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E M P L O Y E E E A R N IN G S A N D H O U R S IN




R E T A IL T R A D E

JUNE 1965

7

Bulletin No. 1501
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner




BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

EM PLO YEE E A R N IN G S A N D H O U R S IN
R E T A IL T R A D E

JUNE 1965

liille t ii No. 1501
January 1967

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W . Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.5. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price 50 cents










Preface

The Bureau of L a b or Statistics conducted a nation­
wide survey of re ta il trade (excluding eating and drinking
pla ces) fo r a June 1965 p a y ro ll period.
Data on em p loy­
ment, average hourly and w eekly earnings, and w eekly
hours of w ork o f nonsu pervisory em ployees w ere obtained
and are presented in this bulletin.
This inform ation
bridges the period since June 1962, when a sim ila r survey
was conducted.
In addition to data fo r 1965, the bulletin
provides an analysis of changes in em ployee earnings and
hours between the two su rvey p eriod s, during which tim e
a F e d e ra l minimum wage o f $1.15 an hour and a 42-hour
standard w orkw eek w ere applied to certain la rg e re ta il
en terp rises which w ere subject to the F a ir L abor Standards
A ct.
Data a re provided fo r the United States; the N orth ­
east, South, North C entral, and W est regions; m e tr o ­
politan and nonm etropolitan areas; men and women; and
fo r re ta il en terp rises and establishm ents by th eir annual
volum e of sales.
Appendix A p rovides technical in fo rm a ­
tion on the scope and method of the su rvey, as w e ll as
definitions of term s. A copy o f the questionnaire used in
the su rvey is shown in appendix B.
C om prehensive sta tistica l data fo r each of the m ajor
re ta il groups which re ta il trade co m p rises, and fo r s e ­
lected lines of re ta il business are available in the in d ivid ­
ual bulletins listed on the inside back co ver.
The su rvey was part of a broad progra m of studies
initiated by the U. S. Departm ent of L a b o r's Wage and Hour
and Pu blic Contracts D ivisions fo r continuing appraisal of
F e d e ra l legislation relatin g to minimum wages and m a x i­
mum hours standards.
In this connection, data fro m the
su rvey w ere published in the R eport Submitted to the Con­
g ress in A ccordan ce With the Requirem ents of Section 4(d)
of the F a ir Labor Standards A ct— -January 1966.
This bulletin was p repared by Joseph K. Cocco and
H a rry A . Donoian, under the su pervision of A lvin Bauman,
in the Bureau's D ivision o f National Wage and Salary In­
com e, Norm an J. Sam uels, Chief.
The study was made
under the gen eral d irection of L . R. L in sen m ayer, A s ­
sistant C om m ission er fo r Wages and Industrial Relations.

iii




Contents
Page
Summary — --------------------- ----------—
——
Char acte r istic s
------------------------- —
Average hourly earnings-------------------Major groups and selected industries.
Selected groups.
Weekly hours of workAverage weekly earnings---------------- Hourly earnings and weekly hours---Wage changes, June 1962—
June 1965Changes in weekly hours of work, June 1962—
June 1965-----------Change s in average weekly earnings, June 1962—
June 1965----- -

1
2
3
8
12

13
17
19
21
27
31

Tables:
1.

2.
3.

4.
5.

6.
7.
8.
9.

10.
11.
12.

Number, average straight-time hourly earnings, and weekly hours
of work of nonsupervisory employees in retail trade and selected
retail industry groups by selected characteristics,
United States, June 1965,________________________________________________
Cumulative numerical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory
employees in retail trade by average straight-time hourly
earnings, United States and regions, June 1965______________________
Cumulative percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in
retail trade by average straight-time hourly earnings, by
metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas, United States
_______________________________________________
and regions, June 1965—
Cumulative percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in
retail trade by average straight-time hourly earnings, by sex,
United States and regions, June 1965----------------------------------------------Cumulative percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in
retail trade by average straight-time hourly earnings, by
enterprise and establishment sales-size classes, United States,
metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas, and regions, June 1965____
Numerical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory employees
in retail trade by weekly hours of work, United States
and regions, June 1965 -------------------------------------- ----------------------------Percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in retail trade
by weekly hours of work, by metropolitan and nonmetropolitan
areas, United States and regions, June 1965_________________________
Percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in retail trade
by weekly hours of workf by sex, United States and regions,
June 1965---------------------------—
-----------------------------------------------------------Percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in retail trade
by weekly hours of work, by enterprise and establishment
sales-size classes, United States, metropolitan and
nonmetropolitan areas, and regions, June 1965_____ __________ ______
Percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in retail trade
having specified average straight-time hourly earnings by
weekly hours of work, United States and regions, June 1965________
Percent distribution of nonsupervisory employees in retail trade
working specified weekly hours by average straight-time
hourly earnings, United States and regions, June 1965 ______________
Average straight-time hourly and weekly earnings of nonsuper­
visory employees in retail trade by weekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965_________________________________




v

34
37

38
39

40
44
44
45

46
48
50
52

Contents— Continued
Page
T able s— Continued
C u m u la tive n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is trib u tio n s o f n o n s u p e rv is o r y
e m p lo y e e s by a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t- tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s ,
U nited States and r e g io n s , June 1965:
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.

B u ild in g m a t e r ia ls , h a rd w a re , and fa r m equ ipm ent d e a l e r s -------------G e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s t o r e s --------------------------------------------------------------D ep a rtm en t s t o r e s ____________________________________________________________ L im ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s --------------------------------------------------------------F o o d s t o r e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------G r o c e r y s t o r e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------A u to m o tiv e d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e s t a tio n s ------------------------------M o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s (new and u sed c a r s ) ----------------------------------------G a so lin e s e r v ic e s t a tio n s ------------------------------------------------------------------A p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r y s t o r e s -----------------------------------------------------------M e n ’ s and b o y s 1 clo th in g and fu rn ish in g s s t o r e s --------------------------------W o m e n ’ s r e a d y - t o - w e a r s t o r e s ______________________________________________
Shoe s t o r e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------F u rn itu re , h om e fu rn ish in g s, and hou sehold a p p lia n ce s t o r e s __________
F u rn itu re , h om e fu rn is h in g s , and equ ipm ent s t o r e s ----------------------------H ou seh old a p p lia n ce s t o r e s ----------------------------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s t o r e s ---------------------------------------------------------------D ru g and p r o p r ie t a r y s t o r e s ---------------------------------------------------------------

53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is trib u tio n s o f n o n s u p e rv is o r y e m p lo y e e s
by w e e k ly hou rs o f w o rk , U n ited States and r e g io n s , June 1965:
B u ild in g m a t e r ia ls , h a r d w a r e , and fa r m equ ipm ent d e a l e r s ---------------G e n e ra l m e rc h a n d is e s t o r e s --------------------------------------------------------------D ep a rtm en t s t o r e s _____________________________________________________________
L im ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s --------------------------------------------------------------F o o d s t o r e s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------G r o c e r y s t o r e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------A u to m o tiv e d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e s t a tio n s ________________________
M o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s (new and u sed c a r s ) ----------------------------------------G a so lin e s e r v ic e s t a tio n s ------------------------------------------------------------------A p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r y s t o r e s -----------------------------------------------------------M e n ’ s and b o y s ’ clo th in g and fu rn ish in g s s t o r e s -------------------------------W o m e n ’ s r e a d y - t o - w e a r s t o r e s --------------------------------Shoe s t o r e s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------F u rn itu re , hom e fu rn ish in g s, and hou sehold a p p lia n ce s t o r e s _________
F u rn itu re , h om e fu rn ish in g s, and equ ipm en t s t o r e s _____________________
H ou seh old app lia n ce s t o r e s ----------------------------------------------------------------M is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s t o r e s ______________
D ru g and p r o p r ie t a r y s t o r e s ---------------------------------------------------------------

71
71
72
72
73
73
74
74
75
75
76
76
77
77
78
78
79
79

A p p en d ix es:
A . Scope and m eth od o f s u r v e y ----------------------------------------------------------------B . Q u estio n n a ire --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

81
87

31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.




Employee Earnings and Hours in Retail Trade, June 1965

S u m m ary
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in the r e t a il tra d e in d u stry (e x c e p t ea tin g and
drinking p la c e s ) ea rn ed an a v e r a g e o f $ 1. 85 on a s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u rly b a sis in
June 1965. T h e y ea rn ed $ 6 8 .0 7 a w eek and w o rk ed 36. 9 houj-s, on the a v e r a g e ,
a cco rd in g to the B u r e a u 's s u rv e y o f ea rn in g s and hours o f w o r k o f a p p r o x im a te ly
6. 7 m illio n n o n s u p e rv is o r y r e t a il tra d e e m p lo y e e s in the U n ited S tates.

E m p lo y e e s w e r e w id e ly d is p e r s e d throughout the pay s c a le .
F o u r out o f
fiv e e m p lo y e e s ea rn ed b etw een $1. 10 and $3 an h ou r, and the m id d le 50 p e rc e n t
ea rn ed b etw een $ 1 .2 7 and $2. 13 an hour.
A m on g the fo u r b ro a d g e o g ra p h ic r e g io n s , ea rn in g s w e r e lo w e s t in the
South, $ 1 .5 4 an hou r, and h ig h e st in the W e s t, $ 2 .2 2 an h ou r.
E m p lo y e e s in
the N a t io n 's m e tr o p o lita n a re a s a v e r a g e d $ 1. 95 an hou r, 38 cents an hour m o r e
than th ose in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .
M en ea rn ed an a v e r a g e o f $ 2 .0 4 an hou r,
co m p a re d to $ 1. 52 fo r w om en .
E m p lo y e e s o f e n te r p r is e s w ith $ 1 m illio n o r
m o r e in annual sa le s w e r e paid an a v e r a g e o f $ 1 .9 9 an hou r; th ose in e n t e r ­
p r is e s w ith annual sa les b etw een $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 and $ 1 m illio n ea rn ed $ 1. 88 an hou r,
on the a v e r a g e , and those in e n te r p r is e s w hich had s a le s o f le s s than $250, 000 a
y e a r ea rn ed $ 1 .5 8 an h ou r, on the a v e r a g e .
A m on g the s e ve n m a jo r in d u stry grou p s w h ich con stitu te r e t a il tra d e (e x c e p t
eating and d rin k in g p la c e s ) a v e r a g e h o u rly pay le v e ls w e r e $ 1. 63 in g e n e r a l
m e rc h a n d is e s t o r e s , $ 1 .7 0 in a p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r y s t o r e s , $ 1 .7 5 in m i s c e l ­
laneous s t o r e s , $1. 91 in fo o d s t o r e s , $ 1 .9 8 at bu ild in g m a t e r ia ls and h a rd w a re
d e a le r s , $2. 02 at a u to m o tive d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e sta tion s, and $2. 10 in
fu rn itu re and a p p lia n ce s to r e s .
D uring the s u r v e y w e e k e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d an a v e r a g e o f 36. 9 h ou rs. T h r e e tenths o f the e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d le s s than 35 h ou rs, o n e -fo u rth w o rk e d 40 h o u rs,
and o n e -fifth w o rk e d 48 hours o r m o r e . A m o n g the fo u r r e g io n s the a v e r a g e nu m ­
b e r o f hou rs w o rk e d during the w e e k ran ged fr o m 34. 4 in the N o r th e a s t to
39. 6 in the South.
E m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s w o rk e d an a v e r a g e o f
36. 0 h ou rs; those in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s w o rk e d 3. 3 h ou rs lo n g e r on the a v ­
era ge.
M en w o rk e d 39. 3 hours a w eek , on the a v e r a g e , 5. 9 hou rs m o r e than
w om en .
A m o n g the th re e e n te r p r is e s iz e g ro u p s , e m p lo y e e s in e n te r p r is e s
w ith $ 1 m illio n o r m o r e in annual s a le s had the s h o r te s t w o rk w e e k , 35. 7 h ou rs,
those in e n te r p r is e s w ith le s s than $2 5 0 ,0 0 0 in annual s a le s had the n ext lo n g ­
es t, 3 7. 1 h o u rs, and th ose in the in te r m e d ia te grou p w o rk e d the lo n g e s t w eek ,
39. 3 h ou rs.
A m o n g e m p lo y e e s o f the se ve n m a jo r in d u stry g ro u p s , a v e r a g e w e e k ly h ou rs
ran ged fr o m 33. 8 fo r those in a p p a re l and a c c e s s o r y s to r e s to 42. 8 at a u to m o tive
d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e sta tio n s.
E m p lo y e e s at bu ild in g m a t e r ia ls and h a r d ­
w a r e d e a le r s and those in fu rn itu re and a p p lia n ce s to r e s a ls o w o r k e d lo n g e r than
the in d u stry a v e r a g e .




2

T h e a v e r a g e pay l e v e l fo r r e t a il e m p lo y e e s in c r e a s e d 18 cen ts an hour sin ce
June 1962 w hen a s im ila r s u rv e y w as conducted. 1 A lth ou gh th e r e w as a g e n e r a l
upw ard m o v e m e n t in the d is trib u tio n , e m p lo y e e s at the lo w e r end o f the p ay
s c a le show ed the g r e a te s t im p ro v e m e n t, the p ro p o r tio n who e a rn e d le s s than
$ 1 .2 5 an hour d e c lin e d fr o m o n e -th ird to o n e -fifth .
D u rin g the sa m e p e r io d ,
a v e r a g e w e e k ly hours d e c lin e d fr o m 37. 8 to 36. 9, r e fle c t in g a s m a ll but n o t ic e ­
able d e c r e a s e in the p ro p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s who w o rk e d 48 hours o r m o r e , and
a c o rre s p o n d in g in c r e a s e in the p r o p o r tio n who w o r k e d le s s than 35 hours a w eek .
C h a r a c t e r is tic s
R e ta il tra d e , as d e fin e d b y the Standard In d u s tria l C la s s ific a t io n s y s te m ,
is the s e llin g o f m e rc h a n d is e fo r p e r s o n a l, hou sehold , o r fa r m con su m ption .
It
is the m eans b y w h ich goods and th e ir u ltim a te co n su m ers a re b rou gh t to g e th e r .
B eca u se o f th e ir fu nction , r e t a il es ta b lis h m en ts a re d is trib u te d throughout the
co u n try in about the sam e p r o p o r tio n as popu lation is d is trib u te d .
R e t a il tra d e
is p ro b a b ly the m o s t w id e s p r e a d in d u s try in the U nited S tates.
R e ta il s to r e s v a r y w id e ly b y s iz e , ty p e , and ex te n t o f s p e c ia liz a tio n .
The
la r g e m e tr o p o lita n d e p a rtm en t s t o r e , the co u n try s t o r e , and the lo c a l c o n fe c ­
tio n e r y b e a r lit t le re s e m b la n c e to one an oth er, but a ll a re r e t a il e s ta b lis h m e n ts .
In a ddition to the m o r e co m m o n ly r e c o g n iz e d s t o r e s , m a il- o r d e r h o u se s, d o o r to -d o o r s e llin g o r g a n iz a tio n s , and ven din g m ach in e o p e r a to r s a re a lso r e t a ile r s .
Th e r e t a il tra d e in d u s try p r o v id e s jo b s (p a r t - and fu ll- t im e ) fo r about 1 out
o f 7 o f the N a tio n 's n o n a g ric u ltu ra l e m p lo y e e s .
In d iv id u a l es ta b lis h m e n ts v a r y
w id e ly in te r m s o f em p lo y m e n t— fr o m the la r g e d e p a rtm en t s to r e w ith s e v e r a l
thousand e m p lo y e e s to the n eigh b orh oo d g r o c e r y w ith o n ly one o r two p a id e m ­
p lo y e e s .
A c c o r d in g to the 1963 Census o f B u s in e s s , o f the 1. 2 m illio n r e t a il
es ta b lis h m en ts (ex clu d in g ea tin g and d rin k in g p la c e s ) in the U nited S tates open
du ring the e n tir e y e a r , th r e e -fo u rth s had fe w e r than fo u r p a id e m p lo y e e s ; o n ly
o n e -e ig h th had 10 o r m o r e .
T h is la tte r grou p o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts , h o w e v e r , a c ­
counted fo r 64 p e r c e n t o f the $226 b illio n in r e t a il s a le s .
O n ly 6 p e r c e n t o f
the es ta b lis h m en ts had as m an y as 20 e m p lo y e e s , but th ey accou nted fo r a lm o s t
o n e -h a lf (47 p e r c e n t) o f a ll r e t a il s a le s .
M o r e than o n e -th ird o f a ll r e t a il tra d e e m p lo y e e s w e r e en ga ged in s e llin g ,
a c c o rd in g to the I960 C ensus o f P o p u la tio n .
A bou t o n e - fifth w o r k e d as m a n a g e rs ,
o f fic ia ls , o r p r o p r ie t o r s ; o n e -q u a rte r w e r e e v e n ly d iv id e d b e tw ee n c l e r i c a l o r
o p e r a tiv e jo b s .
Th e s iz e o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t g o v e rn s the natu re o f the la b o r
fo r c e e m p lo y e d th e re .
A s m a ll d r y -g o o d s s to r e m a y e m p lo y o n ly s a le s p e rs o n n e l.
A la r g e d e p a rtm en t s to r e , w h ile
e m p lo y in g m an y s a le s p e o p le , a lso e m p lo y s
p e o p le in o th er fie ld s — a r t is t s , c a r p e n te r s , accountants, applia n ce r e p a ir m e n ,
and t r u c k d r iv e r s .
C e r ta in r e t a il s to r e s r e q u ir e p e o p le w ith s p e c ia l s k ills .
A p p a r e l s to r e s
e m p lo y t a ilo r s , a u tom ob ile d e a le r s e m p lo y m e c h a n ic s , and dru g s to r e s e m p lo y
p h a rm a c is ts .
O ccu p ation a l r e q u ire m e n ts v a r y e v en am ong s a le s p o s itio n s , fr o m
the lim ite d tra in in g r e q u ir e d to s e ll su n d ries in a v a r ie t y s to r e to the e x te n s iv e
e x p e r ie n c e and kn ow ledge r e q u ir e d to s e ll a u to m o b ile s.
M eth ods o f w a g e p aym en t v a r y am ong e s ta b lis h m e n ts , typ es o f s t o r e s , and
ev e n am ong s a le s p o s itio n s in the sa m e s to r e .
Som e e m p lo y e e s a re p a id on an
h o u rly b a s is , so m e on a s a la r y b a s is , and so m e e n t ir e ly o r p a r t ia lly on a
c o m m is s io n b a s is .

l

See Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, Tune 1962 (BLS Bulletin 1380, 1963).




3

N e a r ly 6. 7 m illio n n o n s u p e rv is o r y e m p lo y e e s w e r e w ith in the sc o p e o f the
s u r v e y in June 1965.
T h r e e -fo u r th s o f th ese w o rk ed in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s .
Th e South and N o r th C e n tra l r e g io n s each accounted fo r 28 p e r c e n t o f the e m ­
p lo y e e s , the N o r th e a s t had 26 p e r c e n t, and the W e st had o n ly 18 p e r c e n t.
E n te r ­
p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n o r m o r e in annual s a le s em p lo y ed o n e -h a lf the r e t a il
w o r k e r s , th ose w ith le s s than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 in annual s a le s em p lo y ed about t h r e e tenths.
T h r e e - fift h s o f the e m p lo y e e s w e r e m en.
Th e d is trib u tio n am ong the
the s u r v e y is shown b e lo w :

in d u s try

grou p s

o f the e m p lo y e e s in clu d ed in

Line of retail business
Retail trade, total

Percent of all
nonsupervisory
employees covered
by the survey in
June 1965

--------------------------------------------------------------

100.0

Building materials, hardware, and farm equipment d e a le r s ---------General merchandise stores ---------------------------------------------------------Department stores ------------------------------------------------------------------Limited price variety stores ----------------------------------------------------Food stores ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Grocery stores -------------------------------------------------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline service stations
-----------------------Motor vehicle dealers (new and used cars)
----------------------------. Gasoline service stations ---------------------------------------------------------Apparel and accessory stores---------------------------------------------------------Men's and boys' clothing and furnishings stores -----------------------Women's ready-to-wear stores ------------------------------------------------Shoe stores -----------------------------------------------------------------------------Furniture, home furnishings, and household appliance stores---------Furniture, home furnishings, and equipment stores — ---- ---------Household appliance stores -----------------------------------------------------Miscellaneous retail stores --------------------------------------Drug and proprietary stores ------------------------------------------------------

7.3
24.6
15. 2
4.1
20.4
17.2
19.0
9.0
7.1
8.7
1.4
3. 2
!• 6
5.4
3.4
1.2
14.4
5.6

In each m a jo r grou p , the m a jo r it y o f the e m p lo y e e s w o rk ed in m e tr o p o lita n
a re a s .
G e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e and food w e r e the o n ly m a jo r groups in w hich
e n te r p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n o r m o r e in annual s a le s accounted fo r a m a jo r it y
o f the e m p lo y e e s .
M en c o m p r is e d the m a jo r it y o f the e m p lo y e e s in e v e r y m a jo r
group ex cep t g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e and a p p a re l and a c c e s s o r ie s .
A v e r a g e H o u rly E arn in gs
N o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il tra d e (e x c e p t ea tin g and d rin k in g p la c e s )
a v e r a g e d $ 1 .8 5 an hour at s t r a ig h t - t im e ra te s in June 1965 (ta b le 2).
E a rn in gs
fo r the a p p r o x im a te ly 6. 7 m illio n e m p lo y e e s s u rv e y e d w e r e b r o a d ly d is trib u te d ;
5 out o f 6 e m p lo y e e s ea rn ed b e tw ee n $1 and $3 an hour; ea rn in g s fo r the m id d le
h a lf o f the w o rk fo r c e ran ged fr o m $ 1 .2 7 to $ 2 .1 3 an hour.
M ed ia n ea rn in gs
(th at amount b e lo w and a b ove w hich ea rn in g s fo r 50 p e r c e n t o f the e m p lo y e e s
a r e found) w e r e $ 1 .5 4 an h ou r, o r 31 cents an hour b e lo w the m ean , r e fle c t in g
the d is p r o p o r tio n a te co n ce n tra tio n o f e m p lo y e e s at the lo w e r end o f the w age
s c a le .
A bou t o n e -e ig h th o f the e m p lo y e e s , o r 809,000, ea rn ed le s s than $1. 15 an
hour and about o n e -h a lf o f th ese w e r e paid le s s than $ 1 an hour.
N e a r ly o n efifth o f the e m p lo y e e s ea rn ed le s s than $ 1 .2 5 an hour.
A bou t 770,000, o r n e a r ly
o n e -eig h th , ea rn ed b etw een $ 1 .2 5 to $ 1 .3 0 an hour; th ey con stitu ted the la r g e s t
grou p o f e m p lo y e e s w ith in any s in g le w a g e in t e r v a l.
H o w e v e r , h ig h e r e a r n ­
in gs w e r e not unusual.
F o r e x a m p le ,
n e a r ly as m an y e m p lo y e e s a v e r a g e d




4

$2 an hour, o r m o r e as ea rn ed le s s than $ 1 .3 0 an hour— 2 m illio n co m p a re d
w ith 2. 1 m illio n e m p lo y e e s , r e s p e c t iv e ly .
O n e -s ix th o f the e m p lo y e e s s u rv e y e d
ea rn ed $2. 50 an hour o r m o r e and on e-ten th ea rn ed at le a s t $ 3 an hour.
G e o g r a p h ic a lly , ea rn in gs w e r e lo w e s t in the South at $ 1 .5 4 an hour and
h ig h e st in the W e st at $ 2 .2 2 an hour; in the N o rth C e n tr a l and N o r th e a s t r e g io n s
a v e r a g e ea rn in g s w e r e $ 1 .8 5 and $ 1 .9 5 an h ou r, r e s p e c t iv e ly .
Th e su b sta n tia l
d iffe r e n c e in p a y le v e ls b etw een the South and the o th er r e g io n s r e fle c t s the
m a rk e d d iffe r e n c e in the d is trib u tio n o f in d ivid u a l e m p lo y e e e a rn in g s .
For
e x a m p le , 1 out o f 4 e m p lo y e e s in the South ea rn ed le s s than $ 1 .1 5 an h ou r,
but am ong the o th e r re g io n s no m o r e than 1 out o f 8 e m p lo y e e s had such e a r n ­
in g s.
Southern r e t a il e m p lo y e e s accounted fo r n e a r ly t h r e e - fift h s o f the N a t io n ’ s
r e t a il e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g le s s than that amount.
A lm o s t t w o - fifth s o f the e m ­
p lo y e e s in the South ea rn ed le s s than $ 1 .2 5 an hour c o m p a re d w ith fe w e r than
on e-ten th in both the N o r th e a s t and W e s t, and o n e - fifth in the N o r th C e n tra l
r e g io n .
In 3 o f the 4 re g io n s (th e W e s t w as the e x c e p tio n ), h o w e v e r , the p r o p o r ­
tion o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g fr o m $ 1 .2 5 to $ 1 .3 0 an hour was g r e a t e r than at any
o th er poin t on the p a y s c a le thus, p a r a lle lin g the w a g e p a tte rn found on a n a tio n ­
w id e b a s is . 2 D iffe r e n c e s b etw een the South and the o th er r e g io n s w e r e not c o n ­
fin ed to the lo w e r w a g e in t e r v a ls , but w e r e sp rea d throughout the d is trib u tio n .
O nly s lig h t ly m o r e than o n e -s ix th o f the e m p lo y e e s in the South ea rn ed as m uch
as $2 an h ou r, w h e re a s am ong the th r e e o th er re g io n s the p r o p o r tio n s w ith
such ea rn in g s ran ged fr o m th re e -te n th s u pw ards.
In c o n tra s t to the South, w h e re
th e re w as a h e a v y c o n ce n tra tio n o f e m p lo y e e s at the lo w e r end o f the p a y s c a le ,
ea rn in gs in the o th e r re g io n s w e r e m o r e e v e n ly d is trib u te d .
F o r e x a m p le , e a r n ­
ings fo r the m id d le h a lf o f the w o rk fo r c e w e r e sp rea d o v e r a 6 0 -cen t ran ge in
the South co m p a re d w ith ran ges o f 83 cents in the N o r th C e n tr a l r e g io n , 89 cents
in the N o r th e a s t, and $ 1 .1 6 in the W est.
C om m u n ity s iz e a p p ea red to in flu e n ce the l e v e l o f e m p lo y e e e a rn in g s .
Em ­
p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s a v e r a g e d $ 1 .9 5 an hou r, 38 cents an h ou r m o r e
than th ose in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s (t a b le 3).
W h e re a s ea rn in g s o f e m p lo y e e s
in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s w e r e b r o a d ly d is trib u te d , th ey w e r e grou p ed to w a rd the
lo w e r end o f the p a y s c a le in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .
E a rn in g s fo r the m id d le
h a lf o f the e m p lo y e e s w e r e sp rea d o v e r a 9 5 -ce n t ra n ge in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s
(fr o m $1. 30 to $2. 25 an hour) but o v e r o n ly a 6 4 -ce n t ra n ge in the le s s populous
a re a s (fr o m $1. 15 to $1. 79 an h ou r).
N o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s accounted
fo r o n ly o n e -fo u rth o f the r e t a il w o rk fo r c e , but r e p r e s e n te d s lig h t ly m o r e than
h a lf o f a ll r e t a il w o r k e r s paid le s s than $1. 15 an hour.
In both pop u lation grou p s,
the la r g e s t co n ce n tra tio n o f e m p lo y e e s was found at the $ 1 .2 5 to $ 1 .3 0 pay
in t e r v a l, thus, h ig h lig h tin g the r e la tio n s h ip noted p r e v io u s ly fo r the U nited States
and r e g io n s .
D iffe r e n c e s b etw een the w age d is trib u tio n s d im in is h ed som ew h at
o n ly at the u pper p a y le v e ls .
F o r e x a m p le , the p r o p o r tio n o f n o n m e tro p o lita n
a r e a e m p lo y e e s who ea rn ed le s s than $ 10 15 an hour w as about th r e e tim e s as
g r e a t as that o f m e tr o p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s (25 and 8 p e r c e n t, r e s p e c t iv e ly ).
T h ir t y - fo u r p e r c e n t o f the m e tr o p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s ea rn ed $2 o r m o r e ,
co m p a re d w ith 19 p e r c e n t o f the n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s .
E a rn in g at
le a s t $3 an hour w e r e 11 p e r c e n t o f the e m p lo y e e s in the m e tr o p o lita n a re a s and
4 p e r c e n t in the le s s populous a re a s .
A m o n g the r e g io n s , a v e r a g e ea rn in g s o f e m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s
ran ged fr o m $ 1 .6 6 an hour in the South to $ 2 .2 9 an hour in the W e st.
In non­
m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s , ea rn in g s ran ged fr o m $ 1 .3 5 an hour in the South to $2 an
2 In the Northeast, the distribution of employees below $1.25 and at or just above that amount is partly
traceable to the influence of State minimum wage laws.
Roughly three-fifths of the employees in the Northeast
were in the five States in which the statutory minimum wage generally applicable in retail trade was $1.25 an hour
at the time of the survey.




5

hour in the W e st.
Th e dow nw ard p u ll o f w ages paid in the South on the o v e r a ll
p ay le v e l was ev id e n t in both m e tr o p o lita n and n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .
T h is
d ra g is w e ll illu s tr a te d when w age data fo r m e tr o p o lita n and n o n m e tro p o lita n
a re a s a r e ex am in ed f ir s t in clu d in g and then ex clu d in g the South.
A s shown in
the fo llo w in g tab u lation, the South e x e r te d a 9-c e n t d ra g on the p a y le v e l in
m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s , and a 1 5 -cen t d ra g in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s .
Average straight-time
hourly earninzs

Difference in
the average
pay level
(in cents)

Including
the South

Excluding
the South

-------------------------------

$1.85

$1.97

12

Metropolitan a r e a s ---------------- ------Nonmetropolitan a re a s ----------- ........

1.95
1.57

2.04
1.72

9
15

Area
United States

In each r e g io n w a g es in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s w e r e h ig h e r than th ose in n on ­
m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s .
Th e w age d iffe r e n t ia l, h o w e v e r , did not a p p ea r to be r e la te d
to the r e g io n a l w age le v e l.
F o r e x a m p le , a v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s o f m e t r o ­
p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s ex c e e d e d th ose in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s by 31 cents in
the South, w h ere ea rn in g s w e r e the lo w e s t, and by 29 cents in the W e s t, w h e re
ea rn in g s w e r e the h igh est.
In r e la t iv e t e r m s , the p a y advan tage o f m e tr o p o lita n
o v e r n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a e m p lo y e e s ran ged fr o m 14 p e r c e n t in the N o r th e a s t
to 23 p e r c e n t in both the South and N o rth C e n tr a l r e g io n s .
W ithin each r e g io n , e m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s a v e r a g e d m o r e than
th ose in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s but this r e la tio n s h ip did not hold tru e on an in t e r ­
r e g io n a l b a s is .
E m p lo y e e s in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s o f the W e s t and N o r th e a s t
a v e r a g e d 34 cents and 8 cents an hour m o r e , r e s p e c t iv e ly , than the $ 1 .6 6 a v e r ­
age fo r e m p lo y e e s in sou thern m e tr o p o lita n a re a s .
In each r e g io n , r e g a r d le s s o f its ea rn in g s le v e l, w a g es o f e m p lo y e e s in
m e tr o p o lita n a re a s w e r e m o r e b r o a d ly d is trib u te d than th ose o f e m p lo y e e s in
n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .
F o r e x a m p le , in the South ea rn in g s fo r the m id d le h a lf
o f the e m p lo y e e s extended o v e r a 6 8 -cen t ran ge in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s as opposed
to 53 cents in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .
When the h ig h e st p a y in g r e g io n is exam in ed
(the W e s t), this re la tio n s h ip s t ill e x is ts ; that is , ea rn in g s fo r the sam e grou p
o f e m p lo y e e s in the w a g e d is trib u tio n c o v e r e d a ran ge o f $ 1 .2 6 in m e tr o p o lita n
a re a s and $ 1 .0 4 in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .
M en ea rn ed an a v e r a g e o f $ 2 .0 4 an hou r, 52 cents an hour m o r e than
w om en (ta b le 4 ).
E a rn in gs fo r m en w e r e w id e ly d is trib u te d , w h e r e a s , th ose
fo r w om en w e r e co n cen tra ted in the lo w and m id d le p a y in t e r v a ls .
A lth o u gh
s im ila r p r o p o r tio n s o f both s e x e s ea rn ed le s s than $ 1 .1 5 an hour (11 p e r c e n t
o f the m en and 14 p e r c e n t o f the w o m en ), w o m e n 's ea rn in g s w e r e c o m p r e s s e d
b etw een $ 1 .1 5 and $ 2 an hour— se ve n -te n th s o f the w om en had such ea rn in gs
co m p a re d w ith o n e -h a lf o f the m en .
W om en accounted fo r so m ew h at m o r e than
o n e -h a lf o f the r e t a il w o r k e r s ea rn in g le s s than $ 1 .3 0 in June 1965, although
th ey m ad e up on ly about tw o -fifth s o f the w o rk fo r c e .
R e la t iv e ly fe w w om en
w e r e found at the u pper end o f the p a y s c a le ; fo r e x a m p le , tw o -fifth s o f the m en
ea rn ed $ 2 an hour o r m o r e co m p a re d w ith s lig h tly fe w e r than o n e -s ix th o f the
w om en.
W om en , thus, accounted fo r o n ly about o n e - fifth o f the e m p lo y e e s who
ea rn ed as m uch as $ 2 an hour.
R e g io n a lly , a v e r a g e ea rn in g s fo r m en ran ged fr o m $ 1 .6 7 an hour in the
South to $ 2 .4 5 an hour in the W e st, and fo r w om en fr o m $ 1 .3 1 to $ 1 .8 1 an
hou r, a ga in in the South and W e s t, r e s p e c t iv e ly .
In each r e g io n m en a v e r a g e d




6

m o r e than w om en ; the s m a lle s t d iffe r e n c e b e tw ee n th e ir e a r n in g s , 36 cen ts an
hou r, w as r e c o r d e d in the South, w h ile the la r g e s t , 64 cen ts an hou r, w as o b ­
s e r v e d in the W e st.
M en a v e r a g e d 56 cents an hour m o r e than w om en in the
N o rth C e n tr a l r e g io n , and 58 cents an hour m o r e in the N o rth e a s t.
Thus o n ly
a lim ite d r e la tio n s h ip a p p e a re d to e x is t b e tw ee n the absolu te m agnitu de o f the
p a y d iffe r e n t ia l b e tw ee n m en and w om en and the r e g io n a l l e v e l o f e a rn in g s .
R e la t iv e ly , this r e la tio n s h ip w as n on existen t.
A lth ou gh the n a r r o w e s t d iffe r e n t ia l
b e tw ee n m en and w om en (27 p e r c e n t) w as found in the South, the d iffe r e n t ia ls
in the o th e r re g io n s w e r e c lo s e ly grou p ed b e tw ee n 35 and 37 p e rc e n t.
A lth ou gh m en e a rn e d m o r e than w om en in ea ch o f the r e g io n s , an i n t e r ­
r e g io n a l c o m p a ris o n r e v e a le d that w om en in the W e s t, the h ig h e s t p a y in g r e g io n ,
a v e r a g e d 14 cents an hour m o r e than m en in the South, the lo w e s t p a y in g r e g io n .
T h is d iffe r e n t ia l r e fle c t s the fa c t that a g r e a te r p r o p o r tio n o f m en in the South
a re co n c e n tra te d in the lo w e r re a c h e s o f the p a y s c a le than a re w o m en in the
W e st.
A t the u pper end, h o w e v e r , d iffe r e n c e s b e tw ee n d is trib u tio n s e v e n tu a lly
d is a p p e a red . F o r e x a m p le , 15 p e r c e n t o f the sou th ern m en w e r e p a id $ 2 .4 0 an
hour o r m o r e , 1 p e rc e n ta g e poin t m o r e than the p r o p o r tio n o f w e s t e r n w om en
w ith such e a rn in g s , and beyon d this point, s lig h t ly g r e a t e r p r o p o r tio n s o f m en
in the South than w om en in the W e s t a re re p re s e n te d .

Th e annual vo lu m e o f sa le s o f the e n te r p r is e and e s ta b lis h m e n t in w h ich
he w o rk s has a b e a rin g on an e m p lo y e e 's e a rn in g s .
T h is w as r e v e a le d when
e m p lo y e e ea rn in g s w e r e tab u lated a c c o rd in g to th es e c h a r a c t e r is t ic s .
R e ta il
e n te r p r is e s w e r e c la s s ifie d a c c o rd in g to w h eth er th e ir annual v o lu m e o f s a le s
w e r e : (1) $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e , (2) at le a s t $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 but le s s than $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ,
and (3) le s s than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 .
In addition , r e t a il es ta b lis h m e n ts w h ich w e r e p a r t
o f the above e n te r p r is e s w e r e d iv id e d into two grou p s— th ose w ith an annual s a le s
vo lu m e o f $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e and those w ith a lo w e r s a le s v o lu m e .
E m p lo y e e s
in e n te r p r is e s w ith $ 1 m illio n o r m o r e in annual s a le s a v e r a g e d $ 1. 99 an hour,
11 cents an hour m o r e than those in the in te r m e d ia te s iz e e n t e r p r is e s , and
41 cents an hour m o r e than e m p lo y e e s in the lo w e s t vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s (ta b le 5).
S im ila r ly , r e g a r d le s s o f the e n te r p r is e grou p , e m p lo y e e s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith
$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in annual s a le s had a h ig h e r a v e r a g e p a y l e v e l than th ose in
es ta b lis h m e n ts w ith lo w e r s a le s .
The r e la tio n s h ip b e tw ee n e a rn in g s and e n t e r ­
p r is e s a le s did not alw a ys hold on an e s ta b lis h m e n t b a s is .
Thus, w h ile e m ­
p lo y e e s o f es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in s a le s a v e r a g e d m o r e in
$1 m illio n e n te r p r is e s than in s m a lle r on es, e m p lo y e e s o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith
le s s than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 in s a le s had lo w e r ea rn in g s in $1 m illio n e n te r p r is e s than
in e ith e r o f the lo w e r vo lu m e e n te r p r is e grou p s.
T h is r e s u lts , in p a rt, fr o m
the d is p r o p o r tio n a te ly la r g e nu m ber o f lim ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s to r e e m p lo y e e s
(who, as is n oted b e lo w , w e r e am ong the lo w e s t p a id in r e t a il t r a d e ) found
am ong e m p lo y e e s in lo w e r vo lu m e e s ta b lis h m en ts w h ich w e r e p a r t o f $ 1 m i l ­
lio n e n te r p r is e s .
T h e r e w as a d is tin c t s im ila r it y b e tw ee n e n te r p r is e s w ith o v e r $ 1 m illio n
in s a le s and th ose w ith $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 m illio n in s a le s in the d is trib u tio n o f
e m p lo y e e e a rn in g s , e x c e p t at the lo w e r end o f the p a y s c a le .
Th us, fe w e r
than o n e -tw e n tie th o f the e m p lo y e e s in the la r g e s t e n te r p r is e s e a rn e d le s s than
$ 1. 15 an hour c o m p a re d w ith o n e -e ig h th o f those in the in te r m e d ia te s iz e e n t e r ­
p r is e s . B elo w the $ 1. 25 p a y le v e l the d is trib u tio n s w e r e m o r e a lik e w ith 14 p e r ­
cent in the fo r m e r grou p and 18 p e r c e n t in the la tt e r ea rn in g le s s than that amount.
In both g ro u p s, about t h r e e - fift h s o f the e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d $ 1 .5 0 o r m o r e , and
this s im ila r it y w as m ain ta in ed fu rth e r up the p a y s c a le .
In e n te r p r is e s w ith
le s s than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 in s a le s , the d is trib u tio n d iffe r e d s h a rp ly fr o m th ose in the
tw o h ig h e r vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s . T h re e -te n th s o f the e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d le s s than
$ 1. 25 an hour and fe w e r than o n e -h a lf as m uch as $ 1. 50.




7

Th e d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e e a rn in g s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r
m o r e in s a le s c lo s e ly p a r a lle le d that o f the e n te r p r is e o f w h ich th ey w e r e a p a rt,
r e fle c t in g the fa c t that th es e e s ta b lis h m e n ts accou n ted fo r b e tt e r than n in e-ten th s
o f the e m p lo y e e s in both the high and m ed iu m vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s . A bou t s e v e n eighths o f the e m p lo y e e s in $250,000 es ta b lis h m e n ts w h i c h w e r e p a r t o f e n te r p r is e s
w ith $1 m illio n o r m o r e in s a le s , w e r e w ith in the scop e o f the $1. 15 m in im u m
w a g e under the F a ir L a b o r Standards A c t, as a p p lied to r e t a il t r a d e . 3 T h is , in
p a rt, accounts fo r the s m a lle r p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g le s s than $1. 15 an
hour in th ese e s ta b lis h m e n ts , than in th ose w h ich w e r e p a r t o f s m a lle r vo lu m e
e n te r p r is e s w h ich g e n e r a lly w e r e not c o v e r e d b y the F a ir L a b o r Standards A c t.
T y p ic a lly , w hen a le g is la t e d m in im u m w a g e d ir e c t ly s e r v e s to r a is e the
ea rn in g s o f a la r g e grou p o f e m p lo y e e s , this is r e fle c t e d in the ea rn in g s d i s t r i ­
bution b y a co n ce n tra tio n o f e m p lo y e e s w ith e a rn in g s at o r ju s t above the m in i­
m um .
In es ta b lis h m en ts g e n e r a lly c o v e r e d b y the F e d e r a l m in im u m in r e t a il
tra d e such a co n ce n tra tio n w as found, but it w as s m a ll (7. 5 p e r c e n t).
On the
o th er hand, 10.4 p e r c e n t o f the e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d b e tw ee n $ 1 .2 5 and $ 1 .3 0 an
hour, ju s t 3 m onths p r io r to the tim e w hen the m in im u m w a g e w as to be r a is e d
to $ 1. 25 an hour.
T h is c o n c e n tra tio n m ay, in p a rt, r e f l e c t an a n tic ip a tio n o f
the r a is e in the m in im u m on the p a r t o f so m e e m p lo y e r s . H o w e v e r , in ea ch o f
the o th er e n te r p r is e -e s t a b lis h m e n t grou p s (w hich a re g e n e r a lly not c o v e r e d b y
the F e d e r a l m in im u m ) th e re w as a s im ila r co n ce n tra tio n o f e m p lo y e e s e a rn in g
$ 1. 25 to $ 1. 30 an hour. T h is m a y have r e s u lte d fr o m so m e in d ir e c t in flu en ce
o f the im pen din g m in im u m ev e n on e s ta b lis h m en ts not w ith in the scope o f the
le g is la t io n ; o r the in d ir e c t in flu en ce o f the $ 1. 25 h o u rly m in im u m a lr e a d y a p p li­
ca b le to m an y o th er in d u s trie s (e. g. , m an u factu rin g and w h o le s a le tr a d e ) in so m e
e s ta b lis h m e n ts . M o st p ro b a b ly a co m b in a tion o f th ese and o th er fa c t o r s r e s u lte d
in the c lu s te r in g o f e m p lo y e e e a rn in g s at $ 1. 25 an hour in a ll o f r e t a il tra d e .
Th e d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e ea rn in g s in es ta b lis h m e n ts w ith s a le s o f le s s
than $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 annu ally w as c h a r a c t e r iz e d b y a co n ce n tra tio n around the lo w e r
end o f the p a y s c a le .
In ea ch e n te r p r is e grou p fr o m th re e -te n th s to o n e -th ir d
o f the e m p lo y e e s in th ese low s a le s vo lu m e es ta b lis h m e n ts e a rn e d le s s than
$ 1 .2 5 an hour and no m o r e than about o n e - fifth e a rn e d as m uch as $ 2 an hour.
W ith in ea ch e n te r p r is e -e s t a b lis h m e n t s a le s - s iz e c la s s , the v a r ia t io n in the
r e g io n a l le v e l o f ea rn in g s fo llo w e d the n a tion al p a tte rn ; that is , e a rn in g s w e r e
lo w e s t in the South and h ig h e st in the W e st.
On the o th er hand, the w a g e r e ­
la tion sh ip s am ong the s a le s - s iz e grou p s v a r ie d som ew h at am ong the r e g io n s .
A m o n g th ree r e g io n s (the N o r th e a s t b e in g the e x c e p tio n ) e m p lo y e e s in e s ta b lis h ­
m ents w ith $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in annual s a le s w h ich w e r e p a r t o f e n te r p r is e s
w ith $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in s a le s e a rn e d at le a s t 12 cents an hour m o r e than
th ose in any o th er group.
In the N o rth e a s t, h o w e v e r , e m p lo y e e s in th ese e s ­
ta b lish m en ts a v e r a g e d 1 cent an hour le s s than those in the sam e e s ta b lis h m e n t
grou p in the in te r m e d ia te s iz e e n te r p r is e s . T h is d e v ia tio n fr o m the usual p a tte rn
is p a r tly a r e s u lt o f the unique e a rn in g s re la tio n s h ip am ong the s a le s grou p s in
so m e o f the m a jo r in d u s try grou p s in the N o rth e a s t. 4 F o r e x a m p le , e m p lo y e e s
in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in s a le s w h ich
w e r e p a rts o f e n te r p r is e s w ith $ 1 m illio n o r m o r e in s a le s a v e r a g e d o n ly 1 cent
an hour m o r e than th e ir co u n terp a rts in lo w e r vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s in the N o r th ­
e a s t, but am ong the th re e o th er r e g io n s , th ey a v e r a g e d at le a s t 19 cents an hour
m o r e . A t the sam e tim e , in th re e m a jo r r e t a il grou ps in the N o rth e a s t (a p p a re l,

In general, the $1.15 minimum applied to employees in retail establishments with $250,000 or more in
annual sales which were part of enterprises with $1 million or more in annual sales.
Excluded were employees of
motor 4
vehicle and farm implement dealers, and employees engaged in food service occupations.
State minimum wage laws also played a role in creating these atypical relationships.
See footnote 2, p. 4 •




8

fu rn itu re , and m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s t o r e s ) e m p lo y e e s in the $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e
e s ta b lis h m en ts a v e r a g e d m o r e in in te r m e d ia te vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s than in the
h ig h e r vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s .
A m o n g the th ree o th er r e g io n s this o c c u r r e d o n ly
in m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s to r e s in the W e st.
Th e South w as the o n ly r e g io n in w h ich a la r g e co n ce n tra tio n o f e m p lo y e e s
o f es ta b lis h m en ts g e n e r a lly su b ject to the $1. 15 F e d e r a l m in im u m w age in r e t a il
tra d e w as found at o r ju s t above the m in im u m . S ix teen p e r c e n t o f the sou th ern
e m p lo y e e s in th ese es ta b lis h m e n ts w e r e paid b etw een $ J. 15 and $ 1. 20 an hou r,
c o m p a re d w ith 7 p e r c e n t o r le s s am ong the o th er r e g io n s .

M a jo r Groups and S e le c te d In d u s trie s
A m o n g the s e v e n m a jo r in d u s try grou p s con stitu tin g r e t a il tra d e (ex clu d in g
ea tin g and d rin k in g p la c e s ) a v e r a g e ea rn in g s ra n ge d fr o m $ 1 .6 3 an hour fo r e m ­
p lo y e e s in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s to $2. 10 an hour fo r those in fu r n itu r e ,
hom e fu rn ish in g s, and h ou seh old a p plian ce s to r e s (ta b les 13 throu gh 30).
T h is
s p re a d in pay le v e ls co n trib u ted to the b ro a d d is trib u tio n o f ea rn in g s in r e t a il
tra d e . In additon to e m p lo y e e s in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s , th ose in a p p a r e l
and a c c e s s o r y s to r e s and in m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s to r e s e a rn e d le s s , on the
a v e r a g e , than the a ll r e t a il tra d e p a y l e v e l o f $ 1. 85 an hour. T h e s e e m p lo y e e s
c o m p r is e d n e a r ly h a lf the r e t a il w o r k fo r c e .
Th e w id e v a r ia t io n in the w a g e
le v e ls o f the m a jo r grou p s w h ich c o m p r is e the r e t a il tra d e in d u s try m a y be
a ttrib u te d to a v a r ie t y o f fa c t o r s .
F o r e x a m p le , the d iffe r in g occu p a tio n a l r e ­
q u irem e n ts and m ethods o f w age p a ym en t d is c u s s e d e a r l i e r . O th er fa c t o r s such
as the p r o p o r tio n o f the w o r k fo r c e lo c a te d in m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s , the s a le s
vo lu m e o f the e s ta b lis h m e n t, vo lu m e o f s a le s p e r e m p lo y e e , F e d e r a l and State
m in im u m w age le g is la t io n , and the nu m ber o f p a r t- t im e e m p lo y e e s , a lso in flu en ce
the le v e l and d is trib u tio n o f ea rn in g s am ong the m a jo r r e t a il g rou p s.
A s p r e v io u s ly noted, the a v e r a g e p a y le v e ls am ong the m a jo r r e t a il grou p s
v a r ie d b y as m uch as 47 cents an hour, r e fle c t in g su b sta n tial d iffe r e n c e s am ong
the e a rn in g s d is trib u tio n s . The p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s e a rn in g le s s than $1. 15 an
hour, fo r e x a m p le , ra n ge d fr o m 7 p e r c e n t at bu ild in g m a t e r ia ls , h a r d w a r e , and
fa r m equ ipm en t d e a le r s to 18 p e r c e n t in m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s t o r e s .
In ea ch
o f the se v e n m a jo r g rou p s, the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g fr o m $ 1 .2 5 to
$ 1. 30 w as la r g e r than the p r o p o r tio n w h ose ea rn in g s f e l l b e tw ee n $ 1. 15 and
$ 1 .2 0 an hour.
Th e p r o p o r tio n e a rn in g le s s than $ 1 .3 0 ra n g e d fr o m o n e - fifth
at b u ildin g m a t e r ia ls d e a le r s to n e a r ly tw o -fifth s in m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s to r e s .
D iffe r e n c e s w e r e not co n fin ed to the lo w e r re a c h e s o f the p a y s c a le . Th e p r o ­
p o rtio n o f e m p lo y e e s who w e r e paid $2 o r m o r e , fo r e x a m p le , ra n ge d fr o m
18 p e r c e n t in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s to 42 p e r c e n t in fu rn itu re s to r e s .
Percent of employees earning—

Major industry group
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers ------------General merchandise stores ---------Food stores-----------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations---------------------------Apparel and accessory stores -------Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance stores-----------Miscellaneous retail stores ------------




Average
hourly
earnings

Less
than
$1.15

Less
than
$1.30

$2
or
more

$3
or
more

$1.98
1.63
1.91

6.8
9.4
12.5

19.7
36.1
30.5

40.4
17.7
37.0

12.9
4.1
11.6

2.02
1.70

13.7
12.6

25.2
35.2

37.8
22.8

13.7
4.6

2.10
1.75

7.9
18.3

20.1
37.1

42.1
26.8

14.8
8.1

9

F o r ea ch m a jo r grou p the r e g io n a l p a tte rn o f ea rn in g s w as s im ila r to that
noted fo r the e n tir e in d u s try ; that is , ea rn in g s w e r e lo w e s t fo r e m p lo y e e s in the
South and h ig h e st fo r th ose in the W est.
In 6 o f the 7 g ro u p s, the N o rth e a s t
r e g is t e r e d next to the h ig h e st p a y le v e l; in fu rn itu re , hom e fu rn is h in g s , and
hou sehold a pplian ce s to r e s , e m p lo y e e s in the N o rth C e n tr a l r e g io n a v e r a g e d
1 cent an hour m o r e than th e ir co u n terp a rts in the N o rth e a s t. A m o n g the grou p s,
the r e la t iv e w a g e advantage o f e m p lo y e e s in the W e s t o v e r those in the South
ran ged fr o m 33 p e r c e n t in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s to 64 p e r c e n t in fo o d
s to r e s , c o m p a re d w ith an in d u stry w id e advantage o f 44 p e rc e n t.
T h e r e w as
lit tle r e la tio n s h ip b e tw e e n the am ount o f this d iffe r e n t ia l and the le v e l o f ea rn in g s
in the m a jo r grou p . F o r e x a m p le , the S ou th -W est d iffe r e n t ia l w as 37 p e r c e n t in
a p p a rel and a c c e s s o r y s to r e s , w h ich had next to the lo w e s t a v e r a g e pa y le v e l,
as w e ll as in fu rn itu re s to r e s , w h ich r e c o r d e d the h ig h e st a v e r a g e p a y le v e l.
The sharp c o n tra s t b etw een a v e r a g e ea rn in g s in the South and those in the o th er
re g io n s is h ig h lig h ted w hen the d iffe r e n t ia l am ong the o th er r e g io n s is ex a m in e d
fo r ea ch m a jo r grou p.
E x clu d in g the South, the in t e r r e g io n a l v a r ia t io n ra n ged
fr o m 12 to 32 p e rc e n t, and in fo u r o f the grou p s it w as 15 p e r c e n t o r le s s ,
as shown b e lo w .
Interregional wage differentials
Including the South

Major industry group
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers ------------General merchandise stores-----------Food stores ----------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations -------------------------Apparel and accessory stores -------Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance stores------------------Miscellaneous retail stores

Excluding the South

Cents per-hour

Percent

Cents per-hour

Percent

$0.88
.47
.97

55
33
64

$0. 55
.24
.60

28
15
32

.63
.52

37
37

.25
.26

12
15

.65
.68

37
48

.28
.40

13
23

In ea ch o f the fo u r r e g io n s , e m p lo y e e s in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s w e r e
the lo w e s t p a id (although in the South th e ir p a y l e v e l w as m a tch ed b y that in
a p p a re l and a c c e s s o r y s t o r e s ).
On the o th er hand, e m p lo y e e s at b u ild in g m a ­
t e r ia ls , h a r d w a r e , and fa r m equ ip m en t d e a le r s w e r e the h ig h e st p a id grou p in
the N o r th e a s t and W e s t; those in fu rn itu re s to r e s w e r e the h ig h e st p a id grou p
in the South and N o rth C e n tr a l r e g io n s .
W ith but th re e e x c e p tio n s , e m p lo y e e s in the h ig h e st p a yin g m a jo r grou p in
the South (fu r n itu r e ) a v e r a g e d le s s than those in any m a jo r grou p in the o th er
r e g io n s . Southern e m p lo y e e s in fu rn itu re a v e r a g e d 8 and 13 cents an hour m o r e ,
r e s p e c t iv e ly , than g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e e m p lo y e e s in the N o r th e a s t and N o rth
C e n tra l r e g io n s , and 10 cents an hour m o r e than a p p a re l e m p lo y e e s in the N o rth
C e n tra l r e g io n .

