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Industry
W age Survey

n & '/

4

Communications,
1970
Bulletin 1751
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1972




Oayton &

Montgomery
Public Library

Co.

JUU4I972
TOJMENT

collection




Industry
W age Survey

Communications,
1970
Bulletin 1751
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
J. D. Hodgson, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner
1972




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D .C . 20402 - Price 30 cents




Preface
This summary of data on employment and hourly rates of pay is based on annual
reports filed with the Federal Communications Commission by telephone carriers, the
Western Union Co., and international telegraph carriers, as required by the amended
Communications Act of 1934. Under a cooperative arrangement, the Bureau of Labor
Statistics tabulates and publishes the data as part of a continuing series.
The study was conducted in the Bureau’s Office of Wages and Industrial Relations.
The analysis was prepared by Joseph C. Bush in the Division of Occupational Wage
Structures.
Other reports available from the Bureau’s program of industry wage studies, as well
as the addresses of the Bureau’s regional offices, are listed at the end of this bulletin.




iii

Contents
Page
Summary ...........................................................................................................................
Telephone carriers ............................................................................................................
Employment and pay rates in December 1970 .................................................
Trends in employment and pay rates ...................................................................
Western Union Company ...............................................................................................
International telegraph c a rrie rs .......................................................................................

1
1
3
5
6

Tables:
Percent distribution of employees in occupational groups by average hourly
rates, December 1970, for —
1. Telephone carriers ..................................................................................
2. Bell System telephone carriers ..............................................................
3. Non-Bell telephone carriers ...................................................................

7
8
9

1

Average hourly rates of employees in selected occupations by region,
December 1970, for —
4. All and Bell System telephone carriers ....................................................10
Percent distribution of employees in occupational groups by average hourly
rates, October 1970, for —
5. Western Union Company .........................................................................11
6. International telegraph c a rrie rs.................................................................12
Chart:
Employment and average hourly rates of communications workers except
officials and managerial assistants, October 1947-December 1970 ............. 2

Appendix. Scope and method of survey ....................................................................... 13




iv

Communications, 1970
increase over the 790,088 employed in 1969. Total
employment declined, however, for the two non vocal
telegraph groups—
down 3.8 percent for the Western
Union Company, the Nation’s only domestic carrier, and
2.1 percent in the international companies.

Summary

Wage rates1 of employees of the Nation’s principal
communications carriers averaged $3.89 an hour in late
1970-up 7.5 percent from a year earlier. This advance
was one of the largest increases recorded by the Bureau’s
annual surveys conducted since 1947, and compares
with the 4.3 percent rise during 1969 and 6.8 percent
during 1968. The number of communications workers2
(excluding officials and managerial assistants) rose 4.9
percent during the 1969-70 period to 860,848-the
highest level since 1947. (See chart.)
Telephone carrier employees, 97 percent of the
workers covered by the survey, averaged $3.89 an hour
in December 1970. Average hourly pay rates for Western
Union’s nonmessenger employees and employees of
international telegraph carriers were $3.88 and $4.81,
respectively, in October 1970. Average wage rates
advanced 7-1/2 percent in the telephone sector, 7.8
percent for Western Union nonmessenger employees,
and 10.3 percent for workers of international telegraph
carriers since the 1969 study.3
Employment in telephone carriers covered by the
survey rose by 41,469 workers in 19704— 5.2-percent
a

Telephone Carriers

Employment and pay rates in December 1970.
Earnings of the 831,557 telephone carrier employees
studied averaged $3.89 an hour in December 1970. (See
table 1.) Individual rates were widely dispersed, ranging
from $2.75 to $4.50 an hour for the middle half of the
workers in the array. The dispersion of individual pay
rates largely reflects the wide range of worker skills
required by the industry, differences in pay by carrier
and locality, and the extensive use of rate-ranges for
specific occupations. These rate ranges, in many
instances, resulted in the maximum rate exceeding the
minimum rate for a given job and locality by as much as
70 percent. The spread was usually greater for craft
occupations than for clerical jobs and telephone
operators.
Wages and working conditions for a large majority of
telephone carrier employees are determined under
provisions of collective bargaining agreements, mostly
with the Communications Workers of America (CWA).
Many carriers have separate agreements for individual
departments and, in some cases, for different areas. The
New York Telephone Co., for example, has separate
agreements for its plant, traffic, and commercial
departments in the New York City area, and three other
agreements for those departments in the rest of the
State.
The industry employs workers in a wide variety of
jobs ranging from custodial to professional and executive
positions, a number of which are staffed almost
exclusively by one sex. Women made up 55 percent of
the work force and accounted for almost all of the
telephone operators, slightly over nine-tenths of the
clerical workers, and seven-tenths of the business office
and sales employees. Men, on the other hand, accounted
for th re e -fo u rth s o f the
professional and
semiprofessional staff, and for nearly all construction,

1 See appendix for scope and method of survey including
definitions of employment covered and pay rates.
Since 1947, annual studies have been made in cooperation
with the Federal Communications Commission. Information
before 1961 for all carriers included in the annual reports
related to an October payroll period. In 1961, the reference
date for telephone carriers was changed to December.
2

The study covered nearly nine-tenths of the estimated
945,500 employees of the Nation’s telephone communications
industry in December 1970 and almost all of the employees in
the telegraph communications industry in October 1970.
3

For results of the previous survey, see Industry Wage
Survey: Communications, 1969, BLS Bulletin 1696,1972.
4

The study of telephone carriers was limited to those (56)
that had annual operating revenues exceeding $1 million and
engaged in interstate or foreign communications services using
their own facilities or through connections with those of
another carrier under direct or indirect common control.
Approximately 7,250 officials and managerial assistants of
these carriers were not included in the study.




1

E m

p lo y m

e n t

a n d

A v e r a g e

a n d

M a n a g e r ia l

H o u r ly

R a te s

o f

A s s is ta n ts ,

C o m

m

O c to b e r

u n ic a tio n s

W

1 9 4 7 — D e c e m

o r k e r s
b e r

E x c e p t

O ffic ia ls

1 9 7 0

T h o u s a n d s o f E m p lo y e e s
1600

A v e r a g e H o u rly R a te s
$ 4 .0 0

/

jjpr

^ 0

1300

1200

A v e r a g e h ourl y ra tes >
V

y
Emp l o y m e n t -

— 4

L

i

i




i

i

i

i

!

I

i

i

i

i

i

i

___ i ____ I____|j

I ___ t

I ___ I_____i ____i

of corresponding rates in Bell companies. Because of
longer average scheduled workweeks, weekly pay rates
of non-Bell clerical workers and switchboard operators
were closer to Bell averages than central office repair­
men; scheduled workweeks for craft jobs averaged about
the same in both carrier groups. (See text table 2.)

installation, and maintenance workers. Average hourly
earnings for numerically important job categories
included $2.71 for experienced switchboard operators,
$2.99 for nonsupervisory clerical employees, $3.93 for
cable splicers, $4 for central office repairmen, and $4.13
for exchange repairmen.
Regionally, average hourly earnings exceeded the
national level of $3.89 in the Pacific and Middle
Atlantic, where earnings averaged $4.12 an hour.
Averages in the remaining regions ranged from $3.89 in
the Great Lakes to $3.45 in the Southeast. The 40,118
employees of American Telephone and Telegraph Long
Lines and Central Office were not tabulated by region
and were included in the U.S. totals only; workers for
this company averaged $4.92 an hour.5
The regional spread in average wages varied by
occupation. Experienced switchboard operators had a
greater percent spread than nonsupervisory clerical
employees and central office repairmen. (See text table
i.)

Text table 2.
Relative pay levels of Bell and non-Bell
carriers (Bell Carriers = 100)
A verag e

C lerical e m p lo y e e s ,
................................
n o ns upe rv isory
E x p e rie n c e d s w itc h b o a rd
o p erato rs .............................................
C e n tra l o ffic e re p a irm e n ................
P B X a n d s ta tio n installers .............
E xch ang e re p a irm e n
.......................
L in e m e n
................................................

E x p e ri­

R eg ion
P acific

supervisory-

......................

M id d le A tla n tic
G re a t Lakes .............
N e w E ng land . . . .
Chesapeake
.............
M o u n t a i n ...................
N o r th C e n tra l . . . .
S o u th C e n tra l . . . .
S o u th e a s t
................

113
113
107
103
102
101
96
100
100

en ced
s w itc h ­
b o ard
op erato rs

C e n tra l
o ffic e
repairm en

120
120
113
110
107
107
105
107

108
102
102
103
102

100

100

104
103
102

Bell System companies employed 95 percent of the
workers in the study and at least 89 percent of those in
each region. Bell System companies usually covered an
entire State or group of States and were generally larger
than other companies. Fourteen of the 25 Bell carriers
employed at least 25,000 workers and the two largest
each employed about 100,000. In contrast, the largest of
the 31 non-Bell companies studied had only 6,500
employees and 18 of the 31 carriers had employments of
fewer than 500.
Average pay levels for occupational groups studied
separately were nearly always higher for Bell than for
non-Bell carriers. (See tables 2 and 3.) In the numerically
important occupational categories, average hourly pay
rates in non-Bell carriers ranged from 82 to 90 percent
5 Also included only in U.S. totals were non-Bell carriers in
Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and Alaska.




w e e k ly
rates

84

88

82

88
90

89
84
83
90

85
82
90

Trends in employm ent and pay rates . Total employ­
ment (except officials and managerial assistants) in­
creased by 41,469 workers or 5.2 percent in 1970. The
increase, amounting to 5 percent in Bell System com­
panies and 9 percent in non-Bell companies, was some­
what smaller than the record 8.5 percent set in 1969.
The employment level for all telephone carriers in
1970 was 50 percent higher than the 552,700 workers
recorded by the initial study in 1947. Since that time,
the employment trend has been generally upward except
for declines registered from 1957 to 1962, when
employment dropped from 681,600 to 596,300. This
decline resulted chiefly from the installation of new and
improved equipment which permitted a sharp reduction
in the number of telephone operators. From 1962,
employment gains have been reflected in nearly all major
categories, including telephone operators.
Growth in telephone-carrier employment between
1947 and 1970 has been accompanied by changes in the
occupational make up of the industry, as well as a
relative increase in the number of men employed. Men
constituted 33 percent of the employment in 1947
compared with 45 percent in 1970. As indicated in text
table 3, proportions of workers in major occupational
categories changed more during 1947-62 period than in
the 1962-70 period.
Wage levels in the Nation’s principal telephone com­
panies rose 7-1/2 percent in 1970—
one of the largest
increases recorded by the Bureau’s annual surveys of oc­
cupational pay rates in communications carriers. This
increase, nearly double the 4 percent in 1969, pushed
the average for all telephone workers (except officials
and managerial assistants) to $3.89 an hour in December
1970-209 percent above the $1.26 recorded in 1947.

Text table 1.
Relative pay levels by occupation and
region (Southeast = 100)

C lerical
em plo yees
(n o n ­

A verage

h o u rly
rates

O c c u p a tio n a l ca teg o ry

3

T e x t table 3. Num ber
1947-Decem ber 1970

and

percent o f

workers

in

major occupational

O c to b e r
1947

Ite m
T o ta l, all e m p lo y e e s :1*
Num ber
................................................................

5 5 2 ,7 0 0

O c to b e r
1957

categories, selected

dates, October

D ec e m b e r
1962

D ecem ber
1969

D ec e m b e r
1970

8 3 1 ,6 0 0

100

6 8 1 ,6 0 0
100

5 9 6 ,3 0 0
100

7 9 0 ,1 0 0

...................................................................

100

100

M en em p lo yee s ................................................................
P ercen t ...................................................................

