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INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY




Communications
1961

Bulletin No. 1343
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEY

C om m unications
1961

Bulletin No. 1343
October 1962

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.




-

Price 20 cents




Prefa ce

This summary of employment and hourly earnings
data is based on annual reports filed with the Federal Com­
munications Commission by class A telephone carriers,
the Western Union Telegraph Co., radiotelegraph carriers,
and ocean-cable carriers, as required by the amended
Communications Act of 1934. Under a cooperative arrange­
ment, the Bureau of Labor Statistics tabulates and publishes
the data.
This bulletin was prepared in the Bureau's Divi­
sion of Wages and Industrial Relations by George L. Stelluto.

Contents
Page
Summary ____________________________________________________________________________
Class A telephone c a r r ie r s ________________________________________________________
Earnings in December 1 9 6 1 ____________________________________________________
Trends in employment andearnings ___________________________________________
Western Union Telegraph Co. ____________________________________________________
Radiotelegraph carriers ___________________________________________________________
Ocean-cable carriers ______________________________________________________________

1
3
3
4
6
8
8

Chart:
Employment and average hourly earnings of communications
workers except officials and managerial assistants,
October 1947—
December 1961 ________________________________
Tables:
Percentage distribution of employees in occupational groups by
average hourly earnings, December 1961, for—
1. Class A telephone c a r r ie r s _____________________________________________
2. Bell System telephone carriers ________________________________________
3. Non-Bell class A telephone carriers __________________________________
Average hourly earnings of employees in selected occupations
by region, December 1961, for—
4. Class A telephone c a r r ie r s _____________________________________________
Percentage distribution of employees in occupational groups by
average hourly earnings, October 1961, for—
5. W ire-telegraph employees of Western Union Telegraph Co. ________
6. Radiotelegraph c a r r ie r s ________________________________________________
7. Ocean-cable carriers ___________________________________________________

14
15
16

Appendix: Scope and method of su r v e y ___________________________________________

17




m

10
11
12
13




Industry Wage Survey
Communications, 1961
Summary
Earnings of the 635,605 employees (excluding officials and managerial
assistants) of the Nation's principal communications carriers averaged $ 2 .6 6 an
hour in late 1961— an increase of 4 .7 percent from October I960 ($ 2 .5 4 ) and
115 percent above the average for October 1947 ($ 1 .2 4 ), the initial date of a
series of annual studies made by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in cooperation
with the Federal Communications Commission. 1 (See chart. ) Scheduled compen­
sation2 of employees of class A telephone carriers, accounting for 94 percent of the
total work force covered by the study, averaged $ 2 . 67 in December 1961 compared
with $2 . 55 in October I960.
Straight-time hourly rates of pay for nonmessenger
employees of Western Union's wire-telegraph operations averaged $ 2 .5 2 in
October 1961, an increase of 8 cents above the average recorded a year earlier.
October 1961 averages for employees of radiotelegraph and ocean-cable carriers
(such employees accounted together for less than 1 percent of the covered em ­
ployment) were $ 2 .9 7 and $ 2 .7 9 an hour, respectively.
The study, based on reports of carriers under the full jurisdiction of
the Federal Communications Commission, covered nearly nine-tenths of the esti­
mated 685, 500 employees in the Nation's telephone communication industry in
December 1961 and over nine-tenths of the estimated 36,700 employees in the
telegraph communication industry in October 1961. 3
Employment by class A telephone carriers covered in the study declined
by about 3 percent between October I960 and December 1961 and was 12 percent
below October 1957, the highest employment level recorded for the periods studied.
Among the other carrier groups, employment levels over the past year dropped
by about 4 percent for Western Union's wire-telegraph operations, but increased
slightly for radiotelegraph and ocean-cable carriers.
1 Prior to 1961, information on employee earnings for all carriers included
in the annual reports relates to an October payroll period.
Effective 1961, the
reference date for class A telephone carriers was changed to December.
See
appendix for scope and method of survey.
2 As explained in the appendix, the earnings data contained in this bulletin,
which pertain to all workers except officials and managerial assistants, were
computed by dividing scheduled weekly compensation by scheduled weekly hours.
"Scheduled weekly compensation" for class A telephone carriers, as defined by
FCC, includes the "basic weekly pay rate plus any regularly scheduled supplemen­
tary compensation, such as differentials for evening and night tours, . . .
It ex­
cludes pay for overtime work and pay in excess of weekday rates for Sunday and
holiday work. "
The Western Union Telegraph Co. has indicated that scheduled
weekly compensation reported for their employees excludes premium pay for
overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Source: BLS employment estimates for telephone and telegraph commu­
nication.
(See Monthly Labor Review, July 1962, p. 821. )




1




3
Class A Telephone Carriers
Earnings in December 1961.
Earnings of the 599,108 employees (ex­
cluding officials and managerial assistants) of the 54 class A telephone carriers
covered by the study4 averaged $ 2 .6 7 an hour in December 1961 (table 1)— an
increase of 4. 7 percent above the level of earnings recorded in October I960
($2. 55). 5 Based on regular scheduled compensation which includes the basic pay
rates plus any regularly scheduled supplementary compensation such as differ­
entials for evening and nightwork, individual earnings of these workers were widely
dispersed.
The middle half of the workers earned between $ 1. 87 and $ 3. 17
an hour.
Wage rates and working conditions of class A telephone carrier em ­
ployees are largely determined through the collective bargaining process.
A c­
cording to agreements on file with the Bureau of Labor S tatistics,6 wage-rate
schedules generally varied by occupational category, region, among companies
in the same region, and, for a given occupation and company, by locality.
Agreements typically provide a range of rates for a specific job and locality
with rate differences between starting and maximum rates frequently amounting
to 100 percent or more.
Advancement from starting to maximum rates quite
commonly involved from 10 to 14 step increases over a 5- to 6-year period.
Reflecting largely locality rate differentials and length-of-service wage increases,
difference between the highest and lowest rates recorded for linemen, for example,
amounted to more than $ 1 an hour in 39 of the 54 class A telephone carriers
included in the study.
Reflecting the great diversity of skills and responsibilities required by
the industry, earnings levels among occupational groups studied separately varied
considerably.
Average hourly earnings in December 1961 ranged from $ 1 .5 6
for trainee telephone operators to $ 4 .9 3 for professional and semiprofessional
em ployees.
Women, constituting nearly three-fifths of the class A telephone carrier
work force, were largely employed in telephone operator and clerical jobs.
Experienced switchboard operators, virtually all women and accounting for about
22 percent of total employment, averaged $ 1.90 an hour.
Operators in training
averaged $ 1 .5 6 .
Nonsupervisory clerical employees (1 11,724 women and 8,396
men) averaged $ 2 .0 5 an hour.
Construction, installation, and maintenance employees, nearly all men,
accounted for nearly three-tenths of the class A telephone carrier employees.
Average hourly earnings for numerically important jobs in these departments
4 The study was limited to telephone carriers having an annual operating
revenue of more than $ 250,000 and subject to the full jurisdiction of the Federal
Communications Commission.
Officials and managerial assistants were not in­
cluded in the study, and their earnings are not included in the averages presented
in this report.
(See appendix. ) Also see appendix regarding inclusion of em ­
ployees outside the conterminous 48 States and the District of Columbia.
5 Wage adjustments for telephone carrier employees, effective between
October I960 and December 1961, are presented in the Bureau of Labor Statistics
monthly series of current wage developments.
(See Current Wage Developments,
Nos. 155 through 170.)
6 Collective bargaining agreements covering roughly three-fourths of the
workers included in the study are on file with the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The major labor organization in the industry is the Communications Workers of
America (AFL—
CIO). Frequently, workers in different departments (e. g. , traffic,
plant, accounting, commercial) of the same company are covered under separate
collective bargaining agreements.




4
were:
$ 3. 13 for exchange repairmen; $ 3. 05 for test-board men and repeatermen,
cable splicers, and PBX and station installers; $ 2 .9 6 for central office repairmen;
and $ 2 . 69 for linemen. These jobs together accounted for nearly 120,000 workers.
Compared with the national average of $ 2 . 67 for all telephone employees,
except officials and managerial assistants, overall averages ranged from $ 2 .3 5
in the Southeast region to $ 2 .8 1 in the Pacific and $ 2 .8 3 in the Middle Atlantic
region (table 4).
Among the other regions, averages for all employees were
above the national average in New England and the Great Lakes and below the
national average in the four remaining regions.
Average hourly earnings for
selected occupational groups shown in table 4 were not consistently highest or
lowest in any one region.
Employees of Bell System companies, accounting for 96 percent of the
class A telephone carrier employees covered by the study, averaged $ 2 .7 0 an
hour— 63 cents above the average recorded for non-Bell System employees (tables
2 and 3).
Part of this difference in all-worker averages can be attributed to
differences in the occupational composition of the two telephone carrier groups.
To illustrate, a larger proportion of Bell carrier employees were in clerical,
sales, and professional occupations; whereas, experienced switchboard operators
accounted for slightly more than a fourth of non-Bell carrier employment and
about a fifth of Bell System employees.
Other factors (e .g . , size of firm and
size of community) also probably contributed to differences in wage levels between
the two carrier groups. Thus, for the 24 Bell System companies, usually covering
an entire State or group of States, employment amounted to more than 50,000
in 4 companies, over 25,000 in 5 other companies, and less than 3,000 in only
2 companies.
Only 1 of the 30 non-Bell companies employed as many as 3,000
workers.
Eleven companies had fewer than 100 workers.
Average hourly earnings for each of the occupational groups studied
separately were substantially higher for Bell than for non-Bell Systems.
It
should be noted, however, that the average scheduled workweek was longer by
nearly 2 hours in non-Bell companies.
The tabulation below indicates the r e ­
lationship of average hourly earnings for each of the two carrier groups as a
percentage of the average for all carriers.
As would be expected, averages for
all carriers largely reflect earnings levels for the Bell System.

