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FEDERAL RESERVE statistical release i
G.17 (419)

F*lr rele$fc$«afe9&5$.in. PEST)
December 15,1993

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AND CA P A C ITY UTILIZATION

Industrial production rose 0.9 percent in November, following a revised gain of 0.7 percent in October. The
growth in recent months has been led by sharp increases in the motor vehicles and parts industry, where the level of
production rose 20 percent between August and November. Excluding motor vehicles and parts, industrial production grew
0.5 percent in November, with solid gains in the output of construction supplies and information processing equipment. At
! 13.2 percent of its 1987 average, industrial production in November was 4.4 percent above its level a year ago. The recent
strength in output boosted the utilization of total industrial capacity 0.6 percentage point in November and 0.5 percentage
point in October. Capacity utilization now stands at 83.0 percent, the highest rate since August 1989 and more than
1.0 percentage point above its 1967-92 average.
Market Groups
Gains in motor vehicles have generated sharp increases in the production of durable consumer goods in each of
the past three months. Excluding autos and trucks, the level of production of consumer durables in November was about
(over)

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AND CAPACITY UTILIZATION: SUMMARY
S e a s o n a lly a d ju s te d
In d e x , 1 9 8 7 = 1 0 0

P e rc e n t ch a n q e

1993
A u g .r

S e p .r

O c t/

N ov.P

1 1 1 .0
1 1 0 .9

1 1 1 .4
1 1 1 .4

1 1 2 .2
1 1 2 .2

1 1 3 .2

M a jo r m a r k e t a ro u p s :
P ro d u c ts , to ta l
C o n su m er goods
B u s in e s s e q u ip m e n t
C o n s tru c tio n s u p p lie s
M a te r ia ls

1 1 0 .3
1 0 7 .8
1 3 7 .6
9 8 .7
1 1 2 .2

1 1 0 .7
1 0 7 .9
1 3 9 .3
9 9 .3
1 1 2 .6

1 1 1 .4
1 0 9 .1
1 4 0 .4
9 9 .6
1 1 3 .4

1 1 2 .4
1 1 0 .0
1 4 2 .3
1 0 0 .8
1 1 4 .3

M a jo r in d u s try a ro u p s :
M a n u fa c tu r in g
D u r a b le
N o n d u ra b le
M in in g
U tilitie s

1 1 1 .9
1 1 5 .7
1 0 7 .3
9 5 .5
1 1 7 .7

1 1 2 .4
1 1 6 .9
1 0 6 .9
9 7 .5
1 1 5 .3

1 1 3 .2
1 1 8 .2
1 0 7 .1
9 8 .0
1 1 5 .6

1 1 4 .4
1 1 9 .8
1 0 7 .7
9 7 .7
1 1 6 .0

in d u s t r ia l

Production

Total index
P re v io u s e s tim a te s

1993
Aug/

Sep/

O c t/

N ov.P

N ov. 9 2 to
N ov. 9 3

.2
.1

.4
.4

.7
.8

.9

4 .4

.2
.3
.3
.1

.3
.1
1 .2
.6
.4

.7
1.1
.8
.3
.7

.9
.8
1 .3
1.1
.8

4 .2
2 .7
1 0 .3
5 .9
4 .6

.3
.3
.3
-.9
.7

.4
1 .0
-.4
2.1
-2 .1

.7
1.1
.2
.5
.2

1 .0
1 .3
.6
-.3
.3

5 .0
8 .0
1 .3
-.1
1.1

.1

C a p a c ity
g ro w th

P e r c e n t o f C a p a c it y

Capacity U tilization
Total industry
M a n u fa c tu r in g
A d v a n c e d p ro c e s s in g
P rim a r y p ro c e s s in g
M in in g
U tilitie s




A v e ra g e
1 9 6 7 -9 2

1982
Low

1 9 8 8 -8 9
H ig h

1992
Nov.

1993
Aug/

Sep/

O c t/

N ov.P

N o v . 9 2 to
N ov. 9 3

8 1 .9

7 1 .8

8 4 .8

8 0 .8

8 1 .7

8 1 .9

8 2 .4

8 3 .0

1 .6

8 1 .2
8 0 .7
8 2 .2
8 7 .4
8 6 .7

7 0 .0
7 1 .4
6 6 .8
8 0 .6
7 6 .2

8 5 .1
8 3 .3
8 9 .1
8 7 .0
9 2 .6

7 9 .7
7 8 .4
8 3 .0
8 7 .4
8 7 .1

8 0 .8
7 9 .2
8 4 .8
8 5 .8
8 8 .6

8 1 .1
7 9 .6
8 4 .4
8 7 .7
8 6 .7

8 1 .5
8 0 .2
8 4 .7
8 8 .1
8 6 .8

8 2 .2
8 0 .8
8 5 .5
8 8 .0
8 7 .0

1 .8
2 .2
.9
-.8
1.1

2 percent higher than in September, reflecting net gains in appliances, carpeting, and furniture. Production of consumer
nondurables remained sluggish, however, advancing just 0.2 percent, and was only 0.5 percent higher than a year earlier.
Over the past year, the production of clothing has been particularly weak.
The rapid expansion in the output of business equipment over the past three months has been led by gains in
motor vehicles atnd computers. On balance, outputeof the other components in this market group has changed little since
July; declines iipcomffiercial aircraft and related equipment have largely offset gains elsewhere.
Among materials, the sharp rise in the output of durables in the past three months has been spurred by sizable
increases in the production of semiconductors and parts for motor vehicles. The production of nondurable goods materials
increased 1.1 percent, largely because of a pickup in the production of paper, paperboard, textiles, and chemicals.
Nevertheless, output of nondurable goods was only slightly higher than in August. The output of energy materials was about
unchanged last month.
Industry Groups
Manufacturing output expanded 1.0 percent in November, following a revised gain of 0.7 percent in October.
The output of durable goods manufacturers was up 1.3 percent, and the output of nondurable goods manufacturers rose
0.6 percent. The utilization of manufacturing capacity increased 0.7 percentage point, to 82.2 percent, 1 percentage point
above its 1967-92 average. The utilization rate in advanced processing increased 0.6 percentage point, to 80.8 percent,
about equal its 1967-92 average. This recent increase for the advanced processing group was concentrated in the motor
vehicles and parts industry, where utilization increased more than 5 percentage points in each of the past two months; at
83.2 percent, the utilization rate in motor vehicles and parts now stands nearly 8 percentage points above its 1967-92
average. The utilization rate in primary processing increased 0.8 percentage point in November, to 85.5 percent, a level
more than 3.0 percentage points above the 1967-92 average. Last month’s increase was concentrated in lumber products,
paper and products, petroleum products, and stone, clay, and glass products. At 91.7 percent and 94.1 percent, respectively,
the November utilization rates in both lumber and petroleum were nearly 9.0 percentage points above their 1967-92
averages.
The output at utilities rose 0.3 percent, and the output of mines declined 0.3 percent.

NOTICE
Revised indexes of industrial production and rates of capacity utilization will be published in the G.17 (419)
statistical release in February 1994. Revised production statistics will begin in 1991 and revised capacity
utilization statistics will begin in 1990.
Points of information
• The revisions to production primarily reflect the incorporation of more comprehensive monthly source data,
review of the production factor coefficients, and updated seasonal factors.
• The revisions to capacity utilization will reflect improved estimates of capital stocks and preliminary results
from the Census Survey of Plant Capacity for 1991 and 1992.
• Diskettes containing the revised data will be available on the day of release from the Board of Governors of
the Federal Reserve System, Publications Services, at (202) 452-3245.




INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AND CAPACITY UTILIZATION
Seasonally adjusted

November data
Industrial production indexes

Twelve-month percent change

Twelve-month percent change

5

0
-5

-10

5

0
-5

-10
Total industry

Manufacturing

Ratio scale, 1987 production = 1 0 0




Ratio scale, 1987 production = 1 0 0

3

Table 1A
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: MARKET GROUPS
Proportion
in Total IP

Index. 19 8 7 = 1 0 0

Seasonally Adjusted

Not seasonally adjusted

1987

1992

1993
June

10 0.0

10 0.0

110.5

110.8

111.0

111.4

112.2

113.2

112.4

59 .5
4 4 .8

5 9 .0
4 5 .6

109.4
112.7

110.0
113.2

110.3
113.5

110.7
114.0

111.4
115.0

112.4
116.0

C onsum er goods
D u ra b le
Automotive products
Autos and trucks
Autos
Trucks
parts and allied goods
Other durable goods
Appliances, TV s, and air-cond .
Carpeting and furniture
Miscellaneous
N o n d u ra b le
Foods and tobacco
Clothing
C hem ical products
Paper products
Energy products
Fuels
Utilities

2 6 .5
5.8
2 .7
1.7
1.1
.6
1.0
3.1
.8
.9
1.4
2 0 .7
9.1
2.6
3,6
2.6
2 .7
.8
2.0

2 6 .2
5.6
2.6
1.6
.8
.8
1.0
3.1
.8
.9
1.4
2 0 .5
9.0
2.3
4 .0
2.5
2.8
.7
2.0

107.3
107.9
10 5.3
10 5.0
8 3 .5
14 2.3
105.8
110.2
116.1
109.1
10 7.6
107.2
10 4 .7
94 .6
123.0
102.6
110.4
105.8
112.2

10 7.7
10 8.6
10 3.3
10 0.3
7 8 .2
13 8.6
108.4
113.2
12 7.3
109.9
10 7.4
10 7.4
104.9
93 .6
124.0
101.3
112.9
105.0
116.0

10 7.8
10 7.9
10 3.0
9 9 .2
7 1 .8
14 6.7
10 9.3
112.2
12 3.8
108.3
108.1
107.8
10 5.5
9 3 .3
123.8
100.8
114.7
104.0
118.9

10 7.9
10 9.3
10 5 .6
104.1
7 5 .4
15 3.9
108.1
112.6
12 6.3
107.3
108.2
107.5
105.6
92 .5
124.0
100.8
112.9
108.2
114.7

109.1
113.6
112.9
114.9
85 .2
16 6.4
10 9.7
114.2
131.1
108.9
107.9
107.8
106.2
92 .3
123.0
100.5
114.8
114.0
115.2

E q u ip m e n t, to tal
B u s in e s s e q u ip m e n t
Information processing & related
Com puter and office
Industrial
Transit
Autos and trucks
O ther
D e fe n s e an d sp a c e e q u ip m e n t
Oil and gas well drilling
Manufactured homes

18.3
13.2
5.5
1.9
3.9
2 .0
1.0
1.8
4 .4
.6
.2

19.4
15.3
7.0
3,0
4 .0
2.6
1.1
1.7
3.5
.4
.2

12 0.4
136.1
15 5.7
2 2 1 .0
115.6
13 8.0
127.2
117.6
78 .6
8 2 .4
113.6

121.2
137.1
158.2
2 2 6 .5
117.2
133.2
118.9
119.6
78 .6
8 1 .0
118.5

121.6
137.6
158.8
2 3 2 .0
117.3
132.5
119.6
121.9
78 .0
87 .8
116.2

122.8
139.3
161.2
2 3 6 .4
117.8
13 5.3
126.5
122.9
77 .5
90.5
120.6

14.7
5.9
8.8

13.5
5.2
8.3

99 .4
96 .8
101.1

10 0.4
98.4
101.7

100.6
98 .7
101.8

4 0 .5

4 1 .0

112.1

112.0

20 .5
4.1
7.4

21 .0
3.9
8.1

114.9

110.2

9.0

9.0

Item

.....

T o tal in d ex
P ro d u c ts , to ta l
F in al p ro d u c ts

Auto

In te rm e d ia te p ro d u c ts
Construction supplies
Business supplies
M a te ria ls
D u ra b le
Consum er parts
Equipm ent parts
Other
Basic metals
N o n d u ra b le
Textile
Paper
Chem ical
Other
E n erg y
Primary
Converted fuel

July

A ua.r

See/

Oct.r

Nov.P

1993
June

July

A ua.r _ S e o /

Oct/

Nov.P

109.7

114.0

114.0

114.1

112.5

111.9
115.1

10 9.0
111.1

114.6
117.7

114.6
117.8

114.1
117.8

111.3
114.8

110.0
116.9
119.2
124.9
9 5 .4
17 6.0
109.6
114.9
13 1.0
10 9.7
109.1
10 8.0
106.6
92.1
12 2.7
100.8
115.5
115.1
115.6

109.5
114.5
117.1
123.0
9 6 .5
16 8.8
107.2
112.3
119.4
112.5
108.2
108.1
10 7.7
98 .2
13 0.0
101.9
95 .5
108.6
90 .4

105.3
9 3 .4
8 0 .6
6 5 .8
51.1
9 1 .3
105.5
104.6
108.9
103.6
102.9
108.7
10 5.0
93 .3
134.4
99 .9
110.1
108.5
110.8

112.6
109.9
10 4.6
100.4
72 .6
148.5
111.8
114.5
12 7.7
112.6
108.2
113.4
112.8
97 .8
136.6
100.6
111.3
106.9
113.0

112.5
113.6
110.0
10 9.0
7 7 .7
16 3.3
111.8
116.7
133.9
111.9
110.0
112.2
113.1
97 .0
13 6.9
99 .4
10 3.7
110.1
101.2

111.8
12 2.4
12 5.5
132.6
9 8 .7
19 1.3
113.5
119.8
140.5
113.4
112.2
108.8
112.0
94 .9
125.5
9 9 .0
98 .8
113.1
93 .2

108.3
117.1
117.3
123.2
94 .7
172.6
107.2
117.0
131.2
110.0
113.4
105.8
105.9
91 .5
117.3
99 .8
109.7
117.1
106.9

123.5
140.4
161.6
2 4 1 .0
117.7
141.2
139.6
123.8
76 .9
88 .6
127.7

124.8
142.3
163.8
2 4 7 .0
118.3
145.9
15 0.5
124.3
7 6 .7
8 5 .7
130.0

123.3
140.3
159.6
23 0 .4
117.5
149.3
148.2
120.2
78.1
76.1
129.4

119.4
135.3
161.6
2 3 4 .2
117.7
110.6
79 .6
120.2
76 .8
80.9
114.2

125.1
142.7
168.1
253.1
119.7
132.4
121.1
125.3
76 .7
87.1
136.3

125.4
142.7
165.2
2 4 3 .8
120.8
137.4
131.0
127.2
77.1
92 .8
13 4.3

12 6.4
143.9
165.9
2 4 9 .6
118.5
151.0
158.6
12 3.7
77.2
93 .9
142.0

124.2
141.0
161.9
2 4 0 .6
117.7
14 5.3
147.5
122.7
77 .4
95 .0
12 0.7

100.4
99 .3
101.2

100.4
99 .6
101.0

101.2
100.8
10 1.5

101.9
101.6
102.1

102.6
100.9
103.7

105.2
102.2
107.2

104.9
10 2.8
10 6.3

103.0
102.5
103.3

100.7
100.2
101.1

112.2

112.6

113.4

114.3

113.3

110.6

113.2

113.1

114.1

114.3

115.4
109.8
124.9
110.2
111.3
114.2
10 5.9
113.4
117.3
114.0
10 3.7
98 .2
114.5

115.8
110.3
126.2
109.7
109.7
115.2
105.6
113.5
119.5
114.2
102.8
96.7
114.9

117.0
111.4
128.0
110.3
110.2
113.8
10 2.9
112.7
118.0
113.3
10 3.3
98 .7
112.4

118.0
114.9
129.5
110.0
110.8
114.2
10 3.7
112.0
118.4
114.3
104.0
9 9 .0
113.6

119.4
118.6
130.6
110.6
110.7
115.5
10 5.7
115.0
119.1
114.7
103.8
98 .8
113.7

116.9
112.5
125.3
112.1
113.3
116.5
106.9
116.6
119.7
115.9
103.9
100.6
110.2

113.6
104.4
123.4
109.6
109.3
112.2
9 8 .6
111.0
116.9
112.2
103.8
96 .6
118.0

116.8
110.3
126.4
111.9
109.1
115.8
107.7
114.2
118.7
116.6
104.3
9 7 .0
118.7

118.3
113.6
127.6
112.6
111.9
115.7
104.1
113.8
120.3
115.5
101.4
9 6 .9
110.4

119.5
118.3
12 9.5
111.9
110.9
116.7
106.6
113.9
118.8
121.2
101.8
97 .6
109.9

119.8
120.2
131.1
110.4
110.2
114.8
103.6
115.8
119.0
112.5
103.5
99 .4
111.6

3.1

3.1

9.0
1.2
2.0

9.4
1.1
2.0

3.8
11.0
7.3
3 .7

4.1
2.1
10.6
6.8
3 .8

124.1
109.4
111.3
114.8
104.9
115.9
118.6
112.3
104.6
100.9
111.7

97 .2
95 .2
9 7 .7

9 7 .3
9 5 .3
9 6 .3

110.4
110.3
107.8

110.9
110.9
108.1

111.1
111.1
108.1

111.4
111.3
10 8.4

111.9
111.6
109.1

112.6
112.2
110.0

111.9
111.8
109.6

110.8
110.8
106.7

114.2
114.2
110.7

113.9
113.8
110.9

113.3
113.1
110.9

112.0
111.6
109.5

C o n s u m e r g o o d s e x c lu d in g :
Autos and trucks
Energy

2 4 .8
2 3 .8

2 4 .6
2 3 .4

107.5
10 7.0

108.2
107.1

108.4
107.0

108.2
10 7.3

10 8.7
108.4

10 9.0
109.4

108.6
111.1

108.1
104.8

113.4
112.7

112.8
113.5

110.4
113.3

107.3
108.2

B u s in e s s e q u ip m e n t e x c lu d in g :
Autos and trucks
Com puter and office equipm ent

12.2
11.3

14.1
12.3

136.8
121.8

13 8.7
122.1

139.1
12 1.7

140.4
12 2.9

140.5
123.5

141.6
124.7

139.6
125.1

140.1
118.7

144.5
124.1

14 3.7
12 5.7

14 2.7
126.2

140.5
124.3

M a te ria ls e x c lu d in g :
Energy

29 .5

3 0 .3

114.9

115.1

115.6

116.0

116.9

118.2

116.8

113.1

116.5

117.5

118.7

118.3

.

