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FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION:
Patrick C. Jackman (202) 606-7000
USDL-98-348
CPI QUICKLINE:
(202) 606-6994
TRANSMISSION OF
FOR CURRENT AND HISTORICAL
MATERIAL IN THIS
INFORMATION:
(202) 606-7828
RELEASE IS EMBARGOED
MEDIA CONTACT:
(202) 606-5902
UNTIL 8:30 A.M. (EDT)
INTERNET ADDRESS:
Tuesday, August 18, 1998
http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX:

JULY 1998

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) rose 0.1
percent in July, before seasonal adjustment, to a level of 163.2 (198284=100), the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor
reported today. For the 12-month period ended in July, the CPI-U has
increased 1.7 percent.
The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) also rose 0.1 percent in July, prior to seasonal adjustment. The
July 1998 CPI-W level of 159.8 was 1.5 percent higher than the index in
July 1997.
CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI-U rose 0.2 percent in July,
following a 0.1 percent increase in June. Indexes for food, energy, and
all items less food and energy each contributed to the slightly larger
advance. The food index, which rose 0.1 percent in June, increased 0.2
percent in July. Prices for food at home advanced 0.3 percent in July
after increasing 0.1 percent in June, reflecting upturns in the indexes
for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs and for fruits and vegetables. The
energy index, which declined 0.7 percent in June, was unchanged in July.
The index for petroleum-based energy decreased 0.1 percent, while the
index for energy services was unchanged. Excluding food and energy, the
CPI-U increased 0.2 percent in July, following a 0.1 percent rise in June.
The indexes for new cars, cigarettes, and airline fares each turned up in
July after declining in June.
Table A.

Percent changes in CPI for Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound
adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate 12-mos.
Category
1998
3-mos. ended
ended

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
All Items
.0
Food and beverages .3
Housing
.1
Apparel
-.5
Transportation
-.3
Medical care
.1
Recreation
.3
Education and
communication
.0
Other goods and
services
.4
Special Indexes
Energy
-2.4
Food
.3
All Items less
food and energy .2

May June July

July `98

July `98

.1
.0
.1
.2
-.4
.3
.3

.0
.0
.2
-.2
-.5
.3
.4

.2
.1
.4
-.1
-.1
.4
.0

.3
.5
.3
.4
.1
.3
.0

.1
.1
.1
.2
-.3
.4
.1

.2
.2
.2
-.3
.3
.2
.0

2.2
3.6
2.3
1.2
.6
3.7
.4

1.7
2.2
2.3
-.5
-1.3
3.4
1.3

-.1

.3

.3

.3

.1

.0

1.6

2.1

.8

-.3

1.0

.7

.0

.7

5.4

6.4

-2.2 -1.2
.0
.0

-.1
.1

.3
.6

-.7
.1

.0
.2

-1.5
3.8

-5.6
2.2

.3

.2

.1

.2

2.1

2.2

.3

.1

Beginning with release of data for January 1999, the BLS will introduce a
new formula for calculating the basic components of the CPI. See page 4
for more details. See pages 5 and 6 for announcements on methodological
changes concerning utility rebates and hedonic quality adjustment for
televisions.
During the first seven months of 1998, the CPI-U rose at a 1.5percent seasonally adjusted annual rate (SAAR). This compares with an
increase of 1.7 percent for all of 1997. Declines in energy costs have
continued to act as a moderating influence on overall consumer price index
movements thus far in 1998, decreasing at a 10.4-percent annual rate after
declining 3.4 percent in all of 1997. Food costs, which rose 1.5 percent
in 1997, have risen at a 2.3-percent SAAR in the first seven months of
1998. Excluding food and energy, the CPI-U has advanced at a 2.4-percent
rate thus far in 1998, compared with a 2.2 percent rise for all of 1997.
The food and beverages index rose 0.2 percent in July. The index for
food at home, which rose 0.1 percent in June, increased 0.3 percent in
July, reflecting upturns in the indexes for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs
and for fruits and vegetables. The latter group rose 0.3 percent in July,
following a 1.0 percent decline in June. The index for fresh vegetables,
which declined 5.5 percent in June, rose 1.3 percent in July, more than
offsetting a 0.8 percent decrease in the index for fresh fruits. (Prior
to seasonal adjustment, prices for fresh vegetables fell 0.3 percent.)
The index for processed fruits and vegetables increased 0.7 percent. The

index for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs rose 0.5 percent in July, its
largest advance in 14 months. The index for fish and seafood rose 1.5
percent; poultry prices increased 0.7 percent. The indexes for beef and
pork advanced 0.1 percent and 0.3 percent, respectively. The index for
other food at home increased 0.3 percent as a sharp increase in prices for
butter and margarine was partially offset by a decline in prices for sugar
and sweets. Among the other three major food at home groups, the index
for nonalcoholic beverages was unchanged, while the indexes for cereal and
bakery products and for dairy products each increased 0.1 percent.
The
other two components of the food and beverage index--food away from home
and alcoholic beverages--rose 0.2 percent and 0.3 percent, respectively.
The housing component rose 0.2 percent in July. Shelter costs rose
0.2 percent, the same as in June.
Within shelter, the index for rent
rose 0.2 percent, owners' equivalent rent increased 0.3 percent, and the
cost of lodging away from home declined 0.7 percent. (Prior to seasonal
adjustment, the latter index increased 1.9 percent.) The index for fuels
and utilities was unchanged in July. The indexes for natural gas and for
fuel oil declined 0.1 and 0.6 percent, respectively, offsetting a 0.1
percent rise in the index for electricity. The index for household
furnishings and operations increased 0.3 percent in July.
The transportation component increased 0.3 percent in July, following
a 0.3 percent decline in June. Upturns in the indexes for new vehicles
and airline fares, coupled with a smaller decline in the index for
gasoline, accounted for the July advance. The index for gasoline, which
declined 0.9 percent in June, decreased 0.2 percent in July. (Prior to
seasonal adjustment, gasoline prices fell 1.2 percent in July.) The index
for new and used vehicle prices rose 0.4 percent. The index for new
vehicles, which declined 0.3 percent in June, increased 0.5 percent in
July. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, new vehicle prices rose 0.1
percent.) The index for used cars and trucks advanced 0.3 percent.
Public transportation costs increased 1.0 percent in July. The index for
airline fares, which declined 2.0 percent in June, increased 3.2 percent
in July.
The index for apparel declined 0.3 percent in July. (Prior to
seasonal adjustment, apparel prices fell 2.2 percent, reflecting seasonal
price declines.)
Medical care costs rose 0.2 percent in July to a level 3.4 percent
above a year ago. The index for medical care commodities--prescription
drugs, nonprescription drugs, and medical supplies--was virtually
unchanged. The index for medical care services rose 0.2 percent. Charges
for professional services and for hospital and related services increased

0.1 and 0.6 percent, respectively.
The index for recreation costs was unchanged in July. Increases in
prices for reading materials and sporting goods were offset by declines
in most other recreation groups, particularly for admissions to movies,
theaters, and concerts.
The index for education and communication was unchanged in July. An
increase in education costs was offset by a decline in the index for
communication. Within the latter group, the index for personal computers
and peripheral equipment and for cellular telephone services declined 6.0
and 0.2 percent, respectively.
The index for other goods and services, which was virtually unchanged
in June, rose 0.7 percent in July. The acceleration largely was
attributable to an upturn in the index for tobacco and smoking products,
which increased 2.6 percent in July after declining 0.6 percent in June.
CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI for Urban Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers increased 0.2 percent in July.
Table B. Percent changes in CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers (CPI-W)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound
adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate
12-mos.
Category
1998
3-mos. ended
ended
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
All Items
.0
.0 -.1
.3
Food and beverages .3
.0
.0
.0
Housing
.0
.1
.3
.3
Apparel
-.5
-.2 -.5
.2
Transportation
-.5
-.4 -.6
.0
Medical care
.2
.2
.3
.4
Recreation
.3
.3
.3
.1
Education and
communication
-.1
.0
.4
.2
Other goods and
services
.5
1.1 -.6 1.4
Special Indexes
Energy
-2.5 -2.1 -1.3 -.2
Food
.4
-.1
.0
.1

