
18
-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
Construction la b o r e r s --------------------------------------C om m e rci al__________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) -------------Street and highw ay--------------------------------------Other heavy construction___________________
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s___________________________
P lu m b e r s' h e lp e r s --------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________

100
55
19
48
67
61
100
100
100

45
81
52

100
34
19
34
36
39

33

39
-

Sundays

Saturdays

7

2

Tim e and
one-half

59
62
68
93
98
100

67
88
82
100
100

63
81
66
64
22
93
98
100

Double
tim e

-

-

Straight
tim e

25
38
7
2

-

-

12
18
-

-

-

-

-

71

4

30

39
-

19
34
36
7

2

Tim e and
on e-h alf

75
62
100
93
98
100

100
88
82
100
100

29
64
57
66
64
61
93
98
100

Holidays
Double
tim e

_

25
38
7
2

-

-

-

12
18
-

-

6
24
39
-

1 Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM— PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
3 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Straight
tim e

71
30

19
34
36
7

2

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
time

75
62
100
93
98
100

-

100
88
82
100
100

-

29
64
57
66
64
61
93
98
100

6
24
39
-

-

-

"

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u rs2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

O ccupation3 and type of construction

Straight tim e

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l___________________________________
C a rp e n ters_______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l___________________________________
Other heavy construction 4__ _____________
Cement m a s o n s __________________________________
C o m m e rcia l___________________________________
E le ctrician s 5_____________________________________
C o m m e rcia l----------------------------------------------------P ip efitters 6______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
P lu m b e r s -------------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------R o o fers_________________ _________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s -----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s ________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________

1
5
_
_
_
_
_
_
13
13
_

Tim e and one-h alf

Double tim e

Tim e and on e-h alf

49
100
76
96

51
24
5

49
100
76
96

100
100
100
100

15
32
53
71

100
100
100
100
80
98
47
15

19
2
53
86

100
100
100
100
81
98
47
15

100
100
100
100
94
99
76
86

100
100
100
100
96
99
76
100

-

4

16
2
29
86

-

Holidays
Double tim e

-

-

24

Double tim e

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

51
_
24
5

1
_
3
3
6
6
_
_
_
_
_
_

Double tim e

100
100
100
100
92
100
100
100
100
94
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

-

Sundays

100
100
100
100
99
100
100
74
74
94
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

1
6
6

-

-

Saturdays

100
100
99
100
99
95
100
71
71
94
94
100
100
100
100
87
87
100
100

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators 6___________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------B ulldozer op erators 6 ---------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s 1 h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
C arpenters 1 h e lp e r s ____________________________
C o m m e rcia l___________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s 6 _________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Street and h ighw ay___ _____________________
Other heavy con stru ction 4 _________________

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2

-

-

T riple tim e

-

_
_
-

83
64
45
27

-

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM— PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
3 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 Double tim e and on e-h a lf for work on Sundays, not shown separately, applied to 8 percent of the carpenters in "oth e r heavy construction " and to 3 percent of the lab orers in that sector.
5 Double tim e for new construction and tim e and on e-h alf for maintenance and repair work, not shown sep arately, applied to 26 percent of the elec tric ia n s, for weekday work outside of specified
hours and for Saturdays.
6 T im e and on e-h alf for Sunday and holiday w ork, not shown sep arately, applied to 6 percent of the pipefitters and about 5 percent of the la b o r e r s; double tim e and one-half for holiday work,
not shown sep arately, applied to 2 percent of each of the back-hoe operators and bulldozer op erators.




(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2
Straight time

Journeym en:
C a r p e n te r s _______________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Plectric.ians
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
P lu m b e r s _________________________________________
C om m ercial
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________

100
100
100
100
49
77
10

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction l a b o r e r s 4 . _
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Other heavy construction___________________
P lu m b e r s' h e lp e r s ______________________________

97
100
100
92
41

Tim e and one-half

-

_
_
_
51
23
90

3
_
_

8
59

Saturdays

Sundays

Straight time

Tim e and one-h alf

69
68
35
35
20
35

32
32
65
65
80
65
100

69
68
35
35
20
35

52
83
24
36
100

48
17
76
64

48
17
76
64

Straight tim e

Holidays

Tim e and one-half

32
32
65
65
80
65
100

69
68
35
35
20
35

48
83
24
27
100

48
17
76
64

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM— PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
3 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 D ou b le-tim e pay provisions on Sundays and holidays, not shown separately, applied to 3 percent of the construction la b o rers.




Straight time

-

Tim e and one-half

32
32
65
65
80
65
100

48
83
24
27
100




Table 62.

Pay provisions for time worked outside regular schedule (union and nonunion separately):

Buffalo, N.Y.
(P ercen t of w orkers in construction establish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of
specified hours 1 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olidays, September 1972)

Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday
work outside of specified
hours 1
T im e and
one -h alf

Double
tim e

Saturday

Sunday
Double
tim e

T im e and
one -h alf

Holiday

Double
time

Double
time

Union 3
Journeym en:
B r ick la y e r s_____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
C arpen ters_____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
Cement m aso n s________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
E le ctrician s 4 ___________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
P ip e fitte r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
P lu m bers 1
5______________________________________
4
3
2
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s4_________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Structural iron w ork ers_______________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________

19
19
11
8
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
81
81
89
92
2
2
100
100

4
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment op erators:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s_________ __________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
Bulldozer op erators____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
T ru ck d rivers 6__________________________________

7
14
3
100

93
100
86
97
100
-

7
14
3
100

93
100
86
97
100
"

100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
3

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers ____
_
_
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________

100
100
100

"

2
1
23

98
99
77

100
100
100

100
100
100

Nonunion 7
Journeym en:
Carpenters 5_____________________________________
R esiden tal (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)___________

100
100

100
100

1 R e fers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule ( e .g ., 7 A M — PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
2 O ve rall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers
in table 2.
4 A ll electricians and virtually a ll sh eet-m etal w orkers receive d ouble-tim e for work before 8:0 0 A M or after 4:3 0 P M ; they also receive tim e
and on e-h alf for work between 3:30 PM and 4:3 0 PM .
5 T im e and one-half for work on Sundays and holidays, not shown sep arately, applied to 4 percent of union plum bers and a ll nonunion carpenters.
6 Double tim e and on e-h alf for work on holidays, not shown sep arately, applied to 97 percent of union truckdriver s .
7 Nonunion carpenters equal 100.
Information is lim ited to carp e n ters, the only occupation for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers
in table 3.

(Percent of w orkers in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 1 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)
Rate of nav for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 1

Occupation 2 and type
o f construction

Straight

Tim e and

Double

T im e and
on e-h alf

Holidays

Sundays

Saturdays
Double
tim e

Double
Tim e and
_____ o n e-h alf_____ _______ tim e________

Tim e and
Double
on e-h alf_____ _______ time____ _
_

Union 3
Journeym en:

Other heavy construction

Other heavy construction

_________________

_______________

C o m m e r cia l ________________________________
R esidential (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________

38
29
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

1 0 0

Pipefitter R,
...
. ..
flnmm(>rcial
_
_
_
_______
Pliim hpfs
_ _
. __ ___________ __
C o m m e r c ia l—_____„_____
__
Residential (1e«« tha.n 5 stnrips)
Rnnfpr a
...
__
_______
O cm m crrip i .. .. _
.... _
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------S h e et-m e tal w ork ers ----------------------------------rn m m p r ria l
...
p p pi dent 1a 1 (leaa than ^ Rtcriea)
Bti' 1'irtiira 1 ir o n w o r k e r s
_ _____________
f .o m m e r r i a l
. .. ...
R e s id e n tia l (le a p than 'i a tn r ie a )

_
_
(4 )
1
3
75
64
100
_
_

8
8

48
54
2
_
_
4
_
1
4
4
12
2
_
94
97
100
71
7
94
94
95
97
91
25
37
100
100
100
70
69
100

15
17
98
100
100
96
100
99
96
96
100
88
98
100
6
4
_
29
93
6
6
4
_
9
_
_

_
22
22
_

59

85
75
100
86
92
81
72
63
93
92
82
100
99
90

15
25

2
4

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

98
100
100
100

2
(4 )

_
_
_
1
_
74
73
100
62
7
84
83
41
52
25
25
37
-

20
18
24
3
_

59

Equipment op era to rs:
R a c k -h o e o p e r a t o r s
_
___ ______
( C o m m e r c ia l
. _ _
_ ___ _
.
R e s id e n tia l ( l e s s than
s to r ie s )
R tre e t and h ig h w ay
_
O th e r h e a v y c o n s tr u c t io n , ..........
B u lld o z e r o p e r a t o r s
....
_
( C o m m e r c ia l
_ __ _
_
S tr e e t and h ig h w ay
. ._
... ...
_
O th e r h e a v y c o n s tr u c t io n
_
_ __
T rnckdri ve r s
_
______
___
C o m m e r c ia l
...
,
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) --------------—
Street and h ig h w ay
_____
O th e r h e a v y c o n s tr u c tio n

_
_
_

_
2
_
_

6
1
-

_
7

92
80
100
100
100
97
99
100
94
99
100
100
100
93

8
20

99
100
100
100
100
96
4

(4 )
(4 )

_

_
_

(4 )
1
_
_

_
_
_

_

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C o n s tr u c t io n la b o r e r a
C o m m e r c ia l
_

___ _
_
____________
R esiden tial (^ sto ries or m o r e )
R e s id e n t ia l (le s ® than ^ p to r ie a )

Street and highway „.

,, ....................

o t h e r h e a v y c o n s tr u c tio n ,

E levator c on stru c tors' h e lp e r s -----------------------

See footnotes at end of table,




1

_

4

_
_

(4 )
96

_
_
_
.
_
_
2
14
3
_
7
7

10
12
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
26
27
_
38
93
16
17
59
48
75
75
64
100
81
82
76
97
100
41

90
88
100

14
9
19
28
37
7
8
18
-

1
11

99

_
1

91
4

96

9

_
_
_
_

_

2
_

-

_
_
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
86
97
100
93
93
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
41

2
14
3
5
6
-

-

2
-

59

98
96
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

2
4

100
100
100
100
100
100
100

.

-

-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
86
97
100
95
95
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
41

98
96
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100

(Percent of w orkers in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 1 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)
Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 1

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
o n e-h alf

Sundays

Saturdays

Tim e and
Double
Tim e and
Double
________tim e________ _____ on e-h ajf_____ ________tim e________ _____ on e-h alf_____

Holidays
Double
time

Tim e and
Double
_____ on e-h alf_____ _______ time_____ „

Nonunion 5
Journeym en:
Cpmpnt- m ason s
R p s-idf»nHa 1 (lo ss than 5 stnries) .......
R lprtririans 6
. ...
.. ... ______

37

73
73
63

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Cnn strnrH on lahnrp.rs ^
Residential (le s s than 5 stories) .................

36
38

64
62

1
2
3
4
5
6

27
27

73
73
37

73
73
37

90
91

27
27
26

73
73
37

27
27
26

72
82

27
27
26

18
9

72
82

18
9

R e fer s to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M — PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) o f construction not shown separately.
Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
L e ss than 0 .5 percent.
Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100.
Where inform ation is presented, it is lim ited to occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w ork ers in table 3.
S traigh t-tim e pay for work on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, not shown sep arately, applied to 37 percent of nonunion electrician s and to 10 percent of nonunion lab orers.

101




Table 64.

Pay provisions for time worked outside regular schedule (union):

Dallas, Tex.

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s 2 and for Saturdays,
holid ays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Journeym en:
B r ick la y e r s
_ _
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
C a r p e n t e r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l______________________________ _
C em ent m a s o n s ________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
P ip efitters
________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_____________________________
H elpers and la b o rers:
C onstruction lab orers
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________

1
in table
2
3

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
-

100
100

Double
tim e

Sundays

Holidays

Double
tim e

Double
tim e

Double
tim e

100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100

100
100

Saturdays
T im e and
o n e-h alf

100
100

-

-

100
100

100
100

-

and

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2
Tim e and
on e-h alf

Sundays,

-

-

100
100
100
100

-

100
100
100
100

-

Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers
2.
R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O ve rall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.

(P ercen t of w o r k e r s 1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

Occupation3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work 'on—

Rate of pay for weekday
work outside of specified
hours 13
2
Straight
time

Tim e and
on e-h alf

102

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Straight
time

Tim e and
one- half

22
54
3
28
54
18
35
35
37
34
27
40
75

76
46
94
100
100
68
46
90
96
92
63
64
63
73
61
25

22
54
3
32
54
10
4
8
35
37
34
27
40
75

2
3
2
4
-

1
-

98
100
100
100
14
94
100
90
97
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

2
87
6
10
3
-

78
46
97
100
100
72
46
100
82
65
65
64
67
73
61
25

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
Street and highway .
................. ._
Other heavy construction.
B ulldozer op erators______________________ _______
C o m m e rcia l
Street and highway
Other heavy construction ___________________
T ru ck d rivers _____________________________________
Street and h igh w ay___________________________

95
100
100
92
98
100
100
90
86
100

5
8
2
11
14
-

83
17
100
100
73
47
100
100
85
100

17
83
27
53
15
-

78
17
100
93
71
47
100
90
85
100

21
83
7
30
53
11
15
-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C a rp e n ters' h elpers
C o m m e rcia l
Street and highway ....
Construction la b o rers
.......
_____
C o m m e r cia l ...
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) ............ .
Street and h ighw ay___________________________
Other heavy construction
E le ctricia n s ' helpers
r ......
_
C o m m e r c ia l__
_ __ __ ____________ ___
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
P lu m b e r s' helpers
C o m m e r c ia l_________ ___ ___ _________ _
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)

99
100
100
90
85
100
90
91
93
79
100
100
100
100

1

90
75
100
81
44
96
100
100
73
100
59
64
56
67

10
25

90
75
100
69
44
63
90
87
86
100
78
64
56
67

10
25

-

Double
time

Straight
tim e

Journeym en:
C arpenters
_____ ...
C o m m e rcia l
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) ,
Street and highw ay___________________________
Other heavy construction
C em ent m ason s
...........................
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __________
Street and highway
E le ctrician s
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)
P lu m b ers ... .
....................... ................
C o m m e r cia l
_ _
___
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)
R o o fe r s ____________________________________________
S h e e t-m e ta lw o r k e r s
.....
...........
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________

10
15
10
10
7
21

Holidays

Sundays

Saturdays

20
57
4
27
-

41
36
44
34

19
40
4
10
13
14
-

22
36
44
34

-

12
17
32
-

Straight
tim e

Double
time

Other
prem ium pay

77
46
97
100
68
66
46
90
96
92
65
64
67
73
61
25

23
54
2
32
30
54
4
8
35
37
34
27
40
75

4
10
-

74
17
100
85
68
47
100
79
72
100

22
83
8
30
53
11
28
“

-

4
7
2
11
-

*

-

89
75
100
73
44
96
90
78
86
100
78
64
56
67

11
25

1 Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w ork ers in table 3.
2 R e fe r s to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule ( e .g ., 7AM— M ) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4P
3 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w ork ers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Tim e and
on e-h alf

16
40
4
10
14
-

22
36
44
34

-

-

8
17
10
-

3
13
-

-

-

-

-

-

(Percent of w ork ers 1 in construction establish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olidays, Septem ber 1972)

Straight
tim e

103

J ourneymen:
B rick la y e rs
C o m m e r cia l _
C a r p e n te r s— _ _
. ...
C o m m e rcia l
.............. .
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highw ay__________________________
E le ctrician s
_ _
. . . . . . ..
C o m m e rcia l ... _
.
.
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
P lu m b e r s ______
.
_
........
C o m m e rcia l
.
_
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
S h e et-m e ta l w ork ers ..
C o m m e r cia l
....
Structural iron w ork ers
_
. ..
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe op erators
..
C o m m e r cia l
_ .
Street and highway
..... ._ ..
Other heavy construction__________________
B ulldozer op erators
Street and highw ay_____ ____ _ _________
T ruckdrive r s ________________
_________________
Street and highway
Other heavy construction__________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ______________ ____________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r cia l _
..
. .
_ ....
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
Street and highway . . .
Other heavy construction__________________

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outs ide of specified he urs 2

Occupation 3 and type of construction

_
_
1
_
_
_
_

T im e and
on e-h alf

Saturdays
Double
tim e

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Tim e and
one-half

Double
time

33
33
4
94
45
52
_

67
67
_
_
7

33
33
100
100
93
100

38
38

62
62
100
100
93
100

38
38

62
62
100
100
93
100

17
43
46
_
7
17
"

79
89
100
57
53
100
93
83
100

4
11
_

6
-

100
100
87
96
54
88
46

_
_
7
4
46

-

91
93
86
94
76
100
54
100
100
98
100

_
1

-

.

100
9
7
3
6
24

_

46
_

_
-

91
93
97
94
76
100
54
100
100
100
100

89
75
100
93
98
100
100
100
100

11
25
_

61
61
93
93
54
100
100

39
39
7
7
46

7
2
_
_
-

_
7
100
7
7
3
6
24

_
100

-

a-i
7J
93
97
94
76
100
54
100
100
100
100

74
75
50
93
88
71
90
72
97

26
25
50
7
12
29
10
28
3

56
75
13
45
30
19
72
29
91

44
25
87
55
70
81
28
71
9

39
39
60
54
54
91
94

61
61
40
46
46
9
6

39
39
52
54
54
58
40

61
61
48
46
46
42
60

46

Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
R e fer s to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule ( e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Holidays

Tim e and
on e-h alf

67
67
96
6
55
48
100
7
7
14
6
24
_
46
_
_
2
“

12
54

Sundays

Double
tim e

7
3
6
24
46

-

93
93
97
94
76
100
54
100
100

100
100

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2
Straight
tim e

Tim e and
one-half

Saturdays
Straight
time

Holidays

Sundays
Tim e and
on e-h alf

Straight
tim e

104

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
one-half

57
55
21

43
45
100
79

Journeym en:
C a r p e n te r s__________________ _____ ___________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________ ______________
E le c tr ic ia n s_________________ _________________

57
55
_
45

43
45
100
55

57
55
_
45

43
45
100
55

57
55
21

43
45
100
79

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators_____________________________

23

77

23

77

23

77

23

77

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s ' h e lp e r s ___________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) -------------C a rp e n ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
Construction la b o r e r s__________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
E le c tr ic ia n s' h elp ers----------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------

7
7
100
28
22
86
72

93
93

7
7
100
28
22
86
72

93
93

7
7
100
27
22
65
44

93
93
73
78
35
56

7
7
100
27
22
65
44

93
93
73
78
35
56

-

72
78
14
28

-

72
78
14
28

-

Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w ork ers in table 3.
R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w ork ers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




-

(Percent of w ork ers in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s1 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, Septem ber 1972)
Rate of pay for work <
an—

Rate of pay for weekda y work
outsi de of specified heiurs 1

O ccupation1 and type of construction
2

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
one-half

Saturdays

Double
tim e

Straight
tim e

Sundays

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Holidays

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

_
_
28
_
_
_
_
_
_

100
100
72
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Tim e and
one-half

Double
time

Union 3

105

J ourneymen:
C a r p e n te r s ______________________________________
C om m ercial__________________________________
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
E le ctr icia n s_______________ ____________________
C omm e r ci al__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l____________ ___________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op era to rs______ ____________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s ___________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r cia l____ ______________________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s _____ ______ __________________
C omm e rci al__________________________________

-

-

28
_
_

28
5

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

-

78
43
100
99

_
_
_

28

-

1

_

_
_

-

-

80

20

100
100
72
100
72
96
100
100
100
100
100
100

_
28
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
28
5
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

100
100
72
100
72
96
100
100
100
100
100
100

22
57
_
1

78
43
100
57

_
_
_
42

22
57
_
1

78
43
100
99

22
57

71
100
100
100

28

1

71
100
100
100

29

-

80

-

_
_

_
_

-

_
_

-

_
_
28
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
-

100
100
72
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

78
43
100
99

22
57

29

-

71
100
100
100

-

71
100
100
100

89

-

89

-

_

_
1

_

1

Nonunion 4
Construction la b o r e r s 5________________________

20

1 R e fers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
2 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
3 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2.
*
Nonunion construction la b o r e r s equal 100. Information is lim ited to construction la b o r e r s, the only occupation for which data are shown for nonunion w ork ers in table 3.
S traigh t-tim e pay on Sundays and holidays, not shown separately, applied to 11 percent of construction lab orers in nonunion situations.




(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, Septem ber 1972)

Straight
tim e

106

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
C a r p e n te r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
E lect ric ia n s______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
R o o fers___________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e rci al__________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators_____________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s -----------------------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s____________________________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------Construction la b o r e r s --------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------Other heavy construction----------------------------

1
2
3

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 1
2
3

Occupation 3 and type of construction

-

Tim e and
one-half

-

2
_
19
_
36
16
16
-

Double
tim e

100
100
98
100
81
100
64
60
60
85
85
100
100
_
48
48
100
100

_
_
_
24
24
15
15
_
_
50
50
_
_
_

_
51
51
52
52
_

-

-

9
50
4
6

85
13
96
94

7
38
-

-

39
95

_

-

Sun day

Saturday
T im e and
on e-h alf

-

2
_
19
36
16
16
-

-

100
100
52
52
-

Double
tim e

100
100
98
100
81
100
64
84
84
100
100
100
100
48
48
100
100

7
38
-

"

94
63
100
100

100
100
61
100
5

39
95

100
100
61
100
5

-

Tim e and
on e-h alf

89
38
85
98

11
63
15
6

89
38
85
94

100
100
97
100
100

3

100
100
97
100
100

11
63
15
2

3
-

_
-

-

Double
time

-

-

-

Tim e and
on e-h alf

100
100
98
100
87
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
98
100
87
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

2
14
-

Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2.
R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule ( e .g ., 7 AM— PM ) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Holiday
Double
tim e

-

2
14
-

-

-

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olidays, September 1972)

O ccup ation 3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2

107

Straight
time

Time and
one-h alf

Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s _____________________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
P ip e fitte r s _______________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________

21
100
100
100
100

80

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p erators
__ .
B ulldozer op erators
.
.
_ _
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C a rp e n ters’ h e lp e r s ___________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s _____________________________

Saturdays
Straight
tim e

Sundays

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Holidays
Double
tim e

54
22
8
9
7

46
78
92
91
93

48
22
8
7
7

6

-

46
78
92
91
93

43
36
62
92

57
64
38
8

43
36
62
92

57
64
38
8

43
36
62
92

-

22
38
-

57
42

92
71
100
73
100

9
29

92
57
62
73
78

9
43
38
27
22

92
57
62
73
78

-

-

-

27

9
3
_

27

-

3
-

-

8

-

40
38
-

22

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

52
78
92
94
93

48
22
8
7
7

10
12
21
66

57
64
38
8

33
24
41
27

92
66
100
15
100

9
29

6

_

_

27

59

Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
R e fers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all the regular shift hours.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Double
time

-

(P ercen t of w ork ers 1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olidays, Septem ber 1972)

108

Straight
time

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s 4 ___________________________ _______
C o m m e r c ia l
C arpenters
C o m m e r cia l
_____ _
___ ... __
C em ent m a so n s__________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________ _____________________
S treet and highway_____________ ____________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P ip e fitte r s ________ _____ _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b ers_________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s.____ _______ _____ __________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Stru ctural iron w ork ers________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l................... ............................... ...........
S treet and highway___________ _______________
O ther heavy construction __________________
B ulldozer op erators_______________ ,_ ____ _____
_
C o m m e r c ia l______________ __________________
T ru ck d rivers 6___________________________________
S treet and highway................................ .............. .
Other heavy construction ................
H elp e rs and la b o r e r s:
C onstruction la b o rers 6.............. ................. .............
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________

1
2
3
4
5
6

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for work outside
of specified hours 2

O ccupation3 and type
of construction

Tim e and
one -h alf

_
13
15
_
_
_
_
.
_
_
_

_
4
2
25
12
100
29
21
_
_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_
1

-

-

9
9
15

Saturdays

Double
time

Tim e and
one -h alf

Double
tim e

Tim e and
one -h alf

Double
tim e

100
100
90
93
80
88
35
80
89
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100

5
6
4
5
_
.
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

100
100
95
94
96
95
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
82
83
75
88
_
71
80
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100

_
10
7
20
12
66
20
11
.
_

19
38
21
38
68
6
7

69
62
68
79
58
32
94
93
100

31
38
32
21
42
68
6
7

6
7

-

73
53
85
79
54
25
85
85
100

-

-

19
24
10

41
6
90

40
70

27
11
90

67
86
10

9
10

.

8
7
9
7

_

-

_

_
_
_
1
-

Holidays

Sundays

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
94
93
100

91
91
100

Tim e and
one -h a lf

5
6
4
5
_
.
_
-

_
_
_
-

6
7
9
10

Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is limited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2 .
R e fer s to any hours outside of regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM— PM) without also working a ll of the regular shift h ours.
4
O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
S traigh t-tim e rates for work on h olid ays, not shown separately, applied to 5 percent of the b rick la y e rs.
L e s s than 0 .5 p ercen t.
S traigh t-tim e rates for work on Saturdays, not shown separately, applied to 6 percent of the construction la b o r e r s.




Double
time

Double time and
on e-h alf

85
85
91
90
92
90
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

11
11
4
4
5
5
_

99
96
100
100
97
95
94
93
100

1
4
3
5
(5 )
-

88
86
100

3
5

-

.
(?)
(5 )

(P ercent of w o r k e r s 1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday
work outside of
specified hours 2
Straight
tim e

109

Tim e and
one-half

Straight
tim e

T im e and
on e-h alf

15
3
41
30
17

85
97
59
70
83

38
58
32

61
42
69

Journeym en:
C a r p e n te r s _______________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
P lu m b e r s ----------------------------------- --------------------------S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ___________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________

14
76
91

88
100
86
24
9

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s ---------------------------------------C omm e r ci al___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _____ _____

34
49
30

66
51
70

12
-

Saturday

Sunday

Holiday

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Straight
tim e

T im e and
on e-h alf

_

-

30
22
59
84
100

-

-

46
52
26
16
-

24
23
14

-

60
74
59
84
100

24
23

-

16
3
41
16

-

-

2

41
58
36

43
16
53

17
26
12

48
58
47

34
16
39

17
26
12

_

Double
tim e

-

-

-

-

Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
R e fers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM ) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Double
time

Double time
and one-half

-

1
2

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified h o u r s2

Double
_________time_________

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
time

3
50
20
54
100
~

100
100
97
99
100
50
80
100
46
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

3
50
20
55
100
"

100
100
97
99
100
50
80
100
46
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

37
100
12
13
52
4
27
7
15

63
88
87
48
96
73

37
100
12
13
52
4
27
45
100

63
88
88
48
96
73

37
100
12
13
52
4
27
45
100

100
100
69
99
12
20
100
100

32
1
88
80
-

100
100
69
99
12
20
100
100

32
1
88
80
-

Oil

Tim e and

Journeym en:
B rick la y e rs ,
C o m m e r cia l .
.. ._ .
C arpenters _
.
......
....
C o m m e r cia l
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 stories)
Street and highway
.............
C em ent m ason s . .. . .
.... _
C o m m e r c ia l..
Street and highway ....
... . ___
Other heavy construction,,.................
E le ctricia n s .
..........
.... ..
C o m m e r c ia l___
___________
P ip e fitte r s________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
P lu m b e r s _________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l______________________________ __
R esid en tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) _________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries) _ _____
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s 4______________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s_____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Bulldozer o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l----------------- ------------ ------------------Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy construction ___________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l------------------------------------------------H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ----------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C onstruction la b o r e r s ---------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy con stru ction ___________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s --------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l----------------------------------------------------

Double

Tim e and

Double
tim e

4

100
100
96
100
82
50
80
100
46
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
100

4
18
50
20
54
100
-

100
100
96
99
82
50
80
100
46
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

63
88
87
48
96
73
94
85

37
100
12
13
52
4
27
7
15

63
88
87
48
96
73
94

-

100
100
69
99
12
20
100
100

32
1
88
80
-

-

18
50
20
54
100
-

_
-

-

32
1
88
80
-

-

-

-

8
5

Holidays

Sundays

Saturdays
Tim e and
on e-h alf

55

"

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e.g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
3 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 S traigh t-tim e pay for weekday work outside of specified hours, not shown sep arately, applied to 2 percent of structural iron w ork ers.




55

"

100
100
69
99
12
20
100
100

(P ercen t of w orkers in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u rs1 and for Saturdays,
Sundays, and h olid ays, September 1972)

Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 1
Tim e and
one -h alf

Double
time

Saturdays
Double
tim e

Tim e and
one -h alf

Sundays
Double
time

Holidays
Double
time

Union 3
Journeym en:
B r icklay e r s....... ............................................................ .
C om m e r c i a l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)............. —
C arp en ters_______________________________________
C om m e r c i a l---------- --------------- -----------------------R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) -------------S treet and highway .................... .............. ...........
O ther heavy construction __________________
C em ent m ason s__________________ ________ ______
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)--------------S treet and h igh w ay...............................................
O ther heavy con stru ction .------ -------------------E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
C om m e r c i a l ____________________________ _____
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)__________
P ip e fitte r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Other heavy construction _________________
P lu m b ers__________________________________ ____ —
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________ ____ _
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)__________
R o o fe r s ___________________ ____________ __________
C o m m e r c ia l______________ _____ _____________
S h e et-m e ta l w ork ers___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)--------------Structural iron w ork ers_______________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________ _______

.
_
_
_
_
100
100
100
100
100
.
_
_
6
7
_
2
6
_
72
77

_
_

.
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
.
.
_
.
100
100
100
94
93
100
98
95
100
28
23
100
100
100
100
100

.
6
7
2
6
.
72
77
.
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
93
100
98
95
100
28
23
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

68
85

88
100

88
100

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s 4____________________ _______
C o m m e r c ia l..............................................................
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)__________
S treet and h ig h w a y _________________________
O ther heavy construction __________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s 4__________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)__________
Other heavy construction __________________
Truckd r iv e r s ____________________________________
O ther heavy construction __________________

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

.
-

H elp ers and la b o r e r s :
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s___________ ____ ___________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)__________
C onstruction la b o r e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l-------------- -----------------------------------R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)__________
S treet and highw ay.............. ........................... —
Other heavy construction __________________

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

.
_

-

.

_
.
-

-

-

-

-

Nonunion16
5
4
3
27
Journeym en:
P lu m b ers 6 7__________ ____ ____ _________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________




1
2
3
4
5
6
7

20
15

68
85

32
15

R e fe r s to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M — P M ) without also working the regular shift h ou rs,
4
O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately,
Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100, Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2 ,
T rip le tim e for work on holidays, not shown separately, applied to all union b ack-hoe operators and bulldozer op erators,
Nonunion plum bers equal 100, Information is lim ited to p lum bers, the only occupation for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
S tra ig h t-tim e pay for weekday work outside of specified hours applied to 13 percent of p lum bers in nonunion situations.
T im e and on e-h alf for work on Sundays and holidays, not shown separately, applied to 13 percent of nonunion p lum bers.

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Tim e and
one-half

Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s .. ___________________________________
C om m e rcial__________________________________
Cem ent m a s o n s 4 _______________________________
C om m e rcial__________________________________
E le ctrician s 4___________ __________ __________
C om m ercial---------------------------------------------------P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------P lu m b e r s ------------------------ --------- _ ----------------C omm e r c ia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ___________________________
C om m ercial----------------------------------------------------

Double
time

Tim e and
one-half

Sundays
Double
tim e

94
100
94
100

100
100
100
100

-

1

99
100

100
100

100
100

100
100

_
_

-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_

Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2.
R e fers to any hours outside the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM—4 PM ) without also working all the regular shift hour.
O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
F or work outside of sp ecified h ou rs, all cement m asons receive time and on e-h alf pay after 4 :3 0 PM and double tim e after 8:0 0 PM ; 52 percent of the electrician s
between 4 :3 0 and 6 :3 0 P M and double tim e for all other overtim e worked.




Double
time

6
_
6
-

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s__________________________
C om m ercial----------------------------------------------------

_

Tim e and
on e-h alf

65
69
12
13

35
31
88
88

35
31
88
88

-

Holidays
Double
tim e

"

65
69
12
13

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators----------------- -------------------------C om m e rcial---------------------------------------------------B ulldozer o p e r a to r s-----------------------------------------C om m e rcial----------------------------------------------------

-

_
_
_
_

T im e and
on e-h alf

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

-

-

_
_
48
48
90
90
_
_
_

Saturdays

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
_
_
_
_
10
10
100
100
100
100

1
2
3
4
on e-h alf

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2

-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

surveyed receive tim e and

(P ercen t of w ork ers 1 in construction establish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

O ccup ation 3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified h o u r s13
2
Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Saturday

Sunday

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Holiday
Double
tim e

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
one-half

Double
time

113

Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s ___________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
C em ent m a s o n s _________________________________

93
93
42

7
7
58

24
24
2

76
76
65

34

24
24
2

76
76
65

34

24
24
2

76
76
65

34

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s __________________________ _
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______ _
Street and highway ________________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________________
B ulldozer op erators
_______________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay________________ _________
T ru ck d rivers __ ___________ __ _______ _____

74
84
57
100
76
40
63
50

26
16
43
. 24
60
37
50

74
60
57
93
61

13
-

74
60
57
93
61

13
-

74
60
57
93
61
63
11

12
40
43
7
39
100
38
89

13
-

63
11

12
40
43
7
39
100
38
89

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C onstruction la b o r e r s ______ __ __________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay_____________________
Other heavy c o n stru ction ______ __________

77
97
29
100

23
3
71

28
8
29
57

72
92
71
43

1
-

7
25

28
8
29
57

65
92
46
43

7
25

-

-

-

-

63
11

12
40
43
7
39
100
38
89

28
8
29
57

65
92
46
43

-

-

-

1 Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
3 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




-

-

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olidays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Tim e and
one-half

114

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C a r p e n te r s______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) ---------------R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
E le ctr icia n s______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------R o ofers___________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l--------- --------------------------------------Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p erators------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------R e sid en tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ---------------B ulldozer o p e r a to r s -----------------------------------------Street and highw ay--------------------------------------H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s__________________________
C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m o r e )---------------R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) -------------E le c tr ic ia n s' h elp ers___________________________

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 1
2
3

1

Double
time

Sundays

Saturdays
Tim e and
on e-h alf

1

Double
tim e '

_
_
13
_
_
_
7

100
99
100
100
100
87
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93

_
13
_
_
_
7

100
99
100
100
100
87
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93

11
_
89
78

89
100
100
11
22

11
89
78

3
-

97
100
100
100
100

3
-

-

-

T im e and
on e-h alf

1

Holidays
Double
tim e

_
7

100
99
100
100
100
87
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93

89
100
100
11
22

11
4
22

89
100
100
96
78

97
100
100
100
100

3
-

97
100
100
100
100

-

_
13
_
_
-

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM—4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
3 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Tim e and
on e-h alf

-

_
_
-

-

Double
time

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100

L

-

99
100
100
100
100

(P ercent of w ork ers 1 in construction establish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2
Straight
tim e

115

Journeymen:
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s _____________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
R esiden tial ( le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment o p erators:
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
T ru ck d rivers
....
... .
Street and highway .
_ .........