2.0

S P E C IA L A G G R E G A T E S

Total e x c lu d in g :
Autos and trucks
Motor vehicles and parts
Com puter and office equipm ent




Table 1B

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: MARKET GROUPS
Percent change

Item

1991 Q 4
to
1992Q 4

Seasonally adjusted
annual rate
19 92
1993
__ ________ QJ____J 2 £

Q 3r

S easonally a d ju s te d .
19 93
A ua.r
S eo .r
Q ct.r Nov.P
.7

.9

4 .0

.0

.3
.5

.7
.9

.9
.9

5.1
5 .9

.0
.1

.1
-.7
-.3
-1 .1
-8 .1
5 .8
.8
-.9
-2 .7
-1 .5
.7
.4
.6
-.4
-.1
-.5
1.6
-.9
2 .5

.1
1.3
2 .5
4 .9
4 .9
4 .9
-1 .1
.3
1.9
-.9
.1
-.3
.0
-.8
.1
.0
- 1 .6
4 .0
- 3 .5

1.1
3 .9
6 .9
10.4
13 .0
8.1
1.4
1.4
3 .9
1.5
-.3
.3
.6
-.3
-.8
-.3
1.7
5 .4
.4

.8
2 .9
5.5
8 .7

-.1
3 .4
5.2
8 .6
7 .0

5.8
-.1
.6
-.1
,7
1.1
.2
.4
-.2
-.2
.3
.6
1.0
.4

6 .9
17 .6
2 9 .8
5 2 .5
4 2 .2
6 2 .6
5 .9
9 .4
17.3
8 .7
5 .2
4 .3
7.4
4 .8
1.6
.6
1.0
—1 .4
2 .0

.0
1.9
4 .8
-.7
1.6
-1 .0
.2
-.9
.2
- 1 .2
-6 .8
3.0
-1 0 .4

1.0
1.2
1.5
1.9
.4
2.1
5 .7
.8
-.6
3.1
3.8

.6
.8
.3
2 .0
-.1
4 .4
10.4
.7
-.8
-2 .1
5.9

1.0
1.3
1.3
2 .5
.5
3 .3
7 .8
.4
-.3
-3 .3
1.8

4 .7
5 .4
4.1
8.1
1.7
19.8
5 2 .2
4 .3
-.2
7 .7
19.3

.2
.0
- 1 .8
-3 .7
.9
3.8
8.2
1.5
.5
6.6
-1 .4

-.1
.6
-.6

.0
.3
-.2

.8
1.1
.6

2 .5
1.2
3 .3

-.2
.7
-.8

.7

.8

2 .3

T o tal in d e x

3.2

6 .7

5.5

2 .3

2 .6

P ro d u c ts , to ta l
F in al p ro d u c ts

3 .7
4.4

7.9
9.6

5,1
5 .4

1.5
1.1

3 .2
3 .2

.2
.2

2.8

8.9
16.8
3 0 .5
5 1 .7
16.0
10 0 .4
2 .5
6 .3

4 .6
2 1 .7
2 7 .7
4 1 .6
4 1 .3
4 1 .8
6.7
16.7
3 5 .9
12.4
9.0
.1

-2 .4
-3 .2
-9 .9
- 1 6 .7
- 2 2 .9
3 .4
3.1
3 .3
9 .7
-1 .0
- 2 .2
-1 .8
-2 .0
1.8
2 .7
- 1 3 .0
-4 .3
- 1 6 .0

.9
-6 .1
- 1 7 .3
- 2 7 .8
— .8
43
-8 .4
3.1
4 .5
18.8
1.8
- 2 .2
3 .0
3 .8
-5 .9
3 .3
-4 .0
14.3
-2 .1
2 0 .9

6.0
10.4
19.8
4 1 .4
8 .0

6 .3
7 .9
16.9
33.1
8.1

Consum er goods
D u ra b le
Autom otive products
Autos and trucks
Autos
Trucks
Auto parts and allied goods
O ther d u ra b le g o o d s
A ppliances, T V s, and air-c o n d .
Carpeting and furniture
M iscellaneous
N o n d u ra b le
Foods and tobacco
Clothing
C hem ical products
P aper products
Energy products
Fuels
Utilities
E q u ip m e n t, to ta l
B u s in e s s e q u ip m e n t
Information processing & related
C om puter and office
Industrial
Transit
Autos and trucks
O ther
D e fe n s e a n d s p a c e e q u ip m e n t
Oil and gas well drilling
M anufactured homes

6.6
10.9
15.0
8 .4

22.2
4 .6
3.1
1.7
8 .3

6.6
6.8
1.2

1.8
1.5
-.5
5.2
-1 .5

2.6

1.8

14.2

1.0
-

-

-1 .7

1.6

2 .9
4 .4
-1 .4
6 .5

2.1

2 9 .0
2 4 .3
3 0 .8

6.6

1.1

10.5

9.8
16.2
31.1

6.1
1.1

6.6

14.4
2 5 .2
8 .3

8.8

4 0 .7
2 1 .5
-7 .5
7 6 .6
10 4.5

1.6

3 1 .5
5.6
16.4
3 9 .0
15.9
- 7 .7
- 3 0 .0
18.0

-1 1 .9
12.7
-8 .8
- 1 3 .0
-3 0 .2

- 2 8 .3
15.9
-7 .5
61 .9
18.4

4.1
6.5
2 .7

2 .6
3.0
2 .4

3.1
7 .8
.1

.2
.3
.1

3.5

1.8

.1

11.0
11.0

2 .3
4 .2

4 .4
-.2

1.1

2 .4

8 .7
18.6
7.2

2.2

5.9
.4
-4 .6

1.1

4 .9
.5
2 .4

6.1

-

-

6.1
11.1

4 .9

4 .0
3.9
5 .7
2.5

10.0

.3
.3
.4
2 .4
.1
-.5
.6
1.9
-.8
8.4
-1 .9

12.6

9.0
7 .8
-7 .8
9.0
4 8 .6

M a te ria ls

2.0

4 .2
16.5

3.9

In te rm e d ia te p ro d u c ts
Construction supplies
Business supplies

D u ra b le
C onsum er parts
Equipm ent parts
O ther
Basic m etals
N o n d u ra b le
Textile
P aper
C hem ical
O ther
E n e rg y
Prim ary
C onverted fuel

-

-

3.7
-.3
8.6
1.1
-1 .1
6.4
.5
12.3
8 .0
1.0
.9
8 .7

2 9 .9
6.3
7.9
8 .4
3.8
3.4

6.8

1.6

11.2

.7
7.6
-1 .5

-

21.1

4.1
-3 .5
9.8
2 .6
-1 .7
.8
3.1
- 6 .4
3.4
1.6
-1 .9

Not seasonally adjusted
19 93
O ct.r Nov.P
A ua.r
S ep .f

.3
.4
1.0
-.4
-1 .4
.9
-.2
.1
1.9
.3
-.9
-1 .6
.3

1.0
1.0
1.5
.5
.4
- 1 .2
- 2 .6
-.7
- 1 .3
-.8
.5
2.1
-2 .1

.9
3.1
1.1
-.3
.5
.3
.8
-.7
.4
.9
.6
.3
1.1

12.0

1.2
3.2
.8
.6
-.1
1.1
1.9
2 .7
.5
.4
- .1
-.2

- 1 .4

4.4

-.4
.0

- 2 .5
- 2 .5

4 .2
4 .5

-.6
7.8
14.0

-3 .1
- 4 .4
- 6 .5
- 7 .0
- 4 .0
- 9 .8
- 5 .6
- 2 .4
- 6 .7
- 2 .9
1.1
- 2 .8
- 5 .4
- 3 .6
- 6 .6
.8
3.5
14.7

- 2 .7
.2
1.1
5.8

- 1 .7
- 2 .0
- 2 .4
- 3 .6
-.6
- 3 .8
- 7 .0
-.8
.2
1.2
-1 5 .0

6.9
10.3
14.7
3 3 .9
5.6
3.9
2 1 .4
12.3
- 7 .8
-.9
9.7

- 1 .9
-.3
-2 .9

- 2 .2
- 2 .3
- 2 .2

3.2
5.9
1.5

-.1

.8

.2

4.6

2 .9
5 .7
2 .4
2.1
-.2
3.2
9.2
3 .0
1.5
3 .9
.4
.4
.6

1.2
3 .0
1.0
.7
2.5
-.1
-3 .3
-.4
1.3
-1 .0
-2 .7
-.1
- 7 .0

1.1
4.1
1.5
-.7
-.8
.9
2 .4
.1
-1 .3
4 .9
.3
.8
-.5

.3
1.6
1.3
- 1 .4
-.7
- 1 .6
- 2 .8
1.7
.2
- 7 .2
1.7
1.8
1.5

7.5
13.7
9.4
3.0
.8
3.1
2.2
4.4
3.0
2.5
.0
- 1 .4
2.3

-.5
-.7
.0

1.2

3.9
3.6
3.1

10.0

1.4

T o tal e x c lu d in g :
Autos and trucks
M otor vehicles and parts
C om puter and office equipm ent

3 .0
2 .9
2 .3

5.7
5.5
6 .0

4 .6
4 .0
4 .5

2 .9
3 .0
.8

3 .7
3 .9
1.3

.2
.2
.3

.4
.3
.6

3.1
3.1
3.8

C o n s u m e r g o o d s e x c lu d in g :
Autos and trucks
Energy

2 .0
2.8

6.6
6 .7

2 .3
4 .6

-1 .3
-1 .1

3.2
-.6

-.2
.3

1.0

.5

5.0
7.6

-.6
.7

B u s in e s s e q u ip m e n t e x c lu d in g :
Autos and trucks
C om puter and office equipm ent

9.9
5 .4

8 .9
6.1

12.5
2 .8

11.4
1.1

.9

9.6

1.0

.1
.5

3.2
4 .5

-.5
1.3

M a te ria ls e x c lu d in g :
Energy

3.4

6.1

8.9

4 .5

3.1

.3

.7

21.6
2 7 .0
17.2
1.5
2 .7
5 .0
1.3
2 .0
-3 .0
-.9
-2 .1
-8 .3
-.4
-4 .7
2 .7
- 7 .9
.8
.8
.4
2 .4
- 1 .9
9.9

21.1

-.3
-.3
.2

-.3
-

1.2

-

6.0
6.8

-

11.6

-

11.2

16.7

.0

2 .7

10.6
14.5
2 1 .3
19.8
2 2 .9
3.4
7.3
18.3
5.8
1.8
.5
1.3
-3 .9
-.5
.0
3.1
6.9
1.8

1.7
2 .5
1.7
1.9
1.4

2.1

Nov. 92
to
Nov. 93

11.1

S P E C IA L , A G G R E G A T E S

10,6

.5

Note— Percent changes shown in the first and last columns are based on se aso n a ly adjusted data




1.2

3 .0

-

-

- 1 .3
- 1 .3

2.8

1.4

2.1

-

-.2

- 4 .6

2.6

-.7
.3

-1 .5
-1 .5

9.4
4,2

1.0

-.3

6.1

index. 1<

D u ra b le
Lumber and products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products

24
25
32

10 0.0

110.5

110.8

84 .6

111.3

26 .4
58.1

4 6 .5
2.1
1.5
2 .4

>
c
P

P rim a ry p ro c e s s in g
A d v a n c e d p ro c e s s in g

1992

27.1
57.1

M a n u fa c tu rin g

1987

1993
June

8 4 .3

T o tal in d e x

Not seasonally adjusted

S easonally Adjusted

100.0

SIC

Item

o
o

Proportion
in Total IP

00

Table 2A
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY GROUPS

S eo .r

O ct.r

Nov.P

1993
June

111.0

111.4

112.2

113.2

112.4

10 9 .7

114.0

114.0

114.1

112.5

111.6

111.9

112.4

113.2

114.4

114.3

110.3

115.3

116.0

116.4

113.9

107.5
113.0

10 7.6
113.5

10 8.0
113.7

10 7.6
114.7

108.1

115.6

109.2
116.8

110.0
116.3

10 6.4
112.1

10 9.7
118.0

10 9.9
118.9

110.6
119.1

10 8.9
116.3

47 .2
1.9
1.4
2.2

114.6
96 .5
109.5
100.5

115.4
99.1
111.1
10 0.8

115.7
9 9 .9
111.1
10 0.9

116.9
10 0.9
111.3
10 2.4

118.2
10 2.4
111.4
10 1.3

119.8
10 3.7
112.4
10 2.6

117.8
10 0.9
111.3
10 3.6

112.4
9 8 .6
10 6.6
10 2.0

118.0
10 4.6
116.7
105.1

119.2
10 4.3
117.3
105.1

121.1
106.1
114.2
10 5.9

119.5
10 1.3
112.6
10 3.4

Julv

Julv

A ua.r

S eo.r

O ct.r

Nov.P

Primary m etals
33
Iron and steel
3 3 1 ,2
R aw steel
Nonferrous
3 3 3 -6 ,9
34
Fabricated metal products
Industrial and commercial
m achinery and computer equip. 35
357
Com puter and office equip.
Electrical machinery
36

3.3
1.9
.1
1.4
5.4

3.2
1.9
.1
1.3
4.9

10 5 .7
110.9
106.8
98 .5
100.1

10 5.3
111.9
108.2
9 6 .3
101.2

10 6.2
112.1
10 6.2
9 8 .0
10 1.0

10 5.8
111.1
10 5.3
9 8 .6
101.1

106.1
112.3
10 6.7
9 7 .6
10 1.6

10 6.3
112.3
10 6.2
98.1
102.2

10 7.3
112.7
107.2
10 0.0
102.8

10 2.9
110.0
10 4.6
93.1
10 0.8

10 4.8
110.1
10 3.6
97 .6
103.1

10 7.7
113.4
10 4.8
9 9 .8
10 3.4

107.5
113.7
107.9
9 9 .0
10 3.3

106.1
112.8
103.4
96 .8
102.5

8.5
2 .3
6.9

10.0
3.7
7.8

145.4
2 2 1 .0
130.1

148.5
2 2 6 .5
13 2.3

14 9.9
2 3 2 .0
13 3.5

15 1.8
2 3 6 .4
13 5.4

153.1
2 4 1 .0
13 6.9

155.2
2 4 7 .0
13 8.7

15 0.0
2 3 0 .4
131.0

15 1.5
2 3 4 .2
12 8.4

15 7 .4
253.1
13 4.3

155.6
2 4 3 .8
13 7.0

155.4
2 4 9 .6
139.1

152.2
2 4 0 .5
14 0.5

Transportation equipment
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks
Aerospace and misc.
Instruments
M iscellaneous

3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

9.9
4 .8
2 .2
5.1
5.1
1.3

9.5
4.7
2.1
4.8
5.0
1.3

10 2.6
114.3
108.2
91 .8
102.5
112.1

10 0.8
110.1
102.8
92 .0
102.8
112.3

10 0.4
110.0
10 4.0
91 .3
10 1.3
112.5

102.1
114.3
10 9.2
90 .6
10 1.8
114.3

106.1
12 3.7
12 0.8
8 9 .5
101.2
113.6

109.5
13 2.0
13 1.7
8 8 .4
100.5
114.3

108.5
12 6.3
12 6.3
9 1 .7
10 3.7
112.6

88.1
8 6 .8
6 7 .4
8 9 .3
10 3.6
10 9.2

9 9 .6
110.6
10 5.2
8 9 .4
10 3.2
113.8

103.2
117.4
114.1
8 9 .9
10 3.7
116.0

111.4
13 4.4
139.4
8 9 .8
10 2.3
118.0

10 9.4
130.5
130.1
8 9 .6
10 0.5
118.1

20
21
22
23
26

3 7 .8
8.8
1.0
1.8
2 .3
3.6

37 .4
8.8
1.0
1.8
2.0
3.7

107.2
107.1
89.1
107.1
91.1
114.2

10 7.0
107.2
91 .5
10 7.7
90 .7
112.0

10 7.3
10 7.8
9 2 .7
10 7.4
90 .6
113.1

10 6.9
10 7.7
9 4 .6
10 5.4
8 9 .5
111.3

107.1
108.3
95 .9
10 6.4
89.1
111.6

10 7.7
108.6
95 .9
107.4
8 8 .9
114.0

109.9
109.2
9 6 .7
111.7
93 .2
114.7

10 7 .7
10 8.6
76.1
10 4.0
8 9 .4
10 9.9

112.0
114.5
9 8 .3
111.4
93 .3
114.1

112.0
114.8
101.2
109.5
9 2 .4
112.3

110.5
114.1
105.7
111.1
90 .9
115.5

10 7.0
108.9
94 .2
10 5.3
8 9 .6
113.4

27
28
29
30
31

6.5
8.8
1.3
3.2
.3

5.8
9.5
1.3
3.3
.3

94 .5
119.1
103.9
112.8
9 7 .0

93 .8
118.7
102.5
114.7
96 .8

93 .4
119.1
102.4
114.8
97 .0

9 3 .7
118.5
10 4.3
113.9
98 .2

93 .6
118.4
106.9
113.5
98 .8

93 .9
118.6
10 8.4
114.9
98 .8

96.1
12 3.0
108.9
115.2
100.3

9 6 .3
123.1
10 9.0
110.1
93 .6

99.1
12 4.7
10 8.3
115.4
99 .8

9 9 .4
125.2
109.5
115.0
100.4

96 .4
119.7
108.3
116.0
10 0.7

9 4 .0
115.4
109.9
114.8
10 0.9

10
12
13
14

8.0
.3
1.2
5.8
.7

7.3
.5
1.2
5.0
.6

98 .0
16 4.4
10 6.7
93.1
91 .7

96 .4
167.7
10 1.0
91 .6
93.2

95 .5
148.2
95 .9
9 2 .4
94 .7

97 .5
15 7.0
103.9
9 3 .0
9 5 .0

9 8 .0
16 1.7
105.5
93.1
94 .4

9 7 .7
161.9
102.1
93 .2
96 .2

9 7 .0
169.3
105.6
9 0 .8
98 .5

9 4 .0
16 6.4
9 3 .5
8 9 .3
100.1

95 .5
153.1
10 2.8
8 9 .8
102.4

9 7 .4
159.1
107.5
9 1 .3
100.9

99 .4
15 6.7
109.3
94 .0
10 0.3

10 0.0
16 0.0
10 5.2
95 .7
9 7 .4

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

7.7
6.1
1.6

8.1
6.4
1.7

114.9
115.6
112.2

116.9
118.1
112.4

117.7
118.9
113.3

115.3
115.1
116.0

115.6
115.4
116.4

116.0
115.8
116.4

108.6
118.3
72 .9

119.3
13 1.7
7 3 .3

119.5
132.2
72 .4

10 9.8
119.4
74 .3

104.8
108.8
90 .3

110.7
108.2
119.9

79 .5
8 1 .9

7 9 .8
8 0 .9

111.1
108.1

111.7
108.3

112.0
108.5

112.3
10 8.9

112.6
10 9.6

113.3
110.6

113.5
111.0

111.7
10 6.7

115.6
111.4

115.9
112.3

115.3
112.6

112.9
110.3

10.2
5.7
4.4
4.2
0.3

9.6
5.4
4 .2
4 .0
0.2

9.7
5.1
4.5
4.3
0.3

10.1
5 .3
4 .8
4 .5
0 .3

11.0
5.9
5.2
4 .8
0 .3

12.0
6.6
5.4
5.1
0 .3

12.0
6.7
5.3
5.0
0 .3

6.4
3.6
2 .8
2.7
0.2

9.9
5.2
4.7
4.4
0 .3

10.7
5.5
5.1
4.8
0.3

12.3
6.6
5.7
5.4
0.3

12.0
6.6
5.4
5.1
0.3

37
371

N o n d u ra b le
Foods
Tobacco products
Textile mill products
Apparel products
P aper and products
Printing and publishing
Chemicals and products
Petroleum products
Rubber and plastics products
Leather and products
M in in g
Metafm ining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Stone and earth minerals

Utilities
Electric
Gas

S P E C IA L A G G R E G A T E S
M a n u fa c tu rin g ex clu d in g :
Motor vehicles and parts
Com puter and office equipm ent

M e m o : M o to r ve h ic le a s s e m b lie s 1
Total
A u to s
Trucks
Light

Heavy and medium

N o te -P rim a r y processing manufacturing includes textile mill products, paper and products, industrial chem icals, synthetic m aterials, and fertilizers,
petroleum products, rubber and plastics products, lum ber and products, primary m etals, fabricated m etals, and stone, clay, and glass products.
Advanced processing manufacturing includes foods, tobacco products, apparel products, printing and publishing, chem ical products and other agricultural
chem icals, leather and products, furniture and fixtures, industrial and com m ercial m achinery and com puter equipm ent, electrical machinery, transportation
equipm ent, instruments, and m iscellaneous m anufactures.




