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EMPLOYMENT
and EARNINGS
Including THE MONTHLY REPORT
ON THE LABOR FORCE
September 1960

Vol. 7 No. 3
Data formerly published by the
Bureau of the Census in The
Monthly Report on the Labor
Force (Series P-57) are shown
in Section A.

DIVISION OF MANPOWER AND EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS
Harold Goldstein, Chief

Page

CONTENTS
Employment and Unemployment Highlights—August I960

iii

STATISTICAL TABLES
TRENDS IN EARNINGS OF FACTORY WORKERS,

Section A—Labor Force, Employment, and Unemployment

191+7-60
Employment Status
An article on postwar trends in earnings of factory workers appears in
the August issue of the Monthly Labor
Review. Reprints of this article are
available on request.

A- 1: Employment status of the noninstitutional population, 19?9 to date
A- 2% Employment status of the noninstitutional population, by sex, 1940,
1944, and 1947 to date
A- 3* Employment status of the noninstitutional population, by age and sex....
A- 4* Employment status of male veterans of World War II in the civilian
noninstitutional population
A- 5* Employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population, by
marital status and sex
A- 6t Employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population, by
color and sex
A- 7: Employment status of the civilian noninstitutional population, total
and urban, by region

1
2
3
3
4
4
5

NEW AREA SERIES
Manufacturing labor turnover rates
for California on a statewide basis
and for the San Bernardino-RiversideOntario area are now included in
table D-U.

Class of Worker, Occupation
A- 8» Employed persons
A- 9: Employed persons
and pay status
A-10: Occupation group
A-ll: Major occupation

by type of industry, class of worker, and sex
with a job but not at work, by reason for not working
•
of employed persons, by sex
group of employed persons, by color and sex

5
5
6
6

Unemployment
A-12: Unemployed persons, by duration of unemployment
A-13t Unemployed persons, by major occupation group and industry group
A-14* Persons unemployed 15 weeks and over, by selected characteristics

7
7
8

Hours of Work
A-15: Persons at work, by hours worked, type of industry, and class of worker.
A-16: Persons employed in nonagricultural industries by full-time or
part-time status and reason for part time
A-17: Wage and salary workers, by full-time or part-time status and major
industry group
A-18: Persons at work, by full-time or part-time status and major occupation
group
A-19: Persons at work in nonagricultural industries, by full-time or
part-time status and selected characteristics
•••••
••••••
For sale by the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C.
Subscription price: $3.50 a year;
$1.50 additional for foreign mailing. Price 45 cents a copy.




Continued on following page.

9
9
9
10
10

EMPLOYMENT
and EARNINGS
Including THE MONTHLY REPORT
ON THE LABOR FORCE

The national industry employment,
hours, and ejarnings data shown
in Sections B and C have been
adjusted to first quarter 1957
benchmark lev*sis.




CONTENTS-Continued
Section B-Payroll Employment, by Industry

Page

National Data
B-l: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry division, 1919
to date

11

B-2: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry. ••
B-3: Federal military personnel
B-ij: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry division
and selected groups, seasonally adjusted
B-5>» Employees in private and Government shipyards, by region
B-6: Women employees in manufacturing, by industry 1/

12
16
17
17

State and Area Data
B-7* Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry division and
State

18

B-8: Employees in nonagricultural establishments for selected areas, by
industry division

21

Section C-Industry Hours and Earnings
National Data
C-l: Gross hours and earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
1919 to date
C-2: Gross hours and earnings of production workers in manufacturing, by
major industry group
C-3: Average weekly overtime hours and average hourly earnings excluding overtime of production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group
C-U: Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours and payrolls in industrial and
construction activities
•
C-£s Average weekly hours, seasonally adjusted, of production workers in
selected industries•••••
••
C-6: Gross hours and earnings of production workers, by industry
C-7: Gross and spendable earnings in industrial and construction activities,
in current and 19li7-Ii9 dollars..«••

27
28
28
29
29
30
36

State and Area Data
C-8: Gross hours and earnings of production workers in manufacturing, by State
and selected areas
•• 37

Section D-Labor Turnover
National Data
D-l: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing, 1951 to date
D-2: Labor turnover rates, by industry
D-3: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing, by sex and major industry group \J

ijl
12
*

State and Area Data
D-k' Labor turnover rates in manufacturing for selected States and areas

Explanatory Notes
BLS Regional Offices
State Cooperating Agencies

US

l-E
IO-E
..•••

inside back cover

1/ Quarterly date included in the February, May, August, and November issues*

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT
HIGHLIGHTS

August 1960

THE MONTHLY REPORT ON THE LABOR FORCE: AUGUST I960
The pickup in nonfarm jobs in August was less than seasonal because of the
early changeover in automobile models together with further reductions in steel
employment. In most industries and in agriculture, employment changes were
largely seasonal. Total employment continued at a record high for the month, and
unemployment fell, although not as much as usual for this time of year.
Unemployment dropped by 200, 000 over the month to 3, 8 million, largely
because of the exit of young summer jobseekers from the labor force. Unemployment among adult men and women held at about their July levels--1. 9 and 1. 1
million, respectively. Seasonal expectations call for a larger drop in the number
of unemployed teenagers, and some decline in the number of unemployed adult men
in August. The seasonally adjusted rate of unemployment rose to 5. 9 percent from
5.4 percent a month earlier. The seasonal adjustment procedure, however, does
not take account of the early model changeover this year.
State insured unemployment, which does not include new labor market
entrants, also de'clined less than seasonally over the month--falling by 75, 000 to
1, 650,000 in the week ending August 13. Both total and insured unemployment were
some 350, 000 higher than a year earlier.
Total civilian employment declined by 400, 000 over the month to 68. 3 million
in August, largely reflecting a seasonal reduction in the farm sector. Nonagricultural employment--including the self-employed, domestics, and unpaid family
workers--remained virtually unchanged at 61.8 million.
Total nonagricultural employment was at a record for the month, 700, 000
above a year ago (after allowance for the addition of Alaska and Hawaii). Agricultural employment was at about its 1959 level in August, but for the year as a whole
it has shown a continuation of its long-term decline, averaging some 300,000 less
in I960 than in 1959.
Nonfarm Payroll Employment
The number of workers on nonfarm payrolls rose by 165, 000 over the month
to 53. 4 million in August. The rise was not as large as usual for this time of year,
mainly because of employment declines connected with the early model changeover
in the automobile industry.
Seasonal expansion in soft-goods manufacturing accounted for an increase of
200, 000 jobs in August, with the food processing industry alone adding 100, 000
workers as cannery operations approached their seasonal peak. Employment in the
apparel industry rose by 50, 000 with the start of production for the winter season.
The rise in apparel employment this month and the declines in the spring have been
smaller than in most previous years, reflecting a moderation of seasonality in this
industry.
In contrast to the seasonal rise in soft-goods manufacturing employment,
durable goods employment dropped, with the transportation equipment industry
showing the largest decline--75, 000. This reflected an early closeout of production
of I960 model cars in preparation for the introduction of new models. Prior to 1959,
the effects of the model changeover were seen in September or later months. The
changeover this year resulted as usual in some job declines in other industries,
particularly in fabricated metals.
The primary metals industry showed continued evidence of employment
weakness; employment in this industry has declined by 130, 000, or 10 percent,
in the past 6 months.




iii

TRENDS IN EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT
Actual and Seasonally Adjusted
January 1949 to Date

MILLIONS
OF PERSONS

MILLIONS
OF PERSONS

70

70

Total Civilian Employment
68

68

66

66

SEASONALLY
ADJUSTED >

64

64

62

62

60

60

58

58

56

~j Data adjusted to new definitions adopted in January 1957

•

'

'

'

•

I

56

— '•! 0

Unemployment
TOTAL.
ACTUAL

SEASONALLY
ADJUSTED

Data adjusted to new definitions adopted in January 1957

1949

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960

Insured under following programs: State unemployment insurance, unemployment compensation for Federal employees, veterans, ex-servicemen,
railroad workers (RRB). and temporary programs. (Through June 1959)
Beginning in January 1960 data include Alaska and Hawaii




The net effect of these developments was to raise total factory employment
by 150, 000 over the month to 16. 4 million in August. Other employment changes
were mainly seasonal; the largest of these--a gain of 50, 000--occurred in the
construction industry.
In the past 6 months, nonfarm payroll employment has risen by 130, 000
more than seasonally, with sharply contrasting developments in different sectors.
On a seasonally adjusted basis, employment increased by 100, 000 in trade and
in State and local government; the construction, service, and finance industries also added substantial numbers of workers to their payrolls. Manufacturing employment on the other hand, declined by about 300, 000, but virtually all of this decline
occurred in transportation equipment (autos and aircraft) and in primary metals.
Most other manufacturing industries were at about the same levels in August
(seasonally adjusted) as earlier in the year.
Factory Hours and Earnings
The average workweek of factory production workers, at 39. 7 hours in
August, held at about the same level as in July. Normally there is a rise in this
period but seasonal gains in a number of industries were offset by a sharp reduction in the workweeks of steel mills and automobile and supplier plants. There also
were smaller-than-usual increases in hours in the electrical machinery, furniture,
and lumber industries.
Average hourly earnings dropped by 2 cents over the month to $2. 27. The
decline was the result both of a reduction in overtime hours, particularly in such
high paying industries as transportation equipment, primary metals, machinery,
and rubber, and a shift in the relative employment weight of high and low paying
industries. Average weekly earnings in manufacturing dropped by $1. 02 to $90. 12
in August.
Since the beginning of I960, the factory workweek has declined by 0. 8 hours
on a seasonally adjusted basis. In the durable goods sector the drop amounted to
1. 4 hours, most of it due to declines in steel and in transportation equipment. The
workweek in nondurable goods was only slightly below its levei earlier in the year.
Total Employment
As is usual for this time of year, there was a net decline of 400, 000 in the
number of teenagers with summer jobs. Of course, this is only a preview of the
large seasonal reduction in teenage employment that will occur in September when
schools reopen.
In agriculture, the reduction in the number of teenage workers was accompanied by a similar reduction among adult women as farm activity slackened. In
nonfarm employment, the teenager drop was offset by an increase of one-fourth
million women over 3 5. There were no significant employment changes among
adult men (20 and over) in either the farm or nonfarm sectors. On a seasonally
adjusted basis, the employment of adult men in nonfarm jobs was at an all-time
peak last spring but has declined by one-half million since May.
Compared with August 1959, nonfarm employment was little changed among
adult men; women and teenagers accounted for all of the 700, 000 increase
(allowing for Alaska and Hawaii). In large part, this development was due to the
growth of the teenage and female labor force, but to some extent it reflected
increased unemployment among adult men. The job gains recorded by women were
mainly in professional and clerical occupations, and personal services.




EMPLOYMENT IN SELECTED DURABLE GOODS INDUSTRIES
Seasonally Adjusted, January 1959 to Date
Thousands

Thousands

l,8OO

l,8OO

1,700

1,700

l,6OO

1,6OO

Transportation Equipment
Machinery

1,500

1,500

Steel
Stxi/U

l,4OO

1,400

Electrical Machinery
Primary Metals

l,3OO

1,300

1,200

1,200

1,100
1,000

1,1OO

v"'

-'""

1,000

9OO

9OO

800

8OO

J

F

M

A

M

J

J
1959

A

S O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

S

O

N

,t
D

I960
Automobile Model Changeover Period

THOUSANDS

A

Not adjusted for seasonality.

UNEMPLOYED MEN AND WOMEN 20 YEARS AND OVER
Seasonally Adjusted: April 1948 to Date

4,500
4,000
3,500

Data Adjusted to New Definitions Adopted in January 1957.

J-

_L

1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962




Beginning in January 1960. data include Alaska and Hawaii.

Full-time and Part-time Employment
The number of persons working 35 hours or more in nonfarm industries
showed a large seasonal increase over the month, reflecting in part the return of
full-time workers from vacation. Although total part-time employment was down
seasonally by one-half million, the number on reduced hours for economic reasons
rose by 100, 000 to 1. 2 million.
Trends in full-time and part-time employment can be more clearly seen by
examining estimates of the number of workers on full-time schedules, including
those working full-time and those who usually work full-time but who worked parttime in the survey week because of temporary factors that do not reflect poor business conditions such as bad weather, illness, holidays, strikes, etc. The table
below shows figures that have been compiled in this manner. The August I960
figures shown below do not include Alaska and Hawaii.
Workers on Full-time and Part-time Schedules, August 1958-60
(In thousands)
August
I960

August
1958

60,884

58,746

6,716
At work:
Working at full-time schedules • • • • •
Working at part-time schedules. • • • •

August
1959

61,586

Work schedule

6,609

5,684

47,833
7,037
2,851
1,216
1,635
4, 186

47,537
6,738
2, 547
1, 003
1, 544
4, 191

46,011
7,051
3,074
1,400
1,674
3,976

About half the net increase in the nonfarm employed over the year was in
full-time jobs. The change in the number of part-time jobs was disproportionately
large since they represented only about 11 percent of all nonfarm jobs in
August 1959. The over-the-year increase in the group of workers on part-time
schedules was entirely among those working part-time for economic reasons.
Characteristics of the Unemployed
Duration of unemployment. The number unemployed less than 5 weeks
(representing those added to the unemployed since mid-July) totaled 1. 7 million
in August or 45 percent of all jobless persons. At the same time, some 1. 9
million who had been seeking work in July were either employed or out of the
labor force in August. Thus, turnover among the unemployed was continuing at
a rate of nearly 50 percent.
Nearly all of the net reduction in unemployment over the month occurred
among the short-term unemployed. Short-term unemployment usually drops in
August.
The long-term unemployed (those seeking work 15 weeks or longer) remained
virtually unchanged over the month at 800,000 and also numbered about the same
as a year ago. As in other recent months, long-term unemployment was only about




vii

UNEMPLOYMENT RATES IN SELECTED WORKER CATEGORIES
PERCENT OF LABOR FORCE
18

August 1959 and 1960

PERCENT OF LABOR

1
6

14
12

10

RATES OF INSURED UNEMPLOYMENTS AUGUST 1960
Not Seasonally Adjusted

HAWAII
2.0

I 6% a OVER
I 4-5.9%

lillH 2-3.9%
1

I UNDER 2%

BASED ON AV. COVERED EMPLOYMENT
12 MOS. ENDING DECEMBER 1959




Insured jobless under State unemployment insurance programs,
week ending May 14; excludes workers who have exhausted their
benefit rights, new workers, and persons from jobs not covered
by State unemployment insurance programs.
Source: Bureau of Employment Security

half its 1958 level but was still 300, 000 above 1957 levels. Long-term unemployment continued to be disproportionately high among nonwhite men and among men
45 years of age and over.
Personal characteristics. Unemployment among teenagers continued downward in August, declining by 200, 000 to 800, 000 or about one-fifth of the jobless
total. As in July, teenagers in the labor force in August appeared to be finding
jobs at about the same rate as a year ago even though their number in the labor
force had increased by 250, 000 from a year ago. About 11 percent of those in the
labor market were unemployed in August I960, the same proportion as in
August 1959.
On a seasonally adjusted basis, unemployment among men 20 years of age
and over has risen for three months in a row. This is the group that has felt the
main impact of recent employment cutbacks in steel, autos, and related industries.
The unemployment rate for married men, 3. 4 percent in August, continued to be
somewhat higher than the comparable rate in 1959 (2. 9 percent).
Industry attachment of last job. As in July, most of the drop in unemployment occurred among young jobseekers with no previous work experience. Among
experienced workers, the only sizable changes over the month were seasonal
recalls in soft goods industries and the layoffs among automobile workers. The
unemployment rate for primary metals workers, which had been rising, stabilized
between July and August although at a comparatively high level.
The unemployment rate for hard goods factory workers continued to be
substantially higher than a year ago (7 percent as compared with 5 percent). The
rate for steel and other primary metals workers (9 percent) was almost twice as
high as in August 1959. The present rate for atuomobile workers (17 percent),
although temporarily higher than in virtually all other industries, was not
significantly different from its level a year earlier when retooling was also in
progress. The unemployment rate among nondurable goods workers (4-1/2
percent), was practically the same as a year earlier.
Insured Unemployment
State insured unemployment edged down 75, 000 between July and August to
1, 650, 000, largely because of the resumption of activity in plants which had been
closed for vacation periods. Although the decline (4 percent) was about the same
as that which occurred last year at this time, it was considerably smaller than
in earlier years. Both this year and last the August figures were influenced by
earlier-than-usual model change layoffs in auto plants.
Thirty-four States showed reductions in insured unemployment over the
month. The largest declines occurred in New York (35,000), Pennsylvania and
Massachusetts (16, 000 each), California (12, 000), and New Jersey (10, 000), and
were due largely to recalls to work following vacation shutdowns, particularly
in textile and apparel plants. In California a seasonal pickup in food processing
activities accounted for most of the decline. The only significant increase in
insured unemployment--33, 000 in Michigan--reflected auto model change layoffs,
and some cutbacks in the steel and machinery industries. A small rise in Ohio
(7, 000) was attributed to layoffs in these three industries. Indiana, New York,
and Wisconsin also reported sizable increases in unemployment among auto
workers.
The national rate of insured unemployment (not adjusted for seasonality)
was 4. 2 percent in August compared with 4. 4 percent in July and 3. 4 percent a
year earlier. Michigan1 s rate of 6. 7 percent was the highest in the Nation.
West Virginia and Pennsylvania were next with rates of 6. 6 and 6. 0 percent,

564934 O - 60 - 2




respectively, due in large measure to unemployment among coal miners and
primary metals worker a Among the other large States, the rates were above the
national average in California, New Jersey, and Ohio while those in Illinois, Indiana,
Massachusetts and Wisconsin ranged from 3. 1 to 4. 0 percent. New York1 s rate
of 4. 2 percent was the same as the national average.
It is estimated that the number of persons exhausting their State benefit rights
in August will show little change from the 123, 000 in July. In August of last year,
exhaustions totaled 106, 000.
Labor Force
The total labor force, including the Armed Forces, declined seasonally by
600, 000 over the month to 74. 6 million in August. The decline resulted from the
withdrawal of young summer jobseekers and the preharvest curtailment in farm
activity.
The labor force continued 1. 1 million above a year earlier (allowing for
Alaska and Hawaii). After a relatively low first quarter, the labor force has
averaged about 1 million above 1959 levels. This amount of growth is fairly close
to that anticipated on the basis of population growth and long-term changes in
proportions in the labor force. It follows a 3-1/2 year period of comparatively slow
labor force growth. Therefore, the present size of the labor force (seasonally adjusted) is about one-half million smaller than would be indicated by the long-term
trend.
As noted earlier, teenagers accounted for about 250, 000 of the increase from
August 1959 to August I960. This was due entirely to their larger number in the
population, although earlier in the summer their proportions in the work force had
also shown some increase. In the first half of the year, the uptrend in labor force
participation among middle aged women appeared to be slowing down, but evidence
from the July and August surveys indicates a resumption of the long-term rise.
Labor force rates for men 65 and over have continued to decline; only about a third
of these older men were in the labor force in the summer of I960 as compared with
40 percent 5 years ago, and 46 percent in 1950.

NOTE: For data on insured unemployment, see Unemployment Insurance Claims
published weekly by the Bureau of Employment Security.




TIMI 1-1: Eiptoymt statis if tbi miKtltitiMil piplitiii
182S ti Jltl

Year and month

Total
noninstitutional
population

(Thousands o
Total labor force ineluding Armed Forces
Percent
of
noninstitutional
population

persons 14 years of age and over)
Civilian labor force
mpJoyed

Total

Total

Agriculture

Unemployed1
Percent of
labor force
Not
season- Seasonally
ally
adjusted

Nonagricultural
industries

Not in
labor
force

adjusted

10,*50
10,3*0
10,290
10,170
10,090

37,180
35,l*»O
32,110
28,770
28,670

1,550
*,3*0
8,020
12,060
12,830

*6,3OO
Uk,220

9,900
10,110
10,000
9,820
9,690

30,990
32,150
3*,*10
36,*8O
3*,530

11,3*0
10,610
9,030
7,700
10,390

3.2
8.7
15.9
23.6
2*. 9
21.7
20.1
16.9
1*.3
19.0

1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.

*9,**0
50,080
50,680
51,250
51,8*0

*9,l8o
*9,820
50,420
51,000
51,590

193*.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.

52,*90
53,1*0
53,7*0
5*,32O
5*, 950

52,230
52,870
53,**O
5*,000
5*,6io

*O,890
*2,26o

*7,63O
*5,*8O
*2,*00

38,9*0
38,760

*if,*10

106,380
101,520
102,610
103,660

55,600
56,180
57,530
60,380
6U,56O

(2)
56.0
56.7
58.8
62.3

55,230
55,6*0
55,910
56,*1O
55,5*0

*5,75O
*7,520
50,350
53,750
5*,*7O

9,610
9,5*0
9,ioo
9,250
9,080

36,1*0
37,980
*l,250
*if,500
*5,39O

9,*80
8,120
5,560
2,660
1,070

17.2
1*.6
9.9
*.7
1.9

(2)
*4,200
*3,99O
*2,230
39,100

10^,630
105,520
106,520
107,608
108,632

66,01*0
65,290
60,970
61,758
62,898

63.1
61.9
57.2
57.*
57.9

5*,63O
53,860
57,520
60,168
6l,**2

53,960
52,820
55,250
57,812
59,117

8,950
8,580
8,320
8,256
6

*5,oio
**,2*0
*6,93O
*9,557
51,156

670
1,0*0
2,270
2,356
2,325

1.2
1.9
3.9
3.9
3.8

38,590
*O,230
*5,55O
*5,85O
*5,733

109,773
110,929
112,075
113,270
115,09*

63,721
6*,7*9
65,983
66,560
67,362

58.0
58.*
58.9
58.8
58.5

62,105
63,099
62,88*
62,966
63,815

58,*23
59,7*8
60,78*
61,035
61,9*5

8,017
7,*97
7,0*8
6,792
6,555

50,*o6
52,251
55,390

3,682
3,351
2,099
1,932
1,870

5.9
5.3
3.3
3.1
2.9

*6,O51
*6;i8l
*6,092
*6,710
*7,732

195*.
1955.
1956.
1957.
1958.

116,219
117,388
118,73*
120,**5
121,950

67,818
68,896
70,387
70,7**
71,28*

58.*
58.7
59.3
58.7
58.5

6k,k6Q
65,8*8
67,530
67,9*6
68,6*7

60,890
62,9**
6*,7O8
65,011
63,966

6,*95
6,718
6,572
6,222
5,8**

5*,395
56,225
58,135
58,789
58,122

3,578
2,90*
2,822
2,936
*,68l

5.6
*.*
*.2
*.3
6.8

*8,*01
*8,*92
*8,3*8
*9,699
50,666

1959.

123,366

71,9*6

69,39*

65,581

5,836

59,7*5

3,813

5.5

51,*20

123,5*9
123,659
123,785
123,908
12U,03U

73,20*
72,109
72,629
71,839
71,808

59.3
58.3
58.7
58.0
57.9

70,667
69,577
70,103
69,310
69,276

67,2*1
66,3*7
66,831
65.6*0
65,699

6,357
6,2*2
6,12*
5,601
*,8n

6O,88U
60,105
60,707
60, oM)
60,888

3,*26
3,230
3,272
3,670
3,577

U.8
k.6
U.7
5.3
5.2

5.*
5.6
6.0
5.9
$.S

50,3*5
51,550
51,155
52,068
52,225

12U,6O6
12U,716
12U,839
12U,917
125,033
125,162

70,689
70,970
70,993
72,331
73,171
75,*99

56.7
56.9
56.9
57.9
58.5
60.3

68,168
68,UU9
68,173
69,819
70,667
73,002

61;, 020
6U,52O
6U,267
66,159
67,208
68,579

U,6ll
U,619
*,565
5,393
5,837
6,856

59,*O9
59,901
59,702
60,765
61,371
61,722

3,931
*,206
3,660
3,*59
*,*23

6.1
5.7
6.1
5.2

5.2
U.8

5.*
5.0

53,917
53,7*6
53,8*5
52,587
51,862
*9,663

125,288
125,*95>

75,215
7*,55l

60.0

72,706
72,070

68,689
68,282

6,885
6,*5*

61,805
61,828

*,017
3,788

$k
$.9

50,07*
50,9*8

1939.
19*0.
19*1.
19*2.
19*319**.
19*5-

ISM..
19*9-..
1950...
1951...
1952...
1953 8

1959* August
Ssptonber.••«
October
NoTOofeer
December
I960: 4 January..,
February.
March....
April....
M
Jtano.

August.

59.U

*.°

6.1

5.3

J
Data for 1947-56 adjusted to reflect changes in the definition of employment and unemployment adopted in January 1957. Two
groups averaging about one-quarter million workers which were formerly classified as employed (with a job but not at work)—those on
temporary layoff and those waiting to start new wage and salary jobs within 30 days—were assigned to different classifications,
mostly to the unemployed. Data by sex, shown in table A-2, were adjusted for the years 1948-56.
2
Not available.
^Beginning 1953, labor force and employment figures are not strictly comparable with previous years as a result of the introduction of material from the 1950 Census into the estimating procedure. Population levels were raised by about 600,000; labor force,
total employment, and agricultural employment by about 350,000, primarily affecting the figures for total and males. Other categories were relatively unaffected.
4
Data for 1960 include Alaska and Hawaii and are therefore not strictly comparable with previous years. This Inclusion has resulted in an increase of about half a million in the nonlnstltutional population 14 years of age and over, and about 300,000 in the
labor force, four-fifths of this in nonagrlcultural employment. The levels of other labor force categories were not appreciably
changed.




Historical Employment Status
Table A-2: Employment status of the noninstitutional population, by sex

Sex, year, and month

Total
noninstitutional
population

(Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over)
Total labor force inCivilian labor force
cluding Armed Forces
Employed1
Percent
of
NonagrinoninstiAgricultural
Number
tutional
culture
induspopulatries
tion

U:nemployed1
'
Percent of
labor force
Not
season- Seasonally
ally
adjusted adjusted

Not in
labor
force

MALE
8,060
5,310
8,2*2
8,213
8,35*
8,*57
8,322
8,502
8,8*0
9,169
9,*3O
9,*65
10,16*
10,677
11,019

**,537
1*5,0*1
*5,756
1*5,882
*6,197
*6,562

35,550
35,110
*1,677
*2,268
*1,*73
*2,l62
1+2,362
*2,237
*2,966
*2,i65
^3,152
*3,999
*3,99O
H3,0*2
**,089

8,*5O
7,020
6,953
6,623
6,629
6,271
5,791
5,623
5,*96
5,*29
5,*79
5,268
5,037
*,802
*,7*9

27,100
28,090
3*,725
35,6*5
3*,8*i*
35,891
36,571
36,61*
37,*7O
36,736
37,673
38,731
38,952
38,2l*0
39,3*0

5,930
350
1,595
1,590
2,602
2,280
1,250
1,217
1,228
2,372
1,889
1,757
1,893
3,155
2,*73

1*.3
1.0
3.7
3.6
5.9
5.1
2.9
2.8
2.8
5.3
*.2
3.8
*.l
6.8
5.3

83.5
81.5
81.*
80.8
80.8

*7,725
*6,6lO
*6,551
*6,232
*6,278

*5,587
**,588
**,5**
*3,863
*3,873

5,050
*,82*
*,782
*,526
*,128

*©,537
39,76*
39,762
39,337
39,7**

2,138
2,022
2,007
2,370
2,*05

*.5
*.3
*.3
5.1
5.2

*8,*12
W,l+87
*8,**5
*9,O6O
*9,337
50,9*9

79.8
79.9
79.7
80.7
81.1
83.7

*5,923
*5,999
*5,958
*6,58O
*6,865
*8,*8*

*3,1O3
*3,328
*3,O*8
**,1*9
**,68l
*5,788

3,995
*,009
*,010
*,575
*,7*9
5,325

39,108
39,319
39,038
39,57*
39,932
*0,*62

2,821
2,672
2,910
2,*31
2,18*
2,696

6.1
5.8
6.3
5.2
*.7
5.6

60,956
61,055

50,998
50,678

83.7
83.O

*8,521
*8,229

*6,O17
*5,829

5,399
5,226

*O,6l7
*O,6O3

2,50*
2,*00

5.2
5.0

50,300
52,650
5*, 523
55,118
55,7*5
56,1+0*
57,078
57,766
58,561
59,203
59,901*
60,690
61,632
62,1+72
63,265

i*,i6o
19,370
16,915
17,599
18,01+8
18,680
19,309
19,556
19,668
19,971
20,8^2
21,808
22,097
22,1+82
22,865

28.2
36.8
31.0
31.9
32.1+
33-1
33.8
33.9
33.6
33.7
35.9
35.9
36.0
36.1

i*,i6o
19,170
16,896
17,583
18,030
18,657
19,272
19,513
19,621
19,931
20,80:;
21,77*
22,06*
22,*51
22,832

n,97O
18,850
16,3*9
16,81+8
16,9*7
17,58*
l8,*21
18,798
18,979
18,72*
19,790
20,707
21,021
20,92*
21,*92

1,090
1,930
1,31*
1,338
1,386
1,226
1,257
1,170
l,06l
1,067
1,239
1,306
1,18*
1,0*2
1,087

io,8Co
10,920
15,036
15,510
15,561
16,358
17,16*
17,628
17,918
17,657
18,551
19,1^01
19,837
19,882
20,*05

15.5
1.7
3.2
*.l
6.0
5.8
*.*
3.7
3.3
6.1
*.9
*.9
*.7
6.8
5.9

63,363
63,*37
63,506
63,57*

36.3
36.3
37.1
36.*
36.2

22,9*2
22,967
23,552
23,078
22,998

21,65*
21,759
22,287
21,777
21,826

1,3@7
1,*18
1,3*3
1,07*
683

20,3*7
20,3*1
20,9*5
20,703
21,1**

5.6
5.3
5.*
5.6
5.1

5.7
5.6
6.*
5.8
6.1

*O,389
*O,*37
39,922

63,0*

22,97*
22,999
23,58*
23,110
23,030

2,190
320
5*7
735
1,083
1,073
851
715
6*2
1,207
1,016
1,067
1,0*3
1,526
1,3*0
1,288
1,209
1,265
1,301
1,172

63,9*2
6*,OO5
6*,07*
61*, 128
6^,191
6*,262

22,277
22,*82
22,5*8
23,271
23,835
2*,550

3*.8
35.1
35.2
36.3
37.1
38.2

22,2*5
22,*50
22,516
23,239
23,803
2*,518

20,917
21,192
21,219
22,010
22,527
22,791

615
610
555
819
1,088
1,531

20,301
20,582
20,66*
21,191
2l,*39
21,260

1,328
1,258
1,296
1,229
1,276
1,727

6.0
5,6
5.8
5.3
5.*
7.0

5.5
5.3
5.8
5.*
5.2
5.9

*1,665
*l,523
*1,527
*O,857
*O,356
39,712

6*,333
6*,**3

2*,217
23,872

37.6
37.0

2*,185
23,8*1

22,672
22,*53

1,*85
1,229

21,187
21,22*

1,513
1,388

6.3
5.8

5.6
5.9

*0,ll6
*O,57l

19*10
,
19*1*
19*7
19*6
19*9
1950
1951
1952
1953 2
195*
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959.
1959: August...,
September.
October...
Hovember..
December.,
i960: January...
February..
March
April.....
May
June

*2,020
1+6,670

50,080
51,980
53,085
53,513
5*,028
5*,526
5*,9?6
55,503
56,53*
57,016
57,*8*
58,0**
58,813
59,Vf8
60,100

July
August

*5,67*
1+6,069
1+6,671+
1+7,001
1+7,692
1+7,81+7
1+8,051+
1*8,579
1+8,61+9
1+8,802
*9,e8i

83.9
89.8
8*. 5
81+. 7
8I+.5
81+. 5
8*. 9
8I+.7
81+.1+
83.9
83.6
83.7
82.7
82.1
81.7

60,186
60,222
60,278
60,333
60,389

50,230
1+9,110
*9,©*5
*8,729
*.8,778

60,6a
60,710
60,763
60,790
60,81*
60,900

l+l+,81+l+
1+5,300

1+1,1+80
35,1*60
*3,272
1*3,858
l+l+,O75
**,**2
*3,6l2
*3,*5*
1*1*, 19I*

1:1
5.8
6.0
5.2
5.1
*.6
*.8
5.2
5.3
5.9

9,956
11,113
11,233
11,60*
11,612
12,251
12,223
12,319
11,73©
11,506
9,951
9,958
10,377

FEMALE
19U0
19**
19*7
19*8
19*9
1950
1951
1952
1953 2
195*
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1959t

August...
September
October..
November.
December.

i960: January..
February.,
March....
April....
May
June
July
August...
]

See footnote 1, table A-l.




2

3*.e

See footnote 3, table A-l.

3

See footnote 4, table A-l.

36,1*0
33,280
37,608
37,520
37,697
37,72*
37,770
38,208
38,893
39,232
39,062
38,883
39,535
39,990
*0,*01

*o,*6*
*0,6l*

Table A-3: Employment statis i f the miistititiiial pipilatin, by lie aid sex
August i960

Age and sex

Total.
Male.
14 to 17 years.. - 14 and 15 years.
16 and 17 years.
18 to 24 years....
18 and 19 years.
20 to 24 years..
25 to 34 years...
25 to 29 years.
30 to 34 years.
35 to 44 years. ..
35 to 39 years.
40 to 44 years.
45 to 54 years
45 to 49 years
50 to 54 years
55 to 64 years
55 to 59 years
60 to 64 years
65 years and over....
65 to 69 years
70 years and over..

(Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over)
Civilian labor force
Total labor force
Employed
Unemployed
including Armed Forces
Percent of
Percent
Percent of
noninsti- Agri- Nonagrlof
noninstitutional cul- cultural
induslabor
tutional
population ture
force
tries
population

Not in la

Total

Keeping
In
house school

k,351

59-4

72,©70

58.6

6,454

61,628

3,788

53
-

50,948

34,99*

805

1,712 13,437

50,678

83.0

48,229

82.3

5,226

40,603

2,400

50
.

10,377

81

421

1,024

2,617
875
1,7*2
7,1*53
2,H*5
5,308

45.8
30.7
60.8

45.4
30.7
60.1
89.5
82.6
92.7

739
327
412
722
252
470

1,568
494
1,074
4,863
1,302
3,561

263
54
209
577
247
330

10.2
6.2
12.3
9.4
13.7
7.6

3,096
1,971
1,125
725
380
3*5

7
2
5
2
2

190
96
9*
162
47
115

14

85!©
93.9

2,570
875
1,695
6,162
1,801
* 6

10,962
5,253
5,709
11,3*3
5,880
5,463

98.1
97.6
98.5
97.7
97.7
97.7

10,287
4,84l
5,446
10,972
5,646
5,326

97.9
97.4
98.5
97.6
97.6
97.6

705
397
308
859
380
479

9,094
4,172
*,922
9,750
5,071
*,679

486
272
214
363
195
168

4.7
5.6
3.9
3.3
3.5
3.2

217
131
86
269
140
129

10
5
5
7
1
6

53
38
15
13
8
5

*7
23
24
85
45
40

9,668
5,173
4,495
6,387
3,679
2,708
2,251
1,236
1,015

95.9
96.9
94.9
86.5
92.0
79.9
32.6
46.1
24.0

9,607
5,127
4,480
6,382
3,675
2,707
2,251
1,236
1,015

95.9
96.8
94.9
86.5
92.0
79.9
32.6
46.1
24.0

884
431
*53
779
432
3*7
538
230
308

8,378
4,527
3,851
5,31*
3,097
2,217
1,636
945
691

344
168
176
288
145

411
168
243
1,001
320
681
4,657
1,447

3
2
1

16

3.6
3.3
3.9
4.5
4.0
5.3
3.5
5.0
1.5

127
54
73
253
106
147
474
126
348

21,224

1,388

5.8

688

2
15
7
8
36
5
31

3,210
Female.

Unable
to
Other
work

23,872

37.0

23,841

37.0

1,229

34,913

384

542
162
380
3,453
650
2,803

165
67
98
186
120
66

14 to 17 years... .
14 and 15 years.
16 and 17 years.
18 to 24 years....
18 and 19 years.
20 to 24 years..

1,479
480
999
3,997
1,399
2,598

26.8
17.5
35.9
49.4
56.5
46.3

1,*79
480
999
3,981
1,393
2,588

26.8
17.5
35.9
49.3
56.4
46.2

214
119
95
121
51
70

1,127
338
789
3,487
1,186
2,301

139
23
116
374
157
217

9.4
4.8
11.6
9.4
11.2
8.4

40,571
4,046
2,262
1,784
4,088
1,076
3,012

25 to 34 years...
25 to 29 years.
30 to 34 years.
35 to 44 years...
35 to 39 years.
40 to 44 years.

4,079
1,954
2,125
5,240
2,555
2,685

35.6
35.7
35.4
42.9
40.3
45.6

4,071
1,949
2,122
5,235
2,552
2,683

35.5
35.6
35.4
42.8
40.3
45.6

180
79
101
239
113
126

3,623
1,734
1,889
4,735
2,324
2,4ll

268
136
132
262
115
147

6.6
7.0
6.2
5.0
4.5
5.5

7,392
3,521
3,871
6,984
3,779
3,205

7,263
3,462
3,801
6,829
3,694
3,135

45 to 54 years
45 to 49 years
50 to 54 years
55 to 64 years
55 to 59 years
60 to 64 years
65 years and over
65 to 69 years
70 years and over.

5,232
2,795
2,437
2,976
1,759
1,217
868
518
350

49.2
49.6
48.9
37.0
41.0
32.3
10.3
16.8
6.5

5,230
2,794
2,436
2,976
1,759
1,217
868
518
350

49.2
49.5
48.9
37.0
4l.O
32.3
10.3
16.8
6.5

235
123
112
170
96
74
71
44
27

4,769
2,559
2,210
2,708
1,609
1,099
777
458
319

226
113
113
99
54
45
20
16
4

4.3
4.0
4.7
3.3
3.1
3.7
2.3
3.2
1.2

5,395
2,845
2,550
5,076
2,529
2,547
7,589
2,570
5,019

5,261
2,780
2,481
4,878
2,432
2,446
6,688
2,400
4,288

7
16
11
5

8,851

1,8*8
1,018
24
10
14

4,586

6 3,334
1 2,033
5 1,301
430
20
14
293
6
137
19
7
12
35
14
21

99
47
52
104
60
44

37
15
22
78
34
44
493
62
431

94
50
44
117
62
55
408
108
300

NOTE: Total noninstitutional population may be obtained by summing total labor force and not in labor force; civilian noninstituional population by summing civilian labor force and not in labor force.
Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960. (See footnote 4, table A-l.)




Table A-4: Employment status of male veterans of World War II in the civilian noninstititional population
(In thousands)
Employment status
Total.
Civilian labor force
Employed
Agriculture
Nonagricultural industries.
Unemployed
Not in labor force.

1*,*55

14,459

14,458

14,065
13,592
577
13,015
473

14,058
13,573
621
12,952
485

14,073
13,631
602
13,029
442

390

401

384

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

(See footnote 4, table A-l.)

Marital Stat.us and Color
Table A-5: Employment status of the civilian noiiRStititional population, by marital states and sex

(Percent distribution of persons 14 years of age and over)

August L959

July I960

August I960

Married, Married, Widowed
Married, Married, Widowed
or
spouse
or
spouse
spouse
Single spouse
absent divorced
present

Sex and employment status

Single

Married, Married, Widowed
spouse
Single
spouse
or
absent divorced
present

MALE
100.0

52.1

68.0
32.0

100.0

100.0

71.3

89.8

28.7

10.2

87.3
12.7

93.U
n.2
82.2
6.6

100.0
88.7
17.9
70.8
11.3

100.0
97.1
8.8
88.3
2.9

92.U
19.7
72.7
7.6

100.0
9U.1
11.8
82.3
$.9

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

31.6
68.U

58.1
1*1.9

36.8
63.2

5fc.7
1*5.3

30.5
69.5

5U.7
U5.3

36.7
63.3

51.9
U8.1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

93.2
5.2
88.0
6.8

7.#5
87.2
5.3

91.9
U.1
87.8
8.1

9U.9
2.8
92.1
5.1

91.6
5.8
85.8
8.U

9U.8
7.1
87.7
5.2

93.1
2.8
90.3
6.9

95.0
3.0
92.0
5.0

93.5
h.9
88.6
6.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

89.2
10.8

85.1
li*.9

5U.8
1*5.2

68.1
31.9

89.1
10.9

83.9
16.1

1*5#.U

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

96.6
8.5
88.1
3.U

90.9
19.2
71.7
9.1

92.U
11.2
81.2
7.6

89.9
18.3
71.6
10.1

96.7
9.2
87.5
3.3

92.5
13.0
79.5
7.5

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

31.5
68.5

U5.o

55.0

37.0
63.0

52.U
U7.6

100.0

100.0

100.0

6.0
88.7
5.3

92.2
3.3
88.9
7.8

9U.8
2.8
92.0
5.2

Nonagricultural industries

100.0

100.0

100.0

Total

100.0

100.0

U7.9
100.0
90.1
16.3
73.8
9.9

FEMALE
Total

Nonagricultural industries

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

(See footnote 4, table A-l.)