May June July
.3
.1
.2
.6
.1
.3
.3
.1
.2
.3
.3 -.4
.1 -.1
.2
.3
.5
.2
-.2
.1 -.1

July`98
2.3
3.8
2.3
.9
.9
3.9
-.8

July `98
1.5
2.0
2.3
-1.2
-1.5
3.4
1.1

.4

.1

.1

2.4

2.1

.8

-.1

.9

6.2

7.1

.3
.6

-.6
.1

-.1
.3

-1.6
3.8

-5.7
2.0

All Items less
food and
energy

.2

.2

.1

.4

.2

.1

.2

2.4

2.1

Consumer Price Index data for August are scheduled for release on
Thursday, September 17, 1998, at 8:30 A.M. (EDT).
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Planned change in the Consumer Price Index Formula
On April 16, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced its decision to
use a new formula for calculating the basic components of the Consumer
Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) and the Consumer Price In3dex
for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W). This change will
become effective with data for January 1999.
The new formula, the geometric mean estimator, will be used in index
categories that comprise approximately 61 percent of total consumer
spending represented by the CPI-U. The remaining index categories, which
are shown in the table below, will continue to be calculated as they are
currently. Based upon BLS research, it is expected that planned use of the
new formula will reduce the annual rate of increase in the CPI by
approximately 0.2 percentage point per year.
The geometric mean estimator will be introduced in both the CPI-U and
the CPI-W effective with data for January 1999, in accord with the past
practice of introducing methodological changes at the beginning of a
calendar year. BLS will continue to publish "overlap" CPI-U and CPI-W
series using the current calculation method for the first six months of
1999. These indexes will not be published regularly for months subsequent
to June 1999, but will be available upon request.
Additional information on this change will be published in the April
1998 CPI Detailed Report and is available on the Internet
(http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm). This information may also be obtained
by writing to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices
and Price Indexes, 2 Massachusetts Ave. N.E., Room 3615 Washington, D.C.
20212-0001 or by calling (202) 606-7000.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Improvements to CPI Procedures for Handling Refunds for Utilities
Effective with the calculation of the index for January 1999,
Consumer Price Index (CPI) will change its treatment of refunds

the
for

electricity, natural gas, or other utility services when the refunds
are based on earlier periods' utility consumption amounts.
The
change will affect both the price indexes and the average prices
computed by the CPI program.
Under the current practice, the CPI utility indexes reflect
refunds that appear on current period bills but that are based on
past period utility consumption. Generally these refunds result
from
the
rollback of temporary rate increases, lower
than
anticipated energy costs, or a reevaluation of rates with respect to
actual costs. The current practice makes these indexes rather
volatile and do not reflect the actual current price (for example,
what a new customer would pay) for a utility service such as
electricity.
Under the new procedure, the CPI will disregard any refund for
past excess charges when it appears on residential customer bills as
a separate refund credit that is subtracted from the charges for
current billing period's usage. The movement of the CPI utility
indexes will reflect all changes in rates-generally in the month
they are effective. The CPI utility indexes will continue to reflect
current period credits that are based on current period consumption,
such as those associated with purchased gas or fuel adjustments.
For additional information on this change, write to the Bureau of
Labor Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices and Price Indexes, 2
Massachusetts Ave. NE, Room 3615, Washington, DC 20212-0001; or
telephone Bob Adkins at (202) 606-6985 ext. 264, or send e-mail to
Adkins_B@bls.gov
-------------------------------------------------------------------Using a hedonic model to adjust television prices in the
Price Index for changes in quality

Consumer

Effective with the release of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for
January 1999, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) will introduce an
improvement in the way in which it calculates the Television stratum
of the CPI.
As of December 1997, Televisions constituted 0.215 percent in the
Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (the CPI-U) and 0.256
percent in the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers (the CPI-W).
Bureau of Labor Statistics researchers developed a regression
procedure, called a hedonic model, that decomposes the price of

television sets into implicit prices for each important feature and
component /1. This model uses Television observations collected for
the CPI and provides an estimate of the value of each of the
significant features and components of the sets for which prices are
collected.
This
yields a mechanism for
replacing
obsolete
televisions in the CPI sample with current ones, allowing the CPI to
capture the price change that may occur as new models replace old
ones in the market place without counting the value of quality
improvements as price increases.
The CPI has used similar hedonic methods to adjust apparel prices
for many years.
In January 1998, the CPI began using a similar
approach for Personal Computers. In the coming years, BLS plans to
extend the method to additional CPI items.
Starting with the CPI for January 1999, when a television model
in the CPI sample improves in some way, the value of that change, as
derived from the regression estimates, will be deducted from the
observed price change for that product. (Conversely, if a model
deteriorates, the value of the difference will be added to the
price.)
For additional information on these changes, write to
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Division of Consumer Prices and Price Indexes
2 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Room 3260
Washington, DC 20212-0001
or telephone Tim LaFleur at (202) 606-6982 ext. 253,
or send e-mail to LaFleur_T@bls.gov
/1 Brent R. Moulton, Timothy J. LaFleur, and Karin E. Moses,
"Research on Improved Quality Adjustment in the CPI: The Case
of Televisions," presented to the Conference of the Ottawa
Group, April 1998.
------------------------------------------------------------------------Overview of Publication Changes
Beginning in 1998, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) introduced
a new geographic area sample, a revised item structure and updated
expenditure weights into the Consumer Price Index (CPI).
Approximately every ten years the CPI undertakes this type of
revision in order to keep the index up-to-date. Since World War
II, revisions of the CPI have been introduced in 1953, 1964, 1978,
and 1987.
Because the changes the CPI undergoes during each revision can

have a major impact on our users, special steps were taken in
order to ameliorate the effects of these changes. Beginning with
the release of the January 1997 index, data series that were to be
changed or dropped from publication have been footnoted in all BLS
published tables. This provided an early warning for users to
reconsider their use of those indexes and provided time for them
to make changes in their use. The 1998 CPI Revision contains
substantial changes in both the items being presented and the
frequency of local area index publication.
Changes to the Item Structure
Effective in 1998, there are considerable changes to both the
items being priced and the manner in which they are being
aggregated in the CPI. The most notable change in presentation is
a reconstruction of several major groups with a resulting change
from the formerly available seven major groups to the new total of
eight.
Formerly the major groups were: Food and Beverages, Housing,
Apparel and Upkeep, Transportation, Medical Care, Entertainment
and Other Goods and Services. Three of these groups-- Food and
Beverages, Transportation, and Medical care remained the same.
The Apparel group was modified to exclude apparel upkeep products
and services. The Entertainment group has been slightly redefined
into a major group called Recreation and a new major group,
Education and Communication, has been formed from past
subelements of the Housing, Entertainment and Other Goods and
Services groups
Other important changes in our item structure at lower levels are
an expansion of our Food Away from Home index, a reorientation of
our car and truck indexes to a vehicle index, and the expansion of
our information processing equipment index.
For a complete listing of the new CPI Publication Structure see
Table X.
Changes to the Geographic Structure
In each revision, the CPI geographic sample is selected to be
representative of the current demographics of the United States.
The 1998 revision utilizes the 1990 Census of population. The CPI
developed an updated area sample design, decided on new local area
indexes and changed the frequency of publication for local area