Table 2B
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY GROUPS
P ercent change
1991 Q 4

to
Item
T o ta l

1992Q 4

S IC

Index

_Q2L

Seasonally adjusted
19 93
A ua.r ~Sep,r
O ct.r Nov.P

Not seasonally a d ju ste d
1993
S e o .r
O c t/
A ua.r
Nov.P

Nov. 92

to
Nov. 93

3.2

and products
Furniture an a fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products

Lum ber

33
Prim ary m etals
3 3 1 ,2
Iron and steel
R aw steel
Nonferrous
3 3 3 -6 ,9
34
Fabricated m etal products
Industrial and com m ercial
m achinery and com puter equip. 35
357
C om puter and office equip.
36
Electrical m achinery
T ransportation equipm ent
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks
A erospace and misc.
Instruments
M iscellaneous

.2

.4

.7

.9

4 .0

.0

.1

- 1 .4

4.4

6.5

6.4

3 .4

2 .4

.3

.4

.7

1.0

4.6

.6

.3

-2 .1

5.0

4 .0
8.1

6 .8

3.2
3.3

2 .0
2 .6

.4
.2

-.4
.8

.5
.9

1.0
1.0

3 .0
5.3

.2
.7

.6

6 .3

.2

-1 .5
- 2 .4

3.9
5.5

9.7
11.2
13.3
4 .8

10.3
4 .7
16.4
2 .9

4 .4
- 9 .2
10.8
7 .6

.3
.9
.0
.2

1.0
.9
.2
1.4

1.1
1.5
.1
-1 .1

1.3
1.2
.9
1.3

5 .0
6.1
9 .4
3.0

1.0
-.3
.6
.0

1.6
1.7
-2 .7

- 1 .3
- 4 .5
- 1 .4
- 2 .4

8.0
3.9

7.4
6.1
10.4
9.5
3.4

14.5
16.6
5.5
11.3
9.8

-.8

.0
4.2
-2 .0
3.1

3 .9
9 .7
6 .6
- 4 .5
1.5

.8
.2
-1 .8
1.8
-.2

-.3
-.9
-.9
.6
.1

.3
1.1
1.4
-1 .1
.4

.2
.0
-.5
.5
.6

1.9
.1
-1 .0
4 .8
2 .3

2 .7
3.0
1.2
2 .3
.2

-.2
.2
2 .9

15.2
31.1
8.1

24
25
32

2 .6

.9
1.3
1.8
.4
2 .3

D u r a b le

2 .3

5 .4
7.1
6.6
5.9

p r o c e s s in g

5.5

2 .9
4.1

Primary processing

6 .7

3 .7

Manufacturing
A dvanced

Seasonallyadjusted
annual rate
1993
1992
Q2
Q4
Q1

18.8
25 .2
10.4

15.1
31 .5
10.7

22.1
41 .4
8.0

17.5
33.1
13.3

1.0
2 .4
.9

1.2
1.9
1.4

.8
2 .0
1.1

1.4
2.5
1.3

39
8.1
4.6

- 1 .2
-3 .7
2.0

-.2
2 .4
1.5

-2 .1
- 3 .6

--1 4 .2
--1 9 .3
--2 4 .3
-8 .0
-2 .1
-.5

-.4
-.1
1.2
-.7
-1 .4
.1

1.7
3.9
4.9
-.8
.5
1.6

3.9
8.2
10.6
-1 .2
-.6
-.6

3.2
6.7
9.1
-1 .3
-.7
.6

13.1
2 7 .3
5 6 .2
.1
-.4
4.2

3.6
6.2
8.4
.6
.5
1.9

7.9
14.4
2 2 .2
-.2
-1 .3
1.7

- 1 .8
- 2 .9
- 6 .7
-.1
- 1 .7
.1

.2
10.2
8.5
- 8 .7
-1 .6
3.6

37
371
3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

Nondurable

11.8
3 3 .7
3 8 .9
- 6 .9
-2 .9
5.3

13.8
3 7 .4
4 0 .9
-7 .9
-2 .7
2.1

-9 .7
-9 .5
-1 5 .1
- 1 0 .0
-1 .3
5.1

4.1 .
11.4
8 .5
5 .7

.8

-.8

-.1

- 1 .3
-.8

- 4 .2
- 2 .2
-.8

1.0

9 .8

5.1
4 .7
8.4
3.3
-.7
4.7
16.8
33 .9
11.5
5 .6
2 0 .0

24 .9
- 9 .6
- 2 .9
2.6

Foods
Tobacco products
Textile mill products ..
Apparel products
P aper and products

20 !
21
22 I
23
26

1.7
.8
9 .0
4.4
- 1 .6
-.1

2.6
2.2
-2 1 .1
-.1
2 .6
• - 2 .3

1.5
.0
- 1 0 .4
3.7
.8
8.0

2.1
1.3
- 2 5 .6
-.3
—
4.9
11.8

.1
2.6
11.4
2.8
-5 .1
- 3 .5

.3
.6
1.4
-.3
-.2
1.0

-.4
-.1
2.1
-1 .9
- 1 .2
- 1 .6

.2
.5
1.4
1.0
-.4
.2

.6
.3
.0
.9
-.2
2.2

4 .0
5.4
29 .2
7.1
4.4
3.8

.0
.3
3.0
-1 .7
- 1 .0
- 1 .5

- 1 .3
-.6
4 .4
1.4
- 1 .6
2.8

- 3 .2
- 4 .5
- 1 0 .9
- 5 .2
- 1 .4
- 1 .9

Printing and publishing
Chem icals and products
Petroleum products
Rubber and plastics products
Leather and products

27
28
29
30
31

-1 .9
3.8
2.8
3.8
8.5

-.1
7 .7
17.0
3.3
13.6

.2
.0
-.1
8.3
9.6

1.8
5.1
-1 .0
1.2

-.4
.4
-.1

.1

- 5 .2
1.5
- 3 .2
3.7
- 4 .3

.2

.4
-.5
1.9
-.7
1.2

-.2
-.1
2.5
-.4
.6

.4
.2
1.4
1.2
.0

3.0
1.3
-.6
4 .9
6.7

.3
.5
1.1
-.4
.6

- 3 .0
- 4 .4
-1 .1
.9
.3

- 2 .5
- 3 .6
1.4
- 1 .0
.2

-.9
6.5
-2 .7
-1 .3
1.0

1.5
14.1
-.4
.9
1.1

-5 .7
- 6 .9
- 3 .8
- 6 .9
2.8

3.2
6.1
12.2
1.9
-6 .1

- 3 .2
--1 7 .5
--2 3 .0
2.7
7.3

-.9
-1 1 .6
-5 .1
.9
1.7

2.1
5.9
8.4
.6
.3

.5
3.0
1.4

-.3
.1
- 3 .2
.2
1.9

1.5
-8 .0
10.0
.5
2 .3

2.0
3.9
4.5
1.7
-1 .4

2.1
- 1 .5
1.7
2.9
-.6

.5
2.1
- 3 .7
1.9
- 2 .9

- 5 .7
- 1 .3
.5
1.9

2 .0
1.9

4 .6
3.2
9.9

-7 .5
-1 .8
-2 6 .1

10.5
9.7
13.7

.7
.7

.2
.2
.4

.1
.3

.8

-2 .1
- 3 .2
2 .3

.3
.4

2 .2

14.4
14.4
14.8

.0

-1 .2

-8 .1
-9 .7
2.6

- 4 .5
-8 9
2 1 .5

5.5
-.6
32.7

1.5
-.7

3 .3
2 .7

5.1
5.7

4.7
5.2

4 .3
1.6

3.9
.8

.3
.1

.2
.3

.3
.7

.6
.9

3.5
4 .4

.3
.9

-.5
.2

-2 .1
- 2 .0

4.1
3.6

Minina

i

M etalm ining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Stone and earth m inerals

10
12
13
14

Utilities
Electric
G as

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

.1

.1
-.7

1.3
2 .0

- 5 .9
1.3
- 4 .2
5.4
-.3
.7
4.4
3.2
2 .2
-.1

1.1

S P E C IA L A G G R E G A T E S

Manufacturing excluding:
Motor vehicles and parts
Com puter and office equipm ent

Note— Percent changes shown in the first and last colum ns are based on seasonally adjusted data.




Table 3
CAPACITY UTILIZATION: M ANUFACTURING, MINING, AND UTILITIES
Percent of capacity, seasonally adjusted
1992
Proportion

1967­
1992
Ave.

1973
Hiah

1978­
19 80
Hiah

1982
Low

1988­
1989
Hiah

1990­
1991
Low

1992
Nov.

1993
June

Julv

A ua.r

S eo .r

O ct.r

Nov.P

Total in d u s try

100.0

8 1 ,9

89 .2

8713

7 1 .8

8 4 .8

7 8 .3

8 0 .8

81 .5

8 1 .7

8 1 .7

8 1 .9

8 2 .4

8 3 .0

M a n u fa c tu rin g

85 .8

8 1 .2

8 8 .9

8 7 .3

7 0 .0

85.1

7 6 .6

79 .7

80 .6

8 0 .7

8 0 .8

81.1

81 .5

82 .2

2 5 .3
60 .6

8 2 .2
8 0 .7

92 .2
87 .5

8 9 .7
8 6 .3

6 6 .8
7 1 .4

89.1
8 3 .3

7 7 .9
76.1

8 3 .0
78 .4

8 4 .5
7 8 .9

8 4 .5
7 9 .2

84 .8
79 .2

84 .4
79 .6

8 4 .7
80 .2

85 .5
80 .8

50.1
1.7
1.4
2.3

79.1
8 3 .0
8 1 .8
7 8 .0

8 8 .8
90.1
96 .8
89 .2

8 6 .9
8 7 .6
8 6 .6
8 7 .0

6 5 .0
60 .9
6 8 .9
63.1

8 3 .9
9 3 .3
86 .8
8 3 .7

73 .8
76 .8
7 1 .7
71 .0

77 .8
8 8 .7
7 9 .8
7 7 .8

79 .4
8 5 .5
8 4 .9
80.1

79 .8
8 7 .8
8 6 .0
8 0 .3

79 .9
8 8 .6
85 .9
8 0 .4

8 0 .6
8 9 .3
85 .9
81 .5

8 1 .3
90 .7
85 .9
8 0 .7

82 .3
91 .7
8 6 .6
81 .8

3.1
1.9
0.1
1.2

100.6
10 5.8
102.7
92 .9
92.1
9 5 .7

10 2.4
110.4
9 5 .7
90 .5
8 0 .8
9 7 .6

4 6 .8
3 8 .3
3 5 .2
6 2 .2
42.1
5 8 ,6

92 .9
9 5 .7
9 2 .7
88 .9
85 .9
100.4

74 .3
72 .3
71 .2
75 .9
73 .6
97 .3

8 1 ,2
7 9 .7
81 .5
83 .5
8 7 .5
9 7 .8

8 4 .6
8 5 .3
8 4 .6
83 .6
95 .0
91 .6

8 4 .3
8 6 .0
8 5 .7
8 1 .8
86.1
8 9 .6

8 5 .0
86.1
84.1
8 3 .3
8 2 .7
8 5 .7

8 4 .7
8 5 .3
83 .4
83 .8
87.1
8 5 .4

84 .9
86 .2
84 .5
8 3 .0
82.1
85 .5

85.1
8 6 .2
8 4 .0
8 3 .5

0.1

7 9 .8
7 9 .4
7 9 .0
8 0 .7
7 1 .9
8 9 .3

83 .5

item

S IC

P rim ary p ro c e s s in g
A d v a n c e d p ro c e s s in g
D u rab le
Lumber and products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Primary metals
Iron and steel
R aw steel
Nonferrous
Primary copper
Primary aluminum

24
25
32

33
3 3 1 ,2
3 3 3 -6 ,9
3331
3334

0.0

34
Fabricated m etal products
Industrial and commercial
machinery and computer equip. 35
Electrical m achinery
36

5.2

7 7 .2

87 .8

8 3 .9

6 2 .9

8 2 .0

71 .7

75.1

7 7 .0

7 7 .8

7 7 .7

77 .8

78.1

78 .6

10.2
9.7

8 0 .9
8 0 .3

9 6 .4
87 .8

92.1
89 .4

6 4 .9
71.1

8 3 .7
84 .9

7 3 .0
76 .8

8 2 .0
8 1 .5

8 7 .5
8 3 .3

89.1
8 4 .4

8 9 .6
8 4 .8

90 .4
8 5 .7

90 .9
8 6 .4

9 1 .8
8 7 .3

T ransportation equipment
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks1
A erospace and misc.
instruments
M iscellaneous

7 4 .8
7 5 .4

83 .8
9 3 .4

3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

10.5
5.3
2.5
5.2
3.4
1.3

75 .8
8 2 .2
7 5 .7

7 7 .0
89 .9
8 2 .9

8 2 .7
93 .0
92 .2
81.1
92 .5
7 8 .7

5 6 .7
4 4 .5
40.1
6 6 .9
7 9 .0
66.1

84 .2
84 .5
89 .6
8 8 .3
81 .2
80.1

70.1
57 .9
5 3 .6
78.1
75.1
7 2 .9

7 1 .5
71.1
73.1
7 2 .0
73 .2
7 7 .4

7 0 .3
7 2 .7
7 3 .6
6 7 .7
7 1 .8
7 7 .0

6 9 .0
7 0 .0
6 9 .8
6 7 .9
7 2 .0
7 7 .0

6 8 .7
6 9 .7
7 0 .5
6 7 .5
7 0 .9
7 7 .0

69 .8
7 2 .3
7 3 .8
6 7 .0
71.1
78.1

7 2 .4
78.1
8 1 .4
66 .2
70 .6
7 7 .5

7 4 .7
83 .2
8 8 .6
6 5 .4
70.1
7 7 .8

20
22
23
26
2 6 1 -3
27

3 5 .8
8.6
1.6
2.1
3.3
1.5
5.8

8 3 .5
8 2 .4
8 6 .0
81.1
8 9 .7
92 .2
86 .5

8 7 .9
8 6 .0
9 2 .0
8 4 .2
96 .9
97.1
8 9 .7

8 7 .0
8 4 .3
91 .7
8 6 .0
94 .2
98 .2
9 2 .2

7 6 .9
7 8 .8
73 .8
7 8 .9
8 2 .0
82.1
8 3 .0

86 .8
83 .3
92.1
84 .2
94 .9
98.1
9 2 .3

8 0 .4
80 .8
78 .7
7 4 .6
8 6 .0
90 .2
78 .4

8 2 .4
81.1
9 0 .8
79 .0
8 8 .6
9 1 .3
7 7 .0

8 2 .3
8 0 .9
9 1 .4
7 7 .7
9 2 .8 94 .4
7 6 .9

8 2 .0
8 0 .8
9 1 .8
7 7 .4
9 0 .9
91 .8
7 6 .4

82.1
81.1
9 1 .5
7 7 .3
9 1 .7
92 .2
7 6 .0

8 1 .7
8 1 .0
89 .8
7 6 .3
90 .2
92 .0
76 .2

81 .8
8 1 .3
9 0 .6
7 6 .0
90 .3
9 1 .3
7 6 .0

82 .2
8 1 .4
91 .4
7 5 .9
92 .2
76 .2

Chemicals and products
28
Plastics materials
2821
Synthetic fibers
2 8 2 3 ,4
Petroleum products
29
Rubber and plastics products
30
Leather and products
31

9.2
0.7
0.4
1.2
3 .0
0 .3

7 9 .9
8 5 .5
84 .8
8 5 .3
8 3 .6
8 1 .9

8 7 .9
102.0.
9 3 .8
96 .7
9 4 .0
8 1 .3

85.1
90 .9
98 .5
89 .5
9 0 .4
92 .4

70.1
6 3 .4
6 4 .4
68 .2
7 3 .5
78.1

85 .9
9 7 .0
99 .7
8 8 .5
9 0 .5
83 .8

78 .5
75 .5
7 7 .3
8 4 .2
7 8 .5
7 5 .4

82.1
8 3 .6
88 .2
8 9 .4
82 .6
8 5 .8

8 1 .7
8 6 .7
89 .8
8 9 .9
8 2 .4
8 6 .4

8 1 .3
8 5 .0
87 .2
8 8 .7
83 .5
8 6 .3

8 1 .4
8 5 .6
9 1 .3
8 8 .7
8 3 .4
8 6 .5

8 0 .8
8 4 .7
8 5 .8
90 .4
8 2 .6
87 .6

8 0 .5

8 0 .5

8 3 .7
9 2 .7
82.1
88.1

94.1
8 2 .9
88.1

10
12
13
138
14

6.7
0.4
1.2
4 .5
0 .6
0.6

8 7 .4
77 .9
8 7 .2
8 8 .2
7 2 .7
8 4 .0

94 .4
9 0 .3
9 0 .8
9 6 .6
9 3 .0
9 3 .7

96 .6
8 7 .6
9 5 .7
96 .9
10 4.3
93 .3

8 0 .6
4 3 .4
7 5 .4
8 2 .5
5 0 .8
6 3 .3

8 7 .0
87 .5
9 1 .4
8 6 .9
6 0 .7
90 .0

86 .8
7 9 .5
83.1
8 7 .8
5 4 .0
77 .6

8 7 .4
9 0 .3
8 0 .3
8 9 .9
6 4 .7
8 0 .3

8 7 .9
8 5 .6
8 2 .2
91.1
64 .9
7 8 .0

86 .5
87 .2
7 7 .7
8 9 .8
6 4 .3
7 9 .3

8 5 .8
7 7 .0
7 3 .7
90 .8
7 0 .2
8 0 .6

87 .7
8 1 .4
79 .7
91 .4
72 .9
80 .9

88.1
8 3 .7
80 .8
9 1 .7
7 1 .8
80 .3

8 8 .0
8 3 .7
78.1
9 2 .0
7 0 .0
8 1 .9

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

7.5
5.7
1.7

8 6 .7
8 8 .9
8 2 .6

95 .6
9 9 .0
9 3 .2

8 8 .3
8 8 .3
93 .6

76 .2
7 8 .7
70 .8

92 .6
94 .8
8 5 .5

83 .4
8 7 .4
6 8 .3

87.1
8 8 .8
8 1 .4

8 6 .6
8 9 .2
77 .9

88.1
91.1
78.1

88 .6
91 .5
7 8 .7

8 6 .7
8 8 .5
80 .6

86 .8
8 8 .6
8 0 .8

8 7 .0
88 .9
80 .8

N o n d u ra b le
Foods
Textile mill products
Apparel products
Paper and products
Pulp and paper
Printing and publishing

M in in g
Metal mining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Oil and gas well drilling
Stone and earth minerals
U tilities
Electric
Gas

37
371

Note— Primary processing manufacturing includes textile mill products, paper and products, industrial chem icals, synthetic materials, and fertilizers,
petroleum products, rubber and plastic products, lum ber and products, primary m etals, fabricated m etals, and stone, clay, and glass products. A dvanced
processing manufacturing includes foods, tobacco products, apparel products, printing and publishing, chem ical products and other agricultural chem icals,
leather and products, furniture and fixtures, industrial and com m ercial m achinery and com puter equipm ent, electrical m achinery, transportation equipm ent,
instruments, and miscellaneous m anufactures.




Table 4
INDUSTRIAL CAPACITY: MANUFACTURING, MINING, AND UTILITIES
------------- ~ —
pi‘rcent ch anae
Item

S IC

Annual rate
1967­ 1967­ 1975­
19 75
19 92
1992
Ave.
Ave.
Ave.

C apacity indexes
P ercent of 1 9 87 cutout

D ece m b er to D ecem b er

1988

19 89

19 90

1991

1992

1992
Nov.

1 9 93
June

Julv

Aua.

Sen.

1.8

1.6

1.5

13 4.2

13 5 .5

13 5.7

13 5.9

13 6.0

Oct.

Nov.

