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Serial No. R. 79
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
FRANCES PERKINS, Secretary

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
ISADOR LUBIN, Commissioner

TREND OF EMPLOYMENT
JANUARY 1934

By Industries:
Pa*c
Manufacturing Industries.............................................1-14
Non manufacturing In d u stries.................................... 14-19
Anthracite and Bituminous Coal Mining
Metalliferous Mining
Quarrying and Nonmetallic Mining
Crude Petroleum Producing
Public Utilities:
Telephone and Telegraph
Power and Light
Electric Railroads
Wholesale and Retail Trade
Hotels
Canning and Preserving
Laundries
Dyeing and Cleaning
Banks, Brokerage, Insurance, and Real Estate
Building Construction..................................................22-27
Public Works Projects................................................. 43-50
Public R o a d s ...............................................................50-51
Federal S e r v i c e .......................................................... 36-38
Class I Steam R ailroad s.............................................
38
By S t a t e s ............................................................................ 28-35
By C i t i e s ............................................................................
36
Average Hours and Average Hourly Earnings.................. 19-22
Wage C h a n g e s ................................................................... 39-42

Prepared by Division of Employment Statistics




LEWIS E. TALBERT, Chief

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1934

TREND OF EMPLOYMENT
January 1934
HE Bureau of Labor Statistics of the United States Department
of Labor presents herewith data compiled from pay-roll reports
supplied by representative establishments in 89 of the principal
manufacturing industries of the country and 16 nonmanufacturing
industries, covering the pay period ending nearest the 15th of the
month. Additional information is presented concerning employ­
ment on public-works projects, public roads, the Federal service, and
class I steam railroads.

T

Employment in Selected Manufacturing Industries in January
1934
Comparison of Employment and Pay-Roll Totals in January 1934 with December
1933 and January 1933

M PLOYM ENT in manufacturing industries decreased 1.1 per­
cent in January 1934 as compared with December 1933 and pay
rolls decreased 0.8 percent over the month interval. A comparison
of employment in January 1934 with January 1933 shows that the
employment index for January of the current year is 22.4 percent
above the January 1933 employment index, while a similar compari­
son of the January 1934 pay-roll index with the January 1933 pay-roll
index shows a gain of 38 percent in pay rolls over the year interval.
The index of employment in January 1934 was 69.3, as compared
with 70.1 in December 1933, 71.4 in November 1933, and 56.6 in
January 1933; the pay-roll index in January 1934 was 49.4, as com­
pared with 49.8 in December, 50.3 in November 1933, and 35.8 in
January 1933. The 12-month average for 1926 equals 100.
These changes in employment and pay rolls in January 1934 are
based on reports supplied by 17,808 establishments in 89 of the prin­
cipal manufacturing industries of the United States. These estab­
lishments reported 3,077,527 employees on their pay rolls during the

E




(1)

2
pay period ending nearest January 15, whose combined weekly earn­
ings were $55,611,536. The employment reports received from these
cooperating establishments cover approximately 50 percent of the
total wage earners in all manufacturing industries of the United States.
Decreases in employment between December and January have
been reported each year since 1923 with the exception of one year,
1925, in which a slight increase was reported, while pay-roll totals
have decreased each year over this 10-year interval. The average
change in employment in January over the 10-year period is a de­
crease of 1.4 percent and the average change in pay rolls over the
same interval is a decrease of 4.6 percent. The decline in employ­
ment, therefore, between December 1933 and January 1934 is less
than the average decline in the preceding 10 years and the current
decrease in pay rolls is much smaller than any decline reported in
January over the period 1923-1932.
This decline of 1.1 percent in factory employment indicates the
release of approximately 70,000 employees from gainful employment,
while the decrease of 0.8 percent in pay-roll totals is equivalent to a
decline of $883,000 in weekly disbursements in January 1934 as com­
pared with December 1933.
Comparing the index of employment in January 1934 (69.3) with
the index of employment in March 1933 (55.1), which was the low
point recorded in the Bureau’s indexes, it is seen that employment
has increased 25.8 percent over this 10-month interval. The January
pay-roll index (49.4) shows an increase of 47.9 percent in pay rolls,
compared with the March 1933 pay-roll index (33.4).
Twenty-six of the 89 manufacturing industries surveyed monthly
by the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported increased employment in
January as compared with December and 33 industries reported in­
creased pay rolls over the month interval. Four of the 14 groups into
which these manufacturing industries are classified showed gains in
employment between December 1933 and January 1934. The most
pronounced percentage increase over the month interval was in the
transportation equipment group, in which an increase of 16.5 percent
in employment was coupled with an increase of 21.4 percent in pay­
roll totals. The increases in employment and pay rolls in this group
were due entirely to the expansion in the automobile industry which
showed a gain of 21.5 percent in employment and 26.9 percent in pay
rolls between December and January. The remaining industries in
the transportation equipment group (shipbuilding, steam and electric
car building, locomotives, and aircraft) reported decreases in both
employment and pay rolls. The leather group, due chiefly to the
increase of 6.6 percent in employment in the boot and shoe industry,




3
reported a gain of 5.1 percent and the chemicals group reported an
increase in employment of 0.7 percent over the month interval. The
textile group showed an increase of 0.3 percent in employment over
the month interval, pronounced seasonal gains being shown in the
women’s clothing and millinery industries. The woolen and worsted
goods industry showed an increase of 2.4 percent and the cotton-goods
industry reported an increase of 0.9 percent. The increase in the
textile group was retarded to some extent by the effect of the hosiery
code authority’s order of December 18 curtailing hosiery-mill oper­
ations. This curtailment was reflected in the decrease of 5.2 percent
in employment and 19.7 percent in pay rolls in the knit-goods industry.
In the remaining 10 groups, the most pronounced percentage decline
in employment (12.4 percent) was shown in the tobacco-products
group. The lumber group, due to sharp decreases in the sawmill,
millwork, and furniture industries, showed a decrease of 8.3 percent
in the number of workers between December and January. Employ­
ment in the food group declined 5 percent over the month interval,
the beet sugar and confectionery industries reporting the usual large
declines at this season of the year. The iron and steel group reported
a falling-off of 4.2 percent in employment between December and
January, the largest percentage declines being reported in the plumb­
ers’ supplies, steam fittings, and stove industries. The iron and steel
industry reported a decrease of 2.9 percent. The stone-clay-glass
products group reported a decrease of 3.5 percent, the brick, marble,
and cement industries in this group reporting seasonal decreases.
The nonferrous metal group reported a decline of 3.2 percent and the
paper and printing group reported a loss of 2.2 percent in employment.
The decrease of 2.1 percent in employment in the rubber-products
group was due to a pronounced decline in the rubber boot and shoe
industry and smaller decreases in the rubber tire and other rubber
goods industries. The machinery group reported a decline of 1.9
percent in employment over the month interval, the most pronounced
decline in this group being shown in the radio and phonograph industry
(17.2 percent), while the textile machinery industry reported a de­
crease of 5 percent in employment. The agricultural implement in­
dustry continued its steady upward trend which began in June and
the machine-tool industry reported a gain of one tenth of 1 percent,
which, while small, continued the gains in employment which began
in May of last year. The railroad repair shop group reported a loss
of 1.2 percent.
Two industries reported more than 100 percent increase over the
year interval, the beverage industry, due largely to the legalization of
beer manufacturing, reporting an increase of 121.7 percent in employ­




4
ment and the radio industry reporting an increase of 114 percent.
Additional industries reporting unusually large percentage gains in
employment were as follows: Agricultural implements, 73; fertiliz­
ers, 69.3; machine tools, 65; iron and steel forgings, 62.9; glass,
56.9; typewriters and supplies, 56.4; engines, turbines, tractors, etc.,
55.1; and textile machinery, 51. Other large percentage gains in
industries of major importance were: Chemicals, 43.9; automobiles,
41.1; iron and steel, 39.9; foundry and machine-shop products, 39.7;
sawmills, 34.2; electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies, 29.5;
cotton goods, 29.3; and slaughtering and meat packing, 24.5. In the
six industries in which decreased employment over the year interval
was shown, the declines in employment were small, with the exception
of the men’s furnishing industry in which a decrease of 22.5 percent
was reported.
In table 1 are shown the number of identical establishments report­
ing in both December 1933 and January 1934 in the 89 manufacturing
industries surveyed, together with the total number of employees on
the pay rolls of these establishments during the pay period ending
nearest January 15, the amount of their earnings for 1 week in January,
the percentages of change over the month and year intervals, and the
indexes of employment and pay roll in January 1934.
The monthly percentages of change for each of the 89 separate in­
dustries are computed by direct comparison of the total number of
employees and of the amount of weekly pay roll reported in identical
establishments for the 2 months considered. The percentages of
change over the month interval in the several groups and in the total
of the 89 manufacturing industries are computed from the index num­
bers of these groups, which are obtained by weighting the index
numbers of the several industries in the groups by the number of
employees or wages paid in the industries. The percentages of change
over the year interval in the separate industries, in the groups, and
in the totals are computed from the index numbers of employment
and pay-roll totals.




5
T

1.—C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN M AN UFACTU RIN G
E S T A B L IS H M E N T S IN J A N U A R Y 1934 W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1933

able

Employment

Industry

Food and kindred prod­
ucts______________________
Baking.
Butter.
Confectionery....................
Flour.................... ...............
Ice cream............................
Slaughtering and meat
packing............................
Sugar, beet_______ _____ _
Sugar refining, cane______
Textiles a n d th eir p rod u cts.
F a b rics_________________
Carpets and rugs........
Cotton goods________
Cotton small wares...
Dyeing and finishing
textiles......................
Hats, fur-felt.......... .
Knit goods____ _____
Silk and rayon goods.
W oolen and worsted
goods____ _________
W ea rin g a p p arel_______
Clothing, men’s_____
Clothing, women’s . __
Corsets and allied gar­
ments_____ _______
M en’s furnishings___
M illin ery ................
Shirts and c o lla rs.....
I r o n a n d steel a n d th eir
p r o d u c ts , n o t in c lu d in g
m a c h i n e r y .______ _______
Bolts, nuts, washers,
and rivets............ .
Cast iron pipe.............
Cutlery (not includ­
ing silver and plated
cutlery) and edge
tools.................... ......
Forgings, iron and
steel......... .......... ......
Hardware................... .
Iron and steel_______
Plumbers’ supplies...
Steam and hot-water
heating apparatus
and steam fittings. .
Stoves.......................... .
Structural and orna­
mental m etalwork..
T in cans and other
tinware......................
Tools (not including
edge tools, machine
tools,
files, and
r
s)_
W irework.

Percent of

Index num­
bers January
1934 (average
1926=100)

Janu­
Decem­ ary
Em­
ber 1933 1933 to
p loy­
to Janu­ Janu­ ment
ary 1934 ary
1934

P ay­
roll
totals

2,987
964
388
277
287
402
347

373,252
64,416
23,043
4,222
32,409
16,894
8,912

- 5 .2
-1 .2
-(i)
-2 .4
-1 2 .5
+<
- 1 .3

+18.7 $5,786,582
+11.1 1,411,359
639,688
+121.7
83,496
+11.4
506, ~
+ .7
349,693
+14.7
223,574
+ 6 .5

- 4 .3
-1 .2
- 2 .3
-3 .7
-1 0 .5
+ 1.
-.4

+25.1
+11.8
+150.4
+ 1.1
+18.3
+14.1
+ 5 .3

93.4
85.9
140.
98.7
76.
94.3
65.

77.7
70.9
123.7
71.8
63.9
75.9

24Q
63
13
3,174
1,936
27
693
109

104,139
11, T "
7,891
704,124
586,343
16,405
301, 337
9,102

- 1 . 5 +24.5 2,234,:
176,121
+13.2
-5 0 .
161,328
- 3 .9 +10.0
+ .3 +14.8 9,896,169
+19.3 8,039,175
-.2
282,658
- 2 . 2 +36.9
+29.3 3,809,636
+140,047
+10.8
-1 .

-.3
-5 8 .8
-7 .0
+ 1 .4
-1 .5
+ 2 .9
+ 3 .3
+ 1 .2

+36.5
+ 8 .4
+ 1 .4
+36.3
+40.3
+85. ‘
+64.5
+28.1

105.2
129.5
79.0
79.9
86.5
70.1
96.7
84.2

91.6
72.3
57.0
57.5
64.8
50.1
79.6
65.1

440
243

5, 735
103.780
46,414

679,300
- . 7 +17.3
108,633
+ 4 .7 +11.9
-5 .2
+ 3 .8 1,295,820
646,582
+ 3 .2
+0)

-2 .4
+ 2 .9
-1 9 .7
+ .8

+22.7
+20.1
+10.3
+27.9

90.7
72.6
82.3
61.6

64.4
46.6
53.4
45.8

244
1,338
392
503

64,875
117.781
60,485
26,101

+ 2 .4 +21.7 1,076,499
+ 1 .6 + 1.7 1,856,994
937,725
+ . 3 + 8 .4
+ 9 .2 - 2 .8

+ 2 .1
+11.3
+ 9 .8
+18.9

+33.
+25.6
+ 37.7
+ 22.4

64.0
67.
61.

66.8
43.2
43.1
42.6

31
69
126
117

5,446
5,217
7,434
13,098

+ 8 .2 +14.1
-1 5 .4 -1 1 .2
+22.9 + 8 .5
-1 2 .4 + 37.4

95.
47.8
66.1
54.6

78.3
28.5
43.2
41.5

1,341

378,544

53
44

8,085
7,487

- 1 .5
-.7
- 9 .9 -2 2 .5
+10.6 + 1 .8
-1 3 .0 + 2 .2

82,422
59,812
136,719
153,722

+36.5 6,542,433

+81.0

66.9

40.9

- 4 . 9 +31.4
+ 7 .7 +39.3

138,113
108,547

- 4 . 2 +70.2
+ 1 .5 +74.0

78.7
37.6

52.6
22.8

195,207

-1 1 .2 + 38.8

71.0

49.0

+ 2 .7
+10.1
- 4 .3
-2 8 .

+116.3
+ 73.7
+ 98.6
+ 25.4

86.2
65.5
70.8
49.7

58.4
38.9
42.5
24.2

-1 6 .1 +40.1
-2 2 .4 + 64.9

35.4
55.8

23.4
30.5

- 4 .2

10,606

-7 .5

65
81
208
71

7,
30,250
232,110
5,773

+ 2.1
+13.0
- 2 .9
-2 4 .2

160

18,671
18,013

-19.2 +13.1
-17.9 +47.6

286,460

198

15,200

-2 .2

+26.8

261,421

+ 58.9

48.3

©.4

56

8,349

- 8 .5

+18.2

158,690

-1 2 .8 +21.6

80.0

8.4

114
71

8,448
7,624

+ .3
+ .7

+40.4
+46.3

153,857
142,832

83.4
123.9

54.6

i Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




Pay-roll totals

Estab­
lish­
Percent of
ments
change
report­
Am ount
ing in Number
of pay
both
on pay
roll (1
Janu­
Decem­
roll
week)
ber and January Decem­ ary
ber 1933 1933 to January
Janu­
1934 to Janu­ Janu­
1934
ary
ary 1934 ary
1934

+22.8

155,040
+62.9
514,339
+35.6
+39.9 3,989,163
79,698
+12.7

+ .2
+ .1

+65.5
+96.8

6
T

1 — C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G
E S T A B L IS H M E N T S IN J A N U A R Y 1934 W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1933—
Continued

able.

Employment

Industry

Machinery* not including
transportation
equip­
m e n t_____________________
Agricultural implements..
Cash registers, adding
machines, and calculat­
ing m ach in es...............
Electrical machinery, ap­
paratus, and supplies . . .
Engines, turbines, trac­
tors, and water wheels..
Foundry and machineshop products_________
M achine tools___ _______
Radios and phonographs Textile machinery and
parts____ ______________
Typewriters and supplies.
Nonferrous metals and
their products___________
Aluminum manufactures.
Brass, bronze, and copper
products----------------------Clocks and watches and
time-recording devices..
Jewelry....................... . __
Lighting equipm ent_____
Silverware and plated
ware................ ...............
Smelting and refining—
copper, lead, and zinc. -.
Stamped and enameled
ware____ ______________
Transportation
equip­
m e n t________ ____ _______
Aircraft_________________
Automobiles___________
Cars, electric-and-steam
railroad________________
Locom otives___________ _
Shipbuilding_________ . .
Railroad repair shops____
Electric railroad........ .........
Steam railroad___________
Lum ber and allied prod­
u c ts.____ _________________
Furniture_______________
Lumber:
M illwork____________
Sawmills____ ______
Turpentine and rosin____
Stone, clay, and glass prod­
ucts_______________________
Brick, tile, and terra cotta.
Cement........ .......................
Glass........... ............ ............
Marble, granite, slate, and
other products................
Pottery------------------ --------Leather and its m anufac­
tures______________________
Boots and shoes...... ..........
Leather__________________

1,739
77

323,477
11,251

Index num ­
bers January
1934 (average
1926 = 100)

i

Percent of
change
Amount
of pay
roll (1
Janu­
week) Decem­ ary
Em­
January ber 1933 1933 to
ploy­
1934
to Janu­ Janu­ ment
ary 1934 ary
1934

Pay­
roll
totals

- 1 .9 +42.6 $6,214,419
+7.4: +73.0
215, 729

- 2 .8 +66.8
+ 9 .0 +126. 5

61.9
47.4

+ 1 .0 +69.7

88.6

72.8

- 3 .9

+41.6

60.1

43.2

-.7

26

14, 729

+ 1 .6 +42.4

280

96,897

- 2 . 7 +29.5 1, 773, 361
+ .7

+55.1

371, 423

498, 514

41.7
42.8

88

22,950

1,015
154
34

110, 878
16,041
27, 725

53
12

10,339
12,667

32
23

99,506
5,936

214

37,229

-1 .6

+36.0

704, 794

25
121
51

8,363
7,043
3,302

-2 .2
- 6 .9
- 4 .5

+20.2
+14.8
+30.0

137,374
125,999
58, 683

58

8,519

- 4 .6

+32.7

157,507

-1 1 .1

+56.7

73.1

47.0

39

13, 264

- 1 .1

+41.9

249, 744

+ 4 .2 +46.7

83.3

54.0

101

15,850

-7 .0

+18.2

257,270

- 6 .7

+55.2

64.8

47.8

406
23
221

303, 726
7,642
254,587

+21.4 +47.8
-.5
+26.9
+ 2 6 . 9 + 51.6

68.4
259.9
72.8

229.8
53 .5

51
11
100
899
366
533

9, 718
2,489
29,290
88,285
18,830
69,455

-.9
-4 .2
- 4 .3
- 1 .2
-1 .2
- 1 .3

+34.4
167, 568
+40.9
47, 056
+18.8
638,179
+ 2 .1 2,011,944
-3 .5
477,777
+ 2 .8 1, 534,167

1,548
448

133,303
45, 598

- 8 .3
-8 .9

478
603
19

18,661
67, 581
1,463

-8 .2
-7 .8
- 9 .2

1,254
637
121
176

95,055
15, 635
9,495
48,055

- 3 .5 +33.9 1,593,933
- 8 . 7 +27.6
203,567
164, 507
+ 8 .7
- 2 .8
878, 710
+ 1.1 + 56.9

208
112

4,342
17,528

456
307
149

135,436
104,374
31,062

1 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




Pay-roll totals

Estab­
lish­
Percent of
ments
change
j
report­
ing in Number
both
on pay
Janu­
Decem­
roll
ber and January Decem ­ ary
ber 1933 1933 to
Janu­
1934 to Janu­ Janu­
ary
ary 1934 ary
1934

+74.5

61.9

42.4

1 +72.7
- 1 .2 +90.3
-2 5 .9 +99.3

58.1
52.3
123.9

36.1
37.3
83.5

218, 237
242,839

- 5 . 2 +81.1
- 5 . 5 +105.2

82.3
89.8

61.2
67.1

+30.7 1,782,885
+28.4
91, 514

- 5 .6 +52.8
-1 2 .9 +27.5

65.5
60.1

45.7
35.7

+67.9

66.1

45.5

-1 0 .2 +51.3
-1 4 .2 +23.9
-1 0 .5 +34.8

47.0
37.9
81.4

34.8
25.9
57.3

- . 3 +39.7 2,076,871
342, 591
+ .1 +65.0
474, 854
-1 7 .2 +114.0
- 5 .0
+ (0

- 3 .2
-3 .6

+51.0
+56.4

+16.5 +38.2 6,311,478
+42.3
188, 556
-0 )
+21.5 +41.1 5, 270,119

+•

- 1 .6

i

50.4

- 4 .7

+ 35.0

24.2

13.5

-3 .9
-2 .5

+ 3 9 .8

17.9

+27.9
+ 7 .8
-3 .4
+ 9 .0

77.2
49.1
63.3
48.0

11.6
58.6
38.6
51.1
3 7 .6

+26.8 1,765,258
+16.1
617,984

-1 1 .6 +49.1
-1 2 .1 +34.8

43.0
49.0

34.3
26.7

+14.1
+ 34.2
+39.8

-1 0 .3 + 27.2
-1 2 .7 +65.7
+ 3 .2 + 58.2

34.7
41.6
60.8

20.6
23.2
58.2

+44.3
+54.5
+19.3
+67.8

47.4
24.5
32.6
83.3

29.0
11.9
17.9
61.4

67,397
279,752

-2 2 .5 -1 8 .2
- 7 . 8 + 53.4

35.4
71.4

17.1
43.1

+ 5 .1 + 8 .1 2,326,273
+ 6 .6 + 3 .1 1,713,419
612,854
+ . 7 +29.1

+10.1 +37.1
+15.1 +33.7
- 1 . 2 +46.3

78.4
75.4
90. 5
|

58.0
53.6
73. 3

-1 0 .6 + 5 .4
- 3 . 8 +30.3

263, 294
863, 520
20, 460

- 5 .6
- 2 .3
-6 .0

- 4 .0
-4 .4
+ 1 .7
+ 1 .5

7
T

1.—C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN M A N U FA C TU RIN G
E S T A B L IS H M E N T IN J A N U A R Y 1934 W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1933—
Continued

able

Employment

Pay-roll totals

Estab­
lish­
Percent of
Percent of
ments
change
change
report­
Amount
ing in Number
of pay
both
on pay
roll (1
Janu­
Janu­
Decem­
roll
Decem­ ary
week)
ber and January Decem­ ary
ber 1933 1933 to January ber 1933 1933 to
Janu­
1934
1934
to Janu­ Janu­
to Janu­ Janu­
ary
ary 1934 ary
ary 1934 ary
1934
1934

Industry

Paper and printing...............
Boxes, pap er.................... .
Paper and pulp__________
Printing and publishing:
Book and jo b ........... .
Newspapers and peri­
odicals........... .
Chemicals and allied prod­
ucts............................. ............
Chemicals............... ........ . .
Cottonseed — oil, cake,
and m eal---------------------Druggists’ preparations-.Explosives— ----------------Fertilizers_______________
Paints and varnishes........
Petroleum refining-,____ R ayon and allied products
Soap------------------------------Rubber products_________
R ubber boots and shoes..
R ubber goods, other than
boots, shoes, tires, and
inner tubes____________
Rubber tires and inner
tubes---------------------------Tobacco m anufactures____
Chewing and smoking
tobacco and snuff______
Cigars and cigarettes_____
Total, 89 industries___

1,938
319
424

329,816
23,852
100,710

- 2 .2
- 5 .9
-.8

+13.2 $5,208,401
+16.9
406,834 .
+26.5 1, 778,621

- 3 .9
-7 .8
-.8

+10.8
+24.5
+35.3

744

46,836

-1 .6

+ 6.1 1,185,187

-2 .6

451

58,418

-2 .8

+ 7 .4 1,837,759

-5 .6

1,068
110

180,956
27,737

107
56
30
166
324
148
23
104
139
9

4,889
8,083
4,286
9,333
15,643
62,454
33,938
14,593
85,403
13,304

-1 0 .5
- 1 .1
-.4
+12.5
+ 4 .2
-.8
-.8
-1 .6
- 3 .1
-8 .6

92

17,828

-2 .0

38
227

54, 271
46,644

- . 5 +37.1 1,171,604
—12.4 - 2 .4
598,860

31
196

9,861
36, 783

+ 1 .8
-1 4 .7

17,808 3 ,077,527

- 1 .1

+ .7 +30.3 3,864,402
+ 1 .3 +43.9
645,539
+27.9
49, 612
+11.6
154,320
+ 35.6
87,475
+69.3
113,937
+26.1
322,092
+18.5 1,603,978
+27. 5
588,814
+11. 7
298,635
+33.1 1,708,499
+25.3
227,925
+30.4

-.8
- 2 .7

308,970

137,163
461, 697

+22.4 55,611,536

Index num­
bers January
1934 (average
1926=100)

Em ­
ploy­
ment

P ay­
roll
totals

88.5
78.7
91.3

69.0
64.0
60,9

+ 6 .1

76.1

61.1

+ 1 .8

104.3

84.1

- . 3 +29.4
+ .4 + 46.0

98.0
122.9

77.0
88.2

- 7 . 8 +32.3
- 2 . 2 f-10.6
-55.2
+ 2 .7
+ 12.3 -66.2
+ 4 .0 -34.6
-12.4
+ .1
-33.1
-5 .8
-.9
-13.5
-60.9
-.5
-1 3 .3
-54.6

46.8
82.5
102.9
84.5
80.2
73.6
190.3
105.2
82.8
64.4

43.8
80.2
72.3
54.0
61.8
59.9
164.4
87.4
58.9
54.9

+40.9

106.4

73.0

+ 2 .7 +74.3
-1 4 .6 +12.0

+ .3

78.7
60.9

54.9
45.8

+ 3 .3 + 2 .8
-1 7 .8 +14.1

89.3
57.3

76.3
42.1

69.3

49.4

-.8

+38.0

Per Capita Earnings in Manufacturing Industries
P e r capita weekly earnings in January 1934 for each of the 89
manufacturing industries surveyed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics
and for all industries combined, together with the percentages of
change in January 1934 as compared with December 1933 and Jan­
uary 1933 are shown in table 2.
These earnings must not be confused with full-time weekly rates
of wages. They are per capita weekly earnings, computed by dividing
the total amount of pay roll for the week by the total number of
employees (part-time as well as full-time workers).
42725—34------2




8
2 —P E R C A P IT A W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S IN
J A N U A R Y 1934 A N D C O M P A R IS O N W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1933

T a b le

Per capita
weekly
earnings in
January
1934

Industry

Food and kindred products:
Baking_____ ___ _______ _______________ __________ ___________
_ ________
____
Beverages___________ _______ __________
B u t te r _______________ _ _______________ ______ _____________
Confectionery_________________________________________ _______
Flour............................................................. ............. .................... .......
Ice cream____________________ _____ ___ __________ ____________
Slaughtering and meat packing ..... ___________
____
Sugar, beet_______________ ___________________ ______ __________
Sugar refining, cane________________ ______________ ___________
Textiles and their products:
Fabrics:
Carpets and rugs______________ _____________ _________ ___
Cotton goods. ___________ ______ _____ ___________ _______
Cotton small wares.____ ___________ _______________ ______
D y e in g and finishing textiles

............................... ..

