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FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION:
Patrick C. Jackman (202) 606-7000
CPI QUICKLINE:
(202) 606-6994
FOR CURRENT AND HISTORICAL
INFORMATION:
(202) 606-7828
MEDIA CONTACT:
(202) 606-5902
INTERNET ADDRESS:
http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX:

USDL-98-458
TRANSMISSION OF
MATERIAL IN THIS
RELEASE IS EMBARGOED
UNTIL 8:30 A.M. (EST)
Tuesday, November 17, 1998

OCTOBER 1998

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) rose 0.2
percent in October, before seasonal adjustment, to a level of 164.0 (198284=100), the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor
reported today. For the 12-month period ended in October, the CPI-U has
increased 1.5 percent.
The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) also rose 0.2 percent in October, prior to seasonal adjustment.
The October 1998 CPI-W level of 160.6 was 1.3 percent higher than the
index in October 1997.
CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI-U rose 0.2 percent in
October, following no change in September. The October advance reflects
upturns in the indexes for food and for energy. The food index, which was
unchanged in September, rose 0.6 percent in October. Prices for food at
home increased 0.7 percent after declining 0.2 percent in September,
primarily as a result of a sharp turnaround in prices for fruits and
vegetables. The energy index, which declined 1.3 percent in September,
rose 0.9 percent in October. The index for petroleum-based energy
increased 2.4 percent, while the index for energy services fell 0.3
percent. Excluding food and energy, the CPI-U increased 0.2 percent in
October, the same as in each of the preceding three months. Smaller
increases in the indexes for shelter and for cigarettes largely were
offset by upturns in the indexes for apparel, for household furnishings
and operation, and for education and communication.
Table A.

Percent changes in CPI for Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate 12-mos.
Category
1998
3-mos. ended ended

Apr.
All Items
.2
Food and beverages .1
Housing
.4
Apparel
-.1
Transportation
-.1
Medical care
.4
Recreation
.0
Education and
communication
.3
Other goods and
services
1.0
Special Indexes
Energy
-.1
Food
.1
All Items less
Food and energy .3

May June July Aug. Sep. Oct.

Oct. `98

Oct. `98

.3
.5
.3
.4
.1
.3
.0

.1
.1
.1
.2
-.3
.4
.1

.2
.2
.2
-.3
.3
.2
.0

.2
.3
.1
1.1
.0
.4
.1

.0
.0
.2
-.7
-.4
.3
.1

.2
.5
.2
.1
.3
.2
-.3

1.7
3.3
2.3
1.5
-.6
3.5
-.4

1.5
2.3
2.3
.5
-2.2
3.6
1.1

.3

.1

.0

-.5

.0

.2

-1.2

1.1

.7

.0

.7

.1

.9

.3

5.5

5.2

.3
.6

-.7
.1

.0 -1.0 -1.3
.2
.2
.0

.9
.6

-5.4
3.3

-9.1
2.4

.2

.1

.2

.2

2.3

2.3

.2

.2

Beginning with release of data for January 1999, the BLS will introduce a
new formula for calculating the basic components of the CPI. See page 4
for more details. See pages 5-9 for announcements of other methodological
changes to be introduced with data for January 1999.
During the first 10 months of 1998, the CPI-U rose at a 1.6-percent
seasonally adjusted annual rate (SAAR). This compares with an increase of
1.7 percent for all of 1997. Energy costs, although increasing in
October, have continued to act as a moderating influence on overall
consumer price index movements thus far in 1998, decreasing at an 8.9percent annual rate after declining 3.4 percent in all of 1997. Food
costs, which rose 1.5 percent in 1997, have risen at a 2.6-percent SAAR in
the first 10 months of 1998. Excluding food and energy, the CPI-U has
advanced at a 2.4-percent rate thus far in 1998, compared with a 2.2
percent rise for all of 1997.
The food and beverages index rose 0.5 percent in October. The index
for food at home increased 0.7 percent, following a 0.2 percent decline in
September. The sharp turnaround in the index for fruits and vegetables-up 3.2 percent in October after declining 2.0 percent in September-accounted for about three-quarters of the acceleration in the food at home
component. In October, the indexes for fresh fruits and for fresh
vegetables increased 2.8 and 5.7 percent, respectively. The index for
processed fruits and vegetables declined 0.3 percent. Upturns in the
indexes for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs and for cereal and bakery

products also contributed to the acceleration in October. Within the
former group, meat prices c
Table 1. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and commodity
and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-U

Relative
importance,
December
1997

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
Oct. 1998 fromSep.
1998

Oct.
1998

Oct.
1997

Sep.
1998

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJuly to Aug. to Sep. to
Aug.
Sep.
Oct.

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

163.6
490.1

164.0
491.3

1.5
-

0.2
-

0.2
-

0.0
-

0.2
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

16.310
15.326
9.646
1.536
2.629
1.037
1.394

161.5
161.1
161.2
181.9
147.5
152.9
193.5

162.4
162.0
162.5
182.2
148.0
155.0
199.5

2.3
2.4
2.2
2.1
-0.6
6.4
5.8

0.6
0.6
0.8
0.2
0.3
1.4
3.1

0.3
0.2
0.3
0.5
0.3
1.6
-0.4

0.0
0.0
-0.2
0.0
-0.7
1.6
-2.0

0.5
0.6
0.7
0.2
0.2
1.4
3.2

1.077
1.972
.377
.291
1.305
.309
5.680
.172
.983

132.2
152.2
150.8
152.4
166.3
103.6
162.1
102.7
166.3

132.6
152.7
150.5
156.8
166.0
103.5
162.3
102.7
166.6

-2.9
2.5
1.6
10.7
2.2
2.6
1.8

0.3
0.3
-0.2
2.9
-0.2
-0.1
0.1
0.0
0.2

-0.7
0.7
0.6
2.0
0.5
0.9
0.2
0.7
0.0

0.0
0.3
0.3
1.9
-0.1
0.1
0.4
0.4
0.4

0.4
0.1
-0.1
2.6
-0.4
-0.1
0.1
0.0
0.1

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................

