View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

U.S.

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Willard Wirtz, Secretary
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402
Price - $1



BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

B n Burdetsky, Acting Com issioner
e
m







P R EFA C E

Up-to-date and accurate manpower information is essential in making wise vocational
decisions. In recognition of this need, Federal, State, and local government agencies
are issuing an increasing number of publications which inform vocational counselors
and others about trends and developments which have implications for career
decisions. This Guide was prepared to encourage the wider use of these materials.
This bulletin was prepared by Gerard C. Smith, under the direction of Neal
Rosenthal, in the Bureau’s Division of Manpower and Occupational Outlook. Joseph
J. Rooney, Gary G. Rubenstein, and John M. Sumansky assisted in the research and
writing of the bulletin.

in




CONTENTS
Page
In tro d u c tio n ............... . ................................................................................................

1

A basic manpower boo k sh elf.......................................................................................

3

Occupational and industry manpower literature ......................................................

4

National information .........................................................................................

4

Occupational outlook service information ............................................

4

Occupational Outlook H a n d b o o k .................................................

4

Occupational outlook report s e rie s ..............................................

4

Occupational Outlook Q uarterly...................................................

9

Occupational outlook slide series .................................................

10

Occupational outlook service —
miscellaneous publications.........................................................

10

Occupational and industry manpower stu d ie s..........................................

11

Occupational manpower s tu d ie s ......................................................

11

Industry manpower s tu d ie s ..............................................................

17

State and local area inform ation...........................................................................

19

Job descriptions.......................................................................................................

21

Careers in the Federal G overnm ent......................................................................

21

Federal Government jobs in the United States .......................................

22

Federal Government jobs overseas ...........................................................

32

Education, financial assistance, and placement inform ation.......................................

34

Education, training, and retraining ......................................................................

34

Financial assistance to students ...........................................................................

38

Job placement in fo rm a tio n ..................................................................................

40

Manpower problems and issues.......................................................................................

42

Defense expenditures and manpower needs ......................................................

43

Depressed a r e a s .......................................................................................................

45




Labor standards....................................................................................................

46

Technological change ............................................................................................

48

Worker mobility

50

....................................................................................................

CONTENTS—
Continued
Page
Special groups in the labor force ...............................................................................

52

Agricultural migrants .........................................................................................

52

Apprentices...........................................................................................................

53

Handicapped w o rk e rs.........................................................................................

55

Minority g ro u p s....................................................................................................

57

Older w o rk e rs......................................................................................................

59

Part-time w orkers.................................................................................................

60

V eterans................................................................................................................

61

Women and girls .................................................................................................

62

Youth ...................................................................................................................

65

Juvenile delinquents..................................................................................

66

School dropouts

.......................................................................................

67

Summer j o b s ..............................................................................................

68

Sources of statistics useful to counselors..................................................................

69

Directories, catalogs, and bibliographies.....................................................................

76

Directories and catalogs ....................................................................................

76

Bibliographies......................................................................................................

78

Appendix A. How to obtain Government publications .........................................

79

Appendix B. Addresses of Federal agencies.............................................................

83

Appendix C. Occupational Outlook Quarterly—
cumulative index .......................

86

Appendix D. Periodicals..............................................................................................

89

Appendix E. Federal depository libraries ................................................................

91




vi

IN TRO D U CTIO N

In an ever growing and changing society, such as ours, the task of making sound vocational and educational
decisions is a growing challenge. Consider, for example, the pace of technological change in recent years and its
effect on job opportunities and job security. Hundreds of thousands of production jobs have disappeared in
various regions, occupations, and industries. At the same time, new industries, products, and processes have
generated employment opportunities-many of these in new occupations. Educational and training requirements
have been raised across a broad range of occupations. Achievement of effective vocational and educational
decisions is further complicated by the unusually large numbers of youths and women entering the labor force,
and lingering high levels of unemployment among youth, older people, and minority group members.
To meet the challenge, counselors must be informed on the major aspects of the Nation’s manpower trends. For
example, they should be familiar with the changing job content of occupations; those occupations with excess
workers and those with worker shortages; the new occupations resulting from technological change; and those with
growing or shrinking employment opportunities. Commenting on the effectiveness of counselors without a full
knowledge of occupations, an outstanding leader in the field of counseling points out that “the weak counselor
pools his own ignorance of occupations with the ignorance of the client and from this shallow pool tries to help
the client to select an appropriate occupation.” 1
A veritable storehouse of occupational and other manpower materials is published by government agencies—
both
Federal and State—
which can help counselors and counselees to achieve the most effective vocational and
educational decisions. These publications cover a wide range of subject matters including job descriptions, industry
and occupation employment trends, changing occupational structure in industry, entry jobs, training requirements
for specific occupations, and starting and managing a small business. Some publications include valuable
bibliographies on subjects of particular interest to counselors. Much material published by State agencies deals with
current and future occupational employment requirements in individual labor areas; or the duties and
characteristics, qualifications required, employment prospects, and related information for individual occupations
or groups of related occupations.
The Counselor's Guide to Manpower Information previously published in 1964,2 is a selected bibliography of
representative materials from all Federal and many State agencies from 1962 through early 1968. Emphasis is
placed on the latest available published materials.
In addition to the preceding separate publications which provide national information, many publications provide
State and local area manpower information. State employment agencies affiliated with the U.S. Department of
Labor publish much valuable information on occupations and employment opportunities in State and local areas.
These State agencies prepare two principal types of studies—
area skill surveys, which analyze current and future
occupational requirements in individual labor areas; and occupational guides, which provide career information for
individual occupations or groups of related occupations. State agencies also publish special manpower and labor
market studies that deal with future manpower supply, characteristics of the work force, changes in State and area
economic activity, and the employment structure of industries.
1Robert Hoppock, Occupational Information, 3d ed. (New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1967), p. 134.
2See the Counselor's Guide to Occupational and Other Manpower Information: An Annotated Bibliography o f Selected Government
Publications. U.S. Department of Labor (BLS Bulletin 1421, November 1964).




1

The Guide to Local Occupational Information, compiled by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of
Employment Security, lists local level occupational guides, occupational guidance publications, and area skill
surveys. (See page 19.)
No attempt was made to tap the vast field of private publications; counselors should consult the NVGA
Bibliography o f Current Occupational Literature, 1966 Edition, published by the National Vocational Guidance
Association.

Use of the Guide
For ease of finding publications pertaining to a specific subject, the Guide is divided into four basic sections:
occupational and industry manpower literature; education, financial assistance, and placement information;
manpower problems and issues; and special groups in the labor force. Introductions to each section identify the
subject area and associated manpower problems. Where applicable, the section introductions describe governmental
policies and programs related to them. Each section is divided into several sub-sections which focus on a specific
subject. Annotated listings are presented on each subject in alphabetical order. The Guide also includes a section
on basic statistics, available from government sources, that can be particularly useful to counselors; and a section
on directories, catalogs, and bibliographies. Appendixes include helpful hints to counselors on how and where to
order government publications.
In citing Federal publications, abbreviations have been used to conserve space. These abbreviations indicate, in
order of their appearance, (1) the name of the issuing department and (2) the agency (abbreviation in parentheses)
to which requests for free publications may be directed. When agencies within a department are responsible for
publications, they are listed immediately after the departmental abbreviation. Free publications may be obtained as
long as supplies last. Virtually all priced publications may be ordered from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S.
Government Printing Office. Federal agencies are listed alphabetically, by their abbreviations, in Appendix B, along
with their addresses. (See also Appendixes A through E for information on how and where to order Federal
publications.)
Free State and local government publications may be requested from the agency whose name and address appear
immediately following the publication title. Priced publications may be ordered from the organization whose name
and address appear in parentheses.
Publication citations in the Guide that are preceded by an asterisk are considered suitable for counselees and
counselors to use. The titles of periodicals are italicized for ease in identification. Information on subscriptions to
selected periodicals is provided in Appendix D.
Many of the publications listed in the Guide are available free of charge; the others may be purchased. School and
public libraries may be sources for some of these publications. Also, Federal depository libraries may be excellent
for Government manpower information. (See Appendix E for list and explanation of Federal depository libraries.)




2

COUNSELOR'S 6UIDE TO OCCUPATIONAL AND OTHER
MANPOWER INFORMATION
A BASIC MANPOWER B O O K SH ELF

Of the hundreds of useful government manpower publications cited in this bibliography, several should be on
every counselor’s reference bookshelf because they are basic sources of comprehensive, practical, and up-to-date
information. These selected, publications are identified briefly below with references to the pages in this
bibliography where they are discussed.
The Occupational Outlook Handbook is the most comprehensive source of occupational and industry career
information available. Published every 2 years by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, it
provides information on the nature of work, long-term employment outlook, and related topics for hundreds of
occupations, and major industries. (See page 4.)
The Occupational Outlook Report Series consists of individual reprints of statements published in the
Occupational Outlook Handbook (119 for the 1968-69 edition). These reprints enable counselors to make
occupation and industry information readily available to students interested in specific careers. (See page 4.)
The Occupational Outlook Quarterly supplements the Handbook by presenting up-to-date occupational outlook
and other timely manpower information. (See pages 9, 86.)
The Dictionary o f Occupational Titles (D.O.T.) published by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of
Employment Security, is an encyclopedia of job definitions and related data. The 1965 edition of the D.O.T.
contains information on about 22,000 jobs, of which about 6,000 are new to the D.O.T. since the previous 1949
edition. (See page 21.)
The Handbook on Women Workers published every 2 years by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Women’s Bureau, is
a sourcebook of facts on women’s employment, occupations, earnings, education, and related subjects. (See
page 63.)
The Manpower Report o f the President including a Report on Manpower Requirements, Resources, Utilization,
and Training published annually by the U.S. Department of Labor is the Federal Government’s primary report on
manpower problems. It discusses the many factors affecting manpower requirements, resources, utilization, and
training. (See page 42.)
Each major branch of the Armed Forces publishes a comprehensive career handbook and other helpful materials,
which describe occupations and training programs for enlisted men. These publications include: U.S. Army
Opportunities; U.S. Navy Occupational Handbook; U.S. Air Force Occupational Handbook; and Occupational
Specialties, issued by the U.S. Marine Corps. (See pages 26, 27.)




3

O CCU PA TIO N A L AND IN D U ST R Y MANPOWER L IT E R A T U R E
National Information
The Federal Government is the main source of occupational and industry manpower information that is primarily
national in scope. A representative sample of the increasing volume of publications incorporating such information
is shown below. The subject matter is varied, but in general deals with careers in individual occupations,
employment changes in industries, and education and training programs which lead to jobs in specific fields.

O CCU PA TIO N A L O U TLO O K S E R V IC E IN FO RM ATION
Occupational Outlook Handbook
The Occupational Outlook Handbook, compiled by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, is
a basic reference book of occupational information. The Handbook is based on information gathered from
industry, labor organizations, trade organizations, trade associations, professional societies, Government agencies,
and educational institutions. It draws upon an extensive program of research in industrial and occupational trends
in the United States.
The Handbook, first published in 1949 and every other year since 1957, is now in its eighth edition. It provides
comprehensive information for approximately 700 occupations and 30 major industries describing their work,
earnings potential, training and educational requirements, and outlook. It also discusses future trends and
conditions which are likely to affect employment outlook in the decade ahead. The 1968-69 edition contains 765
pages with many illustrative photographs and charts.
The Handbook and all other Occupational Outlook Service publications are available from the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or from any of the eight regional offices
of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (See Appendix B, page 83 for addresses.) Send
check or money order. (See appendix A, page 79 for: How to Obtain Federal Government Publications.)
OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK HANDBOOK, 1968-69 Edition. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1550.
1968. 765 pp. $4.25.

Occupational Outlook Report Series
The reports in the Handbook are produced in a series of reprints, each of which covers a single occupation,
industry, or a group of related occupations. These reprints enable counselors to make occupational information
easily available to more students interested in specific careers. Teachers can use the reports as motivational aids in
relating school subjects to earning a living. These reprints are invaluable to groups or organizations answering
career inquiries with authoritative information. Single reprints can be ordered. (See text pages 4 through 9 for a
complete list and prices.)
OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK REPORT SERIES, 119 reprints from Bulletin 1550, Occupational Outlook
Handbook, 1968-69 Edition. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Complete set $9.25.
ACCOUNTANTS. Bulletin 1550-1. 8 pp. 5 cents.
ADVERTISING, MARKET RESEARCH, AND PUBLIC RELATIONS WORKERS. Bulletin 1550-2. 12 pp. 10
cents.
AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-95. 16 pp. 10 cents.




4

AIR-CONDITIONING AND HEATING MECHANICS. Bulletin 1550-3. 8 pp. 5 cents.
AIRCRAFT, MISSILES, AND SPACECRAFT OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-96. 12 pp. 10 cents.
APPAREL INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-98. 12 pp. 10 cents.
APPLIANCE SERVICEMEN. Bulletin 1550-4. 8 pp. 5 cents.
ARCHITECTS. Bulletin 1550-5. 8 pp. 5 cents.
ATOMIC ENERGY INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-99. 12 pp. 10 cents.
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE AND SALES OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-6. 24 pp. 15 cents.
BAKING INDUSTRY. Bulletin 1550-100. 8 pp. 5 cents.
BANKING OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-101. 12 pp. 10 cents.
BARBERS AND COSMETOLOGISTS. Bulletin 1550-7. 8 pp. 5 cents.
BIOLOGICAL SCIENTISTS. Bulletin 1550-8. 8 pp. 5 cents.
BOILERMAKING OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-9. 8 pp. 5 cents.
BOOKKEEPING WORKERS, OFFICE MACHINE OPERATORS. Bulletin 1550-10. 8 pp. 5 cents.
BOWLING-PIN-MACHINE MECHANICS. Bulletin 1550-11. 8 pp. 5 cents.
BRICKLAYERS, STONEMASONS, MARBLE SETTERS, TILE SETTERS, TERAZZO WORKERS. Bulletin
1550-12. 16 pp. 10 cents.
BUSINESS MACHINE SERVICEMEN. Bulletin 1550-13. 12 pp. 10 cents.
CARPENTERS, PAINTERS, PAPERHANGERS, GLAZIERS. Bulletin 1550-14. 16 pp. 10 cents.
CASHIERS. Bulletin 1550-16. 8 pp. 5 cents.
CEMENT MASONS, PLASTERERS, LATHERS. Bulletin 1550-15. 16 pp. 10 cents.
CHIROPRACTORS. Bulletin 1550-17. 8 pp. 5 cents.
CIVIL AVIATION OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-102. 20 pp. 15 cents.
CLERGY: PROTESTANT CLERGYMEN, RABBIS, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS. Bulletin 1550-18. 12 pp. 10
cents.
COMMERCIAL ARTISTS, INDUSTRIAL DESIGNERS, INTERIOR DESIGNERS AND DECORATORS. Bulletin
1550-19. 12 pp. 10 cents.
CONSERVATION OCCUPATIONS: FORESTERS, FORESTRY AIDS, RANGE MANAGERS. Bulletin 1550-20.
12 pp. 10 cents.




5

COUNSELING AND PLACEMENT: COLLEGE PLACEMENT OFFICERS; SCHOOL, REHABILITATION, AND
VOCATIONAL COUNSELORS. Bulletin 1550-21. 12 pp. 10 cents.
DENTAL HYGIENISTS. Bulletin 1550-22. 8 pp. 5 cents.
DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNICIANS. Bulletin 1550-23. 8 pp. 5 cents.
DENTISTS. Bulletin 1550-24. 8 pp. 5 cents.
DIESEL MECHANICS, FARM EQUIPMENT MECHANICS. Bulletin 1550-25. 8 pp. 5 cents.
DIETITIANS. Bulletin 1550-26. 8 pp. 5 cents.
DISPENSING OPTICIANS, OPTICAL MECHANICS. Bulletin 1550-27. 8 pp. 5 cents.
DRIVING OCCUPATIONS: TRUCK, BUS, TAXI, AND ROUTEMEN. Bulletin 1550-28. 20 pp. 15 cents.
EARTH SCIENTISTS: GEOLOGISTS, GEOPHYSICISTS, METEOROLOGISTS, AND OCEANOGRAPHERS.
Bulletin 1550-29. 16 pp. 10 cents.
ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-103. 16 pp. 10 cents.
ELECTRIC SIGN SERVICEMEN. Bulletin 1550-30. 8 pp. 5 cents.
ELECTRICIANS (CONSTRUCTION). Bulletin 1550-31. 12 pp. 10 cents.
ELECTRONIC COMPUTER OPERATING PERSONNEL, PROGRAMERS, SYSTEMS ANALYSTS. Bulletin
1550-32. 12 pp. 10 cents.
ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-104. 12 pp. 10 cents.
ENGINEERS. (10 Fields). Bulletin 1550-33. 16 pp. 10 cents.
FACTORY OPERATIVES: ASSEMBLERS, ELECTROPLATERS, INSPECTORS, POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS,
PRODUCTION PAINTERS. Bulletin 1550-34. 12 pp. 10 cents.
FBI SPECIAL AGENTS. Bulletin 1550-35. 8 pp. 5 cents.
FIREFIGHTERS, POLICEMEN AND POLICEWOMEN, STATE POLICE OFFICERS. Bulletin 1550-36. 12 pp. 10
cents.
FLOOR COVERING INSTALLERS. Bulletin 1550-37. 12 pp. 10 cents.
FORGING OCCUPATIONS, BLACKSMITHS. Bulletin 1550-38. 8 pp. 5 cents.
FOUNDRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-105. 12 pp. 10 cents.
FURNITURE UPHOLSTERERS. Bulletin 1550-39. 8 pp. 5 cents.
GOVERNMENT OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-106. 16 pp. 10 cents.
HOME ECONOMISTS. Bulletin 1550-40. 8 pp. 5 cents.




6

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATORS. Bulletin 1550-42. 8 pp. 5 cents.
HOTEL INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-107. 12 pp. 10 cents.
HOUSEHOLD WORKERS (PRIVATE). Bulletin 1550-41. 8 pp. 5 cents.
INSURANCE INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-109. 12 pp. 10 cents.
IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-110. 12 pp. 10 cents.
LABORERS (CONSTRUCTION). Bulletin 1550-43. 12 pp. 10 cents.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS. Bulletin 1550-44. 8 pp. 5 cents.
LAWYERS. Bulletin 1550-45. 8 pp. 5 cents.
LIBRARIANS. Bulletin 1550-46. 8 pp. 5 cents.
MACHINING OCCUPATIONS: INSTRUMENT MAKERS, MACHINISTS, MACHINE TOOL OPERATORS, TOOL
AND DIE MAKERS, SETUP MEN, LAYOUT MEN. Bulletin 1550-47. 16 pp. 10 cents.
MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIANS,
1550-48. 12 pp. 10 cents.

INDUSTRIAL

MACHINERY

REPAIRMEN,

MILLWRIGHTS.

Bulletin

MATHEMATICS AND RELATED FIELDS: MATHEMATICIANS, STATISTICIANS, ACTUARIES. Bulletin
1550-49. 12 pp. 10 cents.
MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARIANS. Bulletin 1550-50. 8 pp. 5 cents.
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGISTS, MEDICAL LABORATORY ASSISTANTS. Bulletin 1550-51. 8 pp. 5 cents.
MEDICAL X-RAY TECHNICIANS. Bulletin 1550-52. 8 pp. 5 cents.
MOTION PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS. Bulletin 1550-53. 8 pp. 5 cents.
MOTOR VEHICLE INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-11. 12 pp. 10 cents.
NEWSPAPER REPORTERS, TECHNICAL WRITERS. Bulletin 1550-54. 8 pp. 5 cents.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS, PHYSICAL THERAPISTS. Bulletin 1550-55. 8 pp. 5 cents.
OPERATING ENGINEERS (CONSTRUCTION). Bulletin 1550-56. 12 pp. 10 cents.
OPTOMETRISTS. Bulletin 1550-57. 8 pp. 5 cents.
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIANS. Bulletin 1550-58. 8 pp. 5 cents.
PAPER INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-13. 12 pp. 10 cents.
PERFORMING ARTISTS. Bulletin 1550-59. 16 pp. 10 cents.
PERSONNEL WORKERS. Bulletin 1550-60. 8 pp. 5 cents.




7

PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-12. 16 pp. 10 cents.
PHARMACISTS. Bulletin 1550-61. 8 pp. 5 cents.
PHOTOGRAPHERS, PHOTOGRAPHIC LABORATORY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-62. 12 pp. 10 cents.
PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS: CHEMISTS, BIOCHEMISTS, PHYSICISTS, ASTRONOMERS. Bulletin 1550-65. 16 pp.
10 cents.
PHYSICIANS. Bulletin 1550-66. 8 pp. 5 cents.
PLUMBERS AND PIPEFITTERS, ASBESTOS AND INSULATING WORKERS. Bulletin 1550-63. 16 pp. 10 cents.
PODIATRISTS. Bulletin 1550-67. 8 pp. 5 cents.
POST OFFICE OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-114. 12 pp. 10 cents.
PRINTING OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-64. 20 pp. 15 cents.
PSYCHOLOGISTS. Bulletin 1550-68. 8 pp. 5 cents.
PURCHASING AGENTS, INDUSTRIAL TRAFFIC MANAGERS. Bulletin 1550-69. 8 pp. 5 cents.
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-115. 16 pp. 10 cents.
RAILROAD INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-116. 24 pp. 15 cents.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS AND BROKERS. Bulletin 1550-70. 8 pp. 5 cents.
RECEPTIONISTS. Bulletin 1550-71. 8 pp. 5 cents.
RECREATION WORKERS. Bulletin 1550-72. 8 pp. 5 cents.
REGISTERED PROFESSIONAL NURSES, LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES, HOSPITAL ATTENDANTS.
Bulletin 1550-73. 12 pp. 10 cents.
RESTAURANT INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-117. 12 pp. 10 cents.
SALESMEN AND SALESWOMEN IN RETAIL STORES, SALESMEN IN WHOLESALE TRADE, MANUFAC­
TURERS’ SALESMEN. Bulletin 1550-74. 12 pp. 10 cents.
SANITARIANS. Bulletin 1550-75. 8 pp. 5 cents.
SECURITIES SALESMEN. Bulletin 1550-76. 8 pp. 5 cents.
SHEET-METAL WORKERS AND ROOFERS. Bulletin 1550-78. 16 pp. 10 cents.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS. Bulletin 1550-77. 8 pp. 5 cents.
SHOE REPAIRMEN. Bulletin 1550-79. 8 pp. 5 cents.
SOCIAL SCIENTISTS. (6 categories). Bulletin 1550-80. 16 pp. 10 cents.




8

SOCIAL WORKERS. Bulletin 1550-81. 8 pp. 5 cents.
SPEECH PATHOLOGISTS AND AUDIOLOGISTS. Bulletin 1550-82. 8 pp. 5 cents.
STATIONARY ENGINEERS, STATIONARY FIREMEN (BOILER). Bulletin 1550-83. 8 pp. 5 cents.
STENOGRAPHERS AND SECRETARIES, TYPISTS. Bulletin 1550-84. 8 pp. 5 cents.
STRUCTURAL AND OTHER IRON WORKERS, ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS. Bulletin 1550-85. 16 pp. 10
cents.
SURVEYORS. Bulletin 1550-86. 8 pp. 5 cents.
TEACHERS. Bulletin 1550-87. 12 pp. 10 cents.
TECHNICIANS: ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE; DRAFTSMEN. Bulletin 1550-88. 12 pp. 10 cents.
TELEPHONE INDUSTRY OCCUPATIONS. Bulletin 1550-118. 16 pp. 10 cents.
TELEVISION AND RADIO SERVICE TECHNICIANS. Bulletin 1550-89. 8 pp. 5 cents.
URBAN PLANNERS. Bulletin 1550-90. 8 pp. 5 cents.
VENDING MACHINE MECHANICS. Bulletin 1550-91. 8 pp. 5 cents.
VETERINARIANS. Bulletin 1550-92. 8 pp. 5 cents.
WATCH REPAIRMEN, JEWELERS AND JEWELRY REPAIRMEN, INSTRUMENT REPAIRMEN. Bulletin
1550-93. 12 pp. 10 cents.
WELDERS, OXYGEN AND ARC CUTTERS. Bulletin 1550-94. 8 pp. 5 cents.
*

*

*

TOMORROW’S JOBS. Bulletin 1550-A. 12 pp.' 10 cents. Special reprint of the introduction to the Occupational
Outlook Handbook. It discusses, in nontechnical language, expected population and labor force growth, the
changing occupational structure of the economy, and implications for education, training, and future employment
opportunities. This reprint is directed to counselors, parents, teachers, and others who assist young people in
making vocational choices.

Occupational Outlook Quarterly
The Occupational Outlook Quarterly supplements the Occupational Outlook Handbook. It expands and updates
occupational outlook and manpower information between Handbook editions. Published four times during each
school year (September, December, February, and May), the Quarterly presents timely articles on studies by
Government and private organizations and valuable contributions from outstanding authorities on automation,
manpower, economics, education, and guidance.
The following citations illustrate the types of occupational and other manpower literature published in the
Quarterly.
THE MANY FACES OF TECHNOLOGY. Describes different trends in technological change and the net effects
these changes will have on industry employment of various occupations.




9

SYSTEMS ANALYST: A SOFTWARE SPECIALIST. Explains the systems analyst’s duties. It also provides
information on where they are employed, how to enter the field, and what the outlook is for the next decade.
89 MILLION JOBS BY 1975? Gives information on projected employment growth and on the various factors
affecting occupational employment.
OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK QUARTERLY. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Quarterly. 35 cents per copy.
Annual subscriptions are $1.25 domestic or $1.75 foreign. Free reprints of Occupational Outlook Quarterly articles
are available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Service. (See appendix C, page 86 for an
index to recent Quarterly articles and a list of available reprints.)

Occupational Outlook Slide Series
This slide series entitled, LOOKING AHEAD TO A CAREER, represents a new visual aid for counselors. It is
made up of a set of 36 color slides (2 inch by 2 inch, 35 mm.) which illustrate our Nation’s changing occupational
and industrial mix. The slide series provides answers to such relevant questions as: “What kind of jobs will there
be?” ; “What industries will provide these jobs?” ; and “What fields of work look especially promising?” The slides
also provide additional information about the future economic and educational framework within which
individuals must choose their careers. A narrative for use in presenting the slides accompanies each set.
Order the Occupational Outlook Slide Series directly from the Occupational Outlook Service, U.S. Department of
Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, or from any of the Bureau of Labor Statistics eight
regional offices. (See appendix B, page 83 for addresses.) Complete set $10. Enclose check or money order. The
“slide series” cannot be purchased through the Superintendent of Documents.

Occupational Outlook Service — Miscellaneous Publications
In addition to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, the report series, and the Quarterly, other reports, studies,
and pamphlets are available. A series of motivational pamphlets that describes the relationship between academic
subjects and possible careers is available. Another series of reports describe the outlook for jobs in which less than
high school, high school, or college educational backgrounds are required or desirable. These reports provide
information on the number of workers employed, training requirements, and the employment outlook for a large
number of occupations.
Occupational Outlook publications are announced in the Quarterly as they become available. The Occupational
Outlook Service also has a mailing list for free publications. Write to, Occupational Outlook Service, U.S.
Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, D.C. 20212, to have your name placed on the
mailing list.
Motivational Pamphlets: Education has become an important stepping stone to a career. It has grown in
importance due to the increasing demand for the “specialist” in all occupations. The Bureau of Labor Statistics
has prepared several free leaflets describing the relationship of a number of academic subjects to possible careers.
^ENGLISH AND YOUR CAREER. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Leaflet. (OOS). 1966. Free. Describes the
importance of English in every day activities and job hunting. Also discusses the possibilities that exist for making
a living with a proficiency in English. Lists OOH reprints dealing with careers which require varying degrees of skill
in English.
^FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND YOUR CAREER. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Leaflet. (OOS). 1966. Free.
Discusses careers in which knowledge of a foreign language is either essential or a handy extra tool. Lists OOH
reprints describing job opportunities where a foreign language is helpful.




10

*MATHEMATICS AND YOUR CAREER. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Leaflet. (OOS). 1966. Free. Explains
the importance of training in mathematics for high school and college students. Tells how to find out whether
mathematics is needed for a given career field. Lists OOH reprints describing job opportunities in occupations that
require training in mathematics.
*SCIENCE AND YOUR CAREER. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Leaflet. (OOS). 1966. Free. Explains the
importance of training in the sciences for high school and college students. Tells how training fits into different
careers and how to find out whether science is needed for a given career. Lists OOH reprints containing
information on careers requiring training in science.
*SOCIAL SCIENCE AND YOUR CAREER. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Leaflet. (OOS). 1966. Free.
Discusses careers open to students of social science, and the value of social science courses in many occupations
not directly related to the subject. Lists the OOH reprints describing job opportunities in the field.
*YOUR JOB AS A REPAIRMAN OR MECHANIC. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Leaflet. (OOS). 1966. Free.
Presents some of the opportunities available to those people who possess a mechanical aptitude. Briefly describes
job prospects, nature of the work, where training is available, and where to go for further information. Lists the
OOH reprints for occupations in which mechanical ability is helpful.

O CCU PA TIO N A L AND IN D U STR Y MANPOWER STU D IES
Changes in the number of workers employed in occupations and industries are inevitable in an economy typified
by changing markets, technology, resources, and other characteristics. Many agencies of the Federal Government
prepare studies and reports on occupational and industry employment. These studies may cover the economy as a
whole or individual occupations and industries. Examples of occupational and industrial manpower literature are
listed below.

Occupational Manpower Studies
AMERICA’S INDUSTRIAL AND OCCUPATIONAL MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS, 1964-75. The Outlook for
Technological Change and Employment, pp. 9-187. Appendix volume 1 of the report by the National Commission
on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress. Study prepared for the National Commission by the USDL.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1966. 373 pp. $2.25. Presents projections of occupation and industry manpower
requirements to 1975. Discusses factors such as technology and government policy that affect occupational
employment patterns. Covers all major industries in the economy.
*AUDITOR, INTERNAL. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5653. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free. See
page 31 for annotation.
*AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING, CAREERS IN. VA. Pamphlet No. 31-1. (VA). 1966. 12 pp. Free. See page
32 for annotation.
C H ILD WELFARE, A CAREER IN, WHAT IT OFFERS YOU. USDHEW. Children’s Bureau. (CB). 1967. 8 pp.
Free. Defines child welfare services, describes the major services offered by child welfare agencies, tells about
opportunities for employment, qualifications for child welfare workers, and grants for graduate training.
COMMUNICATION AND RECORDS, CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN. USDS. Leaflet. (USDS). 1966. Free. See
page 30 for annotation.
CORRECTIONS, NEW ROLES FOR NONPROFESSIONALS IN: PROS AND CONS. USDHEW. Welfare
Administration. Booklet. 1966. 127 pp. 40 cents. Discusses the development of human service jobs which can
provide new career opportunities for youth. Explores present experimentation with nonprofessional, custodial, or
security personnel in correctional institutions and in the community.




11

COUNSELOR DEVELOPMENT IN AMERICAN SOCIETY. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1966. 306
pp. Free. Contains conference recommendations from the Invitational Conference on Government-University
Relations in the Professional Preparation and Employment of Counselors, held in Washington, D.C. in 1965.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATOR AND SUPERVISORY CRIMINAL INVESTIGATOR. USDT. United States Secret
Service. Criminal Investigating Series GS-1811. (SS). 1963. 12 pp. Free. See page 31 for annotation.
♦CROPS RESEARCH, SCIENTIFIC CAREERS IN. USDA. Agricultural Research Service. Miscellaneous Publica­
tion No. 903. (ARS). 1966. Free. See page 22 for annotation.
♦DEMAND OCCUPATIONS, CAREER GUIDE FOR. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1965. 40 pp. 30
cents. Discusses occupations in current and anticipated short supply that require preemployment training. Gives
required high school subjects; helpful personal characteristics such as interest, temperament, and physical
conditions; and types of preemployment education and training needed.
DENTAL ASSISTANT, THE TRAINED - FACTS FOR COUNSELORS. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1004. Booklet. 1965. 7 pp. 15 cents. Tells how the dental assistant may be able to fill the
manpower gap created by a shortage of dentists. Gives information on trends and outlook, educational
requirements, licensing, and where to obtain further information.
♦DENTAL HYGIENIST, THE REGISTERED - FACTS FOR COUNSELORS. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1508. Booklet. 1966. 8 pp. 15 cents. Describes the role of the dental hygienist as a member of
the dental health team. Gives information on opportunities, educational requirements, entrance requirements,
licensing, and compensation.
DESIGN AND DRAFTING, TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER IN, 1965-75. USDL. Manpower Administration.
Manpower Research Bulletin 12. (MA). 1966. 39 pp. Free. Describes the design and drafting process and it’s
manpower needs. Examines the manpower implications that technological change holds for the design and drafting
function.
♦ECONOMISTS AND STATISTICIANS. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5947. (IRS). 1968. 12
pp. Free. See page 31 for annotation.
♦ELECTRONIC COMPUTING SYSTEMS, OCCUPATIONS IN. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet.
1965. 72 pp. 30 cents. Gives job seekers an up-to-date survey of the electronic data processing field. Gives the
requirements, special job characteristics, and environmental conditions for 23 occupations in this field. Lists
sources of additional information.
♦ENGINEERING, AND RESEARCH: A REWARDING CAREER WITH THE U.S. POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
USPOD. Publication No. 98. (USPOD). 1967. 16 pp. Free. See page 29 for annotation.
♦ENGINEERS AND ARCHITECTS IN THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION. VA. Pamphlet No. 05-15. (VA).
1965. 23 pp. Free. See page 32 for annotation.
♦ENGINEERS AND PHYSICISTS, CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR: BUILDING TOMORROW’S WEATHER
SYSTEMS. USDC. Pamphlet. 1964. 14 pp. 25 cents. See page 25 for annotation.




