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INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY




Communications

I

1962

B u l l e t i n No. 1 3 8 9
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
Ewan C la gu e , Com m issioner

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY

Communications
1962

Bulletin No. 1389
December 1963

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 20 cents










Preface

This summary of employment and hourly earnings
data is based on annual reports filed with the Federal
Communications Commission by class A telephone car­
riers, the Western Union Telegraph Company, radiotele­
gram carriers, and ocean-cable carriers, as required by
the amended Communications Act of 1934. Under a coop­
erative arrangement, the Bureau of Labor Statistics tab­
ulates and publishes the data.
This bulletin was prepared by Joseph C. Bush in
the Bureau's Division of Occupational Pay, under the gen­
eral direction of L. R. Linsenmayer, Assistant Commis­
sioner of Wages and Industrial Relations.

m

Contents
Page
Summary_________________________________________________________________________
Class A telephone carriers______________________________________________________
Earnings in December 1962__________________________________________________
Trends in employment and earnings_________________________________________
Western Union Telegraph Company______________________________________________
Radiotelegraph carriers_________________________________________________________
Ocean-cable carriers____________________________________________________________

1
1
1
4
6
7
8

Chart:
Employment and average hourly earnings of communications
workers except officials and managerial assistants,
October 1947—December 1962----------------------------------------------------------------------

2

Tables:
Percentage distribution of employees in occupational groups by
average hourly earnings, December 1962, for—
1. Class A telephone carriers----------------------------------------------------------------2. Bell System telephone carriers_______________________________________
3. Non-Bell class A telephone carriers_________________________________

9
10
11

Average hourly earnings of employees in selected occupations
by region, December 1962, for—
4. All class A and Bell System telephonecarriers______________________

12

Percentage distribution of employees in occupational groups by
average hourly earnings, October 1962, for—
5. Wire-telegraph employees of Western UnionTelegraph Company____
6. Radiotelegraph carriers______________________________________________
7. Ocean-cable carriers__________________________________________________

13
14
15

Appendix: Scope and method of survey________-_________________________________

17




iv

Industry W age Survey----Communications, 1962
Summary
Earnings of the 631,205 employees (excluding officials and managerial
assistants) of the Nation’s principal communications carriers averaged $2.77 an
hour in late 1962— an increase of 4. 1 percent since 1961.
This compares with
increases of 4 .7 percent between I960 and 1961 and 5 percent between 1959 and
I960. 1 Class A telephone carriers, accounting for 94 percent of the total work
force covered by the study, averaged $2.78 in December 1962, compared with
$ 2 .6 7 , the 1961 level of scheduled compensation. 2 The average straight-time
hourly rate of pay for nonmessenger employees of Western Union’s wire-telegraph
operations was $2.63 in October 1962— an increase of 4 .4 percent above the 1961
level. Employees of radiotelegraph and ocean-cable carriers account for less
than 1 percent of the covered work force. Their earnings in October 1962 aver­
aged $ 3 .1 3 and $ 2 .9 4 an hour, respectively.
The study, based on reports of carriers under the full jurisdiction of the
Federal Communications Commission, covered nearly nine-tenths of the estimated
685,900 employees of the Nation's telephone communication industry in December
1962 and over nine-tenths of the estimated 35,800 employees in the telegraph
communication industry in October 1962. 3
Overall employment of class A telephone carriers covered in the study
declined from December 1961 to December 1962 by 2,781 workers and was 13 per­
cent below October 1957, the year of the highest employment level recorded in
the Bureau's studies.
Among the other carrier groups, employment levels of
both Western Union and radiotelegraph carriers dropped 4. 5 percent.
Oceancable carrier employment has remained comparatively steady for the last 9 years.
Class A Telephone Carriers
Earnings in December 1962. Earnings of the 596, 327 employees (ex­
cluding officials and managerial assistants) of the 58 class A telephone carriers
covered by the study4 averaged $2.78 an hour in December 1962 (table 1)— an
1 Since 1947, annual studies have been made in cooperation with the Federal Communications Commission.
Prior to 1961, information on employee earnings for all carriers included in the annual reports relates to an October
payroll period. Effective 1961, the reference date for class A telephone carriers was changed to December. See
appendix for scope and method of survey.
2 As explained in the appendix, the earnings data contained in this bulletin, which pertain to all workers ex­
cept officials and managerial assistants, were computed by dividing scheduled weekly compensation by scheduled weekly
hours. "Scheduled weekly compensation" for class A telephone carriers, as defined by FCC, includes the "basic weekly
pay rate plus any regularly scheduled supplementary compensation, such as differentials for evening and night tours, • . •
It excludes pay for overtime work and pay in excess of weekday rates for Sunday and holiday work. " Scheduled weekly
compensation of Western Union's wire-telegraph employees excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on week­
ends, holidays, and late shifts.
^ Source: BLS employment estimates for telephone and telegraph communication. (See Monthly Labor Review,
June 1963, p. 7 3 1 .)
4 The study was lim ited to telephone carriers having an annual operating revenue of more than $250, 000 and
subject to the full jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission. O fficials and managerial assistants were
not included in the study, and their earnings are not included in the averages presented in this report. (See appendix.)
Also see appendix regarding inclusion of employees outside the conterminous 48 States and the District of Columbia.




1




3

increase of 4. 1 percent above the level recorded in 1961 ($2.67). Based on reg­
ular scheduled compensation which includes the basic pay rate plus any regularly
scheduled supplementary compensation such as differentials for evening and nightwork, individual earnings of these workers were widely dispersed. The middle
half of the workers earned between $1 .9 4 and $ 3 .3 0 an hour.
Wage rates and working conditions of class A telephone carrier employ­
ees are largely determined through the collective bargaining process. Agreements
on file with the Bureau of Labor Statistics5 indicate that wage-rate schedules
generally varied by occupational category, region, among companies in the same
region, and for a given occupation and company, by locality. Agreements typi­
cally provide a range of rates for a specific job and locality with rate differences
between starting and maximum rates frequently amounting to 100 percent or more.
Advancement from starting to maximum rates quite commonly involved from 10 to
14 step increases over a 5- to 6-year period.
Reflecting largely locality rate
differentials and length-of-service wage increases, the difference between the
highest and lowest rates recorded for linemen, for example, amounted to $1 or
more in 37 of the 58 class A telephone carriers included in the study.
Average hourly earnings in December 1962 ranged from $1.61 for trainee
telephone operators to $5. 10 for professional and semiprofessional employees.
This considerable variation in the earnings level among the occupational groups
studied separately, reflects the great diversity of skills and responsibilities re­
quired by the industry.
Women, constituting 56 percent of the class A telephone carrier work
force, were largely employed in the telephone operator and clerical jobs. Ex­
perienced switchboard operators, virtually all women and comprising one-fifth
of the total employment, averaged $1.98 an hour. Nonsupervisory clerical em­
ployees (112,315 women and 8,300 men) averaged $ 2 .13 an hour.
Construction, installation, and maintenance employees, nearly all men,
accounted for nearly three-tenths of the class A telephone carrier employees.
Average hourly earnings for numerically important jobs in these departments
were: $2 .76 for linemen, $ 3 .0 4 for central office repairmen, $ 3 .1 4 for PBX
and station installers, $3.13 for test-board men and repeatermen, $3.17 for
cable splicers, and $3.25 for exchange repairmen.
Significant regional variations in occupational wage relationships may be
noted. (See table 4.) For example, nonsupervisory clerical employees averaged
from 2 to 8 percent more than experienced switchboard operators in 8 of the 9 re­
gions; they averaged 17 percent more in the Southeast.
Earnings of central
office repairmen exceeded those of experienced switchboard operators by amounts
ranging from about 45 to 56 percent in six regions, 58 percent in the South Central,
71 percent in the Southeast, and 74 percent in the North Central region. The wage
advantage of PBX and station installers over the experienced operators amounted
to 45 percent in the Pacific region and more than 50 percent in all other regions
permitting comparisons, except the Southeast, where the difference was 26 per­
cent. In the latter region, all workers classified as PBX and station installers
were in non-Bell companies (in this region, Bell System PBX and station installers
were also required to repair the equipment and were not classified in that occu­
pational group); whereas, Bell System companies accounted for the large majortiy
of the experienced switchboard operators.

5 C ollective bargaining agreements covering roughly three-fourths of the workers included in the study are on
file with the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The major labor Organization in the industry is the Communications Workers
of America (AFL-CIO). Frequently, workers in different departments (e. g . , traffic, plant, accounting, com m ercial)
o f the same company are covered under separate collective bargaining agreements.




Compared with the national average of $2.78 for all telephone employees
except officials and managerial assistants, overall averages ranged from $2 .4 4 in
the Southeast to $2.91 in the Pacific region and $ 2 .96 in the Middle Atlantic
region.
Among the other regions, averages for all employees were above the
national average in the Great Lakes region and below the national average in
the five remaining regions.
Employees of Bell System companies, accounting for 96 percent of the
class A telephone carrier employees covered by the study, averaged $2.81 an
hour— 66 cents above the average recorded for non-Bell System employees (tables
2 and 3).
Part of this difference in all-worker averages can be attributed to
differences in the occupational composition of the two telephone carrier groups.
To illustrate, a larger proportion of Bell carrier employees were in clerical,
sales, and professional occupations; whereas experienced switchboard operators
accounted for slightly less than a fourth of non-Bell carrier employment and about
a fifth of Bell System employees.
Other factors (e. g. , size of firm and size
of community) also probably contributed to differences in wage levels between the
two carrier groups. Thus, for the 24 Bell System companies, usually covering
an entire State or group of States, employment amounted to more than 50, 000 in
four companies, over 25,000 in five other companies, and less than 3,000 in only
two companies.
Only 1 of the 34 non-Bell companies employed as many as
3,000 workers, while 13 companies had fewer than 100 workers.
Eight-tenths
of the non-Bell employment was concentrated in five regions: Great Lakes,
Chesapeake, Southeast, South Central, and Pacific. Among these regions, aver­
age hourly earnings for non-Bell employees ranged from $ 1 .9 0 in the Chesapeake
and Southeast to $2.68 in the Pacific.
Average hourly earnings for each of the occupational groups studied sep­
arately were higher for Bell than for non-Bell Systems. It should be noted, how­
ever, that the average scheduled workweek was longer by nearly 2 hours in nonBell companies. The tabulation below indicates the relationship of average hourly
earnings for each of the two carrier groups as a percentage of the average for
all carriers.
As would be expected, averages for all carriers largely reflect
earnings levels for the Bell System.

Average hourly earnings as a percentage of
all carrier occupational average for—
Bell System
carriers
Clerical employees, nonsupervisory-----------------------------Experienced switchboard
operators---------------------------------Central office repairm en----------PBX and station installers----------L in em en -----------------------------------Cable splicers---------------------------Cable splicers' h elpers--------------

Non-Bell System
carriers

100

82

101
101
101
101
101
100

78
83
77
85
81
99

Trends in Employment and Earnings.
Total employment of class A tel­
ephone carriers declined by 2,781 workers between December 1961, and Decem­
ber 196*2. Although the December 1962 employment level (596, 300) was 8 percent
above the October 1947 level (552,700), it was 13 percent below the October 1957




5

peak of 681,600. The employment decrease between October 1957 and Decem­
ber 1962 was largely the result of the substantial decline in the number of tele­
phone operators, caused mainly by installation of new and improved equipment.
The total number of these operators (including chief operators and trainees, as
well as regular operators) declined from 235,700 in 1957 to 167,200 in 1962.
The decline from December 1961 to December 1962 in the number of telephone
operators employed by Bell System carriers was greater than the total employ­
ment decrease in the same period for all class A telephone carriers covered by
the study.
The relative importance, in terms of employment, of major occupational
groups has changed substantially since October 1947. As the tabulation below indi­
cates, telephone operators outnumbered construction, installation, and maintenance
employees by 2 to 1 in 1947; in 1961, employment in the two groups was nearly
equal. By 1962, construction, installation, and maintenance employees constituted
a slightly larger proportion than telephone operators. Coinciding with this change
has been an increase in the proportion of men employees in the industry.
Men
accounted for about a third of the total employment in October 1947 compared
with slightly more than two-fifths in December 1962.