indexes in order to better reflect these new demographics.
In addition to the national index, the BLS formerly published
indexes for 29 metropolitan areas. In 1998, it continues to
publish indexes for all but two of these areas--Buffalo-Niagara
Falls, NY, and New Orleans, LA. Due to the revised Metropolitan
Area (MA) definitions issued by the Office of Management and
Budget(OMB), two other areas, Washington, DC, and Baltimore, MD,
which the BLS formerly published separately, constitute a new
Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area. A single index is now
published for this consolidated area.
The new publication plan for local area indexes, that began with
the index for January 1998, is summarized below:
* Monthly indexes are now published for the three largest
metropolitan areas. Because of sample design considerations,
indexes for the Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both
formerly published monthly, are now published every other month
following the release of the December, 1997 index.
* Bimonthly indexes are published for the next 11 largest
areas, including Atlanta and Seattle, which used to have
semiannual average indexes.
* Semiannual average indexes are now published for 12
additional areas, including Pittsburgh and St. Louis, which
formerly had bimonthly indexes.
* The BLS continues to publish separate indexes for the four
Census regions of the United States. However, beginning in 1998,
there are only two area size classes for metropolitan areas,
instead of the former three: Size A - areas with a population
greater than 1.5 million; and Size B/C - areas with less than 1.5
million population. This cutoff of 1.5 million in population
reflects a rise from the former cutoff of 1.2 million and is
important since cities in size class A are those for which the
Bureau publishes city level indexes. The B/C size class is a
combination of the old Size B and Size C metropolitan areas. In
addition to the two metropolitan area size indexes for each
region, separate Size D indexes for urban non-metropolitan areas
continue to be published for both the Midwest and the South.
Separate indexes for Northeast and West urban nonmetropolitan
areas were discontinued in 1987.

The following is the full list of areas for which indexes are
currently published, beginning in January, 1998:
1. Metropolitan Areas for which a local index is published monthly:
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT-PA
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA
2. Metropolitan Areas for which a local index is published bimonthly:
In Odd Months (i.e. January,
March, etc.)
----------------------------

In Even Months (i.e.
February, April, etc.)
----------------------

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NHME-CT

Philadelphia-WilmingtonAtlantic City, PA-NJ-DE-MD

Washington-Baltimore, DC-MDVA-WV

San Francisco-Oakland-San
Jose, CA

Cleveland-Akron, OH
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX

Atlanta, GA
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA

3. Metropolitan Areas for which a local index is published
semiannually (In January and July)
Pittsburgh, PA
Kansas City, MO-KS
Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
Denver-Boulder-Greeley, CO
Portland-Salem, OR-WA

Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN
Milwaukee-Racine, WI
St. Louis, MO-IL
Anchorage, AK
Honolulu, HI
San Diego, CA

--------------------------------------------------------------------BLS to Maintain Current Reference Base of 1982-84-100 for most CPI
index series

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) previously indicated its
intention to change the numerical reference base for both the
Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) and the
Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) from their present 1982-84=100 base to a 1993-95=100 base,
effective with release of the January 1999 index in February 1999.
BLS also indicated that the alternate, or 1967=100 base, would be
discontinued in 1999 as well. This plan was initially described
in the December 1996 Monthly Labor Review, a publication which
contained several articles that dealt with the 1998 CPI Revision.
The BLS has now decided not to implement this rebasing plan.
Instead, the BLS will maintain the reference base of 1982-84=100
used for most items. In addition, the 1967=100 reference base
will continue to be the alternate base for the All Items indexes.
This decision is based in part on the fact that historical data
have less precision after rebasing. Rebasing is simply an
arithmetic transformation that does not substantially impact the
index. Because the rebased index values are smaller, however, the
loss of precision due to rounding is more serious. In addition,
retaining the old index reference bases would spare users the
inconvenience associated with conversion.
Changes in the numerical reference base should not be
confused with the plans by BLS to update the market basket of the
CPI. With release of the January CPI in February 1998, the
expenditure weights applied to CPI categories will be based on
consumer spending patterns for 1993-95.
----------------------------------------------------------------A Note on Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
Because price data are used for different purposes by
different groups, the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes
seasonally adjusted as well as unadjusted changes each month.
For analyzing general price trends in the economy, seasonally
adjusted changes are usually preferred since they eliminate the
effect of changes that normally occur at the same time and in
about the same magnitude every year--such as price movements
resulting from changing climatic conditions, production cycles,
model changeovers, holidays, and sales.

The unadjusted data are of primary interest to consumers
concerned about the prices they actually pay. Unadjusted data
also are used extensively for escalation purposes. Many
collective bargaining contract agreements and pension plans, for
example, tie compensation changes to the Consumer Price Index
unadjusted for seasonal variation.
Seasonal factors used in computing the seasonally adjusted
indexes are derived by the X-12-ARIMA Seasonal Adjustment Method.
The updated seasonal data at the end of 1977 replaced data from
1967 through 1977. Subsequent annual updates have replaced 5
years of seasonal data, e.g., data from 1993 through 1997 were
replaced at the end of 1997. The seasonal movement of all items
and 54 other aggregations is derived by combining the seasonal
movement of 73 selected components. Each year the seasonal status
of every series is reevaluated based upon certain statistical
criteria. If any of the 73 components change their seasonal
adjustment status from seasonally adjusted to not seasonally
adjusted, not seasonally adjusted data will be used for the last 5
years, but the seasonally adjusted indexes will be used before
that period.
Seasonally adjusted data, including the All items index
levels, are subject to revision for up to five years after their
original release. For this reason, BLS advises against the use of
these data in escalation agreements.
Effective with the calculation of the seasonal factors for
1990, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has used an enhanced seasonal
adjustment procedure called Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment for some CPI series. Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment allows for better estimates of seasonally adjusted
data. Extreme values and/or sharp movements which might distort
the seasonal pattern are estimated and removed from the data prior
to calculation of seasonal factors. Beginning with the
calculation of seasonal factors for 1996, X-12-ARIMA software was
used for Intervention Analysis Seasonal Adjustment.
For the fuel oil and the motor fuels indexes, this procedure
was used to offset the effects that extreme price volatility would
otherwise have had on the estimates of seasonally adjusted data
for those series. For some women's apparel indexes and the girls'
apparel index, the procedure was used to offset the effects of
changes in pricing methodology. For the tobacco and smoking
products index, this procedure was used to offset the effects of

increases in excise taxes and wholesale tobacco prices. For some
alcoholic beverage series, Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment was used to offset the effects of excise tax increases.
For the Nonalcoholic beverages index, the procedure was used to
offset the effects of a large increase in coffee prices due to
adverse weather. For the Water and sewerage maintenance index,
the procedure was used to account for a data collection anomaly.
A description of Intervention Analysis Seasonal Adjustment,
as well as a list of unusual events modeled and seasonal factors
for these items may be obtained by writing the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices and Price Indexes,
Washington, DC 20212 or by calling Claire McAnaw Gallagher on
(202) 606-6968.
Table 1. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and commodity
and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-U

Relative
importance,
December
1997

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
July 1998 fromJune
1998

July
1998

July
1997

June
1998

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromApr. to
May

May to June to
June
July

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

163.0
488.2

163.2
488.8

1.7
-

0.1
-

0.3
-

0.1
-

0.2
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................

