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FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION:
Patrick C. Jackman (202) 606-7000
USDL-99-133
CPI QUICKLINE:
(202) 606-6994
TRANSMISSION OF
FOR CURRENT AND HISTORICAL
MATERIAL IN THIS
INFORMATION:
(202) 606-7828
RELEASE IS EMBARGOED
MEDIA CONTACT:
(202) 606-5902
UNTIL 8:30 A.M. (EDT)
INTERNET ADDRESS:
Friday, May 14, 1999
http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX:

APRIL 1999

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) rose 0.7
percent in April, before seasonal adjustment, to a level of 166.2 (198284=100), the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor
reported today. For the 12-month period ended in April, the CPI-U
increased 2.3 percent.
The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) rose 0.8 percent in April, prior to seasonal adjustment. The
April level of 162.7 was 2.3 percent higher than the index in April 1998.
CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI-U rose 0.7 percent in April,
its largest monthly advance since an increase of the same magnitude in
October 1990. About half of the April advance was attributable to a
record increase in gasoline prices. Overall energy costs rose 6.1
percent; the index for petroleum-based energy increased 14.0 percent,
while the index for energy services decreased 0.1 percent. The food
index, which declined 0.2 percent in March, increased 0.1 percent in
April. The index for food at home also turned up in April, largely
reflecting a sharp upturn in the index for fruits and vegetables.
Excluding food and energy, the CPI-U increased 0.4 percent in April,
following increases of 0.1 percent in each of the first three months of
1999. The acceleration in April reflects sharp upturns in the indexes for
apparel and for tobacco and smoking products, coupled with a larger
increase in shelter costs.
Table A.

Percent changes in CPI for Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound
adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate
12-mos.
Category
1998
1999
3-mos. ended
ended
Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
Apr. `99 Apr. `99

All Items
.2
Food and beverages .5
Housing
.2
Apparel
.0
Transportation
.1
Medical care
.2
Recreation
-.2
Education and
communication
.1
Other goods and
services
.3
Special Indexes
Energy
.1
Food
.5
All Items less
food and energy .2

.2
.2
.3
-.1
-.1
.2
.1

.1
.1
.1
.4
.1 -.1
-.6 -1.1
-.4 -.1
.3
.3
.1
.4

.1
.2
.1
-.2
-.1
.2
-.1

.2
-.2
.2
-.3
.7
.2
.0

.7
.1
.4
1.5
2.4
.4
.3

3.9
.2
3.0
4.0
12.5
3.4
.8

2.3
2.3
2.2
-.4
2.0
3.5
.9

.3

-.2

.3

.1

.0

.1

.8

.8

-.3

4.2

2.0

-.1

-.6

1.0

1.1

9.1

-.3 -1.1
.1
.1

-.2
.5

.0
.1

1.6
-.2

6.1
.1

35.0
.0

3.0
2.3

.1

.1

.1

.4

2.3

2.2

.1

.3

During the first four months of 1999, the CPI-U rose at a 3.3-percent
seasonally adjusted annual rate (SAAR). This compares with an increase of
1.6 percent for all of 1998. The index for energy, which acted as a
moderating influence on overall consumer price index movements in 1998-down 8.8 percent--turned up sharply during the first four months of 1999,
increasing at a 24.5 percent annual rate. Food costs, which rose 2.3percent in 1998, have increased at a 1.5-percent SAAR thus far in 1999.
Excluding food and energy, the CPI-U has advanced at a 1.9-percent rate
thus far in 1999, compared with a 2.4 percent rise for all of 1998. The
more moderate rate of advance this year is largely due to smaller
increases in the indexes for shelter and for tobacco and smoking products
The food and beverages index rose 0.1 percent in April. The index for
food at home, which decreased 0.5 percent in March, increased 0.1 percent
in April. The indexes for fruits and vegetables, for meats, poultry, fish
and eggs, and for other food at home, each of which declined in March,
turned up in April, more than offsetting another decline in the index for
dairy products. The index for fruits and vegetables, which declined 2.2
percent in March, rose 1.4 percent in April. A 3.8 percent increase in
the index for fresh fruits more than offset small declines in the indexes
for fresh vegetables and for processed fruits and vegetables. The index
for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs rose 0.3 percent in April, reflecting
price increases for beef, pork, and fish and seafood.
The index for
dairy products, reflecting sharp declines in the basic formula support
prices, fell 3.3 percent in April, following a 0.5 percent decrease in
March. Among the other major grocery store food groups, the indexes for
cereal and bakery products and for other food at home rose 0.4 and 0.3

percent, respectively, while the index for nonalcoholic beverages declined
0.3 percent. The other two components of the food and beverage index-food away from home and alcoholic beverages--each rose 0.2 percent.
The housing component rose 0.4 percent in April. Shelter costs,
which increased 0.3 percent in March, advanced 0.4 percent in April.
Within shelter, the indexes for rent and for owners' equivalent rent each
rose 0.3 percent, and the cost of lodging away from home increased 1.9
percent. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, the cost of lodging while away
from home rose 0.1 percent in April.) The index for fuels and utilities
rose 0.2 percent in April. The index for household fuels increased 0.1
percent, as advances in the indexes for fuel oil and for electricity more
than offset a 0.6 percent decline in the index for natural gas. The
indexes for fuel oil and for electricity increased 3.8 and 0.2 percent,
respectively. The index for household furnishings and operations
increased 0.2 percent in April.
The transportation component rose 2.4 percent in April. The index
for gasoline, which turned up in March, rose 15.0 percent in April,
accounting for more than 90 percent of the overall April transportation
advance.
(Prior to seasonal adjustment, gasoline prices increased 17.0
percent, the largest monthly advance since gasoline prices were introduced
into the CPI in 1935.) Despite the record monthly rise, gasoline prices
are 15.5 percent lower than their peak level in November 1990. The index
for new and used vehicles rose 0.2 percent in April, the first increase
since November. The index for new vehicles rose 0.1 percent and the index
for used cars and trucks increased 0.6 percent in April. (Prior to
seasonal adjustment, new vehicle prices fell 0.1 percent.) Public
transportation costs increased 1.3 percent in April, reflecting a 2.0
percent rise in airline fares. In the five-month period ended in April,
airline fares have risen 12.5 percent.
The index for apparel rose 1.5 percent in April, its first monthly
increase since August. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, apparel prices rose
1.9 percent, further reflecting the introduction of higher-priced springsummer wear.)
Medical care costs rose 0.4 percent in April to a level 3.5 percent
above a year ago. The index for medical care commodities--prescription
drugs, nonprescription drugs, and medical supplies--increased 0.6 percent.
The index for medical care services rose 0.3 percent. Charges for
professional services and for hospital and related services increased 0.3
and 0.1 percent, respectively.
The index for recreation costs, which was unchanged in March,

increased 0.3 percent in April. A 1.3 percent increase in the index for
admissions to movies, theaters, concerts, and sporting events more than
offset small decreases in most recreational goods.
The index for education and communication rose 0.1 percent in April.
Educational costs rose 0.4 percent, while the index for communication
declined 0.3 percent. Within the latter group, the indexes for personal
computers and peripheral equipment and for telephone services declined 1.4
and 0.2 percent, respectively.
The index for other goods and services increased 1.0 percent in
April, following a 0.6 percent decrease in March. The index for tobacco
and smoking products, which declined 3.5 percent in March, rose 3.6
percent in April. The March decline and April increase largely reflect
variations in the discounting of selected major cigarette brands.
CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI for Urban Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers increased 0.7 percent in April.
Table B. Percent changes in CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers (CPI-W)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound
adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate
12-mos.
Category
1998
1999
3-mos. ended ended
Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. Apr. '99
Apr.'99
All Items
.2
.2
.2
.2
.0
.1
.7
3.5
2.3
Food and beverages .4
.2
.1
.4
.1 -.2
.1
.0
2.2
Housing
.2
.3
.2
.0
.1
.3
.3
2.6
2.1
Apparel
.4
-.1 -.5 -1.1 -.4 -.4 1.4
2.5
-.2
Transportation
.2
-.1 -.5 -.1 -.4
.6 2.6
12.0
1.9
Medical care
.2
.2
.2
.3
.2
.3
.4
3.6
3.5
Recreation
-.3
.1
.1
.4 -.2 -.1
.2
-.4
.4
Education and
communication
.1
.3 -.2
.3
.2
.0 -.1
.4
.8
Other goods and
services
.2
-.5 5.8 2.5 -.2 -1.0 1.4
.6
11.7
Special Indexes
Energy
.2
-.4 -1.3 -.1 -.2 2.0 6.4
38.0
3.4
Food
.4
.2
.0
.5
.1 -.2
.1
.0
2.2
All Items less
food and energy
.1
.2
.4
.1
.0
.0
.4
1.6
2.2

Consumer Price Index data for May are scheduled for release on Wednesday,
June 16, 1999, at 8:30 A.M. (EDT).
___________________________________________________________________________
CPI (Old Series)
For the first six months of 1999, BLS will also publish Old Series
CPI-U and Old Series CPI-W based on the former method of calculating the
elementary aggregates, that is, employing an arithmetic mean in all index
categories. These old series data are contained in tables 1 (LAS)-4
(LAS). From March to April, the Old Series CPI-U and the Old Series CPI-W
each rose 0.7 percent; these series are not seasonally adjusted. (The
unadjusted CPI-U and CPI-W using the new method of calculating the
elementary aggregates rose 0.7 and 0.8 percent, respectively, in April.)
___________________________________________________________________________
Consumer Price Index Formula Changed
On April 16, 1998, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced its
decision to use a new formula for calculating the basic components of the
Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) and the Consumer
Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W). This
change is effective with data for January 1999.
The new formula, the geometric mean estimator, will be used in index
categories that comprise approximately 61 percent of total consumer
spending represented by the CPI-U. The remaining index categories, which
are shown in the table below, will continue to be calculated as they have
been. Based upon BLS research, it is expected that planned use of the new
formula will reduce the annual rate of increase in the CPI by
approximately 0.2 percentage point per year.
The geometric mean estimator has been introduced in both the CPI-U
and the CPI-W effective with data for January 1999, in accord with the
past practice of introducing methodological changes at the beginning of a
calendar year. BLS will continue to publish "overlap" CPI-U and CPI-W
series using the former calculation method for the first six months of
1999. These indexes will not be published regularly for months subsequent
to June 1999, but will be available upon request.