1 7 9 ,7 0 0

2 6 7 ,3 0 0
39

3 4 8 ,3 0 0
44

3 7 4 ,4 0 0

33

2 6 2 ,1 0 0
44

5
17

7
21

8
22

10
22

10
22

46

35

28

27

26

23
9

27

30

30

11

11

11

31
11

P ercen t

45

P ercen t o f em plo yee s classified as:
Professional an d semi professional

. . . .

G e r i c a l .............................................................
T e le p h o n e o p e ra to rs .......................................
C o n s tru c tio n , in s ta lla tio n , a n d
m a in te n a n c e ................................................
A ll o th e r e m p lo y e e s ..........................................

1 E xcludes o ffic ia ls an d m anagerial assistants. (E m p lo y m e n t estim ates w ere ro u n d e d to th e nearest h u n d re d .)

An estimated 49 cents of the $2.63 increase during this
period, however, is due to changes in the occupational
composition of the work force.6 Since 1947, pay levels
for four important job categories have increased between
149 and 179 percent. (See text table 4.)

Text table 5. Regional pay relatives for selected periods
(National average = 100)

Text table 4. Average earnings in major job categories,
selected periods, and percent increase from 1947 to 1970

N e w E ng land . . . .
M id d le A tla n tic . .

J o b c a teg o ry

A verage h o u rly earnings
D ec e m b e r
O c to b e r O c to b e r
1947

Professional an d sem iprofessional e m ­
ployees .......................
N o n s u p erviso ry c le ri­
cal e m p lo yee s . . . .
E x p e rie n c e d s w itc h ­
b o ard o p erato rs . . .
C o n s tru c tio n , in s ta lla ­
tio n , an d m a in te ­
nance w o rk e rs . . . .

1957

1970

G re a t Lakes
C hesapeake

P ercen t

. . . .
. . . .

1 9 4 7 -7 0

$ 6 .7 7

149

1 .1 3

1 .9 2

2 .9 9

165

.9 7

1 .7 6

2 .7 1

179

1 .5 5

2 .8 4

4 .2 7

1969

102
104
104

100
106
103

101
105
100

98
106
100

101

99
87
92

96

97

87
94

91
92

91
96
106

89
93
90
94

86
89
88
89
107

P a c i f i c .......................
$ 4 .1 8

1957

S o u th C e n tra l . . .
M o u n t a i n ................

increase

$ 2 .7 2

O c to b e r

19 51

S o u t h e a s t ................
N o r th C e n tra l . . .

175

106

Decem ber

D ece m b er
1970

106

employees resulted from general wage adjustments under
collective bargaining agreements negotiated in 1968.
These agreements provided wage increases of $5.50 to
$6 a week for plant craftsmen and $3.50 to $4 for
telephone operators and clerical employees in 1970.8
Between 1951 and 1970, average earnings for Bell
System employees increased $2.30 an hour (from $1.63)
or 141 percent compared with $2.07 (from $1.14) or
182 percent for employees of other companies. The
average for Bell System employees exceeded that for

Regional relationships have changed little over the
years; the lowest average wages have been recorded in
the Southeast and the highest in the Pacific or Middle
Atlantic States. (See text table 5.)
In December 1970, Bell System employees averaged
$3.93 an hour—
7.7 percent over the previous year’s
average of $3.65. Employees of other companies
averaged $3.21, a gain of 8.1 percent over the 1969
average—
$2.97.7 Much of the increase for Bell System

8

A general wage increase of $23 to $25 a week was granted
to plant craftsmen and $16.50 to $18.50 a week to other
employees under terms o f 3-year collective bargaining agree­
ments effective in the spring or summer of 1971. Also effective
at that time were: (1) Reductions in the rate progression
schedules from 6 to 5 years for plant craftsmen and from 5 to 4
years for telephone employees; and (2) a “big cities” wage
allowance ranging from $5 to $9 a week to compensate for
higher living costs in 29 specified cities. These agreements,
covering employees of A. T. & T. Long Lines and operating Bell
companies, also provided for general wage increases and
cost-of-living adjustments in 1972 and 1973. (For more
information on the 1971 Bell System union settlements, see
Current Wage Developments, September 1 9 7 1 , No. 284, and
later issues.)

6Weighting occupational averages for 1970 by occupational
employment in 1947 results in an average of $3.40 an hour
instead of $3.89.
7The apparent anomaly of the 7.5-percent wage increase for
all carriers compared with the 7.7 and 8.1-percent advance for
its components is largely attributable to two factors: the
greater proportional rise o f employment in lower-paying nonBell companies than in Bell companies; and rounding of the
data used to compute the averages.




O c to b e r

R egion

4

employees of other companies by 49 cents or 43 percent
in 1951, and by 72 cents or 22 percent in 1970.9

Average hourly rates of pay for numerically impor­
tant occupational categories staffed largely by men were
$3.86 for linemen and cablemen, $4.07 for traffic
testing and regulating employees, and $4.26 for
subscribers’ equipment maintainers. Telephone oper­
ators averaged $2.81, while the hourly pay rate for
experienced non-Morse telegraph operators was $2.89.
Nonsupervisory clerical workers averaged $3.32.
Western Union’s messengers, nearly all male, consti­
tuted 10 percent of the company’s work force in
October 1970. Motor messengers averaged $2.75 an
hour, while working an average of 39.7 hours a week.
Walking and bicycle messengers, many of whom were
employed part-time, averaged $1.79, while averaging
29.1 hours a week.
Individual rates of the highest-paid workers exceeded
those of the lowest-paid by $2 an hour or more in most
of the nonmessenger occupational categories shown in
table 5. In a few cases, however, large proportions of
workers in the same occupation were concentrated
within comparatively narrow ranges. One-half of the
subscribers’ equipment maintainers, for example, were
paid between $4.50 and $4.75 an hour, and two-fifths of
the traffic managers, chief operators, supervisors and
instructors received between $3.50 and $3.75. All 911
walking and bicycle messengers had wage rates between
$1.60 and $2 an hour.
The 7.8 percent increase in average rates of pay for
nonmessenger employees between October 1969 and
October 1970 was the largest annual increase for these
workers since 1957-58, when an 8.1 percent increase was
recorded. Percent increases in average pay rates between
1969 and 1970 were not uniform among the oc­
cupational categories studied: 4 percent for clerical
employees, 6 percent for telegraph operators, 6 percent
for construction, installation and maintenance workers,
and 7 percent for professional and semi professional
employees. Average pay rates for motor messengers rose
8 percent and for walking and bicycle messengers, 7
percent. Changes in average pay rates reflect not only
general wage changes but also differences in the dis­
tributions of workers over rate ranges that apply J:o
most occupations. During periods of high labor turnover,
for example, average rates may be affected by a
disproportionate number of workers recently hired and
paid at the minimum rate for a given job.
Total employment (exclusive of officials and mana­
gerial assistants) decreased by 896 workers or 3.8
percent between October 1969 and October 1970.
Employment in most occupational categories declined;
messengers dropped 17 percent and telegraph operators
15 percent. Notable exceptions, however, to the overall
decline occurred among the professional and semiprofessional and clerical job categories, in which some

Western Union Company

Straight-time rates of pay for the 21,634 non­
messenger employees of the Western Union Co. (ex­
clusive of 391 officials and managerial assistants)
averaged $3.88 an hour in October 1970. (See table 5.)
The 1,339 motor messengers averaged $2.75 and the 911
walking and bicycle messengers, $1.79. Between October
1969 and October 1970, average rates of pay rose 7.8
percent for nonmessenger employees, 8.3 percent for
motor messengers, and 7.2 percent for walking and
bicycle messengers. These increases were largely the
result of collective bargaining agreements negotiated in
June 1968, which provided for a deferred wage adjust­
ment in June 1970.
Wage rates for Western Union employees are deter­
mined by collective bargaining agreements with the
United Telegraph Workers (UTW) in all cities except
New York, where the agreements are with the Com­
munication Workers of America (CWA). Effective June
1, 1970, all employees (except walking and bicycle
messengers) received a percentage increase based on their
rates of pay in effect May 31, 1968. In the UTW
bargaining unit, the increase was 6 percent; in the CWA
bargaining unit, 6.3 percent. All walking and bicycle
messengers who had 24 months or more of progression
credit were granted a 6-cents-an-hour raise.
Established wage-rate ranges are provided for all job
classifications covered by UTW and CWA agreements.
Advancements through the several progression steps are
automatic after specified periods of service for
employees meeting requirements for the job. Differences
between the starting and the maximum rates for some
occupations amounted to 75 cents or more. In UTW
contracts, rate ranges for most job classifications varied
by locality, according to the amount of business in each
office. Nationwide rates, however, applied to walking
and bicycle messengers.
Men, making up 56 percent of Western Union’s
nonmessenger employees in October 1970, were pre­
dominant among the professional and semi professional
employees, sales personnel, and construction, installa­
tion, and maintenance workers. On the other hand,
office clerical employees, and telegraph and telephone
operators were predominantly women.
9 Data for Bell System and non-Bell companies as reported to
FCC in prior years are not comparable with those reported
since 1951. (For more information on employment and
earnings trends in Bell System carriers from 1945 to 1965, see
“Employment and Wage Trends in Bell System Companies,
Monthly Labor R eview, March 1967, pp. 3841.)




5

significant increases were recorded. Such year to year
changes have brought about dramatic shifts in the
occupational composition opthe work force during the
23-year period covered by these surveys. (See text table

International telegraph carriers

Pay rates of the 5,407 employees in the five
international telegraph carriers covered by the study1 0
averaged $4.81 an hour in October 1970. (See table 6.)
This rise was 10.3 percent higher than the average
recorded 1 year earlier and compared with increases of
6.1 percent in 1969 and 7.3 percent in 1968. Employ­
ment, on the other hand, declined 2.1 percent during
1970 to' slightly below its October 1968 level of 5,424
employees.
Men, constituting slightly more than four-fifths of the
work force in October 1970, outnumbered women in
nearly all occupational categories for which wage data
were developed. Average hourly rates of pay for
numerically important jobs were $4.95 for mechanics
and maintenance technicians, $4.37 for teletypemultiplex operators, and $3.93 for cable operators.
Nonsupervisory clerical employees, accounting for twothirds of the women surveyed, averaged $3.90 an hour.
Included in the study are carriers engaged in nonvocal
international telegraph communications either by radio
or by ocean cable. Although many of the occupational
categories studied are common to both operations, some
are exclusive to one carrier group. For example, radio
operators and radiotelegraph riggers were reported only
by radio telegraph carriers; cable operators, on the other
hand, were employed only in ocean cable operations.

6 .)

Text table 6. Composition of work force for selected
periods
O c c u p a tio n a l grou p

1947

1960

1969

1970

5 3 ,1 0 7

2 7 ,0 4 2

2 4 ,7 8 0

2 3 ,8 8 4

T o ta l, all e m p lo y e e s :1
Num ber
P ercen t

100

100

100

100

2

4

6

7

agers ....................................
C lerica l e m p lo y e e s ...........
T e leg rap h o p erato rs . . . .
C o n s tru c tio n , in stalla­
t io n , and m a in te n a n c e

8
19
34

9
22

9
24

28

25

10
26
22

e m p lo y e e s .........................

13
3

18
5

23

23

6

6

18
3

12
4

5
3

4

P ercen t o f em plo yee s
classified as:
Professional and sem iprofessional ......................
T e leg rap h o ffic e super­
in te n d e n ts an d m a n ­

Messengers, m o t o r ...........
Messengers, w a lk in g and
b i c y c l e .................................
O t h e r s ....................................

1 °The study excluded 98 officials and assistants and
approximately 2,100 employees working outside the 48
conterminous States and District of Columbia.

3

1

E xcludes o ffic ia ls an d m anagerial assistants.