Percent of total employment in _

Occupational group
Telephone operators---------------------------------Clerical employees, non­
sup ervisory---------------------------------------------Construction, installation, and
maintenance employees--------------------------Other--------------------------------------------------------A ll employees, except officials and mana­
gerial assistants (thousands)----------------------

October October October December December
1947
1952
1957
1961
1962
46

43

35

29

28

16

18

19

20

20

23
15

23
16

27
19

29
22

29
22

552.7

610.6

681.6

599.1

596.3

Changes in the occupational composition of the telephone labor force have
had a substantial impact on the overall earnings level of class A telephone car­
rier employees.
Thus, an estimated 30 cents of the $1 .5 2 increase in average
hourly earnings for all employees, except officials and managerial assistants,
between October 1947 and December 1962 resulted from changes in the occu­
pational makeup of the industry. 67
Average hourly earnings for all class A telephone carrier employees in­
creased by 121 percent' between October 1947 and December 1962— from $1.26 to
$2.78. The following tabulation indicates the increases in average hourly earnings be­
tween October 1947 and December 1962 for major occupational groups.

^ Weighting occupational averages for December 1962 by occupational employment for October 1947 results in
an average of $2.48 instead of $2.78.
7
The percent rise in the all-em ployee average exceeded the increase in most individual job categories because
of long-term shifts in the occupational composition of the industry's labor force.




6
Average hourly earnings Amount of increase

Occupational group
Experienced switchboard operators----- —
Cable splicers' helpers----------------------Clerical employees, nonsupervisory--------------------------------------L inem en--------------------------------------------PBX and station installers-------------------Cable splicers-------------------------------------

October
1947

December
1962

$ 0 .9 7
1.02

$ 1 .9 8
2.09

101
107

104
105

1.13
1.18
1.44
1.61

2.13
2.76
3.14
3.17

100
158
170
156

88
134
118
97

Cents

Percent

Differences among regions in overall hourly earnings for class A tele­
phone carrier employees remained generally unchanged between October 1951 8
and December 1962. As the following tabulation indicates, the interregional wage
spread has narrowed only slightly since 1952.

A ll-em p loyee 1 averages as a percentage <
national averages in—

Region
New England--------------------- ...........
Middle A tlantic---------------- ...........
Great Lakes----------------------- ...........
Chesapeake----------------------- ...........
Southeast--------------------------North Central--------------------...........
South Central--------------------...........
Mountain--------------------------- --------Pacific------------------------------

October
1952

October
1957

101
104
103
99
90
90
87

98
106
103
99
87
94
92
91
105

December
1962
100
107
103
97
88
92
90
91
105

1 Excludes officials and managerial assistants.

Western Union Telegraph Company
Straight-time rates of pay (exclusive of premium pay for overtime and
work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts) for the 25, 146 nonmessenger employ­
ees 9 of Western Union’s wire-telegraph operations averaged $ 2 .63 an hour in
October 1962. (See table 5 .) This was an increase of 11 cents or 4 .4 percent
above the average recorded a year earlier. 10

8 Regional earnings were tabulated for the first time in October 1951.
9 Excludes officials and managerial assistants.
10
Much of this increase was the result of general wage increases included in the terms of agreements negotiated
with The Com m ercial Telegraphers' Union (AFL-CIO) and the American Communications Association (In d .) in 1962.
Effective June 1, 1962, all hourly rated employees (except nonmotor messengers) received a 4-cent-an-hour increase,
and all monthly rated employees received a $6-per-m onth increase; an additional sum, equivalent to about 3 cents
an hour for nonmessenger employees was used for adjusting rates of pay of certain employees, principally in the Plant
Department, due to higher skills required in their classifications. Nonmotor messengers with 24 months or more pro­
gression credit received a 4-cent-an-hour increase effective September 1, 1962. Under the terms of the 1962 agree­
ments, effective June 1, 1963, all hourly rated employees (except nonmotor messengers) are scheduled to receive an
additional increase of 7 cents an hour, and all monthly rated employees an additional increase of $11 per month;
these increases, of course, are not reflected in the earnings data of this report. Contracts with CTU apply in all
cities, except the New York City metropolitan area, and cover approximately 22,000 employees; about 4,100 em ­
ployees in the New York City area are represented by ACA.




7

Men accounted for 56 percent of the nonmessenger employees and vir­
tually all of the messengers in October 1962.
Among the nonmessenger employ­
ees, men were found predominantly in the following occupational groups: Pro­
fessional and semiprofessional employees, telegraph office superintendents and
managers, and construction, installation, and maintenance employees.
Women
accounted for a large proportion of the clerical employees and telegraph operators.
Average straight-time rates of pay for selected occupational classifications are
shown in table 5.
For many of the nonmessenger occupational categories studied, the hourly
rates of the highest paid employees exceeded those of the lowest paid by more
than $1.
Wage provisions contained in agreements with both The Commercial
Telegraphers' Union (AFL-CIO) and the American Communications Association
(Ind. ) include established rate ranges for specific occupations, with differences
between the starting and maximum rates amounting to more than 60 cents an
hour for some classifications. 11 In some jobs, however, individual rates were
closely grouped.
For example, the hourly rates of over three-fourths of the
experienced telegraph operators (except Morse operators) in the traffic depart­
ment, Morse operators, and telephone operators were within 20-cent ranges.
The 4, 558 messengers, nearly all males and constituting about 15 per­
cent of the company's wire-telegraph work force, included 3, 156 full-time and
1,402 part-time employees. Full-time messengers averaged $1.51 an hour and
worked an average of 39 hours a week at the time of the study. Part-time m es­
sengers, earning an average of $1. 19 an hour, averaged 18 hours a week.
In
October 1962, foot and bicycle messengers averaged $1.18 an hour, the same
as a year earlier.
Motor messengers averaged $1.93 an hour, 4 cents more
than in 1961.
Total employment of Western Union's wire-telegraph operators in Oc­
tober 1962 was 4 .5 percent below October 1961 and 44 percent below the employ­
ment level of October 1947 (the date of the Bureau's initial study).
The occupa­
tional composition of the work force has changed considerably in the last 15 years.
For example, the proportion of workers classified as telegraph operators declined
from 34 percent in 1947 to 25 percent in 1962; similarly, the proportion of the
work force classified as foot and bicycle messengers declined from 18 to 11 per­
cent. On the other hand, the proportions of construction, installation, and main­
tenance workers and nonsupervisory clerical employees have increased during this
period. These changes in the occupational composition of the nonmessenger work
force account for 18 cents of the $1.58 increase in average hourly rates of pay
between 1947 and 1962. 12
Radiotelegraph Carriers
The 3,805 employees13 of the five principal companies engaged in trans­
mitting nonvocal radio communication earned $3. 13 an hour in October 1962
(table 6)— an increase of 5 .4 percent above the October 1961 level ($2 .9 7 ). Men,
accounting for approximately seven-eighths of radiotelegraph employees, were pre­
dominant in all of the major occupational groups studied.
Among the numerically important occupational groups studied separately,
average hourly earnings were $3.55 for radio operating technicians, $ 3 .5 0 for

11
Advancement from the starting rate through the various progression steps to the maximum rate is automatic
for employees meeting the requirements of the job after specified periods of service. For additional information on the
company's wage structure, see Industry Wage Survey: Communications, October 1960 (BLS Bulletin 1306, 1961, p. 6).
Weighting current occupational averages by occupational employment for October 1947 results in an average
of $2.45 instead of $2.63 for nonmessenger employees.
13 The study covered only radiotelegraph carriers with annual operating revenues in excess of $50,000. Ex­
cludes officials and managerial assistants and 1,461 employees working outside the conterminous 48 States and the
District of Columbia.




8

radio operators, $3.41 for mechanics and maintenance technicians, $3. 31 for ma­
rine coastal station operators, $ 2 .83 for teletype-multiplex operators, $2 .6 5 for
nonsupervisory clerical employees, and $1 .3 0 for foot and bicycle messengers.
For the period 1961—62, increases in average hourly earnings for these job
groups, except foot and bicycle messengers, ranged from 11 to 15 cents; the
increase for foot and bicycle messengers was 5 cents.
Individual earnings of radiotelegraph carrier employees (3, 286 men and
519 women) in October 1962 were widely dispersed— the middle half of the work­
ers earned between $ 2 .42 and $ 3 .70 an hour. For some of the job groups, how­
ever, individual earnings were concentrated within comparatively narrow limits.
Earnings of six-tenths of the radio operators were within a 20-cent-an-hour
range— $ 3 .5 0 to $ 3 .7 0 .
Seven-tenths of the foot and bicycle messengers earned
between $1 .15 and $1 .3 0 .
Average hourly earnings of radiotelegraph carrier employees rose 122
percent between October 1947 and October 1962— from $1.41 to $ 3 .1 3 .
Since
October 1947, relative increases in average hourly earnings varied among the
occupational categories studied separately. For example, marine coastal station
operators' earnings rose 86 percent, compared with an increase of 121 percent
for teletype-multiplex operators. Employment of radiotelegraph carriers in Oc­
tober 1962 was 24 percent below the level recorded in October 1947, and since
1961, the number of workers has decreased approximately 4 .5 percent.
Ocean-Cable Carriers
Earnings of the 1, 369 employees 14 of the three ocean-cable carriers cov­
ered by the study averaged $ 2 .9 4 an hour in October 1962 (table 7)— 5 percent
above the 1961 level ($2.79). Men, accounting for 85 percent of the ocean-cable
employment, were predominant in the occupational categories studied separately,
with the exception of nonsupervisory clerical employees in some departments.
Average hourly earnings for the numerically important occupational cate­
gories studied separately were $3.51 for mechanics in construction, installation,
maintenance and other technical work; $3.27 for cable operators; $ 2 .69 for non­
supervisory clerical workers; $2.62 for teletype-multiplex operators; and $1.28 for
foot and bicycle messengers.
For these categories, the increases in average
hourly earnings from October 1961 to October 1962 ranged from 7 to 14 cents
except for foot and bicycle messengers, which group remained at the 1961 level.
Reflecting a wide diversity of occupational duties and responsibilities,
earnings of ocean-cable employees were widely dispersed— the middle half of the
workers earned between $2. 30 and $3. 36. However, individual earnings for some
of the occupational groups were concentrated within comparatively narrow limits.
Thus, approximately 50 percent of the cable operators were within a 2 0 -cent
range— $ 3 .3 0 to $ 3 .5 0 .
About two-thirds of the foot and bicycle messengers
earned between $1.15 and $1 .3 0 an hour.
Average hourly earnings of ocean-cable employees rose 96 percent be­
tween October 1947 and October 1962— from $1 .5 0 to $2 .9 4 . Since October 1947,
percentage increases in average earnings have varied among the occupational
group studied separately. Thus, average hourly earnings for cable operators in­
creased 76 percent between October 1947 and October 1962, compared with an in­
crease of 105 percent for telephone operators. Ocean-cable carrier employment
remained approximately at the 1961 level, but was 7 percent below the number of
workers recorded in 1947.

14 The study covered only ocea n -ca b le carriers with annual operating revenues in excess of $50,000; also in­
cludes ocean -cable employees of Western Union Telegraph Company. Excludes officials and managerial assistants
and 3, 806 employees working outside the conterminous 48 states and the District of Columbia.