Additional information on this change was published in the April 1998
CPI Detailed Report and is available on the Internet
(http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm). This information also may be obtained
by writing to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices
and Price Indexes, 2 Massachusetts Ave., N.E., Room 3615, Washington, D.C.
20212 or by calling (202) 606-7000.
Arithmetic Mean (Laspeyres) Formula
1.

Selected shelter services:

A) Rent of primary
residence

2.

B) Owners' equivalent
rent of primary
residence

C) Housing at school,
excluding board

Selected utilities and government charges:

A) Electricity

C) Residential water and
sewerage maintenance

E) Telephone services,
local charges

B) Utility natural gas
service

D) State and local
registration, license,
and motor vehicle
property tax

F) Cable television

3.

Selected medical care services:

A) Physicians' services

C) Eyeglasses and eye
care

E) Hospital services

B) Dental services

D) Services by other
medical professionals

F) Nursing homes and
adult daycare

___________________________________________________________________________
A Note on Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
Because price data are used for different purposes by
different groups, the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes
seasonally adjusted as well as unadjusted changes each
month.

For analyzing general price trends in the economy,
seasonally adjusted changes are usually preferred since they
eliminate the effect of changes that normally occur at the
same time and in about the same magnitude every year--such
as price movements resulting from changing climatic
conditions, production cycles, model changeovers, holidays,
and sales.
The unadjusted data are of primary interest to
consumers concerned about the prices they actually pay.
Unadjusted data also are used extensively for escalation
purposes. Many collective bargaining contract agreements
and pension plans, for example, tie compensation changes to
the Consumer Price Index unadjusted for seasonal variation.
Seasonal factors used in computing the seasonally
adjusted indexes are derived by the X-12-ARIMA Seasonal
Adjustment Method. The updated seasonal data at the end of
1977 replaced data from 1967 through 1977. Subsequent
annual updates have replaced 5 years of seasonal data, e.g.,
data from 1994 through 1998 were replaced at the end of
1998. The seasonal movement of all items and 54 other
aggregations is derived by combining the seasonal movement
of 73 selected components. Each year the seasonal status of
every series is reevaluated based upon certain statistical
criteria. If any of the 73 components change their seasonal
adjustment status from seasonally adjusted to not seasonally
adjusted, not seasonally adjusted data will be used for the
last 5 years, but the seasonally adjusted indexes will be
used before that period.
Seasonally adjusted data, including the All items index
levels, are subject to revision for up to five years after
their original release. For this reason, BLS advises
against the use of these data in escalation agreements.
Effective with the calculation of the seasonal factors
for 1990, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has used an
enhanced seasonal adjustment procedure called Intervention
Analysis Seasonal Adjustment for some CPI series.
Intervention Analysis Seasonal Adjustment allows for better
estimates of seasonally adjusted data. Extreme values
and/or sharp movements which might distort the seasonal
pattern are estimated and removed from the data prior to

calculation of seasonal factors. Beginning with the
calculation of seasonal factors for 1996, X-12-ARIMA
software was used for Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment.
For the fuel oil and the motor fuels indexes, this
procedure was used to offset the effects that extreme price
volatility would otherwise have had on the estimates of
seasonally adjusted data for those series. For some women's
apparel indexes and the girls' apparel index, the procedure
was used to offset the effects of changes in pricing
methodology. For the tobacco and smoking products index,
this procedure was used to offset the effects wholesale
tobacco prices and legal fees passed on to consumers. For
some alcoholic beverage series, Intervention Analysis
Seasonal Adjustment was used to offset the effects of excise
tax increases. For the Nonalcoholic beverages index, the
procedure was used to offset the effects of a large increase
in coffee prices due to adverse weather. The procedure was
used to account for unusual butter fat supply reductions
affecting the Fats and oils series. For the Water and
sewerage maintenance index, the procedure was used to
account for a data collection anomaly.
A description of Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment, as well as a list of unusual events modeled and
seasonal factors for these items may be obtained by writing
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices
and Price Indexes, Washington, DC 20212 or by calling Claire
McAnaw Gallagher on (202) 606-6968 or sending e-mail to
Gallagher_C@BLS.GOV.
Table 1. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and commodity
and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-U

Relative
importance,
December
1998

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
Apr. 1999 fromMar.
1999

Apr.
1999

Apr.
1998

Mar.
1999

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJan. to Feb. to Mar. to
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

165.0
494.4

166.2
497.8

2.3
-

0.7
-

0.1
-

0.2
-

0.7
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

16.408
15.422
9.691
1.544
2.569
1.088
1.440

163.7
163.3
163.4
183.5
146.8
161.5
199.9

163.9
163.4
163.5
184.8
146.7
156.1
203.3

2.3
2.3
2.1
2.6
0.3
5.1
2.9

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.7
-0.1
-3.3
1.7

0.2
0.1
0.1
-0.4
0.9
0.7
-1.1

-0.2
-0.2
-0.5
0.2
-0.2
-0.5
-2.2

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.4
0.3
-3.3
1.4

1.049
2.002
.377
.309
1.316
.320
5.730
.175
.986

134.5
152.9
151.0
149.4
168.1
104.9
164.2
103.7
168.4

134.3
153.6
151.7
149.0
169.2
105.6
164.5
104.0
168.8

0.3
2.7
1.1
5.9
2.5
3.8
2.7
3.4
2.2

-0.1
0.5
0.5
-0.3
0.7
0.7
0.2
0.3
0.2

0.2
0.1
-0.1
0.2
0.2
1.7
0.2
0.2
0.4

0.1
-0.2
-0.3
-0.9
0.0
-0.9
0.2
0.0
-0.1

-0.3
0.3
0.5
-0.2
0.5
0.7
0.2
0.3
0.2

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence (3).............
Lodging away from home (2) (3)............
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3) (4).....................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity (3)..........
Household furnishings and operations ......

39.828
30.283
7.007
2.376

162.8
186.3
176.0
114.5

163.0
186.6
176.4
114.6

2.2
3.1
3.3
4.0

0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1

0.1
0.2
0.2
-0.5

0.2
0.3
0.2
1.8

0.4
0.4
0.3
1.9

20.529
.371
4.735
3.801
.227
3.574
4.810

191.5
100.2
125.9
110.5
86.2
117.9
126.7

191.9
100.3
125.7
110.2
87.7
117.5
127.2

3.0
-0.1
-1.0
-1.9
-5.5
-1.6
0.2

0.2
0.1
-0.2
-0.3
1.7
-0.3
0.4

0.3
0.4
0.2
0.3
-1.4
0.4
-0.2

0.1
0.1
0.2
0.3
1.0
0.3
-0.1

0.3
0.1
0.2
0.1
2.7
-0.1
0.2

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

4.831
1.358
1.939
.272
.876

132.7
131.4
126.3
125.6
126.4

135.2
133.5
128.7
128.2
129.2

-0.4
0.1
-1.7
1.3
1.0

1.9
1.6
1.9
2.1
2.2

-0.2
0.6
-0.4
-2.8
-1.3

-0.3
-0.8
0.4
-0.6
0.7

1.5
1.6
1.1
2.1
1.1

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation (1)..................

16.999
15.653
7.843
4.983
1.914
2.493
2.476
.549
1.624
1.346

140.6
136.4
99.6
143.4
147.4
86.3
85.8
100.1
170.6
198.8

144.3
140.1
99.7
143.3
148.3
100.9
100.4
100.3
170.9
201.4

2.0
1.7
-0.4
-0.7
0.1
10.0
10.2
-0.2
3.1
4.1

2.6
2.7
0.1
-0.1
0.6
16.9
17.0
0.2
0.2
1.3

-0.1
-0.3
-0.7
-0.3
-1.5
-0.3
-0.5
-0.4
0.2
1.4

0.7
0.5
-0.2
-0.2
-0.6
3.6
3.7
-0.6
0.2
3.0

2.4
2.6
0.2
0.1
0.6
15.0
15.0
0.5
0.3
1.3

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services (3).................
Hospital and related services (3).........