100
100
100
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s :
C arpenters' h elp ers
..
R esiden tial ( le s s than 5 sto ries)
. ....
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___ _____ _____________________ __
R esidential (le s s than 5 sto ries)
. . ..
Street and h ig h w a y ......... _
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s __________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s _____________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)

100
100
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Tim e and
one -h alf

-

-

-

-

6
-

Saturdays
Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Sundays
Double
tim e

90
100
86
100
100
56
56
77
77
40
40

10
14
_
44
44
_
60
60

_
_
24
24
-

100
100
100
100

-

-

82
73
93
100
89
100
57
57
89
89

19
27
1
_
43
43
-

-

6
11
11
11

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
one-half

Holidays
Double
tim e

Straight
tim e

90
100
86
100
100
56
56
77
77
40
40

10
_
14
_
44
44
_
_
60
60

100
100
100
100

_
_
_

82
73
93
100
89
100
57
57
89
89

19
27
1
_
_
_
43
43
_

90
100
86
100
100
56
56
77
77
40
40

10
_
14
_
44
44
_
_
60
60

_
_
_
_
24
24
-

100
100
100
100

_
_

_

-

-

82
73
93
100
89
100
57
57
89
89

19
27
1
43
43
-

-

6
11
_
11
11

Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
R e fer s to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




Tim e and
one-half

Double
time

_
_
_
24
24
_
-

_
_
6
_
11
_
_
_
11
11

(Percent of w orkers in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 1 and for Saturdays, Sun days,2 and h o lid a y s,2 September 1972)
Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 1

Occupation 1 and type
3
2
of construction
Straight
time

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Saturdays
Double
tim e
Union 4

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

116

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)
C a r p e n t e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s) ............ ....
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________ __________ ____________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P ip efitters 5 -------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s ________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

6
30
23
_
-

22
22
_
28
100
100
100
100
94
100
70
77
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
27
28

78
79
100
72
_
73
72

7
30
40
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93
100
70
60
100
100
100
95
94
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a t o r s 6 ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay________________________
Other heavy construction
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay_______________________
Other heavy c on stru ction __________________
T ru ck d rivers
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction ________________ _

53
77
33
22
12
46
51
14
26
68
69
64
63
93

48
23
67
78
88
54
49
87
74
32
31
36
37
7

-

53
79
22
53
63
90
27
26
87
90
84
93
97

34
6
73
78
48
37
10
73
74
13
10
16
7
3

-

22
6

100
100
78
94
100
98
43
23

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h elp ers
_ .
C o m m e r c ia l______________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy con stru ction _______________ __

2
51
52

100
100
81
91
100
98
49
48

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers 8
Street and highway .

71
84

30
16

-

17
6
-

-

-

2
3
-

-

-

2
57
77

Nonunion 7




22

'

1
2
3
4
5
6
percent
7
8

-

8
16

'

R e fers to any hours outside the regularly established schedule ( e .g ., 7 A M -4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
A ll union w ork ers w ere eligible for double tim e for work on Sunday or holidays, not shown separately.
O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
Double tim e for other than "e m e r g e n c y " work and tim e and o n e-h alf for em ergencies applied to 5 percent of the pipefitters' work on Saturdays.
Some back -h oe op erators receive tim e and on e-h alf for Saturday w ork, except with plum bers on site when they then receive double tim e.
These w orkers made up 13
of union b ack -h oe op erators surveyed.
Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
S traigh t-tim e for work on Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays applied to 70 percent of the nonunion la b o r e r s, tim e and o n e-h alf to 22 percent, and double tim e to 8 percent.

(Percent of w orkers

in construction establishments, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, October 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of
of construction

Tim e and
on e-h alf

117

Journeym en:
B rick la y e rs
.......
C o m m e r cia l
C arpenters
C o m m e r cia l ....... _
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m ore)
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 stories)
Other heavy construction __________________
Cem ent m ason s
C o m m e r cia l
_
. _
_
...... .
Street and highway ....
E le c t r ic ia n s 4 _
C o m m e r cia l
... ......... ...............
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
P ip e fitte rs __________ _____________ _______________
C o m m e r cia l
_ _ __
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ..................
P lu m b e r s __________________________________ __
............................. .
C o m m e r cia l
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m ore) ............
R o o fe r s _________________________________ _________
C o m m e r cia l
___
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers _
_
_ ....
C o m m e r cia l
Structural iron w o r k e r s ______________________
C o m m e r c ia l.

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2
Double
tim e

Saturdays

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
35
37
13
70
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
37
40
13
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
35
37
13
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

_
_
_
_
_
_
3
4
_
_

96
100
100
92
100
91
100
82
100
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

96
98
100
93
100
79
90
69
100
100
100
100

4
2
_
7
5 21
10
31
1

94
89
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

_
_
_
_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
95
100
69
35
37
13
70
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
97

66
63
87
30
1
1
-

4

96
100
100
92
100
91
100
82
100
-

4

8
9
18
100
100
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s4 _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s 6 _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esidential (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
R esidential (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy construction __________________

100
100
96
96
95
95
95
100

-

-

-

2
1
5
-

5

Holidays

Double
tim e

5
31
66
63
87
30
1
1
2
3

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators
........
C o m m e r cia l.
..........................
Residential (5 stories or m ore)
Street and h ig h w a y _________________________
Other heavy con stru ction .......... _ . ...
B ulldozer op erators _ _
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and h ig h w a y _________________________
Other heavy construction
T r u c k d r iv e r s ___________________________________
Street and highway
Other heavy construction __________________

Sundays

Tim e and
on e-h alf

-

-

8
9
18
100
100
100

100
100
98
100
95
100
95
100

-

-

2
1
5
5

Double
tim e

Double
tim e

Other
premium rate

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

-

-

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2.
2 R e fers to any hours outside the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M — PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
3 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 T im e and on e-h alf for Sunday and holiday work, not shown sep arately,
applied to 62 percent of the elec tric ia n s; a sim ilar provision for Sunday
work applied
to 6 percent of the b rick la y e rs' helpers.
5 F or work on five h olidays, w orkers receive double tim e , for one holiday they receive triple tim e , and for six holidays they r eceive quadruple tim e .
6 S traigh t-tim e pay for weekday work outside of specified h ours, not shown sep arately, applied to 2 percent of the la b o r e r s.




(Percent of w o r k e r s 1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours

Occupation 3 and type of construction

118

Tim e and
one-half

Double
time

Journeym en:
C a r p e n te r s________ __________ ________________
R e sid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
P lu m b e r s ___ ______________ ___________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
_______________________________________
R o o fe r s ..

26
68
27
43
94

17
32
73
57

58

Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe o p erators_____________________________

51

73
40
89
18
65

Saturdays
Straight
tim e

50

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers 4_________________________
C o m m e r cia l___
_____
____________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ---------------Plum bers* h e lp e r s ---------------------------------------------R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________ _

-

26
55

11
82
35

-

6

and holidays, October 1972)

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2
Straight
tim e

and for Saturdays, Sundays.

13
35
2
5
-

Sundays

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double
time

29
65
98
96
94

58
-

6

Straight
tim e

12
25
2
5

Double
tim e

24
58
43
59
-

64
17
55
36
100

_
_

10
35
7

3
12

89
60
93
97
88

5

10
35

_
_

7
55

1

12

75
60
89
15

53

8
5

4
30
35

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM — PM ) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
3 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w ork ers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 "O th e r " p rem iu m pay for Sunday or holiday w ork, not shown separately, applied to 7 percent of the construction la b o r e r s.




Straight
tim e

12
25
2
5
-

T im e and
on e-h alf

24
58
43
59
-

100

100

1
5

Holidays

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double
time

64
17
55
36
100

100

10
35
7
55

12

75
60
89
15
53

8
5
4
30
35

(Percent of w ork ers 1 in construction establish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olidays, Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Straight
time

Time and
one-half

119

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

53
54
66
70
36
33
36
67
69
41
61
85
87
80
79
92
92
100
100

3
3
9
4
25
5
1
3

98
98
91
96
75
95
99
97
100
41
61
94
95
100
100
98
100
100
100

3
3
2
2
15
1
1
3
_

-

96
95
98
99
85
99
99
95
98
100
100
96
97
93
92
98
100
100
100

51
37
48
30
16
42
77
94
56
100

49
63
52
70
84
58
23
6
44

7
10
8
5
10
46
66
35
7

-

100
100
61
88
83
42
9
50

-

44
43
26
27
39
62
63
24
25
_
7
7
20
21
6
8
(4 )
(4 )

3
3
9
4
25
5
1
9
7
59
39
9
6

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s 5 __________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highw ay__________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highw ay--------------------------------------Other heavy construction__________________

9
11
1
3
6
39
15
53
46

56
38
64
31
19
42
60
81
48
54

36
52
36
66
75
58
2
4
-

-

90
89
33
54
28
9

10
11
35
34
72
35
38

-

_
2
_
_
-

33
12
_

56
62
50

Sundays

Saturdays

Double
tim e

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
C a r p e n te r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highw ay__________________________
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
E le ctr icia n s_____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
E levator con stru c to rs__________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P lu m bers 5 ________ _________ ____ ________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s __________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r cia l--------------------------------------------------R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Street and highw ay--------------------------------------Other heavy construction---------------------------E levator c o n str u c to r s' h e lp e r s----------------------

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2

-

-

50

-

59
39
6
5
_
_
2
_
_
-

39
12
17
58
91
50

"

-

4
4
_
_
2
_
_

13
6
17
25
4

Holidays
Double tim e
and on e-h alf

Tim e and
on e-h alf

2
2
(4 )
2
2
-

_
-

_
_
_
_
_

2
_
_

-

-

92
97
89
91
93
90
54
34
65
93

1
2
1
2
_
-

6
_
10
3
5
1
41
66
27

100
100
88
94
83
75
96
100

-

-

-

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 R efers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM—4 PM ) without also working all the regular shift hours.
3 O v e ra ll occupations may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 L e ss than 0.5 percent.
5 T rip le tim e for work on Sundays, not shown separately, applied to 7 percent of union plum bers and 1 percent of union b ack-hoe op erators.




3
3
4
4
15
1
1
3
_
_
_
4
4
-

-

12
6
17
23
-

Double
tim e

97
97
94
93
83
96
96
96
98
100
100
96
97
93
92
98
100
100
100

Double time
and one-half

_
_
(4 )
(4 )
1
(4 )
2
2
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

T riple
tim e

_
_
2
3
_
3
4
_
_
_
_
_
7
8
_
_

_

-

-

91
97
87
90
91
89
60
34
74
100

1
3
1
7
4
8
(4 )

1
.
2
1
_
1
-

100
100
88
92
83
77
100
100

_
_

1
2

_

_

-

-

_

-

(P ercent of w orkers

construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekend work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and h olidays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Straight
time

120

Journeym en:
C arpenters
C o m m e rcial
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
Cement m asons
E le ctrician s
C om m e r cial
P ip efitters
C o m m e r c ia l_____________ _____ ___________
P lu m b ers_________________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w orkers _ ____ ________________
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for
weekday work
outside of specified h o u r s2
Tim e and
one -half

Saturdays
Straight
time

36
54
11

Holidays

Sundays

Tim e and
one -half

Straight
time

Tim e and
one -h alf

Double
time

Straignt
time

64
100
46
90
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

36
54
11

16
2
30
30
15
15
13
33
33

36
54
17

-

48
100
45
90
70
70
85
85
73
67
67

T im e and
one -h alf

Double
time

15
15
14
33
33

44
100
17
83
70
70
85
85
78
67
67

20
30
30
30
8
-

-

44
100
17
83
65
65
100
100
86
100
100

Equipment op era to rs:
T ru ck drivers 4________________________________ _
C o m m e rcia l ______________________________

14
9

86
91

7
9

93
91

7
9

56
47

37
45

7
9

56
47

23
28

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C a rp e n ters' h elp ers___________ ___ _____________
Construction la b o r e r s _________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ........... ......

71
27
50

29
73
50

60
18
24

40
82
77

60
18
24

40
45
73

38
4

60
20
28

29
36
55

11
44
17

1
2
3
4

56
83
17
35
35
14
-

-

-

-

14
-

-

Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information was limited to occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established scheduled (e.g ., 7 A M — PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
T rip le tim e for work on h olid ays, not shown separately, applied to 11 percent of the tru ck d rivers.




(P ercen t of w ork ers 1 in construction establishm ents, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays,
Septem ber 1972)

O ccupation3 and type
of construction

Tim e and
on e-h alf

121

Journeym en:
C arpenters --------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esid en tial ( le s s than 5 sto ries)_________
Cem ent m a so n s-------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 stories)__________
P ip e fitte r s _ ___
________ _____ ______—
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
P lu m b ers________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)__________
S h e et-m e ta l w o rk ers___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Structural iron w orkers
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________

100
100
100
100
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s _______________ ____________
T ru ck d rivers
_____ ___________________________

98
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)--------------S treet and highway______________ _____ ______
O ther heavy construction _________________

100
100
100
100
100




Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2
Double
time

-

Saturdays

Sundays

Holidays

Tim e and
one -h a lf

Double
tim e

Double
tim e

Double
tim e

-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

91
81

10
19

100
100

100
100

96
96
87
100
100

4
4
13
_

100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100

_
_
_

_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

2
-

_

_
_
_
,

_

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 R e fers to any hours outside the regularly established schedule (e .g ,, 7 A M -4 PM) without also working a ll of the regular shift h ours.
3 O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w ork ers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.

(Pe rcent of w o r k e r s 1 in construction establishments, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s 1 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and
2
holidays, Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2

122



Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________
C a r p e n t e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esid en tial (5 stories or m o r e ) -------------R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________
___
Street and h igh w ay__________________
Other heavy construction _________________
Cem ent m a s o n s ________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Street and h igh w ay________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s ____________________________________
............
C o m m e r cia l
P ip e fitte r s______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
P lu m b e r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Structural iron w ork ers ______________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
_____
______
Street and highway ..
Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a t o r s 4 _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and h igh w ay________________ ______
Other heavy con stru ction _________________
B ulldozer op erators
__________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and h igh w ay_______________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s _________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________
Construction la b o r e r s _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________

Sundays

Holidays

Tim e and
one-half

Double
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Double
tim e

Double
tim e

9
14

91
86
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93
89
100
76
71
100
100
100

9
14

"

91
86
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93
89
100
76
71
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
29
9
49

69
87
51

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
31
13
49

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
100
100
100

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
72
75
25
92
82
100
100

26
26
63
9
18
6
7

100
100
100
74
75
37
92
82
94
93

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

8
12
24
29
-

-

71
91
51
28
26
75
9
18
-

Saturdays

-

8
12
24
29
-

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 A M — PM) without also working all of the regu lar shift hours.
4
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 P rovision s for other prem ium rates, not shown separately, applied to 6 percent of the back-hoe op erators.

(Percent of w orkers in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 1
and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 1
2

123



Rate of pay for w eekday work outside of
specified hours 1

Rat e of pay for work on—
Saturdays

Sundays

Holidays

DO UBLE T IM E FO R T IM E W ORKED
OUTSIDE REG ULAR SCHED ULE
APP LIE D TO UNION WORKERS
IN A L L OCCUPATIONS STUDIED
E X C E P T TRUCKDRIVERS AND
CONSTRUCTION LABOR ERS;
THE L A T T E R TW O
OCCUPATIONS PROVIDED
TIM E AND O N E -H A L F FOR W E E K D A Y
WORK OUTSIDE OF SP EC IFIE D HOURS
AND FOR SATUR DAY WORK BUT DOUBLE
TIME FOR SUNDAY AND HOLIDAY W ORK.

1 R efers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM— P M ), without also working
4
all of the regular shift hours.
2 Provisions lim ited to those w orkers for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.

(Percent of w o r k e r s 1 in construction estab lish m en ts, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified hours 2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, Septem ber 1972)
Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified hours 2

Occupation 3 and type of construction

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Sundays

Saturdays
Double
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Holidays
Double
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double
time

Journeym en:

124

Other hf>avy cnn strncti on
flpmsnt m ason s
..............
C om m e rcial
. ..
Fllectri ci an s
....
C o m m e rcia l
Fllpvat.nr r.nn strnrtnr s
P ip efitters
Commerc'd al
P lum bers
____
C o m m e r cia l
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers
. ..
._
C omm e r ci al___________________________________
Structural iron w orkers
_ ___ _
C om m ercial
Equipment op erators:
P a c k -h o e op erators
C om m erci al
Street and highway . . .
O t h e r h e a v y r o n s t r n r t i On
P n lld ow er o p e ra to r s

C om m ercial
..
Street and highway
Truck d rivers
Cther heavy construction . ....
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s 4
C om m ercial
F esidenti a1
stories or m ore )

1

p o g id en ti a (le s s than
Pf-reet and h ig h w a y

stories)

O t h e r h e a v y c o n s t r u c t i on

..........

.. ....

27
48
32
34
5
54
54
31
26
30
4
4

47
47
65
65

48
9
24
22
42
11
13
_
7
_
_
_
_
_
14
14

25
23
63
17
12
30
14
16
9

59
39
80
73
48
29
53
91

38
41
4
22
53
41

23
9
77
79
47
49

51
88
84
87
53
92
100
100
100
93
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

42
_
2
2
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

58
100
98
98
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

49
12
2
2
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

76
29
63
99
71
32
43
69
100

24
71
36
2
29
68
57
31

11
_
_
19
_
_

90
100
100
81
100
100
100
77
100

11

22
3
81
79
100
60

73
97
19

25
43
44
45
53
35
33
69
74
62
96
96
100
100
53
53
21
21

49
12
16
13
48
8
_

17
39
37
3
15
22
57
31

39
50
19
_

10

_
_
7
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
10

23
_

11
_
77
79
14

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 R e fers to any hours outside of the regu larly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM— PM ) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
4
3 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4 Straigh t-tim e pay for work on Saturdays, not shown separately, applied to 5 percent of union construction la b o r e r s.




89
100
23
22
100
86

-

_
-

_

_
-

19
_
_
_

23
_

13
2
77
79
_

14

51
88
98
98
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

90
100
100
81
100
100
100
77
100

87
98
23
22
100
86

(Percent of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishments, by rate of pay for weekday work outside of specified h o u r s2 and for Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, September 1972)

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Rate of pay for work on—

Rate of pay for weekday work
outside of specified h o u r s2
Straight
time

Tim e and
one-half

Saturdays

Sundays

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Straight
tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

125

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___ ___________________ _________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
R esidential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
__
.
C o m m e rcia l ... ...
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
P ip e fitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lum bers
.......... . . .
. ... _ ...
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential H ess than 5 stories')
R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________

93
87
99
89
94
90
93
100
88
100
100
100
100
100
59
52
68
100
91
95
82

7
13
1
11
6
10
8
12
41
48
33
9
5
18

86
84
98
75
48
79
80
100
89
63
59
82
100
100
25
27
19
87
89
91
82

15
16
2
25
52
21
21
11
37
41
19
75
73
81
13
12
9
18

85
84
98
69
43
72
79
100
89
63
59
82
100
100
25
27
19
87
89
91
82

13
14
1
30
49
28
21
_
11
37
40
19
73
71
81
13
11
8
18

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators 5 ............ .....
___
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and highway ...
Other heavy construction ...........
..
B ulldozer op erators ___ _______________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
T ru ck d rivers
. ..
......
Street and highway ...............
..
Other heavy construction

74
100
40
65
97
100
96
58
42
74

26
60
35
3
4
42
58
26

47
70
40
82
68
57
96
49
54
88

53
30
60
18
32
43
4
51
46
12

47
71
40
82
64
57
61
47
52
83

49
23
_
18
36
43
36
29
20
5

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s 1 h e lp e r s ___________________________
C om m ercial
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
C arp en ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
C o m m e rcia l
...........................................
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
___
Construction la b o r e r s 6 .. .
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries) __
Street and highway
Other heavy con stru ction ... . ... .. . ......
E le ctricia n s' h elp ers..
......
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s _____________________________
C o m m e rcia l
Residential (le ss than 5 sto riesl
_
. ...

88
82
98
98
100
97
83
100
85
85
89
100
100
73
75
65

12
18
2
2

81
81
89
89
40
93
71
43
77
78
96
73
87
69
69
65

19
19
11
11
60
8
30
57
23
22
4
27
13
31
31
35

81
81
89
89
40
92
67
43
71
77
93
73
87
69
69
65

19
19
10
11
57
8
28
52
25
14
1
27
13
28
26
35

1
2
3
4
5
6

-

3
16
-

15
16
8
-

27
25
35

Holidays
Double
tim e

1
2
1
1
8
_
(4 )
_
(4 )
1
2
30
_
_
1
1
4
7
60
_
(4 )
4
24
29
12

1
1
1
(4 )
3

_

5
4
4
9
6
1

_

4
5

Straight
tim e

Double
time

86
84
98
69
43
72
80
100
89
63
59
82
100
100
22
27
10
87
89
91
82

13
14
1
30
43
28
20
_
11
37
40
19
_
_
73
71
81
13
11
8
18

1
2
1
2
13
_

47
71
40
82
68
57
96
49
54
88

42
23
_
_
32
43

4
7
60
_

81
81
89
89
40
92
67
43
71
78
93
73
87
53
69
12

19
19
11
9
28
8
27
49
25
14

Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
R efers to any hours outside of the regularly established schedule (e .g ., 7 AM—4 PM) without also working all of the regular shift hours.
O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
L e ss than 0.5 percent.
Double tim e and o n e-h a lf for holiday work, not shown separately, applied to 7 percent of the back-hoe op erators.
Double tim e for weekday work outside of specified hours was provided to 0 .4 percent of the nonunion la b o rers.




Tim e and
one-half

_

27
17
-

_

27
13
28
26
35

(4 )
_
(4 )
1
_
_
_
5
3
9
_
1
1
-

(4 )
4
24
29
12

1
1
1
3
32

_

6
8
4
9
6
1

_

19
5
53

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establish m en ts with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)1
3
2

O ccup ation 2 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Double
T im e and
one -half
time
8 hours

8 hours

Weekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Double
Tim e and
one -half
time
40 hours

40 hours

100
100
22
25
1

126

Journeym en:
B r ick la y e r s______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C arpenters_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Cement m a so n s__________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P ip e fitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Structural iron w o rk ers________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------- --------- -------------

84
83
99
100
73
73
65
65
100
100
19
19

100
100
16
17
1

81
81

78
75
99
100
73
73
60
60
100
100
19
19

Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s ------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l----------------------------------------------------

100
100

-

100
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers 3 ------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________

94
93

-

27
27
35
35
-

-

-

27
27
40
40
-

81
81

100
100

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 22 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.
3 In addition to overtim e rates and effective hours shown, 7 percent of the construction
la b o rers are paid stra ig h t-tim e pay for work after 8 hours.




Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
T im e and
Straight
one -h alf
tim e
8 hours

Journeymen:
C arpenters_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
Cement m ason s_________________________________
S h eet-m etal workers
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)..

100
100
100
44
98
98

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s____________________________
C om m ercial
Other heavy construction __________________
Bulldozer op erators____________________________
Street and highway
.
T ruck drivers____________________________________

88
100
100
78
100

H elpers and la b o rers:
C arp e n ters' h elp ers____________________________
C om m ercial
Construction la b o r e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and highway
Other heavy construction __________________

100
100
90
97
88
48
100

8 hours

-

56
2
2

12
-

22
100
-

-

10
3
12
52

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
one -half
40 hours

100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.

(P ercen t of w o r k e r s 1 in construction establishm ents with p rovisions for daily or w eekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective,
Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after whic:h effective
Tim e and
Double
on e-h alf
tim e
8 hours

8 hours
Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Cem ent m a s o n s ________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________

29
29
17
21
67

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers 3 _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------

67
67

1
in table
2
3

40 hours

40 hours

100
100
71
71
83
79

Equipment op erators:
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------

100
100
71
71
83
79

67

33

-

-

29
29
17
21

33

-

100
100

-

"

Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers
2.
O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
In addition to overtim e rates and effective hours shown, 33 percent of the construction lab orers are paid stra igh t-tim e for work after 8 hours.

Table 92.

127



W eekly overturn e rate and hours
after whic h effective
Double
T im e and
o n e-h alf
tim e

Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (nonunion):

Biloxi—Gulfport and Pascagoula, Miss.
(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with p rovisions for daily or w eekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after
which effective, September 1972)

Occupation2 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after whic h effective
Tim e and
on e-h alf

Straight
tim e

Weekly overtim e rate and
hours after which effective
Tim e and
on e-h alf

8 hours

8 hours

Journeymen:
C a r p e n te r s_______ _____ _________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Cement m a s o n s ________________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s_____________________________________
P lu m b e r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________

39
59
11
100
100
100

61
41
90
_
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment op erators:
B ack-hoe op era to rs__________________________
Bulldozer o p e r a to r s ___________________________
Street and h ighw ay_________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s___________________________________
Street and highw ay_________________________

92
29
46
28
28

8
71
55
72
72

100
100
100
100
100

Helpers and lab orers:
C arpenters' h e lp e r s _________________________
Construction la b o r e r s _________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Street and highway
Other heavy construction__________________
E le ctrician s' h e lp e r s__________________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________

71
42
19
48
44
22
100
100
100

29
59
81
52
56
78
_
_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

40 hours

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are
shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.

Table 93. Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (union):
Boston, Mass.

Table 94.

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establish m en ts with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, September 1972)

(Percent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, Septem ber 1972)

O ccupation1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtime rate
and hours after
which effective
Double
T im e and
time
on e-h alf
8 hours

128

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l___________________________________
C a r p e n te r s_____________________________ __________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Other heavy construction___________________
Cement m a s o n s __________________________________
C om m e rcial
E le ctrician s 3_____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P ip efitte rs------------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------P lu m b e r s _________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------R o o fers____________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w orkers --------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------Structural iron w ork ers _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l-. ----------------------------------------------Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p erators--------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------B ulldozer o p e r a to r s ------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l--------------------------------------------- ----H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s -----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------Construction la b o r e r s 4 -------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------Street and highw ay----------------------------------------Other heavy construction___________________

-

_
1
-

3
3
6
6
51
-

24
5

-

18
2
53
75

8 hours

100
100
100
100
99
100
100
71
71
94
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

49
100
76
96

100
100
100
100
81
98
47
15

Weekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Double
Tim e and
one-half
tim e
40 hours

-

_
_
1
-

3
3
6
6
51
-

24
5

-

19
2
53
86

Occupation 2 and type
of construction

100
100
100
100
99
100
100
71
71
94
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

49
100
76
96

100
100
100
100
81
98
47
15

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Straight
Tim e and
on e-h alf
time

W eekly overtime rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
one-half

8 hours

40 hours

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.
3 Double tim e for new construction and tim e and one-half for maintenance and repair work,
not shown sep arately, applied to 26 percent of the electrician s, after 8 hours daily an d/or 40
hours w eekly.
4 S traigh t-tim e pay after 8 hours daily applied to 1 percent of construction la b o rers.




Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (nonunion):

Boston, Mass.

J ourneymen:
C a r p e n te r s______________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------E le ctricia n s__ - __________________________________
C o m m e rcia l_________________________________
Plumb e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e rcial_________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) -------------H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s--------------------------------------C o m m e rcia l_________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) -------------Other heavy construction__________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s --------------------------------------------

8 hours

40 hours

92
92
61
61
44
77
-

8
8
39
39
56
23
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100

68
64
76
92
41

32
37
24
9
59

100
100
100
100
100

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
separately.

(Percent of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, Septem ber 1972)
Daily overtim e rate and hours after which effective
O ccupation1 and type of construction

Tim e and
one-half
8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate and hours after which effective
Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double tim e
7 hours

7 V2

hours

8 hours

40 hours

Double tim e
35 hours

37

V2 hours

40 hours

Union 1
2

129

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
C a r p e n te r s______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------------------E le ctrician s 3____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l _
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l____ _____ ________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w ork ers 3 _________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________

_
19
19
11
8
_
_

79
79
89
92
_
_

2
2

_
100
100

-

_
_
79
79
89
92
_
_
-

-

-

-

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s___________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________

-

-

7
14
3
100

-

-

7
14
3
100

-

_
_

-

93
100
86
97
100
-

-

-

93
100
86
97
100
-

-

Helpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________

100
100
100

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

100
100
100

100
100

-

-

_
2
2
-

_
19
19
11
8

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
-

-

_
_
_
2
2
-

_
2
2
_

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
100
100

-

Nonunion 4
J ourneymen:
C a r p e n te r s ------------------------- --------- ----------------------R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________

100
100

-

-

-

-

-

1 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
2 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2.
3 F ir s t hour of overtim e is at tim e and one-half and all hours thereafter are at double tim e— effective after 7 hours daily or 35 hours weekly— for electrician s and sh eet-m etal w orkers not shown
separately.
4 Nonunion carpenters equal 100. Information is lim ited to carpenters, the only occupation for which wage data are shown for nonunion w ork ers in table 3.




(P ercent of w ork ers in construction establishments with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
of construction

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Tim e and
Double
tim e
on e-h alf

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Double
Tim e and
tim e
one-half
8 hours

40 hours

8 hours

40 hours

53
54
2
4
1
4
4
12
2
87
95
55
56
7
94
94
95
97
91
100
100
100
95
94
100
78
78
100

47
46
100
98
100
100
96
100
99
96
96
100
88
98
100
6
4
29
93
6
7
5
3
9
5
6
22
22

Union 2

130



J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s - __________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
C arpenters 3 ____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m ore) _________
R e sid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) -------------Street and highw ay________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
Cem ent m a s o n s _______ - _______________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
R esid en tial (5 stories or m o r e )_________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
Street and highway ________________________
Other heavy construction________________
E le ctricia n s 4 __________________ ______________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
R esidential (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
R esiden tial (less than 5 s t o r ie s ) -------------E levator con stru ctors_________________________
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ------------R o o fer s__________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s __________________________
C om m e r c i al_________________________________
R esiden tial (less than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------Structural iron w o r k e r s______________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )--------------

53
54
_
2
4
1
4
4
_
12
2
94
97
100
71
6
94
94
95
97
91
100
100
100
95
94
100
78
78
100

47
46
100
98
100
100
96
83
99
96
96
100
88
98
100
6
4
29
94
6
7
5
3
9
5
6
_
22
22

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p erators------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l------------------ -------------------------------R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------Street and highw ay________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and highw ay_________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s___________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------Street and highw ay________________________
Other heavy construction----------------------------

92
80
100
100
100
100
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

8
20
-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers 3_______________________
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
R esid en tial (5 stories or m o r e )__________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
Street and highw ay-------------------------------------Other heavy construction__________________
E levator con stru c to rs' h elp ers----------------------

100
100
100
100
93
100
4

See footnotes at end of table.

-

(5 )
1
-

92
80
100
100
100
100
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

8
20
(5 )
1
-

(?)
(5 )
(5 )
96

100
100
100
100
100
99
4

(?)
(5 )
(5 )
96

(P ercent of w orkers in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
T im e and
Double
one-half
tim e
8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effectice
T im e and
Double
on e-h alf
tim e

8 hours

40 hours

40 hours

Nonunion 6
J ourneymen:
Cement m a so n s__________
__________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
E lectrician s 3___________________________________

73
73
63

H elpers and lab orers:
Construction la b o r e r s.________________________
R esidential (less than 5 s t o r ie s )_________

64
62

27
27

73
73
63

-

27
27
-

100
100

1 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
2 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown
for union w orkers in table 2.
3 Straight-tim e pay for daily overtim e after 8 hours, not shown sep arately, applied to 17 percent of union carpenters in
street and highway construction, 1 percent of union la b o r e r s, 37 percent of nonunion e le c tr ic ia n s, and 36 percent of nonunion la b o rers.
4 Tim e and one-half after 48 hours w eekly, not shown sep arately, applied to 7 percent of union elec tric ian s.
5 L e ss than 0.5 percent.
6 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. W here inform ation is presented, it is lim ited to occupations for which
wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.

131




Table 97.

Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (union):

Dallas, Tex.

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
T im e and
Double
on e-h alf
tim e
8 hours

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s __________ ___________ ________________
C om m e rcial______________________ _____ _____
C a r p e n te r s______________________________________
C om m e rcial______________________________ __
Cement m a so n s _________________________________
C om m e rcial__________________________________
E le ctricia n s_____________________________________
C omme r c i al__________________________________
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C om m e rcial__________________________________
H elpers and lab orers:
Construction la b o rers__________________________
C om m e rcial__________________________________

8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Tim e and
Double
on e-h alf
time
40 hours

40 hours

100
100
_

-

100
100

-

100
100
100
100
100
100

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
-

-

100
100

_
100
100

-

-

.
_
_
100
100

100
100

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown
for union w orkers in table 2.
2 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.