Table 1. Class A Telephone Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution o f Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Earnings,2 December 1962
Num ber o f em ployees
O ccupational group
Total

A ll em ployees excep t o ffic ia ls and
m an agerial a s s is t a n t s _____ ___ _______
P a rt-tim e em p loyees
F u ll-tim e em ployees
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
em ployees
D ra ftsm en
__
_ _
O thers
B u sin ess o ffic e and sa le s e m p lo y e e s —.
S u p erv isors
N on su p ervisory em ployees

Men

A v era ge
A v e ra ge
sch ed hourly
$ 1. 15 $ 1 . 30 $ 1 .5 0
uled
earn ­ Under
and
Women w eekly
in g s 1
2 $ 1 . 15 under
hours
$ 1. 30 $ 1 .5 0 $ 1 .7 0

596,327 262, 106 334,221
13,443
949 12,494
582,884 261, 157 321,727

50, 281 42, 659
483
404
49,798 42,255
46, 720 15,355
9 ,284
4, 953
37,436 10,402
131,935 11,197
2,897
S u p erv isors
11,320
120,615
8,300
22, 997
395
17,793
29
5,505
30,336
P lant departm ent
1,072
A ccounting departm ent
33,460
A ll other departm ents
16,029
1,299
167,215
33
T elephone o p era tors
15
10, 543
C hief o p era tors
1
S er v ic e assista n ts and in stru cto rs —
11,122
E x perien ced sw itchboard
119,412
13
o p era tors
O perators in t r a in in g ____ —
___
24, 020
2
2
Other sw itchboard e m p lo y e e s --------2, 118
Construction, in stallation, and
m aintenance em ployees
_
— _ 175,359 175,040
F orem en o f telephone c r a ft s m e n ___
23,169 23,158
C entral o ffic e cra ftsm e n
56, 200 55,926
T e s t-b o a r d m en and
rep ea ter men___
16, 392 16, 388
37, 123 36,861
2, 685
2, 677
O thers
Installation and exchange re p a ir
craftsm en
64,187 64,153
P B X and station in sta lle rs — ——
25,834 25,833
Exchange rep airm en
13,349 13,328
O thers
______ —_______ _
25,004 24,992
Line, c a b le, and conduit
cra ftsm en
31, 726 31,726
13,448 13,448
Linem en
_____ _______
C a b le s p l i c e r s
... _ _
15,411
15,411
C a b le s p l i c e r s * h e lp e r s
2, 149
2,149
O thers
718
718
L ab orers
77
77
Building, su pplies, and m o to r v e h icle
em ployees
24, 068 17, 111
Forem en _
.
2,534
2,119
M echanics
3,245
3,249
O ther building s e r v ic e e m p lo y e e s __
13,500
6, 980
Other supplies and m o to r v e h icle
4, 785
4, 767
A ll em ployees not e lsew h ere
711
749

3 8 .2
22 .2
38. 6

$2 . 78
1. 74
2. 79

7, 622
79
7, 543
31,365
4, 331
27, 034
120,738
8, 423
112,315
22, 602
17, 764
24,831
32, 388
14,730
167,182
10, 528
11,121

37 .8
37. 7
37 .8
37 .9
38. 1
37 .8
3 7 .8
3 8.0
37 .8
37. 6
38 .3
3 8 .4
3 7 .4
3 7 .4
37 .0
38 .8
37. 7

5. 10
3 .0 4
5. 12
2. 88
4. 13
2 .5 7
2 .2 6
3. 62
2. 13
1.97
2. 20
2 .2 6
2. 03
2. 23
2. 03
3. 10
2. 34

119,399
24, 018
2, 116

37. 1
3 5 .3
3 8 .0

1.98
1. 61
2.31

(3)

319
11
274

4 0 .0
3 9 .9
3 9.9

4
262
8

P e rce n t o f em ployees receiv in g —
$ 1 . 70 $ 1 .9 0

$2 . 70 $ 2 .9 0

$2. 10 $ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

$2. 70 $ 2 .9 0

$3. 10 $ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .5 0

$3. 70

$3. 70

over

and
$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

10.4

$3 . 10 $ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .5 0

(3)

0. 6

3. 7

7 .6

12. 1

10. 3

6 .6

4 .4

4 .7

5 .3

9 .5

8. 3

2.2

X

X
X

X
X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X
X

X

X

X
X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

(3)
.2
.2
_
.2
.4
_
.5
.7
. 1
.4
.4
.9
1.3
. 1

. 1
3 .3
1 .4
_
1 .8
4 .5
4 .9
7 .5
1 .3
3 .0
6 .8
4 .9
7 .5
.4

.1
2 .7
. 1
3 .9
_
4 .9
11.2
_
12.3
18. 2
4 .2
7 .3
16.0
14.3
13.7
.3
.9

.2
4. 6
.1
10. 1
.4
12.5
14,9
.3
16. 2
21 .3
8 .3
13.8
19. 1
16.3
18.2
1.0
4. 2

.3
5. 6
.2
13.2
.5
16.4
1 6.6
.8
18.0
19.3
22. 8
20. 6
14.8
12.9
22. 1
2 .3
9 .4

.4
5. 2
.4
14. 7
.9
18. 1
18.3
2 .4
19.8
15.5
3 0 .7
21. 7
18.3
13.6
14.4
5 .9
2 9.9

.7
6 .4
.7
8 .9
2.1
10.6
11.8
4 .6
12.4
8. 6
20. 1
11.5
13.4
9 .2
8 .3
10.9
28. 1

.9
2 .9
.9
5 .8
3 .4
6 .4
5 .5
6. 1
5 .4
4 .5
5. 6
3. 1
7. 1
7. 2
6. 0
11. 1
12.4

1. 6
5 .4
1 .6
5 .0
4 .4
5 .2
2 .8
8 .3
2 .3
1. 6
2 .7
1 .9
1.5
5 .5
4 .3
12. 1
6 .9

1. 7
14. 7
1 .6
2 .3
5 .4
1. 6
2 .6
7. 7
2. 1
.9
1. 2
4. 1
.7
4 .0
1 .2
11. 3
5. 2

3. 1
10. 1
3 .0
3 .4
7 .0
2. 6
3 .5
9 .8
2 .9
.7
1.7
7. 8
.6
3 .3
.8
10. 1
2 .3

3 .3
12.2
3. 2
3 .2
5 .6
2. 6
2 .5
9 .6
1 .8
.8
.8
3 .8
.4
3 .6
.6
9 .5
. 1

4 .0
6.2
3.9
4 .9
9 .8
3. 6
1.1
8 .9
.4
.2
,l
.4
.3
1.0
.4
5 .6
.

83. 6
20. 5
84. 2
22.9
60. 5
13.5
4. 3
4 1 .4
.8
.4
.3
.5
.6
3. 2
1. 2
19.8
_

-

1.3
2 .5
_

4 .9
27. 8
.3

12.2
33. 6
.9

20. 0
2 4 .3
2. 1

27 .9
9 .2
8 .5

15.8
2. 0
3 7 .9

7 .3
.3
3 2 ,4

6. 1
.2
11. 0

4 .3
. 1
4 .4

.2
_
1 .4

_
.
1. 0

_
_
. 1

_
_
-

_
_
-

3 .2 2
4 .3 6
3 .05

_

.2
.4

.6
.5

1. 2
_
1.5

1 .8
. 1
2. 7

2 .4
.1
3 .5

2 .3
.1
3 .8

2 .0
.2
3 .0

2 .4
.2
2 .9

7. 2
.2
6 .8

13. 1
.6
11.5

26. 3
1 .4
2 4 .0

23. 8
2. 7
27 .8

3. 6
5.0
8 .0

13.3
89. 3
3. 7

4 0 .0
3 9 .9
3 9.8

3. 13
3. 04
2. 77

-

.3
.3
2 .0

.3
.4
2 .9

.7
1 .4
8 .0

1 .9
3. 1
1.3

2 .5
3 .9
4 .8

2. 7
4 .3
2 .9

2 .4
3 .2
3 .8

1.5
3 .5
2 .8

4 .8
6 .8
18.0

12. 0
11. 1
12. 9

26. 6
2 2.3
3 1 .4

3 1 .0
27 .9
6 .4

10. 1
7. 6
.6

3. 0
4. 1
2. 1

34
1
21
12

40. 0
40. 0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

3.
3.
3.
2.

10
14
25
99

_
_
-

.1
.2
-

.3
. 6
.2

.5
.5
. 1
.6

.8
1 .0
.2
.8

1.5
2 .2
.6
1 .4

1. 2
1. 6
.5
1. 2

1. 1
1 .4
.6
1.0

2 .5
1.8
1 .5
3 .7

8 .9
2 .9
1. 6
19. 1

17.0
8 .9
8. 0
30. 1

35. 1
35. 7
3 3 .0
35. 6

29.
42.
50.
5.

8
7
1
5

.7
.4
2.0
.5

.
.
1.
.

-

40. 0
40. 0
4 0 .0
39 .9
4 0 .0
39.9

2.91
2. 76
3. 17
2. 09
2.8 5
1.82

_
_
_
_
-

.3
.4
.2
.5
.4
18.2

1.5
2 .0
.3
4. 7
7. 5
2 3 .4

3 .0
4 .7
. 1
11.4
7. 7
2 .6

3 .6
4. 7
.3
20. 1
4 .5
10.4

4. 0
5 .4
.9
17. 0
3 .3
11.7

3 .5
4. 2
1.5
13.4
2 .2
2 3 .4

3 .2
3 .3
.9
18.4
2 .8
_

2. 7
3. 7
1 .4
4 .9
5 .3
2 .6

9 .4
13.9
5 .6
6 .4
16. 2
_

17.3
23. 3
15.0
1 .9

30. 6
3 2 .2
3 4 .4
1. 1
9 .5

20. 0
2. 0
3 8 .4
. l
21. 6
_

.4
.1
!6
_
3 .6
_

.6
. 1
.4
_
15. 2
_

6,957
415
4
6, 520

37 .8
39.5
39. 7
3 6 .4

2. 33
3 .8 8
2. 95
1.82

(3)

2 .0
_
_
3 .4

7. 3
.2
.2
12.5

14.9
1.0
1.0
2 3.9

16.6
1 .4
1 .5
2 5 .0

11.6
2. 6
1 .8
17.1

7. 7
3 .5
9 .3

7. 6
2 .2
4. 7
7 .5

6 .6
3. 2
8. 2
.9

5 .8
2 .4
15. 1
.3

5. 6
3. 6
2 5 .4
. 1

4 .0
2 .4
24. 1
_

1. 6
3. 9
7 .8
_

1.4
6 .4
5.1
_

7. 3
67. 3
1. 7
_

18

3 9 .6

2 .4 0

-

.5

1. 3

6.5

11. 3

7. 6

8 .4

12. 7

23. 6

16. 6

8. 5

2 .4

.4

.1

38

38 .5

3. 05

0. 1

1.2

1. 1

LI

2 .3

2. 1

3. 7

4 .3

7 .2

10.8

10.9

17.6

15. 2

10.0

X

r.
-

_
_
(3)
-

_
(3)

3 .3

. 3

7 .8

14.4
X

5
1
6
2

_
11.3

1
C ov ers 58 telephone c a r r ie r s with annual operating revenues exceeding $ 2 5 0,00 0 and engaged in interstate o r fo re ig n com m unication s e r v ic e by m eans o f their own fa cilities
through con n ection with the fa c ilitie s o f another c a r r ie r under d ir e c t o r in d ire ct com m on co n trol.
* See appendix fo r defin ition o f hours and earnings used in this bulletin.
3 L ess than 0. 05 pe rce n t.
N OTE:

x in dica tes that these data w ere not c o lle cte d .




B ecau se o f rounding, sum s o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.

or

o

Table 2. Bell System Telephone Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution o f Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Earnings,2 December 1962
Num ber of em ployees
O ccupational group
T otal

A ll em p loyees except o ffic ia ls and
m an agerial assistants--------------------------P a rt-tim e e m p lo y e e s ------------------------F u ll-tim e em p lo y e e s-------------------------P r o fe s s io n a l and se m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s ---------------------------------------------D ra ftsm en -------------------------------------------O th ers-------------------------------------------------B u siness o ffic e and sales e m p lo y e e s ----Supe rvi s o r s - — -------- ------------ -———-----N on su p ervisory e m p lo y e e s ---------------C le r ica l em p lo y e e s ---------------------------------S u p e rv is o r s ----------------------------------------N on su p ervisory e m p lo y e e s ---------------C o m m e r c ia l departm ent---------------T r a ffic departm ent------------------------Plant departm ent--------------------------A ccounting d e p a rtm e n t----------------A ll other d ep a rtm e n ts------------------Telephone op era tors-------------------------------Chief o p e r a t o r s ----------------------------------S erv ice assistants and in s tru cto rs —
E x p erien ced sw itchboard
o p e r a t o r s ------------------------------------------O perators in training-------------------------Other sw itchboard e m ployees-----------C on struction, installation, and
m aintenance e m p lo y e e s -----------------------F orem en of telephone c r a ft s m e n -----C entral o ffic e cr a fts m e n -------------------T e s t-b o a r d m en and
rep ea term en -------------------------------C entral o ffic e r e p a ir m e n ------------O th ers--------------------------------------------Installation and exchange re p a ir
c r a ft s m e n ----------------------------------------P B X and station i n s t a lle r s ----------Exchange r e p a ir m e n --------------------O th ers--------------------------------------------Line, ca b le, and conduit c r a fts m e n —
Liincmcn
Cable s p lic e r s --------------------------------Cable s p lic e r s ' h e l p e r s ---------------O th ers--------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s --------------------------------------------Building, supplies, and m otor
v eh icle em ployees---------------------------------F o r e m e n ---------------------------------------------M ech a n ics-------------------------------------------Other building s e r v ic e e m p lo y e e s----Other supplies and m otor
v eh icle em ployees----------------------------A ll em ployees not elsew h ere
c la s s ifie d ------------------------------------------------

Men

Women

Average
scheduled
weekly
hours

A verage
hourly
e a rn ­
ings 2

P ercen t o f em ployees receiving$ 1 . 15
and
under
$ 1. 30

$ 1 .3 0

$1.50" $ 1 .7 6

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 90

$3. 10 $3. 30 $3. 50 $3. 70

$2. 50 $ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$3. 10

$3. 30 $3. 50 $ 3 .7 0

6 .7

4. 4

4. 5

5. 3

9 .6

8. 6

2. 2

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

X

X

X

X

and
$ 1 .9 0

$2. 10 $2. 30

322, 099
11,871
310, 228

38. 2
21. 7
38. 5

$2.81
1.76
2 .8 2

0. 2

3. 3

7 .4

10. 3

X
X

X
X

X
X

X
X

4 8,582
362
4 8,220
45,359
9, 006
36,353
127,379
10,968
116, 411
22, 136
17,501
29, 403
32, 215
15, 156
160,423
10, 180
10, 679