12

^ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, AND RELATED PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS. USCSC. Examination Announce­
ment No. 415. (USCSC). 1967. 8 pp. Free. See page 22 for annotation.
ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, AND TECHNICIANS, THE CURRENT EMPLOYMENT MARKET FOR. USDL.
Bureau of Employment Security. Booklet. (BES). Semi-Annual. Free. Presents the current situation and some past
trends in the demand-supply situation for engineers, natural scientists, draftsmen, and laboratory technicians.
Reports on specific occupational opportunities in the engineers’ job market for each of 30 designated major areas.
*EXTENSION AGENT, YOUR CAREER AS AN. USDA. Federal Extension Service. Miscellaneous Publication No.
972. (USDA). 1964. Free. See page 23 for annotation.
*FBI AGENT, WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE AN. USDJ. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Leaflet. (FBI). 1966. Free.
See page 28 for annotation.
^FINGERPRINT TECHNICIAN WITH THE FBI, HOW TO BECOME A. USDJ. Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Leaflet. (FBI). 1966. Free. See page 28 for annotation.
^GEOGRAPHY AS A PROFESSIONAL FIELD. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-26015. 1966. 95 pp. 35
cents. Various geography specialists describe the application of geography to careers in fields such as cartography,
urban and rural planning, location of industries, marketing, climatology, transportation, military operations, and
economic development.
*HEALTH CAREERS GUIDEBOOK. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1965. 260 pp. $1.50. Provides
information on a variety of occupations in the health field. Makes suggestions for career planning, preparation, and
education. Contains a reference list of organizations that can supply further information on specific health
occupations.
HEALTH MANPOWER 1966-75: A STUDY OF REQUIREMENTS AND SUPPLY. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Report 323. (BLS). 1967. 50 pp. Free. Reports on current and prospective supply and demand for
health manpower. The report is presented in two parts: (1) medical and health services industries, and (2) health
occupations. Includes statistical tables and a bibliography.
^LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCE GRADUATES, PROSPECTIVE OCCUPATIONS FOR. USDL. Bureau of
Employment Security. Booklet. 1967. 23 pp. 15 cents. Discusses degree requirements, kinds of work, and
employers common to each of 24 different academic fields.
*LIBRARY SCIENCE OCCUPATIONS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet. 1966. 58 pp. 30 cents.
Surveys 23 occupations related to library science. Relates job descriptions, applicant requirements, and worker
traits. Includes a bibliography and listings of library associations, schools, and periodicals.
*MENTALLY RETARDED, OCCUPATIONS IN THE CARE AND REHABILITATION OF THE. USDL. Bureau
of Employment Security. Pamphlet. 1966. 76 pp. 35 cents. Presents descriptions, educational requirements, and
worker traits of 27 occupations dealing with the care and rehabilitation of the mentally retarded. Deals with those
occupations that require special training and those that involve substantial contact with the retarded and their
problems.*
*NURSE, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No.
1609. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Gives background information on the Service and the challenges of a PHS
nursing career. The various nursing assignments, career rewards, career development possibilities, and application
information, including address for requesting forms, is given. The Commissioned Corps and Civil Service
employment systems are explained.




13

*NURSING CAREERS IN MENTAL HEALTH. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No. 1051. Booklet.
1968. 16 pp. 15 cents. Tells of opportunities in the area of psychiatric-mental health nursing and outlines
programs supported by the National Institute of Mental Health.
*NUTRITIONIST.. .DIETITIAN, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health
Service. Publication No. 1721. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Dietetic and nutrition programs within the Service are
described, including the kinds of activities and positions available for each profession. Qualification for
appointment to both the Commissioned Corps and the Civil Service systems is explained. Training programs
offered for both professional groups are discussed and the address is given for requesting information or
application forms.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health
Service. Publication No. 1668. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Outlines the challenges of a Public Health Service career
and describes the assignment possibilities for occupational therapists in the various PHS programs. Details are given
on professional development programs, locations of positions, qualification requirements, Commissioned Corps and
Civil Service employment systems, and where to request application forms.
^PHARMACIST, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1648. Leaflet. (PHS), 1967. Free. Leaflet outlines the challenges of a Public Health Service career,
possible assignments, career advancement potential, and job locations for pharmacists. In addition, information is
given on the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service, selective service obligations, requirements for
appointment, and the rewards of a PHS career. Address is given for requesting application forms.
*PHYSICAL THERAPIST, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health
Service. Publication No. 1661. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. The programs and services requiring physical therapists
in the Public Health Service are outlined in this leaflet. Location of opportunities and professional development
programs are also described. Information is given on eligibility requirements, Commissioned Corps and Civil Service
employment systems, and how to request application forms.
*PHYSICIAN, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication
No. 1731. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Ffee. Outlines the varied opportunities for physicians in the Public Health Service
and includes a listing of the medical specialties needed in the different programs. Several career development
programs, including internship and residency training, are described. Employment under both the Commissioned
Corps and the Civil Service systems is explained and an address is given for requesting further information or
application forms.
*PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION. VA. Pamphlet No. 10-52. (VA). 1967. 11
pp. Free. See page 32 for annotation.
PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING PERSONNEL. A Reprint From The Manpower Report Of The President.
USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1967. 29 pp. Free. Discusses manpower needs and supply in the
professions, particularly in the fields of science, engineering, teaching, social work, and health manpower.
^PSYCHIATRY, IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, CAREERS IN. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1199. Booklet. 1968. 25 pp. 25 cents. Describes the National Institute of Mental Health’s career
development program for psychiatrists. Provides information on how a physician or psychiatrist can enter the
program, the courses of study and residency, and lists psychiatric career opportunities in the Public Health Service.
*REVENUE AGENT, THE. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5027. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free. See
page 31 for annotation.*
* REVENUE OFFICER, THE. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5028. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free.
See page 31 for annotation.




14

♦SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CAREERS IN GOVERNMENT. USCSC. Booklet. 1967. 22 pp. 30 cents. See
page 22 for annotation.
SCIENCE MANPOWER, 1964, AMERICAN. NSF. Report 66-29. 1966. 219 pp. $1.25. Reports characteristics of
American scientists based on the National Register of Scientific and Technical Personnel. Presents information on a
wide range of characteristics, including education, employment, salaries, and geographic location of U.S. scientists.
Contains detailed statistical tables.
SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL MANPOWER RESOURCES: SUMMARY INFORMATION ON EMPLOYMENT,
CHARACTERISTICS, SUPPLY, AND TRAINING* NSF. Book No. NSF 64-28. 1964. 184 pp. $1.25. Provides
facts on the supply, employment utilization, characteristics, compensation, and education of scientists, engineers,
and technicians. Describes the economic background and growth of science and technology; gives occupational,
educational, and functional breakdowns Of employment; and examines the backgrounds, personal characteristics,
education, training, and demand for scientific and technical manpower.
♦SCIENTIST, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication
No. 41. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Gives background information on the mission and challenges of a Public
Health Service career for scientists. Health programs, position locations, career opportunities, and application
information for Commissioned Corps and Civil Service are explained. An address is given for requesting application
forms and information.
SCIENTISTS, ENGINEERS, AND TECHNICIANS IN THE 1960’S. Prepared for the National Science Foundation
by the USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. NSF 63-64. Booklet. 1964. 68 pp. 45 cents. Assesses the scientific,
engineering, and technician manpower requirements and supply in the 1960’s and discusses the implications of the
demand and supply projections made for this group.
♦SECRETARIES, OVERSEAS OPPORTUNITIES FOR. USDS. Booklet. (USDS). 1967. Free. See pages 30, 32 for
annotation.
♦SECRETARIES, STENOGRAPHERS, AND TYPISTS IN WASHINGTON, D.C., OPPORTUNITIES FOR. USDS.
Leaflet. (USDS). 1967. Free. See page 30 for annotation.
“SKILLED WORKERS, 1965-75, ESTIMATED NEED FOR.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor
Review, April 1966. Reprint No. 2491. (BLS). Free. Presents an analysis of the needs for skilled workers in
selected craft occupations. Counts both the growth in employment requirements and openings created from
retirements and deaths. Includes discussions of projections by industry. Presents information on the training of
skilled workers.
♦SOCIAL WORKER, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1697. Leaflet. (PHS), 1967. Free. Contains background information on the Public Health Service
and the career challenges for the social worker in the Service. Programs at the various PHS facilities are described
and information is given on locations, eligibility, and appointment under Commissioned Corps and Civil Service
employment systems. An address is given for requesting further information and application forms.
♦SPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, SEVEN STEPS TO A CAREER IN. NASA. Report EP-33. 1966. 62 pp.
45 cents. Contains information about the space industry and the world of work. Also presents an overview of
career choices related to opportunities in space science, engineering, and technology.
♦STATISTICS WITH THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR HEALTH STATISTICS, A CAREER IN. USDHEW. Public
Health Service. Publication No. 1034. (PHS). 1965. 22 pp. Free. See page 27 for annotation.
♦TAX EXAMINER, THE ESTATE. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5389. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp.
Free. Seepage 31 for annotation.




15

*TAX LAW SPECIALIST. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5549. (IRS). 1967. 12 pp. Free. See
page 31 for annotation.
*TAX TECHNICIAN, THE. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5431. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free. See
page 31 for annotation.
*TAX WORK, CAREERS IN. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5402 (Request from IRS District
Office). 1967. 14 pp. Free. See page 31 for annotation.
REACHING AS A CAREER. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-26014-A. Pamphlet No. 122. 1965. 31 pp. 20
cents. Offers information on the many opportunities for service in education. Includes information on
opportunities in the Peace Corps and teaching at the university level.
TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS, CAREERS IN. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-80032. Leaflet. 1965. 5 cents.
Describes the duties of and opportunities for work as a technician. Tells where to go for further information.
TECHNICIAN MANPOWER: REQUIREMENTS, RESOURCES, AND TRAINING NEEDS. USDL. Bureau
Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1512. 1966. I l l pp. 60 cents. Describes the work of technicians in fields such
engineering, the life sciences, and others. Gives information on the employment and special characteristics
technicians and their training requirements. Supply and demand projections are made for technicians from 1963
1975.

of
as
of
to

*TREASURY ENFORCEMENT AGENT. USDT. Law Enforcement Agencies. Document No. 5515. (USDT). 1968.
24 pp. Free. See page 31 for annotation.
^VETERINARIAN, CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1679. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Outlines the challenges and rewards of a Public Health Service
career, locations of possible assignments, qualifications for appointment in either the Commissioned Corps or the
Civil Service employment systems. Information is included for requesting application forms.
^VETERINARIANS, IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR.
USDA. Miscellaneous Publication No. 1018. 1967. 16 pp. 15 cents. See page 22 for annotation.
*

*

*

The Small Business Administration publishes a series of booklets showing how to start and manage a small
business. These booklets are designed to help prospective owner-managers decide whether they would be capable
business managers, and to supply basic information about management. Several examples of specific questions
answered in each booklet are how to start a business, how to buy a going concern, where to locate a business, and
how to keep up with developments in the field.
♦STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL BUSINESS OF YOUR OWN. SBA. Vol. 1. 1962. 49 pp. 25 cents.
♦STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL BOOKKEEPING SERVICE. SBA. Vol. 4. 1962. 64 pp. 30 cents.
♦STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL BUILDING BUSINESS. SBA. Vol. 5. 1962. 102 pp. 35 cents.
♦STARTING AND MANAGING AN AVIATION FIXED BASE OPERATION. SBA. Vol. 6. 1963. 52 pp. 25 cents.
♦STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL MOTEL. SBA. Vol. 7. 1963. 70 pp. 30 cents.
♦STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL DUPLICATING AND MAILING SERVICE. SBA. Vol. 8. 1963. 55 pp.
25 cents.




16

*STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL RESTAURANT. SBA. Vol. 9. 1964. 116 pp. 45 cents.
^STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL RETAIL HARDWARE STORE. SBA. Vol. 10. 1965. 73 pp. 30 cents.
*STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL RETAIL DRUGSTORE. SBA. Vol. 11. 1966. 103 pp. 40 cents.
*STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL DRYCLEANING BUSINESS. SBA. Vol. 12. 1966. 80 pp. 35 cents.
^STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL AUTOMATIC VENDING BUSINESS. SBA. Vol. 13. 1967. 70 pp. 30
cents.
^STARTING AND MANAGING A SMALL CAR WASH BUSINESS. SBA. Vol. 14. 1967. 76 pp. 35 cents.
The Small Business Administration also publishes booklets entitled Small Business Bibliographies, which briefly
discuss training programs, educational requirements, and some recent trends in relevant businesses and occupations.
These booklets also provide a list of excellent government and nongovernment sources of further information.
Three examples are:
*HOUSE-TO-HOUSE SELLING. SBA. No. 39. (SBA). 1964. 8 pp. Free.
^TRAINING COMMERCIAL SALESMEN. SBA. No. 56. (SBA). 1965. 8 pp. Free.
DRAINING RETAIL SALESPEOPLE. SBA. No. 23. (SBA). 1963. 8 pp. Free.

Industry Manpower Studies
AMERICA’S INDUSTRIAL AND OCCUPATIONAL MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS, 1964-1975. The Outlook for
Technological Change and Employment, pp. 9-187. Appendix volume I of the report by the National Commission
on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress. Study prepared for the National Commission by the USDL.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1966. 373 pp. $2.25. See page 11 for annotation.
ATOMIC ENERGY FIELD, EMPLOYMENT IN THE. AEC. Occupational Survey. 1962. 43 pp. 35 cents. Presents
the results of an employment survey of industrial establishments and agencies of the Federal Government engaged
in atomic energy work in January 1962. Discusses work in atomic energy, geographic distribution of employment,
and distribution of employment by occupation. (A similar updated report will be available in late 1968.)
CIVIL AVIATION, EMPLOYMENT REQUIREMENTS AND CHANGING OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE IN.
USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1367. 1964. 55 pp. 40 cents. Studies employment in civil aviation,
particularly occupational patterns and trends. Presents projections to 1970 for civil aviation employment as a
whole, and for its three major divisions-airlines, general aviation, and the FAA and CAB. Contains a bibliography.
ELECTRONICS MANUFACTURING, EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK AND CHANGING OCCUPATIONAL STRUC­
TURE IN. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1363. 1963. 61 pp. 40 cents. Estimates employment in
electronics manufacturing for 1958-1961 and projects manpower requirements to 1970. Manpower information is
presented by major product category. Contains a bibliography.
FARM EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING NEEDS, TRENDS IN. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower
Report 3. (MA). 1962. 4 pp. Free. Discusses farm population and employment trends. Emphasizes the anticipated
effects of technological improvements on employment prospects.
^FORESTRY, CAREERS IN. USDA. Forest Service. Miscellaneous Publication No. 249. 1965. 22 pp. 15 cents.
Deals primarily with careers in forestry which call for professional training. Presents information on the nature of
forestry work, the requirements for success, types of employers in the forestry industry, and future expectations.




17

GOVERNMENT, EMPLOYMENT TRENDS AND MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS IN. USDL. Manpower Adminis­
tration. Manpower Report 9. (MA). 1963. 11 pp. Free. Examines trends in Federal, State, and local government
civilian employment. Surveys future manpower needs in the public service.
HEALTH MANPOWER 1966-75: A STUDY OF REQUIREMENTS AND SUPPLY. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Report 323. (BLS). 1967. 50 pp. Free. See page 13 for annotation.
HEALTH SERVICE INDUSTRY 1965-75, TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER IN THE. USDL. Manpower
Research Bulletin 14. (MA). 1967. 109 pp. Free. Presents information on technological developments affecting
manpower in the health service industry. Discusses past trends in employment and manpower needs for the health
services over 1965-75.
PROJECTIONS 1970: INTERINDUSTRY RELATIONSHIPS; POTENTIAL DEMAND; EMPLOYMENT. USDL.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1536. 1966. 155 pp. $1. Projects employment for wage and salary workers by
industry to 1970. Discusses potential demand, interindustry relationships, and employment under alternative
assumptions on the rates and patterns of economic growth.
STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, MANPOWER IN, 1965 AND 1975. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(BLS). 1966. Free. Reports on current and future manpower requirements in State and local governments.
Describes expenditures and employment from 1955 to 1965 and presents projections for 1965-75. Discusses the
impact of technological change on employment.
TELEPHONE INDUSTRY 1965-75, TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER IN THE. USDL. Manpower Adminis­
tration. Manpower Research Bulletin 13. (MA). 1966. 53 pp. Free. Presents information on the manpower
characteristics of the telephone industry. Examines the impact of new technology on employment and presents
projections of manpower requirements in 1975.
*

*

*

Surveys of the manpower situation in selected industries are conducted by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau
of Employment Security. Survey reports usually describe industry employment trends and current labor needs, by
region, State, and labor areas. Changing occupational patterns in industries are sometimes discussed. Summaries of
these reports are published in Employment Service Review, a monthly publication; separate reprints are also
available. Single reproduced copies of those surveys which are out of print are also available upon request from the
Bureau of Employment Security.
AEROSPACE EMPLOYMENT. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Survey No. 112.
(BES). 1965. 18 pp. Out of Print.
BITUMINOUS COAL MINING. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Survey No. 106.
(BES). 1963. 18 pp. Out of Print.
BLAST FURNACES, STEELWORKS, AND ROLLING MILLS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry
Manpower Survey No. 113. (BES). 1967. 16 pp. Free.
DEPARTMENT STORES. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Survey No. 109. (BES).
1964. 14 pp. Free.
FOOTWEAR. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Survey No. 104. (BES). 1962. Out of
Print.
MACHINE TOOLS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Report 110. (BES). 1964. 16 pp.
Free.




18

MEATPACKING. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Report 108. (BES). 1964. 28 pp.
Out of Print.
MISSILES, SPACECRAFT, AND AIRCRAFT. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower
Report 105. (BES). 1963. Free.
TELEPHONE COMMUNICATION. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Report 103.
(BES). 1962. Out of Print.
TIRES AND TUBES. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Industry Manpower Report 107. (BES). 1964. 18
pp. Out of Print.

State and Local Area Information
A great deal of information on occupations and employment opportunities is published by State employment
security agencies. These State agencies prepare two principal types of studies—
area skill surveys and occupational
guides. One or more such studies have been published by 50 State agencies since 1957. State agencies also publish
special studies that deal with future manpower supply, characteristics of the work force, changes in State and area
economics, and the employment structure of industries.
Area skill surveys analyze current and future occupational requirements in individual labor areas. Survey data
provide a basis for anticipating the occupational needs of area industry and estimating the supply of qualified
manpower. Some specific topics covered by most area skill surveys are: The occupational composition of current
employment, by sex and broad age groups; future occupational requirements—
usually 2 to 5 years hence; current
occupational supply and demand situations; the supply of workers expected to be trained over the forecast period;
information on apprenticeship and other training programs; the number of workers in training; and employer
opinion regarding the need for pre-employment or supplementary vocational training.
Occupational guides contain information on job duties; employment prospects; working conditions; entry methods;
advancement opportunities; hours and earnings; and education, training, and experience requirements for individual
occupations or groups of related occupations. Occupations selected for analysis usually are those important to
local industries, or those of interest to particular groups, such as young workers.
Special manpower and labor area studies cover a wide variety of subjects, including: (1) manpower projections,
(2) studies of State and area economics, (3) studies of labor force characteristics, e.g., age, sex, racial composition,
and (4) industry analyses.
Counselors should request lists and copies of published reports from the reports and analysis section of the
individual State agencies. Also, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Employment Security has two free
publications designed to promote wider acquaintance with and increased utilization of labor information issued by
State employment security agencies. These publications are: (1) Guide to Local Occupational Information, which
lists occupational guides and area skill surveys issued by State agencies through mid 1966; and (2) Job
Opportunities Information, which lists occupational guides and skill surveys currently in process.
Examples of studies done by State employment security agencies are listed below:
*ARIZONA OCCUPATIONAL BRIEFS. Arizona State Employment Service, Manpower Economics Section,
Phoenix, Arizona 85005. 1967. 215 pp. Free. Provides counselors and young people with brief and concise
occupational information statements that can be used to assist and guide the decisionmaking process. The briefs
describe the changing composition of occupations and fields of work as they exist in Arizona and the United
States.




19

*COMPUTER OPERATOR. State of New Jersey, Department of Labor and Industry, Division of Employment
Security, Bureau of Research and Statistics, Labor and Industry Building, Trenton, New Jersey 08625. Job Guide
No. 35. 1967. 10 pp. Free. One of a series of publications on specific occupations designed for use by students of
high school age, employment service personnel, school guidance counselors, and others interested in the
occupation. Presents information on the nature of work, related occupations, where employed, physical and
mental requirements, working conditions, training and advancement, outlook, organizations related to the job and
places to go for more information.
EMPLOYMENT IN PRINTING AND PUBLISHING-NEW YORK CITY. New York State Department of Labor,
Division of Employment, Research and Statistics Office, State Office Building Campus, Albany, New York 12201.
1967. 24 pp. Free. Describes with charts and tables, the employment composition of the printing and publishing
industry in New York City. Compares the printing and publishing industry in the United States, New York State,
and Chicago. Also compares printing and publishing employment and manufacturing and nonmanufacturing
employment.
EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK FOR SELECTED OCCUPATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA, 1966-1970. Employment
Security Commission of North Carolina, Bureau of Employment Security Research, P.O. Box 589, Raleigh, North
Carolina 27602. 1966. 66 pp. Free. Studies job opportunities and training needs for 107 occupations in 33
industries in North Carolina. Includes an economic profile for North Carolina; and employment outlook by
industry, by occupation, and by area.
*MOTOR VEHICLE OPERATOR OCCUPATIONS. Utah Job Guide. Utah Department of Employment Security,
1974 Social Hall Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111. 1967. 21 pp. Free. Reports requirements and opportunities
in ten motor-vehicle operator occupations for Utah. Individual job guides are presented for routeman, farm
equipment operator, dump truckdriver, tank truckdriver, tractor-trailor truckdriver, light truckdriver, taxicab
driver, bus driver, industrial truck operator, and tractor operator.
THE MANPOWER RESOURCES OF THE PORTLAND METROPOLITAN AREA. Oregon Department of
Employment, Room 403, Labor and Industries Building, Salem, Oregon 97310. 1966. 64 pp. Free. Presents a
tabulation and analysis of the manpower resources and manpower needs of the Portland Metropolitan area.
THIS IS O’BRIEN COUNTY: A MANPOWER REPORT. Iowa Employment Security Commission, Community
D evelopm ent Section, 100 East G rand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 50309. 1966. 19 pp. Free. R eports on current
and potential manpower resources for O’Brien County, Iowa. Also gives information on the economic resources of
the county.
*

*

*

For specific information about jobs in individual States or local areas, counselors should consult the following
government agencies: (1) State employment service offices and (2) State apprenticeship agencies. The State
employment service and its local offices have a list of hard-to-fill job vacancies compiled from Bureau of
Employment Security interarea clearance lists. Such lists are valuable in locating job openings. State apprenticeship
agencies can provide useful information about training opportunities and requirements in many skilled occupations.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Employment Security, publishes a bimonthly report called AREA
TRENDS IN EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT This publication reports on the adequacy of labor supply
for 150 major labor areas and a number of smaller ones. Each area is classified into 1 of 6 categories ranging from
labor shortage to high unemployment. Also presents a roundup of area labor developments, and employment
outlook for selected industries and occupations.
AREA TRENDS IN EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security.
Bimonthly Publication. (BES). Free.




20

Job Descriptions
Rapidly changing technology creates many new jobs and destroys many others. Also important, however, are the
influences of technological advances on job content and, therefore, on the training requirements of occupations.
Changes in job content are often obscured because job titles remain unchanged.
Job descriptions are available in various types of government publications, including many job guides and wage
surveys. Some State governments publish handbooks of occupational briefs, which describe those jobs important to
the State’s economy. The Dictionary o f Occupational Titles, popularly called “THE D.O.T.” is an encyclopedia of
job definitions and related information.
DICTIONARY OF OCCUPATIONAL TITLES, 3d Edition.
VOLUME I. DEFINITIONS OF TITLES. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1965. 809 pp. $5.
Alphabetically lists over 36,000 different occupational titles. Defines and identifies by code number almost 23,000
separate occupations.
VOLUME II. OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION AND INDUSTRY INDEX. USDL. Bureau of Employment
Security. 1965. 656 pp. $4.25. Presents the occupational classification structure developed by the U.S.
Employment Service, which is arranged under two systems. The first system groups jobs in numerical order
according to some combination of work field, purpose, material, product, generic terms, and industry. The second
system groups jobs according to a combination of required general educational development, specific vocational
preparation, aptitudes, interests, temperaments, and physical demands. Lists all titles by industry.
SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS OF OCCUPATIONS-A SUPPLEMENT TO THE DICTIONARY OF OCCUPA­
TIONAL TITLES. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1966. 280 pp. $2.75. Presents information on physical
demands, working conditions, and training time for each job defined in the Dictionary o f Occupational Titles.
*

*

*

Other specific sources of job descriptions include:
A DIRECTORY OF COMMUNITY WAGE SURVEYS 1948 - JUNE 1966. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(BLS). 1966. 32 pp. Free. A directory of occupational wage and supplementary benefits surveys conducted each
year for major labor areas. Each survey report includes job descriptions for occupations included in the survey. See
page 71 for additional information on community wage surveys.
♦ARIZONA OCCUPATIONAL BRIEFS. Arizona State Employment Service, Manpower Economics Section,
Phoenix, Arizona 85005. 1967. 215 pp. Free. See page 19 for annotation.
♦JOB GUIDE FOR YOUNG WORKERS, 1963-64 Edition. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1963. 78 pp.
45 cents. See page 66 for annotation.
♦OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK HANDBOOK, 1968-69 Edition. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1550.
1968. 858 pp. $4.25. See page 4 for annotation.

Careers in the Federal Government
Many Federal agencies publish materials that provide information on career opportunities related to their activities.
Examples of such publications are listed below. Counselors and students desiring information on employment in
particular agencies should contact them directly. Information on qualifications for specific occupations can be
obtained from the U.S. Civil Service Commission. Some State and local government agencies also publish
information on career opportunities in their agencies. (See also: Summer Jobs, page 68; and Women and Girls, page
62).




21

F E D E R A L G O VER N M EN T JOBS IN TH E U N ITED S T A T E S
U.S. Civil Service Commission
*ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, AND RELATED PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS. USCSC. Examination Announce­
ment No. 415. (USCSC). 1967. 8 pp. Free. Contains information on the advantages and benefits of the Federal
Service. Describes requirements for beginning grades of GS-5 and GS-7; the basis of rating and eligibility listings;
and application procedures.
♦FEDERAL CAREER DIRECTORY: A GUIDE FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS. USCSC. Booklet. 1966. 88 pp. 55
cents. Describes many occupations in the Federal Government that are open to college students. Provides
information on the Federal Service Entrance Examination, how jobs are filled, starting salaries, agency training
programs, and how to apply for jobs. Discusses the programs of many of the Federal agencies and related career
opportunities. A final section presents job briefs that give information on the nature of work, qualifications
required, and career opportunities. The job briefs are indexed by petition title, and college major.
♦OPPORTUNITIES IN TRADES AND CRAFTS WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. USCSC. Pamphlet No.
58. (USCSC). 1964. Free. Tells how to locate U.S. Government jobs in the trades and crafts and how to apply for
them.
♦SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CAREERS IN GOVERNMENT. USCSC. Booklet, 1967. 22 pp. 30 cents. Gives
employment and application information on Federal science and engineering careers. Presents over 50 job briefs
that explain the work, qualifications required, and career opportunities in these positions.
♦SUMMER JOBS IN FEDERAL AGENCIES. USCSC. Examination Announcement No. 414. (USCSC). (revised
each year). Free. See page 68 for annotation.
♦WORKING FOR THE U.S.A. USCSC. Pamphlet No. 4. 1967. 22 pp. 15 cents. Describes job applications,
examinations, eligibility factors, and the general requirements for civil service positions. Explains many of the
employment features, including pay, hours, advancement, incentive awards, insurance, and retirement.

U.S. Department of Agriculture
♦CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR VETERINARIANS IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. USDA.
Miscellaneous Publication No. 1018. 1967. 16 pp. 15 cents. Gives a brief description of the various activities,
advantages, and opportunities for veterinarians with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Presents summer
employment possibilities and sources of additional career information.
♦PROFILES: CAREERS IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. USDA. 1964. $2. Presents a
comprehensive view of the many careers with the Department. Includes sections on employment procedures,
benefits, and salaries. Describes the relation of college studies to jobs in the Department.

Agricultural Research Service
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service publishes a number of pamphlets giving
information on scientific careers in various fields. Generally each gives a description of the work, principal fields of
research, benefits, and salaries.
♦SCIENTIFIC CAREERS IN CROPS RESEARCH. USDA Agricultural Research Service, Miscellaneous Publication
No. 903. (ARS). 1966. Free.
♦SCIENTIFIC CAREERS IN PLANT PEST CONTROL. USDA. Agricultural Research Service. Miscellaneous
Publication No. 854. (ARS). 1967. Free.
♦SCIENTIFIC CAREERS IN PLANT QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT. USDA. Agricultural Research Service.
Miscellaneous Publication No. 853. (ARS). 1967. Free.
22



Farmers Home Administration
*A CAREER WITH THE FARMERS HOME ADMINISTRATION. USDA. Farmers Home Administration. Booklet.
(USDA). 1966. Free. Explains the work of the Farmers Home Administration and the qualifications needed for a
professional agricultural position with this organization. Also lists various fringe benefits and salary information.

Federal Extension Service
*YOUR CAREER AS AN EXTENSION AGENT. USDA. Federal Extension Service. Miscellaneous Publication No.
972. Pamphlet. (USDA). 1964. Free. Discusses duties, qualifications, opportunities, and salaries. Provides sources
of additional information.

Forest Service
^CAREERS IN RESEARCH FORESTRY. USDA. Forest Service. (USDA). 1966. 7 pp. Free. Contains recruitment
information for the position of Research Forester and Forest Products Technologist. Also describes the work,
location of positions, and education and experience requirements.
OPPORTUNITY IN FOREST SERVICE MANAGEMENT CAREERS. USDA. Forest Service. Booklet. (USDA).
1966. 32 pp. Free. Explains the work of the Forest Service and describes its business administration oriented
opportunities. Also contains information on salary, training, fringe benefits, and how to apply for business
management positions.
*THE FOREST SERVICE ENGINEER. USDA. Forest Service. Booklet. 1963. 32 pp. 40 cents. Explains the
functions of the Forest Service especially as they apply to engineering specialties. Tells what it takes to become a
Forest Service engineer and the benefits which accrue to them.
*WOMEN’S WORK IN THE FOREST SERVICE. USDA. Forest Sendee. Miscellaneous Publication No. 1058.
1967. 6 pp. 5 cents. Gives background information on the Forest Service especially as it applies to jobs for
women. Describes the types of jobs available to women and tells of the advantages of working for the Forest
Service.

Rural Electrification Administration
CAREERS FOR SENIORS MAJORING IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, ACCOUNTING, OR ECONOMICS.
USDA. Rural Electrification Administration. Booklet. (USDA). 1967. 5 pp. Free. Explains the work of the Rural
Electrification Administration, and lists the requirements, benefits, and advancement opportunities available to
qualified applicants under the REA Operations Trainee Program.
^ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING, TELEPHONE ENGINEERING CAREERS. USDA. Rural Electrification Adminis­
tration. Booklet. (USDA). 1967. 8 pp. Free. Explains the functions of engineers in the Rural Electrification
Administration and presents information on training, salary, advancement, and other benefits for engineers in the
REA.

Soil Conservation Service*
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Soil Conservation Service publishes a number of pamphlets giving
information on careers. Generally each gives a designation of the work, training requirements, benefits, and
salaries.
*AN ENGINEERING CAREER FOR YOU IN THE SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE. USDA. Miscellaneous
Publication No. 715. 1965. 10 cents.




23

*A SOIL SCIENCE CAREER FOR YOU IN THE SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE. USDA. Miscellaneous
Publication No. 716. 1965. 5 cents.
*CAREERS IN THE SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE. USDA. Miscellaneous Publication No. 717. 1967. 10
cents.
*STUDENTS . . . START YOUR CAREER IN THE SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE BEFORE YOU GRADU­
ATE. USDA. Miscellaneous Publication No. 714. 1966. 5 cents.

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission
♦UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION, EMPLOYMENT WITH THE. AEC. Division of Personnel.
Pamphlet. (AEC). 1966. 25 pp. Free. Provides information to assist interested candidates in exploring career
opportunities with the AEC.
♦UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION: OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHALLENGING CAREERS.
AEC. Division of Personnel. Pamphlet. (AEC). 1966. 20 pp. Free. Lists the functions and locations of the major
AEC offices, the various intern programs for college graduates, and career development opportunities. Discusses
salaries, benefits, and other employment information.

Central Intelligence Agency
♦CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY. CIA. Booklet. (CIA). 1967. 12 pp. Free. Describes the work of the CIA
and discusses the characteristics of a career in the Agency. Gives information on means to employment; lists
academic fields of particular interest to the CIA and some typical duties of CIA employees.

U.S. Department of Commerce
♦CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS. USDC. Booklet. (USDC).
1967. Free. Discusses the different positions available with the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Division of
Domestic and International Business. Presents information on responsibilities and qualifications needed, and gives
places where further information can be obtained. Covers fields of employment in which foreign service may be
involved.
CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. USDC. Pamphlet. (USDC).
1967. 16 pp. Free. Surveys the various bureaus and offices of the Department and lists the occupational
opportunities in each according to major career fields. Lists, for each bureau and office, the location of jobs and
where to write for further information.
*68 CAREER FIELDS IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. USDC. Booklet. 1968. 100 pp. 70 cents.
Gives a comprehensive view of occupational opportunities in the Department. Includes information on the
relationship of academic areas to positions in the Department; and provides summary descriptions of occupations,
including duties, training programs, and how to apply.

Bureau of the Census
♦CAREERS IN THE CENSUS BUREAU. USDC. Bureau of the Census. Pamphlet. (BC). 1966-67. Free. Briefly
discusses the programs and work of the Bureau and occupational opportunities. Gives list of steps to be taken if
interested in a Census Bureau career.




24

Environmental Science Services Administration
*BUILDING TOMORROW’S WEATHER SYSTEMS: CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENGINEERS AND
PHYSICISTS. USDC. Environmental Science Services Administration. Pamphlet. 1964. 14 pp. 25 cents. Defines
the Weather Bureau’s functions and career opportunities for engineers and physicists in the fields of radar, radio
direction finding, automation, telemetry, infrared humidity absorption, optical design, TV and radio communica­
tions, and digital and analog computers. Briefly lists employee benefits.
*EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN DYNAMIC METEOROLOGY AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS. USDC.
Environmental Science Services Administration. (ESSA). 1967. 2 pp. Free. Describes opportunities in dynamic
meteorology and applied mathematics at ESSA’s National Environmental Satellite Center, where data from
earth-orbiting satellites are being used to increase man’s understanding of the physical environment.
^EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. WEATHER BUREAU. USDC. Environmental Science Services
Administration. (ESSA). 1968. 2 pp. Free. Lists career opportunities in the ESSA Weather Bureau for
university-trained meteorologists.
^SCIENCE AND SERVICE: A CAREER IN THE ESSA COMMISSIONED OFFICER CORPS. USDC. Environ­
mental Science Services Administration. (ESSA). 1967. 12 pp. Free. Explains the work of ESSA and lists the
qualifications necessary for appointment to ESSA’s commissioned officer corps. Lists the duties of the officer and
the benefits associated with his job. Gives sources of further information.
*THRESHOLD: ESSA. USDC. Environmental Science Services Administration. (ESSA). 1967. 8 pp. Free.
Describes the activities of ESSA and its components, as well as the activities of ESSA’s physicists, geophysicists,
oceanographers, meteorologists, hydrologists, engineers, geodesists, mathematicians, photogrammetrists, and
cartographers. Briefly describes employment benefits and provides an employment inquiry form.

National Bureau of Standards
*ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN PROGRAM. USDC. National Bureau of Standards. Pamphlet. (NBS). 1967. Free.
Describes opportunities for recent college graduates in the budget, management, personnel, and procurement
aspects of administration.
^CAREERS IN SCIENCE. USDC. National Bureau of Standards. Pamphlet. (NBS). 1968. Free. Explains the
scientific research programs at the National Bureau of Standards and the employment opportunities available to
scientists and engineers.
^OPPORTUNITIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL AND BUSINESS SCHOOL GRADUATES. USDC. National Bureau of
Standards. Pamphlet. (NBS). 1966. Free. Lists opportunities available in the National Bureau of Standards for
clerical workers.
^SCIENTIFIC ASSISTANT CAREERS. USDC. National Bureau of Standards. Pamphlet. (NBS). 1968. Free.
Describes employment opportunities in science and engineering for graduates of high school and junior college, and
veterans of military service.

