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FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION:
Patrick C. Jackman (202) 606-7000
USDL-97-160
CPI QUICKLINE:
(202) 606-6994
TRANSMISSION OF MATERIAL IN
FOR CURRENT AND HISTORICAL
THIS RELEASE IS EMBARGOED
INFORMATION:
(202) 606-7828
UNTIL 8:30 A.M. (EDT)
MEDIA CONTACT:
(202) 606-5902
Thursday, May 15, 1997
INTERNET ADDRESS:
http://stats.bls.gov/cpihome.htm
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX:

APRIL 1997

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased
0.1 percent before seasonal adjustment in April to a level of 160.2 (198284=100), the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor
reported today. For the 12-month period ended in April, the CPI-U
increased 2.5 percent.
The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) also rose 0.1 percent in April, prior to seasonal adjustment. The
April 1997 CPI-W level of 157.2 was 2.3 percent higher than the index in
April 1996.
CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI-U rose 0.1 percent in April,
the same as in March. The food index, which was unchanged in March,
declined 0.2 percent in April. Grocery store food prices decreased 0.4
percent, primarily reflecting a sharp drop in fruit and vegetable prices.
The energy index declined for the second consecutive month, down 1.5
percent in April. The index for petroleum-based energy fell 2.4 percent,
and the index for energy services declined 0.6 percent. Excluding food
and energy, the CPI-U rose 0.3 percent, following increases of 0.2 percent
in each of the two preceding months. The larger advance in April reflects
an upturn in the index for apparel and upkeep.
Table A.

Percent changes in CPI for Urban Consumers (CPI-U)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate 12-mos.
Category
1996
1997
3-mos. ended ended
Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
Apr. '97 Apr. '97
All Items
.3
.3
.3
.1
.3
.1
.1
1.5
2.5

Food and beverages .5
Housing
.3
Apparel and upkeep .2
Transportation
.3
Medical care
.2
Entertainment
.3
Other goods
and services
.3
Special Indexes:
Energy
1.1
Food
.5
All items less
food and energy
.2

.4
.3
.3
.3
.3
.2

.0
.2
.1
.6
.2
.3

-.2
.3
.4
-.2
.2
.0

.3
.3
.2
-.1
.2
.2

.0
.0
-.3
.1
.4
.2

-.2
.2
.9
-.4
.3
.1

.5
1.8
3.4
-1.6
3.3
1.7

2.9
2.6
.9
1.2
3.0
2.3

.4

.1

.4

.5

.5

.8

7.1

4.4

1.2
.4

1.5
.0

.8
-.3

.3 -1.7 -1.5
.3
.0 -.2

-11.3
.5

.0
2.8

.2

.2

.1

3.1

2.7

.2

.2

.3

For the first four months of 1997, the CPI-U advanced at a 1.5 percent
seasonally adjusted annual rate (SAAR). This compares with an increase of
3.3 percent in all of 1996. The food and energy components, which had
accelerated in 1996 after acting as moderating influences throughout most
of the preceding five years, were responsible for the deceleration thus far
in 1997. The food and energy indexes have declined at 0.4 and 6.5 percent
SAARs, respectively, in the first four months of 1997. The CPI-U excluding
food and energy advanced at a 2.7 percent SAAR in the first four months of
1997, about the same rate as the 2.6 percent rise for all of 1996.
The food and beverage index declined 0.2 percent in April. The index
for grocery store food prices, which decreased 0.2 percent in March, fell
0.4 percent in April. The April drop reflects small declines in the
indexes for cereal and bakery products and for dairy products--down 0.4 and
0.3 percent, respectively--coupled with a 3.4 percent decrease in the index
for fruits and vegetables. Fresh vegetable prices, which rose
substantially earlier in the year, declined sharply in April. (Prior to
seasonal adjustment, fresh vegetable prices fell 5.1 percent in April after
advancing 11.6 percent in the three-month period from December through
March.) The indexes for fresh fruits and for processed fruits and
vegetables declined 1.0 and 0.6 percent, respectively, in April. Partially
offsetting the declines noted above, the index for meats, poultry, fish,
and eggs rose 0.4 percent in April, following declines in each of the first
three months of the year. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, this index
declined 0.1 percent.) The index for other food at home rose 1.0 percent
in April, reflecting, in large part, a 6.8 percent increase in coffee
prices.
Price increases of more than 1.0 percent also were recorded for
snacks, for frozen prepared foods, and for the candy and other sweets
components. The other two components of the food and beverage index-restaurant meals and alcoholic beverages--each increased 0.1 percent in

April.
The housing component, which was unchanged in March, rose 0.2 percent
in April. Each of the three major housing groups--shelter, fuel and other
utilities, and household furnishings and operations--contributed to the
upturn. Shelter costs increased 0.3 percent, following a 0.2 percent rise
in March. In April, within shelter, renters' costs and homeowners' costs
each increased 0.3 percent, and maintenance and repair costs rose 0.1
percent. The index for fuel and other utilities declined 0.2 percent in
April after falling 0.8 percent in March. The index for household fuels
fell 0.8 percent, reflecting declines in prices for fuel oil and natural
gas--down 1.8 and 3.0 percent, respectively.
The index for natural gas
has declined 7.1 percent in the past two months after increasing 17.3
percent in the preceding 11-month period. Charges for electricity rose 0.5
percent in April. The index for household furnishings and operation, which
was unchanged in March, increased 0.1 percent in April.
The transportation component declined for the third time in four
months--down 0.4 percent in April. The index for gasoline, which declined
2.1 percent in March, fell 2.6 percent in April. (Prior to seasonal
adjustment, gasoline prices dropped 0.4 percent in April.) As of April,
the index for gasoline was 9.7 percent below its peak level of December
1990. New vehicle purchase costs continued to advance very moderately; the
index for new vehicle prices was unchanged, and automobile finance charges
increased 0.7 percent. During the 12-month period ended in April, new
vehicle prices have increased 1.2 percent and automobile finance charges,
3.0 percent. The index for used cars decreased 1.6 percent in April.
(Prior to seasonal adjustment, used car prices fell 0.1 percent.) Public
transportation costs rose 1.2 percent in April. The index for airline
fares, which rose 4.5 percent in March following the reimposition of the 10
percent federal tax on airline fares effective March 7, increased 1.2
percent in April.
The index for apparel and upkeep turned back up in April, advancing
0.9 percent. It was the largest advance in this index since a 1.1 percent
increase in February 1993. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, clothing prices
rose 1.3 percent in April, reflecting a return to regular prices from heavy
discounting in March associated with the early Easter holiday.)
Medical care costs rose 0.3 percent in April to a level 3.0 percent
above a year ago. The index for medical care commodities--prescription
drugs, nonprescription drugs, and medical supplies--increased 0.2 percent.
The index for medical care services rose 0.3 percent. Charges for
professional services and hospital and related services increased 0.3 and
0.4 percent, respectively.

Entertainment costs rose 0.1 percent in April. Increases in the
indexes for fees for participant sports and for admissions to movies,
theaters, concerts, and sporting events--up 1.4 and 0.7 percent,
respectively--were largely offset by price declines for all entertainment
commodity groups--reading materials, sporting goods and equipment, and
toys, hobbies, and other entertainment commodities.
The index for other goods and services rose 0.8 percent in April. A
2.4 percent increase in the index for tobacco and smoking products
accounted for two-thirds of the April advance in this major group.
CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W)
On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI for Urban Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers was unchanged in April.
Table B. Percent changes in CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical
Workers (CPI-W)
Seasonally adjusted
UnCompound adjusted
Expenditure
Changes from preceding month
annual rate 12-mos.
Category
1996
1997
3-mos. ended ended
Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.
Apr. '97 Apr. '97
All Items
.4
.3
.3
.1
.2
.1
.0
1.0
2.3
Food and beverages .5
.4
.1 -.2
.2
.1 -.2
.3
2.8
Housing
.3
.3
.2
.3
.2
.1
.1
1.6
2.6
Apparel and upkeep .2
.3
.1
.4
.4 -.3 1.0
4.3
1.0
Transportation
.4
.3
.6
.0
.0 -.1 -.6
-2.7
.8
Medical care
.2
.3
.2
.2
.2
.3
.3
3.2
3.0
Entertainment
.3
.3
.3
.0
.1
.1
.1
1.3
2.2
Other goods
and services
.3
.4
.0
.6
.4
.5 1.0
7.6
4.6
Special Indexes:
Energy
1.2
1.4 1.5
.9
.3 -1.8 -1.9 -12.9
-.2
Food
.6
.3
.1 -.3
.3
.1 -.2
.5
2.9
All items less
food and energy
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.3
2.9
2.5

After seasonal adjustment, the level of the CPI-U for All Items was
160.0 in April; the seasonally adjusted CPI-W for All Items was 157.0.

Beginning with January 1997 data, BLS is reporting the level of the
seasonally adjusted U.S. City Average All Items CPI-U and CPI-W in this
monthly news release. Effective with the release of January 1998 data in
February 1998, the seasonally adjusted All Items indexes will be fully
integrated into the releases, appearing in tables 2 and 5 and in the text
where relevant.
Like other seasonally adjusted CPI data, the All Items index levels
are subject to revision for up to five years after their original release.
For this reason, BLS advises against the use of these data in escalation
agreements.
Consumer Price Index data for May are scheduled for release on
Tuesday, June 17, 1997, at 8:30 A.M. (EDT).

