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FEDERAL RESERVE statistical release
For Immediate release

G.3 (402)

February 16, 1984

CAPACITY UTILIZATION
Manufacturing, Mining, Utilities, and Industrial Materials

Capacity utilization In manufacturing, mining and utilities rose
0.7 percentage point in January to 79*9 percent, the highest rate since
September 1981* Manufacturing also operated at 79.9 percent of capacity in
January compared to a downward-revised rate of approximately 79 percent that
prevailed in the last months of 1983. The rate for mining increased 1 percentage
point further in January to 76*2 percent• In contrast, the rate for utilities
declined by 2.1 percentage points to 83.9 percent as the unusually low temperatures
experienced in December were followed by more typical weather In January•
Within manufacturing, operating rates for producers of durable goods
rose 1-1/4 percentage points in January. The rates for the primary metals and
transportation equipment industries advanced strongly, but the level of
utilization was still quite low for steel, copper, commercial aircraft, ships,
and railroad equipment* The utilization rate for nondurable goods industries
advanced 0.4 percentage point in January to 81.8 percent, following a slight
decline in the last two months of 1983. Some nondurable manufacturing Industries
have been operating at relatively high rates. The utilization rates for paper
and products and for rubber and plastics products were above the highs observed
in the 1978-1980 period, and the rate for textile mill products was above the
average of the 1967-1982 period.
The overall operating rate for producers of industrial materials
rose 0.8 percentage point in January to 80.8 percent which remains below its
1967-82 average of 83.3 percent.

Capacity Utilisation: Summary
Percent of capacity, seasonally adjusted
1973
Series

1975
LOB

1978
1982
LOU
-80
HIGH J

1967
-82

1983
OCT I 10?

1984
I

SEC

1

JAN

88.<§

71.1

87.3

69.6

82.4.

78.7

78-3

79.2

79.9

Manufacturing
Durable
Nondurable

87,9
87.9
89*1

69.0
67.6
71-0

87.5
89. 4
87.2

68.8
64.8
73.8

8L8.
80.5.
83*9.

78.9
76.5
81.8

78.9
76.8
81.5

79.0
77.1
81.4

79.9
78.3*
81.8

Mining
Utilities

91,8
94.9

86.0
82.0

90.%
86.8

69.6
79.0

86.5.
88.6.

71.5
83.3

73.1
83.0

75.2
§6.0

76.2
S3. 9

92.6

69.3

88. 9

66.6

83.3.

79.5

79.8

80.0

§0.8

Total Industry

Industrial aiateriats




CAPACITY UTILIZATION

JANUARY DATA

SEASONALLY ADJUSTED, PERCENT

110
TOTAL INDUSTRY
TOTAL MATERIALS
90

70

I I I I

50
110

MINING

UTILITIES

90

\l

MANUFACTURING

70

50
110
MANUFACTURING

REFINED PETROLEUM
PRODUCTS
90

NONDURABLE

V

70

DURABLE

50
110
MOTOR VEHICLES
AND PARTS
90

70

50

I 1 1 11111I 111 1
1969

1972




1975

1978

1981

1984

I IIIIIII|IIIII I
.1989

1972

1975

1978

1981

MANUFACTURING, MINING AND UTILITIES
Table 1

Series

I V973
HIGH

LOU

1982
-80
LOU
| HIGH j

I

1967
-82
LAYER.

IEAB
AGO
HOMTB I

196.3
B Y !
A

JOBSS

J0L1!

A0€ 1

SEP !

OCS 1

HO9 1

I
DEC 1

1984
JAE

70.7

73.9

74.8

76.3

77.3

78.2

78.7

76.8

79-2|

79.9

f

Total Industry

88.4

71.1

87.3 i

69.6

82.4

Manufacturing

87.9

69.0

87.5

68.8

81.8

70.0

73.8

74.9

76.4

77.3

78.4

78.9

93.7
85.5

68.2
69.4

91.4 |
65.9

6fc.2 [
70.0 ,

84.0
80.6

68.6
70.9

74.6
73.4

75-7
74.4

77.1
76.0

78.1
76.9

79.7
77.8

80.4
77.9

87.9
67.6
89.4 | 64.8
88.0 j 6 4 . 0
90.4 J 63.0 !
103.3
69.2
97.5 1 38.8
59.0 | 6 0 . 8
98.2 | 62.1 |
86.3 I 6 5 . 7
90.0 | 60.7 j
88.3 I 7 1 . 8 I 8 3 . 1 j| 61.6 (
88.7 8 6 2 . 3 I 90.6 , 7 4 . 7 J
98.7 1 5 1 . 3
94.5
46.1
MA
UK
9 1 . 6 |I 3 5 . 8 |
76.0 I 6 8 . 0 | S3.9
69.1 I
89.6 I 7 3 . 7 1 92.3
73.1