39.560
29.788
6.885
2.327

161.5
183.4
173.4
109.8

161.4
183.9
173.9
109.5

2.3
3.4
3.4
-

-0.1
0.3
0.3
-0.3

0.1
0.3
0.3
0.7

0.2
0.5
0.3
2.8

0.2
0.2
0.3
-0.3

Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

20.199
.377
4.942
4.018
.261
3.757
4.831

189.2
99.2
130.0
115.2
85.9
123.3
126.5

189.8
99.7
127.1
112.0
86.4
119.6
126.6

3.4
-2.8
-4.6
-9.3
-4.4
1.0

0.3
0.5
-2.2
-2.8
0.6
-3.0
0.1

0.2
-0.1
-0.4
-0.4
-0.7
-0.4
-0.2

0.3
0.0
-0.6
-0.8
-1.7
-0.8
-0.3

0.3
0.5
-0.2
-0.4
-0.8
-0.3
0.2

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

4.944
1.390
1.990
.268
.895

133.6
131.1
127.8
124.9
128.6

135.6
134.1
128.8
130.2
130.3

0.5
0.8
0.4
3.2
-0.2

1.5
2.3
0.8
4.2
1.3

1.1
0.3
1.9
2.0
0.7

-0.7
-1.3
-0.5
0.4
-0.4

0.1
1.2
-1.5
4.2
-0.2

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

17.578
16.240
7.899
5.063
1.880
2.995
2.976
.560
1.603
1.338

140.7
137.0
99.8
142.3
151.9
90.0
89.5
101.2
168.3
190.2

141.3
137.7
100.1
142.5
153.0
90.8
90.3
101.4
169.0
189.9

-2.2
-2.3
0.5
-0.6
3.4
-14.9
-15.2
0.0
3.1
-0.5

0.4
0.5
0.3
0.1
0.7
0.9
0.9
0.2
0.4
-0.2

0.0
-0.2
0.2
0.3
-0.1
-1.6
-1.5
0.0
0.2
2.2

-0.4
-0.3
0.1
-0.1
0.5
-2.0
-2.0
0.0
0.5
-1.6

0.3
0.4
-0.1
-0.3
0.7
2.6
2.7
0.2
0.4
-1.3

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

5.614
1.222
4.392
2.808
1.334

243.9
224.0
248.4
223.7
289.2

244.3
224.2
249.0
224.2
290.2

3.6
4.0
3.5
3.4
3.6

0.2
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.3

0.4
0.6
0.3
0.3
0.3

0.3
0.6
0.2
0.3
0.0

0.2
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.3

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

6.145
1.763

101.3
101.4

101.1
101.1

1.1
1.2

-0.2
-0.3

0.1
0.1

0.1
0.2

-0.3
-0.3

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)

5.528
2.615
.194
2.421
2.913

100.9
104.3
253.7
300.9
97.9

101.0
104.5
257.0
301.2
97.8

1.1
4.6
6.0
4.5
-2.2

0.1
0.2
1.3
0.1
-0.1

-0.5
0.4
-0.3
0.4
-1.2

0.0
0.0
1.2
-0.1
0.0

0.2
0.5
1.4
0.4
-0.1

2.706
2.357

97.7
100.7

97.6
100.7

-2.4
-

-0.1
0.0

-1.3
-1.1

0.0
0.3

-0.1
0.0

.350

36.7

36.1

-26.2

-1.6

-3.8

-2.4

-1.6

Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

.234

68.5

67.5

-

-1.5

-5.5

-3.7

-1.5

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

4.321
.894
3.427
.737
.963
1.465

240.4
283.5
157.5
149.1
167.1
236.2

241.3
284.9
158.1
149.4
167.5
236.9

5.2
13.9
3.1
3.4
2.5
3.5

0.4
0.5
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3

0.1
0.1
0.1
-0.4
0.3
0.4

0.9
3.3
0.3
0.4
0.3
0.3

0.3
0.3
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3

42.635
16.310
26.326
14.729
4.944

141.8
161.5
130.2
132.6
133.6

142.6
162.4
130.8
133.6
135.6

0.1
2.3
-1.3
-1.6
0.5

0.6
0.6
0.5
0.8
1.5

0.1
0.3
0.0
-0.1
1.1

-0.1
0.0
-0.2
-0.3
-0.7

0.4
0.5
0.2
0.6
0.1

9.785
11.596
57.365
29.410
6.984
10.625

137.1
126.8
185.5
191.0
187.3
219.0

137.6
126.9
185.5
191.5
188.2
219.0

-2.6
-0.7
2.5
3.5
0.7
3.0

0.4
0.1
0.0
0.3
0.5
0.0

-0.4
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.4
0.1

-0.2
-0.3
0.2
0.5
-0.3
0.2

0.6
-0.2
0.2
0.2
-0.2
0.1

84.674
70.212
94.386
27.309
15.712
10.768
31.039
27.955
52.973
7.013
92.987
77.661

164.1
157.6
159.2
131.6
134.6
138.9
147.1
193.0
179.6
102.7
171.6
174.2

164.4
157.9
159.5
132.3
135.6
139.5
148.1
192.6
179.7
101.3
172.2
174.7

1.4
0.6
1.3
-1.1
-1.3
-2.1
0.5
1.5
2.4
-9.1
2.3
2.3

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.5
0.7
0.4
0.7
-0.2
0.1
-1.4
0.3
0.3

0.1
0.1
0.2
0.0
-0.1
-0.3
0.0
0.0
0.1
-1.0
0.2
0.2

0.1
-0.1
0.0
-0.3
-0.3
-0.1
0.0
0.0
0.2
-1.3
0.1
0.2

0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.5
0.6
0.5
0.0
0.1
0.9
0.2
0.2

24.053
3.256
53.608

143.2
89.8
191.8

143.8
90.5
192.3

0.8
-14.4
3.0

0.4
0.8
0.3

0.2
-1.4
0.3

-0.1
-2.1
0.3

0.0
2.4
0.2

-

$ .611

$ .610

-

-

-

-

-

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1982-84=$1.00) .........................

Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1967=$1.00) ............................
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1982=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

-

$ .204

$ .204

-

-

-

-

-

base.
base.
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 2. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
Seasonally adjusted indexes

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for

CPI-U

3 months ended-July
1998

Aug.
1998

Sep.
1998

Oct.
1998

All items ...................................

163.3

163.6

163.6

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................

161.2
161.0
161.3
181.2
147.6
148.2
202.0

161.7
161.4
161.8
182.1
148.1
150.5
201.1

133.0
150.9
149.3
147.0

132.1
152.0
150.2
149.9

6 months
ended--

Jan.
1998

Apr.
1998

July
1998

Oct.
1998

Apr.
1998

Oct.
1998

164.0

0.7

1.2

2.2

1.7

1.0

2.0

161.7
161.4
161.4
182.1
147.1
152.9
197.0

162.5
162.3
162.6
182.4
147.4
155.0
203.3

2.0
1.8
1.5
0.9
-3.2
7.3
11.8

0.3
0.3
-1.2
1.6
-2.2
0.5
-6.4

3.6
3.8
4.9
3.4
3.0
-0.8
19.3

3.3
3.3
3.3
2.7
-0.5
19.7
2.6

1.1
1.0
0.1
1.2
-2.7
3.9
2.3

3.4
3.5
4.1
3.0
1.2
8.9
10.6

132.1
152.5
150.7
152.7

132.6
152.7
150.5
156.6

-7.1
-0.5
4.9
-4.4

-2.7
1.6
-1.1
0.9

-0.3
4.4
-0.8
20.5

-1.2
4.9
3.3
28.8

-4.9
0.5
1.9
-1.8

-0.7
4.6
1.2
24.6

Expenditure category

Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

165.7
102.6
161.1
101.6
165.8

166.5
103.5
161.5
102.3
165.8

166.4
103.6
162.1
102.7
166.5

165.8
103.5
162.3
102.7
166.7

3.0
2.6
2.7

2.7
5.3
2.5
2.0
-0.5

2.5
3.6
2.3
4.0
2.7

0.2
3.6
3.0
4.4
2.2

2.9
2.5
1.1

1.3
3.6
2.6
4.2
2.4

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

160.4
181.9
172.2
100.7

160.6
182.4
172.8
101.4

161.0
183.3
173.4
104.2

161.3
183.7
173.9
103.9

1.8
3.2
3.1
-

2.8
3.6
2.9
5.3

2.3
2.9
3.6
-1.6

2.3
4.0
4.0
13.3

2.3
3.4
3.0
-

2.3
3.5
3.8
5.6

188.1
99.3
128.3
112.9
90.3
120.6
127.0

188.5
99.2
127.8
112.4
89.7
120.1
126.8

189.0
99.2
127.0
111.5
88.2
119.1
126.4

189.6
99.7
126.8
111.1
87.5
118.8
126.6

3.3
-5.7
-8.3
-9.2
-8.1
1.3

3.7
0.4
-1.2
-2.4
-9.8
-2.3
3.2

3.3
-4.3
-1.2
-2.1
-6.0
-1.6
1.0

3.2
1.6
-4.6
-6.2
-11.8
-5.8
-1.3

3.5
-3.5
-5.4
-9.5
-5.2
2.2

3.2
-1.4
-2.9
-4.2
-9.0
-3.8
-0.2

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

132.8
131.9
126.0
122.0
128.5

134.2
132.3
128.4
124.4
129.4

133.2
130.6
127.7
124.9
128.9

133.3
132.2
125.8
130.2
128.6

-1.2
2.5
-3.8
-4.4
-0.3

-0.3
0.0
2.9
5.9
-9.0

1.2
-0.3
2.3
-13.8
8.9

1.5
0.9
-0.6
29.7
0.3

-0.8
1.2
-0.5
0.6
-4.8

1.4
0.3
0.8
5.8
4.5

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

141.7
138.2
100.5
143.4
151.3
92.1
91.3
101.3
167.0
190.1

141.7
137.9
100.7
143.9
151.1
90.6
89.9
101.3
167.3
194.2

141.1
137.5
100.8
143.7
151.9
88.8
88.1
101.3
168.1
191.0

141.5
138.1
100.7
143.2
153.0
91.1
90.5
101.5
168.7
188.6

-4.6
-5.0
-1.1
0.5
-24.6
-25.3
-2.0
3.5
-1.7

-4.1
-4.8
0.4
0.3
0.3
-26.9
-27.6
-1.6
1.7
6.3

0.6
0.9
1.2
-0.8
8.6
-0.4
-1.3
2.8
3.2
-3.3

-0.6
-0.3
0.8
-0.6
4.6
-4.3
-3.5
0.8
4.1
-3.1

-4.4
-4.9
-0.4
0.4
-25.8
-26.4
-1.8
2.6
2.2

0.0
0.3
1.0
-0.7
6.6
-2.4
-2.4
1.8
3.7
-3.2

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

242.8
221.7
247.4
222.6
288.5

243.7
223.1
248.2
223.3
289.5

244.4