Table A-6: Employment status of the civilian noninstitntional population, by color and sex
(Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over)

July I960

Aogost I960

August 1959

Color and employment status

WHITE

Labor force
Percent of population
Employed
.
Agriculture
Nonagricultural industries
Unemployed
Percent of labor force

.
,

6U,010
58.0

U3.3W*
82.3

20,667
35.8

61,023
5,50*

1*1,1*56
U,559
36,897

19,567
9U5
IB, 622
1,099
5.3
37,008

61,376
5,71*6
55,630
3,U*8
U.9
1*5,583

2,987
U.7
U6,3O7

Not in labor force

9,299

52,530

57,576

108,798

51,956

56,81*2

1*3,617
83.0

110,106

Total

20,906
36.3

62,91*7
57.9

U3,O28
82.8

19,919
35.0

Ul, 657
U,6l*U
37,013
1,960
U.5
8,913

19,719
1,101
18,617
1,188
5.7
36,670

6O.3U8
5,1*17
5fc,931
2,599
U.1

1*1,1*30
U,U1O
37,020
1,598
3.7

U5,85l

8,929

18,918
1,007
17,911
1,001
5.0
36,923

NONWHITE
Total
Labor force. . .%
Percent of population
Employed
Agriculture
Nonagricultural industries
Unemployed
Percent of labor force
Not in labor force

12,700

5,963

6,738

12,671*

5,9i*9

6,725

12,23ii

5,725

6,189

8,060
63.5

1*,885
81.9

3.17U
U7.1

8,183
6U.6

U,90U
82.U

3,279
1*8.8

7,720
63.2

1*,697
82.0

3,023
1*6.6

7,259
950
6,309
801
9.9

U,373
667
3,707
512
10.5
1,077

2,886
28U
2,602
289
9.1

7,31U
1,139
6,175
869

?55

10.6

11.1

2,951*
381*
2,570
325
9.9

6,893
91*0
5,953
827
10.7

2,736
300
2,1*36
287
9.5

3,563

U,U91

i,d*5

3,1*1*6

1*,157
61*0
3,gL7
53*0
n.5
1,028

U,6i*l

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning I960.




(See footnote 4, table A-l. )

3,U67

.Table A-7: Employment status ef the civilian noninstitutional

Region; Class of Worker
Reasons Employed Persons
population,
t Not at Work

total and urban, by region
(Percent distribution of persons 14 years of age and over)

July i960

August I960

Region

Labor force
Labor force
Percent
Percent
Percent
Employed
Employed
of popof popof popEmployed
ulation
ulation
ulation
Nonagri- UnemNonagri- UnemNonagri- Unemin labor Total Agriin labor Total Agriin labor Total Agricultural ployed
cultural ployed
cultural ployed
culculculforce
force
force
Indusindusindusture
ture
ture
tries
tries
tries

53
.

59.2

100.0 9 5
.

85.0

55
.

58.4

100.0 9.0

86.2

4.8

55
.
49
.
54
.
5.2

59.4
59.5
58.6
59.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6.1
4.7
5.7
5.6

58.7
58.7
57.8
58.6

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

85
.

92.0
84.2
82.2
87.5

53
.
4.7

9.3

91.2
83.7
80.6
85.1

92.7

100.0 1.4

92.5

6.1

58.8

100.0 1.0

93.5

55
.

93.6
93.4
92.1
90.9

100.0
.7
100.0
.9
100.0 2.1
100.0 2.7

92.9
93.3
91.9
91.3

6.4
5.8
6.0
6.0

58.9
58.6
59.4
58.3

100.0
100.0
!8
100.0 1.8
100.0 1.5

93.7
93.4
92.3
94.6

5.8
5.8
5.9
3.9

58.6

North Central
West

100.0

59.0
59.1
57.1
59.8

Total-

100.0 2.8
100.0 10.8
100.0 11.7
100.0 10.5

91.7
84.3
82.9
84.3

1.4
!8
1.7

9.0

100.0

Urban
59.2
59.0
59.3
59.6

South
West

August 1959

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

3.7

85.7

5.9
5.8
6.2
5.4

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

59.3
59.3
60.0
59.7

2.7
11.6
13.7

2.7
11.1
12.8

5.0
4.0

(See footnote 4, table A-l.)

Table A-8: Employed persons, by type of industry, class of worker, and sex
(Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over)

July i960

August i960

Type of industry
and class of worker

22,672

67,241

45,587

1,486
475
119
891

6,357
1,960
3,042
1,355

5,050
1,617
2,890
544

40,618 21,186
35,547 19,298
397 2,191
4,560 2,906
30,590 14,201
4,938 1,325
563
132

60,884
53,956
2,555
7,218
44,183
6,283
645

40,537
35,434
436
4,588
30,410
4,982
120

45,829

Total.

2,419
2,787
1,247

5,226
2,031
2,659
536

6,885
2,403
2,962
1,520

61,828
54,807
2,510
7,654
44,643
6,370
652

40,603
35,475
376
4,763
30,336
5,005
124

61,804
54,845
2,589
7,466
44,790
6,264
695

6,454

Agriculture
Wage and salary workers.
Self-employed workers...
Unpaid family workers...
Nonagricultural industries
Wage and salary workers
In private households
Government workers
Other wage and salary workers
Self-employed workers
Unpaid family workers

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning I960.

August 1959

5,399
1,927
2,843
629

20,347
18,521
2,119
2,630
13,773
1,301
525

(See footnote 4, table A-l.)

Table A-9: Employed persons with a job but not at work, by reason for not working and pay status
Thousands of persons 14 years of a *e and over )

July i960

August i960
Nonagricultural industries
Reason for not working
Total
Total

Wage and
salary workers
Number

68.0

Industrial dispute
Vacation
Illness
All other

6,924

6,737

6,198

16

8

26
5,293
842

26
5,215
78O
700

26
4,881

736

Nonagricultural Jindustries
Total
Total

Percent
paid

29

Total

686
598

77.9
32.9
30.8

August 1959

Wage and
salary workers
Number

7,291

7,136

23
38
5,692
783

20
38
5,636
729

38
5,415
625

756

713

618

6,7H

16

Nonagricultural
Total
Total

Percent
paid

.ndustries

Wag 5 and
salary workers
Number

Percent
paid

70.9

6,812

6,609

6,122

63.3

(1)

28
426
4,778
828

16

11
426
4,417
674

79.3
31.6

595

26.2

8O.5
33.8
29.8

752

426
^,697
770
700

(1)

^Percent not shown vhere "base is less than 100,000.
NOTE: Persons on temporary (less than 30-day) layoff and persons scheduled to start new wage and salary jobs within 30 days have
not been included in the category "With a job but not at work" since January 1957. Most of these persons are now classified as unemployed. These groups numbered 200,000 and 162,000, respectively, August i960.
Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960. (See footnote 4, table A-l.)




Table A-10: Occnpation i m p if mloyei persons, by sei

(Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over)

1959

Angnat
Occupation group

Total

Percent
distribution
FeTotal Male
male

Male

Total

Percent
distribution
FeTotal Male
male

Male

68,282 U5.829 22,U53 100.0 100.0 100.0 67,21*1 U5,587 2l,65U 100.0 100.0 100.0

Total.
Professional, technical, and kindred workers
Medical and other health workers
Teachers, except college
Other professional, technical, and kindred workers
Farmers and farm managers
Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm..
Salaried workers
Self-employed workers in retail trade
Self-employed workers, except retail trade

7,071
1,317
1,205
U,5U9
2,765
7^01*6
3,U96
1,773
1,777
10,121

Clerical and kindred workers
Stenographers, typists, and secretaries....
Other clerical and kindred workers
Sales workers
Retail trade
Other sales workers

U,U32
2,633
1,799
8,898

Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers
Carpenters
Construction craftsmen, except carpenters
Mechanics and repairmen..,
Metal craftsmen, except mechanics
Other craftsmen and kindred workers
Foremen, not elsewhere classified

877

1,968
2,023
1,077
1,797
1,156

12,085
2,1*3*

Operatives and kindred workers
Drivers and deliverymen
Other operatives and kindred workers:
Durable goods manufacturing
Nondurable goods manufacturing
Other industries

3,230
60
3,170
2,729
1,127
1,602
8,663
875
1,95U
2,015
1,067
1,677
1,075

2,170
6,226

36 2,135
2 f 9U9 3,277

l,7U0
3,723

537 1,203
1,682 2,01*1

Farm laborers and foremen

3,362
2,127
1,235
U,109

.
5U U o
.

2,305 1,057
1,777
350

Other industries

967

1,123
2,017

Manufacturing
'Less than 0.05.

528
U,02U

969

1,078
1,979

no 2.6 3.7
2.2
.
72 1 6

.u

Private household workers
Service workers, except private household
Protective service workers
Waiters, cooks, and bartenders
Other service workers

Paid workers
Unpaid family workers
Laborers, except farm and mine.
Construction

223 13.1 19.0
.9
2 1 3 2.0 (1)
.
8 2.8 U.l (1)
25 3.1 U.6 .1
.
.
6 1 7 2 U (1)

a

5.0
5.2
U.0
3.2
91
.

9.5 2,117
1U.6 5,957
1.1 1 6
.1
782
.
2.5 1 2 5 U 1,691
.
.
3,U8U
$.$ 3.7 9 1
.

33

h.9 5.0 U.7 3,107
3.1 3.9 1 6 1,762
.
707 1.8 1.2 3.1 1,3U5
85 6.0 8.8 . U,229
U
2 1 U 2.1 (l) 1,016
.
U5 1.6 2.U • 2 1,331
38 3.0 U.3 • 2 1,882

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

2,620
923
1,667 1,787
2,lU0
631

3,5U3

.1

.
5
.
3

8,808 3,353 18.1 19.3 15.6
2,381
12 3.6 5.2
.1

3.7 8 1 3,U5U
.
U.6 2 7 2,771
.

6U
.

1.2

.
3,033 6,533 U*.3 6 7 30.1
79 2,32U 3.6 .2 10.7
2,95U U,209 10.7 6 5 19.U
.
2,817 1,732 6 8 6 1 8.0
.
.
1,110 1,516 3.9 2 U 7.0
.
1,707
216 2.9 3.7 1.0

8,719 3,367 17.7 19.0 15.0 12,161
2,1*32
22 3.6 5 3
.1 2,393
.

730

8U
0

236 13.0 18.9 1 1 8,87U 8,651
.
2 1.3 1 9 (1)
896
898
.
1U 2.9 U 3 .1 1,876 1,868
.
3.0 U U
2,129 2,10U
8
.
10 1.6 2 3
1,113 1,106
.
120 2.6 3.7
. 1,776 1,667
5
1,082 1,010
.
82 1 7 2.3

906
2,U79
1,712 1,829
2,096
610

763

263

3,68U
668
2,878
132
1,101
5,886
2,950
50U
1,373
367
1,563
230

6,891 1U.8 7.0 30.7 9,566
.1 10.6 2,UO3
2,385 3 6
.
11.2 6 9 20.1 7,163
.
1^703 6 5 6 0 7.6 U,55o
.
.
l,5d6 3.9 2 5 6 7 2,627
.
.
197 2.6 3.5
.9 1,923

2^706

3,38U

9 8 10.2
.
33
.
.
1 6 .6 3 7
.
6.$ 8.1 3.2
.
U 5 6 3 .6
.
10.U 12.9
5.1
5.1 6 5 2.3
.
3.0 1.7
2.6
2 7 3 U 1.1
.
.

U,U85 2,200 10.0
538 708 1 9
.

U,617 2,1*51* 10.U 10.1 10.9 6,685
552 765 1 9 1.2 3 U 1,2U6
.
.
.
32U 881 1 8 .7 3.9 1,067
3,71*1
808 6 7 8.2 3.6 U,372
.
2,61*1
123 U o 5.8 . 3,010
5
.
5,918 1,128 10.3 12.9 5.0 6,987
2,977
520 5.1 6 5 2 3 3,U5U
.
.
1,387
386 2.6 3.0 1 7 l,7Uo
.
222 2.6 3 U 1.0 1,793
1,55U
.

29 2,088
2,88U 3,O7U
750

33

508 1,183
1,626 1,858
1,967 i,lU0
1,U29
333

807
78

U,i£i
i,oiU
1,275
1,862

56
20

5 3 5.7 U.3
.
5.1 3.7 8 3
.
U.1 U 7 2.9
.
.1 9.6
3.1
8 9 6 3 1U.3
.
.
1.2 1 6
.2
.
2.5 1.1 $.$
5.2 3.6 8 6
.
U.6 U.3 5.2
2 6 3.1 1 5
.
.
2.0 1.2 3.7
6.3 9.1 .
U
1 5 2.2 (1)
.
2.0 2 8
.
.
3
2.8 U.1 .1

(See footnote 4, table A-l. )

Table A-11: Major occipatioi groip i f employed persons, by color and sex
(Percent distribution of persons 14 years of age and over)

August

Auguat 1960~
White

Major occupation group
Male

Total

.thousands..
Percent.

Professional, technical, and kindred workers
Farmers and farm managers
Managers, officials, and proprietors,
except farm
Clerical and kindred workers
Sales workers
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers
Operatives and kindred workers
Private household workers
Service workers, except private household...
Farm laborers and foremen
Laborers, except farm and mine
than 0.05.




Female

Male

61,023 1*1,1*56 19,567 7,259
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
11.1

U.2
11.2
15.7
7.1
13.8
17.1*
1.9
8.1
U.1*
5.0

10.8
5.9

11.8
.5

U.3
3.0

ll*.O
7.1
6.1*

33.8
8.5

5.U

2.7
7.6
1.5
6.2
20.1
13.6
17.U
9.U
1U.3

$2
.1

5.5
U.5
7.3

1.1
15.0
S.9
13.6
U.1
.3

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

Female

Total

Male

Female

Male

Female

1*,373 2,886 60,31*8 1*1,1*30 18,918 6,893 U,l57 2,736
100.0
100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
100.0 100.0
5.3
.7

10.6
U.6

10.5
6.U

10.9
.6

3.8
3.3

3.1
5.1

h.9
.5

3.0 2.1
6.2 9.7
1.U
9.9
23.U 5
•2
15.0 3U.0
9.6 21.1
23.2 9.1

11.3
15.2
7.U
1U.0
17.9
1.9
7.8
U.0
5.3

13.9
6.8
6.7
19.9
19.0

S.S
33.U
8.9

2.6
6.0
1.U
$.9
19.9
il*.o
17.9
9.9

2.8
U.8
1.U
9.k
23.0
.2
15.5
9.$
25.2

2.3
7.9

3.6
U.6

.8

%
3.8
7.5

(See footnote 4, table A-l. )

1.1

15.5
6.0
13.1
h.$
.k

15.3

H

15.3
3U.8
21.5
10.5
.3

Table A12: UmpliyiJ pirsiis, ly i i n t i i i if iieipliyieit

(Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over)

Atur. I960

Duration of unemployment

Apr.
I960

1960

Jan.
I960

3,1*59 3 , 6 6 0

U,206

3,931 U , l U 9

vUIlO

3SSBL
3,788

Total.
Less than 5 weeks...
Less than 1 week..
1 week
2 weeks
3 weeks
4 weeks
5 to 14 weeks
5 to 6 weeks
7 to 10 weeks
11 to 14 weeks....
15 weeks and over...
15 to 26 weeks....
27 weeks and over.
Average duration....
age_

100.0

6U5

1*U.8
.U
12.5
13.8
10.3
7.8
33.7
7.U
17.0

U02
UiU

21.5
10.6
10.9

1,697
16
392
295
1,275
279

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning

U,Q17 U,U23

7S5T

1959

3,577 3 , 6 7 0

1 , 6 3 8 1 , 5 8 0 1 , 5 1 6 1,U76 1,909 1,683
11
12
28
16
12
Uoo
U70
387
UU3
567
I46I4
506
1O3
U56
U22
379
361
516
332
317
28U
31U
319
U83
325
3*
C4
399
900
8 7 6 l , l 4 7 U lth91 1,330 1,083
95U
272
305
3l4l
29b
233
283
iao
372
528
589
35U
561
Iil2
685
256
250
I4OO
309
2$9
619
396
920 1,2014
811
910
816
96U
509
381
I4I4I
U20
705
533
101
1*30
396
U69
U99
1431
12.8
10.3
12.9
13.1
(See footnote 4, table A - l . )

1,871 2,65U
86
18
758
385
1436
1,311
532
501
278
83li
1*18
10J6

11.8
1960.

75557
1959

JolT
1959

••s

Aug.
1959

1959

3,272 3,230

1 , 8 1 4 6 1,607 1,539 1,567
23
28
I4O6
393
389
1*71
601
1*35
518
370
1*63
358
388
261
366
298
281*
955 1,076
i,oUo
939
257
282
269
Stik
1*05
382
290
293
276
288
783
736
726
290
3U0
333
U93
396
393
8
13.1
12.U

s

Taili A13: Unemployed persons, by major occupation groip a i l iiiistry group
(Persons 14 years of age and over)

Jnlv I960

t I960
Occupation and industry

Percent
Unemployment
Percent
Unemployment
Percent
Unemployment
distribution
rate1
distribution
rate 1
distribution
rate 1

MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP
100.0

Total.
Professional, technical, and kindred workers
Farmc rs and farm managers
Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm
Clerical and kindred workers
Sales workers
*
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers
Operatives and kindred workers
Private household workers
Service workers, except private household
Farm laborers and foremen
Laborers, except farm and mine
No previous work experience

U.9
.1
1.8
9.9
U.1
9.9
26.3
3.5
10.9
3.1
12.7
12.8

5.3

100.0

55
.

100.0

U.8

2.6
.1
.9
3.6
3.U
U.1
7.6
5.8
6.2
3.3
10.5

3.0
.1
1.8
9.9

1.7
.1
1.0
3.9
3.9
U.2
7.7
5.6
6.0
3.5
11.1

U.1
.2
2.5
10.3

2.0
•2
1.2
3.6
3.2
3.7
6.U
3.9
5.8
U.6
9.1

U.U
9.6
25.U
3.3
10.0
3.3
13.2
16.1

U.U

9.9
2U.2
2.5
10.7

U.U

12.3

1U.5

INDUSTRY GROUP
Total8.
Experienced wage and salary workers
Agriculture
Nonagricultural industries
»
Mining, forestry, and fisheries
Construction
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Machinery (except electrical)
Electrical machinery
Transportation equipment
Motor vehicles and equipment
All other transportation equipment
Other durable goods industries
Nondurable goods
Food and kindred products
Textile-mill products
Apparel and other finished textile products.
Other nondurable goods industries
Transportation and public utilities
Railroads and railway express
Other transportation
Communication and other public utilities
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance, and real estate
Service industries
Professional services
All other service industries
Public administration

100.0
8U.9
3.2
81.7

Ui
9.7
28.2
18.U
2.9
1.6
2.3
2.1
5.7
U.3
1.U
3.9
9.8
1.6
1.1
3.0
U.1
5.U
1.U
2.7
1.3
17.6
1.6
15.8
5.8
10.0
2.0

5.3
U.8
5.3
7.5
8.7
5.9
7.0
8.9
5.2
5.0
5.1
10.7
17.U

IfcS
U.5
3.3
U.1
8.6
3.9
U.2
5.0
5.9
2.U
6.0
2.2
U.7
3.U
6.0
2.2

81.2
3.7
77.5
1.6
9.2
28.3
15.7
3.3
1.6
1.9
2.1
3.9
2.5
1.U
2.9
12.6
2.5
1.7
3.5
U.9
U.8
1.2
2.1
1.5
16.0

1.U
1U.5
U.1
IO.U
1.9

S.h
5.8
5.U
8.5
8.6
6.2
6.3
10.5
5.3
U.2
5.7
7.7
10.5
5.2
5.1
6.2
5.6
6.6
10.6
h.9
U.1

U.5
5.0
3.1
5.7
2.1
2#.6
6.3
2.3

83.U
5.2
78.2
1.8
9.1
26.5
15.1
1.9
1.U
1.1
1.8
5.8
U.6
1.2
3.1

n.U
2.7
1.5
3.0
U.2

5.U

1.3
2.9
1.2
16.2
1.6
15.5
6.1
9.k
2.1

h.9
8.3
U.7
9.3
7.3
5.0
5.1
5.0
U.0
2.U
U.8
8.9
16.3
3.3
U.3
U.9

5.U
U.9
7.9
3.8
3.9
U.0
5.7
2.2
5.2
2.1
U.3

a

2.2

Percent of labor force In each group who were unempLoyed. 2Includes self-employed, unpaid familly workers, and persons with no
previous work experience, not shown separately. NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning I960.' (See footnote 4, table A-l. )
564934 O - 60 - 3




Table A-14: PirsMs nwpfyreJ 15 wuks a i l ever, by selected characteristics,
(Persons 14 years of age and over)

August I960

July i960

August 1959

Percent of
Percent of
Percent of
unemployed
Percent
Percent
unemployed
Percent
unemployed
in each
distribution
distribution
in each
distribution
in each
group
group
group

Characteristics

AGE AND SEX
100.0

Male: 14
14
18
20
25
35
45
65
emale: 14
14
20
25
35
45

years and over.
to 17 years
and 19 years
to 24 years
to 34 years...
to 44 years
to 84 years
years and over
years and over
to 19 years
to 24 years
to 34 years
to 44 years
years and over.

21.5

100.0

20.8

100.0

22.9

69

Total.

23*5
9.1
8.5
17.6
23.6
25.5

66.3
2.0

22.1
*.7
10.8
19.8
21.0
26.8
35 A
(1)
18.6
6.3
18.6
21.1
2^.5
25.5

67.7
2.7
3.8
7A
12.1
1^.2
23.9
3.«
32.3
5.0
8.0
10.9

2*1.8
8.3
12.7
20.9
25.9
31.3
33 A
33.7
19.6
9.5
19A
16.9
25.O
27.5

2
2
7
l*
11
26
k
30
2

3.6
8.5

5
6
7
8
100.0

21.?

100.0

20.8

100.0

22.9

38A
22.6
8.2
16.1
7.0
7.7

26.0
18.9
30.3
19.3
13.5
22.0

37A
21.3
18!6
7.9
7.3

26A
15.5
36.2
23.©
12.0
21.1

35.9
23.9
7.9
15.5
9.9
6.9

27.1
20.3
35.8
19.1
19.6
21.3

106.0

21.5

100.0

20.8

100.0

22.9

76.0
51.0
23.0
2U.0
18.3
5.8

20.8
22.0
18.6
2U.5
29.1
16.3

73.6
V7.8
25.8
26A
18.5
7.9

19.5
20A
18.1
25.3
28.3
20.3

72.8
25.0
27.2
20 A
6.7

22.1
23.6
19.7
25.9
29.8
18.5

100.0

'

6.8
21.7
20.5
23.8
19.O

12.0
11.5
2*.9
3.7
33.7
2.9
5A
7.2
7.6
10.7

21.5

100.0

29.8

100.0

22.9

3.1
.2
3.1
11A
3A
11.3
31.1
1.2
13 A
1.3
13.5
7.0

13 A

2.3
.2
2.3
9.8
3.7
8.9
35.5
2.8

16.0

k.l
.3
3.1
12.5
3.9
8.9
28.5
2.0
12.0
1.9

22.7

MARITAL STATUS AND SEX
Total.
Mal«: Married, wi-fe present....
Single
Other.
Female: Married, husband present.
Single
...
Other

tf
18.1

It

COLOR AND SEX

White....
Male...
Female.
Nonwhite.
Male...
Female.

*7.8

MAJOR OCCUPATION GROUP
Total.
Professional, technical, and kindred workers
Farmer* and farm managers
Managers, officials, and proprietors, except farm
Clerical and kindred workers
Sales workers
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred workers
Operatives and kindred workers.
..
Private household workers
Service workers, except private household
Farm laborers and foremen
Laborers, except farm and mine

0

81

11.8

1.6
17.7
6.2

100.0

1..

No previous work experience

21.$

100.0

20.8

100.0

22.9

89.6
1.7
87.8
3.1
9.8
35.1
22.3
12.6
6.0
17.1
15.0
1.8

22.1
11.5
23.1
(1)
21.8
26.8
26.1
28.0
23.9
20.9
18.5
(1)

89.8
2A
87A
k.7
9.2
38.7
21.9
16.8
6.3
12.6
13.2
2.8

23.0
13 A
23 A
(1)
20.9
28.5
29.1
27.7
27.3
16.3
17.3
(1)

89.3

20.8
9.6
25 A
(1)
22.2
28.9
28.0
29.9
27.6
20.8
21.6
(1)

9

-i

8.8

INDUSTRY GROUP
Total
Experienced wage and salary workers
Agriculture
Nonagricultural industries
Mining, forestry, and fisheries
Construction.
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods.
Transportation and public utilities
Wholesale and retail trade
Service and finance, insurance, and real estate
Public administration
1

it!

20.7
17.5
19.1
29.1
17.6
19.0
9.9
27.9
8.0

2V.8
17.9
25.5
7.5
26A
9.5
22.9

,

,

2.2
87.1

Hi
15.0
6.5
1^.7
16.2

3.8

27.8
20.8
20.7
27.0
(1)
25.8
10.1
25.9
13.9

Percent not shown where base is less than 100,000. 2Includes self-employed, unpaid family workers, and persons with no prevlou
work experience, not shown separately. NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960. (See footnote 4, table A-l. )




Table A-15: Perseis at work, by hairs warked, type af iidistry, aid class af warkar
August I960
(Percent distribution of persons 14 years of age and over)
Nonagricultural industries
Agriculture
Wage and salary workers
SelfUnpaid
SelfWage and
Unpaid
Private
employed family
Total
salary employed family
GovernhouseOthe
workers workers workers
ment
holds

Hours worked

Total at work...thousands.
Percent

61,358 6,267

1 to 34 hours
1 to 14 hours
15 to 21 hour-,s
22 to 29 hours
30 to 34 hours
35 to 40 hours
35 to 39 hours
40 hours
41 hours and over
41 to 47 hours
48 hours
49 hours and over...
49 to 54 hours....
55 to 59 hours....
60 to 69 hours....
70 hours and over.

17.2
U.7
U.6
3.9
U.I
U8.9
6.1
U2.8
33.8
7.3
6.5
20.0
5.9
2.7
5.6
5.7

Average hours.

U1.7

2,372

2,6U8

1,21*7

1QQ. O

100. Q

100.0

35.5

17.7
11.2

19.8
6.2
$.9
U.3
3.U
n.U
5.o
6.U
68.7
3.1
3.8
61.8
7.9
3.6
1U.2
36.1

U3.8

55.2

55,090 U8,6ll 2,362
100.0

27.6
5.9
9.7
6.7
5.3
lU.7
6.5
8.2
57.7
5.2
U.I
U8.U
7.7
U.O
1U.5
22.2
U8.U

32.2
8.6
9.3
6.U
7.9
15.6
5.U
10.2
52.1
6.8
U.8
U0.5
7.2
U.U

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

58.8
32.9

8.2
UU.9
6.7
3.3
3U.9
8.3
U.O
9.0
13.6

16.1
U.6
U.0
3.5
3.9
52.8
6.1
U6.8
31.1
7.5
6.8
16.8
5.7
2.6
h.6
3.9

3.7
3.5
3.9
57.0
6.3
50.7
27.6
7.6
6.8
13.2
5.1
2.3
3.U
2.U

U2.6

Ul.0

U0.1

0
18.5
12.U
U.6
19.6

n.U

*

5,78U UO,U65
100.0 100.0

3.9
2.3
2.U
2.5

9.2
1.7
2.1
2.2
3.2
69.2
U.I
65.1
21.5
6.3
5.3
9.9
2.9
1.5
2.7
2.8

1U.0
3.1
3.U
3.5
U.O
57.3
6.7
50.6
28.8
8.0
7.1
13.7
$-$\
2.U
3.5
2.3

27.2

Ul.2

5,830
100.0

U0.7

12.3
8.3

$.3
21.3
5.0
16.3
19.7
3.9
U.7

11.1

17.9
6.6
U.8
3.0
3.5
21.U
3.6
17.8
60.8
7.3
7.3
U6.2
11.1
U.9
15.0
15.2
U8.5

36.6
0
19.9
8.8
7.9
23.1
7.8
15.3
U0.2
7.9
U.0
28.3
3.6
5.3

July
I960

Aug.
1959

13.9
U2.0

(See footnote 4, table A-l.)

Table A16: Persons employed in nonagricnltural industries, by full-time ar part-time statis and reasan far part time
(Thousands of persons 14 years of age and over)
Hours worked, usual status, and
reason working part time

I960

July
I960

Aug.
1959

Hours worked, usual status, and
reason working part time

61,828 61,805 6O.88U

Total.
With a job but not at work
At work
41 hours and over
35 to 40 hours
1 to 34 hours
Usually work full time on present job:
Part time for economic reasons
Slack work
Material shortages or repairs
New job started
Job terminated
Average hours

6,737
55,090
17,135
29,112
8,8U3

Usually work full time—Continued
Part time for other reasons
7,136 6,609
Own illness
5U,668 5U, 273
Vacation
17,3OU 17,U6l
Bad weather
28,076 28,336
Holiday
9,288 8,U75
All other

1,218

1,120 1,003
861
750
76
58
136
159
1U0
U
O
62
57
2U.8 2U.9 23.8

Primarily includes persons who could find only part-time work.
note 4, table A-l. )

1,766 1,736
502
U30
U17
U59
U57
172
2U8
230
10
105
26
5Uo
581 623

Usually work part time on present job:
For economic reasons1
Average hours
For other reasons

1,636
17.5

U,a5

1,669
17.2
U,735

hft
U,191

U0.8

Average hours for total at work

U1.0
NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

Ul.2

(See foot-

Table A17: Wage and salary workers, by full time ar part-tune statis and majer iadnstry i m p
August I960
(Percent distribution of persons 14 years of age and over)
1 to 34 hours
Major industry group

Total
at
work

Usually work part 35 to
40
time on present job 39
hours
Part time Part ti
hours
For
For
for economic for other economic
other
reasons
reasons
reasons
reasons

Agriculture.

LOO.O

32.2

5.3

Nonagricultural industries
Construction
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Transportation and public utilities
Wholesale and retail trade
Finance, insurance, and real estate
Service industries
Educational services
Other professional services
All other service industries
All other industries

LOO.O
LOO.O

15.5

2.2
U.7
3.U
3.5
3.3
1.6
1.3
.6
1.5
1.0
.8
2.0
1.3

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
LOO.O

100.0
LOO.O

100.0
LOO.O

17.0
10.0

8.5
11.7
7.U
18.3
10.7
27.7
18.5
15.7
36.7
9.5

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.




41 hours and over

Usually work full
time on present job

9.9
3.1
6.2
3.2

3.5
2.9
2.5

2.0
1.8
2.9
7.U
2.7
2.1

3.2
3.3
1.3
.8
1.9
1.2
U.3
7I2
.9

1.U
U.9
.8

(See footnote 4, table A-l.)

11.6
2.8
2.1
.7
3.6
2.1
10.7
7.8
16.1
9.2
10.8
20.7
2.9

49
41 to 48 hours
47 hours and
hours
over

5.U 10.2 52.2 6.8
6.3 50.7 27.6

8
3.3

10.1

3.3
$.k
17.U
7.0
9.3
7.0
6.5
3.7

52.6
60.7
66.9
53.6
6U.5
36.3
51.1
37.8
51.0
50.1
27.9
6U.0

25.U
22.8
21.U
2U.5
2U.8

Uo.o
20.8
27.5
21.2
27.1
29.0
22.9

U.8

U0.5

6.S
5.2
5.6
5.1
6.2
5.3
10.U
3.1
7.2
2.U
7.U
8.0
6.7

13.2
12.3
9.8
9.2

10.5
12.6

19.9
11.1
13.U
10.8
12.8
1U.2

n.5

10

Table AH: Perseis it werfc, by f i l l t i i i ir part tint states art •Jjir iccipitiu i m p
August i960
(Percent distribution of persons 14 years of age and over)
41 hours and over

1 to 34 hours

Major occupation group

Total
at
work

Usually work full
Usually work part
35 to
time on present job time on present job
40
39
Part time
hours
For
Part time
For
hours
for
for other economic
other
economic
reasons

3*1

100.0 17.2

Total
Professional, technical, and kindred
workers
Farmers and farm managers
Managers, officials, and proprietors,
except farm
Clerical and kindred workers
Sales workers
Craftsmen, foremen, and kindred
workers
Operatives and kindred workers
Private household workers
Service workers, except private
household
Farm laborers and foremen
Laborers, except farm and mine

Average
hours

41 to
47
hours

8.3

6.1 42.8 33.8

6.5 20.0

100.0 12.5
100.0 19.4

0,6
3.9

3.8
5.1

0.5
.5

7.6
9.9

6.2 50.1 31.1
5.0 6.2 69.3

7.0
3.2

5.1 19.0
3.9 62.2

42.2
55.6

100.0 7.8
100.0 13.*
100.0 24.7

.8
.8
1.0

2.8
2.9
2.7

.4
1.3
3.7

3.8
8.4
17.3

3.2 27.6 61.5
H.3 60.7 14.6
5.3 32.4 37.5

8.4
6.5
8.4

9.1 44.0
3.5 4.6
6.6 22.5

50.2
38.5
39.5

100.0 9.5
100.0 13.4
100.0 57.8

3.0
4.6
1.6

3.5
3.*
2.0

1.2
2.3
20.5

1.8
3.1
33-7

4.1 55.7 30.8
6.1 51.7 28.8
5.3 16.3 20.5

9.0
7.8
4

M

14.4
6.7 1*.3
4.5 11.9

41.9
41.3
27.9

100.0 20.1
100.0
100.0 26.4

1.3
3.8
4.8

2.1*
5.3
5.2

12.2
18.5
7.*

6.0

6.9
9.0

6.8 12.8 15.0
3.8 38.9
6.9
9.7
6.7

40.2
43.2
36.7

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.

7.7
3.5

39.3 34.6
8.1 49.6
48.8 21.3

(See footnote 4, table A-l.)

Table A19: Perseis at wirk ii inafricittiraJ iiiistries, by fill-tin ail part-tin statis ail selects characteristics
August I960

Characteristics

(Percent distribution o* persons 14 years of age and over)
1 to 34 hours
Total
at work
Usually work full
Usually work part
time on present job
time on present job
Part time
For
For
Part time
(In thouPercent
for economic for other economic
other
sands )
reasons

35 to
40
hours

41
hours
and
over

Average
hours

7.7

52.8

31.1

41.0

51.8
27.7
54.8
53.1
52.0
53.9
40.6

36.7
17.1
&ml
39.8
40.9
36.7
26.9

55.0
29.9
68.9
59.9
56.1
52.3
25.8

19.9
13.8
14.9
17.0
20.8
23.2
29.6

51.1
51.9
52.8

25.8
39.5
31.1

AGE AND SEX
Total
Male
14
18
25
35
45
65

55,090

to 17
to 24
to 34
to 44
to 64
years

years
years
years
years
years
and over

Female
14 to 17
18 to 24
25 to 34
35 to 44
45 to 64
65 years

years
years
years
ye ars
years
and over

100.0

16.1

2.2

3*2

3.0

3.2
1.7
3.1
3.1
3.2
3.5

2.3
20.0

25.2
56.4
16.2
23.1
23.1
24.5
44.6

2.3
2.1
2.8
1.7
2.1
2.7
1.6
2.1
1.9
2.1
2.3
1.8
2.2
1.1

3.3
2.3
3.5
2.3
4.0
3.7
1.2

4.4
17.2
3.7
3.0
3.^
3.8
3.8

3.8
31.5
3A
1.2
.9
1.9
24.5
15.4
35.0
6.9
15.5
13.9
14.8
38.5

100.0
100.0
100.0

23.1
8.7
16,0

2.5
2.2
3.3

2.6
3.3
3.6

7.6
1.0

10.4
2.2

^,869
9,566
3,850

100.0
100.0
100.0

23.5
27.5
21.5

1.8
2.2
2.1

2.8
3.8
2.8

6.5
2.9
5.2

12.4
18.6
11.4

59.1

17.3
18.3
27.2

49,403
33,390
16,013

100.0
100.0
100.0

15.3
11.1
23.9

2.1

3.2

2.4

2.1
1.9

3.1
3.3

2.0

7.6
3.9
15? 3

52.7
51-L
56.2

32.1
37.9
19.9

5.687

100.0
100.0
100.0

23.2

3.5
3.9
2.9

-fc9
3.*

7.7

8.3
3.1
16.1

54.0
5 ^
46.6

22.8
24.8
19.9

36,805
1,509
4,620
8,294
8,707
12,229
1,445

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

11.6
55.3
12.7
7.1
7.1
9.3
32.4

18,286
1,101

3,190
3,057
4,032
6,225
681

100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0

6,488
28,410
1,907

2.2

1.1

.9
1.2
4.1

MARITAL STATUS AND SEX
Male: Single
Married, wife pre
Other
Female : Single
Married, husband present.
Other

3.8

5.3

COLOR AND SEX
White
Male
Female
Nonwhite
Male
Female

NOTE: Data include Alaska and Hawaii beginning 1960.




33.5

(See footnote 4, table A-l. )

11.1

11

Historica

mploy me

Tifelt 1-1: Eipliyees ii inifriciltiril istibliskMits, b iiiistry iifisin
y
1919 ti late
(In thousands)

Mining

Year and month

construction Manufacturing

Finance,
Transportation
Wholesale and insurance, Service and
and public
and real miscellaneous Government
retail trade
utilities
estate

3,882

4,664
4,623
4,754
5,084
5,494

1,050
1,110
1,097
1,079
1,123

2,054
2,142
2,187
2,268
2,431

2,671
2,603
2,531
2,542
2,611

9,523
9,786
9,997
9,839
9,786

3,806
3,824
3,9*K)
3,891
3,822

5,626
5,810
6,033
6,165
6,137

1,163
1,166
1,235
1,295
1,360

2,516
2,591
2,755
2,871
2,962

2,723
2,802

1,497
1,372
1,214
970
809

10,534
9,401
8,021
6,797
7,258

3,907
3,675
3,243
2,804
2,659

6,401
6,064
5,531
4,907
4,999

1,431
1,398
1,333
1,270
1,225

3,127
3,084
2,913
2,682
2,6i4

3,066
3,149
3,264
3,225
3,167

862
912
1,145
1,112
1,055
1,150
1,2*
1,790
2,170
1,567

8,346
8,907
9,653
10,606
9,253

2,736
2,771
2,956
3,114
2,840

5,552
5,692
6,076
6,543
6,453

1,247
1,262
1,313
1,355
1,347

2,784
2,883
3,060
3,233
3,196

3,298
3,477
3,662
3,7^9
3,876

10,078
10,780
12,97^
15,051
17,381

2,912
3,013
3,248
3,433
3,619

6,612
6,9k)
7,416
7,333
7,189

1,399
1,436
1,480
1,'435

3,321
3,477
3,705
3,857
3,919

3,995
4,202
4,660
!'*§•
6,080

1,0*
1,132
1,661
1,982
2,169

17,1H
15,302
14,461
15,290
15,321

3,798
3,872
4,023
4,122
4,141

7,260
7,522
8,602
9,196
9,519

1,428
1,619
1,672
1,741

3,934
4,011
4,474
4,783
^,925

6,043
5,944
5,595
5,474
5,650

14,178
14,967
I6,io4
16,334
17,238

3,949

852

2,165
2,333
2,603
2,634
2,622

9,513
9,645
10,012
10,281
10,527

1^892
1,967
2,038

4,972
5,077
5,264
5,411
5,538

5,856
6,026
6,389
6,609
6,645

777
777
807
809
721

2,593
2,759
2,929
2,808
2,648

1^,995
16,563
16,903
16,782
15,468

4,009
4,062
4,161

M51

10,520
10,81*6
11,221
11,302

2,122
2,219
2,308
2,348
2,374

5,664
5,916
6,160
6,336
6,395

6,751
6,914
7,277
7,626
7,893

51,975
52,205
52,316
52,889
52,802
53,021
53,989

676
677
641
622
622
661
669

2,767
2,788

16,168
16,199
16,212
16,400
16,226
16,307
16,510

3,902
3,921

11,385
11,439

2,425
2,433

£' 52 I
6,558

8,127
8,190

3,942

2,482
2,460
2,449
2,446
2,446

6,616

7,876

3,931
3,958

11,415
11,519
n'605
11,778
12,402

6,627
6,581

8,704

659
670
667
678
679
683

2,331
2,611
2,853
3,002

16,498
16,548
16,505
16,408
16,378
16,461

3,900
3,905
3,918
3,936
3,943
3,962

11,478
11,382
11,379
11,675

June.