(P ercen t of w orkers 1 in construction establish m en ts with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

D aily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Straight
one-half
tim e

Weekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
one -h alf

132

Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s _____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy c on stru ction __________________
B ulldozer op era to rs____________________________
C o m m e rcial _____ ____________ _____ _________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
T r u ck d riv ers_______________________ _____________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Carpenters ' h elp ers____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Street and h ig h w a y --------------------------------------Construction la b o r e r s --------------------- ----------------C o m m e r c ia l______________________ ___________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)........... ........
Street and h ig h w a y --------------------------------------Other heavy c o n str u c tio n .._________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)---------------P lu m bers ' h e lp e r s .............................................. ........
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s )__________

8 hours

85
82
100
54
54
100
8
61
100
98
95
100
100
100
100

15
18
100
46
47
92
39
2
5
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

44
17
63
27
47
13

56
83
100
38
73
53
100
87
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

10
6
100
48
45
2
83
51
20
58
2
9

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

90
94
52
56
98
15
49
80
42
100
98
91
100

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.




Occupation 2 and type
of construction

40 hours

8 hours

Journeym en:
C arpen ters_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy c o n s tr u c tio n ..._______________
Cement m asons
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ______________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s )__________
P lum bers
C o m m e rcia l
. ...
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o rk ers____________________________
C o m m e rcial

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)
Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Double
Tim e and
one -h alf
tim e
8 hours

Journeymen:
B rick layers
_ ___
C om m ercial
C arpenters_______________________________________
C om m ercial
Cement m ason s__________________________________
C om m ercial
_
_. .
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P ip e fitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b ers_________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
S h eet-m etal w ork ers___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Structural iron w ork ers________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

67
67
6
6
26
20
100
9
7
14
6
24
46
-

8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Double
one -h alf
time
40 hours

40 hours

33
33
94
94
74
80
91
93
86
94
76
100
54
100
100
100
100

67
67
6
6
26
20
100
9
7
14
6
24
46
2
-

33
33
94
94
74
80
91
93
86
94
76
100
54
100
100
98
100

97
89
100
100
99
100
100
100
100

3
11
1
-

61
61
94
96
78
100
100

39
39
6
4
22
-

Equipment op erators:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l______: ___ _____ __________________
Street and h igh w ay__________ _______________
Other heavy construction __________ ________
Bulldozer op erators.______ _____________________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
T ru ck d rivers____________________________________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
Other heavy construction __________________

97
89
100
100
99
100
100
100
100

3
11
1
-

Helpers and la b o r e r s:
B rick layers ' h elp ers___________________________
C om m e rcial
.......
_ _.
Construction la b o r e r s _________________________
C om m ercial _ ..............
Residential (le ss than 5 s to r ie s )... ... _ .
Street and highway
Other heavy construction ...
_ ... _

61
61
94
96
78
100
100

39
39
6
4
22
-

"

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
separately.

(P ercent of w ork ers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

O ccupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
, Tim e and
Straight
tim e
one-half
8 hours

i

8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
one-half

(Percent of w orkers in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
Weekly overtime rate
and hours after
and hours after
which effective
which effective
Tim e and
Tim e and
Double tim e
Double time
one-half
one-half
8 hours

40 hours

8 hours

40 hours

40 hours

Uni on 2
J ourneymen:
C a r p e n te r s_______________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Cement m a s o n s _________________ __________ ______
E le ctr icia n s______________________________________

100
100
100
100

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op era to rs_____________________________

133

45

43
40
100
55

23

77

100

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s ’ h e lp e r s ___________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s___________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ---------------

7
7
100
28
22
86
72

93
93
72
78
14
28

100
100
100
100
100
100
100

57
60
-

1 Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.




Journeymen:
C a r p e n te r s----------------------------------------------------------C o m m e rcia l_______________________ ____________
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
E le ctricia n s______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s_________________________________________
C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s ----------------------------------------C o m m e rcial__________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s-----------------------------------C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
Equipment operators:
B ack-h oe op erators----- -----------------------------------C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s------------------------------------------T ru c k d r iv e r s____________________________________
H elpers and la b o rers:
Construction la b o r e r s ---------------------------------------C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s ______________________________
C o m m e rcia l__________________________________

28

-

72
100
72
100
72
96
100
100
100
100
100
100

78
43
100
99

22
57
1

78
43
100
99

22
57

29
_

71
100
100
100

29
_

71
100
100
100

28
-

28
-

28
5
-

-

-

-

-

28
-

28
5
-

_
-

-

-

72
100
72
100
72
96
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

1

Nonunion 3
H elpers and la b o rers:
Construction lab orers 3-------------------------------------

77

100

1 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
separately.
2 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
3 A ll nonunion construction lab orers equal 100.
Information is lim ited to construction
la b o r e r s, the only occupation for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
S traigh t-tim e pay after 8 hours per day, not shown separately, applied to 23 percent of the
la b o rers.

(P ercent of w ork ers 1 in construction establish m en ts with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Weekly overtim e rate and hours after which effective

Daily overtim e rate and hours after which effective
Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Tim e and
on e-h alf
8 hours

134

Journeym en:
B rick la y e rs ...
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C arpenters 3
.......... .
........
C o m m e r cia l
. . ............ .
C em ent m ason s
... ......... . . ...
C om m ercial
Other heavy construction ___________________
E le c t r ic ia n s __________________________________ ,___
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P ip efitters
.. .
.............
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b ers
_
. . . . .
C o m m e r cia l
.....
. ..
R o ofers 3 _________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
......................
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers ...
C o m m e r cia l
.... .....
Structural iron w orkers
C o m m e rcia l
... ...
Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators
...
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s _____________ _____________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B ric k la y e r s' h e lp e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s ._________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------Other heavy construction ___________________

_
2
19
_
36
16
16
4
4
_
51
51
52
52
_

8 hours

88
88
2
2
26
36
7
7
48
48
-

12
12
96
98
55
64
64
84
84
96
96
94
94
100
100

-

-

71
71
4
4

-

-

39
100
95

100
100
61
100
5

-

2
19
36
-

35 hours

36 hours

88
88
2
28
40
-

-

60
62
29
29
55
55

-

51
52
52
-

7
7
48
48
-

51

94
94
-

40 hours

12
12
35
36
53
60
64
41
41
-

100
100

94
63
100
100

7
38

-

100
100
61
100
5

"

39
-

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 O vertim e prem ium rate of tim e and on e-h a lf, effective after 7 V2 hours a day and 37Vz hours a week, not shown




40 hours

-

-

-

-

36 hours

7
38
-

94
63
100
100

Double tim e

Tim e and on e-h alf

Double tim e
7 hours

-

-

-

95

are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
separately, applied to 50 percent of the

ro o fe r s.




(P ercent of workers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after
which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Straight
T im e and
tim e
one -h alf
8 hours

8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
one -h alf
40 hours

Journeymen:
Carpenters
............
.
...
E lectrician s 3 ___________________________________
Pipefitters
...
.............
P lu m bers________________________________________
Residential (le ss than 3 stories)

52
78
92
94
93

48
8
7
7

100
100
100
100
100

Equipment operators:
B ack-hoe o p e r a to r s____________________________
Bulldozer operators
........
....
. ...
Residential (less than 5 sto r ie s)__________
T ruckdrivers____________________________________

43
36
62
92

57
64
38
8

100
100
100
100

H elpers and lab orers:
Carpenters ' h elp ers____________________________
Construction laborers
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
Residential (less than 5 sto r ie s)__________
Plum bers ' h elp ers______________________________

92
53
50
73
100

9
47
50
27

100
100
100
100
100

-

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data
are shown for nonunion workers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
3 Overtim e prem ium pay of tim e and on e-h alf effective after 9 hours a day, not shown sep arately, applied to 22 percent
of the electricians.

(P ercen t of w o r k e r s1 in construction establishm ents with p rovisions for daily or w eekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, Septem ber 1972)

O ccupation1 and type of construction
2

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Double
Tim e and
tim e
on e-h alf
8 hours

136



Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e rcial-------------------------------------------------C a r p e n te r s----------- ---------- ----------------------------------C om m e rcial-------------------------------------------------Cement m a so n s------------------------------------------------C om m e rcial_________________________________
Street and highway-------------------------------------E le ctricia n s-------------------------------------------------------C om m e rcial-------------------------------------------------P ip efitte rs______________________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
P lu m b e r s-----------------------------------------------------------C om m e rcial-------------------------------------------------S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s---------------------------------------C o m m e rcial-------------------------------------------------Structural iron w o r k e r s---------------------------------C om m ercial_________________________________

-

7
7
25
12
100
29
21
-

1
~

8 hours

100
100
93
93
75
88
-

71
80
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100

Equipment operators:
B ack -h oe operators 3__________________________
C om m e rcial_________ _____ — ------ -------------- —
Street and highw ay-------------------------------------Other heavy construction--------------------------B ulldozer operators 3 _________________________
C o m m e rcial_________________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s___________________________________
Street and highway—----------------------------------Other heavy construction---------------------------

62
10
100
79
49
6
94
93
100

19
38

H elpers and lab orers:
Construction la b o rers_________________________
C o m m e rcial_________________________________
Other heavy construction----------------------------

55

22
100

45
79

-

21
38
68
6
7
-

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Double
T im e and
tim e
on e-h alf
40 hours

-

7
7
25
12
100
29
21
-

1
-

40 hours

100
100
93
93
75
88
71
80
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100

62
10
100
79
49
6
94
93
100

19
38
21
38
68
6
7

55

45
79

22
100

-

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage
data for union w orkers are shown in table 2.
2 O verall occupations may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Tim e and one-half after 8 V2 hours daily or 4 2 V2 hours weekly applied to 19 percent of the back-h oe operators
and 13 percent of the bulldozer operators.

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with p rovisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours
after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Straight
Tim e and
tim e
on e-h alf

Weekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Tim e and
on e-h alf

137

8 hours




8 hours

40 hours

Journeymen:
Carpenters ___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
P lu m b e r s _______________________________________
Sheet-m etal w o r k e r s _______________________ _
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________

83
97
14
14
20

17
3
86
86
80

100
100
100
100
100

H elpers and lab orers:
Construction lab orers
_
. . . ..
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ________

60
33
78

40
67
22

100
100
100

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage
data are shown for nonunion w ork ers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.

Table 106. Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (union):
Kansas City, Mo.—Kans.
(P ercen t of w orkers 1 in construction establish m en ts with p rovisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay
and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

138




Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ___________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
C a r p e n t e r s ____________________ ______________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)__________
Street and highway_________________________
Cem ent m ason s_________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and highway__________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________ ______________
Pipefitte r s ________________________ _____________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
P lu m b ers_________________________ _____________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________ _____________
R esidential (5 stories or m ore)___________
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)__________
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________ _____________
Structural iron w ork ers_________________ ____
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s___________
_____________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Street and highway__________________________
B ulldozer op erators______________________
C om m e rcial ______________ ___________
Street and highw ay... ______ _____________
Other heavy co n stru c tio n ... _____________
T ru ck d rivers ____________ ___________________
C om m e rcial __________________________ ___
H elpers and la b o rers:
B r ick la y e r s' h elp ers__________________________
C om m ercial ________ _____________________
Construction la b o r e r s ________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and highway___________ ____________
Other heavy construction_________________
P lu m b ers' h elp ers_________ __________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective

W eek ly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective

Double
time
8 hours

Tim e and
on e-h alf
40 hours

.
4
18
50
20
_
54
100
_
_
_
_
-

-

100
100
96
99
82
50
80
100
46
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

100
100
96
99
82
50
80
100
46
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

63
_
88
87
48
96
73
94
85

37
100
12
13
52
4
27
7
15

63
88
87
48
96
73
94
85

37
100
12
13
52
4
27
7
15

.
_
32
1
88
80

100
100
69
99
12
20
100
100

.
32
1
88
80

100
100
69
99
12
20
100
100

Tim e and
one -h alf
8 hours

.
4
_
18
50
20
_
54
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_

Double
tim e
40 hours

'

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100, Information is lim ited to those occupations for which
wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2,
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.

(P ercent of workers in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, Septem ber 1972)
Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Occupation 1 and type
of construction

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

8 hours

8 hours

40 hours

Double tim e
36 or 37 hours

40 hours

94
93
100
100
100
100
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
_
_
_
81
83
54
_
_
_
28
23
100
100
100
100
100

Union 2

139



Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s -------------------------------------------------------C om m ercial_________________________________
R esidential (less than 5 s to r ie s )_________
C a r p e n ter s______________________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s )-------------Street and highway_________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
Cement m a so n s________________________________
C om m ercial__ _____________________________
R esidential (less than 5 s to r ie s )-------------Street and highw ay_________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
E lectrician s 3___________________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
Residential (less than 5 s to r ie s )_________
P ip efitters______________________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
P lu m b e r s _______________________________________
C om m ercial— ______________________________
Residential (less than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------R o ofers__________________________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s__________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
Residential (less than 5 stories) ------------Structural iron w o r k e r s______________________
C om m ercial---------------------------------- --------- -----Equipment operators:
B ack -h oe operators-----------------------------------------C om m ercial-------------------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------Street and highway_________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
B ulldozer o p era to rs___________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------Other heavy construction__________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s----------------------------------------------------Other heavy construction__________________
H elpers and lab orers:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s__________________________
C om m ercial_________________________________
Residential (less than 5 s t o r ie s )-------------Construction la b o rers_________________________
C om m ercial--------------------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
Street and highway_________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
E levator constructors' h e lp e r s---------------------C om m ercial_________________________________

See footnotes at end of table.

100
100
100
100
100
6
7
_
_
72
77
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
_
81
83
54
94
93
100
100
100
100
28
23
100
100
100
100
100

_
100
100
100
100
100
6
7
_
_
72
77
-

_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
-

-

100
100

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

-

-

--

100
100

-

(P ercen t of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with p rovisions for daily or weekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)
W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Occupation 1 and type
of construction

T im e and
on e-h alf

Double tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

8 hours

8 hours

40 hours

Double tim e
36 or 37 hours

40 hours

Nonunion 4
J ourneymen:
PlnmKprs®
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________

20
15

32
15

68
85

32
40

37
45

1 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
2 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown
for union w ork ers in table 2.
3 Double tim e pay after 7 hours daily and 35 hours weekly applied to 19 percent of the union elec tric ia n s.
4 Nonunion plum bers equal 100. Information is lim ited to p lu m bers, the only occupation for which wage data are shown for
nonunion w ork ers in table 3.
5 S traigh t-tim e pay after 8 hours daily applied to 13 percent of nonunion plum bers.

140




Table 108.

Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (union): Memphis, Tenn.—Ark.

(P ercent of w ork ers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)
Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Occupation1 and type
2
of construction

W eekly overtim e and hours
after which effective

Tim e and
on e-h alf

J ourneymen:
C arpenters .
.
.
.. ....
C om m e rcial
........................ _
Cem ent m ason s
_
........
. ....
C om m ercial
El ect ri r.i an s 3
... _
C om m ercial
P ip efitte rs________________________________________
C om m ercial
. . _
.
P lum pers ._ ...
. . . . . .
C om m ercial
S h e et-m e tal w orkers .
. .
_
C om m ercial
Equipment op erators:
R ack -h oe op erators
C om m ercial
Rnlliio 7;er operators
C om m e rcial
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers
Com m e rci al

.

........... ...
...
..

Double tim e

Tim e and
on e-h alf

Double tim e

8 hours

8 hours

40 hours

40 hours

100
100
100
100
74
74
90
90

35
31
88
88
100
100

10
10
100
100
100
100
65
69
12
13

100
100
100
100
75
75
90
90

35
31
88
88
100
100

_

10
10
100
100
100
100
65
69
12
13

_

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100,
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown
for union w ork ers in table 2.
2 O v e ra ll occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 T im e and on e-h alf after 8 hours daily or 40 hours weekly is paid for hours worked between 4 :3 0 and 6 :3 0 PM and double
tim e th e re a fte r, for 26 percent of the electricians.

(P ercent of w ork ers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Straight
one -half
time
8 hours

Journeym en:
C arpen ters_______________________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )............... .
Cem ent m ason s 3________________________________

100
100
97

Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s ____________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s )-------------Street and h ig h w a y _________________________
Other heavy construction ------------------------B ulldozer op era to rs_________________________ . .
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) .............
Street and h ig h w a y __________________ _____ _
T r u ck d r iv e r s____________________________________

88
84
100
100
86
40
100
100

8 hours

141

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s )--------------Street and h ig h w a y ____________________ _____
Other heavy con stru ction __________________

89
100
66
100

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
one -h alf

11
34

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100

1 Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 32 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.
3 T im e and o n e-h a lf after 8 hours daily or 40 hours weekly is paid for hours worked
between 4 :3 0 and 6:3 0 PM and double tim e thereafter, for 3 percent of the cement m ason s.




Occupation 2 and type
of construction

40 hours

100
100
97

12
16
15
60
“

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctiv e, September 1972)
Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
T im e and
Double
one -half
time
8 hours

Journeymen:
B rick layers
Carpenters
C om m ercial
R esidential (5 stories or m ore)
R esidential H ess than 5 stories)
Cement m asons
C om m ercial
E lectrician s 3
C om m ercial
P ipefitters
C om m ercial
P lum bers 4
C om m ercial
R oofers 4
C om m ercial
S heet-m etal w o r k e r s4
C om m ercial
Structural iron w orkers
Equipment op erators:
B ack-hoe operators
C om m ercial
Residential (5 stories or m ore)
Bulldozer operators
Street and highway
Helpers and la b o rers:
Construction lab orers
C om m ercial
Residential (5 stories or m ore)
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
E le ctr icia n s' h elpers 3

-

1
-

-

13
_
-

-

.
7

11
-

89
78

5
4
.
.

8 hours

100
99
100
100
100
87
100
.

Weekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Double
one -half
time
40 hours

1
.
.
-

13
.

_

40 hours

100
99
100
100
100
87
100
_

.

_

.

100
100

-

100
100
_

-

.
82
82
4
.
93

89
100
100
11
22

95
96
100
100

.
_
_
_
_
_

82
82
4

7

93

11
.

89
100
100
11
22

-

89
78

5
4
.
_

95
96
100
100

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.
3 F ir st hour of overtim e is at tim e and on e-h alf and a ll hours thereafter at double
tim e effective after 7 hours daily or 35 hours weekly.
4 Double tim e after 7 hours daily or 35 hours weekly applied to all p lum bers, 18 percent
of the roofers and 97 percent of the sh e e t-m e ta l w ork ers.

(P ercen t of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by
rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Straight
one -h alf
tim e
8 hours

142




Journeymen:
C arpenters_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)__________
Cement m ason s_________________________________
Street and h ighw ay------------------- -----------------E le c tr ic ia n s_____________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)---------------P lu m b ers________________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)---------------R o o fe r s __________________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)__________

78
69
78
100
100
84
84
100
100
100
100

Equipment op erators:
Bulldozer op erators____________________________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
T ru ck d rivers____________________________________
Street and h igh w ay--------------------------------------

100
100
100
100

H elpers and la b o rers:
Carpenters 1 h elp ers____________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)__________
Construction lab orers 3 _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)__________
Street and h ighw ay_________________________
E lectrician s ' helpers _________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries)__________
P lum bers ' h elp ers______________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)----------------

76
65
84
57
96
100
63
63
100
100

8 hours

22
31
23
16
16
-

■
24
35
16
43
4
37
37
-

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
T im e and
one -h alf
40 hours

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100

100
100
94
100
89
100
100
100
100
100

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for
which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Double tim e after 40 hours, not shown sep arately, applied to 6 percent of the la b o r e r s.

Table 112.

Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (union and nonunion separately):

Minneapolis—St. Paul, Minn.

(P ercen t of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, Septem ber 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Double
one -h alf
time
8 hours
8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
T im e and
Double
tim e
one -h alf
40 hours
40 hours

Occupation 1 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Double
tim e
on e-h alf
8 hours
8 hours

C
Union 2— 1 ontinued

Union 1
2
Equipment op erators— Continued

143

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s__________________ ______ _____________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------R esidential (5 stories or m ore )
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)--------------C arp en ters_______________________________________
C om m e rrial
R esidential (le s s than 5 sto ries)
O ther heavy ronstrnrtinn
Oem ent ma son s .........
C o m m e rcial...............
S treet and highway
O ther heavy c on stru ction __________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
_ _
.
..
.
R esidential (le s s than 5 sto ries)
p ip e fitters
C om m ercial
.......
......
p lu m b e rs
...
C om m ercial
R esidential (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)
.S h e e t-m e ta lw o r k e r s
.....
C o m m e r c ia l----------------- ------ ---------------------------

28
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
27
28

Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a t o r s _________________________ C o m m e r c ia l______________ ___________ _____ _
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s )__________
Street and highway
O ther heavy con stru ction ____________ ______

100
100
100
100
100

1
2
3
4

25
26
_

75
74
100
72
_
_

_
_
_

73
72

25
26
_
28
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
27
28

75
74
100
72
_
_

B ulldozer operators
_ ...
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esidential (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)_________
•Street and highway ....
Other heavy construction
T riickd rive r s
C om m ercial
Street and highway
Other heavy construction

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

_
_
_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

_

100
100
98
97
100
100
100
100

_
-

_

73
72

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B rick la y e rs' h elp ers ......
C om m ercial
Construction lab orers
C om m ercial
Residential (5 stories or m ore)
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and highway
Other heavy construction

100
100
98
97
100
100
100
100

2
3

Nonunion 3
_
_

100
100
100
100
100

-

_

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers 4
Street and highway---------------------------------------

43
42

O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately,
Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100, Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2 ,
Nonunion la b o r e r s equal 100, Information is lim ited to construction la b o r e r s, the only occupation for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3,
S traigh t-tim e pay for daily work after 8 hours, not shown separately, applied to 57 percent of nonunion la b o r e r s.




W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Double
one-half
time
40 hours
40 hours

100
100

2
3

(P ercen t of w orkers 1 in construction establish m en ts with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, October 1972)
W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
of construction

144

Journeym en:
B rick layers
C o m m e rcial
C arpenters
C o m m e rcia l
Residential (5 sto ries or m ore)
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
Cement m ason s
C om m e rcial
........
Street and highway
E le ctrician s 3
C o m m e rcia l
Residential (5 sto ries or m o re )___________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
P ipefitters
C o m m e rcia l
_ ____
Residential (5 sto ries or m ore)
Plum bers
C om m e rcial
R esidential (5 sto ries or m o r e )___________
R oofers
C o m m e rcial
S h e et-m e ta l w ork ers ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Structural iron w o rk ers____________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B rick laye rs 1 h elp ers____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s ______________________
C o m m e r c ia l______________ ___________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o r e )___________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s )__________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
O t h e r h e a v y construction
...........

1
2
3
4

8 hours

-

5

3
4
-

31
(4)

-

30
-

2
3

Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s ____________________________
C o m m e rcial
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e )___________
Street and highway _________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
B ulldozer op erators
_____
_ __ ....
C o m m e rcia l
Street and h ig h w a y ________________________ .
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
T ru ck d rivers ________________________ _________
Street and highway _________________________
Other heavy construction _________________

4
-

8
-

9
-

18
-

100
100
100

100
100
37
78
42
96
(4)

Tim e and on e-h alf

Double tim e

Tim e and one-half
7 hours

-

61
21
53
4
95
100

7 hours

8 hours

35 hours

14
4
2
91

100
100
87
96
98
100
9
95
100
69
35
37
13
70
99
99
100
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
14
16

84
81

30
28
50
48
8
26
60
23
5

66
72
50
44
92
65
40
59
95

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
4
-

-

Double tim e

40 hours

5
31
(4)
30
1
1
-

1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(4)

2
1

5

-

-

5

-

2
3

4
-

8
-

9
-

18
-

100
100
37
78
42
96
(4 )

100
100
100

-

61
21
53
4
95
100

Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is limited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
T im e and on e-h a lf for work after 5 hours daily and 25 hours weekly, not shown sep arately, applied to 62 percent of the elec tric ia n s.
L e ss than 0.5 p ercen t.




35 hours

40 hours

100
100
87
98
100
100
9
95
100
69
35
37
13
70
99
99
100
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
14
16

13
3
91
-

1
2
84
81

30
28
50
48
8
26
60
23
5

66
72
50
44
92
65
40
59
95

-

-

-

-

-

-

(4 )

2
1

5
-

-

5

(P ercent of w o r k e r s 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours
after which effective, October 1972)
Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Occupation1 and type
2
of construction

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective

145




Tim e and on e-h alf

Double tim e

Tim e and on e-h alf

Double tim e

8 hours

J ourneymen:
C a r p e n te r s_____________________________________
R esiden tial (less than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
P lu m b e r s -----------------------------------------------------------R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
R o o fers----------------------------------------------------------------

Straight tim e

8 hours

7 or 8 hours

40 hours

35 hours

20
52
16
24
-

Equipment operators:
B ack -h oe operators--------------------------------- ------ —
H elpers and lab orers:
Construction laborers 3_______________________
C o m m e rcia l_________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s------------------------------------------Residential (less than 5 s t o r ie s )_________

1
w ork ers
2
3

23
48
84
76
94

58
-

6

46
35
41
97
89

58
-

6

100

100

47
35
59
3
11

43
100
100
100
94

1
5
-

92
70
100
100
100

1
5
-

-

Nonunion workers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion
in table 3.
O ve rall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
Tim e and on e-h alf for work after 7 hours daily or 35 hours w eekly, not shown sep arately, applied to 7 percent of the construction la b o rers.

(P ercent of w o r k e r s 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e
by rate of pay and hours after which effective, Septem ber 1972)
W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective

Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Occupation1 and type
2
of construction

146




Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators_____________________________
C o m m e rcia l__________________________________
Street and highw ay---------------------------------------B ulldozer o p e r a to r s-----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highw ay__________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highway__________________________
Other heavy construction___________________
H elpers and la b o rers:
B r ic k la y e r s ' h elpers 3 _________________________
C o m m e r cia l-------------------------------------------------Construction la b o rers__________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Residential (less than 5 s t o r ie s )__________
Street and highway__________________________
Other heavy construction___________________
E levator con stru ctors' h elp ers_______________

T im e and
on e-h alf

8 hours

J ourneymen:
B rick la y e rs 3 ____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
C a r p e n te r s----------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highway__________________________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s--------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
E levator constructors__________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________

Straight
tim e

8 hours

4
-

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_

3
3
9
4
28
43
45
9
7
58
39
8
5
_
_
2
-

_

1
-

7
39

2
-

10

60
37
65
30
16
42
70
93
66
61

38
12
17
65
81
50

Double
tim e

T im e and
one-h alf

Double
tim e

8 hours

40 hours

40 hours

85
89
91
96
72
57
55
91
93
41
61
92
95
100
100
98
100
100
100

7
3
9
4
28
43
45
9
7
58
39
8
5
_
2
-

39
63
36
70
84
58
23
5

61
37
65
30
16
42
77
95
56
100

44

75
73
60
88
83
35
9
50

-

-

40
12
17
65
91
50

85
89
91
96
72
57
55
91
93
41
61
92
92
100
100
98
100
100
100

39
63
36
70
84
58
23
5
44

75
73
60
88
83
35
9
50

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown
for union w ork ers in table 2.
2 O verall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Double tim e effective after 7 hours daily and 35 hours w eekly, not shown sep arately, applied to 8 percent of the brick layers
1 25 percent of the b rick laye rs' helpers.

Table 116. Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (nonunion):
Philadelphia, Pa.—IM.J.
(P ercen t of w ork ers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

O c cupation 1 and type
2
of construction

147

Journeym en:
C arpenters 3 _ _ _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l _________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)
______
C em ent m ason s ---------------- ~ --------- ----------E le c t r ic ia n s ____________ __________________
C o m m e r cia l _________________________________
P ip e fit te r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l . ________
________________
P lu m b e r s______ ___________
______________
S h e e t-m e ta l w ork ers _ ________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Equipment op era to rs:
Truckd r iv e r s _______
C o m m e r c ia l

_____ _________________
... .
....

H elp e rs and la b o r e r s:
C arp e n ters' h e l p e r s ___________________________
Construction la b o rers 3___ ________________
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s) _____

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Straight
Tim e and
time
one -h a lf
8 hours
8 hours

W eekly overtim e
rate and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
one -h a lf
40 hours

-

44
100
38
83
65
65
100
100
100
100
100

92
100
89
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

7
90

93
91

100
100

71
22
40

29
78
60

100
93
100

49
_

50
17
35
35
_
_

1 Nonunion w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100, Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3,
2 O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.
3 Double tim e effective after 8 hours daily and 40 hours w eekly applied to 8 percent of
the carp e n ters; double tim e after 40 hours w eekly also applied to 7 percent of the la b o r e r s.




(P ercen t of w ork ers 1 in construction establishm ents with p rovisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, September 1972)

Occupation 2 and type
of construction

D aily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Double
time
one -h a lf
8 hours
8 hours

Journeym en:
C arpenters
___
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)__________
Cem ent m ason s ________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________! ________
_
E le ctrician s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esidential (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)__________
P ip e fitte r s____________________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 stories)
S h e et-m e tal w o rk ers___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Structural iron w ork ers________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

100
100
100
100
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and
Double
one -h alf
time
40 hours
40 hours

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment o p erators:
B ack-hoe op erators ___________________________
T ru ck d rivers_________________ ____ ______________

100
100

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s 3_________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 sto ries)__________
Street and highway__________________________
Other heavy construction __________________

99
100
96
100
100

_

1 Union w orkers in
occupations for which wage
2 O v e r a ll occupation
sep arately.
3 S traigh t-tim e rates
percent of the construction

-

-

100
100
100
100
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

_
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100

100
100
100
100
100

a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those
data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
after 8 hours per day,
la b o r e r s.

not shown separately,

w ere provided

to 1

(P ercen t of workers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or w eekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after
which effe ctiv e, September 1972)
Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Tim e and
on e-h alf
8 hours

148




Journeym en:
B r ick la y e r s_____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
.....
R esid en tial (less than 5 sto ries)_________
C arpen ters______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m ore)___________
R esid en tial (less than 5 stories)__________
Street and h ighw ay_________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
Cem ent m ason s_________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (less than 5 sto ries)__________
Street and h ighw ay_________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s ____________________________________
C o m m e rcial ________________________________
P ip e fitte r s ______________________________________
C o m m e rcial ________________________________
P lu m b ers________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries)_________
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers___________ ____ ___________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Structural iron w ork ers_______________________
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________
Street and h ighw ay_________________________
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe operators 3 __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and h ighw ay_________________________
Other heavy construction__________________
B ulldozer op erators____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
S treet and h ighw ay________________________
T ru ck d rive rs___________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and highway ________________________
H elpers and la b o rers:
B r ic k la y e r s' h elp ers___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)__________
C onstruction laborers ________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________ _______________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)....... ......... .
Street and h ighw ay_________________________
Other heavy construction _________________
P lu m b ers 1 h elp ers____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________

9
14
7
11
24
29
-

71
91
51

28
26
75
9
18
-

Double tim e
7

V2 hours

55
65
65
71
52
35
29
-

-

-

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
T im e and
one -h alf

8 hours

40 hours

91
86
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
45
35
100
100
28
17
48
41
42
100
100
100

9
14
7
11
24
29
'

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
29
9
49

100
100
100
71
77
17
92
82
100
100

71
91
51

28
26
75
9
18
-

Double tim e
37

V2 hours

40 hours

55
65
65
71
52
35
29
-

91
86
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
45
35
100
100
28
18
48
41
42
100
100
100

"
-

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
29
9
49

-

100
100
100
72
75
25
92
82
86
84

1 Union workers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown
for union w orkers in table 2.
2 O ve rall occupation may include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
3 P rovision s for other prem ium pay, not shown sep arately, effective after 8 hours a day and 40 hours a week applied
to 6 percent of the back-hoe operators.

(Percent of w ork ers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, Septem ber 1972)
Daily overtim e rate and hours
after which effective
of construction

149

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
C a r p e n te r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esidential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ----------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Other heavy construction___________________
Cem ent m ason s __ ______________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------Street and highw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction___________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
P ip efitte rs________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------P lu m b e r s _________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
R o o fers____________________________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s ________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Other heavy construction___________________

Double time

Tim e and one-half
8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate and hours
after which effective

7 hours

Tim e and on e-h alf
8 hours

-

-

49
40
87
85
65
56
74
78
76
100
100
100

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p erators--------------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Street and highw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction___________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s ____________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Street and highw ay---------------------------------------Other heavy construction___________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Street and highw ay---------------------------------------Other heavy construction___________________

_
100
100
100
100

_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s ---------------------------------------C om m ercial___________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) ___________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) --------------Street and highw ay---------------------------------------Other heavy construction........... .............. .........

100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
_
-

100
100
51
59
13
15
35
44
26
23
24
-

-

36 hours

40 hours

97
96
100
100
71
55
-

4
4
29
100
100
100
100
100
45
"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

100
100
100
100

Double tim e
35 hours

100
100
51
60
13
15
35
44
26
23
24
-

49
40
87
86
64
55
74
75
74
-

40 hours

-

3
3
100
100
100

-

-

-

-

-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100

1 Union w ork ers in a given occupation equal 100. Information is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union w ork ers in table 2.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.




