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FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION:
Patrick C. Jackman (202) 606-7000
USDL-98-208
CPI QUICKLINE:
(202) 606-6994
TRANSMISSION OF
FOR CURRENT AND HISTORICAL
MATERIAL IN THIS
INFORMATION:
(202) 606-7828
RELEASE IS EMBARGOED
EMBARGOED
UNTIL 8:30 A.M. (EDT)
MEDIA CONTACT:
(202) 606-5902
Thursday, May 14, 1998
INTERNET ADDRESS:
http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX:

APRIL 1998

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) rose 0.2
percent in April, before seasonal adjustment, to a level of 162.5 (198284=100), the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor
reported today. For the 12-month period ended in April, the CPI-U has
increased 1.4 percent.
The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) rose 0.3 percent in April, prior to seasonal adjustment. The
April 1998 CPI-W level of 159.1 was 1.2 percent higher than the index in
April 1997.
CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI-U rose 0.2 percent in April
after being unchanged in March. The food index increased 0.1 percent.
Grocery store food prices decreased 0.1 percent in April, the same as in
each of the two preceding months. The energy index declined slightly, and
by substantially less than in each of the previous four months. The index
for petroleum-based energy decreased 0.9 percent, while the index for
energy services increased 0.4 percent. Excluding food and energy, the CPIU rose 0.3 percent, following an increase of 0.1 percent in March.
Upturns in the indexes for tobacco and for used cars and trucks, coupled
with a larger increase in shelter costs, were responsible for the
acceleration.
Table A.

Percent changes in CPI for Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound
adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate 12-mos.
Category
1997
1998
3-mos. ended ended
Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
Apr. `98 Apr. `98

RELEASE IS

All Items
.2
Food and beverages .2
Housing
.3
Apparel
.1
Transportation
.0
Medical care
.2
Recreation
Education and
Communication
Other goods and
Services
.7
Special Indexes
Energy
-.2
Food
.3
All Items less
Food and energy .2

.1
.2
.3
.1
-.6
.3
-

.1
.1
.1
.2
-.3
.3
-

.0
.3
.1
-.5
-.3
.1
.3

.1
.0
.1
.2
-.4
.3
.3

1.2
.3
2.8
-.3
-4.1
4.1
2.8

1.4
2.0
2.4
-.2
-2.3
3.0
1.8

-

-

.0

-.1

.3

.3

2.0

2.5

.4

.4

.4

.8

-.3

1.0

6.4

5.4

.0 -1.8 -2.4 -2.2 -1.2
.1
.0
.3
.0
.0

-.1
.1

-13.5
.3

-7.4
2.0

.3

2.8

2.1

.1

.2

.2

.3

.0
.2
.0
.1
.2
.4
-.2 -.1
-.5* -.1
.3
.4
.4
.0

.1

*Revised, see note on page 3.
Beginning with release of the data for January 1999, the BLS will
introduce a new formula for calculating the basic components of the CPI.
See page 4 for more details.
The food and beverages index, which was unchanged in each of the two
preceding months, rose 0.1 percent in April. The index for grocery store
food prices declined 0.1 percent, the same as in February and March,
reflecting decreases in the indexes for cereal and bakery products, for
meats, poultry, fish, and eggs, and for nonalcoholic beverages. The index
for meats, poultry, fish, and eggs declined for the fifth consecutive
month--down 0.1 percent in April. The index for beef increased 0.2
percent in April, but was more than offset by price declines for pork and
for poultry--down 1.3 and 0.5 percent, respectively. (Prior to seasonal
adjustment, beef prices fell 0.2 percent in April.) The index for
nonalcoholic beverages registered its second consecutive decrease--down
0.4 percent in April--reflecting declines in prices for coffee and
carbonated drinks. The index for cereal and bakery products declined 0.2
percent. On the other hand, the indexes for fruits and vegetables and for
dairy and related products increased 0.2 and 0.1 percent, respectively,
while the index for other food at home was unchanged. The other two
components of the food and beverage index--food away from home and
alcoholic beverages--rose 0.2 percent and remained unchanged,
respectively.
The housing component rose 0.4 percent in April.

Shelter costs rose

0.4 percent, following an increase of 0.2 percent in March. Within
shelter, the index for rent rose 0.2 percent, owners' equivalent rent, 0.4
percent, and the cost of lodging away from home, 1.2 percent. (Prior to
seasonal adjustment, the latter index declined 0.9 percent.) The index
for fuels and utilities increased 0.3 percent in April, the same as in
March. The index for household fuels rose 0.4 percent; the index for
electricity rose 0.6 percent, the index for natural gas was unchanged, and
the index for fuel oil declined 0.8 percent. The index for household
furnishings and operation increased 0.4 percent in April.
The transportation component declined for the sixth consecutive
month, down 0.1 percent in April. The index for gasoline continued to
fall--down 1.0 percent in April--but by substantially less than in recent
months. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, gasoline prices rose 0.9 percent,
their first increase since September 1997.) As of April, gasoline prices
were 23.3 percent lower than their peak level of November 1990. The index
for new and used vehicle prices increased 0.1 percent; the index for new
vehicles was unchanged and the index for used car and truck prices
advanced 0.6 percent. (See the note on page 4 for details on a correction
to the March used car and truck index.) Public transportation costs
declined 0.2 percent in April, reflecting a downturn in the index for
airline fares. The index for airline fares, which increased 8.2 percent
during the first three months of 1998, declined 0.3 percent in April.
The index for apparel declined for the second consecutive month, down
0.1 percent in April. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, apparel prices rose
0.7 percent.)
Medical care costs rose 0.4 percent in April to a level 3.0 percent
above a year ago. The index for medical care commodities--prescription
drugs, nonprescription drugs, and medical supplies--increased 0.7 percent.
The index for medical care services rose 0.4 percent. Charges for
professional services and for hospital and related services each increased
0.4 percent.
The index for recreation costs, which increased 0.4 percent in March,
was unchanged in April. Recreational services costs rose 0.4 percent, and
the index for reading material increased 0.5 percent. Declines in the
indexes for sporting goods, for photography, and for toys largely offset
these advances.
The index for education and communication increased 0.3 percent in
April, the same as in March. In April, education costs rose 0.6 percent,
reflecting increases in the indexes for educational books and for child
care and nursery school. The index for communication costs was unchanged.

Within the communication category, an increase in long distance telephone
charges--up 1.3 percent--largely offset declines in the indexes for
personal computers and peripheral equipment and for cellular telephone
services--down 2.4 and 1.0 percent, respectively.
The index for other goods and services rose 1.0 percent in April.
Three-fourths of the increase was attributable to a 3.8-percent increase
in the index for tobacco and smoking products.
CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI for Urban Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers increased 0.3 percent in April.
Table B. Percent changes in CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers (CPI-W)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate 12-mos.
Category
1997
1998
3-mos. ended ended
Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
Apr. '98 Apr. '98
All Items
.2
Food and beverages .3
Housing
.3
Apparel
.0
Transportation
-.1
Medical care
.2
Recreation
Education and
communication
Other goods and
services
.7
Special Indexes
Energy
-.2
Food
.2
All Items less
food and energy
.2

.1
.1
.3
.0
-.6
.3
-

.1
.0
.0
.0
-.3
.4
-

.0
.3
.0
-.5
-.5
.2
.3

.0
.0
.1
-.2
-.4
.2
.3

-.1
.0
.3
-.5
-.6*
.3
.3

.3
.0
.3
.2
.0
.4
.1

.8
.0
2.9
-1.8
-4.2
3.8
2.8

1.2
1.9
2.2
-1.1
-2.7
2.9
1.7

-

-

-.1

.0

.4

.2

2.4

2.6

.4

.4

.5

1.1

-.6

1.4

7.7

5.7

-.2 -1.9 -2.5 -2.1 -1.3
.2 -.1
.4 -.1
.0

-.2
.1

-13.6
.0

-7.8
1.9

.4

2.6

1.9

.1

.2

.2

.2

.1

* Revised, see note below.
Note: selected component indexes in the March Consumer Price Index
for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) and for Urban Wage earners and Clerical
Workers (CPI-W) have been revised to take account of an error in the used

car and truck component of the index. These indexes include the
transportation index and all lower-level indexes that include the used car
and truck index; the All Items indexes did not require revision. Used car
and truck prices in the CPI are based on secondary data published by the
National Automobile Dealer Association (NADA). The error was a result of
a change in the reporting of used car and truck prices by NADA that was
not accounted for in the March CPI.
Consumer Price Index data for May are scheduled for release on Tuesday,
June 16, 1998, at 8:30 A.M. (EDT).
CPI (Old Series)
For the first six months of 1998, BLS also will calculate Old
Series CPI-U and Old Series CPI-W based on the 1982-84 expenditure pattern
used in the CPI from 1987 through 1997. These Old Series data are
contained in tables 1(OS)-4(OS). From March to April, the Old Series CPIU and the Old Series CPI-W rose 0.2 and 0.3 percent, respectively. Note
these series are not seasonally adjusted.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Planned change in the Consumer Price Index Formula
On April 16, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced its decision to
use a new formula for calculating the basic components of the Consumer
Price Index for all Urban Consumers (CPI-U) and the Consumer Price Index
for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W). This change will
become effective with data for January 1999.
The new formula, the geometric mean estimator, will be used in index
categories that comprise approximately 61 percent of total consumer
spending represented by the CPI-U. The remaining index categories, which
are shown in the table below, will continue to be calculated as they are
currently. Based upon BLS research, it is expected that planned use of the
new formula will reduce the annual rate of increase in the CPI by
approximately 0.2 percentage point per year.
The geometric mean estimator will be introduced in both the CPI-U and
the CPI-W effective with data for January 1999, in accord with the past
practice of introducing methodological changes at the beginning of a
calendar year. BLS will continue to publish "overlap" CPI-U and CPI-W
series using the current calculation method for the first six months of
1999. These indexes will not be published regularly for months subsequent
to June 1999, but will be available upon request.
Additional information on this change will be published in the April
1998 CPI Detailed Report and is available on the Internet

(http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm). This information may also be obtained
by writing to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices
and Price Indexes, 2 Massachusetts Ave. N.E., Room 3615 Washington, D.C.
20212 or by calling (202) 606-7000.
Arithmetic Mean (Laspeyres) Formula
1.

Selected shelter services:

A) Rent of primary
residence

2.

B) Owners' equivalent
rent of primary
residence

C) Housing at school,
excluding board

Selected utilities and government charges:

A) Electricity

C) Residential water and
sewerage maintenance

E) Telephone services,
local charges

B) Utility natural gas
service

D) State and local
registration, license,
and motor vehicle
property tax

F) Cable television

3.