T o tal in d u s try

2 .8

3.7

1.5

1.9

136.2

136.4

M a n u fa c tu rin g

3.2

3 .9

2 .9

2 .0

2 .4

2.1

1.8

1.8

136.6

13 8.0

13 8.3

138.5

13 8.7

138.9

139.1

2.1
3.8

4 .0
3.9

1.2
3 .7

1.6
2.1

1.9
2 .6

1.6
2 .2

.9
2 .2

.7
2 .2

12 6.6
14 1.3

12 7.2
14 3.2

12 7.3
14 3.4

12 7 .4
14 3 .7

127.5
14 4.0

127.6
144.2

127.7
144.5

3.5
1.7
3.1
1.3

3 .7
2.9
4 .5
2.5

3 .3
1.0
2 .3
.7

2 .0
1.1
2.7
.2

2 .4
1.0
2 .7
.4

2 .0
.0
2 .0
.4

1.9
-1 .1
.5
-.4

2.1
.3
1.1
.0

14 2.6
112.5
128.1
12 5.5

14 4 .4
112.8
129.1
12 5.5

14 4.6
112.8
1 2 9 .2
12 5.5

14 4.9
112.9
12 9 .4
12 5.5

145.1
112.9
12 9.5
125.5

145.4
113.0
129.6
125.5

145.6
113.0
129.8
125.5

-.1
-.9
-1 .1
1.3
-.4
1.4

1.7
.7
.3
3.6
1.8
5.2

-1 .1
-1 .8
-1 .9
.1
- 1 .6
-.5

.8
1.3
1.3
.1
-.3
1.3

1.4
2.1
1.7
.2
2 .4
1.2

.5
.8
-.2
.0
.3
.4

-.8
-1 .4
-1 .7
.1
.3
.6

-1 .0
-1 .4
-1 .1
-.4
.0
.3

12 5.0
12 9.9
126.2
118.2
13 1.6
1244

12 4.9
13 0.0
126.2
117.8
13 2.4
12 4 .7

12 4.9
130.1
12 6.2
117.8
13 2.5
12 4.7

12 4.9
130.1
12 6.3
117.7
13 2 .7
12 4.8

12 4.9
13 0.2
12 6.3
117.6
132.8
124.8

124.9
130.3
126.3
117.6
133.0
124.9

124.9
130.3
126.4
117.5
133.1
124.9

1.6

3.1

.8

.5

.5

.5

.0

.0

13 0.0

13 0.0

13 0.0

13 0 .0

130.0

130.0

130.0

6.4
5.2

4 .7
6.1

7.3
4.8

1.9
4.1

2 .5
4 .3

3.1
4.1

4 .6
3 .0

3.9
3.6

162.1
152.6

166.1
15 6.2

16 6.7
156.8

16 7.3
15 7.3

167.9
157.9

168.5
158.4

169.1
158.9

37
371

2 .7
3.2

3.0
4.5

2 .6
2.5

3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

2.1
5.4
2.1

1.3
7.6
4 .4

2 .5
4 .3
.9

2.2
2 .3
-.8
2.2
2 .5
1.7

3.0
3.2
2 .0
2 .7
2.9
1.4

1.5
1.8
- .1
1.2
2.2
1.9

1.9
2 .9
.4
.8
1.9
1.5

2 .2
4 .4
4 .8
.0
1.6
1.5

14 4.8
15 4.5
14 4.2
13 5.8
141.5
14 3.9

14 5.9
157.1
14 6.9
13 5.5
14 2.7
14 5.6

146.1
15 7.4
14 7.3
13 5.4
14 2.8
14 5.9

146.2
15 7.7
147.6
135.4
14 3.0
146.1

14 6.3
158.1
148.0
135.3
143.1
146.4

146.4
158.4
148.3
135.3
143.3
146.7

146.6
158.7
14 8.7
135.2
143.5
146.9

20
22
23
26
2 6 1 -3
27

2.9
2 .5
2 .0
1.3
2 .7
2.4
3.2

4 .3
3 .0
4 .3
2 .3
3.9
3.0
3.0

2.2
2 .3
.8
.8
2.1
2.1
3.3

1.9
1.1
1.1
-.7
2.8
3.5
2 .4

2 .3
1.1
1.8
.5
2 .8
2 .3
3.1

2.1
1.3
1.2
.2
2 .6
2.8
2 .7

1.6
1.4
.8
-.5
2.1
3 .0
1.3

1.3
1.5
.5
-.6
1.3
1.9
.4

129.1
13 1.3
116.7
117.6
122.1
12 0.7
12 2.3

13 0.3
132.5
117.2
117.3
12 3.0
12 1.9
12 2.8

130.4
13 2.6
117.2
117.3
12 3.2
122.1
12 2.8

13 0.6
132.8
117.3
117.3
12 3.3
12 2.3
122.9

130.8
133.0
117.4
117.2
123.5
122.4
12 3.0

130.9
133.2
117.4
117.2
123.6
122.6
123.1

131.1
133.3
117.5
117.2
123.7
122.8
123.2

Chem icals and products
28
Plastics m aterials
2821
Synthetic fibers
2 8 2 3 ,4
Petroleum products
29
Rubber and plastics products
30
Leather and products
31

3.9
7 .0
4.4
1.6
5.5
- 3 .2

6.8
12.7
9.7
4 .2
8.6
-1 .5

2.4
4.1
1.8
.3
4 .0
-4 .0

3.5
9.2
4.1
-2 .1
2 .8
-5 .1

3.6
6.4
2 .5
-.7
3.8
-3 .4

2 .9
2.5
.8
1.0
4 .0
-3 .1

2 .6
2 .6
2 .4
-1 .0
3.0
-1 .0

2.5
1.5
6 .3
-1 .3
2.5
-.8

143.5
12 8.8
12 8.4
116.2
13 4.7
112.6

14 5.7
13 0.8
131.2
115.6
13 6.9
112.3

14 6.0
131.2
131.5
115.5
137.2
112.2

146.3
131.5
13 1.9
115.4
13 7.6
112.2

146.7
131.8
13 2.2
115.4
137.9
112.1

147.0
132.2
132.5
115.3
138.2
112.1

147.3
132.5
132.8
115.2
138.5
112.1

10
12
13
138
14

.0
1.4
2 .6
-.6
.7
.9

-.1
.7
2 .5
-1 .0
.8
2 .6

.1
1.8
2 .6
-.4
.7
.0

-4 .3
9.2
1.9
-7 .0
- 2 5 .9
.8

-2 .0
10.9
2.1
-4 .2
-9 .7
.3

-1 .3
4 .8
2.1
- 2 .9
-9 .5
-.2

-.6
2.3
2.1
- 1 .6
-5 .5
-.5

-1 .0
1.3
1.2
-1 .9
-8 .2
-.1

112.0
190.1
128.8
103.2
13 3.5
117.6

111.4
19 2.0
12 9.9
102.2
12 7.0
117.6

111.4
19 2.3
13 0.0
102.0
12 6.0
117.5

111.3
19 2.6
130.2
10 1.9
125.1
117.5

111.2
192.9
130.4
101.7
124.2
117.5

111.2
193.2
130.5
101.6
123.3
117.5

111.1
193.5
130.7
101.4
12 2.4
117.5

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

3.1
4.2
.3

6 .0
7.8
2 .3

1.5
2 .4
-.7

2.3
2 .4
2 .0

.7
1.0
.1

1.8
2 .4
.0

1.0
1.3
.0

1.3
1.7
.0

13 1.8
128.5
14 4.0

13 2.6
12 9.6
14 4.0

132.8
12 9.7
144.0

13 2.9
129.9
14 4.0

13 3.0
130.0
144.0

133.1
130.2
144.0

133.2
130.3
144.0

P rim a ry p ro c e s s in g
A d v a n c e d p ro c e s s in g
D u ra b le
Lum ber and products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Prim ary m etals
Iron and steel
R aw steel
Nonferrous
Prim ary copper
Prim ary aluminum

24
25
32

33
3 3 1 ,2
3 3 3 -6 ,9
3331
3334

34
Fabricated m etal products
Industrial and com m ercial
m achinery and com puter equip. 35
Electrical m achinery
36
T ransportation equipm ent
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks1
A erospace and misc.
Instruments
M iscellaneous
N o n d u ra b le
Foods
Textile mill products
Apparel products
P aper and products
Pulp and paper
Printing and publishing

M in in g
M etal mining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Oil and gas well drilling
Stone and earth m inerals
U tilitie s
Electric
G as
1. Series begins in 1977.




2 .4

Table 5A
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, CAPACITY AND UTILIZATION FOR TOTAL INDUSTRY: HISTORICAL DATA
Seasonally adjusted
Year

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

M ay

June

July

P ro d u c tio n ,
P e rc e n t
C hange1
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985

-.8
- 2 .0

.4
-.5
.8
1.0
.3

-.9
-.6
1.2
.6
.4

.7
-.6
.7
.2

.6
-.3
.6
.5
-.3

1.2
-.6

2 .0
.4

.3
2.1
.0
-.1
.7

1986
1987
1988
1989
1990

.5
“ 3
.3
.3
-.5

-.7
1.4
.2
-.5
.5

-.9
.4
.0
.9
.3

.2
.5
.8
.0
-.7

.0
.6
-.3
“ .3
.7

-.5
.9
.0
-.3
.2

1991
1992
1993

-.2
-.2
.3

-1.1
.8
.5

-.7
.3
.2

.1
.7
.3

.8
.3
-.2

in d u s tria l
P ro d u c tio n
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985

8 5 .2
8 2 .4
8 0 .8
9 1 .0
93.1

85 .4
8 4 .2
8 0 .7
90 .9
93 .8

8 5 .7
8 3 .7
8 1 .3
91 .9
94.1

8 5 .0
83 .2
8 2 .3
9 2 .4
9 4 .5

1986
1987
1988
1989
1990

96.1
96.5
103.2
106.6
105.5

95 .5
97 .9
103.4
106.2
106.1

94 .6
98 .2
103.4
107.1
106.4

94 .8
9 8 .8

1991
1992
1993

104.4
104.5
1 109.3

103.2
10 5.3
109.9

C a p a c ity
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985

104.3
107.8
110.7
113.3
116.0

1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993

D ec.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Annual

-1.1

-.8

-.3
.2
.0
.4

—.9

1.5
-6 .8

.4
-3 .1

5 .7
11.2
2 .4

11.1

6.2
-6 .0
17.8

7.7
3.8

4.0

1.9
-4 .4
3 .7
9.3

.1

- 8 .5
-8 .0
11.2
-3 .4
1.2
5 .8
6.5
3 .0
-.2
-5 .2

.9
4 .9
4 .4

Sep.

Oct.

Nov.

-.5
1.4
.1
.5

-.5
-.7
1.7
- .1
.5

-.8
-.9

-.2

.2
.3
.6
.5
.3

.1
-.2
-.5
-.4
.0

-.6
.2

.2
.8
.3

.1
-.2
.2

8 5 .6
8 2 .7
8 3 .2
9 3 .0
9 4 .7

86.1
82 .4
8 3 .7
9 3 .5
9 4 .4

87.1
8 2 .0
8 5 .3
9 3 .9
94.1

107.1
105.7

9 4 .7
9 9 .4
104.0
10 6.7
106.5

9 4 .3
10 0.3
104.0
106.4
106.7

102.5
105.6
110.1

102.6
106.3
110.4

10 3.3
10 6 .7
110.2

104.6
108.1
110.9
113.5
116.2

104.9
108.3
111.1
113.7
116.5

105.2
108.6
111.3
113.9
116.8

119.2
12 1.6
124.0
125.8
128.2

119.4
121.8
124.1
126.0
12 8.4

119.6
12 2.0
12 4.3
12 6.2
12 8.6

130.5
132.5
134.6

130.7
132.7
134.8

1981
1982
1983
1984
1985

81 .6
7 6 .4
73 .0
8 0 .4
8 0 .3

1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993

Aug.

Industrial

1.9

1.1

1.8

.4
-.3

-.1

.8
-.7
-.8

.7

.5
-.6

1.0

1.3

1.7

2 .4
5 .5
3.8
3 .9
2.1

-3 .4
8.1
3 .0
.3

-.3
.5

- 7 .2
.8
5.5

.3
4 .7
2 .3

5.5
.8
2.6

.3
6 .7

-1 .8

8 4 .8
8 0 .0
8 8 .8
93 .3
9 4 .6

84.1
7 9 .3
8 9 .2
92 .8
9 5 .6

8 5 .5
8 3 .4
8 0 ,9
91 .3
9 3 .6

8 5 .5
8 2 .8
83.1
9 3 .0
9 4 .5

8 6 .8
8 1 .5
8 6 .6
9 3 .9
9 4 .6

8 4 .9
7 9 .8
8 8 .9
93.1
94 .8

8 5 .7
8 1 .9
8 4 .9
9 2 .8
9 4 .4

9 5 .6
102.1
10 5.0
105.0
10 6.3

9 6 .3
102.2
105.6
105.4
105.0

9 6 .8
102.8
106.3
106.1
104.5

9 5 .4
97 ,5
103.3
106.6
106.0

9 4 .6
9 9 .5
104.1
10 6.7
10 6,3

94 .9
100.8
104.8
105.5
10 6.7

96 .2
10 2.3
10 5.6
105.5
10 5.3

9 5 .3
10 0.0
104.4
10 6.0
10 6,0

105.3
10 6.2
111.4

105.1
107.5
112.2

10 5.0
108.4
113.2

104.7

108.9

10 3.3
105.1
109.7

103.4
10 6.3
110,4

10 4.8
106.5

10 4.9
10 8.3

104,1
10 6.5

10 6.4
10 9.5
112.2
114.8
117.9

10 6.7
109.8
112.4
115.0
118.2

1Q7.0
110.0
112.6
115.3
118.4

107.3
110.2
112.8
115.5
118.7

107.6
110.5
113.1
115.7
119.0

104.6
108.1
110.9
113.5
116.2

105,5
108-8
111.6
117,1

106.4
109.5
112.2
114.8
117.9

10 7.3
110.2
112.8
115.5
118.7

10 6.0
10 9.2
111.9
114.5
117.5

12 0.4
12 2.8
12 4.9
12 7.0
12 9.4

12 0.6
12 3.0
12 5.0
12 7.2
12 9.6

12 0.8
123.2
12 5.2
127.4
129.8

121,0
12 3.4
125.3
127.6
129.9

121.2
123.6
125.5
127.8
130.1

12 1.4
123.8
125.6
12 8.0
130.3

119.4
12 1.8
124.1
126.0
128.4

120.0
122.4
124.6
126.6
129.0

120.6
123.0
125.0
127.2
129.6

12 1,2
12 3.6
12 5.5
127.8
130.1

12 0.3
12 2.7
12 4.8
126.9
12 9.3

13 1.4
13 3.4
13 5.5

13 1.5
13 3.6
13 5 .7

13 1.7
13 3.7
13 5.9

131.9
133.9
13 6,0

132.0
134.1
136.2

132.2
134,2
136.4

132.4
13 4.4

13 0.7
132.7
13 4.8

131.2
133.2
135.3

131.7
133.7
135.9

13 2.2
13 4.2

13 1.4
13 3.5

7 6 .0
7 4 .6
8 1 .5
8 0 .9

8 1 .3
7 5 .6
7 4 .9
8 1 .8
8 0 .5

82.1
7 5 .0
76.1
8 1 .9
8 0 .0

8 1 .7
7 4 .5
77.1
8 1 .8
8 0 .2

81.1
73 .8
7 8 .2
8 1 .6
8 0 .4

80 .2
7 3 .0
7 8 .7
8 0 .9
79 ,6

79.1
7 2 .6
7 8 .7
8 0 .8
7 9 .7

78 .2
7 1 .8
7 8 .9
80 .2
8 0 .4

8 1 .7
77 ,2
7 3 .0
80 .4
80 ,6

81.1
76,1
74 .5
81 .4
8 0 .7

81 .6
74 .4
77 .2
81 .8
80 .2

79 .2
7 2 .4
7 8 .8
8 0 .6
7 9 .9

8 0 .9
7 5 .0
75 .8
8 0 .3

79.1
80 .8
83 .8
84 .7
82.1

7 8 .9
8 1 .2
8 3 .5
8 4 .3
8 2 .5

7 8 .4
8 1 .8
8 3 .4
8 3 .9
8 2 .6

7 8 .7
8 1 .9
8 3 .8
8 2 .9
8 2 .3

7 8 .7
$ 2 .0
8 4 .2
8 3 .2
8 2 .4

7 8 .7
8 1 .8
8 3 .6
8 2 .7
8 2 ,3

79.1
8 2 .7
8 3 .8
8 2 .3
8 1 .8

79 .4
8 2 .7
84 .2
8 2 .4
8 0 .7

7 9 .8
83.1
84 .6
82 .8
80 .2

7 9 .9
80.1
83 .2
8 4 .6
8 2 .6

78 .8
8 1 .3
8 3 .6
84 .3
82 .4

7 8 .7
8 1 ,9
83 .9
82 .9
82 .4

7 9 .4
82 .8
8 4 .2
8 2 .5
8 0 .9

79 .2
8 1 .5
8 3 .7
83 .6
82.1

7 8 .3
79 .9
8 1 .7

7 8 .8
80.1
8 1 .5

7 9 .5
79 .5
8 1 .5

7 9 .5
8 0 .0
8 1 .7

7 9 .4
7 9 .7
81 .7

7 9 .9
7 9 .3
81 .9

7 9 .6
80 .2
8 2 .4

79 .4
80 .8
8 3 .0

79.1
81 .0

79.1
7 9 .2
8 1 .4

7 8 .8
7 9 .8
81 .6

79 .6
7 9 .7
81 .8

7 9 .4
8 0 .7

79 .2
7 9 .8

.7
.3
-.4

.1
.6
.4

.6
.7
.6
.7

—.5

-1 .3

-.4

.7
-.4
.4

-.2
1.2
.7

-.1
.9
.9

8 6 .9
8 1 .6
8 6 .5
9 4 .0
9 4 .5

8 6 .5
8 1 .0
8 7 .9
9 3 .9
9 5 .0

8 5 .8
8 0 .3
8 8 .6
93 .2
9 4 .2

9 4 .8
10 0.6
104.6
105.3
10 6.5

9 4 .9
10 0.9
105.2
105.8
10 6.8

9 5 .0
10Q.7
10 4.7
10 5,4
106.8

104.4
10 6.0
110.5

10 4.5
10 6.8
110.8

10 4.6
10 6.6
111.0

10 5.5
108.8

10 5.8
10 9.0

114.2
117.1

114.4
117.3

106.1
10 9 .3
112.0
114.6
117.6

119.8
122.2
12 4.4
126.4
12 8.8

12 0.0
12 2.4
12 4.6
126.6
12 9.0

120.2
12 2.6
12 4 .7
12 6.8
129.2

13 0.8
13 2.9
13 4.9

13 1.0
133.1
135.1

131.2
133.2
13 5.3

81 .7
7 7 .9
72 .8
80.1
8 0 .7

8 1 .7
7 7 .3
73 .2
80 .8
8 0 .7

8 0 .7
7 6 .7
7 3 .9
81.1
8 0 .9

81.1

80 .6
79 .3
8 3 .2
8 4 .8
8 2 .3

79 .9
8 0 .3
8 3 .3
8 4 .3
8 2 .6

79.1
8 0 .5
83 .2
84 .8
82 .8

8 0 .0
7 8 .8
81 .2

7 8 .9
7 9 .3
8 1 .5

78 .3
79.5
81 .6

104,3

1.0

111.6 111.8

.5
.4
.6

-1 .0

1.3

1.1

114.2

5.2
2.9
-4 .4

1.6

111.1

1.5
.0

2 .3

Utilization

1. Q uarterly percent changes are at annual rates. Annual percent changes are calculated from annual averages.




10

81.1

Table 5B
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, CAPACITY AND UTILIZATION FOR MANUFACTURING: HISTORICAL DATA
S easonally ad usted
Year

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

M ay

June

July

Aug.