36 hours

-

-

Table 120. Pay provisions for daily and weekly overtime (union):
Washington, D.C.—M d.—Va.
(Percent of w orkers 1 in construction establishm ents with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effe ctive, September 1972)

(P ercent of w orkers 1 in construction establish m en ts with provisions for daily or weekly
overtim e by rate of pay and hours after which effective, September 1972)

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Weekly overtim e rate
Daily overtim e rate and
and hours after which
hours after which effective
effective
Double
Straight Tim e and Double Tim e and
on e-h alf
time
one -half
time
time
8 hours

8 hours

8 hours

40 hours

40 hours

Journeym en:
.
1
2

C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
K lpvatn r

rnnsf-rnrtrirs

P ip e fitte r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Plum ber s_________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers____________________________
C o m m e rcia l
Structural

iron

_
_
_
_
_
4
4
_
4
4

w orkers

C o m m e r c ia l____________ _____________________

_

55
21
25
23
48
19
13
(3)
(3)
7
_
_
_
_
_
14
14

45
79
74
76
53
81
87
100
100
93
96
96
100
100
96
96
86
86

_
.
_
_
_
14
14

45
79
74
76
53
81
87
100
100
93
100
100
100
100
100
100
86
86

55
21
26
24
48
19
13
(3)
(3)
7

150

Equipment op era to rs:
4
16

R ack-h oe operators
C om m ercia l

Street and h ig h w a y ___

__ __________________

O ther h eavy con stru ction
R n lldn zer o p e ra to r s
C om m ercia l
S treet and high w ay

T ru ck d riv ers__________________ __________________
O ther h eavy constru ction

_
_
_
_
_
_

78
39
63
99
76
48
43
69
100

18
45
37
2
24
52
57
31

78
39
63
99
76
48
43
69
100

22
61
37
2
24
52
57
31
_

31
11
81
79
100
90

67
88
19

33
12
81
100
100
90

67
88
19

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
rnn strn ction la b orers
C om m ercia l
R e<ai H e n t i a l ( 5 s t o r i e s o r m o r e )
R
d ^ fU a l (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s )
S treet and h igh w a y
O th er h e a v y constrn ct.ion

2
1
22

_

_
10

_
10

1 Union w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for union w orkers in table 2.
2 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
sep arately.
3 L e ss than 0 .5 percent.




Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Daily overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Straight
Tim e and
one -h alf
tim e
8 hours

8 hours

W eekly overtim e rate
and hours after
which effective
Tim e and one-half
40 hours

Journeymen:
B rick layers
_ . ...
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
C arpenters 3
C om m ercial
R esidential H ess than 5 stories)
Cement m asons
R esidential fle ss than 5 stories)
Street and highway
E lectrician s
C om m ercial
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
P ipefitters
C om m ercial
Plum bers
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
Roofers
S heet-m etal w ork ers___________________________
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories) _________

89
86
89
83
80
85
82
58
89
99
99
100
100
100
59
52
68
87
98
98
100

41
48
33
13
2
3
-

100
100
100
93
100
91
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment op erators:
B ack-hoe operators
R esidential Hess than 5 stories)
Street and highway
Other heavy construction
B ulldozer operators ___________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)_________
Street and highway
Tru ck d rivers
....... .
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
Other heavy construction

35
84
20
47
66
51
93
66
54
74

66
16
80
53
34
49
7
34
46
26

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Helpers and la b o rers:
B ric k la y e r s' h elpers
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
C arpenters ' helpers 3__________________________
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ).. .
Construction lab orers
___
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and highway
Other heavy construction
. . .
E le c tr ic ia n s' helpers
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
P lu m b ers' h elp ers______________________________
C om m ercial
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________

81
81
80
80
43
83
78
81
86
72
88
86
100
72
74
65

19
19
20
21
57
17
22
19
14
28
12
14

100
100
100
74
100
69
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

12
14
11
17
20
15
18
42
11
1
1
-

_

28
26
35

1 Nonunion w orkers in a given occupation equal 100.
Information is lim ited to those
occupations for which wage data are shown for nonunion w orkers in table 3.
2 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown
separately.
3 Double tim e for w orkers after 40 hours w eekly, not shown separately, applied
to 7 percent of the carpenters and 26 percent of the carpenter's h elp ers.

(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit fu n d s1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, Septem ber 1972)
C en ts-per- -hour em ployer contributions to funds providing—
O ccupation1 and type
2
of construction

Insurance

Pensions

Average Minimum M axim um Average
c ont r iem ployer
em ployer
con tri­
contri­
bution
bution
contri­
bution 5 reported reported bution 5
6

V ac ati on s

Minimum Maxim um Average
contri­
contri­ em ployer
bution
bution
contri­
reported reported
bution 5

151

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
C a r p e n te r s_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Cement m ason s
C o m m e r cia l_________________________________
E le ctr icia n s_____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_____
P ip efitte rs_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
P lu m b e r s ____________________________________
R oofers
C o m m e r cia l
S h e et-m e tal w orkers
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Structural iron w orkers
C o m m e rcia l

30
30
35
35
35
25
25
40
40
33
33
35
20
20
25
25
40
40

30
30
35
35
35
25
25
34
40
30
30
35
20
20
25
25
40
40

30
30
35
35
35
25
25
44
44
35
35
35
20
20
25
25
40
40

30
30
35
35
35
45
45
48
48
47
47
45
20
20
25
25
27
27

30
30
35
35
35
45
45
39
48
45
45
45
20
20
25
25
27
27

30
30
35
35
35
45
45
52
52
50
50
45
20
20
25
25
27
27

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators_____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Other heavy construction ___________________
B ulldozer o p e r a to r s____________________________

25
25
25
25

25
25
25
25

25
25
25
25

15
15
15
15

15
15
15
15

15
15
15
15

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s___________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Other heavy construction___________________

15
15
15
15

15
15
15
15

15
15
15
15

15
15
15
15

15
15
15
15

15
15
15
15

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

Minim um Maxim um A verage Minimum] Maxim um
con tri­
cont r i- em ployer contri­
c ont r ibution
bution
con tri­
bution
bution
reported reported bution 5 reported reported

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

50
50

50
50

_
_

_

_
_

40
40

_

-

_

_
_

_

40
40
_

40
40

-

-

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

-

-

-

_

_
_
_

_
_

'

6
6
2
2
2

6
6
2
2
2

6
6
15
15
2

9
9
8
8
10

2
2
5
5
5

10
10
10
10
10

13
13
5
5

13
13
5
5

13
13
5
5

7
7
7
7

7
7
7
7

7
7
7
7

2
2

2
2

2
2

“

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

50
50

_

Percent of w orkers covered by
em ployer contributions to
specified funds 4

Other benefits 3

■

In sur­
ance

98

Pen­
sions

V acations

98

100

44
47
18

95
89
89
94
99
84
60
60
18

95
89
89
94
99
84
60
60
18
68

98

100

44
47
18

88

68

100
44
47
18

88

100

100

100
100

28
58

28
58

Other
benefits 3

86

33
35

19
71

87
94
99
84

18
68

100
100

'

_

_

21

28
58

21

21

37

37

37

36
43
34

36
43
34

(?)

10

10

1
E xcludes legally requ ired plans. In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreement does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. were considered
fund contributions.
Although studied, no union contributions to holiday or combination benefit funds w ere reported for w orkers in establishm ents visited.
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancement.
4 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 E m ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
6 L e s s than 0.5 percen t.




(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in

istruction and the percent of workers covered, September 1972)
Cents -pei -hour em ployer contributions to> funds providingPensions

Insuranci
M in i­
A verage
mum
em ­
con tri­
ployer
bution
c on tri­
re­
bution 5
ported

Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Mini M a x i­
Mini M a x i­
Average
A verage
mum
mum
mum
mum
em ­
em ­
c o n tri­
con tri­
c on tri- con tri­
ployer bution bution ployer
bution
bution
contri­
contri­
re­
re­
re­
re bution5
ported bution 5 ported ported
ported

152

Journeym en:
C arpenters
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
E lectrician s
C om m e rcial
_______
P lu m b e r s ______ ______________ ______
C om m ercial
S h eet-m etal w orkers
___ _________ __ _______ _
C o m m e rcial

25
25
18
18
35
35

25
25
18
18
35
35

25
25
18
18
35
35

20
20
25
25
20
20
35
35

20
20
8
8
20
20
35
35

20
20
27
27
20
20
35
35

10
10
20
20
-

Equipment op erators:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s ___________
C o m m e r c i a l___
_ ________
B ulldozer o p erators_____ _____

28
28
28

25
25
25

30
30
30

33
33
33

20
20
20

40
40
40

-

-

-

15
15

15
15

15
15

-

_____________
________
--- -

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers _____________
_ _____
C o m m e r c ia l__________________ _____ ______ -

Maxi mum
contri bution
re­
ported

M in i­
A verage
mum
em c o n tri­
ployer
bution
contri­
re bution 5
ported

10
10
20
20
-

10
10
20
20
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20
-

-

1 Excludes legally required plans.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund,
w ere considered fund contributions.
2 O verall occupation m ay include w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancement.
4 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
N O TE :

Dashes indicate no data reported.




P ercent of w orkers covered

Holidays

Vacations

Maxi mum
c o n tr i­
bution
re ported

Other
benefits 3
Mini Average
mum
em ­
contri ployer
bution
contri­
re­
bution 5
ported

to specified funds 4
M a x i­
mum
c o n tri­ Insur bution
ance
re­
ported

P en ­
sions

Vaca tions

H o li­
days

20
20
-

5
3
11
11
1
1

1
1
11
11
1
1

11
11
11
11
1
1

80
77
19
21
43
43

3
7
86
84
19
21
43
43

80
77
1
1
-

18
20
-

-

-

-

-

-

36
67
31

36
67
31

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
5

-

-

Other
bene fits 3

20
20
-

-

-

86
84
19
21
43
43

-

specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations or holidays, etc.

Where benefit information is reported, it is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for all w orkers (union and nonunion) in table

1.

(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, September 1972)
Cents -p er -hour em ployer contributions 'to funds providing—Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Insurance
A verage Minimum
employer
contri­
bution
contri­
reported
bution 6

Other
Combination
benefits 3
benefits 4
Maxim um A verage M inimum M axim um A verage Minim um M axim um A verage M inimum M axim um
c o n tri­ em ployer c o n tri­
c o n tri­ em ployer
c on tri­ em ployer
c o n tr i­
c o n tri­
c o n tri­
con tri­
bution
bution
contri bution
bution
bution
c o n tri­
bution
bution
reported bution 6
reported reported bution 6
reported reported bution 6
reported
reported
Pensions

153

Journeym en:
B r ick la y e r s__________________________ ________ .
C o m m e rcia l _ _____ _______________________
C arpen ters________________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l_______________ ___ __________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
Other heavy construction _________________
Cem ent m aso n s__________________________ ___ __
C o m m e rcial ________________ _ _ ___________
E le ctrician s
. . ..
C o m m e rcia l
.................
P ip efitters 7 ______________________________ ______
C o m m e r c ia l____________________________ _
. . .
P lu m b ers____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________ _ _ _ _ _ _
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)__________
R o o f e r s _________________ _______________________
C o m m e rcia l _____ _____ ______________
S h e et-m e ta l w o rk ers_______
_________
C o m m e rcia l ____________________ _ _ ____
Structural iron w orkers ______________
C o m m e r c ia l______________________ ______ __

51
51
33
34
47
30
42
42
35
35
35
35
35
42
30
55
55
45
45
45
45

39
39
25
25
30
30
35
35
25
25
30
30
30
30
30
55
55
40
40
45
45

62
62
50
50
50
30
50
50
35
35
45
45
50
50
30
55
55
46
46
45
45

51
51
30
30
31
30
38
38
102
102
38
38
60
60
60
45
45
45
45
66
66

40
40
20
20
30
30
20
20
18
18
25
25
60
60
60
45
45
45
45
60
60

70
70
50
35
35
30
51
51
104
104
60
60
60
60
60
45
45
46
46
105
105

Equipment op erators:
R ack-hoe operators
C o m m e rcia l _______________ __________
Other heavy c o n s t r u c tio n ._______________
Bulldozer op erators____ _
_____________
C o m m e r c ia l______________________ ______
Other heavy construction
T ru ck d rivers
Other heavy construction

39
38
40
35
33
40
35
35

25
25
40
25
25
40
29
35

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
35

48
46
50
41
38
50
49
50

25
25
50
25
25
50
30
50

40
40
30
30
36
37
25

39
39
30
30
20
20
20
20
20

40
40
30
30
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
30
30
37
38
29

40
40
30
30
20
25
25
20
25

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B rick laye rs 1 h e lp e r s ..
__________ _____
C o m m e rcia l
C a rp e n ters' helpers
C om m e rcial
Construction la b o rers . . . ____ _____________ ____
C om m e rcial
R esiden tial Hess than 9 sto riesl
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________
Other heavy c on stru ction __________________

33

35

33

36

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

5
5

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

5
5

5
5

-

-

-

6
6

6
6

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
50
30
30
40
40
40
40
40

-

-

-

20
20

20
20

20
20

-

-

-

-

-

-

Percent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified funds 5
Insur Pensions
ance

C om bi­
Other
nation
benefits 4
benefits 3

9
9
3
3
6
1
4
3
3
3
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
24
24

4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
3

25
25
7
7
7
2
9
9
5
5
8
8
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
28
28

76
76
89
100
8
98
83
100
89
89
94
94
50
44
56
100
100
76
81
100
100

76
76
89
100
8
98
83
100
89
89
94
94
50
44
56
100
100
76
81
100
100

2
3
2
3
3
2
2
-

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
"

5
5
2
5
5
2
2
-

69
100
49
94
100
70
90
37

69
100
49
94
100
70
90
37

-

5
5
3
3
5
5
5
5
5

5
5
2
2
1
1
5
5
2

5
5
5
5
10
10
5
5
5

100
100
14
76
84
95
5
100
64

100
100
14
76
84
95
5
100
64

_

_
_

20
26
_
.
-

5
10
.
.
.

12
13
_

-

_
.

_
3

4
_
_

76
76
81
91
8

90
64
75
89
89
100
100
45
34
56
100
100
64
68
100
100

69
100
49
94
100
70
6
100
100
7
39
77
83
5
100
64

1 E xcludes le g a lly required plans.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. were considered
fund contributions.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Funds that provide for a combination of benefits, such as insurance and p en sions, or insurance and vacations.
4 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a r e , apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
5 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
6 Em ployee weighted average relating only to employees covered by contributions to union funds.
7 V acation and holiday ben efits, not shown separately, were provided in establishm ents employing le ss than 6 percent of the p ipefitters.




(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, September 1972)
C e n ts-p e r - hour em ployer contributions to funds providing—

O ccupation1 and type
2
of construction

154

Journeym en:
B rick lave rs
C om m e rcial
Carpenters
C om m e rcial
Other heavy c o n stru ction -------------------------C em ent m a s o n s _______________________________
C om m e rcial
E le ctrician s
C o m m e rcial
P ip efitters
C om m e rcial
P lu m b ers
C om m e rcial
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
S h eet-m etal w ork ers
C om m e rcial ............
... _
____
Structural iron w ork ers
C o m m e rcial

Insurance
A verage M inimum Maxim um Average
contri­ employer
em ployer
contri­
contri­
bution
bution
contri­
bution 6
bution 6 reported
reported

Minimum M axim um A verage M inimum
contri­
contri­
em ployer contri­
bution
bution
bution
contri­
reported
reported reported
bution 6

45
45
33
33
50
50
50
40
40
60
60

94
96
85
85
81
72
73
47
47
63
63
46
46
45
25
25
68
67

33
33
40
40
60
25
25
18
18
35
35
35
35
45
25
25
35
35

100
100
90
90
90
75
75
50
50
64
64
60
60
45
40
40
70
70

40
40
40
40
40
40
28
28

40
40
40
40
40
40
50
50

40
40
40
40
40
40
35
35

40
40
40
40
40
40
35
35

40
40
40
40
40
40
35
35

50
50
50
50

50
60
60
60

100
95
94
91

100
60
60
60

100
100
100
100

41
40
43
43
42

38
38
40
40
40

42
42
43
43
43

-

-

-

26
26
32
32
49
48
50
40
40
58
58

25
25
28
28
32
32
50
30
30
26
26

Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe op erators
C om m e rcial
Other heavv construction
B ulldozer op erators . ..... ...............................
C o m m e rcial
Street and highwav
T ru ck d rivers
...........
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
34

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C arp e n ters' helpers
Construction lab orers
C o m m e rcia l _______________________________
Other heavy construction

50
51
52
52

15
15
40
40
-

56
56
20
20
52
52
-

15
15
40
40
-

56
56
20
20
52
52

Maxim um A verage M inimum Maximum
Com bi­
Other
contri­
contri­
em ployer
contri­
Insurance Pensions nation
benefits 4
bution
bution
contri­
bution
benefits 3
reported
bution 6 reported reported

15
15
40
40
-

56
56
20
20
52
52

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
50

50
50

50
50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P ercen t of w orkers covered by
em ployer contributions to
specified funds 5

Other
benefits 4

Combination
benefits 3

Pensions

"

-

-

-

63
63

60
60

65
65

57
58
60
60
61
7
7
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
8
8
5
5

5
5
4
4
46
4
4
10
10
3
3
2
2
11
2
2
2
2

61
61
67
67
67
60
60
13
13
12
12
11
11
11
8
8
5
5

9
6
91
100
100

63
64
62
62
60
65

65
65
65
65
65
65

5
5

44
44
44
44
44
65
4
4

96
100
100
48
100
28
64

75
70
67
74

75
2
2
69

75
75
75
75

5
5

-

100
100
21
21
99
100
93
100
100
100
100

100
100
91
100
100
96
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
93
100
100
100
100

55

96
100
100
48
100
28
36
17

44
96
99
100

44
96
99
100

2
3
7
9
-

2
2
6
6
79
79
-

98
98
-

"

-

-

-

7
12

100
100
91
100
100
96
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
93
100
100
100
100

96
100
100
48
100
28
36
17

44
96
99
100

1 E xcludes le gally required p la n s. In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. were
considered fund contributions. Although studied, em ployer contributions to holiday funds w ere nonexistent in the establishm ents visited .
A ls o , only p lum bers w ere provided em ployer contributions to
vacation funds; these payments averaged 92 cents per hour for those workers covered by such payments (about on e-fourth of the p lum bers).
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Funds that provide for a combination of benefits, such as insurance and p en sions, or insurance and vacations.
4 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancement.
5 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
6 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.




(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, September 1972)
C en ts-p e r -hour em ployer contributions to funds providing—
Insurance
O ccup ation 2 and type
of construction

A ver­
M ini­
mum
age
con tri­
em ­
ployer bution
contri­
re­
bution 6 ported

Pensions

M axi­
M ini­
A ver­
mum
mum
age
contri­
em ­
contri­
bution ployer
bution
contri­
re­
re­
ported bution 6 ported

Vacations
M axi­
A v e r ­ M ini­
mum
age
mum
contri­
em ­
contri­
bution ployer bution
contri­
re­
re­
ported bution 6 ported

155

Journeym en:
B r ick laye rs
____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Other heavy c o n stru ction C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________ _
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ___
R e sid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
Street and h igh w ay_______________ __
Other heavy con stru ction ___________
Cem ent m a s o n s _______________________ _
C o m m e r cia l _________________________
R e sid en tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ___
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
Street and h igh w ay_________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________ _
E le c t r ic ia n s ---------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l________________________ _
R esid en tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) ___
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
E levator constructors
P ip efitters
_ _
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________
P lum ber s _________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
R oofers
C o m m e r cia l
_
. ..........................
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
Structural iron w ork ers
C o m m e r c ia l_________________ __________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __

40
40
40
44
44
45
44
44
45
44
44
45
42
45
41
37
38
40
29
20
45
46
39
39
39
30
30
30
46
47
43
64
64
63

40
40
40
25
25
45
25
35
40
30
30
45
30
30
40
19
19
38
20
20
25
25
27
27
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
25
25
25

60
60
40
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
43
43
41
41
20
47
47
40
40
40
30
30
30
50
50
50
69
69
69

60
60
60
63
62
63
63
61
62
37
36
35
39
35
42
38
9
40
29
20
49
49
30
30
30
15
15
15
45
47
41
75
74
74

50
50
60
40
53
63
53
53
40
35
35
35
35
35
35
9
9
38
10
20
30
30
19
20
19
15
15
15
15
30
15
13
13
13

61
61
60
74
74
63
74
63
63
60
60
35
50
50
45
43
43
41
41
20
50
50
35
35
35
15
15
15
49
49
49
84
84
84

Equipment op era to rs:
Rack-h oe op erators _
C o m m e r cia l
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
Street and highway
Other heavy construction
B ulldozer op erators
.... _ ...
C o m m e r cia l ________________ _______
Street and h igh w ay_________________
Other heavy construction . ....
T ru ck d rivers
_
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
Street and highway
Other heavy construction
_ __
.
.

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
25
25
25
26
26

40
40
40
40
40
30
30
40
40
25
25
25
25
25

40
40
40
40
40
50
45
40
50
40
28
25
40
30

41
42
42
40
41
41
42
40
41
29
29
27
30
31

40
40
40
40
40
35
35
40
40
25
25
25
25
25

50
50
50
40
50
50
50
50
50
40
31
30
40
40

See footnotes at end of table.




10
_
-

10
_
_

10
_
_
_
_
10
_
-

Combination benefits 3

M axi­
mum
con tri­
bution
re­
ported

-

4
4

-

-

10
_
_
_
10
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
28
1
_
67
19
20
17
8
2
2
8
8
8
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

20
20
36
53
15

-

-

-

20
20
20

_
20
20
20

56
56
56
53
15
_
34
34
25
_
_
20
20
20

_

_
_

_
_

53
52
54
53
15
_
17
17
17
-

-

15
15
15
-

A ver­
age
em ­
ployer
contri­
bution 6

-

11
12
12
10
10
12
12
10
11

10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10

20
20
20
10
10
20
20
20
20

_
_

_

_
_

-

-

-

M ini­
M axi­
A ver­
M in i­
M axi­
mum
mum
mum
age
mum
con tri­ contri­
contri­ c on tri­
em ­
bution bution ployer
bution bution
re­
contri­
re­
re­
re­
ported ported bution 6 ported ported

9
8
9
1

4
4
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
1
1
_
67
5
5
17
5
_
2
2
8
8
8
_
_
_
7
7
7
1

_

_

_

1

1

1

2

2

8
8
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
67
1
_
_
67
65
65
18
17
_
2
2
8
8
8
_
_
_
15
15
15
1

2

_

_

_

2

2

2

8
8
8
8
8
6
6
6
6
4
4
1
4
4
4
19
19
18
18
18
20
20
80
12
80
2
2
2
15
15
15
56
56
5

99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
100
100
83
93
100
92
95
86
81
100
100
100
97
100
95
100
100
100
97
100
90
99
100
41

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
100
100
83
93
100
92
94
86
80
100
100
100
97
100
95
100
100
100
97
100
90
99
100
41

2
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2

20
2
2
20
2
2
2
2
2

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
92
88
100
92
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
92
88
100
92
100

_
_

_
_

2
2

2
2

-

_
-

_
_

50

50

50

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

_

50

_

_

_

50

Pen­
sions

3
3
8
1
1
6
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
18
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
7
7
7
2
2
5

_
_

50

In sur­
ance

7
7
8
6
6
6
6
6
6
1
1
1
2
1
3
14
15
18
9
1
3
3
10
7
11
2
2
2
8
8
10
6
6
5

2
2

_

Percent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified funds 5

Other benefits 4

_
_

V aca­
tions

C om bi­
nation
funds 3

_
_
_

6
7

(7)

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
5
4

_

12
3
3

_

13
6
14
_
_

_

_

_

3
3
_

_

7
_
33
34
53
19
3
3
18
33
6

_
_
_

19
17
25

60
77
68

_

n

_

-

98
100
100
100
94
90
97
92
80

6

3

_
_
_

22

8
8
_
_

Other
benefits 4

94
93
100
99
99
100
99
100
100
85
88
100
59
93
96
59
61
34
62
100
97
97
79
67
88
100
100
100
37
44
22
99
100
41

97
100
78
100
100
92
92
100
100

_
_

4
_

_
_

_

9

_

_

_

_

(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, September 1972)
Percent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified funds 5

C en ts-per -hour em ployer contributions to funds providingPensions

Insurance
Occupation 2 and type
of construction

A ver­
age
em ­
ployer
c o n tri­
bution 6

156

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ___
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
Street and h igh w ay________________ _
Other heavy construction
E levator con stru c to rs' helpers

Vacations

A ver­
A ver­
M ini­
M axi­
M ini­
M axi­
mum
mum
mum
mum
age
age
em ­
contri­ contri­
contri­ contri­
em ­
bution
bution ployer bution bution ployer
contri­
contri­
re­
re­
re­
re­
ported ported bution 6 ported ported bution 6

42
42
42
42
41
41

20

25
25
42
42
25
25
20

55
55
42
42
47

42
20

54
55

30
30

65
55

55
55

55
55

55
55

53
54
20

30
30
20

65
55

Combination benefits 3

M ini­
M axi­
A ver­
M ini­
mum
mum
mum
age
contri­ contri­
con tri­
em ­
bution
bution ployer bution
re­
contri­
re­
ported ported bution 6 ported

Other benefits 4

M axi­ A v e r ­
age
mum
contri­
em ­
bution ployer
con tri­
re­
ported bution 6

M ini­
M axi­
mum
mum
contri­ con tri­
bution bution
re­
re­
ported ported

In sur­
ance

Pen­
sions

V aca­
tions

C om b i­
Other
nation
benefits 4
funds 3

10
-

10

10
_
10

-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

20

3

2

3

96

(7 )

3

3

97

-

100

100

-

-

-

79

79

3
3

_
3
2

3
-

97

_
-

3
3

1

100
100
100

-

1

100
100
100

-

1

10
10

96

(7 )

3

2
9

6
100

1 E xcludes legally required plans.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations or holidays, etc .,
w ere considered fund contributions.
Only sh eet-m eta l workers were provided holiday fund benefits among establishm ents visited ; em ployer contributions to the fund, averaging 20 cents per hour, applied
to 75 percent of the a r e a 's sh eet-m eta l w ork ers.
2 O verall occupations m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Funds that provide for a combination of benefits, such as insurance or pensions or insurance and vacations.
4 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancement.
5 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
6 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
7 L e ss than 0.5 percent.
N O TE :

D ashes




indicate

no

data

reported.

Where

information is

presented,

it is lim ited to occupations

for which wage

data

are

shown

for

all

occupations (union and nonunion)

in table 1.

(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit fu n d s1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, Septem ber 1972)
C en ts-p e r -hour em ployer contributions to funds providing—
Occupation and type
of construction

Pensions

Insurance

Minim um
c on tri­
bution
reported

Percent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified funds3

Other benefits 2

1 57

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 4

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

M axim um
c on tri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
c o n tri­
bution 4

Journeym en:
B r ick la y e r s_______ - _ _________________________
C o m m e r cia l __ _ _
_____________________
C a r p e n t e r s ____
__
_______ _ _ _________
C o m m e r c i a l________ __ . . .
___________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)_________
C em ent m ason s _____ ________________________
C o m m e r c ia l____________ ______
E le ctricia n s ___________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________
P ip e fit te r s __________________________________
C o m m e r cia l _ ____________________________
P lu m b ers____
_ ______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________ ___________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s 5 . ________ ______________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

25
25
20
20
_
25
25
30
30
28
28
28
28
30
30

25
25
20
20

25
25
20
30

40
40
30
30

40
40
30
30

40
40
30
30

25
25
30
30
28
28
28
28
30
30

25
25
30
30
28
28
28
28
30
30

25
25
7
7
58
58
58
58
25
25

25
25
7
7
58
58
58
58
25
25

25
25
7
7
58
58
58
58
25
25

Equipment op erators:
R ack-hoe op erators
C o m m e r c ia l_______

25
25

25
25

25
25

40
40

40
40

18
18
18
18
18
18

18
18
18
18
18
18

18
18
18
18
18
18

20
20
20
20
20
20

20
20
20
20
20
20

20
20
20
20
20
20

A verage
em ployer
c on tri­
bution 4

40
40

______________________

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ick la y e r s' h elp ers
......... .
C arpen ters' h elp ers. ___ ________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)__________

_

_

_

Maxim um
con tri­
bution
reported

_

4
4
2
2
2
1
1
5
5
6
6
6
6
7
7

Minim um
c on tri­
bution
reported

Maxim um
con tri­
bution
reported

4
4
2
2
2
1
1
5
5
6
6
6
6
7
7

4
4
2
2
2
1
1
5
5
6
6
6
6
7
7

Insurance

Pensions

2
2
2
2
2
2

2
2
2
2
2
2

80
83
51
74
_
22
78
31
49
86
100
25
47
42
47

9
33

2
2
2
2
2
2

80
83
51
74
_
22
78
31
49
86
100
25
47
42
47

9
33

36
29
61
31
55
14

36
29
61
31
55
14

Other
benefits 2

80
83
53
74
8
22
78
31
49
86
100
25
47
77
87

36
29
61
27
47
14

1 E xcludes le gally required plans. In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations or holidays,
w ere considered fund contributions. Although studied, em ployer contributions to holiday funds w ere nonexistent among establishm ents visited .
2 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
3 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
4 E m ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
5 A verage em ployer contributions of 18 cents an hour to vacation funds, not shown separately, applied to 77 percent of the sh eet-m etal w ork ers.
NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported.




Where information

is presented,

it is

lim ited

to

those occupations

for which wage

etc,

data are shown for all w orkers (union and nonunion) in table 1.

(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit fun d s1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, Septem ber 1972)
C en ts-per -hour em ployer contributions to funds providing—
Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Insurance
Average
em ployer
contri­
bution 5

Pensions

V acations

Minimum Maximum Ave rage
c ont r icontri­ em ployer
bution
bution
contri­
bution 5
reported reported

Minimum Maxim um A verage
em ployer
contri­
c ont r icontri­
bution
bution
bution 5
reported reported

Minimum Maxim um Average
contri­
contri­ em ployer
bution
bution
con tri­
bution 5
reported reported

158

J ourneymen:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
C a r p e n te r s_______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Cement m a s o n s __________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
Street and highway __________________________
E le ctr icia n s______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
P ip efitte rs------------------------------------------------------------C omm e r ci al___________________________________
P lu m b e r s ___________________________ _____________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) __________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s ________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________

45
45
35
35
35
28
28
30
30
40
40
45
45
45
45
45
30
30
50
50

45
45
35
35
35
25
25
30
30
32
40
45
45
45
45
45
30
30
50
50

45
45
35
35
35
30
30
30
30
40
40
45
45
45
45
45
30
30
50
50

50
50
35
35
35
37
36
50
50
24
24
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
60
60

50
50
35
35
35
20
20
50
50
8
24
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
60
60

50
50
35
35
35
50
50
50
50
24
24
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
60
60

25
25
25
25
25
60
60
60
60
40
40
40
40
40

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators_____________________________
C o m m e r cia l----------------------------------------------------Street and h ighw ay___________________________
Other heavy c o n str u c tio n ---------------------------B ulldozer o p e r a to r s____________________________
Street and highw ay----------------------------------------T ru ck d rivers ____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
Street and h ighw ay___________________________
Other heavy construction------------------------------

27
27
27
27
27
27
30
30
30
30

27
27
27
27
27
27
30
30
30
30

27
27
27
27
27
27
30
30
30
30

25
25
25
25
25
25
20
20
20
20

25
25
25
25
25
25
20
20
20
20

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s -----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
Construction la b o r e r s ----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l___________________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )--------------Street and highway --------------------------------------Other heavy construction-----------------------------P lu m b e r s' h e lp e r s ----------------------------------------------

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25
25
25
25
25
25
20
20
20
20

10
10
10
10

10
10
10
10

10
10
10
10

4
4
4
4
4
4
1
1
1
1

4
4
4
4
4
4
1
1
1
1

4
4
4
4
4
4
1
1
1
1

50
41
100
70
83
100
71
68
80
100

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20
5
9
10
10
6
6
10

20
20
5
6
10
10
6
6
10

20
20
5
10
10
10
6
6
10

48
100
5
78
95
28
94
86
11

-

1 Excluded legally required plans.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified
considered fund contributions. Although studied, em ployer contributions to holiday funds w ere nonexistent among establishm ents visited.
2 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a r e , apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancement.
4 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.