Selected medical care services:

A) Physicians' services
B) Dental services

C) Eyeglasses and eye
care
D) Services by other
medical professionals

E) Hospital services
F) Nursing homes and
adult daycare

----------------------------------------------------------------------Overview of Publication Changes
Beginning in 1998, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) introduced
a new geographic area sample, a revised item structure and updated
expenditure weights into the Consumer Price Index (CPI).
Approximately every ten years the CPI undertakes this type of
revision in order to keep the index up-to-date. Since World War
II, revisions of the CPI have been introduced in 1953, 1964, 1978,
and 1987.
Because the changes the CPI undergoes during each revision can

have a major impact on our users, special steps were taken in
order to ameliorate the effects of these changes. Beginning with
the release of the January 1997 index, data series that were to be
changed or dropped from publication have been footnoted in all BLS
published tables. This provided an early warning for users to
reconsider their use of those indexes and provided time for them
to make changes in their use. The 1998 CPI Revision contains
substantial changes in both the items being presented and the
frequency of local area index publication.
Changes to the Item Structure
Effective in 1998, there are considerable changes to both the
items being priced and the manner in which they are being
aggregated in the CPI. The most notable change in presentation is
a reconstruction of several major groups with a resulting change
from the formerly available seven major groups to the new total of
eight.
Formerly the major groups were: Food and Beverages, Housing,
Apparel and Upkeep, Transportation, Medical Care, Entertainment
and Other Goods and Services. Three of these groups-- Food and
Beverages, Transportation, and Medical care remained the same.
The Apparel group was modified to exclude apparel upkeep products
and services. The Entertainment group has been slightly redefined
into a major group called Recreation and a new major group,
Education and Communication, has been formed from past
subelements of the Housing, Entertainment and Other Goods and
Services groups
Other important changes in our item structure at lower levels are
an expansion of our Food Away from Home index, a reorientation of
our car and truck indexes to a vehicle index, and the expansion of
our information processing equipment index.
For a complete listing of the new CPI Publication Structure see
Table X.
Changes to the Geographic Structure
In each revision, the CPI geographic sample is selected to be
representative of the current demographics of the United States.
The 1998 revision utilizes the 1990 Census of population. The CPI
developed an updated area sample design, decided on new local area
indexes and changed the frequency of publication for local area

indexes in order to better reflect these new demographics.
In addition to the national index, the BLS formerly published
indexes for 29 metropolitan areas. In 1998, it continues to
publish indexes for all but two of these areas--Buffalo-Niagara
Falls, NY, and New Orleans, LA. Due to the revised Metropolitan
Area (MA) definitions issued by the Office of Management and
Budget(OMB), two other areas, Washington, DC, and Baltimore, MD,
which the BLS formerly published separately, constitute a new
Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area. A single index is now
published for this consolidated area.
The new publication plan for local area indexes, that began with
the index for January 1998, is summarized below:
* Monthly indexes are now published for the three largest
metropolitan areas. Because of sample design considerations,
indexes for the Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both
formerly published monthly, are now published every other month
following the release of the December, 1997 index.
* Bimonthly indexes are published for the next 11 largest
areas, including Atlanta and Seattle, which used to have
semiannual average indexes.
* Semiannual average indexes are now published for 12
additional areas, including Pittsburgh and St. Louis, which
formerly had bimonthly indexes.
* The BLS continues to publish separate indexes for the four
Census regions of the United States. However, beginning in 1998,
there are only two area size classes for metropolitan areas,
instead of the former three: Size A - areas with a population
greater than 1.5 million; and Size B/C - areas with less than 1.5
million population. This cutoff of 1.5 million in population
reflects a rise from the former cutoff of 1.2 million and is
important since cities in size class A are those for which the
Bureau publishes city level indexes. The B/C size class is a
combination of the old Size B and Size C metropolitan areas. In
addition to the two metropolitan area size indexes for each
region, separate Size D indexes for urban non-metropolitan areas
continue to be published for both the Midwest and the South.
Separate indexes for Northeast and West urban nonmetropolitan
areas were discontinued in 1987.

The following is the full list of areas for which indexes are
currently published, beginning in January, 1998:
1. Metropolitan Areas for which a local index is published monthly:
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT-PA
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA
2. Metropolitan Areas for which a local index is published bimonthly:
In Odd Months (i.e. January,
March, etc.)
----------------------------

In Even Months (i.e.
February, April, etc.)
----------------------

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NHME-CT

Philadelphia-WilmingtonAtlantic City, PA-NJ-DE-MD

Washington-Baltimore, DC-MDVA-WV

San Francisco-Oakland-San
Jose, CA

Cleveland-Akron, OH
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX

Atlanta, GA
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA

3. Metropolitan Areas for which a local index is published
semiannually (In January and July)
Pittsburgh, PA
Kansas City, MO-KS
Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
Denver-Boulder-Greeley, CO
Portland-Salem, OR-WA

Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN
Milwaukee-Racine, WI
St. Louis, MO-IL
Anchorage, AK
Honolulu, HI
San Diego, CA

--------------------------------------------------------------------BLS to Maintain Current Reference Base of 1982-84-100 for most CPI
index series

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) previously indicated its
intention to change the numerical reference base for both the
Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) and the
Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) from their present 1982-84=100 base to a 1993-95=100 base,
effective with release of the January 1999 index in February 1999.
BLS also indicated that the alternate, or 1967=100 base, would be
discontinued in 1999 as well. This plan was initially described
in the December 1996 Monthly Labor Review, a publication which
contained several articles that dealt with the 1998 CPI Revision.
The BLS has now decided not to implement this rebasing plan.
Instead, the BLS will maintain the reference base of 1982-84=100
used for most items. In addition, the 1967=100 reference base
will continue to be the alternate base for the All Items indexes.
This decision is based in part on the fact that historical data
have less precision after rebasing. Rebasing is simply an
arithmetic transformation that does not substantially impact the
index. Because the rebased index values are smaller, however, the
loss of precision due to rounding is more serious. In addition,
retaining the old index reference bases would spare users the
inconvenience associated with conversion.
Changes in the numerical reference base should not be
confused with the plans by BLS to update the market basket of the
CPI. With release of the January CPI in February 1998, the
expenditure weights applied to CPI categories will be based on
consumer spending patterns for 1993-95.
----------------------------------------------------------------A Note on Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
Because price data are used for different purposes by
different groups, the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes
seasonally adjusted as well as unadjusted changes each month.
For analyzing general price trends in the economy, seasonally
adjusted changes are usually preferred since they eliminate the
effect of changes that normally occur at the same time and in
about the same magnitude every year--such as price movements
resulting from changing climatic conditions, production cycles,
model changeovers, holidays, and sales.

The unadjusted data are of primary interest to consumers
concerned about the prices they actually pay. Unadjusted data
also are used extensively for escalation purposes. Many
collective bargaining contract agreements and pension plans, for
example, tie compensation changes to the Consumer Price Index
unadjusted for seasonal variation.
Seasonal factors used in computing the seasonally adjusted
indexes are derived by the X-12-ARIMA Seasonal Adjustment Method.
The updated seasonal data at the end of 1977 replaced data from
1967 through 1977. Subsequent annual updates have replaced 5
years of seasonal data, e.g., data from 1993 through 1997 were
replaced at the end of 1997. The seasonal movement of all items
and 54 other aggregations is derived by combining the seasonal
movement of 73 selected components. Each year the seasonal status
of every series is reevaluated based upon certain statistical
criteria. If any of the 73 components change their seasonal
adjustment status from seasonally adjusted to not seasonally
adjusted, not seasonally adjusted data will be used for the last 5
years, but the seasonally adjusted indexes will be used before
that period.
Seasonally adjusted data, including the All items index
levels, are subject to revision for up to five years after their
original release. For this reason, BLS advises against the use of
these data in escalation agreements.
Effective with the calculation of the seasonal factors for
1990, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has used an enhanced seasonal
adjustment procedure called Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment for some CPI series. Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment allows for better estimates of seasonally adjusted
data. Extreme values and/or sharp movements which might distort
the seasonal pattern are estimated and removed from the data prior
to calculation of seasonal factors. Beginning with the
calculation of seasonal factors for 1996, X-12-ARIMA software was
used for Intervention Analysis Seasonal Adjustment.
For the fuel oil and the motor fuels indexes, this procedure
was used to offset the effects that extreme price volatility would
otherwise have had on the estimates of seasonally adjusted data
for those series. For some women's apparel indexes and the girls'
apparel index, the procedure was used to offset the effects of
changes in pricing methodology. For the tobacco and smoking
products index, this procedure was used to offset the effects of

increases in excise taxes and wholesale tobacco prices. For some
alcoholic beverage series, Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment was used to offset the effects of excise tax increases.
For the Nonalcoholic beverages index, the procedure was used to
offset the effects of a large increase in coffee prices due to
adverse weather. For the Water and sewerage maintenance index,
the procedure was used to account for a data collection anomaly.
A description of Intervention Analysis Seasonal Adjustment,
as well as a list of unusual events modeled and seasonal factors
for these items may be obtained by writing the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices and Price Indexes,
Washington, DC 20212 or by calling Claire McAnaw Gallagher on
(202) 606-6968.
Table 1. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and commodity
and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-U

Relative
importance,
December
1997

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
Apr. 1998 fromMar.
1998

Apr.
1998

Apr.
1997

Mar.
1998

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJan. to Feb. to Mar. to
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

