View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

FEDERAL RESERVE statistical release
"

“I TS 97

For release at 9:15 a.m. (EDT)
April 16, 1997

G.17 (419)

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AND CAPACITY UTILIZATION

Industrial production advanced 0.9 percent in March after a revised gain of 0.6 percent in February. In
recent months, as in the past year, the gains have been mostly in durable manufacturing. At 119.6 percent of its 1992
average, total industrial production in March was 5.6 percent higher than it was in March 1996. For the first quarter as a
whole, industrial production grew at an annual rate of 5.6 percent after an increase of 4.5 percent in the final quarter of
1996. when growth had been held down by strike-related losses in the motor vehicle industry. Excluding motor vehicles
and parts, manufacturing output grew at the same strong rate in both quarters; the output at utilities declined in the first
quarter as a result of unseasonably mild weather. The utilization of industrial capacity increased 0.5 percentage point in
March, to 84.1 percent, the highest level since March 1995.
Market Groups
The output of consumer goods advanced 0.7 percent, led by another increase of 1.5 percent in the output of
durable consumer goods. Gains were especially notable for household appliances, home computing equipment, and
(over)

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION AND CAPACITY UTILIZATION: SUMMARY
Seasonally adjusted
Index, 1992=100

Percent change

1996
Dec/

1997
Jan/

Feb/

Mar.P

117.7
117.7

117.8
117.6

118.5
118.1

119.6

.4
.4

Maior market aroups:
Products, total
Consumer goods
Business equipment
Construction supplies
Materials

114.3
112.7
130.7
117.8
123.1

114.3
112.0
132.1
117.6
123.3

114.9
111.8
133.8
119.8
124.4

115.9
112.6
135.6
120.6
125.4

Maior industry aroups:
Manufacturing
Durable
Nondurable
Mining
Utilities

119.2
128.8
108.8
104.5
112.6

119.3
129.4
108.4
104.2
113.5

120.4
131.3
108.7
105.7
109.7

121.4
133.1
109.1
106.7
110.6

Indu stria l P ro d u c tio n
Tota l index

Previous estimates

C a p a c ity U tiliza tio n
Tota l in d u s try

Average
1967-96

1982
Low




1997
Jan /

Mar. 96 to
Mar. 97

Feb/

Mar.P

.1
-.1

.6
.5

.9

5.6

.2
.4
.7
-2 .4
.8

.1
-.7
1.0
-.2
.2

.5
-.1
1.3
1.9
.8

.9
.7
1.4
.7
.8

5.0
2.9
10.6
4.4
6.6

.6
.3
.8
1.0
-1 .6

.1

.5
-.4
-.3
.8

.9
1.5
.3
1.5
-3 .4

.9
1.3
.3
.9
.8

6.6
9.2
3.5
3.8
-3 .3

Percent of capacity
1988-89
1996
1996
High
Mar.
Dec/

1997
Jan/

Feb/

Mar.P

Capacity
growth
Mar. 96 to
Mar. 97

82.1

71.1

85.3

82.6

83.5
83.5

83.4
83.2

83.6
83.3

84.1

3.7

81.2
80.6
82.3
87.5
87.2

69.0
70.4
66.2
80.3
75.9

85.7
84.2
88.9
86.8
92.6

81.3
79.4
85.6
90.3
92.2

82.5
80.8
86.6
91.9
89.3

82.3
80.7
86.1
91.6
89.9

82.8
81.1
86.7
92.9
86.7

83.3
81.6
87.2
93.7
87.3

4.1
4.9
2.3
.0
2.0

Previous estimates
Manufacturing
Advanced processing
Primary processing
Mining
Utilities

1996
Dec/

furniture. The production of automotive products rose 0.8 percent for a second consecutive month. After declines in
January and February, the production of nondurable consumer goods increased 0.5 percent, with gains in gasoline, paper,
food, tobacco, and residential utilities.
The output of business equipment rose 1.4 percent further, its third consecutive monthly increase of
1 percent or more. Solid gains were evident in all the major categories within business equipment, with commercial
aircraft, office and computing equipment, and business vehicles again accounting for much of the monthly increase. The
output of defense and space equipment edged down; on balance, this series is close to the low it reached early last year.
The output of construction supplies rebounded further; over February and March, it recouped the
2-1/2 percent drop of the previous two months. On balance, the production in this sector has been at a high level since
last summer. The production of materials rose 0.8 percent for a second month. Gains of about 1-1/2 percent in February
and March in the output of durable goods materials dominated the advance. Among the components of durable materials,
the output of equipment parts rose more than 2 percent for a second month; semiconductors again contributed much of
the increase. The production of basic metals and parts for motor vehicles and other consumer durables also increased
again. The output of nondurable goods materials edged down 0.1 percent and has changed little since the end of last year.
The production of energy materials, which fell back in February because of the benign weather conditions, recovered only
a bit as weather remained mild. The output of coal, which is heavily used to generate electricity, declined.
Industry Groups
Manufacturing output rose 0.9 percent in March, the same amount as in February. The gain was
concentrated in durables; the output in this sector rose 1.3 percent in March and 1.5 percent in February, with sizable
increases in both months for most major groups. The production of nondurables rose 0.3 percent; this group has changed
little, on balance, so far this year. The output at utilities rose, but it recovered only a fraction of the sharp drop in
February. Mining output increased substantially again, propelled by the continued strong gains in oil and gas drilling
activity.
The factory operating rate rose 0.5 percentage point, to 83.3 percent, 2 percentage points above both its
1967-96 average and its level in March 1996. Within the durable manufacturing category, rates remain relatively high for
primary metals, light trucks, and industrial machinery and equipment. The capacity utilization rate for nondurable
manufacturing is at its long-term average; relatively low rates for apparel, leather and products, and textiles balance
operating rates that exceed 90 percent for petroleum refining and rubber and plastics products. The utilization rates for
mining industries, with the exception of coal mining, are high.




Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization
(March data, seasonally adjusted)

Industrial production indexes
Twelve-month percent change

Twelve-month percent change

5
0

-5

-10
10

5
0

-5
1992

1994

1996

1992

Total industry

1996

-10

Manufacturing

Ratio scale, 1992 production = 100




1994

Ratio scale, 1992 production = 100

3

Table 1A
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: MARKET GROUPS
Index. 1$>92=100
19 96
IP
-------- Prooortion1

Item

1996
Oct.

S easonallv Adjusted
1997
. Nov.
D ec/
Jan/
Feb/

Mar.P

118.5

119.6

117.5

116.1

115.3

116.8

118.7

119.2

114.9
115.8

115.9
117.0

114.6
115.3

112.8
113.6

111.7
112.8

113.0
114.6

114.2
116.2

114.6
116.2

112.0
127.5
129.9
138.7
120.1
167.0
116.1
125.7
171.6
124.7
229.1
106.3
109.2
108.0
107.6
107.8
94.3
118.1
101.1
111.3
105.1
113.9

111.8
12 9.4
13 1.0
139.2
12 2.8
16 5.0
117.8
12 8.2
17 9.0
12 9.0
2 4 0 .4
107.9
10 9.7
107.5
107.5
108.0
9 3 .7
117.5
101.5
107.8
106.6
108.0

112.6
13 1.3
13 2.0
141.2
12 5.3
16 6.6
117.6
13 0 .7
185.1
13 7.7
2 4 2 .3
110.3
110.4
10 8.0
108.0
10 8.6
93 .8
117.3
10 2.7
10 8.7
107.3
109.0

112.2
13 2.2
133.2
14 2.9
12 4.3
16 4.7
118.3
13 1.4
18 7.3
13 3.0
2 5 4 .2
113.6
10 8.9
10 7.3
10 9.9
112.2
98 .2
116.7
100.9
92 .6
108.2
8 5 .3

110.6
127.1
127.0
135.3
12 2.4
150.5
113.9
12 7.0
17 5.8
122.5
2 4 1 .9
106.3
10 9.7
106.4
105.8
106.4
94 .6
111.8
103.0
110.4
111.7
109.8

110.3
119.1
109.8
107.3
91 .8
125.4
109.9
125.5
168.6
118.7
2 3 0 .2
103.6
111.6
107.9
103.6
102.5
91 .7
111.9
103.8
132.9
110.5
143.4

112.5
123.3
124.2
130.9
111.0
154.1
113.0
122.5
165.3
123.1
21 5.8
103.3
107.5
109.6
102.6
102.5
88.3
111.3
100.8
149.6
102.3
171.8

112.4
133.7
140.0
155.9
135.3
180.1
117.5
129.3
182.9
141.2
23 1 .6
110.0
108.8
107.2
103.1
103.0
90 .8
110.4
101.7
130.5
101.8
143.9

111.7
13 3.3
13 5.3
14 6.9
127.2
170.0
118.0
131.8
18 7.7
145.6
2 3 6 .4
110.4
111.1
10 6.4
103.9
10 3.3
91 .7
111.6
103.4
121.0
102.7
129.6

119.6
130.7
148.5
327.1
127.3
107.2
113.7
121.4
76 .2
123.6
146.2

120.8
132.1
149.5
33 5.9
127.9
109.8
117.2
123.4
74.9
130.8
156.3

122.5
133.8
152.5
3 4 5 .0
128.0
111.9
119.1
124.8
75 .2
14 0.7
163.5

124.4
13 5.6
154.3
3 5 4 .3
129.2
114.7
122.2
12 6.8
75 .2
15 3.9
16 5.3

120.5
13 0.9
14 8.3
3 2 0 .9
128.5
106.2
12 1.8
121.8
7 6 .8
13 0.4
18 3.7

118.7
128.7
145.6
311.4
125.8
106.1
116.5
118.5
7 7 .0
132.7
156.9

117.1
126.7
148.4
3 2 4 .3
123.0
98 .0
90.1
114.9
78 .0
133.7
123.2

118.1
128.7
144.7
31 6.8
124.6
108.1
111.5
121.4
75 .7
129.5
137.3

122.8
134.5
148.8
3 3 3 .4
129.0
118.8
132.9
128.1
75 .3
133.4
155.9

12 4.0
135.6
151.1
3 4 4 .0
130.4
117.4
125.6
128.4
75 .6
14 0.9
167.6

111.9
12 0.7
10 6.8

111.3
117.8
10 7.4

111.7
117.6
108.2

112.1
119.8
107.5

112.8
120.6
108.2

112.7
12 3.6
10 6.4

110.3
119.3
105.1

108.4
111.4
106.5

108.4
108.8
108.0

108.3
112.4
105.8

10 9.7
115.6
106.2

12 1.7

122.2

123.1

123.3

12 4.4

125.4

12 2.0

12 1.4

120.8

122.6

125.7

126.5

2 3 .0 4
4 .3 4
8 .6 3
10.08
3.3 3
8.9 2
.96
1.61
4 .3 9
1.96
8.1 2
5.2 2
2 .9 0

135.8
126.6
163.4
120.0
117.2
10 8.0
10 8.4
10 8.0
10 9.3
10 3.9
10 3.9
10 2.0
107.5

136.5
129.7
16 5.3
119.1
114.4
108.4
108.5
110.9
10 7.7
106.8
104.0
101.6
108.5

137.8
130.3
167.9
119.9
115.7
109.5
105.9
112.5
110.2
106.3
103.9
102.6
106.3

138.2
131.7
169.4
119.2
114.5
109.3
107.0
111.5
110.5
105.3
104.1
101.9
108.3

140.4
133.8
173.1
120.4
115.6
10 9.8
106.6
113.5
10 9.9
107.5
103.2
101.4
106.6

142.4
135.2
177.0
121.5
117.8
109.7
108.1
112.7
109.6
10 7.3
103.2
101.2
107.0

13 7.3
13 2.0
163.2
121.2
116.6
109.8
111.1
10 8.2
109.2
111.0
9 9 .9
98.1
10 3.4

136.0
127.5
166.1
118.4
114.3
107.7
108.1
110.4
106.8
106.6
102.7
100.8
106.2

134.7
115.2
171.3
117.4
114.0
105.1
97.2
108.7
106.7
101.6
105.7
103.9
109.2

135.3
128.2
168.4
115.2
112.9
108.7
107.1
113.4
108.8
104.7
108.5
104.8
115.4

141.5
140.4
173.0
120.0
117.9
110.5
107.9
115.5
110.9
106.0
105.9
104.4
108.7

144.2
144.2
177.1
121.3
120.0
110.0
110.2
112.9
110.3
106.2
104.1
10 2.4
107.2

9 7 .4 8
9 5 .2 0
9 7 .5 5
9 3 .6 8

116.1
115.9
113.7
110.4

116.9
116.6
114.6
111.2

117.4
117.2
115.1
111.6

117.5
117.1
115.1
111.5

118.2
117.8
115.8
112.0

119.2
118.8
116.7
112.8

117.0
116.7
114.9
111.7

115.8
115.5
113.7
110.2

115.6
115.7
112.7
109.0

116.6
116.2
114.2
110.7

118.0
117.4
116.0
112.3

118.7
118.0
116.4
112.5

2 6 .7 6
2 4 .6 5

109.9
110.8

111.0
111.8

111.4
112.8

110.5
112.0

110.4
112.4

111.1
113.2

110.6
114.9

109.2
110.5

110.2
107.1

111.4
107.2

110.2
109.8

10 9.9
110.3

12 .67
12 .26

13 0.7
116.6

131.2
117.5

132.4
118.2

133.6
119.1

135.2
120.4

13 6.9
12 1.8

13 1.8
118.6

129.9
116.8

130.3
114.1

130.4
116.5

134 .7
121.8

136.6
122.3

3 1 .9 6

127.1

127.8

12 9.0

129.2

130.9

132.2

12 8.8

127.2

125.5

127.0

131.8

133.5

1 0 0 .0 0

116.2

5 9 .9 2
4 5 .1 4

112.8
113.6

2 8 .1 5
5 .8 9
2 .4 0
1.38
.67
.71
1.02
3 .4 8
1.19
.55
.65
.78
1.51
2 2 .2 6
18 .77
9.7 2
1.89
4 .4 0
2 .7 6
3.4 9
1.06
2 .4 3

117.2

117.7

117.8

114.1
114.8

114.3
115.3

114.3
115.2

110:8
124.5
12 2.0
12 5.7
112.3
14 7.4
114.4
12 6.2
17 6.5
123.6
2 4 2 .4
10 8.6
10 6.5
10 7.3
106.8
10 6.6
9 5 .5
115.5
102.9
110.7
108.1
111.7

112.3
127.1
127.4
13 3.8
123.5
15 2.4
116.4
126.8
176.9
125.6
2 4 0 .4
110.7
106.4
108.5
107.4
107.2
95 .0
117.3
102.9
115.3
107.8
118.5

112.7
12 8.4
127.2
135.5
115.9
16 4.9
114.0
129.1
181.1
13 6.4
2 3 4 .5
109.3
109.6
10 8.7
108.3
108.2
94 .9
118.8
103.0
111.8
106.0
114.2

17 .00
13.81
5 .6 8
1.55
4 .4 9
2 .3 0
1.13
1.33
2.31
.64
.23

118.4
128.8
14 7.4
3 1 8 .8
12 7.0
101.9
10 9.4
118.7
7 7 .0
12 0.2
16 5.3

119.0
129.8
147.1
3 2 3 .5
127.1
106.6
115.9
119.9
76.1
12 0.7
159.8

14 .78
5.7 2
9 .0 6

110.2
117.7
10 5.8

Materials

4 0 .0 8

Durable

Total index
Products, total
Final products
Consumer goods
Durable
Autom otive products
Autos and trucks
Autos
Trucks
Auto parts and allied goods
O ther durable goods
Appliances and electronics
Appliances and air cond.
Hom e electronics
Carpeting and furniture
Miscellaneous

Nondurable
N onenergy
Foods and tobacco
Clothing
C hem ical products
P aper products
Energy products
F u e ls

Utilities

Equipment, total
Business equipment
Information processing & related
Com puter and office
Industrial
Transit
Autos and trucks
O ther

Defense and space equipment
Oil and gas well drilling
M anufactured homes

Intermediate products
Construction supplies
Business supplies

C onsum er parts
Equipm ent parts
Other
Basic metals

Nondurable
Textile
Paper
Chem ical
Other

Energy
Primary
C onverted fuel

Not seasonallv adinstPri
1997
Nov.
Dec/
Jan.r
Feb /

19 96
Oct.

Mar.P

SP ECIA L A G G R E G A TE S
Total excluding:
Autos and trucks
Motor vehicles and parts
Com puters
C om puters and semiconductors

Consumer goods excluding:
Autos and trucks
Energy

Business equipment excluding:
Autos and trucks
C om puter and office equipment

Materials excluding:
Energy

1. T h e IP proportion data are estim ates of the industries’ relative contributions to overall IP growth in the following year.




Table 1B
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: MARKET GROUPS
Percent change
1995 Q 4
to
1996 Q 4

Item

S easonally adjusted
annual rate
19 96
19 97
02
Q3
Q 4r
Q1P

Seasonallvadiusted
1997
1996
Jan/
Feb/
Mar.P
D ec/

Not seasonallvadiusted
1996
1997
Dec/
Jan.r
Mar.P
Feb /

Mar. 96
to
Mar. 97

Total index

3.9

6 .2

3 .3

4 .5

5 .6

.4

.1

.6

.9

-.8

1.3

1.6

.5

5.6

Products, total
Final products

3 .8
4.1

5 .3
5.9

3.1
2.8

4 .8
4 .8

4 .8
5.1

.2
.4

.1
.0

.5
.5

.9
1.0

-.9
-.6

1.2
1.5

1.1
1.4

.3
.0

5.0
5.3

2.5
2.4
.9
.5
- 3 .8
7.3
1.3
3.4
10.5
1.5
18.6
.3
-.7
2.5
2.5
2.3
- 2 .7
5.3
2.8
2.5
3.3
2.2

3 .7
18.5
2 5 .5
4 6 .7
9 0 .8
18.1
-.2
13.8
3 1 .6
2 4 .3
37 .5
13.5
1.1
-.1
-.1
-.6
1.0
-2 .1
4.0
.1
2 .4
-.7

.8
2 .6
5.9
11.4
12.7
13.1
-1 .4
.3
7.1
6.2
8 .5
-8 .5
-.7
.3
2.8
.8
-2 .3
7.8
5.7
- 1 2 .4
-.2
- 1 7 .3

5 .6
-5 .0
-1 1 .7
- 2 0 .9
- 4 0 .4
3 .9
3 .3
-.1
2 .5
- 1 4 .7
19.0
-.1
-2 .1
8 .6
7 .9
6.1
-.7
17.9
5 .0
12.7
2 .7
17.5

.8
9.1
18.6
2 6 .7
2 0 .3
3 2 .6
8 .0
2 .9
.9
6 .0
-3 .1
-4 .8
8 .7
-1 .3
.6
2 .8
-5 .0
1.4
- 4 .3
■ 1 .5
-1
-3 .6
--1 4 .8

.4
1.0
-.1
1.3
-6 .1
8 .2
- 2 .0
1.8
2 .4
8.6
- 2 .4
- 1 .2
3.0
.2
.8
.9
-.1
1.3
.1
-3 .1
-1 .7
-3 .7

-.7
-.7
2.1
2.3
3.6
1.3
1.8
- 2 .6
- 5 .2
- 8 .6
- 2 .3
- 2 .8
-.3
-.6
-.7
-.4
-.6
-.6
- 1 .8
-.4
-.9
-.2

-.1
1.5
.8
.4
2 .3
- 1 .2
1.5
2 .0
4 .3
3.5
5 .0
1.5
.5
-.5
-.1
.1
-.7
-.5
.4
- 3 .2
1.5
- 5 .2

.7
1.5
.8
1.5
2.0
1.0
-.2
1.9
3.4
6 .7
.8
2.2
.6
.5
.4
.6
.1
-.2
1.2
.8
.6
.9

-.2
-6 .3
- 1 3 .5
- 2 0 .7
- 2 5 .0
- 1 6 .7
-3 .6
-1 .2
-4 .1
-3 .1
-4 .8
-2 .6
1.7
1.4
-2 .1
-3 .7
-3 .0
.1
.8
2 0 .4
-1 .1
3 0 .6