6

T a b l e 1. T e l e p h o n e C a r r i e r s :

P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s b y a v e r a g e h o u r l y r a t e s , 2 D e c e m b e r 1 9 7 0
N u m t e r of em p l Dyees

A v e ra g e

O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T o ta l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c ia l s a n d
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ______________________
P a r t t i m e __________________________________
F u ll t i m e __________________________________
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p l o y e e s -----------------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n _________________________________
O t h e r s ______________________________________
B u s i n e s s o f fic e a n d s a le s e m p l o y e e s ________
S u p e r v is o r s . _
_
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s _______________
C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ___
___ _
S u p e r v i s o r s ------------------------------------------------N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s _______________
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t ______________
T r a f f i c d e p a r t m e n t ____________________
P l a n t d e p a r t m e n t ________
A c c o u n tin g d e p a r t m e n t ________________
A ll o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s _________________
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s _________________________
C h ie f o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------S e r v ic e a s s i s t a n t s a n d i n s t r u c t o r s _______
E x p e r ie n c e d s w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s __
O p e r a to r s in t r a i n i n g _____________________
O th e r s w itc h b o a r d e m p lo y e e s
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a l l a t i o n , a n d
m a i n t e n a n c e e m p lo y e e s
F o r e m e n o f te le p h o n e c r a f t s m e n ________
C e n t r a l o f fic e c r a f t s m e n __________________
T e s t - b o a r d m e n a n d r e p e a t e r m e n ____
C e n t r a l o f fic e r e p a i r m e n _____________
O t h e r s __________________________________
I n s t a ll a ti o n a n d e x c h a n g e r e p a i r
c r a f t s m e n ------------------------------------------------P B X a n d s ta t io n i n s t a l l e r s ____________
E x c h a n g e r e p a i r m e n __________________
O t h e r s ---------------------------------------------------L i n e , c a b le , a n d c o n d u it c r a f t s m e n _____
L i n e m e n ------------------------------------------------C a b le s p l i c e r s ______
__
C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s _______________
O t h e r s ___________
L a b o r e r s ---------------------------------------------------B u ild in g , s u p p li e s , a n d m o to r v e h ic l e
e m p l o y e e s ____ _____________________________
F o r e m e n ___________________________________
M e c h a n i c s ______________
O th e r b u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s ________
O th e r s u p p lie s a n d m o to r v e h ic l e
e m p l o y e e s ------------------------------------------------A ll e m p lo y e e s n o t e ls e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d

M en

W o m en

P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v in g —

u le d
w e e k ly
llu u i s

8 3 1 ,5 5 7
3 5 ,0 5 8
7 9 6 ,4 9 9

3 7 4 ,3 6 3
5 ,0 0 2
3 6 9 ,3 6 1

4 5 7 ,1 9 4
3 0 ,0 5 6
4 2 7 ,1 3 8

38. 0
23. 6
38. 6

8 5 ,7 0 5
,3 ,499
8 2 ,2 0 6
6 5 ,9 8 8
1 2 ,8 8 2
5 3 ,1 0 6
1 8 0 ,4 1 6
1 3 ,9 1 7
1 6 6 ,4 9 9
3 1 ,8 0 3
2 4 ,2 2 9
4 8 ,6 7 4
3 5 ,1 9 3
2 6 ,6 0 0
2 1 3 ,6 1 4

6 3 ,4 9 8
791
6 2 ,7 0 7
1 8 ,7 2 7
6 ,0 3 7
1 2 ,6 9 0
1 4 ,3 8 8
3, 127

37. 8
38. 0
37. 8
37. 7
38. 0
37. 6
37. 6
38. 0
37. 6
37. 0
38. 2
38. 2
3 6 .9
37. 3
36. 1
38. 3
37. 8
36. 1
35. 0
38. 0

h o u r ly
ra te s 2

U nder
$ 1 .6 0

$ 3 .8 9
2 .8 4
3.92
X
6.77
3.08
6.9 2
4.1 1
5.96
3.66
3.13
4 .8 5
2.9 9
2.8 4
2.9 8
3.05

(3)
X
X
x

2.92

3.15
2.81
4 .5 5
3.34
2.71
2.4 4
3.10

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

3

2 2 ,2 0 7
2 ,7 0 8
1 9 ,4 9 9
4 7 ,2 6 1
6 ,8 4 5
4 0 ,4 1 6
1 6 6 ,0 2 8
1 0 ,7 9 0
1 5 5 ,2 3 8
3 1 ,0 0 6
2 4 , 153
4 1 ,9 1 5
3 3 ,3 7 1
2 4 ,7 9 3
2 1 3 ,2 3 8
1 1 ,0 6 7
1 4 ,9 3 0
1 4 0 ,0 4 2
4 5 ,0 6 1
2 , 138

2 5 8 ,3 9 2
3 8 ,0 6 6
8 6 ,7 0 7
1 8 ,8 9 5
6 3 ,4 6 8
4 , 344

25 6 , 119
3 8 ,0 1 0
8 4 ,5 8 7
1 8 ,7 1 7
6 1 ,6 5 2
4 ,2 1 8

2 ,2 7 3
56
2 , 120
178
1 ,8 1 6
126

3 9 .9
39. 8
39. 9
39. 9
39. 8
39. 8

4 .2 7
6.1 6
4 .0 4
4 .2 7
4 .0 0
3.59

_
_
_
_
-

90,822

9 0 ,7 4 8
4 2 ,3 1 6
2 3 ,2 6 8
2 5 ,1 6 4
4 2 ,7 6 8
1 3 ,6 6 9
2 5 ,2 5 0
2 ,4 7 4
1,3 7 5

74

3.96
3.86
4 .1 3
3.96
3.69
3.39
3.93
2.90
3.81
2.36

_
-

11,2 61

797
76
6 ,7 5 9
1 ,8 2 2
1,8 0 7
376
55
43
55

11,122

1 4 ,9 7 3
1 4 0 ,0 9 7
4 5 ,2 8 1
2, 141

220

6

6

-

39. 9
39. 9
3 9 .9
3 9 .9
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
39. 7
39. 7

2 4 ,4 2 7
3, 108
3 ,7 7 0
1 0 ,9 1 8

1 8 ,8 0 0
2 ,7 5 1
3 ,7 5 6
5 ,7 8 2

5 ,6 2 7
357
14
5 , 136

38. 2
39. 3
39. 6
36. 6

3.53
5.84
4 .0 5
2 .7 0

6 ,6 3 1
3 ,0 1 5

6 ,5 1 1
2 ,4 5 5

120

3 9 .4
3 8 .4

3.41
4 .3 8

4 2 ,3 2 4
2 3 ,3 0 3
2 5 ,1 9 5
4 2 ,7 9 1
1 3 ,6 7 4
2 5 ,2 5 2
2 ,4 7 4
1, 391

8

35
31
23
5
2
16

560

1 C o v e r s 56 te le p h o n e c a r r i e r s w h ich h a v e a n n u a l o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
o r th ro u g h c o n n e c tio n w ith t h o s e o f a n o th e r c a r r i e r u n d e r d i r e c t o r i n d ir e c t c o m m o n c o n tr o l.
S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e f in itio n o f h o u r s a n d r a t e s u s e d in th is b u lle tin .
3 L e s s th a n 0. 05 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

X in d ic a te s th a t th e s e d a ta w e re n o t c o lle c te d .




B e c a u s e o f ro u n d in g ,

su m s

(3)
(3)
_
_
(3)
(3)
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-

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$ 1 .6 0
and
under
$ 1 .8 0

$2 . 0 0

$ 2 .2 5

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$ 2 .7 5

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

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-

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over

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X

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2. 5
23. 6
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17. 8
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40. 0

1. 6
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2
8

T h e s e c a r r i e r s a r e e n g a g e d in i n t e r s t a t e o r f o r e ig n c o m m u n ic a tio n s e r v i c e u s in g t h e i r own f a c i li t ie s

o f in d iv id u a l i t e m s

m ay not equal

100.

T a b l e 2 . B e l l S y s t e m T e l e p h o n e C a r r i e r s : 1 P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s
by a v e r a g e h o u rly ra te s ,2 D e c e m b e r 1 9 7 0
N u m b e r of e m p lo y e e s

A v e ra g e
sched­
u le d
w e e k ly
h o u rs

O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T o ta l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c ia l s a n d
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ______________________
P a r t t i m e ----------------------------------------------------F u l l t i m e ----------------------------------------------------P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p l o y e e s -----------------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n __________________________________
O t h e r s ---------------------------------------------------------B u s i n e s s o f fic e a n d s a l e s e m p l o y e e s -----------S u p e r v i s o r s ------------------------------------------------N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s ----------------------C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ----------------------------------------S u p e r v i s o r s ------------------------------------------------N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s _______________
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t ---------------------T r a f f ic d e p a r t m e n t ------------------------------P l a n t d e p a r t m e n t ----------------------------------A c c o u n tin g d e p a r t m e n t ------------------------A ll o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s _________________
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s --------------------------------------C h ie f o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------S e r v ic e a s s i s t a n t s a n d i n s t r u c t o r s ----------E x p e r ie n c e d s w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s -------O p e r a t o r s in t r a i n i n g -------------------------------O th e r s w i tc h b o a r d e m p l o y e e s ____________
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a l l a t i o n , a n d
m a in te n a n c e e m p l o y e e s ------------------------------F o r e m e n of te le p h o n e c r a f t s m e n ------------C e n t r a l o f fic e c r a f t s m e n --------------------------T e s t - b o a r d m e n a n d r e p e a t e r m e n ------C e n t r a l o ffic e r e p a i r m e n --------------------O t h e r s ----------------------------------------------------I n s t a ll a ti o n a n d e x c h a n g e r e p a i r
c r a f t s m e n ------------------------------------------------P B X a n d s ta t io n i n s t a l l e r s ____________
E x c h a n g e r e p a i r m e n ----------------------------O t h e r s ----------------------------------------------------L i n e , c a b le , a nd c o n d u it c r a f t s m e n -------L i n e m e n ------------------------------------------------C a b le s p l i c e r s --------------------------------------C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s ----------------------O t h e r s ----------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s ---------------------------------------------------B u ild in g , s u p p li e s , a n d m o to r v e h ic le
e m p l o y e e s -----------------------------------------------------F o r e m e n -----------------------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s --------------------------------------------------O th e r b u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s -----------O th e r s u p p lie s a n d m o to r v e h ic le
e m p l o y e e s ------------------------------------------------A ll e m p lo y e e s not e ls e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d -------

W om en

M en

P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v in g —
A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
ra te s 1
2

7 8 7 ,0 8 4
2 9 ,4 2 0
7 5 7 ,6 6 4

3 5 1 ,4 1 1
2 ,2 2 4
3 4 9 ,1 8 7

4 3 5 ,6 7 3
2 7 ,1 9 6
4 0 8 ,4 7 7

37. 9
21. 3
38. 5

8 1 ,3 0 3
3 ,1 1 1
7 8 , 192
6 3 ,2 2 3
1 2 ,4 3 3
5 0 ,7 9 0
1 7 3 ,1 3 7
1 3 ,5 1 0
1 5 9 ,6 2 7
3 0 ,7 3 6
2 3 ,4 1 1
4 6 ,7 2 4
3 3 ,8 8 4
2 4 ,8 7 2
2 0 2 ,1 3 0
1 0 ,5 8 5
1 4 ,3 4 4
1 3 0 ,2 4 3
4 4 ,8 6 0
2 ,0 9 8

5 9 ,9 0 0
547
5 9 ,3 5 3
18, 191
5 ,8 1 3
1 2 ,3 7 8
1 3 ,6 0 8
2 ,9 1 5
1 0 ,6 9 3
753
54
6 ,6 1 6
1 ,7 1 8
1 ,5 5 2
304
41
41
4
216
2