Th e d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s am ong the se v e n m a jo r grou p s w as s im ila r
am ong the r e g io n s and thus did not a ppear to be a fa c to r in flu e n cin g the r e g io n a l
w a g e le v e ls .
T h is is brou gh t out i f the d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y m e n t am ong the
m a jo r grou p s in the W e s t is a lte r e d to c o n fo rm w ith that in the South.
M a in ­
tain in g the a v e r a g e p a y le v e l in each m a jo r goup, the a v e r a g e in the W e st d e c lin e s
o n ly s lig h tly , fr o m $ 2 .2 2 an hpur to $ 2 .2 0 an hour.

in

C om m u n ity s iz e a lso a p p e a re d to in flu en ce the l e v e l o f e m p lo y e e ea rn in g s
ea ch m a jo r grou p :
E m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s e a rn e d m o r e , on an




10

a v e r a g e , than th e ir co u n terp a rts in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s (as shown b e lo w ).
The amount o f the w a g e advantage ra n ged fr o m 32 cents an hour in m is c e lla n e o u s
r e t a il s to r e s to 51 cents an hour in fo o d s to r e s and at a u to m o tive d e a le r s and
g a s o lin e s e r v ic e sta tion s.
In r e la t iv e t e r m s , the pay d iffe r e n t ia ls ra n ge d fr o m
21 p e rc e n t in m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s to r e s to 34 p e rc e n t in fo od s to re s (c o m p a re d
w ith 24 p e r c e n t fo r a ll r e t a il tra d e ). N o r e la tio n s h ip a p p e a re d to e x is t b etw een
the am ount o f the w a g e d iffe r e n t ia l and the o v e r a ll l e v e l o f ea rn in g s r e p o r te d
fo r the grou p .
F o r e x a m p le , the pay advantage o f e m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n
a re a s o v e r those in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s w as 27 p e r c e n t in the h ig h e st pa yin g
r e t a il grou p (fu rn itu re ) and 26 p e r c e n t in the lo w e s t paying grou p (g e n e r a l m e r ­
ch andise) .

Average hourly earnings of
_______employees i

Major industry group
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers -----------General merchandise stores---------Food stores --------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations-------------------------Apparel and accessory stores -----Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance sto res-------Miscellaneous retail stores ----------

Metropolitan
areas

Nonmetropolitan
areas

$2.18
1.70
2.03

$1.72
1.35
1.52

2.19
1.77

1.68
1.42

2.21
1.84

1.74
1.52

w hat was noted on a r e g io n a l b a s is , the d iffe
m e tro p o lita n and n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a w age le v e ls a p p e a re d to be som ew h at r e ­
la ted to in d u stry m ix .
W hen the d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s am ong the m a jo r
grou ps in m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s is tra n s p o s e d to n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s (m ain ta in in g
the sam e n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a a v e r a g e fo r each grou p ) the o v e r a ll r e t a il a v e r a g e
in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s d e c lin e s by 5 cen ts, fr o m $ 1. 57 an hour to $ 1. 52 an
hour.
Th is d e c r e a s e is due, in p a rt, to the in c re a s e d p ro p o rtio n o f e m p lo y e e s
in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s , w h e re a v e r a g e pay le v e ls a re low ,
in trod u ced
into the n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a a v e r a g e (th ese e m p lo y e e s accou n ted fo r 18 p e rc e n t
o f the n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a e m p lo y m e n t b e fo r e the tra n s p o s itio n and 27 p e rc e n t
a ft e r it).
In a ddition , the a fo re m e n tio n e d in c r e a s e in the p r o p o r tio n o f lo w e r
paid w o r k e r s w as a cco m p a n ied by d e c lin e s in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s am ong
two h ig h e r paying in d u s trie s — fr o m 12 to 6 p e rc e n t at bu ildin g m a t e r ia ls , h a r d ­
w a r e , and fa r m eq u ipm en t d e a le r s , w h e re the a v e r a g e in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s
was $ 1 .7 2 an h ou r, and fr o m 25 to 17 p e r c e n t at a u to m o tive d e a le r s and g a s o ­
lin e s e r v ic e sta tio n s, w h e re the a v e r a g e w as $ 1 .6 8 an hou r.
In each m a jo r grou p m en ea rn ed su b s ta n tia lly m o r e than w om en , the d i f ­
fe r e n t ia l ran gin g fr o m 32 cents an hou r at a u to m o tive d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ­
ic e station s to 59 cents in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s . N o a p p a ren t re la tio n s h ip
was found b etw een the m a jo r g r o u p 's le v e l o f ea rn in g s and the amount by w hich
m e n 's ea rn in g s e x c e e d e d those fo r w om en.
M e n 's le v e l o f ea rn in g s g e n e r a lly
s e e m e d le s s in flu en ced by the p la ce o f em p lo y m e n t, o r the n atu re o f the r e t a il
a c t iv it y , than w o m e n 's .
F o r e x a m p le , m en at a u to m o tive d e a le r s and g a s o lin e
s e r v ic e sta tion s (n ext to the h ig h e st paying r e t a il grou p ) a v e r a g e d $2 . 04 an hour,
1 cent an hour le s s than m en in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s (the lo w e s t paying
g ro u p ). A m o n g the seven m a jo r g ro u p s, m en a v e r a g e d fr o m $ 1 .9 7 to $ 2 .2 4 an
hour; and in 5 o f the 7 they a v e r a g e d b etw een $2. 03 and $2 . 06 an hou r. B ecau se
o f this s im ila r it y and the lo w e r pay l e v e l o f w om en , th e r e a p p e a re d to be a




11

re la tio n s h ip b etw een the p ro p o rtio n of w om en e m p lo y e d by a m a jo r g ro u p and
the le v e l o f ea rn in g s o f the grou p. F o r e x a m p le , am ong the th re e h ig h e st paying
g rou p s, no m o r e than th re e -te n th s o f the e m p lo y e e s w e r e w o m en w h e re a s am ong
the tw o lo w e s t paying grou p s at le a s t se ve n -te n th s o f the e m p lo y e e s w e r e w om en .
Average hourly
earnings of—
Men

Major industry group
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers ------------General merchandise stores----------Food stores ---------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations — --------------- -------Apparel and accessory stores ------Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance stores ------Miscellaneous retail stores -----------

Women

$2.03
2.05
2.03

$1.67
1.46
1.66

2.04
2.06

1.72
1.52

2. 24
1.97

1.67
1.44

m anner

as

m en

lin e s o f r e t a il b u sin ess , th e ir a v e r a g e pay le v e l w ould in c r e a s e by 10 cents an
hou r, fr o m $ 1. 52 to $ 1. 62. T h is in c r e a s e is tr a c e a b le to the sh ift in e m p lo y ­
m ent fr o m lo w e r to h ig h e r paying in d u s trie s . F o r e x a m p le , at a u tom otive d e a le r s
and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e station s w om en a v e r a g e $ 1. 72 an hour (h ig h est am ong the
gro u p s) but r e p r e s e n te d on ly 4 p e rc e n t o f the w om en in the r e t a il w o r k fo r c e
b e fo r e the sh ift c o m p a re d w ith 30 p e r c e n t a ft e r it.
C o n v e r s e ly , the p r o p o r tio n
o f w om en in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s , w h e re they a v e r a g e d $ 1 .4 6 an hour,
d e c lin e d fr o m 43 to 12 p e rc e n t.
The ea rn in g s by vo lu m e o f s a le s re la tio n s h ip s noted fo r a ll r e t a il tra d e
w e r e a ls o tru e , in m o s t c a s e s , fo r each o f the m a jo r r e t a il grou p s.
A s shown
in the fo llo w in g tabu lation, in 6 o f 7 m a jo r g ro u p s, e m p lo y e e s in the h ig h e st
vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s had the h ig h est le v e l o f e a rn in g s , and in each o f the seven
those in the lo w e s t vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s had the lo w e s t le v e l o f e a rn in g s .
In
m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s t o r e s , the ex cep tio n , e m p lo y e e s in e n te r p r is e s w ith betw een
$ 2 50 ,00 0 and $ 1,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 in s a les a v e r a g e d 2 cents an hou r m o r e than those in
the $ 1 m illio n e n te r p r is e s .
A n in te rin d u s try c o m p a ris o n r e v e a le d , h o w e v e r ,
that e m p lo y e e s in the lo w e s t vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s o f two o f the h ig h e st payin g
m a jo r grou p s (fu rn itu re and building m a t e r ia ls ) a v e r a g e d m o r e than th ose in
e ith e r o f the h ig h e r vo lu m e e n te r p r is e s o f the two lo w e s t paying grou p s (g e n e r a l
m e rc h a n d is e and a p p a r e l).
Average hourly earnings of employees
in enterprises with annual sales of—

Major industry group
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers--------------General merchandise stores----------Food stores-----------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations--------------------------Apparel and accessory stores---------Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance stores----------Miscellaneous retail stores-------------




$1,000, 000
or
more

$250,000
to
$1,000,000

Less
than
$250,000

$2.17
1.69
2. 15

$2. 01
1.47
1.69

$1. 78
1.23
1.44

2.47
1. 76

1.95
1. 73

1.55
1.60

2.31
1.83

2. 26
1.85

1.81
1.65

12

S e le c te d Groups
E a ch m a jo r in d u s try grou p c o m p r is e s s e v e r a l in d u s trie s . T h e r e fo r e , i n t e r ­
in d u s try d iffe r e n c e s in p a y le v e ls and ea rn in g s d is trib u tio n s , w h ich r e s u lt fr o m ,
am ong o th er th in gs, d iffe r e n c e s in s k ill r e q u ire m e n ts and m ethods o f w a g e p a y ­
m ent, a re s o m e tim e s m a s k e d when a m a jo r grou p is ex a m in e d in its e n tir e t y
and its com p on en t in d u s trie s not c o n s id e re d .
T w o e x a m p le s a r e r e a d ily a v a ila ­
b le ----the a u to m o tive d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e station s m a jo r grou p , and the
g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s m a jo r group.

N e a r ly o n e -h a lf o f the e m p lo y e e s in the a u tom otive d e a le r s and g a s o lin e
station s grou p w o rk e d at m o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s and n e a r ly tw o - fifth s w o r k e d at
g a s o lin e sta tion s.
M o s t m o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s e m p lo y a la r g e p r o p o r tio n o f
h ig h ly s k ille d a u tom otive m ech a n ics and a u tom ob ile s a le s m e n , and fr e q u e n tly
p a y them on a c o m m is s io n b a s is . The ty p ic a l jo b at a g a s o lin e s e r v ic e sta tion ,
on the o th er hand, r e q u ir e s r e la t iv e ly lit tle s k ill o r e x p e r ie n c e , and e m p lo y e e s
in th ese jo b s a re u su a lly p a id on a tim e b a s is .
E m p lo y e e s at m o to r v e h ic le
d e a le r s e a rn e d an a v e r a g e o f $ 2 .4 0 an hour, 88 cents an hour m o r e than th ose
at g a s o lin e sta tion s.
A m o n g e m p lo y e e s at m o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s o n ly o n e -te n th
e a rn e d le s s than $ 1. 25 and m o r e than o n e -th ird r e c e iv e d at le a s t $2. 50 an hour.
B y c o n tra s t, m o r e than o n e -fo u rth o f the g a s o lin e sta tion e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d le s s
than $ 1 .2 5 and fe w e r than o n e-ten th w e r e paid as m uch as $ 2 .5 0 .

S im ila r c ir c u m s ta n c e s p r e v a ile d in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s .
D e p a r t­
m en t s to r e s , w h ich accounted fo r about th r e e - fift h s o f the e m p lo y m e n t in g e n e r a l
m e rc h a n d is e , h ir e s k ille d and k n o w le d g ea b le s a le s p e o p le to s e ll ite m s such as
fu rn itu re , a p p lia n c es, and the m o r e e x p e n s iv e lin e s o f clo th in g. T h e s e e m p lo y e e s
a re fr e q u e n tly p a id on a c o m m is s io n b a s is .
In lim ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s ,
w h ich e m p lo y e d o n e -s ix th o f the e m p lo y e e s in the m a jo r grou p , s k ill and e x ­
p e r ie n c e re q u ir e m e n ts fo r m o s t jo b s a re m in im a l and e m p lo y e e s a re p a id p r i ­
m a r ily on a tim e b a s is .
D ep a rtm en t
s to r e e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d an a v e r a g e o f
$ 1. 75 an hour, e x c e e d in g the ea rn in g s o f v a r ie t y s to re e m p lo y e e s b y 44 cents
an hour.
O n ly o n e -e ig h th o f the d e p a rtm en t s to r e e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d le s s than
$ 1. 25 an hour w h ile m o r e than o n e - fifth e a rn e d at le a s t $2.
V a r ie t y s to r e e m ­
p lo y e e s w e r e co n c e n tra te d in the lo w e r r e a c h e s o f the p a y s c a le w ith c lo s e to on e h a lf ea rn in g le s s than $ 1. 25 an hour and o n ly 1 out o f 20 e a rn in g as m uch as $2.
O ften tim es w hen the jo b r e q u ire m e n ts and m ethods o f w a g e p a ym en t (am ong
o th er th in g s) a re s im ila r , the l e v e l and d is trib u tio n o f ea rn in g s in com ponent
in d u s trie s o f a m a jo r grou p a re s im ila r .
F o r e x a m p le , e m p lo y e e s a v e r a g e d
$2. 10 an hour in fu rn itu re and equ ipm en t s to r e s and $2. 09 in hou seh old a p plian ce
s to r e s , both p a r t o f the fu rn itu re and hou sehold a p plian ce m a jo r grou p , w h e re
ea rn in g s w e r e a lso $2. 10 an hour.
The w age re la tio n s h ip s noted am ong the v a rio u s s e le c te d c h a r a c t e r is t ic s —
r e g io n s , m e tr o p o lita n and n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s , m en and w om en , and e n t e r p r is e e s ta b lis h m e n t s a le s - s iz e c la s s e s fo r the m a jo r g ro u p s, w e r e a lso found in m o s t
c a s e s , fo r the s e le c te d kinds o f r e t a il b u sin ess .
T h e r e w e r e a few n o tew o rth y
ex c e p tio n s . In lim ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s , fo r e x a m p le , ea rn in g s w e r e 2 cents
h ig h e r in the N o r th e a s t than in the W e st (ta b le 16); w om en in som e o f the h ig h e r
p a yin g grou p s a v e r a g e d m o r e than m en in the lo w e r pa yin g groups (as shown
in the fo llo w in g tab u lation )— w hich w as not the c a se am ong the m a jo r g ro u p s; in
shoe s to r e s and hou sehold a pplian ce s to r e s , e m p lo y e e s in e n te r p r is e s w ith b e ­
tw een $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 and $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 in s a les e a rn e d m o r e than th ose in the h ig h e st
vo lu m e e n te r p r is e .




13

Average hourly earnings of employees by
__________selected characteristics_________
Enterprises with sales of—

Line of retail business
Department stores------------------------- Limited price variety stores----------Grocery stores-------------------------------Motor vehicle dealers------------- -----Gasoline service stations-------------Men's and boys' clothing and
furnishings stores------------------------Women's ready-to-wear stores------Shoe stores-----------------------------------Furniture, home furnishings, and
equipment stores------------------------Household appliance sto res----------Drug and proprietary stores-----------

Metropolitan
areas
$1. 77
1.39
2.07
2.65

Nonmetropolitan
areas

Men

$1,000,000 $250,000
or
to
more
Women
$1,000,000

Less
than
$250,000

1.61

$1.61
1.14
1.54
1.93
1.36

$2. 22
1.59
2. 02
2.46
1.52

$1.54
1.27
1. 74
1.83
1.37

$1. 76
1.36
2.16
2. 61
1.66

$1.34
1. 13
1.64
2. 05
1.63

$1. 14
1.06
1.31
1.91
1.47

1.99
1.61
1.93

1.60
1.32
1.58

2.09
1.84
2.04

1.59
1.52
1.52

2.07
1.63
1.83

1.92
1.53
1.91

1. 79
1.46
1.81

2. 22
2.21
1.64

1.69
1.85
1.34

2. 25
2. 24
1.88

1. 70
1.58
1.36

2.37
2. 20
1.66

2. 22
2. 34
1.60

1. 78
1.83
1.49

W e e k ly H ou rs o f W o r k
R e ta il tra d e e m p lo y e e s a v e r a g e d 36. 9 hou rs o f w o r k a w e e k in June 1965
(ta b le 6). A 4 0 -h ou r w o rk w e e k is a co m m o n ly a c c e p te d standard and m o r e e m ­
p lo y e e s ( l 2/3 m illio n , o n e -fo u rth o f the w o rk fo r c e ) w o rk e d th ese hours than
w o rk e d any oth er set o f hou rs on the hou rs s c a le .
P a r t - t im e w o r k (le s s than
35 hours a w eek ) and r e la t iv e ly long w o rk w eek s (48 hours o r m o r e ) a re a ls o
co m m on in r e t a il tra d e — th r e e -te n th s o f the r e t a il e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d on a p a r ttim e b a sis and n e a r ly o n e -fifth had lon g w o rk w e e k s .
A m o n g the fo u r g e o g ra p h ic r e g io n s , a v e r a g e w e e k ly hours w e r e 34 .4 in
the N o rth e a s t, 36. 3 in the N o rth C e n tra l r e g io n , 37 in the W e s t, and 39. 6 in
the South. H a lf the e m p lo y e e s in the N o r th e a s t w o rk e d le s s than 40 h ou rs, the
la r g e s t p ro p o rtio n in any o f the r e g io n s , co n trib u tin g to this r e g io n 's r e la t iv e ly
lo w le v e l o f w e e k ly h ou rs.
T h e d is trib u tio n o f a v e r a g e w e e k ly hours fo r e m ­
p lo y e e s in the N o r th C e n tra l r e g io n g e n e r a lly c o n fo rm e d to the n ation w id e p a ttern .
In the W e s t, the la r g e s t p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s in any o f the fo u r r e g io n s ,
o n e -th ird , w o rk e d 40 h ou rs a w eek , m aking this the on ly r e g io n in w hich m o r e
e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d 40 h ou rs than p a rt tim e (fe w e r than th r e e - t e n th s ).
These
fa c to r s co m b in ed to g iv e the W e s t n ext to the lo n g e s t a v e r a g e w o rk w eek .
The
len gth o f the a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k in the South is a ttrib u ta b le to the fa c t that c lo s e
to o n e -h a lf the e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d m o r e than 40 hou rs a w e e k and m o r e than
o n e -fo u rth w o rk e d 48 h ou rs o r m o r e , one and a h a lf tim e s the p ro p o rtio n in the
r e g io n w ith the n ext lo n g e s t a v e r a g e w o rk w eek .
E m p lo y e e s in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s a v e r a g e d 3 9. 3 h ou rs o f w o r k du ring
the s u r v e y w eek , 3. 3 hou rs m o r e than th ose in m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s (ta b le 7).
Seven out o f 10 e m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s w o rk e d 40 h ou rs o r le s s , and
on ly 1 out o f 2 e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d such hours in the s m a lle r a r e a s .
S im ila r ly ,
o f the e m p lo y e e s who w o rk e d o v e r 40 hours a w eek , o n e -h a lf o f those in m e t r o ­
p o lita n a r e a s , c o m p a re d w ith on ly t w o -fifth s o f those in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ,
w o rk e d le s s than 48 h ou rs.
A m o n g the r e g io n s , the len gth o f the w o rk w e e k in m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ran ged
fr o m 34. 1 hou rs in the N o r th e a s t to 38. 9 hours in the South; and in n o n m e tro ­
p o lita n a r e a s , fr o m 36 .3 to 4 0 .8 hours in the sam e tw o r e g io n s .
In each o f
the r e g io n s , e m p lo y e e s in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s w o rk e d lo n g e r h ou rs, on the
a v e r a g e , than those in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s .
The d iffe r e n t ia l w as 2. 3 hours o r




14

le s s in th r e e o f the r e g io n s , s m a lle r than on a n ation w id e b a s is .
In the N o rth
C e n tra l r e g io n , e m p lo y e e s in the s m a lle r popu lation a re a s w o rk e d 3 .8 hours
m o r e than th ose in the la r g e r a r e a s .
T h is r e g io n had next t o ’ the la r g e s t p r o ­
p o rtio n o f p a r t - t im e m e tr o p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s and next to the la r g e s t p r o p o r ­
tion o f n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g long h ou rs.
M en had a lo n g e r a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k than w o m en , 39. 3 hou rs c o m p a re d
w ith 3 3 .4 hou rs (ta b le 8).
W om en con stitu ted a d is p r o p o r tio n a te ly la r g e p a r t
o f the p a r t - t im e w o rk f o r c e , w h e re a s m en g e n e r a lly w o rk e d the lo n g e r h ou rs.
T w o - fifth s o f the w o m en , co m p a re d w ith o n e -fo u rth o f the m en , w o rk e d on a
p a r t - t im e b a s is .
A lth ou gh o v e r a ll w om en accounted fo r 2 out o f 5 e m p lo y e e s ,
th ey accounted fo r 1 out o f 2 p a r t - t im e e m p lo y e e s .
On the o th er hand, n e a r ly
th re e -te n th s o f the m en (but o n ly 5 p e r c e n t o f the w om en ) w o rk e d 48 h ou rs o r
m o r e , and th es e 1. 1 m illio n m en con stitu ted a ll but o n e -e ig h th o f the e m p lo y e e s
w o rk in g lon g h ou rs.
On a r e g io n a l b a s is , the len gth o f the w o rk w e e k fo r m en ra n ge d fr o m
36 .8 to 42.1 h o u rs, and fo r w om en fr o m 31 .2 to 35.9 h ou rs in the N o r th e a s t
and South, r e s p e c t iv e ly . T h e p a tte rn o f hours w o rk e d by m en and w om en r e g io n ­
a lly d iffe r e d o n ly in d e g r e e fr o m the n a tion w id e p a tte rn .
T h e o n ly r e g io n in
w hich m o r e than o n e -s ix th o f the w om en w o rk ed lo n g e r than 40 hou rs w as the
South, w h e r e n e a r ly th re e -te n th s w o rk ed such h o u rs, accou nting fo r 1 out o f
2 w om en in the N a tio n who w o rk e d lo n g e r than 40 h ou rs.
S im ila r ly , the South
w as the o n ly r e g io n in w hich a g r e a t e r p ro p o r tio n o f m en w o rk e d 48 hou rs o r
m o r e (n e a r ly tw o - fift h s ) than le s s than 40 hours (fe w e r than o n e -fo u r th ).
T h e r e a p p e a re d to be lit t le re la tio n s h ip b etw een the len gth o f the a v e r a g e
w o rk w e e k and e n te r p r is e s iz e .
E m p lo y e e s in e n te r p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n o r
m o r e in annual s a le s had the lo w e s t a v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u rs, 3 5 .7 , th o se in e n t e r ­
p r is e s w ith le s s than $ 2 50 ,00 0 in sa le s had the next h ig h e s t, 3 7 .1 , and th ose
in the in te r m e d ia te s a le s - s iz e e n te r p r is e s had the h ig h e s t, 39. 3 (ta b le 9).
A lth ou gh th e r e w e r e p oin ts on the w e e k ly hou rs s c a le w h e re th e r e w as
so m e s im ila r it y b etw een 2 o f the 3 e n te r p r is e s a le s - s i z e c la s s e s , each d is tr ib u ­
tion w as unique.
F o r in s ta n ce , rou gh ly o n e -th ird o f the e m p lo y e e s in both the
la r g e s t and s m a lle s t e n te r p r is e s w o rk e d p a r t - t im e c o m p a re d w ith o n ly o n e -fo u rth
o f th ose in e n te r p r is e s w ith sa le s o f $250 ,00 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 . On the o th er hand,
the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s who w o rk e d 35 to 40 hou rs in c lu s iv e e x c e e d e d tw o fifth s in the la r g e s t e n te r p r is e s but w as le s s than th r e e -te n th s in each o f the
s m a lle r e n te r p r is e s . M o r e than o n e -fo u rth o f the e m p lo y e e s in both e n te r p r is e s
w ith le s s than $ 2 50 ,00 0 and th ose w ith $250 ,00 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 in s a le s , w e r e
on lon g w o r k w e e k s , m o r e than double the p r o p o r tio n in the la r g e s t e n te r p r is e s .
E m p lo y e e s in es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $250,000 o r m o r e in s a le s w o rk e d lo n g e r
h o u rs, on the a v e r a g e , than th e ir co u n terp a rts in lo w e r vo lu m e e s ta b lis h m en ts
in the sa m e e n te r p r is e grou p .
H o w e v e r , when e m p lo y e e s w e r e grou p ed by
e s ta b lis h m e n t s a le s - s iz e w ithout r e g a r d f o r e n te r p r is e s i z e , the len gth o f the
a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k w as id e n tic a l, 36.9 h o u rs, in both es ta b lis h m en t g rou p s.
S in ce th ey con stitu ted at le a s t n in e-ten th s o f the em p lo y m e n t in th e ir e n t e r ­
p r is e grou p , the d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s in es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $2 50 ,0 0 0 o r
m o r e in s a le s by w e e k ly hou rs p a r a lle le d that a lre a d y noted in th e ir r e s p e c tiv e
e n te r p r is e g ro u p s. Th u s, es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $250,000 o r m o r e in s a le s w hich
w e r e p a r t o f e n te r p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n o r m o r e in sa le s had the s m a lle s t p r o ­
p o rtio n o f e m p lo y e e s who w o rk e d m o r e than 40 h ou rs a w e e k (o n e -fo u r th , c o m ­
p a re d w ith fr o m o n e -th ird to a lm o s t o n e -h a lf in the o th e r e n te r p r is e - e s t a b lis h m e n t
g ro u p s ).
T h is is o f in t e r e s t s in ce the e m p lo y e e s in th es e es ta b lis h m e n ts m ad e
up the g r e a t m a jo r it y o f th ose c o v e r e d by the m ax im u m h ou rs p r o v is io n s o f the




15

1961 amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act.
The amendments required
most large retail establishments to pay their employees time and one-half for
work beyond a maximum weekly standard— 44 hours beginning September 1963,
42 hours a year later, and 40 hours beginning September 1965. However, even
in June 1961, prior to the implementation of the amendments, only slightly more
than three-tenths of the employees in these establishments worked more than
40 hours a week.5
Average weekly hours among employees in the seven major industry groups
ranged from 33. 8 for those in apparel and accessory stores to 42. 8 for those
at automotive dealers and gasoline service stations (tables 31—
48). Employees
at building materials dealers, and in furniture, home furnishings, and household
appliance stores, with average workweeks of 42.3 and 38.9 hours, respectively,
were the only others who exceeded the overall average of 36. 9 hours of work
a week.
The three major groups with the longest average workweeks each had a
much smaller proportion of part-time employees than the other groups— fewer
than one-fifth, compared with from one-third to two-fifths.
Similarly, between
two-fifths and two-thirds of their employees worked longer than 40 hours; among
the four groups with the lower average no more than one-third worked such
hours.
The automotive dealers and gas stations group, and the building mate­
rials group had large proportions of employees who worked 48 hours or more
a week, nearly two-fifths and one-third, respectively.
In the furniture group,
only one-fifth of the employees worked as much as 48 hours during the week and
among the other groups the proportions were still smaller.
Together, building
materials dealers; automotive dealers and gasoline service stations; and furni­
ture, home furnishings, and household appliance stores, which accounted for
three-tenths of all the employees in retail trade, had fewer than one-fifth of the
retail employees who worked less than 35 hours a week and three-fifths of those
who worked 48 hours or more.
The relationship between the regions which was noted for all retail trade
(shortest workweek in the Northeast, longest in the South) generally held true
for each of the major groups.
Similarly, the relationship between the major
groups on a nationwide basis was generally paralleled in each region; employees
at automotive dealers and gasoline stations and at building materials dealers
worked the longest hours.
Employees in metropolitan areas averaged fewer
hours of work a week than those in nonmetropolitan areas, regardless of the
major industry group.
Average weekly hours

Major industry group
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers — -------General merchandise stores---------Food stores----------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations-------------------------Apparel and accessory stores -----Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance sto res-------Miscellaneous retail stores ----------

See Employee Earnings in Retail Trade.




Metro­
politan
areas

Nonmetro­
politan
areas

Men

Women

41.3
33.7
33.7

43.8
35.3
36.2

43.4
36.3
35.2

36.1
33.1
32.5

42.1
33.7

44.3
33.9

43.3
36.1

37.7
32.7

38.4
35.0

40.3
38.4

40.4
37.3

35.2
34.1

June 1961 (Bulletin 1338-8,

1963), table 15.

16

In each m a jo r grou p , m en w ork ed lo n g e r h ou rs, on the a v e r a g e , than
w om en .
Th e lo n g e s t w o rk w eek s fo r both m en and w om en w e r e r e g is t e r e d in
the a u to m o tive and b u ildin g m a t e r ia ls m a jo r grou p s.
T h e high a v e r a g e fo r m en
in th ese two grou p s r e fle c t s the la r g e p r o p o r tio n s who w o rk ed 48 hou rs o r m o r e
(abou t tw o -fifth s in each grou p , co m p a re d w ith no m o r e than about o n e -fo u rth
in the o th e r s ).
T h e a v e r a g e fo r w om en in th ese tw o g ro u p s, on the o th e r hand,
r e fle c t s the r e la t iv e ly s m a ll p ro p o rtio n s w o rk in g p a r t-tim e and l a r g e r p r o p o r tio n s
w o rk in g a 35 to 40-h ou r w eek .
In none o f the m a jo r grou p s did even on e-ten th
o f the w om en w o rk as lon g as 48 h ou rs a w eek .
T h e r e w as no co n sis te n t re la tio n s h ip b etw een e n te r p r is e s iz e and the a v ­
e r a g e len gth o f the w o rk w e e k am ong the m a jo r grou p s as the tab u lation b e lo w
show s.
In each m a jo r grou p , h o w e v e r , e m p lo y e e s in the high vo lu m e e s ta b lis h ­
m en ts o f an e n te r p r is e w o rk ed lo n g e r h ou rs, on the a v e r a g e , than th ose in the
lo w vo lu m e es ta b lis h m e n ts .
In each e n te r p r is e - e s ta b lis h m e n t gro u p in g the r e ­
la tio n sh ip am ong the m a jo r groups on the b a sis o f the a v e r a g e len gth o f the
w o rk w e e k was su b s ta n tia lly the sa m e as that noted on an o v e r a ll b a s is .
Thus,
e m p lo y e e s in the a u to m o tive and gas sta tion group and in the b u ildin g m a t e r ia ls
grou p w o rk ed the lo n g e s t w eek ; w ith one ex cep tio n , e m p lo y e e s in the a p p a re l
grou p w o rk ed the s h o r te s t w eek , on the a v e r a g e .
Average weekly hours of employees in
enterprises with annual sales of—
$ 1 ,0 0 0 , O X)
C

Major industry group
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers--------------General merchandise stores----------Food stores-----------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations--------------------------Apparel and accessory stores---------Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance stores---------Miscellaneous retail stores-------------

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0

or
more

to

Less
than

$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0

4 3 .0
33. 7
3 3 .4

4 2 .3
3 8 .1
3 6 .8

4 1. 8
3 4 .3
34. 7

4 3 .2
33. 1

4 3 .6
3 4 .8

4 1 .8
3 3 .9

39. 1
3 8 .3

39. 7
3 6 .6

3 8 .0
3 4 .5

E ven s h a rp e r d iffe r e n c e s in a v e r a g e w e e k ly hou rs w e r e found am ong the
e m p lo y e e s o f the 11 groups fo r w h ich data a r e shown s e p a r a te ly .
A vera g e w ork ­
w eek s w e r e s h o r te s t fo r lim ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e e m p lo y e e s , 3 1 .7 h ou rs, and
lo n g e s t fo r th ose em p lo y ed by m o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s , 4 3 .7 h ou rs.
E m p lo y e e s
at g a s o lin e sta tio n s , fu rn itu re s t o r e s , and a p p lia n ce s t o r e s , in ad d ition to th ose
at m o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s , had an a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k in e x c e s s o f the a l l - r e t a i l
tra d e a v e r a g e .
W ith the ex c e p tio n o f g a s o lin e sta tio n s, th ese grou ps had r e l a ­
t iv e ly s m a ll p ro p o rtio n s o f p a r t - t im e e m p lo y e e s , fe w e r than o n e - fifth , co m p a re d
w ith about th re e -te n th s to tw o -fifth s am ong the o th e r grou p s.
In g a s o lin e sta tio n s,
th re e -te n th s o f the w o rk fo r c e co n sisted o f p a r t - t im e e m p lo y e e s ; the r e la t iv e ly
lon g a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k r e fle c t s the la r g e p r o p o r tio n w o rk in g long h o u rs, c lo s e
to o n e -h a lf.
E ven at a u tom ob ile d e a le r s , fe w e r than o n e -th ird o f the e m p lo y e e s
w o rk ed as m an y as 48 hours a w eek .
A m o n g the re m a in in g g ro u p s, not even
o n e -fo u rth o f the e m p lo y e e s w o rk ed as m an y as 48 h ou rs.
T h e re la tio n s h ip s fo r the va rio u s c h a r a c t e r is t ic s stu died w hich w e r e noted
fo r a ll r e t a il tra d e and fo r the m a jo r groups h eld tru e , b y and la r g e , fo r the
in d u s try grou p s as w e ll.
In each o f the 11 in d u s try groups stu died s e p a r a te ly ,
the lo n g e s t a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k was in the South, and in 8, the s h o r te s t w as
in the N o r th e a s t.
In 10 grou p s, e m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s w o rk ed fe w e r




17

h ou rs a w eek , on the a v e r a g e , than th ose in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s and in the
o th er grou p th e ir hours w e r e id e n tic a l.
M en a v e r a g e d m o r e hours o f w o rk a
w eek than w om en e x cep t in lim ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s t o r e s , w h e re th ey a v e r a g e d
the s a m e , and dru g s t o r e s , w h e re w om en w o rk ed 1.8 hours m o r e than m en .
H o w e v e r , in e v e r y in d u s try a g r e a t e r p r o p o r tio n o f m en than w om en w o rk ed
m o r e than 40 hours a w eek .
In m o s t o f the in d u s try groups in w h ich c o m ­
p a ris o n s w e r e p o s s ib le , e m p lo y e e s in es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in
sa le s a v e r a g e d m o r e hours o f w o rk a w eek than th e ir co u n terp a rts in e s ta b lis h ­
m ents w ith a lo w e r s a le s vo lu m e in the sa m e e n te r p r is e grou p.
A v e r a g e W e e k ly E a rn in g s
R e ta il e m p lo y e e s a v e r a g e d $68. 07 a w e e k at s t r a ig h t - t im e ra te s in June
1965 (ta b le 12).
A v e r a g e w e e k ly ea rn in g s ran ged fr o m $ 1 3 .5 6 fo r e m p lo y e e s
who w o rk ed le s s than 15 hours a w e e k to $98. 36 fo r th ose who w o rk ed 44 h ou rs.
A v e r a g e w e e k ly ea rn in gs a re dependent upon tw o v a r ia b le s : A v e r a g e h o u rly e a r n ­
ings and the nu m ber o f hours w o rk ed du rin g the w eek .
A s has been shown,
lo w e r p a y is a s s o c ia te d m o r e w ith p a r t - t im e w o rk and lon g w o rk w eek s than w ith
a w o rk w e e k o f about 40 h ou rs.
It is , t h e r e fo r e , not s u r p r is in g to find that a v e r ­
a ge w e e k ly ea rn in g s did not v a r y d ir e c t ly w ith the n u m ber o f hou rs w o rk ed du rin g
the w eek .
F o r e x a m p le , e m p lo y e e s who w o rk ed o v e r 40 but le s s than 44 hou rs
a w eek a v e r a g e d le s s p e r w eek than e m p lo y e e s who w o rk ed 40 h ou rs.
A ls o ,
e m p lo y e e s who w o rk ed 44 hours a w e e k ea rn ed m o r e p e r w e e k , on the a v e r a g e ,
than th ose who w o rk ed a lo n g e r w eek .
Thus, although th ey w o rk ed a g r e a t e r
n u m ber o f h ou rs, so m e e m p lo y e e s , b e ca u s e o f t h e ir lo w e r h o u rly p a y , w e r e
unable to ea rn as m uch (on a s t r a ig h t - t im e b a s is ) in a w eek as o th ers who
w o rk ed fe w e r hours at a h ig h e r ra te o f pay.
A m o n g the r e g io n s , a v e r a g e w e e k ly ea rn in g s ran ged fr o m $60.95 in the
South to $82. 34 in the W e st.
Th e ea rn in gs d iffe r e n t ia l b e tw ee n the South and
each o f the o th er re g io n s w as n a r r o w e r on a w e e k ly than on an h o u rly b a s is ,
r e fle c t in g the e ffe c t o f the lo n g e r a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k in the South on the w e e k ly
w a g e le v e l th e r e .
In e v e r y r e g io n but the N o r th e a s t, e m p lo y e e s who w o rk ed
44 hours a w eek ea rn ed m o r e p e r w e e k than any o th e rs .
In the N o rth e a s t,
e m p lo y e e s who w o rk ed at le a s t 48 hours a w eek had the h ig h e st w e e k ly e a rn in g s ,
r e fle c t in g the r e la t iv e ly n a r ro w d iffe r e n t ia l b etw een th e ir h o u rly p a y l e v e l and
that o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g s h o r te r w e e k s .
(S e e ta b le 11 .)
E m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s a v e r a g e d $70. 31 a w e e k , $8. 73 o r 14 p e r ­
cent m o r e than th ose in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s . (S e e tab u lation on fo llo w in g p a g e .)
T h e r e la t iv e pa y advan tage o f m e tr o p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s o v e r th ose in non­
m e tr o p o lita n a re a s w as 10 p e r c e n ta g e p oin ts s m a lle r on a w e e k ly than on an
h o u rly b a sis b eca u s e e m p lo y e e s in the s m a lle r popu lation a re a s w o rk ed lo n g e r
w e e k ly h ou rs, on the a v e r a g e , and w e r e a b le to com p en sate so m ew h at fo r th e ir
lo w e r h o u rly ea rn in g s.
M en ea rn ed $ 8 0 .2 4 a w eek , on the a v e r a g e , $29.
T h is w as a r e la t iv e advantage o f 58 p e r c e n t, co m p a red
va n ta g e on an h o u rly b a s is , and r e fle c t s the com b in a tion o f
and a lo n g e r w o rk w e e k o p e ra tin g to the advan tage o f the

33 m o r e than w om en.
w ith a 34 p e r c e n t a d ­
h ig h e r h o u rly ea rn in gs
m en .

A m o n g e m p lo y e e s o f the v a rio u s es ta b lis h m en t s a l e s - s i z e grou p s th ose in
es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in s a le s w h ich w e r e p a r t o f e n te r p r is e s
w ith $2 50 ,0 0 0 to $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 in s a le s had the h igh est w e e k ly e a rn in g s .
A lth ou gh
th e ir h o u rly ea rn in g s w e r e 11 cents b e lo w th ose o f e m p lo y e e s in s im ila r e s ta b ­
lish m e n ts w h ich w e r e p a r t o f $ 1 m illio n e n te r p r is e s , th ey w o rk e d 3 .8 hours
lo n g e r du rin g the w eek , m ak in g th e ir w e e k ly ea rn in g s h ig h e st.




18

Employees

Average weekly
earnings

Metropolitan a r e a s ---------------------------------------------------------------------Nonmetropolitan areas-----------------------------------------------------------------

$70. 31
61. 58

M en............................................... - ................................................
W o m en ............................................................................................

80.24
50. 91

Enterprises with $1,000,000 or more in
annual sales ----------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishments with $250,000 or more in
annual sa le s-------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishments with less than $250,000 in
annual sa le s--------------------------------------------------------------------------

70. 98
72. 29
54. 20

Enterprises with $250,000 to. $1,000,000 in
annual sales------------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishments with $250,000 or more in
annual sale s-------------------------------------------------------------------------Establishments with less than $250,000 in
annual sa le s--------------------------------------------------------------------------

60. 30

Enterprises with less than $250,000 in
annual sales-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

58. 59

73. 92
75.40

The in te r a c tio n o f h o u rly ea rn in g s and w e e k ly h ou rs is w e ll illu s t r a te d by
the r e la tio n s h ip s e x is tin g b etw een e m p lo y e e s in g a s o lin e station s and th ose in
each o f tw o o th er in d u s tries— w o m e n 's r e a d y - t o - w e a r and g r o c e r y . (S e e ta b u la ­
tion b e lo w .)
G as station e m p lo y e e s a v e r a g e d 3 cents an hour le s s than those
in w o m e n 's r e a d y - t o - w e a r . H o w e v e r , they w o rk e d 9 h ou rs lo n g e r , on the a v e r ­
a ge , than th ose in r e a d y - t o - w e a r and thus h e ld a $13 ed ge in te r m o f w e e k ly
ea rn in g s. * On the o th er hand, gas station e m p lo y e e s and g r o c e r y e m p lo y e e s
a v e r a g e d about the sam e on a w e e k ly b a s is — $ 6 3 .2 4 and $ 6 6 .2 0 , r e s p e c t iv e ly .
T h is s im ila r it y m asks the 4 1 - cent (27 p e r c e n t) h o u rly pay advan tage o f g r o c e r y
em p lo y e e s and the fa c t that gas sta tion e m p lo y e e s , on the a v e r a g e , had to w o r k
b e tte r than 7 h ou rs m o r e each w e e k in o r d e r to a c h ie v e the w e e k ly pa y l e v e l
o f g r o c e r y s to r e e m p lo y e e s .




Major industry groups
Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers ---------------------------------------------------------General merchandise stores -----------------------------------------------------Food stores ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations ---------------------------------------------------------------------Apparel and accessory stores ----------------------------------------------------Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance sto res-----------------------------------------------------Miscellaneous retail stores --------------------------------------------------------

Average weekly
earnings

$83.75
55. 51
65. 36
86.36
57.39
81.46
62.79

Selected industry groups
Department stores --------------------------------------------------------------------Limited price variety stores -------- ■--------------------------------------------Grocery stores -------------------------------------------------------------------------Motor vehicle dealers --------------------------------------------------------------Gasoline service stations ---------------------------------------------------------Men's and boys' clothing and furnishings stores -----------------------Women's ready-to-wear stores ------------------------------------------------Shoe stores ------------------------------------------------------------------------------Furniture, home furnishings,and equipment stores --------------------Household appliance sto res-------------------------------------------------------Drug and proprietary stores
----------------------------------------------------

58.71
41.53
66.20
105.40
63.24
70. 50
50.41
62.10
81.82
83. 37
52.04

19

H o u rly E a rn in g s and W e e k ly H ou rs
E m p lo y e e s in r e t a il tra d e w e r e g ro u p ed by th e ir a v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s
and, w ithin each ea rn in g s gro u p , d is trib u te d by th e ir w e e k ly h ou rs o f w o rk
(ta b le 10). Tab u la tin g the data in this m an n er r e v e a le d that, fo r the grou p s
ea rn in g at le a s t $ 1. 15 an hou r, as a v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s in c r e a s e d the a v e r ­
age n u m ber o f w e e k ly h ou rs o f w o r k g e n e r a lly r o s e . E m p lo y e e s in each ea rn in g s
grou p b e lo w $ 1. 50 an hour (e x c e p t under $ 1) w o rk e d fe w e r h ou rs, on an a v e r a g e ,
than the o v e r a ll a v e r a g e o f 36. 9 h o u rs, th ose in the ea rn in g s g rou p s at o r above
$ 1. 50 w o rk ed m o r e hou rs du ring the w e e k s u rv e y e d , as shown b e lo w .
Average
weekly hours
of work

Employees with average hourly
earnings of—
Under
$1.00
$1.15
$1. 25
$1. 35
$1. 50
$1. 75
$2.00
$2. 50
$3.00

$1.00 — ...................................................
and under $1. 15 ------------------------------------and under $1. 25 -----------— - — ------------—
and under $1. 35 ------------------------------------and under $1. 50 ------------- ------------------ —
and under $1. 75 ---- --------- — ------------ -—
and under $ 2 . 0 0 ------ ------------------ ----------and under $2. 50 ------------------------------------and under $3.00 ----------------------------------and over — -------------------------------------------

38.0
34.0
32.8
32.4
36.4
37.0
38.8
39.1
40.6
40.5

T h e s e a v e r a g e s , h o w e v e r , b e co m e m o r e m ea n in g fu l when the d is trib u tio n
o f e m p lo y e e s w ith in the v a rio u s ea rn in g s grou p s is ex am in ed .
F o r e x a m p le ,
fr o m the tab u lation shown b e lo w it b e c o m e s app a ren t that am ong lo w e r paid e m ­
p lo y e e s (th ose paid le s s than $ 1. 25 an hou r) both p a r t- t im e w o r k and lon g w eek s
(although to a le s s e r exten t) w e r e m o r e co m m on than am ong h ig h e r p a id e m ­
p lo y e e s (i. e. , th ose p a id $ 1 .5 0 o r m o r e ).
Average hourly earnings of—

Weekly hours of work
Under 35
.................................
40 to 42 inclusive ------------------Over 42 ----------------------------------48 and over ----------------------------

Under
$1.00
35
13
45
34

Under
$1.15
41
15
38
27

Under
$1.25
42
17
31
21

$1.50
and
over

$2.00
and
over

$2.50
and
over

$3.00
and
over

20
36
35
20

15
41
37
19

11
46
37
18

11
47
37
17

S im ila r ly , it is ev id e n t that the a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k o f 38 hours r e p o r te d fo r
e m p lo y e e s p a id le s s than $ 1 an hour is not ty p ic a l o f the w o r k sch ed u le fo r the
m a jo r it y o f e m p lo y e e s w ith in this ea rn in g s grou p . T h e s e lo w e r paid e m p lo y e e s ,
in fa c t, w e r e m o r e lik e ly to w o r k e ith e r on a p a r t- t im e b a s is (o n e -th ir d w o rk e d
le s s than 35 hours a w eek ) o r c o m p a r a tiv e ly lon g hours (o n e - th ir d w o rk e d 48 hours
o r m o r e ).
N e a r ly tw o -fifth s o f the e m p lo y e e s who w e r e paid le s s than $ 1 an
hour and who w o r k e d 48 hou rs o r m o r e w e r e co n ce n tra te d in the a u to m o tive
d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e sta tio n in d u s try , w h ich a ccou n ted fo r o n e - fifth o f
the r e t a il w o r k fo r c e .
T h e re la tio n s h ip w h ich e x is ts b e tw ee n lo w e r ea rn in gs
and lon g w o rk w e e k s b e c o m e s m o r e strik in g when the tab u lation is lim ite d to
e m p lo y e e s who w o rk e d 40 hou rs o r m o r e as shown b e lo w .
________________ Average hourly earnings of— _________________

Weekly hours of work
40 to 42 ........................................
Over 42 ......................... - ............
48 and over
— --------------------------




Under
$1.00
23
77
58

Under
$1.15
28
72
51

Under
$1.25
34
65
45

$1.50
and
over
51
49
28

$2.00
and
over

$2.50
and
over

$3.00
and
over

53
47
25

56
45
21

56
44
21

20

S ig n ific a n tly , o n ly o n e -e ig h th o f a ll e m p lo y e e s who w e r e paid le s s than
$ 1 an hour w o rk e d fr o m 40 to 42 hours in c lu s iv e .
H o w e v e r , such a w o r k w e e k
b e ca m e m o r e p r e v a le n t at ea ch h ig h e r poin t on the p a y s c a le until, at the u pper
end o f the s c a le , n e a r ly o n e -h a lf the e m p lo y e e s w e r e w o rk in g such h ou rs. T h is
in c r e a s e d c o n c e n tra tio n o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g fr o m 40 to 42 h ou rs, co m b in ed
w ith the d e c lin e in the p ro p o r tio n o f p a r t- t im e e m p lo y e e s , is la r g e l y r e s p o n s i­
b le fo r the lo n g e r a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k s am ong the h ig h e r ea rn in g s grou p— r a th e r
than an in c r e a s e in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g o v e r 42 h ou rs.
In
fa c t, the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g o v e r 42 hours a w e e k h eld r e l a t iv e l y
constant at the u pper le v e ls ; those w o rk in g 48 hours o r m o r e b e c a m e s lig h t ly
s m a lle r at ea ch p r o g r e s s iv e step up the pa y s c a le .
W hen e m p lo y e e s w ith in ea ch o f the fo u r r e g io n s w e r e d is trib u te d in the
sa m e m a n n er, the hours and e a rn in g s re la tio n s h ip s that d e v e lo p e d g e n e r a lly
fo llo w e d th ose noted fo r a ll r e t a il tra d e .
Som e d iffe r e n c e s , h o w e v e r , a re s i g ­
n ific a n t and r e q u ir e a m p lific a tio n . F r o m the tab u lation b e lo w , it is appa ren t that
in the N o rth e a s t (in p a r tic u la r ) and N o rth C e n tr a l r e g io n (to a le s s e r e x te n t)
p a r t- t im e w o r k w as e x t r e m e ly co m m on am ong low p a id e m p lo y e e s ; few w o r k e d
long h ou rs.
Employees with average hourly earnings of—
Less than $1,00________
Weekly hours
of work
Under 35 ....................................
40 to 42 inclusive .......... ...........
Over 42 ------------------------ ---------- 48 and over .......... ... .............. -

Northeast
62
15
15
12

South
29
13
52
40

North
Central
54
13
26
17

West
30
27
39
26

__________ $3.00 or more
Northeast
11
48
31
13

South
8
34
53
25

North
Central
11
44
40
16

West
12
52
32
18

In the N o rth e a s t m o r e than t h r e e - fift h s o f the e m p lo y e e s who w e r e p a id le s s
than $ 1 an hour w o rk e d on a p a r t- t im e b a s is .
N e a r ly o n e -th ir d o f th ese e m ­
p lo y e e s w e r e in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s (the m a jo r it y in d e p a rtm en t s t o r e s )
w h ich , due to the long hours m o s t o f th ese s to r e s a re open to the p u b lic , su p­
p le m e n t th e ir fu ll- t im e w o r k fo r c e w ith su b sta n tial n u m bers o f p a r t- t im e e m ­
p lo y e e s (u su a lly w o m en ).
In sh arp co n tra s t, the m a jo r it y o f the e m p lo y e e s in
the South who w e r e p a id le s s than $ 1 an hour w o r k e d c o m p a r a tiv e ly lon g h ou rs—
m o r e than o n e -h a lf w o rk e d o v e r 42 hours a w e e k and t w o - fifth s w o r k e d at le a s t
48 hours a w eek .
Thus, in the N o rth e a s t and N o r th C e n tr a l r e g io n s the lo w e s t
p a id r e t a il e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d on a p a r t- t im e b a s is , w h e r e a s , in the South (the
lo w e s t pa yin g r e g io n ) 2 out o f 3 e m p lo y e e s who w e r e p a id le s s than $ 1 an hour
w o rk e d at th ese low paying jo b s on a fu ll- t im e b a sis (40 hou rs o r m o r e a w e e k ).
A u to m o tiv e d e a le r s and gas station s (p r im a r ily the la t t e r ) in the South accou n ted
fo r 44 p e r c e n t o f the r e g io n ’ s w o r k fo r c e who w e r e p a id le s s than $ 1 an hour
and who w e r e w o rk in g at le a s t 48 hours a w eek .
F u r t h e r m o r e , e v en e m p lo y e e s
in the h ig h e st ea rn in g s group in the South w o r k e d lo n g e r hou rs than th e ir c o u n te r ­
p a rts in the o th er r e g io n s .
O v e r o n e -h a lf o f the e m p lo y e e s w ith e a rn in g s o f
$ 3 o r m o r e an hour w o rk e d m o r e than 42 hours a w e e k in the South, w h e r e a s ,
am ong the o th er r e g io n s , no m o r e than tw o -fifth s o f the e m p lo y e e s w ith such
ea rn in g s w o r k e d s im ila r h ou rs.
In te r e s tin g ly , when e m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n and n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s
w e r e s im ila r ly d is trib u te d , ea ch d is trib u tio n — although to a le s s e r ex ten t in n on ­
m e tr o p o lita n a re a s — g e n e r a lly fo llo w e d the p a tte rn e s ta b lis h e d b y a ll r e t a il tra d e .
A t m o s t points along the e a rn in g s s c a le , g r e a t e r p ro p o rtio n s o f m e tr o p o lita n
a r e a e m p lo y e e s w o r k e d p a r t tim e ; long w eek s w e r e m o r e co m m on am ong n on ­
m e tr o p o lita n a re a e m p lo y e e s .