U.S. Department of Defense
*DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION. USDD. Office of the Secretary. Leaflet. (OSD).
1965. 4 pp. Free. Provides information about application procedures and addresses for employment in Washington,
D.C., service in the field, and for overseas employment. Briefly discusses examinations and methods of obtaining
employment with Department of Defense contractors.




25

♦EXECUTIVE TRAINEE PROGRAM. USDD. Office of the Secretary. Leaflet. (OSD). 1966. 3 pp. Free. Describes
the executive trainee program for college graduates. Comments on pay, trainee work assignments, and permanent
work assignments.

Military Service
Each branch of the military service publishes career handbooks that describe occupations and training programs for
enlisted men. The individual occupational briefs usually include a section that relates military to civilian
occupations. The handbooks contain information on pay, allowances, advancement opportunities, and women in
the services. Other publications describe the service academies, officer training programs, and individual
occupational fields.
Military forces publications are available at local military recruiting offices and most public and school libraries.

U.S. Air Force
♦PILOTS AND NAVIGATORS STAND TALL ON THE AEROSPACE TEAM. (USAF). 1966. 16 pp. Free.
♦UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRMAN OCCUPATIONAL HANDBOOK. (USAF). 1966. 44 pp. Free.
♦UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OCCUPATIONAL HANDBOOK. (USAF). 1964. 200 pp. Free.
♦UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OFFICER TRAINING SCHOOL. (USAF). 1966. 5 pp. Free.

U.S. Army
♦THE SECRET OF GETTING AHEAD. (USA). Booklet. 1966. 38 pp. Free.
♦U.S. ARMY OPPORTUNITIES. (USA). Booklet. 1966. 43 pp. Free.

U.S. Coast Guard (under the U.S. Department of Transportation)
♦THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD: A CAREER SERVICE. (USCG). Pamphlet No. CG-153. 1964. 25 pp.
Free.
♦UNITED STATES COAST GUARD ACADEMY. (USCG). Annual. Free.
♦YOU AND THE COAST GUARD RESERVE. Pamphlet No. CG-254. (USCG). 1964. 18 pp. Free.

U.S. Marine Corps
♦A GUIDE TO OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTIES AND SCHOOLS. (USMC). 1966. 48 pp. Free.
♦BE A LEADER OF MEN. (USMC). 1965. 32 pp. Free.
♦THE BUILDING OF A MARINE AVIATOR. (USMC). 1963. 29 pp. Free.

U.S. Navy
♦EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN THE NAVY. (USN). 1965. 4 pp. Free.
♦LIFE IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY. (USN). 1966. 46 pp. Free.




26

*NAVY ENLISTED OCCUPATIONAL HANDBOOK. (USN). 1966. 136 pp. Free.
*NAVY MEDICAL SERVICE CORPS. (USN). 1965. 24 pp. Free.
♦NAVY OFFICERS CAREERS HANDBOOK. (USN). 1964. 76 pp. Free.
*UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY CATALOGUE. (USN). Annual. Free.

Federal Reserve System
*CAREER SERVICE IN THE FEDERAL RESERVE. FRS. Board of Governors of The Federal Reserve System.
(FRS). 1968. 13 pp. Free. Contains brief summaries of the varied professional fields of employment in the Federal
Reserve System. Gives summaries of pay, working conditions, and other benefits.

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Public Health Service
*A CAREER IN STATISTICS WITH THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR HEALTH STATISTICS. USDHEW. Public
Health Service. Publication No. 1034. (PHS). 1965. 22 pp. Free. Presents a broad view of the work of the National
Center for Health Statistics and the role that the statistician plays in the Center. Gives information on salary,
benefits, and places to obtain further information.
♦CAREERS IN THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No. 1567.
1967. 7 pp. 25 cents. Outlines career opportunities in the Public Health Service. An explanation of the Civil
Service and Commissioned Corps employment systems is given, including the eligibility requirements, advancement
programs, and benefits of each system. The Public Health Service mission, programs, possible assignments, and an
address for requesting information on specific fields is supplied. (See section on Occupational Manpower Studies
beginning on page 11, for information on specific occupational assignments available in the Public Health Service.)
♦COMMISSIONED OFFICER STUDENT TRAINING AND EXTERN PROGRAM, 1967-68. USDHEW. Public
Health Service. Publication No. 1059. (PHS). 1967. 14 pp. Free. Describes employment opportunities available
during vacation with the Public Health Service for college students of health and related studies. Gives information
on ways to apply for the program.

Social Security Administration
♦A CAREER FOR YOU IN SOCIAL SECURITY. USDHEW. Social Security Administration. (SSA). 1967. 25 pp.
Free. Discusses job opportunities for college graduates in the Social Security Administration. Also tells about
starting salaries, advancement, retirement, and other benefits.

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
♦A JOB WHERE THE ACTION IS. USDHUD. Publication MP-37. (HUD). 1966. 13 pp. Free. Discusses the
professional positions available, places of employment, salary, and places to get further information.
JOBS AVAILABLE FOR HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE GRADUATES IN HUD. USDHUD. Pamphlet. (HUD).
1966. 7 pp. Free. Lists duties, qualifications, and salary for a number of different positions available in this
agency.
♦THE URBAN INTERN PROGRAM. USDHUD. Pamphlet. (HUD). 1966. Free. Describes how the urban intern
program works and its advantages. Discusses eligibility by academic fields of specialization.




27

U.S. Department of the Interior
^CAREERS IN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, A DICTIONARY FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS. USDI. Personnel Management Publication No. 3. 1965. 64 pp. 35 cents. Provides employment
information for college students. Includes information on appointments, salary, tenure, and other benefits.
Describes the program of each bureau within the Department and the type of personnel it needs. Explains the
Department’s training programs and gives specific career information.
^CAREER PROFILES. USDI. Personnel Management Publications No. 6. (USDI). 1967. 73 pp. Free. Presents a
series of essays on the work, training, interests, and advancement of actual people in selected occupations with the
Department.
^EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN THE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE. USDI. Bureau
of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife. Pamphlet. 1964. 20 pp. 30 cents. Furnishes occupational briefs of positions in the
Bureau for biologists, chemists, engineers, economists, real estate appraisers, and others. Discusses salary,
application procedure, uniform allowances, employee benefits, and required career preparation.
*CAREERS IN THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE. USDI. National Park Service. Pamphlet. (USDI). 1967. 31 pp.
Free. Describes permanent employment in the National Park Service. Designed to answer the most frequently
asked career information questions. Discusses salary, application procedure, uniform allowances, employee benefits,
and required career preparation.

U.S. Department of Justice
Federal Bureau of Investigation*
*FBI CAREER OPPORTUNITIES. USDJ. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Pamphlet. (FBI). 1967. Free. Describes
professional, technical, and clerical job opportunities with the FBI. Lists duties, qualifications, and places to apply.
*HOW TO BECOME A FINGERPRINT TECHNICIAN WITH THE FBI. USDJ. Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Leaflet. (FBI). 1967. Free. Describes job characteristics, qualifications, and opportunities for advancement. Gives
information on places to apply.
*WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE AN FBI AGENT. USDJ. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Leaflet. (FBI). 1967. 3 pp.
Free. Describes the work and responsibilities of a typical FBI agent. Gives application information. The FBI also
has available a number of one-to-three page pamphlets that describe job qualifications, including salaries. Listed
below are some examples:
CLERICAL AND CLERICALTECHNICAL
JOBS FOR WOMEN
LABORATORY AID
RADIO MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
SPECIAL AGENT
TECHNICAL POSITIONS




28

Federal Bureau of Prisons
A number of announcements for examinations for various positions in the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of
Prisons are available. Most give information on the nature of work, experience requirements, and places to apply.
Some examples of announcements for positions are:
^FARMERS
*FOOD SUPERVISOR
^PRISON INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISOR
^SUPERVISORY JOBS AS STEAMFITTER, MASON, OR LAUNDRYMAN
*TEACHERS IN GENERAL EDUCATION, INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND RELATED TRADES

Immigration and Naturalization Service
^CAREERS WITH THE IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE. USDJ. Immigration and Naturali­
zation Service. Booklet. (INS). 1967. 10 pp. Free. Explains the various duties of a career as an Immigration
Inspector. Gives information on physical and educational requirements, working conditions, salary, and sources of
further information.
INFORMATION ABOUT AND REQUIREMENTS FOR THE POSITION OF PORT RECEPTIONIST. USDJ.
Immigration and Naturalization Service. Leaflet. (INS). No Date. Free. Explains the duties, experience, and
education required of applicants. Discusses language requirements and other qualifications.

U.S. Department of Labor
CAREERS IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR. USDL. (USDL). 1966. 33 pp. Free. Explains the functions
of the Department of Labor and describes training requirements and programs, as well as career and promotion
opportunities.
*MANAGEMENT INTERN PROGRAM IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR. USDL. Pamphlet. (USDL).
1966. 4 pp. Free. Describes the program including on-the-job experience, seminars, and conferences. Discusses
fields of work, benefits, and the steps necessary to become an intern.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
*NASA. A GUIDE TO CAREERS IN AERO-SPACE TECHNOLOGY. NASA. Booklet. (NASA). 1966. 48 pp.
Free. Explains the work of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and describes career specialties,
education and experience requirements, and how to apply.

United States Post Office Department
^CHALLENGES IN MANAGEMENT. USPOD. Publication No. 102. (USPOD). 1967. 21 pp. Free. Discusses
changes in the Post Office Department and the need for highly trained people. Presents summaries of the two
entry programs, the Management Generalist Program and the Management Specialist Program. Contains information
on duties, salaries, work assignments, and advancement opportunities.*
*RESEARCH AND ENGINEERING: A REWARDING CAREER WITH THE U.S. POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.
USPOD. Publication No. 98. (USPOD). 1967. 16 pp. Free. Presents many of the opportunities and challenges
available for engineers in the Post Office Department. Gives an outline of the training program, types of
assignments, and ways to apply.




29

U.S. Department of State
*A CAREER IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES. USDS. Booklet. (USDS). 1968. 27 pp.
Free. Discusses the prerequisites to become a staff member of either the Foreign Service or the U.S. Information
Agency. Gives information on mandatory examinations, salary, opportunities for advancement, drawbacks, and
rewards.
*1967 EXAMINATION FOR FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICER CAREERS. USDS. Booklet. (USDS). 1967. Free.
Lists the career responsibilities in both the Department of State and the U.S. Information Agency as well as
requirements necessary for occupations of these agencies. Gives entrance examination information.
*

*

*

The State Department also has information on clerical positions available both at home and overseas. These, listed
below, present information on nature of the work, working conditions, qualifications, salary and other benefits,
and where to get further information.
*CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN COMMUNICATION AND RECORDS. (USDS). 1966. Free.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR SECRETARIES, STENOGRAPHERS, AND TYPISTS IN WASHINGTON, D.C. (USDS).
1967. Free.
OVERSEAS OPPORTUNITIES FOR SECRETARIES. (USDS). 1967. Free.

Agency for International Development
OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENT. USDS. Agency for International Development. Booklet. (AID). 1966. 14 pp. Free.
Explains the many positions open for overseas AID assignments and the qualifications required of people filling
these positions. Gives locations of assignments, advantages, and places to obtain further information.

U.S. Information Agency
*CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. INFORMATION AGENCY. USIA. Booklet. (USIA). 1968. Free.
Discusses the many jobs available domestically with the USIA. Includes information on duties of the positions and
places to apply. Covers jobs ranging from movie production to librarian.
*FOREIGN SERVICE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. INFORMATION AGENCY. USIA. Booklet.
(USIA). 1968. Free. Discusses overseas career opportunities with the USIA. Explains various methods of entry and
selection, advantages of overseas careers, and sources of further information.
*

*

*

The USIA publishes several brochures which explain intern programs. These brochures include information on
hiring, and ways and places to apply for work. Examples are:
CAREER INTERN PROGRAM IN BROADCASTING. (USIA). 1968. Free.
MANAGEMENT INTERN PROGRAM. (USIA). 1968. Free.
PRESS INTERN PROGRAM. (USIA). 1968. Free.




30

U.S. Department of the Treasury
^TREASURY ENFORCEMENT AGENT. USDT. Document No. 5515. (USDT). 1968. 24 pp. Free. Discusses a
career as an investigator or agent with the Bureau of Customs or Narcotics, the Internal Revenue Service, or the
U.S. Secret Service. Gives essential background, training, opportunities, and salary information.

Interna! Revenue Service
*A CAREER AND A SENSE OF PURPOSE. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5282. (IRS). 1968.
24 pp. Free. Links academic interests to specific careers in the Internal Revenue Service. Outlines professional
training and executive development and gives educational requirements, salary, training, and promotion
opportunities for various IRS positions.
^CAREERS IN TAX WORK. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5402. (IRS). 1967. 14 pp. Free.
Describes opportunities in government and civilian tax accounting and points out the excellent employment
outlook for this field of work. Enumerates personal qualifications and educational requirements.
*

*

*

The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Internal Revenue Service also publishes a series of booklets that give
detailed information on specific career opportunities with the Service. Each booklet discusses necessary
employment qualifications, on-the-job activities, professional development, employment benefits, and policy and
directives.
^ECONOMISTS AND STATISTICIANS. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5947. (IRS). 1968. 12
pp. Free.
^INTERNAL AUDITOR. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5653. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free.
*TAX LAW SPECIALIST. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5549. (IRS). 1967. 12 pp. Free.
*THE ESTATE TAX EXAMINER. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5389. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp.
Free.
*THE REVENUE AGENT. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5027. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free.
*THE REVENUE OFFICER. USDT. Internal Revenue Service. Document No. 5028. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free.
*THE TAX TECHNICIAN. USDT. Document No. 5431. (IRS). 1968. 16 pp. Free.

U.S. Secret Service
^CRIMINAL INVESTIGATOR AND SUPERVISORY CRIMINAL INVESTIGATOR. USDT. United States Secret
Service. Criminal Investigating Series GS-1811. (SS). 1963. 12 pp. Free. Describes job opportunities in the U.S.
Secret Service. Presents information on education, training, physical requirements, and places to go for more
information.
*THE UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE. USDT. United States Secret Service. Leaflet. (SS). 1967. Free.
Contains information about the history, organization, and mission of the United States Secret Service as well as
information about the requirements for becoming a Secret Service Agent and the appointment procedure.




31

Veterans Administration
♦CAREERS IN AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING. VA. Pamphlet No. 31-1. (VA). 1966. 12 pp. Free. Discusses
the opportunities, requirements, training, and benefits of a career with the Veterans Administration, either as a
programer or analyst.
♦ENGINEERS AND ARCHITECTS IN THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION. VA. Pamphlet No. 05-15. (VA).
1965. 23 pp. Free. Presents the duties typical of three types of employment categories: planning and design,
construction supervision, and hospital engineering. Gives specifics, such as salary, training, and outlook.
♦MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIPS IN THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION. VA. Pamphlet No. 05-35. (VA).
1967. 12 pp. Free. Describes the many types of initial assignments available. Keys internships to academic
interests. Gives salary and eligibility requirements.
♦PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION. VA. Pamphlet No. 10-52. (VA). 1967. 11
pp. Free. Provides information on the duties, benefits, salary, and places to apply for a position as a practical
nurse.

F E D E R A L G O VER N M EN T JOBS O V ER S EA S
The Federal Government employs many workers outside the 50 States, in U.S. territories, and in foreign countries.
They work in a great variety of occupations. Some specific occupations include operating engineer, doctor, nurse,
teacher, geologist, mining engineer, meteorologist, clerk, stenographer, typist, and social worker.
♦A CAREER IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES. USDS. Booklet. (USDS). 1968. 27 pp.
Free. Presents career information on overseas assignments with both the Department of State and the U.S.
Information Agency. See page 30 for further annotation.
♦AMERICAN SOCIAL WORKERS ABROAD. USDHEW. Publication No. WA-5. 1964. 5 cents. Stresses the need
for American workers in developing countries and describes several types of foreign assignments. Discusses the
services maintained by the Welfare Administration to help social workers find satisfying overseas assignments.
♦FEDERAL JOBS OVERSEAS. USCSC. Pamphlet No. 29. 1965. 10 pp. 10 cents. Discusses Federal jobs overseas,
by employing agency. Explains ways jobs are filled, conditions of employment, training and skill requirements, and
salaries and benefits. Lists addresses to which job inquiries should be sent.
♦FOREIGN SERVICE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY. USIA.
Booklet. (USIA). 1968. Free. See page 30 for annotation.
♦NEW CAREERS IN INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURE. USDA. Pamphlet. (USDA). 1967. 14 pp. Free.
Discusses USDA involvement in international agriculture, and answers questions of a would be applicant with
regard to job and family aspects of a USDA position in international agriculture.
♦OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENT. USDS. Agency for International Development. Booklet. (AID). 1966. Free. See page
30 for annotation.
♦OVERSEAS OPPORTUNITIES FOR SECRETARIES. USDS. Booklet. (USDS). 1967. Free. Describes life in the
foreign service and the qualifications and conditions of employment. Gives information about entering on duty,
pay, and shipment of effects.
♦THE FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. USDA. Foreign Agricultural Service. (USDA).
1967. Free. Describes the purpose of this program and explains the duties of management development trainees in
the FAS. Also gives salary information and lists eligibility requirements.




32

*THE U.S. AGRICULTURAL ATTACHE-HIS HISTORY AND HIS WORK. USDA. Foreign Agricultural Service.
Booklet. (USDA). 1966. 10 pp. Free. Contains historical information on foreign agricultural representatives as well
as the events leading to the establishment of the Foreign Agricultural Service. Also describes the functions of the
agricultural attache and the requirements for this position.

The Peace Corps
♦PEACE CORPS FACTBOOK AND DIRECTORY. USDS. Peace Corps. (PC). 1968. 57 pp. Free. General
introduction to the Peace Corps, including its history, methods of selecting personnel, training programs, job
locations, and administrative policies.
The Peace Corps publishes pamphlets relating just about every facet of work or education relevant to positions in
the Corps. All can be obtained free of charge from the Peace Corps, Washington, D.C. 20525. Some examples are:
♦AGRICULTURE IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦BUSINESS SKILLS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦ENGINEERING IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦EXPERIENCED TEACHERS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦HEALTH PROFESSIONS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦HOME ECONOMISTS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦LABOR IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦LIBERAL ARTS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦MARRIED COUPLES IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHERS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦OLDER VOLUNTEERS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦REGISTERED NURSES IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦TEACHERS IN THE PEACE CORPS
♦WOMEN IN THE PEACE CORPS
*

*

*

The Peace Corps also publishes information booklets on the various parts of the world where assignments may be
obtained and the type of work and skills needed in those areas. Some examples are:
♦PEACE CORPS IN AFRICA
♦PEACE CORPS IN ASIA
♦PEACE CORPS IN THE FAR EAST
♦PEACE CORPS IN LATIN AMERICA




33

ED U CA TIO N , F IN A N C IA L A SSISTA N C E, AND PLA CEM EN T IN FO RM ATION
Education, Training, and Retraining
Lack of education and training is a basic factor in unemployment. Although steady gains in the educational
attainment and formal training of American workers have helped them meet the demands of rising job standards
and shifting occupational patterns, millions still lack basic education and preparation for work. Thus, in March
1967, more than 750,000 of the unemployed were high school dropouts, and almost 750,000 had finished 8 or
fewer years of school. These unemployed, because of their limited schooling, have difficulty not only in finding
new jobs but also in finding training opportunities.
Education and training requirements for employment are increasing steadily. Yet, about 30 percent of all youths
now drop out of school before finishing the twelfth grade. All aspects of the employment situation are less
favorable for school dropouts than for young people who have completed at least high school. For example, the
unemployment rate of school dropouts is much higher than that of high school graduates; dropouts have difficulty
in obtaining full-time work; the jobs they do get are among the less desirable; and their lack of education
handicaps them in acquiring training and adapting to technological and occupational changes.
Education and training problems affect manpower and the economy as a whole. Therefore, the Federal
Government has instituted a number of programs to help achieve a work force using the skills and flexibility
demanded in today’s world. These programs include, for example, Federal grants to supplement State and local
expenditures for vocational education and technical training; training institutes for science teachers and assistance
to medical and dental schools; fellowships for postgraduate work in the natural and social sciences, engineering,
and other professional fields; and inservice training for Federal civilian employees and the Armed Forces.
Congress has enacted legislation responsive to education and training needs. For example, the Manpower
Development and Training Act of 1962 and its amendments provide for education and training programs to equip
the unemployed and underemployed with marketable skills. Under the Trade Expansion Act of 1962, workers who
are laid off or working only part time because of increased imports resulting from tariff concessions are eligible for
retraining allowances and other financial aid. The Vocational Education Act of 1963 encourages States to establish
and expand vocational education programs to provide more students with occupational training and help upgrade
workers’ skills. The Higher Education Act of 1965 provides funds to help financially weak colleges and
universities; to give financial aid to students; and to improve the quality of undergraduate instruction. Under the
1963 amendments to the National Defense Education Act, the ceiling on Government loans to college students
was raised. These amendments also provide increased funds for school counseling and testing. Money was made
available to purchase a greater variety of teaching equipment in certain subject areas. In addition, the Economic
Opportunity Act of 1964 established programs to increase opportunities for youth to obtain education, vocational
training, and useful work experience.
The Department of Labor administers a number of manpower development programs, chiefly, the work-training
programs (Neighborhood Youth Corps, Job Corps, and others) provided by the Economic Opportunity Act; the
training activities under the Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962 (MDTA); and programs to promote
apprenticeship training.
The various measures taken by the Government generally are designed to strengthen education, training, and
retraining at all levels and for all groups. It is hoped that these measures lead to a long-run solution of the many
educational problems.
Information on these problems and programs is available in the publications listed below. (For appenticeship
information see page 53.)*
*EARN.. . LEARN . . . SERVE: THE NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS. USDL. Neighborhood Youth Corps.
(NYC). 1965. 18 pp. Free. Describes a work-training program which helps youths from 16 through 21 to stay in




34

school, return to school, or develop work habits if they are out of school and unemployed. Gives the requirements
for local sponsorship, and facts about the location, compensation, duration, and financing of the training.
EDUCATION AND TRAINING: EXPANDING THE CHOICES. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-87020. 1967.
107 pp. 60 cents. Fifth annual report of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to the Congress on
training activities under the Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962. Discusses such subjects as the
direction of training programs; types of programs; teachers; curriculum, methods, and materials; experimental and
demonstration projects; and project evaluation. See page 42 for further annotation.
EDUCATION ’67 - THE OFFICE OF EDUCATION - ITS PROGRAMS AND SERVICES. USDHEW. Office of
Education. OE-11006-67. 1967. 97 pp. 35 cents. See page 77 for annotation.
EDUCATION FOR A CHANGING WORLD OF WORK: REPORT OF A PANEL OF CONSULTANTS ON
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-80021. 1963. 269 pp. $1.25. Evaluates Federal,
State, and local vocational and technical education programs showing how well they meet the current and
anticipated education and training requirements of workers. Recommends program changes to cope with the
changing world of work. Includes an extensive bibliography.
“EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF WORKERS.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
February 1968, pp. 26-34. Special Labor Force Report 92. Reprint No. 2559. (BLS). Free. See page 73 for
annotation.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES. NASA. Educational Programs and Services. (NASA). 1965. 14 pp.
Free. Discusses public information programs on peaceful uses of space, including education workshops, institutes,
and traveling exhibits. Lists publications, motion pictures, and other programs and services for space education.
ELECTRONIC BUSINESS DATA PROCESSING PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT OCCUPATIONS-SUGGESTED
CURRICULA. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-86010. 1964. 113 pp. 70 cents. Contains information about the
design and objectives of a program to teach the necessary skills for computer related occupations such as
keypunching. Suggestions are provided for evaluating trainee achievements.
FEDERAL PROGRAMS IN JOB TRAINING AND RETRAINING. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-37012. 73
pp. 50 cents. Describes the major Federal job training and retraining programs available to potential trainees,
especially those with low income backgrounds.
FEDERAL TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAMS IN FIELDS OF THE DISADVANTAGED AND HANDICAPPED.
USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-35088. (OE). 1966. 18 pp. Free. Describes teacher training programs in the
fields of the disadvantaged and handicapped. Includes a list of general instructions for applicants.
FEDERALLY-ASSISTED MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA).
1966. 33 pp. Free. A study of Federal laws that provide for the support of job-oriented education and training to
prepare people for employment.
FORMAL OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING OF ADULT WORKERS. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower
Automation Research Monograph No. 2. (MA). 1964. 48 pp. Free. Analyzes the findings and implications of a
survey of vocational training backgrounds of workers between 22 and 64 “with less than 3 years” and “with 3 or
more” of college. Contains a statistical appendix.
GRADUATES OF PREDOMINANTLY NEGRO COLLEGES, CLASS OF 1964. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1571. 1967. 262 pp. 75 cents. An analysis of how the Negro graduate views his academic training,




35

his hopes for graduate study and employment, and his career aspirations. Findings demonstrate the potential for
more effective utilization of college-trained Negroes in health services and research. Includes a great deal of
statistical materials on the Negro student and graduate.
INDUSTRIAL RETRAINING PROGRAMS FOR TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE: A STUDY OF THE PERFORM­
ANCE OF OLDER WORKERS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1368. 1963. 34 pp. Out of print. See
page 59 for annotation.
JOB CORPS CONSERVATION CENTERS PROGRAM. USDA/USDI. Booklet. (USDA). 1966. 16 pp. Free.
Explains the purpose, objectives, and operation of Job Corps Conservation Centers. Intended as a guide for
teachers, youth workers, counselors, and neighborhood and community leaders.
*LEARN AND TRAIN FOR A JOB UNDER MDTA. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES). 1965. 10 pp.
Free. Tells about the Manpower Development and Training Act (MDTA) training programs and the opportunities
they offer. Lists the general qualifications and benefits for trainees and also some of the occupational skills for
which training programs are available.
MANPOWER AND TRAINING NEEDS OF THE FOOD SERVICE INDUSTRY. USDL. Manpower Administration.
(MA). 1964. 16 pp. Free. Reports on the highlights of a national conference concerned with the changing
occupational structure, and consequent training implications for the food service industry. Discusses the training
resources at hand, makes recommendations concerning various problems, and comments on future action.
MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT: A REVIEW OF TRAINING ACTIVITIES. USDL.
Manpower Administration. (MA). 1967. 22 pp. Free. Discusses the training activities of the Manpower
Development and Training Act, and briefly reviews its accomplishments from the program’s inception through
1966.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION, AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. See page 42 for annotation.
MANPOWER RESEARCH BULLETINS. USDL. Manpower Administration. Series of Reports on Training Needs.
(MA). 1963-1966. Free. See page 43 for annotation.
MDTA-A SUMMARY OF THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT OF 1962, AS AMENDED.
USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1966. 28 pp. Free. Summarizes the Manpower Development and Training
Act of 1962 afid its amendments.
MEETING THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGING SKILLS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1964. 18 pp.
20 cents. Shows how Manpower Development and Training Act programs operate at the local level. Discusses
community action, selection of trainees, courses of instruction and job placement. Lists shortage skills most
frequently taught under MDTA.
1963 DROPOUT CAMPAIGN, THE. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-20060. Bulletin 26. 1964. 34 pp. 20
cents. Summarizes and analyzes the results of a special summer campaign to prevent school dropouts. Some of the
topics covered are: types of programs; methods of contacting dropouts and potential dropouts; selected case
studies; reasons for dropping out; reactions to the summer campaign; and suggested future activities. Contains a
city-by-city campaign activity summary.
NURSE TRAINING ACT OF 1964. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No. 1154. (PHS). 1965. 10 pp.
Free. Summarizes the provisions of the Nurse Training Act of 1964.
ON-THE-JOB TRAINING PROGRAM, THE. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. (BAT). 1965. 23 pp.
Free. Describes on-the-job training carried out in industry. Explains how programs are sponsored, the selection of




36

trainees, and the breakdown of training by occupation. Furnishes information on training costs and results, what
the participants think of this training, and the reaction of management and other groups to on-the-job training
programs.
PARENT AND FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION FOR LOW-INCOME FAMILIES: A GUIDE FOR LEADERS.
USDHEW. Children’s Bureau. 1965. 66 pp. 30 cents. Discusses the problems resulting from lack of education in
low-income families and ways to overcome these problems. Contains a selected bibliography.
PILOT PROJECT IN TRAINING MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELORS. USDHEW. Public Health Service.
Publication No. 1254. Booklet. 1965. 34 pp. 30 cents. Presents the results of an experiment to train mature
married women for work in psychotherapy. Results indicate that married women are a good potential source of
supply to meet the shortage of manpower in the mental health counseling field.
*PLANNED TRAINING. . . YOUR FUTURE SECURITY. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training.
Pamphlet. (BAT). 1965. 10 pp. Free. See page 54 for annotation.
RECRUITMENT AND TRAINING OF AUTOMOBILE MECHANICS, THE. USDHEW. Welfare Administration.
Office of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Development. 1965. 19 pp. 15 cents. Discusses the problems of
recruiting and training automobile mechanics. Some of the topics covered are recruitment; wages; training; and
major problems and trends in recruitment and training.
RESIDENCY TRAINING IN PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND DENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH UNDER THE PUBLIC
HEALTH TRAINEESHIP PROGRAM. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Leaflet. (PHS). 1966. Free. Describes the
Public Health Traineeship Program as it relates to physicians or dentists who desire support of residency training in
general preventive medicine, preventive medicine-public health, and dental public health.
THE ACADEMICALLY TALENTED. USDHEW. Office of Education. School Life, March 1963, pages 9-12. 20
cents per copy. Compares courses studied and class rank of academically talented and average children in public
schools. Concludes that the majority of pupils are not performing as well as they are able.
TRAINEESHIPS FOR PROFESSIONAL HEALTH PERSONNEL UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH TRAINEESHIP
PROGRAM. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No. 1147. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Describes the
Public Health Traineeship Program. Under the Program, support is made available for graduate or specialized
training in public health for individuals who have completed their basic professional education, have been accepted
by a school offering graduate or specialized training in public health, and who plan to pursue a career in the field
of public health.
TRAINEESHIPS FOR REGISTERED NURSES UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH TRAINEESHIP PROGRAM.
USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No. 1269. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Describes the Public Health
Traineeship Program as it relates to support of undergraduate study for registered nurses to prepare them for
first-level positions in public health nursing.
TRAINING OF WORKERS IN AMERICAN INDUSTRY. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. (BAT).
1964. 94 pp. Free. Surveys formal training undertaken in American industry. Identifies the industries, trainees, and
programs involved, including totals. Lists training and apprenticeship programs by occupational group.
TRAINING PROGRAMS OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH. USDHEW. Public Health
Service. Publication No. 1283. Booklet. 1966. 24 pp. 20 cents. Gives training program information for mental
health professionals in psychiatry, psychology, psychiatric nursing, and psychiatric social work. Also includes
information on related National Institute of Mental Health supported training programs.
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION - TRAINING FOR YESTERDAY’S JOBS? USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA).
1966. 4 pp. Free. Discusses the gap between the study of a trade and future employment possibilities in that field.




37

*WHAT EVERY VETERAN SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING
ACT. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES). 1965. 4 pp. Free. Offers facts of interest to veterans about
the Manpower Development and Training Act. Contains a selected list of the occupations for which training is
available.
WORK FORCE ADJUSTMENTS TO TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security.
(BES). 1963. 62 pp. Free. Surveys the methods used by employers to cope with manpower problems arising from
technological change. Discusses company training programs, and the reassignment and relocation of workers.
*

*

*

The U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare’s Office of Education has published a series of reports
entitled “A Suggested Training Program f o r ...” which present suggested training programs for different
occupations. The reports give information on the development and promotion of vocational courses. They also
provide guidance in evaluating and upgrading existing training programs.
Suggested training programs are available for the following occupations:
CLOTHING MAINTENANCE SPECIALIST
COMPANION TO ELDERLY PERSON
FAMILY DINNER SERVICE SPECIALIST
FORESTRY AIDE
HIGHWAY ENGINEERING AIDE
HOMEMAKERS ASSISTANT
HOTEL AND MOTEL HOUSEKEEPING AIDE
LANDSCAPE AIDE
MANAGEMENT AIDE IN LOW RENT PUBLIC HOUSING PROJECTS
SUPERVISED FOOD SERVICE WORKER
VISITING HOMEMAKER
The above reports can be ordered through the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington, D.C. 20402.

Financial Assistance To Students
The costs of higher education prevent many gifted young people from attending college. At the same time,
modern technology is altering manpower requirements towards more education and training. To relieve this
problem, the Federal Government has developed an extensive program of scholarships, Government loans, and
Government insured private loans under the National Defense Education Act of 1958. Work-study programs are
provided by institutions of higher education under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, and outright grants to
exceptionally needy high school graduates are being made through the Educational Opportunity Grant Program
authorized by the Higher Education Act of 1965.




38

Some Federal Government agencies including the Atomic Energy Commission and the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration separately sponsor financial assistance programs for needy and gifted students, often in
conjunction with private groups. A vast number of private associations and institutions also give scholarships and
loans to deserving students.
A new program, set up under the Veterans’ Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966, authorizes aid up to 36 months
of college or other institutional training for veterans who have had military service since January 1, 1955.
The following are examples of publications that provide information on the financial assistance available to help
individuals achieve their educational goals:
AIDS TO STUDENTS. USDHEW. Office of Education. Booklet. (OE). 1966. 45 pp. Free. Provides information on
financial aids to students in vocational, college, and graduate study programs. Includes discussion of grants,
work-study programs, and student loans. Includes information on aids for specialized programs, such as health
careers, teaching, and social work.
COLLEGE AID FOR STUDENTS. USDHEW. Office of Program Analysis. 1965. 30 pp. 25 cents. Reveals the
trend in financial assistance offered by colleges from 1960 to 1964. Describes the work-study program for students
from low-income families.
FEDERAL AIDS TO COLLEGE STUDENTS. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-55001-67. Booklet. (OE). 1966.
56 pp. Free. A guide to the college student guaranteed loan program, the educational opportunity grants program,
the national defense student loan program, and the college work study program. Describes the programs, eligibility
standards, terms, and conditions; and lists sources of further information. Lists participating institutions for the
1966-67 school year.
FELLOWSHIPS IN NUCLEAR FIELDS. AEC. Division of Nuclear Education and Training. Leaflet. (AEC). 1965.
5 pp. Free. Presents brief accounts of Atomic Energy Commission sponsored fellowship programs in nuclear
science and engineering, health physics, industrial medicine, laboratory research, and post-doctoral studies. Gives
information on stipends and places to write for further information.
♦FINANCING A COLLEGE SCIENCE EDUCATION. NSF. Booklet. 1965. 20 pp. 15 cents. Gives information on
locating financial assistance and various government and private sources of financial aid to students. Includes a
bibliography.
GUARANTEED LOANS FOR YOUR COLLEGE EDUCATION. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-55043.
Brochure. (OE). 1966. Free. A guide to State and private nonprofit agency programs authorized by the Higher
Education Act of 1965. Answers specific questions about college loan programs. Lists assistance agencies and
sources of further information.
HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM, THE. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No.
1460. (PHS). 1967. Free. Describes scholarships designed to enable students to undertake the courses of study
required to become physicians, dentists, osteopaths, optometrists, pharmacists, or podiatrists. Selection, eligibility,
and other details of the program are discussed and information is given for obtaining further information and
application forms.
HEALTH PROFESSIONS STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM, THE. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No.
1347. Leaflet. (PHS). 1967. Free. Describes the Health Professions Student Loan Program. Informs prospective
students as to eligibility requirements, selection of loan recipients, amounts that may be borrowed, terms and
conditions of the loans, and where to obtain additional information.




