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EMPLOYMENT
and E A R N I N G S
D EC EM B ER 1958

V o l. 5 No. 6

D IV IS IO N O F M AN PO W ER A N D EM PLOYM ENT STATISTICS
Seymour L. W olfbein, Chief

CONTENTS

Page

Article

EMPLOYMENT IN

Ch an gin g Sh ares of Job s A m ong N onm anufacturing
Industries Since W orld W ar IL .................. ......... *.............

NOKMANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...
Total nonfarm

employment Increased

more than

25

percent between 1946

and 1957>

but

ill

the

gain

was

not

uniform among component industries.

Charts
The Aircraft and Parts Industry, Annual Average 19U7-U7......

xv

Average Weekly Earnings of Factory Production Workers Or osa, Net Spendable, and "Real” Net Spendable** .............

35

Employment H ighlights-N ovem ber 1958.........**••••..............

xvi

This article, the third in a series
analyzing this
ship of

shifting

employment

industries,

relation­

among

nonfarm

deals with nonmanufac­

turing industries*

See pages iii-

xiv*

NEW AREA SERIES...
Manufacturing labor

turnover rates

for Louisiana, Mississippi, and the
Jackson,

Miss.,

metropolitan area

are now shown in table B-3.

For sale by the Superintendent of
Documents, U. S. Government Print­
ing Office, Washington 25, D. C.
Subscription prices $3*50 a year;
$1.50 additional for foreign mail­
ing. Single copies vary in price.
This issue is 45 cents*




STATISTICAL TABLES
A-Em ploym ent
A- 1: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division (November 1958)......... ........... .
A- 2: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division and selected groups (November 1958)•*•••••••••
A- 3 1 Production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (November 1958)............. *.......... .
A- 4.: Index of employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division (November 1958).*...............
A- 55 Index of production workers in manufacturing, by major
industry group (November 1958).......... ...............
A- 6s Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division, seasonally adjusted (November 1958).***•••*••
A- 7? Employees in manufacturing, ty major industry group,
seasonally adjusted (November 1958)..............*.....
A- 8s Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by
industry (October 1958)**.****.*****..... .*•••........
A- 9s Employees in private and Government shipyards, by
region (October 1958)******.••••••*•.•••••••••«••*•«•••
A-10: Federal military personnel (October 1958)*....... .*••••
A-ll: Employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry
division and State (October 1958)**••••••••••*•••••••••
A-12s Employees in nonagricultural establishments for selected
areas, by industry division (October 1958).... *......

Continued next page

1

2
3

U
U
5
5
6

12
12
13
16

EMPLOYMENT
and E A R N I N G S

T h e n a t i o n a l em p lo ym e n t f i g u r e s show n
in t h is

CONTENTS - Continued

r e p o r t h a ve been a d ju s t e d t o

f i r s t q u a r t e r 1957

b e n c h m a rk l e v e l s *

Page

B -Labor Turnover
B-l: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing (October 1958)
B-2: Labor turnover rates, by industry (October 1958)*...
B-3* Labor turnover rates in manufacturing for selected
States and areas (September 1958).... ••••••••••••*

27
28
32

C -H o u rs and Earnings

EX PLA N A TO R Y NOTES

A

b r i e f o u t l i n e o f t h e c o n c e p t s » m eth ­

o d o lo g y , an d s o u r c e s u s e d i n p r e p a r in g
d a t a show n i n t h i s p u b l i c a t i o n a p p e a r s
i n t h e A n n u a l S u p p le m e n t I s s u e * S i n g l e
c o p ie s o f t h e E x p l a n a t o r y R o t e s m ay b e
o b t a in e d fro m t h e U . S . D e p a r tm e n t
La b o r,

B u re a u ,

D iv is io n o f

of

Labor

M anpower

and

of

S t a t is t ic s ,

C-l* Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manu­
facturing, by major industry group (November 1958)•*.*••
C-2 1 Gross average weekly hours and average overtime hours of
production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (November 1958)...........*....... *...............
C-3* Indexes of aggregate weekly man-hours in industrial and
construction activities (November 1958).••••••....... .
C-4* Indexes of aggregate weekly payrolls in industrial and
construction activities (November 1958)••••••••••...... .
C-5* Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory
workers, by industry (October 1958).....................
C-6: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable, of
production or construction workers in selected industry
divisions, in current and 1947-49 dollars (October 1958)
C-7* Average hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime of
production workers in manufacturing, by major industry
group (October 1958)........................ ............
C-8: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manu­
facturing, by State and selected areas (October 1958).••

E m p lo y m e n t

S t a t i s t i c s , W a s h in g t o n 2 5 , D* C .

See

p a g * 55.




List of—
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR'S
BLS REGIONAL OFFICES
Page 56
COOPERATING STATE AGENCIES
Inside back cover

■
Prepared under the supervision of Jeanette G. Siegel

M H

36
37
38
38
39
48
49
50

Changing Shares of Jobs Among Nonmanufacturing
Industries Since World W a r E
Rudolph

C. M e n d e l s s o h n

This is the third in a series of articles which explore the shifting re­
lationship of employment among nonfarm industries.
For the general background,
see America's Changing Job Sources (in Employment and Earnings, November 1957).
A detailed analysis of relative employment trends in manufacturing appeared in
The Declining Share of Nonfarm Jobs in Factories, 1946-57 (in Employment and
Earnings, September 1958). Reprints of the earlier articles are available on
request.
America's economic growth from 1946 through
1957 added more than 10 million nonfarm wage
and salaried jobs to* the 40 million at the
end of World War II— -an increase of more than
25 percent. However, not all industries shared
p r o p o r t i o n a t e l y in this increase, since a
relatively larger share accrued to 5 of 7 non­
manufacturing industries— construction; trade;
finance, insurance, and real estate; service;
and government. On the other hand, in 2 non­
manufacturing industries — mining, and trans­
portation and public util ities — job shares
declined (chart 1).
The post-World War II patterns of relative
employment change in nonmanufacturing indus­
tries are mainly extensions of trends which
were established at least as early as the end
of World War I, but which were interrupted by
the depression of the 1930’ and World War II.
s
The increase of nonproduction workers, in
relation to total factory e m p loyment found
throughout manufacturing industries, is also
clearly evident in the nonmanufacturing in­
dustries for which data are published in E m ­
ployment and Earnings (table 1). Figures for
n o n p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s a v a i l a b l e o n l y for
public utilities (other than transportation
and communication), contract construction,
and similar workers in wholesale and retail
trade, show that the shares of job opportuni­
ties for these w o r k e r s h a v e a d v a n c e d more
swiftly than total industry employment, while
nonproduction workers in the mining division
are declining less rapidly than total indus­
try employment.




M in i n g

Among broadly classified nonagricultural
industries, only mining has recorded a de­
clining employment level during the post-World
II period in addition to a shrinking share of
n o n f a r m employment.
The p a t t e r n for the
mining industry, however, is a composite of
widely disparate movements among several of
the industry's component groups (chart 2).
On the one hand, the two coal mining indus­
tries — b ituminous and a n t h r a c i t e — removed
large numbers of miners from payrolls during
the period; in contrast, the additions to the
work force in the crude-petroleum and naturalgas production industry were so sizable that
a substantial expansion in nonfarm job shares
resulted.
Indeed, the c r u d e -petroleum and
nâtural-gas production industry became the
p r e d o m i n a n t job source in mining, when in
1954 it surpassed the combined coal industries
in number of workers.
In 1947, the p r o d u c ­
tion of coal e m p l o y e d s l i g h t l y m o r e than
500.000 workers on the average compared with
2 3 7 . 0 0 0 in crude p e t r o l e u m ; by 1957, the
standings were substantially reversed — 326,000
w orkers in crude petroleum, c o m p a r e d with
258.000 in coal (table 2).
And, while the
share of nonfarm employment in coal shrank by
half, from over 1.0 percent to about 0.5 per­
cent over the same period, the share of such
employment in petroleum expanded from slightly
less than 0.6 percent to a little more than
that figure.
The severe contraction of the coal mining
work force reflects primarily the effect of

iii

0.2 to 0.05 percent of nonfarm workers, con­
trasted with a reduction from 1.0 to 0.4 pe r ­
cent in bituminous mining.
The contrast in
employment decline is also reflected in pro­
duction figures — anthracite tonnage declined
by more than half over the 1947-57 period,
while bituminous production declined by about
one-quarter.
Metal mining, and nonmetallic mining and
quarrying— two other components of the mining
industry — showed increases in average annual
employment during the postwar period but not
sufficient to prevent moderate declines in
shares of nonfarm employment.
Within metal
mining, however, diverse patterns of employ­
ment appeared. Lead and zinc mining is almost
entirely underground, while both iron and
c o p p e r are n o w i n c r e a s i n g l y d u g from open
pits, requiring less labor per ton produced.
Nevertheless, because of expanding imports
and the increasing cost of mining relatively
low-grade ores, the lead and zinc mining work
force was reduced in number from 22,900 in
1947 to 16,700 in 1957— a 27-percent cut, re­
sulting in an even sha r p e r c o n t r a c t i o n of
about 40 percent in share of nonfarm employ­
ment.
Iron and copper mining, on the other
hand, both showed rising employment, with no
significant change in shares of nonfarm em­
ployment over the period.

Cr2
hta

two p o w e r f u l e c o n o m i c p r e s s u r e s .
First,
sharply reduced manpower requirements resulted
from s p e c t a c u l a r a d v ances in m a c h i n e s for
digging and handling coal (strip mining, and
the c o n t i n u o u s m i n i n g m a c h i n e which works
underground, simultaneously cutting the face
of the seam and loading the loosened coal).
Second, great segm e n t s of the m a r k e t were
lost to competing fuels (e.g., many homes are
now h e a t e d b y o i l or gas and the use of diesel
oil locomotives has grown very rapidly).

Preto Nnam E p o m n
ecn f ofr m l y e t

Of the 2 traditional fuels, anthracite
has sustained the sharper loss in employment,
declining from nearly 80,000 workers in 1947
to sli g h t l y m o r e than 2 8 , 0 0 0 in 1957.
In
terms of employment share, anthracite mining
contracted by about four-fifths, from nearly




iv

Table 1. Employment in mining, construction, trade, and public utilities
Annual averages,

Industry division

1947 and 1957

Production or
All
N onp r o d u c t i o n Nonproduction
nonsupervisory
workers as a
Year employee s
workers
workers
percent of
(In thousands)
total

M i n i n g ................

1947
1957

943
809

845
664

98
145

10. 4
17. 9

Contract
c o n s t r u c t i o n ......

1947
1957

1, 982
2,808

1,764
2,442

218
366

11.0
13.0

Wholesale and retail 1947
trade 1/........... 1957

7,827
9, 775

7, 324
8,888

503
887

6.4
9. 1

1947
1957

492
600

466
540

26
60

5. 3
10.0

Public utilities 2/.

1/ Excludes eating and drinking places.
2/ Other than transportation and communication.
The pattern of nonproduction-worker em­
ployment in relation to total jobs in mining
parallels that found in manufacturing.
For
all the mining components on record, the pro­
portion of nonproduction workers increased.
Numbers of such workers also rose in all ex­
cept coal mining (table 2). Indeed, the ex­
panded work force in metal mining was attrib­
utable almost entirely to the industrywide
increase in nonproduction workers.
Despite
the very sharp reduction in production workers
in lead and zinc mining, the number of n o n ­
production workers advanced slightly.
Even
in bituminous and anthracite coal mining, the
drop in number of nonproduction workers was
comparatively m o d e r a t e — from 23,500 in 1947
to 21,600 in 1957.
T r a n s p o r t a t io n ,
P u b lic

C o m m u n ic a t io n ,

and

jobs in this indu s t r y d i v i s i o n is m a i n l y
attributable to transportation, largest of the
industry division's three parts (chart 3).
R a i l r o a d and bus t r a n s p o r t industries cut
their work force as traffic shifted to trucks,
private autos, and airlines, and as mechanized
traffic control, classification yards, and
power machinery used in track repair reduced
labor requirements.
Interstate railroads,
for example, cut 434,000 workers from p a y ­
rolls, dropping from nearly 1.6 million in
1947 to about 1.1 million workers in 1957,
while employment in bus transportation (other
than local) fell fr o m 6 3 , 0 0 0 to 43,000.
Markedly contrasting trends occurred in air
transportation (a part of the "Other trans­
portation and service industry") and trucking
and warehousing.
The work force in both of
these industry groups rose faster than the
rise in all nonfarm jobs.
Indeed, partly be­
cause of a tripling of passengers carried by
scheduled airlines during the 11-year period
(50 million in 1957), the air transportation
industry increased its relative share of non­
farm jobs by almost one half, advancing from
81,700 jobs in 1947 to 144,600 in 1957. The
decline in the importance of the local railway

O th e r

U t ilit ie s

The number of workers in the t r a nspor­
tation, communication, and other public util­
ities industry division increased over the
postwar period, but proportionately less than
the increase in total nonfarm economy.
The
consequent decline in the share of nonfarm




v

Table 2. Employment in mining
Annual averages,

Industry

Year

1947 and 1957
All
employees

Nonproduc­
Nonproduc­
tion workers tion workers
as a percent
(In thousands)
of total
Prod u c t i o n
workers

1947
1957

943
809

Metal m i n i n g ...................................

1947
1957

103.0
111. 2

93. 1
94.4

9. 9
16.8

9.6
15. 1

Iron m i n i n g ..................................

1947
1957

34. 3
38.9

31.6
33. 9

2. 7
5.0

7.9
12.9

Copper m i n i n g .............................

1947
1957

27. 5
32.6

24. 6
27. 3

2.9
5. 3

10.6
16. 3

Lead and zinc m i n i n g .......................

1947
1957

22. 9
16. 7

20. 7
14. 1

2. 2
2.6

9.6
15.6

Anthracite m i n i n g .............................

1947
1957

79. 4
28.4

74.6
26. 4

4.8
2.0

6. 1
7.0

Bituminous m i n i n g .............................

1947
1957

425.6
230.0

402. 1
208. 4

23. 5
21. 6

5.5
9.4

1947
1957

237. 3
326. 2

188. 7
238.0

48. 6
88. 2

20.5
27.0

1947
1957

97.8
113. 3

86.0
96. 3

11.8
17.0

12. 1
15.0

Crude-petroleum and natural-gas
p r o d u c t i o n ...................................

Nonmetallic mining and q u a r r y i n g ...........



845
664

98
145

10. 4
17.9

M i n i n g .............................................

Cat3
hr
P r e to Nonfarm Employment
ec n f

m a n u f a c t u r i n g and m in in g i s r e p e a t e d in th e
o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s segment ( t a b l e 3 ).
Wholesale and Retail Trade

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

and b u s l i n e i n d u s t r y i s p a r t l y a c o n s e ­
quence o f a u to c o m p e t i t i o n b u t i s a ls o due to
t h e t r a n s f e r o f t h e s e p r i v a t e c o m p a n ie s to
p u b l i c e n t e r p r i s e w here th e w o r k e r s a r e i n ­
c lu d e d w ith government employment f i g u r e s .
Compared w it h 1947 f i g u r e s , th e communi­
c a t i o n g ro u p s c o r e d a m o d e r a t e i n c r e a s e i n
s h a r e o f n o n f arm jo b s in 1957, ow ing p r i m a r i l y
to a r a p i d expan sion o f th e work f o r c e in th e
t e l e p h o n e i n d u s t r y (by f a r th e m a jo r o f t h e
g r o u p 's two c o m p o n e n ts ), d e s p i t e r e m a r k a b l e
i n n o v a t i o n s in l a b o r s a v i n g d e v i c e s such as
a u to m a tic d i a l i n g ( c h a r t 4 ) .
The number o f
w o rk e rs in th e t e l e g r a p h segment, on th e o t h e r
hand, dro p p ed ab o u t o n e - t h i r d o v e r t h e p e r i o d —
from 5 8 ,9 0 0 to 4 1 , 4 0 0 — as messages f e l l from
238 to 172 m i l l i o n and i n c r e a s i n g l y autom ated
equip m ent was i n s t a l l e d .
The s h a r e o f wage and s a l a r i e d j o b s i n
o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ( m a in l y gas and e l e c ­
t r i c ) was o n l y s l i g h t l y h i g h e r a t t h e end
th a n a t th e s t a r t o f t h e p o s t w a r p e r i o d d e ­
s p i t e s o a r in g o u t p u t o f power. M oreover, th e
d i r e c t i o n o f r e l a t i v e employment was m a i n l y
downward, a f t e r th e peak re a c h e d i n 1949, as
expanded demand was met by power i n c r e a s i n g l y
p r o d u c e d and c o n t r o l l e d on i t s way t o th e
consumer by a u t o m a t i c p r o d u c t i o n and t r a n s ­
m i s s io n eq u ip m e n t ( c h a r t 4 ) .
The r e l a t i v e l y
f a s t e r grow th o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y w orker f o r c e s ,
co m p ared to p r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s , fo u n d in




The p o s t w a r g ro w th , from ab o u t 9 to more
t h a n 11 m i l l i o n , i n t h e num ber o f wage and
s a l a r i e d w o r k e r s i n w h o l e s a l e and r e t a i l
t r a d e — th e l a r g e s t s o u rc e o f n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
j o b s and second o n ly to m a n u f a c t u r i n g in d u s ­
t r i e s in t o t a l nonfarm j o b s — has been s l i g h t l y
in e x c e s s o f t h e r a t e f o r t o t a l n o n farm a c ­
t i v i t y , so t h a t t h i s i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n scored
a m o d e ra te i n c r e a s e i n p r o p o r t i o n o f nonfarm
e m p lo y m e n t.
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ad v a n c e d more
r a p i d l y th a n r e t a i l , g a i n i n g a bou t 7 p e r c e n t
in n o n fa rm jo b s h a re , w h ile r e t a i l l i n e s
added a b o u t 1 p e r c e n t .
R e t a i l t r a d e i s th e
more s i g n i f i c a n t s o u r c e o f em ploym ent, how­
e v e r , p r o v i d i n g more th a n 8 m i l l i o n jo b s i n
1 9 5 7 , com p ared w i t h a b o u t 3 m i l l i o n in t h e
w h o le s a le t r a d e l i n e s .
The a d v a n c in g l e v e l o f r e t a i l j o b o p p o r ­
t u n i t i e s r e s u l t s fro m c r o s s - c u r r e n t s o f
C a t4
hr .

Table 3, Employment in other public utilities
Annual averages,

Industry and group

1947 and 1957

Super v i s o r y Supervisory
N o n s u pervisory
All
and related w orkers as a
workers
Year employees
percent of
workers
total
(In thousands
1947
1957

492
600

466
540

26
60

5. 3
10.0

1947
1957

469.5
577.2

445. 1
519.0

24.4
58.2

5. 2
10. 1

1947
1957

213.0
258. 7

201. 7
226.0

11. 3
32. 7

5. 3
12. 6

Local utilities, not
elseviiere classified. * 1947
1957

22.6
23.0

20.5
20.7

2. 1
2. 3

9. 3
10.0

Other public utilities.

Gas and electric
u t i l i t i e s ...........

Electric light and
power utilities..

economic and dem o g rap h ic f o r c e s .
On t h e one
hand, p o p u l a t i o n g r o w th , t o g e t h e r w i t h e x ­
panded p e r s o n a l income and e x p e n d i t u r e s , and
t h e p h e n o m e n a l p o s t w a r r i s e in t h e use o f
consum er c r e d i t , e x e r t p r e s s u r e s w h ic h i n ­
crease re q u ire m e n ts f o r w o rk e rs .
The i n ­
c r e a s e d m a n -h o u r r e q u i r e m e n t s h ave been met
i n l a r g e p a r t by t h e e m p l o y m e n t o f l a r g e
numbers o f p a r t - t i m e w ork ers: D ual j o b h o l d e r s
i n r e t a i l t r a d e and s e r v i c e s t r i p l e d betw een
1950 and 1 9 5 6 , r i s i n g fro m 3 5 0 , 0 0 0 t o more
than a m i l l io n . On th e o t h e r hand, l a b o r s a v i n g
m ethods and d e v i c e s p u t i n t o o p e r a t i o n h a v e
made un n e c e s s a ry th e exp an sio n o f s a le s fo r c e s
i n p r o p o r t i o n to th e r a p i d exp an sio n o f s a le s .
One o f th e most w i d e l y known l a b o r s a v i n g d e­
v i c e s i s t h e s e l f - s e r v i c e s t o r e , w h ic h i s
w i d e s p r e a d among f o o d , d r u g , v a r i e t y , and
o th e r s to res.
T h re e ( fo o d and l i q u o r s t o r e s , a u to m o tiv e
and a c c e s s o r y d e a l e r s , and " o t h e r r e t a i l
t r a d e " ) o f the f i v e r e t a i l t r a d e groups shown
in th e B u r e a u ' s em ploym ent f i g u r e s exc e e d e d
th e combined r e t a i l t r a d e i n d u s t r y in a t t a i n ­




in g i n c r e a s e d s h a r e s o f n o n fa rm j o b s .
G ro ­
c e r y , m e a t, and v e g e t a b l e m a r k e t s ( p a r t o f
t h e fo o d and l i q u o r s t o r e s g r o u p ) , t o m e e t
th e n e e d s o f a r a p i d l y g r o w in g p o p u l a t i o n ,
in c r e a s e d in r e l a t i v e im p o rta n c e as a jo b
source by more th an 10 p e r c e n t i n th e p e r i o d
from 1951 to 1957; a l t h o u g h d i r e c t e v i d e n c e
is n o t a v a ila b le , i t is l i k e l y t h a t th e ex­
p a n s i o n was s u b s t a n t i a l l y g r e a t e r f o r t h e
e n t i r e p o s tw a r p e r i o d . A u to m o tiv e and ac c e s ­
s o r i e s s t o r e s , owing to th e g r e a t e r number o f
c a r s , added 15 p e r c e n t to t h e i r p r o p o r t i o n o f
non farm j o b s o v e r t h e p o s t w a r p e r i o d s t u d i e d
(c h a rt 5 ).
I n c o n t r a s t , a p p a r e l and a c c e s ­
s o r i e s s t o r e s d e c l i n e d in r e l a t i v e im p o rta n c e
as a jo b s o u rc e l a r g e l y because o f changes in
consum er s p e n d in g p a t t e r n s .
The m ost s i g ­
n i f i c a n t r e d u c t i o n i n n o n fa rm j o b s h a r e o c ­
c u r r e d among g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s t o r e s ( d e ­
p a r tm e n t s t o r e s and g e n e r a l m a i l - o r d e r h o u s e s ),
where a c o m p a r a t iv e ly s l i g h t i n c r e a s e o f o n ly
6 8 , 0 0 0 employees, from a 1947 f i g u r e o f a lm o s t
1 . 4 m i l l i o n , f a i l e d to k e e p p a c e w i t h t h e
growth o f t o t a l nonfarm employment, r e s u l t i n g
in a lo s s o f more th a n 10 p e r c e n t in r e l a t i v e

v iii

Ch 5
art .

wholesaling functions by the rapidly growing
retail food chains.

P r e t o Nonfarm Employment
ecn f

As in the case of the m a n u f a c t u r i n g ,
mining, and public utilities segments of the
economy, supervisory and related trade workers
(comparable to n o n p r o d u c t i o n workers) in­
creased more rapidly in relation to total
trade employment than the number of nonsupervisory (production) workers (table 4). And,
although the proportions of supervisory workers
are generally lower in trade industries than
all others, the rate of increase was roughly
comparable to expanding proportions of n o n ­
production workers in other industries for
which data are available.

RETAIL TRADE
-

1
Other Retail Trad«/

..
1
I

1

Food and Liquor Stores
..1
1
1
1

^

\

>
General Merchandise i tores
1
Automotive and Accessories Dealers X
1
Apparel and Accessories Stores^
II I

I

1947 ’48

’49

’50

’5 !

’52

I!
’53

I
’54

i
1
’55

!
I
’56

1957

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B R U O LA O STA
U EA F B R TISTICS

employment during the 11-year period.
The
great spread of population to the suburbs with
their nuclei of shopping centers and competing
specialty shops, (especially furniture and
appliance stores and miscellaneous stores,
such as g arden supply, jewelry, s p o r t i n g
goods, and leather goods), partly accounted
for the relative employment decline in general
merchandise. Additionally, however, a d o p t i o n
of m e c h a n i c a l h a n d l i n g devices, a u tomatic
billing and inventory devices, and, recently,
more self service c o n t r i b u t e d to l i m i t i n g
manpower needs in general merchandise stores.
Emp l o y m e n t data for various w h o l e s a l e
lines are not available in Bureau records for
periods prior to 1951. The evidence at hand
indicates that the major wholesaling indus­
tries such as automotive; electrical goods,
machinery, and hardware; and other full-serv­
ice and 1 imited-function wholesalers (with
the exception of wholesalers of groceries,
food specialties, beer, wines, and liquors)
have participated in the industrywide expan­
sion of job shares (chart 6). While the em­
ployment figures available for the wholesale
grocery, food specialties, beer, wines, and
liquors group show c o m p a r a t i v e stability,
their failure to increase with general e co­
nomic growth reflects the absorption of many
491146 0 -58 -2




ix

Table 4. Employment in wholesale and retail trade
Annual averages,

Industry

1947 and 1957

Supervisory Supervi sory
Nonsupervi sory
All
and related workers as a
Year employees
workers
percent of
workers
tot al
(In thousands)

Total trade 1/. ..............................

1947
1957

7,826
9, 775

7, 325
8, 888

501
887

Retail trade lj............ .......... .

1947
1957
1947
1957
1947
1957
1947
1957
1947
1957
1947
1957
1947
1957
1947
1957
1947
1957

5,416
6, 710
1,389. 1
1,457. 1
1, 160. 7
1,573.9
581.0
804. 2
566. 9
604.6
1,718. 1
2,270.3
2,410
3,065
1,403.4
1, 772. 1
1,006.8
1,293. 1

5, 112
6, 193
1, 323. 4
1,356.5
1,087. 9
1,465. 5
542.4
719. 3
529.6
556. 6
1,628. 4
2,094.6
2, 213
2,695
1,291. 9
1,572. 2
920. 5
1, 122.6

304
517
65. 7
100. 6
72.8
108.4
38.6
84.9
37. 3
48.0
89. 7
175. 7
197
370
111.5
199.9
86. 3
170.5

General merchandise stores ............
Pood and liquor stores.................
Automotive and accessories dealers. . .
Apparel and accessories stores .......
Other retail trade 1/..................
Wholesale trade............................
Full-service and limited-function. .. .
Other distributors......................

JJ Excluding eating and drinking places.



6. 4
9. 1
5. 6
7. 7
4. 7
6.9
6. 3
6. 9
6.6
10.6
6. 6
7. 9
5. 2
7. 7
8.2
12. 1
7. 9
11. 3
8.6
13. 2

Cat 7
hr .
Preto N n a mE p o
ecn f o f r m l yment

is available, Census data reveal that health
services rose by about 70 percent from 1947
to 1955, and that engineering and professional
services, a small field, nearly doubled in
employment from 1947 to 1955. The increased
use of research laboratories and consulting
organizations was also a factor in the growth
of the service industry.
Prom the data at hand, it is clear that
not all portions of the service industry in­
creased in share of nonfarm employment to the
extent shown by the d i v i s i o n as a whole.
Indeed, all 4 of the component categories for
which BLS data are available show declining
shares of nonfarm employment (chart 7), while
2 recorded falling levels of actual employ­
ment in part at least as a consequence of

B R A O LA O STA
U E U F B R TISTICS

The relatively sharper growth of super­
visory workers stems partly from the develop­
ment of staff functions.
For example, some
tr a d e b u s i n e s s e s in r e c e n t y e a r s have de­
veloped facilities for market research, sales
analysis, and studies of buyer psychology to
aid in location and design of stores, pricing
techniques, product display, etc.
Service and Miscellaneous Industries
The major industry division known as serv­
ice and m i s c e l l a n e o u s indus t r i e s includes
such diverse activities as hotels; laundries;
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e n d e r i n g medical, legal,
engineering, and other professional services;
amusement enterprises, such as bowling alleys
and theaters; auto repairing, and garaging,
etc. The postwar expansion of job opportuni­
ties in the service industry division acquired
impetus from rising per capita income and ex­
penditures and from the growth and changing
composition of the popula t i o n — particularly
the e x p a n d i n g p r o p o r t i o n of y o u n g and old
people, whose special needs increase demands
for medical, hospital, educational, and busi­
ness services.
While little BLS information




Construction

UNITEDFLA O STATISTICS
STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B RA O B R
UE U

competing products. One of the latter — motion
pictures— sustained a sharp drop in employment
under the competing pressure from television
and other curr e n t leisure-time activities.
In 1947, motion picture production, distri­
bution, exhibition, and related services re­
quired 252,000 workers; by 1957, employment
had fa l l e n to 2 0 4 , 0 0 0 — a drop of about 20
percent.
The second industry using less man­
power in 1957 than in 1947 — laundries— cut
workers from payrolls partly as a consequence
of more e f f i c i e n t p r o c e s s i n g and h a n d l i n g
methods and partly because of the growing use
of automat ic home washing and drying machinery.
The reduction in work force in laundries, al­
though substantial, was not as severe as that
in motion pictures— an average 326,000 workers
in 1957 represented a loss of 40,000 jobs in
the period studied.
Employment in cleaning
and dyeing, a related industry, did not change
significantly in the postwar years; the share
of jobs in the industry therefore dropped,
with a dvanced equipment and a reduction of
per capita use of cleaning and dyeing facili­
ties contributing to the decline. Employment
in hotels and lodging places advanced at only
a m o d e r a t e pace, less than for the total
Cat9
hr .




x ii

nonfarm economy.
The c o n s e q u e n t c o n t r a c ­
tion in share of jobs, however, was restricted
to the i m m e d i a t e p o s t w a r y e a r s , e n d i n g
a f t e r 1950, p e r h a p s c o i n c i d e n t with the
burst of m o t e l c o n s t r u c t i o n which may in
large measure have supplanted hotel construc­
tion.
C o n tra ct

C o n s t r u c t io n

Most segments of the contract construction
division have participated in the industry­
wide expansion in share of nonfarm employment
(chart 8). The one exception— general build­
ing c o n t r a c t o r s — followed the industrywide
pattern through 1951, when the proportion of
nonfarm jobs among general contractors c o n ­
structing buildings reached a peak of 2 p e r ­
cent of all nonfarm jobs. Subsequently, the
share of this segment of the construction in­
dustry drifted downward and in 1957 reached a
postwar low, despite an increase in the work
force over the period.
An expanding proportion of nonconstruction
workers in relation to the total construction
work force is observable throughout most seg­
ments of the construction industry (table 5).
The change is not as sharp, however, as the
i n c r eases for com p a r a b l e wor k e r s n o t e d in
other industries for which data are available.
The notable exception occurred in "other non­
building construction"— where nonconstruction
jobs rose less rapidly than the constructionworker force.
This is one of the very few
instances shown by BLS data on the nonfarm
economy. Contractors in this segment of the
industry are engaged primarily in the c o n ­
struction of heavy projects, i.e., sewers and
water mains, railroads, piers, abutments,
tunnels, bridges, flood control projects;
mi n i n g appurtenances, such as tipples, and
l o a d i n g and d i s c h a r g i n g stations; ovens,
furnaces, kilns and similar industrial appur­
tenances of industrial plants which are con­
s t r u c t e d at the site.
A l s o i n c l u d e d are
marine construction projects and miscellaneous
projects, such as fences, radio towers, swim­
ming pools, airports, etc.

Table 5. Employment in contract construction
Annual averages, 1947 and 1957

Industry

Contract construction....................

Nonconstruc­
Construction N o n construction
All
tion workers
workers
Year employees
workers
as a percent
of total
(In thousands)

xiii

1947
1957
General contractors, n o n b u i l d i n g ..... 1947
1957
Highway and street construction. . . . 1947
1957
Other nonbuilding c o n s t r u c t i o n .... 1947
1957
General contractors, building ........ 1947
1957
Special-trade contractors............. 1947
1957
Plumbing and h e a t i n g ................. 1947
1957
Painting and decorating............. 1947
1957
Electrical w o r k ....................... 1947
1957
Other special-trade contractors.... 1947
1957




1» 982
2,808
387
586
169. 4
250. 1
217.4
335.6
735.0
869. 3
860.0
1, 352. 7
217. 9
321. 7
1 2 0 .1
164. 2
116.6
188. 9
405.6
677.9

1,764
2,442
338
515
155. 5
226.8
182. 7
288. 5
673.0
772. 6
753.0
1,154. 1
187. 3
265.9
111. 7
150. 1
95.5
151. 7
358. 7
586. 4

218
366
49
71
13. 9
23. 3
34. 7
47. 1
62.0
96. 7
107.0
198. 6
30.6
55.8
8 .4
14. 1
2 1 .1
37. 2
46. 9
91. 5

11.0

13.0
12. 7
12 .1
8 .2
9. 3
16.0
14.0
8 .4
11.1
12.4
14. 7
14.0
17.4
7.0
,8.6
18. 1
19. 7
11.6

13.5

i n g W o r ld War I .
I n t h e d e c a d e a f t e r th e
F i r s t W orld War, th e r e l a t i v e l e v e l o f gove rn­
ment employment was s t a b l e , w h i l e i n t h e p o s t W o r ld War I I e r a , th e s h a r e o f n o n fa rm j o b s
i n gove rnm en t i n c r e a s e d a t r a t e s c o m p a r a b le
w i t h th o s e f o r th e c o n s t r u c t i o n and s e r v i c e
in d u s trie s .

Ca 1 .
h rt 0

P r e t o Nonfarm Employment
ecn f

F in a n c e ,

In s u ra n c e ,

and

Real

T h is r e c e n t r e l a t i v e ex p a n s io n o f g o v e rn ­
ment j o b s grew o u t o f a d d i t i o n s t o S t a t e and
l o c a l g o v e r n m e n t w o rk f o r c e s a t r a t e s s u b ­
s t a n t i a l l y g r e a t e r th a n th o s e f o r t h e t o t a l
nonfarm economy.
The number o f j o b s in S t a t e
and l o c a l g o v e rn m e n ts i n c r e a s e d by s l i g h t l y
more th a n 50 p e r c e n t from 1947 t o 1957, com­
p a r e d w i t h a 2 5 - p e r c e n t e x p a n s io n i n t o t a l
n o n fa rm j o b s .
F i v e o u t o f se v e n g o ve rn m en t
w o r k e r s w e re e m p l o y e d by S t a t e and l o c a l
g o ve rnm en ts i n 1957 and a lm o s t h a l f o f th e s e
S t a t e and l o c a l government em ployees were en­
gaged in e d u c a t i o n .
Or, from a n o t h e r v i e w ­
p o i n t , i n 1957 t h e r e w ere more w o r k e r s , on
th e a v e r a g e , i n S t a t e and l o c a l e d u c a t i o n a l
a c t i v i t i e s than in a l l a c t i v i t i e s o f th e Fed ­
e r a l G o v e r n m e n t1 — 2 . 4 m i l l i o n com p ared w i t h
2 .2 m illio n .
C o m p a r is o n o f e m p lo y m e n t in
e d u c a t i o n w i t h t h a t i n o t h e r S t a t e and l o c a l
g o vern m en t a c t i v i t i e s r e v e a le d t h a t w h ile
b o th o f th e s e a c t i v i t i e s had a c q u ir e d an e x ­
panded s h a re o f n o n fa rm j o b s , th e g ro w th in
th e e d u c a tio n s h are had been somewhat g r e a t e r more th a n 30 p e r c e n t com pared w i t h s l i g h t l y
le s s than 20 p e r c e n t ( c h a r t 1 0 ).