Sep.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Annual

in d u s tria l
P ro d u c tio n ,
P e rc e n t
C hange1
1981
1982
1983
19 84
19 85

-.5
~ 1 .6
2 .2
2 .3
.1

.6
2 .9
.4
.6
.6

.2
-.7
1.4
.9
.7

-.1
-1 .0
1.0
.4
.3

.7
-.2
1.4
.5

.6

-.2
.0
.8
.6
-.5

.8
-.6
1.5
.4
-.2

-.6
-.6
1.3
.2
.8

-.5
-.6
2.2
-.1
.2

-1 .1
-9
.8
.0
-.7

-1 .0
-.4
.5
.0
1.3

-1 .4
-.5
.1
-.4
.1

2.9
- 4 .9
10.4
13.3
1.7

2 .2
-2 .8
13.8
6 .9
5.1

1.4
-4 .8
17.5
4 .7
1.0

- 1 0 .6
-7 .5
12.5
-.3
2.4

1.9
—
4.6
5.6
10.4
2.6

19 86
1987
1988
1989
1990

1.3
-.6
.2
.8
-.1

-.4
1.7
.1
-.9
.9

-1 .0
.5
.2
.6
.4

.9
.4
.7
.2
-.9

.0
.7
-.1
-.5
.5

-.3
.9
.0
-.2
.0

.6
.4
.5
-1 .2
-.3

.5
.0
.4
.4
.5

.3
.2
.0
-.4
-.1

.7
1.0
.1
-.5
-.6

.5
.4
.9
.3
- 1 .2

1.0
.6
.6
.2
-.5

4 .6
6 .3
3 .6
4 .3
3 .7

.1
8 .6
3 .3
-.3
.2

3 .5
5.6
3 .0
-5 .3
1.0

7.2
6.8
4 .4
-1 .3
-5 .5

2.9
6.0
4 .7
1.6
-.3

1991
1992
1993

-.6
-.2
.7

-1 .1
.9
.5

-1 .0
.6
.3

.7
.4
.6

.4
.5
-.1

1.1
-.5
.0

.2
.5
.3

.3
-.1
.3

1.0
-.2
.4

-.2
1.1
.7

-.2
.8
1.0

-.1
.3

-9 .1
2 .0
6 .4

.9
5 .3
3.4

6.3
1.1
2 .4

1.2
6,5

-2 .2
3.1

In d u s tria l
P ro d u c tio n
1981
1982
19 83
1984
1985

80 .0
76 .6
76 .2
87.1
8 9 .9

8 0 .5
78 .8
76 .5
8 7 .6
90 .4

8 0 .6
78 .2
7 7 .6
8 8 .3
91.1

8 0 .5
7 7 .4
7 8 .3
8 8 .7
9 1 .4

8 1 .0
7 7 .3
79 .4
89.1
9 2 .0

8 0 .9
77 .2
8 0 .0
89 .7
9 1 .5

8 1 .5
76 .8
8 1 .2
90.1
9 1 .3

81.1
7 6 .4
8 2 .3
9 0 .3
9 2 .0

80.6
75.9
84.1
90.2
92.3

79 .7
75.2
84 .7
90.2
91 .6

7 8 .9
74.9
85.1
90 .2
92 .8

77 .9
74 .5
85 .2
89 .8
92 .8

8 0 .4
7 7 .9
7 6 .8
8 7 .7
9 0 .5

8 0 .8
7 7 .3
7 9 .3
8 9 .2
9 1 .6

81.1
76 .4
8 2 .5
90 .2
9 1 .9

7 8 .8
74 .9
8 5 .0
90.1
9 2 .4

8 0 .3
76 .6
8 0 .9
8 9 .3
9 1 .6

1986
1987
1988
1989
1990

9 4 .0
96 .2
103.2
107.7
105.5

93 .6
97 .8
103.4
10 6.7
10 6.5

9 2 .7
9 8 .3
103.6
107.3
10 7.0

93 .5
9 8 .7
104.3
10 7.6
10 6.0

93 .6
9 9 .4
104.2
107.1
106.6

9 3 .3
100.3
104.2
106.8
106.6

9 3 .9
10 0.7
10 4.7
105.5
10 6.3

9 4 .4
100.7
105.1
106.0
106.9

94.6
100.9
105.2
105.6
106.8

95 .3
102.0
105.3
105.1
106.2

95 .8
102.4
106.2
105.4
104.9

96 .7
103.0
106.8
105.6
104.4

9 3 .5
9 7 .4
10 3.4
10 7.2
10 6.3

9 3 .5
9 9 .4
104.2
107.2
10 6.4

9 4 .3
10 0.8
105.0
105.7
106.6

9 5 .9
102.5
106.1
105.4
105.1

9 4 .3
100.0
10 4.7
106.4.
106.1

1991
1992
19 93

103.8
104.5
109.9

102.6
105.4
110.5

101.6
106.1
110.8

102.2
106.5
111.4

102.7
107.1
111.3

103.8
106.5
111.3

104.0
107.1
111.6

104.3
107.0
111.9

105.2
106.8
112.4

105.0
108.0
113.2

104.8
108.9
114.4

104.6
109.2

10 2.7
10 5.3
110.4

10 2.9
10 6.7
111.3

10 4.5
10 7.0
112.0

10 4.8
10 8.7

10 3.7
10 6.9

C a p a c ity
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985

100.2
10 3.9
106.7
109.4
113.1

100.5
104.2
106.9
109.7
113.4

10 0.9
10 4.4
107.2
110.0
113.8

10 1.2
10 4.6
107.4
110.3
114.2

101.5
104.9
10 7.6
110.6
114.6

101.8
105.1
107.8
110.9
115.0

102.1
105.3
108.0
111.2
115.3

102.4
105.6
108.3
111.5
115.7

102.7
105.8
108.5
111.8
116.1

103.0
106.0
108.7
112.1
116.5

103.3
106.3
108.9
112.4
116.9

103.7
106.5
109.1
112.7
117.2

10 0.5
104.2
10 6.9
10 9.7
113.4

10 1.5
10 4.9
10 7.6
110.6
114.6

10 2.4
10 5.6
10 8.3
111.5
115.7

103.3
10 6.3
108.9
112.4
116.9

101.9
105.2
10 7.9
111.1
115.2

1986
19 87
1988
1989
1990

117.6
121.2
124.2
126.6
129.6

117.9
12 1.5
12 4.4
126.9
129.8

118.2
121.7
12 4.6
127.1
13 0.0

118.5
121.9
12 4.8
127.4
13 0.3

118.8
122.2
12 5.0
12 7.6
13 0.5

119.1
12 2.4
125.2
12 7.9
130.7

119.3
122.7
125.4
128.1
130.9

119.6
122.9
125.6
128.4
131.2

119.9
123.2
125.8
128.6
131.4

120.2
123.4
126.0
128.9
131.6

120.5
123.7
126.2
129.1
131.8

120.8
123.9
126.4
129.4
132.0

117.9
12 1.5
12 4.4
12 6.9
12 9.8

118.8
12 2 .2
12 5 .0
12 7.6
13 0.5

119.6
12 2.9
12 5.6
12 8.4
13 1.2

12 0.5
12 3.7
126.2
129.1
13 1.8

119.2
122.6
12 5.3
12 8.0
13 0.8

1991
1992
1993

132.2
134.6
137.0

13 2.4
134.8
137.2

13 2.6
13 5.0
137.4

13 2.8
135.2
137.6

13 3.0
13 5.4
13 7.8

133.2
135.6
138.0

13 3.4
135.8
13 8.3

133.6
13 6.0
138.5

133.8
136.2
138.7

134.0
136.4
138.9

134.2
136.6
139.1

134.4
136.8

13 2.4
13 4.8
13 7.2

13 3.0
13 5.4
13 7.8

13 3.6
13 6.0
13 8.5

134.2
13 6.6

13 3.3
13 5.7

79 .8
7 3 .7
7 1 .4
79 .6
7 9 ,5

8 0 .0
75 .6
7 1 .5
7 9 .9
7 9 .7

79 .9
7 4 .9
7 2 .4
8 0 .3
8 0 .0

79 .6
7 4 .0
7 3 .0
8 0 .4
8 0 .0

7 9 .8
7 3 .7
73 .8
8 0 .6
80 .3

79 .5
7 3 .5
74 .2
8 0 .9
7 9 .6

79 .9
72 .9
75 .2
8 1 .0
79 .2

79.1
72 .3
76 .0
80 .9
79 .5

78.5
71.7
77.5
80 .7
79.5

77 .4
70 .9
77 .9
80 .5
78 .6

76.4
70 .5
78.1
80 .3
79 .4

75.1
70 .0
7 8 .0
7 9 .7
79 .2

7 9 .9
7 4 .7
7 1 .8
79 .9
7 9 .8

7 9 .6
7 3 .7
7 3 .7
8 0 .6
8 0 .0

7 9 .2
7 2 .3
7 6 .2
8 0 .9
7 9 .4

7 6 .3
70 .5
7 8 .0
8 0 .2
79.1

7 8 .8
7 2 .8
7 4 .9
8 0 .4
79 .5

1986
1987
1988
1989
1990

8 0 .0
79J
83.1
85.1
8 1 .4

7 9 .4
8 0 .5
83.1
84.1
6 2 .0

7 8 .5
8 0 .7
83.1
8 4 .5
8 2 .3

7 9 .0
8 1 .0
8 3 .7
8 4 .6
8 1 .4

7 8 .8
8 1 .3
8 3 .4
8 3 .9
8 1 .6

78 .4
8 1 .9
83 .2
83 .5
8 1 .5

78 .7
82.1
8 3 .5
8 2 .4
8 1 .2

78 .9
81 .9
8 3 .7
8 2 .6
81 .5

78.9
81.9
83.6
82.1
81.3

79 .3
82 .6
83 .6
81 .5
8 0 .7

79 .5
82 .8
84 .2
81 .6
79.6

8 0 .0
83.1
84 .5
8 1 .6
79 .0

7 9 .3
80 .2
83.1
8 4 .5
8 1 .9

7 8 .7
8 1 .4
8 3 .4
8 4 .0
8 1 .5

7 8 .8
8 2 .0
8 3 .6
8 2 .4
8 1 .3

7 9 .6
8 2 .8
84.1
8 1 .6
7 9 .8

79.1
8 1 .6
8 3 .6
83.1
81.1

1991
1992
1993

7 8 ,5
77 ,6
8 0 .3

77 5
78 .2
8 0 .5

7 6 .6
7 8 .6
8 0 .6

7 7 .0
7 8 .8
8 0 .9

77 .2
79.1
8 0 .7

7 7 .9
78 .6
8 0 .6

77 .9
7 8 .9
8 0 .7

78 .0
78 .7
8 0 .8

78.6
78.4
81.1

78.4
79 .2
81 .5

78.0
79 .7
82 .2

77 .9
79 .8

7 7 .5
78.1
8 0 .5

7 7 .4
7 8 .8
8 0 .8

7 8 .2
7 8 .7
8 0 .9

78.1
7 9 .6

77 .8
7 8 .8

U tiliz a tio n
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985

1. Quarterly percent changes are at annual rates. Annual percent changes are calculated from annual averages.




1
1

Table 6
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES
Proportion
in total IP

Index. 1987 = 100

:

Not seasonally adjusted

Seasonally adjusted

1993

1993
S IC

1987

1992

M av

June

Julv

Aua.r

S eo.r

O ct.r

M av

June

Julv

A ua.r

SeD.r

O ct.r

10

.33
.06
.28
.09

.51
.06
.44
.12

169.3
134.7
176.3
145.3

164.4
135.9
169.9
142.2

167.7
145.6
172.1
138.0

148.2
74.8
163.0
140.3

157.0
109.8
166.5
143.4

161.7

172.1
144.5
177.7
149.8

169.3
148.7
173.5
145.4

166.4
151.2
169.4
138.6

153.1
76.5
168.4
142.0

159.1
110.9
168.7
145.3

156.7

101
102-4,8,9
102
12

1.23

1.22

106.4

106.7

101.0

95.9

103.9

105.5

100.4

105.6

93.5

102.8

107.5

109.3

13

5.03
4.31
2.51
1.80
.30
.43

91.6
92.5
81.9
110.9
110.7
75.1

93.1
93.2
81.2
114.0
113.3
82.4

91.6
91.6
80.0
111.9
112.8
81.0

92.4
91.7
81.5
109.5
113.4
87.8

93.0
92.2
80.5
112.4
112.3
90.5

93.1
92.5
81.7
111.3
113.1
88.6

89.9
91.0
81.5
107.5
111.1
69.2

90.8
91.3
80.5
109.8
112.5
76.1

89.3
89.0
79.2
106.0
111.3
80.9

89.8
88.8
80.3
103.5
112.1
87.1

91.3
89.9
79.9
107.3
110.5
92.8

94.0
92.8
82.2
111.1
113.9
93.9

Item

Metal mining
Iron ore
Nonferrous ores
C opper

Coal mining

167.2

162.8

Crude oil and natural gas
C rude oil, total
Natural gas
Natural gas liquids
Oil and gas well drilling

132
138

5.79
4.91
3.12
1.80
.29
.58

Stone and earth minerals

14

.67

.59

94.0

91.7

93.2

94.7

95.0

94.4

97.9

98.5

100.1

102.4

100.9

100.3

20

2026

8.80
1.00
.40
.28
.31
.02
.86
.01
.19
.17
.09
.39

8.76
1.07
.36
.32
.38
.01
.82
.01
.21
.15
.10
.34

106.7
114.6
97.2
119.0
134.6
84.2
102.6
112.3
119.8
96.4
121.5
92.4

107.1
120.3
99.4
124.8
144.6
92.5
102.7
115.3
120.3
94.7
119.9
93.4

107.2
116.2
98.6
123.0
134.2
85.5
103.7
112.4
121.1
98.5
120.1
93.5

107.8
117.6
100.1
122.0
137.8
86.9
101.5
107.6
119.4
91.5
121.3
92.4

107.7
117.8
99.6
117.5
143.7
80.8
100.9
102.5
120.2
91.5
118.3
91.6

108.3
115.4
98.4
118.6
136.7
74.9
103.1
104.9
123.5
97.7
119.2
91.8

104.3
112.8
96.9
111.7
136.0
79.2
110.8
119.2
124.1
112.9
137.7
97.0

109.2
121.0
104.8
115.1
149.4
87.4
110.9
105.1
125.1
106.7
152.5
96.4

108.6
111.8
99.3
107.3
134.0
77.5
105.4
86.3
118.0
98.0
147.6
93.2

114.5
119.7
105.5
116.1
143.2
82.5
99.3
80.0
115.7
80.1
142.2
90.3

114.8
120.4
103.6
120.2
144.6
80.8
95.0
81.0
116.5
72.7
120.2
88.8

114.1
122.3
103.3
125.7
145.9
79.2
95.3
94.6
121.4
79.1
103.6
88.0

203
204
205
206
207
208
2082,3
2086,7
209
2095

1.25
1.11
1.10
.62
.23
1.64
.54
.86
.99
.19

1.37
1.10
.93
.63
.26
1.62
.56
.84
.97
.16

119.2
104.2
91.6
101.8
121.3
107.0
122.4
99.8
103.9
100.4

122.9
104.0
92.1
104.3
123.7
104.9
113.8
103.3
101.4
83.9

122.1
104.8
93.3
105.2
120.7
104.0
110.9
103.7
104.1
97.0

121.1
106.5
92.5
105.1
125.4
106.3
116.6
104.3
105.3
93.0

121.7
106.3
92.7
103.5
126.3
106.2

121.8
108.2
92.8
105.0
125.4
106.5

124.5
103.2
100.5
92.5
113.2
111.6
121.6
114.9
107.1
75.2

141.0
109.2
101.9
100.6
120.4
116.1
124.2
119.8
113.1
92.4

142.6
111.0
96.4
127.5
131.3
108.3

104.3
105.8
97.0

119.2
104.9
96.5
93.4
122.2
113.8
126.9
110.6
101.5
74.8

148.3
110.1
102.0
109.7
124.7
112.5

104.4
104.1
90.7

110.7
102.7
89.1
88.6
117.9
107.9
128.9
97.8
101.1
89.6

115.3
107.5
91.9

107.9
106.1
96.5

21

1.03

.96

92.1

89.1

91.5

92.7

94.6

95.9

88.3

96.7

76.1

98.3

101.2

105.7

22
Fabrics
221-4
Cotton and synthetic
221,2
N arrow fabrics
224
Knit goods
225
Knit garm ents
2253,4,7-9
Fabric finishing
226
Carpeting
227
Yarns and m iscellaneous
228,9
Cotton and synthetic yarns
2281,2,4

1.85
.53
.45
.04
.45
.33
.17
.22
.48
.28

1.82
.52
.45
.04
.48
.35
.15
.20
.47
.26

106.9
103.7
104.2
103.0
113.2
114.6
93.0
108.8
108.8
106.1

107.1
108.0
109.5
101.9
114.3
116.1
93.2
105.4
105.6
101.2

107.7
108.3
109.4
102.1
112.8
114.3
97.4
107.2
105.4
101.4

107.4
107.6
108.4
100.4
113.9
96.1
106.5
107.1
103.1

105.4
102.3
102.1
99.9
113.1
114.6
89.0
102.4
108.5
103.4

106.4
102.5
102.7
98.1
113.7
115.1
89.3
104.4
109.9
105.8

109.6
107.7
107.9
102.2
114.8
117.2
96.9
108.5
111.6
111.3

111.7
109.5
110.4.
103.8
125.8
129.3
95.8
108.7
108.0
104.2

104.0
99.8
99.8
97.9
114.6
117.9
86.5
111.6
101.4
95.6

111.4
108.8
110.4
100.8
123.1
131.4
98.8
107.7
109.5
106.1

109.5
102.1
102.9
100.3
125.7
131.8
90.0
105.2
111.1
106.2

111.1
105.3
107.1
97.9
121.9
120.4
92.5
112.9
112.8
109.9

89.5

89.1

90.5

93.2

89.4

93.3

92.4

90.9

100.9
92.9
78.0
106.4
94.8
87.0
120.6

102.4
94.3
74.4
108.0
95.4
86.2
127.7

98.0
89.5
70.9
103.8
91.5
86.4
121.2

100.9
92.3
75.8
106.9
93.1
86.6
129.4

98.6
91.4
79.0
103.6
93.7
83.9
114.2

104.6
97.2
80.6
109.7
96.6
88.7
136.3

104.3
96.1
82.5
109.9
96.9
89.8
134.3

106.1
98.3
81.7
111.4
97.7
91.4
142.0

Oil and gas extraction

Foods
M e at products
B eef
Pork
Poultry
Miscellaneous m eats
Dairy products
Butter
C heese
C oncentrated milk
Frozen desserts
Milk and misc. dairy products
C anned and frozen food
Grain mill products
Bakery products
Sugar and confectionery
Fats and oils
B everages
B eer and ale
Soft drinks
Coffee and m iscellaneous
R oasted coffee

Tobacco products

131

201

202
2021
2022
2023
2024

Textile mill products

112.3

Apparel products

23

2.33

2.02

91.2

91.1

90.7

90.6

Lumber and products

24

Logging and lumber
Logging
Lum ber products
Millwork and plywood
Plywood
M anufactured homes

241,2
241
243-5,9
243
2435,6
245

2.07
.85
.29
1.22
.72
.20
.18

1.87
.74
.21
1.14
.60
.16
.17

97.4
90.5
73.1
101.9
90.4
85.2
112.1

96.5
88.5
73.4
102.3
89.9
85.8
113.6

99.1
92.8
74.7
103.5
90.9
85.8
118.5

99.9
94.0
75.3
104.2
92.5
86.0
116.2




12

Table 6 (continued)
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES
Index. 1987 = 100

