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L 2, 2
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[Payton & M o n tg o m ery Co.
P ublic Lib rary

JAN 2 4 1966

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY




COMMUNICATIONS
i

1964

Bulletin No. 1467
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

rssrr




INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY

COMMUNICATIONS
1964

Bulletin No. 1467
November 1965

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S . G overnm ent Printing O ffice, W ashington, D .C ., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 2 0 cents










P reface
This summary of data on employment and hourly
rates is based on annual reports filed with the Federal
Communications Commission by class A telephone car­
riers, the Western Union Telegraph Company, and inter­
national telegraph carriers, as required by the amended
Communications Act of 1934. Under a cooperative ar­
rangement, the Bureau of Labor Statistics tabulates and
publishes the data as part of a continuing series.
This study was conducted in the Bureau's Divi­
sion of Occupational Pay, Toivo P. Kanninen, Chief, under
the general direction of L. R. Linsenmayer, Assistant
Commissioner for Wages and Industrial Relations.
The
analysis was prepared by Joseph C. Bush, under the im­
mediate supervision of L. Earl Lewis.




Contents
Page
Summary________________________________________________________________________
Class A telephone carriers____________________________________________________
Pay rates in December 1964 _______________________________________________
Trends in employment and pay rates ______________________________________
Western Union Telegraph Company____________________________________________
International telegraph carriers ______________________________________________

1
1
1
4
5
7

Chart:
Employment and average hourly rates of communications
workers except officials and managerial assistants,
October 1947—
December 1964____________________________________________

2

T able s :
Percentage distribution of employees in occupational groups
by average hourly rates, December 1964, for—
1. Class A telephone carriers_________________________________________
2. Bell System class A telephone c a r r ie r s __________ -____________ -___
3. Non-Bell class A telephone carriers________________________________

9
10
11

Average hourly rates of employees in selected occupations
by region, December 1964, for—
4. All class A and Bell System telephone carriers____________________

12

Percentage distribution of wire-telegraph employees in occupational
groups by average hourly rates, October 1964, for—
5. Western Union Telegraph Company_________________________________

13

Percentage distribution of employees in occupational groups
by

average

6.
Appendix.

h o u rly

ra tes,

O ctob er

1964,

f o r ------

International telegraph carriers ____________________________________

14

Scope and method of survey_____________________—_________ ____

15




v




Industry Wage Survey--Communications, 1964
Summary
Basic wage rates 1 of the 655, 761 employees (excluding officials and
managerial assistants) of the Nation’ s principal communications carriers av­
eraged $ 2.95 an hour in late 1964.
Employees of class A telephone carriers,
accounting for 95 percent of the workers covered by the study, 2 averaged $2.96
an hour in December 1964. Nonmessenger employees of Western Union’ s wiretelegraph operations averaged $2.80 an hour and employees of international
telegraph carriers (ocean-cable and radiotelegraph carriers) averaged $3.41 an
hour in October 1964.
Pay rates for employees of class A telephone carriers averaged 2.8 per­
cent more in December 1964 than in December 1963.
This compares with in­
creases of 3.6 percent between 1962 and 1963, and 4. 1 percent between 1961 and
1962. Between October 1963 and October 1964, average hourly pay rates of non­
messenger employees of Western Union’ s wire-telegraph operations increased
3. 3 percent and those of employees of the international telegraph carriers,
5. 9 percent.
Employment of class A telephone carriers increased from 604, 984 in
December 1963 to 624, 408 in December 1964. This represents the second con­
secutive annual increase in employment after a steady decline from the peak in
1957 (681,600).
The numbers of employees in Western Union's wire-telegraph
operations and in international telegraph carriers were slightly lower in October
1964 than in October 1963, representing a continuing decline over the past sev­
eral years.
Class A Telephone Carriers
Pay Rates in December 1964. Basic wage rates of the 624, 408 employ­
ees (excluding officials and managerial assistants) of the 57 class A telephone
carriers included in the study 3 averaged $2. 96 an hour in December 1964 (table 1).
1 As explained in the appendix, the pay data contained in this bulletin, which pertain to all workers except
officials and managerial assistants, were computed by dividing scheduled weekly compensation by scheduled weekly
hours. "Scheduled weekly compensation" for class A telephone carriers, as defined by the Federal Communications
Commission, includes the basic weekly pay rate plus any regularly scheduled supplementary compensation, such as
differentials for evening and night tours and certain perquisites. It excludes pay for overtime work and pay in excess
of weekday rates for Sunday and holiday work. Scheduled weekly compensation of Western Union’s wire-telegraph
employees excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
Since 1947, annual studies have been made in cooperation with the FCC. Prior
to 1961, information forall
carriers included in the annual reports relates to an October payroll period. Effective
1961, the reference datefor
class A telephone carriers was changed to December. See appendix for scope and method
of survey.
2 The study, based on reports of carriers under the full jurisdiction of the FCC, covered nearly nine-tenths of
the estimated 710,300 employees of the Nation’s telephone communication industry in December 1964 and almost all
of the employees in the telegraph communication industry in October 1964.
3 The study was limited to telephone carriers having an annual operating revenue of more, than $250,000 and
subject to the full jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission. A total of 6, 343 officials and managerial
assistants were not included in the study. See appendix regarding exclusion and inclusion of employees outside the
conterminous 48 States and the District of Columbia.




1




Employment and Average Hourly Rates o f Communications Workers Except Officials and Managerial Assistants,
October 1947-December 1964

3

Individual pay rates were widely dispersed, the middle half of the workers earn­
ing between $ 2 .05 and $ 3 .5 3 an hour.
Factors contributing to this compara­
tively wide range of hourly rates include the great diversity of skills and re­
sponsibilities required by the industry, pay differences among regions, and the
widespread practice of providing a range of rates for workers in a given job
and locality.
Wage rates and working conditions of class A telephone carrier employ­
ees are determined largely through collective bargaining.
Agreements on file
with the Bureau of Labor Statistics4 indicate that wage-rate schedules generally
varied by occupational category, by region, among companies in the same region,
and for a given occupation and company, by locality.
Agreements typically pro­
vide a range of rates for a specific job and locality; rate differences between
starting and maximum rates frequently amount to 100 percent or more.
Advance­
ment from starting to maximum rates quite commonly involved from 10- to 14step increases over a 5- to 6-year period. Reflecting largely locality rate dif­
ferentials and length-of-service wage increases, the difference between the highest
and lowest rates recorded for linemen, for example, amounted to more than $1 in
42 of the 57 class A telephone carriers included in the study.
Occupationally, average rates of pay in December 1964 ranged from
$ 1.66 for a small number of laborers (mostly in non-Bell companies) to $5.29
for professional and semiprofessional employees (excluding draftsmen).
Women, constituting 56 percent of the class A telephone carrier work
force, were employed largely in the telephone operator and clerical jobs.
Ex­
perienced switchboard operators, virtually all women and comprising nearly onefifth of the total class A employment, averaged $2. 11 an hour. Nonsupervisory
clerical employees (117,200 women and 8,857 men) averaged $2.28 an hour.
Construction, installation, and maintenance employees, accounting for
three-tenths of the total work force, averaged $3.38 an hour.
Average hourly
pay rates for numerically important occupations in this nearly all male category
were: $3. 42 for exchange repairmen, $ 3 .3 4 for cable splicers, $3. 32 for testboard men and repeatermen, $3.27 for PBX and station installers, $3.19 for
central office repairmen, and $2.67 for linemen.
Regionally, average rates of pay for all employees ranged from $2. 59
an hour in the Southeast to $3.17 in the Middle Atlantic region.
Pay rates in
the Pacific, Great Lakes, and New England regions averaged $ 3 .08, $3 .0 3 , and
$3 an hour, respectively, whereas averages in all other regions (except the
Middle Atlantic) were below the national average of $2.96 (table 4).
Average pay rates for the 10 occupational categories shown in table 4
were usually highest in the Middle Atlantic region and lowest in the Southeast
or Mountain regions.
The interregional spread in average pay rates varied by
occupation.
For example, experienced switchboard operators in the Middle
Atlantic region averaged about 20 percent more than their counterparts in the
Southeast, whereas the corresponding spread for central office repairmen was
only 9 percent.

4
file with the
of America.
company are

Collective bargaining agreements covering roughly seven-tenths of the workers included in the study are on
Bureau of Labor Statistics. The major labor organization in the industry is the Communications Workers
Frequently, workers in different departments (e. g . , traffic, plant, accounting, commercial) of the same
covered under separate collective bargaining agreements.




4

Occupational pay relationships varied among regions.
To illustrate,
nonsupervisory clerical employees averaged from Z to 8 percent more than ex­
perienced switchboard operators in all regions except the Southeast where the
p a y advantage was 14 percent.
Average pay rates for PBX and station installers
exceeded the average for experienced switchboard operators by 50 to 60 percent
in 7 of 9 regions, by 73 percent in the North Central, and by 38 percent in the
Pacific region.
Bell System companies accounted for 96 percent of the class A telephone
carrier employees within scope of the study— virtually all of the employees in the
New England, Middle Atlantic, North Central, and Mountain regions, and about
95 percent of those in all remaining regions.
Employees of these companies,
as a group, averaged $ 2 .9 9 an hour, compared with $ 2 .3 0 for employees of
other companies.
Bell System companies usually covered an entire State or group
of States and had employment amounting to more than 50, 000 in four companies,
over 25, 000 in five others, and less than 3, 000 in only two companies.
Only
1 of the 33 non-Bell companies employed as many as 3, 000 workers, and 12 com ­
panies had fewer than 100 workers. Slightly more than half of the employment
in Bell System companies was concentrated in the Middle Atlantic, Great Lakes,
and Pacific regions. Four regions— Great Lakes, Southeast, South Central, and
Pacific— accounted for seven-tenths of the employment in non-Bell companies.

Pay levels for nearly all occupational categories studied separately were
higher for Bell than for non-Bell System s.
Among seven major occupational
categories shown below, average hourly pay rates in non-Bell carriers ranged
from 76 percent to 89 percent of counterpart averages in Bell Systems.
Average pay rates for non-Bell carriers
as a percent of occupational
________ average for Bell Systems_______
Average hourly
rates
ClericaTem ployees, nonsupervisory
Experienced switchboard operators Central office repairm en --------------PBX and station installers--------------L in em en ---------------------------------------Cable s p lic e r s ------------------------------Building, supplies, and motor
vehicle m ech a n ics----------------------

Average weekly
rates

82
76
85
81
89
83

87
82
86
81
89
84

84

85

Average scheduled workweeks for clerical employees and experienced switchboard
operators were 39.8 and 3 9 .4 in non-Bell companies and 37 .7 and 3 6 .4 in Bell
Systems.
Comparisons based on average weekly rates thus indicate a sm aller
difference in pay levels. Among the five craft categories, scheduled workweeks
were about the same in both employee groups.

Trends in Employment and Pay R ates.
Total employment of class A
telephone carriers increased by 19, 424 (3. 2 percent) between December 1963 and
December 1964.
Bell System carriers accounted for more than nine-tenths of
this increase, the second (following an increase during the 1962—
63 period) since
1957.
While the current employment increase is reflected in nearly all major
occupational categories (ranging from about 2 to 5 percent), the employment




5

decrease from the 1957 peak (681,600) to 1962 (596,300) reflected largely a de­
cline in the number of telephone operators, caused chiefly by the installation of
new and improved equipment. 5
The 1964 employment level was 13 percent higher than the level recorded
in 1947 (552, 700), the date of the Bureau’ s initial study.
During this period,
the relative importance of men in the industry has increased from about a third
of the labor force in 1947 to slightly more than two-fifths in 1964.
The level of wages in the telephone industry increased by 2. 8 percent
during the December 1961—
December 1964 period from $ 2 .8 8 to $ 2 .9 6 an hour.
Interregional differences in pay levels in December 1964 are compared in the
following tabulation with those in October 1951 and October 1 9 57.6 The lowest
pay level was recorded in the Southeast for each of the three periods.
The
Middle Atlantic region, tied for second position in 1951, had the highest a ll­
employee average in 1957 and in 1964.

All-employee 1 averages as a percent of
________ national averages in— _______
Regions
New E n gland------------------------------ -------Middle A t la n t ic ------------------------- -------Great Lakes -------------------------------- -------C h esa p ea k e-------------------------------- -------S outheast------------------------------------.........
North C en tra l----------------------------- .........
South C e n tr a l---------------------------- ------M ou ntain -------------------------------------------P a c i f i c --------------------------------------- --------

October
1951
102
104
104
101
86
89
88
89
107

October
1957
98
106
103
99
87
94
92
91
105

December
1964
101
107
102
96
88
92
89
93
104

* Excludes officials and managerial assistants.