39

NDEA . . . AT A GLANCE. USDHEW. Office of Education. Leaflet. 1965. 5 cents. Describes the National Defense
Education Act of 1958 and its extensions. Explains the different parts of the act and by whom it is administered.
*NURSING STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM. USDHEW. Public Health Service. Publication No. 1348. Leaflet. (PHS).
1967. Free. Describes the Nursing Student Loan Program. Informs prospective students as to eligibility
requirements, selection of loan recipients, amounts that may be borrowed, terms and conditions of the loans, and
where to obtain additional information.
SOCIAL SECURITY CASH BENEFITS FOR STUDENTS 18 to 22. USDHEW. Social Security Administration.
(SSA). 1966. 6 pp. Free. Explains provisions of 1965 Amendment to the Social Security Act. Tells how to judge
eligibility for assistance up to the age of 22, and presents criteria for eligibility.
TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS.
NSF. Leaflet No. E-65-C-17. (NSF). 1966. 6 pp. Free. Views four programs-summer institutes, academic year
institutes, in-service institutes, and research participation-that are conducted by colleges throughout the United
States for secondary school teachers. Discusses eligibility requirements, benefits, and application procedures.
VACATIONS ABROAD, COURSES, STUDY TOURS, WORK CAMPS. UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL,
SCIENTIFIC, AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS. Revised each year. (Request from U.N. Secretariat, New
York, New York 10017.) $1.75. Contains information on a variety of educational and cultural vacation activities
abroad, including summer schools and seminars, study tours, student and youth hotels, and summer camps. Gives
financial aid information. Written in English, French, and Spanish.

Job Placement Information
Many young people need assistance in securing employment or in choosing suitable work. The United States
Employment Service and affiliated State employment service offices form a nationwide organization which,
through trained employment counselors in 1900 local offices throughout the United States, finds jobs for workers
and workers for jobs. Young people who are now, or soon will be, looking for a job can obtain help through their
local State employment service office. Job placement help, counseling aid, and aptitude and proficiency testing are
provided free.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Employment Security and other Federal agencies publish information
designed to aid young people seeking jobs. Examples of this type of publication are listed below.
^CHOOSING YOUR OCCUPATION. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet. 1965. 16 pp. 15 cents.
Develops guidelines for choosing a vocation to fit the aptitudes and interests of the prospective worker. Lists other
possible sources of information for answers to some specific occupational questions.
GETTING HIRED, GETTING TRAINED. USDHEW. Welfare Administration. Booklet. 1965. 112 pp. 40 cents.
Discusses many of the training and experience problems faced by young workers.
*HOW TO GET AND HOLD THE RIGHT JOB. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1967. 19 pp. 10 cents.
Enumerates tips on getting and holding a job. Includes: Considering job requirements in light of the jobseekers
qualifications; how to prepare for an interview; how to write a letter of application; reasons people sometimes fail
to get jobs; and why workers lose their jobs.
*HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR JOB INTERVIEWS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet.
1965. 10 pp. 10 cents. Furnishes helpful hints on the preparation and conduct for job interviews.*
*JOB GUIDE FOR YOUNG WORKERS, 1963-64 Edition. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1963. 78 pp.
45 cents. See page 66 for annotation.




40

^LOOKING FOR SCIENTISTS, SOCIOLOGISTS, NURSES, SYSTEMS ENGINEERS, LIBRARIANS, ARCHI­
TECTS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet. (BES). 1966. 6 pp. Free. Describes the nationwide
public employment service that recruits professional personnel without charge to employer or applicant. Lists
occupations handled by and locations of professional network offices.
*MERCHANDISING YOUR JOB TALENTS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet. 1965. 20 pp. 25
cents. Presents some of the basic techniques and principles of preparing a job resume, and for writing a letter of
application. Lists sources of job information and gives hints on preparing for job interviews and testing.
PLACEMENT SERVICES FOR COLLEGE TEACHERS. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1965. 240 pp.
Free. Identifies and catalogues the different sources of college teacher placement assistance and explains the
services they offer. Gives detailed descriptions of the activities of some of the best placement operations.
*YOUR PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT OFFICE CAN SERVE YOU. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Leaflet.
(BES). 1965. 3 pp. Free. Reports on the various manpower services, such as testing and recruitment, which are
available at local public employment offices.




41

MANPOWER PROBLEM S AN D ISSUES
Unemployment and underemployment are two of the country’s major economic problems. Although we have
experienced rapid economic growth in recent years, we have not been able to improve the quality, adaptability,
and mobility of the labor force sufficiently to obtain full employment. Even today, in the midst of an economic
expansion, many workers cannot find employment or are forced to work at jobs that do not make full use of
their skills and abilities.
Underlying unemployment, underemployment, and other serious manpower problems have been factors such as, a
swelling labor force, rapid technological innovation, changes in defense requirements, and changes in consumer and
business demand for goods and services. These developments have altered occupational requirements in favor of
jobs requiring greater education and training. Employment in white-collar occupations has risen faster than in
manual occupations. Also, among both blue-collar and white-collar occupations, there has been a shift away from
jobs requiring relatively little skill.
Other factors contributing to imbalances in manpower supply and demand are the large number of youths who
lack the education necessary for a rewarding adult life; the unwillingness or inability of many workers to respond
quickly to employment opportunities and to adjust to changing job requirements; and the existence of serious
manpower shortages in some occupations while, at the same time, there is a large supply of unused manpower.
Also, developments such as the rapid growth in the number of young job seekers, along with technological and
other changes in skill requirements, indicate a long-term persistence of manpower problems.
Our basic manpower problems, as well as measures designed to alleviate them, are the focus of the publications
annotated in this section.
EDUCATION AND TRAINING: EXPANDING THE CHOICES. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-87020. 1967.
107 pp. 60 cents. Previews and evaluates the programs set up under the Manpower Development and Training Act
of 1962. Describes the characteristics of trainees, courses of instruction, training facilities, training costs,
experimental and demonstration projects, and related subjects. Discusses the need to continue the manpower
training program and steps that can be taken to make the program more effective. Includes a statistical appendix.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION, AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. Reports on the many factors affecting manpower requirements, resources, utilization, and training. Some
examples of the many topics covered are: Industry employment trends; employment gains in the regions and
States; Government and manpower requirements; manpower supply and demand; joblessness and poverty in urban
slums; underemployment and poverty in rural areas; unemployment and underutilization of manpower; skill
shortages and training needs; and much more. Includes an extensive statistical appendix. (Also available for 1963
through 1967).
MDTA: A SUMMARY OF THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT OF 1962, AS AMENDED.
USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1965. 28 pp. Free. Analyzes the provisions of the Manpower
Development and Training Act and briefly describes the research and training activities undertaken since the act
was passed.
QUIET REVOLUTION, THE. OEO. 2d. Annual Report. (OEO). 1966. 137 pp. Free. Reports on the progress
made in implementation of the programs established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to eliminate the
causes of poverty. Discusses the development of such programs as Job Corps, Neighborhood Youth Corps, Project
Head Start, College Work-Study, Adult Basic Education, Legal Services, Rural Loans, and programs for Indians and
migrants. Contains an appendix of statistics on the various programs.
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND MANPOWER NEEDS. USDL. Manpower Administration. Reprint No. 5. (MA).
1964. 4 pp. Free. Describes the purpose of the Vocational Educational Act of 1963 and the importance of
integrating it with the various programs of the Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, and Welfare.




*

*

42

*

Manpower Research Bulletins, published by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Manpower Administration, develop
information on the country’s manpower situation. Several of the bulletins provide research data on worker
mobility in view of economic changes, and on manpower and training programs and their implications on the
national and State level. Other bulletins provide training information for specific groups in the labor force.
Descriptive profiles, training activities, job placement, and future employment possibilities are usually included in
the reports on each group.
MANPOWER RESEARCH BULLETINS:
No. 1 Mobility and Worker Adaptation to Economic Change in the United
States.

(MA).

1963.

Free.

No. 2

Manpower and Training—
Trends, Outlook, Programs.

(MA).

1963.

Free.

No. 3

Young Workers: Their Special Training Needs.

(MA).

1963.

Free.

No. 4

Selected Manpower Indicators for States.

(MA).

1963.

Free.

No. 5

Family Breadwinners: Their Special Training Needs.

(MA).

1964.

Free.

No. 6

The Mentally Retarded: Their Special Training Needs.

(MA).

1964.

Free.

No. 7 Training Foreign Nationals for Employment with U.S. Companies in
Developing Countries: Implications for Domestic Programs.

(MA).

1965.

Free.

No. 8

Training Needs in Correctional Institutions.

(MA).

1966.

Free.

No. 9

Training in Service Occupations.

(MA).

1966.

Free.

No. 10 Unused Manpower: The Nation’s Loss.

(MA).

1966.

Free.

No. 11 Manpower Policy and Programs in Five Western European Countries.

(MA).

1966.

Free.

No. 12 Technology and Manpower in Design and Drafting, 1965-75. See page
12 for annotation.

(MA).

1966.

Free.

No. 13 Technology and Manpower in the Telephone Industry, 1965-75. See
page 18 for annotation.

(MA).

1966.

Free.

No. 14 Technology and Manpower in the Health Service Industry, 1965-75.
See page 18 for annotation.

(MA).

1967.

Free.

No. 15 Sheltered Workshops: A Pathway to Regular Employment.

(MA).

1967.

Free.

Defense Expenditures and Manpower Needs
Expenditures for national defense generate a large volume of employment. More than 8.7 million persons were
employed in defense-related activities in early 1967. More than half of these workers were directly employed by
the Federal Government—
about 3.4 million military personnel and over 1.2 million civilians in the Defense
Department. Nearly 4.1 million workers were employed in defense-related industries supplying missiles, research
and development, and other goods and services.




43

Shifts in the size and types of defense programs can influence overall economic activity. For example, the
increased importance of missiles has resulted in the need for additional thousands of scientists, engineers, and
technicians, in some cases aggravating already short supplies. Changes in defense programs have a marked impact in
States and communities where defense-related employment is a large proportion of total employment. The
termination of defense contracts often creates pools of unemployment in these areas.
The Federal Government has established various programs to help counteract the employment effects of changing
defense requirements. For example, the Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962 and its amendments
encourage business firms to establish facilities in areas of high unemployment. Defense expenditures can be used as
a tool to reduce unemployment; under certain conditions, plants in areas of high unemployment may receive
special consideration in the awarding of contracts.
EMPLOYMENT EFFECT OF DEFENSE EXPENDITURES, THE. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly
Labor Review, September 1967, pp. 9-16. Single copy 75 cents, subscription $7.50 a year. Estimates employment
by industry, generated by defense expenditures in fiscal years 1965 and 1967, and that factor of employment in
1967 that might be attributed to the Viet Nam buildup.
LISTS OF CURRENTLY CRITICAL OCCUPATIONS AND CURRENTLY ESSENTIAL ACTIVITIES. USDL.
Bureau of Employment Security, (joint release, USDC and USDL). No. E-129. (BES). 1965. 13 pp. Free. Explains
standards for determining essential activities and critical occupations. Lists and describes currently essential
activities and currently critical occupations.
*“MILITARY SERVICE: OBLIGATION OR OPPORTUNITY.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational
Outlook Quarterly, September 1963, pp. 7-13. 30 cents per copy. Explains why military service is both an
obligation and an opportunity. Discusses some common misconceptions about military service.
“WORKER SKILLS IN CURRENT DEFENSE EMPLOYMENT.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly
Labor Review, September 1967, pp. 17-20. Single copy 75 cents, subscription $7.50 a year. Estimates the work
skills required in civilian defense-related employment in 1965 and 1967, and the changes that took place during
this period. Provides information for 53 occupations, primarily in the professional and blue-collar fields.

U N ITED S T A T E S A IR FO R CE
^PILOTS AND NAVIGATORS STAND TALL ON THE AEROSPACE TEAM. (USAF). 1966. 16 pp. Free. See
page 26 for annotation.
*UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRMAN OCCUPATIONAL HANDBOOK. (USAF). 1966. 44 pp. Free. See page
26 for annotation.
^UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OCCUPATIONAL HANDBOOK. (USAF). 1964. 200 pp. Free. See page 26 for
annotation.
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OFFICER TRAINING SCHOOL. (USAF). 1966. 5 pp. Free. See page 26 for
annotation.

U N ITED S T A T E S AR M Y
*THE SECRET OF GETTING AHEAD. Booklet. (USA). 1966. 38 pp. Free. See page 26 for annotation.
*U.S. ARMY OPPORTUNITIES—
HANDBOOK FOR COUNSELORS AND STUDENTS. Booklet. (USA). 1966. 43
pp. Free. See page 26 for annotation.




44

U N ITED S T A T E S CO A ST GU ARD
♦THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD: A CAREER SERVICE. Pamphlet No. CG-153. (1-64). (USCG). 1964.
25 pp. Free. See page 26 for annotation.
♦UNITED STATES COAST GUARD ACADEMY. Bulletin of Information. (USCG). Annual. Free. See page 26 for
annotation.

U N ITED S T A T E S N A V Y
♦EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN THE NAVY. (USN). 1965. 4 pp. Free. See page 26 for annotation.
♦NAVY ENLISTED OCCUPATIONAL HANDBOOK. (USN). 1966. 136 pp. Free. See page 26 for annotation.
♦NAVY OFFICER’S CAREERS HANDBOOK. (USN). 1964. 7 pp. Free. See page 26 for annotation.

U N ITED S T A T E S M ARINE CORPS
♦BUILDING OF A MARINE AVIATOR, THE. (USMC). 1963. 29 pp. Free. See page 26 for annotation.
♦GUIDE TO OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALITIES AND SCHOOLS, A. (USMC). 1966. 48 pp. Free. See page 26 for
annotation.

Depressed Areas
Since World War II, economic growth and employment have lagged in some areas. Shifts in consumer demand,
technological change, depletion of natural resources, and outmigration of industrial plants have created pockets of
poverty. Often, these depressed areas are relatively small communities that are heavily dependent upon one
industry, and offer little diversity of employment opportunities. Provisions of the Manpower Development and
Training Act of 1962 seek to aid areas of high unemployment by encouraging firms to locate plants in these areas
and by training unemployed workers to fill existing vacancies and anticipated new jobs. The Public Works and
Economic Development Act of 1965 is designed to help communities, areas, and regions in the United States
which are suffering from excessive unemployment or underemployment. Administered by the U.S. Department of
Commerce, Economic Development Administration, the act provides for financial and technical assistance needed
to create new jobs. (SEE ALSO: Education, Training, and Retraining, page 34.)
APPALACHIA-REBIRTH OF A REGION. USDL. Manpower Administration. Reprint No. 6. (MA). 1965. 4 pp.
Free. Surveys the general plan for redevelopment of Appalachia and emphasizes human resource development
through various training programs.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION: BUILDING COMMUNITIES WITH JOBS. USDC. Economic
Development Administration. Leaflet. (EDA). 1966. 5 pp. Free. Describes the economic characteristics of
depressed areas and the Economic Development Administration programs which aim for growth and stability.
Identifies the assistance available to redevelopment areas, districts, and regions.
FACTS ABOUT EDA: PUBLIC WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 1965. USDC. Economic
Development Administration. Leaflet. (EDA). 1965. 4 pp. Free. Summarizes the five titles of the Public Works and
Economic Development Act of 1965. Discusses the types of assistance, funds authorized, and applicant eligibility.
HARD-CORE UNEMPLOYMENT AND POVERTY IN LOS ANGELES. USDC. Economic Development Admin­
istration. Book No. C 46. 2: L89. 1965. 602 pp. $2.75. Examines various social and economic factors to ascertain
whether a program of economic redevelopment could effectively reduce unemployment in the central section of




45

Los Angeles. Surveys the people and problems of the area; the potential for redevelopment; poverty and other
social problems in the area; land use for private enterprise; and job opportunities for the unemployed. Provides a
comprehensive profile on the characteristics, problems, and attitudes of the unemployed and underemployed. The
book concludes with a series of special reports on Watts, Avalon Central, and other specific communities; on the
retail food trade in the study area; and on assistance from local public service agencies.
“JOBLESSNESS AND POVERTY IN URBAN SLUMS.” A Reprint from the 1967 Manpower Report of the
President. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1967. 18 pp. Free. Discusses unemployment and subemploy­
ment among slum dwellers; obstacles which bar them from employment; and some of the new programs which are
attacking these problems.
POPULATION, LABOR FORCE & UNEMPLOYMENT IN CHRONICALLY DEPRESSED AREAS. USDC.
Economic Development Administration. Pamphlet No. ARA-11. 1964. 48 pp. 20 cents. Focuses on the
composition of the population, labor force participation, and some key characteristics of the structure of
unemployment in depressed areas. Considers policy implication for area redevelopment programs.

Labor Standards
Legal statutes relating to minimum wage, overtime pay, hours of work, length of workday, minimum age for
employment, accident compensation, working conditions, social security, unemployment insurance, and more
recently discriminatory hiring practices, have been enacted to protect the health, wages, general welfare, and rights
of workers. These laws cover groups in the economy such as women, children, Negroes, and farmworkers, who
have, in the past, encountered some difficulty in maintaining either their position or rights as workers.
In 1961, Congress amended the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to raise minimum wages and extend the
coverage of minimum wage and overtime pay laws to new industries, including retail trade. A 1966 amendment
extended coverage to some farmworkers. Another recent amendment, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, requires that
men and women receive equal pay for equal work. Other legislation applicable to women covers minimum wage,
maximum daily and weekly hours, nightwork, meal periods, and industrial homework. The Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission, appointed according to the Civil Rights Act, became effective in July 1965, and has
moved to eliminate discriminatory practices by employers, unions, and employment offices. Also, there are child
labor laws that restrict the kinds of work young people may do, and the number of hours they may work while
school is in session. In addition to Federal labor laws, many State laws are designed to protect the standards of
work and rights of employees.
Workers dealing with life, health, safety, general welfare, and property usually are required to be licensed. For
example, professional workers, such as physicians, dentists, pharmacists, teachers, and certified public accountants,
must be licensed. In addition, workers in more than 100 nonprofessional occupations such as optician, plumber,
beautician, and well driller, require licenses in one State or more. Licensing requirements differ by State according
to training, experience, and age.
AGRICULTURE AND THE CHILD LABOR REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT,
AS AMENDED IN 1966. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions. Child Labor Bulletin 102.
(WHPC). 1968. Free. Question-and-answer summary of the Fair Labor Standards Act Amendments of 1966 as they
apply to child labor in agriculture.
COVERAGE OF AGRICULTURAL WORKERS UNDER STATE AND FEDERAL LABOR LAWS. USDL. Bureau
of Labor Standards. Bulletin 264. (LSB). 1964. 27 pp. Free. See page 52 for annotation.
EMPLOYMENT CERTIFICATES. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Leaflet No. 9. (LSB). 1964. Free. Briefly
describes how certificates protect young workers and employers; gives information on how and where they may be
obtained.




46

EMPLOYMENT OF STUDENT-LEARNERS. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions. Publication
No. 1007. (WHPC). 1964. Free. Explains how the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 pertains to students in
school. Contains reprint of title 29, part 52 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
FEDERAL LABOR LAWS AND PROGRAMS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Bulletin 262. 1964. 180 pp. 55
cents. Summarizes in the form of a layman’s guide, the main provisions of important Federal labor laws and
programs applicable to workers in private employment. Some of the topics covered are wages, hours, and working
conditions; social security; job training; education; and veterans reemployment and training rights.
FOR THE JOB YOU CHOOSE WILL YOU NEED A LICENSE? USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational
Outlook Quarterly, May 1963, pp. 9-14. Reprint. (OOS). Free. Discusses purpose and prevalance of licensing
requirements. Lists many occupations that require a license or certificate. Includes a selected bibliography.
GUIDE TO CHILD-LABOR PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT, A. USDL. Wage and Hour
and Public Contracts Divisions. Publication No. 1096. 1964 30 pp. 15 cents. Summarizes the provisions of the Fair
Standards Act of 1938 that relate to child labor.
HANDY REFERENCE GUIDE TO THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public
Contracts Divisions. Publication No. 1122. (WHPC). 1965. 13 pp. Free. Summarizes the Fair Labor Standards Act
of 1938 as amended. Defines some of the terms used and explains provisions of the act. Covers topics such as
previously covered employment, exemptions from the minimum wage, overtime provisions, and computation of
overtime pay.
HOUSING FOR MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS: LABOR CAMP STANDARDS. USDL. Bureau of
Labor Standards. Bulletin 235. 1962. 112 pp. 50 cents. See page 53 for annotation.
HOW THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OPERATES IN “OUR TOWN.” USDL. Wage and Hour and Public
Contracts Divisions. Publication No. 1106. (WHPC). 1965. Free. Explains which workers, in a typical small town,
would be covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.
INFORMATION ON THE EQUAL PAY ACT OF 1963. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions.
Publication No. 1104. 1965. (WHPC). 10 pp. Free. Outlines the types of jobs to which the equal pay provisions
apply; the meaning of “equal pay” and “equal work;” and what action can be taken by a person who has a
question regarding the applicability of the equal pay standards.
KNOW YOUR EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet. (BES). 1966. 9 pp.
Free. Provides a guide to equal employment opportunity rights. Comments on employment programs, job finding,
and methods of reporting discrimination in programs administered by the Department of Labor.
LABOR LAWS, THEIR EFFECT ON PLACEMENT. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational Outlook
Quarterly, May 1963, pp. 25-29. Reprint. (OOS). Free. Discusses the influence of labor laws on the placement of
youth. Designed to assist counselors in the placement process.
MESSAGE TO YOUNG WORKERS ABOUT THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT. USDL. Wage and Hour and
Public Contracts Divisions. Publication No. 1105. (WHPC). 1964. Free. Briefly highlights the minimum age
provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. Describes job and hour limitations for 14 and 15 year-old
minors, hazardous occupations for which 18 is the minimum age, and exemptions provided under the act.
REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES WHO PERFORM DUTIES IN THE ARMED FORCES.
USCSC. Pamphlet No. 51. 1968. 7 pp. 5 cents. Relates the qualifying conditions, rights, and benefits for
reemployment of Federal employees after active military duty. Covers such topics as seniority, insurance, veterans
preference, and reemployment appeals.




47

RIGHTS OF PENSION PLAN PARTICIPANTS. USDL. Labor Management Services Administration. Pamphlet.
(LMSA). 1965. 13 pp. Free. Discusses the provisions of the Welfare and Pension Plans Disclosure Act. Explains
worker’s rights concerning retirement plans. Knowing the provisions and financial operation, examining the
principal office, and receiving the plan’s description and latest financial report are included. Makes suggestions for
implementing the provisions of a pension plan and collecting benefits.
RIGHTS OF UNION MEMBERS. USDL. Labor Management Services Administration. (LMSA). 1965. 9 pp. Free.
Explains the rights which various provisions of the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959
assure union members. Some topics covered are freedom of speech and assembly, safeguards against arbitrary
discipline, right to democratic union elections, right to sue to protect union funds, and freedom from discipline
for exercising rights.
SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public
Contracts Divisions. Publication No. 1110. (WHPC). 1964. 8 pp. Free. Presents highlights of the Fair Labor
Standards Act of 1938, as amended. Contains a bibliography of nontechnical information about the act.
STANDARDS FOR GOOD DAY-HAND PRACTICES. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Leaflet. (LSB). 1964. 6
pp. Free. States the case in favor of responsible labor standards for farmworkers. Suggests standards for
transportation, health, safety, management, and wage practices.
STATE CHILD LABOR STANDARDS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Bulletin 158. 1965. 399 pp. $1.25.
Consists of a State by State summary of the major State child labor and school attendance laws. Gives, in detail,
the provisions of State child labor laws, rulings, and regulations prohibiting the employment of minors in
hazardous occupations.
SUMMARY OF THE STATE LABOR LAWS FOR WOMEN, AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1963. USDL. Women’s
Bureau. (WB). 1964. 13 pp. Free. A summary of State laws relating to the employment of women. Covers
minimum wages, equal pay, hours of work, maternity leave, and other subjects.
TEENAGERS CAN BE HIRED. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. (LSB). 1965. 2 pp. Free. Summarizes, by age
group, the types of work for which employers can hire youths under child labor laws. Includes information about
employment certificates. Lists reference sources for obtaining additional information.
WHAT CREW LEADERS AND CONTRACTORS OF FARM WORKERS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT CHILD
LABOR IN AGRICULTURE UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public
Contracts Divisions. Leaflet. (WHPC). 1963. Free. Discusses farm employment, during school hours, of children
under 16 years of age.
WHAT IS REQUIRED UNDER THE LAW. USDL. Labor Management Services Administration. Pamphlet.
(LMSA). 1965. 13 pp. Free. Describes, in general, the provisions of the Labor-Management Reporting and
Disclosure Act of 1959. Sets forth certain basic rights for union members. Lists certain financial and administrative
reports that labor organizations and employers are required to make to protect workers. Discusses rules for
democratic union elections, and safeguards for union members.

Technological Change
Technological change promises many social and economic advances including higher standards of living, better
working conditions, and more leisure time. Advancing technology already has given rise to new industries and new
jobs, and has relieved men of much heavy physical labor and much dangerous and repetitive work. However, these
benefits have not been without cost. Although total employment has reached new peaks, unemployment and
underemployment continue to be serious problems.




48

Responsibility for trying to reduce the burdens imposed by technological change falls upon employers, workers
and their representatives, and government. Recognizing their responsibility, all groups have acted to alleviate the
hardships caused by technological progress. For example, some business firms have established personnel policies
that call for the reassignment or retraining of displaced workers. Recent labor-management agreements provide for
early retirements, lump sum severance pay, and relocation allowances. In addition, Congress has enacted legislation
to provide for the training and retraining of workers. Examples of such legislation are: the Manpower
Development and Training Act of 1962, as amended; the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964; and the Vocational
Act of 1963.
AMERICA’S INDUSTRIAL AND OCCUPATIONAL MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS, 1964-75. The Outlook for
Technological Change and Employment, pp. 9-187. Appendix volume 1 of the report by the National Commission
on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress. Study prepared for the National Commission by the USDL.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1966. 373 pp. $2.25. Industry and occupation sections contain a discussion of changes
in technology and implications for employment changes. See page 11 for complete annotation.
AUTOMATION. USDL. The President’s Advisory Committee on Labor-Management Policy. (CLMP). 1962. 11 pp.
Free. Reports on the benefits and problems resulting from technological advances. Recommends private and
governmental programs to reduce unemployment without sacrificing high rates of technological change or human
values.
CASE STUDIES OF DISPLACED WORKERS: EXPERIENCES OF WORKERS AFTER LAYOFF. USDL. Bureau
of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1408. 1964. 94 pp. 50 cents. Summarizes the findings from five case studies of the
effects of plant shutdowns or large-scale layoffs related in part to technological change. Each summary covers the
causes of displacement; labor market conditions at that time; measures taken to prevent displacement and help
workers find jobs; the characteristics of the displaced workers; their job hunting experiences; and some job effects
of displacements. The plants studied were in petroleum refining; iron foundries; and automotive equipment, glass
jars, and floor covering manufacturing.
IMPACT OF OFFICE AUTOMATION IN THE INSURANCE INDUSTRY. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Bulletin 1468. 1966. 71 pp. 45 cents. Covers the extent and pace of office automation from 1954-63, caused by
the introduction of electronic computers into insurance companies. Describes changes in occupational structure
and occupational employment now and for the next decade, and trends in office productivity.
IMPLICATIONS OF AUTOMATION AND OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS: A SELECTED
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1319-1. 1963. 90 pp. Out of print.
See page 78 for annotation.
INDUSTRIAL RETRAINING PROGRAMS FOR TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE, A STUDY OF THE PERFORM­
ANCE OF OLDER WORKERS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1368. 1963. 34 pp. Out of print. See
page 59 for annotation.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION, AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. See page 42 for annotation.
RECENT COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Report 266. (BLS). 1964. 14 pp. Free. Summarizes some collective bargaining approaches to problems of reduced
income and job security arising from technological change. Illustrates approaches to reducing the impact of
technological change on income and job security.
TECHNOLOGICAL TRENDS IN MAJOR AMERICAN INDUSTRIES. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin
1 4 7 4 . 1966. 269 pp. $1.50. Appraises some of the major technological changes emerging among American




49

industries and projects the impact of those changes over the next 5 to 10 years. Major topics covered are
technological change, productivity, and employment.
TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER IN DESIGN AND DRAFTING, 1965-75. USDL. Manpower Administration.
Manpower Research Bulletin 12. (MA). 1966. 39 pp. Free. See page 12 for annotation.
TRAINING IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE: SEMINAR ON MANPOWER POLICY
AND PROGRAMS. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1966. 25 pp. Free. Presents a condensed transcript of
a manpower seminar on the importance of up-to-date vocational training. Suggests changes in the relationship
among educators, employment service personnel, and businessmen.
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION - TRAINING FOR YESTERDAY’S JOBS? USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA).
1966. 4 pp. Free. See page 37 for annotation.
WORK FORCE ADJUSTMENTS TO TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security.
(BES). 1963. 62 pp. Free. See page 38 for annotation.
WORKING WITH AUTOMATION. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1967. 34 pp. Free. Report of a
seminar which discusses the impact of automation on American manpower.

Worker Mobility
The efficient allocation of labor depends on both occupational and geographic mobility. In recent years, there
have been substantial changes in the occupational distribution of employment and in job requirements. Yet, the
labor force has met this problem without any major difficulties. A rising educational level has been the major
force behind the rapid and successful adjustment of the labor force to changing occupational requirements.
Nevertheless, for many individuals occupational mobility is limited by the lack of adequate education and the
inability to acquire the necessary skills. Geographic mobility is restricted by lack of information and by the
inability of jobseekers to finance transportation, job search, and change of residence. Moreover, the mobility of
workers is limited by job discrimination against minority group members and the nontransferability of pension and
seniority rights from job to job.
The Federal Government is sponsoring studies to aid in the development of policies to increase worker mobility
while preserving the traditional right of workers to choose their own employment. An amendment to the
Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962 (MDTA) authorizes the Secretary of Labor to carry out a
number of labor mobility projects designed to assess the feasibility of relocation assistance (grants or loans) in
reducing unemployment.
“GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY AND EMPLOYMENT STATUS,” March 1962-March 1963. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Special Labor Force Report 44. Reprint No. 2443. (BLS). Free. Studies the extent to which
unemployed workers pull up stakes and move to another community, and how this compares with the geographic
movement of the employed.
MANPOWER REPORT: JOB CHANGING AND MANPOWER TRAINING. USDL. Manpower Report 10. (MA).
1964. 8 pp. Free. Discusses the meaning of newly derived statistics on job turnover. Gives reasons for job changes
and reviews related training needs, especially for middle-age men.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. See page 42 for annotation.
“OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY OF EMPLOYED WORKERS.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor
Review, June 1967, pp. 31-38. Special Labor Force Report 84. Reprint No. 2531. (BLS). Free. Provides




50

information on occupational mobility of persons 18 years of age and over between January 1965 and January
1966. Examines the extent of occupational mobility and the direction of the occupational shifts. Assesses the
effects of demographic, social, and economic factors on occupational mobility.
OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY THROUGH MDTA TRAINING. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower
Evaluation Report E-2. (MA). 1964. 9 pp. Free. Discusses mobility patterns by occupational group, and evaluates
the extent to which training programs under the Manpower Development and Training Act are meeting the needs
of unemployed and underemployed persons.
WHY WOMEN START AND STOP WORKING. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Special Labor Force Report 59.
Reprint No. 2576. (BLS). 1965. Free. Provides insight into the attitudes and motives which influence women’s
decisions to participate in or withdraw from the labor force.