Average hourly earnings as a percentage of
all carrier occupational average for—
Bell System
Non-Bell System
carriers
carriers
Clerical employees, nonsupervisory --------------------------Experienced switchboard
operators-----------------------------Central office repairm en--------PBX and station installers ------Linemen -------------------------------Cable sp lic e r s------------------------Cable splicers’ helpers -----------

101

81

101
100
101
101
101
100

78
83
84
84
85
93

Trends in Employment and Earnings.
Total employment of class A tele­
phone carriers declined about 3 percent between October I960 and December 1961.
Although the December 1961 employment level (599, 100) was about 8 percent above
the October 1947 level (552,700), it was 12 percent below the October 1957 peak
of 681,60 0.
The employment decrease since October 1957 has largely been the
result of the substantial decline in the number of telephone operators, caused
mainly by installation of new and improved equipment.
The total number of




5
telephone operators (including chief operators and trainees, as well as regular
operators) declined from 235,700 in 1957 to 174,000 in 1961.
Decline in the
number of telephone operators employed by Bell System carriers accounted for
most of the employment decrease for class A telephone carriers between
October I960 and December 1961.
The relative importance, in terms of employment, of major occupational
groups has changed substantially since October 1947. As the table below indicates,
telephone operators outnumbered construction, installation, and maintenance
employees by 2 to 1 in 1947; in 1961, employment in the two groups was nearly
equal.
Coinciding with this change has been an increase in the proportion of
men employees in the industry.
Men accounted for about a third of total employ­
ment in October 1947 compared with approximately two-fifths in December 1961.

Percent of total employment in—
October October October October December
1947
1952
1957
1961
1960
Occupational group
46
Telephone operators ---------------------- -------43
35
29
31
Clerical employees, non16
18
supervisory ------------------------------------------19
20
20
Construction, installation, and
23
28
maintenance e m p lo y e es-------------- --------29
23
27
Other ----------------------------------------- - .............
15
16
19
21
22
All employees, except officials and managerial assistants (thousands) --------- --------- 552.7

610. 6

681.6

620.4

599. 1

Changes in the occupational composition of the telephone labor force
have had a substantial impact on the overall earnings level of class A telephone
carrier employees.
Thus, an estimated 28 cents of the $ 1 .4 1 increase in
average hourly earnings for all employees, except officials and managerial
assistants, between October 1947 and December 1961 resulted from changes in
the occupational makeup of the industry. 7
Average hourly earnings for all class A telephone carrier employees
increased by 112 percent8 between October 1947 and December 1961— from $ 1 .2 6
to $ 2 .6 7 .
The table below indicates the increases in average hourly earnings
between October 1947 and December 1961 for major occupational groups.

Average hourly earnings Amount of increase
Occupational group
Experienced switchboard operators
Cable splicers' helpers --------------Clerical employees, nonsupervisory -----------------------------Linemen -----------------------------------PBX and station installers ----------Cable splicers ---------------------------

October December
1961
1947

Percent

$0. 97
1.02

$1.90
2.05

93
103

96
101

1. 13
1. 18
1.44
1.61

2.05
2. 69
3.05
3.05

92
151
161
144

81
128
112
89

7 Weighting occupational averages for December
ployment for October 1947 results in an average of
8 The percent rise in the all~employee average
most individual job categories because of long-term
composition of the industry's labor force.



Cents

1961 by occupational em ­
$ 2 .3 9 instead of $ 2 .6 7 .
exceeded the increase in
shifts in the occupational

6
Interregional differences in overall hourly earnings for class A telephone
carrier employees remained generally unchanged between October 19519 and
December 1961.
As the table below indicates, the interregional wage spread
narrowed only slightly over the 10-year period.

A ll-em ployee 1 averages as a percentage
_______ of national averages in—_________
Region

October
1951

October
1952

New E n gland------------------ ----------- 102
101
104
Middle Atlantic ------------------------ 104
104
103
Great L akes-------------------99
C h esap eak e------------------- - ........... 1 0 1
86
87
S ou th east----------------------- ----------89
North Central ---------------90
South Central ---------------88
90
89
87
M ountain------------------—
Pacific — ---------------------------------- 107
107
1 Excludes officials and managerial assistants.

October
1957

October
1960

December
1961

98
106
103
99
87
94
92
91
105

100
106
103
99
87
91
91
92
105

100
106
103
98
88
92
91
91
105

Western Union Telegraph Company
Straight-time hourly rates of pay (exclusive of premium pay for overtime
and work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts) for the 26,183 nonmessenger
em ployees1 of Western Union's wire-telegraph operations in October 1961 averaged
0
$ 2 . 52, an increase of 8 cents or 3. 3 percent above the average recorded a year
earlier. 1
1
Men, accounting for 54 percent of the nonmessenger employees in
October 1961, were found predominantly in the following occupational groups:
Professional and semiprofessional employees, telegraph office superintendents
and managers, and construction, installation, and maintenance employees. Women
accounted for a large proportion of the clerical employees and the telegraph
operators.
Average straight-time hourly rates of pay for selected occupational
classifications are shown in table 5.
Wage provisions contained in agreements with either The Commercial
Telegraphers' Union (AFL—
CIO) or the American Communications Association (ind.)

9 Regional earnings were tabulated for the first time in October 1951.
1 Excludes officials and managerial assistants.
0
1 Much of this increase was the result of deferred wage increases included
1
in the terms of contracts negotiated with The Commercial Telegraphers' Union
(AFLr-CIO) and the American Communications Association (Ind .), in I960. Effective
January 1, 1961, all hourly-rated employees, except nonmotor m essengers, r e ­
ceived an increase of 5 cents an hour, and monthly-rated employees received an
increase of $ 8 a month.
Contracts with CTU apply in all cities, except the
New York City metropolitan area, and covered approximately 23,000 employees;
approximately 4, 300 employees were in the New York City metropolitan area
where contractual agreements were with ACA.



include established rate ranges for specific occupations, with differences between
the starting and maximum rates amounting to as much as 50 cents an hour for
some classifications. 1
2 The survey showed that for many of the occupational
categories studied, the hourly rates of the highest paid employees exceeded those
of the lowest paid by more than $ 1 an hour.
In some jobs, however, individual
rates were closely grouped; for example, the hourly rates of three-fourths or
more of the route aides, experienced telegraph operators (except Morse operators)
in the traffic department, Morse operators, and telephone operators were within
ZO-cent-an-hour ranges.
The 4,9Z2 m essengers, nearly all males and constituting about a sixth
of the total Western Union wire-telegraph work force, included 3,367 full-tim e
and 1,555 part-tim e employees.
Average straight-time hourly rates of pay for
these two groups were $ 1 .4 6 and $ 1 . 19, respectively.
In October 1961, foot
and bicycle messengers averaged $ 1 . 18 an hour, 6 cents above the average for
October I960. 1 Virtually all these employees received rates of pay between
3
$ 1. 15 and $ 1. 30 an hour.
Motor messengers averaged $ 1. 89 an hour, 7 cents
above the average a year earlier.
Total employment of Western Union’ s wire-telegraph operations in
October 1961 was nearly 4 percent below October I960 and 41 percent below the
employment level of October 1947 (the date of the Bureau’ s initial study).
The
following tabulation indicates the considerable change which has taken place in
the occupational composition of the work force since 1947.

Occupational group
Telegraph operators------------------------Messengers, foot and b ic y c le ------------Messengers, m o to r ----------------------------Clerical employees, nonsupervisory -------------------------------- -— Construction, installation, and
maintenance employees ----------------Other --------------------------------------------- A ll employees, except officials and
managerial assistants (thousands) — -

October
1947

Percent of total employment in—
October October October October
1952
1957
1960
1961

34
18
3

32
19
3

30
14
4

28
12
4

27
11
5

16

16

18

18

18

13
16

13
17

16
18

18
20

19
20

53. 1

39. 5

36. 2

32.3

31. 1

Thus, the proportion of employees classified as telegraph operators declined
from 34 percent in 1947 to 27 percent in 1961; sim ilarly, the portion of the work
force accounted for by foot and bicycle messengers declined from 18 to 11 percent.
On the other hand, the proportion of employees in construction, installation, and
maintenance increased from 13 to 19 percent.
Changes in the occupational
composition of the nonmessenger work force account for approximately 15 cents1
4
of the $ 1 .4 7 increase in average hourly rates of pay between 1947 and 1961.

1 Advancement from the starting rate through the various progression steps
2
to the maximum rate is automatic for employees meeting the requirements of the
job after specified periods of service. For additional information on the company's
wage structure, see Industry Wage Survey:
Communications, October I960 (BUS
Bulletin 1306, 1961, p^
1 Effective September 3, 1961, the Federal minimum wage was raised
3
from $ 1 to $ 1 . 1 5 an hour.
1 Weighting current occupational averages by occupational employment for
4
October 1947 results in an average of $ 2 . 3 7 instead of $ 2 . 5 2 for nonmessenger
employees.



8
Radiotelegraph Carriers
Earnings of the 3, 986 em ployees1 of the five companies engaged in trans­
5
mitting nonvocal radio communications averaged $ 2 . 9 7 an hour in October 1961
(table 6)— an increase of 4. 6 percent above the level of earnings recorded a year
earlier ( $2. 84) .
More than four-fifths of the radiotelegraph employees covered
by the study were men, and in nearly all of the occupational groups studied
separately, they were the majority.
Average hourly earnings for all numerically important occupational
categories studied separately were $ 3 . 4 3 for radio operating technicians, $ 3 . 38
for radio operators, $ 3 . 2 9 for mechanics and maintenance technicians, $ 3 . 2 0
for marine coastal station operators, $ 2 . 6 8 for teletype-multiplex operators,
$ 2 . 5 4 for nonsupervisory clerical employees, and $ 1 . 2 5 for foot and bicycle
m essengers.
Since October I960, increases in average hourly earnings for these
occupational groups, except foot and bicycle m essengers, ranged from 10 to
20 cents an hour.
The average for foot and bicycle messengers rose by 4 cents
an hour since October I960.
In part, reflecting a wide diversity of occupational duties and responsi­
bilities, earnings of radiotelegraph employees were widely dispersed— the middle
half of the workers earned between $ 2. 25 and $ 3. 50 an hour. However, individual
earnings for some of the occupational groups were concentrated within com par­
atively narrow lim its. Thus, slightly more than half of the radio operators earned
between $ 3. 30 and $ 3. 50 an hour and over four-fifths of the foot and bicycle
messengers earned between $ 1. 15 and $ 1. 30.
Average hourly earnings of radiotelegraph employees rose 111 percent
between October 1947 and October 1961— from $1.41 to $2.97. Since October 1947,
percentage increases in average earnings varied among the occupational groups
studied separately.
Thus, average hourly earnings for marine coastal station
operators rose by 80 percent since October 1947, compared with an increase of
109 percent for teletype-multiplex operators.
Employment of radiotelegraph
carriers in October 1961 was 21 percent below the October 1947 employment
level but slightly higher (about 1 percent) than in October I960.
Ocean-Cable Carriers
The 1, 406 em ployees1 of the three ocean-cable carriers covered by the
6
study averaged $ 2 . 7 9 an hour in October 1961 (table 7)— 4. 1 percent above the
level of earnings recorded in October I960 ($2. 68).
Men, accounting for a large
majority of the employees in nearly all job groups studied separately, comprised
over four-fifths of the ocean-cable carrier employment in October 1961.
Among the numerically important occupational groups studied separately,
average hourly earnings were $ 3. 43 for mechanics in construction, installation,
maintenance, and other technical work; $ 3 . 2 0 for cable operators; $ 2 . 5 5 for
nonsupervisory clerical employees; $ 2 . 4 9 for teletype-multiplex operators; and