52,302
52,284
52,398
53,076
53,195
53,560

n,599
11,693

2,437
2,447
2,452
2,471
2,478
2,505

6,507
6,518
6,545
6,679
6,752
6,780

8,351
8,406
8,601
8,618
8,513
8,474

July
August.••

53,195
53,360

658
682

3,131
3,184

16,297
16,450

3,957
3,948

11,632
11,629

2,537
2,538

6,764
6,729

8,219
8,200

1,021
848
1,012
1,185
1,229

10,53*!
10,534
8,132
8,986
10,155

3,7H
3,998
3,459
3,505

27,770
28,505
29,539
29,691
29,710

1,124
1,230
953
920
1,203
1,092
1,080
1,176
1,105
1,041

1,321
1,446
1,555
1,608
1,606

1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.

31,041
29,143
26,383
23,377
23,466

1,078
1,000
864
722
735

1934.
1935.
1936.

25,699
26,792
28,802
30,718
28,902

1939.
19*10..
1941.
1942.
1*3.

30,311
32,058
36,220
39,779
42,106

937
1,006
882
845
916
947
983
917

1944.
1945.
*6
1*7
1948.

41,534
40,037
41,287
k3,h62
44,448

883
826

1*9.
1950.
1951.
1952.
1953.

43,315
44,738
47,347
W,3O3
49,681

918

1954.
1955.
1956.

48,431
50,056
51,766
52,162
50,543

1959 1
1959 2

1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.

26,829
27,088
24,125
25,56928,128

1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.

1959: August...
September,
October.•
November.
December.
i960: January.•
February*
M&rcli....
April....

1

982

3,132
3,068
2,985
2,877
2,719
2,472
2,408

4,166
4,185
4,221

3,903

Data relate to the United States without Alaska and Hawaii.
Data include Alaska and Hawaii. The monthly data shown below relate to the United States including Alaska and Hawaii.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.
2




2,848
2,917
2,996

Table B-2: Employees i i iiiafricnltiral establishments, by industry

(In thousands)
All employees

Production workers 1

I960

June
I960

Aug.
1959

52,93*1

TOTAL.

53,309

52,066

660

MINING.

681

639

710

506

ANTHRACITE MINING

163.6

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING.
CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCT ION
Petroleum and natural-gas production
(except contract services)
NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING.

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.

94.4
34.6
30.7
U.O

96.7
35.3
31.9
ll.l*

62.0
10.6
20.1
12.9

97.4
35.2
31.0
12.7

78.2
29.7
25.0
8.8

10.7

94.6

METAL MINING
Iron mining
Copper mining
Lead and zinc mining.

Aug.
1959

July
1959

534

494

562

52,3*13

656

June
I960

July
1959

Industry

11.8

15.1*

17.1

9.0

141.0

16>*.2

135.8

119.2

171.3

80.4
30.5
26.0
9.1
XO.O

144.3

45.1
6.0
14.4
10.4
13.8

80.1
30.2
25.3
10.2
15.5
152.5

118.6

293.2

3A57

309.7

310.7

203.3

202.9

219.0

218.6

178.6
117.8

291.6
177.0

183.7

184.0

103.9

103.2

109.3

108.4

96.7

96.4

97.2

95.5

116.6
3,104
666
321.5

HOHBUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Highway and street construction.
Other nonbuilding construction. .

344.5
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION.

2,1*38

116.8
2,977

H5.7
3,107

113.8

315.0
328.1

688
347.2

687
343.0

340.4

61*3

2,678

3,035

344.1

2,334

579
293.6
285.2
2,099

2,419
2,348
816.8
849.8
836.7
849.5
1,588.0 1,517.6 1,569.8 1,511.3
311.3
315.5
323.5
330.8
23»*.2
254.5
239.9
246.9
187.9
201.1
179.1
184.2
784.2
768.8
816.9
807.9

GENERAL CONTRACTORS..
SPEC IAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS
Plumbing and heating
Painting and decorating.
Electrical work
Other special-trade contractors

747.8
1,351.5
257.1
232.4
161.1
700.9

2,558
558
286.7
271.0

2,699
606
320.1
285.6

2,632
606
315.6
290.1

2,000

2,093

2,026
750.9
714.7
737.2
1,285.4 1,342.4 1,288.4
271.9
253.4
264.6
225.4
212.7
218.3
147.9
149.6
142.8
697.2
669.7
662.7

16,1*07

DURABLE GOODS....
NONDURABLE GOODS.

16,251

16,1*22

16,169

16,410

12,316

12,155

12,332

12,173

12,433

9,305
7,102

MANUFACTURING.

9,356
6,895

9,501*
6,918

9,058
7,H1

9,523
6,887

6,863
5,453

6,906
5,249

7,056
5,276

6,679
5,494

7,161
5,272

Durable Goods

144.4

71.1

72.2

6IO.7
119.1
291.8

628.4
107.8
305.2

627.0
108.6
302.2

110.3
39.8
49.7

112.0
40.8
50.0

125.5
39.4
50.5

125.4
41.0
49.8

321.8
236.9

326.7
240.4

323.9
242.2

319.5
237.9

45.8

38.3

38.8

37.7

35.9

33.4

35.5

27.9

28.1

24.6

26.8

24.8

24.3

I8.7

19.4

19.4

18.9

565.7
32.7
100.9
17.9
43.5
78.4
49.4
12318.4
101.0

449.8
25.8
89.7
13.3
35.3
66.2
41.2
95.0
15
68.1

456.1
26.2
93.2
13.6

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS
Plat glass
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown..
Glass products made of purchased glass.
Cement, hydraulic
Structural clay products
Pottery and related products
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products.
Cut-stone and stone products
Misc. nonmetallic mineral products

563.1

468.3
29.9
87.4
15.0
36.3
68.7
42.8
101.7
16.1
70.4

463.5
28.8
85.7
14.8
36.0
68.5
42.4
99.9
15.9
71.5

685.9
126.1
324.8
133.0
44.8
57

147.4
43.2
57.6

147.0
44.8

386.O
276.4

391.0
279.9

386.3
280.1

382.2
276.6

49.4

48.0

37.1

24.1

393.5

678.7
126.3
320.6

694.4
115.3
330.4

36.9

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES
Household furniture.
Office, public-building, and professional furniture
Partitions, shelving, lockers, and
fixtures
Screens, blinds, and miscellaneous
furniture and fixtures

142.4

696.O
114.6
333.2

1*8.6

680.1




72.4
617.4
118.6
296.0

142.3

56.8

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS
Logging camps and contractors....
SawniUs and planing mills
Millwork, plywood, prefabricated
structural wood products
Wooden containers
Miscellaneous wood products

See footnotes at end of table.

72.1

149.6

131.2
1*3.8

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.

24.6

145.9

557.6
30.1
106.5
16.1*
1*3.2
76.3
1*8.1
120.3
17.€
98.9

562.6
30
IO9.8
16.5
43.0
75.7
49.1
120.0
18.4
99.6

571.5
34.1
102.9
18.1
43.6
78.7
49.7
126.2
18.5
99.7

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

70.1
612.1

329.4

456.5

5
42.
95.0
15.8
69.O

13

Table 1-2: Enpleytes ii miagriciltiul tstiMisfcMits, by
(In thousands)
All employees

July
I960

Industry

Durable

June
I960

1959

Production workers1

July
1959

^6i960

July
i960

June
i960

987.5

Aug.
1959

Goods—Continued

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES

•

1,158.9 1,203.1

Blast furnaces, steel works, and
rolling mills
.
Iron and steel foundries
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals.
Secondary smelting and refining of
nonferrous metals
<
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
nonferrous metals
Nonferrous foundries
Miscellaneous primary metal industries..

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
Tin cans and other tinware
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware..»...,
Heating apparatus (except electric) aad
plumbers ' supplies
Fabricated structural metal products...
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving.,
Lighting fixtures
,
Fabricated wire products.
Miscellaneous fabricated metal products.

550.9
220.8

58O.O
226.8

59.2

59.2

11.8

11.9

112.0

113.5
61.6
150.1

Jfc?
1,057-6 1,062.3
64.0
126.6

1,086.3
63.6
132.2

114.4
295.0
225.2
46.9
5^.5
135.7

115.9
293.1
236.3
49.I
56.6
139.5

970.3

628.0

1,038.4

630.8
230.1

441.2
I67.I

468.9
193.1

132.4
194.1

521.2
197.7

56.9
55.7
12.5
12.8
119.4
117.1
64.6
64.1
137.1
152.3
1,055.9 1,084.1
62.8
64.7
132.4
134.7
116.6
120.6
278.8
303.1
219.8
226.0
47.6
49.1
56.0
52.8
137.6
135.4

46.4

46.6

43.2

44.5

8.6

8.6

9.4

9.4

83.5
46.0
112.7

85.2
50.3
117.6
840.1
55.6
103.8

89.8
52.9
106.2
815.2
56.6
106.3

92.2
52.5
120.9
846.9
55.0
104.4

87.8
206.1
192.8
37.9
h 2

1,131.9 1,154.1
62.9
61.8
101.5
99.9
87.4
85.O
195-6
191.1

92-9
195.6
177.1
38.2
41.9
106.6
1,137.7
65.2
111.8
90.7
176.1

89.2
221.5
186.0
36.9
44.9
109.0
1,149.4
66.4
124.6
94.1
175.5

122.1
143.1
92.4
137.7
198.8

124.2
146.5
92.9
143.0
200.1

116.3
146.5
68.6
136.0
204.5

114.9
143.1
87.7
138.3
204.8

8I18.3

858.7

849.6

835.9

277.6
407.0
281.3
274.9
29.4
28.4
36.9
26.4
21.8
21.1
21.1
26.9
45.7
54.6
52.8
68.6
24.0
24.6
25.4
27.5
412.8
410.2
413.7
625.6
36.2
36.3
36.3
48.9
1,692.8 1,051.2 1,113.7 1,127.2 1,132.0
6l4.9
580.7
744.3
519.7
361.8
735.6
444.5
347.5
213.1
433.4
263.7
214.2
72.0
146.8
83.7
58.4
6.1
8.9
14.3
2.7
70.6
68.2
141.1
72.2
118.4
116.5
144.6
111.1
102.3
100.1
123.3
91.4
16.4
16.1
21.3
19.7
42.3
44.5
57.7
45.6
8.3
10.6
9.0
8.1
224.3
225.2
339.2
224.0
227.5
35.8
65.3
35.1
35.7
64.2
94.3
63.5
66.2
10.8
12.4
15.3
12.7
26.4
30.4
30.0
42.0
20.9
21.3
25.6
39.7
65.7
38.7
25.6
31.0
22.5

277.8
27.3
20.4
52.9
23.8
397.9
35.8

856.2 1,266.1
242.2
226.7

1,627.3 1,638.0
100.6
1*7.1
125.2
259.3
176.1
228.2
140.6
187.7
273.2

178.O
230.8
140.4
192.6
274.3

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY

1,309.2 1,291.2

1,297.0

412.8
38.4
27.9
69.6
26.2
664.6
49.7

413.6
39.3
26.5
71.3
29.I
665.7
49.5

4U.4
37.9
27.7
61.3
27.7
645.3
49.3

1,520.2 1,594.0
750.8
629.3
371.9
125.8
11.1
120.5
143.6
124.0
19.6
59.7
10.6

1,607.9
784.7
618.1
371.2

1,619.8
679.1
732.4
433.0
144.0
14.0
141.4
140.7
121.2
19.5
56.9

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT
Motor vehicles and equipment
Aircraft and parts
Aircraft.
Aircraft engines and parts
Aircraft propellers and parts
Other aircraft parts and equipment....
Ship and boat building and repairing...
Ship building and repairing....
Boat building and repairing
Railroad equipment
Other transportation equipment

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS

351.4

Laboratory, scientific, and engineering
instruments
Mechanical measuring and controlling
instruments
Optical instruments and lenses
Surgical, medical, and dental
instruments
Ophthalmic goods
Photographic apparatus
Watches and clocks
See footnotes at end of table.




349.3
65.7
98.7
18.1
45.2
27.0
66.8
27.8

810.7

114.9
8.3
123.7
134.0
110.9
23.1
60.8
10.3

166.8
230.3
132.4
185.7
274.9

165.9
226.2
129.8
136.3
275.3

1,260.6 1,241.6

10.7

352.8

343.4

65.9
101.0
18.5
45.8
27.2
65.9
28.5

65.7
94.9
15.8
42.8
26.4
66.0
31.8

815.7
55.8
98.2
86.2
210.4
181.2
35.9
43.0
105.0

1,658.6 1,624.6 1,633.9 1,121.9
101.3
103.6
104.1
148.8
158.9
171.5
127.6
135.5
132.1
264.8
239.3
239.9

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)
Engines and turbines
,
Agricultural machinery and tractors....
Construction and mining machinery
,
Metal working machinery
,
Special-industry machinery (except
metalworking machinery)
General industrial machinery..
Office and store machines and devices..,
Service-industry and household machines
Miscellaneous machinery parts.....

Electrical generating, transmission,,
distribution, and industrial apparatus
Electrical appliances
,
Insulated wire and cable
Electrical equipment for vehicles
Electric lamps
Communication equipment
Miscellaneous electrical products

915.1

866.2

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

l'

IO8.9

1,207.4
586.3
446.6
264.8
86.4
9.2
86.2
120.5
102.3
18.2
43.2
8.8
220.6
35.5
62.9
10.3
27.7
20.1
39.5
24.8

Industry Employmen
Table B-2: Enpliyees ii mairiciltiral tstablishmts, by iitostry-Cntiniei

Aug.
I960

Industry

Durable

(In thousands)
All employees
mploy

July
I960

510.0

3.8
i.Q
ft
18.6

June
I960

Aug.
1959

Production workers1

July
I960

July
1969

June
i960

Aug.

1959

July
1959

390.5
35.8
15.1
79.8
23.8
46.0
71.9
118.1

405.2
36.5
15.2
83.5
23.8
47.8
74.8
123.6

1*00.7
36.2
15.3
80.1
23.5
50.4
73.4
121.8

380.2
34.5
12.3
72.6
22.9
47.7
71.6
118.6

Goods—Continued

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...
Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware....
Musical instruments and parts
Toys and sporting goods
Pens, pencils, other office supplies....
Costume jewelry, buttons, notions
Fabricated plastics products
..
Other manufacturing industries

95.1
32.0
57.5
92.8
153.0

508.9
U5.8
18.6
98.6
31.8
59.7
95.6
158.8

501.2
1*5.6
18.1*

94.0
31.6
62.5
93.6
155.5

1*80.7
1*4.3
15.5
86.1
31.1
59.*
91.5
152.8

405.0

1,516.0
306.3
104.3
253.7
114.9

1,158.7

Nondurable Goods

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
Meat products
Dairy products
Canning and preserving
Grain-mill products
Bakery products
Sugar.
Confectionery and related products
Beverages
Miscellaneous food products

1,613.9 1,513.9
304.4
102.5
2W.5
112.1
292.1
26.4
66.6

98.6

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES
Cigarettes
,
Cigars
,
Tobacco and snuff.
Tobacco stemming and redrying
TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS
Scouring and combing plants
Yarn and thread mills
Broad-woven fabric mills
Harrow fabrics and smallwares
Knitting mills
Dyeing and finishing textiles
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings....
Hats (except cloth and millinery)
Miscellaneous textile goods

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS
Men's and boys' suits and coats
Men's and boys' furnishings and work
clothing
Women's outerwear
Women's, children's under garments
Millinery
Children's outerwear
Fur goods
Miscellaneous apparel and accessories...
Other fabricated textile products

953.8

106! 5
393.7
29.5
225.5
90.1
44.0
10.1
56.8

1,238.3 1,185.6 1,215.9
116.1
108.8
31*9.2
326.5
113.9
16.3
75.0
7.2
56.9
131.8

357.6
329.0
118.6
13.1
75.6
7-*
61.7
136.8

560.1
274.0
150.8
135.3

567.0
278.3
152.6
136.1

894.5

890.1
331.*
61.9
62.8
229.3

892.0
331.*
62.3
62.3
229.4
68.6
22.6
U81

Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills
Paperboard containers and boxes
Other paper and allied products

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES
Newspapers.
Periodicals
Books
Commercial printing
Lithographing
Greeting cards
Bookbinding and related industries
Miscellaneous publishing and printing
services




961.7
103.0
389.3
28.9
217.0
89.O
^3.2
9.8
55.7

68.3

22.1
1*8.1
66.2

1,630.
3H.
103.
350.
115.
290.
27.
73.
220.
139.

99.9
37.9
26.8
6.8
28.1*

7.9

56* .4

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS

See footnotes at end of table.

221.7
139.6
78.5
38.4
24.4
6.2
9.5

,*9.2
303.*
102.0
207.7
110.2
290.8
25.8
70.0
220.2
139.1
77.8
38.2
25.4
6.3

67.O

98O.I
5.8
111.7
399.8
29.8
230.6
89.O
U5.6
10.3
57.5

286.8

26.2
68,3
217.9
137.6
77.3
35.7
25.7
6.8
9.1
964.7
5.8
111.2
395.7
29.8
221.3
88.4

45.6
9.8
57.1

1,234.7 1,178.6
113.5 104.6

62.9
135.8
566.2
277.7
154.6
133.9

5.2
7.3

120.6
19.6
76.1*
8.1*

67.9
33.1
23.8
5.2
5-8

89.7
32.8
25.2
5.7
26.0

67.2
30.5
24.1
5.7
6.9
872.1
5.2
102.7
367.7
26.1
200.7
76.4

886.7
5.3
103.0
371.5
26.2
209.7
76.8
38.O
8.7
38.0
44.9
46.6
9.1
47.1
1,108.3 1,057.5 1,085.3 1,102.7 1,047.5
101.8
97.6
93.1
104.7
859.1

864.8
323.6
60.9
57.1
222.9
65.6
20.9
45.B
68.0

3*8.7
31*8.8

68.7
33.4
22.8

339.0
330.5
112.7
18.6
74.5
10.0
57.7
131.0
561.3
276.9
151.7
132.7

871.0
324.7
61.7
58.9
223.2
66.2
21.3
1*7.2
67.8

89.O

1,057.5 1,015.4 1,176.0 1,061.7
241.8
21*2.1
245.2
249.3
70.8
72.0
71.0
70.3
218.6
213.0
314.8
173.1
78.4
79.6
76.6
78.9
165.6
165.6
164.4
162.5
21.4
22.2
20.5
20.4
54.2
52.3
55.3
59.*
118.4
117.8
115.8
117.9
94.0
95.7
96.1
95.6

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

449.0

573.3

847.5
4.9
<*-7
360.4
25.2
196.2
76.8
35.7
8.7

866.7
5.0
97.7
364.7
25.9
204.6
77.7
36.4
8.9
45.8

317.5
293.0
101.0
14.5
67.3
5.6
50.9
110.1
444.5
221.4
120.0
103.1

326.0
293.9
105.2
11.3
67.9
5.6
55.7
115.0
451.8
225.7
122.0
104.1

318.6
311.3
107.7
17.4
68.0
6.4
56.8
114.7

309.0
293.3
100.0
16.4
66.0
7.8
51.8
110.1

454.3
226.6
123.9
103.8

449.0
225.9
120.8
102.3

568.6
163.7
26.7
38.3
183.9
51.9
16.0
37.6
50.5

571.9
165.O
26.8
37.5
184.5
52.0
16.6
38.0

558.2
161.0
26.0
36.4
179.0
50.1
15.6
37.2
52.9

552.1
159.9

51.5

178i8
49.7
15.3
36.0
52.7

15

'rent Industry

Employrm

Table B-2: Employees i i lemgriciltvral establishments, by iifcstry-Coitined
(In thousands)
All employees

Production workers 1

July
I960

June
i960

Aug.
1959

July
1959

Aug.
I960

July
I960

June
I960

Aug.
1959

July
1959

878.6
106.1
347.0
108.0

877.8
105.8
3*3.7
106.6

854.2
104.1
332.8
104.9

847.8
103.6
330.2
104.8

539.2

538.0
69.4

540.4
69.5
211.1
57.5

532.1
69.2
207.8
57.5

526.6
68.9
205.7
57.2

52.7
79.1
7.9
31.9
36.1
109.8

53.1
78.4
7.9

51.6
76.6

8.'?
6.4

31.3
46.6
6.4
25.8

109.9

38.0
106.1

51.0
76.2
7.8
31.6
37.3
105.3

30.6
45.9
6.3
22.5
25.1
67.2

30.2
45.6
6.4
21.7
24.4
66.5

230.0
183.3

232.5
184.0

229.9
183.2

189.3

152.6
116.5

155.6
117.6

150.7
114.7

158.2
120. 4

U6.7

Industry

48.5

46.7

48.2

36.1

38.0

36.0

37.8

252.3
103.4
21.5
127.4

258.1
103.5
22.0
132.6

264.7
105.4
22.7
136.6
379.7
37.1
5.2
19.5
253.3
15.7
32.2
16.7

264.0
106.7
22.5
134.8

192.9

203.8
78.4
18.4
107.0

203 A
79.7
18.3
105.4

375.1
36.9
5.0
19.6
252.2
15.5
30.2
15.7

330.7

339.3
32.8
4.0

334.6
32.4
3.9
17.6
227.3
13.2
26.3
13.9

Nondurable Goods — Continued

880.8

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS
Industrial inorganic chemicals........
Industrial organic chemicals
,
Drugs and medicines
Soap, cleaning and polishing preparations
,
Paints, pigments, and fillers
Gum and wood chemicals...
Fertilizers
Vegetable and animal oils and fats...
Miscellaneous chemicals

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL-.

230.4

Petroleum refining
Coke, other petroleum and coal
products

RUBBER PRODUCTS

253.3

Tires and inner tubes.
Rubber footwear
Other rubber products.

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS
Leather: tanned, curried, and finished.
Industrial leather belting and packing.
Boot and shoe cut stock and findings..
Footwear (except rubber)
Luggage.
Handbags and small leather goods
Gloves and miscellaneous leather goods.

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES.

37^.0
4.3

16.3
29.8
14.8

3,922

3,937

152.9

192.2
76.3
17.6
98.3
321.6
29.9
3.2

in

i4.o
25.6
12.8

1
18.2
103.1
323.2
30.2
3.2
17.3
2l6.9
13.8
26.0
13.8

13.4
28.3
14.8

2,562
2,592
2,589
2,571
928.4
960.4
9H.9
819.6
807.4
81(6.2
8OO.7
92.3
92.0
91.1
90.9
855.7
854.7
878.7
887.I
680.1
687.2
689.O
694.6
42.3
42.2
40.8
41.3
^6
148.0
152.1
152.3

3,949

24.8

24.6

25.6

25.9

751

751
712.9
37.3

744
707.0
36.4

748
710.8
36.8

750
7H.7
37.2

6l4

COMMUNICATION.

615
590.1
260.4
157.0

606
582.5
257.3
155.3

612
588.2
260.2
156.6

610
585-7
259-4
156.3

544
522.2
224.4
140.2

537
515.7
221.6
139.0

547
525.3
226.9
140.9

544
522.6
226.2
140.7

172.7

169.9

171.4

170.0

157.6

155.1

157. i>

155.7

24.4

23.9

24.0

23.9

21.7

21.1

21.4

21.3

Telephone...
Telegraph...

OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES
Gas and electric utilities
Electric light and power utilities.
Gas utilities.
Electric light and gas utilities
combined.
Local utilities, not elsewhere
classified

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE.

LI,572

Wholesalers, full-service and limitedfunction
Automot ive
Groceries, food specialties, beer,
wines, and liquors
Electrical goods, machinery, hardware,
and plumbing equipment
Other full-service and limitedfunction wholesalers.
Wholesale distributors, other

11,575

Ll,637

LL,36O

3,1**

WHOLESALE TRADE




3,942

3,928

Interstate railroads
Class I railroads
Local railways and bus lines
Trucking and warehousing
Other transportation and services
Bus lines, except local
> . ..
Air transportation (common carrier)...
Pipe-line transportation (except
natural gas )

564934 O - 60 - 4

16.0
30.2
15.8

2,563

TRANSPORTATION

See footnotes at end of table.

IS:?

21.8
23.6
67.2

3,134

3,129

3,081

1,868.9 1,867.1 1,836.0
142.2
139.2
141.5

LL,324

2,687

2,646

3,069

2,691

1,820.6
137-3

1,624.5 1,621.8 1,601.8
121.1
123.0
122.3

1,589.4
119.6
273.1

315.5

314.1

305.3

305.5

459.7

458.1

453.8

452.0

925.8
953.4
937.7
951.5
1,265.0 1,261.6 1,245.2 1,248.6

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

2,655

280.5

278.9

272.6

394.8

394.0

393.4

391.4

826.6
826.2
814.7
1,066.2 1,065.4 1,052.7

805.3
1,056.1

16

Current Industry Employmen

Table B-2: Employees ii imfriciftiral establiskMits, by Mistry-CMtiiitJ
(In thousands)
Production workers 1
Industry

Aug.
I960

July
1959

Aug.
I960

July
I960

June
I960

Aug.
1959

July
1959

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE—Continued
RETAIL TRADE
General merchandise stores
Department stores and general
mail-order houses
Other general merchandise stores.....
Pood and liquor stores
Grocery, meat, and vegetable markets.
Dairy-product stores and dealers
Other food and liquor stores
Automotive and accessories dealers....
Apparel and accessories stores
Other retail trade 2
Furniture and appliance stores
Drug stores

8,508
8,*28
1,*39.5 1,*29.3 l,*62.5

1,651.5

817.8
586.0
3,932.9

8,279
8,255
l,*O7.6 1,396.7

1,325.7 1,359.5 1,307.9

1,301.5

91*.2
898.7
93*.2
905.5
528.3
502.1
515.1
*98.0
1,66*.3 1,655.6 1,6O*.2 1,600.3
1,206.8 1,203.7 1,161.9 1,158.*
226.8
230.6
231.7
231.0
225.1
211.7
210.9
225.8
827.*
800.6
798.9
823*6
628.3
568.8
572.1
593.*
3,930.8 3,933.9 3,897.6 3,887.0
389.5
397.0
390.7
398.9
38*.*
398.6
385.7
397.6

8*1.0
861.3
833.9
*8*.7
*98.2
*7*.O
1,523.6 1,513.* 1,*77.5
1,133.2
196.5 1,129.0 1,089.8
192.*
198.5
193.9
I89.2
192.0
727.5
709.0
538.9
729.*
517.3
2,137.2
571.7
359.0 2,129*0 2,12*.8
353.6
376.9
356.9
36*.8
378.2

830.*
*71.1
1,*68.*
1,080.8
199.5
188.1
708.6
521.0
2,110.9
352.1
363.3

2,529

2,528
2,*96
2,*7*
2,*75
682.*
671.2
651.1
6*9.8
102.7
100.*
98.0
97.*
9*6.6
930.8
915.*
91*.l
795.8
793.6
809.8
813.*

6,693

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE

6,582
6,728
6,603
6,7*5
602.6
595.6
602.7
52*. 5

Banks and trust companies
Security dealers and exchanges
Insurance carriers and agents
Other finance agencies and real estate

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS.
Hotels and lodging places...
Personal services:
Laundries
Cleaning and dyeing plants.
Motion pictures

316.0
175.6
192.0

3L*.6
I8I.3
190.7

3X5-8

165.6
195.9

8,136

8

FEDERAL

8,155

8,*O9

2,206

GOVERNMENT.

2,205
2,177.1
919.0
56*.8
693.3
22.8
*.9
5,950
1,5*3.3
*,*O6.9
2,5*7.6
3,*O2.6

2,20*
2,183
2,176.6 2,155.2
922.8
9*1.5
560.0
551.3
693.8
662.*
22.8
22.7
*.9
*.8
5,630
6,205
1,575.2 1,*67.9
*,629.9 *,162.*
2,851.3 2,330.0
3,353.8 3,300.3

Executive
Department of Defense..
Post Office Department.
Other agencies
Legislative
Judicial

5,930

STATE AND LOCAL.
State
Local
Education.
Other

33-7.5
169.3
192.9
7,837

7,813

2,190
2,162.0
9*9.6
5*9.*
663.O
22.7
*.8
5,6*7
l,*80.1
*,166.7
2,335.5
3,311.3

For mining and manufacturing, data refer to production and related workers; for contract construction, to construction workers; and
for all other industries, to Ronsupervisory workers.
2
Data for nonsupervisory workers exclude eating and drinking places.
*Data are prepared by the 0.8. Civil Service Commission and relate to civilian employment only.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most rte«nt months are preliminary.
Data relate to the United States without Alaska and Hawaii.

TaMi 13: FtfcrD
(Io thousands)
Branch
TOTAL

my

m>

2,511

I960

July
1999

2,507

2,537

JMM

Branch
Navy

l

July
i960

July
1959

618.3

June
I960
618.0

629.2

876.6

873.1

863.2

172.8

170.6

17*.8

8L2.9

&*«8

836.7

30.5

30.5

30.6

*Data refer to forces beth la continental United States and abroad.
NOTE: Data for the currtnt i»nih > r e preliminary.
SOURCE: U.S. Department +f B»f*as« and U.S. Department of Treasury.




17

TiMt M : EaptoyMS ii mnriciltvil
b Mstry inrisiti aid silictil |nipsf susmNr
y
(In thousands.;
All employees
Aug.
July
I960
I960

Industry division and group

53,33*
53,076

Total
Total without Alaska and Hawaii 1 .

Production workers
July
I960

June
I960

June
I960

53,388
53,1*0

53,*20
53,158

673

659

678

2,860

2,863

2,790

16,278
9,3*3
6,935

16,*21
9,*68
6,953

16,498
9,499
6,999

12,202
6,90*
5,298

12,338
7,022
5,316

12,*O7
7,051
5,356

1**
655
399
557
1,153
1,066
1,656
1,327
1,520
35*
512

1*6
666
399
562
1,168
1,087
1,655
1,322
1,59*
35*
515

150

70
588

72
599
335
*55
937
8*1

72
596
337
45*
970
8**
1,1*3
B68
1,127
229
*X1

1,*65
91
963

l,*55

Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods.
Durable Goods
Ordnance and accessories
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Machinery (except electrical)
Electrical machinery
Transportation equipment
Instruments and related products
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.

664
401
560

33*

*52
920
819

1,203
1,090
1,648
l,3O6
1,608

1,051

1,11*

35*
515

228
*07

229

1,020

1,009

1,1*9

86*

879
*12

Nondurable Goods
Food and kindred products
Tobacco manufactures
Textile-mill products.
Apparel and other finished textile products.
Paper and allied products
Printing, publishing, and allied industries.
Chemicals and allied products.
Products of petroleum and coal
Rubber products
Leather and leather products

1,216
562
901
887
227
255
368

896
890
227
258
368

892
888

Transportation and public utilities.
Transportat i on
Communication
Other public utilities

3,899
2,550
7**
605

3,908
2,558
7**
606

3,926

Wholesale and retail trade.
Wholesale trade..,
Retail trade

,7
3,1**
8,600

11,720
3,150
8,570

11,712
3,161
8,551

1,*83

88
962
1,262

567

81
1,086

1,032
78
867
1,130
*52
572
5*8
15*
198
325

79
87*

868

1,108

**7
579
57
*

449
575
59
*

231

150

150

258

195
325

196
325

368

603

Finance, insurance, and real estate.

2,1*92

2,*78

2,*71

Serv i ce and m i see 11 aneons

6,660

6,695

6,6*5

Government
Federal

8,*70
2,228

2,216
6198

8,420
2,215
6,205

State and local.

slate

detail adds to the total without Alaska and Hawaii.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

Table B-5: Enpkyeis it prifiti art fimnmnt safaris, k rigta
y
Region1
Total

ALL REGIONS
North Atlantic2
South Atlantic
Gul f
Pacific

217.5
99-1
39-0
22.1
49.9
3.9

(In thousands)
July I960
Private
Navy
124.0
56.7
20.6
22.1
17.2
3.9
3.5

32.7

June I960
Private

Navy

Total

JuJy 1959
Private

U0.9

93.5
4S.4
18.4

Total

84.4
38.4
22.2
50.5
4.0
3.7

92.3

216.8

123.3

43.0
20.1
22.2
17.9
4.0
3.7

41.4
18.3

100.8
36.5
22.7
48.9
3.8

59.7
17.9
22.7
15.1
3.8

32.6

*
4

Navy
93.5

18.6
33.8

-

North Atlantic region includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in Conn., Del., Maine, Md., Mass., N.H., N.J., N.Y., Pa., R.I., Vt. The Sou* Atlantic region* includes all yards bordering on the Atlantic in Ga., N.C., S.C., Va. The Gulf region includes all yards in Fla., and all yards bordering on the Gulf of Mexico ia Ala., La., Miss.,
Tex. The Pacific region includes all yards in Calif., Oregon, Wash. The Great Lakes region includes all yards bordering on the Great Lakes in 111., Mich,, Minn., N.Y., Oluo,'
z
Pa., Wis. The Inland region includes all other yards.
Navy data include Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




18

Tiblt B-7: Eipliyus ii mafriciltiral tstalliskuits, b iiiistry Jivisiii n l State
y
(In thousands)

July

June
I960

July
1959

Al abama
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado

753-7
322.2
361.2
4,834.1
507.0

758.1
323.6
364.9
4,824.5
502.4

751.8
289.9
356.6
4,691.4
497.8

Connecticut
Delaware..»
District of Columbia.
Florida
Georgia

156.9
528.0
1,237A
1,010.2

155.6
525.7
1,259-4
1,020.9

878.2
153.8
515.9
1,216.2
1,011.0

Idaho
Illinois.
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas

158.1
3,411.7
1,393.*
676.3
550.1

156.5
3,**7.6
l,*20.3
684.4
551-5

159.9
3,426.0
1,404.2
672A
559.3

Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine.
Maryland
Massachusetts

631.8
778.*
288.1
897.1
1,89*.5

638.8
778.7
286.0
902.6
1,903.0

Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana.

2,249.4
942.7
395.5
1,295.3
166.9

Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico..

(1)

(1)

Contract construction

Mining

TOTAL

July
196Q
11.8
15.0

6A
31-9
16.6
(1)

(3)
(3)

8.5
5.8

June
I960

July
1959

12.3
15.8
6A
31.7
17.1

11.3
15.2
6.3
33.6
15.1

81

(2)

(3)
8.5
5.8

July
I960

June
I960

July
1959

47.3
31.7
22.0
313.3
37-2

46.3
30.7
21.7
308.2
36.O

47-3
18.0
20.8
299.8
39-3

(1)

(1)

3
(3)
7.7
5.8

12.8
22.5
118.3
57.7

12.5
22.3
114.6
57.9

45.8
13.2
23-5
135.8
62.3

11.7
194.3
72.6
*3-3
36.5

11-3
181.O
72.1
42.5
34.9

11.6
185.7
69A
44.9
40.4

38.4
57-3
17.5
69.3
88.9

37A
55.6
16.5
66.7
85.6

40.7
58.9
17.7
69.O
89.6
114.0
66.0
28.3
70.6
13.8
25A

2.3

2.3

27.6
10.4

27.9
10.5

3.6
29.7
10.5

17.4

17.9

18.7

633A
775.5
285.8
883.9
1,878.3

26.8
42.4
(3)

30.2
42.6
(3)

27.7
47.3
(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

2,281.5
940.4
397.2
1,315.9
166.9

2,288.9
936.1
389.7
1,307.7
170.2

15.9
19.8
6.5

16.0
19.5
6.3
8.4

110.8

7.7

16.6
17.5
6.5
7.7
7.5

62.7
12.4

98.1
63-5
25.2
61.5
12.0

371.1
103.6
199.0
1,987.0
236A

372.7
101.5
197.5
1,998.8
238.9

368.5
98.1
195.1
1,980.3
233.5

3.1

3.0

3A
A
3.7
21.0

3.*
.3
3.7
20.9

3.0
3.2

»3
3.8
20.3

24.5
7.5
10.0
107.1
19.8

23.6
7.6
9.5
106.6
19.7

6.3
10.4
102.4
21.4

New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma

6,188.4
1,1*3.3

6,236.7
1,148.9
130.4
3,151.0
571.4

6,089.9
1,119.*
130.7
3,122.2
569.1

10.0
3.8

10.1
3.8

9.9

292.7
66.3

295.2
65.8
13.2
159-7
33.5

281.2
63.4
15.7
164.7
37.6

Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota.

511.7
3,655.7
280.8
557.2

(1)

29.2
184.7
12.9
38.9
11.6

28.6
196.8
13.5
33A
11.6

Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia

885.5
2,512.3
268.0
113.0
1,011.2

889.1
2,513-7
266.6
109.2
1,015.7

887.5
2,491-9
260.6
113.6
991-4

Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

820.0
450.0
1,193.9
103.3

817.1
456.8
1,190.8
100.8

815.O
460.7
1,187.0
95.5

55.8
4.3
10.6

(1)

3,104.3
565.5

(1)

514.0
3,695.0
281.4
559.0
140.5

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




510.3

3,7l6A

281.5
5*5.8
138.8

4.1

2.4

8.0

4.1

2.4

4.2

2.4

8.8

67.4
27A

2.4

3.1
2.3

20.9
45.0

20.9
45.7

20.6
49.6

167.3
34.2

1.3

l 3
61.8
(3)

1.3

70.8
(3)

1.7
2.5

1.7
2.6

30.4
195.0
13.1
39.7

7.1

7.2

125A
14.2

124.9
14.3

7.9
132.2
14.7

52.1
171.9
16.8

49.9
172.9
16.1

50.5
176.5
18.0

(1)

52.9
(3)
1.7
(l)

(1)

1.3

1.3

1.2

17.2

17.2

17.2

77.9

77A

74.1

1.7

52.0
21.6
64.2
ll.l

50.1
20.4
60.6
11.0

48.8
20.8
61.5
10.1

1.8

1.9

59.5

61.9

4.2

4.2

10.1

9.7

7.2

7.0

7.8

19
Tibli B-7: Eipliyiis ii mafriciltiral istablisbmts, b iilistrj livisin ail Stati-Ciitinil
y

Manufacturing

July
lOfo
238.6
*7-9

June

I In thousands)
Transportation and
public utilities
June
July
July
July
1Q60
1050
1060
1050

*9.*

Wholesale and retail trade
July

June

July

1060

1060

1050

181
*.

239.8
*9.2
102.3
1,281.*
86.0

2*3.*
*6.5
101.0
1,310.9
81.1

*9.0
25.1
28.*
361.1
**.5

25.2
28.*
356.*
**.2

*9.1
23.7
28.*
355.6
**.3

150.1
78.6
81.*
1,073.5
120.6

150.*
78.5
81.7
1,069.*
119.*

72.7
8O.5
1,016.0
121.0

19*.9
332.8

(l)
6O.5
20.1
202.7
335.0

395.6
60.3
19.9
189.1
339.8

(1)
10.7
28.6
98.1
72.2

(1)
10.8
28.3
98.1
72.5

**.7
11.1
28.6
96.9
72.0

(1)
28.9
8*. 6
3*3.9
221.7

(1)
29.0
8*.2
3*9.*
223.*

150.7
27.7
82.2
333.0
218.3

30.3
1,171.3
576.8
176.8
112.8

30.*
1,195.2
59*-5
177.2
113.8

32.5
1,216.8
605.8
181.7

15.*
288.0
92.6
56.1
55.2

15.3
288.*
93.©
56.1
55.2

15.*
208.8
9*.3
55.7
56.7

39.*
722.9
27*.*
169.I
129.*

39.1
727.5
275.8
170.*
128.*

39.3
716.5
272.5
166.7
129.8

Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine.
Maryland
Massachusetts.

l6*-3
1*3-2
108.5
261.5
681.7

167.1
1*3.1
109.1
260.1
693.0

169.7
1*3.0
108.3
263.*
685.7

51.8
86.8

52.0
85.*
18.1
73.1
107.6

53.5
85.3
18.8
71.8
IO8.7

1*1.5
18*.5
55.1
188.1
387.*

1*0.0
185.7
55.0

137.*
182.0
5*.8
18*.*
380.0

Michigan....
Minnesota...
Mississippi.
Missouri....
Montana

918.6
232.3
118.3
391.8
20.9

952.9
229.3
119.2
396.2
20.8

955.3
232.0
118.1
395.2

137.*
85.*
25.*
19.8

1*2.5
87.1
25.1
12*.*
20.2

*25-3
228.8
85.I
300.7
38.8

*29.5
229.5

21.2

136.9
8*.9
25.3
118.0
20.0

Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire.
New Jersey....
New Mexico

65.3

38.*

38.3

39.0

90.6

5.2

5.6

88.3
796.3
18.0

86.8
799.3
18.3

95
.