5.713
1.252
4.461
2.854
1.354

248.3
227.7
253.1
227.4
296.6

249.1
229.3
253.5
228.2
296.3

3.5
4.1
3.3
3.2
3.7

0.3
0.7
0.2
0.4
-0.1

0.2
0.2
0.3
0.1
0.5

0.2
0.4
0.2
0.3
0.3

0.4
0.6
0.3
0.3
0.1

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

6.120
1.748

101.8
101.2

102.0
101.0

0.9
-0.4

0.2
-0.2

-0.1
-0.5

0.0
-0.5

0.3
-0.1

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (5)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

5.478
2.694
.203
2.492
2.783

100.8
105.4
261.4
303.5
96.6

100.7
105.5
261.2
303.8
96.3

0.8
4.8
5.0
4.8
-3.0

-0.1
0.1
-0.1
0.1
-0.3

0.1
0.8
1.2
0.7
-0.4

0.0
0.4
0.3
0.4
-0.3

0.1
0.4
0.2
0.4
-0.3

2.580
2.327

96.1
100.2

95.8
100.0

-3.4
-0.5

-0.3
-0.2

-0.4
-0.3

-0.4
-0.2

-0.3
-0.2

.253

32.4

32.1

-25.0

-0.9

-1.5

-2.7

-0.9

.148

57.6

56.8

-34.4

-1.4

-2.8

-3.5

-1.4

4.624
1.159
3.465
.742
.973
1.491

253.3
335.9
160.0
150.8
169.9
241.1

256.1
349.9
160.2
150.9
170.3
241.4

9.1
32.8
2.8
2.4
3.1
3.4

1.1
4.2
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1

-0.1
-1.4
0.3
-0.1
0.3
0.4

-0.6
-3.5
0.4
0.7
0.4
0.1

1.0
3.6
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1

42.109
16.408
25.702

142.6
163.7
130.2

144.6
163.9
133.2

1.8
2.3
1.7

1.4
0.1
2.3

-0.2
0.2
-0.4

-0.1
-0.2
0.0

1.3
0.1
2.1

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........
Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........

Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (4).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................

14.345
4.831

133.2
132.7

138.6
135.2

4.2
-0.4

4.1
1.9

-0.2
-0.2

0.3
-0.3

3.4
1.5

9.514
11.356
57.891
29.912
6.963
10.768

138.5
126.0
187.6
193.9
190.7
221.3

145.7
126.1
187.8
194.3
191.0
221.7

6.7
-1.6
2.5
3.1
1.4
2.8

5.2
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.2

-0.4
-0.6
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2

0.7
-0.2
0.3
0.4
0.8
0.1

4.4
0.0
0.3
0.4
0.2
0.3

84.578
69.717
94.287
26.688
15.331
10.500
30.753
27.979
53.429
6.294
93.706
78.284

165.3
158.5
160.5
131.7
135.3
140.5
148.5
194.2
181.5
98.4
173.7
176.2

166.7
159.9
161.6
134.6
140.4
147.0
151.4
194.5
181.8
105.0
174.2
176.8

2.3
1.9
2.2
1.7
4.0
6.2
3.2
1.9
2.5
3.0
2.2
2.2

0.8
0.9
0.7
2.2
3.8
4.6
2.0
0.2
0.2
6.7
0.3
0.3

0.1
0.0
0.0
-0.4
-0.3
-0.4
-0.1
0.2
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.1

0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.7
0.2
0.3
0.3
1.6
0.1
0.1

0.8
0.9
0.7
2.0
3.2
4.0
1.3
0.3
0.3
6.1
0.4
0.4

23.967
2.720
54.316
-

143.9
86.4
194.7
$ .606

144.9
99.9
195.0
$ .602

0.8
8.8
2.8
-

0.7
15.6
0.2
-

-0.4
-0.5
0.2
-

-0.3
3.5
0.3
-

0.6
14.0
0.4
-

-

$ .202

$ .201

-

-

-

-

-

Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (4)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar .....
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar - old
base ....................................

1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100 base.
3 This index series was calculated using a Laspeyres estimator. All other item stratum index series converted to a
geometric means estimator in January, 1999.
4 Indexes on a December 1982=100 base.
5 Indexes on a December 1988=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 2. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

Seasonally adjusted indexes

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for

CPI-U

3 months ended-Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

All items ...................................

164.6

164.7

165.0

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

163.5
163.3
163.5
184.4
145.5
161.2
204.8

163.8
163.5
163.7
183.6
146.8
162.3
202.6

133.4
152.9
151.1
150.2
167.6
104.1
163.5
103.5
167.6

6 months
ended--

July
1998

Oct.
1998

Jan.
1999

Apr.
1999

Oct.
1998

Apr.
1999

166.2

2.0

1.5

1.7

3.9

1.7

2.8

163.4
163.2
162.9
183.9
146.5
161.5
198.1

163.6
163.3
163.0
184.6
147.0
156.1
200.9

3.0
3.3
3.6
2.5
1.6
-0.8
13.1

3.3
3.3
3.5
2.7
0.3
19.7
1.6

2.7
2.7
2.5
4.5
-5.1
17.0
6.3

0.2
0.0
-1.2
0.4
4.2
-12.1
-7.4

3.2
3.3
3.5
2.6
1.0
8.9
7.2

1.5
1.4
0.6
2.4
-0.5
1.4
-0.8

133.7
153.1
151.0
150.5
167.9
105.9
163.8
103.7
168.3

133.9
152.8
150.6
149.1
167.9
104.9
164.2
103.7
168.1

133.5
153.3
151.3
148.8
168.7
105.6
164.5
104.0
168.5

-0.3
4.9
-0.3
20.2
3.2
3.6
2.3
4.0
2.2

-1.2
4.6
2.7
27.8
0.2
3.6
3.0
4.4
2.2

2.4
0.5
1.3
-14.9
4.2
2.3
3.0
3.2
2.2

0.3
1.1
0.5
-3.7
2.7
5.9
2.5
1.9
2.2

-0.7
4.7
1.2
23.9
1.7
3.6
2.6
4.2
2.2

1.4
0.8
0.9
-9.5
3.4
4.1
2.7
2.5
2.2

161.9
184.6
175.3
101.9

162.1
184.9
175.6
101.4

162.5
185.4
176.0
103.2

163.1
186.2
176.5
105.2

2.0
2.9
3.3
-0.4

2.3
4.0
3.8
11.6

1.5
2.0
3.5
-7.1

3.0
3.5
2.8
13.6

2.1
3.5
3.5
5.4

2.2
2.7
3.1
2.7

190.8
99.7
126.8

191.3
100.1
127.1

191.5
100.2
127.4

192.1
100.3
127.6

3.3
-4.3
-2.2

3.2
1.6
-4.6

2.6
0.0
0.0

2.8
2.4
2.5

3.2
-1.4
-3.4

2.7
1.2
1.3

Expenditure category

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence (3).............
Lodging away from home (2) (3)............
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3) (4).....................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................

Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity (3)..........
Household furnishings and operations ......

110.8
84.8
118.6
127.0

111.1
83.6
119.1
126.7

111.4
84.4
119.4
126.6

111.5
86.7
119.3
126.9

-2.8
-6.0
-2.9
1.0

-6.2
-12.2
-5.8
-0.9

-1.1
-11.4
-0.3
1.0

2.6
9.3
2.4
-0.3

-4.5
-9.2
-4.4
0.0

0.7
-1.6
1.0
0.3

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

130.8
130.3
122.2
130.0
127.1

130.6
131.1
121.7
126.4
125.5

130.2
130.1
122.2
125.6
126.4

132.1
132.2
123.5
128.2
127.8

0.0
-0.3
0.3
-13.8
6.5

1.5
0.3
0.3
29.7
-0.3

-7.0
-5.3
-11.0
-0.6
-4.0

4.0
6.0
4.3
-5.4
2.2

0.8
0.0
0.3
5.8
3.0

-1.6
0.2
-3.6
-3.0
-0.9

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation (1)..................

140.4
136.8
100.5
143.5
150.6
86.4
86.0
101.0
169.8
190.4

140.2
136.4
99.8
143.0
148.3
86.1
85.6
100.6
170.2
193.1

141.2
137.1
99.6
142.7
147.4
89.2
88.8
100.0
170.6
198.8

144.6
140.6
99.8
142.8
148.3
102.6
102.1
100.5
171.1
201.4

0.0
0.3
1.2
-0.8
8.6
-4.2
-4.7
2.0
2.9
-2.9

-1.4
-1.2
0.8
-0.3
4.6
-10.0
-9.7
0.8
4.1
-4.3

-2.5
-2.9
-0.8
0.6
-6.1
-14.3
-14.0
-1.6
2.6
1.1

12.5
11.6
-2.8
-1.9
-6.0
98.9
98.7
-2.0
3.1
25.2

-0.7
-0.4
1.0
-0.6
6.6
-7.2
-7.2
1.4
3.5
-3.6

4.7
4.1
-1.8
-0.7
-6.0
30.5
30.7
-1.8
2.9
12.5

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services (3).................
Hospital and related services (3).........