20
20
2
2
2
7
8
-

-

7
13
13
15
15
15
15
15
14
14
4
4

em ployer

20
20
2
2
2
11
11

In sur­
ance

-

-

25
25
25
25
25
60
60
60
60
40
40
40
40
40

Percent of w orkers cove red by
em ployer contribution s to
i
specified funds 4

20
20
2
2
2
9
10
7
13
13
15
15
15
15
15
14
14
4
4

-

25
25
25
25
25
60
60
60
60
40
40
40
40
40

Other
benefits 3
Minimum Maxim um
contri­
contri­
bution
bution
reported reported

P en­
sions

7
13
13
15
15
15
15
15
14
14
4
4

73
100
83
98
67
88
96
15
100
83
97
100
100
85
100
80
100
100
100
100

73
100
83
98
67
88
96
15
100
83
97
100
100
85
100
80
100
100
100
100

payments

to em ployees

V aca­
tions

"

73
100
83
98
67
88
96
100
83
97
100
100
85
100
80
100
100
100
100

50
41
100
70
83
100
71
68
80
100

71
68
80
100

50
41
100
70
83
100
71
68
80
100

48
100
5
78
95
28
94
86
11

-

48
100
5
78
95
28
94
86
11

for

73
100
83
98
67
88
96
15
100
-

Other
benefits 3

-

100
100
85
100
80
-

-

vacations,

etc. were

(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for employee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, September 1972)
C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—
Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Pensions

Insurance
A verage Minimum
employer
con tri­
contri bution
bution 5
reported

Vacations

Maxim um A verage M inimum M axim um A verage Minim um
c o n tr i­ em ployer
contri c o n tri­
c o n tri­ em ployer
c o n tri­
bution
c on tri­
bution
bution
bution
reported reported bution 5
reported
reported bution 5

159

Journeym en:
C arp en ters_________________________ _____________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
E le ctrician s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------P lu m b ers_________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------S h e et-m e tal w ork ers 6__________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s-----------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l----------------------------------------------------

25
25
25
25
30
30
25
25
26
26

25
25
25
25
30
30
25
25
26
26

25
25
25
25
30
30
25
25
26
26

20
20
8
9
20
20
20
20
50
50

20
20
6
9
20
20
20
20
50
50

20
20
9
9
20
20
20
20
50
50

34
35
40
40

-

-

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s ------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l-------------------- ---------------------------B ulldozer op era to rs--------- ------ -----------------------T r u ck d r iv e r s--------------------------------------------------------

30
30
30
27

30
30
30
15

30
30
30
35

30
30
30
29

30
30
30
25

30
30
30
30

"

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers ------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto ries) -------------Other heavy co n stru c tio n -------- ----------------P lu m bers 1 h e lp e r s---------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------

24
28
28
15
16
15

15
28
28
15
15
15

28
28
28
15
30
15

24
28
28
20

10
28
28
20

28
28
28
20

40

40

-

30
35
40
40
-

Other
benefits 3
Maxim um A verage M inim um M axim um
c o n tri­ em ployer
c o n tri­
c o n tr i­
con tri­
bution
bution
bution
reported bution 5
reported
reported

P ercent of w orkers covered
\jy cuijjiuyci uwuu tuuu
to specified funds 4
Other
Insur Pensions Vacations
benefits 3
ance

35
35
40
40
-

4
4
8
9
10
10
5
5
2
2

4
4
6
9
10
10
5
5
2
2

4
4
9
9
10
10
5
5
2
2

68
100
97
96
98
100
100
100
100
100

68
100
97
96
98
100
100
100
100
100

97
96
98
100

-

98
100
100
100
100
100

-

1
1
1
-

1
1
1
"

1
1
1
-

34
100
88
100

34
100
88
52

-

34
100
63

7

7

75
98
9
34
67
100

69
98
9
5

-

7

-

-

-

-

40

10

10

10

-

-

68
100
97
96

-

5

1
5

1 E xcludes le g a lly required plans.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. w ere considered
fund contributions.
Although studied, no em ployer contributions to holiday funds w ere reported in establishm ents visited .
2 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
4 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
6 A verage em ployer contribution of 4 cents per hour to combined funds, not shown sep arately, w ere provided to a ll sh eet-m eta l w ork ers.
Combined funds provide for a combination of benefits,
such as insurance and pensions or insurance and vacations.
NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported.




Where benefit information is reported, it is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for a ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in table 1.

(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, Septem ber 1972)
iroviding---Cents -pe r-h ou r em ployer contributions to funds p
Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

P ercen t of w ork ers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified fun ds4

Other benefits 3

Pensions

Insurance

160

A verage
em ployer
c o n tri­
bution 5

Minimum
con tri­
bution
reported

Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
c on tri­
bution 5

M inimum
con tri­
bution
reported

M axim um
c o n tri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
c on tri­
bution 5

M inimum
con tri­
bution
reported

Maxim um
con tri­
bution
reported

Insurance

Journe ymen:
B rick layers
C o m m e rcial
Carpenters
C o m m e rcia l
Cem ent m ason s
C o m m e rcia l
Other heavy construction
E le ctrician s
C o m m e rcia l
P ip efitters
C o m m e rcia l
Plum be r s
C o m m e rcia l
R o o fe r s _______________________________________ __
C o m m e r cia l
S h e et-m e ta l w orkers
C o m m e rcial
Structural iron w o r k e r s ________________ ____
C o m m e rcia l _____ _____ _________________

38
38
40
40
39
40
44
65
65
53
53
43
43
43
43
50
50
45
45

35
35
25
40
25
40
40
65
65
43
43
43
43
43
43
50
50
30
30

40
40
50
40
50
40
50
65
65
54
54
43
43
43
43
50
50
55
55

25
25
24
24
25
25
25
49
49
52
52
43
43
35
35
51
51
38
38

25
25
20
20
25
25
25
49
49
43
43
43
43
35
35
51
51
30
30

25
25
30
30
25
25
25
49
49
54
54
43
43
35
35
51
51
44
44

15
15
1
1
15
15
.
4
4
14
14
15
15
_
.
14
14
5
4

15
15
1
1
15
15
_
4
4
10
10
15
15
_
_
14
14
4
4

15
15
16
1
15
15
5
5
16
16
15
15
_
_
14
14
40
5

96
96
72
82
100
100
100
72
88
85
93
42
88
100
100
100
100
100
100

96
96
72
82
100
100
100
72
88
85
93 42
88
100
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe operators
C o m m e rcia l
O ther heavy construction
B ulldozer op erators __ ___ ____
_______
T ru ck d rivers __________ ___
____
____
O ther heavy construction . . . _______ _ _

31
36
30
30
35
35

30
30
30
30
28
35

45
45
30
30
35
35

25
25
25
25
50
50

25
25
25
25
35
50

25
25
25
25
50
50

13
7
15
8
_

5
5
15
5
_

15
15
15
15
_

-

-

43
100
44
31
64
92

23
63
32
3
_

"

43
100
44
31
64
92

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ick la y e r s' h elp ers _________
____________
C o m m e rcia l
---------------------C arp en ters' h elp ers---------------------------------Construction lab orers —_ ___ _______________
C o m m e rcia l _ ___________ __________
S treet and highw ay.. _________________
Other heavy construction _________________

30
30
40
30
30
30
30

30
30
40
30
30
30
30

30
30
40
30
30
30
30

30
30
25
30
29
30
30

25
25
25
25
25
30
30

30
30
25
30
30
30
30

5
5
1
7
6
7
7

5
5
1
5
5
5
5

5
5
1
10
10
10
10

100
100
12
64
74
50
63

100
100
12
64
74
50
63

100
100
12
64
74
50
63

Pensions

Other
benefits 3

38
38
72
82
50
51
-

45
56
85
93
42
88
_
_
100
100
100
100

-

1 Excludes le g a lly required p lan s. In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. w ere considered
fund contributions. Although studied, em ployer contributions to holiday funds were nonexistent in the establishm ents v isited . A ls o , only sh eet-m etal w orkers w ere provided em ployer contributions to
vacation funds; these payments averaged 55 cents per hour for those w orkers (about half of all sh eet-m eta l w orkers in the area) covered by such fund contributions.
2 O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
4 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 E m ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.




(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for employee benefit fu n d s1 in construction and the percent of w orkers c overed, Septem ber 1972)
Cents -p e r - Hour em ploye r contributions to funds providing—O ccupation1 and type
2
of construction

Insurance

Pensions

Percent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified fund4

161

Average
em ployer
contri­
bution 5

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

Maxim um
con tri­
bution
reported

J ourneymen:
B ricklaye r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
C a r p e n te r s________________ ____________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Cement m asons _______________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
Street and highway ________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s ____________________________________
C o m m e rcia l _____________ _ _____ ________
P ip efitte rs______ _____________ _____ ________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
P lu m bers _______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__ __________ ___________________
S h e e t -m e ta lw o r k e r s ___________ ______________
C o m m e r cia l_________ ________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________

30
30
39
40
18
18
16
16
30
30
30
30
40
40
40
40

30
30
30
40
18
18
16
16
30
30
30
30
40
40
40
40

30
30
40
40
18
18
16
16
30
30
30
30
40
40
40
40

20
20
27
27
25
25
33
33
50
50
25
25
40
40
65
65

20
20
27
27
25
25
33
33
50
50
25
25
40
40
65
65

20
20
30
27
25
25
33
33
50
50
25
25
40
40
65
65

4
4
7
7
5
4
6
12
12
6
6
8
8
8
8

8
8

8
8

3
3

3
3

4
4

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe operators ___
__ __________
___
C om m e rcial- ----- -------------------------------------Street and highway -------------------------------------Other heavy c o n str u c tio n _____
________
Bulldoze? o p e r a to r s — _______________ _____
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s.
______ _____
__ __ - ____
Street and highway ___ - ____ _ _ . ____
Other heavy construction -------------------------

25
25
25
25
25
25
20
19
24

25
25
25
25
25
25
18
18
18

25
25
25
25
25
25
30
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
30
26
26
27

30
30
30
30
30
30
23
25
23

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

5
5
5
5
5
5
9
9

5
5
5
5
5
5
5
9

5
5
5
5
5
5
9
9

-

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers __ _ _ __ ____________
C o m m e r cia l_________ _ _ _______ __________
Other heavy construction
_ __ _ ____ _

18
18
18

18
18
18

18
18
18

25
25
25

25
25
25

25
25
25

8
9

7
9

7

7

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 5

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

Other
benefits 3
M inimum
contri­
bution
reported

Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

Average
em ployer
con tri­
bution5

4
4
2
7
4
4
5
12
12
4
4
8
8

Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

In sur­
ance

Pen­
sions

Other
benefits J

73
91
80
95
5
38
59
72
78
90
34
70
4
76
100
100

73
91
80
95
5
_
38
59
72
78
90
34
70
4
76
100
100

73
91
80
95
40
38
100
59
72
78
90
34
70

84
63
100
100
87
100
100
100
100

84
63
100
100
87
100

-

84
63
100
100
87
100
100
100
100

9
9
9

60
80
100

60
80
100

60
80
100

4
4
8
8
7
5
7
12
12
8
8
8
8

34

76
100
100

27

30

1 E xcludes legally required plans. In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreement does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. were considered
fund contributions. Although studied, no contribution to separate union holiday or vacation funds w ere reported for w orkers in establishm ents visited.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for workers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship tra in in g, education, and industry advancement.
4 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.




(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployer benefit funds1 in construction and the percent of w orkers c overed, September 1972)
C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—

O ccupation1 and type
2
of construction

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l
......
_ .
C arpenters
.. ....
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Street and highway ,
.............. .

P ensions

Insurance
A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 5

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

Other
benefits

Vacations

P ercen t of w orkers covered by
em ployer contributions to
specified fun d s4

3

Maximum A verage M inimum Maxim um A verage Minimum Maxim um A verage Minimum M axim um
Other
contri­ em ployer contri­
contri­
contri­ em ployer contri­
contri­
contri­ em ployer
Insurance Pensions Vacations
benefits 3
bution
bution
bution
contri­
bution
contri­
bution
bution
contri­
bution
bution 5 reported reported bution 5 reported reported
reported
bution 5 reported reported

162

11

11

11

11

11
11

6
6
6
6
17
17
5
5

6
6
6
6
17
17
5
5

6
6
6
6
17
17
5
5

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
“

15
15
15
15
15
15
15
5
5

15
15
15
15
15
15
15
5
5

15
15
15
15
15
15
15
5
5

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

50
50
50
-

3
3
9
3
3
15
15
3
3

3
3
9
3
3
15
15
3
3

3
3
9
3
3
15
15
3
3

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

Street and highw ay__________________________
Other heavy constru ction . _
.
E lectrician s 6
C o m m e rcial
P ip efitters
C o m m e rcial
........
P lu m b ers
____ ______
C o m m e rcia l
.
.......
Residential (5 stories or m o re ) ..........
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries) .
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s ________________________ _
C o m m e rcia l
. _ ...
.
Structural iron w ork ers
. __ .
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

35
35
33
33
33
33
20
20
20
20
20
20
38
38
40
40
40
40
35
35
40
40

35
35
33
33
33
33
20
20
20
20
20
20
38
38
40
40
40
40
35
35
40
40

35
35
33
33
33
33
40
20
20
20
20
20
38
38
40
40
40
40
35
35
40
40

35
35
20
20
20
20
32
25
45
45
33
33
75
75
60
60
60
60
35
35
40
40

35
35
20
20
20
20
25
25
45
45
31
33
75
75
60
60
60
60
35
35
40
40

35
35
20
20
20
20
45
25
45
45
33
33
75
75
60
60
60
60
35
35
40
40

15
15
50
50
50
60
60
50
50

15
15
50
50
50
60
60
50
50

15
15
50
50
50
60
60
50
50

3
3
4
4
4
4
10
13
5
5
3
3

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s_____________________________
C o m m e rcia l
... __
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
C o m m e rcia l
. ........
Street and highw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction ___________________
T ru ck d rivers . _
____ _______________
C o m m e rcial _________________________________

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
25
25

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
25
25

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
25
25

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
50
50

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
50
50

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
50
50

50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
“

50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
“

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e rcia l ____________ ___ __ _ _ __ _
Construction la b o r e r s ____________ ___________
C o m m e rcial
_ _ - _______________ R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction __________________
"Plum bers' h e lp e r s ____________________________
___ _________________
C o m m e rcia l
_

30
30
34
30
30
40
40
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
40
40
30
30

30
30
34
30
30
40
40
30
30

15
15
24
15
15
40
40
15
15

15
15
15
15
15
40
40
15
15

15
15
40
15
15
40
40
15
15

50
50
50
-

50
50
50
-

3
3
4
4
4
4
5
13
5
5
3
3

3
3
4
4
4
4
13
13
5
5
3
3

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
28
100
100
94
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
55
■

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
45
100

-

63
75
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

40
“
100
100
"

1 Excludes le g a lly required p lan s.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer paym ents to em ployees for vacations,
considered fund contributions.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
4 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
6 E m ployer contributions to union holiday funds, not shown separately, applied to 94 p ercen t of the a r e a 's elec tric ia n s. The average contribution for this fund was 10 c e n ts-p e r-h o u r .




etc.

w ere

(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for employee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, September 1972)
C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—
Combination
benefits 3
M a x i­ Average M in i­
Maxi - A verage
M in i­
Maxi - Average Mini A verage M in i­
M a x i­
mum
mum
em ­
em ­
mum
mum
em ­
mum
em ­
mum
mum
mum
ployer
con tri­ c on tri­ ployer
c o n tr i­ contri - ployer
c o n tr i­ contri - ployer
c o n tri­ c o n tr i­
con tri­ bution
bution contri­
bution
but ion c o n tri­
bution
bution
c o n tri­
bution
bution
bution 6 reported reported bution 6 reported reported bution 6 reported reportec bution 6 reported reported
Pensions

Insurance

Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

Vacations

P er cent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
Other
to specified funds 5
benefits 4
A verage M in i­
M a x i­
C o m b i­
em ­
mum
mum
Other
P en ­ V a c a ­ nation
Insur ployer
c on tri­ c o n tri­
bene ance
sions tions bene bution
contri bution
fits 4
fits 3
bution 6 reported reported

163

Journeym en:
B rick la y e rs_____________________________
Cortimer cial
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )..
C arpenters
C o m m e rcial
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 st o r ie s )..
Street and highway ________________
Othier heavy c on stru ction _________
Cement m ason s
___ _ .
___
C o m m e rcial
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s )..
Street and h ig h w a y ________________
Other heavy construction
E le ctrician s
....
C o m m e rcial
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 st o r ie s )..
P ip e fitte r s ______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________
P lu m b ers________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )..
R o o fe r s __________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________
S h e et-m e ta l w orkers
C o m m e rcia l
_ _
_ .
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s )..
Structural iron w orkers
C o m m e rcial

60
60
60
69
69
69
69
69
90
90
90
90
90
37
37
33
80
90
83
83
84
83
49
43
69
69
69
63
63

60
60
60
69
69
69
69
69
90
90
90
90
90
25
25
25
74
74
83
83
83
83
35
35
69
69
69
63
63

60
60
60
69
69
69
69
69
90
90
90
90
90
40
40
40
86
86
83
91
91
86
69
69
69
69
69
63
63

55
55
55
85
85
85
85
85
95
95
95
95
95
78
79
71
109
105
133
133
134
133
65
58
109
106
112
88
88

55
55
55
85
85
85
85
85
95
95
95
95
95
54
54
54
73
73
133
133
133
133
50
50
105
105
105
88
88

55
55
55
85
85
85
85
85
95
95
95
95
95
86
85
86
138
138
133
146
146
138
85
85
120
120
120
88
88

45
45
45
70
70
70
70
70
50
50
75
75

45
45
45
70
70
70
70
70
50
50
75
75

45
45
45
70
70
70
70
70
50
50
75
75

60
60
60
60
60
105
104
108
108
109
108
60
60
97
97
97
-

60
60
60
60
60
100
100
100
108
108
108
60
60
89
89
95
-

60
60
60
60
60
113
113
113
119
119
112
60
60
103
103
98
-

27
27
27
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
37
38
26
8
8
8
8
8
8
5
6
6
6
6
3
3

27
27
27
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
8
8
8
8
1
1
6
6
6
3
3

27
27
27
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
47
47
47
20
20
8
9
9
9
7
7
6
6
6
3
3

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
91
85
95
81
70
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
91
85
95
81
70
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
47
54
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
91
85
95
34
16
100
100
100
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
91
85
95
81
70
100
100
100
100
100

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s _________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s )..
Street and h ig h w a y _________________
Other heavy construction .... _ .......
B ulldozer op era to rs__________________
C om m e rcial
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )..
Other heavy construction
T r u ck d riv ers___________________________
Other heavy c on stru ction _________

75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
62
59

75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
25
25

75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
65
65

120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
55
55

120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
55
55

120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
55
55

25
25

25
25

25
25

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
75
75

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
75
75

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
75
75

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
-

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
-

2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93
85

6
15

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93
85

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h elp er s__________________
C om m e rcial
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s )..
Construction la b o r e r s _________________
C o m m e rcia l
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s )..
Street and highway ........
. . . ....
Other heavy construction

55
55
55
55
55
55
55
55

55
55
55
55
55
55
55
55

55
55
55
55
55
55
55
55

110
110
110
110
110
110
110
110

no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no

no
no
no
no
no
no
no
no

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

-

-

-

10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10

10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10

10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

"

“

'

-

-

~

-

-

1 Excludes le g a lly required plans.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. w ere considered
fund contributions.
Although studied, no em ployer contribution to union holiday funds were reported in establishm ents visited.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
3 Funds that provide for a combination of benefits, such as insurance and pensions, or insurance and vacations.
4 Includes funds for such item s as dental ca re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
5 A ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
6 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.




(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and percent of workers covered, September 1972)
C en ts-pel -hour em ployer contributions to funds providing
Occupation and type
of construction

164

Journeymen:
C arpenters
.
.
.
C o m m e r c ia l.. ______________________________
Cement m ason s ...................................
C o m m e rcia l ___ _____________________________
_______________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ___
C om m e rcial _
.
P ip e fitte rs ___
_ ______________________________
C o m m e r cia l ...
Plum bers _ ............ _ ..... . . ......................... ........
C o m m e r cia l.
.
.
....
.........
S h eet-m etal w orkers 5 .
.
............_ .
C o m m e r c ia l. . _ . .... ...................... .............. .
Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s .........................................
C o m m e rcial
..................
..........
T ru ck d rivers
..........................
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s ________________ __________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________

Insurance

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 4

Other
benefits 2
Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

20
20
25
25
7
7
30
30
15
15
15
15

3
3
7
7
3
3
5
5
5
5
7
7

3
3
6
6
3
3
5
5
5
5
7
7

20
20
20
20
5

20
20
20
20
5

_
-

10
10

10
10

Pensions

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 4

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

Maximum
contri­
bution
reported.

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 4

Minimum
con tri­
bution
reported

30
30
27
27
30
30
30
30
5
5
40
40

30
30
25
25
30
30
30
30
5
5
40
40

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
5
5
40
40

20
20
18
18
7
7
30
30
15
15
15
15

20
20
15
15
7
7
30
30
15
15
15
15

20
20
20
20

20
20
20
20

20
20
20
20

-

-

-

20
20
20
20
5

15
15
15

15
15
15

15
15
15

10
10

Maximum
contri­
bution
. reported

P erce nt of w orkers covered
by ernployer contributions
to specified funds 3
Maximum
contri­
Insurance
bution
reported__

3
3
8
8
3
3
5
5
5
5
7
7

Pensions

57
100
52
62
97
100
95
95
81
80
89
95

57
100
52
62
97
100
95
95
81
80
89
95

-

14
55
20
84

-

-

"

2
2

57
100
52
62
97
100
95
95
81
80
89
95

14
55
20
84
6

2
2

Other
benefits ^

2
2

54
92
22

2
4

42
78

1 Excludes legally required plans.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. w ere considered
fund contributions. Although studied, em ployer contributions to holiday funds were nonexistent among establishm ents visited .
2 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
3 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
4 E m ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
5 E m p loyer contributions to vacation funds, not shown separately, were granted to 53 percent of the a r e a 's sh eet-m eta l w ork ers; these contributions average 30 c e n t s per h o u r .
NOTE:

Dashes indicate no data reported.




Where benefit information is reported, it is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for a ll w orkers (union and nonunion) in table

1.

(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, Septem ber 1972)
C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—

O ccu p ation 1 and type
2
of construction

Insurance

V acation

Pensions

Average Minimum Maxim um A verage
em ployer
contri­
contri­ em ployer
contri­
con tri­
bution
bution
bution 5 reported
bution 5
repo rted

r e r c e n t oi worKers covered
by em ployer contributions 4

Other b en efits3

M inimum M axim um A verage M inim um M axim um A verage M inimum M axim um
em ployer
c on tri­
c o n tri­
con tri­
c o n tri­
em ployer
c o n tri­
c o n tri­
Insurance Pensions
c o n tri­
bution
bution
bution
bution
contri
bution
bution
reported
reported
bution 5 reported repo rted
bution 5 reported reported

165

Journeym en:
B r ick la y e r s------------ ----------------------- -----C arpen ters_________________ ______________
C o m m e r c ia l---------- ------------------------Residential (5 stories or m ore) _
Residential (le s s than 5 stories)
Cem ent m ason s
______ . . .
____
C o m m e rcia l __ ___________
_____
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) ___
________ _
__ _
E le ctricia n s
._
C o m m e r cia l _
___ _____________
P ip e fit te r s ______ ________________
_____
C o m m e r c ia l_______
_________ __
________________________________
Plumbe rs
C o m m e r cia l _______________________
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)___
R oofers ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l______________________
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s _______________ ___
C o m m e rcia l _______________________
Structural iron w ork ers
_____________

40
45
45
45
45
39
40
40
26
26
46
46
40
40
40
43
43
45
45
45

40
45
45
45
45
20
40
40
26
26
46
46
40
40
40
43
43
45
45
45

40
45
45
45
45
40
40
40
26
26
46
46
40
40
40
43
43
45
45
45

39
30
30
30
30
38
39
39
29
29
61
61
80
80
80
25
25
35
35
58

39
30
30
30
30
20
39
39
29
29
61
61
80
80
80
25
25
35
35
58

39
30
30
30
30
39
39
39
29
29
61
61
80
80
80
25
25
35
35
58

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a t o r s ______________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o r e )_____
B ulldozer o p erators______________________
Street and highway____________________
T ru ck d rivers______________________________

35
35
35
35
35
14

35
35
35
35
35
14

35
35
35
35
35
14

25
25
25
25
25
20

25
25
25
25
25
20

25
25
25
25
25
20

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s ___________________
C o m m e r c ia l___________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o re )_____
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ).. _
Other heavy con stru ction ____________
E le c tr ic ia n s' h elp ers _________________

20
20
20
20
20
13

20
20
20
20
20
13

30
30
20
20
20
15

30
29
30
30
30
24

15
15
30
30
30
24

30
30
30
30
30
23

-

-

-

_

-

-

51
51

51
51

51
51

_

_
_

.
_
-

_
_
.

1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1

-

-

.

-

-

1
1
1
1

13
13
15
15
15
15
15
2
2
2
2
11

13
13
15
15
15
15
15
2
2
2
2
9

13
13
15
15
15
15
15
2
2
2
2
13

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

.

-

-

_

-

-

_
-

_

-

"
_
-

14

_
_
_
-

26

_
-

-

14

14

_

_
_
.

_
_
-

-

26

31

70
90
95
100
88
77
100
54
87
100
100
100
74
100
11
63
100
88
100
93

70
90
95
100
88
77
100
54
87
100
100
100
74
100
11
63
100
88
100
93

56
100
100
69
26
14

77
91
100
72
24
31

"

-

-

56
100
100
69
26
14

25
25
25
25
25
8

25
25
25
25
25
4

25
25
25
25
25
8

80
94
100
72
48
31

Vaca­
tions

-

87
100
_
_
_
.

-

Other
benefits 3

90
95
100
88
-

82
94
100
100
74
100
11
63
100
88
100
93

_

_

-

-

14

_
_
_
-

31

75
87
100
72
24
31

1 E xcludes le g a lly required plans. In instances where the lab or-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc, were considered
fund contributions. Although studied, em ployer contributions to holiday funds w ere nonexistent among establishm ents v isited ,
2 O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately,
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent,
4 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100,
5 E m ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds,




(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit fun d s1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, Septem ber 1972)
Percent of w orkers covered
K pmnl Diro r r rmf ti KirH rmc
ir
» *
»
to sp ecifieci fund5

C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—
Pensions

Insurance
Occupation 2 and type
1
of construction

Other benefits 4

Combination benefits 3

V acations

M axi­
Average M in i­
M axi­
M axi­ A verage M in i­
Mini­
M axi­
Average M ini­
M axi­ A verage
M in i­
A verage
mum
mum
em ­
mum
mum
mum
mum
em ­
mum
mum
em ­
mum
mum
em ­
em ­
In sur­ Pen­ 'V aca­ C om bi­ Other
ployer contri­ con tri­
contri­
ployer contri­
c on triployer c ont r iployer contri­ contri­
contri­ contri­
p loyer
sions tions nation bene­
ance
bution | bution
con tri­
bution
c ont r i- bution
buti on
bution
bution
contri­ bution
bution
contri­
bution
con tri­
funds 3 fits 4
bution 6 reported reported bution 6 reported reported bution 6 reported reported bution 6 reported reported bution 6 reported reported

Journeym en:
53
53
53
53
50
50
50
50
-

166

C o m m e r cia l__________________________
R esid en tial (5 stories or m o r e ) .—
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
C a r p e n te r s______________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
Other heavy construction---------------Cement m a s o n s _________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________
Street and highw ay__________________
Other heavy construction__________
Elect ric ia n s_____________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) __
P ip efitte rs_______________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) __
S h e et-m e ta l w o r k e r s ---------------------------C o m m e r cia l---------------------------------------

31
31
31
31
40
40
40
40
30
30
30
30
39
39
39
38
38
38
38
38
32
32

31
31
31
31
40
40
40
40
30
30
30
30
36
36
36
38
38
38
38
38
32
32

31
31
31
31
40
40
40
40
30
30
30
30
40
40
40
38
38
38
38
38
32
32

23
23
23
23
20
20
20
20
25
25
25
25
16
16
16
35
35
35
35
35
30
30

23
23
23
23
20
20
20
20
25
25
25
25
12
12
12
35
35
35
35
35
30
30

23
23
23
23
20
20
20
20
25
25
25
25
24
24
24
35
35
35
35
35
30
30

53
53
53
53
50
50
50
50
65
66
56
121
123
125
125
125
_

53
53
53
53
50
50
50
50
26
26
26
114
114
114
114
125
_

53
53
53
53
50
50
50
50
80
80
66
125
125
125
125
125
-

-

-

"

53
53
53
53
50
50
50
50
80
80
80
118
118
118
117
119
80
80

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators------------------------------C om m e r ci al--------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) —
Street and highw ay--------------------------Other heavy construction---------------B ulldozer o p e r a to r s ___________________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) ~
Street and highw ay------------------------Other heavy construction__________
T r u c k d r iv e r s-----------------------------------------C o m m e r cia l--------------------------------------Street and highw ay--------------------------Other heavy construction----------------

25
25
25
25
25
26
25
25
25
27
25
25
26
25

25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25

25
25
25
25
25
35
25
25
25
35
35
25
35
35

25
25
25
25
25
26
25
25
25
27
25
25
25
25

25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25

25
25
25
25
25
35
25
25
25
35
25
25
25
25

-

-

-

40
40
"

40
40
"

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s --------------------- —
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------Construction la b o r e r s--------------------------C o m m e r cia l--------------------------------------Residential (5 stories or m o re ) —
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Street and highw ay--------------------------Other heavy construction----------------

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35

-

-

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

80
80
80
114
114
114
114
114
80
80

~

77
78
82
72
63
75
42
23
29
27
32
53
70
42
67
32
90
93

53
53
53
53
50
50
50
50
80
80
80
125
125
125
125
125
80
80

2
2
2
2
4
5
4
4
16
16
18
5
5
5
5
5
7
7

2
2
2
2
2
2
5
2
8
8
8
5
5
5
5
5
4
4

5
5
2
5
5
5
5
5
20
20
20
5
5
5
5
5
10
10

100
100
100
100
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
94
100
100
96
100
95
100
100

100
100
100
100
99
99
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
100
94
100
100
96
100
95
100
100

! 23
22
18
28
37
24
58
77
71
73
61
47
31
55
33
62
~

40
40
-

“
~

”

“
-

96
92
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
100
96
100

96
92
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
100
96
100

“
~
~
“

24
-

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

-

-

-

100
100
97
98
100
100
86
95

100
100
97
98
100
100
86
95

21
23
80
15
27
3

100
100
74
74
20
78
59
92

'
~
■
■
■
9
-

76
70
72
93
92
90
99
87
93
93
94
100
100
96
100
95
100
100

"
■

-

“
“
“

1 E xcludes legally required plans. In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreement does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. w ere considered
fund contributions.
E m p loyer payments to holiday funds, not shown separately, applied to 63 percent of the electrician s in the area; these payments average 28 cents per hour for electricians
covered by such plans.
2 O verall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Funds that provide for a combination of ben efits, such as insurance and pensions, or insurance and vacations.
4 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a r e , apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancement.
5 All w orkers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
6 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.