A Note on Seasonally Adjusted and Unadjusted Data
Because price data are used for different purposes by
different groups, the Bureau of Labor Statistics publishes
seasonally adjusted as well as unadjusted changes each
month.
For analyzing general price trends in the economy,
seasonally adjusted changes are usually preferred since they
eliminate the effect of changes that normally occur at the
same time and in about the same magnitude every year--such
as price movements resulting from changing climatic
conditions, production cycles, model changeovers, holidays,
and sales.
The unadjusted data are of primary interest to
consumers concerned about the prices they actually pay.
Unadjusted data also are used extensively for escalation
purposes. Many collective bargaining contract agreements
and pension plans, for example, tie compensation changes to
the Consumer Price Index unadjusted for seasonal variation.
Seasonal factors used in computing the seasonally
adjusted indexes are derived by the X-11-ARIMA Seasonal
Adjustment Method (1988). The updated seasonal data at the
end of 1977 replaced data from 1967 through 1977.
Subsequent annual updates have replaced 5 years of seasonal
data, e.g., data from 1992 through 1996 were replaced at the

end of 1996. The seasonal movement of all items and 47
other aggregations is derived by combining the seasonal
movement of 60 selected components. Each year the seasonal
status of every series is reevaluated based upon certain
statistical criteria. If any of the 60 components change
their seasonal adjustment status from seasonally adjusted to
not seasonally adjusted, not seasonally adjusted data will
be used for the last 5 years, but the seasonally adjusted
indexes will be used before that period.
Effective with the calculation of the seasonal factors
for 1990, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has used an
enhanced seasonal adjustment procedure called Intervention
Analysis Seasonal Adjustment for some CPI series.
Intervention Analysis Seasonal Adjustment allows for better
estimates of seasonally adjusted data. Extreme values
and/or sharp movements which might distort the seasonal
pattern are estimated and removed from the data prior to
calculation of seasonal factors. Beginning with the
calculation of seasonal factors for 1996, X-12-ARIMA
software was used for Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment.
For the fuel oil and the motor fuels indexes, this
procedure was used to offset the effects that extreme price
volatility would otherwise have had on the estimates of
seasonally adjusted data for those series. For some women's
apparel indexes and the girls' apparel index, the procedure
was used to offset the effects of changes in pricing
methodology. For the tobacco and smoking products index,
this procedure was used to offset the effects of increases
in excise taxes and wholesale tobacco prices. For some
alcoholic beverage series, Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment was used to offset the effects of excise tax
increases. For the nonalcoholic beverages index, the
procedure was used to offset the effects of a large increase
in coffee prices due to adverse weather. For the water and
sewerage maintenance index, the procedure was used to
account for a data collection anomaly.
A description of Intervention Analysis Seasonal
Adjustment, as well as a list of unusual events modeled and
seasonal factors for these items, may be obtained by writing
the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of Consumer Prices
and Price Indexes, Washington, DC 20212 or by calling Claire

McAnaw Gallagher on (202) 606-6968.
Table 1. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and commodity and service
group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
+

Relative
Unadjusted indexes
importance,
December
Mar.
Apr.
1996
1997
1997

Unadjusted
percent change to
Apr. 1997 fromApr. 1996 Mar. 1997

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJan. to
Feb. to
Mar. to
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.

Expenditure category

+
+

+
+
+
+

All items ..................................
All items (1967=100) .......................

100.000
-

160.0
479.3

160.2
479.7

2.5
-

0.1
-

0.3
-

0.1
-

0.1
-

Food and beverages .......................
Food ...................................
Food at home .........................
Cereals and bakery products ........
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs .....
Dairy products 1/ ..................
_
Fruits and vegetables 2/ ...........
_
Other food at home .................
Sugar and sweets .................
Fats and oils ....................
Nonalcoholic beverages ...........
Other prepared food ..............
Food away from home ..................
Alcoholic beverages ....................

17.484
15.913
10.040
1.479
3.002
1.245

157.1
156.6
157.7
176.7
147.8
146.1

157.1
156.6
157.5
176.9
147.7
145.7

2.9
2.8
2.7
2.1
4.2
6.4

.0
.0
-.1
.1
-.1
-.3

.3
.3
.5
.1
-.2
-1.1

.0
.0
-.2
.3
-.9
-.1

-.2
-.2
-.4
-.4
.4
-.3

1.974

189.3

186.4

-1.1

-1.5

3.0

.1

-3.4

2.340
.331
.246
.724
1.039
5.873
1.571

145.5
146.3
142.4
129.5
160.3
156.0
162.1

146.9
147.9
142.4
131.9
161.1
156.2
162.3

2.9
4.0
1.8
1.5
3.7
3.0
2.8

1.0
1.1
.0
1.9
.5
.1
.1

.2
.0
.1
-.5
.8
.2
.2

.1
-.6
-.1
1.3
-.4
.3
-.1

1.0
1.1
.0
1.9
.5
.1
.1

Housing 2/ ...............................
_
Shelter ................................
Renters' costs 3/ 4/..................
_ _
Rent, residential ..................
Other renters' costs 4/ ............
_
Homeowners' costs 3/ 4/...............
_ _
Owners' equivalent rent 3/ .........

41.203

155.9

155.8

2.6

-.1

.3

.0

.2

28.194
7.994

175.2
186.8

175.3
186.3

3.1
3.7

.1
-.3

.3
.3

.2
.3

.3
.3

5.731
2.263

165.1
231.7

165.5
228.0

2.9
5.5

.2
-1.6

.1
.9

.3
.3

.2
.4

20.000

179.8

180.2

2.8

.2

.3

.2

.3

19.616

180.1

180.5

2.8

.2

.3

.1

.3

+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+
+
+

+

+
+
+

_
Household insurance 3/ 4/ ..........
_ _
Maintenance and repairs 1/ 4/ ........
_ _
Maintenance and repair
services 1/ 4/ .................
_ _
Maintenance and repair
commodities 1/ 4/ ..............
_ _
Fuel and other utilities 2/ ............
_
Fuels ................................
Fuel oil and other household fuel
commodities ....................
Gas (piped) and electricity (energy
services).......................
Other utilities and public
services 4/ ......................
_
Household furnishings and operation 2/ .
_
Housefurnishings 4/ ..................
_
Housekeeping supplies ................
Housekeeping services 4/ .............
_

.383

163.3

163.8

2.8

.3

.9

-.5

.4

.200

142.4

142.5

3.3

.1

.6

.1

.1

.123

148.4

148.9

3.5

.3

.1

.0

.3

.077

134.3

133.6

2.8

-.5

1.1

.3

-.5

7.102

129.9

128.9

2.8

-.8

.3

-.8

-.2

3.878

117.2

115.3

2.1

-1.6

.5

-1.5

-.8

.424

105.5

102.1

.0

-3.2

-1.9

-3.3

-2.1

3.453

123.4

121.7

2.4

-1.4

.7

-1.3

-.6

3.224

160.5

160.8

3.5

.2

.0

.1

.2

5.908

125.4

125.5

.6

.1

.2

.0

.1

3.332

111.1

111.1

-.7

.0

.2

-.3

-.2

1.093
1.482

142.8
150.6

143.3
151.1

1.3
3.1

.4
.3

.1
.1

.0
.5

.4
.4

Apparel and upkeep .......................
Apparel commodities 4/ .................
_
Men's and boys' apparel ..............
Women's and girls' apparel............
Infants' and toddlers' apparel 1/ ....
_
Footwear .............................
Other apparel commodities 4/..........
_
Apparel services 1/ 4/ .................
_ _

5.330
4.786

134.5
131.0

136.1
132.7

.9
.8

1.2
1.3

.2
.2

-.3
-.4

.9
1.1

1.280
2.102
.186

129.2
130.1
129.7

131.4
131.9
133.7

1.9
1.3
.0

1.7
1.4
3.1

-.9
.7
-.5

-.2
-.6
2.0

1.8
.8
3.1

.718
.500

127.0
149.5

129.3
148.1

.9
-3.5

1.8
-.9

.2
.7

-.4
-.3

1.2
-.7

.545

162.4

162.6

2.4

.1

.3

.1

.1

Transportation ...........................
Private transportation .................
New vehicles .........................

17.140
15.499
4.955

144.9
141.5
145.4

144.8
141.3
145.2

1.2
.7
1.2

-.1
-.1
-.1

-.1
.2
.0

.1
-.2
.1

-.4
-.6
.0

+
+
+

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

New cars ...........................
Used cars ............................
Motor fuel ...........................
Gasoline ...........................
Maintenance and repairs ..............
Other private transportation 4/.......
_
Other private transportation
commodities 4/..................
_
Other private transportation
services 4/ ....................
_
Public transportation ..................

3.952
1.278
3.171
1.533
4.562

142.9
154.4
106.4
105.8
161.5
177.4

142.6
154.3
106.0
105.4
161.9
177.3

.9
-2.0
-2.4
-2.6
3.0
2.5

-.2
-.1
-.4
-.4
.2
-.1

.0
.5
.0
.0
-.1
.5

.1
1.2
-2.1
-2.1
.2
.3

.0
-1.6
-2.5
-2.6
.2
.2

.589

105.1

104.7

-.4

-.4

.3

-.3

-.1

3.973

194.5

194.5

2.9

.0

.6

.4

.2

1.642

188.1

189.8

5.9

.9

-2.0

2.2

1.2

Medical care .............................
Medical care commodities ...............
Medical care services ..................
Professional medical services ........