246.9
226.2
251.3
226.1
293.5

247.5
226.6
252.1
226.4
295.0

248.1
227.5
252.6
227.0
296.0

249.0
228.8
253.3
227.7
296.3

3.7
3.9
3.6
3.5
3.7

3.7
5.1
3.1
3.5
3.1

3.3
2.9
3.4
2.9
4.3

3.4
4.7
3.2
2.9
3.9

3.7
4.5
3.4
3.5
3.4

3.4
3.8
3.3
2.9
4.1

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

101.6
101.7

101.5
101.2

101.5
100.7

101.8
100.6

0.4
0.4

0.4
1.6

2.4
1.2

0.8
-4.3

0.4
1.0

1.6
-1.6

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (5)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

101.0
105.0
256.4
301.2
97.3

101.1
105.8
259.4
303.3
96.9

101.1
106.2
260.3
304.4
96.6

101.2
106.6
260.7
305.6
96.3

2.0
4.4
4.3
4.6
-0.8

-1.2
3.9
9.4
3.6
-5.1

1.6
4.7
-0.3
4.9
-2.0

0.8
6.2
6.9
6.0
-4.0

0.4
4.2
6.8
4.1
-3.0

1.2
5.5
3.2
5.4
-3.0

96.9
100.7

96.5
100.4

96.1
100.2

95.8
100.0

-0.8
4.0

-5.5
-3.1

-2.8
0.0

-4.5
-2.8

-3.2
0.4

-3.7
-1.4

33.8

33.3

32.4

32.1

-30.3

-27.3

-23.2

-18.7

-28.9

-20.9

61.4

59.7

57.6

56.8

-43.1

-35.1

-31.5

-26.8

-39.2

-29.2

Other goods and services ...................

255.9

255.6

254.1

256.6

5.7

5.7

25.7

1.1

5.7

12.7

Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

353.9
158.9
149.9
168.8
239.4

349.0
159.4
149.8
169.3
240.4

336.9
160.0
150.8
169.9
240.7

348.9
160.2
150.9
170.3
241.0

17.7
2.9
5.0
2.2
3.7

15.8
2.8
0.8
3.4
3.8

142.2
2.0
1.3
3.1
3.8

-5.5
3.3
2.7
3.6
2.7

16.7
2.8
2.9
2.8
3.7

51.2
2.7
2.0
3.4
3.2

142.8
163.5
130.6
133.0
130.8

142.5
163.8
130.1
132.7
130.6

142.4
163.4
130.1
133.1
130.2

144.3
163.6
132.8
137.6
132.1

1.1
3.0
0.0
2.1
0.0

0.8
3.3
-0.6
0.3
1.5

1.4
2.7
0.3
0.6
-7.0

4.3
0.2
6.9
14.6
4.0

1.0
3.2
-0.3
1.2
0.8

2.8
1.5
3.6
7.4
-1.6

139.3
126.8
186.5
192.5
188.4
220.8

138.7
126.0
186.9
192.7
189.1
221.3

139.7
125.7
187.5
193.4
190.6
221.6

145.8
125.7
188.1
194.1
191.0
222.2

1.8
-0.3
2.4
3.0
-0.2
3.2

0.0
-1.6
2.2
4.3
-0.6
1.8

5.6
-1.3
2.2
1.9
1.1
3.7

20.0
-3.4
3.5
3.4
5.6
2.6

0.9
-0.9
2.3
3.6
-0.4
2.5

12.6
-2.3
2.8
2.6
3.3
3.1

164.7
158.4
159.9
132.2
135.1
141.1
148.3
193.5
180.5
98.8
173.2
175.7

164.8
158.4
159.9
131.7
134.7
140.5
148.2
193.8
180.9
98.8
173.3
175.8

165.2
158.5
160.2
131.8
135.2
141.5
148.5
194.4
181.4
100.4
173.4
176.0

166.6
159.9
161.4
134.4
139.5
147.2
150.5
194.9
182.0
106.5
174.1
176.7

1.5
1.3
1.8
0.3
1.8
2.0
3.3
2.1
2.5
-3.4
2.1
2.1

1.5
0.8
1.5
-0.6
0.6
0.3
1.4
0.4
2.3
-7.9
2.4
2.3

1.5
1.8
1.8
0.3
0.9
5.3
1.9
2.3
2.0
-6.2
2.3
2.1

4.7
3.8
3.8
6.8
13.7
18.4
6.1
2.9
3.4
35.0
2.1
2.3

1.5
1.0
1.7
-0.2
1.2
1.2
2.3
1.3
2.4
-5.7
2.2
2.2

3.1
2.8
2.8
3.5
7.1
11.7
4.0
2.6
2.7
12.5
2.2
2.2

144.4
86.2
193.4

143.8
85.8
193.8

143.3
88.8
194.4

144.1
101.2
195.1

0.8
-4.2
2.6

0.8
-10.4
3.0

2.2
-14.0
2.3

-0.8
90.0
3.6

0.8
-7.4
2.8

0.7
27.9
2.9

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (4).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (4)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............

1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100 base.
3 This index series was calculated using a Laspeyres estimator.
geometric means estimator in January, 1999.
4 Indexes on a December 1982=100 base.

All other item stratum index series converted to a

5 Indexes on a December 1988=100 base.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 3. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
All items

CPI-U

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
Apr.1999 from--

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

M

164.3

164.5

165.0

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

171.4
172.5
102.6

171.6
172.4
103.0

Midwest urban ...............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

160.4
161.6
102.6

M

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................
West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

U.S. city average ...........................

Percent change to
Mar.1999 from--

Apr.
1998

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Mar.
1998

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

166.2

2.3

1.0

0.7

1.7

0.4

0.3

171.9
172.8
103.2

172.8
173.6
103.9

1.9
2.0
1.8

0.7
0.7
0.9

0.5
0.5
0.7

1.5
1.5
1.5

0.3
0.2
0.6

0.2
0.2
0.2

160.5
161.8
102.6

161.0
162.4
103.0

162.2
163.6
103.7

2.0
2.2
1.8

1.1
1.1
1.1

0.7
0.7
0.7

1.6
1.8
1.4

0.4
0.5
0.4

0.3
0.4
0.4

155.5

155.6

155.7

156.4

2.1

0.5

0.4

1.8

0.1

0.1

M
M
M

159.9
158.9
102.9

160.0
158.9
103.0

160.6
159.7
103.3

161.5
160.5
103.9

1.9
1.8
1.9

0.9
1.0
0.9

0.6
0.5
0.6

1.5
1.6
1.5

0.4
0.5
0.4

0.4
0.5
0.3

M

160.8

160.9

161.5

162.6

2.2

1.1

0.7

2.0

0.4

0.4

M
M
M

166.4
167.3
103.6

166.9
167.8
103.8

167.3
168.2
104.1

169.0
170.0
105.1

3.3
3.5
2.8

1.3
1.3
1.3

1.0
1.1
1.0

2.4
2.7
1.8

0.5
0.5
0.5

0.2
0.2
0.3

Region and area size(2)

Size classes
A (4)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................

M
M
M

148.9
102.9
160.6

149.0
103.0
160.7

149.5
103.3
161.1

150.5
104.1
162.1

2.4
2.1
2.3

1.0
1.1
0.9

0.7
0.8
0.6

2.0
1.5
1.9

0.4
0.4
0.3

0.3
0.3
0.2

Selected local areas(5)
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

166.1
164.2

166.4
164.6

167.0
165.0

167.6
166.6

1.7
3.0

0.7
1.2

0.4
1.0

1.8
2.2

0.5
0.5

0.4
0.2

M

175.0

175.1

175.5

176.0

1.7

0.5

0.3

1.4

0.3

0.2

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (6)........

1
1
1
1

174.1
160.6
155.0
102.8

-

174.8
161.2
156.4
103.2

-

-

-

-

2.0
1.6
2.2
1.6

0.4
0.4
0.9
0.4

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

-

161.9
161.2
146.6
161.4

-

164.0
164.1
148.3
161.7

2.0
3.1
1.4
0.9

1.3
1.8
1.2
0.2

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

168.6
169.4
170.6

-

171.1
172.2
172.2

2.4
4.6
3.5

1.5
1.7
0.9

-

-

-

-

1 Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
5 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
6 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 4. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-W

Relative
importance,
December
1998

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
Apr. 1999 fromMar.
1999

Apr.
1999

Apr.
1998

Mar.
1999

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJan. to Feb. to Mar. to
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

161.4
480.9

162.7
484.7

2.3
-

0.8
-

0.0
-

0.1
-

0.7
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

18.011
16.966
10.832
1.689
3.055
1.193
1.492

162.9
162.6
162.3
183.2
146.4
161.5
198.7

163.0
162.6
162.2
184.5
146.3
155.7
201.7

2.2
2.2
1.9
2.6
0.2
5.1
2.8

0.1
0.0
-0.1
0.7
-0.1
-3.6
1.5

0.1
0.1
0.1
-0.4
1.0
0.7
-1.4

-0.2
-0.2
-0.4
0.2
-0.3
-0.4
-2.2

0.1
0.1
0.0
0.4
0.3
-3.6
1.1

1.184
2.220
.420
.354
1.446
.355
6.133
.216
1.045

133.6
152.3
151.1
148.9
168.0
105.0
164.1
103.8
167.3

133.2
153.0
151.7
148.6
169.0
105.2
164.4
104.1
167.8

0.4
2.8
1.1
5.8
2.4
3.4
2.6
3.5
2.2

-0.3
0.5
0.4
-0.2
0.6
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.3

0.2
0.1
-0.2
0.2
0.2
1.6
0.2
0.1
0.5

0.2
-0.2
-0.1
-1.1
0.0
-0.8
0.2
0.1
-0.4

-0.3
0.3
0.5
0.0
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.3

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence (3).............
Lodging away from home (2) (3)............
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3) (4).....................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity (3)..........