Western Union Telegraph Company
Nonmessenger em ployees7 of Western Union’ s wire-telegraph operations
averaged $ 2 . 8 0 an hour (exclusive of premium pay for overtime and work on
weekends, holidays, and late shifts) in October 1964; straight-time rates of pay
for m essengers averaged $ 1 . 5 8 an hour (table 5). Since October 1963, the date
of the last study, average wages of nonmessenger employees had increased 9 cents
an hour and those of m essengers, 5 cents.
These increases were largely the
result of general wage increases, effective June 1, 19 6 4 .8
5
Occupational employments (or pay rates) for the current, as well as the 1963 study, are not precisely co m ­
parable with preceding years due, in part, to the adoption by Bell System companies in 1963 of a new and more re­
fined system of occupational classification. The revised system provides an increased number of occupational classi­
fications and resulted in some reclassification of workers, usually within major occupational groups, but in some
instances, from one major group to another.
8 Regional pay levels were tabulated for the first time in October 1951.
7 Excludes 299 officials and managerial assistants.
8 Under the terms of agreements reached in 1964 with The Com m ercial Telegraphers' Union and with the
American Communications Association (Ind.), all hourly rated workers (except nonmotor messengers) received an in­
crease of 6 cents an hour; all monthly rated employees, $9 a month; and nonmotor messengers with a year or more
of progression credit, 5 cents an hour. The 1964 agreements also provide for the following increases, effective
June 1, 1965: A ll hourly rated workers (except nonmotor messengers) receive an increase of 7 cents an hour; all
monthly rated employees, $11 a month; and nonmotor messengers with 2 years or more of progression credit, 5 cents
an hour. These latter increases, of course, are not reflected in the rate data in this report.




6

Men, comprising 57 percent of the 22,262 nonmessenger employees,
tended to be concentrated in different occupational groups than women. Among
the job categories in which men were predominant, average straight-time hourly
rates of pay were: $ 3 . 2 0 for traffic testing and regulating employees and for
subscribers1 equipment maintainers; and $2. 88 for linemen and cablemen. Aver­
age straight-time hourly rates of pay in October 1964 for numerically important
occupational categories predominantly held by women were:
$2. 51 for nonsupervisory clerical employees, $2.35 for experienced telegraph operators (except
Morse operators) in the traffic department and $2. 22 for those in the commercial
department, and $ 2 . 3 3 for telephone operators.

Rates of pay of individual workers varied greatly in many of the specific
job categories for which data are presented in table 5.
In many of the nonmessenger jobs, the hourly rates of the highest paid workers exceeded those of
the lowest paid by more than $ 1 an hour.
In some jobs, however, individual
rates were closely grouped; for example, at least seven-tenths of the traffic
department clerical employees and experienced telegraph o p e r a t o r s (except
Morse) and telephone operators had hourly rates between $2. 30 and $2. 50.

Wage rates for employees of Western Union are determined by labormanagement agreements with The Commercial Telegraphers1 Union in all cities
except the New York metropolitan area where contracts are with the American
Communications Association (Ind).
Wage provisions contained in agreements
with both the CTU and ACA include established rate ranges for all occupations;
differences between the starting and maximum rates amounted to more than
60 cents an hour for some classifications. Advancement from the starting rate
through the various progression steps to the maximum rate is automatic for
employees meeting the requirements of the job after specified periods of service.
Established rates of pay for nonmessenger jobs and motor messengers varied
by location, whereas nationwide rates applied to foot and bicycle messengers.

The 4, 046 messengers, nearly all men, comprised 15 percent of the
company’ s wire-telegraph work force in October 1964.
Seven-tenths of these
workers were employed on a full-time basis and averaged $ 1 . 6 4 an hour, com­
pared with $1. 28 an hour for the 1,150 part-time employees who worked an
average of about I 7V2 hours a week at the time of the study. Foot and bicycle
messengers (both full- and part-time employees) as a group averaged $1. 27 an
hour; those with less than 1 year of service with the company received $ 1. 25 an
hour, while those with longer service were paid $1. 30.
Motor messengers
averaged $2. 06 an hour in October 1964. Rates of pay for nearly half of these
workers were between $2. 10 and $2. 30 an hour.

Total employment of Western Union’ s wire-telegraph operations in Octo­
ber 1964 was 5 percent below October 196 3 and only one-half of the employment
level of October 1947, the date of the Bureau’ s initial study.
As indicated in
the tabulation on the following page, not only has the level of employment steadily
declined but the occupational composition of the work force has changed consider­
ably during the 17-year period. The proportion of workers classified as telegraph
operators declined from 34 percent in 1947 to 24 percent in 1964, and the pro­
portion of workers classified as foot and bicycle messengers declined from 18 to
10 percent. On the other hand, the proportions of construction, installation, and
maintenance workers, and clerical employees have increased during this period.




7

Wire-telegraph operations
October
1964
Total, all em ployees:1
Number -----------------------------------------Percent -----------------------------------------Percent of employees classified as:
Telegraph office superintendents
and m an agers------------------------------Clerical em ployees-------------------------Telegraph op era tors-----------------------Construction, installation, and
maintenance e m p lo y e e s --------------Messengers, foot and b i c y c l e ---------Messengers, m o t o r -------------------------O ther-----------------------------------------------

October
1963

October
1955

October
1947

26,308
100

27,706
100

37,471
100

53,107
100

10
22
24

10
22
25

9
19
31

8
19
34

22
10
5
7

20
11
5
7

14
16
4
7

13
18
3
5

1 Excludes officials and managerial assistants.

International Telegraph C arriers

Rates of pay for the 5, 045 em ployees9 of international telegraph carriers
(five ocean-cable and radiotelegraph carriers) averaged $ 3 . 4 1 an hour in October
1964 (table 6).
This was an increase of 5. 9 percent above the average recorded
in October 1963 ( $3. 22) .
The hourly average for the 4, 565 nonmessenger e m ­
ployees was $ 3 . 5 7 ; the 480 m essengers, nearly all foot and bicycle, averaged
$1.45.
Men, accounting for nearly seven-eighths of the total work force, were
predominant in nearly all of the occupational categories.

Average hourly rates of pay for numerically important occupational
categories were:
$ 3 . 7 4 for radio operating technicians, $ 3 . 7 0 for mechanics
and maintenance technicians, $ 3 . 0 3 for teletype-multiplex operators, $ 2 . 9 4 for
nonsupervisory clerical w orkers, and $ 1 . 4 4 for foot and bicycle m essengers.

Reflecting a wide diversity of occupational duties and responsibilities,
rates of pay for international telegraph carrier employees were widely dispersed.
Nearly a tenth of the workers (mostly foot and bicycle m essengers) had rates of
less than $ 1 . 7 0 an hour and approximately one-third of the workers had rates of
$ 3 . 7 0 or m ore.

9 The study, covering only ocea n -ca b le and radiotelegraph carriers with annual operating revenues in excess of
$50,000, excludes 66 officials and managerial assistants and 2,501 employees working outside the conterminous
48 States and the District of Columbia.




8

S ta rtin g
n a tio n a l te le g r a p h
w ere

p ro v id ed

o v e ra ll
sin ce

w ith

th e

ca rrie r

s e p a r a te ly

e m p lo y m e n t

and

1963

survey,

data

in p r e v i o u s

average

of pay

October
October
October
October
October

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964

Number
of
employees

------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------

A lth o u g h
in

to

one

hand,

co m b in e d

The
fo r

for

ra d io te le g ra p h
fo llo w in g

th e

tw o

in ter­

c a r r i e r s — w h ich

ta b u la tio n

p resen ts

te le g ra p h

c a rrie rs

in tern a tio n a l

I960.

Date

w ere

and

rep orts.

rates

Radiotelegraph
_______ carriers________

both

c a rrie r
rep orted
w ere

m any

group.
o n ly

fou n d




by

5,313
5,392
5, 174
5, 115
5,045

o f th e

ra d io te le g ra p h
F or

Average
hourly
rates

and

$2.80
2.92
3.08
3.22
3.41

o ccu p a tio n a l

e x a m p le ,

in o c e a n -c a b le

Number
of
employees

Average
hourly
rates

3,946
3,986
3,805
-

$2.84
2.97
3. 13

c a te g o rie s

o c e a n -c a b le
ra d io

ra d io te le g ra p h

O cean-cable
________ carriers_______

Number
of
employees

________ Total_________

m on

w ere

g ro u p s— o c e a n -c a b le

c a rrie rs,
o p era tors

ca rrie rs;

o p e ra tio n s

o n ly .

1,367
1,406
1, 369
-

stu d ie d
som e
and

ca b le

Average
hourly
rates

$2.68
2.79
2.94

s e p a r a te ly
are

fou n d

are

ra d io te le g ra p h

op era tors,

on

c o m ­

e x c lu siv e ly
rig g ers

th e

oth er

Table 1. Class A Telephone Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution of Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Rates,2 December 1964
N um ber o f em p .oyee s
O cc u p a tio n a l g rou p
T otal

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o ff ic i a ls and
m a n a g e r ia l a ssista n ts ______________
P a r t t i m e ___________________________
F u ll tim e ___________________________
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s ____________________________
D r a ft s m e n __________________________
O th ers _______________________________
B u s in e s s o ff ic e and s a le s
e m p lo y e e s ____________________________
S u p e r v is o r s _________________________
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s _____
C l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s
_
______
S u p e r v is o r s _______________
_____
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s
C o m m e r c ia l d ep a rtm en t ______
T r a ffic d ep a rtm en t
____ _
P la n t d e p a r t m e n t _______________
A c co u n tin g dep a rtm en t ________
A ll o th e r d e p a r t m e n t s __________
T elep h on e o p e r a t o r s __
___
C h ie f o p e r a t o r s _ _ __
_____
S e r v ic e a ss is ta n ts and
in s t r u c t o r s _________________________
E x p e r ie n c e d sw itc h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s _____ ___________________
O p e r a to r s in tra in in g
_______
O ther s w itc h b o a r d e m p lo y e e s
C o n s tru ctio n , in sta lla tio n , and
m a in ten a n ce e m p l o y e e s _____________
F o r e m e n o f telep h on e cr a ft s m e n __
C e n tr a l o f f ic e cr a ft s m e n ____
T e s t -b o a r d m en and
r e p e a t e r m e n ___________________
C e n tr a l o ff ic e r e p a i r m e n ______
O th ers
In sta lla tion and ex ch a n g e re p a ir
cr a ft s m e n
_ __
P B X and sta tion i n s t a l l e r s __
E x ch a n g e r e p a ir m e n
___
O th ers
__
L in e, c a b le , and con d u it
c r a ft s m e n _________________________
L in em en _________________________
C a ble s p l i c e r s __________________
C a ble s p l i c e r s ' h e lp e r s ________
O th ers ___________________________
L a b o r e r s ____________________________
B u ild in g , s u p p lie s , and m o to r
v e h ic le e m p lo y e e s
F o r e m e n ____________________________
M e c h a n ics __________________________
O ther b u ild in g s e r v i c e
e m p lo y e e s __________________________
O ther su p p lie s and m o to r
v e h ic le e m p lo y e e s
A ll e m p lo y e e s not e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d _____________________________

1
through
2
3

Men

W om en

6 2 4 ,4 0 8 273, 922 350, 486
1, 001 15,2 88
16,289
608, 119 2 72 ,92 1 3 35,198
60, 428
2, 523
5 7,9 05
4 7 ,7 2 0
9, 457
38, 263
136,378
10,321
1 26,057
2 4 ,5 2 4
1 8,837
32,0 16
33, 088
1 7,592
172,957
8, 569
13, 438
117, 183
3 1 ,5 69
2, 198

4 7 ,5 0 0
716
4 6 ,7 8 4

12,9 28
1, 807
11, 121

15,5 53 32, 167
5, 184
4, 273
10,3 69 2 7 ,8 9 4
10, 965 1 25,413
2, 108
8, 213
8. 857 1 17,200
589 23, 935
28 1 8,809
6, 074 25, 942
1, 060 3 2,0 28
1, 106 16, 486
61 172,896
13
8, 556

A v e ra g e
s c h e d - A v era g e
uled
h ou rly
Under
w eek ly
ra tes1
2
$ 1. 25
hours

38. 1
21. 4
38. 5

$ 2 . 96
1. 91
2. 97

37. 8
37. 9
37. 8

5. 17
2. 38
5. 29

37.
38.
37.
37.
38.
37.
37.
37.
38.
37.
37.
36.
38.