1.9
3.5
13.1
2 2 .0
2 0 .9
2 2 .9
2.9
- 2 .4
- 2 .0
3.6
- 6 .3
-.3
- 3 .6
1.6
-.9
.0
- 3 .7
-.5
- 2 .9
12.6
- 7 .5
19.8

-.1
8.5
12.7
19.2
21 .9
16.9
4.0
5.5
10.7
14.7
7.3
6.5
1.2
- 2 .3
.4
.4
2.8
-.9
.9
-1 2 .8
-.4
-1 6 .2

-.6
-.4
- 3 .4
- 5 .8
- 6 .0
- 5 .6
.4
1.9
2.6
3.2
2.1
.4
2.1
-.7
.3
1.0
1.1
1.7
- 7 .2
.8
- 9 .9

2.9
8.7
14.7
27 .0
34.0
23 .0
-.1
4.9
11.6
6.3
16.3
-.4
2.2
1.4
2.5
1.7
- 2 .2
6.1
3.0
- 4 .8
.3
- 6 .9

6.8
8.0
10.8
38.9
-.2
21.5
- 1 .9
3.6
- 1 .2
14.0
.4

9.6
8 .3
10.1
4 2 .9
-.5
2 8 .7
5 0 .3
.6
6 .4
50.1
2 1 .8

6 .0
8.1
9.5
4 4 .4
-.1
22 .2
8.9
6 .4
1.8
-1 6 .1
-2 .0

3 .4
5.6
7.5
22.1
1.1
6.2
- 2 5 .6
12.3
-6 .9
2.5
- 1 8 .5

12.4
13.0
12.6
30.1
4.1
29.1
2 5 .0
17.8
-6 .7
8 5 .6
12.4

.5
.7
.9
1.1
.2
.5
-1 .9
1.3
.0
2 .4
-8 .5

.9
1.0
.7
2.7
.5
2.5
3.1
1.6
- 1 .6
5.8
6.9

1.5
1.3
2.0
2 .7
.1
1.9
1.6
1.1
.4
7.6
4 .6

1.5
1.4
1.2
2.7
1.0
2.5
2.6
1.6
-.1
9.4
1.1

-1 .3
- 1 .6
1.9
4.1
-2 .3
-7 .7
- 2 2 .7
-3 .1
1.3
.8
- 2 1 .5

.9
1.6
- 2 .5
- 2 .3
1.4
10.3
23 .8
5.7
- 2 .9
-3 .1
11.5

3.9
4.6
2.8
5.2
3.5
9.9
19.2
5.5
-.5
3.1
13.5

1.0
.8
1.6
3.2
1.1
-1 .2
- 5 .5
.2
.4
5.6
7.5

9.3
10.6
10.3
33.5
1.7
31.2
28.3
10.5
-3 .1
28.4
1.8

3.0
5.7
1.3

3.6
11.1
-.8

4.1
9 .3
.8

4 .8
-.4
8.2

3.8
2 .0
5.0

-.6
-2 .4
.6

.4
-.2
.7

.4
1.9
-.6

.6
.7
.6

- 1 .8
-6 .6
1.3

.0
- 2 .3
1.5

-.1
3.3
- 2 .0

1.3
2.8
.4

4.0
4.4
3.7

M
aterials

4.0

7.5

3.6

4.1

6 .9

.8

.2

.8

.8

-.5

1.5

2.5

.7

6.6

Durable

5.5
.8
11.2
2.8
2.6
2.8
1.1
2.5
4.5
.1
1.0
-.1
2.8

9.4
16.8
12.4
3.9
5.6
6 .0
10.1
6 .0
4.5
7.2
4 .0
4 .7
2 .7

6.2
2.2
10.6
4 .2
5.2
4.2
8.2
7.3
6 .4
-4 .2
-4 .1
-4 .9
-2 .8

3.9
-6 .5
10.9
2 .7
7.2
6 .3
- 1 .8
9.1
10.7
-1 .4
2.0
-1 .1
7 .9

11.1
15.2
19.7
2 .4
.8
3 .8
-1 .3
7 .9
3 .4
3 .9
-1 .6
-2 .3
-.5

1.0
.5
1.6
.6
1.1
1.0
-2 .4
1.5
2 .3
-.5
- .1
1.0
-2 .0

.3
1.0
.9
-.6
- 1 .0
-.1
1.1
-.9
.2
-.9
.2
-.7
1.9

1.6
1.6
2.2
1.1
.9
.4
-.4
1.8
-.5
2 .0
-.9
-.6
-1 .6

1.4
1.0
2.2
.9
1.9
-.1
1.5
-.7
-.2
-.1
.1
-.1
.4

-.9
- 9 .6
3.1
-.9
-.2
-2 .4
- 1 0 .0
-1 .6
.0
-4 .7
3.0
3.1
2 .9

.4
11.2
- 1 .7
-1 .8
- 1 .0
3.4
10.1
4 .3
1.9
3.1
2.6
.9
5.7

4.6
9.5
2.7
4.1
4.4
1.7
.8
1.9
2.0
1.2
- 2 .4
-.4
- 5 .8

1.9
2.7
2.4
1.1
1.8
-.5
2.2
- 2 .3
-.6
.2
- 1 .7
- 1 .9
- 1 .4

10.0
15.5
14.5
4.0
5.1
5.1
3.4
8.0
5.9
1.8
- 1 .2
- 2 .6
1.3

4.0
4.2
3.1
2.6

5 .3
4 .8
5 .4
5.0

3.1
3 .3
2 .4
1.9

5 .3
5 .6
4 .0
3 .5

5.1
4 .7
5 .0
3 .9

.4
.5
.4
.3

.0
.0
.0
.0

.6
.6
.6
.4

.9
.8
.8
.7

-.2
.2
-.9
-1 .1

.9
.4
1.4
1.5

1.2
1.0
1.5
1.4

.6
.5
.4
.2

5.1
4.7
4.9
4.2

2.6
2.5

1.7
4.1

.2
2.8

7.2
4 .6

-.4
2 .6

.3
.9

-.8
-.7

-.1
.3

.7
.7

.9
-3 .1

1.1
.1

-1 .1
2.4

-.3
.5

1.8
4.0

8.9
4.4

5.2
4 .3

8 .0
3.9

9.1
3 .6

12.0
10.8

.9
.6

.9
.8

1.2
1.1

1.3
1.2

.3
-2 .3

.1
2.1

3.3
4.5

1.4
.4

9.3
7.8

4.7

8 .4

5.6

4 .6

9 .0

1.0

.2

1.3

1.0

-1 .4

1.2

3.8

1.3

8.6

Consumer goods
Durable
Autom otive products
Autos and trucks
Autos
Trucks
Auto parts and allied goods
O th er durable goods
A ppliances and electronics
Appliances and air cond.
H om e electronics
C arpeting and furniture
M iscellaneous

Nondurable

N onenergy
Foods and tobacco
Clothing
C hem ical products
P aper products
Energy products
Fuels
Utilities

Equipment, total
Business equipment
Information processing & related
C om puter and office
Industrial
Transit
Autos and trucks
O ther

Defense and space equipment
Oil and gas well drilling
M anufactured homes

Intermediate products
Construction supplies
Business supplies

C on sum er parts
Equipm ent parts
O ther
Basic m etals

Nondurable
Textile
P aper
C hem ical
O ther

Energy

Prim ary
C onverted fuel

.8

SPECIAL AGGREGATES
Total excluding:
Autos and trucks
M otor vehicles and parts
Com puters
Com puters and semiconductors

Consumer goods excluding:
Autos and trucks
Energy

Business equipment excluding:
Autos and trucks
C om puter and office equipm ent

Materials excluding:
Energy

Note— Percent changes shown in the first and last colum ns are based on seasonally adjusted data.




5

Table 2A
.
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY GROUPS
Index. 1£)92= 100

Item

S IC

.....

Total index
Manufacturing

1996
IP
Prooortion1

1996
O c t ..

S easonallv Adjusted
19 97
Nov.
Jan.r
Feb /
D e c .r

Mar.P

1996
Oct.

10 0.00

116.2

117.2

117.7

117.8

118.5

119.6

117.5

8 6 .3 4

117.6

118.5

119.2

119.3

12 0.4

121.4

120.2

27 .7 2
58 .6 2

113.8
119.5

113.8
120.8

114.0
12 1 .7

113.6
12 2.0

114.6
12 3.2

115.4
124.4

115.8
122.3

4 6 .7 9
2.0 6
1.30
2.1 2

127.1
109.2
110.4
111.7

128.4
113.1
110.5
111.8

12 8 .8
10 8.0
110.5
111.3

12 9.4
10 8.8
10 9.9
112.4

13 1.3
110.9
110.2
112.7

133.1
111.9
112.1
112.6

129.7
115.4
111.4
115.7

33
Primary metals
Iron and steel
3 3 1 ,2
R aw steel
Nonferrous
3 3 3 -6 ,9
Fabricated m etal products
34
Industrial machinery
and equipment
35
Com puter and office equip.
357
Electrical machinery
36
Semiconductors
3 6 7 2 -9

3.5 2
1.88
.09
1.64
5.2 8

122.1
123.2
111.5
120.7
119.3

118.5
115.9
108.7
121.4
119.1

118.8
116.7
112.5
12 1.2
119.5

117.3
117.1
111.7
117.5
119.1

119.2
119.0
112.3
119.3
12 0.7

121.7
121.9
115.4
121.3
121.9

9.51
2.4 5
8.5 8
3 .8 7

159.9
32 3.6
165.6
26 6.5

161.7
3 2 8 .3
167.2
27 2 .5

16 2.9
3 3 2 .5
16 8 .8
2 8 0 .4

16 4.6
3 4 0 .5
168.8
2 8 3 .9

167.1
3 4 9 .7
17 3.3
2 9 3 .7

Transportation equipment
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks
Aerospace and misc.
Instruments
Miscellaneous

3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

8.41
4.8 0
2.2 9
3.62
4.7 2
1.29

105.3
121.2
117.3
89 .4
103.4
113.0

109.5
128.9
125.7
90 .3
103.0
114.1

10 9.6
12 7.9
12 5.6
9 1 .5
104.1
116.6

112.0
132.0
128.8
92 .2
103.3
116.3

Foods
Tobacco products
Textile mill products
Apparel products
Paper and products

20
21
22
23
26

39 .55
9.3 7
1.16
1.57
1.80
3.29

107.4
107.1
104.0
107.6
97 .8
107.6

107.9
107.6
105.4
108.2
97 .3
110.1

10 8.8
10 8.2
10 8.9
10 6.3
9 7 .2
111.6

Printing and publishing
Chemicals and products
Petroleum products
Rubber and plastics products
Leather and products

27
28
29
30
31

6.4 4
10.17
1.75
3.7 8
.20

99 .7
111.3
108.4
121.4
78 .4

100.0>
111.8
107.4
121.7
77 .3

10
12
13
14

5.5 9
.42
.87
3.71
.60

103.4
105.6
107.5
100.0
120.0

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

8.0 7
6.2 6
1.81

8 1 .5 4
8 3 .8 9
80 .0 2

Primary processing
Advanced processing
Durable
Lumber and products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products

24
25
.32

37
371

Nondurable

M
ining
Metal mining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Stone and earth minerals

Utilities
Electric
Gas

___ Not seasonally adjusted
19 97
Nov.
Dec/
Jan/
Feb /
116.1

Mar.P

115.3

116.8

118.7

119.2

117.6

115.2

115.8

119.2

12 0.4

113.4
119.7

110.9
117.3

110.9
118.2

113.9
12 1.8

114.6
123.2

127.7
111.1
108.3
112.0

124.9
10 2.4
10 8.7
106.8

126.1
10 4.3
106.1
10 5.5

132.1
10 8.5
110.5
10 7.8

133.9
110.1
110.7
109.4

121.7
122.2
111.1
121.1
121.3

118.1
115.6
108.2
121.0
119.6

115.5
113.1
10 9.7
118.2
119.2

116.6
114.6
112.1
118.8
115.1

12 2.8
12 3.4
116.8
122.1
118.8

12 3.8
12 4.4
118.6
123.1
121.1

169.6
35 9.2
176.7
30 3.5

161.4
32 5.7
168.0
26 6.2

157.4
316.1
168.7
27 5.4

157.0
3 2 9 .7
170.0
2 8 6 .6

159.1
3 2 1 .2
16 6.4
2 8 2 .4

168.1
3 3 8 .0
172.5
2 9 2 .7

171.4
3 4 8 .7
176.1
3 0 4 .6

113.0
133.0
12 9.7
9 3 .3
104.1
117.5

114.6
135.1
131.7
94.5
104.6
118.0

110.4
132.7
133.3
88 .6
103.8
116.9

108.9
127.8
127.1
90.2
102.8
118.1

99 .0
103.4
99 .8
93 .3
104.0
117.5

110.1
127.6
121.5
92 .6
101.1
112.3

119.3
145.6
145.4
93 .8
102.5
114.8

119.6
144.5
136.9
95 .3
103.3
117.2

10 8.4
108.2
10 5.8
106.6
96 .5
110.3

108.7
10 8.4
105.2
106.3
96 .2
111.2

109.1
108.7
108.0
108.0
96.4
111.0

110.0
112.2
115.5
113.4
99.1
110.0

106.8
107.7
103.6
105.7
97.8
108.9

104.8
105.0
89 .5
95 .3
9 6 .9
106.7

10 4.7
103.2
102.9
101.0
93 .4
112.0

10 5.7
10 2.7
108.7
104.9
94.1
113.1

106.2
103.3
106.8
106.9
9 5 .3
110.7

9 9 .8
114.0
10 7.3
12 2.6
80.1

9 9 .9
113.7
107.5
12 1.2
7 8 .2

100.5
113.2
108.9
123.1
7 7 .7

101.2
113.0
109.3
123.9
78 .5

100.7
112.1
109.7
122.7
80 .0

98.7
108.6
109.6
121.7
79.0

9 7 .9
108.3
107.6
121.8
8 0 .3

9 5 .7
10 9.9
9 9 .9
119.8
7 6 .3

9 6 .6
110.5
10 0.7
123.1
7 5 .8

98 .2
110.8
102.9
123.5
77 .9

103.5
102.5
108.8
100.2
120.2

10 4.5
10 6.3
10 9.5
10 0 .7
12 2.9

104.2
10 5.7
106.4
10 1.3
12 0.6

10 5.7
10 5.7
109.6
102.5
12 3.3

106.7
106.2
105.5
104.8
122.8

106.4
104.1
110.9
100.8
141.7

105.6
102.3
108.7
103.1
121.5

10 3.7
105.8
106.1
103.4
100.4

10 1.0
101.1
105.6
10 2.0
8 5 .8

10 2.9
103.8
114.0
10 2.4
88.1

104.4
106.2
112.6
103.1
99 .7

111.9
112.0
111.3

114.5
112.7
120.9

112.6
112.6
112.7

113.5
113.2
114.4

10 9.7
110.0
108.5

110.6
110.9
109.5

98.0
103.5
78.6

108.9
104.4
124.3

124.8
112.9
165.7

139.1
12 0.4
2 0 3 .7

124.7
110.5
17 3.7

118.0
106.8
156.7

117.3
114.7
110.8

117.9
115.5
111.6

118.6
116.1
112.0

118.5
116.1
112.0

119.6
117.1
112.8

120.6
118.1
113.5

119.4
117.2
113.4

117.0
114.7
110.7

115.7
112.2
107.9

115.1
112.8
10 8.6

117.7
116.1
111.8

119.0
117.2
112.6

11.4
5.6
5.8
5.5
0.3

12.0
6.2
5.8
5 .6
0 .3

12.1
5 .8
6 .3
6 .0
0 .3

12.3
6.0
6 .4
6.1
0 .3

12.4
6.1
6 .3
6 .0
0 .3

12.6
6.2
6.4
6.0
0.3

13.4
6.6
6.8
6.5
0.3

11.5
5.9
5.6
5.3
0.3

9.5
4 .6
4 .9
4 .6
0.2

12.1
5 .9
6.2
6 .0
0 .3

12.5
6.2
6 .3
6 .0
0.3

12.4
6.1
6.3
6 .0
0 .3

SPECIAL AGGREGATES
Manufacturing excluding:
Motor vehicles and parts
Com puter and office equipm ent
Computers and semiconductors

M
emo: Motor vehicle assemblies2
Total
Autos
Trucks
Light
H eavy and medium

1. The IP proportion data are estim ates of the industries’ relative contributions to overall IP growth in the following year.
2. Millions of units at an annual rate.
Note— Primary processing manufacturing includes textile mill products, paper and products, industrial chemicals, synthetic m aterials, and fertilizers,
petroleum products, rubber and plastics products, lumber and products, prim ary m etals, fabricated metals, and stone, clay, and glass products.
Advanced processing manufacturing includes foods, tobacco products, apparel products, printing and publishing, chem ical products and other agricultural
chemicals, leather and products, furniture and fixtures, industrial m achinery and equipm ent, electrical machinery, transportation equipm ent, instruments,
and m iscellaneous m anufactures.




Table 2B
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY GROUPS
P ercent change

S IC

Item

1995Q 4
to
1996Q 4

Seasonally adjusted
annual rate
19 96
19 97
Q 4r
qip
Q2
Q3

S easonallv adjusted
.... Not seasonallv adjusted
19 97
1996
1997
1996
Ja n .r - F e b /
D ec/
Mar.P
Jan.r
Feb /
D ec/
Mar.P

Total index

3 .9

6.2

3.3

4.5

5 .6

.4

.1

.6

.9

-.8

Manufacturing

4.1

6 .3

5.0

4.3

6 .6

.6

.1

.9 .