(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r -h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, October 1972)
C e n ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—

167

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l _______________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______
C a r p e n te r s ___________________________________ —
C o m m e r cia l _______________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
Cem ent m a s o n s ______________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l_________ __ _________________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s______________________________ _ —
C o m m e r cia l _________________________________
R esid en tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) ______
P ip e fitte rs _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l _________________________________
R esid en tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) ---------------P lu m b e r s _________________________ _____________
C o m m e r cia l _ __ __ __________________ R esid en tial (5 sto r ie s or m ore)
_ __
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 stories)
R o o fe r s _____________________________ _____ _____
C o m m e r cia l
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s _________ ________________
C o m m e r cia l _________________________________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r cia l _________________________________

A verage
em ployer
con tribution 6

Minimum
contribution
reported

Holidays

Vacations

Pensions
of construction

M axim um
c o n tribution
reported

A verage
em ployer
c on tribution 6

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

266
263
258
123
127
140
97
137
121
120
126
99
97
113
73
98
98
106
67
67
68
154
154
69
69
182
181

135
135
135
40
40
140
40
81
120
120
120
14
17
58
14
15
15
106
19
19
61
117
117
57
57
115
115

275
275
275
140
140
140
140
140
152
148
152
162
127
162
127
106
106
106
78
78
75
167
167
203
203
185
185

31
32
33
58
56
50
70
53
96
98
84
54
54
53
89
81
81
81
92
93
82
67
67
42
42
98
98

Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

30
30
30
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
37
37
47
89
80
80
81
80
80
80
55
55
21
21
70
70

50
50
50
80
80
50
80
75
100
100
100
89
89
89
89
84
84
81
115
115
115
100
100
103
103
99
99

46
46
33
33
33
33
-

46
46
33
33
33
33
-

46
46
33
33
33
33
-

46
46
-

46
46

46
46

50
50

50
50
“

_

_

51
51
54
54
49
49

50
50
38
38
49
49

70
70
70
86
86
80
86
86
85
85
85
64
64
58
64
80
80
57
62
62
62
52
52
57
57
52
52

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s ____________________________
C o m m e r cia l _________________________________
R esid en tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 stories) „
Street and highway
Other heavy c o n stru ction __________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____ __ _____ ________ __
C o m m e r cia l _____________________________ __
Street and highway
.
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
Street and h ig h w a y __ ___ _______________ _
Other heavy construction

53
52
56
69
59
47
53
59
55
46
62
56
69

46
46
46
69
46
46
46
46
46
46
40
40
69

70
69
66
70
70
46
69
69
60
58
69
69
69

59
56
60
99
67
48
66
78
77
47
117
94
141

46
46
46
97
46
46
46
46
46
46
60
60
141

117
117
75
100
100
46
97
97
85
75
141
141
141

79
78
85
87
72
80
96
84
72
43
43
"

70
70
70
70
70
70
70
70
70
43
43
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s ______ __________________
C o m m e r c i a l__ ______________________ _
C a rp e n ters' h elp ers _ __ ____________________
Construction la b o r e r s
...
__
C o m m e r c ia l
_ ____
.... ..
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m ore)
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 stories)
Street and highway
Other heavy construction

62
61
80
76
67
76
54
77
95

40

64
64
80
116
116
116
64
116
116

109
104
140
79
90
89
88
63
74

62
62
140
24
21
46
24
24
38

115
115
140
115
115
115
115
115
82

33
30
50
48
47
50
37
50
50

30
30
50
30
30
50
30
30
30

51
30
50
51
51
50
51
50
50




69
69
68
79
79
80
79
80
83
83
78
48
48
47
42
56
56
57
52
52
56

55
55
55
50
50
80
65
65
48
48
52
21
21
33
22
22
22
57
27
27
46

40

80
30
30
38
30
30
36

Maximum
con tri­
bution
reported

Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

43

43
-

"

~

50
50

"

(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, October 1972)
C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—
O ccupation2 and type
of construction

168

Journeym en:
B rick laye rs ____________________________________
C o m m e rcia l _________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) ---------C arpenters _ __________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_____ ________________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Other heavy construction ___________________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
C o m m e r cia l ______________________________ _
Street and highw ay__________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s_________________ _________________
C o m m e rcia l _________________________________
R esidential (5 stories or m o r e ) __ ____ ___
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P ip efitters
- ,
C o m m e rcia l _________________ ______________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
P lu m b e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l ____________________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
R o o fe r s___________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
____
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s __________ ____________
C o m m e r cia l ___________________ ___________
Structural iron w ork ers ____________________
C o m m e r cia l __________ _________________
Equipment op era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s _________________________ __
C o m m e r cia l _ ______________________________
R esid en tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ______
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay________________________
Other heavy construction ________________
_______________________ _
B ulldozer op erators
C o m m e r cia l ________________________ ____
Street and h igh w ay____________________ ___
Other heavy construction..__ _____________
T r u c k d r iv e r s _________________ _________________
Street and h igh w ay______________________
Other heavy construction ___________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B rick la y e r s' h e lp e r s ________ ______________
C o m m e r cia l ________ _________________
C arpen ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
Construction la b o r e r s ______________________ —
C o m m e r c i a l____ _______ __________________
R esiden tial (5 stories or m o r e ) ________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction __________________

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

_

Combination
benefits 3
Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

Maximum
contri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

Percent of w orkers covered by em ployer
contributions to specified funds 5

Other
benefits 4
Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

Insurance

Pensions

Vacations

Holidays

Combination
funds 3

Other
benefits 4

84
85
79
40
81
81
100
81
84
78
69
57
66
6
7

99
100
90
94
99
98
71
100
90
99
100
95
95
97
70
99
99
100
86
97
79
51
67
78
90
97
98
97
96
100
100
70
100
85
92
100
100
98
88
77
96
100
100
9
66
87
57
36
37
81

_
_
_
_
23
23
40
80
35
35
50
43
43
57
43
42
42
_
68
68

_
_
80
80
68
80
80
80
50
300
300
86
86
44
44
_
242
242

4
5
5
5
5
3
9
3
4
4
6
19
19
17
10
11
11
7
7
8
6
3
1
1
8
8
10
10

4
4
4
2
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
4
4
13
8
7
7
7
3
3
3
3
1
1
6
6
8
8

10
10
10
11
30
7
11
11
10
10
10
71
71
40
13
116
116
7
22
22
22
3
1
1
19
19
14
14

99
100
90
93
99
98
71
93
90
99
100
95
95
97
100
96
96
100
27
37
17
75
87
90
97
98
97

99
100
90
93
99
98
71
93
90
99
100
95
95
97
100
96
99
100
27
37
17
75
87
90
97
98
97

99
100
90
94
99
98
71
100
90
99
100
75
73
95
30
99
99
100
26
36
17
75
87
90
97
98
97

n
(7 )
40
34
52
48
-

_
_
_
-

-

-

-

16
14
13
79
17
11
35
40
44
11
5
5
5

1
1
11
73
1
11
11
11
11
11
3
5
3

87
87
15
86
87
15
88
88
87
15
5
5
5

96
100
100
70
100
87
92
100
100
100
99
100
96

96
100
100
70
100
87
92
100
100
100
99
100
96

88
96
100
85
87
60
56
51
100
20
37

20
37

-

"

“

5
5
3
4
5
4
5
2
2

5
5
3
2
2
2
3
2
2

5
5
3
12
12
5
5
5
5

100
100
9
90
97
79
36
100
90

100
100
9
87
97
79
36
100
78

7
11
9
42
46
18
20
60
24

1
4

(7 )
4
-

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
48
48
41
80
54
53
50
82
83
83
75
43
43
_
_
138
138

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

35
35
_
-

35
35
-

35
35
-

“

"

“

-

1 E xcludes legally required p lans.
In in stan ces where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations,
fund contributions.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Funds that provide for a combination of benefits, such as insurance and pensions, or insurance and vacations.
4 Includes funds for such item s as dental c a re, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancement.
5 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
6 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
7 L e ss than 0.5 percent.




etc. w ere considered

(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r -h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit funds 1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, Septem ber 1972)
C e n ts-p e i -hour em ployer contributions to funds providing—
O ccu p ation 1 and type
2
of construction

Insurance
A verage
em ployer
con tri­
bution 5

P ensions

P ercen t of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified funds4

Other b en efits3

V acations

Minimum Maximum A verage M inim um M axim um A verage Minim um Maxim um A verage M inim um M axim um
contri
contri­
contri­
em ploye r
em ployer
c on tri­
c on tri­
con tri­
em ployer
c on tri­
c o n tri­
Insurance Pensions
contri­
bution
bution
bution
bution
con tri­
bution
bution
c o n tri­
bution
bution
reported
reported
bution 5 reported
reported
bution 5 reported reported
bution 5 reported
reported

169

Journeym en:
B rick laye rs
-------------------------------------- .
C o m m e r cia l ________________________
C arp e n ters____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l______________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)—.
S treet and highway__________________
C em ent m a so n s__________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
E le v a to r c o n str u c to r s_________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
P ip e fitte r s _______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
P lu m b ers_________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) ...
S h e et-m e ta l w ork ers
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
Structural iron w o rk ers.
_ _____ _
_
C o m m e r cia l _

69
70
37
37
38
37
73
71
34
34
20
20
57
57
53
52
57
30
30
46
46

55
55
30
30
38
30
35
37
20
20
20
20
57
57
30
30
57
30
30
43
43

75
75
40
40
38
38
84
84
42
42
20
20
57
57
57
57
57
30
30
47
47

46
46
41
41
40
41
42
40
36
36
20
20
92
92
90
90
92
50
50
96
96

25
25
12
38
40
12
12
27
15
15
20
20
92
92
30
30
92
50
50
70
70

60
60
54
54
40
53
70
70
40
40
20
20
92
92
92
92
92
50
50
103
103

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s ------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
Street and highway__________________
B ulldozer op era to rs____________________
C o m m e rcia l _________________________
S treet and highway__________________
Truckd r iv e r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
S treet and highway
Other heavy con stru ction __________

48
43
51
45
39
51
34
34
33
34

35
36
35
34
34
37
24
30
24
34

72
60
72
60
39
60
37
35
37
34

67
60
71
63
55
71
31
32
30
33

10
50
10
9
47
9
12
24
12
33

103
60
103
83
55
83
34
34
33
33

H elpers and la b o r e r s :
B rick la y e r s' h elp ers _ _______________
C o m m e rcia l _________________________
C arp en ters' h elp er s___________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________
C onstruction la b o r e r s 7_________________
C o m m e r cia l
...
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) ...
S treet and highway__________________
Other heavy c o n stru ction __________
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s __________________
E le vator co n stru c to rs' h e lp e r s _______

63
63
38
38
40
38
43
41
43
39
20

39
39
35
38
15
15
39
35
15
39
20

69
69
38
38
65
45
65
45
45
39
20

40
40
40
40
22
22
23
24
20
39
20

20
20
12
40
10
10
20
12
10
39
20

45
45
40
40
55
55
40
54
20
39
20

_
_

_
_

_
_

40
40
40
39
6

6
30
40
6
6

40
40
40
40
6

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_

65
65

50
50

86
86

6

6

6

_

_

_

6

6

6

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

6

_

6

6

6

-

-

6
-

6

_

_

_
_

_
_

39
40
33
40
20
6

6
40
6
40
20
6

40
40
40
40
20
6

_
_

_
_

_
_

3
3
38
37
42
36
7
8
13
13
5
5
7
7
8
8
8
12
11
4
4

1
1
5
5
42
5
5
5
5
5
2
5
3
3
5
5
8
11
11
1
1

8
8
42
42
42
42
28
28
23
23
9
9
8
8
15
15
8
12
12
4
4

86
97
80
93
47
85
52
51
79
81
100
100
89
90
54
82
7
87
85
100
100

86
97
80
93
47
85
52
51
79
81
100
100
92
93
54
82
7
87
85
100
100

21
6
30
23
6
38
3

5
5
6
5
5
6
3

75
7
75
61
6
61
3

_

_

-

3
-

3
-

87
66
100
99
100
99
70
78
56
100

87
66
100
99
100
99
70
77
56
100

4
4
42
42
5
5
5
5
5

2
2
42
42
5
5
4
5
5

11
11
42
42
8
8
5
5
5

93
100
21
66
87
88
24
100
94
34
100

93
100
21
66
86
86
24
100
94
34
100

_

3

_

_

_

5

2

6

V aca­
tions

_
_
71
81
47
70
(6)
_
_
_

_
_

_

_

31
31

(6)
1
_
_

_

(6)
(6)

_
_

21
66
1
2
4
(6)

_

Other
benefits 3

47
53
80
93
47
82
46
44
71
72
100
100
92
93
53
81
7
87
85
87
87
85
66
95
69
100
40
2
_

5
57
65
21
66
80
80
20
97
85

_

100
'

1 E xclud es le g a lly required p lans. In instances where the lab or-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations or other benefits
w ere considered fund contributions. Although studied, em ployer contributions to holiday funds w ere nonexistent in the establishm ents v isited .
2 O v e ra ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately,
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 E m ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
6 L e ss than 0. 5 p ercen t.
7 Funds that provide for combination of benefits, such as insurance and pensions, or insurance and vacations, w ere reported for only construction la b o r e r s; these payments averaged 4 cents
p er hour for la b o r e r s receivin g such paym ents.




(E m ployer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit fun ds1 in construction and the p ercen t of w orkers covered, September 1972)
C ents-per- hour em ployer contributions to funds providing—

Occupation 2 and type
of construction

P ensions

Insurance
A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 5

P ercen t of w orkers covered by
em ployer contributions to
specified fun ds4

Other
benefits 3

V acations

Minimum Maxim um A verage Minim um Maxim um A verage Minimum M axim um A verage 'M inimum Maximum
contri­ em ployer contri­
contri­
contri­
em ployer
contri­
contri­ em ployer contri­
contri­
Other
Insurance Pensions V acations
contri­
bution
bution
bution
bution
bution
contri­
bution
contri­
bution
bution
benefits 3
reported reported
reported reported bution 5 reported reported bution 5 reported reported
bution 5

170

Journeym en:
Carpenters .
C o m m e rcial
Residential (le s s than 5 sto r ie s!
............................. ..
Cem ent m ason s
C o m m e r c ia l_________ ____________________
E lectrician s
C o m m e rcia l
.............
...... .......
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories')
P ip efitters
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________
P lu m bers
_
_____ ___ _ _ . ... _
.
C o m m e rcia l _
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s) ............. .
S h eet-m etal w ork ers
C o m m e rcia l
____ _ ___ ... ... .... .....
Structural iron w ork ers
C o m m e rcia l

40
40
40
36
37
25
25
25
48
48
47
48
47
30
30
48
48

40
40
40
35
35
25
25
25
48
48
45
48
45
30
30
48
48

40
40
40
40
40
25
25
25
48
48
48
48
48
30
30
48
48

40
40
40
36
37
38
38
38
66
66
66
66
66
34
34
65
65

40
40
40
35
35
38
38
38
66
66
66
66
66
34
34
65
65

40
40
40
40
40
38
38
38
66
66
66
66
66
34
34
65
65

35
35
35
35
35
25
25
25
75
75
75
75
75
27
27
25
25

35
35
35
35
35
25
25
25
75
75
75
75
75
27
27
25
25

35
35
35
35
35
25
25
25
75
75
75
75
75
27
27
25
25

21
21
21
7
10
2
2
2
24
24
24
24
24
2
2
5
5

21
21
21
4
4
2
2
2
24
24
24
24
24
2
2
5
5

21
21
21
21
21
2
2
2
24
24
24
24
24
2
2
5
5

98
100
93
100
100
99
100
96
100
100
98
100
97
100
100
100
100

98
100
93
100
100
99
100
96
100
100
98
100
97
100
100
100
100

98
100
93
20
33
99
100
96
100
100
98
100
97
100
100
100
100

98
100
93
100
100
53
48
66
100
100
98
100
97
100
100
100
100

Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe op erators
T ruckd r iv ers

40
35

25
35

45
35

47
40

7
40

60
40

25
15

25
15

25
15

3
2

3
2

3
2

100
100

100
100

76
100

100
100

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers
C o m m e rcia l
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Street and highwav
Other heavv construction

40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
40

45
45
45
45
45

45
45
45
45
45

45
45
45
45
45

20
20
20
20
20

20
20
20
20
20

20
20
20
20
20

5
5
5
5
5

5
5
5
5
5

5
5
5
5
5

87
100
82
100
51

87
100
82
100
51

87
100
82
100
51

87
100
82
100
51

1 Excludes le g a lly required p la n s.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer paym ents to em ployees for vacations, etc. were
considered fund contributions.
A m ong establishm ents v isited , only construction lab orers w ere provided em ployer contributions to holiday funds; these paym ents average 30 cents per hour for those
w ork ers (about 2 p ercen t of all construction lab orers in the area) provided such fund contributions
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
4 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 Em ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
NO TE :

D ashes indicate no data reported.




W here benefit information is reported, it is lim ited

to

those occupations for which wage data are shown for all w orkers (union and nonunion) in table 1.

C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing---Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Insurance
Average
employer
con tri­
bution 6

Minimum
contribution
reported

Pensions
M axim um
c o n tr i­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
contri bution 6

Minim um
c o n tri­
bution
reported

Vacations
M axim um
c o n tri­
bution
reported

171

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s_____________________________________
C o m m e rcia l
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)__________
C arp en ters_______ ________________________ _______
C o m m e rcia l
. ...
R esidential (5 sto ries or m ore)
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 stories) ______ Street and h ig h w a y ___________ ____________
Other heavy construction
Cem ent m asons
C o m m e rcia l
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and h ig h w a y ________________________
E le ctrician s _____________________________ ______
C o m m e rcia l
P ip e fitte r s __________________________________
C o m m e rcia l
P lu m bers
C o m m e rcial
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers
C o m m e rcial
Structural iron w orkers
C o m m e rcial
Street and highway

52
52
52
26
26
25
25
25
30
58
58
57
54
35
35
89
91
40
38
40
23
21
40
40
40

52
52
52
25.
25
25
25
25
25
40
40
40
40
25
25
27
27
27
27
32
15
15
30
30
40

52
52
52
45
45
25
45
25
35
60
60
60
60
39
39
130
130
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

59
60
58
30
30
30
30
27
28
38
39
37
35
42
43
72
72
40
40
40
29
25
49
49
49

30
30
30
25
25
30
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
40
40
40
40
40
15
15
30
30
45

84
70
84
30
30
30
30
30
30
40
40
40
40
90
90
90
90
50
50
40
55
55
50
50
50

Equipment op erators:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_____ ________ _______
_______
Street and highway _
Other heavy construction
B ulldozer op erators
C om m e r c.ial
Street and highway ___________________ ___
Tru ck d river s__________________________________
C o m m e rcia l
Street and highway

33
33
31
33
32
34
31
32
31
33

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
31
31
31

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
31
35

55
50
76
61
64
47
74
29
30
27

40
40
40
40
40
40
40
25
30
25

85
85
85
85
85
85
85
30
30
30

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' helpers
C o m m e rcia l
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Construction la b o r e r s _________________ ______
C o m m e r c ia l______________________ _________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)________
S t r e e t and highway
Other heavy construction ___ ____________
P lu m bers ' h e lp e r s__________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l_________ ____________________

30
29
30
30
30
30
30
28
30
30

20
20
30
20
20
30
25
25
30
30

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

34
36
30
43
46
48
36
40
29
29

10
20
10
20
20
20
20
20
20
20

50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
30
30




A verage
em ployer
c o n tri­
bution 6

40
40
38
-

M inimum
c o n tri­
bution
reported

35
40
35
-

Holidays
M axim um
contri bution
reported

40
40
40
-

A verage
em ployer
contri bution 6

Minimum
c ont r i bution
reported

-

-

-

-

-

Maximum
con tri­
bution
reported

-

-

-

-

-

100
100
100
100
54
54
43
43
49
48
50
53
52
75
75
75

100
100
100
100
51
51
30
30
40
40
40
48
48
75
75
75

100
100
100
100
54
54
45
45
50
50
50
63
63
75
75
75

66
66

66
66

66
66

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

31
31
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

-

-

-

30
30
30

30
30
30

30
30
30

-

_

_

-

_
-

30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

50
50
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30

_
_
_

.
_
.

_

.
_
_

-

_

C en ts-per-h o u r
Occupation 1 and type
2
of construction

172

Journeym en:
B rick la y e rs_____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries)..
C arpenters______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o r e )...
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)..
Street and h ig h w a y ________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________
Cement m ason s________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)..
Street and h ig h w a y ________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
P ip e fitte r s ______________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
P lu m b ers________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries)..
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers__________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Structural iron w o rk ers______________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Street and h ig h w a y ________________

A verage
em ployer
c on tri­
bution 6

1 Excludes le gally required plans.
fund contributions.
2 O verall occupation
3 Funds that provide
4 Includes funds for
5 A ll w orkers (union
6 Em ployee weighted




Maximum
con tri­
bution
reported

_

_

_

_

50
50
50
50
50
50

50
50
50
50
50
50

50
50
50
50
50
50
_
_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_

.

.
_
.
_

_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_
.
_
.
_
_
_
_
_

.
_
_
_
.
_
_
_
-

_
_

_

40

40
_

_

_

_

_
_

40

40

-

P ercent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified funds 5

mployer contributions to funds providing—

_

Equipment o p erators:
B ack-hoe o p e r a to r s ___________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Street and h ig h w a y ________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________
B ulldozer o p erators----------------------------C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Street and h ig h w a y ________________
T r u ck d r iv er s___________________ ____ ___
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Street and h ig h w a y ________________
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B rick layers ' h elp ers__________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)..
Construction la b o r e r s ------------------------C o m m e r c ia l________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)..
Street and h ig h w a y ________________
Other heavy con stru ction _________
P lu m bers ' h elp ers-------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l________________________

Combination
benefits 3
Minimum
contri but ion
reported

.
.
40
.
_
40
_
"

A verage
em ployer
c o n tribution 6

Other
benefits 4
M inimum
c o n tri­
bution
reported

M axim um
c o n tri­
bution
reported

Insurance

Pensions

Vacations

7
7
7
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
14
14
96
101
35
33
39
6
6
3
3
3

7
7
7
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
2
2
2
2
2

7
7
7
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
16
16
155
155
40
40
40
12
12
3
3
3

65
75
33
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
84
81
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
84
81
100
100
100

71
74
61
88
91
83
69
100
100
25
26
100
100
100
100
100
6
8
18

5
4
6
5
5
4
6
30
30
30

2
2
4
4
4
4
4
30
30
30

7
7
7
7
7
7
7
30
30
30

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
100
100
100

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
100
100
100

_

6
6
6
3
3
2
4
4
6
6

6
6
6
2
2
2
2
2
6
6

6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6

53
58
44
85
91
92
68
68
88
87

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
78
100
100

53
58
44
69
83
92
36
36
88
87

-

Holidays

84
83
87
81
98
-

_
-

-

Combination
benefits 3

87
88
100
96
37
3
-

-

1
17
-

Other
benefits 4

65
75
33
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
100

94
100
100
74
100
100
100
76
100
49

37
43
27
97
98
100
97
78
12
14

In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacations, etc. w ere considered

m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
for a combination of ben efits, such as insurance and pensions, or insurance and vacations.
such item s as dental c a r e , apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.

C e n ts-p e r -h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—

O ccupation 2 and type
of construction

Insurance
A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

P ensions
Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

M inimum
contri­
bution
reported

Vacations
Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

M inimum
contri­
bution
reported

Holidays
M axim um
contri­
bution
reported

173

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (5 stories or m o r e ) __________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Other heavy construction __________________
C em ent m ason s _________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
...............
Street and highway
Other heavy construction __________________
E le ctrician s ..........................
........
C o m m e rcial
P ip e fit te r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________ _____ _________
P lu m b e r s ___________________________ ___________
C o m m e rcia l
„ .. _
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
.
R o ofers
_ ___
S h eet-m etal w ork ers
..... .
C o m m e rcia l
Structural iron w o r k e r s ____________________ _
C o m m e rcial
Other heavv construction

65
65
60
60
60
60
60
56
56
56
56
55
54
69
72
85
93
77
55
38
38
63
63
63

65
65
60
60
60
60
60
56
56
56
56
43
43
44
53
44
44
49
48
36
36
63
63
63

65
65
60
60
60
60
60
56
56
56
56
70
70
144
144
144
144
144
60
38
38
63
63
63

60
60
55
55
55
55
55
75
75
75
75
42
42
95
95
85
83
87
63
78
78
88
88
88

60
60
55
55
55
55
55
75
75
75
75
24
37
65
71
65
65
71
55
70
70
88
88
88

60
60
55
55
55
55
55
75
75
75
75
60
60
100
100
100
100
100
75
no
no
88
88
88

70
70
59
55
105
102
63
64
60
30
65
65
75
75
75

70
70
35
35
34
34
34
34
34
30
65
65
75
75
75

103
92
120
120
100
100
100
30
65
65
75
75
75

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators
C o m m e rcial _________________________________
Street and highwav
Other heavy construction
B ulldozer op erators
C om m ercial
Street and highwav
Other heavy construction __________________
T ru ck d rivers
C o m m e rcial
Street and highwav
Other heavv construction

62
62
62
62
62
62
62
62
77
77
77
77

62
62
62
62
62
62
62
62
77
77
77
77

62
62
62
62
62
62
62
62
77
77
77
77

90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
60
60
60
60

90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
60
60
60
60

90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
60
60
60
60

-

-

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers
C o m m e rcial .... ______ _
Residential (5 sto ries or m o re l
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
Street and highway
................ . .
Other heavv construction
...... ...... . .......

55
55
55
55
55
55

55
55
55
55
55
55

55
55
55
55
55
55

105
105
105
105
105
105

105
105
105
105
105
105

105
105
105
105
105
105

See footnotes at end of table.




70
70
-

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

35
35
40
40
40
40
40
32
32
-

35
35
40
40
40
40
40
32
32
-

-

Maximum
contri­
bution
reported

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

41
35
40
40
40
40
40
32
32
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

_

(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r-h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit fun d s1 in construction and the percent of w orkers covered, September 1972)
C en ts-p e r-h o u r em ployer contributions to funds providing—

O ccupation 1 and type
2
of construction

174

Journeym en:
B rick lave rs
C o m m e rcial
C arpenters
_
C o m m e rcial
Residential (5 sto r ie s or m ore )
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Other heavy construction
..............
. .... ..
Cem ent m ason s
C o m m e rcial
Street and highway
________
Other heavy construction
E lectrician s
C o m m e rcial
P ip efitters
.......... ..
C o m m e r c ia l____________________
__ _____
P lu m b ers
C o m m e rcial
_ _
Residential (le ss than 5 sto r ie s!
R oofers
S h eet-m etal w ork ers
C o m m e rcial
Structural iron w ork ers
C o m m e rcial
Other heavv construction

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
98
95
83
82
98
95
99
78
92
91
_
_

75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
92
92
76
76
72
72
97
75
86
86
_
-

P ercen t of w orkers covered by em ployer
contributions to specified funds 5

Other
benefits 4

Combination
benefits 3
Maxim um
contri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
contri­
bution 6

Minim um
contri­
bution
reported

M axim um
contri­
bution
reported

Insurance

P ensions

Vacations

Holidays

Com bi­
nation
fund s 3

Other
bene­
f it s 4

75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
75
112
106
120
120
100
100
100
85
100
100
_
-

20
20
4
4
4
4
4
42
43
21
23
59
66
52
8
16
16
8
3
17

20
20
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
1
1
8
14
21
4
2
2
3
3
3

20
20
4
4
4
4
4
51
51
127
127
117
117
117
14
26
26
30
30
30

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
88
92
99
100
63
81
43
18
63
63
100
100
100

51
60
16
19
35
44
26
63
63
"

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
13
8
14
16
37
19
57
82
38
37
"

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
“
"
55
62
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

-

"

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s____________________________
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________
Street and h igh w ay_______ _______________
Other heavy construction
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and highwav
. ............ ......
Other heavy construction
T ru ck d rivers
... .... _
.
C o m m e rcial
Street and highwav
Other heavv construction

60
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
85
85
85
85

60
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
85
85
85
85

60
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
85
85
85
85

24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
-

24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
-

24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
"

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

~

“

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers
C o m m e rcia l ________________________________
Residential (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) ____ ____
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
Other heavy construction

70
70
70
70
70
70

70
70
70
70
70
70

70
70
70
70
70
70

6
6
6
6
6
6

6
6
6
6
6
6

. 6
6
6
6
6
6

100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100

-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100

99
100
100
88
100
100

1 E xcludes le gally required p lan s.
In instances where the labor-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union
considered fund contributions.
2 O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
3 Funds that provide for a combination of benefits, such as insurance and pensions, or insurance and vacations.
4 Includes funds for such item s as dental care, apprenticeship training, education, and industry advancem ent.
5 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
6 E m ployee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.




fund,

specified

em ployer payments to

em ployees

for

vacations,

“

etc.

were

(E m p loyer c e n ts-p e r -h o u r contributions for em ployee benefit fu n d s1 in construction and the percent of w ork ers covered, Septem ber 1972)
P ercent of w orkers covered
by em ployer contributions
to specified funds 4

Cents -p e r -h our employ er contributions to funds providing—
Occupation 2 and type
of construction

Pensions

Insurance
A verage
employe r
contri­
bution 5

Minimum
contri­
bution
reported

M axim um
c on tri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
c o n tri­
bution 5

Minim um
c on tri­
bution
reported

10
18
10
24
29
29
24
29
15
20
15
20
20

Other benefits 3
M axim um
c o n tri­
bution
reported

A verage
em ployer
c on tri­
bution 5

175

Journeym en:
B ric k la y e r s------------------------------------------- -------------C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s ).............. .
C arp e n ters_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m o r e )___________
S treet and highway__________________________
Other heavy c on stru ction __________________
C em ent m a so n s__________________________________
C om m e r c i a l __________________________________
S treet and highway__________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s _____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)__________
E le v a to r constructors ________________________
P ip e fit te r s ____________ ______ ____________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s------------------------ ------------ ------------------------C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s )_________
R o o f e r s ___________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
S h e e t-m e ta l w o r k e r s_____
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Stru ctural iron w o rk ers________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

34
37
25
25
25
25
24
25
19
19
21
35
35
35
20
31
31
30
30
30
30
35
35
55
55
45
45

25
37
25
20
25
25
20
25
19
19
19
20
20
35
20
30
30
30
30
30
30
35
35
55
55
45
45

37
37
25
25
25
25
25
25
22
19
22
35
35
35
20
40
40
38
38
30
30
35
35
59
59
45
45

19
21
10
29
29
29
28
29
20
20
16
34
34
_

-

20
35
35
10
10
10
10
20
20
55
55
35
35

20
25
25
10
10
10
10
20
20
55
55
35
35

Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
S treet and highway__________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
B ulldozer o p era to rs________ ___________________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------S treet and highway__________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
T r u ck d riv ers_____________________________________
S treet and highway__________________________
O ther heavy con stru ction __________________

32
35
27
32
34
35
33
34
27
31
24

22
35
22
22
22
35
22
22
22
22
22

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
25

31
35
22
32
34
35
32
33
23
28
19

15
35
15
15
15
35
15
15
15
15
15

35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
25

8
10
10
8
10
10
10
9
10
10

H elpers and la b o r e r s :
B r ic k la y e r s' h e lp e r s......... ............................ .............
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------C arp en ters' h e lp e r s----------------------------- ------------C om m e r c i a l __________________________________
C onstruction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R e sid en tial (5 stories or m o r e )___________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto r ie s)__________
S treet and highway__________________________
O ther heavy c o n stru ction _________________
P lu m b e r s' h e lp e r s ....................................................
C o m m e r cia l

26
26
28
28
27
28
26
28
23
23
30
30

25
25
28
28
19
22
25
25
22
19
30
30

37
37
28
28
35
35
28
35
25
28
38
38

24
24
25
25
24
25
25
20
20
21
25
25

18
18
25
25
15
15
25
20
15
15
25
25

25
25
25
25
25
25
25
20
25
25
25
25

Minim um
c o n tri­
bution
reported

5
5
5
7
7
7
7
7
5
5
3
14
14

3
3
5
7
7
7
7
7
3
3
3
5
5

_

_

_

20
40
40
25
25
10
10
20
20
59
59
35
35

1
4
4
4
4
5
5
_

1
3
3
3
3
5
5
_
_
4
4
6
6

33
33
10
29
29
29
29
29
20
20
20
39
39

M axim um
c o n tri­
bution
repo rted

Insurance

Pensions

Other
benefits 3

10
10
5
8
8
7
7
7
5
5
3
19
19
.
10
10
10
13
13
5
5
_
_
9
9
6
6

38
54
18
48
86
15
32
95
36
72
6
63
67
43
100
84
84
45
54
40
7
74
85
57
66
98
100

38
54
18
48
86
15
32
95
36
72
6
66
77
_
100
16
16
45
54
40
7
74
85
57
66
98
100

28
37
18
49
87
15
32
90
34
72
1
66
77
_
100
64
64
45
54
40
7
_
_
57
66
98
100

15
10
10
15
10
10
10
10
10
10
-

38
28
66
47
45
90
43
53
60
50
62

38
28
66
47
45
90
43
53
60
50
62

34
28
24
46
44
90
37
51
19
34

-

5
5
10
5
5
10
10
5
3
10
-

3
3
4
3
5
5
4
4
3
3
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3

5
5
5
5
8
8
5
5
3
5
13
13

23
32
14
59
40
76
36
10
14
32
33
42

23
32
14
59
36
76
8
2
14
32
33
42

23
32
15
66
36
74
34
8
7
22
33
42

_

8
8
6
6

-

1 E xclud es le g a lly required p lans. In instances where the lab or-m anagem ent agreem ent does not set up a union fund, specified em ployer payments to em ployees for vacation or insurance, etc.
w ere consid ered fund contributions. Although studied, no contributions to union holiday funds w ere reported for w orkers in establishm ents visited . Vacation payments to funds were only found for
elevator c o n stru c to rs; they averaged 52 cents per hour.
2 O v e r a ll occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown sep arately.
3 Includes funds for such item s as dental ca re, apprenticeship training, education and industry advancem ent.
4 A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
5 E m p loyee weighted average relating only to em ployees covered by contributions to union funds.
NOTE:

D ash es indicate no data reported. W here benefit




inform ation is reported, it is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for all w orkers (union and nonunion) in table 1.

(P ercent of w ork ers in construction estab lish m en ts with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans 1 not provided by union funds)
P e r c e n t2 of w orkers in establishm ents providing—

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

A fter 1 year
Total

4
or
le ss

5
or
6

Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans 1

W eeks of paid va c a tio n s4

Paid holidays

7
or
8

Total

1 to
under
2

2

A fter 5 years

Over
2

1 to
under
2

A fter 10 years

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

Hospi­
Life
in su r­ ta liz a ­
tion
ance

Sickness
and
R e tire­
Major accident
ment
M edical an d/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

Sur­
gical

M edical

2
14
13
23
1
11
11
6
1
16
82
32
100

2
14
13
23
1
11
11
6
1
16
82
32
100

12
13
5
11
11
6
1
16
82
32
100

2
9
9
5
11
11
6
1
16
67
32
80

3
4
4
68
26
92

1
12
84
76
100

32
5
38
12
84
84
100

32
5
38
12
84
84
100

13
5
6
42
84
100

30
38
6
42
68
89

1
6
42
-

1
6
42
30
39

75
81
20
16
9
74
17

57
81
25
22
18
74
17

57
81
25
22
18
74
17

57
81
20
19
9
69
“

57
81
19
16
9
65
15

26
37
2
1
18
"

5
13
11
2
57
”

7
7
6
7
3
34
39
19
19

7
7
6
7
3
8
9
70
79
57
57

7
7
6
7
3
8
9
70
79
57
57

7
7
6
7
3
8
9
70
79
57
57

7
7
6
7
3
8
9
70
79
57
57

6
6
7
"

-

5
8
17
17
19

5
8
17
66
72

5
8
17
66
72

5
8
17
66
72

5
8
17
66
72

-

Atlanta, Ga.

176

Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C a r p e n t e r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
E le ctrician s . . .
_
_ _
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P ip e fitte rs _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m bers
. . . . . . . .
_____ __
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________

2
15
10
56
11
11
6
1
_
47
32
52

_
_
_
_
_
_

Equipment op erators:
Back-hoie o p e r a to r s_____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Other heavy construction ___________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
T ru ck d rivers ____________________________________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________

19
38
6
42
46
61

6
42
-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction ___________________

23
7
27
24
48
31
17

2
15
10
56
11
11
6
1
_
47
32
52

_
-

-

-

19
38
46
61

9
11
19
-

23
7
18
13
48
12
17

"

15
10
56
11
11
6
1
_
82
32
100

15
10
56
11
11
6
1
_
82
32
100

_
_
_
-

_
-

16
20
20
53
42
96
100

16
20
20
53
42
96
100

-

-

18
34
28
51
69
32

18
32
25
51
69
30

-

-

-

"

-

11
5
47
8
8
6
1
_
71
32
86

5
4
9
4
4
_
11
14

_
-

15
16
20
53
42
43
39

1
5
54
61

-

18
28
22
38
57
32

7
6
13
12

-

-

“

11
5
47
8
8
6
1
_
71
32
86

5
4
9
11
14

4
4
-

15
16
20
53
42
43
39

1
5
54
61

-

18
28
22
38
57
32

7
6
13
12

-

”

“

-

(7)
12
9
33
1
11
11
1
1
4
56
32
64

1
7
C )

4
26
35

Biloxi—Gulfport and P ascagoula, M iss.
Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C a r p e n t e r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ------------Cem ent m a s o n s _________________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________ _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

15
17
-

15
17
-

-

-

3
7
6
7
15
17
-

-

-

"

"

"

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s-------------------------------------------B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------Street and h igh w ay--------------------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s ---------------------------------------------------Street and h igh w ay__________________________

-

_

_

-

-




-

-

-

"

3
7
6
7
15
17
-

"

-

-

3
7
6
7
-

15
17
-

-

-

-

3
7
6
7
-

15
17
-

-

"

-

"

-

-

-

-

_

-

(P ercent of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans 1 not provided by union funds)
P e r c e n t2 of w orkers in establishm ents providing—

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

A fter 5 years

A fter 1 year
Total

4
or
le ss

5
or
6

i
Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans 1

Weeks of paid v a c a tio n s4

Paid holidays

7
or
8

Total

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

A fter 10 years

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

Life
in su r­
ance

H ospi­
ta liz a ­
tion

Sickness
and
R e tire­
Sur­
Major accident
M edical
ment
gical
M edical an d/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

Biloxi—
Gulfport and P ascagoula, M is s .— Continued
H elpers and la b o r e r s :
Construction la b o r e r s _______________________ _
C o m m e rcia l ______________ ________________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
E le ctr icia n s' h e lp e r s ________________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s _____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_____________________ __________

24
28

24
28

-

“

6
19
40
24
28

6
19
40
24
28

-

-

6
19
40
-

~

24
28

-

24
28

-

3
22
4
4
19
20
18
18
19

-

8
8
11
22
24
19

70

_
-

-

8
12
6
30
20
82

58
3
-

1
-

6
19
40
-

“

11
12
14
39
49
56

25
12
54
39
53
88
100

25
12
54
39
53
88
100

25
12
54
39
53
88
100

25
12
54
39
53
88
100

2
7
-

-

B oston, M a ss.