3.
4.
2.
2.
3.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
2.
3.

8
1
7
8
0
8
4
9
8
3
2
6
9

12
52
77
38
64
28
14
34
40
18
35
15
30

P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g —
$ 1. 25 $ 1. 30
and
under
$ 1. 30 $ 1. 50

$ 1. 50

$ 1. 70

$ 1. 90

$ 2 . 10 $ 2 . 30

$ 1. 70

$ 1. 90

$ 2 . 10 $ 2 . 30

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 90

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 90

$ 3. 10 $ 3. 30 $ 3.50

$ 3 . 70

over

(3 )

0. 2

1. 6

6. 2

9. 4

8. 3

5. 8

4. 2

4. 1

4. 4

7. 7

8. 8

17. 5

X

X

X

X

10. 3
x

11. 3

X
X

X

X

X

X

X

X
X

X

X

X
X

X

X

X
X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X
X

-

(3 )
.2
(3 )

(3 )
.7
-

.5
10. 3
. 1

.7
12. 2
.2

1.1
16. 1
.4

2. 3
22. 1
1. 5

1. 5
8. 8
1. 2

1. 8
7. 3
1. 5

1. 7
3. 1
1. 7

1. 7
2. 5
1. 7

2. 2
4. 6
2. 1

2. 6
3. 5
2. 6

3. 0
2. 8
3. 0

80. 7
5. 5
84. 0

(3 )
(3 )

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
. 1
. 1
.2
. 3
.5
. 1

.7
_
.9
.9
_
1. 0
1. 2
.4
1. 1
.9
1. 2
4. 2
. 1

2. 4
. 1
3. 0
8. 6
(3 )
9. 3
12. 8
2. 8
5. 6
13. 1
11. 0
12. 0
. 1

6. 4
.2
7. 9
11. 7
. 1
12. 7
18. 2
6. 7
9 .6
13. 7
15. 0
17. 4
.5

10. 9
.2
13. 6
14. 3
.4
15. 4
18. 3
11. 5
15. 8
15. 6
14. 6
17, 4
1. 2

11. 2
.4
13. 9
20. 1
1. 0
21. 6
22. 6
26. 6
23. 0
20. 6
14. 3
16. 6
3. 0

14.
1.
17.
12.
2.
13.
9.
21.
13.
14.
10.
11.
6.

2.
4.
1.
2.
9.
2.
.
.
5.
.
1.
.
7.

4
7
9
6
2
1
7
9
5
4
9
5
5

29. 1
7 1 .7
18. 6
5. 1
44. 8
1. 8
1. 3
1. 0
1. 4
1. 1
5. 6
1. 7
27. 9

(3 )
-

0
0
2
9
6
7
8
7
2
2
6
3
6

9.
2.
10.
10.
4.
11.
7.
18.
10.
11.
8.
6.
10.

1
5
8
6
7
1
3
5
3
7
8
6
4

4.
3.
5.
5.
8.
4.
4.
5.
2.
6.
6.
5.
12.

8
6
1
0
3
7
3
9
2
0
2
4
4

4.
4.
4.
2.
9.
2.
1.
2.
1.
1.
4.
4.
11.

5
4
5
5
1
0
5
0
8
3
2
4
7

2. 1
5. 3
1. 3
2. 5
9 .6
1. 9
1. 1
1. 3
3. 4
.7
3. 6
1. 4
10. 4

2.
5.
1.
3.
10.
2.
.
.
7.
.
2.
.
8.

1
9
2
0
1
4
5
8
0
4
5
7
1

13, 416

37. 7

2. 60

-

(3 )

.2

.6

1. 5

6. 0

11. 3

27. 9

21. 9

10. 6

6. 3

5. 0

3. 6

1. 3

3. 7

17 117,166
4 31, 565
5
2, 193

36. 5
35. 4
37. 6

2. 11
1. 74
2. 49

-

3. 1
11. 4
. 3

8. 6
33. 4
.6

16. 5
33. 2
1. 3

20. 8
14. 8
4. 0

21. 2
5. 9
12. 5

12. 1
.8
35. 7

5. 9
. 3
25. 7

5. 6
. 1
10. 0

4. 8

_

.6

(3 )
0. 2

.7
. 1
(3 )

_

_
_

_
_

_

6. 1

2. 0

1. 1

. 1

. 3

391
12
345

39. 9
39. 8
39. 9

3. 38
4. 62
3. 21

-

(3 )
. 1

. 3
(3 )
. 3

1. 4
(3 )
1. 0

3. 1
(3 )
3. 1

3. 0
(3 )
3. 7

2. 9
. 1
3. 8

3. 0
. 1
4. 8

1. 9
. 1
3. 1

3. 0
. 3
3. 7

5. 7
.2
5. 8

10. 2
.6
9. 3

21. 2
1. 3
20. 0

25. 7
2. 5
27. 1

18. 5
94. 6
14. 2

40. 0
39. 9
39. 8

3. 32
3. 19
2. 97

-

. 1
. 1
. 1

. 3
. 3
1. 1

.5
.9
4. 8

1. 6
3. 4
4. 7

2. 5
3. 7
10. 2

2. 9
4. 1
3. 9

2. 7
5. 6
2. 1

2. 3
3. 2
4. 9

2. 7
4. 0
3. 6

3. 6
6. 5
6. 2

10. 8
8. 9
9. 6

22. 4
19. 0
23. 6

31. 9
26. 0
19. 4

15. 8
14. 3
6. 0

.2
.4
(3 )

.
.
.
1.

8
5
1
7

1.
1.
.
2.

9
9
6
8

2.
3.
.
1.

5
9
7
5

2.
3.
1.
1.

1.
1.
.
1.

4
8
7
1

3.
2.
1.
6.

4
1
7
5

7.
3.
3.
15.

1
5
1
3

13. 9
10. 9
9. 4
2 1 .4

28.
25.
31.
32.

7
3
2
1

33.
43.
47.
10.

9
1
4
9

2.
.
3.
3.

0
7
3
0

5
6
2
9
2
3

4. 3
8. 8
.2
7. 8
3. 8
29. 4

8.
13.
1.
32.
5.
11.

4
7
1
9
5
8

4.
5.
2.
13.
4.
8.

4
7
2
0
7
8

3. 1
3. 3
2. 0
7. 9
6. 6
_

2. 3
2. 5
1. 4
8. 3
2. 8
_

3.
4.
2.
2.
4.

2
1
5
2
8

6.
9.
4.
1.
6.

7
8
8
9
5

11.
14.
11.
1.
7.

22.
22.
26.
.
16.

8
7
2
8
7

23.
5.
40.
1.
26.

1
1
3
6
6

3.
.
6.
.
7.

6
2
5
2
9

6. 7
2. 1
3. 8

6. 7
2. 0
4. 9

5. 9
2. 4
6. 0

22

1 82 ,61 4 1 82 ,22 3
2 4 ,1 0 4
2 4 ,0 9 2
5 8 ,8 8 4
5 9 ,2 2 9

_

13, 386
43, 368
2, 475

1 3,385
43, 040
2, 459

1
328
16

6 7 ,7 8 2
31, 873
14,5 45
21, 364

6 7 ,7 4 9
3 1 ,8 7 3
14, 526
21,350

33
19
14

40.
40.
40.
40.

0
0
0
0

3.
3.
3.
3.

26
27
42
15

-

(3 )

3 1,465
12,586
15,4 93
1, 994
1, 392
34

3 1,465
1 2,586
15, 493
1 ,9 9 4
1, 392
33

1

40.
40.
40.
40.
39.
40.

0
0
0
0
9
8

2.
2.
3.
2.
3.
1.

98
67
34
09
03
66

-

(3 )
(3 )

2 2 ,5 9 0
2, 533
2, 764

16, 123
2, 139
2, 760

6, 467
394
4

2. 53
4. 24
3. 17

(3 )
-

.4
-

3. 6
_

10. 4
.2
.4

15. 8
.8
1. 9

14. 1
.9
2. 4

9. 9
2. 3
3. 7

1 2 ,4 30

6, 381

6, 049

36. 3

1. 96

(3 )

.7

6. 2

17. 4

25. 1

20. 7

13. 6

8. 2

6. 7

.6

.4

. 1

. 1

(3 )

4, 863

4, 843

20

39. 6

2. 60

_

. 1

.8

3. 6

7. 8

11. 0

8. 0

7. 0

10. 2

21. 0

15. 2

8. 1

3. 6

2. 1

1.6

1,721

1 ,497

224

38. 0

3. 29

■

. 1

.2

2. 3

6. 3

7. 6

5. 1

3 ,

5. 5

7. 7

4. 2

6. 9

8. 0

8. 4

33.'9

x indicates that these data were not collected.




$ 3. 30 $ 3. 50 $ 3. 70
and

$ 2 . 50

37. 8
39. 3
39. 6

-

-

.
.
.
.
2.
35.

2. 0
2. 4
.6
2. 2
6.
9.
1.
21.
4.
14.

1
4
6
3
1
7

3
5
3
3

_

C o v e r s 57 telep h on e c a r r ie r s with annual operating rev en u es e x ce e d in g $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 and en g ag ed in in tersta te o r fo r e ig n co m m u n ica tio n s e r v ic e
c o n n e ctio n w ith the fa c ilit ie s o f another c a r r ie r under d ir e c t o r in d ir e c t co m m o n c o n t r o l.
See a ppen dix fo r defin ition o f hours and ra tes used in this b u lle tin .
L e s s than 0. 05 p e r ce n t.

KOTE:

$ 3. 10

Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal 100.

_

5. 1
2. 5
10. 8

b y m ea n s

5
0
1
1
9

3. 4
3. 0
10. 7

_

4. 8
3. 3
29. 5

o f th eir

2. 9
3. 5
16. 5

10. 2
76. 9
9. 3
. 1

ow n fa c ilit ie s

or

(0

Table 2. Bell System Class A Telephone Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution of Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Rates,2 December 1964
A v era g e
s c h e d ­ A v era g e
uled
h ou rly
w eek ly r a t e s 2
h ou rs

Numbe r o f em p lo y e e s
O cc u p a tio n a l g rou p
T ota l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x ce p t o ff ic i a ls and
m a n a g e r ia l a s s i s t a n t s ----------------------P a r t t i m e ------------------------------------------F u ll t i m e ------------------------------------------P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s ------------------------------------------D r a ft s m e n -----------------------------------------O th ers ________________________________
B u s in e s s o f f ic e and s a le s e m p lo y e e s —
S u p e r v is o r s --------------------------------------------N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s ------------C le r ic a l e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------S u p e r v is o r s --------------------------------------------N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s ------------C o m m e r c ia l d ep a rtm en t -------------T r a ffic d e p a r t m e n t --------------------------P la n t d e p a r t m e n t -----------------------------A ccou n tin g d e p a r t m e n t ----------------A ll o th e r d e p a r t m e n t s -------------------T elep h on e o p e r a t o r s --------------------------------C h ief o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------S e r v ic e a s s is ta n ts and in s t r u c t o r s —
E x p e r ie n c e d sw itc h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------------O p e r a to r s in t r a in in g -------------------------O th er sw itc h b o a r d e m p l o y e e s ---------C o n s tru ctio n , in sta lla tio n , and
m a in ten a n ce e m p l o y e e s -----------------------F o r e m e n o f telep h on e cr a ft s m e n —
C en tra l o f f i c e c r a f t s m e n ------------------T e s t -b o a r d m en and
r e p e a t e r m e n ------------------------------------C en tra l o f f ic e re p a ir m e n ----------O th ers --------------------------------------------------In sta lla tion and ex ch a n g e re p a ir
c r a ft s m e n ---------------------------------------------P B X and sta tion in s t a l le r s ---------E x ch a n g e r e p a ir m a n ---------------------O th ers ------------------------------------------------L in e , c a b le , and con d u it
c r a f t s m e n ---------------------------------------------L in e m e n ---------------------------------------------C a ble s p l i c e r s --------------------------------C a ble s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s -------------O t h e r s ________________________________
L a b o r e r s --------------------------------------------------B u ild in g , s u p p lie s , and m o t o r
v e h ic le e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------F o r e m e n --------------------------------------------M e c h a n ic s -----------------------------------------O th er b u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p lo y e e s ..
O th er su p p lie s and m o t o r
v e h ic le e m p lo y e e s --------------------------A ll e m p lo y e e s not e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d ---------------------------------------------