22.0

87.6
780.1
17.5

New York
North Carolina.
North Dakota...
Ohio...
Oklahoma

1,88*.2
*90.5
(1)
1,2*5 A
87.0

1,901.2
*92.5

1,889.2
*88.5

7.1

7.0

1,268.2
88.3

1,288.6
88.3

Oregon
PennsylvaniaT..,
Rhode Island...
South Carolina.
South Dakota...

151.6
i,*n.7
117.6
239.1
(l)

151.8
1,*36.1

Alabama....
Arizona....
Arkansas...
California.
Colorado...
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois.
Indiana..
Iowa
Kansas...

101.7
1,292.2

87.0
(1)
61.1
20.2

66.2

53
.

65.8

119.1
239.9
13.2

121.1

*87.7
65.6
13.5
208.3
*8.*

157.7
l,*6l.2
117.8
236.I
13.7

*5.*
277.0
15.3
26.*

*5-3
281.8
15\3
26.*
10.2

309.1
*93.2
*6.0
36.6
267.9

5*.8

55.6

226.9
23.3

229.O
23.0

223.9
127.9
*65-3

220.7
130.0

*58.9

232.9
130.5
*77.7

8.0

76
.

73
.




9*
.
98
.

*8l.l
6*.7
(1)
207.5
*8.0

Washington....
West Virginia.
Wisconsin
Wyoming

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

96
.
9*9

120.5

1*9.1

312.*
*90.*
*8.9
35.6
273.6

273.2

73.9
106.6

1*8.2
21.2

Tennessee.
Texas.
Utah
Vermont...
Virgina...

308.7
*90.8
*6.9
36.3

18.*

(1)

78
.
8*.3

as
76.6
12.7

20.8

8*.5
303.1
38.9

**0.9
228.8
83.2
301.5

*0.*

10.2
1*9.7
20.8

35.0
375.6
50.7

90.5
21.3
3*.5
373.6
50.8

90.8
20.7
33.6
368.*
*9.*

*92.0
63.9
13.6

1,26*.5
216.1
(1)
603.6
135.0

1,279.2
216.1
38.1
602.5
135.1

1,227.5
208.6
37.7
597.0
131.9

*6.3
283.*
1*.9
25.9
10.3

111.9
686.5
51.2
08.O

111.6

(l)

691.9
51.1
97.7
38.1

110.0
689.*
51.9
98.6
38.3

55.7
231.5
23.3

189.6
6*5.9

190.1
6**.9
60.0
20.9
213.9

179.1
82.8

211.3

*8.*

83.8

8*.6

77
.

60.0
21.2
213.0

62.7
*5.1
76.6
12.5

62.9
*6.*
77.2
12.8

180.7
82.2
2*3.1
22.9

7.8

191.1
393.5

2*2.9
22.2

190.9
630.7
58.5
20.8
209.6
176.8
83.7
236.6
20.3

20

TaMt 1-7: E»fitytts Hi tuifriciJtiril istiblislHMits, ky iiiistry .ivisiii ni State-Ciitiiiei

(In thousands)
Finance, insurance,
and real estate

July
6
Alabama
Arizona....
Arkansas...
California.
Colorado...

Connecticut
Delaware
,.
D i s t r i c t of Columbia.*,.
Florida
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois.
Indiana..
Iowa
Kansas. . .

June

July

Service and miscellaneous

July

June

July

Government

July
6

July
1O5Q

29.8
i*.7
12.2
2*3-7
23.6

152.6
65.5
66.6
862 A
103.8

155.6
66.k
69.7
885.7
105.1

1*7.9
60.1
66.0
823.*
101.1

(1)
5.9
25.7
7*.3
*3-*

18.7
266.6
207.6
179.2

(1)
19.O
265.2
218.6
185.8

5.6
178.2
5*-5
31.0
22.2

19.3
*33-*
127.5
8*.i
68.*
79.2
91.9
32.6
115 A
282.5

3*.l
396.O
l8*.5
111.7
108.2

33.5
*16.9
190.7
116.1
110.6

89.2
18.1
258.9
196.2
175 A
33.1
388.6
17* A
107.8
103.9

IO6.9
1*0.0
*7.1
1*2.6
2*7.7

110.6
1*1.9
*8.0
1*8.2
2**. 6

105.7
136.7
*5.«
139.2
2*1.6

325.0
1*1.7
81.7
183.1
39.2

333.3
1*6A
85.5
195.7
*0A

309.5
138.5
78.*
176.7
37.1

Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland *
Massachusetts.

22.9
32.3
8.9
V3.9
99.7

Michigan....
Minnesota...
Mississippi.
Missouri
Montana

77.8
V6.9
12.2
67.5

6A

239.©
120.8
38.9
163.5
21.5

Nebraska
.
.
Nevada
New Hampshire.
New Jersey....
New Mexico....

21.*
3.2
7.3
90.8
8.6

52 A
3*.2
27.0
2*6.7
36.5

51.9
31.9
25.3
238.7
35.5

7*,5
18A
21.9
23*.8
61.1

77.0
18.3
22.7
237.8
63.5

72.*
18.0
21.5
227.9
59.1

New York
North Carolina.
North Dakota...
Ohio
Oklahoma

*91 A
39.6
(1)
116.7
2*.5

966.O
107.7
(1)
359.*
63.8

937.6
106.5
18.5
355.3
6*.8

798.5
15*.6
(1)
383.5
128.O

821.0
158.0
32.1
*02.6
131.5

775.6
1*8.8
31.1
372.0
12* .0

Oregon
Pennsylvania. . .
Rhode Island...
South Carolina.
South Dakota. . .

20.3
1*9.6
12.3
17.1
(1)

59.9
1*58.8
33-5
**.2
(1)

58.5
*53.7
33.8
19.6

9©-9
*2*.2
37.8
91.0
(1)

9*.6
*31.7
37.9
92.9
39.8

88.0
*13.7
37.5
89.*
37.5

Tennessee.
Texas
Utah
Vermont...
Virginia *

35 A
121.3
11A
3.9
*3-3

101.8
308.5
33.8
20.1
11* .0

99.3
300.0
32.0
20.0
111.9

132.3
*22.0
59.6
16.1
187.9

1*0.6
*23.6
60.8
16.1
193.9

38.1
12.3
*3.8
2.7

99.8
Mi. 6
1*3.5
i*.o

95.6
*5.*
139 A
12.0

160.5
60.6
153.2
21.3

165.9
61.1
160.2
21.2

139.9
*10A
57.1
15.8
183.7
158A
59.5
1*7.8
20.7

Washington....
West Virginia.
Wisconsin
Wyoming

**.l

1
Iot available.
*C<»biaec vita oomstruetien.
?
CaBbin«4 vitfa. scrrlee.
^Federal eaployaft&t la tk« Maryland and Virginia sectors of the District of Columbia Metropolitan area is included in data for
Bistrict of Columbia.
I0TE: Bata for the current B»nth are preliminary.
SOOTCli Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back coyer.




21

Industry Emp

Tiblt U: Eipltpts M Niafnciltinl tstablisbitits fir selected areas, by iilistry livisioi
(In thousands)

July
I960

June

July
1959

IQ6O

July
i960

Jun«

July
1959

June
I960

July
I960

Industry division
Birmingham

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction,
Manufacturing
,
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade
Finance.
Service
Government.
,

195.2
7.6
11.2
60.1
15.7
45-5
11.9
23.6
19.6

196.4
8.0
ll.l
60.9
15.8
45.S
11.9
23.4
19.5

Mobile

199.5
7.5
10.7
65.©
15.9
46 .4
11.7
23 A
18.9

91.1
(1)

Phoenix

92.2
(1)

5 A
17.5
lO.l
19.6
3.7
10.0
24.8

July
July
1959
I960
ARlZON

5-3
17.5
10.3
19.7
3.7
10.0
25.7

172.1
.5
17.9
31.9
12.6
46.5
10.5
22.2
30.0

91.9
(1)
5.3
18.2
10.2
18.7
4.2
10.2
25.1

June
I960

July
1959

Tucson

172 A

150.6
.1
17 '.6 10.0
29.3
32.8
12.1
12.6
42.2
1*6.3

9.6
20.1
27.2

10 A
22.1
30.1

64.8
2.7
7.0
8.1
5.5
15.3
2.6
10.3
13.3

66.1
2.7
6.9
8.3
5.7
15.5
2.6
10.2
14.2

59.5
2.5
4.7
9.1
5.3
1^.3
2.4
9.0
12.2

ARKANSAS
Lbs AngelesLong Beach

Little RockN. Little Rock

TOTAL........
Mining
,
Contract construction,
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
,
Service
Government

Hi5
7.0
15.2
8.0
18.3
5.2
11.6
14.3

79.6
(1)
7.0
14,8
8.0
18.5
5.1
11.6
14.6

78.0
(1)
6.4
15.1
8.0
18.3
5.0
11.3
13.9

13.2

Mining
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade.
Finance
Service
Government

34.2

34.2

36.6

12.3

261.6
.6
21.6
66.8
14.7
53.7
11.4
37.4
55 A

261.2
.6
23.©
74.1
13.8
51.8
10.5
34.3
53.1

260.9
.6
21.5
66.8
14.4
53.3
H.3
36.7
56.3

999.2
1.9
62.8
207.5
104.9
220.2
68.6
137.3
196.O

Denver

995.5
1.9
62.5
202.5
103.9
218.8
67.5
137.1
201.3

COLORADO

Stockton

11.6

13.5

318.2
4.4
24.4
62.8
30.6
77.5
17.8
45.8
54.9

(2)

3

25.3
59.2
29.9
78.0
18.3
k3
'l
51.8

(2

39.4
(3)
1.5
23.9
1.8
5.3
.8
3.1
2.9
DELAWARE

39.0
(3)
1.4
24.0
1.8
5.1
.9

Ji

(2
(2
(2
2
2
2
2

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction,
Manufacturing
,
Trans, and pub. util.•
Trade
Finance.
•
Service
Government

See footnotes at end of table.




130.9
(1)
9.2
56.8
8.6
23.1
5.3
14.8
13.1

A

59.3
(3)
3.9
22.7
2.7
11.6
2.4
10.9
5.2

121.7

(3)
6.8
12.'3
22.7
6.5
18.2
11,6

Washington
130.6
(1)
10.0

57.3
8.7
22.4
5.3
14.4
12.5

16.7
66.9

16.2
67.7

9.1

9.0
31.8

721.4
(1)
52.5
34.7
46.6
142.4
38.O
113.8
293 A

720.7
(1)
52.3
34.6
46.3
142.4
37.6
114.3
293.2

34.2
7.2

28.7
26.2

.1

6.5

24.8
23 3

(3)
5.8

64.4
5.8
19.7
3.3
11.6
9.5

232.0
(3)
12.2
87.9

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

43.5
30.5
24.5
23.9
Waterbury

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Wilmington

131.8
(1)
9.3
57.2
8.6
23.O
5.3
15.6
12.8

ill

120.1

New Haven

New Britain

39.1
(3)
1.6
23.7
1.8
5.2
•9
3.1
3.0

179.4

.1

CONNECTICUT

CONNECTICUT — Continued

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
,
Finance
Service
Government

189.1

Bridgeport

310.1

313.9
4.4
23.2
62.5
30.3
76.6
17.8
44.3
54.8

977.1 196.6
.1
2.0
62.4 17.3
204.3 73.3
106.2
9-5
212.8 3^.7
66.4
7.4
132.0 28.7
191.0 25.6

CVJ

13.6

16O.6
.2
12.8
26.5
11.2
31.4
6.7
14.8
57.0

CVJ

Mining
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

170.5
.2
14.4
28.9
10.7
33.7
6.8
16.O
59.8

San Diego

CALIFORNIA—Continued

TOTAL

2,269.4 170.7
.2
13.1
135.3 14.7
780.3 27.9
142.2 11.1
492.2 34.8
114.6
6.8
319.0 16.1
272.7 59.1

CALIFORNIA—Continued
San FranciscoOakland

San BernardinoRive rside-Ont. ario

TOTAL

12.6

2,317.7 2,318.0
12.8
12.9
142.4
144.3
763.1
759.1
11*3.5
11*5.5
510.5
513.0
120.2
121.9
332.7
335.9
135.9
292.8
>85.1

Sacramento

59.6

(3)
3.9
23.1

2.8
11.7
2.3
10.6

57.1
(3)
3.6
22.4
2.7
11.1
2.2
10.2

65.2
(3)
2.1
37.2
2.8
9.5
1.6

ii

FLORIDA

139.0
(1)
10.9
19.9

284.0

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

13 A
18.0
21.2

10.9
19.7
13.9
41.4
13.4
18.O
22.2

66.0
(3)
2.1
38.4
2.8
9.4
1.6
6.1

5.7
Miami

Jacksonville

704.8
(1)
53.5
3^.1
46.3
138.5
37A
111.0

66.4
(3)
2.1
38.0
2.9
9.9
1.6
6.3

137.9 293.9
(1)
(l)
11.5 25.3
20.8 4O.3
14.4 33.9
39.7 83.8
13.4 19.4
17.3 57.7
20.8 33.5

299.5
(1)
24.3
41.8
3^.3
84.9
19.4
58.7
36.1

290.2
(1)
29.1
39.6
33.9
79.4
19.5
56.8
31.9

22

Talk M: Eaptoytts ii imiriciltiril istaMUhititsto sikcUi artasv ly iilistry Jivisiii- Ciitimi

(Int thousands)

July

Jun*

July

July

19ft

I i960 I \<m

Industry division

July
-1959-

July
I960

IDA—Continued
TampaSt. Petersburg

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction,
Manufacturing
,
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
,
Service
Government

191.5

18* .7

(1)

(1)

21.3
3*.7

21.2
36.1
1*.*
56.9
10.6
26.2
26.1

23.7
33.7
13.7

362.*
(1)
21.5
8*.6
35.7
96.9
25.6
*7.8
50.3

359.9

(1)

(1)
21.*
83.O
35.7
96.5
25.8
*8.0

1*.*

5*.*

9.9
25.8
23.5

36O.6
(1)
23.*
88.1
35.3
9*-3
25.5
*6.1
VT.9

ILLINOIS

Mining
Contract construction,
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

2,366.5 2,393.1 2,380.3
6.0
\ 6.3
6.2
122.2

113.6

857

116.2
866.0
203.3
500.6

Mining
.,
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
,
Service
Government

856.7
201.3
201.5
50^.2
508.2
1*2.9
1*1.2 32* .S
330.2
331.2 221.1
221.5
23*.6
INDIANA—Cont nued

76.3

82.3

(1)

(1)

3.3
33 A
*.5
15.3
3.9
10.1
5.8

3.3
39.0
*.7
15.1
3.8
10.6
5.8

%
16.6
6.3
12.9
2.*
6.3
6.7

6*.3
1.6
2.9
25.8
*.6

2.3
7.3
5.9

2.3
7.3
5.6

2*2.6

2*3.0

(1)

(1)

16.3
82.8
21.7
52.5
11.7
31.3
26.3

1*.9
83.9
21.7
52.6
11.6
31.2
27.1

2I3
7.3
5.5

80.5
(l)

3*.©
6.7
17.8

3.6
33.7
6.7
17.9

7.9

7.9
6.*

6.2

102.1
(1)

6.3
23.1
9.0
25.2
11.6
13.7
13.5

102.0
6.1
2*.3

8.7
2*.8
11.*
13.7
13.2

*8.6
.1

*8.1
.1

6^5
7.5
9.3
2.7
6.6
11-5

6^5
7.3
9A
2.7
6.6
11-5

27.1
(1)
1.3
1*.2
1.0
5.2

.8

li

27.3
(1)
1.2
l*-3
1.0
5.3
.7
3.3
1.5

Mining
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

39.8
21.8
1.6
7.1

2**.5
(1)
16.2

69.9

70.9

.3
6.8

.3
7.0

86.9
21.8
52.8
11.6
30.0
25.2

17.7

17.9

l*.*

l*.5

3.3
8.0

3.3
7.9

l*.7

15.3

*.6

*.6

71.8
.*
8.1
18.7
*.7
15.1
3.2
7.8
13.9

281.0
7.8
17.5
*5-9
*2.8
72.8
16.5
*0.8
36.9

3.2

See footnotes at end of table.




3.2

I?)9

83.2
(

&

3

1:?

17.9
7*9
6.2

(1)
2.2
2.7
2.5

3.6
5A

3.6
5.3

7.3

JU6

15.3
100.0
20.*
6*.8
19.5
31.3
39.6

292.0
(1)
15.0
101.2
20.5
65.0
19.2
31.2
39.9

291.5
(1)
1*.8
103.7
21.9
63.9
18.6
30.1
38.5

Wichita

*8.*
.1

3.6
6.8
9.6
2.6
6.*
12.2

116.5
1.8
6.2
*3.*
7.3
25.2
5>
l*.9
12.5

12*.6
1-9
7.6
*8.*
7A
26.3
5.5
15.O
12.7

117.0
1-5
5.9
*3.6
7.3
25.2
5A
1*.8
13.1

27.2
(1)
1.2
1*.5
.9
5.2
.7
3.3
1.*

53 A
(1)
3.3
12.9
5.8
1*.8
3.7
8.3
*.6

53.1
(1)
3.1
12.8
5.7
1*.8
3.6
8.2

52.9
(1)
3.3
13.1
5.8
1*.6
3.6
8.3
*.2

18.7
*5.2

k3

'l

72.8
16.0
*0.7
35.3

72.9
5.1
7.0
9.0
9.5
19.6
3.3
9.5
10.1

1-5
25.5
2.3
8.6

1.*
27.5
2.2
8.5
3.7

72.9
5.1
6.8
9.1
9.*
19.7
3.2
9.5

10.2
MASSACHUSETTS

617.0
.9

*1.0
197.3
56.0
123.6
33.0
78.*
86.6

621.7
.9
39A
196.5
55.2
125.7
32.3
8l.l
90.6

612.0
.9
*1.2
199.6
5*.l
121.1
32.0

76.7
86.*

1,072.8
(1)
55.0
293.1
68.2
2**.9
75.0
19*.1
1*2.5

MASSACHUSETTS—Continued

72.7
5.3
7.2
9.1
9.1
19.6
3.2
9.0
10.1

1-5
25.*
2.2

8.7
*.O

161.1
(1)
7.2
67.1
8.3
29.*
8.2
21.7
19.2

NOTE: Data for t h e current month are preliminary.

163.7
(1)
6.9
69.5
8.*
30.2
8.1
21.6
19.0

163.7
(l)

7-3
70.1
8.5

To
21.7
18.5

1

53.0
291.1
68.9
2*8.8
73.8
192.5
1*1.2

1,068.6
(1)
55.5
299.1
69.9
2*0.3
72.6
190.6
1*0.6

Worcester

Springfield-Holyoke

*8.6

3.2

280.2
8.0

Baltimore

New Bedford"

23.1
1.5
7.6

280.8
7.7
17.2
*5.8
*2.2
73.3
16.5
*1.1
36.9

Shreveport

MARYLAND
Portland

*2.1
23.9
1.6

25.2

(1)
2.1
2.5
2.5
7.2
1.6

LOUISIANA

Fall Riveri

TOTAL

7.3
1.6
3.6
5 A

2*.9

Indianapolis

New Orleans

Baton Rouge

Lewiston-Auburn

Mining
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

25.1
(1)
2.2
2.5
2.5

KANSAS

103.1
(1)
6.2
23.3
9.0
25.3
11.5
13.9
1*.O

July

Juu«
I lQfiQ
IDAHO

Topeka

MA NE

TOTAL

6.3
7.5
INDIANA

(1)
3.6

KENTUCKY

Mining
Contract construction,
Manufacturing.
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

2.*

IOWA

Louisville

TOTAL

(1)
*.O
16.1
6.2
12.3
2.3
6.*
7.2

80.7

Des Moines

82.7
(1)
3.3
*0.8
*.8
15.2
3.8
9.6
5.2

5*.5

(1)
3.6
15.7
6.*
12.9

Fort Wayne

62.6
1.7
2.9
23.9

62.3
1.7
2.9

South Bend

TOTAL

July
1060

Boise

5*.8

5*.6

Evansville

Chicago

TOTAL

July

Savannah

189.1

56.6
10.8
26.3
25.0

Jus*
I960

6E0R8IA

II) 3
*.2
*9.2
*-3
18.9
5.2
12.1
13 A

109.6
(1)
*.O

107.6

l

50.3
*.*
18.5
5.1
11.8
13.1

19.3
5.1
12.2
13 A

(l)
*.*

Area Industry Em
T be B-8: Eipliyits ii iimriciltiral establishes fir selected areas, b iidistry Jivisiii-Ciitiuri
a l
y

(In thousands)
June
1Q6Q

July
IQ6Q

July
1QSQ

July
IQ6Q

June
i960

Industry division

July
July
ig6Q
1959
MICHI6AN

Flint

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

1,138.8
.8
1*6.5
485.7
69-5
224.6
48.2
133.3
130.2

112.0
(1)
4.7
6*.5
4.5
17.1
2.3
9.1
9.8

53.8
(1)
2.9
24.7
5.1
10.2
1.3
5.3
4.3

53.3
(1)
2.8
25.0
4.8
10.0
1.2
5.2
4.2

kk.2
45-7
(1)
(1)
1.5
l.k
2k.1
25.9
2.5
2.5
6.6
6.8
•9
.9
k.O
3.9
k.l
4.3
MISSISSIPPI

45-3
(1)
1.6
26.0
2.3
6.7
.8
3.7
4.1

3.0
24.3
5.1
10.2
1.3
5.2
4.2

July
1959

July
I960

113.0
(1)
6.0
48.2
8.1
23.6
k.2
13.6
9.3

113.7
5.6
49.4
8.0
23.7
4.1
13.5
9-4

112.3
86.2
(l)
(1)
4.7
6.4
29.2
14-8.8
3.2
8.0
15.2
23.O
2.9
k.2
8.1
12.7
22.8
9.3
MINNESOTA

Mining
Contract construction..
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

62.9
1.0
6.0
11.2
k.k
Ik.8
k.k
8.6
22.k

63 .k
1.0
5.9
11.4
k.k
Ik. 7
k.k
8.7
12.8

61.5
l.l
5.3
11.6
4.5
Ik.k
4.3
8.5
11.9

365.8
.7
8.7
105.1
40.0

m

47.9
43.1

368.7
.9
9.1
105.8
41.2
95.0
24.8
48.3
43.6
NEVADA

39.6
(1)
1.8
8.0
6.5

39.7
(1)
2.0
7.9
6.5
9.5
1.8
7.0
5.1

9

'I

1.8
7.1
M I S S O U R I 4.9

160.7
(3)
ll.l
37.5
20.6
35.8
12.8
23.3

160.9
(3)
10.7
37.3
20.5
35.9
12.7
24.1
20.0

158.6
(3)
10.7
36.9
21.3
35.9
12.3
22.5
19.2

19.8

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

638.9
1.0
28.0
239.4
44.4
124.4
45.5
89.6
66.6

33.1
(5)
2.7
2.1
3.4
7.8
1.4
10.5
5.2

32.6
(5)
2.7
2.1
3.3
7.7
1.4
10.2
5.2

385.4
.9
24.7
107.1
43.1
96.2
24.7
48.5
40.2

731.3
2.5
40.4
262.2
67.7
153.8
37.3
89.9
77.5
NEW

42.0
(1)
2.7
9.0
6.8
9.8
1.7
7.1
4.9

539.0
(1)
34.7
149-7
50.8
131.1
34.8
72.1
65.8

81.0
(1)
9.0
7.5
6.7
18.9
4.6
17.9
16.4

See footnotes at end of t a b l e .
564934 O - 60 - 5




734.7
2.5
39.7
264.0
68.3
154.5
36.7
90.3
78.7

729.7
3.0
39.5
267.1
68.2
149.6
36.8

20.4
(1)
1.7
3.1
2.3
5.8
(1)
4.3
3.2

HAMPSHIRE

(1)

4.8
15.4
2.9
8.0
22.5

543.6
(1)
32.2
151.2
51.1
132.3
34.4
73.0
69.3

535.6
(1)
36.0
148.4
52.2
130.7
33.9
70.6
63.8

MONTANA

31.3
(5)
2.6
2.3
3.4
7.1
1-3
9.9
4.7

42.8
(l)
2.3
18.2
2.9
8.4
2.5
5.3
3.3

43.3
(1)
2.2
18.4
2.8
8.5
2.5
5-5
3.3

20.4
(1)
1.7
3.1
2.3
5.9
(1)
4.2
3.2

20.8
(1)
2.4
3.1
2.2
5.8
(1)
4.2
3.1

NEW.JERSEY

Manchester

644.7
1.0
27.6
241.3
45.4
125.7
45.2
90.1
68.4

637.2
1.3
29.6
242.2
45.8
120.0
45.6
88.2
64.5

350.8
.4
20.6
153.6
20.9
72.2
12.9
38.8
31.4

358.2

357-1

20^5
159.7
21.1
73.3
12.6
38.9
31.7

22 .'8
162.8
20.7
70.5
12.2
37.5
30.3

173.0
.7
9.8
85.2
9-1
27.2
3.3
13.4
24.3

NEW MEXICO

Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

87.2

Jersey City
42.3
(l)
2.3
18.3
2.8
8.0
2.4
5.1
3.3

257.3

172.5
.7
9.5
87.2
9.1
26.8
3.2
12.7
23.3

103.1
.1
4.4
38.0
5.8
17.6
4.1
14.4
18.7

8.9
118.9
37.6
37.0
9.2
20.3
25.4

258.7

259.2

8.7

8.0
120.6
38.6
36.9
8.8
20.4
25.9

118.8
38.2
37.9
9.1
20.5
25.5

NEW JERSEY—Continued
PatersonPerth Amboy
Clifton-Passalc (

Alb anySchenectady^Tro;

Albuquerque

TOTAL

88.8
(1)
4.5
29.5
3.3
15.7
2.9
8.2
24.7

Great Falls

Reno
TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

July
1959

Minneapolls-St. Paul

Kansas City

TOTAL

Jun«
I960
Lansing

Grand Rapids

117.1
114.5
1,159.3
(1)
(1)
.8
to A 52.3
3.9
4.2
511.6
69.1
66.8
507 A
70.0
4.4
4.5
70.2
17.2
227.2
226.4
17.1
2.4
47.6
47.1
2.4
9.5
131.3
129.4
9.5
10.5
125.8
130.9
10.0
MICHIGAN—Continued
MuskegonSaginaw
Muskegon Heights
1,159.7
.8

Jun«
I960

81.9
(1)
8.9
7.8
6.7
18.8
4.5
17.9
17.3

78.5
(1)
8.3
7.7
6.3
18.3
4.7
17.5
15.7

224.8
(1)
10.3
64.9
17.3
44.7
8.7
31.9
46.9

225.6
(1)
10.0
65.3
17.5
44.9
8.6
31.4
48.0

176.9
.7
9.4
88.7
9.1
27.4
3.3
13.3
25.0
NEW YORK

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

78.8
(1)
3.9
39.7
3.9
13.0
2.3
6.8
9.1

39.0
5.7
17.8
3.9
14.8
18.4

Binghamton
79.0
(1)
4.2
40.0
3.9
12.9
"2.3
6.9
8.8

104.6
.1
*.9

102.2
.1
4.9
38.1
5.9
17.2
3.8
14.1
18.1

Buffalo
79.0
(1)
3.6
40.7
4.1
12.8
2.3
6.7
8.9

432.0

174.7
34.2
82.7
15.4
50.9
45.2

429.6
(1)
20.4
177.8
34.9
83.9
15.2
51.3
46.2

441.3
(1)
29.3
18O.5
35.6
86.1
15.2
50.5
44.1

24

A r e a Industry Emp

Tiblt B-8: Enployns ii inifriciltiril istablishMits fir silictil areas, b iiiistry lifisiii-Ciitiiiri
y
(In thousands)

June
I960

July
1960

July
1959

July
July
Jun«
I960
I960
1959
NEW YOU*— Continued
Nassau and
New York City
Suffolk Counties'

Industry division
Elmlra *

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government.

33-3

33.2

32.8

16.3

16.1

15.6

6.1

6.1

6.2

July
1969

July

423.0
(1)
36.4
118.7
20.3
99.5
18.1
63.3
66.7

424.2
(1)
36.2
119.9
23.0
98.4
17.3
61.2
68.2

409.2
(1)
32.8
120.5
23.1
91.3
16.2
61.5
63.9

June
I960

July
I960

July
1959

New York-Northeastern
New Jersey

3,529.2 3,577.5 3A67.3 5,635.0 5,699.9 5,559.4
1.9
5.2
5.4
5.2
1.9
1.9
258.8
125.8
242.1
134.5
252.9
118.6
949.1
961.9
952.9 1,740.6 1,767.1 1,762.3
318.8
322.0
478.8
468.0
475.8
324.0
754.5
766.3
722.2 1,168.4 1,182.9 1,119.1
384.5
391.4
492.5
484.1
480.1
382.0
598.4
591.8
86©.1
836.9
863.9
572.6
408.2
396.0
634.8
647.4
662.3
393.1

N W YORK—Continued
E
Syracuse

Rochester

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

221.5
(1)
12.1
107.2
9.9
39.0
8.0
24. 4
20.9

220.7
(1)
11.2
106.2
9.8
39.7
7.9
24.7

218.4
(1)
11.6
106.8
10.0
38.2
7.6
23.9

21.2

20.2

177.6
(1)
7.9
68.3
12.9
35.6
8.0
21.7
23.2

18O.9
(1)
9.1
69.O
12.7
36.3
7.9
22.2
23.8

Westchester County*

Utica-Rome

178.6
(1)

8.9
68.8

12.7
36.0
8.2
21.6
22.3

100.8
(1)
3.9
38.6
5.7
16.4
3.8
10.3
22.0

102.0
(1)
4.4
39.5
5.7
16.7
3.8
10.0
21.9

103.4
(1)
4.8
40.2
5.7
17.2
3.7
10.3
21.5

TOTAL
Mining...
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

103.6
(1)
9-4
25-5
10.4
29.0
7.1
13.5
8.7

Ti.9

9.2
25.4
10.4
29.1
7.2
13-5
9.1

GreensboroHlgh Point
100.8
(1)
8.2
25.6
10.2
28.5
6.8
13.1
8.4

44.7

Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

173.9
.1
8.3
82.6
12.5
33.2
4.8
18.9
13.5

175.8
.1
7.9
83.5
12.6
32.8
4.7
19.7

179.7
.1
9.1
86.5
12.6
33.7
4.6
19.2
13.9

(l)

(l)

19.5
64.2
14.8
48.4
11.0
41.1
29.5

18.2
65.2
14.9

18.5
64.5
15.3
46.4
11.0
41.3
26.3

107.8
.6
5.2
53.2
6.2
20.0

3.3

11.0
8.2

Canton
110.8
.6
4.7
55.5
6.4
20.2
3.2
11.4
8.8

223.3

48.8
11.0
39.7
27.7

Fargo

Winston-Salem

37.2

43.7

37.4

36.9

23.8
(1)
2.5
1.9
2.8
7.9
1.8
3.5
3.5

Akron

TOTAL

44.9

225.5

(1)

NORTH DAKOTA

NORTH CAROLINA

Charlotte

228.5

Cincinnati
112.1
.6
4.8
57.2
6.5
20.1
3.1
11.6

394.2
•3
22.9
151.3
32.5
78.9
20.5
47.8
40.0

8.3

398.4
.3
21.7
154.1
32.6
78.7
20.2
49.2
41.6

23.6
(1)
2.5
1.9
2.8
7.9
1.7
3.5
3.3

23.3
(1)
2.7
1.8
2.8
7.6
1.7
3.5
3.3

Cleveland
395.1
.3
20.6
155.8
32
78.2
19.7
49.0
39.0

695.3
.5
35.9
282.6
45.0
140.1
32.0
83.7
75.4

702.7
.5
33.9
289.0
45.1
140.1
31.5

85.9
76.7

693.9
.5
36.8
286.5
45.7
138.4
31.3
84.7
70.2

OHIO—C
Toledo

Dayton

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service
Government

254.9
16 \z
71.1
18.1
53.2
14.7
33.6
47.3

257.2
.7
15.7
72.8
18.3
53.4
14.6
34.8
47.O

253 .4
.8
17.1
71.7

18 .4
53.0
14.2
33.3
44.9

243,

11,
101,
9
42,
6,
26,
44

246.1
.4
10.4
103.4
9.9
42.3
6.2
27.8
45.7

245.9
.4
11.4
106.1
9.8
41.5
6.2
27.1
43.5

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma City

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction.
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade
Finance
Service.
Government

168.0
6.8
12.4
19.6
12.5
41.5
9.5
20.7
45.O

See footnotes at end of table.




168.7
6.8
12.5
20.0
12.2
41.5

9.5
20.6
45.6

156.5
.2
9.4
57.9
13.4
35.1
6.0
20.6
13.9

Tulsa
164.9
6.9
13.2
19.5
12.6
38.9
9.5
20.6
43.7

131.1
13.1
9.9
27.4
15.0
32.0
6.7
16.1
10.9

131.4
13.2
9.7
28.0
14.9
31.9
6.6
16.2
10.9

158.9
.2
8.7
59.3
13.4
35.3
6.0
21.4
14.6

Youngstown— Warren
155.3
.3
9.5
57.3
13.7
34.5
5.6
20.9
13.5

OREGON

"8>S

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

17.0
66.2
28.0
65.9
14.5
35.1
38.6

266.2
(1)
16.3
66.3
27.9
66.1
14.4
35.3
39.9

9.1

9.1

29.5

29.6

17.1
13.4

17.6
14.1

8.2

4.1

168.8

.4
8.9
86.2
9.4
29.2
4.1
17.4
13.2

4.1

PENNSYLVANIA
AllentownBethlehem-Easton

Portland

129.9
13.6
9.6
29.2
13.6
30.7
6.5
16.1
10.6

75.7

160.4
.4
8.3
77.1

157.6
.4

262.3
(1)
15.7
66.4
28.4
64.5
14.3
34.8
38.2

179.9
7^6
97.2
11.0
28.4
4.7
17.9
12.6

180.4
.5
7.3
97.7
11.0
28.5
4.6
17.9
12.9

177.8
96.5
10.4
27.6
4.6
17.6
12.1

Industry Employmen
Table B-8: Employees ii iiiagriciltiral istablishieits fir stlictil anas, br iilistry Jivisiii-CiitiiieJ

June

July
IQfiD

July
1Q5Q

(In thousands)
June
June:
July
July
i960
1Q6Q
1959
PENNSYLVANIA —Continued

July

Industry division

TOTAL

76.2
(1)
2.6
36.0
5.5
14.0

Mining
Contract construction,.
Trans, and pub. util..

76.4
(1)
2.4

36.3
5.5
14.0

24
.
89
.
68
.

Service

2.3
90
.
69
.

75.9
(1)
3.3
35.5
5.7
13.9
2.2

88
.
65
.

144.2
(1)
10.0
35.4
12.7
24.7

143.2
(1)
9.3
34.8
12.7
24.8

758.8
10.7
45.5
283.3
60.1
154.3
31.1
102.6
71.2

Trans, and pub. util...
Trade

776.1
13.8
43.1
294.9
61.4
155.6
31.1
103.8
72.4

53
.
17.0
39.1

793.0
14.5
45.6
311.3
63.3
154.6
31.7
102.6
69.4

Trans, and pub. util...
Trade
Finance......... .... •

82.6
(1)
4.6
42.4
5.1
13.4
1.7
7.6
7.8

82.2
(1)
4.9
42.4
4.7
13.6
1.7
7.3
7.6

100.6
(1)
4.3
52.2
5-8
15.3
3.6
11.2
8.2

99.4
(1)
4.5
51.3
5.8
15.3
3.7
10.9
7.9

277.6
(1)
11.6
128.0
13.6
48.7
11.9
31.0
32.8

279.8
(1)
11.4
131.1
13.6
48.6
11.7
30.5
32.9

SOUTH CAROLINA —Continued

Mining

Trans, and pub. util...
Trade.
•

Mining
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

70.7
(1)
6.4
32.7
3.5
13.2
2.6
6.4
5.9

(o\
70.4
68.3
(1)
(1)
2)
6.3
5.5
2)
32.6
31.9
2)
3.6
3.5
2)
12.4
13.1
2)
2.6
2.6
6.4
(2)
6.5
5.8
(2)
5.9
TENNESSEE—Continued

189.3
.2
11.2
45.8
16.0
51.4
9.2
25.9
29.6

189.9
.3
10.7
45.9
16.1
51.4
9.2
25.9
30.4

26.5
(1)
2.0
5.6
2.6
7.8
1.5
4.0
3.1

187.1
.3
11.1
44.4
16.1
50.3
8.9
25.6
30.4

140.4

93.6

See footnotes at end of t a b l e .

93.1

278.8
(1)
11.9
128.6
13.3
49.4
11.7
31.3
32.6

Hi'
3.9
9.7
4.7
12.2
2.4
5.4
17.2

Wilkes-Barr
Hazleton

29.2

29.4

23.7

39.8

40.4

39.9

Columbia

55.4

56.2
(1)
3.7
10.3
4.6
12.3
2.4

(1)
4.2
9.8
4.6
11.9
2.4
5.9
16.6

x?:l

70.6
(1)
4.9
12.4
5.4
15.5
4.4
8.1
19.9

68.8
(1)
4.3
12.1
5.3
15.3
4.3
8.0
19.5

70.4
(1)
4.8
12,2

J:2
4.4
8.2
19.9

TENNI SSEE
Chattanooga
26.6
(1)
1.9
5.9
2.6
7.8
1.5
3.9
3-0

90.5
.1
3.9
40.6
4.8
16.2
4.9
8.9
ll.l

Knoxville
89.7
.1
4.1
40.8
4.7
16.0
4.9
9.1
10.0

91.3
.1
4.1
41.4
4.8
16.0
4.8
8.9
11.2

138.7

37.9
11.0
31.1
9.6
21.8
18.9

Dallas
136.6
.3
7.6
39.0
11.1
3©.l
9.5
21.0
18.0

92.0

112.8
1.6
8.1
43.9
6.6
21.7
3.2
11.2
16.5

111.2
1.7
7.4
43.1
6.6
22.3
3.2
11.1
15.8

112.6
1.6
7.9
43.4
6.7
22.2
3.2
11.1
16.5

Fort Worth

91.8

91.6

52.9

23.6

VERMONT

Salt Lake City

23.1

54.4

52.7

UTAH

San Antonio

93.9

1,468.2
1.8
79.9
549.7
109.1
291.5
76.3
187.2
172.7

1,483.3
2.0
74.1
555.6
112.6
288.8
75.8
194.4
180.0

TEXAS

&.1

40.2
11.0
30.8
9.6
21.7
18.5
TEXAS— C ontinued

July
1959

SOUTH CAROLINA

TOTAL




97
.
67
.

74
.

1,474.0
2.0
78.5
552.1
111.2
286.9
77.4
191.7
174.2

Charlestoi1

Nashville

Houston

Mining
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util..#
Trade
Finance
•• ••••

28.9

Sioux Falls

Memphis

TOTAL

92.5
(1)
5.7
47.6
4.8
15.8
2.2

93.3
(1)
5.1
47.1
5.0
16.5
2.2
10.0

Scranton
99.9
(1)
4.5
51.7
5.9
15.3
3.7
ll.l
7.7

June
I960
Philadelphl a

SOUTH DAKOTA

(
3reenvlll<

TOTAL

K

RHODE ISLAND
ProvidencePawtucket

York
82.0
(1)
4.6
42.1
5.©
13.3
1.7
7.7
7.6

92.5
(1)
5.1
46.7
5.0
16.3
2.2
10.1

{1

Reading

PENNSYLVANIA—Continued

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction..

143.0

9.6
35.7
5.2
13.3
52
.
16.3
17.2
24.0
39.2
7.1
38.9
PENNSYLVANIA—Continued

Pittsburgt1
TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction..