51

SP E C IA L GROUPS IN TH E LABO R FO R CE
Agricultural Migrants
Migrant agricultural workers-numbering about 400,000 in recent years-are an economically and socially
handicapped group. Their incomes are small and their work is seasonal. Most migrant workers are required to pay
their own travel and living expenses while they are away from home. The availability of work when they reach
their destination often is uncertain, as are their wage rates and the duration of work. Generally, they are not
covered by laws providing for unemployment insurance, or the right to bargain collectively with their employers.
In addition, migrant workers-with their low levels of education and training-seldom qualify for nonfarm jobs.
The special problems of migratory farmworkers recently have been the focus of attention by Federal, State, and
local governments. In 1966, the Office of Economic Opportunity approved grants to 76 agencies operating in 35
States for education, day-care, housing, and sanitation projects for migrant and seasonal farmworkers.
Approximately 150,000 farmworkers benefited from these programs. In addition, many adult education programs
have been organized under which farmworkers receive a stipend while attending classes, thus equipping them for
additional job training programs and better paying jobs.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Service has expanded its Annual Worker Plan. Under this program,
workers, employers, and employment service officers attempt to regulate and maximize migrant worker
employment and plan their work schedules in the most beneficial manner. Under the Smaller Communities
Program of the Employment Service, detailed information is collected on the manpower resources of rural
communities in 18 States. This program offers employment services to sparsely populated areas which cannot
support a permanent office, develops training proposals, and provides placement and counseling services. The Farm
Labor Service also is experimenting with counseling, training, and relocation programs for rural workers.
AGRICULTURE AND THE CHILD LABOR REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT,
AS AMENDED IN 1966. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions. Child Labor Bulletin 102.
(WHPC). 1968. Free. See page 46 for annotation.
*C OVERAGE OF AGRICULTURAL WORKERS UNDER STATE AND FEDERAL LABOR LAWS. USDL.
Bureau of Labor Standards. Bulletin 264. (LSB). 1964. 27 pp. Free. Contains a series of maps and brief
discussions which show how 10 major labor laws apply to migrant and agricultural workers in general, as well as
those in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.
“FARM LABOR SERVICE - PROGRESS AND PROSPECTS.” USDL. Bureau of Employment Security.
Employment Security Review, January 1963. pp. 1-68. 20 cents. Included in the January issue are a number of
articles concerning agricultural migrant workers; examples are “Migrants are People,” “What Migrant Farmworkers
Expect from Employers,” and “Education for Children of Migrants.”
FARMWORKERS. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1966. 28 pp. Free. Surveys and makes recommenda­
tions regarding the employment conditions, employment requirements, income, job training, and community
development of farmworkers. Contains specific information on migrating farmworkers, earnings of hired
farmworkers, reduction in employment of foreign workers, and intensified domestic recruitment programs.
FROM THE FIELDS TO THE CLASSROOM: AN EXPERIMENT IN MIGRANT WORKER DEVELOPMENT.
USDL. Manpower Administration. Reprint No. 8. (MA). 1965. 4 pp. Free. Examines an experimental Manpower
Development and Training Act project that was intended to train culturally deprived unemployed heads of families
from the migratory work force. Discusses project formation, recruitment, counseling, job placement, and usefulness
of this project as a guide for starting new ones.
HIRED FARMWORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES). 1964. 38
pp. Free. Contains sections on the work settings of hired farmworkers, their numbers, characteristics, employment




52

patterns, wage rates, and earnings. Reviews the special problems of migratory U.S. farmworkers and foreign
contract workers.
HOUSING FOR MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS: LABOR CAMP STANDARDS. USDL. Bureau of
Labor Standards. Bulletin 235. 1962. 112 pp. 50 cents. Provides detailed information on State laws and
regulations relating to migrant agricultural housing, including coverage and administration, site and physical
facilities, and sanitary facilities. Discusses voluntary State and county standards.
INFORMATION ABOUT INSURANCE FOR INTERSTATE FARM LABOR CONTRACTORS. USDL. Bureau of
Employment Security. Leaflet. (BES). 1966. 3 pp. Free. Advises the migrant worker of his travel insurance rights
and coverage under the Farm Labor Contractor Registration Act.
*MAJOR AGRICULTURAL MIGRANT LABOR DEMAND AREAS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security.
Booklet. (BES). 1965. 14 pp. Free. Consists of a series of monthly maps that show major crop production centers
where migratory agricultural workers usually are employed.
MIGRANT AND THE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ACT, THE. OEO. Leaflet. (OEO). 1965. 5 pp. Free. Gives
examples of migrant assistance programs that provide for housing, sanitation, education, day-care, counseling, and
training. Presents information on how to apply for assistance.
STATE COMMITTEES ON SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL LABOR: THEIR ORGANIZATION AND PRO­
GRAMS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Bulletin 274. (LSB). 1965. 72 pp. Free. Provides a look at labor
committees which were organized in 28 States to conduct action programs for service to agricultural workers,
particularly the domestic migrant. Gives a State by State breakdown of the Committee membership, activities,
publications, and methods of financing. Lists related Federal legislation and agencies that are sources of further
information.
TERMINATION OF THE BRACERO PROGRAM: SOME EFFECTS ON FARM LABOR AND MIGRANT
HOUSING NEEDS. USDA. Economic Research Service. Agricultural Economic Report 77. (USDA). 1965. 29 pp.
Free. Deals with the termination of Public Law 78, which permitted the entry of foreign farmworkers. Reviews
the history, composition, and size of the supplemental farm work force in 1963, and estimates the replacement
labor needed. Studies the migrant housing problems resulting from the termination of the bracero program.
WELCOME STRANGER-GOODBYE FRIEND: A GUIDE TO COMMUNITY EFFORTS TO IMPROVE CONDI­
TIONS FOR AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Bulletin 258. (LSB). 1964. 14
pp. Free. Outlines the organization of a community program to meet the needs of migrant workers. Lists the State
and Federal agencies concerned with agricultural migrants. Contains a bibliography of reference materials.
WHAT CREW LEADERS AND CONTRACTORS OF FARM WORKERS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT CHILD
LABOR IN AGRICULTURE UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public
Contracts Divisions. Leaflet. (WHPC). 1963. Free. See page 48 for annotation.

Apprentices
Apprenticeship is training for those occupations, commonly known as skilled crafts or trades, that require a wide
and diverse range of skills and knowledge, as well as extensive work experience. There are about 400
apprenticeable occupations, representing 90 trades.
Training for craftsmanship under apprenticeship programs is based largely upon on-the-job practice under the
supervision of a skilled journeyman. Such training is often combined with classroom instruction in the practical
and theoretical aspects of a trade. Apprenticeship provides a job and, at the same time, a long-term training
program. The duration of apprenticeships generally ranges from 2 to 6 years, depending upon the complexities of
the skills involved.
53



Only a small proportion of young persons currently are being trained in apprenticeship programs. At the end of
1966, about 208,000 apprentices were covered by programs registered by the Department of Labor or cooperating
State agencies. Three major trade groups accounted for more than 85 percent of the registered apprentices.
Fifty-nine percent were in the building trades (in the construction industry and elsewhere), almost 22 percent in
the metal trades, and 6 percent in the printing trades.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (BAT) has long been promoting
apprenticeship training by encouraging the establishment of apprenticeship programs and by providing technical
assistance for setting up such programs. The Bureau works closely with employers, labor, vocational schools, and
others concerned with apprenticeship programs. In this undertaking, both labor and management have the
assistance of the Bureau’s field representatives located in each of the 50 States.
APPRENTICESHIP AND ECONOMIC CHANGE. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Technical Report
3. (BAT). 1964. 24 pp. Free. Presents facts and figures on the number of new apprentices and their completion
rates. Discusses new trends in apprenticeshp with a section devoted to relating educational and occupational
factors to apprenticeship.
APPRENTICESHIP AND UNEMPLOYMENT. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Pamphlet. (BAT).
1964. 11 pp. Free. Discusses, with the help of tables, the problem of the declining number of active apprentices
since the period 1956-57. Considers the effect of recessions, unemployment, and better qualified high school
graduates on the number of new registered apprentices and those that complete their training.
*APPRENTICESHIP FOR ME. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Leaflet. (BAT). 1964. 11 pp. Free.
Discusses the objectives of apprenticeship, the consideration of a skilled trade as a career, and the terms of training
for various trades. Lists the addresses of the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training regional offices.
BUREAU OF APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING, THE. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Booklet.
(BAT). 1966. 8 pp. Free. Describes the nature and purpose of the national apprenticeship program and the
functions of the Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Lists regional offices of the Bureau where further
information and technical assistance for apprenticeship programs can be obtained.
♦NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM, THE. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Pamphlet.
(BAT). 1965. 31 pp. Free. Describes the national, State, and management-labor roles in apprenticeship programs.
Gives standards and applicant information on skill training. Provides a directory of occupational listings under
basic trade classifications with code number references to the Dictionary o f Occupational Titles.
NEGROES IN APPRENTICESHIP. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower Automation Research Monograph
No. 6 (MA). 1967. 38 pp. Free. See page 58 for annotation.
♦PLANNED TRAINING - YOUR FUTURE SECURITY. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training.
Pamphlet. (BAT). 1965. 10 pp. Free. Develops guidelines for a career choice through apprenticeship. Covers the
benefits, qualifications, and application sources. Appendixes list the training periods for skilled trades, the Bureau
of Apprenticeship and Training regional offices, and State apprenticeship agencies.
TRAINING OF WORKERS IN AMERICAN INDUSTRY. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Booklet.
(BAT). 1964. 94 pp. Free. See page 37 for annotation.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training also publishes a series of pamphlets listing
the apprenticeship standards for specific trades. Each pamphlet generally contains a breakdown of the trade’s
apprenticeship system, qualifications, program information, recommended work experience schedules, relevant




54

Federal regulations, and sample apprenticeship agreements. The following are some of the more recent National
Apprenticeship Standards pamphlets:
*AUTOMOBILE MECHANICS. (BAT). 1966. 26 pp. Free.
*CARPENTRY. (BAT). 1965. 27 pp. Free.
*DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNICIANS. (BAT). 1965. 29 pp. Free.
^PAINTING, DECORATING, PAPERHANGING. (BAT). 1964. 20 pp. Free.
*PLASTERING. (BAT). 1965. 42 pp. Free.
*ROOFERS. (BAT). 1964. 33 pp. Free.
*SHEET METAL. (BAT). 1965. 42 pp. Free.

Handicapped Workers
Vocational rehabilitation of the almost 2Vi million physically handicapped persons of working age is a major
problem in the United States. In addition, about 3 million mentally retarded persons are considered to have
potential for earning a living. Despite their impairments, handicapped workers, as a group, have proven themselves
to be efficient and dependable. After sufficient training they can compete with nonhandicapped workers.
Placement of the handicapped, however, is hindered by bias on the part of many employers who believe that
handicapped workers lack the ability and dedication to perform well on the job.
Action to combat employer prejudices is being taken on many fronts. For example, the Federal Coordination
Program for Employment of the Handicapped, established in 1964, placed 9,000 handicapped workers in Federal
Government jobs the first year, and 17,000 in 1966. Similarly, a cumulative total of 3,900 mentally retarded
workers have been placed in 39 Federal Government agencies between the program’s initiation in 1964 and late
1967. In addition, hundreds of mentally retarded persons are being trained annually for many different
occupations under this program. The Vocational Rehabilitation Act amendments of 1965 made possible increased
Federal participation in the rehabilitation of the severely handicapped. Handicapped workers who lose their jobs in
distressed areas, or who are unemployed for long periods, may qualify for assistance under Federal manpower
training and retraining programs. In addition, much work has been done by voluntary associations and large
industrial employers to help the handicapped.
APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT: TO AMERICAN INDUSTRY FROM THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED.
PCEH. (PCEH). 1965. 24 pp. Free. Discusses the importance of the handicapped worker in the accelerating search
for trained manpower in the U.S. Compares the abilities and records of the handicapped with unimpaired workers.
Presents several case histories of handicapped workers now gainfully employed.
BUILDING AND MAINTAINING COMMUNITY SUPPORT. PCEH. (PCEH). 1966. 32 pp. Free. Tells why
community involvement is important in promoting employment of the handicapped and how the community can
help. Lays own guidelines for an effective organization at the local level, including, how to conduct an
organizational meeting; a calendar of year-round activities; and some samples of actual plans, bylaws, and State
organizational patterns.
EMPLOYMENT ADJUSTMENT OF VETERANS WITH HISTORIES OF PSYCHOSIS AND PSYCHONEUROSIS,
THE. VA. Department of Veterans Benefits. TR. 22-1. 1963. 47 pp. 25 cents. Reports on the occupations and
personnal adjustments of veterans with histories of functional psychiatric conditions. Discusses vocational potential
and work adjustment capacities of these people. Lists industries where they are employed.




55

EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE FOR THE HANDICAPPED. PCEH. (PCEH). 1966. 37 pp. Free. A directory of
Federal and State programs to help the handicapped in the direction of rehabilitation, training, and employment.
Gives eligibility requirements and tells where to apply.
GUIDE TO JOB PLACEMENT OF THE MENTALLY RESTORED. PCEH. (PCEH). 1965. 41 pp. Free. Discusses
the characteristics of the mentally restored and special considerations to be taken in dealing with them. Contains a
discussion aimed at helping counselors and employers to better evaluate the prospective employee who is mentally
restored.
GUIDE TO JOB PLACEMENT OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED. PCEH. (PCEH). 1965. 16 pp. Free. Intended
to help counselors and employers better evaluate the job potentials of retarded persons entering the labor force.
Discusses the characteristics of the mentally retarded and special considerations necessary in their training and job
placement.
HOW TO GET A JOB. PCEH. (PCEH). 1967. 29 pp. Free. Contains helpful tips on where to go and how to apply
for work. It is written at the elementary school level for mentally retarded job-seekers.
MENTALLY RETARDED, THE: THEIR SPECIAL TRAINING NEEDS. USDL. Manpower Administration.
Bulletin 6. (MA). 1964. 18 pp. Free. Lists some of the characteristics of retarded persons and some of the
occupations for which they can be trained. Contains information on training methods and services, and some new
training and employment possibilities.
OPERATION VOLUNTEERS: THE WOMEN’S COMMITTEE OF THE PRESIDENT’S COMMITTEE ON
EMPLOYMENT OF THE HANDICAPPED. PCEH. Leaflet. (PCEH). 1963. Free. An invitation to women and
women’s groups to help “create a climate” of positive attitudes that will result in more jobs for handicapped
workers.
“PROGRESS IN SERVING THE HANDICAPPED.” USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Employment
Security Review, August-September 1963, pp. 3-26. 30 cents. Included in this issue are articles which discuss the
problems of placing handicapped workers. Examples of articles are, “Training of Handicapped in Ohio,”
“Specialized Services for the Severely Handicapped,” and “Does MDTA Benefit the Handicapped?”
PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS, THE: A PROGRAM GUIDE, 1966-67. PCEH. Booklet. (PCEH). 1966. 25 pp. Free.
Presents information on and description of the handicapped and their abilities. Lists some methods of organizing
community groups toward effective action in aiding the handicapped. Gives information on various publications,
films, and exhibits distributed by the Committee.
*SEVEN SERVICES-HOW THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE HELPS THE HANDICAPPED. USDL. Bureau of
Employment Security. Booklet. (BES). 1966. Free. Explains the efforts of the U.S. Employment Service in aiding
the handicapped through employment service resources and in cooperation with other agencies. Discusses seven
kinds of assistance furnished to help the handicapped worker find a suitable job. Included among these services
are: appraisal of applicant’s capacities; counseling; and referral and followup service.
SO YOU’RE GOING TO HIRE THE MENTALLY RETARDED. PCEH. (PCEH). 1963. Free. A few “do’s” to
keep in mind if you have decided to hire a mentally retarded worker. Also a number of comments by employers
about their experiences with retarded workers after they had been on the job 12 years. Compares their work
records, production, attendance, earnings, etc., with the nonretarded.
SPECIAL REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT - REPORT OF THE ADVISORY COUNCIL OF THE PRESIDENT’S
COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT OF THE HANDICAPPED. PCEH. Booklet. (PCEH). 1965. 68 pp. Free. Presents
information on various topics dealing with the retarded, including: Opportunities under the President’s
Anti-Poverty Program; mentally restored and mentally retarded; agricultural rehabilitation and employment; and
benefits for the severely handicapped. Gives various agency reports on the programs and progress made in these
areas.
56



THEY RETURN TO WORK.. .THE JOB ADJUSTMENT OF PSYCHIATRIC ALLY DISABLED VETERANS OF
WORLD WAR II AND THE KOREAN CONFLICT. VA. Department of Veterans Benefits. Pamphlet No. 22-9.
1963. 210 pp. 70 cents. Reports the work experiences and personal adjustments of psychiatrically disabled
veterans, by occupation.
♦TIPS FOR HANDICAPPED JOB SEEKERS: SOME DO’S AND DON’TS WHEN APPLYING FOR WORK. PCEH.
Leaflet. (PCEH). 1962. Out of Print. Gives advice to handicapped workers who are about to apply for work.
TO WORK AGAIN. ..TO LIVE AGAIN. VA. Pamphlet No. 21-65-1. (VA). 1965. 127 pp. Free. An intensive
discussion of vocational training for disabled homebound veterans. Presents information on the preliminary
considerations for developing a vocational plan and on directives for the development, setting up, and carrying out
of the vocational plan. Gives selected case narratives and case studies by training objective and type of disability.
Includes a bibliography.
VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION OF THE DISABLED: THE PUBLIC PROGRAM. USDHEW. Office of
Program Analysis. 1966. 30 pp. 25 cents. Discusses the Vocational Rehabilitation Act amendments of 1965.
Describes the public vocational rehabilitation program and key characteristics of the rehabilitated. Identifies
current research projects in vocational rehabilitation.
WASTED ASSETS? PCEH. Booklet. (PCEH). 1965. 15 pp. Free. Gives brief summaries of how seven different
communities have gone about informing and improving public understanding of the employment needs, abilities,
and skills of the mentally restored.

Minority Groups
The enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 marked the efforts of the Federal Government to put an end to
discrimination in the hiring and career advancement of minority groups. However, Negroes and other minority
groups often are disadvantaged because of a lack of education and training. Although the economic status of
Negroes has improved steadily in recent decades, they still lag behind the majority of citizens in economic
well-being. Negroes continue to be concentrated in the low-skilled occupations and their rate of unemployment is
about twice that for white workers. Members of other minority groups—
for example, Puerto Ricans and
Mexicans—
have the additional problem of language barriers.
Federal efforts to promote equal job opportunities for Negroes and other minority groups have been intensified in
recent years. The Economic Opportunity Act, enacted in 1964, is designed to improve the motivation, skills,
employability, and social outlook of the young people of the country. Under the Manpower Development and
Training Act, members of minority groups are being prepared for occupations that offer greater stability of
employment. Also, in January 1964, the U.S. Department of Labor issued regulations barring the registration of
apprenticeship programs that fail to ensure equality of opportunity.
AMERICA IS FOR
the progress of the
racial discrimination
their unemployment

EVERYBODY. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1963. 19 pp. 30 cents. Reports on
Negro towards social and economic equality. Discusses Federal Government efforts to end
in education, training, and employment. Presents statistics on the number of Negro workers,
rates, educational attainment, and income levels.

COUNSELING MINORITY GROUP YOUTH: DEVELOPING THE EXPERIENCE OF EQUALITY THROUGH
EDUCATION. The Ohio Civil Rights Commission, Columbus, Ohio. (Ohio Scholarship Tests, 751 Northwest Blvd.,
Columbus, Ohio 43212.) 1962. 139 pp. 50 cents. Supplies counselors with information to help them guide
minority group youth toward equality of opportunity. Discusses social and psychological considerations in
counseling, improving the teaching and instructional methods for minority group youth, and testing their
individual potential. Presents guidelines for working with minority youths. Includes an excellent bibliography.




57

ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED. OEO. Pamphlet. (OEO). 1965. 38 pp. Free. Records
the provisions of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, as amended. Includes information on youth programs,
urban programs, community action programs, employment and investment incentives, and other methods and
programs to combat poverty.
EMPLOYMENT - ECONOMIC GROWTH - EQUAL OPPORTUNITY RESEARCH JOINT EFFORT. Report of the
Governor’s Committee on Unemployment. Springfield, Illinois. (Illinois Information Service, Capitol Building,
Springfield, Illinois 62706.) 1963. 217 pp. $1.50. Discusses the problem of unemployment in the State and
recommends solutions. Emphasizes the special problems of minority group members.
*EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT. USCSC. Pamphlet. (USCSC). 1966. 6 pp. Free.
Explains the steps taken by the Federal Government to eliminate discrimination in personnel practices and to
assure that equal opportunity principles are an integral part of the day-to-day operations of the Government’s
personnel system.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION, AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. Contains sections on the problems of minority groups. See page 42 for complete annotation.
NEGROES IN APPRENTICESHIP. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower Automation Research Monograph
No. 6. (MA). 1967. 38 pp. Free. A report on the opportunities and problems of Negroes in apprenticeships, based
on a research study conducted through a Manpower Administration contract.
NEGROES IN THE UNITED STATES - THEIR ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL SITUATION. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Bulletin 1511. 1966. 244 pp. $1.25. Discusses Negro population trends, occupations, unemployment
rates, income levels, and educational attainment. Estimates the effects of selected Federal programs on
employment and unemployment. Contains a bibliography and a large number of illustrative graphs, and tables.
SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CONDITIONS OF NEGROES IN THE UNITED STATES. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics and USDC. Bureau of the Census. BLS Report 332. Current Population Reports, Series P-23, No. 24.
1967. 97 pp. 55 cents. A statistical report about the social and economic conditions of the Negro population of
the United States. Presents information on recent changes in income, employment, education, housing, health, and
other major aspects of life.
THE MANPOWER POTENTIAL IN OUR ETHNIC GROUPS. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1967. 24
pp. Free. Discusses the untapped and often unrecognized employment characteristics and special skills of minority
groups within our society.
THE QUIET REVOLUTION. OEO. 2d Annual Report. (OEO). 1966. 137 pp. Free. Contains information on
training and employment programs for minority groups. See page 42 for complete annotation.
*VIST A AT WORK. OEO. Pamphlet No. V-21b. (OEO). 1965. 22 pp. Free. Describes Vista’s (Volunteers in
Service to America) urban and rural projects, projects specifically for migrant workers, Indians, and the mentally
handicapped.
*VIST A SERIES: A SUMMARY. OEO. Leaflet No. V-22a. (OEO). 1966. 4 pp. Free. Briefly describes Vista’s
(Volunteers in Service to America) accomplishments among the urban poor, migrant workers, Indians, and others.
Indicates the demand for interesting facts by prospective volunteers.
WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAM, TITLE V - ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY ACT OF 1964. USDHEW. Bureau of
Family Services. Leaflet No. W-2. (OEO). 1966. 5 pp. Free. Provides information on a program to provide work
experience and training for low-income families. Lists examples of projects designed to develop new or improve
skills, conserve existing skills, prevent deterioration of work habits, or attain employment for older persons.




58

Older Workers
Although older workers are less likely than younger workers to lose their jobs, those who become unemployed
often face serious difficulties in getting new jobs and may remain unemployed for long periods. Older workers are
likely to have less formal education than younger people and their education may not be keyed to current
occupational demands; they often encounter hiring age limits set by employers; and they may find it difficult to
move to areas offering greater employment opportunities because of home ownership, and family and other
community ties. Older workers also may be forced to take jobs that make little or no use of their previously
acquired skills and experience.
In recent years, both the Federal and State Governments have taken steps to meet the problems of older workers.
Notable among these steps is the Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962 (MDTA), which provides for
training of unemployed and underemployed workers who lack the skills needed in today’s labor market. Recent
amendments to MDTA provide for basic literacy training. Provision is made for subsistence allowances during the
training period and relocation allowances designed to assist individuals leaving an area to find appropriate
employment. Similarly, the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 established several programs that offer financial
support or pay training costs for needy adults who enroll in projects intended to eliminate illiteracy and raise their
levels of education or training.
Other programs include the assignment of older worker specialists to a number of State employment service
agencies that are cooperating with training, rehabilitation, and welfare agencies serving older workers.
*HOW TO APPLY FOR A FOSTER GRANDPARENT PROJECT. OEO. Booklet No. C-29. (OEO). No Date. 13
pp. Free. Discusses the Foster Grandparent program which employs low-income persons over 60 to serve deprived
children. Comments on typical working conditions and recommends application procedure for interested
communities.
INDUSTRIAL RETRAINING PROGRAMS FOR TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE, A STUDY OF THE PERFORM­
ANCE OF OLDER WORKERS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1368. 1963. 34 pp. Out of print. A
study of the types of technological change giving rise to the need for retraining in industry, and of the
effectiveness with which displaced older workers adapt to such retraining.
“LABOR MARKET EXPERIENCE OF UNEMPLOYED OLDER WORKERS.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Monthly Labor Review, March 1963, pp. 282-284. 75 cents. Reports the findings of a study of unemployed older
persons in Peoria, Illinois. Discusses the length of their unemployment, previous work experience, and jobseeking
behavior.
*MEMO ON JOB FINDING FOR THE MATURE WOMAN. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Leaflet No. 13. 1963. 5
cents. See page 64 for annotation.
MR. BUSINESSMAN - ARE YOU CUTTING YOURSELF OFF FROM ONE-THIRD OF YOUR LABOR SUPPLY.
USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet. (BES). 1966. Free. Attempts to correct some of the
misconceptions that employers have about hiring workers over 40. Gives some of the attributes of the over 40
worker.
*OLDER VOLUNTEERS IN THE PEACE CORPS. USDS. Peace Corps. Leaflet. (PC). 1962. Free. See page33for
annotation.
POVERTY AND THE OLDER AMERICAN. OEO. Pamphlet. (OEO). 1966. 28 pp. Free. Reports on the extent
and characteristics of poverty among the older poor. Discusses the causes of poverty and potential remedial
programs.




59

THE EMPLOYMENT OF RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower/
Automation Research Notice. (MA). 1966. Free. See page 61 for annotation.
*VISTA AT MY AGE? OEO. Pamphlet No. U-19. (OEO). 10 pp. Free. Challenges citizens of retirment age to
share their skills with deprived Americans. Gives facts about Vista (Volunteers in Service to America) and lists the
occupational work and benefits for volunteers.
*

*

*

The U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare’s Administration on Aging, publishes several informative
references dealing specifically with the problems, both social and economic, of the aged.
ARE YOU PLANNING ON LIVING THE REST OF YOUR LIFE? USDHEW. Administration on Aging. AOA
Publication No. 803. 1965. 72 pages. 30 cents. Designed to help people plan for retirement and overcome
problems associated with it, including relocation of home, income adjustment, budgeting, nutrition, health and
recreation.
A TIME OF PROGRESS FOR OLDER AMERICANS - REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL ON AGING.
USDHEW. President’s Council on Aging. AOA Publication No. 137. 1968. 58 pages. 50 cents. A review of the
progress that has been made by Federal programs for older people since 1965. Reviews such major areas as health
care; housing; employment; income in retirement; and independent, meaningful living in retirement. Appendixes
summarize legislation for the elderly, and the growth of the older population.
FACTS ABOUT OLDER AMERICANS. USDHEW. Administration on Aging. AOA Publication No. 410. 1966. 10
cents. Presents a statistical profile of the older population, including geographical distribution, their living
arrangements, marital status, income, spending habits, and labor force participation.
YOU, THE LAW AND RETIREMENT. USDHEW. Administration on Aging. AOA Publication No. 800. 1966. 36
pages. 25 cents. Provides a basic guide to the legal problems of retirement and instances when a lawyer should be
consulted. It advises the older person about drawing up a will, arranging control of assets, or beginning a small
business.

Part-Time Workers
One of the notable postwar changes in the utilization of this country’s manpower is a marked increase in part-time
employment-employment for fewer than 35 hours a week. The great bulk of such employment is voluntary in the
sense that the workers are not seeking full-time employment. Part-time workers are primarily housewives and
students who are not available or willing to work full-time because of family, school, or other obligations. Another
large group is composed of semiretired persons and others who prefer not to work a full week, or cannot because
of ill health or partial disability.
Workers on part-time for economic reasons are those who want full-time work but cannot find it, or who are
employed on jobs that are ordinarily full-time but have been cut back because of business conditions. In 1966,
these workers accounted for nearly one-sixth of the total part-time employed.
The recent prolonged period of prosperity has helped the employment situation of those seeking part-time work.
Employment among full-time workers rose 1.8 million in 1966, 230,000 less than in 1965; the increase in 1966
among part-time workers was 600,000, double that for the previous year.
“EMPLOYMENT OF SCHOOL AGE YOUTH, OCTOBER 1966.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly
Labor Review, August 1967, pp. 20-26. Special Labor Force Report 87. Reprint No. 2538. (BLS). Free. Reports
on the employment of school age youth. Some of the topics covered are occupations, hours of work,
unemployment, and out of school youth. Includes information on full or part-time work status.




60

“MOONLIGHTING - AN ECONOMIC PHENOMENON.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor
Review, October 1967, pp. 17-22. Special Labor Force Report 90. Reprint No. 2547. (BLS). Free. Reports on the
incidence and causes of multiple job holding. Describes personal and economic characteristics of multiple
jobholders including age, sex, race, occupation, industry of employment, and hours of work. Presents data on
trends in multiple jobholding.
“WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE POPULATION.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
January 1968, pp. 35-45. Special Labor Force Report 91. Reprint No. 2555. (BLS). Free. Reports on changes in
work experiences of various groups in the labor force. Gives the occupations and industries of employed and
unemployed workers. Includes discussions of full and part-time employment.

Veterans
The serviceman who returns to civilian life has several alternatives as to what his future work status will be. He
may choose to return to the job he held prior to entering the service, or he may decide to obtain training to
better equip him in the civilian world of work.
The Universal Military Training and Service Act of 1947 guarantees to the veteran the same seniority, status, and
pay he would have received if he had continued his employment from the time of his entering the Armed Forces
until the time of his reemployment. Training allowances are available under the Manpower Development and
Training Act of 1962, as amended, to ex-servicemen who are enrolled in vocational school programs to learn a skill
needed in industry. On-the-job training and other programs for veterans are also available under the MDTA. Under
the benefits of the Veterans Readjustment Act of 1966, veterans can receive aid for up to 36 months of college or
other institutional training.
In addition to the training and education programs available to veterans, efforts are being made to make Armed
Forces training equip the serviceman with skills and experience that will aid him in obtaining a civilian occupation
as well as for his duties while in the service.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES FOR VETERANS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Booklet. (BES). 1967. 22
pp. Free. Gives some characteristics of the veteran population and describes the program of employment services
to veterans. Discusses the older veteran, occupational retraining, and gives some statistics on the employment and
earnings of veterans in the labor force.
*FIELD LETTER. NO. 20. USDL. Office of Veterans’ Reemployment Rights. Booklet. 1963. 22 pp. 15 cents.
Presents an explanation of the Amendments to the Reemployment Rights Provisions of the Universal Military
Training and Service Act of 1947. Gives the effects of the changes on the rights of servicemen and the obligations
of their employers.
*GOING BACK TO CIVILIAN LIFE. USDD. Pamphlet No. DOD PA-5. (USDD). 1965. 22 pp. Free. Provides
information for men soon to be separated from active duty. Reports on such matters as reemployment rights,
jobfinding assistance, vocational rehabilitation, hospitalization, VA loans, insurance, and problems with military
uniforms, awards, and records. Lists sources of advice and assistance, and service obligations after separation.
INFORMATION SHEET ON REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS. USDL. Office of Veterans’ Reemployment Rights.
Leaflet. (OVRR). 1966. Free. Explains some of the more important provisions of the Universal Military Training
and Service Act of 1947. Presents information on the serviceman’s employment rights and the obligations of
employers.
THE EMPLOYMENT OF RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower/
Automation Research Notice. (MA). 1966. Free. A brief summary of a study undertaken to deal with the
problems that retired military personnel face upon entering civilian employment.




61

*THE RIGHT JOB - A LABOR DEPARTMENT GUIDE FOR RETURNING SERVICEMEN. USDL. Office of
Veterans’ Reemployment Rights. Pamphlet. (OVRR). 1966. Free. Gives information on reemployment rights,
employment opportunities available to returning servicemen, and the availability of unemployment compensation.
Provides information on occupational outlook leaflets available to ex-servicemen.
*WHAT EVERY VETERAN SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING
ACT. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES). 1965. 4 pp. Free. See page 38 for annotation.
*YOUR CIVIL SERVICE VETERAN PREFERENCE. USCSC. Pamphlet No. 48. 1967. 6 pp. 5 cents. Explains the
classes of preferences provided for veterans seeking Federal employment. Tells how these preferences are applied
to examinations, appointments, and job retention; and discusses some other preference benefits.

Women and Girls
The rising number of women workers and their expanding job opportunities attests to their growing contribution
to economic activity. Between 1966 and 1980, the number of women in the labor force is expected to rise from
about 28 million to 36 million, an increase of about 29 percent.
For some time women have been faced with problems that limit the full realization of their economic potential.
For example, since women’s occupational role traditionally has been narrowly conceived, the extent of their
education and training often has been limited. Consequently, many of the lowest paid jobs in manufacturing and
service industries have been filled by women. Many barriers to the employment of women were dropped when the
Civil Rights and Equal Pay Acts of 1964 were enacted.
Since many married women now enter the labor market because home and family responsibilities take less time,
they need specialized guidance and counseling in making decisions concerning education, employment
opportunities, and leisure time activities. Women returning to work after years of homemaking often have job
placement problems, because the skills they once possessed are obsolete. Young girls need to be made aware of the
careers open to them and encouraged to enter occupations where their greatest interests lie.
(SEE ALSO: Occupational and Industry Manpower Literature, page 4; Labor Standards, page 46; and Sources of
Statistics Useful to Counselors, page 69.)
AMERICAN WOMEN, REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT’S COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN.
President’s Commission on the Status of Women. 1963. 86 pp. $1.25. Presents up to date findings and
recommendations regarding the opportunities and responsibilities of women in American life. Discusses such
subjects as education, the home and community, protective labor legislation, civil and political rights, and special
problems of Negro women.
BACKGROUND FACTS ON WOMEN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES. USDL. Women’s Bureau. (WB).
1966. 16 pp. Free. Contains information on women workers in the economy. Some of the topics covered are labor
force status, industry of employment, occupation, earnings, and educational attainment.
CLERICAL OCCUPATIONS FOR WOMEN, TODAY AND TOMORROW. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Bulletin 289.
1964. 69 pp. 35 cents. Examines the trends in clerical jobs and discusses expectations for clerical employment in
the future. Surveys a number of clerical occupations and considers the possible effects of automation on clerical
work.
COLLEGE WOMEN SEVEN YEARS AFTER GRADUATION - RESURVEY OF WOMEN GRADUATES - CLASS
OF 1957. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Bulletin 292. 1966. 54 pp. 40 cents. Covered are topics such as characteristics of
graduates; employment status in 1964; family status and employment; occupational patterns; and work histories of




62

graduates. Contains information on counseling and placement services; continuing education programs; and
graduate fellowships, grants, and loan programs.
CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR WOMEN. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Pamphlet No. 10. 1966. 31
pp. 20 cents. Describes continuing education programs for women. Gives a list of special educational programs by
area. Contains a bibliography of selected readings.
COUNSELING GIRLS AND WOMEN: AWARENESS, ANALYSIS, ACTION. USDL. Bureau of Employment
Security. 1966. 71 pp. 60 cents. Contains information on some of the basic aims of counselors with the special
considerations appropriate for counseling girls and women, especially in connection with their role in society.
COUNSELING GIRLS TOWARD NEW PERSPECTIVES. USDL. Women’s Bureau. 1966. 88 pp. 35 cents.
Discusses problems and prejudices that occur in the counseling of girls. Covers such topics as restrictions on career
choices and the counselor’s effect on career choices of girls.
CURRENT DATA ON NONWHITE WOMEN WORKERS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. (WB). 1965. 13 pp. Free.
Presents current data on nonwhite women workers. Categories include labor force status, age group, and
occupation.
DIGEST OF STATE EQUAL PAY LAWS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. (WB). 1965. 26 pp. Free. Lists, in chart form,
the equal pay laws of the 50 States.
♦FEDERAL CAREERS FOR WOMEN. USCSC. Pamphlet No. 35. 1967. 14 pp. 10 cents. Lists reasons why
women should consider a Government career, and traces the history of women’s progress in Government
employment. Gives information on how to begin a Federal Government career and get the job you want.
FRINGE BENEFIT PROVISIONS FROM STATE MINIMUM WAGE LAWS AND ORDERS. USDL. Women’s
Bureau. Bulletin 293. 1966. 112 pp. ’55 cents. Lists, by State, fringe benefits provisions of State minimum wage
laws that are applicable to women.
♦FUTURE JOBS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Pamphlet No. 7. 1966. 67 pp. 30 cents.
Describes many of the occupations that are open to female high school graduates and some tips on how to get
additional training and experience.
HANDBOOK ON WOMEN WORKERS, 1965. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Bulletin 290. 1965. 321 pp. $1. Contains
factual information covering the participation and characteristics of women in the labor force, patterns of their
employment, occupations, income, education and training, and the Federal and State laws affecting the civil,
political and employment status of women. Lists professional and social organizations for women. Published
biennially.
INFORMATION ON THE EQUAL PAY ACT OF 1963. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions.
(WHPC). 1963. 11 pp. Free. Explains provisions of the Equal Pay Act of 1963 that were enacted to correct wage
differentials, based on sex, in industries engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for commerce.
♦JOB HORIZONS FOR COLLEGE WOMEN IN THE 1960’S. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Bulletin 288. 1967. 83 pp.
30 cents. Contains information on the job market for women, graduate education, fellowships and loans, and other
data of interest to parents and counselors and to young women preparing for college.
♦JOB TRAINING SUGGESTIONS FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Leaflet No. 40. 1965. 12
pp. 10 cents. Relates the importance of training to women who are seeking employment. Gives information on the
types of training available and where it can be obtained.