2 1 ,4 0 3
2 ,5 6 4
1 8 ,8 3 9
4 5 ,0 3 2
6 ,6 2 0
3 8 ,4 1 2
1 5 9 ,5 2 9
1 0 ,5 9 5
1 4 8 ,9 3 4
2 9 ,9 8 3
2 3 ,3 5 7
4 0 ,1 0 8
3 2 ,1 6 6
2 3 ,3 2 0
2 0 1 ,8 2 6
1 0 ,5 4 4
1 4 ,3 0 3
1 3 0 ,2 3 9
4 4 ,6 4 4
2 ,0 9 6

37. 7
37. 8
37. 7
37. 6
38. 0
37. 5
37. 5
37. 9
37. 5
37. 0
38. 2
38. 2
36. 8
37. 1
36. 0
38. 3
37. 7
3 5 .9
35. 0
38. 1

3.70
3.16
4 .8 7
3.01
2.85
3.00
3.07
2.94
3.19
2.84
4 .5 9
3.36
2.75
2.44
3.11

2 4 1 ,5 9 9
3 6 ,0 8 8
8 1 ,2 9 7
1 8 ,2 8 3
6 0 ,2 5 6
2 ,7 5 8

2 3 9 ,5 9 2
3 6 ,0 5 0
7 9 ,3 6 4
1 8 ,1 4 4
5 8 ,4 8 7
2 ,7 3 3

2 ,0 0 7
38
1 ,9 3 3
139
1 ,7 6 9
25

3 9 .9
39. 8
39. 9
3 9 .9
39. 8
40. 0

8 4 ,6 6 3
3 9 ,7 7 9
2 2 ,0 7 3
2 2 ,8 1 1
3 9 ,5 5 1
1 2 ,1 3 7
2 3 ,7 6 6
2 ,3 5 3
1 ,2 9 5
-

8 4 ,6 4 3
3 9 ,7 7 2
2 2 ,0 7 1
2 2 ,8 0 0
3 9 ,5 3 5
1 2 ,1 3 7
2 3 ,7 6 6
2, 353
1 ,2 7 9
-

20

2 2 ,9 1 3
2 ,9 6 8
3 ,6 0 6
1 0 ,2 3 6

1 7 ,5 4 0
2 ,6 1 4
3 ,6 0 6
5 ,2 9 8

5, 373
354

, 103
2 ,7 7 9

6

6,022

2 ,2 7 6

7
2
11

16
16

-

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4 ,9 3 8
81
503

$ 3 .9 3
2.6 4
3.96

U nder
$1.60

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and
under
$ 1 .8 0

X
X

$ 1 .8 0

$2 . 0 0

$ 2 .2 5

$ 2 .5 0

$2 .7 5

$3.0 0

$3.25

$3.5 0

$3.75

$4.0 0

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$4.50

$4.75

$2 . 0 0

$ 2 .2 5

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 5

$ 3 .0 0

$3.25

$3.5 0

$3.75

$4.0 0

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$4.50

$4.75

over

10. 7

13. 7
x

a nd

-

0. 3

5. 2

X

X
X

X
X

X

_
_
-

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_
. 1
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39. 9
3 9 .9
40. 0
39. 9
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
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3.90
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3.73
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3.92
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_
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38. 1
39. 3
39. 6
36. 5

3.56
5.89
4 .0 8
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-

6.88

3.07
7.0 3
4 .1 6
6.02

4.31
6.22

3.43
4 .4 2

39. 4
38. 3

NOTE:

X in d ic a te s th a t th e s e d a ta w e re n o t c o lle c te d .




B e c a u s e of ro u n d in g ,

su m s

X

X
X

X

9.

8
X

6

.

8

X

X

X

4. 4
x
X

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11. 0
15. 8
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2. 4
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25. 8
31. 5
27. 7
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1. 5
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10. 5
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1.

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3. 7
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4 .6

1 C o v e r s 25 B e ll S y s te m te le p h o n e c a r r i e r s w h ic h h a v e a n n u a l o p e ra tin g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
ow n f a c i l i t i e s o r th r o u g h c o n n e c tio n w ith th o s e o f a n o th e r c a r r i e r u n d e r d i r e c t o r i n d ir e c t c o m m o n c o n tr o l.
2 S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e f in itio n o f h o u r s a n d r a t e s u s e d in th is b u lle tin .

o f in d iv id u a l ite m s

.4
8 .9

7. 3
X

.1

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_
1. 0
6. 7

_

1
1

13.

2

6

6

8

6

6

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0

1. 3
2 .4
1. 3
5. 5
3. 4
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4. 5
5. 8
4. 3
3 .4
3. 1
3. 6
5. 5
6 . 6
3 .9
7. 9
8 . 0
4. 5
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6. 2
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6

4. 4

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X

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1

X
X

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19. 5
X

x

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1. 5
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10. 7
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1. 2
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10. 9
5. 9
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1. 0

2. 7
1. 8
2. 7
2. 5
6 .4
1. 6
2. 9
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2. 2
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1 1 .7
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11.
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.
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13. 7
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1. 7
2. 7
1. 6
4. 6
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4. 6
2. 9
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1. 6
1. 8
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2. 1
4. 9
4. 6
10. 9
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5. 8
6. 6
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6

6

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2

2
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3
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1.6

2
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5. 7
7. 3

2. 9
7. 4

81. 9
5. 2
85. 0
27. 4
72. 0
16. 5
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49. 0
1. 8
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4. 9
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11.0

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42. 0

T h e s e c a r r i e r s a r e e n g a g e d in i n t e r s t a t e o r f o r e ig n c o m m u n ic a tio n s e r v i c e u s in g t h e i r

m ay not equal

100.

T a b l e 3 . N o n - B e l l T e l e p h o n e C a r r i e r s : 1 P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s
by a v e r a g e h o u rly ra te s ,2 D e c e m b e r 1 9 7 0
N u m b e r of em plc y e e s
O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T o ta l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c ia l s a n d
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ______________________
4 4 ,4 7 3
............. . ....
P a r t tim e . _
.
5 ,6 3 8
F u l l t im e _ ....
_
. .
3 8 ,8 3 5
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s ___________________________________
4 ,4 0 2
D r a f ts m e n _________________________________
388
O t h e r s ---------------------------------------------------------4 , 014
B u s i n e s s o ffic e a n d s a le s e m p lo y e e s
_ ....
2, 765
S u p e r v i s o r s ________________________________
449
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s
2 ,3 1 6
C l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s
_
7, 279
S u p e r v i s o r s ________________________________
40 7
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s
6 ,8 7 2
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t ______________
1 ,0 6 7
T r a f f i c d e p a r t m e n t ____________________
818
P l a n t d e p a r t m e n t _______________________
1 ,9 5 0
A c c o u n tin g d e p a r t m e n t _ .
1 ,3 0 9
A ll o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s _________________
1, 728
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s _________________________
1 1 ,4 8 4
C h ie f o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
537
S e r v ic e a s s i s t a n t s a n d i n s t r u c t o r s _______
629
E x p e r ie n c e d s w itc h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s ....
9, 854
O p e r a to r s in t r a i n i n g _____________________
421
O th e r s w i tc h b o a r d e m p l o y e e s ____________
43
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a l l a t i o n , a n d
m a in te n a n c e e m p l o y e e s ____________________
1 6 ,7 9 3
F o r e m e n of te le p h o n e c r a f t s m e n ________
1 ,9 7 8
C e n t r a l o f fic e c r a f ts m e n ..............
5 ,4 1 0
T e s t - b o a r d m e n a n d r e p e a t e r m e n ____
612
C e n t r a l o ffic e r e p a i r m e n _____________
3 ,2 1 2
O th e rs
..............
1 ,5 8 6
I n s t a ll a ti o n a n d e x c h a n g e r e p a i r
c r a f t s m e n ________________________________
6, 159
PB X a n d s ta t io n i n s t a l l e r s ____________
2, 545
E x c h a n g e r e p a i r m e n __________________
1 ,2 3 0
O t h e r s __________________________________
2, 384
L in e , c a b le , a n d c o n d u it c r a f t s m e n _____
3, 240
L in e m e n _
1 ,5 3 7
C a b le s p l i c e r s _______________________
1 ,4 8 6
C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s _______________
121
O t h e r ____________________________
_ _
96
L a b o r e r s ___________________________ _
6
B u ild in g , s u p p li e s , a n d m o to r v e h ic le
e m p lo y e e s ___________________________________
1 ,5 1 4
F o r e m e n __________________________________
140
M e c h a n ic s ______________________________________________
164
O th e r b u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p lo y e e s „
682
O th e r s u p p lie s a n d m o to r v e h ic le
e m p l o y e e s ........... _
528
A ll e m p lo y e e s n o t e ls e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d ______
236

M en

W o m en

A v erag e
sc h e d ­ A v e ra g e
u le d
h o u r ly
w e e k ly
ra te s 2
h o u rs

P e r c e n t of e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g —
U nder
$ 1 .6 0

$ 1 .6 0
and
under
$ 1 .8 0

2 2 ,9 5 2
2, 778
2 0 ,1 7 4

2 1 ,5 2 1
2, 860
18, 661

39 .4
35.2
4 0 .0

$ 3 .2 1
3 .4 8
3 .1 8

(3 )

3 ,5 9 8
244
3 ,3 5 4
536
224
312
780
212
568
44
22

39.6
39.6
39.6
39 .5
4 0 .0
39 .4
39.3
39.9
39.2
37.9
39.3
39.3
39 .4
3 9 .7
38 .7
4 0 .0
4 0 .5
38.5
39.5
35.3

4 .8 0
3.16
4 .9 1
2.9 9
4 .4 0
2.71
2.63
4 .1 7
2.53
2 .4 4
2.56
2 .5 0
2.51
2.6 3
2.36
3 .7 0
2.9 4
2.25
2 .2 2
2.73

0.1
.1
(3 )
(3 )

1 6 ,5 2 7
1 ,9 6 0
5, 223
573
3, 165
1,4 8 5

266
18
187
39
47
101

3 9 .8
39.9
39 .8
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
39 .4

3.66
5 .1 0
3 .5 9
3 .7 4
3.5 9
3 .5 2

6, 105
2, 544
1, 197
2, 364
3, 233
1, 532
1 ,4 8 4
121
96
6

54
1
33
20
7
5
2
-

39 .8
4 0 .0
39 .4
39.9
39 .8
39.9
3 9 .7
4 0 .2
4 0 .0
39 .7

3 .4 7
3.2 9
3 .4 8
3 .6 7
3 .2 7
3.0 8
3 .6 0
2.33
2.33
2.36

1, 260
137
150
484

254
3
14
198

38 .8
39.3
40.1
37.8

2.95
4 .6 7
3 .3 4
2 .3 2

489
179

39
57

39.6
40.3

3.1 5
3.91

143
104

X in d ic a te s th a t th e s e d a ta w e re n o t c o lle c te d .