224.5
248.6
224.0
289.5

244.9
224.7
249.2
224.4
290.5

3.3
3.6
3.0
3.0
3.0

4.1
3.5
4.4
3.9
4.3

3.7
3.7
3.6
3.3
4.1

3.5
5.5
2.9
3.3
2.8

3.7
3.6
3.7
3.4
3.7

3.6
4.6
3.3
3.3
3.5

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

101.1
101.1

101.2
101.2

101.3
101.4

101.0
101.1

2.8

2.8
3.2

0.4
-1.2

-0.4
0.0

3.0

0.0
-0.6

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

100.9
102.9
250.8
295.3
99.1

100.4
103.3
250.1
296.4
97.9

100.4
103.3
253.2
296.1
97.9

100.6
103.8
256.8
297.4
97.8

1.8
5.3
-1.6

2.0
5.7
8.7
5.5
-1.2

1.6
4.4
4.1
4.6
-0.8

-1.2
3.5
9.9
2.9
-5.1

5.2
5.4
-1.4

0.2
4.0
7.0
3.7
-3.0

99.0
101.5

97.7
100.4

97.7
100.7

97.6
100.7

-1.6
-

-1.6
2.4

-0.8
4.0

-5.5
-3.1

-1.6
-

-3.2
0.4

39.1

37.6

36.7

36.1

-20.3

-26.3

-30.3

-27.3

-23.4

-28.9

75.2

71.1

68.5

67.5

-

-36.2

-43.1

-35.1

-

-39.2

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

238.5
273.8
157.0
149.1
166.1
234.8

238.7
274.2
157.1
148.5
166.6
235.7

240.9
283.2
157.5
149.1
167.1
236.5

241.7
284.0
158.1
149.4
167.5
237.3

5.0
7.1
3.4
4.5
2.2
4.1

6.4
17.1
3.4
3.3
2.2
2.1

5.4
15.7
2.9
5.0
2.2
3.5

5.5
15.8
2.8
0.8
3.4
4.3

5.7
12.0
3.4
3.9
2.2
3.1

5.4
15.7
2.8
2.9
2.8
3.9

142.1
161.2
130.7
132.7
132.8

142.2
161.7
130.7
132.6
134.2

142.0
161.7
130.4
132.2
133.2

142.5
162.5
130.7
133.0
133.3

-1.1
2.0
-3.0
-5.8
-1.2

-1.4
0.3
-2.4
-3.8
-0.3

2.0
3.6
0.6
2.8
1.2

1.1
3.3
0.0
0.9
1.5

-1.3
1.1
-2.7
-4.8
-0.8

1.6
3.4
0.3
1.8
1.4

137.6
127.8
184.4
189.5
187.8
217.8

137.1
127.8
184.8
190.3
188.6
218.1

136.8
127.4
185.2
191.2
188.0
218.6

137.6
127.2
185.5
191.5
187.7
218.8

-7.7
-0.3
2.0
3.3
1.3
3.0

-6.2
-0.9
3.3
3.5
2.2
4.0

3.9
0.3
2.2
2.8
-0.6
3.2

0.0
-1.9
2.4
4.3
-0.2
1.8

-7.0
-0.6
2.7
3.4
1.7
3.5

1.9
-0.8
2.3
3.5
-0.4
2.5

163.6
157.5
158.6
132.3
134.8
139.3
147.0
192.4

163.8
157.6
158.9
132.3
134.6
138.9
147.0
192.4

163.9
157.4
158.9
131.9
134.2
138.7
147.0
192.4

164.2
157.8
159.3
132.3
134.9
139.5
147.8
192.4

0.5
-0.3
0.5
-2.7
-4.9
-6.6
-0.5
0.6

1.5
0.3
1.0
-2.4
-3.8
-5.9
-2.4
2.8

2.0
1.8
2.0
0.9
3.0
3.5
3.1
2.5

1.5
0.8
1.8
0.0
0.3
0.6
2.2
0.0

1.0
0.0
0.8
-2.5
-4.3
-6.2
-1.5
1.7

1.7
1.3
1.9
0.5
1.7
2.0
2.6
1.3

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............

Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1982=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

178.7
102.5
171.3
173.8

178.9
101.5
171.7
174.2

179.3
100.2
171.9
174.5

179.5
101.1
172.3
174.8

2.1
-15.5
1.9
2.1

3.0
-13.5
2.4
2.8

2.5
-1.5
2.6
2.1

1.8
-5.4
2.4
2.3

2.5
-14.5
2.1
2.5

2.2
-3.5
2.5
2.2

143.4
91.8
190.9

143.7
90.5
191.4

143.6
88.6
191.9

143.6
90.7
192.3

0.6
-23.0
2.8

1.1
-25.7
3.7

1.1
-1.3
2.6

0.6
-4.7
3.0

0.8
-24.4
3.2

0.8
-3.0
2.8

base.
base.
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 3. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
All items

CPI-U

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
Oct.1998 from--

July
1998

Aug.
1998

Sep.
1998

Oct.
1998

M

163.2

163.4

163.6

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

169.9
170.7
102.0

170.5
171.4
102.2

Midwest urban (4)............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

159.8
161.2
102.2

159.5
161.0
102.0

U.S. city average ...........................