63

*KNOW YOUR RIGHTS-WHAT A WORKING WIFE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HER LEGAL RIGHTS. USDL.
Women’s Bureau. (WB). 1965. 14 pp. Free. Discusses the rights and responsibilities of the working wife. Written in
the form of a question and answer discussion.
*LAWS ON SEX DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT. USDL. Women’s Bureau. (WB). 1967. 13 pp. Free.
Discusses Title VII of the Federal Civil Rights Act which prohibits discrimination in private employment based on
sex.
*MEMO ON JOB-FINDING FOR THE MATURE WOMAN. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Leaflet No. 13. 1963. 5
cents. Explains the importance of job skills, planning interviews, and social security coverage to mature women
seeking work.
NEW APPROACHES TO COUNSELING GIRLS IN THE 1960’S.USDL. Women’s Bureau. Report. 1966. 88 pp.
30 cents. Discusses problems and prejudices that occur in the counseling of girls. Makes recommendations for the
improvement of counseling services.
^OPPORTUNITIES FOR GIRLS IN CRAFTS AND TRADES. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Leaflet. 1966. 6 pp. Free.
Discusses how changes in the working lives of women and changes in the crafts and trades lead to ever increasing
opportunities for women in these fields.
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. President’s Commission on the Status of Women. 1963. 71
pp. 50 cents. Contains the recommendations and analysis of 15 men and women experts on key educational
problems-including guidance and counseling, home and family life, education, and continuing education for the
mature women—
which condition the status of women in modern society.
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT. President’s Commission on the Status of
Women. 1963. 195 pp. $1.50. Considers the work experience of women in the Federal Civil Service, the military
service, and the foreign service, with the main focus on the 1962 policy which provides for appointment to the
Federal Service solely on the basis of merit and fitness and without sex discrimination.
TRENDS IN EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF WOMEN. USDL. Women’s Bureau. (WB). 1967. 18 pp. Free.
Presents information on the educational attainment of women in the United States.
UNDERUTILIZATION OF WOMEN WORKERS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. (WB). 1966. 25 pp. Free. Contains
brief summary statements and charts documenting the underutilization of women workers in the economy.
WHO ARE THE WORKING MOTHERS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Leaflet No. 37. 1965. 4 pp. 10 cents. Presents
facts about working mothers such as why they work, what proportion have children under 18 years of age, and
the number of nonwhite working mothers.
*WHY NOT BE AN ENGINEER. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Leaflet No. 41. 1967. 5 cents. Presents many of the
advantages that an engineering career offers to a woman. Lists sources of further information.
WOMANPOWER POLICIES FOR THE 1970’S USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1967. 40 pp. Free.
Discusses jobs available to women and the greater use of womanpower to meet future demands for workers.
WOMEN’S PART-TIME AND PART-YEAR EMPLOYMENT PATTERNS IN THE UNITED STATES. USDL.
Women’s Bureau. (WB). 1966. 19 pp. Free. Discusses the many reasons women are not full-time workers. Some of the
topics covered are work experience by age; part-time and part-year employment by age; work experience by
occupation; and work experience by marital status.*
*WOMEN’S WORK IN THE FOREST SERVICE. USD A. Forest Service. Miscellaneous Publication No. 1058.
1967. 6 pp. 5 cents. See page 23 for annotation.




64

WORK LIFE EXPECTANCY AND TRAINING NEEDS OF WOMEN. USDL. Manpower Administration. Manpower
Report 12. (MA). 1967. 12 pp. Free. A study of the work life patterns of women and how these patterns affect
the economy.

Youth
An unprecedented number of young people will enter the labor force in the next few years. Although job
prospects for young people who complete college will be highly favorable, school dropouts will face major job
problems since, in many of the occupations traditionally open to them, employment is expected to increase
slowly or, in some cases, decline. Also, many of the jobs for which dropouts qualify offer little security.
Unemployment is much higher among young people than adults. Because youths are relatively inexperienced and
lack seniority they are often vulnerable to layoffs. Also, young people frequently quit jobs in hope of finding
some suitable career fields.
The employment problems of many youths are complicated not only by inadequate training, but also because they
lack vocational guidance and motivation. The special handicaps faced by racial minorities, rural youths, and
physically or mentally handicapped youths create additional employment problems.
The Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 is heavily oriented toward aiding young workers. The Job Corps,
Neighborhood Youth Corps, and Work-Study Program, established under the Act, enable young people to gain
more education, vocational training, and work experience. Counselors and other educators, parents, representatives
of management and labor, and government officials, both at the national and local level, face the challenge of
developing action programs or in revising existing programs. This section provides examples of literature dealing
with the special employment problems, policies, and programs concerning young workers.
(SEE ALSO: Occupational and Industry Manpower Literature, page 4; Apprentices, page 53; Labor Standards,
page 46; Women and Girls, page 62; and Financial Assistance to Students, page 38.)
DESIGN FOR COMMUNITY ACTION. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Bulletin 248. 1962. 36 pp. 20
cents. Discusses the community’s role in helping to alleviate youth unemployment. Supplies a model program for
initiating action. Reviews problems of young jobseekers.
“EMPLOYMENT OF SCHOOL-AGE YOUTH, OCTOBER 1966.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics .M onthly
Labor Review, August 1967, pp. 20-26. Special Labor Force Report 87. Reprint No. 2538. (BLS). Free. Reports
on the employment-unemployment situation of school age workers (age 14 to 24). Presents statistics on labor
force participation, unemployment, and industries and occupations of the Nation’s youth. Points out the social
and economic problems of unemployed youths.
^FUTURE JOBS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Pamphlet No. 7. 1966. 67 pp. 30 cents.
See page 63 for annotation.
*HANDBOOK FOR YOUNG WORKERS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Bulletin 271. 1965. 29 pp. 20 cents.
Presents information on employment choice, applications, and on-the-job problems. Discusses the labor laws
pertinent to young workers and the general State and private employment services available. Provides information
on job training programs open to young people.*
*IS THERE A JOB IN YOUR FUTURE. OEO. Pamphlet No. J-3A. (OEO). 1966. 15 pp. Free. Presents
information on the Job Corps urban and conservation centers and their provisions for basic education and work
skills. Sketches life at a typical center.




65

*JOB GUIDE FOR YOUNG WORKERS, 1963-64 Edition. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. 1963. 78 pp.
45 cents. Supplies young workers with information on 90 different entry jobs. Discusses nature of work, working
conditions, training and other requirements, avenues of advancement, employment prospects, and location of jobs.
Gives advice on how to seek work.
RURAL YOUTH IN CRISIS - FACTS, MYTHS, AND SOCIAL CHANGE. USDHEW. Welfare Administration.
Publication No. JD-3001. 1965. 401 pp. $1.25. A comprehensive book of readings on the problems of rural youth.
Among the topics presented are the rural community backgrounds of rural youth, rural education, the physical
and mental health of rural youth, prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency in rural areas, adaptation of
rural youth to urban living, and helping socially disadvantaged rural youth such as those from low income, Negro,
Indian or Spanish-American families.
*RURAL YOUTH - WHAT KIND OF WORK WOULD YOU LIKE TO DO? USDL. Bureau of Employment
Security. (BES). 1967. 8 pp. Free. Presents the current farm employment situation in this country, and in view of
this, lists job alternatives directly or indirectly related to farming.
TESTING THE UNTESTABLE.
Free. Describes a demonstration
paper and pencil tests. The test
increasing complexity given over

USDL. Manpower Administration. Demonstration Notes No. 2. (MA). 1964. 4 pp.
project directed at non-verbal testing for alienated youth who “fail” standardized
called Work Evaluation, consists of a series of about 125 industrial like tasks of
a 4 week period.

THE YOUTH YOU SUPERVISE. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. Bulletin 174. 1965. 12 pp. 15 cents. Gives
information on the physical, mental, and emotional characteristics of youth. Advises supervisors on how to speed
the development of youth in the labor force.
UPWARD BOUND - THE WAR ON TALENT WASTE. OEO. Pamphlet No. C-30. (OEO). No date. 12 pp. Free.
Outlines a pre-college program for youth from impoverished backgrounds. Explains the program’s activities and
administration.
*WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME? USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Leaflet. (BES). 1965. 2 pp. Free. Outlines the
range of vocational assistance available at local Youth Opportunity Centers for young people between the ages of
16 and 21.
YOUNG WORKERS. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA). 1966. 29 pp. Free. Examines employment and
unemployment of youth, student workers, and school dropouts; as well as job changing and occupational trends.
Describes programs such as the Job Corps, Neighborhood Youth Corps, and the youth service of the public
employment service as implemented by recent Federal legislation.
YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM OF THE UNITED STATES EMPLOYMENT SERVICE. USDL. Bureau of
Employment Security. (BES). 1962. 22 pp. Free. Surveys employment services for youth and explains plans for
improving and expanding them. Discusses special services for school dropouts, rural youth, and college graduates.

JU V E N IL E D ELIN Q U EN TS
DELINQUENTS ARE PEOPLE. USDHEW. Office of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Development. Booklet.
(USDHEW). 1965. 27 pp. Free. Discusses the progress of the recent Federal Anti-Delinquency Program and some
future directions of this program. Contains sections on youth employment and education.
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY SERVICES. USDHEW. Children’s Bureau. Publication No. 421. 1964. 48 pp. 25
cents. Intended to provide more information on the various types of services that should be available in the
community to control and treat juvenile delinquency. Includes discussions of training schools, forestry corps, and
group workers. Gives hints to the private citizen on delinquency problems.




66

RURAL YOUTH IN CRISIS - FACTS, MYTHS AND SOCIAL CHANGE. USDHEW. Welfare Administration.
Publication No. JD-3001. 1965. 401 pp. $1.25. See page 66 for annotation.

SCHOOL DROPOUTS
A boy or girl who enters today’s job market without a usable skill is severely handicapped. For example, in
October 1965, more than 1 of every 5 high school dropouts was unemployed-almost twice the ratio of high
school graduates. The situation for dropouts can be expected to become worse in the coming years, because
workers without a high school diploma will have increasing difficulty entering those expanding occupations where
education and training qualifications are high.
Dropouts are handicapped, not only by their lack of education and experience, but also by the unfavorable image
that dropouts have among employers. Dropping out of school often suggests lack of motivation and perseverance,
difficulty in learning, and the absence of other qualifications that employers look for in job applicants.
CHARACTERISTICS OF SCHOOL DROPOUTS AND HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES, FARM AND NONFARM,
1960. USDA. Economic Research Service. Agricultural Economic Report 65. (USDA). 1964. 32 pp. Free. Contains
commentary and tables on the socio-economic characteristics of school dropouts and high school graduates, from
ages 16 to 24. Compares variance in income with educational attainment and age.
*EARN, LEARN, SERVE - THE NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS. USDL. Neighborhood Youth Corps.
Pamphlet. (NYC). 1965. 18 pp. Free. Describes a work-training program that makes it possible for youths from 16
through 21 to stay in or return to school. Gives the requirements for local sponsorship and facts about the
location, compensation, duration, and financing of work, study, and training programs.
“EMPLOYMENT OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES AND DROPOUTS IN 1966.” USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Monthly Labor Review, July 1967, pp. 15-21. Special Labor Force Report 85. Reprint No. 2537. (BLS).
Free. Compares labor force status of high school graduates and dropouts. Analysis emphasizes the situation of new
young workers as they adjust from school to work or to further schooling combined with work.
“EXPANDED EMPLOYMENT SERVICE TO YOUTH.” USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Employment
Security Review, March 1963, pp. 3-40. 20 cents. Contains a series of articles on youth employment service
programs. Discusses services provided in the following States: South Carolina, California, Massachusetts, Idaho,
Utah, Florida, Michigan, Nebraska, Kentucky, and Rhode Island.
FACTBOOK ON THE SCHOOL DROPOUT IN THE WORLD OF WORK. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Middle Atlantic Region (341 Ninth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10001). 1964. 19 pp. Free. Using graphs and tables,
portrays the dropout in today’s world of work. Compares rates of unemployment and lifetime earnings of school
dropouts and graduates. Presents information on some personal characteristics of dropouts and reasons for leaving
school.
“JOBS FOR YOUTH.” USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Employment Security Review, March 1962, pp.
3-32. 20 cents. Contains a series of articles explaining youth employment services programs in North Carolina,
Montana, California, Texas, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, New York, Delaware, and the District of Columbia. Emphasizes
programs for school dropouts.
KEEP THEM IN SCHOOL. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. 1963. 8 pp. 10 cents. Explains the importance of
keeping young people in school. Emphasizes the rate of education as a key to better jobs, more pay, and greater
job security. Points out how parents can help their children remain in school.
“ OUT OF SCHOOL YOUTH - 2 YEARS LATER.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
August 1966, pp. 860-866. Special Labor Force Report 71. Reprint No. 2497. (BLS). Free. Discusses followup
survey of young men included in a 1963 study of early work experience. Assesses the relative progress of




67

graduates and dropouts. Concludes that whatever the measure used-unemployment rate, earnings, or steadiness of
employment-men with more education made greater advances over the 2-year period between the surveys.
PREPARING DISADVANTAGED YOUTH FOR WORK. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES). 1966. 16
pp. Free. Consists of reprinted articles from the Employment Service Review. Describes the findings of a project
designed to prepare a group of school dropouts for training or jobs. Examines their jobseeking patterns, counseling
and job placement experience, and the work adjustment project itself.
*SCHOOL OR ELSE. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Pamphlet. 1965. 10 pp. 10 cents. Tells the
advantages of an education for job opportunities and security. Includes suggestions for finding part-time work
while attending school.
“THE DROPOUT - SCHOOLS SEARCH FOR CLUES TO HIS PROBLEMS.” USDHEW. Office of Education.
School Life, May 1963, pp. 5-7, 30-33. (OE). Free. Points out some approaches used by State and local school
systems to cope with dropout problems. Explains why the solution of the dropout problem rests with individual
schools.

SUMMER JOBS
Summer jobs enable young people to earn money and gain valuable work experience. In addition, this time affords
them the opportunity to develop good work habits, gain actual job knowledge, and test their job interests and
aptitudes before making career decisions.
In 1966, The War on Poverty’s largest youth program - The Neighborhood Youth Corps - appropriated 130,000
jobs in an effort to alleviate severe unemployment among city youth during the summer months.
*“ SUMMER JOB LEADS.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational Outlook Quarterly, February 1963,
pp. 25-28. 30 cents. Tells high school students how and when to look for summer jobs.
*SUMMER JOBS FOR STUDENTS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards. (LSB). 1966. Free! Designed to help
students find summer employment. Lists some job possibilities. Gives some self-help pointers and sources of
further information.
^SUMMER JOBS FOR STUDENTS AND HOW TO FIND THEM. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES).
1966. 4 pp. Free. Gives advice and sources of counseling on summer job opportunities. Lists the types of jobs
available to students.
SUMMER JOBS FOR YOUTH. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Occupational Outlook Quarterly, May 1967, pp.
1-2. (OOS). Free. Article, by Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, dealing with the President’s Youth Opportunity
Summer Job Campaign. Discusses how counselors can help young people to obtain summer employment.
*SUMMER JOBS IN FEDERAL AGENCIES. USCSC. Examination Announcement No. 414. (USCSC). (revised
each year). Free. Discusses the summer employment programs of various Federal agencies. Lists the occupations of
summer employees, by agency. Tells how to apply for jobs.
*SUMMER VOLUNTEER SERVICE IN THE WAR ON POVERTY. OEO. Booklet. (OEO). 1966. 80 pp. Free.
Helps students find specific antipoverty programs in which they can serve as summer volunteers. Describes a
number of programs, such as Head Start and Upward Bound, and gives sources of further information.
*TRY PUBLIC WELFARE THIS SUMMER. USDHEW. Welfare Administration. Leaflet. 1964. 5 cents. Lists the
advantages and rewards of doing social work in public welfare agencies for the summer.*
*WHAT TO DO THIS SUMMER? USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Leaflet. 1965. 4 pp. 5 cents. Offers
hints, ideas, and reasons for finding summer vaction jobs.




68

SO U R CES OF S T A T IS T IC S U SEFU L TO CO U N SELO R S
Federal and State Government agencies compile and publish a great variety of statistical information that details
the characteristics of our population and labor force. Much of this information can be useful to counselors. For
example, such statistics provide information on the number employed in an occupation; whether its workers are
geographically concentrated or dispersed; whether the occupation employs more men than women, more white
than nonwhite, more young persons than old; and the industries in which its workers are employed. Counselors
can use such information to identify jobs for youth or to help determine the relative importance of particular
occupations and industries in their localities.
The purpose of this section is to familiarize counselors with employment and related statistics available from
several major Federal, State, and local sources. Examples of how counselors can use the statistics are given. The
sources depict the social and economic characteristics of State and local populations or those of the Nation as a
whole. These sources supply three main types of data; employment by occupation and industry, current
employment and unemployment, and wages.
(See also: Occupational and Industry Manpower Literature, page 4.)

I.

Employment by Occupation And Industry

a. The U.S. Census o f Population, compiled and published every tenth year, is the most comprehensive source of
statistical information on employment by occupation and industry. The most recent Census data are for 1960.
Counselors will find that the most useful of the many Census reports are those called “Detailed Characteristics,”
which are available for each State. These reports provide information on the population’s social characteristics such
as age, race, school enrollment, and school years completed; and economic characteristics, such as occupation and
industry of employment, weekly hours of work, and income. For some characteristics, metropolitan areas with
population exceeding 100,000 are tabulated separately.
b. Employment and Earnings Statistics for States and Areas, 1939-66 (reissued each year) provides historical data
on employment, average weekly hours, and hourly and weekly earnings, by industry, for States and metropolitan
areas. The major industries of each State and area are included.
These two statistical sources can help counselors obtain data for many of the employment characteristics of State
and local areas. By examining Employment and Earnings Statistics for States and Areas, 1939-66, a counselor in
Salt Lake City, Utah, for example, can determine many facts about employment in his local area and State. In
1966, there were 319,200 persons employed in nonagricultural jobs in the State of Utah. More than half of these
people were employed in the Salt Lake City area. Most workers in the State were employed by government,
wholesale and retail trade, or manufacturing concerns. Employment of government workers has increased rapidly
between 1956 and 1966, rising from 54,700 to 90,900. Employment in the bituminous coal industry has been
falling over the last few years. In 1956, there were 3,100 people employed in the industry; in 1966 only 1,400
people were so employed. Over sixty percent of those employed in Utah contract construction worked in the Salt
Lake City area.
Utah counselors can find information about the occupations and industries in which workers in both Utah and the
Salt Lake City area are employed in U.S. Census o f Population: 1960 Detailed Characteristics, Utah.3 According
to this source, for example, there were 5,052 employed carpenters in 1960; nearly 3,500 of them worked in the
contract construction industry. About 243 employed pharmacists were employed in the Salt Lake City area. In
1959, their average (mean) earnings were $6,238, and nearly one-sixth earned between $7,000 and $9,999.
3 Industry employment totals for 1960 in Employment and Earnings Statistics for States and Areas, 1939-66, and in the U.S.
Census o f Population differ for several technical reasons. For example, establishment data in the former publication covers wage
and salary workers only and are obtained from the payrolls of industrial establishments; Census data cover all workers in an
industry (wage and salary, self-employed, and unpaid family workers) and are obtained through household interviews.




69

c. County Business Patterns furnishes detailed data on employment in industries, by county. State summaries and
a U.S. summary are published annually. The latest U.S. summary contains data for the first quarter of 1966.
Whereas Employment and Earnings for States and Areas, 1939-66, gives employment data only for large industries,
by State and metropolitan area, County Business Patterns provides such data for all industries, by county. Hence,
counselors located outside metropolitan areas (e.g. small cities and rural areas) will find the data in this publication
particularly useful. It shows, for example, that 108 persons were employed in furniture stores in the Kent County
of Rhode Island in mid-March 1966.
d. Employment and Earnings Statistics for the United States, 1909-67 (reissued every year) furnishes historical
average annual employment data for over 350 nonagricultural industries. Data are included on employment, by
sex; production workers; hourly and weekly earnings; and overtime hours. The data in this publication are the
national totals of the data for individual States published in Employment and Earnings Statistics for States and
Areas, 1939-66.
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS CATALOG. USDC. Bureau of the Census. Annual edition published in quarterly
issues cumulative to an annual volume with 12 monthly supplements. 1967. $2.25. Lists Bureau of the Census
publications and gives ordering and price information. Includes current information on data files, unpublished
materials, and other services available from the Bureau of the Census.
COUNTY BUSINESS PATTERNS. USDC. Bureau of the Census. (U.S. Summary and State volumes published
annually). Latest U.S. Summary contains information for the first quarter of 1966. Number of pages and prices
vary.
EMPLOYMENT AND EARNINGS STATISTICS FOR STATE AND AREAS, 1939-66. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Bulletin 1370-4. 1967. 812 pp. $5.
EMPLOYMENT AND EARNINGS STATISTICS FOR THE UNITED STATES, 1909-67. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Bulletin 1312-5. 1967. 884 pp. $4.75.
OCCUPATIONAL EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS, 1960-66. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1579. 1967.
32 pp. 25 cents. This report is the second in a series. The first, Occupational Employment Statistics, Sources and
Data, presented employment information for many occupations and selected industries through 1964. This report
updates statistics thought to be of continuing importance and whenever possible includes the year 1966. In
addition, new occupational employment data of potential interest to researchers and students of the social sciences
are presented.
OCCUPATIONAL EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS, SOURCES, AND DATA. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Report 305. (BLS). 1966. 87 pp. Free. Brings together statistics from various sources on the number of persons
employed nationwide in individual occupations and in selected industries. Describes briefly the sources of the data.
“STATISTICAL TABLES ON MANPOWER.” USDL. Manpower Administration. Reprint from the 1967 Manpower
Report o f the President. (MA). 90 pp. Free. Reprint of the Statistical Appendix to the 1967 Manpower Report of
the President. Presents current and historical data on labor force employment and unemployment; labor force
characteristics; employment, hours, earnings, and labor turnover in nonagricultural establishments; State and area
employment and unemployment; training and apprenticeship; and productivity, gross national product, and other
manpower and related information.




70

II.

Current Employment and Unemployment

Employment and Earnings and Monthly Report on the Labor Force, presents comprehensive monthly statistics on
the Nation’s labor force; employment and unemployment trends; numbers of workers, and production workers;
weekly hours; hourly and weekly earnings; payroll and man-hour indexes; and labor turnover rates. In addition, for
States and selected metropolitan areas, statistics are provided on employment in major industries, gross hours and
earnings of production workers, and labor turnover rates in manufacturing.4 An annual supplement provides
annual averages for all series for recent years.
Counselors can find much useful information in this publication. For example, in May 1967 manufacturing
production workers in Denver, Colorado, averaged $123.62 for a 42.2 hour workweek; total nonagricultural
employment in Waterloo, Iowa increased from 48,600 in April 1967 to 49,400 in May 1967. Most of the
employment increase in Waterloo in this period was in manufacturing, which increased from 20,700 to 21,300.
EMPLOYMENT AND EARNINGS AND MONTHLY REPORT ON THE LABOR FORCE. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Published monthly. $7 a year; 65 cents an issue.

III. Wages and Income
Community Wage Surveys are published annually by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for 86 labor areas. These
studies are designed to provide data on occupational earnings, establishment practices, and supplementary wage
provisions. The occupations selected for study are common to a variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing
industries and are grouped as follows: Office clerical; professional and technical; maintenance and powerplant; and
custodial and materials movement. The following examples of the types of information published are from a
March 1965 wage survey of the Cincinnati, Ohio - Kentucky area: 660 maintenance electricians had average hourly
earnings of $3.26; one-half of the maintenance electricians earned between $2.93 and $3.51 an hour.
Industry Wage Surveys, conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, provide information on the average
straight-time earnings of workers in particular industries, such as basic iron and steel, foundries, and motor
vehicles. Two types of industry wage surveys are conducted: (1) Those providing information on the average and
distribution of employee earnings without regard to occupation; and (2) those providing information for selected
occupations representative of jobs in particular industries. These surveys usually include information on
supplementary benefits, e.g., paid holidays and paid vacations. From the surveys above, counselors can compare
the earnings of workers in an occupation in various regions and metropolitan areas.
Union Scale Studies are published annually by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and provide information on the
minimum wage scales and maximum schedules of hours at straight time rates agreed upon through collective
bargaining in selected metropolitan areas. Such studies are available for building trades workers, local transit
operating employees, motortruck drivers and employees, printing industry workers, and others. Counselors can use
this information to compare union scales for particular occupations in their areas with those of other areas and the
Nation as a whole.
A DIRECTORY OF COMMUNITY WAGE SURVEYS. 1948-June 1966. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
(BLS). 1966. 37 pp. Free.
A DIRECTORY OF INDUSTRY WAGE SURVEYS AND UNION SCALE STUDIES. 1955 -July 1966. USDL.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. (BUS). 1966. 27 pp. Free.
*

*

*

4 Month-to-month changes in the statistical series should be interpreted with caution since they may reflect seasonal or short-run
fluctuations in economic activity.




71

Reports are available that present, analyze, and interpret many of the basic statistics published by the Federal
Government. Some that may be of interest to counselors are listed and annotated below under four general
headings:

1.

OCCUPATION AN D IN D U STR Y EM PLO YM ENT T R E N D S AND O U TLO O K

“CHANGES IN OCCUPATIONAL EMPLOYMENT OVER THE PAST DECADE.” USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Monthly Labor Review, August 1967, pp. 27-30. Special Labor Force Report 88. Reprint No. 2539.
(BLS). Free. Reviews occupational employment trends over the 1956-66 time period.
EMPLOYMENT IN PROFESSIONAL MATHEMATICAL WORK IN INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT. NSF.
Booklet No. NSF 62-12. 1962. 82 pp. 55 cents. Supplies commentary and statistics on mathematical personnel,
positions, and income. Breaks down personnel by age, sex, educational attainment, professional experience, job
changing, etc.; describes positions by type of employer, education required, functions of work, etc.; gives income
by educational level, age, sex, and type of employer.
INDUSTRY GROUP BY OCCUPATION: 1960. USDC. Bureau of the Census. U.S. Census o f Population: 1960.
Supplementary Reports. PC(Sl)-27. 1962. 8 pp. 10 cents. Gives the number of workers employed in each industry
group, by occupation and sex, 1960.
INDUSTRY MANPOWER SURVEYS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Series of reports issued irregularly.
(BES). Free. Each survey usually describes industry employment trends and current labor needs by region, State,
and metropolitan area. Also discusses changing occupational patterns in the industry being surveyed. (See page 18
for a listing of Industry Manpower Surveys available.)
INDUSTRY OF THE EXPERIENCED LABOR FORCE: 1960. USDC. Bureau of the Census. U.S. Census o f
Population: 1960. Supplementary Reports PC(Sl)-33. 1962. 9 pp. 10 cents. Presents data on the number of
employed workers, by industry of employment, race, and sex, 1960. Gives unemployment rates and ranges of
earnings of workers, by industry, race, and sex, 1959.
“JOB TENURE OF WORKERS, JANUARY 1966.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
January 1967, pp. 31-37. Special Labor Force Report 77. Reprint No. 2513. (BLS). Free. Examines differences in
job tenure by age, sex, color, and occupation.
“LABOR FORCE AND EMPLOYMENT IN 1965.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Special Labor Force Report
69. Reprint No. 2494. (BLS). Free. Contains information on the civilian labor force by age, sex, and color. Also
gives information on employed persons by type of industry and occupation. Has information on unemployment
for a number of characteristics. Beginning in 1966, annual labor force and employment data are contained in the
January issue of Employment and Earnings and Monthly Report on the Labor Force. See page 71 for
annotation.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION, AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. See page 42 for annotation.
SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL MANPOWER RESOURCES: SUMMARY INFORMATION ON EMPLOYMENT
CHARACTERISTICS, SUPPLY, AND TRAINING. NSF. Book No. NSF 64-28. 1964. 184 pp. $1.25. See page 15
for annotation.
“THE OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE OF U.S. EMPLOYMENT, 1940-60.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Monthly Labor Review, November 1962, pp. 1209-1213. Reprint No. 2403. (BLS). 1962. Free. Reports on the
changing occupational structure of the labor force based on data from the 1940, 1950, and 1960 Censuses of
Population. Shows employment trends for occupational groups and some individual occupations.




72

2.

SO CIA L AND ECONOM IC C H A R A C T E R IS T IC OF W O RKERS

“ADULT MEN NOT IN THE LABOR FORCE.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review, March
1967, pp. 5-15. Special Labor Force Report 79. Reprint No. 2520. (BLS). Free. Presents a discussion of historical
trends and the characteristics of adult men not in the labor force. Also gives new data on work histories, incomes,
and jobseeking intentions.
CHARACTERISTICS OF PROFESSIONAL WORKERS. USDC. Bureau of the Census. U.S. Census o f Population:
1960. Subject Report PC(2)-7E. 1964. 161 pp. $1. Provides statistics on the social and economic characteristics
of workers in professional and technical occupations.
CHARACTERISTICS OF SCHOOL DROPOUTS AND HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES, FARM AND NONFARM,
1960. USDA. Economic Research Service. Agricultural Economic Report 65. (USDA). 1964. 32 pp. Free. See page
67 for annotation.
“EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT OF WORKERS.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
February 1968, pp. 26-34. Special Labor Force Report 92. Reprint No. 2559. (BLS). Free. Reports on recent
trends in the educational attainment of workers and the relationship of educational attainment to occupation,
employment, and income. Compares the changing educational attainment of groups in the labor force.
“LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS FOR 1970-80.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
February 1965, pp. 129-140. Special Labor Force Report 49. Reprint No. 2455. (BLS). Free. Contains projections
of the labor force through 1980. Projections are developed by age and sex, and for young and older workers.
“LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS BY COLOR, 1970-80.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor
Review, September 1966, pp. 965-972. Special Labor Force Report 73. Reprint No. 2501. (BLS). Free. Presents
characteristics and some implications of projected labor force growth among white and nonwhite groups. Discusses
young workers, adult women, adult men, and older workers. Contains several charts and tables.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. See page 42 for annotation.
“MARITAL AND FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS OF WORKERS, MARCH 1967.” USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Monthly Labor Review, April 1968, pp. 14-22. Special Labor Force Report 94. Reprint No. 2565.
(BLS). Free. Analyzes the effect of business conditions, changing social mores, and other elements on the labor
force participation of women. Examines characteristics such as age of labor force entrants, occupational similarities
between husbands and wives, and employment and income characteristics among different types of families.
“OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH - TWO YEARS
August 1966, pp. 860-866. Special Labor
achievements of school dropouts with those
unemployment, duration of employment, job

LATER.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
Force Report 71. Reprint No. 2497. (BLS). Free. Compares the
of high school graduates. Discusses differentials such as employment,
training, and earnings. Contains many statistical charts and tables.

“POVERTY AREAS OF OUR MAJOR CITIES.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
October 1966, pp. 1105-1110. Special Labor Force Report 75. Reprint No. 2508. (BLS). Free. Examines and
compares the employment situation of Negro and white workers in metropolitan areas. Includes topics such as,
unemployment rates, types of jobs held, and expected minimal employment needs.




*

*

73

*

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, has published statistical studies of 36 cities that
provide information on population, male civilian labor force, high school enrollment, educational attainment,
income level, and unemployment, by ethnic group and neighborhood. Based on data collected during the 1960
Census of Population, these studies were made to help meet the needs of the President’s Committee on Youth
Employment for information on area environmental factors that could be associated with disadvantaged youth.
These studies were prepared for cities that had populations of 500,000 or more, as well as for a few smaller cities.
An illustrative citation follows:
INCOME, EDUCATION, AND EMPLOYMENT IN NEIGHBORHOODS - CHICAGO, ILL. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. (BLS). 1963. 91 pp. Free.
Studies of the following cities are also available:
Atlanta, Ga.
Baltimore, Md.
Birmingham, Ala.
Boston, Mass.
Buffalo, N.Y.
Cincinnati, Ohio
Cleveland, Ohio
Dallas, Texas
Denver, Colo.
Detroit, Mich.
Houston, Tex.

Indianapolis, Ind.
Kansas City, Mo.
Los Angeles, Calif.
Memphis, Tenn.
Milwaukee, Wis.
Minneapolis - St. Paul, Minn.5
Newark, N J.
New Orleans, La.
New York, N.Y.6
Oakland, Calif.
Oklahoma City, Okla.

Philadelphia, Pa.
Phoenix, Ariz.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
St. Louis, Mo.
San Antonio, Tex.
San Diego, Calif.
San Francisco, Calif.
San Juan, P.R.
Seattle, Wash.
Tampa - St. Petersburg, Fla.5
Washington, D.C.

Each of the Bureau of Labor Statistics regional offices also publishes special studies regarding a specific geographic
area. Such studies may deal with employment in general or for a specific industry or occupation. For a complete
listing of BLS Regional Office Publications see:
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, CATALOG OF PUBLICATIONS, BULLETINS, REPORTS, AND RE­
LEASES. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (BLS). Free. See page 76 for annotation.

3.

UN EM PLOYM ENT

“ADULT MEN NOT IN THE LABOR FORCE.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review, March
1967, pp. 5-15. Special Labor Force Report 79. Reprint No. 2520. (BLS). Free. See page 73 for annotation.
“LABOR FORCE PROJECTIONS BY COLOR, 1970-80.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor
Review, September 1966, pp. 965-972. Special Labor Force Report 73. Reprint No. 2501. (BLS). Free. See page
73 for annotation.
MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT INCLUDING A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS,
RESOURCES, UTILIZATION, AND TRAINING. Transmitted To The Congress, April 1968. USDL. 1968. 323 pp.
$2.25. See page 42 for annotation.
“OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH - TWO YEARS LATER.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
August 1966, pp. 860-866. Special Labor Force Report 71. Reprint No. 2497. (BLS). Free. See page 73 for
annotation.
“POVERTY AREAS OF OUR MAJOR CITIES.” USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly Labor Review,
October 1966, pp. 1105-1110. Special Labor Force Report 75. Reprint No. 2508. (BLS). Free. See page 73 for
annotation.
5 Both cities in one report.
6 Each of five boroughs is shown in a separate report.




74

4.