41,164
319
40, 845
15, 009
4,805
10, 204
10, 495
2, 690
7,805
348
22
5, 361
913
1, 161
12
9
_

7, 418
43
7, 375
30,350
4, 201
26, 149
116,884
8, 278
108,606
21,788
17, 479
24, 042
31,302
13,995
160,411
10, 171
10, 679

37. 7
36.9
37. 7
37.8
38. 1
37. 8
37. 8
37.9
37. 7
37. 5
38. 3
38. 4
37. 3
37. 2
36.9
38. 8
37. 6

5. 17
3. 32
5. 18
2.91
4. 17
2.59
2. 27
3 .6 4
2. 14
1.98
2. 20
2. 28
2. 04
2. 25
2. 05
3. 13
2. 36

_
_
_
.1
_
.1
_
_
.1
.4
-

_
_
_
1. 1
1 .4
3 .9
_
4. 3
6 .8
1. 2
2. 5
6. 1
4. 1
7. 0
.1

_
_
3. 7
_
4 .6
11. 1
_
12. 1
18. 1
4. 0
7. 1
15.9
14. 2
13.2
.1
.5

.1
2. 2
.1
9 .9
_
12. 3
14. 7
.2
16. 1
21. 3
7 .9
13. 5
19. 1
16. 5
18. 1
.6
3. 0

.2
3. 3
.1
13. 1
.1
16.3
16.6
.6
18.1
19.7
22. 7
20.7
14.8
12.9
22.7
2. 0
9. 1

.3
2. 5
.3
15.0
.6
18. 5
18.8
2. 2
20. 4
15.9
31. 2
22. 3
18. 9
14. 0
14.9
5. 8
30. 5

.6
7. 2
.6
8 .9
1.9
10.6
12. 1
4 .4
12.8
8 .9
20. 5
11.8
13.8
9. 3
8. 5
10. 7
28.8

.8
2 .8
.8
5 .9
3 .4
6. 5
5 .6
6. 0
5. 5
4. 7
5 .6
3. 2
7. 3
7. 4
6. 3
11. 0
12.9

1 .4
6.1
1 .4
5. 1
4. 4
5. 2
2.8
8. 3
2. 3
1.6
2.7
1.8
1. 5
5. 7
4. 5
12. 0
7. 2

1. 5
14. 1
1. 4
2. 3
5. 5
1. 5
2. 6
7. 7
2. 2
.9
1. 3
4. 2
.7
4. 2
1. 2
11. 5
5 .4

2.8
11.9
2.7
3. 5
6 .9
2.6
3 .6
9 .9
3. 0
.7
1. 7
7.9
.6
3. 5
.9
10. 4
2. 4

3. 0
15. 5
2 .9
3. 2
5 .6
2. 6
2. 5
9 .6
1.9
.8
.8
3 .9
.4
3 .8
.6
9 .8
.1

3.8
8. 3
3 .8
4 .9
9 .7
3. 7
1. 1
9 .0
.4
.2
.1
.5
.3
1. 1
.4
5. 7
-

8 5 .5
26. 2
85 .9
2 3 ,4
61.8
13.9
4 .4
42. 1
.9
.4
.3
.5
.6
3. 4
1. 3
20. 4
-

113, 781
23, 704
2, 079

3
-

113, 778
23, 704
2, 079

36.9
35. 3
38. 1

2. 00
1.62
2. 32

.1
2. 2

-

4. 1
27. 6
-

11. 5
33.6
.2

20. 0
24. 6
1.8

28.9
9 .3
8. 5

16. 5
2. 1
38. 6

7. 7
.4
32.8

6 .4
.2
11. 2

4 .5
.1
4. 5

.2
1. 4

1.0

-

-

-

167,375
22, 339
54, 081

167,104
22, 329
53, 821

271
10
260

39.9
39.9
39.9

3. 25
4. 40
3. 08

-

.2
.3

1. 0
1. 5

1.7
2. 7

2. 3
3. 5

2. 3
3 .8

1.8
2.9

1.9
2. 7

6 .4
6 .0

13. 0
.3
11. 3

26.9
.8
24. 4

24.8
2. 2
28. 8

3. 7
4. 7
8. 3

13.8
91 .9
3.8

16,037
35,803
2, 241

16,036
35, 545
2, 240

1
258
1

39.9
39.9
39.8

3. 15
3. 06
2.80

_
_
_

.1
.2
2. 5

.6
1 .4
9. 3

2. 0
3. 1
1. 4

2. 5
3.9
4. 6

2 .8
4. 3
3. 1

2. 4
3. 1
3. 5

1. 5
3. 2
2 .6

4. 3
6 .0
18. 6

11.8
11. 1
9 .4

26.9
22. 7
34. 1

31. 7
28.9
7. 6

10. 3
7 .9
.8

3. 1
4. 2
2. 5

6 1 ,203
24, 503
12, 921
23, 779
2 9,724
12, 351
14,860
1,968
545
28

61, 202
24, 502
1,2, 921
23, 779
29,724
12, 351
14, 860
1,968
545
28

1
1
>
_
_
_
_
_

40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
40. 0
39.9
40. 0
40. 0

3. 13
3. 17
3. 27
3. 01
2 .95
2.79
3. 19
2. 10
3. 12
2. 08

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

.1
_
.2
.7
1. 2
2. 7
1. 1
-

.3
.2
.5
2. 7
4. 4
11.6
4. 4
-

.7
.9
.2
.6
3. 5
4. 5
.2
21. 7
4. 2
17.9

1. 4
2. 1
.6
1. 2
3 .9
5 .4
.9
18. 0
2 .6
17.9

1. 1
1. 6
.4
1. 1
3. 4
4. 2
1. 5
14. 0
1. 5
64. 3

.9
1. 1
.5
.9
2.9
2.8
.8
19. 1
1. 3
-

1. 7
.8
.3
3 .4
2. 3
3. 3
1. 1
4. 7
4. 2
-

8 .0
2.6
1. 3
17. 1
8. 7
13. 7
4 .8
5.7
14. 7
-

17. 1
8. 6
7. 5
31. 1
17. 5
24. 2
14.8
1. 3
.4
-

36. 3
36.6
33. 7
37. 4
32.0
34. 2
35. 0
1. 1
12. 5
-

31. 2
45. 0
51.8
5. 8
21. 3
2. 0
39.8
.2
28. 4
-

.8
.4
2. 0
.5
.4
.6
4.8
-

.5
.1
1.7
.2
.6
.1
.5
20 .0
-

22, 966
2, 467
3, 171
12,874

16,218
2, 052
3, 171
6, 543

6, 748
415
_
6, 331

37. 8
39.5
39. 7
36. 4

2. 35
3 .90
2.9 6
1.83

1. 3
_
_
2. 3

15.
1.
.
24.

0
0
7
3

16.8
1. 2
1 .6
25. 4

11.8
2 .6
1.8
17. 5

7 .9
3. 3
3 .4
9 .7

7 .8
2. 0
4 .7
7 .8

6. 6
3. 0
8. 0
.8

5.6
2. 3
14. 5
.3

5 .8
3. 5
25.9
.1

4. 1
2. 1
24. 2
-

1. 6
3 .9
8. 0
-

1. 4
6. 1
5. 2
-

7. 6
68. 7
1.7
-

4, 454

4, 452

2

39.6

2. 42

-

6. 3

1 1.4

7. 3

8. 3

13. 0

24. 4

1 6.4

9. 0

2. 6

.4

.1

17

38. 3

3. 17

1 .0

1. 5

1. 3

1.8

2. 6

4. 5

11. 3

13. 1

21. 7

18. 4

11.8

604

587

.7

X
X

NOTE: x in dica tes that these data w e re not c o lle cte d .

Because of rounding, sums o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.

10.6

14.8

250,589
850
249, 739

6. 7
.2
.2
11.6

12. 3

over

572,688
12, 721
559,967

1 C ov ers 24 B ell System telephone c a r r ie r s , all c la s sifie d as c la s s A c a r r ie r s .
2 See appendix fo r defin ition o f hours and earnings used in this bulletin.




$2. 10 $2. 30 $2. 50 $ 2 .7 0

X
X

X
X

10.9

Table 3. Non-Bell Class A Telephone Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution o f Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Earnings,2 December 1962
Number o f em ployees
O ccupational group
Total

A ll em p loyees excep t o ffic ia ls and
m an agerial a s s is ta n ts ____ ________ _ 23,639
P a r t-tim e e m p lo y e e s ________________
722
___ ____ 22,917
F u ll-tim e em ployees ___
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p loy ees______________________________
1,699
D ra ftsm en .. ____ ____ ___ ____ _
121
O th ers___ ____
___
__ __ _
1,578
B u sin ess o ffic e and sales e m p lo y e e s ___
1, 361
S u p erv isors __ _________ _ __ — —
278
N on su p ervisory pm plnypps____ _____
1, 083
C le r ica l em p loyee s _ _____ __________
4,556
S u p erv isors _________ 352
N on su p ervisory e m p lo y e e s—________
4,204
C o m m e r c ia l dep a rtm en t_________
861
T r a ffic depa rtm en t_______________
292
P lant departm ent--------------------------933
Accounting departm ent
1,245
A ll other d ep a rtm en ts____________
873
___________ __ __
Telephone o p e ra to rs
6,792
C hief o p e ra to rs __ ___________ — _
363
S er v ic e assista nts and in s tru cto r s __
443
E x p erien ced sw itchboard
o p e r a to r s ____ ___ __ ______ __
5,631
O perators in tra in in g________________
316
Other sw itchboard e m p lo y e e s _______
39
C onstruction, installation, and
m aintenance e m p lo y e e s __________
7,984
F orem en o f telephone c r a fts m e n ___
830
C entral o ffic e craftsm en __________ __
2, 119
T e s t-b o a r d m en and
rep eaterm en___________ ________
355
C entral o ffic e r e p a ir m e n ________
1, 320
O thers — __ _ - __ __ ____ _
444
Installation and exchange re p a ir
c r a fts m e n ___________________________
2, 984
P B X and station in s t a lle r s _______
1,331
Exchange r e p a ir m e n _____________
428
O th ers_____________________________
1,225
Line, c a b le , and conduit
c r a fts m e n ___________________________
2,002
Linem en___ ______ _____ _ __ _
1,097
Cable s p lic e r s
__ _________
551
Cable s p l ic e r s ' h e lp e r s __________
181
O thers _______
- _____ __ ____
173
L a b o r e rs
___________________________
49
Building, su pplies, and m o to r
v eh icle e m p lo y e e s ___________________ _
1, 102
F orem en ______________________________
67
M echanics ------ ------------ _ ____— _
78
Other building s e r v ic e e m p lo y e e s___
626
Other supplies and m o to r
v eh icle e m p lo y e e s __________________
331
A ll em p loyees not elsew h ere
c la s s ifie d _
_________
__ _______
145

Men

A verage
sch e d - A verage
hourly
$ 1. 15
uled
earn ­ Under
and
Women w eekly
ings 2 $1. 15 under
hours
$ 1. 30

11,517
99
11,418

12, 122
623
11,499

39.9
31. 5
4 0 .2

$2. 15
1.47
2. 16

1,495
85
1,410
346
148
198
702
207
495
47
7
144
159
138
21
6
1

204
36
168
1, 015
130
885
3,854
145
3,709
814
285
789
1, 086
735
6,771
357
442

40. 3
39.9
40. 3
39 .4
40. 0
39. 3
39.9
40. 0
39.9
39.9
40. 0
39.9
39.9
39.8
40. 0
40. 0
40. 5

3.29
2. 30
3. 36
2. 13
2.88
1.93
1.83
2.98
1.74
1.63
1.77
1.79
1.71
1.80
1.61
2.43
1. 94