80.5
78.4
82.3
83.8
79.6
79.8
80.0
78.6
RA
78.1
83.5

i 66.4
| 64.2
49.1
| 66.2
60.9
I 61.0
|I 76.4
| 58.7
57.8
69.4
72.6

|
|
|
|
\
:

70.7
69.5
57.8
75.7
65.0
64.0
80.4
67.7
64.0
68.0
72.9

71.8
70.6
56.0
75.4
66.6
65.4
81.2
70-8
7^.5
67.9
72.8

73.6
72.6
59.7
74.1
68.9
67.3
83.6
74.1
77.3
68.0
74.2

74.6
73.6
62.5
73.9
70.6
68.5
83.8
75.3
78.6
68.3
75.1

76.0
75.3
65.1
76.0
71.3
68.8
66.5
78.9
80.5
68.7
75.9

74.5
| 78.5 |
| 76.9 |
} 90.4 |
65.2 i
| 69.2 I
76.3 i

77.7
78.3
85.4
91.6
63.8
76.0
85.5

?8.7
86.8
92.3
69.8
75.6
87.2

79.9
8S.0
89.9
93.4
70-8
76.5
S7.8

80.8
79.6
90.3
§5.3
71.2
16.0
90.9

73.8

68.2

68.1

§§.5

80.9
80.0

80.8
79.4

83.. 5
82.9

Primary processing
Advanced processing
Durable manufacturing
Stone, clay and glass products
Iron and steel, subtotal
Nonferrous metals, subtotal
Fabricated metal products
Nonelectrical machinery
Electrical machinery
motor vehicles and parts
Autos
Aerospace and misc. trans, ©qp.
Instrument®
Nondurable manufacturing
Foods
Textile mil! products
Paper and products
Chemicals and products
Petroleum products
Rubber and plastics products

89.1
85.7
95.4
96.7
86.2,
99.1
97.4

I
I
I
I
9
3
!

Mining

91.8

i 86.0

Utilities
Electric utilities

94.9
97.6

I 82.0 I 8 6 . 8
79.0
! 8 2 . 1 I 87.0
77.9
1
1

71.0
77.2
61.3
69.1
65.9
84.6
62.1

I
>
|
I
!
!
|

87.2
85.2
91.3
95.1
83.6
93.0
91.5
90.%

I
|
|
I
S
|

63.9
73.8
7 6 . 5 j 83.3
73.0
86.2
84.2 I 89.6
6 4 . 0 j 78.7
71.5
89.6
74.0
86.3
69.6

i 86.5

®8.6
78.4
! 89.8 I 77.2
I
I

|
I

1
I

78.9

i

79.9

80.1
78.1

79.08
79.8J
78.5J

80.8
79.4

76.5
75.3
70-2
77.5
71.0
69.1
87.5
79.0
77.2
69.6
75.5

76.8
75.6
66.0
78.0
71..7
69.9
87.9
63. 2
77.1
70.5
75.3

77.IJ
75.2!
63-11
80.0|
71.4J
70.01
63.5g
83*08
81.6|
7 1 . 0J
75-0|

78.4

31.5
78.8
91.2
96.3
72.2
77.3
92.0

81.8
78.3
91.2
96.8
73.4
76.5
91.9

81.5
78.1
89.5
97.1
72.8
77.8
91. 3

81.4!
1
88.6g
96.7|
72.88
74.6j
90.9§

81-8

76.2

70.8

71.5

.73.1

85.0
84.5

34.8
83.9

83.3
32.1

83.0
81.7

1982

Of XLIZ AT 1015
1983
L _M .

I
86.0§
85.5|
$

72.3
70.8
90.3
85-2
83.2
72-2
75.9

75.1
76.2
83.9
82-7

Table 2

Output, Capacity, and Capacity Utilization
Quarterly, seasonally adjusted
Series

1982
If

0DTP0T
1983
I

I
J
Ifl

Total Industry

135.3

138.5

144.5

151.8

Manufacturing

134.5

138.4

145.2

152.8

a

1982
If

CAPACI1T
1983
XI
I

..Ml

193-7

194.6

195.5

196.4

156.6J 194.8

195.7

196.6

197.5

155.61

S
f
Xfl
1
197.31
1
19©.«!