7.346
1.273
6.073
3.472

233.4
214.7
237.7
214.2

233.8
215.2
238.1
214.7

3.0
2.7
3.0
3.7

.2
.2
.2
.2

.2
.3
.2
.1

.4
.5
.3
.5

.3
.2
.3
.3

Entertainment 4/ .........................
_
Entertainment commodities 4/ ...........
_
Entertainment services 4/ ..............
_

4.352

162.1

162.2

2.3

.1

.2

.2

.1

1.957

144.5

144.1

.9

-.3

.1

.0

-.2

2.395

182.7

183.3

3.4

.3

.3

.3

.3

Other goods and services 2/ ..............
_
Tobacco and smoking products ...........
Personal care 1/ .......................
_
Toilet goods and personal care
appliances 1/ ....................
_
Personal care services 1/ ............
_
Personal and educational expenses 4/ ...
_
School books and supplies ............
Personal and educational services 4/ .
_

7.145

221.4

222.7

4.4

.6

.5

.5

.8

1.601
1.145

238.2
151.8

243.2
152.7

5.5
2.0

2.1
.6

.6
-.1

.4
.2

2.4
.6

.588

143.6

144.5

.2

.6

-.2

.2

.6

.557

161.2

162.0

4.0

.5

.0

.3

.5

4.398

255.8

256.0

4.7

.1

.6

.5

.3

.264
4.134

235.4
257.6

235.8
257.7

4.6
4.6

.2
.0

.4
.6

.3
.5

.5
.3

Commodity and service group

All items ..................................
Commodities ..............................
Food and beverages .....................
Commodities less food and beverages ....
Nondurables less food and beverages ..
Apparel commodities 4/ .............
+
_
Nondurables less food, beverages,
and apparel ....................
Durables .............................
Services .................................
Rent of shelter 3/ .....................
+
_
Household services less rent of
shelter 3/ 4/.......................
+
_ _
Transportation services ................
Medical care services ..................
Other services .........................

100.000
42.873
17.484
25.389
15.147
4.786

160.0
142.0
157.1
132.9
135.0
131.0

160.2
142.3
157.1
133.2
135.8
132.7

2.5
1.5
2.9
.5
.8
.8

.1
.2
.0
.2
.6
1.3

.3
.2
.3
.1
.3
.2

.1
-.2
.0
-.3
-.8
-.4

.1
-.1
-.2
.0
.1
1.1

10.362
10.242
57.127
27.577

140.2
129.9
178.2
182.3

140.6
129.6
178.3
182.4

.9
.1
3.2
3.1

.3
-.2
.1
.1

.1
.1
.2
.3

-.6
.0
.2
.3

-.4
-.2
.3
.3

8.698

144.3

143.7

2.9

-.4

.4

-.3

-.1

7.148
6.073
7.631

184.9
237.7
207.3

185.4
238.1
207.7

3.6
3.0
4.1

.3
.2
.2

-.1
.2
.4

.8
.3
.4

.4
.3
.3

84.087
71.806
80.000

160.6
155.6
161.2

160.8
155.8
161.2

2.4
2.2
2.3

.1
.1
.0

.2
.2
.2

.1
.0
.1

.2
.0
.1

92.654
26.960
16.718
11.932
32.631
29.550

155.9
134.1
136.6
141.4
146.2
186.7

156.0
134.4
137.4
141.7
146.6
186.8

2.4
.7
1.0
1.1
1.9
3.4

.1
.2
.6
.2
.3
.1

.3
.1
.2
.1
.3
.2

.0
-.2
-.7
-.7
-.4
.3

.1
-.1
.1
-.4
-.1
.3

51.054
7.049
92.951
77.038

172.7
111.2
166.5
169.0

172.8
110.0
166.8
169.4

3.3
.0
2.6
2.7

.1
-1.1
.2
.2

.2
.3
.2
.2

.3
-1.7
.2
.2

.2
-1.5
.2
.3

23.364
3.596
53.674

143.0
106.6
183.8

143.5
105.8
184.1

1.1
-2.1
3.3

.3
-.8
.2

.1
-.2
.3

.1
-2.2
.3

.3
-2.4
.3

-

$.625

$.624

-2.5

-.2

-.3

-.2

-.2

-

.209

.208

-

-

-

-

Special indexes
All items less food ........................
All items less shelter .....................
All items less homeowners' costs 3/ 4/......
+
_ _
All items less medical care ................
Commodities less food ......................
Nondurables less food ......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ..........
Nondurables ................................
Services less rent of shelter 3/ 4/ ........
+
_ _
Services less medical care services ........
Energy .....................................
All items less energy ......................
All items less food and energy ...........
Commodities less food and
energy commodities .................
Energy commodities ...................
Services less energy services ..........
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar:
1982-84=$1.00 1/ .........................
+
_
1967=$1.00 1/ ............................

-

+

_

+
+
+
+
+

1/
_
2/
_
3/
_
4/
_
NOTE:

Not seasonally adjusted.
This index series will undergo a change in composition in January, 1998.
Indexes on a December 1982=100 base.
This index series will no longer appear in its present form after December, 1997.
See Table X for a comparable index series.
Data not available.
Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 2. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U): Seasonally adjusted U.S. city average, by expenditure category and
commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
+

Seasonally adjusted indexes
Jan.
1997

Feb.
1997

Mar.
1997

Apr.
1997

July
1996

Seasonally adjusted annual rate
percent change for
3 months ended6 months endedOct.
Jan.
Apr.
Oct.
Apr.
1996
1997
1997
1996
1997

Expenditure category
All items ....................................

+
+

Food and beverages .........................
Food .....................................
Food at home ...........................
Cereals and bakery products ..........
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs .......
Dairy products 1/ ....................
_
Fruits and vegetables 2/..............
_
Other food at home ...................
Sugar and sweets ...................
Fats and oils ......................

-

-

-

-

2.6

3.1

2.8

1.5

2.8

2.2

156.3
156.0
156.7
176.3
148.7
147.8

156.8
156.5
157.5
176.4
148.4
146.2

156.8
156.5
157.2
177.0
147.1
146.1

156.5
156.2
156.5
176.3
147.7
145.7

5.1
5.4
6.5
3.5
9.0
15.4

5.3
5.3
6.6
2.8
8.2
22.2

.8
.5
-1.3
2.1
2.5
-4.0

.5
.5
-.5
.0
-2.7
-5.6

5.2
5.3
6.5
3.2
8.6
18.8

.6
.5
-.9
1.0
-.1
-4.8

182.2

187.7

187.8

181.5

5.6

4.4

-11.0

-1.5

5.0

-6.4

144.5
146.9
141.9

144.8
146.9
142.1

145.0
146.0
142.0

146.5
147.6
142.0

1.7
6.3
1.7

2.5
3.4
4.7

2.0
4.2
.9

5.7
1.9
.3

2.1
4.8
3.2

3.8
3.0
.6

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+
+
+

Nonalcoholic beverages .............
Other prepared food ................
Food away from home ....................
Alcoholic beverages ......................

127.9
159.4
155.3
161.4

127.3
160.6
155.6
161.8

129.0
160.0
156.0
161.6

131.5
160.8
156.2
161.8

-3.4
4.2
3.2
2.8

-2.2
4.7
3.4
4.4

.9
2.5
3.2
3.0

11.7
3.6
2.3
1.0

-2.8
4.4
3.3
3.6

6.2
3.1
2.7
2.0

Housing 2/ .................................
_
Shelter ..................................
Renters' costs 3/ 4/....................
_ _
Rent, residential ....................
Other renters' costs 4/ ..............
_
Homeowners' costs 3/ 4/ ................
_ _
Owners' equivalent rent 3/ ...........
_
Household insurance 3/ 4/ ............
_ _
Maintenance and repairs 1/ 4/ ..........
_ _
Maintenance and repair services 1/ 4/
_ _
Maintenance and repair
commodities 1/ 4/ ................
_ _
Fuel and other utilities 2/...............
_
Fuels ..................................
Fuel oil and other household fuel
commodities ......................
Gas (piped) and electricity (energy
services).........................
Other utilities and public services 4/ .
_
Household furnishings and operation 2/ ...
_
Housefurnishings 4/ ....................
_
Housekeeping supplies ..................
Housekeeping services 4/ ...............
_

155.2

155.6

155.6

155.9

2.9

2.6

3.4

1.8

2.8

2.6

173.4
182.8

174.0
183.4

174.3
183.9

174.9
184.5

3.6
4.6

2.4
2.5

2.8
3.8

3.5
3.8

3.0
3.5

3.2
3.8

164.4
221.1

164.6
223.1

165.1
223.7

165.5
224.6

3.3
7.3

2.5
2.2

3.0
6.0

2.7
6.5

2.9
4.8

2.8
6.2

179.0

179.5

179.8

180.4

3.2

2.3

2.7

3.2

2.8

2.9

179.3

179.9

180.1

180.7

3.2

2.3

2.7

3.2

2.8

2.9

162.9

164.3

163.5

164.2

3.8

5.1

-1.0

3.2

4.4

1.1

141.5

142.3

142.4

142.5

4.1

2.3

3.8

2.9

3.2

3.3

148.2

148.4

148.4

148.9

7.1

2.8

2.5

1.9

4.9

2.2

132.5

133.9

134.3

133.6

.3

1.2

6.3

3.4

.8

4.8

131.2

131.6

130.5

130.2

2.2

5.1

7.0

-3.0

3.7

1.9

118.8

119.4

117.6

116.7

-.3

6.1

10.4

-6.9

2.8

1.4

108.2

106.1

102.6

100.4

-20.2

45.9

15.8

-25.9

7.9

-7.3

125.3
160.0

126.2
160.0

124.6
160.2

123.9
160.6

2.0
5.5

2.3
3.6

10.2
3.1

-4.4
1.5

2.2
4.6

2.6
2.3

124.9

125.1

125.1

125.2

.6

1.0

.0

1.0

.8

.5

111.0

111.2

110.9

110.7

-1.4

.0

-.4

-1.1

-.7

-.7

142.3
149.6

142.5
149.7

142.5
150.5

143.0
151.1

-.3
5.6

1.1
3.5

2.3
-.8

2.0
4.1

.4
4.6

2.1
1.6

132.3
128.6

132.6
128.8

132.2
128.3

133.4
129.7

-2.1
-2.8

-.6
-.6

3.1
3.2

3.4
3.5

-1.4
-1.7

3.2
3.3

Apparel and upkeep .........................
Apparel commodities 4/ ...................

