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Released March 25, 1959
U.S. DEPARTMENT CF IABCR
Bureau of labor Statistics
Washington 25, D. C.
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX FCR FEBRUARY 1959
Consumer prices in United States cities declined 0.1 percent between
January and February 1959, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor
Statistics* Lower food prices more than offset higher prices for most other groups of
goods and services* Prices of nonfood commodities rose 0*2 percent, vith nondurables less
food up 0*3 percent and durables down 0*2 percent. Service rates were 0.2 percent higher.
The Consumer Price Index in February 1959 was 123.7 (1947-49=100),
1.0 percent higher than a year earlier.
FOCD

Average food prices dropped 0.7 percent in February resuming a
decline which was interrupted in January after five consecutive
months. Lower prices of pork, eggs, and coffee were largely responsible for the decrease,
although all major classes of food at hone were also lower. The food index at 118.2 was
0.4 percent lower than a year ago and 2.9 percent below the July 1958 peak.
Prices of meats, poultry, and fish were 1.1 percent lower over the
month mainly because of a 4*0 percent drop in prices of pork products. This was the 7th
consecutive month in which pork prices have declined, in response to unusually large
supplies. Pork chops were down 4*4, percent, ham 3«9 percent, and bacon 3*7 percent. Leg
of lamb, canned luncheon meat, and frankfurter prices were also lower. However, prices
of frying chickens rose 1.4 percent and most cuts of beef and veal were higher.
The 4*0 percent drop in egg prices was less than their usual decline
in February. Prices of coffee fell 3*5 percent and fats and oils declined 1.4 percent,
with reductions in prices of shortening.
Fruit and vegetable prices decreased 0.4 percent on the average,
largely because of lower prices for fresh and frozen fruits. Oranges were down 4*7 percent and frozen orange juice concentrate 7.2 percent. Prices of grapefruit and bananas
also declined, but apple prices were higher. Fresh vegetable prices were up 0.8 percent
as lettuce advanced 17.2 percent, onions 8.9 percent, and green beans 3*7 percent.
Tomato and celery prices declined 8.7 and 8.6 percent, respectively. Prices of canned
and dried fruits and vegetables advanced slightly.
The dairy products and cereals and bakery products group indexes
each declined 0.1 percent, while prices of restaurant meals rose 0.1 percent.
HOUSING

The housing index rose 0.2 percent, with advances in all of its
component subgroups except household operation. Housefurni shings
prices were 0.6 percent higher, largely because household textiles returned to regular
prices following January sales; prices of some appliances (washing machines and refrigerators) also advanced with introduction of new models. Solid fuels and fuel oil prices
increased 0.8 percent as prices of anthracite and fuel oil were higher. Gas bills were
higher in several cities, but electricity rates were unchanged on the average. Rents
edged up 0.1 percent.




2
OTHER COMMODITIES
AND SERVICES

Medical care costs advanced 0.7 percent, mainly because of increases
in rates for hospitalization insurance in several cities.
There
9
were also increases in fees for physicians' and dentists services.

The advance of 0.1 percent in transportation costs was primarily the
result of a rise of 1.7 percent in gasoline prices, as "price wars" ended in several
cities* New car prices were down 0*7 percent and used cars 0.2 percent.
Personal care prices were up 0.3 percent with increases for toilet
goods, particularly face powder and toilet soap, and scattered higher prices for barber
and beauty shop services.
A rise of 0*1 percent for reading and recreation was primarily the
result of higher prices for television sets, radios, and movie admissions*
Apparel prices were unchanged
on the average as reductions in prices
1
of men's suits, topcoats,
and slacks, and boys suits were offset by increases for shoes
1
and women's and girls apparel.




TABLE 11 Consular Prioe Index—Itaited States city trnigi
Major group, subgroup, and special group indexes, February 1959
and percent changes fron selected dates

3

(1947-49=100 unless otherwise specified)

Fsroent change to February 1959 fro*
February
1959

January
1959

January
1959

November
1958

123.7

123.8

- 0.1

- 0.2

FoodFood at honeCereals and bakery productsMeats, poultry, and fia
Dairy productsFruits and vegetablesOther foods at honeFood away fron hone (Jan. 1953=100)-