Percent change to
Sep.1998 from--

Oct.
1997

Aug.
1998

Sep.
1998

Sep.
1997

July
1998

Aug.
1998

164.0

1.5

0.4

0.2

1.5

0.2

0.1

170.6
171.7
102.2

171.3
172.3
102.6

1.5
1.7
1.2

0.5
0.5
0.4

0.4
0.3
0.4

1.3
1.5
0.9

0.4
0.6
0.2

0.1
0.2
0.0

159.9
161.4
102.2

160.1
161.4
102.4

1.5
1.9
1.1

0.4
0.2
0.4

0.1
0.0
0.2

1.5
2.0
1.0

0.1
0.1
0.0

0.3
0.2
0.2

Region and area size(2)

Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M

153.5

153.3

154.0

154.3

0.7

0.7

0.2

0.4

0.3

0.5

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

159.3
158.5
102.4

159.5
158.9
102.5

159.5
158.8
102.5

159.8
159.0
102.8

1.3
1.5
1.0

0.2
0.1
0.3

0.2
0.1
0.3

1.3
1.5
1.0

0.1
0.2
0.1

0.0
-0.1
0.0

M

160.0

160.2

160.1

159.8

1.8

-0.2

-0.2

1.9

0.1

-0.1

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

164.3
165.1
102.3

164.8
165.6
102.5

165.1
165.9
102.7

165.5
166.3
103.0

1.7
2.0
0.9

0.4
0.4
0.5

0.2
0.2
0.3

1.9
2.2
0.9

0.5
0.5
0.4

0.2
0.2
0.2

M
M
M

147.7
102.3
159.3

148.1
102.4
159.4

148.2
102.4
159.7

148.5
102.7
159.7

1.7
1.0
1.3

0.3
0.3
0.2

0.2
0.3
0.0

1.8
1.0
1.5

0.3
0.1
0.3

0.1
0.0
0.2

Size classes
A (5)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas(6)
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

166.5
162.1

165.4
162.6

165.3
162.6

165.7
163.2

2.0
1.3

0.2
0.4

0.2
0.4

2.0
1.3

-0.7
0.3

-0.1
0.0

M

173.6

174.2

174.4

174.8

1.5

0.3

0.2

1.6

0.5

0.1

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (7)........

1
1
1
1

170.7
159.9
154.2
102.8

-

172.1
161.5
154.5
102.9

-

-

-

-

2.6
2.7
1.5

0.8
1.0
0.2
0.1

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

-

161.9
160.5
147.4
160.8

-

162.0
161.0
148.5
161.1

2.0
0.8
-

0.1
0.3
0.7
0.2

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

168.6
166.6
168.5

-

170.3
167.2
169.3

1.6
2.9
-

1.0
0.4
0.5

-

-

-

-

1
2
3
4

Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau.

It is composed of the same

geographic entities.
5 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
6 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
7 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 4. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-W

Relative
importance,
December
1997

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
Oct. 1998 fromSep.
1998

Oct.
1998

Oct.
1997

Sep.
1998

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJuly to Aug. to Sep. to
Aug.
Sep.
Oct.

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

160.2
477.2

160.6
478.4

1.3
-

0.2
-

0.1
-

0.1
-

0.3
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......

17.903
16.861
10.785
1.678
3.125
1.135
1.447

160.8
160.4
160.2
181.8
147.1
152.6
192.5

161.6
161.3
161.3
181.9
147.5
154.6
198.4

2.2
2.3
2.1
2.2
-0.7
6.3
5.7

0.5
0.6
0.7
0.1
0.3
1.3
3.1

0.2
0.3
0.3
0.5
0.3
1.6
-0.6

0.0
-0.1
-0.2
0.1
-0.7
1.7
-2.0

0.5
0.5
0.7
0.1
0.2
1.3
3.3

1.215
2.185
.420
.332
1.432
.344

130.9
151.7
150.6
151.9
166.3
103.7

131.3
151.9
150.2
156.1
165.7
103.3

-2.9
2.4
1.5
10.4
2.1
-

0.3
0.1
-0.3
2.8
-0.4
-0.4

-0.7
0.7
0.7
1.9
0.4
0.7

-0.1
0.2
0.1
1.7
-0.1
0.2

0.3
0.1
-0.1
2.6
-0.5
-0.4

Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

6.076
.212
1.042

162.0
102.8
165.1

162.3
102.8
165.4

2.6
1.6

0.2
0.0
0.2

0.2
0.7
0.0

0.4
0.6
0.3

0.2
0.0
0.2

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

36.450
27.033
8.347
1.346

157.8
177.9
173.0
109.8

157.6
178.4
173.5
109.7

2.1
3.3
3.3
-

-0.1
0.3
0.3
-0.1

0.1
0.2
0.2
0.5

0.2
0.4
0.3
2.7

0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3

17.016
.324
5.053
4.143
.229
3.914
4.365

172.4
99.4
130.0
114.9
86.2
122.9
124.9

172.9
100.0
126.9
111.6
86.9
119.1
124.9

3.3
-2.8
-4.5
-8.5
-4.4
0.8

0.3
0.6
-2.4
-2.9
0.8
-3.1
0.0

0.2
0.0
-0.5
-0.6
-0.8
-0.7
-0.2

0.2
0.0
-0.6
-0.9
-1.8
-0.8
-0.4

0.3
0.6
-0.2
-0.2
-0.7
-0.3
0.2

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

5.300
1.503
1.985
.337
1.082

132.0
130.7
125.5
125.8
129.3

134.3
134.1
126.9
131.0
130.9

0.3
1.3
0.1
2.6
-0.7

1.7
2.6
1.1
4.1
1.2

0.9
-0.1
1.9
1.9
0.9

-0.5
-1.0
-0.1
0.6
-0.3

0.4
1.7
-1.2
4.1
-0.2

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

19.847
18.790
9.285
5.304
3.162
3.682
3.658
.694
1.664
1.057

139.6
137.1
100.1
143.4
153.2
90.1
89.6
100.5
169.4
186.5

140.4
137.9
100.4
143.6
154.2
90.9
90.4
100.7
170.3
186.3

-2.2
-2.3
0.7
-0.8
3.2
-14.7
-15.0
0.1
3.3
-0.8

0.6
0.6
0.3
0.1
0.7
0.9
0.9
0.2
0.5
-0.1

-0.1
-0.3
0.2
0.3
-0.2
-1.6
-1.6
-0.1
0.2
1.8

-0.4
-0.3
0.0
-0.2
0.5
-2.1
-2.0
0.0
0.5
-1.7

0.4
0.5
0.0
-0.4
0.7
2.6
2.8
0.2
0.5
-1.2

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

4.591
.906
3.684
2.372
1.097

243.2
220.8
248.2
225.3
285.3

243.7
220.8
248.8
225.8
286.4

3.6
3.7
3.5
3.5
3.6

0.2
0.0
0.2
0.2
0.4

0.3
0.5
0.3
0.2
0.4

0.3
0.7
0.2
0.4
0.0

0.2
-0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

5.969
1.968

101.0
101.3

100.8
101.0

0.7
1.1

-0.2
-0.3

0.2
0.1

0.0
0.2

-0.3
-0.3

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................