+

+
+
+

+
+
+

+
+
+
+
+

_
Men's and boys' apparel ................
Women's and girls' apparel .............
Infants' and toddlers' apparel 1/ ......
_
Footwear ...............................
Other apparel commodities 4/............
_
Apparel services 1/ 4/ ...................
_ _

129.5
125.7
127.9

128.3
126.6
127.2

128.0
125.8
129.7

130.3
126.8
133.7

-1.2
-3.5
-21.9

-.3
-1.3
9.2

6.8
6.6
-1.9

2.5
3.5
19.4

-.8
-2.4
-7.6

4.6
5.1
8.3

126.4
146.8

126.7
147.9

126.2
147.5

127.7
146.5

1.6
-1.0

-.6
-2.6

-1.3
-9.5

4.2
-.8

.5
-1.8

1.4
-5.2

161.7

162.2

162.4

162.6

2.8

1.8

2.8

2.2

2.3

2.5

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ...................
New vehicles ...........................
New cars .............................
Used cars ..............................
Motor fuel .............................
Gasoline .............................
Maintenance and repairs ................
Other private transportation 4/.........
_
Other private transportation
commodities 4/....................
_
Other private transportation
services 4/ ......................
_
Public transportation ....................

145.4
142.4
144.4
141.9
155.1
111.8
111.3
161.3
175.2

145.3
142.7
144.4
141.9
155.8
111.8
111.3
161.2
176.1

145.4
142.4
144.6
142.0
157.7
109.5
109.0
161.5
176.7

144.8
141.6
144.6
142.0
155.1
106.8
106.2
161.9
177.0

.0
-1.1
2.5
2.6
-4.7
-11.5
-11.2
2.8
3.3

3.4
2.3
2.0
2.0
-.3
2.3
1.1
4.9
2.3

3.1
4.0
-.6
-1.4
-2.5
21.0
21.6
2.8
.2

-1.6
-2.2
.6
.3
.0
-16.7
-17.1
1.5
4.2

1.7
.6
2.3
2.3
-2.5
-4.9
-5.3
3.9
2.8

.7
.9
.0
-.6
-1.3
.4
.4
2.1
2.2

104.8

105.1

104.8

104.7

-.4

.8

-1.5

-.4

.2

-.9

192.0

193.1

193.9

194.3

3.9

2.5

.4

4.9

3.2

2.6

185.6

181.9

185.9

188.1

8.6

15.4

-5.0

5.5

11.9

.1

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities .................
Medical care services ....................
Professional medical services ..........
Entertainment 4/ ...........................
_
Entertainment commodities 4/ .............
_
Entertainment services 4/ ................
_

231.9
212.8
236.0
212.4
161.1

232.3
213.5
236.4
212.7
161.4

233.2
214.5
237.2
213.7
161.7

233.8
215.0
237.9
214.4
161.8

3.4
2.9
3.3
3.3
2.8

2.6
3.1
2.6
3.9
2.5

2.6
.8
2.9
3.7
2.0

3.3
4.2
3.3
3.8
1.7

3.0
3.0
3.0
3.6
2.7

3.0
2.5
3.1
3.7
1.9

144.0

144.2

144.2

143.9

1.4

2.3

.6

-.3

1.8

.1

181.1

181.6

182.1

182.7

4.1

2.7

3.2

3.6

3.4

3.4

Other goods and services 2/.................
_
Tobacco and smoking products .............
Personal care 1/ .........................
_

220.3

221.3

222.3

224.1

3.8

3.4

3.5

7.1

3.6

5.3

236.2
151.6

237.6
151.5

238.5
151.8

244.2
152.7

2.8
.8

4.4
2.4

1.4
1.9

14.3
2.9

3.6
1.6

7.6
2.4

+
+
+
+

Toilet goods and personal care
appliances 1/ ......................
_
Personal care services 1/ ..............
_
Personal and educational expenses 4/ .....
_
School books and supplies ..............
Personal and educational services 4/ ...
_

143.6

143.3

143.6

144.5

.6

.6

-2.7

2.5

.6

-.1

160.7

160.7

161.2

162.0

1.6

4.2

7.3

3.3

2.8

5.3

253.5

255.0

256.3

257.0

5.0

3.3

4.7

5.6

4.1

5.2

232.2
255.0

233.2
256.5

234.0
257.8

235.1
258.5

3.1
4.9

7.4
3.1

2.8
4.8

5.1
5.6

5.2
4.0

3.9
5.2

141.8
156.3
133.0
135.3
128.6

142.1
156.8
133.1
135.7
128.8

141.8
156.8
132.7
134.6
128.3

141.7
156.5
132.7
134.8
129.7

2.6
.9
5.1
-1.8
-2.1
-2.8

3.1
3.2
5.3
1.8
1.8
-.6

2.8
2.3
.8
3.4
5.5
3.2

1.5
-.3
.5
-.9
-1.5
3.5

2.8
2.0
5.2
.0
-.1
-1.7

2.2
1.0
.6
1.2
2.0
3.3

142.2
129.5
177.2
180.8

142.3
129.6
177.6
181.3

141.4
129.6
178.0
181.8

140.8
129.3
178.5
182.3

-4.0
.3
3.8
3.2

2.9
.9
3.0
2.5

8.9
-.3
3.2
3.2

-3.9
-.6
3.0
3.4

-.6
.6
3.4
2.8

2.3
-.5
3.1
3.3

145.1

145.7

145.2

145.0

4.3

3.1

4.8

-.3

3.7

2.2

182.9
236.0
206.1

182.7
236.4
206.9

184.1
237.2
207.8

184.9
237.9
208.4

4.6
3.3
4.3

5.9
2.6
3.0

-.4
2.9
4.4

4.4
3.3
4.5

5.2
3.0
3.6

2.0
3.1
4.5

159.9
155.2
160.5

160.2
155.5
160.8

160.3
155.5
160.9

160.6
155.5
161.0

2.1
2.1
2.3

2.8
3.4
3.3

3.1
2.6
2.8

1.8
.8
1.3

2.4
2.8
2.8

2.4
1.7
2.0

155.1
134.2
136.8
142.9
146.1
185.9

155.5
134.4
137.1
143.1
146.5
186.2

155.5
134.1
136.2
142.1
145.9
186.7

155.7
134.0
136.3
141.5
145.7
187.2

2.7
-1.8
-1.8
-1.7
1.4
4.5

3.2
2.1
1.8
4.4
3.4
3.5

2.6
3.0
5.4
6.1
3.6
3.1

1.6
-.6
-1.5
-3.9
-1.1
2.8

2.9
.2
.0
1.3
2.4
4.0

2.1
1.2
1.9
1.0
1.2
2.9

Commodity and service group
All items ....................................
Commodities ................................
Food and beverages .......................
Commodities less food and beverages ......
Nondurables less food and beverages ....
Apparel commodities 4/ ...............
+
_
Nondurables less food, beverages,
and apparel ......................
Durables ...............................
Services ...................................
Rent of shelter 3/ .......................
+
_
Household services less rent
of shelter 3/ 4/......................
+
_ _
Transportation services ..................
Medical care services ....................
Other services ...........................
Special indexes
All items less food ..........................
All items less shelter .......................
All items less homeowners' costs 3/ 4/........
+
_ _
All items less medical care ..................
Commodities less food ........................
Nondurables less food ........................
Nondurables less food and apparel ............
Nondurables ..................................
Services less rent of shelter 3/ .............

+

_
Services less medical care services ..........
Energy .......................................
All items less energy ........................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ..........................
Energy commodities .....................
Services less energy services ............

171.7
114.6
165.5
167.9

172.0
114.9
165.9
168.3

172.5
112.9
166.2
168.7

172.9
111.2
166.6
169.2

3.9
-5.6
3.2
2.7

3.1
4.5
3.0
2.4

3.3
14.9
1.7
2.2

2.8
-11.3
2.7
3.1

3.5
-.7
3.1
2.6

3.1
.9
2.2
2.7

142.0
111.5
182.4

142.2
111.3
182.9

142.3
108.8
183.4

142.7
106.2
184.0

.3
-12.3
4.1

1.4
6.2
2.9

.8
20.1
2.7

2.0
-17.7
3.6

.9
-3.5
3.5

1.4
-.6
3.1

+
+
+
+
+

1/
_
2/
_
3/
_
4/
_

Not seasonally adjusted.
This index series will undergo a change in composition in January, 1998.
Indexes on a December 1982=100 base.
This index series will no longer appear in its present form after December, 1997.

NOTE:

See Table X for a comparable index series.
Data not available.
Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 3. Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers: Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
+

Percent change to
Apr. 1997 fromApr.
Feb.
Mar.
1996
1997
1997

Percent change to
Mar. 1997 fromMar.
Jan.
Feb.
1996
1997
1997

Pricing
schedule
1/
_

U.S. city average ......................

M

159.1

159.6

160.0

160.2

2.5

0.4

0.1

2.8

0.6

0.3

M
M

166.2
166.8

166.9
167.7

167.3
168.1

167.1
167.7

2.6
2.5

.1
.0

-.1
-.2

2.8
2.7

.7
.8

.2
.2

+

+

Indexes

Area

Jan.
1997

Feb.
1997

Mar.
1997

Apr.
1997

Region and area size 2/
_
Northeast urban.........................
Size A - More than 1,200,000 ........