177

Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
E le c tr ic ia n s --------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
S h eet-m etal w o r k e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

4
30
2
7
7
37
56
18
8 18
19

1
7
_
-

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------Other heavy con stru ction __________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------Other heavy construction __________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
Other heavy construction __________________

966
68
62
9 50
30
100
10 91
82

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s :
C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l________________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay--------------------------------------Other heavy con stru ction __________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s __________________________ __

8
1 50
1
15
20
86

3
23
3
3
-

4
4
29
56
“

5
40
2
11
11
37
56
18
18
19

(7 )
2
7
7
37
56
18
18
19

3
22
4
4
-

-

2
18
2
7
7
19
37
-

"

"

-

8
12
6
30
78
44

11
37

-

-

3
-

-

-

58
3
-

1
-

-

-

-

-

17
86

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

"

17
86

4
43

-

-

"

8
12
6
30
7
44

"

8
12
6
30
90
82

1
23

1
-

2
15
86

58
3
20
86

-

-

-

3

-

-

20
86

“

"

3
22
4
4
19
20
18
18
19

-

2
18
2
7
7
19
37
-

"

"

8
12
6
30
89
82

-

-

-

0
(7 )

~

2
(7 )
18
11
11
48
56
39
24
19

2
(7 )
18
11
11
48
56
39
24
19

2
(7 )
18
11
11
48
56
39
24
19

2
(7)
18
11
11
48
56
39
24
19

(7)
(7)

8
12
6
30
7
44

8
12
6
30
7
44

8
12
6
30
7
44

8
12
6
30
7
44

_
-

7
2
2
"

62
24
1
1

62
24
1
1

62
24
1
1

5
24
1
1

10
52
8
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
24
1
1

62
24
1
1

-

-

-

-

3

-

14

3
100

3
100

-

9
100
4
1
7

9
100
4
1
7

-

-

-

3
100

3
100

7
79
4

2
21

8
8
-

11
13
4
4
-

-

B uffalo, N .Y .
Journeym en:
Carpenters ____________________ ______________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______
Cement m a s o n s _________________________________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________




-

-

-

-

-

-

1
7

-

1
7

-

4
43

4
43

-

-

1
7

1
7

-

-

-

-

-

4
43
-

1
7

-

-

-

-

-

1
7

-

-

-

-

(P ercent of w ork ers in construction establish m en ts with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans 1 not provided by union funds)
P e r c e n t2 o fw o rk e rs in establish m en ts providing—
Paid holidays
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Weeks of paid vacations 4
After 1 year

Total

4
or
le ss

5
or
6

7
or
8

Total

1 to
under
2

A fter 5 years

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

Health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans
A fter 10 y ears
1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

Life
in su r­
ance

H ospi­
ta liz a ­
tion

Sur­
gical

M edical

Sickness
and
R e tire­
M ajor accident
ment
M edical an d/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

B uffalo, N .Y .---- Continued
Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s . .................................
C o m m e r c ia l______________________ ________
Other heavy construction ..
Bulldozer operators
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________
T ru ck d rivers
... _
C om m ercial
Helpers and la b o r e r s:
C arp en ters' helpers
Construction lab orers
C o m m e rcia l

95
76
100
100
100
100
100
100

4
2

-

_
-

-

12
7
14
56
10
72
36
45

83
69
86
44
90
28
64
55

_
40
_
55
96
100

_
_
40
_
55
96
100

_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_

-

4
2

-

_
_

_
_

-

"

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
75
83

40
_
55
20
17

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

"

-

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
64
55

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

40
_

40
_

40
_

40
_

55
_

55
_

55
_

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
32
45

-

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

_
_
_

"

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_

_

40

55
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

55
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

56
_

56
_

56
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

"

"

-

-

-

"

-

-

_
_
_
_

2
12
1
8
_
_
_

2
12
1
8
_
_
_
_
_

2
12
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

2
12
1
8

2
12
_
_
_
_

4

2
12
1
8
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

1
3

1
3

1
3

-

_

-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

-

-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
_

-

_
_
_
_
-

_
-

(7)
2

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

6
3
8
62
46
35
10
_

6
3
8
62
46
35
10
_

(7 )

_
11
_
1
_
_
2

_
_
32
4
10
_

87

6
3
8
59
46
25
10
_
57

(7 )

87

6
3
8
62
46
35
10
_
87

C hicago, 111.

178

Journeymen:
Cement m ason s
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
E le ctrician s ... .. .
Residential (le ss than 5 sto ries)
.......
E levator constructors . ... .
P ipefitter s ______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l
................
P lu m b e r s _______________________________________
C o m m e rcia l
........... ............
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
S heet-m etal w orkers
............
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________

1
8
100
3
3
2
4
2
6

1
8
3
3
-

100
_
2
6

Equipment op era to rs:
T r u c k d r iv e r s ___________________________________
.................................
C o m m e r cia l
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and highway
.................
Other heavy construction
. . .. . .
..

73
82
36
77
80

_
-

(7 )
2
100

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o rers
.......... . .
Residential (le ss than 5 stories) ............
E levator c o n stru ctors' h elp ers ....... .

-

_
2
_
4
_
-

_
1
8
100
_
2
2
4
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
2
2
4
_
-

_
_
1
8
100
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
1
8
_
_
_
2
2
4
_
-

73
82
36
76
80

_
-

72
83
36
73
76

71
83
36
71
67

2
_
_
2
9

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

_
100

(7)
2

(7)
2
100

_
_

_
_

-

"

_
-

(7 )
2

_
100

_
_
_
_

_
_
1
8
_
_
_
2
_

100
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

4
_
-

100
_
_
1
2
_
_
-

72
83
36
73
76

_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_
-

72
83
36
73
70

1
_
_
_
6

(7)
2

_
_

_
_

(7 )
2
-

100

_
_
100

13
12
15
_
32
1
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

2
_

-

_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

D allas,, Tex.
Journeymen:
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Street and highway--------------------- --------------Other heavy con stru ction __________________
Cem ent m a s o n s ------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) ________
Street and h igh w ay_________________________




5
2
15
-

-

-

6
2
15
-

-

-

_
-

14
12
17
11
32
16
39
2

13
12
17
14
39

_
-

_
_
_

1
_
3
11
14
_
39
2

13
12
15
32
1
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

1
_
3
11
_
14
_
39
2

6
3
8
62
46
31
10
_
77

Table 143.

Employee benefits not provided by specified union funds:

Selected areas— Continued

(Percent of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans

not provided by union funds)

1

P e r c e n t 2 of w orkers in establishm ents providing—
Paid lolidays

Wee.ks of paid vacations

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

A fter 1 year
Total

or
le ss

or

6

8

Total

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

4

A fter 5 years
1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

i

Sickness

A fter 10 years
Life
in su r­
ance

H ospi­
ta liz a ­
tion

R e tire ­
Sur­
Major accident
M edical
ment
gical
Medical an d/or
plans 6

sc5
ik

Dalla s, Tex.-— Conti nued
Journeymen— Continued
E le c tr ic ia n s ___________
C o m m e r c ia l________
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
Pipefitters
P lum bers
C o m m e r cia l _
Residential (le s s than 5 stories)
R oofers __
S h eet-m etal w ork ers
C o m m e rcia l

179

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators __
C o m m e r c ia l.
Street and hiehwav
Other heavv construction
B ulldozer op erators
C o m m e rcia l _
Street and h ig h w a y _______
Other heavv construction
T ru ck d rivers ...
Street and highway

33
7
79

-

33
7
79

31
-

2

21
2

84

57

10

-

2

29

37

68

6

6

72

72

45
94

40
29
54

17
7

17

17

11

2

6

3
3

7

33

33
17
51

6

13

60

43

37

36

11

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C arp e n ters' h elp ers .
C o m m e r cia l .
Street and h ig h w a y .............
Construction la b o r e r s .
C o m m e r c ia l.
Residential (le ss than 5 stories)
Street and highway
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
E le ctricia n s' h elp ers
C o m m e r c ia l________ _____
Residential (le ss than 5 stories) .. .
P lu m b ers' helpers
C o m m e r cia l .
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)

14

11

16
3
35

2

9

-

3
35

62
59

15

21

13
59

60

60

36
47
47

47
84

28
55

28
55

10
10

24

68

42
55

_ _

6

13

11

23

9

5

10

34

20

3
59
15
43
55

78

78
66

86

17
83

17
83

91
84

84

13
“
3

8

2

"
"

6

1

“

“
“
"

60
46
47
84

8
2

“

_
"
“

11

2
11

34
42

5
10

17
56

14

-

-

:

-

13
3
24
15
34
29

7

28
55

14

“

35

-

10

-

26

5

5

"

"

10

64
56
56
56

44
30
36
28

g
11

40
48
56
45

11

~
~
~

8

~

39

-

15
34
29

26

44
8

~

12
2
20

10

8
11

40
70
91
63

~

50
48
52

50
48
52

50
48
52

50
48
52

1

1

1

1

1

48

24
-

48

48

48

48

12

22

20

20

20

20

81
36

81
36
14
3

81
36
14
3

81
36
14
3

81
36
14
3

3
23
36
“

17
28
“

48
67
43
40

48
67
43
40

48
67
43
40

45
67

8

16
28
15

88
100

88
100

88

88

100

10 0

54

54

54

54

100

100

100

100

72
45

72
45

72
45

67
36

11

3

11

21

66

6

23
7
52

20

“
“

36

6

11

5

51
45
58
14
7

11

48
47
84

2

29
7Q
30
17

11

69
5

55
1

37

40

20
2

29

-

55

-

36
67
43
18
76
100

54
47
52
45

5

5

5

5

20

40

5

12
6

28
31
41
37
15
“

3
3
4
4

2

2

2

2

2

38
32
13
35
60
59
46

38
34
13
35
70

38
35
13
35
70

38
35
13
35
70

34
31
13
35
49

66

66

66

66

66

66

33

21

79
59

79
59

79
59

79
59

2 1

_
1

11
12

21

14
"

1

6

4
4

39

23
-

66

66

66

66

66

10

22

44
73

44

44

44

11

44
73

73

73

73

8
11

36
17

"

14

17
7

17
7

17
7

17

“

-

2
12

2
12

2
12

2

15

17
3
15

17
3
15

17
3
15

17
3
15

20

20

20

20

20

“
"

59
8

66

66

D enver, C olo.
Journeym en:
B rick laye rs ..
Carpenters _
C o m m e r cia l
...
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ’!
E lectrician s
C om m ercial
P lum bers
.
R esidential (le s s than 5 stories)




4
5
10

9
5
.. .

5
-

10

9
5

6

-

4
8

5

:

4

1

5

12

10

17
3
15

17
15

5

10

10

20

20

1

19

19

:

12

17

3

2

10
8

9
“
"

13
2

1

13
2
10

19

“

(P ercent of w orkers in construction establish m en ts with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans 1 not provided by union funds)
P e r c e n t 2 of w orkers in eistablishm ents providing—

Occupation 3 and type
of construction

A fter 1 year
Total

4
or
le ss

Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans l

Weeks of paid va c a tio n s 4

Paid holidays

5
or

7
or

6

8

Total

1 to
under

A fter 5 years

Over

2

2

2

1 to
under

A fter 10 years

Over

2

2

2

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

Life
H osp i­
in su r ­ ta liz a ­
tion
ance

Sickness
and
R e tire ­
M ajor accident
Sur­
M edical
ment
gical
M edical an d /or
plan s 6
sick
leave 5

Denver, Colo .— Continued
Equipment o p erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s_____________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Other heavy construction....
.
B ulldozer op erators
T ru ck d rivers _
Street and highway
_
_ _

180

-

-

57
9

-

“

_
-

-

1

2

_
_
14
_

9

_
7
14
28
"

_
-

100
10 0

-

65

9
_

1

30
_

12 3 0

_
_

"

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B ric k la y e r s' helpers
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)
... ..... _
C arp en ters' h elp ers
............... ........ .
Construction la b o rers
....... .
C o m m e r cia l
............
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and highway .
Other heavy construction
E le ctr icia n s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
................
.. _ .
P lu m b ers' h elp ers

3
_
7
14
14
28
-

-

(7 )
1

1

-

-

-

"

-

4
7
61
4
16
-

14
3
_

100
100

_
-

-

4
7
61
4
16
-

65

-

-

6

12

(7 )
1

11

-

-

12

57
9
1

-

9
30
-

20

20

20

57
30
9

57
30
9

57
30
9

55
30
9

1

-

20

-

1

2

2

2

2

“

-

"

-

-

”

“

"

4
7
61

-

2

2

9
-

7
-

14
28

23
44
14

27
51
95
7
3
16
14

27
51
95
7
3
16
14

27
51
95
7
3
16
14

27
51
61
3
9
14

100
100

100

100

100

10 0

-

100

100

100

59

-

6

65

65

65

100

55
9

“

-

-

11

(7)
1

86

72
59

"

2

4
14
79
72
65

9
30
-

7
20

-

65

14
35
56
59

(7 )
4
~

1

Des M oin es, Iowa
Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s ______________________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s______________________________________
P lu m b e r s ______________________________________

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s____________________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s ------------------------------------------------------

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction la b o r e r s --------------------------------------C o m m e rcia l ________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Other heavy con stru ction ___________________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s ---------------------------------------------

32
3
2

14

13

27
3
*

33
13
42

-

13
91
13
33

“

-

-

27
3

27
3

-

-

27
-

3

-

2

_

2

2

"

"

"

2

*

42

-

-

-

1

1

"

"

“

-

“

~

-

-

"

"

11

91
33

-

13

13

2

2

91
9
33

91
9
33

1

3

11

2

91
33

9
"

*

27
-

“

3
"

1

32
-

32
-

2

2

2

32
_

27
”

27
3
-

“

33
13
“

33
13
“

33
13

33
13
-

33
13
“

“

'

10

15
91

15
91

15
91

10

49

22

22

22

22

22

"

_

“

7
49
9
“

2

49

4
4
27
18
26

4
4
27
18
29

4
4
27
18
29

4
4
27
18
29

4
4
27
18
29

"
25
16
26

_
9
-

12

12

12

12

12

12

8
8

15

15

15

14

7

8

8

8

8

8

-

_

5
42
33

19
7

-

3

6

2

49
-

9
■

32
3
"

32
-

2

'

9
"

H artford, Conn.
Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________ ___ ___________
C a r p e n t e r s ----------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l----------------- ---------------------------------E le c t r ic ia n s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------P ip e fitte r s_______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l----------------------------------------------------




4
4
12
2

29
12

15
8

_
_
-

4
4
12
2

3
4
8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

14
16
29

14
16
29

12

12

15

15

-

14
16

8
-

-

19
7

8

8

-

-

10
12
8
8

-

14
16
10
12
8
8

20

4
-

(P ercent of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans

1

not provided by union funds)

P e r c e n t2 of w orkers in establish m en ts providing—
Paid holidays
Occupation 3 and type
of construction
Total

4
or
le ss

5
or
6

Health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans l

Weeks of paid v a c a tio n s4
A fter 1 year
7
or
8

Total

1 to
under
2

A fter 5 years

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

A fter 10 years

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

Life
in su r­
ance

H ospi­
ta liz a ­
tion

Sur­
gical

Sickness
and
R e tire­
Major accident
M edical
ment
M edical and/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

H artford, Conn.— Continued

58
12
100

-

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack-h oe o p e r a to r s____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Other heavy construction __________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
Other heavy construction

181

Journeymen— Continued
P lu m b e r s ------------------------------------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l--------------------------------------------------Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________

68
50
68
83
100
94
100

-

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C arp en ters' h e lp e r s ___________________________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r cia l
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Street and highway _ _______________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
P lu m b ers' h elpers
..... ... _ .. . _

49
25
10
100
50
25
100

-

-

"

38
12
61

-

56
9
100

19
22
79
28
“

50
50
68
60
21
66
100

32
13
60
100
73
92

49
18
10
85
50
100

7
15
25

57
4
100
78

6
11

-

24
28
100
15
-

8
13
12
-

20
57
92

57
4
100
53

24

-

51
9
89

-

"

26
50

_
-

30
9
50

26
_
50

_
_
-

15
12
18

58
12
100

58
12
100

58
12
100

54
12
93

32
9
54

4
_

19
_
22
79
10
-

13
_
13
18
21
6
-

_
_
20
_
57
92

19
_
_
22
79
10
-

13
_
13
18
21
6
-

_
_
20
_
57
92

57
_
56
58
62
36
8

57
_

57
_

57
_

57

38

56
58
62
18
8

56
58
62
18
8

56
58
62
18
8

56
58
62
18
8

56
47
21
9
8

_
_
_
_
_

57
4
_
85
53

1
_
15
24

_
_
-

57
3
_
85
_
_
53

_
1
_
15
_
_
24

_
_
_
_
_
_

38
18
10
73
50
_
100

38
8
10
73
_
_
100

38
8
10
73
_
_
100

38
8
10
73
_
_
100

38
8
10
73

38
1
_

_
100

_
78

3
(7 )
11
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_
55
30
38
24
50

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
65
30
66
24
100

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
65
30
66
24
100

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
65
30
66
24
100

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

48
_

16
30
11
24

30
9
50

-

15

7

18

_
10
_
50
_

Indianapolis, Ind.
Journeym en:
C arpenters
_
_____
C o m m e r c ia l_____________________ __________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _______
Cem ent m ason s _ _
E lectrician s
P ip efitters
......
..... _ ...
C o m m e r cia l
P lu m bers
_ ...........
................. ..
C o m m e r cia l _ _
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s __________________________
C o m m e r cia l
R e sid en tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)
_.

2
(7 )
11
9
23
10
40
5
9

Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators
C o m m e r cia l
_
B ulldozer op erators

________________________ _
.................
_ .
._
.
.
._ _ _
.

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
Construction lab orers
C o m m e r cia l
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)

9
1523
10

2
(7 )
11
-

-

-

-

-

40
5
9

13

-

5

1
(7 )
4

-

1
(7 )
2

-

"

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

2
3
_
_
_
_
_

-

_
_
-

39
27
_
50

9
23
10
18
30
38
24
50

17
37
8

-

_
_
-

17
37
5

_
_
8

18
37
8

18
37
8

18
37
8

18
37
8

_
_

6
10
4

_
_

3
_
12

9
10
18

1
_
2

15
10
18

17
10
30

17
10
30

17
10
30

_
_
6

_
_

4
3
8
_
23
10
55
30
38
24
50

1
(7 )
3
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

4
4
11
9
23
10
57
30
66
24
100

1
-

-

-

27
_
50

9
23
10
18
30
38
24
50

8

17
37
13

17
37
5

8

-

5

(7 )

12
10
32

8
10
16

1
(7 )
4

_
-

6
28

-

2

-

2
3
_
_
_
_
_
39
-

3
(7 )
11
_

"

9

55
100




10
16
6
2

-

10
16
6
2

-

6

6

-

-

_
-

6

_
-

_
-

15
_
_
_
_
23
41
_
_

8

18
37
8

15
5
30

11
10
2

17
14
45

K ansas C ity, M o.—
Kan s.
Journeym en:
C arpenters 16
. . ._
Cement m ason s 16_______________________________
E le c tr ic ia n s _____________________________________
Structural iron w orkers 16.
. . . . . . . . . . ....

_
_
_

NO D ATA REPO RTED FOR
ESTABLISHM ENTS VISITED

8

(P ercen t of w orkers in construction estab lish m en ts with form al provisions for paid h olid ays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans 1 not provided by union funds)
P e r c e n t2 of w orkers in establishm ents providing—

O ccupation3 and type
of construction
Total

5
or
6

7
or
8

Total

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

A fter 10 y e a rs

A fter 5 years

A fter 1 year
4
or
le ss

Health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans 1

W eeks of paid vacations 4

Paid holidays

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

Life
in su r­
ance

H osp i­
ta liz a ­
tion

Sickness
and
R e tire­
Sur­ M edical M ajor accident
ment
Medical. an d/or
gical
plans 6
sick
leave 5

-K
K ansas C ity, M o.— an s .— C ontinue d
Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe op erators 16__________________________
B ulldozer op erators 16__________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

60
49
53
77

-

60
49
53
77

"
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C onstruction la b o rers 16_____________________

-

34
77

34
77

-

-

-

34
77

-

-

34
77

-

NO D ATA R E P O R TE D FOR
E STA BLISH M E N TS VISITED

"

30

30
'

'

'
Los A n g e le s-L o n g Beach and Anaheim—Santa Anar-Garden G rove, C alif.

182

Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s ------------------------------------------------ — _
C o m m e r cia l ________________________________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P lu m b e r s ------------------------------------- --------------------C o m m e r c ia l _______ _______ _______ —
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) --------------R o ofers _________________- ___ ____________ __
C o m m e r c ia l__ ____ ____________ _________ _

_

_

(I)
(7 )
1
8
15
3
_

(7 )
6
11
3
_

(7 )
1
2
4
-

_

5
11
-

(7)
1
4
4
3
-

-

■

“

"

“

“

_

“

“

C)

M em phis,

Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s ___________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 sto ries) ________
Cem ent m a s o n s -------------------- --------------------- __
E le ctricia n s _________________________ n
P lu m b e r s ___________________ — ---------- —
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s --------------------------- ---------C o m m e r c ia l____________________ _______ ___

15
-

15
-

■

“

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s . --- ------------------- ----------R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) --------------Street and h ighw ay__ — __ _________ __
Other heavy con stru ction ____ __ ________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ----- ------------- ----------------R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay------------------------------------T r u c k d r iv e r s ________________ ________________

10
36
8
35
25

10
15 36
8
15 35
1S25

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C onstruction la b o r e r s —-----------------------------------C om m e rc ia l ,, ,
__ .. , , _
____ _
r
,_,T
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay...... ................ — -------------

2
11

2
11




(7)
1
4
4
3
-

-

~

“

2
3
1
3
19
16
6

3
7
-

-

'

-

4
10
1
3
19
16
6

4
10
1
3
19
16
6

■

“

“

-

_

21
60
3
28
4
6
10

-

“

21
60
3
28
4
6
10

-

-

7
6
4
4

7
6
4
4

-

-

"

“

2
3
1
3
19
16
6

-

-

“

-

0
(7 )
5
11
-

-

21
60
3
28
4
6
10

-

-

21
60
3
28
4
6
10

-

7
6
1
4

1
3

-

7
6
1
4

1
3

-

-

0
(7 )
1
9
15
5
19
30

(7 )
1
9
15
5
19
30

(I)
(7)
i
9
15
5
19
30

0
(7)
1
7
15
2
19
30

13
29
15
16
4
5

13
29
14
15
16
4
5

13
29
14
15
16
4
5

13
29
15
16
4
5

13
29
15
16
4
5

10
24
15
19
73
24
24

11
24
15
7
19
73
24
24

11
24
15
7
19
73
24
24

10
24
12
7
18
73
18
14

11
24
15
7
19
73
24
24

17
6
39
35

25
6
57
35

25
6
57
35

20
6
39
32

21
6
39
35

0

6
15
19
30

2
4
19
30

2
3
-

-

Tenn.— rk.
A

3
7
"

“

(7 )
(7 )
1
7
15
2
19
30

'

~

(!)

O

'

2
4
_
■

2
4
_

"

-

”
-

3
12
4
18
6

4
29

1
"
3

(P ercent of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans 1 not provided by union funds)
P e r c e n t2 of worke:rs in establish m en ts providing—
Paid holidays
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

A fter 1 year
Total

4
or
le ss

5
or
6

Health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans l

Weeks of paid vacations 4

7
or
8

Total

1 to
under
2

A fter 5 years

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

A fter 10 years

Over
2

2

1 to
under
2

Over
2

2

Life
H ospi­
in su r­ ta liz a ­
tion
ance

Sur­
gical

M edical

Sickness
and
R etire­
Major accident
ment
Medical an d/or
plan s 6
sick
leave 3

Miami,, F la .

3
3
2
57
4
6
47
20
68
-

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators
_
............
B ulldozer op erators
Street and highway
.. .
. .
T ru ck d rivers
__
...........
.......
Street and h igh w ay__________________________

183

Journeym en:
C arpenters
_
. . . . . . . .
..
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)
Street and highway ..... _
Cem ent m ason s . __
E le c tr ic ia n s ______________________________________
R e sid en tial (le ss than 5 sto ries)
P lu m bers
...............
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________

12
11
26
46
61

H elpers and la b o r e r s :
C a rp e n ters' h elp ers
_ ... _
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 stories)
Construction la b o rers
C o m m e r cia l
. ......
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)
. ...
Street and h igh w ay____________________ ___
Other heavy construction
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
R esid en tial H ess than 5 sto ries) ..
P lu m b ers' h elp ers _
. . . .. . .
R e sid en tial (le s s than 5 sto ries)

44
27
8
5
8
47
40
57
89
89

2
2
2
57
4
5
18
-

.
.
2
17
-

-

12
11
26
46
61

9
1
3
10
14
15 56
56

35
27
5
2
3
47
33
33

1
1
4
15 30
15
15 50
"

4
5
2
100
15
4
30
7

3
5
2
57
4
4
30
_
_

.
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

7
23
57
46
61

2
5
30
43
"

2
3
2
_
4
30
_
_

2
2
_
57
4
.
_
_
_

-

1
.
.
43
12
.
.
.
7

-

20
50
46
61

_
_
-

7
3
7
.
-

54
27
9
5
1
79
10
14
.

44
27
7
5
(7 )
55
10
14
-

.
-

10
2
_
_
24
_
_
.
_

"

-

(7 )
1
.
-

2
3
2
_
_
4
30
_
_

2
2
.

1
_
_

57
4
.
_
_
_

-

1
_
_
43
12
_
_
_
_
7

-

.
_
_
_
-

.
20
50
46
61

7
3
7
.
-

26
27
3
5
(7 )

18
.
4
1
1
55
_
_
_
_

10
.
2
_
_
24
_
.
_
_

"

-

_
10
14
.
-

-

-

43
12
_
_
_
_
7

4
5
2
100
16
13
83
20
68
7

5
5
3
100
16
13
83
20
68
7

5
5
3
100
16
13
83
20
68
7

5
5
3
100
16
13
83
20
68
7

5
5
3
100
16
13
83
20
68
7

_
_
_
_
-

_
20
50
46
61

7
3
7
_
-

19
30
74
68
90

44
30
74
76
100

44
30
74
76
100

44
30
74
76
100

44
30
74
76
100

26
27
3
5
(7 )

18
_
4
1
1
55
_
_
_
_

10
_
2
_
_
24
_
_
_
_

54
27
12
5
8
76
_

-

"

59
35
13
5
8
76
44
69
100
89
89

59
35
13
5
8
76
44
69
100
89
89

59
35
13
5
8
76
44
69
100
89
89

59
35
13
5
8
76
44
69
100
89
89

_
10
14
_

69
100
89
89

1
3

1

3
3
4
30
15
50

46
14

7

_
4
9
6
8

7
8
19
18
24

_
_

10

3
3

3

21
_

43

26
37
56
56

_
_
_
-

_

Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn.
Journeymen:
C a rp e n ters_
.. _ ...
C o m m e r c ia l__
_ _ _
E le c t r ic ia n s .
..
. ... .
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Equipment op era to rs:
T ru ck d rivers
_
Street and highway

..................
...

_

_
-

1
2
1
7

_
-

1
2
_
-

1
2
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_
-

-

-

_
-

-

_
_
-

.

.

.

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

1
2

_

_
_

_

_

_

1
2
1
7

_

1
2

_

_

_

_

_

_
1
7

_
_
1
7

_

1
7

_
1
7

_

.

_

-

2
4

2
4

2
4

2
4

2
4

-

-

2

2

1

_

New York and N assau^Suffolk, N .Y .
Journeym en:
C a r p e n t e r s __ _ _ __
... _ _
C o m m e r c ia l_________________
_ ___________
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m ore ) _
R esid en tial ( le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Cem ent m ason s _
.
. _
.
E le c t r ic ia n s .
.
.
.
C o m m e r cia l
R esid en tial (5 sto ries or m ore)




5
1
2
19
1
67
64
88

-

_

4
1
2
15
1

_

.
.

_
_

-

1
_
_

3

2

_

_

4

2
12

2
9

_

_

_

64
61
85

3
4

(7)

_
_
_

_
.

.
_

_

3
4

.
_

_

1
_
_
3
_

1
1

1
_
2
5

_
_
_

1

_
_
4
_
3
3

1

1

2

2

2

_

1

_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

3

2
5

4

_

_

9

9

9

9

9

4

_

_

2
1
3

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

3
3

1
1

_
(7 )

1
1

3
3

(P ercen t of w orkers in construction estab lish m en ts with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans

not provided by union funds)

1

P e r c e n t 2 of w orkers in establishm ents providing—
Weeks of paid vacations

Paid holidays
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

A fter 1 year
Total

4
or
le ss

5
or

7
or

6

8

Total

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

1 to
under

A fter 10 y ears

Over

2

2

2

Health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans

4

A fter 5 years

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

Life
in su r­
ance

H ospi­
ta liz a ­
tion

Sur­
gical

1

Sickness
and
M ajor accident R e tire­
M edical
ment
M edical and/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

New York and N assau—
Suffolk, N .Y .— Continued
Journeymen— Continued
P ip e f it te r s _______________________________________
C o m m e r cia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (5 s to r ie s or m o r e ) __________
P lu m b e r s ________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l_______________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto r ie s or m o r e ) __________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s )_________
R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_____________________ __________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s _________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________ _________
Structural iron w o r k e r s _______________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

184

Equipment op erators:
B ack -h oe o p e r a to r s_____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l... _
R esiden tial (5 sto r ie s or m ore) ________
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r ie s ) _________
Street and highw ay_______________________
Other heavy construction __________________
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s ____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Street and h ighw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction __________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
Street and highw ay__________________________
Other heavy construction _________________

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
C arp e n ters' h e lp e r s ____________ _____________
Construction la b o r e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (5 sto ries or m o r e ) __________
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) --------------Street and h ighw ay______ __________________
Other heavy con stru ction ___________________

3
2

1742
11

4
92 1

29
25
13
10

3
4
4

61
58
50
30
45
89
17 46
17

8

39
95
17 80
63
96

91
9
4
30

_
_
_
_
_
7
-

-

-

1
1

1
1

-

25
13
3
3
-

4
_
14
_
-

-

-

-

-

2

1

9
-

30
-

"

"

■

-

36
7

55
D

91

91

1
2

1

_
_
6

4

-

19

-

26
5
18

2

~

2

10
2
21

1
1
2

-

29
-

7
-

“

-

1

1

30
80
63
96

30
-

(7 )
“

79
63
96

(7 )
3
■

-

21

29
25
13
10

3
-

1

5
“

1

(7 )

1

10

4

11

1

-

(7)

21
6

“

21
2

"

-

"

4

6
2

1
1

2

-

-

2
2

8
2
21

2

17
25
13

10

21

-

6

10

25
13
3
-

-

3
-

-

-

'

79
63
96

-

“

(7 )
“

-

36

55
“

(7 )
-

2

14
-

1

30
-

(I)
(7 )
2

"

10

1

21

3
"

“

10

3
-

1
1

-

-

1

36
1

21
6

-

80
63
96

55
-

“

-

-

-

10
2

21

21

10
2
21

10
2
21

26
-

29
25
13

29
25
13

10

10

3
-

3
-

29
25
13
3
3
-

8

-

30
"

-

"

1

1

1

1

30
“

30
“

30
"

30
"

55

55

55

55

1

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

21

21

21

6

6

6

6

“

“

"

“

5
2

18
25
13
3
3
"
-

5
5
3
17
-

4
21

25
13
10

3
-

1

1

30
-

-

30
-

"

"

55
(7 )
3
“

55
-

(7 )
-

6

2

-

"

2

1

~

Philadelphia, Pa.—j
N.J.
Journeym en:
B r ic k la y e r s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________ _______________
C a r p e n t e r s _____________________ ___ ___________ C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esidential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay------------- ----------------------Cem ent m a s o n s ---------------------------------------------- _
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
E le c t r ic ia n s ______________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l---------------------------------------------------E levator c o n str u c to r s ------------- ----------------------C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________




5
7
19
7
28
37
9
9
13

3
4
7

9

3

1

6
21

-

15
-

-

2
-

-

7
22

7
9
_

11

-

100

-

100

100
100

1

-

18

14
3
15
6

36
5
5
14
12
10 0
10 0

2

3
14
4
36
5
5
14
12
-

1
2
-

-

(7)
-

-

-

-

-

-

100
100

2

3
11

4
24
-

3
2

1
-

5
4
5

2
-

12
12
-

-

2

2
-

11

7
100
100

3
4
24
1
2
-

3
2

5
(7 )
12
12
-

-

12

2

6

7
4
5

28
5
5

-

6
6
-

100
100

-

-

-

-

-

6
2

6
2

5

14
3

6
2

6

2

2

21

21

21

21

27
-

7
4
5
-

5
5

5
5

5
5

4
5

1

-

21

21

21

6

6

19
-

19
-

19
-

6

6

-

-

(P ercent of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans

not provided by union funds)

1

P erc en t 2 of w orkers in establishm ents providing—

A fter 1 year
Total

4
or
le ss

Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans i

Weeks of paid v a c a tio n s 4

Paid holidays
O ccup ation 3 and type
of construction

5
or

7
or

6

8

Total

to
under
1

A fter 5 years

Over

2

2

2

to
under
1

A fter 10 years

Over

2

2

2

to
under
1

Over

2

2

2

Life
in su r ­
ance

Ho spi ta liz a tion

Sickness
and
Retire Sur­
Major accident
M edical
ment
gical
Medical an d/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J.— ■Continued
Journeymen— C ontinue d
P ip e fitte rs_____________________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
P lu m b e r s ______________________________________ _
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
S h e et-m e tal w o r k e r s __________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________

185

Equipment op era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators
C o m m e r cia l
..............
Street and highway
......... ...
B ulldozer op erators
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
T r u c k d r iv e r s ____________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
... ..........._
.
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction.. ...............
H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ick la y e r s' h elp ers
.......... .
C arp e n ters' h elp ers
.. .
....
. _
C o m m e r cia l
....... „
Construction lab orers _
C o m m e r cia l
. . ...
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto r ie s)
_ __
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy construction
. ..
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s ___________________________
Elevator co n stru c to rs' h e l p e r s .................