21

M o re v a r ia tio n w as found w hen m en and w om en w e r e co m p a re d .
A m on g
the m en, p a r t- t im e w o r k and, to a s m a lle r d e g r e e , lon g w eek s b e ca m e le s s
com m on and a stan dard w o rk w e e k m o r e com m on as h o u rly e a rn in g s in c re a s e d .
A m on g the w om en , p a r t- t im e w o r k d e c lin e d in im p o rta n c e w ith in c r e a s in g h o u rly
ea rn in g s but the d e c lin e w as not as g r e a t as am ong m en.
E v e n am ong the h ig h ­
e s t paid w om en m o r e than o n e -fo u rth w o rk e d p a rt tim e .
L on g w eek s w e r e w o rk e d
b y o n ly s m a ll p ro p o rtio n s o f w om en , e x c e p t am ong those p a id le s s than $ 1 an
hour, m o r e than o n e -fifth o f w hom w o rk e d such hou rs.
A bou t t h r e e - fift h s o f
th ese w om en w e r e e m p lo y e d in m is c e lla n e o u s s to r e s (m o s tly dru g s t o r e s ) and
g e n e r a l m e rch a n d ise s to r e s .
W hen e m p lo y e e s w e r e g rou p ed a c c o rd in g to the num ber o f hours th ey w o r k e d
ea ch w e e k and then d is trib u te d b y the a v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s m uch the sam e
p ic tu re e m e r g e d (ta b le 11).
Th at is , g r e a t e r p ro p o rtio n s o f low paid e m p lo y e e s
(paid le s s than $ 1. 25 an h ou r) w e r e found am ong those w o rk in g p a r t tim e o r
lon g w eek s than am ong th ose w o rk in g a stan dard w e e k (40—
42 h o u rs).
T h is la s t
grou p , on the o th er hand, had the g r e a te s t p ro p o rtio n s paid $ 1. 50 o r m o r e and
the s m a lle s t p ro p o rtio n s p a id le s s than $ 1. 25.
In te r m s o f a v e r a g e h o u rly
e a rn in g s , e m p lo y e e s on a stan dard w e e k (as w e ll as those w o rk in g fr o m 40 to
48 h o u rs) ea rn ed $ 2 .0 4 , 27 cents m o r e than those w o rk in g at le a s t 48 hours a
w e e k and 54 cents m o r e than those w o rk in g le s s than 35 h ou rs a w eek .
A m o n g the s e v e r a l c h a r a c t e r is t ic s
a d h eren ce to this ea rn in g s pa ttern .
W a ge C hanges,

stu died s e p a r a te ly ,

th e re w as g e n e r a l

June 1962—
June 1965

The B u r e a u 's 1962 s u r v e y 6 o f e m p lo y e e ea rn in g s and h ou rs in r e t a il tra d e
m ak es p o s s ib le a m e a s u re m e n t o f the change in e m p lo y e e p a y le v e ls and d i s t r i ­
butions o v e r a 3 -y e a r p e r io d .
D u rin g this p e r io d r e t a il e m p lo y m e n t in c r e a s e d
b y n e a r ly on e-ten th , fr o m 6. 1 m illio n in 1962 to 6. 7 m illio n in 1965 and a v e r a g e
s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s r o s e b y 18 cen ts, fr o m $ 1 .6 7 to $ 1 .8 5 .
T h is
advance o f n e a r ly 11 p e r c e n t in the p a y le v e l r e fle c t s changes throughout the
ea rn in g s d is trib u tio n but e s p e c ia lly in the lo w e r re a c h e s .
The change in ea rn in g s
fo r the m id d le 50 p e r c e n t o f the w o r k fo r c e is an in d ica tio n o f the w id e s p re a d
ea rn in g s in c r e a s e .
In June 1962^the m id d le 50 p e r c e n t o f the e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d
b etw een $ 1. 12 and $ 1. 99 an hour.
B y June 1965, the sam e grou p w as ea rn in g
b e tw ee n $ 1 .2 7 and $ 2 .1 3 an hour.
Thus, the earn in gs d iffe r e n t ia l s e p a ra tin g
the lo w e s t fr o m the h ig h e st paid fo u rth o f the e m p lo y e e s n a r ro w e d b y o n ly 1 cent,
r e fle c t in g the s im ila r it y o f the w age in c r e a s e s fo r th ese two g rou p s.
S im ila r ly ,
m ed ian ea rn in g s r o s e fr o m $ 1. 43 an hour to $ 1. 54 an hour.
The p ro p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s p a id le s s than $ 1 an hour d e c lin e d fr o m c lo s e
to on e-ten th to about o n e -tw en tie th .
G r e a te r changes o c c u r r e d above this poin t
on the p a y s c a le , h o w e v e r.
N e a r ly o n e -e ig h th o f the e m p lo y e e s e a rn e d b etw een
$ 1 and $ 1. 05 an hour in 1962, but fe w e r than o n e -tw e n tie th had such ea rn in g s
in 1965.
M uch o f the e a r l i e r co n ce n tra tio n at this pa y l e v e l w as a ttrib u ta b le
to the F e d e r a l m in im u m w age o f $ 1 an hour w h ich a p p lied to m o s t e m p lo y e e s in
la r g e r e t a il e n te r p r is e s .
H o w e v e r , in 1965, when the m in im u m fo r such e m ­
p lo y e e s w as $ 1 .1 5 an hour, th e re w as no co n ce n tra tio n at this p a y le v e l.
But
n e a r ly o n e -e ig h th o f the e m p lo y e e s w e r e g ro u p ed at o r ju s t above $ 1. 25 an hour,

^ See Employee Earnings in Retail Trade, June 1962 (BLS Bulletin 1380, 1963). Data for June 1962 which were
published previously were readjusted to the updated 1962 employment levels reported in Employment and Earnings
Statistics for the United States, 1909^64 (December 1964).
Consequently, data for June 1962 shown ill this bulletin
are not necessarily identical to those published previously.




22

w h ich in S e p tem b e r 1965 w as to be the new F e d e r a l m in im u m w age a p p lie d to
c o v e r e d e m p lo y e e s .
T h e d e c lin e in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s who w e r e p a id
le s s than $ 1 .2 5 an h ou r, fr o m m o r e than o n e -th ir d to le s s than one-^fifth, w as
the m o s t n o te w o rth y change in the d is trib u tio n du rin g the 3 y e a r s .
C hanges
w e r e a lso e v id e n t at the upper end o f the d is trib u tio n ; f o r e x a m p le , the p r o p o r ­
tion o f e m p lo y e e s e a rn in g $2 o r m o r e in c r e a s e d fr o m o n e -fo u r th to th r e e -te n th s .
North
Central

West

$1.38
1.54

$1.67
1.85

$2.04
2. 22

1.8
.8

20.5
14.1

8 .7
4 .0

2. 7

8.5
2. 7

16.9
6. 7

12.6

5.0

5.2

1.8

15.6
4.6

45.3
24.4

27.9

11.3
3. 7

5.0

Item

United
States

Average hourly earnings:
1962---------------------- - ...................................1965-------- -------- — .............— ......... .---------

$1.67
1.85

$1.80
1.95

9.4
5.4

Percent of employees earning—
Under $1.00:
1962 .......... ......... ..........................-..........
1965 — ........................................ .--------$1. 00 and under $1.05:
1962 ....................... - .........- ......... --------1965 ........................... - ................ ...........
Under $1.15:
1962 .......... - ................................. -..........
1965 .............. - -----------------------------..........
$1.15 and under $1. 20:
1962 ........ ..................... - ..............--------1965...................................... ........ --------Under $1. 25:
1962 .......................................... — ..........
1965 ...... ........................- ............. ..........
$1. 25 and under $1. 30:
1962 .............. - ............ - .............. ..........
1965 ----------------- --------------------------- --------Under $2. 00:
1962 ................- ........................... --------1965 --------------- ------------ - .............. ---------$3. 00 or more:
1962 ................... - ........................ ..........
1965 ............................................. ..........

11.6
4.4
27.2

12.1

North­
east

South

12.1

.8

4.6
5.3

5.9

10.0

3.8
5.4

2.9

2.6

34.4
19.3

24.5
8.3

53.1
37.6

34.6
19.8

15.6

7.5

7.8
14.9

6.3
11.9

7.9
11.5

6.0

69.8

71.2
66.3

86.9
82.4

75.9
70.6

58.6
53.6

5.6
9.3

5.5
9,0

2.9
4 .4

5.1
8.3

11.9
19.1

11.6

75.2

1.8
6.0
8.3

A v e r a g e h o u rly p a y le v e ls advan ced b y s im ila r amounts in ea ch o f the fo u r
r e g io n s , b y 15 cen ts in the N o rth e a s t, 16 cents in the South, and 18 cen ts in the
W e s t and N o rth C e n tra l r e g io n s . In r e la t iv e t e r m s , th ese in c r e a s e s ra n g e d fr o m
8 p e r c e n t in the N o rth e a s t to 12 p e r c e n t in the South.
Thus, the in t e r r e g io n a l
p a y d iffe r e n t ia l w id en ed som ew h at in absolute t e r m s , but n a r ro w e d s lig h t ly on
a r e la t iv e b a s is .
C hanges in the d is trib u tio n o f ea rn in g s w e r e e v id e n t in ea ch r e g io n .
At
the lo w e r end o f the p a y s c a le , the sh a rp e s t changes o c c u r r e d in the South.
Th e p r o p o r tio n o f sou thern e m p lo y e e s p a id le s s than $ 1 .1 5 an hour d rop p ed fr o m
45 p e r c e n t to 24 p e rc e n t, accounting fo r tw o - fifth s o f the nationw ide d e c lin e at
this p a y le v e l.
A t the sam e tim e , the South w as the o n ly r e g io n in w h ich th ere
w as a su b sta n tial in c r e a s e in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s p a id b e tw ee n $ 1 .1 5 and
$ 1 .2 0 an hour— fr o m o n e -tw e n tie th to on e-ten th .
Substantial d e c r e a s e s in the
p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s p a id le s s than $ 1 .2 5 an hour w e r e r e c o r d e d .
In ea ch
o f the r e g io n s , e x c e p t the W e s t, the d e c lin e am ounted to fr o m 15 to 16 p e r ­
cen tage p o in ts.
In the W e s t, the d e c lin e w as o n ly 10 p o in ts, but in 1962 o n ly
16 p e r c e n t o f the e m p lo y e e s in the W e s t e a rn e d le s s than $ 1 .2 5 .
Th e W e s t w as
a lso the o n ly r e g io n in w h ich th e re w as no in c r e a s e in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s
ea rn in g b e tw e e n $ 1. 25 and $ 1. 30 an hour.
F u r th e r up the p a y s c a le changes
in the d is trib u tio n w e r e m o r e a lik e .
F o r e x a m p le , the p ro p o rtio n s ea rn in g at
le a s t $ 1 .5 0 an hour in c r e a s e d b y 7 to 9 p e rc e n ta g e p o in ts , depending on r e g io n .




23

E a rn in g s fo r the N a t io n fs r e t a il e m p lo y e e s in m e tr o p o lita n a re a s advanced
b y 17 cents an h ou r, to $ 1 .9 5 , ea rn in g s fo r th ose in n o n m e tro p o lita n a re a s
advanced b y 13 cents an h ou r, to $ 1 .5 7 , w id en in g the d iffe r e n c e b etw een the
tw o a re a s both a b s o lu te ly and r e la t iv e ly .
T h e p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g
le s s than $ 1 .1 5 an hour d e c r e a s e d in both a re a s — fr o m 21 to 8 p e r c e n t in
urban a re a s and fr o m 41 to 25 p e r c e n t in le s s u rb an ized a r e a s .
A lth o u gh non­
m e tr o p o lita n a r e a e m p lo y e e s accounted fo r o n ly about o n e -fo u rth o f the r e t a il
w o rk fo r c e , th es e e m p lo y e e s re p re s e n te d m o r e than tw o -fifth s o f the red u ction
in w o r k e r s ea rn in g le s s than $ 1 .1 5 an hour.
L it t le change w as evid en t in
e ith e r a r e a in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g b e tw ee n $ 1 .1 5 and $ 1 .2 0
an hour.
T h e p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g le s s than $ 1 .2 5 d e clin e d b y
the sa m e amounts in both a r e a s , fr o m 28 to 15 p e r c e n t, in m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s ,
and fr o m 48 to 34 p e r c e n t in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s .
S im ila r ly , th e re was
lit t le d iffe r e n c e b etw een the a re a s in changes w hich took p la c e fu r th e r up the
p a y s c a le .

Metropolitan
Item
Average hourly earnings:
1962......................................
1965......................................
Percent of employees earning—
Under $1.15:
1962..................................
1965..................................
$1.15 and under $1.20:
1962..................................
1965..................................
Under $1. 25:
1962..................................
1965..................................
$1. 25 and under $1. 30:
1962..................................
1965..................................
Under $1. 50:
1962........ .........................
1965..................................
Under $2.00:
1962..................................
1965..................................
$3.00 or more:
1962..................................
1965..................................

Nonmetropolitan

areas

areas

$1.78
1.95

$1.44
1.57

21.1
7.8

40.8
24.7

4.6
4.9

4.4
6.5

28.4
14.5

47.7
33.5

7.5
11.3

7.5
12.2

47.3
39.6

65.6
58.1

71.0
65.9

84.5
81.2

6.7
11.1

3.2
4.2

T h e a v e r a g e h o u rly p a y le v e l fo r m en in c re a s e d by 20 cents an hour b e ­
tw een s u r v e y s , 5 cents m o r e than the in c r e a s e fo r w om en . E ach grou p showed
m a rk ed changes in the lo w e r end o f its, w a g e d is trib u tio n .
F o r e x a m p le , the
p r o p o r tio n o f m en paid le s s than $1. 15 an hour d e c lin e d by about o n e -h a lf, fr o m
21 to 11 p e r c e n t, and the p r o p o r tio n ea rn in g le s s than $ 1 .2 5 b y about tw o - fift h s ,
fr o m 26 to 15 p e r c e n t. F o r w om en , d e c lin e s at the sa m e in te r v a ls w e r e th r e e fifth s (fr o m 37 to 14 p e r c e n t) and m o r e than tw o -fifth s (fr o m 47 to 26 p e r c e n t),
r e s p e c t iv e ly .
Thus, d iffe r e n c e s at the lo w e r end o f the p a y s c a le n a rro w e d
o v e r the 3- y e a r p e r io d .
A t the h ig h e r end o f the s c a le , on the o th e r hand,
d iffe r e n c e s b e c o m e g r e a t e r . Th e p r o p o r tio n o f m en ea rn in g at le a s t $ 3 an hour
in c re a s e d fr o m 9 p e r c e n t to 15 p e r c e n t; the p r o p o r tio n o f w om en w ith such e a r n ­
ings b a r e ly changed, as shown in the tabulation on the next p a g e.




24

Men

Item
Average hourly earnings:
1962............ .............................
1965........ - ...............................
Percent of employees earning—
Under $1. 15:
1962....................................
1965...... .............................
$1. 15 and under $1. 20:
1962........ .................... .......
1965....................................
Under $1. 25:
1962............ - ......................
1965....................................
$1. 25 and under $1.30:
1962....................................
1965....................................
Under $1.50:
1962....................................
1965------------- --------------------Under $2.00:
1962................- ..................
1965....................................
$3.00 or more:
1962....................................
1965....................................

Women

$1.84
2.04

$1.37
1.52

20.5
10.5

37.0
14.4

3.2
3.3

6.4
8. 1

25.5
15.0

47.3
25.5

6.7
9.4

8.6
14.5

41.7
34.1

69.4
58.8

65.2
59.2

89.6
84.8

8.9
14.6

.8
1.8

A v e r a g e ea rn in g s o f e m p lo y e e s in e n te r p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n o r m o r e in
annual s a le s in c r e a s e d by 19 cents an hour, fr o m $ 1 .8 0 in June 1962. 7 E a r n ­
in gs o f th ose in s m a lle r e n te r p r is e s in c r e a s e d b y 16 cen ts an hour, fr o m $1. 55.

Enterprises with annual sales of—
_______$1, OOP, 000 or more_______

Enterprises with annual sales of—
_______less than $1,000,000______

Establishments with
annual sales of—
Item
Average hourly earnings:
1962-........................... .........
1965-----------------------------------Percent of employees earning—
Under $1.15:
1962 .............. ..................
1965 -------------------- ---------$1. 15 and under $1. 20:
1962 -------------------- - .........
1965 ------------------------------Under $1. 25:
1962 ------------------------------1965 ................................
$1. 25 and under $1. 30:
1962 ........ ........................
1965 — .............. ..............
Under $1. 50:
1962 ........ - -------- -----------1965 --------------- --------------Under $2. 00:
1962 ................................
1965 — ...........................
$3. 00 or more:
1962 ..................... - ........
1965 -------------------------------

Total

$250, 000
or more

$1.80
1.99

$1.83
2. 02

21.6
4.0

Less than
$250,000

Establishments with
annual sales of—
Total

$250,000
or more

Less than
$250,000

$1.47
1.55

$1.55
1. 71

$1. 73
1. 91

$1.44
1.58

19.6
2.3

41. 8
24. 7

32.9
20.5

22.5
11.8

38. 9
25.9

5.2
7.5

5.2
7.5

5.0
7. 7

3.9
3.0

4. 1
3.6

3. 8
2.6

29.9
13.8

28.0
12. 1

49.9
35.4

38.9
25.0

28. 9
16. 8

44. 7
30.1

5. 8
10.5

5. 7
10.4

6. 7
12.1

9. 2
12.6

7.2
10.5

10.4
13. 9

48.1
40.3

46.4
38.5

66.2
64.3

57.9
48.5

47.4
39.0

64.0
54.4

71.0
65.4

69. 8
64.0

82. 8
83.6

79.4
74.3

72.2
65.6

83. 7
79.6

6.3
11.4

6.6
12.0

3. 1
3.6

4.9
7.2

7.0
10. 7

3. 7
5.0

7 In 1962, data were tabulated for enterprises with $1 million or more and those with less than $1 million in
annual sales as w ell as for establishments with more and less than $250,000 in sales.
The analysis of change is
therefore limited to these groups.




25

Since n in e-ten th s o f the e m p lo y e e s in e n te r p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n o r m o r e
in s a le s w o rk e d in es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $2 50 ,0 0 0 in s a le s , ch anges in the l e v e l
and d is trib u tio n o f ea rn in g s in th ese es ta b lis h m en ts a lm o s t e x c lu s iv e ly accounted
fo r the ch anges in the e n te r p r is e grou p.
E x c e p t fo r the a p p r o x im a te ly 15 p e r ­
cent w o rk in g at a u to m o b ile and fa r m equ ipm en t d e a le r s and in fo o d s e r v ic e o c c u ­
p ation s, e m p lo y e e s in th ese es ta b lis h m en ts w e r e g e n e r a lly under the p r o te c tio n
o f the F a ir L a b o r Standards A c t.
Th e p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s paid le s s than
$ 1 .1 5 an hour, the m in im u m w a g e a p p lie d to c o v e r e d r e t a i l es ta b lis h m en ts b e ­
ginning S ep tem b er 1964, d e c lin e d fr o m o n e -fifth to on ly 2 p e r c e n t b e tw ee n June
1962 and 1965.
T h e r e w as a s im ila r sharp d e c lin e in the p r o p o r tio n paid le s s
than $ 1 .2 5 an hour, fr o m c lo s e to th re e -te n th s to fe w e r than on e-eig h th .
At
the sam e tim e , the p ro p o r tio n ea rn in g b e tw ee n $1. 25 and $1. 30 an hour doubled,
fr o m o n e -tw en tie th to on e-ten th .
W h ile changes in the d is trib u tio n w e r e not
con fin ed to the lo w e r end o f the pay s c a le , th ey w e r e m uch g r e a t e r th e re than
to w a rd s the h ig h e r end o f the s c a le . O v e r a ll, a v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s in th ese
es ta b lis h m e n ts in c r e a s e d 19 cents.
O f co u rse , the F e d e r a l m in im u m w a g e w as not the on ly fo r c e a ctin g to
change e m p lo y e e ea rn in g s in r e t a il tra d e . T h is is r e a d ily seen fr o m an e x a m i­
n ation o f the changes in the pay stru c tu re in the th re e oth er es ta b lis h m en ts
g rou p s w hich w e r e g e n e r a lly ex em p t fr o m the p r o v is io n s o f the F a ir L a b o r
Standards A c t.
A v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s am ong th ese es ta b lis h m en ts in c re a s e d
by fr o m 8 to 18 cents an hour.
R edu ction s in the p ro p o rtio n s o f e m p lo y e e s
paid le s s than $1. 15 and le s s than $1. 25 an hour in th ese es ta b lis h m e n ts a lm o s t
m atch ed the m agnitu de o f th ose in es ta b lis h m en ts c o v e r e d by F L S A . Since they
w e r e g r e a te r in 1962, the p ro p o rtio n s o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g le s s than th ese
am ounts (e s p e c ia lly $ 1 .1 5 ) in n o n c o v e re d es ta b lis h m en ts re m a in e d su b sta n tia lly
g r e a t e r than in c o v e r e d e s ta b lis h m en ts.
In c r e a s e s in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m ­
p lo y e e s paid $2 an hour or m o r e w e r e about the sam e in both es ta b lis h m en t
grou p s in the lo w v o lu m e e n te r p r is e s as in es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $ 2 50 ,00 0 o r
m o r e in s a le s w h ich w e r e p a rt o f $ 1 m illio n e n te r p r is e s . H o w e v e r , th e re w as
v ir t u a lly no change in the p r o p o r tio n o f such e m p lo y e e s in e s ta b lis h m en ts w ith
le s s than $250 ,00 0 in sa le s w hich w e r e p a r t o f $1 m illio n e n te r p r is e s .
The a v e r a g e pay l e v e l in c re a s e d fo r e m p lo y e e s in each o f the se ve n m a jo r
r e t a il tra d e grou p s, by 13 cents an hour in m is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s to r e s to 25 cents
an hour at a u to m o tive d e a le r s and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e station s. In 4 o f the 7 grou p s,
a v e r a g e ea rn in g s in c r e a s e d by 18 to 20 cents an hour.
No r e la tio n s h ip a p p e a re d to e x is t b e tw ee n the am ount the pay le v e l advan ced
in a m a jo r group and its w a g e le v e l in June 1962. F o r ex a m p le , a v e r a g e e a r n ­
in gs in fu rn itu re , h om e fu rn is h in g s , and hou sehold a p p lia n ce s to r e s (th e h ig h e st
p a yin g in d u stry in 1962) a dvan ced by 20 cents an hour, or by 11 p e rc e n t, w h e re a s
in a p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r y s to r e s (n ext to the lo w e s t pa yin g in d u stry in 1962)
ea rn in g s a d va n ced by 19 cents an hour, o r 13 p e rc e n t.

Major industry groups
General merchandise stores ---------Apparel and accessory stores -------Miscellaneous retail stores -----------Food stores ----------------------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline
service stations -------------------------Building materials, hardware, and
farm equipment dealers ------------Furniture, home furnishings, and
household appliance sto res----------




Relative
increase)
percent

Wage level
in June 1962

Cents-per hour increase,
1962-1965

$1.49
1.51
1.62
1.73

0.14
.19
.13
.18

9.4
12.6
8.0
10.4

1.77

.25

14.1

1.79

.19

10.6

1.90

.20

10.5

26

Th e p ro p o rtio n s o f e m p lo y e e s ea rn in g le s s than $1.15 and le s s than $1. 25 an
hour d e c lin e d m a r k e d ly b etw een s u rv e y s in each o f the m a jo r in d u s try groups
as shown b e lo w .
T h e m o s t d ra m a tic d e c lin e s o c c u r r e d in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e
s t o r e s , w h e re the p r o p o r tio n paid le s s than th ese am ounts d e c lin e d fr o m 34 and
45 p e r c e n t, r e s p e c t iv e ly , in 1962 to 9 and 23 p e r c e n t, r e s p e c t iv e ly , in 1965.
A s shown on the fo llo w in g tab u lation, changes w e r e not con fin ed to the w a g e
in te r v a ls noted a b ove but w e r e sp rea d throughout the w a g e d is trib u tio n s .
For
e x a m p le , the p r o p o r tio n o f a u tom otive d e a le r and g a s o lin e s e r v ic e sta tio n e m ­
p lo y e e s who w e r e paid $3 o r m o r e an hour in c r e a s e d fr o m 8 to 14 p e r c e n t.
S im ila r ly , the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s in food s to r e s w ith such ea rn in g s in ­
c r e a s e d b y 7 p e r c e n ta g e p o in ts , fr o m 5 to 12 p e r c e n t.
Ma jor industry groups

Item
ercent of employees
earning—
Under $1. 15:
1962................................ ■
----1965................................
$1. 15 and under $1. 20:
1962................................
1965................................ ----Under $1. 25:
1962................................ ----1965....................... ........ ----$1. 25 and under $1. 30:
1962................................ ----1965....................... ........
Under $1. 50:
1962................................ ----1965------------------------------Under $2.00:
1962........ ....................... ----1965................................ ----$3. 00 or more:
1962................................ ----1965................................ -----

Building
materials,
hardware,
and farm
equipment
dealers

General
merchan­
dise stores

Automotive
Furniture,
dealers and Apparel
Miscel­
home
gasoline
and
furnishings, laneous
service
Food
retail
accessory and equip­
stores
stations
stores
ment stores stores

15.1
6.8

33.8
9.4

26.0
12.5

23.4
13.7

32.5
12.6

16. 1
7 .9

30.4
18.3

3.8
1.8

7.3
9.8

2.9
5.6

3.0
1.5

5.2
7.7

3.0
1.8

5. 1
3.5

21.4
9.7

45.3
22.6

30.9
19.8

28.4
16.2

41.3
22. 2

20.7
10.7

37.4
23.6

7.0
10.0

7.3
13.5

5.8
10.7

8.0
9.0

9.3
13.0

7.2
9.4

8.6
13.5

39.4
30.4

66.8
57.0

45.8
41.3

46.7
35.6

63. 1
50.3

37.8
29.4

55.8
47.7

67.9
59.6

85.8
82.3

67.7
63.0

70.7
62.2

83.9
77.2

64.3
57.9

76.9
73.2

7.5
12.9

3.0
4.1

4.9
11.6

8.4
13.7

3.0
4.6

10.2
14.8

6.0
8. 1

A m o n g the 11 s e le c te d in d u stry grou p s, in c r e a s e s in the a v e r a g e p a y le v e l
ran ged fr o m 10 cents an hour in shoe s to r e s to 27 cents an hour at m o to r v e h ic le
d e a le r s h ip s . A m o n g 6 o f the 11 grou ps ea rn in gs in c r e a s e d fr o m 17 to 20 cents an
hour. A s was noted f o r the m a jo r g ro u p s, no r e la tio n s h ip a p p e a re d to e x is t b e ­
tw een the am ount o f the w a g e in c r e a s e and the 1962 p a y l e v e l in the in d u s try group.
M o r e d r a m a tic changes a p p eared am ong the w a g e d is trib u tio n s in the s e ­
le c te d in d u s try groups than am ong the m a jo r grou p s. G e n e r a lly , the m o r e s tr ik in g
changes w e r e found am ong the lo w e r p a yin g in d u s trie s . F o r e x a m p le , the p r o ­
p o rtio n o f e m p lo y e e s in lim ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s to r e s who w e r e paid le s s than
$ 1 .1 5 an hour d e c lin e d fr o m tw o -th ir d s in June 1962 to about o n e - fifth in June
1965. In w o m e n 's r e a d y - t o - w e a r s t o r e s , d e p a rtm en t s t o r e s , and dru g s t o r e s , the
p r o p o r tio n ea rn in g le s s than $1. 15 an hour d e c lin e d b y fr o m 18 to 22 p e r c e n ta g e
p o in ts.
W h ile changes at h ig h e r p a y le v e ls took p la c e in each o f the g rou p s,
th ey w e r e g e n e r a lly s m a lle r than those tak in g p la c e at lo w e r le v e ls .




27
Selected lines of business

Item
Average hourly earnings:
1962..................... ..................
1965......................... ..............
Percent of employees earning—
Under $1.15:
1962 ................- .............—
1965 — .............................
$1.15 and under $1. 20:
1962 ....................... - .........
1965 ........ ..........................
Under $1. 25:
1962 -------- ------------------------1965 ...................................
$1. 25 and under $1. 30:
1962 ..................- ...............
1965 ...............................—
Under $1. 50:
1962 ....................- .........—
1965 ..................................
Under $2. 00:
1962 ................................ 1965 ....................... - .........
$3. 00 or more:
1962 - .................................
1965 ---------------------- -------- -

Men's and
boys' cloth­
ing and
furnishings
stores

Grocery
stores

$1.61
1. 75

$1.13
1.31

$1. 75
1.93

$2.13
2.40

$1.34
1.52

$1. 75
1.92

22.0
2.0

65.2
21.5

25.1
10.9

13.3
8.0

38.0
23.4

21. 7
8.4

7.5
8.3

8.2
17.5

2.6
6.1

1.9
1.0

3.3
2.1

3.4
4.2

34.2
12.8

77.4
47.4

29.6
18. 7

16.9
9.9

43.4
26.6

27.0
13.9

7.8
14. 7

6c 3
15.4

5.2
9.8

4.1
5.0

13.6
13. 7

9.6
12.0

59.3
49.9

91.4
83.0

44.1
39.2

30.1
22.5

68.0
54.5

45. 7
36. 2

82.8
78.4

97.9
95.2

66.8
61.0

55.2
45.5

88.6
83.4

70. 7
64. 7

3.9
5.2

.2
.5

4.5
12.0

15.1
23.4

1. 7
2.5

5. 8
8.8

Department
stores

Women’s
readyto-wear
stores
Average hourly earnings:
1962............ .................. .........
1965........................................
Percent of employees earning—
Under $1.15:
1962 ............ ......................
1965 ........ .........................
$1. 15 and under $1. 20:
1962 - ...............................1965 - .............. - ................
Under $1. 25:
1962 ...................................
1965 ...................................
$1. 25 and under $1. 30:
1962 ...................................
1965 ...................................
Under $1. 50:
1962 .............. ....... .............
1965 .............. - ..................
Under $2. 00:
1962 — .............. - ...............
1965 — .............. ..............
$3. 00 or more:
1962 ...... ...........- ..............
1965 ..................... - ...........

Motor
vehicle
dealers
(new and
used cars)

Limited
price
variety
stores

-

Shoe
stores

Furniture,
home
furnishings,
and equip­
ment stares

Gasoline
service
stations

Household
appliance
stores

Drug and
proprietary
stores

$1.35
1.55

$1. 74
1.84

$1. 91
2.10

$1.83
2. 09

$1.45
1.56

37.6
15.6

24.8
11.4

16. 7
8.0

16. 7
7.1

46.9
28.9

6.2
10.4

3.8
5.5

3.0
2. 2

2.6
1.4

4.5
6.1

47.1
28. 7

31.6
19.1

21.1
11.3

21.3
9.2

53.6
37.6

9.6
13.3

6.9
9.2

7.0
10.0

7.4
8.9

8.4
15.0

72.6
58. 7

48. 7
42.5

38.3
30.6

38.6
26.6

69.8
63. 1

92.1
84. 5

71.4
69.5

64.4
58.9

67.0
54. 7

82. 7
81.6

1.0
2. 7

5.3
5.8

11.8
16.1

7.4
13.2

7.4
7.4

Changes in W e e k ly H ou rs o f W o rk , June 1962—
June 1965
R e ta il tra d e e m p lo y e e s w o rk e d n e a r ly 1 hour a w eek le s s , on the a v e r a g e ,
in June 1965 than in June 1962.
Th e sh orten in g o f the a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k fr o m




28

37. 8 to 36. 9 hours r e fle c t s a s m a ll but n o tic e a b le m o v e m e n t a w ay fr o m lon g
w o rk w e e k s (48 hou rs or m o r e ) and tow a rd s m o r e p a r t - t im e e m p lo y m e n t ( le s s
than 35 h ou rs a w e e k ). Th e p ro p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s on lon g w o rk w e e k s d e c lin e d
by 3 p e r c e n ta g e poin ts, fr o m 22 to 19 p e rc e n t, m atch ed b y an in c r e a s e fr o m
27 to 30 p e r c e n t in the p ro p o r tio n w o rk in g p a r t tim e . Th e natu re o f the change
in the d is trib u tio n is brou gh t into sh arp fo cu s w hen it is n oted that the nu m ber
o f e m p lo y e e s who w o rk ed 48 hours or m o r e d e c lin e d by 73, 000, d e s p ite an o v e r ­
a ll in c r e a s e in em p lo y m e n t o f 563, 000. C hanges in the d is trib u tio n , oth er than
th ese, w e r e n e g lig ib le .
Percent of employees working—
Under
35
hours

Average
weekly
hours

Over 40
and under
48 hours

40
hours

48 hours
and over

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

United States ------------—

37.8

36.9

27.1

29.9

24.9

24.9

17.0

16.3

21.9

18.9

Northeast ----------- -----S o u th ----- ------------ — —
North Central — -------W e st.......- ------- ---------

35.6
40.5
37.5
37.2

34.4
39.6
36.3
37.0

31. 7
20.9
29.0
27.0

36.1
22.6
33.0
27.8

25. 7
21.2
23.6
32.8

24.6
21.4
22.9
33.8

15. 7
20.4
16. 7
13.5

13.7
20.3
16.5
13.4

13.9
30.0
22.0
19.8

12.5
26.8
17.9
17.9

E m p lo y e e s in each r e g io n w o rk e d fe w e r h ou rs, on the a v e r a g e , in 1965 than
in 1962. Th e len gth o f the a v e r a g e w o r k w e e k d e c lin e d b y 1. 2 hou rs in both the
N o rth e a s t and N o rth C e n tra l r e g io n s , b y 0. 9 hours in the South, but by only
0. 2 hou rs in the W est. In each r e g io n the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g m o r e
than 48 h ou rs a w e e k d e c r e a s e d w h ile p a r t- t im e em p lo y m e n t in c r e a s e d , but none
o f th ese ch an ges am ounted to as m uch as 5 p e r c e n ta g e poin ts.
In the W est,
the num ber o f e m p lo y e e s who w o rk e d 48 hou rs o r m o r e in c r e a s e d by about
28,000, ev e n though they r e p r e s e n te d a s m a lle r p a rt o f the r e g io n 's r e t a i l w o r k
fo r c e in 1965 than in 1962.
In each o f the oth er r e g io n s the nu m ber w o rk in g
lon g h ou rs d e c lin e d .

The len gth o f
a r e a s and by 0. 9
36. 8 hou rs and 40.
hou rs s c a le did not

the a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k d e c lin e d by 0. 8 h ou rs in m e tr o p o lita n
hou rs in n o n m e tro p o lita n a r e a s fr o m r e s p e c t iv e le v e ls o f
2 h ou rs. C hanges in the d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s alon g the
d iffe r fr o m the p a tte rn noted on a n a tio n a l and r e g io n a l b a s is .

Percent of employees working—
Average
weekly
hours

Under
35
hours

Over 40
and under
48 hours

40
hours

48 hours
and over

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

Metropolitan a r e a s ---------- 36.8

36.0

28.9

31.6'

28.0

27.0

16.0

15.3

16.9

15.4

40.2

39.3

23.2

25.3

17.8

18.6

19.5

19.3

32.8

29.3

Nonmetropolitan areas —

Th e d iffe r e n c e b e tw ee n m en and w o m en in the len gth o f the a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k
n a r ro w e d som ew h at b e tw ee n s u rv e y s .
M en w o rk ed , on the a v e r a g e , 1. 1 h ou rs
le s s and w om en 0. 7 h ou rs le s s in 1965 than in 1962.
T h e p r o p o r tio n o f m en




29

w o rk in g 48 hours o r m o r e d e c lin e d fr o m 33 to 29 p e r c e n t w h ile the p r o p o r tio n
on a p a r t - t im e w e e k r o s e fr o m 22 to 25 p e r c e n t, fo llo w in g the g e n e r a l p a tte rn
noted p r e v io u s ly .
Th e d e c lin e in the p ro p o r tio n o f w om en w o rk in g lon g hours
was o n ly 1 p e r c e n ta g e p oin t, but o n ly 6 p e r c e n t w o rk ed such hours in 1962,
Th e p r o p o r tio n o f w om en w o rk in g 40 hours d e c lin e d fr o m 31 p e r c e n t to 29 p e r ­
cent; the p r o p o r tio n o f th ose w o rk in g p a r t tim e advanced b y 3 p o in ts.

Percent of employees working—
Under
35
hours

Average
hourly
hours

Over 40
and under
48 hours

40
hours

48 hours
and over

Characteristics
Men

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

-------------------

40.4

39.3

22.0

24. 7

20.8

21.9

20.2

19.9

32.6

28.6

34.1

33.4

34.5

37.4

30. 7

29.0

12.6

11.3

6.4

5.4

Women

----------------

A som ew h at d iffe r e n t p a tte rn o f hours changes e m e r g e d when e m p lo y e e s
w e r e grou p ed b y the s a le s - s iz e o f the e n te r p r is e and es ta b lis h m e n t in w h ich
th ey w ork ed . In e n te r p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n o r m o r e in annual s a le s , the a v e r ­
a ge nu m ber o f h ou rs w o rk ed p e r w eek d e c lin e d fr o m 36. 3 to 35. 7.
H ow ever,
in e n te r p r is e s w ith a lo w e r s a le s v o lu m e the d e c lin e w as m o r e than tw ic e as
g r e a t— 1 .4 hours fr o m a 1962 le v e l o f 3 9 .4 hou rs a w eek .
U n lik e the p a tte rn
in o th er e m p lo y e e g rou p in g s, am ong e m p lo y e e s in e n te r p r is e s w ith $1 m illio n
o r m o r e in annual s a le s th e re w as v ir t u a lly no change in the p r o p o r tio n w o rk in g
48 hours o r m o r e a w eek and the nu m ber w o rk in g such hours a c tu a lly in c re a s e d
b y 13,700.
T h e r e w a s , h o w e v e r , a 3 -p oin t d e c lin e in the p r o p o r tio n w o rk in g
m o r e than 42 and le s s than 48 h ou rs a w eek .
T h e p r o p o r tio n w o rk in g e x a c tly
40 hours drop p ed fr o m 31 to 28 p e r c e n t, w h ile p a r t - t im e e m p lo y e e s in c r e a s e d

Percent of employees working—
Average
weekly
hours
Characteristics
Enterprises with annual
sales of $1,000,000 or
more ---------------------------Establishments with
$250,000 or more
in annual s a l e s -------Establishments with
less than $250,000
in annual s a l e s -------Enterprises with annual
sales of less than
$1,000,000 — ................
Establishments with
$250,000 or more
in annual s a l e s -------Establishments with
less than $250,000
in annual s a l e s --------




Under
35
hours

Over 40
and under
48 hours

40
hours

48 hours
and over

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

36.3

35. 7

28.3

30.9

20.7

28.3

17.1

16.0

12.4

11.6

36.3

35.8

27.8

30.4

32.0

28.9

17.1

16.3

11.3

10.8

35.9

35.1

33.8

37.0

17.2

21.2

17.6

12.5

23.4

20.3

39.4

38.0

25.9

29.0

19.0

21.3

17.1

16.5

31.3

26.5

40.8

39.6

19.5

22.3

19.2

23. 7

22. 7

20.8

31.2

26.3

38.5

37.1

29.6

33.1

18.9

19.8

13. 7

13.9

31.4

26.6

30

fr o m 28 to 31 p e r c e n t.
C hanges in the d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s b y w e e k ly
hours o f w o rk in es ta b lis h m en ts w ith $2 50 ,0 0 0 o r m o r e in s a le s w hich w e r e
p a r t o f $ 1 m illio n e n te r p r is e s g e n e r a lly fo llo w e d the p a tte rn fo r the e n tir e e n t e r ­
p r is e grou p .
In fa c t, the nu m ber o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g 48 hours o r m o r e in ­
c r e a s e d b y m o r e than tw ic e the in c r e a s e in the e n tir e e n te r p r is e .
The vast
m a jo r it y o f the e m p lo y e e s in this e n te r p r is e - e s ta b lis h m e n t s a l e s - s i z e c la s s w e r e
in es ta b lis h m en ts w hich w e r e su b ject to the m a x im u m h ou rs stan dard a p p lied b y
the 1961 am endm ents to the F a ir L a b o r Standards A c t .
Th us, fo r th es e e m ­
p lo y e e s , a 4 4 -h ou r m ax im u m standard w o rk w e e k w as e s ta b lis h e d in S e p te m b e r
o f 1963 and then lo w e r e d to 42 hours a y e a r la te r . E m p lo y e e s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts
c o v e r e d b y the act w ould g e n e r a lly h a ve to be p a id IV 2 tim e s t h e ir r e g u la r ra te
o f p a y fo r a ll tim e w o rk ed beyond the standard.
D e s p ite the in s titu tio n o f the
standard, the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g lo n g e r than 42 h ou rs a w e e k d e ­
c lin e d b y o n ly 2 p e r c e n ta g e p o in ts , fr o m 24 p e r c e n t in 1962, a d e c r e a s e o f 8 p e r ­
cent.
In e v e r y o th er s a le s - s iz e c a te g o r y , th e re w as a g r e a t e r d e c lin e , both
a b s o lu te ly and r e la t iv e ly , in the p r o p o r tio n w o rk in g lo n g e r than 42 hou rs a w eek —
ran gin g fr o m 4 to 8 p e r c e n ta g e points o r fr o m 10 to 22 p e r c e n t. In th es e o th er
e n te r p r is e and es ta b lis h m en t g ro u p s, th e r e w as a d e c r e a s e in the p r o p o r tio n o f
e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g 48 hou rs and o v e r , and in c r e a s e s in the p r o p o r tio n s w o rk in g
40 hours and le s s than 35 h ou rs. T h e m agn itu de o f the changes at th es e le v e ls
v a r ie d but n e v e r ex c e e d e d 5 p e r c e n ta g e p o in ts.

E m p lo y e e s in each m a jo r in d u stry grou p e x p e r ie n c e d a d e c lin e in the a v e r ­
a ge n u m ber o f hou rs w o rk ed d u rin g the w eek . T h e g r e a te s t d e c lin e , 1.3 h ou rs,
o c c u r r e d at a u to m o tive d e a le r s and g a s o lin e sta tio n s; the s m a lle s t, 0 .5 h ou rs,
took p la c e in g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s t o r e s . E m p lo y e e s in this la s t grou p , alon g
w ith th ose in the bu ild in g m a t e r ia ls and h a rd w a re m a jo r grou p ( f o r w hom the
a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k d e c r e a s e d b y 0. 8 h ou rs) w e r e the o n ly ones fo r w hom the
a v e r a g e w o rk w e e k d e c lin e d b y an am ount le s s than that fo r r e t a il e m p lo y e e s
o v e r a ll.
T h e m o v e m e n t aw ay fr o m lon g w o rk w e e k s w as ev id e n t in each m a jo r
grou p .
T h e g r e a te s t d rop in the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s who w o rk ed lo n g e r
than 48 hou rs a w eek o c c u r r e d in the a u to m o tive and g a s o lin e sta tion grou p ,
fr o m 45 to 39 p e r c e n t, s t ill the g r e a te s t p r o p o r tio n am on g the m a jo r grou p s.

Percent of employees working—
Average
weekly
hours
Major industry groups
Building materials,
hardware, and farm
equipment d e a le rs -------- General merchandise
stores----------------------------Food stores ---------------------Automotive dealers and
gasoline service
stations ------------------------ Apparel and accessory
sto res---------------------------- Furniture, home
furnishings, and
household appliance
stores -------------------------- Miscellaneous retail
stores -------------------------- -




Under
35
hours

Over 40
and under
48 hours

40
hours

48 hours
and over

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

43.1

42.3

13. 7

14.6

18.9

23.2

25.5

24.2

37.6

33.5

34.5
35.3

34.0
34.3

32.4
36.2

34.4
40.4

33.0
27.0

30.0
25.0

11.9
13.9

10.6
13.0

6.8
16.4

6.3
15.0

44.1

42.8

15.2

17.0

13.4

15.6

23.1

24.9

44.9

38.5

34.8

33.8

32.2

35.8

25.5

25. 7

15. 7

13.2

12.0

9. 7

40.1

38.9

16.2

19.3

29.4

31.2

21.9

21.9

24.4

20.2

37.1

35.9

28.9

32. 7

24.3

25.8

17.1

15.0

21.6

18.1

31

D e c lin e s o f about 4 p e r c e n ta g e p o in ts o c c u r r e d in the b u ild in g m a t e r ia ls , fu r n i­
tu re, and m is c e lla n e o u s m a jo r g rou p s. Th e a u to m o tive grou p w as the on ly one
in w h ich the p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s w o rk in g m o r e than 40 but le s s than 48 h ou rs
in c re a s e d , but th is w a s le s s than the d e c r e a s e in the p r o p o r tio n w o rk in g m o r e
than 48 h ou rs a w eek .
Thus, in each m a jo r grou p th e r e w a s a t le a s t so m e
d e c lin e in the p r o p o r tio n w o rk in g m o r e than 40 h ou rs a w eek . E v en at 40 h ou rs,
th e re w e r e s m a lle r p r o p o r tio n s in tw o o f the grou p s— g e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e and
food .
P a r t - t im e em p lo y m e n t in c r e a s e d in each m a jo r group, b y fr o m 1 to
4 p e r c e n ta g e poin ts.
Th e len gth o f the a v e r a g e w o r k w e e k d e c lin e d fo r e m p lo y e e s in each o f the
11 s e le c te d in d u s try grou p s, b y fr o m 0 .5 h ou rs in shoe s to r e s to 1.7 h ou rs in
g a s o lin e sta tion s, the on ly in d u stry in w h ich the d e c r e a s e w as not w ith in 0. 5
hou rs o f the o v e r a ll d ro p o f 0. 9 h ou rs. F iv e oth er grou p s in a d d ition to g a s o ­
lin e station s r e g is t e r e d d e c r e a s e s in the a v e r a g e w o r k w e e k w h ich w e r e g r e a te r
than the o v e r a ll ra te .
The p a tte rn o f ch anges in the d is trib u tio n o f e m p lo y e e s
b y w e e k ly hou rs o f w o r k in the s e le c te d in d u s trie s w as s im ila r to that noted in
oth er e m p lo y e e g rou p in g s. Th at is , in each th e re w a s a d ro p in the p r o p o r tio n
o f e m p lo y e e s who w o rk e d 48 hou rs o r m o r e , as w e ll as a d e c lin e in the p r o ­
p o rtio n w o rk in g lo n g e r than 40 h ou rs.
A t the sa m e tim e , p a r t - t im e w o r k a c ­
counted fo r a g r e a te r p r o p o r tio n o f e m p lo y e e s in 1965 than in 1962 in each o f
the in d u s trie s .
___________________ Percent of employees working— _____________________
Average
weekly
hours
Selected line of
retail business
Department stores-----Limited price variety
stores-----------------------Grocery stores-----------Motor vehicle dealers
(new and used
ca rs)-----------------------Gasoline service
stations--------------------Men's and boys'
clothing and
furnishings stores-----Women's ready-towear stores--------------Shoe stores----------------Furniture, home
furnishings, and
equipment stores-----Household appliance
stores ---------------------Drug and proprietary
stores----------------------

Under
35
hours

Over 40
and under
48 hours

40
hours

48 hours
and over

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

1962

1965

34.4

33.6

31.4

34.5

38.1

33.6

10.6

9.6

3. 7

2.9

32.3
35.4

31. 7
34.3

40.3
36.0

42.4
40. 7

25.2
27.1

22.1
24.8

8.1
14.5

9. 7
13.9

5.9
16.2

3 .7
14.2

44.8

43. 7

6.1

7.8

15.5

17.5

38.4

39.0

36.4

31.9

43.3

41.6

26.8

30.0

9.8

11.3

6. 7

7.9

54.0

46. 7

37.4

36. 7

25.9

28.6

22. 7

24. 7

20.0

18.6

22.0

20.0

34.0
34.3

32.6
33.8

33.6
35.0

39.5
36.5

26.8
21. 7

25.6
21.0

14.9
17.0

10.2
17.9

4.9
19. 7

3.9
16.5

40.1

39.0

16.3

18. 7

32.1

30.3

21.0

22. 7

23.6

19. 7

40. 7

39.8

16.2

17.4

21.5

33.1

25.4

22.8

28.3

23.0

34.6

33.4

37.9

41.8

21.3

21.7

14.5

13. 7

17.8

13.8

Changes in A v e r a g e W e e k ly E a rn in g s, June 1962—
June 1965

R e ta il tra d e em p lo y ees * a v e r a g e w e e k ly ea rn in g s in c r e a s e d fr o m $63. 53 to
$68. 07, an adva n ce o f $4. 54, b e tw ee n June o f 1962 and 1965.
Th e in c r e a s e in
a v e r a g e h o u rly ea rn in g s is not fu lly r e fle c t e d in in c re a s e d w e e k ly ea rn in g s (a s
the tab u lation sh ow s) b e ca u s e o f the m itig a tin g e ffe c t o f the d e c r e a s e in w e e k ly
h ou rs. W h ile h o u rly e a rn in g s in c re a s e d 10. 8 p e rc e n t, w e e k ly ea rn in g s in c re a s e d
on ly 7. 1 p e rc e n t.




32

Average weekly
earnings
1962
United States--------------------.................
Northeast-------------------------- ..................
South------------------------------- ..................
North Central------------------- ..................
West---------------------------------

1965

Percent
increase in
average hourly
earnings
Percent

Increase
Dollars

$63.53

$68.07

$4.54

7.1

10.8

64.49
56.40
63.03

67. 27
60.95
66. 96
82. 34

2.78
4.55
3.93
5.90

4.3
8.1
6.2
7.7

8.3
11.6
10.8
8.8

On a r e g io n a l b a s is , w e e k ly e a rn in g s in c r e a s e d b y am ounts ra n gin g fr o m
$ 2 .7 8 in the N o rth e a s t to $ 5 .9 0 in the W est. F o r e m p lo y e e s in the South, the
h ig h e st r e la t iv e in c r e a s e in h o u rly e a rn in g s, and next to the s m a lle s t r e la t iv e
d e c r e a s e in w e e k ly h ou rs w o rk e d com b in ed to p r o v id e an 8. 1 p e r c e n t in c r e a s e
in w e e k ly e a rn in g s , h ig h e st am ong the fo u r r e g io n s . F o r e m p lo y e e s in the W est,
a ll but o n e -e ig h th o f the in c r e a s e in a v e r a g e h o u rly e a rn in g s is r e f le c t e d in the
in c r e a s e in w e e k ly e a rn in g s, as a r e s u lt o f the v e r y s m a ll d e c r e a s e in w e e k ly
h ou rs w o rk e d .
A m o n g the oth er r e g io n s , at le a s t th r e e -te n th s o f the in c r e a s e
in h o u rly ea rn in g s w as not r e fle c t e d in w e e k ly e a rn in g s b e ca u s e o f the d e c r e a s e
in the nu m ber o f h ou rs w o rk e d du rin g a w eek .







33

Table Note

B ec a u se o f rou nding, sum s o f in d ivid u a l ite m s
m a y not eq u al to ta ls .
Dash ( - ) in d ic a te s no e m p lo y e e s .
A s t e r is k ( * ) in d ic a te s fe w e r than 50 e m p lo y e e s
o r le s s than 0 .0 5 p e rc e n t.

