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mite’ fcrttt, Commercial ©te,
A

§taitomt} Ponitor, anil insurance f onmat

WEEKLY

NEWSPAPER,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

YOL. 3.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1866.
thus to control its value.

CONTENTS.

Capitalists
Treasury Regulations for Collect¬

ing the Cotton Tax

Debt and Finances of Wisconsin
American Manufactures and Em-

385

igratton

.

Boston Semi-annual Dividends..

386
387

Commercial
News

....

388

and

31
39^

391

Miscellaneous

'.

392

THE BANKERS’ GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL TIMES.

Money Market, Railway Stocks,

Commercial
Cotton
Breadstuff8

U. S.

Securities, Gold Market,
Foreign Exchange, New York
City Banks, Philadelphia Banks
National Banks, etc.
Sale Prices N. Y. Stock Exchange
National, State, etc., Securities.

393
396
397

Epitome

;.
.

Dry Goods
Imports

cent, more than

398
399
400

the

These bonds

Department at Washington, and

they cannot be stolen

.

THE RAILWAY MONITOR AND INSURANCE JOURNAL.

Railway News
Railway, Canal, etc.. Stock List.
Railroad, Canal, and Miscellane-

their face-value.

are

held in

endorsed that
misappropriated by any dishonest
officer of the Government, Hence there is an ample pro¬
vision for the ultimate payment of the note, should the bank

401
402

Prices Carrent and Tone of the
Market
-.
403-05

green¬

pondered, and
scheme which
provided for the absorption of the Md banks, and the sup¬
pression of all currency-issuing privileges, except under the
most strict conditions.
It provides that the notes shall be
secured by gold-bearing bonds to an amount equal to 10 per

Latest

Monetary and Commercial
English News
’

Early in the history of our

back system these difficulties were ^anxiously
the result was the elaboration of a banking

THE CHRONICLE
Defects of our Banking System..
The Panama Railroad and English

NO. 66.

406!
ous Bond List
408-09
407 Insurance and Mining Journal...
410
411-16
| Advertisements

fail which has issued it.
notes

the

$l)e Chronic!*.

are

sure

securities

worth

to

be

which
much

are so

or

For it is clear that broken-bank

eventually paid in full
will

be

sold

for

so

that

long

as

purpose

ninety cents on the dollar.
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is issued every Satur¬ This method of
securing a circulation of bank notes is in¬
day morning by the publishers of Hunt's Merchants' Magazine,
finitely to be preferred to the vicious plan, which obtained in
with the latest news by mail and telegraph up to
midnight
some of the
of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every morning with all
states, of allowing a bank to issue notes to more i
the Commercial and Financial news of the previous day up to than
double the amount of its capital, and this, in some cases,
the hour of publication. ‘
without exacting any adequate security.
It is even better
TEEMS OF SUBSCRIPTION—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
than the plan adopted for the Bank of
England, for beyond
COMMERCIAL
FINANCIAL CuBONIOLK, with THE DAILY
the aggregate of sixteen millions
Bulletin, delivered by carriers to city subscribers, and mailed to all
sterling its notes are not
Others, (exclusive of postage)
$12 00
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle, without Thb Daily
represented by government securities at all. Here, then, is
Bulletin, (exclusive of postage)
10 00
For Thb Daily Bulletin, without The Commercial
one of the most excellent features of our
Financial
banking system. It
Chronicle, (exclnsiveof postage)
5 00
controls and regulates the currency, by making it certain of
Canvassing Agents have no authority to collect money.
Postage is paid by subscribers at their own post-gfflce. It is, on the Chroni¬ ultimate payment in full.
cle, 20 cents per year, and on the Daily Bulletin $1 20 in advance.
But this is not enough.
WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Publishers,
A note which is sure to be event¬
60 William Street, New York.
ually paid is not fit to perform the functions of money, except
Neat Files for holding the Chronicle or Bulletin can be had at the the holder can get full payment
for its face anywhere, at any
Office. Price $1 50.
time, and in any commodities he needs in the market. He
must be sure that it will be accepted freely in
liquidation of
DEFECTS OF OUR BANKING SYSTEM.
his debts.
Bank notes, to be perfect as an internal currency,
It cannot be denied that our National
Banking system has, must be kept at par in every village and hamlet over the
up to this time, worked better, has kept the financial whole country. Prior to the war we never had in this country
movements of the country
more steady, and has done less a paper currency which was everywhere equal in value and
harm and more good than was believed possible
by that large negotiable without discount.
These advantages we first
class of persons who advocated its passage
as the least of two enjoyed when greenbacks were issued, and the people prized
evils. In all probability it has saved us from one of the them so
highly that they will never again consent to be without
most formidable
dangers of an era of paper money—that, them. If the National banks are unable to give us such a cur.
namely, of unlimited issues of the notes of ill-regulated, irre¬ rency, they will place themselves under the necessity of giv¬
sponsible State banks. The mischievous privileges granted ing up their functions as banks of issue altogether.
to these old institutions to issue
currency were apparently
But, we think, the National banks are able to keep all
too firmly rooted to be
curtailed, and too profitable to be their notes ^at par. Experience shows us that if the notes
given up. . The banking interest in most of the states was are redeemable in New1 ;York, and are thus kept at par
so
powerful as mot to be made /w^r upon with impunity; l Tt here, they will be at pare everywhere else.1 But, on the
therefore, asrif we were doomed-to have a:' curl mother hand, if the notes are not redeemable here they will be
rency defying all ^attempts to regulate its amount, and sometimes at a discount, as, indeed, was the case a few weeks
are

*




AND

and

,

<

as

as

[September 29,1866.

THE CHRONICLE

386

point it is that we

ago.
At this
defect in our system.

find the most important

the soundest institutions

and which are less

worthy of trust.

This question of increased publicity we would suggest to Mr.
The existing law does not provide
worthy
for compulsory metropolitan redemption here.
Fortunately Hooper as eminently early nextof attention in the new law
which he is to report
session.
for the system a large proportion of the banks do redeem
Reference was made just now to the necessity for ample
here. But they are not obliged to do so. And as it is more
reserves.
The provision of the present National Currency
profitable for a speculative bank in an obscure far-off locality Act
requires every bank to keep a reserve of cash on hand
not to redeem here, lest its notes should come back to it too
equal in amount to 25 per cent of the aggregate of its circu¬
freely, there is a very large number of banks that do not re¬ lation and
deposits. A more sound and conservative arrange¬
deem here nor (what is in effect the equivalent) in Philadelphia
ment it is impossible to contrive, and to its enforcement is
or Boston.
As these institutions can keep out their notes
in part due the stability and elastic promptitude with which
longer than the redeeming banks, it is obvious that they our
banking system has been able to respond to the emerg¬

§!«

will have a
ency, whenever a panic or severe pressure has convulsed and
tendency to become vitiated, by coming more and more from thrown
into temporary confusion the monetary relations of
weak banks, and that the system naturally offers a premium
the country. Another circumstance which has contributed to
to the non-redeeming institutions.
Mr. Hooper, as is well this
stability is the virtual Union of the banks into one
known, introduced a bill into Congress last session, which was
organized, complex whole. This union, however, has its
intended to remedy this fault, and in spite of the opposition
dangers, and being of so intimate and vital a nature, it im,
with which it has met it will no doubt be passed next session.
poses the obligation on every sound bank to discourage the
We find the following very judicious remarks on the subject
unsound ones, and to favor every arrangement which, like
in yesterday’s issue of a morning journal:
the redemption of the notes, or the enforcement of ample re¬

obtain

an

unfair advantage—that our currency

It is denied that the Western banks object to any system of par re¬
demption for their notes, “they only object to being compelled to re¬
deem in New York/’ This is a distinction without a difference. Of
course each bank stands ready to redeem its notes when offered at its
counter; but neither that nor an arrangement for redemption in any
Western city can make the notes at par throughout the country; and
this fact is as well known in Chicago as it is in New York. The talk in
this connection about “paying tribute” to this city is perfectly ridicu¬
lous ; interior banks which do not redeem at par here are exacting tri¬
bute of New York, and this too when the privileges connected with
their circulation will afford ample compensation without the levy of such
a tax.
There can be no system of par redemption, unless it secures the
holders of the notes against their depreciation at the financial centre.
To object, therefore, to a par redemption at New York, is to object
to any system of par redemption, for no other arrangement will answer

tends to give strength and
ganized system. *
■
serves,

■

THE PANAMA RAILROAD AND

stability to the whole or~

ENGLISH CAPITALISTS.

three weeks a statement has been
quite generally published throughout the country to the
effect that the Panama Railroad has passed into the hands
of English capitalists. This announcement was certainly a
surprise, and if true, we might almost add, a national calam¬
ity. But, fortunately, we are authorized to say that there is
For the past two or

issues in question were disbursed in legitimate no foundation whatever for the statement.
where the several banks were located, and simply
followed the law of financial gravitation to New York, there would be
The rumor in question probably grew out of the.action of
a sufficient reason why they should be redeemed here at par on their
arrival by the banks which had received all the benefit of the circula¬ the Colombian Congress, in June last, which has been entirely
tion. The notes could then be taken home and again set afloat to renew
misapprehended. Our readers are most likely aware that
their course. But it is still more the duty of the banks to provide
the grant to the Panama Railroad was limited : Colombia
against a possible redundancy of their issues when the notes are brought
in whole packages and paid out here, and unless provided for at par are reserving to herself the right to purchase the road in 1876
liable at once to become a charge upon this community. In urging the
for $5,000,000.
These reserved rights the representatives
the establishment of such a system we are consulting as much the well¬
of that Government have of late years made the subject of
being of all sound banks, wherever located, as any local interest. Un¬
less this is done there can be no healthful circulation of the national
currency ; and this principle, if not soon accepted, will vindicate itself frequent negotiations with the company and others—Colom¬
ere long in the unavoidable experience ot those most concerned.
bia placing great value upon them, and striving to replenish
In the early part of
As yet we have been regarding the banks as being her exhausted treasury by their sale.
this purpose. If the
business at the points

this year, however, General Mosquera, the Minister of Co¬
simply banks of issue. But they are also banks of deposit
and discount. They are the reservoirs of capital. To them lombia to England and France, made two contracts, each of
which affected the interests of the road. The first one was
our people lend their disengaged funds, and from them they
borrow in time of need. It is easy to see how important with William H. Catterrall, solicitor, of London. This was
it is that institutions which thus deal in credit should be an agreement to sell to Mr.Catterrall these reserved rights, for
the sum of XI,000,000, to be paid as follows: £200,000 on
placed ever under the scrutiny of the public. Such dis¬
the ratification of the agreement by the Congress of Colom¬
graceful failures as the Pennsylvania banks, or the Mer¬
chants’ bank at Washington, ought to be made impossible. bia, and £800,000 ten years hence, at the expiration of the
For this £1,000,000 Mr.
Our system should be so arranged that an unsound bank absolute grant to the railroad.
should not be able to get the confidence of the people. If Catterrall was to obtain the position, with regard to the rail¬
road, held by this South American Government—that is, the
a bank depart from the rules of legitimate business, if it en¬
danger its own stability and the security of funds entrusted right to purchase for $5,000,000. This agreement wras to be
to its care, if it fails to maintain a due proportion be¬ first ratified by the Colombian Government, and then Mr.
tween its liabilities and its available reserve, if it engages Catterrall was to have the option of accepting or reject¬
in speculation in stocks or produce—the public ought to ing it.
While the ink was scarcely dry that penned this remarkable
have the means of discovering the fact. And as one of the
contract, General Mosquera sought another sale for Colum¬
means of informing the people, sworn statements of the
bank’s affairs should be published at very frequent inter¬ bia’s reserved rights. This time, however, a different style
vals.
Publicity is a safeguard against many of the evils of of agreement was entered into, the bonus to be paid taking
unsound banking, because it affords a means of quickly de¬ the form of a loan. The arrangement was in substance that
tecting them. The official examiner of the Bank Department £1,500,000 should be given the Colombian government, for
has lately gone through the books of several of the banks which she should issue her bonds to an equal amount, and to
of this city. But the fact has been enshrouded with a very secure the prompt payment of the interest she should appro¬
unnecessary mystery, as if it were some government secret. priate for that purpose thirty-five per cent, of the customs
Such official reports should be published, so far at least duties, wh)le the principal should be secured by the pledge

that the people may




form their own judgment as to which arej of these same reserved

rights in the Panama Railroad, The
m
-

September 29,1866.]

i

(0

?