162.2
485.8

162.5
486.8

1.4
-

0.2
-

0.1
-

0.0
-

0.2
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage

16.310
15.326
9.646
1.536
2.629
1.037
1.394

160.1
159.7
160.2
179.6
147.2
148.4
196.1

160.2
159.8
160.2
180.2
146.3
148.5
197.5

2.0
2.0
1.7
1.9
-0.9
1.9
6.0

0.1
0.1
0.0
0.3
-0.6
0.1
0.7

0.0
0.0
-0.1
0.2
-0.1
-0.4
-0.8

0.0
0.0
-0.1
0.4
-0.4
0.5
-1.0

0.1
0.1
-0.1
-0.2
-0.1
0.1
0.2

materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

1.077
1.972
.377
.291
1.305
.309
5.680
.172
.983

134.2
149.5
150.8
142.2
164.3
101.5
159.9
100.3
165.1

133.9
149.6
150.1
140.7
165.0
101.7
160.2
100.6
165.2

1.5
1.8
1.5
-1.2
2.4
2.6
1.8

-0.2
0.1
-0.5
-1.1
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.1

0.1
0.1
-0.4
0.7
0.1
0.0
0.3
0.3
-0.1

-0.3
0.3
0.9
0.6
0.1
1.1
0.2
-0.1
-0.1

-0.4
0.0
-0.7
-1.1
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.0

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

39.560
29.788
6.885
2.327

159.2
180.8
170.3
111.2

159.5
181.0
170.7
110.2

2.4
3.3
3.1
-

0.2
0.1
0.2
-0.9

0.1
0.3
0.1
0.5

0.2
0.2
0.4
-0.4

0.4
0.4
0.2
1.2

20.199
.377
4.942
4.018
.261
3.757
4.831

185.9
100.3
127.1
112.5
94.4
119.4
126.3

186.4
100.4
127.0
112.3
92.8
119.4
127.0

3.3
-1.5
-2.6
-9.1
-1.9
1.2

0.3
0.1
-0.1
-0.2
-1.7
0.0
0.6

0.3
-0.1
-0.9
-1.3
-2.3
-1.2
0.3

0.2
0.1
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.2
0.1

0.4
0.1
0.3
0.4
-0.7
0.4
0.4

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

4.944
1.390
1.990
.268
.895

134.9
133.6
129.9
124.4
126.5

135.8
133.4
130.9
126.6
127.9

-0.2
1.5
-0.8
-5.3
-1.1

0.7
-0.1
0.8
1.8
1.1

0.2
0.0
0.7
-1.4
-1.3

-0.2
0.6
0.1
1.1
-0.8

-0.1
-0.6
-0.1
1.8
-0.2

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

17.578
16.240
7.899
5.063
1.880
2.995
2.976
.560
1.603
1.338

R141.4
R137.5
R100.1
144.4
R147.3
90.9
90.3
101.2
165.7
193.7

141.5
137.7
100.1
144.3
148.2
91.7
91.1
100.5
165.7
193.4

-2.3
-2.5
-1.4
-0.6
-4.0
-13.5
-13.6
-1.3
2.3
1.9

0.1
0.1
0.0
-0.1
0.6
0.9
0.9
-0.7
0.0
-0.2

-0.4
-0.6
0.0
-0.1
0.2
-3.3
-3.4
0.1
0.3
1.4

-0.5
-0.6
0.0
0.1
-0.7
-3.5
-3.5
0.0
0.1
0.4

-0.1
-0.1
0.1
0.0
0.6
-0.9
-1.0
-0.5
0.0
-0.2

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

5.614
1.222
4.392
2.808
1.334

239.8
218.5
244.8
220.4
285.2

240.7
220.2
245.4
221.1
285.6

3.0
2.3
3.1
3.0
3.1

0.4
0.8
0.2
0.3
0.1

0.3
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.5

0.3
0.0
0.3
0.4
0.2

0.4
0.7
0.4
0.4
0.4

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

6.145
1.763

101.0
101.4

101.1
101.4

1.8
3.0

0.1
0.0

0.3
0.6

0.4
0.2

0.0
0.0

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

5.528
2.615
.194
2.421
2.913

99.9
100.5
247.5
289.5
99.3

99.9
100.7
248.8
290.0
99.3

2.5
5.3
5.5
5.3
-1.3

0.0
0.2
0.5
0.2
0.0

-0.1
0.3
0.7
0.3
-0.4

0.3
0.5
0.6
0.4
0.1

0.3
0.6
0.8
0.6
0.0

2.706
2.357

99.3
100.4

99.2
100.5

-1.4
-

-0.1
0.1

-0.5
0.1

0.2
0.4

-0.1
0.1

.350

43.4

42.8

-16.7

-1.4

-4.1

-2.0

-1.4

.234

88.7

86.6

-

-2.4

-5.8

-2.8

-2.4

4.321
.894
3.427
.737
.963
1.465

232.4
254.1
155.5
147.3
164.7
232.8

234.7
263.5
155.9
147.3
165.2
233.5

5.4
8.3
2.1
1.9
2.0
4.2

1.0
3.7
0.3
0.0
0.3
0.3

0.8
2.9
0.3
0.4
0.0
0.0

-0.3
-2.6
0.3
0.4
0.2
0.3

1.0
3.8
0.3
0.0
0.3
0.2

42.635
16.310
26.326
14.729
4.944

141.5
160.1
130.4
132.1
134.9

142.0
160.2
131.0
133.0
135.8

-0.2
2.0
-1.7
-2.1
-0.2

0.4
0.1
0.5
0.7
0.7

-0.1
0.0
-0.2
-0.1
0.2

-0.4
0.0
-0.5
-1.0
-0.2

0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1
-0.1

9.785
11.596
57.365
29.410
6.984
10.625

135.6
R128.0
182.9
188.1
188.4
215.1

136.6
128.1
183.2
188.4
188.3
215.6

-2.8
-1.2
2.7
3.3
1.6
3.8

0.7
0.1
0.2
0.2
-0.1
0.2

-0.6
-0.2
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.2

-1.0
0.0
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.4

0.0
-0.1
0.4
0.3
-0.1
0.4

84.674
70.212
94.386
27.309

162.6
156.5
157.8
131.8

163.0
156.9
158.1
132.4

1.4
0.7
1.3
-1.5

0.2
0.3
0.2
0.5

0.1
-0.1
0.1
-0.2

0.1
-0.1
0.0
-0.5

0.2
0.2
0.2
0.1

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........
Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................

Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar .....
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar - old
base ....................................
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1982=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
R Revised.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

15.712
10.768
31.039
27.955
52.973
7.013
92.987
77.661

134.1
137.5
146.2
190.6
177.2
101.6
170.1
172.6

135.0
138.4
146.7
190.8
177.4
101.9
170.4
173.0

-1.7
-2.3
0.1
2.1
2.7
-7.4
2.2
2.1

0.7
0.7
0.3
0.1
0.1
0.3
0.2
0.2

-0.1
-0.6
-0.2
0.0
0.1
-2.2
0.2
0.3

-0.9
-1.0
-0.4
0.4
0.3
-1.2
0.1
0.1

0.0
0.1
0.0
0.3
0.3
-0.1
0.2
0.3

24.053
3.256
53.608
-

143.1
91.3
189.4
$ .617

143.8
91.8
189.7
$ .615

0.2
-13.2
3.0
-

0.5
0.5
0.2
-

0.2
-3.3
0.3
-

-0.1
-3.1
0.2
-

0.1
-0.9
0.4
-

-

$ .206

$ .205

-

-

-

-

-

base.
base.
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 2. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
Seasonally adjusted indexes

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for

CPI-U

3 months ended-Jan.
1998

Expenditure category

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Apr.
1998

July
1997

Oct.
1997

Jan.
1998

Apr.
1998

6 months
ended-Oct.
1997

Apr.
1998

All items ...................................

161.9

162.0

162.0

162.4

1.5

2.5

0.7

1.2

2.0

1.0

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

159.7
159.4
159.9
179.0
147.3
148.3
196.5

159.7
159.4
159.7
179.4
147.2
147.7
194.9

159.7
159.4
159.5
180.1
146.6
148.4
193.0

159.8
159.5
159.4
179.7
146.5
148.5
193.3

3.1
3.1
3.9
3.0
3.6
-6.4
8.1

2.6
2.8
2.6
2.0
-2.1
6.9
10.0

2.0
1.8
1.5
0.9
-3.2
7.3
11.8

0.3
0.3
-1.2
1.6
-2.2
0.5
-6.4

2.8
3.0
3.2
2.5
0.7
0.0
9.0

1.1
1.0
0.1
1.2
-2.7
3.9
2.3

134.0
148.7
150.0
140.0
163.6
100.4
159.2
100.1
164.9

134.1
148.8
149.4
141.0
163.8
100.4
159.6
100.4
164.8

133.7
149.3
150.7
141.8
164.0
101.5
159.9
100.3
164.7

133.1
149.3
149.6
140.3
164.7
101.7
160.2
100.6
164.7

19.3
6.7
3.6
-3.1
1.3
2.3
2.7

-1.5
0.8
-1.3
2.0
3.0
2.8
2.0

-7.1
-0.5
4.9
-4.4
3.0
2.6
2.7

-2.7
1.6
-1.1
0.9
2.7
5.3
2.5
2.0
-0.5

8.4
3.7
1.1
-0.6
2.1
2.6
2.4

-4.9
0.5
1.9
-1.8
2.9
2.5
1.1

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

158.4
179.0
169.5
99.8

158.6
179.5
169.7
100.3

158.9
179.9
170.3
99.9

159.5
180.6
170.7
101.1

2.6
3.2
3.2
-

2.3
3.2
3.4
-

1.8
3.2
3.1
-

2.8
3.6
2.9
5.3

2.5
3.2
3.3
-

2.3
3.4
3.0
-

184.9
100.3
129.1
114.2
94.1
121.8
125.7

185.5
100.2
127.9
112.7
91.9
120.3
126.1

185.9
100.3
128.3
113.1
92.3
120.6
126.2

186.6
100.4
128.7
113.5
91.7
121.1
126.7

3.4
1.5
-0.7
-13.2
1.0
1.0

2.7
1.2
1.0
-4.0
1.6
-0.6

3.3
-5.7
-8.3
-9.2
-8.1
1.3

3.7
0.4
-1.2
-2.4
-9.8
-2.3
3.2

3.0
1.4
0.2
-8.7
1.3
0.2

3.5
-3.5
-5.4
-9.5
-5.2
2.2

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

132.5
132.0
124.4
124.8
128.8

132.7
132.0
125.3
123.1
127.1

132.5
132.8
125.4
124.4
126.1

132.4
132.0
125.3
126.6
125.8

0.3
1.2
0.3
-7.0
0.3

-1.2
2.2
-2.8
-14.7
4.8

-1.2
2.5
-3.8
-4.4
-0.3

-0.3
0.0
2.9
5.9
-9.0

-0.4
1.7
-1.3
-10.9
2.5

-0.8
1.2
-0.5
0.6
-4.8

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................