Men

W om en

P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g $ 1. 50

$ 1. 70

$ 1. 9 0

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 30

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 90

$ 3 . 10

$ 3. 30

$ 3 . 50

$3.70

$ 1. 50

$ 1. 7 0

$ 1. 90

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 30

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 . 70

$ 2. 90

$ 3 . 10

$ 3 . 30

$ 3. 50

$ 3 . 70

over

$ 1. 30

and
und er

and

3 3 7 ,4 1 5
1 4,5 19
322,896

38. 0
2 1. 0
3 8. 5

$2.99
1 .9 5
3. 00

1. 1
X
X

6. 0
X
X

9. 2
X
X

10. 3
X
X

11. 5
X
X

8. 5
X
X

5.9
X
X

4. 1
X
X

3. 9
X
X

4 .4
X
X

7. 8
X
X

9. 1
X
X

17 .9
X
X

58,492
2, 389
56,103
46,311
9,210
37,101
131,464
9,943
12 1 ,5 2 1
23,544
18,460
31,012
31,743
16,762
165,580
8,234
12,966

12,701
45,791
1 ,7 6 2
627
45,164
10,9 3 9
3 1 , 114
15,1 9 7
4 , 160
5, 05 0
26,954
10,1 47
10, 239 1 2 1 , 2 2 5
1 ,8 9 3
8 , 0 50
8 , 346 1 1 3 , 1 7 5
22,995
549
28
18,4 3 2
25,075
5,937
30,853
8 90
15,820
94 2
42 165, 5 3 8
8,2 2 4
10
1 2,9 45
21

37. 7
37. 8
37. 7
37. 7
38. 1
37. 7
37. 7
37. 9
37. 7
37. 3
37. 9
38. 7
37. 2
37. 1
36. 4
38.9
3 7. 6

5. 23
2. 38
5. 35
3. 15
4 . 56
2. 8 0
2.40
3.66
2.29
2. 15
2. 35
2.42
2. 20
2. 37
2. 17
3. 32
2.62

. 3
.4
. 5
.4
.4
. 5
. 2
. 7
. 2
. 5
3. 2
. 1

. 5
10. 4
. 1
2. 2
2. 7
8. 4
9. 1
12. 7
2. 8
5. 2
12. 9
10. 9
11. 9
,4

. 7
12. 2
. 2
6. 0
7.5
11. 4
. 1
12.4
18. 0
6. 1
9.4
13.4
15. 0
17. 1
. 2
1. 1

1. 1
16. 0
.4
10. 9
13. 6
14. 2
. 3
15. 3
18. 3
11.4
15. 4
15. 7
14.4
17. 6
. 9
4. 8

2. 3
2 2. 9
1 .4
1 1. 3
. 2
14. 0
2 0. 3
. 7
22. 0
23. 0
26. 7
23.4
2 0. 9
14. 6
17. 2
2. 9
11. 3

1. 4
8. 7
1. 1
14. 3
. 8
17. 6
13. 2
2. 3
14. 1
10. 1
22. 1
13. 6
14. 7
10. 8
11. 7
6. 5
28.6

1. 7
7. 5
1 .4
9. 2
2.4
10. 9
10. 9
4. 7
11.4
7. 6
18. 8
10. 6
12. 1
9. 0
6. 8
10. 3

1. 6
3. 1
1. 6
4. 8
3. 5
5. 2
5. 1
8. 3
4.9
4 .4
6. 0
2. 2
6. 2
6.4
5. 6
12. 2

22. 2

11. 0

1. 6
2. 2
1. 6
4. 5
4. 4
4. 6
2. 5
8.9
2. 0
1. 5
2. 0
1. 7
1. 3
4. 3
4. 6
11.8
6. 5

2. 0
4. 4
1 .9
2. 1
5. 3
1. 3
2. 6
9.8
2. 0
1. 1
1. 3
3. 5
. 7
3. 7
1.4
10. 4
5. 2

2.4
3. 5
2. 4
2. 2
5.9
1. 2
3. 1
10. 3
2. 5
. 5
. 8
7. 2
.4
2. 6
. 7
8. 1
3. 7

2. 7
2.8
2. 7
2. 4
4. 6
1 .9
2. 7
9. 3
2. 1
.8
.9
5. 7
.4
2. 0
. 5
7. 8
1 .4

81.9
5. 6
85. 2
2 9. 7
72. 8
19. 0
5. 1
45. 3
1 .9
1.4
1. 0
1.4
1. 1
5. 8
1.7
2 8. 8
3. 8

1 1 1 ,0 5 9
31,149
2, 172

6 1 1 1 , 053
4
31,145
1
2, 171

36.4
35.4
37. 6

2. 14
1.74
2.49

1. 6
11. 1
. 3

8. 2
33. 4
. 6

1 5 .9
33.4
1. 1

21.3
15. 0
3. 9

2 2. 2
5.9
12. 3

12. 7
. 8
3 6. 1

6. 2
. 3
26. 0

5.9
. 1
10. 1

5. 0
6. 2

. 7
2. 0

1. 1

5 9 9 , 112
15,388
583,724

261,697
8 69
2 6 0 , 8 28

. 3

1 7 4 , 114 1 73, 771
2 3 , 158
23,146
56,937
56,606

343
12
331

3 9. 9
39.8
39.9

3 .4 1
4.67
3. 23

-

1. 2
. 9

3. 1
3. 1

2.9
3. 7

2.9
3.9

2.9
4. 8

1. 8
3. 0

2.4
. 1
3. 2

4. 9
. 1
5. 0

10. 2
. 2
9. 2

2 1. 7
. 6
2 0. 2

2 6. 8
2. 1
2 8. 1

19. 2
96.9
14.8

13, 016
41,953
1 ,9 6 8

13,0 1 6
41,628
1,9 6 2

325
6

39.9
39.9
3 9. 7

3. 34
3. 20
3. 01

-

.4
. 8
5. 3

1. 6
3. 4
5. 0

2. 6
3. 7
11. 6

2. 9
4. 2
3. 4

2. 7
5.6
1. 6

2. 3
3. 2
5. 0

2. 2
3.6
2. 8

3. 0
5. 8
1. 2

10. 7
8.8
8. 2

22. 8
19. 2
2 3. 9

32. 6
2 6. 9
24.4

16. 2
14. 7
7. 5

64,502
30,430
14 ,0 5 1
20,021

64,502
30,430
14 ,0 51
20,021

_
-

40.
40.
40.
40.

0
0
0
0

3. 29
3.29
3.44
3. 18

-

.6
. 3
1. 6

1.
1.
.
2.

7
8
4
6

1.9
2.4
. 5
2. 0

2. 4
4. 0
. 6
1 .4

2.
3.
1.
1.

1

1. 1
1. 5
. 7
.9

2.
1.
.
5.

2
1
4
5

13. 9
10.4
9.4
22. 3

29.
2 6.
31.
3 4.

8
0
6
2

35. 6
45 . 1
49. 0
11.6

2. 1
.7
3.4
3. 2

29,513
11,583
14,798
1,8 9 6
1,236
4

29,513
1 1 ,5 8 3
1 4 ,7 9 8
1 ,8 96
1 ,2 3 6
4

_

40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
39. 9
(3 )

3. 01
2.69
3. 37
2. 10
3. 14

. 1
. 1
. 1
-

3. 9
8.4
7. 3
2. 3
-

8.
14.
.
3 3.
5.
-

3
0
9
3
3

6. 0
9.4
1. 5
21. 7
4. 0
1 00. 0

4.4
5. 8
2. 1
13. 4
4 .4
-

2. 9
3. 1
1 .9
7.9
5. 7
-

2. 1
2. 1
1. 2
8.4
2. 6
-

2. 6
3. 6
1.9
2. 3
2. 1
-

5.9
9. 2
3. 8
1. 8
6. 9
-

11. 7
14.4
11. 1
1. 1
8.9
-

23.6
24. 2
26. 5
. 8
18. 9
-

2 4. 7
5. 5
42. 1
1. 7
2 9. 9
-

3.9
. 2
6. 8
.2
8.9
-

21,528
2 ,4 7 1
2,695
11,782

15,240
2, 077
2,695
5,895

6,288
394

3 7.
3 9.
3 9.
3 6.

7
3
6
3

2.55
4 . 26
3. 18
1.98

3. 0

16.
.
1.
2 5.

1
7
7
8

14.
.
2.
21.

10.
2.
3.
14.

6.9
2. 1
3.9
8. 6

6. 9
1.9
5. 0
7. 0

5.8
2. 1
5.8
. 6

4.9
2. 3
10. 3
. 3

3.
2.
10.
.

5
8
5
1

5. 0
3. 2
3 0. 1

5. 3

9.9
. 2
. 3
16.6

3.
3.
17.
.

4 , 580

4 , 573

7

39.6

2.62

. 2

3.4

7. 6

10. 8

8. 2

6.9

10. 6

2 0. 9

15. 0

8. 6

3. 8

2. 3

1.7

1 ,6 2 3

1, 417

206

38. 3

3. 32

2. 0

6. 2

7. 5

4 .4

3. 5

5. 5

7. 3

4. 1

7. 3

8. 0

8. 7

3 5. 3

_

-

-

5,887

(3 )

-

-

3
8
3
3

2
2
6
1

.

1 C o v e r s 24 B e ll S y ste m telep h on e c a r r i e r s , a ll c la s s ifie d as cla s s A c a r r ie r s .
2 See a ppen dix f o r d e fin itio n o f h o u r s and ra tes u sed in this b u lletin .
3 In su ffic ie n t data to w a r ra n t p r e se n ta tio n o f an a v e r a g e .
NO TE: x indicates that these data were not collected.




-

Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal 100.

2
3

2

5
3
7
5

6.
3.
2.
13.

-

0
3
0
1

10 .6
78. 2
9.5
. 1

Table 3. Non-Bell Class A Telephone Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution of Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Rates,2 December 1964
N u mb e r of e m p l o y e e s

Average
sch ed ­ Av erage
uled
h o ur l y
w e ek l y
r at es 1
2
ho ur s

O c c u pa t i on a l group
T otal

A l l e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s and
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ----------------------------P a r t t i m e ---------------------------------------------------F u l l t i m e ---------------------------------------------------P r o f e s s i o n a l and s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l
e m p l o y e e s -----------------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n --------------------------------------------------O t h e r s ---------------------------------------------------------B u s i n e s s o f f ic e and s a l e s e m p l o y e e s —
S u p e r v i s o r s ------------------------- --------------------N o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s ----------------C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s -------------------------------------S u p e r v i s o r s ----------------------------------------------N o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s ----------------C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t ---------------T r a f f i c d e p a r t m e n t -------------------------Pl an t d e p a r t m e n t ----------------------------A c c o u n t i n g d e p a r t m e n t -------------------A l l o th e r d e p a r t m e n t s -------------------T e l e p h o n e o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------C h i e f o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------------S e r v i c e a s s i s t a n t s and i n s t r u c t o r s —
E x p e r i e n c e d s w i t c hb o ar d
o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------------O p e r a t o r s in t r a i n i n g ---------------------------O th e r s wi t c h b o a r d e m p l o y e e s ----------C o n s t r u c t i o n , i n s t a l l a t i o n , and
m a i n t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s -------------------------F o r e m e n o f t e le ph on e c r a f t s m e n ----C e n t r a l o f f i ce c r a f t s m e n -------------------T e s t - b o a r d m e n and
r e p e a t e r m e n _________ __ ------C e n t r a l o f f i c e r e p a i r m e n -------------O t h e r s -------------------------------------------------I ns ta ll at i on and e xc ha ng e r epa i r
c r a f t s m e n ----------------------------------------------P B X and s ta ti on i n s t a l l e r s ----------Ex ch a ng e r e p a i r m e n ----------------------O t h e r s -------------------------------------------------L i n e , c a b l e , and conduit
c r a f t s m e n -----------------------------------------------L i n e m e n -----------------------------------------------C a bl e s p l i c e r s ----------------------------------C a bl e s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s ----------------Oth e r s ___ .___________________ _____ —
L a b o r e r s ---------------------------------------------------B u i l d i n g , su ppl i es , and m o t o r
v e h i c l e e m p l o y e e s ----------------------------------F o r e m e n -----------------------------------------------------M e c h a n i c s ------------------------------------------------O t h e r buil ding s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s —
O t h er s u p pl i es and m o t o r
v e h i c l e e m p l o y e e s -------------------------------A l l e m p l o y e e s not e l s e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d -----------------------------------------------------

Me n

Women

25,296
901
2 4 ,3 9 5

12,225
132
12,093

13,071
7 69
12,3 0 2

1 ,9 3 6
134
1 ,8 0 2
1,4 0 9
247
1 ,1 62
4,914
3 78
4 ,536
980
3 77
1 ,0 0 4
1 , 345
8 30
7 ,3 7 7
335
4 72

1 ,709
89
1 ,6 2 0
3 56
134
222
7 26
215
511
40
137
170
164
19
3
1

2 27
45
182
1 ,0 53
113
9 40
4, 188
163
4, 0 25
940
3 77
867
1 ,1 75
6 66
7 ,3 5 8
3 32
471

3 9.
3 9.
4 0.
3 9.
3 9.
3 9.
39.
4 0.
39.
3 9.
3 9.
40.
3 9.
3 9.
3 9.
4 0.
4 0.