B ecau se

of ro u n d in g ,

su m s

$ 2 .2 5

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 5

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .2 5

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 5

$4.0 0

$ 4 .2 5

$ 4 .5 0

$ 4 .7 5

$ 2 .2 5

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 5

$ 3 .0 0

$ 3 .2 5

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 5

$ 4 .0 0

$4.25

$ 4 .5 0

$4.75

over

9 .8

5.3

4.3

5.2

6 .0

6.7

4 .8

3.0

9.5

x

x

x

and

1.8
x

12.5

11.8

X

X
X

X
X

.1
_
_
_
_

1.6
2 .7
1.1
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1.8
1.8
4 .2
_
4 .3
13.3
_

.4
4 .9
_
12.2
_
14.6
13.2
.2
14.0
12.6
8.2
16.6
14.9
14.1
28 .4
_
1.9
32.1
20 .2
9.3

1.4
10.8
.5
11.0
13.1
16.4
_
17.3
2 2 .8
15.3
18.4
19.6
12.1
16.5
.7
5.1
18.7
3.1
4 .7

2.6
5 .7
2.3
11.4
_
13.6
18.1
1.7
19.1
22 .6
22 .5
20 .6
14.3
17.4
22.1
5 .0
12.2
2 1 .9
6 2 .0
34 .9

3 .7
10.8
3.0
19.7
6 .2
22 .4
19.5
2.9
20.5
16.9
26.4
22 .0
20.6
18.2
14.8
6.5
16.7
15.7
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7.0

_
_
_
_
-

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_
1.3
.2
1.7
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1.3
_
1.7
1.5
2 .0
1.1

3 .7
_
3.1
3 .8
2 .8
3 .7

6 .3
.3
5 .2
5 .2
4 .6
6.3

_

.4
.8
_
.1
1.3
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2.1
_
4 .2
_

1.3
3.0
_
.3
1.4
1.1
1.1
7.4
3.1
_

3.5
6.6
1.1
1.4
7.0
7.9
1.0
3 7 .2
4 9 .0
33.3

9 .2

X
X

11.1
X

X

X

-

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

2.6

X

8.0
X
X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

5.3
20.6
3 .8
13.0
9 .4
13.7
12.2
4 .7
12.7
12.5
13.0
8 .8
16.0
14.5
7.0
8 .0
25 .4
6 .0
1.0
11.6

2.8
8.0
2.3
5.5
6.2
5.4
6.6
10.6
6.4
6.6
8.2
5.0
4 .8
8.2
2.3
9.7
16.4
1.1
_
11.6

3.6
6 .7
3.3
4 .7
6 .7
4 .4
3.5
9.1
3.1
1.2
1.7
1.4
4 .0
6.3
1.5
13.4
15.1
_
_
18.6

4 .1
6 .4
3.9
1.5
5.3
.8
2.1
7.6
1.8
1.5
1.6
1.6
1.2
2.5
.9
14.2
3.0
.1
_
2.3

4.3
13.1
3.4
2.3
6 .7
1.4
1.3
8.8
.9
.4
.5
1.0
.6
1.5
.7
11.9
2.9
_

_

7.4
.6
5.2
3.4
4 .5
7.3

6 .9
1.3
6 .7
4 .1
6 .4
8.2

7.4
2.1
7.7
4.1
7.7
9.3

6 .7
1.7
7.7
4.1
7.5
9.4

10.1
1.7
11.3
11.6
12.4
9.2

12.5
4.3
14.2
19.8
14.5
11.6

6.1
11.0
4 .1
1.8
12.2
16.5
4 .5
3 6 .4
33.3
5 0 .0

10.2
11.1
12.3
8.1
9 .8
14.7
5.3
7.4
2.1
16.7

8.3
7.6
8.7
8 .7
8.1
9 .8
7.0
6 .6

6 .8
5.4
11.0
6.2
7.8
8.8
7.9
.8
1.0
_

13.2
18.7
6 .7
10.7
7.0
5.3
9.9

_

7.8
5.5
14.5
6 .7
9.5
9 .8
10.0
4.1
2.1
_

5.2
4 .4
5.3
2.4
6.0
1.7
1.2
9.1
.7
.1
.2
1.2
.3
1.0
.4
8.9
.5

7.5
1.5
8.0
2.3
5.8
1.6
1.3
10.1
.8

.2
.6
.8
1.0
.3
6.7
.2

.6
1.7
.4
.5
.2
4 .7
.2

14.8
7.0
16.6
19.4
17.5
13.6

9.4
6.0
14.3
10.5
14.9
14.4

4 .7
10.2
4 .4
12.4
3.1
3.8

8.2
6 4.8
.6

13.9
8.8
21.1
15.5
12.1
10.7
15.2

17.0
8.8
9.2
29.9
12.2
11.2
14.8

6.3
9.4
1.5
5.6
9.0
3.5
15.5

4.3
2.9
9.8
2.8
2.6
.1
5.5

1.0
.4

_

1.0

1.0

3.1
2.3
10.0
8.5

5.5
16.9

16.8
.7
6 .7
3 0 .4

14.3
.7
4 .3
2 1 .8

12.2
1.4
6 .7
15.2

6.3
1.4
11.6
2 .8

6.0
2.9
3 .7
3 .7

4 .4
3.6
8.5
2.2

7.7
7.1
12.8
.7

7.6
7.1
11.0
.9

5.0
7.1
17.7

.2
“

3.0
2.1

6.6
18.2

11.2
6 .4

12.7
7.6

10.4
5.1

10.6
1.7

6.3
5.5

15.2
5.9

15.3
5.1

6.8
2.5

_

o f in d iv id u a l it e m s

x

7.0
2.1
7.4
2.9
8.5
1.8
1.0
7.6
.6

1.8
5.1

-

1 C o v e r s 31 n o n - B e ll t e le p h o n e c a r r i e r s w h ic h h a v e a n n u a l o p e r a tin g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
f a c i l i t i e s o r t h r o u g h c o n n e c tio n w ith th o s e of a n o th e r c a r r i e r u n d e r d i r e c t o r i n d i r e c t c o m m o n c o n tr o l.
2 S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e fin itio n of h o u r s a n d r a t e s u s e d in t h i s b u lle tin .
3 L e s s t h a n 0.0 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

$ 2 .0 0

$ 2 .0 0

.1
1.0
_
1.4
1.7
1.5

255
72
14
2
51
4
1

804
144
660
2, 229
225
2, 004
6 ,4 9 9
195
6, 304
1, 023
796
1 ,8 0 7
1 ,2 0 5
1 ,4 7 3
1 1 ,4 1 2
523
627
9, 803
417
42

$ 1 .8 0

.1

1.2
10.7
1.2

52.0
3.9
56.7
9.5
39.0
3 .8
2.0
27.5
.5
.3
.4
.4
.7
.8
.5
10.2
.5

.5
1.1

2.1
.2
.1
.2

4.5
47.1

. 1

1.3
16.5

9.7

.4
13.6

T h e s e c a r r i e r s a r e e n g a g e d in i n t e r s t a t e o r f o r e ig n c o m m u n ic a tio n s e r v i c e u s in g t h e i r own

m ay not eq u al

100.

T a b l e 4 . A l l 1 a n d B e l l S y s t e m T e l e p h o n e C a r r i e r s : A v e r a g e h o u r l y r a t e s 2 o f e m p l o y e e s in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s
by reg ion s, D e c e m b e r 1 9 7 0
U n ite d S t a te s 3
O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

N ew E n g la n d
N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

M id d le A tla n tic
N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

G reat L akes
N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v er­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

C h esapeake
N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

S o u th e a s t
N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

N o rth C e n tra l

S o u th C e n t r a l

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

M o u n ta in
N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

P a c if i c

A v e r­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

N um ­
ber
of
w o rk ­
e rs

A v er­
age
h o u r ly
ra te s

A ll c a r r i e r s
A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c ia l s
a n d m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s 4 ---- 8 3 1 ,5 5 7
C a b le s p l i c e r s _______________
2 5 ,2 5 2
2 ,4 7 4
C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s -------C e n t r a l o f fic e r e p a i r m e n ------ 6 3 ,4 6 8
C l e r i c a l ( n o n s u p e r v is o r y ) ------ 1 6 6 ,4 9 9
2 3 ,3 0 3
E x c h a n g e r e p a i r m e n ------------E x p e r ie n c e d s w i tc h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------ 1 4 0 ,0 9 7
L i n e m e n ---------------------------------- 1 3 ,6 7 4
M e c h a n ic s , b u ild in g a n d
m o to r v e h ic le s e r v i c e -------2 1 ,3 1 9
P B X a n d s ta t io n i n s t a l l e r s —
4 2 ,3 2 4
T e s t- b o a rd m en and
r e p e a t e r m e n ------------------------1 8 ,8 9 5

$ 3 .8 9
3.93
2 .9 0
4 .0 0
2 .9 9
4 .1 3

6 0 ,1 5 0
1 ,7 6 9
520
3 ,2 1 0
1 2 ,2 6 5
812

$3.80
3.93
2.99
4 .0 0
2.87
4 .0 5

1 6 9 ,2 6 9
5 ,6 4 3
536
1 3 ,5 0 8
3 4 ,5 9 2
6 ,2 5 5

$4.12
3.92
2 .9 9
3.97
3.16
4 .0 5

1 4 2 ,2 5 0
4 , 378
340
9 ,9 5 3
2 7 ,4 0 3
5 ,7 8 6

$3 .8 9
3.92
2.89
3.96
2.98
4 .1 8

4 6 ,7 1 9
1 ,5 1 7
109
3 ,5 2 3
9 ,6 4 0
822

$ 3 .7 6
4 .0 7
3.04
3.95
2.8 5
4 .3 3

1 0 5 ,9 8 1
4 ,2 1 0
348
6 ,9 6 8
1 8 ,5 4 8
2 ,7 0 6

$3 .4 5
3.97
2 .8 3
3.88
2.79
3.79

2 6 ,8 1 5
980

4.01
2.68
4 .1 4

7 6 ,4 5 6
1 ,5 9 7
479
6 ,2 7 2
1 2 ,8 1 3
2 ,5 8 2

$3.52
3.67
2.76
3.95
2.79
4 .3 3

3 3 ,9 3 4
844
2 ,0 3 9
7 ,5 1 4
649

$3.6 4
3.83
4 .0 2
2 .80
4 .2 0

1 ,8 9 6
5, 344
403

2.71
3.39

1 0 ,2 1 6
1 ,0 9 9

2.69
3.64

2 5 ,1 8 5
2, 550

2 .9 5
3.57

2 4 ,1 4 6
2, 356

2.76
3.38

7 ,9 5 7
855

2.6 2
3.11

2 2 ,0 0 8
2 , 234

2.45
3.16

4 ,9 0 8
573

2.57
3.18

1 6 ,7 2 9
1 ,6 7 1

2.62
3.15

5 ,5 9 8
638

2.61
3.34

18, 672
1 ,5 0 0

2.93
3.79

3.16
3.86

2 , 117
1 ,8 1 2

3.01
3.78

5 ,2 9 1
1 0 ,7 6 4

3.35
3.98

5, 121
8 ,8 8 5

3.17
3.84

1 ,3 8 2
2 ,2 8 4

2.9 9
3.73

1 ,5 4 7
5 , 144

2.8 9
3.57

774
895

2 .98
4 .09

1 ,2 3 6
5 ,1 1 2

2.84
3.85

765
1 ,2 9 5

2.92
3.83

2 ,6 2 8
5 ,7 6 0

3.40
4 .1 0

4 .2 7

1, 186

4 .2 0

2 ,7 9 3

4 .4 1

2 ,2 1 8

4 .3 5

708

4 .3 8

2 , 323

4 .1 5

273

4 .27

1 ,0 6 3

4 .2 9

512

4 .3 0

2, 120

4 .49

3.63
3.75

3.57
3.72
2.85
3.96
2.83
4 .3 3

3 3 ,9 3 4
844

3.64
3.83

2 ,0 3 9
7 ,5 1 4
649

4 .0 2
2.80
4 .2 0

1 1 4 ,9 3 2
3, 342
23
9, 170
2 7 ,0 6 6
2 ,8 1 7

4 .15
4 .08
3.54
4 .19
3.17
4 .38

-

$3.6 3
3.75
-

1 2 2,231 $4.12
3 ,5 7 0 4.09
26
3.48
9 ,7 8 3
4.19
2 8 ,0 6 3
3.16
2, 864 4 .37

B e ll S y s te m c a r r i e r s
A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f ic ia ls
a n d m a n a g e r ia l a s s i s t a n t s 4 ---- 7 8 7 ,0 8 4
C a b le s p l i c e r s ------------------------ 2 3 ,7 6 6
2, 353
C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s _____
C e n t r a l o f fic e r e p a i r m e n ____ 6 0 ,2 5 6
1 5 9 ,6 2 7
C l e r i c a l ( n o n s u p e r v is o r y ) -----2 2 ,0 7 3
E x c h a n g e r e p a i r m e n ------------E x p e r ie n c e d s w itc h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------ 1 3 0 ,2 4 3
L i n e m e n ---------------------------------- 1 2 ,1 3 7
M e c h a n ic s , b u ild in g a n d
m o to r v e h ic le s e r v i c e -------1 9 ,9 4 5
P B X a n d s ta t io n i n s t a l l e r s —
3 9 ,7 7 9
T e s t - b o a r d m e n a nd
1 8 ,2 8 3
r e p e a t e r m e n -------------------------