118.2
116.1
133.8
112.6
114.0
121.2
108.1
114.1

119.0
117.1
133.9
113.8
114.1
121.7
109.9
114.0

-

.7
.9
.1
1.1
.1
.4
1.6
.1

- 1.0
- 1.3
- .1
- .8
- .4
.1
- 4.0
.4

Housing 2/-1
RentGas and e l e c t r i c i t y —
Solid fuels and fuel oilHousefurnishingsHousehold operation—

128.5
139.0
118.5
140.0
103.8
133.1

128.2
138.8
118.2
138.9
103.2
133.1

.2
.1
.3
.8
.6
0

ApparelMen's and b o y s ' —
Vanen's and girls'
FootwearOther apparel-

106.7
107.8
98.8
131.3
91.7

106.7
108.0
98.7
130.8
91.7

Trans portation—
Private
Public

144.3
133.3
191.8

Medical care-

Group

February
1958

Tear
1939

1.0

108.2

-

.4
.9
.9
.5
- .4
- 2.6
- 2.9
2.5

151.0
146.5
133.9
170.7
128.9
161.8
123.3
<l/>

.4
.4
.3
3.1
.3
.4

.9
1.5
2.2
2.0
- 1.0
2.5

68.9
60.5
13.0
148.2
94.4
94.6

0
.2
.1
.4
0

- .9
- .6
- 1.8
.8
- .7

- .1
- 1.1
.2
1.4
- .3

103.2
112.2
81.3
161.0
125.9

144.1
133.1
191.8

.1
.2
0

-

.1
.2
.4

4.2
4.2
3.5

105.6
103.5
135.9

148.6

147.6

.7

1.1

4.7

104.7

Fsrsonal care-

129.8

129.4

.3

o5

1.4

117.8

Reading and recreatio

117.1

117.0

.1

.1

.4

85.9

Other goods and serrioes-

127.4

127.3

.1

.1

•3

80.5

All itens less food

126.7

126.4

.2

.2

1.5

83.4

All itens less shelter-

121.4

121 o5

-

.1

1.0

119.1

CosnoditiesNondurablesFood
Nondurables less foodApparelNondurables less food and apparelDurables •
•
•Hew carsUsed ears (Jan. 1953=100)Durables less e a r s — — — —

116.0
117.6
118.2
117.1
106.7
126.1
112.2
140.0
89.2
103.2

116.2
117.8
119.0
116.7
106.7
125.4
112.4
141.0
89.4
103.1

-

.2
.2
.7
.3
0
.6
.2
.7
.2
.1

- .5
- .5
- 1.0
0
- .9
.5
- .5
- 2.9
.5
.1

.4
0
- .4
.3
- .1
.6
1.7
5.2
11.9
- 1.1

124.8
128.8
151.0
99.5
104.8
91.4
95.8
145.6
0/)
80.1

Ccsnodities less food-

114.2

114.0

.2

-

.3

.9

92.3

ServioesRentServloes less rentHousehold operation servioes, gas,
and electricity- • • .
Transportation services
Medical care serrioes—
Other services 2/-

144.2
139.0
145.7

143.9
138.8
145.4

.2
.1
.2

.6
.4
.6

2.3
1.5
2.4

79.4
60.5
98.2

133.3
178.2
154.0
130.0

133.2
178.2
152.7
129.9

.1
0
.9
.1

.4
1.2
1.3
.2

2.6
3.0
5.2
1.2

53.2
122.5
118.4
123.0

$0,808

10.808

0

.1

- 1.0

-52.0

All iteas-

-

Special groups:

Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1947-49=11.00)

-

1/ Hot available.
1J Includes house purchase, interest, taxes, insuranoe, and upkeep, not shown separately.
1/ Includes house purchase, interest, taxes, insuranoe, and upkeep servioes; shoe repairs, television repairs, barber
and beauty shop servloes, and movies.




TABIC 2s Consuatr Price Index—111 items indexes and percent changes, selected dates
U.S. city average and 20 large cities

4

Peroent change to
current month from —
November February
Year
1958
1958
1939

Indexes (1947-49=100)
City
United States city average

'

—

111

February
1959

November
1958

February
1958

123.7

123.9

122.5

59.4

- 0.2

127.1
123.3
126.3
121.7
123.3

127.4
123.4
126.1
121.7
123.5

126.2
123.7
124.1
120.3
122.3

58.6
59.0
60.4
60.1
59.2

-

Tear
1939

1.0

108.2

.7
.3
1.8
1.2
.8

116.9
109.0
109.1
102.5
108.3

Cities prioed monthly l/
Detroit

.......