16.310
15.326
9.646
1.536
2.629
1.037
1.394

160.6
160.1
160.5
181.6
146.3
148.1
198.1

160.9
160.5
160.8
181.8
146.9
148.2
198.2

2.2
2.2
2.0
2.0
-0.9
3.4
7.4

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.1
0.1

0.5
0.6
0.8
0.4
0.3
-0.3
5.3

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.3
0.0
0.0
-1.0

0.2
0.2
0.3
0.1
0.5
0.1
0.3

1.077

132.8

132.3

-2.9

-0.4

-0.5

0.4

0.0

Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

1.972
.377
.291
1.305
.309
5.680
.172
.983

150.4
150.5
143.3
165.6
102.5
160.7
101.0
165.5

151.1
149.9
147.6
165.9
102.6
161.1
101.6
165.6

1.7
0.5
4.4
2.9
2.5
1.7

0.5
-0.4
3.0
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.6
0.1

-0.1
-0.4
0.6
-0.1
-0.3
0.2
0.0
0.0

0.8
0.9
1.6
0.6
1.1
0.1
0.4
0.4

0.3
-0.7
2.6
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.6
0.3

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

39.560
29.788
6.885
2.327

160.6
181.8
171.7
109.6

161.2
182.6
172.2
111.7

2.3
3.2
3.2
-

0.4
0.4
0.3
1.9

0.3
0.4
0.4
1.0

0.1
0.2
0.3
-0.7

0.2
0.2
0.2
-0.7

20.199
.377
4.942
4.018
.261
3.757
4.831

187.4
99.1
131.2
116.8
89.5
124.7
126.7

188.0
99.3
131.3
116.8
87.8
124.9
127.2

3.2
-0.6
-2.3
-7.3
-2.3
1.3

0.3
0.2
0.1
0.0
-1.9
0.2
0.4

0.3
-0.8
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
-0.2

0.2
-0.5
-0.4
-0.5
-1.2
-0.4
0.2

0.3
0.2
0.0
0.0
-0.3
0.0
0.3

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

4.944
1.390
1.990
.268
.895

132.5
131.0
125.8
124.7
128.2

129.6
129.4
120.6
122.0
127.0

-0.5
1.1
-0.4
-7.1
0.9

-2.2
-1.2
-4.1
-2.2
-0.9

0.4
-0.4
1.0
0.2
0.6

0.2
0.2
0.6
-1.7
1.5

-0.3
0.2
-0.9
-2.2
0.1

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

17.578
16.240
7.899
5.063
1.880
2.995
2.976
.560
1.603
1.338

141.7
138.2
99.7
142.6
150.9
94.8
94.3
101.0
166.5
188.2

141.8
138.0
99.9
142.7
151.3
93.7
93.2
101.1
166.8
192.0

-1.3
-1.5
-0.2
-0.7
0.9
-9.8
-10.0
-1.2
2.4
1.4

0.1
-0.1
0.2
0.1
0.3
-1.2
-1.2
0.1
0.2
2.0

0.1
0.1
0.0
-0.3
1.2
0.9
0.8
0.1
0.1
-0.8

-0.3
-0.1
-0.1
-0.3
0.6
-1.0
-0.9
0.5
0.4
-1.1

0.3
0.2
0.4
0.5
0.3
0.0
-0.2
0.1
0.2
1.0

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

5.614
1.222
4.392
2.808
1.334

242.0
222.1
246.5
222.5
285.8

242.7
222.2
247.4
222.8
288.2

3.4
2.9
3.4
3.2
3.6

0.3
0.0
0.4
0.1
0.8

0.3
0.7
0.2
0.2
0.1

0.4
0.2
0.4
0.5
0.3

0.2
0.0
0.2
0.1
0.6

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

6.145
1.763

101.2
101.2

101.1
101.1

1.3
1.2

-0.1
-0.1

0.0
-0.2

0.1
0.0

0.0
-0.1

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

5.528
2.615
.194
2.421
2.913

100.1
100.8
248.6
290.4
99.4

100.0
101.0
249.0
291.1
99.1

2.1
5.0
4.8
5.1
-1.5

-0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
-0.3

0.3
0.5
0.6
0.5
0.1

0.1
0.3
0.0
0.3
0.0

0.0
0.3
0.4
0.3
-0.3

2.706
2.357

99.3
101.4

99.0
101.5

-1.7
-

-0.3
0.1

0.1
0.6

0.0
0.3

-0.3
0.1

.350

40.6

39.1

-20.4

-3.7

-3.0

-2.2

-3.7

.234

80.0

75.2

-

-6.0

-4.5

-3.3

-6.0

4.321
.894
3.427
.737
.963
1.465

236.4
266.9
156.8
149.2
165.3
234.7

237.8
273.2
157.0
149.1
166.1
235.1

6.4
12.9
2.9
3.8
2.2
3.6

0.6
2.4
0.1
-0.1
0.5
0.2

0.7
1.7
0.4
1.4
0.1
0.2

0.0
-0.6
0.1
-0.1
-0.1
0.4

0.7
2.6
0.1
-0.1
0.5
0.3

42.635
16.310
26.326
14.729
4.944

141.8
160.6
130.6
133.0
132.5

141.6
160.9
130.1
131.8
129.6

0.4
2.2
-0.7
-0.8
-0.5

-0.1
0.2
-0.4
-0.9
-2.2

0.4
0.5
0.2
0.7
0.4

-0.1
0.1
-0.1
-0.1
0.2

0.2
0.2
0.1
0.1
-0.3

9.785
11.596
57.365
29.410
6.984
10.625

138.2
127.4
184.2
189.3
187.1
216.6

138.0
127.5
184.9
190.1
187.8
216.9

-0.9
-0.6
2.7
3.3
1.2
3.7

-0.1
0.1
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.1

0.9
-0.2
0.3
0.4
-0.2
0.3

0.0
0.0
0.1
0.2
-0.2
0.3

0.1
0.3
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1

84.674
70.212
94.386
27.309
15.712

163.5
157.3
158.6
132.1
134.9

163.6
157.3
158.7
131.5
133.8

1.6
1.1
1.5
-0.6
-0.7

0.1
0.0
0.1
-0.5
-0.8

0.2
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.7

0.1
0.1
0.0
-0.1
-0.1

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........
Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................

Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1982-84=$1.00) .........................
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1967=$1.00) ............................
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1982=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

10.768
31.039
27.955
52.973
7.013
92.987
77.661

139.9
146.9
192.1
178.4
105.7
170.5
173.0

139.7
146.4
192.6
179.0
105.2
170.8
173.3

-0.8
0.7
2.0
2.5
-5.6
2.3
2.2

-0.1
-0.3
0.3
0.3
-0.5
0.2
0.2

0.7
0.6
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.2

0.1
-0.1
0.1
0.2
-0.7
0.1
0.1

0.1
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.0
0.2
0.2

24.053
3.256
53.608

142.8
94.5
190.3

142.4
93.3
190.9

0.6
-9.5
3.0

-0.3
-1.3
0.3

0.1
0.8
0.3

0.0
-1.0
0.2

0.1
-0.1
0.2

-

$ .614

$ .613

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ .205

$ .205

-

-

-

-

-

base.
base.
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 2. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
Seasonally adjusted indexes

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for

CPI-U

3 months ended-Apr.
1998

May
1998

June
1998

July
1998

162.4

162.9

163.0

163.3

6 months
ended--

Oct.
1997

Jan.
1998

Apr.
1998

July
1998

Jan.
1998

July
1998

2.5

0.7

1.2

2.2

1.6

1.7

Expenditure category
All items ...................................