W AGES AND INCOME

NATIONAL SURVEY OF PROFESSIONAL, ADMINISTRATIVE, TECHNICAL, AND CLERICAL PAY. USDL.
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1585. 1967. 83 pp. 50 cents. Surveys the compensation for selected
occupations, such as, accountants, chemists, clerical workers, and others, in private industry. Consists of
commentaries and statistical tables on average monthly and annual salaries, employment distribution by salary and
by industry, average weekly hours for occupations by industry, and much more.
REVIEW OF DATA ON SCIENCE RESOURCES: SALARIES AND PROFESSIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF
U.S. SCIENTISTS, 1964. NSF. Review No. 2. NSF 64-27. 1964. 8 pp. 5 cents. Gives wage, educational,
occupational, sex, and age characteristics for scientific and technical personnel. Breaks down salary data by
occupational field, work activity, academic degree and type of employer.
SUMMARY OF MANUFACTURING EARNINGS SERIES, 1939-1965. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Report
229. 1966. (BLS). 17 pp. Free. Reports on trends in hourly and weekly earnings of factory production workers
and changes in the Consumer Price Index since 1939.
SUPPLEMENTARY COMPENSATION FOR NONPRODUCTION WORKERS, 1963. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Bulletin 1470. 1965. 110 pp. 70 cents. Analysis of major supplements to regular pay for white-collar
workers in private industry including paid leave, overtime pay, nonproduction bonuses, and insurance. Considers
both employer expenditures for the supplements and the practices for which the payments are made.
*

*

*

WAGE CHRONOLOGIES are reports issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics on specific employers such as North
American Aviation or Armour & Company. Each report traces, over a time period, the changes in wage scales and
related benefits contained in agreements usually reached through collective bargaining. Tables list the agreement
provisions, effective dates, applications, exceptions, and other related matters.
A DIRECTORY OF . . . WAGE CHRONOLOGIES 1948-JANUARY 1967. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
1967. (BLS). 10 pp. Free. Lists the employers for which Wage Chronologies are available. Indicates for each
employer the period covered, report number, price, and related Monthly Labor Review articles.
WAGES AND RELATED BENEFITS PART I: 86 METROPOLITAN AREAS, 1966-67. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Bulletin 1530-87. 1967. 96 pp. 50 cents. Brings data for each of the metropolitan areas studied in the
Occupational Wage Surveys into one bulletin. Provides information on the movement of wages by occupation and
skill level and the structure and level of wages among areas and industry divisions.
WAGES AND RELATED BENEFITS PART II: METROPOLITAN AREAS, UNITED STATES AND REGIONAL
SUMMARIES, 1965-66. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1465-86. 1967. 113 pp. 60 cents. Summarizes,
in national and regional form, information from metropolitan area statistics on the number of workers, average
weekly hours and earnings, and the distribution of salaries for individual occupations. Gives industry wage
differences among the metropolitan areas; trends of occupational earnings for regions; and data on establishment
practices and supplementary wage provisions.




75

D IR E C T O R IE S , C A T A LO G S, AND B IB LIO G R A P H IES
Directories and Catalogs
Comprehensive price lists of Federal Government publications, compiled by broad subject area, are published
annually by the U.S. Government Printing Office. A few lists of particular interest to counselors are shown below:
SELECTED PRICE LIST OF GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Education
Labor
Occupations
Industrial Workers

PL-31
PL-33
PL-33A
PL-78

Annual
Annual
Annual
Annual

(GPO)
(GPO)
(GPO)
(GPO)

Free
Free
Free
Free

A semimonthly selected list of priced publications is also issued free by the GPO. Requests for placement on the
mailing list should be sent to the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C. 20402.
Most agencies within the Federal Government distribute booklets listing their publications. These booklets
sometimes are annotated and often contain references to additional information related to each publication. Most
booklets are updated periodically by brief lists that describe the most recently published materials.
A LIST OF HEALTH INFORMATION OF THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. USDHEW. Public Health
Service. Publication No. 323. (PHS). 1966. Free.
BUREAU OF APPRENTICESHIP AND TRAINING PUBLICATIONS. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and
Training. (BAT). Free.
BUREAU OF CENSUS CATALOG. USDC. Bureau of the Census. Annual edition published in quarterly issues
cumulative to an annual volume with 12 monthly supplements. 1967. $2.25.
BUREAU OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY PUBLICATIONS. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES).
1966. Free.
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS CATALOG OF PUBLICATIONS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (BLS).
Semiannual. Free.
CHECKLIST OF BUREAU OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PUBLICA­
TIONS. USDC. Semiannual. (USDC). 1967. Free.
LIST OF AVAILABLE PUBLICATIONS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. USDA. Office of
Information. List No. 11. 1966. 155 pp. 40 cents.
LIST OF OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK PUBLICATIONS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. (OOS). Free.
LIST OF PUBLICATIONS. USDL. Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions. (WHPC). Free
MANPOWER PUBLICATIONS. USDL. Manpower Administration. Leaflet. (MA). Free.
PUBLICATIONS OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION. NSF. (NSF). 1967. Free.
PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICE OF EDUCATION. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-llOOE. 40 cents.




76

PUBLICATIONS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT. USDHUD.
Publication MP - 36. 1967. (HUD). Free.
PUBLICATIONS OF THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, 1961-JUNE 1966. USDL. Annual. (USDL). 1967.
Free.
PUBLICATIONS OF THE WOMEN’S BUREAU. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Leaflet No. 10. (WB). Free.
SELECTED PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU OF LABOR STANDARDS. USDL. Bureau of Labor Standards.
Booklet. (LSB). 1966. 25 pp. Free.

Federal Government agencies publish directories and catalogs that are valuable sources of information on subjects
such as occupations, training, and Federal aid programs. A number of these are listed and annotated.
CATALOG OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS FOR INDIVIDUAL AND COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT. OEO. (OEO).
1965. 414 pp. Free. Describes governmental programs intended to help individuals and communities meet their
own goals for economic and social development. Contains a program index and program descriptions.
DIRECTORY OF COUNSELOR EDUCATORS. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-25036-A. 1965. 82 pp. 50
cents. Lists, by State and school, the names of educators who are either teaching, supervising, or administering a
program for the preparation of guidance counselors.
EDUCATION ’67 - THE OFFICE OF EDUCATION - ITS PROGRAMS AND SERVICES. USDHEW. Office of
Education. OE-11006-67. 1967. 97 pp. 35 cents. Catalog of Federal programs designed to help educators carry on
the work of education. Gives implications of new legislation on education.
EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE FOR THE HANDICAPPED. PCEH. (PCEH). 1966. 37 pp. Free. See page 56 for
annotation.
FEDERAL CAREER DIRECTORY: A GUIDE FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS. USCSC. Booklet. 1966. 88 pp. 55
cents. See page 22 for annotation.
HANDBOOK OF FEDERAL AIDS TO COMMUNITIES. USDC. Economic Development Administration. Booklet.
1966. 112 pp. 60 cents. Directs interested community and regional groups to Federal financial aid programs,
technical assistance programs, and information sources to help strengthen their economies. Lists the individual
Federal agencies and the programs for which they have primary responsibility.
HANDBOOK ON WOMEN WORKERS. USDL. Women’s Bureau. Bulletin 290. 1965. 338 pp. $1. Contains
directories of commissions on the status of women and organizations of interest to women. See page 63 for
further annotation.
HIGHER EDUCATION - BASIC STUDENT CHARGES. USDHEW. Office of Education. OE-52005-65-1. 1965. 19
pp. 35 cents. An annual comprehensive report on higher education giving information on costs such as tuition,
fees, and room and board charges for many schools around the country.
NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM, THE. USDL. Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Pamphlet.
(BAT). 1965. 31 pp. Free. Provides a directory of apprenticeable occupations under basic trade classifications;
code number references to the Dictionary o f Occupational Titles are made. See page 54 for further annotation.




77

Bibliographies
COUNSELOR’S REFERENCE BIBLIOGRAPHY. OEO. Job Corps. Publication PM-400-4A. (OEO). 1966. Free.
Provides an annotated listing of books pertinent to the field of counseling. Entries deal with counseling,
psychology, educational and occupational literature, social interactions, child and family development, and
miscellaneous topics.
IMPLICATIONS OF AUTOMATION AND OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS: A SELECTED
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Bulletin 1319-1. 1963. 90 pp. Out of print.
Contains listings related to the social and economic aspects of automation. Covers the implications of automation
on employment, unemployment, occupational skill requirements, training and retraining, collective bargaining, and
business management and organization. Lists publications on automation in other countries.
SOCIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF OCCUPATIONS - A BIBLIOGRAPHY. USDL. Manpower Administration. (MA).
1965. Free. Lists materials that examine occupations from a personal and social point of view.




78

APPENDIX A.

HOW TO OBTAIN GOVERNM ENT PUBLICATIONS

The largest dealer in Government reports, pamphlets, and books is the Superintendent of Documents of the U.S.
Government Printing Office. Approximately 25,000 pieces of mail are delivered each day in the world’s largest
printing house. These requests, orders, and inquiries reflect impressions of the Government Printing Office held in
the mind of the public. Following are a few popular impressions-Are they true or false?
1. The GPO is a huge information agency that deals with all documents published by the Federal Government.
False. Although the GPO’s Division of Public Documents, commonly known as Superintendent of Documents,
maintains a reference department, searching is limited to identification of the titles available in its sales stock of
over 25,000 different publications.
2. Because of its size, GPO is necessarily slow in filling orders.
False. Despite its size and heavy workload, GPO processes most orders relatively quickly; it compares favorably
with its counterpart in private industry, the mail-order house. Many delays occur because of insufficient ordering
information from the customer. Another frequent time-consuming error is the attempt by customers to order
publications through the various Government agencies in Washington, D.C. Most agencies cannot sell publications
and, therefore, must refer orders to the Superintendent of Documents.
3. The Government pays the postage on most publications ordered from GPO.
True. The price charged for Government publications includes the postage required to send them by regular mail to
addresses in the United States.
4. GPO allows a discount on large orders.
True. A 25-percent discount is allowed on orders for 100 copies or more of the same publication mailed to one
address. The discount can mean a big saving when a person is ordering for several classes or for different schools in
the same system.
5. The GPO is an excellent source of free Government literature.
False. The GPO is not a source of free literature. It does the printing for the Congress, Executive Office, the
judiciary, all executive departments, independent offices, and establishments of the Government, and sells to the
public through its Superintendent of Documents.
For a free copy of a publication write directly to the issuing agency or department in Washington, D.C. If you do
not know which Government agency issued the publication, consult your librarian. Bear in mind, however, that
the issuing agencies have only limited supplies of their priced publications for free distribution.
Many people, when writing to a particular Government agency for a free copy of a publication, tack onto the
address “Government Printing Office” or “c/o Superintendent of Documents.” This practice amounts to a
conflicting address and the post office will always deliver such letters to the GPO. Thus, your request for free
material is classified as a “sales” transaction.
To make sure you will get a copy of the publication you want, it is safer to purchase it directly through the sales
agent, the Superintendent of Documents. With very few exceptions, a remittance should not be sent directly to a
Government agency. They are not authorized to handle such remittances and must either refer your order to GPO,
or return it to you. Some agencies, however, do maintain regional offices throughout the country which, in




79

addition to their specific functions, sell the publications prepared by their own agency. The Labor Department’s
Bureau of Labor Statistics, which has eight regional offices, is a case in point. (For BLS regional office addresses,
see Appendix B, page 83.)

How To Order
Many avoidable errors are made in ordering publications through the GPO. Be sure to include all of the following
information: Title of the publication, quantity, price, your name and address, and the remittance.
If the need should arise to check on publications not received, all of the original identifying information should be
restated in your inquiry. Preferably, an exact copy of the purchase order should be sent. References to the
sender’s purchase order number or the date of the original order are meaningless to the GPO in trying to locate
your order. Should a second followup be necessary, include all identifying information and state that this is the
second followup. In this way, the search will not be duplicated.

Various Methods
Schools, boards of education, and other State and local agencies, in ordering publications from the Superintendent
of Documents, may meet a seeming impasse: the GPO must have remittance before shipment; the schools cannot
issue checks until publications have been delivered. In order to reconcile these differences, several systems have
been devised to accommodate schools and other agencies. The following sections describe these systems.
Claim Voucher: One system of ordering involves claim vouchers, which are blank forms designed, printed, and
used by individual schools. These vouchers are as varied in size, color, and text as they are in number. Whether
attached to a purchase order or combined with one in a single form, the voucher basically states that the vendor
(GPO) has delivered goods and has not received payment.

When such a claim voucher is received with a purchase order by the Superintendent of Documents, personnel there
will stamp the voucher “Pro Forma Invoice,” fill it out in accordance with the purchase order, sign, and even
notarize it if requested to do so. Any changes in titles or prices are made on the voucher and purchase order. Both
forms are then returned to the school or agency, which processes them and issues a check. The purchase order is
then resubmitted with the covering check and the sale is transacted.

Pro Forma Invoice: This system is similar to the claim voucher system, except that the piece of paper necessary to
support the disbursement is not preprinted by the school but is supplied by the Superintendent of Documents, on
request. The pro forma invoice is filled out, as is the claim voucher, to conform with the purchase order, signed,
notarized if necessary, and sent out to the school. There it is processed, a check is issued, and the purchase order
and one copy of the pro forma invoice are resubmitted with the check.

Note that the first step in both the claim voucher and pro forma invoice systems is merely preliminary paperwork.
No sale is transacted until the paper is returned with the check. Up until that point, the GPO has kept no record
of the transaction, has not reserved publications, and has made no shipments. In fact, GPO does not guarantee
that prices will remain the same or that publications will be available until the sale is consummated, although
ordinarily discrepancies do not occur.
Certified Invoice; Paid Receipt: Many schools and agencies, either through special funds or by agreement with
their disbursing officials, are able to send checks with their order but require a certified invoice or paid receipt to




80

support the disbursement of these funds. The Superintendent of Documents provides these either on forms
provided by the schools or by issuing its own receipts, and the forms are sent with the shipment of publications.
This system avoids the necessity of resubmitting the purchase order and thereby expedites shipment.

Combination Systems
The following two methods of ordering are growing in popularity. Both methods are simple to set up and are paid
for by just one check which is issued in accordance with the system described above (claim voucher, pro forma
invoice, or certified invoice) which best suits a particular school.
Coupons. Special document coupons in 5-cent denominations are sold by the GPO in sets of 20. Discrepancies in
price can be corrected and refunds made through this convenient means of exchange. The Superintendent of
Documents, which as a rule makes refunds of less than $1 in the form of coupons, finds them so popular that
many customers request that all refunds be made in that form.
Schools using these coupons generally are small or are branches of larger school systems. In many cases, the board
of education might purchase several hundred dollars worth of coupons and distribute blocks of $25 or $50 to its
various schools.
Depositors* Accounts. Even more popular-and most suitable for schools which order rather frequently from the
GPO-are the depositors’ accounts. More than 40,000 of them are currently in use. Probably the ideal ordering
system for schools, these accounts can be opened for as little as $25. This method of ordering provides the
maximum convenience for schools and State agencies, because it enables them to avoid obtaining quotations,
sending individual remittances, and preparing claim vouchers for each order.
When such an account is opened, an individual account number is assigned, a supply of special depositors’ order
blanks is forwarded to the new depositor, and orders are filled as soon as they are received. Annotations are made
on the order blanks as to the status of any nondelivered goods and are sent to the depositor, showing charges
made and balance on hand. The Superintendent of Documents will advise the depositor when this balance becomes
low. There is no charge for maintaining a deposit account.
With these last two methods, the check to cover the cost is procured through the system ordinarily used by the
school. But in these instances the purchase order would read, for example, “Special Document Coupons: $50” or
“ For Depositor’s Account: $100.” The accompanying claim voucher or pro forma invoice, if requested, would be
executed by the Superintendent of Documents and sent to the school. The check that would then be issued by
the school or agency would cover the cost of several months’ or perhaps a year’s supply of Government
publications and would eliminate many separate paper processings. Use of coupons or depositors’ accounts also
facilitates the ordering of low-price publications and subscriptions which might otherwise not have been placed,
being thought of as “not worth all that paperwork.”

Points to Remember
1. Do include all the necessary identifying information when ordering publications from GPO.
2. Do write directly to the issuing agency for publications meant for free distribution. Do not add “GPO” to the
address.
3. Do not add postage when totaling your bill if you want the publications sent by regular mail. Do add the
postage if you request air mail, special delivery, or foreign delivery. One-fourth of the purchase price of
publications should be added for foreign mail.
4. Do not send cash or postage stamps in payment. Do send check or money order, payable to the Superintendent
of Documents, or special document coupons with your order unless you are charging the publications against your
depositor’s account.



81

5. Do remember the 25-percent discount allowed on orders for 100 copies or more of the same publication to be
mailed to one address. You may find that you can consolidate your order with that of another teacher or
counselor.
6. Do keep abreast of current Government publications for sale. Request that your name be added to the growing
list (now over 1 million) of those who receive free the semimonthly list of selected Government publications. (See
page 76 for information on how to obtain this list.)
7. Do separate any request for information from a direct order. If you do not, your order will be held up until
the search for information has been completed.
Requests for information and orders for priced publications should be addressed to the Superintendent o f
Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C 20402.




82

APPENDIX B. ADDRESSES OF FED ERAL AGENCIES
AEC

Atomic Energy Commission
P. O. Box 62
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831

AID

U.S. Department of State
Agency for International Development
Chief, Recruitment Branch
Employment Division
A/PA
Washington, D.C. 20523

BES

BC

BLS

CB

CIA

CLMP

EDA




ESSA

U.S. Department of Commerce
Environmental Science Services Administration
Publications Division
Rockville, Maryland 20852
Federal Bureau of Investigation
Room 4718
Washington, D.C. 20535

FBP

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training
Division of Information and Publications
1730 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

U.S. Department of Justice
Federal Bureau of Prisons
Publications Office
101 Indiana Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20537

FRB

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Employment Security
Office of Manpower Information
14th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Room 2210
Washington, D.C. 20210

Federal Reserve Board
Director
Division of Personnel Administration
Board of Governors
Washington, D.C. 20551

GPO

Superintendent of Documents
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402

HSNS

BAT

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Office of Public Affairs
1800 G Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006

FBI
AOA

EEOC

U.S. Department of Defense
High School News Service
Building 1 B
Great Lakes, Illinois 60085

HUD

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development
Director of Personnel
Washington, D.C. 20410

INS

U.S. Department of Justice
Immigration and Naturalization Service
Personnel Officer
119 D Street, N.E.
Washington, D.C. 20536
U.S. Department of Treasury
Internal Revenue Service
Room 1024
1111 Constitution Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20224

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Administration on Aging
330 Independence Avenue, S.W.
Room 33339
Washington, D.C. 20201

U.S. Department of Commerce
Bureau of the Census
Publications Distribution
Federal Office Building No. 4
Room 2205
Washington, D.C. 20233
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Office of Inquiries and Correspondence
441 G Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20212
(The addresses of BLS regional offices are
listed on page 85.)

IRS

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Children’s Bureau
Publications Distribution of the Children’s
Bureau
Social and Rehabilitation Service
North Building, Room G - 761
Washington, D.C. 20201

LMSA

Central Intelligence Agency
Office of Personnel
Washington, D.C. 20505

U.S. Department of Labor
Labor-Management Services Administration
14th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

LSB

U.S. Department of Labor
The President’s Advisory Committee on
Labor-Management Policy
14th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Standards
Publications Office
Railway Labor Building, Room 403
400 First Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

MA

U.S. Department of Labor
Manpower Administration
Office of Assistant Manpower Administrator
Publications Room 550
1726 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

U.S. Department of Commerce
Economic Development Administration
Room 6814-B
Washington, D.C. 20230

83

NASA

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Code FAD-1
Washington, D.C. 20545

NBS

U.S. Department of Commerce
National Bureau of Standards
A617
Publications Section
Administration Building
Washington, D.C. 20234

NSF

NYC

OE

PCEH

PHS

OEO

OOS

OPA

OSD

OVRR

PC

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Office of Information
Division of Publications
Washington, D.C. 20250

USDC

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Office of the Assistant Secretary (for
Legislation)
Office of Program Analysis
Room 5427 North
Washington, D.C. 20201

U.S. Civil Service Commission
Washington, D.C. 20415

USDA

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Occupational Outlook Service
441 G Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20212

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Social Security Administration
414 11th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20203

USCSC

Office of Economic Opportunity
1200 19th Street, N.W.
Room 307
Washington, D.C. 20506

U.S. Department of the Treasury
U.S. Secret Service
Treasury Building, Room 1434
Washington, D.C. 20226

SSA

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Office of Education
Publications Distribution Unit
400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20202

Small Business Administration
Publications Unit
1441 L Street, N.W.
Room 100
Washington, D.C. 20416

SS

Department of Labor
Neighborhood Youth Corps
Publications
Room 550
1726 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
U.S. Public Health Service
Public Inquiries Branch Chief
Room 5251
Health, Education, and Welfare South
Washington, D.C. 20201

SBA

National Science Foundation
Distributions
1800 G Street, N.W.
Room 232
Washington, D.C. 20550

President’s Committee on Employment of the
Handicapped
Washington, D.C. 20210

U.S. Department of Commerce
Office of Publications
Washington, D.C. 20301

USDHEW

USDI

U.S. Department of Labor
Office of Information
14th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

USDS

U.S. Department of State
Peace Corps
Public Affairs Support
Room 337
1717 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20525

U.S. Department of Justice
Public Information Office
Room 5113
10th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20530

USDL

U.S. Department of Labor
Office of Veterans’ Reemployment Rights
Room 7400
14th & Constitution Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

U.S. Department of Interior
Office of Personnel Management
Washington, D.C. 20240

USDJ

U.S. Department of Defense*
Office of the Secretary of Defense
Office Services Branch
Publications
Room 3 B 200
Washington, D.C. 20301

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Office of Public Information
Room 5551
Washington, D.C. 20201

U.S. Department of State
Recruitment Branch
Office of Personnel
Washington, D.C. 20520

♦Military forces publications are available at local military recruiting offices and most school and public libraries.




84

USIA

U.S. Information Agency
Personnel Services Staff
1776 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006

VRA

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Vocational Rehabilitation Administration
3rd Street and Independence Ave., S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20201

USPOD

U.S. Post Office Department
Bureau of Personnel
Room 3140
Washington, D.C. 20260

WB

U.S. Department of Labor
Women’s Bureau
Division of Information & Publications
14th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

WHPC
VA

Veterans Administration
Forms and Publications Depot
2625 Shirlington Road
Arlington, Virginia 22206

U.S. Department of Labor
Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions
Office of Information, Room 5133
14th Street and Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

Much Government issued occupational literature that is of interest to teachers and vocational guidance counselors
is prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the U.S. Department of Labor.
The BLS has eight regional offices located throughout the country. These offices have been designated as agents of
the Superintendent of Documents for the purpose of selling priced publications. In addition, they distribute all of
the free BLS publications. Each office sends out periodic announcements describing the free and priced materials
available through them.
To be added to the mailing list of the regional office in your area, write to the office at the address nearest you:
REGION I - BOSTON
1603-A Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Massachusetts 02203
REGION II - NEW YORK
341 Ninth Avenue
New York, New York 10001
REGION III - PHILADELPHIA
1015 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107
REGION IV - ATLANTA
1371 Peachtree Street, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309




REGION V - CHICAGO
219 S. Dearborn Street
Chicago, Illinois 60604

(Conn., Maine, Mass., N.H.,
R.I., Vermont)

REGION VI - KANSAS CITY
911 Walnut Street
Kansas City, Missouri 64106

(N.J., N.Y., P.R., V.I.)

(111., Ind., Ky., Mich.,
Minn., Ohio, Wis.)
(Colo., Iowa, Kansas, Mo.,
Montana, Neb., N.D., S. D.,
Utah, Wyoming.)

REGION VII - DALLAS
1411 N. Akard Street
Dallas, Texas 75201

(Ala., Fla., Ga., Miss.,
S.C., Tenn.)

85

(Ark., La., N.M., Okla.,
Texas.)

REGION VIII - SAN FRANCISCO
450 Golden Gate Avenue
Box 36017
San Francisco, California 94102

(Del., D.C., Md., N.C., Pa.,
Va.,W. Va.)

(Alaska, Ariz., Calif.,
Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada,
Oregon, Washington.)

APPENDIX C. OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK Q UAR TERLY-CU M U LATIVE INDEX
Manpower and Occupational Outlook
Issue
A million and a half technicians needed by 1975 ............................................................................
Aerospace facts, the manpower story ..............................................................................................
Automotive services, career opportunities.........................................................................................
Business growth boosts salaried management j o b s ..........................................................................
Career opportunities in government................................................................................. May 1966,
Changing job market.............................................................................................................................
Eighty-nine million jobs by 1975? ...................................................................................................
Farm machinery troubleshooter........................................................................................................
Federal Government work force: A need for new and more complex skills.................................
Foreign service, careers i n ...................................................................................................................
Government service: An urgent need for ta le n t...............................................................................
High school graduates, spotlight on o p p o rtu n ities..........................................................................
Jobs with a future for high school graduates....................................................................................
lineup for college women at baccalaureate plus seven......................... ...........................................
Looking for a temporary job?.............................................................................................................
Manpower shortages, facts about........................................................................................................
Medical laboratory assistants, career opportunities..........................................................................
NASA: Brief history-Long s trid e s...................................................................................................
New jobs for N egroes............................................................................................................. ..
xOccupational forecasting-A bridge between education and w ork................................................
Shorthand reporters, employment o u tlo o k .......................................................................................
Skilled jobs, average p a y .....................................................................................................................
Skilled jobs for g irls.............................................................................................................................
State and local governments: Burgeoning need for m anpow er......................................................
xState policeman, employment opportunities.................................................................................
xSystems analyst: A softwear specialist...........................................................................................
The job-shop engineer..........................................................................................................................
xThe men behind the man in the m o o n ............................................................................................
The Negro’s occupational p ro g re ss...................................................................................................
The unemployed-A portrait in depth.................................................................................................
xThe health manpower gap: A high hurdle ....................................................................................
xThey play for money (employment outlook for athletes) ...........................................................
Where the action is (summer jobs) ...................................................................................................
White-collar workers, salaries..............................................................................................................
Who are the unem ployed?...................................................................................................................

December
May
February
February
September
December
May
September
September
September
September
September
February
September
September
May
February
May
December
September
December
December
December
May
September
May
February
May
December
May
February
December
February
September
May

1967
1966
1966
1967
1966
1966
1967
1967
1967
1966
1966
1967
1968
1967
1968
1966
1966
1966
1966
1967
1966
1967
1967
1967
1966
1967
1968
1966
1966
1966
1967
1967
1966
1966
1966

February
September
February
September
December
December
September
December
February
September

1966
1967
1968
1967
1966
1966
1966
1967
1966
1967

Service and Work Programs
A human renewal program...................................................................................................................
Community Action Program: Grass roots o p p o rtu n ities................................................................
Jobs: The live ammunition in the war on p o v e rty ..........................................................................
Neighborhood Youth Corps-Help for chronic losers .....................................................................
OIC: Craftsmen with confidence........................................................................................................
Plans for Progress..................................................................................................................................
Service occupations, training for, under M D TA ...............................................................................
VISTA: Volunteers with V ision........................................................................................................
Summer jobs, where the action i s ......................................................................................................
Teacher C orps.......................................................................................................................................




86

Education and Training
xABC: A college survival technique..............................................................................................
xApprentice opportunities for youth..............................................................................................
Colleges lead climb in school enrollment.........................................................................................
Cooperative education, putting theory into practice.....................................................................
xDental assistant: Third hand for the d e n tis t...............................................................................
Education for the public service......................................................................................................
Educational attainment of the work force.......................................................................................
xEducational talent search: Radar for the colleges.......................................................................
xGuidance for gifted students...........................................................................................................
xHelp for the disadvantaged..............................................................................................................
How to get into the college of your ch o ice....................................................................................
Negroes climb toward equality of education..................................................................................
Spotlight on high school g rad u ates................................................................................................
Vocational education: Training for yesterday’s job? ..................................................................

Issue
February
December
May
February
February
September
September
February
February
September
February
May
September
May

1968
1967
1967
1966
1966
1966
1966
1968
1968
1967
1966
1967
1967
1966

February
February

1967
1967

February
September
September

1967
1966
1966

May
September
December
May
September
December
December
December
May
May
December
December
February

1966
1966
1967
1967
1967
1966
1967
1967
1966
1967
1966
1967
1966

May
December
May
December
December
May

1967
1967
1967
1966
1967
1967

Legislation and Regulations
x Old problem: Young w o rk e rs ......................................................................................................
Warmer benefits for the Cold War GI ............................................................................................

Other Background Material for Counseling
Cold War GI, warmer benefits f o r ...................................................................................................
College graudates, annual spring scramble for..................................................................................
Counseling a id s .................................................................................... February 1966, May 1966,
February 1967, May 1967, December 1967, February 1968
Counseling and the world of work in the 1970’s .............................................................................
Educational attainment of the work force.......................................................................................
Electronic computer industry: A young giant...............................................................................
“Everything’s go” for the college g r a d .........................................................................................
For women-A longer w orklife........................................................................................................
Interview with Vice President Hubert H. H um phrey.....................................................................
Jobs for high school and college stu d en ts.......... ...........................................................................
xMinority youth can beapprentices ................................................................................................
xNASA counsels the earthbound......................................................................................................
NEA to match teachers and counselors with jobs-by computer...................................................
New jobs for N egroes........................................................................................................................
Pay is good in craft jobs ................................................................................................................
Recent publications on manpower .................................................................................................
May 1966, September 1966, February 1967, September 1967, December 1967,
February 1968.
xRetooling for higher education......................................................................................................
xSkilled jobs for g irls ........................................................................................................................
Summer jobs for y o u th .....................................................................................................................
xThe counselor and the Negro student............................................................................................
The dropout who made g o o d ...........................................................................................................
xThe many faces of technology......................................................................................................




87

Issue
xThe Negro en tre p ren e u r................................................................................................................
The world of work as it appears to high school s tu d e n ts .............................................................
Upward bound: Quest for hidden t a l e n t .......................................................................................
What happens to school d ro p o u ts? .................................................................................................

February
May
February
February

1966
1967
1967
1967

Note: This index lists all articles (some titles abbreviated to conserve space) that appeared in the Occupational Outlook Quarterly
in the 2-year period February 1966-February 1968.
Reprints of articles preceded by an x are available free of charge from the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Occupational Outlook Service, Washington, D.C. 20212, as long as supplies last.




88

APPENDIX D. PERIODICALS
In several sections of this Guide, references have been made to periodicals published by various departments of the
Federal Government. Several of these periodicals frequently contain information that is of interest to counselors.
Their titles and prices are listed below, by issuing department. The U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO),
Washington, D.C. 20402, handles all requests for subscriptions that are priced. (See appendix A.)

President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped
PERFORMANCE - THE STORY OF THE HANDICAPPED. (PCEH). Free. Booklet issued monthly containing
various articles of interest to the handicapped and to those dealing with the handicapped. Some typical subjects
covered are architectural barriers, training opportunities for the retarded, and stories of people who have overcome
their handicaps.

U.S. Civil Service Commission
CIVIL SERVICE JOURNAL. 25 cents a copy. $1 a year. Booklet contains articles on government employment,
training, personnel, and related programs. Regular features include recruiting needs, incentive awards, personnel
legislation, legal decisions, training news, and book reviews.

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
AMERICAN EDUCATION. USDHEW. Office of Education. 10 issues annually. 45 cents a copy. $3.75 a year.
Reports on the Federal Government’s role in education. Consists of articles that discuss the important trends in
education. Lists recent government publications concerned with education and also contains a special feature called
the Statistic of the Month.

U.S. Department of Labor
AREA TRENDS IN EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. (BES).
Bi-Monthly. Free. See page 20 for annotation.
EMPLOYMENT AND EARNINGS AND MONTHLY REPORT ON THE LABOR FORCE. USDL. Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Monthly. 65 cents a copy. $7 a year. Presents statistics on the labor force, employment, earnings, hours,
and labor turnover, based on industry payrolls and household surveys. Provides data on employment in State and
metropolitan areas, by industry. An Annual Supplement containing statistical averages for the preceding year is
available toward the end of each year. Seepage 71 for annotation.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE REVIEW. USDL. Bureau of Employment Security. Monthly. 40 cents a copy. $4.50 a
year. A monthly publication containing articles on employment service operations in the fields of manpower
development and utilization. Presents articles on occupational developments, manpower trends, community and
industry occupational surveys, training requirements, and other related subjects.
MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly. 75 cents a copy. $7.50 a year. A
monthly publication presenting studies, reports, and special articles on labor and related topics. Contains a separate
section which provides current statistics on employment, labor turnover, earnings and hours, prices, etc. (reissued
subsequently as an annual supplement). Special departments summarize developments in industrial relations and
court decisions. Also includes book reviews, book notes, and a chronology of labor events.
OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK QUARTERLY. USDL. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 35 cents a copy. $1.25 a year. A
quarterly publication reviewing current developments affecting employment opportunities. Includes articles on




89

topics such as changing occupational employment and changing occupational structure, occupational and industry
employment trends, education and training requirements, and other subjects of interest to counselors. Issued as a
supplement to the biennial Occupational Outlook Handbook.
THE CURRENT EMPLOYMENT MARKET FOR ENGINEERS, SCIENTISTS, AND TECHNICIANS. USDL.
Bureau of Employment Security. (BES). Semiannual. Free. See page 13 for annotation.

U.S. Department of Defense
HIGH SCHOOL NEWS SERVICE REPORT. USDD. High School News Service. (HSNS). Free. Published monthly
during the school year, the report is designed primarily as a reference source for counselors and others who are
called upon to furnish students with specific information on current personnel programs of the U.S. Armed
Forces. The first issue of the year describes basic facts about military service. The remaining monthly issues,
intended primarily for student readership, contain illustrated articles featuring various facets of modern military
techniques, organization, and specialized skills required for men and women in uniform today. Printed in
detachable form to facilitate posting and classroom use.
HIGH SCHOOL NEWS SERVICE CLIPSHEET. USDD. High School News Service. (HSNS). Free. Published
monthly during the school year as a supplement to the High School News Service Report. Clipsheet is designed for
bulletin board use and deals with a single topic of interest to students who expect to serve in the Armed Forces.




90

APPENDIX E. FED ER A L DEPOSITORY LIBR A R IES
Certain libraries throughout the United States are designated depositories for Government publications. Through
them Federal Government publications are made available to residents of every State, the District of Columbia,
and Puerto Rico.
It is sometimes impossible to obtain desired publications from the Superintendent of Documents. Stocks may have
been exhausted or the document may be out of print. In these instances, the depository libraries render an
invaluable service by keeping such publications permanently available. Not every Government publication can be
found at all depository libraries, as each library selects the classes of publications of interest to its particular
clientele. The depository libraries are, nevertheless, an excellent source for locating Government published
manpower and other counseling information.
The following list shows the location and names of each of the depository libraries as of February 1967. Those
libraries designated as REGIONAL receive and retain at least one copy of all Government publications made
available to depositories and provide interlibrary loans and reference services for the other depository libraries
located within their region.




