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S e r ia l N o . R .7

U N IT E D

S T A T E S

D E P A R T M E N T

O F

L A B O R

FRANCES PERKINS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ISADOR LUBIN, Commissioner

TREND OF EMPLOYMENT
JUNE 1933

By Industries:
Page
Manufacturing Industries................................................ 1-13
Non manufacturing In d u s tr ie s .......................................14-17
Anthracite and Bituminous Coal Mining
Metalliferous Mining
Quarrying and Nonmetallic Mining
Crude Petroleum Producing
Public Utilities:
Telephone and Telegraph
Power and Light
Electric Railroads
Wholesale and Retail Trade
Hotels
Canning and Preserving
Laundries
Dyeing and Cleaning
Banks, Brokerage, Insurance, and Real Estate
Building C onstruction ..................................................... 20-22
Executive Civil Service.....................................................30-32
Class I Steam Railroads . .................................. .... .
32
By S t a t e s ........................................................................ .... • 22-29
By C i t i e s ..................................................................................
30
Average hours and average hourly e a r n i n g s ................... 18-20
Wage C h a n g e s ........................................................................ 32-36




UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
W ASHINGTON : 1933

TREND OF EMPLOYMENT
June 1933
HE Bureau of Labor Statistics of the United States Department
of Labor presents in the following tables, data compiled from
pay-roll reports supplied by cooperating establishments in 17 of the
important industrial groups of the country and covering the pay
period ending nearest the 15th of the month.
Information for each of the 89 separate manufacturing industries
and for the manufacturing industries combined is shown, following
which are presented tabulations showing the changes in employment
and pay rolls in the 16 nonmanufacturing groups included in the
Bureau’s monthly survey, together with information available con­
cerning employment in the executive Civil Service and on class I
railroads.
Employment in Selected Manufacturing Industries in June 1933
Comparison of Employment and Pay-Roll Totals in June 1933 with May 1933
and June 1932

M PLOYM ENT in manufacturing industries increased 7 per­
cent in June 1933 as compared with May 1933 and pay-roll
totals increased 10.8 percent over the month interval. Comparing
June 1933 with June 1932, increases of 9.2 percent in employment
and 9.7 percent in pay-roll totals are shown over the 12-month period.
The index of employment in June 1933 was 62.8 as compared with
58.7 in May 1933, 56 in April 1933, and 57.5 in June 1932; the pay­
roll index in June 1933 was 43.1 as compared with 38.9 in May 1933,
34.9 in April 1933, and 39.3 in June 1932. The 12-month average
for 1926 equals 100.
The percents of change in employment and pay-roll totals in June
1933 as compared with May 1933 are based on returns made by
17,952 establishments in 89 of the principal manufacturing industries
in the United States, having in June 2,802,711 employees whose
combined earnings in one week were $50,408,132.
The gains of 7 percent in factory employment and 10.8 percent in
pay rolls in June mark the third consecutive month in which both
employment and earnings have increased. The increase in employ­
ment in June combined with the increases of 1.6 percent in April and
4.8 percent in May represents a gain of 14 percent in employment
since the bank holiday in March. These combined increases have
brought the level of employment in June to the highest point reached
in the last 15 months and for the first time since October 1929 indicate
more workers on manufacturing-establishment pay rolls in the cur­
rent month than were employed in the corresponding month of the

E




(1 )

2

preceding year. The June 1933 employment index, however, is still
36.8 percent below the level of June in the index base year 1926.
The increase of 10.8 percent in pay rolls in June combined with the
increase of 4.5 percent in April and 11.5 percent in May represents a
total increase of 29 percent over the March low and brings the June
1933 pay-roll index to a point 9.7 percent above the level of June
1932. The pay-roll index in June 1933 remains 56.8 percent below
the level of the June 1926 pay-roll index.
The broadness of the current expansion is indicated by the increases
in employment in 79 of the 89- separate manufacturing industries
surveyed, while 80 industries reported increases in pay rolls over the
month interval. The 10 industries in which decreased employment
was reported between May and June were industries usually affected
by seasonal decreases at this period.
Thirteen of the fourteen groups into which these 89 manufacturing
industries are classified, reported gains in employment and pay rolls
over the month interval, the lumber-products group reporting the
most pronounced gain, 13 percent, due to increases of 15.1 percent in
employment in sawmills, 10.8 percent in furniture, and 9.6 percent in
millwork. The stone-clay-glass and the rubber-products group
reported gains in employment of 11.7 percent each. In the stoneclay-glass group, the brick and cement industries reported gains in
employment of nearly 15 percent and the marble-slate-granite
industry reported a slightly larger gain. In the rubber-products
group, the most pronounced gain was in the rubber tire and tube
industry which reported an increase of 14.7 percent in number of
workers over the month interval coupled with an increase of 26.4
percent in pay rolls. The textile-products group reported an increase
of 10.1 percent in employment and 16.1 percent in pay rolls, the largest
gain in employment in this group being reported in the woolen and
worsted goods industry (23.3 percent). The cotton-goods industry
reported a gain in employment of 15.7 percent, knit goods 7.8 percent,
and silk and rayon goods, 4.9 percent. In the wearing-apparel division
of the textile group gains in employment of 8.1 percent and 9.7 percent
were reported in the men's clothing and the shirt and collar industries,
respectively, while the women's clothing and the millinery industries
both reported seasonal declines. The combined totals of the indus­
tries comprising the iron and steel group showed gains of 9.8 percent
in employment and 22 percent in pay rolls, each of the 13 industries
in this group reporting substantial increases in employment coupled
with more pronounced gains in earnings. The cast-iron pipe industry
reported the greatest increase in employment (19.9 percent) and the
iron and steel industry reported a gain of 9.6 percent in employment
coupled with an increase of 25.1 percent in pay rolls. The machinery
group, under which heading is classified such important industries as
agricultural implements, electrical machinery, foundries and machine
shops, machine tools, radio, and textile machinery, reported an in­
crease of 8.1 percent in employment, the gains in employment in
these separate industries ranging from 5.3 percent in the electricalmachinery industry to 15.6 percent in the textile-machinery industry.
The nonferrous metal group reported an increase of 7.3 percent and
the transportation group reported a gain of 6.4 percent. In this
last-named group, the automobile industry reported increases of 8
percent in employment and 7.1 percent in earnings. The leather-




3
products group reported an increase of 4.4 percent in employment
from May to June due to the combined increases of 10 percent in the
leather industry and 2.9 percent in the boot and shoe industry. The
food group reported a gain of 4 percent in number of employees, the
beverage industry in this group continuing to report substantial
additions to its already greatly expanded total. The level of em­
ployment in the beverage industry in June 1933 measured by changes
in the Bureau’s indexes is 95.9 percent above the level of the corre­
sponding month of 1932, due almost entirely to legalizing the manu­
facture of beer. This is not the only industry in which expansions
of large proportions have occurred over the year interval, although
in the beverage industry the expansion represents the addition of
new workers to the industry, while in the woolen-goods industry,
for instance, in which employment shows a gain of 89.6 percent from
June 1932 to June 1933, the gain represents a return of employees
to plants previously operated due to recently increased activity.
In this 12-month comparison, the cotton-goods industry also shows
an increase in employment of nearly 60 percent and the rayon industry
shows a gain of 65.8 percent in employment over the year interval.
The radio and the silk-goods industries both show increases of 44
percent over the year interval and 13 additional industries showed
increases of more than 20 percent in employment. In 31 of the 89
industries the level of employment in June 1933 was still below the
level of June 1932.
In table 1, which follows, are shown the number of identical estab­
lishments reporting in both May and June 1933 in the 89 manufac­
turing industries, together with the total number of employees on the
pay rolls of these establishments during the pay period ending nearest
June 15, the amount of their earnings for 1 week in June, the percents
of change over the month and year intervals, and the indexes of
employment and pay roll in June 1933.
The monthly percents of change for each of the 89 separate indus­
tries are computed by direct comparison of the total number of
employees and of the amount of weekly pay roll reported in identical
establishments for the 2 months considered. The percents of change
over the month interval in the several groups and in the total.of the
89 manufacturing industries are computed from the index numbers of
these groups, which are obtained by weighting the index numbers of
the several industries in the groups by the number of employees or
wages paid in the industries. The percents of change over the year
interval in the separate industries, in the groups and in the totals are
computed from the index numbers of employment and pay-roll totals.




4
T a b le

1.—COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AN D PAY ROLLS IN MANUFACTURING
ESTABLISHM EN TS IN JUNE 1933 W ITH M A Y 1933 A N D JUNE 1932

Industry

Food and kindred prod­
u cts____________________
Baking________________
Beverages_____________
B utter________________
Confectionery_________
Flour__________________
Ice cream______________
Slaughtering and meat
packing_____________
Sugar, beet____________
Sugar refining, cane___
Textiles a n d th eir p r o d ­
u c t s ____________ ____ ___
F a b rics _______ _______
Carpets and rugs.—
Cotton goods______
Cotton small wares.
Dyeing and finish­
ing textiles______
Hats, fur-felt--------Knit goods_______
Silk and rayon goods
Woolen and wor­
sted goods______
W earin g a p p a rel____
Clothing, m en's__
Clothing, wom en’s..
Corsets and allied
garments________
M en’s furnishings..
M illinery__________
Shirts and collars-..
I ro n a n d steel a n d their
p ro d u c ts , n o t in c lu d ­
in g m a c h i n e r y ...............
Bolts, nuts, washers,
and rivits_____ ______
Cast-iron pipe_________
Cutlery (not including
silver and plated cut­
lery) and edge tools.
Forgings, iron and steel
Hardware_____________
Iron and steel_________
Plumbers’ supplies____
Steam and hot-water
heating apparatus and
steam fittings________
Stoves_________________
Structural and orna­
mental metalwork___
Tin cans and other tin­
ware________________
Tools (not including
edge tools, machine
tools, files, and saws)..
Wire w ork_____________
M achinery, n o t includ­
ing t r a n s p o r t a t i o n
equipm ent_____________
A g r i c u l t u r a l imple­
m ents_________ _____
Cash registers, adding
machines, and calcu­
lating machines_____
i N o change.




Employment
Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
Percent of
ing in
change
both
Number
M ay
on
pay
and
June
June roll June M ay
1932
1933
to
1933
June to June
1933
1933

3,013
960
357
317
318
420
323

252,449
59, 379
23, 073
6,058
33, 225
15, 513
11,907

250
57

11

93, 092
4 ,1
6.113

3,135
1,894
27
651
113

703,865
574,419
11,842
279, 784
10,146

152
35
438
242

36,249
5, 451
112, 378
47,507

236
1,241
398
476

Percent of
change
Amount
of pay roll
(1 week)
June 1933

+ 4 .0 + 6 .9 ? 5 ,187,093
1,257, 218
+ 1 .4 - 3 .8
670, 232
+18.1 +95.9
- 1 .4
124, 259
+ 7 .8
414, 022
- . 7 +12.9
- 1 .4
308, 967
0)
301,881
+15.8 - 7 .9
+ 3 .2

Index num ­
bers (average
1926=100)

Pay-roll totals

M ay
to
June
1933

E m ­ P ay­
ploy­ roll
June
1932 ment totals
to June
1933

+ 3.9
- 0 .3
+ 1 .9 - 10.8
+14. - +102. 7
+ 5 .9 -1 4 .9
- 4 .7
- 5 .1
- 5 .4
- 8 .3
+15.6 -1 7 .1
1.

79.3
160.8
102.0

73.6
82.8
78.0

69.7
63.7
151.6
75.7
48.6
62.6
58.8

+4.
+23.2
+4.~

1,877, 733
84, 327
148,454

+ 4 .3
+ 6 .9

+1.0

+ 1 .4
+ 3.1

90.
48.9
78.3

72.6
36.2

+13.3
+15.5
+15.7
+9. ~

+37.7
+47.0
+13.7
+59.8
+24.6

9,176,541
7,506,648
207, 823
3,109,403
154, 215

+16.1
+21.2
+28. “
+24.0
+12.8

+49.7
+65.1
+61, “
+84.9
+38.6

80.7
85.4
59.1
91.7
89.2

52.7
60.1
42.3
65.1
66.4

+ 5 .0
+1+ 7 .8
+ 4 .9

+13.3
+21.5
+19.4
+44.9

678,283
104, 884
1, 448, 570
605,924

+ 9.1 +21.6
+20.4 +58.1
+10.4 +21.4
+10.1 +57.8

81.0
68.5
89.2
59.7

60.2
43.8
59.6
39.3

71,062
129,146
63, 908
25, 854

+23.3 +89.6
+ 1 .5 +16.
+8.1 +25.0
+ 5 .2
- 8 .1

1,197, 546
1,669,893
813,116
368, 771

+37.1 +121.2
+ 2 .4 +15. 9
+18.5 +42.5
- 7 .4
-1 3 .8

93.3
69.4
69.9

72.1
38.0
36.9
33.9

34
76
139
118

5, 719
7,844
9,690
16,431

+1+•
+ 7 .9 + 10.9
- 3 .6 -2 3 .5
+ 9.7 +18.4

82,196
87,960
147,058
170, 792

+ 1. 7 +8.2
+13.3 + 4 .8
- 4 .3 +20.5
+19.1 +26.1

100.8

1,368

326,734

36

9, 672
4,713

129
65
106
205

6,046
21,861
199, 580

93
159

14,649
17,843

+8.8

182

12,904

+ 3 .7

-1 7 .4

196, 593

+ 5 .9

60

9,102

+ 6 .9

+ 2.

181,805

+10.2

128
67

7,003
6,194

124,954
124,241

1,771

266,298

75

6,
13,768

+12.1
+ .5

+10.1

+9.

+6.

+12.6

+13.9

+22.0

-

68.2

63.0

77.5
37.4
42.4
43.0

+33.8

36.0

175, 708
60, 57£

+30.0 +32.5
+21.7 - 8.0

73.0
29.4

47.3
16.1

+ 8 .4
+• 4
+8.2
+21.2

159,994
111,483
327,161
3, 657,41C
157,404

+12.8 - 1 0 .1
+23. 6 +26.5
+19.8 + 9 .7
+25.1 +54.1
+24.4 +39.1

60.6
63.1
52.6
59.4
77.1

41.7
39.2
29.5
35.9
51.9

+18.7
+ 9 .6 +15.3

264, 566
328, 444

+15.3 +22.4
+14.8 +33.9

40.0
53.4

25.1
33.6

- 2 2 .5

39.4

21.0

+ 7 .5

78.9

50.3

+28.9 + 6 .4
+21.1 +32. '

63.0
104.3

40.0
87.5

48.2

31.8

27.7

21.7

70.6

53.5

+19.9

+ 4.1
+12.4
+8.2
+ 9 .e
+15.4

6.1

-

-

12.0

+8.8 - 3 .5
+12.2 + 11.
+8.1

- 3 .8

5,135,608

+ 8.

+25.3

116, 275

+18.2 +32.

-.7

338,193

+11.3

+ 9 .3

+15.9

+ 2 .3

+12.6

5
1.—C OM PARISON OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y ROLLS IN MANUFACTURING
ESTABLISHM ENTS IN JUNE 1933 W ITH M A Y 1933 A N D JUNE 1932—Continued

T a b le

Industry

M achinery, n o t includ­
ing t r a n s p o r t a t i o n
equipm ent—Continued.
Electrical machinery,
apparatus, and sup­
plies.............................
Engines, turbines, trac' tors, and water wheels.
Foundry and machineshop products_______
Machine tools............
R ad i o s a n d phono­
graphs.................... ......
Textile machinery and
parts.--------------------Typewriters and sup­
plies.................. ...........
Nonferrous m etals and
their products................
Aluminum
manufac­
tures________________
Brass, bronze, and cop­
per products_________
Clocks and watches and
time-recording devices
Jewelry________________
Lighting equipment___
Silverware and plated
w a re............. ...............
Smelting and refining—
copper, lead, and zinc..
Stamped and enameled
ware...............................
spoi
m en t______ ____________
A ircraft...........................
Automobiles__________
Cars, electric and steam
railroad.............. .........
Locom otives__________
Shipbuilding.......... ........
Railroad repair shops___
Electric railroad_______
3 team railroad........... ...
Lum ber and allied prod­
ucts____________________
Furniture....... ................
Lumber:
M illwork.................
Sawmills....... ..........
Turpentine and rosin. . .
Stone, d a y , and glass
products...........................
Brick, tile, and terra
cotta.............. ............. .
Cement............................
Glass____ _____________
Marble, granite, slate,
and other p rod u cts...
Pottery............................

Employment
Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
Percent of
ing in
change
both
Number
M ay
on pay
and
June M ay
June
June roll1933
1932
to
June to June
1933
1933

Percent of
change
Am ount
of pay roll
(1 week)
June 1933

+ 5 .3 -1 6 .4 $1,881, 544

M ay
to
June
1933

June

Em­
P ay­
ploy­
roll
ment totals

to June
1933

+10.9 -1 0 .5

282

90,885

91

16,210

+10.0

- 5 .8

335,388

+16.7

+1.1

42.4

27.9

1,044
145

100,837
10,753

+8.2
+12.1

-.9
- 9 .6

1,788,
213,708

+ 18.7
+30. ~

+ 4 .6
-.5

46.5
31.2

27.3
20.2

29

11,313

+13.3 +44.1

177, 796

+20.2

161,059

2.0

- 8 .3

122,946

+ 7 .3

+ 3 .9

1,416,606

+11.8
+ 11. +11.2
+12.0 - 5 .

93,849

50

7,

17

8,000
79,667

27

5,319

177

26,187

27
133
51

7,327
7,340
2,741

+15.6
-

+ 5 .7

+ 6 .5
+ 7 .2

51

7,311

44

9,932

+ .6

13, 510

+ 7 .6

+ 5 .2

+21.

49.

92.1

65.5

62.5

47.2

54.0

31.7

+13.6 +11.9

55.8

38.5

+12.1

52.2

35.3

+40.8 +72.3
+ 4 .2

+.

+ 47.7

498,639

+19.5 +30.

57.7

40.2

+ .6
- 5 .4

99,002
128, 826
50,652

+21.

-.7

6.1

+1.
-

+ 8.

+ 6 .9
+14.2

- 8 .4
0)
- 5 .7

40.0
36.0
64.

23.9
22.9
47.8

130,135

+ 5 .6

+ 1 .9

60.2

37.0

194,047

+6.0
+10.8

- 3 .7

56.

38.6

+ 6 .9

67.1

43.4

221,456

407
24
234

237,433
6, 652
192,625

+ 6.4 -1 5 .4
+2.6 +27.
+8.0 -1 3 .4

5,166,360
183,909
4,439,784

+ 5 .7 -1 2 .6
+15.1
+•
- 8.1
+ 7 .1

49.9
251.2
52.8

39.0
233.1
42.1

42

11

4,170
1,491
22,484

-1 3 .3 - 20.0
-4 1 .1
+ 7.
+1.0 -3 1 .5

62,817
28,062
451, “

-1 9 .7 -3 3 .6
+ 9 .9 - 5 2 .4
+ (2) -4 0 .2

15.2
57.5

7.5
6.8
39.6

391
508

86,965
20,123
66,842

- 8 .9
-1 8 .2
- 7 .7

45.0
63.0
43.