(7 )

12
10

46
17
93
48
59

71
98
47
66

92
42
68

87
46
61

65
35
15
16
27
2

27
66
100

1
19

39
50

1
2
1

15
15
18
7

2046
-

10
10

2

10

1

9
46
17
93
13
15

15
4
33
9
9

31
13
60
-

25
33
9
-

44
64
37

21

28
19
-

-

19
35

1
1

8
6

4
(7)
-

13
1

27
216 6
100

"

5
5
44
13
93
12

3
3
_
-

50
80

20

20

54

54

5

79
35

79
35

10

10

8
6

15
23

15
18

66

92
42
25
37
9
54

-

1

2

11

2

32
3
4
-

1

-

-

66
100

66

12

37
13
76
-

-

-

15

■

1

12

1

33
7
15
-

3
4
-

(7)
5
-

3
3
9
4
17
12

-

13

13
34
53
85

3
3
9
4
17

2

-

-

15

1
1

-

43
66
20

54

7
6

37
13
76

-

34
35
5

6

6

9

15

8

1

29

37

45
-

6
6

1

11

1

32
-

7
6

6

6

10

1

-

2

46
17
93
9
9

40
17
77
3

"

46
17
93
9
9

40
17
76

2

46
17
93
9
9

2

-

2

13
33
-

13
33
-

13
33
-

(7 )

1

(7 )

1

-

(7 )

1

7

7

2
2

1

1

7
14
"

9
16
-

45
(7 )

7
58

-

-

12

12

12

12
6

12

12

12

7

7

7

6

5
9

1

10

10

10

15

8

1

29

-

9
17
29

12
12
2
1

17
-

17
-

17
-

66

66

66

43
66
20

2

5
-

54

34
35
5

37

100

100

2
2

40
17
76
3

1

(7 )

11

11

11

20

20

20

-

-

-

"
-

-

1

9
16
-

4
-

5

2
2

1

5

8

8

-

-

“

"

7
54
-

13
29

17
29

45
5
9
-

'

2
2

100

Portland, O reg.— ash.
W

Journeym en:
C arpenters
. .......... ..
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries}
E le ctrician s
....
....
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries}
_
Plum bers
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries) _

3
7

3
7

-

1

1

1

-

4

4

4

2

2

2

-

-

3

3
'

-

H OLIDAY AND V A C AT IO N B ENEFITS NOT PROVIDED
B Y UNION FUNDS W ERE NO NEXISTENT
IN E STABLISH M ENTS VISITED

3
7

3

_
.. _
.

'

St . Louis , M o-111.
Equipment o p erators:
T ru ck d rivers
C o m m e r cia l
Street and h ig h w a y __________________________




73
97
49

-

-

73
97
49

74
100

49

59
49

1

-

-

-

73

1

100

-

49

-

5
12

69

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

88

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

49

(P ercent of w orkers in construction establish m en ts with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans

1

not provided by union funds)

P e r c e n t 2 of w orkers in establishm ents providing—
Paid holidays
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Weeks of paid vacations
A fter 1 year

Total

4
or
le ss

5
or

7
or

6

8

Total

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

1 to
under

A fter 10 years

Over

2

2

2

Health, in suran ce, and retirem ent plans

4

A fter 5 years

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

Life
in su r­
ance

H ospi­
ta liz a ­
tion

1

Sickness
and
R e tire­
Sur­
M ajor accident
M edical
ment
gical
M edical an d/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

San F ran cisco—
Oakland., C alif.
H O L ID A Y, V A C AT IO N , OR H E A LTH , INSURANCE AND R E T IR E M E N T PROVISIONS NOT
PROVIDED B Y UNION FUNDS W ERE NOT R E P O R TE D IN E STABLISH M ENTS VISITED
Washington D .C .—Md, - V a .

186

Journeym en:
B rick la y e rs
C o m m e rcial
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
C arpenters
C om m ercial
R esiden tial (5 sto r ie s or m ore)
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and highway
Cement m ason s
_ ....................
C o m m e rcia l.................
............ . . „
R esidential (le ss than 5 stories)
_
Street and highway ..
E le ctricia n s
... .
C o m m e r cia l
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries) ...........
E levator constructors .
...
___
P ip efitte rs. .
.. .. .............. ...
C o m m e r cia l
_
...
._ _
P lu m bers ._ .
C o m m e r cia l
_
_ .................
R esiden tial (5 stories or m ore)
.. . .
R esid en tial (le ss than 5 stories)
_ ..
R o o fe r s ___________________________________________
C o m m e r cia l
S h e et-m e tal w ork ers ...
C o m m e r cia l
................
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 sto ries) _ . .. ..

Equipment o p era to rs:
B ack -h oe op erators ...... .................. _ _ . ...
C o m m e r cia l _____ _______
_____
R esid en tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) __
Street and highway
Other heavy c on stru ction ..............
B ulldozer o p e r a t o r s _________________________
C o m m e r cia l .
..... . .
R esidential (le ss than 5 sto ries) .
Street and highway
Other heavy construction
T ru ck d rivers
_
.................. .. .
__
Street and h ig h w a y ...............
Other heavy construction . _ ... _ _ ...
_

1

-

2

2

23
6

6
2

85
46
-

14
-

1

1

_

_

8

8

28
24
53

14

28
52
57
46
54
39
50
28
26
33

6

9

11

23

100

(7)
(7 )

30
9

-

8

53

6
6

(7 )

51
67

11

3
85
19
_
_
14

-

6

35
28
82

_

16

100
6
6

_

H elpers and la b o r e r s:
B r ic k la y e r s' helpers _
.................. ........ ._
C o m m e r c ia l_______________________________ _
R esiden tial (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________




1

-

11
22

24

30
-

16

11
12

82

2

17
-

1

(7 )

1
1

1
1
-

1

_
_
_
_
-

-

4

(7 )

-

5

28
32
28

-

-

11

14

43
35
40
17
26
19

2
-

2
-

-

7

7

4
12
-

24
56
-

25
9
37
49
5
1

_
10
21

15
47
10 0

_
14

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

"

-

14
4

20
_

6

37
25
_
_
_
14
9
43
-

10
10

10
10

51
40
61
94
9

33
17
61
94
9

11

11

39
32
82

38
31
82

43
72
7

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
(7 )
(7 )
100

52

21

-

10

35

28

3
17

2

(7 )

10
-

-

-

2
-

-

39
23
24

_
-

3
-

-

C)

-

C)

1

21
-

_

1
1
1

_

20
6

4

(7 )

37
40
4
_
_

_
7
-

2

(7 )
1

32
27
59

_
19
15
43
3
3
5
7
7
5
23

_
-

23

21

20
-

50
7

-

2

10
2
1

4
6
6

45
34
61
94
9
11

35

21
-

(7 )

1

_
_
_
(7 )
(7 )
100

_
_
_
_
-

-

_

1

19
4
37
40
4
_
_

5
3
7
-

23

21

20
-

52
7

1

4
6
6

45
34
61
94
9
11

35
_

_

2
-

-

-

2
-

-

-

15

8

14

-

30
9

10

-

-

30
9

10

"

"

10

-

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

13
14
-

10
2

-

(7)
(7 )

(7 )
_
14
9
43
3
3
5
7
_
26
17
82

10
-

14
14

1
1

-

21
2
10
_

_
(7)

15
19

14
19

11

11

11

12

25

25

25

24
7
85
45
-

6

8

8

8

48

1

20
2

85
48
-

85
48
-

85
48
-

_
_
_
5
6

100

_
_
_
-

_

10

11

19
1

20
1

14

5

6

1

37
26
3

10
2

21

12

12

12

18
_
23
24
19
47
13
13
40
36
61
63
9

20

20

20

12
20

_

_

_

_

1
21

1
21

1
21

1
21

16
47
16
16
48
44
61
63
26
15
39
33
82

16
47
16
16
48
44
61
63
26
15
39
33
82

16
47
16
16
48
44
61
63
26
15
39
33
82

16
47
16
16
48
44
61
63
26
15
39
33
82

24
18
60

57
72
61

57
72
61

57
72
61

48
72
61

33
56
30

21

21

21

21

21

53
34

53
34

53
34

35

19
16

11

38
31
82

33
20

-

13

1

1

_
-

_
23
14

21

15
47
10
10

9
7
22

9
11

10

36
9
9
28
17
61
63
31
23
82

7
4
7
7

_
-

23
28
47
34
-

10

10

10

22
-

_

54
35
47
37
49
32

54

54

54

54

43

22

22

22

22

33

47
19
15
32

47
19
15
32

47
19
15
32

47
19
15
32

2
-

19
14
32

22

10

-

1

15
19

1

-

(7 )
(7 )

15
19
11

-

2
-

14
14

18
_

10

-

-

10

4
-

35
22

15

16

16

16

16

15

20

21

21

21

21

21

23
32

1

1

4

4

4

4

(P ercent of w ork ers in construction establishm ents with form al provisions for paid holidays, paid vacations, and selected health, insurance, and retirem ent plans

1

not provided by union funds)

P e r c e n t 2 of w orkers in eistablishments providing—
Paid holidays
Occupation 3 and type
of construction

Weeks of paid vacations
A fter 1 year

Total

4
or
le ss

5
or

7
or

6

8

Total

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

1 to
under

A fter 10 years

Over

2

2

2

Health, insurance, and retirem ent plans

4

A fter 5 years

1 to
under

Over

2

2

2

Life
in su r ­
ance

H osp i­
ta liz a ­
tion

1

Sickness
and
R etire­
Sur­
Major accident
M edical
ment
gical
Medical and/or
plans 6
sick
leave 5

Washington D .C .—Md.~-Va.---- Continued
H elpers and la b o rers— Continued
C arp en ters' h e lp e r s ___________________________
C o m m e r c ia l_________________________________
Residential (le ss than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Construction la b o r e r s -----------------------------------C o m m e r c ia l___________________________________
Residential (5 sto ries or m o r e ) ---------------Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
Street and h igh w ay__________________________
Other heavy con stru ction __________________
E le c tr ic ia n s' h e lp e r s __________________________
Residential (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) _________
P lu m b ers' h e lp e r s _____________________________
C o m m e r c ia l__________________________________
R esiden tial (le s s than 5 s t o r i e s ) --------------

33
40
27
17
3

10

9
11
2

38
-

4
-

8

2
12
-

98
7
35

11

3
13
(7 )
3

28
28
24
12

15
27
5
5
3

-

1

1

4

61

(7)

61

100

18
7
16

9
-

2

2

28

13
-

21

6
86
100

7
35

1
-

-

12
8

2

54
73
44
41
47

53
73
30
23
47

-

-

20

-

-

17
16

-

-

8
12

-

-

25
17
47

10
2

8
11

(7 )
-

18
9

8

(7)

16

(7)

1

10

8
2

2

2

2
21
12

3
-

2

-

23

1

12

-

_
3
-

-

-

42
73
19
24

-

2

-

8
12

25
17
47

8
11

-

42
73
19
24

2

7
1

_
3
-

-

29
27
34
26
14
64
21

35
55
53
73
40
37
47

37
28
37
34
17
64
54

37
28
37
34
17
64
54

37
28
37
34
17
64
54

37
28
37
32
17
64
52

33
18
34
13
5

8

8

8

8

8

61
56
73
57
58
47

61
56
73
57
58
47

61
56
73
57
58
47

47
56
73
57
58
47

41
54
73
19
24

(7)
1

(7)
11
1

1

2

18

7
27
36
29
60

32
26
47

187

Includes only those plans for which at least part of the cost is borne by the em ployer and excludes legally required plans, such as w ork ers' compensation and social security; however, plans
by State tem p orary disability laws are included if the em ployer contributes m ore than is legally required or if the em ployees receive benefits in ex ce ss of legal requirem ents.
A ll w ork ers (union and nonunion) in a given occupation equal 100.
Totals for holiday an d/or vacation provisions m ay include w orkers with specific benefits not shown separately.
Where
inform ation on paid holidays, paid vacations, and health, insurance, and retirem ent plans is presented, it is lim ited to those occupations for which wage data are shown for union and nonunion w orkers
combined in table 1 .
3
O ve rall occupation m ay include data for w orkers in type(s) of construction not shown separately.
4
Vacation pay such as percent of hourly earnings was converted to an equivalent tim e b a sis.
P eriods of service w ere chosen arb itrarily and do not n e c e ssa r ily reflect individual establishment
p rovisions for p r o g r e ssio n .
For exam ple, changes in provisions indicated at 5 years m ay include changes occurring between 1 and 5 y e a rs.
5
Unduplicated total of w ork ers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance.
6
Unduplicated total of w ork ers covered bypensions
or retirem ent severance
pay.
7
L e ss than 0.5 percen t.
8
A ll w ork ers received 12 paid holidays.
9
A ll w ork ers not shown separately received 10 paid holidays.
10
W ork ers not shown sep arately were distributed as follow s:
15 percent at 9 days; 10 percent at 10 days; and 59 percent at 11 days.
11
A ll w ork ers in 4 day or le s s interval received 2 paid holidays; a ll other w orkers not shown separately received 9 paid holidays.
12
A ll w ork ers received 4 paid holidays.
13
A ll w ork ers received 1 paid holiday.
14
A ll w ork ers received 6 V2 paid holidays.
15
A ll w ork ers received 3 paid holidays.
16
Holiday provisions w ere the same regard le ss of type of construction.
17
A ll w ork ers not shown separately received 11 paid holidays.
18
About 12 percent of the w ork ers, not shown separately, received 10 cents per hour for vacation pay, equivalent to 1.3 percent of the basic rate as of September 1972.
This percentage
equates to about 3 days of vacation pay.
19
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
35 percent received 1 paid holiday and 4 percen t, 3 paid holidays.
20
A ll w ork ers received 2 paid holidays.
21
Includes 37 percent of the w orkers receiving 6 paid holidays and 29 percent granted 6 V2 days.
22
W ork ers w ere distributed as follow s:
13 percent at 1 day; 4 percent at 3 days; and 8 percent at 4 days.
23
A ll w ork ers not shown separately received 9 paid holidays.
1

required
2

NOTE:

D ashes indicate no data reported.




Appendix A.

Scope and Method of Survey

Scope of survey

The survey included establishments engaged primarily
in the following types of construction as defined in the
1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual (SIC), prepared by the Bureau of the Budget,
now the Office of Management and Budget:

his hours during the survey payroll period, rather than
by establishment SIC designation. The five types of con­
struction defined for this survey were:

Commercial Includes nonresidential buildings such as
industrial, institutional, office, and public buildings;
light and power plants; natural gas compressing stations ;
oil pumping stations; and refuse disposal plants.
SIC 15 - Building construction-general contractors
SIC 16 - Construction, other than building-general
contractors
Residential (five stories or more). Includes residential
buildings such as high-rise apartments.
SIC 17 - Construction-special trades contractors
[Part]
in the following industries:
Residential (less than five stories). Includes residential
171 - Plumbing and heating
buildings such as garden-type walkup apartments and
173 - Electrical work
single-family housing units.
1741 - Masonry, stone setting, and other
stonework
Carpentry
Roofing and sheet-metal work
Concrete work
Structural steel erection
Excavating and foundation work
Wrecking and demolition work
Installation or erection of building
equipment, n.e.c.
SIC 656 - Operative builders (those building for
sale on their own account)
1751
176
177
1791
1794
1795
1796

-

Highway and street. Includes all highway and street
construction, except elevated highways.
Other heavy construction. Includes construction of rail­
roads, tunnels, subways, elevated highways, viaducts,
dams, bridges, reservoirs, hydroelectric projects, pipe­
lines, transmission and telephone lines, radio towers, etc,

Excluded are SIC’s 172 (painting, paper hanging, and
decorating), 1742 (plastering and lathing), 1743 Method of study
(terrazzo, tile, marble, and mosaic work), 1752 (floor
Data were
laying), 178 (water well drilling), 1792 (ornamental iron field staff to obtained by personal visits of the Bureau’s
a representative sample of establishments
work), 1793 (glass and glazing work), 1799 (special within the scope of the survey. To obtain appropriate
trade contractors, n.e.c.). Also excluded was force accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large
account construction; that is, construction work per­
formed by an establishment primarily engaged in some than small establishments was studied. In combining the
data,
all establishments were given an appro­
business other than construction for its own account and priate however, All estimates are presented, therefore, as
weight.
use and by its own employees.
Establishments studied were selected from those relating to all establishments in the industries, excluding
those
employing eight workers or more at the time of refer­ only of the below the minimum size at the time of refer­
ence
universe data.
ence of the data used in compiling the universe lists.
Once selected, however, the establishment was studied
even if its employment was below the eight-worker cut­ Establishment and area definitions
off during the survey reference period. Table A-l shows
An establishment is
as all
the number of establishments and construction workers struction sites of a firmdefined for this study Exceptcon­
within a survey area.
for
estimated to be within the scope of the survey, as well as Biloxi, area definitions conform to Standard Metropoli­
the number actually studied by the Bureau.
tan Statistical Area definitions established by the U.S.
Type of construction
Office of Management and Budget through November
Workers in occupations studied were classified by the 1971. (See tables 4 through 55 for individual area
type of construction on which the worker spent most of definitions.)




Table A-1. Estimated number of establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied, construction
industries, September 1972
N o n s u p e r v is o r y c o n s t r u c t io n

N u m b e r o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts 2

w o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts

A re a 1
W i t h in sco p e

A c t u a l ly

W i t h in s co p e

A c t u a l ly

o f s tu d y

s tu d ie d

o f s tu d y

s tu d ie d

................................................................................

2 0 ,5 5 5

2 ,7 0 7

5 3 0 ,6 6 5

1 7 0 ,0 0 1

B o s to n

........................................................................................................

1 ,0 2 3

119

2 6 ,4 5 4

6 ,9 4 1

B u f f a lo

........................................................................................................

328

63

8 ,2 0 2

3 ,6 9 7

H a r t f o r d ........................................................................................................

305

65

5 ,7 5 6

2 ,3 2 9

N e w Y o r k a n d N a s s a u -S u ffo lk 3 ....................................................

3 ,1 3 2

356

8 6 ,4 2 5

3 2 ,2 7 9

P h i l a d e l p h i a ................................................................................................

1 ,5 3 0

169

4 0 ,7 7 7

1 1 ,8 0 5

6 ,4 4 5

T o t a l , 21 areas
N o r th e a s t:

S o u th :
832

118

2 0 ,4 1 6

................................................

128

42

2 ,3 4 6

1 ,0 7 4

D a l l a s ................................................................................................................

867

91

2 6 ,3 5 5

8 ,4 3 5

M e m p h i s ........................................................................................................

340

66

9 ,0 4 9

3 ,2 0 1

M i a m i ................................................................................................................

711

115

1 5 ,7 7 8

4 ,9 4 1

................................................................................................

1 ,7 9 8

236

5 2 ,7 8 9

1 6 ,1 5 3

........................................................................................................

1 9 ,0 1 7

A t la n t a

........................................................................................................

B i l o x i - G u l f p o r t a n d P a s ca g o u la

W a s h in g to n
N o r t h C e n tr a l:

2 ,3 5 8

292

5 7 ,5 3 2

................................................................................................

148

40

3 ,4 1 4

1 ,4 4 9

I n d i a n a p o l i s ................................................................................................

418

57

1 0 ,7 8 5

2 ,8 3 5

K an sas C i t y ................................................................................................

508

109

1 2 ,2 2 8

5 ,3 6 1

M in n e a p o lis - S t . P a u l

............................................................................

842

112

2 1 ,2 1 6

6 ,6 5 7

S t. L o u i s ........................................................................................................

857

109

1 9 ,1 7 5

5 ,4 2 8

Denver

716

96

2 0 ,5 9 4

5 ,8 8 6

C h ic a g o

D es M o in e s

W e s t:
................................................................................................

Lo s A n g e le s -L o n g B e a c h a n d
................................

2 ,2 9 3

254

5 6 ,8 5 4

1 6 ,1 6 2

P o r t l a n d ........................................................................................................

397

72

8 ,7 3 6

2 ,7 8 7

S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k l a n d ........................................................................

1 ,0 2 4

126

2 5 ,7 8 4

7 ,0 6 9

A n a h e im - S a n t a A n a - G a r d e n G r o v e

1 For definition of areas, see footnote 2, tables 4 through 55.
2 Includes only establishments which had 8 workers or
more at the time of reference of the universe data.

Employment

Estimates of the number of workers within the scope
of the study are intended as a general guide to the size
and composition of the construction labor force rather
than as precise measures of employment.
Nonsupervisory construction workers

“Nonsupervisory construction workers” includes
working supervisors, journeymen, equipment operators,
apprentices, and laborers employed by the establishment
in the survey area during the reference period studied.
Excluded were nonsupervisory office workers and
administrative, executive, and professional employees.




2

The survey reference month was October 1972.

Occupations selected for study

Occupational classification was based on a uniform
set of job descriptions designed to take account of inter­
establishment and interarea variations in duties within
the same job. (See appendix B for these descriptions.)
Two criteria for selection of the occupations were: The
number of workers in the occupation and appropriate
representation of the entire job scale in the industry.
Full- and part-time workers were included in the data for
selected occupations; working supervisors, apprentices,
and trainees were not reported by occupation but were
included in the employment estimates for nonsuper­
visory construction workers.

Information on wages relates to straight-time hourly
earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Zone rates,
usually based on distance between local union head­
quarters and the construction site, are included in the
wage data for purposes of the study, but incentive pay­
ments and nonproduction bonuses are excluded.
Average (mean) hourly rates for each occupation
were calculated by weighting each rate by the number of
workers receiving the rate, totaling, and dividing by the
number of individuals.
Separate occupational wage data are presented, where
possible, for workers whose wage rates are set by labormanagement agreement or are not set by such agree­
ments. This classification does not necessarily depend on
whether or not the individual worker is a union member.
Nonunion workers, however, were not classified as
receiving union rates when employed on federally
funded or federally assisted projects where union rates
were used in accordance with the Davis-Bacon Act.

Overtime pay provisions

Overtime pay provisions relate to the policies of
establishments for work outside of regularly scheduled
hours (without working all of the shift), for daily and
weekly overtime, and for work on Saturday, Sunday,
and holidays. Separate tabulations are presented for
union and nonunion situations.

Employer contributions to specified union funds

Information is presented by occupation on the
amounts and area wide incidence of employer con­
tributions to specified union funds providing insurance,
pensions, holidays, vacations, combination benefits
(such as a combined vacation and holiday fund), and
“other” benefits, such as dental care, apprenticeship
training, education, and industry advancement. The
average (mean) payment and minimum/maximum con­
tribution to each fund is calculated for occupations
reported. In those instances where the labormanagement agreement did not set up a specified union
fund, if the employer pays a specified amount to the
employee for a particular benefit in lieu of a fund con­
tribution, this is reported as a fund contribution for
purposes of the study.




Employee benefits not provided by specified union
funds in an establishment were considered applicable to
all workers in a survey occupation if they applied to half
or more of such workers in the establishment. Similarly,
if fewer than half of the workers in the job were
covered, the practice or benefit was considered non­
existent in the establishment. Because of length-ofservice and other eligibility requirements, the proportion
of workers receiving the benefits may be smaller than
estimated.
Paid holidays. Paid holiday provisions relate to full-day
and half-day holidays provided annually.
Paid vacations. The summaries of vacation plans are
limited to formal arrangements and exclude informal
plans whereby time off with pay is granted at the dis­
cretion of the employer or the supervisor. Payments not
on a time basis were converted; for example, a payment
of 2 percent of annual earnings was considered the equi­
valent of 1 week’s pay. The periods of service for which
data are presented represent the most common practices,
but they do not necessarily reflect individual establish­
ment provisions for progression. For example, the
changes in proportions indicated at 5 years of service
may include changes in provisions which occurred be­
tween 1 and 5 years.
Health, insurance, and retirement plans. Data are pre­
sented for all health, insurance, and pension and
retirement severance plans for which the employer pays
all or part of the cost, excluding only programs required
by law such as workers’ disability compensation and
social security. Among the plans included are those
underwritten by a commercial insurance company and
those paid for directly by the employer from his current
operating funds or from a fund set aside for this
purpose.
Death benefits are included as a form a life insurance.
Sickness and accident insurance is limited to that type of
insurance under which predetermined cash payments are
made directly to the insured on a weekly or monthly
basis during illness or accident disability. Information is
presented for all such plans to which the employer con­
tributes at least part of the cost. However, in New York,
where the temporary disability insurance law requires
employer contributions,1 plans are included only if the
^ h e temporary disability insurance law in California does
not require employer contributions.

employer (1) contributes more than is legally required or
(2) provides the employees with benefits which exceed
requirements of the law.
Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are limited to
formal plans which provide full pay or a proportion of
the workers’ pay during absence from work because of
illness; informal arrangements have been omitted.
Medical insurance refers to plans providing for
complete or partial payment of doctors’ fees. Such plans
may be underwritten by a commercial insurance com­
pany or a nonprofit organization, or they may be selfinsured.




Major medical insurance, sometimes referred to as
extended medical or catastrophe insurance, includes the
plans designed to cover employees for sickness or injury
involving an expense which goes beyond the normal
coverage of hospitalization, medical, and surgical plans.
Tabulations on retirement plans were based on an
unduplicated total of workers under plans providing
either pensions (regular payments for the remainder of
the retiree’s life), or severance pay (one payment or
several over a specified period of time) to employees on
retirement, or both types of benefits. Separate tabula­
tions by type of retirement plan are not presented.

Appendix B.

Occupational

Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau’s wage surveys is to
assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed
under a variety of payroll titles and different work arrangements from establishment to
establishment and from area to area. This classification permits the grouping of occupa­
tional wage rates representing comparable job content. Because of the emphasis on inter­
establishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau’s job
descriptions may differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or
those prepared for other purposes. In applying these job descriptions in the construction
survey, the Bureau’s field staff were instructed to exclude working supervisors, appren­
tices, trainees, and handicapped workers.
Bricklayer

Lays building materials such as brick, structural tile,
concrete, cinder, glass, gypsum, terra cotta block, and
stone to construct walls, partitions, arches, sewers, and
other structures. May construct fireplaces and chimneys
in residential construction.
Carpenter

electrical fixtures, apparatus, and wiring used in electri­
cal systems.
Excludes line installers and cable splicers.
Elevator constructor

Assembles and installs electric and hydraulic freight
and passenger elevators, escalators, and dumbwaiters,
determining layout and electrical connections from blue­
prints. Work involves installing such items as counter­
weights, pumps, motor foundations, escalator drives,
elevator cars, control panels, and safety and control
devices.

Builds wooden structures, such as concrete forms,
scaffolds, tunnel and sewer supports, and temporary
frame shelters, according to specifications. In latter
stages of commercial or residential building construc­
tion, work involves: Installing sub flooring, sheathing,
partitions, floor joists, studding, and rafters. When Pipefitter (steamfitter)
building is ready for trimming, workers install molding,
wood paneling, cabinets, window sash, doorframes,
Using blueprints, lays out, fabricates, assembles,
doors, and hardware, as well as build stairs and lay floor. installs, and maintains piping and piping systems, fix­
tures, and equipment for steam, hot water, heating,
cooling, lubricating, and industrial processing systems.
Cement mason
Exclude plumbers who are to be classified separately.
Smooths and finishes surfaces of poured concrete See description for Plumbers below.
floors, walls, sidewalks, roads, or curbs to specified
textures, using handtools such as floats, trowels, and Plumber
screeds. May direct helper in the pouring of the
concrete.
Assembles, installs, and repairs pipes, fittings, and
fixtures of heating, water, and drainage systems,
according to specifications. This classification excludes
Electrician (inside wirer)
pipefitters (steamfitters) who are primarily engaged in
Using blueprints, specifications, or other guides or installing equipment for steam, hot water, and cooling
instructions, lays out, assembles, installs, and tests systems. See description for Pipefitters (steamfitters).



Laborers

Roofer, composition

Covers roofs with roofing materials, other than sheet
metal, such as composition shingles or sheets, wood
shingles, or asphalt and gravel. Work involves: Cutting,
fitting, and fastening materials to roofs with asphalt
cement or nails; and installing strips of flashing into
angles formed by walls, vents, and intersecting roof
surfaces.

Construction laborer

At construction sites, loads and unloads construction
materials, stacks and carries materials, shovels and grades
earth, and does other work as directed. May also keep
the work area clean.
Operating engineers
Back-hoe operator

Sheet-metal worker

Fabricates, assembles, installs, and repairs sheet-metal
equipment such as control boxes, drainpipes, ventilators,
and furnace casings, according to specifications.

Operates power shovel, which digs by pulling dipper
toward the machine, to move dirt, rocks, sand, and other
materials.
Bulldozer operator

Structural ironworker

For commercial and residential building construction,
performs duties required to raise, place and unite girders,
columns and other structural steel members to form
completed structures or structure framework. For heavy
construction, erects the steel framework of bridges,
buildings, and other structures including metal storage
tanks and overhead crane runways that support heavy
equipment. This classification excludes workers whose
primary duties are setting and tying in concrete rein­
forcing rods.




Operates bulldozer to excavate, load, or move dirt,
gravel, or other materials, May read and interpret grade
and slope stakes and simple plans. May grease, adjust,
and make emergency repairs to equipment.
Truckdrivers
Truckdriver (dumptruck)

Drives truck of more than 8 wheels to transport dirt,
rocks, gravel, sand, and other materials to and from
specified destinations.

Industry Wage Surveys
The most recent reports providing occupational
wage data for industries included in the Bureau’s
program of industry wage surveys since 1960 are
listed below. Copies are for sale from the Super­
intendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from any of its
Manufacturing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1839
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1970.
BLS Bulletin 1732
Cigar Manufacturing, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1796
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1748
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1695
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1763
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1972
BLS Bulletin 1803
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 14641
Footwear, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1792
Hosiery, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1743
Industrial Chemicals, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1768
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 16261
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1973.
BLS Bulletin 1835
Machinery Manufacturing, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1859
Meat Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1677
Men’s and Boys’ Separate Trousers, 1971
BLS Bulletin 1752
Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and
Nightwear, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1794
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1973.
BLS Bulletin 1843
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1969.
BLS Bulletin 1690
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1679
Nonferrous Foundries, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1726
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970
BLS Bulletin 1719
Petroleum Refining, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1741
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1970.
BLS Bulletin 1713
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1972.
BLS Bulletin 1844
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969.
BLS Bulletin 1694



regional sales offices, and from the regional offices
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics shown on the
inside back cover. Copies that are out of stock are
available for reference purposes at leading public,
college, or university libraries, or at the Bureau’s
Washington or regional offices.
Manufacturing- Continued
Structural Clay Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1697
Synthetic Fibers, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1740
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1757
Textiles, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1801
West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1704
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970
BLS Bulletin 1728
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1971.
BLS Bulletin 17831
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1971.
BLS Bulletin 1793
Work Clothing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 16241
Nonmanufacturing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1689
Banking, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1703
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583
Communications, 1973. BLS Bulletin 1854
Contract Cleaning Services, 1971. BLS Bulletin 1778
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1972.
BLS Bulletin 1797
Educational Institutions: Nonteaching Employees,
1968-69. BLS Bulletin 1671
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1834
Electrical Appliance Repair Shops, 1972. BLS
Bulletin 1838
Hospitals, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1829
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1645 1
Life Insurance, 1971, BLS Bulletin 1791
Metal Mining, 1972. BLS Bulletin 1820
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542 1
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1967-68.
BLS Bulletin 1638
Scheduled Airlines, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1734
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970.
BLS Bulletin 1712
1 Bulletin out or stock.
☆ U.S. GOVERN ME NT PRINTING OFFICE : 1975

0-583-674 (89)

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
REGIONAL OFFICES

Region V

Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

C h ic a g o , I I I .

60604

Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Region II
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St., NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)




9th Floor
Federal O ffice Building
230 S. Dearborn

Region VI
Second Floor
555 G riffin Square Building
D allas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions VII and VIII *
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X **
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Regions VII and VIII are serviced by Kansas City
Regions IX and X are serviced by San Francisco


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102