36.685
27.496
8.500
1.379

158.8
180.5
175.6
114.2

159.1
180.8
176.0
114.5

2.1
3.0
3.3
3.8

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3

0.1
0.2
0.2
-0.5

0.3
0.3
0.2
1.6

0.3
0.3
0.2
1.8

17.296
.320
4.850
3.928
.201
3.727

174.5
100.6
125.8
110.0
86.8
117.3

174.8
100.6
125.5
109.7
88.1
116.9

2.9
0.1
-1.1
-1.9
-5.4
-1.7

0.2
0.0
-0.2
-0.3
1.5
-0.3

0.2
0.3
0.2
0.1
-1.4
0.2

0.2
0.2
0.4
0.5
1.1
0.4

0.2
0.0
0.1
0.0
2.5
-0.1

Household furnishings and operations ......

4.339

124.9

125.2

-0.3

0.2

-0.3

-0.2

0.2

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

5.199
1.474
1.948
.344
1.057

131.1
131.6
123.9
126.5
126.8

133.7
133.6
126.5
129.3
129.5

-0.2
0.5
-1.4
1.9
0.9

2.0
1.5
2.1
2.2
2.1

-0.4
0.8
-0.9
-2.8
-1.2

-0.4
-0.5
0.0
-0.6
0.5

1.4
1.5
1.2
2.2
1.2

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation (1)..................

19.166
18.109
9.250
5.224
3.216
3.066
3.045
.682
1.690
1.056

139.1
136.2
99.5
144.5
148.7
86.4
85.9
99.8
172.0
194.1

142.9
140.1
99.7
144.5
149.6
100.8
100.3
99.6
172.3
196.4

1.9
1.7
-0.4
-0.7
0.1
9.7
9.9
-0.3
3.3
3.3

2.7
2.9
0.2
0.0
0.6
16.7
16.8
-0.2
0.2
1.2

-0.4
-0.5
-0.9
-0.5
-1.4
-0.6
-0.5
-0.2
0.2
1.2

0.6
0.6
-0.2
-0.2
-0.6
4.0
3.9
-0.5
0.2
2.6

2.6
2.6
0.2
0.1
0.6
14.5
14.7
0.1
0.2
1.2

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services (3).................
Hospital and related services (3).........

4.672
.926
3.746
2.415
1.114

247.5
223.9
252.8
228.9
292.8

248.2
225.7
253.3
229.7
292.3

3.5
4.0
3.3
3.2
3.8

0.3
0.8
0.2
0.3
-0.2

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.4

0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.3

0.4
0.8
0.3
0.3
0.0

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

5.925
1.951

101.3
101.0

101.4
100.8

0.4
-0.6

0.1
-0.2

-0.2
-0.6

-0.1
-0.5

0.2
-0.1

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (5)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

5.361
2.478
.200
2.278
2.883

101.0
105.6
264.0
298.0
97.4

100.9
105.7
263.9
298.3
97.0

0.8
5.0
5.1
4.9
-2.5

-0.1
0.1
0.0
0.1
-0.4

0.2
0.8
1.2
0.8
-0.4

0.0
0.4
0.3
0.4
-0.3

-0.1
0.4
0.2
0.3
-0.4

2.733
2.519

97.1
100.4

96.7
100.0

-2.8
-0.5

-0.4
-0.4

-0.4
-0.3

-0.3
-0.1

-0.4
-0.4

.213

33.5

33.0

-25.2

-1.5

-1.7

-2.6

-1.5

.120

56.9

55.9

-35.0

-1.8

-2.9

-4.0

-1.8

4.981
1.694
3.287
.838

255.6
336.0
160.3
151.6

259.5
350.5
160.4
151.7

11.7
33.0
2.9
2.2

1.5
4.3
0.1
0.1

-0.2
-1.3
0.3
0.1

-1.0
-3.5
0.4
0.5

1.4
3.9
0.1
0.1

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................

Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

.975
1.253

170.2
241.4

170.6
241.7

3.1
4.0

0.2
0.1

0.3
0.4

0.4
0.2

0.2
0.0

46.764
18.011
28.753
15.564
5.199

142.5
162.9
130.3
133.1
131.1

144.7
163.0
133.6
139.1
133.7

2.2
2.2
2.1
5.1
-0.2

1.5
0.1
2.5
4.5
2.0

-0.3
0.1
-0.5
-0.5
-0.4

-0.1
-0.2
0.0
0.5
-0.4

1.4
0.1
2.2
3.7
1.4

10.365
13.189
53.236
27.175
6.800
10.144

138.7
125.7
184.0
173.8
187.8
217.8

146.7
125.8
184.2
174.1
187.9
218.1

7.9
-1.4
2.4
3.0
1.2
2.7

5.8
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.1

-0.5
-0.7
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.2

0.7
-0.3
0.3
0.2
0.6
0.2

4.9
0.0
0.2
0.3
0.1
0.1

83.034
72.504
95.328
29.798
16.609
11.410
33.575
26.061
49.490
6.994
93.006
76.040

161.1
156.1
157.5
131.8
135.1
140.5
148.3
172.6
178.2
97.5
170.2
172.2

162.6
157.7
158.8
135.0
140.8
147.9
151.4
172.7
178.4
104.5
170.7
172.9

2.3
2.0
2.3
2.1
4.9
7.3
3.6
1.7
2.3
3.4
2.2
2.2

0.9
1.0
0.8
2.4
4.2
5.3
2.1
0.1
0.1
7.2
0.3
0.4

-0.1
-0.1
-0.1
-0.5
-0.5
-0.4
-0.1
0.1
0.2
-0.2
0.0
0.0

0.2
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.4
0.6
0.2
0.3
0.2
2.0
-0.1
0.0

0.9
1.0
0.8
2.2
3.6
4.5
1.7
0.1
0.2
6.4
0.4
0.4

26.531
3.267
49.509
-

143.7
86.6
191.5
$ .619

144.8
100.2
191.8
$ .615

1.2
8.8
2.7
-

0.8
15.7
0.2
-

-0.5
-0.7
0.2
-

-0.5
3.7
0.3
-

0.6
13.9
0.3
-

-

$ .208

$ .206

-

-

-

-

-

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (4).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (4)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar .....
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar - old
base ....................................

1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100 base.
3 This index series was calculated using a Laspeyres estimator.
geometric means estimator in January, 1999.
4 Indexes on a December 1984=100 base

All other item stratum index series converted to a

5 Indexes on a December 1988=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 5. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
Seasonally adjusted indexes

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for

CPI-W

3 months ended-Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

All items ...................................

161.3

161.3

161.5

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

162.9
162.5
162.4
184.0
145.1
161.1
205.0

163.1
162.7
162.6
183.3
146.5
162.2
202.1

132.3
152.2
151.2
149.8
167.5
104.2
163.5
103.6
166.7

132.5
152.4
150.9
150.1
167.8
105.9
163.8
103.7
167.5

6 months
ended--

July
1998

Oct.
1998

Jan.
1999

Apr.
1999

Oct.
1998

Apr.
1999

162.7

1.8

1.5

2.3

3.5

1.6

2.9

162.8
162.4
161.9
183.6
146.1
161.5
197.7

162.9
162.5
161.9
184.3
146.6
155.7
199.9

3.0
3.3
3.6
2.9
1.4
-1.1
13.4

3.0
3.0
3.3
2.2
0.3
19.7
2.0

2.7
2.8
2.5
4.2
-5.1
17.9
7.6

0.0
0.0
-1.2
0.7
4.2
-12.7
-9.6

3.0
3.2
3.4
2.6
0.8
8.8
7.6

1.4
1.4
0.6
2.4
-0.5
1.4
-1.4

132.8
152.1
150.7
148.5
167.8
105.0
164.1
103.8
166.9

132.4
152.6
151.4
148.5
168.5
105.2
164.4
104.1
167.4

0.3
4.9
-0.3
19.9
3.2
4.4
2.3
3.6
2.2

-1.5
4.0
2.2
27.2
-0.2
2.0
3.0
5.2
2.0

2.8
0.8
2.1
-14.5
4.4
3.5
3.0
3.1
2.9

0.3
1.1
0.5
-3.4
2.4
3.9
2.2
1.9
1.7

-0.6
4.5
0.9
23.5
1.5
3.2
2.6
4.4
2.1

1.5
0.9
1.3
-9.2
3.4
3.7
2.6
2.5
2.3

Expenditure category

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence (3).............
Lodging away from home (2) (3)............
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3) (4).....................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity (3)..........
Household furnishings and operations ......