M

164.2

164.2

164.8

165.4

3.0

.7

.4

2.9

.4

.4

M

164.7

165.3

165.6

165.6

2.7

.2

.0

3.0

.5

.2

M
M
M

155.5
156.0
154.3

155.9
156.5
154.4

155.9
156.6
154.6

156.1
156.9
154.8

2.5
2.6
2.4

.1
.3
.3

.1
.2
.1

2.8
2.6
2.8

.3
.4
.2

.0
.1
.1

M

157.8

158.3

158.1

158.2

2.8

-.1

.1

3.3

.2

-.1

M

152.2

152.1

152.1

152.1

2.1

.0

.0

3.0

-.1

.0

South urban ............................
Size A - More than 1,200,000 ........
Size B - 450,000 to 1,200,000 3/.....
+
_
Size C - 50,000 to 450,000 3/........
+
_
Size D - Nonmetropolitan
(less than 50,000) .........

M
M
M

155.7
154.9
158.5

156.1
155.2
158.9

156.5
155.4
159.7

156.7
155.7
159.8

2.3
2.2
2.7

.4
.3
.6

.1
.2
.1

2.7
2.6
3.0

.5
.3
.8

.3
.1
.5

M

155.0

155.6

155.7

156.0

1.9

.3

.2

2.3

.5

.1

M

154.8

155.5

156.0

156.1

2.4

.4

.1

2.9

.8

.3

West urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,250,000 ........
Size C - 50,000 to 330,000 3/........
+
_

M
M
M

159.6
159.6
164.9

160.1
160.1
165.4

160.8
160.9
166.3

161.1
161.2
166.5

2.5
2.5
2.7

.6
.7
.7

.2
.2
.1

2.8
2.7
3.0

.8
.8
.8

.4
.5
.5

M

143.6

144.1

144.4

144.5

2.4

.3

.1

2.6

.6

.2

M

159.2

159.5

160.1

160.4

2.8

.6

.2

3.0

.6

.4

M

159.1

159.6

159.8

160.0

2.4

.3

.1

2.8

.4

.1

M

155.9

156.2

156.4

156.5

2.3

.2

.1

2.8

.3

.1

M
M
M

160.4
159.1
169.1

161.1
159.2
170.1

161.0
159.8
170.7

160.9
159.9
170.2

2.9
1.4
2.5

-.1
.4
.1

-.1
.1
-.3

3.0
1.6
2.5

.4
.4
.9

-.1
.4
.4

M

165.1

165.8

166.1

166.0

2.4

.1

-.1

2.5

.6

.2

+
+

Size B Size C -

500,000 to 1,200,000 3/.....
_
50,000 to 500,000 3/........
_

North Central urban ....................
Size A - More than 1,200,000 ........
Size B - 360,000 to 1,200,000 3/.....
+
_
Size C - 50,000 to 360,000 3/........
+
_
Size D - Nonmetropolitan
(less than 50,000) .........

Size classes
A 4/ .................................
+
_
B 3/ .................................
+
_
C 3/ .................................
+
_
D ....................................
Selected local areas
Chicago-Gary-Lake County, IL-IN-WI......
Los Angeles-Anaheim-Riverside, CA ......
N.Y.-Northern N.J.-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT
Phil.-Wilmington-Trenton,
PA-NJ-DE-MD 5/ .........................
+
_

San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA 5/ ..
_

M

157.0

Baltimore, MD 6/ .......................
_
Boston-Lawrence-Salem, MA-NH ...........
Cleveland-Akron-Lorain, OH .............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ..............
St. Louis-East St. Louis, MO-IL 7/ .....
+
_
Washington, DC-MD-VA 6/ ................
+
_

1

155.8

-

157.1

-

-

-

1
1
1
1

167.7
153.8
158.1
151.5

-

168.1
155.4
158.5
152.2

-

-

1

161.6

-

161.9

-

-

Dallas-Fort Worth, TX ..................
Detroit-Ann Arbor, MI ..................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX .........
Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley, PA 7/ ........
+
_

2
2
2
2

+
+

-

157.9

150.7
155.4
144.5
156.2

159.2

-

159.6

150.6
156.0
145.2
156.6

3.7

1.1

4.1

1.4

-

2.7

.8

-

-

-

3.3
3.0
4.0
2.2

.2
1.0
.3
.5

-

-

-

2.2

.2

-

1.4
2.4
1.5
2.5

.3

-.1
.4
.5
.3

-

-

-

+
+

+
+

1/
_

2/
_
3/
_

+

4/
_
5/
_

+

6/
_

+

7/
_

+

Foods, fuels, and several other items priced every month in all areas; most other goods and services priced as
indicated:
M - Every month.
1 - January, March, May, July, September, and November.
2 - February, April, June, August, October, and December.
Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
Starting in January, 1998, a new Size Class B/C will be introduced, composed of current
Size Class B and Size Class C cities.
Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.

There will be no individual Size Class B or Size Class C.

Indexes for the cities of Philadelphia and San Francisco will no longer be published on a monthly
basis starting in January, 1998. Beginning in February, 1998 they will be published on a
bi-monthly basis.
Indexes for the cities of Washington and Baltimore will no longer be published separately after December, 1997.
Beginning in January, 1998 the two cities will be published as a Washington-Baltimore
combined metropolitan area.
Indexes for the cities of Pittsburgh and St. Louis will no longer be published on a bi-monthly
basis after December, 1997.

Beginning in July, 1998 they will be published semi-annually, each

.8

-

NOTE:

January and July.
Data not available.
Local area CPI indexes are byproducts of the national CPI program. Each local index has a smaller sample size than
the national index and is, therefore, subject to substantially more sampling and other measurement error. As a
result, local area indexes show greater volatility than the national index, although their long-term trends are
similar. Therefore, the Bureau of Labor Statistics strongly urges users to consider adopting the national average
CPI for use in their escalator clauses.

Table 4. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and
commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
+

Relative
Unadjusted indexes
importance,
December
Mar.
Apr.
1996
1997
1997

Unadjusted
percent change to
Apr. 1997 fromApr. 1996 Mar. 1997

Seasonally adjusted
percent change fromJan. to
Feb. to
Mar. to
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.

Expenditure category

+
+

+

All items ..................................
All items (1967=100) .......................

100.000
-

157.0
467.8

157.2
468.3

2.3
-

0.1
-

0.2
-

0.1
-

0.0
-

Food and beverages .......................
Food ...................................
Food at home .........................
Cereals and bakery products ........
Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs .....
Dairy products 1/ ..................
_
Fruits and vegetables 2/ ...........
_
Other food at home .................
Sugar and sweets .................
Fats and oils ....................
Nonalcoholic beverages ...........
Other prepared food ..............
Food away from home ..................
Alcoholic beverages ....................

19.436
17.749
11.387
1.688
3.535
1.387

156.5
156.1
156.7
176.4
147.4
145.8

156.5
156.1
156.6
176.6
147.3
145.4

2.8
2.9
2.8
2.1
4.1
6.3

.0
.0
-.1
.1
-.1
-.3

.2
.3
.3
-.1
-.3
-1.1

.1
.1
-.1
.4
-.8
-.1

-.2
-.2
-.3
-.4
.5
-.3

2.086

188.2

185.2

-1.3

-1.6

2.7

.3

-3.3

2.691
.373
.282
.841
1.194
6.362
1.687

145.1
146.2
142.2
128.9
160.1
156.0
161.5

146.4
147.9
142.1
131.1
161.0
156.2
161.7

2.8
4.0
1.7
1.3
3.8
3.0
2.8

.9
1.2
-.1
1.7
.6
.1
.1

.2
.2
.1
-.4
.7
.2
.1

.1
-.7
.1
1.1
-.5
.3
.1

1.0
1.2
-.1
1.8
.7
.0
.0

Housing 2/ ...............................
_
Shelter ................................

38.747

152.5

152.4

2.6

-.1

.2

.1

.1

25.867

169.9

170.1

3.0

.1

.3

.2

.3

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+
+
+

+

+

Renters' costs 3/ 4/..................
_ _
Rent, residential ..................
Other renters' costs 4/ ............
_
Homeowners' costs 3/ 4/...............
_ _
Owners' equivalent rent 3/ .........
_
Household insurance 3/ 4/ ..........
_ _
Maintenance and repairs 1/ 4/ ........
_ _
Maintenance and repair
services 1/ 4/ .................
_ _
Maintenance and repair
commodities 1/ 4/ ..............
_ _
Fuel and other utilities 2/ ............
_
Fuels ................................
Fuel oil and other household fuel
commodities ....................
Gas (piped) and electricity (energy
services).......................
Other utilities and public
services 4/ ......................
_
Household furnishings and operation 2/ .
_
Housefurnishings 4/ ..................
_
Housekeeping supplies ................
Housekeeping services 4/ .............
_
Apparel and upkeep .......................
Apparel commodities 4/ .................
_
Men's and boys' apparel ..............
Women's and girls' apparel............
Infants' and toddlers' apparel 1/ ....
_
Footwear .............................