_!£_

III

I?

69.8

71.2

73.9

77.3

78.9

69.0

70.7

73-8

77.4

78.9

66.3
70.2

70.5
#1.1

74-. 6
73.5

78.3
76.9

80.1
78.1

a

129.3
137.3

137.0
139.7

145.2
145.1

152.8
152.8

156.9! 193.7
156.01 195.4

194.3
196.5

194.8
197.6

195.3
198.6

195.S1
199.7!

Durable manufacturing
Stone, clay and glass products
Iron and steel, subtotal
Nonferrous metsls, subtotal
Fabricated metal products
Non@lectrlcai machinery
Bsctrieal machinery
m&m vehicles and parts
Autos
Aerospace and misc. trans, eqp.
instruments

119.8
126.9
49.4
94.3
107.3
139.7
165.5
104. 5
81.7
98.7
156.1

124.2
131.8
63.4
102.3
110.6
137.6
170.7
120.0
101.4
97.9
154.0

131.1
139.7
69.2
111.2
116.4
146.2
179.9
130.7
109.5
98.1
155.7

139.1
148.5
75.0
110.9
125.4
156.6
191.1
145.8
132.3
99.2
161.5

143.51
152.2!
79.7J
116.4|
127.81
160.9|
200.0!
154.08
132.1!
102.9!
162.7S

184.0
198.8
120.5
146.4
176.2
225.3
220.9
194.4
168. 2
142. 1
212.0

184.7
199.6
120. 1
148.4
176.9
226.7
222.4
193.7
167.8
143.1
213.0

185.4
200.4
120.1
146.4
177.6
226.1
224.1
192«.l
167.8
144.2
214.1

186.1
201.1
120.1
148.*
178.3
229.6
225.7
191.7
167.8
145.2
215.1

65.1
63.3
41.0
63.6
60.9
62.0
74.9
53.8
48.6
69.5
73«7

67.2
66.0
52.8
68.9
§2.5
60.7
76.8
62.0
60.4
68.4
72«*3

70.7
69.7
57.6
74.9
65.S
64. 1
80.3
67.8
65.2
63.0
72.8

74.7
73.8
62.5
74.7
70.3
68.2
84.7
76. 1
78.8
68.3
75.1

76.8
75.4
66.4
78.5
71.4
69.7
£8.0
80-7
78.6
70.4
75.3

Nondurable manufacturing
Foods
Textile mil! products
Paper and product®
Chemicals and products
F&troieum products
mmw and pigsties product®

155.7
152.1
123.7
153.5
194.3
120.8
252. 1

159.©
153.1
129*5
156.§
201.9
113-3
264.1

165. S
155.7
139.3
160.5
211*4
122.5
288.3

172.7
159.1
147.6
168.0
220.9
124.2
304.6

175.51
157.71
196.3}
171.98
227.9}
123.11
309.4;

210.5
195.8
163.8
175*3
301.3
164.6
335«0

211.7
197.2

212.8
198-7
163.4
176. ft
306.8
163.0
336.3

213.9
200.2
163.2
S76Ȥ
309.4
162.1
337.7

186.61
201.9!
120. 1|
148.*!
179o0f
231.0!
227.48
190.7J
167.81
146.3}
213.2!
i
21s.es
201.78
163.08
177.«|
312.18
161.31
338«S8
1

74.0
77.7
75*5
87.6
64.5
73.4
75.3

75.1
77.6
79.1
B9.2
66.4
69»2
78.6

77.8
'78.3
85.3
91.0
68.9
75.2
65.6

30.7
79.5
90.4
95.0
71.4
76.6
90*2

81.6
76.2
S3., 8
96.9
73.0
76.3
91.4

Minim

T17.0

..116.7

112.3

tliJ

121.2!