143.0
139.6
100.1
143.6
148.1
99.7

142.4
138.8
100.1
143.5
148.4
96.4

R141.7
R138.0
R100.1
143.7
R147.3
93.0

141.5
137.9
100.2
143.7
148.2
92.2

-3.3
-3.6
-0.8
-10.9
-15.8

3.4
3.5
-1.1
-5.2
20.6

-4.6
-5.0
-1.1
0.5
-24.6

-4.1
-4.8
0.4
0.3
0.3
-26.9

0.0
-0.1
-1.0
-8.1
0.8

-4.4
-4.9
-0.4
0.4
-25.8

Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

99.3
101.0
165.0
188.8

95.9
101.1
165.5
191.4

92.5
101.1
165.7
192.1

91.6
100.6
165.7
191.7

-16.3
2.4
3.0
-1.1

23.1
-3.8
1.2
4.3

-25.3
-2.0
3.5
-1.7

-27.6
-1.6
1.7
6.3

1.5
-0.8
2.1
1.6

-26.4
-1.8
2.6
2.2

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

238.2
217.8
242.6
218.7
282.6

238.9
218.0
243.5
219.2
284.0

239.6
218.1
244.3
220.0
284.6

240.6
219.7
245.2
220.8
285.6

2.2
1.9
2.4
2.4
2.3

2.2
0.4
2.7
2.6
2.9

3.3
3.6
3.0
3.0
3.0

4.1
3.5
4.4
3.9
4.3

2.2
1.1
2.5
2.5
2.6

3.7
3.6
3.7
3.4
3.7

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

100.3
100.6

100.6
101.2

101.0
101.4

101.0
101.4

6.2

0.0

2.8

2.8
3.2

3.1

3.0

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

100.0
100.4
243.2
288.1
99.6

99.9
100.7
244.9
289.0
99.2

100.2
101.2
246.3
290.3
99.3

100.5
101.8
248.3
292.0
99.3

7.0
5.4
0.0

4.6
4.9
-2.4

1.8
5.3
-1.6

2.0
5.7
8.7
5.5
-1.2

5.8
5.2
-1.2

5.2
5.4
-1.4

99.6
99.9

99.1
100.0

99.3
100.4

99.2
100.5

0.4
-

-2.8
-

-1.6
-

-1.6
2.4

-1.2
-

-1.6
-

46.2

44.3

43.4

42.8

-16.7

-1.6

-20.3

-26.3

-9.5

-23.4

96.9

91.3

88.7

86.6

-

-

-

-36.2

-

-

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

231.8
253.8
154.6
146.1
164.3
231.6

233.7
261.2
155.0
146.7
164.3
231.6

233.0
254.3
155.5
147.3
164.7
232.4

235.4
264.0
155.9
147.3
165.2
232.8

2.9
-2.1
-0.3
-2.2
1.2
6.2

6.2
12.2
1.8
2.2
2.2
4.5

5.0
7.1
3.4
4.5
2.2
4.1

6.4
17.1
3.4
3.3
2.2
2.1

4.5
4.8
0.8
0.0
1.7
5.4

5.7
12.0
3.4
3.9
2.2
3.1

141.9
159.7
131.3
133.1
132.5

141.8
159.7
131.0
133.0
132.7

141.3
159.7
130.3
131.7
132.5

141.4
159.8
130.5
131.8
132.4

-0.6
3.1
-3.0
-1.8
0.3

2.3
2.6
2.1
3.6
-1.2

-1.1
2.0
-3.0
-5.8
-1.2

-1.4
0.3
-2.4
-3.8
-0.3

0.8
2.8
-0.5
0.9
-0.4

-1.3
1.1
-2.7
-4.8
-0.8

138.5
128.0
181.9

137.7
127.8
182.3

136.3
R127.8
182.7

136.3
127.7
183.4

-4.2
-2.1
2.9

7.1
-1.5
2.7

-7.7
-0.3
2.0

-6.2
-0.9
3.3

1.3
-1.8
2.8

-7.0
-0.6
2.7

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................

Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................

186.6
187.1
214.0

187.1
187.8
214.4

187.6
188.2
215.2

188.2
188.1
216.1

3.1
1.7
4.3

3.3
2.0
3.1

3.3
1.3
3.0

3.5
2.2
4.0

3.2
1.8
3.7

3.4
1.7
3.5

162.2
156.7
157.4
132.8
135.1
140.2
146.8
189.9
176.3
106.7
169.2
171.7

162.3
156.6
157.5
132.6
135.0
139.4
146.5
189.9
176.5
104.3
169.6
172.2

162.4
156.5
157.5
131.9
133.8
138.0
145.9
190.6
177.0
103.0
169.8
172.4

162.8
156.8
157.8
132.0
133.8
138.1
145.9
191.2
177.6
102.9
170.2
172.9

1.3
0.8
1.6
-2.7
-1.5
-3.1
0.8
3.2
3.0
-7.4
2.2
1.9

2.5
2.3
2.6
2.1
3.3
6.4
2.8
2.1
2.8
9.1
2.2
1.9

0.5
-0.3
0.5
-2.7
-4.9
-6.6
-0.5
0.6
2.1
-15.5
1.9
2.1

1.5
0.3
1.0
-2.4
-3.8
-5.9
-2.4
2.8
3.0
-13.5
2.4
2.8

1.9
1.5
2.1
-0.3
0.9
1.6
1.8
2.7
2.9
0.5
2.2
1.9

1.0
0.0
0.8
-2.5
-4.3
-6.2
-1.5
1.7
2.5
-14.5
2.1
2.5

142.6
99.2
188.0

142.9
95.9
188.6

142.8
92.9
189.0

143.0
92.1
189.7

-0.6
-15.6
3.1

0.0
17.6
2.8

0.6
-23.0
2.8

1.1
-25.7
3.7

-0.3
-0.4
3.0

0.8
-24.4
3.2

Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1982=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
R Revised.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

base.
base.
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 3. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
All items

CPI-U

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes
Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Percent change to
Apr.1998 from-Apr.
1998

Apr.
1997

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Percent change to
Mar.1998 from-Mar.
1997

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

U.S. city average ...........................

M

161.6

161.9

162.2

162.5

1.4

0.4

0.2

1.4

0.4

0.2

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

168.8
169.5
101.6

169.1
170.1
101.4

169.3
170.2
101.7

169.5
170.2
102.1

1.4
1.5
1.4

0.2
0.1
0.7

0.1
0.0
0.4

1.2
1.2
1.2

0.3
0.4
0.1

0.1
0.1
0.3

Midwest urban (4)............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

157.6
158.5
101.2

158.0
158.9
101.6

158.4
159.5
101.6

159.0
160.1
101.9

1.9
2.0
1.6

0.6
0.8
0.3

0.4
0.4
0.3

1.6
1.9
1.4

0.5
0.6
0.4

0.3
0.4
0.0

M

152.9

152.7

152.9

153.2

0.7

0.3

0.2

0.5

0.0

0.1

Region and area size(2)

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

157.6
156.6
101.5

157.8
156.7
101.6

158.2
157.2
101.8

158.5
157.6
102.0

1.1
1.2
0.9

0.4
0.6
0.4

0.2
0.3
0.2

1.1
1.2
0.9

0.4
0.4
0.3

0.3
0.3
0.2

M

157.5

157.9

158.4

159.1

1.9

0.8

0.4

1.5

0.6

0.3

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

163.0
163.3
102.3

163.2
163.6
102.3

163.3
163.8
102.3

163.6
164.2
102.2

1.6
1.9
0.8

0.2
0.4
-0.1

0.2
0.2
-0.1

1.6
1.8
1.1

0.2
0.3
0.0

0.1
0.1
0.0

M
M
M

146.0
101.6
157.7

146.4
101.7
157.8

146.6
101.8
158.1

147.0
102.0
158.5

1.7
1.1
1.3

0.4
0.3
0.4

0.3
0.2
0.3

1.5
1.1
1.1

0.4
0.2
0.3

0.1
0.1
0.2

Size classes
A (5)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas(6)
Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

162.8
161.0

163.1
161.1

164.1
161.4

164.8
161.8

2.4
1.2

1.0
0.4

0.4
0.2

1.9
1.0

0.8
0.2

0.6
0.2

M

172.1

172.7

173.0

173.0

1.6

0.2

0.0

1.3

0.5

0.2

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................

1
1
1

171.2
158.2
152.1

-

171.3
158.6
153.0

-

-

-

-

1.9
2.1
-

0.1
0.3
0.6

-

Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (7)........

1

101.0

-

101.6

-

-

-

-

0.8

0.6

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

-

159.5
158.5
146.1
160.2

-

160.8
159.1
146.3
160.2

2.0
0.8
-

0.8
0.4
0.1
0.0

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

167.0
163.2
166.5

-

167.1
164.6
166.4

0.7
3.1
-

0.1
0.9
-0.1

-

-

-

-

1 Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau. It is composed of the same
geographic entities.
5 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
6 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
7 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 4. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): U.S. city average, by expenditure
category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

CPI-W

Relative
importance,
December
1997

Unadjusted
Unadjusted indexes percent change to
Apr. 1998 fromMar.
1998

Apr.
1998

158.7
472.7

159.1
473.9

Apr.
1997

Mar.
1998

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJan. to Feb. to Mar. to
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

1.2
-

0.3
-

0.0
-

-0.1
-

0.3
-

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

17.903
16.861
10.785
1.678
3.125
1.135
1.447

159.4
159.1
159.2
179.3
146.9
148.1
194.8

159.5
159.1
159.1
179.9
146.0
148.2
196.3

1.9
1.9
1.6
1.9
-0.9
1.9
6.0

0.1
0.0
-0.1
0.3
-0.6
0.1
0.8

0.0
-0.1
-0.1
0.3
-0.1
-0.3
-1.1

0.0
0.0
-0.1
0.4
-0.3
0.5
-0.9

0.0
0.1
-0.1
-0.2
-0.1
0.1
0.2

1.215
2.185
.420
.332
1.432
.344
6.076
.212
1.042

133.1
148.9
151.0
141.9
164.3
101.8
159.9
100.3
164.0

132.7
148.9
150.0
140.4
165.0
101.7
160.2
100.6
164.2

1.2
1.7
1.4
-1.2
2.5
2.6
1.5

-0.3
0.0
-0.7
-1.1
0.4
-0.1
0.2
0.3
0.1

0.1
0.1
-0.5
0.6
0.1
0.0
0.2
0.2
-0.1

-0.3
0.3
1.0
0.4
0.1
1.3
0.2
0.0
-0.1

-0.4
-0.1
-0.7
-1.0
0.4
-0.1
0.2
0.3
0.1

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......

36.450
27.033
8.347
1.346

155.5
175.2
170.0
110.8

155.8
175.5
170.3
110.3

2.2
3.2
3.1
-

0.2
0.2
0.2
-0.5

0.1
0.2
0.1
0.0

0.3
0.2
0.4
0.0

0.3
0.3
0.2
1.5

17.016
.324
5.053
4.143
.229
3.914
4.365

169.5
100.5
126.9
111.9
94.5
118.9
125.0

169.9
100.5
126.9
111.8
93.1
118.9
125.6

3.2
-1.3
-2.5
-8.5
-1.9
1.3

0.2
0.0
0.0
-0.1
-1.5
0.0
0.5

0.4
-0.2
-0.9
-1.2
-2.2
-1.2
0.4

0.2
0.3
0.3
0.4
0.8
0.3
0.1

0.3
0.0
0.4
0.4
-0.5
0.5
0.4

Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................
Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

5.300
1.503
1.985
.337
1.082

133.0
132.8
127.3
124.5
127.1

134.0
132.9
128.3
126.9
128.4

-1.1
1.4
-1.8
-5.9
-1.5

0.8
0.1
0.8
1.9
1.0

-0.2
-0.2
0.3
-1.8
-1.5

-0.5
0.6
-0.3
1.1
-1.1

0.2
-0.2
-0.1
1.9
-0.1

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................