5.396
2.402

101.1
104.3

101.1
104.5

1.2
4.7

0.0
0.2

-0.5
0.3

0.1
0.2

0.1
0.5

Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

.192
2.211
2.994

255.9
294.9
98.5

259.4
295.2
98.4

6.0
4.6
-1.5

1.4
0.1
-0.1

-0.4
0.4
-1.2

1.2
0.0
0.1

1.5
0.4
-0.1

2.841
2.547

98.4
100.8

98.3
100.8

-1.6
-

-0.1
0.0

-1.2
-1.0

0.1
0.3

-0.1
0.0

.294

38.2

37.4

-25.3

-2.1

-3.2

-1.8

-2.1

.191

69.0

67.5

-

-2.2

-4.3

-3.1

-2.2

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

4.544
1.300
3.244
.832
.964
1.226

239.4
283.7
157.7
150.1
167.4
236.0

240.4
285.2
158.3
150.4
167.8
236.6

6.3
14.1
3.3
3.4
2.6
3.9

0.4
0.5
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3

0.2
0.3
0.1
-0.3
0.4
0.5

1.3
3.4
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.6

0.3
0.2
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3

47.234
17.903
29.331
15.928
5.300

141.7
160.8
130.3
132.1
132.0

142.4
161.6
131.0
133.2
134.3

0.1
2.2
-1.3
-1.8
0.3

0.5
0.5
0.5
0.8
1.7

0.1
0.2
-0.1
-0.5
0.9

-0.1
0.0
-0.2
-0.2
-0.5

0.4
0.5
0.3
0.8
0.4

10.628
13.403
52.766
26.708
6.824
10.006

136.6
126.7
182.2
171.3
184.7
215.7

137.3
126.9
182.3
171.8
185.8
215.7

-2.8
-0.3
2.4
3.4
0.9
3.0

0.5
0.2
0.1
0.3
0.6
0.0

-0.4
-0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.0

-0.3
-0.2
0.2
0.5
-0.3
0.3

0.9
-0.1
0.2
0.3
-0.1
0.1

83.139
72.967
95.409
30.373
16.970
11.670
33.831
26.057
49.082
7.825

160.0
155.3
156.3
131.7
134.0
138.4
146.7
171.8
176.6
101.8

160.4
155.7
156.8
132.4
135.2
139.0
147.7
171.3
176.6
100.5

1.1
0.6
1.2
-1.1
-1.5
-2.4
0.3
1.4
2.3
-9.5

0.3
0.3
0.3
0.5
0.9
0.4
0.7
-0.3
0.0
-1.3

0.1
0.1
0.1
-0.1
-0.3
-0.2
0.0
0.1
0.2
-1.1

0.1
-0.1
0.0
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2
-0.1
0.1
0.2
-1.4

0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.7
1.0
0.5
0.0
0.1
1.0

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................

All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1982-84=$1.00)..........................
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1967=$1.00) ............................
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1984=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

92.175
75.315

168.3
170.3

168.9
170.9

2.2
2.3

0.4
0.4

0.2
0.2

0.2
0.2

0.2
0.2

26.463
3.910
48.852

142.8
90.0
188.8

143.5
90.8
189.3

0.9
-14.2
2.9

0.5
0.9
0.3

0.1
-1.6
0.2

0.1
-2.1
0.3

0.1
2.4
0.2

-

$ .624

$ .623

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ .210

$ .209

-

-

-

-

-

base.
base
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 5. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
Seasonally adjusted indexes

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for

CPI-W

3 months ended-July
1998

Aug.
1998

Sep.
1998

Oct.
1998

All items ...................................

159.9

160.0

160.1

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............