165.1

165.2

165.3

165.*

U5.5I

70.9

70.6

67.9

?0»2

73.3

ynssties

166. 2
187. «

163.3
185*2

169*$
192.5

178.2
203.6

30.1
78.8

78.5
77, 4

30. S
79.8

84»«
33.8

84.1
33.1

Primary processing
Advanced processing

1




175.9
304.1
163.8

1

178.7J 207. 4
203.6! 237.7

208.5
239.2

209.8
2*1.1

211.1
243.0

212.4g
3§®.9l
a

INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS
Tabled

Cspscify UtHSistlon
ftflonthly, seasonally adjusted, percent of capacity
1973
BIGS
Series

M®t$.i materials

Paper materials
Gn@m!eal materials

B2C |

J9.6J*
JAB

AOC §

SIP |

OCf 5

68.7

73.5

74.4

76.5

77.4

78.6

79.5

79.8

80.0|
1

eo.8

62.3
63.5
88.4 | 5 9 . 8 8 79.7
I
97.8 | 68.0 r 95.4 | 46.2 | 82.2 I 53.3

68.9

70.0

72.1

73.6

75.2

76.1

76.6

76.81

78.0

61.0

61.2

62.3

64.0

65.5

68.0

67.0

58.0
63.0

58.2
64.5

59.4
68.0

61.0
71.2

63.3
73.6

67.5
75.1

68.6
76.0

66.81
1
73.81
79.04
J

6S.5

84,8 I «7.9
68.0 102.9' i
73. 4 i 97.9 {I 40.2 I 90.6 j 59.0
1 57.9 I
I
70.7 | 86.5 I 73.4
67.4 ! 91.7

78.7

79.6

80.7

81.1

82.9

84.1

84.V

83.71

83.9

S0.4

80.5

32. 6

84.8

84. 1

83. 7 j

83.8

I 69.3 ( 88.9 j 66.6 J 83.3

91.4

95.1

65.4 i

72.4
99. 4
95.5 i 64.2
S4.5

Energy materials

1
1983
J0XY4

Nondurable goods materials
T@Kfll©9 p&$mt, arid ehemieai materials

1967
fSAB
AGO J
-82
I AVEB.jS BOKTBj

JOKES

107.1
96.8

f?8w tit®@!
Aluminum

1982
LOW

HAf JL

92-6

Dure§8® goods materials

1978
1975
LOS J -80
HIGH

aa.u

78.1

I 86.5 I 71.«

92.3

68.6

97.9
91.3

93.4 ! 90.S
86.3
6a. o J 85.1 i 66.4

I

79.2

j

1

$2.9
74. Q

93.1
75.3

96.7
75.9

75^5

99.0
77.8

7§I?

101.6
79.5

78.5

73.8

82, §

S2.8

81,6

81.$

8.1.7

I

|
\
88.9 j 78.5 9 8 8 . 5 I 80.1
f
1

79I5I
1
i

83.61

83.5

8

Tsbts 4

Output, Capacity, and Cap^9§|f

Quarterly, seasonally adjusted
Serits

Utlfatkm
1982
If

GGT2UT
1983
I
11

III

a
Ifi

1982
IV

C&P&CI3I
1983
I
II

1
S
III

III

1982
11

0TILIZATI01
1983
I
II

67.1

70.1

73.5

77.5

• ?9«8

60.2

64.2

68.9

73.6

76.5

*7«4

I I I

If

y@t£f materials

66-5

78.6

84.9

89.3

9 3 . 9 | 140.3

1%0.2

139.9

139.8

8
199.01
8
I
196.5*
I
139.61

56.1

60.7

63.9

67.3

Raw §t@#9
Aluminum

<49.9
97.5

61.9
99.0

68.7
105.1

72.7
119.0

8 2 . 8 | 119.7
128.61 167.6

119.4
167.7

119.1

113.8
167.7

I18.5g
167.7£

• 1-.-7
58.1

51.9
59.0

57.7
62.7

6U2
?@.9

69.9
76.7

157.0

163.7

171.7

179.1

217.8

213.6

S
220.61 7 2 . «

75.2

78«5

SU5

84.0

229,4

238.1

231*6

232,7 5

70.5

73.8

77.9

81.2

89.0

165.3
294.3

166.1
296*6

16§.9
293.3

167.7|300.11
I

S9.7

90.7
69.«

92.3:
7».€ ;

97.5
76. *

100. 5
79.6

153.9

154S.3

15«,7

155.33 79.2
s-

79.5

78.7

82.3

192.3

192.9

193.4

144.2

154.7j 191.7
I
1
150,39 194.8

195»2

195.6

196.0

gf^yatdtS IS@t@r9s!s

128*7

134.8

141.7

149.9

.Durable goods materials

117.1

125.2

13*.7

Nondurable goods materials
Textile, pap#r and ehsmica! materials
P*p#r maf@risl@
Chemical materials