1 The study covered only radiotelegraph carriers with annual operating
5
revenues in excess of $ 50, 000.
Excludes officials and managerial assistants and
1,255 employees working outside the conterminous 48 States and the District of
Columbia.
1 The study covered only ocean-cable carriers with annual operating
6
revenues exceeding $ 50, 000; also includes ocean-cable employees of Western
Union Telegraph Co.
Excludes officials and managerial assistants and 4, 003 em ­
ployees working outside the conterminous 48 States and the District of Columbia.



9
$ 1. 28 for foot and bicycle m essengers.
Since October I960, increases in average
earnings for these job groups ranged from 8 to 25 cents an hour.
Employees
in these categories accounted for about 72 percent of the ocean-cable carrier
employment in October 1961.
Individual earnings of ocean-cable carrier employees (1, 195 men and
211 women) in October 1961 were widely dispersed— the middle half of the workers
earned between $ 2 . 16 and $ 3. 17 an hour.
For some of the job groups, however,
individual earnings were concentrated within comparatively narrow lim its.
Earnings of approximately three-fourths of the cable operators and half of the
mechanics were within 20-cent-an-hour ranges— $ 3. 10— 3. 30, and $ 3. 50— 3. 70,
$
$
respectively.
About three-fourths of the foot and bicycle messengers earned
between $ 1. 15 and $ 1. 30 an hour.
Average hourly earnings of ocean-cable carrier employees rose by
86 percent between October 1947 and October 1961— from $ 1. 50 to $2 . 79.
Since
October 1947, relative increases in average hourly earnings varied among the
occupational categories studied separately. For example, average hourly earnings
for cable operators rose by 72 percent since October 1947, compared with an
increase of 100 percent for telephone operators. Ocean-cable carrier employment
in October 1961 had decreased by about 5 percent since October 1947, but was
3 percent above the level recorded in October I960.




T a ble 1.

Class A T e le p h o n e C a rr ie r s :1 Percentage D istribution o f E m ployees in O ccup ational G roups by A verage H ourly E a rn ings,2 D ecem ber 1961
A verag e
A verage
sch ed ­
h o u r ly
u le d
earn W o m e n w e e k ly
in g s 2
h ours

O c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p
T ota l

A ll e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s and
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ___________________
P a r t - t i m e e m p l o y e e s ----------------------------F u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s ----------------------------P r o f e s s i o n a l and s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l
e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------------------D r a f t s m e n ------------------------ --------------------O t h e r s --------------------------------------------------------B u s in e s s o f f i c e and s a l e s e m p l o y e e s —
S u p e r v i s o r s ---------- --------------------------------N o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s ----------------C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ________________________
S u p e r v i s o r s ______________________________
N o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s ----------------C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t ----------------T r a f f i c d e p a r t m e n t _________________
P la n t d e p a r t m e n t ___________________
A c c o u n t in g d e p a r t m e n t -------------------A l l o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s --------------------T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------C h ie f o p e r a t o r s --------------------------------------S e r v i c e a s s i s t a n t s and i n s t r u c t o r s —
E x p e r i e n c e d s w it c h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s -----------------------------------------------O p e r a t o r s in t r a in i n g ---------- --------------O t h e r s w it c h b o a r d e m p l o y e e s -----------C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a ll a t io n , and
m a in t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s --------------------------F o r e m e n o f t e le p h o n e c r a f t s m e n ------C e n t r a l o f f i c e c r a f t s m e n --------------------T e s t - b o a r d m e n an d
r e p e a t e r m e n _______________
C e n t r a l o f f i c e r e p a i r m e n --------------O t h e r s --------------------------------------------------I n s t a l la t io n and e x c h a n g e r e p a i r
c r a fts m e n
-------- -------- --------------------P B X a n d s t a t io n i n s t a l l e r s -----------E x c h a n g e r e p a i r m e n -----------------------O t h e r s _________________________________
L in e , c a b l e , an d c o n d u it
c r a f t s m e n -----------------------------------------------L in e m e n _______________________________
C a b le s p l i c e r s -----------------------------------C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s -----------------O t h e r s --------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s ---------------------------------------------------B u ild in g , s u p p li e s , an d m o t o r v e h i c l e
e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------------------F o r e m e n ---------------------------------------------------M e c h a n ic s ------------------------------------------ -----O t h e r b u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s ___
O t h e r s u p p li e s and m o t o r v e h i c l e
e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------------A ll e m p lo y e e s n ot e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d ------------------------------------------------------

1
th ro u g h
2
3

M en

$ 1 .3 0

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

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5 9 9 , 108 2 5 8 ,5 0 5 3 4 0 ,6 0 3
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C o v e r s 5 4 t e le p h o n e c a r r i e r s w ith a n n u al o p e r a t in g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 and
c o n n e c t io n w ith th e f a c i l i t i e s o f a n o th e r c a r r i e r u n d e r d i r e c t o r in d ir e c t c o m m o n c o n t r o l .
S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e f in it i o n o f h o u r s and e a r n in g s u s e d in th is b u lle tin .
L e s s th an 0. 05 p e r c e n t .

NOTE:

O

P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e :s r e c e i v i n g —

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s

x in d ic a t e s th a t t h e s e d a ta w e r e n ot c o l l e c t e d .

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e n g a g e d in i n t e r s t a t e

o r fo r e ig n

s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot e q u a l 100.

9
4
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c o m m u n ic a t i o n s e r v i c e

2

-

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7. 6

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b y m e a n s o f t h e ir o w n f a c i l i t i e s

or

T a ble 2.

B ell System T elephon e C a rriers:1 P ercen tage D istrib u tion o f E m ployees in O ccu p ation a l G roups by Average H ourly E a rn in g s,2 D ecem ber 1961
N u m b e r o f em p o y e e s

24 7 , 408 3 2 8 ,3 8 2
827
1 1 ,4 0 1
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38 .1
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3 9 ,9 9 7
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44
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2, 733
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5, 585
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3 7 .8
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3 9 .9
3 9 .9
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1 5 ,2 4 9
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292
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12, 611
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3 0 , 776
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2 3 ,7 9 5
2, 515
3, 166
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1 6 ,6 7 9
2, 080
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7, 116
435
6, 679

3 7 .8
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2 .2 6
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2

3 9 .7

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649

637

12

3 8 .6

3.11

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g ,

$ 3 .5 0

4 .5
X
X

305
12
293

that t h e s e d ata w e r e n ot c o l l e c t e d .

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and

_

( 3)

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x

8 2 .8
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C o v e r s 24 B e l l S y s t e m te le p h o n e c a r r i e r s , a ll c l a s s i f i e d a s c l a s s A c a r r i e r s .
S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e fin it i o n o f h o u r s and e a r n in g s u s e d in th is b u ll e t in .
L e s s th a n 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

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5*

A ll e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s and
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ___________________
P a r t - t i m e e m p l o y e e s __________________
F u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s __________________
P r o f e s s io n a l and s e m ip r o fe s s io n a l
e m p lo y e e s
.............
............
... .
D r a f t s m e n _______________________________
O th ers
.
.............
B u s in e s s o f f i c e and s a l e s e m p l o y e e s __
S u p e r v is o r s
.... . .
N o n s u p e r v is o r y
..
___ _ .
..
. ..
C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ______
_____
S u p e r v is o r s
N o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s ___________
C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t ___________
T r a ffic d ep a rtm en t
P la n t d e p a r t m e n t
_
. ...
A c c o u n t in g d e p a r t m e n t ____________
A l l o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s _____________
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s ______________ _________
...................
C h ie f o p e r a t o r s .............
S e r v i c e a s s i s t a n t s and i n s t r u c t o r s __
E x p e r i e n c e d s w it c h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s _______ _____ ____ _________
O p e r a t o r s in t r a in i n g __________________
O t h e r s w it c h b o a r d e m p l o y e e s ________
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a ll a t io n , and
m a in t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s _________________
F o r e m e n o f t e le p h o n e c r a f t s m e n ____
C e n tra l o f f ic e c r a fts m e n
T e s t - b o a r d m e n an d
rep ea term en
_
. . .
C e n tr a l o f f ic e r e p a ir m e n
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_________ ..
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.. .
_
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_ _
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L in e , c a b l e , a n d c o n d u it
c r a f t s m e n _______________________________
L i n e m e n _______________________________
C a b le s p l i c e r s __
.. . .. .
C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s ___________
O th ers
_______
. . . .
L a b o r e r s _________________________________
B u ild in g , s u p p li e s , and m o t o r v e h i c le
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__
_
. . . . . . . .. .
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M e c h a n i c s ___________________________ __
O t h e r b u il d i n g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s __
O t h e r s u p p li e s and m o t o r v e h i c l e
e m p l o y e e s __________ _________________
A ll e m p l o y e e s n o t e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d __________________________________

M en

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8.7

7 .9

T able 3.