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

159.8
159.5
159.4
179.7
146.5
148.5
193.3

160.6
160.4
160.7
180.5
146.9
148.1
203.5

160.8
160.6
160.8
181.0
146.9
148.1
201.4

161.2
161.0
161.3
181.2
147.6
148.2
202.0

2.6
2.8
2.6
2.0
-2.1
6.9
10.0

2.0
1.8
1.5
0.9
-3.2
7.3
11.8

0.3
0.3
-1.2
1.6
-2.2
0.5
-6.4

3.6
3.8
4.9
3.4
3.0
-0.8
19.3

2.3
2.3
2.0
1.5
-2.7
7.1
10.9

1.9
2.0
1.8
2.5
0.4
-0.1
5.7

133.1
149.3
149.6
140.3
164.7
101.7
160.2
100.6
164.7

132.5
149.2
149.0
141.1
164.5
101.4
160.6
100.6
164.7

133.0
150.4
150.3
143.3
165.5
102.5
160.7
101.0
165.3

133.0
150.9
149.3
147.0
165.7
102.6
161.1
101.6
165.8

-1.5
0.8
-1.3
2.0
3.0
2.8
2.0

-7.1
-0.5
4.9
-4.4
3.0
2.6
2.7

-2.7
1.6
-1.1
0.9
2.7
5.3
2.5
2.0
-0.5

-0.3
4.4
-0.8
20.5
2.5
3.6
2.3
4.0
2.7

-4.3
0.1
1.8
-1.3
3.0
2.7
2.3

-1.5
3.0
-0.9
10.3
2.6
4.4
2.4
3.0
1.1

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

159.5
180.6
170.7
101.1

159.9
181.3
171.3
102.1

160.1
181.6
171.8
101.4

160.4
181.9
172.2
100.7

2.3
3.2
3.4
-

1.8
3.2
3.1
-

2.8
3.6
2.9
5.3

2.3
2.9
3.6
-1.6

2.1
3.2
3.3
-

2.5
3.3
3.2
1.8

186.6
100.4
128.7
113.5
91.7
121.1
126.7

187.2
99.6
128.8
113.5
91.7
121.1
126.4

187.6
99.1
128.3
112.9
90.6
120.6
126.6

188.1
99.3
128.3
112.9
90.3
120.6
127.0

2.7
1.2
1.0
-4.0
1.6
-0.6

3.3
-5.7
-8.3
-9.2
-8.1
1.3

3.7
0.4
-1.2
-2.4
-9.8
-2.3
3.2

3.3
-4.3
-1.2
-2.1
-6.0
-1.6
1.0

3.0
-2.3
-3.7
-6.7
-3.4
0.3

3.5
-2.0
-1.2
-2.3
-7.9
-2.0
2.1

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

132.4
132.0
125.3
126.6
125.8

132.9
131.5
126.5
126.9
126.5

133.2
131.7
127.2
124.7
128.4

132.8
131.9
126.0
122.0
128.5

-1.2
2.2
-2.8
-14.7
4.8

-1.2
2.5
-3.8
-4.4
-0.3

-0.3
0.0
2.9
5.9
-9.0

1.2
-0.3
2.3
-13.8
8.9

-1.2
2.3
-3.3
-9.7
2.2

0.5
-0.2
2.6
-4.4
-0.5

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................

141.5
137.9
100.2
143.7
148.2
92.2
91.6

141.7
138.1
100.2
143.2
150.0
93.0
92.3

141.3
137.9
100.1
142.7
150.9
92.1
91.5

141.7
138.2
100.5
143.4
151.3
92.1
91.3

3.4
3.5
-1.1
-5.2
20.6
23.1

-4.6
-5.0
-1.1
0.5
-24.6
-25.3

-4.1
-4.8
0.4
0.3
0.3
-26.9
-27.6

0.6
0.9
1.2
-0.8
8.6
-0.4
-1.3

-0.7
-0.9
-1.1
-2.4
-4.6
-4.1

-1.8
-2.0
0.8
-0.3
4.4
-14.7
-15.5

Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

100.6
165.7
191.7

100.7
165.9
190.2

101.2
166.6
188.2

101.3
167.0
190.1

-3.8
1.2
4.3

-2.0
3.5
-1.7

-1.6
1.7
6.3

2.8
3.2
-3.3

-2.9
2.3
1.3

0.6
2.4
1.4

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

240.6
219.7
245.2
220.8
285.6

241.4
221.2
245.7
221.3
285.9

242.3
221.6
246.8
222.3
286.7

242.8
221.7
247.4
222.6
288.5

2.2
0.4
2.7
2.6
2.9

3.3
3.6
3.0
3.0
3.0

4.1
3.5
4.4
3.9
4.3

3.7
3.7
3.6
3.3
4.1

2.7
2.0
2.9
2.8
3.0

3.9
3.6
4.0
3.6
4.2

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

101.0
101.4

101.0
101.2

101.1
101.2

101.1
101.1

0.0

2.8

2.8
3.2

0.4
-1.2

1.4

1.6
1.0

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

100.5
101.8
248.3
292.0
99.3

100.8
102.3
249.9
293.5
99.4

100.9
102.6
249.8
294.3
99.4

100.9
102.9
250.8
295.3
99.1

4.6
4.9
-2.4

1.8
5.3
-1.6

2.0
5.7
8.7
5.5
-1.2

1.6
4.4
4.1
4.6
-0.8

3.2
5.1
-2.0

1.8
5.0
6.3
5.1
-1.0

99.2
100.5

99.3
101.1

99.3
101.4

99.0
101.5

-2.8
-

-1.6
-

-1.6
2.4

-0.8
4.0

-2.2
-

-1.2
3.2

42.8

41.5

40.6

39.1

-1.6

-20.3

-26.3

-30.3

-11.5

-28.4

86.6

82.7

80.0

75.2

-

-

-36.2

-43.1

-

-39.8

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

235.4
264.0
155.9
147.3
165.2
232.8

237.0
268.4
156.6
149.3
165.4
233.3

236.9
266.9
156.8
149.2
165.3
234.2

238.5
273.8
157.0
149.1
166.1
234.8

6.2
12.2
1.8
2.2
2.2
4.5

5.0
7.1
3.4
4.5
2.2
4.1

6.4
17.1
3.4
3.3
2.2
2.1

5.4
15.7
2.9
5.0
2.2
3.5

5.6
9.6
2.6
3.4
2.2
4.3

5.9
16.4
3.1
4.1
2.2
2.8

141.4
159.8
130.5
131.8
132.4

141.9
160.6
130.7
132.7
132.9

141.8
160.8
130.6
132.6
133.2

142.1
161.2
130.7
132.7
132.8

2.3
2.6
2.1
3.6
-1.2

-1.1
2.0
-3.0
-5.8
-1.2

-1.4
0.3
-2.4
-3.8
-0.3

2.0
3.6
0.6
2.8
1.2

0.6
2.3
-0.5
-1.2
-1.2

0.3
1.9
-0.9
-0.6
0.5

136.3
127.7
183.4
188.2

137.5
127.4
183.9
189.0

137.5
127.4
184.1
189.3

137.6
127.8
184.4
189.5

7.1
-1.5
2.7
3.3

-7.7
-0.3
2.0
3.3

-6.2
-0.9
3.3
3.5

3.9
0.3
2.2
2.8

-0.6
-0.9
2.3
3.3

-1.3
-0.3
2.8
3.1

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................

Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................

188.1
216.1

187.8
216.8

187.5
217.5

187.8
217.8

2.0
3.1

1.3
3.0

2.2
4.0

-0.6
3.2

1.6
3.1

0.7
3.6

162.8
156.8
157.8
132.0
133.8
138.1
145.9
191.2
177.6
102.9
170.2
172.9

163.2
157.1
158.3
132.2
134.7
139.1
146.8
191.7
178.0
103.2
170.7
173.3

163.3
157.2
158.3
132.1
134.5
139.2
146.7
191.9
178.3
102.5
170.9
173.5

163.6
157.5
158.6
132.3
134.8
139.3
147.0
192.4
178.7
102.5
171.3
173.8

2.5
2.3
2.6
2.1
3.3
6.4
2.8
2.1
2.8
9.1
2.2
1.9

0.5
-0.3
0.5
-2.7
-4.9
-6.6
-0.5
0.6
2.1
-15.5
1.9
2.1

1.5
0.3
1.0
-2.4
-3.8
-5.9
-2.4
2.8
3.0
-13.5
2.4
2.8

2.0
1.8
2.0
0.9
3.0
3.5
3.1
2.5
2.5
-1.5
2.6
2.1

1.5
1.0
1.5
-0.3
-0.9
-0.3
1.1
1.4
2.4
-4.0
2.0
2.0

1.7
1.0
1.5
-0.8
-0.4
-1.3
0.3
2.7
2.7
-7.7
2.5
2.5

143.0
92.1
189.7

143.2
92.8
190.2

143.2
91.9
190.5

143.4
91.8
190.9

0.0
17.6
2.8

0.6
-23.0
2.8

1.1
-25.7
3.7

1.1
-1.3
2.6

0.3
-4.9
2.8

1.1
-14.4
3.1

Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1982=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

base.
base.
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 3. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
All items

CPI-U

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes
Apr.
1998

May
1998

June
1998

Percent change to
July1998 from-July
1998

July
1997

May
1998

June
1998

Percent change to
June1998 from-June
1997

Apr.
1998

May
1998

U.S. city average ...........................