THE CHRONICLE.

387

parties agreeing to make the loan not feeling willing to trust tion of particular places for weighing points, to which the
our sister republic, inserted a clause in the agreement to the
planters are required to bring their cotton. Complaint is
effect that the bondholders should be allowed to station agents made that these places are so inconvenient and inaccessible
at the Custom-houses for the purpose of preventing any mis¬ that the cost of removing the cotton thither would be double
appropriation of the thirty-five per cent, of customs duties. that of transporting it to a seaport town. The majority of
These two agreements were made, as we have already the points to which it is usually shipped have not been
stated, at about the same time, and General Mosquera sent selected for weighing points. The Government can derive
them with all haste to the Colombian Congress to be no special benefit from this incurring of unnecessary expense.
The producers, besides, generally depend upon the pro¬
acted upon.
They came before that body at their last
session, and in June a decision was reached. The first ceeds of the sale of their cotton for the means to pay the
tax.
The present system, therefore, obliges them to dispose
agreement, being the one entered into with Mr. Catterrall,
was
rejected.
The second agreement was amended by of their crop to speculators at a sacrifice, or they must give
striking out the clause allowing European agents to be bond for payment before they can be allowed to remove their
In those cases in which they have
stationed in their Custom houses, and also by adding a pro¬ cotton from the district.
vision forbidding the bond holders, in case of default in pay¬ followed the old practice of obtaining advances from mer¬
ment of the principal, to sell the reserved rights in the chants, this bond interferes badly with the arrangement.
It
Panama Railroad except with the consent of the Colombian places the cotton under control of the revenue officers, and
Government; in other words giving a mortgage with no enables the collector to send it to a bonded warehouse before
power, without the consent of the mortgagor, to dispose of transferring it to the merchant, thus making unnecessary
the property mortgaged.
In this emasculated form the expense to both parties. There are other impediments which
second agreement was ratified.
Of course, however, the the regulations create, the effect of which will be to dis¬
parties proposing to make the loan refused to do so on any courage the production of the staple altogether. Every
obstacle in the way of its rapid passage to market is a posi¬
such security.
Out of these agreements, then, of General Mosquera, and tive injury to the country, as well as to the planter; for the
out of these proceedings of the Colombian Congress, has latter, in event of his being unable to send his crop to mar¬
arisen the rumor of the transfer of the Panama Railroad to ket without sacrificing a large part of the proceeds, will ne¬
English capitalists. The facts we have recited show not cessarily turn his attention to the growing of other products
only that there is no truth in the rumor, but that for the instead, which are free of these disabilities. It is the interest
next ten years the rights of the present owners of the road of all of us that the production of this staple should be
*

but that the parties stimulated, not fettered.
The cotton factors and merchants of New Orleans, appre¬
who were
through successfully
that magnificent enterprise, will have the ability to wisely hensive of embarrassment from the enforcement of the
present system of regulations, held several meetings during
manage and retain it.
the month of September to devise modifications which the
TREASURY REGULATIONS FOR COLLECTING THE COTTON TAX. exigencies of the cotton trade seemed to require. A me¬
The regulations of the Treasury Department for ascer¬ morial was prepared and addressed to Mr. McCulloch, the
taining and collecting the tax upon raw cotton threaten to Secretary of the Treasury, setting forth that the existing
involve mnch inconvenience both to the producer and to the regulations are exceedingly onerous, and, as they conceive,
Government, which seem to be unnecessary, and if so, ought not well adapted to protect the interests of the Government.
It cannot be expected that the cultivation The object of the law imposing a tax upon cotton they very
to be obviated.
of that staple will be pursued extensively if the annoyances rightly consider to be to collect the amount levied at the
and other inconveniences incident to carrying out the law are smallest cost, in the shortest time possible, and with the
too aggravated for common patience, and we have no doubt least expense, inconvenience and annoyance to the citizens
that the Government will carefully reconsider the matter, and who pay the tax. . For the reasons which we have already
modify, so far as may be, the instructions lately issued, shown, the present system is calculated to obstruct greatly
adopting the simplest and most inexpensive measures it is the accomplishment of so desirable an end. The tone of the
‘able under the law to adopt, for the weighing of cotton and memorial is excellent, and its logic, as wrell as conclusions,
the collection of the tax.
Tins is but the commonest dic¬ appear to be unanswerable.
tate of justice and good policy.
They accordingly suggest that all the cotton-growing
The act of July, 1866, requires the tax of three cents a States shall be arranged into a single district for the pur¬
pound to be paid to the Collector of Internal Revenue for pose of collecting the tax. The power to do this they claim
the district in which the cotton shall have been produced, is conferred by the seventh section of the Internal Revenue
except in cases where permits have been duly obtained of Act of 1864 which authorizes the President “ to alter the
the assessor upon the giving of proper security for the respective collection districts ” as the public interests may
amount due the Government.
This provision obliges the require. This modification of the organization would per¬
assessor to visit each plantation to superintend the weighing,
mit the free movement of cotton to the best market. The
or
compels the planter to haul it to some point designated, delay, expense and restrictions - now existing would be ob¬
saddling upon him the expenses of this moving or the charges viated. The planter would be able to ship his crop as
of the assessor. In the event of delay there are great liabil¬ rapidly as it could be prepared, and the merchant who is in
ities of losing favorable opportunies for shipping the crop to the practice of making advances to aid in the production of
market. It is not practicable for the assessors to visit all cotton would be enabled to receive it with greater prompt¬
the plantations and weigh the cotton without increasing their ness, thus protecting his credit and at the same time made
number to an undue extent.
Besides the difficulties in the able to furnish additional supplies to the planter for the
The Government, too, would
way of a proper performance of their duty constitute a cultivation of another crop.
be a gainer.
By establishing suitable regulations for re¬
strong temptation to give certificates of weight without ac¬
tually seeing the cotton, and are liable accordingly to lead ceiving cotton at the points of delivery, for weighing it
to fraud.
where every facility for that purpose exists, and for bonding
The regulation* of the Department authorize the designa¬ it till it shall have been sold, or for receiving the tax from
are

i)

no doubt
able to undertake and carry

absolute; and

M



we

have

*

[September 29,, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

388

the payment $548,800, deducting which from the above aggregate, left
of the tax with greater certainty and in a shorter time, and the whole outstanding indebtedness of the State on the 30th
In every way, therefore, it would appear September, 1865, at $2,179,200, or including interest receipts
at a smaller cost.
•
that the plan suggested would be far better than the regula¬ ($376,011) issued for discredited currency, at $2,555,211.
Of this indebtedness there was held at the date named the
tions now in force.
It may be, and in fact has been, insisted upon by some sums (as follows) by the
the merchant

that the law

or

as

other holder, it would secure

it

now

stands would not allow of the pro¬

In the act of 1866 it
is made unlawful to transport cotton from any point in the
district in which it may have been produced till duly
weighed, marked, landed, &c., or to transport it from one
cotton growing State to another.
This provision it is claim¬
ed contemplates that no two States are to be comprehended
posed arrangement being carried out.

$1,000,700

.—

School Fund

53,000

University Fund
Normal School Fund

......

Amount due Trust Funds

$1,331,700

... -

77,200

Department for State Banks
for banks assigned to the State
Companies on deposit
.-.
Corporations and Individuals
Currency—Interest-bearing Receipts
Bank
“

278,000

“

,

Insurance

67,600
366,000
346,800
376,011

$2,565,101

Aggregate debt

Undoubtedly such was the idea Congress
The details of this indebtedness together with the amounts
portion of the act was framed :— originally issued are shown in the following statement:
these words presuppose that a district was not to extend beyond
OutOutIssued. stan (ting.
Issued. standing.
the State. And yet in a previous act (1864) referred to above
$17,000
$100,000
$229,000 Bonds due 1886.
Bonds due 1867... $260,000
1887.
62,000
100,000
50,000
1868...
50,000
they gave unlimited power to the President to reconstruct
1888.
100,000
68,000
1877
72,700
100,000
150,000
1893.
150,000
1878
the districts in any manner he saw fit; showing that they
46,500 Certifl. “
100,000
100,000
1894.
100,000
1879
15,000
100,000
1895.
100,000
100,000
1880
65,000
100,000
thought some arrangement, in that particular, other than the
1897.
100,000
100, ooc
1881...
58,000
100,000
100,000
1898.
100,000
one they had contemplated might be found better adapted
1882
45,000
100,000
1899.
50,000
50,000
1883...
54,000
100,000
527,aw
to the economical collection of the tax, and hence they put
528,000
1884...
76,000 Tem.Loansl866.
100,0 0
876,011
1885...
57,000 Int.Rec’ptsl866.
100,000
no
limit to the power granted for making the necessary
In this exhibit and the previous one the total debt appears
changes. We should think, therefore, that under this
provision the relief asked could be granted, tor there can to amount to $110 more than in the first statement; but
be, it seems to us, no legal objection to breaking up the this is so in the original.
The great bulk of the bonds authorized during the war had
State districts, which might not be urged with equal force
against dividing up the smaller districts. In this connection to be sold at a time of extraordinary depression in the stock
U. S. six per cent, bonds were selling at 84£ per
it should also be remembered that the object of the act is markets.
not to re-district the Southern States, but simply to collect a cent.; Illinois six per cents at 77, and Michigan seven per
The State Treasurer says that there was no op¬
tax on cotton with as little expense and as little derangement cents at 82.
tion with the Loan Commissioners as to the time of selling
to business as possible, and all its provisions should be in¬
terpreted so as best to carry out this sole object of the law. the bonds. The necessities of the Commonwealth were such,
Still, if it be determined that the act does not allow of this that they had to be sold for whatever could be obtained.
interpretation, the necessary legislation, without doubt, can be The law directed the Loan Commissioners to negociate and
easily obtained, and in the meantime such modifications contract for a loan or loans, on the most favorable terms
should be made in the present regulations as may be possible which, in their judgment, could be obtained. Finding in¬
and may tend to remove the difficulties and disabilities re¬ surmountable obstacles in the way of raising the money in
New York, the bonds were finally sold to the Wisconsin
ferred to.
banks at what was called par; 70 per cent, to be paid on de¬
DEBT AND FINANCES OF WISCONSIN.
livery of the bonds, and the remaining 30 per cent, in semi¬
in

one

district.

had before it when this

...