. .

-•

February November
1959
1958

Cities prioed in February, Hay,
August, November

Seattle
Washington, D.C.

124.8
124.1
120.3
126.9
121.3

—

January
1959

Cities prioed in January, April,
July, October 2/
Kansas C i t y — —
Minneapolis
- ••• »•
Pittsburgh
Portland, Oregon • • • ••

125.4
124.5
125.3
124.4
.—•••— 124.2

- -••••——

-•

• ••

Cities prioed in March, June,
September, December 7j

124.5
124.2
120.7
126.0
121.5
October
1958
125.4
124.9
124.5
124.5
124.5

February
1958

Year
1939

124.5
122.3
119.1
125.0
120.3

59.2
59.5
58.5
59.2
60.4

-

January
1958

Year
1939

October
1958

123.4
122.4
123.2
122.6
123.3

61.0
61.7
60.7
58.1
58.3

December September December
1958
1958
1957

Atlanta

124.4
125.5
122.4
125.7
127.9

Cincinnati
San F!ranei8C0

124*6
124.8
122.5
125.3
128.4

-

.2
.1
.2
0
.2

122.4
122.1
120.8
122.5
124.8

November
1958
-

-

Year
1939

-

.2
.1
.3
.7
.2

0
.3
.6
.1
.2

Year
1939

February
1958
.2
1.5
1.0
1.5
.8

110.8
108.6
105.6
114.4
100.8
Year
1939

January
1958

105.6
101.8
106.4
114.1
113.0

1.6
1.7
1.7
1.5
.7

Year
1939

September December
1957
1958
-

58.3
57.9
58.4
59.3
58.6

-

.2
.6
.1
.3
.4

1.6
2.8
1.3
2.6
2.5

113.4
116.8
109.6
112.0
118.3

1/ Rents priced bimonthly.
2/ Foods, fuels, and a few other items prioed monthly; rents and other commodities and services priced quarterly.

TABLE 31 Consumer Price Index—Peroent changes from January 1959 to February 1959
U.S. city average and five cities priced monthly
All itens and commodity groups

City

All
items

Food

Baited States city average—

- 0.1

- 0.7

Chicago
Detroit

—

Heir Y o r k — — — — —
Philadelphia
—




-

0
0
.1
.1
.1

-

.4
.8
.2
.7
.7

Housing

Apparel

0.2

0

.2
•4
.1
.3
.3

- 0.2
- .1
- .1
.2
.6

Transportation

Reading
and
Medical Personal
recreation
care
care

0.1

0.7

0.3

0.1

.4
.8
1.2
- .1
- .7

2.6
3.4
0
1.3
.1

.5
.2
.1
.3
.6

0
- 1.0
0
.1
0

-

-

Other
goods &
servioes
0.1
-

.1
0
0
0
- .1

T A B U 4 s Consumer Price Index—All Items and ccnmqiity groups
February 1959 indexes and percent changes, November 1958 to February 1959
U.S. city average and 10 cities priced in February 1959
U.S.
CleveLos
City
Detroit Houston Angeles
Average Chicago land

Group

New
York

5

PhilaWashingt
delphia Scrantox Seattle D. C.

Indexes (19*7-49-100)
All items —

123.7

127.1

124.8

123.3

124*1

126.3

121.7

123.3

120.3

126.9

121.3

Cereals and bakery products —
feats, poultry, and fish
Dairy products — — —
Fruits and vegetables
Other foods at home — — — —

118.2
116.1
133.8
112.6
1U.0
121.2
108.1

115.2
112.6
123.1
105.2
112.8
119.6
113.3

114*3
111.9
129.2
106.1
110.3
111.4
110.8

117.7
115.2
125.1
108.1
109.0
129.8
108.4

116.0
114.2
126.1
108.5
113.7
124.8
106.8

123.8
119.8
145.9
112.9
110.5
132.7
110.1

119.9
117.6
142.5
115.1
118.0
117.8
106.2

120.8
118.1
138.8
113.9
119.0
121.3
106.2

115.8
115.3
135.6
113.6
113.3
115.7
104.6

119.9
118.3
145.5
113.5
115.4
126.2
106.0

118.8
116.3
132.1
112.6
117.6
116.5
108.9

138.6

126.8
145.1
116.7
126.9
109.5
120.9

129.8
139.6
116.6
—

—

99 e 5
142.4

102.1
123.5

125.5
129.2
115.6
147.8
104.0
132.4

122.2

129.1
144.9
100.8
134.1

130.2
159.7
116.1
141.7
101.6
122.4

135.5

Oas and electricity
Solid fuels and fuel oil
Housefurnishings — — — — — —
Household operation