Lancaster

Harrisburg

Erie

July
i960

July
1959

Burlington

139.7
7.2
9.3
24.2
13.2
37.5
8.8
19.0
20.5

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

139.9
7.2
8.8
24.3
13.1
37.5
8.7
19.2
21.1

137.7
7.2
10.0
23.0
13.6
36.6
8.4
18.6
20.3

4

21.6

20.9

21.5

5.0
1.7
5.5

4.9
1.7
5.5

5.0
1.6
5.5

26

Tihli li:

Eipliyiis ii niifriciftinl istablisfeMits fir silictii arias, by iiiistry ihrisiii-Ciitiiiid

(In thousands)

Industry division

June
I960
195J
ERMONT—Continued

July
I960

Mining
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
Service
,
Government

12.3
6.5
.8
1.7

12.0

12.0

6.6
.8
1.6

I

July
1959
VIRGINIA

June
I960

NorfolkPortsmouth

Springfield *

TOTAL

June
I960

6.3
.8
1.6

1*9.8
.2
12.1
16.3

150.9
.2
12.3
16.*
15.2
36.8
5.*
18.O
1*6.6

in

5-*
18.O
*5-5

1*9.8
.2
12.7
15.7
15 A
36.3

5A
17.7
*6.*

16* A

16*.9
.2
12.8
*1.6
15.7
38.5
13.0
19.6
23.5

.2
13.1
*1.8
15.8
38 A
13.2
19.3
22.6

IS)7
*.8

I?)5

13.7

5.1
15.2

*.6

i*.i
8.*
20.*

8.2

8.7

20.6

*.l

*.O

12.5
12.*

12.5
13.0

20.7
*.2
12.2
12.*

78.0
(l)

*.8
17.6
6.*
16.2
3.5
9.*
20.1

WEST VIRQINIA--Contlnucd
Wheeling

TOTAL
Mining
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
Service
,
Government
,

1

52.9
3.2
3.2
16.0
*.2
13.1
2.1
6.8
*.6

53.*
3.3
2.9
16.6
*.2
13.0
2.1
6.7
*.9

Hi 7
*.8
17.*
6.2
16.2
3.5
9.2
20.*

6.6
*.*

*52.3

(1)
2*.5
196.5
28.2
88.5
21.6
50.8
*2.2

*53-6
(1)
23.3
197.9
28.1
88.6
21.3
51.3
*3.0

Combined with service.
Hot available.
Combined with construction.
Total includes data for industry divisions not shown separately.
^Combined with manufacturing.
Subarea of New York-Northeastern Hew Jersey.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.

2

3




78.1
3.3
5-2
17.5
6.3
15-9
3.*
9.1
20.1

wise

23 '.6
9.0
16.8
3.3
8.9
9.*
NSIN

Milwaukee

53.6
3.3
2.8
17.5
*.2
12.7
2.1

195?

Seattle

161.5
.2
11.9
*1.*
15.7
38.2
13.1
19.2
21.8

369.5
(1)
19.*
113.6
32.2
82.3
21.8
*5.8
5*.*

369.I

37*.8

113.0
31.5
82.3
21.7
*6.l
56.O

**.3
52.1

{

V
18.5

(1)
20.1
122.3
31.*
82.9
21.7

HuntingtonAshland

Charleston

76.6
(1)

June
i960
WASHINGTON

WEST V R 6 I H 1 A

WASHINGTON—Continued

Mining
Contract construction,
Manufacturing
Trans, and pub. util.
Trade
Finance
,
Service
,
Government

Jul
196

Richmond

Spokane
TOTAL

July
Jul;
1959

13
3.8
23.*
9.0
16.9
3.3
8.9
9.8

7

*1

k.6
22.*
9.2
16.9
3.3
9.3
8.8

66.0
1.2
2.8
2*.O
6.9
13.8
2.*
7.*
7.6

*0.5
(1)
1.8
18.0
1.9
7.6
1.0
6.0
*.3

*0.8
(1)
1.7
18.*
1.9
7.6
1.0
5.9
*.*

2A
7.3
7.6

68.0
1.0
3.3
25.2
7.3
15.0
2.3
7.0
7.2

WYOMING
Casper

Racine

*51.6
(1)
23.*
200.9
28.*
87.7
21.0
*9.6
*0.7

67.1
1.2
2.7
25.0
6.9

*3.6
(1)
2.*

21.5
1.9

7.*
.9

20.0
5.0
1.9

19.*
*.7
1.8

18.1
3.9

1.7
*.*
.8

2.0
1.7

1.8
1.9
1.6

*.3
.8

*.3
.7

2.1

2.0
2.1

2.0
2.1

1.8
2.1

27

Historical Hours an

Table C-1: Gnss hnrs ail uriiifs if pntfictiii wirkirs ii •aufictiriig
1919 ti date
Manufacturing

Durable goods

Nondurable goods

Year and month
weekly
earnings

weekly
hours

$22.08
26.30
22.18
21.51
23.82

47.4
43.1
44.2
45.6

192U
1925
1926
1927
1928

23.93
24.37
24.65
24.7^
24.97

1929....
1930.
1931
1932
1933

1919
1920
1921
1922
1923

:

hourly
earnings

weekly
earnings

weekly
hours

hourly
earnings

weekly
earnings

weekly
hours

Average
hourly
earnings

$0,477
.555
[522

$25.78

$21.94

43.7
44.5
45.0
45.0
44.4

.547
.547
.548
.550
.562

25.84
26.39
26.61
26.66
27.24

22.07
22.44
22.75
23.01
22.88

25.03
23.25
20.87
17.05
16.73

44.2
42.1
40.5
38.3
38.1

.566
.552
.442

27.22
24.77
21.28
16.21
16.43

18.1(0
20.13
21.78
24.05
22.30

34.6
36.6
39.2
38.6
35.6

.532
.550
.556
.624
.627

23.86
25.20
29.58
36.65
43.14

37.7
38.1
40.6
42.9
44.9

»6.08
44.39
43.82
49.97
54.14

22.93

a.84

32.6
34.8

$0,497
.472

20.50
17.57
16.89

4l.9
4o.O

$0,420
.427

18.87
21.52
24.04
26.91
24.01

33-9
37.3
4i.o
4o.o
35.0

.556
.577
.586
.674
.686

18.05
19.11
19.94
21.53
21.05

35.1
36.1
37.7
37.U
36.1

• 515
.530
.529
.577
.584

.633
.661
.729
.853
.961

26.50
28.44
34.04
42.73
49.30

38.0
39.3
42.1
45.1
46.6

.698
.724
.808
.<*7
1.059

21.78
22.27
24.92
29.13
34.12

37.4
37.0
38.9
40.3
42.5

.582
.602
.640
.723
.803

45.2
43.4
40.4
40.4
40.1

1.019
1.023
1.086
1.237
1.350

52.07
49.05
46.49
52.46
57.11

U6.6
44.1
40.2
4o.6
40.5

1.117
1.111
1.156
1.292
l.4io

37.12
38.29
4l.l4
46.96
50.61

43.1
42.3
40.5
40.1
39.6

.861

.904
1.015
1.171
I.278

54.92
59.33
64.71
67.97
71.69

39.2
40.5
4o.7
4o.7
40.5

l.llOl

1.465
1.59
I.67
1.77

58.03
63.32
69.^7
73.**6
77.23

39.5
4l.2
41.6
41.5
41.3

1.469
1.537
1.67
1.77
1.87

51.41
54.71
58.46
60.98
63.60

38.8
39.7
39.5
39.6
39.5

1.325
1.378
1.48
1.54
1.61

71.86
76.52
79.99
82.39
83.50

4o!7
40.4
39.8
39.2

1.81
1.88
1.98
2.07
2.13

77.18
83". 21
86.31
88.66
90.06

40.2
41.4
4l.l
40.3
39.5

1.92
2.01
2.10
2.20
2.28

64.74
68.06
71.10
73.51
75.27

39.0
39.8
39.5
39.1
38.8

1.66
1.71
1.80
1.88
1.94

-

89.U7

U0.3

2.22

97.10

U0.8

2.38

79.60

39.6

2.01

August...,
September,
October...
November.,
December..

88.70
89-1*7
89.06
88.98
92.16

U0.5
U0.3
40.3
39.9
40.6

2.19
2.22
2.21
2.23
2.27

95.88
96.70
96.52
99.87

U0.8
U0.8
U0.9
40.1
1*1.1

2.35
2.37
2.36
2.38
2.43

80.20
80.79
79.79
80.39
81.19

U0.1
39.8
39.5
39.6
39.8

2.00
2.03
2.02
2.03
2.04

January..,
February.,
March
April.
Hay

40.3
39.8
39.7
39.3
39.9

Uo.o

2.29
2.29
2.29
2.28
2.29
2.29

100.86
98.98
98.74
97.36
98.58
98.98

la.o
ko.k

,

92.29
91.14
90.91
89.60
91.37
91.60

U0.3
39.9
Uo.U
ko.h

2.1*6
2.45
2.1*5
2.1*
2.1*
2.45

80.77
79.95
79.93
79.52
81.35
82.16

39.4
39.0
38.8
38.6
39.3
39.5

2.05
2.05
2.06
2.06
2.07
2.08

Juty
August....

91. Ik
90.12

39.8
39.7

2.29
2.27

97.60
96.71

Uo.o
39.8

2.1*
2.43

39.5
39.6

2.09
2.08

1934
1935
1936
1937
1938

•
•

1939
ISkO
19IH
1942
1943

,
-

1944
1945
19W
19^7
1948

-

19^9
1950
1951
1952
1953

,

1954
1955.
1956
1957
1958

-

1959
1959*

1960s

June

NOTE:

9$.hk

Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.
Data on hours of work based on the household survey are shown in tables A-15 through A-19.
Data In all tables in Section C relate to the United States without Alaska and Hawaii.




rtiffie Date m
Table C-2: Grass beirs a i l eariiifs ef prediction workers in mainfacturiirg, by major industry group

Average weekly hours Average hourly earnings

Average weekly earnings
Major industry group

Aug.
I960

Aug.
I960

July
i960

^ugV
1959

Aug.
I960

I960

V&9

$88.70

July
I960

40.5

$2.27

$2.29

$2.19

Aug.
1959

July

39.7

96.71

MANUFACTURING.

39.8

97.60
82.56

95.88
80.20

39.8
39.6

4o.O
19* 5

40.8
40.1

2.43
2.08

2.44
2.09

2.35
2.00

104.41
81.78
75.36
93.48
105.08
100.37
103.94
91.54
107.29
96.22
77.41

105.86
80.96
74.80
93.02
108.47
99.23
104.70
91.08
110.15
96.22
76.44

103.38
82.61
76.31
92.35
104.81
99.01
102.34
89.91
108.14
93.48
76.76

39.7
39.7
40.3
4l.o
37.8
40.8
40.6
39.8
39.3
40.6
39.9

40.1
39.3
40.0
40.8
38.6
40.5

4o.7
41.1
41.7
41.6
39.7
41.6

39.6
40.2
40.6
39.4

4o.*5
40.2
4l.O
40.4

2.63
2.06
1.87
2.28
2.78
2.46
2.56
2.30
2.73
2.37
1.94

2.64
2.06
1.87
2.28
2.81
2.45
2.56
2.30
2.74
2.37
1.94

2.54
2.01
1.83
2.22
2.64
2.36
2.49
2.22
2.69
2.26
1.90

84.87

41.0
38.9
39.8

37.7
39.8
36.3
42.3
38.2
41.5
41.5
40.6
38.4

41.4
40.7
40.8
37.4
43.1
38.3
41.2
40.6
42.3
37.8

2.15
1.70
1.62
1.58
2.31
2.78
2.54
2.90
2.52
1.64

2.18
1.82
1.62
1.55
2.29
2.77
2.55
2.92
2.56
1.63

2.05
1.62
1.59
1.52
2.22
2.71
2.44
2.86
2.49
1.60

$90.12

DURABLE GOODS....
NONDURABLE GOODS.

S2.T7
Durable Goods

Ordnance and accessories.
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Machinery (except electrical)
Electrical machinery
Transportation equipment
Instruments and related products
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.

ko.s

Nondurable Goods
Food and kindred products
Tobacco manufactures
Textile-mill products
Apparel and other finished textile products.
Igaper and allied products
Printing, publishing, and allied industries.
Chemicals and allied products
Products of petroleum and coal
Rubber products
Leather and leather products

88.15
66.13
64.48
57.99
97.71
106.20
105.92
119.19
100.55
61.83

89.60
68.61
64.48
56.27
96.87
105.81
105.83
121.18
1O3.91*
62.59

65.93
64.87
56.85
95.68
103.79
100.53
116.12
105.33
60.48

41.7
39*9
37.7

NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

Table C-3: Average evert'me beurs aid average bewly eauiijs excMiii tvtrthne
ef pnlictrei werkers in iamfactirtif, by iajor iiiistfy
Majo'r industry group

Average hourly earnings
excluding overtime

June
I960

DURABLE GOODS....
NONDURABLE GOODS.

2.7

$2.22

$2.22

$2.16

2.7
2.8

2.38

2.38
2.01

1.95

2.1

2.1

4.1
3.3
3-9
2.6

3.5
2.8
3.6
2.4
3.0
2.9

2.58
1.98
1.81

June
I960

Aug.
1959

July
1959

2.3

MANUFACTURING.

2.4

2.5

2.9

2.1

2.3
2.6

2.4
2.5

3.0

2.6

July
1959

July
I960

July
I960

Aug.
I960

2.02

2.31

Durable Goods
Ordnance and accessories
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Machinery (except electrical)
Electrical machinery
Transportation equipment
Instruments and related products
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.

2.0

-

3.0
2.3
3-2
1.7
2.5

3*.4

2.4
3.1
1.6
2.7
2.5 , 2.7
1.8 1 1.8
2.2
2.4
2.2
2.0

2.0
2.1

34
.

2.8
2.4
2.7
2.3
2.7

2.1

2.6
2.4
2.4

2.20

2.75
2.38
2.49
2.25
2.67
2.31
I.89

2.57
1.99
1.81
2.19
2.76
2.38
2.49
2.25
2.66
2.30
I.89

2.49
1.89
1.77

2.10

2.00

1.79
1.58
1.52
2.17

1.72
1.52
1.48

2.13

2.73
2.29
2.41
2.17
2.57
2.22

1.84

Nondurable Goods
Food and kindred products
Tobacco manufactures
Textile-mill products
Apparel and other finished textile products
Paper and allied products
Printing, publishing, and allied industries
Chemicals and allied products
Products of petroleum and coal
Rubber products.
Leather and leather products

3.6
_
_
_
_

3.2

1.2

1.2

2.6
1.3
4.3
2.9
2.5
2.3
2.8
1.7

2.9
1.3
4.3
2.9
2.4

3.3
1.7
3.3
1.7
4.9
3.2
2.5

2.1

2.0

2.7
1.3

4.6
1.3

3.4
1.8
3.1
1.4

47
.

2.9
2.4
2.3
4.8
1.3

2.09
1.79
1.57
1.53
2.18
(2)

(2)

2.47
2.84
2.47
1.60

2.45
2.84
2.45
1.62

2.10
(2)

2.37
2.82

2.38
1.57

1

Derived by assuming that overtime hours are paid at the rate of time and one-half.
Not available as average overtime rates are significantly above time and one-half,
the group in the nondurable-goods total has little effect.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.
2




Inclusion of data for

29

Table C-4: Indexes ef aggfefatc weekly man lisurs and payrolls|
in industrial and constmctien activities l
(1947-49-100)

Aug.
i960

I960

June
i960
Man-hours

Aug.
1959

July
1959

TOTAL

102.8

101.5

102.3

103.2

104.0

MINING

67.5

64.0

66.8

61.7

66.9

135.5

146.1

140.1
101.3

Activity

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION

145.6
99.1

DURABLE GOODS

97.9

99.9

101.8
95.8

MANUFACTURING

99.8

102.8
92.2

106.1
92.5

101.6
97.7

108.0
93.2

301.2
79.6
109.8
106.0
85.2
105.1
98.3
134.4
103.1
117.9
104.8

312.9
78.6
106.5
103.9
88.2
105.1
99.8
130.8
111.7
117.2
99.7

319.7
81.8
IO8.7
105.9
92.9
109.2
102.7
134.2
114.1
119.4
104.8

313.2
04.6
111.7
110.3
61.4
107.9
100.9
134.2
113.6
118.3
105.1

322.0
83.2
108.0
108.9
98.4
110.5
102.5
130.7
123.1
116.9
98.6

95.1
86.0
72.1
108.2
111.6
115.9
IO6.5
83.3
96.8
91.8

87.O
64.4
71.0
102.2
110.5
114.9
105.8
83.8
98.0
91.0

82.4
66.3
73.4
104.7
113.0
115.1
107.1
84.7
100.8
90.1
Payrolls

97.3
90.6
109.7
115.0
112.9
103.7
81.O
108.3
94.6

86.9
67.O
74.2
102.6
113.5
111.4
102.5
86.1
108.6
94.5

NONDURABLE GOODS
Durable Goods
Ordnance and accessories
Lumber and wood products
Furniture and fixtures
Stone, clay, and glass products
Primary metal industries
Fabricated metal products
Machinery (except electrical)
Electrical machinery
•
Transportation equipment
Instruments and related products
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries
Nondurable Goods
Food and .kindred products,
Tobacco manufactures
Textile-mill products
Apparel and other finished textile products.
Paper and allied products
Printing, publishing, and allied industries.
Chemicals and allied products
Products of petroleum and coal
Rubber products
Leather and leather products

76.1

103.2

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION
MANUFACTURING

169.5

108.4

98.4

106.5

264.4

MINING

246.9

257.7

244.4

169.2

172.5

164.9

170.2

!

Por mining and manufacturing, data refer to production and related workers; for contract construction, data relate to construction workers.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

TaMe C-5: Avenge weekly hews, seasenaly adjBted, ef predictiei welters in selected Mutrics 1

Industry

Aug.
I960

July
i960

June
i960

Aug.
1959

July
1959

Manufacturing.

39.6

39-9

39.9

40.4

40.3

Durable goods
Nondurable goods
Building construction
Retail trade (except eating and drinking
places)

39.8
39.3

40.3
39.3
35.6
37.6

40.2

40.8
39.8
36.0
38.0

40.8
39.6
35.6
38.2

39-5
35.6
37.6

•^For manufacturing, data refer to production and related workers; for building construction, to construction workers; and for retail trade, to nonsupervisory workers.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.




30

Industry Hours and Earnings

Tabli C-S: Gnss burs ail taniifs if pniictiii wirkirs,1 b iriistry
y

Average weekly earnings

July
I960

Industry

Jane
I960

Jane
1360

July
1959

July
I960

June
I960

July
1959

Ul. 7

1*1.2

39.2

$2.67

#2.69

I2.6U

1*2.1
1*1.3
1*3.7
1*0.0

1*2.3
1*0.9
1*3.9

36.1
28.9
1*0.5
38.8

2.66
2.87
2.62
2.27

2.67
2.89
2.63
2.29

2.58
2.91
2.1*9
2.30

33.9

33.9

2.75

2.75

101*. 98

37.8

37.1

32.5

3.25

3.28

3.23

1959

1110.83

MINING.
111.99
118.53
lll*.l*9

METAL MINING
Iron mining
Copper mining
Lead and zinc mining.

90.80
ANTHRACITE MINING

93.23
BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING.

122.85

112.91*
118.20
115.U6
95.01*
93.23

Average weekly hours Average hourly earnings

July
I960

July

93.H*

8U.10
100.85
89.21*
79.20

121.69

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS PRODUCTION:
Petroleum and natural-gas production (except contract
services)

116.57

113.52

117.31

1*0.9

1*0.1*

1*1.6

2.85

2.81

2.82

NONMETALLIC M I N I N G A N D Q U A R R Y I N G .

101.70

101.70

98.32

1*5.0

1*5.2

1*5.1

2.26

2.25

2.18

123.93

121.18

116.56

37.9

37.1*

37.6

3.27

3.2b

3.10

125.21
122.36
128.11

121.06
117.1*3
125.15

118.30
115. liU
121.29

1*2.3
1*3.7
1*0.8

1*1.6
1*2.7
1*0.5

1*2.1
1*3.1*
1*0.7

2.96
2.80
3.11*

2.91
2.75
3.09

2.81
2.66
2.98

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION.

123.31

121.21*

116.16

36.7

36.3

36.3

3.36

3.31*

3.20

GENERAL CONTRACTORS.

113.09

111.13

107.15

36.6

36.2

36.2

3.09

3.07

2.96

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS
Plumbing and heating
Painting and decorating
Electrical work
Other special-trade contractors.

128.82
135.61
120.35
152.10
121*. 18

126.69
131*. 87
118.62
11*9.38
121.1a

120.88
129.96
Hi*. 95
11*5.08

36.7
38.2
35.5
38.8
36.1

36.3
38.1
35.2
38.7
35.5

36.3
38.0
35.7
39.0
35.3

3.51
3.55
3.39
3.92
3.1*1*

3.1*9
3.5U
3.37
3.86
3.1*2

3.33
3.1*2
3.22
3.72
3.21*

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.
NONBUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Highway and street construction.
Other nonbuilding construction..

m*.37

91. Hi

89.65

39.8

1*0.0

1*0.2

2.29

2.29

2.23

98.98
82.16

96.80
80.00

1*0.0
39.5

1*0.1*
39.5

l*o.5
39.8

2.1*1*
2.09

2.1*5
2.08

2.39
2.01

105.86

107.30

105.06

U0.1

1*0.8

1*1.2

2.6U

2.63

2.55

80.96
78.1a
79.80
5U.21
99.33

83.81*
81.18
82.61
5U.83
100.22

80.19
79.13
80.36
5U.23
98.80

39.3
39.8
39.9
Ul. 7
38.8

l*o.5
U1.0
ia.i
1*2.5
39.3

1*0.5
U1.0
la.o
1*2.7
1*0.0

2.06
1.97
2.00
1.30
2.56

2.07
1.98
2.01
1.29

2.55

1.98
1.93
1.96
1.27
2.1*7

81.90
81.80
81.70
63.U5
62.62
68.1*5

DURABLE GOODS....
NONDURABLE GOODS.

91.60

97.60
82.56

MANUFACTURING.

83.37
81.59
85.17
62.1*2
61.76
70.55

83.85
82.78
85.22
60.53
61.30
66.71*

39.7
39.8
39.8
1*0.8
1*0.9

1*0.9
1*1.6
U0.2
1*0.9

2.05
1.99
2.12
1.1*8
1.1*7
1.62

7U.77
69.83
6U.62
72.96
80.13
88.UO
7U.29
97.17
96.76
77.36

7l*.66
71.31*
65.36
72.71*
87.57
70.52
96.35
87.71
7l*.U8

1*0.2
39.9
1*0.9
38.2
38.9
1*1.5
1*3.7
1*1.0
U1.0
1*0.5

1*0.8
la.o
U1.9
38.9
la.k
ia. 7
1*3.0
1*1.0
38.3
1*0.7

2.10
2.05
2.15
1.51*
1.52
1.69
1.87
1.75
1.58
1.90
2.06
2.11*
1.70
2.39
2.39
1.91

2.10
2.05
2.H;
1.53
1.51
1.70

7U.8O
69.30
63.52
72.20
83.6U
88.60
71*. 80
99.66
97.27
76.59

39.0
39.9
38.0
la. 2
Ul. 2
1*0.5
1*0.0
39.6
1*0.2
38.0
1*0.6
la.i*
l*l*.o
la. 7
1*0.7
1*0.1

1.86
1.75
1.58
1.91
2.06
2.13
1.70
2.37
2.36
1.91

l.?3
1.71*
1.56
1.87
2.03
2.10
1.61*
2.35
2.29
1.83

93.02
121*. 89
92.1*0

93.07
125.29
92.86
9U.19
90.68
73.71
105.63

92.13
131.99
88.36
88.80
87.30
72.68
101.09

1*0.8
39.9
1*0.0
1*1.1
38.1
39.8
Ul. 2

1*1.0
39.9
1*0.2
1*0.6
39.6
39.0
1*1.1

1*1.5
1*1.9
39.8
Uo.o
39.5
39.5
Ul. 6

2.28
3.13
2.31
2.32
2.30
1.88
2.59

2.27
3.H*
2.31
2.32
2.29
1.89
2.57

2.22
3.15
2.22
2.22
2.21
1.81*
2.1*3

Durable Goods
ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS
Sawmills and planing mills
Sawmills and planing mills, general
South2
West 3
Millwork, plywood, prefabricated structural
products
Millwork
Plywood
Wooden containers
Wooden boxes, other than cigar
Miscellaneous wood products
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES
Household furniture
Wood household furniture, except upholstered
Wood household furniture, upholstered
Mattresses and bedsprings
Office, public-building, and professional furniture
Wood office furniture
Metal office furniture
Partitions, shelving, lockers, and fixtures
Screens, blinds, and misc. furniture and fixtures
STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS
Plat glass
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown.
Glass containers
Pressed or blown glass
Glass products made of purchased glass
Cement, hydraulic
See footnotes at end of table.




,
,
,
,
,

95.35
87.63
U8

106.71

NOTE*. Data for the current month are preliminary

la. 7
1*1.2

31
Table C-6: Grass heirs a i l tariiifs of prirfictin wirkers.i by iiiistry-Ciitiiiei

Industry

Durable

Average weekly hours Average hourly earnings
July
June
July
June
I960
I960
1959
1959

Goods—Continued

STONE, CLAY, AHD GLASS PRODUCTS—Continued
Structural clay products
Brick and hollow tile
Floor and wall tile
Sewer pipe
Clay refractories
Pottery and related products
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products
Concrete products
Cut-stone and stone products
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral products.
Abrasive products
Asbestos products
Nonclay refractories
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling mills..
Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling mills, except
electrometallurgical products
Electrometallurgical products
Iron and steel foundries
Gray-iron foundries
Malleable-iron foundries
Steel foundries
Primary smelting and refining of nonferrous metals
Primary smelting and refining of copper, lead, and zinc...
Primary refining of aluminum
Secondary smelting and refining of nonferrous metals
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of nonferrous metals
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of copper
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of aluminum
Nonferrous foundries
Miscellaneous primary metal industries
Iron and steel forgings
Wire drawing
,
Welded and heavy-riveted pipe
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
Tin cans and other tinware
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware
Cutlery and edge tools
Hand tools
.......
Hardware
Heating apparatus (except electric) and plumbers* supplies.
Sanitary ware and plumbers' supplies
Oil burners, nonelectric heating and cooking apparatus,
not elsewhere classified
Fabricated structural metal products
Structural steel and ornamental metal work
Metal doors, sash, frames, molding, and trim
Boiler-shop products
Sheet-metal work
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving
Vitreous-enameled products
Stamped and pressed metal products
Lighting fixtures.
Fabricated wire products
Miscellaneous fabricated metal products
Metal shipping barrels, drums, kegs, and pails
Steel springs
Bolts, nuts, washers, and rivets
Screw-machine products
MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)
Engines and turbines
Steam engines, turbines, and water wheels
Diesel and other internal-combustion engines, not
elsewhere classified
Agricultural machinery and tractors
Tractors

Agricultural machinery (except tractors)
See footnotes at end of table.




Average weekly earnings
June
July
I960
I960
1959

$82.22
78A9
81.18
86.10
86.87
80.37
95 .*7
92.12
76A5
97.12
97.&
10*.13
9*.58

$83 A3
78.81
82.00
86.7*
93.06
82.*6
9*.60
92.32
77.27
96.96
98.89
101.99
97.88

108 .*7
113 .16

109.70
115.7*

113 .22
109 .62
97 .61
96 .68
92 .88
103 .36
110 .00
102 .92
118 .99
.2*
110 .56
107, .68
11*. 39
101, ,*0
110, ,12
113. .9*
105, .07
112, .00

115.81
107A7
97.61
96A3
91.96
103.62
108.2*

$82.19
76.86
85.*8
80.39
93.51
78.**
95.37
92.57
7*.7*
97.58
100.53
105.08
106.23
108.19
111.29

*0.5
*2.2
39.6
*1.0
36.5
36.7
**.2

*1.3
*2.6
*0.0
*1.7
39.1
38.O

$2.03
1.86
2.05
2.10
2.38
2.19
2.16
2.07
1.86
2.*1
2.51
2A5
2.62

$2.02
1.85
2.05
2.08
2.38
2.17
2.15
2.07
1.88
2.*0
2.51
2 A*
2.61

$1.99
1.80
2.0*
2.03
2.*1
2.12
2.11
2.03
1.85
2.3*
2.*7
2.*1
2.61

**.o

*1.1
*0.3
38.9
*2.5
36.1

**.6
*1.1
*0A
39.*
*1.8
37.5

3
*2.7
*1.9
39.6
38.8
37.0
*5.2
*5.6
*0A
Vl.7
*0.7
*3.6
*0.7

38.6
37.1

38.9
37.7

38.5
35.9

2.81
3.05

2.82
3.07

2.81
3.10

37.0
*0.6
39.2
39.3
38.7
39.3
*1.2
M.5
*0.2
*0.1

35.8
39.7
*0.7
*0.8
*0.6
*0.7
*0.8
*0.9
*0.3
*0A
*2.0
*2.5
*2.0
*0.8
M.3
*0.6
*1A
*0.7

3.06
2.70
2A9
2A6
2.*0
2.63
2.67
2A8
2.96
2.35
2.69
2.62
2.79
2.51
2.76
2.87
2.66
2.80

3.08
2.66
2.*9
2A6
2A2
2.61
2.6*
2A3
2.96
2.33
2.69
2.6*
2.78
2.51
2.76
2.89
2.63
2.78

3.11
2.62
2.*2
2.39
2.36
2.5*
2.58
2.33
2.96
2.27
2.65
2.57
2.77
2.**
2.76
2.85
2.62
2.86

**.5

110.83
109.03
11*.5*
101.91
109.85
113.29
10*.67
109.25

111.3*
10*.01
98.*9
97.51
95.82
103.38
105.26
95.30
119.29
91.71
111.30
109.23
116.3*
99.55
113.99
115.71
IO8A7
116A0

*1.0
*0A
39.9
39.7
39.5
*0.0

37.6
*0.1
39.2
39.2
38.0
39.7
*1.0
*1A
*0.3
*0.2
*1.2
*1.3
*1.2
*0.6
39.8
39.2
39.8
39.3

99.23
119-5*
93.83
81.00
93.30
98.09
92.28
9*.33

100.21
118.*0
93.60
82.62
92.90
96.80
92.98
9*.*6

97.17
113.85
92.25
80.18
92.11
9*.99
92.29
9*.01

*0.5
*3.0
*0.1
*0.3
39.7
*0.2
39.1
38.5

*0.9
*2.9
*0.0
*0.5
39.7
*0.0
39.*
38.*

*1.0
*2.8
*1.0
*0.7
*0A
M.3
*0.3
39.5

2.*5
2.78
2.3*
2.01
2.35
2 A*
2.36
2.*5

2.*5
2.76
2.3*
2.0*
2.3*
2.*2
2.36
2A6

2.37
2.66
2.25
1.97
2.28
2.30
2.29
2.38

91 A l
102.01
102.51
9*.25
103.07
105.25
101*.75
78A1
110.57
87.19
89.38
95.20
106.63

92.3*
102.09
102.26
93.25
105.08
105.75
107.33
79.00
11* .09
91.08
88.75
95.68
10*. 66
105.85
98.25
92.29
105.88
11* .26
120.*2
112.61
102.80
106.*0
99.05

91.58
97.77
96.16
90.29
100.61
10*.50
102.75
8*.53
109 A6
86 A6
86A0
97.81
IH.83
106.30
101.70
91.30

39.8
*1.5
*lA
*0.9
*1.7
*1.8
*1.6
39.7
*2.1
*0.3
39.8
*0.2
*0.1
*0A
*0.1
*o.3
*1.2

*0.T
*0A
39.9
39-6
*0.9
*1.8
*1.6
*3.8
*2.1
*0A
*0.0
*1.8
*2.2
*1.2
*2.2
*1.5

2.32
2.*7
2.*7
2.31
2.52
2.53
2.58
1.98
2.71
2.23
2.2*
2.38
2.62
2.63
2.*5
2.27

2.32
2A6
2.*7
2.28
2.52
2.53
2.58
1.99
2.71
2.26
2.23
2.38
2.61
2.62
2.*5
2.29

2.25
2A2
2.*l
2.28
2A6
2.50
2A7
1.93
2.60
2.1*
2.16
2.3*
2.65
2.58
2.*1
2.20

103.25
108.81
110.71

39.*
*1.3
*1.5
*0.8
*0.9
*1.6
*0.6
39.6
*0.8
39.1
39.9
*0.0
*0.7
*0.0
39.9
*0.2
*0.9
*0.5
*0.7

*1.3
*0.6

2.56
2.75
2.93

2.57
2.78
2.93

2.50
2.68
2.81

108.39
103.31
105.21
100.37

*0A
39.9
*0.5
39.2

*0.9
*0.2
39.7
*0.8

2.70
2.59
2.68
2A8

2.7*
2.57
2.66
2.*7

2.65
2.57
2.65
2A6

105.20

97.76
91.25
10*.70
111.38
119.25
109.08
103.3*
108.5*
97.22

100.60
119.29

93.67

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

*0.0
*0.0
*0.1

32

Tallt C-S: Grass hiirs aii IKIHIIS if prriictni wirkers,1 b iifatry-CiitintJ
y

Average weekly earnings
July
June
July
I960
I960
1959

Industry

Durable

X??9

Goods—Continued

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTR4CAL)—Continued
Construction and mining machinery
Construction and mining machinery, except for oil fields..
Oil-field machinery and tools
Metalworking machinery
Machine tools
Metalworking machinery (except machine tools).....
Machine-tool accessories
Special-industry machinery (except metalworking machinery^.
Food-products machinery
Textile machinery...
'.
Paper-industries machinery
Printing-trades machinery and equipment
General industrial machinery.. *
Pumps, air and gas compressors
Conveyors and conveying equipment
Blowers, exhaust and ventilating fans
Industrial trucks, tractors, etc
Mechanical power-transmission equipment
Mechanical stokers and industrial furnaces and ovens
Office and store machines and devices
Computing machines and cash registers
Typewriters
•
Service-industry and household machines
Domestic laundry equipment
*.
Commercial laundry, dry-cleaning, and pressing machines...
Sewing machines
Refrigerators and air-conditioning units
Miscellaneous machinery parts
Fabricated pipe, fittings, and valves
Ball and roller bearings
Machine shops (job and repair)
ELECTRICAL MACHINERY
Electrical generating, transmission, distribution, and
industrial apparatus
Wiring devices and supplies
Carbon and graphite products (electrical)
Electrical indicating, measuring, and recording
instruments
Motors, generators, and motor-generator sets
Power and distribution transformers
Switchgear, switchboard,, and industrial controls
Electrical welding apparatus
Electrical appliances
Insulated wire and cable
Electrical equipment for vehicles
Electric lamps
Communication equipment
Radios, phonographs, television sets, and equipment
Radio tubes
Telephone, telegraph, and related equipment
Miscellaneous electrical products
Storage batteries
Primary batteries (dry and wet)
X-ray and nonradio electronic tubes
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPHENT
Motor vehicles and equipment
Motor vehicles, bodies, parts, and accessories.
Truck and bus bodies
Trailers (truck and automobile)
Aircraft and parts
Aircraft
Aircraft engines and parts
Aircraft propellers and parts.
Other aircraft parts and equipment
Ship and boat building and repairing.
Ship building and repairing.....
Boat building and repairing.
Railroad equipment
Locomotives and parts
Railroad and street cars
Other transportation equipment
See footnotes at end of table.




Average weekly hours Average hourly earnings
July
June
July
June
July
July
I960
I960
I960
I960
1959

$102.26 $102.77 $102.34
104.34
103.72
100.53
98.46
98.36
107.07
122.24
118.02
114.33
110.83
105.75
107.79
114.66
114.51
107.53
131.42
120.81
124.70
102.61
97.58
102.37
102.34
101.93
98.71
88.41
84.03
89.25
116.00
100.91
113.05
110.04
114.38
113.74
101.43
102.91
103.91
100.04
98.29
103.15
106.24
104.09
106.75
95.18
94.25
95.27
103.63
108.71
108.71
103.12
105.00
102.77
97.86
99.70
IOO.67
103.42
104.96
99.80
114.82
112.88
109.45
91.80
86.41
87.15
96.96
98.65
97.27
97.15
99.47
96.39
93.38
91.96
87.85
107.41
98.36
108.93
97.81
97.93
98.95
101.25
102.83
99.70
100.04
98.70
97.96
98.30
99.58
102.09
101.60
102.92
104.13

$2.46
2.47
2.45
2.69
2.53
2.61
2.79
2.34

42.6
41.0
41.0
40.5
1*0.2
42.3
40.3
41.6
41.0
41.6
40.8
39.7
37.8
40.6
44.2
39.6
1*0.2
39.5
38.7
41.3

46.4
43.0
41.4
42.1
40.9
40.5
1*0.8
40.6
41.2
1*0.4
40.9
39.1
101
*.
37.8
1*0.7
44.1
39.9
40.5
39.8
38.9
41.5

41.6
40.7
43.7
42.5
41.8
41.2
43.3
41.7
41.3
41.6
42.4
42.0
41.4
41.3
41.5
40.8
42.8
42.0
42.0
1*0.9
41.3
41.5
40.4
40.6
40.3
41.5
40.3
41.8
4l.O
41.0
42.5

$2.55
2.58
2.48
2.79
2.61
2.73
2.90
2.42
2.49
2.12
2.49
2.67
2.51
2.44
2.57
2.37
2.57
2.55
2.42
2.56
2.76
2.25
2.45
2.57
2.30
2.43
2.47
2.48
2.48
2.54
2.46

$2.55
2.57
2.49
2.61
2.62
2.72
2.94
2.42
2.48
2.11
2.50
2.66
2.51
2.45
2.61
2.35
2*54
2.42
2.56
2.76
2.21
2.46
2.55
2.26
2.47
2.48
2.50
2.48
2.56
2.48

2.39
2.02
2.38
2.62
2.45
2.38
2.56
2.31
2.54
2.50
2.33
2.44
2.65
2.10
2.40
2.45
2.18
2.37
2.43
2.1*6
2.44
2.49
2.45

1*0.1
1*0.2
39.7
42.3
41.3
42.0
43.0
42.3
41.1
42.1

45.4

1*0.3
40.6
39.5
43-5
42.3
42.1
44.7

42.4
41.1
41.9

91.08

92.23

89.02

39.6

1*0.1

40.1

2.30

2.30

2.22

96.56
82.43
96.16

96.88
83.07
97.12

94.60
82.78
94.89

39.9
38.7
39.9

1*0.2
39.0
40.3

40.6
39.8
1*0.9

2.42
2.13
2.41

2.41
2.13
2.4l

2.33
2.08
2.32

87.62
104.90
100.40
101.00
106.66
90.16
88.62
98.46
85.25
87.02
85.24
82.74
96.87
89.55
99.25
74.59
100.61

89.55
104.49
102.41
100.10
110.59
91.25
89.68
97.32
86.75
89.24
86.76
84.02
103.42
88.43
99.90
78.88
98.49

84.35
101.43
100.60
98.57
111.64
89.04
86.94
94.47
83.95
85.14
84.80
75.83
95.52
90.01
105.22
72.00
99.70

38.6
40.5
1*0.0
1*0.4
41.5
39.2
41.8
39.7
38.4
39.2
39.1
39.4
39.7
39.8
39.7
101
*.
40.9

39.8
40.5
40.8
1*0.2
42.7
39.5
42.3
39.4
38.9
1*0.2
39.8
1*0.2
41.7
39.3
39.8
41.3
1*0.7

39.6
4o.9
41.4
1*0.9
44.3
39.4
41.4
4o.2
39.6
39.6
40.0
38.3
39.8
41.1
42.6
40.0
40.2

2.27
2.59
2.51
2.50
2.57
2.30
2.12
2.48
2.22
2.22
2.18
2.10
2.44
2.25
2.50
1.86
2.46

2.25
2.58
2.51
2.49
2.59
2.31
2.12
2.47
2.23
2.22
2.18
2.09
2.1*8
2.25
2.51
1.91
2.42

2.13
2.48
2.43
2.41
2.52
2.26
2.10
2.35
2.12
2.15
2.12
1.98
2.4O
2.19
2.47
1.80
2.48

110.15
111.20
113.20
101.27
82.68
110.70
111.11
112.05
107.86
108.00
106.50
110.43
81.33
106.20
108.81
105.47
84.80

110.97
112.87
115.18
101.19
86.02
110.57
110.57
112.89
106.85
108.40
105.60
HO.76
80.58
HO.65
112.00
110.19
oo. 30

108.53
111.10
112.75
102.12
86.86
106.78
1O6.4O
109.52
100.53
106.14
102.70
106.74
77.03
111.38
112.47
110.68
86.43

40.2
40.0
40.0
41.0
38.1
41.0
41.0
41.5
42.8
40.3
39.3
39.3
39.1
38.2
1*0.3
37*4
3o.2

1*0.5
1*0.6
1*0.7
41.3
39.1
1*0.8
40.8
41.2
42.4
40.6
39.7
39.7
39.5
39.1
1*0.0
38.8
38.9

40.8
41.3
41.3
42.2
40.4
40.6
40.0
41.8
40.7
41.3
39.2
39.1
39-3
40.5
41.5
1*0.1
1*0.2

2.74
2.78
2.83
2.47
2.17
2.70
2.71
2.70
2.52
2.68
2.71
2.81
2.08
2.78
2.70
2.82
2.22

2.74
2.78
2.83
2.45
2.20
2.71
2.71
2.74
2.52
2.67
2.66
2.79
2.04
2.83
2.80
2.84
2.22

2.66
2.69
2.73
2.42
2.15
2.63
2.66
2.62
2.47
2.57
2.62
2.73
1.96
2.75
2.71
2.76
2.15

NOTE: D^ta for the current month are preliminary.