.9

-2 .1

2 .9
4 .8

5.9
6.5

5.4
4.8

2.3
5.2

2 .4
8 .7

.2
.7

-.4
.3

.9
.9

.7
1.0

- 2 .2
- 2 .0

5 .7
2 .7
2 .5
1.9

10.3
15.5
8 .7
2 .0

6.0
-1 .9
- 2 .7
11.8

2.8
-1 .3
7.1
- 5 .0

10.2
1.5
1.0
3.7

.3
-4 .5
.0
-.4

.5
.7
-.5
1.0

1.5
1.9
.3
.3

1.3
.9
1.6
-.1

- 2 .2
-7 .9
.3
- 4 .6

Prim ary metals
33
3 3 1 ,2
Iron and steel
R aw steel
3 3 3 -6 ,9
Nonferrous
Fabricated metal products
34
Industrial machinery
and equipment
35
C om puter and office equip.
357
Electrical machinery
36
Semiconductors
3 6 7 2 -9

3 .7
2 .4
-1 .7
5 .2
2 .7

9.1
8.9
4 .6
9.3
3.3

7.4
7.4
-.4
7.6
3.1

4.1
2.6
- 7 .9
6.0
.1

-1 .4
2 .6
8 .4
-5 .7
4 .3

.3
.7
3.5
-.2
.3

-1 .3
.4
-.7
-3 .1
-.3

1.6
1.6
.5
1.5
1.4

2.1
2.4
2.8
1.8
1.0

10.0
3 7 .4
7.1
16.0

10.6
4 0 .7
8.5
14.5

11.6
4 3 .0
5.6
15.3

6.8
22.1
6.7
17.8

14.6
29 .2
14.4
3 3 .7

.7
1.3
1.0
2 .9

1.1
2 .4
.0
1.2

1.5
2.7
2.6
3.5

37
371
3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

6.5
- 1 .6
-.4
18.9
2 .7
3.2

2 5 .7
36 .8
53 .0
11.7
1.5
2.4

7.6
2 .7
11.7
14.9
.3
1.9

- 2 .2
- 1 5 .2
- 2 4 .8
18.1
2.9
5.9

20.1
2 5 .6
2 5 .6
13.5
1.8
9.6

.1
-.8
- .1
1.3
1.0
2 .2

2.1
3.2
2 .5
.8
-.8
-.3

Foods
Tobacco products
Textile mill products
Apparel products
P aper and products

20
21
22
23
26

2 .3
2.1
2.6
.5
-2 .8
1.7

1.6
1.0
-9 .1
7.7
4.2
10.5

3.7
.9
- 4 .5
5.4
- 2 .9
4.2

6.0
6.0
9.1
- 1 .8
- 3 .6
2.8

2 .5
3.0
.7
-1 .7
-4 .3
3.9

.8
.6
3 .3
-1 .7
-.1
1.3

-.4
.0
-2 .9
.2
-.7
-1 .1

Printing and publishing
Chem icals and products
Petroleum products
Rubber and plastics products
Leather and products

27
28
29
30
31

.4
5.0
3.5
2.5
- 4 .7

- 4 .2
2.2
1.6
2.9
-.4

3.8
6.9
2.4
7.8
- 6 .2

6.9
12.3
3.9
.3
-5 .1

2.9
3 .4
3.2
2 .7
-2 .4

-.1
1.9
-.1
.7
3 .5

10
12
13
14

3.4
1.7
4.1
3.0
6.9

10.9
8.6
2 6 .9
8.1
8.3

.8
14.5
- 4 .6
-.5
7.5

.5
2.7
9.6
-2 .1
2.6

6 .7
4.2
-5 .2
10.5
4 .0

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

1.4
.9
3.1

2.2
2.2
2.3

- 1 2 .0
- 1 0 .8
-1 6 .1

9.5
5.9
23.1

4 .5
3.3
2 .7

4 .7
5.3
4 .9

5.1
4.0
3.4

5.6
3.8
3.1

Primary processing
Advanced processing
Durable
Lum ber and products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products

Transportation equipm ent
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks
Aerospace and misc.
Instruments
Miscellaneous

24
25
32

Nondurable

Mining
M etal mining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Stone and earth minerals

Utilities
Electric
G as

1.3

Mar. 96
to
Mar. 97

1.6

.5

.5

3.0

1.0

6.6

.0
.7

2.8
3.1

.6
1.2

4.1
7 .8

1.0
1.9
- 2 .4
- 1 .2

4 .7
4 .0
4.1
2.1

1.4
1.5
.2
1.5

9.2
2.0
5.9
3.5

- 2 .2
-2 .1
1.4
-2 .3
-.4

.9
1.4
2.2
.5
- 3 .5

5.4
7 .7
4.2
2.8
3.3

.8
.7
1.5
.8
1.9

5.3
7.1
2.5
3.2
3.7

1.5
2.7
2.0
3.4

-.3
4 .3
.8
4.1

1.3
- 2 .6
-2 .1
- 1 .5

5.7
5.2
3.7
3.7

1.9
3.2
2.1
4.0

11.2
32 .6
10.2
22 .8

1.0
.8
.7
1.2
.8
1.0

1.4
1.5
1.5
1.2
.4
.4

-9 .1
-1 9 .1
- 2 1 .5
3.4
1.2

-.6

11.3
23 .5
21 .8
-.7
- 2 .8
- 4 .4

8.3
14.1
19.6
1.2
1.4
2.2

.2
-.8
- 5 .8
1.6
.8
2.1

20 .8
26 .5
27.9
14.0
1.6
4.8

.3
.2

-.3
-.3
.9

.3
.3
2.7
1.6
.1
-.2

-1 .9
- 2 .5
- 1 3 .6
- 9 .8
- 1 .0
-2 .0

-.1
- 1 .8
15.0
6.0
- 3 .6
4.9

.9
-.5
5.6
3.9
.8
.9

.5
.6
- 1 .7
1.9
1.3
-2 .1

3.5
2.4
- 3 .0
.9
- 1 .8
4.9

.1
-.2
.2
-1 .1
-2 .4

.6
-.5
1.3
1.6
-.6

.7
-.2
.4
.7
1.0

-.9
-.2
- 1 .8
.1
1.6

- 2 .2
1.4
- 7 .2
- 1 .6
- 4 .9

.9
.5
.8
2.7
-.7

1.7
.3
2.2
.4
2.7

3.7
6.0
3.4
3.8
- 3 .3

1.0
3 .7
.6
.5
2 .2

-.3
-.6
-2 .9
.6
-1 .9

1.5
.0
3.0
1.2
2.3

.9
.5
- 3 .7
2.3
-.4

- 1 .7
3.5
- 2 .3
.3
- 1 7 .4

- 2 .7
- 4 .5
-.5
- 1 .4
-1 4 .6

1.9
2.7
8.0
.3
2.7

1.5
2.3
- 1 .3
.7
13.2

3.8
4.5
-.3
4.6
4.2

-6 .0
-3 .7
--1 3 .8

-1 .6
-.1
-6 .8

.8
.6
1.5

-3 .4
-2 .8
-5 .2

.8
.8
1.0

14.6
8.2
3 3 .3

11.5
6.6
22 .9

- 1 0 .4
- 8 .2
- 1 4 .7

- 5 .3
- 3 .3
- 9 .8

- 3 .3
- 2 .7
- 5 .4

5 .6
6 .0
4 .7

.6
.5
.4

-.1
.0
- .1

.9
.9
.7

.8
.7

-1 .1
- 2 .3
- 2 .6

-.6
.6
.7

2.3
2.9
2.9

1.1
.9
.7

5.6
5.8
5.0

-.6

5.6

SPECIAL AGGREGATES
Manufacturing excluding:
M otor vehicles and parts
C om puter and office equipm ent
Com puters and semiconductors

N ote— Percent changes shown in the first and last colum ns are based on seasonally adjusted data.




.8

Table 3
CAPACITY UTILIZATION: MANUFACTURING, MINING, AND UTILITIES
P ercent of capacity, seasonally adjusted
1996
Proportion

1 9 671996
Ave.

1973
Hiah

19 7819 80
Hiah

19 82
Low

19881989
Hiah

19 901991
Low

19 96
Mar.

1996
Oct.

Nov.

Dec/

1997
Jan/

Feb/

Mar.P

Total industry

10 0.00

82.1

8 9 .2

8 7 .3

71.1

8 5 .3

78.1

8 2 .6

8 3 .0

83 .4

83 .5

83 .4

83 .6

84.1

Manufacturing

8 7 .4 3

8 1 .2

8 8 .5

8 6 .9

6 9 .0

8 5 .7

7 6 .6

8 1 .3

8 2 .0

8 2 .4

82 .5

82 .3

82 .8

8 3 .3

26.61
60.81

8 2 .3
8 0 .6

91 .2
8 7 .2

88.1
8 6 .7

6 6 .2
7 0 .4

88 .9
84 .2

7 7 .8
76.1

8 5 .6
7 9 .4

8 6 .7
7 9 .9

86 .5
80 .5

86 .6
80 .8

86.1
80 .7

86 .7
81.1

8 7 .2
8 1 .6

4 7 .7 0
1.97
1.32
2 .2 0

7 9 .5
8 2 .7
8 1 .7
7 8 .0

8 9 .2
8 8 .7
9 6 .8
88 .8

8 7 .7
87 .9
85 .5
8 8 .0

6 3 .9
6 0 .8
6 8 .9
6 4 .3

84 .5
93 .6
86 .6
83 .6

73 .2
75 .5
72 .5
6 9 .7

8 0 .9
8 6 .0
7 9 .3
7 8 .3

81 .5
84 .2
8 1 .6
7 9 .3

8 1 .9
8 7 .0
81 .6
7 9 .3

8 1 .7
8 2.9
8 1 .4
78 .8

81 .7
83 .3
80.8
79 .4

82.5
84 .7
80 .9
79 .5

83.1
8 5 .3
82.1
7 9 .3

3.2 2
1.75
.08
1-.46
.08
.10

8 0 .8
8 0 .6
80 .6
8 1 .3
74.1
88 .5

100.2
10 5.8
10 2.7
9 0 .8
9 3 .4
95 .7

94 .2
95 .8
9 5 .8
91.1
8 1 .5
97 .6

45.1
37 .0
35 .2
60.1
42.1
58 .6

92 .7
95.2
92 .7
89 .3
86 .3
100.4

7 3 .7
7 1 .8
71 .5
7 4 .2
73 .6
9 7 .3

9 0 .4
8 8 .0
9 1 .8
9 3 .3
8 2 .2
85 .2

9 3 .5
9 2 .6
90 .5
9 4 .7
9 5 .3
8 5 .8

90 .5
8 6 .8
88.1
95.1
89 .8
85 .6

90 .4
87.1
91.1
94 .7
96 .8
85 .5

89 .0
87.1
90 .3
91.6
93.3
85.5

90.2
88 .2
90.5
92 .7
95 .7
86 .0

9 1 .9
90.1
9 2 .8
94.1

83 .9

6 3 .7

82 .0

72 .2

84 .5

8 4 .3

84 .0

84.1

83.6

84.6

85 .2

7 2 .4
6 6 .9
75.1

90 .5
9 2 .3
85.1

89.1
91 .8
80 .5

89 .2
90 .7
80 .2

89 .0
89.5
80 .0

89.1
89.2
79.0

89 .6
89.1
80.1

90.1
88 .9
8 0 .7

SIC

item

Primary processing
Advanced processing
Durable
Lum ber and products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Prim ary m etals
Iron and steel
R aw steel
Nonferrous
Primary copper
Primary aluminum
Fabricated metal products
Industrial m achinery
and equipment
C om puter and office equip.
Electrical machinery

24
25
32

33
331,2
3 3 3 -6 ,9
3331
3334

86 .4

34

5.1 8

78 .2

87.8.

35
357
36

8.9 2
2.3 7
8.7 7

81 .5
81 .5
81.1

96 .0
9 0 .9
89 .2

93 .2
92 .6
89 .4

64 .0
65 .5
71 .6

85 .4
86 .9
84 .0

37
371

7 5 .7
76 .4

86.1
93 .4

3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

9.7 7
5.5 6
2 .4 9
4.2 2
4 .9 8
1.36

7 5 .3
8 1 .9
7 5 .3

78 .4
8 9 .9
82 .9

84 .8
95 .0
94 .6
81 .9
92 .7
79 .4

57 .2
45 .5
4 0 .6
66 .6
78 .4
65 .4

85 .8
89.1
92.2
87 .3
81 .4
79 .0

68 .5
5 5 .9
5 3 .3
79 .2
77 .2
7 1 .7

6 4 .4
6 1 .3
6 4 .3
68 .5
79 .2
7 8 .3

71.1
6 8 .5
72 .8
7 4 .6
7 9 .6
78 .0

73 .8 "
72 .7
77 .8
75 .4
79 .3
78 .7

73.8
71 .9
77 .7
76 .4
80.1
80 .3

75.4
74.1
79.5
77.1
79.5
80.0

76.1
74.6
79 .9
78.0
80.1
80 .7

77.1
7 5 .7
81 .0
79 .0
80 .4
8 0 .9

20
22
23
26
2 6 1 -3
27

3 9 .7 3
9.4 8
1.60
1.99
3.1 7
1.26
6.5 5

83 .4
83 .0
85 .5
81.1
8 9 .3
9 2 .4
8 5 .9

87 .8
86 .0
91 .4
84 .2
97.1
97 .2
8 9 .7

87 .5
84 .6
91 .2
87 .5
96.1
98 .3
93 .9

76 .4
79.1
72 .3
77 .5
80 .6
82 .0
82 .0

87 .3
85 .4
90 .4
85.1
93.5
98 .0
91 .7

8 0 .7
8 2 .7
7 7 .7
7 5 .5
8 5 .0
8 9 .9
79 .6

81 .9
8 1 .6
8 3 .0
7 5 .3
8 6 .6
88 .2
8 0 .0

8 2 .7
8 1 .3
8 2 .4
7 4 .7
8 7 .4
91 .5
82 .0

82 .9
81 .7
8 2 .7
74.2
89 .3
92 .7
82 .2

83.5
82 .0
81.1
74.1
90 .4
94 .0
82 .2

83.1
81.8
81.2
73.5
89.3
92.8
82.3

83 .2
81.9
80 .9
73 .3
90 .0
93 .6
82 .8

83 .4
8 2 .0
8 2 .2
7 3 .4
8 9 .7

Chem icals and products
28
2821
Plastics materials
2823,4
Synthetic fibers
Petroleum products
29
Rubber and plastics products
30
Leather and products
31

10.69
.78
.36
1.50
3.4 3
.24

7 9 .6
8 6 .6
85.1
8 6 .3
84 .9
81 .2

87 .6
102.0
93 .8
9 6 .7
95.5
8 1 .3

84 .6
90 .9
98 .6
90.0
91.2
92.1

6 9 .9
63 .4
64 .4
66 .8
72 .7
75 .8

86.2
97.0
99 .7
88 .5
89.6
83 .3

7 9 .3
74 .8
7 7 .6
85.1
7 7 .4
76.1

7 7 .7
9 2 .9
8 3 .4
93.1
90 .7
72 .2

7 9 .5
94 .0
9 5 .4
95 .3
91 .5
70 .3

79.6
92 .4
90 .4
94 .4
91 .6
69 .4

81 .0
94 .0
93 .8
94.2
92.1
72 .0

80.6
93.5
95.9
94.4
90.9
70.4

80 .0

79 .7

88 .8
95.6
92.1
70.1

96 .0
92 .5
7 1 .0

10
12
13
138
14

5.2 9
.42
.85
3.5 0
.65
.52

87 .5
78 .5
86 .9
88 .5
72 .8
85 .4

9 4 .3
89 .6
91 .0
9 6 .9
93 .0
95 .0

96 .0
87 .9
99 .4
97 .3
104.3
92 .7

80 .3
4 4 .4
7 6 .6
82 .3
50 .9
63 .3

86 .8
89 .4
91.5
86 .6
60 .6
89.1

86.1
79 .9
8 3 .4
87 .5
53 .7
7 9 .4

9 0 .3
8 6 .0
86.1
91 .2
79 .6
9 4 .4

9 1 .0
88 .9
86 .8
91 .6
81 .8
95.1

91.1
86 .3
87 .8
91.8
82 .5
95.1

91 .9
89 .5
88 .3
92 .3
84 .8
97 .0

91.6
89.0
85.7
92.9
89.9
95.0

92 .9
88 .9
88.1
94 .0
96.8
97 .0

9 3 .7
8 9 .3
84 .8
96.1
106.0
9 6 .4

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

7 .2 8
5.5 9
1.69

87 .2
89.1
82 .4

96 .2
9 9 .0
94.1

89.1
88 .2
93 .7

75 .9
78 .9
69.1

92 .6
95 .0
85 .0

8 3 .4
87.1
67.1

92 .2
93 .2
88 .2

8 9 .0
90 .2
8 4 .5

91 .0
90 .6
91 .7

8 9 .3
90 .3
85 .4

89 .9
90.7
86 .6

86 .7
88 .0
82.1

8 7 .3
88 .6
8 2 .9

Transportation equipment
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks1
A erospace and misc.
Instruments
Miscellaneous

Nondurable
Foods
Textile mill products
Apparel products
P aper and products
Pulp and paper
Printing and publishing

Mining
Metal mining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Oil and gas well drilling
Stone and earth minerals

Utilities
Electric
G as

83 .5

1. Series begins in 1977.
N ote— Primary processing manufacturing includes textile mill products, paper and products, industrial chem icals, synthetic materials, and fertilizers,
petroleum products, rubber and plastic products, lumber and products, primary metals, fabricated m etals, and stone, clay, and glass products.
A dvanced processing manufacturing includes foods, tobacco products, apparel products, printing and publishing, chem ical products and other agricultural
chem icals, leather and products, furniture and fixtures, industrial m achinery and equipment, electrical machinery, transportation equipment, instruments,
and miscellaneous m anufactures.




8

Table 4
INDUSTRIAL CAPACITY: MANUFACTURING, MINING, AND UTILITIES

item

S IC

...

P ercent ch an a e
D ece m b er to D ecem b er
Annual rate
1 9 6 7 ­ 19 67­ 1 9 7 5 ­
1997
1997
1975
1994
1995
1993
Ave.
1996 1997P
Ave.
Ave.

C apacity indexes
Percent of 1992 outout
1996
Mar.

1996
Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

1997
Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Total industry

2.8

3.8

2 .4

1.8

2.9

3.4

3.7

3.7

137.1

14 0.0

14 0.5

14 0.9

14 1.3

141.8

142.2

Manufacturing

3.1

4.0

2.8

2 .0

3.2

3.8

4.1

4.1

140.1

143.4

143.9

14 4.4

144.9

145.3

145.8

2.1
3.6

4.1
4.0

1.4
3.5

1.2
2.4

2.1
3.8

2.1
4 .6

2.4
4.9

2.1
5.1

129.4
145.3

131.2
149.4

131.5
150.0

131.7
150.7

131.9
151.3

132.2
151.9

132.4
152.5

3.5
1.8
2.8
1.4

3.7
2.9
4.5
2.5

3.4
1.4
2.1
.9

2.6
.4
1.4
.1

4.2
2.6
1.4
1.0

5.7
2.1
1.3
1.3

6.2
2.9
2.4
2.3

6.3
2.7
2.3
2.0

150.7
127.6
133.4
138.9

156.0
12 9.7
135.2
140.7

156.8
130.0
13 5.5
14 1.0

157.7
13 0.4
135.8
14 1.3

158.5
130.7
136.0
141.5

159.2
131.0
136.3
141.8

160.0
131.3
136.5
142.0

3 3 3 -6 ,9
3331
33 34

.3
-.4
-.9
1.5
.2
1.2

1.7
.7
.3
3.8
1.8
5.2

-.3
-.8
- 1 .3
.5
-.4
-.4

-.1
-.8
- 4 .3
.9
5.2
.5

1.5
3.1
1.4
-.4
-1 .1
.0

1.8
1.8
3.3
1.8
2.5
.0

3.5
4.8
.9
1.9
- 2 .9
.0

3.3
3.6
3.5
2.9
- 1 .3
.0

127.9
129.3
122.7
126.1
130.1
103.7

130.6
133.0
123.3
127.5
12 7.7
103.7

13 1.0
133.5
12 3.4
127.8
127.3
10 3.7

131.4
134.0
123.5
128.0
127.0
103.7

131.8
134.5
123.7
128.3
126.7
103.7

132.1
134.9
124.1
128.6
126.6
103.7

132.5
135.3
124.4
128.9
126.5
103.7

34

‘ 1.6

3.1

1.1

1.6

1.4

2.8

2.9

2.7

139.1

141.4

141.8

142.1

142.4

142.8

143.1

35
357
36

5.3
20.4
7.4

12.0

4.7
5.9

5.6
24 .0
8.1

4.8
19.4
8.3

6.5
23.1
12.0

9.2
29 .5
17.0

11.6
36 .7
16.5

12.7
39.8
15.5

168.4
29 3 .5
188.3

179.6
3 5 2 .6
2 0 5 .8

181.3
3 6 2 .0
2 0 8 .5

183.0
37 1 .6
211.2

184.7
38 1 .8
21 3 .8

186.5
39 2 .7
2 1 6 .3

188.4
40 3.8
21 8.9

37
371

2.5
3.3

3.0
4.4

2.4
2.8

3 7 2 -6 ,9
38
39

1.4
4.5
2.1

1.1
7.6
4.4

1.5
3.2
1.2

3.0
-.2
- 2 .0
.5
1.5

3.2
7.9
6.2
-2 .1
.1
1.4

2.8
7.1
5.7
- 2 .6
.0
1.4

1.1
3.0
1.5
- 1 .4
.0
1.4

1.3
2.2
-.1
.5
1.7

147.3
174.1
160.1
120.9
129.9
143.7

148.2
176.9
161.3
119.9
129.9
144.9

148.3
17 7.3
161.5
119.8
12 9.9
14 5.0

148.4
177.7
161.7
119.7
129.9
145.2

148.5
178.0
161.9
119.6
129.9
145.4

148.6
178.2
162.2
119.6
130.0
145.6

148.7
178.4
162.5
119.6
130.0
145.8

20
22
23
26
2 6 1 -3
27

2.7
2.4
2.2
1.2
2.7
2.4
2.5

4.3
3.0
4.4
2.3
3.9
2.9
3.0

2.0
2.1
1.3
.7
2.2
2.2
2.3

1.3
1.8
2.5
.5
2.3
1.8
-.9

1.9
2.0
3.7
.4
1.4
1.9

.0

1.6
2.1
4.1
3.2
2.0
3.0
-.2

1.7
1.9
2.3
1.1
1.5
2.2
-.6

1.5
1.8
.5
.0
1.0
1.6
-.7

128.7
130.2
128.9
130.2
122.1
117.9
122.0

130.0
13 1.6
130.6
131.0
123.2
119.4
121.6

130.1
13 1.8
130.8
131.1
123.3
119.6
121.5

130.3
132.0
131.1
131.2
123.4
119.8
121.5

130.5
132.2
131.2
131.3
123.5
120.0
121.4

130.6
132.4
131.3
131.3
123.6
120.1
121.3

130.8
132.6
131.3
131.3
123.7
120.3
121.3

Chem icals and products
28
Plastics m aterials
2821
2 8 2 3 ,4
Synthetic fibers
Petroleum products
29
R ubber and plastics products
30
Leather and products
31