34.9
49.8
33.7

1,541
447

136,789
44, 532

+io.- +12.8

+ 5 .6

1,634,603
599, 300

+30.7 + 3 .3
+ 1 7 .“ + 16.7

39.9
48.5

21.6
25.8

460
610
24

18,410
62,480
1,367

-.5
+ 9.
+15.1 + 3 .1
+12.7 +14.5

264, 307
754, 322
16,674

+16.1
+25.1
+ 6 .4

- 5 .4
-.5
+ 5 .2

36.3
36.9
50.4

21.1
19.2
38.3

1,311

95,363

+11.7

+ 5 .7

1,593,451

+16.8

+ 3 .0

46.0

27.8

663
124
191

18,484
15,336
41, 479

+14. 5
+14.9

-7 .0
+ 2 .9

+10.0 +22.1

221,885
260,439
786,738

+27.4 - 10.
+ 19.0 - 12.0
+ 13.2 +20.5

27.7
42.7
70.6

12.3
23.4
52.9

216
117

4,850
15,213

+17.2
+ 5.1

+ 6 .4

91,246
233,143

+24.8 -1 6 .5
+ 11.6 +10.4

38.4
61.8

22.7
34.9

1 N o change.
2 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




Index num ­
bers (average
1926=100)

Pay-roll totals

- 3 .6
-

1 .0

- 2 .7
+13.0

-9 .2
-

6.6

3,004,699
500,672
1,504, 027

- 3 .0
- 2 .5
-

2 .0

10.6

6
1.—COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AN D PA Y ROLLS IN MANUFACTURING
ESTABLISHM ENTS IN JUNE 1933 W ITH M A Y 1933 A N D JUNE 1932—Continued

T a b le

Index num ­
Employment
Pay-roll totals
bers (average
E stab­
1926=100)
lish­
ments
report­
Percent of
Percent of
ing in
change
change
both
Amount
Number
M ay
Em­
Pay­
on
pay
of
pay
roll
and
roll
(1 week)
June
M ay
June ploy
June roll June M ay
ment totals
1932
1932
to
1933
June
1933
to
1933
June to June
June to June
1933
1933
1933
1933

Industry

Leather and its m a n u ­
factures------------------------Boots and shoes........ ...
Leather_______________
Paper and printing______
Boxes, paper....................
Paper and pulp________
Printing and publish­
ing:
Book and jo b ______
Newspapers and
periodicals_______

+ 4 .4 +13. 3 $3,397,330
+ 2 .9 +10.1 1, 753, 439
+10.0 +26.7
543,881

483
330
153

139,164
111,861
27,303

1,934
316
389

311,370
21, 427
78, 527

+ 1 .9
+ 6 .6
+ 3 .4

- 1 .3
+ 6 .5
+ 5 .5

+13.0 +37.9
+11.6 + 24.0
+17.4 +40.3

78.9
78.5
80.3

55.5
52.7
65.4

5,034,386
376,913
1,463, 641

+3 .7
+10.0
+ 7 .7

- 8 .6
+ 6 .2
+ 8 .4

78.9
73.6
77.3

61.9
61.4
54.1

764

43,403

+ 1 .1

-1 0 .3

1,085,045

+ .6

- 1 6 .9

67.4

52.2

465

68,013

-.3

- 1 .5

2,108,687

-.1

-1 2 .3

96.2

77.5

1,101
110

153,788
21,461

+ 3.1 +13.9
+ 6. 7 +12.8

3,438,133
518,131

+ 5 .6 + 6 .8
+ 8 .6 +12.2

78.9
94.3

64.5
69.1

112
45
30
202
350
131

3,073
6,859
3,298
6,078
16,446
50,183

+20.4 +17.2
-5 .0
+ 1.3
+ . 5 + 5 .8
-3 4 .2 +36.3
+ 6 .7 + 5 .7
+ 1 .7
0)

33,150
139, 574
66,932
74,723
371, 531
1,383, 551

+26.3 + 4 .9
+ 4 .7 - 6 .4
+ 9 .0 +12.5
-2 4 .0 + 11.2
+ 7 .7
+ .8
+ 1 .7 - 8 .1

27.9
67.0
75.4
44.3
76.4
64.7

27.7
66.1
51.2
27.9
62.3
54.6

23
98

30, 303
15,087

+ 5 .4 +65.8
+ 3 .8 + 4 .0

516,631
323,909

+10.4 +66.2
+ 5 .6 - 8 .1

154.9
99.5

130.1
83.2

Rubber products............ .
Rubber boots and shoes.
Rubber goods, other
than boots, shoes, tires,
and inner tubes______
Rubber tires and inner
tubes. ............................

153
9

80,813
8,965

+6. 5
+ 1 .7

70.4
42.2

54.4
36.0

99

20, 022

+ 8. 0

+ 9 .4

369,863

+17.5 +14.6

88.1

61.3

45

51,826

+14.7

+ 8 .8

1,258, 290

+26.4

+ 4 .3

71.6

56.2

Tobacco m an u factu res..
Chewing and smoking
tobacco and snuff___
Cigars and cigarettes___

337

53,035

+ 3 .3

- 3 .8

677,935

+ 3 .7

- 9 .4

68.4

50.3

32
205

10,155
42,870

+ 3 .9
+ 3 .2

+ .8
- 4 .5

136, 394
541,541

+ 1 .6 - 1 .9
+ 4 .1 -1 0 .5

90.1
65.6

71.9
47.7

3,803,711

+ 7 .0

+ 9 .3 50,408,133

63.8

43.1

Chemicals and allied
products............................
C h em icals____________
Cottonseed, oil, cake,
and meal......................
Druggists’ preparations.
Explosives..... ..................
Fertilizers........ ........... .
Paints and varnishes___
Petroleum refining_____
R ayon and allied prod­
ucts........ ......................
Soap.................. ...............

Total, 89 industries. 17,953

+11.7
+ 6.1

+41
-2 4 .4

1,785,360
157,107

+33.5
+10.6

+10.8

+9 .7

1 N o change.

Per Capita Earnings in Manufacturing Industries
P e r capita weekly earnings in June 1933 for each of the 89 manu­
facturing industries surveyed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and
for all industries combined, together with the percents of change in
June 1933 as compared with May 1933 and June 1932, are shown in
table 2.
These earnings must not be confused with full-time weekly rates of
wages. They are per capita weekly earnings, computed by dividing
the total amount of pay roll for the week by the total number of
employees (part-time as well as full-time workers).




7
T a b le

2 —PER CAPITA W E E K L Y EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES IN
JUNE 1933 A N D COM PARISON W ITH M A Y 1933 AND JUNE 1932

Industry

Food and kindred products:
Baking.....................................................................................................
Beverages....................................................... ........................................
B utter.................................. ..... ................................ _............................
Confectionery........................................................................................
Flour.........................................................................................................
Ice cream.................. ................... ............................ .............................
Slaughtering and meat packing..........................................................
Sugar, b e e t.............................................................................................
Sugar refining, cane__........... ........................................................... .
Textiles and their products:
Fabrics:
Carpets and rugs.......................... .................................................
Cotton goods........................................ .........................................
Cotton small wares............. ............ .............................................
Dyeing and finishing textiles................................r...................
Hats, fur-felt................................................................... ..............
K nit goods.......... ............................................................................
Silk and rayon goods.................................................................... .
W oolen and worsted goods........................... ....................... ........
Wearing apparel:
Clothing, m en’s............................................................................. .
Clothing, wom en’s....................................................................... .
Corsets and allied garments........................................................
M en’s furnishings- - ..................................................................... .
M illinery— ______ ________________ _________ ____________ _
Shirts and collars.................................................. ...................... .
Iron and steel and their products, not including machinery:
Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivets........................................................ .
Cast-iron pipe...... ..................................................................................
Cutlery (not including silver and plated cutlery) and edge tools.
Forgings, iron and steel........................................................................
Hardware..................... ..........................................................................
Iron and steel....... ............ ................................................................... .
Plumbers’ supplies...... ...................................................................... .
Steam and hot-water heating apparatus and steam fittings_____
S tov es........................ ......................................................................... .
Structural and ornamental metalwork............................................ .
Tin cans and other tinware................................................. ............. .
Tools (not including edge tools, machine tools, files, and saws)_„
W irew ork...........................................................................................
Machinery, not including transportation equipment:
Agricultural implements....... ........................................................
Cash registers, adding machines, and calculating machines.. _
Electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies..........................
Engines, turbines, tractors, and water wheels............................
Foundry and machine-shop products...........................................
Machine tools...................................................................................
Radios and phonographs....................... ........................................
Textile machinery and parts.........................................................
Typewriters and supplies...................................... ........................
Nonferrous metals and their products:
Aluminum manufactures...................... .......................................
Brass, bronze, and copper products...... .............. ........................
Clocks and watches and time-recording devices........................
Jewelry..................... ....................... ............................................... .
Lighting equipment_____________ ____________ ________ _____
Silverware and plated ware........................... ...............................
Smelting and refining—copper, lead, and zinc........... ...............
Stamped and enameled ware....... - ...................... - .......................
Transportation equipment:
Aircraft....... ............................................................. .......... ................
Automobiles.......................................................................................
Cars, electric and steam railroad............................................ .......
Locom otives.....................................................................................
Shipbuilding......................................... ............................................
Railroad repair shops:
Electric railroad.............................. ............................. ..................
Steam railroad_____ __________ _________________ ____ _______
Lum ber and allied products:
Furniture____________________ _________ - ..............- ..................
Lumber:
M ill work............. .......................................................................
Sawmills------- ------- -------------------------- ------------- ------- --------Turpentine and rosin............................- ....................................... 3 23 6 -3 -




Per capita
weekly
earnings
in June
1933

Percent of change com ­
pared with—
M a y 1933

June 1932

$21.17
29.05
20.51
12.46
19.92
25. 35
20.17
20.62
24. 28

+ 0 .5
-2 .7
-1 .8
-4 .0
-4 .0
-.2
+ 1 .1
-4 .6
+ .5

- 7 .3
+ 3 .5
-1 3 .8
-1 5 .9
-8 .3
- 9 .8
-5 .8
- 1 7 .4
-1 .3

17. 55
11.11
15.20
18.71
19.24
12.89
12.75
16.85

+11.4
+ 7 .1
+ 2 .6
+ 3 .9
+ 18.2
+ 2 .5
+ 4 .9
+ 11.2

+ 41.2
+ 15.9
+ 10.9
+ 7 .4
+ 30.3
+ 2 .0
+ 9 .0
+ 16.8

12.72
14.26
14.37
11. 21
15.18
10.39

+ 9 .6
-6 ,2
+ 1 .3
+ 5 .1
-.7
+ 8 .6

+13.8
- 1 1 .9
+ 6 .4
-5 .5
-2 .1
+ 6 .6

18.17
12.85
18.39
18.44
14.97
18.33
18.59
18.06
18.41
15.24
19.97
17.84
20.06

+15.4
+ 1 .5
+ 8 .3
+ 10.0
+10.7
+14.2
+ 7 .8
+ 6 .0
+ 4 .7
+ 2 .1
+ 3 .0
+18.5
+ 8 .0

+ 16.5
-1 .9
+ 2 .1
+ 16.4
+ 9 .0
+ 42.3
+ 14.8
+ 3 .2
+16.0
-6 .0
+ 4 .4
+ 10.3
+ 19 .2

16.99
24. 56
20.70
20.69
17. 74
19.87
15.72
20.95
15.37

+ 8 .6
+ 1 .8
+ 5 .2
+ 6 .0
+ 9 .7
+ 16.3
- 7 .1
+21.8
+ 6 .4

+ 5 .3
+13.5
+ 7 .6
+ 7 .0
+ 5 .2
+ 9 .8
- 1 5 .7
+ 43.1
+ 9 .6

17.64
19.04
13.51
17. 55
18. 48
17.80
19. 54
16. 39

+ 6 .0
+ 6 .8
+ 8 .7
+ .3
+ 6 .6
+ 3 .5
+ 5 .5
+ 3 .0

+ 32 .2
+ 17.5
- 3 .0
-.6
-.1
+ 2 .3
+ 2 .8
-1 .4

27. 65
23. 05
15.06
18.82
20.09

-2 .2
-.9
-7 .4
+ 1 .9
-1 .0

-9 .8
+ 6 .2
- 1 7 .2
-1 9 .3
-1 2 .7

24. 88
22.50

- 1 .5
+ .8

-9 .9
-1 .2

13.46

+ 6 .3

+ 3 .3

14. 36
12.07
12. 20

+ 6 .0
+ 8 .6
-5 .6

-4 .7
- 4 .0
-8 .1

8
T a b le

2 .—PER CAPITA W E E K L Y EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING INDU STRIES IN
JUNE 1933 A N D COM PARISON W ITH M A Y 1933 AND JUNE 1932—Continued

Industry-

Stone, clay, and glass products:
Brick, tile, and terra c o t t a . ____ __________ _______ __ _ _
Cement............ .......................................................... ........... .............
G la s s ....____ _______________ __________ _____ ________________
Marble, granite, slate, and other products.......................................
Pottery____ ____________________________ ______ ____ __________
Leather and its manufactures:
Boots and shoes____________________________ _____ _______
Leather_____________________________ ___ ____________________
Paper and printing:
Boxes, paper_________________________ _____________ _________
Paper and pulp______________________________________ ________
Printing and publishing:
Book and io b ____________________ _________________________
Newspapers and periodicals________ ______ ________________
Chemicals and allied products:
Chemicals_________ _____ ___________________________ ____ ____
Cottonseed, oil, cake and meal________________ ________________
Druggists’ preparations________________________________________
Explosives___________________________ ____ _____________ _____ _
Fertilizers________ ____ _____________ ______________ ____ _____
Paints and varnishes__________________________________________
Petroleum refining..______ ______ __________________ ____ _____
R ayon and allied products_______________________ _____ ________
Soap________________________ ___________ ___________ ____ ____
Rubber products:
Rubber boots and shoes______ _________ _________________ ____
Rubber goods, other than boots, shoes, tires, and inner tubes__
Rubber tires and inner tubes___________________ _______________
Tobacco manufactures:
Chewing and smoking tobacco and snuff_________________________
Cigars and cigarettes ________________________________________
Total, 89 industries____________________ ________ ____________

Per capita
weekly
earnings
in June
1933

Percent of change com ­
pared with—
M a y 1933

June 1932

$12.00
16.98
18.97
18.81
15.33

+11.2
+ 3 .6
+ 3 .0
+ 6 .5
+ 6 .2

—4.1
—14.6
—1. 7
—8. 6
+ 3 .8

15.68
19.92

+ 8 .5
+ 6 .8

+13.0
+ 11.0

17. 59
18. 64

+ 3 .2
+ 4 .1

—. l
+ 2 .5

25.00
31.00

—.5
+ .1

- 7 .3
—11.3

24.14
10.79
20. 35
20.29
12.29
22.59
27. 57
17.05
21.47

+ 1 .7
+ 5 .0
+ 3 .4
+ 8. 4
+15. 5
+ 1 .0
(*)
+ 4 .8
+ 1 .7

-.6
—10.4
—1.6
+ 6 .3
-1 7 .9
-4 .5
-8 .0
1
-1 2 .0

17. 52
18.47
24. 2S

+ 4 .2
+ 8 .8
+10.3

+34.5
+ 4 .6
-4 .2

13.43
12.63

-2 .3
+ .9

-3 .2
- 6 .2

17.99

2 + 3 .5

* + .4

1 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.
3 Weighted.

General Index Numbers of Employment and Pay-Roll Totals in Manufacturing
Industries
G e n e r a l index numbers of employment and pay-roll totals in
manufacturing industries by months, from January 1926 to June 1933,
together with average indexes for each of the years from 1926 to 1932,
and for the 6-month period, January to June 1933, inclusive, are
shown in the following table. In computing these general indexes
the index numbers of each of the separate industries are weighted
according to their relative importance in the total. Following this
table are two charts prepared from these general indexes showing
the course of employment and pay rolls from January 1926 to June
1933, inclusive.




0
T a b le

IN DEXES OF E M PL O Y M E N T AN D PAY ROLLS IN MANUFAC­
TURING INDUSTRIES, JANUARY 1926 TO JUNE 1933

3 . — GE N ERAL

[12-month average, 1926=100]

E mployment

Pay rolls

M onth
1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1926
January_____
February____
M arch______
A pril________
M a y ........ .......
June.............
July................
August....... .
September - _.
October_____
N ovem ber__
December___
A verage...

100.4
101.5
102.0
101.0
99.8
99.3
97.7
98.7
100.3
100.7
99.5
98.9

97.3
99.0
99.5
98.6
97.6
97.0
95.0
95.1
95.8
95.3
93.5
92.6

100.0 96.4

91.6
93.0
93.7
93.3
93.0
93.1
92.2
93.6
95.0
95.9
95.4
95.5

95.2
97.4
98.6
99.1
99.2
98.8
98.2
98.6
99.3
98.4
95.0
92.3

90.7
90.9
90.5
89.9
88.6
86.5
82.7
81.0
80.9
79.9
77.9
76.6

74.6
75.3
75.9
75.7
75.2
73.4
71.7
71.2
70.9
68.9
67.1
66.7

64.8
65.6
64.5
62.2
59.7
57.5
55.2
56.0
58.5
59.9
59.4
58.3

1927

1928

1929 1930 1931 1932

56.6 98.0 94.9 89.6 94.5 88.1
57.5 102.2 100.6 93.9 101.8 91.3
55.1 103.4 102.0 95.2 103.9 91.6
56.0 101.5 100.8 93.8 104.6 90.7
58.7 99.8 99.8 94.1 104.8 88.6
62.8 99.7 97.4 94.2 102.8 85.2
95.2 93.0 91.2 98.2 77.0
98.7 95.0 94.2 102.1 75.0
99.3 94.1 95.4 102.6 75.4
102.9 95.2 99.0 102.4 74.0
99.6 91.6 96.1 95.4 69.6
99.8 93.2 97.7 92.4 68.8

__
__
__

93.8 97.5 84.7 72.2 60.1 157.8

100.0

63.7
68.1
69.6
68.5
67.7
63.8
60.3
59.7
56.7
55.3
52.5
52.2

48.6
49.6
48.2
44.7
42.5
39.3
36.2
36.3
38.1
39.9
38.6
37.7

1933
35.8
36.4
33.4
34.9
38.9
43.1

__
__
__

96.5 94.5 100.5 81.3 61.5 41.6 137.1

* Average for 6 months.

Time Worked in Manufacturing Industries in June 1933
R e p o r t s as to working time in June were received from 13,848
establishments in 89 manufacturing industries. Three percent of
these establishments were idle, 56 percent operated on a full-time
basis, and 42 percent worked on a part-time schedule.
An average of 90 percent of full-time operation in June was shown
by reports received from all the operating establishments included
in table 4. The establishments working part time in June averaged
77 percent of full-time operation.
A number of establishments supplying data concerning plantoperating time have reported full-time operations, but have qualified
the hours reported with a statement that, while the plant was op­
erating full time, the work in the establishment was being shared
and the employees were not working the full-time hours operated by
the plant.







10

11

MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES.
MONTHLY INDEXES 1926-1933.




M O NTH LY AVERAGE.

1 9 2 .6 = 1 0 0 .