N on-B ell Class A T elep h on e C a rrie rs:1 P ercentage D istrib u tion o f Em ployees in O ccup ational G roups by Average H ourly E arnings,2 D ecem ber 1961
N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s

O c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p
T ota l

A l l e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s and
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ___________________
P a r t - t i m e e m p l o y e e s ______ __________
F u ll-t im e e m p lo y e e s
P r o f e s s i o n a l and s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l
e m p l o y e e s __________________________________
D r a f t s m e n ________________________________
O t h e r s ____ ______________________________
B u s in e s s o f f i c e and s a l e s e m p l o y e e s ___
S u p e r v i s o r s __________ _________________
N o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s ____________
C le r i c a l e m p lo y e e s
...
_ _ ...
S u p e r v i s o r s ______________________________
N o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p l o y e e s ____________
C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t _____
T r a f f i c d e p a r t m e n t _________________
P la n t d e p a r t m e n t
.. . _ .
A c c o u n t in g d e p a r t m e n t
A ll o th e r d e p a rtm e n ts
.................... _
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s _______________________
C h ie f o p e r a t o r s _____
S e r v i c e a s s i s t a n t s an d i n s t r u c t o r s __
E x p e r i e n c e d s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s
O p e r a t o r s in t r a in i n g
... _
_ .........
O t h e r s w it c h b o a r d e m p l o y e e s ___ ... .
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a ll a t io n , and
m a in t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s
F o r e m e n o f te le p h o n e c r a f t s m e n ____
C e n t r a l o f f i c e c r a f t s m e n _____________
T e s t - b o a r d m e n an d
r e p e a t e r m e n _______ ______________
C e n t r a l o f f i c e r e p a i r m e n ______________
O t h e r s _________________________________
I n s t a lla t io n and e x c h a n g e r e p a i r
c r a f t s m e n _______________________________
P B X an d s t a t io n i n s t a l l e r s
E x ch a n g e r e p a ir m e n . . . .
. . .
O t h e r s ________ ___ _
______________
L in e , c a b l e , and c o n d u it
c r a f t s m e n ____
_
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C a b le s p l i c e r s
. . .
C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s
O t h e r s _________________________________
L a b o r e r s _________________ __ __________
B u il d i n g , s u p p l i e s , an d m o t o r v e h i c l e
e m p l o y e e s ---------------------------------------------------F o r e m e n _________________ ______________
M e c h a n ic s ________ _____________________
O t h e r b u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s ___
O t h e r s u p p li e s an d m o t o r v e h i c l e
e m p l o y e e s ______________________________
A ll e m p lo y e e s not e ls e w h e r e
c l a s s i f i e d ___________ __ _________________

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-

-

0
5
3
6

6 .4
3. 0
2. 6
5. 9

5 .4
6. 1
5. 1
1 .9

3.
10.
11.
.

0
6
5

8. 7
6. 1
32. 1

8

.8

4.
12.
14.
.

6
1
1
2

2.
7.
16.
.

. 9
12. 1
1. 3
-

1. 0
16. 7
-

. 5
9. 1
-

.6
10. 6
-

6. 9

10. 5

8. 7

1 1 .7

3. 6

1 8 .4

9 .0

1. 2

. 3

-

-

10. 5

7. 5

12. 8

9 .8

15. 0

18. 0

2. 3

3. 0

1. 5

2. 3

2. 3

12.
1.
7.
18.

9
5
7
0

9.
4.
f.
9.

-

5.
5.
2.
11.
9.
7.

1 C o v e r s 30 n o n - B e l l t e le p h o n e c a r r i e r s w ith a n n u al o p e r a t in g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 and e n g a g e d in in t e r s t a t e
o r t h r o u g h c o n n e c t io n w it h th e f a c i l i t i e s o f a n o th e r c a r r i e r u n d e r d i r e c t o r in d ir e c t c o m m o n c o n t r o l .
2 S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e f in it i o n o f h o u r s and e a r n in g s u s e d in th is b u lle tin .
3 L e s s th a n 0. 05 p e r c e n t .
NOTE:

X
X

B e c a u s e o f r o u n d in g , s u m s o f in d iv id u a l it e m s m a y n ot e q u a l 100.

-

o r fo r e ig n

-

c o m m u n ic a t i o n

-

-

s e r v ic e

1
6
7
2

by m eans

-

o f t h e ir

-

-

-

-

(3 )

. 2
(3 )

. 2
-

2. 3

ow n f a c ilit ie s

T able 4.

Class A T elephone C a rr ie r s :1 [Average H ourly E a rn ings2 o f E m ployees in Selected O ccup ations, by R eg ion , D ecem ber 1961
U n ited S ta tes 3
N o.
of
w k r s.

O c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p

A l l e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s and
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s 4 _________________
C a b le s p l i c e r s __________________________
C a b le s p l i c e r s ' h e l p e r s _______________
C e n t r a l o f f i c e r e p a i r m e n _____________
___________
C l e r i c a l ( n o n s u p e r v is o r y )
E x c h a n g e r e p a i r m e n ___________________
E x p e r i e n c e d s w it c h b o a r d
o p e r a t o r s ______________________________
L in e m e n __________________________________
M e c h a n i c s , b u ild in g , and m o t o r
v e h ic le s e r v ic e
__
__________
P B X a n d s t a t io n i n s t a l l e r s ___________
T e s t - b o a r d m e n and
r e p e a t e r m e n __________________________

A vg .
h r ly .
e a rn .

N ew E n g la n d
N o.
of
w k r s.

A vg.
h r ly .
earn .

M id d le A t la n t ic
N o.
of
w k r s.

A vg.
h r ly .
earn .

$ 2 .6 8 1 2 9 ,7 9 1 $ 2 .8 3
3 .1 2
3 .2 2
2, 979
2 .0 8
801
2 .0 5
3 .0 3
7, 850
3 .0 9
2 .1 0
1.99 29, 161
3 .2 4
3, 752
3 .2 2

G reat L akes
N o.
of
w krs.

A vg.
h r ly .
earn .

1 0 5 ,1 0 6 $ 2 .7 6
2, 858
3 .0 9
2 .0 2
361
6, 322
3 .0 0
2 .1 0
2 0 ,0 8 9
3 .1 2
3, 9 58

C h esapeake
Avg.
h r ly .
earn .

3 1 ,8 2 5
934
178
1, 759
5, 849
422

$ 2 .6 2
3 .0 7
2 .0 5
2 .9 8
2 .0 3
3 .1 5




N o.
of
w krs.

A vg.
h r ly .
earn .

N o r th C e n t r a l
N o.
of
w krs.

A vg.
h r ly .
earn .

S ou th C e n t r a l
N o.
of
w krs.

M o u n ta in

A vg.
h r ly .
earn.

N o.
of
w k rs.

A vg.
h r ly .
earn .

P a c ific
N o.
of
w k rs.

A vg.
h r ly .
ea rn .

5 9 9 ,1 0 8 $ 2 .6 7
1 5 ,4 1 2
3.05
2, 6 02
2.05
3 5 ,5 7 3
2.96
1 2 0 ,1 2 0
2.05
13, 0 64
3.13

4 5 ,0 4 7
1 ,2 5 5
255
2, 198
9 ,0 9 1
372

1 2 9 ,6 0 9
1 3 ,8 8 6

1.90
2.69

1 0 ,1 5 5
907

1 .9 4
2 .8 0

2 5 ,7 9 3
2, 959

2 .0 7
2 .9 3

22, 742
2, 409

1.97
2 .7 5

7, 467
8 64

1.87
2.5 6

1 6 ,8 3 3
1, 315

1 .6 4
2 .5 5

5, 322
6 38

1 .7 0
2 .3 4

1 5 ,4 9 4
2, 056

1 .8 4
2 .5 7

4, 991
792

1.81
2 .4 2

1 5 ,2 5 5
1, 505

2 .0 1
2 .8 5

3, 244
2 5 ,7 1 9

2.86
3.05

210
456

2 .7 3
3 .1 2

937
8, 625

2 .8 9
3 .1 6

682
6, 700

2 .9 8
3.0 6

169
561

2 .7 0
2 .8 4

4 58
115

2 .6 4
2 .0 5

69
15

2 .8 4
2 .3 4

112
3, 253

3 .0 7
3 .0 6

56
733

2 .5 0
2 .8 0

498
4, 892

2 .9 7
2 .9 9

1 5 ,5 7 6

3.05

633

3 .2 0

1, 548

3.3 1

1, 783

3 .1 3

385

3 .1 5

1, 347

2 .9 6

368

3 .0 1

1, 524

3 .0 4

514

2 .9 6

3, 008

3.11

C o v e r s t e le p h o n e c a r r i e r s w ith an n u al o p e r a t in g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 2 5 0 , 000,
2 S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e fin it io n o f h o u r s and e a r n in g s u s e d in t h is b u lle t in .
3 A l s o in c l u d e s l o n g - l i n e s e m p lo y e e s an d c la s s A te le p h o n e c a r r i e r e m p lo y e e s in H a w a ii an d P u e r t o R i c o .
n ic a t i o n s C o m m i s s i o n .
4 I n c lu d e s e m p l o y e e s in o c c u p a t io n s in a d d itio n to t h o s e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
5 I n s u f f i c i e n t d a ta t o w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t i o n o f an a v e r a g e .

NOTE:

S o u th e a s t

N o.
of
w krs.