33

Tabli C-6: Cross heirs ni

Industry

Durable

taunts if prriictiti wtrktrs,1 fy i i i i s t r y - C i i t i m i

Average weekly earnings
Juno
July
July
I960
I960
1959

Average• weekljf hours Average hourly e a r n i n g s
JtLTy
Juno
July
July
July
Jane
1960
_196O_ I960
I960
1959
1959

Goods—Continued

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.
Laboratory, scientific, and engineering instruments
Mechanical measuring and controlling instruments
Optical instruments and lenses
Surgical, medical, and dental instruments
Ophthalmic goods
;
Photographic apparatus
Watches and clocks
•
MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES
Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware
Jewelry and findings
Silverware and plated ware
Musical instruments and parts
Toys and sporting goods
Games, toys, dolls, and children's vehicles.
Sporting and athletic goods
Pens, pencils, other office supplies
Costume jewelry, buttons, notions....
Fabricated plastics products
Other manufacturing industries

•96.22
U5.79
93.50
98.77
85.27
78.98
109.61
79.00

•95.65

76.1*1*
77.81

77.U1
80.36
77.27
89.10
90.17
69.63

87.#56
89.51
68.58
6I*.33
77.81

65.50

67.30
81*. 05
80.79

93*. 90
98.77
85.89
81.20
107.12

78.01

78!oi
69.9$
70.22
83.03
80.19

•2.35
2.75
2.33
2.38
2.10
2.01
2.60
1.99

•2.28
2.63
2.27
2.27
2.01*
1.93

1.9i*
1.96
1.87
2.20
2.21
1.80
1.72
1.96
1.78
1.73
2.06
2.03

1.91*
1.96
1.88
2.20
2.21
1.79
1.71
1.96
1.78
1.76
2.01*
2.02

1.89
1.87
1.77
2.11*
2.11
1.71*
1.68
1.87
1.76
1.72
2.00
1.98

2.18
2.1*5
2.73
2.1*9
2.17
2.27
2.26
1.79
1.70
1.83
2.21
2.26
1.98
2.18
2.22
2.03
2.1*5
2.66
2.28
1.82
1.75
2.1*8
1.79
3.11
2.1*1*
2.09
2.51
1.82

2.18
2.1*3
2.71
2.1*7
2.15
2.20
2.26
1.80
1.71*
1.89
2.18
2.21
1.98
2.17
2.21
2.03
2.1*0
2.61
2.25
1.82
1.76
2.1*6
1.76
3.07
2.1*5
2.08
2.53
1.79

2.09
2.33
2.60
2.37
2.07
2.12
2.19
1.71
1.82
1.72
2.12
2.16
1.92
2.07
2.11
1.91
2.29
2.1*5
2.17
1.77
1.71
2.39
1.70
3.00
2.36
2.02
2.1*5
1.79

1*0.1
1*2.8
37.7
39.2
37.7

1.82
2.09
1.83
1.66

1.82
2.08
1.1*5
1.83
1.68

1.76
2.01*
1.1*0
1.75
1.57

1*0.1*
1*3.7
39.9
1*0.1
38.7

1.62
1.75
1.52
1.53
1.59
1.61
1.59
1.71
1.57
1.71*
1.66

1.63
1.75
1.52
1.53
1.60
1.62
1.60
1.71
1.58
1.75
1.67

1.58
1.72
1.1*9
1.50
1.53
1.55

1*0.6

1*0.7

ia.5

la. 8

39.1
1*0.9
39.7

1*0.1*

75.60
75.17
71.86
83.89
85.21*
67.69
6U.68
71*. 21*
68.82
66.39
83.1*0
79.79

39.1*
39.7
39.7
39.8
1*0.5
38.1
37.1*
39.7
36.8
38.9
1*0.8
39.8

39.9
ia.o
ia.i

1*0.5
1*0.8
38.9

1*0.0
1*0.2
1*0.6
39.2
1*0.1*
38.9

85.1*8
95.53
108.16
100.96
87.56
87.77
S**.6l
66.52
55.87
69.32
93.1*9
95.26
86.1*0
81*. 25
86.30
76.02
9U.58
105.35
8U.63
69.92
67.03
99.90
75.82
122.70
91.80
8l*.i*l*

ia.i
ia.i*

1*0.3

1*0.3

•2.37
2.79
2.32
2.38
2.09
2.02
2.68
1.99

•93.71
109.93
93.52
93.30
83.61*
78.9!*
105.32
77.00.

ia # .8
1*1.2

1*1.5
\a.$ 1*0.9 la.i
1*0.8
1*1.0
1*0.9

la. 2 ia.3
39.2 39.9

38.5

38.5

39.8
39.3
39.9
1*0.7
39.7

39.7
39.1
38.6

1*0.6
1*0.7

1*0.9
1*1.0

ia.7

1*0.3

2.55
1.93

Nondurable Goods
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS
Meat products
•
Meat packing, wholesale
•
Sausages and casings
Dairy products
Condensed and evaporated milk
Ice cream and ices
Canning and preserving
Sea food, canned and cured
Canned fruits, vegetables, and soups
Grain-mill products
Flour and other grain-mill products
Prepared feeds
Bakery products
Bread and other bakery products
Biscuit, crackers, and pretzels
Sugar.
Cane-sugar refining
Beet sugar
.
Confectionery and related products
Confectionery
Beverages
Bottled soft drinks. .
Malt liquors
Distilled, rectified, and blended liquors.
Miscellaneous food products
Corn sirup, sugar, oil, and starch
Manufactured ice

89.60
101.1*3

88.51

106.32
92.01
9l*.l*3
97.1a
70.35
55.1*2
7U.66
99.23
101.02
90.68
89.16
90.80
82.82
101.68
U7.57
85.96
71.31*
68.1*3
102.18
78.01*
125.33
91*. 67
86.71*
107.1*3
82.63

98.90
112.71*
10U.23
90.73
91.52
95.82
67.86
52.72
72.77
54*. 61
97.02
86.33
88.51*
90.39
82.01
99.81*
111.97
88.20
72.62
69.87
100.37
7U.98
123.11
96.29
86.11
110.06
80.01

8U.13

1*3.6
1*0.3
38.8
1*1.5
1*2.8
1*5.1*

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES
Cigarettes
Cigars...
Tobacco and snuff
Tobacco stemming and redrying.

68.61
80.86
53.36
67.89
60.92

71.53
85.07
51*. 38
70.1*6
61*. 31*

70.58
87.31
52.78
68.60
59.19

37.7
38.7
36.8
37.1
36.7

39.3
1*0.9

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS
Scouring and combing plants....
Yarn and thread mills
Yarn mills
Thread mills
Broad-woven fabric mills
Cotton, silk, synthetic fiber.
North4
South 2
Woolen and worsted
Narrow fabrics and smallwares..

6L.W
75.25
58.98
59.52
60.26
65.53
6!*.i*0
69.77
63.59
72.01*
65.57

65.53

63.83
75.16
S9.h$
60.15
59.21
63.71
62.1*2
66.26
61.76
72.50
65.69

39.8
1*3.0
38.8
38.9
37.9
1*0.7
1*0.5
1*0.8
1*0.5
ia.h

1*0.2
1*2.3
39.3
39.3

See footnotes at end of table.




nU.93

71*. 03
59.71*
60.13
61.60
66.58
65.28
69.91*
61*.1*6
7l*.55
68.30

no.50

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

1*2.1
1*2.7
1*2.1*

la. 6 ia.6
1*2.2
1*2.2

2*2.6
1*2.3

ia.6

ia.6

ia.k

1*3.1
39.3
32.6
1*0.8
11.9
**
11. 7
**
1*5.8
1*0.9
1*0.9
1*0.8

Ul.5
11. 2
**
37.7
39.2
39.1

ia.2

39.5

1*2.1*
37.7
30.3
38.5
1*3.1*
1*3.9
1*3.6
1*0.8
1*0.9
1*0.1*

la. 6
1*2.9
39.2
39.9
39.7
1*0.8
1*2.6
1*0.1
39.3
ia.i*
1*3.5
1*U.7

37.5
38.5
38.3

38.5
ia.i

1*0.8
1*0.9
1*0.8
.1*2.6
1*0.9

1*3.2
38.9
30.7
1*0.3

l*J*!l
1*5.0
1*0.7
1*0.9
39.8
1*1.3
1*3.0
39.0

39.5
39.2

la. 8
l*l*.6
1*0.9
38.9
1*1.8
1*5.1
1*7.0

l*o!8
1*0.1*
1*0.9
1*2.9
1*0.8

1.1*5

1.53
1.61*
i.5i
1.69
1.61

ndustrv He
Talli C-6: Griss burs ni uriiigs if pniictiii wirkirs,1 b iilistry-Ciitinel
y

Average weekly earnings
July
June
July
I960
I960
1959

Industry

Average weekly Jiours Average hourly earnings
July
June
July
July
June
1959
I960
1060
1959
I960

Nondurable Goods —Con t inued
TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS—Continued
Knitting mills
Full-fashioned hosiery
North4
South2
Seamless hosiery.
North4
South 2
Knit outerwear
Knit underwear
Dyeing and finishing textiles
Dyeing and finishing textiles (except wool)
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings
Wool carpets, rugs, and carpet yarn
Hats (except cloth and millinery)
Miscellaneous textile goods
Pelt goods (except woven felts and hats)
Lace goods
Paddings and upholstery filling
Processed waste and recovered fibers
..
Artificial leather, oilcloth, and other coated fabrics....
Cordage and twine

38.6
37.4
38.0
37.2
38.1
38.1
38.1
38.7
38.1
41.9
4l.9
40.2
38.4
37.0
1*0.5
40.1
37.2

100.95
63.60

38.5
37.3
38.2
37.0
38.0
37.9
38.O
38.9
36.8
39.9
39.7
4o.7
38.5
35.6
39.8
39-0
37.7
39.4
39.2
43.4
38.1

48.15
56.05
67.23
52.99
53.14
63.84
51.91
63.99
61.93

55.90
72.58
49.37
50.03
51.57
43.90
56.95
54.08
U8.77
69.97
51.12
1*8.74
56.05
58.56
53.05
52.27
61.94
51.83
62.65
63.52

55.57
64.18
48.90
49.02
49.02
45.59
60.20
55.78
47.39
77.02
50.09
48.28
54.96
64.33
53.02
52.59
59.28
52.13
62A9
58.55

36.3
38.3
37.1
37.7
38.1
37.1
34.3
32.9
35.4
35.3
36.O
36.2
35.7
34.3
36.8
36.4
38.0
36.3
39.5
39.7

36.3
38.2
37.4
37.9
38.2
37.2
33-7
32.0
35.6
34.3
36.0
36.1
35.7
32.0
37.1
36.3
38.0
36.5
39.4
1*0.2

36.8
37.1
38.2
38.6
38.0
39-3
35.0
33.4
35.1
36.5
36.3
36.3
36.4
34.4
37.6
37.3
38.0
37.5
39.3

101
*.

1.46
1.68
1.43
1.62
1.56

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS
Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills.
Paperboard containers and boxes...
Paperboard boxes.
Fiber cans, tubes, and drums
Other paper and allied products...

96.87
106.82
88.78
88.17
91.37
85.49

97.13
106.19
89.64
89.02
93.20
85.70

95.03
104.78
87.78
86.94
92.96
83.OO

42.3
43.6
41.1
41.2
39.9
4

42.6
43.7
41.5
41.6
1*0.7
41.4

43.0
44.4
41.8
41.8
41.5
41.5

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED INDUSTRIES
Newsp apers
Periodicals
Books
Commercial printing
Lithographing
Greeting cards.
Bookbinding and related industries
Miscellaneous publishing and printing services.

105.81
111.43
120.10
93.43
105-06
109.30
73.30
82.78
116.97

105.54
112.10
114.09
93.43
105.18
109.53
69.74
82.64
116.18

103.52
108.02
114.39
90.23
102.83
108.53
69.50
81.33
116.43

38.2
35.6
41.7
40.1
39.2
39.6
39.2
38.5
38.1

38.1
35.7
1*0.6
1*0.1
39.1
39.4
37.9
38.8
37.6

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS
Industrial inorganic chemicals
Alkalies and chlorine
Industrial organic chemicals.
Plastics, except synthetic rubber
Synthetic rubber
Synthetic fibers
Explosives
Drugs and medicines.
Soap, cleaning and polishing preparations.
Soap and glycerin

105.83

105.59
116.20
115.79
112.67
116.1*8
123.26
96.74
105.22
94.19
113.82
124.79

100.28
111.64
IIO.83
106.86
112.30
122.22
91.46
90.00
89.28
103.17
113.00

41.5
41.8
41.9
4l.9
42.5
41.8
42.0
40.0
1*0.5
41.2
41.5

41.9
41.8
41.8
1*2.2
43.3
41.5
41.7
41.1
1*0.6
42.0
42.3

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE PRODUCTS
Men's and boys' suits and coats
Men's and boys' furnishings and work clothing....
Shirts, collars, and nightwear
Separate trousers
Work shirts
Women's outerwear
Women's dresses
Household apparel
*
Women's suits, coats, and skirts
Women's, children's under garments
Underwear and nightwear, except corsets
Corsets and allied garments
Millinery
Children's outerwear
Miscellaneous apparel and accessories
Other fabricated textile products
Curtains, draperies, and other housefurnishlngs.
Textile bags
Canvas products

See footnotes at end of table.




$57-75
56.32
58.^5
55.50
52.82
53.82
52.62
62.2k
52.99
70.62
69.87
80.18
73.54
58.74
75.22
79.17
73.52
77.62
61.54

$58.67
57.22
59.66
56.17
53.72
54.10
53.72
61.92
55.25
75.00
74.58
79.60
73.34
62.53
76.55
82.61
70.31
79.77
64.62

$57.13
54.60
56.93
53.64
51.41
52.77
51.27
61.00
56.09
70.45
69.70
82.91
79.65
60.35
74.44
82.62
69.34
75.14
62.62

101.12
61.72

103.64
62.31

56.27
70.47
W.97
49.76
51.05
43.78
59.00
56.59
48.14
71.66

50.to

217 M
117.32
112.71
115.18
124.15
99.54
101.20
94.37
111.24
122.01

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

4o.7
1*0.9
44.1
38.7

38.6
36.4
37.7
36.0
37-8
38.8
37.7
39.1
39.5
41.2
4l.O
42.3
41.7
35.5
40.9
40.9
38.1
1*0.4
41.2
43.7
1*0.0

$1.50
1.51
1.53
1.50
1.39
1.42
1.39
1.60
1.44
1.77
1.76
1.97
1,91
I.65
I.89
2.03
1.95
1.97
1.57
2.33
1.62

$1.52
1.53
1.57
1.51
1.41
1.42
1.41
1.60
1.45
1.79
1.78
1.98
1.91
1.69
I.89
2.06
I.89
1.96
1.58

1.55
1.84
1.32
1.32
1.34
1.18
1.72
1.72
1.36
2.03
110
.*
1.33
1.57

1.54
1.90
1.32
1.32
1.35
1.18
1.69
I.69
1.37
2.04
1.42
1.35
1.57
1.83
1.43
1.44
1.63

2.35
1.61

$1.48
1.50
1.51
1.49
1.36
1.36
1.36
1.56
1.42
1.71
1.70
1.96
1.91
1.70
1.82
2.02
1.82
1.86
1.52
2.31
1.59

1.59
1.58

1.51
1.73
1.28
1.27
1.29
1.16
1.72
1.67
1.35
2.11
1.38
1.33
1.51
1.87
1.41
1.41
1.56
1.39
1.59
1.46

2.29
2.45
2.16
2.14
2.29
2.08

2.28
2.43
2.16
2.14
2.29
2.07

2.21
2.36
2.10
2.08
2.24
2.00

38.2
35-3
41.0
39.4
39.4
39.9
38.4
39.1
38.3

2.77
3.13
2.88
2.33
2.68
2.76
1.87
2.15
3.07

2.77
3.14
2.81
2.33
2.69
2.78
1.84
2.13
3.09

2.71
3.06
2.79
2.29
2.61
2.72
1.81
2.08
3.04

41.5
41.2
41.1
42.7
42.0
41.2
39.6
40.4
1*0.3
40.5

2.55
2.81
2.80
2.69
2.71
2.97
2.37
2.53
2.33
2.70
2.94

2.52
2.78
2.77
2.67
2.69
2.97
2.32
2.56
2.32
2.71
2.95

2.44
2.69
2.69
2.60
2.63
2.91
2.22
2.49
2.21
2.56
2.79

112
.*

35

Industry

Hours

Tibli C-6: Griss lurs ail iifiiifs if pri.ictiu wirkirs.1 br iiJistry-CiitintJ

Average weekly earnings
Industry

Average weekly hours Average hourly earnings

July
1959

July
I960

June
I960

July
1960

June
I960

Joly
1959

US.92 113.28

$98.36
95.22
85.UQ
75.26
87.03
82.64
92.17
91.76
7U. 50
106.91

41.1
40.9
43.5
41.9
43.5
1*3.2
43.9
40.6
38.8
42.0

41.9
41.8
43.2
42.7
44.1
44.1
44.1
40.5
38.5
41.8

41.5 $2.48
2.41
41.4
42.7 2.14
40.9 1.94
43.3 2.12
42.6 1.96
44.1 2.30
40.6 2.37
38.6 2.00
41.6 2.76

•2.46
2.40
2.09
1.89
2.09
1.93
2.29
2.34
2.02
2.71

•2.37
2.30
2.00
1.84
2.01
1.94
2.09
2.26
1.93
2.57

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL
Petroleum refining
Coke, other petroleum and coal products...

121.18
124.84
109.13

119.60
123.22
108.36

118.78
121.80
109.1*8

41.5
41.2
42.3

41.1
40.8
42.0

41.1
40.6
42.6

2.92
3.03
2.58

2.91
3.02
2.58

2.89
3.00
2.57

RUBBER PRODUCTS
Tires and inner tubes
Rubber footwear
Other rubber products

103.94
123.82
82.21
91.88

102.72
121.39
82.82
92.34
62.37
86.27
78.21
59.44
60.00
66.42
56.30
54.24

107.10
128.74
78.60
95.1*0

40.6
41.0
40.3
40.3

40.6
40.6
40.6
40.5

42.5
43.2
40.1
42.4

2.56
3.02
2.04
2.28

2.53
2.99
2.04
2.28

2.52
2.98
1.96
2.25

60.90
79-70
79. $6
58.05
59.21
65.11
56.60
51.61

38.4
39.0
40.1
38.3
38.6
38.1
37.2
36.4

37.8
40.5
39.3
38.1
37.5
39.3
36.8
36.9

38.3
38.5
40.8
38.7
38.2
39.7
38.5
36.6

1.63
2.11
2.00
1.55
1.59
1.68
1.51
1.48

1.65
2.13
1.99
1.56
1.60
1.69
1.53
1.47

1.59
2.07
1.95
1.50
1.55
1.64
1.47
1.41

110.42
100.92

107.35
95.1*7

m
43.2

42.8
43.5

42.6
43.2

(S)

2.31

2.58
2.32

2.52
2.21

102.37

88.26
69. 94
121.12
104.00

86.29
68.44
118.1*0
95.79

39.9
38.1
43.4
42.3

39.4
37.6
42.8
42.8

39.4
37.4
42.9
42.2

2.26
1.86
2.88
2.42

2.24
1.86
2.83
2.43

2.19
1.83
2.76
2.27

109.34
109.88
102.21
114.80

109.34
109.88
101.15
115.62

106.01*
107.53
98.74
110.1*2

40.8
41.0
40.4
4i.o

40.8
41.0
40.3
41.0

41.1
41.2
40.8
41.2

2.68
2.68
2.53
2.80

2.68
2.68
2.51
2.82

2.58
2.61
2.42
2.68

I960

June
I960

Nondurable Good*-—Continued
CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS—Continued
Paints, pigments, and fillers
Paints, varnishes, lacquers, and enamels.
Gum and wood chemicals.
Fertilizers
Vegetable and animal oils and fats
Vegetable oils
Animal oils and fats.....
••••
Miscellaneous chemicals
,
Essential oils, perfumes, cosmetics.......
Compressed and liquefied gases

«

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS
...
Leather: tanned, curried, and finished....
Industrial leather belting and packing....
Boot and shoe cut stock and findings......
Footwear (except rubber )
Luggage..
Handbags and small leather goods
Qloves and miscellaneous leather goods....

•101.93 $103.07
98.57 100.32
93.09
90.29
81.29
80.70
92.22
92.17
84.67
85.11
100.97 100.99
96.22
94.77
77.60
77.77

62.59
82.29
80.20
59.37
61.37
64.01
56.17
53.87

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES:
TRANSPORTATION:
Interstate railroads:
Class I railroads
Local railways and bus lines

(6)

99.79

COMMUNICATION:
Telephone
Switchboard operating employees8.
Line construction employees7
Telegraph8

90.17
70.87
121*. 99

OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES:
Gas and electric utilities
Electric light and power utilities.
Gas utilities
Electric light and gas utilities combined.

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE:
WHOLESALE TRADE

93.96

93.09

91.76

40.5

40.3

40.6

2.32

2.31

2.26

RETAIL TRADE (EXCEPT EATING AND DRINKING PUCES)

69.52
50.61
56.64
73.16
91.29
51.98

68.80
49.74
56.00
72.16
91.29
52.82

68.68
1*9.07
54.82
72.18
90.20
52.65

38.2
34.9
35.4
36.4
44.1
34.2

37.8
34.3
35.0
35.9
44.1
34.3

38.8
35.3
35.6
37.4
44.0
35.1

1.82
1.45
1.60
2.01
2.07
1.52

1.82
1.45
1.60
2.01
2.07
1.54

1.77
1.39
1.54
1.93
2.05
1.50

77.30
83.69

77.08
82.88

77.15
81.70

40.9
42.7

41.0
42.5

41.7
43.0

1.89
1.96

1.88
1.95

1.85
1.90

69.94
117.59
88.11

69.75
117.16
87.99

68.06
120.43
86.57

37.4

37.3

37.6

1.87

1.87

1.81

General merchandise stores
Department stores, and general mail-order houses.....
Food and liquor stores
Automotive and accessories dealers
Apparel and accessories stores
Other retail trade:
Furniture and appliance stores
Lumber and hardware supply stores

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE:
Banks and trust companies
*...
Security dealers and exchanges
Insurance carriers
See footnotes at end of table.




NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

36
Tabii M : Grass heirs aid immfi if prriictiei werkers,* If iiiistrj-Ctitiiiti

Average weekly hours Average hourly t
July
June
July
June
July
I960
i960
i960
I960
1959

Industry

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS:
Hotels and lodging places:
Hotels, year-round
.
Personal services:
Laundries
•
Cleaning and dyeing plants
.
Motion pictures;
Motion-picture production and distribution

8
4
6

40.0
46.22
51.92

39.9
38.7

40.0
39.9
39.9

40.2
39.5
37.9

$1.22 $1.22
1.22

1.22
1.43

$1.18
1.17
1.37

108.26

West: Includes California, Oregon, and Washington.
North: Includes all States except the 17 listed as South in footnote 2.
Not available.

*Money payments only; additional value of board, room, uniforms, and tips, not included.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

Table C-7: Gross M l speriakle average weekly eaniifs i i Mistrial Hi ceistrictiei activities,
ii cirreit ni 1947-49 dollars 1
Type of earnings

Gross average weekly earnings:
Current dollars
1947-49 dollars

,

July
I960

$111.34
87.95

Mining
June

July
1959

Contract construction
July
June
I960
I960

Manufacturing
July
June
I960
1959

$110.83 $103.49
87.6I
82.86

$123.93
97.89

$121.18
95.79

$116.56
93.32

$91.14
71.99

$91.60
72.41

$89.65
71.78

Spendable average weekly earnings:
Worker with no dependents:
Current dollars
1947-49 dollars

89.37
70.59

88.98
70.34

83.81
67.IO

99.01
78.21

96.90
76.6O

93.82
75.12

73.67
58.19

74.03
58.52

72.97
58.42

Worker with 3 dependents:
Current dollars
1947-49 dollars

97.76
77.22

97.34
76.95

91.78
73.48

108.08
85.37

IO5.83
83.66

102.50
82.07

81.23
64.16

81.59
64.50

80.50
64.45

For mining and manufacturing, data refer to production and related workers; for contract construction, to construction
workers.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




37

lours

and

tarninqs

Tilli M: Griss hwrs Ml iiniifs if priiictioi wtrkers ii •anfactiriif, b State ail selictei anas
y

State and area

Average weekly earnings
June
July
i960
I960
1959

Avera e weekly hours

July
I960

June
I960

July
1959

ALABAMA.
Birmingham.
Mobile

$76.81
103.17
90.12

$77.01
101.89
88.93

$76.22
100.50
88.00

39.8
40.3
39.7

39.9
39.8
39.7

39.7

ARIZONA..
Phoenix.

101.11
102.17

99.87
101.02

98.98
100.53

41.1
41.7

64.06
64.64

63.34
65.04

63.69
62.47

io4.8o
110.68
87.93
103.86
117.10
107.07
109.33
111.1*4
108.38

102.11
105.92

97.81

104.54
107.06
87.28
103.46
111.20
107.07
106.90
110.48
112.19
100.00

101.02
98.66

99.63
98.74

ARKANSAS
LLttle Rock-North L i t t l e Rock.

CALIFORNIA

Bakersfield
Fresno
Los Angeles-Long Beach
Sacramento
San Bernardino-Riverside-Ontario.
San Diego.*
San Francisco-Oakland
San Jose
Stockton

COLORADO.
Denver..

to.o

$1.93
2.56
2.27

$1.93
2.56
2.24

$1.92
2,50
2.20

41.1
41.4

40.9
41.2

2.46
2.45

2.43
2.44

2.42
2.44

I1O.8
40.4

40.6
40.4

41.9
41.1

1.57
1.60

1.56
1.61

1-52
1.52

4o.o
41.3
37.9
40.1
40.8
4o.l
39.9
39.8
42.5
39.6

39.9
40.4
37.3
40.1
40.0
40.1
39.3
39.6
41.4
4o.o

40.2
4l.7
38.3
l|0.7
41.2
35.0
40.3
39.8
40.6
41.8

2.62
2.68
2.32
2.59
2.87
2.67
2.74
2.80
2.55
2.47

2.62

86.56
102.56
114.54
87.85
105.99
107.46
100.28
97.81

2.58
2.78
2.67
2.72
2.79
2.71
2.50

2.54
2.54
2.26
2.52
2.78
2.51
2.63
2.70
2.47
2.34

97.99
96.OO

41.4
40.6

41.0
40.8

4l.O
41.2

2.44
2.43

2.43
2.42

2.39
2.33

I

(1)

39.7
(1)
40.4
40.3

41.4
4o.9
42.0
41.6
40.4
41.9
42.3

2.29
(1)
2.43
2.32

2.25
2.33
2.30
2.22
2.19
2.37
2.27

93.15
95.30
96.6O
92.35
88.48
99.30
96.02

CONNECTICUT..
Bridgeport..
Hartford..•.
New Britain.
New Haven...
Stamford....
Waterbury...

Average hourly earning
July
I960

ltO.2

£1
2.30

tie

92.97
108.58

92.74
108.05

85.79
101.49

40.6
41.6

41.4
41.4

38.3
39.8

2.32
2.29
2.61

2.24
2.61

2.24
2.55

DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA:
Washington

99.00

98.60

97.28

39.6

39.6

40.2

2.50

2.49

2.42

FLORIDA
Jacksonville
Miami..
Tampa-St. Petersburg.

77.14
81.81
75.58
79.34

76.45
79.20
74.24
78.26

72.90
77.81
71.06
72.32

40.6
40.3
40.2
42.2

ii

39.6
39-7
42.3

40.5
39.7
39.7
40.4

1.90
2.03
1.88
1.88

1.86
2.00
1.87
1.85

1.80
1.96
1.79
1.79

GEORGIA...
Atlanta..
Savannah.

66.47
82.62
90.90

66.23
81.80
87.70

65.04
81.61

39.8
40.3
40.4

39.9
39.9
40.6

ltO.4
40.6
4l.o

I.67
2.05
2.25

1.66
2.05
2.16

1.61
2.01
2.06

IDAHO.

94.09

102.29

93.04

39.7

43.9

42.1

2.37

2.33

2.21

97.84
99.79

97.09
97.19

4o.l
4o.l

I4O.6
40.2

(1)
(1)

2.44
2.49

2.39
2.42

100.97

101.86

101.39

40.0

40.3

40.9

2.52

2.53

2.U6

93.77
99.95

91.77
99.40

91.36
97.52

39.7
38.5

39.5
39.0

40.2
39.0

2.36
2.59

2.32
2.55

2.27
2.50

96.97
102.94
100.75

95.91
106.18
98.99

93.51
103.94
97.07

4l.2
42.4
40.5

40.9
42.5
40.1

4l.O
43.7
39.7

2.35
2.43
2.49

2.35

2.28
2.38
2.45

DELAWARE....
Wilmington.

ILLINOIS.
Chicago.

INDIANA.

IOWA
Des Moines.

KPNSAS...
Topeka..
Wichita.

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




38

Taili C-8: Gnss burs ail iinlifs if prilictiei wirkirs ii •aiifactiriif, b State aid selected areas-Ciitiiied
y

Average weekly hours
July
June
1959
I960

State and area

July
I960

Average hourly earnings
July
June

KENTUCKY....
Louisville.

$83.74
97.35

$85.01
97.97

$83.41
95.76

39.5
4o.i

101
*.
40.7

1*0.1
1*0.7

$2.12

LOUISIANA....
Baton Rouge.
New Orleans.
Shreveport..

88.17
119.94
89.IO
80.40

87.56
117.14
90.50
80.20

86.74
115.51
87.42
84.80

41.2
41.5
39.6
39.8

41.3
4l.l
40.4
39.9

41.5
41.4
40.1
42.4

MAINE
Lewiston-Auburn.
Portland.•••••••

72.27
60.74
76.64

71.69
61.02
76.63

69.77
61.31
75.92

40.6
38.2
39.1

40.5
37.9
39.5

40.8
39.3

MARYLAND...
Baltimore.

90.63
96.63

90.90
96.05

82.56
85.33

101
*.
40.6

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
Fall River
New Bedford
Springfield-Holyoke.
Worcester

83.37

81.20
85.10

39.7
39.5
36.8
38.2
40.7

88.84

83.60
89.55
60.06
67.12
89.32
88.48

MICHIGAN
Detroit
Flint
Grand Rapids
Lansing
•
Muskegon-Muskegon Heights.
Saginav

110.49
117.14
122.13
102.31
114.98
101.92
110.12

111.90
118.64
122.27
101.71
112.40
102.40
108.95

107.88
114.53
117.72

98.81
103.75
95.82
102.71

41.5
40.6
40.4
39.2
1*0.5

MINNESOTA
Duluth
Minneapolis-St. Paul.

93.17
105.96
97.10

94.47
104.17
97.15

90.57
104.79
94.51

MISSISSIPPI.
Jackson..•.

61.05
73.25

61.86
72.85

MISSOURI
Kansas City.
St. Louis. ••

87.38
95.19
99.40

MONTANA.
NEBRASKA.
Omaha...
NEVADA.
NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Manchester...

NEW JERSEY
•«•
Jersey City 2
Newark *
Paterson-Clifton-Passale
Perth Anboy 2
Trenton
NEW MEXICO...
Albuquerque.

$2.12
2.41

$2.08
2.35

2.14
2.89
2.25
2.02

2.12

2.01

2.09
2.79
2.18
2.00

1*0.6

1.78
1.59
1.96

1.77
1.61
1.94

1.71
1.56
1.87

1*0.4
40.7

37.7
37.1

2.26
2.38

2.25
2.36

2.30

1*0.0

4o.o
39.4
36.5
38.8
41.3
40.4

2.10
2.25
1.65
1.75
2.23
2.21

2.09
2.25
I.65
1.73
2.20
2.19

2.74
2.91
2.94
2.52
2.85
2.60
2.72

2.74
2.92

39.4
40.5

40.8
40.6
41.7
1*0.9
38.7
38.7
40.2

2!8l
2.60
2.69

2.64
2.82
2.82
2.42
2.68
2.48
2.56

39.9
1*0.8
39.8

40.4
40.4
4o.i

40.3
1*0.7
40.2

2.34
2!l*4

2.34
2.58
2.42

2.25
2.57
2.35

60.53
70.68

39.9
42.1

1*0.7
42.6

40.9
43.1

1.53
1.74

1.52
1.71

1.48
1.64

87.69
95.74
99.59

85.66
92.50
96.25

39.4
39.4
1*0.0

39.3
39.6
40.1

1*0.2
39.1
40.3

2.22
2.41
2.48

2.23
2.42
2.49

2.13
2.36
2.39

98.46

96.68

92.02

39.7

39.3

38.5

2.48

2.46

2.39

90.28
96.88

88.55
95.72

84.46
90.11

43.4
42.7

42.7
42.5

42.7
41.8

2.08
2.27

2.07
2.25

1.98
2.16

109.62

116.03

107.90

1*0.3

42.5

41.5

2.72

2.73

2.60

70.45
64.18

71.33
64.85

68.34
62.70

39.8
38.2

40.3
38.6

40.2
38.0

1.77
1.68

1.77
1.68

1.70
I.65

95.24
95.60
97.04
94.33
IOO.78
94.36

95.63
96.31
96.92
94.91
98.94
92.61

93.04
91.13
93.75
93-05
96.47
92.39

1*0.1
1*0.2

40.4
40.4
40.5
40.2
40.6
39.8

1*0.4
39.5
4o.6
1*0.3
1*0.5
1*0.9

2.37
2.38
2.40
2.37
2.45
2.35

2.37
2.38
2.39
2! 44
2.33

2.30
2.31
2.31
2.31
2.38
2.26

82.62
86.94

82.82
87.56

81.40
84.23

40.8
41.3

1*0.5
41.7

2.05
2.10

2.03
2.12

2.01
2.02

QQ
OO
OO.OO

60.72
66.85
90.76

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




90.86
86.46

1*0.2

39.8
36.4
38.8
40.6
1*0.4

4o.4

1*0.9

1*0.2

40.7
41.8
40.8

40.4
39.8
41.2
40.1
1*0.3

41.4

1*0.0

2.43

2.19

2.03

2.16
1.63
1.67
2.20
2.14

39

State

and Area

Hours

and

Earninc

Tifcli CJ: Gross Urn a i l tarings if priiictien workers i i Maiifactiriif,fcyState a i l selected areas-Coithiie!

Average weekly earnings
State and area

NEW YORK
Albany-Schenectady-Troy
Binghamton
Buffalo
Elmira
•
Nassau and Suffolk Counties 2 ...
2
New York City
New York-Northeastern New Jersey.
Rochester
Syracuse
Utica-Rome
Westchester County 2
NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
Greensboro-High P o i n t .

June
I960

July
1959

July
I960

June
I960

$89.96
96.26
65.93
105.69
87.8O
100.8k
85.20
90.1*0
102.91
96.32
86.89
92.1*7

$89.75
95.89
83.28
107.27
90.39
100.5*
81*. 1 5
*
89.86
101.71*
96.69
86.3*
92.39

$88.31
(1)
78.83

39-0
39.9
38.8
1*0.1

!j

107.29
88.53
97.87
83.10
88.37

38.9
39.9
39.8
39.6
39.*
1*0.6
37.6
38.8
1*0.8
1*0.6
39.7
39.5

39.6
39.8

1*0.5
39.5

61A5
66.99
59.72

62.1*7
65.93
59.88

61.1*6
65.85
59.98

39.9

1*0.3
1*0.2

1*0.7
1*0.9

83.81*
86.03

83.82
87.51

103.77
113.02
95.99
99.82
107.1*1
99.26
112.87
105.17
105.98
86.31
81.76
93.71

10l*.75
115.16
100.11
100.15
108.56
IOO.67
112.70
105.51
109.93

103.36
115.22
IO6.78
95.5*
106.33
96.60
IO8.76
IO8.36
II8.87

OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma City.
Tulsa

85.89
82.37
91.*3

OREGON....
Portland.

97.93
98.01*

PENNSYLVANIA
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton.
Erie
Harrisburg.
Lancaster
•
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Reading
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre—Hazleton
York

89.5*
88.9I*
100.02

Average hourly earnings

July
1959

NORTH DAKOTA.
Fargo.......

OHIO
Akron
Canton
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbus
Dayton
Toledo
Youngstown-Warren•

Average weekly hours

July
I960

81.19
78.1*1
<*.96
107.36
79.98
67.20
61.51*
75.95

June
I960
$2.31
2.1*1
2.16
2.67
2.23
2.1*8
2.26
2.33
2.52
2.37
2.19
2.3*

$2.30
2.1*0
2.15
2.67
2.2*
2.*7
2.2*
2.31
2.*8
2.37
2.18
2.32

39.2

1.5*
1.65
1.58

1.55
1.6*
1.58

39.5

*3.1

(1)
2.17

1.99
2.18

1.90
2.03

1*0.1*
1*0.2

2.59
2.88
2.64
2.1*2
2.67
2.1*6

39.9
36.6

1*1.3
1*0.1*
1*0.7
*1.5
39.9
37.8

1*0.7
1*1.6
1*0.1
1*0.8
1*1.0
1*0.6
1*1.1*
1*0.7
1*0.2

2.90

2.59
2.86
2.6*
2.*2
2.69
2.*7
2.72
2.6*
2.91

2.5*
2.77
2.66
2.3*
2.59
2.38
2.63
2.66
2.96

86.11
78.66
93.81*

1*1.1
*1.5
1*1.1

1*0.9
1*1.6
1*0.1

1*1.2
1*1.1*
1*0.8

2.10
1.97
2.28

2.10
1.98
2.28

2.09
1.90
2.30

97.51
96.92

96.1*1*
95.66

37.9
38.1*

38.0
38.1*

38.7
38.9

2.58
2.55

2.57
2.52

2.*9
2.1*6

90.55
88.17
97.27
8i.i*o
79.60
9*.56
108.1*2
78.97
68.32
62.07
77.11

90.12
88.26
96.93
80.80
78.78
93.67
106.81
80.59
66.01
61.05
76.63

39.1

39.2
38.5

39.7
39.*

38.6
37.0
1*1.2

2.29
2.31
2.1*1
2.0*
1.97
2.38
2.76
2.03
1.75
1.70
1.88

2.31
2.29
2.39
2.0*
1.98
2.37
2.78
2.03
1.77
1.71
1.89

2.02
1.95
2.33
2.76
1.98
1.71
1.65
1.86

85.35
89.51

140.6

37.8

1*0.1*
1*0.8

37.7
38.9
1*1.0
1*0.9

37.9

38.7
1*0.7
1*0.3
1*1.0

37.9
39.1
1*0.1*

1*2.1

1*0.0
39.2
36.1*
1*1.3
1*0.3
1*0.3
1*1.1*

S3

ir*
39.9
38.9
39.*
38.1*
36.2
1*0.1*

37.9

1*0.7

39.9
1*0.2

39.9
39.0
38.9
38.6
36.3
1*0.8

1*1.6
1*0.0
1*0.1*
1*0.2
1*0.7

£3

2^33

RHODE ISLAND
Providence-Pawtucket.

75-*l
7*.6l

76.19
75.33

7*. 56
73.93

39.9
39.9

1*0.1
1*0.5

1*0.3
1*0.1*

1.89
I.87

1.90
1.86

I.85
I.83

SOUTH CAROLINA.
Charleston....

63.36
69.5*

61*. 53
76.26

62.02
68.7*

1*0.1
38.0

1*1.1
1*1.9

1*0.8

1.58
1.83

1.57
1.82

1.52
1.79

SOUTH DAKOTA.
Sioux Falls.

Ii!

89.39
100.9*

88.70
100.21*

1*5.0
1*5.0

*6.*
*7-5

1.9
2.2

1.91
2.11

Chattanooga.
Khoxville...
Memphis
Nashville...