M

162.5

162.8

163.0

163.2

1.7

0.2

0.1

1.7

0.3

0.1

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

169.5
170.2
102.1

169.4
170.2
101.8

169.6
170.4
101.9

169.9
170.7
102.0

1.4
1.5
1.0

0.3
0.3
0.2

0.2
0.2
0.1

1.6
1.6
1.3

0.1
0.1
-0.2

0.1
0.1
0.1

Midwest urban (4)............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

159.0
160.1
101.9

159.4
160.5
102.3

159.5
160.8
102.2

159.8
161.2
102.2

2.0
2.5
1.6

0.3
0.4
-0.1

0.2
0.2
0.0

1.8
2.2
1.5

0.3
0.4
0.3

0.1
0.2
-0.1

M

153.2

153.4

153.3

153.5

0.6

0.1

0.1

0.5

0.1

-0.1

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

158.5
157.6
102.0

158.8
157.7
102.2

159.1
158.4
102.3

159.3
158.5
102.4

1.5
1.7
1.1

0.3
0.5
0.2

0.1
0.1
0.1

1.3
1.7
1.0

0.4
0.5
0.3

0.2
0.4
0.1

M

159.1

159.3

160.0

160.0

2.3

0.4

0.0

2.4

0.6

0.4

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

163.6
164.2
102.2

164.3
165.0
102.4

164.2
165.0
102.3

164.3
165.1
102.3

2.0
2.4
1.0

0.0
0.1
-0.1

0.1
0.1
0.0

2.0
2.4
1.0

0.4
0.5
0.1

-0.1
0.0
-0.1

M
M
M

147.0
102.0
158.5

147.3
102.2
158.8

147.5
102.2
159.2

147.7
102.3
159.3

2.0
1.2
1.7

0.3
0.1
0.3

0.1
0.1
0.1

2.0
1.2
1.7

0.3
0.2
0.4

0.1
0.0
0.3

Region and area size(2)

Size classes
A (5)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas(6)
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

164.8
161.8

165.6
162.3

166.0
162.2

166.5
162.1

3.0
1.6

0.5
-0.1

0.3
-0.1

2.7
1.8

0.7
0.2

0.2
-0.1

M

173.0

173.0

173.1

173.6

1.6

0.3

0.3

1.6

0.1

0.1

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (7)........

1
1
1
1

-

170.9
159.2
153.0
101.5

-

170.7
159.9
154.2
102.8

2.2
2.3
1.7

-0.1
0.4
0.8
1.3

-

-

-

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

160.8
159.1
146.3
160.2

-

162.0
159.4
146.4
160.2

-

-

-

-

2.8
1.1
-

0.7
0.2
0.1
0.0

-

2
2
2

167.1
164.6
166.4

-

168.0
165.5
167.5

-

-

-

-

1.1
3.4
-

0.5
0.5
0.7

-

1 Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau. It is composed of the same
geographic entities.
5 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
6 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
7 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 4. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-W

Relative
importance,
December
1997

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
July 1998 fromJune
1998

July
1998

July
1997

June
1998

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromApr. to
May

May to June to
June
July

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

159.7
475.6

159.8
476.0

1.5
-

0.1
-

0.3
-

0.1
-

0.2
-

Food and beverages .........................

17.903

159.9

160.2

2.0

0.2

0.6

0.1

0.3

Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

16.861
10.785
1.678
3.125
1.135
1.447

159.5
159.4
181.4
145.9
147.7
197.1

159.8
159.7
181.6
146.6
147.8
197.3

2.0
1.8
2.1
-0.9
3.4
7.2

0.2
0.2
0.1
0.5
0.1
0.1

0.6
0.8
0.5
0.3
-0.3
5.2

0.1
0.1
0.3
0.1
-0.1
-1.2

0.3
0.3
0.1
0.5
0.1
0.5

1.215
2.185
.420
.332
1.432
.344
6.076
.212
1.042

131.6
149.8
150.5
143.1
165.5
102.5
160.8
101.0
164.3

131.2
150.5
149.9
147.3
165.9
102.8
161.1
101.5
164.5

-2.7
1.8
0.5
4.4
2.9
2.5
1.4

-0.3
0.5
-0.4
2.9
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.5
0.1

-0.5
0.0
-0.5
0.8
0.0
-0.2
0.2
0.0
-0.1

0.4
0.7
0.9
1.4
0.5
1.0
0.1
0.4
0.3

0.2
0.5
-0.6
2.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.5
0.4

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

36.450
27.033
8.347
1.346

157.0
176.4
171.3
110.0

157.6
177.0
171.8
111.9

2.3
3.1
3.2
-

0.4
0.3
0.3
1.7

0.3
0.3
0.4
0.5

0.1
0.2
0.3
-0.2

0.2
0.2
0.3
-1.1

17.016
.324
5.053
4.143
.229
3.914
4.365

170.8
99.3
131.3
116.5
90.0
124.5
125.2

171.2
99.4
131.5
116.6
88.2
124.6
125.6

3.1
-0.3
-2.1
-6.7
-2.1
1.2

0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1
-2.0
0.1
0.3

0.4
-0.8
-0.1
-0.1
0.0
-0.1
-0.2

0.2
-0.4
-0.3
-0.4
-1.0
-0.4
0.0

0.3
0.1
0.1
0.0
-0.3
0.1
0.4

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

5.300
1.503
1.985
.337
1.082

131.0
130.7
123.4
125.4
128.8

128.2
129.1
118.6
122.7
127.4

-1.2
0.9
-1.7
-7.0
0.5

-2.1
-1.2
-3.9
-2.2
-1.1

0.3
-0.5
0.9
0.4
0.5

0.3
0.2
0.5
-1.6
1.5

-0.4
0.2
-1.0
-2.2
-0.2

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....

19.847
18.790
9.285
5.304
3.162
3.682
3.658
.694
1.664

140.9
138.5
100.0
143.8
152.3
95.0
94.5
100.3
167.6

140.8
138.2
100.2
143.9
152.7
93.9
93.4
100.5
168.0

-1.5
-1.6
0.0
-0.7
0.9
-9.7
-9.8
-1.0
2.4

-0.1
-0.2
0.2
0.1
0.3
-1.2
-1.2
0.2
0.2

0.1
0.2
0.1
-0.4
1.2
0.9
0.7
0.0
0.1

-0.1
-0.1
0.0
-0.3
0.7
-0.9
-0.9
0.6
0.4

0.2
0.1
0.4
0.4
0.3
-0.2
-0.2
0.1
0.2

Public transportation .....................