3.9 3
3.95
2 .9 3
4 .0 3
3.01
4 .1 7

6 0 , 118
1 ,7 6 7
520
3, 206
1 2 ,2 5 4
812

3.80
3.93
2.99
4 .0 0
2.87
4 .0 5

1 6 8 ,0 3 4
5 ,5 9 0
536
1 3 ,3 8 3
3 4 ,3 5 7
6 ,2 5 5

4 .1 3
3.93
2.9 9
3.98
3.17
4 .0 5

1 2 6 ,2 6 0
3 ,8 0 8
320
8 ,7 8 8
2 5 ,1 3 7
5, 104

3.98
3.96
2.9 2
4 .0 0
3.02
4 .2 8

4 3 ,2 0 6
1 ,4 0 5
108
3, 177
8 ,9 5 2
822

3.84
4 .1 3
3.04
4 .0 2
2.89
4 .3 3

1 0 3 ,8 4 4
4 , 174
335
6 ,7 8 7
1 8 ,1 5 4
2 ,6 6 1

3.46
3.97
2.8 6
3.89
2.79
3.80

2 6 ,6 6 5
980
1 ,8 9 6
5 , 327
384

4.01
2.68
4 .1 7

6 9 ,9 9 5
1 ,4 3 6
397
6 ,0 3 3
1 1 ,8 7 2
2 ,5 6 9

2 .7 5
3.4 3

1 0 ,2 1 6
1 ,0 9 4

2.69
3.64

2 4 ,8 5 6
2 ,4 9 1

2.9 5
3.58

2 0 ,2 9 9
1 ,8 1 1

2.86
3.43

7 ,0 4 3
706

2.7 0
3.25

2 1 ,5 2 3
2, 169

2.4 5
3.17

4 ,8 7 0
566

2.57
3.19

1 5 ,2 3 2
1, 373

2.68
3.28

5 ,5 9 8
638

2.61
3.34

17,0 1 6
1 ,2 2 7

2.97
3.79

3.19
3.9 0

2 , 116
1 ,8 0 7

3.01
3.78

5 ,2 4 3
1 0 ,6 3 5

3.36
3.98

4 ,5 6 1
8 ,4 3 1

3.21
3.85

1 ,2 7 6
1 ,8 8 7

3.06
3.87

1 ,4 6 8
4 ,9 2 6

2.9 2
3.59

769
895

2.98
4 .0 9

1 ,0 4 0
4 ,4 0 4

2.91
3.96

765
1 ,2 9 5

2.92
3.83

2 ,4 2 9
5 ,4 9 7

3.40
4 .1 0

4 .2 9

1, 186

4 .2 0

2 ,7 8 0

4.41

1 ,9 8 3

4 .4 3

675

4 .4 2

2 , 262

4 .1 7

273

4 .2 7

994

4 .3 2

512

4 .3 0

2 ,0 0 8

4 .5 0

-

-

-

-

1 C o v e r s t e le p h o n e c a r r i e r s w h ic h h a v e a n n u a l o p e r a tin g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
2 S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e f in itio n o f h o u r s a n d r a t e s u s e d in th is b u lle tin .
3 I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r e m p lo y e e s in A l a s k a , H a w a ii, P u e r to R ic o , a n d V ir g in I s la n d s ; a n d l o n g - l in e s e m p lo y e e s o f th e A m e r i c a n T e le p h o n e a n d T e l e g r a p h C o. w h ic h a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m th e r e g io n a l
t a b u l a ti o n s .
( F o r s c o p e o f s u r v e y , s e e a p p e n d ix .)
4 I n c lu d e s e m p lo y e e s in o c c u p a tio n s in a d d itio n to th o s e sh o w n s e p a r a te l y .
NOTE;
F o r p u r p o s e s o f th is s tu d y , th e r e g io n s f o r w h ic h s e p a r a t e d a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d in c lu d e : N ew E n g la n d — C o n n e c tic u t, M a in e , M a s s a c h u s e t t s , N ew H a m p s h ir e , R h o d e I s l a n d , a nd V e rm o n t;
M id d le A tla n tic — D e l a w a r e , N ew J e r s e y , N e w Y o r k , a n d P e n n s y lv a n ia ; G r e a t L a k e s — I ll in o i s , I n d ia n a , M ic h ig a n , O h io , a n d W is c o n s in ; C h e s a p e a k e — D i s t r i c t o f C o lu m b ia , M a r y la n d , V i r g in ia , a n d
W e s t V i r g in ia ; S o u th e a s t— A la b a m a , F l o r i d a , G e o r g ia , K e n tu c k y , L o u is ia n a , M i s s i s s i p p i , N o r th C a r o li n a , S o u th C a r o li n a , a n d T e n n e s s e e ; N o r th C e n t r a l — Io w a , M in n e s o ta , N e b r a s k a , N o rth D a k o ta ,
a n d S o u th D a k o ta ; S o u th C e n t r a l — A r k a n s a s , K a n s a s , M i s s o u r i, O k la h o m a , a n d T e x a s ( e x c e p t E l P a s o C o u n ty ); M o u n ta in — A r i z o n a , C o lo r a d o , Id ah o (s o u th of th e S a lm o n R i v e r ) , M o n ta n a , N e v a d a ,
N ew M e x ic o , T e x a s (E l P a s o C o u n ty ), U ta h , a n d W y o m in g ; and P a c if i c — C a lif o r n ia , Id ah o ( n o rth o f th e S a lm o n R iv e r ) , O r e g o n , a n d W a sh in g to n .




T a b l e 5 . W e s t e r n U n i o n T e l e g r a p h C o m p a n y : P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s 1 in o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s
by a v e r a g e h o u rly rates,2 O c t o b e r 1 9 7 0
N u m b e r of e m p lo y e e s
O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T o ta l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s , m a n a g e r i a l
a s s i s t a n t s , a n d m e s s e n g e r s . ....... .............. ............
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p l o y e e s -----------------------------------------------------E n g i n e e r s a n d e n g in e e r in g
a s s i s t a n t s ------------------------------------------------O t h e r s _________________________________ ____
T e l e g r a p h o f fic e s u p e r i n te n d e n t s a n d
m a n a g e r s --------------------------------------------- -------- S a le s e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------------C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ___________________________
S u p e r v i s o r s ------------------------------------------------N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s ----------------------C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t ---------------------T r a f f ic d e p a r t m e n t ------------------------------A ll o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s _________________
R o u te a i d e s ------------------------------------------------T e l e g r a p h o p e r a t o r s _________________________
T r a f f ic m a n a g e r s , c h ie f o p e r a t o r s ,
s u p e r v i s o r s , a n d i n s t r u c t o r s ___________
E x p e r ie n c e d t e l e g r a p h o p e r a t o r s
( e x c e p t M o r s e o p e r a t o r s ) _______________
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t ---------------------T r a f f ic d e p a r t m e n t ____________________
O p e r a to r s in t r a i n i n g _____________________
O th e r o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
M o r s e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s __________________
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a l l a t i o n , a n d
m a i n t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s ____________________
T r a f f ic t e s t i n g a n d r e g u l a ti n g
e m p l o y e e s ________________________________
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a l l a t i o n , a n d
m a i n t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s _________________
F o r e m e n ________________________________
S u b s c r i b e r s ' e q u ip m e n t
m a i n t a i n e r s ___________________________
L in e m e n a n d c a b l e m e n ________________
O t h e r s ___________ ______________________
L a b o r e r s __________________________________
B u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s --------------------------M e c h a n ic s --------------------------------------------------O t h e r s ------------------ ---------------------------- --------M e s s e n g e r s --------------------------- ----------- ------- -------- —
F u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s -------------------------------------P a r t - t i m e e m p l o y e e s ------------------------------------F o o t a n d b ic y c le m e s s e n g e r s -----------------------M o to r m e s s e n g e r s -------------------------------- -------- -

M en

W o m en

A v erag e
schedu le d
w e e k ly
h o u rs

P e r c e n t of e m p lo y e e s r e c e i v in g —
A v e ra g e
h o u r ly
ra te s 1
2

$ 1 .60
and
under
$1.80

$1.80

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

$2.00

$2.25

$2.50

$2.75

$3.00

$3.25

$3.50

$3.75

$4.00

$4.25

$4.50

$4.75

over

and

2 1 ,6 3 4

1 2 ,2 1 9

9 ,4 1 5

3 9 .0

$ 3 .8 8

-

-

-

6 .0

9.3

9.1

12.1

12.4

9.2

6.6

5. i

4.6

10.0

15.6

1 ,6 1 1

1 ,427

184

37.3

6.8 5

-

-

-

-

-

-

1.6

1.8

2 .8

4 .3

2.5

2.0

2.5

82.4

560
1,051

552
875

8
176

3 7 .8
37.1

6 .7 8
6 .90

_

_

-

_

_

_

.9
2 .0

1.4
2.0

1.1
3.7

2 .0
5.5

1.3
3.2

2.0
2.1

1.8
2.9

89.6
78.6

2, 278
369
6, 180
721
5 ,3 6 8
3, 047
426
1 ,8 9 5
91
5, 178

1, 397
359
1 ,9 8 3
502
1 ,4 4 3
751
106
5 86
38
1 ,2 3 4

881
10
4, 197
219
3, 925
2, 296
320
1, 309
53
3, 944

3 9 .9
36 .3
38.1
37.7
38.1
3 8 .8
3 9 .9
36.6
39.1
39.7

3.6 8
5.91
3 .5 0
4 .9 8
3.32
3.22
2 .8 8
3.60
2.41
3.03

-

-

-

15.8
1.6
16.9
5.0
18.8
19.7
36.6
13.4
18.5

19.0
4.3
14.1
8.5
15.1
17.5
1.6
14.2
20.1

19.1
3.5
9.0
10.3
9.0
6.2
2.6
14.9
_
8.6

12.9
3.3
8.1
9.6
8.0
8.2
.2
9.3
3.2

7.6
8.9
3.7
2.6
3.9
3.4
5.5
_
.5

2.9
7.0
4 .9
6.0
4 .8
2.6
9.4
.3

1.7
6.5
2.5
5.8
2.1
1.9
3.0
.1

9.0
6 4.8
9.3
50.3
3.9
2.1
7.7
1.3

1, 100

437

663

39.7

3 .6 8

-

-

-

2, 944
1, 316
1 ,6 2 8
99
1 ,0 3 5
13
1 ,0 2 2

637
285
352
40
120
9
111

2 ,3 0 7
1 ,0 3 1
1 ,2 7 6
59
915
4
911

39.6
39.5
39.7
39.9
39 .8
4 0 .0
3 9 .8

2 .8 9
2.8 3
2 .9 4
2.2 7
2.81
3.26
2.81

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5, 612

5 ,4 9 9

113

39.6

4 .3 0

-

1, 335

1 ,3 0 0

35

3 9 .8

4.0 7

-

-

4, 192
1 ,0 9 1

4 , 114
1 ,087

78
4

39.6
39 .0

4 .3 8
5.3 6

-

-

1 ,6 4 3
446
1 ,0 1 2
85
406
72
334
2 ,2 5 0
1,8 4 1
409
911
1, 339

1 ,6 3 8
446
943
85
319
72
247
2, 184
1,8 1 0
374
888
1 ,2 9 6

5
69
87
87
66
31
35
23
43

3 9 .8
39.7
39.7
4 0 .0
39.0
3 9 .9
3 8 .9
35 .4
3 9 .9
14.9
29.1
39.7

4 .2 6
3.86
3.76
3.93
2 .9 8
3.95
2.77
2.4 3
3.42
1.77
1.79
2.75

21 .2

-

9.2
13.7
1.4
15.6
18.8
19.2
9 .8
12.2
7.5

6.5

18.5

4 0 .0

15.2

2.3

1.5

.5

6.0

2 4 .8
25 .3
2 4 .4
31.7
32.1

14.7
17.9
12.2
11.0
7.7
11.1

23.5
25.2
22.1
19.0
38.5
18.8

21.1
11.1
29.1
2 0 .8
5 3.8
20.5

.1
.2
.1
_
-

_
-

( 3)