8
T able 1.

N u m b e r, a v e ra g e straight-tim e hourly earnings, and weekly hours of w ork of nonsupervisory em ployees in retail trade and selected
retail industry groups by selected c h aracteristics, United States, June 1965

j^Em^lo^eesinthous^d^
Industry group

R etail tra d e ------------------------------------

----------- ET1 nonsupervisory
Nonm etropolitan areas
Men
M etropolitan areas
em ployees
Num ber
A v e ra g e
A v e ra g e
A v e ra g e
A v erage
Num ber
A v erage
A v e ra g e
Num ber A v e ra g e
hourly
hourly
Total
hourly
of
hourly
weekly
weekly
weekly
of
of
em ployees earnings
earnings
em ployees earnings
hours
hour 8
hours
employees earnings
6687.0

$1.85

36.9

4977.4

$1.95

36. 0

1709.6

$1. 57

39. 3

3913. 2

Women
Num ber A v e ra g e
A v e ra g e
of
hourly
weekly
hours
em ployees earnings

A v e ra g e
weekly
hours

2773. 8

33. 4

$2.04

39. 3

$1. 52

Building m a t e r ia ls , h a rd w a re , and
fa rm equipment d e a l e r s ----------------------

488.9

1.98

42. 3

283. 6

2.18

41. 3

205. 3

1.72

43. 8

412. 8

2.03

43. 4

76. 1

1. 67

36. 1

G e n eral m erch an dise s t o r e s ---------------Departm ent s t o r e s ---------------------------Lim ited p ric e v a riety s t o r e s -----------

1647. 3
1019.3
277. 1

1.63
1.75
1. 31

34.0
33. 6
31.7

1332.8
906.7
192. 2

1,70
1.77
1. 39

33.7
33. 5
31. 3

314. 5
112. 6
84.9

1. 35
1. 61
1. 14

35. 3
34. 5
32.8

459.0
298. 2
35.6

2.05
2. 22
1.59

36. 3
35. 3
31.7

1188.3
721. 1
241.5

1. 46
1. 54
1. 27

33. 1
32. 8
31.7

Food s t o r e s ---------------------------------------------G ro c e ry s t o r e s -----------------------------------

1366.8
1150.9

1.91
1.93

34. 3
34. 3

1055. 7
870. 0

2.03
2.07

33.7
33.8

311. 1
280.9

1. 52
1. 54

36. 2
35. 8

895. 3
778. 7

2.03
2.02

35. 2
34.9

471.5
372. 2

1. 66
1.74

32. 5
33.0

1269.8

2. 02

42. 8

846. 7

2. 19

42. 1

423. 1

1. 68

44. 3

1167. 2

2.04

43. 3

102. 6

1. 72

37. 7

604.4
476. 1

2. 40
1. 52

43. 7
41. 6

401.7
302.7

2. 65
1.61

42.9
40. 9

202. 7
173. 5

1.93
1. 36

45. 3
42. 9

541. 2
460. 1

2. 46
1.52

44. 3
41.9

63. 2
16.0

1. 83
1. 52

38. 6
34. 8

1.77

33.7

115.4

1.42

33.9

180. 2

2.06

36. 1

401.9

1. 52

32. 7

1.99
1.61
1.93

36. 5
32. 5
33.8

16. 8
47. 1
27.0

1. 60
1. 32
1. 58

37.7
32. 6
33. 8

62. 8
17.7
62. 5

2.09
1. 84
2.04

37.9
33. 2
35. 1

35.7
197. 3
42. 5

1.59
1. 52
1. 52

34.8
32. 5
31.9

Autom otive d e a le rs and gasolin e
s e rv ic e s ta tio n s -----------------------------------M otor vehicle d e a le rs (new and
used c a r s ) ----------------------------------------G asolin e s e rv ic e s t a t io n s ---------------A p p a re l and a c c e s s o ry s t o r e s -------------M en 's and boys* clothing and
furnishings s t o r e s -------------—— -----W om en 's re a d y -t o -w e a r s t o r e s -----Shoe s t o r e s -----------------------------------------

582. 1

1.70

33. 8

466.8

98. 5
215.0
105.0

1.92
1. 55
1.84

36.7
32. 6
33.8

81.7
167.9
78.0

F u rn itu re, home fu rn ish in g s, and
household appliance s t o r e s -----------------F u rn itu re, home furn ish in gs, and
equipment s t o r e s ---------------------------Household appliance s t o r e s --------------

363.9

2. 10

38.9

279. 4

2.21

38.4

84. 5

1. 74

40. 3

258.8

2. 24

40.4

105.1

1. 67

35. 2

232.4
79.0

2. 10
2.09

39.0
39. 8

179. 2
55. 3

2.22
2. 21

38. 6
39.1

53. 2
23. 7

1.69
1. 85

40.4
41. 5

161.0
59. 6

2. 25
2. 24

40.7
41. 3

71.4
19. 4

1. 70
1.58

35. 4
35. 2

M iscellan eou s re tail s t o r e s ------------------D ru g and p ro p rie ta ry s t o r e s -----------

968. 2
371.8

1.75
1. 56

35.9
33.4

712. 5
274. 5

1.84
1. 64

35.0
33.0

255.7
97.3

1. 52
1. 34

38. 4
34. 6

539.9
149. 8

1.97
1.88

37. 3
32. 3

428. 3
222.0

1. 44
1. 36

34. 1
34. 1




T ab le 1.

N u m ber, average straigh t-tim e hourly earn in gs, and weekly hours of w ork of nonsupervisory em ployees in retail trade and selected
retail industry groups by selected ch aracteristics, United States, June 1965— Continued

E n terp rises with annual sa le s of—
$1,000,000 o r m o re
E stablishm ents with annual sales of—

Industry group

R etail t r a d e -------------------- —— — —

L e s s than $250,000

$250,000 o r m ore

Total
Num ber
of
employees

A v e ra g e
hourly
earnings

A v e ra g e
weekly
hours

N um ber
of
em ployees
3142. 3

A v e ra g e
hourly
earn in g8

A v e ra g e
weekly
hours

Num ber
of
employees

A v e ra g e
hourly
earnings

A verage
weekly
hours

$2.02

35.8

243. 6

$1.55

35. 1

3385.9

$1.99

35.7

Building m a te ria ls , h a rd w a re , and
fa rm equipment d e a l e r s -------- —----------

135. 6

2. 17

43.0

121.8

2. 22

43.1

13.8

1.75

41. 7

G e n e ra l m erch an dise s t o r e s ---------------Departm ent sto re s
— ------- ——.—
Lim ited p ric e variety s t o r e s ------ -----

1398.0
999.5
227.9

1.69
1.76
1. 36

33. 7
33. 6
31.6

1333. 3
993.4
186. 3

1. 71
1.76
1. 41

33. 7
33.6
31.9

64. 7
n
41.6

1. 18
<*>
1. 13

32. 3

Food sto res --------------------------------------------G ro c e ry s t o r e s ----------------------------------

835.8
785.5

2.15
2.16

33.4
33.4

786.8
753. 6

2. 18
2.17

33. 5
33.4

49.0
31.9

1. 81
2. 00

32.9
34.0

488.2

2.47

43. 2

452.4

2. 55

43. 3

35. 8

1. 53

41.9

387. 1
48. 3

2.61
1.66

43. 6
41.7

385. 3
21.5

2.61
2.00

43.6
41.7

(M
26. 7

Autom otive d e a le rs and gasolin e
s e rv ic e stations — --------• --------------- ----M otor vehicle d e a le rs (new and
used c a r s ) -----— — -------------G asoline s e rv ic e s t a t io n s ---------------A p p a re l and a c c e s s o ry s t o r e s -------------M e n 's and b o y s' clothing and
furnishings sto res ■ ----------- - — ----■
W om en 's r e a d y -t o -w e a r s t o r e s ------Shoe sto res —— ---------------------------------F u rn itu re, home fu rn ish in gs, and
household appliance sto res ------- ———
F u rn itu re , home fu rn ish in g s, and
equipment s t o r e s -----------------------------Household appliance s t o r e s -------------M iscellan eou s re ta il s t o r e s ------- —--------D ru g and p ro p rie ta ry s t o r e s ---------—

1. 39

C)
41.8

252. 5

1.76

33. 1

209.4

1.79

33. 5

43. 1

1.59

31.0

29.0
86.9
52.4

2.07
1. 63
1.83

35. 1
32. 3
31.9

25.1
78.4
28. 2

2. 12
1.66
1.91

35.1
32.8
33.0

3.9
8. 5
24. 2

1. 76
1. 30
1.73

34. 9
28. 5
30. 6

86. 3

2. 31

39. 1

76. 1

2. 35

39. 1

10. 2

2.04

39.0

57.8
19.0

2. 37
2. 20

39. 1
40.0

56. 3
10.9

2. 37
2. 37

39.1
40.0

(*)

(l )

8. 1

1.96

39.9

189. 5
84.0

1. 83
1.66

38. 3
34.7

162. 5
76.0

1.88
1. 68

38. 3
34.9

27.0
8.0

1. 53
1.46

38. 2
32.9

I n s u ffic ie n t d a ta to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n .




(M

0)

30.5

(M

T ab le 1.

N u m ber, av e ra g e straigh t-tim e hourly earnings, and weekly hours of w ork of n onsupervisory em ployees in retail trade and selected
retail industry groups by selected ch aracteristics, United States, June 1965— Continued

^Emglo^ees^r^thousa^
E n terp rises with annual sales of—
$250,000 to $1,000,000

L e s s than $250,000

Establishm ents with annual sales of—

Industry group
Total

$250,000 o r m ore

N um ber
of
em ployees

A v e ra g e
hourly
earnings

A v e ra g e
weekly
hours

N um ber
of
employees

A v e ra g e
hourly
earnings

L e s s than $250,000
A v e ra g e
weekly
hours

N um ber
of
em ployees

A v e ra g e
hourly
earnings

R etail t r a d e -----------------------------------

1399.6

$1.88

39.3

1262. 3

$1.91

39. 6

Building m a te ria ls , h a rd w a re , and
fa rm equipment d e a l e r s ----------------------

193. 3

2.01

42. 3

181.7

2.01

42. 4

G en eral m erch an dise s t o r e s ----------------Departm ent s t o r e s -----------------------------Lim ited p ric e v ariety s t o r e s -----------

106. 9
0)
14.0

1.47
(l )
1.13

38.1
n
33. 6

85. 2

1.49
(* )

38. 3
n
(l )

Food s t o r e s --------------------------------------------G ro c e ry s t o r e s -----------------------------------

211.7
180. 2

1. 69
1. 64

36. 8
36.7

199.8
173. 5

1. 70
1. 64

36.9
36. 7

11.9
6. 7

1. 56
1. 64

337. 2

1.95

43. 6

311. 2

1. 98

43. 7

25.9

185. 4
86. 3

2. 05
1.63

44. 2
42. 7

181. 1
70. 3

2. 05
1.69

44. 3
42. 3

(M
16.0

Autom otive d e a le rs and gasoline
se rv ic e s t a t i o n s ----------------------------------M otor vehicle d e a le rs (new and
used c a r s )----------------------------------------G asoline se rv ic e s t a t io n s ------ ---------A p p a re l and a c c e sso ry stores -------------M e n 's and boys' clothing and
furnishings s t o r e s --------------—---------W om en 's re a d y -t o -w e a r s t o r e s -----Shoe s t o r e s ---------- —---------------------------F u rn itu re, home fu rn ish in gs, and
household appliance s t o r e s ---------------F u rn itu re, home fu rn ish in gs, and
equipment s t o r e s ---------------------------Household appliance s t o r e s -------------M iscellan eou s re ta il s t o r e s -----------------D ru g and p ro p rie ta ry sto res -----------

1

Num ber
of
em ployees

A v e ra g e
hourly
earnings

A v e ra g e
weekly
hours

$1. 62

37. 3

1901.5

$1. 58

37. 1

11.7

1.97

40. 3

160.0

1. 78

41. 8

21.8

1. 39

37. 4

142. 3
(M
35. 2

1. 23
(M
1. 06

34. 3
(')
31. 6

35.0
36. 3

319. 3
185. 2

1. 44
1. 31

34. 7
35. 5

1. 56

43. 4

444. 5

1. 55

41. 8

(M
1. 37

(‘ )
44. 1

31.9
341.6

1.91
1. 47

42. 8
41. 4

137. 2

<:>
(M

<!>
(l )

(J)
( )

138. 6

1.73

34. 8

114. 2

1. 75

34. 9

24. 4

1. 64

34. 0

191. 1

1. 60

33.9

37. 8
59. 5
20. 4

1.92
1. 53
1.91

37. 3
32. 7
34.8

33.0
53. 6
10.9

1.94
1. 54
1.96

37. 5
32. 8
35. 5

4. 8
6. 0
9.5

1. 75
1. 42
1.84

36. 3
31. 7
34. 0

31.8
68. 6
32. 2

1. 79
1. 46
1. 81

37. 5
32. 7
36. 2

131. 3

2. 26

39. 7

124.0

2. 29

39. 8

7. 3

1. 83

38.0

146. 3

1. 81

38.0

86. 4
27.8

2. 22
2. 34

40.0
39.3

82.0
26.4

2. 24
2. 36

40. 1
39.4

4 .4

1.76

39. 3

(M

(* )

88. 2
32. 2

1. 78
1. 83

38. 1
40. 1

280. 6
91.6

1.85
1. 60

36. 6
34. 6

246. 3
79.9

1. 88
1. 61

36.9
34. 7

34. 3
11.7

34. 7
34.0

498. 1
196. 2

1. 65
1. 49

34. 5
32. 3

I n s u ffic ie n t d a ta to w a r r a n t p r e s e n t a t io n .




SI)

Total

A v e ra g e
weekly
hours

1. 63
1. 49

n

T a b le 2.

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il tr a d e b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s
U nited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965

_____ _______________________________________________________
United States

(E m ployees in thousands)
Northeast

South

North Central

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $ 0 .5 0 ___________________________________ _________
Under $0.75 _____________________________________________
Under $ 1 .0 0 _____________________________________________

Percent

N um ber

12.8
1 2 9 .C
363.9

•2
1 .9
5 .4

Percen t

.5
2 .3
13.3

•1
•8

Num ber

Percent

N um ber

Percent

Num ber

Percent

10.6
103.4
26 6 .2

.6
5 .5
14.1

1 .4
21 .3
7 5 .0

•1
1.1
4 .0

•2
2 .0
9 .4

*
.2
.8

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.05 _____________________________________________
$1. 1 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .1 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .2 0 ____________________________________ _____ ___
$ 1 .2 5 _____________________________________________

656.2
707.5
811.3
1163.6
1293.8

S .8
10.6
12.1
17.4
19.2

6 1 .7
6 7 .7
81.1
125.3
145.4

3 .5
3 .9
4 .6
7 .2
8 .3

391.9
4 1 9 .5
4 6 0 .1
6 47.4
708.4

20.8
2 2 .3
2 4 .4
3 4 .4
3 7 .6

171.2
184.3
225.8
326.2
269.3

5 .2
9 .9
12. 1
17.5
19.8

3 1 .4
3 5 .9
4 4 .3
6 4 .7
70.7

2 .6
3 .0
3 .7
5 .5
6 .0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .3 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .4 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .5 0 _____________________________________________

2064.6
2310.8
2604.2
2617.8
2966.7

30.9
34.6
28.9
4 2.1
4 4 .4

4 0 7 .0
4 7 4 .4
568.1
626.6
667.1

23.2
27.1
3 2 .4
3 5 .8
38.1

93 2 .8
1001.7
1078.6
1136.6
1176.8

4 9 .5
53.2
5 7.2
6 0 .3
6 2 .4

582.9
649.5
727.2
750.7

e36.5

31.3
34.8
39.0
42.4
44 .5

1 4 2 .C
185.2
230.2
2 6 3 .9
286.3

12.0
15.6
19.4
22.3
24.1

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.55 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .6 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .6 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 ____ ________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 _____________________________________________

3389.6
3539.2
3742.5
3897.2
4023.5

50.7
52. S
56.0
58.3
60.2

795.8
839.9
907.4
947.6
983.1

4 5 .4
4 7 .9
51 .8
54.1
56.1

1259.8
1300.6
1346.3
1378.8
1410.2

6 6 .9
6 9 .0
7 1 .4
7 3 .2
7 4 .8

557.5
556.6
1055.1
1058.4
1134.3

51.3
5 3 .4
56.6
58.5
60. 8

376.5
4 0 2 .0
4 3 3 .7
4 7 2 .3
4 9 6 .0

31 .8
33.9
36.6
39.8
41 .8

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .8 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .8 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .9 5 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .0 0 _____________________________________________

4226.5
4336.7
4487.1
4590.4
4666.3

63 .2
6 4 .9
67.1
6 8 .6
69.8

1043.3
1070.4
1114.9
1143.9
1161.9

59 .5
6 1 .1
6 3 .6
6 5 .3
6 6 .3

1451.2
1477.3
1510.6
1534.8
1552.6

77.0
7 8 .4
8 0 .2
8 1 .4
82 .4

1187.0
1222.2
1262.7
1253.2
1315.9

63.7
65.5
6 7 .7
69.3
70.6

545.0
566.8
598.9
618.6
6 3 6 .0

46.0
4 7 .8
50.5
52.2
53.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 _____________________________________________
$2. 2 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .3 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .4 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .5 0 _____________________________________________

4958.6
5130.4
5320.2
5446.9
5553.4

74.2
76 .7
79.6
81.5
83.0

1254.7
1309.1
1370.1
1406.1
1441.6

7 1 .6
7 4 .7
7 8.2
8 0 .3
8 2 .3

1610.5
1642.4
1679.0
1695.4
1717.1

8 5 .5
8 7 .2
89.1
50 .2
9 1 .1

1356.9
1448.2
1 5 0 0 .C
1538.3
1567.5

74. 5
77 .7
8C.4
82.5
84.1

656.6
730.7
771.1
803.1
827.1

58.7
61.6
65.0
67.7
69.8

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 _____________________________________________
$2. 7 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .8 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .9 0 _____________________________________________
$3.00 _____________________________________________

5732.2
5826.1
5922.0
6003.6
6064.2

85. ?
87.1
88.6
89.8
9 0 .7

1494.7
1524.4
1556.3
1579.1
1595.1

85.3
87 .0
8 8 .3
9 0.1
9 1 .0

1747.5
1762.6
1778.5
1791.4
1801.0

9 2 .7
53 .5
5 4 .4
55.1
9 5 .6

1617.1
1642.2
1668.1
1689.8
1709.1

86.7
88.1
89. 5
90 .6
91 .7

e 7 2 .8

856.5
919.1
543.4
555.0

73.6
75.6
77.5
79.6
8 0 .9

100.0

1884.4

100.0

1864.8

1 0 0 .C

1185.7

T o t a l______________________________________________
A verag e hourly ea rn in g s _______________________________




6687.0

100.0
$1. 85

1752.1
$1. 95

$1. 54

$1,.85

100.0
$2 .22

C
O

T a b le 3.

C u m u la tiv e p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
b y m e t r o p o lit a n and n o n m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s , U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , J une 1965
United States

A v e ra g e hourly earnings

Under $0.50 _____________________________________________
Under $ 0 .7 5 _____________________________________________
Under $ 1 .0 0 _____________________________________________
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .0 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .1 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .1 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .2 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .2 5 _____________________________________________

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .3 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .4 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .5 0 _____________________________________________

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .5 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .6 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1.6 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 _____________________________________________

Under $ 1 .8 0 _____________________________________________
Under $ 1 .8 5 _________________________________ ____________
Under $ 1 .9 0 _____________________________________________
Under $2.00

IIIIII_LI___ I__I___ I___ II__HIHII-I-I

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 10_____________________________________________
$ 2 .2 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .3 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .4 0 _____________________________________________
$2. 5 0 _____________________________________________

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2.60 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .7 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .8 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .9 0 _____________________________________________
$ 3 .0 0 _____________________________________________
T o ta l_______________________________________________

Number of employees (in thousands) -------------------------A v e ra g e hourly earnings




South

Northeast
M e tro ­
politan
areas

N onm etro­
politan
areas

M e tro ­
politan
areas

North C entral

W est

Nonm etro­
politan
areas

M e tro ­
politan
areas

•3
2 .7
8 .2

1 .0
10.2
24.0

♦
•5
2 .2

.2
2 .8
8 .8

*
•2
.7

•2
1 .3

6 .0
6 .8
8.1
12.0
13 .9

13.3
14 .5
16 .3
26.7
30.3

3 3 .3
35 .3
38.1
4 7 .3
4 9 .9

6 .0
6 .4
8 .2
13.5
15.7

17 .6
22.2
27.9
30.5

1 .7
2 .0
2 .5
4 .0
4 .4

6 .2
7 .1
8 .3
10.9
11 .9

2 1.8
2 5 .*
31.1
34 .5
36 .8

3 2.1
35.2
4 0 .5
4 3 .8
4 6 .1

43 .0
4 7 .1
51 .7
54 .8
57.1

6 0 .4
6 3 .4
6 6 .6
69.5
71 .5

26.6
30.1
34.5
37 .6
40 .2

4 3 .4
4 7. 1
50.6
54.9
56.9

9 .4
13.2
1 6 .9
19.7
2 1 .5

21.7
24.9
28 .9
32.1
34.2

64.2
66.6
69.5
71.3
7 3 .C

4 3 .9
46 .3
50.2
52.5
54.6

5 4 .9
58.2
6 1 .9
6 4 .0
6 5 .7

6 1 .7
63 .9
66 .5
6 8 .4
7 0 .3

7 5 .5
77 .6
79.7
81 .2
82 .5

4 6 .7
4 8 .7
51.7
54.1
56.0

63.5
65.8
69.2
7 1.3
73.4

28 .9
3 0 .9
33 .4
3 7 .0
39 .0

4 2 .5
4 5 .2
4 8 .5
50.5
5 2 .4

59.0
6C.7
63.1
6 4 .7
6 5 .9

75.5
77.0
78.9
60.2
81.2

58.1
59.6
62.1
63 .8
6 4 .9

6 8 .8
7 0 .4
7 2 .9
7 4 .4
7 5 .4

72 .6
74 .2
76 .2
7 7 .4
78 .4

84.3
85.5
8 6 .9
8 8 .2
89.1

59.0
6 0 .8
63 .1
64 .9
6 6 .2

75 .8
77 .9
7 9 .7
81.0
8 2 .C

4 3 .3
45.1
4 8 .0
4 9 .7
5 1 .2

5 6 .2
57 .9
6 0 .1
6 1 .6
6 2 .7

70.5
73.3
76.4
78.5
80.4

84. €
86.6
88.7
89.9
90.9

70.2
73.3
76.8
78.9
81.1

80 .2
8 3 .6
8 7 .3
8 8 .8
8 9 .8

81.8
84.0
86 .1
8 7 .4
88 .7

9 1 .5
9 2 .5
94 .1
9 4 .8
9 5 .2

7C.7
73.8
76.8
79.3

65.8
€7.7
89. 8
90.9
91 .8

56 .4
59 .4
6 3 .0
6 5 .7
6 7 .6

67 .7
70.0
7 2 .6
75 .3
7 7.8

83 .3
84.9
86.5
87.9
88.9

92.7
9 3.7
94 .5
95 .3
95.8

84.2
86.0
8 8.0
89 .4
90 .3

9 2 .0
9 3 .3
9 4 .3
9 5 .0
9 5 .6

9 0 .6
91 .6
9 2 .7
93.5
9 4 .2

9 6 .3
9 6 .7
9 7 .2
9 7 .6
9 7 .9

84.0

9 3 .7
94. ?
95 .3
96. C
96.5

7 1 .6
73 .6
75.4
77.5
7 8 .9

61.2
83.4
85.7
87 .4
88.5

M e tro ­
politan
areas

N onm etro­
politan
areas

•1
•8
2.9

.5
5.1
12.9

*
•1
•8

*
•1
•8

6 .0
6 .6
7 .8
12.7
14.5

20.8
22.2
24.7
31.2
33.5

3.1
3 .4
4 .1
6 .4
7 .4

25.8
29.6
34.2
37.4
39.6

4 5 .7
48.9
52.6
56.1
58.1

46.C
46 .2
5 1 .3
53.8
55.8

e i.i

e5.5

87.2
88.6
89.8

N onm etro­
politan
are a s

ie.9

M e tro ­
politan
a reas

N onm etro­
politan
a reas

100.0

1C0.0

100.0

100 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100. G

1CC.0

100.0

4977.4

1709.6

1511.6

240.5

1180.6

70 3 .8

1346.9

517.9

938.4

247.3

$1.95

$ 1 .5 7

$1.99

$1.74

$1.66

$1.35

$ 1.96

$1 .5 9

$ 2 .2 9

$2.00

T a b le 4.

C u m u la tiv e p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
b y s e x , U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , J u n e 1965
U n ited S tate s

South

N o rth e a st

N orth C en tral

W est

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s
M en

U n d e r $ 0 .5 0 ..................................................................................
U n d e r $ 0 . 7 5 _______________________________________________________
U n d e r $ 1 . 0 0 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .0 5 _
__________ _
__ _
$ 1 . 1 0 _______________________________________
$ 1 . 1 5 _______ __ __________ ______ _____
$ 1 .2 0
_
$ 1 .2 5
_ __
_ _ _

U n d e r $ 1 . 3 0 _______
_
_ _
U n d e r $ 1 .3 5 __
____
_
U n d e r $ 1 .4 0
_ _ _ _ _

__
_

_____________
_____ _____
_ ___
___ _

_ _
_ _ _

T n J a *. $ l* o\) ______________„_________ _____________- _____________ T
_
u m d e r ^ 1 CA
Under
U nder
U nder
TT_ J
Under
T ti/)a v
T
under

$ 1 . 5 5 ______________________ ______________________ ___ _
_
i 1 Ln
$ i . 0(1
..
.....................................................
$ l •00
______________________________ _________ __A 1 7A
$ 1 .7 U
__ __
_
_„
i 1 id
$ 1 . 7C ______
- _ ________ _

Under
TT«, J
U nder
T n/ e*
T 4a
u md r
TT J _ _
__
_
Under
U nder

$ 1 . 8 0 _____________________________________________________
A 1 AC
$ l.o !>
_
__
ip 1 7 U
J i . QA
. . . . . . . . . . ____
_____
A 1 A£
$ 1 .4d
_
_
_
. .. .
f z .u u
_
_
..
.
„ „

Under
Under
T mJ am
T
Under
t T_ J e „
Und- r
T7 _-3 . _
_
Under

$ 2 . 1 0 _______________________________________________________
$ 2 .2 0 .
.
____
* 7 1A
$CmM)
_
_
_
_ __
_
i 7 Af\
$ z .4 U ............ ...... ........ ..... ................................
A A PA
_
__
_
_
_ ......... . ..

U n d e r $ 2 .6 0 _
_
_
_
.
_
U nder
f v ____ _____„_________________________________ _ ____ _
TY«.#4a « $ £ * o u
U n d e r # O QA
_
_
.
.
....... .
.........
Under
_
........... .
i o a
U n d e r $ i « u a ___________________________________________
u
_
T o t a l -------------------------------------------------------------------------------N u m b e r o f e m p lo y e e s ( i n th o u s a n d s ) ______________________
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s __




__

__

_

_

W om en

M en

•2
1 .5
4 .7

•2
2 .5
6 .5

*

*

• 1
•6

.1
1 .0

•6
4 .2
1 2 .4

•6
7 .4
1 6 .7

.1
.9
3 .0

8 .5
9 .2
1 0 .5
1 3 .8
1 5 .0

1 1 .6
1 2 .6
1 4 .4
2 2 .5
2 5 .5

2 .6
2 .7
3 .4
4 .8
5 .3

4 .8
5 .4
6 .3
1 0 .4
1 2 .4

1 8 .8
2 0 .2
2 2 .3
2 9 .1
3 1 .5

2 3 .9
2 5 .4
2 7 .6
4 2 .3
4 6 .8

7 .4
7 .9
9 .6
1 2 .5
1 3 .5

1 1 .5
1 2 .4
1 5 .3
23. 8
2 7 .7

2 4 .4
2 6 .7
2 9 .9
3 2 .3
3 4 .1

4 0 .0
4 5 .6
5 1 .7
56. C
s e .e

1 6 .4
1 8 .6
2 2 .2
2 4 .3
2 5 .9

3 2 .5
3 8 .7
4 6 .5
5 1 .5
5 4 .8

4 2 .1
4 5 .3
4 8 .9
5 1 .8
5 3 .9

6 0 .6
6 5 .0
6 9 .9
7 3 .2
7 5 .3

2 2 .8
2 5 .0
2 7 .8
30 44
2 2 .4

4 0 .4
4 2 .4
4 5 .1
4 7 .4
4 9 .2

6 5 .2
6 7 .7
7 1 .2
7 3 .6
7 5 .6

3 3 .2
3 5 .5
3 9 .0
4 1 .1
4 3 .0

6 2 .2
6 4 .9
6 9 .3
7 1 .9
7 4 .1

5 8 .5
6 0 .7
6 3 .2
6 5 .0
6 6 .8

7 9 .5
8 1 .5
8 3 .8
8 5 .5
8 7 .0

5 2 .4
5 4 .1
5 6 .3
5 8 .0
5 9 .2

7 8 .5
8 0 .0
8 2 .3
8 3 .7
84. 8

4 6 .6
4 8 .2
5 0 .8
5 2 .7
5 3 .8

7 7 .2
7 8 .7
8 1 .2
8 2 .5
8 3 .4

6 9 .1
7 0 .7
7 2 .8
7 4 .2
7 5 .3

6 4 .3
6 7 .1
7 0 .5
7 2 .8
7 4 .7

8 8 .1
S O .3
9 2 .3
9 3 .7
9 4 .8

6 0 .3
6 3 .7
6 7 .9
7 0 .4
7 2 .7

8 7 .1
8 9 .8
9 2 .3
9 3 .7
9 5 .5

7 8 .1
8 0 .0
8 2 .1
8 4 .0
8 5 .4

9 6 .5
9 7 .1
S 7 .6
9 8 .0
9 8 .2

7 6 .9
7 9 .3
8 2 .0
8 3 .9
8 5 .4

9 6 .8
9 7 .6
9 8 .2
9 8 .6
9 8 .7

100.0

W om en

100.0

M en

W om en

M en

W om en

*

W om en

•2
.7

♦
•2
.9

2 .6
2 .9
3 .3
4 .5
4 .9

2 .7
3 .3
4 .4
6 .9
7 .7

4 1 .9
4 7 .2
5 3 .1
5 7 .5
6 0 .4

1 0 .3
1 1 .7
1 4 .4
1 6 .0
1 7 .2

1 4 .7
2 1 .9
2 7 .5
3 2 .3
3 5 .3

3 9 .2
4 1 .2
4 3 .9
4 6 .2
4 8 .3

6 6 .5
6 8 .8
7 2 .5
74. 8
7 6 .5

2 3 .9
2 5 .4
2 7 .3
3 0 .4
3 2 .0

4 4 .3
4 7 .6
5 1 .4
5 4 .9
5 7 .6

8 8 .9
9 0 .0
9 1 .3
9 2 .3
9 3 .0

5 1 .3
5 3 .3
5 5 .6
5 7 .4
5 8 .7

7 9 .2
8 0 .9
8 2 .9
8 4 .3
8 5 .4

3 6 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .5
4 1 .0
4 2 .2

6 2 .0
6 4 .3
6 8 .2
7 0 .1
7 2 .0

7 9 .1
8 1 .2
8 3 .8
8 5 .4
8 6 .6

9 5 .0
9 6 .1
9 7 .0
9 7 .5
9 8 .0

6 3 .8
6 7 .0
7 0 .5
7 3 .C
7 4 .9

88. 8
9 1 .1
9 2 .9
9 4 .4
9 5 .6

4 7 .4
5 0 .0
5 3 .7
5 6 .4
5 8 .8

7 7 .0
8 0 .3
8 3 .2
8 5 .9
8 7 .4

8 8 .8
9 0 .0
9 1 .2
9 2 .3
9 2 .1

9 8 .7
9 8 .9
9 9 .1
9 9 .2
9 9 .3

7 8 .1
8 0 .1
8 2 .2
8 4 .1
8 5 .8

9 7 .5
9 8 .1
9 e .6
98. 8
9 8 .9

6 3 .1
6 5 .7
6 8 .1
7 0 .9
7 2 .6

9 0 .4
9 1 .6
9 2 .5
9 3 .4
9 4 .1

100.0

100.0

100.0

.1
1 .5
5 .3

M en

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 .0
C

100.0

100.0

3 9 1 3 .2

2 7 7 3 .8

1 0 1 2 .9

7 3 9 .2

1 1 3 2 .4

7 5 2 .0

1 0 3 7 .7

8 2 7 .1

7 3 0 .3

4 5 5 .5

$ 2 .0 4

$ 1 .5 2

$ 2 .1 8

$ 1 .6 0

$ 1 .6 7

$ 1 .3 1

$ 2 .0 1

$ 1 .5 1

$ 2 .4 5

$ 1 .8 1

T a b le 5.

C u m u la tiv e p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t ra d e b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , b y e n t e r p r i s e and e s t a b lis h m e n t s a l e s - s i z e c l a s s e s ,
U n ited S ta te s , m e t r o p o lit a n and n o n m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , and r e g i o n s , June 1965
United States
E n terp rises with annual sales of—
L e s s than
$250,000

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

$ 1, 000, 000 o r m ore

A v e ra g e h ourly earnings

Establishm ents with annual sales of—
Total
Under $0.50 _ ______ ________
Under $0.75 ____________________
Under $ 1 . 0 0 ___________________

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

$250,000
or m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

*
.5
1 .6

*
•2
.9

.2
3 .6
10.2

.1
1 .5
5.1

.1
1.1
4 .4

.1
4 .7
11.8

.5
4 .9
12.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.05 ______ __________
$ 1 .1 0 ___________________
$1. 1 5 ___________________
$ 1 . 2 0 ..............................
$ 1 . 2 5 ____________ _______

3 .0
3 .4
4 .0
11.5
13. 8

1.8
2 .0
2 .3
9 .8
12. 1

19.4
21.5
24 .7
3 2 .4
3 5 .4

9. 9
K .7
13.0
16. 8
18.3

8 .8
9 .7
11.8
15.4
16.8

19.3
2 n .b
24.7
29.6
31.6

2 1 .9
2 3 .3
26.1
2 8 .4
3 0 .0

Under
Under
Under
U nder
U nder

$ 1 . 3 0 ____________________
$ 1 . 3 5 ___________________
$ 1 . 4 0 ___________________
$ 1 . 4 5 ..............................
$ 1 . 5 0 ____________________

24.3
28.9
33.8
27.6
40.3

22.5
27.1
31.9
35.7
38.5

4 7 .5
52.1
57.8
6 1 .4
6 4 .3

28. 7
32 .0
35.8
38.5
4 6 .6

27.3
30 .4
34.2
36.8
39.0

4 2 .3
47 .0
5 1 .2
5 3.8
5 5 .6

4 4 .1
4 6 .5
5 0 .4
5 3 .u
5 4 .3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 5 5 .............................
$ 1 .6 0 _________________ _
$1.65
.......................
$ 1 . 7 0 ___________________
$ 1 .7 5 .............. ..............

4 5 .4
47. 9
51. C
53.6
55.7

4 3 .6
46.1
4 9 .3
51.9
54.1

6 8 .6
70 .2
72 .4
75.1
7 6 .4

47.1
49.5
52. 5
54. 5
56.4

4 5.5
47.8
50.9
52.9
54.8

6 2 .0
6 5 .u
6 7 .2
6 8 .9
70.6

6 2 .7
64 .5
6 7 .5
6 9 .4
7 0 .9

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 8 0 ____________________
$ 1 . 8 5 ___________________
$ 1 . 9 0 ____________________
$ 1 . 9 5 ................. ............
$ 2 .00 ..............................

58.4
60.2
62.4
64.1
65.4

56.8
58.7
6 0 .9
62.7
6 4 .0

7 7.9
79.6
81 .0
8 2 .5
8 3 .6

59.9
6 1.7
64.2
6 5 .9
67.0

58.4
60.1
62.7
6 4 .4
65.6

74.2
75.9
77.8
79 .6
80.2

7 4 .2
7 5.5
7 7 .7
7 8 .8
79.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 ___________________
$2. 2 0 ___________________
$ 2 . 3 0 ____________________
$ 2 . 4 0 ..............................
$ 2 . 5 0 ____________________

69. 3
72.3
75.4
7 7.7
7 9 .9

6 8 .0
71.1
74.2
76.7
78.9

8 5 .9
87.5
89.9
9 1 .2
9 2 .3

72.2
74.9
78.6
79. 8
81.2

71 .0
73.7
76.9
78.7
80.2

8 3 .8
65.8
87 .9
89.2
89 .9

84 .2
8 5 .9
88 .2
8 9 .4
9 0 .1

Under
U nder
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 ____________________
$ 2 . 7 0 ____________________
$ 2 . 8 0 ___________________
$ 2 . 9 0 ___________ -_______
$3.00 ___________________

8 2 .6
84.2
85 .9
87 .4
88.6

81.7
8 3 .4
85.2
86.7
88.0

9 3 .4
9 4 .5
9 5 .3
9 5 .8
9 6 .4

84. 3
8 5.9
87.4
S8.9
89.9

83.5
85.2
86.8
88. 3
89.3

91. 1
9 2 .1
9 2 .8
9 4 .4
9 4 .7

9 2 .4
9 3 .2
9 4.0
9 4 .7
9 5.0

106.0

lO li.C

1262.3

137.2

19U1.5

$1.91

$1.62

$ 1 .5 8

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

N u m ber of em ployees
(in thousands)_________________

3385.9

3142.3

2 4 3 .6

1399.6

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s _____

$ 1 .5 9

$2.02

$1.55

$ 1 .8 8

Total




T a b le 5.

C u m u la tiv e p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , b y e n t e r p r i s e and e s t a b lis h m e n t s a l e s - s i z e c l a s s e s ,
U n ited S ta te s , m e t r o p o lit a n and n o n m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , and r e g i o n s , June 1965-— on tin u ed
-C
M etropolitan areas

Nonm etropolitan areas
E n terp rises with annual salesi of—

A v e ra g e h ou rly earnings

$ 1, 000, 000 o r m ore

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

L e s s than
$250,000

$ 1,000, 000 o r m ore

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

L e s s than
$250,000

Establishm ents with annual sales of—
Total

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

Total

$2507000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

Under $0.50 ____________________
Under $0.75
_ ___
Under $ 1 .0 0 ___________________*

♦
.2
1.1

♦
.2
•8

.1
.9
5 .4

*
1 .0
3 .5

*
•8
3 .0

♦1
3 .0
8 .3

.3
2 .2
6 .7

•1
1 .7
4 .3

.1
.3
1 .4

.4
8 .8
1 9 .6

•1
2 .4
8 .2

.1
1 .8
7 .0

.2
8 .2
19.2

.9
9 .5
22 .5

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.05 ___________________
$1.10
$1.15
_
$ 1.20
$1.25 ____________________

2 .2
2 .4
2 .9
9 .4
11.6

1.6
1 .8
2.1
8 .7
10.8

12.5
13 .8
16.2
22.2
2 4 .7

7 .6
8 .2
10 .0
13.2
14.5

6 .8
7 .3
8 .9
11.9
13.1

15.1
16.1
20 .3
2 5 .4
28.0

14.1
15.2
17.8
2 0 .0
2 1 .5

7 .6
8 .4
9 .6
22.6
2 6 .U

2 .9
3 .2
3.8
17.1
20.3

3 2 .8
36.5
4 1.2
52.2
56 .3

14.2
15.7
18 .9
2 3 .7
25 .5

12.8
14.3
17.3
22 .2
24 .0

28 .2
30.1
33 .8
38.4
39 .2

35.1
37 .0
40.1
4 2 .7
4 4 .5

Under
Under
U nder
Under
Under

$ 1 . 3 0 ____________________
$ 1 . 3 5 ____________________
$ 1 .4 0 .......................
$ 1 .4 5 ____________________
$1.50 ____________________

21.7
26.3
3 1 .3
35 .0
3 7.8

20 .7
25.3
30.2
33.9
36.7

38.2
43.3
49. 9
5 2 .8
56.3

2 4 .8
2 7 .8
31.8
34.2
36 .3

23 .2
2 6 .0
2 9 .9
32 .3
3 4 .3

38 .6
4 4 .6
4 9 .2
51.1
5 3 .3

3 6 .3
38 .9
4 3 .2
4 5 .4
4 6 .6

3 8 .5
4 2 .8
4 7 .3
5 1.4
54.0

33 .5
3 7 .9
4 2 .5
4 6. 5
49 .2

65.4
69.2
73.2
77. 9
79. 9

36 .5
40 .1
4 3 .7
4 6 .8
49 .0

35.1
38.9
4 2 .5
4 5 .5
4 7 .9

50.1
52.1
55.4
59.3
6 0 .4

5 7 .3
59.4
62 .7
6 5 .8
67.3

Under
Under
Under
Under
U nder

$ 1 . 5 5 ____________________
$ 1 .6 0 ____________________
$ 1 . 6 5 ____________________
$ 1 . 7 0 ____________________
$1.75
............. .........

4 2 .8
4 5.2
4 8 .3
51 .0
5 3 .2

41 .7
44.2
47 .3
50.0
52.2

60.5
62.2
64. 8
68 .4
70.0

4 3 .0
4 4 .6
4 7 .6
4 9 .6
5 1 .4

41.0
4 2 .7
4 5 .6
4 7 .6
4 9 .4

6 0.5
6 3 .6
6 5 .8
6 7.6
6 9.0

5 6.2
58.1
6 1 .4
6 3 .6
6 5 .3

59 .6
62.1
6 5 .4
67 .5
6 9 .3

55.0
57.8
61.3
6 3.7
6 5 .7

84.4
85.7
87.2
88.0
89.0

55.2
58 .5
6 2 .0
6 3 .9
66.1

5 4.2
5 7.5
61.1
63 .0
6 5 .3

6 5 .0
68 .0
70.4
71.8
74.0

73 .8
75 .5
77 .7
79.3
80 .5

Under
U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder

$ 1 .8 0 ____________________
$1.85 __________________
$ 1 . 9 0 ___________________
$1.95 ...............
$ 2 .0 0 ____________________

5 5 .9
5 7 .8
6 0 .0
6 1 .8
6 3 .1

55.0
56.8
59.1
60.9
62.2

71. 7
73.6
75.3
77.1
78.3

5 5 .2
56 .8
5 9 .4
61.1
62.1

53.2
54.8
57.5
59.1
6 0 .2

7 3.4
74.8
7 6.8
78 .6
79 .2

6 9 .2
70.6
73 .1
7 4 .3
7 5 .4

71.5
73.3
7 4 .9
7 6 .6
77.8

68.1
69 .9
71.7
73.5
74.8

89. 9
91 .3
92.2
92.9
93. 9

69 .1
71.3
7 3 .4
7 5 .4
76.6

6 8 .5
70.6
72.8
74 .7
76.0

75 .7
78 .2
79 .9
81.7
82.1

82.7
83.8
85 .5
86.3
86 .9

U nder
U nder
Under
U nder
Under

$ 2 .1 0 ____________________
$ 2 . 2 0 ____________________
$ 2 . 3 0 ____________________
$ 2 . 4 0 ____________________
$2.50 _______ ___________

6 7 .2
70 .3
73.5
76.0
78.3

66.3
69.5
72.7
75.3
77.6

81.3
83.2
86.3
88.0
89.5

67 .6
70.5
7 3 .7
75.7
77.3

66 .0
68 .9
72.3
74.4
76. o

82 .6
84 .5
8 6 .4
8 8.0
8 8.8

80. 7
8 2 .8
8 5 .5
86 .8
8 7 .7

80.7
83.0
85 .4
87.1
88.5

78.0
8C.7
83.3
85.2
86.8

94.7
95.9
96. 9
97.4
97.7

81.2
83.5
8 6.2
87.5
88.6

80.7
8 3.0
85.7
87.1
88.2

8 6 .4
88.5
9 1 .2
9 1 .7
9 2 .3

90.2
9 1 .3
9 2 .9
9 3 .7
9 4 .2

Under
U nder
Under
Under
U nder

$2 .6 0
. _
$ 2 .7 0 ________ _________
$ 2 . 8 0 ____________________
$2 .9 0
_______________
$3.00 _ _____________
_

81.1
82 .9
84 .7
86.2
87.5

80.5
82.3
84.1
85.7
87.0

91.0
92.5
93.7
94.2
95.1

8 0 .9
82.6
84 .6
86.3
87 .4

79 .9
8 1 .7
83 .7
85 .5
86 .7

90 .0
91 .0
9 2 .0
9 3 .9
9 4 .4

9 0 .4
9 1 .4
9 2 .4
9 3 .1
9 3 .6

9 0 .4
91 .6
9 2.8
9 3 .8
9 4 .7

89.0
90 .4
9 1 .7
9 2 .9
9 3 .9

98.1
98.3
98 .4
98 .8
98.9

9 0 .9
92.1
93.0
9 3 .9
94.6

9 0 .6
9 1.9
92 .9
9 3 .7
9 4 .5

93 .4
9 4 .3
94. 7
9 5 .4
9 5 .4

95 .7
9 6 .3
96.9
97 .3
97 .5

100.€

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1U0.G

100.0

1 0 0 .c

1 0 0.0

100.0

100.(3

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

N u m ber of em ployees
(in th ou san d s)_________________

Total _

2 8 5 6 .2

2695.3

16C.8

924.5

8 3 1 .6

9 2 .9

1196.8

52 9 .8

447.0

82 .8

475.1

4 3 0 .7

4 4 .3

704.7

A v e ra g e h ourly e a r n in g s _____

$ 2 .0 4

$2.C7

$1.68

$1.99

$2.03

$1.66

$1.71

$ 1 .7 0

$1.77

$1.28

$1.68

$1.69

$1.54

$1.38




t
o
T a b le 5.

C u m u la tiv e p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g a , b y e n t e r p r is e and e s t a b lis h m e n t s a l e s - s i z e c l a s s e s ,
U n ited S ta te s , m e t r o p o lit a n and n o n m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , and r e g i o n s , June 1965— C ontinued
South

Northeast
E n terp rises with annual sales of—
A v e ra g e hourly earnings

L e s s than
$250,000

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

$ 1, 000, 000 o r m ore

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

$ 1,000, 000 o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

$250,000
o r m ore

Total

Establishm ents with annual sales of—
Total

$256,000
o r m o re

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

$250,000
or m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

Total

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

.6
10.1
2 5 .6

.3
3 .7
12.3

.2
2 .8
10.7

.4
10.6
24.6

1 .4
12 .7
30.1

Under $ 0.50 ____________________
Under $0. 7 5 ____________________
U nder $ 1 .0 0 ___________________*

*
*
•5

*
*
•4

_
*
•4

.

_

*
1 .3

.4

•2
•8

.1
•4
1 .5

.2
1.5
4 .5

.1
. 7
2 .4

Under
U nder
Under
Under
Under

________
$ 1 .0 5 ______
$ 1 .1 0 ____________________
$ 1 .1 5 ___________ ________
$ 1 .2 0 ___________________
$ 1 . 2 5 ___________________

1 .7
1.8
2 .1
5 .6
7 .1

1.1
1.2
1.4
4 .8
6 .2

11.4
12.2
14.5
2 0 .7
2 3 .7

3 .1
3 .6
4 .4
6 .0
6 .8

2 .9
3 .4
4 .1
5 .2
5 .8

5 .6
7 .1
8 .5
15 .5
20.4

7 .2
7.8
9 .3
1 0 .8
11 .4

6 .9
7 .5
8 .3
23.9
28.<>

3.7
4.1
4 .8
21.0
25.1

38. 9
4 1 .4
4 3 .6
53 .4
55. 8

19.6
2 1 .6
24.7
31.7
34.3

17.9
19 .8
2 2 .8
2 9.9
32.7

32 .7
34.6
38 .7
4 5.1
4 6 .6

4 2 .8
4 5 .3
4 8 .8
52 .2
54.6

Under
U nder
Under
U nder
Under

$ 1 .3 0 __ _____ ___________
$ 1 . 3 5 ..............................
$ 1 .4 0 ____________________
$ 1 .4 5 .................... .........
$ 1 .5 0 ..............................

2 0 .2
25.5
3 1 .5
35. 8
3 8 .8

19.2
24. 5
30.4
3 4 .9
37.9

37.5
4 3 .6
49. 7
52.7
55. 7

19.2
21.1
25.6
27.5
29 .7

17.9
19.8
24 .1
26.0
28.1

35.2
38.2
4 5 .8
4 7 .4
50.0

3 1.5
34 .0
3 8 .8
4 1 .3
4 2 .5

4 0.6
4 5.3
50.1
53.6
56.2

38.0
43.0
48.0
51.6
84.3

66.4
68.6
71.1
73 .6
75.9

4 6 .4
4 9 .6
53.8
56.7
58 .7

4 5 .0
4 8 .2
52.5
55.3
5 7 .5

5 7 .0
60.4
63 .9
67.0
67 .6

65 .2
67.6
7C.5
73.0
74 .5

U nder
Under
Under
U nder
U nder

$1.55 ____________________
$ 1 . 6 0 __ „ .. __ _ __
$ 1 . 6 5 ..............................
$ 1 . 7 0 ..............................
$ 1 . 7 5 ___________________

4 4 .0
4 6 .6
5 0 .0
52 .5
5 4 .8

43.1
4 5 .8
49.2
5 1 .8
54.1

60. 1
61.3
63.4
65.2
67. C

37.8
40 .3
44 .7
46 .9
48 .8

36.3
38.6
4 3 .0
4 5 .2
4 7.1

57.4
62.1
6 6 .7
69.1
7 1 .2

5 3 .2
5 5 .6
6C.0
62.C
6 3 .4

60.8
63.1
65 .6
6 7 .9
69.7

58.9
61.2
64.2
66.3
68.1

79.8
81.2
02.6
83. 8
84.8

63 .3
66 .0
68.7
70.4
72.4

6 2 .4
65.1
6 8 .0
6 9 .6
7 1 .7

70.4
73.1
74.4
76.3
78.0

78.5
80.2
8 1 .9
83 .2
84 .4

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .8 0 ____________________
$ 1 .8 5 ___________________
$ 1 .9 0 ____________________
$1.95 ___________________
$ 2 .0 0 _________ _________

5 7.7
5 9 .4
6 1 .6
6 3 .3
6 4 .4

57.1
58.7
6 1 .0
6 2 .7
63. 7

6 5.2
71.4
72.9
75.1
76.1

53.4
55.1
58.2
60.4
61.6

51.8
53.6
56.8
59.0
60 .2

73.7
74.9
76.5
78.3
79 .3

67 .1
6 8 .3
7 1 .C
7 2.2
7 3 .0

72 .0
73.7
75 .4
76.9
78.1

7C. 6
72.4
74.2
75.8
76.8

85.3
86.5
87.7
88.3
89.5

75.1
76.8
79.0
3U.5
81.6

74 .2
7 5 .9
78 .2
7 9 .7
80 .9

81.6
8 3 .4
34.8
86.5
86 .6

86.1
8 6 .7
88.2
8 9 .C
8 9 .6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 ..............................
$ 2 . 2 0 ...... .......................
$ 2 . 3 0 ..............................
$ 2 . 4 0 ---------------------------$2. 5 0 ___________________

6 8 .6
7 1 .8
75 .3
77.8
81 .5

68.0
71.2
7 4 .e
77.2
e r .i

79.5
81.1
85.2
87.3
88. 6

68.2
71.8
75.6
77.7
79.4

67 .1
70.8
74 .8
77.0
78.7

32.8
85.1
86.6
87.1
89 .0

7 9 .3
8 2 .0
8 5.1
66.5
8 7 .4

81.2
83.9
8 5.9
87.4
88.8

80.2
82.6
85. 1
86.7
88.1

81.6
82. 7
84. 3
85.
95. 6

35.2
86.3
88.9
39 .9
90.6

8 4.7
8 6 .4
8 8 .4
89.5
9 0 .2

89.2
89.7
92.3
92.8
9 3 .0

9 2 .1
9 2 .9
94.1
94 .6
95 .1

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 6 0 --- ------------ -----$ 2 .7 0 ___________________
$ 2 . 8 0 ..............................
$ 2 .9 0 ...... .......................
$ 3.00 ..............................

6 3 ,3
8 5.2
6 7 .3
8 8 .9
9 0 .L

82. 9
84 .8
86.9
88. 5
8 9. 8

9C . .3
92.3
53.5
54. 7
55. 3

83.2
85.0
87.3
88.7
89.9

82.6
84.5
86 .8
88.2
89 .5

90.4
92.1
9 3.7
94 .5
95 .7

9 0 .4
9 1 .6
9 2 .7
9 3 .4
9 3 .6

8 0 .3
8 1.5
82.7
83.6
84.3

88. 8
81.8
82.2
82.2
83.8

86.2
96. 8
87.5
87. 8
98.1

92.7
93.5
94.3
94.9
96.4

9 2 .5
9 3 .4
9 4 .1
9 4 .7
9 5 .3

94.2
95.0
95.4
96.3
96 .4

9 6 .4
9 6 .7
97.1
9 7 .?
97 .6

T o t a l ................................

lO C .o

1OC.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .C

lu C .O

KH..0

190.0

100.0

100.0

N um ber of em ployees
(in th ousan ds)------------------------

90 7 .9

859.8

343.1

31 8 .6

2 4.5

501.1

896.3

814.3

49 2 .7

355.4

47 .3

585.4

$2*02

$2.04

$1.73

$1.79

$ 1 • 7u

$1.74

$1.57

$1.58

$1.43

$1.29

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s -------




$2.U2

$2 • i 3

100.

48. 1
$1. 74

lOO.i'

82 . :
>
$1.32

1 0 0 .C ;

T a b le 5.