128.5
139.0
118.5
140.0
103.8
133.1

103.4
139.9
108.4
133.7

123.3
131.1
117.7
147.2
100.7
117.0

131.9
147.6
86.7
138.5
104.6
138.8

120.9
128.4
130.6
149.6
99.9
131.6

106.7
107.8
98.8
131.3
91.7

109.9
113.2
99.8
134.8
95.9

109.1
113.3
100.3
128.1
94.8

104.6
108.2
94.7
128.3
85.4

112.5
104.6
110.9
138.6
88.9

106.1
110.8
99.6
133.1
84.5

105.9
108.2
96.5
131.9
95.8

104.8
108.1
94.7
132.1
92.4

110.1
110.1
103.4
135.9
92.1

107.6
111.1
98.3
134.6
86.1

103.8
107.8
95.6
126.1
89.3

144.3
133.3
191.8

154.3
136.2
196.9

139.6
130.3
181.9

135.7
131.3
157.3

142.0
135.4
188.0

140.9
137.0
162.1

144.4
125.4
191.4

150.1
130.5
188.9

144.0
130.4
191.9

148.4
137.1
180.1

143.9
136.1
172.4

148.6
129.8
117o1
127.4

155.8 166.1
130.0 •128.2
125.0
123.2
121.2 127.5

158.3
133.9
113.7
135.6

133.6
136.3
116.7
129.2

139.2
133.2
102.2
124.0

137.3
122.9
120.1
126.9

149.5
135.8
120.0
128.5

127.8
132.9
144.0
119.5

149.4
133.4
118.5
135.8

148.1
125.3
117.6
136.2

Food

—

Hen's and boys' — 1 — — —
Women's and girls

Private
Public
Medical care
Reading and recreation
Other goods and services

—
— — —

—

—

130.7

—

Percent change from November 1958 to February 1959
All items

- 0.2

- 0.2

0.2

Food
Food at home
— —
Cereals and bakery products —
Meats, poultry, and fish
Dairy products
Fruits and vegetables
Other foods at hone
—

- 1.0
- 1.3
- .1
- .8
- .4
.1
- 4.0

- .9
- 1.1
- .2
- .7
.1
.4
- 4.4

- 1.6
- 1.8
.2
- 2.2
.1
- 1.1
- 4.0

lousing
—
Rant
— — — — — — — —
Oas and electricity
Solid fuels and fuel oil
louse furnishings -----—------Household operation

.4
.4
.3
3.1
.3
.4

Apparel
Men's and boys' — — — — — —
Women's and girls' - - — - - - — — Footwear
Other appartl

- .9
- .6
- 1.8
•8
- .7

Transportation
—
—
—
—
P r i v a t e — — — —
Public

-

Medical care
— —
—
Personal care — — — — — — — —
Reading and recreation
Other goeds and services