_
-

-

( 3)
( 3)

-

1.8

.2

3.0

3.7

5.0

8.5

6 .8

10.6

22.0

21.4

5.6

.1

.1

1.0

5 .8

6 .9

6.6

13.6

53.6

2.0

4.6

-

.6
2 .4

.1
.3

3.9
.4

4 .6
.6

4 .8
.8

9.2
2 .8

7.0
2.1

8.9
1.9

11.7
4 .0

28.1
18.6

21.1
66.0

-

-

2 .0

15.7
20.2
12.1
100.0
17.4
17.6

_
9.6
11.7
8.6

_
11.8
39 .9
4 8 .5
16.9

1.4
9.0
9.4
4 .7
2 7 .8
3 3 .8
2 7 .8

4.1
3.8
10.0
2 .4
3.2
3.9
6.2

3.6
9.2
9.1
1.2
5.7
29.2
.6
-

7.7
15.7
15.8
3.7
2 0 .8
_
-

4 .6
9.9
14.9
3.2
16.7
.3
-

13.3
6.5
10.4
44.7
2.5
13.9
_
-

7.8
34.1
16.5
35.3
.5
1.4

50.0
7.6
11.7
_
.5
2.8
_
-

7.5
4.3
2.3
_
3.4
15.3
.9
-

X

X

X

X

X

-

_
19.2

X

X

X

X

X

X

4 7 .5

-

14.4

52 .5

2 .4
11.4
.3
12.8
14.3
2 7 .9
6 .9
18.7
2 0 .9

.3
6 .5
.3
6 .0
5.2
11.7
6.1
81.3
14.3

X

X

X

28.5

X

4 6 .7

10.5

1 I n c lu d e s e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g in th e c o n te r m in o u s 48 S ta te s a n d th e D i s t r i c t of C o lu m b ia ; th e c o m p a n y d o e s n o t o p e r a t e in A la s k a a n d H a w a ii.
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o rk on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s , a n d la t e s h if t s .
3 L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

X in d ic a te s th a t th e s e d a ta w e re n o t c o lle c te d . B e c a u se o f ro u n d in g ,




su m s

o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n o t e q u a l

100.

X
-

X

.1
_
-

X
X

-

-

X

X

-

X
X

-

-

.3

X

-

-

16.9

X

X
X

-

-

X

-

-

T a b l e 6 . I n t e r n a t i o n a l T e l e g r a p h C a r r i e r s : 1 P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f e m p l o y e e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s
by a v e r a g e hou rly ra te s ,2 O c t o b e r 1 9 7 0
N u m b e r of e m p lo y e e s
O c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p
T o ta l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c e r s a n d
a s s i s t a n t s _______________________________________
A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c e r s a n d
a s s i s t a n t s a n d m e s s e n g e r s _________________
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------- ---------------E n g i n e e r s a n d e n g in e e r in g a s s i s t a n t s ----------O t h e r s --------------------------------------------------------------O ffic e o r s ta t io n s u p e r i n te n d e n t s a n d
a s s i s t a n t s ___-___ __________ __________________
S a le s e m p l o y e e s ______________________ ___ ________
C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------------S u p e r v i s o r s _______ _________________________
N o n s u p e r v is o r y c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ------------O p e r a tin g d e p a r t m e n t — ------------------------ _
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t __________________
A c c o u n tin g d e p a r t m e n t ____ _______ ____
E n g i n e e r i n g d e p a r t m e n t ___________________
A ll o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s ___________ ________
O p e r a t o r s -------------------------------------------------------------T r a f f i c c h ie f s , d i s p a t c h e r s , s u p e r v i s o r s ,
i n s t r u c t o r s , a n d a s s i s t a n t s ------------------------N o n s u p e r v is o r y o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------R a d io o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------------M a r i n e c o a s t a l s ta t io n o p e r a t o r s _________
C a b le o p e r a t o r s ___________________________
T e l e t y p e - m u l ti p le x o p e r a t o r s ____________
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------A ll o t h e r o p e r a t o r s , in c lu d in g M o r s e ____
M e s s e n g e r s _______________________________________
F o o t a n d b i c y c l e ---------------------------------------------M o t o r __ ___________________________ _______
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a ll a ti o n , m a i n t e n a n c e ,
a n d o t h e r t e c h n i c a l e m p l o y e e s ------------------------S u p e r v i s o r s ----------------------------------------------M e c h a n ic s a n d m a i n t e n a n c e t e c h n i c ia n s ____
R a d io o p e r a t in g t e c h n i c ia n s — ______________
R a d i o te l e g r a p h r i g g e r s ---------------- __ ----------O t h e r s --------------------------------------------------------------B u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p lo y e e s -------------------------------A ll e m p lo y e e s n o t e ls e w h e r e c l a s s i f i e d _____ __

M en

W o m en

A v erag e
sched­
u le d
w e e k ly
h o u rs

B ecause




of ro u n d in g ,

sum s

$ 1.60
and
under
$ 1.80

$ 1.80

$ 2.0 0

$ 2.25

$ 2.5 0

$ 2.7 5

$ 3.00

$ 3.25

$ 3 .50

$ 3.75

$ 4 .0 0

$ 4 .2 5

$ 4 .5 0

$ 4 .7 5

$ 2.0 0

$ 2.25

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2.7 5

$ 3.0 0

$ 3.25

$ 3.50

$ 3.75

$ 4 .0 0

$ 4 .2 5

$ 4 .5 0

$ 4 .7 5

over
4 9.8

a nd

5 ,4 0 7

4 ,4 5 6

951

36 .8

$ 4 .8 1

(3 )

4 .8

0.9

0.4

2.6

3.1

6.4

4 .7

6.4

3.9

4.8

5.6

6.6

5, 089

4 , 142

947

37.3

4 .9 4

_

_

.2

.4

2.7

3.2

6.7

5.0

6.8

4.1

5.1

5.9

7.0

52.9

641
265
376

615
265
350

26
26

37 .2
37 .2
37.3

7.08
7.31
6.92

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
-

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_

.3

_

.8

_

.5
1.1
_

.5

1.3

.9
.8
1.1

1.6
.8
2.1

3.6
1.1
5.3

9 2.4
96.2
89.6

33
328
1, 572
143
1 ,4 2 9
596
119
437
65
212
1 ,2 9 0

33
292
907
131
776
446
42
183
32
73
1 ,0 7 2

36
665
12
653
150
77
254
33
139
218

37 .0
36.1
37 .2
36.9
37.2
37 .4
3 7 .4
37.2
37.3
36 .4
37.5

8.0 0
5.47
4.11
6.19
3.90
4.01
3.86
3.70
4 .1 0
3.99
4 .5 6

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
.4
.4
.5
1.7
.2
_
_
_

_
_
1.0
_
1.1
.7
4 .2
1.1
3.1
_
_

_
9.1
5.1
_
5.6
4 .2
8.4
8.5
1.5
3.3
1.9

_
1.5
8.1
_
9 .0
5.9
10.9
11.2
15.4
9.9
1.6

_
2.1
12.0
_
13.2
9.9
11.8
17.8
12.3
14.2
9.3

3.0
3.7
8.9
_
9.8
6.5
16.8
9.6
9.2
15.6
5.5

_
2.1
6.9
_
7.6
5.9
10.1
6.9
7.7
12.3
10.9

.
1.2
5.7
2.8
6.0
4 .4
7.6
7.6
7.7
6.1
3.6

_

_

6.7
5.7
2.1
6.0
5.0
3.4
7.1
7.7
7.5
3.6

4.3
8.4
2.1
9 .0
9.9
2.5
11.4
3.1
7.1
4 .0

5.2
13.2
1.4
14.4
24.5
10.1
6.6
9.2
6.1
3.3

168
1, 122
17
128
233
602
97
45
318
306
12

165
907
16
128
210
442
69
42
314
302
12

3
215
1

37 .4
37.5
36 .6
37.5
37.5
37.5
37 .5
37.5
29 .2
29 .0
34.6

5.98
4 .3 5
5.01
5.16
3.93
4.3 7
4.1 7
4 .0 7
1.98
1.94
2.79

_
_
_
_
_
_
0.3
.3
_

_
_
_
_
13.2
12.7
25 .0

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
1.6
1.3
8 .3

_
2.2
_
_
.4
3.7
_
4 .4
_
_
_

_
1.9
_
_
2.6
1.3
5.2
4 .4
.9
.3
16.7

_
10.7
_
1.6
27.5
6.0
18.6
_
2.2
.3
50.0

_
6.3
_
1.6
4.3
8.0
8.2
6.7
_
_
_

_
12.6
5.9
1.6
15.5
13.6
8.2
26.7
.3
.3
_

4.1

_
_

.6
4.1

.6
4 .5

3.9
8.6
1.7
2.1
20.0
_
_
_

12.5
4.3
2.5
3.1
4 .4
_
_
_

7.8
9 .0
2.3
5.2
2.2

.6
3.7
5.9
7.0
3.4
3.7
_
2.2

1, 133
195
565
134
18
221
84
11

1, 132
195
564
134
18
221
83
11

1

37.5
36.5
37 .8
37 .5
37.5
37.5
37 .5
38 .0

5.2 0
6.73
4 .9 5
4.81
5.35
4 .7 3
3.66
4.5 3

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

.8

1.9

7.1

3.7

_

_
_
_

_

_
_

.2
4.5

8.7
12.7

7.9
.5
10.1
9 .0

8.1
1.0
10.6
6.7

5.3
1.0
5.0
3.0

_
-

_
_

_

_
_

2.4

2 .4

4 .8
-

.2
7.5
5.6
4 .5
2.4
9.1

9 .5
2.4
-

11.8
4.8
18.2

-

23
160
28
3
4
4
-

-

1
-

1
"

1 C o v e r s e m p lo y e e s o f i n t e r n a t i o n a l t e l e g r a p h c a r r i e r s w ho h a v e a n n u a l o p e r a tin g
c o n te r m i n o u s 48 S ta te s a n d th e D i s t r i c t of C o lu m b ia .
2 S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e f in itio n o f h o u r s a n d r a t e s u s e d in th is b u lle tin .
3 L e s s th a n 0.0 5 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

P e r c e n t of e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g —
A v erag e
h o u r ly
ra te s 1
2

o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s m a y n o t e q u a l 100.