Hats, fur-felt__________ _________ _____ ____ ______________
K n it goods ____

_____

.

...........................

Silk and rayon goods_ ________________________ ___________
_
W oolen and worsted goods_________________ _______________
Wearing apparel:
Clothing, men’s_____________ _______ ________ _____________
Clothing, wom en’s ___________ _____ ______________________
Corsets and allied garments_______________________ ____ ___
M en’s furnishings_______ _______________ ______________ ___
M illinery______________ __________________ _____________ _
Shirts and collars________ ____ ____ _______________ _______
Iron and steel and their products, not including machinery:
Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivets.— __ _____________ _______ ___
Cast-iron pipe................................. ....................................... ...............
Cutlery (not including silver and plated cutlery) and edge
tools_______________ _________________ _____ _________________
Forgings, iron and steel____ _________________ ________________ _
Hardware_____________________ ____________ _________________
Iron and steel__________________________ ______________________
Plumbers’ supplies_____ ______________________________________
Steam and hot-water heating apparatus and steam fittings.........
Stoves____________ _____ ______ ___________ ___________________
Structural and ornamental metalwork___________________ ______
Tin cans and other tinware___________ ______ _________________
Tools (not including edge tools, machine tools, files, and
saws)________________________________ ______ ________________
W ire work__________________ ____ _________ _________________
M achinery, not including transportation equipment:
Agricultural implements____ ___________ ______________ ______
_
Cash registers, adding machines, and calculating machines_____
Electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies__________ _______
Engines, turbines, tractors, and water wheels____ ______________
Foundry and machine-shop products____________ ______________
M achine tools____ _____________ _______________ ______ ________
Radios and phonographs............ ..................................... ............ .....
Textile machinery and parts.____ __________ __________ ________
Typewriters and supplies______ ____________________ ___________
Nonferrous metals and their products:
Aluminum manufactures___________________ ______ _ _____ ____
Brass, bronze, and copper products_____ ____ ___________ _____
Clocks and watches and time-recording devices__________ ______
Jewelry______________________________ ____ ______ _____________
Lighting equipment________________ _______ _________ _______
Silverware and plated ware____________________________________
Smelting and refining —copper, lead, and zinc.. _______________
Stamped and enameled ware____ _______________ _____________
Transportation equipment:
Aircraft_______________ _____ _______ _____ _____ ______________
Automobiles___________________________________________________
Cars, electric- and steam -railroad.___ ____ ___________________
Locom otives_____ ____ _________________________________ ____ _
Shipbuilding______________ _____________________ _____________
Railroad repair shops:
Electric railroad_____________ _ ____________________________ .
Steam railroad___________ ________ ________________ ____________
i N o change.




Percent of change,
Janury 1934 compared
with—
December
1933

January
1933

$21.91
27. 76
19.78
15.63
20.70
25.09
21.46
15.55
20.44

0)
-2 .3
- 1 .3
+ 2 .3
+ 1 .2
+ 1 .0
+ 1 .2
-1 6 .4
-3 .3

+ 0 .8
+13.1
-9 .5
+ 17 .6
-.2
—.7
+ 9 .5
-4 .5
-7 .5

17.23
12.64
15.39
17.56
18.94
12.49
13.93
16.59

+ 5 .1
+ 2 .3
+ 2 .9
—1.7
—1.7
-1 5 .2
+ .7
-.2

+35.4
+ 26 .5
+ 15.2
+ 4 .8
+ 7 .4
+ 6 .1
+ 23.5
+ 9 .5

15. 50
18.64
15.13
11.46
18.39
11.74

+ 9 .5
+ 8 .9
+ 9 .8
- 6 .1
+11.1
+ .7

+ 27 .0
+26.3
+ 15 .0
+ 14 .6
+ 6 .9
+ 34 .8

17.08
14.50

+ .8
-5 .7

+ 29.7
+ 25 .6

18.41
19.56
17.00
17.19
13.81
19.23
15.90
17.20
19.01

-4 .0
+ .6
- 2 .6
-1 .4
-5 .7
+ 3 .7
—5.4
-4 .4
-4 .7

+12.7
+32 .8
+27.7
+ 42 . a
+11.8
+ 24 .0
+11.7
+25.1
+ 2 .9

18. 21
18.73

—.2
—. 7

+ 18 .0
+ 34.2

19.17
25.22
18.30
21. 72
18.73
21.36
17.13
21.11
19.17

+ 1 .5
-.6
—1.3
—1.3
+ .4
—1.3
-1 0 .5
—.2
- 5 .5

+ 30.4
+ 19 .2
+ 9 .6
+ 12 .5
+ 23.9
+15.4
-7 .0
+ 19.7
+ 31 .2

-9 .6
-8 .2
—7. 7
- 6 .3
- 6 .8
+ 5 .4
+ .4

—.5
+ 23.3
+ 25.7
+ 7 .7
+ 3 .4
+ 18.3
+ 3 .9
+31.1

24. 67
20.70
17.24
18. 91
21.79

-.5
+ 4 .5
-3 .9
+ .4
+ 2 .0

-1 0 .8
+ 7 .6
+ .6
-.8
+ 7 .8

25.37
22.09

—1.2
-4 .7

15.42
18.93
16.43
17. 89
17. 77
18.49
18. 83
16.23

0)

0)

+ 5 .7

9
T

2 .—P E R C A P IT A W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S IN
J A N U A R Y 1934 A N D C O M P A R IS O N W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1933—
Continued

able

Industry

Lum ber and allied products:
Furniture___________________________________________ _______
Lumber:
M illwork________________________________________ _________
Sawmills_________ ____ ____ __________ _________ __________
Turpentine and rosin._____ ________ ________ ________ _______
Stone, clay, and glass products:
Brick, tile, and terra cotta ............ .............. . . . .
Cement..................... .......................................................... ..................
Glass___________________ ______________________________________
Marble, granite, slate, and other products............ .............. ............
Pottery____ ___________ ___________ ____ __________________ ___
Leather and its manufactures:
Boots and shoes_________________________________ ____ ________
Leather..................... ....... ............. ............. .................... ............ .........
Paper and printing:
Boxes, p a p e r __________________ __________________ ____________
Paper and pulp________________________________________________
Printing and publishing:
Book and job ______ ________________________________ _____ _
Newspapers and periodicals____ __________________________
Chemicals and allied products:
Chemicals____ __________________________ ______ _____ ________
Cottonseed—oil, cake, and meal_______________________________
Druggists’ preparations________ __________________ ____ _______
Explosives_____ __________________________ ____ _______________
Fertilizers______________ _______________ ____ _______________ _
Paints and varnishes_____ ____ _____ _____ ______________ ____
Petroleum refining____________________________ __________ _____
R ayon and allied products______________ ______ ______ _______
Soap______________ ____ ____________ _________________________
Rubber products:
Rubber boots and shoes____________________________ ________
Rubber goods, other than boots, shoes, tires, and inner tubes _ _.
Rubber tires and inner tubes____ _______________ ____________
Tobacco manufactures:
Chewing and smoking tobacco and snuff_______________________
Cigars and c ig a r e t t e s ____ ______________________ ____ _______
Average, 89 industries_______________________________________

Per capita
weekly
earnings in
January
1934

Percent of change, Janu­
ary 1934 c o m p a r e d
with—
December
1933

January
1933

$13.55

-3 .6

+16.4

14.11
12.78
13.98

- 2 .2
- 5 .3
+13.7

+ 11.6
+ 23.6
+ 13.2

13.02
17.33
18.29
15. 52
15.96

+ 4 .7
+ 4 .6
+. 5
-1 3 .3
- 4 .1

+20.6
+ 9 .3
+ 6 .8
-2 2 .2
+ 17.6

16.42
19. 73

+ 8 .0
-1 .8

+29.5
+13.7

17.06
17.66

-2 .0
+ .1

+ 6 .3
+ 7 .3

25.31
31.46

-1 .0
- 2 .8

+. 1
- 5 .3

23. 27
10.15
19.09
20.41
12.21
20.59
25.68
17.35
20.46

-.9
+ 3 .0
- 1 .1
+ 3.1
-.2
- .1
+ .9
—5.1
+ .7

+ 1 .9
+ 3 .8
-.7
+14.4
-1 .5
+ 6 .5
-5 .2
+ 4 .2
+ 1 .4

17.13
17.33
21. 59

- 5 .1
+ 2 .3
+ 3 .2

+23.3
+ 8 .0
+27.0

13.91
12.55

+ 1 .5
- 3 .7

+ 3 .6
+ 17.0

18. 07

2 + .4

2 +12. 6

2Weighted.

General Index Numbers of Employment and Pay-Roll Totals in Manufacturing
Industries
G e n e r a l index numbers of employment and pay-roll totals in
manufacturing industries by months, from January 1927 to January
1934, together with average indexes for each of the years from 1927
to 1933, are shown in table 3. In computing these general indexes,
the index numbers of each f f the separate industries are weighted
o
according to their relative importance in the total. Preceding this
table are two charts prepared from these general indexes showing the
course of employment and pay rolls from January 1926 to January
1934.




10
MANUFACTURING INDU STRIES.
MONTHLY INDEXES 1926 - 1933




MONTHLY

AVERAGE.

192.6*100.

11
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES.
MONTHLY INDEXES 1926-1933.
MONTHLY AVERAOL

1 9 2 ,6 = 1 0 0 .

PAY-ROLL TOTALS.

105

' l93L‘i

--------

\

•>*4
.*/ .
, ' j r ^ 192.7

1 00

105

v n
\

.• \ *•
\

/

\
\

ij

/
V

\

/I9Z 6

95

V

/
+ S \

*
----\

'|928

\

/

90 V

100

'

\

-*•—

\/

/

\
\

95
\

\

/

V

'
\

90

/i 9 3 0

V
\

85

65

\
\

\

60

60

75

\

75
v .— —
/
/
/

1331
j
1

70

A
/

65

\
V

\

\
\

/

\
\
\

to

"v—•
„

60
s.
\

55

55

\
V ..

50

im

45

1
I

40
\

1533

1

1

.

35

JAW

FEB.




MAY

JUNE JULY

AUG.

1
SEPT. OCT.

R1 35
NOV.

DEC.

12
T

able

3 —G E N E R A L IN D E X E S OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN M A N U F A C ­
T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S , J A N U A R Y 1927 TO J A N U A R Y 1934
[12-month average, 1926=100]

Employment

Pay rolls

1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934
January.............
February..........
M arch...............
A pril..................
M a y ...................
June...................
J u ly-..................
August....... .
September........
O ctober. ...........
N ovem ber........
December..........
A vera g e____

97.3
99.0
99.5
98.6
97.6
97.0
95.0
95.1
95.8
95.3
93.5
92.6

91.6
93.0
93.7
93.3
93.0
93.1
92.2
93.6
95.0
95.9
95.4
95.5

95.2
97.4
98.6
99.1
99. 2
98.8
98.2
98.6
99.3
98.4
95.0
92.3

90.7
90.9
90.5
89.9
88.6
86.5
82.7
81.0
80.9
79.9
77.9
76.6

74.6
75.3
75.9
75.7
75.2
73.4
71.7
71.2
70.9
68.9
67.1
66.7

64.8
65.6
64.5
62.2
59.7
57.5
55.2
56.0
58.5
59.9
59.4
58.3

56.6
57.5
55.1
56.0
58.7
62.8
67.3
71.5
73.9
74.0
71.4
70.1

1927

1928 1929

69.3 94.9 89.6 94.5
____ 100.6 93.9 101.8
____ 102.0 95.2 103.9
____ 100.8 93.8 104.6
99.8 94.1 104.8
____
97.4 94.2 102.8
____
93.0 91.2 98.2
95.0 94.2 102.1
94.1 95.4 102.6
95.2 99.0 102.4
91.6 96.1 95.4
93.2 97.7 92.4

96.4 93.8 97.5 84.7 72.3 60.1 64.6 . . . . .

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934
88.1
91.3
91.6
90.7
88.6
85.2
77.0
75.0
75.4
74.0
69.6
68.8

63.7
68.1
69.6
68.5
67.7
63.8
60.3
59.7
56.7
55.3
52.5
52.2

48.6
49.6
48.2
44.7
42.5
39.3
36.2
36.3
38.1
39.9
38.6
37.7

35.8 49.4
36.4
33.4
34.9
38.9
43.1
46.5
51.9
53.3
53.6
50.3
49.8

96.5 94.5 100.5 81.3 61.5 41.6 44.0 . . . . .

Time Worked in Manufacturing Industries, January 1934
H e p o r t s as to working time in January were received from 14,395
establishments in 89 manufacturing industries. Of these establish­
ments 3 percent were idle, 71 percent operated on a full-time basis,
and 26 percent worked on a part-time schedule.
An average of 93 percent of full-time operation in January was
shown by reports received from all the operating establishments
included in table 4. The establishments working part time in
January averaged 75 percent of full-time operation.




13
T a b le

4 —P R O P O R T IO N OF F U L L T IM E W O R K E D IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S
B Y E S T A B L IS H M E N T S R E P O R T IN G IN J A N U A R Y 1934

Percent of
Establishments establishments
reporting
operating—
Industry
Total
num­
ber

Food and kindred products . . .............................
B a k i n g .. ..- ....................... - ................... - .......... Beverages...... ..................................... .....................
Butter---------------- ------------------- -----------------------Confectionery........................................................ Flour_____ _____________________ _____ ______
Ice cream---------- --------------------------------------------Slaughtering and meat packing------- --------------Sugar refining, cane-------------- ------------------------Textiles and their products............ .................Fabrics:
Carpets and rugs----------------- --------------------Cotton goods____________________________
Cotton small wares--------------- ------------------Dyeing and finishing textiles-------------- -----Hats, fur-felt..........- ............ ...........................
Knit goods------ ---------- -----------------------------Silk and rayon g o o d s ____________________
W oolen and worsted goods-------- ------------. .
Wearing apparel:
Clothing, men’s---------------------------------------Clothing, women’s-----------------------------------Corsets and allied garments______________
M en’s furnishings----------------------------- ------M illinery________________________________
Shirts and collars.............. ..............................
Iron and steel and their products, not in­
cluding m achinery______________
_________
Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivets______________
Cast-iron pipe------- --------- ------- . - ------------------Cutlery (not including silver and plated cut­
lery) and edge tools............................................
Forgings, iron and steel______________________
H ard w are___________________________________
Iron and steel. ----------------- ------------------- ---------Plumbers’ supplies____________ ____ ________
Steam and hot-water heating apparatus and
steam fittings.............................. ........................
Stoves------- ------- ------------------------------------ --------Structural and ornamental metalwork____
Tin cans and other tinware_________________
Tools (not including edge tools, machine tools,
files, and saws)........................... .........................
Wire work____________________________________
Machinery, not including transportation
equipm ent___________________________________
Agricultural implements---------------------------- __
Cash registers, adding machines, and calculat­
ing machines_______________ :__ _______ __
Electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies.
Engines, turbines, tractors, and water wheels..
Foundry and machine-shop products..............
Machine tools________________________________
Radios and phonographs_____________ _______
Textile machinery and parts...............................
Typewriters and supplies______ _____________
Nonferrous metals and their products_______
Aluminum manufactures.................................. .
Brass, bronze, and copper products___________
Clocks and watches and time-recording devices.
Jewelry............................................ ........................
Lighting equipment....... ......................................
Silverware and plated ware__________________
Smelting and refining—copper, lead, and zin c..
Stamped and enameled w a r e .................. ..........
Transportation equipm ent___________________
Aircraft.................................................. ..................
Automobiles............................................. .............
Cars, electric- and steam-railroad_____________
Locom otives___________ ______ _____ _
Shipbuilding............................................................
* Less than one half of 1 percent.




Per­
cent
idle

Full
time

Part
time

Average percent of
full time reported
b y—
All op­
erating
estab­
lish­
ments

Estab­
lish­
ments
operating
part time

9
5

84
83
69
82
86
91
79
96
93
55
69

16
16
30
17
13
9
19
3
7
36
27

97
98
94
96
97
97
95
99
99
91
91

81
86
79
79
80
69
77
82
80
78
68

21
593
101
132
24
378
216
224

10
1
5
1
4
4
3
2

67
67
72
74
38
44
90
90

24
31
23
25
58
52
7
8

92
89
93
94
84
80
97
97

68
66
73
77
74
62
64
69

274
342
23
49
85
82

9
11

74
72
35
61
44
76

17
17
65
31
54
16

94
93
87
90
95
94

69
63
ou
71
90
63

61
57
27

36
43
55

90
90
84

73
77
11
76

61
75
42
63
50

36
25
58
26
48

90
94
82
92
82

74
Iu
R
Q
oi#
72
64

2,534
848
319
206
256
372
254
210
58
11
2; 544

1
0)
0)
0)

1
1
2
1

8
2
9
3

1,080
37
33

18

105
40
73
155
56

3
11
2

80
146
165
49

1
2
2

59
67
64
78

40
31
35
22

86
92
94
94

66
74
84
71

91
50

2

57
66

41
34

89
91

73
74

1,478
57

1
2

67
81

33
18

92
96

75
79

68
61
60
64
84
66
83
86
60
29
62
71
38
61
54
75
82
77
76
84
53
17
79

32
39
39
35
16
34
17
14
40
71
38
29
61
39
46
25
17
20
19
14
43
83
17

93
94
90
90
96
95
96
98
91 I
79
91 <
94
87
89
88
93
96
96
97
98
87
76
97

78
84
75
72
72
83
76
88
76
70
77
79
78
7l
75
73
77
79
86
82
70

19
246
70
869
139
29
42
7
530
21
184
21
98
38
50
28
90
316
21
159
40
6
90

1
1

0)

1

1
3
5
1
5
4

85

14
T a b le

4 .—P R O P O R T IO N OF F U L L T IM E W O R K E D IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S
B Y E S T A B L IS H M E N T S R E P O R T IN G IN J A N U A R Y 1934— Continued
Percent of
Establishments
establishments
reporting
operating—
Industry
Total
num­
ber

Railroad repair sh o p s._____ ___________ _______
Electric railroad . .
Steam railroad____ _______________ __________
Lum ber and allied products.. . . ........... . . . .
Furniture............ .......... . ............ ............ ..........
Lumber:
M illw ork_____________ _____ ______ _____
Sawmills_______________ ____ ____________
Turpentine and rosin . . .
Stone, clay, and glass products_______________
Brick, tile, and terra cotta..................... ..............
Cement.....................................................................
Glass___ ________________ _______________ ___
Marble, granite, slate, and other products____
Pottery________ _______ _
__ ____ _______
Leather and its m anufactures________________
Boots and shoes___ __________________________
________________________
Leather________ .
Paper and printing- ____ .
____ __________
Boxes, paper____________ . . . _______________
Paper and p ulp _________
-. . . ____
Printing and publishing:
Book and jo b ____________________ _______
Newspapers and periodicals............. . _
Chemicals and allied p ro d u c ts ____ ________
C h e m ic a l s ..................... .
. ... _ _
_
Cottonseed—oil, oake, and m e a l..................... .
Druggists’ preparations.. ______ _____ ____
Explosives______________________ ______ _____
Fertilizers.............................. . ...........................
Paints and v a rn ish es .____
Petroleum refining........................................ .......
Rayon and allied products...... .............. ..............
Soap ____
.
___
Rubber products_________ ____________________
Rubber boots and shoes_____________ _______ _
Rubber goods, other than boots, shoes, tires,
and inner tubes............................................ .......
Rubber tires and inner tubes________ _______
Tobacco m anufactures____________ . . . ______
Chewing and smoking tobacco and snuff_____
Cigars and cigarettes_____ _________ _________

680
274
406
1,321
380

82
22
203
28
175

Total, 89 industries______ _______________

14, 395

416
510
15
738
245
95
150
162
86
350
215
135
1,684
270
359
663
392
826
69
79
34
15
148
284
103
13
81
111
7

Per­
cent
idle

Full
time

All op­
erating
estab­
lish­
ments

Estab­
lish­
ments
operating
part time

50
93
21
65
73

50
7
78
33
25

90
98
85
91
93

81
79
81
74
75

59
64
67
60
47
85
88
27
81
82
77
90
82
71
62

39
33
33
23
27
7
9
43
13
15'
19
9
17
29
36

89
91
92
92
90
99
98
80
94
96
94
98
96
93
90

73
74
77
71
73
87
77
68
55
72
69
82
76
77
74

91
94
78
99
71
85
20
96
62
88
100
86
50
100

9
6
20
1
20
15
80
3
38
10

98
99
96
99
92
97
89
99
92
99
100
97
88
100

73
87
79
60
64
80
86
69
80
90

11
7
11

51
27
57
75
54

49
73
32
18
34

89
80
89
95
88

73
<0
73
70

3

71

26

93

75

C)
1
1
2
2
2
3
17
26
7
3
30
6
3
4
1
1
0)

Part
time

Average percent of
full time reported
b y—

2

0)
1
9
1
2

14
50

82
76

i Less than one half of 1 percent.