6, 124
4 20
26

11
4

8,500
9 46
2,292

P e r c e n t o f e m p l o y e e s r ec e i v i n g —
Under
$ 1. 25

$ 1. 25
and
under
$ 1. 30

$ 1 . 30

$ 1. 50

$ 1 . 70

$ 1.90

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 30

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 90

$ 3 . 10

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 . 50

$ 3 . 70

$ 1.50

$ 1. 70

$ 1.90

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 30

$ 2 . 50

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 90

$ 3 . 10

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 . 50

$ 3 . 70

o v er

9.9
X
X

5. 5
X
X

3. 4
X
X

3. 7
X
X

6. 8
X
X

8. 7
X
X

5. 2
X
X

5. 0
X
X

1 .9
X
X

4. 5
5. 2
4. 5
7. 2
4. 9
7. 7
2. 9
5. 8
2. 7
. 7
2. 4
1. 5
3. 0
6. 0
1. 6
9.9
14. 4

4. 1
4. 5
4. 1
2. 8
6. 5
2. 1
2. 2
6. 9
1. 8
. 7
1.3
2. 2
1 .4
3. 3
. 8
14. 3
. 6

5. 6
8. 2
5. 4
1. 9
4. 5
1.4
2. 1
12. 7
1. 3
. 1
. 3
3. 7
. 7
1. 1
.4
16.4
. 2

8. 7
8. 2
8. 8
2. 6
5. 3
2. 0
1. 1
5. 0
.8
. 3
.5
1 .0
1 .9
.5
9.6
. 6

9. 2
3. 7
9. 6
2. 1
4. 9
1. 5
1. 1
5. 6
. 7
. 1
2. 0
.4
1 .0
. 3
9. 9
-

12. 3
1.5
13. 1
2. 6
8. 9
1 .2
.9
8. 5
.3
.5
.3
.6
. 1
.6
. 2

43.
4.
4 6.
8.
31.
3.
2.
31.
.
.
.
.
.
1.
.
5.
.

-

-

-

-

7. 7

7. 7

-

and

$ 2 . 30
1.50
2. 32

0. 1
X
X

5. 3
X
X

13. 8
X
X

10. 3
X
X

14. 4
X
X

9
1
0
6
9
6
8
0
8
6
6
0
9
7
5
1
5

3. 55
2. 40
3. 63
2. 23
3. 18
2. 03
1 .9 9
3. 24
1 .8 8
1. 79
1.91
1 .9 4
1.8 5
1 .9 6
1 .7 0
2. 67
2. 10

_
. 1
.8
. 2
-

.5
3. 0
. 3
5.4
6. 5
4. 4
4. 7
5. 4
2. 9
2. 7
5. 8
5. 5
12. 1
1 .5
.2

1.0
6. 7
. 6
12. 8
15. 6
14. 2
15. 4
18. 0
10. 3
12. 4
16. 7
16. 1
2 6. 6
1. 8
3. 8

1.4
8. 2
.9
9. 1
3. 2
10. 3
13. 9
. 3
15. 0
16.4
7. 4
15. 8
16. 0
14. 1
15. 3
2. 1
6. 6

1. 6
11.2
. 9
18. 9
6. 5
21.5
19. 3
1. 1
2 0. 8
2 3. 5
3 3. 2
17. 3
2 1. 6
14. 7
25. 2
8. 4
12. 3

2.
17.
.
12.
7.
13.
18.
4.
19.
19.
19.
2 8.
14.
19.
12.
6.
40.

1
2
9
3
7
3
4
0
6
7
1
3
1
0
1
6
5

2. 7
8. 2
2. 3
8. 7
9. 3
8. 5
12. 5
9. 3
12. 7
13. 2
2 0. 7
9. 8
14. 4
9.4
3. 6
6. 6
13. 1

3. 0
9. 7
2. 6
5. 0
6. 1
4. 7
4. 1
9. 5
3. 7
2. 1
1.9
3. 1
4. 3
5. 9
1.0
6. 6
7. 0

6, 113
420
22

3 9. 4
3 9. 5
3 5. 4

1 .6 2
1.54
2. 08

1 .9
15. 4

13. 8
9. 3
3. 8

2 9. 2
36. 2
-

15. 2
3 7. 6
3. 8

2 8. 0
13. 8
19. 2

11.0
1 .0
15. 4

2. 8
. 2
2 6. 9

. 1
-

8 ,4 5 2
9 46
2 ,2 7 8

48
14

4 0. 1
4 0. 1
4 0. 2

2. 76
3. 53
2. 74

-

. 7
2. 4

5. 2
. 1
7. 3

4. 9
.2
2. 8

4. 9
. 4
3. 0

4. 3
1. 3
3. 3

3. 3
3. 2
3. 0

4. 8
2. 9
3. 6

5. 4
3. 1
4. 4

15. 7
5. 3
14. 7

21. 6
4. 2
2 7. 6

1 1 .7
10. 7
11.9

11. 3
16. 7
15. 1

1. 7
12. 2
1 .0

4. 5
39. 9
-

370
1 ,4 15
507

369
1,412
497

1
3
10

4 0. 3
40. 2
4 0. 2

2. 71
2. 72
2. 83

-

5. 4
2. 2
. 6

11.9
6. 9
5. 1

1.6
3. 2
2. 8

1.4
3. 3
3. 6

3. 6
4. 7

1.4
2. 3
6. 1

1. 1
4. 2
3. 7

5. 1
4. 2
4. 3

18. 6
16. 6
6. 7

2 4. 6
29. 1
25. 4

16. 5
9. 5
15. 0

7. 0
14. 7
22. 3

5. 4
. 3
-

. 1
-

3 ,2 8 0
1,4 4 3
4 94
1 ,3 43

3.247
1 ,4 43
475
1 ,3 29

33
19
14

4 0.
4 0.
4 0.
40.

1
1
3
0

2.
2.
2.
2.

72
66
93
72

-

. 1
-

3. 9
8. 2
. 7

4.
5.
2.
3.

1
0
8
6

4.
4.
6.
5.

9
0
3
4

4.
2.
2.
6.

0
4
8
0

3. 0
3. 0
1 .4
3. 7

5. 6
7. 8
1 .8
4. 5

6.
9.
2.
4.

5
8
2
5

21.0
18. 6
29. 1
2 0. 6

2 4. 8
10. 0
22. 5
41.7

13.
2 0.
9.
7.

7
7
7
6

8. 4
10. 5
21. 1
1 .4

. 1
.2
. 2

. 1

1 ,9 5 2
1 ,0 03
695
98
156
30

1,9 5 2
1 ,0 03
695
98
156
29

_
_
_

1
9
5
3
0
9

2. 50
2. 40
2. 79
1 .8 9
2. 18
1.61

-

. 3
. 6
-

10.
13.
3.
17.
16.
3 3.

6
8
7
3
0
3

9.
10.
5.
27.
6.
13.

2
5
5
5
4
3

7.
9.
5.
13.
5.
3.

7
5
0
3
1
3

4.
4.
3.
6.
6.
10.

3
1
7
1
4
0

5.
5.
4.
7.
13.
-

9
8
3
1
5

5.
6.
4.
7.
4.
-

8
9
3
1
5

13.
10.
16.
2 6.
-

3
8
0

.
1

4 0.
39.
4 0.
40.
4 0.
4 0.

17.
16.
2 4.
3.
3.
-

9
9
6
1
2

8. 7
10. 2
9. 6
1 .0
-

9. 4
4. 8
19. 4
-

.2
. 3
-

-

1 ,0 62
62
69
648

883
62
65
486

179
_
4
162

3 8.
39.
4 0.
37.

1
5
1
0

2.
3.
2.
1.

. 3
. 5

4.
3.
7.
3.

1
2
2
5

3.
1.
2.
1.

4
6
9
5

2. 3
6. 5
1 .4
1 .5

8.
12.
14.
1.

7
9
5
2

7.
9.
3 0.
.

5
7
4
8

2. 4
1 1.3
18. 8
.2

1.
9.
2.
1.

283

270

13

39. 8

2. 34

,3

80

18

34. 0

2. 69

39. 7
2 8. 7
4 0. 1

03
25
68
68

6.
6.
3.
17.
18.
4 0.

9
2
7
3
6
0

16. 6
_
_
2 2. 5

1. 1
1 .0 -

-

8. 6
13. 6

3

21.6
7. 2
31.6

10. 5
1. 6
10. 1
11.7

10. 5
8. 1
4. 3
9.7

10. 6

6. 7

9. 5

14. 1

4. 9

8. 1

3. 2

2 3. 3

17. 0

4. 1

8. 2

8. 2

9. 2

17. 3

5. 1

5. 1

14. 3

6. 1

6. 0
X
X
1
5
0
4
2
6
8
5
4
1
3
3
4
2
3
7
4

7
7
9
5

. 6
9. 7
-

1. 5
25. 8
-

1 .4

-

-

-

“

7. 1

3. 1

11. 2

1 C o v e r s 33 n o n -B e ll telep h on e c a r r ie r s with annual op eratin g rev en u es e x ce e d in g $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 and engaged in in te r sta te o r fo r e ig n co m m u n ica tio n s e r v i c e b y m ea n s o f th eir own fa cilitie s
o r th rou g h co n n e ctio n with the fa c ilit ie s o f a nother c a r r ie r und er d ir e c t o r in d ir e c t com m on c o n tr o l.
2 See a ppen dix fo r d efin ition o f h ou rs and rates used in this b u lletin .
NOTE:

x indicates that these data were not collected.




Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal 100,

Table 4. All Class A1 and Bell System Telephone Carriers: Average Hourly Rates2 of Employees in Selected Occupations by Region, December 1964
United States 3
O cc u p a tio n a l g rou p

New England

Num ber
of
w ork ­
ers

Num­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

A v er­
age
h ou rly
ra te s

A v er­
age
h ourly
ra tes

M iddle A tla n tic
Num­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

A ver age
h ou rly
ra te s

G rea t !L akes
Num­
b er
of
w ork ­
ers

A ver­
age
h ou rly
r a te s

C hesap eak e
Num­
b er
of
w ork ­
ers

A v er­
age
h ou rly
ra te s

N orth C en tral

Southeast
Num ­
b er
of
w ork ­
ers

A ver­
age
h ou rly
ra te s

South C en tra l

Num ­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

Num ­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

A ver age
h ourly
ra te s

A v er­
age
h ou rly
ra te s

M ountain
Num ­
ber
of
w ork ­
ers

A v er­
age
h ou rly
ra te s

1
0
P a c ific
Num b er
of
w ork ­
ers

A v er­
age
h ourly
ra tes

A ll c a r r ie r s
A ll e m p lo y e e s e x ce p t o ff ic i a ls
and m a n a g e r ia l a s s is t a n t s 4__
C a ble s p l i c e r s . . ....................
C a ble s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s _____
C e n tr a l o ff ic e r e p a i r m e n ___
C l e r i c a l ( n o n s u p e r v i s o r y )__
E x ch a n g e r e p a i r m e n ________
E x p e r ie n c e d sw itc h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s ___________________
L in e m e n ______________________
M e c h a n ic s , b u ild in g , and
m o t o r v e h ic le s e r v i c e _____
P B X and sta tion in s t a lle r s __
T e s t -b o a r d m en and
r e p e a t e r m e n ________________

2 7 ,4 6 2
616
1
1, 587
5, 683
515

$ 2 . 75
3. 05
(5)
3. 10
2. 11
3. 24

9 4 ,5 3 6
2, 125
40
7 ,2 4 6
2 1 ,6 9 7
2, 185

$ 3. 08
3. 38
2. 39
3. 24
2 .4 0
3 .4 3

1 3 ,5 3 4
1,821

1 .9 9
2. 48

5, 108
755

2. 00
2. 49

1 4,0 54
1, 336

2. 28
2. 94

2. 84
3. 38

126
3, 540

3. 16
3. 19

48
897

2 .6 9
3. 13

412
5, 992

3. 31
3. 14

223

3. 33

875

3. 28

433

3. 34

1, 773

3. 47

62
26
92
10
16
21

2 2 ,5 0 5
719

$ 2 . 73
3. 15

1 ,4 7 7
4, 326
226

3. 18
2. 05
3. 36

5 2 ,9 7 5
1 ,0 9 5
423
3, 985
9 ,0 4 1
1,781

67
10
07
14
15
35

2 7 ,3 9 8
616
1
1 ,5 8 6
5 ,6 7 3
512

$ 2 . 76
3. 05
(5)
3. 10
2. 11
3. 24

9 0 ,3 6 8
2, 056
26
7 ,0 0 9
2 0 ,7 9 2
2, 089

3 5 ,8 4 7
1 ,0 8 9
108
2, 157
6, 892
563

$ 2 .8 5
3. 32
2. 03
3. 09
2. 17
3. 40

7 4 ,6 5 4
2, 350
310
4, 354
1 3 ,0 7 3
1, 105

$ 2 . 59
3. 22
1.91
3. 06
2. 14
3. 21

2 2 ,6 7 0
720
1
1,491
4, 348
243

$ 2. 73
3. 15
( 5)
3. 18
2. 05
3. 31

56, 162
1, 175
467
4, 094
9, 610
1, 783

1 9,8 09
1,8 1 9

2. 16
2. 89

7 ,2 3 4
892

2. 06
2. 34

16,3 37
1 ,9 2 6

1 .88
2. 13

4, 655
581

1. 95
2. 37

3. 33
3. 45

684
6, 627

3. 20
3. 38

176
1 ,4 8 4

2. 82
3. 08

133
2, 810

2 .9 7
2 .9 9

44
537

3. 69

1,6 7 4

3. 49

448

3. 53

1 ,418

3. 28

117, 183
1 2 ,5 8 6

2. 11
2. 67

9 ,0 1 8
877

2. 20
2 .91

22,8 50
2, 297

2. 26
3. 14

2, 764
3 1 ,8 7 3

3. 17
3. 27

198
1, 160

2. 94
3. 30

879
8, 539

1 3 ,3 8 6

3. 32

714

3. 54

1,573

$ 3.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

64
07
04
13
13
35

$ 3. 03
3 .4 3
2. 23
3. 32
2. 33
3 .4 6

4 5,0 11
1 ,202
246
2, 509
9, 305
593

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

00 128,266
50
2, 907
11
528
23
8, 860
25 2 7,4 92
3, 742
47

$ 3.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

17 104 ,40 0
2 ,7 6 3
58
16
232
34
6, 658
35 2 0 ,1 5 3
52
3, 682

96
34
09
19
28
42

6 2 4 ,4 0 8
15, 493
1 ,9 9 4
4 3, 368
1 2 6 ,0 5 7
1 4 ,5 4 5

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

B e ll S y stem c a r r ie r s
A ll e m p lo y e e s e x ce p t o ff ic i a ls
and m a n a g e r ia l a s s i s t a n t s 4__
C able s p li c e r s . ... .
C a ble s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s _____
C e n tr a l o ff ic e r e p a i r m e n ___
C l e r i c a l ( n o n s u p e r v i s o r y )__
E x ch a n g e re p a irm e n
E x p e r ie n c e d sw itc h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s ___________________
L in em en _____________________
M e c h a n ic s , b u ild in g , and
m o to r v e h ic le s e r v i c e _____
P B X and sta tion in s t a lle r s __
T e s t -b o a r d m en and
rep eaterm en
.. . _ ...

$3.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

11
38
44
24
42
45

9 7 ,4 8 7
2, 535
224
6, 353
19,0 87
3 ,4 2 4

$ 3. 08
3 .4 7
2. 24
3. 34
2. 35
3. 51

3 3 ,6 8 7
1 ,0 2 4
102
2 ,0 1 2
6 ,4 8 0
563

$ 2 .9 1
3. 36
2. 03
3. 1 1
2. 21
3 .4 0

7 0 ,8 1 2
2 ,2 4 9
293
4. 034
1 2,4 56
1, 105

22,5 97
2, 259

2. 27
3. 15

18,1 36
1,4 9 6

2. 21
2. 98

6 ,6 0 3
771

2. 12
2 .4 0

1 5 , 111
1 ,8 2 9

1.91
2. 13

4, 613
571

1 .9 5
2. 38

1 2,7 04
1,6 8 5

2. 02
2. 51

5. 093
752

2. 00
2 .4 9

1 3 ,2 1 4
1, 146

2. 31
2. 94

2. 94
3. 30

879
8 ,461

3. 33
3 .4 6

664
6 ,4 5 5

3. 21
3. 39

175
1,2 2 8

2. 82
3. 21

117
2, 665

3. 08
3. 04

44
536

2. 84
3. 38

124
3, 301

3. 17
3. 23

47
896

2. 70
3. 13

398
5, 726

3. 31
3. 13

3. 54

1,569

3. 70

1,571

3. 52

431

3. 55

1, 353

3. 31

223

3. 33

836

3. 30

433

3. 34

1 ,727

3. 47

$ 2 . 99
3. 37
2. 10
3. 20
2. 29
3 .4 4

4 4 ,9 9 5
1 ,202
246
2, 507
9, 302
593

$ 3. 00 127,525
3. 50
2 ,8 9 0
2. 11
528
3. 23
8 ,8 2 7
2. 25 27,3 46
3 .47
3, 742

1 1 1 ,059
1 1 ,5 8 3

2. 14
2. 69

9 ,0 1 8
874

2. 20
2 .91

2, 695
3 0 ,4 3 0

3. 18
3. 29

198
1, 160

1 3 ,0 1 6

3. 34

713

$3.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

$ 2.
3.
1.
3.
2.
3.

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

18
58
16
34
36
52

599, 112
1 4 ,7 9 8
1 ,8 9 6
4 1 ,9 5 3
121 ,52 1
14,0 51

-

-

1 C o v e r s telep h on e c a r r i e r s with annual operatin g rev en u es ex ceed in g $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 .
2 S ee a ppen dix fo r d e fin itio n o f h ou rs and ra te s u sed in this bulletin .
3 In clu d es data f o r e m p lo y e e s in H aw aii and P u erto R ico and lo n g -lin e s e m p lo y e e s o f the A m e r ic a n T elep h on e and T e le g ra p h C o. w hich a re ex clu d ed fr o m the r e g io n a l ta b u la tion s.
had no c la s s A c a r r i e r s re p o rtin g to the F e d e r a l C om m u n ica tion s C o m m is s io n .
(F o r s c o p e o f s u r v e y , see a p p e n d ix .)
4 In clu d e s e m p lo y e e s in o c c u p a tio n s in addition to th ose shown sep a r a te ly .
5 In su ffic ie n t data to w a rra n t p r e se n ta tio n o f an a v e r a g e .

A lask a

N O T E : F o r p u rp o s e s o f th is study, the re g io n s fo r w hich sep arate data a re p r e s e n te d in clu d e: New England— C on n ecticu t, M ain e, M a ss a c h u se tts, New H a m p s h ire , R hode Island, and
V e r m o n t; M id d le A tla n tic— D e la w a r e , New J e r s e y , New Y ork , and P en n sy lv a n ia ; G reat L a k es— I llin o is , Indiana, M ich igan , O hio, and W is co n s in ; C h esap eak e
D is tr ic t o f C olu m b ia , M aryland ,
V irg in ia , and W est V ir g in ia ; S outheast
A labam a, F lo r id a , G eorg ia , K entucky, L ou is ia n a , M is s is s ip p i, N orth C a ro lin a , South C a ro lin a , and T e n n e s s e e ; N orth C en tra l— Iow a, M innesota,
N eb ra sk a , N orth D akota, and South D ak ota; South C en tra l— A rk a n sa s, K a n sa s, M is s o u r i, O klahom a, and T e x a s (e x ce p t E l P a s o C ounty); M oun tain— A r iz o n a , C o lo r a d o , Idaho (south o f the
Sa lm on R iv e r ), M ontana, N evada, New M e x ic o , T ex a s (E l P a s o County), Utah, and W y om in g ; and P a c ific ----C a lifo r n ia , Idaho (north o f Sa lm on R iv e r ), O re g o n , and W ashington.




Table 5. Western Union Telegraph Company: Percentage Distribution of Wire-Telegraph Employees1 in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Rates* October 1964
N um ber of e m p lo y e e s
O cc u p a tio n a l g rou p
T ota l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o f f ic i a ls , m a n a g eria l
a s s is t a n t s , and m e s s e n g e r s ___________ __ __
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s _____________ __ ________________
E n g in e e rs and en g in e e r in g
a s s is ta n ts ________________________________
O th ers ________________ ________ ___ ____
T e le g r a p h o f f ic e su p erin ten d en ts and
m a n a g e rs __________ _ ___________ _______
S a les e m p lo y e e s _______________________________
C l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s ___________________________
S u p e r v is o r s ________________________________
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s _______________
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t--------------------T r a ffic d e p a r t m e n t ------------------------------A ll o th e r d e p a r t m e n t s ------------------------R ou te a i d e s ____ __________________________
T e le g r a p h o p e r a t o r s _______ ________ _______
T r a ffi c m a n a g e r s , c h ie f o p e r a t o r s ,
s u p e r v is o r s , and in s t r u c t o r s ___________
E x p e r ie n c e d te le g r a p h o p e r a t o r s
(e x c e p t M o r s e o p e r a t o r s )_______________
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t______________
T r a ffi c d e p a r t m e n t____________________
S w itch in g c l e r k s ----------------------------------------O p e r a to r s in t r a in in g _____________________
O th er o p e r a t o r s _________ ________________
M o r s e o p e r a t o r s _______________ _____
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s __________________
C o n s tr u c tio n , in sta lla tio n , and
m a in ten a n ce e m p l o y e e s ____________________
T r a ffi c testin g and reg u la tin g
e m p lo y e e s -------------------------------------- --------C o n s tr u c tio n , in s t a lla t io n , and
m a in ten a n ce e m p l o y e e s _________________
F o r e m e n ________________________________
S u b s c r ib e r s ' eq u ip m en t
m a in t a in e r s __ ________________________
L in e m e n and c a b le m e n ________________
O t h e r s ___________________________________
L a b o r e r s ___________________________ _____
B u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p lo y e e s ______________________
M e c h a n ic s ___________________________________________
O th ers ------------------------------------------------------------------------M e s s e n g e r s ----------------------------------------------------- . . _____
F u ll -t im e e m p lo y e e s ________________________________
P a r t -t im e e m p l o y e e s _______________________________
F o o t and b ic y c le m e s s e n g e r s ____________________
M o to r m e s s e n g e r s ------------------------------------------------------

Men

A v e ra g e
s c h e d ­ A v e ra g e
$ 1. 25
u led
h ou rly
and
ra tes 2
W om en w eek ly
under
h ou rs
$ 1. 30