3.7
6.5
3.8
1.4
5.1
- 3 .2

6.8
12,7
9.7
4.2
8.4
- 1 .5

2.5
4.1
1.4
.3
3.8
- 3 .8

2.1
-1 .6
.8
-.5
3.2
-2 .1

3.0
7.5
1.2
2.1
4 .4
-1 .7

2.0
5.4
-.2
-.5
2.0
- 1 .9

3.6
7.1
1.3
.4
1.6
- 1 .4

3.2
5.8
1.4
.0
2.3
- 2 .8

137.1
128.0
120.9
113.4
131.5
112.4

140.0
133.3
121.9
113.8
132.8
111.5

14 0.3
13 4.0
12 2.0
113.8
13 3.0
111.4

140.7
134.8
122.2
113.8
133.2
111.3

141.1
135.5
122.3
113.9
133.4
111.1

141.5
136.2
122.5
113.9
133.6
110.8

141.8
136.8
122.6
113.9
133.9
110.5

10
12
13
138
14

.1
1.3
2.3
-.6
.2
1.1

-.1
.5
2:4
- 1 .0
.8
2.6

.1
1.6
2.3
-.4
-.1
.5

-.5
1.6
1.6
- 1 .6
- 6 .7
1.7

.8
- 1 .8
4.5
.0
-.9
1.0

-.6
1.2
- 1 .4
-.9
- 2 .2
1.9

-.3
1.0
1.1
- 1 .0
- 4 .2
1.9

.5
1.0
1.3
.0
- 1 .2
2.2

113.8
118.2
123.0
109.8
150.6
124.9

113.7
118.8
123.8
109.2
146.8
126.2

113.7
118.8
124.0
109.1
14 6.3
12 6.4

113.7
118.8
124.1
109.1
145.8
126.6

113.7
118.8
124.2
109.0
145.4
126.9

113.7
118.9
124.4
109.1
145.3
127.1

113.8
119.0
124.5
109.1
145.2
127.4

4 9 1 ,3pt
4 9 2 ,3pt

2.8
3.9
.3

6.1
7.8
2.3

1.5
2 .3
-.5

.8
1.3
.2

1.2
1.0
.4

1.9
2.4
.5

2.1
2.6
.8

1.5
1.7
.5

124.1
122.3
131.2

125.6
124.1
131.8

12 5.9
12 4.4
13 1.9

126.1
124.7
132.0

126.3
124.9
132.0

126.5
125.1
132.1

126.6
125.2
132.1

Primary processing
Advanced processing
Durable
Lum ber and products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Prim ary m etals
Iron and steel
R aw steel
Nonferrous
Prim ary copper
Prim ary aluminum
Fabricated metal products
Industrial m achinery
and equipm ent
C om puter and office equip.
Electrical m achinery
Transportation equipm ent
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos and light trucks1
A erospace and misc.
Instruments
M iscellaneous

Nondurable
Foods
Textile mill products
Apparel products
Paper and products
Pulp and paper
Printing and publishing

24
25
32

33
33 1 ,2

Mining
Metal mining
Coal mining
Oil and gas extraction
Oil and gas well drilling
Stone and earth m inerals

Utilities
Electric
Gas

.7

p. Preliminary estim ate for current year.
1. Series begins in 1977.




9

.7

Table 5A
I N D U S T R IA L P R O D U C T I O N , C A P A C I T Y A N D U T I L IZ A T I O N F O R T O T A L I N D U S T R Y :

H IS T O R IC A L D A T A

Seasonally adjusted
Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct,

Nov.

Dec.

Q1

.4

.9
-.7

.2
.8

.2
-.2

-.2

.6
.3

.4

.6

.1

.3

.0

.6

.5

-.8

.9

.3

.1
-.6

.0
-.2

.7
-1 .0

.5
.4

-.9
.9
1.3
.3
-.5

.7
.9

.4

.6
-.1
-.1

.6

-.3
.9

-.4
.3

1.2

.3
-1 .0
.4

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

-.5
-.5

.5

.5
-.9

-.6

.4

-.8

.3
.7
.3
.4

.8

.0
1.2

-.1
.1

.2
.1

1995
1996
1997

.3
-.4

-.2

.1

1.3

.1

.6

-.5
.9

86.9
89.6
90.2
95.8
99.7

87.6
88.9
91.2
96.1

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

98.5
96.7
97.5
102.3
105.7

99 .0
9 5 .S

98.1

95.0
98.9

102.8

102.8

106.2

107.0

1995
1996
1997

111.9
112.4
117.8

111.6
113.8
118.5

111.7
113.2
119.6

113.9
115.3
116.8

109.0
112.3
114.0
115.5
117.0

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

119.2
121.4
123.3
125.7
128.0

1995
1996
1997

Year
Industrial
Production,
Percent
Change1
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

Industrial
Production
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

.6
-.6
.1

.0
.4
.3

.7
.5
.5

9 8 .9

.8
.1
.7

-.3
.9

.4

-.3

-.6
.6

.2
.5

.7
.3
.5

.1

.2
.6

.0
.0

A

88.0

88.2

88.0

88.7
91.9
96.7

88.5
92.3
96.8
99.5

S1.5

-.2
.1

-.5

-1 .3

-.4

.9
.5

-.1
.8

-.1
.6

-.2
.0

1.0
.1

.3

.5

.6

.6

.8

.4

-.4

.3

.1

.2

.2
.8

100.1

.9
6.3

-5 .7

-.2

1.1

2.2
1.7
4.4

5.6
5.8
5.6

-2 .0
3.2
3.4
5.0

3.2
3.3

.8

3.3

4.5

2.8

93.7
97.7
98.5

88.4
90.0
95.3
98.5
98.5

89.0
93.1
97.3
99.0

99.4
97.6
100.3
103.3
109.2

97.9
97.9
101.7
104.7
110.7

112.4
115.8

112.7
117.0

112.1

110.7
113.3
114.7
116.2
118.2

111.6
113.7
115.1
116.5
118.8

110.3
113.0
114.6
116.0
117.9

121.0

120.1

124.2
126.4
129.2

120:4
122.5
124.7
126.9
130.1

123.0
125.3
127.5
131.1

122.3
124.4
126.7
129.7

.8

-.6
-.6
.1

1.9
-8 .2

1.1

1.3
6.7

.7
.9

3.7

.8

6.2

6.7

.1

3.9

-.7

.4

1.6

6.2

91.0
96.0
99.5
99.0
95.8
98.2

99.2
96.2
99.8

102.6

102.8

106.3

108.0

97.1
97.4
101.9
105.4

110.6

111.6
112.8

111.8

111.6

117.7

113.1
118.7

114.8

111.9
113.8
115.2
116.7
119.0

109.0
112.3
114.0
115.5
117.0

109.8

119.3
121.5
123.6
125.8
128.3

112.5
116.2

112.7
117.2

109.2
112.5
114.1
115.6
117.2

109.5
112.7
114.3
115.7
117.4

109.8

110.1
113.0
114.5
115.9
117.8

110.4
113.1
114.6
116.0
118.0

110.7
113.3
114.7
116.2
118.2

111.0

112.8

113.4
114.8
116.3
118.4

111.3
113.5
115.0
116.4
118.6

113.7
115.1
116.5
118.8

119.3
121.5
123.6
125.8
128.3

119.5
121.7
123.8
126,0
128.6

119.7
121.9
124.0
126.2
128.9

120.0
122.2

120.2

124.2
126.4
129.2

124.4
126.6
129.5

122.4
124.6
126.7
129.8

120.4
122.5
124.7
126.9
130.1

120.6

122.0

131.8
136.3
141.3

132.1
136.7
141.8

132.5
137.1
142.2

132.8
137.5

133.2
137.9

133.6
138.4

134.0
138.8

134.3
139.2

79.9
79.8
79.1
83.1
85.3

80.4
79.2
80.0
83.3
84.5

80.4
78.2
80.2
83.2
85.1

80.3
78.7
80.5
83.6
85.2

80.3
78.4
80.7
83.6
84.6

79.9
78.1
81.3
83.5
84.3

79.4
78.2
81.8
84.0
83.3

82.6
79.6
79.0

83.2
78.1
79.9

82.6
78.2
80.4

8 1 .6

82.6

82.9
78.9
79.4
81.7
82.8

81 .7
8 3 .3

82.8
78.7
80.6
81.2
83.7

82.7
79.5
80.2
81.2
83.9

82.5
79.5
80.6
81.3
84.1

1995

84.9
82.4
83.4

84.5
83.2
83.6

83 .9
83.1

83.7
83.2

83.6
83.5

83.4
83.2

119.9

88.0
88.5
92.5
96.8
99.6

97.7
98.1
101.9
104.6

113.0
116.0

114.4
115.8
117.6

99.3
97.2
99.7

87.4

88.8

99.0
98.2
101.3
104.1
109.9

115.8

100.1
102.8
109.2

111.6

112.8
114.4
115.8
117.6

88.1
88.6

88.0

98.9
96.9

100.0
103.4
108.6

115.2

121.0

121.2

125.1
127.3
130.8

123.0
125.3
127.5
131.1

123.2
125.5
127.7
131.4

134.7
139.6

135.1
140.0

135.5
140.5

135.9
140.9

132.1
136.7
141.8

133.2
137.9

134.3
139.2

135.5
140.5

133.8
138.6

79.6
78.3
81.7
84.3
83.5

79.9
78.2
81.6
84.0
83.2

79.0
78.8
82.6
84.1
82.7

79.2
79.1
82.7
84.6
82.9

79.5
79.7
83.1
85.0
83.2

80.2
79.1
79.8
83.2
85.0

80.2
78.4
80.8
83.6
84.7

79.6
78.2
81.7
84.1
83.3

79.2
79.2
82.8
84.6
82.9

79.8
78.7
81.3
83.9
84.0

82.5
79.5

81.9
79.9
81.0
81.8
84.1

80.7
79.7
81.3
82.1
84.4

80.1
79.1
81.2
82,5
84.9

82.9
78.9
79.5
81.6
82.9

82.7
78.8
80.4

82.5
79.7
80.4

81 .4

8 1 .3
8 3 .9

80.9
79.6
81.2
82.1

82.3
79.2

81.0
83.9

82.5
80.1
80.5
81.7
83.7

83.8
83.2

83,9
83.1

83.3
83.0

83.2
83.4

83.0
83.5

8 0 .2

122.7
124.9
127.1
130.5

120.8
122.8

Quarterly percent changes are at annual rates. Annual percent changes are calculated from annual averages.




1.8

99.5
98.3
100.5
103.9
109.3

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

1.

.0

99.4
97.4

112.6

82.6
84.1

4.6
4.4

4.3
3.1
3.8

.5
.5

89.0
90.7
95.8
99.1
98.9

111.7
115.5

8 4 .3

1.6
1.1

88.4
89.9
95.2
98.6
98.5

111.7
115.5

1996
1997

1.4
6.5
6.9
3.6

87.9
89.5
94.9
97.9
98.1

111.5
114.8

83.2

.3
.7
5.6
3.8
-4 .4

88.6

111.4
114.3

81,4

2.8
-1 .7
6.7
3.0
,5

88.7
93.7
97.6
98.5

108.6

Utilization
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

3.0

88.1

108.1

112.2

Annual

88.7
93.8
98.0
98.7

102.8

108.7

99.3
96.0

93.1
96.8
99.3

87.6
88.5
93.7
97.4
98.3

100.0
102.6

Capacity
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

98.9
95.3
99.6
103.2
107.4

88.0
88.2

99.2
97.2
100.4
103.1
109.1

99.4

Q4

2.0

.6

Q3

5.6

87.8

9 6 .2
9 9 .8

-.4

.5
.3
.7
.4

Q2

10

84.6

82.8
83.7

119.9

122.0

83.6
83.7
83.3

8 4 .4

80.4
81 .6
83 .7

8 3 .7

8 3 .2

83.8

83.2

83.3

83.1

Table 5B
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, CAPACITY AND UTILIZATION FOR MANUFACTURING: HISTORICAL DATA
S easonally adjusted
Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

M ay

June

July

Auq.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

D ec.

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Annual

In d u s tria l
P ro d u c tio n ,
P e rc e n t
C hange1
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

.1
1.5
-8
-.2
.9

.6
-.5
1.6
.4
- 1 .2

.7
-.9
.2
-.1
.8

.2
1.4
.5
1.0
.1

.5
-.1
.3
-.1
-.7

-.3
-.3
1.0
.0
.0

-.4
.3
.7
.7
-1 .1

.9
.6
-.2
.3
.4

.4
.0
.1
.2
-.3

-.8
.8
1.3
.2
-.6

1.1
.4
.5
1.0
.4

-.1
1.2
.6
.6
.1

2.1
4 .5
5 .0
2 .4
4 .3

4.2
1.7
7.0
4.1
-.7

1.1
1.7
5.5
3.7
- 4 .5

1.6
6 .7
7.6
5.2
-1 .4

2 .3
2 .8
5 .3
4 .7
1.9

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

-.2
-.9
.2
.8
.1

.9
-.7
.8
.3
.6

.3
-1 .1
.9
.1
.9

-.8
.3
.6
.5
.7

.4
.7
.4
-.5
.7

-.1
1.4
-.1
.0
.2

.0
.2
.7
.3
.8

.3
.2
-.3
-.3
.1

.0
1.1
.4
1.1
.2

-.6
-.1
.7
.2
.7

- 1 .3
-.2
.6
.5
.7

-.6
-.5
- .1
.8
.9

2 .9
-9 .7
2 .3
4 .5
6 .3

-.1
1.2
7.3
1.4
8.1

.8
7.8
2.8
1.2
5.0

-6 .3
1.7
5.1
6.2
6 .7

-.5
-2 .4
4 .0
3 .7
5.5

1995
1996
1997

.4
-4
.1

-.4
1.3
.9

.1
-.8
.9

-.3
1.1

-.1
.4

.2
.7

-.1
.5

7

.7
.2

-.4
.2

-.1
.8

.1
.6

4 .2
1.1
6 .6

- 1 .4
6.3

2.6
5.0

1.0
4 .3

3.5
2 .7

In d u s tria l
P ro d u c tio n
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