12
T a b le

4 —PROPORTION OF FULL TIM E W ORKED IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
B Y ESTABLISHM ENTS REPO RTIN G IN JUNE 1933
Percent of estab­
lishments oper­
ating—

Establishments
reporting
IndustryTotal
number

Percent
idle

94
97
98
97
83
91
95
97
100

79
82
79
85
72
73
84

4

74

22

96

83

20
1
1
2

47
84
63
67
68
79
67
84

33
15
36
31
32
19
29
15

70
61
59
70
63
74

26
22
41
24
35
25

34
29
15

62
71
61

73
78

Textiles a n d th eir p r o d u c ts ___________
Fabrics:
Carpets and rugs_.............................
Cotton goods....... ..............................
Cotton small wares......................... .
Dyeing and finishing textiles.........
Hats, fur-felt.................................... .
Knit g ood s...................... .................
Silk and rayon goods...................... .
Woolen and worsted goods.............
Wearing apparel:
Clothing, men’s...... ..................... .
Clothing, wom en’s - ......................
Corsets and allied garments______
M en ’s furnishings............... ........... .
M illinery............ ............................. .
Shirts and collars............................ .

2,543
15
616
96
142
19
381
219
218
293
296
29
54
80
85

3
17

Ir o n a n d steel a n d th eir p r o d u c ts ,
n o t in c lu d in g m a c h in e r y ....................
Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivets...........
Cast-iron pipe......... ................................ .
Cutlery (not including silver and
plated cutlery) and edge tools............
Forgings, iron and steel.........................
Hardware.................................................
Iron and steel...... .......... .........................
Plumbers’ supplies.................... .............
Steam and hot-water heating appara­
tus and steam fittings................. ........
Stoves_______________ ______________ _
Structural and ornamental metal­
work_____ _________________________
T in cans and other tinware.------ -------Tools (not including edge tools,
machine tools, files, and saws)............
Wire work................................................. .
M a ch in e ry , n o t in c lu d in g tra n s p o r­
ta t io n e q u ip m e n t ...... ............................
Agricultural implem ents.......... ............ .
Cash registers, adding machines, and
calculating machines_______________
Electrical machinery, apparatus, and
supplies____________ _______________
Engines, turbines, tractors, and water
wheels_____________________________
Foundry and machine shop products..
Machine tools._____ __________________
Radios and phonographs.......................
Textile machinery and parts__________
Typewriters and supplies......................
N o n fe rr o u s m eta ls a n d th eir p ro d u c ts .
Alum inum manufactures........... ............
Brass, bronze, and copper products___
Clocks and watches and time-record­
ing devices____________ _____________
Jewelry_______ _______________________
Lighting equipm ent......... .......................
Silverware and plated w a re ..................

1 Less than one half of 1 percent.




1,032
56
33

1

0)

All oper­ Estab­
lish­
ating es­
ments
tablish­
operating
ments
part time

26
19
14
21
59
32
28
28
2
10

2,482
764
288
249
270
388
261
204
48
10

(0

Part
time

73
80
84
78
40
68
71
72
96
90

F o o d a n d k in d red p r o d u c ts ..................
Baking...................................................... .
Beverages............... _..................- ............ .
Butter...................... ................................ .
C onfectionery____ _______________ —
Flour........................................................ .
Ice cream................. .................................
Slaughtering and meat packing---------Sugar, beet.................................. - .......... .
Sugar refining, cane................... .............

0)

Full
time

Average percent of
full time reported
by—

3
1
1
1
2

2
5
1

6
3
1
4
24

71

88
79
87
76
84
83
87
80
73
79
84

106
36
60
136
53

2
10

37
22
25
40
55

62
78
73
50
45

71
73
70
67
75

80
131

3
4

21
37

76
60

60
73

131
54

2
6

31
61

66
33

77
83

108
48

1

24
42

75
58

80

73
80

1,325
49

1

31
29

68
71

82

70
74

1

63

37

202

30
1

24

76

73

72
792
115
24
32
9

3
1
3

22
33
23
50
41
22

75
66
75
50
59
78

73
67
73
82
82

487
19
138

1

36
58
34

63
42
66

76
76
79

20
31
21
33

80
66
76
65

65
71
76
74

20
113
42
48

3
2
2

70

13
T

able

4 —PROPORTION OF FULL TIM E W ORKED IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
BY ESTABLISHM ENTS R EPO RTIN G IN JUNE 1933—Continued

Establishments
reporting

Percent of estab­
lishments oper­
ating—

Industry
Total
number

Nonferrous m etals and tlteir prod­
uets—Continued.
Smelting and refining—copper, lead,
and zinc..... ...........................................
Stamped and enameled ware...... .........

Percent
idle

Full
time

Average percent of
full time reported
by—
All oper­ Estab­
lish­
ating es­
ments
tablish­ operating
ments
part time

Part
time

35
72

17
64

82
81

Transportation equipm ent............
Aircraft..............................................
Autom obiles.......... ..........................
Cars, electric and steam railroad.
Locom otives.....................................
Shipbuilding.....................................

291
23
137
35
7

45
43
45
74
43
33

78
87
80
70
63
81

Railroad repair shops.
Electric railroad.........
Steam railroad..........

725

56
35
73

80
84
79

1,110
347

52
51

75
74

305
437
21

60
49
52

75
75
83

Stone, d a y , and glass products_______
Brick, tile, and terra cotta .....................
Cement.................................................... .
Glass................ ................................. ........
Marble, granite, slate, and other
products................................................ .
Pottery..... .............................................. ..

608
197
74
144

35
34
8
14

73
70
72
78

183
100

48
62

Leather and its m anufactures..
Boots and shoes............................
Leather..........................................

357
240
117

43
47
34

82
82
81

1,622
261
305

45
59
45

80
79
74

Lum ber and allied products..
Furniture.................................
Lum ber:
M ill w ork...........................
Sawmills............................
Turpentine and rosin............

Paper and p rin tin g .................. .
Boxes, paper__________ ________
Paper and p u lp ........ .....................
Printing and publishing:
Book and jo b _ _ ......................
Newspapers and periodicals.
Chemicals and allied products...
Chemicals..... ....................... ..........
Cottonseed, oil, cake, and m eal.
Druggists’ preparations...............
Explosives................................... .
Fertilizers. __...................................
Paints and varnishes.....................
Petroleum refining............. ..........
R ayon and allied products..........

651
405

127

Tobacco m anufactures......... ...................
Chewing and smoking tobacco and
snuff__________ ____________________
Cigars and cigarettes_________________

211

JLess than one half of 1 percent.




75
73

32
26
34
45
83
30
31
27

83
87
82
84
81
79
83
88
80

51

80
85
77
86

31
35

60

32
179
13,848

82

54
23

0)
0)

80
58
29
12
156
310
95
11
87

Rubber products_______ ___________ ___
Rubber boots and shoes____ _________
Rubber goods, other than boots, shoes,
tires, and inner tubes....... .......... ........
R ubber tires and inner tubes......... ......

T otal, 89 industries..

0)

75
71
75

56

42

77

14
Employment in Nonmanufacturing Industries in June 1933
HE general improvement in the employment situation between
May and June 1933 was also reflected in the nonmanufacturing
industries surveyed monthly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Increased employment was reported in 13 of the 15 nonmanufacturing
industries appearing in the following table and increased pay rolls
were reported in 10 industries. Data for the building-construction
industry are not presented here but are shown in more detail under the
section “ Building construction.” The increases in employment in
June 1933 in most instances were contrary to the May-June trend in
the preceding years for which data are available, and, while two indus­
tries reported declines in employment, the decrease (8.5 percent)
reported in June in one of these industries (anthracite mining) was not
as pronounced as in previous years while the decrease in employment
in the other (telephone and telegraph) was only 1.3 percent.
The most pronounced gains in employment and pay roll over the
month interval in these 15 nonmanufacturing industries were seasonal
increases in the canning and preserving industry, which reported the
usual sharp May to June pick-up with the beginning of its active
season. The quarrying and nonmetallic mining industry also reported
substantial increases in both employment and pay rolls, which were
partly seasonal. The bituminous-coal mining industry showed
practically no change in employment and the anthracite mining
industry reported a decrease in number of workers. Both of these
industries, however, reported very substantial gains in total weekly
earnings between May and June due to sharply increased production.
Four of these fifteen nonmanufacturing industries, crude petroleum
producing, bituminous-coal mining, dyeing and cleaning, and canning
and preserving reported more employees on the pay roll in June 1933
than in June of the preceeding year.
In the following table are presented employment and pay-roll data
for the nonmanufacturing industries surveyed, exclusive of building
construction.

T




15
T

able

1.—COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND P A Y ROLLS IN NONMANUFACTUR­
ING ESTABLISHM ENTS IN JUNE 1933 W ITH M A Y 1933 AND JUNE 1932

Industrial groups

Employment
Pay-roll totals
Estab­
lish­
ments
Percent of
Percent of
report­
change
change
Amount of
ing in Number
both
on pay
pay roll
M a y roll, June M a y to June (1 week), M a y to June
1933
to June 1933 June 1932 to
and
June 1932
June
June
June
1933
1933
1933
1933
1933

Coal mining:
Anthracite.......... .............
160
Bitum inous____________
1,480
Metalliferous mining.......... . .
278
Quarrying and nonmetallic
mining ______ __________
1,135
Crude petroleum producing_
256
Public utilities:
Telephone and telegraph. 8,286
Power and light________
3,181
Electric - railroad and
motor-bus operation
and maintenance_____
572
Trade:
Wholesale.......................... 3,025
Retail____ ____ ________ 17,879
Hotels (cash payments only)1 2, 656
Canning and preserving____
818
Laundries_____ ____________
945
Dyeing and cleaning..........
337
Banks, brokerage, insurance,
and real estate_____ ______
4, 320

53,984
185,709
21, 509

- 8 . 5 -2 5 .5 $1,362,059
+ . 1 + 1 .3 2,311, 622
+ 5 .0 - 2 . 2
405, 531

Index num ­
bers, June
1933 (average
1926=100)
Em ­
ploy­
ment

Pay­
roll
totals

+14.3
+ 8 .4
+ 7 .6

-8 .3
+ 7 .0
-9 .0

39.5
61.3
31.5

34.3
29.2
18.3

32,149
23,119

+ 8 .9
+ 1 .8

- 4 .4
+ 7 .0

490,314
625,436

+15.2
- 2 .5

- 8 .3
- 9 .4

47.3
58.0

27.5
40.6

249,412
195, 665

-1 .3
+ .4

-1 3 .4
- 7 .1

6,499,606
5, 563, 489

-2 .8
~ ( 2)

-1 8 .9
-1 3 .2

69.2
77.3

66.6
69.9

133, 213

+ .3

- 9 .4

3, 534, 593

-.4

-1 7 .4

69.3

58.0

77,536
363, 296
132,178
43,145
55, 495
11,858

+ 2 .3
+ 1 .7
+ 2 .5
+22.2
+ 3 .3
+ 4 .5

- 1 .7
- 1 .4
- 5 .6
+ .2
-6 .2
+ .6

1,984,691
6,891, 677
1, 640, 566
494,176
815, 970
202, 981

-.3
+ 1 .8
+ 1.1
+15.3
+ 4.1
+ 5 .2

-1 3 .4
-1 1 .3
- 1 8 .0
-9 .4
-1 7 .3
-1 3 .8

75.7
78.3
73.6
55.6
76.0
85.6

57.3
60.5
52.3
36.7
56.7
56.7

164,899

3 + 1 .0

3-.7

5, 351,127

3+ l . 3 3- 6 .3

3 97. 4

3 84.7

1 The additional value of board, room, and tips cannot be computed.
2 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.
3 Weighted.

Per capita weekly earnings in June 1933 for 15 nonmanufacturing
industries included in the Bureau's monthly trend-of-employment
survey, together with the percents of change in June 1933 as com­
pared with May 1933 and June 1932, are given in the table following.
These per capita weekly earnings must not be confused with full-time
weekly rates of wages; they are per capita weekly earnings computed
by dividing the total amount of pay roll for the week by the total
number of employees (part-time as well as full-time workers).
T able

2 —P E R C A P IT A W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S IN 15 N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S ­
T R IE S IN JU N E 1933 A N D C O M P A R IS O N W IT H M A Y 1933 A N D JU N E 1932

Industrial group

Per
capita
weekly
earnings
in
June
1933

Coal mining:
Anthracite__________________ _________________________ _____________
B itum inous._______ ______________________ _________________________
Metalliferous mining__________ _____________ _________ _________________
Quarrying and nonmetallic minins:____ ______ __________________________
Crude petroleum producing....................................................... .......................
Public utilities:
Telephone and telegraph.............................. ..................................................
Power and light_______________________________________ ______________
Electric-railroad and motor-bus operation and maintenance__________
Trade:
Wholesale______ ______ _________ ________________ __________________
Retail............. .............................................. ................... ..................................
Hotels (cash payments only) l . ....................................... ................. .............
Canning and preserving______________________________________ ___________
Laundries._____ __________________________________ ______ _____________
Dyeing and cleaning______________ _______________________________ . __
Banks, brokerage, insurance, and real estate_____________________ ______ _
1 The additional value of board, room, and tips cannot be computed.
3236—33------3




Percent of change
June 1933 com ­
pared with—
M ay
1933

June
1932

$25.23
12. 45
18.85
15. 25
27. 05

+24.9
+ 8 .3
+ 2 .4
+ 5 .7
- 4 .2

+22.9
+ 5 .5
—6. 9
- 4 .1
-1 5 .4

26. 06
28.43
26. 53

-1 . 5
—.4
-. 7

-6 . 4
—6. 6
- 8 .8

25. 60
18. 97
12. 41
11.45
14. 70
17.12
32. 97

- 2 .6
+ .1
- 1 .4
- 5 .7
+ .8
+. 6
2 + .3

-1 2 .0
—10.0
-1 3 .1
- 9 .6
—11.9
-1 4 .4
2 - 5 .6

2 Weighted.

1 6

Indexes of Employment and Pay-Roll Totals for Nonmanufacturing Industries
I n d e x numbers of employment and pay-roll totals for 15 nonmanu­
facturing industries are presented in the following table. These
index numbers show the variation in employment and pay rolls by
months, from January 1930 to June 1933, in all nonmanufacturing
industries with the exception of the laundry, dyeing and cleaning,
and the banks, brokerage, insurance, and real-estate industries for
which information over the entire period is not available. The
Bureau has secured data concerning employment and pay rolls for the
index base year 1929 from establishments in these industries and has
computed index numbers for those months for which data are available
from the Bureau’s files. These indexes are shown in this tabulation.
IN D E X E S OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S F O R N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G
IN D U S T R IE S , J A N U A R Y TO D E C E M B E R 1930, 1931, A N D 1932, A N D J A N U A R Y T O
JU N E 1933
[12-month average, 1929=100]

T a b l e 3 .—

Anthracite mining
M onth

Em ploym ent

Bituminous-coal mining

Pay rolls

Em ploym ent

Pay rolls

1930 1931 1932 1933 1930 1931 1932 1933 1930 1931 1932 1933 1930 1931 1932 1933
January................
F ebruary-----------M arch __________
A pril_________
M a y ____________
June_______ _____
J u ly_____________
August__________
Septem ber______
October_________
N ovem ber______
D ecem ber_______
Average___

102.1
106.9
82.6
84.1
93.8
90.8
91.6
80.2
93.8
99.0
97.2
99.1

90.6
89.5
82. (
85.2
80.3
76.1
65.1
67.3
80.0
86.8
83.5
79.8

76.2 52.5 105.8I 89.3;
71.2 58.7 121.51101. 9'
73.7 54.6 78.5 71.3
70.1 51.6 75.0' 75.2
66.9 43.2 98.8 76.1
53.0 39.5 94.3 66.7
44.5
84.0 53. 7
49.2
78.8 56.4
55.8 ____ 91.6 64.9
63.9 ____ 117.2 91.1
62.7 ____ 98.0 79.5
62.3 ------- 100.0 78.4

6i.si 43.2! 102. 5i
57.3i 56.8; 102. 4:
61.2’ 48.8; 98.6!
72.0i 37.4 94.4:
58.0 30.0 90.4
37.4 34.3 88.4
34.5
88.0
41.4
89.2
47.0
90.5
66.7
91.8
92.5
51.0
56.2 ------ 92.5

73.3I 47. C> 36.1
68.31 47.0> 37.2
65.2! 46.81 30.7
58.61 33.91 26.6
54.4 30.7 26.9
52.4 27.3 29.2
50.4 24.4
50.6 26.4
53.6 30.2
56. 2 37.8
54.6 38.0
52.3 37.7 -------

93.4 80.5 62.5 150.0 95.3 75.4 53.7 141.8 93.4 83.2 67.4 165.5 81.3 57.5 35.6 131.1
Metalliferous mining

January------------ ,
February_______
M a rch __________
A pril____________
M a y ____________
June____________
J u ly _____________
August__________
Septem ber______
October_________
N ovem ber______
Decem ber_______

93. Sl 80.81 69.8; 101. 4:
91.5> 77.4 69.3; 102.1
88. Si 75.2I 67.6i 86.4
85.9' 65.5. 63.7 81.7
82.4 62.6i 61.2: 77.5
78.4 60.5 61.3 75.6
76.4 58.6
68.9
77.0 59.4
71.1
80.4 62.4
74.9
79.4
81.3 67.0
81.1 69.4
79.1
81.2 70.0 ------- 77.7

95.7
92.3
90.9
89.3
87.5
84.6
80. 5
79.0
78.1
77.2
72.8
70.1

68.3
65.3
63.5
63.9
62.4
60.0
56.2
55.8
55.5
53.8
52.8
51.2

49.3 32.4
46.9 31.5
45.0 30.0
43.3 29.4
38.3 30.0
32.2 31.5
29.5
28.6
29.3
30.5 ____
31.9 ____
33.3 -------

92.7
92.5
90.8
88.3
85.6
81.6
71.9
71.0
69.9
68.6
63.4
59.9

55.0
54.6
52.8
51.4
49.3
46.1
41.3
40.2
40.0
37.4
35.1
34.3

Quarrying and nonmetallic mining
29.7 18.1
27.8 17.8
26.5 17.4
25.0 16.4
23.8 17.0
20.1 18.3
16.9
16.5
17.0
18.0 ____
18.7
18.7 ------

79.6
79.8
83.0
87.4
90.8
90.3
89.9
89.3
87.7
84.7
78.3
70.2

64.4
66.6
70.0
76.1
75.0
72.3
71.0
68.9
66.6
64.5
59.3
53.9

48.9 35.1
47.4 34.8
46.0 35.1
48.6 39.3
50.6 43.4
49.5 47.3
49.5
51.1
52.4 ____
52.4 ____
49.4 ____
42.3 ------

71.9
73.5
80.0
85.4
90.2
90.9
85.5
85.8
82.5
79.3
66.8
59.9

50.4
54.4
58.2
62.6
62.3
60.1
57.3
55.1
51.2
48.7
43.3
36.9

30.2 18.1
29.6 17.4
28.7 17.8
30.0 20.2
32.3 23.8
30.0 27.5
29.1
29.7
30.5
30.1 ____
27.1
22.1 -------

Average___ 83.2 59.1 36. 5 130.8 78.0 44.8 21.6 U7.5 84.3 67. 4 49.0 139.2 79.3 53.4 29.1 120.8
Crude petroleum producing
January_________
February-----------M a rch __________
A p ril____________
M a y ____________
June____________
Ju ly_____________
August__________
September______
October_________
N ovem ber______
Decem ber_______

92.7
90.8
89.3
86.8
89.8
90.2
89.9
87.7
85.0
85.2
83.6
77.4

74.8
73.2
72.2
69.8
67.8
65.0
65.3
62.4
61.2
60.4
57.6
58.2

54.9 57.2
54. 4 57.0
51.4 56.5
54.9 56.8
54.5 56.9
54.2 58.0
55.4 ____
57.4 ____
56.2 ____
56.8
56.5
57.2 ------

94.0
88.6
91.3
86.6
85.4
87.1
88.5
86.0
84.0
82.6
80.0
77.2

71.5
70.0
73.2
66.3
64.7
62.7
59.2
56.3
55.2
54.4
52.0
54.9

46.5 39.9
46.9 41.7
43.2 42.5
44.5 40.1
47.1 41.6
44.8 40.6
44.6 ____
42.9 ____
41.9 ____
42. 5
42.4 ____
41.7 ------

Telephone and telegraph
101.6
100.2
99.4
98.9
99.7
99.8
100.0
98.8
96.8
94.5
93.0
91.6

90.5
89.2
88.6
88.1
87.4
86.9
86.6
85.9
85.0
84.1
83.5
83.1

83.0 74.6 105.1
82.0 73.9 101.9
81.7 73.2 105.8
81.2 72.3 103.4
80.6 70.1 103.2
79.9 69.2 103.4
79.1 ____ 106.6
78.1 ____ 102.5
77.4 ____ 102.2
76.2 ____ 100.9
75.5 ____ 97.9
74.8 ------ 101.3

96.3
94.8
97.9
95.0
94.1
95.0
93.3
92.3
92.1
91.6
89.7
92.7

89.1 71.7
89.6 71.9
88.2 71.6
83.4 67.8
82.8 68.5
82.1 66.6
79.6 ____
79.1 ____
75.9 ____
75.7 ____
74.3 ____
73.5 -------

Average___ 87.4 65.7 55.3 157.1 85.9 61.7 44.1 141.1 97.9 86.6 79.1 172. 2 102.9 93.7 81.1 169. 7
i Average for 6 months.