19.847
18.790
9.285
5.304
3.162
3.682
3.658

R140.1
R137.4
R100.0
145.6
R148.8
91.0
90.5

140.3
137.7
100.1
145.5
149.5
91.9
91.3

-2.7
-2.9
-1.7
-0.6
-4.0
-13.2
-13.4

0.1
0.2
0.1
-0.1
0.5
1.0
0.9

-0.4
-0.6
0.0
-0.1
0.1
-3.1
-3.2

-0.6
-0.6
-0.1
0.2
-0.7
-3.2
-3.4

0.0
-0.1
0.2
0.1
0.5
-1.0
-0.9

Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

.694
1.664
1.057

100.7
166.7
190.2

99.9
166.8
190.1

-0.9
2.4
1.8

-0.8
0.1
-0.1

0.1
0.3
1.2

-0.1
0.1
0.3

-0.5
0.1
-0.2

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

4.591
.906
3.684
2.372
1.097

239.1
215.5
244.5
221.8
281.4

239.9
217.0
245.1
222.5
281.7

2.9
2.2
3.0
3.0
3.0

0.3
0.7
0.2
0.3
0.1

0.2
0.0
0.3
0.4
0.5

0.3
0.1
0.3
0.2
0.2

0.4
0.7
0.4
0.3
0.2

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

5.969
1.968

101.0
101.4

101.0
101.4

1.7
3.2

0.0
0.0

0.3
0.7

0.3
0.2

0.1
0.0

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

5.396
2.402
.192
2.211
2.994

100.0
100.5
250.0
283.9
99.5

100.1
100.7
251.2
284.4
99.5

2.6
5.4
5.8
5.5
-1.0

0.1
0.2
0.5
0.2
0.0

0.0
0.4
0.9
0.4
-0.4

0.4
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.2

0.2
0.6
0.8
0.6
0.0

2.841
2.547

99.5
100.4

99.5
100.5

-1.0
-

0.0
0.1

-0.3
0.1

0.2
0.4

0.0
0.1

.294

44.8

44.1

-15.8

-1.6

-4.0

-2.2

-1.6

.191

88.3

86.0

-

-2.6

-5.7

-3.1

-2.6

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

4.544
1.300
3.244
.832
.964
1.226

229.3
253.7
155.5
148.2
164.9
231.7

232.3
263.6
155.9
148.4
165.5
232.5

5.7
8.6
2.2
2.1
2.1
3.9

1.3
3.9
0.3
0.1
0.4
0.3

1.1
3.0
0.3
0.4
0.0
0.0

-0.6
-2.8
0.3
0.4
0.2
0.3

1.4
4.1
0.3
0.1
0.4
0.2

47.234
17.903
29.331
15.928
5.300

141.1
159.4
130.1
131.2
133.0

141.6
159.5
130.9
132.3
134.0

-0.4
1.9
-1.9
-2.4
-1.1

0.4
0.1
0.6
0.8
0.8

-0.1
0.0
-0.2
-0.2
-0.2

-0.5
0.0
-0.7
-1.1
-0.5

0.2
0.0
0.2
0.2
0.2

10.628
13.403
52.766
26.708

134.8
R127.5
179.6
168.6

136.0
127.6
179.9
169.0

-3.1
-1.3
2.6
3.2

0.9
0.1
0.2
0.2

-0.4
-0.1
0.2
0.2

-1.2
-0.1
0.3
0.2

0.1
0.1
0.3
0.4

Commodity and service group
Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................

Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................

6.824
10.006

185.8
211.9

185.7
212.4

1.6
3.8

-0.1
0.2

0.3
0.2

0.2
0.4

0.1
0.4

83.139
72.967
95.409
30.373
16.970
11.670
33.831
26.057
49.082
7.825
92.175
75.315

158.5
154.2
154.9
131.5
133.2
136.6
145.6
169.6
174.1
100.8
166.7
168.6

159.0
154.6
155.3
132.2
134.2
137.8
146.2
169.8
174.4
101.1
167.1
169.1

1.1
0.5
1.1
-1.8
-2.1
-2.5
-0.1
2.0
2.6
-7.8
2.0
1.9

0.3
0.3
0.3
0.5
0.8
0.9
0.4
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.3

0.0
-0.1
0.1
-0.2
-0.3
-0.4
-0.4
-0.1
0.0
-2.1
0.2
0.2

-0.1
-0.2
-0.1
-0.7
-0.9
-1.4
-0.3
0.4
0.4
-1.3
0.1
0.1

0.3
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.0
0.2
0.2
-0.2
0.3
0.4

26.463
3.910
48.852
-

142.3
91.4
186.4
$ .630

143.1
92.1
186.7
$ .629

0.0
-12.9
3.0
-

0.6
0.8
0.2
-

0.2
-3.0
0.3
-

-0.3
-3.0
0.3
-

0.4
-1.0
0.3
-

-

$ .212

$ .211

-

-

-

-

-

Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar .....
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar - old
base ....................................
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1984=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
R Revised.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

base.
base
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 5. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city
average, by expenditure category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
Seasonally adjusted indexes

CPI-W

Seasonally adjusted annual rate percent
change for
3 months ended--

6 months
ended--

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Apr.
1998

All items ...................................

158.7

158.7

158.6

Food and beverages .........................
Food ......................................
Food at home .............................
Cereals and bakery products .............
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ..........
Dairy and related products (1)...........
Fruits and vegetables ...................
Nonalcoholic beverages and beverage
materials ...........................
Other food at home ......................
Sugar and sweets .......................
Fats and oils ..........................
Other foods ............................
Other miscellaneous foods (1) (2)......
Food away from home (1)...................
Other food away from home (1) (2)........
Alcoholic beverages .......................

159.2
158.8
158.9
178.6
147.0
147.9
196.5

159.2
158.7
158.7
179.1
146.8
147.4
194.4

132.7
148.1
149.9
140.0
163.6
100.5
159.3
100.1
164.0

Housing ....................................
Shelter ...................................
Rent of primary residence ................
Lodging away from home (2)................
Owners' equivalent rent of primary
residence (3).........................
Tenants' and household insurance (1) (2)..
Fuels and utilities .......................
Fuels ....................................
Fuel oil and other fuels ................
Gas (piped) and electricity .............
Household furnishings and operations ......
Apparel ....................................
Men's and boys' apparel ...................
Women's and girls' apparel ................

July
1997

Oct.
1997

Jan.
1998

Apr.
1998

Oct.
1997

Apr.
1998

159.0

1.3

2.6

0.5

0.8

1.9

0.6

159.2
158.7
158.6
179.8
146.3
148.1
192.6

159.2
158.8
158.4
179.4
146.1
148.2
193.0

3.1
3.4
3.9
3.0
3.6
-6.4
8.6

2.6
2.3
2.3
1.8
-2.4
7.2
10.0

1.8
2.0
1.3
0.9
-2.9
6.8
12.7

0.0
0.0
-1.3
1.8
-2.4
0.8
-6.9

2.8
2.8
3.1
2.4
0.5
0.1
9.3

0.9
1.0
0.0
1.4
-2.7
3.7
2.4

132.8
148.2
149.2
140.8
163.8
100.5
159.6
100.3
163.8

132.4
148.7
150.7
141.4
163.9
101.8
159.9
100.3
163.6

131.9
148.6
149.6
140.0
164.5
101.7
160.2
100.6
163.7

17.3
6.2
3.3
-3.1
1.8
2.3
2.8

-1.2
0.8
-1.9
2.3
2.8
2.8
1.5

-7.2
-0.3
5.2
-3.9
3.2
2.8
2.7

-2.4
1.4
-0.8
0.0
2.2
4.9
2.3
2.0
-0.7

7.7
3.5
0.7
-0.4
2.3
2.6
2.1

-4.8
0.5
2.2
-2.0
2.7
2.5
1.0

154.8
174.0
169.2
100.1

155.0
174.4
169.4
100.1

155.4
174.8
170.0
100.1

155.9
175.4
170.3
101.6

2.4
3.1
3.4
-

2.4
3.1
3.2
-

1.3
3.3
3.1
-

2.9
3.3
2.6
6.1

2.4
3.1
3.3
-

2.1
3.3
2.9
-

168.5
100.4
128.8
113.5
93.9
121.1
124.2

169.1
100.2
127.6
112.1
91.8
119.7
124.7

169.5
100.5
128.0
112.5
92.5
120.0
124.8

170.0
100.5
128.5
112.9
92.0
120.6
125.3

3.2
1.9
-0.3
-12.5
0.7
1.0

2.7
1.2
1.0
-4.5
1.6
-0.6

3.1
-5.7
-8.7
-8.8
-8.7
1.3

3.6
0.4
-0.9
-2.1
-7.9
-1.6
3.6

2.9
1.5
0.3
-8.6
1.1
0.2

3.4
-3.3
-5.4
-8.4
-5.3
2.4

131.3
131.4
123.0

131.1
131.1
123.4

130.5
131.9
123.0

130.7
131.7
122.9

0.3
1.2
1.0

-1.5
0.9
-4.1

-2.1
2.2
-4.4

-1.8
0.9
-0.3

-0.6
1.1
-1.6

-2.0
1.5
-2.4

Expenditure category

Infants' and toddlers' apparel (1).........
Footwear ..................................

125.3
129.9

123.1
128.0

124.5
126.6

126.9
126.5

-8.3
-0.3

-12.4
6.4

-7.3
-0.9

5.2
-10.1

-10.4
3.0

-1.2
-5.6

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ....................
New and used motor vehicles (2)...........
New vehicles ............................
Used cars and trucks (1).................
Motor fuel ...............................
Gasoline (all types) ....................
Motor vehicle parts and equipment ........
Motor vehicle maintenance and repair .....
Public transportation .....................