Employment in Nonmanufacturing Industries in January 1934

S IX of the 15 nonmanufacturing industries surveyed monthly by
the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported increased employment in
January 1934 as compared with December 1933, and 6 industries
reported increased pay rolls. Data for the building-construction
industry are not presented here but are shown in more detail under
the section “ Building construction.”
The gains were not in identical industries in every instance, the
power and light industry reporting a small gain in employment com­
bined with a slight decline in earnings, and the banks, brokerage,
insurance, and real estate group reporting a very small decrease in
employment coupled with slightly increased pay rolls. The most




15
pronounced gains in both employment and pay rolls over the month
interval were in the anthracite-mining industry. Employment in this
industry increased 17.6 percent and pay rolls increased 65.2 percent,
reflecting sharply increased production over the month interval. The
gain of 5 percent in the hotel industry was due to the combined effect
of several factors, i.e., N.R.A. codes, repeal of national prohibition,
and the opening of winter resort hotels. The telephone and telegraph
industry reported an increase of 1.1 percent in employment and the
gains in the remaining three industries reporting increased employment
(bituminous-coal mining, power and light, and laundries) were five
tenths of 1 percent or less. The most pronounced declines in employ­
ment and pay rolls between December and January (19.7 percent and
14.3 percent, respectively), were shown in the retail-trade group.
This seasonal decline reflects to a large extent the release from employ­
ment of those workers temporarily employed for Christmas trade.
The group composed of department, variety, and general merchandise
stores and mail-order houses, showed a decrease of 27.2 percent in
employment between December and January. Retail food stores
surveyed by the Bureau showed a decrease of 1.7 percent in employ­
ment over the month interval. The remaining decreases which were
of considerable size were shown in the canning industry (12.9 percent)
and the quarrying and nonmetallic-mining industry (12.5 percent),
The declines in these industries were seasonal, canning activities
normally decreasing to a low level in January and operations in
quarrying being greatly affected by weather conditions. The dyeing
and cleaning industry reported a decline of 3.4 percent and the
metalliferous-mining and the crude-petroleum-producing industries
reported decreases in employment of 2.5 and 2.4 percent, respectively,
The declines in employment in the remaining groups were slig h twholesale trade, 1.1 percent; electric-railroad and motor-bus operation
and maintenance, five tenths of 1 percent; and banks, brokerage*
insurance, and real estate, one tenth of 1 percent.
Thirteen of the 15 nonmanufacturing industries appearing im
the following table reported increased employment and pay rolls
between January 1933 and January 1934, crude-petroleum producing*
canning and preserving, metalliferous mining, and anthracite mining
reporting the largest percentage gains in employment over the year
interval. Laundries reported no change in employment and an
increase in pay rolls. The remaining two industries (electric-railroad
and motor-bus operation and maintenance and telephone and tele­
graph) reported decreases in employment and pay roll over the
12-month period.

42725— 34-------3




16
In the following table are presented employment and pay-roll data
for the nonmanufacturing industries surveyed, exclusive of building
construction.
T

^ —C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN N O N M A N U F A C T U R 193? E S T A B L IS H M E N T S IN J A N U A R Y 1934 W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y

able

Em ploym ent

Industrial group

Pay-roll totals

Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
Percent of
Percent of
ing in
change
change
both
Decem­ Num ber
A mount
ber 1933
on
D ecem ­ Janu­ of pay roll D ecem ­ Janu­
and
(1 week)
pay roll
ber
ary
ber
ary
Janu­ January
1933 to 1933 to January 1933 to 1933 to
ary 1934 1934
1934
Janu­ Janu­
Janu­ Janu­
ary
ary
ary
ary
1934
1934
1934
1934

Coal mining:
Anthracite..........................
160
Bituminous........................ 1,508
Metalliferous mining..............
283
Quarrying and nonmetallic
1,144
m ining....................................
Crude-petroleum producing254
Public utilities:
Telephone and telegraph. 8,244
Power and light................ 3,098
E le c tr ic -ra ilr o a d a n d
motor-bus o p e r a t io n
503
and maintenance..........
Trade:
2,993
W holesale.........................
R etail.................................. 18,609
Hotels (cash payments on ly )1 2,294
771
Canning and preserving____
Laundries.................................. 1,240
334
Dyeing and cleaning...............
Banks, brokerage, insurance,
and real estate....................... 4,469

89,077
231,175
25,903
26,217
27,750
252,032
205,570
129,599
85,182
415,461
114,014
36.914
64,529
9,455
175,943

Index num­
bers, January
1934 (average
1929=100)

Em­
ploy­
ment

Pay­
roll
totals

+17.6 +22.1 $2,963,992
+ .5
+ 8 .6 4,025,325
- 2 . 5 + 22.2
537,363

+ 65.2 +69.4
+ .9 +42.1
- 2 . 9 +40.3

64.1
75.8
39.6

73.2
51.3
25.4

-1 2 .5 +13.1
- 2 . 4 + 28.0

-1 2 .6 +17.7
- . 4 +32.8

39.7
73.2

21.3
53.0

70.2
82.2

69.0
73.8

368,224
768,647

+ 1 .1
+ .5

- 5 .9
+ 5 .8

6,711,915
5,811,933

+ 1 .8
-.9

-3 .8
+ 1.1

-.5

-.1

3,476,739

-.6

+ 9 .4
- 1 .1
-1 9 .7 +10.0
+ 5 .0 +10.4
-1 2 .9 +26.4
+ .2
(*)
-3 .4
+ 1 .1
* -.1

3+1 .7

-2 .8

70.5

59.2

2,220,315
8,321,385
1,406,405
470,664
957,027
163,719

-.9
+ 3 .6
-1 4 .3
+ 9 .7
+ 5 .7 + 9 .2
- 9 . 3 +42.7
+ 1 .0 + 1 .7
- 1 .1
+ 6 .0

82.4
84.6
81.5
43.1
75.4
73.8

63.9
68.8
60.8
35.4
58.9
49.4

5,858,980

8+ . 8 3+3.4

3 99.2

*88.1

i The additional value of board, room, and tips cannot be com puted.
* N o change.
» Weighted.

Per capita weekly earnings in January 1934 for 15 nonmanufactur­
ing industries included in the Bureau’s monthly trend-of-employment
survey, together with the percentages of change in January 1934 as
compared with December 1933 and January 1933, are given in the
table following. These earnings must not be confused with full-time
weekly rates of wages; they are per capita weekly earnings computed
by dividing the total amount of pay roll for the week by the total
number of employees (part-time as well as full-time workers).




17
T

2 .—P E R C A P IT A W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S IN 15 N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S
IN J A N U A R Y 1934 A N D C O M P A R IS O N W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1933

able

Industrial group

Per capita
weekly
earnings in
January
1934

Percent of change Jan­
uary 1934 compared
with—
December
1933

Coal mining:
Anthracite_____________________________________________________
$33.27
+40.5
+ .4
17.41
Bituminous___________________________________________________
-.4
Metalliferous m in in g ________________________________ ______ ___________
20.75
—.1
Quarrying and nonmetallic m ining________________________________
14.05
Crude-petroleum producing___ - ___________________________________
+ 2 .0
27.70
P ublic utilities:
+ .8
Telephone and telegraph_____________________ ________________
26.63
Power and light_______________________________________________
28.27
—1.5
-.1
26.83
Electric-railroad and motor-bus operation and maintenance........
Trade:
+ .2
Wholesale_____________________________________________________
26.07
Retail.................................................................. ....................................
20.03
+ 6 .7
12.34
Hotels (cash payments o n ly ) 1__________________ __________________
+ .7
Canning and preserving________________________ __________________
12.75
+ 4 .2
Laundries__________________________________________________ ____
14.83
+ .7
D yeing and cleaning_______________________________________________
+ 2 .4
17.32
Banks, brokerage, insurance, and real estate a + .9
_______________________
33.30

January
1933

+ 38.8
+30.9
+14.7
+ 4 .1
+ 3 .7
+ 2 .3
-4 .5
- 2 .7
-5 .4
- .2
—1.2
+12.9
+ 1 .7
+ 4 .9
a + 1 .6

i The additional value of board, room , and tips cannot be computed.
* Weighted.

Indexes of Employment and Pay-Roll Totals for Nonmanufacturing Industries
I n d e x numbers of employment and pay-roll totals for 15 nonmanu­
facturing industries are presented in table 3. These index numbers
show the variation in employment and pay rolls by months, from
January 1931 to January 1934, in all nonmanufacturing industries
except the banks, brokerage, insurance, and real estate group, for
which information for 1931 is not available. The Bureau has, how­
ever, secured data concerning employment and pay rolls for the index
base year, 1929, from establishments in this group and has computed
index numbers for those months for which data are available from the
Bureau’s files. These indexes are shown in the table.




18
OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S F O R N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G
IN D U S T R IE S , J A N U A R Y T O D E C E M B E R 1931, 1932, A N D 1933, A N D J A N U A R Y 1934

T a b l e 3 .— IN D E X E S

[12-month average, 1929=100]
Anthracite mining
M onth

Employment

Pay rolls

Bituminous-coal mining
Employment

Pay rolls

1931 1932 1933 1934 1931 1932 1933 1934 1931 1932 1933 1934 1931 1932 1933 1934
January.................
February..............
M arch...................
A pril......................
M a y ____________
June.......................
Ju ly....... ................
August..................
September............
O ctober................
N ovem ber............
December.............
Average—

90.6
89.5
82.0
85.2
80.3
76.1
65.1
67.3
80.0
86.8
83.5
79.8

76.2
71.2
73.7
70.1
66.9
53.0
44.5
49.2
55.8
63.9
62.7
62.3

52.5 64.1 89.3 61.5 43. 2 73.2 93.9 80.8 69.8 75.8 73.3
58.7
91.5 77.4 69.3
68.3
101.9 57.3 56.8
54.6
71.3 61.2 48.8
88.8 75.2 67.6
65.2
75.2 72.0 37.4
58.6
51.6
85.9 65.5 63.7
54.4
43.2
76.1 58.0 30.0
82.4 62.6 61.2
39.5 ------- 66.7 37.4 34.3 ------- 78.4 60.5 61.3 ........ 52.4
76.4 58.6 63.2
50.4
43.8
53.7 34.5 38.2
56.4 41.4 46. 6
50.6
77.0 59.4 68.6
47.7
80.4 62.4 71.8
56.8 : : : : : 64.9 47.0 60.7
53.6
56.9
91.1 66.7 61.6 : : : : : 81.3 67.0 68.0
56.2
81.1 69.4 74.8 .......... 54.6
61.0
79.5 51.0 47.8
78.4 56.2 44.3
81.2 70.0 75.4
52.3
54.5

Average___

68.3
65.3
63.5
63.9
62.4
60.0
56.2
55.8
55.5
53.8
52.8
51.2

49.3
46.9
45.0
43.3
38.3
32.2
29.5
28.6
29.3
30.5
31.9
33.3

Quarrying and nonmetallic mining

32.4 39.6 55.0 29.7 18.1 25.4 64.4 48.9 35.1 39.7 50.4 30.2 18.1 21.3
31.5
54.6 27.8 17.8
54.4 29.6 17.4
66.6 47.4 34.8
58.2 28.7 17.8
52.8 26.5 17.4
30.0
70.0 46.0 35.1
29.4
51.4 25.0 16.4
76.1 48.6 39.3
62.6 30.0 20.2
62.3 32.3 23.8
49.3 23.8 17.0
75.0 50.6 43.4
30.0
60.1 30.0 27.5
31.5
46.1 20.1 18.3
72.3 49.5 47.3
71.0 49.5 49.5
57.3 29.1 28.4
33.0
41.3 16.9 19.0
40.2 16.5 21.9 ........ 68.9 51.1 51.6
55.1 29.7 29.9
36.8
66.6 52.4 52.6 : : : : : 51.2 30.5 29.3
38.9
40.0 17.0 23.9
40.7
37.4 18.0 25.9
64.5 52.4 53.2
48.7 30.1 31.2
43.3 27.1 28.3
40.6 ____ 35.1 18.7 25.6
59.3 49.4 51.1
36.9 22.1 24.4
40.6
34.3 18.7 26.2
53.9 42.3 45.3

59.1 36.5 34.6 ........ 44.8 21.6 20.6 ........ 67.4 49.0 44.9 ........ 53.4 29.1 24.7 ........
Crude-petroleum producing

January.................
F ebruary.............
M arch...................
A pril____________
M a y ......................
June____________
July.......................
August....... ..........
September............
October.................
N ovem ber............
December...........
Average___

74.8
73.2
72.2
69.8
67.8
65.0
65.3
62.4
61.2
60.4
57.6
58.2

54.9
54.4
51.4
54.9
54.5
54.2
55.4
57.4
56.2
56.8
56.5
57.2

_______

F e b ru a ry -...........
M arch...................
A pril......................
M a y .......................
June
__ _____
July
.
August..................
September............
O ctober................
N ovem ber............
December.............

65.7 55.3 62.2 ........ 61.7 44.1 44.1

Average___

99.2
97.8
96.7
97.1
97.6
97.2
96.7
95.9
94.7
92.7
91.3
90.3

89.3
87.2
85.5
84.8
84.0
83.2
82.3
81.5
81.0
79.9
79.1
78.4

Telephone and telegraph

57.2 73.2 71.5 46.5 39.9 53.0 90.5 83.0 74.6 70.2
89.2 82.0 73.9
70.0 46.9 41.7
57.0
73.2 43.2 42.5
88.6 81.7 73.2
56.5
66.3 44.5 40.1
88.1 81.2 72.3
56.8
56.9 ........ 64.7 47.1 41.6 ........ 87.4 80.6 70.1 ------86.9 79.9 69.2
62.7 44.8 40.6
58.0
59.2 44.6 42.2
86.6 79.1 68.5
59.5
56.3 42.9 42.5
85.9 78.1 68.1
60.8
85.0 77.4 68.3
66.2 : : : : : 55.2 41.9 44.4
54.4 42.5 50.1 : : : : : 84.1 76.2 68.7
70.6
52.0 42.4 50.3
83.5 75.5 68.9 ____
72.2
83.1 74.8 69.4
54.9 41.7 53.2
75.0

Power and light
Jfl.nna.ry

36.1 51.3
37.2
30.7
26.6
26.9
29.2 ........
33.6
43.3
44.1
44.1
50.7 ........
50.8

80.5 62.5 51.7 ........ 75.4 53.7 45.8 ........ 83.2 67.4 67.9 ........ 57.5 35.6 37.8 ........
Metalliferous mining

January .
February..............
M arch...................
A pril......................
M a y ____________
June____________
J u l y . . ...................
August..................
September............
October.................
N ovem ber............
December.............

47.0
47.0
46.8
33.9
30.7
27.3
24.4
26.4
30.2
37.8
38.0
37.7

77.7 82.2 98.6 88.4 73.0 73.8
99.7 86.0 71.6
77.4
102.4 85.4 71.9
76.9
97.6 82.4 69.4
76.9
98.7 84.2 69.9
76.9
98.3 80.5 69.9
77.3
97.4 78.7 70.0
77.5
96.2 76.7 70.9
78.1
94.3 74.7 71.8
80.3
93.2 74.4 76.2 : : : : :
82.2
82.6 .......... 93.3 73.2 74.5
91.2 73.2 74.4
81.8

96.3
94.8
97.9
95.0
94.1
95.0
93.3
92.3
92.1
91.6
89.7
92.7

89.1
89.6
88.2
83.4
82.8
82.1
79.6
79.1
75.9
75.7
74.3
73.5

71.7 69.0
71.9
71.6
67.8
68.5 ........
66.6
66.7
66.1
64.6
67.0 : : : : :
67.7
67.7

86.6 79.1 70.4 ........ 93.7 81.1 68.2 ........
Electric-railroad and motor-bus operation
and maintenance *
86.9
86.6
86.4
86.8
85.9
85.3
85.6
84.8
84.0
82.7
81.5
79.9

79.5
78.9
77.6
78.0
76.9
76.5
75.6
74.1
73.5
72.3
71.8
71.4

70.6 70.5 85.6 75.4 60.9 59.2
87.1 74.8 60.6
70.4
88.1 73.6 59.4
69.8
86.6 71.8 58.1
69.5
85.1 72.2 58.2
69.1
84.8 70.2 58.0
69.3
83.3 66.4 57.4
69.4
81.9 63.8 58.2
69.5
81.2 62.5 57.8 ........
69.7
79.0 61.5 59.8
70.6
71.0 ........ 79.7 61.7 59.4
70.8
77.8 61.9 59.6

95.6 83.0 78.8 ........ 96.7 79.8 72.0 ........ 84.7 75.5 70.0 ........ 83.4 68.0 58.9 ........

i N ot including electric-railroad-car building and repairing; see transportation equipment and railroad
repair-shop groups, manufacturing industries, table 1.




19
T

3 .—IN D E X E S OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S F O R N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G
IN D U S T R IE S , J A N U A R Y T O D E C E M B E R 1931, 1932, A N D 1933, A N D J A N U A R Y 1934—
Continued

able

Retail trade

Wholesale trade
M onth

Em ploym ent

Pay rolls

Em ploym ent

Pay rolls

1931 1932 1933 1934 1931 1932 1933 1934 1931 1932 1933 1934 1931 1932 1933 1934
82.4 87.5 74.1
____ 88.4 72.5
89.1 71.3
85.2 68.9
84 7 69.7
84 1 66.2
83 3 64.7
82.1 63.2
____ 81.4 63.1
____ 79.9 63.9
____ 79.7 63.3
------- 77.8 62.6
------- 83.6 67.0

89.5
88.2
87.4
87.4
87.1
87.1
86 8
86.5
86.1
85.2
84.1
83.7
86.6

81.8
80.9
79.8
78.9
77.9
77.0
76.6
76.4
77.1
77.8
77.6
77.0
78.2

75.3
74.1
73.1
73.3
74.0
75.7
76 9
79.7
82.1
83.5
83.4
83.3
77.9

January.................
February________
M arch...................
April_______ ____
M a y ____________
June.......................
July.......................
August...................
September______
October_________
Novem ber............
December.............

95.0
96.8
96.8
95.9
92.5
91.6
93.3
92.8
90.6
87.4
84.9
83.1

83.2
84.3
84.0
82.7
80.1
78.0
78.4
77.6
77.0
75.4
74.3
73.2

73.8 81.5 91.0 73.9 55.7 60.8 48.9 35.0 34.1 43.1
93 7 73.9 55.9
48.3 37.1 35.1
73.8
72.4
93.4 72.4 53.5
53.0 36.3 33.2
89.9 69.6 51.7 ____ 59.6 47.0 49.2 ____
71.9
87 7 67.0 51.8
56.0 40.5 45.5
71.9
85.4 63.8 52.3
70.6 55.5 55.6
73.6
85.2 61.8 53.3
102.2 73.0 76.6
75.6
83.8 59.6 54.0
142.9 99.0 112.7
77.1
78.7 ____ 81.9 59.1 55.6 ____ 180.1 125.3 175:6 ____
79.7 58.6 56.2
77.0
108.1 81.1 26.3
75.8
77.1 57.5 55.2
60.8 50.5 69.3
77.6 ------- 75.4 56.6 57.6 ........ 40.7 33.7 49.4 ........

61.7
58.6
57.1
56.0
57.4
57.3
59.1
60.8
62.3
66.0
64.1
64.5
60.4

63.9 90.0 84.3 76.9
____ 87.1 80.5 73.4
____ 87.8 81.4 71.4
90.1 81.6 78.6
89.9 80.9 77.0
89.1 79.4 78.3
83.9 74.6 74.6
81.8 72.6 78.1
____ 86.6 77.8 86.0
____ 89.8 81.3 89.6
____ 90.9 81.7 91.6
_____ 106.2 95.2 105.4
........ 89.4 80.9 81.7

84.6 89.4
86.7
87.5
88.3
88.0
87.6
83.3
80.3
____ 83.5
____ 84.6
____ 85.4
........ 94.1
........ 86.6

January.................
February..............
M arch...................
A pril— .................
M a y ____________
June ,
.... _ _
July_______ _____
August--------------September............
October. ...............
N ovem ber............
December.............
Average___

Hotels

Average___

78.0
73.7
73.4
72.7
71.1
68.2
63.3
60.7
64.6
67.1
66.9
73.6
69.4

62.7 68.8
58.4
55.1
60.4
59.5
60.5
58.1
62.7
69.2
72.3
72.6
80.3 ........
64.3

Canning and preserving
46.1
48.6
50.3
57.1
56.0
58.6
74.2
104.7
129.4
77.6
48.1
36.9

31.8
32.7
31.9
37.9
36.0
40.5
47.5
65.6
75.1
51.8
34.4
25.6

24.8 35.4
25.9
24.2
33.5 ____ _
31.8
36.7
46.2
68.3
127.0
87.1
50.8
39.0 ........

91.7 79.0 74.9 ------- 85.4 64.5 54.4 ........ 80.9 59.5 71.9 ------- 65.6 42.6 49.6 ........
Laundries

January................
February_______
M arch...................
A p ril.....................
M a y ......................
June____________
July_____________
August....... ..........
September............
October.................
N ovem ber............
December— ------Average___

____

90.5
90.0
89.5
90.5
90.3
91.0
91.8
90.2
89.3
88.1
86.2
85.3
89.4

84.7
82.9
82.0
82.0
81.4
81.0
80.3
78.9
78.6
77.5
76.2
75.9

75.4 75.4
74.4 ____
73.0 ____
73.4 ____
73.5
76.0 ____
76.3 ____
77.9 ____
79.3 ____
78.0 ____
75.3 ____
75.2 ------80.1 75.6 -------

86.6
85.6
85.6
86.8
86.5
87.1
87.4
84.6
84.1
81.8
78.9
77.4
84.4

Dyeing and cleaning
76.4
73.3
71.6
71.4
70.6
68.6
66.3
63.9
62.9
61.2
59.1
58.7
67.0

57.9
55.5
52.9
54.0
54.5
56.7
56.1
57.6
60.6
59.7
57.9
58.3
56.8

58.9
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
-------------

88.9
87.4
88.0
95.7
96.7
99.0
98.6
93.5
95.3
94.2
90.1
84.9
92.7

82.1
80.5
80.6
83.3
84.5
85.1
82.4
79.5
83.3
82.3
78.0
75.2
81.4

73.0
70.9
71.2
81.1
82.0
85.6
82.9
83.1
88.6
88.4
82.4
76.3
80.5

73.8
____
____
____

77.7
75.1
75.6
86.3
86.6
____ 89.1
____ 86.2
____ 80.0
____ 82.6
____ 81.4
____ 74.7
------- 67.9
------- 80.3

65.8
62.2
61.7
65.9
67.3
65.8
60.0
56.3
61.0
58.8
52.3
48.4
60.5

46.6
42.4
41.0
54.6
53.9
56.7
52.8
52.8
60.3
60.6
55.4
50.0
52.3

49.4
____
____
____
____
____
____

........