17

NONMANUFACTURING

T a b l e 3 . — IN DEXES

OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PAY ROLLS FOR
INDUSTRIES, JANUARY TO D E C E M B E R 1930, 1931, AND 1932, AND JANUARY TO
JUNE 1933—Continued
Electric-railroad and motor-bus operation
and maintenance 2

Power and light
M onth

Employment

Pay rolls

Employment

Pay rolls

1930 1931 1932 1933 1930 1931 1932 1933 1930 1931 1932 1933 1930 1931 1932 1933
January_________
February_______
M arch__________
A pril____________
M a y ____________
June____________
July____________
August__________
September______
October_________
N ovem ber______
December_______

99.6
98.8
99.7
100.7
103.4
104.6
105.9
106.4
105.2
104.8
103.4
103.2

99.2
97.8
96.7
97.1
97.6
97.2
96.7
95.9
94.7
92.7
91.3
90.3

89.3
87.2
85.5
84.8
84.0
83.2
82.3
81.5
81.0
79.9
79.1
78.4

77.7
77.4
76.9
76.9
76.9
77.3

99.7 98.6
100.4 99.7
102.1 102. 4
102.6 97.6
104.5 98.7
107.8 98.3
106.7 97.4
106.6 96.2
106.1 94.3
105.6 93.2
103.7 93.3
106.3 91.2

88.4
86.0
85.4
82.4
84.2
80.5
78.7
76.6
74.7
74.4
73.2
73.2

73.0
71.6
71.9
69.4
69.9
69.9

97.1
95.1
94.4
95.2
95.2
94.8
95.3
92.9
91.8
91.0
89.3
88.8

86.9
86.6
86.4
86.8
85.9
85.3
85.6
84.8
84.0
82.7
81.5
79.9

79.5
78.9
77.6
78.0
76.9
76.5
75.6
74.1
73.5
72.3
71.8
71.4

70.6
70.4
69.8
69.5
69.1
69.3

97.8
95.7
95.4
97.1
96.0
97.0
95.6
92.1
90.5
88.9
87.7
88.6

85.6
87.1
88.1
86.6
85.1
84.8
83.3
81.9
81.2
79.0
79.7
77.8

75.4
74.8
73.6
71.8
72.2
70.2
66.4
63.8
62.5
61.5
61.7
61.9

60 9
60.6
59.4
58.1
58.2
58.0

Average___ 103.0 95.6 83.0 177.2 104.3 96.7 79.8 171.0 93.4 84.7 75.5 169.8 93.5 83.4 68.0 159.2
Retail trade

Wholesale trade

January_________
February_______
M a r c h ................
A pril____________
M a y ... ________
J u n e.. _________
July_____________
August__________
September______
O ctober................
N ovem ber______
December_______

100.0
98. 5
97.7
97.3
96.8
96.5
96.0
95.0
94.8
94.2
92.6
Average___ 92.0

89.5
88.2
87.4
87.4
87.1
87.1
86.8
86.5
86.1
85.2
84.1
83.7

81.8
80.9
79.8
78.9
77.9
77.0
76.6
76.4
77.1
77.8
77.6
77.0

75.3
74.1
73.1
73.3
74.0
75.7

100.0
98.3
99.7
97.9
97.4
98.6
96.0
93.6
93.6
92.9
91.0
91.3

87.5
88.4
89.1
85.2
84.7
84.1
83.3
82.1
81.4
79.9
79.7
77.8

74.1
72. 5
71.3
68.9
69.7
66.2
64.7
63.2
63.1
63.9
63.3
62.6

61.7
58.6
57.1
56.0
57.4
57.3

98.9
94.4
93.9
97.3
96.7
93.9
89.0
85.6
92.0
95.5
98.4
115.1

90.0
87.1
87.8
90.1
89.9
89.1
83.9
81.8
86.6
89.8
90.9
106.2

84.3
80.5
81.4
81.6
80.9
79.4
74.6
72.6
77.8
81.3
81.7
95.2

76.9
73.4
71.4
78.6
77.0
78.3

99.7
96.0
95. 5
97.5
97.3
96.8
91.7
87.6
92.4
95.1
96.8
107.7

89.4
86.7
87.5
88.3
88.0
87.6
83.3
80.3
83.5
84.6
85.4
94.1

78.0
73.7
73.4
72.7
71.1
68.2
63.3
60.7
64.6
67.1
66.9
73.6

62.7
58.4
55.1
60.4
59.5
60.5

78.2 174.3 96.0
95.9 86.6
83.6 67.0 158.0 95.9 89.4 80.9 175.9 96.2 86.6 69.4 159.4
Canning and preserving

Hotels
January___ _____
February_______
M arch__________
A pril____________
M a y ------ -----------June____ _______
July_____________
August--------------September______
October_________
N ovem ber. ____
D ecem ber.. __
Average___

100.4
102.4
102.4
100.1
98.0
98.0
101.3
101. 5
100.1
97. 5
95.2
93.5

95.0
96.8
96.8
95.9
92.5
91.6
93.3
92.8
90.6
87.4
84.9
83.1

83.2
84.3
84.0
82.7
80.1
78.0
78.4
77.6
77.0
75.4
74.3
73.2

73.8
73.8
72.4
71.9
71.9
73.6

100.3
103.8
104.4
100.3
98.4
98.1
99.8
98.6
97.1
95.5
93.6
91.5

91.0
93.7
93.4
89.9
87.7
85. 4
85.2
83.8
81.9
79.7
77.1
75.4

73.9
73.9
72.4
69.6
67.0
63.8
61.8
59.6
59.1
58.6
57.5
56.6

55.7
55.9
53.5
51.7
51.8
52.3

46.1
45.7
49.7
74.8
65.7
83.0
126.3
185.7
246.6
164.7
96.7
61.6

48.9
48.3
53.0
59.6
56.0
70.6
102.2
142.9
180.1
108.1
60.8
40.7

35.0
37.1
36.3
47.0
40.5
55. 5
73.0
99.0
125.3
81.1
50.5
33.7

34.1
35.1
33.2
49.2
45.5
55.6

50.3 46.1
51. 5 48.6
50.8 50.3
72.6 57.1
66.9 56.0
81.5 58.6
112.7 74.2
172.0 104.7
214.8 129.4
140.0 77.6
82.9 48.1
57.4 36.9

31.8
32.7
31.9
37.9
36.0
40.5
47.5
65.6
75.1
51.8
34.4
25.6

24.8
25.9
24.2
33.5
31.8
36.7

99.2 91.7 79.0 172.9 98.5 85.4 64.5 153.5 103.9 80.9 59.5 142.1 96.1 65.6 42.6 129.5
Laundries

Employment

B anks, brokerage,
insurance, and real
estate

Dyeing and cleaning

Pay rolls

Employment

Pay rolls

E m ploy­
ment

Pay rolls

1931 1932 1933 1931 1932 1933 1931 1932 1933 1931 1932 1933 1932 1933 1932 1933
January........... .
February_______
M a r c h ..............
A pril......................
M a y _________ J u n e .............. .......
J u l y .....................
August______ --.
September______
October_____
N ovem ber............
December_______
Average___

90.5
90.0
89.5
90.5
90.3
91.0
91.8
90.2
89.3
88.1
86.2
85.3

84.7
82.9
82.0
82.0
81.4
81.0
80.3
78.9
78.6
77.5
76.2
75.9

75.4
74.4
73.0
73.4
73.5
76.0

------

86.6
85.6
85.6
86.8
86.5
87.1
87.4
84.6
84.1
81.8
78.9
77.4

76.4
73.3
71.6
71.4
70.6
68.6
66.3
63.9
62.9
61.2
59.1
58.7

57.9
55. 5
52.9
54.0
54.5
56.7

88.9
87.4
88.0
95.7
96.7
99.0
98.6
93.5
95.3
94.2
90.1
84.9

82.1
80.5
80.6
83.3
84.5
85.1
82.4
79.5
83.3
82.3
78.0
75. 2

73.0
70.9
71.2
81.1
82.0
85.6

77.7
75.1
75.6
86.3
86.6
89.1
86.2
80.0
82.6
81.4
74.7
67.9

65. 8
62.2
61.7
65.9
67.3
65.8
60.0
56.3
61.0
58.8
52.3
48.4

46.6
42.4
41.0
54.6
53.9
56.7

98.6
98.6
99.1
98.8
98.2
98.1
98.5
98.7
98.6
98.7
------- 98.2
98.0

97.6
97.0
96.8
96.3
96.4
97.4

------

94.0
93.5
93.3
92.4
93.2
90.4
90.1
88.5
87.3
86.5
86.0
85.7

85.5
84.7
84.1
83.3
83.6
84.7

-------

89.4 80.1 174.3 84.4 67.0 155.3 92.7 81.4 177.3 80.3 60.5 149.2 98.5 197.0 90.1 184.3

1 Average for 6 months.
2 N ot including electric-railroad car building and repairing; see transportation equipment and railroad
repair-shop groups, manufacturing industries, table 1.




18
Average Man-Hours Worked and Average Hourly Earnings

I N THE following tables the Bureau presents a tabulation of man-

hours worked per week and average hourly earnings, based on
reports supplied by identical establishments in May and June 1933
in 15 industrial groups and 74 separate manufacturing industries.
Man-hour data for the building-construction group and for the insur­
ance, real estate, banking, and brokerage groups are not available, and
data for several of the 89 manufacturing industries surveyed monthly
are omitted from these tables due to lack of adequate information.
The total number of establishments supplying man-hour data in
these 15 industrial groups represents approximately 50 percent of the
establishments supplying monthly employment data.
The tabulations are based on reports supplying actual man-hours
worked and do not include nominal man-hour totals, obtained by
multiplying the total number of employees in the establishment by
the plant operating time.
Table 1 shows the average hours worked per employee per week and
average hourly earnings in 15 industrial groups and for all groups
combined. The average hours per week and average hourly earnings
for the combined total of the 15 industrial groups are weighted aver­
ages, wherein the average man-hours and average hourly earnings in
each industrial group are multiplied by the total number of employees
in the group in the current month and the sum of these products
divided by the total number of employees in the combined 15 indus­
trial groups.
In presenting information for the separate manufacturing industries
shown in table 2, data are published for only those industries in which
the available man-hour information covers 20 percent or more of the
total number of employees in the industry at the present time. The
average man-hours and hourly earnings for the combined 89 manu­
facturing industries have been weighted in the same manner as the
averages for all industrial groups combined, table 1.
T able

1 —A V E R A G E H O U R S W O R K E D P E R W E E K P E R E M P L O Y E E A N D A V E R A G E
H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S IN 15 IN D U S T R IA L G R O U PS , M A Y A N D JU N E 1933

Average hours per
week

Average hourly
earnings

Industrial group
M a y 1933 June 1933 M a y 1933 June 1933

Manufacturing__________ ____________________________ ________
Coal mining:
Anthracite_______________ _______________________________
B itum inous______ _________________________ ______ _______
Metalliferous mining_______________________ __________ _____ __
Quarrying and nonmetallic mining_____________________ _______
Crude petroleum producing________________ _________________
Public utilities:
Telephone and telegraph_______ ________________ _________
Power and light______________________ __________________
Electric-railroad and motor-bus operation and maintenance.
Trade:
W holesale... . ................. ......................................... ..................
Retail.......................... ........................ ............................. ............
H otels_________ __ ............................................................................
Canning and preserving—_____ ___________________ ___________
Laundries__________________________
__
. . . ............... .
Dyeing and cleaning__________________________________________
T otal________________________________________ __________




Hours
40.8

Hours
42.6

Cents
42.0

Cents
41.9

25.2
26.0
38.5
38.6
43.5

31.2
28.5
40.0
40.9
42.6

81.3
45.8
47.3
37.3
64.7

81.7
45.6
47.0
37.6
62.9

37.5
46.1
46.2

37.5
46.0
46.4

72.0
61.7
57.1

71.1
61.7
56.7

47.3
44.9
51.6
42.8
42.6
47.0

47.1
45.0
50.6
42.6
42.4
47.4

54.3
41.6
22.9
34.2
33.3
36.4

53.2
41.3
23.1
31.2
33.2
36.6

42.3

43.3

44.2

43.9

19
Per capita weekly earnings, computed by multiplying the average
man-hours worked per week by the average hourly earnings shown in
the following table, are not identical with the per capita weekly
earnings appearing elsewhere in this trend-of-employment compila­
tion, which are obtained by dividing the total weekly earnings in all
establishments reporting by the total number of employees in those
establishments. As already noted, the basic information upon which
the average weekly man-hours and average hourly earnings are com­
puted covers approximately 50 percent of the establishments report­
ing monthly employment data.
2 .—A V E R A G E H O U R S W O R K E D P E R W E E K P E R E M P L O Y E E A N D A V E R A G E
H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S IN S E L E C T E D M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S , M A Y A N D
JU NE 1933

T able

Average hours per
week

Average hourly
earnings

Industry
M a y 1933 June 1933 M a y 1933 June 1933
Food and kindred products:
Baking___ . .. ...................
, . ......
.
- Beverages. _____________________________ _________ _______
Confectionery___________________________ ________________
Flour_____ _________ _______________ ____ ________________
_____
___________________
Ice cream__ _____________
Slaughtering and meat packing
Sugar, beet.______ _____________________ ________ _________
Sugar refining, cane_______________ _____ ________ _______
Textiles and their products:
Carpets and r u g s ,. __________________________ ____ _______
Cotton goods____________________________ ________ _______
Cotton small wares___________________________ _ ________
Dyeing and finishing textiles.................... ..................................
Knit g o o d s .-._______ ________________ ____ _______ _______
Silk and rayon goods____________________ _ ____ ________
W oolen and worsted goods______ _______ _________________
Iron and steel and their products, not including machinery:
Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivets_______________ ______ ____
Cast-iron pipe___ _______ ____________________________ ____
Cutlery (not including silver and plated cutlery) and edge
tools________________________________________________ ___
Forgings, iron and steel_____ ____ _____________ _____ ____
Hardware. _______________________________________________
Iron and steel__ __________________________________________
Plumbers’ supplies_______________-________________________
Steam and hot-water heating apparatus and steam fittings.
Stoves____________________________________ ______________
Structural and ornamental metal work___ ______ ___ _____
Tools (not including edge tools, machine tools, files, and
saws)___________________________________________________
M achinery, not including transportation equipment:
Agricultural implements__________________________________
Cash registers, adding machines, and calculating machines. _
Electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies_____________
Engines, turbines, tractors, and water wheels_____________
Foundry and machine-shop p ro d u c ts .-............................ .......
Machine tools________ ____ ______________________ ________
Radios and phonographs__________________________________
Textile machinery and parts________ ____ ___________ ____
Typewriters and supplies___________ _____ ___ _______ ___
Nonferrous metals and their products:
Aluminum manufactures__________________________________
Brass, bronze, and copper products_________________ _____
Clocks and watches and time-recording devices___________
Jewelry...................................... ......... .......................... ...............
Silverware and plated ware_________ _________ ___________
Smelting and refining—copper, lead, and zinc_____________
Stamped and enameled w a re -....................................................
Transportation equipment:
A ir c r a ft -___ _
__ _____________________ _____ ________
A u t o m o b ile s ..___________________________________________
L o c o m o t iv e s ..___ _____________________ _______________
Shipbuil ding_______ _______________ ____ ________ ____ ___
Railroad repair shops:
Electric railroad _ _______________________________________
Steam railroad_________________________________ __________




Hours
46.5
48.5
40.3
49.2
52.1
47.9
45.1
54.7

Hours
46.7
47.7
38.0
46.9
53.1
48.2
47.3
54.1

Cents
42.0
60.8
32.8
41.6
48.1
42.3
51.9
43.4

Cents
42.2
60.1
34.3
42.0
46.3
41.6
47.9
44.0

40.7
47.9
44.2
48.0
44.1
40.6
45.5

44.4
49.1
46.3
50.8
47.0
42.0
48.3

38.6
21.6
33.4
37.0
29.9
29.8
33.0

38.2
22.6
33.4
37.0
29.4
30.3
34.3

34.1
32.2

40.7
31.9

42.7
38.7

42.6
38.5

40.3
32.0
34.0
32.7
40.9
35.7
38.2
33.8

42.9
40.0
38.0
37.9
43.1
38.0
39.3
35.2

46.1
48.0
41.7
48.8
43.6
48.1
45.3
42.1

46.0
46.0
41.1
48.2
43.2
47.6
44.9
41.6

32.1

38.6

44.4

45.0

32.6
38.7
34.5
35.3
32.6
31.1
44.2
31.7
33.9

36.6
40.7
37.8
37.3
35.9
36.3
42.1
42.8
35.1

46.4
63.9
55.2
54.6
49.9
53.3
38.8
54.4
44.7

45.8
62.0
53.0
53.9
49.6
53.7
37.7
52.4
45.0

39.9
38.2
36.1
33.7
37.6
39.6
39.7

43.1
41.4
41.5
36.5
38.2
41.2
41.6

41.3
46.5
37.1
46.9
44.7
47.2
38.9

40.2
46.0
35.6
44.1
44.6
47.9
38.5

46.2
40.8
38.1
32.7

42.0
40.4
39.9
31.5

62.0
57.0
50.2
56.3

63.4
57.1
49.6
55.0

44.4
36.9

43.9
36.7

56.4
63.0

56.3
62.7

20
T

2 .—AVERAGE HOURS W ORKED PER W EEK PER EM PLOYEE AND A V E R A G E
HOURLY EARNINGS IN SELECTED
INDUSTRIES, M A Y A N D
JUNE 1933—Continued

MANUFACTURING

able

Average hours per
week

Average hourly
earnings

Industry
M ay 1933 June 1933 M a y 1933 June 1933
Lumber and allied products:
Furniture_____ _____________________________________ _____
Lumber:
Mill work _____________________________ ______ _______
Sawmills_________________________ _______________ ____
Stone, clay, and glass products:
Brick, tile, and terra cotta_________________________________
C em en t--.____ ___ _______________________________________
Glass____ ___________________ ___________________________
Marble, granite, slate, and other products______ __________
Pottery____________
________________________________ ___
Leather and its manufactures: Leather__________________ . . .
Paper and printing:
Boxes, paper___ ______________________________________ ___
Paper and p u lp _______________________________________ ____
Printing and publishing:
Book and jo b _______________________ __________ ______
Newspapers and periodicals______ _______ ____________
Chemicals and allied products:
Chemicals___ __
____________________ ___________ ____
Cottonseed, oil, cake, and meal___________________________
Druggists’ preparations____ ____________________ _______
E xplosives.. _. _ _ _ _ _ ________ ______ ____ ___________
Fertilizers_________________________________ ____ __________
Paints and varnishes________________ ____________________
Petroleum refining_________________ ____________________
R ayon and allied products................... ............... .....................
Soap__ ______________________ _______ __ _______________
R ubber products:
R ubber goods, other than boots, shoes, tires, and inner
tubes___________________________________________________
Rubber tires and inner tubes_______ ________________ _____
T obacco manufactures:
Chewing and smoking tobacco and snuff_____ ____________
Cigars and cigarettes______________________________________

Hours
36.4

Hours
39.7

Cents
33.3

Cents
32.2

40.5
39. 7

43.3
43.0

32. 5
27. 5

32.6
27.6

33.7
37.5
39.0
34.6
34.5
44.3

36.8
38.7
42.1
35. 7
35.0
46.6

31.9
41.0
45.0
49. 9
39.9
39.8

31.9
40.6
44. 0
50. 2
40. 0
41.0

42.3
43.3

44.9
46.8

40.5
41.4

40.0
39.9

36.8
41.4

37.2
41.0

66.9
72.7

66.4
73.1

43.3
53.0
37.8
35. 0
40.8
46.6
39.3
44.6
42.9

44.6
58.9
40.3
36.5
45.1
47.6
39.6
45.3
43.8

54.9
21.4
46.2
55. 0
25.0
47.0
63.0
37.5
45.9

54.3
19.7
46.3
54.3
26.8
46.9
63.2
38.3
45.2

40.7
37.7

43.3
42.0

41.2
58.4

42.8
57.9

44. 3
42.3

41.4
42.3

31.5
29.4

32.1
29.7

Employment in Building Construction in June 1933
M PLOYM ENT in the building-construction industry increased
6.1
percent in June as compared with May and pay rolls in­
creased 4.4 percent over the month interval.
The percents of change of employment and pay-roll totals in June
as compared with May are based on returns made by 10,325 firms
employing in June 78,445 workers in the various trades in the buildingconstruction industry. These reports cover building operations in
various localities in 34 States and the District of Columbia.