84 .4
87 .9
89 .6
95.4
100.3

84.9
87.4
91.0
95.8
99.1

85 .4
86 .6
91.2
95 .7
99 .9

85 .6
87 .8
91 .6
9 6 .7
10 0.0

8 6 .0
8 7 .7
9 1 .9
96 .6
99 .4

85 .7
87 .5
92 .8
96 .6
9 9 .4

85 .4
8 7 .7
9 3 .4
97 .2
9 8 .3

86.1
88 .2
93 .3
97 .5
98 .7

86 .4
88 .2
93 .4
97 .7
98 .4

8 5 .7
8 8 .9
94 .6
97 .9
97 .9

8 6 .7
8 9 .3
9 5 .0
9 8 .9
98 .2

8 6 .6
9 0 .3
9 5 .6
9 9 .4
9 8 .3

8 4 .9
8 7 .3
90.B
9 5 .7
9 9 .8

85 .8
8 7 .7
92.1
96 .6
99 .6

86.0
88.0
93.4
97.5
98.5

8 6 .3
8 9 .5
95.1
9 8 .7
98.1

8 5 .7
88.1
9 2 .8
97.1
9 9 .0

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

98.1
95.8
97.2
102.6
106.0

99.0
95.1
98.0
102.9
106.6

99 .3
94.1
98 .9
103.0
107.5

9 8 .6
9 4 .4
99 .5
103.6
108.2

9 9 .0
9 5 .0
10 0.0
10 3.0
10 9.0

9 8 .9
9 6 .3
9 9 .9
10 3.0
109.2

98 .8
96 .6
100.5
103.4
110.0

99.1
96 .8
100.2
103.0
110.1

99.1
97 .8
100.6
104.2
110.3

98 .5
97 .8
101.4
104.4
111.1

9 7 .2
9 7 .6
10 2.0
105.0
111.9

9 6 .6
97.1
10 1.8
10 5 .9
112.9

9 8 .8
9 5 .0
9 8 .0
10 2.9
10 6.7

98 .8
95.2
99 .8
103.2
108.8

99 .0
97.0
100.5
103.5
110.2

97 .4
97 .5
101.7
105.1
111.9

9 8 .5
9 6 .2
10 0.0
10 3.7
10 9.4

1995
1996
1997

113.3
113.4
119.3

112.9
114.8
120.4

113.1
113.9
121.4

112.7
115.2

112.6
115.7

112.9
116.4

112.7
117.0

113.4
117.2

114.2
117.4

113.8
117.6

113.6
118.5

113.8
119.2

113.1
114.0
12 0.3

112.7
115.8

113.4
117.2

113.7
118.4

113.2
116.3

C a p a c ity
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

107.0
111.0
113.2
115.1
117.0

107.3
111.2
113.4
115.3
117.3

107.6
111.4
113.6
115.4
117.5

108.0
111.6
113.8
115.5
117.8

10 8.3
111.7
113.9
115.7
118.0

10 8.7
111.9
114.1
115.8
118.3

109.0
112.1
114.2
116.0
118.5

109.3
112.3
114.4
116.1
118.7

109.7
112.5
114.6
116.3
119.0

110.0
112.7
114.7
116.5
119.2

110.4
112.9
114.9
116.6
119.5

110.7
113.0
115.0
116.8
119.7

10 7 .3
111.2
113.4
115.3
117.3

108.3
111.7
113.9
115.7
118.0

109.3
112.3
114.4
116.1
118.7

110.4
112.9
114.9
116.6
119.5

10 8.8
112.0
114.1
115.9
118.4

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

119.9
122.4
124.5
127.2
129.8

120.1
122.6
124.7
127.4
130.1

120.3
122.7
125.0
127.6
130.5

120.5
12 2.9
125.2
127.8
13 0.8

120.7
123.1
125.4
128.0
131.2

12 0.9
12 3.3
12 5.7
128.2
131.5

121.1
123.5
12 5.9
12 8.4
131.9

121.3
123.6
126.1
128.6
132.2

121:5
123.8
126.3
128.9
132.6

121.7
124.0
126.5
129.1
132.9

12119
124.2
126.8
129.3
133.3

12 2.2
12 4 .3
12 7 .0
12 9 .5
13 3.6

120.1
12 2.6
12 4.7
12 7.4
130.1

120.7
123.1
125.4
128.0
131.2

121.3
123.6
126.1
128.7
132.2

121.9
124.1
126.8
129.3
13 3.3

12 1.0
12 3.4
125.8
12 8.3
13 1 .7

1995
1996
1997

134.0
139.1
144.9

134.4
139.6
145.3

134.8
140.1
145.8

135.2
140.5

135.6
141.0

13 6.0
14 1.5

136.5
142.0

136.9
142.5

137.3
142.9

137.8
14 3.4

138.2
14 3.9

1 3 8 .7
14 4 .4

13 4.4
13 9.6
14 5 .3

135.6
14 1.0

136.9
142.5

138.2
14 3.9

13 6 .3
14 1 .7

78 .9
79.1
79.1
82 .9
85 .7

79.1
78.6
80.2
83.1
84.5

79 .3
77 .8
80 .3
82 .9
85 .0

79 .2
7 8 .7
8 0 .6
8 3 .7
8 4 .9

7 9 .4
7 8 .5
8 0 .7
83 .5
8 4 .2

7 8 .9
78.1
8 1 .4
8 3 .4
84.1

7 8 .3
78 .2
81 .8
8 3 .8
8 3 .0

78 .8
7 8 .6
81 .5
84 .0
83.1

78 .8
7 8 .4
81 .5
84 .0
82 .7

77 .9
7 8 .9
82 .5
84.1
82.1

78 .5
79.1
82 .8
84 .8
82 .2

7 8 .2
7 9 .9
83.1
85.1
8 2 .2

79.1
7 8 .5
7 9 .9
8 3 .0
85.1

79 .2
78 .5
80 .9
83 .5
8 4 .4

78.6
78.4
81 .6
83.9
82.9

7 8 .2
7 9 .3
8 2 .8
8 4 .7
82.1

7 8 .8
7 8 .7
8 1 .3
8 3 .8
8 3 .6

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994

81 .8
78 .2
78.1
80 .7
81.6

82.4
77.6
78.6
80.8
81.9

82 .6
76 .6
79.1
80 .7
82 .4

8 1 .8
7 6 .8
7 9 .5
8 1 .0
8 2 .7

8 2 .0
7 7 .2
79 .7
80 .5
83.1

8 1 .8
78.1
79 .5
8 0 .4
8 3 .0

81 .6
78 .2
7 9 .9
80 .5
8 3 .4

8 1 .7
78 .3
79 .5
80.1
83 .3

81 .5
79 .0
79 .7
80 .9
83.2

80 .9
78 .9
80.1
80 .9
8 3 .6

79 .7
78 .6
80 .4
81 .2
84 .0

79.1
78.1
8 0 .2
8 1 .7
8 4 .5

8 2 .3
7 7 .5
7 8 .6
8 0 .7
8 2 .0

8 1 .9
7 7 .4
79 .5
8 0 .6
8 3 .0

81.6
78.5
79 .7
80.5
83 .3

79 .9
78 .5
80 .2
8 1 .3
8 4 .0

8 1 .4
7 8 .0
7 9 .5
8 0 .8
83.1

1995
1996
1997

84 .6
81.5
82 .3

84.0
82.2
82 .8

83 .9
81 .3
83 .3

8 3 .4
8 2 .0

8 3 .0
8 2 .0

8 3 .0
8 2 .3

82 .6
82 .4

8 2 .9
82 .3

83.2
82.1

82 .6
82 .0

82 .2
82 .4

8 2 .0
8 2 .5

8 4 .2
8 1 .7
8 2 .8

83.1
82.1

82.9
82 .3

8 2 .3
8 2 .3

83.1
82.1

Y ear

U tiliz a tio n
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

'

1. Quarterly percent changes are at annual rates. Annual percent changes are calculated from annual av erages.




1
1

Table 6
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES

Nov.

D ec.r

Index. 19 92 = 100
------------ ----------------—
Not seasonaliv adjusted
'
1997
1996
1997
Jan.r
Feb.r Sent.
Oct.
Nov.
D ec.r
Jan.r
Feb.r

105.6
114.3
104.4
105.6

102.5
117.6
100.4
110.9

106.3
111.8
105.6
115.1

105.7
108.0
105.5
104.7

105.7
122.9
103.2
106.5

107.5
124.2
105.2
111.8

104.1
112.7
103.0
10 7.4

102.3
120.0
99 .8
106.8

105.8
112.7
105.0
112.2

106.2

107,5

108.8

109.5

106.4

109.6

109.3

110.9

108.7

10 0.5
97.2
9 0 .3
10 6.7
111.2
117.5

10 0.0
96 .0
88 .9
105.8
112.9
120.2

100.2
96.1
88.2
107.0
112.7
120.7

100.7
96.1
87.8
107.6
114.3
123.6

101.3
95.9
88.1
106.5
109.9
130.8

102.5
95 .5
87 .5

132
138

3.71
2 .8 4
1.52
1.32
.22
.64

110.4
140.7

10 0.6
9 5 .7
8 9 .4
104.5
112.2
126.2

10 0.8
95.1
89 .2
103.1
114.0
13 0.4

14

.60

118.5

12 0.0

120.2

122.9

120.6

123.3

138.4

20
201

20 2
2021
2 0 22
2023
2024
20 26

9 .3 7
1.26
.48
.27
.49
.02
.81
.01
.19
.14
.12
.34

106.2
108.2
10 0.6
102.1
121.5
100.9
97.5
84 .6
106.4
8 0 .9
99 .9
100.8

107.1
109.6
105.4
99.5
121.8
101.2
98 .2
80 .0
107.9
84 .2
96.1
101.6

107.6
109.3
107.8
94.8
121.6
99.8
99.3
86 .3
106.7
93.3
92.0
101.8

108.2
109.0
108.1
95.4
120.5
95.8
100.7
81.6
110.0
90.7
99.5
102.1

108.2
113.5
113.6
98 .3
125.1
89.5
99.6
76.3
109.4
84 .9
102.7
101.5

108.4
113.8
113.0
101.0
124.8
91 .2
101.2
75.1
111.4
87 .8
104.9
102.2

203
204
205
206
207
208
20 8 2 ,3
2 0 8 6 ,7
209
20 9 5

1.30
1.30
1.03
.64
.24
1.74
.54
.98
1.05
.17

103.7
105.6
105.1
109.2
9 2 .4
111.3
104.1
116.2
10 9.9
9 6 .0

105.2
107.1
105.9
109.4
96.1
112.4
103.7
118.8
107.8
101.0

106.9
107.3
103.9
111.2
97.0
112.8
105.5
117.9
110.0
110.8

107.0
108.5
104.1
114.5
100.3
113.2
106.5
117.6
109.2
97.2

104.7
108.7
106.0
110.6
101.5
111.8

104.2
108.1
107.3
111.3
102.6
112.4

116.0
109.7
101.0

117.4
108.7

21

1.16

10 4 .9

104.0

105.4

108.9

105.8

22
Te x tile m ill p ro d u c ts
2 2 1 -4
Fabrics
2 2 1 ,2
Cotton and synthetic
224
Narrow fabrics
225
Knit goods
2 2 5 3 ,4 ,7 -9
Knit garm ents
226
Fabric finishing
227
Carpeting
2 2 8 ,9
Yarns and m iscellaneous
2 2 8 1 ,2 ,4
Cotton and synthetic yarns

1.57
.39
.32
.04
.44
.32
.15
.18
:4 1
.19

10 7.2
107.2
110.2
110.1
107.0
107.8
100.5
108.5
10 9.7
10 2.4

107.6
107.7
110.6
110.9
109.4
111.2
102.3
99 .3
111.7
105.7

108.2
106.1
108.4
109.9
107.1
108.8
101.8
109.1
113.7
1T2tO

106.3
102.7
104.4
107.1
107.4
109.6
90.3
106.2
115.3
111.8

23

1.80

98 .2

97 .8

97 .3

97.2

S IC

Item
M etal m in in g
Iron ore
Nonferrous ores
C opper

10 5.3
117.5
103.5
110.0

12

.87

13
131

S to n e a n d ea rth m in e ra ls
Foods
M e a t products
B eef
Pork
Poultry
M iscellaneous m eats
Dairy products
Butter
C heese
C oncentrated milk
Frozen desserts
Milk and misc. dairy products

A p p a re l p r o d u c ts
L u m b e r a n d p r o d u c ts
Logging and lum ber
Logging
Lum ber products
Millwork and plywood
Plywood
M anufactured hom es

1996
SeDt.

.42
.06
.36
.12

O il a n d g a s e x tra c tio n
C rude oil and natural gas
C ru de oil, total
Natural gas
N atural gas liquids
Oil and gas well drilling

T o b a c c o p r o d u c ts

Seasonallvadiusted

10
101
1 0 2 -4 ,8 ,9
102

C o a l m in in g

C an ned and frozen food
Grain mill products
B akery products
S ug ar and confectionery
Fats and oils
B everages
B eer and ale
Soft drinks
Coffee and m iscellaneous
R oasted coffee

1996
IP
Prooortion

24
2 4 1 ,2
241
2 4 3 -5 ,9
243
2 4 3 5 ,6
245

2 .0 6
.79
.28
1.27
.65
.15
.23

110.7
99 .6
91 .2
119.1
112.4
9 7 .9
16 5.6

Oct.

109.2
95 .7
91 .6
119.3
113.6
100.4
165.3

113.1
104.8
9 4 .7
119.4
112.8
101.1
159.8

108.0
99.0
93.2
114.8
110.8
92.8
146.2

101.1
100.4
101.4
103.4

103.8
111.0
103.0
106.0

106.1

105.6

114.0

103.1
97 .5
88 .8
109.4
114.1
132.7

10 3.4
9 7 .9
88 .6
110.7
111.7
133.7

102.0
97.2
88.8
108.8
107.6
129.5

102.4
96.8
88.6
108.5
133.4

14 1.7

121.5

100.4

85 .8

88.1

114.6
111.0
105.5
102.6
122.9
99.1
92 .5
68 .0
106.8
63 .9
99 .5
97 .7

112.2
115.3
10 9.3
10 6.7
128.1
101.1
91 .4
7 3 .7
107.5
6 9 .6
8 3 .8
97 .6

10 7.7
108.8
104.3
101.9
118.4
99.1
91 .3
78.1
107.2
77 .8
72 .2
97 .7

105.0
106.0
101.9
99 .8
114.7
9 8 .3
96 .0
89 .2
111.0
93 .4
71 .2
99 .2

103.2
111.9
111.5
97.9
122.4
90 .4
95 .3
95.5
105.3
87 .6
78.2
100.6

102.7
112.2
109.5
99.7
123.9
97.9
101.5
92.7
112.7
91.8
95.8
103.3

127.8
110.4
117.8
117.1
9 0 .4
119.1
97 .8
133.9
119.3
91 .2

118.3
110.3
10 9.2
129.6
10 0.9
115.1
98.1
122.9
111.5
107.2

107.5
110.2
101.1
133.0
104.1
108.0
92 .9
112.4
109.6
115.8

99 .8
110.1
98 .2
131.3
104.0
101.2
8 6 .8
107.9
109.3
119.1

94.1
106.5
98 .8
113.5
103.5
102.6

92.7
105.0
97 .4
107.2
105.3
103.3

105.3
106.0
112.3

103.7
103.4

105.2

108.1

115.5

10 3.6

89 .5

102.9

108.7

106.6
105.8
107.7
112.8
109.7
112.9
92.5
96 .8
114.1
110.0

106.3
103.8

113.4
110.4
115.3
111.5
118.4
115.8
10 5.9
113.8
113.9
108.1

10 5.7
105.7
10 8.6
112.0
104.1
103.2
103.1
9 7 .0
112.4
10 6.7

9 5 .3
96 .2
9 6 .6
10 8.7
95 .9
99.1
80 .2
8 3 .9
105.1
9 0 .4

101.0
106.6
108.1
111.8
91.2
92 .7
94.3
92.9
112.7
107.3

104.9
103.9

113.7
109.2
112.3
100.5
9 7 .8
111.8
103.5

110.1
105.3
109.1
112.7
116.5
122.8
9 9 .6
110.5
112.0
104.1

96.5

96 .2

101.5

99.1

9 7 .8

96 .9

93 .4

94.1

115.4
111.1
10 4.0 -1 0 2 .0
95 .4
99 .6
12 4.0
118.0
116.1
112.9
10 4.6
98 .8
18 3.7
15 6.9

102.4
92 .8
90 .6
10 9.6
10 8.7
8 4 .9
123.2

104.3
97.1
87 .9
109.8
103.6
88 .8
137.3

108:5
100.7
89 .2
114.3
106.4
100.6
155.9

108.8
100.8
94.6
114.8
109.2
91.5
156.3

110.9
101.4
94 .2
118.0
112.6
101.1
163.5

115.4
105.6
10 0.6
12 2.8
116.0
101.5
17 5.6

1. T h e IP proportion da ta are estim ates of the industries’ relative contributions to overall IP growth in the following year.




12

111.0
102.0
105.3
102.5
96.3
113.9
108.0

Table 6 (continued)
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES
Index. 19192 = 100

Item

_

S IC

1996
IP
Proportion1

S easonallv adjusted
1996
Seat.

Oct.

Nov.

D ec.r

1997
Jan/

Feb/

1996
SeDt.

....
"'
.....
Not seasonallv adjusted
1997
Nov.
D ec/
Jan/
... Oct.

Feb /

25
251

1.30
.60

108.8
111.2

110.4
111.5

110.5
111.2

110.5
110.3

109.9
109.3

110.2
111.2

115.1
116.2

111.4
113.5

10 8 .3
10 9.2

1 0 8 .7
1 0 9 .7

106.1
106.5

110.5
114.3

26
2 6 1 -3
261
262
263
2 6 5 ,7
265
267

3.29
1.32
.09
.76
.46
1.97
.73
1.24

108.8
108.6
101.7
104.7
117.6
108.9
119.0
103.3

107.6
10 9.3
100.2
10 4.9
119.5
106.5
10 9.7
10 4.8

110.1
110.8
10 4.5
107.5
118.7
10 9.7
115.3
10 6.6

111.6
112.6
9 8 .9
110.0
120.5
110.9
114.3
109.1

110.3
111.3
98 .3
109.7
117.4
109.6
111.3
108.8

111.2
112.4
106.1
109.4
119.6
110.4
116.2
107.3

108.8
108.3
101.0
104.2
117.5
109.1
119.6
103.2

110.0
10 9.3
100.8
105.6
118.0
110.4
121.2
10 4.3

10 8.9
110.1
10 2 .4
108.1
115.6
108.1
10 9.6
107.2

1 0 6 .7
109.1
9 7 .2
1 0 7 .0
115.5
105.1
102.1
10 6 .7

112.0
112.7
100.2
111.6
117.7
111.5
111.7

111.2

113.1
114.7
106.8
111.6
122.1
112.0
115.6
10 9.8

P rin tin g a n d p u b lis h in g
27
N ewspapers
271
Periodicals, books, and cards 2 7 2 ,3 ,7
Job printing
2 7 4 -6 ,8 ,9

6.4 4
1.41
1.91
3.1 2

99.1
8 7 .3
100.3
104.6

9 9 .7
8 8 .9
10 1.4
104.4

10 0.0
8 6 .5
10 1.8
10 6.0

99 .8
86 .0
101.9
105.9

99 .9
87 .9
98 .9
106.9

100.5
90.3
99 .7
106.5

105.1
86.4
100.7
118.1

100.7
8 9 .8
9 8 .7
107.9

9 8 .7
8 8 .5
10 1.3
10 2.5

9 7 .9
8 7 .8
10 2 .9
10 0.0

9 5 .7
8 6 .0
9 8 .4
99 .2

96 .6
91 .9
99 .7
97 .0

28

10.17

109.7

111.3

111.8

114.0

113.7

113.2

115.2

112.1

10 8.6

10 8 .3

109.9

110.5

107.7
89.6
117.4
101.1
81.9
92.5

104.8
90.1
113.1
93.0
84.7
99.4

106.7
92 .5
113.5
103.9
86.1
99 .4

104.5
8 9 .3
115.3
87.1
83 .6
95 .4

10 4.9
8 7 .3
117.3
9 8 .4
7 9 .6
8 7 .8

106.9
8 6 .9
114.2
93 .8
7 9 .8
87 .5

108.6
90 .2
117.3
101.5
82.5
95 .3

122.3

124.4
126.7
118.2
102.0

118.6
12 2.2
10 9.4
102.8

116.9
118.9
10 8.8
10 5.7

121.9
12 3.7
114.2
106.8

125.0

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s
Household furniture
P a p e r a n d p ro d u c ts
Pulp and paper
W ood pulp
Paper
Paperboard
Paper products
Paperboard containers
C onverted paper products

C h e m ic a ls a n d p r o d u c ts
Industrial chem icals and
synthetic materials
Basic chem icals
Alkalies and chlorine
Inorganic pigments
Inorganic chem icals, nec
Acids and other

2 8 1 ,2 ,6
281
2 8 12
2 8 16
2819

4.0 6
.80
.06
.09
.51
.35

104.0
88.1
112.7
93 .9
82.1
93 .9

106.8
90 .4
113.1
109.8
8 2 .3
9 3 .7

10 5.6
8 7 .8
114.9
8 9 .3
8 1 .4
9 1 .0

108.2
8 9 .4
115.7
102.5
81 .6
92 .0

108.3
89 .0
114.8
94.1
82 .3
92 .3

282
2821
2 8 2 3 ,4
286

1.42
.90
.38
1.84

120.6
126.4
108.6
100.8

12 3.3
12 5.3
116.2
103.9

119.9
12 3.9
110.3
10 5.0

124.1
126.7
114.6
107.0

124.6
126.7
117.3
107.0

108.7
107.0

120.9
126.8
109.0
101.3

2 8 3 -5 ,9
28 3
28 4
285
287

5.5 0
3.05
1.36
.50
.61

114.6
118.9
102.5
126.5
103.7

115.5
120.5
105.3
12 1.3
104.0

117.3
12 2.9
105.7
12 4.6
10 3.3

119.1
124.8
106.6
124.2
105.8

118.5
123.4
107.3
126.2
106.5

118.0
123.4
105.5
128.3
106.3

124.7
132.6
110.5
131.4
103.1

116.8
121.8
106.3
126.0
105.2

111.8
116.9
10 1.4
112.5
10 5.6

111.0
117.3
10 0 .9
9 6 .2
10 5.6

112.1
114.8
104.2
111.2
107.3

111.9
114.3
102.3
126.2
107.3

P e tro le u m p ro d u c ts
29
Petroleum refining and misc.
2 9 1 ,9
M iscellaneous petroleum products
Distillate fuel oil
Residual fuel oil
Aviation fuel and kerosene
Automotive gasoline
Paving and roofing m aterials
295

1.75
1.57
.32
.30
.05
.15
.75
.19

10 6.9
105.4
104.2
111.1
8 0 .3
118.4
103.2
118.1

10 8.4
106.8
105.5
12 0.3
8 1 .3
111.4
103.4
120.5

10 7.4
105.8
10 4.0
117.2
7 5 .2
10 8.6
10 4.2
119.3

107.3
105.7
108.3
115.0
78 .7
108.7
102.5
119.3

107.5
105.6
110.6
108.2
89 .0
105.1
103.7
121.8

108.9
107.0
109.7
114.0
84.5
112.4
103.8
123.9

111.9
109.3
116.0
114.5
79.9
119.0
105.0
133.3

109.7
106.7
106.2
122.0
77 .6
109.9
103.0
134.1

10 9.6
107.1
9 6 .2
12 3.3
7 9 .8
110.9
107.5
12 9.4

10 7 .6
10 6.3
93.1
119.7
8 4 .4
116.0
107.1
116.1

99 .9
99 .7
88 .8
104.9
89 .6
111.1
101.2
98 .3

100.7
100.4
93 .4
107.6
85 .7
112.3
99 .6
100.9

R u b b e r a n d p la s tic s p ro d u c ts
30
301
Tires
O ther rubber products
3 0 2 ,5 ,6
Plastics products, nec
308

3.78
.35
.62
2.81

12 2.8
123.9
114.7
124.7

121.4
118.0
115.5
123.4

12 1.7
12 0.8
114.9
12 3.6

122.6
115.4
115.8
125.2

121.2
116.3
115.8
123.2

123.1
116.5
116.8
125.6

124.1
123.1
119.7
125.4

122.7
12 6.6
116.0
124.0

121.7
114.8
112.4
124.9

12 1.8
9 7 .5
111.4
127.5

119.8
120.2
108.4
122.6

123.1
127.3
116.5
124.2

31
314

.20
.09

79 .4
8 0 .3

7 8 .4
80 .7

7 7 .3
7 9 .5

80.1
81.2

78 .2
79 .6

77.7
81.0

81.1
81.7

8 0 .0
82 .5

7 9 .0
8 1 .0

8 0 .3
8 1 .3

7 6 .3
78 .5

75 .8
77 .6

S to n e , cla y, a n d g la s s p r o d u c ts
32
Pressed and blown glass
32 2
Glass containers
3221
324
C em ent
Structural clay products
32 5
C oncrete and m iscellaneous
3 2 6 -9

2.12
.30
.13
.17
.10
1.26

113.1
9 5 .9
77 .8
108.2
120.6
116.5

111.7
9 3 .0
73 .3
110.9
122.1
114.7

111.8
9 4 .9
77 .8
10 9.9
121.1
114.5

111.3
93 .3
73 .4
105.4
121.0
114.8

112.4
96 .7
79.1
112.6
121.0
115.0

112.7
94.6
75.5

116.5
95.5
74 .9
128.9
125.0
118.6

115.7
95 .8
76 .6
135.4
125.9
116.8

112.0
9 2 .8
7 3 .4
10 8.4
119.4
115.9

106.8
83.1
5 6 .0
8 0 .6
110.5
114.9

105.5
91 .7
72 .8
6 6 .8
109.0
113.1

107.8
95 .8
79 .2

Synthetic m aterials
Plastics m aterials
Synthetic fibers
Industrial organic chem icals
Chem ical products
Drugs and m edicines
Soap and toiletries
Paints
Agricultural chem icals

L e a th e r a n d p ro d u c ts
Shoes

122.3
115.9

1. The IP proportion data are estim ates of the industries’ relative contributions to overall IP growth in the following year.