C u m u la tiv e p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p l o y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , b y e n t e r p r is e and e s t a b lis h m e n t s a l e s - s i z e c l a s s e s ,
U n ited S ta te s , m e t r o p o lit a n and n o n m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , and r e g i o n s , June 1965— C on tin u ed
North Central

W est
E n terp rises with annual sales of—

A v e ra g e h ou rly earnings

$ 1, 000, 000 o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

$ 1, 000, 000 o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

Establishm ents with annual sales of—
Total
Under $ 0.50 ____________________
Under $ 0 . 7 5 ......... __.................
Under $ 1 .0 0 ____________________

*
•1
•6

$250,000
o r m ore
♦
•1
.4

L e s s than
$250,000

.4
3 .0

Total

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

_

Total

Total
*
•1
•4

*
1 .2
4 .6

♦
.9
3 .9

3 .7
11.3

.3
3 .2
1 0 .4

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

a
•1
.3

_

a

a

_

.4
2 .6

.3
1 .0

.3
1 .0

.7

.2
1.3

a

a

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .0 5 ____________________
_______
$ 1 .1 0 __
$ 1 .1 5 ..........................___
$ 1 .2 0 __ __ __ __ —
$ 1 .2 5 ____________________

2 ,0
2 .2
3 .0
1 0 .4
13.0

1 .3
1.5
1 .9
9.2
11.8

1C. 7
12.2
17 .5
2 6 .0
30.1

10.6
11.3
14 .8
18.5
20 .1

9 .2
9 .8
12.9
16.7
18.2

2 4.2
2 5 .4
3 3 .3
3 5 .8
37.9

22 .3
2 3 .9
2 7 .9
3 0 .8
33 .0

1.0
1 .4
1.7
3 .6
4 .1

.7
.7
.9
2 .5
2 .9

5 .6
9.5
1 1 .9
1 6 .4
19.1

2 .5
2 .6
3 .6
5 .5
5 .8

2 .4
2 .6
3 .5
5 .2
5 .5

2 .5
2 .7
4 .1
8 .1
8 .2

5 .9
6 .5
7.7
8 .9
9 .6

Under
U nder
Under
Under
U nder

$ 1 . 3 0 ___________________
$ 1 . 3 5 ____________________
$ 1 .4 0 ____________________
$ 1 .4 5 ..............................
$ 1 .5 0 ..............................

2 3 .6
2 8 .0
3 2 .9
36 .8
3 9 .8

22.0
26.4
31.1
34.8
37.9

44. 8
49 .1
56. 8
6 2 .9
65 .8

30.7
3 4 .2
37.5
4 0 .5
4 2 .8

28.7
32 .2
35 .6
3 8.6
4 0 .9

50.1
53 .0
5 5 .8
5 8 .9
6 1 .4

4 6 .8
4 8 .8
5 2 .3
5 5 .0
5 6 .4

7 .6
11.1
14.6
17.7
19.9

5 .9
9.1
12.2
15.3
17 .5

2 7 .7
36.1
4 4 .0
4 6 .3
50 .4

11.1
15.9
19.1
2 1 .7
23.6

10.8
14.8
17.9
2 0.6
2 2 .4

13 .8
2 4 .6
2 8 .7
3 0 .6
33.0

21.0
2 3 .9
28.6
31 .4
3 2.6

U nder
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .5 5 ____________________
_
$ 1 .6 0 .................... ..
$ 1 . 6 5 ____________________
$ 1 .7 0 ____________________
$1.75 ___
___
_

4 5 .0
4 7 .4
5 0 .7
5 3 .1
5 5 .3

43.1
45 .5
48.8
51.2
53.4

70.6
73.1
76.1
78.3
79.9

50 .2
52.1
55 .3
5 7.3
59 .2

4 8 .0
4 9 .9
53.1
55 .2
5 7.2

7 1.3
7 3.7
7 6 .1
7 7 .2
78 .4

6 4 .7
6 6 .4
6 9 .2
7 1 .6
7 3 .1

25 .3
27.9
3 0 .7
34.9
37.0

2 2 .9
25.7
2 8 .5
32.5
34.6

54.5
55.4
58.2
6 4 .7
66.2

29.8
31.9
3 3 .4
35.6
3 7.3

2 8 .6
3 0 .6
32.1
3 4 .3
3 6.1

3 9 .7
4 2 .9
4 4 .3
4 5 .7
4 7 .6

4 5 .5
4 6 .9
50.2
52 .6
54.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.80 _ .........................
$ 1 .8 5 ____________________
$1.90 ___
_ ............
$ 1 .9 5 ..............................
$ 2 .0 0 .........
..............

58 .1
6 0 .1
6 2 .1
6 4 .0
6 5 .4

56.3
58.3
60.3
62.2
63 .7

81.7
84.3
85.4
86. 9
87. 7

62.0
6 4 .0
66 .3
6 8 .0
6 8 .9

6 0 .1
62.1
6 4 .6
6 6 .3
6 7 .3

80.7
8 1 .8
8 3 .4
8 4 .2
8 4 .4

7 5 .9
77.5
7 9 .9
81.1
82 .1

3 9 .6
41.5
4 4 .5
4 6 .5
4 8 .1

37.3
39.3
4 2 .3
44 .3
4 5 .9

67.1
6 8 .9
71.1
7 3 .0
74. 8

4 2 .0
43 .5
46 .0
47 .6
4 8 .9

4 0 .6
4 1 .9
4 4 .3
4 5 .7
4 7 .0

5 3 .8
5 6 .6
5 9 .8
6 3 .5
64 .6

6 1 .2
6 3.1
6 5 .6
66.6
6 8 .0

Under $2. 1 0 ____________________

Under $ 2 .4 0 ____________________
U nder $2.50 ___ .......................

6 9 .3
7 2 .8
7 5 .7
7 8 .3
80.5

67.9
71.4
74.4
77.2
79.5

89.2
91.0
92.4
93.0
93 .8

74.0
76.7
79.6
81.5
82.7

72.6
75.2
7 8 .3
80.1
8 1 .4

8 8 .3
9 0 .7
9 3 .0
9 4 .3
9 4 .9

8 6 .6
88.1
9 0 .5
9 1 .6
9 2 .1

52.5
55 .7
5 9.3
6 2 .3
6 4 .6

50. 4
53.7
57.3
60.4
62.7

77.4
7 9 .7
83.2
85 .7
87 .8

5 4.8
57.9
61.6
6 4 .2
66.7

52 .9
5 6 .0
5 9 .9
62 .5
65.1

70.0
7 3 .5
7 5 .3
7 8 .3
79 .1

73.9
75.9
78.7
8C.9
82.1

Under
U nder
Under
U nder
U nder

8 3.6
8 5 .2
8 6 .9
8 8 .3
89 .7

82.8
84.4
86.2
87.7
89.1

94.6
95.3
95.9
96.2
57.0

85.4
87 .0
88.4
89 .8
90.8

8 4 .3
86 .0
8 7 .6
89 .0
90 .1

9 5 .9
9 6 .3
9 6 .8
9 7 .1
9 7 .1

9 3 .9
9 4 .6
95 .3
9 5 .9
9 6 .3

6 8 .3
7 0.6
72.5
74.5
76.3

66.6
68.9
70 .9
73.0
74.9

89 .9
91.3
92.1
92 .5
93.6

71.1
73.4
75.5
78.5
79.8

6 9 .9
7 2 .4
7 4 .6
7 7 .4
78.8

8 0 .6
8 1 .5
82 .7
87 .5
87 .9

85.7
87.1
68.6
89.9
9 0 .5

__

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

100.0

__ __ _

9 7 6 .8

508.9

6 7 .9

393.0

3 5 5 .9

3 7 .0

4 9 5 .0

6 0 4 .9

559. 3

4 5 .6

260.8

23 2 .4

2 8 .4

320.0

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s _____

$ 1 .9 9

$1.85

$1.89

$1.56

$2.37

$2.41

$1. 82

$2.26

$2.29

$2.02

$1.91

Under $2 .2 0 ________ _
Under $ 2 .3 0 ____ _ _ _ _ _

$ 2 . 6 0 __ _ _________ _
$2.70 ..............................
$ 2 .8 0 ____________________
$ 2 .9 0 ..............................
$ 3 .0 0 ______
___ __
Total

__ _____

N u m ber o f em ployees
(in thousands) _____




12.03

$1.54

$1.49

A
*
T a b le 6.

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il tra d e b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
United S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

W est

W eekly hours of w o rk
Num ber

U nder 15 _ ______
_
_
_
15 and under 3 5 ___ _
35 and under 4 0 _______ _ .

_
_ _
.....
. .
... _ _ ___
4 0 _______ ________________ ____________________________
O ver 40 and under 42
.
_ ____ _____
_____ _
4 2 .........................................................................................
O v er 42 and under 44 __. . .
__ _
44
_ ______
O v er 44 and under 48 ____
_ _
___
48 and o v e r
____
______ _ .
_ __
Total .

_

_.
__
_ _

____________________________________________

A v e ra g e w eek ly hours ______________

T ab le 7.

___________

Percent

556.1
1447.7
662.5
1662.3
153.2
128.9
132.9
306.6
37C.{)
1266.8

8.3
21.6
9.9
24.9
2.3
1.9
2.0
4.6
5.5
18.9

10.1
26.0
13.1
24.6
1.6
1.5
2.2
3.3
5.1
12.5

Percent

Num ber

6.4
16.2
8.9
21.4
2.8
2.8
2.2
5.8
6.8
26.7

1884.4

N um ber

Percent

9 .C
24.1)
9.7
22.9
2.6
1.9
1.9
4.6
5.5
17.9

89.9
239.3
83.3
4C1.4
23.1
14.6
18.1
54.2
50.0
211.9

7.6
20.2
7.0
33.8
1.9
1.2
1.5
4 .6
4.2
17.9

100.0

1185.7

1864.8

39.6

34.4

Percent

167.8
447.0
181.4
427.6
48.6
35.1
34.6
86.4
1C2.8
333.5

100.0

121.0
306.1
167.6
402.4
52.9
53.5
41.0
108.7
128.4
502.8

100.0

1752.1

36.9

Num ber

100.0
37.0

36.3

P e rc e n t distribution of nonsupervisory employees in retail trade by weekly hours of w ork, by m etropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas
United States and region s, June 1965
South

Northeast

United States

North Central

W est

M e tro ­
politan
areas

W eekly hours of w o rk

Under 15 ..................................................................................
15 and under 3 5 _____________ ____________________ __ ------35 and under 4 0 ______________________________________________
40 _______________________________ _______________________________
O v e r 40 and under 42 __________ ____________ ____________
42 -------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------- —
O ver 42 and under 44 ______________________________________
O v er 44 and under 48

Percent

177.4
455.3
230.2
43 J. 9
28.6
25.7
39.2
57.4
88.8
218.4

luO.O

6687.C

____

Num ber

.... ......... _ _
/
I
|
|

s
j
1
j
I
j
!
j

%

s

ti
n
o

N onm etro­
politan
areas

M e tro ­
politan
areas

N onm etro­
politan
areas

M e tro ­
politan
areas

N onm etro­
politan
areas

M e tro ­
politan
areas

8 .5
23.1
10.7
2 7.0
2 .4
1.8
2.0
4 .1
5.0
15.4

7 .9
17.4
7. 5
18. 6
2.1
2 .3
1 .9
5 .9
7 .1
29.3

10.3
2 6 .5
13.5
2 5 .0
1 .6
1 .4
2 .3
2 .9
4 .8
1 1 .6

9 .1
22.9
10.7
21 .9
1.7
2.1
1 .6
5 .5
6 .6
18.0

5 .9
17 .8
10.5
23 .9
3 .0
2 .9
2 .2
5 .5
6 .1
22 .2

7 .3
13.7
6 .2
17.1
2 .4
2 .7
2.1
6 .3
7 .9
34 .2

9 .3
2 5 .5
10.6
25.5
2 .8
1.8
1 .8
4 .3
4 .9
13.5

8 .3
1 9 .9
7 .4
16.2
2 .1
2 .2
2 .0
5. 5
7 .2
29.2

7 .6
2 0 .9
6 .7
36.2
2 .1
l.l
1 .6
4 .2
4 .0
15 .6

7 .5
17.3
8 .1
24.8
1 .5
1.9
1.3
6 .1
5 .0
26.7

N on m etro­
politan
areas

M e tro ­
politan
areas

N onm etro­
politan
areas

T o t a l --------------------------------------------------------------------------

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100,0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

N u m ber of em ployees (in thousands) _____________________

4977.4

1709.6

1511.6

2 40.5

1180.6

703.8

1346.9

517.9

938.4

247.3

36 .0

39.3

3 4.1

3 6 .3

3 8 .9

40*8

35.2

39. 0

3 6 .6

3 8 .9

A v e ra g e w eekly h o u r s _________________




____________________

T a b le 8.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il tra d e by w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
b y s e x , U nited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , J une 1965
South

Northeast

United States

N orth Central

W est

W eekly h ours of w o rk
Men

Under 15 ____________________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 ______________________________________________
35 and under 4 0 _________ „ ------- ------- ----------------- __
4 0 ..............................................................................................
O ver 40 and under 42___ _____ __________________________
42 _ _________________________________________________________
O ver 42 and under 44_______________________________________
44 ______________________________________________________________
O v er 44 and tinder 48_______________________________________
48 and o v e r . _______________
___________________ __ _____
T o t a l ........................................................................

_

N um ber of em ployees (in thousands) ___________________ _
A v e ra g e w eek ly h o u r s _________________




_____

_____

_____

Women

Men

W omen

Men

Women

Men

7 .7
17.0
4 .9
21.9
2.0
1.9
2 .2
6 .4
7 .4
28 .6

9.2
2 8.2
16. 9
29.0
2 .7
2 .0
1 .7
2 .0
2 .9
5 .4

9 .7
19 .8
5 .9
2 5 .4
1 .6
1 .9
3 .0
5 .0
7 .7
2 0 .0

10.7
3 4 .4
23.0
23 .5
1 .6
.9
1 .2
.9
1 .5
2 .1

5 .6
13.2
4 .4
17.3
2 .0
2 .2
1.9
7 .2
8 .2
3 8 .0

7 .7
20 .8
15 .6
2 7 .4
4 .0
3 .9
2 .6
3 .7
4 .7
9 .7

8 .4
18.4
5 .0
18.9
2 .2
1 .9
2 .0
7 .0
7 .5
2 8 .7

9. 8
31 .0
15 .6
2 8 .0
3 .1
1 .9
1 .6
1. 7
3 .0
4 .4

7 .1
17.1
4 .2
2 8 .6
2 .1
1 .2
1 .9
6 .3
5 .8
2 5 .7

Women

Men

Women

8 .3
25 .2
11 .6
4 2 .2
1 .7
1 .2
.9
1.7
1.8
5 .4

100.0

1 0 0 .0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

3913.2

277 3 .8

1012.9

73 9 .2

1132.4

752.4

1037.7

82 7.1

730.3

455.5

39.3

3 3 .4

3 6 .8

3 1.2

4 2 .1

3 5 .9

3 9 .0

3 8 .8

34 .2

32. 8

T a b le 9.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il tr a d e b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k , by e n t e r p r i s e and e s t a b lis h m e n t s a l e s - s i z e c l a s s e s ,
U n ited S ta te s , m e t r o p o lit a n and n o n m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , and r e g i o n s , J u n e 1965
United States
E n terp rises with annual sa le s of—
L e s s than
$250,000

$250,000 to $1,000,000

$ 1,000,000 o r m ore

W eekly hours of w o rk

Establishm ents with annual sa le s of—
L e s s than
$250,000

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

$250, Odd
o r m ore

Total

Total

6 .5
15.8
6 .9
23.7
1.8
2 .0
2 .2
6 .6
8 .2
26.3

Total

Under 15
15 and under 35
35 and under 4 0 ____ _______
40
O ver 40 and under 4 2 _________
42
O ver 42 and under 4 4 _________
44
O v er 44 and under 48_________
48 and over _ _
_ _________

7» 9
23.0
13.1
28.3
3 .3
2. 1
2 .2
3. 9
4 .5
11 .6

7 .4
2 3 .0
13.4
28.9
3 .4
2.1
2 .3
4.(/
4 .5
10.9

13.6
23.4
8 .9
21.2
1.7
2.1
1.5
2 .8
4 .4
20.3

6. 9
16.3
6 .8
2 3 .0
1 .7
1. 9
2 .2
6 .6
8 .0
26.5

T o t a l_____________________

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

10C.G

N u m ber of em ployees
(in th ou san d s)_________________

3385.9

3142.3

243.6

1399.6

1262.3

137.2

1901.5

3 5 .7

35.8

35.1

39.3

39.6

37.3

3 7 .1

A v e ra g e w eekly hours

10.5
20.8
6 .5
1 7 .G
1.3
1.4
2.0
6 .8
5 .8
27.9

10 .1
2 3 .1
6 .5
20 .0
1 .0
1 .6
1 .4
4 .2
5 .5
2 6 .5

Nonm etropolitan a re a s

Metropolitan areas
E n terp rises with annual sales <
$ 1,000, 000 or m ore

$250, 000 to $1,000,000

L e s s than
$250,000

$ 1,000, 000 o r m ore

$250,000 to $1,000,000

L e s s than
$250,000

$ 250, 000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

Establishm ents with annual sales of—
Total
U nder 1 5 ....................................
15 and under 3 5 _________ ____
35 and under 4 0 ------------------- _
4 0 .................................................
O v e r 40 and under 42_________
4 2 .................................................
O v e r 42 and under 44_________
4 4 .................................................
O ver 44 and under 4 8 _________
48 and o v e r _____________________
T o t a l _____________________

$250, (T O
O
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

Total

t .9
23 .8
13.5
25 .4
3 .2
1 .8
2 .2
4 .0
4 .2
1G.J

7 .6
23 .7
13. 8
2 9 .8
3 .3
1 .9
2 .3
4. .
4 .2
9 .4

12 .7
2 5 .3
8.5
22 .5
1 .4
1 .4
1 .2
3.1
4 .3 '
19.5

7 .6
18.3
7 .2
26.2
1.7
2 .0
2 .5
5 .0
7 .5
22.1

7 .2
17.7
7 .2
27.3
1.7
2.0
2 .6
4 .9
7 .7
21 .6

11.4
2 3 .2
7.6
15.7
1.5
1.6
1 .4
5.1
5 .7
26.8

10 .5
2 5 .3
6 .9
2 1 .9
.9
1.5
1.2
3 .9
4 .9
2 3 .0

7 .9
19.0
11.1
22.5
3 .7
3 .5
2.1
3 .9
6 .v
i
20.2

100. C

N u m ber of em ployees
(in thousands)
____________ _

2 856.2

A v e ra g e w eekly h o u r s _________

35 .3




$250,000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

6 .5
18.8
11.3
23.3
4 .0
3.5
2.1
4 .3
6 .3
2?..0

1 5 .4
1 9 .7
9 .5
18 .6
2 .3
3 .5
2 .3
2 .1
4. 8
2 1 .8

5 .5
12.5
6 .1
16.9
1 .8
1 .8
1 .7
9 .9
8 .9
35.0

5 .2
12.1
6 .3
16.6
1 .9
1 .9
1 .5
9 .9
9 .2
35.5

8.5
15.8
4 .4
19. 5
1.0
•8
3 .3
10.3
6. 1
30.3

9 .5
19.5
5 .7
16.9
1.1
1 .8
1.5
4 .7
6 .6
32 .3

1 JO. v

100.0

100.0

1JO.W

100.0

82. 8

475.1

4 3 0 .7

44. 3

7 0 4 .7

41.8

4 2 .0

100.0

la e .t

100.0

io o . u

l Ju.O

100.0

100.0

1*10.0

2655.3

160.8

924.5

831.6

9 2 .9

1196.8

529.8

447.0

34. 8

38.1

3 8 .3

36.3

3 6 .0

3 7.8

3 5. 4

38.2 '

3 5 .5

3 9 .3

38.8

T a b le 9 .

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k , b y e n t e r p r i s e and e s t a b lis h m e n t s a l e s - s i z e c l a s s e s ,
U n ited S ta te s , m e t r o p o lit a n and n o n m e t r o p o lit a n a r e a s , and r e g i o n s , J une 1965— C on tin u ed
South

N ortheast
E nterp rises with annual sales of—
$1,000,000 o r m ore

W eekly hours of w o rk

L e s s than
$250,000

$250,000 to $1,000,000

$1,000,000 o r m ore

$250,000 to $1,000,000

JLess than
$250,000

Establi shments wit:h annual sales of—
Total

t

7 w rm ~
o r m ore

L e ss' than
$250,000

Total

T Z S ffT W F ] L e s s than
$250,000
o r m ore

Total

Total
6 .5
18.7
12.3
24.5
4 .2
3 .5
2 .4
4 .5
6.Q
17.4

o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

Total

$250, 000
o r m ore

L e s s than
$250,000

5 .9
18.7
12 .8
25.3
4 .5
3. 5
2 .4
4 .5
6 .0
16.3

1 2.4
1 8.4
7.5
1 5 .8
2 .0
3 .9
2 .4
3 .9
5 .6
2 8.1

4 .6
11.0
6 .0
19.3
1 .8
2 .7
2 .3
9 .1
10.1
33.2

4 .2
10.8
6 .1
19 .8
1 .9
2 .8
2 .1
9 .0
10.5
3 2 .7

7 .3
12.6
5 .4
15 .6
.9
1.5
3 .6
9 .6
7 .1
36.5

7 .5
16.0
5 .6
18.0
1 .3
1 .9
1 .8
5 .5
5 .8
36.5

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Total

Under 15 ________________________
15 and under 35 .............. ..... _
35 and under 4 0 __ ___________
4 0 .................................................
O ver 40 and under 4 2 _________
4 2 .................................................
O ver 42 and under 44_________
44
O ver 44 and under 48 _
48 and o v e r _____________________

9 .1
2 7 .6
1 6 .2
2 4 .9
2 .3
1 .4
2 .7
2 .1
4 .2
7 .5

8 .7
27.4
18.7
25.1
2 .3
1 .4
2 .7
2 .1
4.1
7 .4

15.5
30.1
9 .9
22.5
1.3
1 .0
1 .4
2 .9
5 .4
10 .0

9 .3
13.7
8 .5
2 6 .u
1 .4
1 .6
2 .9
5 .7
7 .8
18.1

8 .8
18.1
8 .4
2 6 .7
1 .4
1 .5
3 .0
5 .5
8 .0
18.5

16.3
2 6 .9
9 .6
16.7
2 .0
2.8
2 .3
7 .1
3 .9
1 2 .4

1 2 .5
28 .1
7 .0
2 3 .0
.7
1 .5
1 .0
3 .7
4 .8
1 7.6

T o t a l .................................

100.0

10C.0

100. C

10 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

____

9 0 7 .9

859. 8

48.1

343.1

3 1 8 .6

24.5

501.1

8 9 6 .3

814.3

82.0

40 2 .7

355.4

4 7 .3

585.4

A v e ra g e w eekly h o u r s _________

3 3 .8

33.9

3 1 .6

3 6 .9

3 7 .3

3 2 .4

3 3 .8

3 7 .8

3 7.7

3 8 .0

4 2 .1

4 2 .2

4 1 .2

4 0 .7

N u m ber of em ployees
(in th ou san ds)___ _____

W est

North C entral
Under 15 __ _________ ________
15 and under 3 5 _________ ____
35 and under 4 0 ________________
40 ____
____________________
O v er 40 and under 42_________
42
___________ __ ______ ____
O ver 42 and under 4 4 _________
44
O ver 44 and under 48_________
48 and o v e r ___________________ _
T o t a l _____________________
N um ber of em ployees
(in th ou san ds)___ _____
A v e ra g e w eekly hours




__

8 .4
2 5 .1
12.4
2 7 .3
3 .7
2 .0
1 .8
4 .6
4 .3
1 0 .4

8.1
25.2
12.6
27.7
3 .9
2.C
1 .9
4 .7
4 .4
9 .6

12.3
2 3 .4
1 0 .6
2 2 .6
2 .2
1 .0
i.C
2 .4
3.2
20.5

7 .7
19 .0
7 .0
19 .7
1 .7
1 .9
2 .1
5 .7
7 .2
2 8 .0

7 .2
17.9
7 .1
2 0 .3
1 .7
2 .1
2 .2
5 .7
7 .2
2 8 .6

12.4
2 9 .4
6 .5
13.7
1 .7
.3
1 .1
5 .6
7 .2
2 2 .0

11.3
2 5 .7
6 .5
16 .8
1.1
1 .7
1.8
3 .9
6 .5
2 4 .7

7 .3
19.3
7 .6
4 0 .8
2 .6
1 .3
1 .9
4 .9
3 .1
11.2

6 .6
18.8
7 .6
4 1 .9
2 .7
1 .3
2 .0
5.2
3.1
10.8

1 5 .9
2 5 .6
7 .5
2 7 .3
.9
.7
.9
1 .0
3 .2
17.C

6 .2
17.1
5 .6
29.8
2 .1
1 .3
1 .4
5 .6
6 .2
24 .8

6 .0
1 7.0
5 .5
30 .6
2 .3
1 .3
1 .5
5 .8
6 .5
2 3 .6

8 .2
13.0
5 .8
2 3 .6
1.0
1.2
.5
3.5
3 .5
3 4 .7

9 .2
2 4 .4
7 .1
24 .0
•6
1.1
.9
3.2
4 .6
24 .8

1 0 0.0

10C.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100 .0

10C.0

10C.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .G

9 7 6 .8

908.9

6 7 .9

3 9 3.0

35 5 .9

37.0

4 9 5 .0

6 0 4 .9

559.3

4 5 .6

2 60.8

2 3 2 .4

2 8 .4

320.0

3 5 .3

35.3

35.2

3 9 .0

3 9.4

3 4 .6

36.1

36.3

36.6

33.2

3 8 .8

3 8 .9

3 8 .5

37.0

T a b le 10.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il tr a d e h a vin g s p e c i fie d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s
b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k , U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
Em ployees with average hourly earnings of—
A ll
employees

W eekly hours of w o rk

Under
$1.00

$1.00
and
under
$1.15

$1.15
and
under
$1.25

$1.25
and
under
$1.35

$1.35
and
under
$1.50

and
under
$1.75

$ 1.75
and
under
$2.00

$2.00
and
under
$2.50

$2.50
and
under
$3.00

$3.00
and
over

United States:
Under 15 _________________________________________________________________
15 and under 35 .
_ .... ____ ..... . . . . . .
____
35 and under 40
. . . . . . ____ .
.. . .... .
_ ..
.
.
40 to and including 4 2 _________________________________________________
O ver 42 and under 44 _
_
...
_
___
44 and under 4 8 _________________________________________________________
48 and o v e r _________________________________________________ ________ ___
Total

.

... ...

.

...

.. _ _
.

N u m ber of em ployees (in thousands! ..

........ .

... ...

_

... ._

8.3
21.6
9.9
29. 1
2.0
10. 1
18.9

12.3
23. 1
6 .0
13.4
2.0
9.3
34. 0

14. 4
30. 4
7.5
15.8
1.5
9 .2
21. 3

12.4
32. 6
16.8
19.8
1.6
5. 0
11.8

13. 2
34. 3
11.6
20. 7
1. 3
5.6
13. 3

7.2
26. 2
13.4
25. 3
1.7
8. 1
18. 3

8. 1
21.6
10. 0
29.3
1.9
9. 5
19.6

5.4
16.8
9 .4
33. 4
2. 1
11. 1
21.8

5. 3
14. 5
9. 1
34.7
2. 2
12.9
21. 3

3.2
8. 0
6.9
44.8
3. 2
15.6
18. 3

3. 6
7. 3
5.9
46.8
2.9
16.5
17. 1

100.0

100.0

100.0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

100. 0

6687.0

363.9

447. 4

482. 5

1017.0

655.9

1056.8

642.8

887. 0

510.8

622.8

___________

36.9

38. 0

34.0

32.8

32. 4

36. 4

37. 0

38.8

39. 1

40. 6

40. 5

Under 15 _________________________________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 ___________________________________ _________ _______
35 and under 4 0 _________________________________________________________
40 to and including 4 2 ___________________________________ ____________
O v er 42 and under 4 4 ________________________________________________
44 and under 4 8 _________________________________________________________
48 and o v e r ______________________________________________________________

10.1
26.0
13.1
27.7
2 .2
8 .3
12.5

IS .2
43.0
8.C
14.6
.6
2 .4
12.2

2C.3
3 9.6
7 .4
1 7.4
1 .5
5. 9
7 .9

17.8
4 0 .9
16.6
16.1
•8
2 .7
5 .1

18.4
4 4 .9
12.1
15.8
.8
3 .0
4 .9

8 .9
36.2
19.1
20.1
1.3
4 .7
9 .7

1 0 .c
2 5 .4
14.3
2 5 .8
2 .2
7 .8
14.6

6 .7
18 .8
13.3
31.1
2 .5
9 .6
18.0

6 .0
15.5
12.9
31. 8
2 .6
13.8
17.5

2 .9
7.5
10. 9
4 4 .9
4 .2
1 3 .0
1 6 .7

4 .5
6 .5
9.5
4 8 .1
4 .8
13 .3
13.2

1U0. C

A v e ra g e w eekly h o u r s ____________________________________
Northeast:

T o t a l --------------------- -------------------- ----------------------------------------------

100.0

1UU.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .C

100.0

100. C

10 0 .0

N u m ber of em ployees (in th ou san d s)________________________________

1752.1

13.3

6 7 .8

64 .3

328.9

192.8

315.9

178.8

279.8

153.5

1 5 7.0

A v e ra g e weekly h o u r s _________________________________________________

34 .4

28.7

2 8 .4

28.5

2 7 .6

3 2 .7

3 4 .8

3 7 .4

3 8 .2

4 0 .3

3 9 .7

6 .4
16.2
8 .9
27.0
2.2
12.6
26.7

11.1
17.8
5 .8
13.0
2 .0
10.1
4(5.2

10.1
2 1 .8
5 .5
16 .6
1 .7
1 2 .7
31.5

9 .8
27 .4
17.2
22.5
2 .0
6 .2
15.0

6 .6
2 1 .5
12.0
25.6
2 .2
9 .1
22.9

3 .3
13.6
11.3
28 .0
2 .5
13 .9
27.5

4 .0
1 0 .7
8 .0
3 4 .6
2 .6
14 .6
2 5 .7

2 .2
7 .7
6 .3
37 .2
2 .1
1 6 .4
28 .0

3 .8
10.2
5 .5
3 6 .6
2 .0
15.9
2 6 .0

2 .1
5 .0
3 .6
4 7.0
2. 8
17 .5
2 1 .9

2 .4
5 .4
5.1
34.3
2 .5
25 .1
25 .2
1 00.0

South:
Under 15 _________________________________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 _____________ _________________________________________
35 and under 4 0 _________________________________________________________
40 to and including 4 2 _________________________________________________
O v er 42 and under 4 4 __________________________________________________
44 and under 4 8 _________________________________________________________
48 and o v e r ______________________________________________________________
T o t a l ______________________________________________________________
N n m h ftr

of em ployees (in thousands)

..........._...

.

. . ...... .

A v e ra g e w eekly h o u r s _______________________________ _________________




1150.0

l u c .o

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .u

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.C

1884.4

266.2

193.9

2 4 8 .4

293.3

175.1

23 3 .4

142.3

164.6

83. 8

8 3 .4

39.6

40.2

3 8 .6

35.1

38.6

4 1 .1

4 0 .9

4 2 .4

4 0 .9

41. 9

4 2 .3

T a b le 10. P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e h a vin g s p e c i f ie d a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s
b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k , U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , J u n e 1965— C on tin u ed
Em ployees with average hourly earnings of—
A ll
em ployees

W eek ly hours of w ork

Under
$1.00

$1.00
and
under
$1. 15

$1. 15
and
under
$1.25

$ 1.25
and
under
$1.35

$1.35
and
under
$1.50

9 .0
24 .0
9 .7
2 7 .4
1.9
10.1
17.9

15.2
38.9
6 .5
13.1
2 .6
7 .3
16.5

1 7 .5
3 6 .3
9.2
14.1
1 .4
7 .2
1 4 .4

14.4
38.3
17.0
16.8
1 .2
3 .8
8 .5

11.9
33 .9
11 .7
22.0
1 .3
5 .3
14.0

7 .9
26.2
11.0
2 6 .2
1 .7
7 .8
19.2

$1.50
and
under
$1.75

$1.75
and
under
$2.00

$2.00
and
under
$2.50

$2750
and
under
$3.00

$3.00
and
over

N orth C en tral:
Under 15 _________________________________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 _________________________________________________________
35 and under 4 0 _______________________________________ ________________
40 to and including 4 2 _________________________________________________
O ver 42 and under 4 4 ________________________________ ________________
44 and under 48 ________________ ______________________________ ______ ___
48 and o v e r
_
_ _____________
_________________________ _ __
T o t a l _________________________________________ ___________________
N um ber of em ployees (in thousands)

__

___

-

A v e ra g e w eek ly h ou rs

_ _ ______ _

_______

_

_

_

___

8 .4
2 2 .0
6 .9
2 6 .8
1 .8
9 .5
2 2 .6

6 .2
1 8 .9
9 .6
3 0 .8
1 .7
10.2
2 2 .5

5 .4
16 .2
9 .2
32 .3
2 .0
1 2 .8
22.1

3 .8
8 .9
6 .8
4 2 .3
3.2
18.2
1 6 .7

3 .9
6 .9
5 .4
4 4 .1
2 .6
21.1
1 6.0

10 0 .0

100.0

10C.G

1CC.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .C

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1864.8

75.0

1 5 0.8

143.5

28U.2

187.0

297.8

181.6

2 5 1 .6

1 4 1 .7

155.7

3 6 .3

31.7

31.1

30 .7

3 3 .3

36.5

3 7 .4

3 8 .4

39 .1

4 0 .4

4 0 .7

7 .6
2 0 .2
7 .0
3 7 .0
1 .5
8 .8
17.9

12.2
17.6
4 .2
26.9
.3
12 .7
26.1

13.2
3 4 .3
11.2
1 5 .8
.3
5 .1
2 C .0

13.4
30.3
13.5
19.7
1.9
5 .2
16.1

18.5
37 .3
9 .3
19.1
.9
4 .2
10.8

9 .2
28 .6
10.6
28.7
.9
4 .8
17.2

9 .3
2 7 .2
7 .5
32.6
.9
6 .3
16.1

6 .1
2 0 .8
7 .3
3 5 .9
1 .9
8 .8
19.2

5 .5
14 .5
6 .7
4 0 .4
2 .0
9 .1
21 .9

3 .4
9 .7
4 .5
4 6 .0
2 .2
1 4 .7
19.5

3 .1
8 .7
4 .1
52.3
1 .9
12.3
17.6

W est:
Under 15 _________________________________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 ______ ________________________________________________
35 and under 40
_
_
____________
40 to and including 4 2 ________________________ _______________________
O ver 42 and under 4 4 ____________________________ __ ____________
44 and under 4 8 _________________________________________________________
48 and o v e r ____________________________________________________________
T o t a l ____________________________________________

________________

N um ber of em ployees (in th o u san d s)________________________
A v e ra g e w eek ly hours




_ _

______

_

100. C

1G0.0

1GC.0

100. U

100 .0

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1185.7

9 .4

3 5 .0

26.3

114.5

101.1

20 9 .7

140.1

191.1

1 3 1 .8

2 2 6 .7

37.0

39.8

3 2 .6

33.3

29 .6

35.0

3 5 .4

3 7 .7

39 .1

40.2

4 0 .2

*
(0

T a b le 11.

P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e w o rk in g s p e c i f ie d w e e k ly h o u r s
b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
Em ployees with w eekly hours of w o rk of—

A v e ra g e hourly earnings

A ll
em ployees

Under
15

13
and
under
35

35
and
under
40

40
to and
including
42

O ver
42
and under
44

44
and
under
48

48
and
over

United States:




U nder
$ 1.00
$1.15
$ 1.25
$ 1.35
$1.50
$1.75
$2.00
$2.50
$ 3 .00

$1.00 ..........................................................................
and under $ 1. 15 ......................................................
and under $ 1. 2 5 _______ _____ _____ ________ „
and under $1.35 . ________
_____ .. ___ ___
___ .. ________
and under $1.50 _ ________ __
and under $ 1 .7 5 . __ __ . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________
and under $ 2. 0 0 ___________ ________ __ _____ ___
and under $ 2 .5 0 ____ .. __ ________ _____ „
and under $3.00 _ _____ __
_____ . ______ „
and o v er
_ _ _ ______ _ _ __ _____ ____ _____
Total

5 .4
6 .7
7 .2
1 5 .2
9 .8
15.8
9 .6
13 .3
7 .6
9 .3

8 .0
1 1 .6
1 0 .8
24 .2
8 .4
1 5.3
6 .3
8 .5
2 .9
4 .0

5 .8
9 .4
1 0 .9
2 4 .1
1 1 .8
1 5 .7
7 .5
8 .9
2 .8
3 .1

3 .3
5 .1
12.3
17 .9
13.3
16.0
9 .1
12.2
5 .3
5 .6

2 .5
3 .6
4 .9
10.8
8 .5
1 5 .9
1 1 .0
15 .8
11 .8
15.0

5 .5
4 .9
5 .8
10.3
8 .2
15 .2
10 .0
14.5
12.2
13.5

5 .0
6 .1
3 .5
8 .4
7 .8
14 .8
1 0 .6
1 6.9
11 .8
15.2

9 .8
7 .5
4 .5
1 0 .7
9 .5
1 6 .4
11 .0
1 4 .9
7 .4
8 .4

..........................................................................

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

N u m b e r of em ployees (in thousands)_______ ____________

6 687.0

556.1

1447.7

662.5

1944.5

132.9

6 7 6 .6

1266.8

$ 1 .8 5

$ 1 .4 6

$1.51

$1.69

$2.04

$1.97

$2.07

$1.77

•8
3 .9
3 .7
18.8
11.0
18 .0
10.2
16.0
8 .8
9 .0

1 .4
7 .8
6 .5
34 .2
9 .7
1 7 .8
6 .7
9 .5
2 .5
4 .0

1 .3
5 .9
5 .8
32 .4
1 5 .3
1 7 .6
7 .4
9.5
2 .5
2 .3

.5
2 .2
4 .6
17.3
16.0
19.6
10 .4
15.7
7 .2
6 .5

•4
2 .4
2 .1
10.7
8 .0
16 .8
11 .4
1 8 .3
14.2
1 5 .6

.2
2 .6
1 .4
6 .5
6 .2
1 7 .6
11.3
18.5
16.3
19.4

.2
2 .7
1 .2
6 .9
6 .1
1 6 .8
1 1 .8
2 6 .3
13.6
14 .3

.7
2 .5
1 .5
7 .4
8 .6
2 1 .1
14.7
2 2 .4
1 1 .7
9 .5

T o t a l ...............................................................................

100.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

N um ber of em ployees (in thousands)______________________

1752.1

1 7 7.4

4 5 5 .3

230.2

4 8 5 .3

39.2

146.2

21 8 .4

$ 1 .9 5

$ 1 .52

$1.55

$1.82

$2.14

$2.24

$2.18

$2.01

1 4 .1
10 .3
13.2
1 5 .6
9 .3
12 .4
7 .6
8 .7

1 5 .5
1 3 .8
2 2 .2
2 0 .6
7 .8
8 .2
3 .6

5 .6

12.7
8 .2
12.1
15.7
10.5
14.6
7 .4
8 .0
5 .7
5 .1

1 1 .3
1 0 .4
6 .5
1 1 .3
1 0 .3
14 .3

1 .4
1 .5

9 .2
6 .4
2 5 .5
21 .0
1 1 .8
11.1
5 .4
5 .4
1 .8
2 .5

6 .8
6 .3
11 .0
14.8
9 .6
1 5 .9
1 0 .4
11.8

4.4
4 .4

2 4 .4
1 6.2
20 .1
1 6.0
4 .7
7 .6
2 .6
5 .2
1 .5
1 .6

2 1 .3
12.1
7 .4
13 .4
9 .6
11.9
7 .9
8 .5
3 .7
4 .2

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

100.0

10 0 .0

100.0

1884.4

121.0

306.1

1 67.6

5 0 8 .8

4 1 .0

237.1

5 0 2 .8

$ 1 .5 4

$ 1 .21

$ 1 .29

$1.42

$1.69

$1.57

$1.74

$1.45

A v e ra g e h ourly e a r n in g s ____________________________________
Northeast:
Under
$ 1.00
$ 1. 15
$ 1.25
$1.35
$ 1.50
$1.75
$2.00
$2 .5 0
$3.00

$ 1 . 0 0 ..........................................................................
and under $ 1. 15 _ ____________ __ __ „ __ __
and under $ 1 .2 5 ____ __
_____ ________ _____ ___
and under $ 1 .3 5 ____ ________ _____ __ _____ __
and under $ 1 .5 0 _______ „ _ __ „
_____ ___
and under $1.75 . __ __ ____________ _____ _____
and under $ 2. 0 0 ______________________________________
and under $ 2 .5 0 ___________ . __ __ ________ __
and under $ 3 .0 0 ______________________________________
and o v er ____________
„ .. _____
__

A v e ra g e h ou rly earnings

__

_ _ _ _ _

South:
Under
$1.00
$1.15
$ 1.25
$1.35
$ 1.50
$1 .7 5
$ 2 . 00
$ 2 . 50
$3.00

$ 1 .0 0 ______ _____ __ ________
________ _
and under $ 1 .1 5 ______________________________________
and under $ 1 .2 5 ______________________________________
and under $ 1 .3 5 ____ ______ ______ __ „ _____ _
and under $ 1 .5 0 ______________________________________
and under $ 1 .7 5 ___________ __
.. _____
__
and under $ 2 .0 0 ____ __________ .. _____ _________
and under $ 2. 50 _
_____ __
„ __ _____
and under $3.00 _
________ _____
__
and o v er ____________ __ „
_____ „
__ ___
T o t a l........................................................... .................

N u m ber o f em ployees (in thousands) _ _
A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s ____________________________________

|

5.5

7.7

9.9
11.0
6 .2
8 .8




T a b le 11. P e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s in r e t a il t r a d e w o rk in g s p e c i f ie d w e e k ly h o u r s
b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s , U n ited S ta te s and r e g i o n s , J u n e 196 5 — C on tin u ed
Em ployees with w eekly hours of w o rk of—
A ll
em ployees

A v erage hourly earnings

Under
15

and
under
35

35
and
under
40

40
to and
including
42

O ver
42
and under
44

44
and
under
48

48
and
over

N orth C en tral:
Under
$ 1.00
$1. 15
$ 1.25
$ 1.35
$1.50
$1 .7 5
$2.00
$ 2. 50
$3. 00

$1.00 ____
_______ .... _______________
and under $1.15 ..................................................... ....
_____ _______________________
and under $ 1. 25 _
and under $ 1 .3 5 ______________________________________
and under $ 1.50 _ _ _ _ _
_____
and under $1.75
_ _
_ _
and under $ 2. 0 0 ______________________________________
and under $ 2.50
_
_
__ _
and under $ 3. 0 0 ______________________________________
and o v e r _______ ________ ________ __ _____ _____
Total

___________________________________________________

_

_

6 .8
1 5 .7
1 2 .4
19.8
8 .8
1 4 .8
6 .7
8 .1
3 .2
3 .7

6 .5
1 2 .3
12.3
2 1 .2
1 1 .0
1 4 .7
7 .7
9 .1
2 .8
2 .4

2 .7
7 .6
1 3.4
18 .0
11 .3
14.6
9 .6
1 2 .7
5 .3
4 .6

1 .9
4 .1
4 .7
12.0
9 .6
1 5.6
1 0 .9
1 5 .9
1 1 .7
1 3 .4

5 .6
6 .0
4 .9
1 0 .5
9 .3
15 .7
9 .0
14.3
13.0
1 1 .6

2 .9
5 .7
2 .9
7 .9
7 .7
1 5 .0
9 .8
1 7 .0
1 3 .7
1 7 .4

3 .7
6 .5
3 .6
1 1 .8
10 .7
2 0 .1
1 2 .3
1 6 .7
7 .1
7 .5

______

1 0 0.0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

100.0

100.0

1 00.0

100.0

1864.8

N u m ber o f em ployees (in thousands) _
A v e ra g e h ourly earnings

4 .0
8 .1
7 .7
1 5 .0
10.0
16 .0
9 .7
1 3 .5
7 .6
8 .3

167.8

4 4 7 .0

181.4

5 1 1 .3

3 4 .6

1 8 9.1

33 3 .5

$ 1 .8 5

8 1 .4 5

8 1 .4 9

81.67

82.01

81.92

$2.15

$ 1 .82

•8
2 .9
2 .2
9 .7
8 .5
1 7 .7
1 1 .8
16.1
1 1 .1
19.1

1 .3
5.1
3 .9
2 3 .5
1 0 .4
2 1 .8
9 .5
1 1 .6
5 .0
7 .8

.7
5 .0
3 .3
1 7 .8
12.1
2 3 .8
12.1
1 1 .5
5 .3
8 ,2

.5
4 .7
4 .3
12.7
1 2 .9
19.0
12.3
1 5 .4
7 .1
11 .2

.6
1 .3
1 .2
5 .0
6 .6
1 5 .6
1 1 .5
17.6
1 3 .8
2 7 .0

•1
•6
2 .7
5 .6
4 .9
10 .5
15.1
2 0 .7
16 .2
2 3 .6

1.1
1 .7
1 .3
4 .6
4 .7
12 .7
1 1 .8
1 6 .7
1 8 .6
2 6 .8

1 .2
3 .3
2 .0
5 .9
8 .2
1 6 .0
1 2 .7
1 9.8
12.1
18.9

W est:
U nder
$ 1.00
$ 1. 15
$1.25
$ 1.35
$ 1.50
$1.75
$ 2. 00
$2.50
$3. 00

$1.00
_
.
.
__ ____
_________
and under $ 1. 1 5 ____ __ _____ _____ _ _________
and under $ 1.25
.
_
and under $1.35
. .... _
____
and under $ 1.50
and under $ 1. 75
_ _
_ _ _ _ _ _
and under $ 2. 0 0 ____ __ __ _______________________
and under $ 2. 5 0 ______________________________________
and under $3.00
and o v e r _______________________________________________
T o t a l ______ _____________________________________________

N u m ber of em ployees (in thousands)_____
A v e ra g e hourly earnings

_

_

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

100.0

1 0 0 .0

10 0 .0

1 1 8 5 .7

8 9 .9

239.3

83.3

4 3 9 .1

18 .1

104.1

2 1 1.9

8 2 .2 2

81 .7 0

8 1 .78

81.93

82.39

$2.40

$2.50

$2.19

T a b le 12.

A v e ra g e straight-tim e hourly and weekly earnings of nonsupervisory em ployees in re ta il trade by weekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

W eekly hours of w o rk

U nder 15 ......................................................
15 and under 3 5 --- ---------------------------------35 and under 4 0 _________________________
4 0 ..................................................................
O v er 40 and under 42 ____________________
4 2 ..................................................................
O ver 42 and under 44 ___________________
4 4 ___________________________________________
O ver 44 and under 48 ___________________
48 and o v e r ________________________________
T o t a l ________________________________




A v e ra g e
N u m ber
hourly
of
em ployees earnings

South

Northeast

Num ber
A v e ra g e
A v e ra g e
weekly
of
hourly
earnings em ployees earnings

N um ber
A v e ra g e
A v e ra g e
of
hourly
weekly
earnings em ployees earnings

North Central
A v e ra g e
Num ber
A v e ra g e
hourly
weekly
of
earnings em ployees earnings

West

A v e ra g e
Num ber
A v e ra g e
weekly
of
hourly
earnings em ployees earnings

A v e ra g e
weekly
earnings

556. 1
1447. 7
662. 5
1662. 3
153. 2
128.9
132.9
306. 6
370. 0
1266. 8

$1.46
1. 51
1.69
2. 08
1. 90
1.77
1.97
2. 24
1. 93
1.77

$13. 56
36. 93
62. 83
83. 21
77.86
74. 34
84.68
98. 36
88. 51
93. 61

177. 4
455. 3
230.2
430.9
28.6
25.7
39.2
57.4
88.8
218.4

$1. 52
1.55
1.82
2. 16
1. 98
2. 04
2. 24
2. 24
2. 15
2. 01

$14. 50
37. 11
67. 29
86. 36
80.88
85.82
96. 21
98. 63
98. 35
105. 29

121.0
306. 1
167. 6
402.4
52.9
53. 5
41.0
108. 7
128.4
502. 8

$ 1. 21
1. 29
1.42
1.74
1. 57
1.46
1. 57
1.89
1.61
1.45

$ 11. 15
32. 21
52. 90
69.67
64. 17
61. 22
67.47
83. 06
73. 77
77. 17

167. 8
447. 0
181.4
427. 6
48.6
35. 1
34. 6
86.4
102.8
333. 5

$ 1.45
1.49
1. 67
2. 03
1.95
1.90
1.92
2. 38
1.97
1.82

$13. 33
36. 37
62. 20
81. 19
79. 73
79. 70
82. 51
104.81
90. 25
97.49

89.9
239. 3
83. 3
401.4
23. 1
14. 6
18. 1
54. 2
50.0
211.9

$ 1. 70
1.78
1.93
2. 39
2.48
2. 12
2.40
2.69
2. 31
2. 19

$15. 40
43. 69
71.86
95. 58
101.59
89. 20
102. 88
118.49
105. 34
114.44

6687.0

1.85

68.07

1752. 1

1.95

67. 27

1884.4

1. 54

60.95

1864.8

1.85

66. 96

1185. 7

2. 22

82. 34

Table 13.

Building materials, hardware, and farm equipment dealers

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f non s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $0.50 _________________________________________________
Under $ 0 . 7 5 __________________________________________ _______
Under $ 1 .00 _________________________________________________
Under $ 1 . 0 5 _________________________________________________

$! ]!IZZZZZ”
l
IZZ!IZ!ZZ

Under
15
Under $ 1 . 2 0 _________________________________________________
Under $ 1 . 2 5 _________________________________________________

Percent

Num ber

Percent

N um ber

P ercen t

Num ber

Percent

Num ber

Percent

•3
3 .4
11.7

•1
.7
2 .4

_

.

•1
•1

•1
.1

•2
1 .7
7 .7

.1
1.1
4 .9

•1
1 .5
3 .5

•1
1 .0
2 .3

•l
•4

.1
.5

24 .8
27.1
33.3
4 2 .2
47 .6

5.1
5 .5
6 .8
8 .6
9 .7

.7
.9
1 .0
1 .6
1 .9

•8
.9
1 .0
1.6
1 .9

14 .0
1 5 .5
1 9.3
2 4 .6
28 .2

8 .9
9 .9
12.3
1 5 .7
18.0

9 .3
10.0
12.2
14.9
16.4

6 .1
6 .5
e .c
9 .7
10.7

.7
.7
•8
1 .1
1 .2

•8
.9
1 .0
1 .4
1 .4

96.5
109.0
124.4
139.8
148.8

19.7
22 .3
25.5
28 .6
3 0 .4

9 .8
11.1
1 3 .7
15.1
1 6.1

10.2
11 .5
14.3
15 .7
1 6 .8

5 2 .6
58 .5
6 6 .5
73.5
7 7 .5

33 .5
37 .3
4 2 .4
46 .8
4 9 .4

30 .3
34.8
38.9
4 4 .2
47.6

19.8
22 .7
25.4
2 8.9
31.1

3 .8
4 .5
5 .3
6 .9
7 .6

4 .7
5 .4
6 .4
8 .4
9 .2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 3 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 4 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 4 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 5 0 _________________________________________________

Under
Under
Under
Under
U nder

$ 1 . 5 5 ___________________________________
$ 1 . 6 0 ___________________________________
$ 1 . 6 5 ____________________________ ______
$ 1 . 7 0 ___________________________________
$ 1 . 7 5 ___________________________________

182.8
192.8
210.2
221.4
234.1

3 7 .4
3 9 .4
4 3 .0
4 5 .3
4 7 .9

2 1 .0
2 2 .8
2 8 .4
3 0 .3
3 2 .7

2 1 .8
2 3 .6
2 9 .5
3 1 .5
3 4 .0

9 0 .1
9 3 .9
99 .1
102.3
106.2

5 7 .4
5 9.8
6 3 .1
6 5 .1
6 7 .7

59.1
6 2 .2
67.7
71.9
7 6.1

38.6
40. 7
4 4 .2
4 7.0
49. 7

12 .5
1 3 .9
1 5 .1
16 .9
1 9.0

15.2
16.9
18.2
20.4
23.0

U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder

$ 1 . 8 0 ___________________________________ *_____________
$ 1 . 8 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 9 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .9 5 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

251.1
261.8
276.2
285.4
291.3

51.4
53.5
56.5
58.4
59.6

3 6 .5
3 9 .0
4 2 .0
4 4 .3
4 5 .2

3 7 .9
4 0 .5
4 3 .6
4 6 .0
4 6 .9

111.5
114.9
119.5
122.6
125.4

7 1 .0
7 3 .2
76.1
78 .1
7 9 .9

81.1
64.6
88.4
9 0 .9
92.4

53.0
55.3
57.8
59.4
6 0 .4

2 2 .0
23 .3
26 .3
27.6
28 .3

26 .6
28.2
31.8
33.4
34.3

U nder
U nder
Under
Under
U nder

$ 2 .30 ...
$ 2 .40 ...
$2.50 .. .