Banks, brokerage insurance, and real estate
Januarv
February_____________________________________ _____________
M arch_____________________ ____ _______ ___________________
April_______ _____________ ______ _______ ____ ______________
M a y ________________________________________________________
June__________ ____ ____________________ ____ ______________
July_______________________ __________________ _____________
August______________________________________________________
September________ _______ _________________________________
October_____________________________________________________
Novem ber................... ................... ............ ......................................
December_______ ____________ ____ _________________________
Average___ ______ ____________________________________

98.3
98.3
98.9
98.6
98.0
97.9
98.4
98.5
98.4
98.6
98.0
98.0
98.3

97.5 99.2
96.8
96.5
96.2
96.2
97.3
97.7
98.3
99.0
99.4
99.6
99.3
97.8

93.5
93.0
92.9
92.1
92.7
90.0
89.8
88.2
87.1
86.3
85.7
85.5
89.7

85.2 88.1
84.3
83.7
82.9
83.2
84.4
84.8
84.4
84.5
84.7
86.1
87.4
84.6

Average Man-Hours Worked and Average Hourly Earnings

I N THE following tables the Bureau presents a tabulation of
man-hours worked per week and average hourly earnings based on
reports supplied by identical establishments in December 1933 and
January 1934 in 15 industrial groups and 78 separate manufacturing
industries. Man-hour data for the building-construction group and




20

for the insurance, real estate, banking, and brokerage group are not
available, and data for several of the 89 manufacturing industries
surveyed monthly are omitted from these tables due to lack of
adequate information.
The total number of establishments supplying man-hour data in
these 15 industrial groups represents approximately 50 percent of the
establishments supplying monthly employment data.
The tabulations are based on reports supplying actual man-hours
worked and do not include nominal man-hour totals, obtained b y
multiplying the total number of employees in the establishment b y
the plant operating time.
Table 1 shows the average hours worked per employee per week
and average hourly earnings in 15 industrial groups and for all groups
combined. The average hours per week and average hourly earnings
for the combined total of the 15 industrial groups are weighted aver­
ages, wherein the average man-hours and average hourly earnings in
each industrial group are multiplied by the total number of employees
in the group in the current month and the sum of these products
divided by the total number of employees in the combined 15 indus­
trial groups. The average man-hours and hourly earnings for the
combined 89 manufacturing industries have been weighted in the
same manner as the averages for all industrial groups combined
(table 1).
In presenting information for the separate manufacturing industries
shown in table 2, data are published for only those industries in
which the available man-hour information covers 20 percent or more
of the total number of employees in the industry at the present time.
T

1 . —A V E R A G E H O U R S W O R K E D P E R W E E K P E R E M P L O Y E E A N D A V E R A G E
H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S IN 15 IN D U S T R IA L G R O U P S , IN J A N U A R Y 1934 A N D P E R C E N T
OF C H A N G E F R O M D E C E M B E R 1933

able

Average hours per
week
Industrial group
January
1934

Manufacturing__________________________________________ ______
Coal mining:
Anthracite__________________________________ _____________
Bitum inous_______________________________________________
Metalliferous mining____ ____________________________ _________
Quarrying and nonmetallic mining_________ ______ ____________
____________________ _______________
Crude-petroleum producing
Public utilities:
Telephone and telegraph__________________________________
Power and light___________________________________________
Electric-railroad and motor-bus operation and maintenance.
Trade:
Wholesale_________________________________________________
R e ta il____________________________________________________
Hotels _______________________________________________________
Canning and preserving_______________________________________
Laundries ___________________________________________________
Dyeing and cleaning___________________________________ _______
Average_________________________________________________




Average hourly
earnings

Percent of
Percent o t
change
change
from D e­ January from D e­
1934
cember
cember
1933
1933

33.7

-0 .9

Cents
53.3

+0.9*

39.5
30.3
38.7
30.8
36.5

+32.6
+ 2 .0
—1.3
-1 .9
+ 3 .7

85.0
58.9
53.5
45.6
76.9

+ 6 .1
-.5
+ .8
+ .2
—.5

37.6
38.9
45.0

+ .5
-9 .3
-.2

71.6
72.5
59.1

+• 1
+ 8 .4
+ .2

41.5
40.7
48.9
32.9
38.6
39.2

—.5
-4 .7
—1.8
+. 6
+ 1.3
-.3
- 1 .9

61.9
51.1
24.6
40.2
37.9
45.1

+ .7
+12.1
+ 4 .2
+ 1 .8
—.8
+ 2 .7
+ 3 . 9*

37.0

53.9

21

Per capita weekly earnings, computed by multiplying the average
man-hours worked per week by the average hourly earnings, are not
identical with the per capita weekly earnings appearing elsewhere in
this trend-of-employment compilation, which are obtained by divid­
ing the total weekly earnings in all establishments reporting by the
total number of employees in those establishments. As already
noted, the basic information upon which the average weekly manhours and average hourly earnings are computed covers approximately
50 percent of the establishments reporting monthly employment data.

,

2 —A V E R A G E H O U R S W O R K E D F O R W E E K P E R E M P L O Y E E A N D A V E R A G E
H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S IN S E L E C T E D M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S , IN J A N U A R Y
1934 A N D P E R C E N T OF C H A N G E F R O M D E C E M B E R 1933

T a b le

Average hours per
week
Industry
January
1934

F ood and kindred products:
...........
■Raking
.
. T
_ _
Beverages_______ _________________________________________
Confectionery______________________________________ _____
Flour.................................................................................................
Ice cream........ ..................... .......... .............. .................................
Slaughtering and meat packing____________________________
Sugar, beet-.................. .......... ........................................................
Sugar refining, cane...... ...............................................................
Textiles and their products:
Fabrics:
Carpets and rugs.....................................................................
Cotton goods___________________ ______________________
Cotton small wares___________________________________
Dyeing and finishing textiles_______________ ;__________
Knit goods____________________________________________
Silk and rayon goods_________________________________
Woolen and worsted goods_________________________
Iron and steel and their products, not including machinery:
Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivets___________________________
Cast-iron pipe______ ______________________________________
Cutlery (not including silver and plated cutlery) and edge
tools______________________ _____________________ ____ _
_
Forgings, iron and steel___________________________________
Hardware___________________ ______________ _________
__
Iron and steel............... ..................................................................
Plumbers’ supplies................................................................. .......
Steam and hot-water heating apparatus and steam fittings—
Stoves__________________________________________ _____ __
Structural and ornamental metal work............... .....................
T in cans and other tin w a re--.................... ................................
Tools (not including edge tools, machine tools, files, and
saws) .............................................................................................
Wire work................ .............................................. ......................
Machinery, not including transportation equipment:
Agricultural implements................................... ..........................
Cash registers, adding machines, and calculating machines..
Electrical machinery, apparatus, and supplies......... ..............
Engines, turbines, tractors, and water wheels.........................
Foundry and machine-shop products........................................
Machine tools.................................................................................
Radios and phonographs___________________ ___________ __
Textile machinery and parts........ ........................ .....................
Typewriters and supplies............ ................................................
Nonferrous metals and their products:
A lu m in u m manufactures__________________ _______________
Brass, bronze, and copper products............ .............................
Clocks and watches and time-recording devices____________
Jewelry.............................................................................. .............
Lighting equipment_______________________________________
Silverware and plated ware............ .............................................
Smelting and refining—copper, lead, and zinc_____ ________
Stamped and enameled ware.......................................................
1 N o change.




Average hourly
earnings

Percent
Percent
of change January of change
from D e­
from D e­
1934
cember
cember
1933
1933

40.8
37.2
37. 2
38.7
40.9
40.9
35.3
34.1

+ 0 .5
—2.4
+ 1 .1
+ 1 .6
- 1 .9
+ 1 .7
—28.1
-2 .8

Cents
50.8
74.5
40.7
50.5
62.9
52.5
49.7
58.5

+ 0 .2
—2.0
+ 1 .0
—1.4
+ 1 .1
+ .2
+21.2
+ 1 .6

32.3
34.1
34.8
33.3
27.9
31.0
33.8

+3. 5
+ 2 .4
+ 1 .8
—5.4
—18.4
0)
—. 6

49.7
37.4
45.0
52. 5
46.3
44.2
49.1

+ 1 .0
+ .3
+ .9
+ .8
+ 2 .0
+ 1 .1
+ 1 .2

32.6
30.7

-2 .7
-7 . 5

51.4
47.2

+ 2 .8
+. 4

36. 2
34. 7
33.1
29.4
26.8
34.0
30.5
31.1
34.3

—3. 5
+. 6
—3.2
- 2 .3
—3.9
+ 3 .0
—3.8
- 4 .3
—8.0

52.7
56.8
52.9
58.5
50.5
56.4
52.2
55.5
55.4

+ 1 .0
—. 5
—4
0)
—2.9
+ 1 .3
+ .2
—.4
+ 5 .7

35.3
37.9

+ .6
+ 7 .4

50.9
56.6

—.6
+ 5 .8

36.4
39.2
31.5
36.2
33.4
37.0
30.3
36.9
38.3

+ 1.1
-1 .5
(0
- 1 .1
+ .9
—.5
—2. 6
+ .8
—5.9

53.1
65.0
57.0
60.1
56.8
57.9
54.1
61. 7
50. 5

+ .6
+ .2
—.9
—.2
—.4
+ .2
+ 1 .9
—1.6
+ .6

31.5
35.4
35.8
31. 5
35.9
36.6
36.7
33.7

—8.7
0)
-6 .5
—15.1
—6. 5
—8. 0
+ 8 .3

48.2
53.5
45.8
52.0
51.5
50.3
50.6
48.1

+ 3 .4
+ 2 .0
—1.9
+ 1 .8
+ .2
+ 1 .0
—1.7
+ .4

0)

22
T a b l e 2L— A V E R A G E H O U R S W O R K E D F O R W E E K P E R E M P L O Y E E A N D A V E R A G E

h o u r l y e a r n i n g s i n s e l e c t e d m a n u f a c t u r in g i n d u s t r i e s , i n J a n u a r y
1934 A N D P E R C E N T O F C H A N G E F R O M D E C E M B E R 1933—Continued

Average hours per
week
Industry

Transportation equipment:
Aircraft___________________________________________________
Autom obiles___________________________________________ _
_
Cars, electric- and steam-railroad ________________________
Locom otives
________________________ __________________
Shipbuilding , ..................................
,
.... - -Railroad repair shops:
Electric railroad___________________________________________
Steam railroad___________________________ ____ ____________
Lum ber and allied products:
Furniture. _______________________________________________
Lumber:
M illw ork_____________________________________________
Sawmills______________________________________________
Stone, clay, and glass products:
Brick, tile, and terra cotta_________________________________
Cement_______________________________________________ ____
Glass______________________________________________'_______
Marble, granite, slate, and other products_________________
Pottery___________________________________________________
Leather and its manufactures:
Leather____ _______________________________________________
Paper and printing:
Boxes, p a p e r _____________________________________________
Paper and p ulp___________________________________________
Printing and publishing:
Book and jo b __________________________________- _______
Newspapers and periodicals___________________________
Chemicals and allied products:
Chemicals
___________________________________________
Cottonseed—oil, cake, and meal___________________________
Druggists’ preparations
_____________________________ - __
Explosives
______________________ _____________
Fertilizers___ _______________________________- ____ - _______
Paints and varnishes______________________________________
Petroleum r e f i n i n g __________________________________________ _
R ayon and allied products________________________________
Soap
- - ________________________________
R ubber products:
R ubber goods, other than boots, shoes, tires, and inner tubes.
Rubber tires and inner tubes
____________ - _______
T obacco manufactures:
Chewing and smoking tobacco and snuff__________________
Cigars and cigarettes______________________________________




Average hourly
earnings

Percent
Percent
January of change January of change
from D e­
from D e­
1934
1934
cember
cember
1933
1933

39.5
32.4
32.2
32.1
30.1

—0.3
+ 5 .5
-3 .0
+ .9
—3. 5

Cents
65.4
63.1
56.8
60.0
69.6

43.6
36.3

—1.1
-3 .7

58.2
61.4

30.3

- 7 .9

44.6

+ 2 .5

32.7
31.8

-3 .5
-3 .9

44.0
42.3

+ 2 .3
—.2

30.7
31.4
33.8
29.8
33.7

+ 1 .0
+ 7 .9
- .9
-6 .0
-1 0 .8

42.4
55.7
52.3
60.3
47.8

+ 3 .2
—1.1
+ .4
(0
+ 6 .2

37.1

-2 .4

52.3

+ .6

34.4
35.3

- 5 .0
0)

49.6
49.8

+ 2 .3
—.2

36.3
37.1

-.5
—1.6

71.0
82.6

- .3
—.6

39.2
41.8
37.3
34.1
33.3
37.8
35.5
36.0
38.4

-1 .3
+ 1 .7
-2 .4
+ 1 .8
+ .3
-.8
—.6
—5.0
+ 1 .1

60.0
25.1
48.7
61.0
36.1
53.8
69.3
48.3
52.9

+ .2
—.4
+ 3 .4
+ 1 .0
+ .6
+ .6
+ .6
+ .2
+ .8

33.9
30.3

- 2 .6
+ 1 .7

51.6
71.9

+ 4 .9
—.4

36.3
35.4

+ 4 .0
- 4 .6

37.5
36.3

—2.1
+ .6

+ 1 .4
-.6
-2 .2
+. 5
+ 8.1
(0
0)

23
Employment in Building Construction in January 1934

I N January 1934, as compared with December 1933, the percentages
of increase or decrease in employment, pay rolls, and man-hours
in building construction were as follows:
Percent

Total employment__________________________________
Total pay rolls______________________________________
Total man-hours worked___________________________
Average weekly earnings___________________________
Average hours per week per man__________________
Average hourly earnings____________________________

— 12. 6
— 9. 3
—

8.0

+3. 7
+3. 7
+1. 2

The table following is based on returns made by 11,142 firms
engaged on public and private building-construction projects not
aided by public-works funds. These reports include all trades, from
excavation through painting and interior decoration, which do their
share of work in erecting, altering, or repairing buildings. Work
on roads, bridges, docks, etc., is omitted. The reports cover build­
ing operations in various localities in 34 States and the District of
Columbia.
The 11,142 firms employed 62,144 workers in January as compared
to 71,114 workers in December, and had a total pay roll of $1,365,907
in January as compared with $1,506,686 in December. The average
weekly earnings for the January group amounted to $21.98 as com­
pared to $21.19 for the December group of workers. These are
per capita weekly earnings, computed by dividing the total amount
of the weekly pay roll by the total number of employees—part time
as well as full time.
Of the 11,142 cooperating firms, 7,471 firms, or 67.1 percent, re­
ported the man-hours worked by their employees, namely, 816,125
in January as compared with 886,670 in December.
The average hours per week per man were computed by dividing
the total number of man-hours by the total number of workers
employed by the 7,471 firms which reported the man-hours. The
average hourly earnings were computed by dividing the total pay roll
of the 7,471 firms which reported man-hours, by the man-hours.

42725— 34-------4




E M P A O Y M E N T , P A Y R O LLS , A V E R A G E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S, A V E R A G E H OU RS P E R W E E K P E R M A N , A N D A V E R A G E H O U R L Y E A R N IN G S IN
T H E BU ILD IN G - CONSTR U CTIO N INDU STR Y IN J A N U A R Y 1934, A N D P E R C E N T A G E S OF C H A N G E F R O M D E C E M B E R 1933

Employment

Locality

Num ­
ber of
firms Num ­
report­ ber on
ing
pay
roll
Janu­
ary 1934

Average weekly
earnings

Pay rolls

Per­
cent of
change
from
Decem­
ber 1933

Amount
January
1934

Average hours
per week per
man 1

Per­
Per­
cent of
cent of Num ­
change Amount change
ber
January
from
from
Janu­
1934
Decem­
Decem­ ary 1934
ber 1933
ber 1933

Average hourly
earnings 1

Per­
Per­
cent of Amount cent of
change January change
from
from
1934
Decem­
Decem­
ber 1933
ber 1933

11,142

62,144

-1 2 .6

$1,365,907

- 9 .3

$21.98

+ 3 .7

27.9

+ 3 .7

Cents
77.5

+ 1 .2

75

254

-1 1 .5

3,487

- 4 .6

13.73

+ 7 .8

25.1

+ 3 .7

53.0

+ 3.7

23
25
15

1,172
484
336

+ 4 .0
-2 6 .9
- 3 .7

23,113
15,385
7,364

+. 6
+11.8
- 3 .2

19.72
31.79
21.92

- 3 .3
+52.9
+ .5

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

The S tate.....................

63

1,992

- 6 .8

45,862

+ 3 .4

23.02

+11.0

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

Colorado: D enver__________
Connecticut:
Bridgeport........................
Hartford. ______ ________
New H aven_____ ______

224

612

- 8 .1

11,865

- 9 .8

19.39

- 1 .9

25.1

+ .8

78.4

- 3 .7

126
252
178

325
686
668

-1 9 .0
-1 6 .3
-1 3 .9

7,176
15,000
16,424

-1 1 .1
- 9 .1
+ 5 .9

22.08
21.87
24.59

+ 9 .7
+ 8 .6
+23.0

26.6
30.8
32.6

(4
)
+ 7.3
+25.9

81.6
68.3
75.1

+10.6
+ 1.9
-.1

The State____________

556

1,679

-1 5 .9

38,600

- 3 .7

22.99

+14.5

30.8

+13.4

73.3

+ 2 .7

115
482

617
5,463

+ ,5
- 5 .7

10,890
159,276

+ .3
+ 5 .4

17.65
29.16

-.2
+11.8

28.6
31.9

+ 3 .2
+34.4

61.9
90.7

- 4 .2
+ 1.5

57
85

208
664

-5 9 .9
-2 3 .2

4, 019
13,250

-5 4 .0
-2 1 .1

19.32
19.95

+14.7
+ 2 .7

27.9
27.4

-1 2 .0
- 6 .5

67.7
70.8

+12.8
+10.6

The State____________

142

872

-3 7 .0

17,269

- 3 2 .4

19.80

+ 7.3

27.5

- 8 .0

70.0

+11.3

Georgia: Atlanta___________
Illinois:
Chicago 2...... .....................
Other localities 2
...............

174

900

-1 2 .9

14,379

-1 4 .0

15.98

- 1 .3

27.2

+ 8 .8

55.2

-1 0 .4

137
97
234

1,684
1,268
2,952

+16.8
-3 5 .5
-1 3 .4

34,442
34, 251

+ 8.1
-3 3 .6

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

-1 7 .7

- 7 .5
+ 2.9
- 5 .0

(3
)
(3
)

68,693

20.45
27.01
23.27

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

All localities.................
Alabama: Birmingham.........
California:
Los Angeles 2...... ..............
San Francisco-Oakland 2.
Other localities2
—...........

Delaware: W ilm ington_____
District of Columbia........ .
Florida:
Jacksonville_____ _____ _
M iam i................................

The State.......................




(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

to

Indiana:
Evansville....... ............ .......
Fort W ayne_____________
Indianapolis_____________
South B end ______ ____

-2 3 .4

1,371

-17.1

26,656

-14.0

19. 44

+ 3 .7

27.3

-.5

70.4

+ 3 .8

Iowa: Des Moines___________
Kansas: W ichita____ _______
Kentucky: Louisville..............
Louisiana: New Orleans.........
Maine: Portland_____ _____ _
M aryland: Baltimore 2______
Massachusetts: All localities 2.

249
171
773
533
285
1,279
3, 559

-14.4
+. 6
-18.3
-12.8
- 1 .0
-12.1

5,071
2,639
13,733
9,381
5,956
23,688
84,093

-1 1 .6
- 2 .9
- 8 .8
-1 3 .8
- 7 .7
+10.2

20.37
15.43
17.77
17.60
20.90
18.52
23.63

+ 3.3
- 3 .4
+ 1 .4
+ 5 .5
+ 5 .9
+11.4
+ 6 .2

27.1
24.9
30.6
27.4
28.3
(3
)
(3
)

- 1 .8
-.4
+ 1.3
+ .4
-.4
(3
)
(3
)

76.3
64.8
56.0
62.1
71.6
(3
)
(3)

+ 5 .4
-.9
- 1 .8
+ 6.3
+ 5 .3
(3
)
(3
)

Michigan:
Detroit_______
F lint_________
Grand Rapids.

2,659
130
222

-24.2
-23.1
-27.2

57,581
1,880
3,837

-22.0
-31.0
-12.2

21.66

+ 2 .9
-1 0 .2
+20.6

32.1
20.4
25.1

+11.5
-1 3 .9
+ 4.1

69.0
71.6
67.7

-.1
+10.0
+15.1

The State_____________

+ 1 .9
-1 0 .3
-

2 1 .0

-

10.0

-

10.2

- 5 .5
-1 9 .3
- 6 .9

The State.

3,011

-2 4 .4

63,298

199
934
804

-32.8
-20.6
-3 .4

3,069
19,092
20,420

-2 0 .2
-1 3 .8
+16.7

The State.

1,937

-1 5 .9

42,581

1,151
2,502

-17.0
-12.8

3,653

14.46
17.28

-2 1 .8

Minnesota:
D uluth_____
Minneapolis.
St. Paul____

14. 57
20.06
19.27
23.43

-1 1 .9
+ 5 .4
+ 2 .2
+21.5

21.2
29.2
27.0
30.3

-5 .0
- 1 .4
+ 7 .4
+ 2 .3

2,361
5,617
14,296
4,382

162
742
187

+ 3 .4

66.6
68.9
69.5
77.2

+ 1 .2

+10.0

The State.
Nebraska: Omaha.

15.42
20.44
25.40

+18.7
+ 8 .5
+20.8

25.8
26.6
30.5

+15. 2
+ 9.9
+10.9

68.5
78.4
83.2

-7 .4
+ 1 .3
+12.4

-2 .1

21.9

+16.4

28.2

+11.3

80.0

+ 5 .5

22,510
64,614

-25.5
-18.6

19.56
25.82

-1 0 .2
-6 .7

23.0
25.4

-1 0 .9
- 3 .1

87.1
103.3

+ .6
- 2 .1

-14.2

87,124

-2 0 .5

23.85

- 7 .3

24.6

- 5 .7

18.6

-1 .0

-14.2

Missouri:
Kansas C it y 5
St. Louis........

13,089

-1 0 .8

23.50

+3.S

2.1

+ 6 .3

74.5

-.4

-.7
-1 4 .1

137,972
105,954

+. 4
-12.8

29. 77
22.60

+ 1 .2
+ 1 .6

(3)
(3
)

New York:
New York City 2.
Other localities 2_.

4,634

The State.

9,322

- 7 .9

243,926

- 5 .8

26.17

+ 2 .4

(3
)

300

+13.2

4,656

+ 9 .2

15.52

- 3 .5

26.7

North Carolina; Charlotte_______________________________ _________ _______ _




- 1 0 .5
+ 3 .5
- 4 .6
+17.9

1 Averages computed from reports furnished b y 7,471 firms.
2 Data supplied b y cooperating State bureaus.
3 N ot available.

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

(3
)

- 5 .3

4 N o change.
5 Includes both Kansas City, M o., and Kansas City, Kan.

58.5

+ 7 .3

E M P L O Y M E N T , P A Y R O LLS, A V E R A G E W E E K L Y E A R N IN G S, A V E R A G E H O U R S P E R W E E K P E R M A N , A N D A V E R A G E H O U R L Y E A R N INGS IN
T H E B U IL D IN G -C O N STR U CT IO N IN D U ST R Y IN J A N U A R Y 1934, A N D P E R C E N T A G E S OF C H A N G E F R O M D E C E M B E R 1933— Continued

Employment

Locality

Num­
ber of
firms N um ­
report­ ber on
ing
pay
roll
Janu­
ary 1934

Per­
cent of
change
from
Decem­
ber 1933

Average weekly
earnings

Pay rolls

Amount
January
1934

Average hours
per week per
man 1

Per­
Per­
cent of Am ount cent of N um ­
change January change
ber
from
from
Janu­
1934
Decem­
Decem­ ary 1934
ber 1933
ber 1933

Average hourly
earnings 1

Per­
Per­
cent of
cent of
change Amount change
January
from
from
Decem­ 19, 1934 Decem­
ber 1933
ber 1933

Ohio:
Akron________________
C incinnati6__________
Cleveland......................
D ayton................ ..........
Youngstown......... ........

83
469
623
119
76

180
1,291
1,725
344
239

-2 4 .7
-1 5 .2
-1 4 .3
-1 5 .9
+20.7

$2,958
28,760
44, 567
6,617
3,769

-2 8 .7
-1 4 .8
- 7 .7
- 5 .7
+26.0

$16.43
22.28
25.84
19. 24
15. 77

- 5 .4
+. 5
+ 7 .8
+12.2
+ 4 .4

24.3
26.4
26.8
27.2
21.9

-1 0 .0
(*)
+ 8.1
+ 5 .4
+ 6 .8

Cents
68.8
84.1
98.2
70.6
71.1

+ 6 .2
+ .2
+ .2
+ 6 .0
- 2 .6

The State............ .......

1,370

3,779

-1 3 .8

86,671

- 9 .9

22.93

+ 4 .5

26.3

+ 3 .4

87.9

+ 1 .3

Oklahoma:
Oklahoma C ity_______
Tulsa._____ ____ _____

105
54

418
158

-1 1 .6
-1 3 .2

7, 587
2,881

-1 3 .2
- 1 0 .5

18.15
18. 23

- 1 .8
+23.1

26.9
25.0

+• 7
+ 1 .6

67.8
75.6

- 3 .7
+ 4 .9
- 1 .1

The State.......... ........