6 6 ,1 6 6 $ 2 .3 5
2 .9 4
2, 029
187
2 .1 5
2 .8 3
3, 560
1 .9 2
1 2 ,0 3 4
-

-

2 2 ,3 5 4 $ 2 .4 6
613
2 .7 8
2
(5 )
3 .0 2
738
4, 001
1 .8 4
2
(5 )

A la s k a h a d n o c l a s s

A t e le p h o n e

5 5 ,6 0 6 $ 2 .4 3
2 .9 7
1, 2 0 4
524
2 .0 8
3, 155
2 .9 2
1.96
9, 978
1 ,6 2 4
3 .1 0

c a r r ie r s

2 6 ,1 3 7 $ 2 .4 4
709 2 .7 9
44 2 .1 9
1, 318 2 .7 3
5, 278 1 .85
327 2 .9 0

83, 773 $ 2 .8 1
2, 322
3 .1 2
46
2 .4 7
5, 087
2 .9 5
1 7 ,7 8 7
2 .1 6
2, 484
3 .0 9

r e p o r t in g to th e F e d e r a l C o m m u ­

F o r p u r p o s e s o f th is s tu d y , th e r e g i o n s f o r w h ic h s e p a r a t e d a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d i n c l u d e : N ew E n g la n d — C o n n e c t ic u t , M a in e ,
M a s s a c h u s e t t s , N ew H a m p s h i r e , R h o d e I s la n d , and V e r m o n t ; M id d le A t la n t i c — D e la w a r e , N ew J e r s e y , N ew Y o r k , a n d P e n n s y lv a n ia ;
G r e a t L a k e s — I l li n o is , In d ia n a , M ic h ig a n , O h io, and W i s c o n s in ; C h e s a p e a k e — D i s t r i c t o f C o lu m b i a , M a r y la n d , V i r g i n i a , and
W e s t V ir g in ia ; S o u th e a st— A la b a m a , F l o r i d a , G e o r g i a , K e n tu c k y , L o u is ia n a , M i s s i s s i p p i , N o r th C a r o li n a , S ou th C a r o li n a , an d
T e n n e s s e e ; N o r th C e n t r a l— I o w a , M in n e s o t a , N e b r a s k a , N o r th D a k o ta , an d S ou th D a k o ta ; S ou th C e n t r a l— A r k a n s a s , K a n s a s ,
M i s s o u r i , O k la h o m a , an d T e x a s ( e x c e p t E l P a s o C o u n ty ); M o u n ta in — A r i z o n a , C o lo r a d o , Id a h o (s o u th o f S a lm o n R i v e r ) , M o n ta n a ,
N e v a d a , N ew M e x i c o , T e x a s (E l P a s o C o u n ty ), U tah, an d W y o m in g ; and P a c i f i c — C a li f o r n ia , Id a h o (n o r t h o f S a lm o n R i v e r ) ,
O r e g o n , and W a s h in g to n .

T a ble 5.

W estern U nion T elegraph Co.:

P ercentage D istribution o f W ire-T elegraph E m ployees1 in O ccupational G roups by Average H ourly E a rn in g s,2 O ctober 1961

N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s
O c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p
T o ta l

A ll e m p lo y e e s e x c e p t o ff ic i a ls , m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s , and m e s s e n g e r s ___
P r o f e s s i o n a l and s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l
e m p l o y e e s ______________________________
E n g i n e e r s and e n g i n e e r in g
a s s i s t a n t s -----------------------------------------O t h e r s _________________________________
T e le g r a p h o f f i c e s u p e r in t e n d e n t s
and m a n a g e r s __________________________
S a le s e m p l o y e e s -------------------------------------C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s -------------------------------S u p e r v i s o r s ----------------------------------------C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s -------------------------C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t ----------T r a f f i c d e p a r t m e n t _____________
A l l o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s --------------R o u te a id e s ___________________________
T e le g r a p h o p e r a t o r s
--------------------------T r a ffic m a n a g e r s , c h ie f
o p e r a t o r s , s u p e r v i s o r s , and
i n s t r u c t o r s ------- ----------------------------E x p e r i e n c e d t e le g r a p h o p e r a t o r s
( e x c e p t M o r s e o p e r a t o r s ) _______
C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t ----------T r a f f i c d e p a r t m e n t --------------------S w itc h in g c l e r k s -------------------------------O p e r a t o r s in t r a in i n g ______________
O t h e r o p e r a t o r s _____________________
M o r s e o p e r a t o r s -------------------------T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s ____________
C o n s t r u c t io n , in s t a ll a t io n , and
m a in t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s --------------------T r a f f i c t e s t in g and r e g u la t in g
e m p l o y e e s ! __________________________________
_
C o n s t r u c t io n , in s t a ll a t io n , and
m a in t e n a n c e e m p l o y e e s _____________
F o r e m e n ___________________________________
S u b s c r i b e r s ' e q u ip m e n t
m a in t a i n e r s -------------------------------------------L in e m e n and c a b le m e n ____________
O t h e r s -------------------------------------------------------------L a b o r e r s ---------------------------------------------------------------B u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s --------------------M e c h a n ic s -----------------------------------------------------------O t h e r s ____________________________________________
M e s s e n g e r s -----------------------------------------------------------------------F u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s _________________________
P a r t - t i m e e m p l o y e e s _________________________
F o o t and b i c y c l e m e s s e n g e r s ----------------M o t o r m e s s e n g e r s _____________________________

1
2
3

W om en

A verage
h o u r ly
earn ­
in g s 2

P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g $ 1 .1 5 "
and
under
$ 1 .3 0

$ 1 .3 0

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .5 0 ~ $ 3.7 0

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 0

1 and
over

26, 183

1 4 ,2 6 0

11, 923

39. 3

$2 . 52

-

0. 1

2. 8

7. 1

12. 0

27. 2

12. 1

11. 8

6. 6

9. 1

1. 6

1. 5

1. 5

6 .7

1, 150

1, 008

142

35. 8

4. 07

-

-

-

. 2

. 3

7. 0

5. 7

4. 8

6. 0

5. 0

3. 9

6. 2

9. 8

51. 1

744
406

726
282

18
124

35. 0
37. 2

4 . 16
3. 93

-

-

-

. 5

. 7

8. 3
4. 7

3. 8
9. 1

3. 6
6. 9

1. 3
14. 5

5. 6
3. 9

3. 8
4. 2

7. 0
4. 7

13. 4
3. 2

53. 1
47. 5

2, 907
400
6, 823
971
5, 705
3, 231
683
1, 791
147
8, 255

1, 808
373
2, 739
757
1, 935
882
181
872
47
1, 931

1, 099
27
4, 084
214
3, 770
2, 349
502
919
100
6, 324

39.
37.
38.
37.
38.
39.
39.
36.
40.
39.

2. 54
3. 76
2. 43
3. 33
2. 30
2. 24
2. 14
2. 47
1 .6 8
2. 22

-

. 3

. 2
3. 6
2. 3
2. 2
1. 9
2. 7
76. 9
5. 6

2. 5
. 3
9. 5
10. 8
10. 0
13. 9
11. 2
23. 1
10. 1

15. 5
. 3
14. 2
1 .0
16. 8
18. 9
15. 2
13. 8
12. 5

19. 8
. 5
28. 1
8. 5
32. 2
36. 0
62 . 2
13. 8
48 . 3

23 . 6
3. 3
12. 7
9. 2
13. 7
16. 0
2 .9
13. 5
9. 3

14.
14.
9.
13.
9.
8.
3.
13.
9.

6

9 .9
3. 5
5. 2
7. 0
5. 0
4. 5
. 1
7 .9
1. 3

3. 2
16. 8
5. 0
5. 4
5. 0
1. 3
. 1
13. 5
. 6

1. 2
3. 5
2. 8
9. 0
1. 9
.8
4. 6
. 5

1. 8
3. 0
1. 6
4. 7
1. 1
.6
2. 5
. 5

1 .7
4. 0
1 .4
6. 7
. 6
.4
1. 1
.4

5. 9
50. 8
5. 9
35. 5
1. 0
. 7
1. 8
1. 2

2. 2

22. 2

51. 3

6. 9

3. 1

2. 6

2. 5

2. 2

6. 3

5.
9.
.
1.
80.
5.

14.
19.
8.
41 .
1.
8.

8
0
4
4

2. 7
1. 3
4. 4
-

. 2
. 3
. 1
-

-

-

_
-

-

15. 2
84. 0
1 .9

-

-

-

65 . 2
12. 7
75. 3

-

-

-

4. 9

9
7
4
7
4
5
9
0
0
8

1, 529

685

844

4, 502
2, 443
2, 059
90
131
2, 003
324
L 679

881
605
276
21
57
287
236
51

3, 621
1, 838
1, 783
69
74
1, 716
88
1, 628

5, 903

5, 828

75

39. 9

2. 73

1 ,6 3 3

1, 611

22

40 . 0

2. 80

4, 097
562

4. 055
561

42
1

39. 8
39. 3

2. 73
3. 55

-

-

-

. 7

1, 275
733
1, 527
173
745
129
616
4, 922
3, 367
1, 555
3, 4 94
1, 428

1, 275
731
1, 488
162
573
129
444
4, 809
3, 260
1, 549
3, 436
1, 373

-

2. 71
2. 61
2. 50
3 2. 20
2. 02
3 2. 59
1. 90
1 .4 2
1. 46
1. 19
1. 18
1. 89

-

_

-

1. 8

2
39
11
172

_

172
113
107
6
58
55

40. 0

2. 70

39.
39.
39.
39.
40 .
39.
40 .
39.

2.
2.
2.
1.
1.
2.
2.
2.

-

40.
40 .
39.
40 .
39.
39.
39.
31.
38.
17.
29.
37.

8
7
9
7
0
7
1
6

0
0
8
0
5
9
5
9
6
5
8
1

09
01
19
94
57
18
34
15

.9
-

16. 8

6
8
5
1
2
1

1
1
2
1
5
0

-

-

-

70. 9

X
X
99 . 9

2. 9

X
X
. 1
9. 7

-

-

6. 1

9. 6

-

-

-

.2

-

18. 6
3 1 .5
3. 4
53. 3
1. 5
6. 5
3. 4
7. 1

1. 2

5. 2

8. 8

12. 6

17. 5

14. 8

30. 1

1 .6

1. 7

1. 5

3. 1

-

4. 5

6. 8

12. 3

14. 5

5 2. 2

2. 6

.7

. 9

2. 4

5. 3
. 2

10. 4
. 7

] 5. 3

19. 4
1. 4

15. 2
4. 3

2 2. 4
2 4. 2

1. 3
7. 7

2. 1
13. 2

1. 8
12. 1

6. 1
36. 3

5.
9.
18.
11.
2.
10.

16. 1
9. 4
23. 0
4. 0
2. 6
5. 4
1 .9

20.
36.
16.
20.
7.
40.

13.
27.
15.
9.
2.
10.

44.
13.
7.
4.

. 8
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. 9
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. 7

3. 1

3. 9

3. 9

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3. 1

X
X
-

X
X
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■

•

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"

-

. 8

58.
38.
83.
4.

6
3
9
0
6
7
5
6

-

4
8
5
6
8
9

-

-

-

4
8
9
8
4
3
. 5

not collected.