E sta te

F in a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e com­
b in e d , r e c o r d e d a m o d e ra te i n c r e a s e i n s h a r e
o f n o n fa rm j o b s d u r i n g t h e 1 1 - y e a r p o s t w a r
era.
R e l a t i v e l y l a r g e r a d d i t i o n s to th e work
f o r c e o c c u r r e d in two c o m p o n e n ts — banks and
t r u s t co m p an ies, and i n s u r a n c e c a r r i e r s and
a g e n t s — w h ere t h e i n c r e a s e s i n n o n fa r m jo b
s h a r e s were a p p r o x i m a t e l y 20 and 30 p e r c e n t ,
re s p e c tiv e ly (c h a rt 9 ).
The growth in i n s u r ­
ance r e f l e c t s th e h e ig h t e n e d im p o rta n c e which
consumers and businessmen a t t a c h to f i n a n c i a l
p r o t e c t i o n a g a i n s t p e r s o n a l and p r o p e r t y lo s s ,
as w e l l as t h e e x p a n s io n o f i n s u r a b l e ite m s .
G overnm ent a c t i o n a l s o i n c r e a s e d i n s u r a n c e
n e e d s ; t h e w r i t i n g o f a u to , i n s u r a n c e , t h e
l a r g e s t ty p e o f c a s u a l t y i n s u r a n c e , f o r e x ­
a m p le , e x p a n d e d w i t h t h e a d o p t i o n o f la w s
m aking such p r o t e c t i o n m a n d a to ry .
E x p a n s io n
o f jo b s in banks and t r u s t companies r e f l e c t e d
n o t o n l y th e p r e s s u r e s o f e x p a n d in g b u s in e s s
and p o p u l a t i o n , b u t h i g h e r income l e v e l s and
th e e x te n s io n o f bank s e r v i c e s , such as s m a ll
lo an s and economy c h e c k in g a c c o u n ts .

R e l a t i v e employment by th e F e d e r a l Govern­
m ent has n o t changed s i g n i f i c a n t l y o v e r th e
p e r i o d ( a l t h o u g h some f l u c t u a t i o n s o c c u r r e d
betw een 1947 and 1 9 5 7 ) .
I n f a c t , a p a r t from
t h e Po st O f f i c e and D e fe n s e D e p a rtm e n ts , jo b s
i n o t h e r F e d e r a l Government a c t i v i t i e s , ta k e n
as a u n i t , have d e c l i n e d by 25 p e r c e n t in r e ­
l a t i o n to a l l n o n farm j o b s .
P o s t O f f i c e De­
p a r t m e n t j o b s ended t h e p e r i o d o f th e s tu d y
a t th e same l e v e l o f s h a r e s as a t th e b e g in ­
n i n g , w h i l e th e D e f e n s e D e p a r t m e n t , on t h e
o t h e r h a n d , i n c r e a s e d fr o m 1 . 6 p e r c e n t o f
n o n fa rm j o b s in 1947 t o n e a r l y 2 p e r c e n t i n
1957. ( c h a r t 1 0 ).

G o v e rn m e n t

The g o v e rn m e n t d i v i s i o n ( F e d e r a l , S t a t e
and l o c a l com bined) was t h e one b ro a d nonfarm
in d u s t r y c l a s s i f i c a t i o n w here th e r e l a t i v e
tr e n d o f p o s t - W o r l d War I I employment d i f f e r e d
s i g n i f i c a n t l y from t h a t o f th e decade f o l l o w ­




^ E xclu sive

x iv

of

those

in

the

m ilita ry .

THE

AIRCRAFT

A N D

PARTS

INDUSTRY

Annual Average 1947-57

united states department of labor

B R A O L B R SAITC
U E U F A O TTSIS




1957 data are preliminary

Employment Highlights
N O V E M B E R

j
t

-xr y, . -+ ,"V*3*->, «*?&&&
I -

Nonfarm employment rose in November, mainly as a
result of the return of workers on strike the previous
month. Settlement of some of the strikes in the auto­
mobile and related durable-goods industries, together
with a seasonal expansion in trade, brought nonfarm
employment to 51.3 million— an increase of 200,000
over the month.

Factory Workweek Rises to 39»9 Hours
Average weekly hours in manufacturing rose by 0.2
hours over the month to 39*9 in November. This betterthan-seasonal rise was due to the resumption of fullwee k work at plants which had been on strike during
part of the October survey week, and to a sharp in­
crease in overtime in the automobile Industry.

The factory workweek rose from an average of 39*7
hours in October to 39*9 in November.
Increases in
hours of work coupled with Increases in hourly earn­
ings boosted weekly earnings of factory workers by
$ 1.62 to a record high of $86.58 .

Factory Earnings Rise Sharply
Earnings of factory production workers rose 3
cents to $2.17 per hour in November.
Employment gains
in Industries with above-average earnings, together
with a sharp rise in overtime in auto plants, and wage
rate Increases in a number of industries, were the prin­
cipal factors in the rise in average hourly earnings.

Factory Jobs Rise as Strikers Return
Employment in manufacturing, which normally drops
somewhat in November, rose by 155*000 over the month
to 15.7 million.
The unusually large rise for that
month followed the ending of a number of work stop­
pages in the automobile and in the metals and machin­
ery industries.
However, strikes continued to affect
employment in the agricultural machinery and glass in­
dustries. Employment changes in most other manufac­
turing industries were mainly seasonal.

This rise in hourly earnings, together with the
lengthening of the workweek, boosted gross weekly earn­
ings by $1.62 to a new high of $86.58. Weekly earnings
were higher than a year ago in every manufacturing in­
dustry group and $3.66 higher than a year ago for manu­
facturing as a whole.
Employment Down 1 Million Over Year
Compared with November 1957# nonagricultural em­
ployment was down by 1 million and was l.k million
under November 1956.
Factory employment this November
was about 850,000 lower than in November 1957* and
about 1.5 million lower than in November 1956.

Trade Rise and Construction Drop are Seasonal
Employment changes in nonmanufacturing industries
were also almost entirely seasonal.
The largest
changes occurred in retail trade, where 160,000
workers were added to serve Christmas shoppers, and in
contract construction, where employment declined by
115,000 with the approach of winter weather.




1958

¿Jo***'*sa>*v*i t/<t v* -v'’' 4K v ,, ? ! . -' y/, - ?^ v ;
K *
♦=
•
a
?
{*fwfrfrjssg-ft*fgf ? * f— ^
aa c , '

The average workweek in manufacturing was 0.6
hours higher than in November 1957, but 0.6 hours lower
than in November 1956.

xvi

H isto ric a l Em ploym ent Data
Table A -l: Employees in non agricultural establishments,
by industry division

Year and month

TOTAL

Mining

26,829
27,088

1,124
1,230
953

Annual average:

1919.«

1920..

1921..
1922*
1923..
1921k .
1925..
1926.,
1927..
1928..

2k,125
25,569
28,128
27,770
28,505
29,539
29,691
29,710
31,041
29,143

1929..
1930..
1931..
1932..
19331934.
1935.
1936..
19371938.,

26,383

23,377
83,*66
25,699
26,792

28,802

30,718

28,902

1939.■
1940..
194l.■
1942.,
19431944.,
19451946.,
19471948..

30,311
32,058

36,220

39,779
42,106
41,534
40,037
41,287
43,462
44,448
43,315
44,738
47,347
48,303
49,681
48,431
50,056

19491950.,
1951..
1952.,
1953..
1954.,
1955..
1956..
1957..

51,766

920

1,203

1,092
1,080

1,176
1,105
1,041

1,078

1,000
864
722
735
874
888
937

1,006
882
84$

December..•

1958: January....

February. ••

49,690

May.......
July......
August...•.
September..
October....
November..•

49,726
49,949
50,413
50,178
50,576
51,237
51,135
51,325

1,185
1,229
1,321
1,1*46
1,555

1,608
1,606
1,^97
1,372
1,214
970
809

862
912

1,145
1,112

1,055

3,711
3,998
3,*59
3,505
3,882

10,53*

3,907
3,675
3,2*3
2,80*
2,659
2,736
2,771
2,956
3,11*
2,840

6,*01
6,06*
5,531
*,907
*,999
5,552
5,692

2,912

6,612

9,401
8,021
6,797
7,258
8,346
8,907
9,653

10,606
9,253

918

2,165

14,178
14,967

852
9*3

889
916

885
852
777
777

793

50,477

1,012

788

766
747
733

716
711

717
705
708

711
707

708

12,974
15,051
17,381
17,111
15,302
14,461
15,290
15,321




3,806
3,82*
3,9*0
3,891
3,822

3,013
3,248
3,433
3,619
3,798
3,872
4,023
4,122
4,141

5,626
5,810

6,033

6,165

6,137

6,076
6,5*3
6,453

6,9*0

7,*16

7,333
7,189

7,260
7,522

8,602

9,196
9,519

9,513
9,6*5
10,012
10,281
10,527

2,622

16,33*
17,238
15,995

3,9*9
3,977
4,166
*,185
4,221
*,009

2,929
2,808

16,903
16,782

4,l6l
4,151

11,221
11,302

2,805
2,612

16,561
16,302

4,114

11,557

2,387
2,173
2,316

15,865
15,593
15,355
15,104
15,023

3,985
3,944
3,910
3,883
3,874
3,904

11,140
10,948
10,939
10,940

3,907
3,897

10,984

2,333
2,603
2,634
2,593
2,759

2,493
2,685
2,806
2,882
2,955
2,927

2,889

2,774

16,104

16,563

15,206
15,161

15,462
15,755
15,542
15,697

NOTE: Data f o r t h e 2 most r e c e n t months are p r e li m in a r y *
4 9 1146 0 - 5 8 -3

4,664
4,623
4,754
5,084
5,*9*

10,53*
10,534
8,132
8,986
10,155
9,523
9,786
9,997
9,839
9,786

982

947
983
917
883
826

52,316

49,777

848

10,078
10,780

807
809

52,610

1,021

(In thousands)
Transpor­
Finance,
Wholesale
Manufac­ tation and and retail insurance,
public
and real
turing
trade
utilities
estate

1,150
1,294
1,790
2,170
1,567
1,094
1,132
1,661
1,982
2,169

916

52,162

1957: November...

Contract
con­
struction

*,062

4,094

3,886

3,892

3,882

10,520

10,8*6

12,076

10,961
11,035

11,011
11,151
11,231

11,397

1,050
1,110
1,097
1,079
1,123
1,163
1,166
1,235
1,295
1,360
1,431

1,396
1,333
1,270
1,225
1,2*7
1,262
1,313
1,355
1,3*7

Service
and
miscel­
laneous

2,054
2,142

2,187
2,266
2,431
2,516
2,591
2,755
2,871
2,962

3,127
3,084
2,913
2,682
2,614
2,784

2,883
3,060

Govern­
ment

2,671
2,603
2,531
2,5*2

2,611

2,723
2,802
2,8*8
2,917
2,996

3,066
3,1*9
3,26*
3,225
3,167
3*298
3,*77

3,662

3,233
3,196

3,7*9
3*995
*,202

1,7*1

3*321
3**77
3*705
3,857
3,919
3,93*
*,011
*,*7*
*,783
*,925

1,765
1,82*
1,892
1*967
2,038
2,122
2,219

*,972
5,077
5,264
5,411
5,538
5,664
5,916

5,856
6,026

2,348

6,160
6,336

7,277

2,360

6,367
6,318

8,067

6,241
6,240

7,7*9
7,789

1,399
1,*36
1**5®

1**69

1**35
1,*09
1,428
i ,6:-9

1,672

2,308

2,353

3,876

*,660
5,*83

6,080
6,0*3
5,9**
5,595
5,*7*
5,650

6,389
6,609
6,6*5
6,751
6,91*

7,626

7,759

2,344
2,3*3
2,348
2,356
2,370
2,391

6,384
6,455
6,488

7,850
7,870

2,410
2,413
2,392
2,377
2,371

6,465
6,452
6,472
6,467
6,424

7,664
7,678
7,9*3

6,267

7,822

7,866

8,030
8,072

C u rre n t Em ploym ent D ata

2

Table A -2 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups
(In thousands)

Ubvemlber 1958
iovenDer
October
1958
1957

November
1958

October

November

1958

1957

TOTAL.....................................

51,325

51,135

52,316

♦190

-991

MINING.....................................

708

707

793

♦1

-85

89.3
190.5
112.2

89.3
189.1
112.lt

106.li
225.7
111*.3

0
♦1.U
-•2

-17.1
-35.2
-2.1

Industry division and group

Nonmetallic mining and quarrying............

net chanée from:

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.......................

2,771*

2,889

2,805

-115

-31

MANUFACTURING..............................

15,697

15,51*2

16,561

♦155

-861*

DURABLE GOODS.............................
NONDURABLE GOODS ..........................

8,911
6,786

8,673
6,869

9,608
6,953

♦238
-83

-167

131*.2
639.5
373.3
521».6
1,129.1»

128.6
658.8
37l*.3
517.9
1,107.7

121.3
635.1*
376.2
550.0
1,258.1»

♦5*6
-19.3
-1.0
♦6.7
♦21.7

♦12.9
♦U.l
-2.9
-25.lt
-129.0

1,056.0
1,171.8
1,H»9.0
1,639.7
319.7
17* 1
*1.

1,032.0
1,1»6I».7
1,121.2
1,1*66.8
316.6
18* 0
*1.

1,131». 9
1,657.1»
1,221.8
1,817.0
331».9
500.9

♦2U.0
♦7.1
♦27.8
♦172.9
♦3.1
-9.9

-78.9
-185.6
-72.8
-177.3
-15.2
-26.8

1,1*71*.6
91.9
955.9
1,180.6
55U.1
855.5
826.6
232.5
251.6
362.6

1,51*8.6
103.5
951*.7
1,183.3
553.9
858.7
826.5
231*.1
251.3
353.9

1,508.1»
97.8
987.0
1,199.8
565.8
866.7
81*2.6
21*7.7
269.7
367.1*

-7U.0
-11.6
♦1.2
-2.7
♦.2
-3.2
♦.1
-1.6
♦.3
♦8.7

-33.8
-5.9
-31.1
-19.2
-11.7
-11.2
-16.0
-15.2
-18.1
-U.8

3,882

3,892

l*,lll*

-10

-232
-173
-56
-3

-697

D
urable Go s
od
Ordnance and accessories.....................
Lumber and wood products (except furniture)..
Furniture and fixtures.......................
Primary metal industries................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment)....
Machinery (except electrical)...............
Electrical machinery.........................
Transportation equipment.....................
Instruments and related products............

Nn u able Go s
odr
od
Food and kindred products...................
Tobacco manufactures.........................
Textile-mill products........................
Apparel and other finished textile products..
Paper and allied products....................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries..
Chemicals and allied products...............
Products of petroleum and coal..............

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES..........
TRANSPORTATION............................
COMMUNICATION.............................
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES.....................

2,533
752
597

2,51*2
752
598

2,706
808

600

-9
0
-1

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE..................

11,397

11,231

11,557

♦166

-160

♦9
♦157
♦109.9
♦18.2
♦5.2
♦lb.9
♦9.1

-59
-101
♦1.3
♦3.6
-52.6
-8.9
-1*3.6

WHOLESALE TRADE...........................
RETAIL TRADE-..............................

General merchandise stores...................
Food and liquor stores.......................

Other retail trade...........................

3,01*1»
8,353
1,583.1»
1,615.2
758.1»
617.1»
3,778.9

NOTE: Data fo r the 2 most recen t months are prelim in a ry.




3,035
8,196
1,1*73.5
1,597.0
753.2
602.5
3,769.8

3,103
8,USI*
1,582.1
1,611.6
811.0
626.3
3,822.5

1

3

C u rre n t Em ploym ent D ata

Table A -2: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and selected groups-Continued
(In thousands)

Noveifcer
1958

Industry division and group

O cto b e r

1958

N ovenber

1957

N ovem ber 1958
n e t chantf e from:
o cto o e r
Norember

1958

1957

2,371

2,377

2,360

-6

♦11

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS......................

6,1*21*

6,1*67

6,367

-1*3

♦57

GOVERNMENT......................................

8,072

8,030

7,759

♦1*2

♦313

2,171
5,901

2,173
5,857

2,11*8

STATE AND LOCAL............................

5,611

-2
♦**
11

♦23
♦290

FINANCE,

INSURANCE,

AND REAL ESTATE...........

NQTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

Table A -3 : Production workers in m anufacturing,
by major industry group
(In thousands)
Major industry group

H o r e * b .r

1958

O cto b e r

1958

N ovem b er

1957

N ovenber

1958

net chaînée from:
O cto b e r

1958

N o ra fce r

1957

11,887

MANUFACTURING

DURABLE GOODS ..........................
NONDURABLE GOODS........................

D
urable

11,728

12,691*

♦159

-807

6,671
5,216

6,1*31
5,297

7,322
5,372

♦21*0
-81

-651
-156

goods

Lumber and wood products (except furniture)....
Purniture and fixtures.........................
Primary metal industries.......................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries........

72.2
571*.1
313.1*
U28.8
922.1*

66.6
593.1*
313.1*
1*21.!*
899.7

70.3
569.5
313.7
1*53.0
1,029.8

♦5.6
-19.3
0
♦7.U
♦22.7

♦1.9
♦1*.6
-.3
-21*.2
-107.1*

819.6
1,015.1
771*.1
1,166.2
209.6
375.7

791*.0
1,007.0
71*6.2
996.7
207.1
385.9

891*.6
1,179.1*
851.2
1,337.2
222.8
1*00.0

♦25.6
♦8.1
♦27.9
♦169.5
♦2.5
-10.2

-75.0
-161*.3
-77.1
-171.0
-13.2
-21*.3

1,037.1
81.8
861*.6
1,050.2
1*1*6.5
51*7.2
517.9
152.8
191*.0
323.1*

1,108.5
93.1
863.7
1,053.7
1*U6.3
551.1
518.3
151*.1
193.3
311*.9

1,067.9
87.7
891*. 8
1,065.7
1*58.1
559.1
537.3
165.6
209.2
326.6

-71. 1
*
-11.3
♦.9
-3.5
♦.2
-3.9
-.1*
-1.3
♦.7
♦8.5

-30.8
-5.9
-30.2
-15.5
-11.6
-11.9
-19.1*
-12.8
-15.2
-3.2

N
ondurable G o s
od
Food and kindred products......................
Apparel and other finished textile products....
Paper and allied products...»..................
Printing, publishing, and allied industries....

NOTE: Data f o r the 2 most recen t months are p relim in a ry.




4

E m p loym en t In d e x e s

Table A -4: Index of employees in nonagricultural establishments, by industry division
( 1947- 49= 1 00 )

Boreaber
1958

TOTAL........................................

October
1958

September
1958

Novweber
1957

117.3

116.9

117.1

119.6

71».7
131.8
105.1
110.7
98.7
95.1»
88.0
111.2
115.5
121.1
122.0
120.8
137.1»
131.3
12(2.6
115.0
156.1»

In d u s try d iv is io n

7l».6
137.2
10l».l
107.7
99.9
95.6
88.3
111.2
115.7
U9.U
121.6
118.6
137.7
132.2
ua. 9
115.1
155.3

75.0
139.0
105.5
109.5
100.9
95.5
87.7
112.0
117.2
118.5
120.8
117.7
138.6
132.3
U»0.3
U5.1
152.9

83.6
133.3
110.9
119.3
101.1
101.1
91».0
119.5
116.1
122.8
121».3
122.3
136.7
130.1
137.1
113.8
ll»8.8

NOTE: D a t a f o r th e 2 m o st r e c e n t m o n th s a re p r e l i m i n a r y .

T ab le A -5: Index of production workers in m anufacturing, by maior industry group
( 1947- 49= 1 0 0 )
M a jo r i n d u s t r y

g ro u p

MANUFACTURING.....................................

DURABLE GOODS..............................
NONDURABLE GOODS...........................

Novenber
1958

October
1958

96.1

91».8

96.5

102.6

100.0
91.6

96.U
93.0

98.6
91».1

109.7
91».3

317.6
77.8
106.0
98.6
89.6

295.6
80.1»
106.0
96.8
87.1»

300.0
79.9
105.0
100.7
87.1

308.8
77.2
106.3
101».1
100.1

105.3
89.3
120.9
ULuO
108.2
98.9

101.9
88.6
116.5
97.5
106.7
101.6

105.5
88.6
119.0
107.6
105.7
100.0

ni».9
103.7
132.9
130.7
lll».9
105.3

87.6
77.6
70.8
100.8
111.6
113.8
101.5
82.3
95.3
89.3

93.7
88.0
70.7
101.2
111.3
114.6
101.5
82.8
91».8
87.1

99.5
90.9
70.1»
101.3
111.6
111».0
100.1
81 9
».
92.3
88.8

90.2
83.3
73.2
102.1»
lli*.3
116.3
105.2
89.2
102.6
90.1»

Septeotoer
1958

Novesber
1957

Durable Goods

F u r n it u r e

and f i x t u r e s ...................................................................

F a b r ic a t e d m e ta l p ro d u c ts

(e x c e p t o rd n an ce ,

Nondur abl e Goods

P r in t in g ,

p u b lis h in g ,

and a l ' l i e d

i n d u s t r i e s ...............

NOTE: Data fo r the 2 most re ce n t months are p relim in a ry .




5

S e a s o n a lly A d ju ste d Em p loym en t D ata

Table A-6: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division, seasonally adjusted
Number
Industry division

Nov.
1958

TOTAL..............................................................................................

50,773

704
2, 680
15>599
8,869
6,730
3, 872
2, 520
752

600
11, 133
2, 984
8, 149
2,383
6,424

(in th o u s a n d s )

Oct.
1958

50,586

50,780

707
2, 7 00

707
2, 6g8
i5 , 52g
8, 801
6,728
3*858
2, 4g8

15,369

8, 637
6, 7 32
3, 882
2, 529
752

601
11, 160

2, 193
5,785
NOiE:

Data

for the 2 m o s t

recent

months

5,770

78g
2, 71O

Sept.
1958

Nov.
1957

7 4 -6
74-3
127.3 128.3
104.5 102. 9
110. 1 107.3
97.8 9 7 - 9
95- 1 9 5 - 4
87. 6 8 7 - 9
111. 2 111.2
116. 1 116. 2
118.3 118. 6
119.6 120. 4
117.9 118. 0
138• 1 138.4

74-6
83- 2
128. 2 128.7
104. 0 110 . 2
109.3 118.8
9 7 - 8 100. 2
9 4 - 8 100. 8
86.8 9 3 -6
112. 0 119-5
116. 6 116.6
118. 5 120. 0
120.8 121. g
117.7 11g• 3
138- 6 137-4
1 3 1 - 3 130-9 131. 6 130- 1
14 1. 0 140.9 141.4 135-5
116. 2 116.8 116.9 114-9
153-4 153-0 153-7 145.8

16,455
9,562

6, 893
4, 104
2, 693
808
603
11, 2go
3*042
8, 248
2,372
6,367
7,671
2, 170
5 , 5 oi

5,798

(1947-49®100)

Oct.
1958

116. 1 115. 6 116. 1 118. q

51,758

757

2,38g
6,403
7,976
2, 206

3 , oo5
8, 155

Nov.
1958

Nov.
1957

603
11, 151
3,016
8, 135
2,392
6, 440
8, 005
2, 207

7,978

Index

Sept.
1958

ar e p r e l i m i n a r y .

Table A -7: Employees in manufacturing,
by major industry group, seasonally adjusted
Major

industry

group

No v .
1958

(In t h o u s a n d s )
All employees
Oct.
Sept.
1958
1958

Nov.
1957

No v .
1958

Production workers
Sept.
Oct.
1958
1958

...........................

15,599

15,36g

15 *52g

i6,455

i l , 787

DURABLE GOODS......................
NONDURABLE GOODS...................

8,869

8 ,637
6,732

8,801
6,728

9,562
6,893

5 ,160

5 ,163

134
632

130

121
627
368

72
566

522
1 ,129

129
642
368
512
1,108

1,048
1,482
1 , 138
1,640
319
460

1*452

MANUFACTURING

6,73°

6,627

21,557

6,394

11,725
6, 568

Nov.
1957

,

1 2 590
7,276

5,157

5,3i4

576

570

3 07
41 5

308

70
562
306

Durable Goods
Ordnance and accessories...........................
Lumber and wood products (except f h m i t u r e ).....
Furniture and fixtures.............................
Stone, clay, and glass products...................
Primary m e t a l industries...........................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,
machinery, and transportation equipment).......
Ma c h inery (except electrical).....................
Elect r i c a l machi n e r y ........................ ......
Instruments and related products .................
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries...........

365

634

368

52g
1 ,103

547
1,258

1,028
1,486
1,114
1,467
316
467

1*057
1,492
1 *133
1,572

1 ,126
1,669
1,209
1,817

470

486

i,457

1,457

1,484
91
97 8
1 ,iÇ5
561
861
838
249
267

313

334

67

3°5
425
922

goo

812

79 0
1 , 028

1,02$

763
1 , 166
20 Ç

739
997
206

36g

362

432

g

8 7
822

449

1 , 03 0

1,°33
762
1 , 100
205
371

1,igi

,0 ig

1, 044
81

,034

1 , 06 1

838

1,337

222
385

Nondurable Goods
85

Apparel and other finished textile products .....
Printing, publishing, and allied industries.....
Chemicals and allied produ c t s .....................

947

1*175
550
851
822

234
249

365

8g

955

955

356

1,163
548
855
818
237
244
360

1,166
550
854
822
234
249

NOTE: Data f o r t'he 2 most recen t months are p relim in a ry.




gì

369

,0 14
75
856

,045

443
542

515
154
191
325

1,020

78

864
1 038
442

,

54 6
513
154

îgi

317

80
864

440

548
508
156
187
321

886

453
553
534
167
206

32 g

6

Industry Employment

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry
(In t h o u s a n d s )
All employees

Oct,
1958

Industry

Sept.
I 958

Production or construction workers

Oct.
1957

TOTAL...................................................................

51,135

51,237

707

711

Sept.

1958

1958

-

52,570

MINING ....................................................................

Oct.

802

MT L M
EA
INING...................................................

56O

107.6

564

653

17.5

16.7

25.3

227.8

167.9

166.2

205.9

301.5

323.9

206.6

210.8

232.5

184.0

187.8

192.5

109.9

112.9

118.5

11 2.4

113.0

115.8

95.1

95.5

98.6

90 .7
31.8

28.4
11.4

AT RC E M
N H A IT
INING.........................................

19.3

18.5

B U IN U O
IT M O S-C AL M
INING...............................

189.1

187.2

C U E ER L U AD N
R D -P T O E M N ATU AL-G
R
AS
POUT N
R D C IO .....................................................

296.5

P e t r o l e u m and natural-gas p ro d u c t i o n
( e x c e p t c o n t r a c t s e r v i c e s ) .............

N N E A L M IN A D Q A R G
O M T L IC IN G N U R YIN ..........

72.7
26.7

27.2

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.....................................

2,889

NON BU 1LO 1N Q C ONSTRUCTION.................

653

2,927

2,956

22.2
8.6

2,507

318.2

BUILDING CONST RUCTION....................

—

9.2

31.2

27.I
11.0

c o n s t r u c t i o n ........

—

90.4
34.8
25.1
12.2

89-3

39.9
3O .6
14.8

Other nonbuilding

±]

Oct.
19 57

672
328.4

6^7
289.6

292.7

334.3

3*0.5

357.3

286.5

2,236

2,255

2,309

579

1,928

74.3
27.3

23.2

2,544
598
303.4
294.7
1,946

2,587
575
265.9
309.4
2,012

G N R L C N R C O S.....................................
EEA
OTATR

787.9

802.1

878.1

696.5

709.I

782.4

SPECIAL-TRADE C N R C O S.........................
OTATR

1,4 48 .5
323.O

1,453.0

1 ,431.3

1,231.9

1, 2 3 6 . 9

178.8
191.1
728.9

173.4
14 7. 7
645.6

1 ,229.8
276.9

151.6

P a i n t i n g a n d d e c o r a t i n g ..................
E l e c t r i c a l w o r k .............................
O t h e r s p e c i a l - t r a d e c o n t r a c t o r s .......

190.7
183.2
751.6

321.9
193.5
187.1
750.5

265.2

332.5

263.6
176.3
64 5.4

164.3
1 5 3 .8
63 4.8

MANUFACTURING.....................................................

15,542

15,755

16,783

11,728

11,940

12,896

DURABLE G O ODS..............................
NONDURABLE GOODS..........................

8,673
6,869

8 ,811*.
6,941

9,718
7,065

6,431
5,297

6,579
5,361

7, 41 3
5,483

Durable Goods

O D A C A D ACCESSORIES...............................
RNNE N

128.6

130.4

123.4

66.6

68.4

71.6

L M E A D W O P O U T (EXCEPT
U B R N OD R D C S
FURNITURE).........................................................

658.8

657.1
89.8

593.4
93.0
297.4

590.1

324.9

655.1
99.0
324.4

590.4
83.3
301.6

135.6

133.6

132.3
4 8.7

114. 2
4 1.8

56.6

47.0

L o g g i n g c a m p s a n d c o n t r a c t o r s .............
S a w m i l l s a n d p l a n i n g m i l l s .................
Hillwork, plywood, and prefabricated
s t r u c t u r a l w o o d p r o d u c t s ..................
W o o d e n c o n t a i n e r s .............................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s w o o d p r o d u c t s ...............

See fo o tn o te at end o f table*




98.8

45.8
53.7

1*5.2
52.9

329.7

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are prelim in a ry.

9 3.1
2 97 . 3
112. 4
4 1.2
46.1

111.2
4 4.4
4 9.9

7

Industry Em ploym ent

Tab le A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry-Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )

All employees
Industry

P r o d u c t i o n w o r k e r s 1/

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

1958

1958.

1957

1958

1958

1957

Durable Go od s— C o n t i n u e d

FU N U E A D FIXTURES.....................................
R IT R N

270.8

STO E, CLAY, A D G
N
N
LASS P O U T
R D C S...................
F l a t g l a s s .....................................
G l a s s a nd g l a s s w a r e , p r e s s e d or b l o w n . . .
G l a s s p r o d u c t s m a d e o f p u r c h a s e d glass. .
Cement, h y d r a u l i c ............................
P o t t e r y an d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s ..............
C o n c r e t e , gypsum, and p l a s t e r p r o d u c t s . .
C u t - s t o n e a nd s t o n e p r o d u c t s ..............
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral

369.9
266.4

380.7
270.7

313.4
233.9

229.6

318.9
233.5

45.4

45.6

47.4

35.5

36.0

37.5

35 . 0

35.0

3 8.1

26.1

26.5

28.6

23.1

O f f ice, p u b l i c - b u i l d i n g , a n d p r o f e s ­
s i o n a l f u r n i t u r e ...........................
P a r t i t i o n s , s h e l v i n g , loc k e r s , and
f i x t u r e s .......................................
Scre e n s , b l i n d s , and m i s c e l l a n e o u s

374.3

22.9

24.5

17.9

17.7

19.3

517.9

535.0
31. 9
98.9
16.7
43.1
75.9
43.9

557.2
35.3

421.4

438.1

11.0

101.0

83.0

28.0

18.4
43.5
81.4
48.3
112.4

1^.3
35. 5

459.8
31 . 4
85.4
15.4
36.4

19.3

15.0

97.4
17.3
42.8

76.1
44.8
114.3

309.8

83.9
13.7
35.7

66.3

66.1

71.2

92.0

37.7
94.0

41.9

16.4

16.5

91.2
16.7

38.4

19.0

116.3
19.0

91.2

89.3

97.6

64.5

62.5

70.2

1 ,107.7

1,103.3

1 , 280.1

899.7

896.5

1,050.7

188.2

55 4 . 5

540.7
194.1

628.5
228.5

458.0
158.6

444.9
164.8

522.3
195.8

53.8

53.4

65.5

41.2

40.8

51 . 1

11.5

11.4

13.0

8.4

8.2

9.6

106.6

105.6

M i s c e l laneous primary metal industries..

58.4
134.7

58.9
139.2

112.8
69.8
162.0

8i r 8
47.3
104.4

FABR
ICATED M T L P O U T (EXCEPT O D
EA
RDCS
R­
N C M
AN E, ACH ER A D TR N O TA N
IN Y, N
A SP R TIO
EQUIPM
ENT)........................................... ................

1 ,032.0

1 ,056.5
62.3

1,137.2

794.0
51.7
89.5

P IM R M T L INDUSTRIES.................................
R A Y EA
blat»o f u r n a c e s , s t e e l works, and
r o l l i n g m i l l s ................................
I r o n and s t e e l f o u n d r i e s ...................
P r i m a r y s m e l t i n g and r e f i n i n g o f
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ...........................
S e c o n d a r y s m e l t i n g and r e f i n i n g o f
n o n f e r r o u s m e t a l s ...........................
R o l l i n g , d r a w i n g , and a l l o y i n g o f

59.3

Cutl e r y , h a n d tools, and h a r d w a r e ........
H e a t i n g a p p a r a t u s ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c ) and

119.0
113.7

305.2
209.1
43.8

Fabricated structural metal products....
M e t a l s t a m p i n g , c o a t i n g , and e n g r a v i n g . .
L i g h t i n g f i x t u r e s ............................
F a b r i c a t e d w i r e p r o d u c t s . ..................
M iscellaneous fabricated metal products.

127.5

M C IN R (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL).......................
AH EY

1,464.7

E n g i n e s and t u r b i n e s .........................
A g r i c u l t u r a l m a c h i n e r y a n d t r a c t o r s .....
C o n s t r u c t i o n a n d m i n i n g m a c h i n e r y ...... .
M e t a l w o r k i n g m a c h i n e r y ......................
S p e c i a l - i n d u s t r y m a c h i n e r y ( except

54.4

90.8

131-5

146.1

112.5

109.3
331.6
243.6
53.1
56.9

308.8

217.1
46.0
53.0
125.3
1,466.4
92.3

139.4
115.7
211.5

138.2
116.9
210.8

155.0
211.5

155.4

See fo o tn o te at end o f ta b le .