13

111.2
106.9

118.4
112.4

Table 6 (continued)
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES
Index. 19 92 = 100

Item
P rim a ry m e ta is ;
Iron and steel
Basic steel and mill products
Basic iron and steel
Pig iron
R aw steel

S IC
33
3 3 1 ,2
331

1996
IP
ProDortion1

Seasonallv adjusted

Not seasonallv adjusted
19 97
Nov.
Dec/
Jan/

1996
S ect.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec/

1997
Jan/

Feb.r

19 96
SeDt.

Oct.

3 .5 2
1.88
1.46
.30
.17
.09

119.5
117.4
119.5
106.2
104.9
112.6

122.1
123.2
126.1
104.4
102.2
111.5

118.5
115.9
115.6
101.6
99.1
108.7

118.8
116.7
117.5
104.1
101.5
112.5

117.3
117.1
119.9
10 3 .4
10 0.6
111.7

119.2
119.0
12 0.9
10 6.3
105.2
112.3

121.0
119.3
121.1
105.4
103.8
111.8

121.7
122.2
124.3
103.9
101.3
111.1

118.1
115.6
114.6
102.8
101.5
108.2

115.5
113.1
113.5
104.2
103.1
109.7

116.6
114.6
117.9
104.5
10 2.4
112.1

12 2.8
12 3.4
12 6 .0
10 8.6
107.1
116.8

123.4
140.0
131.2
135.0
111.6
117.0
110.4

132.5
146.0
142.2
147.4
125.2
125.6
113.6

119.7
130.6
119.7
143.9
104.9
114.2
116.6

121.5
135.8
112.1
137.7
8 6 .9
119.7
113.7

12 4 .8
13 4.8
118.6
13 7 .7
12 1.5
1 2 1 .7
10 8 .0

125.2
13 3.9
12 4.9
140.5
112.9
121.7
112.7

125.7
142.6
13 1.4
139.8
111.9
118.8
113.0

130.3
146.0
135.8
149.9
110.9
123.2
115.1

118.1
131.6
119.0
144.7
99 .6
110.9
118.3

116.2
117.5
108.3
133.8
111.6
114.5
111.5

12 1.9
13 2.3
12 2.0
129.8
10 1 .3
119.3
10 3.9

13 1.2
14 4.4
13 4.7
14 0.0
10 7.6
127.2
114.9

Feb /

S teel mill products
C onsum er durable steel
Equipm ent steel
Construction steel
C an and closure steel
Miscellaneous steel
Iron and steel foundries

332

1.16
.19
.13
.14
.04
.66
.42

Nonferrous m etals
Prim ary nonferrous m etals
C opper
Aluminum

3 3 3 -6 ,9
333
3331
3334

1.64
.24
.08
.10

121.8
100.6
110.4
88 .8

120.7
103.1
121.6
8 9 .1 .

121.4
103.5
114.3
88 .8

121.2
103.8
122.9
8 8 .7

117.5
10 4.0
118.2
8 8 .7

119.3
10 5.6
121.2
89 .2

122.9
100.5
111.2
8 8 .3

121.1
103.8
121.7
8 8 .8

121.0
103.8
116.3
89 .0

118.2
103.2
119.9
89 .2

118.8
10 5.4
118.1
8 9 .2

122.1
10 8.9
125.2
8 9 .7

Nonferrous products
Nonferrous mill products
Aluminum
Nonferrous foundries

3 3 5 ,6
335
3 3 5 3 -5
336

1.12
.84
.29
.28

123.6
120.4
111.1
134.2

121.7
117.6
97.9
135.1

122.5
118.8
102.7
134.7

122.5
118.2
104.7
136.9

117.6
112.4
8 9 .3
13 4.7

121.1
116.8
97 .0
135.4

12 4.8
121.6
111.4
135.1

121.8
117.7
97.9
135.4

121.2
116.8
94.0
136.1

118.7
112.1
90 .8
140.7

12 0.0
115.2
9 4 .9
136.1

12 3.5
119.5
102.5
13 6.8

F a b ric a te d m etal p ro d u c ts
34
341
M etal containers
H ardw are, tools, and cutlery
342
3 4 2 3 ,5 ,9
H ardw are and tools
344
Structural metal products
O ther fabricated metal products 3 4 5 - 9
3 4 5 -7
Fasteners, stampings, etc.

5 .2 8
.16
.54
.47
1.47
2.91
1.67

119.3
81 .2
117.6
118.4
124.4
120.3
127.8

119.3
94.9
118.6
119.1
124.5
119.4
126.9

119.1
93.9
117.3
118.1
125.5
118.7
126.2

119.5
91 .6
118.9
118.5
125.9
119.2
127.3

119.1
92 .5
119.8
119.9
12 4 .7
119.2
12 7.5

12 0.7
95 .3
120.3
12 0.6
128.0
120.2
12 7.9

123.5
8 4 .9
123.8
125.2
127.4
123.1
132.7

121.3
89 .0
119.5
119.7
127.3
120.2
128.5

119.6
83.9
115.9
115.8
128.0
118.7
125.0

119.2
82.2
115.4
113.9
128.7
118.4
123.5

115.1
8 1 .6
112.3
111.7
122.5
115.9
12 0.7

118.8
80 .5
119.5
119.9
123.1
121.2
129.5

In d u s tria l m a c h in e ry
a n d e q u ip m e n t
35
Engines and turbines
351
Farm
352
Construction and allied
353
354
Metalworking
Special industry m achinery
355
G eneral industrial m achinery
356
3 5 6 2 ,6 ,8
Bearings and gears
Equipm ent
3 5 6 1 ,3 -5 ,7 ,9
357
Com puter and office equip.
Service industry m achines
358
Refrig, and heating equip.
3585
Miscellaneous machinery
359

9.51
.47
.45
.99
1.10
.84
1.10
.33
.77
2 .4 5
.90
.64
1.20

159.4
117.1
118.5
153.2
124.1
130.6
114.5
114.9
114.3
31 9 .0
132.4
136.1
134.7

159.9
118.5
121.8
153.5
124.5
131.3
115.3
113.8
116.0
32 3.6
123.2
122.2
137.4

161.7
117.9
125.5
153.9
126.8
129.5
114.4
112.8
115.2
32 8.3
131.7
133.9
137.0

162.9
119.3
132.6
152.7
125.9
130.6
115.6
115.3
115.8
33 2.5
132.2
135.4
136.7

16 4.6
12 2.7
13 9.4
15 7.8
12 5.6
13 1.6
114.8
115.5
114.6
3 4 0 .5
12 6.4
12 6.4
13 7.9

167.1
121.9
144.2
156.2
125.2
132.8
115.6
115.3
115.7
3 4 9 .7
135.3
137.6
137.9

164.8
117.8
118.4
157.2
133.3
130.8
120.5
115.2
122.8
32 9 .6
130.1
132.4
144.2

161.4
118.9
129.0
160.7
124.5
130.5
115.1
112.8
116.2
3 2 5 .7
122.7
121.5
137.5

157.4
121.2
123.6
154.0
122.3
131.1
112.7
114.5
111.9
316.1
119.8
116.2
131.8

157.0
124.8
115.8
138.3
119.8
135.4
112.4
119.4
109.4
3 2 9 .7
118.4
113.5
130.2

159.1
122.9
145.5
15 8.7
118.1
132.8
110.3
117.0
10 7.4
3 2 1 .2
12 1.6
119.4
12 9.3

168.1
12 2.5
162.5
165.3
12 3.9
13 3.4
115.2
116.9
114.4
3 3 8 .0
14 2.6
148.3
136.1

E le c tric a l m a c h in e ry
M ajor electrical and parts
Electric distribution equip.
Household appliances
Cooking equipment
Refrigerators and freezers
Laundry
Miscellaneous
Electrical housewares
Appliances, nec

36
3 6 1 ,2
361
363
3631
3632
3633
3 6 3 4 ,5 ,9
3634
3639

8 .5 8
.95
.30
.51
.09
.10
.11
.21
.05
.09

165.2
113.3
104.2
129.6
132.9
117.7
153.9
123.3
111.3
141.7

165.6
111.8
104.3
123.7
111.5
116.3
147.8
122.5
107.4
136.0

167.2
113.2
104.&
126.8
122.3
129.0
142.2
121.8
104.9
134.4

168.8
112.0
104.8
128.9
130.0
127.5
145.7
122.4
101.9
135.6

16 8.8
112.8
10 3.6
12 2.7
115.0
12 2.5
135.1
12 1.6
10 0.7
13 7 .7

17 3.3
113.3
102.4
12 3.7
119.3
125.6
12 7.7
123.9
109.6
139.8

169.2
119.9
113.7
13 5.4
137.2
128.1
160.6
127.1
118.6
140.5

168.0
112.5
106.4
136.0
128.0
128.9
165.9
129.9
117.9
152.0

168.7
109.6
100.9
125.9
128.8
115.7
146.2
120.5
115.2
133.8

170.0
107.6
9 9 .6
114.8
112.2
92.1
130.0
119.6
105.5
132.2

16 6.4
108.3
9 8 .2
119.7
112.6
115.6
13 3.0
119.2
9 6 .5
13 1.8

172.5
110.4
100.0
132.1
124.1
13 4.4
146.2
12 9.0
10 1.9
151.1

Audio and video equipm ent
Com munication equipm ent
Electronic components
Sem iconductors
Misc. electrical supplies
Storage batteries

365
366
367
3 6 7 2 -9
369
3691

.19
1.65
3 .9 4
3 .8 7
.69
.11

110.7
120.8
2 5 9 .0
2 6 5 .4
128.7
117.0

131.6
120.5
26 0.8
26 6.5
126.7
108.8

123.7
118.9
26 6.5
27 2.5
128.3
119.1

108.7
120.1
2 7 3 .3
28 0 .4
127.9
109.8

9 2 .5
119.8
277.1
2 8 3 .9
125.1
113.1

104.4
122.7
2 8 7 .0
2 9 3 .7
125.2
110.3

128.4
121.2
2 6 0 .8
2 6 6 .9
135.7
153.5

151.3
120.5
2 6 1 .7
26 6 .2
130.7
124.7

138.3
121.6
26 9 .9
27 5.4
131.0
125.6

10 3.5
126.0
2 7 8 .7
2 8 6 .6
132.8
121.6

8 6 .8
12 0.6
2 7 5 .3
2 8 2 .4
123.6
9 7 .4

9 9 .5
12 2.0
2 8 5 .9
2 9 2 .7
12 3.8
103.1

37
371

3714
3716

8.41
4 .8 0
1.32
1.26
1.19
.71
.48
2 .1 5
.06

107.3
127.0
117.5
138.4
139.1
146.6
132.9
127.3
120.6

105.3
121.2
101.6
139.3
141.0
147.4
136.4
125.3
111.5

109.5
128.9
111.7
143.1
144.3
152.4
137.6
133.2
120.2

109.6
127.9
104.8
151.9
153.7
164.9
143.0
131.8
101.2

112.0
13 2 .0
10 8.6
15 4 .0
15 6.4
16 7 .0
14 6.5
137.1
10 7 .7

113.0
13 3.0
111.1
15 3.5
15 5.6
16 5.0
14 7.4
13 7.7
113.9

108.8
130.2
119.2
152.5
153.7
161.4
142.9
125.8
116.0

110.4
132.7
115.0
155.4
158.0
164.7
148.6
132.8
123.8

108.9
127.8
113.2
143.2
144.8
150.5
136.8
130.2
100.8

9 9 .0
103.4
8 4 .9
118.9
119.0
12 5.4
110.2
108.6
7 9 .6

110.1
12 7.6
10 2.6
146.1
14 8.4
154.1
140.5
13 6.0
10 1.4

119.3
14 5.6
125.1
170.2
17 2.9
180.1
16 2.8
147.3
12 0.3

3 7 2 -6 ,9
372
373
3 7 4 -6 ,9

3 .6 2
2 .3 0
.38
.94

87 .9
86 .2
88.1
90 .6

89 .4
89.1
86 .7
89 .9

90 .3
90 .7
87 .7
8 8 .6

91 .5
92 .0
8 5 .9
90 .6

9 2 .2
93.1
8 6 .0
9 0 .6

9 3 .3
9 4 .0
8 4 .8
93.1

8 7 .8
86.1
8 8 .3
9 0 .5

88 .6
87 .8
8 6 .3
89 .8

90 .2
90 .3
87 .3
89.5

9 3 .3
94 .2
8 8 .2
9 1 .4

9 2 .6
9 3 .9
8 5 .6
9 0 .5

9 3 .8
9 5 .2
8 2 .4
9 2 .7

T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t
Motor vehicles and parts
Autos
Trucks and truck trailers
Trucks and buses
C onsum er trucks
Business trucks
Motor vehicle parts
Motor homes
A erospace and m iscellaneous
transportation equipm ent
Aircraft and parts
Ships and boats
Railroad and m iscellaneous

1. T h e IP proportion data a re estim ates of the industries’ relative contributions to overall IP growth in the following year.




14

Table 6 (continued)
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: INDUSTRY SUBTOTALS AND INDIVIDUAL SERIES

Item

S IC

Index. 1S 9^ = 10 0
........
________ . ___ S easonally adjusted_____________
_
19 96
Not seasonally adjusted
1997
1996
19 96
IP
1997
Jan/
Feb / .S e p t.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec/
S ect.
ProDortion1
Oct.
Nov.
Dec/
Jan/

Feb /

38
3 8 1 -4
384

4 .7 2
3 .7 7
1.45

10 3.0
10 0 .0
10 7 .0

103.4
10 0.7
108.8

103.0
9 9 .9
106.8

104.1
100.9
107.5

103.3
100.2
107.7

104.1
100.9
108.9

106.1
10 3.8
117.6

10 3.8
10 1.0
110.3

102.8
9 9 .4
10 3.7

104.0
100.8
10 1.8

101.1
97 .5
99 .8

102.5
99.1
10 3.0

M is c . m a n u fa c tu re s
C onsum er goods
Business supplies

39
3 9 1 ,3 ,4 ,6
3 9 5 ,9

1.29
.62
.67

113.0
10 7 .3
118.6

113.0
106.4
119.6

114.1
107.3
121.0

116.6
110.7
122.6

116.3
108.9
123.7

117.5
109.1
125.8

116.0
110:2
12 2.0

116.9
110.9
12 2 .9

118.1
112.9
12 3.4

117.5
111.9
123.1

112.3
105.6
119.0

114.8
10 7 .3
12 2.3

E le c tric u tilitie s
G eneration
Fossil fuel
Hydro and nuclear

4 9 1 ,3p t

6 .2 6
2 .4 2
.91
1.51

110.9
110.6
10 8.0
113.2

112.0
111.9
109.5
114.4

112.7
111.1
111.5
111.6

112.6
111.3
106.9
115.0

113.2
112.8
110.8
115.0

110.0
109.5

113.5
108.0
110.4
107.1

10 3.5
100.1
10 2.9
9 8 .8

10 4.4
10 4.9
105.1
10 5.4

112.9
112.6
10 4.8
118.3

120.4
118.8
112.2
123.8

110.5
112.9

3 .8 4
1.64
2.21
1.32
.89

111.2
111.5
111.1
114.4
1 0 6 .7

112.2
112.5
112.0
115.7
107.1

113.8
116.0
112.3
117.3
105.5

113.5
115.5
112.1
116.9
105.8

113.6
114.0
113.4
117.9
107.4

110.4

117.1
117.2
117.1
122.6
10 9.4

10 5.6
9 6 .5
112.2
114.6
10 8.9

104.1
10 0.2
10 7.0
109.2
10 3.9

113.3
120.0
108.5
112.4
103.0

121.5
135.9
111.3
116.7
104.0

109.0
10 5.3

1.81
.80
.35
.48

111.8
10 7 .7
113.6
112.3

111.3
108.2
113.4
110.0

120.9
121.2
124.2
116.3

112.7
109.3
118.3
111.2

114.4

108.5

6 1 .0
3 5 .6
5 8 .2
85.1

7 8 .6
6 1 .9
78.1
9 3 .5

12 4.3
12 7.4
131.1
117.9

165.7
188.1
177.7
139.2

20 3.7

17 3.7

In s tru m e n ts
Scientific and medical
M edical instruments

S ales
Residential
Nonresidential
Com m ercial and other
Industrial
G a s u tilitie s
Residential
C om m ercial and other
G as transmission

4 9 2 ,3 p t

111.6

1. T h e IP proportion data are estim ates of the industries’ relative contributions to overall IP growth in the following year.

Table 7
INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION: GROSS VALUE OF PRODUCTS
Billions of 1992 dollars at annual rates, seasonally ad usted
1992

1996

19 95
Q4

1996
Q1

Q2

Q3

Q 4r

1997
Q1P

1996
Oct.

Nov.