E




21

BUILDING CON­

COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND TOTAL PAY ROLL IN THE
IN D U STRY IN ID E N TICA L FIRMS, M A Y AND JUNE 1933

STRUCTION

Locality

N um ­ Number on pay roll
ber of
firms ■
report­ M ay 15 June 15
ing

Alabama: Birmingham-----------------California:
Los Angeles 1 -------------------------San Francisco-Oakland 1 --------Other reporting localities 1------Colorado: D enver______ ____ _____
Connecticut:
Bridgeport------------- -----------------Hartford_____________________ N ew H aven-----------------------------Delaware: W ilm ington....................District of Columbia---------------------Florida:
Jacksonville-----------------------------M iam i....... .......... ........................
Georgia: Atlanta---------------------------Illinois:
Chicago 1________ _____ _______
Other reporting localities 1-------Indiana:
Evansville-------------------------------Fort W ayne-------------- ------------- Indianapolis-------------- --------------South B end------------------- ---------Iowa: Des Moines------------------------ Kansas: W ichita------------------- ------- Kentu ck y : Louisville. ............ ..........
Louisiana: N ew Orleans___________
M aine: Portland.......................... .......
M aryland: B altim ore1. ....................
Massachusetts: All reporting local­
ities 1 -------------- ------- ---------- ------- Michigan:
D etroit---------------------------------Flint__________________________
Grand R apids.------------------------Minnesota:
D uluth............................. ..............
Minneapolis------------ ---------------St. Paul----------------------------------Missouri:
Kansas C ity 2__ ...........................
St. Louis. _______ ___________
Nebraska: Omaha.................. ...........
N ew York:
New York C ity 1______________
Other reporting localities 1_____
N orth Carolina: Charlotte................
Ohio:
A kron_____ ___________________
C incinnati3_____ __________ . . .
Cleveland_____________________
D ayton______ _________________
Y o u n g s t o w n . _________ . . . _
Oklahoma:
Oklahoma C ity________________
Tulsa__________________________
Oregon: Portland___________ ____
Pennsylvania:4
Erie area 1_____________________
Philadelphia area 1_________ __
Pittsburgh area 1___ __________
Reading-Lebanon area 1_______
Scranton area 1________________
Other reporting areas 1_________
"Rhode Island: Providence____ . . .
Tennessee:
Chattanooga......................... ........
Knoxville_____________________
M em phis.. ___________________
N a sh ville......................... ............
"Texas:
Dallas_________________________
El Paso_______________________
H ouston..................................
San Antonio___________________

Amount of pay roll Percent
of
change
M a y 15 June 15

69

299

302

+ 1 .0

$3,666

$4,106

+12.0

27
28
18
186

721
815
691
595

779
805
629
619

+ 8 .0
—1. 2
-9 .0
+4. 0

16,171
18, 212
13,778
11, 269

15,685
15,959
14, 267
12,036

- 3 .0
-1 2 .4
+ 3 .5
+ 6 .8

130
206
170
113
503

524
837
894
919
7,706

543
977
974
994
8, 327

+ 3 .6
+16. 7
+ 8 .9
+ 8 .2
+ 8.1

11, 257
18, 345
21,515
17,699
206,972

11.287
21,858
23,060
19,467
233,378

+ .3
+19.1
+ 7 .2
+10.0
+12.8

51
78
139

295
516
1,164

375
637
1,273

+27.1
+23.4
+ 9 .4

4,860
7,818
17,932

5,833
9,743
18,072

+20.0
+24.6
+ .8

134
81

2,298
465

2,050
595

-1 0 .8
+28.0

77, 793
9,992

39,983
13,390

-4 8 .6
+34.0

49
84
164
33
99
66
121
119
103
103

303
234
854
92
419
305
811
1,295
400
663

282
262
1,047
101
570
313
881
1,156
384
665

- 6 .9
+12.0
+22. 6
+ 9 .8
+36.0
+ 2 .6
+ 8 .6
-1 0 .7
-4 .0
+ .3

4,304
3,452
15,425
1,260
7.494
4,022
12,394
18,578
8,281
9,195

4,371
3,654
20,497
1,607
10, 574
5,144
15,512
18,622
7,907
9,983

+ 1 .6
+ 5 .9
+ 32.9
+27.5
+41.1
+27.9
+ 25.2
+ .2
- 4 .5
+ 8 .6

720

4, 312

4, 395

+ 1 .9

106,114

105,854

-.2

450
48
96

2, 317
131
299

2,855
222
367

+23.2
+69.5
+22.7

43,147
1,934
4,261

54,642
3,152
5,659

+26.6
+63.0
+32.8

48
196
150

264
1,199
673

278
1,249
779

+ 5 .3
+ 4 .2
+15.8

3,709
24,261
12,290

3, 793
26,707
13,984

+ 2 .3
+10.1
+13.8

249
489
134

1,319
2, 579
872

1,311
2,480
1,151

-.6
- 3 .8
+32.0

29,478
62,899
15,471

26,509
64,307
20, 252

-1 0 .1
+ 2 .2
+30.9

299
209
40

5,256
4,718
204

4,871
4,849
231

- 7 .3
+ 2 .8
+ 13.2

167,881
117,388
2, 578

160, 526
118, 236
2,954

-4 .4
+ .7
+14.6

76
423
544
116
71

204
2,249
2,492
398
263

295
2,134
2, 614
522
267

+44.6
- 5 .1
+ 4 .9
+31.2
+ 1 .5

2, 764
52,883
57, 216
6, 663
4,890

4,264
47, 844
63,018
9,439
4,972

+54.3
-9 .5
+10.1
+41.7
+ 1 .7

76
53
161

294
251
602

395
223
726

+34.4
-1 1 .2
+20.6

4,285
3,465
10, 229

6,193
3,198
13, 607

+44.5
- 7 .7
+33.0

28
516
251
52
41
333
234

146
4,599
1,716
254
225
2,297
1,258

177
4,879
1,800
278
232
2, 579
1,333

+21.2
+ 6.1
+ 4 .9
+ 9 .4
+ 3.1
+12.3
+ 6 .0

2,432
77,669
35, 629
4,132
5,170
35,794
26, 314

2, 271
86,652
35,027
4,629
5,188
41,338
27,876

-6 .6
+11.6
- 1 .7
+12.0
+. 3
+15.5
+ 5 .9

41
46
80
64

303
430
373
709

285
364
453
1,040

- 5 .9
-1 5 .3
+21.4
+46.7

5,828
4,985
6,070
9,742

5,096
4,680
6, 375
12,800

-1 2 .6
- 6 .1
+ 5 .0
+31.4

158
25
140
119

1,189
167
787
886

1,257
141
823
905

+ 5 .7
—15. 6
+ 4 .6
+ 2.1

18,020
1,810
12,160
10, 731

18,249
1,736
12,103
12,046

+ 1 .3
- 4 .1
-.5
+12.3

1 Data supplied b y cooperating State bureaus.
2 Includes both Kansas City, M o., and Kansas City, Kans.
3 Includes Covington and Newport, K y.
4 Each separate area includes from 2 to 6 counties.




Percent
of
change

22
BUILDING CON­

COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND T O TAL PA Y ROLL IN THE
IN D U ST R Y IN ID E N T IC A L FIRMS, M A Y AND JUNE 1933-Continued

STRUCTION

Locality

N um ­ Num ber on pay roll
Percent Amount of pay roll Percent
ber of
of
of
firms
report­ M a y 15 June 15 change
M a y 15 June 15 change
ing

Utah: Salt Lake C ity _________ ____
76
Virginia:
N orfolk-Portsm outh.. ________
86
143
Richm ond______ ______________
Washington:
148
Seattle______________________46
Spokane____ ___________________
71
Tacom a_______________________
West Virginia: W heeling_________
45
60
Wisconsin: All reporting localities 1Total, all localities................ . 10,325

350

364

+ 4 .0

4,816

5,809

+ 20.6

781
758

962
898

+23.2
+18.5

12, 762
13, 596

15, 666
17, 047

+ 22.8
+25.4

466
134
153
138
780
73,910

541
175
125
193
887
78,445

+16.1
8,167
9,736
2,160
2,811
+30.6
-1 8 .3
2, 669
1,901
+39.9
2, 531
3, 707
12, 852
14,100
+13.7
+ 6.1 1, 591,529 1,661,948

+19.2
+30.1
- 2 8 .8
+46.5
+ 9 .7
+ 4 .4

i Data supplied by cooperating State bureaus.

Trend of Employment in June 1933, by States

I N THE following table are shown the fluctuations in employment

and pay-roll totals in June 1933 as compared with May 1933,
in certain industrial groups by States. These tabulations have
been prepared from data secured directly from reporting establish­
ments and from information supplied by cooperating State agencies.
The combined total of all groups does not include building-construction data, information concerning which is published elsewhere in a
separate tabulation by city and State totals. In addition to the
combined total of all groups, the trend of employment and pay rolls
in the manufacturing, public utility, hotel, wholesale trade, retail
trade, bituminous-coal mining, crude-petroleum producing, quarry­
ing and nonmetallic mining, metalliferous mining, laundry, and
dyeing and cleaning groups is presented. In this State compilation,
the totals of the telephone and telegraph, power and light, and electric-railroad operation groups have been combined and are presented
as one group— public utilities. Due to the extreme seasonal fluctu­
ations in the canning and preserving industry, and the fact that
during certain months the activity in this industry in a number of
States is negligible, data for this industry are not presented separately.
The number of employees and the amount of weekly pay roll in May
and June 1933 as reported by identical establishments in this indus­
try are included, however, in the combined total of “ All groups.”
The percents of change shown in the accompanying table, unless
otherwise noted, are unweighted percents of change; that is, the
industries included in the groups, and the groups comprising the
total of all groups, have not been weighted according to their relative
importance in the combined totals.
As the anthracite-mining industry is confined entirely to the State
of Pennsylvania, the changes reported in this industry in table 1,
nonmanufacturing industries, are the fluctuations in this industry by
State totals.
When the identity of any reporting company would be disclosed by
the publication of a State total for any industrial group, figures for
the group do not appear in the separate industrial-group tabulation,
but are included in the State totals for “ All groups.” Data are not
presented for any industrial group when the representation in the
State covers less than three establishments.




23
IDENTICAL ESTABLISHM ENTS

COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PAY ROLLS IN
IN M A Y AND JUNE 1933 BY STATES

[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued b y
cooperating State organizations]
Manufacturing

Total, all groups

State

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
Per­
ber of ber on
roll (1
pay
cent of week),
estab­
roll,
lish­
change
June
ments June
1933
1933

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
Per­
Per­
ber of ber on
roll (1
pay
cent of estab­
cent of
week),
roll,
change lish­
June change
June
ments
1933
1933

Alabama............... .
492 57, 515
Arizona____ ____ _
8,155
419
Arkansas...............
HS1 14, 7AS
C aliforn ia--_ ........ * 4,950 212,668
Colorado............... .
819 28,502

+11.9 $642,394
- 3 .1
165, 598
+ 2.6
203,459
+ 1 .4 4,895,898
+ .8
570,166

+15.4
- 2 .5
+ 2.8
+ 1.2
-.4

200
59
181
841
125

1,103 142,133
134 10,094
629 30,885
544 21, 734
656 84, 588

+ 7 .0 2,709,905
+ 8 .6
209, 261
+ .6
730,115
- 2 .6
333,174
+13.2 1,019, 038

+13.9
+ 9.2
+ 1.1
- 4 .6
+13.9

Idaho.....................183
6,567
Illinois..................... 31,709 291, 841
Indiana................... 1, 211 116,050
Iowa..................... . 1,187 42,800
*986 60,895
Kansas....................

113, 571
+ 9 .9
+ 5.2 6,041,226
+ 8 .6 2,182,979
804,078
+ 3 .6
+ 2 .9 1,334,950

+11.5
+ 7.0
+10.0
+ 3 .8
+ 4 .0

Kentucky________
821 61,065
509 30,021
Louisiana...............
532 42,860
M aine___________
3 815 76,283
M aryland............. .
Massachusetts___ 68,185 3^5,248

916,972
+ 4 .6
441,881
+ 1 .8
+ 8 .5
716, 252
+ 3 .8 1,455,146
+ 4.3 7,130,029

+ 9 .7
+ 2 .5
+11.5
+ 7.7
+ 5.7

Connecticut--------D ela w a re--...........
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida__...............
Georgia____ ____ _

40,706
2,053
9,949
77, 543
10, 540

+16.3
-1 1 .2
+ 6 .6
+ 4 .4
+ .8

Per­
cent of
change

$451,321
40,486
119,776
1,698,84
200,181

+23 .6
- 1 1 .6
+ 4-8
+ 4. 47
+ 1 .0

651 121,858
49
6,916
56
3,935
126 11,847
310 72, 068

+ 7 .9 2,188,038
+ 5 .8
142,854
129,019
+ .1
151,333
+• 4
+16.0
758, 365

+ 17.5
+ 12.0
+ 1 .9
-2 .4
+21. 5

3,144
38
1,093 183,474
546 85,146
445 23, 875
413 24,282

+21.2
54,374
+ 5 .8 3 , 483,292
+ 9 .6 1, 631,935
+ 5 .7
444,050
+ 4 .3
490, 276

+ 32.9
+13.1
+12.4
+ 7 .4
+ 2 .5

194
210
175
449

23,606
18, 627
35,948
51,842
1,140 170,030

+ 8 .0
400, 388
+ 5 .0
250, 777
+ 8 .3
578,875
5 + 4 -0
948,754
+ 7 .5 3, 048. 308

+ 14.7
+ 7 .3
+ 13.0
« + 8 .1
+ 11 .3

M ichigan................
M inn esota.............
Mississippi........... .
Missouri.................
Montana................

1, 536 241,010
1,064 60, 744
376
8,622
1, 210 108, 524
350
8, 539

+ 7 .0 5 ,370, 223
+ 3 .7 1,244,566
+13.4
106,188
+ 3 .4 *2,186,062
200, 685
- 1 .6

+ 6.3
+ 3 .0
+14.0
+ 5 .0
-.4

419 200,273
268 28, 546
70
5, 256
521 61, 501
50
2,383

+ 8 .2 4,915,185
+ 3 .8
566,244
+20.9
56,102
+ 5. 7 1,167, 562
- 1 .7
48, 747

+ 16.2
+ 6 .3
+ 34 .5
+ 8 .9
+ 4 .1

Nebraska................
N evada................. .
N ew Hampshire. .
N ew Jersey.......... .
N ew M exico..........

723 21,685
141
1,405
492 36,483
1,486 175,151
190
4, 564

+ 2 .3
447,489
+ 4 .5
34,783
+ 7 .0
576,332
+ 4 .9 3, 866, 865
74,068
+ 2 .1

+ 1.1
+ 5 .0
+12.3
+ 6.1
+ 2 .4

122 10,452
24
295
183 32,303
7 679 162,825
25
438

214,412
+ 3 .3
-1 .0
7,156
+ 7 .8
485,632
+ 5 .7 3,436,580
+ 3 .3
7, 276

+ 3 .6
- 3 .7
+ 15 .6
+ 8.1
+ 12 .3

N ew Y ork ..............
North C a rolin a-..
N orth Dakota .. .
O hio________ ____
Oklahoma......... .

7,941 511, 787
889 123,346
355
3, 799
5,003 390,186
714 25, 221

+ 2 .5 12,179,487
+12.7 1,437,441
77,442
+• 1
+ 6 .6 7, 739, 703
+ 3 .4
478,338

+ 3 .3 » 1,690 312,606
+15.5
526 118, 598
1,031
59
+. 7
+11.6 1,908 283,106
+ 2.9
106
9, 618

+ 4 .2 6,861,385
+13.3 1,365,235
+ 3 .4
23,025
+ 8 .4 5, 598,711
+ 6 .6
175,934

+ 6 .4
+16.5
+ 3 .9
+15.6
+ 6 .0

Oregon___________
Pennsylvania........
Rhode Island____
South Carolina___
South Dakota

707 27,782
5,111 584, 511
899 59, 796
325 57, 352
257
5, 533

+ 9 .1
511,186
+ 2 .6 10, 759, 075
+10.2 1,111,164
+ 7.1
573, 439
+ 3 .4
129, 353

+ 8 .4
+ 9.3
+17.2
+13.9
- 2 .8

+13. 6
271,438
+ 5 .8 5,393,763
+12. 4;
331,138
522, 422
+ 7 .6
+ 4 .6
35, 718

+ 22 .8
+13.2
+ 22.8
+15.7
-5 .4

Tennessee________
Texas____________
Utah......... .............
Verm ont_________
Virginia............. .