-

3
0
1
2
0
9
. 2

-

0
4
9
0

2. 6
2. 7

37. 0
7. 3

3. 5
1 1 .7
22 . 0
49 . 9
17. 8
56 . 7
13. 3

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
-

X
X
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X
X
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X
X
-

. 1
. 8
X
X
-

9. 3

25. 3

45. 7

9. 9

"

■

“

■

5. 2
2. 1

-

23. 1
30. 6

-

1. 1
2. 9

I n c lu d e s e m p l o y e e s w o r k in g in the c o n t e r m in o u s 48 S ta te s and th e D i s t r i c t o f C o lu m b i a ; the c o m p a n y d o e s n ot o p e r a t e in A la s k a o r H a w a ii.
C o m p a n y r e p o r t s that e a r n in g s e x c l u d e p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o li d a y s , and la te s h ift s .
T h e d e c r e a s e in a v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s s in c e O c t o b e r I9 6 0 r e f l e c t s a t u r n o v e r in f o r c e c o n s is t e n t w ith th e c o m p a n y 's p e r s o n n e l r e q u ir e m e n t s .

NOTE: x indicates that these data we:




M en

A verage
sch edu le d
w e e k ly
hou rs

Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.

X
X
-

X
X
-

2. 9

-

T able 6.

R adiotelegraph C arriers:1 P ercentage D istrib u tion o f E m ployees in O ccupational G roups by Average H ourly E a rn in g s,2 O ctober 1961
N u m be r o f e m p lo y e e s

O c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p
T ota l

A l l e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s and
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s -----------------------------A ll e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s ,
a s s i s t a n t s , a n d m e s s e n g e r s ________
P r o f e s s i o n a l an d s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l
e m p l o y e e s _________________________________
E n g i n e e r s an d e n g i n e e r in g
a s s i s t a n t s ______________________________
O t h e r s ____________________________________
O f f i c e o r s t a t io n s u p e r in te n d e n ts
a n d a s s i s t a n t s _____________________________
S a le s e m p l o y e e s ____________________________
C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ________________________
S u p e r v i s o r s _____________________________
A l l o t h e r c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s _________
O p e r a t in g d e p a r t m e n t _____________
C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t ___________
A c c o u n t in g d e p a r t m e n t ____________
E n g i n e e r in g d e p a r t m e n t ___________
A ll o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s --------------------O p e r a t o r s ____________________________________
T r a ffic c h ie fs , d is p a tc h e r s ,
s u p e r v i s o r s , in s t r u c t o r s , and
a s s i s t a n t s ______________________________
O t h e r o p e r a t o r s _________________________
R a d io o p e r a t o r s _____________________
M a r in e c o a s t a l s ta tio n
o p e r a t o r s ______________________________
T e le tv p e -m u ltip le x o p e ra to rs
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s _________________
A l l o t h e r o p e r a t o r s __________________
M e s s e n g e r s _____________________________________
F o o t and b i c y c l e ________________________
M o t o r _____________________________________
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a ll a t io n , m a in t e ­
n a n c e , an d o t h e r t e c h n i c a l
e m p l o y e e s _________________________________
S u p e r v i s o r s _____________________________
R a d io o p e r a t in g t e c h n ic i a n s __________
R i g g e r s ------------------- --------------------------------G r o u n d m e n ______________________________
M e c h a n ic s and m a in t e n a n c e
t e c h n i c i a n s _____________________________
O t h e r s ____________________________________
B u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s _____________

M en

W om en

A verage
u le d
w e e k ly
h ou rs

P e r c e nt o f e m p lo y e e ;3 r e c e i v i n g —

A verage
h o u r ly
in g s 1
2

$ 1 .1 5
Unde r
$ 1.15

$ 1 .3 0

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0 ' $ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .3 0

$3.50"

under
$ 1 .3 0

$ 1 .5 0

$ 1 .7 0

$ 1 .9 0

$ 2 .1 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .1 0

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 0

9 .4

2.1

0 .7

3.3

4 .6

6 .2

6 .2

8 .4

8 .3

6 .6

11.3

7 .9

6 .2

18.8

.5

.6

3.5

5 .2

6.9

7.1

9 .4

9 .4 '

7 .4

12.8

8 .9

7 .0

2 1 .2

and

3, 986

3, 434

552

3 6 .5

$ 2 .9 7

0.1

3, 527

2, 978

549

3 7 .5

3 .1 4

.1

-

185

182

3

3 7 .4

4 .4 0

-

-

159
26

158
24

1
2

3 7 .5
3 6 .8

4 .4 8
3 .9 0

-

-

100
104
1, 105
123
982
47 3
72
205
38
194
1 ,0 9 2

99
104
713
107
606
380
43
101
26
56
960

1
392
16
376
93
29
104
12
138
132

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .4
3 7 .5
3 7 .4
3 7 .5
3 7 .4
3 7 .4
3 7 .3
3 7 .4
3 7 .6

5 .0 9
3 .7 8
2 .6 9
3 .9 2
2 .5 4
2 .5 3
2 .2 8
2 .5 7
2 .8 9
2 .5 5
3 .0 0

-

120
972
157

119
841
149

1
131
8

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .3

4 .0 3
2 .8 8
3 .3 8

-

140
498
58
119
459
437
22

140
423
45
84
456
434
22

75
13
35
3
3
-

37 .7
3 7 .7
3 7 .4
3 7 .5
28 .7
2 8 .2
3 7 .5

3 .2 0
2 .6 8
2 .8 5
2 .7 0
1.29
1.2 5
1.81

845
119
300
42
22

831
116
299
42
22

14
3
1
-

3 7 .6
3 7 .5
3 7 .6
3 7 .5
3 7 .7

3 .4 2
4 .2 8
3 .4 3
3 .1 8
2 .4 5

-

-

-

267
95
96

267
85
89

10
7

3 7 .5
3 7 .4
3 7 .6

3 .2 9
3 .0 0
2 .2 8

3.1

_
-

-

-




Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal 100.

$ 2 .3 0

-

-

.5

-

1.1

3 .8

2 .7

3 .2

5.9

9 .2

7 .0

6 6 .5

-

-

-

3 .8

-

1.3

-

-

3 .8
3 .8

1.9
7 .7

3.1
3 .8

4 .4
1 5.4

8 .2
1 5.4

6 .9
7 .7

7 0 .4
4 2 .3

-

1.4
1.6
1.9
5.6
1.5
.1

9 .9
11.1
11.2
16.7
11.7
10.3
.2

1.0
10.3
11.6
9 .7
19.4
10.7
10.5
14.4
3.3

1.0
9 .5
10.7
7.4
2 5 .0
8.3
7.9
16.5
10.4

11.1
12.5
15 .4
8.3
13.2
5.3
7 .7
8 .4

_
1.9
9 .7
.8
1 0.8
1 0 .4
4 .2
1 0 .2
7 .9
1 5 .5
12.7

1 2.4
1 4.0
1 8 .4
4 .2
16.1
2 .6
6 .7
8 .6

6 .7
7 .6
3 .3
8.1
8 .9
2 .8
7.3
1 8 .4
7 .2
1 0 .0

11.5
10.8
8.1
11.1
13.7
6 .9
4 .9
2 8 .9
9 .3
2 0 .8

7 .7
4 .3
8.9
3.7
1.5
8 .8
10.5
3 .6
11.7

4 .0
1 4 .4
4 .0
21.1
1.8
4 .2
4 .9

-

1.0
1.4
1.5
1.5
1.4
1.5
2 .6
1.5
.2

2 .6
2 .8

9 6 .0
54.8
7.7
57.7
1.4
1.4
1.0
5.3
4 .6
10.7

-

.1
-

.2
-

.2
.6

3 .7
-

11.7
1.3

.8
9 .4
1.9

14.3
3 .2

9 .7
3 .2

.8
11.1
.6

2 3 .4
2 1 .0

5.0
12.6
5 2.9

8 .3
2 .2
5 .7

8 5 .0
1.5
9.6

-

-

.2

-

5 .0
13.3
8 .6
8 .4

1 5 .0
1 4 .9
12.1
2 6 .9

12.1
9 .2
1 9.0
1 2 .6

12.1
2 8 .7
4 8 .3
5 .0
-

8 .6

-

19.7
3 .4
10.1
.9

2 7.9

-

6 .4
6 .9

19.3
7 .2

-

-

-

-

8 1 .3
8 4 .9
9.1

-

-

14.4
14.4
13.6

1 C o v e r s e m p l o y e e s o f r a d io te le g r a p h , c a r r i e r s w ith an n u a l o p e r a t in g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 ;
m in o u s 4 8 S ta te s and th e D is t r ic t o f C o lu m b ia .
2 S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e fin it io n o f h o u r s and e a r n in g s u s e d in th is b u lle t in .

NOTE;

$ 3 .7 0

-

-

.2

.2
1.7

-

-

1.3
.7
13.6

-

2 .0

.2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 7 .0
-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4 0 .9

4 .5

18.2

-

.5
4 .5

1.2
18.2

1.4
.7
9.1

1.9
1.7
1.7
2 .4
13.6

6 .9
.8
4 .0
14.3
13.6

1 0 .2
7 .7
14.3
4 0 .9

6 .6
.8
9 .0
7.1
-

9 .6
.8
10.3
1 6.7
-

13.5
2.5
11.3
11.9
-

16.4
3 .4
17.3
3 3.3
-

3 1.8
8 9 .9
3 8 .0
-

2.1

.4
2.1
8.3

6.3
2 1.9

.4
7.4
13.5

.4
4 .2
16.7

1 0.9
7 .4
2 0 .8

1 2.7
1 4.7
1 0 .4

3 .4
1 6 ,8

9 .7
16.8

2 2 .5
12.6

2 3 .2
7 .4

16.5
4 .2
2.1

e x c lu d e s

1, 255

e m p lo y e e s w o r k i n g f o r

r a d io t e le g r a p h

c a r r ie r s

1. 0

o u t s id e the

con ter­

T able 7.