158.2
179.3
174.9
101.9

158.4
179.7
175.3
101.4

158.8
180.2
175.6
103.0

159.2
180.7
176.0
104.9

2.1
2.8
3.8
-2.0

2.1
3.9
3.5
12.9

1.8
2.3
3.5
-6.4

2.6
3.2
2.5
12.3

2.1
3.3
3.7
5.2

2.2
2.7
3.0
2.5

173.8
100.1
126.5
110.3
85.3
118.1
125.2

174.2
100.4
126.7
110.4
84.1
118.3
124.8

174.6
100.6
127.2
110.9
85.0
118.8
124.6

174.9
100.6
127.3
110.9
87.1
118.7
124.9

2.9
-4.3
-1.5
-2.5
-5.5
-2.0
0.3

3.3
2.4
-4.9
-6.6
-11.8
-6.2
-1.3

2.6
0.4
0.0
-0.4
-11.3
0.0
0.6

2.6
2.0
2.6
2.2
8.7
2.0
-1.0

3.1
-1.0
-3.2
-4.5
-8.7
-4.1
-0.5

2.6
1.2
1.3
0.9
-1.8
1.0
-0.2

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

129.9
130.0
121.1
130.8
127.7

129.4
131.1
120.0
127.2
126.2

128.9
130.5
120.0
126.5
126.8

130.7
132.4
121.4
129.3
128.3

0.0
-0.3
0.3
-12.6
5.8

3.4
2.5
2.6
29.9
0.3

-6.5
-7.1
-9.3
-0.6
-4.0

2.5
7.6
1.0
-4.5
1.9

1.7
1.1
1.5
6.6
3.0

-2.1
0.0
-4.3
-2.6
-1.1

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation (1)..................

139.2
136.7
100.6
144.8
151.8
86.5
86.0
100.4
171.2
186.8

138.7
136.0
99.7
144.1
149.6
86.0
85.6
100.2
171.6
189.1

139.6
136.8
99.5
143.8
148.7
89.4
88.9
99.7
172.0
194.1

143.2
140.4
99.7
143.9
149.6
102.4
102.0
99.8
172.3
196.4

0.3
0.6
2.0
-1.1
8.8
-4.2
-4.2
1.6
3.4
-2.9

-1.4
-1.4
1.2
-0.6
4.0
-10.4
-9.7
1.2
4.3
-5.0

-2.8
-2.9
-1.2
1.4
-6.1
-14.3
-14.7
-1.6
2.9
1.1

12.0
11.3
-3.5
-2.5
-5.7
96.4
97.9
-2.4
2.6
22.2

-0.6
-0.4
1.6
-0.8
6.4
-7.4
-7.0
1.4
3.9
-4.0

4.3
4.0
-2.4
-0.6
-5.9
29.7
29.9
-2.0
2.7
11.1

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services (3).................
Hospital and related services (3).........

245.9
222.6
251.0
227.7
289.9

246.4
223.0
251.5
228.0
291.2

247.2
223.6
252.3
228.5
292.2

248.1
225.4
253.0
229.2
292.3

3.7
3.6
3.8
3.7
4.0

3.3
4.8
3.1
3.6
3.1

3.2
2.6
3.3
2.9
4.7

3.6
5.1
3.2
2.7
3.4

3.5
4.2
3.5
3.6
3.6

3.4
3.8
3.2
2.8
4.0

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

101.2
101.6

101.0
101.0

100.9
100.5

101.1
100.4

0.0
-0.4

-0.4
1.2

2.4
1.6

-0.4
-4.6

-0.2
0.4

1.0
-1.6

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)

101.2
105.1
259.0
295.5
98.1

101.4
105.9
262.1
297.8
97.7

101.4
106.3
263.0
298.9
97.4

101.3
106.7
263.4
299.8
97.0

2.0
4.4
3.9
4.6
0.4

-0.8
4.3
9.0
3.9
-4.7

1.6
4.7
0.5
5.0
-1.2

0.4
6.2
7.0
5.9
-4.4

0.6
4.4
6.4
4.2
-2.2

1.0
5.5
3.7
5.5
-2.8

(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (5)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

97.8
100.8

97.4
100.5

97.1
100.4

96.7
100.0

0.0
4.0

-4.7
-2.7

-2.0
0.0

-4.4
-3.1

-2.4
0.6

-3.2
-1.6

35.0

34.4

33.5

33.0

-31.0

-25.1

-23.3

-21.0

-28.1

-22.1

61.1

59.3

56.9

55.9

-44.0

-32.2

-32.9

-29.9

-38.4

-31.4

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

259.3
353.8
159.1
150.7
169.1
239.5

258.7
349.3
159.6
150.8
169.6
240.4

256.1
337.0
160.3
151.6
170.2
240.9

259.7
350.1
160.4
151.7
170.6
241.0

6.7
16.4
2.9
4.7
2.2
3.5

6.9
15.8
3.4
0.8
3.4
5.2

35.6
141.5
2.0
0.8
3.1
4.5

0.6
-4.1
3.3
2.7
3.6
2.5

6.8
16.1
3.1
2.7
2.8
4.4

16.8
52.2
2.7
1.7
3.4
3.5

142.9
162.9
131.0
133.3
129.9

142.5
163.1
130.3
132.6
129.4

142.4
162.8
130.3
133.2
128.9

144.4
162.9
133.2
138.1
130.7

1.7
3.0
0.3
2.1
0.0

0.8
3.0
-0.3
0.9
3.4

2.0
2.7
1.5
2.7
-6.5

4.3
0.0
6.9
15.2
2.5

1.3
3.0
0.0
1.5
1.7

3.1
1.4
4.2
8.8
-2.1

139.8
126.7
183.1
172.8
185.9
217.4

139.1
125.8
183.5
173.1
186.5
217.8

140.1
125.4
184.1
173.5
187.7
218.2

147.0
125.4
184.5
174.1
187.9
218.5

1.8
0.6
2.2
2.6
0.0
3.2

0.3
-0.9
2.0
4.1
-0.4
2.1

8.4
-1.6
2.2
2.3
0.9
3.4

22.2
-4.0
3.1
3.0
4.4
2.0

1.0
-0.2
2.1
3.3
-0.2
2.6

15.1
-2.8
2.7
2.7
2.6
2.7

160.7
156.2
157.3
132.6
135.3
141.3
148.1
172.1
177.5
97.9
170.1
172.1

160.6
156.0
157.2
131.9
134.6
140.8
148.0
172.3
177.8
97.7
170.1
172.1

160.9
156.1
157.4
131.9
135.2
141.6
148.3
172.8
178.2
99.7
170.0
172.1

162.4
157.6
158.6
134.8
140.0
148.0
150.8
173.0
178.6
106.1
170.6
172.8

1.5
1.6
1.8
0.6
2.1
1.8
3.1
1.9
2.3
-3.1
2.4
2.1

1.3
0.8
1.5
-0.3
0.9
0.6
1.4
0.7
2.1
-8.4
2.4
2.1

2.0
2.1
2.1
1.5
2.7
7.4
2.5
1.9
2.3
-7.0
2.9
2.8

4.3
3.6
3.3
6.8
14.6
20.4
7.5
2.1
2.5
38.0
1.2
1.6

1.4
1.2
1.7
0.2
1.5
1.2
2.2
1.3
2.2
-5.8
2.4
2.1

3.2
2.9
2.7
4.1
8.5
13.7
5.0
2.0
2.4
13.3
2.0
2.2

144.6

143.9

143.2

144.1

1.4

1.1

3.7

-1.4

1.3

1.1

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (4).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (4)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................

Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............

86.5
190.6

85.9
191.0

89.1
191.6

101.5
192.1

-4.6
2.6

-10.4
2.8

-13.9
2.3

89.6
3.2

-7.6
2.7

27.8
2.8

1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100 base.
3 This index series was calculated using a Laspeyres estimator. All other item stratum index series converted to a
geometric means estimator in January, 1999.
4 Indexes on a December 1984=100 base
5 Indexes on a December 1988=100 base.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 6. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
All items

CPI-W

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
Apr.1999 from--

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

M

161.0

161.1

161.4

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

168.4
168.5
102.4

168.3
168.1
102.6

Midwest urban ...............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

156.6
157.1
102.3

M

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............

M
M

U.S. city average ...........................