735
790
344
376
1,274

65,190
58,174
12,006
9, 532
80, 437

896, 560
+ 6 .7
+ 3 .7 1,247,158
+ 1 .2
229, 990
184, 692
+11.6
+ 3 .2 1,236,338

+ 8 .3
+ 3 .7
+. 2
+18.5
+ 5 .2

265
388
87
114
410

W ashington........... 1,152 48,786
West Virginia . .
851 92, 558
Wisconsin............... 91,060 133,186
W yom ing...... .........
198
5, 521

962,947
+ 5 .6
+ 1 .8 1,496,700
+ 7 .2 2,335,020
- 4 .0 1 121,890

+ 2.9
+ 7 .8
+11.1
+ .4

234 23,913.
+ 9 .9
438,933
+ 9 .0
+5. 3
671,994
169 34, 721
+ 8 .6
781 105,7021 5 +11.7 1,808,073 5 +19.5
- 1 .2
26
1,241
33, 315
+. 8

158 16,432
1,748 331,418
260 47,987
182 54,098
46
1,953

48,934
+ 8 .7
31,232
+ 4.4
4,077
+ 4 .5
5,016 +16. 0
55, 5401 + 3 .6

642,891
696,206
77,004
96,219
812,181

+11.3
+ 4 .3
+ 3 .5
+ 28 .9
+ 7 .0

1 Includes automobile dealers and garages, and sand, gravel, and building construction.
2 State report not received.
3 Includes building and contracting.
4 Includes transportation, financial institutions, restaurants, and building construction.
5 Weighted percent of change.
6 Includes construction, municipal, agricultural, and office employment, amusement and recreation,
professional and transportation service.
7 Includes laundries.
8 Includes laundering and cleaning.
9 Includes construction, but does not include hotels and restaurants.




24
IDENTICAL

COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PAY ROLLS IN
ESTABLISHM ENTS
IN M A Y AND JUNE 1933 BY STATES—Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued b y
cooperating State organizations]

Wholesale trade

State

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
ber of ber on
Per­
roll (1
pay
estab­
cent of w
eek),
roll,
lish­
change
June
ments June
1933
1933
$12,633
4,850
9,347
145,310
25, 405

Retail trade
N um ­ N um ­
Per­ ber of ber on
pay
cent of estab­
roll,
change lish­
ments June
1933

Per­
cent of
change

Amount
of pay
roll (1
week),
June
1933

Per­
cent of
change

-1 2 .2
- 2 .9
- 7 .4
- 3 .8
+ 2 .5

64
189
131
972
270

2,013
1,580
1,377
27,041
4,006

-2 .2
+ .5
- 4 .5
-.9
+ 6 .8

$29,669
27, 223
519,407
76, 758

- 2 .1
-.3
-.3
+ .6
+ 4 .3

+ 1 .4
+3. 5
+ 1 .9
-.4
+ 1.4

32, 842
+. 7
+ 2 .4
2,363
12,309 + (10)
17, 505
-.3
12, 358
- 1 .5

112
9
402
70
27

4,857
129
10, 732
995
1,956

+ 5 .4
-1 0 .4
+ 1 .3
- 5 .7
-.6

92,121
2,109
215, 582
18,199
29, 594

+ 3. 5
+ .2
+ 1 .4
-5 .7
-2 .5

111
1,656
1,029
1,034
1,869

+ 2 .8
- 1.9
+ 1 .5
+ 1. 4
+ 2.6

2, 969
38,211
24,977
24, 498
42,585

- 2 .0
- 4 .5
- 1 .0
+ .7
+2.1

32
132
164
124
298

275
19,733
5.995
3, 079
5,121

-.4
+ 4.0
+ 4 .3
+ .4
+•6

4,625
408,362
95, 567
50, 756
87,564

+ 4 .4
+10.4
+ .9
+ 3. 4
+ 3 .6

22
31
17
35
735

410
718
412
747
14,076

+ .7
-.7
(n)
-1 .6
+ 1 .3

8, 759
15, 014
9, 733
15,411
368,886

+1.1
- 2 .2
+ 1.2
-.8
+ 1 .4

30
51
68
38
4,262

1,908
2, 871
1,022
5,811
60,719

- 1 .5
27, 831
-. 1
39, 774
-.8
18, 211
+11.2
91,287
1,210,574
+ 1.4

+ 4 .1
+ 1 .4
-.4
+ 10 .4
+ 1 .3

M ich ig a n ..............
M innesota..............
Mississippi----------M issouri............... M ontana........... .

58
58
5
59
12

1,582
3, 888
116
4, 501
203

+ 1 .3
+ 1 .3
+ 2 .7
+ 3 .3
-.5

39, 613
102,981
2,105
108,146
5,566

+ 1 .2
+ 1 .5
- 2 .7
-.5
1

149
283
56
133
85

10,168
8,012
410
6,804
843

-.3
+ 4 .1
+ 4 .3
+. 5
+ 2 .6

170,916
125,003
4,103
126,059
17, 209

+• 2
-3 .9
+ 2 .1
+ 4 .6
+ .3

Nebraska...............
N evada__________
New Hampshire. _
N ew Jersey............
N ew M exico--------

36
7
15
25
8

870
95
175
554
136

+ 4.1
+ 2 .2
- 1 .7
- 1 .2
+18.3

21, 779
2, 846
4, 538
16,161
4,328

+ 1 .6
- 4 .6
-1 .1
- 1 .2
+ 7 .6

190
40
73
411
47

1,704
230
813
7, 201
243

+ 1 .5
+ 6 .0
+ 5 .2
-1 .2
+ 3 .8

30, 789
5,420
11,910
155, 945
5, 349

+. 9
+ 8 .3
+ 6 .0
-1 .0
+ 1 .3

N ew Y o r k ............
N orth Carolina__
N orth D akota___
Ohio_____________
Oklahoma..............

450
17
16
242
57

12, 510
238
212
4, 945
822

+ 3 .9
+ .s
+ 1 .0
+ 2.1
-.2

364,108
5,331
5,874
119,166
19, 340

-.1
- 3 .8
-.9
+ 1.4
- 3 .9

3,996
171
34
1, 576
99

69, 607
540
424
32,950
1,618

+ 1 .7 1,445, 875
+ 3.1
10, 615
+ 4 .2
6, 437
+ 2 .6
584,810
+ 1 .4
24, 890

+• 7
+ 3 .1
+ 4 .5
+ 3 .9
- 2 .8

Oregon----------------Pennsylvania------R hode Island........
South Carolina___
South Dakota

53
130
43
15
10

1,108
3,601
956
206
130

+ 1 .7
+. 9
+ 2 .6
+ .5
+ 5 .7

29,434
94,299
22,088
4, 546
3, 373

-.8
-.2
+ 3 .2
-.9
- 2 .5

203
344
482
14
12

2,167
26, 334
4,629
397
117

+ 1 .4
+ 2 .5
-.2
+ 1 .5
- 6 .4

41, 549
489, 220
92, 631
3, 636
1,895

- 2 .1
+ 2 .0
+ .2
+ 1 .7
- 8 .3

Tennessee________
T e x a s ................. ..
U tah_____________
Verm ont_________
Virginia__________

33
W
15
5
42

613
2,822
457
119
962

+ 9 .5
+ 2 .5
+ 1 .6
+ 5 .3
+16.7

12, 769
68,605
10, 493
2, 789
21,972

+ 6.4
-.4
- 3 .3
+ 4.1
+ 5 .9

51
73
82
41
479

3. 243
6,428
663
444
4, 680

- 1 .9
+ 2 .2
+ 2 .2
+ 4 .5
+ .2

47,454
105,417
13,103
6, 346
82,988

-1 .4
+ 1 .5
-1 .7
- 1 .0
+ .9

Washington______
West Virginia____
W isconsin________
W yom ing...... .........

90
29
46
9

2,108
584
1,753
58

+ 4 .3
+ 4 .8
+ 3.1
+ 3 .6

52, 749
14, 773
38,093
1,618

- 1 .5
-.5
- 3 .8
+ 2 .3

420
49
53
44

5,999
860
8,750
217

- 1 .3
+ 4 .4
+ 2 .7
+ .9

110, 354
13, 705
123,142
5, 111

-2 .0
- . 1
+ 1 .6
+ 1 .5

Alabama_________
Arizona---------------Arkansas....... .........
California...... ........
Colorado........... .

16
22
17
2 151
29

567
188
409
5,121
937

+ 2 .0
+ 5 .0
- 3 .1
+ .8
+ 2.1

Connecticut______
Delaware.......... . . .
Dist. of Columbia.
F lo r id a -...............
Georgia----------------

57
9
32
47
33

1,209
118
419
742
448

Idaho-------- ---------Illin ois.--...............
Indiana..................
Iowa_____________
K ansas..................

8
SO
55
34
69

Kentucky________
Louisiana...............
M aine.....................
M aryland___ ____
Massachusetts-----

2 State report not received.
10 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.
11 N o change.




22,004

25

IDENTICAL

COMPARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PAY ROLLS IN
ESTABLISHM ENTS
IN M A Y AN D JUNE 1933 BY STATES—Continued
lFigures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]
Quarrying and nonmetallic mining

State

Metalliferous mining

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
Per­
ber of ber on
Per­ ber of ber on
roll (1
pay
pay
cent of week),
cent of estab­
estab­ roll,
roll,
lish­
change
change lish­
June
June
ments June
ments
1933
1933
1933

Alabama_________
Arizona__________
Arkansas_________
California________
Colorado.................

17
3
10
*40
3

639
49
416
1.043
15

+ 6 .5
-2 3 .4
+31.6
+ 7 .5
+ 7.1

$6,951
642
3,863
21,324
187

- 0 .7
-1 4 .3
+19.2
+13.1
-2 1 .4

ConnfiP.t.innt
Delaware________
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida___________
Georgia__________

25

263

+ 6.0

5,025

+ 4 .2

16
23

906
1,073

+23.8
+ .4

9,877
10,093

+17.2
+ 6 .9

Idaho...... ................
Illinois___________
Indiana
I o w a . . __ ___ ___
Kansas___________

22
64
25
17

477
1,480
345
757

+19.3
+ 16.2
+10.9
+ 5.3

9,376
24,290
4,888
18,644

+ 9 .9
+25.7
+28.3
+ 8. 4

K entucky________
Louisiana. ........... .
M aine___________
M aryland________
M assachusetts___

37
13
8
U

935
656
278
231

+ 23.2
+ 3 .0
+30.5
-2 1 .2

8,743
7,179
6, 566
3f 718

+36.7
+13.1
+52.2
- 8 .6

M ich ig a n ...............
Minnesota_______
M ississippi______
M issouri_________
M ontana_________

47
29
9
46
8

1,305
397
130
1,106
92

+16.9
+ 5 .0
—1.5
+18.8
- 6.1

18,760
6,166
1,461
13,383
1,038

+16.9
- 5 .9
+25.4
+14.1
-1 7 .9

+51.5
+ 1.0

$11,588
45,973

+ 64.9
+ 7 .3

25
17

1,690
898

+ 7 .5
+ 1.2

42.536
22,273

+ 1 .9
+ .6

7

1,904

+ 2 .5

31,792

- 3 .4

11

464

+22.4

8,418

+65.4

38
32

2,761
641

-2 3 .0
-1 4 .3

34,181
8,692

- 3 .1
+ 4 .1

13
15

1, 594
1, 780

+ 2.0
+17.8

16, 584
47, 666

+71.2
+ 12.1

14

176

+23.1

4,668

+25.4

3
5

6
932

-1 4 .3
+ 11.2

146
15, 616

-5 .2
+ 6 .5

+ 6 .5

18, 720

+20.7

853

- 11.6

212

-3 1 .8

3,255

-1 3 .9

144
512

- 1 .4
+ 7 .3

3,110
9,492

+ 1.2
+13.6

80
11

2,167
196

+ 4.1
- 8.0

44, 350
1, 727

+ 3 .2
+ 9 .0

131
20

3, 222
190

+ 7 .5
-1 7 .7

45,490
1, 555

+19.6
-1 4 .0

31

1, 204

Oregon___________
Pennsylvania. _
R hode I s la n d ___
South Carolina___
South Dakota _

5
149

71
5,005

+ 7 .6
+ 10.9

1,038
74, 557

- 5 .0
+33.4

4

48

6
6

82
40

—24.8
+ 2.6

785
804

-1 6 .2
+41.5

Tennessee________
Texas
U tah......... .............
Vermont
Virginia. _ _______

30
21
6
38
26

1,410
812
83
2,128
1,361

+ 5 .3
+ 10.6
00
+11.5
+ 3 .8

17, 502
14,483
1,271
41, 272
14,834

+ 3 .6
+ 6.1
- 6.0
+15.5
+17.7

Washington _ _
West Virginia
Wisconsin________
W yoming

18
19
n

220
664
181

+ 12.8
+25.5
+ 64.5

3,107
8,966
2, 370

+ 4 .2
+41.3
+60.4

2State report not received.
11 No change.




Per­
cent of
change

1,050
2,073

5

N ew Y ork _______
North Carolina__
North Dakota___
Ohio_____________
Oklahoma________

Amount
of pay
roll (1
week),
June
1933

9
19

13
32

Nebraska........ .......
Nevada_______ __
N ew Hampshire - _
N ew Jersey______
New M e x i c o __ __

Per­
cent of
change

00

4

211

+ 6.6

2,978

+21.9

12

1, 977

+ 2.1

34,637

- 1 .9

26
IDENTICAL

COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PAY ROLLS IN
ESTABLISHM ENTS
IN M A Y AND JUNE 1933 BY STATES—Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]

Bituminous coal mining

State

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
ber of ber on
Per­
roll (1
pay
cent of
estab­ roll,
week),
lish­
June change
June
ments
1933
1933
+ 0.2

N um ­ N um ­
Per­ ber of ber on
Per­
pay
cent of estab­
cent of
roll,
change lish­
change
ments June
1933

48

8,687

3

182

52

3, 375

- 4 .0

46, 723

-1 1 .9

34
48
23
13

5,133
5,309
1,107
1,302

- 1 .0
+ 1 .7
- 12.8
- 3 .3

89,049
86,474
18,051
9, 766

+ 6.3
+3.1
- 9 .3
-2 7 .6

Kentucky..............
Louisiana________
Maine _____ ____
M aryland________
Massachusetts__

159

23,955

+2. 5

270, 724

+12.3

13

1,160

+ 1.4

7, 676

-\-ll. 4

M ichigan________
M innesota_______
Mississippi _____
Missouri............. .
M ontana........... .....

3

19

+ 5 .6

503

+ 4 .8

21
11

1,448
465

- 5 .7
-3 4 .6

15,128
12, 258

+ 2 .5
-1 2 .4

Nebraska . _____
N evada__________
New Hampshire
N ew Jersey ____
New M exico_____

14

1,673

- 4 .4

21, 343

- 2 .3

Alabama................
Arizona____ _____
A r k a n s a s . .........

(“ )

$72,432

Crude petroleum producing

2,547

Amount
of pay
roll (1
w eek),
June
1933

Per­
cent of
change

- 1 .3
0 1)

9
240

381
6,792

+ 2 .4
+ .9

$8,131
199,874

8
5

157
31

+ 6.1
- 8.8

2, 845
512

30

1,129

—.5

23,956

-6 .9

5
8

209
111

-.9
- 11.2

2,966
2, 674

-5 .9
- 6.2

4

38

+31.0

1,037

+48.4

—1. 7
—. 7

Connecticut...........
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida _______ Georgia...... ............
Idaho____________
Illinois___________
Indiana_____ ____
I o w a ____________
Kansas___________

New Y ork _______
North Carolina
North Dakota___
Ohio. ___________
Oklahoma..............
Oregon....................
P en n sy lv a n ia ___
Rhode Island____
South Carolina
South D a k o t a ___

5

47

+14.6

1,366

-6 .9

4

67

- 1 .5

1,481

-5 .5

5
81
20

188
9,883
354

—16.1
—. 5
- 6.8

2, 772
123,998
5,485

—7.3
-.8
+ 1.0

6
55

51
3,343

(“ )
- 2.2

559
71, 508

—14. 5
-4 .9

452

56,888

+ 2.1

687, 228

+16.1

23

604

+ 4 .0

13, 207

-3 .0

20
5
17

2,401
314
1,340

-3 . 3
+ 8 .3
- 8 .7

22,195
6, 472
24,795

+20.7
+ 22.8
- 2 .9

3

7,637

-\-6.4

260,979

+ 6.7

36

8,059

+ 2.1

101,173

+ 7 .6

10
347

1,279
47, 290

—. 2
-.6

19,870
598,839

+ 9 .5
+10.4

8

305

- 5 .9

7,074

- 6.2

33

3,041

60, 957

-.1

7

159

+ 11.2

3, 784

- 2.2

Tennessee________
T exa s......................
U t a h ____________
Verm ont_________
Virginia__________
W ashington...........
West Virginia____
Wisconsin________
W yom ing________

- 4 .8
-6 .7

2 State report not received.
11 No change.




- 7 .8

27

IDENTICAL

COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PAY ROLLS IN
ESTABLISHM ENTS
IN M A Y AND JUNE 1933, BY STATES—Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued b y
cooperating State organizations]

Public utilities

State

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
Per­
ber of ber on
roll (1
pay
cent of week),
estab­ roll,
lish­
change
June
June
ments
1933
1933

Alabama...............
89
Arizona__________
67
52
Arkansas_________
California...... ......... 2 1,263
Colorado_________
196

1,719
1,182
1,613
44,081
5,196

Hotels
Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
Per­
Per­ ber of ber on
roll (1
pay
cent of estab­
cent of
week),
roll,
change
change lish­
June
June
ments
1933
1933

Per­
cent of
change

$33,804
+ 1 .2
29, 515
+• 4
38,356
+ 2 .2
- . 7 1,156,644
-2 .1
129, 583

- 3 .5
-4 .2
+ 4-2
- 2 .8
-2 . 7

23
19
13
234
66

1,049
418
530
9,907
1,488

- 0 .4
- 6 .5
-2 4 .5
- 1 .3
+ 5.7

$8,633
5, 756
4,224
146,881
18,982

- 1 .0
-4 .7
-1 7 .5
- 2 .9
+ 4 .9

279, 703
28, 774
227, 414
97, 518
172,002

-.3
- 5 .9
+ 1 .2
-7 .2
- 5 .3

26
6
51
59
28

1,028
252
3, 803
1,052
1,128

- 1 .4
+ 3 .3
- 3 .7
- 7 .1
- 2 .8

13,414
2,981
53, 647
9,915
8, 598

+. 3
-(10)
- 7 .3
- 7 .1
- 3 .1

Connecticut...........
Delaware________
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida___________
Georgia__________

135
28
21
184
186

9,341
1,059
7, 915
3,876
6, 403

I d a h o ............... . .
Illinois....................
Indiana__________
Iowa...... ............ .
Kansas___________

55
77
131
423
27

635
66,146
8, 536
9,189
6,856

12, 284
+ 1 .4
1,772,321
-0 °)
+ .2
200,454
+ 1 .7
198,431
+ 3 .8
157,033

-5 .5
- 2 .7
+ 1 .0
- 1 .4
+ 5 .7

24
i2 45
81
73
32

327
9,747
2, 968
2, 231
720

- 3 .5
+26.2
- 3 .3
- 6 .2
- 1.2

3, 670
140, 877
29, 626
20,018
7,303

+ 1. 2
+21.1
- 4 .7
-.7
-2 .5

K entucky________
Louisiana...... ........
M aine.......... . ........
M aryland________
Massachusetts___

293
150
166
U
13134

6,173
4,138
2,671
12,289
44,%62

-.2
139,910
+ 1.3
88, 728
+ 3 .0
73,049
329, 938
-• 4
+ .3 1,222,684

- 2 .2
- 2 .6
+ 2 .9
+ 4-2
+ 1 .4

35
24
28
24
84

1,578
1,908
922
1,187
3.303

- 9 .8
+ 2 .0
+40.3
- 2 .7
+ .2

16,012
19,458
9,924
14,348
46,900

- 6 .5
+ 1 .8
+21.5
- 2 .3
- 1 .2

M ichigan...............
M innesota_______
Mississippi_______
Missouri...... ..........
M ontana................