128.7
166.7

212.6
127.2
165.2

245.4

G e n e r a l i n d u s t r i a l m a c h i n e r y ..............
O f f i c e an d s t o r e m a c h i n e s and d e v i c e s . . .
Service-industry and household machines.

58.6

247.8

87.8
221.2

81.0

86.5

47.7
109.I

128.2

821.6

896.5

57.2

54.4
I O 3.6

50.9
116.4

86.5

83.4
247.5

138.0

166.9
32 . 5
43.7

100.7

224.8
175.6
35.9
42.3
98.5

1,684.8
94.2
145.1
147.5
275.4

1 ,007.0
56.6

1 , 007.0
58.6

1,204.4

97.0
77.2

95.3
78.4
150.5

102.4
104.1

151.6
105.2

178.4
249.4
135.4

132.1
87.4

175.4
284.0

105.3

200.0
42.3
45.8

110.2
66.0
206.0
123.5

161.7

121.6

132.0
86.3
120.1

178.3

180.5

215.7

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.

96.7

128.3

8

Industry Em ploym ent

Tab le A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by mdustry-Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )
All employees
Industry

Oct.
1958

Sapt.
1958

Oct.
1958

Sapt.
1958

XI
Oet.
1957

Production workers

Oet.
1957

Durable Good s— C o n t i n u e d

ELECTR AL M
IC
ACH ER
IN Y.........................................

l a m p s ..................... .............

Miscellaneous

e l e c t r i c a l p r o d u c t s ........

TR N O TA N EQ IPM T.................................
A SP R TIO
U EN

A i r c r a f t p r o p e l l e r s a n d p a r t s ........... .
O t h e r a i r c r a f t p a r t s a n d e q u i p m e n t ......
S h i p and boat b u i l d i n g and repairing....
S h i p b u i l d i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g ...............
B o a t b u i l d i n g a n d r e p a i r i n g ...............

IN R M N S A D R L T D P O U TS................
ST U E T N E A E
RDC
Laboratory,

scientific,

Mechanical measuring

71(6.2

762.2

868.1

361.0
3 5.5
26.9
52.0
25.6
576.8

103.5
40.6
27.3
71(.8
30.1
602.4
50.2

237.U
26.5
20.8
36.7
21.8
372.3
30.7

21*4.2
25.5
20.2
1(9.2
21.4

U3.ii

367.9
3U.6
26.2
63.8
25.2
569.4
46.0

280.7
30.9
21.0
58.7
25.9
1*14.4
36.5

1,1(66.8
5Uu3
762.5
1(58.6
153.2
16.1
131*. 6
139.9
123.0
16.9
39.9
10.2

1,572.2
613.0
763.7
1(60.9
153.9
17.0
131.9
11(0.9
124.6
16.3
1&.5
10.1

1,809.0
833.5
503.7
170.6
20.7
138.5
11*9.6
129.7
19.9
72.0
10.7

996.7
364.9
481.1
290.7
90.9
10.4
89.1
116.4
102.3
14.1
25.9
8 .4

1,100.1
462.9
480.4
291.7
90.9

8.3

1,316.2
586.1
539.3
326.4
103.4
14.1
95.U
127.1
110.3
16.8
54.8
8 .9

316.6

313.0

336.7

207.1

204.9

224.3

57.8

63.0

31.6

31-6

31(.7

au.7
11». 6

83.6

lü.4

90.6
13.7

56.8
9.6

56.0
9 .5

61.2
10.2

41.2
22.0
64.8
29.2

1(1.9
25.9
69.5
32.1

27.0
18.2
39.5

2lul(

27.0
17.9
39.2
23.7

28.6
20.3
1(2.7
26.6

484.0
46.2
17.1
92.4
29.8
61.9
87.1
li»9.5

478.6
W .3
92.9
29.6
61.0
85.9
11(7.2

512.5
48.0
18.5
102.2
32.9
62.6
92.9
155.U

385.9
36.4
14.2
78.3
22.2
50.1
68.2
116.5

380.0
35.6
13.7
79.0
21.6
1(9.1
66.7
114.3

1(11.7
37.9
15.9
87.3
24.8
l»9.9
72.6
123.3

1.5U8.6
312.9
97.1
266.3
115.7
285.7
1(0.7
81.5
210.2
138.5

1,623.2
312.7
101.3
31(7.0
117.0
285.4
28.9
80.3
211.0
139.6

1,584.1*
329.5
101.4
270.3
115.5
289.1
1(2.5
83.7
212.8
139.6

1,108.5

1,178.4
21(9.0
67.9
311.8
82.5
165.8
23.4
66.5
115.2
96.3

1,1U0.4
263.4
67.1
236.4
81.3
171.5
37.1
69.6
U 8 .1
95.9

7l»3.2

368.4
33.3

11.0

86.8
118.0
104.U
13.6
30.5

and controlling

M ELLAN U M N F C U IN INDUSTRIES...
ISC
EO S A U A T R G
silverware,

1,238.9

and en gin eer ing

O p t i c a l i n s t r u m e n t s a n d l e n s e s .............
Surgical, medical, and dental

Jewelry,

1,133.1

1»1.3
23.5
64.7
30.0

Electric

1,121.2

57.8

Electrical generating, transmission,
d i s t ribution, and i n d u s t r i a l apparatus.
E l e c t r i c a l a p p l i a n c e s ..................... .

and p lated ware....

Pens, p e ncils, o t h e r o f f i c e sup p l i e s . . . .
C o s t u m e j e w e l r y , b u t t o n s , n o t i o n s ........

16.7

Nondurable Goods

F O A D K D E P O U TS...............................
O D N IN R D R D C
M e a t p r o d u c t s ....................................
D a i r y p r o d u c t s ...................................
C a n n i n g a n d p r e s e r v i n g . . . . . . ...............
G r a i n - m i l l p r o d u c t s ............................
B a k e r y p r o d u c t s ..................................
S u g a r ................................................
C o n f e c t i o n e r y a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s .......
B e v e r a g e s ............................ .............
M i s c e l l a n e o u s f o o d p r o d u c t s .................

See fo o tn o te at end o f ta b le .




NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.

250.4
64.7
232.1
81.3
165.8
3U.9
67.8
115.6
95.9

9

Industry Employment

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry-Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )
Industry

Oct.
_ ..195Ô

All e m p l o y e e s
Sept.
1958

Oct.
1957

Oct.
195Ô

Production workers H
Sept.
Oct.
1958
1957

Nondurabte Goods— C o n t i n u e d
*
TBCOMN FCUE
OAC
A U A T R S.......................................

103.5

36.6
29.2

T o b a c c o an d s n u f f ...........................

6 .5

31.2
TEXTILE-MILL P O U T
R D C S.....................................
S c o u r i n g and c o m b i n g p l a n t s .......... .

K n i t t i n g m i l l s ...............................
D y e i n g a n d f i n i s h i n g t e x t i l e s ............
C a rpets, rugs, o t h e r f l o o r c o v e r i n g s . ..
H a t s ( e x c e p t c l o t h and m i l l i n e r y ) ......

A P R L A D O H R FINISHED TEXTILE
PAE N TE
POUT
R D C S.............................................................
H e n ' s and boys' ’u r n i s h i n g s and wor k
f
c l o t h i n g .....................................

M i l l i n e r y ................................ .
C h i l d r e n * s o u t e r w e a r .......................
M i s c e l l a n e o u s a p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r i e s . .
O t h e r f a b r i c a t e d t e x t i l e p r o d u c t s ......

954.7
5.3
109.3
398.9
28.4
217.1
85.4
45.2
9.9
55.2

106.8

106.7

36.9

35.2

6.5
34.7

6.5

28.7

951.4
5.3

109.0
399.2

28.2
216.2
84.8
44.6
9.9
54.2

an d p a p e r b o a r d m i l l s .......

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, A D ALLIED
N
INDUSTRIES.........................................................

Soap,

8.6

44.2

1,053.7
94.0

1,055.3
97.4

1,071.1
102.7

288.7

289.6

303.9
105.9

306.7
103.3

294.2
305.1

115.3

19.2
75.3
11.5

60.8

131.0

135.2

553.9

554.5
271.7
153.2

567.9
275.1

129.6

858.7
318.0
63.1

854.8
316.1
62.4
55.4

17.6
66.1

9.3
54. 4
113.8

196.0
73.4
36.7

8.6

18.7
66.3
9. 4
53.8

110.1

108.7
16.7
66.7
8.9
54.9
113.2

134.2

100.0

447.0
222.5
124.0
100.5

866.5
31 6 . 9
62.5
55. 4
225.7

551.1
159.0

547.6
157.0

26.7

26.1

3 3. 5

33.8
177.5
49.6

35.0
183.5

15.8

15.7
37.7

158.6

220.7
65.6

22 . 5
44.9

21.7
45.4

21.5
47.1

67.2

67.5

69.6

826.5
100.0
311.7
102.7

821.4
100.7
311.1

846.2
107.7
320.3

50.9
73.8
7.8
34.3

51.1
74.0
7.8
32.9
38.9

103.2

106.0

371.1
24 . 5

45.2

66.1

C E IC LS A D ALLIED P O U T
HM A
N
R D C S.....................

100.6

907.2
4.5

59.8

134.4

270.6

859.9
4.8

37 1 . 4
24.7
197.1
73.7
37.4

322.3
345.1
121.4

60.3

31.6

31.1
5.5
29.4

10.3

317.7
34 3 . 5
115.1

74.7
11.7

5.5

100.8

50. 4

317.4
340.8

74.8
11.9
59.5

96.6
30.6

4.8

88.6

1 ,206.1

21.1

32.0
27.0

395.7
25.4
197.9
77.4
41.5
9 .1
49.7

1,184.3
109.7

117.8
19.9

96.1

863.7

999.5
5. 1
114.6
423.2
29.I
218.4

1,183.3
106.3

55.4
221.5

B o o k b i n d i n g and r e l a t e d i n d u s t r i e s .....
M i s c e l l a n e o u s p u b l i s h i n g an d p r i n t i n g

27-5
5.5
28.3

32.2

129.2

Pulp, pa p e r ,

31.8

32.8

154.1

P P R A D ALLIED P O U T
AE
N
R D C S.............................

93.1

67.8

446.3
221.9
124.4

178.6
50.0
16.3

460.5

227.0

128.4
105.I

157.5

560.6
26.1
51.8

35. 5

35.9

51. 5

51.8

53.3

518.3

510.9

101.8

193.6
56.7

191.4
57 . 2

542.0
72.7
203.9

50. 5
74.9
8.5
34. 1
43.7
104.7

31 . 5
44.5
6.4
24.7
29.9
64.8

31.5
44.6
6.4
23.4

66.2

66.0

58.8

c l e a n i n g and p o l i s h i n g p r e p a r a -

F e r t i l i z e r s ..................................

42.7

102.6
See fo o tn o te a t end o f ta b le -

4 1 4 O-58 -4
916




101.7

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.

26.5
63 . 9

31.2
45.3
7.2
25.1
31.2

66.6

10

Industry Em ploym ent

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by ¡ndustry-Contmued
(In t h o u s a n d s )
All e m p l o y e e s
Industry

Production or nonsupervisory workers 1/

Oct.
1957

Oct.
1958

Sept.
1958

Oct.
1957

Oct.
1958

Sept.
1958

234.1
186.9

238.7
191.5

249.2
197.7

15U.1
117.3

157.5
120.1*

167.2
126.6

1*7.2

47.2

51.5

36.8

37.1

1*0.6

251.3
100.7
21.4
129.2

245.3
99.7
21.1
124.5

270.2
111.6
21.9
136.7

193.3
75.0
17.1
101.2

187.5
7U.1
16.8
96.6

209.8
81*.l*
17.6
107.8

353.9
37.8

360.3
37.8

368.2
1*0.4
4.6
18.3
240.4
15.8
31.8
16.9

3l2w9
33.7
3.U
15.7

321.0
33.6
3.2
15.7
212.9
13.2
29.0
13.U

327.1*
36.0
3.5
16.3
215.9
13.2
27.7
li*.8

Nondurable Goods — C o n t i n u e d

P O U T O P T O E M A D COAL................
RDCS F ERLU
N
P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g ........................
Coke, o t h e r p e t r o l e u m and coal

RBE P O UT
U B R R D C S...............................................
R u b b e r f o o t w e a r ............................
O t h e r r u b b e r p r o d u c t s ....................

L A H R A D L A H R P O U TS....................
ET E N ET E
RDC
Le a t h e r : tanned, curr i e d , and finished.
I n d u s t r i a l l e a t h e r b e l t i n g and pac k i n g .
B o o t and s h o e cut s t o c k and f i ndings..
Luggage............ ..........................
H a n d b a g s and s m a l l l e a t h e r g o o d s ......
G l o v e s and m i s c e l l a n e o u s l e a t h e r goods.

l*.l*

l*.l

17.7
229.7
16.1
33.3
U*.9

17.6
237.1
15.8
32.7
15.2

206.0
13.5
29.5
13.1

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

3,886

1*,152

2,51*2
961.8
841.5
9k.U
808.6
677.1
1*1.5
141.1

2,523
959.8
839.9
91*. 7
781.3
686.9
1*2.5
11*1.3

2,71*3
1,112.4
971*. 5
1O3.0
832.3
695.0
1*3.2
ua. 5

25.1*

25.8

26.2

752
713.6
37.7

757
718.8
37.7

809
766.8
41.0

598
575.5
256.5
151.7

606
582.7
259.4
153.U

600
577.1*
259.0
11*9.6

532
511.5
220.6
137.0

139.0

538
517.9
225.6
136.6

167.3

169.9

168.8

153.9

156.8

155.7

22.9

23.1

22.9

20.1i

20.6

20.5

-

-

-

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S .............

3,892

TRANSPORTATION...............................

Bus lines, e x c e p t l o c a l ...................
Air transportation (common carrier)....
P i p e - l i n e t r a n s p o r t a t i o n (ex c e p t

COMMUNICATION................................

E l e c t r i c l i g h t a n d gas u t i l i t i e s
c o m b i n e d .....................................
Lo c a l u t i l i t i e s , n o t e l s e w h e r e

_

_
_

-

-

_

_
_
_
-

_
_

_
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

51*0
519.7

223.9

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE...............................

11,231

11,151

11,387

WHOLESALE T R A D E ..............................

3,035

3,016

3,097

2,61*2

2,625

2,718

1,771«.3
127.8

1,762.7
127.8

1,788.4
125.7

1,557.1*
111.0

1,51*6.3
111.3

l,5 8b .7
110.1*

307.5

306.1

305.2

276.7

275.5

27l».li

1(37.8

1*37.1*

1*57.1*

380.0

380.1

1*02.1

901.2
1,260.7

891.4
1,253.2

900.1
1,308.7

789.7
1,081*.1

779.1
1,078.3

797.8
1,133.2

Wholesalers,

full-service

and l i m i t e d -

G r d c eries, f o o d s p e c i a l t i e s , beer,
wines, and l i q u o r s ........................
E l e c t r i c a l goods, m a c h i n e r y , h a r d w a r e ,
and p l u m b i n g e q u i p m e n t ...................
O t h e r f u l l - s e r v i c e and l i m i t e d -

See fo o tn o te at end o f ta b le .




NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.

I

ndustry Employment

Table A -8 : Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry-Continued
(In t h o u s a n d s )

Industry

oct.

1958

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

1958

Oct.

Nonsupervisory workers JJ
Oct.
Oct.

19?7

1958

19§8

1957

8,290
1 ,1*70.6

1 ,376.1
*

1 ,322~.9

1 ,371.9

951*.l
516.5
1 ,585.0
1 ,121*.9

879.0
497.4
1 ,476.2
1 ,083.4
192.7

840.0

482.9
1 ,479.8

887.4
184.5
*
1 ,474.9

TRADE— Continued

RETAIL TRADE...........................
General merchandise stores*..........
Department stores and general mail­
order houses........................
Other general merchandise stores....
Food and liquor stores.... ...........
Grocery, meat, and vegetable markets.
Dairy-product stores and .dealers....
Other food and liquor stores........
Automotive and accessories dealers....
Other retail trade................. .
Other retail trade (except eating and
drinking places).....................
Furniture and appliance stores......

FINANCE,

All employees
S*pt.

INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE

Banks and trust companies............
Security dealers and exchanges.......
Insurance carriers and agents........
Other finance agencies and real estate..

SER V IC E AND MISCELLANEOUS ..............

Hotels and lodging places............
Personal services:
Laundries............................
deeming and dyeing plants..........
Motion pictures.......................

8,196
1 ,173.5
*

91*7.2
526.3
1 ,597.0
1 ,155.0

223.5
218.5
753.2
602.5
3 ,769.8

8,135

1 ,1*20.8
908.1

512.7
1 ,595.5
1 ,11*6.7
230.2
218.6

755.0
590.1
*
3,773.6

_

388.5
355.2

2,377

615.6

85.3
892.7
783.2

6 ,1*67
1 78.3
*

2,392

616. »
1
81*.8

900.3
790.8

6 ,1*72

1 ,076.8
202.1

1 ,054.0
203.0

803.0
608.6
3 ,822.7

200.1
666.1

667.2

551.1

540.7

217.9
718.3
560.3

39k. 8

2,066.7
356.2

2,070.5
352.0
337.0

2,110.3
360.9
343.7

229.9

_

391.9
358.1

230.2

361.1

2,361
608.3
83.8

880.3
788.3

6 ,1*06

526.6

505.2

311.1

311.6

170.3
191.1
*

166.5
195.3

323.8
172.6

205.0

-

31*0.2

_
_

200.9

-

-

_
_
_
-

_
_
_
-

_

_

~

_
-

_
-

_

-

GOVERNMENT..............................

8,030

7 ,91*3

7,723

_

_

FEDERAL5-/..............................

2,173

2,171*

2,156
2,128.9

-

_

_

-

1*.7

526.6
630.8
22.0
1*.6

l,5ll*.l*
1 31*2.5
*,

5,769
1,176.3
*
1 292.7
*,

1 ,1*08.6
U, 157.9

-

2,715.3
3,11*1.6

2,573.9

2,552.0

_

3,195.1

3,0ll*.5

Department of Defense...............
Post Office Department..............
Legislative...........................
Judici al..............................
STATE AND LOCAL ........................

XJ

2,11*5.6

963.0
538.8
61*3.8
22.1
1*.8

5,857

2 ,11*6.8

962.5
539.0
61*
5.3
22.2

971.5

5,567

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

F o r m i n i n g and m a n u f a c t u r i n g , d a t a r efer to p r o d u c t i o n and r e l a t e d workers; for c o n tract construction,
c o n s t r u c t i o n workers; and for all o ther industries, to n o n s u p e r v i s o r y workers*
2/ D a t a a r e p r e p a r e d b y t h e U. S. C i v i l S e r v i c e C o m m i s s i o n a n d r e l a t e t o c i v i l i a n e m p l o y m e n t o n l y .
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are preliminary.




_

-

-

_

_
to

Shipyard

12

Employment

Military P e r s o n n e l

A -9 : Employees in private and Government
shipyards, by region

| H

(I n t h o u s a n d s )

October

Septeaber

October

1958

1958

1957

ALL REGIONS ..................................................

218.2

219.7

223.7

PRIVATE YARDS............................................................................................
HAVY YARDS...................................................................................................

123.0

121*. 6

95.2

95.1

129.7
9 *.0
1

NORTH ATLANTIC...............................................

97.9
55.3

1(2.6

98.lt
55.7
12.7
*

51*.8
12.5
*

35.5

35.6

36.2

18.7

17.0
18.6

17.?
18.5

27.1
*

29.0

31.5

50.1*

19.1
* *

Region

'

SOUTH ATLANTIC...............................................

16.8

97.3

GULF:
PACIFIC......................................................

16.5
33.9

33.8

18.5
*
15.5
33.0

3.5

3.5

5.3

3.5

3.8

1*.9

15.6

GREAT LAKES:
INLAND:

11 T h e N o r t h A t l a n t i c r e g i o n i n c l u d e s
Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts,

a ll y a r d s b o r d e r i n g o n the A t l a n t i c in the f o l l o w i n g S t a t e s : C o n n e c t i c u t ,
N e w Hampsh i r e , N e w Jersey, N e w York, P e n n s y l v a n i a , Rho d e Island, a nd

Vermont.
The S o u t h A t l a n t i c r e g i o n i n c l u d e s all y a r d s b o r d e r i n g on the A t l a n t i c in the f o l l o w i n g S t a t e s : F l o r i d a ,
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
T h e G u l f r e g i o n i n c l u d e s all y a r d s b o r d e r i n g on the G u l f o f M e x i c o in the f o l l o w i n g S t a t e s : A l a b a m a ,
Florida, Louisiana, M i s s i ssippi, and Texas.
The P a c i f i c r e g i o n i n c l u d e s all y a r d s in C a l i f o r n i a , Oregon, and W a s h i n g t o n .
Th e G r e a t L a k e s r e g i o n i n c l u d e s all y a r d s b o r d e r i n g on the G r e a t L a k e s in the f o l l o w i n g S t a t e s : I l l i n o i s ,
Michigan, Minnesota, N e w York, Ohio, P e n n sylvania, and Wisconsin.
The Inland r e g i o n i ncludes all other yards.
— / D a t a i nclude C u r t i s B a y C o a s t G u a r d Yard.
NOTE:

Data

for the

current month

are p r e l i m i n a r y .

Table A-10: Federal m ilitary personnel
(In t h o u sands)

October

TOTAL U .....................................................

October

1958

1957

2.627
901.8
863.8
61*
1.3
189.1
*

A i r F o r c e ................................ ..................................
M a r i n e C o r p s ..............................................................
C o a s t G u a r d ................................................................

■ D a t a r e f e r to f o r c e s b o t h i n c o n t i n e n t a l U n i t e d S t a t e s
i/
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h are p r e l i m i n a r y .

September

1958

Branch

30.7
and

abroad.

S U C : U, S. Department of Defense and U. S. Department of Treasury.
ORE




2.629
900.1*

865.2
6 *3.5
1
188.9
30.7

2.729
955.3
902.1

6b6.8
191*.9

30.3

13

State Employment

Table A - ll: Employees in non agricultura I establishm ents,
by industry division and State
(In thousands)

TOTAL
State

O ct.

1958
A l ab ama. . .............

Arizona............
A r k a n s a s ....... .
C a l i f o r n i a ...........
C o l o r a d o ..............
C o n n e c t i c u t . ........
D e l a w a r e ..............

731.6
285.7
3*3.1

*, 5* 7-2
*65.6

877.0
1*5.1

O ct.

1953

1957

725.8
281.8
3*0.5
*,551.2
*6*.2
873.*
1* 9.1

502.8

8

505.7

92*. 8
378.2
1 .265.7
168.2
360.*

927.3
376.5
1,272.3

N e w J e r s e y ...........
N e w M e x i c o ...........
N e w Y o r k ..............
N o r t h C a r o l i n a ......
N o r t h D a k o t a ........
O h i o ....................
O k l a h o m a ..............

1 .866.0
218.7
6,075.6
1.099.1
(*)
2,9*6.5
558.1

1 .880.6
218.9
6,066.7

O r e g o n .................
P e n n s y l v a n i a .........
R h o d e I s l a n d ........
S o u t h C a r o l i n a .....
S o u t h D a k o t a ........
T e n n e s s e e .............
T e x a s ....... ..........

*8*. 9
3.623.8
277.1

* 92.*
3 ,627.*
276.6
531.6

U t a h ....................
V e r m o n t ...............
V i r g i n i a ..............
W a s h i n g t o n ...........
W e s t V i r g i n i a .......
W i s c o n s i n .............
W y o m i n g ...............

oW .
852.*
2,*71.3

135.3
8* 9.2
2,*62.1

2*6.2

2*6.6

101.5
1.013.1
807.1
*76.8
1.125.9
88.3

102.5

1,8*1.9
2,338.2

6.8

&
4.6
3.3
29.0

14.3

6.8

13.3

122.2

4.7
3.6
29.2

5.1
4.5

12.1

10.2

3.4

W,

17.4
35.6
41.0

.6

2.6
(2)

30.2

10.4
3.6

18.2
40.4
k6.3
.6
2.6

14.5

14.5

939.8
372.8
1 .298.0
170.0
356.9
86.5
186.8

17.7

17.9

21.8

1.957.5
213.8
6,256.3
1 .108.5
12*.3
3.175.7
576.2

3.7
13.2

43.8

*87.0
3.810.1

1.1

1.2

1.2

69.8

69.2

85.4

(2)

(2)

283.2
535.9
131.*

86*. 2

4.8
7.5
8.9
2.5
2.9

.2

11.1

3.1
w.

20.4

(2)

1.3
«
7.7

4.7
7.5

8.8

2.5
2.9

.2

3.6
14.8
11.0

4.3

8.5
9.7
2.5
3.6

.2

4.2
I 7.5

12.0

3.2

3.7

20.5
43.7

2I .9
48.8

2.2

1-3
2.5
7.7

2.0

1.3

2.6
8.6

2,*87.0

122.0

123.5

130.3

2*6.2
103.6

I 5.O

14.7

15.9

1,010.9

91.6

89.3

67.8
3.5
7.9

18.3
1.7
67.4
3.7

19.4

* 7*.*

810.0
512.*
1.156.8

18.4

1,00*.6

806.0

1,1*1.8

1.2

1.8

31.0
50.6
12.8

'!!»

3.5

1*0.0
.6
2.6
(f)

16.2

,

f

10.2

35.4

7.2

(2)
I6.I

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data f o r the cu rrent month are p relim in a ry .




18.5
120.3

&

M i n n e s o t a . ............
M i s si s s i p p i . ........
M i s s o u r i ..............
M o n t a n a ...............
N e b r a s k a . .............
N e v a d a .................
N e w H a m p s h i r e .......

531.0

18.8

36.1

561.0
6*6.7
799.7
278.*
880.8

556.8

42.1
28.9
20.9
302.2
32.4
52.2
13.1

34.3

*75.*
906.8
151.1

537.6
625.7
76*. 0
271.9
873.8
1,792.1
2.120.5

1,100.0
12*. 9
2 ,963.6

42.4
29.3
20.5
299.8

33.6
13.*

*,5*1.2

(*)
631.7
765.3
270.1
871.2
1,788.3
2.027.9

185.3

JL22L

15.6
16.4

K a n s a s 3 / .............
K e n t u c k y ..............
L o u i si a n a .............
M a i n e ..................
M a r y l a n d ..............
M a s s a c h u s e t t s .......
M i c h i g a n ..............

90.2

1958

15.7

969.0
151.2
3,51*.8
1,*33.5
6* 5.*

357.9

O ct.

1958

I 5.7

958.8
152.0
3,3*0.*
1,3*3.1
6*7.8

88.6
182.*

S ep t.

1957

1958

O ct.

l*.l

1,122.3

170.8

1958

O ct.

S ep t.

270.9
338.3

1,12*.0

I n d i a n a 3 / ..............
I o w a ....................

O ct.

7*2.1

501.7
1,1*6.1
958.8
150.*
3,3*3.7
1.323.7
6*6.5

District of Columbi
F l o r i d a ...............
G e o r g i a ...............
I d a h o ..................
I l l i n o i s ..............

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t io n

M in in g

S ep t.

1.2

8.0

1.3

1.9
80.9
3.9
8.7

56.6

206.1
70 .7
38.0

w
31.7
63.6
14.6
64.2
84.5
96.4
65.2
17.6

67.8

15.9
24.3

8.2

9.8
90.1

20.4
273.3
53.9
w
154.2
34.9

57.5

11.9
207.0
73.1
39.2

37.3

31.4
63.1
14.7
64.6
84.2
980I
65.6
19.1
68.1

15.8
23.2
8.5

23.7

20.6

283.2
35.1
54.8
12.3
17.0
122.9
51.7
11.8

213.5
78.5

36.1

37.9
39.4
72.0
14.4
70.6

89.3

117.8

64.7

17.9
67.9
14.1
20.5
7.4

10.2

10.2

93.3

105.9
17.7
283.1
57.6
13.3
172.1
34.6

20.6

275.9
54.9
13.1

154.4
35.3
28.2

27.7
191.1

194.0

28.4
(*)
Í4.0
159.9

11 .7

43.9
157.8

17.4
5.7
68.3
47.5
31.4
61.5
7.3

17.9
5.9
69.3
48.3
30.7
62.0
8.4

20.2

k o .k

20.0

27.8

24.5
189.5
18.1

26.2
9.6
43.5
167.2
1 6.4

5.5

71.8

46.7
33.1
62.5
7.4

u

State Employm ent

Table A-ll: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State-Continued
Manufacturing
State

Oct.

Sept*

1958

1958
229.0
39.5
89.1

(In thousands)
Transportation and
public utilities
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Sept.
1958
1958
1957
1957

1,23*.0
7*.*
382.8
58.3

17.1
163.1
309.7
27.3
1 , 128.*
526.7
162.5

Arkansas..................

229.8
39.9
89.8
1 , 2x7.5
75.6
386.2
55.8

112.1
l 6 l .l
139.6
102.8

128.1
167.*
1*9.6

256.6
6* 5.8

270.2

687.6

8*1.8

982.0

(*)

16* .*
139.6
102.2
253.2
6*8.1
736.8

50.3
21.6
28.9
368.3
45.5
46.6
10.3

153.5
71.*
80.0
1 , 015.8
119.*
160.*
29.*

152.5
71.5
79.*
1 , 019.9
120.*
158.7
29.2

17.0

16.8

159.7
312.9
27.1
1,130.*
5*6.9
162.3

159.*
323.3
27.3
1,255.3
609.9

27.0
90.1

27*2
90.0
69.8

29.I
89.6

89.*
327.3
217.3
37.7
713.6
286.3
175.1

91.0
332.3
223.1
38.1
7* 3.0

165.6

108.0

223.6

7*6.3
22.1
1,78*.3
*73.6
6.7
1,169.9

80*.7
21.3
1,9*3.*
*80.1
6.6
1,327.0
86.8

1*6.*
1,36*.*
112.3
221.9
12.5

1*0.*
l,*99-5
118.9

1*0.3
1 , 363.3
112.1
219.6
(*)

289.8
* 57.*
38.8
33.1
260.9
225.*
120.9

*1*.2
7.2

80.2

107.6
385.3
22.0

60.2
5.0
82.3

227.2
12.*

*59.1

298.2
*81.5

39.8
33.0

39*5
35.2

225.3
119.9
*29.3
6.7

230.3
132.7
** 9.*
7 .*

288.1

256.2

265.7

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rrent month are p relim in a ry.




Oct.
1957

49.4
20.8
27.1
336.5
39.0
46.5
10.0

736.6
21.7
1 , 777.7
*71.7
80.5

Sept.

1958

49.5
21.8
27.5
347.2
43.3
46.4
9.9

221.6
112.1
363.3
21.2
57.1
*.7
79.8

(*)
1, 1* 3.5

Oct.

1958

244.0
1*0.1
88.2
1,25*.7
75.7
*22.*
61.*

215.6
113.1
353.1
21.7
58.2
*.7
79.9

New York..................

Wholesale and retail trade

69.9
15.1
285.4
91.3

52.2
«

54.0
82.9
18.9
73.7

112.1
138.3

84.7
24.3
121.0
19.1
37.2
8.7
9.6
150.3
19.5

496.1
61.5
«
202.6
46.0

14.6

15.6

91.3

307.3
101.3
54.2

54.4
53.5

60.0
58.8
87.2

1* 5.1
185.5

(*)

128.7
1*3.6
18*. 5

130.0
1*3.3

19.1
73.8
113.0
137.9

20.3

5*.2
19*.*
376.2
*32.*

5*.3
191.9
377.0
*36.*

56.3
191.2
383.8
*71.8

92.1
25.9
125.4
21.4
38.9
9.0
10.5

232.8

232.5

235.5
88.8
323.5
*2.1
97.0
18.7
3*. 6

156.9
20.5
513.6
62.4
13.6
223.5
50.1

359.0
*9-3
1,37**8

46.9
311.6
15.1
25.5
9.8
58.9
230.0

105.9
72*.*

285.2
52.6

83.6

86.0

23.8

120.7
19.3
37.4
8.3
9.7
149.6
19.2
495.5

61.5

12.8
202*4
46.3

44.2

41.4

282.5

14.1
24.6
M
54.1

221.3

14.1
24.7
9.8
53.4
222*3

22.3

21.9

61.0
46.0
72.9
12.1

67.7
80.1
1 , 018.5
122.8
156.2
28.9

90.2
339.6
218.1
37.0
719.5
288.2
17*. 1

282.1

7.8
85.5

155.5

7.8

85.2
58.4
45.4
73.4
12.5

73.1

76.2
119.9
150.1

22.8
8.3
90.9
64.0

52.2
76.8
13.0

87.5
318.8
*0.9
97-3
18.*
33.1

227.6

630.*
138.7

51.2
107.6
(*)

192.1
690.*
56.6

20.6

236.5
185.6
87.3
258.3
20.1

87.2

316.*
*2 .*

96.8
18.6

33.5

30*.6
175.7

192.6

361.7
*9.8
1,365.*
226.*
38.9
628.9
139.*

368.2
*7.1
1,387.8

108.2

110.6
7*1.1
52.3
108.3
39.2
196.7

720.9
51.0
107.3
*0.0
190.6

687.6
56.*
20.7
23*.7

185.2
87.5
255.9
21.0

227.6
38.8
6*6.*
1**.5

685.9
57.3
20.7
231.9
187.*
92.1
259.*
19.7

15

State Employment

Table A-ll: Employees in nonagricultural establishments,
by industry division and State-Continued

State

(In thousands)
Finance, insurance,
Service and miscellaneous
and real estate
Oct.
Òct.
Sopt*
Oct.
Oct.
Sept.
1958
1958
1958
1957
1528 . . . 1957

Oct.
1957

1*0.6
57.9
66.5
792.*
97.*

139.6
56.1
63.9
753.8
96.*

15.6

1**.*
59.3
67.7
800.9
98.0
89.5
16.9

72*9
167.3
97.2
19.1
419.8
114.9
74.6

2* 9.6
189.0
162.7
31.5
377.9
171.*
112.7

251.7

.

28.8
11.6
11.0
222.4
21.9
51.7
5.5
District of Columbia^/....