1.057

185.5

188.7

1.3

1.7

-0.7

-0.8

0.9

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

4.591
.906
3.684
2.372
1.097

241.4
218.9
246.4
224.1
282.0

242.1
219.1
247.2
224.4
284.3

3.4
2.7
3.5
3.3
3.6

0.3
0.1
0.3
0.1
0.8

0.3
0.7
0.2
0.3
0.2

0.5
0.2
0.5
0.5
0.3

0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.6

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

5.969
1.968

101.0
101.1

100.9
101.0

1.1
1.0

-0.1
-0.1

-0.2
-0.3

0.1
0.0

-0.1
-0.1

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

5.396
2.402
.192
2.211
2.994

100.3
100.9
250.9
284.7
99.8

100.2
101.1
251.3
285.3
99.6

2.1
5.1
4.7
5.1
-1.0

-0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
-0.2

0.4
0.5
0.8
0.4
0.2

0.1
0.3
-0.1
0.3
0.1

0.1
0.3
0.4
0.3
-0.2

2.841
2.547

99.8
101.4

99.5
101.5

-1.2
-

-0.3
0.1

0.2
0.7

0.1
0.2

-0.3
0.1

.294

41.8

40.2

-19.8

-3.8

-3.4

-1.9

-3.8

.191

79.5

74.4

-

-6.4

-4.8

-2.9

-6.4

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

4.544
1.300
3.244
.832
.964
1.226

234.0
266.6
156.8
150.3
165.6
233.6

236.0
273.4
157.0
150.1
166.4
233.9

7.1
13.1
3.0
3.8
2.3
3.7

0.9
2.6
0.1
-0.1
0.5
0.1

0.8
1.5
0.5
1.4
0.1
0.2

-0.1
-0.6
0.1
-0.1
-0.1
0.3

0.9
2.7
0.1
-0.1
0.5
0.3

47.234
17.903
29.331
15.928
5.300

141.7
159.9
130.7
132.5
131.0

141.5
160.2
130.3
131.4
128.2

0.4
2.0
-0.8
-1.1
-1.2

-0.1
0.2
-0.3
-0.8
-2.1

0.3
0.6
0.2
0.7
0.3

0.0
0.1
-0.1
-0.2
0.3

0.2
0.3
0.2
0.4
-0.4

10.628
13.403
52.766
26.708
6.824
10.006

137.8
127.2
181.1
169.8
184.9
213.4

137.7
127.3
181.6
170.4
185.2
213.7

-1.0
-0.5
2.5
3.1
1.3
3.8

-0.1
0.1
0.3
0.4
0.2
0.1

1.0
-0.3
0.2
0.2
-0.1
0.3

-0.2
0.0
0.2
0.3
-0.1
0.3

0.1
0.5
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.1

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................

Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1982-84=$1.00)..........................
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1967=$1.00) ............................
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1984=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

83.139
72.967
95.409
30.373
16.970
11.670
33.831
26.057
49.082
7.825
92.175
75.315

159.6
155.1
155.9
132.1
134.4
139.4
146.5
171.2
175.5
105.0
167.2
169.2

159.7
155.0
156.0
131.6
133.4
139.3
146.1
171.5
176.0
104.5
167.4
169.4

1.4
0.9
1.4
-0.7
-1.0
-0.8
0.6
2.0
2.4
-5.7
2.1
2.1

0.1
-0.1
0.1
-0.4
-0.7
-0.1
-0.3
0.2
0.3
-0.5
0.1
0.1

0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.6
0.7
0.6
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2

0.1
0.0
0.1
-0.1
-0.1
-0.3
-0.1
0.1
0.2
-0.6
0.1
0.1

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.2
-0.1
0.2
0.2

26.463
3.910
48.852

142.3
94.8
187.3

142.0
93.7
187.9

0.6
-9.4
2.9

-0.2
-1.2
0.3

0.1
0.8
0.3

0.0
-0.8
0.2

0.2
-0.2
0.2

-

$ .626

$ .626

-

-

-

-

-

-

$ .210

$ .210

-

-

-

-

-

base.
base
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 5. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
Seasonally adjusted indexes

CPI-W

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for
3 months ended--

Apr.
1998

May
1998

June
1998

July
1998

6 months
ended--

Oct.
1997

Jan.
1998

Apr.
1998

July
1998

Jan.
1998

July
1998

Expenditure category
All items ...................................