159

576

- 1 2 .1

10,468

- 1 2 .5

18.17

-.5

26.4

+ .9

70.0

Oregon: Portland.............. .
Pennsylvania: *
Erie area 2____________
Philadelphia area 2___
Pittsburgh area2_____
Reading-Lebanon area
Scranton area 2_______
Other areas 2.................

189

535

-2 6 .8

10,431

-3 3 .0

19. 50

- 8 .4

25.3

- 7 .3

77.0

22
445
236
47
30
303

584
3, 743
1,104
260
98
2,029

+17.5
-1 4 .7
-2 2 .3
- 8 .1
-3 8 .4
- 8 .1

3,330
72, 260
24,158
4,494
1,896
32,409

+ 8 .9
-1 1 .1
-1 7 .0
-1 0 .2
-3 6 .4
-1 7 .0

5. 70
19.31
21.88
17.28
19. 35
15. 97

- 7 .3
+ 4 .3
+ 6.8
- 2 .3
+ 3 .2
- 9 .7

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3)
(3
)

- 2 .9

(3
)
(3)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3)
(3
)
(3
)

(3
)
(3
)
(3
)
(3)
(3)
(3
)

(3)

(3)

(3)

The State.......... ........

1,083

7,818

-1 2 .7

138,547

-1 3 .7

17. 72

- 1 .1

(3
)

Rhode Island: Providence.
Tennessee:
Chattanooga..................
Knoxville_____________
M em phis_______ ____ _
Nashville....... ................

252

1,125

-1 3 .0

23, 698

- 8 .5

21.06

+ 5.1

29.1

+ 4 .3

73.1

+ 2 .5

33
49
80
83

121
249
267
536

- 4 .7
-1 3 .2
+ 4 .3
-1 2 .4

1,720
3,036
4,064
7, 560

+ 3 .0
-2 0 .6
+ .5
-1 7 .5

14. 21
12.19
15. 22
14.10

+ 8.1
- 8 .5
- 3 .6
- 5 .8

23.1
24.5
28.4
26.1

+ 6.5
- 6 .1
+ 8 .0
- 4 .4

59.6
53.1
53.5
56.1

+ 3 .7
-.2
- 9 .6
+ 2 .7

The State........ ..........

245

1,173

- 8 .5

16,380

-1 2 .4

13.96

- 4 .3

25.9

-1 .0

55.2

-.5




to
O)

Texas:
Dallas........... .
El Paso....... .
Houston_____
San Antonio..

188
25
189
126

534
144
776
398

- 6 .8
+60.0
-2 5 .4
-.7

7,446
1,678
12,050
5,377

The State______

528

1,852

-1 2 .0

26,551

Utah: Salt Lake C ity.

89

177

- 3 .8

2,982

87
139

502
630

+ 7.5
- 9 .6

8,730
12, 581

226

1,132

- 2 .7

159
56
82

414
145
295

297
48
58

Virginia:
N orfolk-Portsmouth..
Richm ond................ .
The State .
Washington:
Seattle___
Spokane—
T a com a..
The State.
West Virginia: W heeling.
Wisconsin: All localities 2
_




- 5 .6
+30.6
-3 2 .4
- 1 .6

-.9
- 8 .9
- 4 .9
-1 8 .0

60.9
59.4
60.1
65.8

+ 3.7
- 9 .7
- 4 .0
+27.5

23.2

- 7 .7

61.3

+ 2 .9

22.7

-1 3 .7

75.0

+ 2.2

27.4
30.2

+17.6
+ 2 .0

62.4
65.8

- 1 .4
+ 3.9

+12.6

28.8

+ 7.3

64.2

+ 1.3

17.49
21. 38
19. 76

- 4 .6
+. 8
+28.3

21.2
29.0
25.7

- 4 .5
+ 3.9
+44.4

83.5
77.2
76.5

-.7
- 1 .4
- 9 .3

-1 1 .7

18. 93

+ 4 .2

24.0

+ 8 .2

79.7

- 3 .7

-3 5 .9
-1 6 .4

16. 32
21.60

- 7 .2
+24.1

22.2
(3
)

- 5 .1
(3
)

75.1
(3
)

- 1 .1
(3
)

13.94
11.65
15. 53
13. 51

+ 1 .2
-1 8 .4
- 9 .3
-.9

-1 8 .2

14. 34

- 7 .1

-1 3 .3

16. 85

- 9 .8

+20.9
+ 2.7

17. 39
19.97

+12.4
+13.6

21,311

+ 9 .4

18. 33

-2 5 .4
-2 7 .1
+16.1

7, 239
3,100
5,829

-2 8 .8
-2 6 .6
+49.0

854

-1 5 .3

16,168

76
706

-3 0 .9
-3 2 .7

1,240
15,248

23.0
19.5
25.4
20.9

bO
1 Averages computed from reports furnished by 7,471 firms.
2 Data supplied b y cooperating State bureau.
3N ot available.

4N o change.
6 Includes Covington and Newport, K y.
7 Each separate area includes from 2 to 8 counties,

28
Trend of Employment in January 1934, by States
LUCTUATIONS in employment and pay-roll totals, in January
1934 as compared with December 1933, in certain industrial
groups are shown by States in the table following. These tabulations
have been prepared from data secured directly from reporting estab­
lishments and from information supplied by cooperating State agen­
cies. The combined total of all groups does not include buildingconstruction data, information concerning which is shown by city
and State totals under the section “ Building construction.” In
addition to the combined total of all groups, the trend of employmenand pay rolls in the manufacturing, public utility, hotel, wholesale
trade, retail trade, bituminous-coal mining, crude-petroleum product
ing, quarrying and nonmetallic mining, metalliferous mining, laundry,
and dyeing and cleaning groups is presented. In this State compila­
tion, the totals of the telephone and telegraph, power and light, and
electric-railroad operation groups have been combined and are pre­
sented as one group— public utilities. Due to the extreme seasonal
fluctuations in the canning and preserving industry, and the fact that
during certain months the activity in this industry in a number of
States is negligible, data for this industry are not presented separately.
The number of employees and the amount of weekly pay roll in De­
cember 1933 and January 1934 as reported by identical establishments
in this industry are included, however, in the combined total of “ all
groups.”
The percentages of change shown in the accompanying table, unless
otherwise noted, are unweighted; that is, the industries included in
the groups, and the groups comprising the total of all groups, have
not been weighted according to their relative importance in the
combined totals.
The State totals for the anthracite-mining industry, which is
confined entirely to the State of Pennsylvania, will be found in table
1, nonmanufacturing industries.
When the identity of any reporting company would be disclosed by
the publication of a State total for any industrial group, figures for
the group do not appear in the separate industrial-group tabulation,
but are included in the State totals for “ all groups.” Dat?a are not
presented for any industrial group when the representation in the
State covers less than three establishments.

F




29
C 0 M P A R I S 0 N 1 0 F E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN ID E N T IC A L E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
[IN D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y S T A T E S j
I Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]
Manufacturing

Total—all groups
Em ploym ent
State

N um ­
ber of
estab­
lish­
ments

Em ploym ent

Pay roll (1 week)

Pay roll (1 week)

Per­
Per­
cent N um ­
cent
Percent
Percent
N um ­
of
ber of N um ­
of
of
of
ber on change Amount, change estab­ ber on change Amount, change
from
lish­ payroll, from
January
January
payroll, from
from
1934
1934
De­ ments Janu­ Decem ­
Janu­
D e­
Decem­
cem­
ary 1934 ber 1953
ary 1934 cem­
ber 1933
ber
ber
1933
1933
209
42
178

46,207
1,792
12,487
1,101 135, 450
118 11, 358

- 1 .1
$586,918
32, 305
- 7 .9
158,521
+. 8
- 2 .3 3,050,851
-2 3 .3
215,474

- 2 .3
-8 .9
+ 1.3
- 1.8
-2 5 .7

- 3 .2
-7 .6
- 7 .2
+ 1 .7
+ 1 .2

610 126, 476
46
6, 528
3,149
49
128 12,918
305 71,878

- 2 .8 2, 246,618
- 7 .4
124,428
-1 0 .0
100,305
- 9 .7
175,880
849,919
+ 1 .3

-3 .6
-1 0 .6
-1 4 .6
-1 2 .9
+ 3 .0

- 9 .8

529 64,992 - 2 .4
A labam a.............. .
393
Arizona........ ..........
9,126
+ .8
i 422 18,182
Arkansas_________
+• 7
California________ 2 1,879 246,507 - 3 .9
814 31,944 -1 2 .3
Colorado_________

$856,132 - 3 .5
181,944 + 2 .4
253, 624 + 8.4
5, 896,822 - 2.2
640, 297 -1 3 .1

Connecticut______
Delaware________
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida___________
Georgia__________

2, 790,203
200, 319
750,390
486, 249
1,190,934

1, 074 147,380
156
9,608
605 32,648
652 31,156
995 89, 534

- 2 .9
-6 .4
-9 .8
+ 5 .8
+ .5

226
Idaho___________
9, 736
Illinois.................... 31,762 328,448
Indiana__________
1,275 125, 636
1,160 46, 673
Iow a________ ____
Kansas______ ____ s 1, 459 67,704

+ .2
- 2 .4
-2 .4
-.4
-2 .5

Kentucky-----------863 62, 608
469 32,356
Louisiana...... ........
527 45, 567
Maine __________
1,006 91,335
M aryland________
Massachusetts___ 5 7,989 362,189

- 6 .3
-4 .2
+ 1 .2
-5 .2
-4 .0

2,282,065
875,187
1,490,767

162, 927

- 1 .9
+• 5
- 2.8

33
4,848
1,105 206,195
546 94,365
404 24, 216
439 25,702

1, 008,947
522, 961
777,176
1,773,721
7,547,725

- 3 .9
-2 .4
+ 2 .4
- 5 .9
-1 .9

192 21,844
348,699
- 9 .5
- 4 .9
272,608
191 19,479
644,712
175 39,208 1 + 2 .2
633 64,393 6 - 2 . 7 1,176,294
- . 9 3,455,420
1,131 186,310

-1 2 .2
- 1 .3
+ 3 .9
6 - 3 .9
+ .5

773 298,740
273 29,648
64
6,132
498 56,320
50
3, 386

+ 15.3 6,335,852
- 2 .3
572,133
+ 1 .7
72,407
+ .3 1,027, 572
-5 .5
57,860

+22.7
- 5 .8
+ 4 .9
+. 5
-2 1 .8

117 10, 547
19
233
177 32,128
7 698 190,476
20
548

-1 3 .7
225,355
- 1 .7
5,498
+ 4 .9
519,969
- 2 . 9 3,925,329
+10.0
8,972

-9 .9
- 4 .4
+ 9 .5
-4 .5
+ 1 .6

- 2 .7 81,815 345,884
549 129, 332
-5 .6
852
+ .8
58
- 2 .9
1,784 292, 567
-2 .5
149 10,373

- . 6 7 ,881,065
- . 7 1, 518,325
- 4 .4
17,497
- 1 . 2 5,358,370
- 3 .6
184,158

+ 1.0
-6 .0
-.2
-1 .7
-5 .9

-1 2 .0
261,738
- 4 . 4 6,096,666
+ 5 .9
738,346
- 1 .2
636,462
+ .3
46,150

-1 5 .0
- 7 .0
+ 6 .9
+. 6
- 3 .6

-4 .4
+ 1.2
+• 7
-1 1 .9
-.3

629,198
759,886
92,438
75, 758
923,839

- 7 .7
+ .*
-1 9 .0
-1 1 .9
-.4

-6 .2
507,782
-.9
819,415
- 1 .0 1,981,594
-1 9 .1
28,441

-8 .0
-.6
6 - 1 .9
-1 8 .5

6,907,624

-.8

M ichigan_____
M innesota_______
Mississippi_______
M issouri_________
M ontana_________

1,650 328, 591 +11.3 6,993, 219 +15.7
1,361,030 - 5 . 4
1,066 66, 216 - 5 . 2
348
9, 699 - 1 .5
128,100 + 1 .2
1,195 107, 778 - 2 . 7 ' 2,158,844 - 1 .6
215, 699 - 8 .6
335
9,898 - 3 .7

N ebraska........ .......
N evada__________
N ew H am pshire..
N ew Jersey_______
N ew M exico_____

724 22,410
132
1,652
472 36,373
1,536 206, 250
189
4,917

-8 .8
-.1
+ 3 .3
- 3 .3
+ .7

476,755
41,134
616,641
4,499, 418
88,900

N ew Y ork _______
_
North Carolina_
North Dakota ..
O h io______ ____ _
Oklahoma________

7,740 538,204
909 135,129
4,312
337
4,973 406,996
844 31,349

- 5 .1
-.6
-.3
-3 .2
- 2 .1

13, 369, 415
1, 612, 702
87,766
7,792,807
616,443

Oregon___________
Pennsylvania____
Rhode Island____
South Carolina___
South D a k ota .. ..

700 27,416
4,864 649,778
867 56,112
419 55,856
259
6,353

-7 .6
538,688
- 1 .9 13, 405, 214
+ 3.1 1,030,132
-1 .4
706,926
150,912
-2 .6

- 7 .9
+ 4 .5
+ 3 .6
+ .6
-2 .9

Tennessee........... .
Texas ............... .......
U t a h ................. .
V erm ont............. .
Virginia........... .......

711
744
334
374
1,236

63, 549
63,635
15,626
8,607
80,850

- 4 .5
- 1.1
-1 .0
- 8 .9
-.9

932,971
1,387,012
285, 777
157, 208
1, 341,121

- 6 .1
- 1 .4
- 8 .6
- 8 .4
-.5

1,107 53,111
W ashington...........
864 120,058
W est Virginia
Wisconsin............... 01, 048 144,461
191
5,857
W yom ing.............

- 9 .7
- 1 .1
-3 .0
- 5 .5

1,073,340 - 7 .3
2, 209,004
+ .1
2,545,588 - 1 . 4
132,931 -1 3 .3

- 5 .1
-.2
+ 7 .7
- 4 .1
-4 .2

151 15, 256
1,748 361,102
248 43,719
166 51,173
44
2, 336
248
377
74
109
379

45,699
37,471
6,403
4, 227
59,034

249 28, 291
171 44,365
774 116,857
25
1,137

-1 .9
73,779
- 1 3 .9
- 2.2 4,003,125 + (*)
- . 4 1,659,178
-.4
444,079
-.9
-.9
- 1.0
530,596
-2 .3

0

1 Includes automobile dealers and garages, and sand, gravel, and building construction.
2 Includes banks, insurance, and office employment.
3 Includes building and contracting.
* Less than one tenth of 1 percent.
8 Includes construction, municipal, agricultural, and office employment, amusement and recreation,
professional, and transportation services.
6 Weighted percent of change.
7 Includes laundries.
8 Includes laundering and cleaning.
9 Includes construction but does not include hotels and restaurants, and public works.




30
C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN ID E N T IC A L E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
IN D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y S T A T E S — Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]

Wholesale trade
Employment

Retail trade

Pay roll (1 week)

Employment

Pay roll (1 week)

Per­
Per­
N um ­
cent N um ­
cent
ber of
ber of N um ­ Percent
N um ­
of
of
estab­
of
ber on change Amount, change estab­ ber on
lish­
lish­ payroll, change A mount,
January
January
from
ments payroll, from
from
1934
1934
D e­ ments Janu­ Decem ­
Janu­
D e­
cem­
ary 1934 ber 1933
ary 1934 cem­
ber
ber
1933
1933
$16,431
5,753
16,105
149,487
22,420

- 6 .9
+ 4 .4
- 24.6
+• 4
- 2 .1

178
119
123
267

2,136
1,881
1,608
24,553
4, 265

-1 8 .7
-1 0 .5
+18.5

29,006
2,476
23, 792
30,856
16,251

+ 4 .3
+ 1 .6
- 2 .9
+ 7 .2
- 2 .3

121
33
389
92
355

5,019
575
11.583
2,508
4, 533

-

3,348
54,881
38,980
27,953
58,737

- 1 .4
- 1 .8
+ 2 .1
+ 1 .2
- 4 .5

62
173
188
109
537

1,015
28.583
6,493
3,096
6,980

+ .3
- 1 .5
-1 .9
-.4

7, 851
14,577
9,789
48,935
891,188

-.6
- 3 .3
-.7
+ .8
-.9

78
36
62
45
\ 149
,

3,349
3,018
1,053
7,826

3,012
5,358
122
4,811
212

-.2
-.4
-3 .2
- 2 .7
-1 .4

69,603
133, 663
2,299
124,468
6,419

-4 .0
-2 .0
-3 .6
- 1 .7
-.5

157
230
29
138
79

11,875
8,177
386
10,118
844

-2 7 .5
-1 6 .8
-2 9 .7

25,972 + 1 .5
3, 551 + 3 .6
4,027 + 1.1
18, 292 + 1 .6
2, 507 -1 0.7

185
38
70
417

1,920
249

Alabam a...
Arizona___
Arkansas...
California..
C olorado..

15
24
28
96
25

Connecticut...........
Delaware...............
D ist. of Columbia.
Florida— ...............
Georgia...... ............

51
8
35
79
35

117
796
1,317
644

Id a h o .. .
Illinois. .
Indiana.
Iow a___
Kansas—

10
48
75
38

130
2,289
1,654
1,122
2,330

- 2 .3

382
638
413
2,057
15,172

110

K entucky----------Louisiana.............
M aine...................
M aryland.............
M assachusetts.. .

20
25
17

M ich ig a n ...
M innesota..
Mississippi..
Missouri___
M ontana—

635
232
688
5,878
838

+ 5 .5
-8 1 7
-.1
+ .5
+ 4 .0
-2 .5
-

1.0

-

1.2

+ 6.1
-

1. 2

- .1
- 1 .1
-8 .5

Percent
of
change
from
Decem ­
ber 1933

$35,494
29,050
19,919
522,384
82, 590

+48. £
-1 6 .1
-1 1.3 .

2 1 .6

+ 1 .8
-1 3 .3

101, 656
12,238
234,877
47, 250
70,022

—6. 5
- 8 .9
-1 5 .5
+ 6 .1
-10.0*

+13.7
-1 6 .9
-2 4 .8
- 1 6 .0
-1 1 .0

14,832
483, 469
116,927
58, 849
119,649

+ 4 .3
- 1 1 .7
-1 9 .0
- 4 .4
- 5 .7

-2 3 .9
58, 261
- 1 5 .2
44,112
-1 0 .5
20, 841
- 8 0 .0
126,148
- 1 3 .8 1,266,800

-1 6 .4
-1 6 .9
-4 .8
-2 7 .1
-9 .7

-

22.6

-1 5 .9
12 .6

12.2

- 1 5 .5
-

6.1

-1 5 .3

242,209
137,430
3,990
187,133
17,341

—18.0*
-1 2 .3
-1 6 . 6
-1 8 .9 '
-7 .3

-1 5 .2
-6 .7
-2 8 .1
-2 9 .7
(10)

35,013
5, 583
13,242
174, 325
5, 609

-8 .2
- 9 .1
-1 3 . 8
-2 3 . 8
- 5 .1

-

21.8

Nebraska..............
N evada_________
N ew Hampshire .
New Jersey_____
New M exico........

32
8
11
24
6

992
112
154
659
78

- 4 .5
-.9
- .6
+ 1 .2
-1 .3

New Y ork______
North C arolin a..
North D a k o ta -. .
Ohio...... ................
Oklahoma............

442
14
17
223
53

13, 308
164
270
5,198
1,042

- 1 .5
-3 .0
-2 .9
- 1 .3
-.2

397, 512
3, 677
6,932
127, 210
24, 237

- 2 .4
+ 2 .7
- 5 .2
- 1 .6
+ 4 .8

3,914
157

84,521
698
271
35, 687
2,879

-2 2 .3 1,950,158
-3 .7
13, 034
-1 3 .7
3,939
- 22.2
665, 514
- 6 .2
51, 549

- 1 5 .8
- 4 .5
- 1 5 .0
- 1 6 .0
-4 .8

Oregon_________
Pennsylvania. -.
Rhode I sla n d ...
South Carolina..
South Dakota—.

43
122
40
13
10

1,002

3,527
1,139
182
123

—5. 7
-.7
-7 .5
-2 .2
- 3 .1

27,121
92,900
27,919
3, 853
3,248

+ 0
- 1 .0
- 5 .5
+ 4 .3
- 1 .4

194
354

2,249
29,498
5,340
1,298
140

-5 .7
- 2 0 .5
- 11.2
-1 7 .5
12.0

+

43, 260
580, 730
99, 715
15,884
2,427

-1 6 .8
-6 . 8
- 4 .3
+10. 2

- 2 .1
- 1 .7
- 1.0
-.9

12,351
72,806

-3 .0
+ 2.8
-1 .6
-.9
-1 .9

51
77
71
37
477

3,520
6,824
558
384
5,174

- 2 4 .0
- 1 1 .4
- 9 .3
-2 7 .3
-1 7 .6

57, 255
114,106
13,003
6, 270
97,041

-1 7 . 5
-1 0 .0
- 3 .1
-2 1 .3
- 11.8

- 2 .3
-.6

356
52
51

5, 641
877
10,208
253

-3 0 .4

106, 792
15,441
144,174
5,440

—19. T
- 1 2 .7
-1 7 .8
-2 .5 .

Tennessee..
T exa s........
Utah______
V erm ont...
Virginia___

31

112
14
5
43

Washington___
West Virginia..
W isconsin____
W yom ing_____

100
25

*

645
2,861
495
116
1,132
1,922
534
906
60

12, 222

2.2

2,685
26,189

+ .*
- 1.6

51, 726
13, 564
81,017
1,684

-

Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




+4. 8

- 1 .9

244

-

2 1 .2

-2 2 .5
-2 .3

1 N o change.
0

31
C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN ID E N T IC A L E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
IN D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y S T A T E S —Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]
Quarrying and nonmetallic mining
Employment

.State

Metalliferous mining

Pay roll (1 week)

Employment

Pay roll (1 week)

Per­
Per­
cent
cent
Percent
N um ­ N um ­ Percent
N um ­ N um ­
of
of
of
of
ber of ber on change Amount, change ber of ber on
Amount,
change January change
from estab­ pay roll,
January
estab­ pay roll, from
from
from
1934
lish­ Janu­
lish­
1934
De­
D e­
Janu­
Decem ­
cem­ ments ary 1934 Decem­
ments ary 1934 cem­
ber 1933
ber 1933
ber
ber
1933
1933

Alabama. ____
Arizona______ . . .
California_____
Colorado_______
Connecticut
D elaw are..
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida____
Georgia______

$6,860
657 -1 7 .7
501
36 + 2 .9
2, . ,
Arkansas, 565
202 —15.5
11,022
603 - 9 . 7
326
28 - 6 . 7

25
3

202 -1 6 .5
52 -1 3 .3
-.3
+ 2 .8

-2 7 .7
+13.9
—16.2
-1 1 .0
+ 2 .2

10
21
3
35
17

1,161
2,376
379
2,691
1,040

—28.8
+ 3 .6
—.5
—.7
-.6

$15,373
57,511
4,950
66,298
28, 552

-3 1 .3
+ 5 .1
—.6
+ 8 .8
+ 3 .5

10

17
3
9
34
5

2,120

- 1 .3

43,062

-1 3 .2

14

932

-8 .8

20,965

+ 2 .8

3,335 -1 1 .9
752 - 7 . 2
11,294
12,045

+ 2 .2
+ 2 .8

16
26

901
1,300

I d a h o ........... . . .
Illinois_______
Indiana______
Iowa_________ ___
Kansas....................

21
64
28
29

496 - 6 .1
1,062 -1 2 .7
307 -1 0 .8
6
1,000

K entucky. _ __
Louisiana____ __
M aine.
M arylan d.. __
M assachusetts___

34
7
10
U
19

669
601
90
190
247

-2 9 .9
—.3
—78.7
-1 0 .4
-2 2 .1

7,179
7,883
1,666
2,285
4,747

-3 0 .4
-1 3 .5
—73.9
-1 1 .0
-2 2 .7

M ichigan________
Minnesota_______
Mississippi___ ___
M issou ri.............
................