91

LIS T O F D E P O S I T O R Y L I B R A R I E S

Searcy

ALABAMA
Auburn
Birmingham

Florence
Gadsden
Huntsville
Jacksonville
Maxwell A.F. Base
Mobile
Mobile (Spring Hill)
Montgomery
Normal
St. Bernard
Troy
Tuskegee Institute
University
Anchorage
College
Juneau

State College

Auburn University Library
Samford University
Birmingham Southern College,
M. Paul Phillips Library
Public Library
Florence State College, Collier
Library
Gadsden Public Library
University of Alabama Library at
Huntsville
State Teachers College Library
Air University Library
Mobile Public Library
Spring Hill College, Thomas Byrne
Memorial Library
Department of Archives and History
Library
Supreme Court Library of Alabama
Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical
College, Carnegie Library
St. Bernard College Library
Troy State College Library
Hollis Burke Frissell Library
University of Alabama LibraryREGIONAL
Alaska Methodist University Library
Anchorage Community College
Library
University of Alaska Library
Alaska State Library

CALIFORNIA
\naheim
Archata
Bakersfield
Berkeley
Chico
Claremont
Culver City
Davis
Downey
Fresno
Fullerton
Gardena
Hayward
Inglewood
Irvine
La Jolla
Lancaster
Long Beach

AMERICAN SAMOA
Pago Pago

Los Angeles

Library of American Samoa
ARIZONA

Flagstaff
Phoenix
Tempe
Thatcher
Tuscon
Yuma

Northern Arizona University Library
Department of Library and ArchivesREGIONAL
Phoenix Public Library
Arizona State University, Matthews
Library
Eastern Arizona Junior College
Library
University of Arizona LibraryREGIONAL
Yuma City-County Library

Lynwood
Marysville
Menlo Park

ARKANSAS
Arkadelphia
Batesville
Clarksville
College Heights
Conway
Fayetteville
Little Rock
Magnolia
Russellville




Harding College, Beaumont Memorial
Library
Arkansas State College Library

Montebello
Monterey
Monterey Park
Northridge

Ouachita Baptist College Library
Arkansas College Library
College of the Ozarks Library
Arkansas Agricultural and Mechanical
College Library
Hendrix College, The H.F. Buhler
Library
University of Arkansas Library
Little Rock Public Library
Supreme Court Library
Southern State College, J.M. Peach
Library
Arkansas Polytechnic College Library

Oakland
Orange
Pasadena

Pleasant Hill
Redding
Redlands

92

Anaheim Public Library
Humboldt State College Library
Kern County Free Library
Earl Warren Legal Center Library of
University of California at Berkeley
University of California Library
Chico State College Library
Pomona College, Honnold Library
Culver City Library
University of California Library at
Davis
Downey City Library
Fresno County Free Library
Fresno State College Library
California State College Library at
Fullerton
Gardena Public Library
California State College Library at
Hayward
Inglewood Public Library
University of California Library at
Irvine
University of California Library at
La Jolla
Antelope Valley College Library
California State College Library at
Long Beach
Public Library
California State College at Los Angeles,
John F. Kennedy Memorial Library
Los Angeles County Law Library
Los Angeles Public Library
Loyola University of Los Angeles
Library
Occidental College Library
Pepperdine College Library
University of California Library
at Los Angeles
University of California, School of
Law Library
University of Southern California
Library
Lynwood Library
Yuba College District Library
Department of Interior, Geological
Survey Library
Rio Hondo Regional Library
Naval Postgraduate School Library
Bruggemeyer Memorial Library
San Fernando Valley State College
Library
Mills College Library
Oakland Public Library
Orange County Free Library
California Institute of Technology
Library
Pasadena Public Library
Contra Costa County Library
Shasta County Free Library
University of Redlands Library

Redwood City
Reseda
Richmond
Riverside
Sacramento

San Bernadino
San Diego

San Francisco

San Jose
San Leandro
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clara
Santa Cruz
Santa Rosa
Stanford
Stockton
Thousand Oaks
Turlock
Walnut
West Covina
Whittier

Redwood City Public Library
West Valley Regional Branch Library
Richmond Public Library
Riverside Public Library
University of California Library
at Riverside
California State Library-REGIONAL
City Free Library
Sacramento County Law Library
Sacramento State College Library
San Bernadino County Library
San Diego County Library
San Diego Public library
San Diego State College Library
University of San Diego, School of
Law Library
Mechanics Institute Library
San Francisco Public Library
San Francisco State College, Social
Science and Business Library
University of San Francisco, Richard
A. Gleeson Library
San Jose State College Library
San Leandro Community Library
Center
Santa Ana Public Library
University of California Library
at Santa Barbara
University of Santa Clara, Michel
Orradre Library
University of California Library at
Santa Cruz
Santa Rosa Public Library
Stanford University Libraries
Stockton Free Public Library
California Lutheran College Library
Stanislaus State College Library
Mt. San Antonio College Library
West Covina Library
Whittier College Library

CONNECTICUT
Bridgeport
Bristol
Hartford
Danbury
Middletown
Mystic
New Haven
New London
Storrs
Waterbury

DELAWARE
Dover
Newark
Wilmington

Washington, D.C.

Canal Zone Library
COLORADO

Alamosa
Boulder
Colorado Springs
Denver

Fort Collins
Golden
Greeley
Gunnison
La Junta
Pueblo
U.S. Air Force Acad.




Delaware State College Library
State Law Library
University of Delaware, Morris
Library
Wilmington Institute Free Library
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

CANAL ZONE
Balboa Heights

Bridgeport Public Library
Public Library
Connecticut State Library-REGIONAL
Hartford Public Library
Trinity College Library
Danbury State College Library
Wesleyan University, Olin Library
Mystic Seaport Library
Yale University Library
Connecticut College, Palmer Library
U.S. Coast Guard Academy Library
University of Connecticut Library
Silas Branson Library

Adams State College Library
University of Colorado LibraryREGIONAL
Colorado College, Charles Learning
Tutt Library
Colorado State Library
Department of Interior, Bureau of
Reclamation Library
Public Library-REGION AL
Regis College Library
University of Denver, Mary Reed
Library
Colorado State University Library
Colorado School of Mines Library
Colorado State College Library
Western State College Library
Otero Junior College, Wheeler
Library
McClelland Public Library
Southern Colorado State College
Library
Academy Library

Bureau of the Budget Library,
Executive Office of the President
Civil Service Commission Library
Department of Commerce Library
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare Library
Department of Interior Central
Library
Department of Interior, Geological
Survey Library
Department of Justice Main Library
Department of State Library
Department of State, Office of Legal
Advisor, Law Library
National Agricultural Library
National War College Library
Navy Department Library
Navy Department, Office of Judge
Advocate General Library
Post Office Department Library
Public Library
Treasury Department Library
FLORIDA

Boca Raton
Coral Gables
Daytona Beach
De Land
Fort Lauderdale
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Lakeland
Leesburg
Melbourne
Miami
Opa-Locka
Orlando
Palatka
Pensacola
St. Petersburg

93

Florida Atlantic University Library
University of Miami Library
Volusia County Public Libraries
John B. Stetson University, Sampson
Library
Nova University Library
University of Florida LibraryREGIONAL
Jacksonville Public Library
Jacksonville University Library
Park Trammell Public Library
Lake-Sumter Junior College Library
Brevard Engineering College Library
Miami Public Library
Biscayne College Library
Florida Technical University Library
St. Johns River Junior College
Library
University of West Florida
St. Petersburg Public Library

Tallahassee

Tampa
Winter Park

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical
University Library
Florida State Library
Florida State University Library
Tampa Public Library
University of South Florida Library
University of Tampa Library
Rollins College, Mills Memorial
Library
GEORGIA

Albany
Americus
Athens
Atlanta

Augusta
Brunswick
Carrollton
Dahlonega
Macon
Marietta
Milledgeville
Savannah
Statesboro
Valdosta

Decatur
De Kalb
Edward sville

Albany Public Library
Georgia Southwestern College
University of Georgia Libraries
Atlanta Public Library
Atlanta University, Trevor Arnett
Library
Emory University, Asa Griggs
Candler Library
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Price Gilbert Memorial Library
Georgia State Library
Augusta College Library
Brunswick Public Library
West Georgia College Library
North Georgia College Library
Mercer University Library
Keenesaw Junior College Library
Women’s College of Georgia Library
Savannah Public Library
Georgia Southern College Library
Valdosta State College Library

Elsah
Evanston
Freeport
Galesburg
Jacksonville
Kankakee
Lake Forest
Lisle
Lockport
Macomb
Monmouth
Normal
Oak Park
Peoria

GUAM
Agana

River Forest
Rock Island
Rockford
Springfield
Urbana
Wheaton
Woodstock

Nieves M. Flores Memorial Library
HAWAII

Hilo
Honolulu

Laie
Wailuku

University of Hawaii, Hilo Campus
Library
Chaminade College Library
Hawaii State Library
Municipal Reference Library
University of Hawaii Library
Church College of Hawaii Library
Maui County Library

INDIANA
Anderson
Bloomington
Crawfordsville
Evansville
Fort Wayne

IDAHO
Boise
Caldwell
Moscow
Pocatello
Rexburg

Boise College Library
Boise Public Library
Idaho State Law Library
The College of Idaho,' Strahorn
Memorial Library
University of Idaho LibraryREGIONAL
Idaho State University Library
Ricks College Library

Gary
Greencastle
Hammond
Hanover
Huntington
Indianapolis

ILLINOIS
Bloomington
Carbondale
Carlinville
Champaign
Charleston
Chicago




Chicago Public Library
Illinois Teachers College, North
Campus Library
John Crerar Library
Loyola University, E.M. Cudahy
Memorial Library
Newberry Library
University of Chicago, Law Library
University of Chicago Library
University of Illinois, Chicago Circle
Campus Library
Decatur Public Library
Northern Illinois University Library
Southern Illinois University, Lovejoy
Memorial Library
Principia College, Marshall Brooks
Library
Northwestern University Library
Freeport Public Library
Galesburg Public Library
MacMurray College Library
Olivet Nazarene College Library
Lake Forest College, Donnelley
Library
St. Procopius College Library
Lewis College of Science and
Technology Library
Western Illinois University Memorial
Library
Monmouth College Library
Illinois State Normal University
Library
Oak Park Public Library
Bradley University Library
Peoria Public Library
Rosary College
Rock Island Public Library
Public Library
Illinois State Library-REGIONAL
University of Illinois Library
Wheaton College Library
Woodstock Public Library

Jeffersonville

Illinois Wesleyan University Libraries
Southern Illinois University Library
Blackburn College Library
University of Illinois
Eastern Illinois University, Booth
Library
Chicago Natural History Museum
Library

Lafayette
Muncie
Notre Dame
Rensselaer
Richmond

94

Anderson College, Charles E. Wilson
Library
Indiana University Library
Wabash College Library
Evansville Public Library
Indiana-Purdue University Regional
Campus Library
Public Library
Gary Public Library
Indiana University, Northwest
Campus
De Pauw University Library
Hammond Public Library
Hanover College Library
Huntington College Library
Butler University, Irwin Library
Indiana State Library-REGIONAL
Indianapolis Public Library
Indiana University, Southeastern
Campus Library
Purdue University Library
Ball State Teachers College Library
Public Library
University of Notre Dame Library
St. Joseph’s College Library
Earlham College, Lilly Library
Morrison-Reeves Library

South Bend
Terre Haute
Valparaiso

Hammond

Indiana University, South BendMishawaka Campus Library
Indiana State College Library
Valparaiso University Library

Lafayette
Lake Charles
Monroe

IOWA
Ames
Cedar Falls
Council Bluff
Des Moines
Dubuque
Fairfield
Grinnell
Iowa City
Lamoni
Mount Vernon
Sioux City

Iowa State University of Science
and Technology Library
State College of Iowa Library
Free Public Library
Iowa State Traveling Library
Drake University, Cowles Library
Public Library
Carnegie-Stout Free Public Library
Parsons College Library Branch of
Fairfield Free Public Library
Grinnell College Library
University of Iowa Library-REGIONAL
Graceland College Library
Cornell College Library
Public Library

Natchitoches
New Orleans

Ruston
Shreveport
Thibodaux

KANSAS
Atchison
Baldwin City
Emporia
Hays
Hutchinson
Lawrence
Manhattan
Pittsburg
Salina
Topeka
Wichita

MAINE

St. Benedict’s College, The Abbey
Library
Baker University Library
Kansas State Teachers College,
William Allen White Library
Fort Hays Kansas State College,
Forsyth Library
Hutchinson Public Library
University of Kansas Library
Kansas State University Library
Kansas State College of Pittsburg,
Porter Library
Kansas Wesleyan University Library
Kansas State Historical Society
Library
Kansas State Library
Wichita State University Library

Augusta
Bangor
Brunswick
Lewiston
Orono
Portland
Springvale
Waterville

Bowling Green
Danville
Elizabethtown
Frankfort
Lexington
Louisville
Morehead
Murray
Owensboro
Pikeville
Richmond

Annapolis
Baltimore
Bethesda
Chestertown

Ashland Public Library
Union College, Abigail E. Weeks
Memorial Library
Western Kentucky State Teachers
College Library
Centre College Library
Oxbow Regional Library
State Law Library
University of Kentucky Library
Louisville Free Public Library
University of Louisville Library
Morehead State University, Johnson
Camden Library
Murray State College Library
Kentucky Wesleyan College Library
Pikeville College Library
Eastern Kentucky University, John
Grant Crabbe Library

College Park
Germantown
Salisbury
Towson
Westminster




Maryland State Library
U.S. Naval Academy Library
Enoch Pratt Free Library
Johns Hopkins University Library
Morgan State College Library
Montgomery County Department of
Public Libraries
Washington College, George Avery
Bunting Library
University of Maryland LibraryREGIONAL
Atomic Energy Commission Library
Salisbury State College Library
Gaucher College, Julia Rogers
Library
Western Maryland College Library
MASSACHUSETTS

Amherst
Boston

LOUISIANA
Baton Rouge

Maine State Library
Bangor Public Library
Bowdoin College Library
Bates College Library
University of Maine LibraryREGIONAL
Portland Public Library
University of Maine, Law Library
Nasson College Library
Colby College Library
MARYLAND

KENTUCKY
Ashland
Barbourville

Southeastern Louisiana College,
Sims Memorial Library
University of Southwestern
Louisiana Library
McNeese State College Library
Northeast Louisiana State College,
Sandel Library
Northwestern State College of
Louisiana
Law Library of Louisiana
Louisiana State University Library
Loyola University Library
New Orleans Public Library
Southern University in New Orleans
Library
Tulane University, Howard-Tilton
Memorial Library
Louisiana Polytechnic Institute
Library-REGIONAL
Shreve Memorial Library
Francis T. Nicholls State College
Library

Brookline
Cambridge

Louisiana State University, Law
Library
Louisiana State University LibraryREGIONAL
Southern University Library

95

Amherst College Library
University of Massachusetts, Goodell
Library
Boston Athenaeum Library
Northeastern University, Dodge
Library
Boston Public Library
State Library of MassachusettsREGIONAL
Public Library
Harvard College Library, Serials
Division
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Library

Chestnut Hill
Lowell
Lynn
Medford
New Bedford
North Dartmouth
North Easton
Springfield
Waltham
Wellesley
Wenham
Williamstown
Worcester

Boston College, Bapst Library
Lowell Technological Institute
Library
Lynn Public Library
Tufts University Library
Public Library
Southeastern Massachusetts
Technological Institute Library
Stonehill College, Cushing-Maicin
Library
City Library
Brandeis University Library
Wellesley College Library
Gordon College, Winn Library
Williams College Library
American Antiquarian Society
Library
Free Public Library

Mankato
Minneapolis
Moorhead
Morris
Northfield
St. Cloud
St. Paul
St. Peter
Stillwater
Willmar

MISSISSIPPI
Columbus

MICHIGAN
Albion
Allendale
Alma
Ann Arbor
Battle Creek
Benton Harbor
Bloomfield Hills
Dearborn
Detroit

East Lansing
Escanaba
Flint
Grand Rapids
Houghton
Jackson
Kalamazoo
Lansing
Livonia
Marquette
Mt. Pleasant
Muskegon
Petoskey
Port Huron
Rochester
Saginaw
Traverse City
University Center
Ypsilanti

Hattiesburg

Albion College, Stockwell Memorial
Library
Grand Valley State College Library
Alma College, Monteith Library
University of Michigan, General
Library
Willard Library
Benton Harbor Public Library
Cranbrook Institute of Science
Library
Henry Ford Community College
Library
Detroit Public Library
Marygrove College Library
Mercy College Library
University of Detroit Library
Wayne County Public Library
Wayne State University Library
Michigan State University Library
Michigan State Library, Upper
Peninsula Branch
Charles Stewart Mott Library
Grand Rapids Public Library
Michigan College of Mining and
Technology Library
Jackson Public Library
Public Library
Western Michigan University,
Dwight B. Waldo Library
Michigan State Library-REGIONAL
Schoolcraft College Library
Northern Michigan College, Olson
Library
Central Michigan University Library
Hackley Public Library
North Central Michigan College
Library
Port Huron Public Library
Oakland University Library
Hoyt Public Library
Northwestern Michigan College,
Mark Osterlin Library
Delta College Library
Eastern Michigan University Library

Jackson

State College
University




Mississippi State College for Women,
J.C. Fant Memorial Library
University of Southern Mississippi
Library
Jackson State College Library
Millsaps College, Millsaps-Wilson
Library
Mississippi Library Commission
Mississippi State Library
Mississippi State University, Mitchell
Memorial Library
University of Mississippi Library
MISSOURI

Cape Girardeau
Columbia
Fayette
Fulton
Hannibal
Jefferson City
Joplin
Kansas City
Kirksville
Liberty
Rolla
St. Joseph
St. Louis

Springfield
Warrensburg

Southeast Missouri State College,
Kent Library
University of Missouri Library
Central Methodist College Library
Westminster College Library
Free Public Library
Lincoln University Library
Missouri State Library
Missouri Supreme Court Library
Missouri Southern College
Kansas City Public Library
Rockhurst College Library
University of Kansas City Library
N.E. Missouri State Teachers College,
Pickier Memorial Library
William Jewell College Library
University of Missouri Library at
Rolla
St. Joseph Public Library
St. Louis Public Library
St. Louis University Library
University of Missouri Library at
St. Louis
Washington University Library
Drury College Library
Southwest Missouri State College
Library
Central Missouri State College
Library
MONTANA

Billings
Bozeman
Butte
Helena

MINNESOTA
Bemidji
Collegeville
Duluth

Mankato State College Library
Public Library
University of Minnesota LibraryREGIONAL
State College Library
University of Minnesota, Morris
Library
Carleton College Library
St. Olaf College Library
St. Cloud State College Library
Minnesota Historical Society Library
Minnesota State, Law Library
St. Paul Public Library
Gustavus Adolphus College Library
Stillwater Public Library
Kandiyohi County-Willmar Library

Bemidji State College Library
St. Johns University Library
Duluth Public Library

96

Eastern Montana College Library
Montana State University Library
Montana School of Mines Library
Historical Society of Montana
Library
Montana State Library

Missoula

State University o f Montana Library-

Trenton

REGIONAL
NEBRASKA
Blair
Crete
Fremont
Hastings
Kearney
Lincoln
Omaha

Scottsbluff

Upper Montclair

Dana College Library
Whitin Library of Doane College
Midland College Library
Hastings Public Library
Nebraska State Teachers College
Library
Nebraska State Library
University of Nebraska Libraries
Creighton University, Alumni
Library
Municipal University of Omaha
Library
Omaha Public Library
Scottsbluff Public Library

West Long Branch
West New York
Woodbridge

NEW MEXICO
Albuquerque
Las Vegas
Portales
Santa Fe

NEVADA
University Park
Carson City
Las Vegas
Reno

Nevada State Library
University of Nevada, Southern
Regional Division Library
University of Nevada LibraryREGIONAL

Albany
Binghamton
Brooklyn

New Hampshire State Library
University of New Hampshire Library
Dartmouth College Library
New England College Library
City Library
St. Anselm’s College, Geisel Library

Buffalo

NEW JERSEY
Atlantic City
Bayonne
Bloomfield
Bridgeton
Camden
Convent Station
East Orange
Elizabeth
Glassboro
Hackensack
Irvington
Jersey City
Madison
Mount Holly
New Brunswick
Newark
Passaic
Plainfield
Princeton
Rutherford
South Orange
Teaneck
Toms River




University of New Mexico
New Mexico Highlands University,
Rodgers Library
Eastern New Mexico University
Library
New Mexico State, Law Library
New Mexico State Library, State
Library Extension Service-REGIONAI
New Mexico State University Library
NEW YORK

NEW HAMPSHIRE
Concord
Durham
Hanover
Henniker
Manchester

State of New Jersey, State Library,
Law and Reference Bureau,
Department of Education
Free Public Library
Montclair State College, Harry A.
Sprague Library
Monmouth College, Guggenheim
Memorial Library
West New York Free Public Library
The Free Public Library of Woodbridge

Free Public Library
Free Public Library
Free Public Library
Cumberland County Library
Camden Free Public Library
College of St. Elizabeth, Santa
Maria Library
Free Public Library
Public Library
Glassboro State College, Savitz
Library
Johnson Free Public Library
Free Public Library
Free Public Library
Jersey City State College Library
Drew University, Rose Memorial
Library
Burlington County Library
Free Public Library
Rutgers University Library
Public Library-REGIONAL
Rutgers The State University,
John Cotton Dana Library
Passaic Public Library
Plainfield Public Library
Princeton University Library
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Library
Seton Hall University Library
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Library
Ocean County College Library

Canton
Corning
Cortland
Elmira
Farmingdale
Flushing
Garden City
Greenvale
Hamilton
Hempstead
Huntington
Ithaca

Jamaica
Kings Point
Mount Vernon
New Paltz
New York City

97

New York State Library-REGIONAL
State University of New York Library
at Albany
Harpur College Library
Brooklyn College Library
Brooklyn Public Library
Polytechnic Institute Library
Pratt Institute Library
State University of New York,
Downstate Medical Center Library
Buffalo and Erie County Public
Library
Buffalo and Erie County Public
Library, Grosvenor Reference
Division
State University of New York at
Buffalo, Lockwood Memorial
Library
St. Lawrence University Library
Corning Community College Library
State University College Library
Elmira College Library
State University Agricultural and
Technical Institute Library
Queens College Library
Adelphi University Library
C.W. Post College Library
Colgate University Library
Hofstra University Library
Nassau Library System
Huntington Public Library
New York State Colleges of
Agriculture and Home Economics,
Albert R. Mann Library
Cornell University Library
Queens Borough Public Library
St. Johns University Library
U.S. Merchant Marine Academy
Library
Mount Vernon Public Library
State University College Library
College of the City of New York
Library
College of Insurance Library
Columbia University Library
Cooper Union Library

Newburgh
Oakdale
Oneonta
Oswego
Plattsburgh
Potsdam
Poughkeepsie
Rochester
St. Bonaventure
Saratoga Springs
Schenectady
Staten Island
Stony Brook
Syracuse
Troy
Utica
West Point
Yonkers

Fordham University Library
New York Law Institute Library
New York Public Library (Astor
Branch)
New York Public Library (Lenox
Branch)
New York University, University
Heights Library
State University of New York,
Maritime College Library
Newburgh Free Library
Adelphi Suffolk College Library
State University College, James M.
Milne Library
State University College, Penfield
Library
State University College, Benjamin
F. Feinberg Library
Clarkson College of Technology
Library
State University College Library
Vassar College Library
Rochester Public Library
University of Rochester Library
St. Bonaventure College Library
Skidmore College Library
Union College Library
Wagner College, Horrmann Library,
Grymes Hill
State University of New York Library
Syracuse University Library
Troy Public Library
Utica Public Library
U.S. Military Academy
Yonkers Public Library

NORTH DAKOTA
Bismarck
Fargo

Grand Forks
Minot
Richardton
Valley City

OHIO
Ada
Akron
Alliance
Ashland
Athens
Bluffton
Bowling Green
Cincinnati
Cleveland

Columbus

NORTH CAROLINA
Asheville
Boone
Buies Creek
Chapel Hill
Charlotte

Cullowhee
Davidson
Durham
Greensboro

Greenville
Murfreesboro
Pembroke
Raleigh
Salisbury
Wilmington
Wilson
Winston-Salem




State Historical Library
North Dakota Supreme Court
Law Library
Fargo Public Library
North Dakota State University of
Agriculture and Applied Sciences
Library
University of North Dakota Library
Minot State College, Memorial
Library
Assumption College, Abbey Library
State Teachers College Library

Asheville-Biltmore College Library
Appalachian State Teachers College,
Dauphin Disco Dougherty Memorial
Library
Campbell College, Carrie Rich
Memorial Library
University of North Carolina
Library-REGIONAL
Public Library of Charlotte &
Mecklenburg Co.
Queens College Library
University of North Carolina at
Charlotte, Atkins Library
Western Carolina College Library
Davidson College Library
Duke University Library
Agricultural and Technical College
Library
University of North Carolina at
Greensboro, Walter Clinton
Jackson Library
East Carolina College Library
Chowan College Library
Pembroke State College Library
North Carolina State University,
D.H. Hill Library
North Carolina State Library
Catawba College Library
Wilmington College Library
Atlantic Christian College, Clarence
L. Hardy Library
Forsyth County Library System
Wake Forest College Library

Dayton

Delaware
Elyria
Gambier
Granville
Hiram
Kent
Marietta
New Concord
Oberlin
Oxford
Portsmouth
Rio Grande
Springfield
Steubenville
Tiffin
Toledo
Van Wert
Wooster
Youngstown

Ohio Northern University, J.P.
Taggart Library
Akron Public Library
University of Akron Library
Mt. Union College Library
Ashland College Library
Ohio University Library
Bluffton College, Musselman Library
Bowling Green State University
Library
Public Library of Cincinnati and
Hamilton County
University of Cincinnati Library
Cleveland Public Library
Cleveland State University Library
Western Reserve University,
Freiberger Library
John Carroll University, Grasselli
Library
Columbus Public Library
Ohio State Library-REGIONAL
Ohio State University Library
Dayton and Montgomery County
Public Library
Miami University-Ohio State
University, Dayton Campus Library
Ohio Wesleyan University, Charles
Slocum Library
Elyria Public Library
Kenyon College Library
Denison University Library
Hiram College Library
Kent State University Library
Marietta College Library
Muskingum College Library
Oberlin College Library
Miami University Library
Free Public Library
Rio Grande College Library
Warder Public Library
Carnegie Library
Heidelberg College Library
Toledo Public Library
University of Toledo Library
Brumback Library of Van Wert
County
The College of Wooster, The Andrews
Library
Youngstown Public Library
OKLAHOMA

Ada

98

East Central State Teachers College
Library

Alva
Bartlesville
Durant
Edmond
Enid
Langston
Norman
Oklahoma City
Shawnee
Stillwater
Tahlequah
Tulsa
Weatherford

Northwestern State Teachers College
Library
Department of Interior, Region IV,
Bureau of Mines Library
Southeastern State College Library
Central State College, Max Chambers
Library
Public Library of Enid and Garfield
County
Langston University Library
University of Oklahoma Library
Oklahoma City University Library
Oklahoma State Library-REGIONAL
Oklahoma Baptist University Library
Oklahoma State University Library
Northeastern State Teachers College
Library
Tulsa City-County Library Commission
University of Tulsa Library
Southwestern State College Library

Corvallis
Eugene
Forest Grove
La Grande
McMinnville
Monmouth
Portland

Salem

Southern Oregon College of Education
Library
Oregon State University Library
University of Oregon Library
Pacific University Library
Eastern Oregon College Library
Linfield College, Northup Library
Oregon College of Education Library
Department of Interior, Bonneville
Power Administration Library
Lewis and Clark College Library
Library Association of Portland
Portland State College Library
Reed College Library
Oregon State Library
PENNSYLVANIA

Allentown
Bethlehem
Bradford
Carlisle
Cheyney
Collegeville
East Stroudsburg
Erie

T h iel C o lleg e, L an gen h eim M em orial
Library

Harrisburg
Haverford
Hazelton
Indiana
Johnstown
Lancaster
Lewisburg
Meadville
Millersville
New Castle
Philadelphia

Pittsburgh




Reading Public Library
Scranton Public Library
Slippery Rock State College Library
Swarthmore College Library
Pennsylvania State University Library
Villanova University, Law Library
Warren Library Association
Memorial Library of Washington and
Jefferson College
Waynesburg College Library
King’s College Library
James V. Brown Library
York Junior College Library
PUERTO RICO

Mayaguez
Ponce

University of Puerto Rico, College of
Agriculture and Mechanical Arts
Library
Catholic University of Puerto Rico
Library
University of Puerto Rico General
Library
RHODE ISLAND

Kingston
Newport
Providence

Warwick
Westerly

University of Rhode Island Library
Naval War College Library
Brown University Library
Providence Public Library
Rhode Island College Library
Rhode Island State Library
Warwick Public Library
Westerly Public Library
SOUTH CAROLINA

Charleston
Clemson
Columbia

Muhlenberg College Library
Lehigh University Library
Carnegie Public Library
Dickinson College Library
Cheyney State College Library
Ursinus College Library
East Stroudsburg State College
Erie Public Library

G reenville

Waynesburg
Wilkes-Barre
Williamsport
York

Rio Piedras

OREGON
Ashland

Reading
Scranton
Slippery Rock
Swarthmore
University Park
Villanova
Warren
Washington

Greenville
Orangeburg
Rock Hill

Charleston College Library
The Citadel Library
Clemson University Library
Columbia College Library
South Carolina State Library
University of South Carolina Library
Furman University Library
Greenville County Library
South Carolina State College Library
Winthrop College, Carnegie Library
SOUTH DAKOTA

Aberdeen

Pennsylvania State Library
Haverford College Library
Hazelton Public Library
Indiana State College Library
Cambria Public Library
Franklin and Marshall College,
Fackenthal Library
Bucknell Univeristy Library
Allegheny College Library
Millersville State College
New Castle Free Public Library
Drexel Institute of Technology
Library
Philadelphia Free Library
Temple University Library
University of Pennsylvania Library
Allegheny Regional Branch Library
Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Department of Interior, Region V,
Bureau of Mines Library
U niversity of Pittsburgh Library

Brookings
Pierre
Rapid City
Sioux Falls
Spearfish
Vermillion
Yankton

Northern State Teachers College
Library
South Dakota State University,
Lincoln Memorial Library
South Dakota State Library
Commission
Rapid City Public Library
South Dakota School of Mines &
Technology Library
Carnegie Free Public Library
Black Hills Teachers College Library
University of South Dakota Library
Yankton College Library
TENNESSEE

Chattanooga
Clarksville
Jefferson City
Johnson City

99

Chattanooga Public Library
Austin Peay State College Library
Carson-Newman College, Maples
Library
East Tennessee State University
Library

Knoxville
Martin
Memphis
Murfreesboro
Nashville

Sewanee

University of Tennessee Library
University of Tennessee LibraryMartin Branch
Cossitt Reference Library
Memphis State University, John W.
Brister Library
Middle Tennessee State College
Library
Fisk University Library
Joint University Libraries
Nashville Public Library
State Library Division, Tennessee
State Library and Archives
University of the South Library

UTAH
Cedar City
Ephraim
Logan
Ogden
Provo
Salt Lake City

VERMONT

TEXAS
Abilene
Arlington
Austin

Beaumont
Brownwood
Canyon
College Station
Commerce
Corsicana
Dallas

Denton
Edinburg
El Paso
Fort Worth
Galveston
Houston
Huntsville
Kingsville
Longview
Lubbock
Marshall
Nacogdoches
Plainview
San Angelo
San Antonio

San Marcos
Sherman
Texarkana
Waco
Wichita Falls




College of Southern Utah Library
Snow College Library
Utah State University of Agriculture
and Applied Science LibraryREGIONAL
Weber College Library
Brigham Young University Library
University of Utah Library
Utah State Library
University of Utah, Law Library

Hardin Simmons University Library
Arlington State College Library
Texas State Library-REGIONAL
University of Texas, Institute of
Public Service Library
University of Texas, Law Library
University of Texas Library
Lamar State College of Technology
Library
Howard Payne College, Walker
Memorial Library
West Texas State University Library
Texas A & M University Library
East Texas State College Library
Navarro Junior College Library
Bishop College, Zale Library
Dallas Public Library
Southern Methodist University
Library
North Texas State University Library
Pan American College Library
El Paso Public Library
University of Texas, Texas Western
College Library
Fort Worth Public Library
Texas Christian University Library
Rosenberg Library
Houston Public Library
University of Houston Library
Sam Houston State Teachers College,
Estill Library
Texas College of Arts and Industries
Library
Nicholson Memorial Library
Texas Technological College LibraryREGIONAL
Wiley College, Carnegie Library
Stephen F. Austin State College
Library
Wayland Baptist College, Van Howeling
Memorial Library
San Angelo College Library
Public Library, Business and Science
Department
St. Mary’s University Library
Trinity University Library
Southwest Texas State College Library
Austin College, Arthur Hopkins
Library
Texarkana College Library
Baylor University Library
Midwestern University Library

100

Burlington
Johnson
Middlebury
Montpelier
Northfield
Putney

University of Vermont Library
Johnson Teachers College Library
Middlebury College, Egbert Starr
Library
Vermont State Library
Norwich University Library
Windham College, Dorothy Culbertson
Marvin Library
VIRGINIA

Blacksburg
Bridgewater
Charlottesville
Emory
Fairfax
Fredericksburg
Hampden-Sydney
Lexington
Norfolk

Petersburg
Richmond
Roanoke
Salem
University
University of
Richmond, P.O.
Williamsburg

Virginia Polytechnic Institute Library
Bridgewater College Library
University of Virginia, Law Library
Emory and Henry College Library
George Mason College of the University
of Virginia Library
Mary Washington College Library
Hampden-Sydney College Library
Virginia Military Institute Library
Washington and Lee University
Library
Armed Forces Staff College Library
Norfolk Public Library
Old Dominion College, Hughes
Library
Virginia State College Library
Virginia State Library
Roanoke Public Library
Roanoke College, Bittle Memorial
Library
University of Virginia Library
University of Richmond Library
William and Mary College Library
WASHINGTON

Bellingham
Cheney
Ellensburg
Everett
Olympia
Port Angeles
Pullman
Seattle
Spokane
Tacoma
Vancouver
Walla Walla

Western Washington State College
Eastern Washington State College
Library
Central Washington State College
Library
Everett Public Library
Washington State Library-REGIONAL
Port Angeles Public Library
Washington State University Library
Seattle Public Library
University of Washington Library
Spokane Public Library
University of Puget Sound Library
Tacoma Public Library
Fort Vancouver Regional Library
Whitman College Library

WEST VIRGINIA
Athens
Charleston
Elkins
Fairmont
Glenville
Huntington
Institute
Morgantown
Salem
Weirton

Milwaukee

Concord College Library
Department of Archives and History,
State Library
Kanawha County Public Library
Davis and Elkins College Library
Fairmont State College Library
Glenville State College, Robert
F. Kidd Library
Marshall University Library
West Virginia State College Library
West Virginia University LibraryREGIONAL
Salem College Library
Mary H. Weir Public Library

Oshkosh
Platteville
Racine
River Falls
Stevens Point
Superior

WISCONSIN
Appleton
Beloit
Eau Claire
Fond du Lac
La Crosse
Madison




Waukesha
Whitewater

Lawrence College Library
Beloit College Libraries
Wisconsin State College, William D.
McIntyre Library
Fond du Lac Public Library
Public Library
Wisconsin State University, Florence
Wing Library
Madison Public Library
Reference and Loan Library
State Historical Society LibraryREGIONAL

University of Wisconsin Library
Wisconsin State Library
Milwaukee County Law Library
Milwaukee Public Library-REGIONAL
Mount Mary College Library
Oklahoma Library
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Library
Oshkosh State College Library
Wisconsin State College and
Institute of Technology, Karrmann
Library
Racine Public Library
Wisconsin State University, Chalmer
Davee Library
Wisconsin State College Library
Superior Public Library
Wisconsin State College, Curran
Library
Waukesha Public Library
Wisconsin State College, Harold
Anderson Library
WYOMING

Casper
Cheyenne
Laramie
Sheridan

Natrona County Public Library
Wyoming State Library
University of Wyoming Library
Sheridan College, Mary Brown Kooi
Library
☆ u.s. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1968 0 - 3 2 2 - 2 4 9

101