0. 1
-

10
2
2

5,621
314
37

40. 0
39.7
34.9

1.55
1.39
1.85

7,936
829
2, 105

48
1
14

40. 2
40. 1
4 0 .2

352
1,316
437

3
4
7

2,951
1,331
407
1, 213

33

2,002
1,097
551
181
173
49

-

893
67
74
437

209

315
124

P e rce n t o f em ployees receivin g—
$1. 30 $1. 50

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 10 $ 2 .3 0

$2. 50

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$1. 50

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 10 $2. 30 $2. 50

$2. 70

$ 2 .9 0

$3. 10 $3. 30 $3. 50 $3. 70

13. 1

12.6

$3. 10 $3. 30 $3. 50 $ 3 .7 0
and

13.8

over

8. 3

3 .4

4. 3

5. 6

9 .6

5 .9

5 .4

2. 0

1. 6

3. 5

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X
X

X
X

X
X

X

X

X
X

X

X

X
X

X

X

-

.2
.8
.2
3.7
4 .7
11.9
.6
12.8
17. 1
4. 5
10.9
11. 3
15. 7
20.8
.8
1.6

1.7
13. 2
.8
12.7
.7
15. 6
19.9
21. 5
25. 8
10. 6
19. 8
24.7
18. 3
20. 0
.6
6. 8

1.9
10.7
1. 2
11.5
.4
14.4
15. 2
.6
16.4
19.3
18. 5
13.6
17. 0
15. 0
2 5 .4
8 .0
10.4

2. 5
11. 6
1.8
18. 9
13.7
20. 1
19.7
4. 0
21. 1
22.8
30. 1
25. 2
19.4
14. 2
19.9
14. 3
33.9

3. 1
12.4
2. 3
18. 0
10.8
19.8
14. 5
6. 5
15. 2
9. 1
29. 1
16.8
16. 2
13.4
8. 1
8 .8
19. 0

4 .4
13. 2
3. 7
5. 2
9 .7
4. 1
4 .7
9. 1
4. 3
3. 3
3.8
2 .9
3 .9
7 .4
1. 5
8. 0
14. 2

4 .8
4. 1
4 .8
8. 5
8 .6
8 .5
3.9
10.8
3. 3
1.4
.3
1.5
3.7
7. 6
1.7
15.4
12. 0

4. 3
3. 3
4 .4
3. 1
4. 3
2 .8
2. 2
10.5
1.5
.7
1. 0
.8
1.4
3 .4
.8
14. 6
.9

6 .9
3. 3
7. 2
3. 2
5.8
2 .6
2. 3
8. 5
1. 8
.2
1.4
4 .6
.7
2. 1
.8
14. 6
.2

8 .6
16. 5
8. 0
2. 9
3. 6
2. 8
1. 1
6. 3
.7
.2

11. 5
5. 0
12. 0
2. 6
7. 6
1. 3
1. 2
6. 0
.8

11. 6
2. 5
12. 3
2. 4
6. 5
1.4
1. 0
9. 7
.3

.7
2 .4
.3
.8
.1
2. 5

_
.3
.2
.7
. 1
.8
.7

23.7
21. 5
2 .6

21. 1
4 2 .7
12.8

27. 2
33. 2
38. 5

20. 3
1. 3
15.4

7. 5
.9
12.8

.2
.3
_

12.8

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
5. 1

_

-

2.56
3. 18
2.52

-

4 .9
10.6

7. 1
. 1
5. 3

4. 2
1. 0
2 .4

3 .4
2 .9
2. 2

4 .4
4. 0
4 .4

3 .6
3 .5
3. 0

6. 0
4. 2
5. 1

11.8
5 .7
8. 5

23. 0
5. 1
26. 4

14. 1
8. 9
17.3

12. 0
17. 5
14. 0

2. 1
15. 8
.8

1. 6
13. 3
(3)

40. 2
4 0 .2
40. 1

2.47
2.51
2. 60

-

13.8
9 .2
11.9

8. 5
4. 5
5. 2

3. 1
2 .4
1.6

.6
3 .2
.7

.3
5. 0
5 .9

.6
3.9
2. 3

3.9
5 .4
5. 2

3 .7
11.5
3. 6

29. 3
2 9 .4
15. 1

22. 3
11. 5
30. 6

13.2
13. 0
17. 3

.8
.8
;5

40. 2
40. 1
41. 0
4 0 .0

2. 56
2.43
2 .74
2.63

_
-

1.8
3 .8

4.
6.
4.
2.

2
1
2
2

3. 0
2 .6
1.6
3 .9

4. 1
3. 6
1.9
5. 3

3. 6
3. 2
2 .8
4. 2

6. 3
8. 2
4 .9
4 .7

18. 0
20. 1
36. 2
9 .4

28. 3
8. 0
10.0
56.8

13.9
13.7
24. 5
10. 5

10.7
18.7
12.6
1.4

.

.3

5 .8
11.9
.5
1. 1

4 0 .2
4 0 .2
40. 2
40. 0
40. 0
39.9

2. 36
2. 35
2. 58
2. 07
1.99
1.66

-

13. 0
10.9
7 .8
27. 1
27.7
36.7

7. 6
8 .4

-

4 .8
4 .4
6 .4
5. 5
1.7
28. 6

5. 3
6.7
3. 1
3. 3
5 .2
6. 1

4 .8
5 .7
2. 5
5. 5
5 .8
8. 2

4. 2
4. 3
2 .9
7 .7
4 .6

7. 2
8 .8
2.9
11.0
7. 5
_

8 .7
9 .0
8. 5
7. 2
8 .7
4. 1

19.5
16.6
26.7
13.8
20.8

13. 3
12.9
20. 0
8. 3

9 .8
9 .6
16.2
1.7

38. 1
39.9
4 0 .0
36.8

1.90
3. 08
2. 59
1.53

.3

16.6

20. 1

-

8.
3.
1.
8.

4. 2
3. 0
6 .4
1. 6

3.8
9 .0
2 .6
1. 1

6 .6
10.4
14. 1
1.6

9. 3
9 .0
39.7
.3

16

39.6

2. 14

-

7 .9

9 .7

9 .4

10. 0

10.9

8 .8

8. 2

13. 6

21

39. 2

2 .52

.7

6. 2

5. 5

5 .5

5. 5

5 .5

11.7

11. 0

18. 6

-

21
12

-

-

-

4
189

(3)

-

-

.1
-

.5

10.9

_

-

-

-

1. 3
24.9

2 .6
30. 0

2 .4

8 .8
17.9
4. 1
12. 3
1.5
10. 3
15. 3

12.5
7. 5
_

16. 0

3
0
3
5

_

. 1

_

_

1. 1
.7
.8
.3
5. 5
.5

12. 2

_

1 .4
9. 0
2. 6

_

2. 1
10.4
19.2
.2

19. 3

2. 1

_

9 .0

2. 1

.7

1

_
.

8.8
9 .4
3. 2
10.4
1.4
.7
8. 2
_
.1
.2
.2
.1
2.8

29. 8
3. 3
31.8
3. 8
18. 0
.2
1.6
19. 3
.l
.2
^1
.3
.2
3. 3

_

_
.

1

1.9
18. 2
(3)
_
_

.2
^1
_

.5

1
1
.2
.
.

1

1. 1
1. 8
.4

.5
.8
.4

_
_

_
_

.4
4. 5

1. 1
17.9

.9
14. 9

_

_

_

2 .8

13. 1

(3)
. 1
_
_

.3
2. 1

C ov ers 34 n o n -B e ll telephone c a r r ie r s with annual operating revenues exceeding $ 2 5 0,00 0 and engaged in interstate o r foreign com m unication s e r v ic e by m eans o f their own fa c il­
ities o r through connection with the fa cilitie s o f another c a r r ie r under d ire ct o r in d ire ct com m on co n tro l.
2 See appendix fo r defin ition o f hours and earnings used in this bulletin.
3 L e s s than 0. 05 p e rce n t.
NOTE: x indicates that these data w ere not co lle cted .




B ecau se o f rounding, sum s o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.

Table 4. All Class A 1 and Bell System Telephone Carriers: Average Hourly Earnings2 of Employees in Selected Occupations by Region

O ccupational group

United States 3

New England

No.
of
w krs.

No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
h rly .
earn.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

M iddle Atlantic
No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

G reat Lakes
No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

Chesapeake
No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

Southeast
No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

North Central

South Central

No.
of
w krs.

No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

December 1962
Mountain

No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

P a c ific
No.
of
w krs.

Avg.
hrly.
earn.

A ll c a r r ie r s
A ll em ployees except o ffic ia l
and m an agerial a ssista n ts 4____ 596,327
15,411
Cable s p l ic e r s __ _____________
Cable s p l ic e r s ' h e lp e r s -------2, 149
Central o ffic e r e p a ir m e n -----37,123
C le r ica l (n o n s u p e rv io s ry )----- 120,615
Exchange rep a ir m e n ----- -----13,349
E x p erien ced sw itchboard
o p e r a to r s ___________________ 119,412
L in em en _________ ____________
13,448
M ech an ics, building, and
m otor veh icle s e r v i c e ---- —
3, 249
P B X and station in s t a lle r s __
25,834
T e s t-b o a r d m en and
repeaterm en________________
16,392

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

77 125,581
23
2,937
04
566
8, 341
06
08 27,690
37
3,813

$ 2 .8 5
3. 23
2. 21
3. 13
2. 18
3. 24

32,398
961
117
1,840
6 ,060
417

$2. 70
3. 20
1.96
2.99
2. 08
3. 31

66,811
2, 128
237
3,673
12,315

20,692
2,296

2. 03
2.92

7,207
838

1.92
2. 64

3.01
3. 25

681
6, 588

3. 08
3. 20

178
562

3.41

1,763

3. 24

380

$ 2.96 103,421
3. 34
2,755
2. 13
258
3. 17
6,426
2.20 20, 065
3.31
3,998

78
17
09
04
13
25

44,759
1,237
258
2, 346
9, 109
378

1.98
2. 76

9,524
869

2. 00
2.83

23,805
2,687

2. 15
2.98

2 .95
3. 14

219
369

2. 78
3. 27

953
8,708

3. 13

668

3. 30

1,569

-

$2. 44
3. 04
1.92
2. 92
2. 00
-

22,117
616
2
747
4, 177
10

$2. 55
2. 97
(5 )
3. 12
1.88
(5 )

55,384
1,221
491
3,222
9,941
1, 671

15,752
1,459

1.71
2. 51

4 ,7 2 0
584

1.79
2.4 4

2.7 3
2. 90

448
123

2. 72
2. 15

68
15

3. 29

1,452

3. 07

$ 2 .4 7
3. 06
1.96
2.97
2. 02

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

50
06
12
01
02
22

26,196
684
32
1,389
5, 373
331

$2. 54
2. 93
2. 13
2 .83
1.92
3. 03

85,920
2, 331
35
5, 302
18,706
2,661

$2.91
3. 23
2. 56
3. 05
2. 22
3. 20

14,347
2, 019

1.91
2. 64

4,638
780

1.88
2.47

13,902
1,510

2. 10
2.92

2 .8 2
(5 )

117
3,350

3. 16
3. 09

59
749

2. 54
2. 90

459
5,013

3. 11
3. 05

376

3. 13
1________

1, 618

3. 15

551

3. 09

3, 232

3. 20

21,902
613

$2. 56
2. 98

52,194
1, 142
434
3, 117
9,395
1, 670

53
10
19
03
04
22

26,140
684
32
1, 389
5, 360
331

$2. 54
2.93
2. 13
2. 83
1.93
3. 03

82, 270
2, 282
9
5, 093
18,031
2,567

$ 2 .9 2
3. 23
(S)
3. 05
2. 23
3. 21

B e ll System c a r r ie r s
A ll em p loyees except o ffic ia ls
and m an agerial a s s is ta n ts 4----- 572,688
Cable s p l ic e r s _______________
14,860
Cable s p lic e r s ' h e lp e r s -------1,968
C entral o ffic e r e p a ir m e n -----35,803
C le r ica l (n o n s u p e rv is o ry )----- 116,411
Exchange repairm en ------------12,921
E x p erien ced sw itchboard
op e r ato r s_____ _____ ___ _____ 113,781
Linem en __ _ ____ ______ __
12,351
M ech an ics, building, and
m otor veh icle s e r v i c e -------3, 171
P B X and station in s t a lle r s __
24,503
T e s t-b o a r d m en and
16,037
repeaterm en-------------------------

tions.