Government
Sept.
1958

24.3
63.9
40.2
5.0
177.4

50.8

28.4
w

22.7
29.7
8.3

40.4
97.2
75.9
45.4
11.3
63.4

6.0
20.6
2.6
6.7
87.7
8.4
465*3
35.5

&
106.7
22.4
17.?
143.4
12.6

16.5
w

31.7
117.9
9.9
3.5

42.8
34.5
12.3
43.3
2.2

26.8
11.6
11.0

222.7

21.8
51.8
5.5

27.7
10.8
10.6
220.0
21.4
49.3
5.5

69.1
36.7
39.8
610.0
63.0
92.2

24.5

7**7
170.1
97.0

2*. 3
63.8
>10.3
5.1
179.0
51.1
28.7

39.8
5.0
179.0

20.*
22.8

29.6

8 .*
*0.*
9 7 .8
7 6 .3

*5.7
11.3
«3.9

6.0
20.7
2.6
6.7

88.*

8.5
*67.1

35.6
5.3
107.3
22.*

18.1

60.9

1*.8

19.1

51.2
28.5

20.3
21.7

(*)
73.9

62*1
73.5
90*2
27.8
108.0
239.6

29.8
8.3
39.8
97.1
76.3
45.5
11.0

63.1
5.9

20.6
2.6
6.6
86.2
7-7
461.8
34.4
5.2

89.2
26.7
106.5
236.2

606.6
62.3
91.8

59.4
72.4

92*6
27.2

<*)

10* .*
13* . 7

88.8
16.9

186.2
158.8
32.*
37*. 9
170.9
110.*

85.8
17.1

25*.*

181.9
155.7

29.8

366.8

162.5
107.2

105.2
10*.0
132.*
**.2
135.9
23*. 7
271.6

187.1

103.2
129.6
*3.3
127.1
228.6
27*. 0

244.0

250.2

120.8
39.*
I 60.6
22.5
*8.*
25.9
21.*

119.0
39.3
162.2

1*2.7
80.2
173.5
33.2
71.9
17.2
21.6

139.1
79.1

137.1
77.6

27.4
23.5

119.5
39.7
159.5
22.1
47.5
24*0
21.3

33.3
71.7
17.2
21.6

69.6
16.2

222.9
26.7
896.2
99.0

224.1

219.3

215.7
57.5

213.6
56.0
769.8

1*6.8
(*)
366.*
126.8

1*6.0

90.6
*19.0
37.2
89.7
(*)
1*0.2
389.8

89.9
*1*.6
36.9

106.6
21.9
17.9
142.2
12.6

65.0

9.9
3.6
*3.0
3*.9
12.3
*3.2
2.2

9.8
3.5

27.9
13.6

42*9
33.4
12.6
42.7
2.4

34.5
38.8

2*3.0

& K
322.*

16.0

76.2

6?. 0

1958

**.6
136.2
23*.0
290.7

5.3
32*0
114*2

118.0

97.5

19.6

421.2
113.3

5.*
31.9

12.7
16.5

74.7

168.6

*ao.o
11* .*
75.3

57.2
*30.7
29.7
*3.3
(*)
92.8
312.6

1**.*

69.1
35.9
39.7
609.2
65.5
92.6
16.I

Oct.

U

7.3

9*«1
*8.5

131.1
U .2

24.0
48.4

27.9
897.8
98.8
17.0

103.1
235.6

27*0

885*6
99.0

16.8

324.4
65.4

319.1
66.5

59.0
437.*

58.3
431.5
29.7
43.6

29.6

43.1

18.3

18*0

92.9
311.8

92.7
303.9

28.2
14.1
117.3
96.9
48.5
134.2
11.9

27*1
13.2
111*9
92.7
47.6
126.4
10.8

781.0

170.2

29.0
355.9
12*.l

89.0

35.3
1*0.7

382.0
57.8

16*.8
32.7

21.0
212.1
55.0
769.0
1*3.7
27.9
359.0
123.0
87.2
*09.3
36.5
87.8
3*.6
133.6
37*. 0

58.3
16.3
183.*
157.2

16.3
180.6

16.1
176.*

155.3

153.6

1*1.1
20.3

1*0.2
20.9

135.6
19.9

62.7

62.6

57.*

61.2

1/ Combined with construction. 2/ Combined with service. 3/ Revised series; not strictly comparable with
previously published data. 4/ Hot available. 5/ Federal employment in the Ml. and Va. sectors of the D. C.
metropolitan area is included in data for D. C.
NOHSj Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on Inside back cover.




16

A re a Employment

Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division
Area and industry division

ALABAMA
Biralnghaw

Oct.
1958

(Jfl-thgttgaBdal
Area and industry division

Oct.
1957

Sept.
1958

Los Angeles-Long Beach

209.8
8.1»
16.7
63.7
16.8
49.0
12.2
22.7
20.5

208.4
8.7
16.4
62.8
16.7
48.7
12.2
22.9
20.3

206.6
10.7
6.9
68.1
16.9
50.1
12.3
22.8
19.1

91.4
5.3
16.8
10.7
19.2
4.9
10.1
24.4

91.6
5.3
17.5
10.6
19.1
4.9
10.1
24.1

95.0
5.9
22.5
11.1
19.2
4.2
10.0
22.3

M i n i n g . •
Contract construction. .
Manufactaxing... .
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..............
finance........
Service........ .
Government...........

144.0
.3
14.0
23.7
10.7
40.9
7.9
19.5
27.0

141.4
.3
13.9
23.5
10.1
40.8
7.9
18.6
26.3

135.4
.3
10.8
23.3
10.5
39.3
7.3
18.0
25.9

Tucson
""Total.....*.........
Killing.............
Contract construction..
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..............
finance.............
Service.............
Qoveraaent..........

61.8
2.4
6.4
8.6
5.1
14.7
2.1
9.8
12.7

59.9
2.4
6.2
8.4
5.0
14.5
2.1
9.4
11.9

58.0
2.3
5.5
9.5
4.9
13.4
2.0
8.7
11.7

77.3
7.2
14.0
7.5
18.7
5.0
10.7
14.3

76.4
6.6
14.0
7.5
18.4
5.1
10.7
14.3

75.0
6.2
13.0
7.9
18.5
4.9
10.7
13.9

14.3

13.7

14.2

iot«ir..................
W r i n g -- -------------- -

Contract construction. ••
Mmufacturing.
Trans, and pub. util....
Trad»...............
finance........ .
Sendee...............
OwfrMMit....«,.......

Mobilt
Total... ••••....... .
Contract construction* ..
Manufacturing. •••••••••.
Trans* and pub. util...•
Trade...............
n u a n c e .................

Service l/......... .
(bTinUMBt, •••••••••••••

ARIZONA
Phoenix
“ t a : . ................
E

ARKANSAS
Little Rock£ Littì* Rock
total......... ........

Contract construction..
Manufacturing.••••••.••
Trans, and pib. util...
Trade..............
finance..............
Service l/.......... .
Qovernnsnt...........
GAUfGRNIA
fresno
Manufacturing........

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




Oct.
1958

Contract conatruction...
Trans, and pub. util....

San Bernardinokiveraide-Ôntario
San Diego
Contract construction...
Trans, and pdb. util....

San francisco-Oakland
Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....

San Jose
................

Contract construction...
Manufacturing.••••»•••••
Trans, and pub. util....

Oct.
1957

2,158.1»
1» 7
1.
127.7
701».1
128.9
1*82.1»
115.5
320.2
261*.9

2,190.1
15.3
126.1»
71*9.7
11*2.5
1*80.8'
113.3
311*.8
21*7.3

Ii
l 7.9
.6
11.2
23.8
11.7
28.0
5.6
12.i|
5U.6

11*8.5
.6
11.0
2*l
l.*
11.5
28.3
5.5
12.6
5U.6

11*1.0
.5
10.1
20.1
12.5
28.2
5.5
12.2
51.9

31.8

31.3

32.1

226.1*
.2
lit.l
69.2
12.0
1*6.9
10.1*
26.7
1*6.9

226.3
.2
1» 1
1.
68.5
12.0
1*7.1
10.1*
27.5
1*6.5

222.6
.2
13.7
68.0
12.2
1*6.5
10.1
26.1*
1*5.5

953.8
952.1
1.9
1.9
57.6
57.2
190.9 . 197.3
106.8
105.5
217.2
217.5
66.6
66.5
123.9
123.5
187.7
183.9

956.7
1.9
5b.5
201.1*
111.3
217.7
66.0
123.1*
180.5

153.1
.1
13.0
53.7
8.6
29.0
6.1
19.9
22.7

na. 2
.1
10.8
1*8.2
9.3
28.3
5.8
18.6
20.1

2,170.3
1» 1
1. *
127.1
708.1
Trans, and pub. util....
132.5
1*83.3
116.0
320.6
268.3

Mining..............
Contract construction...

Sacramento

Stpt.
1958

159.3
.1
12.9
61.1
8.8
28.9
6.1
19.2
22.2

A re a Employment

17

Table A-12: Em pbyees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry d¡vision-Continued

Area and industry division

CALIFORNIA— Continued
Stockton
Manufacturing.....
COLORADO
Denver
fotal...............
Mining. ••••••••... .
Contract construction. .•
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...........
Finance.
Service... ...... .
Government.... ......
CONNECTICUT
Bridgport
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub, util..
Trade...... .......
Finance............
Service............
Government............

Oct.

Sept.

19S 8

19S8

Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing... .....
Trans, and pub* util.***
Trade...............
Finance...............
Service...... *......
Government*....... *...

Men Britain
Total*
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing*.*••*.••••
Trans* and pub* util**.*
Trade............ .
Finance... ......... *
Service*.... *.......
Government* *•*••......
Mew Haven
""ïotîüTr. «•*•*••*•••«*••

Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing*........
Trans, and pub. util.***
Trade...............
Finance.*.****...... ..
Service........ .....
Government...........

19S7

14.3

271.5

15.7

268*8

3.0

2*9
19.7

28.3
74.3
16.3
37.3
41.5

24.4
74.5

19.3

16.2

38.7
ia.5

113.9
6*9
60*9

113.4
7.0

19.4
2*9
9.3
8.5

19.1

209.0

60*8
6*1

15.4

273.4
3.0
19.6
49.8
29.9
75.8
16*2
37.0
42*1

123.6
7.3
69.4

2.8

6*1
20*2
2*8

8*4

8*2

11*7
73.8
8*7
1|3.0
30*8

206.7
11.7
72*7
8*7
41.7
30*9

213*6
12.5
80.3

19.8

19.8

21*2

21*4
19.0

38*2

37.9

42*9

22*5

26.7

6*0

21.2

1.8
22.8
2*1
5.7
.8
2.8

2.4

9.3

1*8

9.6

8*6

42*2
29*6

1.8

5.6

2.2
6.2

*8
2*8

2.8

2*0

.7

41.4
13*0
23.5
6*9
17.6
9.8

120*9
8*9
41.4

13.0
23*6

6*9
17.6
9.7




10.9
2.0
7.5
1*.2
62.8
2.5
36.7
2.8
9.8
1.1*
1*.5
5.2

62.3
2.5
36.lt
2.7
9.7
1.1*
U.5
5.2

65.3
2.4
39.6
2.7
9.7
1.4
4.4
5.1

Contract construction.
Manufacturing.......
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade............
Finance..... ......
Service 1/...... .
Government.......

123.2
10.8
52.8
7.8
22.9
I?
n
12.6
U.l*

126.3
U.0
55.3
8.0
22.6
1*.9
13.2
11.3

129.9
10.1
58.0
9.3
22.8
4.9
12.9
11.9

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington
fotal7. .7..........
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..... .
Finance........ ....
Service 1/..........
Government.........

656.5
1*0.7
27.7
U3.1
136.lt
3U.0
105.1
269.5

656.7
1*0.2
27.5
1*3.3
135.3
3* 1
1.
101».8
271.5

657.9
38.6
27.3
45.0
137.5
34.4
101.4
273.7

130.1*
9.6
18.9
13.8
39.2
12.2
16.8
20.1

132.9
10.5
19.3
14.6
39.9
11.6
16.8
20.3

279.5
25.5
35.3
35.7

278.3
25.9
36.4
34.5

Waterbury
totil...................

Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing....... 7
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance............
Service.... .......
Government....... .
DELAWARE
Wilmington

.............

FLORIDA
Jacksonville

6.8

Miami
fotal............ .
Contract construction,
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util.,

280.2
26.0
36.9
35.8

17.8
9.5

Oct.
1957
54.9
4.9
21.4
3.2
11.6
1.9
8.0
4.0

Finance.............
Service 1/......... .
Government..... ....

9.2
45.7
13.4
23.9

S*pt.
19Z9
52.0
U.2
20.I
*
3.0
10.8
1.9
7.6
l*.l

Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing... *....
Trans* and pub. util*.*.
Trade.......... *....
Finance*••*•••••••••••••
Service............ *
Government...........

126.2

2.4

2*4

..
.

52.2
*.3
20.5
2.9

T s m : : .................

"To 5ai:. ~ ......... .
T

Contract construction,
Manufacturing...... ,
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade.............. .

120.8
8*6

Oct.
1? »

131.1
9.U
19.0
13.8
39.5
12.1
16.9
20.6

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.

4 1 4 cO- 5 - 5
9 16 8

Area and industry division

Stamford

Hartford
T S t S 7 7 ...................................

(In thousands)

Oct.




18

>le A-12: Empbyees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
Oct.
1958

Sept.
1958

(In th usands)
Oct.
Area and industry division
1957

Oct.
1958

Peoria
78.h
l6.h
53.7
33.2

78.9

16.2

5b.h
33.1

80.7
15.7
5h.6
30.6

176.0
18.7
33.3
13.h
55.2
8.8
23.6
23.1

173.5
18.8
32.8
13.2
Sh.O
8.8
23.2
22.8

168.8
19.h
31.0
12.8
53.8
8.3
23.0
20.6

3h0.2
22.9
7h.5
33.1
91.8
25.3
h6.8
h5.8

3hh.5
2h.O
79.3
32.7
91.5
25.5
h6.7
hh.8

3h8.1
20.3
8h.O
3h.5
93.2
2h.8
h7.2
hh.l

5.8
12.6
2.2
7.h
7.2

5h.7
3.h
15.9
5.9
12.7
2.2
7.5
7.1

55.7
3.7
15.6
6.1
13.h
2.2
7.h
7.3

23.6
2.0
2.1
2.8
7.1
l.h
3.2
5.0

23.5
2.0
2.1
2.6
7.1
l.h
3.3
5.0

23.h
1.9
2.1
2.8
7.1
l.h
3.3
h.8

2,1*88.6
h.o
129.5
905.1
206.9
532.7
1U3.9
329.7
236.9

2,1*86.0
h.O
130.9
903.5
206.7
526.0
lh5.h
332.0
237.6

2,635.8
3.8
136.9
1,013.0
22h.2
551.3
lh5.7
328.5
232.h

5h.7
3.3

16.2

>le.
month are p relim in a ry .

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

LU*.

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

75,
h,
hl.
2,
12,
2,
7.
h.

61».6
1.7
3.1
25.5
lit.8
2.1
13.0

Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....

69.
1.
3.
28.
h
<
15.
2.
12.

7li.5
2.8
31.3
7.1
17.2
3.8
12.3

78,
3.
3h.
7.
17.
3.
12.

280.3

92.2
20.0
66.8
17.8
67.lt

*96«
15,
L06,
21,
68.
18,
66,

76.3
2.8
36.3
U.2
11».9
3.1»
1U.7

85
3,
h2,
h.
16,
3.
lh,

1.
1
1*6,
6,
22.
3.
10,
8,

Rockford
Contract construction 1/
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

INDIAMI
Evansville
Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....

Fort

k.k

Wayne

Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

Indianapolis
Contract construction..«

Manufacturing.

Trans, and pub. util....

16.1

South Bond
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util....

A re a Employment

19
Table A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
(In thousands)

Area and industry division
ICWA
Des Moines
Total...................
Contract construction..•
Manufacturing........ .
Trans* and pub* util.**.
T r a d e .............................................

Finance.................
Service l / .............
Government..............

Oct*

Sept.

Oct.

1958

1253

1951 .

.

22.0

98.5
5.3

21.8

100.1
6.2
22.9

7.8

7.8
26.3
10*9

27*0

98.3
5.3

26*1

10*8
13.8

12.7

13.8

12*7

7.8

10.7
13.6
12.1

Area and industry division
Mew Orleans
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance....... •••••••
Service...... ........
Government.*•••••••••*

Oct*

Sept.

.3.958.

1953 .

281.4
7.1
16.3
45.5
44*6
73.9
14.7
43.6
35.7

281.2
7.2

291.9
7.9

45.2
45.1
73.5
14.8
43.9
35.4

46*9
74.9
14.7
44.0
34.7

8.1

8.2

8.3

27.4

27.2

28.2

Finance.... ..........
Service 1/ ............
Government...... ....•

14.1
.9
5.4
.7
3.7
1.4

14.0
.9
5.4
.7
3.7
1.4

1.3
14.7
•9
5.5
.7
3.7
1.4

Portland
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade..............
Finance...............
Service l/............
Government............

52.3
4.1
12.3
6.3
14.6
3.4
7.7
3.9

52.5
4.3
12.3
6.3
14.6
3.4
7.8
3.8

53.1
4.0
12.5
6.4
14.8
3.5

596.0
.9

595.4
.9

187-9
126.3
30*9
71.3
84*5

189.3
56.0
123.9
30*9
71.9
84*3

607.5
.9
43.9
204.9

999.5
50.7

997.0
51.1

Shreveport
Manufacturing.

16.2

KANSAS
Topeka
T o t a l ............................................
M in in g ..........................................
C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t i o n . **
M a n u f a c t u r in g ...................... *
T ra n s , and p u b . u t i l . . . .
T r a d e * * . * . .................................
F in a n c e ........................................
S e r v i c e ................................... ..
G o v e rn m e n t.................................

W i c h i t a 5/
T o t a l .............................................
M in in g ...........................................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .. .
M a n u f a c t u r in g .........................
T ra n s, and p ub . u t il.* * *
T r a d e .............................................
F in a n c e ........................................
S e r v i c e .......................................
G o v e rn m e n t.................................

KENTUCKY
L o u is v ille
T o t a l .............................................
C o n tra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .. .
M a n u f a c t u r in g . .......................
T ra n s * a n d pub* u t i l . . * *
T r a d e * * ................................... ..
F in a n c e ........................................
S e r v i c e l / . ..................
G o v e rn m e n t................................

LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge
Total...................
Mining
Contract construction*.*
Manufacturing...........
Trans* and pub* util.***
Trade.*..... ...........
Finance....... .........
Service....... .........
Government..............

19.0
50*0

mahœ

46.9

50.9

4.8
5.7
6.7
9.5

5.0
5.9
6.7
9.4

6.4

5.9

5.9
11.3

122.6

123.2
1.7
7.4
47.5
7.0
26.3
5.3

.2

2.6

11.2

1.7
7.3
17.0
*

7.0
26.1
5.3

14.1
14.4

.2

.2

6*0

7.3
9.9

2.6

14*2
l 4*l

2*6

5.8

12*8

137.0

2*0

7.0

61*1
7.5

27*2
5.3
13.9

Lewiston
Total........
Contract construction.
Manufacturing...... ..
Trans, and pub. util..
T r a d e . ...............

13.2

1.2

1.1

8.1

3.8

MARYLAND

241.1
13.3
86*8

21.7
5^*9
10.9
27.9

239.5
14*0
84*2
21.8

55.2

10.8

245.2
13.9
88.9
23.5
56.7
10*8

25.6

28*3
25.3

26*2

72.6

72*8

12*0
17.8

12*2

*4

74.0
.4
11.4

4.2
15.3

18*1

19.8

4.3
15.3

15.6

6.9

6.9

7.0
12.7

.4

2*8

13.2

2.8

12.8

25.1

4.4

2*8

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .




Oct.
191Z -

Baltimore
Total..................
Mining...............
Contract construction..
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade..................
Finance................
Service................
Government...... .

MASSACHUSETTS
Boston
Total..*•*.........*.
Contract construction
Manufacturing*.... .
Trans, and pub. util
Trade...............
Finance..... .......
Service 1/..........
Government.........

38.0

56.2

270*0
67.7

2I
16.8
71.3
159.6
133.4

38.2

270.6

68*4
243.3
72.0
158.3
133.3

56.8
124.7
30.6

69.3
76.4

1 ,019.8
51.1

286.2

74.0

250*2
71.6

157.1
129.6

20

A re a Employment

Ta b le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
lor selected areas, b y industry division -Continued
Oct.
1958

Sept.
1958

(In

*6.*

M a n u f a c t u r in g * . . . . . . . . . .

26*1

Trans, and pub. util....
Trade*..................... ..............
G o v e rn m e n t....................... ........
O t h e r n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ..

Oct.
122T-

*3*0

**.9

*7.8

11.*

22**

23.1

21**2

2K l

2** 2

22*0

2**9

*2.*
3.7
8*7
5.8

15.2
*

2.1
6.8

*2*6
3.6
8.6
6*0
11.1
2.1
7.0
*. *

505.7
31.2
139.*
*9.9
123.7
32*5
6**5
61**5

500.*
31.3
137.7
50.2
123.5

61.1

lW*0
51.7
128**
33.0
63.9
61*3

59.2
*8
**5
11*0
*.6
15*6
3.7
7.8
11.*

59.*
.8
5.0
10.9
*.6
15.6
3.7
7.6
11.*

57.6
*8
*.2
10*5
*.6
15.*
3.6
7.8
10*9

360.5

Area and industry division

Sept*
1958

*.*

MASSACHUSETTS— Continued
Fall River
Total....... ...........

Oct.
1957

uaanOs)

21.6

Area and i ndustry division

360.8

367.1
.7
21.1
99.3
* 5.7
96.*

Oct*
1958

(»rand Rapids

2*6
8*0
3.1
6*6

*5.6
25.5
2.6
7.9
3.1
6*5

*5.8
25*1
2*7
8*0
3.1
6.9

Lansing
Muskegon
Saginaw

New Bedford
Total......
Contract construction
Manufacturing*......,
Trans* and pub* util
Trade...... •••••.*•
Government**•••*••••
Other nonmanufacturing

*7.5
1.3
25.7
2.*
7.8
3.7
6*6

50*2

*7**
1.2

1.7
28.0
2.*
8.1
3.6
6.*

2 5 *8

2.*
7.8
3.7
6*5

MINNESOTA.
Duluth
Contract construction* *.
Manufacturing***...*.**•
Trans* and pub. util**.*
Finance.**••.«•**•••«••*

^field-Holyoke
Contract construction. **
Manufacturing. *.*..*•.••
Trans, and pub. util... *
Trade........ .*••••*•••
Finance.................
Service 1/ ...... *......
Government*.......... .

Worcester
Dotal....
Contract construction.
Manufacturing..... ...
Trans* and pub* util.*
Trade...•*•*••••**••••
Finance..............
Service l/.*.***.*••••
Government............

158.6
7.*

67.6
7.7
33.9
7.3
17.5

17.2

157.9
7.5
67.3
7.7
33.1
7.*
17.7
17.2

101**

101*2

*.*

*.3
*3.3

*3*2
6*0
18*7
5.1
11*8
12*2

16**2
7.6
71.3
8*2
3*. 5
7.3
17.Ô

12*2

MLnneapolis-St. Paul
Contract construction.*»
Ifenufacturing....... .
Trans, and pub. util....

17.5

108*3
*.5
*9.2

6*0

18*6
5.1
11.7

6.0

20.1

5.1

11.8
11.6

Contract construction* **

MICHIGAN
Detroit

SL*..............

Flint
Ifeuiufacturing.

,0S k .k
*8

1 ,087.6

53.6
393.3
73.8
233.1
*6.8
136.9

5*^L
l*2*.l
7*.2
235.O
16.9
*
13*. 8
117.7

53*. 2
79.*
252.*
*8.1
lte.2
II8.8

75.®

76.8

126.0

32.0

*8

1 ,2*3*0

63.9

28*7

.8

67.0

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r th é cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




32.8

51*. 9

MISSISSIPPI
Jackson

Trans* and pub* util****

Mining******....... .
Contract construction***
Manufacturing* *•«•*•••*•
Trans* and pub. util....
Trade...................
Finance.................
Service...... ......... .
Government............

10.9

3.5
9.6
7.7
11.3
2*0
6*7
*.3

MISSOURI
Kansas City
Contract construction* * *
Manufacturing*....... .
Trans* and pub* util****

.7
22*3

96*2

*0*6
9*.6
2l
**5
*3.3
38*3

.7
22.2
96.9
*0.8
9*.o
21**6
*3.5

38.1

2 3 .5
* 3 .6

36.8

21

A re a Employment

Tab le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued
(In thousands)
Area

and i n d u s t r y

division

MISSOURI— Continued
St. Louis
Mining.................
Contract construction..
Manufac turing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

1958

1958

1957

696.k
2.5
39.3
2 k 8 .6

62.2
151.2
36.7

86.*
69.5

MONTANA
Great Falls
Total..................
Contract construction..
Manufacturing...... .
Trans, and pub. util...

700.3
2.5
39.7
253.3

62.1

1*9.9
36.9

86.6
69.3

20.7
2.3
2.7

21.2
2.6

2*1

271.0

66.4
157.3

36.0
85.6
68.5

2.2

6.7
*♦3

727.*
2.3
*0.3

6.7
*.*

2.6

20.1
1.9

2.8

2.7

2 .k

6.*
*.1
2.5

2.6

Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trank, and pub. util...

31.8

20.8
37.9
12.7
21.1

16.0

1*9.6
9.7
31.5
20.6
37.8
12.8
21.*
15.9

Contract construction..
Manufacturing 1/......
Trans, and pub. util...

28.6

2.7

1.8
3.1
7.3
1.2
8.1
*.*

27.5
3.0
1.7
3.3
7.0
1.1
7.3
*.1

Trenton
Total. ...... ..........
Mining................
Contract construction,
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util*.
Trade....... .........
Finance...............
Service...... ........
Government...........

*1.3
2.0
18.3
2.7
8.2
2.2
*.7
3.1

NEW MEXICO
Albuquerque
Total................ .
Contract construction.
Manufacturing....... .
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.......... .
Finance...........
Service l/......... .
Government...... .

22.1
38.9
12.9
20.9

NEW HAMPSHIRE
Manchester
Contract construction..
Manufacturing..........
Trans, and pub. util...

*0.2
2.0
17.9
2.6
7*8
2.2
*•7
3.1

*0.2
2.1
17.7
2.6
7.8
2.2
*.7
3.2

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p re lim in a ry .

4 1 4 0 -58 -6
916



Paterson 7 /
IbtSl.T...............
Mining............... .
Contract construction.
Manufacturing..... ...
Trans, and pub. util*.
Trade...... ••••••••.,
Finance.............. .
Service............
Government........... <

15.6

151.5
8.7
32.*

NEVADA.
Reno
28.2
2.7
1.8
3.2
7.3
1.2
7.6
*.*

NEW JERSEY
Newark-Jersey City 7 /
Total................
Mining...............
Contract construction
Manufacturing........
Trans* and pub. util.
Trade................ ,
Finance.........•••••<
Service.............. .
Government............

Perth Amboy 7/
Total.... ........... .
Mining...............
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.••••••.,
Trans, and pub. util.,
Trade.................
Finance..............,
Service...... ........
Government...........

NEBRASKA
150.6
10.*

Area and industry division

Oct.
1958

Sept.
1<«8

Oct.
1057

789.*
.2
29.5
31*.0

789.*
.2
30.5
317.6
77.8
1**.8

839.1
.2
35.*
350.8
83.9
153.0
*9.9
91.8

78.6

1*6.0
50.3
9*.0

76.8

389.7
1.3
27.O

166.9
2*.*
71.*

51.0
92.5
75.0

389.*
1.2

28.8
166.6
2*.3

70.*

7*.l

*03.0
1.6
29.9
179.0
2*. 2
72.1
12.1
*3.2
*0.9

12.1

*3.8
*2.8

12.1
*3.7
*2.3

1*9-5
.8
6.*
7*. 7
8.6
23.*
2.6
12.2
20.8

150.3
.7
6.9
75.6
8.6
22.8
2.6
12.3
20.8

160.*
.8
7.*
83.5
9.0
23.5
2.6
11.7

93.3

95.0
.1
3.0
3*. 3
6.1

103.5
.1
3.3
*0.7
6.7
17.6
3.5
13.6

.1
2.8

32.6
6.0

17.0
3.7
12.9
18.2

3.6
13.0
18.3

73.6

72.0

67.*

18.2

5.3
U.8
5.5
16.7
3.8
9.0
15.3

6.9

13.2
5.2
18.1
*•3
9.8

16.1

16.6

21.9

6.8
13.2
*.9

*.3
9.7
1*.9

18.0

22

A re a Employm ent

T a b le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected a re a s, b y industry division-Continued

Area and i n d u s t r y division

[In iiismsvnteL,

Oct«

Sept.

Oct.

1959

195?.

1357

m TO K
R
llba]^-Schoi^ta4r-Troy

li3.i»

201*.2
7.6
61**1
15.7
1*2.5
7.7
23.lt
1*3.3

212.7
8.7
72.5
16.6
1*2.1*
7.7
23.3
1*1.5

Binflbattton
r es t . ............
Contract construction. ••
Manufacturing.........
Trans* and pub* «til* ***
Trade*.*...... .
Finance*******........
Service 1/............
Government......... .

75.9
3.2
37.6
1**0
13.5
2*3
6*5
8*8

76.5
3.2
38.5
3.9
13.li
2.3
6.3
8.9

80.7
l*.l
1*1.1*
l*.l
11*.3
2.1
6.2
8.5

Buffalo
TotalT*••••••*•••»•••**•
Contract construction* **
Manufacturing........
Trans* and prib* util* ***
Trade...............
Finance* **•••• *...... .
Service 1/*............
Government. *••••••••••••

103.3
26*1
161.9
35.0
85.1*
11**8
1*7.0
W.2

U20.7
26.1
168.6
35.2
85.6
11*. 9
1*6.8
1*3.5

160.2
*

31.1
15*0
6*3
9.8

30.8
11*.?
6.3

3U.8
17.6

9.8

Area and industry division

Bew Tork-Kortheagtarn
Wwt Jeraey— Continued
Trade................
Finance.............
Service..............
Q e w n M B t ...........

Oct.

Sept.

1958

1958

Oct.
l$ 2 L

1,213.6
1*61*. 1
850.7
637.9

1,202.6
1*65.6
81*8.2
621.5

1,232.1
2*60.8
83lt.lt
627.6

3,600*3
2.2
121.8
918.5
328*8
839.7
373.3
615.0
1*01.0

3,561*.0
2.1
123.9
909.1*
328.2
831.3
373.9
608.1
386.9

3,667.5
2.2
116.2
981.3
338.1*
851.9
371.2

219.2
11.7
10!*. 6
9.7
1*0.5
8.0
23.9
20.8

226.3
10.8
112.8
10.0
1*1.0
7.5
2l*.0
20.2

153.0

16.U

11*5.1*
8.1*
53.3
11.0
31.0
7.2
18.3
16.3

Contract construction* **
Manufacturing..... **.*
Trans, and pub* util***.
Trade...... .........
Finance.............
Service l/*..........
Qovemnent* ....... *.*•

100.0
3.2
1*0.6
1*.9
16.5
3.5
9.9
21.1*

100.3
3.6
1*0.2
5.0
16.1*
3.6
10.1
21.3

105.7
5.3
1*1».6
5.2
17.1
3.1*

Westchester County 7/
Total: 77^.7*77.7*7...
Contract construction.**
Manufacturing........
Trans* and pub* util*.*.
Trade......... *.....
Finance.............
Service l/......... .
Government...........

205.1
19.5
51.6
13.2
1*8.2
10.0
36.5
26.1

208.8
20.9
52.6
13.3
1*7.8
10.3
37.3
26.5

205.9
18.3
55.7
It*.2
1*7.1*
10.6

10.5

Contract construction. ••
Manufacturing.........
Trans* and pub* util* •••
Trad*......... .
Finance....... «.....
Service 1/..... .
Qoverzunent............

203*7
7.8
63.14
1S.7
1*2.5
7.7

23.2

Elmira

Total... *..........*
Manufacturing..... ***•
Trade...............
Other nonmannfacturing. *

25.9
199.5
37.3
91.5
U*.9
1*8.6
1*2.5

6.7

lew Tork City 7/
t o t i i . : . r . . : . 7 . ..........

Mining..............
Contract eonetruction...
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Trade...............
Finance.............
Service.............
Qovernaent...........
Rochester
total...............
Contract construction. **
Manufacturing..... ****
Trans, and pub* util* ***
Trade** ...........
Finance.............
Service 1/.......... *
Government* *•••••••••*••
Syracuse
Total...............
Contract construction* **
Manufacturing* *••••••*••
Trans* and pub* util*•**
Trade.......... *....
Finance.............
Service 1/..... .
Qovemnent...........

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

Uilt.8
8.6
52.3
10.8
31.1*

7.1
18.3

607.2
399.1

9.1*
58.6
11.1*
32.8
6.8
18.1
15.9

Utica-Rome
Massait and Suffolk
Counties 7/
f S t a l " . . . ........................

Contract construction* **
Manufacturing... *....
Trans* and pub* util* .**
Trade...................

Finance..............
Service 1/*••*........
Qovemment............. *

T w a c.“
357.9
25.6
103.1*
22.2
80.6
11**8
1*7.5
63.8

362.6
25.8
103.0
22.2
81.1
11*. 7
52.1*
63.1*

351.1*
29.0
102.5
22.0
80.3
13.5
1*1*.3
59.9

Hew Tork-Mortheastern
Mew Jersey
TîS ÏÎ h ^Î#
Î
M
Mining..................

Contract construction* **
Manufacturing* *•.••••••*
Trans, and pub* util* ***

5,522.2
5.7
232.3
1,639.9
1*77.9

5,1*91*. 8
5.1*
239.2
1,635.1*
1*76.5

5,657.1*
6.1
238.7
l,76l*.l
U93.7

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry .




...........................

9.6
20.1*

31*.5
25.2

A re a Employment

23

T a b le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued

Area and industry division

NORTH CAROLINA.
Charlotte
fJtii........ .
Contract construction...
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub* util«...
Finance*
Service ^ / .
Government.••••••••••.••

Sept.
1958

Oct.
1958
97.0
7.7
2b.l
9.6
29.9
66
11 i
t
7.7

(In thousands

Oct.
1957

Area and industry division

97.2
8.7
23.3
10.0
30.1
6.1*

96.6
7.8
23.9
9.8
29.8
6 I
W» 7
11 1

il

ï

OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma City
Mining..............
Contract construction...
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....
Finance.
Service.•••••••••••••••.

Oct.
1958

S«pt.
1958

llii 7
7.1*
9.7
15.0
11.5

Uii <5
•UÜ.7
7.1*
9.9
15.0
11.2

8.1*

A)
i
O.l*

^7 fi

^7 0

Oct.
1957
ll.t A
i4?.v
7.6
9.7
16.0
11.7
oft c
jo* ?