I
1

160.8

169o3

179.6

183.0

185.31 216.9
1
195.51 228,3

147.6

149.9
204.7

153.4
219.4

162.3
227.8

168.51 16M.fc
238e9§ 292.3

§

§

Energy ^mmi&m

121.5

122.2

121.5

127.4

127.71 153.3
a

K. T^f§ mimm contains estimates of oytpyt, capacity, and cap®c§ty utilization tm ih%
nation's fsctorSts, minas, snd e^ctrlc and gas vtmiimi. Estimates of zchml output @nd capacity output are @%pr©§s@d m peccentsgss of 18S7 actual output. Estima!®§ of capacity utilization
®@ calculated a.a rstfoa, in percent, of the F@d@rai Reserve's s@asons$iy adjusted indexes of irv
r
dustrlsS prodycfion to f?ie indexes of capacity. Th© cspacify £nd®x®@ are based on a variety cf
-3zt&, including capacity data in physical units, surveys of capacity growth and utiHzation rates,
&r«d ©it9mat©s @ capitsi stock growth, instead of a formal definition of capacity the concept of
f
pmctteai capacity @ applied, which is ih& gr@at©et i#v@l of output that a plant can maintain
i
within thm frtm^wor^ of s realistic work pattern, tsking account of normal downtime, snd
sssornlng suffici#^t avaiiabilSty of inputs to operate machinery and equipment In pi&se. When
tf^s capacity indssts for individual industries ars sggregetes—for enamps© to totsl manuf@ctyr°
Sng—no ©gpfl€§f account is fak©o of possible gafiarmi @qu3i9brfum con&tmints swcfs.M ®«i®rgJng
S d t
l t ? k

Qmi^m^ Hstimsts® of capacity and Industrial production for manufacturing Indy©tr3#s @
r
®
aggr®9af@d I© primary processing, and advanced processing industries, to durable snd n@n*
dursblt m@nuf§€turing industries, and to total manufacturing. Th® mining, manufacturing, and
ut!Htf@@ @§timat®s sggregat® to th® total ind$x. Industrial materi&Ss ar® items produesd snd us>
@ ®e Input® &y manyfaeturing plants, mlnss, and u!lll!3@§. Industrial mai®rt§38 insiyde many of
d
m& \Um% 8n@Sudtd in Ih© primary proessslng grouping of manufacturing, as w@!l m som® of tm
output of the advanced proeesiing induitrlss, mines, and utHities—such « i iron of®, erud® oS«,




"6 5.. 5

@ Tfi# histories! highs md lows in capacity utilization Bhown in the tables above are
.
specific to each $ r ® and did not aii occur in the same month. Industrial plants "usually
@S g
operate ®t capacity utlUistion rates ..that ire w H be!ow 100 percent: none of the broad ag@
gregates has ever r @ h d 10© psrs@nt. For mining, manufacturing, and .utilitiesas a ^ho!e, and
@ c@
for total mmufaQiwIng, utilisation rates as high ss ©0 percent ht¥# fc^n tse@@d@d only in wartime.
irst estimates for a month are published about the 17th of the following month.
These estimates may revis© in each of the next three months as new data become available.
After the fourth month no further revisions are undertaken until an annual or benchmark revision. The median of the revisions in the total manufacturing utilization rate between the first
end fourth estimate is 0.3 of a percentage point; that is, in about half of the cases, the absolute
value of th® revision from the first t© the fourth estimate is iess than 0.3 of a percentage point.
@ The methodology used to estimate the series is discussed in New Federal Reserve
.
Massures oi Capacity and Capacity Utilization, Federal Reserve Bulletin, July'1983 Revised
data from 1987-82 are included in the statistical supplement to the July 1333 capacity utilization release, which may &s obtained from Publications Services, Soard of Governors of the
Federal Reserve System, Washington, D.C. 20551.
Hounding. The rounding algorithms appiied to the capacity, output, and utilization rate series
are independent. Aggregates are derived from unrounded detailed components.
hadute for 1984. Approximately 1f a.m. on February 16, March 16, April 16. May 15.
p p y
y ,
p
y
l 6 A
June 18, July 16, August 16, September 17, October 17, November 16, and December 17.