45
26
10
47
9

645
227
172
934
45

-4 1 .1
9,663
-3 0 .6
3,189
—16.9
2,232
11,663
-2 9 .8
+ 2M ontana 679
.3

-3 7 .4
-3 6 .1
-1 0 .7
-3 3 .5
+ 4 .9

Nebraska
N e v a d a .._______
N ew Hampshire. _
N ew Jersey______
N ew Mexico .

10

51 -3 8 .6

792 -1 9 .3

10
39

68 —28.4
529 -2 1 .3

1,250 —13. 5
7,900 -2 0 .3

- 8 .3
- 3 .1

- .1
34,257
4,113 -1 2 .7

N ew Y ork _______
;North Carolina__
N orth D a k ota ...
Ohio_________
Oklahoma________

74
14

1, 594
373

8,384 —7.0
13,472 -2 5 .3
4,425 - 8 . 2
18,260 -4 -1

145
16

2,927 —6. 5
151 -3 5 .2

43,608 - 1 .8
1,285 -2 5 .1

O r e g o n ..________
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina___
South Dakota

5
157

45 -2 7 .4
3, 636 -1 3 .5
102 —13.6
72 —59.1

24
21
6
38
27

+ .8
1,325
979 +55.2
125 -1 8 .8
1,987 —2.6
1,015 + 5.3

17, 673 + 3 .0
17,725 +43.6
2,315 - 6 . 3
34,385 - 4 .1
8,293 + 5 .5

Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin...............
W y o m in g ___ __

12
22
u

126 -2 0 .3
731 -1 2 .1
181 - 9 . 0

1,998 -3 0 .5
8,087 —15.0
2,133 - 2 .8

55,822
19,190

- 1 .1
-1 5 .6

14
18

1,689
2,436

—1.9
- 1 .5

23,146
68,837

+ 1 .4
-2 .0

14

467

+ 4 .5

12,106

+ 5 .7

3
5

14
918

-1 7 .6
—.6

285
17, 707

-1 5 .9
—.7

32

1,493

-3 .8

23,745

- 7 .7

6

50

-2 8 .6

953

-2 6 .4

4

278

-1 0 .6

5,704

-2 .0

12

2,051

+ .8

42,272

+ 2 .2

217

-6 .1

4,108

- 18.5

1,042 + 5 .8
1,064 -4 4 .4

Tennessee......... .....
Texas
Utah........................
Vermont
Virginia . . .

3,828 + 2 .7
1,109 -1 4 .1

776 -3 0 .5
44,191 -1 3 .3

7
7

32
31

1 N ot available.
1




(“ )

32
C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN ID E N T IC A L E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
IN D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y . 1934, B Y S T A T E S —Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]

Bituminous-coal mining
Em ploym ent

Crude-petroleum producing

Pay roll (1 week)

Em ploym ent

Pay roll (1 week)

Per­
N um ­
cent ber of
N um ­
Percent
N um ­ Percent
ber of N um ­ Per­
of
of
of
estab­
estab­ ber on cent Amount, change lish­ ber on change Amount, change
January
from ments pay roll
lish­ pay roll,
January
from
from
of
1934
De­
1934
Janu­ Decem ­
ments Janu­ change
Decem ­
cem­
ary 1934
ary 1934 ber 1933
ber 1933
ber
1933

State

Alabama_________
Arizona__ _ _____
_
Arkansas_____ ___
California________
Colorado_________

54

9,424

-0 .4

116 +17.2

$122,342

- 0 .6
8
41

372
8,516

+ 7 .2
-.4

$8,362
267,904

+ 7 .3
+ 5 .5

8
4

204
33

-6 .0
-2 .9

4,291
659

-5 .7
-4 .4

28

1,727

+ 4 .5

38,633

+ 3 .9

5
10

62
271

- 6 .1
+ 6 .3

1,022
6,366

+ 3 .4
+ 6 .2

29,217 +13.2
20,958 -1 0 .0

4

32

-3 .0

636

+ 4 .1

31,589

5

62

-1 .6

1,788

+ 4 .1

3

S

89

+ 12.7

2,074

+ .5

5
60

43
5,744

- 2 .3
+ .2

540
140,192

-4 .8
-(0

(“ )

47

5,129

- 1 .1

82,751

-8 .9

36
49
20
21

8,885 + 4 .7
5,735 + 1 .0
2,081 + 2 .0
1,762 + 18.3

170,386
124,375
38,863
28,882

+ 4 .5
+ 1 .4
+ 8 .0
+ 4•0

Connecticut ■
Delaware________
Dist. of Columbia,
Florida___________
G eorgia.. _______
Idaho____________
Illinois....................
Indiana__________
Iow a_____________
Kansas....................
K entucky...............
Louisiana________
M aine____________
M aryland________
Massachusetts.

146

25,681

-1 .8

374,676

+ 6 .7

17

1,557

+ 2 .4

25,641

—8.5

M ichigan________
Minnesota_______
Mississippi_______
M issouri_________
M ontana_________

3

885

+ .1

19,345

+ 2 .6

21
11

1,936
933

+ 4 .9
- 1 .8

Nebraska________
N evada__________
N ew Hampshire
N ew Jersey______
N ew M exico_____

14

1,837

-.1

N ew Y ork _______
North Carolina
N orth Dakota.......
O h io .......................
Oklahoma________

-9 .7

9
78
19

785
13,350
941

+ 8 .9
+ 4 .2
+ 5 .0

476

71,396

- 1 .1

1,269,126

-.7

20

925

+ .2

19,866

+ .3

Tennessee________
T e x a s .....................
U tah........................
Vermont_________
Virginia__________

21
5
17

2,949
355
2,170

+ 4 .4
+ .9
-.9

37,627
5,194
49,482

+ 7 .2
-8 .8
- 5 .1

3

6,563

- 8 .7

216,572

-7 .7

26

4,137 +28.7

Washington______
W est Virginia____
W isconsin________
W yom ing________

11
363

1,378
64,678

+ 3 .8
-.7

29, 087 -1 3 .7
1,152,079
+ .9

32

3,393

-.9

74, 548 -1 4 .9

Oregon__________ _
Pennsylvania____
Rhode Island_ __
_
South Carolina
South Dakota........

16,844 +11.5
251,354 + 5 .9
14,837 - 1 . 0

66,248 +22.4

4Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




8
7

399

- 1 .7

8,355

-2 .2

162

- 8 .5

4,517

-5 .1

N ot available.

33
C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN ID E N T IC A L E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
IN D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y S T A T E S — Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]
Public utilities
Em ploym ent

State

Hotels

Pay roll (1 week)

E m ploym ent

Pay roll (1 week)

Per­ N um ­
Per­
N um ­
cent ber of
cent
ber of
Percent
N um - Percent
of
of
estab­ N um of
of
be on change Amount, change estab­ be on change Amount,
lish­
lish­
from
January change
January
pay roll from
pay roll from
ments
from
ments Jan1934
Jan1934
D e­
D e­
Decem­
ary 1934 cem­
cem­
ary 1934 Decem ­
ber 1933
ber 1933
ber
ber
1933
1933

Alabama............. .
Arizona...................
Arkansas................
California________
Colorado............. . .

89
67
58
47
196

1,759
1,573
1,863
43,091
5,368

-0 .6
+ 4 .3
+ .1
+ .1
-1 .0

$37,316
38,048
39,715
1,195,462
132,901

+ 1 .3
+ 9 .2
+ 9.3
+ 1.0
- 1 .5

Connecticut....... .
Delaware............
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida....................
Georgia................. .

132
28
21
184
186

9,724
1,070
8,569
4,566
6, 503

+ .9
- 4 .1
- 1 .1
+ 2 .3
-.2

292,280
29,125
231,032
111,024
173,979

-.1
-7 .0
-.2
-1 .4
- 2 .9

25
6
44
91
26

Idaho.......................
Illinois....................
Indiana...................
Iow a........................
Kansas___________

56
82
131
432
1 149
3

767
70,986
9,155
10,934
7, U7

-.8
+ .5
+ .3
+ 6 .5
—. 7

15,308
1,908,522
218,425
226,336
176,006

+ .9
+• 4
-.1
+ 2 .5
+ .1

K entucky...............
Louisiana________
M aine.......... ..........
M aryland________
Massachusetts___

293
147
168
n
130

6,237
5,448
2,778
12, 449
45,175

-.4
-.3
+ 3 .2
+ .1
-.1

141,569
135,838
70,632
347, 478
1,272,039

M ichigan................
M innesota..............
Mississippi.............
M issouri.................
M ontana........... .....

416
231
190
179
86

22,799
12,277
1,679
19,170
929

- 1 .7
- 4 .6
-.4
+ 1 .5

Nebraska................
N evada...................
New Hampshire. .
New Jersey...........
N ew M exico..........

299
37
140
197
53

5,591
400
2,292
12,884
557

N ew Y ork ..............
North Carolina___
North Dakota___
Ohio_____ ____ _
Oklahoma________

831
96
171
474
245

Oregon.................. .
Pennsylvania____
Rhode Island____
South Carolina___
South D akota.. ..

+ 3 .9
+58.9
+ 21.4
+ 2 .8
+ 1 .9

$11,222
9,288
6,578
142,80S
17,658

+ 3 .9
+38.1
+ 35.6
+ 1 .7
+ 2. &

-.5
1,197
(10)
261
+ 2 .2
4,290
3,996 +103.7
1, 241 +25.7

26
21
13
166
52

14,932
3,615
62,856
43,371
10,741

- 2 .1
(10)
+ i.a
+107.6+39.1

1,343
723
721
9,265
1,296

369
10,725
2,775
2,516
711

+ 7 .6
+10.6
+(<)
+ .6
+ 8 .6

4,126
166,267
29,199
24,158
7,269

+ 2 .6
+ 8 .7

74
64
27

-.4
-.7
+. 3
+ .3
-.1

35
24
20
24
80

1,975
1,864
696
1,371
5,065

+ .7
+ 7 .7
-.7
-.8
+ .1

20,263
20,202
8,755
16,205
78, 097

+. 6
+11.3
+ .3
+ .7
+ 4 .8

656,325
308,287
34,966
506,674
23, 262

- 1 .1
-1 .5
- 1 .7
+ .9
+ 3 .7

100
77
18
89
26

4,730
3,322
492
4,886
381

+ .2
+ .9
+12.1
+ 3 .5
+ 3 .8

56, 597
38,275
3,247
59,266
4,879

+ .9
+ 2 .1
+ 4 .0

-0 )
+ 3 .6
+ 1 .0
+ 2 .2
-1 .4

139,203
10,986
59,033
381,301
11,478

+. 3
+2.1
-.5
+ 4 .4
- 1 .1

44
11
10
58
14

1,800
127
166
3, 570
329

-7 .7
-8 .0
-1 .8
-6 .8
+ 4 .4

17,873
2,039
2,074
42,932
3,378

+ 1 .1
-1 2 .0
- 2 .8
- 4 .6
+ 4 .0

98,343
1, 731
1,228
34,014
5,939

+0)
-1 .3
+ .6
+ .4
-.6

3,007,017
36,909
29,183
880,322
133,610

-.1
+ 1 .7
+ .5
- 1 .5
-.3

52
36
23
145
56

4,690
1,462
424
9,183
1,294

+ 8.1
+ 8 .1
+ 4 .4
+ 1 .5
+ 2 .9

66,654
12,818
3,786
112,377
12,862

+ 11.7
+15.5
+ 1 .5
+ 1 .2
+ .9

177
675
42
70
129

5,496
48,285
3,367
1,607
975

+ 1 .1
-.1
+ .8
- 3 .8
- 4 .7

139,859
1,323,717
96,041
33,340
24,168

+ 3 .7
-.2
-1 .5
-2 .5
-2 .6

58
164
13
19
18

1,174
9, 542
200
612
291

+ 3 .0
+ 1 .6
+ 7 .0
+ 42.0
-2 .3

14,250
122,320
2,552
5,288
3,339

+ .6
+ 3 .4
+11.3
+ 35.6
-7 .8

Tennessee...............
Texas......................
U tah........................
V e rm o n t...............
Virginia..................

245
117
69
122
178

4,578
6,579
1,797
1,074
5,863

+ 1 .4
+ .9
- 2 .3
- 3 .4
-.4

102,009
176,963
36,431
25,473
141,463

+ 1 .6
+ .6
-1 .9
-2 .4
+ .9

36
37
12
24
34

2,164
2,358
461
475
1,847

+ 3 .2
- . 1
+• 7
- 6 .9
-3 .6

18, 030
29,454
5,972
4, 557
18,739

+ 1 .6
+ S .0
+ 4 .4
- 7 .6
-5 .4

Washington...........
West Virginia........
W isconsin________
W yom ing...............

196
120
i*41
48

9,763
5,968
10,536
451

+ 1 .2
-1 .2
—.1
-.4

268,464
153,526
296,238
10, 241

+ 3 .5
+ .9
+ .5
-1 .9

12 48

79
37

2,464
1,127
1,854
107

+ 1 .9
+ 1 .7
+ 6.1
-5 .3

28, 379
11,802
01
)
1,401

+ 1 .7
+ .7

+ .4

* Less than one tenth of 1 percent,
1 N o change.
0




20
12 52

1 N ot available.
1
1 Includes restaurants.
2

10

+ 4 .6

+ 6 .3
+ .^

+ 7 .4

+ 3 .1

-7 .8

1 Includes steam railroads.
3
1 Includes railways and express.
4

34
C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN ID E N T IC A L E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
IN D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y S T A T E S — Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]

Laundries
Em ploym ent

State

Dyeing and cleaning
Em ploym ent

Pay roll (1 week)

Pay roll (1 week)

Per­ N um ­
Per­
N um ­
cent ber of
ber of N um - cent
Percent
Num - Percent
of
of
estab­
of
of
be on change Amount, change estab­ be on
Amount,
lish­
lish­
pay roll from
January
from
pay roll change January change
from
ments
from
ments JanJan1934
1934
D e­
De­
Decem ­
Decem­
ary 1934 cem­
cem­
ary 1934 ber 1933
ber 1933
ber
ber
1933
1933

Alabama.................
Arizona..................
Arkansas................
California. .............
Colorado—.............

17
10
12
15 68
33

C onnecticut...........
Delaware_________
Dist. of Columbia.
Florida..... ..............
Georgia...... ............

44
3
21
18
25

Idaho......................
Illinois...................
Indiana...................
Io w a .......................
Kansas....................

18
U28
42
32
0«) 39

348
1,814
1,550
1,058
927

+ 1 .2
—.2
-.7
-.4
+ 3 .0

K entucky...............
Louisiana...............
M aine....................
M aryland...............
Massachusetts___

30
7
24
23
m

1, 272
439
521
1,767
3,757

-.9
-.7
—1.3
-.7
- 1.1

15,396
4,397
7,532
27,010
60,836

-.1
- 2 .4
—1.6
+ 1 .8
-1 .0

M ichigan________
M innesota_______
Mississippi_______
M issouri_________
M ontana_________

66
37
12
47
15

2,520
1,415
419
2, 621
418

+ .1
-.3
—.5
+ 3 .8
(10)

34,746
21,054
3,910
34,629
7,071

+ 3 .1
-1 .4
- 2 .8
+ 5 .0
-.3

Nebraska..........
N evada__________
New Hampshire. _
New Jersey............
N ew M exico_____

13
3
13
37
6

717 +11.5
35 —5.4
244 - 1 . 2
3,669 - 1 .3
211 - 3 .7

N ew Y ork _______
N orth Carolina.
N orth Dakota____
O h io.. .................
Oklahoma________

67
12
10
73
15

6, 714
701
194
3,807
727

-.2
-.3
—1.5
+ 2 .1
- 2 .8

116,390
7,693
2,822
57,998
9,395

-.6
+ 1 .5
+ .4
+ 3 .2
+ .4

Oregon___________
Pennsylvania____
Rhode Island____
South Carolina___
South Dakota____

9
40
19
9
8

271
2,762
1,009
433
182

- 1 .1
-.7
- 1 .1
+ 3 .1
—2.2

4,074
42,072
16,664
4,240
2,421

T ennessee.......... .
Texas_______ _____
U tah_____________
Verm ont____ ____
Virginia__________

14
19
11
6
18

1,234
964
633
87
983

+ 2 .0
-2 .2
- 1 .7
+ 1 .2
-3 .2

W ashington______
West Virginia____
W isconsin....... .......
W yom ing____ ___

15
16
™28
6

586
593
925
132

+ 2 .8
+• 2
+ .3
—.8

930
289
311
5,149
1,254

+ 0 .1
+ 5 .5
+ 4 .9
+ .9
- 4 .3

1,671 - 1 .9
233
+. 4
2,768
-.1
976 +10.9
2,164 + 1 .2

4 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




$8,027
3,703
3,383
91, 772
16,078

+ 1 .3
+ 4 .8
+ 4.1
+•2
- 4 .5

4

99

+ 1 .0

$1,059

10

26,705 - 1 . 2
4,101 + 2 .3
43,237 - 1 .1
10,851 +23.5
23,370 + 2 .9

9
3
6
9
3

140

- 2 .8

2,390

-3 .4

189
55
164
108
88

-2 .6
+ 7 .8
-5 .2
+13.7
+ 1 .1

4,152
1,103
3,144
1,809
1,000

+ 4 .7
+ 36.7
-3 .2
+18.3
-1 .8

9
4

143
54

- 1 0 .1
+ 1 .9

2,214
1,013

- 1 0 .8
+ 2 .0

5
5

159
80

-2 .5
-2 .4

2,396
909

- 1 .5
-3 .4

15
80

225
1,751

- 5 .9
- 2.3

3,780
28,884

- 3 .9
+ 5 .4

13
9

367
322

(10)
-.9

7,328
5,227

+ 4 .7
-.7

11
3

398
19

- 5 .9
-5 .0

6, 680
431

-4 .3
-.2

3

94

(10)

1, 782

+ 6 .0

7

186

- 3 .1

4, 346

- 3 .1

15
4

470
59

-.4
- 9 .2

8,497
731

-(4
)
-1 1 .3

35
7

1,400
162

- 1 .1
+ 3 .8

24, 537
2,242

+ .2
+ 2 -1

- 2 .0
-.2
+. 9
+ 2 .2
+ 4 .9

3
18
4

41
859
266

-2 .4
-1 0 .4
+ 1 .1

765
14,668
4,258

-2 .0
-6 .8
-.8

11,526
10,301
8,800
1,028
11,506

+ 1 .6
- 4 .9
- 5 .3
—5.2
+ 2 .7

3
12
8

30
354
105

- 3 .2
+ .6
-7 .9

341
5,939
1,840

-5 .5
+0)
-6 .8

19

230

-.9

3,235

-.1

9, 558
7,530
11,736
2,122

+ 3 .7
+ 2 .5
—2.4
+ .9

9
8

110
210

-4 .3
(10)

2,055
2,801

-1 .2
+ 1 .2

5,328

24,866

20,283
14, 533
12,423

1

+ 2 .1
—.3
+ 1 .2
+ 3 .1
+ 1 -4

9,835 +17.6
608 —1.3
3,656 - 1 .8
69,727 + 1 .3
2,934 - 4 .3

1 N o change.
0

1 Includes dyeing and cleaning.
5

-1 .5

35
C O M P A R IS O N OF E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN ID E N T IC A L E S T A B L IS H M E N T S
IN D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y S T A T E S — Continued
[Figures in italics are not compiled b y the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but are taken from reports issued
b y cooperating State organizations]

Banks, brokerage, insurance, and real estate
Employment
State

Pay roll (1 week)

Number
of estab­
Percent
Percent
Number
lish­
of change
Amount,
on pay roll of change
ments
January from D e­ January 1934 from D e­
cember
cember
1934
1933
1933

Alabama................... ..................... ...........................
Arizona................... ...............................................
Arkansas............................................ ....................
California.................................... ............................
C olorad o......................... .................. . . ..................

19
25
20
1,122
29

479
197
249
22,751
1,011

(10)
+ 3.1
-.4
- .4
+ .9

$13,714
5,321
6,163
759,902
35,326

-0 .8
+ 4 .7
+ 2 .3
+ 1 .8
-(< )

C on n ecticu t..________ ________________ ______
D e la w a re ....... .........................................................
District of Columbia..............................................
Florida. ............................................ ........................
Georgia.......................................................................

56
16
40
17
28

1,893
567
1,329
585
1,125

-1 .7
- .4
-.1
+ 2 .5
+ .8

71,284
20,890
51,147
17,865
33,062

- 1 .1
+ 5 .8
+ 6 .3
-3 .2
-.9

Id a h o................................. ......................................
Illinois.............................................. ........ ................
Indiana............................................................ ........
I o w a ......... .......... ................... ........... .....................
Kansas..................................................................... .

14
92
43
14
1 $3
6

125
10,846
1,215
956
776

-1 .6
+ 1.3
-6 .5
-.4
- 2 .1

3,097
380,155
42,227
31,068
23,718

-4 .7
-.3
- 2 .3
+ 1 .0
- 3 .2

K entucky........ .................................................... .
Louisiana.............................................................. .
M aine...... .................................... .................... .......
M aryland...... .......... .......................................... . . .
Massachusetts............. ..................................... .

21
10
15
24
i*278

828
385
224
857
7, m

-1 .0
(10)
+ 1 .4
+ .2
+ 1.1

29,630
14, 734
6,122
39,493
217,757

-1 .8
+. 6
+ 7 .3
+23.5
+ .6

M ichigan...................................................................
Minnesota.................................................................
Mississippi................................................... ............
Missouri........................ .........................................
M ontana. ............................................ ....................

91
52
17
85
21

4,202
4,022
206
4,699
245

+ 3 .2
-1 4 .1
+ 4 .6
-.3
+ .4

142,637
118,514
4,431
144, 534
6,877

+ 2 .7
- 8 .2
+ 1 .3
-1 .0
- 1 .2

Nebraska...................................................................
Nevada________________________ ____ ________
New Hampshire.................. ...................................
New Jersey............................................ .................
New M exico— ............. .......................................

18

531

- 1 .1

18,939

+ 1 .2

40
127
16

484
12, 765
126

+ 1 .7
+ .5
+ 5 .0

13, 231
374,323
2,854

+15.7
+ 3 .0
+ 4 .6

Oklahoma...............................................................

726
26
37
269
23

53,455
574
264
7,597
604

-.3
+ 1.1
-2 .2
-.1
-.8

1,906,780
15,102
6,348
254,066
18,331

+. 3
+ 2 .2
- 1 .9
- 3 .1
+ 1 .0

O regon......................................................................
Pennsylvania......................................... .................
Rhode Island—...................................... ..................
South Carolina...... ............ ............. ............. .........
South Dakota........ ..................... ............................

32
722
31
11
32

1,190
22,238
1,062
118
241

-.3
+ .4
-.1
(10)
-.8

38,286
688,688
44,475
3,276
5,919

-3 .3
-.3
-4 .3
+ .7
- 1 .8

Tennessee..................................... .................... .......
Texas........................................................... ..............
U t a h .............. ........................................................
V erm ont.................................................. ............. .
Virginia_______ ______ _______ _____ _________

33
30
15
30
31

1,126
1,480
,473
230
1,353

-.7
+ .3
+ 1 .5
- 1 .3
-.4

41,241
40,962
16,363
6,635
43,846

-1 .3
-.4
-5 .7
-.2
-1 .7

W ashington..............................................................
West Virginia...........................................................
W iscon sin.............. ........................ ........................
W yom ing........................................................... .......

40
42
17
12

1,597
576
919
111

+ 4 .6
+ .7
+• 1
(10)

49,932
16,404
33,334
3,381

+ 4 .9
+. 3
+ 5 .2
-.1

N ew Y ork—. ........................ .................... .............
North Carolina.........................................................
North D akota.................... . . . ...............................

4 Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




w N o change.

1 Does not include brokerage and real estate.
6

36
Employment and Pay Rolls in January 1934 in Cities of Over
500,000 Population
LUCTUATIONS in employment and pay-roll totals in January
1934 as compared with December 1933 in 13 cities of the United
States having a population of 500,000 or over are presented in the
following table. These changes are computed from reports received
from identical establishments in each of the months considered.
In addition to including reports received from establishments in the
several industrial groups regularly covered in the Bureau's survey,
excluding building construction, reports have also been secured from
other establishments in these cities for inclusion in these totals.
Information concerning employment in building construction is not
available for all cities at this time and therefore has not been included.