8.079

161.9

161.8

3.3

-.1

.3

.3

.4

6.580
1.499

164.7
229.9

165.2
226.9

2.9
5.2

.3
-1.3

.1
.6

.2
.3

.3
.7

17.599

163.9

164.3

2.8

.2

.3

.2

.2

17.277

164.3

164.6

2.8

.2

.3

.2

.2

.322

148.1

148.5

1.7

.3

.7

-.3

.4

.189

140.9

141.0

3.1

.1

.4

.1

.1

.105

150.3

150.9

3.4

.4

.2

.0

.4

.084

128.7

128.2

2.6

-.4

.8

.3

-.4

7.344

129.6

128.6

2.7

-.8

.3

-.8

-.4

3.979

116.5

114.7

2.1

-1.5

.5

-1.4

-.9

.391

105.3

101.7

.1

-3.4

-2.0

-3.5

-2.2

3.588

122.9

121.2

2.3

-1.4

.7

-1.2

-.8

3.365

161.2

161.5

3.5

.2

.1

.1

.2

5.536

123.9

124.0

.5

.1

.1

.0

.0

3.261

109.8

109.7

-.7

-.1

.1

-.1

-.3

1.129
1.145

143.5
153.3

143.9
153.7

1.6
2.7

.3
.3

.1
.1

.1
.3

.4
.5

5.348
4.838

133.8
130.5

135.5
132.3

1.0
.8

1.3
1.4

.4
.4

-.3
-.3

1.0
1.0

1.286
2.053
.240

128.8
129.2
130.7

131.1
130.7
134.9

1.9
.9
.1

1.8
1.2
3.2

-.9
1.1
-.3

-.2
-.4
2.0

1.8
.4
3.2

.799

127.9

130.3

1.0

1.9

.1

-.5

1.3

+
+

+
+
+

+
+
+
+
+
+
+

Other apparel commodities 4/..........
_
Apparel services 1/ 4/ .................
_ _

.461

149.5

149.3

-2.4

-.1

1.0

-.9

.4

.510

161.5

161.7

2.2

.1

.3

.1

.1

Transportation ...........................
Private transportation .................
New vehicles .........................
New cars ...........................
Used cars ............................
Motor fuel ...........................
Gasoline ...........................
Maintenance and repairs ..............
Other private transportation 4/.......
_
Other private transportation
commodities 4/..................
_
Other private transportation
services 4/ ....................
_
Public transportation ..................

19.190
17.934
4.893
3.533
2.320
3.921
1.616
5.185

144.2
141.9
146.6
142.5
155.7
106.3
105.7
162.5
172.8

144.2
141.8
146.4
142.3
155.7
105.9
105.4
162.9
172.8

.8
.6
1.3
1.0
-1.8
-2.5
-2.7
3.0
2.5

.0
-.1
-.1
-.1
.0
-.4
-.3
.2
.0

.0
.1
-.1
-.1
.4
-.1
-.2
-.2
.4

-.1
-.1
.2
.2
1.3
-2.2
-2.2
.4
.3

-.6
-.8
.1
-.1
-1.6
-2.7
-2.7
.2
.2

.742

104.1

103.7

-.5

-.4

.1

.0

-.3

4.442

190.2

190.3

3.0

.1

.5

.3

.3

1.256

185.1

186.8

5.2

.9

-2.2

1.7

1.2

Medical care .............................
Medical care commodities ...............
Medical care services ..................
Professional medical services ........

6.251
1.047
5.204
2.973

232.8
212.1
237.4
215.4

233.2
212.3
237.9
216.0

3.0
2.6
3.1
3.8

.2
.1
.2
.3

.2
.4
.0
.2

.3
.3
.4
.5

.3
.2
.3
.3

Entertainment 4/ .........................
_
Entertainment commodities 4/ ...........
_
Entertainment services 4/ ..............
_

4.015

159.6

159.7

2.2

.1

.1

.1

.1

2.036

143.4

143.0

.8

-.3

.1

.0

-.4

1.979

182.8

183.6

3.7

.4

.1

.4

.5

Other goods and services 2/ ..............
_
Tobacco and smoking products ...........
Personal care 1/ .......................
_
Toilet goods and personal care
appliances 1/ ....................
_
Personal care services 1/ ............
_

7.012

218.0

219.8

4.6

.8

.4

.5

1.0

2.117
1.107

237.7
151.6

242.7
152.6

5.4
2.0

2.1
.7

.5
-.1

.4
.1

2.3
.7

.610

144.3

145.4

.5

.8

-.1

.1

.8

.497

161.2

162.1

4.1

.6

.0

.2

.6

+
+

Personal and educational expenses 4/ ...
_
School books and supplies ............
Personal and educational services 4/ .
_

3.788

251.6

251.8

4.9

.1

.6

.5

.3

.232
3.556

237.1
253.0

237.4
253.3

4.8
4.9

.1
.1

.3
.6

.3
.5

.6
.3

100.000
47.057
19.436
27.621
16.215
4.838

157.0
142.0
156.5
133.1
134.8
130.5

157.2
142.2
156.5
133.4
135.6
132.3

2.3
1.4
2.8
.5
.8
.8

.1
.1
.0
.2
.6
1.4

.2
.2
.2
.2
.2
.4

.1
-.1
.1
-.3
-.7
-.3

.0
-.2
-.2
-.2
.0
1.0

11.377
11.407
52.943
25.329

139.9
129.6
175.2
163.5

140.3
129.3
175.3
163.7

.9
-.1
3.1
3.0

.3
-.2
.1
.1

.1
.1
.2
.2

-.8
.0
.2
.2

-.4
-.3
.2
.3

8.553

132.6

132.0

2.8

-.5

.4

-.4

-.1

7.314
5.204
6.542

182.3
237.4
204.1

182.8
237.9
204.6

3.3
3.1
4.2

.3
.2
.2

-.1
.0
.3

.6
.4
.4

.4
.3
.3

82.251
74.133
82.401

157.1
153.7
147.5

157.3
153.8
147.6

2.2
2.1
2.2

.1
.1
.1

.2
.1
.2

.1
.0
.0

.1
-.1
.0

93.749
29.308
17.901
13.064
35.651
27.613

153.5
134.2
136.4
141.1
146.0
166.3

153.6
134.6
137.1
141.4
146.4
166.4

2.3
.6
1.0
1.1
1.9
3.4

.1
.3
.5
.2
.3
.1

.2
.1
.3
.2
.2
.3

.0
-.3
-.9
-.8
-.3
.2

.1
-.1
-.1
-.4
-.1
.1

47.738
7.901
92.099
74.350

169.9
110.7
163.5
165.5

170.0
109.6
163.9
165.9

3.2
-.2
2.6
2.5

.1
-1.0
.2
.2

.2
.3
.2
.2

.2
-1.8
.2
.2

.2
-1.9
.2
.3

Commodity and service group
All items ..................................
Commodities ..............................
Food and beverages .....................
Commodities less food and beverages ....
Nondurables less food and beverages ..
Apparel commodities 4/ .............
+
_
Nondurables less food, beverages,
and apparel ....................
Durables .............................
Services .................................
Rent of shelter 3/ .....................
+
_
Household services less rent of
shelter 3/ 4/.......................
+
_ _
Transportation services ................
Medical care services ..................
Other services .........................
Special indexes
All items less food ........................
All items less shelter .....................
All items less homeowners' costs 3/ 4/......
+
_ _
All items less medical care ................
Commodities less food ......................
Nondurables less food ......................
Nondurables less food and apparel ..........
Nondurables ................................
Services less rent of shelter 3/ 4/ ........
+
_ _
Services less medical care services ........
Energy .....................................
All items less energy ......................
All items less food and energy ...........

Commodities less food and
energy commodities .................
Energy commodities ...................
Services less energy services ..........
Purchasing power of the consumer dollar:
1982-84=$1.00 1/ .........................
+
_
1967=$1.00 1/ ............................
+
_

24.996
4.312
49.354

142.5
106.5
181.0

143.1
105.8
181.3

1.1
-2.3
3.2

.4
-.7
.2

.2
-.3
.2

.1
-2.3
.3

.2
-2.7
.3

-

$.637

$.636

-2.3

-.2

-.3

-.2

-.2

-

.214

.214

-

-

-

-

-

+
+
+
+
+

1/
_
2/
_
3/
_
4/
_
NOTE:

Not seasonally adjusted.
This index series will undergo a change in composition in January, 1998.
Indexes on a December 1984=100 base.
This index series will no longer appear in its present form after December, 1997.
See Table X for a comparable index series.
Data not available.
Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 5. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W): U.S. city average, by expenditure category and
commodity and service group
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
+

Seasonally adjusted indexes
Jan.
1997

Feb.
1997

Mar.
1997

Apr.
1997

July
1996

Seasonally adjusted annual rate
percent change for
3 months ended6 months endedOct.
Jan.
Apr.
Oct.
Apr.
1996
1997
1997
1996
1997

Expenditure category
All items ....................................
Food and beverages .........................
Food .....................................
Food at home ...........................
Cereals and bakery products ..........