411
225
190
184
100

20,300
11,609
1,611
18,942
1, 763

- 1 .1
+• 2
+ 2 .2
- 1 .1
- 8 .1

575,045
302, 577
31, 302
496,468
49,019

+ 1 .7
+ .8
- 5 .2
- 1 .4
-1 1 .8

105
75
19
95
29

4,851
2,935
527
4, 661
409

+11.6
+ 1.1
+ 9.1
+1. 0
+ 3 .0

47,866
32,339
3,689
53,310
5,505

+ 6 .5
- 6 .0
+ 7 .9
-.8
+ 2 .0

Nebraska________
N evada__________
N ew Hampshire . .
N ew Jersey............
N ew M exico_____

299
36
140
265
49

5,482
376
2,131
21,023
480

-.3
- 3 .1
- 2 .2
-.4
+ 1 .7

132,988
10,464
56, 542
591, 769
9,904

- 3 .3
+ 2 .3
- 6 .9
+ .2
-.7

44
14
17
77
16

1,502
162
335
4,240
335

- .3
+20.0
+24.1
+12.9
+ 9 .8

14,031
2,650
3,502
49,224
3,407

- 5 .1
+22.9
+19.2
+ 6 .4
+ 9 .6

N ew Y ork _______
North Carolina__
North Dakota.. .
Ohio_____________
Oklahoma________

880
96
170
484
245

96,331
- . 8 3, 008, 587
1,699
+ 1 .4
33,248
1,132
- 1 .4
27,306
31,306 + (10)
794, 280
+ 4 .8
5, 778
128,056

- 1 .4
- 1 .6
-.9
+. 3
+ 5 .2

271
33
24
153
51

28,808
1,110
388
8, 754
1,149

-.1
- 3 .0
-.3
-.7
+ .5

432, 716
9, 571
3,825
104,446
11,102

- 1 .1
- 1 .8
- .5
-.6
- 3 .3

Oregon.____ _____
Pennsylvania.. __
Rhode Island____
South Carolina___
South Dakota____

183
823
43
70
129

5,496
58,428
3, 378
1,682
918

-.9
129,698
- 1 . 0 1, 517,374
+ 4 .4
96,084
+ 2 .9
33,400
+ 3 .0
22,836

-8 .0
- 1 .8
+ 7 .2
-.7
- 2 .7

57
181
18
14
19

951
9, 507
395
428
323

+ 5 .4
+ 1 .7
+ 3 .9
-.9
- 1 .2

11,307
113,504
5,165
3,066
3,617

+ 1 .5
+1* 3
+ 2 .0
-1 .5
+ .3

Tennessee________
Texas____ _______
Utah_____________
V erm ont_________
Virginia__________

244
115
63
121
179

4,167
6,329
1,588
981
5, 569

+ .7
+ .9
O1)
+ 2.1
+ 1 .0

90, 355
168,968
33, 855
25,370
129, 272

- 3 .2
+ 2 .0
- 2 .2
+ 5 .4
- 4 .0

41
43
12
25
32

2,331
2,914
446
559
1,818

+ 5 .0
- 1 .6
+ 3 .2
+ 6.5
- 2 .4

19,435
32,500
5,479
5, 619
19,068

+ 3 .0
- 5 .1
+ 4 .5
+ 7 .8
-.4

W ashington____ _
West Virginia____
W iscon sin .............
W yom ing ...............

200
124
i *4£
48

9, 457
5,626
10,023
412

-.6
- 1 .2
-.2
+ 2 .2

241,067
142, 643
256,298
9,904

- 4 .3
- 2 .9
- 3 .9
-.8

86
41
i*46
14

2, 262
1,118
1,381
168

+ 1 .9
+ 3 .2
+ 3 .5
+ 3 .7

24,985
11, 694
(15)
2, 223

+ 2 .0
+ 2 .2

-.7
- 2 .0
-.5
- 1 .8
-.2

2 State report not received.
10 Less than one tenth of 1 percent,
n N o change.
12 Includes restaurants.
13 Includes steam railroads.
14 Includes railways and express.
Data not supplied.




+ 3 .9

28

IDENTICAL

COMPARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PAY ROLLS IN
ESTABLISHM ENTS
IN M A Y AND JUNE 1933, BY STATES—Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued b y
cooperating State organizations]
Laundries

State

Dyeing and cleaning

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
ber of ber on
Per­
roll (1
pay
cent of week),
estab­
roll,
change
lish­
June
June
ments
1933
1933

Amount
N um ­ N um ­
of pay
Per­
ber of ber on
Per­
roll (1
pay
cent of estab­
cent of
week),
roll,
change lish­
change
June
June
ments
1933
1933

Alabama_____ . . .
Arizona__________
Arkansas................
California_______
C o lo r a d o ._______

5
10
IS
2 105
8

481
379
S69
5,890
574

+ 3.4
00
+ .5
—.6
+ .7

$3, 548
5,089
3,345
105,647
7,388

+ 3 .9
- 1 .1
+• 4
+ .1
+ .5

Connecticut______
Delaware________
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida.......... ........
Georgia__________

28
4
18
7
12

1,289
304
2,437
325
663

+ 4 .0
+ 5 .2
+ 7 .6
-.6
+ 1 .2

20,988
4,759
36, 617
2,924
5, 736

+ 8.8
+ 6.7
+ 8.6
- 7 .5
- 1 .4

Idaho...... ................
Illinois. ........... .......
Indiana__________
Iow a_____________
K a n s a s ............

™26
18
3
16 57

1,621
1,437
207
987

+ 3.2
+ 3.1
+• 5
+ 1 .2

21,119
18,310
2, 869
15, 648

16

1,053

+47.3

17
25

+ 2 .0
+ 5 .9
+ 1 .9
+ 1 .5
+ 3 .9

Per­
cent of
change

3

101

- 7 .3

$1,062

- 7 .2

15
10

864
151

—1.5
+10.2

16,995
2,690

—3.5
+18.4

11
3
5

244
46
144

+ 8 .0
+ 9.5
+25.2

4,996
737
2,429

+ 7.7
+18.5
+17.8

5

113

-.9

1,172

+ 4 .2

+ 2 .9
+ 2 .9
+ 2 .7
+ .3

11

200

+ 1 .0

3,079

- 4 .6

9,491

+ 6.4

5

240

+ 4 .8

3, 514

+ 3 .6

4, 566
28,061
59,632

+ 4.1
+ 7 .6
+ 3 .6

8
77

405
2,007

+ .*
+ 5 .0

5,229
33,891

+ 7 .2
+ 7 .3

+ 6 .7
+ 8.1
+ 1 .6
+ 4 .7
+ 2 .8

15
9

617
320

+ 3 .7
+ 6 .3

10,879
5,141

- 1 .3
+ 7 .7

12

428

+ 7 .3

6,993

+ 3 .0

K entucky........... .
Louisiana________
M aine___________
M aryland
_____
Massachusetts___

114

350
1,896
3,732

M ichigan................
M innesota___ __ _
Mississippi_______
M issouri_________
M ontana_________

19
11
5
34
14

1,318
720
244
2,510
316

+3.~8
00

15, 643
11,455
2, 241
33,730
5, 415

Nebraska________
N evada__________
N ew H am pshire...
New Jersey.......... .
New M exico_____

6
3
16
25
4

521
37
272
2,802
192

+ 7 .9
—2.6
+ 4 .6
+ 2 .3
- 2 .0

7,126
684
3,994
55, 288
2,852

+11.7
- 2 .4
+ 4 .9
+ 5 .7
-.9

4

107

+ 2 .9

1, 856

+ 2 .3

8

259

+ 8 .4

6,466

+12.5

New Y ork _______
North Carolina__
North Dakota____
O hio. ___________
Oklahoma________

70
12
10
78
7

6,870
755
198
4,050
601

+ 3 .5
+ 3.9
+ .5
+ 1.1
+ .3

114,889
7, 677
2,927
58,473
7,169

+ 5 .0
+ 4.6
+ 1 .4
+ 3 .2
- 3 .6

15

553

+ 8 .6

11, 227

+ 9.1

39
3

1, 665
73

+ 4.1
+ 5.8

27,977
768

+ 6 .0
+ 3 .6

Oregon___________
Pennsylvania____
Rhode Island........
South Carolina___
South Dakota____

38
18
8
7

2,902
1,082
286
129

+ 4 .2
+ 1 .8
+1.1
00

41,821
18, 412
2,571
1,681

+ 5 .2
+ 7 .0
+ 2.8
-.8

20
5

1,129
342

+ 2 .8
+11.0

20, 204
6,031

+ 6 .0
+ 6 .9

Tennessee......... .
Texas. __________
U tah_____________
V erm ont_________
Virginia_________

12
22
7
4
10

848
1, 204
503
46
735

+ 5 .2
+ 4 .6
+ 1 .4
- 9 .8
+10. 0

6, 861
12, 418
6,859
582
8, 292

+ 3 .0
+ .4
+ 3 .9
- 1 .9
+10.9

15
7

456
109

00
+ 1 .9

6,937
2,037

- 1 .6
+ 6 .6

20

269

+ 7 .6

3,692

+ 9 .4

W ashington______
West Virginia____
Wisconsin________
W yom ing...........

14
17
™28
4

608
600
977
80

00
+ 2 .2
+ 1 .9
+ 2 .6

1,104
7, 514
12,617
1,396

-.8
+ 3 .9
+ 2 .9
+ 6 .3

9
8

no
191

00
+ .5

1,638
2,433

+ 8.8
-.5

2 State report not received.
11 N o change.
16 Include dyeing and cleaning.




29
IDENTICAL

COM PARISON OF E M PL O Y M E N T AND PA Y ROLLS IN
M ENTS IN M AY AND JUNE 1933, BY STATES—Continued

ESTABLISH-

[Figures in italics are not com piled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued b y
cooperating State organizations]

Banks, brokerage, insurance, and real estate
State

ount of
Num ber Num ber on Percent of Am
pay roll (1 Percent of
of estab­ pay roll,
week), June change
change
lishments June 1933
1933

Alabam a..................................................... ..............
Arizona....... ................... ..................... .....................
Arkansas_________ ____________________________
California.................................. .............. ..................
Colorado............................... ............................. .

15
28
18
1,112
25

338
192
216
22, 611
1,027

-0 .3
-2 .0
+ .5
+ .9
-1 .0

$9, 240
5,325
5, 255
741, 777
34,452

- 4 .2
- 1 .2
+ .4
+ 2.1
-1 .0

C onnecticut...... ....................................................
Delaware........................ ........... ..............................
District of Columbia....................... .......................
F lo r id a ...................... ..............................................
Georgia........................................ ........................ .

57
14
42
16
22

2,012
550
1,316
419
625

-.2
+ .7
+ .7
-.9
+ 2 .1

72,483
19, 220
48, 766
15,005
20, 240

+ 1 .5
+ 3 .2
+ 1 .3
+ .3
+ 1 .5

Id a h o ..................................... ...................................
Illinois................ ......................................... ..............
Indiana........................... .......................................
Iow a ......................................................... ........... .
Kansas________ _______________________________

15
85
37
18
H

125
9,036
1,137
1,079
798

- 3 .1
-.2
+ .3
+ .3
+ 1 .8

3,146
318,898
38,591
34, 654
U , 866

-2 .1
+ .8
+ 1 .3
-.3
-2 .3

K en tu cky..................................... ................ ............
Louisiana.................................... ..............................
M aine...................................................... .................
M aryland.................................................................
Massachusetts................................................ .........

18
10
12
22
222

664
417
178
841
8,029

+ .5
-4 7 .5
+ 3 .5
+ .7
-.2

24,165
15, 565
4,654
32, 267
255,103

+. 6
-2 5 .2
(« )
+ .4
-.1

M ichigan__________________ ___________________
M innesota............................. ............... ............... .
Mississippi........................ .......................................
Missouri........................................................ ............
M ontana......................................... ........................

128
51
16
82
18

2,000
2, 649
165
4,689
204

-1 .3
+ 3 .4
+ .6
+ .7
- 1 .4

63, 574
74,300
3,709
142,118
6,310

-7 .5
+ .3
-.8
+. 1
-1 .3

N ebraska.................................................................
N evada____________________________ __________
N ew Hampshire.....................................................
N ew Jersey____ ____________ __________________
N ew M exico..................... .......... ............ ........... .

13

487

-.4

17, 642

+ .5

33
100
15

286
12, 226
82

-.3
+ .4
-1 .2

6, 769
365,005
2,479

-.6
+ 1 .6
+ 1 .1

N ew Y ork ............................. ....................................
North Carolina........................ ..................... ..........
North Dakota______ _________ ________________
Ohio........... ...................... ................................ .........
Oklahoma______ ______________________________

625
22
35
246
19

47,188
180
206
8,068
457

+ 2 .0
-.6
-.5
+ 5.1
+ .2

1, 656,628
3,867
4, 923
257,067
13, 670

+ 1 .7
-.4
- 2 .1
+ 4 .8
+ 1 .2

O r e g o n ..____________ _________________________
Pennsylvania............. ............ ....................... ..........
Rhode Island...................... ......................................
South Carolina_____ __________________________
South D akota.......... .............................. ..................

16
804
28
8
26

394
23, 345
981
87
182

-7 .5
+ .3
+• 1
(“ )
+ .6

13,145
734, 606
39,007
2, 550
4,492

-9 .7
+ .4
+ .3
+ .6
-.2

Tennessee........ .........................................................
Texas_________________________________________
U tah.......................... ............... ..................... ..........
V erm ont......................................... ......................... .
Virginia...... ................................. .......... ..................

26
19
14
25
34

888
1,224
444
211
1,299

+• 1
-1 .2
-.4
+ 1 .9
+ 1 .6

31, 763
33,002
15, 680
6,018
41, 752

+ 1 .9
-.4
- 2 .0
- 1 .1
+ 1 .8

W ashington______ ____________________________
W est Virginia................................................. .........
Wisconsin.................................................................
W yom in g............................................. .....................

31
40
17
9

1,154
599
918
80

+. 1
+ 1 .2
+• 2
+ 1 .3

37,846
17,065
30, 780
2,350

-.9
+ .4
-1 .2
+ 1 .8

10 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.
11 N o change.




30
Employment and Pay Roll in June 1933 in Cities of Over
500,000 Population

I N THE following table are presented the fluctuations in employ­

ment and pay-roll totals in June 1933 as compared with May
1933 in 13 cities of the United States having a population of 500,000
or over. These changes are computed from reports received from
identical establishments in each of the months considered.
In addition to including reports received from establishments in the
several industrial groups regularly covered in the Bureau’s survey,
excluding building construction, reports have also been secured from
other establishments in these cities for inclusion in these totals.
Information concerning employment in building construction is not
available for all cities at this time and therefore has not been included.
F L U C T U A T IO N S IN E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L IN JU NE
W IT H M A Y 1933

Cities

N ew York C ity _________
Chicago, 111_____________
Philadelphia, P a................
Detroit, M ich ___________
Los Angeles, Calif.............
Cleveland, Ohio_________
St. Louis, M o ______ ____
Baltimore, M d _____ ____
Boston, Mass______ _____
Pittsburgh, P a__________
San Francisco, Calif..........
Buffalo, N .Y ____________
Milwaukee, W is_________

Number of
establish­
ments re­
porting in
both
months
5,123
1,818
852
533
851
1,127
515
559
3,069
421
1,161
396
472

Number on payroll
Percent
of
change
M a y 1933

June 1933

306,295
195,760
125,828
143, 263
64,073
85,502
62,188
44,116
91,439
53,922
47, 346
37,337
37,143

308,271
203,829
129, 667
154,879
65, 758
90,291
64, 606
45,078
92, 111
55, 245
47, 730
39,079
39, 821

+ 0 .6
+ 4 .1
+ 3.1
+ 8 .1
+ 2 .6
+ 5 .6
+ 3 .9
+ 2 .2
+ 0 .7
+ 2 .5
+ 0 .8
+ 4 .7
+ 7 .2

1933 AS C O M P A R E D

A mount of pay roll
(1 week)

M a y 1933

June 1933

$8,070,546
4, 592,200
2, 661, 428
3, 383, 848
1, 471, 501
1, 725, 746
1, 321, 457
835, 801
2, 208, 306
1,123,987
1,130, 996
802, 510
720, 474

$8,090,373
4,826,514
2, 762, 415
3, 555, 774
1, 544, 485
1, 856,085
1, 376, 215
862, 735
2, 205, 261
1,154, 507
1,142, 597
845,025
787, 331

Percent
of
change

+ 0 .2
+ 5 .1
+ 3 .8
+ 5 .1
+ 5 .0
+ 7 .6
+ 4 .1
+ 3 .2
- 0 .1
+ 2 .7
+ 1 .0
+ 5 .3
+ 9 .3

Employment in the Executive Civil Service of the United States
June 1933
Comparing June 1933 with June 1932, there was a decrease of 12,799
employees in the executive Civil Service of the United States. Com­
paring June 1933 with May 1933, there was a decrease of 8,474
employees.
These figures do not include the legislative, judicial, or Army and
Navy services. The information as shown in the table was compiled
by the various departments and offices of the United States Govern­
ment and sent to the United States Civil Service Commission where
it was assembled. The data were tabulated by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics and published here by courtesy of the Civil Service Commis­
sion and in compliance with the direction of Congress. No informa­
tion has as yet been collected relative to amounts of pay rolls. In­
formation is presented for the District of Columbia, for the Federal
service outside of the District of Columbia, and for the Government
service as a whole. Approximately 12 percent of the total number of
Federal workers are employed in the District of Columbia.