Winston-Salem

OHIO
Akron
Canton

f
ot oo

37.8

36.7

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

23.3
2.9
2.1
2.3
8.0
1.5
3.2
3.2

23.1i
3.0
2.2
2.3
8.1
1.6
3.2
3.2

82.5

36.7

Tulsa
Mining......... .....
Contract construction...
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

92.7
58.0

5o.o

Government.
OREGON
Portland
Total...................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing..... .
Trans, and pub. util....

PENNSYLVANIA
Allentown-Bethlehemlaston
M in i n g..... •••••••••••••

11*7.8

Cleveland
»gi

yig, ,,,,,,,,,,

11*7.5

159.6

Contract construction...
Manufacturing....... ..
Trans, and pub. util....

258.3

261*.1

306.1

Service

61.5

7* 2
1.

6* 7
1.

Erie
‘
lEnufactaring. ••••••••••
Harrisburg

Dayton

f|(;

là.2

37.9

51.6

Cincinnati

Toledo

1*3.3

82.9

NORTH DAKOTA
Fargo
Total...............
Contract construction...
Manufacturing.••••••••••
Trans, and pub. util...•

Colunbus

1*3*7

7.1*

82.1
ng, ,,,,,,,,,,

Youngstown
Manufacturing........

86.3

95.7

52.2

52.8

61.3

88.5

92.7

112.5

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f ta b l e .
NOTE: D a t a for th e c u r r e n t m o n t h




are p r e l i m i n a r y .

Mining..................
Contract construction...
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util....

17 */
if Q

lA n
XO.i.
36.8

1ft 9
xo. c
35.1*

121.1*
11.5
7.1*
25.9
13.2
31.6
5.9
17.1
8.8

121.3
11.6
6.8
26.1*
13.2
31.6
5.9
17.1
8.8

127.9
12.7
7.9
30.1
13.6
31.3
6.2
17.7
8.6

252.0
15.1*
60.1
*
28.5
61.7
13.1
3l*.9
38.0

252.3
15.7
60.8
26.1*
62.1*
13.2
35.9
37.9

251*.o

11.0

Greensboro-High Point

7.5

170.7
.8
7.9
90.0
11.5
28.7
l*.l
16.7

170.7
.8
8.5
89.7
11.5
28.3
1*.2
16.6
11.1

182.9
.8
9.2
99.1*
12.7
29.1*
1*»0
16.5
10.9

35.0

35.1

iil.5

139.9
.*
1
10.1
31.1
13.1
25.0
5.8
Ut.8
39.6

139.9
.*
1
10.3
30.9
13.2
25.0
5.8
12*.7
39.6

11*2.7
.*
1
9.0
35.0
11*.7
2l*.8
5.7
11*.5
38.6

12*.0

60.9
29.8
6U.1*
13.1
3* 8
1.
37.0

2k

A re a Employment

T a b le A-12: Em pbyees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry d¡vision-Continued

Area and indus t r y division

EEHNSYVIANIA— Continued
Lancaster
Manufacturing.

Oct.
195e

Sept.
125SL

Reading
Manufacturing.
Scranton
Manufacturing.
Wilkes-Barre— Hazleton
Manufacturing....... .
York
Manufacturing.
RHODE ISLAND
Providence
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance..............
Service 1 J ............
Government.•••••.....
SOUTH CAROLINA
Charleston
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service 1/ ....... ....
Government............

78I.I
I6.O
*3.7

1957

1^51.6

1,500.9
2.1

1.9
82.5
522.7
111.3

83.9
550.6

120.8
31*.*
7*.*

305.9
75.*
179.7
172.2

183.7

17.5
* 5.5

163.3
30.6

15.9
* 5.2
290.2
63.*
163.7
30.9

97.6
77.9

99.6
77.*

99.5
77.9

1*8.2

1*8.1

51.1

29.O

333.6
70.5
166.6
29.8

28.6

30.8

37.2

37.2

39.1

*1.1

1*2.1

1*2.8

270.*
I7.9
II9.8

270.3
I7.7

120.3

12.5
18.7
*

12.6
18.5
*

27.5

31.8

5*. 8
*.2

9.1
5.1

12.3

31.5

5*. 9
¿•0
9.1

5.3

12.5
2.1

12.6
2.1

5.2

5.3
16.7

16.8

275.7

16.0
125.7

27.1*

12.2

SOUTH DAKOTA
Sioux Falls
Total.................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service 1/...........
Government....... .

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

1958

1958

1957

29.I*.

29.2

30.0

(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)

2 * .1
1-

2l
*.3
1.7
5.1

2.0

2.0

9I.9
.1

92.O
.1

9*.0

3.7
10.7
*
5.*

3.7
10.9
*
5.5

3.5
* 3.2
5.6

1.7
5.2
2.2

7.6

1.6

3.8

171.O

81*
0.9

288.3
63.7

Area said industry division

Greenville
Manufac turing.

786.3

Se e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f tabl e.
NOTE: D a t a for the c u r r e n t m o n t h




thousands)

Mwl

k k .l

Philadelphia
1,14-63.6
Total.................
2.0
Mining................
Contract construction...
83.I
Manufacturing........
525.5
Trans, and pub. util..
HI.2
Trade.................
310.8
Finance...............
75.0
Service...............
183.6
Government.•••••••••..
172.*
Pittsburgh
Total..... ...........
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade••••••••••••••«••
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............

(I n

Oct.

are p r el im in ar y.

13A

*9.7

12.3
27.5
31.1

55.5

3.8
9.8
5.2
12.7
2.1

5.3

I6.9

Chattanooga
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufac turing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...... ........
Government............
Knoxville
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance...............
Service...............
Government............
Memphis
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.................
Finance.............. .
Service...............
Government...... •••••
Nashville
Total.................
Mining................
Contract construction.
Manuf ac turing........
Trans, and pub. util..
Trade.*........ .
Finance............
Service....... .......
Government............

18.2

*.9
9.3
9.7
109.*
2.1

5.6
39.9
7.3
23.6

3.2

I8.O
l*-.8
9.*

2.2
8.0
1.6

3.6

.1

18.7

*.7
9.2

9.7

9.1

108.8
2.2
5.*

113.8

39.5
7.3

23.2

3.1

2.3
5.8

*1.8

7.7
24.8
3.1

12.0
I6.O

12.1
16.2

12.0

188.8

I87.3

I92.8

.3

.3
10.9
* 5.7

.3

12.1
*1.3
I6.0

55.1

8.6
26.1
29.1
*

139.5

.3

7 .*
39.3

12.0
32.2

9.2

20.6

18.7

11.9
1*0.6
15.7
5*. 3
8.6
26.3

29.7

138.9
.3
7.5
39.0
12.0
3I.9

9.2

2O.5
I8.7

16.5

16.8

55.8

8.6
26.O
28.8

138.*

.3
7.0
39.0
12.5
31.8
9.1
20.5

18.*

A re a Employment

25

Table A-12: Em pbyees in nonagricultural establishm ents
for selected areas, by industry division-Continued

Area and in d u stry d iv is io n

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

1958

1958

1957

Dallas

Port Worth
Manufacturing.
Houston
Manufacturing•
San Antonio
Mantrfecturlng.

83.4

83.6

Iftjtal.................
Mining ••••••*•••••••••
Contract construction.
Manufac turing.........
Trans, and pub. util.•
Trade..................
Finance................
Service.......... .....
Government....... .

VERMONT
Burlington
Total................
îfenufacturing...... •
Trans, and pub. util

Trade.......... .
Service.............
Other nonmanufacturing

Springfield

Total.................
Manufacturing.........
Trans, and pub. utll..
Trade..................
Service................
Other nonmanufacturing

Contract construction....
Manufacturing.... •••••••

52.3
87.4
21.9

54.0

52.1

Oct.

1957

167.6
.2
12.3

166.8
.2
13.O

40.3

40.2

.2
12.0

40.4

15.6

43.6
87.0

13.9
19.5
23.I

93.6

15.8
43.I
I3.9

19.4
22.6

16.0

42.6
13.6
19.5
21.7

21.1

21.4

WASHINGTON
Seattle
127.8
6.2
9.0
20.5
13.5
35.7
7.7
15.9
19.3

127.2
6.1

I27.O

7.3
8.7

9.4

20.2
H .9

341.0

Contract construction.... I7.2
Manufacturing............ 112.7
28.8

I9.9
13.4

18.6

35.6
7.5

35.9
7.8
16.7

40.2
47.8

75.7

15.7
18.9

I9.2

Spokane
Total.
Contract construction....
Manufacturing...........*
17.8

17.8

4.2
1-5

k .l

4.8

4.8

1.6
1+.8

3.3
4.0

3.3
4.0

3.1
3.9

11.0

6.7

1.7

1.7

.6
1.8
1.1

IO8.4

27.7
75-7

29.5
77.1

47.3

38.7
46.7

74.5
5.5

77.1
5.1

18.7
4l.o

12.1
8.1

21.4
4.0
12.4

18.6

13.8
8.6
22.0

4.0
12.4

11.0

11.2

74.5
4.9

75.2
5.3

Tacoma

11.7

5.9

336.4
17.4

18.0
112.2

8.2

11.0

Contract construction....
Manufacturing............

IO.9
5.8
.6
1.8
1.1

75.2
5.7
12.5

340.6

21.5
3.9
12.4

I7.5

4.3
1.5

74.1
4.9

15.5

6.4

17.O

.6
1.8
1.1
1.6

3.0

15.8
6.2
17.5

16.I

6.9

16.7

8.8
18.5

3.0

3.0

8.9
18.2

8.9
18.3

88.1

88.4
7.2
4.9
24.6
9.4

93.3
9.2
5.2
26.4

WEST VIRGINIA
Charleston

VIRGINIA
Norfolk -Portsmouth

Dotal..................
Mining.................

157.8

Contract construction..
Manufacturing........ ..
Trans, and pub. util...
Trade......... .........
Finance.......... ......
Service...... ..........
Government....... ......

14.2
14.6

.2

16.O

157.4

.2

159.4

.2

14.2

14.7

13.9

15.5
17.3

Contract construction....
Manufacturing...........
Trans, and pub. util....

7.4

4.8

24.8
9-4

43.4

18.7

19.O

10.2
19.4

6.2
18.4

16.1
43.8
6.2
18.8

3.1

44.4

44.5

9.4
10.7

3.1
9.7

3.1
9.4

44.2

17.7

43.8

6.1

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rrent month are p relim in a ry .




Sept.

1958

168.3

88.8

UTAH
Salt lake City

Oct.

1958

Richmond

TEXAS

Manufacturing.

Area and industry division

10.7

10.6

A re a Employment

26

Tab le A-12: Employees in nonagricultural establishments
for selected areas, by industry d¡vision-Continued
thougapdgj
Area and industry division
WEST V IR G IN IA
H u n t in g t o n - A s h la n d

Totair.......... .....
Mining................
C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t io n *
M a n u f a c t u r in g * • • * ...........
T r a n s , a n d pub* u t i l . *
T r a d e .................. .....................
F i n a n c e ...................................
S e r v i c e ...........................
G o v e rn m e n t .* . * ..................
W h e e lin g - S t e u b e n v ille
T o t a l ......................... . ............
M in in g ..............................
C o n t ra c t c o n s t r u c t io n .
M a n u f a c t u r in g * .................
T r a n s * a n d pub* u t i l . .
T r a d e ........................................
F in a n c e .................. ................
S e r v i c e .............* ...................
G o v e rn m e n t.............

Oct.

1958

Sept.

1958

Oct.

1957

Milwaukee— Continued
Trans, and pub. util....

C o n t r a c t c o n s t r u c t io n *
M a n u f a c t u r in g * • • • • • • * .

1/
2j
3/
5J
5/

Sept*

Oct.

1958

1958

1957

28.8

29.8
96.7

71.U

28*3
9*. 8

93.9
21.1

3.2
25.U

21*0

5U .3
U 0.7

55.0
* 0.9

53.5
39.8

15*2

2*5
20.9
5.2
15.3

2*5
7*1
8*3

7.3
8.3

Ul .7
2*2

h i. 2

h l.h

19.9
1.9
7.7

19*6
1*9
7*6

20*2
1*8

5*3
3*9

5*2
3.8

3*U

3.U
1.9

21.5
5*6

2*6

21.1

1.1

8.0
16*0
2.6

7.2

8*0

Racine
Contract construction...
Trans, and pub. util....

109.U
h. 9

5*7

U 9.2
8*1
18*6

3*0

12.0
8*0

108.0
li.9

117.1
5.1

5.9

8.8

3.0

52.5
9.3
19.U
2.9

137.7
*
23-1
175.U

1.0

U 7.8
8.2
18.6
12*1

11.1*

7.8

7.9

UU 1.3

22.7
179.0

2*1

1*0

1.9

7*9

1*0
1 9
*.

3.7

WYOMING
Casper
Contract construction.*.
Manufacturing.... .
Trans* and pub. util..**

U61.7
21*.1

196.7

Includes mining.
Not available.
Includes government.
Includes mining and government*
Revised series; not strictly comparable with previously published data.
b j Includes mining and finance*
7/ Subarea of New York-Northeastern New Jersey.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary*
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.




Oct.

63.0
1.1

6ii*l
1.2
2*8

W ISCO N SIN
M ilw a u k e e
J o t a l . . . ..................

Area and industry division

1.8
1*8
1*6
h .2

1*8
1.6
1U

.5
2*5

2.6

.5

3.7

1.8
1 .9

1*8

h .l

.5

2*2

Table B-1: Labor turnover rates in manufacturing
(Per 100 employees)
Year

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

5.2
4.4

4.5
3.9
I .2
f
2.5
3.2
3.1
2.8
2.2

k .6

3.8
3.9
3.6
3.5
2.5
3.6
3.0
3.9

k .l

Apr.

Hay

June

July

Annual
average

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

4.5
5.9
4.3
3.3
4.5
3.8
3.2
3.9

4.3
5.6

l.t
tl
5.2
3.3
3.6

3.9
if.O
2.7
3.3
3.3
3.0
2.2

3.0
3.3
2.1
2.5
2.5
2.3
1.7

l.t
tl
l.t
tl
3.9
3.0
3.7
3A
2.9

4.3
3.5
lt.2
3.0
3.1
3.3
l .0
t

3.5
3-4

l .t
tl

k .O

4.3
3.5
3.3
3.5
3.6

Total accessions

1951.....
I952.....
1953.....
195^.....
1955.....
I956.....
1957.....
I958.....

k .k

2.8
3.3
3.3
3.2
2.5

3.9
k .k

2.8
3.6
3.1
2.8
2.4

*.5
3.7
4.3

4.5
3.9

4.9
4.9
5.1
3.5
4.3

k .l

3.5
3.3
2.8
2.5

2.7
3.8
3.4
3.0
3.0

k .6
k .l

4.8
3.9

4.3
3.9

k .k

k .2

2 .k

k .2

3.8

k .2
k .k
k .l

2.9
3.*
3.3
3.2
3.3

k .O

3-4
4.i
f
4*1
3.3
k .O

k .l
k .2

2.9
3.3

Total separations

I95I .....
I952.....
1953----1954.....
1955.....
I956.....
1957.....
I958.....

4.1
k .O

3.8
4.3
2.9
3.6
3.3
5.0

3.7
k .l

3.7
3.0
3.5
3.3
U.2

4.3
3.8
3.1
3.*
3.3
U.l

3.3
3.2
3.7
3.*
3.6

3.1
3.2
3 .4
3.0
2.9

k .k

5.0
4.3
3.1
3.*
3.2
3.1
3.2

5.3
i .6
f

5.1
4.9
5.2
3.9

k .O

k .k
k .k
k .k

3.5

3.5

4.7
l
t.2
4.5
3.3
3.5
3.5
4.0
3.1

3.1
3.0
2.9
2.2
2.2
I.9
1.2

3.1
3.5
3.1
1.8
2.8
2.6
2.2
1.5

2.5
2.8
2.1
1.2
1.8
1.7
1.3
1.1

I.9
2.1
1.5
1.0

O .k

0.3

k .8

3.5
k .O

3.9

3.0
3.0
2.8
3.8

k .l

Quits

I95I .....
I952.....
1953.....
1954.....
1955.....
I956.....
1957.....
I958.....

2.1
1.9
2.1
1.1
1.0
1.4

I95I.....
I952.....
1953.....
1954.....
1955.....
I956.....
1957.....
I958.....

0.3
.3
.3
•2
.2
.3
.2
.2

.8

2.1
1.9
2.2
1.0
1.0
1.3
1.2
.7

2.5
2.0
2.5
1.0
1.3
1.4
1.3
.7

2.7
2.2
2.7
1.1
1.5
1.5
1.3
.7

2.8
2.2
2.7
1.0
1.5
1.6

0.3
.3

0.3
.3

O .k

O .k

O .k

.3

.3

.3

0.3
.3

.k

.k

.k

.k

.k

.2
.2
.3
.2
.2

.k
.2

.k

.2
.2
.3
.2
.2

.2
.3
.2
.2
.1

.2
.3
•3
.3
.2

.2
.3
.3
.2

1.3
2.2
1.1
1.6
1.3
1.2

1.4
1.0
1.3
1.7

1.3
.7
1.5

1.3

1.3
1.2
1.6

2.0

1.9

l. k

.8

2.5
2.2
2.6
1.1
1.5
1.6
1.3
.8

2 .k

2.2
2.5
1.1
1.6
1.5
l. k

.9

l. k

l. k

1.3
.9

1.7
1.1
.9
1.1
1.0
.7

2.t
i
2.3
2.3
l.l
1.6
1.6
1M

O .k
.k

0.3
A
.3
.2
.3
•3
.2

0.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

0.3
.3
.4
.2
.3
.3
.2

l. k

1.7
•7
2.3
1.6
1.2

1.5
1.0
2.5
1.7

1.2
1.1
1.3
1.9
1.2

l. k

Discharges

.2
.3
.3
.2
.2

•3
•3
•3
.1

.2
.3
.3
.2
.2

•3

.k
.k

.2

.t
I
.2
.3
.3
.2
.2

Layoffs

I95I.....
I952.....
1953.....
1954.....
1955.....
I956.....

1957.....
1958.....

1.0
1.4
•9
2.8
1.5
1.7
1.5
3.8

0.8
1.3
.8
2.2
1.1
1.8

0.8
1.1
.8
2.3
1.3

1.0
1.3
.9
2 .k

1.2

1.6

l. k

l. k

l. k

2.9

3.2

I .5
3.0

1.2
1.1
1.0
1.9
1.1

1.0
1.1
.9
1.7
1.2

1.6
1.5

1.3
1.1

2 .k

1.8

1.7

1.1
l. k

1.8
1.6

.7
1.8
1.6
1.2

1.3
2.3

l. k

1.5
2.7

1.4
2.7

1.5
1.7

O.lt
.3
.3
.1

0.3
.3

0.5
.3
.3

1.6

Miscellaneous, including military

1951.....
1952.....
1953.....
1954.....
1955.....
1956.....
1957.....
1958.....

0.7
.k
.k

.3
.3

.2

.3
.3

0 .6

.k
.k

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

0.5
•3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

0.5
.3
.3
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

O .k

.3
•3

.2
.2
.2

•3
.2

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




O .k

.3
.3

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

O .k

.3
.3
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

O .k

•3
.3
.3

.2
.2

.3
.2

0.4
.3
.3
.3
.2

.2
.2
.2

o .k

.3
.3

.2
.2

.2

.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2

Table B -2: Labor turnover rates, by industry
(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
rates

Industry

Separation rates
Total

Discharges

Quits

Layoffs

Misc., incl.
military

Oct. Sept.

Oct. Sept.

Oct. Sept.

Oct.

3.7
2.7

14.6

3.3
2.9

3.6
3.3

1.0
1.2

l.U
1.7

.2
.2

.2
.2

1.8

1.8

3.0

1.3

1.3

.2
.2

.2
.2

2.9

2.9

2.1

2.5

1.0

1.5

0.1

0.1

0.8

0.6

0.1

0.2

U
.8

5.0
7.2
U.8

2.3
U.7
1.9

3.3
U.8
3.2

.U
.3

.u

2.1

.1

1.1

1.1

.2
.1

.u

.5
.U

5.9

3.7

li.9
10.9
1*.2 3.6

3.U

li.5

3.9

U.2

1.7

3.1

.u

.U

1.6

3.5
3.7

li.3
ii.6
3 .li

3.7
3.3
U.6

3.6
3.3
U.U

1.6

1.5

1.9

.3
.3

.3
.U
.3

2.7
3.2

3.a
li.O

2.5
3.3
2.5

2.5

3.1
k .2

2.0

3.0
3.7
2.9
3.U
2.U

3.5

li.O

2.1

U.l

DURABLE G O O D S ...........................
NONDURABLE G00DS_i/.....................

Sept 4 Oct. Sept.

2.8

MANUFACTURING.......................................................

Sept, Oct.

U.o

1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958
U.O 3.1
1.1 1.5 0.2 0.2 1.6 1.6 0.2 0.2
3.3
3.5

Durable Goods

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES................................
LUMBER AND W
OOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE)...........................................................
Logging camps and contractors ............
Sawmills and planing m i l l s ...............
Hillwork, plywood, and prefabricated
structural wood pr o d u c t s ............

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES....................................
Household fur n i t ure .......................

STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PRODUCTS..................
Glass and glass p r oducts..................
Structural clay p r o d u c t s ..................
Pottery and related prod u c t s ......... .

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES................................
Blast furnaces, steel works,

1.1
2.6

2.1

2.1

1.3

2.1
1.6

.7

1 .3

Steel fou n d r i e s...........................
Primary smelting and refining of
n onferrous metals:
Primary smelting and refining of
copper, lead, and zinc..................
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
nonferrous metals:
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
cop p e r .....................................
Nonferrous f o u n dries......................
Other primary metal industries:
Iron and steel forgings..................

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT ORD­
NANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTATION
EQUIPMENT)...........................................................
and h a rdware.......

Hardware. * ....................... ..........
Heating apparatus (except electric)
and plumbers' s upplies ....... ...........
Sanitary ware and p l u m b e r s ’ supplies...
Oil burners, nonelectric heating and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere

.2

.5

.2

.2

1.7
1.3
2.9

1.2
.7
2.U

.1
.2
.1

.2
.2

.1
.2
.1
.2
.2

1 .U
2.2
1.2

1 .3

.2

1.9

.2
.2

.2

1.3

.8

1.5
.9

.2
.i

.1

1.5

1.2

2.7

.U

.6

.1

.1

l.U

1.6

.2

.3

3.0
3.0
3.1
1.7
3.6

.2
.6

.U

(2)

( 2)

1.1
2.1

.3

.7
.9
.5

.9

1.1

.1

.5

.2

1.5
l.l
3.3

2*2
1.8
1.8

.3

.1
.2
.2

.2

2.7

.2

.2
.2

.U

1.2

.2

.1

.5

.9

.2

.2

.3

.1

(2)

.2

.3

.2
3.8

1.0

.3

1.3

.3

.2

U.8
3.7

3.5

2.2

3.2

1.3

2 .U

2.9

li.O
U.U
li.O

«2

.5
.9
.9

1.7
3.0
2.5
2.3
li.l

3 .6

( 2)

.2
.2
.1
.2
.2

.8

l.U

1.6

.8

.2

.2

1.0

.3

.2
.2
.1

.2
.2

.3

.2
.3

1.6

2.2

.8

1.6

U.3

6.9

5.2

2.7

.8

1.0

3.6

li* 2

3.0

2.8

.U

.5

.1

,1

2.2

1.9

.2

.2

3.8
li.5
li. 8
2.7
5.1

5.7

6.8

U.o
2.U

U.l

.9

l.U
.9

.3
.3

.3

2.6

.3

.2
.2
.2

3.3

2.3
l.U
.U
l.U
1.7

.2
.2

3.7
3.1

.9
•
U

8.6

2.1

1.7
2.9
2.9

1.0
1.2
1.0
1.0

.8
1.0

.2
.2

.9

.3

.2
.2

1.1

1.5

.3

.3

2.0

2.8

.3

3.1
2. li

3.6
2. 1
i

3.U
3.0

3.0
2.5

1.0
.6

3.5
Fabricated structural metal products....
Metal stamping, coating, and engraving..

li. 2
3.2
9.5

3.7
U.U
u.2

3.3
U.9
3.9

1.1
.8
1.0

2.1

5.9

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rrent month are prelim in ary.




.u

1.1

1.8

.1

and

Iron and steel foundries..................
Gray-iron fou n d ries..................... .

Cutlery, hand tools,

5.5

11.0 10.2

1.8
1.7

.8

.2

.u

.2
.3

.2

1.8
.6

2.0

.2

1.9

.U
.u
.3

3.3

2.1
2.6

.3

.3

.3
.2

.2
.1

1.0
1.0

.2

.2

.2

1.0
2.6
2.U

.1
.1
.2

.2
.2

.1

.3

Labor Turnover

29

Table B-2: Labor turnover rates,
by industry-Contmued

Industry

(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
Total
rates

Oct.

Sept. Oct.

Separation rates
Quits

Sept. Oct.

Discharges

Sept. Oct.
195Ô

! $ •

0.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

0.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

.1
.1

1958 1958 195Ô 1958 195Ô 1958

Layoffs

Oct.

1958

M i s c . , incl,
military

Sept. Oct.
1958 1958

»

Durable Goods-Continued

MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL).......................
Agricultural machinery and tractors.....
Co n struction and mining m ac h i n e r y .......
Machine t o o l s . . . . «........................
Metalworking machinery (except machine

3.1
U.9
3.3
2.9
2.9

2.1

3.U
U.7
3.8
2.5
3.1
1.9

2.U
2.U
2.U
2.3
2.3

2.2

2.9
2.3
3.2
3.2
3.6
3.2

0.6
.6
.6

0.9

.7
.5

.9
.7

.6

.6

3.5
U
.6

.5

2.8

.7
.7

1.9
5.5

2.0
6.U

2.5

2.5
2.U

3.0
2.5

5.2
2.5

2.5
2.5
3.0
5.2
3.8

1.8
2.8
2.1

3.2
1.7
3.3
2.5

3.3

U.U

2.9

2.9

2.8
3.3

3.U
U.6

2.U
3.0

3.0

U.5

5.8

3.8

1.0

2.0

U.U
U.7
6.U

Special-industry machinery (except
General industrial m a c h i n e r y ........ ..
Office and store machines and devices...
Ser v ice-industry and household machines.
Miscellaneous machinery p a r t s ............

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY.........................................
E lectrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus.
Communication equipment...................
Radios, phonographs, television sets,

2.8

2.1

1.1
1.1

.8
.6

Aircraft engines and p a r t s ..............
Other aircraft parts and equip m e n t .....
Ship and boat building and repairing....
Railroad e q u i p m e n t......... .
Locomotives and parts.
Railroad and street c a r s ....... .
Other transportation e q uipment...........

.7
U.3
(3)
(3)
(3)

20.8
3.0

2.6

2.3
3.7

.2
.2

.3

2.1

1.6
1.8

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.2

.2

1.5
.9
1.5

.5

1.1

l.U

.3
.3

.2

1.2

1.5

.2

.2

1.2

1.0

.2

.3

.8

1.1
2.0

.2
.2

.2
.2

1.1
1.1

l.U
.5

.3

.2

l.U

3.5

1.8

2.U

.3

.3

l.U

.6

.2

.3

1.U

1.7

.5

.9

.1

.1

#5

•
U

.3

.3

5.1

3.0

3.2

1.2

l.U

.3

.2

1.2

l.U

.3

.2

6.3
9.5
2.7
2.7

U.l
U
.2
2.7
2.U
3.7

5.0
5.5
3.1
2.9
3.0
8.9
3.0
11.9
7.1
3.0
1U.0
3.9

1.0
.9

1.2
.6

#2
#2

.1
.1
.1
.1
#
1

3.2
U
.2
1.3

#3

#
1
#
1
.1
#
1

2.7
2.7
1.5

7.5

.1
.1

.1
.1

8.5

(3)
(3)
(3)
.5

.3
.5
.5
.5
.3

1.0

2.1

2.U
2.0
2.U

1.0

2.5

2.2
1.1

6.2

U.l
ll.U
7.3

3.5
(3)
(3)
1.6 (3)
17.0 20.9
2.3
5.U

2.2

(3)
3.8
2.9

2.U
l.l
5.2
2 .U

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES...

U.3
3.0

5.2
3.U

U.9

3.0

2.8

3.3
3.U

3.5

3.1
2.3

2.7

(3)

1.6

Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware....

1.7
1.3

.3

.1
.2
.1
.2
.1

Photographic apparatus................ .. # .
Watches and clocks U/..................................
Professional and scientific instruments.

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS................

.1
.1

.3

.2
.2
.2

.2
.1
.2
.1

2.8

.6
.8

Electrical appliances, lamps, and

2.2
2.1
2.1

1.3
1.5
l.U

1.6

1.7
.9

#9
1.1
1.1
1.0
.8

Telephone, telegraph, and related

TRANSPORTATION EOUIPMENT.................................

0.2

1.8
2.0
2.6
2.2

0.2
*2
.2
.2
.2
.2

l.U
1.5

.9
.9
.7

1.1
l.U
(3)
(3)
(3)
.U

1.1

1.5

1.6
1.1
1.2
1.6
2.7
•
U
.u

.2
2.8

.5
(3)
(3)
(3)
.3
.U

13.2
.U

6.2
2.1

.2

.1
.1
.2

.1

.3

•U

.6
.1
.1

.2

.8

.8

.2

.1
.2

(3)
2.3

.3

(3)

.9

.2
.2

.2
.1
.2
.1

2.1
1.2

.3

.u

2.6

.2

.1

.U

1.6
.2

.2
.2

.1
.1

1.6

.2
.1

.2
.2
.1

2.1
2.0

.2

2.5
.7

2.5
3.1
1.5
1.1

.3
.U

.2

.2
.2
.1
.2

(3)

5.1

(3)

.2

.9

U
.2
1.7

1.8
1.2

1.0

2.8

U.5
U
.2
3.3
3.8

.7
.5
.9 V1.6
2.1
1.5

.2
.u

.u

(3)

6.7

(3)

1.3

(3)

.1

2.0

1.0

.2

.3

.1
.1
.1
.1

.1
(3)

(3)

1.1
1.6

2.7
U.9
.3
1.5
.U
(3)
( 2)
(3)
( 2)
(3)
.1 19.7
.U
.7

1.3
1.5
.9
l.U

(3)
3.6

1.2

•
U

1.8

.8

1.2

Nondurable Goods
FOOD

AND KINDRED PRODUCTS...............................

Beverages:

2.8

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rrent month are p relim in a ry.




2.8

U.o

30

Labor T urno ver

Table B -2: Labor turnover rates,
by ¡ndustry-Contfnued
(Per 100 employees)
Total
accession
rates

Industry

Separation rates
Total

Quits

Discharges

Layoffs

M i s c . , incl.
military

Oct. Sept. Oct. Sept. Oct. Sept. Oct. Sept. Oct. Sept. Oct. Sept.
195Ö 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958
Nondurable Goods— -Continued
TOBACCO MANUFACTURES.....................

TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS....................
Cotton, silk, synthetic f i b e r ..........

Dyeing and finishing t e xtiles............
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings....

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS................................
Men's and boys' suits and c o a t s .........
Men's and boys' furnishings and work

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...............
Pulp, paper, and paperboard m i l l s .......
Paperboard containers and b o x e s .........

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS...........

Drugs and m e d i c i nes ........................

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL..........
RUBBER PRODUCTS..... ....................

LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS............
Leather: tanned, curried,

and finished..

1.6
.5
3.2
1.1

2.0
1.2
2.9
1.6

3.3
3.3
3.5
3.*
4.6
3.2
3.2
3.0
2.3
2.1
4.6

3.5
3.4
3.3
4.6
3.8
3.3
4.1
3.3
1.9
3.7

3.8
3.0

3.8
2.0

4.0

.k

1.2
.9
1.5
.8

0.1
.1
.2
.1

0.1
.1
.1
.2

0.2
(2)
.5
.1

0.3
(2)
•7
.1

0.1
.1
.1
.4

0.1
.1
.1
.2

3.5
3.6
3.6
3.3
5.9
3.9
3.1
2.8
2.5
2.5
2.1

1.5
1.8
1.6
1.7
1.0
1.7
1.6
1.8
1.6
.9
.8

1.8
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.5
2.2
2.3
1.9
1.8
1.2
.9

.3
.3
.3
.2
.2
.3
.1
.1
.2
.1

.2
.3
.3
•3
.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.2

1.2
.9
1.3
.8
5.2
1.3
.2
1.6
.6
.8
1.0

1.3
1.3
1.3
.9
1.5
.5
.7
.6
1.0
.7

.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
.1
(2)
.1
.2
.2

.1
.1
.1
.1
.2
.1
(2)
(2)
.1
.1
.2

k .2

3.6
3.3

2.1
1.4

2.3
1.6

.3
.1

.2
.1

1.3
2.5

1.0
1.4

.1
.2

.1
.2

k .O

3.8

3.6

2.3

2.5

.3

.2

1.1

.8

.1

.1

2.0
1.4
2.8

2.5
1.8
3.1

2.5
1.5
3.1

3.3
2.8
3.5

.9
.5
1.3

1.9
1.8
2.3

.2
.1
.3

.2
.1
.3

1.3
.7
1.3

1.0
.7
.8

.2
.2
.2

.2
.2
.1

1.5
1.0
.9
1.2
1.2
1.1

1.7
1.0
1.2
1.0
1.6
1.0

1.6
1.3
1.1
1.1
1.6
1.7

2.3
2.1
2.1
2.2
2.0
2.5

.6

1.2
1.2
.7
.5
1.6

.2
.1
(2)
(2)
.1
.1

.1
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

.7
.5
.6
.8
.5
.9

.8
.7
1.0

.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2

.2
.2
.2
.3
.1
.2

.8
.2

.6
.2

1.5
1.1

1.6
1.3

3 .k

.k

1.6
1.1

2.3
1.0

1.3

3.1
3.3
3.4
2.9
6.7
3.3
2.2
3.6
2 .k

2.0
2.1
3.8

2 .k

0.8
.2
1.6

.k

.3
.2
.8
.5

k .O

l.k

.2
.8

.8
.8

.1
(2)

(2)
(2)

.k

.2

.2

.6
.7

.3
.3

.9
.5
1.6
1.1

.2
(2)
.2
.3

.1
(2)
.2
.2

1.0
.5
2.1
1.1

.7
.5
.4
.9

.2
.1
.3
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2

2.0
1.0
2.2

.3
.3
.3

.2
.2
.2

1.7

1.3
.8
1.4

.1
.2
.1

.1
.2
.1

1.9
3.6
6.6

2.0
.9

1.9
1.2

k .l

2.4

2 .k
2 .k

.6
.2
1.5
.8

3.*
2.4
3.5

3.1
2.8
3.2

3.7
2.2
4.0

3.7
2.2
3.9

1.7
.6
1.9

k .k

l.k

.k

.2

.k

2.6
1.7
3.0
3.3

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .
NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are prelim inary.