141.9
139.5
100.1
144.7
149.7
99.5
99.2
100.5
166.0
185.8

141.3
138.7
100.1
144.6
149.9
96.4
96.0
100.6
166.5
188.1

R140.4
R137.9
R100.0
144.9
R148.8
93.3
92.7
100.5
166.7
188.7

140.4
137.8
100.2
145.0
149.5
92.4
91.9
100.0
166.8
188.4

-4.1
-4.2
-0.8
-10.6
-15.5
-15.9
3.2
3.5
-0.6

3.4
3.5
-0.5
-5.2
20.2
22.1
-3.9
1.2
4.4

-5.2
-5.5
-1.9
0.8
-24.9
-25.3
-0.8
3.2
-2.1

-4.2
-4.8
0.4
0.8
-0.5
-25.6
-26.3
-2.0
1.9
5.7

-0.4
-0.4
-0.7
-7.9
0.8
1.3
-0.4
2.3
1.8

-4.7
-5.2
-0.5
0.1
-25.3
-25.8
-1.4
2.6
1.7

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities ..................
Medical care services .....................
Professional services ....................
Hospital and related services ............

237.6
215.0
242.5
220.0
278.8

238.1
214.9
243.2
220.8
280.3

238.8
215.1
244.0
221.3
280.8

239.8
216.6
244.9
222.0
281.4

2.1
1.9
2.2
2.6
2.2

2.6
0.8
2.9
2.8
2.9

3.3
3.2
3.2
2.8
3.1

3.8
3.0
4.0
3.7
3.8

2.3
1.3
2.5
2.7
2.6

3.5
3.1
3.6
3.2
3.4

Recreation (2)..............................
Video and audio (1) (2)....................

100.3
100.5

100.6
101.2

100.9
101.4

101.0
101.4

7.1

-0.4

2.4

2.8
3.6

3.3

3.0

Education and communication (2).............
Education (2)..............................
Educational books and supplies ...........
Tuition, other school fees, and childcare
Communication (1) (2)......................
Information and information processing (1)
(2)...................................
Telephone services (1) (2)...............
Information and information processing
other than telephone services (1) (4)
Personal computers and peripheral
equipment (1) (2)...................

99.9
100.3
245.3
282.1
99.7

99.9
100.7
247.4
283.2
99.3

100.3
101.2
248.7
284.7
99.5

100.5
101.8
250.7
286.4
99.5

8.5
5.6
0.4

4.0
5.2
-2.8

1.6
5.0
-0.8

2.4
6.1
9.1
6.2
-0.8

6.3
5.4
-1.2

5.3
5.6
-0.8

99.6
99.9

99.3
100.0

99.5
100.4

99.5
100.5

0.8
-

-3.1
-

-1.2
-

-0.4
2.4

-1.2
-

-0.8
-

47.7

45.8

44.8

44.1

-16.4

0.0

-17.8

-26.9

-8.6

-22.5

96.6

91.1

88.3

86.0

-

-

-

-37.2

-

-

Other goods and services ...................
Tobacco and smoking products ..............
Personal care (1)..........................
Personal care products (1)................
Personal care services (1)................
Miscellaneous personal services ..........

228.5
253.6
154.5
147.0
164.5
230.5

230.9
261.1
155.0
147.6
164.5
230.6

229.6
253.9
155.5
148.2
164.9
231.3

232.8
264.4
155.9
148.4
165.5
231.8

2.2
-2.1
-0.5
-2.2
1.2
4.6

6.6
12.3
2.4
2.2
2.2
4.5

5.4
7.3
3.2
4.5
2.5
4.5

7.7
18.2
3.7
3.9
2.5
2.3

4.4
4.8
0.9
0.0
1.7
4.5

6.6
12.6
3.4
4.2
2.5
3.4

Commodity and service group

Commodities .................................
Food and beverages .........................
Commodities less food and beverages ........
Nondurables less food and beverages .......
Apparel ..................................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel ..............................
Durables ..................................
Services ....................................
Rent of shelter (3).........................
Transportation services ....................
Other services .............................

141.8
159.2
131.2
132.9
131.3

141.6
159.2
130.9
132.6
131.1

140.9
159.2
130.0
131.1
130.5

141.2
159.2
130.3
131.3
130.7

-0.8
3.1
-3.3
-2.1
0.3

2.6
2.6
2.5
3.6
-1.5

-1.4
1.8
-3.6
-6.1
-2.1

-1.7
0.0
-2.7
-4.7
-1.8

0.8
2.8
-0.5
0.7
-0.6

-1.5
0.9
-3.1
-5.4
-2.0

138.1
127.5
178.8
167.6
184.7
210.7

137.5
127.4
179.1
167.9
185.2
211.2

135.8
R127.3
179.6
168.3
185.5
212.0

135.9
127.4
180.2
169.0
185.6
212.9

-4.5
-2.5
3.0
3.2
2.2
3.7

7.7
-1.9
2.5
2.9
1.3
3.3

-8.5
-0.3
2.0
3.4
1.8
3.1

-6.2
-0.3
3.2
3.4
2.0
4.2

1.4
-2.2
2.8
3.1
1.8
3.5

-7.4
-0.3
2.6
3.4
1.9
3.7

158.3
154.5
154.8
132.7
134.7
139.7
146.5
169.1
173.4
106.0
166.0
168.0

158.3
154.4
154.9
132.4
134.3
139.2
145.9
169.0
173.4
103.8
166.3
168.4

158.2
154.1
154.7
131.5
133.1
137.3
145.5
169.7
174.1
102.4
166.4
168.5

158.7
154.4
155.1
131.8
133.3
137.6
145.5
170.1
174.5
102.2
166.9
169.1

0.8
0.5
1.0
-3.2
-1.8
-4.5
0.6
2.9
3.1
-8.1
2.0
1.9

2.6
2.4
2.6
2.4
3.6
9.5
2.5
2.4
2.6
9.9
2.0
1.7

0.0
-0.5
0.0
-3.2
-5.7
-8.4
-0.8
0.5
1.9
-16.8
2.0
1.9

1.0
-0.3
0.8
-2.7
-4.1
-5.9
-2.7
2.4
2.6
-13.6
2.2
2.6

1.7
1.4
1.8
-0.4
0.9
2.3
1.5
2.7
2.8
0.5
2.0
1.8

0.5
-0.4
0.4
-3.0
-4.9
-7.2
-1.8
1.4
2.2
-15.2
2.1
2.3

142.1
99.2
185.4

142.4
96.2
185.9

142.0
93.3
186.4

142.5
92.4
187.0

-0.8
-15.2
3.1

0.0
18.0
2.7

0.3
-23.9
2.9

1.1
-24.7
3.5

-0.4
0.0
2.9

0.7
-24.3
3.2

Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (3)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ...........................
Energy commodities .......................
Services less energy services .............
1 Not seasonally adjusted.
2 Indexes on a December 1997=100
3 Indexes on a December 1984=100
4 Indexes on a December 1988=100
R Revised.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as

base.
base
base.
a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 6. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

All items

CPI-W

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
Apr.1998 from--

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Apr.
1998

M

158.4

158.5

158.7

Northeast urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)..........

M
M
M

165.7
165.4
101.3

165.9
165.8
101.1

Midwest urban (4)............................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

153.9
153.9
101.1

M

U.S. city average ...........................

Percent change to
Mar.1998 from--

Apr.
1997

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Mar.
1997

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

159.1

1.2

0.4

0.3

1.1

0.2

0.1

166.0
165.8
101.3

166.3
166.0
101.5

1.2
1.3
0.9

0.2
0.1
0.4

0.2
0.1
0.2

0.9
1.0
0.9

0.2
0.2
0.0

0.1
0.0
0.2

154.2
154.2
101.4

154.4
154.7
101.3

155.0
155.4
101.7

1.6
1.8
1.6

0.5
0.8
0.3

0.4
0.5
0.4

1.3
1.6
1.3

0.3
0.5
0.2

0.1
0.3
-0.1

150.9

150.8

150.7

150.9

0.6

0.1

0.1

0.4

-0.1

-0.1

Region and area size(2)

South urban .................................
Size A - More than 1,500,000 .............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3)........
Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) ...............................

M
M
M

155.8
154.4
101.2

155.7
154.3
101.1

156.0
154.7
101.3

156.4
155.1
101.5

0.8
1.0
0.6

0.4
0.5
0.4

0.3
0.3
0.2

0.8
0.8
0.6

0.1
0.2
0.1

0.2
0.3
0.2

M

157.6

158.0

158.2

159.1

1.8

0.7

0.6

1.3

0.4

0.1

West urban ..................................
Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ............
Size B/C - 50,000 to 1,500,000 (3).........

M
M
M

159.4
158.0
102.2

159.4
158.0
102.2

159.4
158.1
102.1

159.6
158.5
102.0

1.1
1.5
0.6

0.1
0.3
-0.2

0.1
0.3
-0.1

1.3
1.4
0.8

0.0
0.1
-0.1

0.0
0.1
-0.1

M
M
M

144.6
101.3
156.7

144.8
101.3
156.8

145.0
101.4
156.8

145.4
101.6
157.3

1.4
0.9
1.1

0.4
0.3
0.3

0.3
0.2
0.3

1.3
0.8
0.9

0.3
0.1
0.1

0.1
0.1
0.0

Size classes
A (5)......................................
B/C (3)....................................
D .........................................
Selected local areas(6)

Chicago-Gary-Kenosha, IL-IN-WI ..............
Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County, CA .....
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island,
NY-NJ-CT-PA .............................

M
M

157.3
155.1

157.4
155.0

158.3
155.1

159.0
155.6

2.4
0.8

1.0
0.4

0.4
0.3

1.7
0.6

0.6
0.0

0.6
0.1

M

167.7

168.2

168.2

168.5

1.4

0.2

0.2

1.0

0.3

0.0

Boston-Brockton-Nashua, MA-NH-ME-CT .........
Cleveland-Akron, OH .........................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................
Washington-Baltimore, DC-MD-VA-WV (7)........

1
1
1
1

169.3
150.0
152.2
100.8

-

169.3
150.1
152.8
101.3

-

-

-

-

1.5
1.8
0.5

0.0
0.1
0.4
0.5

-

Atlanta, GA .................................
Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint, MI .................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City,
PA-NJ-DE-MD .............................
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........
Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA ................