P e r c e n t of e m p lo y e e s re c e iv in g —
$ 1. 30

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 30

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 . 90

$ 3 . 10

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 0

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1. 70

$ 1. 90

$ 2 . 10

$ 2 . 30

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 . 10

$ 3 . 30

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 0

over

and

22, 262

12,698

9, 564

39. 3

$ 2 .8 0

_

_

_

2. 2

7. 0

9. 2

26. 3

14. 1

9. 2

5 .9

1 1 .4

4 .0

1 .6

947

826

121

3 5 .9

4 .6 1

_

_

_

_

_

. 1

3. 1

4. 3

8. 1

4. 1

4 .6

3. 8

1. 2

7 0 .6

57 3
374

567
259

6
115

35. 1
37. 1

4. 76
4. 38

-

-

-

-

-

.2
-

3 .0
3. 2

2. 1
7 .8

2 .6
1 6.6

2 .6
6. 4

5 .8
2 .9

4. 2
3. 2

.9
1 .6

7 8 .7
58. 3

2, 575
257
5, 742
815
4, 830
2, 891
499
1, 440
97
6, 299

1, 645
243
2, 196
604
1, 560
776
132
652
32
1, 547

930
14
3, 546
211
3, 270
2, 115
367
788
65
4 ,7 5 2

40. 0
39. 2
3 8 .5
3 7 .8
3 8 .6
3 9 .6
3 9 .9
36. 2
4 0 .0
3 9 .9

2 .7 5
3 .5 8
2 .6 4
3. 55
2 .5 1
2 .4 4
2. 34
2. 74
1 .8 6
2. 42

_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

. 2
3. 6
2 .9
2 .6
2. 2
3. 7
69. 1
4. 1

2. 1
7 .5
_
8. 3
8 .0
8 .8
8 .7
3 0 .9
1 0.7

1 1.7
1 3 .9
.5
16. 5
20. 1
1 2 .6
1 0 .4
_
1 0.6

2 1 .5
_
2 9 .0
9 .9
3 2 .9
36. 8
7 0. 3
1 2.0
_
5 0 .8

26. 0
7 .0
16. 6
15. 3
17. 2
18. 2
4. 8
1 9.5
_
16. 3

14. 1
1 7.9
8 .6
1 1.5
8. 2
8. 3
.6
1 0.7
_
3 .0

10. 9
5 .8
3. 8
4. 8
3. 7
2. 2
.4
7 .8
_
1. 3

3. 8
2 5 .7
5 .0
4. 2
5. 2
1 .5
.2
14. 4

1. 1
3. 1
3 .0
8. 1
2. 2
1 .0

1. 8
3. 1
1 .7
5. 3
1. 1
.4

6 .7
3 7 .4
7. 3
40. 4
1 .9
.9

_

5. 3

_

2 .8

4 .5

.5

.3

.4

2 .0

1, 322

587

735

4 0 .0

2 .8 8

-

_

_

.7

2 .6

6 0. 8

14. 1

6. 3

2. 3

1.7

2 .0

9. 4

3 ,4 6 1
1, 825
1 ,636
43
50
1, 423
169
1, 254

755
480
275
5
17
183
123
60

2, 706
1, 345
1, 361
38
33
1, 240
46
1, 194

39. 8
39. 8
39. 8
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .9
40. 0
3 9 .9

2. 28
2. 22
2. 35
2. 25
1 .7 6
2. 35
2. 50
2. 33

-

-

_
_
-

4 .9
7 .9
1 .5
9 6 .0
3 .0
3. 3

16. 3
2 2 .7
9. 2
2 .0
7. 4
8 .4

14. 8
2 3 .8
4 .6
95. 3
7 .4
4. 1
7 .9

6 0 .8
4 3 .4
80. 3
4 .7
2 .0
7 4. 3
35. 5
7 9 .6

3. 1
2. 0
4. 4
_
_
7 .9
60. 4
.8

. 1
.2
. 1
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
.

_
_

5, 886

5, 815

71

39. 8

3. 15

-

-

-

(3)

.5

3. 2

6 .5

7. 1

14. 4

1, 663

1, 640

23

39. 8

3. 20

-

-

-

-

_

1 .4

1. 2

4. 0

1 4.8

4, 096
594

4, 052
593

44
1

39. 8
3 9 .7

3. 15
3 .9 5

-

-

-

-

. 1

3. 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

8 .8
.2

8. 5
.8

1, 441
626
1, 435
127
556
74
482
4, 046
2, 896
1, 150
2, 674
1, 372

1, 437
626
1, 396
123
426
74
352
3, 961
2, 815
1, 146
2, 632
1, 329

4

3 9 .8
4 0 .0
3 9 .8
4 0 .0
3 9 .4
3 9 .9
39. 4
3 3 .0
39. 2
1 7 .4
30. 4
38. 2

3. 20
2 .8 8
2 .8 9
2. 56
2. 19
2 .8 3
2 .0 9
1 .5 8
1 .6 4
1 . 28
1. 27
2 .0 6

_
.
_

_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
-

_
_

3. 1
3. 3

.9
3. 2
6 .6
29. 1
15. 5
2. 7
1 7 .4
16. 5

1. 1
9. 1
1 9 .9
2. 4
4. 1
20. 3
1.7
2 .9

3 .6
2 3 .8
9 .9
.8
2. 3
8. 1
1 .5
_

_

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
.

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
_

■

9 .7

26. 3

8 .5

-

-

-

39
4
130
-

130
85
81
4
42
43

44. 3
X
X

67. 1
“

-

2 4 .0
X
X

3 2 .9
6 .7

_

.8
2 .7
-

_

.3
18. 9
64. 9
2. 7
74. 5
8 .9

48. 8

1 In clu d es e m p lo y e e s w ork in g in the con term in ou s 48 States and the D is tr ic t o f C olu m b ia ; the com p an y d oes not op e r a te in A la s k a o r H a w aii.
2 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s, and la te s h ifts.
3 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .
N OTE:

x in d ic a te s th e se data w ere not c o lle c t e d .




B eca u se o f roun din g, sum s o f in div idu a l item s m a y not equal 100,

_
_
_

_
_

9. 1

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
.
_
_

_
.
_
_
_
.
_
_

11. 3

34. 3

10. 7

2 .8

9. 2

1 2.0

49. 2

8. 5

2 .5

6. 3

1 4.6
1. 3

10. 3
.2

28. 9
1 .7

1 2 .0
22. 1

3. 1
11. 4

1 3.6
18. 2
1 9 .6

12. 1
14. 2
1 1 .0
3 3 .9
3. 4
20. 3
. 8

58.
16.
16.
14.

0
8
2
2
. 4
2 .7

9. 1
1 4.7
9 .5

1.6

_
_

2. 4

4 .6

. 2
1 .4

.4
2. 7

8. 1

_

_
_

_
_

_

_
_

X
X
.

X
X
_

X
X
_

X
X
_

X
X
_

-

-

"

-

-

_

5 .0
31. 1
1 . 0

_

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

10.6
62. 3

1

.

1

Table 6. International Telegraph Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution of Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Rates,2 October 1964

$ 2. 10

o

$ 2 . 10

$ 2. 30

$ 2. 50

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 90

$ 3. 10

$ 3. 30

$ 3. 50

$ 3. 70

o

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

&

o

W om en

$ 1. 25
and
under
$ 1. 30

$ 1. 50

o

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o ff ic i a ls and
m a n a g e ria l a s s i s t a n t s ______________________
A ll e m p lo y e e s e x ce p t o f f ic i a ls ,
a s s is t a n t s , and m e s s e n g e r s ____________
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s
_
_
__
__
E n g in e e rs and en g in e e r in g
a s s i s t a n t s _________________________________
O th ers ________ ____ _______ _________________
O ffic e or sta tion su p erin ten d en ts
and a s s is t a n t s
_ . _
_ ...
S a le s e m p l o y e e s ______________________________
C l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s ___________________________
S u p e r v is o r s ________________________________
N o n s u p e r v is o r y c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s _____
O p era tin g d e p a r t m e n t _________________
C o m m e r c ia l d e p a r t m e n t ______________
A c co u n tin g d e p a r t m e n t ._______________
E n g in e e rin g d ep a rtm en t
_ _
A ll oth er d e p a r t m e n t s _________________
O p e r a to r s ______________________________________
T r a ffi c c h ie fs , d is p a t c h e r s , s u p e r ­
v i s o r s , in s t r u c t o r s , and a s s i s t a n t s ___
N o n s u p e r v is o r y g p e r a t o r s _______________
R a d io o p e r a t o r s ________________________
M a rin e c o a s t a l station o p e r a t o r s ____
C a ble o p e r a t o r s ________________________
T e le t y p e -m u lt ip le x o p e r a t o r s ________
T elep h on e o p e r a t o r s ___________________
J u n ior o p e r a t o r s _______________________
A ll o th e r o p e r a t o r s ____________________
M e s s e n g e r s ____________________________________
F o o t and b ic y c le _________________ _________
M o t o r _______________________________________
C o n s tru ctio n , in s ta lla tio n , m a in te n a n ce ,
and o th er t e c h n ic a l e m p l o y e e s _____________
S u p e r v i s o r s ___________ ____ ________________
M e c h a n ics and m a in ten a n ce
te c h n ic ia n s ________________________________
R a d io o p e r a tin g t e c h n i c i a n s _____________
R a d io te le g ra p h r i g g e r s ___________________
R a d io te le g ra p h g r o u n d m e n _____________ _
O th ers ............................ ...... ......... ..........................
B u ild ing s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s _________________
A ll e m p lo y e e s not e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d ___________________________________

Men

P e rce n t of e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g —
A v e ra g e
h ourly
ra te s 2

©

T otal

A v e ra g e
schedu led
w eekly
h ou rs

o

N um ber o f em jlo y e e s
O cc u p a tio n a l g rou p

$ 2 . 70

$ 2 . 90

$ 3 . 10

$ 3. 30

$ 3. 50

$ 3. 70

over

and

5 ,0 4 5

4, 364

681

36. 5

$ 3 .41

4. 3

3. 2

1.8

2. 0

3. 0

3. 3

5. 1

4. 4

5. 1

6. 9

7. 8

9. 7

9. 0

4, 565

3 ,8 8 5

680

37. 4

3. 57

. 1

. 1

.4

1. 6

3. 3

3. 6

5. 5

4. 8

5. 6

7. 6

8. 6

10. 7

9 .9

38. 2

300

293

7

37. 4

5. 26

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

. 3

4. 3

1. 3

4. 7

89. 3

181
119

180
113

1
6

37. 4
37. 3

5. 26
5. 25

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.6
-

6 .0
1. 7

1. 7
.8

6. 6
1. 7

85. 1
95. 8

49
209
1,5 7 0
172
1, 398
671
105
336
71
215
1, 351

49
197
1 ,0 6 6
162
904
597
42
127
42
96
1,2 1 7

12
504
10
494
74
63
209
29
119
134

37. 3
3 6 .9
37. 4
37. 3
37. 4
37. 5
37. 4
37. 2
37. 3
37. 2
37. 6

6. 19
4. 65
3. 10
4. 39
2. 94
3. 12
2. 52
2. 76
2 .9 1
2. 86
3. 37

-

. 3
.4
. 3

.9
. 1

.8
.9
.7
1 .0
.9
1 .9
. 1

4. 4
4 .9
3. 1
1 2 .4
5. 7
4. 2
6 .0
. 1

.5
7. 8
8. 8
5. 5
13. 3
14. 6
8. 5
7 .9
.8

1. 0
6. 4
7. 2
5. 1
17. 1
7. 7
7. 0
8 .4
3. 2

1 .0
8. 5
9. 5
6. 6
19. 0
1 1.9
9. 9
10. 2
6. 3

1 .9
7. 1
8. 0
6. 3
7. 6
10. 7
9. 9
8. 8
4 .4

1 .9
7. 8
8. 7
9 .7
4. 8
7 .4
12. 7
8. 4
6. 3

2. 4
6. 8
7. 6
7. 3
2. 9
7. 1
11. 3
10. 2
10. 5

2 .4
10. 1
1. 7
11. 2
13. 3
4. 8
1 1.0
7. 0
9. 3
12. 1

2 .4
14. 6
3. 5
16. 0
26. 2
4. 8
6. 8
2. 8
7. 9
12. 4

4. 8
8. 3
7. 0
8. 5
9. 5
10. 5
5. 7
11. 3
7 .9
16. 1

100. 0
8 1 .8
17. 0
87. 8
8. 3
6. 4
1.9
10. 1
15. 5
12. 1
27. 7

140
1,211
121
134
211
492
85
1
167
480
471
9

138
1 ,079
113
134
211
424
62
1
134
479
470
9

2
132
8
68
23
33
1
1
-

37. 5
37. 6
3 7 .4
37. 5
37. 7
37. 7
37. 5
( 3)
37. 5
27. 4
27. 2
37. 5

4. 63
3. 22
3. 73
3. 53
3. 07
3. 03
3. 25
( 3)
3. 36
1 .4 5
1 .4 4
2. 19

44. 2
45. 0
-

. 1
.2
3 1 .9
32. 5
-

. 1
.2
15. 8
1 5 .9
11. 1

. 1
.2
6. 2
6. 2
11. 1

.9
2. 2
.4
.2
11. 1

3. 6
. 5
8. 1
1. 2
.6
-

7. 0
15. 6
9. 3
4. 7
100. 0
.6
1. 2
66. 7

4. 9
3. 3
6. 0
2. 8
7. 3
5. 9
-

7. 0
.8
5. 2
18. 5
5. 3
4. 7
4. 8
-

11. 7
.8
8. 2
15. 2
14. 4
5. 9
13. 2
-

13. 5
1. 7
9 .0
13. 7
13. 2
2 1 .2
22. 8
.2
.2
-

13. 8
2. 5
6. 0
10. 0
12. 2
23. 5
32. 9
-

3. 6
96. 4
17. 6 ,
19. 7
90. 1
.8
16. 4
49. 3
10. 0
13. 7
27. 2
32, 9
4. 2
2 1 .0
-

1,001
136

981
133

20
3

37. 5
37. 5

3. 79
4. 81

-

-

-

. 1
-

.6
-

1 .4
-

1 .9
-

3. 5
-

3. 1
.7

7. 6
2. 9

4. 8
-

7. 9
-

8. 0
.7

61. 1
95. 6

540
179
32
9
105
84

539
179
32
9
89
81

37.
37.
37.
39.
37.
37.