.

44

44

44

44

44

44

44

44

44

44

...

“

“

“

“

“

“

44

“

“

“

“

“

“

...

.

...

.

..

..

..

..

44

..

44

44

4k

44

44

44

44

44

..

..

..

..

.

The exhibit of the financial condition of the State of Wis¬
consin for the official year

just published.

ending September 30, 1865, is

From this document, and the four preceding

annual statements, we

have obtained the figures given below.
STATE

DEBT.

The

ordinary State debt is expressly limited by constitu¬
provision to a sum not to exceed $100,000, except in
of invasion, or for the suppression of rebellion. Such

tional
case
was

the

sum

total of State issues up to

May, 1861, when the

Legislature (assembled in extra-session) voted a war loan of
$1,000,000, and at the regular session of 1862 a further loan
of $200,000.
In 1863 still another loan or an issue of certi¬
ficates of indebtedness not exceeding $350,000 was authorized,
and also a loan of $50,000 for the purpose of defraying ex¬
traordinary expenditures in the enlargement of the State
capitol. Other laws were passed authorizing temporary
%

loans from the trust

funds, for which certificates were issued

deposited with the State Treasurer. The issues for war
purposes under these several authorizations were as follows:
and

In 1860-61 bonds to the amount of

Eight hundred thousand
disposed of on these terms. The next sale was
made on similar terms, except that eighty per cent, was paid
on delivery.
Subsequent sales were all made at par, the
whole amount paid on the delivery of the bonds.
It was
never supposed that the entire 30 per cent, left unpaid in the
first sale would in all cases be paid.
By the terms of the
bonds given by the banks to secure the payment of this 30
per cent., the billholders were first to be fully protected. In
quite a number of cases, in closing up banks, there has not
been enough realized to redeem the circulation and pay the
30 per cent, bonds in full; yet, notwithstanding these losses,
the State has realized, in the aggregate, on all the bonds sold
during the progress of the war 88 per cent. There is due
from banks still in good credit, on the thirty per cent, bonds,
$41,620. The banks which have assigned their bonds to the
State, as provided by chap. 232, laws of 1865, have also as¬
signed the benefits of their lost circulation, and the Treasurer
thinks that enough will be realized from these two sources to
make the aggregate receipts for the bonds sold ninety-two
annual instalments of one per

dollars

cent.

were

$951,500; in 1861-62,
bonds to the amount of $473,100; in 1862-63, bonds $75,400, percent.
VALUATION AND TAXATION*
and certificates $220,000—total, $295,400 ; in 1863-64,
The subjoined statement exhibits the quantity of taxable
certificates $385,000, and in 1864-65, certificates $623,000.
These sums amount to an aggregate of $2,728,000. Of this land and the value thereof, together with the valuation of

by returning to the Bank city and village lots and personal property, with the amount
Comptroller the circulation of discredited banks (authorized of taxes levied thereon for State purposes ;for the cy$*rs
by chapter 282, laws of 1865) State bonds to the amount of 1860-65, both inclusive:

amount




there has been redeemed

Yv>

25668811

-Valuation.-

Acres of

1860

Land.

City, &c. lots Personal.

—\

Al

rate,

Taxes
levied.

$41,178,377 $27,606,761 $184,062,636 $242,081
36,721,727 25,318,504 180,062,586 340,492
37,596,038 24,331,861 18?,507,222 599,251
31,433,779 25,481,640 153,071,773 882,180
32,916,999 26,982,719 162,939,329 786,861
91,453,693 33,151,291 32,811,313 157,416,297 900,278

17,616,174 $116,377,897
17,792,854 118,022,305
17,298,631 120,579,322
16,845,374 96,156,354
16,845,496 93,039,611

.

1863

17,563,316

The taxes above stated

are

succeeding year. Regarding the diminished valuation
after 1862, it is proper to observe that the diminution was,
in a great measure, the result of a change in the assessment
law.
AND

0

DISBURSEMENTS.

following statement exhibits the receipts into the
treasury on account of all the. funds and the disbursements
on all accounts yearly, for the years ending Sept. 30, 18611865, both inclusive:
The

Receipts
Total

1863.

1862.

1861.
Balance from previous year.

1864.

1865.

$187,301 $243,931 $312,217 $367,926 $107,621
1,674,234 1,732,474 2,636,889 2,182,722 4,188,746
$1,861,535 $1,976,405 $2,949,106 $2,550,648 $4,296,367
1,617,604 1,664,188 2,581,180 2,443,027 4,061,877

resources

Disbursements

$243,931

Balance to next year

$312,217

$367,926

$107,621

$234,490

The above statement includes the several trust funds which
are no

Fund

It also includes the Allotment
(so called), which is simply an agency through which
charge upon the State.

the soldier in the field was
home

a

enabled to send to his family at

Transfers from one fund to an¬
large, and of course to that extent have

portion of his pay.

other have also been

duplicated both sides of the account. Again, loans have boon
made, and in some part repaid. Allowing for all these, it is
obvious that the actual receipts and payments have been
above, and to obtain them approxi¬
mately, at least 25 per cent ought to be deducted from the
much lessthan exhibited

yearly.

statement

AMERICAN MANUFACTURES AND EMIGRATION.
While

we are

not the advocates

of special legislation on

Government for the purpose of planting
among us particular branches of industry, especially such as
are not well adapted to our country, or to the genius of our
the

part of our

people,

we

cannot refrain from taking deep interest in the

development of manufacturing enterprise. Perhaps there
is no vocation or department of labor more essential to

cultivate the soil, and render
sufficiently productive to nourish the inhabitants of other

national greatness.
it

countries.

We

may

W e may dig the precious ores in quantities ample

supply every nation ; we may produce the fibre for every
spindle and loom; but so long as we require from other
countries the principal manufactured wares necessary to our
comfort,, we lack a necessary element of independence. Our
commerce, which ought to be a reciprocal exchange of values
created by industry, is rendered, to a large extent, an agency
to place us under a form of vassalage; for the taking of the

to

products of the soil and mine abroad for manufacture, is but
an element of dependence which tends to enfeeble a nation.

the sudden recurrence of a
war, to find itself in a pitiable condition indeed, deprived as
it is, to a great degree, of the means of defence.
Such

a

country is liable, upon

So conscious of this have the governments

D

But it is' unnecessary to multiply instances. It
is evident that a state of dependence is not one of power.
This subject is invested with new interest by the events of
the present period.
Up to this time England has been able
to retain her manufacturing supremacy, and the products of

provinces.

those for the service of the her looms

next

RECEIPTS

been that have
held countries and colonies in subjection, that it was long the
practice to discourage, and even to prohibit, the people of
such colonies engaging in manufactures.
When Porsena

conquered Rome he forbade the working of iron in that
State, compelling it to depend upon the forges and furnaces
of Etruria. The Philistines, when they overrun the country
of the Israelites, permitted no smith to work among them.
The European nations of modern times, so far as lay in their
power, carried out a like policy. The Dutch Government
made manufacturing a penal offence in the colony of New
Netherland; and the British Parliament enacted laws against

now

fill the markets of the world.

Hitherto, her

mills have

produced at so low a price as to preclude success¬
competition. It was more profitable for the planter
to raise cotton, and the farmer wool and breadstuff's for the
manufacturing towns of England than to erect factories at
home to convert the raw fibre into cloths, muslins, and other
articles of prime necessity. Statesmen often sought to change
this condition by special legislation, not being sufficiently
far sighted to perceive that they were attempting to set aside
the omnipotent laws of trade.
They have always failed, of
course, to -take away from England her supremacy.
It was
not legislation which could remedy the matter, but a law
higher than man could devise.
Agencies are, however, now in operation, which are almost
certain to modify this condition of things and to give our
people greater importance among manufacturing nations.
We place no dependence upon the remarkable declaration of
Mr. Gladstone in regard to the exhaustion of the coal beds of
England. It is a contingency too remote to be taken into
calculation, while science and commerce can both be pressed
into service to obviate vthe difficulty.
But there is another
agency at work, more rapid in its influence and more sure to
accomplish the result.
We refer to the equalizing move¬
ment now going on in the emigration that is taking place at
prodigious and constantly increasing rates.
The supremacy of England as a manufacturing country
has been due to the cheap prices of labor.
Her dense pop¬
ulation has produced manufactured goods at rates low enough

ful

to enable the

merchants to undersell Americans

even

in

our

could be maintained
we were dependent upon that
country for our supplies. But
there has been a change taking place for several years.The
wages of English operatives have been steadily increasing.
With this improvement in their circumstances comes, natur¬
ally, the acquirement of more expensive habits. Better food
has been been obtained, better clothing worn; not only
has the importation of breadstuff’s been continued as hereto
fore, but other articles, like beef and the products of the dairy,
have been added to the requirements of the laboring popula¬
tion.
The European supply of these products is annually
falling shorter, and the demand is at the same time increasing
rapidly. This necessarily tends not only to keep up the rates
of wages, but to make it necessary to increase them, and is
telling upon the manufacturing enterprise of the country.
Thus, while the better classes of operatives—the more skill¬
ful laborers—are swelling the multitude of emigrants that
are
coming weekly to the United States to better their con¬
dition, those who remain are deminding, and must receive,
a
large increase in their rates of wages.
The cheapness of labor has enabled England to control the
enterprise of other countries.
She could import cotton,
wool, and other raw material for her factories, and breadstuffs for the operatives, and, by reason of the low price of
work, could keep the price of manufactured goods lower
than they could be afforded where labor was better remune¬
rated.
But this is impossible when a considerable increase
of wages shall have taken place. Of course, we predict no
immediate violent change.
The influence of this movement,
however, which is even now being felt, will gradually work
out the result indicated, enabling our manufacturers to suc¬
cessfully compete in foreign markets. In all particulars, ex¬
cept the one of labor, our advantages have ever been greatly

own

markets.

slitting mills sod other benches of Industry in their American superior.




389

THE CHRONICLE.

September 29,1868.]
1-nd.

•_Y

^

As long as this condition

We produce the

raw

material for most classes of

'•'l

and wool, but the most im¬
portant metals; our country is an immense coal field;
almost every State in the Union abounds with water power
enough for all the mills and forges of the world, and general¬
manufacture, not only cotton

ly running waste; we produce

all the food required for

With the enormous influx, then, of population,
will have the last impediment removed to successful

laborers.
we

[September 29, 1860.

THE CHRONICLE.

390

competition with every other country.
necessity of reducing the price
the rates in Europe. To be sure when¬

interest maturing Oct. 1, but on the 1st
$23,292,684 will be due on $776,422,800 Five-twenties
outstanding Sept. 1.
The State of Massachusetts pays its interest in coin. The city of
The Government has no

of November

interest in coin on the first day of October only, and
after that claims the option to pay gold or its equivalent, at the
market price on that day.
Interest is also due Oct. 1 on Roxbury City 6 per cent bonds at
the Treasurer’s office, or Suffolk bank.
,-Stock
Boston will pay

Div ’ds—
Capital
October, April. Oct.