160.7
160.3
160.3
181.0

161.1
160.8
160.8
181.9

161.1
160.7
160.4
182.0

6 months
ended--

Jan.
1998

Apr.
1998

July
1998

Oct.
1998

Apr.
1998

Oct.
1998

160.6

0.5

0.8

2.3

1.8

0.6

2.0

161.9
161.5
161.5
182.1

1.8
2.0
1.3
0.9

0.0
0.0
-1.3
1.8

3.8
3.8
4.9
3.6

3.0
3.0
3.0
2.5

0.9
1.0
0.0
1.4

3.4
3.4
4.0
3.0

Expenditure category

Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

147.3
147.8
201.6

147.8
150.1
200.4

146.7
152.6
196.4

147.0
154.6
202.9

-2.9
6.8
12.7

-2.4
0.8
-6.9

3.3
-1.1
19.1

-0.8
19.7
2.6

-2.7
3.7
2.4

1.2
8.8
10.5

131.9
150.4
149.3
146.7
165.9
102.8
161.1
101.5
164.7

131.0
151.5
150.3
149.5
166.6
103.5
161.4
102.2
164.7

130.9
151.8
150.4
152.1
166.5
103.7
162.0
102.8
165.2

131.3
152.0
150.2
156.1
165.7
103.3
162.3
102.8
165.5

-7.2
-0.3
5.2
-3.9
3.2
2.8
2.7

-2.4
1.4
-0.8
0.0
2.2
4.9
2.3
2.0
-0.7

0.0
4.9
-0.8
20.6
3.4
4.4
2.3
3.6
2.5

-1.8
4.3
2.4
28.2
-0.5
2.0
3.0
5.2
2.0

-4.8
0.5
2.2
-2.0
2.7
2.5
1.0

-0.9
4.6
0.8
24.3
1.5
3.2
2.6
4.4
2.2

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

156.8
176.8
172.0
100.8

156.9
177.2
172.4
101.3

157.2
177.9
173.0
104.0

157.5
178.4
173.5
104.3

1.3
3.3
3.1
-

2.9
3.3
2.6
6.1

2.3
3.2
4.1
-3.1

1.8
3.7
3.5
14.6

2.1
3.3
2.9
-

2.1
3.5
3.8
5.4

171.4
99.4
128.1
112.4
90.8
120.1
125.5

171.8
99.4
127.4
111.7
90.1
119.3
125.2

172.2
99.4
126.6
110.7
88.5
118.4
124.7

172.7
100.0
126.4
110.5
87.9
118.1
124.9

3.1
-5.7
-8.7
-8.8
-8.7
1.3

3.6
0.4
-0.9
-2.1
-7.9
-1.6
3.6

3.3
-4.3
-1.2
-1.8
-5.1
-1.6
0.6

3.1
2.4
-5.2
-6.6
-12.2
-6.5
-1.9

3.4
-3.3
-5.4
-8.4
-5.3
2.4

3.2
-1.0
-3.2
-4.2
-8.7
-4.1
-0.6

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

131.0
131.6
123.4
122.7
128.8

132.2
131.5
125.7
125.0
130.0

131.6
130.2
125.6
125.8
129.6

132.1
132.4
124.1
131.0
129.4

-2.1
2.2
-4.4
-7.3
-0.9

-1.8
0.9
-0.3
5.2
-10.1

0.9
-0.3
1.6
-12.6
7.5

3.4
2.5
2.3
29.9
1.9

-2.0
1.5
-2.4
-1.2
-5.6

2.2
1.1
2.0
6.6
4.6

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

140.7
138.2
100.7
144.6
152.7
92.2
91.5
100.7
168.1
187.2

140.5
137.8
100.9
145.1
152.4
90.7
90.0
100.6
168.5
190.6

139.9
137.4
100.9
144.8
153.2
88.8
88.2
100.6
169.3
187.4

140.5
138.1
100.9
144.2
154.2
91.1
90.7
100.8
170.2
185.2

-5.2
-5.5
-1.9
0.8
-24.9
-25.3
-0.8
3.2
-2.1

-4.2
-4.8
0.4
0.8
-0.5
-25.6
-26.3
-2.0
1.9
5.7

0.9
1.2
2.0
-1.1
8.8
-0.9
-1.7
2.8
3.2
-2.5

-0.6
-0.3
0.8
-1.1
4.0
-4.7
-3.5
0.4
5.1
-4.2

-4.7
-5.2
-0.5
0.1
-25.3
-25.8
-1.4
2.6
1.7

0.1
0.4
1.4
-1.1
6.4
-2.8
-2.6
1.6
4.1
-3.4

Medical care ...............................