Dec/

1997
Jan/

Feb/

Mar.P

2 0 0 1 .9

2 2 6 1 .9

2 2 1 2 .2

2221.1

2 2 5 9 .7

2274.1

2 2 91.8

2 3 2 1 .6

2 2 7 0 .7

2 3 0 3 .5

2301.1

23 0 6 .2

2 3 1 8 .2

2 3 4 0 .5

1552.1

1 7 66.0

1725.1

17 33.5

1765.9

1776.0

1787.9

1813.9

17 7 1 .8

1795.1

1796.8

1800.8

1811.1

1 8 2 9 .7

C onsum er goods
Durable
Autom otive products
O ther durable goods
N ondurable

1049.6
2 3 8 .3
123.8
114.4
811.3

1166.0
3 0 2 .7
157.6
145.1
8 6 3 .9

1152.7
2 9 7 .5
15 5.8
1 4 1 .7
8 5 5 .9

1152.7
2 9 1 .2
14 9.9
14 1.4
8 6 1 .7

1167.4
307.1
160.5
146.6
8 6 1 .4

1166.7
30 9.3
163.2
146.1
85 8.5

1176.4
303.1
157.0
146.1
87 3.3

1182.4
311.0
164.7
146.4
87 2 .2

1164.7
2 9 6 .9
15 1.9
14 5.0
8 6 7 .5

1182.2
3 0 5 .4
159.6
14 5.9
8 7 6 .9

1182.3
307.1
159.6
147.5
87 5 .6

1178.6
306.2
163.2
143.1
87 2.8

1179.9
311.2
16 4.7
14 6.6
8 6 9 .6

1188.5
3 1 5 .5
16 6 .2
1 4 9 .3
8 7 4 .2

Equipm ent, total
Business and defense
Business
D efense and space

50 2 .5
4 8 3 .9
39 9.2
8 4 .7

5 9 9 .2
5 7 3 .9
509.1
6 4 .9

5 7 1 .8
5 4 8 .6
4 8 3 .0
6 5 .6

5 8 0 .2
5 5 5 .9
4 9 1 .5
6 4 .4

5 9 7 .7
57 1 .3
5 0 5 .9
65 .4

60 8.6
58 3 .0
51 7.7
65.4

61 0 .7
58 5 .7
52 1.4
64 .4

6 3 0 .8
6 0 2 .8
5 3 9 .8
6 3 .2

6 0 6 .3
5 8 0 .9
5 1 6 .0
6 4 .9

612.1
5 8 7 .0
5 2 3 .0
6 4 .2

6 1 3 .7
5 8 9 .3
52 5 .2
64.1

62 1.5
59 5 .3
53 2.3
63.1

6 3 0 .5
6 0 2 .5
5 3 9 .4
63 .2

6 4 0 .5
6 1 0 .7
5 4 7 .7
63.1

4 4 9 .9
177.2
2 7 2 .7
7 0 .4

4 9 6 .4
2 0 6 .0
2 9 0 .2
8 0 .3

4 8 7 .5
19 8 .0
2 8 9 .3
7 8 .7

488.1
199.5
2 8 8 .4
7 9 .6

4 9 4 .4
2 0 5 .3
2 8 8 .9
8 0 .5

49 8 .7
20 9.6
28 8.9
79.3

50 4.3
20 9.3
29 4 .7
81 .6

5 0 8 .4
2 1 0 .4
2 9 7 .7
81 .6

4 9 9 .3
2 0 7 .3
2 9 1 .8
8 0 .4

5 0 8 .6
2 1 3 .3
295.1
8 2 .2

5 0 4 .9
2 0 7 .3
2 9 7 .3
82 .2

50 6.0
20 7.2
29 8.5
82.0

50 7 .8
211.2
2 9 6 .3
8 0 .8

511.5
2 1 2 .9
2 9 8 .4
8 1 .9

Item
P ro d u c ts , to ta l
F in a l p ro d u c ts

In te rm e d ia te p ro d u c ts
Construction supplies
Business supplies
Com m ercial energy products

Table 8
DIFFUSION INDEXES OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION
Percent
Y ear
O n e M o n th E a rlie r
1995
1996
19 97
T h re e M o n th s E a rlie r
1995
19 96
1997
S ix M o n th s E a rlie r
1995
19 96
1997

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

M av

June

July

Auq.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

5 5 .3
34 .5
4 8 .3

4 7 .7
6 5 .5
6 1 .9

5 0 .0
5 4 .2

4 3 .2
5 2 .7

4 7 .7
5 8 .0

50.4
64 .8

52 .7
51 .5

5 8 .7
5 3 .4

5 4 .9
5 0 .8

4 4 .7
55 .3

47 .3
56.8

4 7 .7
5 7 .4

64 .0
4 1 .3
57 .2

5 8 .7
5 0 .0
5 8 .3

4 9 .6
5 3 .8

4 3 .6
6 8 .9

4 3 .2
59.1

47 .3
63.8

4 8 .5
56 .4

5 2 .7
6 1 .0

5 8 .0
5 3 .0

5 1 .9
57 .2

4 8 .5
52 .3

45.1
5 6 .4

62.1
4 7 .3
5 5 .7

6 2 .9
4 9 .6
6 1 .4

6 4 .4
4 9 .6

5 4 .9
5 4 .2

51.1
59 .5

44 .3
67 .0

4 4 .3
6 3 .6

4 6 .2
6 0 .6

51.1
6 1 .0

4 7 .3
6 0 .2

50 .8
60.2

5 3 .0
5 8 .0

Note— T h e diffusion indexes are calculated as the percentage of series that increased over the indicated span (one, three, or six months) plus o n e -h a lf
the percentage that w ere unchanged.




15

Table 9
ELECTRIC POWER USE: MANUFACTURING AND MINING
Index. 1 9 9 2 ^ W
1992
Billion
KWH

1996
Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

934.1

10 6.0

10 6.4

10 6.0

8 5 4 .0
36 5 .8
4 8 8 .3
80.1

106.2
105.4
106.9
102.1

106.7
105.4
107.7
102.6

IN D U S T R Y G R O U P S a n d S E R IE S
M etal m in in g
10
101
Iron ore
102
C opper ore

18.6
7.3
6.6

114.0
126.1
10 9.4

C o a l m in in g

12

12.7

O il a n d g a s e x tra c tio n
C rude oil and natural gas
Natural gas liquids

13
131
132

S to n e a n d ea rth m in e ra ls
Crushed stone
S and and gravel
Chem ical and fertilizer m aterials
Foods
M e at products
Dairy products
C an ned and frozen food
Grain mill products
Bakery products
S ug ar and confectionery
Fats and oils
B everages
Coffee and m iscellaneous

S easonally adjusted

Not seasonally adjusted
1997
Oct.
Nov.
Dec/
Jan /

D ec.r

19 97
Jan.r

Feb.P

1996
Sept.

106.3

10 6.6

107.0

109.4

10 7.3

10 4.8

104.6

104.3

103.8

10 6.3
10 4.7
107.6
10 1.0

106.5
104.4
108.2
104.0

106.7
10 4.8
108.2
10 5.4

107.2
105.8
108.3
104.9

109.9
108.6
111.1
101.6

10 7.7
10 6.3
10 8.7
10 2.3

10 5.0
10 3.4
10 6.3
10 1.7

104.4
102.3
106.1
106.6

104.0
101.9
105.7
108.4

103.8
103.5
104.0
104.3

118.3
124.4
119.9

111.0
115.2
113.9

115.4
113.7
123.7

117.9
119.0
124.5

118.9
123.7
123.6

114.4
125.1
112.3

119.0
12 9.3
118.1

113.0
119.6
114.1

118.2
118.6
124.8

120.7
119.1
129.3

114.8
115.6
122.0

99.1

96 .9

9 6 .9

100.6

9 8 .3

95 .2

92 .3

93 .2

9 8 .9

107.1

109.4

108.6

36 .0
31 .0
3.6

9 1 .7
91 .5
8 9 .5

9 2 .3
92 .2
88 .3

9 2 .7
91.1
9 4 .9

94.1
93 .7
93.2

9 5 .9
9 6 .4
8 6 .7

96 .2
97.8
75.2

92 .0
91 .6
8 9 .9

9 1 .7
9 1 .8
87 .5

9 0 .6
8 9 .6
9 2 .8

96.1
95.5
95 .6

99 .2
99 .6
89 .5

93 .6
95.2
71 .7

14
142
144
147

12.8
3.5
2.7
: 4.7

111.8
130.9
10 9.7
107.6

109.7
131.5
110.9
102.5

1'10.4
13 4.0
110.8
102.8

114.0
143.0
112.1
106.5

117.4
150.5
109.0
112.8

116.0
151.7
101.3
111.4

116.1
143.0
117.7
108.9

113.1
144.5
119.1
102.1

113.7
146.8
118.4
102.2

112.8
141.3
110.2
105.3

110.0
124.5
93 .9
112.1

108.1
122.9
86 .0
111.2

20
201
202
203
204
20 5
20 6
207
20 8
209

58.8
10.3
6.8
8.1
11.4
3.5
4.0
3.9
6.1
4.7

112.2
120.6
104.5
110.0
114.3
110.0
111.9
108.6
100.8
121.0

114.3
124.6
107.6
111.7
120.7
111.0
109.6
108.6
103.0
117.0

114.2
123.9
10 6.8
113.5
123.1
109.1
105.2
108.5
102.1
117.6

115.3
124.3
107.4
113.7
123.6
109.5
113.8
110.0
101.9
119.5

115.7
124.8
108.7
111.3
125.3
111.6
116.0
110.9
100.4
119.1

115.3
124.2
109.1
110.5
123.3
113.2
115.5
111.9
101.7
118.3

123.9
133.1
114.1
135.3
119.6
123.3
110.7
107.0
116.1
134.4

118.8
127.2
107.6
125.3
12 6 .4
114.4
113.2
107.8
106.4
120.6

114.2
121.1
101.5
113.9
12 6.3
106.1
124.5
112.0
9 7 .3
116.0

111.5
118.9
100.9
105.8
120.8
103.2
132.6
117.5
93 .4
114.9

110.4
118.5
102.2
99 .9
122.8
104.0
129.0
120.7
91.1
111.9

107.5
114.0
99.5
98.1
120.9
102.7
120.1
115.1
89 .8
108.7

21

1.5

104.3

99 .6

105.1

98.8

102.2

92 .0

114.7

105.1

10 1.9

93 .2

91 .8

92 .3

22
2 2 1 -4
225
226
228
229

31.5
11.8
4.1
2.5
8.3
3.4

10 8.9
10 2.8
102.6
12 2.7
107.6
124.6

106.1
98 .4
107.7
119.3
105.9
119.8

10 8.6
101.1
10 1.7
122.5
113.2
119.3

109.1
99.5
104.3
126.8
116.4
120.5

109.6
102.5
107.5
123.5
112.6
120.7

110.7
103.8
107.0
122.4
114.3
120.1

119.4
112.9
117.0
128.7
118.7
133.3

110.9
10 2.7
112.3
121.4
111.3
125.2

10 4.7
9 7 .4
96 .6
12 1.9
10 8.8
116.1

100.8
91 .7
94 .5
123.3
106.6
112.9

93 .3
87 .0
88 .4
114.2
94.1
105.6

104.3
98.0
100.4
120.6
107.0
113.2

23
2 3 1 ,2
233

8.2
2.0
2.5

101.7
93 .0
96 .2

101.8
93 .0
95 .4

103.6
9 7 .0
9 9 .9

100.3
92 .7
98.2

101.0
93 .8
98.1

100.0
93.6
94.2

117.8
111.4
112.2

104.1
95 .8
9 7 .9

9 7 .2
8 8 .5
9 2 .4

9 1 .9
82 .4
8 8 .7

87 .8
77 .8
85 .9

93.2
84.4
87.0

L u m b e r a n d p r o d u c ts
Lum ber
Millwork and plywood

24
24 2
243

19.8
7.7
5.6

117.3
108.0
12 6.3

118.8
108.7
131.5

119.7
108.9
132.2

119.9
110.6
132.1

117.2
109.4
130.9

120.0
112.6
133.1

117.8
106.6
128.0

117.8
107.4
130.9

120.1
111.1
13 1.8

119.7
110.9
131.8

118.4
111.8
131.3

123.3
117.9
135.8

F u rn itu re a n d fix tu re s
H ousehold furniture

25
251

6.0
3.2

113.7
113.0

114.9
113.3

114.5
113.0

114.6
112.1

114.0
111.1

114.6
113.0

120.4
118.1

116.3
115.4

112.2
111.0

112.7
111.5

109.7
108.3

115.6
116.3

P a p e r a n d p r o d u c ts
W ood pulp
P aper
P aperboard
Paperboard containers
C onverted paper products

26
261
262
263
265
267

113.3
8.8
62 .3
28 .3
5.1
8.9

104.1
8 4 .8
105.5
10 3.4
111.5
103.5

104.5
95 .7
104.4
105.2
111.2
104.4

102.1
9 7 .9
101.4
10 1.3
110.0
103.2

103.8
95 .4
104.2
104.8
108.1
102.1

10 3.7
9 2 .5
104.1
106.3
107.3
102.2

101.1
89 .0
101.7
100.7
106.4
101.5

105.0
8 5 .3
105.6
102.8
115.4
108.5

103.7
9 2 .9
10 3.4
103.7
112.4
105.1

10 2 .0
9 9 .6
10 1.4
10 0.5
10 9.3
102.8

103.0
9 8 .3
103.7
103.1
105.4
99 .8

102.9
9 4 .9
104.0
105.5
103.5
97 .9

99 .4
88 .4
100.3
100.2
102.6
98.1

P rin tin g a n d p u b lis h in g
N ew spapers
C om m ercial printing

27
271
275

17.3
3.6
9.2

110.6
104.5
111.4

110.4
103.6
110.6

113.8
10 2.7
113.4

112.7
106.3
113.1

113.4
105.7
113.5

113.2
104.6
113.6

124.1
115.0
125.4

113.6
10 4.9
114.3

110,1
9 9 .2
10 9.8

107.0
102.7
106.5

105.8
100.9
105.3

103.6
96 .6
103.5

28
281
2812
2819

171.7
78 .9
14.9
38 .3
14.0
24 .3

10 3.3
9 9 .0
8 2 .2
9 6 .8
9 8 .4
9 6 .0

103.8
98 .9
85 .5
95 .9
89.1
99 .3

10 4.6
9 9 .7
7 8 .3
10 0.9
9 7 .4
102.6

106.0
100.0
76 .4
102.2
100.3
103.2

10 6.9
101.5
7 8 .0
104.0
9 9 .8
106.0

106.2
100.4
79.2
101.5
100.5
102.0

104.5
9 8 .4
8 0 .4
9 4 .0
9 8 .0
92 .0

104.4
99 .6
8 6 .0
9 6 .8
88.1
101.2

10 3.0
9 8 .5
7 6 .3
9 9 .3
9 7 .8
10 0.0

104.8
99 .9
7 6 .9
103.2
10 1.7
10 3.9

107.1
102.3
76 .5
105.6
103.3
106.8

102.7
96.9
76.5
96 .4
98 .0
95 .6

Item

19 87 S IC

To ta l
M A JO R IN D U S T R Y G R O U P S
M a n u fa c tu rin g
D u ra b le
N o n d u ra b le
M in in g

T o b a c c o p r o d u c ts
Te x tile m ill p r o d u c ts
Fabrics
Knit goods
Fabric finishing
Yarn and thread
M iscellaneous textiles
A p p a re l p r o d u c ts
M e n ’s outerw ear
W o m en ’s outerw ear

C h e m ic a ls a n d p r o d u c ts
Basic chem icals
A lkalies and chlorine
Inorganic chem icals, nec
Acid and fertilizer m aterials
N uclear m aterials, nondefense




16

Feb.P

Table 9 (continued)
ELECTRIC POWER USE: MANUFACTURING AND MINING
Index. 1S192 = 100
S easonallvadiusted

"
Not seasonallv adiusted
1 9 97
Nov.
Oct..
Dec/
Jan/

1 9 8 7 S IC

19 92
Billion
KWH

1996
Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

D ec/

1997
Jan/

Feb.P

1996
SeDt.

C h e m ic a ls a n d P ro d u c ts (c o n t.)
282
Synthetic m aterials
2821
Plastics m aterials
283
Drugs and medicines
284
S oap and toiletries
286
Industrial organic chem icals
287
Agricultural chem icals

2 9 .2
18.3
6 .7
3.0
39 .2
9 .7

104.1
114.7
119.7
100.5
10 6.3
113.8

108.1
121.9
122.4
104.3
105.5
115.8

10 8.7
116.8
12 3.9
10 3.8
10 6.4
115.5

111.8
1 2 4 .8
12 5 .8
10 4 .7
10 6.5
12 0.8

112.0
123.2
12 4.4
105.4
108.5
123.0

112.2
121.9
124.4
103.3
108.7
122.7

106.8
116.6
133.6
108.4
109.3
112.9

108.0
120.4
123.7
105.3
107.2
115.2

107.2
114.3
117.8
9 9 .6
10 5.3
116.0

109.1
122.7
118.3
99.1
105.5
121.8

111.9
122.5
115.8
10 2.4
10 8.8
12 3 .7

10 9.0
118.8
115.4
100.2
106.3
120.8

29

4 7 .0

106.8

110.1

10 8.8

1 0 5 .4

10 1.4

107.7

110.1

108.6

107.8

107.1

10 4.8

101.8

R u b b e r a n d p la s tic s p r o d u c ts
Tires
Rubber products, nec
Plastics products, nec

30
301
306
308

38 .0
4 .3
3.2
2 8 .9

123.9
107.1
111.7
129.0

125.4
107.2
112.6
131.0

12 3.4
10 2.7
111.4
129.5

1 2 3 .9
9 9 .6
111.8
13 0 .7

124.1
95 .9
112.2
132.0

124.6
101.8
112.7
131.0

129.6
112.7
116.8
134.8

127.1
107.7
113.1
133.2

12 2.7
10 2.4
10 8.7
12 9.0

118.9
9 2 .8
107.8
126.1

114.7
9 0 .4
104.9
12 1.3

123.1
100.2
112.6
129.4

L e a th e r and p ro d u c ts
Shoes

31
314

1.0
.3

92 .0
94 .0

94 .6
94.6

9 2 .8
9 0 .2

9 1 .5
9 0 .9

91 .8
93 .9

90 .0
91.9

101.3
106.0

94.5
95.9

8 9 .8
87 .2

87.1
8 4 .2

8 7 .0
8 6 .2

88 .8
88 .9

S to n e , clay, & g la s s p r o d u c ts
Flat glass
Pressed and blown glass
C em ent
Structural clay products
Concrete products

32
321
322
324
325
327

33 .8
1.5
7.3
9.6
1.4
4.7

110.5
106.6
101.2
111.3
114.4
110.4

110.1
108.0
99 .9
110.8
119.8
107.1

10 8 .7
10 4.4
99.1
109.7
115.2
108.3

10 8 .7
10 4.8
10 0.2
10 9.0
116.7
10 9 .9

110.8
101.3
101.1
115.2
118.2
10 7.7

110.7
108.2
100.4
113.9
118.1
106.6

113.2
110.0
102.9
115.1
117.9
113.1

113.2
108.0
101.8
118.7
119.3
109.3

110.9
10 3.3
99 .2
117.0
115.6
110.2

10 8.7
103.7
9 7 .7
112.6
116.7
110.9

106.1
9 7 .4
9 7 .7
105.1
113.8
104.9

103.6
104.4
99.1
93.6
113.4
101.7

33
331
332
333
3334
336

150.9
5 7 .0
9.9
66.2
60 .3
2 .7

96 .4
108.9
108.6
81.1
69 .8
119.4

96.4
106.9
120.0
80 .3
67.2
122.9

9 5 .0
103.4
12 0.0
8 0 .5
6 8 .2
12 5.0

9 4 .9
1 0 6 .0
116.3
7 9 .3
6 5 .5
118.2

94 .0
105.0
110.5
78 .8
64 .3
117.5

97 .3
109.2
115.5
81 .2
69 .8
120.9

95.5
107.5
111.1
79 .3
67 .0
122.6

97.1
107.0
121.6
81 .0
67.5
125.3

94 .5
103.1
121.8
79 .0
66 .8
126.5

9 4 .7
104.7
114.1
8 0 .6
6 6 .6
117.0

9 5 .0
10 7.3
10 6.3
8 0 .4
6 6 .0
113.6

95 .5
109.5
117.7
7 6 .6
64.1
122.2

F a b rica te d m etal p ro d u c ts
M etal containers
Hardware, tools, and cutlery
Structural metal products
Fasteners
Metal stampings

34
341
342
344
345
346

3 1 .4
2 .9
2 .7
5 .4
1.7
6.7

112.4
10 7.9
109.8
117.9
114.6
123.9

112.6
107.3
110.4
117.2
115.9
126.1

112.3
113.4
109.5
116.0
116.5
122.1

114.1
116.6
1 0 9 .9
119.0
117.9
1 2 2 .9

114.1
113.1
111.3
119.0
114.9
125.4

112.0
111.2
111.9
114.3
116.4
124.8

116.9
112.4
116.1
120.9
119.8
128.9

113.3
107.8
111.0
117.2
117.4
127.6

110.8
111.2
107.5
115.4
114.3
121.2

110.1
109.2
105.7
116.9
111.7
120.1

109.1
10 8 .3
10 3.6
118.1
10 8.0
118.1

113.0
109.8
111.3
117.6
116.9
126.8

In d u stria l m a c h in e ry
a n d e q u ip m e n t
Engines and turbines
Farm
Construction and allied
Metalworking
Special industry
General industrial
Com puter and office equip.
Service industry m achines