This does not involve the
of labor

as

low

as

properly adjusted, there will be

values shall become

ever

34—

that particular. But another
computation will exist of wThich pur laborers will
have the principal benefit.
While the operatives in England
require that both material and food shall be shipped to them
at- enormous waste of capital for transportation, our work¬
important modifications in
element in

men

supplied at their hand from our own
The importance of this fact can readily be perceived.

will have all these

fields.
.

consideration is the fact that a few
will give to the United States the control of the com

Another important

years

countries of the East indies.
The Pacific Railroad when finished will, with its collateral

merce

of China and the other

routes, make a speedy transit from ocean to ocean; all Asia
will thus be brought into communication with the United

period of time many days shorter than can be
effected with any commercial town of Europe.
We thus
not only gain this eastern trade, but have the facility for
easily distributing our products and manufactures in the
East, giving us a transit to an extensive market, cheaper be¬
cause nearer, than any other country possesses.
Hence we
see that emigration—this equalizing movement—must in the
end necessarily work out a change which will be hastened
and rendered more certain and complete by other agencies
States in

a

now or soon

to be at

work.

BOSTON SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDENDS.

BANK

BOSTON

DIVIDENDS.

with the last two

great uniformity as compared with April last, the only change
being old Boston Bank from 5 to 6, and Webster 5 to 4 per cent.
A like instance has never before occurred among the banks in this
city and it is doubtful if it ever will again. The payments are
as cannot fail to give satisfaction to the shareholders and are
alike creditable to the bank managers.
Of the forty-five Banks in
the table, twenty-four divide 5 per cent., eight 6 per cent., eight
4 per cent., and one each of 7£, 7, 4£,
and 3 per cent., averag¬
ing a fraction over 5 per cent.
In contrast with the current rates of dividends we present those
of some twenty to twenty-five years ago, when very few bank shares
were selling above par.
The following comprises all the banks
such

then in

^

operation.
1842.

1843.

Atlantic.... 3 —8 3 —2
Atlas
2 —2* 2 —2
Boston.... 3*-3I

1845.
2*—2* 3 —3
3844.

0

-

3

3 -3

31—3* 3*—31 31-3* NewEngl’d 3—3

0—2 2 —1* 21—2i 3 —3

City

Colombian. 3 —3

3 —2

2 —21 2*—3

0 —0 3 —2 2*—3 3 —3*
3*—8* 31—3* 3*— 3* 31—3*

Eagle

Freeman...
Globe...... 3 —3
Grange
2|—2

3 —3

3 —3

3 —2

3 —3

3 —2

2 —3 3 —3
2 —21 3 —3

Market.... 8 —3
Massch’te ♦ 7 —7

3 —3
7 —5

Hamilton

..

Bank shares

1842.
1843.
Mechanics. 8 —2 2i—3
Merchants. S*—3* 3;—3

3 —3

3 —3

Norih
0—2
Shawmut.. 3 —3
S.&Leather 31—3*
State
3 —3*
Suffolk
4 —4
Tiaders
0 —0
Tremont
3 —0
Union
3 —3
...

..

4 —4
5 --6* 7 —71 Washingt’n2

in

3—3
2—2

2^—2
3 —8
3 —2
4
0
2
3

__

.

—

2f

—4

—0

*

Massachusetts par value $250.




900,000
500,000

200,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
2,000,000
500,000
1,000,000

Commerce, (National Bank of)....
Continental, National

Eagle, (National)
Eliot, National
Everett, National

1,000,000
200,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

Exchange, (National)
Faneuil Hall, National
First National

1,000,000

Freeman’s, National
Globe, National
Hamilton, National

400,000
1,000,000
750,000
1,000,000
750,000
800,000

(National)

Howard, National
Market, National
Massachusetts, National, par $250.
Maverick, National

800,000

400,000
250,000
3,000,000
200,000
1,000,000

3i—3*

5
6
7
5
4
6
4
5
5
6

2,-3

82,000

102

140
134
146

120
135
125
140
110
110
120
106
115

105

40,000
16,000

115
100
110
117

1.000,000

6
6

Second National

1,000,000

7#

7#

Shawmut, National
Shoe and Leather, National
State, National
Suffolk, National
Third National
Traders’ National

1,000,000
2,000,000
1,500,000
300,000

5
6

5
6
4
4

60,000
76,000
37,600
60,000
80,000
60,000

4

12,000

Tremont, National

21,000
100,000

117

60,000
45,000

118
120
110

Republic, (National Bank of the)..

1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

Revere, (National)

750,000

4

5
5

4
4
4

33*

2,000,000
1,000,000

5
5

750.000

6
5

5
5
6
4

Union, (National)
Washington, National

1,500,000

Webster, (National)

123
120

108
...

60,000

33*

600,000

.

60,000

...

130
115
108
180
140
150
117
140
115
118
1< 8

963*

103
125
123
125
115

2.138.600
2.622.600
2,384,000

$42,550,000
42,350,000
40,550,000

The

following is

to be disbursed at

statement of the dividends and interest money
the dates given in October, and all payable in this
a

The Berkshire Railroad, American Shoe

city.

Tip Company, Lib.

Warehouse,^Middlesex Mills,'Mount Pleasant Coal,
In addi¬
Roaring Brook Coal and Sallisbury Mills are quarterly.
tion to these, early in October is the usual period for payment of
dividends by the Boylston, City, Howard, Manufacturers’, Merch¬
ants’, National, Neptune, Suffolk and Washington Insurance Com¬
panies, as also the Boston Exchange and Hamilton Woolen Com¬
panies, quarterly—adding, in round numbers, probably $150,000
and making the total to be paid out in October over $3,300,000,
including bank dividends. The Lawrence manufacturing Company
erty Square

its dividend.
Ogdensburg and Lake Champlain Railroad pays its first
dividend on the eight per cent, preferred stock, which is intended
eventually to absorb the first mortgage bonds, and the directors now
offer to the holders of these bonds, five thousand shares of preferred
stock, free from government tax, in exchange for five hundred thou¬
sand dollars of bonds, at par, without interest, one share of stock
to be given for a hundred dollar bond.
This exchange is deemed a
desirable one for the bond holders, and will doubtless be promptly
passes

The

1845.

3*-S*

Pay¬
able
Oct.

r-Divid’ds—.
Names of

companies, &c.

4—4
3-3

Capital,
Oct., ’66.
$1,200,000

April,

■

Oct.,

Amount

1866.

Oct., ’66.

23*

23*

500,000

3
S

200,000
320,500

3
3
3

$30,000
10,000
15,000
6,000

IX

Int. abo’t.

12—Boston Five Cents Sav. Bank.

21—3

100,000
400,000
800,000

w

Bullion Consolidated Co

1

1..;. Cambridge Horae

...

Railroad.

1866.

8

Interest.
Interest.

Abt 90,000
600 shar’s

Dividends given in dollars per share.

100
135
128
135
115
130
120
135
102

4*

1,000,000

England, National.
North, National
North America, (National Bank of)

3 —3

_

120
123

1183*

70,000
37,600

C

123
117

1123*

5
6

New

—21 21—2* 3 —3
—2* 21—21 3 -3
_

5

6
7
5
4
5
4
6
5
5
4
5
5

$

110
129

108%
110
118
106

122
108
104
120
130
146
108
135
110
120
104

Vernon, National
National Bank of Redemption

Mount

-21 3 -3
—2* 3 —3
3 —3*
2 —21 3 —3

1*—2* lj—2*

5
5
6
6
5
4
5
5
5
5
5
8
6
5
6
5

12,000
150,000
10,000
40,000
60,000
60,000
4X 45,000

Mechanics’ National
Merchants’ National

2

2—3

.

6
6
5
5
6
5
4
5
6
5
5
5
3
6
5
6
5

’66. 27.’66
118
116
115
110
180
128
115
108
70
68
123
135
110
105

1866.

37,500
50,000
60,000
37,600
64,000
30,000
10,000
40,000
50,000
100,000
25,000
60,000
50,000
6,000
60,000
50,000
60,000
20,000
50,000
46,000

5
5

on—.

April, 6ept.

availed of.

1844.
3 —i
3 —3

good favor and command high rates, private
sales being sometimes made at a figure materially above quoted
transactions. In uonsequence of the small number of shares put
upon the maikft for sale it is extremely difficult to price them ac¬
curately.
are

750,000

Boylston, National
Broadway, National
City, (National)
Columbian, National

Oct.,

MISCELLANEOUS DIVIDENDS.

following table presents the capital of each Bank, together
semi-annual dividends, and the amount payable
cm Monday, October 1.
Also, the market value of each stock,
dividend on April 1, 1866, and at the present time.
A noticeable feature of the Bank dividends at this time is the
The

Atlas, National
Blackstone, National
Boston, National
Cld Boston, National, par $50

Hide and Leathet,

5

$750,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

div’d

Amount

1866. 1866.

1866.

of Boston.

Atlantic, National

Total, April, 1866
Total, Oct., 1865
Total, April, 1865......

Joseph G. Martin of BostOD, sends us the following with
regard to the dividends payable in that city, &c.
Mr.

National Banks

♦IX
2X
23*

$50t
8

123*

$1833*
3
10

727,800

43*

$5
♦43*

110,000

4

♦4

5,600
90,000
115,000
2,250
80,000
3,000
40.000

15,000
82,751
4,400

and State
t The par value of Boston Manufacturing Co. is to be raised from 750 to 1,000
by an assessment of $833* per share and balance from reserved fund.
% The Bullion Consolidated dividend is monthly, and the company has divided
*

Berkshire, Cambridge, and

taxes in October and

tfO per cent or

Chelsea Railroads, less Government

Government tax only in April.

$180,000 within a year.

4j f

'

11..

200,000
1
Han. and St. Jos. L. G. bonds— Interest.
1 * * Liberty Square Warehouse
600 shar’s
1
.Massachusetts 6’s, 1868
160,000
1* ..Massachusetts 6’s, ’65, ’74
275,000
1;.: .Mass. (Troy & Gr’n’d) 5’s, ’90 .... 1,166,500

1

..

.Eliot Fire Insurance

.

.Malden and Meirose
Middlesex Mills

Railroad 6's.

,

.

nx

3

3

2*
zx

zx
zx
3
5
4
1
8
10
8

8
5

75,000

750,000

4

Michigan Central RR bonds, '82.. 4,514,500
Mount Pleasant Coal
..
5,000 she
National Dock Co. (East Boston).
800,000
New England Glass Co
500,000
1
6’s, ’74
149,400
Northern N. H. RR
.New Bedford 5’s, ’77-’80
77,000
1
Og. and Lake Cham. RR, pref ..
856,400
210,500
1
Old Colony Railroad bonds
1
Portland City 6’s..;
Int. abo’t
1
Prescott Fire A Marine Ins. Co..
100,000
4
Roaring Brook Coal
‘ 250,000
3
Salisbury Manuf
1,000,000
1
Shoe & Leather F. A M. Ins
200,000
South Shore RR 6’s, 1880
150,000
1.... Western Railroad 6’s, 1875
938,000

1
1
1
1

45,000
4,500
4,600
6,875
29,163
2,250
37,600

3X

3#

$5

.

..