73.97
76.21*
85.07
82.1*1
81.56

77.59
85.68
81.81
78.57

71.^*6
7*. 37
81*.1»6
80.32
76.36

1*0.7
1*0.2
1*0.8
1*0.7
1*0.5

1*0.6
1*0.2
1*1.2
1*1.1*

1.83
1.93
2.10
2.01
1.9*

1.76
1.85
2.05
1.9*
1.89

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




1*0.2

39.5
1*0.9
1*1.0
1*1.1*

38.1*

1*0.1*

1.8*
1.93
2.08
2.01
1.97

4o
Tallt C8 firiss htirs n i tariiigs if prilictiu wtrktrs i i •mfictiritf, b Stiti Ml silictii iriis-Cutiuri
-:
y

State and area

Average weekly earnings
June
July
I960
I960

Average hourly earnings

TEXAS
Dallas
Fort Worth..
Houston
San Antonio.

$90.03
81.18
96.29
104.ll*
69.36

$88.97
79.76
93.77
103.98
70.00

UTAH
Salt Lake City.

100.1*5
98.95

102.36
97.10

2.35
2.26

VERMONT
Burlington..
Springfield.

76.96
78.36
92.21

77.10
79.30
92.00

1.77
1.76
2.08

VIRGINIA
Norfolk-Portsmouth.
Richmond

71.73
77.68
81.81

73.21
77.08
82.1*1

1.71
1.86
1.96

102.96
103.36
108.1*1
100.1*9

102.57
102.18
10l*.54
99.07

2.53
2.53
2.68
2.55

WEST VIRGINIA.
Charleston...
Wheeling

95.01
118.37
95.^9

9.3
116.24
95.06

93.69
116.33
92.30

WISCONSIN..
Kenosba...
Lacrosse..
Ifedison...
MLlvauke*.
Racine....

96.21
128.16
95.07
108.1*1*
106.87
95.02

98.03
126.85
94.32
104.25
107.51
96.23

95.20
127.53
88.59
97.76
105.94
98.08

2.38
2.84
2.37
2.60
2.64
2.44

2.27
2.75
2.25
2.43
2.56
2.44

WYOMING.
Casper.

98.30
122.18

92.60
112.1*2

97.17
119.54

2.53
2.89

2.46
2.93

WASHINGTON.

Seattle...
Spokane...
Tacoma....

1

$89.19
77-97
95.12
105.83
67.49

Not available.
Subarea of New York-Northeastern Nev Jersey.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.

2




2.39
2.81
2.41

Table 1-1: Later tviivir rites i i •aiifactiriit
1951 t i late
(Per 100 employees)
Feb.

5.2
k.k
k.k

1951
1952
1953
195*
1955
1956
1957
1958
I959
i960

2.8

3.3
3.3
3.2
2.5

*.5
3«9
k.2
2.5
3.2
3.1
2.8
2.2

3,3
3.6

3.9

3.5

3.1

2.9

3.U

3.3

l.k
1.7
2.2
2.0
1.0
1.5

1951..
1952..
1953..
195*-.
1955...
1956..
1957..
1958..

3.3

1.3
1.8
2.1
1.7

1.9

2.9

.9
1.7

1.7

Apr.

k.6
3
'?
k.k

*.5
3*7
k.3

2.8

3.6

May

July

4.5
3-9

k.9
k.9

k.l
2.7

5.1

2.k

3.5
3.3

3.8
3.k

k.3

3.3

2.8
2.5

3.0
3.0

3.9
3.8

3.6
2.7

3.5
2.8

3.6
3.2

3.9

3.7
2.8

3.7
2.8
3.5

3.7
2.9
3.3
l.k
2.5
2.3
1.9
1.0
2.2
1.7

3.8
k.2
1.9
3.1
3.0
2.6
1.6
3*0
2.3

3.1
2.8
2.k

tl
2.2
1.9
1.7
•9
1.9
1.5

1.2
2.2
2.1
1.7
.9
2.0

k.o

5.9

k.l

2.9
3.2

3.3
3.3
2.7

3.2
3.3
3.3
1.6
2.5
2.2
2.1
1.5
2.2

3^3
3.*8
3.2

3.9
3.9

3.9
3.3
1.8
3.2
2.6
2.1
1.6
2.5

k.k

3.9

3.0

5.6

5.2

^.0
3.k
k.k

3.3
3.6
k.l

k.O
2.7

3.3

k.l

3.3

k.2
2.9

k.O

3.^

3.9

3.1

3.2

k.2

k.k

Annual
average

Sept.

k3

3.^

k.2

Aug.

3.^
k.l
2.k
1.8
2.9
2.6
1.7
1.7
2.0

k.k
3.0
1.9
3.1
2.7
2.0
2.6

k.k
k.k
3.9

3.3
3.3

2.1
2.5
2.5

3.0
2.2
2.8
3.0

2.3

3.7
3.k

2.k
3.8

3.6

2.8
3.3
1.7
1.7
2.k
1.9
1.1

2.0
2.6
1.1
1.3
1.7
1.5
•7
1.1

1.3

3.0

2.9
3.0

3.k
3.3
3.0
1.6
2.k
2.3
1.8
1.3
2.0

3*5

Total separations

k.l
k.O
3.8
k.3
2.9
3.6
3.3
5.0
3.1
2.9

1951.
1952.
1953.
195*.

1955.
1956.
1957.
1958.
1959 1
I960.

1951
1952
1953
1955.,
1956
1959
i960

4

2.1
1.9
2.1
1.1
1.0
l.k
1.3
.8
•9
1.0

3.5
2.5
3.6
3.0
3.9
2.6
3.0

k.l
3-7
k.l
3.7
3.0
3.5
3.3
k.2
2.8
3.7

k.6
k.l
k.3
3.8
3.1
3.k

2.1
1.9
2.2
1.0
1.0
1.3
1.2
!8
1.0

2.5
2.0
2.5
1.0
1.3
i.k
1.3
.7
1.0
1.0

2.7
2.2
2.7
1.1
1.5
1.5
1.3

3.8
3

'?
3.6

ft
3.0
3.6

.7

1.1
1.1

k.8
3.9
k.k
3.3
3.2
3.7
3.k
3.6
2.9
3.3

k.3
3.9
k.2
3.1
3.2
3.^
3.0
2.9
2.8
3.3

3.U

2.8
2.2
2.7
1.0
1.5
1.6
l.k
.8
1.3
1.1

2.5
2.2
2.6
1.1

2.k
2.2
2.5
1.1
1.6
1.5
l.k
•9
1.3
1.1

3.1
3.0
2.9
l.k
2.2
2.2
1.9
1.2
1.8

3.1
3.5
3.1
1.8
2.8
2.6
2.2
1.5
2.2

1.3
2.2
l.l
1.6
1.3
1.2
1.3
2.0
l.k

1.0
1.3
1.7
1.3
1.2
1.6
1.9

1.3
.7
1.5
1.7
1.1
1.1*.
1.8
1.6
1.5

II
1.3

.8
1.3
1.1

k.k

2.1
3.1
3.*
3.2
3.1
3.2
3.3

5.3

k.6
k.Q

¥0
3.9

k.O

3.5
3.7

tl
5.2

3.9
k.k
k.k
k.k

l

k.2
h-5
3.3
3.5
3.5
k.o
3.2

k.3

II
3.0
3.1
2.8

3.5

k.k

k.O
3.0
3.0
2.8

k.3
3.5
3.3
3.5
3.6
3.6

k.l

3.8
2.8

U.1

3.1

2.5
2.8
2.1
1.2
1.8
1.7
1.3
1.1
l.k

1.9
2.1
1.5
1.0
l.k
1.3

1.7
1.1
.9
1.1
1.0

1.0

.7
.7
.9

l.k
.7
1.8
1.6
1.2
1.3
2.3
1.7
2.8

1.7
.7
2.3
1.6
1.2
1.5
2.7
1.6
2.6

1.5
1.0
2.5
1.7
l.k
l.k
2.7
1.8
1.7

k.l

3.U

2.k
2.3
2.3
1.1
1.6
1.6
1.*
•9
1.3

Layoffs
1951.
1952.
1953.
195*.
1955.
1956.
1957.
1958.
1959i960.

1.0
1.*

0.8
1.3
.8

2.8

2.2
1.1
1.8
1.1+
2.9
1.3

.9

1.5
1.7
1.5
3.8
1.7
1.3

1.5

0.8
l.l
.8
2.3
1.3
1.6
l.k
3.2
1.3
2.2

1.0
1.3
.9
2.k
1.2
l.k
1.5
3.0
1.3
2.0

1.2
1.1
1.0
1.9
1.1
1.6
1.
•I
2,
1.1
1.6

1.0
1.1
.9
1.7
1.2
1.3
1.1
1.8
1.0

1.2
1.1
1.3
1.9
1.2
1.5
1.7
2.3
1.6

1.7

Beginning with January 1959, transfers between establishments of the same firm are included in total accessions and total separations, therefore rates for these items are not strictly comparable with prior data. Transfers comprise part of other accessions
and other separations, the rates for which are not shown separately.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
Data in all tables'in Section D relate to the United States without Alaska and Hawaii.




Table 1-2: Lab* t i r i m r rates, ky iidistry

(Per 100 emplpyees)
Accession rates
Industry

Separation rates
Quits
Layoffs
July
June
Jane
July
June
I960
I960
19&L
I960

July
I960

June
I960

July
I960

Jane
I960

19&.

2.7

3.9

1.5

2.3

3.U

3.3

1.1

1.1

1.9

1.7

2.6
2.8

3.8
U.1

1.3
1.9

2.1
2.7

3.8
2.8

3.7
2.6

.9

1.U

1.0
1.3

2.U
1.0

2.1
.8

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES.

1.6

3.2

0.9

1.6

3.0

2.8

0.8

0.8

1.7

1.5

LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS
Logging camps and contractors
Sawmills and planing mills
Millwork, plywood, prefabricated structural wood products.

2.9
(2)
3.1
2.5

8.3
18.7
6.2
3.9

2.5
(2)
2.7
2.1

6.3
12.5

3.6
(2)
1.
*2
3.1*

U.2
5.8
3.6
3.7

1.7
(2)
1.9
1.9

2.U
3.3
2.2
1.8

1.U
(2)
1.7
1.0

1.2
1.9
.7
1.3

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES
Household furniture
Other furniture and fixtures.

3.1
3.3
2.7

U.0
3.6

2.7
3.3

3.9
U.1
3.5

3.3
3.6
2.U

1.6
1.6

U.8

2.1*
2.5
2.2

1.5
1.7
1.1

1.7
1.9
1.2

1.2
1.U
.6

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS.
Glass and glass products.
Cement, hydraulic
Structural clay products
Pottery and related products...

2.5
2.7
1.8
2.8
2.1

3.3
3.14
3.9
3.9
2.1*

1.1
1.2
1.3
1.6
1.0

2.1
2.2
2.7
2.6
1.6

3.1
2.7
3.2
3.8
2.3

3.5
5.3
1.3
3.U
2.3

.8
1.0

2.0
1.5
2.3
2.3
1.0

2.2
3.8

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES
Blast furnaces, steel works, and rolling mills
,
Iron and steel foundries
Gray-iron foundries
,
Malleable-iron foundries
,
Steel foundries
,
Primary smelting and refining of nonferrous metals:
Primary smelting and refining of copper, lead, and zinc..,
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of nonferrous metals:
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of copper
Nonferrous foundries
Other primary metal industries:
Iron and steel forgings

2.3
2.6
1.8
1.9
1.U
1.9

2.1*
1.9
2.9
3.2
2.9
2.5

.U

1.
*6
6.$
2.9
3.3
2.1*
2.6

U.U
5.6

.6
.7
.U
.7

.7
.3
1.1
1.1
.6
1.3

1.7

2.7

1.3

2.0

1.3
U.3

1.9
3.3

.U

2.U

3.6

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS
Cutlery, hand tools, and hardware
,
Cutlery and edge tools
,
Hand tools
Hardware
,
Heating apparatus (except electric) and plumbers' supplies,
Sanitary ware and plumbers' supplies
,
Oil burners, nonelectric heating and cooking apparatus,
not elsewhere classified
,
Fabricated structural metal products
,
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving
,

2.8
1.6
2.U
1.9
1.3
1.8
1.6

3.9
2.9
3.9
2.6
2.8
3.3
2.1

1.U
.8
.9
1.3
.7
1.2
.9

1.9
3.6
3.3

3.8

i

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)
Engines and turbines
Agricultural machinery and tractors
Construction and mining machinery
Metalworking machinery
Machine tools
Metalworking machinery (except machine tools)
,
Machine-tool accessories
Special-industry machinery (except metalworking machinery)
General industrial machinery
Office and store machines and devices
Service-industry and household machines
Miscellaneous machinery parts

2.1
1.2
2.8
1.7
1.5
1.3

2.U

3.1
2.6
U.3
2.5
2.6
2.1
2.7
3.5
3.3
3.2
2.9
2.7
3.3

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY
Electrical generating, transmission, distribution, and
industrial apparatus
»
Communication equipment
Radios, phonographs, television sets, and equipment
Telephone, telegraph, and related equipment
Electrical appliances, lamps, and miscellaneous products.

2.2
2.2
2.0

MANUFACTURING.
DURABLE GOODS
NONDURABLE GOODS1

July

Durable Goods

See footnotes at end of table.




5.U
3.1

1.U
.7

i

.5
1.8
1.0

1.1
1.0

.U
1.1
1.0
.5
.3
.7
•8
.8
.6

3.6
5.6
1.7
1.9
1.2
1.7

3.U
U.7

3.1
2.8
3.6
3.3

.U
.3
.7
.9
.7
.5

1.7

1.U

.5

.8

.7

.1

.5

1.6

1.6

1.7

U.5

3.U

.3
.7

•2
.8

.7
3.3

.8
2.0

1.1

3.7

U.0

.3

.6

2.9

2.9

2.0
1.2
2.2
1.9
.9
2.0
.9

U.0
3.1
2.8
2.7
3.U
3.3
2.6

U.o
S.k

.8
.9
.8
1.0
.8
.7
.7

.9
.9
1.1
1.1
.8
.9
.7

2.6
1.8
1.6
1.3
2.0
1.6
1.3

2.6

3.8
2.7
6.1

2.9
3.2
5.3

1.6
.7

1.8
1.3
k.9

tl

2.7
1.9
3.6
3.U
3.0
3.U
1.2

3.3
3.1
5.3
3.7
2.5
2.5
1.9
3.2
1.9
2.6
2.U

1.5
.9
2.U
1.9
1.8
2.1

1.9
1.9

1.5
1.U
1.U
.6
.8

1.7
1.1*
l.k
1.5
1.9
1.1*
2.1
2.6
2.7
2.3
1.7
1.1*
1.0

3.8

1.1

2.1

U.1

2.9
U.3
5.7

d

U.5

1.1
.9
1.5
•6
1.6

1.1*
2.6
3.3
1.6
2.1*

H
1.8
2.0
2.3
2.3
1.9

5.1
3.5

2.0

.2

.8

.8
1.1
.6
1.1
.9
1.0
.8
1.3
1.1

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

3.U
1.0

2.3
2.6
6.8
2.6
2.1

3.0

.8
1.0
.6
.7
.6
.6
.8
•6
.6
.5
.8
.8
.9
.6
.6
.7

3.2

3.1

1.0

1.0

.7
.5
2.6
1.6
1.5

2.1

2.9
3.2
U.1
1.U
U.1

.8
1.1

.8
1.2
1.U
.7
1.0

.8
1.U
1.1
1.8
2.U

U.o
1.9
2.0
1.6
3.7
2.7

3.U
U.7
2.6

U.0

5.5

1.1

.8
.7
.7
.9
.8
.8
.7
.9
.8
.9
.8
.7
.6

.U

1.9
1.5
2.U
2.1

2.5

U.o
.8
1.1

5.U
1.1
.8

3.9

2.U
1.2
1.2
.7
1.9
•6
1.1
1.1

U.3
1.9
1.U
1.2
1.3
1.8
.3
2.3

Table 0-2: Labor turnover rates, by industry-Continued
(Per 100 employees)
Industry

Total
July June
I960 I960

New hires
July June

Separation rates
Layoffs
Quits
June
July June
July
I960
i960 i960
I960 I960
I960
Total
July June

I960

I960

1.1
(2)

1.4

5.6

4.2

d
1.5

(2)

3.4
• 1
3
3«-L 2.9

Durable Goods — Continued
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT
Motor vehicles and equipment
Aircraft and parts
Aircraft
Aircraft engines and parts
Aircraft propellers and parts
Other aircraft parts and equipment..
.Ship and boat building and repairing.
Railroad equipment
'.
Locomotives and parts
Railroad and street cars
Other transportation equipment

MANUFACTURING

35
.
3.2

1.6 <£.4
l.k 2.2
1.8 2.9
1.3 2.8
4.1
3.5
8.0
9.*
0

95
.
(2)
10.8

)
i

5-k

3.1
7.8

•
9
.8
.9
1.2

2.6
2.7
5.0

1.5
1.8
2.3
2.8

INDUSTRIES-

Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware..

2.8
4.8

3.0

1.6

1.2
2.4

2.3
1.9

1.3

3.0
2.4
3.2
3.2

.8
•9

1.7
2.5

k.k

5.2

3.0

35
.

2.8

2.6

1.6

2.2

5.4

2.2

•9
.6

1.2

1.6
1.8
6.6 .8

65
.
79
.

36
.

4.0
12.8

.
5
.
6

2.7

{2

2.1

1.8
1.7

1.5

l

2.4

(2)

(2)

2.0

.8
1.6

.4

12.0

3.6

9.2
1.9

1.2

1.5

75
.

2.2

2.2

.8
2.3
2.6

.9
2.5

.7
.
5

.
9
.
5

1.1
.1

(2)
13.6

1.4
2.1

0.9

4.2

2.5

(2)
4.4
4.2

k.3

0.8
(2)

1.5
1.9
.8
1.3

8.9

97
.

k.l
2.6
2.0

3.0
2.9

2.0

3.^

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS
Photographic apparatus
Watches and clocks
Professional and scientific instruments.
MISCELLANEOUS

3.2
(2)

2.3

1.7
10.1

k.l
.1

.8
.2

.8
.8

1.2
1.0

•9
1.5

.8

33
.

4.0

1.7

1.6

1.1

2.9

2.3

1.1

1.3

1.6

1.6
.3

3.1
1.7
2.9
3.8

3.2
2.8
2.5
2.6

3.1
3.0
3.2
3.0

1.0

1.1

1.7

3.6

(2)

3.1

2.4

•
9

Nondurable Goods
FOOD AND

KINDRED

PRODUCTS.

2.6 k.9
k.O k.9
3.2 k.9

Meat products
Grain-mill products
Bakery products
Beverages:
Malt liquors

(2)
1

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.
Cigarettes
Cigars
Tobacco and snuff. . .

1.4
.8
2.3

AND OTHER

FINISHED

AND ALLIED

1.0

•7
.2

1 0
J..U

.5

PRODUCTS

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...
Industrial inorganic chemicals.
Industrial organic chemicals...
Synthetic fibers
Drugs and medicines
Paints, pigments, and fillers..

.
6

(2)

2.1

.
7

.
5
1.8
1.2

3.k
3.6
3.1
2.7

2.8
3.2
2.9
2.7

1.7
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.7

1.6

2.4
2.0

2.1
2.1

2.5

2.0

2.7

2.6
2.5
3.1

3.1
2.9

1.7
1.6
1.9
2.6

2.1
2.0

36
.

57
.
36
.

4.0
2.9

2.0

2.0

2.6

3.2

3.k

2.7
2.5
2.8

2.8

4.7
4.9
2.4

3.7

5.0

2.9

(2)
1.6
(2)

4.6
2.3
2.1

(2)

35
.

(2)

.8

1.6

2.4

(2)

.6

3.8
3.5
3.8

4.2

2.6

2.9

k.l
37
.

1.4
2.9

2.k 4.0
1.7 3.5
2.5 k.9

1.8

1.1

•7
.5
1.0

.c.
.1
.4

.3

•3

.8v
.9
.8
.6
1.7

1.9

1.3
1.3
.9
.6
3-k
.8
.3
.5

(2)

2.2

(2)

•3

.8

.
7

1.8

1.6
1.6
1.7

.
5
.4
.4

fe?

(2)

1.8
2.5

(2)

.6

3.8
3.3
3.9

3.0
2.0
3-0

2.7

2.2
2.8

1.6
3.1

2.1
1.4
2.2

1.1

.3

.
6
.
3
.
6

3.0
2.8

.8

.7

1.4

.
9
.
5

1.0

1.2

.4

37
.

3.1

1.3

.6
1.5

.4

1.9

2.2
1.2
2.4

.6<

.
7

1.2
1.0

2.6
2.5

1.3

1.4
1.4

.6

.4
.4

2.1

.8

3.1

.8
.3
1.3

1.8
2.8

36
.

1.4

3.0

1.5
1.6

1.2
1.4

.4

1.3

1.1

1.1

.
3

1.2

.
5

.8

.
9
.
3

1.2

2.5

.8
1.8
1.5

1.4
2.8

2.6
1.6
3.6
3.2

2.3

3.3
2.3

37
.

3.5-

2.5

3.3

3A
2.7

• 2.5
9
1.6
1.8

.
5
.k 1.6

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL.
Petroleum refining

2.1

2.0

3.4

5.1

2.6

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS
Leather: tanned, curried, and finished.
Footwear (except rubber)

3.1

1.3

RUBBER PRODUCTS
Tires and inner tubes.
Rubber footwear
Other rubber products.

See footnotes at end of table.

(2)

1.8
.6

1.9

3.1

.8

.8

35
.
38
.

3.*

1.6

2.6
2.2

2.4

1.4

1.3

1.6
1.9
1.9
.8

3.2
1.8

2.8
3.0

1.7

2.0
1.1

1.4

2.6
2.5

1.3
1.3

.
9

.7
.8

.6

1.8

PRODUCTS

Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills.
Paperboard containers and boxes...




1.7

(2)

1.6
1.5

TEXTILE

Men's and boys' suits and coats
Men's and boys' furnishings and work clothing.
PAPER

6.0

3.2
2.8

1.8

TEXT ILE-MILL PRODUCTS
Yarn and thread mills
Broad-woven fabric mills
Cotton, silk, synthetic fiber.......
Woolen and worsted
Knitting mills
Full-fashioned hosiery
Seamless hosiery
Knit underwear
Dyeing and finishing textiles
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings.
APPAREL

)i

.
9

37
.

*.3 6.1
3.2 3 6
.
k.k 6.4

1.3
1.3
3.2
2.2

3.3

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

4.0
2.2
4.2

1.0
1.1

33
.
35
.

2.3

.
7

1.5

.6

.6
.6

.4

.
5

•
9

.4

.4

.2

•7

•3

.
6

.
7
.7

.
3
.
8
.7

.2
•2

•3
.3

.5

.4

.1

.2

.7

.8
.3

1.4

1.3
.9

1.3
.8

2.2

.
9

1.0
2.0

2.3

2.2

.
7

1.1

.8

.8

1.0

2.4

.7

.7

•3

.3
.4
.4

.
9

.2
.2
.1

.
3

.7
1.8

•
7

Table 0-2: Lab* tirimr rates, by iidistry-Coitimei

Industry

(Per 100 employees)
Accession rates
New hires
June
July
July
June
i960
I960
I960
i960

July
I960

Separation rates
Quits
Layoffs
July
July
June
i960
i960 I960
i960
i960

NONMANUFACTURING:
METAL HININQ
Iron mining
Copper mining
Lead and zinc mining.
ANTHRACITE MINING
BITUMINOUS-COAL

MINING.

COMMUNICATION:
Telephone.
Telegraph*

3

k.O
2.2

k.6
k.o

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

1.5

1.8

.2

.8

.9

2)
2)

3.2
1.5
2.6
2.9

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

1.2
.3
1.3
2.0

13
(2)
(2)

.2
.2

3.8

.1

.5

5.1

1.9

6.9

3.1

.5

.2

5.5

2.6

(2)
(2)

1.6
1.6

.5

2.9
2.7

*Data for the printing, publishing, and allied industries group are excluded.
*Not available.
3
Less than 0.05.
**Data relate to domestic enployees except messengers.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




2.9

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

6.8

2.6
1.5
2.2

.3

.5

1.2
.9

0.3

.3

.1
•3

Labor Ti
Table 0-4: Laker tinner rites i i •mfactirhi fir selected States aii areas

(Per 100 employees)
Accession rates
State and area

Separation rates

June
I960

May
I960

June
I960

May
I960

June
I960

May
I960

June
i960

May
I960

ALABAMA
Mobile

3.7
4.6

3.9
9.3

2.1
2.5

2.2
5.8

3.7
12.0

4.0

1.0
1.5

1.1
1.6

ARIZONA..
Phoenix.

5.2
5.7

5.2
5.7

4.1
4.4

4.4
5.0

5.8
6.3

5.3
6.2

2.2

2.4

2.4
2.8

2.8
2.9

2.2
2.6

ARKANSAS
Little Rock-North Little Rock.

5.7
5.3

5.4
4.8

4.3
3.5

3.7
3.1

5.9
6.8

4.9
6.7

2.5
1-9

2.5
2.5

2.8
4.2

1.9
3.8

CALIFORNIA x ..
Los Angeles-Long Beach 1
San Bernardino-Riverside-Ontario
San Diego 1
San Francisco-Oakland *
San Jose *

5-4
5.0
4.8
(2)
7.3
5.7

4.2
4.1
3.8
2.7
4.6
3.4

3.8
3.6
3.1
(2)
3.8
4.9

3.0
3.0
1.8
1.9
2.8
2.8

4.5
4.7
4.7
(2)
5.8
3.5

4.9
5.0
4.0
3.4
5.1
3.0

1.9
2.0

1*7
1.8

2.4
2.4
2.2
1.8
2.9

2.2

1.2
1.1
1.3
1-5

1.8
1.9
2.6
(2)
3.7
.6

CONNECTICUT..
Bridgeport..
Hartford....
New Britain.
New Haven...
Waterbury...

2.6
3.2
2.7
2.5
2.8
3.1

2.6
2.0
2.2
1.8
2.7
2.3

17
.

1-5
1.2
1.5
1.1
1.8

2.2
2.2
2.7
3.3
3.0
2.3

3.0
2.8
2.6
2.7
2.7
2.7

1.0

1.1

.8

2.0
2.0
1.1
1.9
1.4

.7

1.4
16
.
13
.
15
.
.8
1.4

DELAWARE....
Wilmington.

4.0
3.2

2.4
2.0

2.9
2.2

1.4

1.9
1.6

2.3
1.9

.9
.7

11
.

1.1

.8

.5
•5

.6
.6

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:
Washington

46
.

4.2

43
.

3.9

3.4

3.8

2.1

2.4

.
6

FLORIDA
Jacksonville
Miami....'
Tampa-St. Petersburg.

5.9
8.0
5.5
5-4

5.6
8.2
5.8
4.4

4.3
4.2
4.2
4.1

4.0
4.5
5.2
2.5

8.1
8.0
7.5
6.5

6.6
9.3
6.8
6.0

2.7
2.6
2.4
2.9

2.3
2.7
2.0

GEORGIA....
Atlanta 3

4.1
3.7

3.5
3.4

2.8
2.6

2.4
2.5

3.5
3.3

3.8
3.9

ll.l

10.8

6.8

6.4

5.5

41
.

INDIANA *
Indianapolis 5

3.4
2.8

3.6
2.5

1.9
1-7

1-7
1.2

3.8
3.6

IOWA
Des Moines.

5.4
4.9

4.6
3.7

3.2
3.5

2.0
2.8

KANSAS 6 ..
Topeka....
Wichita 6

4.0
3.9
2.8

3.1
2.2

2.4
1.?
1.7

KENTUCKY.

4.1

3.2

LOUISIANA.

3.4

MAINE
Portland.

8.6
6.5

IDAHO

MARYLAND
4.5
Baltimore
3.9
See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.




.
9

7.4

H
.8
1.1

.9

12
.
11
.

.
8
•9
.
8
12
.
10
.

11
.
11
.
17
.
11
.

.9

4.5
3.1

3.4
6.1
3.4
3.5

17
.
16
.

1.2
1.4

1.4
1.7

2.8

2.1

2.0

1.3

3.3
3.6

1.0
.9

11
.
10
.

2.2
2.2

1.7
2.1

3.3
3.0

4.1
3.6

1.4
1.5

15
.
2.1

1.6
1.0

2.2
1.1

2.7
2.0
1.5

4.0
2.7
4.5

4.2
3.7
3.7

1.4
1.8
1.1

14
.
17
.
1.2

2.1

.7
2.9

2.3
1.7
2.0

1.8

1.5

3.6

4.9

1.0

1.0

2.0

3.4

4.2

2.3

1.9

3.4

2.2

.8

1.9

1.0

6.5
4.3

5.7
4.9

3.6
2.0

3.7
2.0

3.6

2.1

2.0
1.0

19
.
13
.

10
.

1.2

.6

.5

3.4
3.2

2.7
2.3

2.0

1.8

4.1
4.1

3.2
3.1

1.2
1.1

10
.

2.5
2.6

1.7
1.7

2.5

•9

4.8
4.8

46

Tibli D-4: Libir tiruiir ratis ii •mfactiriif fir silictid States ail auas-Ciitiiittf

(Per 100 employees)
State and area

Total
June
i960

New hires
June
I960
&

&

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
Fall River
Mew Bedford
Springfield-Holyoke
Worcester

k k
4.1
4.7
4.6
4.1
3.8

3.1
3.5
3.0

3.0
2.9
2.1
2.6
2.4
2.8

MINNESOTA
Minneapolis-St. Paul

7.1
6.1

4.6
4.6

4.5
3.6

MISSISSIPPI

4.7
3.5

4.6
3.8

3 T
2:6

4.5

k

-3

3.0

69
.

63
.

8.7
5.6

•
a

Layoffs

June
I960

I960

0

14
.
15
.
14
.
12
.
11
.

15
.
17
.
14
.
ll
.
12
.

.8
1.5
2.1
1.6
.9

1.1
2.9
1.9
2.2
1.1

-*

4.7
4.4

16
.
16
.

1.6
1.6

2.0
1.7

OJ OJ

4.6
3.9

4.7
5.3

18
.
15
.

1.9
1.6

2.2
1.4

CM CO

2.8

36
.

38
.

1.6

1.7

1.5

1.6

48
.

45
.

39
.

46
.

1.5

1.7

1.9

1.0

55
.

73
.

48
.

55
.

62
.

3.6

4.0

.
7

1.2

49
.

47
.

37
.

44
.

48
.

2.6

2.5

1.1

1.6

4.2
3.1

4.8
2.6

POH

CM CO

3.0
1.6

Co Co

1.0

3A

4.3
2.4
2.6
3.2
4.3
2.9
5.7
2.0
3.2
2.9
3.7

1.1

1.1

.7

.7

1.1

l.l

.
9
14
.

10
.
10
.
13
.

2.8
1.1
•3
2.3
1.7
1.2
4.1
.8
2.9
2.2
2.2

2.5
.6
.5
2.2
2.3
1.3

2.1
2.8
3.6
3.2

2.3
1.2
1.1
1.4
1.8
2.0
2.9
1.4
1.7
2.0
2.5

18
.
18
.
21
.

18
.
16
.
19
.

.8
.4
.5

3.3

4!l
3.4
2.8

CO

HCO

UN CM

3.3
5.1
3.8
3.7
2.8

UN-*

3.2
2.9

POPO

0 0
2.0
1.9
1.9
2.1
2.1

Separation rates
Quits
June
I960
i960

ro ro

r\

Total
May
I960

Co Co

•a

June
I960

CM PO

Jackson

MISSOURI

MONTANA *

NEVADA

5.0
3-9

UNCO

-*VO

4.6
3.3

NEW YORK
Albany-Schenectady-Troy....
Binghamton
Buffalo
ELmlra
Nassau and Suffolk Counties
lev Tork City
Rochester
Syracuse
Utica-Ron*
Westchester County

5.0
2.9
3.8
3.1
k
-9
3.9
6.2
3.1
3.7
3.8
5.1

4.0
2.9
2.2
2.6
k
-5
2.9

2.9
1.6
2.3
1.8
2.3
3.0
3.5
2.3
2.2
2.4
3.7

NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
Oreensboro-High Point

4.0
3.1
3.7

3.2
2.7
2.6

3.2
2.8
3.2

2.4
2.3
2.2

NORTH DAKOTA
Fargo

65
.

61
.

58
.

38
.

OKLAHOMA 8
Oklahoma City
Tulsa •

UN00 CO

4.5
6.6
3.7

4.7
5-9

OREGON X
Portland

8.2
5.6

6.1
4.2

6.6
4.1

-*

VO UN

5.1
4.7

OJOJ

bo Co

NEW HAMPSHIRE

3.8
7.6

3.0
4.3

HEW MEXICO

7

.6

Albuquerque 7

5 . 1

12
2.1
5.2
3.7
4.2

.6
.9
1.3
1.2

.
9
l.l

1.5
2.2
1.6

'2.1
17
.
16
.

UN-*

CM UN

2.5
1.6

2.4
1-5

1.7
1.6

2.1
2.4

Jt -*

VO CO

UN.*

OCO

1.9
1.7

2.0
2.0

2.0
1.9

OJ CM

COON

VO CM

00 CO
H PO

C
r

2.0
2.8
1.9

H

H POO
co co co

1.9
2.5
1.3

2.0
2.1

1.1
5.6

1.0
5.4

3.5
9.9

•3
.3

POH

2.8
4.6

ON

4.7
5.2
3.9

UN PO

r

C

4.0
5.8
3.5

HCO

ONCM

A
.2

CO CM

POCM CO

.4

PO

H

.8

10
.

UN H




3.7
.8
1.5
1.3
1.9

O k
2.2

CO

See footnotes at end of table.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.

1.6

•9

2.1

CO-*

3.9
7.3

1 k

2.7

.6

ll
.
11
.
12
.

POPOCM

9

CM ON

RHODE ISLAND
Prorldence-Pavtucket

CM O ON

x

SOUTH CAROLINA
Charleston

,•

4.6
2.8
2.6
3.4
3.1

Takli 04: Labor timvir ritis ii •aiifactiriif fir stltcttJ Statis n l arias-Cntiiiitf

State and area

SOUTH DAKOTA.
Sioux Falls.

Chattanooga.
Knoxville...
Memphis
Hashville.,.

TEXAS

10

.

VERMONT
Burlington..
Springfield.

(Per 100 employees)
Accession rates
Total
June
June
May
I960
I960
I960

Separation rates
Total

June
I960

Layoffs
June
May
I960
1900

June
I960
2.1
1.5

2.1*
1.5

3.8
6.3

2.7

1.2
(2)

1.1
1.1

1.2
(2)

1.6
1.0
.9
1.6
1.5

6.9
6.1

7.6
5-7

k.i
3.2

k.k
1.5

6.5
8.2

5.6

ft

3.3
3.*
1.8
3-2
k.6

2.6
(2)
2.2
2.k
2.6

2.0
2.1
1.1
2.2
2.3

2.8
(2)
1.7
k.O
2.3

3.1
2.5
1.7
3.6
3.3

i.k
1.3

1.2

.
7
19
.
.
6

k.o

33
-

3.2

2.k

3.1

2.9

i.k

1.5

1.2

2.k
2.5
1.6

2.1
1.3
.8

2.7
2.1
2.1

2:1

i.k

2.2

3-1
2.k
1.6

1.1
1.1

1.8
1.7
1.0

.8
.
5
.7

1.0
.k
.5

2.8
3-3
3.8

5.2

.
8

1.8

.7

3.5

VXRaiHIA..
Richmond.

3-9
3.8

2.8
3-1

2.3
2.7

3.1
3.0

3.6
3.2

16
.

1.5
I.k

1.1

35
.

.7

1.5
1.1

WASHINGTON

5-2

k.i

3.7

2.8

3.7

k.5

18
.

1.8

I.k

2.3

WEST VIRGINIA.
Charleston...
Wheeling

3.3
2.k
1.7

2.8
1.2

1.6
2.0

1.1

2.3
1.1

2.7
1.1

.5

.6
.2

1.2

16
.

3.6

.7

.7

!6

1

.7
.5

Excludes canning and preserving.
Iot available.
'Excludes agricultural cheaicals, and miscellaneous manufacturing industries.
4
Excludes canning and preserving, and sugar.
^Excludes canning and preserving, and newspapers.
"Excludes instruments and related products.
^Excludes furniture and fixtures.
8
Excludes new-hire rate for transportation equipment.
^Excludes tobacco stemming and redrying.
10
Excludes canning and preserving, sugar, and tobacco.
IOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.
2




3.7

.2

.7
k.i

Explanatory Notes
Additional information concerning the preparation of the
labor force,

employment,

hours and earnings, and labor

turnover series--concepts and scope, survey methods, and
limitations—is contained in technical notes for each of
these series, available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics free of charge.

Use order blank on page 9-E.

INTRODUCTION

hours during the survey week. In the figures based on establishment records, persons who worked in more than one establishment during the reporting period are counted each time
their names appear on payrolls.

The statistics in this periodical are compiled from
two major sources: (1) household interviews and (2) payroll
reports from employers.
Data based on household interviews are obtained from
a sample survey of the population. The survey is conducted
each month by the Bureau of the Census for the Bureau of Labor
Statistics and provides a comprehensive measure of the labor
force, i.e., the total number of persons Ik years of age and
over who are employed or unemployed. It also provides data on
their personal and economic characteristics such as age, sex,
color, marital status, occupations, hours of work, and duration
of unemployment. The information is collected by trained interviewers from a sample of about 35,000 households in 330 areas
throughout the country and is based on the activity or status
reported for the calendar week ending nearest the 15th of the
month.

Hours of Work
The household survey measures hours actually worked
whereas the payroll survey measures hours paid for by employers.
In the household survey data, all persons with a Job but not at
work are excluded from the hours distributions and the computations of average hours. In the payroll survey, employees on
paid vacation, paid holiday, or paid sick leave are included
and assigned the number of hours for which they were paid
during the reporting period.

Data based on establishment payroll records are compiled each month from mail questionnaires by the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, in cooperation with State agencies. The payroll survey provides detailed industry information on nonagrlcultural wage and salary employment, average weekly hours,
average hourly and weekly earnings, and labor turnover for the
Bation, States, and metropolitan areas.
The figures are based on payroll reports from a
sample of 180,000 establishments employing about 25 million
nonfarm wage and salary workers. The data relate to all
workers, full- or part-time, who received pay during the payroll period ending nearest the 15th of the month.

Comparability of the household interview data with other series
Unemployment insurance data. The unemployed total
from the household survey includes all persons who did not work
at all during the survey week and were looking for work or were
waiting to be called back to a Job from which they had been
laid off, regardless of whether or not they were eligible for
unemployment insurance. Figures on unemployment insurance
claims, prepared by the Bureau of Employment Security of the
Department of Labor, exclude persons who have exhausted their
benefit rights, new workers who have not earned rights to unemployment insurance, and persons losing jobs not covered by unemployment insurance systems (agriculture, State and local
government, domestic service, self-employed, unpaid family work,
nonprofit organizations, and firms below a minimum size).

Relation between the household and payroll series
The household and payroll data supplement one another,
each providing significant types of Information that the other
cannot suitably supply. Population characteristics, for
example, are readily obtained only from the household survey
whereas detailed industrial classifications can be reliably derived only from establishment reports.
Data from these two sources differ from each other
because of differences In definition and coverage, sources of
Information, methods of collection, and estimating procedures.
Sampling variability and response errors are additional reasons
for discrepancies. The factors which have a differential effect
on levels and trends of the two series are described below:

In addition, the qualifications for drawing unemployment compensation differ from the definition of unemployment
used in the household survey. For example, persons with a job
but not at work and persons working only a few hours during the
week are sometimes eligible for unemployment compensation, but
are classified as employed rather than unemployed in the household survey.

Employment
Coverage. The household survey definition
of employment comprises wage and salary workers (including domestics and other private household workers), self-employed
persons, and unpaid workers vho worked 15 hours or more during
the survey week in family-operated enterprises. Employment in
both farm and nonfarm Industries Is included. The payroll survey covers only wage and salary employees on the payrolls of
nonfarm establishments.

Agricultural employment estimates of the Department of
Agriculture. The principal differences in coverage are the inclusion of persons under Ik in the Agricultural Marketing
Service (AMS) series and the treatment of dual jobholders who
are counted more than once if they worked on more than one farm
during the reporting period. There are also wide differences In
sampling techniques and collecting and estimating methods, which
cannot be readily measured In terms of Impact on differences In
level and trend of the two series.