Proportion
in total IP

Seasonallvadiusted

Not seasonally adiusted

1993

1993
S IC

1987

1992

M av

June

Julv

A ua.r

S eo.r

O ct.r

M av

June

Julv

A ua.r

SeD.r

O ct.r

25
251

1.47
.69

1.36
.65

108.4
108.9

109.5
110.4

111.1
110.8

111.1
108.9

111.3
108.9

111.4 106.3
110.2 .109.3

111.3
113.7

106.6
101.0

116.7
114.2

117.3
114.0

114.2
113.5

26
261-3
261
262
263
265,7
265
267

3.65
1.68
.16
1.01
.50
1.97
.71
1.26

3.71
1.73
.17
1.04
.52
1.98
.74
1.23

112.1
113.2
107.6
113.4
114.5
111.1
116.5
108.1

114.2
115.1
107.0
116.0
115.8
113.4
115.0
112.5

112.0
112.1
103.3
113.1
113.0
111.8
116.6
109.1

113.1
112.7
105.0
114.1
112.5
113.3
118.9
110.2

111.3
112.7
107.0
111.8
116.4
110.2
116.7
106.6

111.6
112.0

109.3
110.0
103.2
110.0
112.4
108.7
114.6
105.5

114.7
115.5
106.9
116.0
117.2
114.1
117.6
112.2

109.9
110.5
105.8
110.5
112.1
109.4
116.5
105.4

114.1
113.0
103.3
114.4
113.3
115.0
122.2
111.0

112.3
113.3
105.6
112.9
116.7
111.5
119.1
107.2

115.5
113.6
113.4
115.9
117.2
132.3
108.6

27

271
N ew spapers
Periodicals, books, and cards 272,3,7
Job printing
2 7 4 -6 ,8 ,9

6.51
1.76
1.79
2.97

5.81
1.36
1.67
2.78

94.7
81.1
99.5
99.9

94.5
80.4
100.4
98.7

93.8
79.9
99.2
98.8

93.4
79.2
97.8
99.2

93.7
79.4
99.4
98.8

99.0

93.0
81.7
98.9
96.2

96.1
80.7
99.2
103.3

96.3
74.6
98.4
107.8

99.1
77.8
97.2
112.9

99.4
81.8
96.9
111.3

96.4
84.7
96.1
103.5

28

8.76

9.46

118.1

119.1

118.7

119.1

118.5

118.4

117.2

123.0

123.1

124.7

125.2

119.7

281,2,6
281
2812
2816
2819

3.66
.81
.05
.10
.54
.33

3.97
.98
.05
.11
.69
.41

119.3
127.6
108.3
106.8
131.5
131.8

120.7
128.5
106.9
116.9
131.2
132.5

119.3
126.3
106.3
108.3
130.6
135.7

120.4
124.6
110.6
118.1
126.4
137.3

119.0
123.7
106.4
110.5
127.1
137.4

120.2
126.6
108.6
110.3
131.0

118.5
126.9
105.5
110.3
129.9
126.8

122.0
130.9
107.7
119.4
134.1
136.6

118.6
124.7
109.7
108.2
128.0
132.6

119.7
126.5
110.6
113.3
130.2
142.8

121.5
125.8
107.8

12 0.8

129.7
141.7

282
2821
2823,4
286

1.29
.79
.41
1.56

1.33
.80
.43
1.66

114.1
111.8
114.2
119.2

116.2
113.4
117.8
120.4

114.2
111.5
114.7
119.9

116.6
112.6
120.3
121.3

113.3
111.6
113.4
121.3

113.6
111.0
122.5

113.1
111.5
112.8
118.7

117.6
114.1
121.4
121.0

113.4
110.7
115.3
119.8

114.6
111.1
118.1
120.4

116.1
114.2
116.1
123.7

115.5
121.8

283-5,9
283
284
285
287

4.65
2.04
1.57
.45
.46

4.95
2.47
1.54
.40
.53

115.9
136.8
104.1
92.4
129.2

116.4
135.5
106.8
92.1
129.2

117.3
138.0
105.6
91.2
130.3

117.0
139.9
102.9
90.6
129.1

117.1
139.0
104.5
90.2
127.9

115.9
136.8
105.0
90.1
127.9

114.8
134.9
101.5
100.6
130.4

123.3
145.1
110.5
105.9
128.9

126.2
150.4
113.6
98.3
127.3

128.4
155.7
111.8
99.5
127.0

127.8
156.4
111.4
95.2
129.0

118.1
140.6
105.8
90.4
128.0

29

1.34
1.13
.23
.20
.05
.11
.54
.21

1.28
1.10
.21
.05
.10
.53
.18

103.6
105.7
101.7
108.5
104.8
107.3
106.0
94.2

103.9
105.4
102.0
112.7
90.8
116.2
103.4
95.6

102.5
104.1
103.2
114.4
91.0
105.4
101.5
94.3

102.4
103.2
107.7
112.6
86.4
96.2
100.8
97.7

104.3
105.7
103.9
115.8
99.0
94.2
105.6
96.6

106.9
109.3
104.6
124.2
95.5
92.1
110.5
94.1

104.6
106.3
108.0
107.4
101.2
102.1
106.5
95.5

108.9
109.8
117.1
113.4
90.0
110.9
107.1
103.6

109.0
109.9
120.7
116.8
85.9
106.4
105.7
104.3

108.3
108.5
123.3
113.1
84.2
98.0
104.9
107.6

109.5
109.9
117.7
117.5
92.9
97.9
107.7
107.3

108.3
108.8
105.0
127.3
87.7
95.0
108.2
105.9

30
301
302,5,6
308

3.21
.40
.56
2.25

3.31
.45
.54
2.31

113.8
132.4
104.1
112.7

112.8
125.2
103.5
113.0

114.7
129.9
105.0
114.3

114.8
131.8
104.6
114.4

113.9
124.7
103.3
114.6

113.5
125.5
102.7
113.9

113.8
132.5
103.2
113.1

115.2
127.0
107.7
115.0

110.1
109.6
103.9
111.7

115.4
133.5
107.9
114.1

115.0
128.8
106.9
114.5

116.0
134.8
106.1
115.2

31
314

.32
.16

.28
.13

98.2
94.3

97.0
91.7

96.8
92.2

97.0
94.4

98.2
96.4

98.8
98.5

97.6
94.2

100.3
95.4

93.6
91.5

99.8
97.9

100.4
98.1

100.7
98.9

32
322
3221
324
325
326-9

2.41
.37
.20
.17
.13
1.43

2.17
.35
.18
.14
.11
1.25

99.6
101.3
91.1
90.0
105.9
97.8

100.5
104.5
94.8
96.2
106.4
97.8

100.8
105.3
98.0
97.5
95.9
98.4

100.9
101.1
92.3
99.5
89.9
99.2

102.4
104.8
96.1
97.7
88.4
100.3

101.3
101.0
91.7

100,9
105.5
96.0
98.8
106.3
97.5

103.6
107.7
100.4
116.2
109.2
99.0

102.0
108.4
102.1
112.1
90.6
98.7

105.1
105.7
97.7
120.8
94.7
101.6

105.1
105.0
95.4
116.4
93.2
101.8

105.9
105.3
96.5

Item

Furniture and fixtures
Household furniture
P a p e r and products
Pulp and paper
W ood pulp
P aper
Paperboard
P aper products
Paperboard containers
Converted paper products

Printing and publishing

Chemicals and products
Industrial chem icals and
synthetic m aterials
Basic chem icals
Alkalies and chlorine
Inorganic pigments
Inorganic chem icals, nec
Acids and other
Synthetic m aterials
Plastics m aterials
Synthetic fibers
Industrial organic chem icals
C hem ical products
Drugs and m edicines
S oap and toiletries
Paints
Agricultural chem icals

Petroleum products

Petroleum refining and misc.
291,9
M iscellaneous petroleum products
Distillate fuel oil
Residual fuel oil
Aviation fuel and kerosene
Autom otive gasoline
Paving and roofing m aterials
295

Rubber and plastics products
Tires
O ther rubber products
Plastics products, nec

Leather and products
Shoes

Stone, clay, and glass products
Pressed and blown glass
Glass containers
C em ent
Structural clay products
Concrete and m iscellaneous




.22

13

110.9
115.7
111.2
120.5
105.9
93.6
79.0
98 .9

90.5
99.3

112.0

125.1
107.6
105.6
130.1
116.8

96.9
102.6

Ta

> 6 'continued)
_ : ;L PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES

in ;

Index. 1 9 8 7 = 1 0 0

Proportion
in total IP
Item
P rim a ry m e ta ls
Iron and steel
Basic steel and mill products
Basic iron and steel
Pig iron
R aw steel

S easonallvadiusted

Not seasonallv adjusted
O ct.r

1993
M av

June

S IC

19 87

1992

1993
M av

33
3 3 1 ,2
331

3 .3 3
1.93
1.48
.35
.20
.10

3.1 6
1.90
1.49
.34
.20
.10

104.2
108.1
111.7
106.0
111.1
105.1

105.7
110.9
115.3
105.9
110.1
106.8

105.3
111.9
116.6
106.6
110.0
108.2

10 6.2
112.1
117.2
106.2
110.0
10 6.2

105.8
111.1
115.1
105.6
109.2
10 5.3

106.1
112.3
117.0
10 8.5
113.6
10 6.7

10 4.8
108.9
112.6
106.2
111.0
107.1

10 7.3
112.7
116.5
105.5
109.5
10 7.2

10 2.9
110.0
115.1
105.5
110.2
10 4.6

10 4.8
110.1
115.3
105.2
10 9.7
10 3.6

10 7.7
113.4
117.5
10 5.9
109.9
10 4.8

107.5
113.7
117.7
108.8
113.3
10 7.9

1.15
.18
.12
.12
.05
.68
.41

113.5
105.9
95 .0
119.9
92.0
120.9
95.8

118.2
112.2
103.5
126.0
97 .7
123.8
96.0

119.8
103.2
106.8
126.8
111.9
127.2
96.5

12 0.7
112.9
10 4.2
124.9
101.5
127.9
95 .0

118.1
10 9.7
105.9
12 6.4
10 0.3
123.6
97 .8

119.7
111.6
10 5.6
12 7.0
9 2 .8
12 6.5
9 7 .0

114.5
113.3
96 .8
121.6
98 .4
119.1
96 .9

119.9
115.7
10 2.3
12 7.7
10 6.3
124.9
100.2

118.1
90 .2
100.1
13 0.2
117.6
12 8.6
93.1

118.4
111.1
99 .4
128.8
105.1
12 4.3
9 3 .0

12 1.0
115.4
10 4.4
132.1
10 0.4
12 6.4
10 0.0

120.5
121.1
103.3
131.7
86 .6
12 5.3
100.2

June

Juiv

A ua.r

S eo.r

Julv _Au9..r . S e p ;

O ct.r

S teel mill products
C onsum er durable steel
Equipm ent steel
Construction steel
C an and closure steel
M iscellaneous steel
Iron and steel foundries

332

1.13
.19
.14
.12
.06
.62
.45

N onferrous m etals
Prim ary nonferrous m etals
C opper
Alum inum

3 3 3 -6 ,9
333
3331
3334

1.40
.22
.03
.14

1.27
.24
.03
.16

98.9
118.2
118.0
114.0

98 .5
121.0
125.8
114.2

96 .3
108.6
114.1
111.8

9 8 .0
10 9.3
109.8
106.9

9 8 .6
117.1
115.6
106.6

9 7 .6
112.8
109.2
10 6.8

99.1
117.6
114.9
114.4

10 0.0
118.3
12 2.7
114.4

93.1
106.2
109.1
111.2

9 7 .6
10 7.7
112.1
106.1

9 9 .8
116.8
119.6
10 5.7

9 9 .0
114.6
112.6
106.6

N onferrous products
Nonferrous mill products
Alum inum
N onferrous foundries

3 3 5 ,6
33 5
3 3 5 3 -5
336

.99
.75
.24
.25

.82
.61
.22
.21

91.6
91.3
102.6
92.5

91.3
91.2
92.8
91 .9

91 .3
91 .3
102.1
91 .4

92 .9
93 .0
100.0
9 2 .6

92 .9
92 .2
108.1
9 4 .9

9 1 .8
9 0 .7
104.1
9 5 .2

92 .3
92.1
104.6
9 2 .8

9 3 .3
9 3 .3
96 .9
9 3 .3

8 8 .4
8 8 .7
101.5
8 7 .5

92 .5
93.1
100.6
90 .9

93 .9
94.1
106.5
93 .2

93 .0
9 2 .2
105.3
95 .7

34
F a b ric a te d metal products
341
M etal containers
3411
M eta! cans
342
H ardw are, tools, and cutlery
3 4 2 3 ,5 ,9
H ardw are and tools
344
Structural m etal products
O th er fabricated m etal products 3 4 5 -9
3 4 5 -7
Fasteners, stampings, etc.

5.4 2
.30
.28
.58
.52
1.35
2 .9 8
1.63

4.9 2
.31
.28
.50
.45
1.19
2.7 3
1.50

100.6
113.1
114.1
94.1
92.8
95.8
103.2
108.0

100.1
107.0
107.4
93.9
92.5
96 .5
102.5
106.2

101.2
110.2
110.5
94 .4
93.2
96 .9
103.7
107.9

101.0
109.8
109.9
94 .9
93 .7
9 7 .5
103.3
107.1

101.1
107.1
106.9
94 .9
9 4 .3
98 .9
103.0
10 7.5

101.6
10 6.8

102.8
126.8
12 8.7
9 6 .3
95 .2
9 7 .7
104.4
109.8

10 0.8
120.5
12 1.4
94 .5
9 3 .6
9 8 .2
101.4
106.3

103.1
125.3
126.6
98.1
97 .2
10 0.0
103.5
108.8

103.4
114.5
115.1
9 9 .2
9 9 .0
9 9 .9
104.5
111.0

103.3
9 6 .7

9 4 .0
93.1
9 9 .7
103.6
108.6

100.6
124.8
126.5
92 .2
90 .9
95.1
102.7
107.4

97 .2
96 .5
102.1
106.1
112.7

In d u s tria l and commercial
m a c h in e ry and computer equip. 35
351
Engines and turbines
352
Farm
Construction and allied
353
354
Metalworking
Special industry m achinery
355
G eneral industrial m achinery
356
Bearings and gears
3 5 6 2 ,6 ,8
Equipm ent
3 5 6 1 ,3 -5 ,7 ,9
C om puter and office equip.
357
Service industry m achines
358
359
M iscellaneous m achinery

8.5 4
.51
.41
.82
1.00
.70
1.00
.32
.67
2 .3 4
.83
.95

10.01
.51
.46
.78
1.02
.70
1.04
.29
.75
3.6 9
.79
1.02

144.2
112.3
132.6
111.4
118.3
113.2
114.9
100.0
122.0
21 6.5
113.4
124.5

145.4
112.6
136.7
112.1
118.2
113.9
116.8
98 .7
125.5
2 2 1 .0
108.2
123.6

148.5
114.6
137.1
114.9
120.0
115.6
117.7
101.7
125.4
22 6.5
111.3
127.0

149.9
112.0
141.8
114.0
119.8
117.7
116.5
100.3
124.3
2 3 2 .0
111.4
127.1

151.8
117.2
14 1.8
116.1
119.0
118.9
115.0
9 8 .0
123.2
2 3 6 .4
113.4
12 7.6

153.1
115.5
14 4.8
116.9
119.0
118.3
114.1
98 .5
121.5
2 4 1 .0
116.0
12 6.4

142.2
111.5
13 7.0
111.2
114.9
112.8
113.2
99 .6
119.8
2 1 0 .2
118.3
121.7

15 0.0
111.1
136.9
112.7
121.4
113.8
119.1
98 .9
128.8
23 0 .4
118.8
127.5

151.5
113.6
12 4.3
113.8
12 3.8
111.9
118.6
9 7 .9
128.5
2 3 4 .2
119.6
133.2

157.4
109.5
13 1.3
112.9
127.2
114.9
118.6
96 .9
128.9
253.1
116.4
136.9

155.6
115.3
13 1.8
114.8
127.0
116.3
119.2
97 .0
129.8
2 4 3 .8
118.5
13 5.3

155.4
116.0
138.2
116.4
121.1
117.8
115.1
97 .2
123.7
2 4 9 .6
113.2
12 8.3

M ajor electrical and parts
Electric distribution equip.
Household appliances
Cooking equipm ent
R efrigerators and freezers
Laundry
M iscellaneous
Electrical housew ares
Appliances, nec

36
3 6 1 ,2
361
363
3631
3632
3633
3 6 3 4 ,5 ,9
3634
3639

6 .9 2
.97
.33
.54
.09
.10
.10
.24
.10
.09

7.7 9
.95
.30
.54
.08
.11
.10
.24
.10
.08

129.7
106.2
93.8
116.6
106.1
119.9
112.6
121.0
114.1
102.8

130.1
106.9
93 .3
111.6
96.8
105.4
112.8
119.5
113.3
100.3

132.3
106.4
95.9
118.0
100.5
111.9
135.3
120.1
116.2
107.2

133.5
108.2
98 .7
111.9
88.1
118.5
113.5
117.5
119.4
100.7

13 5.4
108.5
98 .3
117.0
93 .6
12 7.8
117.7
120.9
124.1
104.1

136.9
107.6
9 8 .0
120.9
9 8 .8
129.4
124.1
12 4.3
125.7
110.2

128.5
104.4
90 .7
117.1
102.2
133.3
120.5
114.3
111.9
103.3

131.0
110.9
98 .0
115.4
88 .4
125.9
120.4
119.1
114.0
107.4

12 8.4
110.1
98.1
10 4.2
8 0 .8
113.6
94.1
113.4
110.5
88.1

134.3
113.2
105.8
112.6
94 .8
98 .0
119.0
123.1
121.9
99 .6

137.0
113.0
104.4
121.1
96 .3
12 8.2
12 1.3
127.4
128.3
106.8

139.1
108.4
9 9 .9
130.9
122.9
131.9
133.8
13 2.3
136.9
122.8

Audio and video equipm ent
C om m unication equipm ent
Electronic com ponents
Misc. electrical supplies
S torage batteries

365
366
367
369
3691

.22
1.44
2 .2 3
.78
.12

.26
1.61
2.9 5
.82
.10

143.3
125.0
160.0
116.7
92.8

139.5
127.2
161.2
116.2
86 .0

172.0
127.6
163.2
117.3
91.3

168.5
127.2
167.5
115.8
89 .6

162.2
127.9
171.9
117.1
91 .8

164.2
125.9
177.1
117.5

140.8
124.5
159.7
112.7
78 .3

140.3
124.9
161.7
115.4
8 4 .7

132.6
124.1
15 9.7
112.1
85 .4

185.0
126.5
166.6
117.4
102.0

184.6
126.4
170.2
120.4
114.8

179.9
126.5
177.4
122.0

Transportation equipment

37
371

3714
3716

9 .9 0
4 .7 9
1.62
1.22
1.13
.63
.51
1.91
.05

9.54
4.7 2
1.39
1.40
1.32
.75
.57
1.89
.04

105.5
118.1
98.4
146.2
147.8
150.9
144.0
117.7
90.7

102.6
114.3
95 .0
138.4
139.7
142.3
136.4
115.8
91 .4

100.8
110.1
88.9
133.4
133.6
138.6
127.4
113.7
97.1

100.4
110.0
8 1 .7
141.6
142.9
146.7
138.2
114.1
100.1

102.1
114.3
85 .7
149.5
150.8
153.9
147.0
116.6
97.4

106.1
12 3.7
96 .8
161.4
16 3.3
166.4
159.4
122.7
113.2

109.5
127.4
111.4
161.6
163.8
167.4
159.4
120.0
94 .0

108.5
126.3
109.8
162.3
164.9
168.8
160.0
118.2
92.1

88.1
8 6 .8
58.1
91 .2
89 .4
91 .3
87.1
108.2
97 .4

99 .6
110.6
82 .6
143.8
144.8
148.5
140.2
113.4
97 .7

103.2
117.4
88 .4
157.2
15 8.6
163.3
152.9
117.3
95 .3

111.4
134.4
112.2
182.5
18 5.4
191.3
178.2
123.0
117.9

3 7 2 -6 ,9
37 2
373
3 7 4 -6 ,9

5.11
2 .9 5
.55
1.61

4.8 2
2.9 9
.49
1.34

93 .7
96.9
91.9
88 .2

91.8
95 .3
90.6
85 .6

92.0
95.5
91.1
85.8

91 .3
94 .8
91 .8
84 .9

90 .6
94 .3
90 .8
83 .6

89 .5
92 .5
90.1
83 .8

92 .8
96 .3
9 1 .6
8 6 .8

91 .7
95 .4
89 .9
8 5 .6

89 .3
91 .9
89 .6
8 4 .4

89 .4
92 .4
89 .6
83 .6

8 9 .9
93 .6
89 .6
8 3 .3

89 .8
91 .9
91 .2
8 5 .3

Electrical machinery

Motor vehicles and parts
Autos
Trucks and truck trailers
Trucks and buses
C on sum er trucks
Business vehicles
M otor vehicle parts
M otor hom es
A erospace and m iscellaneous
transportation equipm ent
Aircraft and parts
Ships and boats
Railroad and m iscellaneous




I ~Y

Table 6 (continued)
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES
Index. 1£ 8 7 = 1 0 0