35
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358

33.2
2.6
2.0
3.8
4.1

107.8
98.1
110.3
112.5
112.2

107.4
96 .3
121.3
109.7
112.6

10 7.7
9 7 .0
12 9.0
10 9.3
115.0

1 0 6 .4
9 5 .4
12 2 .8
110.1
113.7

106.6
9 2 .6
115.2
114.3
113.7

107.8
94.5
112.8
113.5
112.2

114.7
101.4
111.9
121.2
120.6

107.6
95.8
115.2
110.0
112.7

10 4.6
9 6 .7
12 4.0
10 8.6
111.0

10 2.0
91 .6
119.5
106.1
108.2

10 0.4
8 9 .6
119.3
10 7.5
10 7.0

106.3
94 .5
121.6
112.2
111.1

5.2
5.1
3.5

10 4.7
94 .3
115.2

106.2
89 .0
114.5

10 5.4
8 9 .9
114.2

10 5.8
8 4 .8
115.7

104.7
87.1
110.7

109.9
88 .0
116.3

112.5
97 .5
124.7

106.4
89 .7
116.4

10 2.4
86 .6
111.1

100.1
84 .2
107.5

98 .2
8 2 .3
10 0.9

108.6
85 .2
112.0

E le ctrica l m a c h in e ry
Electrical distribution
Electrical industrial
Household appliances
Lighting and wiring products
T V and radio sets
Communication equipm ent
Electronic components

36
361
362
363
364
365
366
367

33 .0
1.3
4 .0
2 .4
3.0
.8
3 .3
14.5

118.8
88 .5
88 .2
10 3.6
112.4
136.1
118.7
134.5

117.1
88 .6
85 .6
104.9
114.4
137.4
114.3
132.5

119.5
8 8 .7
8 7 .8
10 2.8
113.4
130.8
116.6
13 7.6

118.9
8 8 .7
8 6 .3
10 2 .4
112.3
13 3 .3
114.7
13 7 .7

120.0
87 .5
8 7 .8
104.3
112.5
138.5
115.2
13 7.7

116.4
86 .4
9 0 .3
101.6
114.6
134.1
115.5
131.0

127.1
9 6 .7
91 .9
111.8
118.0
144.8
130.4
143.6

118.6
90.3
85 .6
107.2
115.3
141.2
114.8
133.8

116.3
8 5 .6
85.1
98.1
110.8
129.9
111.5
134.0

114.9
8 4 .3
8 3 .3
92 .5
107.6
129.8
111.3
13 4.0

113.0
8 3 .0
8 4 .6
9 6 .8
10 5.2
13 1 .7
10 7.0
12 9.9

112.1
8 4 .4
87 .8
98 .4
113.7
129.8
108.0
125.0

Tra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t
Motor vehicles and parts
Aircraft and parts
Ships and boats

37
371
37 2
373

3 9 .6
2 2 .8
10.7
2.2

107.0
119.4
84.1
8 5 .0

107.6
119.1
84 .5
88 .0

10 5.7
116.8
8 3 .4
9 0 .0

10 3 .7
112.9
8 6 .3
8 8 .4

107.0
117.7
88 .2
87 .2

107.4
120.4
84 .4
88.1

113.5
127.4
89 .5
86.5

108.4
120.6
85.6
85 .3

103.2
114.7
8 0 .4
8 6 .9

9 9 .0
10 7.6
8 2 .7
8 8 .0

10 0.7
110.2
83.1
8 7 .4

104.8
116.8
8 2 .3
90 .5

In s tru m e n ts
Photographic equip. & supplies

38
386

13.7
1.8

99 .4
87 .8

100.1
88.2

9 8 .6
8 7 .6

1 0 0 .2
9 1 .6

101.8
95 .7

102.0
95 .8

108.5
93.1

101.8
90.2

9 5 .3
84.1

9 5 .2
8 7 .8

9 5 .7
9 3 .5

9 7 .3
93 .6

39

4.5

126.5

129.3

12 9.6

13 2 .0

130.2

131.0

137.8

131.2

12 5.0

12 4.8

12 1.3

12 7.7

9 0 9 .8
8 3 5 .3
98 .8

10 6.4
10 6.3
10 4.0

106.7
106.5
101.9

106.1
10 6.2
9 9 .3

10 6 .5
1 0 6 .7
9 8 .9

106.6
106.9
9 7 .0

107.2
107.8
99 .3

110.2
109.9
101.6

107.6
107.6
102.6

10 5.0
105.2
9 8 .9

10 4.6
10 4.6
103.8

10 4.2
10 4 .3
10 3.9

104.2
10 4.4
9 5 .3

Item

P e tro le u m p ro d u c ts

P rim a ry m etals
Basic steel and mill products
Iron and steel foundries
Primary nonferrous m etals
Aluminum
Nonferrous foundries

M is ce lla n e o u s m a n u fa c tu re s
S U P P LEM EN TA R Y G R O U P S
Total, excluding nuclear nondefense
Utility sales to industry
Industrial generation




17

Feb.P

Explanatory Note

T h e sta tistic a l r ele a se o f Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization reports
m ea su res o f ou tp u t, cap a city , and c a p a c ity u tiliz a tio n in m an u factu rin g, m in in g, and
th e e le c tr ic and g a s u tilities in d u stries. T h e r e le a se a lso in c lu d e s m o n th ly in d ex es on
the u se o f e le c tr ic p o w e r in m an u factu rin g and m in in g . D ata in the release and
h isto r ic a l data are a va ila b le un der statistica l r e le a se s at http://www.bog.frb.fed.us.
the B o a r d ’s W orld W id e W eb site. T h e se d ata are a lso a v a ila b le on lin e o n the d ay o f
issu e th rou gh th e E c o n o m ic B u lle tin B oard o f th e D ep a rtm en t o f C om m erce. For
in fo rm a tio n , c a ll (2 0 2 ) 4 8 2 -1 9 8 6 . D isk e tte s c o n ta in in g h isto rica l data and the data
p u b lish ed in th is r elea se are a v a ila b le from the B oa rd o f G ov ern o rs o f the Federal
R ese rv e S y ste m , P u b lica tio n s S e r v ic e s, (2 0 2 ) 4 5 2 -3 2 4 5 .

Industrial Production

Coverage. T h e industrial p rod u ction (IP ) in d e x m ea su res output in the
m a n u fa ctu rin g, m in in g, and e lec tric and g a s u tilities in d u stries; the referen ce period
fo r th e in d e x is 1992. F or the p eriod s in c e 1 9 9 2 . the total IP in d ex has been
c o n stru cted fro m 2 6 4 in d iv id u a l series b a sed o n the 1 987 Standard Industrial
C la ssific a tio n (S IC ). T h e se in d iv id u a l ser ie s are c la s s ifie d in tw o w ays: (1) m arket
g ro u p s (sh o w n in tab le 1), su ch as c o n su m e r g o o d s , eq u ip m e n t, interm ed iate
p ro d u cts, and m aterials; and (2 ) industry g ro u p s (sh o w n in tab les 2 and 6 ), su ch as
tw o -d ig it S IC in d u stries and m ajor a g g r eg a tes o f th ese in d u stries— for exa m p le ,
d u rab le and non d u rab le m an u factu rin g, m in in g , and u tilities.
M arket groups. For p u rp o ses o f a n a ly sis, th e

in d iv id u a l IP series are grou p ed into
fin a l p ro d u cts, in term ed iate p rod u cts, and m a teria ls. F in al p rod u cts are assu m ed to be
p u rch ased by c o n su m e r s, b u sin e sse s, or g o v e r n m e n t for fin al u se. Interm ediate
p ro d u cts are e x p e cte d to b e c o m e in p u ts in n on in d u strial secto rs, su ch as
co n stru c tio n , agricultu re, and ser v ice s. M a teria ls are indu strial output requiring
further p r o c essin g w ith in the industrial sector. T ota l p ro d u cts c o m p rise final and
in term ed ia te p rod u cts, and final p rod u cts are d iv id e d in to co n su m e r g o o d s and
eq u ip m en t.
Timing. T h e first estim ate o f outp u t for a m on th is p u b lish ed around the 15th o f the
fo llo w in g m on th . T he e stim ate is p relim in ary (d en o te d by the superscript “p" in
ta b le s) and su b ject to rev isio n in each o f the su b se q u e n t th ree m on th s as n ew source
data b e c o m e a v a ila b le. (R e v ise d e stim a te s are d en o te d by the superscript “r" in
ta b le s.) A fte r the fourth m on th, in d e x es are not r ev ised further until the tim e o f an
ann u al r e v isio n or a b en ch m ark rev isio n . T h e last th ree b en ch m ark r ev ision s w ere
p u b lish ed in 199 0 . 1985. and 1976.
Source data. In annual or b en ch m ark r e v isio n s, the in d iv id u a l IP in d ex es are
c o n stru c ted from a variety o f so u rce data, su ch as the q u in q u en n ial Censuses of
Manufactures and Mineral Industries and the Annual Sur\'ey of Manufactures,
p repared by the B ureau o f the C en su s; the Minerals Yearbook, prepared by the
D ep artm en t o f the Interior; and p u b lic a tio n s o f the D ep a rtm en t o f E nergy. O n a
m o n th ly b a sis, the in d ivid u al in d e x es o f in du strial p ro d u ctio n are con stru cted from
tw o m ain ty p es o f sou rce data: ( I ) outp u t m ea su red in p h y sic a l u nits and (2) data on
in p u ts to the p rod u ction p ro cess, from w h ic h ou tp u t is in ferred . D ata on p h ysical
p ro d u cts, su ch as ton s o f steel or barrels o f o il. are o b ta in ed from private trade
a sso c ia tio n s as w ell as from g o v ern m en t a g e n c ie s in clu d in g th o se listed ab ove; data
o f th is typ e are u sed to e stim ate m o n th ly IP w h ere p o ssib le and appropriate. W hen
su ita b le data o n p h ysical product are u n a v a ila b le, e stim a te s o f output are based on
e ith er p ro d u ctio n -w ork er hours or elec tric p o w e r u se by industry. D ata on hours
w ork ed by p rod u ction w ork ers are c o lle c te d in the m o n th ly esta b lish m en t su rvey
c o n d u cte d by the B ureau o f L abor S ta tistic s. T h e data on elec tric p ow er u se are
d esc r ib e d b elo w . T he factors u sed to co n v e rt in p u ts in to e stim a te s o f p roduction are
b a sed on h istorical rela tio n sh ip s b etw ee n the in p u ts and the c o m p re h en siv e data u sed
to b en ch m ark the IP in d ex es; th ese factors a lso m ay be in flu e n c e d by tec h n o lo g ic a l
or c y c lic a l d e v e lo p m en ts. E sp e c ia lly fo r the first and se c o n d e stim a te s for a g iven
m o n th , the a va ila b le so u rce data are lim ited and su b ject to rev isio n .
Weights. In the in d ex , series that m easu re th e ou tp u t o f an in d iv id u a l industry are
w e ig h te d a cc o rd in g to their prop ortion in the total v a lu e -a d d ed output o f all
in d u stries. T h e in dustrial p rod u ction in d e x , w h ic h e x te n d s b ack to 1919, is built as an
a n n u a lly w eig h te d ch a in -ty p e in d ex sin c e 1 97 7 . T h e c o m p o n e n ts o f IP are c om b in ed
u sin g e stim a te s o f valu e add ed per unit o f ou tp u t. F or m o n th s from January to June,
the w e ig h ts are draw n from the y ear c o n ta in in g th e m on th b ein g e stim ated and the
p re c ed in g year; for m on th s from July to D ec e m b er , th e w e ig h ts are draw n from the
curren t and fo llo w in g year. T he IP p rop ortion s sh o w n in c o lu m n 1 o f tab les 1A , 2 A ,
and 6 are e stim a te s o f the in d u stries' rela tiv e con tr ib u tio n s to o v erall grow th in the
fo llo w in g year. For e x a m p le , a 1 percen t in cr e a se in d u rab le g o o d s m anu facturin g in
1 99 7 w o u ld a cc o u n t for an in crease in total IP o f n early 1/2 p ercent.
Seasonal adjustm ent. In d ividu al ser ie s a re-season al ly a d ju sted by the X - l 1 A R IM A
m eth o d , d e v e lo p e d at S tatistics C an ad a. F or se r ie s b ased o n p rod u ction -w ork er
h ou rs, the current sea so n a l factors w ere e stim a te d w ith data throu gh O ctob er 1996;
fo r o th er ser ie s, the factors w ere estim a ted w ith d ata th rou gh at least June 1996. In
so m e c a s e s , ser ie s w ere pread ju sted for th e e ffe c ts o f h o lid a y s or the b u sin ess c y c le
b efo r e u sin g X —11 A R IM A . F or the d ata s in c e 1 9 7 7 , all sea so n a lly adjusted
a g g r eg a te in d e x e s are c alcu la ted by a g g r eg a tin g th e se a so n a lly ad ju sted in d ex es o f
the in d iv id u a l series.
Reliability. T h e a verag e rev isio n to the level o f th e total IP in d e x , w ith o u t regard to
sig n , b e tw e e n the first and the fourth e stim a te s w a s 0 .2 8 p ercen t durin g the 1 9 8 7 -9 6
p eriod . T h e a ve r a g e rev isio n to the percent change in total IP, w ith o u t regard to sign ,



^ 18

from the first to th e fourth e stim a te s w a s 0.2 1 p ercen tage p oin t d uring the 1 9 8 7 -9 6
p eriod. In m o st c a s e s (ab o u t 81 p ercen t), the d irectio n o f ch a n g e in ou tp u t in d ica ted
by the first e stim a te fo r a g iv e n m on th is the sa m e as that sh ow n by the fourth estim a te.

Rounding.

T h e p u b lish ed p ercen t c h a n g es are c alcu la ted from u n rou nd ed in d e x e s,
and m ay n ot b e the sa m e as p ercen t c h a n g es c alcu la ted from the rou n d ed in d e x e s
sh o w n in the rele a se .

Capacity Utilization
Definition. C ap a city u tilizatio n is c a lcu la ted for the m an u facturin g, m in in g, and
e lectric and gas u tilities in d u stries. F or a g iv e n industry, the u tilizatio n rate is eq u a l to
an outp u t in d ex d iv id e d by a ca p a c ity in d ex. O utput is m easured by se a so n a lly
adju sted in d e x es o f indu strial p rod u ction . T h e cap a city in d e x es attem p t to cap tu re
the c o n c e p t o f su sta in a b le p ractical cap a city , w h ich is d efin ed as the greatest le v e l o f
outp u t that a plant can m ain tain w ith in the fram ew ork o f a realistic w ork sch e d u le ,
taking a cco u n t o f norm al d o w n tim e , and a ssu m in g su fficien t a va ila b ility o f in pu ts to
operate the m a ch in ery and eq u ip m en t in p lace. T h e 7 6 in d ivid u al ca p a c ity in d e x es
are b ased on a variety o f data, in clu d in g cap a city data m easured in p h y sic a l u nits
c o m p ile d by trade a sso c ia tio n s, su rv e y s o f u tilizatio n rates and in v e stm e n t, and
e stim a te s o f g ro w th o f the cap ital input.
Groups.

E stim a tes o f cap a city and u tilization are ava ila b le for a variety o f g rou p s,
in clu d in g primary' and a d v a n ced p ro c essin g indu stries w ith in m an u factu rin g,
durable and n on d u rab le m an u factu rin g, total m an u facturin g, m in in g, u tilities, and
total industry. C o m p o n e n t in d u stries o f the prim ary and a d van ced p ro c essin g g rou p s
w ith in m an u factu rin g are listed in the note on tab les 2 and 3 o f the relea se.

Weights. A lth o u g h each u tilizatio n rate is the result o f d ivid in g an IP ser ie s by a
c o rresp o n d in g ca p a c ity in d ex , agg reg a te u tilization rates are e q u iv a le n t to
co m b in a tio n s o f in d iv id u a l u tilizatio n rates a ggregated w ith p rop ortions that reflect
current cap a city le v e ls o f outp u t v alu ed in current-period valu e add ed per unit o f
actual outp u t. T h e im p lied p rop ortion s o f in d ivid u al industry op eratin g rates in the
rate for total indu stry for the m ost recent year are sh ow n in the first c o lu m n o f tab le 3.
Perspective. T h e h isto rica l h igh s and lo w s in cap a city u tilization sh o w n in the tab les
a b o v e are sp e c ific to each series and did not all o ccu r in the sam e m on th. Industrial
plants u su a lly op erate at cap a city u tilizatio n rates that are w ell b elo w 100 percent:
n on e o f the broad a g g r eg a tes has e v e r reached 100 percent. For total industry and
total m an u factu rin g, u tilizatio n rates h ave e x c e e d e d 9 0 p ercent o n ly in w artim e.

Electric Power
D ata on e lec tric p o w e r (ex p r essed in k ilo w att hours) are c o lle c te d by the F ederal
R eserv e D istrict B an k s from elec tric u tilities and a lso from m an u factu rin g and
m in in g e sta b lish m e n ts that g en era te e lectric p ow er for their o w n u se (co g e n e r a to rs).
T he in d e x es o f p o w e r u se sh o w n in tab le 9 are su m s o f k ilow att hours u sed by an
industry or indu stry grou p e x p r esse d as a p ercen tage o f that in d u stry's or grou p 's
u sag e in 1992. T h e first c o lu m n o f the table sh o w s, for referen ce, elec tric p o w e r u se
in b illio n s o f k ilo w att h ours as reported by m anu facturin g and m in in g in d u stries in
the 1992 c e n su se s o f th ose in d u stries. T he su p p lem entary grou p . “T otal, le ss n u clear
n on d efen se." is sh o w n sep arately b eca u se the valu e-ad d ed p roportion for the
n on d e fe n se n u clear m aterial series (part o f S IC 2 8 1 9 ) in total IP is co n sid er a b ly
sm a ller than its share o f total e lec tric p ow er use. E x clu d in g this c o m p o n e n t from total
p ow er u se facilita tes co m p a r iso n s w ith total IP.

References
T h e annual r ev isio n p u b lish ed in January, in clu d in g a d escrip tion o f the a g g r eg a tio n
m eth od s for industrial p rod u ction and cap a city u tilizatio n , is d escrib ed in the Federal
Reserve Bulletin. v o l. 83 (Feb ru ary 1 997), pp. 6 7 - 9 2 . In add ition , the m o st recent
rev ision to the e lec tric p o w e r u se data is d isc u sse d in that article.

Industrial Production— 1986 Edition con ta in s a m ore d eta iled d escrip tion o f the
oth er m eth od s u sed to c o m p ile the industrial prod u ction in d ex , plus a h istory o f its
d ev e lo p m en t, a g lo ssa ry o f term s, and a b ib liograp hy. T o obtain Industrial
Production— 1986 Edition ($ 9 .0 0 per c o p y ), w rite to B oard o f G ov ern o rs o f the
F ederal R ese rv e S y ste m . P u b lica tio n s S e r v ic e s, W ash in gton , D C 2 0 5 5 1 . T h e m ajor
r ev isio n s to the IP in d e x es and c ap a city u tilizatio n sin c e 1990 h ave b een d escrib ed in
the Federal Resene Bulletin (A p ril 199 0 , June 1990, June 199 3 , M arch 1994,
January 1995, and January 1 996). T h e b asic m e th o d o lo g y u sed to estim a te cap a city
and u tilizatio n is d isc u sse d in the June 1 99 0 Federal Reserve Bulletin.

Release Schedule for 1997
A t 9 : 15 a.m . on January 17, February 14, M arch 14. A pril 16, M ay 15, June 17, July
16, A u g u st 14, S ep te m b e r 16. O cto b er 17, N o v e m b e r 17, and D e c e m b e r 15.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102