-

.1

—

-

.3
2.3
- .7
- 1.5
- .9
- .7
- 1.6
.5
- .5

-

- 0.1

- 0.1

-

1.6
2.0
.1
2.2
2.6
.9
- 4.5

- .4
- .6
- .1
- 1.3
1.8
2.3
- 3.6

.2
.1
.1 l/- .1
.6 - .3
.7
1.9
.6
.1
2.8
.8

0
.1
.4

.2
0
.7
.7
.1

0
.2
.3
1.7
- 1.2

-

.1
.2
.4

.3
.3
.7

.8
.8
.8

.5
.4
1.1

1.1
.5
.1
.1

2.8
.3
- .4
- .2

8.2
.3
0
.1

3.5
.1
.1
- .1
-

0.2

0

- 0.2

- 0.3

0.7

- 0.2

.4
.5
0
.7
- .2
- .2
- 2.9

- 0.9
- 1.2
.1
.2
- 1.0
- .3
- 5.2

- 1.2
- 1.6
- .1
- .7
- 2.0
0
- 4.8

- 1.1
- 1.3
.1
- 1.4
.1
1.4
- 5.0

- .7
- 1.2
- 1.0
- .8
- .1
.2
- 3.6

- .8
- 1.2
- .2
- .4
- .7
1.4
- 5.1

.7

.7
.2
0
2.9
.1
.1

1.6
.8
0
.4
1.7
.6

•4
.5
.1
6.3
- .8
- .1

.3
.2
.8
1.2
- 1.0

.2
0
- .4
2.3
.2

2.6
2.9
0

- 1.1
- 1.3
0

.4
.1
.4
•A

.5
.2
0
.1

-

.2
—

.1

—

-

—

.4
.1

1.5
2.7

.8 - 1.5 • 2.7 .7
- 2.4 -

.4
.8
.5
.7
.2

-

1/
-

.6
.5
.1
6.8
1.1
.1

-

-

0
5.8
.6
0

.7
0
- 1.5
.2
- .3

- 2.3
- .1
- 5.4
1.9
- 1.4

-

.5
.2
.8
1.2
.2

.6
.6
0

1.7
2.0
0

.5
.6
0

.1
.2
0

- 2.3
- 2.6
0

.1
.7
0
.2

.2
.1
.4
0

1.5
.6
.7
.2

.6
1.0
1.3
0

.2
1.8
- .2
- .1

-

• Previous indexes revised, as follows* November 1958, 127.8; August 1958, 126.7.
1/ Change from December 1958 to February 1959.




—

-

-

-

TABUS 5* Consumer Price Index — rood and Its subgroup*
February 1959 indexes and percent changes, January 1959 to February 1959
U.S. city average and 20 large cities
(JL9*7-*9.100]
Total
food at home

T otal food
City

Percent
change

Index

U.S. city average

118*2

0*7

116*1

Atlanta
Baltimore
Boston — — — — —
Chicago
Cincinnati — — — —
Cleveland
Detroit
— —
louston
— —
Kansas City
—
—
Los Angeles —
—

.6
115.5
117*4 - 1.2
118*8
.1
115.2 - .4
119.1
.9
114*3 - .7
117.7 - .8
116.0 - .3
112.1 - 1.1
123.8 - .2

113*9
114.1
115*9
112*6
116*5
111*9
115*2
114.2
109.5
119.8

117.7 .5
119.9 - .7
120*8 - .7
119.8 - .7
Portland, Oreg*
— 120.3 - .5
8t. Louis — — — - 119.2 - .8
San Francisco
— 122.7 - .2
8cranton
115*8 - .5
Seattle
...... 119.9 - 1*0
Washington, D.C*
118.3 - 1.1