81
19
10
06
14
27

44,740
1,237
258
2, 344
9, 105
378

2. 00
2. 79

9, 524
864

2. 00
2. 83

2. 96
3. 17

219
369

3. 15

667

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

77 125,437
2,934
23
04
566
06
8, 327
08 27,661
3,790
37

89
25
22
14
20
28

30,498
917
111
1,715
5,704
417

$ 2 .7 5
3. 23
1.96
3. 02
2. 12
3. 31

63,279
2, 063
221
3, 388
11,743

19,032
2, 017

2. 07
2.98

6,620
724

1.97
2.77

14,606
1, 263

1.74
2. 54

4,658
571

1.79
2.45

13,492
1,876

1.94
2. 68

4,617
780

1.88
2.47

13. 190
1, 312

2. 12
2.93

3.01
3.25

661
6,446

3. 09
3. 20

177
345

2.73
3. 26

435

2 .7 4

68

2 .82

115
3, 126

3. 16
3. 13

59
749

2. 54
2. 90

444
4 ,7 6 0

3. 12
3. 05

3.41

1,657

3. 27

365

3. 30

1,407

1, 582

3. 16

551

3. 09

3, 193

3. 20

$2.9 6
3. 34
2. 13
3. 17
2.20
3. 32

96,846
2,599
256
6, 148
19,014
3,768

23,773
2,678

2. 15
2.98

2.78
3. 27

953
8,708

3. 30

1,567

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

-

_

-

_

3. 09

-

735
4, 148
-

-

375

-

3. 13
1.88
-

-

3. 05

$2.
3.
2.
3.
2.
3.

C ov ers telephone c a r r ie r s with annual operating revenues exceeding $25 0 ,0 0 0 .
See appendix fo r definition o f h ou rs and earnings used in this bulletin.
Includes data fo r e m ployees in Hawaii and P uerto R ico and lon g-lin es em ployees o f the A m e rica n Telephone and T elegraph Company which are excluded from the region al tabulaA laska had no c la s s A telephone c a r r ie r s reporting to the F ed eral Com m unications C om m ission .
(F o r sco p e o f survey, se e appendix. )
Includes em p loyees in occupations in addition to those shown separately.
Insufficient data to w arrant presen tation of an average.




N OTE:

F o r p u rp o se s o f this study, the regions fo r which separate data are presen ted include: New England— Connecticut, M aine,
M assach u setts, New H am pshire, Rhode Island, and Verm ont; M iddle A tlantic— D elaw are, New J e r s e y , New Y ork, and Penn­
sylvania; G reat Lakes— Illinois, Indiana, M ichigan, Ohio, and W isconsin; Chesapeake— D istrict o f Colum bia, M aryland,
V irgin ia , and W est V irginia; Southeast— Alabam a, F lo rid a , G eorgia, Kentucky, L ouisiana, M is s is s ip p i, North Carolina,
South C arolina, and Ten nessee; North Central— Iowa, M innesota, N ebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota; South Central—
A rk a n sas, Kansas, M issou ri, Oklahoma, and Texas (except El P a so County); Mountain— A rizon a, C olorado, Idaho (south
o f Salm on R iv e r), Montana, Nevada, New M e xico , Texas (El P a so County), Utah, and W yom ing; and P a c ific — C aliforn ia,
Idaho (north o f Salmon R iv e r), Oregon, and Washington.

Table 5. Western Union Telegraph Company: Percentage Distribution o f Wire-Telegraph Employees
in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Earnings,2 October 1962
Number o f em ployees
O ccupational group
Total

A ll em ployees ex cep t o ffic ia ls , m anag e r ia l a ssista n ts, and m e s s e n g e r s ___
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
em p loy ees_
____ _______________
E ngineering and engineering
a s s is ta n ts ____ _____ __________
O th ers_____________________________
T elegraph o ffic e superintendents
and m a n a g e r s _________________ ____
Sales em p lo y e e s ______________________
C le r ica l e m p loy ee s__________________
S u p e rv is o r s . ___________________ _
C le r ica l em p lo y e e s _______________
C o m m e r c ia l dep a rtm en t______
T r a ffic depa rtm en t____________
A ll other d e p a rtm e n ts_________
Route a id e s ________________________
T elegraph o p e r a t o r s _________________
T r a ffic m a n a g e rs, ch ief
o p e r a to r s , s u p e r v is o r s , and
in s tru cto r s _______________________
E x p erien ced telegraph o p e ra to rs
(except M o rs e o p e r a to r s )_______
C o m m e rcia l d epa rtm en t---------T r a ffic dep a rtm en t____________
Switching c le r k s ---------------------------O perators in tra in in g _____________
Other o p e r a t o r s __________________
M orse o p e r a t o r s ______________
Telephone o p e r a t o r s __________
C onstruction, installation, and
m aintenance e m p lo y e e s ____________
T r a ffic testing and regulating
e m p loy ees- _______ ____________
C on struction, installation, and
m aintenance e m p lo y e e s _________
F orem en - ___________ _____ S u b s c r ib e r s ' equipm ent
m ain tain ers__________________
L inem en and ca b le m e n ________
O th ers__________________________
L a b o r e rs ____________________ __
Building s e r v ic e e m p lo y e e s_________
M ech an ics_________________________
O thers—____________________________
M e s s e n g e rs ---------------------------------------------F u ll-tim e em p loyees _______________
P a rt-tim e em p loyees ------------------ _
F oot and b ic y c le m e s s e n g e r s -----------M otor m e s s e n g e r s ___________________

Men

Women

A verage
sch ed ­
uled
w eekly
hours

A verage
hourly
earn ­
ings 1
2

P e rce n t o f em ployees receivin g—
$1. 15 $1. 30 $ 1 .5 0
and
under
$ 1 .3 0 $1. 50 $ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 50

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 10 $2. 30 $2. 50 $ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$3. 10 $3. 30 $3. 50

5 .8

$2. 10 $2. 30

$3. 70
and

$ 3 .7 0

over

25,146

14,102

11,044

39. 3

$ 2 .6 3

-

-

1. 2

9 .4

26. 5

12.4

11.8

7. 1

5. 4

8. 1

2. 8

1.4

8. 0

1,201

1,057

144

35.9

4. 19

-

-

-

.2

-

3.7

5 .4

4. 6

7. 0

3. 8

4. 3

6 .4

5. 8

58. 7

799
402

783
274

16
128

35. 2
37. 2

4. 25
4. 07

-

-

-

.3
-

-

4 .4
2. 5

3. 1
10. 0

2 .9
8. 0

2 .9
15. 2

4. 5
2. 5

4. 0
5. 0

7. 6
4. 0

7. 5
2.5

62. 8
50. 5

2,802
399
6,457
949
5, 377
3,099
608
1,670
131
7,512

1,758
377
2,568
743
1,779
842
164
773
46
1,794

1, 044
22
3,889
206
3,598
2, 257
444
897
85
5,718

39.9
37.7
38.4
37.7
38. 5
3 9.6
3 9.9
36. 0
40. 0
39.9

2 .6 0
3.79
2. 50
3.41
2. 36
2. 29
2. 20
2.58
1.72
2. 27

-

-

1.5
1. 0
1. 0
1. 3
1. 0
30.5
2. 6

12. 0
.5
11. 3
.2
13.5
15. 3
14. 0
10. 1
.8
11.4

19.9
26. 3
4. 6
30. 7
31 .4
66. 4
16.6
_
50. 1

24. 1
4. 0
18.5
11.8
20. 2
26. 1
5. 3
14.7
10. 1

15.8
15. 0
9 .8
11. 3
9 .8
8 .9
3. 3
13. 8

3. 3
16. 5
3. 2
4. 1
3. 1
1. 6
.2
7. 1
_
.7

1.2
3.5
3.8
6. 0
3.5
.9

1. 6
3. 0
2. 8
8 .9
1. 8
.4

1.7
3. 0
1. 3
4. 3
.8
.4

6. 6
50.9
6. 9
39. 5
1. 3
.6

9 .6

3. 1

.5

5. 2
_
.5

1.9

10. 8

12. 1
3. 5
6. 5
9. 3
6. 1
5. 1
.8
10. 0
2 .4

.5

1.4

.5

1. 6

14. 1

53.7

12. 1

3. 3

2.7

2. 6

2.3

7. 0

17. 9
2 7 .4
6.7
13.4
_
5. 6
_
6. 5

59 .9
40. 7
82. 5
68. 7
2. 3
7 0 .4
12. 8
7 9 .5

6 .7
8. 1
5. 2
_
_
15.6
8 6 .8
4. 3

. 1
.2
. 1
_
_
. 1
.4
_

(3)
. 1
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

1.7
8. 0
8. 0
8. 5
8. 7
6. 8
68. 7
9 .0

1,496

662

834

40. 0

2.75

-

-

-

-

4, 153
2,253
1,900
67
87
1,709
234
1,475

846
584
262
13
38
235
173
62

3, 307
1,669
1,638
54
49
1,474
61
1,413

39.8
39.8
39.9
40. 0
40. 0
39. 8
39.9
39.8

2. 14
2. 06
2. 23
2.06
1.62
2. 22
2. 37
2. 20

-

-

2 .5
4 .5
. l
9 5 .4
.5
.6

12.8
19. 0
5. 5
17.9
2. 3
7 .8
9. 1

6, 109

6, 038

71

39.9

2.9 2

-

-

-

.4

1,649

.1,627

22

40. 0

3. 01

-

-

-

-

4, 333
556

4 ,2 9 2
555

41
1

39.8
39. 3

2 .90
3.73

-

-

_

1,493
721
1, 563
127
666
98
568
4, 558
3, 156
1,402
3, 130
1,428

1,491
719
1,527
119
510
98
412
4,4 5 2
3, 054
1,398
3,076
1,376

2
2
36
8
156
156
106
102
4
54
52

40. 0
40. 0
39. 8
40. 0
39.5
39.9
3 9.4
32. 5
39. 1
17. 7
30. 1
37. 6

2.93
2 .73
2 .66
2.41
2. 05
2. 66
1.95
1.45
1.51
1. 19
1. 18
1.93

-

-

6.7

15. 0

11.9

14. 8

27. 2

5. 6

1.8

5 .9

1.8

11.8

13. 6

11.0

44. 6

9. 2

.8

3. 1

. l
_

1. 3
-

11. 3
.5

8 .6
.4

16. 7
.7

10.8
1.8

16. 3
1. 8

21. 3
14. 0

4. 4
20. 7

2. 1
14.4

7. 2
45. 7

13.
33.
17.
.
5.
31.
1.

13.9
5.7
13. 3
26. 0
3.9
2 2.4
.7

22.
24.
12.
12.
.
3.

4 1 .9
16. 5
6. 3
3.9

1. 1
_
3. 8
_
.3
2. 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

.5
.5
1.9

. 1
.3
15. 0
29. 6
34. 7
7. 3

.3
.3
3. 2
19.7
50. 0
11. 2
56.7
16.4

3. 5
11. 5
2 2 .4
17. 3
6. 3
11. 2
5. 5
3. 7

3. 6
7 .9
16.6
4. 7
2. 1
9 .2
.9

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
-

6. 2

23. 2

52. 2

11. 7

X
X

98. 1

1.9
6.7

NOTE: x indicates that these data w ere not co lle cte d .

_
_
_

9. 3

-

3. 4

_
_

3. 5

-

X
X

_
_
_

.5

6 7 .4

_

_

1.5

1 Includes em p loyees w orking in the conterm inous 48 States and the D istrict o f C olum bia; the com pany does not operate in Hawaii.
2 Company re p o rts that earnings exclude prem ium pay for o vertim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
3 L es s than 0. 05 pe rce n t.




$3. 10 $3. 30 $ 3 .5 0

Because of rounding, sum s o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.