F

F L U C T U A T IO N S IN E M P L O Y M E N T A N D P A Y R O L L S IN J A N U A R Y 1934 A S C O M P A R E D
W IT H D E C E M B E R 1933
Pay roll (1 week)

Employment

Cities

N ew York C ity ____
Chicago, 111................
Philadelphia, P a----Detroit, M ich .......... .
Los Angeles, Calif—.
Cleveland, Ohio____
St. Louis, M o .......... .
Baltimore, M d ........ .
Boston, Mass........... .
Pittsburgh, P a..........
San Francisco, Calif.
Buffalo, N .Y .............
Milwaukee, W is____

Num ber of
establish­
ments re­
porting
in both
months

4,746
1,814
804
543
821
1,101
501
577
3,515
404
1,126
404

Number on pay roll

December
1933

338,403
231, 206
150,217
177,874
78,422
98,410
67,005
54,040
91,103
57,539
49,475
37,823
43,691

January
1934

315,958
226,695
141,656
210,738
73,861
95,261
64,701
49, 553
88, 210

53,609
47,680
37,418
41, 550

Amount
Percent
of
change
Decem­
ber
December
January
19331933
1934
January
1934
- 6 .6
-2 .0
-5 .7
+18.5
-5 .8
-3 .2
-3 .4
-8 .3
-3 .2
-6 .8
-3 .6
-1 .1
-4 .9

001,
416,
286,
766,
822,
973,
378,
058,
198,
187,
189,

$8,652,094
5,397,408
3, 111, 773
4,653,215
1,766,509
1,906,283
1,360,243
991,996
2,163,272
1,124,995
1,152,311
882,722
808,127

Percent
of
change
Decem ­
ber
1933January
1934

- 0 .3
-5 .3
+23.5
- 3 .1
-3 .4
- 1 .3
-6 .3
- 1 .6
- 5 .2
- 3 .1
+ 1 .5
- 6 .1

Employment in the Various Branches of the Federal Govern­
ment, January 1934
U RING the month of January 1934 there were 591,113 employ­
ees on the pay rolls of the executive departments of the United
States Government. This is an increase of 27,952 employees or 5
percent as compared with January 1933, and a decrease of 562
employees or 0.1 percent as compared with December 1933.
The information shown in table 1 is compiled by the various depart­
ments and officers of the United States Government and sent to the
United States Civil Service Commission where it is assembled. The
figures are tabulated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Table 1 shows the number of employees in executive departments
of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia, the number

D




37
outside the District of Columbia, and the total number of such
employees.
Approximately 13 percent of the workers in the executive branch
of the United States Government are located in Washington.
T a bl e 1 .— E M P L O Y E E S

IN T H E E X E C U T IV E S E R V IC E OF T H E U N IT E D
J A N U A R Y A N D D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934

District of Columbia

Outside the District

STATES

Entire service

Item
Perma­ Tem po­ Total
nent 1 rary *
N um ber of employees:
January 1933.....................
2,714 66,800
64,086
December 1933.................. 66,894
8,556 75,450
January 1934.....................
69,808
8,237 78,045
Gain or loss:
January 1 933-Jan uary
1934................................. +5,722 +5,523 +11,245
December 1933-January
1934.................................. +2,914
-3 19 +2,595
Percent of change:
January 1933-Jan uary
1934..................................
+ 8 .9 +203.5 +16.8
December 1933-January
1934..................................
+ 4 .4
-3 .7
+ 3 .4
Labor turnover:
Additions...........................
2,962
1,904
4,866
1,307
Separations.................... —
928
2,235
11.05
Turnover rate per 100___
1.91
2.91

Perma­ Tem po­
Total
nent 1 rary *

469,080
463,618
467, 570

Perma­ Tem po­ Total
n en t1 rary a

27,281 496,361 533,166
52,607 516,225 530,512
45,498 513,068 537,378

29,995 563,161
61,163 591,675
53,735 591,113

-1 ,5 1 0 +18,217 +16,707 +4,212 +23,740 +27,952
+3,952 -7,1 0 9 -3,157 +6,866 -7 ,4 2 8
-.3

+66.8

+ 3 .4

+ .8

+79.1

+ .9

-1 3 .5

-.6

+ 1 .3

-1 2 .1

7,171
4,839
1.04

20,621
26,146
42.04

10,133
6,146
1.15

22,525
27,074
39.21

27,792
30,985
5.40

-5 6 2
+ 5 .0
-.1
32,658
33,220
5.52

* Including appointments of indefinite duration.
* N ot including field employees of the Post Office Department.

In January 1934 there were 78,045 employees in the executive
departments of the Federal Government in the city of Washington.
This is an increase of more than 11,000 as compared with January,
1933, and an increase of over 2,500 as compared with December 1933.
The number of permanent employees in thQ District of Columbia
in January 1934 showed an increase of 8.9 percent as compared with
January 1933, and an increase of 4.4 percent as compared with Decem­
ber 1933. Comparing the number of temporary employees, January
1934 showed an increase of over 200 percent as compared with January
1933, but a decrease of 3.7 percent as compared with December 1933.
The turnover rate for the entire executive service within the Dis­
trict of Columbia was 2.91.
Comparing January 1934 with December 1933, there was an increase
of 0.9 percent in the number of permanent employees and a decrease
of 13.5 percent in the number of temporary employees, making a net
decrease of 0.6 percent in employment in the executive Federal depart­
ments outside of the District of Columbia.
Table 2 shows the number of employees and amounts of pay rolls
of the various branches of the United States Government during
December 1933 and January 1934.




38
T

2 .—N U M B E R OF E M P L O Y E E S A N D A M O U N T S OF P A Y R O L L S IN T H E V A R IO U S
B R A N C H E S OF T H E U N IT E D S T A T E S G O V E R N M E N T , D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D
J A N U A R Y 1934

able

Number of employees
Branch of service

December
1933

January
1934

Am ount of pay roll
December
1933

Executive service. . . __________________________________
Military service___ - ___________________ - _____________
Judicial service_________ ______________________________
Legislative service____________________________________

591,675
263,622
1,872
3,864

591,113 $80,414,086
262,942 17,656,909
1,780
432,435
3,845
886, 781

T otal___________________________________________

861,033

859,680

99,390,211

January
1934
$75,942,967
18,499,516
417,000
871,753
95,731,236

Employment on Class I Steam Railroads in the United States
EPORTS of the Interstate Commerce Commission for class I
railroads show that the number of employees (exclusive of exec­
utives and officials) decreased from 954,248 on December 15, 1933,
to 953,589 (preliminary) on January 15, 1934, or 0.1 percent. Data
are not yet available concerning total compensation of employees for
January 1934. The latest pay-roll information available shows a
decrease from $114,470,607 in November to $112,532,640 in December,
or 1.7 percent.
The monthly trend of employment from January 1923 to January
1934 on class I railroads— that is, all roads having operating revenues
of $1,000,000 or over—is shown by index numbers published in the
following table. These index numbers are constructed from monthly
reports of the Interstate Commerce Commission, using the 12-month
average for 1926 as 100.

R

T

able

1 .—IN D E X E S OF E M P L O Y M E N T ON CLASS I S T E A M R A IL R O A D S IN T H E
U N IT E D S T A T E S , J A N U A R Y 1923 T O J A N U A R Y 1934
[12-month average, 1926=100]

M onth

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

January..........................
February.......................
M arch............................
April...............................
M a y ...............................
June................................
July................ ...............
August...........................
September.....................
October..........................
N ovem ber.....................
December......................

98.3
98.6
100.5
102.0
105.0
107.1
108.2
109.4
107.8
107.3
105.2
99.4

96.6
97.0
97.4
98.9
99.2
98.0
98.1
99.0
99.7
100.8
99.0
96.0

95.6
95.4
95.2
96.6
97.8
98.6
99.4
99.7
99.9
100.7
99.1
97.1

95.8
96.0
96.7
98.9
100.2
101.6
102.9
102.7
102.8
103.4
101.2
98.2

95.5
95.3
95.8
97.4
99.4
100.9
101.0
99.5
99.1
98.9
95.7
91.9

89.4
89.0
89.9
91.7
94.5
95.9
95.6
95.7
95.3
95.3
92.9
89.7

88.2
88.9
90.1
92.2
94.9
96.1
96.6
97.4
96.8
96.9
93.0
88.8

86.3
85.4
85.5
87.0
88.6
86.5
84.7
83.7
82.2
80.4
77.0
74.9

73.3
72.7
72.9
73.5
73.9
72.8
72.4
71.2
69.3
67.7
64. 5
62.6

61.2 53.0
60.3 52.7
60.5 51.5
60.0 51.8
59.7 52. 5
57.8 53.6
56.4 55.4
55.0 56.8
55.8 57.7
57.0 57.5
55.9 55.9
54.8 154.1

Average............... 104.1

98.3

97.9

100.0

97.5

92.9

93.3

83.5

70.6

57.9

R e v is e d .




1933

1934
54.1

54.4 ..........

39
Wage-Rate Changes in American Industries
Manufacturing Industries

HE following table presents information concerning wage-rate
adjustments occurring between December 15, 1933, and January
15, 1934, as shown by reports received from manufacturing establish­
ments supplying employment data to this Bureau.
Increases in wage rates averaging 12.5 percent and affecting 19,874
employees were reported by 204 of the 17,805 establishments surveyed
in January. Of these, 8 automobile establishments reported increases
averaging 9.6 percent, affecting 2,292 employees; 16 establishments
in the foundry and machine-shop products industry averaged in­
creases of 10.5 percent, affecting 2,250 employees; 9 establishments in
the rubber goods other than boots, shoes, tires, and inner tubes
industry had average increases of 7.5 percent, affecting 1,768 workers;
8 establishments in the slaughtering and meat-packing industry
averaged increases of 8.4 percent, affecting 2,190 employees; 5 pottery
establishments averaged increases of 12.5 percent, affecting 1,454
employees; and 4 establishments in the paper and pulp industry
reported average wage-rate increases of 9.5 percent, affecting 1,444
employees.
Of the 17,805 manufacturing establishments included in the Jan­
uary survey, 17,578 establishments, or 98.7 percent of the total,
reported no change in wage rates over the month interval. The
3,056,501 employees not affected by changes in wage rates constituted
99.3 percent of the total number of employees covered by the January
trend-of-employment survey of manufacturing industries.
Twenty-three manufacturing establishments in 10 industries
reported wage-rate decreases affecting 1,103 employees between
December and January.

T




40
T a b le

1.— W A G E -R A T E

C H A N G E S IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G
M O N T H E N D IN G JA N . 15, 1934

Industry

All manufacturing industries..
Percent of total..............

Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
ing

17,805 3,077,478

100.0

Food and kindred products:
Baking_________________ ____
964
388
Beverages........................ ..........
B u t t e r ...----------------------------277
Confectionery-..........................
287
Flour........................... - ............
402
347
Ice cream-----------------------------Slaughtering and meat pack­
ing_______ ____ - ...................
246
Sugar, beet--------------- ------Sugar refining, cane........ .........
13
Textiles and their products:
Fabrics:
Carpets and rugs...............
27
Cotton goods-----------------693
Cotton small wares.—- . —
109
Dyeing and finishing
textiles------------------------147
Hats, fur-felt.....................
33
Knit goods---------------------440
Silk and rayon goods-----243
Woolen and worsted
goods_____________ ___
244
Wearing apparel:
Clothing, m en’s-------------392
Clothing, wom en’s......... _
503
Corsets and allied gar­
31
ments__________________
M e n ’s furnishings----------69
M illinery...... .....................
126
117
Shirts and collars-----------Iron and steel and their products,
not including machinery:
Bolts, nuts, washers, and
53
rivets................. .....................
Cast-iron pipe....... ............... —
44
Cutlery (not including silver
and plated cutlery) and
edge tools------------- ------------132
Forgings, iron and steel..........
65
Hardware------ ------- ----------- —
81
Iron and steel...........................
208
Plum bers’ supplies--------------71
Steam and hot-water heating
apparatus and steam fit­
88
tings----------- ---------------------Stoves---------------- -----------------160
Structural and ornamental
metalwork----------- ------------198
Tin cans and other t i n w a r e 56
Tools (not including edge
tools, machine tools, files,
and saws).................... .........
114
W irework..................................
71
Machinery, not including trans­
portation equipment:
Agricultural implements____
77
Cash registers, adding ma­
chines, and calculating
machines_____ _____ _____ 26
Electrical machinery, appa­
ratus, and supplies________
280
Engines, turbines, tractors,
and water wheels..................
88
Foundry and machine-shop
products__________________
1,015
Machine tools. - ......... ........... .
154
Radios and phonographs.----34
Textile machinery and parts.
53
Typewriters and supplies___
12
'Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




Number of establish­
ments reporting—
Total
number
of em ­
ployees

100.0
64,416
23,043
4,222
32,409
16,894
8,912

I N D U S T R IE S

D U R IN G

Number of employees
having—

No
Wage- WageWage- Wagewage- rate in­ rate de­ N o wage- rate in­ rate de­
rate
rate
creases creases changes creases creases
changes
17, 578
98.7

383
274

204
1.1

3,056, 501
99.3

19,874

64,113
22,892
4,202
31,909
16,812
8,912

303
151
20
500
82

104,139
11, 277
7,891

238
60
13

101,919
11, 277
7,891

16,405
301,337
9,102

27
687
107

16,405
301,136

38, 695
5,735
103, 780
46,414

146
33
438
243

38, 649
5, 735
102,919
46,414

1,103
0)

201
106
46
861

64,875

244

64,875

60,485
26,101

389
487

60,331
25, 596

5,446
5, 217
7,434
13,098

115
117

5,446
5, 217
7,034
13,098

400

7,605
7,487

480

8,085
7,487

102

10,606
7,928
30,250
232,110
5,773

130
65
77
207

10, 538
7,928
30, 089
231, 630
5,741

18,671
18,013

87
159

18, 611
17,975

60

15,200
8,349

195
50

15,109
7,895

91
454

8,448
7,624

70

8,425
7, 330

23
294

11,251

77

11, 251

161
480
32

14, 729

25

14, 688

41

96,897

279

96,378

519

22, 934

16

153
34
53
12

108, 628
15, 984
27, 725
10,339
12,667

2, 250
57

22,950
110,878
16,041
27,725
10,339
12,667 1

41
T a b le

1.—W A G E -R A T E

C H A N G E S IN M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S
M O N T H E N D IN G JAN . 15, 1934—Continued

Industry

Nonferrous metals and their
parts:
Aluminum manufactures-----Brass, bronze, and copper
products__________________
Clocks and watches and timerecording devices__________
Jewelry_____________________
Lighting equipment_________
Silverware and plated ware. _
Smelting and refining—cop­
per, lead, and zinc_________
Stamped and enameled ware..
"Transportation equipment:
Aircraft----- --------------------------Automobiles________________
Cars, electric- and steam-railroad___________ __________
Locom otives------------------------Shipbuilding________________
Railroad repair shops:
Electric railroad_____________
Steam railroad_____________ _
Lum ber and allied products:
Furniture___________________
Lumber:
M ill w ork_______________
Sawmills.................. ..........
Turpentine and rosin-----------Stone, clay, and glass products:
Brick, tile, and terra cotta___
C em en t--............ ............ ........
Glass_______________________
Marble, granite, slate, and
other p r o d u c ts .-.-------------Pottery_____________________
Leather and its manufactures:
Boots and shoes-------------------Leather________ ________ ___
Paper and printing:
Boxes, paper..........................
Paper and p u lp _____________
Printing and publishing:
Book and jo b ___________
Newspapers and periodi­
cals-----------------------------Chemicals and allied products:
Chemicals___________________
Cottonseed—oil, cake, and
meal______________________
Druggists' preparations______
Explosives__________ ____
Fertilizers___________________
Paints and varnishes________
Petroleum refining__________
Rayon and allied products. __
Soap______________ _________
Rubber products:
R ubber boots and shoes_____
R ubber goods, other than
boots, shoes, tires, and
inner tu b es.--_____ _______
Rubber tires and inner tubesTobacco manufactures:
Chewing and smoking tobac­
co and snuff—. ........... ..........
Cigars and cigarettes---........ .




Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
ing

Number of employees
having—

N um ber of establish­
ments reporting—
Total
number
of em­
ployees

D U R IN G

No
Wage- Wage- N o wage- Wage- Wagewage- rate in­ rate de­
rate in­ rate de­
rate
rate
creases creases changes creases creases
changes

5,936

23

5, 936

37,229

207

36, 781

448

25
121
51
58

7,043
3,302
8, 519

25
121
50
56

8,363
7,043
3,297
8, 505

4

39
101

13, 264
15,850

13, 264
15,634

216

23
221

7,642
254, 587

7,642
252, 279

2,292

51
11
100

9,718
2,489
29,290

23

23
212

2

9, 718
2,489
29,110

18,830
69,455

364
529

2
4

18, 668
69,380

45, 598

444

3

45, 405

112

478
603
19

18, 661
67, 581
1,463

478
602
19

18,661
67, 526
1,463

637
176

15, 635
9,495
48,055

630
121
174

15,440
9, 495
47,985

208
112

4,342
17,528

208
107

4, 342
16, 074

1,454

307
149

104,374
31,062

306
149

104, 325
31, 062

49

319
424

23,852
100, 710

305
420

13
4

23,429
99, 266

418
1, 444

744

46,836

742

2

46,812

24

451

58,418

449

2

58, 339

79

27, 737

109

1

27, 681

56

4,889
8,083
4,286
9,333
15, 643
62,454
33,938
14,593

95
56
30
165
311
148
23
103

1

4,012
8,083
4, 286
9, 300
15,402
62,454
33,938
14, 558

16

162
75

448

10

33

121

107
56
30
166
324
148
23
104

1

1

11

13,304
17,828
54,271

16,048
54, 271

31
196

9,861
36, 783

81

183
70

33
227

14

1,768

12

13,304

92

180

31
194

9,861
36, 775

42
Nonmanufacturing Industries
D a t a concerning wage-rate changes occurring between December
15, 1933, and January 15, 1934, reported by cooperating establish­
ments in 14 nonmanufacturing industries are presented in table 2.
No changes in wage rates were reported in the anthracite mining
and telephone and telegraph industries. Increases were reported in
each of the remaining 13 industries and decreases were reported in
five industries over the month interval. In the banks-brokerageinsurance-real-estate group 57 establishments reported an average
increase of 5.8 percent for 3,037 employees; hotels averaged an in­
crease of 20.1 percent affecting 1,601 employees; bituminous-coal
mining reported an average increase of 5.7 percent affecting 1,048
employees; and 1,051 power and light employees averaged a 14.9percent increase. The wage-rate decreases were inconsequential,
affecting less than 100 employees in any one industry.
T a b l e 2 .— W A G E -R A T E C H A N G E S IN N O N M A N U F A C T U R IN G IN D U S T R IE S D U R IN G
M O N T H E N D IN G JA N . 15, 1934
!
Number of establish­
ments reporting—

I
Estab­
lish­
ments
report­
ing

Total
number
of em­
ployees

Anthracite mining..........................
160
Percent of change.....................
100.0
Bituminous-coal mining................
1,508
Percent of change.......... . ......... 100.0
Metalliferous mining............. ........
283
100.0
Percent of change.....................
Quarrying and nonmetallic min­
1,144
ing..................................................
Percent of change.....................
100.0
Crude petroleum producing..........
254
Percent of change.....................
100.0
Telephone and telegraph................ 8,244
Percent of change.....................
100.0
Power and light..............................
3,098
Percent of change..................... 100.0
Electric-railroad and motor-bus
operation and maintenance........
503
Percent of change..................... 100.0
Wholesale trade...... ......................... 2,993
Percent of change..................... 100.0
Retail trade_____________________ 18,609
Percent of change.....................
100.0
2,294
H o t e ls .............................................
100.0
Percent of change.....................
1,240
Laundries_______________________
Percent of change.....................
100.0
334
D yeing and cleaning.......................
100.0
Percent of change................. .
Banks, brokerage, insurance, and
real estate............. ................... ..... 4,469
Percent of change___________
100.0

89,077
100.0
231,175
100.0
25,903
100.0

160
100.0
1,492
98.9
281
99.3

26,217
100.0
27,750
100.0
252,032
100.0
205,570
100.0

1,138
99.5
253
99.6
8,244
100.0
3,096
99.9

6
.5
1
.4

129,599
100.0
85,182
100.0
415,461
100.0
114,014
100.0
64,529
100.0
9,455
100.0

500
99.4
2,978
99.5
18,571
99.8
2,230
97.2
1,232
99.4
333
99.7

3
.6
9
.3
14
.1
64
2.8
4
.3
1
.3

175,943
100.0

4,399
98.4

57
.1.3

Industrial group

* Less than one tenth of 1 percent.




Number of employees
-having—

|
No
Wage- Wagewage- rate in­ rate de­ N o wage- Wage- Wagerate
rate in­ rate de­
rate
changes creases creases changes creases creases
89,077
100.0
230,127
99.5
25,398
98.1

16
1.1
2
.7

1,048
.5
505
1.9

26,149
99.7
27,690
99.8
252,032
100.0
204,519
99.5

2
.1

6
.2
24
.1
4
.3

13
.3

1,051
.5

127,965
98.7
85,032
99.8
415,281
100.0
112,413
98.6
64,412
99.8
9,446
99.9

1,634
1.3
116
x
140
0)
1,601
1.4
29
0)
9
.i

172,857
98.2

3,037
1.7

68
.3
60
.2

34
(*)

40

<>
*
88
.1

49
(»)

43
Employment Created by the Public-Works Fund, January 1934
HERE were 273,583 employees working on projects financed
from the public-works fund during the month of January 1934'.
Monthly pay rolls for these employees totaled over $14,000,000.