114.7
117.6
118*1
118*5
118*4
114.7
121*1
115*3
118*3
116.3

-

Minneapolis —
lev Tork
Philadelphia

Percent
change

Index

Cereals and
bakery products
Index

-

0*9

133.8

-

1.0

125.2
128*3
132*8
123*1
133*8
129.2
125.1
126.1
127.4
145.9

- 1.6
- .1
.5
- 1.2
.9

-

1.0

- .5
- 1.4
•4

_

•7
.8
.9
- .8
- .8
.9
.2
.6
- 1*3
- 1.4

-

134.3
142.5
138.8
133.1
140.3
125.0
147*2
135*6
145.5
132*1

Index

0*1

112.6

- 1*1

114.0

•2
.3
.2
.2
.2
0
.2
.1
•1
.7

113.8
110.9
114.9
105.2
111*1
106*1
108*1
108*5
106*2
112*9

-

1*8
1*9
.4
.4
1*2
1*1
.8
.9
2*4
2.0

113*7
117*1
115*7
112*8
116.4
110*3
109.0
113.7
107.9
110*5

.1
.1
.4
.1
.1
0
.1
0
.4
.1

107*4
115*1
113*9
112*5
116*4
108*0
117.0
113.6
113*5
112*6

-

1*1
.9
1.5
1.1
1.7
1.8
.3
.9

-

1.2

104*7
118.0
119*0
117.2
117.3
105*6
116*9
113*3
115.4
117.6

-

-

-

-

-

Dairy
products

Percent
change
-

-

Meats, poultry,
and fish
Percent
change

- 2*3

Fruits iand
vegetables

Percent
change

Index

-

-

0*1

121.2

.3
.1
0
0
0
.1
2.2
1.8
.2
.5

121*6
114.3
119.1
119.6
121.6
111*4
129.8
124.8
112*1
132*7

0
•2
.1
.1
.1
.1
.1

_

-

_
_
_
-

_

125*9
117*8 121*3
120*4
119*3
127.3
130*0
115*7
126*2
116*5 -

.1

0
.7

-

Percent
change

Index

Other
foods at home
Percent
change

Index

0*4

108*1

- 1*6

2*1
2*1
1.4
.5
1.9
.8
.2
*1
1.3
.6

102*5
107*0
102*2
113*3
111*3
110*8
108.4
106*8
101*9
110*1

-

.7
.6
.2
1*2
.7
.1
.3
1*7
2*2
1.6

114.2 - 1.8
106*2 - 2*1
106.2 - 1.8
117*5 - 1*1
109*8 - 1.0
115.2 - 1.9
109*0 - .5
104*6 - 2.6
106*0 - 1.9
108*9 - 1.8

Feb*
1959

Jan*
1959

54.5
14.0
11*7
14*4
19.5
13.3
9.9
32,2
31*0

54*3
13*9
10*3
14.7
16*7
15*1

.7
2*1
.7
1*4
2*5
1*7
1*7
2*2
1.6
.7

TABIE 61 Consumer Price Index - - Average retail prices of selected foods
U.S city average
Food and unit
Cereals and bakery products;
Flour., wheat — — — — — — —
5 ib.
Biscuit mix —
—
—
20 oz.
Corn meal — — — — — — — —
ib.
Rice — — — — — — — — —
;b.
Rolled oats — — — — — —
1 a 0z.
Corn flakes — — — — —
12 oz.
Bread, white — — — — — —
ib.
Soda crackers — — — — — — — — ib.
Vanilla cookies — — — — —
7 oz.
Meats, poultry, and fish:
Round steak — — — — — —
ib.
Chuck roast — — — — — — —
ib.
Rib roast — — — — — — —
ib.
Hamburger — — — — — — —
ib.
Veal cutlets — — — — — — — - — ib.
Pork chops, center cut —
—
ib.
Bacon, sliced — — — — — —
ib.
Ham, whole — — — — — —
ib.
Lamb, leg — — — — — —
ib.
Frankfurters — — — — — —
ib.
Luncheon meat, canned — — — 12 oz.
Frying chickens, ready-to^cook — ib.
Ocean perch, fillet, frozen — — ib.
Haddock, fillet, frozen — — — — ib.
Salmon, pink, canned — — — — 10 oz.
Tuna fish, canned — — — — a to 6fc oz.
Dairy products;
Milk, fresh, (grocery) —
qt.
Milk, fresh, (delivered) —
qt.
Ice cream — — — — — — — —
pt.
Butter — — — — — —
ib.
Cheese, American process — —
ib.
Milk, evaporated — — — 144-oz. can
Fruits and vegetables:
Frozen:
Strawberries — — — — —
10 oz.
Orange juice concentrate
6 oz.
Peas, green — — — — — —
10 oz.
Beans, green — — —
9 0 z.
Fresh:
Apples
ib.
Bananas — — — — — —
ib.
Oranges, size 2 0 0 — — — — —
doz.
Lemons — — — — — — —
ib.
Grapefruit *
each
* Priced only in season*




Feb*
1959

Jan*
1959
Cents
55.0
26.8
12*9
18.7
20*4

25.7

19.6

29.2

24*4

106.7
64*3
82.5
55.6
139*1
88*8

72*1
67*5
75.5
65.7
53.0
42.9
47*6
59.7
61*4
33.7

24*1
25.2

29*6
74.5
58*2

15.2

26*2

25.4

19.9
22.9

13.2

17.1
61*3

19.1

11.8

24.0

25*3
29*5
74.7
58*2
15.1
26.4
27*4
20*1

22.9

12.8
17.2
64*3
19.5
12*4

Food and unit
F r e s h — C ontinued
Peaches • — — — —
Strawberries • — — — —
Grapes, seedless * - —
Watermelons * — — — —
Potatoes — — — — —
Sveetpot&toes
—
Onions
—
Carrots — — — —
Lettuce — —
Celery —
—
Cabbage — —

— -

ib.

—

—

—
—
—

—

—

—

ib.

Beans, green — — — — — — —

ib.