242.1

242.9

243.7

244.1

3.3

3.8

3.9

3.3

3.5

3.6

Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

218.7
247.2
224.1
284.5

219.9
248.0
224.6
285.6

221.5
248.5
225.5
285.6

221.3
249.1
226.2
286.7

3.2
3.2
2.8
3.1

3.0
4.0
3.7
3.8

3.9
3.8
3.8
4.5

4.8
3.1
3.8
3.1

3.1
3.6
3.2
3.4

4.4
3.5
3.8
3.8

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

100.8
101.0

101.0
101.1

101.0
101.3

100.7
101.0

2.4

2.8
3.6

-0.8
-1.6

-0.4
0.0

3.0

-0.6
-0.8

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

101.1
102.9
253.3
289.4
99.6

100.6
103.2
252.3
290.5
98.4

100.7
103.4
255.3
290.6
98.5

100.8
103.9
259.1
291.7
98.4

1.6
5.0
-0.8

2.4
6.1
9.1
6.2
-0.8

2.4
4.4
4.2
4.3
0.4

-1.2
3.9
9.5
3.2
-4.7

5.3
5.6
-0.8

0.6
4.2
6.8
3.7
-2.2

99.5
101.5

98.3
100.5

98.4
100.8

98.3
100.8

-1.2
-

-0.4
2.4

0.0
4.0

-4.7
-2.7

-0.8
-

-2.4
0.6

40.2

38.9

38.2

37.4

-17.8

-26.9

-31.0

-25.1

-22.5

-28.1

74.4

71.2

69.0

67.5

-

-37.2

-44.0

-32.2

-

-38.4

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

236.3
273.7
157.0
150.1
166.4
233.7

236.7
274.5
157.2
149.6
167.0
234.9

239.7
283.7
157.7
150.1
167.4
236.2

240.4
284.3
158.3
150.4
167.8
236.8

5.4
7.3
3.2
4.5
2.5
4.5

7.7
18.2
3.7
3.9
2.5
2.3

6.2
14.8
2.9
4.7
2.2
3.3

7.1
16.4
3.4
0.8
3.4
5.4

6.6
12.6
3.4
4.2
2.5
3.4

6.6
15.6
3.1
2.7
2.8
4.4

141.9
160.7
130.7
132.4
131.0

142.0
161.1
130.6
131.8
132.2

141.8
161.1
130.3
131.5
131.6

142.4
161.9
130.7
132.6
132.1

-1.4
1.8
-3.6
-6.1
-2.1

-1.7
0.0
-2.7
-4.7
-1.8

2.0
3.8
1.2
3.4
0.9

1.4
3.0
0.0
0.6
3.4

-1.5
0.9
-3.1
-5.4
-2.0

1.7
3.4
0.6
2.0
2.2

137.1
127.6
181.2
170.1
185.6
214.5

136.5
127.5
181.5
170.5
186.0
214.6

136.1
127.2
181.9
171.3
185.5
215.3

137.3
127.1
182.2
171.8
185.4
215.5

-8.5
-0.3
2.0
3.4
1.8
3.1

-6.2
-0.3
3.2
3.4
2.0
4.2

3.6
0.6
2.2
2.6
0.0
3.0

0.6
-1.6
2.2
4.1
-0.4
1.9

-7.4
-0.3
2.6
3.4
1.9
3.7

2.1
-0.5
2.2
3.3
-0.2
2.5

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes

All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1984=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

159.5
155.2
156.0
132.2
134.2
138.5
146.7
171.1
175.7
101.8
168.0
170.1

159.6
155.3
156.1
132.1
133.8
138.2
146.7
171.2
176.0
100.7
168.3
170.4

159.7
155.1
156.1
131.9
133.5
137.9
146.6
171.3
176.3
99.3
168.6
170.7

160.0
155.5
156.6
132.3
134.5
139.3
147.3
171.3
176.4
100.3
168.9
171.0

0.0
-0.5
0.0
-3.2
-5.7
-8.4
-0.8
0.5
1.9
-16.8
2.0
1.9

1.0
-0.3
0.8
-2.7
-4.1
-5.9
-2.7
2.4
2.6
-13.6
2.2
2.6

2.0
2.1
2.3
1.2
2.7
2.6
3.3
2.4
2.8
-1.6
2.7
2.4

1.3
0.8
1.5
0.3
0.9
2.3
1.6
0.5
1.6
-5.8
2.2
2.1

0.5
-0.4
0.4
-3.0
-4.9
-7.2
-1.8
1.4
2.2
-15.2
2.1
2.3

1.6
1.4
1.9
0.8
1.8
2.5
2.5
1.4
2.2
-3.7
2.4
2.3

143.0
92.2
188.2

143.2
90.7
188.6

143.3
88.8
189.1

143.4
90.9
189.5

0.3
-23.9
2.9

1.1
-24.7
3.5

1.4
-0.9
2.6

1.1
-5.5
2.8

0.7
-24.3
3.2

1.3
-3.2
2.7

base.
base
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 6. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
All items

CPI-W

U.S. city average ...........................
Region and area size(2)

Pricing
schedule
(1)

M

Indexes

Percent change to
Oct.1998 from--

July
1998

Aug.
1998

Sep.
1998

Oct.
1998

159.8

160.0

160.2

160.6

Percent change to
Sep.1998 from--

Oct.
1997

Aug.
1998

Sep.
1998

Sep.
1997

July
1998

Aug.
1998

1.3

0.4

0.2

1.2

0.3

0.1

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

166.6
166.5
101.5

167.1
167.1
101.7

167.4
167.5
101.8

168.1
168.1
102.2

1.4
1.6
1.0

0.6
0.6
0.5

0.4
0.4
0.4

1.1
1.3
0.7

0.5
0.6
0.3

0.2
0.2
0.1

Midwest urban (4)............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

155.9
156.5
101.9

155.6
156.4
101.7

156.0
156.7
101.9

156.2
156.7
102.1

1.4
1.8
0.9

0.4
0.2
0.4

0.1
0.0
0.2

1.4
1.8
0.8

0.1
0.1
0.0

0.3
0.2
0.2

M

151.7

151.4

152.2

152.4

0.9

0.7

0.1

0.5

0.3

0.5

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

157.2
156.1
101.9

157.5
156.3
102.1

157.5
156.3
102.1

157.8
156.6
102.4

1.1
1.2
0.9

0.2
0.2
0.3

0.2
0.2
0.3

1.0
1.2
0.8

0.2
0.1
0.2

0.0
0.0
0.0

M

160.4

160.6

160.6

160.4

2.0

-0.1

-0.1

1.8

0.1

0.0

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

160.3
159.3
102.1

160.7
159.7
102.3

160.9
160.0
102.5

161.5
160.5
102.8

1.4
1.6
0.7

0.5
0.5
0.5

0.4
0.3
0.3

1.5
1.8
0.7

0.4
0.4
0.4

0.1
0.2
0.2

M
M
M

146.2
101.9
158.3

146.4
101.9
158.3

146.6
102.0
158.7

147.0
102.4
158.9

1.6
0.9
1.4

0.4
0.5
0.4

0.3
0.4
0.1

1.5
0.7
1.3

0.3
0.1
0.3

0.1
0.1
0.3

Size classes
A (5)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas(6)
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

160.6
155.9

159.6
156.1

159.6
156.1

160.0
156.8

2.0
0.9

0.3
0.4

0.3
0.4

2.0
0.9

-0.6
0.1

0.0
0.0

M

169.1

169.7

169.9

170.5

1.4

0.5

0.4

1.3

0.5

0.1

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (7)........

1
1
1
1

168.8
152.1
154.0
102.5

-

169.9
153.3
154.3
102.7

-

-

-

-

2.2
2.7
1.3

0.7
0.8
0.2
0.2

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,

2
2
2
2

-

159.1
155.1
146.1
158.0

-

159.2
155.7
146.9
158.6

2.2
0.4
-

0.1
0.4
0.5
0.4

-

-

-

-

PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2

-

167.9
162.7
163.8

-

169.3
163.4
164.9

1.5
2.4
-

0.8
0.4
0.7

-

-

-

-

1 Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau. It is composed of the same
geographic entities.
5 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
6 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
7 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.