rev en u es

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

8 1 .4
84.6
_
_
_

_

_
_

_

_

"
e x c e e d in g

$ 50, 000;

e x c lu d e s

13.1
"

e m p lo y e e s

_

_

_

.9
15.5
9.1
w o rk in g

_

_

_

_

4 .4
1.5

_

_

6.8
9 .5
9.1

6.8
7.1
9.1

_

_

9 .0
28.6
9.1

f o r i n te r n a t i o n a l t e l e g r a p h

_

_
_
_

_

c a rrie rs

_
_
_

_

97.0
64.0
24.6
91.6
17.8
22.7
12.6
11.9
23.1
17.9
56.2
98.2
49.9
88.2
64.1
24.5
57.3
49.5
28.9
_
_
_
65.0
97.4
60.9
55.2
94.4
50.7
7.1
36.4

o u tsid e th e

Appendix. Scope and Method of Survey
Hours and rates

Data presented in this study are based on annual
reports filed with the Federal Communications Com­
mission by communication carriers, as required by the
amended Communications Act of 1934. All carriers en­
gaged in interstate or foreign communications service by
means of their own facilities or through connection with
the facilities of another carrier under direct or indirect
common control are subject to the full jurisdiction of
the Commission. A large number of telephone carriers
engaged in interstate or foreign service only by con­
nections with the facilities of another unaffiliated carrier
are not subject to the full jurisdiction of the Commission
and are not required to file annual reports of hours and
earnings of employees.
Tabulations for telephone carriers relate to those
having annual operating revenues in excess of $1 million,
and subject to the full jurisdiction of the FCC. Included
are 25 Bell System companies and 31 companies not
affiliated with the Bell System.
Tabulations for wire-telegraph and international tele­
graph carriers were confined to companies with annual
revenues exceeding $50,000 and engaged in interstate or
foreign commerce. Western Union Telegraph Co. is the
only wire-telegraph company included. Five companies
engaged in non vocal radio or cable communications are
included in the international telegraph tabulations.

Average hourly rates presented in this bulletin were
co m p u ted by dividing total “scheduled weekly
compensation” by total “scheduled weekly hours.”
Average scheduled weekly hours were obtained by
dividing the total scheduled weekly hours by the number
of employees.
The terms “scheduled weekly hours” and “scheduled
weekly compensation” for the three carrier groups
covered by the study are defined, according to the FCC’s
Rules and Regulations , as follows:
Telephone Carriers

51.12(b). “Scheduled weekly hours” means the number
of regular hours, excluding overtime hours, in the duty tours
which the employee is scheduled to work during the week in
which December 31 occurs, whether or not excused because
o f a holiday, vacation, leave of absence, or other reason.
51.13(b). “Scheduled weekly compensation” means com­
pensation to the employee at the rate of pay in effect on
December 31 for the “scheduled weekly hours.” It includes
the basic weekly pay rate plus any regularly scheduled sup­
plementary compensation, such as differentials for evening
and night tours, equivalent value of board and lodging for
unlocated employees, equivalent value of meals furnished
dining service employees, and equivalent value of living
quarters and maintenance furnished managers of agency
offices. It excludes pay for overtime work and pay in excess
of weekday rates for Sunday and holiday work.

Employees and occupational groups
Western Union Telegraph Company

covered by the study

52.21(b). “Scheduled weekly hours” are defined as an
employee’s regular daily tour of duty multiplied by the
number of days, or fraction of days, scheduled to be worked
during a week.

Officials and managerial assistants were not included
in the tabulations. Also excluded were employees work­
ing outside the 50 States and the District of Columbia,
except telephone carrier employees in Puerto Rico, and
the Virgin Islands. All other employees, both full time
and part time, were included. Part-time employees are
defined as those regularly assigned shorter hours than a
full-time schedule.
Occupational groups for which separate data are
presented are defined in the FCC’s Rules and Regula­
tions , volume X, part 51, applying to telephone carriers,
and part 52, applying to telegraph companies. Copies of
this volume are on sale by the Superintendent of Docu­
ments, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C., 20402, at $1.50 per subscription.




52.22(b). “Scheduled weekly compensation” is defined
as the wages scheduled to be paid for scheduled weekly hours
as defined in 52.21(b). This should include employee contri­
butions for old-age benefits, unemployment insurance and
similar deductions, paid vacation and holiday hours, the
regularly scheduled weekly compensation for employees
temporarily on leave due to disability or sickness, and the
scheduled weekly compensation of both full- and part-time
employees.

The company reports that “scheduled weekly com­
pensation” excludes premium pay for overtime and for
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.

13

International telegraph carriers

Distribution of workers by earning classes

International telegraph carriers are instructed to
report scheduled weekly hours and compensation for
their employees as defined above for the Western Union
T elegraph C o ., e x c e p t th a t scheduled weekly
compensation should include regularly scheduled main­
tenance, travel, or other allowances.

In the tables, workers are distributed according to the
percentage having stipulated hourly rates of pay. Be­
cause of rounding, sums of individual items may not
equal 100.




14

Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the ing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402, or any of its reBureau’s program of industry wage surveys since January gional sales offices, and from the Bureau of Labor Statis1960 are listed below. Copies are available from the tics, Washington, D.C., 20212, or from any of its reSuperintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Print- gional offices shown on the inside back cover.
I. Occupational Wage Studies

Manufacturing
Price

Basic Iron and Steel, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1602 .......................................................................................................$0.55
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1732 ........................................................................... 45
Cigar Manufacturing, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1581.................................................................................................................25
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1472.......................................................................................................... 20
Cotton and Man-Made Fiber Textiles, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1637............................................................................. 1.00
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1695 ................................................................................................... 50
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1531................................................ ......................................................... 30
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1576 .................................................................................... 25
Fluid Milk Industry, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1464 ................................................................................................................ 30
Footwear, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1634 .................................................................................................................................. 75
Hosiery, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1562 .................................................................................................................................... 70
Industrial Chemicals, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1529 .............................................................................................................. 40
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1626 ................................................................................................ 1.00
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1618...............................................................................................55
Machinery Manufacturing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1664 ......................................................................................................65
Meat Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1677 .................................................................................................................. 1.00
Men’s and Boys’ Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1659 .............................................65
Men’s and Boys’ Suits and Coats, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1716 ................................................................................. 1.00
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1690 .............................................................................................60
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1679 ........................................................................................................75
Nonferrous Foundries, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1726 ............................................................................................................ 50
Paints and Varnishes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1739 .............................................................................................................. 60
Paperboard Containers and Boxes, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 9 ................................................................................. 1.25
Petroleum Refining, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1526 .................................................................................................................30
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 3 ..................................................................................50
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1608 ........................................................................................ 60
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1694 .................................................................................... 50
Structural Clay Products, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1697..........................................................................................................65
Synthetic Fibers, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1740....................................................................................................................... 40
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1965—
66. BLS Bulletin 1527 ........................................................................................ 45




I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued

Manufacturing— Con tinued
Price

West Coast Sawmilling, 1969. BLS Bulletin 17 0 4 ..................................................................................................... $0.45
Women’s and Misses’ Coats and Suits, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1728 ..................................................................................35
Women’s and Misses’ Dresses, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1649 .................................................................................................45
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1651................................................................ 60
Wool Textiles, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1551............................................................................................................................45
Work Clothing, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1624 ......................................................................................................................... 50
Nonmanufacturing

Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1689 ......................................................................................................50
Banking, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1703 .................................................................................................................................... 65
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1583.......................................................................................................... 50
Communications, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1696....................................................................................................................... 30
Contract Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1644......................................................................................................55
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1566 .....................................................................30
Educational Institutions: Nonteaching Employees, 1968—
69. BLS Bulletin 1671 ................................................... 50
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1967. BLS Bulletin 1 6 1 4 ........................................................................................................70
Hospitals, 1969. BLS Bulletin 1688 ........................................................................................................................... 1.00
Laundry and Cleaning Services, 1968. BLS Bulletin 1645............................................................................................... 75
Life Insurance, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1569 ......................................................................................................................... 30
Motion Picture Theaters, 1966. BLS Bulletin 1542..........................................................................................................35
Nursing Homes and Related Facilities, 1967—
68. BLS Bulletin 1638 .................................................. ........................ 75
Scheduled Airlines, 1970. BLS Bulletin 173 4 ...................................................................................................................45
Wages and Tips in Restaurants and Hotels, 1970. BLS Bulletin 1 7 1 2 ........................................................................... 60
II. Other Industry Wage Studies

Employee Earnings and Hours in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the South and North Central Regions,
1965. BLS Bulletin 1552
...........................................................................................................................................50
Employee Earnings and Hours in Eight Metropolitan Areas of the South, 1965. BLS Bulletin 1533 .......................40
Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade, June 1966Retail Trade (Overall Summary). BLS Bulletin 1584...................................................................................... 1.00
Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm Equipment Dealers, BLS Bulletin 1584-1 ...........................................30
General Merchandise Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-2................................................................................................. 55
Food Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-3 ......................................................................................................................... 60
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations. BLS Bulletin 1584-4 ..........................................................50
Apparel and Accessory Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-5 ...........................................................................................55
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household Appliance Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-6 ....................................50
Miscellaneous Retail Stores. BLS Bulletin 1584-7 ................................................................................................. 65




☆

U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F I C E : 1972 O - 4 8 4 -7 9 3 (114)

BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S
REG IONAL OFFICES

PUERTO RICO

R egion I

R egion V

1 6 0 3 J F K Federal B u ild in g
G o v e rn m e n t C e n te r

8 th F lo o r, 3 0 0 S o u th W ack er D riv e

B os ton , Mass. 0 2 2 0 3
Phone: 2 2 3 -6 7 6 2 (A re a C ode 6 1 7 )

Phone:

Region II

C hicago, III. 6 0 6 0 6
3 5 3 * 1 8 8 0 (A re a C ode 3 1 2 )

R egion V I

1 5 1 5 B ro a d w a y
N e w Y o r k , N .Y . 1 0 0 3 6

1 1 0 0 C om m e rc e S t., R m . 6 B 7
D allas, T e x . 7 5 2 0 2

Phone: 9 7 1 - 5 4 0 5 (A re a C od e 2 1 2 )

P hone: 7 4 9 - 3 5 1 6 (A re a C ode 2 1 4 )

Region I I I

R egion V I I a n d V I I I
Fe deral O ffic e B u ild in g
9 1 1 W a ln u t S t., 1 0 th F lo o r

4 0 6 Penn Square B u ild in g
1 3 1 7 F ilb e r t S t.
P h ila d e lp h ia , Pa. 1 9 1 0 7

Kansas C ity , M o . 6 4 1 0 6

Phone:

P hone: 3 7 4 -2 4 8 1 (A re a C ode 8 1 6 )

5 9 7 -7 7 9 6 (A re a C od e 2 1 5 )

R egion IV

R egion IX an d X
4 5 0 G o ld en G ate A ve.
B ox 3 6 0 1 7

S u ite 5 4 0
1 3 71 Peachtree S t. N E .
A tla n ta , G a. 3 0 3 0 9
Phone: 5 2 6 -5 4 1 8 (A re a C ode 4 0 4 )




San Francisco, C a lif. 9 4 1 0 2
P hone:

5 5 6 - 4 6 7 8 (A re a C ode 4 1 5 )

Regions V I I and V I I I w ill be serviced b y Kansas C ity .
R egions IX an d X w ill be serviced b y San Francisco.

' *•**

6

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

T H IR D C LA S S M A IL

BUREAU OF LABOR STA TISTIC S
W A SH IN G T O N , D.C. 20212
P O S T A G E A N D F E E S PA ID
O F F I C I A L B USIN ESS
PENALTY

F O R P R IV A T E

U.S. D EP A R TM E N T OF LABOR
USE, $300

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