1.2

1.1

1.7

.k

Table B-2: Labor turnover rates,
by industry-continued
( P e r 100 e m p lo y e e s )
S e p a r a t io n r a t e s
T o ta l
a c c e s s io n
M is c ., i n c l .
T o ta l
Q u it s
L a y o ffs
D is c h a r g e s
ra te s
m ilit a r y
O ct.
S e p t. O ct.
S e p t. O ct. S ep t.
O ct.
S e p t. O ct.
S ep t.
S e p t. O ct.

In d u s try

I958

1958 1958

1958

-958
I958 Ï

1958

1958

0.1

0.1
(2)

1958 1 958 I958 1958

HOHMAHUFACTURIHG

1.2

2.2

0.6
.2
(3 )

l. k
.k
l. k

2.9

.5

3.6

1.2

.6

1.9

2.3

.9

(3 )
(3)

.9
l.k

(3 )
(3)

1.9

2.1

M T L MINING..................................................... ..
EA

H.5

6.0

L e a d and z i n c m i n i n g ...............................................

1.3
(3)
2.7

l. k

A T RC EM
N H A IT
INING...............................................

5A

BITU IN U
M O S-CO M
AL INING.....................................

5.5

1.7
2.3
(3)

3.2
4.0

( 2)

1.5

(3 )
(2)

.1
.1

•3

.2

.3

1.3

.3

.k

2.0

(3 )
(3)

l. k

0.8

1.8
(3 )

1*5
3.3
.k

.3

1.2

(2)

.6

(2)

(2)

(3 )
(3 )

(2)
(2)

0.3

.k
(3 )

0.3
.k

.3

.3

.2

.k

.1

( 2)

•5

.7

.1

.2

(3)
(3)

.k
.6

(3 )
(3 )

.k

C M U IC T N
O M N A IO :

XI

D a ta f o r th e p r i n t i n g ,

2/ Less than 0*05*
3j Not available*

p u b lis h in g ,

arid a l l i e d

in d u s t r ie s

g ro u p a r e e x c lu d e d .

k j Data for August 1958 are: 1*0, 1.3* 0 .7> 0 .1, 0*4, and 0*2«
5/ Data relate to domestic employees except messengers.




.9

.1

State and A re a Labor Turnover

32

Table B -3: Labor turnover rates in m anufacturing
for selected States and areas
(Per 100 employees)

State and area

Total
accession
rates

Sept.
1#8

Separation
Total

Quits

rates

Di scharges

Aug* Sept.
i?58 1 & 8

Aug. Sept.
1958 1 & 8

Aug. Sept.

1.3

0.2

0.3

2.0

.3

Layoffs

Aug. Sopt#

Misc., incl.
militar y

Aug. Sept.

Aug.

2.6

1.8

0.2

0.2

2.2

1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958

ALAB 1M 1 1/...............................

4.1

4.6

4.4

3.6

1.4

O I lS M k ........................................

5.0
4.6

4.3
3.8

3.6
3.6

4.6
4.4

2.0

1.7

.2
.2

.2

1.3
1.3

2.3

.1
.2

.1
.1

ARKANSAS i
Little Rock-North Little Rock..«..... .

7.2

6.6

4.5

5.0

2.9

3.0

.5

.5

.9

1.5

.2

.1

CALIFORNIA:
Lo8 Angeles-Long Beach 1/ . ..............
San Francisco-Oakland 1/................

4.9

4.9
5.1
4.7

4.6
4.8
5.3

4.5
4.9
3.4

2.4

S.l

2.0

1.9
1.7

1.5
2.3
1.3

1.9
2.7

.1
.1
.2

.1
.2
.1

3.0

2.9
2.3

1.1
.8

1.1

3.5

.6
1.0
l.l

.1
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2

.1
.2
.1

5.2

CONNECTICUT..............................

,3.4

2.8

3.5
3.1

lew Britain.

2.6
2.2
2.8

3.0
3.2

6.3
5.3

3.2
2.9

2.0

1.9
3.0

2.6
1.6
1.8

6.4
3.8

3.8

4.2

7.4

2.1

1.5

1.2

1.2

1.3
.9
1.7

.9
.9

.8

.6

.4
.4

.2
.1
.2
.1
.2
.1

.2
.1
.2
.1
.2
.1

.3
.7

1.0
.8

.8

2.3
•4

.3

.1
.2

1.1

4.7
4.2

1.5
1.3

.7

.2
.1

.1
.1

4.5
2.2

3.5
3.1

.2
.2

.3

2.6

3.4

1.9

2.6

.3

.3

.3

.4

.1

.1

7.0

6.2

6.0

3.0

2.7

.7

.7

2.4

2.5

.1

.1

3.6

4.0

4.7

3.1

2.0

1.9

.4

.4

2.2

.7

.1

.1

IDAHO ¿/...........................

6.0

6.8

8.6

7.4

4.9

3.7

.3

.4

2.9

2.9

•4

.4

INDIANA. 1/

...............................
Indianapolis \^J

5.6
3.8

4.4
3.1

3.2
2.3

4.0
3.4

1.2
.8

.9
.7

.2
.2

.2
.1

1.6
1.1

2.6

.2
.2

.3

KANSAS 5/................................
Wichita ¿/........................

2.7

2.9
1.5

4.2
4.2

4.3
4.5

1.7

1.6

1.7
1.3

.2
.1

.2
.2

2.0
2.2

2.2

2.0

2.9

.2
.2

.2
.2

KENTÜCET........................... 5.0

6.4

3.4

2.7

1.5

1.2

.3

.2

1.5

1.1

.1

.2

LOUISIANA..................... ..... 4.5

5.4

3.2

3.0

1.2

1.1

.4

.3

1.3

1.4

.3

.2

MAINE.............................

4.7

5.4

5.5

2.6

2.7

.2

3

2.3

2.1*

•3

.2

WiladLngton........................

7.6
5.3

3.4

.6

.4
.4

1.4
.9

DELAWARE.................................

2.2

2.7
2.3

1.9

.8

.2

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA)
FLORIDA...........................
GEORGIA:

4.5

See la s t page f o r fo o tn o te s .
NOTE: Data f o r the cu rrent month are prelim in ary.




2.4

.2

State and A re a Labor Turnover

33

T a b le B -3 : Labor turnover rates in m anufacturing
for selected States and areas-Continued
(Per 100 employees)
Separation rates
State and area

accession
rates

Sept.

AUg.

Total

sept.

Aug.

Quits

sept.

Aug.

Discharges

Sept.

1958

1958 1958 1958 1958

U.8
U.8

U.9
3.9

U.2
2.9

3.9
3.9

1.2

1.1

1.3

0.2

MASSACHUSETTS......................

(6)

3.9

(6)

3.1*

(6)

1.5

MINNESOTA................... ......
10cnfltpollg^St« P u l* •••••••••••••••••••

7.9
5.2

7.0
U.o

8.7
U.5

U.5
3.8

3.8

2.1

2.1

MISSISSIPPI.

6.3

6.0
5.0

5.5
2.9

U.9
U.7

MARYLAND...........................

6.2

AUg.

Misc., incl.
military
AUg.
AUg.

Layoffs

sept.

1958 1958 1958

1958

1958

0.2
.2

2.3
1.3

2.2
2.5

0.1
.1

0.1
.1

(6)

.2

(6)

1.5

(6)

.2

.2
.2

.2
.2

U.5

2.0

2.0

1.5

1.9

.2
.2

.2
.2

2.5
1.9

2 .U
2.8

.5
.7

.5
.6

2.3
.2

1.8

1.2

.2
.1

.2
.1

1.5

1958 1958
.2

MISSOURI...........................

U.2

3.6

U.8

U.l

1.8

1.6

.3

.3

2.5

2.0

.2

.2

NEVADA............................

5.9

6.5

6 .U

U.6

U.2

2.9

.8

.6

1.1

.9

.3

.1

NEW HAMPSHIRE*•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

5.0

U.9

U.U

U.5

2.6

2.5

.2

.2

l.U

1.6

.2

.2

NEW MEXICO 2/......................

U.6
5.6

U.6
5.1

U.9
U.3

5.2
U.3

2.5
2.5

2.2
2.5

.2
.5

.6
.5

2.1
1.2

2.3
1.2

.1

.1
.1

NEW YORK...........................
Albany-Schenectacfy-Troy.............

U.2
2.1
1.7
3.8
5.6
3.7
U.5
3.9
2.7
U.7
5.2

U.U
1.7
1.7
3.3
3.5
3.U
5.7

3.3

.2
.2
.3

.2
.5
.2

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.1
.2
.2

1.2
1.7

.2
.3

1.9
1.8
.2
1.6
1.5
1.3
2.5
.7
.7
1.1

1.6
.9
.U
1.8

1.2
2.1
1.6
1.7
1 .U
1.6
2.U

1.2
.8
1.1
.8
1.1
1.5
1 .U
.9

.3

1.9
2.9
2.5
3.6
U.O
1.9
2.2
2.8
3.8

1.6
.9
1.1

3#l
.
U.1
U. 7

3.9
3.0
1.8
2.9
2.9
3.6
U.8
2.7
2.5
3.1
3.7

.3

1.0

5.2
U.3

5.3
3.5

3.3
2.8

3.1
2.6

2.0

1.8
1.7

.3
.3

.3
.2

1.0
.U

U.U
7.6

U.2
7.1*
9.1 13.1»

U.7
8.8

3.6
U.1

2.3
1.9

.1
.3

(8)
(8)

U.5
5.U
3.3

3.8
6.6
2.8

5.2
5.9
5.5

5.U
5.5
5.3

2.3
2.3
1.9

2.0
2.0

1.6

.2
.3
.2

7.U

5.7

7.8

6.0

U.1

2.8

.5

Nassau aod Suffolk Counties..........
Nov York City*••••••••••••••••••••••••••
Westchester County*....... ...........

NORTH CAROLINA«••••••••••••••«•«•••••••••
NORTH DAKOTA.......................
OKLAHOMA...........................

OREGON X/..........................

See l a s t page fo r fo o tn o te s .
NOTE: Data f o r the cu rrent month are prelim in a ry.




2.0

1.0

1.9

1.0

.3

.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

.1
.2

.1
.1
.2
.u

.1
.2
.1

1.0
1.8

2.0
.7
.7
1.3
1.6

.1

.2
.2

.1

.2
.2
.2

.3

.2
.1

.2
.1

.9
.6

.1
.1

.1
.1

3.6
9.0

2.2
6.7

(8)

.2
.3
.2

2.5
3.2
3.3

3.0
2.9
3.3

.2

.2

.1

.1

.3
.2

.5

3.0

2.5

.2

.2

.1

.2

.2

State and A re a Labor Turnover

3U

Tab le B -3 : Labor turnover rates in m anufacturing
for selected States and areas-Continued
(Per 100 employees)

State and area

Total
accession
rates

S e p t.

Separation rates
Total

Quits

Discharges

Aug. Sept. Aug. Sept. Aug.

S*pt.

l. k

SOUTH CAROLINA. £/•........................ 3.3
7.7

SOUTH DAKOTA.............................. 5.9

Misc., incl.
mi litar y

Aug. Sept. Aug. Sept. Aug.

1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1??8

RHODE ISLAND........................

Layoffs

1?58 1?58 i?58

1958

6.9

6.1*

5.3

2.5

2.0

0.1»

O.li

3.2

2.6

0.3

0.3

3.5

3.3
6.5

3.l
i
11.1

1.9
1.9

1.7
1.9

.3

•li

.U

.5

1.0
U.l

1.2
8.6

.1
.1

.1
.1

6.6

li.2
U .9

6.1

5.2

5.8
7.l
i

3.5
3.2

2.6

5.8

.2
(8)

.2
.2

2.3

1.8

2.7

2.5

U .3

.2
.2

.3
•5

3.5

3.5

3.8

3.0

l.li

l.li

.2

.2

1.9

1.2

•3

.2

WASHINGTON l/............................. 5.0

3.2

ii.8

2.9

2.9

l.li

.2

.2

1.5

1.1

.2

.2

VEST VikQUIIA............................. 3.3

2.8
1.2
2.6

2.1*
1.1

2.U
1.0

.8
.U

.6

1.5

1.9

.5

.li

.1
(8)
.1

1.3

1.5

.1
.1
(8)

.2
.2
.2

.2
.1
.2

VERMONT............................

Wheeling-Steuben^iUe....................

1.2
2.0

1/ Excludes canning and preserving.
2/ Excludes fertilisers, and Miscellaneous Manufacturing industries.
3/ Excludes canning and preserving, and sugar*
4/ Excludes canning and preserving, and newspapers.
5/ Excludes instruments and related products.
6/ lot available.
7/ Excludes furniture and fixtures,
f / Less than 0 .0$.

7/ Excludes tobacco steaning and redrying.
lOTEi Data for the current aonth are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.




.3

•U
.8

.6
1.2

A v e r a g e

W

e e k l y

E a r n i n g s

o f

F a c t o r y

P r o d u c t i o n

W

o r k e r s

GROSS, NET SPENDABLE, AND "REAL“ NET SPENDABLE
Jonuory 1948 to Date

Do) Iors

UNITED STATES D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R
bureau of labor statistics




Dollors

LATEST DATA: OCTQ-BER 1 5 (PRELIMINARY)
98

36

C u rren t Hours and Earnings

Table C-l: Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by major industry group

Major

industry

group

Average
Nov.

1953

weekly earnings
UCl.
No t .

Average weekly hours
Bor.
Oct.
NOV.

Average
Nov.

hourly earnings
m o t .
Oct.

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

1958

1953

1957

MANUFACTURING.....................................................

$86.58

♦81*. 96

♦82.92

39.9

39.7

39.3

♦2.17

♦2.1U

♦2.11

D U R A B L E G O O D S ...............................
N O N D U R A B L E G O O D S ..........................

91.13
77.03

91.60
76.61*

88.93
71*.11

1*0.1*

39.3

1*0.0
39.3

39.7
38.8

2.33
1.96

2.29
1.95

2.2U
1.91

100.35

102.75

96.00

1*0.3

1*1.1

UO.O

2.U9

2.50

2.U0

76.76
73.62
87.71*
107.1*1

79.32
73.57
86.51
106.59

71.91*
69.87
8!*.6l
97.03

1*0.1*
1*0.9
1*1.0
39.2

U l.l
U l.l
1*1.0
38.9

39.1
39.7
U0.1
38.2

1.90
1.80
2. li*
2.7U

1.93
1.79
2.11
2.7li

1.8U
1.76
2.11
2.5U

93.20
96.1*0
87.85
108.50
89.28
71*. 77

93.02
95.28
85.79
100.1*7
89.28
71*. 37

90.32
92.50
82.95

U0.8
39.7
39.9
39.U

U0.5
39.7
39.5
U0.6

85.20
72.25

1*0.1*

1*0.1*
1*0.2

UO.O

39.7

2.29
2.1*1
2.18
2.6U
2.21
1.86

2.28
2.1*0
2.15
2.55
2.21
1.85

2.23
2.33
2.10

101.50

1*0.7
1*0.0
1*0.3
1*1.1

2.13
1.82

83.6U
62.16
61.10

81.81
59.82
60.80

79.18
57.60
58.29

1*0.8

37.9
1*0.2

U0.7
39.1
UO.O

Uo.U
3 7 .U
38.6

2.05
1.6U
1.52

2.01
1.53
1.52

1.96
1.5U
1.51

51*. 26
91.38

55.08
91.16

53.10
87.15

?5*Z
«2 .5

36.0
U2.6

35.U
U1.9

1.52
2.15

1.53
2.1U

i.5 o
2.08

99.01*
96.59
111.91
97.92
58.99

99.01*
95.91*
109.87
97.51
58.1*6

95.76
92.66
111.11
93.20
57.31

37.8
U l.l

37.8
1*1.0
U0.1
1*0.8
37.0

38.0
Ul.o
U0.7
UO.O
36.5

2.62
2.35
2.77
2.U0
1.59

2.62
2.3U
2 .7 k
2.39

2.52
2.26
2.73
2.33
1.57

Durable Goods

L u m b e r and wood p r o d u c t s (except
f u r ni t u r e ).......................................
S t o n e , c l a y , a n d g l a s s p r o d u c t s ...........
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s .....................
Fabricated metal products (except
ordnance, machinery, and transporta­
t i o n e q u i p m e n t ) ................................
M a c h i n e r y ( e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ) ..............

I n s t r u m e n t s a n d r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s . . . .....
Miscellaneous m a n u f acturing industries..

1*0.2

2.50

Nondurable Goods
Pood

a n d k i n d r e d p r o d u c t s ........ ..........

Apparel and other finished textile
p r o d u c t s . ........................................
Printing, publishing, and allied
i n d u s t r i e s .......................................
C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ..............
P r o d u c t s o f p e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l ............
R u b b e r p r o d u c t s .................................

NOTE:

Data

for the




2 most

recent months

ar e p r e l i m i n a r y .

1*0.1*

1*0.8
37.1

1.58

37

O v e rtim e H ours

Table C-2: Gross a v e ra g e weekly hews and average overtime hours
of production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group
Major industry group

Nov.

Orose

1958
Over­
time

Oct. 1958
Grose Over­
time

Sept. 195Ô
Gross Over­
time

Gross

1957
Over­
time

Nov.

D u r a b le

39.7

2.1*

39.9

2.1*

39.3

2.3

2.5
39.3 _ 2.5

to.o
39.3

2.3
2.5

U0.2
39.5

2.3
2.6

32*7
38.8

2.2
2.1*

Ul.l
Ul.l
1*1.1
1*1.0
38.9

2.3
3*7
3.0
3.1*
1.5

In. 2
*1.3
in.o
»n.i
39.1

2.1*
3.7
3.0
3.U
1.7

»(0.0
39.1
39.7
1)0.1
38.2

1.3
2.7
2.2
3.0
1.1*

-

1*0.8
39.7
39.9
39.U
1 01* .»
1»0.2

2.6
1.8
2.0
2.1
1.8
2.5

41.0

2.6
1.8
2.2
2.0
1.8
2.1*

»»0.5
39.7
39.5
»10.6
»10.0
39.7

2.7
1.9
1.5
3.0
1.9
2.1*

-

DURABLE 800DS...... ...................
NONDURABLE GOODS.................... .

2.5

“

MANUFACTURING................................. ......................................

•
-

1|0.7
39.1
1*0.0
36.0
12.6
*
37.8
1*1.0
1*0.1
1*0.8
37.0

3.3
1.0
2.7
1.3
U.5
2.6
2.3
1.5
3.1
1.3

in . 6

ItO.l
39*7
36.1

3.5
1.3
2.5
1.3

h 2 .j

h .5

2f0.»t
37.4
38.6
35.»*
»fl.9

3.3
1.5
2.3
1.1
i*.o
2.8
2.2
1.9
2.8
1.3

39-9

G oods

Lumber and wood products (except furniture)......
Furniture and fixtures............. ...........
Primary metal industries..-........... ........
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

to.o

JtO.U
39*6
*10.3
1»0.1

N o n d u ra b le G ood e

MOTE: D a ta f o r t h e 2 m o st r e c e n t m o n th s a r e p r e l i m i n a r y .




38.0

fcl.O
lt0.7
»»0.8

36.7

2.7
2.2
1.8
3.0
1.2

38.0
»n.o

»»0.7
»tO.O
36.5

Indexes of M an -H o u rs and Payrolls

38

Tab le C -3 : Indexes of a g gre ga te w ee kly man-hours
in industrial and construction activitiesJ/
( 1947- 49=100 )

loTsaber
1958

Activity

, 97*7 ..
.
.

October
1958

September
1958

Noveabar
1957

97.7

99.6

102.0

M IN IN G ............................. ,.............

68.7

68.1

68.3

76.1

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................

123.0

135.2

136.1

120.2

MANUFACTURING ....................................

96.0

9l»-3

96.5

101.1

DURABLE GOODS.....................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.................................

100.3
90.9

95.9
92.U

98.6
9U.0

108.3
92.1*

311*.9
75.9
106.0
99.6
89.0

296.2
79.9
106.6
97.7
86.2

305.0
79.8
105.1
101.9
86.3

301*. 3
72.9
103.1
102.8
97.0

106.1
87.7
121.6
119.8
109.0
97.9

103.1
86.2
116.1
98.1
107.7
100.7

107.0
86.9
120.0
108.7
106.5
98.9

115.3
101.1
131.0
135.5
111*. 9
103.0

ait.8
76.9
73.2
99.6
111.6
109.1*
100.7
81.7
99.6
88.5

90.3
90.1*
72.8
100.9
111.7
110.2
100.6
81.8
99.1
85.8

98.1
95.8
71.8
101.2
112.2
110.0
99.2
85.0
96.2
86.8

86.1*
81.5
72.7
100.1*
112.7
112.2
101*.1
*
89.3
105.1

Durable Goods

Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries............
Nondurable Goods

Tobacco m a nufactures.................................

Printing, publishing,

and allied industries......

Xl For mining and manufacturing, data refer to production and related workers.
relate to construction workers.
NOTE: Data for the 2 most recent months are preliminary.

87.7

For contract construction, data

Table C -4: Indexes of a g g re g a te w e e kly payrolls
in industrial and construction activities!/
(1947- 4 9 = 1 0 0 )

SoTaaber

October

September

Hovaaber

1958

1958

1958

1957

M IN IN G ...........................................

10l
*.9

105.5

117.6

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION............................

230.5

232.9

200.2

152.2

155.7

160.7

Activity

MANUFACTURING....................................
XI S e e
NOTE:

f o o t n o t e 1,
D a t a for the




t a b l e C-3.
2 most recent months

157.2

are preliminary.

39

Industry H o u rs an d Earnings

Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry
Industry

Average weekly <arnings
»

Oct.
1958

M IN IN G ............................ .....

$102.26

METAL MINING.................................................

Sept.
1958

98.42
101.72

Oct.
1957

$102.14 $102.91

100.44
88.04

98.04

Averageì weeklyr hours Average hourl*v earn in ds
Oct.
1958

Sept.
1958

1957

Oct.
I958

öept.
I958

1957

40.1

39.9

1*0.2

$ 2.55

$2.56

$2.56

38.9

30.6

2.53

2.81
2.1*8
2.19

2.5I*
2 .8 *
1
2.1*1*
2.20

2.1*8
2.71
2.1*2

Oct.

83.16

98.70
106.23
92.20
88.10

40.5
40.2

37.8

39.8
39.2
38.1
40.6

104.80
94.67

36.2

36.9

38-8

2.17

ANTHRACITE MINING.........................................

79.30

80.08

81.27

30.5

30.8

30.9

2.60

2.6O

2.63

BITUMINOUS-COAL MINING...............................

107.76

106.55

110.66

35.8

35.1
*

36.1*

3.01

3.OI

3.0I*

CRUDE-PETROLEUM AND NATURAL-GAS
PRODUCTION:
Petroleum and natural—gas production
(except contract services)........

106.39

110.02

106.92

40.3

1*0.9

40.5

2 .6 *
1

2.69

2 .6 *
1

NONMETALLIC MINING AND QUARRYING..........

95.13

95.34

91.19

45.3

15.1
* *

hh.7

2.10

2.10

2.01*

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION.... .............

115.44

114.91

109.96

38.1

37.8

37.4

3.O3

3.0I*

2.94

NONBUILDING CONSTRUCTION.............

118.71

II7.32

42.7
44.7
40.7

1*2.2
13.6
*
1*0.7

1*0.6
in. 5

2.78

2.78

39.8

2.62
2.96

2.69
2.1 9
*

117.11
120.47

114.23
120.07

109.21
103.34
114.23

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION......... .......

114.50

114.25

110.23

36.7

36.5

36.5

GENERAL CONTRACTORS*.................................

106.64

105.56

102.65

36.9

36.1*

SPECIAL-TRADE CONTRACTORS.......................

118.95
125.68

118.99

36.6
38.2

Highway and street construction....
Other nonbuilding construction.....

2.62

2.95

2.87

3.12

3.I3

3.O2

36A

2.89

2.9O

2.82

36.6

3.25
3.29
3.16
3.63

3.26
3.3O
3.I5
3.62

35.9

36.5
38.3
35.0
38.7
35.7

3.17

3.18

3.I5
3.18
3.OI*
3.1
*3
3.O9

II3.8O

113.53

115.29
122.11
105.79
135.49
110.00

MANUFACTURING..........................

84.96

85.39

82.56

39.7

39.9

39.5

2.11*

2.11*

2.O9

DURABLE GOODS... ..................
NONDURABLE GOODS...................

91.60

92.46

76.64

88.75
74.10

40.0
39.3

ho .2
39.5

39.8
39.0

2.29
1.95

2.3O
I.95

2.23

77.03

102.75

103.00

94.96

4l.l

kl.2

39.9

2.5O

2.5O

2.38

80.12

73.97
72.44
73.23
50.55
89.47

4i.l
41.0
40.9
42.5
39.8

11.3
*
1*1.1
1*1.1
1*2.1*

1*0.2

1.93
39.8 ■ 1.88
39.8
I.90

1.9!*
I.89
I.9I
I.23
2.1*1

1 .8 *
1

76.78
77.11
76.02
56.74
57.20
62.06

41.6
41.9

1*1.8
1*2.3
1*1.8
1*0.6
1*1.1
1*0.8

I.99
I.96
2.O3
1 .1
*7
1.1*6

I.91
1.89
I.91
1.1*1*
1 .1
*3
1 .51
*

111.23
140.12

D u ra b le

126.39
110.25
140.09

35.2
38.6

38.4
3^.8
39.5
35.6

I.90

Goode

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES............................
LUMBER AND W
OOD PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
FURNITURE).......................................................
Sawmills and planing mills..........
Sawmills and planing mills, general...
South.
West. ................. ..... .
Mi11work, plywood, and prefabricated
structural wood products...........
Millwork..........................
Wooden boxes, other than cigar.......

79.32
77.08

77.68

77.71

78.50
52.15
96.16

52.70

95.92
82.78
81.71
85.06

83.18
82.91

59.13
57.89
65.92

60.01

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




84.85
59.68
64.87

41.9

40.5
40.2
41.2

39.9

1*1,1
38.1*

1.21*
2.1*1

1*0.2
1*0.8

1.99
1.95

39.8
39.1
*

1*0.0
1*0.3

2.03
1.1*6
1.1*1*
1.60

1.59

1.82
1 .8 *
1
I.23

2.33

4o

Industry H ours and Earnings

Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by Industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings

Oct.

Sept*

Oct.

1958

Industry

I

958

1957

Ayerage weekly hours

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

I

I

958

1957

958

Average hourly earnings

Oct.

I

958

Sept.

Oct.

1958

1957

$ 1.80
I . 7I

$ 1 .7 7
I .69

I .52
I .87
1 .9 7

I .50
1.86
1.92

Durable Goods— Continued
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES.................
Ho usehold furniture .....................
Wood household furniture, except
Wood household furniture, upholstered.
Mattresses and b edsprings .............
Office, public-building, and profes­
sional fur n i t u r e .......... ............
Metal office f u r niture................
Partitions, shelving, lockers, and
fi x t u r e s .................................
Screens, blinds, and miscellaneous
furniture and fixtures................

STONE, CLAY AND GLASS PRODUCTS........
Plat g l a s s................................
Glass and glassware, pressed or blown.
Glass cont a i n e r s ........................
Pressed or blown glass................
Glass products made of purchased glass.
Cement, h y d r a u l i c ........................
Structural clay p r o d u c t s ...............

$ 7 3 .8 0
7 0 .4 5

$ 7 3 .5 7
7O.97

4 1 .1
4 1 .5

4 1 .0
4 1 .2

4 0 .7
4 0 .9

4 2 .0
4 1 .4
4 0 .7

4 1 .5
4 0 .7
4 1 .8

4 1 .6
4 0 .6
3 9 .2

I
I
I

6 5 .6 7

4 1 .1
4 2 .3
3 9 .8

3 9 .8
4 1 .3

2 .0 4
1 .5 8

2.28

2 .0 4
1 .5 7
2 .2 7

1.98
1.59
2.19

2 .2 5

2.16

63.O 8
7 6 .1 1
8 2 .3 5

6 2 .4 0
7 5 .5 2
7 5 .2 6

8 1 .4 0

8 3 .8 4
6 6 .4 1

78.80

$ 1 .7 9
I . 7I

.52
.89
.97

66.68
88.69

90.35

83.66

3 9 .9
4 2 .2
3 8 .9

86.80

87.98

87.70

3 9 .1

3 9 .1

4 0 .6

2.22

7 2 .2 7

7 2 .4 5

70.12

4 0 .6

4 0 .7

4 0 .3

I

88.78 8 4 .6 5
128.94 116.76

4 1 .0
2 7 .5
4 0 .4
4 0 .7
4 0 .0
4 0 .7
4 0 .8
4 0 .8
4 2 .2
4 0 .4
4 o .4

4 1 .1
4 2 .0
3 9 .8
3 9 .9
3 9 .6
4 0 .7
4 1 .1
4 0 .9
4 1 .9
4 0 .7
4 0 .4
3 8 .7

4 0 .5
4 0 .4
3 9 .5
3 9 .6
3 9 .4
4 0 .9
4 0 .4
4 0 .1
4 0 .9
4 0 .1
4 0 .5

2.11

86.51
76.18
87.67
88.73

8 5 .9 7

86.58

8 6 .4 0
7 4 .8 9

8 5 .1 4

75.70

96.70
79.15

9 7 .8 2
7 9 .3 5
7 3 .3 3
7 9 .3 7
7 9 .5 9

91.10

Cut-stone and stone p r o d u c t s ...........
Miscellaneous nonmetallic mineral
p r o d u c t s ................................ *

69.12

6 3 .8 4
7 8 .2 5
8O . I 8

7 4 .2 7
7 9 .5 9
7 9 .9 9

Pottery and related pr o d u c t s ...........
Concrete, gypsum, and plaster products.

$ 7 2 .0 4

91.72

7 5 .5 2
9 1 .8 4

7 4 .3 0

8 3 .7 4
8 4 .7 4
8 2 .7 4
7 4 .4 4

90.50
76.19
71.58
7 6 .9 9
7 6 .5 5
8 4 .8 0
7 4 .6 3

85.06

88.45

90.37
87.47

7 5 .4 4

7 5 .2 1

72.62
8 7 .6 4

8 3 .3 5

38.6

36.6

38.2

38.2

3 7 .2
4 4 .8
4 4 .9
4 l. O

4 4 .3
4 4 .4
4 1 .1

3 7 .5
4 3 .4
4 4 .1
4 0 .8

4 0 .9
4 0 .5
4 1 .4
3 8 .9

4 0 .6
3 9 .7
4 1 .4
3 9 .2

4 0 .2
3 9 .2
4 1 .5
3 6 .3

.78

2 .7 7
2. I 7

2.18
2.16
1 .8 4
2 .3 7

1.94
1.76
1 .9 7

1.98
2.36
2.03
2.05

.78

1.74

2.16
3.07
2.16
2.17

2.09
2.89
2.12

I

2 .1 5

1.86
2.38
1.94
1 .7 5
1 .9 5
1 .9 7
2 .3 7

2.03
2 .0 4

2 .1 4

2.10
1.82
2 .2 4
I .90
1 .7 5
I .92
I .89

2.22

1 .9 9
I .96
I .89
I .78

1 .9 7
1 .8 4

1.97
1.83

2 .2 4
2 .3 5

2. I 8

2.26
2.50

2.25
2.33
2.28
2.53

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES..............
Blast furnaces, steel works, and
rolling m i l l s ...........................
B last furnaces, steel works, and
rolling mills, except electrometal­
lurgical p r o d u c t s .....................

M a l l eable-iron f oundries..............
Steel f o u n d r i e s .........................
Primary smelting and refining of
nonferrous m e t a l s ......................
P r i m a r y smelting and refining of
copper, lead, and zinc...............
P r i m a r y refining of aluminum .........
S e condary smelting and refining of

91.62

9 1 .3 5

9 5 .1 8
9 3 .5 6
9 7 .2 5

9 4 .3 9
9 9 .1 8

90.94
91.30
87.12

1 0 6 .5 9

IO 6.74

98.18

3 8 .9

3 9 .1

3 8 .5

2 .7 4

2.73

2 .5 5

1 1 4 .8 2

115.71 103.74

3 8 .4

3 8 .7

38.O

2 .9 9

2.99

2 .7 3

115.20
100.50
86.16
83.IO

116.10 103.85
1 0 1 .4 5

3 8 .4
4 0 .2
3 7 .3
3 7 .1

3 8 .7
4 0 .1

3 7 .9
3 9 .9

3.00
2.50
2.31

2 .7 4
2 .4 0

2 .2 3
2 .2 3
2 .3 9

92.50

88.77

83.85

38.1
38.1

38.0

2 .2 4
2 .2 9
2 .4 7

3.00
2.53
2.33
2.29
2.31
2.45

2 .4 0

2.28

92.61

8 4 .2 9
9 3 .2 1

36.8
38.2

3 8 .5
3 7 .8

3 7 .6
3 7 .8
3 9 .0

I O I . 7I

101.05

9 7 .4 4

4 0 .2

4 o .i

4 0 .1

2 .5 3

2.52

2 .4 3

91.31
118.90

91.01 89.50
117.38 107.59

3 9 .7
4 1 .0

40.9

3 9 .4

3 9 .6
4 0 .6

2. 3O
2. 9O

2.31
2.87

2 .6 5

4 1 .0

4 0 .5

4 0 .4

2 .2 5

2 .2 4

2 .1 7

8 7 .2 5
8 8 .9 4

8 4 .2 7
9 4 .3 5

9 2 .2 5

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are prelim in a ry.




9 5 .7 6
8 6 .6 4

2 .3 2

2.20

90.72

87.67

2.26

mIndustry ÿH o u rs a n d Earnings
u m y j

ia

Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by Industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings

Oct.

Sept*

Oct.

1958

1958

1957

$ 106.55

$104.60

104.42

102.59

111.65

Industry

Average weekly hours

Average hourly earn ings

Oct.

Sept.
1958 1958

Oct.
1957

Oct.
1958

Sept.
1958

Oct.
1957

$ 97.28

41.3

40.7

40.2

*2.58

$2.57

$2.42

97.03

41.6

41.2

40.6

2.51

2.49

2.39

108.27 98.46
91.64
95.18
106.13
99.43
104.34 102.43
105.88
96.56
105.18 97.27

41.2
40.2
39.9
38.4
4l.O
40.3

4o.l
4o.5
39.9
38.5
41.2
39.1

39-7
39.5
39.3
38.8
39.9
38.6

2.71
2.36
2.69

2 .7O

2.73
2.59
2.74

2.71

2.53
2.64
2.42

2.69

2.52

4o.8
41.2
4l.O
4o.4
39.5

4l.o
42.6
39.9
40.2

2.28
2.58
2.11
1.95
2.23
2.11

2.29

2.22
2.40

Durable G o o d s — - Continued

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES— Continued
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of
Rolling, drawing, and alloying of

94.87

Miscellaneous primary metal industries.
I ron and steel f o r g i n g s ................