Tomatoes —

—

—
ib.
—
t.
P
—— — iv,>
jo ib.
— ib.

—
—

—

—
—

—

—

—

head
ib.
ib.

Canned:
Orange juice —

—

—

—

—

Peaches — — —
Pineapple — — — —
Fruit cocktail — — — —
Corn, cream style — —
Pea8, green — — — —
Tomatoes — * — — — —
Baby foods — — —
Dried:
Prunes
Beans
Other foods at home:
Tomato SOUp —

—

—

10.2

35.3
29*9

46.7
35*6
35*7

to 5 oz.

47*2
35*9
35*8
27*7
18*9
20.S
15*3
10*1

ib.
ib.

39*3
17*2

38*9
17*2

to H - o z . can

12.5
15.1
26*5

12*4
15*1
26.7
22*6
83.7
64.0

46-oz. can

—
—
—
—
—
—
44

#2* can
#2 can
#303 can

#303 can
#303 can
#303 can

Beans with pork — — —
16-oz. can
Pickles, sliced — — — — —
1 5 C z.
Catsup, tomato — — — — —
14 0 z.
Coffee
lb. oan
Coffee
lb. bmg
Tea bags — — — — — — —
k . of 16
P g
Cola drink, carton — — — — —
36 oz.
Shortening, hydrogens.ted —
3 ib.
Margarine, colored — — — — —
ib.
Lard — — — — — — —
ib.
Salad dressing — — — — —
.
pt
Peanut butter — — — — — —
ib.
Sugar — —
—
— —
5 ib.
Corn syrup — — — — — — — 24 oz.
Grape jelly — — — — — — — — i 2 oz.
Chocolate bar — — — — —
1 G z.
Eggs, Grade A , large — — — —
doz.
Gelatin, flavored — —
3 to 4 oz.

22.6

80.5
62*3
24*1
28*3

90.0
28*3
21.3
37*8
56.0
56*7
26*4
28*1

5*2
55*3
9*2

27*6

18.6

21*0
15*9
10*1

24*2

28*3
92*3
28*9
22*1
37*3
56.1
56.9
26.3

28.1
5*2
58.1
9*1

Labor D.C. - PLS 2395

TABUS A* Consumer Price Index—All items and commodity groups
1958 annual average indexes and percent changes, 1957 to 1958
5 cities prioed in February 1959
(1947-49=100)
Greep

All items

Clevsiland
Percent
Index change

Houston
II Scrajaton
Percent
Percent
Index change
Index change

Seattle
"PT^iBiltan. D.C.
Percent
Percent
Index change
Index change

124*3

125.8

2.2

121.1

2.4

121.6
120.0
131.8
114.6
118.6
126.8
113.9

4.0
4.7
1.9
9.6
1.5
8.8
0

2.2

123.6

rood
Food at hone
Cereals and bakery products —
Meats, poultry, and fish — —
Dairy products
Fruits and vegetables
Other foods at home

117.2
115.4
129.7
110.0
109.6
118.9
115.1

3.4
3.6
3.6
8.4
2.7
3.1
- 1.2

117.0
115.5
126.3
110.9
112.5
124.2
110.1

3.4
4.0
4.2
10.2
1.3
3.8
- 1.4

118.4
5.1
118.4
5.4
6.1
135.1
10.7
116.3
1.2
112.3
123.0
7.9
110.2 - .3

121.3
120.6
143.9
115.9
116.5
127.6
110.8

3.6
3.9
3.6
9.4
- 1.0
5.5
- .7

Rent
— —
Gas and electricity
Solid fuels and fuel oil
Housefurnishings
—
Household operation — — — — — —