2
2
2
2

-

156.6
152.9
144.7
157.3

-

157.7
153.5
144.8
157.4

1.7
0.5
-

0.7
0.4
0.1
0.1

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

-

166.1
159.6
162.2

-

166.5
160.8
161.9

0.8
2.6
-

0.2
0.8
-0.2

-

-

-

-

1 Areas on pricing schedule 2 (see Table 10) will appear next month.
2 Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
3 Indexes on a December 1996=100 base.
4 The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau. It is composed of the same
geographic entities.
5 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
6 In addition, the following metropolitan areas are published semiannually and appear in Tables 34 and 39 of the
January and July issues of the CPI Detailed Report: Anchorage, AK; Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN; Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
CO; Honolulu, HI; Kansas City, MO-KS; Milwaukee-Racine, WI; Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI; Pittsburgh, PA; Portland-Salem,
OR-WA; St. Louis, MO-IL; San Diego, CA; Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL.
7 Indexes on a November 1996=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 1(OS). Old Series Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S.
city average, by expenditure category and commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

Item and group

Relative
importance,
December

Unadjusted
indexes

Unadjusted
percent change
to
Apr. 1998 from-

1997

Mar.
1998

Apr.
1998

All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

162.2
486.0

Food and beverages ........................
Food ....................................
Food at home ..........................
Cereals and bakery products .........
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ......
Dairy products ......................
Fruits and vegetables ...............
Other food at home ..................
Sugar and sweets ..................
Fats and oils .....................
Nonalcoholic beverages ............
Other prepared food ...............
Food away from home ...................
Alcoholic beverages .....................

17.465
15.886
9.964
1.476
2.921
1.218
1.982
2.366
.332
.241
.747
1.046
5.923
1.578

Housing ...................................
Shelter .................................
Renters' costs (1).....................
Rent, residential ...................
Other renters' costs ................
Homeowners' costs (1)..................
Owners' equivalent rent (1)..........
Household insurance (1)..............
Maintenance and repairs ...............
Maintenance and repair services .....
Maintenance and repair commodities ..
Fuel and other utilities ................
Fuels .................................
Fuel oil and other household fuel
commodities .............................
Gas (piped) and electricity (energy
services)................................
Other utilities and public services ...

Apr.
1997

Mar.
1998

162.6
487.1

1.5
-

0.2
-

160.0
159.6
160.1
179.5
147.0
148.8
194.9
149.7
150.6
142.2
134.9
164.5
159.8
164.8

160.1
159.6
160.0
180.1
146.4
148.6
194.9
149.6
150.0
140.8
134.7
165.2
160.1
164.9

1.9
1.9
1.6
1.8
-.9
2.0
4.6
1.8
1.4
-1.1
2.1
2.5
2.5
1.6

.1
.0
-.1
.3
-.4
-.1
.0
-.1
-.4
-1.0
-.1
.4
.2
.1

41.469
28.640
8.169
5.810
2.359
20.269
19.881
.388
.202
.126
.076
7.015
3.769

159.2
180.7
192.7
170.3
239.1
185.5
185.8
167.5
146.3
154.5
135.0
128.6
112.4

159.5
181.0
192.7
170.7
237.9
185.9
186.3
167.6
146.5
156.0
133.4
128.6
112.3

2.4
3.3
3.4
3.1
4.3
3.2
3.2
2.3
2.8
4.8
-.1
-.2
-2.6

.2
.2
.0
.2
-.5
.2
.3
.1
.1
1.0
-1.2
.0
-.1

.368

94.6

93.1

-8.8

-1.6

3.401
3.246

119.3
164.8

119.4
165.0

-1.9
2.6

.1
.1

Expenditure category

Household furnishings and operation .....
Housefurnishings ......................
Housekeeping supplies .................
Housekeeping services .................

5.814
3.232
1.090
1.492

126.1
110.3
145.6
154.3

126.7
111.1
145.4
154.9

1.0
.0
1.5
2.5

.5
.7
-.1
.4

Apparel and upkeep ........................
Apparel commodities .....................
Men's and boys' apparel ...............
Women's and girls' apparel.............
Infants' and toddlers' apparel ........
Footwear ..............................
Other apparel commodities .............
Apparel services ........................

5.291
4.748
1.292
2.072
.182
.719
.484
.543

134.6
130.8
133.2
128.5
124.2
127.2
145.9
165.3

135.4
131.6
133.2
129.4
126.9
128.3
147.8
165.6

-.5
-.8
1.4
-1.9
-5.1
-.8
-.2
1.8

.6
.6
0.0
.7
2.2
.9
1.3
.2

Transportation ............................
Private transportation ..................
New vehicles ..........................
New cars ............................
Used cars .............................
Motor fuel ............................
Gasoline ............................
Maintenance and repairs ...............
Other private transportation ..........
Other private transportation
commodities .............................
Other private transportation services
.........................................
Public transportation ...................

16.620
15.054
4.829
3.842
1.195
2.925
1.546
4.560

R141.4
R137.4
144.4
141.7
R147.2
90.8
90.3
165.7
179.5

141.6
137.5
144.3
141.6
148.0
91.6
91.1
165.7
179.2

-2.2
-2.7
-.6
-.7
-4.1
-13.6
-13.6
2.3
1.1

.1
.1
-.1
-.1
.5
.9
.9
.0
-.2

.574

104.0

103.3

-1.3

-.7

3.986
1.566

197.4
193.8

197.3
193.3

1.4
1.8

-.1
-.3

Medical care ..............................
Medical care commodities ................
Medical care services ...................
Professional medical services .........

7.426
1.280
6.145
3.518

239.9
218.5
244.8
220.4

240.6
220.0
245.4
221.1

2.9
2.2
3.1
3.0

.3
.7
.2
.3

Entertainment .............................
Entertainment commodities ...............
Entertainment services ..................

4.339
1.924
2.415

164.6
144.5
187.8

164.7
144.3
188.1

1.5
.1
2.6

0.1
-.1
.2

Other goods and services ..................
Tobacco and smoking products ............
Personal care ...........................
Toilet goods and personal care
appliances ..............................
Personal care services ................
Personal and educational expenses .......

7.390
1.688
1.152

232.0
254.1
155.6

234.4
263.7
155.8

5.3
8.4
2.0

1.0
3.8
.1

.589
.564
4.550

147.6
164.6
268.0

147.6
165.1
268.5

2.1
1.9
4.9

.0
.3
.2

School books and supplies .............
Personal and educational services .....

.273
4.277

247.8
269.7

248.2
270.3

5.3
4.9

.2
.2

100.000
42.255
17.465
24.791
14.865
4.748

162.2
141.6
160.0
130.5
132.2
130.8

162.6
142.1
160.1
131.3
133.4
131.6

1.5
-.1
1.9
-1.4
-1.8
-.8

.2
.4
.1
.6
.9
.6

10.117
9.926
57.745
28.016

136.0
R128.3
183.0
188.1

137.4
128.4
183.2
188.4

-2.3
-.9
2.7
3.3

1.0
.1
.1
.2

8.687
7.097
6.145
7.799

144.7
188.8
244.8
215.0

145.0
188.6
245.4
215.4

.9
1.7
3.1
3.7

.2
-.1
.2
.2

84.114
71.360
79.731
92.574
26.369
16.443
11.695
32.329
29.728
51.599
6.695
93.305
77.419

162.7
156.7
162.7
157.9
132.0
134.3
138.1
146.3
190.8
177.2
101.5
170.1
172.7

163.2
157.1
163.1
158.2
132.7
135.3
139.2
146.9
191.0
177.4
101.8
170.5
173.2

1.5
.8
1.2
1.4
-1.3
-1.5
-1.8
.2
2.2
2.7
-7.5
2.2
2.2

.3
.3
.2
.2
.5
.7
.8
.4
.1
.1
0.3
.2
.3

23.076
3.293
54.343

143.4
91.5
189.4

144.2
92.0
189.7

.5
-13.0
3.0

.6
.5
.2

-

$ .616

$ .615

-

-

Commodity and service group
All items ...................................
Commodities ...............................
Food and beverages ......................
Commodities less food and beverages .....
Nondurables less food and beverages ...
Apparel commodities .................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel .................................
Durables ..............................
Services ..................................
Rent of shelter (1)......................
Household services less rent of shelter
(1)......................................
Transportation services .................
Medical care services ...................
Other services ..........................
Special indexes
All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less homeowners' costs (1).........
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (1)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy ............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities .............................
Energy commodities ....................
Services less energy services ...........
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar:
1982-84=$1.00 ...........................

1967=$1.00 ..............................

-

$ .206

$ .205

-

-

1 Indexes on a December 1982=100 base.
R Revised.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 2(OS). Old Series Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers (CPI-W): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and commodity and service
group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

Item and group

Relative
importance,
December
1997

Unadjusted
indexes
Mar.
1998

Apr.
1998

Unadjusted
percent change
to
Apr. 1998 fromApr.
1997

Mar.
1998

Expenditure category
All items ...................................
All items (1967=100) ........................

100.000
-

158.8
473.0

159.2
474.3

1.3
-

0.3
-

Food and beverages ........................
Food ....................................
Food at home ..........................
Cereals and bakery products .........
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs ......
Dairy products ......................
Fruits and vegetables ...............
Other food at home ..................
Sugar and sweets ..................
Fats and oils .....................
Nonalcoholic beverages ............
Other prepared food ...............
Food away from home ...................
Alcoholic beverages .....................

19.434
17.739
11.309
1.689
3.441
1.358
2.100
2.722
.376
.277
.863
1.206
6.430
1.695

159.3
158.9
159.0
179.1
146.7
148.4
193.4
149.0
150.6
141.7
133.7
164.4
159.9
163.8

159.3
159.0
158.9
179.7
146.0
148.2
193.4
149.0
149.9
140.4
133.4
165.2
160.2
163.9

1.8
1.9
1.5
1.8
-.9
1.9
4.4
1.8
1.4
-1.2
1.8
2.6
2.6
1.4

.0
.1
-.1
.3
-.5
-.1
.0
.0
-.5
-.9
-.2
.5
.2
.1

Housing ...................................
Shelter .................................
Renters' costs (1).....................
Rent, residential ...................
Other renters' costs ................
Homeowners' costs (1)..................
Owners' equivalent rent (1)..........
Household insurance (1)..............
Maintenance and repairs ...............
Maintenance and repair services .....
Maintenance and repair commodities ..
Fuel and other utilities ................
Fuels .................................
Fuel oil and other household fuel
commodities .............................
Gas (piped) and electricity (energy
services)................................
Other utilities and public services ...
Household furnishings and operation .....
Housefurnishings ......................
Housekeeping supplies .................
Housekeeping services .................

39.037
26.305
8.250
6.686
1.564
17.864
17.538
.327
.191
.107
.084
7.274
3.875

155.6
175.2
167.1
169.9
237.7
169.1
169.4
152.0
144.1
155.5
129.7
128.5
111.8

155.9
175.6
167.4
170.4
237.8
169.4
169.8
152.1
144.2
156.9
128.4
128.5
111.7

2.3
3.2
3.5
3.1
4.8
3.1
3.2
2.4
2.3
4.0
.2
-.1
-2.6

.2
.2
.2
.3
.0
.2
.2
.1
.1
.9
-1.0
.0
-.1

.338

94.5

93.1

-8.5

-1.5

3.537
3.399
5.458
3.171
1.130
1.157

118.8
165.8
124.5
109.0
146.4
157.3

118.8
166.0
125.1
109.8
146.1
157.9

-2.0
2.8
.9
.1
1.5
2.7

.0
.1
.5
.7
-.2
.4

Apparel and upkeep ........................
Apparel commodities .....................
Men's and boys' apparel ...............
Women's and girls' apparel.............
Infants' and toddlers' apparel ........
Footwear ..............................
Other apparel commodities .............
Apparel services ........................