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS (EXCEPT
ORDNANCE, MACHINERY, AND TRANSPORTA­
TION EQUIPMENT)...............................................

107.33

104.83
106.19
110.4s

93.02

2.35
2.66

2.57

2.48

2.32

41.9

4o.o

40.7
40.0
41.0
40.3
39.7
41.6

41.2
39.8

40..9
4o.l

40.2
39.5

2.25
2.34

2.25

87.69

91.27
96.46

85.46
94.39

4l.8
4o.4

41.3
40.7

40.5
41.4

2.21
2.37

2.21
2.37

2.11

94.80

96.05

96.37

40.0

40.7

41.9

2.37

2.36

2 .3O

91.13
97-53
99.12
93.48
82.03
97.10

91.71
97.04
101.22
95.40

89.82

40.5
40.3
41.3
41.0
42.5
40.8
40.8
40.6
41.1

40.4
40.1
42.0
41.3
42.0
41.5
40.7
40.7
41.4

40.1
41.6
4l.l
40.5
41.7
40.7
39.9
39-5
41.0

2.25

2.42
2.40
2.28
I .93
2.38
2.00
2.12
2.27

2.27
2.42
2.41
2.31
I .93
2.40

2.24

94.85
94.12
90.72
76.31
94.42
82.19
82.16
89.79

95*01
93.85
92.70
'87.53

39.6
39.7
4l.4
4l.l

43.9
38.7
4l.6

2.57
2.44
2.36

40.9

39.1
39.6
41.2
40.9

105.82

95.60
93.67
104.49 100.40

39.7
40.7

40.0
40.5

116.31

114.65 112.75

41.1

102.06
96.71
99.15

101.40
95.74
96.75

96.62
92.83
95.59

93.83
94.49

94.24
94.25

93.06

94.41
94.40

106.30
86.51
78.78

93.89

107.78
86.18
76.78

88.09 ! 87.25

Heating apparatus (except electric)
S ani t a r y ware and plumbers* supplies..
Oil burners, nonelectric heating and
cooking apparatus, not elsewhere
F abric a t e d structural metal products...
Str u c t u r a l steel and ornamental metal

S t a mped and pressed metal products....

92.70

92.03
94.24

86.03

93.13

92.38
95.75

81.06
99.60

81.60
86.07

83.84
87.IO
93.98

115.02

93.30

97.70
89.19
MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)....................
Engines and t urbines.............. .......
S t e a m engines, turbines, and water
D i esel and other internal-combustion
engines, not elsewhere classified....
Agricultural machinery and tractors....
Ag ricultural m a chinery (except
C o n s truction and mining machinery......
Con s t r u c t i o n and mining machinery,
except for oil fields..................

95.28

97.34

NOTEi Data f o r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




89.38
76.17
84.96
94.02

88.40

IOI .77
96.87

F abricated wire p r o d u c t s .................
M i s c e l laneous fabricated metal products
M e t a l shipping barrels, drums, kegs,

96.00

88.41

Metal doors, sash, frames, molding,

Metal stamping, coating, and engraving.

90.35

92.49
97.76
88.34

39.3

2.53

2.16

2.18

I .91
2.22
2.21

I .89
2.14
2.14
2.22

2.35

2.06

2.14

2.27
2.62

2.26

2.28

2.28

2.29
2.24
1.83

2.32
2.06
2 .O8
2 .I9

2.39
2.35

2.17

2.16

2.43
2.37
2.25
2.14

40.2
40.0

2.40
2 o60

2.39
2.58

2.33
2.51

40.8

41.3

2.83

2.81

2.73

40.5
39.8
39.5

40.4
39.4
38.7

39.6
39-5
39.5

2.52
2.43
2 .5I

2.51
2.43
2.50

2.44
2.35
2.42

89.44
91.25

4o.l
39-7

4o.l
39-6

39.4
39.5

2.34
2.38

2.35
2.38

2.27
2.31

89.93
94.13

39.I
40.9

39-5
40.0

39.I

2.38
2.38

2.39
2.36

2.30

40.4

2.33

Industry H ours and Earnings

4
2

Table C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings

Oct.

Industry

1958

Sept.

1958

Average weekly hours

Average hourly earnings

Oct.

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

1957

1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

39.1
38.1

1*0.1*
1*0.1

♦ 2.5 *
1
2.ia

* 2.54

* 2.48
2.40

2.55

Durable Goods— Continued
MACHINERY (EXCEPT ELECTRICAL)— continued
#100.08
91.82

♦ 99.31

91.06

$ 100.19
96.21*

101*. 92

99.71

98.01*
103.88

103.38

1*0.2

91.25
9 *.83
1

91.25
9 *. 89
1

90.68
Paper-industries ma c h i n e r y .............
Printing-trades machinery and equipment
98.55
General industrial m a c h i n e r y ............
95.12
Pumps, air and gas compressors ........
91.87
Conveyors and conveying equipment.....
92 . 3k
Blowers, exhaust and ventilating fans.
93 . h i
97.69
Industrial trucks, tractors, etc ......
Mechanical power-transmission
95.68
eq u i p m e n t .................... - ..........
Mechanical stokers and industrial
furnaces and o v e n s .....................
91*.37
Office and store machines and devices..
95.51
Computing machines and cash registers. 105.01
82.01
T y p e w r i t e r s ...............................
89.78
Service-industry and household machines

89.72
99.51
*
9l
*.33
91.31
93.9 *
1
92.57

90.61*
91.80
78.7 *
1
91*.18

Machine t o o l s ....... .....................
Metalworking machinery (except
machine tools )............. ............
Special-industry machinery (except
metalworking m a c h i n e r y ) ................

78.80

102.30

Commercial laundry,

dry-cleaning,

and

78.80

97.69

99.12
93.38
90.72

39.1
*
38.1

38.6

1*0.2

39.8

10.7
*

1*0.2

1*0.2

10.7
*

10.9
*

1*1.2
1*0.8
1*0.8
13.2
*
la. 3
1*0.6
10.5
*
ia.i
1*0.2

39.1

1*0.0

1*0.0

39.6
39.9
39.8
39.6

39.7
10.3
*
39.8
39.7
38.5

2.61

2.27
2.32
1.97
2.26
2.47
2.37

39.5

2.27
2.33
1.97
2.29
2.1
*7
2.39
2.32
2.1
*3
2.29
2.1
*3

NOTE:

Data

for




the

current

month

are

2.18
2.40
2.30

2.24
2.40

1*0.6
1*1.1

93.30

93.96

39.7

39.2

10.5
*

2.1a

2.38

2.32

9 *.83
1
95.31*
101*.31i

98.00
91.1 *
1

10.7
*

81.1*1
9 *.89
1
111.60

78.01
90.7 *
1

10.5
*
10.3
*
10.7
*

11.7
*
39.8
39.9
39.8
39.8

2.33
2.37
2.58

2.33
2.36
2.57

2.35
2.29
2.48
1.96

98.65

1*2.1

1*0.1*
1*0.6
10.5
*
10.9
*
1*5.0

98.95

1*0.2

38.7

la. 8

ai*.89
87.11*

87.57
88.09

11.5
*
38.8

39.3
38.9

Ul. 7

93.32
9 *.1
1 *7
93.30
92.90
95.65

89.93
91.88
91.5 *
1

37.3
39.1
*
39.8

1*0.1*
1*0.2

93.30

39.5

39.7
39.7
10.7
*

39.1
10.3
*
39.8
39.1

85.79

87.26

81.95

39.9

l*0.1t

91.1 3
*

90.63
79.59

89.20

82.00

76.1 *
0

1*0.1
1*0.0

87.60

86.11

82.68

85.75

87.08

99.06
93.53
9 *.16
1

Electrical welding apparatus...........
Electrical appliances.............. .
Insulated wire and cable ............... .
Electrical equipment for vehicles......
Electric l a m p s ............................
Communication e q u i p m e n t ..................
Radios, phonographs, television sets,
and e q u i p m e n t ...................... .
Radio t u b e s ...............................
Telephone, telegraph, and related
e quip m e n t .................. ........... . •

2.20

2.25
1.93

100.28

86.91
92.98
9 *.33
1
89.17
93.22

Electrical generating, transmission,
distribution, and industrial apparatus
Wiring devices and supplies............
Carbon and graphite products
( e l e c t r i c a l )............................
Electrical indicating, measuring, and
recording instruments ............ .....
Motors, generators, and motorgenerator s e t s ..........................
Power and distribution transformers...
Switchgear, switchboard, and

2.30

2.43
2.54

38.0
1*0.8
1*0.2

86.91

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY...................

2.54

2.61

98.61,
88.1*1*
90.1*6

88.81

Refrigerators and air-conditioning
uni ....................................
Miscellaneoiis machinery p a r t s ...........
Fabricated pipe, fittings, and valves.
Ball and roller bearings...............
Machine shops (job and rep a i r ) ........

2.39

89.60
88.1*1*

87.99
73.58

85.01
83.62

39.5

2.01*
2.32
2.1 3
*

2.11*
2.21*

2.01

2.32

2.48

2.20

2.29

2.28

2.36

2.16

2.10

2.24

2.23
2.30

2.36

2.31
2.35
2.35
2.34
2.35

2.27
2.27

39.1
*

2.15

2.16

2.08

1*0.1
39.1
*

1*0.0
38.8

2.28
2.05

2.26
2.02

2.23
1.97

1*0.0

39.5

38.1

2.19

2.18

2.17

82.00

39.7

10.5
*

1*0.0

2.16

2.15

2.05

97.77
91*.71

97.03
91.25

1*0.6

1*0.1*
10.3
*

1*0.6

2.1*1*

39.8

39.5

2.35

2.42
2.35

2.39
2.31

93.20
92. H
87.12

92.52
91*.37
83.71*
8 *. 26
1

39.9
39.3

1*0.0
1*0.1*

1*0.1*
10.5
*

2.36
2.28
2.20

2.33
2.28

2.29
2.33

33.6

1*2.0
1*0.6

88.20
9 *.19
1

81.35
8 ».2 *
1 1

88.76

86.58
78.1
a

38.6

1*0.2
1*2.1

39.6

76.83

1*0.1
1*0.2

39.3
10.5
*

1*1.1

39.5

1*1.1

39.0
39.6
39.0

2.33

2.44
2.28
2.44

2.36

2.37
2.31

2.09
2.19

2.20
2.10

2.32
2.07

2.28
2.30

2.12

2.05

2.22
1.98

2.12
2.08

2.08

1.97

83.61*
76.81

7 *.30
1

1*0.2

1*0.8

71.80

39-8

38.6

2.01*
1.91»

2.05
1.93

1.91

39.8

38.9

77.21
95.82

9 *.87
1

90.12

1*0.6

1*0.2

39.7

2.36

2.36

2.27

82.01

preliminary.

1.86

l Industry H o u rs sa n d Earnings
i g m
B n
g
Table C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued
Average weekly earnings
Industry

Average! weekly hours

Average hourly earnings

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

Oct.

Sopt.

Oct.

Oct.

S«pt.

Oct.

1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

m .2 5

* 85.89

*2.10

*2.06

2.29
1.73

2.28

Durable Goods — Continued
ELECTRICAL HACH1NERY— Continued
91».16

Primary batteries (dry and wet ) .......
X-ray and non-radio electronic tubes..

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT...............

73.10
93.77
100.1»7

96.38
Motor vehicles, bodies, parts,

97.76
72.22
9U.1
»7

183.22 10.7
*
9U .35 11.3
*
67.82 ia .3
90.97 39.1
*

10.9
*
ia.6
1*0.8
1*0.2

1*0.1*
1*1.2

* 2.07
2.28

39.2
39.9

1.77

2.38

2.35
1.77
2.35

100.98
98.1 3
*

97.57 39.1
*
99.18 38.1»

39.6

39.5
39.2

2.55
2.51

2.55
2.55

2.1
*7
2.53

99.58
88.03
87.57

100.7 » 38.0
1
82.91» 38.6
85.68 ia .9
96.21» 10.3
*
95.20 10.3
*
96.78 38.7
98.77 1*0.8
97.75 1*2.0
95.31 39.9
97.61» 39.9
77.1*1 39.1
*
99.72 35.5
102.9 * 37.6
1
98.1 3U .8
*3

38.3
39.3
11.7
*

39.2

2.57

2.60
2.21»
2.10

2.57

38.6

and

97.66
Ûii.92

88.I1I

A i r c r a f t ..................................
Aircraft propellers and p a r t s .........
Other aircraft parts and equipment....
Ship and boat building and repairing...

103.17
103.57
99.07
97.10
107.10

103.3b
106.53

lßb.Olt

103.ST
105.83
96.U6
105.75
100.35
102.83
79.60
97.99

1*0.8

10.3
*
ia .5
10.7
*

1«1.8

38.1*
1*0.8
1(0.1
1*0.0

39.5

ia .5
10.9
*

2.20
2.11
2.56

2.57

2.56
2.38

2.55
2.57
2.55
2.37
2.53
2.56
2.63

2.16
2.10
2.1*0
2.38
2.1*5
2.38

2.00

2.00

39.9
38.3
39.6

2.72
2.72
2.72

2.11

2.67
2.6 »
1
2.69
2.11

2.39
2.1*5
2.51
1.99
2.57
2.58
2.57
2.05

85.03

81.18 1(0.1»

89.28

89.1 7
*

8I
*.99 ltO.l»

U0.3

39.9

2.21

2.22

2.13

105.73

107.7 »
1

95.68 ia .3

ia.6

39.7

2.56

2.59

2.ia

87.31*
93.95

86.65 39.7

86.00 12.9
»

39.9
1 2.5
*

10.3
»
1*0.0

2.20

93.50

2.19

2.21
2.20

2.15
2.15

73.8 »
1
97.69
75.98

80.99
73.30
97.11
**
75.2 »
1

76.17
67.1
*9
95.76
73.10

10.5
*
39.7

l 0.3
»

39.6

2.00
1.86
2.1
*3

1.99
1.87
2.1
*3

1.89

1*0.2
1*0.2

10.7
*
39.2

Tfc.37
80.33
75.90

7l
*.19
76.67

72.22 1*0.2
75.81 12.5
*
70.99 1*2.1*
88.1a 1 2.7
*
85.70 ia.u
65.90 39.7

1*0.1
ia.o
10.7
*
la. 7
ia.o
39.1
*

78.80

96.56
102.27

9l*.66
85.21*

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS.......
Laboratory, scientific, and engineerMechanical measuring and controlling

Surgical, medical, and dental

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES..
Jewelry, silverware, and plated ware...
Jewelry and findings................. .
Musical instruments and p a r t s ........
Toys and sporting g o o d s.............. .
Games, toys, dolls, and children's

81.00

91.81
89.01

101». 28
9 *.69
1

88.18

72.01»
88.82

87.33
67.37

66.30
Sporting and athletic goods............
Pens, pencils, other office supplies...
Costume jewelry, buttons, n o tions......

67.89

6I».68

71.86

73.60
67.1
*3
66.19
82.7 »
1

66.76
66.08
81.31*

76.03

76.21»

6 *.31 39.7
1
69.65 39.7
67.09 39.5
66.76 39.1
78.53 11.5
*
73.30 39.6

1*0.1

39.2

1*0.0

39.9
39.1
*
1*2.0

39.5

38.9
38.9
38.9

2.55
2.59
2.67

39.2
39.1
39.8
36.7
39.5
35.2
10.3
»

38.8

39.7
39.9
39.3
39.9

1*1.2
1(0.8
12.3
(
la. 2

39.7
39.7
39.8
39.7
39.5
10.9
»
39.2

1.89

1.90

1.85
1.89
1.79
2.15
2.15
1.71

1.85
1.87
1.77
2.13
2.13
1.71

1.67

1.65
1 .8 »
1
1.69

1.81

1.69
1.69
1.96

1.68

1.70
2.1*0
1.86
1.81

1 .8 »
1
1.71
»
2.09

2.08
1.66

1.62

1.75
1.69
1.69
1.92
1.87

1.92

1.97
1.93

10.7
*

2.01
2.28

1.99

1 .9 »
1
2.19

10.5
*

2.36

2.55

2.55
2.35
1.99
2.03

2.1a
2.21»
1.86

Nondurable Goods

Dairy p roducts............................

81.81

82.78

92.80
101».55
9 ».87
1

FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS.... ..........

93.9 *
1

83.18
8l.la
88.20

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are prelim in a ry




106.08

95.88
8 *.18
1
8 ».U5
1
89.89

77.99
89.13
99.29
90.72
77.38
77.61
82.59

10.7
*
10.7
*

1*1.0
1*0.2
Ul. 8
10.5
*
1*2.0

1*1.6
ia. 2
ia.6
1*0.8
1 2.3
*
ia.6
1*2.1*

1»0.2
1*1.2
1*1.6
Ul .5
ia .5

1.99

2.01
2.10

2.28

2.12

1.87
1.99

nd ustry H o u rs a n d Earn in gs
Table C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Continued

Industry

Average weekly earnings
Sept.
Oct.

Oct.

1958

1958

1957

$ 66.36
5 9 .6 2
69. 4 6
91A 9
9 7 .4 0

$ 71.06

$ 62.65

Average weekly hours

Average hourly earnings

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

1958

I

1957

1958

1958

1957

$ 1.68
I .87
I .70

$ 1 .6 4
I .70

958

Nondurable Goods— Continued
FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS— Continued

Canning and p r e s e r v i n g...................
Sea food, canned and cured .............
Canned fruits, vegetables, and soups..
Plour and other grain-mill products...

Bread and other bakery prod u c t s .......
Biscuit, crackers, and p r e t z e l s .......
S u g a r .......................................
Beet s u g a r ................................

Malt l i quors.......................... - • •
Distilled, rectified, and blended

84.74
80.00
82.22
71.97
86.96
101.15
8 2 .5 3

66.80
6 4 . 31
92. t o
67.^0
109. 3t.
1
9 4 .3 7

Miscellaneous food p r o d u c t s .............
C orn sirup, sugar, oil, and starch....

81.99
103.39
7 3 .7 8

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES...............................................

5 9 .8 2
7 6 .5 7
5 4 .4 9

55.17
75.82
92.53
98.93

50.66
65.90

8 8 .2 4
9 0 .6 4

8 4 .5 2

82.21

7 2 .5 2

7 6 .4 0
7 8 .5 9
6 8 .6 4

79.80
82.01

60.15

3 9 .1
4 0 .3
3 9 .2
3 7 .3
3 8 .1

4 0 .1
4 0 .2
3 9 .4
3 7 .3
4 1 .2

3 8 .3
3 7 .9
3 8 .9
3 7 .1
3 8 .3

1 .5 3
I .90
I .39

1.68
1.21

1.66
1.18

3 9 .7
4 1 .5
3 8 .9

3 9 .1
3 7 .4

1 .5 2
I. 6
I
1 .4 0
1 .4 1
1 .4 3
1 .4 6
1 .4 4
I .54
1 .4 3

I .51
1 .5 9
1 .4 0
1 .4 1
1 .4 2
1 .4 6
1 .4 4
I .54
1 .4 2

5 6 .4 6
5 0 .2 5
5 2 .8 5

3 9 .2

1 .-5 6
1 .4 7
1 .5 3
1 .5 8
1 .5 1
1 .3 7
1 .4 0

1 .5 5

58.28
62.09

4 0 .0
4 0 .2
3 9 .0
3 8 .9
3 7 .2
4 0 .4
4 0 .2
3 9 .6
4 0 .3
4 1 .6
3 9 .3
3 9 .0
3 9 .3
3 9 .8

1 .5 3
1 .5 7
1 .5 1
1 .3 5
1 .4 l

1 .4 1

1 .5 3
1 .4 1

65.61
106.15
84.97
7 7 .4 9
9 5 .2 6

71.81
5 5 .9 2

7 5 .9 8
5 4 .7 7

61.92

68.98
52.90
60.47

4 6 .1 0

4 8 .6 2

4 5 .1 9

59 *9 5
6 5 .9 9
5 4 .4 6
5 4 .7 1
5 4 .2 4
5 7 .9 6
5 6 .7 4

5 9 .0 4
5 9 .8 4
5 2 .4 4
5 2 .5 4
5 6 .5 2
5 7 .6 7

60.80
6 4 .7 2
5 4 .6 0
5 4 .8 5
5 3 .2 0

58.98
5 7 .8 9

60.98

60.68

5 7 .6 3

5 5 .9 5

66.56
61.31
Knitting m i l l s ............................

5 7 -3 3

60.13
62.88
58.89
5 2 .3 3
5 4 .8 8

51.82
59.91

Dyeing and finishing t e x t i l e s ..........
Dyeing and finishing textiles (except
Carpets, rugs, other floor coverings...
Wool carpets, rugs, and carpet yarn...
Hats (except cloth and mill i n e r y ) ......

5 5 .8 4
6 9 .4 7

69.22
81.56
78.31
5 5 .5 8

NOTE: Data f o r the cu rren t month are prelim in ary.




66.56
61.69
57.18
5 8 .4 5
6 1 .3 9
5 7 .0 8

51.30
55.13

56.88
5 9 .3 6

56.63
62.65
6 1 .1 4
5 5 .1 9

5 0 .6 5
5 9 .6 7

49.74
58.06

6 7 .3 2

67.16

67.08

66.91

8 o .4 i
7 7 .7 9

7 5 .4 4

56.12

58.98

2.07
2.16
I .87

43.0

62.09

8 7 .6 4

62.66
TEXT 1L E -M IL L PRO DUCTS...........................................

1.69
2.07
2.15
I .90

38.O
4 1 .6
4 1 .8
4 4 .9

6 4 .5 5

87.40
82.78
99.07
76.78

3 9 .7
4 3 .9
4 4 .0
4 4 .2
4 0 .0
4 0 .3
3 9 .0
4 1 .7
4 2 .3
4 1 .6
3 9 .6
3 9 .3
3 9 .3
4 0 .5

$ 1.68
1 .8 4

4 0 .5
4 1 .2
4 2 .9
4 3 .4

6 9 .5 5
6 7 .5 7

113.08

44.7
45.8
45.2

38.2
29.8

4 2 .5
4 5 .1
4 o .o
3 9 .7
4 0 .0
4 1 .1
3 8 .5

78.81
93.91
72.80

6 9 .3 7

4 2 .3
2 9 .5
4 4 .6

4 0 .1
4 0 .4
3 9 .2
4 1 .9
4 3 .8
3 9 .7
4 1 .4
4 1 .2
4 0 .1
4 2 .3
3 9 .4

92.60
105.56
82.18
93.03

3 9 .5
3 2 .4
4 l.l
4 4 .2
4 5 .3
4 4 .6
4 0 .2
4 0 .5
3 8 .9

5 1 .7 5

71.55
5 8 .9 1

43.T

38.8
38.2

3 9 .7
3 9 .4
3 9 .4
3 9 .4
4 1 .6
3 9 .8
3 8 .9

38.6
38.8

4 1 .0
4 1 .6

38.0

3 7 .8
3 9 .8
3 9 .5
3 9 -5

38.8

1 .9 9

2.03
1.85
1 .9 9
2 .3 8

1.83
1.67
1.62
2.31
1 .6 4
2 .8 4
2 .3 3
1 .9 9
2 .4 1
I .70

1 .9 9
2.O 3
1 .8 5

2.21
2 .4 1

2.O 7
1.68
1 .6 4

2.32

1 .6 4

2.87

2.30

1.66
2.01
2.O 6
1.86
I .91
1 .9 5

1.76
1.89
2.22
1 .7 5
I .63
I .58
2 .2 3

1.62
2 .7 5

2.19

1 .9 9
2 .3 7
I .71

I .89
2 .2 9
I .67

1.50
1.89

1 .4 6

1 .3 9

1.82
1.36
1.63
1.18
I.51

I .60
1.38

1 .3 9
1 .4 2
1 .4 6
1 .4 4
1 .5 3
1 .4 3
1 .5 9
I .54
1 .4 6
1 .5 5
1 .5 8
1 .5 3

3 8 .9
3 9 .6
4 1 .6

3 9 .1
3 7 .8
3 9 .0
3 9 .8
4 0 .8

3 9 .6
3 9 .4
3 9 .7
3 7 .8
3 7 .6
3 9 .3
3 6 .9
3 7 .5
3 8 .3
3 7 .4
3 7 .7
3 7 .5
4 0 .7

1.67

1.65

1.38
1.65

4 1 .7
4 2 .7
4 2 .1
3 4 .1

4 0 .9
4 2 .1
4 1 .6
3 4 .9

4 0 .8
4 1 .0
3 9 .1
3 5 .7

1.66
1.91
1.86
1.63

1 .6 4
I .91

1 .6 4
1 .8 4

39.0
38.2
38.1

38.2

3 9 .1
3 7 .8

38.0

1.60

1.36
I .54

1.60

1.47

1.34

1.87
1.69

1.34
1.38
1 .3 3
I .54

1.83
1.65

45

Industry H o u rs a n d Earnings

Table C-5: Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by industry-Contmued
Average weekly earnings

Oct.
1958

Sept*
1958

Oct*
1957

$71.46

$72.92

$70.22

77-39
66.55
75.65
62.82

78.53
70.43
76.68
62.13

92.23
60.44

I ndustry

Average weekly hours
Oct.
Sept. Oct.

Average hourly earnings

1958

1957

Oct.
I958

40.6

41*2

39.9

$1.76

$1.77

$1.76

77.42
66.98
70.27
57.37

40.1
37.6
42.5
41.6

40*9
38*7
42.6
41*7

41.4
36.8
39.7
40.4

1.93
1.77
I.78
I.5I

I.92
1.82
I .80
1.49

I.87
1.82
1.77
1.42

98.57
62.06

98.IO

42.5
39.5

44*4
40*3

45.0
38.7

2.I7
1.53

2.22

58.82

1.54

2.18
1.52

55.08
60.71

55.23
63.01

53.49
61*42

36.0
34.3

36.1
35.6

35.9
34.7

1.53
1.77

1.53
1.77

1.49
1.77

47.60
48.38
46.64
b Z . 57
58.30
56.24
47.70
70.26
52.30

48.38
48.89
47.16
45.05
57.96
55.21
47.08
70.64

46*98
47.86
45.92
41*18
56.60
55.24
45.89
65.89
49.82

36.9
37.5
35.6
36.7
33.7
32*7
35.6
33.3
37.9

37.5
37.9
36.0
38.5
33.5
32.1
35.4
33.8
37.4

36.7
37.1
35.6
35.5
34.3
34*1
35.3
32*3
36.9

I.29
I.29
I.3I
I.I6
1.73
1*72
I.34

I.29
1*29
I.3I
I.I7
1.73
I.72
1.33
2.O9
I.36

1*28

51.21

49.65
54.15
69.52
50.54

38.5
36.3
36.5
37.2
37.3
38.2

37.9
36.1
36.4
36*1
37.2
38.4

37.6
35.2
35.3
36.2
36.9
38.2

1.33
I.5I

1958

Sept.
1958

Oct.
1957

Nondurable Gooda— Continued
TEXTILE-MILL PRODUCTS— Continued
M i s c e l laneous textile goo d s ........ .
Pelt goods (except woven felts and
hats)>.

........... ....
........... ...

Paddings and u p h o l s t ery filling......
Pr o c essed waste and recovered fibers.
Artificial leather, oilcloth, and

APPAREL AND OTHER FINISHED TEXTILE
PRODUCTS........................ ......
Men's and boys' suits and coats .......
Men's and boys' furnishings and work

Women's, children's under garments....
Un derwear and nightwear, except

50.86

2.11

I.38

I.29
1*29
I.I6
1*65

1*62

I.30
2*04
1.35

Pulp, paper, and p a p erboard m i l l s .....
Paperboard b o x e s . . . ....................

PRINTING, PUBLISHING, AND ALLIED
INDUSTRIES............................

Bookbinding and related industries....
Miscellaneous publishing and printing

51.71
63.55
63.ll

51.19
58.67
58.56

38.4
39*6
40.4

38*3
4l*0
40*2

38.2
38.6
39.3

1*36
I.54
1*48

1.35
1.55
1.57

I.34
I.52
1.49

91.16
98.29
86.50
85.85
92.96
80.54

91.38
99.20
86.09
85.65
89.98
80.75

88.19
96.35
83.16
82.91
84*38
77.71

42*6
43.3
42*4
42*5
41*5
41*3

42*7
43.7
42*2
42.4
•40*9
41*2

42.4
43*4
42.0
42*3
39.8
40*9

2*14
2*27
2*04

2.14
2.27
2.04

2*22

2*02

2*02
2.20

99.04
105.19
106.00
87.42
99.04
99.71
65.57
75.20

99.56
104.49
107.86

97.15
103*46
104*49

88.53

82*68

101.39
66.09
75.42

96*56
96.19
62.87
73.72

37.8
35.3
39.7
39.2
39.3
39.1
37.9
37.6

38*0
35.3
39.8
39.7
39.6
39.3
38.2
37.9

38*4
35.8
40*5
38.1
39.9
39.1
38.1
38.8

112.35

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS.............

59.1^

52.22
60.98
59.79

Millinery. . ...............................
Children's o u t e r w e a r ....................
Miscellaneous apparel and accessories.
O ther fabricated textile products.....
Curtains, draperies, and other house-

48*88
52*10
60.72
49.59
51.66
58*45

110.70

III.36

37.7

37.4

38.8

54.81
68.62
51.71
53.3^
58.06

52.82

100.19

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rren t month are p relim in a ry.




1.39
1*43
1.52

I.3I
I.50
I.9I
1.40
1.42
I.54

I.30
1.48
1*72
1.37
1*40
1.53

1*88

2*08

1*98
1.96

2*24
1.95

I.96

I.90

2.62
2.98
2.67
2*23

2*62
2.96
2.71
2*23
2.53

2.00

1.73
1.99

2.53
2.89
2.58
2*17
2.42
2.46
1.65
1.90

2.98

2*96

2.87

2*52

2*55
1.73

2.58

2*12

46

Industry H o u rs a n d Earn in gs

T a b le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory w orkers,
by ¡ndustry-Contmued
Average weekly earnings
Industry

Nondurable Goods —

O c t.
I 958

A l k a l i e s a n d c h l o r i n e . ..................
I n d u s t r i a l o r g a n i c c h e m i c a l s ...........
Plastics, except s y n t h e t i c rubber...

cleaning

.

1958

Average

weekly hours

Average

and polishing

S o a p a n d g l y c e r i n . . . .....................
P a i n t s , p i g m e n t s , a n d f i l l e r s ..........
P a ints, v a r n i s h e s , lacquers, and
e n a m e l s .....................................
F e r t i l i z e r s ...................................
Vegeta ble and animal oils and fats..*
V e g e t a b l e o i l s .............................

$ 9 5 .9 4
1 0 6 .2 3
IO 6.O 8

102.16

IO 6.O 8
1 1 4 .6 7
8 4 .9 6
9 9 .7 7
8 5 .8 4
I O I .93
I I O .83
9 4 .4 8

$ 9 5 .9 4
1 0 7 .4 2
IO 5.O I
1 0 2 .2 5
1 0 5 .7 5
I I 3.98
8 6 .4 6
9 9 .2 9

85.63
105.00

O ct.
I 958

S ep t.
I 958

O c t.
1957

$ 9 1 .8 4

4 1 .0
4 0 .7
4 0 .8
4 0 .7
4 1 .6
4 1 .1
3 9 .7
4 1 .4
4 0 .3

4 1 .0
4 1 .0
4 0 .7
4 0 .9
4 1 .8
4 l.O
4 0 .4
4 1 .2
4 0 .2

4 l.O
4 0 .6
4 0 .2
4 0 .8
4 1 .8
4 0 .5
4 0 .1
4 0 .9
4 l. O

$ 2 .3 4
2. 6I

4 l.l
4 1 .2
4 0 .9

4 2 .0
4 2 .4
4 1 .2

40.9

2 .4 8

4 1 .2
4 0 .6

2.69
2.31

2.13
2.50
2.71
2. 3O

4 1 .2
4 2 .0
4 2 .2
4 3 .8
4 3 .4
4 4 .3
3 9 .9
3 9 .1
4 1 .4

4 0 .6
4 1 .7
4 1 .7
4 5 .8
4 6 .2

2 .2 5
1 .9 3
1 .7 7
1 .7 9
I .65

4 0 .2

38.6

2.07
2.18
1.88

2 .2 4
I .92
1 .7 9
I .87
I .74

96.70

4 0 .9
4 1 .4
4 2 .1
4 6 .2
4 7 .3
4 4 .2
4 0 .0
3 9 .8
4 0 .9

M i s c e l l a n e o u s c h e m i c a l s ..................
E s s e n t i a l oils, p e rfumes, cosmetics.
C o m p r e s s e d a n d l i q u e f i e d g a s e s .......

4 1 .5

2 .4 6

2 .4 3

2.76

101.50
98.09
9 8 .3 3
1 0 1 .9 9
1 0 8 .1 4

83.01

9 4 .4 8
8 4 .0 5
9 7 .3 4

1 1 4 .9 0
9 4 .7 6

106.30
90.13

9 2 .2 9
8 0 .6 4
7 5 .5 4

87.70

7 5 .5 2

72.07

87.20

90.82
86.98

7 4 .8 2

7 3 .1 2

8 9 .7 5
8 4 .8 2
6 8 .7 1

92.03
79.90
7 4 .5 2

81.91

82.70
78.05

9 1 .4 9

O ct.
I 958

7 7 .9 8
7 2 .1 4
7 8 .3 2

45.1

2.60
2. 5I

2 .5 5
2 .7 9
2 .1 4
2 .4 1

2.13

other petroleum and coal

RUBBER PRODUCTS.......................

100.61

100.60

109.87
112.92

1 1 2 .3 3

116.00

110.03
113.36

4 0 .1
3 9 .9

4 0 .7
4 0 .7

4 0 .6
4 0 .2

2 .7 4

9 9 .4 7

PRODUCTS OF PETROLEUM AND COAL.......
Coke,

hourly earnings

O ct.
1957

S e p t.
I 958

O ct.
1957

Continued

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS........

Soap,

S ep t.