*325.8
339.9
360.3
370.8
378.9

66. 6
69. 5
7 3 .7
7 5 .8
77. 5

5 2 .6
57.1
62 .8
6 5 .9
6 8 .8

5 4 .6
59 .3
6 5 .2
6 8 .4
7 1 .5

13 4 .5
1 3 7 .6
141.4
143.0
143.7

85.7
8 7 .6
9 0 .1
91 .0
9 1 .5

103.9
1C? .9
114.6
117.7
120.5

6 7.9
70.5
74.9
76.9
78. 8

3 4 .8
3 7 .4
4 1 .5
44 .2
4 5 .9

42.1
45 .3
5 0.2
53.5
55.5

Under
U nder
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .60 . . .
$ 2 .70 .. .
$ 2 .80 .. .
$ 2 .90 . . .
$ 3 . 0 0 __

3 96.6
4 0 4.3
413.1
420.0
425.6

81 .1
82.7
84.5
85 .9
87.1

73.4
7 5 .0
7 7 .7
78.4
79.1

7 6 .2
7 7 .9
80.6
8 1 .4
8 2 .2

14 7 .5
148.3
149.6
150.7
151.2

9 3 .9
9 4 .4
9 5 .3
9 6 .0
9 6 .3

125.0
128.1
130.5
132.7
135.5

81.7
83.7
85.3
86.7
88.6

5 0.7
5 2.9
5 5 .4
58 .2
5 9.8

61.3
64.1
67.1
7 0 .4
7 2 .3

100.0

96.3

100.0

157.0

100.0

1 5 3 .C

100.0

82.6

$ 2.10 . . .
$ 2 .2 0 . . .

Total
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s




4 8 8 .9
$1. 98

$2. 26

$1. 61

$1.,94

100.0
$2 .49

T a b le 14.

General m
erchandise stores

2

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r i c a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f x io n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
N um ber

Under SO. 50 _
Under S O .75 _
Under $ 1.00

_ __

. ________ ... _______________

..........

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.05 _ .....................................
$ 1 .1 0 _ ...
.
............
_ .... .....
___
S l.1 5
_
...
$ 1 .2 0 __________________________________________________
$ 1.25
_ _
___
__
___
_ _ _
...

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 _____________________________________________
_
$ 1.35
____ __ _ ___
__________ ___
_
_
$ 1.40
_
___
_
$ 1 .4 5 ----------------------------------------------------------------------$ 1 .5 0 .
________ ___
_______ __ _

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

Percent

N um ber

2 .2
34.3
79.8

.1
2.1
4 .8

*
.1
3 .2

Percent

*
•
•8

Num ber

Percent

.4
6 .7
12.9

1 .8
3 1 .0
5 9.4

N um ber

Percent

•3
3 .0
15.2

Num ber

Percent

.1
•6
3 .0

.1
1 .5

.7
2 .4
3 .1
4 .1
6 .9
7 .8

12.7
14 .4
16.2
3 4 .4
4 3 .6

3 .0
3 .4
3 .8
8 .1
10.3

7 7 .4
81.5
66.6
171.2
194.7

16.8
17.7
1 8 .8
3 7.1
4 2 .2

30.7
3 4 .0
42 .2
93 .0
113.4

6 .1
6 .8
8.4
18.6
22.6

6 .1
8.2
10.6
1 7 .9
20.4

36.1
42.7
45.2
54.0
5 7 .C

1 2 4 .6
158.6
154.2
21 7 .9
23 3 .4

2 9 .3
3 7.3
4 5 .7
51 .3
5 4 .9

259.2
28 2 .4
306.7
322.3
333.0

56.2
6 1 .2
6 6 .5
6 9 .9
7 2 .2

179.6
210.3
242.0
267.5
262.3

35.5
42.C
48 .3
53.4
56.4

31.2
52.7
6 7 .5
81.8
5C.8

12.0
20.2
2 5 .9
31.4
3 4 .9

1033.5
1078.5
1137.3
1178,6
1210.5

6 2 .7
65.5
69 .0
71.5
73.5

2 58.3
270. C
2 8 6.5
256.5
305.5

6 0 .8
6 3 .5
6 7 .5
6 9 .8
7 1 .9

350.6
3 6 0 .C
37 1 .7
379.4
385.8

7 6 .0
78 .0
80.6
8 2 .3
63.7

311.3
324.0
343.2
358.0
368.0

62.2
64.7
68 .5
71.5
73.5

113.3
124.5
135.5
14 4 .8
151.6

4 3 .5
4 7 .8
52.0
55 .6
58.2

$ 1 .8 0 .......... ................................................................
$ 1 . 8 5 __________________________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 __________________________________________________
$ 1 . 9 5 ............. ..............................................................
$ 2 . 0 0 ...........................................................................

1252.6
1278.8
1316.2
1340.0
1356.2

76. C
77.6
79.5
81.3
82.3

316.9
322.9
333*7
34 0 .5
345.3

7 4 .6
7 6 .0
7 8 .5
8 0 .2
81.2

3 9 4.4
39 9 .4
4 0 5 .3
4 0 8 .8
4 1 2 .3

85.5
8 6 .6
8 7 .9
8 8.6
89 .4

281.3
385.8
401.1
4C8.7
413.1

76.1
77.8
e o .i
81.6
82.5

160.1
166.7
176.2
18 1 .6
185.6

6 1 .5
6 4 .0
6 7 .7
6 9 .8
71.3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 ...........................................................................
$2. 2 0 _________________________________________________
$2. 3 0 __________________________________________________
$ 2 . 4 0 ______________________ ___________________________
$ 2 . 5 0 _______________________________ ________________

1404.4
1438.6
1468.5
1491.5
1508.8

85.3
87.3
69.2
9 0.5
51 .6

3 5 8.0
3 6 8 .C
3 7 6 .8
362.9
3 8 8.2

8 4 .2
8 6 .6
8 8 .7
9 0 .1
9 1 .3

4 2 0 .6
4 2 5 .5
4 3 0 .7
4 3 4 .7
4 3 7 .9

5 1 .2
9 2 .3
9 3 .4
9 4 .2
5 4 .9

42 6 .1
425.4
446.5
455.1
46 0 .3

£5.5
87.7
85.6
5 0 .5
5 1.5

157.7
20 5 .8
2 12.8
21 8 .8
222.5

7 6 .0
79.1
81.9
84.1
85.5

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2,60 _______________________________ ____ ________ ____
_
$2. 7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 8 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 9 0 _________________________________ ________________
$ 3 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

1530.0
1544.6
1557.7
1571.7
1575.2

52.5
53.8
54.6
55.4
55.5

394.4
398.5
4C2.1
405. 8
4 C 7.8

9 2 .8
9 3 .8
9 4 .6
95 .5
9 6 .0

4 4 1.8
4 4 4 .5
44 7 . C
4 4 9 .5
4 5 0 .8

9 5 .8
9 6 .4
5 6 .9
9 7 .5
9 7 .8

465.5
47C.5
474.5
477.5
48C.4

53. C
54. C
54. 8
55.4
5 5 .5

228 .0
2 31.1
2 3 3 .8
238.1
2 40.2

87.6
68 .8
89.8
91.5
9 2 .3

T o t a l ___________________________________________________

1647.3

1CC.C

42 5 .0

100.0

4 6 1 .2

100.0

5CU.8

126.9
1 3 8 .C
155.6
316.5
372.1

7 .7
8 .4
5 .4
15.2
22.6

594,6
704.1
810,4
889,5
939.6

$1.55 .
___________________
_______________ _
$1.60 . . . ______ __________
____
$ 1 . 6 5 ____________________________ ___________________
$ 1 .7 0 ____ ____________ ______________________________
$ 1 .7 5 ...........................................................................

Under
Under
U nder
Under
Under

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s __________________________________ _




$ 1 . 62

S I . 70

S I . 42

100.0
S I,►
65

26G.3

100.0
SI • 89

Table

is. Department stores

Cumulative numerical and percent distributions of nOnsupervisory employees by average straight-time hourly earnings,
United States and regions, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)

United States

Northeast

South

North Central

West

Average hourly earnings
Number
Under $ 0 .5 0 _____ __ ___________ ___ ____ „ „ „ __
Under $ 0 .7 5 ........ ..........................................................
_________ _____ ___________ __
Under $ 1 .0 0 _____

Percent

Number

Percent

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

•3
3.1
9.6

•3
.9

•1
2.1

•8

.3
2.8
5.9

.1
1.1
2.3

•2
1.5

•1
.5

•1

a
a

a

a

Number

a

a

a

a
a

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .0 5 ...................................................................
__ _________________ „ __
$ 1 .1 0 _________ „
$ 1 .1 5 _________ ________ _____ _________________
__ _ _ _ _ _ ____ ________ .
$ 1.20
_
_
$ 1 .2 5 ---------------------------------------------------------------

15.6
17.6
20.2
104.5
130.5

1.5
1.7
2.C
10.3
12.6

3.9
4.5
4 .9
12.3
16.7

1.4
1.6
1.8
4.5
6 .1

7.0
8.0
8.5
53.9
65.6

2.7
3.1
3.3
21.0
25.5

3.7
4.1
5.4
35.0
44.4

1.2
1.3
1.7
11.2
14.2

1.0
l.i
1.3
3.3
3.8

.6
•6
.8
1.9
2.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 ............................................... ...................
$ 1 .3 5 ___________________ ____ ____ _____ _____
$ 1.40 __
__
_ _ __ ________ _ _____ __
$ 1 .4 5 __________________________________ __________
$ 1 .5 0 -------------------------------------- -------------------------

279.8
347.5
419.2
473.7
509.1

27.5
34.1
41.1
46.5
49.9

69.4
93.9
119.9
138.4
150.2

25.2
34.0
43.5
50.2
54.5

110.7
125.9
143.1
154.5
162.0

43.0
48.9
55.6
60.0
62.9

89.7
108.9
129.3
144.3
J54.4

28.6
34.7
41.2
4 6 .C
49.2

9.9
18.8
26.9
36.4
42.5

5.8
10.9
15.6
21.1
24.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .5 5 _____________________________________________
$1.60 _
_
_ __ __________ „ __
$1.65
__ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _
$ 1 .7 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 ---------------------------------------------------------------

576.2
607.9
645.7
674.9
698.9

56.5
59.6
63.4
66.2
68.6

167.2
174.9
185.0
191.9
198.3

60.6
63.5
67.1
69.6
71.9

175.4
181.9
189.9
195.4
200.1

68.1
70.7
73.8
75.9
77.7

173.6
182.4
194.1
203.3
210.5

55.3
58.1
61.9
64.8
67.1

60.0
68.6
76.7
84.4
90.0

34.8
39.8
44.5
48.9
52.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .8 0 __ __ ____ __ __ _________ ______ ____
$ 1 .8 5 ---------------—---------------------------------------------$ 1 .9 0 ------------- , ----------------------------------------- ------$1.95 — -------------------------------------------------- —-----$ 2 .0 0 __ __ __ ________ ________________________

728.4
747.8
771.7
787.0
799.0

71.5
73.4
75.7
77.2
76.4

205.6
209.9
215.5
219.2
222.0

74.6
76.1
78.2
79.5
80.5

206.2
210.0
214.4
216.7
218.8

80.1
81.6
83.3
84.2
85.0

22C.2
226.2
232.8
238.2
241.6

70.2
72.1
74.2
75.9
77. C

96.4
101.7
108.9
112.9
116.6

55.9
59.0
63.1
65.5
67.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .1 0 ..............................................................
$ 2 .2 0 _____ __________ _ ____ ___________ __
$ 2 .3 0 _____ ________ __ __ ____ __ __ ________
$2.40
__ _
__ _ __ ____ _____
___
__ ________ ________ ____
$ 2 .5 0 ______________

833.5
858.1
882.3
900.1
913.4

61.8
84.2
86.6
ee.3
89.6

230.6
236.4
242.7
247.3
251.1

63.6
85.7
68.0
89.7
91.1

224.2
228.1
232.4
235.6
237.5

87.1
88.6
90.3
91.5
92.3

253.5
262.1
270.0
275.3
279.6

80.8
83.6
86.1
87.8
89.1

125.2
131.5
137.2
142.0
145.2

72.6
76.2
79.5
82.3
84.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2.60 _________ ____
_
_ _ _________ __
$ 2 .7 0 __ _ __ ____
______ ___________ ____
$ 2 .8 0 __ ______________ ________ „ ________ __
$ 2 .9 0 ___________________ __ __________
„ ___
$ 3 .0 0 __ ________ ____ ________ __
________

928.7
940.5
951.2
960.2
965.8

91.1
92.3
93.3
94.2
94. e

255.0
257.8
260.6
263.1
264.3

92.5
93.5
94.5
95.4
95.9

240.5
242.8
245.0
247.1
248.0

93.4
94.3
95.2
96.0
96.4

284.4
288.5
292.1
294.4
296.3

90.7
9 2 .C
93.1
93.9
94.5

148.9
151.3
153.5
155.7
157.2

86.3
87.7
89.0
90.2
91.1

1019.3

100.0

275.7

100.0

257.4

100.0

313.7

100.0

172.5

Total

.................................................................

Average hourly earnings




_____

S I. 75

$1. 72

S I. 60

S I.,77

100.0
SI,.98

T a b le

16

.

Limited price variety stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r i c a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by a v e r a g e
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965

s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,

(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

South

Northeast

W est

North Central

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Percent

*
*
1.1

.4
9 .3
19.2

.4
10.6
22 .0

.1
1.3
7 .4

.2
1. 8
9. 9

.

_

.1
.8

.3
2.0

3 .3
3 .6
4 .3
13 .7
1 7 .8

4 .3
4 .7
5 .5
17.9
23.2

27.8
29 .5
3 0 .4
52.1
6 1 .1

31.8
33.8
34 .8
59.6
6 9 .9

14.8
16.1
2C .7
35.9
44 .7

19.8
21.5
27.6
4 8 .0
55. 8

1 .6
3 .2
4 .1
6 .3
7 .5

4 .2
8 .4
10.8
16.6
19.8

62.8
70.6
77.1
80. 5
8 3 .C

38.1
4 5 .5
51.5
54.3
56.3

4 9 .6
59.1
6 6 .9
7 0 .6
73.2

7 1 .4
7 5.1
78.1
79 .8
81.0

81 .6
€6.0
89.3
9 1 .3
9 2 .6

54.1
57.6
62 .2
64.8
66 .4

72.3
7 7 .C
83.1
86. 7
88.7

10.5
17 .4
21 .9
2 4 .2
2 6 .4

27.6
4 5.7
57.6
63.8
69.6

N um ber

Under $0.50 _____________
U nder $0.75 _____________
U nder $ 1 .0 0 _____________

Percent

.5
10.7
2 8 .2

.2
3 .5
10.2

*
*
•8

47.5
52.4
59.4
108.0
131.2

17.1
18.9
21.5
39.0
47 .4

174.1
195.6
213.6
223.1
230.1

Percent

N um ber

N um ber

Percent

Num ber

Percent

U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder

$ 1 .0 5 _____________
$1. 1 0 _____________
$1. 1 5 ______________
$ 1 .2 0 _____________
$ 1 . 2 5 _____________

Under
U nder
U nder
Under
Under

$ 1 . 3 0 _____________
$ 1 . 3 5 _____________
$ 1 . 4 0 _____________
$ 1 .4 5 ______________
$1.50 _____________

Under
U nder
U nder
Under
U nder

$1.55 _____________
$ 1 . 6 0 _____________
$1.65 _____________
$1.70 _____________
$ 1 .7 5 ______________

239.1
243.5
2 4 9 .C
251.7
254.2

86.3
87.9
89.9
90.8
91.7

59.3
6 1 .0
6 2 .7
6 3 .6
6 4 .6

77 .1
79.3
81.5
82 .6
84 .0

82.7
83.4
84 .1
8 4.3
84.8

94.7
9 5 .4
S6 .2
9 6 .5
97 .1

68.2
69.1
7C.2
7C.7
71.2

91.1
52.4
53.8
54.5
95.2

2 8 .9
3 0 .C
32.1
3 3 .1
3 3 .6

76.d
79.0
84.5
87.2
88.4

U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder

$ 1.80 _____________
$ 1 .8 5 ______________
$ 1 .9 0 ______________
$ 1 .9 5 _____________
$ 2 .0 0 ______________

256.9
258.8
261.4
262.8
263.7

92.7
93.4
94.3
94. 8
95.2

6 5 .7
6 6 .5
6 7 .8
68 .5
69.1

8 5 .4
86.4
88.1
89.1
89 .9

85 .5
85.9
86.1
86.2
86.3

97.8
9 8 .3
9 8 .6
9 8 .7
98 .8

71.5
71.8
72.3
72.5
72.6

55.6
55.9
56.6
56.5
57.1

34.2
34 .6
35.2
35 .6
35 .6

90.0
91.1
92.7
93 .6
93.8

Under $ 2 . 1 0 _____________
U nder $ 2. 2 0 _____________
U n d e r-'$ 2 .3 0 _____________
Under $ 2 . 4 0 _____________
U n d e r.$2. 5 0 _____________

266.5
269.2
27C.5
271.6
272.2

96.3
97.2
97.6
98.0
98.3

7 0 .6
72.1
7 3.0
7 3 .7
7 4 .2

9 1 .9
93.7
94 .9
95 .8
96 .4

86.9
8 7.0
87.1
87.2
87.2

9 9 .4
9 9 .6
9 9 .7
9 9 .7
9 9 .8

73.0
73.4
7 3 .5
73.7
7 3 .8

57.6
98.1
98.3
58.5
58.7

36 .4
36.7
3 6 .9
37.1
37.1

95 .7
96.7
97 .1
97 .6
97.7

Under
U nder
U nder
Under
U nder

$ 2 . 6 0 _____________
$2. 7 0 _____________
$ 2 . 8 0 _____________
$ 2 . 9 0 _____________
$ 3.00 _____________

273.4
274.0
274.4
275.3
275.7

98.7
98.9
99.0
99.4
99.5

7 4 .7
7 5 .0
75.2
75 .7
7 6 .0

97.1
9 7 .5
97 .8
9 8 .5
98 .8

87.3
87.3
87.4
87.4
87.4

9 9 .9
9 9 .9
10C.0
100.0
100.0

7 4 .C
7 4 .2
74.3
74.5
7 4.6

5 5 .C
95.1
59.4
95 .6
59. 7

37 .4
37 .5
37.5
3 7 .7
3 7 .8

9 8 .4
98.7
98.8
99 .2
99.4

T o t a l _______________

277.1

100.0

7 6 .9

100.0

87.4

100.0

74.8

100.0

3 8 .0

Average hourly earnings




$1. 31

$1. 49

$1. 14

$1. 26

100.0
$1 .47

T a b le 17.

Food stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965

s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,

(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North C entral

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $0.50 _____________________________________________
Under $0.75 _____________________________________________
Under $ 1 .0 0 _____________________________________________

Percent

N um ber

P ercen t

Num ber

Percent

Num ber

P ercen t

Num ber

Percent

4 ,4
2 9 .C
i
76.4

•3
2 .1
5 .6

•1
.7
3 .4

*
.2
•8

3 .6
2 2 .6
5 1 .5

1 .0
6 .4
14 .6

•6
5 .6
19.8

•2
1.5
5 .2

*
.1
1 .7

*
•1
.7

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .0 5 _____________________________________________
$1.10 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .1 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .2 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .2 5 _____________________________________________

4*5 .3
152.2
1TQ.3
247.2
27C.9

10 .6
11.1
12.5
18.1
19.8

2 0 .5
2 2 .4
2 5 .5
3 2 .0
3 5 .6

5 .1
5 .5
6 .3
7 .9
8 .8

7 6 .4
7 8 .4
82 .7
128.7
140.3

2 1 .7
22. 2
23.4
36 .5
3 9 .8

42 .8
4 5.0
54.0
72.8
80.4

11.2
11.8
14.2
15.1
21.1

5 .7
6 .4
8.1
13 .7
14 .7

2 .5
2 .8
3 .6
6 .0
6 .4

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .3 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .4 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .5 0 _____________________________________________

416.2
454.4
502.9
536.1
564.5

30 .5
33.2
36 .8
39 .2
4 1 .3

95 .3
107.1
126.1
138.4
145.9

23.5
2 6 .5
3 1 .2
34.2
36 .1

174.7
186.3
199.2
20 8 .5
216.3

4 9 .6
5 2 .8
56 .5
59.1
6 1 .3

116.4
125.6
135.4
144.3
153.8

30.5
33 .0
35.5
37.5
4 0 .3

2 9 .8
3 5 .4
4 2 .1
4 4 .9
4 8 .6

13.1
15.5
18.5
19.7
21.3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .5 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .6 0 __________________________ __________________
$ 1 .6 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 _____________________________________________

626.2
650.5
681.2
716.0
736.2

4 5 .8
4 7 .6
4 9 .6
52.4
53.9

1 6 8 .9
180. 1
19 2 .0
200.1
2 0 7 .8

4 1 .7
4 4 .5
4 7 .5
4 9 .5
5 1 .4

2 2 9 .4
235.4
243.5
250.4
2 5 5.3

65.1
6 6 .8
6 9 .0
7 1 .0
7 2 .4

171.5
177.1
185.2
191.4
197.3

4 5 .0
4 6 .4
4 8 .6
50.2
51. 8

5 6 .4
5 7 .9
6 0 .6
7 4 .2
7 5 .7

24 .7
25.3
26.5
32.5
33.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .8 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .8 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .9 5 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .0 0 _____________________________________________

769.3
789.2
818.4
841.4
860.6

56.3
57.7
59 .9
6 1 .6
6 3 .0

2 1 9.4
2 24 ..8
235.3
24 1 .6
24 5 .9

54 .2
55 .6
5 8 .2
59 .7
6 0 .8

262.5
26 7 .5
2 7 3.7
27 9 .2
283.1

7 4 .4
7 5 .9
7 7 .6
7 9 .2
8 0 .3

207.2
215.2
222.9
230.5
239.3

54.3
56.4
58.5
6 0 .5
6 2 .8

80.2
81.8
86.4
SC. 1
92.3

35.1
35.8
37.9
39.4
4 0 .4

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .1 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .2 0 __________________________________________ ...
$ 2 .3 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .4 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .5 0 _____________________________________________

915.3
959.0
1001.8
1C38.0
1073.2

67.0
70.2
73.3
7 5 .9
78 .5

2 6 4.2
2 7 7.6
2 9 3.5
304 . 9
3 1 9 .8

6 5 .3
6 8 .6
7 2 .5
7 5 .4
79 .0

295.0
30 4 .7
313.5
3 1 8.6
324.2

8 3 .7
8 6 .4
88.9
9 0 .3
9 2 .0

256.1
272.2
284.5
2 98.9
3C9.7

67.2
71.4
74.6
7 8 .4
81.2

1 0 0 .0
104.5
110.3
1 1 5 .6
11 5 .6

4 3 .8
4 5 .8
48.3
50.6
52.4

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .7 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .8 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .9 0 _____________________________________________
$ 3 .0 0 _____________________________________________

1118.3
1144.0
1170.5
1190.4
1208.7

£1.8
83.7
85.6
87.1
88 .4

33 4 .5
3 4 4.3
3 5 4 .0
36 1 .8
368. C

8 2 .7
8 5 .1
87.5
8 9 .4
9 0 .9

330.3
334.7
338.7
341.5
343.8

9 3 .7
9 4 .9
96 .1
9 6 .9
9 7 .5

326.9
333.3
340.8
345.1
350.2

£5.7
87.4
89.4
9 0 .5
91 .8

126.5
13 1 .7
137.1
1 42.0
14 6 .8

55.4
57.7
60.1
6 2 .2
6 4 .3

T o ta l____________________________________ __________

1366.8

100.0

352.6

100.0

381.3

100.0

22 8 .3

Average hourly earn ings_______________________________




100.0
$ 1 . 91

4 0 4 .6
$1. 99

$1. 51

$1. 88

100.0
$2..48

3

T a b le 18.

Grocery stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
South

Northeast

United States

North C entral

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $ 0 .5 0 ____________
Under $0.75 ____________
Under $ 1 .0 0 ____________

Percent

P ercen t

N um ber

3 .3
18.5
4 5 .2

1 .0
5 .8
13 .9

.6
4 .0
13.9

.2
1 .2
4 .3

*
•1
1 .6

4
•1
•8

3 .4
3 .6
4 .0
5 .5
6 .2

6 6 .5
6 8 .2
71.7
114.2
124.5

2 0 .5
2 1 .0
22.1
35 .2
36.4

30.3
32.1
27.2
55.2
6 1 .2

5 .4
5 .5
11.5
17.0
18 .5

3 .2
3 .9
4 .5
9 .2
9 .9

1.7
2 .0
2 .4
4 .8
5 .2

60.2
6 9 .8
84.5
92.8
58.9

1 9 .4
2 2 .5
27.2
2 9 .8
31 .8

156.0
167.1
175.4
168.3
195.5

46.1
51 .5
55 .3
58.1
6 0 .3

91.0
58.5
1C7.0
114.6
122.5

28.1
30. 5
33.0
35.4
27. 5

2 0 .9
24.1
2 8 .8
3 0 .9
3 3 .4

10.9
12.6
15.0
16.1
17.4

Percent

Num ber

4 ,0
23.6
6 2 .9

.3
2.1
5.5

.1
.5
2 .2

*
.2
.7

110.6
115.2
126. C
195.5
214.9

5.6
10.0
10.9
17.0
16 .7

1 0 .5
11.1
1 2 .4
1 7.0
19.2

328.0
359.5
399.8
4 26.7
4 50.8

26.5
31.3
34.7
37.1
25.2

N um ber

Percent

Num ber

Percent

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .0 5 ____________
$1. 1 0 ....................
$,1.15____________
$ 1 .2 0 ____________
$ 1 .2 5 ______ _____ _

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 ____________
$ 1 .3 5 ____________
$ 1 .4 0 ____________
$ 1 .4 5 ____________
$ 1 .5 0 ....................

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .5 5 ____________
$ 1 .6 0 ................... .
$ 1 .6 5 ____________
$ 1 .7 0 ............... .
$ 1 .7 5 ................... .

499.8
52C.2
547.5
575.6
597.6

43.4
45.2
47.6
50.4
51.5

116.3
124.5
134.8
142.2
149.3

3 7 .4
40 .1
4 3 .4
4 5 .8
4 8 .0

207.5
213.5
221.6
227.7
232.5

64 .1
6 5 .9
6 8 .3
7 0 .2
7 1 .7

136.6
141.7
148.5
154.1
155.4

42.2
4 2 .7
4 5 .8
4 7 .5
45.2

3 8 .9
40.1
4 2 .6
5 5 .7
5 6 .4

20.3
20 .9
22 .3
29.0
2 9 .4

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .8 0 ____________
$ 1 .8 5 ____________
$ 1 .9 0 ____________
$ 1 .9 5 ____________
$ 2 .0 0 ____________

624.7
6 41.5
663.8
685.1
701.6

54.3
55.7
57.7
59.5
61.0

ls e .i
162.2
169.5
175.4
178.7

5 0.9
52.2
54.5
5 6 .4
5 7 .5

235.2
244.1
249.6
254.8
258.5

7 3 .7
7 5 .3
76 .9
7 6 .5
7 9 .7

167.8
174.3
175.6
166.2
154.3

51.8
53.8
55.4
57.5
60 .0

55 .6
6 0 .9
65.1
6 8 .7
70.1

31.1
31 .8
34 .0
3 5 .9
36.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 ____________
$2. 2 0 ____________
$2. 3 0 ____________
$ 2 .4 0 ____________
$2. 5 0 ____________

749.6
789.4
826.2
859.3
892.4

65.1
68.6
71.8
74.7
77.5

193.4
2 0 4 .7
218.2
228.6
242.1

62 .2
6 5 .8
7 0.2
73 .5
77 .9

265.7
279.2
287.6
292.6
29e.G

83.1
86.1
88 .7
9C.2
9 1 .9

210.0
225.2
235.3
2 48.4
258.8

64. 6
6 5 .5
72.6
76.7
75.5

7 6 .4
80.3
85.1
89.7
5 3.4

39.9
4 1 .9
4 4 .4
4 6 .8
4 8 .8

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 ____________
$2. 7 0 ____________
$ 2 .8 0 ____________
$ 2 .9 0 ____________
$3.00 ....................

931.6
954.7
577.7
995.4
1012.3

80.5
83.0
e s .o
66.5
88.0

253.3
261.5
2 6 9.9
2 7 6 .4
2 6 1.5

81.5
84.1
86.8
8 8 .9
9 0 .7

303.6
307.8
311.6
314.3
316.4

9 3 .6
5 4 .9
9 6 .0
9 6 .9
9 7 .6

274.8
280.7
286.5
250.6
255.4

e 4 .e
66.7
86.6
85.8
51 .2

95 .8
104.7
1C9.3
113.9
118.5

52.1
54 .6
57.1
59 .4
6 1 .9

T o t a l ______________

115C.5

100.0

31C.9

100 .0

324.4

100.0

32 4 . C

1C0.C

1 5 1.6

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s




S i . 53

$2.04

$1.51

$1. 92

100 .0
$2. 55

T a b le 19.

Automotive dealers and gasoline service stations

Cumulative num erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by a v erage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings,
United States and region s, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

South

Northeast

North C entral

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Percent

Niamber

P ercen t

N um ber

P ercen t

N um ber

P ercen t

Num ber

Percent

Under $0.50 _________________________________________________
Under $0.75 __ ____________________________________________
Under $ 1 .0 0 __ _________________________________________ „

2.4
IS .5
74.6

•2
1 .5
5 .9

♦
•2
1 .4

♦
•1
•5

2 .1
16.0
6 1 .0

.5
4 .2
15 .9

.2
2 .6
9 .7

. 1
.6
2 .8

.1
•8
2 .6

♦
.3
.9

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 0 5 ................ ..........................................................
$ 1 . 1 0 _____________________________________________ „
$ 1 . 1 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .2 0 ___________________________________ ____________
$ 1 . 2 5 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

136.7
151.7
173.3
192.9
2 0 6 .C

10.8
11 .5
13.7
15.2
16.2

7 .3
8 .2
1 2 .5
14.1
1 5 .5

2 .7
3 .0
4 .6
5 .2
5 .7

9 2 .5
102.3
112.2
1 2 2 .9
130.5

24 .0
2 6 .6
29.2
22 .0
3 3 .9

26.5
30 .0
35.3
4 0 .5
4 3 .6

7 .5
8. 8
10.3
11.8
12.8

10 .0
11.3
13.2
1 5 .4
16.4

3 .7
4 .1
4 .8
5 .7
6 .0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 3 0 ...........................................................................
$ 1 . 3 5 ____________________ ______________ ____________
____________________
$ 1.40 _ _ _ •_
__ . __
$ 1.45
_
_
_ __
_
_ .
$ 1 . 5 0 _________________________________________________

320.0
349.9
292.1
426.7
451.9

25.2
2 7 .6
30.5
23.6
25.6

4 2 .3
4 8 .3
5 7 .9
6 4 .0
6 9 .7

1 5 .6
1 7 .9
2 1 .4
23 .7
2 5 .8

164.1
176.0
188.0
2 0 0.5
208.1

4 2 .7
4 5 .8
4 8 .9
52.1
54.1

7 8 .8
5 8 .5
108.6
116.2

23.1
25.5
28. 8
3 1.8
34.0

3 4 .8
3 8 .6
4 7 .7
53.5
5 7 .9

12.7
14.1
17.5
19.6
21.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.55 _____________________________________ ___________
$1.60
._ _ _ ...
.. .
.
$1.65 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 ____________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 _____________________________________________ __

538.2
568.2
605.7
632.4
659.1

4 2 .4
44 .7
4 7 .7
45. 6
51.5

92.2
55.6
110.2
116.7
1 2 1 .9

3 4 .1
3 6 .8
4 0 .7
4 3 .1
4 5 .1

22 2 .4
231.1
240.1
246.3
254.5

57 .8
6 0 .1
6 2 .4
6 4 .0
6 6 .2

150.2
160.5
168.7
175.7

4 1 .5
4 4 .C
4 7 .0
4 5 .4
51.4

81 .9
8 7.4
94 .9
100.7
107.0

30.0
32.0
34.8
3 6 .9
39.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.80 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 8 5 __ _________ ___________________________________
____
_
_ _ _ _
__ _________ _____
$1.90
$ 1 . 9 5 __ _________________________________________ ..
$ 2 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

702.8
727.1
753.8
776.2
789.3

55.3
57.3
59 .4
61.1
62.2

134.2
138.4
145.2
150.2
153.3

4 9 .6
51.2
5 3 .7
55.5
5 6 .7

262.2
269.7
27 6 .6
283.1
286.9

68.1
70.1
7 1 .9
7 3 .6
7 4 .6

185.4
192.2
200.5
2C7.5
210.5

54.3
56.3
58.7
60 .7
6 1 .7

121.0
126.7
131.4
135.3
138.1

4 4 .3
4 6 .4
48.1
49.5
50.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 . 1 0 ...........................................................................
$2. 2 0 _________________________________________________
$2. 3 0 ______________________________________ ________
$ 2 . 4 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 5 0 ________________________________________________ _

654.9
685.9
929.8
556.8
579.6

67.3
6 5 .6
73.2
75 .3
77.1

174.7
184.4
196.1
20 2 .6
2 0 7 .4

6 4 .6
6 8 .2
7 2 .5
7 4 .9
7 6 .7

2 9 9.8
306.6
316.1
321.9
3 2 6.8

77 .9
7 9 .7
82.2
83 .7
85.0

228.9
236.8
248.8
256.0
262.1

67.0
69 .3
72.8
74 .9
76.7

15 1 .4
158.0
168.8
176.3
183.2

55.5
57.9
61 .8
64.6
67.1

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 6 0 _________________________________________________
$2.70
$2.80
___ ___
_ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
$ 2 .90 ___________________ __
________________
_
$ 3 .00
___
___
_______ _ _

1018.9
1040.0
1061.2
1080.6
1C95.8

80.2
61 .5
63.6
85.1
86.3

21 7 .9
223.2
2 2 9 .9
2 3 3 .7
236.3

80.5
82 .5
8 5 .0
8 6 .4
8 7 .3

3 3 4.3

86 .9
88.0
88.9
90 .0
90 .9

272.8
278.7
283.5
28 9 .4
254.6

7 9.5
81.6
83.0
8 4.7
86.2

153.9
15 5 .8
205.5
211.2
215.5

71.0
73.2
75.3
77 .4
7 8 .9

10C.C

2 7 0.5

100.0

3 8 4 .7

100.0

241.6

10 0 .0

27 3 .0

T o t a l ___

_ _ _ _ _

_______

_ _ _

_ _

_____

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s ___________________________________




1269.8
$2. 02

$2. 15

3 3 e .4

342.2
346.3
349.5

S I.,69

e7 .c

M l.7

$2<.07

100.0
$2 .32

T a b le

20

.

Motor vehicle dealers (new and used cars)

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited Sta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965

(Em ployees in thousands)

A verage hourly earnings
Number

Percent

Under $0. 5 0 _____________________________ __________ ____
Under $ 0 .7 5 _____________________________________________
Under $ 1 .0 0 _____________________________________________

•7
4.4
21.2

.1
.7
3.5

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.05 ................................................... ...................
$1. 1 0 ________________ ______ ______________________
$ 1 .1 5 ... .................................................. ................
$ 1 .2 0 ................................. .....................................
$1.25 .....................................— ..............................

34.8
35.9
48.1
54.6
60.0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 ................ ......................................................
$ 1 .3 5 _______________ ______ _______________________
$ 1 .4 0 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .4 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .5 0 ................................................... -..................

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

South

Northeast

United States

Number

Percen t

Number

West

North Central
Percent

Number

Percen t

Number

Percent

*
*
.6

♦
*
.5

.6
2.5
14.7

.3
1.5
7.6

l.C
3.9

. 6
2.3

•1
.4
1.9

•1
.4
1.8

5. 8
6.6
8.0
5.0
5.5

1.8
2.4
3.1
3 .9
4 .6

1.4
1.8
2.4
3.0
3.6

22.5
26.0
31.0
34.3
37.7

11.8
13.3
15.9
17.6
15.3

7.3
8.1
5.8
11.4
12.4

4.2
4 .7
5.7
6.5
7. 1

2 .9
3 .4
4 .2
5 .0
5.4

2.7
3.2
3.9
4.7
5.0

9C.3
100.7
113.2
124.5
135.7

14.5
16.7
18.7
20.7
22.5

11.4
12.2
14.8
16.4
18.6

8.8
9 .5
11.5
12.7
14.4

4 5 .C
55.7
60.6
65.5
70.4

25.2
28.6
31.1
33.9
36.2

22.1
23.7
27.1
3C.2
22.6

12.7
13.6
15.6
17.4
15.3

7.8
9 .0
1C.6
12.4
13.1

7 .3
8.4
9 .9
11.6
12.2

$ 1 .5 5 ................................................... ...................
$1.60 ..................... ....................... ..............- .........
$ 1 .6 5 ............... ............... .................... ...................
$ 1 .7 0 ............... ............................. ........................$ 1 .7 5 .................................................... ..................

155.3
173.6
187.3
198.1
213.3

26.3
26.7
31.0
32. e
35.3

24.9
27.3
31.2
33.6
36.6

19.3
21.1
24.2
26.1
28.3

77.3
82.6
87.9
91.6
97.1

39.7
42.4
45.1
47.0
49.9

41.3
45.5
48.7
52.1
56.2

2 2. e
26.2
28.0
30.9
32.4

15.7
18.3
19.5
20.7
23.4

14.7
17.1
18.2
19.4
21.8

Under
Under
Under
Under
Undejr

$ 1 .8 0 ________________________________ _____ _______
$ 1 .8 5 _____________________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 .................... ..................................................
$ 1 .9 5 ......................................................................
$ 2 .0 0 ........................................................ -.........—

23C.G
242.6
255.1
267.4
275.3

36.1
4C.1
42.2
44.2
45.5

4 1 .G
43.0
46.2
48.7
5C.4

31.7
33.3
35.8
37.7
39.1

19 2.1
107.6
111.4
116.4
119.2

52.4
55.3
57.2
55.8
61.2

61.2
64.6
68.4
71.5
73.3

35.3
37.2
35.4
41.2
42.2

25.8
27.4
29.2
30.7
32.3

24.1
25.6
27.3
28.7
30.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .2 0 ........... ............... — ........................ ...............
$ 2 .3 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .4 0 __________________________ __________ ________
$ 2 .5 0 .................... ..................................................

309.2
328.4
352.4
368.8
383.5

51.2
54.3
56.3
6 1 .C
63.4

61.2
66.7
72.8
77.0
80.4

47 .4
51.7
56.4
59.7
62.3

128.0
133.2
135.6
144.1
147.4

65.8
68.4
71.7
74.0
75.7

82.3
e 5 .i
56.5
101.4
1C5.5

4 8 .C
51.3
55. 8
58.4
61. C

36.7
39.5
43.2
46.4
45.8

34.3
36.9
40.4
43.3
46.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 _____________________________________________
$2. 7 0 __ _________________________________________
$ 2 .8 0 _____________________________________________
$ 2 .9 0 _____________________________________________
$ 3 .0 0 _________________________________ -................

408.9
423.1
436.7
450.3
462.8

67.7
7 0 .C
72.3
74.5
76.6

88.2
91.6
55.2
97.9
100.0

68.3
71.0
73.8
75.8
77.4

152.3
155.7
158.3
161.3
164.2

78.2
80.0
81.3
82.9
84.3

113.5
118.1
122.5
127.2
131.7

65.4
68.0
7C.5
73.3
75.5

54.9
57.6
6C.7
64.0
67.0

51.3
53.9
56.7
59.8
62.6

T o t a l ______________________________________________

604.4

100.0

194.7

100.0

173.6

le o .o

1C7.0

A verag e hourly ea rn in g s------------ -------- --------------------




100.0
$2.40

129.1
$2.52

$2. 06

$2. 47

100.0
$2.,83

Table

21.

Gasoline service stations

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965

(Em ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

West

A verage hourly earnings
Number
Under $0.50 _________________________________
Under $0.75 _________________________________
Under $ 1 . 0 0 _________________________________

1.6
14.0
48.4

.3
2.5
10.2

.1
.5

•1
.5

91.6
99.3
111.5
121.4
126.7

_____

Percent

15.2
20.5
23.4
25.5
26.6

4 .8
4 .9
8.4
9.1
9.8

191.9
207.7
230.5
248.6
259.7

40.3
43.6
48.4
52.2
54.5

Number

Percen t

Number

Percent

Number

1.4
12.2
42.1

1.1
10. C
34.5

•2
1.4
5.2

4 .6
4 .7
8.1
8.7
9 .3

62.1
67.2
71.5
76.3
7 5 .C

5C.9
55.0
58.6
62.5
64.7

16.5
20.3
23.4
26.8
28.0

15.1
16.5
1 5 .C
21. 6
22.8

27.9
32.7
38.7
42.5
4 5.5

26.7
31.2
37.0
40.6
43.4

91.4
94.3
97.6
102.5
104.4

74.8
77.3
8C.0
84.3
85.5

49.5
55.5
62.5
68.0
71.4

_

_

Percen t

.2
1.2
4.3

Number

Percent

.3
.5

.2
.4

6.2
6 .9
8.1
9.3
9.9

4 .9
5.5
6 .4
7.3
7.8

40.6
45.2
5C.5
55.4
58.1

22.7
25.2
31.7
35.2
38.4

17.9
19.9
25.0
27.8
30.3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 0 5 _________________________________
$ 1 . 1 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 1 5 _________________________________
$ 1 .2 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 2 5 _________________________________

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 3 0 _________________________________
$ 1 .3 5 _________________________________
$ 1 . 4 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 4 5 _________________________________
$ 1 . 5 0 _________________________________

Under
Under
Under
U nder
Under

$1,55 _________________________________
$ 1 .6 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 6 5 _________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 _________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 _________________________________

307.7
317.7
333.5
343.7
350.1

64.6
66.7
70.1
72.2
73.5

58.1
61.4
66.5
70.0
71.0

55.5
58.7
63.5
66.8
67.8

108.2
110.2
111.2
112.2
113.4

88.6
90.3
91.1
91.9
52.9

84.1
67.2
51.2
53.7
54.5

68. 5
71.0
74.3
76.3
77.3

57.3
58.8
64.6
67.8
70.8

45.3
46.5
51.1
53.6
56.0

Under
Under
Under
Under
U nder

$1.80 _________________________________
$ 1 . 8 5 _________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 9 5 _________________________________
$ 2 . 0 0 _________________________________

371.8
375.4
388.1
353.8
397.1

78.1
79.7
81.5
82.7
83.4

77.1
78.5
81.0
82.7
83.6

73.6
75.0
77.4
79.0
79.8

114.7
115.3
116.4
116.9
117.2

54.0
54.4
95.3
95.7
96.0

58.6
IC O .9
1C3.9
1C5.5
106.4

6C.3
82.2
84.6
85.5
86.6

81.4
84.6
86.9
88.8
89.9

64.4
66.9
68.7
70.2
71.0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 ____ , ___________________________
$ 2 . 2 0 _________________________________
$ 2 . 3 0 _________________________________
$ 2 . 4 0 _________________________________
$ 2 . 5 0 _________________________________

417.1
425.5
437.5
443.0
447.0

87.6
85.4
51.5
53.0
53.5

91.1
93.9
97.0
98.2
58.9

87.0
89.7
92 .6
93.8
94.5

118.7
115.2
120.0
120.3
120.5

57.2
57.6
98.3
98.6
58.7

111.0
112.7
115.3
116.7
117.8

5C.4
51.8
53.5
95.1
95.5

56.3
99.7
105.2
1C7.7
1C9.9

76.1
78.9
83.2
85.1
86.8

Under
U nder
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 . 6 0 _________________________________
$ 2 . 7 0 _________________________________
$ 2 .8 0 _________________________________
$ 2 . 9 0 _________________________________
$3.00 _________________________________

—

453.5
457.0
461.0
463.1
464.1

55.3
56.0
56.8
57.3
57.5

99.7
IC C .7
102.3
1G2.6
1C2.6

95.2
96.2
97.7
98.0
98.0

121.1
121.2
121.4
121.6
121.6

99.2
99.3
99.5
59.6
55.6

119.1
115.6
12C.0
120.5
120.5

5 7 .C
97.4
57.7
58.1
98.2

113.6
115.4
117.3
118.4
119.3

89.8
91.3
92.7
93.6
94.3

-----

476.1

1CC.0

1C4.7

100.0

122.1

100.0

122.8

100 .C

126.5

T o t a l __________________________________
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s __________________




—

—

$1.52

$1.68

$1.12

$1.53

100.0
$1. 84

ja b ie 2 2 .

Apparel and accessory stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r i c a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
Northeast

United States

South

North C entral

W est

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
N um ber

Under $0. 50 .
Under $0.75 _

...

.

_

Percent

Num ber

Percen t

Num ber

Percent

Num ber

P ercen t

N um ber

Percent

•6
7 .9
2 8 .4

.1
1 .4
4 .9

.1
1 .2

•1
•6

•6
6 .6
22 .0

•4
4 .5
14.9

*
1 .1
4 .5

*
.7
3 .1

*
.1
•6

*
•1
.7

Under $ 1 .1 5 __________________________________________________
Under $ 1 .2 0 __________________________________________________
Under $ 1 .2 5 __________________________________________________

56 .2
61.3
73.3
117.9
129.5

9 .7
10. 5
12.6
20.3
22.2

6 .3
6# 8
8 .4
1 6 .0
1 8 .4

3 .2
3 .5
4 .3
8 .1
9 .3

3 3 .5
36 .4
4 1 .5
6 3 .6
6 8 .3

22 .7
24 .7
28 .2
4 3 .2
46 .4

15.1
16.5
2C.9
34.0
37.8

10.3
11.3
14.2
23.1
25.8

1 .3
1 .6
2 .5
4 .3
5 .0

1 .5
1 .8
2 .8
4 .8
5 .5

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 __________________________________________________
$ 1 .3 5 __________________________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1.45 _ .
.
_
_ ........
_ _ .. _ _
_
. .
$1.50
. . . ....... . .

204.9
227.9
258.2
278.1
292.8

35.2
39 .2
44.3
47.8
50.3

4 8 .6
5 5 .8
6 7 .8
7 5 .2
80.6

2 4 .6
2 8 .3
3 4 .3
38 .1
4 0 .9

8 9 .0
9 4 .2
9 9 .7
104.2
107.1

6 0 .4
6 4 .0
6 7 .7
70 .7
7 2 .7

55.9
6 2 .0
6 8 .9
73.1
7 7 .4

38.1
4 2 .3
4 7.0
49. 8
52.8

1 1 .5
15 .9
2 1 .8
2 5 .6
2 7 .7

12.7
17 .6
24.1
28.2
30.5

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .5 5 __________________________________________________
$ 1.60 ___ .
__
_ ____
$1.65 __________________________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 _________________________________________________

333.9
347.7
368.1
3 8 2 .C
394.4

57.4
59.7
63.2
65 .6
67.8

96 .9
102.5
111.8
118.6
124.0

49 .1
5 2.0
5 6.7
6 0 .1
6 2 .9

112.8
115.5
119.0
121.1
123.1

7 6 .6
78.4
80 .8
82.2
83.6

86.9
S C .3
9 5 .4
98.2
IC O .7

59.2
61.6
65.1
6 7 .0
68 .7

3 7 .4
39 .3
4 1 .8
4 4 .0
4 6 .6

41 .1
4 3 .3
46 .1
48 .5
51.3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.80 __________________________________________________
$ 1 .8 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .9 5 ...........................................................................
$ 2 .0 0 ............................................................... ..........

413.4
421.9
435.5
442.6
449.2

71.0
72.5
74.8
76.0
77.2

13C.8
133.6
139. C
142.4
144.5

6 6 .3
6 7 .7
7 0 .5
7 2 .2
7 3 .2

125.9
127.1
128.9
139.1
131.4

85.5
86.3
87.5
88 .3
89.2

1C5.7
1C8.1
111.1
112.6
113.9

72.0
73. 7
75 .7
76.8
77.6

5 0 .9
53.1
56.5
5 7 .5
59 .4

56 .1
58.5
6 2 .3
63 .3
6 5 .4

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 ............................................... ................. .........
$2. 2 0 __________________________________________________
$2. 3 0 ...................................................... ....................
$ 2 .4 0 ...........................................................................
$2. 5 0 .......... ................................................................

472.7
4 8 9.4
5C4.2
514.9
523.0

81.2
84.1
86.6
88.4
89.8

153.3
159.7
166.2
169.4
172.9

7 7 .7
8 0 .9
8 4 .2
8 5 .8
8 7.7

134.6
136.2
138.1
139.0
139.7

9 1 .4
92 .4
9 3 .8
94 .4
9 4 .8

119.8
124.2
128.1
121.1
122.4

81.7
84.6
87. 3
89.3
9C.2

6 5 .0
6 9 .4
71.8
75.4
78.0

7 1 .6
7 6 .4
79.1
83.1
85.9

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 ...... ....................................................................
$2. 7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 .8 0 _________________________ ________________________
$ 2 .9 0 ....... ...................................................................
$ 3 .0 0 ..........................................................................

533.6
540.6
547.0
551.4
555.1

91.7
92.9
94.0
94.7
95.4

177.2
180.2
182.9
184.7
185.8

8 9 .8
9 1 .4
9 2 .7
9 3 .6
9 4 .2

141.2
141.7
142.6
143.0
143.7

9 5 .9
96 .2
9 6.8
97.1
9 7 .6

135.2
136.3
138.3
139.7
14C.7

92.2
92. 9
9 4.3
95.2
9 5 .9

79 .8
82.3
83.3
84.1
84.9

87.9
90 .6
91 .7
9 2 .6
93 .5

T o t a l.............................................................................

582.1

1C0.0

197.3

100.0

147.3

100.0

146.7

1U0.0

90.8

Under $1.05

. ....

__ _ _

...

.

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s ___________________________________




$1. 70

S I . 83

S I . 42

S I ,,68

100.0
SI .94

T a b le 23.

Men’s and boys’ clothing and furnishings stores

C u m u lativ e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $0.50 _________________________________
Under $0.75 _________________________________
Under $1.00 _________________________________

Percent

*
•2
2.3

♦
.2
2 .4

6 .4
6 .8
8 .3
12.4
13.7

Num ber

N um ber

Percent

♦
•5

.1
1 .3

•
•1
1 .1

•1
.5
4 .5

*
•1
•8

♦
.2
3 .0

6 .5
7 .0
€.4
12 .6
13 .9

.7
•8
1 .0
1 .8
2 .0

2 .1
2 .3
2 .9
5 .3
5 .7

3 .2
3 .4
4 .0
6 .4
6 .5

13.5
14.5
17.1
2 6 .9
2 9 .4

2 .3
2 .4
3 .0
3 .9
4 .4

25.5
27.8
31.9
33.8
35.6

25 .5
28 .2
3 2 .4
34.3
36 .2

5 .6
6 .5
7 .7
8 .1
8 .9

1 6.0
18.5
22 .0
2 3 .4
2 5 .6

1 1 .0
11 .5
12.5
1 3 .1
13.6

4 6 .6
4 6 .9
5 3 .0
5 5 .3
5 7 .6

_

-

•2

7 .5
8 .1
9 .1
5 .7
10.1

29.7
3 2 .2
36.1
38. €
4 0 .4

1 .5
1 .8
2 .6
2 .8
3 .0

10.0
11.8
17.6
18.9
19.9

6 2 .2
6 4 .1
6 8.1
7 0 .0
7 1 .7

12.3
13.1
13.8
14.4
14.5

4 6 .8
52.1
5 5 .0
57.4
55.5

4 .9
5 .0
5 .3
5 .5
5 .8

32.6
33.5
35.5
37 .0
38 .4

17.8
18.0
18.5
18 .6
18.7

7 5 .2
7 6 .5
7 8 .3
7 9 .0
7 9 .4

15.5
16.4
17.2
17.5
17.7

63.3
6 5 .5
6 8 .5
6 9 .7
70.7

6 .4
6 .6
7 .1
7 .2
7 .7

42.8
4 4 .2
4 7 .1
48 .0
51.2

6 3 .9
6 7 .6
7 1 .1
7 3 .0
7 7 .5

15.8
20.2
2 0 .7
21.0
2 1 .2

83 .9
85.8
8 7 .5
8 9 .0
8 9 .7

19.2
1 9 .e
2 0 .7
21.4
21 .8

76.6
75 .0
82.6
85.4
86. 8

8 .9
9 .5
10.2
1 0 .7
11.2

59.0
6 3 .4
67.8
7 1 .0
74.5

80.3
8 2 .6
8 4 .6
86.5
8 7 .5

2 1 .6
2 1 .7
22.1
22.3
22 ,4

9 1 .6
9 2 .0
9 3 .8
9 4 .4
9 4 .7

22.5
2 2 .8
2 3 .2
23 .4
23 .5

85.8
90 .5
92.4
5 3 .2
9 3 .6

1 1 .8
1 2 .6
13 .0
13.2
13.5

7 8 .9
84.1
86.7
88.0
90 .2

100.0

2 3 .6

100.0

25.1

100.0

1 5 .0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 5 5 _________________________________
$ 1 . 6 0 _________________________________
$ 1 .6 5 _________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 _________________________________
$1.75 _________________________________

4 4.2
46 .4
4 5 .5
51.8
53.9

4 4.5
47.1
50.2
52.6
5 4 .7

1 2 .4
1 3 .1
14 .3
1 5 .4
1 6 .3

35 .5
3 7 .7
4 1 .0
4 4 .1
4 6 .7

14.7
15.1
16.1
16.5
16.9

Under
Under
Under
Under
U nder

$ 1 . 8 0 _________________________________
$ 1 .8 5 _________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 9 5 _________________________________
$ 2 .0 0 _________________________________

57.4
58.8
6 1 .3
62 .5
63.7

58.2
59.7
62.2
6 3 .5
6 4 .7

1 7 .3
1 7 .7
18 .5
1 9 .2
19.6

4 9 .7
5 0 .8
53.3
5 5 .2
5 6 .3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 _________________________________
$2.20 _________________________________
$ 2 . 3 0 _________________________________
$ 2 .4 0 _________________________________
$ 2 .5 0 _________________________________

70 .1
73.1
76.3
78.5
81.1

71.2
74.2
7 7 .5
79.7
82.3

2 2 .2
2 3 .5
2 4 .7
2 5 .4
2 7 .0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2. 6 0 _________________________________
$2. 7 0 _________________________________
$ 2 . 8 0 _________________________________
$ 2 . 9 0 _________________________________
$3.00 _________________________________

83.9
85.9
87.8
89.0
89.8

85 .2
87.2
89.1
50.3
9 1.2

2 7 .9
2 8 .8
2 9 .4
3 0 .1
3 0 .5

100.0

3 4 .8




Percent

1.0
1 .4
1 .6
2 .1
2.1

$ 1 . 3 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 3 5 _________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _________________________________
$1.45 _________________________________
$ 1 . 5 0 ___________________ _____________

$1.92

Num ber

•2
•2
•2
•3
•3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

98.5

Percen t
i__________

W est

5 .3
9 .7
1 2 .0
1 5.4
17.6

$ 1 . 0 5 _________________________________
$1 .1 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 1 5 _________________________________
$ 1 . 2 0 _________________________________
$ 1 . 2 5 _____________________ ___________

T o t a l __________________________________

N um ber

♦

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s __________________

j

P ercen t

$2.09

$1.66

$1. 80

100.0
$2. 15

T a b le

24

.