31
T

able

1 —EM PLOYEES IN THE EXECU TIVE CIVIL SERVICE OF THE U NITED STATES,
JUNE 1932, M A Y AND JUNE 1933
District of Columbia

Outside the District

Entire Service

Perma­ Tem po­
nent
rary 1 Total

Perma­ Tem po­ Total
nent
rary 1

Perma­ Tem po­
rary i Total
nent

Item

N um ber of employees:
June 1932_______________
65,619
M a y 1933...........................
64,249
June 1933...... .....................
63,067
Gain or loss:
June 1932-June 1933_____ -2 ,5 5 2
M a y 1933-June 1933____ -1 ,1 8 2
Percent of change:
June 1932-June 1933....... .
-3 .9
M a y 1933-June 1933____
-1 .8
Labor turnover, June 1933:
260
A dditions______ _______
Separations________ _____
1,442
Turnover rate per 100_______
0.41

3,174
2,311
2, 370

68,793 476, 735
66, 560 472,057
65,437 466,443

32,703 509,438 542,354
35, 289 507,346 536,306
33, 552 499,995 529, 510

35,877 578,231
37,600 573,906
35,922 565,432

-8 04 - 3 , 356 -1 0 , 292
+849 -9 ,4 4 3 -12,844
+45 -12,799
+59 -1 ,1 2 3 - 5 , 614 - 1 , 737 -7,351 - 6 , 796 -1,6 7 8 -8 ,4 7 4
-2 5 .3
+ 2 .6
452
393
16. 79

- 4 .9
- 1 .7

-2 .2
- 1 .2

+ 2 .6
- 4 .9

- 1 .9
- 1 .4

- 2 .4
- 1 .3

+ 0.1
- 4 .5

-2 .2
- 1 .5

712
1,835
1.08

1,661
7, 275
0.35

15, 598
17, 335
45. 32

17, 259
24, 610
3.43

1,921
8, 717
0. 36

16,050
17, 728
43. 66

17,971
26,445
3.15

1 N ot including field service of the Post Office Department.

Comparing June 1933 with June 1932, there was a decrease of 3.9
percent in the number of permanent employees in the District of
Columbia. Temporary employees decreased 25.3 percent during
this period. The total Federal employees in the District of Columbia
decreased 3,356, or 4.9 percent. Comparing June 1933 with May
1933, there was a decrease of 1.8 percent in the number of permanent
employees and a increase of 2.6 percent in the number of temporary
employees, which makes a decrease of 1.7 percent in the total Federal
employees in the District of Columbia.
Outside the District of Columbia, the number of permanent em­
ployees decreased 1.2 percent and the number of temporary employees
decreased 4.9 percent; the total Federal employment decreased 1.5
percent.
Table 2 shows employment and the pay rolls in the Emergency
Conservation Corps, sometimes known as the Forest Service.
T able

2 —E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN T H E E M E R G E N C Y C O N S E R V A T IO N
C O R P S , M A Y A N D JU N E 1933
Number

Payrolls
M ay

June

M ay

June

Enrolled p ersonnel___________________________________
Reserve officers—Line........................... .............................
Reserve officers—M edical_________________ _____ _____
Supervisory and technical_____ ________________ ____

186,973
1,045
472
2, 623

272,219
1,132
867
7,236

$5,839,173
0)
0)
378, 421

$8,501,403
0)
0)
873,593

T otal...............................................................................

191,113

281,454

6, 217, 594

9,374,996

i Data not available.

On May 31, there were in the Emergency Conservation Corps
186,973 enrolled personnel. On June 30, there were 272,219 enrolled
personnel. In addition to the men enrolled for forest duty, there were
a supervisory and technical civilian force and line and medical Re­
serve officers in the Emergency Conservation Corps.




32
There were 191,113 persons employed in the Emergency Conserva­
tion Corps as a whole on May 31, 1933. By June 30 this number had
increased to 281,454. The pay of the enrolled personnel is $30 per
month, except that 5 percent of the members of each company are paid
$45 per month and an additional 8 percent paid $36 per month.
The pay rolls as shown for the enrolled personnel were figured on this
basis. For the month of June, the civilians in the Emergency Con­
servation Corps were paid over $9,000,000. Pay-roll data, however,
were not available for either the line or medical Reserve officers.
Employment on Class 1 Steam Railroads in the United States
EPORTS of the Interstate Commerce Commission for class I
railroads show that the number of employees (exclusive of
executives and officials) increased from 926,222 on May 15, 1933, to
945,173 on June 15, 1933, or 2 percent. Data are not yet available
concerning total compensation of employees for June 1933. The
latest pay-roll information available shows an increase from
$102,257,898 in April to $108,411,242 in May, or 6 percent.
The monthly trend of employment from January 1923 to June 1933
on class I railroads— that is, all roads having operating revenues of
$1,000,000 or over— is shown by index numbers published in the
following table. These index numbers are constructed from monthly
reports of the Interstate Commerce Commission, using the 12-month
average for 1926 as 100.

R

T a b le

1.—I N D E X E S OF E M P L O Y M E N T ON CLASS I STEAM RAILROADS IN T H E
U N IT E D S T A T E S , J A N U A R Y 1923 T O JU N E 1933
[12-month average, 1926=100]
M onth

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

January______________
February_________ __
M arch......... ............ .......
A pril_________ ________
M a y __________________
June__________________
July.................................
August_______________
September....... .........
October___ __________
Novem ber____________
D ecem ber.. ________

98.3
98.6
100.5
102.0
105.0
107.1
108. 2
109. 4
107.8
107.3
105. 2
99.4

96.6
97.0
97.4
98.9
99. 2
98.0
98.1
99.0
99.7
100.8
99.0
96.0

95.6
95.4
95.2
96.6
97.8
98.6
99.4
99. 7
99.9
100. 7
99.1
97.1

95.8
96.0
96.7
98.9
100. 2
101.6
102. 9
102. 7
102.8
103.4
101. 2
98. 2

95.5
95.3
95.8
97.4
99.4
100.9
101.0
99. 5
99.1
98.9
95.7
91.9

89.3
89.0
89.9
91.7
94.5
95.9
95. 6
95. 7
95.3
95.3
92.9
89.7

88.2
88.9
90.1
92.2
94.9
96. 1
96.6
97.4
96.8
96.9
93.0
88.8

86.3
85.4
85. 5
87.0
88.6
86.5
84. 7
83.7
82.2
80.4
77.0
74.9

73.3
72.7
72.9
73. 5
73.9
72.8
72.4
71. 2
69.3
67.7
64.5
62.6

61. 2
60.3
60.5
60.0
59.7
57.8
56. 4
55. 0
55. 8
57.0
55.9
54.8

53.0
52.7
51.5
51.8
52.5
53.6

104.1

98.3

97.9

100.0

97.5

92.9

93.3

83.5

70.6

57.9

i 52.5

Average________

1933

1 Average for 6 months.

Wage-Rate Changes in American Industries
Manufacturing Industries

I N THE following table is presented information concerning wage-

rate adjustments occurring between May 15 and June 15, 1933, as
shown by reports received from manufacturing establishments supply­
ing employment data to this Bureau. Of the 17,952 manufacturing
establishments included in the June survey 17,546 establishments, or




33
97.7 percent of the total, reported no change in wage rates over the
month interval. The 2,584,762 employees not affected by changes in
wage rates constituted 92.2 percent of the total number of employees
covered by the June trend of employment survey of manufacturing
industries.
Increases in wage rates were reported by 350 manufacturing estab­
lishments in 46 industries, averaging 8.8 percent and affecting 213,444
employees or 7.6 percent of the employees in the establishments con­
cerned, during the period May 15 to June 15. This is the largest
number of establishments reporting wage-rate increases to the Bureau
since January 1930. Increases were reported in such important
industries as cotton goods, wrhich reported increases averaging 11.5
percent and affecting 76,212 workers, automobiles, boots and shoes,
woolen and worsted goods, and rayon. The increases in wage rates
reported in June represent in practically all instances a partial restora­
tion of former wage scales.
Decreases in wrage rates were reported by 58 establishments in 24
of the 89 industries surveyed. This is the smallest number of estab­
lishments reporting wage-rate decreases since December 1930 and
represents only 0.3 percent of the total number of establishments
covered. These decreases averaged 9.2 percent and affected 4,505
employees or 0.2 percent of all employees in the establishments
surveyed.
T able 1.—W A G E

CHANGES

Industry

All manufacturing industries____
Percent of total___________
Food and kindred products:
Baking_____________________
Beverages___________________
Butter______________________
Confectionery_______________
Flour_______________________
Ice cream___________________
Slaughtering and meat pack­
ing-----------------------------------Sugar, beet_________________
Sugar refining, cane_________
Textiles and their products:
Fabrics:
Carpets and rugs________
Cotton goods____ _____
Cotton small wares_____
Dyeing and finishing tex­
tiles__________ ____ ___
Hats, fur-felt_____ ____
Knit goods______________
Silk and rayon goods____
W oolen and worsted
goods_________________
Wearing apparel:
Clothing, men’s_________
Clothing, wom en’s______
Corsets and allied gar­
ments________________
M en’s furnishings______
M illinery.........................
Shirts and collars_______




IN

M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S
E N D IN G JU NE 15, 1983

Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
ing

Total
number
of em­
ployees

17,952 2,802, 711
100.0
100.0

Number of establish­
ments reporting—

D U R IN G

M ONTH

Number of employees
having—

No
Wage Wage N o wage Wage Wage
in­
in­
de­
de­
wage
creases creases
changes creases creases
17,546
97.7

350
1.9

58 2,584, 762 213,444
92.2
7.6

4, 505
.2

960
357
317
318
420
323

59, 379
23, 073
6,058
33, 225
15, 513
11,907

351
317
316
417
320

59, 326
22, 757
6,058
32,012
15, 427
11,852

250
57
11

93,092
4,089
6,113

245
57
11

92,716
4,089
6,113

27
651
113

11,842
279, 784
10,146

27
544
112

152
35
438
242

36, 249
5,451
112, 378
47, 507

141
35
432
233

30, 543
5, 451
107,488
43,170

5,706

54,512

16, 379

171

63,908
25,854

391
474

62,714
25, 758

1,064
96

130

5, 719
7,844
9,690
16,431

34
75
139
113

5,719
7,831

71,062

34
76
139
118

107
1

11,842
203, 572
10,060

28
1,178
86
55
323

53

76, 212
86

4,890
4,337

34
T

able

1

MANUFACTURING

WAGE CHANGES IN
INDUSTRIES DU RING M ON TH
E N DIN G JUNE 15, 1933—Continued

Industry-

Iron and steel and their prod­
ucts, not including machinery:
Bolts, nuts, washers, and
rivets......................... ............
Cast-iron pipe................ ..........
Cutlery (not including silver
and plated cutlery) and
edge tools.
...................... .
Forgings, iron and steel........ .
Hardware___________________
Iron and steel_______ _______
Plumbers’ supplies......... .........
Steam and hot-water he.ating
apparatus and steam fit­
tings........ ................... ...........
Stoves____ _________________
Structural and ornamental
metalwork________ _______
Tin cans and other tinware __
Tools (not including edge
tools, machine tools, files,
and saws)_________________
W irework______ ______ _____
Machinery, not including trans­
portation equipment:
Agricultural implements____
Cash registers, adding ma­
chines, and calculating
machines......................... .......
Electrical machinery, appa­
ratus, and supplies________
Engines, turbines, tractors,
and water wheels_________
Foundry and machine-shop
products........ .........................
Machine tools______ ______
Radios and phonographs____
Textile machinery and parts.
Typewriters and supplies___
Nonferrous metals and their
products:
Aluminum manufactures.......
Brass, bronze, and copper
products............... .................
Clocks and watches and timerecording devices................ .
Jewelry___________ _______
Lighting equipment_________
Silverware and plated ware__
Smelting and refining—cop­
per, lead, and zinc__............
Stamped and enameled ware..
Transportation equipment:
Aircraft___ __________________
Autom obiles___ ____ _
Cars, electric and steam railroad___...........
Locomotives _
Shipbuilding______
Railroad repair shops:
Electric railroad................ .......
Steam railroad-____ ____
Lumber and allied products:
Furniture....................... ..........
Lumber:
M ill work ____ ________
Sawmills_________ ______
Turpentine and rosin
Stone, clay, and glass products:
Brick, tile, and terra cotta___
Cement
Glass______________ ________
Marble, granite, slate, and
other products .
Pottery...... ................................




Number of establish­
ments reporting—

Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
ing

Total
number
of em­
ployees

70
36

9,672
4, 713

68
36

129
65
106
205
68

8,698
6,046
21,861
199, 580
8,469

129
65
104
204
68

93
159

14,649
17,843

93
157

182
60

12,904
9,102

128
67
75

N um ber of employees
having—

Wage
No
Wage Wage N o wage Wage
in­
de­
wage
in­
de­
changes
changes creases creases
creases creases

2

2
1

9,414
4, 713

258

8,698
6, 046
21, 757
199,471
8, 469

104
109

1

1

14,649
17, 752

75

16

177
60

1

4

12, 738
9,102

29

137

7,003
6,194

126
67

1

1

6,639
6,194

361

3

6,844

74

1

6, 836

8

38

13, 768

38

282

90,885

279

3

90, 588

297

91

16,210

88

3

15, 734

476

1,044
145
29
50
17

100, 837
10, 753
11, 313
7,688
8,000

1,035
145
29
48
17

6

97, 366
10, 753
11,313
7,516
8,000

3, 408

13, 768

3

2

63

172

27

5,319

27

177

26,187

176

1

26,117

70

27
133
51
51

7, 327
7,340
2,741
7,311

26
133
51
51

1

5.311
7, 340
2, 741
7.311

2,016

44
89

9,932
13,510

41
89

3

9,181
13,510

751

24
234

6,652
192, 625

24
213

21

6, 652
150, 221

42
11
96

4,170
1,491
22,484

42
11
96

391
508

20,123
66,842

382
508

2

7

19, 350
66,842

447

44,532

439

6

2

460
610
24

18,410
62,480
1,367

452
596
24

6
11

2
3

663
124
191

18,484
15, 336
41,479

654
124
190

5

4

216
117

4,850
15,213

214
117

5,319

42, 404

4,170
1,491
22,484

1
2

84

689

43, 702

720

110

16,519
59, 633
1,367

1,877
2, 483

14
364

18,077
15, 336
41,449

314

93

4, 781
15,213

30
69

35
T

able

1

W AGE CHANGES IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES DURING M ON TH
EN DIN G JUNE 15, 1933—Continued

Industry

Leather and its manufactures:
Boots and shoes......................
Leather........ ............ ................
Paper and printing:
Boxes, paper............... .............
Paper and p u lp _____________
Printing and publishing:
Book and jo b ...................
Newspapers and periodi­
cals................. ................
Chemicals and allied products:
Chemicals.............................. .
Cottonseed, oil, cake, and
m eal____ __________ _____ _
Druggists’ preparations_____
Explosives........ ...................... .
Fertilizers......... .......................
Paints and varnish.................
Petroleum refining.................
Rayon and allied p rod u cts..
R ubber products:
Rubber boots and shoes_____
R ubber goods, other than
boots, shoes, tires, and in­
ner tubes................................
Rubber tires and inner tubes.
Tobacco manufactures:
Chewing and smoking to­
bacco and snuff................... .
Cigars and cigarettes............. .

Number of establish­
ments reporting—

Number of employees
having—

Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
ing

Total
number
of em-

330
153

111,861
27.303

142

86,410
22,230

25,451
5,073

316

21,427
78, 527

315
377

21,280
75,774

147
1,520

1,233

764

43,403

759

42, 707

9

687

465

68,013

461

67,617

243

110

21,461

108

21,144

317

112
45
30
202
350
131
23

3,073
6,859
3,298
6,078
16,446
50,183
30.303
35,087

111
45
30
202
345
131
12

3,033
6,859
3,298
6,078
16, 275
50,183
18,159
15,087

40

Wage
No
inwage
changes

Wage N o wage Wage
Wage
de­
de­
in­
creases changes creases creases

8,965

153

167
12,144

8,965

45

20,022
51,826

43

19,415
51,428

32
205

10,155
42,870

32
204

10,155
42,790

607

80

Nonmanufacturing Industries
D a t a concerning wage-rate changes occurring between May 15 and
June 15, 1933, in 15 groups of nonmanufacturing industries are
presented in the following table.
No change in wage rates was reported in the anthracite mining
industry. Both increases and decreases were reported in 11 of the
remaining 14 industries over the month interval. The average per­
cents of increase reported were as follows: Dyeing and cleaning, 30.7
percent; canning and preserving, 24.9 percent; laundries, 20 percent;
quarrying and nonmetallic mining, 18 percent; wholesale trade, 12.6
percent; bituminous coal mining, 10.6 percent; metalliferous mining,
10.5 percent; banks, brokerage, insurance, and real estate, 9 percent;
hotels, 8.8 percent; retail trade, 6.6 percent; and electric-railroad and
motor-bus operation, 2.5 percent. The average percents of decrease
reported were as follows: Telephone and telegraph, 20 percent; crude
petroleum producing, 14.9 percent; hotels, 14.6 percent; laundries,
14.1 percent; quarrying and nonmetallic mining, 13 percent; power
and light, 12.2 percent; banks, brokerage, insurance, and real estate,
11.8; retail trade, 11.2 percent; wholesale trade, 10.2 percent; electricrailroad and motor-bus operation, 6.7 percent; and bituminous-coal
mining, 4 percent.




36
ABLE 2 — WAGE

CHANGES IN NON M AN UFACTU RIN G INDUSTRIES DURING
M ON TH ENDING JUNE 15, 1933

Industrial group

Anthracite m ining---------------- ----Percent of total_____________
Bituminous-coal mining_________
Percent of total ........................
Metalliferous mining____________
Percent of total_____________
Quarrying and nonmetallic m in­
ing----- ------------------------------------Percent of total_____________
Crude petroleum producing.........
Percent of total. .....................
Telephone and telegraph...............
Percent of total..................... ..
Power and light__ ______________
Percent of total_____________
Electric-railroad and motor-bus
operation and maintenance____
Percent of total--------------------Wholesale t r a d e .............. ...........
Percent of total_____________
Retail trade________ ____________
Percent of total.......... .............
Hotels__________________________
Percent of total_____________
Canning and preserving-------------Percent of total_____________
Laundries______________________
Percent of total_____________
Dyeing and cleaning.----------------Percent of total_____________
Banks, brokerage, insurance, and
real estate........................... .........
Percent of total.................. ......

Estab­
Total
lish­
number
ments
of
report­ em ploy­
ees
ing

Number of establish­
ments reporting—
No
Wage
Wage
in­
vag<
de­
changes creases creases

160
100.0
1,480
100.0
278
100.0

100.0
185, 709
100.0
21, 509
100.0

160
100.0
1,390
93.9
270
97.1

1,135
100.0
256
100.0
8,286
100.0
3,181
100.0

32,149
100.0
23,119
100.0
249,412
100.0
195, 665
100.0

1,116
98.3
252
98.4
8, 278
99.9
3,164
99.5

17
1.5

572
100.0
3, 025
100.0
17,879
100.0
2,656
100.0
818
100.0
945
100.0
337
100.0

133, 213
100.0
77, 536
100.0
363, 296
100.0
132,178
100.0
43,145
100.0
55,495
100.0
11,858
100.0

561
98.1

4,320
100.0

162,325
100.0

i Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




O

N umber of employees
having—
No
wage
changes

Wage
Wage
de­
in­
creases creases

1
0.1

53,984
100.0
166,829
89.8
20,820
96.8

2
0.2
4
1.6
8
0.1
17
0.5

31,802
98.9
22,945
99.2
249, 293
100.0
194, 519
99.4

336
1.0

99.1
17,843
99.8
2,644
99.5
813
99.4
942
99.7
335
99.4

1
0.2
14
0.5
6
0)
8
0.3
5
0.6
1
0.1
2
0.6

10
1.7
13
0.4
30
0.2
4
0.2

129,153
97.0
77,169
99.5
362,865
99.9
131, 792
99.7
42,830
99.3
55,460
99.9
11,827
99.7

916
0.7
243
0.3
164
0)
271
0.2
315
0.7
13
0)
31
0.3

4,277
99.0

27
0.6

16
0.4

160,796
99.1

1,094
0.7

6.0
8
2.9

2
0.2

18,804
10.1

76
0)

3.2
11
0)

174
0.8
119

(0
1,146
0.6
3,144
2.4
124
0.2
267
0.1
115
0.1
22
(0

435
0.3