101.02

9 9 .6 6

4 0 .6

4 0 .9

4 1 .7

2 .4 5

97.51

4 0 .8
4 0 .7
4 0 .1
4 1 .0

4 0 .8
4 0 .5
3 9 .7
4 1 .3

4 0 .1

3 7 .0

3 6 .7

2.83

$ 2 .3 4

2.62

2 .5 8
2. 5O
2 .5 3
2 .7 8
2 .1 4
2 .4 1

2.05
2. I 8
I .87

$ 2 .2 4

2.50

2 .4 4
2 .4 1
2 .4 4

2.67
2.07
2.31
2.05
2.38
2.58
2.22
2. I 6
I .87
1 .7 3
I . 7I
I .56
1 .9 9
2.11

I .78
2 .3 3

2 .8 5

2. 7I
2.82

2 .4 7

2 .3 9

7 7 .3 9

88.56

76.62
89.21

93.03
105.18
76.02
86.10

5 8 .4 6

5 7 .9 9

5 7 .0 4

7 9 .3 7

7 9 .7 9

7 7 .8 1

3 9 .1

3 9 .5

3 9 .1

79.17

78.21

77.90

5 4 .3 9
5 5 .0 8
6 4 .9 4
5 8 .1 5

5 4 .4 5
5 4 .9 3
6 6 .5 7
5 4 .9 6

5 5 .2 8
5 4 .1 5

4 0 .6
3 6 .5

62.21
5 4 .1 0

3 9 .6
4 0 .1

3 9 .5
3 6 .3
3 5 .9
4 0 .1
3 7 .9

4 1 .0
3 7 .1
36. I
3 7 .7
38. I

1 .5 3
1 .6 4
1 .4 5

1 .4 5

I .90
1 .4 9
I .50
1 .6 5
1 .4 2

5 0 .8 7

4 9 .6 2

49.78

36.6

3 5 .7

36.6

1 .3 9

1 .3 9

I

( 1)
91.38

IO 3.39

9 4 .9 5

( 1)
4 2 .7

4 2 .2
4 2 .4

43.O

( 1)
2 .1 4

2 .4 5
2 .1 4

2 .2 5

81.51
108.26

81.12
66.20
108.10

7 7 .2 2
6 3 .4 1
1 0 4 .0 0

9 3 .6 3

3 9 .0
3 7 .4
4 1 .9
4 1 .8

3 9 .2
3 7 .3
4 2 .8
4 1 .5

I .78
2 .5 9
2 .2 4

I .97
I .70
2 .4 3

9 3 .4 1

3 9 .0
3 7 .4
4 1 .8
4 1 .7

2.08

6 6 .5 7

9 7 .5 1

113.96
Other

r u b b e r p r o d u c t s .....................

LEATHER AND J.EATHER PRODUCTS.........
Leather: tanned, curried, and
f i n i s h e d . ..................... ..............
Industrial leather belting and
p a c k i n g .......................................
B o o t and shoe cut s t o c k and findings.
L u g g a g e ........................................
Gloves

and m i s c e ll an eo u s

leather

1 1 3 .4 0

36.0

2.80

2.80

2 .3 9

2 .3 2

3 9 .8
4 l.0

1 .9 3

1 .9 3

I.

36.8

1.58

1 .5 8

1 .5 5

2.03

2.02

1 .9 9

39. I

2 .3 9

2.16

1 .9 5

1.49

2.16

I .98
I .50
1 .5 3

1.66

2.69
9I
2.10

.36

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S :
TRANSPORTATION:
Interstate
Local

railroads:

railways

and bus

l i n e s ............

COMMUNICATION:
T e l e p h o n e ................................... .
S w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t i n g e m p l o y e e s 27*
L i n e c o n s t r u c t i o n e m p l o y e e s 3 J ......
T e l e g r a p h £ j .................................
NOTE:

Data

for




the

current

month

are

90.74

preliminary.

89.01

87.15

4 2 .2

2.09

1 .7 7

2.58
2 .2 4

2.07

2.10

47

Industry H o u rs a n d Earn in gs

Tab le C -5 : Hours and gross earnings of production or nonsupervisory workers,
by ¡ndustry-Continued
Average weekly earnings

Average weekly hours

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

1958

1958

Oct.

1957

$101.84
102.66
96.12

$97.58

98.12

105.71

Average hourly earnings

Sept.

Oct.

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

-1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957 .

40.9
40.8
41.4

40.9
40.9
40.9

41.0
4l.l
4l.O

$ 2.51

$ 2.49

$ 2.38

98.64
93.07

2.53
2.37

2.51
2.35

2.40
2.27

105.93

99.80

40.5

40.9

40.9

2.61

2.59

2.44

87.85

88.66

85.63

40.3

40.3

40.2

2.18

2.20

2.13

64.64

64.98
46.92

62.79
44.48

37.8
34.3

38.0

37.6
33.7

1.71
1.35

1.71
1.36

1.67

46.31

52.35
68.04

Industry

52.65
68.44

49.93
65.34
82.84

34.9

35.1

1.50

49.30

43.7
34.6

1.50
1.87
1.91
1.47

1.46

43.7
34.3

34.2
36.1
43.6
34.0

1.75

1.72
1.79

TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S — Con.
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES:

Gas and electric u t i lities.............. $102.66
Electric light and power utilities.... 103.22
E lectric light and gas utilities

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE:
WHOLESALE TRADE.........................
RETAIL TRADE (EXCEPT EATING AND
DRINKING PLACES)...... ................
General m e r c handise stor e s ..............
Department stores and general mail-

36.0

34.5
36.6

1.89

1.32
1.81

50.76

83.47
50.86

73.81
79.61

79.18

71.72
75.90

41.7
42.8

41.7
42.8

41.7
42.4

65.98
108.04
83.19

64.74
97.70
80.77

—
—

—

—

—
—

—
—

—
—

—

—
—

—

83.18

—

—

—

—

45.77

45.09

44.00

39.8

39.9

40.0

1.15

1.13

1.10

44.92

44.80

43.73
51.35

39.4
39.5

39.4
38.9

1.14
1.34

1.14
1.33

1.11

51.34

39.3

52.93
102.75

Automotive and accessories dealers .....
Apparel and accessories stores..........
Other retail trade:
Furniture and appliance stor e s ........
Lumber and hardware supply s t o r e s .....

100.62

103.02

__

_

83.03

72.98

1.90
1.48
1.77

1.86

' 1.85

1.90
1.45

FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE:
Banks and trust companies...............
Security dealers and exchanges..........

66.56

111.87

SERVICE AND MISCELLANEOUS:
Hotels and lodging places:
Hotels, year-round 3 /..................
Perso n a l services:

Motion pictures:
Motion-picture production and

38.6

_

__

_

1.32
__

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
1 / Not available.
2 J Data relate to employees in such occupations in the telephone industry as switchboard operators; service
assistants; operating room instructors; and pay-station attendants.
In 1 9 5 7 , such employees made u p 39 percent
of the total number of nonsupervisory employees in establishments reporting hours and earnings data.
Data relate to employees in such occupations in the telephone industry as central office craftsmen; in­
stallation and exchange repair craftsmen; line, cable, and conduit craftsmen; and laborers.
In 1957 , such em­
ployees made up 29 percent of the total number of nonsupervisory employees in establishments reporting hours and
earnings data.
4/ Data relate to domestic nonsupervisory employees except messengers.
.£/ Money payments only; additional value of board, room, uniforms, and tips, not included.




U8

A d ju ste d E a rn in g s

Table C-6: Average weekly earnings, gross and net spendable,
of production or construction workers in selected industry divisions,
in current and 1947-49 dollars
Gross average weekly earnings
Division,
month and year

Current
dollars

1947-49

dollars

Net spendable average weekly earnings
Worker with no dependents
Current
1947-49
dollars
dollars

Worker with 3 dependents
Current
1947-49
dollars
dollars

MINING:
$102.91

$84.98

102.14

82.57

102.26

82.67

IO9.96

90.80

114.91
115.44

92.89
93.32

82.56

68.18
69.03
68.68

$83.86
83.27
83.36

$69.25
67.32
67.39

$91.80
91.16
91.26

$75.81
73.69
73.78

89.26
93.05

101.64

97.58

93.46

73.71
75.22
75.55

102.07

80.58
82.17
82.51

67.70
69.97
69.63

55.90
56.56
56.29

75.11
77.43
77.08

62.02
62.59
62.31

CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION:

MANUFACTURING:
October 1957.............

85.39
84.96

NOTE:

Data for the current month are preliminary.




A d ju ste d E a rn in g s

19
*

Table C -7: A ve rage hourly earnings, gross and excluding overtime,
of production workers in manufacturing, by major industry group

O •
o c*

Oct.

1958

1!

Gross average hourly earnings
Major industry group

Average hourly earnings,
excluding overtime 1/

Oct.

Oct.

Sept.

1957
* 2.09

1958

1958

Oct.

1957

*2.08

*2.08

* 2.03

MANUFACTURING........................................

*2.11*

*2.1b

DURABLE GOODS....................................
NONDURABLE GOODS.................................

2.29
1 . 9$

2.23

2.21*

1.95

1.90

1.89

1.89

2.17
1.8 *
1

2.50

2.U3
1.85
1.73
2.03

2.1 3
*
1.86

1.78

2.30

2.23

D u ra b le Goods

2.50
1.93
1.79

2.38
1.8b

2.11

1.80
2.16

2 . 7k

2.73

1.77
2.09
2.55

2.28

Primary metal industries.................................
Fabricated metal products (except ordnance,

1.9 *
1

2.29
2.39

2.22

2.33

2.55

2.b7
2.13

2.1*0

2.08

2.35

1.73
2.07
2.67

1.71

2.21

2.22

2.35

2 . 3k

2.15
2.27

2.68

2.10
2.1*8
2.16

2.15
2.55

2.16

2.21

2.22

1.85

1.85

1.81

1.79

1.50

1.99

1 .9b
l.b6

1.51
1.53

1.51
l.b9

1.93
1.51
1.1 7
*
1.50
2.03

2 .1 0

2.1
*9
2.17
1.79

2.01

2.50

2.01*
2.1*0
2.08

1.75

N o n d u ra b le Goods

2.01

1.53
1.52
1.53
Z l .......

2 .2 k
2 .6 2
2. 3k
2 . 7h

2.11«
2.62
2.31;
2.76

2.39
1.58

Printing, publishing, and allied industries

2.39
1.58

2.08

2.53

2.2b

2.71
2.32
1.55

—

2.27
2.69
2.30

1.55

1.91

1.1*8

l. k 7

1.87
1.1*
l. k 7

1.50
2.03

1.1 7
*

2.28

2.18

2.70
2.31
1.56

2.65
2.23
1.53

—

1.98
—

JJ -Derived by assuming that the overtime hours shown in table C -2 are paid at the rate of time and one-half.
Average hourly earnings, excluding overtime, are not available separately for the printing, publishing, and
allied industries group, as graduated overtime rates are found to an extent likely to make average overtime pay
significantly above time and one-half.
Inclusion of data for the group in the nondurable-goods total has little
effect.
NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
2J




State a n d A r e a H o u rs a n d E arn in gs

50

Table C -8 : Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas
A v e ra g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s

A v e ra g e w e e k ly h o u r s

A v e ra g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s

uct.

Sept.

Oct.

Oct.

Sept.

Oct.

Oct.

S8pt#

1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

1958

1958

1957

ALABAMA.................................

$ 71.16
93.06

$70.35

85.81

39.7
40.3
40.0

39.3
39.3
41.8

$ 1.82
2.35
2.14

$ 1.82
2.35

$1.79

Mobile.................................

$72.25
94.71

2.13

2.25
2.23

ARIZONA.................................

2.25

S ta te

and a r e a

ARKANSAS................................
Little Rock-N. Little Rock............
CALIFORNIA..............................

85.20

93.21

88.43

39.1
39.6
4o.l

97.58
97.03

94.64
95.84

90.90
88.70 1

41.0
40.6

40.1
40.1

40.4
39.6

2.38

2.36

2.39

2.39

60.83
60.83

60.35
60.12

59.54

4l.l
41.1

40.5
40.9

40.5
40.4

1.48
1.48

1.49
1.47

1.47
1.45

98.83

99.25

91.91
92.35

39.4
38.5
39.7
40.7
39.4
39.8
38.9
37.5
39.9

2.45
2.15
2.44
2.50
2.59
2.59
2.37
2.22

2.44
2.11
2.44
2.54
2.49

85.09

40.7
38.7
40.3
47.1
40.3
41.7
39.6
42.8
43.7

2.33

98.41
119.39

40.3
39.4
40.3
40.6
41.7
41.6
39.4
39.8
41.8

2.28
2.32

84.76
98.41
104.07
104.04

107.66

81.65

100.61
107.76

58.58
80.02

96.42
93.72
92.42
95.66
84.53

!

101.95
94.25
92.65

COLORADO................................

CONNECTICUT.............................

Oct.

101.57

91.43
95.35

93.02
94.19

85.24
88.44

40.1
4l.l

40.8
40.6

39.1
40.2

88.48
92.57
90.85
83.37
84.16

87.23
91.08

84.42

88.88

84.99

83.16

80.78
80.18

40.2
40.3
39.5
39.6
39.4
40.9
40.7

40.2
40.0
39.9
39.6
39.5
40.8
40.7

96.05
96.81

2.56

2.58
2.56
2.25
2.21

2.28

2.24

2.08
2.38
2.37

2.38
2.32

2.46
2.26

2.13
2.18

2.32

2.20
2.10

2.10
2.12
2.27
2.21

2.17
2.26
2.25
2.10
2.10
2.26
2.20

2.04
2.03
2.22
2.13

82.74
92.43
89.54

90.58

86.69

98.46

87.31

85.41
95.20

85.60
96.00

40.8
39.7

40.1
38.7

40.0
40.0

2.14
2.48

2.13
2.46

2.14
2.40

94.13

Hartford................ ...............

40.4
40.6
40.2
39.7
39.7
40.8
41.3

94.83

89.04

40.4

40.7

39.4

2.33

2.33

2.26

70.24
73.82
69.32

65.67
71.71

40.6
39.5
39.6
40.7

39.8
39.4
40.1
40.0

1.72
1.68

1.73
1.85
1.72
1.70

1.65

66.40

40.6
39.9
40.3
40.7

1.73

68.38

70.24
73.08
68.11
69.19

61.75
76.40

62.00
78.01

72.01

40.0
39.6
42.2

38.7
38.1
40.7

1.54
1.91
1.99

1.55
1.97
2.00

1.53

79.77

40.1
40.0
41.6

82.35

41.9

41.8

39.4

2.15

2.15

2.09

88.68

40.3
40.4
39.7
40.0

39.8
39.5
39.5
42.0

2.30
(1 )
(1 )

a)

2.30
2.43
2.44
2.25

2.23
2.33
: 2.31
2.24

92.62
91.27

DELAWARE................................
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:
FLORIDA.................................
Miaai..................................
GEORGIA.................................

82.78

84.40

89.87

87.20

66.17
59.21

2.19

2.28
2.26

1.85

2.18
2.13

1.82
1.65
1.66

1.89
1.96

IDAHO...................................

90.09

ILLINOIS................................

91.98

Peoria.................................

(1)
(1)
(l)

98.20
96.78
90.03

92.18
91.42
94.23

40.0
(1)
(1)
(1)

93.93

95.20

91.74

39.8

40.5

40.1

2.36

2.35

2.29

89.61

89.74
92.35

83.93
87.39

40.8
38.9

40.8
38.7

40.1
38.4

2.20
2.35

2.20
2.39

. 2.09

INDIANA.................................

91.59
See

footnotes

at en d




of

table.

NOTE:

Data

for

92.75

the

current month

are pr el im in ar y.

2.28

51

State a n d A r e a H o u rs a n d E arn in g s

Table C -8 : Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued

S ta te

A v e ra g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s
O ct.
S ep t.
O c t.
1958
1958
1957

and a r e a

A v e ra g e w e e k ly h o u r s
O ct.
S e p t.
O ct.
1958 1958
1957

A v e ra g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s
O ct.
S ep t.
O ct.
1958
1958
1957

$ 93.66

W i c h i t a ..........................................................................

( 1)
( 1)
( 1)

94.32
98.88

$ 89.58
8 1 .4 1
9 4 .7 1

( 1)
( 1)
( 1)

4 1 .5
4 1 .6
4 1 .0

4 2 .2

KENTUCKY.............................. ...........................................

$ 83.03

8 1 .4 1
9 3 .0 4

7 9 .2 1
8 9 .7 7

4 0 .9
4 1 .7

4 0 .5
4 1 .3

4 0 .2
4 1 .1

4 0 .8
4 0 .5
4 0 .0
4 1 .4

4 1 .0
4 0 .1
4 0 .0
4 1 .6

1 .9 2

KANSAS...............................................................................

95.11

L O U IS IA N A ........................................................................

S h r e v e p o r t * ................................ ..........................
M AINE..................................................................................

MARYLAND...........................................................................

MASSACHUSETTS...............................................................
F a l l R i v e r ...................................................................

81.81
111.52
81.16
79. 1 9
*

82.82

38.6

( 1)
( 1)
( 1)
$ 2.03

2.28
2.01

1 1 0 .9 7

1 0 7 .0 7

7 9 .4 9

7 7 .7 9

4 0 .7
4 0 .7
3 9 .4
4 1 .4

66.63

6 6 .4 0
5 5 .6 0
6 9 .4 6

4 0 .5
3 7 .9
3 9 .8

4 0 .2
3 7 .2
4 0 .4

4 0 .7
3 7 .0
4 0 .5

1 .6 7
1 .5 2
1 .7 9

81.96
86.66

4 0 .5
4 0 .7

4 0 .1
4 0 .5

3 9 .4
3 9 .5

3 9 .2
3 9 .5
3 6 .7
3 7 .4
4 0 .2
3 9 .3

3 9 .6
3 9 .9
3 6 .5

4 0 .2
3 9 .8

3 9 .9
3 8 .9
4 0 .9
4 0 .7
4 0 .1
3 9 .1
4 1 .0

4 0 .2
3 9 .9
3 9 .9
4 0 .7
3 9 .8
3 9 .3
4 1 .2

4 0 .9

86.00

4 0 .4
3 7 .3
4 0 .1

4 0 .4
3 8 .4
4 0 .1

3 9 .9
3 5 .0
3 9 .5

83.60

67. 1 5
*
57. 1 3
*
71.16

5 6 .5 1
7 2 .7 8

86.67
92.39

9 1 .5 3

8 5 .4 1

76.83
83. 71»

7 7 .6 2
8 4 .9 9
5 6 .9 4
6 2 .5 3

5 8 .7 2
6 0 .5 9

83.62
81*.50
MICHIGAN...............................

80.36

4 1 .5

82.81
83.98

100.07
IO U .68
105. 1 0
*

I O I .63

80.00

7 4 .4 8
7 9 .7 8
5 7 .1 3

61.66
80.80
8 2 .5 9

9 8 .4 5

38.6

2 .7 4

2.06

1 .9 6
2 .6 7

2.09
1.92

2.00

1 .8 7

1.66

I .63
1.50

1 .5 2

.96
2.12
1.60
1.62
2.08

1.96

1 .9 0

2 .1 3
1 .5 6

1 .5 4

3 9 .6
3 9 .2
4 0 .7
4 0 .1
3 8 .4

2 .5 1
2 .6 9
2 .5 8
2 .2 5
2 .5 4
2 .4 3
2 .4 3

I

2 .1 5

90.96

8 4 .4 6
8 0 .1 4

M I S S IS S I P P I ...................................................................

62.78
69.12

6 2 .7 3
6 9 .5 4

56.66
65.21

4 1 .3
4 3 .2

4 1 .0
4 2 .4

3 9 .9
4 1 .8

M IS S O U R I...........................................................................

81.19
93.51
90.69

81.50
92.30
90.78

7 7 .7 5
8 7 .5 4
8 6 .7 9

3 8 .9
4 0 .4
3 9 .6

3 9 .0
4 0 .1
3 9 .5

3 8 .9

39.6

2.09
2.31

39.1*

8 5 .3 9

4 1 .7

4 0 .9

3 9 -3

7 7 .9 2

;

2 .0 3
2 .7 4

3 9 .2
3 9 .3
3 7 .1
3 8 .3
4 0 .2
3 9 .9

8 6 .2 5
9 3 .2 8
9 0 .5 9

88.87

1 .9 7
2 .1 9

2.08

9 0 .7 3

MINNESOTA........................................................................

2 .2 5

2 .1 3

1 0 7 .5 3
9 0 .2 7
9 9 .0 7
9 1 .9 9

98.36

2.01

2 .1 4
2 .2 7

1 0 5 .3 0
9 3 .3 7
1 0 5 .2 7
9 5 .7 7
IO O .98

9 5 .1 3
99.1*3

2.11

2 .2 4

1 .7 2

103.49

101.97

$ 2.16

1.80

107.09

91.71*

$ 2.26
2 .2 7
2 .4 1

38.8

2.26

2 .1 9

2.03

1.62
2.06
2.11

1.61
2.01
2.07

2 .5 3

2 .4 9
2 .6 4
2 .6 4
2 .2 5

2.68

2 .6 4
2 .2 9
2 .6 5
2 .4 4
2 .4 5

2 .3 7
2 .4 1

2 .1 3
2 .4 3

2 .2 9

1 .5 3
1 .6 4

1 .4 2
1 .5 6

2 .2 9

2 .0 9
2 .3 0
2 .3 0

2.00
2.21
2.20

2.28

2 .3 3

2 .1 7

2.20
2 .4 3
2 .2 7

1 .5 2

1.60

2.58

2.12

2.26

2.18

MONTANA................................

95.05

9 5 .3 2

NEBRASKA...........................................................................

80.83
87.56

88.98

82.52

4 1 .5
4 l.l

4 2 .2
4 1 .6

11 . 1
* *
1
*0.1*

2.13

1 .9 4
2 .1 4

2 .0 4

NEVADA.................................

107.56

106.26

9 9 .5 8

3 9 .4

3 9 .5

3 8 .3

2 .7 3

2.69

2.60

NEW HAMPSHIRE..........................

65.51
60.26

66.50

6 4 .0 8
5 8 .9 0

3 9 .7
3 7 .9

4 0 .3
3 8 .9

3 9 -8
3 8 .0 1

1 .6 5
1 .5 9

1 .6 5
1 .5 8

See fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le .




8 1 .8 4

6 1 .4 6

NOTE: Data fo r the current month are p relim in a ry.

1 .9 5

1.88

1.61
j

1 .5 5

52

State a n d A r e a H o u rs an d EarVtings

Table C -8 : Hours and gross earnings of production workers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued
A v e ra g e w e e k ly e a r n in g s

Sept.

Oct.
1958

$ 88.57
88.98

89.73

and a r e a

1958

$88.88
89 .46

S ta te

86.17
87.93

A ve ra g e

Oct*

Oct.

1957
$ 84.65
86.19

84.52

î w e e k ly

h o u rs

Sept.

Oct.

1958
40.0
40.1
40.6
39.7
40.3

1958

39.9

1957
39.3
39.5
39.7
39.1
39.2

39.7
39.9
39.4

38.6

A v e ra g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s

Oct.

1958
$2.22

2.23

2.21
2.28

2.32

2.19
2.30

2.28
2.28

38.9
40.1
39.0
39.8
39.8
39.7
38.5
37.7
39.1
40.1
40.0
39.2

2.17
2.37

2.17
2.36

2.10
2.28

2.54

2.51

1.96
2.46

2.14

2.14
2.31
2.25

1.45

1.44

86.65
83.85

87.25
95.82

89.13
94.30

92.34
39.3
93.94 : 41.3

40.7
41.0

40.5
41.2

2.22

84.63
95.02

83.9^
93.85

81.69
91.61

38.7
39.7

99.32

76*57
97.74
82.05

76.1+3

Nassau-Suffolk Counties 2/ ...........

83.1*9
91.66
85.02
81.56
(1)

76.92

85.29

92.03

83.49
79.T9

92.43

40.3
42.3
38.4

39.8
40.7
38.8

1.46

1.46

84.89

(1)
a)

42.0
41.1

44.1
41.4

(1)
(1)

1.89
2.07

1.93

95.30

39.3
37.5
38.7

39.7
39.1
38.7
40.2
39.4
38.5
40.4
40.0
37.9

40.2

2.42

37.8
40.1
40.9
41.4
40.2
40.6

2.37
2.56
2.41

2.25
2.50
2.27

2.42
2.63
2.48
2.23
2.47

82.28

58.73

58.03
68.10
56.06

62.68
56.26

95.16
98.31
97.41
92.73

85.02

95.91

56.91

83.42

102.82

98.67

96.13

90.95

97.23
87.97

99.87
93.52
101.14

89.64

86.50

38.1
(1)

90.29

103.82

100.14
107.25

108.02

104.81

41.2
40.0
40.5
35-3
39-6
37*2

83.85
80.03

80.80

40.7

41.2
40.3

40.9
41.9
39.8

39-2

38.8

100.15

91.87

82.62

100.14

100.26

91.88

91.14

79.42
87.47

95.30
92.23

95.43

89.66

91.81

86.44

84.20
77.54

84.63

82.29
79.21

79.10

88.03
70.88

76.45
87.53

103.83

York..................................
See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le .




74.87
63.03
58.40
75.12

76.80
91.80
72.96
74.89

2.02

40.5
41.8
38.5

77.45
87.53
86.40
80.84

84.13

79.51

2.02

2.14

40.2
40.4
39.8

87.18
80.85

89.89
83.76

(1)
(1)

38.0

2.15

39.6
41.0
40.3
38.3
37.3
40.0
39.9
40.5
39.2

90.42
83.41
84.20

66.88
56.21

39.1
40.1
37.9
39.9
39.7
40.5
39.0

2.18

2.13

2.22

86.86

101.14

NEW YORK...............................

Oct.

1957
$2.15

2.28
2.18

90.71
86.56
NEW MEXICO.............................

Sept.

1958
$ 2.23
2.23
2.19

87.67

75.46
73.62
84.41
89.95
104.76 101.79
74.47 ! 73.84
61.42
61.34
56.52
57-72
72.09
71.63

38.8

37.1
39-3
37.5
41.1
38.9
38.6

39.2

38.2

36.5
41.5

38.6

2.10
2.26
2.18
(1)

2.25

2.07
2.12
1.60

2.62
2.52

2.56

2.08
2.28
2.18

2.07

2.15
1.61

2.28

2.57

2.06
2.20
2.10

2.05
2.24
2.16
2.02
2.10

1.43
1.54
1.45
2.01

2.16

2.44

2.26
2.52

2.53

2.50

2.88

2.85

40.4
41.8
39.4

2.03
1.92

2.05
1.91
2.29

1.90

39.4
38.4

38.3
37.6

2.43

2.42
2.39

2.34
2.30

39.0
37.1
40.8

39.0
37.9
40.4
39.1
40.9
38.9
39.0
39.7
38.1
36.7
40.5

2.17
2.09

2.17
2.07
2.25
1.91
1.84

2.09
2.17
1.93

38.2

40.7
39.8
38.8

39.4
37.0
36.3
40.7

NOTE: Data fo r the cu rrent month are p relim in a ry .

38.8

2.28

2.38

2.24

I.89
1.86

2.25

2.26

2.47
2.70
2.00
2.22

2.11

1.80

2.17

2.69

2.70

1.91

1.89
1.66

2.61
1.86
1.61

1.59

1.54

1.65
I.60
1.81

1.76

1.78

53

State a n d A r e a H o u rs an d E arn in g s

T a b le C -8 : Hours and gross earnings of production w orkers in manufacturing,
by State and selected areas-Continued

State and area

Average weekly earnings
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
1958
1958
1957

Average weekly hours
Sept. Oct.
Oct.

1958

1968

1957

Average hourly 1 arnings
e
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
1Q 58
1958
1957

SOUTH CAROLINA.................... .
SOUTH DAKOTA.............................

TENNESSEE..............................

$ 70.17
71.02

$ 70.46

$68.87
69.08

39.2
39.9

39.8
40.1

39.6
39.7

$1.79

$ 1.77

$1.74

70.58

1.76

1.74

58.84
71.05

58.25
71.92

56.59
65.27

40*3
40.6

39.9
41.1

39.3
39.8

1.46
1.75

1.46
1.75

1.44
1.64

(1)
(1)

82.16

96.94

84.50
93.12

(1)
(1)

43.7
46.9

45.4
47.2

(1)
(l)

1.88
2.07

1.97

69.32
71.71

69.32
72.25

66.97

40.1
40.1
39.3
40..6
39.9

1.72
1.82
2.07

74.34
75.71

40.3
39.7
40.2
40.4
41.6

1.72

74.92
73.44

40.3
39.4
39.8
40*5
40.8

86.32

RHODE ISLAND.............................

87.15
81.73

41.5
41.7
40.7
41.3
39.6

40.7
40.4
40.8
40.2
4l.l

2.09
1.96

2.49
2.43

1.96
2.48
2.44
1.63

83.18
Nashville...............................

83.21

70.18

79.39
74.30
68.23

84.25
77.16
93.02

1.78

1.82

2.09

1.85
1.80

1.86
1.67

1.75

1.84

2.02
I.83

1.82

1.71

2.10

2.07
1.91

100.10
98.90

100.94
100.77

96.08

64.48

64.55

63.29

41*3
41*3
40.2
40*7
39.8

UTAH......................................
Salt Lake City..........................

90.32
88.62

89.89
89.32

84.64
84.96

39.1
40.1

39.6
40.6

38.3
39.7

2.31
2.21

2.27

2.21

VERMONT.................................

69.70

69.73

68.21

40.8
40.8
37.5

40.7
40.3

1.71

1.72

38.8

40.8
40.3
39.2

1.67
1.69

41.0
41.0
40.3

40.6
39.4
40.7

40.3
40.8
40.0

39.3
38.9
39.2
39.3

38.2
38.2

38.7
37.7

Dallas...................................

80.95

72.51
75.48

78.38

67.65

67.40
70.92

64.88
73.85

75.70

71.60

98.85

96.82

89.17

96.13

88.81

106.31

102.69

93.49
WEST VIRGINIA..........................

79.01

99*04

WASHINGTON.............................

68.04

77.08
74.56

VIRGINIA..................................

70.67

95.40

94.79
87.19

39.8
39.5
40.3
38.7

87.91

89.50
105.60
IO3.72

84.06
104.23

38.9
38.7
38.0

39.6
40.0
38.7

39.1
40.4
37.6

86.02

40.7
39.7
39.2
39.1
39.7
39.6

40.4
39.1
39.2
40.0
39.4
39.6

41.0
40.4

38.7
39.7

105.65
101.08

92.12

WYOMING.................................

107.20
87.10

89.08

96.47
95.95
93.64

WISCONSIN..............................

95.78
95.92
92.05

95.07
93.13
89.26

40*9
42*7
39.2
39.4
39.7
40.1

90.40

93.89
118.37

88.24
113.14

40.0
41.4

89.13

113.85

1/ Not available*
2/ Subarea of New York-Northeastern New Jersey.

87.19
95.07

90.55
87.74

NOTE: Data for the current month are preliminary.
SOURCE: Cooperating State agencies listed on inside back cover.




1.62

2.20

1.78
2.02

1.75
2.04

1.65

1.66
1.80
1.86

1.88
1.85

2.48
2.51
2.64
2.41

2.46
2.47
2.62

2.43

2.28

2.39
1*54
2.14

2.00

1.61
1.81

1.79
2.33
2.33
2.45
2.31

2.26

2.26

2.73
2.66

2.64

2.68

2.15
2.58
2.45

2.18

2.45
2.42
2.34

2.14
2.39
2.27
2.45
2.42
2.32

2.13
2*32
2.24
2.38
2.36
2.25

2.26

2.29

2.28

2.75

2.93

2.85

2.51
2.22




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U N ITE D

S T A T E S
Bureau

D E P A R T M E N T
of

Labor

C O O P E R A T I N G

O F

L A B O R

Statistics

STATE

AGE NC IE S

Labor Turnover Program

ALABAMA

- Department of Industrial Relations, M o n t g o m e r y 4 .

ARIZONA

- U n e m p l o y m e n t Compensation Division, E m p l o y m e n t Security C o m m i s s i o n ,

ARKANSAS

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Division, D e p ar tm en t of Labor, Little Rock.

CALIFORNIA

- R es e a r c h and Statistics, De partment of E m p l o y m e n t , S a c ra me nt o 14.

CONNECTICUT

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Division, D e p ar tm en t of Labor, Hartford 15.

DELAWARE

- Unemployment Compensation Commission, Wilmington 99.

Phoenix.

DISTRICT O F C O L U M B I A

- U. S. E m p l o y m e n t Service for D. C., Washington 25 .

FLORIDA

- Industrial Com mi ss io n, Tallahassee.

GEORGIA

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Agency, D ep ar tm en t of Labor, Atlanta 3.

IDAHO

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Agency, Boise.

INDIANA

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Division, Indianapolis 25 .

KANSAS

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Division, Dep a rt me nt of Labor, Topeka.

KENTUCKY

- Bu r e a u of E m p l o y m e n t Security, D e p a r t m e n t of E c o n o m i c Security, Frankfort.

LOUISIANA

- Division of E m p l o y m e n t Security, D e p a r t m e n t of Labor, Baton R o u g e 4 .

MAINE

- E m p l o y m e n t Security C o m m i s s i o n , Augusta.

MARYLAND

- D epartment of E m p l o y m e n t Security, Baltimore 1.

MASSACHUSETTS

- R es ea rc h and Statistics, Division of E m p l o y m e n t Security, Boston 15.

MINNESOTA

- Department of E m p l o y m e n t Security, St. Paul 1.

MISSISSIPPI

- E m p l o y m e n t Security C o m m i s s i o n , Jackson.

MISSOURI

- Division of E m p l o y m e n t Security, Jefferson City.

NEVADA

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Department, C a r s o n City.

N E W HAMPSHIRE

- Department of E m p l o y m e n t Security, Concord.

NEW MEXICO

- E m p l o y m e n t Security C o m m i s s i o n , Albuquerque.

NEW YORK

- B u r e a u of R e se ar ch and Statistics, Division of E m p l o y m e n t , State Depa rt me nt

NORTH CAROLINA

- B u r e a u of R es ea rc h and Statistics, E m p l o y m e n t Security C o m m i s s i o n , Raleigh.

NORTH DAKOTA

- U n e m p l o y m e n t Compensation Division, W o r k m e n ' s C o m p e n s a t i o n Bureau,

of Labor, 5 00 Eighth Avenue, N e w Y o r k 18.

Bismarck.
OKLAHOMA

- E m p l o y m e n t Security C o m m i s s i o n , O k l a h o m a City 2 .

OREGON

• U n e m p l o y m e n t Compensation C o m m i s s i o n , Salem.
-

R H O D E ISLAND

- Department of E m p l o y m e n t Security, Providence 3.

SOUTH CAROLINA

- E m p l o y m e n t Security C o m m i s s i o n , C o l u m b i a 1.

SOUTH DAKOTA

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Department, Aberdeen.

VERMONT

- U n e m p l o y m e n t Compensation C o m m i s s i o n , Montpelier.

WASHINGTON

- E m p l o y m e n t Security Department, Olympia.

W E S T VIRGINIA

- Department of E m p l o y m e n t Security, Charleston 5 .




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