Women’s ready-to-wear stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r i c a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by a v e r a g e
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965

s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,

(Em ployees in thousands)
Northeast

United States

North Central

South

We st

A verage hourly earnings
Number

Percent

Under $0.50 __________________________________________________
Under $0.75 ............................................................................
Under $1.00 ...........................................................................

.1
3.9
12.8

*
1.8
6.C

Under $ 1 . 0 5 __________________________________________________
Under $ 1.10
......
Under $ 1 . 1 5 ......................... ............. ................................
Under $ 1 .2 0 _____________________ _______________ _________
Under $ 1 . 2 5 ...........................................................................

26.6
28.5
33.6
55.8
6 1 .6

Number

Percen t

Number

Percent

Number

♦
.3

*
.5

.1
2.3
10^5

.1
5.8
18.4

3 .1
3 .2
4 .0
7 .6
8 .8

4 .6
4 .8
5 .9
11 .2
13.0

16.1
17.3
15.1
29.6
3 2 .2

28.1
20.2
33.3
51 .7
56.2

Number

Percent

*
.1
.3

*
.3
.8

12. 5
13.1
17.3
25.5
33 .3

.7
.9
1 .1
2 .4
2 .6

1 .9
2 .5
3 .2
6 .7
7 .3

*
.5
3 .1

*
.5
1.7

12.4
13.3
15.6
26. C
28.7

Percen t

6 .8
7 .1
5 .4
16.2
1 8 .C

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .3 0 .................................................. .......... .............
$ 1 . 3 5 ................................................. .........................
$ 1 .4 0 .................... ............................ ........................
$ 1 . 4 5 .............. ............................................................
$ 1 .5 0 .................. ......... ................................ .............

9 0 .4
99.0
112.7
120.4
126.3

42.0
4 6 .C
52.4
5 6 .C
5 e.7

2 0 .4
2 2 .8
2 8 .6
31.5
3 3 .5

30.1
3 3 .7
4 2 .1
4 6 .4
4 9 .5

35.1
4 0 .8
42 .8
4 4 .3
4 5 .5

68.3
71.2
74 .7
77.4
75.4

25.0
27.6
30.6
22.0
3 4 .C

46 .2
50.5
56.4
55.1
62. 7

5 .9
7 .8
10 .8
12 .5
13 .3

16.4
21.8
30.2
35.1
3 7 .3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 5 5 ...... ....................................................................
$1.60 ........................................................... ..............
$ 1 .6 5 .......................................... ........................ ........
$ 1 .7 0 ................. ....................... ............................ .
$1.75 ________________ _________________________ ________

141.8
146.6
153.8
158.2
162.4

66.0
68.2
71.5
73.6
75.5

3 9 .9
4 2 .1
45 .1
4 6 .6
4 8 .3

5 8 .9
6 2 .0
6 6 .5
6 8 .8
7 1 .3

48 .0
4 8 .e
45 .8
50.7
51 .2

83.8
8 5.2
8 6.9
88.5
89.6

37.1
3 8 .C
35.5
4 0 .5
4 1 .6

68.4
70.1
73.6
75 .5
76. 8

16.8
17.7
15.0
2 0.0
2 1 .1

4 7 .0
45 .7
5 3 .2
55.9
59 .0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .8 0 ________________________ _________________________
$ 1 .8 5 ____________________________________ ___________
$ 1 .9 0 ........................................... ......... ............ .........
$1.95 .............................................. .............................
$ 2 .0 0 ......... ................ .................................................

168.9
172.3
177.3
179.4
181.8

78.6
80.1
82.5
83.4
84.5

5C.8
5 1.5
54.1
55.1
5 5 .7

74 .9
7 6 .6
7 9 .8
8 1 .2
82 .1

52.2
52.5
5 2 .1
53.5
5 3 .9

51 .1
91.7
9 2 .7
93.4
94.1

42.5
4 3.7
44.6
4 5.0
4 5 .3

75.2
8C.7
e2 . 2
82.5
83.6

2 3 .C
24.1
25 .5
2 5 .8
2 6 .5

6 4.4
67.6
71.3
7 2 .3
75.2

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 . 1 0 .............................................. ........................
$2. 2 0 .................. ........................................................
$2. 30 ................................. ......... ...............................
$ 2 .4 0 .................................... ...... ...............................
$2. 5 0 _____________________ __________ _________________

189 .0
194.2
198.5
201.2
202.7

87.9
90.3
92.3
93.6
94.3

58 .2
6C.5
6 2 .6
6 3 .5
6 3 .9

8 5 .9
89 .2
9 2 .3
9 3 .7
9 4 .3

54 .5
55.2
55.7
55.8
55.5

9 5 .7
5 6 .4
9 7 .2
9 7 .4
9 7 .6

4 6 .5
47.5
4 9.0
45 .7
50.1

85.5
68.3
5 0 .4
51.7
52 .4

29 .4
30 .5
3 1 .3
32.2
3 2 .7

82 .4
85.6
87.5
90.1
91 .6

Under'
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 _________________________________________ ________
$2. 7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 .8 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 9 0 ......................... ...... .................... ......................
$3.00 _________________________________________________

204.9
206.1
207.7
208.5
209.2

95.3
95.9
9 6 .6
57.0
57.3

6 5 .0
6 5 .7
66. C
6 6 .3
6 6 .4

9 5 .8
9 6.8
9 7 .4
9 7 .8
9 8 .0

56.1
56.2
5 6.2
5 6.3
5 6 .4

9 6 .0
58.1
9 8.1
9 8 .3
9 8 .4

50.6
50.8
51.7
52. C
52.3

52 .4
53 .7
5 5 .3
5 6 .0
5 6 .6

33.2
3 3 .5
3 3 .7
33 .9
3 4 .0

93 .0
93 .7
94 .5
94 .9
95 .3

215.0

100.0

6 7 .8

100.0

57.3

100.0

54.2

1 0 0 .G

3 5 .7

100.0

T o t a l_________________________________________ _____
A verag e hourly ea rn in g s ________________________________




$1.55

$1.64

$1.29

$1. 56

$1.,80

T a b le 25.

Shoe stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d i s t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s
U n ited S tates and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North C entral

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $ 0.50 _________________________________________________
Under $0.75 _________________________________________________
Under $ 1 . 0 0 _______________________________ ___________ ______
Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 0 5 ............................................................. .............
$ 1 . 1 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 1 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1.20 _
$ 1 .2 5 ______ _________________________________________

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

P ercen t

*

1.2
4 .2

P ercen t

*

1.2
4 .4

Num ber

*
•2

*
•6

Num ber

Percent

3 .2
9 .9

8.5

8.1

.9

2 .8

1.0

20 .1

5 .6
11 .4
16.5
15.1

3 .3
4 .3
7 .8
9 .7

4 .5
5 .2
6 .4
9 .2
9 .9

32 .6
35.2

$ 1 .3 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 3 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 4 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 5 0 _________________________________________________

29.7
34.4
38.4
41.8
44 .6

2 8 .3
3 2.8
3 6 .5
35.5
42. 5

5 .0

8 .9

16.4
1 9 .9
2 4 .3
2 6 .9
2 9 .0

13.5
14.5
15.2
16.3
17.0

4 7 .8
51.5
54.0
58 .0
6 0 .4

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 5 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 6 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 6 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 7 5 _________________________________________________

50.2
53.5
56.7
55.4
6 1.7

4 7. 8
50.5
54.0
56.5
5 8.8

10.9
1 1 .9
1 3 .0
14.1
15 .1

3 5 .5
3 8 .8
4 2 .6
4 6 .2
4 9 .2

17.9
18.8
19.7

66 .8

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 .8 0 _________________________________________________
. _________ _
_ _ __
$1.85 ____
$ 1 .9 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 9 5 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

65.7
67.3
6 5.5
71.2
72.5

62 .6
64.1

66 .2

16 .3
16.7
17.3
1 7 .8
ie .4

53.1
54 .6
5 6 .4
5 8.1
6 0 .3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 2 0 _________________________________________________
$2.30 ....
.. _
_________
$2.40 _________________________________________________
$2. 5 0 ............. .......................................................... .

7 7.3
81.2
85.2
87.5
85.8

73 .7
77.3
81.1
83.3
8 5 .5

2 0 .1
2 1.6
2 3 .2
2 3 .9
2 4 .5

6 5 .7
7 0 .4
7 5 .8
7 8 .3
8 0 .2

23 .7
24.2
25.0
25.3
25.7

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 . 6 0 _________________________________________________
.
. _
_
$ 2. 70 ... . _
$2.80 .
_
_
$ 2. 9 0 _________________________________________________
$ 3 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

52.6
94.4
96.1
97.7
98.9

88 .2
8 9.9
51.6
9 3 .0
54 .2

2 5 .6
2 6 .4
2 7 .3
2 7 .9
2 8 .3

8 3 .7
8 6 .3
8 9 .2
9 1 .1
9 2 .4

26 .3
2 6 .5
26 .8
2 7 .0
27.3

T o t a l ________________________________ __________________

105.0

100.0

3 0 .6

10 0 .0

2 8 .2

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s ___________________________________




6 7.8
6 9 .5

S I . 84

1 .3
2 .4
3 .0

6 .1
7 .4

8 .2

$2 . 01

Percen t

.1

*
.9

2 .8

10 .0
11.5
17.7

N um ber

16.0
18 .6

22.6

63 .6
6 9 .7
71 .7
7 2 .9

20 .2
20 .5

7 5 .4
7 6 .7
78 .3
79 .7
81.5

21.3

2 1.6
2 2 .1
22 .5
23.0

84.2
8 5 .8

Num ber

.3

1.1

_

_

1.2

4 .2

•2

1.0

2.8

5 .5

3 .4
3 .7
5 .5
6 .3

13.1
15.3

.3
•3
.5

1 .9
1.9
2 .9
3 .3
4 .9

12 .0
2 2 .1

.6
.9

13.2
14 .0

32. 8
37.5
4 2 .4
4 6 .0
4 8.8

15.9
17.0
17.6
18.2
18.6

55.5
55.1
6 1 .4
6 3 .4
6 4 .8

5 .5
5 .8
6 .3

19.9

6 5.5
70.3
71.7
73.6
74 .9

8 .3

9 .4
10.5

12 .2

2 0 .2
2 0 .6
2 1.1
21 .5

2 2 .6

1.8

10.4
16.6

2 .9
3 .5
4 .1
4•6

20 .2
23 .2
26.6
31.2
33.4
36.3
3 8.9
4 2 .9

6 .8
7 .5

4 7.2
50.3
54.8
56.1
5 7.2

8.8
9 .6
9 .8

10 .0
1 0 .9
11 .9

89 .8
5 1 .1

23.6
24.4
25 .2
25.5

7 8.6
82.3
8 5 .C
87.7
88 .7

9 3 .4
94 .0
55 .1
9 5 .7
96 .7

26.1
2 6 .4
26.8
2 7.2
2 7.6

5 0 .5
92.1
53.3
54. 8
96 .2

1 4.6
1 5 .0
15.3
1 5.6
1 5 .8

10 0 .0

2 8 .7

88.8

$1 . 59

Percent

10 0 .0
S I . 75

62.6
67.7
71.8
7 4 .5
80.6

12 .6
13 .0
14.1

83.3

86 .0
87.2
89.1
90 .2

10 0 .0

1 7.5
S2«.09

T a b le 26.

Furniture, hom furnishings, and household appliance stores
e

Cum ulative n um erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by average straigh t-tim e hourly earnings,
United States and region s, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
South

Northeast

United States

W est

North Centred

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Percent

N um ber

Under $ 0 . 5 0 ----------------------------- --------------------------------- __
Under $0.75 __________________________________________________
Under $ 1 . 0 0 ...........................................................................

.3
4 .4

.1
1.2

P ercen t

N um ber

.1
.1

.1
.1

N um ber

Percent

3 .3
9 .6

1.6

1.8
6 .1
6 .2

2 1.6
23 .2

2 2.0

9 .3

34 .8
37 .6
4 2 .9
4 5 .9
4 8 .5

33.0
35.6
4 0 .6
43 .5
4 6 .0

16.8
18.5

2 1.0

.3

•3

10 .1

6. 4
6.6

1.8

1 .9

1 .9

2.0

2 .6

2 .7
3 .6
3 .9

14.7
15.8
17.6

Under
U nder
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 3 0 .......................................... .. ..............................
$ 1 .3 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 ----------------------------------------------------------------------$ 1 .4 5 __________________________________________ _____
$ 1 . 5 0 __________________________________________________

73.3
80.8
92.8
100.7
107.1

Under
Under
Under
U nder
Under

$ 1 . 5 5 __________________________________________________
$ 1 .6 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .6 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 ...........................................................................
$1.75 ...........................................................................

Under
U nder
U nder
U nder
U nder

7 .9
9 .7
10.7

3 .5
3 .7

2 0 .1
22 .2

14.5
16.6

25.5
27.7
29.4

2 0 .1
2 1.8
2 3 .7

15.0
17 .3
2 0 .9
2 2 .7
2 4 .6

131.3
139.6
149.2
157.8
166.6

36.1
38.4
41.0
4 3 .4
4 5 .8

3C.4
3 2 .4
3 5 .6
37 .6
4 0 .0

3 1 .6
3 3 .7
3 7 .0
39.1
4 1 .6

53 .2
56.4
59 .0
6 2 .1
6 4 .6

$ 1 .8 0 _________________________ ________________________
$ 1 .8 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 9 0 ...........................................................................
$ 1 . 9 5 .................................................. ........................
$ 2 . 0 0 ...........................................................................

181.5
188.8
199.4
205.9
210.7

49.9
51.5
54.6
56.6
57.5

4 3 .8
4 5 .9
4 8 .6
5 1 .0
5 1 .9

4 5 .6
4 7 .7
5 0 .6
5 3 .1
54 .0

Under
Under
Under
Under
U nder

$2. 1 0 ...........................................................................
$2. 2 0 _________________________________________________
$2. 3 0 ...........................................................................
$ 2 .4 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 5 0 ...........................................................................

231.4
243.5
257.6
265.8
2 71.4

63.6
66 . S
70. €
73.0
74.6

58.6
6 2 .9
6 6 .3
7 0 .2

6 1 .0
6 5 .5
6 9 .0
7 1 .6
7 3 .0

9 0 .0

Under
U nder
U nder
Under
Under

$ 2 . 6 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2. 7 0 _________________ _______________________ _____
$ 2 . 8 0 ________ _________________________________________
$ 2 . 9 0 .......................................................................
$ 3 .0 0 _________________________________________________

284.9
290.6
299.3
305.6
309.9

78.3
75.5
84.0
65.2

74 .6
76 .3
7 8 .7
8 C. 8
8 1 .9

7 7 .6
7 9 .4
8 1 .9
8 4 .1
8 5 .2

9 2 .3
9 3 .0
9 4 .8
9 5 .6
56 .6

363.9

100.0

56.1

10 0 .0

105.5

Total

____________________________________ ____________




$ 2 . 10

$2 . 15

.5

5 .4
5 .6
6 .3

3 .5

23.3
24.9
28.6
35 .4
38.9

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s --------------------------------------------------

.4

13.9
15.0
16.7
20.5

12 .8

$ 1 . 0 5 __________________________________________ _______
$ 1 . 1 0 __________________________________________________
$ 1 . 1 5 ____________________ ___________________________
$ 1 .2 0 __________________________________________________
$ 1 .2 5 ___________________________________ _____________

e 2 .3

Percent

.2

•2
3 .5

Under
Under
Under
U nder
Under

68 .8

N um ber

7.1
8 .5
10.4

8.0

Num ber

Percent

*
.5

*
.3
.7

1.0

1 .4

1 .9

1.6
2 .1

2 .2
2 .9
3 .2
3 .6

2 .4

2 .6

18.8
20 .7
2 3 .5

7 .3

8 .1
8.8

10 .0
11.1
12 .1

23.1
24.3

25. e

9 .9
10.5

13 .6
14.5

50.5
53.5
56.0
58.8
6 1 .2

3 1 .5
33 .7
3 6 .C
38.2
4 0 .5

35.2
37.7
4 0 .3
4 2 .7
4 5 .3

16.2
17.1
18.6

2 2 .2

2 1 .5

23 .4
25.5
27 .5
29.5

6 7 .8
6 9 .5
7 2 .9
7 4 .8
75 .8

6 4 .3
6 5 .8
69.1
7 0 .9
7 1 .9

44.0
4 5 .8
4 8 .1
4 9 .2
50.6

4 5 .2
51.2
53. 8
55.0
56.6

2 5 .8
2 7 .7
29.8
3 0 .9
32 .3

35.5
3 8 .0
4 1 .0
4 2 .4
4 4 .4

80 .8
83 .5
67.3

7 6 .6
7 9 .2
82 .7
8 4 .2
85.3

55.5
5 6 .2
6 2 .2
6 4 .2
6 5 .7

62 .1
65.1
6 9 .5
7 1 .8
73.4

36.5
3 8 .8
4 1 .8
4 3 .9
4 5 .6

50.1
5 3 .3
57 .5
6 0 .3
62 .6

87.5

68 .8

88.2
89.9
50.6
9 1 .5

70.8
73.0
74 .5
7 6 .1

76.5
75.1
81.6
€3.3
85.0

4 9 .2
50.7
52 .7
5 4 .7
5 5 .4

67 .6
6 9 .7
7 2 .5
7 5 .2
76 .1

100.0

89.5

10 0 .0

72.8

1 0 0 .0

8 8 .8

S I.,78

27 .2

$ 2 , .16

20 .0

$2 .4 3

T a b le

27

.

Furniture, home furnishings, and equipment stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

South

Northeast

North C entral

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $0.50 _____________________________________
Under $0.75 _____________________________________
Under $1.00 _____________________________________

P ercen t

•3
2.7

•1
1.1

8.6

3 .7
6.5
7 .0
e .o

N um ber

Percen t

N um ber

.1
•1
•1

•2

1.1
1.2

10.7
11.3

1 .4
2 .4

Percent

12 .6

•2
•2

•2
2 .1

N um ber

Percent

_

•3
3 .0
10 .5

7 .4

.5

•2
•9

2 .9
3 .0
3 .4
4 .6
5 .8
10 .5

Num ber

Percent

*
•3

*

.6

.6
1.2

5 .3
5 .5
6 .4
e .7
10.9

1.0
1.2
1.6
1.8
2 .0

3 .4
3 .8
4 .3

19 .6
20 .7
23.3
25 .3
26 .8

.1

4 .7
5 .3
5 .7
6 .3

10 .0
1 C .7
11.6
1 2 .7
1 3 .8

24.8
27.1
29.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
U nder

$ 1 . 0 5 ____________________ ________________
$ 1 . 1 0 _____________________________________
$1. 1 5 _____________________________________
$ 1 . 2 0 _____________________________________
$ 1 .2 5 ____________________ ________________

15.2
16.2
18.5
23.7
26.2

10 .2

.7
.7
•9
1 .5

11.3

1.6

2 .6

1 5 .8
16.8

15.2
16.1
17.9
2 2 .4
23 .9

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.30 _____________________________________
$ 1 . 3 5 _____________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _____________________________________
$ 1 .4 5 _____________________________________
$ 1 . 5 0 _____________________________________

49 .6
54.3
61.9
67.4
71.0

21.3
23 .3
2 6 .6
29.0
30.6

9 .4
1 2 .9
14.2
1 5 .3

15 .2
17 .7
2 0 .9
2 3 .0
2 4 .7

25.1
26.9
30.8
3 3 .2
34 .7

35 .6
3 8 .3
4 3 .8
4 7 .3
4 9 .3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 5 5 _____________________________________
$ 1 . 6 0 _____________________________________
$ 1 .6 5 _____________________________________
$ 1 .7 0 _____________________________________
$1.75 _____________________________________

86.5
91.4
97.2

2 2 .5
2 4 .0
2 5 .7

3 1 .5
3 3 .4
3 6 .4
3 8 .8
4 1 .6

3 6 .1
39.€
4 1 .5
4 3 .2
4 5 .2

54.1
56 .7
59.0
6 1 .5
6 4 .3

2 1.6

108.8

37.2
3 9 .3
4 1 .6
44 .2
4 6 .6

22.9
24 .1

35.5
3 7 .9
4 0 .5
4 2 .8
4 5 .0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.80 _____________________________________
$1.85 _____________________________________
$ 1 .9 0 _____________________________________
$1.95 _____________________________________
$ 2 .0 0 _____________________________________

130.5
134.1
137.0

50.7
5 2 .8
56.1
57 .7
58.9

2 8 .4
2 9 .7
3 1 .8
3 3 .0
3 3 .4

4 5 .9
4 8 .0
5 1 .5
5 3 .3
5 4 .1

4 7 .3
4 8 .5
5 1 .0
52.1
52 .9

6 7 .3
6 9 .0
7 2 .5
7 4 .1
75.2

26.2
27.2
28 .8
2 9 .4
29 .9

4 9 .0
5 0 .8
53. 8
55.C
55.9

16.1
1 7 .4
1 8 .9
1 9 .6
2 0 .7

34.3
37.3
4 0 .3
4 1 .9
4 4 .3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .1 0 _____________________________________
$ 2 . 2 0 _____________________________________
$ 2 .3 0 ________________________________ _____
$ 2 . 4 0 _____________________________________
$ 2 .5 0 _____________________________________

149.5
156.1
164.1
168.6
172.1

6 4 .3
67.2
70.6
7 2 .6
74.1

3 7 .9
4 0 .1
4 2 .2
4 4 .0
4 5 .0

6 1 .3
6 4 .9
7 1 .2
7 2 .8

55 .7
5 7 .5
59 .5
6 0 .3
6 1.1

7 9 .2
8 1 .7
84 .6
85 .8
8 6 .9

3 2 .7
3 4 .2
36.2
37.4
3 6 .2

6 1 .2
6 3 .8
6 7 .6
6 9 .8
71 .3

23 .2
2 4 .3
2 6 .3
27 .1
2 7 .9

4 9 .6
52.0
56.1
58.0
59.6

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 2 .6 0 _____________________________________
$ 2 .7 0 _____________________________________
$ 2 . 8 0 _____________________________________
$ 2 . 9 0 _____________________________________
$ 3 .0 0 _____________________________________

179.6
183.5
188.8
192.4
194.9

7 7 .3
79.0
61 .2
82.8
€3 .9

4 7 .2
4 8 .4
5 0 .2
5 1 .2
5 2 .0

7 6 .4
7 8 .4
8 1 .2
8 2 .9
84 .1

6 2 .7
6 3 .1
6 4 .2
6 9 .7
6 5 .1

89 .2
8 9 .7
9 1 .3
92.1
9 2 .6

3 9 .7
41 .G
4 2 .2
4 3 .3
4 4 .2

74.1
7 6 .6
79.0
82.7

30.1
3 1 .0
32.2
3 3 .2
3 3 .6

68 .7
70 .9
n . 7

232.4

10 0 .0

6 1 .8

100.0

70.3

10 0 .0

53 .5

100.0

4 6 .8

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s _______________________




102.8
117.9

12 2.8

$2 . 1 0

11.0

1 9 .5

2 0 .6

6 8 .2

* 2 .,17

,72
$1 ,

11.1
12.5
13.5
14.3
19.0
20.3

e c .s

$ 2 .1 8

2 .1
2 .6

10 .0
11.3

12 .2
13.5
14.5

6.8

21.3

22.8

64 .3

6 6 .2

100.0
$2 .51

0)
Nl

T a b le

28

.

Household appliance stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r i c a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
Northeast

United States

South

North Central

W est

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Percent

N um ber

Under $0.50
Under $0.75
Under $1.00

2 .4

U nder
U nder
Under
Under
U nder

$1.05
$1. 10
$1.15
$1.20
$1.25

4 .4
4 .9
5.6
6 .7
7 .3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.30
$1.35
$1.40
$1.45
$1.50

14.3
15.7
17.8
19.3

2 1.0

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.55
$1.60
$ 1.65
$1.70
$1.75

Under
Under
U nder
Under
U nder

*
1.4
3.1

*

1.1

N um ber

P ercen t

_

*

5.3
5 .4
6 .3
7 .5

1.6

8 .1

6 .3

26.5
28.8
32 .6
34.2
3 7 .8

3 .2
3 .5
3 .8
4 .2
4 .3

15. 5
17.2
18.9

5 .4
6 .C

9 .0
9 .5
9 .9

1 4.1
16 .6
2 0 .3

24.4
26.6

25.8
28.1
30.4
32.1
34.2

32.6
35.6
38.5
40.7
43.3

$1.80
$1.85
$1.90
$1.95
$2.00

37.3
38.7
4 0.3
42.1
43 .2

47.2
49.0
51.0
53.3
54.7

1C.5
1 1 .3
1 1 .4

Under
U nder
U nder
Under
U nder

$2. 10
$2.20
$2.30
$2.40
$2.50

4 8 .5
52.1
56.0
57.8
59.2

61.4

12 .8

66 .0
70.9
73.2
74.9

14 .4
1 5.3
15 .7
1 5 .9

Under
Under
U nder
U nder
U nder

$2.60
$2.70
$2.80
$2 .9 0
$3.00

66 .2
68 .6

79.9
81.3
83.8
85.4
6 6 .e

Total ..

79.0

100. C




$ 2 . 09

6.8
7 .7

2 1.8

8 .1

2 4 .9

9 .0

6 .9
7 .6
8 .3
8 .5
9 .1

3 2 .9
36.2
39 .4
4 0 .3
4 3 .3

9 .8
10.9
11 .4
12.3

12 .6

41 .6
4 5 .9
46 .2
51.8
53.0

9 .7

4 6 .2
4 7 .9
4 9 .6
5 3 .7
5 4 .2

13.1
13.4
14.0
14.5
14.7

55.4
56.5
59.1
61 .1
62 .0

6 0 .5
6 8 .3
7 2 .5
74 .5
7 5 .5

16.5
17.0
18.3
18 .8
19.0

6 9 .4
71 .9
77 .2
7 9 .4
80.1

17 .3
1 7 .7
18.1
1 8 .5
1 8 .7

8 1 .9
8 3 .7
8 5 .6
8 7 .7

19.5
19 .6

2 0 .1
20 .2

8 2 .3
82 .8
84 .6
85.2

88 .6

20 .5

2 1.1

100.0

2 3 .7

10 .1

$2 . 09

•6

1.1
1.1

*

•1
•8

1.6

.2
.2

1.7

1.8

.3
.3
.3

2 .3
2 .3

1.8

12 .8

1 .9

21. 5

2 .4
2 .5

13.7
14.6
16.9
17.6

27 .0
29. 7
3 2 .8
35.4
39.9

3 .5
3 .6
4 .0
4 .2
4 .4

25 .2
25.7
28.7
30.1
31.5

44. 7
47.1
49 .0
50.7
54 .0

5 .4
5 .7

38.6
4 0.4
42 .5
4 3 .3
44.0

20 .6

6.6
7.1

8 .1

10 .2
10.9

12 .1
13.0
14.2
14.6
15.1

59.9
6 4 .6
7 0 .4
7 2 .3
7 4 .5

86.6

16.3
16.7
17.2
17.4
17.9

80. 8
82.8
85.1
86 .3
8 8.4

100.0
$ 1 ..99

_

.1

1.3
1.5

*

Percent

_

10.3
12.3
13 .7
16.0
17.2

3 .0
3 .5
4 .3
4 .6
5 .3

A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s

_

2 .4
2 .9
3.2
3 .8
4 .1

18.1
19.9

Num ber

•1
3 .0

.

3 .0
3 .2
4 .0
5 .3
5 .8

.8
1.1
1.2

67 .5

P ercen t

.4

.1
•6
.7

6 3 .1
64.3

N um ber

•1
4 .4
6 .9

-

7.1
8.5
9.2

22.6

Percent

1.1
1.6

-

6.2

5.5

Num ber

20 .2

1 C0 . 0
$2 • C9

2 .0

6.0
6 .1
6.2
7 .2
7 .6

51.5
54.5
5 8.7
6 2.0
6 5 .6

8 .2
8.7
9 .2

10 .0
10 .2

7 1 .4
73.1
7 8 .1
81.0
82.2

1C.9
11.3
1 1 .5

10 0 .0

14.0

$2 .2 8

T a b le

29

.

Miscellaneous retail stores

C u m u la tiv e n u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y a v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North C entral

West

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Num ber

Under $ 0 . 5 0 _________________________________________________
Under $0.75 _________________________________________________
Under $ 1 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

Percent

2 .7
30.6
8 0 .2

.3
3 .2
8 .3
14.8
1 5.7
18.3

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 0 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 1 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 1 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 2 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .2 5 _________________________________________________

143.0
152.2
176.9
211.5
228.8

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 3 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 3 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .4 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .4 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 5 0 _________________________________________________

Under
Under
Under
Under
Under

N um ber

Percent

.2
1.1

•1
.4
1 .4

3 .6

Num ber

Percent

Num ber

P ercen t

N um ber

.1
2 .8
8.2

.5
1 .5

16.3
17.2

6 .1
6.2

2 1.8

3 .4
3.5
3 .9
5 .5
5 .8

2 .1
2 2.0

.8
8.0

7 .1

54 .4

19 .7

2 0.8

83.5
8 9.7

4 1 .1
4 3 .3
5 4 .8
6 3 .2
68 .4

25.1
27 .2

Percent

6 .9
9 .8
10 .4

.2

.1

•1
.3
•8

23 .6

1 2 .4
13.1
1 4 .9
2 3 .6
2 6 .7

10 .2

114.9
123.3

3 0.2
32.5
3 6 .3
4 1 .6
4 4 .6

359.0
384.8
423.4
446.9
462.0

37.1
39.7
4 3 .7
46 .2
4 7 .7

7 2 .0
7 6 .9
88 .4
94.2
97.6

27 .5
2 9 .3
3 3 .7
3 5 .9
3 7 .2

1 5 8.4
166.6
175.7
1 81.7
186.2

5 7.4
6 0 .3
6 3 .6
6 5 .8
6 7 .4

1C5.1
111.3
122.5
129.8
134.9

4 1 .7
4 4 .2
4 8 .6
51. 5
53.5

23.5
3 0 .0
3 6 .9
4 1 .2
4 3 .3

13.2
16.9
20.7
23.2
24.3

$ 1 . 5 5 _________________________________________________
$1.60 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 6 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 _________________________________________________

543.6
561.9
590.7
609.0
622.3

56.1
5 8 .0
61 .0
6 2 .9
6 4 .3

128.1
13 2 .5
1 42.4
147.9
151.1

4 8 .8
50 .5
54 .3
5 6 .4
57 .6

2 0 1.1

7 2.8
7 5 .4
77.5
7 8 .7
7 9 .9

155.6
159.1
167.1
172.1
176.0

6 1 .8
63 .2
6 6 .3
68 . 3
6 9.9

5 8 .9
6 2 .0
67.3
71.7
74.5

33.1
34.9
37.8
4 0 .3
4 1 .9

Under
Under
Under
Under
U nder

$ 1 . 8 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 8 5 _________________________________________________
$ 1 . 9 0 _________________________________________________
$1.95 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

656.0
669.2
687.5
698.9
708.9

6 7 .8
69.1
71.0
7 2 .2
73 .2

161.7
1 6 5.8
1 71.0
173.4
175.8

6 1 .6
6 3 .2
6 5 .2

8 2.2
83.1
8 4 .7
85.5

8 6 .1

182.2
186.5
190.6
193.7
195.6

72.4
74. C
7 5.6
76 .9
77.7

e5.G

6 7 .0

227.0
229.3
233.7
236.1
2 3 7 .7

87.6
92.2
95.7
99.9

4 7 .8
49 .2
51.8
53.8
56.1

U nder
Under
U nder
Under
U nder

$2. 1 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 2 0 _________________________________________________
$2. 3 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 4 0 ___________________________________________ *.____
$ 2 . 5 0 _________________________________________________

754.1
774.1
797.6
609.3
818.4

77.9
7 9 .9
82 .4
8 3 .6
84.5

193.2
199.5
2C8.4

73 .7
7 6 .0
7 9 .4
8 0 .7
8 1 .7

245.0
248.3
251.9
253.5
25 4 .8

88.7
8 9 .9
9 1 .3
9 1 .8
92 .3

204.7
209.5
213.3
215.3
216.8

81.2
83.2
84.7
85.5

U nder
U nder
Under
Under
U nder

$ 2 . 6 0 ______________________________________________....
$2. 7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 8 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 9 0 _________________________________________________
$ 3 . 0 0 _________________________________________________

850.0
861.7
873.1
883.8
889.8

87.8
89 .0
90 .2
91.3
91 .9

2 2 2 .9
2 2 6 .9
231. C
2 3 3 .8
23 6 .3

85 .0
86 .5
89 .1
9 0 .1

260.1
262.0
263.6
264.4
2 65.4

94.2
9 4 .9
9 5 .5
9 5 .8
9 6 .1

222.4
224.5
227.1
22C.4
231.8

100.0

276.1

10 0 .0

251.9

T o t a l________________
A v e r a g e h o u r ly e a r n in g s




2 1.8

10 0 .0

968.2
$1.75

4 .7
5 .0
5 .7
9 .0

6 6 .1

2 11.6
2 1 4 .4

8 8 .1

2 6 2.3
$ 1 . 93

100.2

208.3
214.0
217.3

2 20 .6

$ 1 .4 3

111.2

8 6 .1

116.8
124.0
128.9
132.4

62.5
65.6
69 .7
72.5
74.4

88.3
89. 1
90 .2
91.5
92.0

144.6
14 8 .3
151.3
155.2
156.4

81.3
83.*
85.1
87.2
87.9

100.0
$ 1 .71

10 0 .0

1 7 7 .9
$2 . 1 1

Table 30.

Drug and proprietary stores

Cumulative numerical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory employees by average straight-time hourly earnings,
United States and regions, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

South

Northeast

North Central

W est

A v e ra g e hourly earnings
Percent

N um ber

Under $ 0 . 5 0 ___ ________ __ „ „ _________
„ „ ..
Under $0.75 __________________________________________________
U nder $ 1 . 0 0 __________________________________________________

Percen t

N um ber

N um ber

Percent

Num ber

P ercen t

Numbe r

Percent

•4
5.6
15.0

6

.1
1.8

•1
2 .3

1 .4
15.5
3 7 .7

1.1

5 5 .7

12 .7
3 0 .9

5 .2
15.1

♦
4 .5
14.1

.2
1.1

•3
1 .7

1.4

2 1.0

U nder
Under
Under
Under
Under

$1.05 ...........................................................................
$ 1 .1 0 _________________ _________ ____________ „
$ 1 . 1 5 _________________
_____ _________ _________
$ 1 . 2 0 __________________________________________________
$ 1 . 2 5 -----------------------------------------------------------------------

91.8
96 .5
107.6
130.0
139.7

24.7
26.G
28.5
35.0
27.6

6 .9
7 .3
7 .9
1 4 .5
1 5 .3

8 .7
9 .1
9 .9
1 6 .2
1 9 .2

55.0
57 .8
6 1 .7
7 0 .7
7 5 .2

4 5 .1
4 7 .4
5 0.6
58 .0
6 1 .7

2 6.3
27.8
34.0
39.7
44.0

24 .5
2 5 .5
31 .7
37 .0
4 1 .0

3 .6
3 .6
4 .0
5 .2
5 .3

5 .7
5 .7
6 .3

Under
U nder
Under
Under
Under

$ 1 . 3 0 ...........................................................................
$ 1 .3 5 ____________________ ____________ _________ —
$ 1 .4 0 ...........................................................................
$ 1 . 4 5 ...........................................................................
$ 1 . 5 0 __________________________________________________

195.5
205.6

3 7 .6
39 .1
4 3 .2
4 5 .1
4 6 .0

4 7 .2
4 9 .2
54 .3
5 6 .7
5 7 .9

8 5.9
8 9 .6
9 3 .2
9 5 .5
9 7 .0

70.5
7 3.5
7 6.5
7 8 .3
7 5 .6

60 .6
6 3 .6
68. C
70 .5
72.5

56 .7
55 .3
63 .4
6 5 .8
67 .6

11.2

17.8

13.3
16 .6
17 .9
15 .0

2 1.1

229.1
234.5

52.6
55.3
55.4
61.6
63.1

Under
U nder
U nder
U nder
Under

$ 1 . 5 5 ___________________________________ _____ ..
$ 1 . 6 0 ______ _________________________________________
$ 1 .6 5 ____________________________
__________________
$ 1 . 7 0 _________________________________________________
$ 1 .7 5 .........................................................................

260.2
265.C
273.7
279.7
283.2

70.0
71.3
73.6
75.2
76.2

5 2 .9
54.1
56 .3
5 7 .5
58.1

66 .5
6 7 .9
7 0 .7
7 2 .2
7 3 .0

101.7
103.2
104.5
106.0
106.5

6 3.4
84 .6
8 5 .8
67.0
8 7.4

8 0.1
81.5
84.2
8 5.5
6 7 .3

7 4 .7
76.G
7 8 .5
81.4

25 .5
26.3
2 8 .6
3 0 .3
3 1 .3

4 0 .4
4 1 .7
4 5 .4
4 8 .0
4 9 .6

U nder
Under
U nder
U nder
U nder

$ 1 .8 0 __________________________________________ _____
$ 1 .8 5 ...........................................................................
$ 1 . 9 0 __________________________________________________
$ 1 . 9 5 ................................ ..........................................
$2.00 ...........................................................................

291.4
294.3
298.3
300.9
3C3.2

78.4
79.2
80.2
80.5
81.6

5 9 .7
6 0 .0
6 0 .7
6 1 .3
6 1 .6

7 5 .0
7 5 .3
7 6 .2
7 7 .0
7 7 .3

107.8
108.4
1 0 9 .7

88.5
88.9
9 0 .0
9 0 .4
9 0 .6

69 .2
50 .3
51 .0
51.6
52 .0

63.2
64.2
64.5
65.4
6 5 .e

3 4 .7
3 5 .6
3 6 .9
3 7 .9
39 .2

55.0
56 .5
58 .5
6 0 .0
6 2 .2

Under
U nder
Under
Under
Under

$2. 1 0 .............. .......................................................
$ 2 . 2 0 _________________________________________________
$ 2 . 3 0 ------------- --------------------------------- — -----------$ 2 .4 0 __________________________________________________
$ 2 . 5 0 _________________________________________________

312.6
317.4
322.6
326.1
3 2 7 .e

84.1
85.4

8 6.2

6 4 .4
6 5 .4
6 6 .4
6 6 .9
67 .3

8 1 .0
8 2 .1
8 3 .4
84 .1
8 4 .5

112.5
113.3
113.7
113.8

9 1 .9
9 2 .3
93 .0
9 3 .3
9 3 .4

54.1
5 5 .3
5 6 .C
56.5
5 7 .C

67. 7
68.5
65.5
90 .0
90 .5

4 2 .1
4 4 .2
4 6 .9
4 8 .9
4 9 .7

66 .7
70.0
74 .3
7 7 .4
78.7

Under
Under
U nder
Under
Under

$ 2. 6 0 -------- ----------------------------------------------------------$ 2 .7 0 ...........................................................................
$ 2 .8 0 _________________________________________________
$2. 9 0 ----------------------------- -------------------------------------$3. 0 0 __________________________________________________

335.2
340.9
342.6
343.6
344.3

51.2
51.7
52.1
52.4
52.6

68 .6

8 6 .2

6 9 .0
6 9 .6
6 9 .9
6 9 .9

86.7
8 7 .4
8 7 .8
8 7 .9

115.3
115.7
116.0
116.1
116.3

9 4 .6
9 4 .9
5 5 .1
9 5 .3
9 5 .4

58.7
5 9.0
59.2
55.5
5 5 .7

92 .0
52 .3
52.6
92.8
5 3 .0

5 6 .7
5 7 .2
5 7 .7
5 8 .1
5 8 .4

89.8
90.6
9 1 .5
9 2 .1
92 .5

T o t a l ..............................................................................

3 7 i.e

10 0 .0

75 .6

100.0

121.9

100.0

1C7.2

1CC.0

6 3.1

A v e ra g e hourly e a r n in g s --------------




------------

„

__ -----

2 21.0

66.8
87.7

> 1 .,56

S I.,79

110 .2
110.4

112 .0

SI,.28

e c .i

SI .52

8.2
8 .3

26.3
2 8 .4
30.1

10 0 .0
SI .9 6

Table 31.

Building m
aterials, hardware, and farm equipment dealers

Numerical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory employees by weekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(Employees in thousands)
United States

South

Northeast

North Central

West

Weekly hours of work
Number
Under 15____ _________
15 and under 3 5 ______
35 and under 4 0 ______
4 0 _____________________
Over 40 and under 42.
4 2 _____________________
Over 42 and under 44.
4 4 _____________________
Over 44 and under 48 .
48 and o ve r___________

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

6 .7
13.5
5 .0
25.7
1.5
2 .6
1.7
5.2
10.5
24.0

6 .9
14.0
5.2
26.7
1.6
2.7
1.7
5.4
10.9
24.9

3,4
13.7
7.3
28.2
3.3
1.9
3.1
13.2
19.8
63.1

2.2
6.7
4 .7
17.9
2.1
1.2
2.0
8.4
12.6
40.2

6.6
16.2
6.1
30.8
2.7
3.2
3.2
9.5
15.7
58.9

100.0

488.9

Average weekly hours

Number

4.1
10.5
4.3
23.2
1.8
1.8
1.8
7.5
11.3
33.5

20.1
51.6
21.2
113.6
8.7
9.0
8.9
36.7
55.4
163.7

T o ta l___________

Percent

96.3

100.0

157.0

100.0

153.0

42..3

39 .7

44• 2

Number

Percent

4.3
10.6
4.0
20.1
1.8
2.1
2.1
6.2
10.3
38. 5

3 .3
8.3
2 .7
28.9
1.2
1.4
•9
8.8
9.4
17.7

4.0
10.0
3.3
35.0
1.4
1.7
1.1
10.7
11.4
21.4

100.0

82.6

Percent

100.0

42.8

40.8

North Central

West

Table 32. General merchandise stores
Numerical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory employees by weekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(Employees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

Weekly hours of work
Number
Under 15
....................
15 and under 35
35 and under 40 _
_
_
_
4 0 __
Over 40 and under 42
42
_
Over 42 and under 44
...
44.
....................
Over 44 and under 48
48 and over
_
. .
Total
Average weekly hours




.......
_____

_

..... ............
...........................
.......
_ _____
_ __ _
.................... ..............
... _
_ _
. .
_ __
.

.

_
_

____

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

150.4
416.0
306.6
494.9
57.9
31.5
24.4
18.6
43.4
103.6

9.1
25.3
18.6
30.0
3.5
1.9
1.5
1.1
2 .6
6.3

42.5
127.4
109.0
100.6
10.4
3.2
5 .0
3.2
7.4
16.5

10.0
30.0
25.6
23.7
2.4
.7
1.2
•8
1.7
3.9

40.0
93.3
84.2
119.7
23.6
15.3
9.2
7.6
20.4
47.9

8.7
20.2
18.3
26.0
5.1
3.3
2.0
1.7
4.4
10.4

48.1
136.2
84.1
165.2
16.2
9.7
7.6
4.6
10.6
18.5

1647.3

.... .........
_

Percent

100.0

425.0

100.0

461.2

100.0

500.8

34.0

32.3

35.7

Percent

Number

9.6
27.2
16.8
33.0
3.2
1.9
1.5
.9
2.1
3.7

19.8
59.2
29.3
109.5
7.8
3.4
2.6
3.1
5.1
20.6

100.0
33.3

Percent

260.3

7.6
22.7
11.3
42.0
3.0
1.3
1.0
1.2
1.9
7.9
100.0
35.1

nJ

Department stores

T a b le 3 3 .

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p lo y e e s by w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
U n ited S tates and r e g i o n s , June 1965

(Em ployees in thousands)
Northeast

United States

North Central

South

W est

W eekly hours of w o rk
Num ber

Percent

Under 15 ..................................................................................
15 and under 35
__
_
_ _ _
_
__ __
35 and under 4 0 __ _____ ____________ _____ _____ _____
4 0 ........................................................ ...................................
O ver 40 and under 42 _______________________ ____________
4 2 _____________________________________________________________
O v er 42 and under 44_______ ____________________ _______
44 _ ___________________
_____________
O v er 44 and under 48 __ __________________________________
48 and o v e r ___________________________________________________

85*8
265.7
198.3
343.0
4 1 .9
17.0
13.4
5 .4
19.6
29.1

8.4
26.1
19. 5
33. 6
4.1
1 .7
1.3
•5
1. 9
2. 9

T o t a l ..............................................................................

1019.3

Num ber

10 0 . C

A v e ra g e w eekly hours _____

_____

________________

_____

Percen t

2 8 .2

10 .2

86 .0
6 8 .1

31.2
24.7
2 3 .3
2 .9
.7

6 4.1

8.0
1 .9
3 .0

1.1

2 .0

•7

1.8

5 .0
9 .3

3 .4

2 7 5 .7

10 0 .0

3:2 .6

N um ber

17.8
5 5 .9
59.8
80.5
15. 3
8 .3
4 .6
1 .3
6 .3
7 .6

6 .9
21.7
23.3
31.3
5 .9
3.2

1.8

Num ber

P ercen t

Num ber

9.1
27.0
16.4
3 6.4
4 .0
1. 7

11.4
39.2
18.8
84.3

1.2

2 .1

1.2
1*6

28.4
84.6
51.5
114.1
12.4
5 .3
3 .7

P ercen t

6.6
22.7
10.9
4 8 .8
3 .6
•8

6.2
1.5

1.2
2 .4
2 .9

5 .7
6 .7

1. 8
2. 1

2 .7
5 .5

3 .2

100.0

257.4

313.7

100. G

172.5

100.0
34 .9

3 3 .2

3 4 .9

32 .0

T able 34.

Percent

Limited price variety stores

Num erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by w eekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

W est

Weekly hours of work
Num ber

Percent

Num ber

Percen t

Num ber

P ercen t

N um ber

Over 44 and under 48________________________________________
48 and o ve r------------------------------------------------------------------

3 6 .3
8 1 .2
61 .0
6 1 .2
7.0
6 .2
4 .2
2 .2
7 .4
10.3

13.1
2 9.3
22.0
22.1
2 .5
2.2
1.5
. 8
2 .7
3.7

1 0 .8
2 4 .6
2 0 .7
1 5 .6
1 .2
.5
.5
.5

14.0
3 2 .0
2 6 .9
2 0 .3
1 .5
.7
.7
•6
1 .2
2 .1

10 .5
20 .3
15 .9
2 1 .9
3 .4
4 .1
1.1
1.0
4 .1
4 .9

12.1
23 .3
18 .2
25.1
3 .9
4 .6
1 .3
1.1
4 .7
5 .6

9 .0
25 .0
17.6
13.8
1 .5
1 .1
2 .3
.5
1 .7
2 .2

T o ta l... ..................................................................

277.1

100.0

8 7 .4

100.0

74 .8

Unde* 15 ..................................................................................
15 and under 3 5 ___ ____ ___
_____ __ __ __ __ __ __
35 and under 40 — __ ________________ _____ _____ _____
40 _ __ .. ...............................................................................
Over 40 and under 4 2 ________________________________________
___________ ______ _____________
____ _ _
42 __
„ .
Over 42 and under 44 _____ ____________________ _______

Average weekly hours




___ __ ____

___________

____

100.0
31 . 7

.9
1 .6
7 6 .9
30 .5

33 .5

Percen t

Num ber

1 2 .0
33 .5
2 3 .6
18. 5
2 .0
1 .5
3.1
.6
2 .2
3. C

15.7
2 9 .6
17 .7
26.0
2 .4
1 .3
.6
.8
1 .9
4 .0

6 .0
11.2
6 .7

1 0 0.0
31 . 4

P ercen t

3 8 .0

9.9
.9
.5
.2
.3
.7
1 .5

100.0
3 0 .9

T a b le 3 5 .

frood stores

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p lo y e e s b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)__________________________________________
United States

Northeast

South

North C entral

W est

W eek ly h ou rs o f w o rk
Num ber

Under 15 __...............................................................................
________ ________ __ __
15 and under 3 5 _________ ___
35 and under 4 0 __ _____ __ __ _____ _____ _____ _____
4 0 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 40 and under 42 ______________________________________
42 ...
_
_
_
_
_
_
O ver 42 and under 44
_
_
44 ......_
__
......... . _
O v er 44 and under 48 __ __ __ __ ________ _____ _____
____
__ __ __ __ __ __ ____________ _____
48 and over

140.3
415.2

T o t a l-------------------------------------------------------------------------

P ercen t

1366.8

A v e ra g e w eek ly h ours __ _____

__

_ _

____

10.3
3 0 .4
6 .3
2 5 .0
2. 8

86 .2
342.3
38.5
28.2
31.9
19.9
59.0
205.2

__

2 .1
2 .3
1. 5
4 .3
15.0

10 0 .0

N um ber

P ercen t

Num ber

P ercen t

N um ber

4 8 .2
1 3 3 .0

1 1 .9
3 2 .9
5 .4
2 6 .9

3 0 .1
9 1 .1

8 .5
2 5 .8

2 1.8

6.2

7 9 .4

22.5
3 .2
3 .3
1 .9
4 .5
2 2 .3

38.5
129.1
3 0 .4
76.1
16.1
7 .0
9 .5
5 .0
20 .5
4 9 .0

100.0

381.3

2 1.8
1 0 8 .9
6 .3
6 .9
1 3 .9

1.6

11.2

1 .7
3 .4
1 .5
4 .4
1 0 .4

1 1 .5
6 .4
6 .5
15 .8
7 8 .7

100.0

35 2 .6

6.0
17.6
4 2 .0
4 0 4 .6

1.8

3 2 .6

3 4 .3

T a b le 36,

P ercen t

10 .1
3 3 .9

8.0
2 0 .0
4 .2
1. 8
2 .5
1 .3
5 .4
12 .9

10 0 .0

N um ber

2 3 .6
6 2 .0

10.3
27.1
5 .4
34.1

12 .2
7 7 .8
4 .8
2 .9

2 .1
1 .3
.9

2 .0

1.1

2 .4
5 .1
3 5 .4

2 .3
15.5

10 0 .0

2 28.3
34.3

3 3 .6

3 6 .8

P ercen t

Grocery stores

N u m e ric a l and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by w eekly hours of work,
United States and region s, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
N orth Central

South

Northeast

United States

W est

W eek ly h ou rs o f w o rk

U n der 1 5 _________________
15 and under 3 5 _________
35 and under 4 0 _________
40 __________________________
O v e r 40 and under 42___
O v e r 42 and under 44___
4 4 __________________________
O v e r 44 and under 48___
48 and o v e r _______________




P ercen t

3 5 .8
104.2
17 .1
8 2 .9
5 .8
6 .3
13 .5
4 .5
1 3 .7
2 7 .1

1 1 .5
3 3 .5
5 .5
2 6 .7
1 .9

2 8 .3
8 4 .7
19.9
73 .2
10 .9

8 .7
2 6 .1

2 .0
4 .3
1 .4
4 .4
8 .7

11.0
6 .1
6 .3
15.0
6 9 .0

3 .4
3 .4
1 .9
1 .9
4 .6
21 .3

3 3 .4
110.4
27.1
6 2 .1
15.5
6 .5
8 .4
4 .7
17.9
38 .1

10 0 .0

3 1 0 .9

10 0 .0

3 2 4 .4

10 0 .0

324.0

3 0 .5
6 .4
2 4 .8
3.1
2 .3

2 .6

34.3

Percen t

Num ber

10 .2

1150.9

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s _

Num ber

P ercen t

117.2
350.6
7 4 .1
285.2
36.0
26.1
29.8
17.8
5 0 .7
163.3

T o t a l _______________

Percen t

1 .5
4 .4
14.2

Num ber

Num ber

32 .5

6 .1
2 2 .6

3 6 .6

10.3
34.1
8 .4
19.2
4. 8

2 .0
2 .6
1 .5
5 .5
11. 7

10 0 .0
3 3 .5

Num ber

Percent

10 .2

1 9 .6
5 1 .3

26.8
5 .2
35.0

10 .0
6 7.1
3 .9
2 .3
1 .7
2 .3
4 .2
2 9 .2

2 .0
1.2
.9

1*2
2 .2
15.2

10 0 .0

191.6
34 .3

T a b le 3 7.