12,000

6

6
3

250,000

—Granite Railway.

1

.

IX
3
10
3

6
5
5
3
8

\
-

increase in the

importation from all quarters. The Board of Trade re¬

fallacious nature of the rumors current in the

exhibit that steady and progreasire
staple. The increase, this sea¬
son, is not, inded, in so great a ratio as in 1865, compared with 1864;
but there is, nevertheless, an augmented import during the seven months
of 4,000,000 lbs. From Germany important supplies of wool continue
to be

lbs.

received—the supply imported

greater than in 1865.

7*
5
3

8

this

year

being nearly 6,000,000

Of low wools, from our Indian possessions

1865.

1866.

lbe.
16,004,402
9,014,684
5,740,096
61,144,369
9,610,740

lbs.
11,558,481
12,075,162
7,049,204
72,506,701

lbs.
17,489,552
10,348,498
9,689,823
76,520,499

101,514,291

113,848,148

1864.

Payable on demand.

From—
Hanse Towns and other
British South Africa
British India

parts of Europe.

Australia

latest monetary

early months

of the year, that Australia would not
increase in her exports of this particular

2,600,000 lbs. have been imported more than in 1865: but, on the other
hand, the receipts from the Cape of Good Hope have declined to the
extent of 1,700,000 lbs. Annexed are the particulars of imports for the
28,140 seven months ending July 81:

4
6

4

an

turns show the

9,000
50,000
4,482
1,925
14,266
6,815
5,000
4,000
15,000
75,000
10,000
4,500

4
8
8

3

is

180,580
5,000

zx

zx
3

£2,800,000, as compared with the corresponding period in 1865. Our im¬
ports of wool are very large, and, with the exception of South Africa, there

$1,003,987
*

391

THE CHRONICLE.

September 29,1866.]

anit Commercial Cnglisl) Nemo.

....:

Other countries
Total

10,658,610

11,804,165
125,252,537

exports of wool from the United Kingdom during the first seven
present year were between 12,000,000 and 13,000,000
lbs. less than during the corresponding period in 1865.
The principal
feature iu the export return is the heavy falling off iu the demand for
shipment to Belgian and German ports. French buyers have taken
a large snpply, but less than last year.
As regards the exports to
France, the official figures have created some little surprise in the wool
trade, inasmuch as it was presumed the exports thence would have
The

[From our own Correspondent.]
London, Wednesday, Sept. 12,1866.

months of the

has been contracted this week, chiefly
of the unfavorable weather for harvest work in the North,
and the upward movement in the value of wheat.
Yesterday consider¬
able heaviness prevailed in the market, and prices declined ^th to 3-16th
per cent.; but to-day there has been a somewhat improved feeliDg ap¬
parent The principal check to the downward movement is the abund¬
ance of money in the discount market, and the comparatively satisfac-1 shown a considerable increase, owing to the large
tory position of financial and commercial affairs. Great caution is evi- have been taken on
sales, at which it wa9 asserted the French took two-thirds of the whole
dently displayed in making investments. The present position of the
The following were the ex¬
shareholders of Overend, Gurney & Co., and of other undertakings, have supply—about 190,000 bales-—offered.
ports of wool in the seven months ending July 31:
induced a most cautious policy.
In trade, there is undoubtedly a want
COLONIAL.
1864.
1865.
1866.
of business, and, with the exception of cereals, rice, aud British grain and
lbs.
lbs.
lbs.
567,469
946,441
fruit, the quotations tend downwards.
2,767,399
Annexed are the highest prices To Hanse Towds
2,957,104
1,758,381
Belgian
7,790,433
of Consols on the days enumerated:
31,131,732
France
17,650,868
29,655,001
Business in the Stock Exchange

in consequence

supply reported to

French account, at the June-July series of public

Three

Monday. Tuesday. Wed’day

days ending Sept. 12.

89*

Consols for money.

89*

89*

j

|

United States
Other Countries
Total

1,424,814
758,730

587,522
1,690,616

581,250
806,241

23,358,985

43,967,702

33,746,314

153,464
2,065,095
1,426,210

109,077
886,638
664,694

—•

/.

FOREIGN.

Although a considerable amount of Indian paper has mature! this
week, the demand for money, both at the Bank of England and in the

market, has been comparatively limited. There is no material
change in the rates from the close of last week. The supply of money
seeking investments large. Annexed are the rates current for the beet

open

paper:

Per Cent.
5

Bank minimum

Open market rates:
80 to 60 days’ bills

4*(3> *

Percent.
months’ bills
6 & 4 months’ hank bills..
6 & 4 months’ trade bills..

s

4*@4 mx
5 mx

j,the Continent the rates of mone^ tend downwards, and a few
place during the present week. Annexed are the
quotations at eome of the leading cities :
Pank
On

alterations have taken

Bank
rate,

Open

Open

rate,

market,

market.
# c.

To Hanse Towns

43,084

.

791,594

Belgium

423,375
1,922,995
438,992

France

Other Countries

557,118

1,262,818
403,068

5,766,58S

8,326,345

1,354,741
1,167,062
1,863,462
33,284
600,180

1,050,189

2,591,464
716,154
785,463

United States

5,899,633

5,018,719

4,745,126

3,620,040

Total

1,674,701

HOME GROWN.

1,303,319

To Hanse Towns

Belgium

503,233

...

France

United States
Other Countries
Total

/.....

319,472

2,995,914
5,500
374,061
•

of

With the exception of woolen, yarn and blankets, the exports
woolen manufactures have been very large. To nearly all countries
there has been a large increase in the quantities of goods exported,

the

principal exceptions being Hong Kong, Italy, Portugal and Peru. The
annexed statement shows the extent of the exports of each particular
descriptions of woolen goods in the seven months:
1864.
1865.
1866.
Berlin
5 bills 5
Madrid
B* adv—
Woolen and worsted yarn
.lbs. 19,358,561 17,173,697 18,916,548
Hamburg
—
8# * Woolen cloths
Frankfoit
4
3#
yards. 12,149,079
8,781,997 11,908,290
St. Petersburg
6#
5 6
6
Amsterdam.
6
do
mixed with other material®.
5,828,152
5,171.798
7,973,724
“
Flannels
“
4,431,043
3,501,135
2,972,276
The market for American securities has been qnieter, and prices are Blankets
4,275,423
3,588,020
2,815,818
“
984,920
1,032,467
784,728
in general below the late highest point. At the close of business to-day Blanketing and baizes.
3,500,136 2,630,794
Carpets and druggets.
“
3,985,031
there was a firmer tone apparent, and the prices then current were the Shawls, rugs, &c
469,467
No.
528,369
338,735
Worsted stuffs of wool only
yards. 23,836,753 26,642,280 28,758,208
best of the week. Atlantic and Great Western debentures closed at
do
mixed with other materials.
“
94,792,042 82,161,023 104,180,585
66 to 67, being an advance of two from yesterday.
Stockings
doz. pairs.
82,951
80,184
52,110
The latest price of Five-twenties from Frankfort is 76f; from Am
Eaglith market Reports—Per Cable.
sterdam, 74 18-16 ; from Berlin, 76-fc, and from Hamburg, 68£.
The Atlantic Cable has been silent for the past several days, and our
The wheat trade on Monday was very firm; and an advance of 4s,
latest reports are only as of the 22d host. Though resumption of oper¬
per quarter took place in prices. The market to-day, owing to the
ations had been expected all of to-day (28th), no additional telegram
•lightly improved state of the weather, was quiet; nevertheless, Mon¬ had been received
up to the time of our going to press. We have,
day’s advance in prices was supported. The French have taken very
therefore, only two days’ markets to report in continuation of the re¬
little from the London market; but at some of the outports a fair
turns given in our last.
quantity of produce has been purchased.
The London Money market, both on the 21st and 22d, was without
The wool trade has probably shown more activity than any other
material change. Consols had been steady at 89£. U. S. Five-twen¬
branch of commerce dariog the last few weeks. The heavy decline
ties advanced £ on the 22d, closing at 72|. Illinois Central closed at
which took place about two months since has, to some extent, been re¬
covered, English wool having improved in value about 2d. per lb., whilst 781, and Erie shares at 48.
The Liverpool markets exhibited an increased activity. Cotton ad¬
in colonial qualities, at the public sales now in progress, an advance of
vanced Jd. on the 21st, closing at 18£d., but on the 22d the quotation
Id. to Id. per lb., so far as all good and fine wools are concerned, has
fell off, and closed at 18|d. Breadstuffs are firmer, without change of
been established, as compared with the June-Jnly series. The principal
price. Western Mixed Corn is quoted at 27s. 9d. Provisions generally
reason for this improvement is undoubtedly the very“ active demand
are more active.
Beef advanced on the 21at 2s. 6d. per cwt. Pork
which has prevailed for woolen goods of all kinds, the increase in our
continues dull. Bacon and Cheese are slightly lower.
exports during the first seven months of the present year being about
ao c

At Paris
Vienna
“

'




.3
5

aa

# c.

c

I@2*
6

Turin
Brussels
“

6
—
3 bills 8
8* adv—
9
—'

THE CHRONICLE.

392

COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.

--

Week.—The imports are less this

YORK.

REVENUE FROM CUBTOM8 AT NEW
'

■

Imports and Exports for thx

[September 29,1S66.

'-

1865.

1864.

■
,

Six months....
In July
In August

$42,463,224 98
3,585,848 44
6,237,364 17

1866.

$36,695,577 07
9,778,276 65
13,113,689 50

$87,548,189 78
* 11,507,186 60
12,849,760 82

general merchandise and in dry goods, being in the ag¬
Total since January 1st
$52,286,437 59
$59,587,543 22
$91,405,137 20
gregate $5,490,912, against $6,170,609 last week, and $5,890,871 the
The total amouut of customs since January 1st is very large, and
previous week. The exports are $3,335,610 this week, against $2,782,- another month will carry the aggregate for the current year above one
215 last week, and $8,042,686 the previous week. The exports of hundred millions in
gold.
cotton the past week were 6.246 bales, against 4,311 bales last week.
The exports continue to decrease.
The comparison with previous
Included in the exports were 12,147 bbls wheat flour, 540 bbls. rye years shows the total exports last month were not half as large as for
the same period in 1864.
It should be remembered, however, that
flour, 3,491 bbls. corn meal, 9,842 bushels wheat, 6,3C0 bushels rye, tr is
year there are exports of cotton, <fcc., from Southern ports which
810 bushels oats, 250,105 bushels corn, 848 pkgs candles, 3,141 tons was not the case in 1864.
The figures below (except specie, which is
r.oal, 620 bales hay, 62 bales hops, 1,021 bbls. spirits turpentine, 4,631 given at its tale value) show the price of the shipments in paper money
The following is our usual com¬
I bis, rosin, 230 bbls. tar, 172 bbls. pitch, 7,723 galls, sperm oil, 250 at this port on the day of clearance.
parison for the month :
galls. linseed oil, 331 galls, lard oil, 986,404 galls, petroleum, 1,175 bbls.
EXPORT8 FROM NEW YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS IN AUGUST.
j>ork, 177 bbls. beef, 24 tierces beef, 111,713 lbs. cutmeats, 24,255 lbs.
1864.
1865.
1866.
$26,617,850
$14,500,860
$12,646,004
butter, 772,621 lbs. cheese, 204,409 lbs. lard, 379 bbls. rice, 61,099 lbs. Domestic produce
Foreign"merchandise, free
126,537
45,045
50,720
do
tallow, 8,710 hhds. tobacco, 1,020 other pkgs. crude tobacco, 74,723 lbs
dutiable
2,231,782
135,172
226,786
week both io

o

„

The

following

are

1,001,813

the imports at New York for week ending (for

dry-goods) Sept. 21, and for tne week ending (for general merchan¬
dise) Sept. 22:

Total exports
Total exclusive of

The

following is

EXPORTS

1865.