5.311
4.801
1.298
2.019
.233
.800
.450
.510

132.8
129.2
132.7
126.0
124.9
127.7
142.7
164.4

133.8
130.3
132.4
127.4
127.9
129.1
144.8
164.6

-1.3
-1.5
1.0
-2.5
-5.2
-.9
-3.0
1.8

.8
0.9
-.2
1.1
2.4
1.1
1.5
.1

Transportation ............................
Private transportation ..................
New vehicles ..........................
New cars ............................
Used cars .............................
Motor fuel ............................
Gasoline ............................
Maintenance and repairs ...............
Other private transportation ..........
Other private transportation
commodities .............................
Other private transportation services

18.597
17.389
4.781
3.439
2.179
3.608
1.634
5.188

R140.0
R137.2
145.6
141.2
R148.8
90.9
90.4
166.7
174.7

140.3
137.5
145.5
141.1
149.6
91.8
91.3
166.8
174.4

-2.7
-3.0
-.6
-.8
-3.9
-13.3
-13.4
2.4
.9

.2
.2
-.1
-.1
.5
1.0
1.0
.1
-.2

.727

103.3

102.6

-1.1

-.7

.........................................
Public transportation ...................

4.460
1.208

192.9
190.3

192.8
190.1

1.3
1.8

-.1
-.1

Medical care ..............................
Medical care commodities ................
Medical care services ...................
Professional medical services .........

6.331
1.054
5.276
3.020

239.3
215.8
244.5
221.9

239.9
217.3
245.0
222.5

2.9
2.4
3.0
3.0

.3
.7
.2
.3

Entertainment .............................
Entertainment commodities ...............
Entertainment services ..................

4.006
2.005
2.001

161.8
143.0
188.3

161.9
142.9
188.7

1.4
-.1
2.8

0.1
-.1
.2

Other goods and services ..................
Tobacco and smoking products ............
Personal care ...........................
Toilet goods and personal care
appliances ..............................
Personal care services ................
Personal and educational expenses .......
School books and supplies .............
Personal and educational services .....

7.285
2.237
1.116

229.1
254.0
155.6

232.1
263.6
155.7

5.6
8.6
2.0

1.3
3.8
.1

.612
.504
3.932
.241
3.692

148.4
164.9
263.6
250.0
265.0

148.4
165.3
264.2
250.4
265.6

2.1
2.0
4.9
5.5
4.9

.0
.2
.2
.2
.2

100.000
46.401
19.434
26.967
15.915
4.801

158.8
141.2
159.3
130.2
131.3
129.2

159.2
141.8
159.3
131.1
132.7
130.3

1.3
-.3
1.8
-1.7
-2.1
-1.5

.3
.4
.0
.7
1.1
.9

11.114
11.052
53.599
25.761

135.3
R127.6
179.7
168.7

136.8
127.9
180.0
169.1

-2.5
-1.1
2.7
3.3

1.1
.2
.2
.2

8.554
7.302
5.276
6.706

132.9
185.9
244.5
211.9

133.0
185.8
245.0
212.4

.8
1.6
3.0
3.8

.1
-.1
.2
.2

Commodity and service group
All items ...................................
Commodities ...............................
Food and beverages ......................
Commodities less food and beverages .....
Nondurables less food and beverages ...
Apparel commodities .................
Nondurables less food, beverages, and
apparel .................................
Durables ..............................
Services ..................................
Rent of shelter (1)......................
Household services less rent of shelter
(1)......................................
Transportation services .................
Medical care services ...................
Other services ..........................
Special indexes

All items less food .........................
All items less shelter ......................
All items less homeowners' costs (1).........
All items less medical care .................
Commodities less food .......................
Nondurables less food .......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ...........
Nondurables .................................
Services less rent of shelter (1)............
Services less medical care services .........
Energy ......................................
All items less energy .......................
All items less food and energy ............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities .............................
Energy commodities ....................
Services less energy services ...........
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar:
1982-84=$1.00 ...........................
1967=$1.00 ..............................

82.261
73.695
82.136
93.669
28.662
17.610
12.809
35.349
27.838
48.322
7.483
92.517
74.778

158.6
154.3
148.5
155.0
131.5
133.3
137.3
145.7
169.8
174.2
100.6
166.7
168.8

159.2
154.8
149.0
155.4
132.5
134.6
138.6
146.3
169.9
174.5
101.0
167.2
169.4

1.2
.7
.9
1.2
-1.6
-1.8
-2.0
-.1
2.1
2.6
-7.8
2.0
2.1

.4
.3
.3
.3
.8
1.0
.9
.4
.1
0.2
.4
.3
.4

24.717
3.946
50.062

142.5
91.5
186.4

143.5
92.2
186.8

.3
-12.9
3.0

.7
.8
.2

-

$ .630
$ .211

$ .628
$ .211

-

-

1 Indexes on a December 1984=100 base.
R Revised.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.
Table 3(OS) Old Series Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Selected areas, all
items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

Area

U.S. city average ...........................
Selected local areas

Pricing
schedule
(1)

M

Indexes

Percent change to
Apr.1998 from--

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Apr.
1998

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

161.6

162.0

162.2

162.6

0.6

0.4

0.2

Chicago-Gary-Lake County, IL-IN-WI ..........
Los Angeles-Anaheim-Riverside, CA ...........
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT

M
M
M

162.5
161.0
172.1

163.0
161.2
172.8

163.8
161.3
173.1

164.7
161.7
173.1

1.4
.4
.6

1.0
.3
.2

.5
.2
.0

Boston-Lawrence-Salem, MA-NH.................
Cleveland-Akron-Lorain, OH ..................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................

1
1
1

171.0
158.0
152.2

-

171.2
157.9
153.3

-

-

-

-

Detroit-Ann Arbor, MI .......................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Trenton, PA-NJ-DE-MD
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........

2
2
2
2
2

-

158.7
146.5
160.6
167.4
163.5

-

159.3
146.4
160.1
167.1
164.8

-

.4
-.1
-.3
-.2
.8

-

M
M
M
M

168.8
157.6
157.7
163.0

169.2
158.1
157.9
163.3

169.3
158.4
158.5
163.3

169.5
159.1
158.9
163.6

.4
1.0
.8
.4

.2
.6
.6
.2

.1
.4
.3
.2

M
M

146.0
157.9

146.4
158.0

146.6
158.2

147.0
158.7

.7
.5

.4
.4

.3
.3

M
M
M
M

169.5
158.3
156.7
163.2

170.1
158.8
156.8
163.6

170.2
159.3
157.6
163.7

170.2
160.0
157.8
164.2

.4
1.1
.7
.6

.1
.8
.6
.4

.0
.4
.1
.3

M

153.0

153.1

153.3

153.5

.3

.3

.1

M

157.7

158.0

158.4

159.1

.9

.7

.4

Region and area size
Northeast urban .............................
Midwest urban (2)............................
South urban .................................
West urban ..................................
Population size classes
A (3)........................................
D ...........................................
Region/Population size class cross
classifications
Northeast Size A - More than 1,500,000 .....
Midwest Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ......
South Size A - More than 1,500,000 .........
West Size A
- More than 1,500,000 .........
Midwest Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) .................................
South Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) .................................

1 The 'All items' index size B/C is on a December 1996=100 base.
2
The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau.
composed of the same geographic entities.
3 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.

It is

Table 4(OS) Old Series Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W):
Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)

Area

Pricing
schedule
(1)

Indexes

Percent change to
Apr.1998 from--

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

Apr.
1998

Jan.
1998

Feb.
1998

Mar.
1998

M

158.4

158.7

158.8

159.2

0.5

0.3

0.3

Chicago-Gary-Lake County, IL-IN-WI ..........
Los Angeles-Anaheim-Riverside, CA ...........
New York-Northern N.J.-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT

M
M
M

156.8
155.1
167.7

157.2
155.2
168.3

157.9
155.1
168.5

158.7
155.6
168.6

1.2
.3
.5

1.0
.3
.2

.5
.3
.1

Boston-Lawrence-Salem, MA-NH.................
Cleveland-Akron-Lorain, OH ..................
Dallas-Fort Worth, TX .......................

1
1
1

169.5
149.9
152.2

-

169.5
149.7
152.5

-

-

-

-

Detroit-Ann Arbor, MI .......................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX ..............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ...................
Philadelphia-Wilmington-Trenton, PA-NJ-DE-MD
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA ..........

2
2
2
2
2

-

153.0
145.1
157.8
166.3
160.1

-

153.8
145.0
157.3
166.0
161.2

-

.5
-.1
-.3
-.2
.7

-

M
M
M
M

165.8
153.9
155.8
159.3

166.1
154.3
155.8
159.4

166.1
154.5
156.2
159.3

166.3
155.2
156.6
159.7

.3
.8
.5
.3

.1
.6
.5
.2

.1
.5
.3
.3

M
M

144.6
156.8

144.8
156.8

145.0
156.9

145.4
157.4

.6
.4

.4
.4

.3
.3

U.S. city average ...........................
Selected local areas

Region and area size
Northeast urban .............................
Midwest urban (2)............................
South urban .................................
West urban ..................................
Population size classes
A (3)........................................
D ...........................................

Region/Population size class cross
classifications
Northeast Size A - More than 1,500,000 .....
Midwest Size A
- More than 1,500,000 ......
South Size A - More than 1,500,000 .........
West Size A
- More than 1,500,000 .........
Midwest Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) .................................
South Size D - Nonmetropolitan (less than
50,000) .................................

M
M
M
M

165.4
153.7
154.4
157.9

165.9
154.2
154.3
158.1

165.8
154.5
154.8
158.0

166.0
155.3
155.1
158.5

.4
1.0
.5
.4

.1
.7
.5
.3

.1
.5
.2
.3

M

151.0

151.0

151.0

151.1

.1

.1

.1

M

157.7

158.0

158.3

159.2

1.0

.8

.6

1 The 'All items' index size B/C is on a December 1996=100 base.
2
The 'North Central' region has been renamed the 'Midwest' region by the Census Bureau.
composed of the same geographic entities.
3 Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.
- Data not available.
NOTE: Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.

It is