156.0
155.5
156.0
176.2

156.3
155.9
156.5
176.0

156.4
156.0
156.3
176.7

156.1
155.7
155.8
176.0

2.4

3.1

2.9

1.0

2.8

1.9

5.1
5.1
6.2
3.5

5.3
5.6
6.7
2.6

1.0
.5
-1.0
2.8

.3
.5
-.5
-.5

5.2
5.4
6.4
3.0

.6
.5
-.8
1.1

+
+

+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+

+
+

Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs .......
Dairy products 1/ ....................
_
Fruits and vegetables 2/..............
_
Other food at home ...................
Sugar and sweets ...................
Fats and oils ......................
Nonalcoholic beverages .............
Other prepared food ................
Food away from home ....................
Alcoholic beverages ......................
Housing 2/ .................................
_
Shelter ..................................
Renters' costs 3/ 4/....................
_ _
Rent, residential ....................
Other renters' costs 4/ ..............
_
Homeowners' costs 3/ 4/ ................
_ _
Owners' equivalent rent 3/ ...........
_
Household insurance 3/ 4/ ............
_ _
Maintenance and repairs 1/ 4/ ..........
_ _
Maintenance and repair services 1/ 4/
_ _
Maintenance and repair
commodities 1/ 4/ ................
_ _
Fuel and other utilities 2/...............
_
Fuels ..................................
Fuel oil and other household fuel
commodities ......................
Gas (piped) and electricity (energy
services).........................
Other utilities and public services 4/ .
_
Household furnishings and operation 2/ ...
_

148.3
147.6

147.9
146.0

146.7
145.8

147.4
145.4

9.1
15.8

8.0
21.2

2.5
-3.4

-2.4
-5.8

8.5
18.5

.0
-4.6

181.8

186.7

187.2

181.0

5.4

3.7

-10.9

-1.7

4.5

-6.4

144.1
146.6
141.4
127.4
159.3
155.4
160.8

144.4
146.9
141.6
126.9
160.4
155.7
160.9

144.5
145.9
141.8
128.3
159.6
156.2
161.0

145.9
147.7
141.7
130.6
160.7
156.2
161.0

1.7
6.0
1.4
-3.1
4.2
2.9
2.8

2.0
3.1
4.7
-2.5
4.7
3.7
4.6

2.3
3.6
.3
.9
2.8
3.4
3.0

5.1
3.0
.9
10.4
3.6
2.1
.5

1.8
4.6
3.0
-2.8
4.4
3.3
3.7

3.7
3.3
.6
5.6
3.2
2.7
1.8

151.9

152.2

152.3

152.5

2.7

2.4

3.5

1.6

2.6

2.5

168.6
159.6

169.1
160.0

169.5
160.4

170.0
161.0

3.4
4.4

2.2
2.0

2.9
3.3

3.4
3.6

2.8
3.2

3.1
3.4

164.1
220.5

164.3
221.8

164.7
222.4

165.2
223.9

3.5
7.5

2.2
1.3

3.0
5.8

2.7
6.3

2.9
4.4

2.8
6.1

163.2

163.7

164.1

164.5

3.0

2.3

2.7

3.2

2.6

3.0

163.5

164.0

164.4

164.8

3.0

2.2

2.7

3.2

2.6

3.0

147.9

148.9

148.4

149.0

2.2

3.6

-1.6

3.0

2.9

.7

140.1

140.7

140.9

141.0

3.3

1.8

4.7

2.6

2.5

3.6

150.0

150.3

150.3

150.9

6.5

3.6

1.3

2.4

5.0

1.9

127.3

128.3

128.7

128.2

-.6

.0

8.3

2.9

-.3

5.5

130.8

131.2

130.2

129.7

2.2

4.8

7.4

-3.3

3.5

1.9

118.1

118.7

117.0

115.9

.0

6.1

10.5

-7.2

3.0

1.2

108.2

106.0

102.3

100.0

-19.3

45.5

17.2

-27.0

8.4

-7.5

124.8
160.6

125.7
160.7

124.2
160.9

123.2
161.3

2.0
5.2

2.7
3.9

10.2
3.0

-5.0
1.8

2.3
4.5

2.3
2.4

123.5

123.6

123.6

123.6

.0

1.0

.3

.3

.5

.3

+
+

+

+
+
+

+
+
+

+
+

Housefurnishings 4/ ....................
_
Housekeeping supplies ..................
Housekeeping services 4/ ...............
_

109.7

109.8

109.7

109.4

-1.4

.4

-.4

-1.1

-.5

-.7

142.9
152.5

143.1
152.6

143.2
153.0

143.8
153.7

.3
4.3

1.1
3.2

2.6
.0

2.5
3.2

.7
3.8

2.6
1.6

Apparel and upkeep .........................
Apparel commodities 4/ ...................
_
Men's and boys' apparel ................
Women's and girls' apparel .............
Infants' and toddlers' apparel 1/ ......
_
Footwear ...............................
Other apparel commodities 4/............
_
Apparel services 1/ 4/ ...................
_ _

131.3
128.0

131.8
128.5

131.4
128.1

132.7
129.4

-2.4
-2.8

-1.2
-1.6

3.1
3.2

4.3
4.4

-1.8
-2.2

3.7
3.8

129.2
124.5
128.5

128.1
125.9
128.1

127.8
125.4
130.7

130.1
125.9
134.9

-1.6
-4.1
-21.7

.3
-3.5
6.8

6.1
7.4
-1.2

2.8
4.6
21.5

-.6
-3.8
-8.6

4.4
6.0
9.5

127.6
146.3

127.7
147.7

127.0
146.3

128.6
146.9

2.2
1.6

-.6
-1.3

-.9
-11.2

3.2
1.7

.8
.1

1.1
-5.0

160.8

161.3

161.5

161.7

2.8

1.0

2.8

2.3

1.9

2.5

Transportation .............................
Private transportation ...................
New vehicles ...........................
New cars .............................
Used cars ..............................
Motor fuel .............................
Gasoline .............................
Maintenance and repairs ................
Other private transportation 4/.........
_
Other private transportation
commodities 4/....................
_
Other private transportation
services 4/ ......................
_
Public transportation ....................

145.2
143.0
145.7
141.6
156.4
112.1
111.6
162.2
171.1

145.2
143.2
145.6
141.5
157.1
112.0
111.4
161.9
171.8

145.1
143.0
145.9
141.8
159.1
109.5
109.0
162.5
172.3

144.2
141.9
146.0
141.7
156.5
106.5
106.1
162.8
172.6

-.8
-1.4
2.8
2.3
-4.7
-11.5
-11.9
2.8
3.4

3.1
2.3
1.9
2.0
.3
2.7
2.3
4.9
2.9

4.0
4.3
.0
-.8
-2.5
21.8
21.9
2.8
.0

-2.7
-3.0
.8
.3
.3
-18.5
-18.3
1.5
3.6

1.1
.4
2.4
2.1
-2.2
-4.7
-5.1
3.8
3.1

.6
.6
.4
-.3
-1.1
-.4
-.2
2.1
1.8

103.9

104.0

104.0

103.7

-.4

.4

-1.1

-.8

.0

-1.0

188.1

189.0

189.6

190.1

4.0

3.3

.2

4.3

3.6

2.2

184.0

179.9

182.9

185.1

8.9

11.8

-1.7

2.4

10.4

.3

231.2
210.1
235.9
213.5
158.8

231.6
211.0
236.0
213.9
159.0

232.4
211.7
236.9
215.0
159.2

233.0
212.1
237.6
215.7
159.3

3.4
2.9
3.3
3.3
2.9

2.7
3.1
2.6
3.9
2.3

2.6
.4
3.3
3.6
2.3

3.2
3.9
2.9
4.2
1.3

3.0
3.0
3.0
3.6
2.6

2.9
2.1
3.1
3.9
1.8

142.9

143.1

143.1

142.5

1.4

2.0

.8

-1.1

1.7

-.1

Medical care ...............................
Medical care commodities .................
Medical care services ....................
Professional medical services ..........
Entertainment 4/ ...........................
_
Entertainment commodities 4/ .............
_

+
+
+
+
+
+
+

Entertainment services 4/ ................
_

181.4

181.6

182.3

183.3

4.6

2.7

3.4

4.3

3.7

3.8

Other goods and services 2/.................
_
Tobacco and smoking products .............
Personal care 1/ .........................
_
Toilet goods and personal care
appliances 1/ ......................
_
Personal care services 1/ ..............
_
Personal and educational expenses 4/ .....
_
School books and supplies ..............
Personal and educational services 4/ ...
_

216.8

217.7

218.7

220.8

3.6

3.2

4.0

7.6

3.4

5.8

236.1
151.6

237.2
151.4

238.2
151.6

243.7
152.6

2.8
1.1

3.5
2.4

2.2
1.9

13.5
2.7

3.1
1.7

7.7
2.3

144.4

144.2

144.3

145.4

.8

1.1

-2.7

2.8

1.0

.0

160.8

160.8

161.2

162.1

1.3

4.7

7.3

3.3

3.0

5.3

249.2

250.6

251.8

252.6

4.9

3.5

5.6

5.6

4.2

5.6

234.0
250.6

234.8
252.0

235.6
253.3

236.9
254.1

2.5
5.0

8.7
3.1

3.1
5.8

5.1
5.7

5.6
4.1

4.1
5.7

141.9
156.0
133.3
135.4
128.0

142.2
156.3
133.5
135.7
128.5

142.0
156.4
133.1
134.7
128.1

141.7
156.1
132.8
134.7
129.4

2.4
.6
5.1
-2.1
-2.1
-2.8

3.1
3.2
5.3
1.8
1.8
-1.6

2.9
2.6
1.0
3.7
6.1
3.2

1.0
-.6
.3
-1.5
-2.1
4.4

2.8
1.9
5.2
-.2
-.1
-2.2

1.9
1.0
.6
1.1
2.0
3.8

142.2
129.3
174.3
162.5

142.4
129.4
174.7
162.9

141.2
129.4
175.1
163.2

140.7
129.0
175.5
163.7

-4.8
-.3
3.6
3.3

3.5
.9
2.8
2.3

9.5
-.3
3.3
3.3

-4.2
-.9
2.8
3.0

-.7
.3
3.2
2.8

2.5
-.6
3.0
3.1

133.5

134.0

133.4

133.2

3.8

3.1

5.3

-.9

3.4

2.1

180.8
235.9
203.0

180.6
236.0
203.7

181.6
236.9
204.6

182.4
237.6
205.3

4.6
3.3
4.5

5.0
2.6
2.8

.2
3.3
5.1

3.6
2.9
4.6

4.8
3.0
3.7

1.9
3.1
4.8

156.5
153.5

156.8
153.7

156.9
153.7

157.0
153.6

1.6
1.9

2.6
3.5

3.4
2.9

1.3
.3

2.1
2.7

2.3
1.6

Commodity and service group
All items ....................................
Commodities ................................
Food and beverages .......................
Commodities less food and beverages ......
Nondurables less food and beverages ....
Apparel commodities 4/ ...............
+
_
Nondurables less food, beverages,
and apparel ......................
Durables ...............................
Services ...................................
Rent of shelter 3/ .......................
+
_
Household services less rent
of shelter 3/ 4/......................
+
_ _
Transportation services ..................
Medical care services ....................
Other services ...........................
Special indexes
All items less food ..........................
All items less shelter .......................