5
6
6
8
6
6
1

_

_

_
_

X
X
_

X
X
_

X
X
-

2
4
0
6
5
1

_
X
X

_

_

.8

_
-

3. 7

_

_

.8
5. 1

.6
4. 1

_

_
_

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X

'

'

_

Table 6. Radiotelegraph Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution o f Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Earnings,2 October 1962
N um ber o f em ployees
O ccupational group
Total

A ll em ployees except o ffic ia ls and
m anagerial a s s is ta n ts _________________
A ll em ployees except o ffic ia ls ,
a ssista n ts, and m e s s e n g e r s ----------P r o fe s s io n a l and sem ip ro fe s s io n a l
em p loyees______________________________
E ngineers and engineering
a s s is ta n ts ___________________________
O thers______________________________ _
O ffice o r station superintendents
and assista n ts__________________________
Sales em ployees _______________________
C le r ica l em p loyees______________________
S u p erv isors___________________________
A ll other c le r ic a l e m p lo y e e s ________
O perating departm ent-------------------C om m ercia l d epa rtm en t_________
Accounting depa rtm en t___________
Engineering departm ent__________
A ll other d ep a rtm e n ts____________
O p e r a to rs ________________________________
T ra ffic c h ie fs , disp atch ers,
s u p e r v is o r s , in s tru cto rs , and
a s s is ta n ts ___________________________
Other o p e r a t o r s ---------------------------------Radio o p e r a t o r s __________________
M arine coa sta l station
o p e r a to r s ________________________
T eletyp e-m u ltip le x o p e r a t o r s -----Telephone o p e r a t o r s ______________
A ll other o p e r a to r s _______________
M es s e n g e rs ________________________ ____
Foot and b ic y c le ___________________ __
M otor_________________________________
C onstruction, installation, m ainte­
nance, and other technical
em p loy ees______________________________
S u p erv isors___________________________
Radio operating tech n ician s--------------R ig g e r s -----------------------------------------------Groundm en ______________________________________
M echanics and m aintenance
technicians ____________________________________
O thers _____________________________________________
Building s e r v ic e em p lo y e e s __________________

Men

Women

A verage
scheduled
weekly
hours

A v era ge
hourly
ea rn ­
ings 2

P e rce n t o f em ployees receivin g—
$1. 15
and
under
$ 1. 30

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$2. 50 $2. 70

$2. 90

$3. 10 $3. 30 $3. 50 $3. 70

$1. 70

$ 1 .9 0

$1. 50

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 10 $2. 30

$3. 10 $3. 30 $3. 50 $3. 70
and

$ 1 .7 0

ov er

3,805

3, 286

519

36. 5

$3.13

1. 6

2. 1

2. 5

3. 6

4. 8

5. 0

6 .9

8. 1

8. 1

6. 7

11. 6

6. 2

3,404

2,886

518

37. 5

3.29

. 1

.3

.5

2. 7

4. 1

5. 1

5. 6

7. 7

9. 1

9. 0

7. 5

13. 0

6 .9

28. 4

163

160

3

37.4

4. 54

-

-

-

-

-

-

2. 5

1. 2

1.8

1. 8

5. 5

4. 3

5. 5

77. 3

148
15

146
14

2
1

37. 5
36. 3

4. 55
4 .4 3

_

_

-

_

_

_

2. 7
_

1. 4
_

1.4
6 .7

2. 0
_

5 .4
6 .7

4. 1
6. 7

4. 7
13. 3

78. 4
66.7

106
117
1, 088
132
956
428
80
259
59
130
1,021

104
106
719
114
605
360
26
130
28.
61
910

2
11
369
18
351
68
54
129
31
69
111

37.5
37. 5
37.4
37. 5
37.4
37. 5
37.4
37.4
37. 2
37.4
37. 6

5.47
3.94
2.83
4. 18
2. 65
2. 68
2. 50
2. 64
2.70
2. 60
3. 15

-

.8
.9
.2
1.9
1.7
1. 5
-

.9
1. 1
1. 3
1.4
2. 5
.4
2. 3
.3

1.7
7. 6
8. 7
10. 5
8. 8
8. 1
6 .8
4. 6
-

.9
9 .9
11. 3
7 .9
22. 5
11. 2
18.6
12. 3
1.6

3 .4
7. 2
8 .2
4 .9
15. 0
8 .9
5. 1
14. 6
6. 3

.9
8 .4
9 .5
7 .2
11. 3
10.4
10. 2
13. 8
7. 0

11. 2
12.8
14. 7
6. 3
12. 7
13. 6
10. 0
7. 9

3 .4
7. 8
8 .9
10. 3
7. 5
8. 5
5. 1
7. 7
12.7

3. 4
11. 7
.8
13. 2
17. 3
5. 0
12. 0
6. 8
10. 0
10. 5

6 .8
7 .7
2. 3
8. 5
10. 3
6. 3
6 .6
6 .8
8. 5
7. 8

1.9
12. 0
9 .7
6. 8
10. 1
14. 0
7. 5
6. 2
13. 6
5. 4
22. 8

.9
4. 3
4. 8
12. 1
3. 8
1. 2
3. 8
6 .9
8. 5
3. 8
8 .9

97. 2
62. 4
12. 0
78. 0
2 .9
3. 8
6. 2
3. 4
5. 4
14. 2

111
910
141

110
800
132

1
no
9

37. 5
37. 6
37. 5

4. 18
3. 02
3.50

-

-

.3
-

-

1.8
-

7. 0
.7

7. 8
-

8 .9
1. 4

14. 3
3. 5

11. 8
3. 5

8. 8
-

25. 6
19. 9

2. 7
9 .7
59.6

97. 3
4. 1
11. 3

138
476
46
109
401
392
9

138
416
35
79
400
391
9

60
11
30
1
1

37. 7
37.7
37. 5
37. 5
28. 0
27.8
37.5

3. 31
2.83
3. 03
2.89
1. 32
1.30
2. 09

69. 1
70.7

-

-

2. 7
6 .5
-

13.7
5.5
-

3. 6
12. 4
2. 2
12. 8
-

4. 3
17. 6
13. 0
26.6
-

23. 2
8. 2
21. 7
19. 3
-

16.7
6. 3
24.8
-

15. 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32. 6
27. 3
47. 8
7. 3
-

2 .9

13. 2
13. 5

.6
15. 2
15. 1
22. 2

828
104
278
36
19

812
101
277
36
19

16
3
1
-

37. 5
37. 5
37. 6
37.5
37.9

3. 52
4 .4 3
3.55
3. 36
2. 51

-

-

-

7. 7
6. 5
16. 7

9. 1
1.9
10. 8
5. 6

9 .4
6. 5
2 .8

-

-

-

-

8 .9
1.9
9 .4
16. 7
10.5

299
92
81

299
80
75

-

37.5
36.6
37.7

3.41
3. 02
2. 51

-

-

-

10. 0
10.9
3.7

5 .4
23. 9
1. 2

10. 7
9 .8
4 .9

-

-

12
6

7 .4

$2. 10 $2. 30 $2. 50

$1. 30 $ 1 .5 0

3.7

-

2. 5

-

-

1. 4
11. 1
8. 7
3. 7
1. 7
77. 8

.6
10. 5

.5
_
5. 3

1.8
15. 8

1.7
1. 1
15.8

6. 2
1.9
7. 6
5. 6
-

7 .7
1.9
3.6
11. 1
42. 1

-

-

3. 3
2. 5

3. 3
11. 1

3
12. 0
17. 3

3
7. 6
13. 6

7 .4
4. 3
7. 4

10.4
9 .8
27. 2

-

.7
.8

.

.

-

-

25. 4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17.4
7 .6

46.
92.
54.
41.

4
3
7
7

-

38. 1
7. 6
4 .9

1 C ov ers em p loyees o f radiotelegrap h c a r r ie r s with annual operating revenues exceeding $50, 000; excludes 1,461 em ployees working fo r radiotelegraph c a r r ie r s outside the c on ter­
m inous 48 States and the D is tr ic t o f Colum bia.
2 See appendix fo r defin ition o f hours and earnings used in this bulletin.
NOTE: B ecau se o f rounding,




sum s o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.

Table 7. Ocean-Cable Carriers:1 Percentage Distribution o f Employees in Occupational Groups by Average Hourly Earnings,2 October 1962
Number o f em ployees
O ccupational group
Total

A ll em p loyees excep t o ffic ia ls and
m an agerial a s s is ta n ts _________________
A ll em p loyees except o ffic ia ls ,
a ssista n ts, and m e s s e n g e r s _______
P r o fe s s io n a l and s e m ip ro fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s .. ___________________________
E n gin eers and engineering
a s s is ta n ts ___________________________
O th ers______ ________________________
O ffice o r station superintendents
and a ssista n ts__________________________
Sales e m p loy ees_________________________
C le r ica l em p loyees ____________________
S u p e rv is o rs ___________________________
A ll other c le r ic a l e m p lo y e e s ________
O perating departm ent-------------------C o m m e r c ia l depa rtm en t____ ____
A ccounting depa rtm en t___________
E n gineering departm ent__________
A ll other d ep a rtm en ts____________
O p e r a t o r s ______________ '-------------------------T r a ffic c h ie fs , d isp a tch e rs,
s u p e r v is o r s , in s tru cto r s , and
a s s is ta n ts ----------------------------------------Other o p e r a t o r s ______________________
Cable o p era tors -------------------------M orse o p e r a t o r s __________________
T elety p e-m u ltip le x o p e r a t o r s ____
Telephone o p e r a t o r s ______________
Junior o p era tors _ _______________
A ll other o p e r a to r s -----------------------M e s s e n g e r s , foot and b i c y c l e __________
C on struction, installation, m ain te­
nance, and other tech n ica l
em p loy ees______________________________
S u p erv is ors ___________________________
M ech an ics-------------------------------------------O th ers_________________________________
Building s e r v ic e em p lo y e e s_____________
A ll em p loyees not elsew h ere

Men

Women

' A verage
sch e d uled
w eekly
hours

A v era ge
hourly
e a rn ­
ings 2

P e r c e n t o f em ployees receivin g—
S I. 15 $1. 30 $ 1 .5 0
and
under
$1. 30 $ 1. 50 $ 1 .7 0

$2 . 10 $2. 30 $ 2 . 50

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$ 1 .9 0

$2. 10 $2 . 30

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$3. 10 $3. 30

$3. 10 $3. 30 $ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 0
and

$ 2 .5 0

$3. 50

$ 3 .7 0

over

1, 369

1, 159

210

3 6.4

2.9 4

7. 2

3. 2

0 .9

2. 6

3.5

7. 6

6. 8

10. 2

10.7

10. 4

9 .4

8. 0

3.5

16. 0

1, 218

1,008

210

3 7.4

3. 09

-

-

.8

2. 5

3 .9

8. 5

7 .6

11. 5

12. 0

11.7

10.6

8. 9

3.9

18. 0

52

50

2

36.8

4. 69

-

-

-

-

1.9

_

_

1.9

1.9

1.9

9 .6

7. 7

1.9

73. 1

40
12

40
10

2

37. 1
35.6

4. 57
5. 11

-

-

-

-

_
8. 3

_
_

_
_

2. 5
_

2. 5
_

2. 5
_

12. 5

7. 5
8. 3

2. 5
_

70. 0
83. 3

9
59
532
54
478
298
34
66
17
63
414

9
56
383
41
342
270
13
29
7
23
358

3
149
13
136
28
21
37
10
40
56

3 7.4
37. 0
3 7.4
37. 2
3 7.4
37. 5
37. 5
37. 5
37. 5
36.8
37. 5

5 .9 0
4. 17
2. 83
4. 06
2.69
2.78
2. 35
2. 46
2. 53
2 .72
2. 92

-

-

_
5. 1
5. 6
5. 0
14. 7
9. 1
1. 6
_

_
_
7. 1
_
7 .9
4. 0
29 .4
12. 1
17.6
7 .9
.7

_
_
10. 5
_
11. 7
7. 7
20. 6
21. 2
17. 6
14. 3
9 .9

_
_
8. 1
_
9 .0
5.7
5 .9
15. 2
11.8
19. 0
11. 1

_
6. 8
12. 2
_
13. 6
13. 1
2 .9
13. 6
29. 4
17.5
14. 0

_
1.7
14.7
_
16. 3
23. 5
5.9
3. 0
5 .9
4 .8
14. 5

_
3. 4
15. 4
_
17. 2
23. 2
5 .9
4. 5
5 .9
11. 1
11.4

_
11.9
10. 0
9. 3
10. 0
14.4

-

1.7
1.9
2 .9
7. 6
4 .8
-

_
8.5
4. 1
20.4
2. 3
.3
5.9
6. 1
5.9
4 .8
2.9

100.0
52. 5
9. 0
61. 1
3. 1
1. 3
5. 9
4. 5

41
373
59
3
115
44
51
101
151

40
318
58
3
95
24
51
87
151

1
55
1
20
20
14
-

37. 5
37. 5
37. 5
(3)
37. 5
37. 5
37. 5
37. 5
28. 1

3. 83
2. 82
3. 27
( 3)
2. 62
2.89
2. 30
3. 03
1. 28

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

29. 1

1. 3

_
16. 1
_
_
24. 3
22.7
2. 0
20. 8
_

_

-

_
15. 5
_
_
42. 6
4. 5
_
6 .9
_

61. 0

-

_
12. 3
_
_
7. 0
11.4
45. 1
9 .9
_

29. 3

-

_
11. 0
_
_
10.4
4. 5
52.9
_
_

9. 8
17.7
52. 5

-

_
.8
_
_
1.7
2. 3
_
.7

_
_

131
15
105
11
18

131
15
105
11
18

-

37. 5
37.5
37.5
37. 5
37.5

3.
4.
3.
3.
2.

7. 6
6 .7
8. 6

22. 2

1. 5
_
1. 0
9. 1
22. 2

_
_

-

3

3

33. 3

33. 3

(3)

Cl" ‘ “Ud"

56
23
51
08
14

(3)

6 5 .6

-

-

-

.
3. 3

-

-

-

_
_

_

_

_

-

_

_

5. 6

16.7

_

22. 2

_

3 .8

_

12. 6
10. 2
100. 0
13.9
27. 3
_

9 .9

_

_

3. 0
5 .9
3. 2
12. 6
_

13.9
37. 3
27. 3
_

17.8
_

8. 4

_

_

3.8
9. 1

8 .6
18. 2

_

15.
2.
9.
1.
1.