Percent change to
Mar.1999 from--

Apr.
1998

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Mar.
1998

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

162.7

2.3

1.0

0.8

1.7

0.2

0.2

168.5
168.3
102.8

169.5
169.3
103.5

1.9
2.0
2.0

0.7
0.7
0.9

0.6
0.6
0.7

1.5
1.5
1.5

0.1
-0.1
0.4

0.1
0.1
0.2

156.5
157.2
102.2

156.9
157.5
102.6

158.2
158.8
103.5

2.1
2.2
1.8

1.1
1.0
1.3

0.8
0.8
0.9

1.6
1.8
1.3

0.2
0.3
0.3

0.3
0.2
0.4

153.6

153.4

153.4

154.4

2.3

0.7

0.7

1.8

-0.1

0.0

157.9
156.4

158.0
156.4

158.4
156.9

159.4
157.9

1.9
1.8

0.9
1.0

0.6
0.6

1.5
1.4

0.3
0.3

0.3
0.3

Region and area size(2)

Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M

102.5

102.6

102.8

103.5

2.0

0.9

0.7

1.5

0.3

0.2

M

161.1

161.0

161.5

162.7

2.3

1.1

0.7

2.1

0.2

0.3

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

162.4
161.6
103.4

162.7
161.9
103.6

163.2
162.3
104.0

164.9
164.2
105.0

3.3
3.6
2.9

1.4
1.4
1.4

1.0
1.2
1.0

2.4
2.7
1.9

0.5
0.4
0.6

0.3
0.2
0.4

M
M
M

147.4
102.6
159.6

147.4
102.6
159.4

147.7
102.9
159.8

148.9
103.7
160.9

2.4
2.1
2.3

1.0
1.1
0.9

0.8
0.8
0.7

1.9
1.5
1.9

0.2
0.3
0.1

0.2
0.3
0.3

Size classes
A (4)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas(5)
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

160.5
157.8

160.6
158.1

161.1
158.3

161.7
160.1

1.7
2.9

0.7
1.3

0.4
1.1

1.8
2.1

0.4
0.3

0.3
0.1

M

170.8

170.6

170.8

171.3

1.7

0.4

0.3

1.5

0.0

0.1

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (6)........

1
1
1
1

172.2
152.7
154.6
102.7

-

172.3
152.9
155.8
102.8

-

-

-

-

1.8
1.9
2.0
1.5

0.1
0.1
0.8
0.1

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

-

159.1
155.8
145.0
158.8

-

160.9
158.7
146.6
159.1

2.0
3.4
1.2
1.1

1.1
1.9
1.1
0.2

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

167.8
165.7
166.0

-

170.6
168.8
167.8

2.5
5.0
3.6

1.7
1.9
1.1

-

-

-

-

1 Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
5 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
6 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.

- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 1(LAS). Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U-XL): U.S. city average, by
expenditure category and commodity and service group using a Laspeyres Estimator
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-U

Relative
importance,
December
1998

Unadjusted
indexes
Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

Unadjusted
percent change to
Apr. 1999 fromApr.
1998

Mar.
1999

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

165.2
494.9

166.3
498.2

2.3
-

0.7
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products ..............
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1).........
Food away from home ......................
Other food away from home (1)...........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

16.408
15.422
9.691
1.544
2.569
1.088
1.440

163.7
163.3
163.5
183.4
147.0
161.4
200.4

163.9
163.5
163.6
184.7
146.9
156.3
203.7

2.3
2.3
2.1
2.5
0.4
5.3
3.1

0.1
0.1
0.1
0.7
-0.1
-3.2
1.6

1.049
2.002
.377
.309
1.316
.320
5.730
.175
.986

134.4
152.8
151.0
149.1
168.0
104.9
164.2
103.7
168.4

134.0
153.6
151.8
148.9
169.2
105.7
164.5
104.0
168.8

0.1
2.7
1.1
5.8
2.5
3.9
2.7
3.4
2.2

-0.3
0.5
0.5
-0.1
0.7
0.8
0.2
0.3
0.2

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................

39.828
30.283
7.007

163.0
186.5
176.0

163.2
186.7
176.4

2.3
3.1
3.3

0.1
0.1
0.2

Lodging away from home (1)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (2).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1).....
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

2.376

116.1

115.4

4.7

-0.6

20.529
.371
4.735
3.801
.227
3.574
4.810

191.5
100.2
125.9
110.5
86.2
117.9
127.0

191.9
100.3
125.7
110.2
87.7
117.5
127.4

3.0
-0.1
-1.0
-1.9
-5.5
-1.6
0.3

0.2
0.1
-0.2
-0.3
1.7
-0.3
0.3

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel ............
Footwear ..................................

4.831
1.358
1.939
.272
.876

133.7
132.0
127.9
125.6
127.2

135.8
133.9
130.1
128.3
129.1

0.0
0.4
-0.6
1.3
0.9

1.6
1.4
1.7
2.1
1.5

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (1)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks ....................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

16.999
15.653
7.843
4.983
1.914
2.493
2.476
.549
1.624
1.346

140.7
136.5
99.7
143.4
147.5
86.3
85.8
100.3
170.6
198.4

144.3
140.1
99.8
143.3
148.4
100.9
100.3
100.3
171.0
201.3

2.0
1.7
-0.3
-0.7
0.1
10.0
10.1
-0.2
3.2
4.1

2.6
2.6
0.1
-0.1
0.6
16.9
16.9
0.0
0.2
1.5

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

5.713
1.252
4.461
2.854
1.354

248.4
228.1
253.1
227.4
296.6

249.2
229.8
253.5
228.2
296.3

3.5
4.4
3.3
3.2
3.7

0.3
0.7
0.2
0.4
-0.1

Recreation (1)..............................
Video and audio (1).......................

6.120
1.748

102.0
101.1

102.2
101.0

1.1
-0.4

0.2
-0.1

Education and communication (1).............
Education (1)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1).........................
Information and information processing
(1)...................................
Telephone services (1)..................
Information and information processing

5.478
2.694
.203
2.492
2.783

100.8
105.4
261.1
303.4
96.7

100.7
105.5
260.9
303.8
96.4

0.8
4.8
4.9
4.8
-2.9

-0.1
0.1
-0.1
0.1
-0.3

2.580
2.327

96.2
100.3

95.9
100.1

-3.3
-0.4

-0.3
-0.2

other than telephone services (3)...
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1)......................

.253

32.5

32.2

-24.8

-0.9

.148

57.7

57.0

-34.2

-1.2

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care .............................
Personal care products ...................
Personal care services ...................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

4.624
1.159
3.465
.742
.973
1.491

253.3
335.8
160.1
150.2
170.1
241.5

256.2
348.5
160.4
150.9
170.6
241.8

9.2
32.3
2.9
2.4
3.3
3.6

1.1
3.8
0.2
0.5
0.3
0.1

42.109
16.408
25.702
14.345
4.831

142.8
163.7
130.4
133.6
133.7

144.8
163.9
133.3
138.8
135.8

2.0
2.3
1.8
4.4
0.0

1.4
0.1
2.2
3.9
1.6

9.514
11.356
57.891
29.912
6.963
10.768

138.6
126.1
187.7
194.2
190.7
221.5

145.7
126.2
187.9
194.4
191.1
221.9

6.7
-1.5
2.6
3.2
1.5
2.9

5.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2

84.578
69.717
94.287
26.688
15.331
10.500
30.753
27.979
53.429
6.294
93.706
78.284

165.6
158.6
160.6
132.0
135.7
140.6
148.8
194.3
181.7
98.5
173.9
176.5

166.8
160.1
161.7
134.8
140.7
147.1
151.6
194.6
181.9
104.9
174.3
177.0

2.3
2.0
2.3
1.8
4.2
6.3
3.3
2.0
2.5
2.9
2.3
2.3

0.7
0.9
0.7
2.1
3.7
4.6
1.9
0.2
0.1
6.5
0.2
0.3

23.967
2.720
54.316

144.2
86.4
194.9

145.1
99.9
195.1

0.9
8.8
2.8

0.6
15.6
0.1

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (2).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (2)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar

(1982-84=$1.00) .........................
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1967=$1.00) ............................

-

$ .605

$ .601

-

-

-

$ .202

$ .201

-

-

1 Indexes on a December 1997=100 base.
2 Index is on a December 1982=100 base.
3 Indexes on a December 1988=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 2(LAS). Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W-XL): U.S.
city average, by expenditure category and commodity and service group using a Laspeyres Estimator
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-W

Relative
importance,
December
1998

Unadjusted
indexes
Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

Unadjusted
percent change to
Apr. 1999 fromApr.
1998

Mar.
1999

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

161.6
481.3

162.8
485.0

2.3
-

0.7
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products ..............
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1).........

18.011
16.966
10.832
1.689
3.055
1.193
1.492

163.0
162.6
162.3
183.1
146.6
161.3
199.2

163.1
162.7
162.3
184.4
146.5
155.9
202.0

2.3
2.3
2.0
2.5
0.3
5.2
2.9

0.1
0.1
0.0
0.7
-0.1
-3.3
1.4

1.184
2.220
.420
.354
1.446
.355

133.4
152.1
151.1
148.7
167.8
104.9

132.9
153.0
151.7
148.5
169.0
105.4

0.2
2.8
1.1
5.8
2.4
3.6

-0.4
0.6
0.4
-0.1
0.7
0.5

Food away from home ......................
Other food away from home (1)...........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

6.133
.216
1.045

164.2
103.8
167.3

164.5
104.1
167.8

2.7
3.5
2.2

0.2
0.3
0.3

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (1)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (2).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1).....
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

36.685
27.496
8.500
1.379

158.9
180.6
175.6
115.2

159.1
180.9
176.0
115.0

2.1
3.1
3.3
4.3

0.1
0.2
0.2
-0.2

17.296
.320
4.850
3.928
.201
3.727
4.339

174.5
100.6
125.8
110.0
86.8
117.3
125.1

174.8
100.7
125.5
109.7
88.1
116.9
125.6

2.9
0.2
-1.1
-1.9
-5.4
-1.7
0.0

0.2
0.1
-0.2
-0.3
1.5
-0.3
0.4

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel ............
Footwear ..................................