FROM

a

NEW

$2,462,663

2,665,655

2,042,682

3,817,968

3,028,249

$2,673,024
168,182,243

$7,838,380
125,998,449

$5,490,912
226,393,385

flince

$170,855,267 $133,836,829

$231,884,297

1864.

$1,075,245

Total for the week

129,036,209

Previously reported

January 1

$132,777,109

our

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.

1863.

Previously reported
fctnce

January 1

1864.

1865.

1866.

$3,298,900
124,444,090

For the week

FOREIGN

$5,148,484
156,519,052

$3,704,475

$3,335,610

111,204,359

139,950,607

$161,667,536 $114,908,834

$143,280,217

$130,742,990

In the commercial

PORTS

1ST.

Foreign merchandise, free
dutiable

Specie and bullion....

FOR

EIGHT

MONTHS FROM

f

1865.

1864.
Domestic produce
do

report of the dry-goods trade will be found the imports of dry
goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of specie) from
the port of New York to foreign ports, for the week ending Sept. 25 :
In

$14,611,381
12,923,510

comparison of the movement since January 1st:
YORK TO

1866.

$4,020,412

$3,740,900

General merchandise

$16,935,475
14,681,077

JANUARY

$630,342

1863.
....

1,587,851

$29,977,982
28,976,169

specie.

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOB THE WEEK.

Drygoods

1,554,398

Specie and bullion

manufactured tobacco.

$138,256,446
733,606
11,501,097
32,101,263

1866.

$95,170,873
708,177
2,540,787
20,194,143

$129,957,616
536,783
3,654,497
58,191,740

’
$182,592,411 $118,136,980 $187,340,636
98,419,837
134,148,896
specie
150,491,148
Internal Revenue Instructions—Articles Exempt from Taxa¬
tion.—The Internal Revenue Bureau has just issued instructions to the
United States assessors concerning the exemption of articles and pro¬
ducts from taxation under the 10th section of the act of July last, from
which it appears that packing boxes, understood and taken on the
Total exports
Total exclusive of

signification, are exempt, but packing boxes
made of paper or other material than wood, except those made for
friction matches, cigar lights, and wax tapers, are taxable. All dry
barrels and casks, made water tight, are taxable, though not used for or
intended to hold fluids alone.
The exemption of building stone applies only to the ordinary stones,
aod not to articles manufactured from stone, marble, or slate. The ex¬
technical and mercantile

department will be found the official detailed
emption of mouldings for looking glasses and picture-frames applies
imports and exports for the week.
only to mouldings used for the purposes enumerated. The law does
The following will show the exports of specie from the port of New not exempt other mouldings nor looking
glass or picture frames made
from mouldings.
York, for the week ending Sept. 22, 1866 :
These are subject to a tax of five per cent, ad valorem,
ttatement of the

Bept. 19—S.S. Eagle, Havana—
Spanish gold
$5,100
Cept 21—S.S. Hermann, BremenForeign coin
4,500
Bept. 22—S.S. Guiding Star, Para—
American gold
17,388

Total for the week

Previously reported
..

$21,727,792

1864
1863
1862
1861

,

34,675,197
31,105.416
41,846,247
3,266,103

..

......

Same time In
1858
1857
1856
1855
1854
1853

Commerce

New York

of

for

and tarred paper

$112,500
53,540,758

$53,653,258
$19,875,292
32,564,472
26,583,408
24,344,469
29,106,754

38,452,674
56,444,87111852

I860
1859

however made.
The exemptions

13,512

Silver bars
Mexican gold

Total since Jan. 1,1866
Bame time in
1865

72,000

Sept. 22—S.S. Edinburgh, Liverpool-

14,775,258

19,918,128

August.—We have just completed

the official returns of the commence of New York for August, and find
that the total is a fraction below the imports for the corresponding

The change, however, is trifling, the aggregate receipts

month of 1865.

representing a foreign gold cost of nearly twenty-four million dollars.
The imports for the same month of 1863 were only fifteen million dol¬
lars. We annex a comparative summary of the month’s receipts for
last three years:
FOREIGN

IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR THE MONTH OF AUGU8T.
1864.

Entered for non sumption
Entered for warehousing
Free

goods
Specie and bullion
Total entered at

port

Withdrawn from warehouse

1865.

1866.

$6,603,653 $15,903,743 $14,560,161
8,123,406
10,437,478
7,553,260
936,474
836,533
931,856
245,858
182,072
269,221
$18,223,463 $24,475,608 $23,884,644
7,967,843
9,661,136
10,530,593

A little larger proportion
the month than for the same

of the goods has been warehoused during
period of last year, but much below the
amount bonded in August, 1864. The totals from January 1st, show
the movement for eight months of the year as fo lows:
FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR THE EIGHT MQNTHS FROM JAN.
1864.

Entered for consumption
Entered for warehousing
Free goods

Specie and bullion
Total entered at port
Withdrawn from warehouse

1865.-

1ST.

1866.

$89,021,270 $64,204,961 $117,624,326
80,136.535 53,210,826 85,851,147
8,006,572
6‘746,676
8,868,021

1,800,924

1,487,535

1,795,368

$178,965,301 $125,649,498 $214,138,862
44,194,458
59,900,368 69,608,689

these

under the head of printing paper of all descriptions,
for wiping and other purposes, are confined strictly to
descriptions. Paper technically known as printing paper is exempt

All other

kinds, whether writing paper,

wrapping

paper,

drawing

hangings, blotting paper, felting paper, and the like, are
taxable, and paper made for tarring, if sold dry, is liable to a tax.
The exemption of flax and the manufactures thereof includes and
carries all the exemptions of flux prepared for textile or felting pur¬
poses, etc.; but a manufacturer who makes articles of dress for the
wear of men, women, and children, from cloth of fabrics purchased in
the markets, or purchased from the manufacturer thereof, is not entitled
to exemption from tax.
A manufacturer who makes cloths, fabrics, or articles partly of flax
and partly of other materials is not to be regarded as a manufacturer
of flax, nor are such mixed products exempt from taxation.
Exemptions are to be construed literally. The exemption in the new
law specifies only the hulls of ships and other vessels.
Boats propelled
by oars cannot be regarded as vessels, and are liable to a tax of five per
cent. Iron drains aud sewer pipes are exempt, but not gas or water
mains or pipes. Medicinal aud mineral waters are exempt, but not sar¬
saparilla, pop, root, and the like beer.
Cordage, ropes and cables, made of vegetable fibres, are taxable when
not used a9 a part of the rigging or tackle of vessels.
Photograph albums are not regarded as books within the meaning of
the excise law. They are liable to an ad valorem tax of five per cent.
Photographs and other sun pictures, when sold by the producer at
wholesale at a price not exceeding fifteen cents each, or are used for
the illustration of books, are exempt.
All others are subject to an ad
paper, paper

valorem tax or five per cent.
The exemption of the repairs of articles of all kinds does not extend
to the material used in making repairs, when such materials are in
themselves taxable manufactures. The exemption of car wheels, thim¬

bles, skeins and pipe-boxes aud springs, tires and axes made of steel,
used exclusively for vehicles, cars or locomotives, is restricted in the
material from which they are made, and in the uses to which they may
be applied. They must be made of steel, and used exclusively for
vehicles, cars or locomotives. The law exempts the finished umbrella
and parasol, and also the sticks and frames made for the same, but the
handle is declared by the Commissioner to be taxable.
By the teDth section of the act of July, the value of bullion used in
the manufacture of wares, watches and watch cases, and bullion pre¬

of platina and watch makers, is exempt from internal
by manufacturers is not therefore ex¬
empt from tax, but only such as is used and prepared under the pro¬
pared for the

tax.

use

All bullion which is used

visions of the above-named section. Bullion used in the manufacture
figures stand for the foreign cost alone in gold, the of jewelry is not exempt. Gold and silver rings, bracelets pins, charms,
freight and duty not added. As a larger portion of the goods are etc., are regarded as jewelry, but gold pens, thimbles, spectacle frames,
warehoused than usual, the receipts for customs during the month etc., are regarded as wares. Yam and warps are exempt from taxa¬
tion wJiw made and told or wed a*
out of which are fabric
bpw i decrease of more than three-fourths of a million dollars

All the above




0

Both
Weekending Regular Open
Both Weekending Regular Open
Board. Board. Boards
Friday.
Board. Board. Boards Friday.
3....225,075 204,156 429,234
May
25....228,080 454,381 6S2,461 August
June 1(5 days).228,873 380,306 609,179 August 10.... 165,587 134,603 300,189

uses*

ted cloths or articles of wearing apparal for household or other
which cloths or other articles are liable to taxation under the provis¬
ions of section ninety-four. Manufacturers having on hand yarns or
warps on which a tax has been paid are entitled to pay tax only on
increased value, where the same are wane into cloth, or fabrics or ar¬
ticles.
Wire, on which no tax has been previously paid as wire, is liable to
a tax of five per cent, upon the price at which it is 9old, whether that

June
JuneJune
Juue

otherwise provided for are

a

advertisement in

columns of 8

our

per

State

particulars can be had from the circular of Mr. J.
lin, agent, at 112 Broadway.

$45,000

92,500

1(H),000

4,000

20,000

85,500

7,000

21,300

110,000

12,2300

163,150

107,500

5,666

2,000
14,000

1,000

1.000

The
ar

and

F. Frank¬

Chicago & Alton
400
Chicago, Burlington & Q.
300
Chicago & Great Eastern.
Chicago & Northwestern. 1.430
Chicago, R. Isl. & Pacific. 1,400
Cleveland & Pittsburg.... 2,000
Cleveland* and Toledo
1,500
Erie Railway
S,910
llannibal & St. Joseph...

100

200

4,450

2,100
2,100

Indianapolis & Cincinnati

2,500
1,400

600

7.575

3,155

5,900

1,600

2.200

500

.

.

.

460

700

.

•

100

2300
50

nk>

1,000

300

310

200

200

1.S00

4,900

2,600

2,2(H)

913

900
900

....

...

Michigan Central
Michigan Southern
Mil. & St. Paul
New York Central
New York & New Haven.
Norwich & Worcester
Ohio & Mississippi ($100)
Panama

....

1,145

3,425

.

.

m

.

50

1,900
9(H)

1.850

12,100

3.360

4,51 H)

1,450
4,1(H)

20.4(H)

4,800
9,120

27,603

7.550

100

100
5

8,510

3,900
15,150

5,450

14,810
50,250

2,160

700

1,800

6,800

10,400

6,500

.

....

100
20

,

,

.

10

8,500

100

....

100

20

....

....

....

700

800

300

400

2,000

4,300

;
....

....

....