3
1
3
3
7

_
_
_

1. 6
16. 9

_

34. 7
_

9. 2

11. 5

5. 7
54. 5

13. 3
9. 1

_

_
_

6. 1
6.7
6.7
_

_

9. 5
6. 0

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

51. 9
86. 7
52.4
_

11. 1
33. 3

“

“

“

“

'

C ov ers em ployees o f o c e a n -c a b le c a r r ie r s with annual operating revenues exceeding $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ; a lso includes o c e a n -c a b le em ployees o f W estern Union Telegraph C o . ; excludes 3,806
em ployees w orking fo r o c e a n -c a b le c a r r ie r s outside the conterm inous 48 States and the D istrict o f Colum bia.
2 See appendix fo r defin ition o f hours and earnings used in this bulletin.
3 Insufficien t data to w arrant presentation o f an average.
NOTE; B ecau se o f rounding, sum s o f individual item s may not equal 100.







Appendix: Scope and Method of Survey
Data p re s e n te d in this study a re b a se d on annual r e p o rts file d with the F e d e ra l
C om m unications C o m m is sio n by com m u n ica tion c a r r ie r s , as re q u ire d by the am ended C om ­
m u n ication s A ct o f 1934.
A ll c a r r ie r s engaged in in tersta te o r fo r e ig n com m u n ica tion s
s e r v ic e by m eans o f th eir own fa c ilit ie s o r through con n ection with the fa c ilit ie s o f another
c a r r ie r under d ir e c t o r in d ir e c t com m on c o n tro l a re su b je ct to the fu ll ju r is d ic tio n o f the
C om m ission .
A la rg e num ber o f telephone c a r r ie r s engaged in in tersta te o r fo r e ig n s e r v ic e
only by con n ection with the fa c ilitie s o f another u naffiliated c a r r ie r a re not su b je ct to the
full ju r is d ic tio n o f the C o m m is s io n and a re not re q u ire d to file annual re p o rts o f h ou rs and
earnings o f e m p lo y e e s .
T abulations fo r telephone c a r r ie r s rela te to those having annual operating reven ues
in e x c e s s o f $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 (c la s s A c a r r ie r s ), and su b je ct to the fu ll ju r is d ic tio n o f the F C C .
Included a re 24 B e ll System com p a n ies and 34 com p a n ies not a ffilia te d with the B e ll S ystem .
T abulations fo r w ir e -te le g r a p h , ra d io te le g ra p h , and o c e a n -c a b le
fined to com p a n ies with annual reven ues ex ceed in g $ 5 0 , 000 and engaged
m erce.
W estern Union T elegra p h Com pany is the only w ir e -te le g r a p h
This com pany and two oth ers c o m p r is e the th ree o c e a n -c a b le c a r r ie r s ;
panies a re in cluded in the tabulations fo r ra d ioteleg ra p h c a r r ie r s .

c a r r ie r s w e re co n ­
in in tersta te c o m ­
com pany included.
data fo r fiv e c o m ­

E m p loy ees and O ccu pational G roups C o v e re d by the Study
O fficia ls and m a n a g e ria l a ssista n ts w e re not in cluded in the tabulations. A ls o e x ­
cluded w ere em p lo y e e s w ork ing ou tside the con term in ou s 48 States and the D is tr ic t o f C o­
lum bia, ex cep t c la s s A telephone c a r r ie r e m p lo y e e s in Hawaii and P u e rto R ic o .
A lask a
had no c la s s A telephone c a r r ie r s rep ortin g to the F e d e ra l C om m u n ications C o m m issio n .
A ll oth er e m p lo y e e s , both fu ll-tim e and p a r t-tim e , w e re in cluded.
P a r t-t im e e m p loyees
a re defined as those re g u la rly a ssig n e d s h o rte r h ou rs than a fu ll-tim e sch ed u le.
O ccu pational grou ps fo r w hich sep a ra te data a re p re se n te d a re defined in the F e d e ra l
C om m u n ications C o m m is s io n 's R ules and R egu la tion s, V olu m e 10, P a r t 51, applying to te l­
ephone c a r r ie r s , and P a r t 52, applying to teleg ra p h co m p a n ie s.
C opies o f this volu m e a re
on sale by the Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts, U. S. G overn m en t P rin tin g O ffic e , W ashington,
D. C. 20402, at $ 1 .5 0 p e r su b scrip tio n .
H ours and E arnings
A v e ra g e h ou rly earn in gs p re se n te d in this bu lletin w e re com puted by dividing total
"sch ed u led w eek ly co m p e n sa tio n " by total "sch e d u le d w eek ly h o u r s ." A v e r a g e sch ed u led w eek ly
h ou rs w e re obtained by dividing the total sch ed u led w eek ly h ou rs by the num ber o f em p lo y e e s.
The te rm s "sch e d u le d w eek ly h o u r s " and "sch e d u le d w eek ly c o m p e n sa tio n " fo r the
fou r c a r r ie r grou p s c o v e r e d by the study a re d efined, a cc o r d in g to the F C C 's R ules and
R egu lation s, as fo llo w s :

CLASS A TELEPHONE CARRIERS
5 1.12(b) "Scheduled weekly hours" means the number of regular hours, excluding overtim e
hours, in the duty tours which the em ployee is scheduled to work during the week in which December
31 occurs, whether or not excused because o f a holiday, vacation, leave o f absence or other reason.
5 1 .13(b) "Scheduled weekly com pensation" means compensation to the em ployee at the
rate o f pay in effect on D ecem ber 31 for the "Scheduled weekly hours. " It includes the basic weekly
pay rate plus any regularly scheduled supplementary compensation, such as differentials for evening
and night tours, equivalent value o f board and lodging for unlocated em ployees, equivalent value
o f meals furnished dining service em ployees and equivalent value o f living quarters and maintenance
furnished managers o f agency offices.
It excludes pay for overtim e work and pay in excess o f weekday
rates for Sunday and holiday work.




17

18
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY
52. 21(b) "Scheduled weekly hours" are defined as an em ployee's regular daily tour of duty
m ultiplied by the number o f days, or fraction o f days, scheduled to be worked during a w eek.
52. 22(b) "Scheduled weekly com pensation" is defined as the wages scheduled to be paid for
scheduled weekly hours as defined in 52. 21(b).
This should include em ployee contributions for old
age benefits, unemployment insurance and similar deductions, paid vacation and holiday hours, the
regularly scheduled weekly compensation o f em ployees temporarily on leave due to disability or sick­
ness, and the scheduled weekly compensation o f both full-and part-tim e em ployees.

The com pany r e p o r ts that "sch e d u le d w eek ly c o m p e n sa tio n " ex clu d es p re m iu m pay
fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s, and late sh ifts.

RADIOTELEGRAPH AND OCEAN-CABLE CARRIERS

R adiotelegra p h and o c e a n -c a b le c a r r ie r s a re in stru cte d to r e p o r t sch ed u led w eek ly
h ou rs and com p en sa tion fo r th eir e m p lo y e e s as d efined above fo r the W estern Union T e le ­
graph Com pany, ex cep t that sch ed u led w eek ly com p en sa tion should in clude re g u la rly sch ed u led
m aintenan ce, tra v e l, o r oth er a llo w a n ce s.
D istribu tion o f W o rk e rs by E arnings C la sse s
In the ta b le s, w o r k e r s a re d istrib u ted a cco rd in g to the p e rce n ta g e having stipulated
h ou rly rates o f pay.
B e ca u se o f rounding, sum s o f individual item s m ay not equal 100.




INDUSTRY WAGE STUDIES

The most recent reports for industries included in the Bureau's program
of industry wage surveys since January 1950 are listed below.
Those for which a
price is shown are available from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Gov­
ernment Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402, or any of its regional sales
offices.
Those for which a price is not shown may be obtained free as long as
a supply is available, from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D. C. 20210
or from any of the regional offices shown on the inside back cover.
I. Occupational Wage Studios
Manufacturing

Basic Iron and Steel, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1358 (30 cents).
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, I960. BLS Report 195.
♦Canning and Freezing, 1957. BLS Report 136.
Cigar Manufacturing, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1317 (30 cents).
Cigarette Manufacturing, I960. BLS Report 167.
Cotton Textiles, I960. BLS Report 184.
Distilled Liquors, 1952. Series 2, No. 88.
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1957. BLS Report 123.
Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1362 (40 cents).
Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1337 (30 cents).
Fluid Milk Industry, I960. BLS Report 174.
Footwear, 1962. BLS Bulletin .1360 (45 cents).
Gray Iron Foundries, 1959. BLS Report 151.
Hosiery, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1349 (45 cents).
Industrial Chemicals, 1955. BLS Report 103.
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1963. BLS Bulletin 1378 (40 cents).
Machinery Manufacturing, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1352 (40 cents).
Men's and Boys' Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear, 1961. BLS Bulletin
1323 (40 cents).
Men's and Boys' Suits and Coats, 1958. BLS Report 140.
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, I960. BLS Report 168.
Miscellaneous Textiles, 1953. BLS Report 56.
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Parts, 1957. BLS Report 128.
Nonferrous Foundries, I960. BLS Report 180.
Paints and Varnishes, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1318 (30 cents).
Petroleum Refining, 1959. BLS Report 158.
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, I960. BLS Report 177.
♦Processed Waste, 1957. BLS Report 124.
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1341 (40 cents).
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951. Series 2, No. 84.
Railroad Cars, 1952. Series 2, No. 86.
♦Raw Sugar, 1957, BLS Report 136.
Southern Sawmills and Planing Mills, 1962. BLS Bulletin 1361 (30 cents).
Structural Clay Products, I960. BLS Report 172.
Synthetic Fibers, 1958. BLS Report 143.
Synthetic Textiles, I960. BLS Report 192.
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1961. BLS Bulletin 1311 (35 cents).
♦Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957. BLS Report 136.
* Studies o f the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
Manufacturing— Continued

West Coast Sawmilling, 1959. BBS Report 156.
Women’s and M isses’ Coats and Suits, 1962. BBS Bulletin 1371 (25 cents).
Women’s and M isses’ Dresses, I960. BBS Report 193.
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1962. BBS Bulletin 1369 (40 cents).
^Wooden Containers, 1957. BBS Report 126.
Wool Textiles, 1962. BBS Bulletin 1372 (45 cents).
Work Clothing, 1961. BBS Bulletin 1321 (35 cents).
N onmanufacturing

Auto Dealer Repair Shops, 1958. BBS Report 141.
Banking Industry, I960. BBS Report 179.
Bituminous Coal Mining, 1962. BBS Bulletin 1383 (45 cents).
Communications, 1961. BBS Bulletin 1343 (20 cents).
Contract Cleaning Services, 1961. BBS Bulletin 1327 (25 cents).
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, I960. BBS Report 181.
Department and Women’s Ready-to-Wear Stores, 1950. Series 2, No. 78.
Eating and Drinking Places, 1961. BBS Bulletin 1329 (40 cents).
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1962. BBS Bulletin 1374 (50 cents).
Hospitals, I960. BBS Bulletin 1294 (50 cents).
Hotels and Motels, 1961. BBS Bulletin 1328 (30 cents).
Bife Insurance, 1961. BBS Bulletin 1324 (30 cents).
Power Baundries and Cleaning Services, 1961. BBS Bulletin 1333 (45 cents).
II. Other Industry Wage Studies

Factory Workers’ Earnings—Distribution by Straight-Time Hourly Earnings,
1958. BBS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents).
Factory Workers' Earnings—Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959. BBS
Bulletin 1275 (35 cents).
Retail Trade:
Employee Earnings in Retail Building Materials, Hardware, and Farm Equip­
ment Dealers, June 1961. BBS Bulletin 1338-1 (25 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail General Merchandise Stores, June 1961. BBS
Bulletin 1338-2 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Food Stores, June 1961. BBS Bulletin 1338-3 (35 cents).
Employee Earnings at Retail Automotive Dealers and in Gasoline Service
Stations, June 1961. BBS Bulletin 1338-4 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Apparel and Accessory Stores, June 1961. BBS
Bulletin 1338-5 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Household
Appliance Stores, June 1961. BBS Bulletin 1338-6 (40 cents).
Employee Earnings in Miscellaneous Retail Stores, June 1961. BBS Bulletin
1338-7 (35 cents).
Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, June 1961 (Overall Summary of the
Industry). BBS Bulletin 1338-8 (45 cents).
Wages in Nonmetropolitan Areas, South and North Central Regions, October
I960. BBS Report 190.

* Studies o f the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1964 0 -7 1 7 -6 6 5




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