All items less homeowners' costs 3/ 4/........
_ _
All items less medical care ..................
Commodities less food ........................
Nondurables less food ........................
Nondurables less food and apparel ............
Nondurables ..................................
Services less rent of shelter 3/ .............
+
_
Services less medical care services ..........
Energy .......................................
All items less energy ........................
All items less food and energy .............
Commodities less food and energy
commodities ..........................
Energy commodities .....................
Services less energy services ............

+

147.1

147.4

147.4

147.4

2.2

3.4

2.8

.8

2.8

1.8

153.0
134.6
136.9
142.8
146.0
165.7

153.3
134.8
137.3
143.1
146.3
166.2

153.3
134.4
136.1
141.9
145.8
166.5

153.4
134.2
136.0
141.3
145.6
166.7

2.2
-1.8
-2.1
-2.0
1.4
4.3

3.2
1.8
2.7
4.4
3.4
3.5

2.9
3.6
5.7
6.7
3.9
3.2

1.0
-1.2
-2.6
-4.1
-1.1
2.4

2.7
.0
.3
1.1
2.4
3.9

2.0
1.2
1.5
1.1
1.4
2.8

169.1
114.6
162.6
164.6

169.4
114.9
162.9
164.9

169.7
112.8
163.3
165.3

170.1
110.7
163.6
165.8

3.9
-6.0
3.0
2.7

2.7
4.1
3.0
2.2

3.4
16.1
1.7
2.2

2.4
-12.9
2.5
2.9

3.3
-1.1
3.0
2.5

2.9
.5
2.1
2.6

141.6
112.0
180.0

141.9
111.7
180.3

142.1
109.1
180.9

142.4
106.2
181.5

.0
-12.3
3.9

1.1
5.8
3.0

.9
21.4
2.7

2.3
-19.2
3.4

.6
-3.6
3.4

1.6
-.9
3.0

+
+
+
+
+

1/
_
2/
_
3/
_
4/
_
NOTE:

Not seasonally adjusted.
This index series will undergo a change in composition in January, 1998.
Indexes on a December 1984=100 base.
This index series will no longer appear in its present form after December, 1997.
See Table X for a comparable index series.
Data not available.
Index applies to a month as a whole, not to any specific date.

Table 6. Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers: Selected areas, all items index
(1982-84=100, unless otherwise noted)
+
Area
+

Pricing
schedule
1/
_

Indexes
Jan.
1997

Feb.
1997

Mar.
1997

Apr.
1997

Percent change to
Apr. 1997 fromApr.
Feb.
Mar.
1996
1997
1997

Percent change to
Mar. 1997 fromMar.
Jan.
Feb.
1996
1997
1997

U.S. city average ......................
+

M

156.3

156.8

157.0

157.2

2.3

0.3

0.1

2.7

0.4

0.1

M
M
M

163.5
163.1
162.0

164.2
163.9
161.9

164.5
164.2
162.6

164.4
163.9
163.1

2.6
2.4
2.9

.1
.0
.7

-.1
-.2
.3

2.7
2.6
2.8

.6
.7
.4

.2
.2
.4

M

166.3

166.8

167.0

167.0

2.5

.1

.0

3.0

.4

.1

M
M
M

152.1
151.9
150.5

152.4
152.3
150.5

152.4
152.3
150.5

152.6
152.6
150.8

2.4
2.4
2.4

.1
.2
.2

.1
.2
.2

2.8
2.5
2.7

.2
.3
.0

.0
.0
.0

M

155.2

155.6

155.3

155.4

2.7

-.1

.1

3.3

.1

-.2

M

150.5

150.3

150.1

150.0

2.0

-.2

-.1

3.0

-.3

-.1

M
M
M

154.2
153.1
154.7

154.5
153.2
155.0

154.8
153.4
155.6

155.1
153.6
155.8

2.2
2.0
2.6

.4
.3
.5

.2
.1
.1

2.7
2.6
3.0

.4
.2
.6

.2
.1
.4

M

154.9

155.5

155.5

155.8

1.8

.2

.2

2.3

.4

.0

M

155.3

155.8

156.1

156.3

2.2

.3

.1

2.6

.5

.2

M
M
M

156.3
154.7
161.7

156.8
155.2
162.1

157.4
155.9
163.1

157.8
156.2
163.3

2.3
2.2
2.6

.6
.6
.7

.3
.2
.1

2.6
2.5
3.1

.7
.8
.9

.4
.5
.6

M

142.5

143.0

143.2

143.4

2.3

.3

.1

2.5

.5

.1

M

156.3

156.5

157.0

157.3

2.6

.5

.2

2.9

.4

.3

M

158.2

158.7

158.8

159.0

2.3

.2

.1

2.8

.4

.1

M

155.3

155.4

155.4

155.6

2.1

.1

.1

2.6

.1

.0

Region and area size 2/
_

Northeast urban.........................
Size A - More than 1,200,000 ........
Size B - 500,000 to 1,200,000 3/.....
+
_
Size C - 50,000 to 500,000 3/........
+
_
North Central urban ....................
Size A - More than 1,200,000 ........
Size B - 360,000 to 1,200,000 3/.....
+
_
Size C - 50,000 to 360,000 3/........
+
_
Size D - Nonmetropolitan
(less than 50,000) .........
South urban ............................
Size A - More than 1,200,000 ........
Size B - 450,000 to 1,200,000 3/.....
+
_
Size C - 50,000 to 450,000 3/........
+
_
Size D - Nonmetropolitan
(less than 50,000) .........
West urban .............................
Size A - More than 1,250,000 ........
Size C - 50,000 to 330,000 3/........
+
_
Size classes
A 4/ .................................
+
_
B 3/ .................................
+
_
C 3/ .................................
+
_
D ....................................

Selected local areas
Chicago-Gary-Lake County, IL-IN-WI......
Los Angeles-Anaheim-Riverside, CA ......
N.Y.-Northern N.J.-Long Island, NY-NJ-CT
Phil.-Wilmington-Trenton,
PA-NJ-DE-MD 5/ .........................
+
_
San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA 5/ ..
+
_

M
M
M

155.3
153.6
165.1

155.9
153.6
166.2

155.6
154.2
166.6

155.3
154.3
166.1

2.5
1.2
2.4

-.4
.5
-.1

-.2
.1
-.3

2.8
1.5
2.5

.2
.4
.9

-.2
.4
.2

M

164.4

164.9

165.3

165.1

2.4

.1

-.1

2.5

.5

.2

M

154.1

155.0

156.2

156.7

3.2

1.1

.3

3.6

1.4

.8

Baltimore, MD 6/ .......................
_
Boston-Lawrence-Salem, MA-NH ...........
Cleveland-Akron-Lorain, OH .............
Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL ..............
St. Louis-East St. Louis, MO-IL 7/ .....
+
_
Washington, DC-MD-VA 6/ ................
+
_

1

154.6

-

155.9

-

-

-

-

2.7

.8

-

1
1
1
1

166.6
146.2
156.0
150.6

-

166.8
147.5
156.2
151.1

-

-

-

-

3.2
3.1
3.9
2.1

.1
.9
.1
.3

-

1

158.9

-

159.1

-

-

-

-

2.4

.1

-

Dallas-Fort Worth, TX ..................
Detroit-Ann Arbor, MI ..................
Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX .........
Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley, PA 7/ ........
+
_

2
2
2
2

+

-

150.8
150.3
143.6
149.6

-

150.4
151.0
144.1
150.1

1.2
2.3
1.3
2.5

-.3
.5
.3
.3

-

-

+
+

+
+
+
+

1/
_

2/
_
3/
_
4/
_
5/
_

Foods, fuels, and several other items priced every month in all areas; most other goods and services priced as
indicated:
M - Every month.
1 - January, March, May, July, September, and November.
2 - February, April, June, August, October, and December.
Regions defined as the four Census regions. See map in technical notes.
Starting in January, 1998, a new Size Class B/C will be introduced, composed of current
Size Class B and Size Class C cities.
Indexes on a December 1986=100 base.

There will be no individual Size Class B or Size Class C.

Indexes for the cities of Philadelphia and San Francisco will no longer be published on a monthly
basis starting in January, 1998.

Beginning in February, 1998 they will be published on a

-

-

+

6/
_

+

7/
_
NOTE:

bi-monthly basis.
Indexes for the cities of Washington and Baltimore will no longer be published separately after December, 1997.
Beginning in January, 1998 the two cities will be published as a Washington-Baltimore
combined metropolitan area.
Indexes for the cities of Pittsburgh and St. Louis will no longer be published on a bi-monthly
basis after December, 1997. Beginning in July, 1998 they will be published semi-annually, each
January and July.
Data not available.
Local area CPI indexes are byproducts of the national CPI program. Each local index has a smaller sample size than
the national index and is, therefore, subject to substantially more sampling and other measurement error. As a
result, local area indexes show greater volatility than the national index, although their long-term trends are
similar. Therefore, the Bureau of Labor Statistics strongly urges users to consider adopting the national average
CPI for use in their escalator clauses.