200

400

2,850

4 UK)

2.1(H)

400

200

ioo

300

6,200

1,2300

10

....

..

6,300

7,100'
100
5u0
IRK)

Pacific Mail

Quicksilver
Rutland Marble

500
200

Spruce Hill Coal

Navigation
Western Unioii Telegraph 1,484
Union

t*#

Wilkesbarre Coal

„

1,400

2,900

•

1,686
^

•

•

•

10,900

.

.

>

200

6,650
.

•

•

900

300

....

....

4,700

3,400

27,150

5

205

220

5,600

6,200

42,7(H)

.

6,600

1,2300
14,050
1,600

360

100

50

1,420

3,500

2,100

12,0*20

3,900

2,200
1,400

123,700

1,8'JQ

1,700
5,300
1,100

400

200

400

1,2236

1,478

2,100

7,7234

217

200

622
200

•

400
200

....

200

200

•

•

500

100
7(H)
100

110
500

„

....

....

....

Wyoming Coal

4,000

.

800
900
7(H)

....

..

.

1

....

...

500

...

100

200

Atlantic Mail

Russian

813
'

1,200

800

Ashburton Coal

“

3,000

10

....

Stonington
Toledo, Wabash & West’n
Miscellaneous shares, viz

Mariposa

1.200

1,100

2,600

2,900

Central Coal
Cumberland Coal..
Delaware & Hud. Canal

4,910

i,io6

H..

Boston Water Power
Canton

1.500

1,2350

2,200

1.070

440

Pitts., Ft. Wayne & Chic.
St. Louis, Alton & T.

700

5

...

Reading

57,740

...

200

....

....

31, (XH)

....

....

....

lMOO

313

....

.

1,750
38,345
16,900

12,800

16,400

100

200

Long Island

“

3,800

200
500

•

1,470

8,900
2,000

14,000

3,500

1.400
23,400

2,715
4,000

....

Illinois Central

Marietta & Cincinnati

737

600

7,400

.

....

....

....

1,100

•

•

•

6,600
1,700
15,718
1,2239

2300

15,000

6,0(H)

•

•

.

•

•

5,000
5,000
1,000

,

2,666

20,000

.

,

167,000

72,000

16,000

38,000

41,000

146,000

63,000

20,COO

3,000

441,000

28,000

.....

4,500

37,500

365,000
3,000

SOOOO

91,666

20,000

42,000

,

108,000

5,000

11,000
10,000
30,000

Total of week.... $464,000
The totals of each class
are

•

•

•

•

;

42,000

....

•

•

....

•

,

0(H)
200

follows:

State, &c.,
Bonds.

Governments
»
Bonds.
Notes.

$952,900

$3,23-40,100

3,846,500
3,931.2300

2.591,900

3,006,700

1,691,500

5,79S,2300
S,002,700

1

3,7239,650
2,258,250

1,679,500
1,236.600

10,476,250

2,198,750

7,463,800

;

40,987,850

2,903, (KM)

1,614,000
1,6:33,000

2,485,250

2.577,000

-

and for the weeks ending on Friday—
Ail".
3
$2,085,400
$661,650
605,2350
An". 10
2,589,450
An'". 17
2,786,500
670,850
An” 21
1,248.300
655,400 Ail"- 31
3,269,200
3723,400
Sent
7-.-.'
2,354,200
1,002,75 I
1,456,000
7:30,900
Sent. 14
Sent. 21
1,174,800
251,500 '

1,254,300

Sept. 28

and City
Week.

$1,254,300
432,750
1,061,500
259,500

$589,000 $525,000 $168,2300 $587,250 $704,500 $3,008,050

$4,821,200

January

2,000

of securities sold in the first eight months of the year

showp in the statement which

August

3(H)
20.250
4,000

100
850

•

1,000

1,666

July

550

515

1,000

10,000

•

•

.

m

12,000

June

32

100
100

....

m

24,000"

44,000

3,666

May

....

....

....

400

Hudson River

13

10
100

5,666

3,666

February

l1

9
205

.

•

5,666

•

432,750
5,500
25,000

.*..

10,000

.

cent

1235

195

40

85

137

145

Railroad shares, viz.:
Central of New Jersey....

1.000

•

•

•

following shows the description and number of shares sold at the RcgnOpen Boards conjointly ou each day and for the week ending on Friday.
Wed. Thnrs. Fri’y. Week.
Mon. Tnes.
Sat.

Bank Shares

8,500

5,666

City Bonds, viz :
1,000
1,000
Brooklyn 6’s..
The following is a summary of the amount of Governments, State
securities, and railroad bonds1, sold on each day :
Thur.
Fri.
Sat.
Mon.
Tues. Wed.
U. S. Bonds
$197,500 $178,500 $272,500 $62,500 $189,2300 $354,000
U.S. Notes
’
7,500
32,000 110,000 12,300 163,450 107,500
State&City bonds 219,000 331,500 113,500 83,000 162,500 152,000
10,000
47,000
29,000 10,500 72,000 91,000
Railroad Bonds..

BOARDS.

STOCK

82,000

Virginia 6’s,...

®l)c Bankers’ t&a^ette.
THE

120,000

30,(HX)

7,500

Kentucky 6’s.

$15,500 $186,500
285,500
820,500
7,000
34,000
235,000
171,800
11,000
42,000

3,000

2*2,500

bonds, viz.:

Louisiana 6's.
Minnesota S’s.
Missouri 6’s..
N.Y. State 6’s.
N.Y. State 7’s.
N. Carolina 6’s
Ohio 6’s
Tennessee 6’s.

Week

Fri.

Thnr.

Wed.

$1,000 $19,000
186,000
36,500

April

AT

112,465 2221309

Tnes.

March

BUSINESS

110,316 271,897

126,910 298,137

$6,000

California 7’s..
Connecticut 6s
Illinois 6’s....
Indiana 5’s...

Compromise Bonds of the City of Keokuk, which are issued under the
signature of Henry A. Smythe, Esq. as Trustee. The name of Mr.
Smythe alone should give assurance of the security offered in this loan,
but further

...

Mon

U.S 6’8 (5-20’s).
U.S 6’s (old)...
U.S 5’s (10-40s )
U.S 5’s (old)..
U. S 7-30 notes

per ceut.
We call attention to the

171,227
395,501 August 24
389,544 Aug. 31 (5 days'll 10,844

$100,000

Sat.

U. S. 6’s, 1881.

ton. The castings otherwise provided
for are malleable iron castings, unfinished castings, made especially for
locks, safes, looms, spinning machines, steam engines, hot air and hot
water furnaces, and sewing machines, and castings for iron bridges.
These castings, when not sold or used for any other purpose, and when
a tax is assessed and paid on the article of which the casting is a part,
are exempt from taxation.
Castings of all descriptions made for arti¬
cles, machines, or instruments, other than those specially enumerated, are
liable to tax. The words “ castings of all descriptions ” include cast¬
ings of brass and other metals, or combination of metals, as well as
castings of iron. Woodenware, as used in the section of the new law,
can only be construed to exempt such articles or implements of kitchen
or
househrld use as are made exclusively of wood, and technically
known as woodenware, viz : Tubs, pails, chopping-boards and trays,
wooden plates, bowls, dishes, spoons, knives, ladles, rollers, pins, moulds,
prints, mortars, pestles, dippers, ironing-boards, pastry and meat-boards,
wash boards, clothes sticks, clothes-horses, Ac., Ac.
Other articles
made of wood, such as churns, boxes, kegs, firkins, fish-kits, measures,
saw-frames, ladders, pumps, Ac., are liable to an ad valorem tax of five
of three dollars

a tax

268,910
238,680
165,500

•

■

wire.

subject to

17....161,581

482,930 August

278,850

8....

284,937 Sept. 7
...107,208 165,050 272,253
133,403 150,914 284,2317
July 6 (4 days)113,413 110,300 2*23,713 Sept. 14
1S9.497 223,170 412,667
13....202,529 227.640 436,169 Sept. 21
July
198,822 245,400 444,222
July
20... .167,471 260,300 427,771 Sept. 28
July
27.... 121,265 185,552 306,817
The Government, State, &e., bonds sold at the two Boards, daily, last week,
are given in the following statement:
>•

price is sixty cents, one dollar, or two dollar per pound. The law im¬
poses a tax of five per cent ad valorem. The assessment of the tax
must be at that rate. The amount of tax depends on the value of the
Castings of iron of all descriptions not

204,080

15....126,591
22.... 150,864
29.... 119,437

432,750

1,986,990
$683,400
408,51X1
466.000
467,500
388,500
514,500
516,000
791,000

1,061,500

Railroad
Bonds.

Total
amonnt.

$3,035,500' $12,155,700 *
1,692,100
9,822,000
10,622,840
781.240

&3S,700
781,900

515,700

455,500

993,000
$164,600
175,000
169.000
282,500
2423.500
197,700
179,500
. 207,500

259,500

12,056,150
12,279,450

12,078,750
14,765,500

16,544,750

$2,394,450
3,778,300
4,092,350
2,653,700

4,274,600
4,069,105
2,912,400
2,424,800

3,008,050

Friday, P. M., Sept. 28, 1866.

The Monet

There

are no

Market.—The extreme ease in money

prominent indications of the flow

continues.

of money to the in¬
this season, all
their local re¬

moving the-crops, which usually occurs at
sections being apparently adequately supplied for
terior for

quirements. Perhaps at no former period have the banks held such
large idle balances as at present. The currency due to the banks,

the first half instalment in redemption of the Clearing House
allowed to remain at the Sub-Treasury with¬
out interest; the banks having so little use for the money that, for
the sake of the convenience of the Certificates in settling balances
at the Clearing House, they, prefer retaining them to receiving
greenbacks. As the instalment amounts to $12,500,000, this fact
strikingly exhibits the comparative uselessness of currency to the
banks in the present condition of the market.
The daily clearings at the Clearing House show a greater activity .
in monetary movements, the result of increased transactions in the
stock market; but the attendant changing of loans has had no per¬
ceptible effect upon the market rate of interest.
Although trade is generally active, there is a comparatively
nominal demand for mercantile discounts. The merchants of the
interior ask for but little credit, the extreme abundance of currency
apparently enabling them to purchase to an important extent upon
cash terms. An important demand for currency for the South, for
upon

Certificates, has been

yet has not
be some probability that
crop, attendant upon the
staple, will cause the crop
to come forward to the ports later than usual, which may obviate
any sudden demand for currency from that section.

moving the cotton crop,

has been anticipated; but as

transactions in shares at the two Boards, comparatively, for
made its appearance. There appears to
each day of the two last weeks, and the total for the same weeks, is shown by
the obstacles to the moving of the cotton
th« following statement:
/-Reg. Board.—,
Open Board—> v-Both Boards—, 'method of collecting the tax upon that
Last
Prev’s
Last Prev’s
Last
Prev’s
The volume of

week.

week.

week.

week.

Thursday
Friday
Total of week
The transactions in

following statement:




• S.-C-

week.

week.