Automotive dealers and gasoline service stations

>1

A

N u m e ric a l and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by w eekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North C entral

W est

W eekly h ours o f w o rk
Percent

.
_ _________ ___________
U nder 15 _______________
15 and under 3 5 ______________________________________________
35 and under 40
_
.
.
_ —
40 . -------_
_ _ ____
O v e r 40 and under 42
_ __
__ _____ __
42 _____________ ___________________________ __ __ ____ ____
O v er 42 ahd under 44
_
_________
4 4 ______________________________________________________________
O v e r 44 and under 48 _____ ________________ _________ __
48 and o v er
_
_ _ _ _ _ _
__________
Total > — _

_ __

A v e ra g e w eekly hours

__ ._ __ ________________
_______

_____

__ __

61 .8
153.4
4 9 .8
198.7
14.3
15.7
25.9
146.4
114.3
489.6
1269.8

__ _________ _____

N um ber

Percen t

4 .9
12.1
3. 9
15.6
1.1
1 .2
2 .0
11 .5
9 .0
3 8.6

Num ber

1 7.8
4 4 .4
14.1
4 9 .8
3 .0
4 .2
1 0 .5
2 3 .0
3 1 .8
7 2 .0

6 .6
1 6 .4
5 .2
1 8 .4
1.1
1.5
3 .9
8 .5
11 .7
2 6 .6

11.1
2 7 .5
1 0 .2
39.5
2 .2
4 .4
6 .3
4 5 .8
38.1
1 99.7

100.0

3 8 4 .7

270.5

100.0

Num ber

Percen t

2 .9
7 .1
2 .6
10.3
•6
1.1
1 .6
11 .9
9 .9
5 1.9

T ab le 38 .

19.8
4 4 .7
13.6
4 7 .7
4 .1
4 .4
3 .1
49.0
27.2
128.0

100.0

39 .7

42 .8

Num ber

P ercen t

34 1 .6

Num ber

5. 8
13.1
4 .0
14 .0
1.2
1 .3
. 9
14.3
8 .0
37. 5
100.0

4 .8
13.5
4 .4
22 .6
1 .8
1.0
2 .3
10.5
6 .3
32 .9

1 3 .0
3 6 .8
1 2 .0
6 1.6
5 .0
2 .8
6 .1
2 8 .6
17.2
89.9
2 7 3 .0

100.0
4 1 .7

4 2 .3

46 .4

Percen t

Motor vehicle dealers (new and used cars)

N u m erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by weekly hours of w ork,
United States and regions, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

W est

W eekly hours of w o rk
Num ber

Under 15 .......................... .. ....................................................
15 and under 35 . ----- __ ----_ ______ _________ __ __
35 and under 40 — _____ _____ _____ _____ ____________
40
_ __ __ — ------- __ ------_ _ _ _ _ _ _
O v er 40 and under 42 __ _____ _____ _____ _____ ___
42 ..............................................................................................
O v e r 42 and under 44___ __
_____ _______ ___ _____
4 4 ............................................................................................
O v e r 44 and under 48 __ __ __ ________________ _____ __
48 and o v e r
____
— __ __ __ ___________________
._ __

11.7
35 .4
22.9
105.9
7.8
7 .7
19.0
125 .C
75.9
193.1

Total ... ..........................................................................

Percent

604.4

A v e ra g e weekly hours




___

__ _____

____________

_____

1. 9
5 .9
3. 8
17.5
1.3
1.3
3.1
20.7
12.6
31.9
100.0
43,.7

N um ber

P ercen t

41 .3

N um ber

1 .9
6 .9
4 .7
15.0
1.2
1 .5
4 .8
3 8 .6
27.8
9 2 .3

1 .0
3 .5
2 .4
7 .7
.6
.8
2 .5
19.8
14.3
4 7 .4

3 .8
11.5
6 .1
27.2
2 .1
3 .5
1 .8
4 4 .5
19.3
53 .9

100.0

129.1

P ercen t

3.1
10.2
6 .4
23.3
1.6
•8
6 .4
13.1
16.8
18.2

4 .0
13 .2
8 .2
30 .1
2 .0
1 .0
8 .3
1 7.0
2 1 .8
2 3 .5

Num ber

194.7

100.0

173.6

46 .1

P ercen t

P ercen t

2 .2
6 .6
3 .5
1 5 .6
1 .2
2 .C
l.C
25. 6
11.1
31.0

2 .0
3 .9
3 .8
3 3 .7
2 .5
1 .7
4 .1
2 5 .0
7 .1
2 3 .3

1 .8
3 .6
3 .6
3 1 .4
2 .3
1*5
3 .8
2 3 .4
6 .6
21.8

100.0
43 • 6

N um ber

1C7.0

100.0
42 .5

T ab le 3 9 .

Gasoline service stations

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v i s o r y e m p lo y e e s b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North Central

W est

W eekly h ou rs of w o rk
Percent

Num ber

U nder 15 ... ............. - — ................................................ —
15 and under 3 5 _________ ___
________ — — __
—
35 and under 4 0 __
__ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
40 ___ ______ ___________ _________________________________ „______
__ _____ _____ ____________
O ver 40 and under 42 ___ __
42 ______ _______ __ ______ ______ ______ *_______.. . __ __ __ __
O ver 42 and under 44 _____ _____________ ______ _____
4 4 ...........................................................................................
O v er 44 and under 48_______________________________________
48 and o v e r ________ __
__ __ _ --------------------„ „
T o t a l .............................................................................
A v e ra g e w eek ly hours

_____

_____

------------

8 .7
2 1 .3
4 .1
11.3
•6
.9
.7
1 .9
3. 9
46. 7

476.1

Percen t

Percen t

Num ber

1 1 .4
2 6 .0
4 .0
11.5
.4
2 .5
•8
2 .9
6 .1
3 4 .4

8 .0
16.7
2 .8
10 .0
.2
.3
.4
2 .3
4 .2
7 7 .2

6 .6
1 3 .7
2 .3
8 .2
.2
.2
.3
1 .9
3 .4
6 3 .2

11.7
2 7 .2
5 .2
13.7
1 .0
.7
.5
2 .0
4 .2
56.5

100.0

10 4 .7

Num ber

122.1

100.0

122.8

1 2 .0
27 .2
4 .1
12 .0
.4
2 .6
.9
3 .1
6 .3
36.1

100.0

41.6
101.4
19.4
53.7
2.7
4 .3
3.2
8 .9
18.6
222.3

—

Num ber

T a b le 40.

9 .5
22.2
4 .3
11.2
.8
.6
.4
1 .6
3 .4
46. C
100.0

Num ber

Percent

9 .9
3C.3
7 .2
1 8 .0
1 .0
.7
1 .5
1 .5
3 .8
5 2 .6

7 .8
24 .0
5 .7
14.2
•8
•6
1 .2
1 .2
3 .0
4 1 .6

126.5

100.0
40i.5

40 • 6

47,.7

37

41,.6

Percen t

Apparel and accessory stores

N u m erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by weekly hours of work,
United States and region s, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

N orth C entral

W est

W eekly hours of w o rk
P ercen t

U nder 15 „ ----------------------- ------------ -------------------------- 15 and under 3 5 _________ ___
_________ __ _____ „
35 and under 4 0 __ _____ __ _________ _____ _____ „
40
....................................................................................
O v er 40 and under 42
_____ ____________ ____________
42
---- n -----------------------------------------------------------------------------•
O v er 42 and under 44
_
_____ __________
O v e r 44 and under 48 __ __________________________
48 and o v e r . ____________ __
. . ________________ __ __
Total

___

_

__

A v e ra g e w eek ly h o u r s __________




_
_

_
__

_

_
_ _

__
___

582.1
33. 8

Percen t

N um ber

Percen t

Num ber

2 1 .0
5 0 .8
4 7 .2
4 4 .2
2 .5
3 .4
2 .7
3 .3
5 .9
1 6 .4

10 .6
2 5 .8
2 3 .9
2 2 .4
1.2
1.7
1 .4
1 .7
3 .0
8 .3

15 .3
2 8 .8
17.7
34 .3
4 .8
7 .0
7 .0
6 .0
6 .6
19.8

10.4
19 .6
12 .0
2 3 .3
3 .3
4 .8
4 .7
4 .1
4 .5
13.5

20 .2
4 0 .7
17.5
3 5.7
3 .6
4 .1
2 .7
2 .6
7 .0
12.6

1 0 0.0

6 7 .3
140.7
9 0 .9
149.8
11.6
16.0
13.8
13.5
22.0
56.5

Num ber

1 1 .6
24 .2
1 5 .6
25. 7
2 .0
2 .7
2 .4
2 .3
3 .8
9. 7

Num ber

1 97.3

100.0

147.3

100.0

146.7

33 • 2

35 .6

Percen t

Num ber

13. 8
2 7 .7
1 1 .9
24.3
2 .5
2. 8
1. 9
1. 8
4. 8
8 .6

11.9
22.5
9 .4
39.2
•8
1.7
1 .6
1.7
2 .6
8 .5

10.8
2 0 .4
8 .6
3 5 .6
.7
1 .5
1 .4
1 .6
2 .4
7 .7

1 0 0 .0
3 2 .6

Percent

90.8

100 .0
33.8

^
1

01

T a b le 41.

Men's and boys’ clothing and furnishings stores

0)

Num erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by weekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(Em ployees in thousands)
Northeast

United States

South

North Central

W est

W eekly hours of w o rk
Num ber

9 .6
18.6
8.0
24.3
2 .3
3.2
2.3
4 .4
6 .0
19.7

T o t a l ......... ..... ...............................................................

98.5

A v e ra g e w eekly hours ______________________________________

9. 7
1 8. 9
8.1
24. 7
2 .4
3.3
2.3
4 .5
6.1
20.0
100.0

P ercen t

N um ber

Num ber

Num ber

P ercen t

N um ber

Percent

11.0
26 .0
6 .7
2 7 .4
.5
2 .7
3 .9
3 .3
5 .0
13 .5

1 .6
3.6
1.3
5 .5
1.0
1.1
.5
1 .6
1.5
5 .9

6 .6
15 .3
5.3
2 3 .2
4 .3
4 .8
2 .2
6 .8
6 .3
25.1

2 .8
4 .3
2 .1
6 .7
.8
.9
.7
.8
2 .4
3 .7

11.1
17 .2
8 .4
26. 5
3 .4
3. 6
2. 6
3 .1
9 .4
14. 6

1 .6
3 .9
1 .0
4 .1
.1
.4
.6
.5
.7
2 .0

100.0

2 3 .6

100.0

25.1

100.0

1 5 .0

39. 0

36. 6

36. 7

Table 42.

P ercen t

10.3
1 9.4
10.5
2 3 .2
1.1
2 .2
1 .4
4 .4
4 .1
2 3.3

3 .6
6 .8
3 .6
8.1
.4
.8
.5
1 .5
1 .4
8 .1
0
0

Under 15
15 and under 35
.... ...
. _
_ .
35 and under 40
_
40 ______________
O v e r 40 and under 42
.... .......... _ . ..... _
42
. ... ____
O v er 42 and under 44_____________________________ _________
44
....... .
O v e r 44 and under 48________________________________________
48 and over _
_ ________ ______________________________

Percent

100 .0
34 .2

36,. 3

W om en’s ready-to-wear stores

Num erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by weekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(Em ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North C entral

W est

W eekly h ou rs of w o rk
Num ber

U nder 15 __________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 ------------------------------------------------35 and under 4 0 __________________________________
4 0 __________________________________________________
O v er 40 and under 42 ____________________________
4 2 ___ _______________________________________________
O v er 42 and under 44___________________________
O v e r 44 and under 48___________________________
48 and o v e r _______________________________________




—
_____

32.,6

P ercen t

7 .6
22 .1
1 8 .9
14.2
1 .1
.6
.7
.2
.7
1 .8

100.0

215.0

A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s __________________________

—

Num ber

10.5
2 9 .0
20.7
25.6
2.2
2.3
1 .8
1 .7
2.2
4.C

22.6
6 2 .3
44 .5
55.0
4 .8
5.1
3.9
3.6
4.7
8.5

T o t a l _______________________________________

Percent

6 7 .8

Num ber

11.2
3 2 .6
2 7 .8
2 0 .9
1 .6
.9
1 .1
.3
1 .0
2 .6

34,>8

6 .0
19.6
9 .9
12.1
1 .6
1.1
.8
.4
1.4
1.4

1 00.0

57 .3

N um ber

8 .6
2 1 .5
19.1
24.9
3 .2
5 .5
3.3
4 .3
3 .5
6 .1

5 .0
1 2 .3
11 .0
14.3
1 .8
3 .2
1.9
2 .4
2 .0
3 .5

100.0
31 .1

P ercen t

54.2

N um ber

P ercen t

11.1
36.1
18.2
22.3
2. 9
2.1
1 .6
. 7
2. 5
2. 6

4 .0
8 .3
4 .8
14 .5
.4
.2
.5
.5
.7
1 .9

11.3
23 .2
13.5
4 0 .6
1 .0
•6
1 .3
1 .5
1 .9
5 .2

100. 0

3 5 .7

P ercen t

31. 4

100.0
33 .3

T a b le

43

.

Shoe stores

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s b y w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965

(Em ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

North C entral

West

W eek ly h o u rs of w o rk
Num ber

Percent

N um ber

P ercen t

N um ber

Percen t

U nder 15 __________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 __________________________________
35 and under 4 0 __________________________________
4 0 __________________________________________________
O ver 40 and under 42 ___________________________
4 2 __________________________________________________
O ver 42 and under 4 4 ___________________________
4 4 __________________________________________________
O ver 44 and under 48___________________________
48 and o v e r _______________________________________

16*9
21,5
8.5
22.0
1.7
4.1
4.7
2.9
5.4
17.3

16.1
20.4
8.1
21 .0
1 .6
3. 9
4 .5
2. 7
5.2
16. 5

4 .2
5 .3
4 .0
8 .7
.5
1 .3
.6
.5
1 .5
4 .1

13 .6
17.5
12.9
2 8.5
1 .5
4 .1
2 .0
1.7
4 .9
13.3

4. i
4 .2
2 .0
4 .2
.6
1 .4
3 .0
1 .2
1 .5
6 .0

14.4
15.0
7 .0
1 4 .9
2 .3
5 .1
10.6
4 .2
5 .2
21 .4

6 .3
7 .5
2 .1
3 .8
.5
i.i
.8
.7
1 .8
4 .3

T o t a l _______________________________________

105.0

100.0

3 0 .6

100.0

2 8 .2

100.0

2 8 .7

A v e ra g e w eek ly hours __________________*______

33 .8

T able

Num ber

36 .0

34 .4

Percen t

21. 8
2 6 .0
7 .2
13.1
1. 8
3. 7
2. 8
2 .4
6. 1
15 .0
100.0

Numbe r

Percent

2 .4
4 .4
.5
5 .4
.1
.3
.3
.5
.7
2 .9

13.9
25.3
2 .9
3 0 .7
.4
1.7
1.7
2.7
4 .0
16.7

17 .5

100.0

30. 7

34.1

North Central

W est

44. Furniture, home furnishings, and household appliance stores

Num erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by weekly hours of work,
United States and regions, June 1965
(Em ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

W eek ly h ou rs o f w o rk
Num ber

U nder 15 ____________________________________
15 and under 3 5 ____________________________
35 and under 4 0 ____________________________
O v er 40 and under 42______________________
4 2 ____________________________________________
O v er 42 and under 44 ______________________
4 4 ____________________________________________
O v e r 44 and under 48______________________
48 and o v e r ___ ______________________________

P ercen t

363.9
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ____________________




Percen t

Num ber

Percen t

Num ber

5. 8
13.5
7.3
31.2
2 .2
2 .7
2 .2
7. 7
7.2
20.2

20.9
4 9 .3
26.7
113.6
8 .1
9 .8
8 .0
27.9
26 .3
73.3

N um ber

6 .7
1 4 .7
10.1
3 3 .0
2 .2
2 .2
1 .3
5 .4
6 .6
1 4 .0

7 .0
15.3
10.5
34 .3
2 .3
2 .2
1 .4
5 .6
6 .8
14.6

3.8
8 .6
5 .6
28 .6
2 .7
5 .0
2 .5
12.3
9 .4
27.0

3 .6
8.1
5 .3
2 7.1
2 .5
4. 7
2 .4
11.7
8 .9
2 5 .6

7 .0
14.4
6 .4
2 5 .0
1.7
1 .5
3 .0
6 .3
6 .5
17.8

100.0

105.5

100.0

8 9.5

1 0 0 .0
38 .9

96.1
37 .3

41 .5

P ercen t

7. 8
16.1
7.1
27. 9
1. 8
1. 6
3. 3
7.1
7. 3
19.9
1 0 0 .0
37 .9

Num ber

Percent

3 .4
11.6
4 .7
27.1
1 .6
1 .2
1 .2
3 .8
3 .8
14.5

4 .7
15.9
6 .5
37.2
2 .2
1.7
1 .6
5 .2
5 .2
19.9

72.8

100 .0
3 8 .4

T a b le

45

Furniture, hom furhishings, and equipment stores
e

.

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
U n ited Sta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(Em ployees in thousands)
Northeast

United States

South

North C entral

W est

W eekly hours of w o rk
Num ber

Percent

Num ber

Percen t

Num ber

Percen t

N um ber

Under 15 ________________
15 and under 3 5 ________
35 and under 4 0 ________
4 0 _________________________
O v er 40 and under 42__
4 2 _________________________
O ver 42 and under 44__
4 4 _________________________
O v e r 44 and under 48__
48 and o v e r ______________

11.6
31 .8
20.2
70.5
5 .7
8 .3
5 .7
14.7
18.0
4 5 .8

5 .0
1 3 .7
e. 7
30.3
2. 5
3 .6
2 .5
6.3
7 .8
19.7

3 .2
9 .6
7 .4
2 1 .0
1 .5
2 .0
1 .0
1 .3
5 .4
9 .4

5 .2
15.5
12.0
33 .9
2 .4
3 .2
1 .6
2 .1
8 .8
15.2

2 .3
6 .1
5 .1
16.5
1.8
4 .6
1.6
8 .0
5 .8
1 8 .4

3 .3
8 .6
7.3
23 .5
2 .6
6 .5
2 .3
11.4
8.2
26.2

4 .0
8 .8
3 .7
14.7
1 .2
1 .0
2 .2
3 .2
4 .4
10.4

T o t a l ______________

232.4

100.0

6 1 .8

100.0

7 0 .3

100.0

5 3.5

A v e ra g e w eekly h ours .

39 .0

37 .8

T able 46.

41 .5

Percen t

Num ber

7 .4
1 6 .5
6. 9
2 7 .4
2 .2
1 .9
4.1
6. 0
8.2
19. 5

2 .1
7 .4
4 .0
18 .3
1 .3
•8
.9
2 .2
2 .4
7 .5

100.0

P ercen t

4 6 .8

3 7 .8

4 .4
15 .7
8 .5
3 9 .2
2 .8
1 .6
1 .9
4 .6
5 .1
16.1
1 0 0.0
38 .3

Household appliance stores

N u m erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by weekly hours of work,
United States and region s, June 1965
(Em ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

North C entral

South

W est

W eekly h ou rs of w o rk
Percent

Num ber

Under 15 ____________________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 ------------------------------------------------------------ __
35 and under 4 0 _________ ____________ _____ _____ _____
40 ___ ____________________________________ _____ _________________
O v e r 40 and under 42 _______________________ ____________
4 2 ............................................. ..............................................
O v e r 42 and under 4 4 _______ ___________________ ________
4 4 ......................................................... ..... ...............................
O v er 44 and under 48 __ ___ ____________________________
48 and o v e r __ _____ _____ __ __ __ ___________________ __

4 .2
9 .5
3 .0
26.1
1.0
.4
1.7
9 .2
5 .6
18.1

T o t a l ..............................................................................

79.0

A v e ra g e w eekly hours -----------------------




------------------ -------

N um ber

5.3
12.1
3 .7
33.1
1.3
.5
2 .2
1 1 .7
7.2
22.9

1 .3
3 .2
1 .7
7 .2
.4
.2
.3
3 .2
.8
2 .9

100.0
39. 8

P ercen t

21.1

N um ber

6 .2
15.1
8 .0
3 4 .0
1 .7
.8
1 .2
15.2
4 .0
13.8

Percen t

N um ber

P ercen t

4 .9
7 .5
1 .0
38.0
1.1
.3
3 .5
9 .3
10.3
24.1

1 .0
2 .7
•6
5 .8
.2
•2
•4
2 .8
1 .5
5 .0

5 .2
1 3 .3
3 .2
2 8 .6
1 .0
.8
2 .2
13. 7
7 .5
2 4 .6

.7
1 .9
.4
4 .2
•2
*
.2
1 .1
.9
4 .5

5 .0
1 3.5
2 .7
29 .7
1 .5
•1
1 .3
7 .6
6 .1
3 2 .4

100.0

1 .2
1.8
.2
9 .0
.3
.1
•8
2 .2
2 .4
5 .7

100.0
3 7. 9

N um ber

2 0 .2

1 0 0 .0

14 .0

P ercen t

2 3 .7
40. 8

40., 4

100.0
40,.1

T a b le 4 7 .

Miscellaneous retail stores

N u m e r ic a l and p e r c e n t d is t r ib u t io n s o f n o n s u p e r v is o r y e m p lo y e e s by w e e k ly h o u r s o f w o r k ,
U n ited S ta tes and r e g i o n s , June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
United States

Northeast

South

W est

North C entral

W eekly h ou rs of w o rk
Num ber
Under 15 ______________________________________________________
15 and under 3 5 _________________ ____________ ________ __
35 and under 4 0 _________ ____________ _____ _____ _____
40 ______________________________________________________________
O ver 40 and under 42_______________________________________
4 2 ..............................................................................................
O ver 42 and under 44_______ ___________________ ________
4 4 ...........................................................................................
O v er 44 and under 4 8 --------------------------------------------------48 and o v e r . ------- ------------ — __________________________
Total . . .

.

------------------------------------------------------- —

N um ber

P ercen t

Percen t

Num ber

9 5.3
221.5
81 .2
249.3
14.0
18.7
19.9
43.8
49 .6
174.9

9 .8
2 2 .9
8 .4
25. 8
1 .4
1. 9
2.1
4 .5
5.1
18.1

3 4 .6
7 1 .5
23 .2
6 8 .8
2 .8
3 .3
4 .2
11.3
9 .1
33.5

13.2
2 7 .3
8 .8
26.2
1 .1
1 .3
1 .6
4 .3
3 .5
1 2 .8

100.0

262.3

100.0

35,, 9

Num ber

Percent

27 .5
6 5 .8
23.3
47 .1
4 .2
5 .4
5 .5
9 .3
15.2
4 8 .7

10 .9
26.1
9 .3
18. 7
1 .7
2 .2
2 .2
3 .7
6 .0
19.3

1 5 .9
4 1 .2
1 3 .8
6 0 .9
1 .9
1 .5
3 .7
5 .9
6 .9
26.2

8 .9
23.1
7 .8
3 4 .2
1 .1
•8
2 .1
3 .3
3 .9
14.7

251.9

100.0

1 7 7 .9

100.0
35

35 .7

38,.9

33 .1

T ab le 48.

P ercen t

100.0

27 6 .1

A v e ra g e w eek ly hours _____________________________________

Num ber

6 .2
15.6
7 .6
2 6 .3
1 .9
3 .1
2 .4
6 .3
6 .7
24 .1

1 7 .2
4 3 .1
20 .9
7 2 .6
5.1
8 .5
6 .5
1 7 .3
18.4
6 6 .5

968.2

Percen t

•6

Drug and proprietary stores

N um erical and percent distributions of nonsupervisory em ployees by weekly hours of work,
United States and region s, June 1965
(E m ployees in thousands)
South

Northeast

United States

W est

North Central

W eekly hours of w o rk
Num ber

U nder 15 ____________________________________
15 and under 3 5 ____________________________
35 and under 4 0 ____________________________
O ver 40 and under 42_____________________
4 2 ____________________________________________
O v e r 42 and under 44 _____________________
4 4 ____________________________________________
O v er 44 and under 48 _____________________
48 and o v e r _________________________________

P ercen t

1 1 .9
2 9 .9
9.Q
21. 7
1 .3
2 .8
2.1
2. 8
4 .7
13. 8

44.2
111.1
33.5
80.7
4 .7
10.4
7 .9
10.5
17.5
51.3

1 0 0 .0

371.8
A v e r a g e w e e k ly h o u r s ____________________




33,,4

Num ber

P ercen t

1 3 .7
2 9 .4
6 .5
1 6 .4
.7
.8
.9
1 .9
2 .6
6 .7

N um ber

17.2
3 7 .0
8 .1
20 .6
.8
1.0
1 .1
2 .3
3 .3
8 .4

29,,7

37,.3

P ercen t

Num ber

Percent

14 .4
3 8 .2
10.0
17.3
1.9
3 .5
2 .3
2 .5
5 .2
12 .0

1 3 .5
3 5 .6
9 .3
16. 1
1 .8
3 .2
2.1
2 .3
4 .8
11.2

6 .6
1 8 .5
5 .9
2 1 .2
•6
.9
•8
1 .3
2 .0
5 .4

10.4
29.3
9 .4
33 .5
1.0
1 .4
1 .2
2 .1
3 .2
8 .5

100.0

12 1 .9

N um ber

7 .8
2 0 .6
9 .1
21.2
1.2
4 .3
3 .2
3 .9
6 .3
2 2 .3

9 .5
2 5 .1
11.1
2 5 .9
1.5
5 .3
3 .9
4 .8
7 .7
2 7 .2

100.0

79 .6

Percen t

107.2

1 0 0 .0

63.1

31 .9

100.0
33 •0




Appendix A. Scope and Method of Survey
Scope of Survey
The survey of earnings and hours of work in retail trade includes all establishments
(except eating and drinking places) with one or more paid employees engaged in selling
merchandise for personal, household, or farm consumption, as defined in the 1957 edition
of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual prepared by the Bureau of the Budget. Also
included are auxiliary units affiliated with and servicing retail establishments, such as
warehouses, repair shops, and central offices.
Geographically, the 50 States and the District of Columbia are covered.
The data
reflect earnings and hours of work of nonsupervisory employees for a payroll period in­
cluding June 12, 1965,
Sample Design
The sample was designed to yield national and regional estimates for each of the
major kinds of business groups in retail trade and for some specific lines of retail business..
A stratified sample design was used with variable sampling ratios depending on the kind of
business and employment size. For example, the sample size for lines of business shown
separately was proportionately larger than for those not published and the probability of
selection increased with the employment size of the unit.
The following tabulation shows the number of units included in the sample for the
m ajor retail groups and lines of business in the United States for which separate data are
published:
Kindo f business
Retail trade (except eating and drinkingplaces)

Number

---------------------------------------------------------

Building materials, hardware, and farm equipment --------------------------------------------------General merchandise1----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Department s to re s -------------------Limited price variety stores-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Food 1
— .......................................... .....................— ........................... - ----------------------------Grocery stores--------------------Automotive dealers and gasoline service stations*---------------------------------------------------------Motor vehicle dealers (new and used cars) -------------------------------------------------------------Gasoline service stations------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Apparel and accessories1
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------M en’s and boys' clothing and furnishings stores -----------------------------------------------------Women's ready-to-w ear stores ------------------------------------------------Shoe s to re s--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Furniture, home furnishings, and household appliances1---------------------------------- -----------Furniture, home furnishings, and equipment s to re s------------------------------------------------Household appliance stores -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Miscellaneous retail stores1 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Drug and proprietary stores --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

o f units

21, 715
1,318
2,432
768
1,052
4,674
3, 869
3,468
729
2,340
4,145
935
1,130
1,289
1,954
1,139
523
3, 724
2,173

1 Includes lines of business in addition to those shown separately.

Establishment samples were obtained from three different sources:
(1) State unem­
ployment insurance listings furnished employer reporting units with four or m ore employees.
(2) The large chainstore enterprises provided current lists of retail stores and auxiliary
units from which a sample of such units was selected.
It was necessary to obtain these
lists from the large chainstore enterprises because State unemployment insurance listings
frequently provide data on a statewide or county basis for such companies rather than on
an individual establishment basis. (3) The Bureau of the Census sample used in conjunction
with its Monthly Survey of Retail Sales covered single-unit retail stores with fewer than
four employees.
The Census coverage of small units was necessary to supplement the
Bureau's universe list for retail trade, since State unemployment insurance laws in many
States do not cover employers with fewer than four employees.




81

82

Method of Collection
The majority of the establishments included in the sample were solicited for infor­
mation by mail. The largest units were visited in person by field economists of the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, as were the smallest units by the Bureau of the Census enumerators
acting as agents for the BLS.
Personal visits were also made to a sample of the nonre­
spondents to the m ail questionnaire.
Estimating Procedure
Data collected for each sampling unit were weighted in accordance with the proba­
bility of selecting that unit.
For example, where 1 store out of 10 was selected from an
industry-size group, data for that store were considered as representative of the 10 stores
in the group.
Thus, each segment of the retail trade industry was given its appropriate
weight in the total, regardless of the disproportionate coverage of large and sm all stores.
No assumption has been made that the wage structures of the units not responding
to the m ail questionnaire were sim ilar to those of the units responding.
To minimize the
bias resulting from nonresponse, data obtained by personal visits from a sample of nonre­
spondents were weighted to represent all other nonrespondents in sim ilar industry-size
groups.
To compensate for schedules with unusable data, their weights were assigned to
usable schedules of the same industry-size group and from the same or related area.
A ll estimated totals derived from the weighting process were further adjusted to the
employment levels for June 1965, as reported in the Bureau of Labor Statistics monthly
employment series.
Since the monthly series is updated from time to time, the data
for June 1962 which were published previously were readjusted to the employment levels
reported in Employment and Earnings Statistics for the United States, 1909—1964 (December
1964). Consequently, data for June 1962 published in June 1965 are not necessarily identical
to those published previously. The published estimates in this report are, thus, consistent
with the nonsupervisory worker employment shown in the monthly series.
Employment
estimates for individual industry groups for which the Bureau does not publish monthly
figures were prepared especially for the purposes of thi9 survey. Current regional estimates,
which could not be prepared from the monthly series, were based on regional distributions
from the most recent Census of B usiness, prepared by the Bureau of the Census.
The adjustment of the survey totals to the predesignated totals for June 1965 was
confined, for the most part, to that segment of the survey for which the sample units were
obtained from State unemployment insurance listings.
The lists generally were prepared
prior to the time of the survey and consequently do not account for units opened or closed
after the date of the lists. In the Census and the large chainstore enterprise samples, the
best unbiased estimates of totals were presumed to be the weighted-up sample totals, since
there was no apparent problem of unrepresented business births in these groups.
Criteria for Publication of Estimates
The results of this survey differ from those that would have been obtained by a com­
plete canvass of all retail operations, since the survey was conducted on a sample basis.
These differences may be substantial in those instances where the sample was small.
It
has not been possible, therefore, to present data for all cases. No earnings distributions
are shown for groupings of fewer than 50 stores, except for department stores where the
sample included most of the large stores in the universe.
Kind of Business Covered
Retail trade, as defined in the 1957 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification
Manual, prepared by the Bureau of the Budget, includes establishments engaged in selling
merchandise for personal, household, or farm consumption.
Each establishment studied
was classified by the kind of retail business according to the definitions established in that
manual. Where more than one kind of business was reported, the establishment was c la ssi­
fied by its m ajor retail activity on the basis of sales volume.
Auxiliary units of retail
establishments were classified on the basis of the m ajor activity of the retail establishments
serviced. A brief description and the SIC code follow for each kind of business for which
data were tabulated separately.




S3
Building materials, hardware, and farm equipment dealers (SIC 52).
This major
group includes retail establishments prim arily engaged in selling lumber, building m aterials,
heating and plumbing equipment, paint, glass, and wallpaper, electrical supplies, hardware,
and farm equipment.
Establishments included in this group sell to contractors as w ell as
to the general public.
General merchandise stores (SIC 53). This major group includes retail stores which
sell a number of lines of merchandise, such as dry goods, apparel and accessories, fu r­
niture and home furnishings, sm all wares, hardware, and food.
In addition to department,
variety, and general merchandise stores, this group includes nonstore operations, such as
m ail-order houses, vending machine operators, and direct selling organizations.
Department stores (SIC 531).
These stores carry a general line of apparel,
home furnishings, m ajor household appliances and housewares, and other lines of
merchandise which are normally arranged in separate sections or departments and
integrated under a single management. Employment in these stores normally exceeds
25 persons.
Limited price variety stores (SIC 533). These stores handle a variety of m e r­
chandise in the low - and popular-price ranges and are frequently known as “ 5 and
10 cent” stores and ”5 cents to a dollar" stores, although merchandise is usually sold
outside these price ranges.
Food stores (SIC 54).
This major group includes retail stores prim arily engaged in
selling food for home preparation and consumption and covers groceries, meat and fish
markets, fruit stores and vegetable markets, confectioneries, dairy products stores, bak­
eries, and egg and poultry dealers.
Establishments prim arily engaged in processing and
distributing milk and cream are classified in manufacturing.
Grocery stores (SIC 541). These stores are commonly known as supermarkets,
food stores, grocery stores, and delicatessen stores and are prim arily engaged in the
retail sale of all sorts of packaged and fresh foods.
Automotive dealers and gasoline service stations (SIC 55). This m ajor group includes
retail dealers selling new and used automobiles, trucks, parts and accessories, aircraft,
boats, and gasoline service stations.
Motor vehicle dealers (SIC 551).
These establishments are prim arily engaged
in retail sales of new automobiles and trucks, or these in combination with used
vehicles. Automobile repair shops operated by motor vehicle dealers are also included.
Gasoline service stations (SIC 554). These establishments are prim arily engaged
in selling gasoline, lubricating oils, and related merchandise and also may perform
minor repair work.
Apparel and accessory stores (SIC 56). This major group includes retail stores p r i­
m arily engaged in selling clothing, shoes, hats, underwear, and related articles for personal
wear and adornment.
Custom tailors carrying stocks of materials, and fu rrie rs are in­
cluded in this group.
M e ^ s and boys1 clothing and furnishings stores (SIC 561).
These stores are
prim arily engaged in the retail sale of men's and boys* overcoats, topcoats, suits,
workclothing; and other stores included specialize in the sale of m en's and boys' shirts,
hats, underwear, hosiery, gloves, and other furnishings.
Women's ready-to-w ear stores (SIC 562).
These stores/are prim arily engaged
in the retail sale of women's coats, suits, and dresses.

Shoe stores (SIC 566).
These stores are prim arily engaged in the retail sale
of men*s, women's, children's and juveniles' shoes.




B4
Furniture, home furnishings, and household appliance stores (SIC 57).
This m ajor
group includes retail stores selling goods used for furnishing the home, such as furniture,
floor coverings, draperies, glass, chinaware, lamps, m irrors, Venetian blinds, etc. , as
w ell as domestic stoves, refrigerators, radios, televisions, m usical instruments, and mu­
sical supplies.
Establishments selling electrical and gas appliances are included in this
group only if the major part of their sales consists of articles for home use.
Furniture, home furnishings, and equipment stores (SIC 571). These stores are
prim arily engaged in the retail sale of household furniture as w ell as home furnishings,
m ajor appliances, and floor coverings.
Secondhand furniture dealers are classified
in miscellaneous retail trade (SIC 59).
Household appliance stores (SIC 572).
These stores are prim arily engaged in
the retail sale of electric and gas refrigerators, stoves, and other household appli­
ances, such as electric irons, percolators, hot plates, vacuum cleaners, television
sets, and radios.
Miscellaneous retail stores (SIC 59). This m ajor group covers retail stores not else­
where classified and includes the following kinds of stores: Drug, liquor, antique and second­
hand, book and stationery, sporting goods and bicycle, farm and garden supplies, jewelry;
fuel and ice dealers, and other retail establishments such as florists, cigar stores, news­
paper stands, camera and photographic supply stores, gifts and souvenirs shops, optical
goods stores, etc.
Drug and proprietary stores (SIC 591). The stores classified in this group are
included on the basis of their usual trade designation rather than on the more strict
interpretation of commodities handled.
These establishments are prim arily engaged
in the retail sale of prescription drugs and patent medicines and any combination of
such merchandise as cosmetics, toiletries, tobacco and novelty merchandise; and they
may or may not operate a soda fountain or lunch counter.
Definitions of Term s
Nonsupervisory employees include all full-tim e, part-tim e, seasonal, and casual em ­
ployees below the supervisory•level, such as salespersons, shipping, receiving, and stock
clerks, laborers, warehousemen, caretakers, office clerks, driver-salesm en , deliverymen,
installation and repairmen, elevator operators, porters, janitors, food service employees,
and working supervisors.
Enterprise is defined as a company which operates, directs, or controls a group of
establishments engaged in the same general business. In the case of single unit companies,
the single unit was considered the enterprise.
Establishment is generally defined as a single physical location where business is
conducted.
Where two separate business entities transacted business at a single physical
location (for example, a leased shoe department in a department store), each was treated
as a separate establishment.
On the other hand, a drug store which also operated a food
counter was treated as a single establishment.
Annual volume of sales excludes excise taxes at the retail level.
Earnings data relate to straight-time earnings and exclude premium pay for over­
time and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts. Commission and bonus earnings
and special bonuses, such as " P .M . 's " and "stim s” paid quarterly or oftener, are included.
Individual average hourly earnings for employees not paid by the hour (e .g . , salary,
commissions) were obtained by dividing individual earnings reported by the number of hours
worked during the corresponding period.
Individual weekly earnings when not reported were obtained by multiplying the indi­
vidual average hourly earnings by the number of hours worked during a single week in
June 1955.




85

Group average hourly earnings published in this bulletin were obtained by dividing
total individual weekly earnings by total individual weekly hours worked.
Group average weekly earnings were obtained by dividing the sum of individual weekly
earnings by the number of employees represented in the group total.
Weekly hours of work are for a 1-week period and include hours paid for vacations,
holidays, sick leave, etc.
Group average weekly hours were obtained by dividing total weekly hours worked by
total number of nonsupervisory employees.
Regions used in this study include the following: Northeast— Connecticut, Maine,
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and
Vermont; South— Alabam a, Arkansas, Delaw are, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, M ississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia; North Central— Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,
Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, M issouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and
Wisconsin; and West— Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana,
Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.
Metropolitan areas as used in this bulletin refers to those cities
defined by the Bureau of the Budget as ’’Standard Metropolitan Statistical
politan areas include those counties containing at least one central city of
and those counties around such cities which are metropolitan in character
and socially integrated with the county containing the central city.
For
description, see Standard Metropolitan Statistical A reas, 1964, prepared
the Budget.




and county areas
A reas. " M etro­
50,000 population
and economically
a more detailed
by the Bureau of




Appendix B. Questionnaire

BLS2786

Budget Bureau N o. 44—6511.
Approval expires 1 2 -3 1 -6 5 .

(R ev. *65)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S
W A S H IN G T O N , D. C. 2 0 2 1 2

Your report will be
held in confidence

R E T A IL TR AD E

■ n ■ ........... iiii.il
i. .i
1. COMPANY IDENTIFICATION:

BLSJJSE ONLY

Individual Hours and Earnings

Ent.
State Area sales

SIC

Wg..

The data, except for Item 2 which relates to the
entire company, should cover all establishments
(retail stores , warehouses , central o ffices , e tc .)
in the county or area designated to the left.

^
2.

ANNUAL GROSS SALES FOR THE COMPANY OR ENTERPRISE:

^

Under
$250,000

( Check appropriate box.)

$250,000 to
$1,000,000

$1,000,000
or more

Check the block which indicates the annual gross volume of sales (exclusive o f excise taxes at the retail lev el) fron. all
related activities of the enterprise. Include receipts from stores covered by this report as T ell as all other related
activities. Use the last calendar or fiscal /ear.

3. ESTABLISHMENT INFORMATION:
Please enter the information requested in the columns below for each separate establishment (retail store, warehouse, or
central office) covered by this report. Each retail store in a separate location is considered a separate establishment for
the purpose of this survey. However, if the records for main store and suburban branch are kept on a combined basis, they
may be considered as one establishment.
(a ) Location: Identify each establishment by its street address and city.
(b) Type o f Retail Activity: Enter for each establishment the major retail activity such as department store, drug store,
gas station, etc.
(c ) Employment: Include all full-time, part-time, seasonal, and casual employees who received pay for any part of the
payroll period including June 12, 1965. Exclude employees, such as those in leased departments and demonstrators,
who received all or a substantial part of their pay from another employer.
Total—.Enter total number of employees including officers and other principal executives, such as buyers, department
heads, and managers whose work is above the working supervisory level.
Nonsupervisory— Enter total number of employees below the supervisory level, such as salespersons, shipping and
receiving clerks, laborers, warehousemen, caretakers, office clerks, driver-salesmen, installation and repairmen,
elevator operators, porters, janitors, watchmen, and other employees whose services are closely associated with those
listed above. Qo not include officers and other principal executives, such as buyers, department heads, and managers
whose work is above the working supervisory level.
(d) Annual Gross Sales for the Establishment: Check the column which indicates the annual gross volume of sales (exclu­
sive of excise taxes at the retail level).
(a )

(b)

Location

Type of
retail
activity

(street address
and c ity )

4.

(c)
Employment
for payroll period
including

June 12, 1%5
NonTotal
supervisory

(d)
Gross establishment
sales
(w e re last year’ s sa le s
S250,000 or more?)

Y es

No

PA Y R O LL PERIOD:
Employment and earnings data reported should correspond to your payroll period (for example, weekly, biweekly, or
monthly) including June 12, 1965- Indicate the dates for the payroll period used. I f the length of the payroll period
varies among employees, enter the dates affecting the greatest number.




From ______________________________ _ 19____ t o ----------------------------------------- - 19-------

87

88

5. EARNINGS AND HOURS OF WORK OF NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES:
T h is study is designed to provide information on hourly earnings and w eek ly hours o f work for both male and
fem ale nonsupervisory em ployees and working su pervisors for a payroll period including June 12, 1965.
The number of em ployees in each establishm ent for which earnings and hours data are reported should co rre­
spond with the number of nonsupervisory em ployees shown in item 3 (c ) on page 1. The information requested
should be reported separately for each establishm ent and the establishm ent id en tified . Earnings data for food
counter, ca fe te ria , or restaurant workers in Department, Drug, or V a riety Stores should be entered only on the
blue supplement provided. Data for a ll other em ployees should be reported in Item 5 o f this form.
Report earnings and hours separately for each em ployee unless these data are id en tica l for two or more em­
p lo yees. Do not report aggregate earnings and hours for se ve ra l em p lo y ees. For convenience o f reporting for
em ployees paid on other than an hourly basis, columns 5 through 8 are provided. Data w ill not, however, be
published separately by various methods of pay. Instructions and exam ples for reporting the necessary data in
each column are listed below.
INSTRUCTIONS

(P lease read carefully to avoid correspondence)
C olu m n ( 1 ) — I n d ic a t e w h e t h e r th e e m p lo y e e i s m a le (M ) or fe m a le ( F ) .

Complete col­
umns 1, 2, and
3 for all nonsu­
pervisory em­
ployees cov­
ered by this
report (see
examples 1—
5).
Use column 4 to
report earnings
o f employees
paid on an
hourly basis
(see example 1).
Use columns 5
and 6 to report
earnings o f em­
ployees paid on
a weekly, bi­
weekly, monthly,
or semimonthly
basis (see ex­
ample 2).

Use columns 7
and 8 to report
earnings o f non­
supervisory em­
ployees based
entirely or in
part on com­
missions and
bonuses (see
example 3).

C o lu m n ( 2 ) ___U s e a s e p a r a t e l in e fo r e a c h e m p lo y e e a n d e n t e r “ 1 , " u n l e s s tw o o r m ore e m p l o y e e s o f th e s a m e
s e x w ork th e s a m e n u m ber o f h o u r s d u rin g th e s e l e c t e d w e e k , an d r e c e i v e i d e n t i c a l h o u r ly or s a la r y r a t e s
( s e e e x a m p le 1 ).

D a ta a re t o b e r e p o r t e d i n d i v id u a l ly fo r e a c h

e m p lo y e e w h o s e e a r n in g s are b a s e d e n t ir e ly

o r in part on c o m m i s s i o n s or b o n u s e s ( s e e e x a m p le s 3 , 4 , a n d 5 ).
C o lu m n ( 3 ) —- E n t e r th e n u m ber o f h o u r s w o rk e d d u rin g th e w e e k o f J u n e 6 to J u n e 12, 1 9 6 5 .
p a id fo r s i c k l e a v e , h o l id a y s , v a c a t i o n s , e t c .
o f th e le n g t h o f th e p a y r o ll p e r io d .

T h e s e h o u rs

I n c lu d e h o u rs

s h o u ld r e la t e to a 1 -w e e k p e r io d r e g a r d l e s s

C o lu m n ( 4 ) — E n te r th e b a s e (s t r a ig h t -t im e ) h o u r ly r a t e . P rem iu m p a y fo r o v e r t im e w ork s h o u ld n o t b e r e p o r t e d .
T h is colu m n m a y a l s o b e u s e d t o r e p o r t e a r n in g s o f e m p l o y e e s p a id on o th e r than an h o u r ly b a s i s i f a v e r a g e
s t r a ig h t-t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s are a v a i l a b l e . F o r e m p l o y e e s p a id a c o m m is s io n or b o n u s in a d d it io n to an
h o u rly r a t e , a l s o c o m p le t e c o lu m n s 7 a n d 8 ( s e e e x a m p le 4 ).

C olu m n ( 5 ) — E n te r fo r

each

m o n th ly , or s e m im o n t h ly )
o v e r t im e p rem iu m .

e m p lo y e e th e s t r a ig h t-t im e
in c lu d in g

June

12,

15*65-

e a r n in g s

fo r the

s a la r y

p e r io d ( w e e k l y ,

b i w e e k ly ,

I n c lu d e s t r a ig h t-t im e p a y fo r o v e r t im e , but e x c l u d e

D o n o t in c lu d e " d r a w s " a g a i n s t c o m m i s s i o n a s s a la r y .

C o lu m n ( 6 ) — E n ter th e n u m b er o f h o u r s w o rk e d d u rin g th e s a la r y p e r i o d (w e e k l y , b i w e e k ly , m o n t h ly , o r s e m i­
m o n t h ly ). I n c lu d e h o u r s p a id for s i c k l e a v e , h o l i d a y s , v a c a t i o n s , e t c . F o r e m p l o y e e s p a id a c o m m is s io n o r
b o n u s , a l s o c o m p le t e c o lu m n s 7 an d 8 ( s e e e x a m p le 5 ).

C olu m n ( 7 ) ___E n te r fo r e a c h e m p lo y e e th e t o t a l c o m m i s s i o n a n d /o r b o n u s e a r n in g s , i n c lu d in g " P M ' s , " " S t i m s , "
T h e s e e a r n in g s a re t o b e
or an y s p e c i a l b o n u s e s b a s e d on s a l e s p a id q u a rte r ly or o ft e n e r b y th e s t o r e .
r e p o r t e d fo r th e c o m m i s s i o n or b o n u s p e r i o d i n c lu d in g J u n e 1 2 , 1 9 6 5 .
I f th e c o m m i s s i o n s e a r n e d dur­
in g that p a y p e r io d a re n o t r e p r e s e n t a t iv e o f n orm a l c o m m is s io n e a r n in g s , a l o n g e r p e r io d m ay b e u s e d . If
s t o r e e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e b o th c o m m is s io n and b o n u s p a y m e n ts fo r an i d e n t i c a l p e r io d o f tim e , r e p o r t th e
c o m b in e d fig u r e ( s e e e x a m p le 4 ). If b o n u s p a y m e n t s c o v e r a p e r io d lo n g e r than th e c o m m is s io n p e r io d , a d d
o n ly the p r o r a te d a m ou n t o f the b o n u s t o th e c o m m i s s i o n e a r n in g s th a t c o r r e s p o n d t o th e c o m m is s io n p e r io d
( s e e e x a m p le 5 ).

(T h e h o u r s s h o u ld
C o lu m n ( 8 ) ___E n ter th e n u m b er o f h o u rs w o rk e d d u r in g th e c o m m is s io n or b o n u s p e r i o d .
r e fe r t o t h e t o t a l h o u r s w o r k e d d u rin g th e p e r io d ( w e e k l y , b i w e e k ly , m o n th ly , o r s e m im o n t h ly ) a n d n o t n e c ­
e s s a r il y o n ly to t h o s e h o u r s d u rin g w h ich c o m m i s s i o n s or b o n u s e s w e re e a r n e d .) F o r e m p l o y e e s p a id an
h o u rly r a t e o r s a la r y in a d d it io n t o c o m m i s s i o n s o r b o n u s e s , it i s a l s o n e c e s s a r y to c o m p le t e c o lu m n 4 , or
c o lu m n s 5 an d 6 ( s e e e x a m p le s 4 an d 5).
EXAM PLES

(See illustrations on next page)
1. Two women each worked 36% hours during the selected week, and each was paid a straight-time hourly rate o f $1.05.
2. One man worked 40 hours during the selected week, and received a salary o f $125, exclusive o f premium pay for overtime,
for 88 hours worked during the salary period (% month).
3. One man worked 32% hours during the selected week and was paid on a straight commission basis, receiving $215.70
for 168 hours.
4. One woman worked 40 hours during the selected week and was paid an hourly rate o f $1.25; she also received $35 in com­
missions and $7.50 in uPM’s * for 173.6 hours worked during the commission period (1 month).
5. One man worked 37% hours during the selected week, and was paid a weekly salary o f $75; he also earned commissions o f
$102 during a 1-month period (162 hours) and $150 in bonuses during a 3-month period. Only % o f the bonus, or $50 is
reported so that the bonus period corresponds to the commission period.




89

BLS USE ONLY
5. EARNINGS AND HOURS OF WORK OF
NONSUPERVISORY EMPLOYEES —-Continued

Complete these columns for
each nonsupervisory employee.

(1)

(2)
Number
of
employees

Hours worked
during the
week of
June 6—
12, 1965

Use this
column for non­
supervisory em­
ployees paid on
an hourly basis.

(3)

Sex
(M or
F)

Sch.

Eat, C ity
sa le s s ize

Emp.

C lass
emp.

Use these columns for nonsupervisory employees paid
other than on an hourly basis.

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

(8)

Straight-time
hourly rate

Straight-time
salary for
salary period
Including
June 12, 1965

Hours worked
during
salary period

Total
commissions
and/or
bonus pay

Hours worked
during
commission
period

Illustrations of examples on page 2.

1. F

2

1
1

40.0
325

1

$ i ns

a&.w

2..M.

4Q0

A M

AM

_ J _____ ____ m

_____

$

...$
i2 5 on

...

..

S3.0
9L15.70

____Z J D
5 2 ___

—

IfoX 0

42 50

u s.

173.6

225.______ _____ L52J2Q____ ____ m s i ____

DATA FOR EACH ESTABLISHMENT SHOULD BE REPORTED SE PA R A TE LY AND THE ESTABLISHMENT IDENTIFIED.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Do

you w a n t a c o p y o f th e B u re a u ’ s r e p o r t on t h is s u r v e y ? --------- Y e s

|

|

No

(

N am e a n d t it l e o f p e r s o n fu r n is h in g d a ta




(Please type or print)

* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : I 9 « 7 0 - 2 4 5 - 7 2 3




E m p lo y e e E a rn in gs and H ou rs in R e ta il T r a d e , June 1965

S e p a ra te b u lletin s h ave b een issu ed fo r the fo llo w in g :

B u lle tin
nu m ber

P r ic e

B u ild in g m a t e r ia ls , h a rd w a re , and
fa r m equ ipm ent d e a le r s

1501-1

25 cents

G e n e r a l m e rc h a n d is e s to r e s
D ep a rtm en t s to r e s
L im ite d p r ic e v a r ie t y s to r e s

1501-2

40 cents

F ood s to r e s
G r o c e r y s to re s

1501-3

30 cents

A u to m o tiv e d e a le r s and g a s o lin e
s e r v ic e station s
M o to r v e h ic le d e a le r s
(n e w and used c a r s )
G a so lin e s e r v ic e station s

1501-4

40 cents

A p p a r e l and a c c e s s o r y s to r e s
M e n 's and b o y s ' cloth in g
and fu rn ish in g s s to r e s
W o m e n 's r e a d y - t o - w e a r s to r e s
Shoe s to r e s

1501-5

45 cents

F u rn itu re , hom e fu r n is h in g s , and
hou sehold a p p lia n ce s to r e s
F u rn itu re , hom e fu r n is h in g s ,
and equ ipm ent s to r e s
H ou sehold a p p lia n ce s to r e s

1501-6

40 cents

M is c e lla n e o u s r e t a il s to r e s
D ru g and p r o p r ie t a r y s to r e s

1501-7

30 cents

O r d e r fr o m the Su perin tendent o f D ocu m en ts, W ashin gton, D. C , 20402, o r
fr o m any o f the B u re a u 's s ix r e g io n a l sa le s o ffic e s as shown on the in s id e fro n t
cover.