O cean-C able C a rrie rs:1 Percentage D istribution o f E m ployees in O ccupational Groups by Average H ourly E a rn in g s,2 O ctober 1961
N u m be r o f e m p lo y e e s

O c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p
T ota l

A l l e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s and
m a n a g e r i a l a s s i s t a n t s ___________________
A ll e m p l o y e e s e x c e p t o f f i c i a l s ,
a s s i s t a n t s , an d m e s s e n g e r s
P r o f e s s i o n a l an d s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l
e m p l o y e e s __________________________________
E n g i n e e r s and e n g i n e e r in g
a s s i s t a n t s _______________________________
O t h e r s ____________________________________
O f f ic e o r s t a t io n s u p e r in t e n d e n t s
a n d a s s i s t a n t s _____________________________
S a le s e m p l o y e e s ____________________________
C l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s ________________________
S u p e r v i s o r s ______________________________
A ll o t h e r c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s
O p e r a t in g d e p a r t m e n t
C o m m e r c i a l d e p a r t m e n t ___________
A c c o u n t in g d e p a r t m e n t _____________
E n g i n e e r in g d e p a r t m e n t ___________
A ll o t h e r d e p a r t m e n t s
O p e r a t o r s ____________________________________
T r a ffic c h ie fs , d is p a tc h e r s ,
s u p e r v i s o r s , i n s t r u c t o r s , and
a s s i s t a n t s _______________________________
O t h e r o p e r a t o r s _________________________
C a b le o p e r a t o r s
..............
M o r s e o p e r a t o r s ____________________
T e l e t y p e - m u l t i p l e x o p e r a t o r s ____
T e le p h o n e o p e r a t o r s ________________
J u n io r o p e r a t o r s ____________________
A ll o th e r o p e r a t o r s
_ _
M e s s e n g e r s , fo o t an d b i c y c l e ____________
C o n s t r u c t io n , i n s t a ll a t io n , m a in t e ­
n a n c e , an d o th e r t e c h n ic a l
e m p l o y e e s __________________________________
S u p e r v is o r s
_
. ...
....
.... ____ _
M e c h a n ic s
. . . .............
.
O t h e r s ..................................................................
B u ild in g s e r v i c e e m p l o y e e s ............... .
A l l e m p l o y e e s n ot e l s e w h e r e
c la s s ifie d
. _
.................... .. .............. ..

M en

W om en

A verag e
u led
w e e k ly
h ou rs

P e r c e n t o f e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv in g -

A verage
h o u r ly
in g s 2

T X 30
under
$ 1.30

$ 1.50

$ 1.70

$ 1.90

$ 2. 10

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3 .1 0

T " 3 .3 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 1.50

$ 1.70

$ 1.90

$ 2. 10

$ 2 .3 0

$ 2 .5 0

$ 2 .7 0

$ 2 .9 0

$ 3. 10

$ 3 .3 0

$ 3 .5 0

$ 3 .7 0

and

1 ,4 0 6

1. 195

211

36.0

$ 2 .7 9

1, 232

1, 021

211

37.3

2 .9 4

44

42

2

36.9

4 .6 0

33
11

33
9

2

37.1
36. 1

4 .4 6
5 .0 4

_

-

-

8
52
570
56
514
332
28
67
14
73
414

8
50
417
49
368
300
8
31
3
26
360

2
153
7
146
32
20
36
11
47
54

3 7.5
36.1
37.3
37.2
3 7 .4
37 .4
37.5
37 .5
37 .5
36 .7
37.5

5.6 7
3 .9 5
2 .6 9
4 .0 0
2 .5 5
2 .5 7
2 .3 2
2 .4 0
2 .4 6
2.6 6
2 .8 2

_
_
_

_
.4
.4
3.6
1.5
-

_
3.2
3.5
3.9
6 .0
1.4
-

5.6
6 .2
4 .2
2 5 .0
11.9
4.1
1.4

12.1

.
8.6

13.4
11.7
2 1 .4
16.4
28.6
12.3
2.2

9.5
5.7
17.9
16.4
7.1
17.8
10.9

39
375
86
2
138
43
1
105
174

38
322
852
118
24
1
92
174

1
53
1
20
19
13
-

37.5
3 7 .5
37.5

3.7 3
2 .7 3
3 .2 0

(3 )
3 7 .4
37.5

(3 )
2 .4 9
2 .8 2

(3 )
37.5
26 .7

(3 )
2.6 3
1.2 8

7 7 .0

_
_
18.4

4 .0

1.6
2.2
2 .9
_

2.4
_
5.1
4 .7
_
_
_

12.0
15.9
2.3
2 1.0

124
14
98
12
18

124
14
98
12
18

-

37.5
37.5
37.5
3 7 .5
37.5

3 .4 7
4. 15
3 .43
2 .9 5
2 .1 2

2 7 .8

_
_
2 2 .2

2

2

(3 )

(3 )

9.5
.

2.4

1.8

3.1

5.9

7.3

9 .2

9 .2

1 3 .4

9 .8

9 .3

3.6

5 .5

.2

1.5

3.6

6.7

8.2

10.6

10.5

15.3

1 1.2

1 0.6

4 .1

6 .2

11.4

2.3

-

2.3

-

2 .3

2 .3

6 .8

9.1

9. 1

6 5 .9

9.1

-

3.0
-

-

3 .0
-

3 .0
_

6 .1
9 .1

12.1
_

12.1
_

6 0 .6
8 1 .8

_
1 1.5
3 .5
1 7 .9
1.9
1.8
_
1.5
_
4. 1
2 1 .0

_
1 9.2
2 .8
8 .9
2.1
.6
7.1
3 .0
_
6 .8
2 .4

_
1.9
1.8
10.7
•8
_
3.6
3.0
.
1.4
2 .7

100.0
5 0.0
7.4
57. 1
1.9
_
3.6
4.5
_

2 5 .6
_
_
_
-

-

_
_
_
-

.
_
_
-

_
-




Because of rounding,

sums of individual items may not equal 100.

_
-

_
_
11.6
12.8
12.0
3.6
1 6 .4
7.1
17.8
14.5

_
1.9
1 1.6
1 2.8
1 3 .0
7.1
1 1.9
3 5 .7
1 1.0
1 3.0

_
5 .8
1 8 .2
2 0 .2
2 9 .5
3.6
1.5
7.1
4.1
1 6 .4

_
9 .6
1 3.3
5 .4
1 4.2
17.5
3.6
6 .0
14.3
1 1.0
1 1 .4

.6

16.0
_
32 .6
_
.
14.3
_

_
1 4.4
1 7 .4
1 8.6
_
2 1 .0
_

18.1
2 6 .1
4 1 .9
1 0 0 .0
1 2 .4
_

_
12.5
2 3 .3
1 0 0 .0
.7
9 .3
_
19-0
_

2 .6
2 2 .9
7 6 .7
_
_
2 3 .3
_
9 .5
.

.8
1.0
2 7 .8

.8
_
8.3
16.7

4 .0
5.1
_
5.6

ii.3
_
1 0 .2
3 3 .3
-

7 .3
_
6.1
2 5 .0
_

12.1
_
1 1 .2
3 3 .3
_

50 .0

1 C o v e r s e m p l o y e e s o f o c e a n - c a b l e c a r r i e r s w ith an n u al o p e r a tin g r e v e n u e s e x c e e d in g $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ; a l s o in c lu d e s
e m p l o y e e s w o r k i n g f o r o c e a n - c a b l e c a r r i e r s o u ts id e the c o n t e r m in o u s 48 S ta te s and the D i s t r i c t of C o lu m b ia .
S e e a p p e n d ix f o r d e fin it i o n o f h o u r s and e a r n in g s u s e d in th is b u ll e t in .
* I n s u f f i c i e n t d a ta to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t i o n o f an a v e r a g e .

NOTE:

~ $ 3 .70

'
_
_
.

8.1
_
1 0 .2
_
.

10.0

8.2

4.1

2 8 .2
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

4 3 .6

4 1.1

14.5
8 5 .7
6.1

_

14.3
5 0 .0
.
.

_
_
.
.
_
.

_

_

5 0 .0

o c e a n -c a b le

e m p lo y e e s

of W estern

U n io n T e le g r a p h C o . ; e x c l u d e s

4 ,0 0 3

Appendix: Scope and Method of Survey
Data presented in this study are based on annual reports filed with the Federal
Communications Commission by communication carriers, as required by the amended Commu­
nications Act of 1934. All carriers engaged in interstate or foreign communications service
by means of their own facilities or through connection with the facilities of another carrier
under direct or indirect common control are subject to the full jurisdiction of the Commission.
A large number of telephone carriers engaged in interstate or foreign service only by con­
nection with the facilities of another unaffiliated carrier are not subject to the full jurisdiction
of the Commission and are not required to file annual reports of hours and earnings of
employees.
Tabulations for telephone carriers relate to those having annual operating revenues
in excess of $ Z50, 000 (class A carriers), and subject to the full jurisdiction of the FCC.
Included are 24 Bell System companies and 30 companies not affiliated with the Bell System.
Tabulations for w ire-telegr aph, radiotelegraph, and ocean-cable carriers were con­
fined to companies with annual revenues exceeding $50,000 and engaged in interstate commerce.
Western Union Telegraph Co. is the only wire-telegraph company included. This company
and two others comprise the three ocean-cable carriers; data for five companies are included
in the tabulations for radiotelegraph carriers.
Employees and Occupational Groups Covered by the Study
Officials and managerial assistants were not included in the tabulations. Also ex­
cluded were employees working outside the conterminous 48 States and the District of Co­
lumbia, except class A telephone carrier employees in Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Alaska
had no class A telephone carriers reporting to the Federal Communications Commission.
All other employees, both full-time and part-time, were included. Part-time employees are
defined as those regularly assigned shorter hours than a full-time schedule.
Occupational groups for which separate data are presented are defined in the Federal
Communications Commission's Rules and Regulations, Volume 10, Part 51, applying to
telephone carriers, and Part 52, applying to telegraph companies.
Copies of this volume
are on sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Wash­
ington 25, D .C ., at $ 1.50 per subscription.
Hours and Earnings
Average hourly earnings presented in this bulletin were computed by dividing total
"scheduled weekly compensation" by total "scheduled weekly hours." Average scheduled weekly
hours were obtained by dividing the total scheduled weekly hours by the number of employees.
The terms "scheduled weekly hours" and "scheduled weekly compensation" for the
four carrier groups covered by the study are defined, according to the FCC's Rules and
Regulations, as follows:
CLASS A TELEPHONE CARRIERS
51.12(b) "Scheduled weekly hours" means the number of reg­
ular hours, excluding overtime hours, in the duty tours which the
employee is scheduled to work during the week in which December
31 occurs, whether or not excused because of a holiday, vacation,
leave of absence or other reason.
51.13(b) "Scheduled weekly compensation" means compensation
to the employee at the rate of pay in effect on December 31 for
the "Scheduled weekly hours." It includes the basic weekly pay
rate plus any regularly scheduled supplementary compensation, such
as differentials for evening and night tours, equivalent value of
board and lodging for unlocated employees, equivalent value of meals




17

18
furnished dining service employees and equivalent value of living
quarters and maintenance furnished managers of agency offices.
It excludes pay for overtime work and pay in excess of weekday
rates for Sunday and holiday work.
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO.
52.21(b) "Scheduled weekly hours" are defined as an employee's
regular daily tour of duty multiplied by the number of days, or
fraction of days, scheduled to be worked during a week.
52.22(b) "Scheduled weekly compensation" is defined as the
wages scheduled to be paid for scheduled weekly hours as defined
in 52.21(b). This should include employee contributions for old age
benefits, unemployment insurance and similar deductions, paid va­
cation and holiday hours, the regularly scheduled weekly compen­
sation of employees temporarily on leave due to disability or sick­
ness, and the scheduled weekly compensation of both full- and
part-time employees.
The company reports that "scheduled weekly compensation" excludes premium pay
for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
RADIOTELEGRAPH AND OCEAN-CABLE CARRIERS
Radiotelegraph and ocean-cable carriers are instructed to report scheduled
weekly hours and compensation for their employees as defined above for the Western Union
Telegraph Co., except that scheduled weekly compensation should include regularly scheduled
maintenance, travel, or other allowances.
Distribution of Workers by Earnings Classes
In the tables, workers are distributed according to the percentages having stipulated
hourly rates of pay. Because of rounding, sums of individual items may not equal 100.