5.199
1.474
1.948
.344
1.057

132.1
132.1
125.4
126.6
127.6

134.2
134.0
127.8
129.5
129.4

0.1
0.8
-0.4
2.0
0.8

1.6
1.4
1.9
2.3
1.4

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (1)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks ....................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

19.166
18.109
9.250
5.224
3.216
3.066
3.045
.682
1.690
1.056

139.1
136.3
99.5
144.5
148.8
86.4
85.9
100.0
172.1
193.7

143.0
140.2
99.7
144.4
149.7
100.7
100.2
99.8
172.5
196.2

1.9
1.8
-0.4
-0.8
0.1
9.6
9.7
-0.1
3.4
3.2

2.8
2.9
0.2
-0.1
0.6
16.6
16.6
-0.2
0.2
1.3

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

4.672
.926
3.746
2.415
1.114

247.6
224.3
252.8
228.9
292.8

248.3
226.1
253.3
229.7
292.3

3.5
4.2
3.3
3.2
3.8

0.3
0.8
0.2
0.3
-0.2

Recreation (1)..............................
Video and audio (1).......................

5.925
1.951

101.4
101.0

101.5
100.8

0.5
-0.6

0.1
-0.2

Education and communication (1).............
Education (1)..............................

5.361
2.478

101.1
105.6

100.9
105.7

0.8
5.0

-0.2
0.1

Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1).........................
Information and information processing
(1)...................................
Telephone services (1)..................
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (3)...
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1)......................

.200
2.278
2.883

263.7
297.9
97.4

263.5
298.3
97.1

4.9
4.9
-2.4

-0.1
0.1
-0.3

2.733
2.519

97.1
100.4

96.8
100.1

-2.7
-0.4

-0.3
-0.3

.213

33.5

33.2

-24.7

-0.9

.120

57.0

56.1

-34.8

-1.6

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care .............................
Personal care products ...................
Personal care services ...................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

4.981
1.694
3.287
.838
.975
1.253

255.6
335.9
160.3
151.1
170.4
241.7

259.4
349.0
160.7
151.7
170.9
242.1

11.7
32.4
3.1
2.2
3.3
4.1

1.5
3.9
0.2
0.4
0.3
0.2

46.764
18.011
28.753
15.564
5.199

142.6
163.0
130.6
133.4
132.1

144.8
163.1
133.8
139.2
134.2

2.3
2.3
2.2
5.2
0.1

1.5
0.1
2.5
4.3
1.6

10.365
13.189
53.236
27.175
6.800
10.144

138.8
125.8
184.1
173.9
187.9
218.0

146.7
125.9
184.3
174.2
188.1
218.3

7.9
-1.3
2.4
3.1
1.3
2.8

5.7
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.1

83.034
72.504
95.328
29.798
16.609
11.410
33.575
26.061
49.490
6.994

161.3
156.2
157.6
132.0
135.4
140.5
148.5
172.7
178.3
97.5

162.7
157.8
158.9
135.1
141.0
147.9
151.5
172.8
178.5
104.5

2.3
2.1
2.3
2.2
5.1
7.3
3.6
1.8
2.4
3.4

0.9
1.0
0.8
2.3
4.1
5.3
2.0
0.1
0.1
7.2

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (2).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (2)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................

All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1982-84=$1.00) .........................
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar
(1967=$1.00) ............................

93.006
76.040

170.4
172.4

170.9
173.0

2.3
2.3

0.3
0.3

26.531
3.267
49.509

144.0
86.6
191.6

145.0
100.1
191.8

1.3
8.7
2.7

0.7
15.6
0.1

-

$ .619

$ .614

-

-

-

$ .208

$ .206

-

-

1 Indexes on a December 1997=100 base.
2 Index is on a December 1984=100 base.
3 Indexes on a December 1988=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 3(LAS). Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U-XL): Selected areas, all items index
using a Laspeyres Estimator
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-U

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
Apr.1999 from--

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

M

164.4

164.7

165.2

166.3

1.2

1.0

0.7

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

171.6
172.6
102.8

171.7
172.6
103.0

172.1
173.1
103.3

173.0
173.8
104.0

0.8
0.7
1.2

0.8
0.7
1.0

0.5
0.4
0.7

Midwest urban ...............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than

M
M
M

160.4
161.6
102.6

160.6
161.9
102.7

161.2
162.5
103.1

162.3
163.7
103.8

1.2
1.3
1.2

1.1
1.1
1.1

0.7
0.7
0.7

U.S. city average ...........................
Region and area size(2)

50,000) ...............................

M

155.6

155.7

155.8

156.5

0.6

0.5

0.4

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

160.0
158.9
102.9

160.2
159.1
103.1

160.8
159.8
103.4

161.6
160.6
104.0

1.0
1.1
1.1

0.9
0.9
0.9

0.5
0.5
0.6

M

160.9

161.1

161.7

162.8

1.2

1.1

0.7

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

166.5
167.3
103.7

167.0
167.9
103.9

167.5
168.4
104.3

169.2
170.1
105.2

1.6
1.7
1.4

1.3
1.3
1.3

1.0
1.0
0.9

M
M
M

148.9
103.0
160.6

149.1
103.1
160.8

149.6
103.5
161.3

150.7
104.1
162.3

1.2
1.1
1.1

1.1
1.0
0.9

0.7
0.6
0.6

Size classes
A (4)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

166.0
164.2

166.4
164.7

166.9
165.2

167.6
166.6

1.0
1.5

0.7
1.2

0.4
0.8

M

175.2

175.4

175.8

176.3

0.6

0.5

0.3

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (5)........

1
1
1
1

174.1
160.6
155.2
102.8

-

175.2
161.1
156.4
103.4

-

-

-

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

-

162.1
161.3
146.8
161.4

-

163.8
164.0
148.3
161.8

-

1.0
1.7
1.0
0.2

-

2
2
2

-

168.7
169.5
170.8

-

171.1
172.5
172.6

-

1.4
1.8
1.1

-

1 Foods, fuels, and several other items priced every month in all areas;
most other goods and services priced as indicated:
M - Every month.
1 - January, March, May, July, September, and November.
2 - February, April, June, August, October, and December.

2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
5 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 4(LAS). Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W-XL): Selected
areas, all items index using a Laspeyres Estimator
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-W

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
Apr.1999 from--

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

Apr.
1999

Jan.
1999

Feb.
1999

Mar.
1999

M

161.1

161.2

161.6

162.8

1.1

1.0

0.7

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

168.5
168.5
102.5

168.4
168.3
102.7

168.7
168.5
102.8

169.7
169.5
103.5

0.7
0.6
1.0

0.8
0.7
0.8

0.6
0.6
0.7

Midwest urban ...............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

156.6
157.1
102.3

156.6
157.2
102.3

157.1
157.6
102.7

158.3
158.8
103.6

1.1
1.1
1.3

1.1
1.0
1.3

0.8
0.8
0.9

M

153.7

153.5

153.5

154.4

0.5

0.6

0.6

U.S. city average ...........................
Region and area size(2)

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

158.0
156.5
102.5

158.1
156.5
102.7

158.5
157.0
102.9

159.5
157.9
103.6

0.9
0.9
1.1

0.9
0.9
0.9

0.6
0.6
0.7

M

161.2

161.2

161.7

162.8

1.0

1.0

0.7

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............

M
M

162.5
161.6

162.8
162.0

163.3
162.4

165.0
164.2

1.5
1.6

1.4
1.4

1.0
1.1

Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M

103.5

103.7

104.1

105.1

1.5

1.4

1.0

M
M
M

147.4
102.6
159.6

147.5
102.7
159.5

147.8
103.0
159.9

149.0
103.8
160.9

1.1
1.2
0.8

1.0
1.1
0.9

0.8
0.8
0.6

Size classes
A (4)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

160.5
157.9

160.6
158.1

161.1
158.5

161.7
160.1

0.7
1.4

0.7
1.3

0.4
1.0

M

170.9

170.8

171.0

171.6

0.4

0.5

0.4

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (5)........

1
1
1
1

172.2
152.8
154.8
102.7

-

172.7
152.9
155.9
103.0

-

-

-

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

-

159.3
155.9
145.2
158.8

-

160.9
158.6
146.6
159.2

-

1.0
1.7
1.0
0.3

-

2
2
2

-

167.9
165.8
166.2

-

170.5
169.0
168.1

-

1.5
1.9
1.1

-

1 Foods, fuels, and several other items priced every month in all areas;
most other goods and services priced as indicated:
M - Every month.
1 - January, March, May, July, September, and November.
2 - February, April, June, August, October, and December.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
5 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.