Proportion
in total IP

S easonallvadiusted

........ ....... ,............. ..
Not seasonally adjusted

S IC

1987

1992

19 93
M av

June

Julv

Aua.r

Sep.r

O ct.r

19 93
M av

June

Julv

A ua.r

S eo .r

O ct.r

38
3 8 1 -4
384

5 .1 3
4 .0 7
1.06

5.0 2
4.01
1.34

102.5
10 3.4
14 2.8

10 2.5
103.7
144.1

10 2.8
10 4.0
14 6.5

101.3
102.3
141.1

101.8
102.6
143.8

101.2
102.0
141.7

101.0
10 1.7
13 8.3

10 3 .7
10 4.9
14 9.2

10 3 .6
1 0 5 .0
15 5.6

103.2
10 4 .7
15 3 .8

10 3.7
10 5.2
154.9

10 2 .3
10 3 .5
14 8.0

M is c. m a n u fa c tu re s
C onsum er goods
Business supplies

39
3 9 1 ,3 ,4 ,6
3 9 5 ,9

1.26
.65
.61

1.30
.66
.63

113.1
111.4
114.5

112.1
110.4
113.6

112.3
110.0
114.8

112.5
109.9
115.2

114.3
111.5
117.4

113.6
110.8
116.7

112.2
110.7
113.7

112.6
110.4
115.1

10 9.2
10 4.2
114.4

113.8
10 9.8
118.0

116.0
113.3
118.9

118.0
116.6
119.4

E le c tric u tilitie s
Generation
Fossil fuel
Hydro and nuclear

4 9 1 ,3p t

6 .0 7
2 .5 7
1.46
1.11

6 .3 6
2 .6 9
1.42
1.26

114.0
114.4
9 7 .5
13 6.7

115.6
115.7
10 5.8
12 8.8

118.1
117.1
111.8
124.1

118.9
116.5
114.2
119.5

115.1
113.0
106.3
121.8

115.4
113.2

10 6.3
108.6
9 0 .0
133.1

118.3
122.1
111.1
13 6 .7

13 1 .7
13 0.2
12 7 .6
13 3 .7

13 2 .2
12 7.6
12 8 .2
12 6 .7

119.4
112.7
110.5
115.7

10 8.8
10 4 .4

3 .5 0
1.42
2 .0 8
1.16
.92

3 .6 7
1.46
2.21
1.23
.98

113.7
110.0
116.3
115.7
117.0

115.5
113.8
116.7
116.4
117.1

118.9
12 0.5
117.8
118.2
117.3

120.7
124.4
118.2
119.6
116.3

116.7
117.3
116.3
117.0
115.4

117.0

104.6
9 1 .9
113.3
110.3
117.1

115.4
10 8.2
12 0.4
12 0.4
12 0.3

13 2 .8
14 0.4
12 7 .7
13 2.8
12 1.2

13 5.5
14 4.4
12 9.5
13 4 .4
12 3 .3

124.3
125.5
123.4
126.9
119.0

112.0

1.64
.56
.26
.56

1.74
.57
.27
.60

104.9
10 2.0
109.2
105.0

112.2
10 8.3
114.9
113.4

112.4
10 4.6
115.8
116.0

113.3
104.9
111.1
118.8

116.0
108.2
115.2
120.8

116.4

8 2 .8
6 6 .5
7 8 .5
90 .3

7 2 .9
4 5 .3
6 2 .2
8 6 .9

7 3 .3
3 5 .9
6 0 .8
9 2 .4

7 2 .4
3 3 .4
5 6 .8
9 3 .0

74 .3
39 .5
60 .8
92 .6

Item
In s tru m e n ts
Scientific and medical
Medical instruments

Sales
Residential
Nonresidential
Com m ercial and other
Industrial
G as u tilitie s
Residential
Com m ercial and other
G as transmission

4 9 2 ,3p t

116.5

117.2

9 0 .3

Table 7
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: GROSS VALUE OF PRODUCTS
Billions of 1987 dollars at annual rates, seasonally ad usted
1987

1992

1992
Q2

Q3

Q4

1993
Q1

Q2

Q 3r

1993
June

July

Aug/

S ep .r

O ct.r

Nov.P

17 07.0

1 8 06.4

18 04.6

1803.1

1 8 46.6

1875.1

1876.2

1882.2

1873.2

18 7 7 .4

1 8 7 9 .3

18 9 0 .0

1 9 13.4

1938.1

1 3 14.6

1420.1

1 4 17.3

14 1 6 .7

14 5 7 .3

14 82.2

1480.3

1483.8

14 77.5

14 7 9 .0

14 8 0 .5

1 4 92.0

1 5 15.6

15 3 6 .9

C onsum er goods
Durable
Autom otive products
O ther durable goods
N ondurable

8 6 6 .6
226.1
114.9
111.2
6 4 0 .5

9 1 3 .0
2 3 4 .2
113.0
12 1.2
6 7 8 .8

9 1 3 .8
2 3 6 .5
114.5
122.0
6 7 7 .3

9 0 8 .6
2 3 2 .8
111.8
12 1.0
6 7 5 .8

932.1
243.1
12 0.6
12 2.5
6 8 9 .0

9 4 5 .2
2 5 6 .3
129.1
12 7.3
6 8 8 .8

93 8 .4
2 5 3 .8
125.2
128.6
68 4 .6

937.1
24 9 .8
118.3
131.6
68 7.2

93 5 .5
2 4 8 .3
120.7
127.6
6 8 7 .3

9 3 5 .5
2 4 9 .9
117.5
13 2.4
6 8 5 .6

9 3 5 .6
2 4 8 .4
116.8
13 1 .6
6 8 7 .3

940.1
2 5 1 .2
12 0.5
13 0.7
6 8 8 .8

957.1
2 6 2 .3
130.1
132.2
6 9 4 .8

9 7 0 .0
2 7 1 .9
13 8.4
13 3.4
6 9 8 .2

Equipm ent, total
Business and defense
Business
D efense and space

4 4 8 .0
4 3 0 .5
3 3 5 .4
95.1

507.1
4 9 2 .0
4 1 4 .6
7 7 .4

5 0 3 .5
4 8 9 .3
4 1 0 .9
7 8 .4

508.1
4 9 3 .4
4 1 7 .2
7 6 .2

5 2 5 .2
5 0 7 .9
433.1
7 4 .9

5 3 7 .0
5 2 0 .2
4 4 7 .0
73 .2

54 1 .9
526.1
4 5 4 .9
71.1

5 4 6 .7
52 9.5
4 5 9 .7
69.8

54 1.9
52 5.5
45 5 .2
70 .3

5 4 3 .4
5 2 6 .8
4 5 6 .5
7 0 .3

5 4 4 .9
5 2 7 .7
4 5 7 .9
6 9 .8

5 5 1 .9
534.1
4 6 4 .8
6 9 .3

5 5 8 .5
5 4 0 .5
4 7 1 .6
6 8 .9

5 6 6 .9
5 4 9 .0
4 8 0 .3
6 8 .7

3 9 2 .5
162.7
2 2 9 .8
6 0 .3

3 8 6 .4
15 3.4
2 3 2 .9
6 5 .3

3 8 7 .3
15 3.6
2 3 3 .7
6 5 .6

3 8 6 .4
15 3.7
2 3 2 .7
65.1

3 8 9 .2
15 5.3
2 3 3 .9
6 6 .7

3 9 3 .0
157.1
2 3 5 .9
6 8 .3

39 5 .9
158.6
2 3 7 .3
67 .7

39 8 .4
161.8
23 6.6
67 .0

3 9 5 .7
158.4
2 3 7 .3
68 .4

3 9 8 .4
16 0.9
2 3 7 .5
6 7 .7

3 9 8 .8
16 1.8
2 3 7 .0
6 7 .0

398.1
16 2.6
2 3 5 .4
66 .2

3 9 7 .8
16 3.3
2 3 4 .5
6 6 .0

4 0 1 .2
165.1
236.1
6 6 .3

Item
P ro d u c ts , to ta l
F in al p ro d u c ts

In te rm e d ia te p ro d u c ts
Construction supplies
Business supplies
Com m ercial energy products

Table 8
DIFFUSION INDEXES OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION
Percent
Year
O n e M o n th E a rlie r
1991
1992
1993
T h re e M o n th s E a rlie r
1991
1992
1993
S ix M o n th s E a rlie r
1991
1992
1993

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

M ay

June

July

Aug.

Sep.

Oct.

Nov.

D ec.

3 7 .3
4 2 .0
5 2 .7

4 2 .0
5 8 .2
5 8 .2

3 5 .5
6 1 .0
4 9 .8

5 1 .6
5 7 .5
5 7 .8

5 6 .9
5 4 .3
4 2 .5

63.7
42.5
52.4

53 .5
5 6 .7
58.2

6 1 .0
4 7 .3
52 .2

6 2 .4
46.1
5 1 .4

4 6 .9
6 1 .0
57.1

5 0 .8
6 4 .9

4 9 .8
5 1 .6

3 1 .0
4 9 .0
59 .2

3 1 .4
5 4 .9
5 7 .3

3 2 .2
63.1
6 1 .6

3 4 .5
6 7 .6
5 6 .3

45.1
6 5 .3
5 0 .0

63.9
50.0
48 .0

6 2 .0
52 .7
51.2

67 .6
44 .5
54 .3

65.1
44.1
5 8 .2

6 1 .6
4 7 .3
5 1 .8

5 8 .4
6 3 .7

4 8 .2
6 3 .3

31 .4
5 5 .3
54 .9

3 0 .2
5 9 .6
6 7 .8

25.1
6 0 .0
6 6 .3

25.1
6 4 .7
6 6 .7

3 5 .5
6 4 .3
5 9 .6

44.5
61.6
58.0

4 9 .8
66 .5
58 .2

59 .2
56 .7
52 .4

7 1 .8
5 0 .0
5 2 .0

7 1 .0
5 2 .4
4 8 .8

6 9 .4
5 9 .8

6 2 .0
5 9 .0

N ote— t h e diffusion indexes are calculated as the percentage of series that increased over the indicated span (one, three, or six months) plus one-^Haff
the percentage that w ere unchanged.




15

Table 9
ELECTRIC POWER USE: MANUFACTURING AND MINING
Index, 1 9 8 7 = 1 0 0
19 87
Billion
KW H

1993
M av

June

Julv

8 5 0 .7

110.0

110.6

111.2

7 7 6 .5
3 5 1 .3
4 2 5 .2
74 .2

110.2
105.3
115.0
106.9

111.0
106.9
115.0
105.2

IN D U S T R Y G R O U P S an d S E R IE S
M e ta l m in in g
10
101
Iron ore
102
C opper ore

14.6
6.3
4.8

126.6
137.3
107.8

C o a l m in in g

12

13.4

038 a n d g a s e x tra c tio n
C rude oil and natural gas
Natural gas liquids

13
131
132

S to n e a n d e a rth m in e ra ls
Crushed stone
S and and gravel
C hem ical and fertilizer m aterials
Foods
M e a t products
Dairy products
C an ned and frozen food
Grain mill products
Bakery products
S ugar and confectionery
Fats and oils
B everages
Coffee and m iscellaneous

Seasonallvadiusted

Not seasonally adjusted

Aua.r

Sen/

Oct.P

1993
M av

June

Julv

A ua.r

S eo .r

Oct.P

110.2

110.7

10 9.8

110.0

113.0

111.8

113.2

114.4

111.6

111.6
108.2
114.7
105.7

111.0
106.7
114.2
100.1

111.2
10 8.3
113.7
10 3.7

110.4
105.8
113.7
102.2

110.2
106.2
113.8
10 6.9

113.7
109.0
117.9
10 3.3

112.6
10 7.7
117.0
100.6

114.3
108.8
119.1
9 7 .6

115.2
110.2
119.8
10 2.7

112.2
107.3
116.7
102.4

125.4
135.8
106.4

122.8
132.8
103.3

102.4
71 .4
112.8

112.9
9 5 .5
115.6

121.1
116.5
114.6

12 7.6
13 8.5
10 7.6

12 3.4
13 2.8
10 5.0

12 4.0
134.2
10 5.0

10 2.9
7 4 .4
110.3

114.4
9 8 .4
117.8

12 0.6
117.9
113.6

100.6

101.3

98.8

98 .0

9 4 .8

9 2 .3

9 7 .0

92 .9

77 .5

8 6 .4

8 8 .0

8 9 .5

3 3 .0
2 7 .7
3 .7

104.1
105.8
85 .8

101.8
102.2
88 .4

100.7
100.7
87.2

98 .7
97.8
85 .2

10 1.6
10 1.3
9 1 .2

99 .5
99 .4
8 4 .5

10 2.3
10 3.5
8 8 .5

10 1.4
101.5
90 .0

10 0.3
9 9 .9
8 8 .3

97 .4
95 .8
8 5 .7

10 2.4
10 1.4
9 2 .0

99 ,2
99 .5
8 2 .8

14
142
144
147

12 .3
3 .5
2 .9
3.9

10 5.5
116.8
128.1
8 8 .3

99.0
114.9
121.1
76.5

106.5
113.3
125.5
92 .0

104.5
114.4
123.8
8 8 .3

109.1
116.8
12 5.7
9 2 .7

107.0
12 0.0
12 2.7
8 8 .3

108.5
12 1.7
13 2.7
91.1

99 .5
12 0.6
129.6
7 5 .0

106.2
119.0
132.1
8 9 .8

10 7.7
12 0.5
136.1
9 0 .4

110.2
127.5
13 4.9
9 0 .7

10 7.7
12 9.8
13 7.0
8 4 .9

20
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209

5 2 .9
8 .7
6.5
6.6
10.9
3 .3
3 .7
3 .4
5.9
3.9

114.8
121.2
106.5
116.2
118.6
121.6
123.5
128.9
101.1
10 0.8

116.3
122.7
104.9
119.1
119.2
121.8
135.7
126.1
104.3
102.3

118.2
125.9
108.5
118.9
122.4
124.8
136.2
119.0
106.3
102.6

117.4
122.6
107.3
119.5
121.9
124.8
133.3
121.5
103.2
103.5

118.6
12 3.8
10 7.9
118.6
12 2.7
12 5.6
133.1
12 4.5
10 7.3
10 7.0

115.5
120.2
106.5
118.4
117.7
122.7
127.5
12 2.3
104.8
103.1

111.1
117.2
106.1
10 7.8
117.5
118.2
110.2
119.5
99 .2
9 7 .5

118.9
12 7.9
112.9
116.0
118.8
128.5
129.4
119.8
111.9
106.8

124.2
13 5.9
118.5
121.2
12 1.0
134.2
129.2
110.7
117.7
112.9

12 7.4
13 3.9
115,8
138.4
12 4.8
137.1
13 1.0
118.7
118.5
114.5

129.5
136.5
115.4
144.4
127.0
138.5
135.5
124.3
118.2
114.9

12 2.0
12 4.9
10 6.4
137.8
123.7
127.5
140.0
12 3.0
108.4
10 7.3

21

1.7

83 .6

89 .3

92 .9

90.3

90 .2

8 6 .9

8 3 .7

93 .6

92 ,0

100.5

10 1.3

97 .5

T e x tile m ill p ro d u c ts
Fabrics
Knit goods
Fabric finishing
Yarn and thread
M iscellaneous textiles

22
2 2 1 -4
225
226
228
229

2 9 .9
11.6
3.4
2 .2
8 .4
2 .9

10 9.0
9 8 .0
128.1
117.7
114.0
115.4

112.2
101.3
131.7
116.9
120.7
112.8

113.7
102.4
134.5
125.0
118.2
119.0

110.9
103.6
125.1
114.9
115.0
114.8

112.6
10 1.3
13 0.7
118.9
118.7
120.2

10 8.2
95 .8
128.5
115.9
113.0
118.4

112.1
10 0.9
13 1.0
119.5
117.1
117.1

12 4.4
112.9
146.5
126.1
13 3.9
120.9

113.6
102.2
13 9.3
12 0.7
116.9
116,1

12 5.9
117.9
144.4
12 3.3
130.7
126.8

12 4.8
112.3
15 0.0
129.6
13 0.2
129.0

114.2
100.6
134.9
122.5
12 0.0
123.1

A p p a re l p ro d u c ts
M e n ’s outerw ear
W o m en ’s outerw ear

23
2 3 1 ,2
233

6.6
1.9
1.9

9 5 .0
98.1
84.1

96.6
103.1
83.8

99 .7
104.4
89.2

94.0
93.1
83 .6

9 7 .6
10 4.3
8 0 .7

9 4 .7
97 .9
8 2 .6

92 .6
9 6 .0
82.1

105.5
115.2
90 .5

10 7.7
110.9
9 7 .7

110.7
110.3
9 IU

114.2
124.1
9 4 .7

99 .2
10 1.9
8 5 .5

L u m b e r a n d p ro d u c ts
Lum ber
Millwork and plywood

24
242
243

2 1 .6
7.9
5 .7

111.1
10 4.8
98 .6

110.6
103.0
98.6

112.4
103.8
101.0

112.3
105.7
100.3

113.0
10 5.4
103.1

111.9
106.2
99 .0

110.9
104.4
9 9 .0

110.5
10 1.3
9 8 .7

108.7
9 8 .8
9 8 .7

111,4
103,2
98 .8

113.5
104.8
103.2

111.7
10 5.7
99 .6

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s
Household furniture

25
251

5 .7
3.2

10 9.9
102.5

110.4
104.6

114.2
106.1

111.8
105.1

113.9
10 5.0

111.3
10 6.0

10 7.6
10 3.8

112.7
108.1

10 8.8
96 .5

117.5
108.9

119.8
109.4

114.2
10 7.8

P a p e r a n d p ro d u c ts
W ood pulp
P aper
P aperboard
Paperboard containers
C onverted paper products

26
261
262
263
265
267

9 7 .0
7.1
5 1 .6
2 6 .0
4.5
7.6

114.1
113.1
109.1
126.2
112.2
118.6

113.3
115.2
106.4
136.6
114.3
117.1

115.0
108.8
108.2
139.9
111.6
119.0

116.1
101.8
111.5
137.0
112.2
115.1

117.5
109.4
114.4
13 8.4
10 9.9
117.9

113.3
10 8.0
108.9
131.7
115.2
111.0

113.1
10 9.3
10 8.7
12 5.0

114.4
111.0
107.1
137.6
116.6
121.0

114.8
10 7.9
108.5
13 6.3
113.7
119.3

118.0
102.1
113.4
137.3
116.1
120.5

118.3
110.4
113.0
13 8.3
114.9
12 4.0

114.9
110.3
110.0
134.9
116.1
114.0

P rin tin g a n d p u b lis h in g
N ew spapers
C om m ercial printing

27
271
275

15.7
3.4

8.2

125.2
111.0
129.1

125.1
115.0
127.7

127.5
114.0
130.3

126.5
112.4
129.5

128.2
114.3
12 9.9

125.5
111.9
128.8

12 0.5
10 7.2
124.2

130.1
119.6
131,9

139.5
125.8
141.8

143.1
126.2
146.6

14 3.7
12 6.6
146.1

12 9.9
113.6
134.8

14 6.2
6 1 .8
14.1
29.1
10.9
18.2

114.0
117.2
116.9
12 7.6
10 5.3
14 4.4

115.3
117.6
123.5
126.5
108.9
139.0

113.3
112.2
125.5
114.1
104.0
120.3

'•110.2
106.3
127.3
101.9
103.7
100.4

10 9.7
12 3.9
10 7.8
10 4.6
10 9.4

114.6
115.3
126.2
120.0
99 .5
133.5

114.8
119.4
12 1.6
132.4
10 6.9
15 0.5

116.9
117.8
124.2
126.1
10 7.3
13 9.4

114.7
111.4
127.8
111.7
10 5.0
116.4

113.0
10 8.3
12 6.6
102.5
10 5.4
10 0.4

113.8
110.3
124.6
106.2
10 2.7
10 8.7

115.6
116.4
124.8
12 1.6
99 .2
137.6

Item

1 9 87 S IC

T o tal
M A J O R INDUSTRY G R O U P S
M a n u fa c tu rin g
D u ra b le
N o n d u ra b le
M in in g

T o b a c c o p ro d u c ts

C h e m ic a ls an d p ro d u c ts
Basic chem icals
Alkalies and chlorine
Inorganic chem icals, nec
Acid and fertilizer m aterials
N uclear m aterials, nondefense