3. 70
3. 74
3. 68
2 .4 1
3. 17
2. 66

-

-

-

.2

1. 3
.6
10. 5
1 1 .9

5. 0
.6
6. 7
13. 1

2. 2
7. 3
3. 1
33. 3
1 .0
15. 5

5. 4
7. 3
6. 3
3. 8
3. 6

8. 5
8. 4
18. 8
1 1 .4
4. 8

6. 3
10. 6
18. 8
19. 0
-

6 2 .4
59. 8
50. 0
21. 0
6 .0

1

1

|

1
-

16
3

5
6
5
2
5
6

( 3)

(3)

. 3

-

-

-

-

3. 6

-

2. 4

1 .0
1 .2

"

"

“

-

4 4 .4
1 .9
9. 5
■

-

11. 1
1 1.4
6. 0
'

■

_

"

8.
5.
3.
11.
12.
22.
"

7
6
1
1
4
6

~

34. 6

100. 0

1 C o v e r s e m p lo y e e s o f in tern a tion a l teleg ra p h c a r r ie r s with annual op era tin g re v e n u e s e x ce e d in g $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ; e x clu d e s 2 ,5 0 1 e m p lo y e e s w orkin g fo r in tern a tion a l te le g r a p h c a r r i e r s outside
the c o n te r m in o u s 48 Sta tes and the D is tr ic t of C olu m bia.
2 See a p p en d ix f o r d efin itio n o f h ou rs and ra te s u sed in this b ulletin.
3 In s u ffic ie n t data to w a r ra n t p r e se n ta tio n o f an a v e r a g e .
N O TE:

B e c a u s e o f rou n din g, su m s o f in dividual item s m a y not eq u al 100.




Appendix. Scope and Method of Survey
D ata p resen ted in this study are b a sed on annual re p o rts filed with the F e d e ra l
Com m unications C om m ission by com m unication c a r r ie r s , as requ ired by the amended C om ­
m unications Act of 1934. A ll c a r r ie r s engaged in in terstate or foreign com m unications
se rv ic e by m eans of their own fa c ilitie s or through connection with the fa c ilitie s of another
c a r r ie r under d ire ct or in d irect common control are su b ject to the full ju risd ictio n of the
C om m issio n . A larg e number of telephone c a r r ie r s engaged in in terstate or foreign se rv ic e
only by connection with the fa c ilitie s of another unaffiliated c a r r ie r are not subject to the
full ju risd ictio n of the C o m m issio n and are not requ ired to file annual repo rts of hours and
earn in gs of em ployees.
Tabulations for telephone c a r r ie r s relate to those having annual operating revenues
in e x c e ss of $250, 000 (c la ss A c a r r ie r s ) , and su bject to the full ju risd ictio n of the FC C .
Included are 24 B e ll System com panies and 33 com panies not affiliated with the B e ll System .
Tabulations for w ire -te le g rap h and international telegraph c a r r ie r s w ere confined
to com panies with annual revenues exceeding $ 50, 000 and engaged in in terstate or foreign
co m m erce. W estern Union T elegrap h Co. is the only w ire -te le g rap h company included.
Five com panies engaged in nonvocal radio an d/or cable com m unications are included in the
international telegrap h tabulation s.
E m ployees and Occupational G roups C overed by the Study
O fficials and m an ag erial a ss is ta n ts w ere not included in the tabulations. A lso
cluded w ere em ployees working outside the conterm inous 48 S tates and the D istric t of
lum bia, except c la s s A telephone c a r r ie r em ployees in Hawaii and Puerto R ico. A lask a
no c la s s A telephone c a r r ie r s reporting to the F e d e ra l Com m unications C o m m issio n .
other em ployees, both full-tim e and p a rt-tim e , w ere included. P a rt-tim e em ployees
defined as those re g u la rly a ssig n ed sh o rter hours than a fu ll-tim e schedule.
Occupational groups for which sep a ra te data are presen ted
Com m unications C o m m issio n ’s R ules and R egu latio n s, Volume X,
phone c a r r ie r s , and P a rt 52, applying to telegraph co m pan ies.
on sale by the Superintendent of Docum ents, U .S . Governm ent
ton, D .C ., 20402, at $ 1. 50 p er su bscriptio n .

ex­
Co­
had
All
are

are defined in the F e d e ra l
P art 51, applying to t e le ­
Copies of this volume are
Printing O ffice, W ashing­

Hours and R ates
A verage hourly ra te s p resen ted in this bulletin w ere computed by dividing total
"scheduled weekly com pensation" by total "sch eduled weekly h o u rs ." A verage scheduled
weekly hours w ere obtained by dividing the total scheduled weekly hours by the number of
em ployees.
The te rm s "sch ed uled w eekly h ou rs" and "sch edu led w eekly com pensation" for the
three c a r r ie r groups covered by the study are defined, according to the F C C ’s R ules and
R egu latio n s, as follow s:
CLASS A TELEPHONE CARRIERS
51. 12(b). "Scheduled weekly hours" means the number o f regular hours, excluding over­
tim e hours, in the duty tours which the em ployee is scheduled to work during the week in which
December 31 occurs, whether or not excused because o f a holiday, vacation, leave o f absence, or
other reason.
5 1 .13(b). "Scheduled weekly compensation" means compensation to the em ployee at the
rate o f pay in effect on December 31 for the "Scheduled weekly hours. " It includes the basic weekly
pay rate plus any regularly scheduled supplementary compensation, such as differentials for evening
and night tours, equivalent value o f board and lodging for unlocated em ployees, equivalent value o f
meals furnished dining service em ployees, and equivalent value o f living quarters and maintenance
furnished managers o f agency offices. It excludes pay for overtim e work and pay in excess o f week­
day rates for Sunday and holiday work.




15

16
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY
5 2.2 1(b ). "Scheduled weekly hours" are defined as an em ployee's regular daily tour o f duty
m ultiplied by the number o f days, or fraction o f days, scheduled to be worked during a week.
52. 22(b). "Scheduled w eekly compensation" is defined as the wages scheduled to be paid
for scheduled weekly hours as defined in 52. 21(b).
This should include em ployee contributions for
old -a g e benefits, unemployment insurance and similar deductions, paid vacation and holiday hours,
the regularly scheduled weekly compensation o f em ployees temporarily on leave due to disability or
sickness, and the scheduled weekly compensation o f both fu ll- and part-tim e em ployees.

The company rep o rts that "sch ed u led weekly com pensation" excludes prem ium pay
for overtim e and for work on w eekends, h olidays, and late sh ifts.
INTERNATIONAL TELEGRAPH CARRIERS

International telegrap h c a r r ie r s are in stru cted to re po rt scheduled w eekly hours and
com pensation for their em ployees as defined above for the W estern Union T elegraph Co. ,
except that scheduled w eekly com pensation should include re g u la rly scheduled m aintenance,
tra v e l, or other allow ances.
D istribution of W orkers by E arn in gs C la s s e s
In the ta b le s, w orkers are distributed according to the percen tage having stipulated
hourly ra te s of pay. B ecau se of rounding, sum s of individual item s m ay not equal 100.




Industry Wage Studies
The most recent reports for industries included in the B ureau's program
of industry wage surveys since January 1950 are listed below.
Those for which
a price is shown are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S.
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. , 20402, or any of its regional
sales offices.
Those for which a price is not shown may be obtained free as
long as a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington,
D. C. , 20212, or from any of the regional offices shown on the inside back cover.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manufacturing
Basic Iron and Steel, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1358 (30 cents).
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, I960. BLS Report 195.
^Canning and Freezing, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Cigar Manufacturing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1436 (30 cents).
Cigarette Manufacturing, I960. BLS Report 167.
Cotton Textiles, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1410 (40 cents).
Distilled Liquors, 1952. Series 2, No. 88.
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1957. BLS Report 123.
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1362 (40 cents).
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1337 (30 cents).
Fluid Milk Industry, I960. BLS Report 174.
Footwear, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1360 (45 cents).
H osiery, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1456 (45 cents).
Industrial Chemicals, 1955. BLS Report 103.
Iron and Steel Foundries, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1386 (40 cents).
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1378 (40 cents).
Machinery Manufacturing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1429 (35 cents).
Meat Products, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1415 (75 cents).
M en 's and Boys* Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1964.
BLS Bulletin 1457 (40 cents).
M en 's and B oys' Suits and Coats, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1424 (65 cents).
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1439 (35 cents).
Miscellaneous Textiles, 1953. BLS Report 56.
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Parts, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1393 (45 cents).
Nonferrous Foundries, I960. BLS Report 180.
Paints and Varnishes, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1318 (30 cents).
Petroleum Refining, 1959. BLS Report 158.
P ressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1423 (30 cents).
"■'Processed Waste, 1957. BLS Report 124.
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard M ills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1341 (40 cents).
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951. Series 2, No. 84.
Railroad C ars, 1952. Series 2, No. 86.
*Raw Sugar, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Southern Sawmills and Planing M ills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1361 (40 cents).
Structural Clay Products, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1459 (45 cents).
Synthetic Fiber s , 1958. BLS Report 143.
Synthetic Textiles, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1414 (35 cents).
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1311 (35 cents).
^Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957. BLS Report 136.
* Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
Manufacturing— Continued
West Coast Sawmilling, 1959. BLS Report 156.
W omen's and M isse s' Coats and Suits, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1371 (25 cents).
Women's and M is s e s ' D re sses, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1391 (30 cents).
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1369
(40 cents).
'Wooden Containers, 1957. BLS Report 126.
Wool T extiles, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1372 (45 cents).
Work Clothing, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1440 (35 cents).
Nonmanufa c tu r ing
Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1964. BLS Bulletin 1452 (30 cents).
Banking Industry, I960. BLS Report 179.
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1383 (45 cents).
Communications, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1426 (20 cents).
Contract Cleaning S ervices, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1327 (25 cents).
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, I960. BLS Report 181.
Department and Women's R eady-to-W ear S tores, 1950. Series 2, No. 78.
Eating and Drinking P la ces, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1400 (40 cents).
Electric and Gas U tilities, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1374 (50 cents).
Hospitals, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1409 (50 cents).
Hotels and M otels, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1406 (40 cents).
Laundries and Cleaning Services, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1401 (50 cents).
Life Insurance, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1324 (30 cents).

II. Other Industry Wage Studies
Factory W orkers' Earnings— Distribution by Straight-Tim e Hourly Earnings,
1958. BLS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents).
Factory W orkers' Earnings— Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959.
BLS Bulletin 1275 (35 cents).
Retail Trade:
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, June 1962 (Overall Summary of the
Industry). BLS Bulletin 1380 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings at Retail Building M aterials, Hardware, and Farm
Equipment D ealers, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-1 (25 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail General Merchandise Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-2 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Food Stores, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-3
(40 cents).
Employee Earnings at Retail Automotive Dealers and in Gasoline Service
Stations, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-4 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Apparel and A ccessory Stores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-5 (45 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household
Appliance Stores, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1380-6 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Miscellaneous Retail S tores, June 1962.
BLS Bulletin 1380-7 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Nonmetropolitan A reas of the South and North Central
Regions, June 1962. BLS Bulletin 1416 (40 cents).*

*

Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : I96S 0 -7 9 4 -7 6 6




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102