T

Employment on Construction Projects, by Types of Project
A l l o t m e n t s for construction projects awarded by the Public Works
Administration are divided into two groups— Federal allotmentsand
non-Federal allotments.
Projects to be built from Federal allotments are financed wholly by
public-works funds. They are built either by force account (that is,
the Federal department which has charge of the work hires the
laborers directly) or under contracts awarded to commercial firms by
the Federal departments, and are supervised entirely by a represen­
tative of the Federal Government. These projects include such types
of construction as post-office buildings; Federal courthouses; naval
vessels; river, harbor, and flood-control projects; reclamation projects;
road building; and forestry service.
Table 1 shows, by type of project, employment, pay rolls, and
man-hours worked during January 1934 on Federal projects financed
by public-works funds.
T a b l e 1 .— E M P L O Y M E N T , P A Y

R O L L S , A N D M A N -H O U R S W O R K E D ON F E D E R A L
P R O JE C T S F IN A N C E D F R O M P U B L IC -W O R K S FU N D S D U R IN G J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y
T Y P E OF P R O J E C T

Aver­
Number
Value of
age
Amount of Number of earn­
materials
man-hours
of wage
pay roll
worked ings per purchased
earners
hour

T ype of project

1,085,450
16,682,611
3,399, 592
981,684
784,613
731, 349
1,810,518
54,232
1,011, 522

$0.665
.476
.577
.430
.746
.661
.635
.574
.552

$1,974,861
6,265, 000
3,008,967
426,837
1,348,656
2, 439, 384
537,211
44,940
3,601,216

13,852,632 | 26, 541, 571

.522

19, 647,072

$721,391
7,940,127
1,961,683
422,276
585,024
483, 729
1,149,102
31.142
558,158

Building construction- ___ __ ___ _________ ___
14,240
Public roads____ . ______ _______________ _____ 145, 701
River, harbor, and flood control__________ _____
49,886
Streets and roads 1_. - __ ________
___________
10, 725
Naval vessels. . _ .
____ _______ ______ _____
5, 651
6,199
Reclamation______ .
________
_____
Forestry......... . . . _ _____ _______ ______ . . . .
15,793
Water and sewerage
__ ____
_ __ - . _ _
717
7,563
Miscellaneous__ _
______
. _ _______
Total__

. __

_________

256,475

1 Other than those reported b y the Bureau of Public Roads.

For the month ending January 15, 1934, there were 256,475
employees (exclusive of the administrative and clerical force) directly
engaged in working on Federal construction projects financed by the
public-wT
orks fund. The Bureau of Public Roads provided work
for more than one half of the employees engaged on public-works
projects during the month. Nearly 50,000 men were working on
river, harbor, and flood-control projects. Forestry service accounted




44
fo f slightly more than 15,000; and building construction more than
14,000; and streets and roads (other than public roads) more than
10,000. No other type of project engaged as many as 10,000 people.
Pay rolls for all workers on Federal projects totaled nearly $14,000,000 of which more than half was paid to workers on road building
under the jurisdiction of the Department of Agriculture. Workers on
river, harbor, and flood-control projects were paid nearly $2,000,000
and those in the forestry service over $1,000,000.
Workers on Federal public-works projects earned an average of
more than 50 centMKr^l^MHMIpdiiMi^i^navakvessQls^aYeraged
slightly over 75 cents^1er% 0^fand those on building construction,
reclamation projects, and forestry service averaged in excess of 63
cents per hour; while public-road building was the only type of work
on which earnings averaged less than 50 cents per hour.
The value of material orders placed during the month of January
totaled over $19,000,000. Contractors working on public-roads
projects purchased materials to cost over $6,000,000. Purchase
orders for materials used on miscellaneous projects totaled over
$3,600,000; on river, harbor, and flood-control projects, over $3,000,000; and on reclamation projects, in excess of $2,000,000.
Non-Federal projects are for the most part confined to building
construction (such as school buildings, city and county buildings,
housing projects, etc.), street and road paving, and water and sewer­
age projects. The Public Works Administration makes a direct
grant of 30 percent of the total cost of non-Federal work and in many
cases will loan the remaining 70 percent.
Table 2 shows employment, pay rolls, and man-hours worked
during January 1934 on non-Federal projects financed from publicworks funds, by type of project.
T

2 —E M P L O Y M E N T , P A Y R O L L S , A N D M A N -H O U R S W O R K E D ON N O N F E D E R A L
P R O JE C T S F IN A N C E D F R O M P U B L IC -W O R K S F U N D S D U R IN G J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y
T Y P E OF P R O J E C T

able

Type of project

Aver­
Number of
Number
age
Value of
materials
of wage Am ount of man-hours earn­
pay roll
ings per purchased
earners
worked
hour

Building construction________ ________ _________
Streets and roads...... ............ .................... .............
Water and sewerage........ ... .......... ................... ..........
Miscellaneous_____ _____________________________

5,106
6,225
5,284
493

$244, 277
228,441
230,988
18,622

291,212
406,970
389,372
29,466

$0.839
.561
.593
.632

$2,527,914
662,338
622,295
63,310

Total______________________________________

17,108

722,328

1,117, 020

.647

3,875,857

The 17,108 workers employed on non-Federal public-works projects
drew a total pay roll for the month ending January 15 of more than
$700,000 and worked over 1,000,000 hours during the month. Their
average earnings per hour were slightly over 64 cents.
Street and road paving accounted for the largest number of nonFederal workers. Workers on building construction, however, had




45
the highest average earnings per hour— their earnings during January
averaging nearly 85 cents. Workers on miscellaneous projects had an
average pay of 63 cents per hour, while the average pay of street and
road workers and water and sewerage workers’ pay exceeded 55 cents
per hour.
Material orders placed for use on non-Federal projects for the
month ending January 15, totaled over $3,800,000.
Employment on Construction Projects, by Geographic Divisions
T a b l e 3 show& e m ^ y llf® ^ ^ ^ ^ M ^ ^ M | ^ ia n -h o u r s worked
during January 1934 on Federal projects ffiiaifced irom Public Works
funds, by geographic divisions.
T a bl e 3 .— E M P L O Y M E N T , P A Y

R O L L S , A N D M A N -H O U R S W O R K E D ON F E D E R A L
P R O JE C T S F IN A N C E D F R O M P U B L IC -W O R K S F U N D S D U R IN G J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y
G E O G R A P H IC D IV ISIO N S
Aver­
Value of
age
Am ount of Number of earn­
man-hours
materials
pay roll
worked ings per purchased
hour

Geographic division

N um ­
ber of
wage
earners

N ew England___________________________________
M iddle A tlantic-- _________ _______ ___________
East North Central......... . - ........ ............ ..............
W est North Central_______ _____________________
South Atlantic.......... ...................... .................- - - .
East South Central_________ _____ ______________
West South Central_____________________ _______
M ountain_____________________ ________________
Pacific_______________ ____ ______________________

8,536
24,058
22, 327
40,183
30,971
30,045
49,656
28, 644
17,332

$661,180
1,369,363
1,222,448
2,169,249
1,612,074
1,106, 545
2,118,379
2,118,416
1, 221,161

1, 111, 668
2,577,805
2,161,477
4,329,731
3,461,172
2,446,174
4,779,826
3,436,044
1,707, 619

$0.595
.531
.566
.501
.466
.452
.443
.617
.715

$1,060,575
2,169,086
688,855
946,533
1,905,177
1,696,667
1,235,038
1,886,796
816,911

Total continental United States 1___ ______
Outside continental United States_______________

252, 421
4,054

13,658,096
194,536

26,139,712
401,859

.523
.484

2 18,781,10&

Grand total._________ _____________________

256,475

13, 852, 632

26, 541,571

.522

19,647,072

845,966

1 Includes data for 669 wage earners which cannot be charged to any specific geographic division.
2 Included $6,265,000, estimated value of material orders placed for public roads projects which cannot be
charged to any specific geographic division.

Nearly 257,000 wage earners were working on Federal public-works
projects during the month of January. Of these almost 50,000 were
employed in the West South Central States, while more than 30,000
were working in each of the following divisions: West North Central,
South Atlantic, and East South Central.
Pay rolls in the Mountain, West South Central, and the West
North Central divisions totaled over $2,000,000.
The highest average earnings per hour, 72 cents, occurred in the
Pacific division. Workers in the Mountain division averaged over 60
cents per hour. In only three divisions— the South Atlantic, East
South Central, and the West South Central— were average earnings
less than 50 cents per hour.
Material orders, placed by contractors and Government depart­
ments doing force-account work, reached a total of over $2,000,000 in
the Middle Atlantic States, while in the South Atlantic and the
Mountain States they totaled slightly less than $2,000,000.




46
Table 4 shows employment, pay rolls, and man-hours worked
during January on non-Federal projects financed from public-works
funds, by geographic divisions.
T a b l e 4 .— E M P L O Y M E N T , P A Y R O L L S , A N D M A N -H O U R S W O R K E D ON N O N -F E D E R A L

P R O J E C T S F IN A N C E D F R O M P U B L IC -W O R K S F U N D S D U R IN G J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y
G E O G R A P H IC D IV ISIO N S

A ver­
Number Amount of Number of
age
Value of
of wage
man-hours earn­
materials
pay roll
earners
worked
ings per purchased
hour

Geographic division

N ew England____ ______________________________
M id d le A tlantic_______ ___________ ____________
East N orth Central.____ ________________ _
W est N orth Central.. . ...................... ...... .. .
South Atlantic.............. ........
........... ....................
East South Central........... .
........................ .
.
W est South Central................... .................
M ou ntain........ .......... .........
.................. . . . ___
Pacific.................... ..................
......

1,249
2,034
5,720
3,051
852
498
871
987
1,788

$56,930
61,440
276,937
92,663
30,191
19,356
30,882
37,011
114,042

93,497
116,921
435,862
141,247
49,830
34,164
49,109
60,758
131,374

$0.609
.525
.635
.656
.606
.567
.629
.609
.868

$131,265
2,145,911
749,722
369,063
155,513
36,450
68,820
51,641
158,525

Total continental United States___________
Outside continental United States...........................

17, 050
58

719, 552
2,876

1,112,762
4,258

.647
.675

3,866,910
8,947

Grand total_______________ ________________

17,108

722,328

1,117,020

.647

3,875,857

The East North Central division had the largest number of workers
on non-Federal projects, followed in order by the West North Central
and the Middle Atlantic divisions.
The average hourly earnings for all geographic divisions was 65
cents. In the Pacific States, however, average earnings per hour
were over 86 cents. The other divisions, except the Middle Atlantic
and the East South Central States, had an average rate of over 60
cents per hour.
The Middle Atlantic was the only division in which contractors
placed material orders during the month for more than $2,000,000.
Table 5 shows expenditures for materials purchased during the
month ending January 15, 1934, by types of materials.
T

able

5 .—M A T E R IA L S P U R C H A S E D D U R IN G M O N T H E N D IN G J A N U A R Y 15, 1934, F O R
P U B L IC -W O R K S P R O J E C T S , B Y T Y P E O F M A T E R I A L

T yp e of material

Aircraft (new )........ ...............
A uto tracks........................
Bolts, nuts, washers, etc___
Cast-iron pipe and fittings.
C em ent.
Clay products---------------- ---------------------- ------- ------------- ----------------------------Coal--------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------- -------- - ............ .
Concrete products................................................................... ............................
Copper products......................... ....................... .......... .................................... —
Cordage and twine....................................- ................... - ......................... - ..........
Crushed stone...........................................- ..................... - .........— .............. —
Doors, shutters, and window sash and frames, molding and trim, metal..
Electrical machinery and supplies................. - . .................................... ..........
Engines and turbines.............................................. ............ .............. ........... —
Explosives..
Forgings, iron and steel, not made in plants operated in connection with steel works or
rolling mills................... ........... ............................ ............. ............................................................
F oundry and machine-shop products, not elsewhere classified..................................... ..............
F uel oil............................... —........................................... - .................................. - ------- ---------------------




A m ount ex­
pended
$567,151
239,911
61,087
24,653
397,312
370,668
260,434
72,214
517,354
22,384
12,223
56,675
75,391
2,210,056
250,446
179,524
383,212
1,728,032
119,635

47
T able

5 — M A T E R IA L S P U R C H A S E D D U R IN G M O N T H E N D IN G J A N U A R Y 15, 1934, F O R
P U B L IC -W O R K S P R O J E C T S , B Y T Y P E OF M A T E R IA L — Continued
Am ount ex­
pended

T yp e of material

Gasoline................................. - ---------------- ------- ---------------- -----------------------------------------------------Glass_______________________________ _________ ___________________________________________
Hardware, miscellaneous------- ------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Instruments, professional and scientific___________________________________________________
Lighting equipm ent...... ............ - __________________________________________________________
Lubricating oils and greases------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Lum ber and timber products-------- . ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Machine tools______________ ___________ ________________________ ________________________
Marble, granite, slate, and other stone products....... ........ .......................................... ..........—
Nonferrous-metal alloys; nonferrous-metal products, except aluminum, not elsewhere
classified........................................................................ ....................................... .............................
Paints and varnishes............... ............ ....................................... . . . .........- ................- ..................... .
Paving materials and mixtures-------------------------------------------------------------- ------- -------------------Planing-mill products___________________________________________________ ______________- -.
Plum bing supplies____________________________________ __________________ _______________
Pumps and pum ping equipm ent---------------- --------------------- ------- -----------------------------------------Refrigerators and refrigerator cabinets, including mechanical refrigerators-------------------------Roofing, built-up and roll; asphalt shingles; roof coatings other than p a in t.................. ........
Sand and gravel............. ............................................................................. ..........................................
Sheet-metal work------ ------------- -------------------- -------------- ------------------ ------- ---------------------------Steam and hot-water heating apparatus--------------- ------- ------------- ------------- -------------------------Steel-works and rolling-mill products, including structural and ornamental metal w ork—
Tools, other than m ach in e__________________________ ____________________ ______________
W all plaster, wall board, insulating board, and floor com position___________ _____________
Wire, drawn from purchased rods_________________________________________ ______________
W ire work, not elsewhere classified______________ ________________________________ _______
Other_______________ _______________________________________________________ _____________
Public-road projects L . _____ _________________________________________________ ___________

$184,620
72,068
98, 017
241,062
57,641
33, 731
1,192,632
327,665
513,900

Total_____________ ________________________________________________________________

23,522,929

22,707
34,263
133,857
414,933
204,200
119,996
29,067
74,919
283,483
69,612
65,56&
3,870,799
62,463
32,814
154,154
27,933
1,387,466
6,265,000

i N ot available b y type of material.

During the month ending January 15, 1934, the value of orders
placed for material by contractors on public-works projects totaled
over $23,000,000. Of this amount, more than $3,500,000 was ex­
pended for steel; over $2,000,000 for electrical machinery; over
$1,700,000 for foundry and machine-shop products; and over
$1,000,000 for lumber.
It is estimated- that the fabrication of materials purchased during:
the month will create approximately 64,000 man-months of labor.
Table 6 gives data concerning employment, pay rolls, and manhours worked during each of the 4 months for which employment
was created by projects financed from public-works funds.
T

6 .—E M P L O Y M E N T , P A Y R O L L S , A N D M A N -H O U R S W O R K E D D U R IN G O C T O B E R ,
N O V E M B E R , A N D D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, O N P R O J E C T S F I N A N C E D
F R O M P U B L IC W O R K S FU N D S

able

1933
Item

January 19341
October

114,098
Number of wage earners em ployed____________
$7,006,680
Am ount of pay roll____ _______________________
Num ber of man-hours wor ked ______________
2 2, 346, 927
Average earnings per hour ___________________
2 $0. 613
Value of materials purchased____________ _____ 3 $22, 005, 920

N ovem ber

December

254,784
$14, 458,364
2 9, 497,828
2 $0. 589
4 $24, 605, 055

270,808
$15,724,700
2 11,241,098
2 $0.612
5 $24, 839, 098

1 Subject to revision.
2 Excluding data for Bureau of Public Roads which are not available.
3 Includes $6,687,273 estimated value of material orders placed for public-road projects.
4 Includes $12,473,681 estimated value of material orders placed for public-road projects.
* Includes $11,424,000 estimated value of material orders placed for public-road projects.




273,583
$14, 574,960
27,658, 591
$0. 527
$23, 522,929

48
In spite of adverse weather conditions, total employment on publicworks projects during January exceeded that reported for December.
It must be remembered that by far the greater part of public-works
projects entail labor out-of-doors. Weather conditions during
January were not conducive to full-time employment on road work,
forestry work, reclamation projects, or other out-door activities
in the northern section of the country.
Data concerning man-hours worked on public roads are not avail­
able for the months of October, November, and December. Since
the rates paid on this type of project are somewhat lower than on
most of the other types of projects, and since many of the employees
are working on public roads, the inclusion of the man-hours in January
tended to lower the hourly rate as published. Average hourly
earnings for January 1934 were for all types of projects, while those
shown for October, November, and December 1933 were confined
to projects other than public roads.
Material orders placed during the 4 months totaled $95,000,000,
while pay rolls totaled over $51,000,000. These figures must not be
construed to show the relationship of the cost of labor to material on
public-works projects, as the total pay-roll figures are the amount
actually paid to labor on the job, while the value of the materials
shown is the total value of material orders placed. Much of this
material, however, will not be used, for several months.
Civil Works Administration
D u r i n g the week ending February 1 more than 3,800,000 people
drew pay from the $400,000,000 allotted by the Public Works Ad­
ministration to the Civil Works Administration. This is a decrease of
4 percent as compared with the number on the pay rolls during the
week ending January 18.
Table 7 shows the number of civil-works employees on the pay
rolls for the weeks ending January 18 and February 1, 1934.
T

able

7 .— N U M B E R

OF E M P L O Y E E S A N D A M O U N T S OF P A Y R O L L S ON C IV IL -W O R K S
P R O J E C T S , JAN . 18 A N D F E B . 1, 1934

Num ber of employees,
week ending—

Amount of pay roll, week
ending—

Geographic divisions
Jan. 18
N ew England...................... ............... ....................
M id d le A tla n tic......... ...................... ....................
East N orth Central........... ..................... ...............
W est North Central................................................
South Atlantic________________ . ____________ ._
East South C e n t r a l...____ ____ _____ _________
West South Central................................................
M ou ntain_____________________________________
Pacific...... ............ .............................. ....................
T o t a l......................................................... .
Percent of change_____ ______________ ________




Feb. 1

Jan. 18

Feb. 1

232,258
723,480
865,322
460,446
532,852
329,463
512,892
134,681
248,080

227,085
728,888
754,954
477,134
523,504
335,379
456, 230
133,004
239,837

$3,762,410
11,394,489
15, 652,585
7,103,739
6,898,762
3,709,471
5, 763,530
2,567,669
4,493,038

$2,909,822
8,957,717
9,991,040
4,994,951
4,629,399
2, 690,157
3,923,259
1,804,852
3,221,029

4,039,474

3,876,015

61,345,693

43,122,226

-4 .0

-2 9 .7

49
Although there were 163,000 fewer employees on the pay rolls of
the various civil-works projects on February 1 than on January 18,
the decrease was not universal, as 3 of the 9 geographic divisions
showed more employees on civil-works projects on February 1 than
on January 18.
It should be borne in mind, however, that weather conditions affect
employment differently in the various sections of the country, and
since most of the jobs are outside work, the weather greatly influences
employment conditions.
No data are shown for localities outside of continental United
States, although it is known that the Civil Works Administration has
employed a number of people in our outlying territories.
Emergency Conservation Work
E m p l o y e e s on the rolls of the Emergency Conservation Work are
now paid by allotments from the Public Works Administration fund.
Table 8 shows the employment and pay rolls of the Emergency Con­
servation Work during the months of December 1933 and January
1934.
T able 8 .— E M P L O Y M E N T

A N D P A Y R O L L S IN T H E E M E R G E N C Y C O N S E R V A T IO N
W O R K , D E C E M B E R 1933 A N D J A N U A R Y 1934

Number of employees

Amount of pay rolls

Group
December
1933

January 1934

December
1933

January 1934

Enrolled personnel_______________________ ____
Reserve officers_____ _____________ ___________
Supervisory and technical_____________________
Carpenters and laborers........... .............................

288,855
» 4, 508
13,168
11,343

299,273
4,585
13,159
3,803

$9,020,943
848,373
1,362,724
1,215,637

$9,346,302
(2)
1, 536,051
474,210

Total___________________________________

317,874

320,820

12,447,677

3 12,204,936

1 Revised.

2 Data not available.

8 Including estimated pay for Reserve officers.

There was an increase of slightly more than 10,000 people engaged in
Emergency Conservation Work comparing January 1934 with Decem­
ber 1933. The increase occurred almost entirely in the enrolled per­
sonnel.
Information concerning employment and pay rolls in the Emergency
Conservation Work is collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics from
the War Department, the Department of Agriculture, and the Depart­
ment of the Interior.
The pay of the enrolled personnel is $30 per month, except that 5
percent of the members of each company are paid $45 and an addi­
tional 8 percent are paid $36 per month. The pay roll of this branch
of the service is figured on this basis.




50
The carpenters and laborers, shown in table 8, are constructing
recreation buildings in a number of camps. This work will probably
be completed sometime in March.
Table 9 shows the monthly totals of employees and pay rolls of the
Emergency Conservation Work from the inception of the work in
May 1933 to January 1934. There has been a slight revision in these
figures.
T

able

9 —M O N T H L Y T O T A L S OF E M P L O Y E E S A N D P A Y R O L L S IN T H E E M E R G E N C Y
C O N S E R V A T IO N W O R K , M A Y 1933-JANUARY 1934

M onths

Num ber
of em­
ployees

1933
M a y ... . __________________
June........ .............................
J uly_____ _______ ____ ______ ,
A ugust................... , ................. !
September__________________

191,113
281,861
314,142
305,039
240,901

A mount of
pay rolls

$6,353,641
9,663,701
11,223,542
11,333,318
9,487,755

Number Am ount o f
of em­
pay rolls
ployees

Months

October. _ ______ ____ _____
Novem ber_______ ______ ___
D ecem ber.. ________ ______
1934
January________________

292,456
340,713
317,874

$11,994,703;
14,086,448
12,447, 677

_ . 320,820

i 12,204,936

1 Subject to revision.

Employment on Public Roads (Other than Public Works)
HE following table shows, by geographic divisions, the number of
employees, exclusive of those paid from the public-works fund,
engaged in building and maintaining State and Federal roads during
the months of December 1933 and January 1934.

T

T a b l e 1 .— N U M B E R OF E M P L O Y E E S E N G A G E D IN T H E C O N S T R U C T IO N A N D M A I N ­

T E N A N C E OF P U B L IC R O A D S , S T A T E A N D F E D E R A L , D U R IN G D E C E M B E R 1933
A N D J A N U A R Y 1934, B Y G E O G R A P H IC D IV ISIO N S i
Federal

Geographic division

Number of
employees
i
Decem­ Janu­
ber
ary
1933
1934

New England_______________
M iddle A tlantic.......................
East North Central.'..............
West N orth Central_________
South Atlantic......... ................
East South Central........ .........
W est South C en tra l..............
M ountain__________ _________
P acific........ .
. . . .............
T otal_____ ___________
Percent of change

855
1,619
2,886
1,854
3, 537
3,311
4,839
1,525
919
21, 345

200
474
779
702
1,641
1,100
2,260
414
63

State

Amount of pay
rolls

Decem ­
ber 1933

Janu­
ary
1934

51,670
113,030
163,161
104, 243
159, 457
127,665
223, 565
117,174
74,761

11,000
36,148
53,009
42,017
61,491
46, 752
92, 735
39,909
5,365

Number of
employees
Decem­ Janu­
ber
ary
1933
1934
14,213
32,632
34,849
29,600
34,481
13, 040
12,034
8,167
8,607

9,209
41,728
27,352
18,848
30, 513
9,110
10,373
6,285
8,367

Am ount of pay rolls

December
1933

January
1934

625, 643
2,115,187
1,594, 500
1, 046,900
1,091, 030
359, 648
693,409415, 657
742,135

1,316,448
1,677,643
1,867,178
1, 567,817
1, 238,904
514,117
741,796
538,683
765,774

8,684,109

7, 633 1,134,726 388,426 187,623 161, 785 10, 228,360
-6 4 .2

-6 5 .8

-1 3 .8

~

-1 5 .1

1 Exluding employment furnished b y projects financed from the public-works fund.

The funds from which the regular Federal highway-building pro­
gram is financed have been practically exhausted, and for that reason
employment on Federal roads not financed from the public-works




51
fund may be expected to cease altogether in the near future. Practi­
cally all new contracts awarded for road building are now financed
from the public-works fund.
Due to weather conditions there was a decrease in the number of
employees working on State highways, comparing January 1934 with
December 1933, of 13.8 percent. Pay rolls for these workers also
decreased 15.1 percent. Of the workers engaged on State roads,
84.6 percent were engaged in maintenance work and 15.4 percent in
the construction of new roads.
Table 2 shows the number of employees engaged in the construction
and maintenance of State and Federal public roads, by months,
January to December 1933.
T

2 .—N U M B E R OF E M P L O Y E E S E N G A G E D IN C O N S T R U C T IO N A N D M A I N T E ­
N A N C E OF P U B L IC R O A D S , S T A T E A N D F E D E R A L , J A N U A R Y TO D E C E M B E R 1933 i

able

Number of employees working o n State roads

M onth
Federal
roads
New

74, 405
76,969
94, 491
121, 089
138,934
151, 614
128,801
106,907
79,980
56,872
38,112
21,345

January___
February...
M arch_____
A pril______
M a y ______
June........ .
J u ly............
August.......
September .
October___
N ovem ber..
Decem ber—

39,906
36,352
37,891
40,560
47,540
54,388
61,428
60.365
62.366
58,711
63,379
46,810

Mainte­
nance

150, 989
140,639
145, 559
136,996
142, 713
152,855
141, 558
158,159
160,492
171, 260
170,765
140,813

Total

190,895
176,991
183,450
177,556
190, 253
207,243
202,986
218,524
222,858
229,971
234,144
187,623

1 Excluding employment furnished b y projects financed from the public-works fund.

The peak of employment on Federal roads, other than those financed
from the public-works fund, was reached in June, when 151,614
people were working under the regular Federal highway appropriation.
The high point in number of employees working on State roads was
reached in November, when 234,144 employees were paid from State
highway funds.




o