28
281
2812
2819

16

111.6

nod

117.9

Table 9 (continued)
ELECTRIC POWER USE: MANUFACTURING AND MINING
_

■
—
S easonallvadiusted

1987
Billion
KW H

1993
M av

June

Julv

A ua.r

SeoS

282
2821
283
284
286
287

2 6 .5
14.2
5.5
3.1
3 6 .0
8.5

105.0
107.1
117.9
114.5
107.7
111.3

10 8.5
111.5
116.7
117.6
111.2
110.3

10 9.6
119.9
126.5
116.5
114.1
113.7

112.0
115.9
128.1
113.8
107.9
116.2

29

40.1

110.5

110.5

109.2

Tires
Rubber products, nec
Plastics products, nec

30
301
306
30 8

33.1
3.6
3.1
2 4 .9

124.4
112.1
104.9
127.0

124.1
115.9
105.2
12 6.5

L e a th e r an d p ro d u c ts
Shoes

31
314

1.0
.4

96 .6
88 .3

S to n e , clay, & g la s s p ro d u c ts
Flat glass
Pressed and blown glass
C em ent
Structural clay products
Concrete products

32
321
322
324
32 5
327

33 .8
1.7
6 .7
10.1
1.6
5.1

33
331
332
333
3 3 34
33 6

Index. 1 9 8 7 = 1 0 0

:
Not s e a s o n a lly a d ju ste d "

Oct.P

1993
Mav

June

J u lv

A u a .r

S e o .r

Oct.P

107.9
109.7
127.7
115.4
115.7
110.4

109.4
113.4
120.7
114.6
115.5
111.3

104.5
107.4
116.6
111.4
106.0
110.8

112.9
114.6
12 5.2
12 1 .3
111.0
111.5

113.8
12 2.4
13 7.7
124.9
113.9
112.0

114.9
117.8
14 2.2
12 3.0
111.4
115.3

112.4
114.2
143.0
122.8
119.3
111.9

109.6
113.8
1 23.7
116.1
119.0
111.4

110.5

111.7

110.1

110.0

113.2

113.6

116.4

115.7

110.4

126.4
113.2
109.0
129.4

129.1
113.3
10 7.3
133.2

130.5
111.5
107.7
135.4

124.9
108.5
104.2
130.3

125.2
113.3
104.5
128.2

12 9.5
12 1.9
10 9.4
132.1

12 6.6
113.7
107.9
12 9.7

13 2 .6
12 3.6
111.5
135 .2

134.4
119.8
111.3
138.1

130.4
113.8
107 .7
1 35.0

9 7 .0
8 7 .2

102.6
91 .8

9 5 .6
8 4 .9

100.3
89.7

96 .4
88 .8

96 .7
88 .5

10 2.8
9 3 .8

99 .9
91.1

10 3.4
9 4 .9

105.8
9 6 .4

87.3

101.9
105.4
100.3
100.0
107.7
90 .6

102.8
107.1
10 5.3
9 7 .9
10 4.4
90 .9

102.7
104.6
102.2
100.7
108.7
90 .6

99 .8
99.1
9 9 .3
9 4 .8
104.2
9 1 .4

103.7
102.3
104.8
100.3
106.6
93.9

101.9
100.2
99.5
101.2
103.6
92 .7

104.0
104.4
102.6
106.6
107.8
90.5

10 6.0
10 8.6
10 7.2
10 5.9
10 7.3
9 2 .4

104.5
10 4.4
10 4.4
10 6.0
1 08.9
9 2 .0

10 4.4
10 2.8
10 2.3
102.1
10 7.5
9 4 .0

10 6.6
105.3
106.4
106.3
109.9
96.1

106.4
101.7
1 02.2
110.4
1 05.7
96.1

137.9
54 .4
9.9
55 .8
5 1 .2
2 .7

10 8.0
114.7
104.7
97 .8
95 .2
103.9

111.1
118.8
10 5.6
10 2.0
96 .9
105.5

108.2
113.1
106.7
98 .4
95 .6
105.6

10 7.7
112.0
104.5
9 4 .6
9 7 .2
105.6

108.5
113.4
108.5
94.1
97.1
105.1

105.0
110.9
107.4
82 .5
96 .3
103.7

109.1
114.7
105.9
97.9
97 .9
103.2

110.5
116.7
10 9.7
100.1
97 .2
10 7.7

10 7.0
110.1
102.1
98.1
9 8 .2
102.1

107.2
111.9
10 0.8
93 .8
9 7 .3
10 6.4

1 07.7
112.7
110.0
93 .7
9 4 .7
109.1

107.2
113.5
110.5
85 .6
9 7 ,7
107.6

34
341
342
344
345
34 6

31 .5
2 .5
2 .7
5.6
1.7
7.1

107.9
121.8
109.7
96 .8
102.5
115.1

10 5.4
119.6
108.2
9 2 .3
9 6 .4
113.4

108.5
122.9
111.3
101.1
103.0
118.5

108.2
123.6
110.8
98.1
101.2
117.2

109.1
122:3
113.2
99.3
104.2
117.9

107.8
119.4
109.8
98.9
99 .9
118.3

106.8
120.6
107.5
96.8
99.0
116.8

108.9
125.2
111.5
9 4 .7
10 0.2
120.1

109.8
12 7.3
112.0
101.9
104.0
115.4

111.1
12 6 .8
115.2
9 8 .0
10 5.7
116.4

113.9
126.5
118.3
102.8
107.2
121.2

110.0
120.9
113.8
9 8 .6
103.8
121.9

In d u s tria l an d c o m m e rc ia l
m a c h in e ry an d c o m p u te r e q u ip ., 35
Engines and turbines
351
352
Farm
Construction and allied
353
354
Metalworking
355
Special industry
356
G eneral industrial
357
C om puter and office equip.
358
Service industry m achines

33 .4
2.5
1.6
4 .2
4 .2
2.5
4 .8
6.1
3.3

109.0
111.2
130.0
8 7 .7
120.1
108.9
108.6
99 .2
131.2

109.5
113.4
128.8
9 5 .4
119.7
10 8.4
111.5
9 6 .0
13 2,5

111.9
111.2
127.9
95 .6
124.2
110.0
111.5
97 .9
134.7

10 9.2
1 0 5 .8
13 7.3
93 .8
122.5
111.0
110.6
9 1 .9
13 4.8

111.4
116.5
126.0
94.6
121.8
114.0
110.0
95.1
134.6

108.2
113.4
120.9
97 .0
119.9
112.5
108.0
8 8 .4
136.1

107.4
109.7
127.9
87 .7
117.0
104.6
106.9
96.5
130.6

113.4
118.3
12 8.6
9 7 .9
12 3.0
111.1
11 5.2
99 .5
13 9.5

115.3
113.0
123.0
99 .8
12 8.3
114.1
115.2
101.3
144.2

115.7
112.3
13 2 .5
9 7 .7
12 9 .8
118.4
115.8
9 9 .3
14 4.8

117.9
117.8
134.3
101.1
129.7
121.7
116.8

110.6
112.1
121.8

36
361
36 2
363
364
365
36 6
36 7

3 1 .3
1.4
4.1
2 .5
2.9
.6
3.1
12.8

10 3.0
76 .5
110.4
8 7 .0
97 .0
126.5
83 .5
111.9

10 3.4
7 5 .9
112.9
8 9 .5
98 .2
127.2
8 1 .7
114.7

103.7
77 .5
110.5
90.6
9 8 .9
129.9
8 4 .7
114.5

10 5.0
79.1
112.3
90.1
99 .6
13 2.7
88 .8
114.1

105.5
79.5
113.0
92.0
97.5
139.3
85.7
114.0

104.3
76 .9
109.5
90.1
98 .0
137.8
83 .8
113.0

101.8
74 .0
109.8
88.9
96.5
124.0
81.9
110.6

10 7.4
7 9 .4
115.9
9 5 .0
10 2.4
12 9.7
8 6 .7
118.3

10 8.5
79.1
114.7
90 .9
99 .8
133.8
9 2 .2
12 1.0

111.0
8 4 .8
115.5
9 3 .9
9 8 .5
14 1.0
9 5 .4
121.1

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t
Motor vehicles and parts
Aircraft and parts
Ships and boats

37
371
37 2
373

3 8 .3
2 1 .9
10.1
2.1

98 .0
92.1
100.8
99 .3

97 .7
92 .2
99 .4
9 8 .0

99.1
93 .0
102.2
99.2

9 7 .7
9 2 .0
9 6 .3
9 9 .8

99.0
93.8
97.5
104.3

97 .0
93 ,4
95 .3
10 3.4

99.8
95.3
98.1
98.2

103.1
9 8 .8
102.2
10 0 .7

101.0
93 .0
107.3
99 .9

In s tru m e n ts
Photographic equip. & supplies

38
38 6

13.1
1.7

109.4
101.1

110.2
106.4

112.0
103.3

108.7
98.1

113.7
106.4

109.6
97 .6

106.7
100.6

114.2
10 6.9

39

4 .6

115.1

117.1

124.3

119.9

122.0

119.3

112.5

8 3 2 .5
7 6 5 .4
8 5 .3

109.0
109.5
119.3

109.4
110.1
122.8

111.2
110.6
122.8

110.5
10 9.8
118.5

111.1
110.3
120.2

109.1
109.5
119.3

108.7
109.7
116.3

Item

1987 S IC

Chemicals

a n d P ro d u c ts (c o n t.)
Synthetic m aterials
Plastics m aterials
Drugs and m edicines
Soap and toiletries
Industrial organic chem icals
Agricultural chem icals

Petroleum p ro d u c ts
Rubber a n d p la s tic s

p ro d u c ts

P rim a ry m e ta ls
Basic steel and mill products
Iron and steel foundries
Prim ary nonferrous m etals
Aluminum
Nonferrous foundries
F a b ric a te d m e ta l p ro d u c ts
Metal containers
H ardw are, tools, and cutlery
Structural m etal products
Fasteners
M etal stampings

Electrical m a c h in e ry
Electrical distribution
Electrical industrial
Household appliances
Lighting and wiring products
T V and radio sets
Com m unicationequipm ent
Electronic components

M is c e lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu re s
S U P P L E M E N T A R Y GRO UP S
Total, excluding nuclear nondefense
Utility sales to industry
Industrial generation




17

97 .3

99.6
120.7
113.2

98.4

110.3
93.6

145.2

138.4

112.6

106.4

84.8
116.2
96.6
103.9
147.8
92.5

78.7
109.7
91.3
99.6

122.2

115.6

104.2
9 8 .3
103.7
10 2 .3

105.0
99.5

100.6

120.0
108.4

117.9
10 4.4

121.3
110.8

113.1

119.9

1 27.5

129 .5

130.6

1 7.

112.2
112.7
119.9

111.6
111.2
124.2

113.6
112.8
121 .2

114.6

110.8
111 .3
721 2

104.7
104.3

•’ , p>

117.7

142.8
8 5 .6

97.5
98.6
99.2

Explanatory Note
The statistical release of industrial Production and Capacity Utilization reports
measures of output, capacity, and capacity utilization in manufacturing, mining, and
the electric and gas utilities industries. It also includes survey data on the use of
electric power in manufacturing and mining. Data in the release are available on-line
on the day of issue through the Economic Bulletin Board of the Department of
Commerce. For information, call (202) 482-1986. Diskettes containing historical
data and the data published in this release are available from the Board of Governors
of the Federal Reserve System, Publications Services, (202) 452-3245.

Industrial Production

Coverage. The industrial production (IP) index measures output in the
manufacturing, mining, and electric and gas utilities industries. For the period since
1987, the total IP index has been constructed from 255 individual series based on the
1987 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). These individual series are classified
and grouped in two ways: (1) market groups (shown in table 1), such as consumer
goods, equipment, intermediate products, and materials, from which the seasonally
adjusted total index is derived; and (2) industry groups (shown in tables 2 and 6), such
as two-digit SIC industries and major aggregates of these industries—for example,
durable and nondurable manufacturing, mining, and utilities.
M arket groups. For purposes of analysis, the individual IP series are grouped into
final products, intermediate products, and materials. Final products are assumed to be
purchased by consumers, businesses, or government for final use. Intermediate
products are expected to become inputs in nonindustrial sectors, such as
construction, agriculture, and services. Materials are industrial output requiring
further processing within the industrial sector. Total products comprises final and
intermediate products, and final products are divided into consumer goods and
equipment.
Timing. The first estimate of output for a month is published around the 15th of the
following month. The estimate is preliminary (denoted by the superscript “p” in
tables) and subject to revision in each of the subsequent three months as new source
data become available. (Revised estimates are denoted by the superscript “r” in
tables.) After the fourth month, indexes are not revised further until the time of an
annual revision or a benchmark revision. The last three benchmark revisions were
published in 1990, 1985, and 1976.
Source data. In annual or benchmark revisions, the individual IP indexes are
constructed from a variety of source data, such as the quinquennial Censuses o f
‘ Manufactures and M ineral Industries and the Annual Survey of Manufactures,
prepared by the Bureau of the Census; the M inerals Yearbook , prepared by the
B ureau of Mines; and publications of the Department of Energy. On a monthly basis,
the individual indexes of industrial production are constructed from two main types
of source data: (1) output measured in physical units and (2) data on inputs to the
production process, from which output is inferred. Data on physical products, such as
tons of steel or barrels of oil, are obtained from private trade associations as well as
from the government agencies listed above; data of this type are used to estimate
monthly IP where possible and appropriate. When suitable data on physical product
are unavailable, estimates of output are based on either production-worker hours or
kilowatt hours. Data on hours worked by production workers are collected in the
monthly establishment survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The data
on kilowatt hours are described below. The factors used to convert inputs into
estimates of production are based on historical relationships between the inputs and
the comprehensive data used to benchmark the IP indexes (censuses, annual surveys,
and the like); these factors also may be influenced by technological or cyclical
developments. Especially for the first and second estimates for a given month, the
available source data are limited and subject to revision.
Weights. In the index, series that measure the output of an individual industry are
weighted according to their proportion in the total value-added output of all
industries. The industrial production index, which extends back to 1919, is built in
chronological segments that are linked together to form a continuous index
expressed as a percentage of output in a comparison base year (currently 1987). Each
segment, which usually spans five years, is a Laspeyres quantity index showing
changes in quantities with prices (Census value added per unit of output) held at
base-year values for the segment. For the period from 1987 to the present, IP is
aggregated on the basis of 1987 value-added weights. The aggregation of the index
for the 1982-86 period is based on 1982 weights, whereas 1977 weights are used for
the 1977-81 period. The other weight years in the postwar period are 1972, 1967,
1963, 1958, 1954, and 1947. The 1987 value-added weights used to aggregate the
index are shown in the first column of tables 1,2, and 6, in the “1987” column under
the heading “Proportion in total IP.” To the extent that a given industry grows faster
(slower) than the total index after 1987, its current proportion will rise (fall).
Proportions for the most recent complete year of data are shown in the second columnof tables 1,2, and 6, in the column headed by the most recent year under the heading
“Proportion in total IP.”
Seasonal adjustm ent. Individual series are seasonally adjusted by theX -11ARIMA
method, developed at Statistics Canada. The current seasonal factors are based on
data through October 1992. In some cases, series were preadjusted for the effects of
holidays or the business cycle before using X -l 1 ARIMA. The major market and
industry groups are seasonally adjusted directly; as a result, the seasonally adjusted
value of a given market or industry group may not be equal to an aggregation of its
seasonally adjusted components. The seasonally adjusted total index is calculated by
18



aggregating the seasonally adjusted major market groups, and may not precisely
equal art aggregation of the seasonally adjusted industry groups.
Reliability. The average revision to the level of the total IP index, without regard to
sign, between the preliminary estimate and its third revision (or from the first and the
fourth estimates) was 0.35 percent during the 1972-92 period. The average revision
to the percent change in total IP, without regard to sign, from the first to the fourth
estimates was 0.26 percentage point during the same period. In most cases (about 85
percent), the direction of change in output indicated by the first estimate for a given
month is the same as that shown by the fourth estimate.
Rounding. In some cases, components may not add to totals because of independent
rounding. In addition, the published percent changes are calculated from unrounded
indexes, and may not be the same as percent changes calculated from the rounded
indexes shown in the release.
References. Industrial Production— 1986 Edition contains a more detailed
description of the methods used to compile the index, plus a history of its
development, a glossary of terms, and a bibliography. To obtain Industrial
Production— 1986 Edition ($9.00 per copy), write to Board of Governors of the
Federal Reserve System, Publications Services, Washington, DC 20551. The 1990
revision to the index is described in the Federal Reserve Bulletin, vol. 76 (April
1990), pp. 187-204. The 1993 revision to the index is described in the Federal
Reserve Bulletin, vol. 79 (June 1993), pp. 590-605.

Capacity Utilization

Definition. Capacity utilization is calculated for the manufacturing, mining, and
electric and gas utilities industries. For a given industry, the utilization rate is equal to
an output index divided by a capacity index. Output is measured by seasonally
adjusted indexes of industrial production. The capacity indexes attempt to capture
the concept of sustainable practical capacity, which is defined as the greatest level of
output that a plant can maintain within the framework of a realistic work schedule,
taking account of normal downtime, and assuming sufficient availability of inputs to
operate the machinery and equipment in place. The 75 individual capacity indexes
are based on a variety of data, including capacity data measured in physical units
compiled by trade associations, surveys of utilization rates and investment, and
estimates of growth of the capital stock.
Groups. Estimates of capacity and utilization are available for a variety of groups,
including primary and advanced processing industries within manufacturing,
durable and nondurable manufacturing, total manufacturing, and total industry.
Component industries of the primary and advanced processing groups within
manufacturing are listed in the note on tables 2 and 3 of the release.
Weights. Value-added proportions are used to weight the individual capacity
indexes in aggregations in the same manner as individual IP series are aggregated to
the total index of industrial production. Although each utilization rate is the result of
dividing an IP series by a corresponding capacity index, aggregate utilization rates
are equivalent to combinations of individual utilization rates aggregated with
proportions that reflect current capacity levels of output valued in base-period
value-added per unit of actual output. The implied proportions of individual industry
operating rates in the rate for total industry for the most recent year are shown in the
first column of table 3.
Perspective. The historical highs and lows in capacity utilization shown in the tables
above are specific to each series and did not all occur in the same month. Industrial
plants usually operate at capacity utilization rates that are well below 100 percent:
none of the broad aggregates has ever reached 100 percent. For mining,
manufacturing, and utilities as a whole, and for total manufacturing, utilization rates
as high as 90 percent have been exceeded only in wartime.
References. The basic methodology used to estimate capacity and utilization is
discussed in the Federal Reser\>e Bulletin, vol. 71 (October 1985), pp. 754-66. The
1990 revision of capacity and capacity utilization is described in the Federal Reserve
Bulletin , vol. 76 (June 1990), pp. 412-35, and the 1993 revision is described in the
Federal Reserve Bulletin, vol. 79 (June 1993), pp. 590-605.

Electric Power

Data on electric power (expressed in kilowatt hours) are collected by the Federal
Reserve District Banks from electric utilities and also from manufacturing and
mining establishments that generate electric power for their own use (cogenerators).
The indexes of power use shown in table 9 are sums of kilowatt hours used by an
industry or industry group expressed as a percentage of that industry’s or group’s
usage in 1987. The first column of the table shows, for reference, electric power use
in billions of kilowatt hours as reported by manufacturing and mining industries in
the 1987 censuses of those industries. The supplementary group, “Total, less nuclear
nondefense,” is shown separately because the nondefense nuclear material series
(part of SIC 2819) accounts for a disproportionately large part of total electric power
use. Because the value-added proportion for this industry in total IP is considerably
smaller than its share of total electric power use, excluding this component from total
power use facilitates comparisons with total IP.

Release Schedule for 1994

At 9:15 a.m. on January 14, February 15, March 15, April 15, May 16, June 15, July
15, August 15, September 16, October 14, November 15, and December 14.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102