INDUSTRY WAGE STUDIES

The following reports cover part of the Bureau's program of industry wage surveys. These reports cover the period 1950 to date
and may be obtained free upon request as long as a supply is available. However, those for which a price is shown are available only
from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C . , or any of its regional sales offices.

I. Occupational Wage Studies
Manufacturing

Apparel:
Men's Dress Shirts and Nightwear, 1950 - Series 2, No. 80
Men's and Boys' Dress Shirts and Nightwear, 1954 BLS Report 74
♦Men's and Boys' Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear,
1956 - BLS Report 116
Men's and Boys' Shirts (Except Work Shirts) and Nightwear,
1961 - BLS Bulletin 1323 (40 cents)
Men's and Boys' Suits and Coats, 1958 - BLS Report 140
Women's and Misses' Coats and Suits, 1957 - BLS Report 122
Women's and Misses' Dresses, 1960 - BLS Report 193
Work Clothing, 1953 - BLS Report 51
Work Clothing, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1321 (35 cents)
♦Work Shirts, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 115
♦Work Shirts, 1957 - BLS Report 124

Chemicals and Petroleum:
Fertilizer, 1949-50 - Series 2, No. 77
♦Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 111
♦Fertilizer Manufacturing, 1957 - BLS Report 132
Industrial Chemicals, 1951 - Series 2, No. 87
Industrial Chemicals, 1955 - BLS Report 103
Paints and Varnishes, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1318 (30 cents)
Petroleum Production and Refining, 1951 - Series 2, No. 83
Petroleum Refining, 1959 - BLS Report 158
Synthetic Fibers, 1958 - BLS Report 143
Food:
Candy and Other Confectionery Products, 1960 BLS Report 195
♦Canning and Freezing, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 117
♦Canning and Freezing, 1957 - BLS Report 136
Distilled Liquors, 1952 - Series 2, No. 88
Fluid Milk Industry, 1960 - BLS Report 174
♦Raw Sugar, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 117
♦Raw Sugar, 1957 - BLS Report 136
Leather:
Footwear, 1953 - BLS Report 46
♦Footwear, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 115
Footwear, 1957 - BLS Report 133
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1954 - BLS Report 80
Leather Tanning and Finishing, 1959 - BLS Report 150

Lumber and Furniture:
Household Furniture, 1954 - BLS Report 76
Lumber in the South, 1949 and 1950 - Series 2, No. 76
Southern Lumber Industry, 1953 - BLS Report 45
♦Southern Sawmills, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 113
♦Southern Sawmills, 1957 - BLS Report 130
West Coast Sawmilling, 1952 - BLS Report 7
West Coast Sawmilling, 1959 - BLS Report 156
Wood Household Furniture, Except Upholstered, 1959 BLS Report 152
♦Wooden Containers, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 115
♦Wooden Containers, 1957 - BLS Report 126

♦ Studies of the effects of the $1 minimum wage.




Paper and Allied Products:
Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard, 1952 - Series 2, No. 91
Primary Metals, Fabricated Metal Products and Machinery:
Basic Iron and Steel, 1951 - Series 2, No. 81
Fabricated Structural Steel, 1957 - BLS Report 123
Gray Iron Foundries, 1959 - BLS Report 151
Nonferrous Foundries, 1951 - Series 2, No. 82
Nonferrous Foundries, 1960 - BLS Report 180
Machinery Industries, 1953 -54 - BLS Bulletin 1160 (40 cents)
Machinery Industries, 1954-55 - BLS Report 93
Machinery Manufacturing, 1955-56 - BLS Report 107
Machinery Manufacturing, 1957-58 - BLS Report 139
Machinery Manufacturing, 1958-59 - BLS Report 147
Machinery Manufacturing, 1959-60 - BLS Report 170
Machinery Manufacturing, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1309 (30 cents)
Radio, Television, and Related Products, 1951 - Series 2, No. 84
Steel Foundries, 1951 - Series 2, No. 85
Rubber and Plastics Products:
Miscellaneous Plastics Products, 1960 - BLS Report 168
Stone, Clay, and Glass:
Pressed or Blown Glass and Glassware, 1960 - BLS Report 177
Structural Clay Products, 1954 - BLS Report 77
Structural Clay Products, 1960 - BLS Report 172
T extiles:
Cotton Textiles, 1954 - BLS Report 82
Cotton Textiles, 1960 - BLS Report 184
Cotton and Synthetic Textiles, 1952 - Series 2, No. 89
Hosiery, 1952 - BLS Report 34
Miscellaneous Textiles, 1953 - BLS Report 56
♦Processed Waste, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 115
♦Processed Waste, 1957 - BLS Report 124
♦Seamless Hosiery, 1955 and 1956 - BLS Report 112
♦Seamless Hosiery, 1957 - BLS Report 129
Synthetic Textiles, 1954 - BLS Report 87
Synthetic Textiles, 1960 - BLS Report 192
Textile Dyeing and Finishing, 1956 - BLS Report 110
T e x t i l e Dyeing and Finishing, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1311 (35 cents)
Woolen and Worsted Textiles, 1952 - Series 2, No. 90
Wool Textiles, 1957 - BLS Report 134
Tobacco:
Cigar Manufacturing, 1955 - BLS Report 97
♦Cigar Manufacturing, 1956 - BLS Report 117
Cigar Manufacturing, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1317 (30 cents)
Cigarette Manufacturing, 1960 - BLS Report 167
♦Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1955 and 1956 BLS Report 117
♦Tobacco Stemming and Redrying, 1957 - BLS Report 136

T ransportation:
Motor Vehicles and Parts, 1950 - BLS Bulletin 1015 (20 cents)
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Parts, 1957 - BLS Report 128
Railroad Cars, 1952 - Series 2, No. 86

I. Occupational Wage Studies— Continued
Nonmanufac Curing

Auto Dealers Repair Shops, 1958 - BLS Report 141
Banking Industry, 1960 - BLS Report 179
Contract Cleaning Services, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1327 (25 cents)
Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Production, 1960 BLS Report 181
Department and Women's R eady-to-W ear Stores, 1950 Series 2, No. 78
Eating and Drinking Places, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1329 (40 cents)
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1950 - Series 2, No. 79

Electric and Gas Utilities, 1952 - BLS Report 12
Electric and Gas Utilities, 1957 - BLS Report 135
Hospitals, 1960 - BLS Bulletin 1294 (50 cents)
Hotels, 1960 - BLS Report 173
Hotels and Motels, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1328 (30 cents)
Life Insurance, 1961 - BLS Bulletin 1324 (30 cents)
Power Laundries and Cleaning Services, 1961 BLS Bulletin 1333 (45 cents)
Power Laundries and Dry Cleaners, 1960 - BLS Report 178

II. Other Industry Wage Studies
Communications Workers, Earnings in October 1956 - BLS Report 121
Communications Workers, Earnings in October 1957 - BLS Report 138
Communications Workers, Earnings in October 1958 - BLS Report 149
Communications Workers, Earnings in October 1959 - BLS Report 171
Communications, October 1960 - BLS Bulletin 1306 (20 cents)
Factory Workers' Earnings - Distributions by Straight-Time Hourly Earnings, 1954 - BLS Bulletin 1179 (25 cents)
Factory Workers' Earnings - 5 Industry Groups, 1956 - BLS Report 118
Factory Workers' Earnings - Distribution by Straight-Time Hourly Earnings, 1958 - BLS Bulletin 1252 (40 cents)
Factory Workers' Earnings - Selected Manufacturing Industries, 1959 - BLS Bulletin 1275 (35 cents)
Wages in Nonmetropolitan Areas, South and North Central Regions, October 1960 - BLS Report 190

Retail Trade, Employee Earnings in October 1956:
Initial Report - BLS Report 119 (30 cents)
Building Materials and Farm Equipment Dealers - BLS Bulletin 1220-1 (20 cents)
General Merchandise Stores - BLS Bulletin 1220-2 (35 cents)
Food Stores - BLS Bulletin 1220 -3 (30 cents)
Automotive Dealers and Gasoline Service Stations - BLS Bulletin 1220 -4 ( 35 cents)
Apparel and Accessories Stores - BLS Bulletin 1220-5 (45 cents)
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Appliance Stores - BLS Bulletin 1220-6 (35 cents)
Drug Stores and Proprietary Stores - BLS Bulletin 1220-7 (15 cents)
Summary Report - BLS Bulletin 1220 (55 cents)

Regional Offices

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
18 Oliver Street
Boston 10, Mass.

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
341 Ninth Avenue
New York 1, N. Y .

1371 Peachtree Street, NE.
Atlanta 9, Ga.

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
1365 Ontario Street
Cleveland 14, Ohio

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
105 West Adams Street
Chicago 3, 111.

Ui S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
630 Sansome Street
San Francisco 11, Calif.




☆

U. S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

U. S. G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O F F I C E : 1962

O - 665327