159.0

159.5

159.6

159.9

2.6

0.5

0.8

2.3

1.5

1.5

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

159.2
158.8
158.4
179.4
146.1
148.2
193.0

160.1
159.7
159.7
180.3
146.5
147.8
203.0

160.2
159.8
159.8
180.8
146.6
147.7
200.5

160.7
160.3
160.3
181.0
147.3
147.8
201.6

2.6
2.3
2.3
1.8
-2.4
7.2
10.0

1.8
2.0
1.3
0.9
-2.9
6.8
12.7

0.0
0.0
-1.3
1.8
-2.4
0.8
-6.9

3.8
3.8
4.9
3.6
3.3
-1.1
19.1

2.2
2.2
1.8
1.4
-2.7
7.0
11.4

1.9
1.9
1.8
2.7
0.4
-0.1
5.3

131.9
148.6
149.6
140.0
164.5
101.7
160.2
100.6
163.7

131.2
148.6
148.9
141.1
164.5
101.5
160.6
100.6
163.6

131.7
149.7
150.2
143.1
165.3
102.5
160.8
101.0
164.1

131.9
150.4
149.3
146.7
165.9
102.8
161.1
101.5
164.7

-1.2
0.8
-1.9
2.3
2.8
2.8
1.5

-7.2
-0.3
5.2
-3.9
3.2
2.8
2.7

-2.4
1.4
-0.8
0.0
2.2
4.9
2.3
2.0
-0.7

0.0
4.9
-0.8
20.6
3.4
4.4
2.3
3.6
2.5

-4.2
0.3
1.6
-0.9
3.0
2.8
2.1

-1.2
3.1
-0.8
9.8
2.8
4.6
2.3
2.8
0.9

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

155.9
175.4
170.3
101.6

156.3
176.0
171.0
102.1

156.5
176.4
171.5
101.9

156.8
176.8
172.0
100.8

2.4
3.1
3.2
-

1.3
3.3
3.1
-

2.9
3.3
2.6
6.1

2.3
3.2
4.1
-3.1

1.8
3.2
3.1
-

2.6
3.2
3.3
1.4

170.0
100.5
128.5
112.9
92.0
120.6
125.3

170.6
99.7
128.4
112.8
92.0
120.5
125.0

170.9
99.3
128.0
112.4
91.1
120.0
125.0

171.4
99.4
128.1
112.4
90.8
120.1
125.5

2.7
1.2
1.0
-4.5
1.6
-0.6

3.1
-5.7
-8.7
-8.8
-8.7
1.3

3.6
0.4
-0.9
-2.1
-7.9
-1.6
3.6

3.3
-4.3
-1.2
-1.8
-5.1
-1.6
0.6

2.9
-2.3
-3.9
-6.7
-3.7
0.3

3.5
-2.0
-1.1
-1.9
-6.5
-1.6
2.1

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

130.7
131.7
122.9
126.9
126.5

131.1
131.1
124.0
127.4
127.1

131.5
131.4
124.6
125.4
129.0

131.0
131.6
123.4
122.7
128.8

-1.5
0.9
-4.1
-12.4
6.4

-2.1
2.2
-4.4
-7.3
-0.9

-1.8
0.9
-0.3
5.2
-10.1

0.9
-0.3
1.6
-12.6
7.5

-1.8
1.5
-4.2
-9.9
2.7

-0.5
0.3
0.7
-4.1
-1.7

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

140.4
137.8
100.2
145.0
149.5
92.4
91.9
100.0
166.8
188.4

140.6
138.1
100.3
144.4
151.3
93.2
92.5
100.0
167.0
187.0

140.4
138.0
100.3
144.0
152.3
92.4
91.7
100.6
167.7
185.5

140.7
138.2
100.7
144.6
152.7
92.2
91.5
100.7
168.1
187.2

3.4
3.5
-0.5
-5.2
20.2
22.1
-3.9
1.2
4.4

-5.2
-5.5
-1.9
0.8
-24.9
-25.3
-0.8
3.2
-2.1

-4.2
-4.8
0.4
0.8
-0.5
-25.6
-26.3
-2.0
1.9
5.7

0.9
1.2
2.0
-1.1
8.8
-0.9
-1.7
2.8
3.2
-2.5

-1.0
-1.1
-1.2
-2.2
-5.0
-4.5
-2.3
2.2
1.1

-1.7
-1.9
1.2
-0.1
4.0
-14.1
-14.9
0.4
2.5
1.5

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

239.8
216.6
244.9
222.0
281.4

240.5
218.1
245.4
222.7
282.0

241.6
218.5
246.6
223.9
282.8

242.1
218.7
247.2
224.1
284.5

2.6
0.8
2.9
2.8
2.9

3.3
3.2
3.2
2.8
3.1

3.8
3.0
4.0
3.7
3.8

3.9
3.9
3.8
3.8
4.5

2.9
2.0
3.0
2.8
3.0

3.8
3.5
3.9
3.8
4.1

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

101.0
101.4

100.8
101.1

100.9
101.1

100.8
101.0

-0.4

2.4

2.8
3.6

-0.8
-1.6

1.0

1.0
1.0

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

100.5
101.8
250.7
286.4
99.5

100.9
102.3
252.6
287.5
99.7

101.0
102.6
252.4
288.5
99.8

101.1
102.9
253.3
289.4
99.6

4.0
5.2
-2.8

1.6
5.0
-0.8

2.4
6.1
9.1
6.2
-0.8

2.4
4.4
4.2
4.3
0.4

2.8
5.1
-1.8

2.4
5.3
6.6
5.2
-0.2

99.5
100.5

99.7
101.2

99.8
101.4

99.5
101.5

-3.1
-

-1.2
-

-0.4
2.4

0.0
4.0

-2.2
-

-0.2
3.2

44.1

42.6

41.8

40.2

0.0

-17.8

-26.9

-31.0

-9.4

-29.0

86.0

81.9

79.5

74.4

-

-

-37.2

-44.0

-

-40.7

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

232.8
264.4
155.9
148.4
165.5
231.8

234.6
268.3
156.7
150.5
165.7
232.3

234.3
266.6
156.8
150.3
165.6
233.1

236.3
273.7
157.0
150.1
166.4
233.7

6.6
12.3
2.4
2.2
2.2
4.5

5.4
7.3
3.2
4.5
2.5
4.5

7.7
18.2
3.7
3.9
2.5
2.3

6.2
14.8
2.9
4.7
2.2
3.3

6.0
9.7
2.8
3.3
2.4
4.5

6.9
16.5
3.3
4.3
2.3
2.8

141.2
159.2

141.6
160.1

141.6
160.2

141.9
160.7

2.6
2.6

-1.4
1.8

-1.7
0.0

2.0
3.8

0.6
2.2

0.1
1.9

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................

Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................

130.3
131.3
130.7

130.6
132.2
131.1

130.5
131.9
131.5

130.7
132.4
131.0

2.5
3.6
-1.5

-3.6
-6.1
-2.1

-2.7
-4.7
-1.8

1.2
3.4
0.9

-0.6
-1.3
-1.8

-0.8
-0.8
-0.5

135.9
127.4
180.2
169.0
185.6
212.9

137.2
127.0
180.6
169.3
185.5
213.6

136.9
127.0
180.9
169.8
185.3
214.2

137.1
127.6
181.2
170.1
185.6
214.5

7.7
-1.9
2.5
2.9
1.3
3.3

-8.5
-0.3
2.0
3.4
1.8
3.1

-6.2
-0.3
3.2
3.4
2.0
4.2

3.6
0.6
2.2
2.6
0.0
3.0

-0.7
-1.1
2.3
3.2
1.5
3.2

-1.4
0.2
2.7
3.0
1.0
3.6

158.7
154.4
155.1
131.8
133.3
137.6
145.5
170.1
174.5
102.2
166.9
169.1

159.1
154.9
155.6
132.1
134.1
138.6
146.4
170.7
175.0
102.5
167.4
169.5

159.2
154.9
155.7
132.0
134.0
138.2
146.3
170.8
175.4
101.9
167.6
169.7

159.5
155.2
156.0
132.2
134.2
138.5
146.7
171.1
175.7
101.8
168.0
170.1

2.6
2.4
2.6
2.4
3.6
9.5
2.5
2.4
2.6
9.9
2.0
1.7

0.0
-0.5
0.0
-3.2
-5.7
-8.4
-0.8
0.5
1.9
-16.8
2.0
1.9

1.0
-0.3
0.8
-2.7
-4.1
-5.9
-2.7
2.4
2.6
-13.6
2.2
2.6

2.0
2.1
2.3
1.2
2.7
2.6
3.3
2.4
2.8
-1.6
2.7
2.4

1.3
0.9
1.3
-0.5
-1.2
0.1
0.8
1.4
2.2
-4.4
2.0
1.8

1.5
0.9
1.6
-0.8
-0.7
-1.7
0.3
2.4
2.7
-7.8
2.4
2.5

142.5
92.4
187.0

142.7
93.1
187.5

142.7
92.4
187.9

143.0
92.2
188.2

0.0
18.0
2.7

0.3
-23.9
2.9

1.1
-24.7
3.5

1.4
-0.9
2.6

0.1
-5.2
2.8

1.3
-13.6
3.0

Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1984=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

base.
base
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 6. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
All items

CPI-W

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
July1998 from--

Apr.
1998

May
1998

June
1998

July
1998

M

159.1

159.5

159.7

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

166.3
166.0
101.5

166.4
166.1
101.5

Midwest urban (4)............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

155.0
155.4
101.7

M

U.S. city average ...........................

Percent change to
June1998 from--

July
1997

May
1998

June
1998

June
1997

Apr.
1998

May
1998

159.8

1.5

0.2

0.1

1.5

0.4

0.1

166.5
166.3
101.5

166.6
166.5
101.5

1.2
1.3
0.7

0.1
0.2
0.0

0.1
0.1
0.0

1.3
1.4
1.0

0.1
0.2
0.0

0.1
0.1
0.0

155.6
155.9
102.1

155.7
156.2
101.9

155.9
156.5
101.9

1.8
2.4
1.4

0.2
0.4
-0.2

0.1
0.2
0.0

1.7
2.2
1.3

0.5
0.5
0.2

0.1
0.2
-0.2

150.9

151.3

151.3

151.7

0.7

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.0

Region and area size(2)

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

156.4
155.1
101.5

156.7
155.3
101.8

157.1
155.9
101.8

157.2
156.1
101.9

1.2
1.4
0.9

0.3
0.5
0.1

0.1
0.1
0.1

1.1
1.3
0.7

0.4
0.5
0.3

0.3
0.4
0.0

M

159.1

159.6

160.4

160.4

2.4

0.5

0.0

2.5

0.8

0.5

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

159.6
158.5
102.0

160.3
159.4
102.2

160.3
159.3
102.1

160.3
159.3
102.1

1.7
2.0
0.8

0.0
-0.1
-0.1

0.0
0.0
0.0

1.8
2.1
0.8

0.4
0.5
0.1

0.0
-0.1
-0.1

M
M
M

145.4
101.6
157.3

145.8
101.9
157.8

146.0
101.8
158.1

146.2
101.9
158.3

1.8
1.0
1.6

0.3
0.0
0.3

0.1
0.1
0.1

1.7
0.9
1.5

0.4
0.2
0.5

0.1
-0.1
0.2

M
M

159.0
155.6

159.9
156.2

160.2
156.1

160.6
155.9

2.9
1.4

0.4
-0.2

0.2
-0.1

2.7
1.5

0.8
0.3

0.2
-0.1

Size classes
A (5)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas(6)
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....

New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M

168.5

168.6

168.8

169.1

1.5

0.3

0.2

1.6

0.2

0.1

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (7)........

1
1
1
1

-

168.9
151.2
152.8
101.3

-

168.8
152.1
154.0
102.5

1.8
2.6
1.4

-0.1
0.6
0.8
1.2

-

-

-

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

157.7
153.5
144.8
157.4

-

159.3
154.0
145.1
157.6

-

-

-

-

2.8
0.7
-

1.0
0.3
0.2
0.1

-

2
2
2

166.5
160.8
161.9

-

167.4
161.7
162.8

-

-

-

-

1.3
3.0
-

0.5
0.6
0.6

-

1 Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau. It is composed of the same
geographic entities.
5 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
6 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
7 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.