130.6
159.8
115.4
137.4
101.9
118.6

2.1
1.8
.1
2.5
- .1
1.9

130.0
139.2
116.1

-

.5
.4
.1

100.1
141.9

- 1.3
4.2

122.4
1.1
129.6
1.8
117.7 - .7
141.7 - .6
101.6 - 1.9
116.3
1.7

129.3
145.2
86.6
138.4
103.6
137.5

.7
2.3
0
- 3.4
2.0
2.0

120.2
127.2
126.3
138.9
100.1
130.2

1.1
1.3
3.9
- 4.7
.2
3.2

108.9
113.4
99.8
128.1
94.9

.8
.6
.7
1.5
.4

111.4
106.8
107.2
137.2
91.0

1.4
.5
3.2
.1
- .2

109.3
.7
110.3 - .2
102.3
1.3
134.2
1.1
91.8
.2

108.4
111.9
100.0
131.8
87.2

-

.1
.2
- 1.0
1.8
0

103.4
107.5
96.1
122.8
88.2

- .5
- .3
- .8
- .1
- .5

136.6
127.7
176.4

1.8
1.5
3.2

137.4
130.3
188.0

1.8
.6
9.4

141.1
127.4
191.4

4.0
4.6
•4

143.3
131.9
180.1

3.8
4.3
0

140.3
133.8
161.9

1.9
1.7
3.4

153.1
127.6
124.0
127.4

2.4
1.1
2.8
1.1

132.4
134.9
116.2
128.4

2.3
2.0
2.1
1.4

126.8
129.1
140.2
119.6

1.1
2.5
5.9
1.1

147.4
132.9
119.3
135.9

4.6
2.4
3.6
1.7

140.2
124.0
118.3
136.4

6.6
2.9
7.1
1.0

Apparel
lien's and boys'
Women's and girls'
Footwear

—

Private
Public
Medical care — — — — — —
Personal care
— — — —
Other goods and services




—

—
—

— — —

—

1.7

—

-

120.2

2.8

7
ftritf

ftreteflftttm

of

Qtl

The Consumer Prioe Index (CPI) measures average changes in prices of goods and
services usually bought by city families of wage earners and clerical workers* It is
based on prices of about 300 items which were selected so that their price changes would
represent the movement of prices of all goods and services purchased by wage and clerical
families} they include all of the important items in family spending. Prices for these
items are obtained in 46 cities which were chosen to represent all urban places in the
United States; they are collected from grocery and department stores9 hospitals, filling
stations, and other types of stores and service establishments w h i c h wage-earner and
clerical-worker families patronise*
Prices of foods, fuels, and a few other items are obtained every month in all
46 cities* Prices of most other commodities and services are collected every month in
the 5 largest cities and every 3 months in other cities* Almost all prices are obtained
by personal visits of the Bureau's trained representatives*
In calculating the index, price changes for the various items in each city are
averaged together with weights which represent their importance in family spending* City
data are then combined in the total index with weights based on the 1950 populations of
cities they represent* Index numbers are computed on the base 1947*49=100*
The national index (the United States city average) includes prices from the
20 large cities for which separate indexes are published in this report, as well as
from the following 26 medium-sized and small citiess
Anna, Illinois
Camden, Arkansas
Canton, Ohio
Garrett, Indiana
Glendale, Arizona
Grand Forks, N* Dakota
Grand Island, Nebraska

Pulaski, Virginia
Ravenna, Ohio
Rawlins, looming
San Jose, California
Sandpoint, Idaho
Shawnee, Oklahoma
Shenandoah, Iowa
Youngstown, Ohio

Huntington, W* Virginia
Laconia, Hew Hampshire
Lodi, California
Iynchburg, Virginia
Madill, Oklahoma
Madison, Wisconsin
Middlesboro, Kentucky
Middletown, Connecticut
Newark, Ohio

Comparisons of city indexes show only that prices in one city changed more or
less than in another* The city indexes cannot be used to measure differences in price
levels or in living costs between cities*
A description of the index is contained in BLS Bulletin 1140, "The Consumer
Price Index: A Layman's Guide," which may be purchased for 20 cents at any Bureau of
Labor Statistics regional office (addresses below) or from the Superintendent of Documents, U* S« Government Printing Office, Washington 2$, D* C* A more technical
description of the index
appears in BLS Bulletin 1168, techniques of Preparing Major BLS
n
Statistical Series. Reprints of chapter 9, pertaining to the CPI, are available on
request to the Bureau of Labor Statistics in Washington or at any of its regional offices*
Historical series of index numbers for the United States city average and for
20 large cities are available upon request* These series include index numbers for All
Items, Food, Apparel, and Rent for periods from 1913 to date; and for other groups of
goods and* services from 1935 to date*
BLS Regional Offices
Atlanta
1371 Peachtree
Street, N. S*
Zone 9




New York
341 Ninth Ave*
Zone 1

Chicago
105 West Adams St*
Zone 3

San Francisco
630 Sansone St*
Zone U
lAnrt*

_

n

n

Boston
18 Oliver St*
Zone 10