Multiple Jobholding. The household approach
provides information on the work status of the population without duplication since each person is classified as employed, unemployed, or not in the labor force. Employed persons holding
more than one Job are counted only once, and are classified according to the job at which they worked the greatest number of




Unpaid absences from jobs. The household
survey includes among the employed all persons who had Jobs but
were not at work during the !survey week--that is, were not
working or looking for work but had jobs from which they were
temporarily absent because of illness, bad weather, vacation,
labor-management dispute, or because they were taking time off
for various other reasons, whether or not they were paid by
their employers for the time off. In the figures based on payroll reports, persons on paid sick leave, paid vacation, or
paid holiday are included, but not those on leave without pay
for the entire payroll period.

Comparability of the payroll employment data with other series
Statistics on manufactures and business, Bureau of
the Census. BLS establishment statistics on employment differ
from employment counts derived by the Bureau of the Census from

1-E

Each employed person Is counted only once. Those who
held more than one Job are counted in the job at which they
worked the greatest number of hours during the survey week.

its censuses or annual sample surveys of manufacturing establishments and the censuses of business establishments. The major reason for lack of comparability is different treatment of
business units considered parts of an establishment, such as
central administrative offices and auxiliary units, and in the
industrial classification of establishments due to different
reporting patterns by multi-unit companies. There are also differences in the scope of the industries covered, e.g., the
Census of Business excludes professional services, transportation companies, and financial establishments, while these are
Included in BLS statistics.

Included in the total are employed citizens of foreign countries, temporarily in the United States, who are not
living on the premises of an Embassy (e.g., Mexican migratory
farm workers).
Excluded are persons whose only activity consisted of
work around the house (such as own home housework, and painting
or repairing own home) or volunteer work for religious, charitable, and similar organizations.

County Business Patterns. Data in County Business
Patterns, published jointly by the U.S. Departments of Commerce
and Health, Education, and Welfare, differ from BLS establishment statistics in the units considered integral parts of an
establishment and in industrial classification. In addition,
CBP data exclude employment in nonprofit institutions, interstate railroads, and government.

Unemployed Persons comprise all persons who did not
work at all during the survey week and were looking for work,
regardless of whether or not they were eligible for unemployment Insurance. Also included as unemployed are those who did
not work at all and (a) were waiting to be called back to a job
from which they had been laid off; or (b) were waiting to report to a new wage or salary job within 30 days (and were not
in school during the survey week); or (c) would have been lookIng for work except that they were temporarily ill or believed
no work was available in their line of work or in the community.
Persons in this latter category will usually be residents of a
community in which there are only a few dominant Industries
which were shut down during the survey week. Not included in
this category are persons who say they were not looking for work
because they were too old, too young, or handicapped in any way.

Employment covered by Unemployment Insurance programs.
Not all nonfarm wage and salary workers are covered by theTJneaployment Insurance programs. All workers in certain activities,
such as nonprofit organizations and interstate railroads, are
excluded. In addition, small firms in covered industries are
also excluded in 3k States. In general, these are establishments with less than four employees.

LABOR FORCE DATA

The Unemployment Rate represents the number unemployed
as a percent of the civilian labor force, i.e., the sum of the
employed and unemployed. This measure can also be computed for
groups within the labor force classified by sex, age, marital
status, color, etc. When applied to industry and occupation
groups, the labor-force base for the unemployment rate also represents the sum of the employed and the unemployed, the latter
classified according to industry and occupation of their latest
full-time civilian Job.

COLLECTION AND COVERAGE
Statistics on the employment status of the population,
the personal, occupational, and other economic characteristics
of employed and unemployed persons, and related labor force data
are compiled for the BLS by the Bureau of the Census in its
Current Population Survey (CPS). (A detailed description of
this survey appears In Concepts and Methods Used in the Current
Employment and Unemployment Statistics Prepared by the Bureau of
the Census, U. S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population
Reports, Series P-23, No. 5. This report is available from BLS
on request.)

Duration of Unemployment represents the length of time
(through the current survey week) during which persons classified as unemployed bad been continuously looking for work or
would have been looking for work except for temporary illness,
or belief that no work was available in their line of work or in
the community. For persons on layoff, duration of unemployment
represents the number of full weeks since the termination of
their most recent employment. Average duration is an arithmetic
mean computed from a distribution by single weeks of unemployment.

These monthly surveys of the population are conducted
with a scientifically selected sample designed to represent the
civilian noninstltutional population Ik years and over. Respondents are Interviewed to obtain information about the employment status of each member of the household l t years of age
*
and over. The Inquiry relates to activity or status during the
calendar week, Sunday through Saturday, ending nearest the 15th
of the month. This is known as the survey week. Actual field
interviewing is conducted in the following week.

The Civilian Labor Force comprises the total of all
civilians classified as employed or unemployed In accordance
with the criteria described above. The "total labor force" also
includes members of the Armed Forces stationed either in the
United States or abroad.

Inmates of institutions and persons under Ik years of
age are not covered in the regular monthly enumerations and are
excluded from the population and labor force statistics shown in
this report. Data on members of the Armed Forces, who are included as part of the categories "total noninstitutlonal population" and "total labor force," are obtained from the Department of Defense.

Not in Labor Force Includes all civilians 1^ years and
over who are not classified as employed or unemployed. These
persons are further classified as "engaged in own home housework," "in school," "unable to work" because of long-term physical or mental illness, and "other." The "other" group includes
for the most part retired persons, those reported as too old to
work, the voluntarily idle, and seasonal workers for whom the
survey week fell in an " o f f season and who were not reported as
unemployed. Persons doing only Incidental unpaid family work
(less than 15 hours) are also classified as not in the labor
force.

The sample for CPS is spread over 333 areas comprising 6kl counties and independent cities, with coverage in 50
States and the District of Columbia. At present, completed interviews are obtained each month from about 35,000 households.
There are about 1,500 additional sample households from which
Information should be collected but is not because the occupants are not found at home after repeated calls, are temporarily absent, or are unavailable for other reasons. This represents a nonlnterview rate for the survey of about k percent.
Part of the sample is changed each month. The rotation plan
provides for approximately three-fourths of the sample to be
common from one month to the next, and one-half to be common
with the same month a year ago.

Occupation; Industry, and Class of Worker apply to the
job held in the survey week. Persons with two or more jobs are
classified in the job at which they worked the greatest number
of hours during the survey week. The occupation and industry
groups used in data derived from the CPS household interviews
are defined as in the 1950 Census of Population. Information on
the detailed categories included in these groups is available
upon request.

CONCEPTS
Employed Persons comprise (a) all those who during
the survey week did any work at all either as paid employees, or
in their own business or profession, or on their own farm, or
who worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers on a farm or in a
business operated by a member of the family, and (b) all those
who were not working or looking for work but who had Jobs or
businesses from which they were temporarily absept because of
illness, bad weather, vacation, or labor-management dispute, or
because they were taking time off for various other reasons,
whether or not they were paid by their employers for the time off.




The Industrial classification system used in the Census
of Population and the Current Population Survey differs somewhat
from that used by the BLS in its reports on employment, by industry. Employment levels by industry from the household survey,
although useful for many analytical purposes, are not published
in order to avoid public misunderstanding since they differ from
the payroll series because of differences in classification,
sampling variability, and other reasons. The industry figures
from the household" survey are used as a base for published
distributions on hours of work, unemployment rates, and other

2-E

characteristic! of industry groups such as age, sex, and
occupation.

mortality, and migration between the United States and other
countries.

The class-of-worker breakdown specifies "wage and
salary workers," subdivided into private and government workers,
"self-employed workers," and "unpaid fanily workers." Wage and
salary workers receive wages, salary, commission, tips, or pay
in kind from a private employer or from a governmental unit.
Self-employed persons are those who work for profit or fees in
their own business, profession, or trade, or operate a farm.
Unpaid family workers are persons working without pay for 15
hours a week or more on a farm or in a business operated by a
member of the household to whom they are related by blood or
marriage.

3. Composite estimate procedure. In deriving statistics for a given month, a composite estimating procedure is
used which takes account of net changes from the previous month
for continuing parts of the sample (75 percent) as well as the
sample results for the current month. This procedure reduces
the sampling variability especially of month-to-month changes
but also of the levels for most items.

Hours of Work statistics relate to the actual number
of hours worked during the survey week. For example, a person
who normally works kO hours a week but who was off on the
Veterans Bay holiday would be reported as working 32 hours even
though he was paid for the holiday.
For persons working in more than one job, the figures
relate to the number of hours worked in all jobs during the
week. However, all the hours are credited to the major job.
Persons who worked 35 hours or more in the survey
week are designated as working "full time"; persons who worked
between 1 and 3* hours are designated as working "part time."
Part-time workers are classified by their usual status at their
present job (either full time or part time) and by their reason
for working part time during the survey week (economic or other
reasons). "Economic reasons" include: Slack work, material
shortages, repairs to plant or equipment, start or termination
of job during the week, and inability to find full-time work.
"Other reasons" include: Labor dispute, bad weather, own illness, vacation, demands of home housework, school, no desire for
full-time work and full-time worker only during peak season.

Seasonal Adjustment
The seasonal adjustment method used for unemployment
and other labor force series is a new adaptation of the standard
ratio-to-moving average method, with a provision for "moving"
adjustment factors to take account of changing seasonal patterns. A detailed description and illustration of the method
will be published later this year.
Seasonal adjustment factors for major components of
the labor force to be applied to data for 1958 and later
periods are shown in table A. Factors for broad age-sex groups
and for duration of unemployment categories will be included in
the 'publication cited in the preceding paragraph. In computing
these factors, the pre-1957 data were adjusted to reflect the
new definitions of employment and unemployment adopted in
January 1957. Seasonally adjusted aggregates for these series
for 19*7 to date are available on request.

Table A. Seasonal adjustment factors for the labor force and
major components, to be used for the period 1958-60

Month
ESTIMATING METHODS
The estimating procedure is essentially one of using
sample results to obtain percentages of the population in a
given category. The published estimates are then obtained by
multiplying these percentage distributions by Independent estimates of the population. The principle steps involved are shown
below. Under the estimation methods used in the CPS, all of the
results for a given month become available simultaneously and
are based on returns from the entire panel of respondents.
There are no subsequent adjustments to Independent benchmark
data on labor force,employment, or unemployment. Therefore, revisions of the historical data are not an inherent feature of
this statistical program.
1. Noninterview adjustment. The weights for all interviewed households are adjusted to the extent needed to
account for occupied sample households for which no Information
was obtained because of absence, Impassable roads, refusals, or
unavailability for other reasons. This adjustment is made separately by groups of sample areas and, within these, for six
groups--color (white and nonwhlte) within the three residence
categories (urban, rural nonfarm, and rural farm). The proportion of sample households not interviewed varies from 3 to 5
percent depending on weather, vacations, etc.

Jan...
97.7
98.0
Feb...
98A
Mar...
99.0
Apr...
May... 100.1
June.. 102. k
July.. 102.7
Aug... 101.8
Sept.. 100. k
Oct... 100.6
Nov... 100.0
Dec... 99.1

Unemployment
Employment
NonagriRate
AgriTotal cul- cultural Total Both
FeindusMales males
ture tries
sexes
96.9
97.0
97.7
98.6
100.1
101.8
102.*
102.3
101.2
101.8
100.5
99.*

98.6
98.7
99.0
99.2
99.5
100.0
100.7
101.3
100.2
100.7
97-* 100.9
85.O 101.0

81.3
81.8
86.2
93.6
106.0
118.2
117.9
111.1
109.9
112.0

11*. 2
116.3
111.1
103.1
99.*

113.2
105.0
91.2
83.9
78.8
90.0
93.5

116.7
118.6
112.9
104.1
99.2
lio A
102.3
89.5
83.5
78.2
89.9
9*.*

108.2
105.2
99.3
97-7
102. k
118.6
97.* 111.0
8k.6 98.6
77.8 9*.o
7*.8 84.3
86.2 96.6
99.6 84.2

121.6
125.9
120.0
107.7
97.7
106.2

In evaluating deviations from the seasonal pattern—
that is, changes in a seasonally adjusted series—it is important to note that seasonal adjustment is merely an approximation based on past experience. Seasonally adjusted estimates
have a broader margin of possible error than the original data
on which they are based, since they are subject not only to
sampling and other errors but, in addition, are affected by the
uncertainties of the seasonal adjustment process itself.

2. Ratio estimates. The distribution of the population selected for the sample may differ somewhat, by chance,
from that of the Nation as a whole, in such characteristics as
age, color, sex, and residence. Since these population characteristics are closely correlated with labor force participation
and other principal measurements made from the sample, the
latter estimates can be substantially Improved when weighted
appropriately by the known distribution of these population
characteristics. This is accomplished through two stages of
ratio estimates as follows:

Reliability of the Estimates
Since the estimates are based on a sample, they may
differ from the figures that would have been obtained if it
were possible to take a complete census using the same schedules and procedures.
The standard error is a measure of sampling variability, that is, the variations that might occur by chance because
only a sample of the population is surveyed. The chances are
about two out of three that an estimate from the sample would
differ from a complete census by less than the standard error.
The chances are about 19 out of 20 that the difference would be
less than twice the standard error.

a. First-stage ratio estimate. This is the procedure in which the sample proportions are weighted by the
known 1950 Census data on the color-residence distribution of
the population. This step takes Into account the differences
existing at the time of the 1950 Census between the colorresidence distribution for the Ration and for the sample areas.

Table B shows the average standard error for the major
employment status categories, by sex, computed from data for 12
recent months. Estimates of change derived from the survey are
also subject to sampling variability. The standard error of
change for consecutive months is also shown in table B. The
standard errors of level shown in table B are acceptable approximations of the standard errors of year-to-year change.

b. Second-stage ratio estimate. In this step,
the sample proportions are weighted by independent current estimates of the population by age, sex, and color. These estimates
are prepared by carrying forward the most recent census data
(1950) to take account of subsequent aging of the population,




Civilian
labor
force

3-E

as the standard error of the monthly level in table D, i t may
be seen that the standard error of the 500,000 increase is
about 135,000.

Table B. Average standard error of major employment
status categories
(in thousands)

Table D. Standard error of estimates of
month-to-month change

Average standard error o f —
Employment status
and sex

Monthly level

Month-tomonth change
(consecutive
months only)

BOTH SEXES

(In thousands)
Standard error of month-tomonth change
Standard error of monthly level

Labor force and total employment.
Agriculture
I onagri cultural employment
f
Unemployment

180
120
180
100

250
200
300
100

10,000..
25,000..
50,000..
100,000.
150,000.
200,000.
250,000.
300,000.

MALE
120
180
200
75

90
90
120
90

180
75
180
65

Labor force and total employment.
Agriculture
Honagricultural employment
Unemployment

150
55

All estimates
except those
relating to
agri cultural

Estimates
relating to
agricultural
employment

employment
12
26
k8

35
70
100
110

90
130
160
190
220

FEMALE
Labor force and total employment.
Agriculture
Konagricultural employment
Unemployment

120

65

The figures presented in table C are to be used for
other characteristics and are approximations of the standard
errors of all such characteristics. They should be interpreted
as providing an indication of the order of magnitude of the
standard errors rather than as the precise standard error for
any specific item.

The reliability of an estimated percentage, computed
by using sample data for both numerator and denominator depends
upon both the size of the percentage and the size of the total
upon vhich the percentage is based. Where the numerator is a
subclass of the denominator, estimated percentages are relatively more reliable than the corresponding absolute estimates
of the numerator of the percentage, particularly if the percentage is large (50 percent or greater). Table E shows the
standard errors for percentages derived from the survey.
Linear interpolation may be used for percentages and base figures not shown in table E.
Table E.

Standard error of percentages

Table C. Standard error of level of monthly estimates
(In thousands)
Size of estimate

Total
or
vhite

10,000
50 000
100,000
250,000
500 000
1,000,000
2,500,000
5,000,000
10,000,000
20,000,000
30^000,000
ko,000,000

Nonvhite
5

5
11
15
2*
3^
k&

Ik
21
30
ko

75
100

50
50

Uo
180
210
220

10

Total
or
vhite

Konvhite

7
Ik
20
31
k3
60

Ik
21
30
*0

90

50

110
3A0
150

5

10

Total
or
white
5
10
Ik
22
31
*5
70
100
130
170

150

Nonwhite
5

10
Ik
21
30
ko

Illustration: Assume that the tables shoved the total
number of persons working a specific number of hours, as
15,000,000, an increase of 500,000 over the previous month.
Linear interpolation in the first column of table C shows that
the standard error of 15,000,000 is about 160,000. Consequently,
the chances are about 68 out of 100 that the figure vhich would
have been obtained from a complete count of the number of persons working the given number of hours would have differed by
less than 160,000 from the sample estimate. Using the 160,000

250

500

1,000

2,000

3,000

1.0

0.8

0.3
.k

0.2

1.1

0.6
.8
1.2
1.7

o.k

l.k
2.2
3.0
3-5
k.O
k.2
k.7
k.9

1 or 99
2 or 98
5 or 95
10 or 90
15 or 85
20 or 80
25 or 75....
35 or 65....
50

50

The standard error of the change in an item from one
month to the next month is more closely related to the standard
error of the monthly level for that item than to the size of the
specific month-to-month change itself. Thus, in order to use
the approximations to the standard errors of month-to-month
changes as presented in table D, it is first necessary to obtain
the standard error of the monthly level of the item in table C,
and then find the standard error of the month-to-month change in
table D corresponding to this standard error of level. It
should be noted that table D applies to estimates of change between 2 consecutive months. For changes between the current
uonth and the same month last year, the standard errors of level
shown in table C are acceptable approximations.




Base of percentage (thousands)

Estimated
Female

Male

Both sexes

1.7
2.3
2.8
3.1

2.0
2.2

3*7
39

Z.k
£.6
2.8
25,000

50,000

0.2
.2

.k
•5

.6
.7
.8
.8
•
9

.6

l.k
1.6
1.7
1.9
1-9

j5;00Q' 10,000
1 or 99
2 or 98
5 or 95
10 or 90
15 or 85
20 or 80
25 or 75....
35 or 65....
50

.5
.9

0.1
.2

•
3
.k
.
V
.
5
.
5

.6
.
6

0.1
.1
.2
.2

.3
•3
•
3
.k
.k

1.2

.8
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3

l.k

•3
•5

.7
.6

.
9

1.0
l.l
l.l

75,000

0.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2

•3
•3

0.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

ESTABLISHMENT DATA
COLLECTION
Payroll reports provide current information on wage
and salary employment, hours, earnings, and labor turnover in
nonfarm establishments, by geographic location.
Federal-State Cooperation
Under cooperative arrangements with State agencies,
the respondent fills out only 1 employment or labor turnover
schedule, vhich is then used for national, State, and area
estimates. This eliminates duplicate reporting on the part of
respondents and, together vith the use of identical techniques
at the national and State levels, ensures maximum geographic
comparability of estimates.

Labor Turnover

State agencies mail the forms to the establishments
and examine the returns for consistency, accuracy, and completeness. The States use the information to prepare State and
area series and then send the data to the BLS for use in preparing the national series. The BLS and the Bureau of Employment Security jointly finance the current employment statistics
program in 1 3 States, the turnover program in 1 1 States.
*
*

Labor turnover reports are received from approximately
10,500 establishments in the manufacturing, mining, and communication industries (see table below). The following manufacturing industries are excluded from the labor turnover sample:
Printing, publishing, and allied industries (since April 19^3);
canning and preserving fruits, vegetables, and sea foods;
women's and misses' outerwear; and fertilizer.

Shuttle Schedules

Approximate size and coverage of BLS labor turnover
sample used in computing national rates

The Form BLS 790 is used to collect employment, payroll, and man-hours data, Form 1219 labor turnover data. Both
schedules are of the "shuttle" type, with space for each month
of the calendar year.

Industry

The BLS 790 provides for entry of data on the number
of full- and part-time workers on the payrolls of nonagricultural establishments for the pay period ending nearest the 15th
of each month. The labor turnover schedule provides for the
collection of information on the total number of accessions and
separations, by type, during the calendar month.

Manufacturing
Durable goods
Nondurable goods.
Metal mining
Coal mining:
Anthracite
Bituminous
Communication:

INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION
Establishments are classified into industries on the
basis of their principal product or activity determined from information on annual sales volume. This information is collected
each year on a product supplement to the monthly 790 or 1219 report. In the case of an establishment making more than one
product or engaging in more than one activity, the entire employment of the establishment is included under the Industry
indicated by the most important product or activity.

Telephone
Telegraph

Number of
establishments in
sample

Employees
Number in
sample

Percent
of total

10,200
6,1*00
3,800
120

5,99*,000
l*,199,OOO
1,795,000
57,000

39
*3
32
53

20
200

6,000
71,000

19
32

661,000
28,000

88
65

1/ Does not apply.

CONCEPTS
Industry Employment

Prior to publication of State and area data for
January 1959, all national, State, and area employment, hours,
earnings, and labor turnover series were classified in accordance with the following documents: (1) For manufacturing,
Standard Industrial Classification Manual, Volume I, Bureau of
the Budget, 19^5, and (2) for nonmanufacturing, Industrial
Classification Code, Social Security Board, 19**2. Beginning
with January 1959 (with an overlap for 1958), State and area
series are classified under the revised Standard Industrial
Classification Manual published in 1957. The national industry
statistics will be converted to the 1957 SIC early in 1961.

Employment data for all except Federal Government
refer to persons on establishment payrolls who received pay for
any part of the pay period ending nearest the 15th of the month.
For Federal Government establishments, current data generally
refer to persons who received pay for the last day of the month.
The data exclude proprietors, the self-employed, unpaid family workers, farm workers, and domestic workers in
households. Salaried officers of corporations are included.
Government employment covers only civilian employees; Federal
military personnel are shown separately, but their number is
excluded from total nonagricultural employment.

COVERAGE

Persons on an establishment payroll who are on paid
sick leave (when pay is received directly from the firm), paid
holiday, or paid vacation, or who work during a part of the pay
period and are unemployed or on strike during the rest of the
period, are counted as empldyed. Persons are not counted as
employed who are laid off, on leave without pay, or on strike
for the entire period, or who are hired but do not report to
work during the period.

Employment, Hours, and Earnings
Monthly reports on employment and, for most industries, payroll and man-hours are obtained from approximately
l80,000 establishments. The table below shows the approximate
proportion of total employment in each industry division
covered by the group of establishments furnishing monthly employment data. The coverage for individual industries within
the division may vary from the proportions shown.

Benchmark Adjustments
Approximate size and coverage of BLS employment
and payrolls sample 1/

Industry division

Mining
Contract construction
Manufacturing
Transportation and public
utilities: Interstate
railroads (ICC)
Other transportation and
public utilities
Wholesale and retail trade..
Finance, insurance, and
real estate
Service and miscellaneous...
Government:
Federal (Civil Service
Commission) 2/
State and local

Number of
establishments in
sample
3,500
22,000
1*3,900

Employment estimates are periodically compared with
complete counts of employment in the various industries defined
as nonagricultural, and appropriate adjustments made as indicated by the total counts or benchmarks. The comparison made
for the first 3 months of 1957, the last benchmark adjustment,
resulted in changes amounting to 0.5 percent of all nonagricultural employment, identical with the extent of the adjustment
to the first quarter 1956 benchmark. The changes were less
than 0.5 percent for three of the eight major industry divisions; under 2 percent for two other divisions; and 3.2, 3.3,
and 6.k percent for the remaining three divisions. The manufacturing total was changed by only 0.1 percent for the second
successive year. Within manufacturing, the benchmark and estimate differed by 1.0 percent or less in 39 of the 132 individual industries, 1 1 industries were adjusted by 1.1 to 2.5 per*
cent, and an additional 27 industries differed by 2.6-5.0
percent. One significant cause of differences between the
benchmark and estimate is the change in industrial classification of individual firms, which is usually not reflected in BLS
estimates until they are adjusted to new benchmarks. Other
causes are sampling and response errors.

Employees
Number in
sample

Percent
of total

393,000
860,000
11,779,000

*7
26
69

1,152,000

97

15,700
65,100

1,693,000
2,2M*,000

57
20

12,900
11,1*00

757,000
8i*8,ooo

33
13

5,800

2,196,000
3,11*8,000

100
63

The basic sources of benchmark information are the
quarterly tabulations of employment data, by industry, compiled
by State agencies from reports of establishments covered under
State unemployment insurance laws. These tabulations are prepared under Bureau of Employment Security direction. Supplementary tabulations prepared by the U.S. Bureau of Old Age and
Survivors Insurance are used for the group of establishments
exempt from State unemployment insurance laws because of their

1/ Since some firms do not report payroll and man-hour information, hours and earnings estimates may be based on a slightly
smaller sample than employment estimates.
2/ State and area estimates of Federal employment are based or
2,300 reports covering 1,1*30,000 employees, collected through
the BLS-State cooperative program.




5-E

low-paid work and changes in workers' earnings in individual
establishments also affect the general earnings averages.
Averages for groups and divisions further reflect changes in
average hourly earnings for individual industries.

small Bite. Benchmarks for Industries wholly or partly excluded from the unemployment insurance lavs are derived from a
variety of other sources.
The BLS estimates relating to the benchmark quarter
(the first quarter of the year) are compared vith the new
benchmark levels, industry by industry. Where revisions are
necessary, the monthly estimates are adjusted between the new
benchmark and the preceding one. The new benchmark for each industry is then projected to the current month by use of the
sample trends. Under this procedure, the benchmark is used to
establish the level of employment while the sample is used to
measure the month-to-month changes in the level.

Averages of hourly earnings differ from wage rates.
Earnings are the actual return to the worker for a stated
period or time, while rates are the amounts stipulated1 for a
given unit of work or time. The earnings series, however, does
not measure the level of total labor costs on the part of the
employer since the following are excluded: Irregular bonuses.,
retroactive items, payments of various welfare benefits, payroll taxes paid by employers, and earnings for those employees
not covered under the production-worker or nonsupervisoryemployee definitions.

Seasonal Adjustment

Gross average weekly earnings are derived by multiplying average weekly hoars by average hourly earnings. Therefore, weekly earnings are affected not only by changes in gross
average hourly earnings, but also by changes in the length of
the workweek, part-time work, stoppages for varying causes,
labor turnover, and absenteeism.

Employment series for many industries reflect a regularly recurring seasonal movement which can be measured on the
basis of past experience. By eliminating that part of the
change in employment which can be ascribed to usual seasonal
variation, it is possible to clarify the cyclical and other nonseasonal movements in the series. Seasonally adjusted employment aggregates are published. These estimates are derived by
the use of factors based on free-hand adjustments of 12-month
moving averages. Seasonal factors are available on request.

Average Weekly Hours
The workweek information relates to the average hours
for which pay was received, and is different from standard or
scheduled hours. Such factors as absenteeism, labor turnover,
part-tint work, and stoppages cause average weekly hours to be
lower than scheduled hours of work for an establishment. Group
averages further reflect changes in the workweek of component
industries.

Industry Hours and Earnings
Hours and earnings data are derived from reports of
payrolls and man-hours for production and related workers or
nonsupervisory employees. These terms are defined below. When
the pay period reported is longer than 1 week, the figures are
reduced to a weekly basis.

Average Overtime Hours
Production and Related Workers include working foremen and all nonsupervisory workers (including leadmen and
trainees) engaged in fabricating, processing, assembling, inspection, receiving, storage, handling, packing, warehousing,
shipping, maintenance, repair, janitorial and watchman services,
product development, auxiliary production for plant's own use
(e.g., power plant), and recordkeeplng and other services
closely associated with the above production operations.

The overtime hours represent that portion of the
gross average weekly hours which were in excess of regular
hours and for which premium payments were made. If an employee
works on a paid holiday at regular rates, receiving as total
compensation his holiday pay plus straight-tine pay for hours
worked that day, no overtime hours would be reported.
Since overtime hours are premium hours by definition,
the gross weekly hours and overtime hours do not necessarily
move in the same direction from month to month; for example,
premiums may be paid for hours in excess of the straight-time
workday although less than a full week is worked. Diverse
trends on the industry-group level may also be caused by a
marked change in gross hours for a component industry where
little or no overtime was worked in both the previous and current months. In addition, such factors as stoppages, absenteeism, and labor turnover may not have the same influence on
overtime hours as on gross hours.

Nonsupervisory Employees include employees (not above
the working supervi sory leve1) such as office and clerical
workers, repairmen, salespersons, operators, drivers, attendants, service employees, linemen, laborers, janitors, watchmen,
and similar occupational levels, and other employees whose
services are closely associated with those of the employees
listed.
Payroll covers the payroll for full- and part-time
production, construction, or nonsupervisory workers who received pay for any part of the pay period ending nearest the
15th of the month. The payroll is reported before deductions
of any kind, e.g., old-age and unemployment Insurance, group
insurance, withholding tax, bonds, and union dues; also included is pay for overtime, holidays, vacations, and sick leave
paid directly by the firm. Bonuses (unless earned and paid
regularly each pay period), other pay not earned in pay period
reported (e.g., retroactive pay), and the value of free rent,
fuel, meal8, or other payment in kind are excluded.

Spendable Average Weekly Earnings
Spendable average weekly earnings in current dollars
are obtained by deducting estimated Federal social security and
income taxes from gross weekly earnings. The amount of income
tax liability depends on the number of dependents supported by
the worker, as well as on the level of his gross income. To
reflect these variables, spendable earnings are computed for
two types of income receivers—a worker with no dependents, and
a worker with three dependents. The computations are based on
the gross average weekly earnings for all production and related workers in manufacturing, mining, or contract construction without regard to marital status, family composition, or
total family income.

Man-Hours cover man-hours worked or paid for, during
the pay period ending nearest the 15th of the month, for production, construction, and nonsupervisory workers. The manhours include hours paid for holidays and vacations, and for
sick leave when pay is received directly from the firm.

"Real" earnings are computed by dividing the current
Consumer Price Index into the earnings average for the current
month. The resulting level of earnings expressed in 19^7-^9
dollars is thus adjusted for changes in purchasing power since
the base period.

Overtime Hours cover premium overtime hours of production and related workers during the pay period ending
nearest the. 15th of the month. Overtime hours are those for
which premiums were paid because the hours were in excess of
the number of hours of either the straight-time workday or
workweek. Weekend and holiday hours are included only if premium wage rates were paid. Hours for which only shift differential, hazard, incentive, or other similar types of premiums
were paid are excluded.

Average Hourly Earnings Excluding Overtime
Average hourly earnings excluding premium overtime
pay are computed by dividing the total production-worker payroll for the industry group by the sum of total productionworker man-hours and one-half of total overtime man-hours.
Prior to January 1956, data were based on the application of
adjustment factors to gross average hourly earnings (as
described in the Monthly Labor Review, May 1950, pp. 537-5^0).
Both methods eliminate only the earnings due to overtime paid
for at one and one-half times the straight-time rates. No adjustment is made for other premium payment provisions, such as

Gross Average Hourly and Weekly Earnings
Average hourly earnings for manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries are on a "gross" basis, reflecting not
only changes in basic hourly and incentive wage rates, but also
such variable factors as premium pay for overtime and late-shift
work, and changes in output of workers paid on an incentive
plan. Employment shifts between relatively high-paid and




6-E

holiday work, late-shift work, and overtime ratea other than
time and one-half.

employment because of discharge, permanent disability, death,
retirement, transfers to another establishment of the company,
and entrance into the Armed Forces expected to last more than
30 consecutive calendar days.

Indexes of Aggregate Weekly Payrolls and Man-Houra

Accessions are the total number of permanent and temporary additions to the employment roll including both new and
rehired employees.

The indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls and nan-hours
are prepared by dividing the current Month's aggregate by the
monthly average for the 19^7-^9 period. The Man-hour aggregates
are the product of average weekly hours and production-worker
employment, and the payroll aggregates are the product of gross
average weekly earnings and production-worker employment.

Hew hires are temporary or permanent additions to the
employment roll of former employees not recalled by the employer, or persons who have never before been employed in the
establishment, except for those transferred from other establishments of the company.

Railroad Hours and Earnings
The figures for Class I railroads (excluding switching
and terminal companies) are based on monthly data summarized in
the M-300 report of the Interstate Commerce Commission and relate to all employees who received pay during the month except
executives, officials, and staff assistants (ICC Group I ) .
Gross average hourly earnings are computed by dividing total
compensation by total hours paid for. Average weekly hours are
obtained by dividing the total number of hours paid for, reduced
to a weekly basis, by the number of employees, as defined above.
Gross average weekly earnings are derived by multiplying average
weekly hours by average hourly earnings.

Other accessions, which are not published separately
but are included in total accessions, are all additions to the
employment roll which are not classified as new hires.
Comparability With Employment Series

Month-to-month changes in total employment in manufacturing industries reflected by labor turnover rates are not
comparable with the changes shown in the Bureau's employment
series for the following reasons: (1) Accessions and separations are computed for the entire calendar month; the employment reports refer to the pay period ending nearest the 15th of
the month; (2) the turnover sample excludes certain industries
(see Coverage, p. 5-E); (3) plants on strike are not Included in
the turnover computations beginning with the month the strike
starts through the month the workers return; the Influence of
such stoppages is reflected, however, in the employment figures.

Labor Turnover
Labor turnover is the gross movement of wage and
salary workers into and out of employment status with respect to
individual establishments. This movement, which relates to a
calendar month, is divided into two broad types: Accessions
(new hires and rehires) and separations (terminations of employment initiated by either employer or employee). Each type of
action is cumulated for a calendar month and expressed as a rate
per 100 employees. The data relate to all employees, whether
full- or part-time, permanent or temporary, including executive,
office, sales, other salaried personnel, and production workers.
Transfers to another establishment of the company are included
beginning with January 1959.

STATISTICS FOR STATES A N D AREAS

Separations are terminations of employment during the
calendar month and are classified according to cause: Quits,
layoffs, and other separations, as defined below.

State and area employment, hours, earnings, and labor
turnover data are collected and prepared by State agencies in
cooperation with BLS. Additional industry detail may be obtained from the State agencies listed on the inside back cover.
These statistics are based on the same establishment reports
used by BLS for preparing national estimates. For employment,
the sum of the State figures may differ slightly from the
equivalent official U.S. totals because of differences in the
timing of benchmark adjustments, slightly varying methods of
computation, and, since January 1959, a different classification system. (See Industrial Classification, p. 5-E.)

Quits are terminations of employment initiated by
employees, failure to report after being hired, and unauthorized
absences, if on the last day of the month the person has been
absent more than 7 consecutive calendar days.

For Alaska and Hawaii, satisfactory employment
estimates cannot be derived by subtracting the U.S. totals
without Alaska and Hawaii from the totals including the 2 new
States.

ESTIMATING METHODS

Layoffs are suspensions without pay lasting or expected to last more than 7 consecutive calendar days, initiated
by the employer without prejudice to the worker.

The procedures used for estimating industry employment, hours, earnings, and labor turnover statistics are summarized in the following table. Details are given in the
appropriate technical notes, which are available on request.

Other separations, which are not published separately
but are included in total separations, are terminations of




7-E

Summary of Methods for Computing Industry Statistics
on Employment, Hours, Earnings, and Labor Turnover
Item

Individual Manufacturing and
nonnanufacturing Industrie!

Total nonagricultural divisions,
major groups, and groups

Monthly Data
All employees

All-employee estimate for previous month
multiplied by ratio of all employees in
current month to all employees in previous
month, for sample establishments which reported for both months.

Sum of all-employee estimates for component
industries.

Production or
nonsupervisory workers;
Women employees

All-employee estimate for current month
multiplied by (1) ratio of production or
nonsupervisory workers to all employees
in sample establishments for current month,
(2) ratio of women to all employees.

Sum of production- or nonsupervisory-worker
estimates, or women estimates, for component
industries.

Gross average weekly hours

Production- or nonsupervisory-worker man-hours
divided by number of production or nonsupervisory workers.

Average, weighted by production- or
nonsupervisory-worker employment, of the
average weekly hours for component Industries.

Average weekly overtime
hours

Production-worker overtime man-hours
divided by number of production workers.

Average, weighted by production-worker employment, of the average weekly overtime hours for
component industries.

Gross average hourly
earnings

Total production- or nonsupervisory-worker
payroll divided by total production- or
nonsupervisory-worker man-hours.

Average, weighted by aggregate man-hours, of
the average hourly earnings for component
industries.

Gross average weekly
earnings

Product of gross average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

Product of gross average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

Labor turnover rates
(total, men, and women)

The number of particular actions (e.g.,
quits) in reporting firms divided by total
employment in those firms. The result is
multiplied by 100. For men (or women), the
number of men (women) who quit is divided by
the total number of men (women) employed.

Average, weighted by employment, of the rates
for component industries.

Annual Average Data
All employees and production or nonsupervisory
workers

Sum of monthly estimates divided by 12.

Sum of monthly estimates divided by 12.

Gross average weekly hours

Annual total of aggregate man-hours (production- or nonsupervisory-worker employment
multiplied by average weekly hours) divided
by annual sum of employment.

Average, weighted by production- or
nonsupervisory-worker employment, of the
annual averages of weekly hours for component
industries.

Average weekly overtime
hours

Annual total of aggregate overtime man-hours
(production-worker employment multiplied by
average weekly overtime hours) divided by
annual sum of employment.

Average, weighted by production-worker employment, of the annual averages of weekly overtime
hours for component industries.

Gross average hourly
earnings

Annual total of aggregate payrolls (product!onor nonsupervisory-worker employment multiplied
by weekly earnings) divided by annual aggregate
man-hours.

Average, weighted by aggregate man-hours, of
the annual averages of hourly earnings for
component industries.

Gross average weekly
earnings

Product of gross average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

Product of gross average weekly hours and
average hourly earnings.

Labor turnover rates

Sum of monthly rates divided by 12.

Sum of monthly rates divided by 12.




8-E

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics
COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES
Employment and Labor Turnover Statistics Programs

ALABAMA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO*
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
IDAHO
ILLINOIS*
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN*
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY*
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO*
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA*
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH*
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN*
WYOMING*

-Department of Industrial Relations, Montgomery 4.
-Unemployment Compensation Division, Employment Security Commission, Phoenix.
-Employment Security Division, Department of Labor, Little Rock.
-Division of Labor Statistics and Research, Department of Industrial Relations,
San Francisco 1 (Employment). Research and Statistics, Department of Employment,
Sacramento 14 (Turnover).
-U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Denver 2.
-Employment Security Division, Department of Labor, Hartford 15.
-Unemployment Compensation Commission, Wilmington 99.
-U. S. Employment Service for D. C. , Washington 25.
-Industrial Commission, Tallahassee.
-Employment Security Agency, Department of Labor, Atlanta 3.
-Employment Security Agency, Boise.
-Division of Unemployment Compensation and State Employment Service,
Department of Labor, Chicago 6.
-Employment Security Division, Indianapolis 4.
-Employment Security Commission, Des Moines 8.
-Employment Security Division, Department of Labor, Topeka.
-Bureau of Employment Security, Department of Economic Security, Frankfort.
-Division of Employment Security, Department of Labor, Baton Rouge 4.
-Employment Security Commission, Augusta.
-Department of Employment Security, Baltimore 1.
-Division of Statistics, Department of Labor and Industries, Boston 16 (Employment).
Research and Statistics, Division of Employment Security, Boston 15 (Turnover).
-Employment Security Commission, Detroit 2.
-Department of Employment Security, St. Paul 1,
-Employment Security Commission, Jackson.
-Division of Employment Security, Jefferson City.
-Unemployment Compensation Commission, Helena.
-Division of Employment Security, Department of Labor, Lincoln 1.
-Employment Security Department, Carson City.
-Department of Employment Security, Concord.
-Bureau of Statistics and Records, Department of Labor and Industry, Trenton 25.
-Employment Security Commission, Albuquerque.
-Bureau of Research and Statistics, Division of Employment, State Department of Labor,
500 Eighth Avenue, New York 18.
-Division of Statistics, Department of Labor, Raleigh (Employment). Bureau of Research
and Statistics, Employment Security Commission, Raleigh (Turnover).
-Unemployment Compensation Division, Workmen1 s Compensation Bureau, Bismarck.
-Division of Research and Statistics, Bureau of Unemployment Compensation, Columbus 16.
-Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma City 2.
-Department of Employment, Salem.
-Bureau of Employment Security, Department of Labor and Industry, Harrisburg.
-Division of Statistics and Census, Department of Labor, Providence 3 (Employment).
Department of Employment Security, Providence 3 (Turnover).
-Employment Security Commission, Columbia 1.
-Employment Security Department, Aberdeen.
-Department of Employment Security, Nashville 3.
-Employment Commission, Austin 1.
-Department of Employment Security, Industrial Commission, Salt Lake City 10.
-Unemployment Compensation Commission, Montpelier.
-Division of Research and Statistics, Department of Labor and Industry, Richmond 14 (Employment).
Employment Commission, Richmond 11 (Turnover).
-Employment Security Department, Olympia.
-Department of Employment Security, Charleston 5.
-Unemployment Compensation Department, Industrial Commission, Madison 1.
-Employment Security Commission, Casper.

•Employment statistics program only.





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102