10,768
28,308
30,812
21,690
47,395
53,849

Saturday
Monday.
Tuesday
Wednesday

18,778
27,508
31,722
44,101
41,407
25,9S1

23,050
34,500
27,600
32,800
68,650
58,800

198,822

189,497 245,400 223,170 444,222 412,667

shares weekly since

24.100
39,818
30,450
62,808
35.100
58,412
39,000 154,490
53,220 116,045
41,300 112,649

' 42,878

the 25th of May are shown

57,958
66,822
83,101
04,627

67.281

in the

the general rate is four per cent.; exceptional
transactions on varied amounts are made occasionally at three per
cent. The prevailing rate of discount on prime endorsed notes, of
two to four months, is five per cent.; longer dates, 5^@6 per cent.
Gn demand loans

The

following are the current rates for

A

loans of various classes ;

Per cent.
4 © —
6 © 7

Call loans
Loans on bonds & mort..
Prime endorsed bills, 2
months

5

©

—

do
Lower

been

5

bills, 8 A

© 6
@7

The following

©12

another week

comparative inactivity in Governments. The interruption of
communication through the Atlantic cable has produced a disposi¬
tion to deter operations, but without any consequent weakness of
prices. There has been a steady strengthening of quotations during
the week, prices being
higher upon the leading securities. ' A
growing supposition that gold will take an upward turn in October

moderate amount of conversions
effected at the Sub-Treasury during the week ,

thirties

143#

Sept. 22.
Sept. 24.
Sept. 25

fresh shipments of Five-twenties, appears to have been
principal cause of the improved tone of prices. Some of the

There has been a

million

143#
144#

Low’st Highest

_

144#
144#

145#
145#

144#

143# Sept. 26
144# Sept.
144# Sept.

145#

the Custom House and the office of the
States Assistant Treasurer, for last week, wrere as follows:

The transactions at

United

Custom Ilonse.

“

“
“

“

518,736 23
387,568 68

$5,C80,903 50

$12,453,160 16

917,932 57
869,682 13

341,251 67
302,988 80
323,586 22

680,996 67

*
Total
Balance in Sub-Treasury

,

Receipts.
$3,213,414 37
1,590,426 49
1,988,099 08
1,647,744 49
1,246.564 26
2,766,941 47

Payments.
$2,526,377 20
460,606 69

472,274 93

18
19
i0
21.:......
22

“

Sub-Treasury

.—

Receipts.
$278,171 77

Sept. 17

Of

of Sevenbut to-day

and lowest quotations for

last six days:

Lowest. Highest.

and promote

foreign houses have bought moderate amounts of Five-twenties
1862, in expectation of higher quotations at London.

have been the highest

gold on each of the

of

a

probably aggregate about one

dollars.

6
9

single names:
grades

Securities.- -We have to report

United States

officially reported, but

Per cent.

Good endorsed
4 months

[September 29, 1866.

CHRONICLE.

THE

394

$2,399,270 06
morning of Sept. 17

87,084,843 46
$99,538,003 62

Deduct

payments during the

5,680,903 50

week

has been temporarily suspended by an order from Wash,
Balance
$93,857,100 12
evening
ington to convert no more 7 30’s of the 1st series into 5-20’s of 1865. Increaseon Saturday week
during the
6,772,256 66
It is understood that these instructions have reference to a purpose
Total amount of gold certificates issued, $3,973,000. Included
on the part of the Secretary of the Treasury to issue for conversion
in the receipts of customs are $251,000 in gold, and $2,148,270 iu
purposes a 5-20 bond dated May 1, 1866.
gold certificates.
On the 25th iust. $22,750,000 of the Temporary Loan, repre¬
The following table shows the aggregate transactions at the Subsented by Clearing-House Certificates, ceased to bear interest and
Treasury since July 7 :
become payable; as previously intimated, the banks of this city al¬
Changes in
-Sub-TreasuryCustom
Balances,
House.
lowed their portion to remain in the Sub-Treasury.
Payments. Receipts. Balances.
inc.
$7,220,061
$2,471,626 $18,039,083 $25,259,144 $88,065,802
iuc.
6,183,395
The following are the closing prices of leading securities, com*
2,486,296
10,184,139 16,366,534 94,248,198
dec.
2,675,266
13,797,169 ' 91,572,92S
16,472.438
2,480,149
dec.
5,668,660
pared with preceding weeks:
14,013,440
85,904,262
19,6S2,106
2,926,884
dec.
3,436,623

the process

U.
U.
U.
U.

Aug. 24. Aug. 31.
112#
Ill#

S. 6’s, 1881 coup
S. 5-20’s, 1862coupons.
S. 5-20’s, 1864
“
..
S. 5-20’s, 1865
..
“

“
U* S 7-80’s 1st series
U. S. 7-30’s2d Series
U. S 7-80’s 3rd series
U.SlO-40’8,

..

..

..

108#

108#
108#

102
106#
106#
106#

Sep. 7. Sep. 14. Sep. 21. Sep. 28.

112

111#

HI#
109

109#
108#
102# x. c.98#
107#
106#
106#
105#
100#
105#

Railroad and Miscellaneous

ill#
111#
H-8#
1 3#
98#
106
106
106

111#
111#
108#
108#

Ill#
111#

99
106
106
106

99#
106#
106#
106#

109
109

Stocks.—The stock market has

3,069,803

16,700,883

3,199,168
3,222,265
3.105,457
2,399,270

47,807,365

Sept

82,467,6134
86,439,444
88,816,644
96,007,229

18,578,526
9,747,042
13,639,422
23,900,447

34,094,678

22,015,194

2,794,658
2,676,331
2,461,876

Aug.

Foreign

5,825,232
11,262,202
16,820,266

19,047,272
5,680,903

19,0-'9,718
21,5*38,121

inc.
inc.
dec.

82,294.512
84,563.995
87,048,843

12,453,160

inc.

93,857,100

i: c.
inc.
iuc.

3,971,810
2,377,219
7,190,504

13,712,686
2,269,452
2.520,848

6,772,256

been steadily

Exchange.—The course of exchange has

Further purchases have been made upon speculation, so
of bills actually offering has been reduced, with a
ivity. All
corresponding advance in rates. There are but few bills being
combinations for a rise of prices; and the process of forcing up quo^ made
against cotton, and the supply of commercial paper is quite
tations has been very successfully carried on since last week. Quo¬ limited. Importers, however, decline to buy at the rates now asked,
tations are 2@5 percent, higher than a week ago ; aud yet so firm
and the market closes about £ lower for. sterling than this morning.
is the tone of the market that there are no parties courageous enough
The following are the closing quotations tor the several classes
to put out “ short ” contracts.
of foreign bills, compared with those of the three last weeks :
Sept. 28.
Sept. 14.
Sept. 7.
Aug. 31.
Erie has been very active, under purchases made by the parties
106#© 107#
105#© 106
105#© 106
London Cornm’l.. 104 ©105
108 @
#
107 @107#
do bkrs#o/«<7
105#© 106# 106#© 107#
contending for the control of the coming election of directors. The
109 @
#
108 @108#
107#© 108
do
do short
106#© 107
5.25 @5.22#
5.26#@5.25
price has advanced 3|, aud closes at 79l@|. New York Central Paris, long
5.33#©5.33# 5.30 @5.25
5.22#@5.20
5.27#@5.22# 5.22#@
do short
5.35 @5.32#
has advauced in connection with the purchases of parties aimiug to
5.27# ©5.25
5.31 #@5.27# 5.28#@5.27#
Antwerp
5.40 @5.35
5.27#@5.25
6.31#©5.27# 6.28#©5.27#
Swiss
5.40 ©5.35
secure ihe election of a President, in lieu of Mr. Dean Richmond,
35#©
35#©
35#@ 35#
Hamburg
35#@ —
41 ©
41
@
40#@
deceased. The price has advanced from 106± to 114L A rumor Amsterdam
40 © 40#
41
41 ©
©
40 © 40#
Frankfort
89#© 40
77#@
77# © 78
77 #@ 77#
that the large surplus earnings of the company will be distributed Bremen
77#© 77#
71 ©
71#@ 72
70# @ 71
70 © 70#
Berlin
among the stockholders has also tended to promote the advance. A
New York City Banks.—The following statement shows the
report has also oeen circulated, to the effect that a dividend will be
condition of the Associated Banks of the City of New York tor the
immediately declared upon the preferred stock of North Western ;
week ending with the
commencement ot business on JSept. 22,
but the statement is without foundation.

speculative act¬
the leading stocks are under manipulation by influential

shown, throughout

the week, a steady increase of

upward.

that the amount

-

~

....

....
....

....

....

....

....

....

following are the closing quotations
those of the six preceding weeks :
The

Aug. 17. Aug. 24. Aug. 31.
Cumberland Coal

47#

Quicksilver..*....

51

Cantou Co

Mariposa pref....

....

New York Central
Erie
Hudson River....

1<4#
69#

Reading

115#

Mich. Southern..

Michigan Central

Clev. aud Pittsb.
Clev. and Toledo.
Northwestern....
“

preferred

Rock Island
Fort Wayne

Illinois Central

The

..

Gold

47#
....

28”
104
73

47#
49#
52#
—

103#
73#
—

....

85#
111

87#
116

35#

67#
107

104#
122#

115#
85#

113#

114

112

87#
116

36#
68#
109#
104#
123#

84#

of to-day, compared with

Sep. 7. Sep.14. Sep.48 Sept. 2821.
55#
46#
46#
~
“
57#
52#
30#
106#
72#

50#
....

28

103#
71

....

54

33#
106#
75#
120#

120#

122

114
84

115#
83#

115

111

118
87

....

86#

86#

115#
35#
67#
108#
104#
123#

114#
35#

....

116

34#

....

'

66#

104#

109
105

122

122#

109

85#
117#
35#
67#
111

105#
121#

53#
54#
30#
114#
79#
124#
116#
8 •#
1>4#
89#
121#
37#
71
112

107#

123#

Market.—Gold has been comparatively steady.

Early in the week the continued receipts of coin from Europe had
the effect of partially weakening the premium ; but the further ad¬
vance in exchange has since strengthened the market, and at pre.
sent the tendency is upward.
We understand, upon good authority,
that the Secretary of the Treasury has no intention of either antici¬
pating the payment of the November coupons, or of selling gold ;
and this fact has further strengthened the upward tendency of the
premium.
The importations of gold from Europe during the week have not




1866

:

Average amount of—

,

Circnla-v

Loans and

discounts.

Banks.
New York...
Manhattan

Merchants’
Mechanics’
Union
America
Pheuix...

4,588,723
9,539,480
4,415,764

City...
Tradesmen’s

4,069,746

3,042,961
2,862,237
5,696,861
3,588,<65
2,903,190
2.586,266
1 962,163
1,043,618
3,650.015

Fulton

Chemical
Merch’ts Exchange

National
Bntch. & Drova*s..
Mech’s & Traders..
Greenwich
Leather Mannfact’s

1,312,9:14
5,783,910
12,443,383
23,129,613
5,287,614
3,742,314
3,514.976

Seventh Ward
State of N. York...
American Exc’ge..
Commerce

Broadway......;..
Ocean

Mercantile
Pacific

2,051^959
4,799,834

Republic....

1,849,492

Chatham

'

People’s

North America

tion.
$737,966
12,889
627,3 '6
517,562
446,833
2,710
295,000

Specie.

$8,253,355 $1,477,486
6,197,823
401,719
8,982,650
655,763
6,869,434
132,680

...

Hanover.

Irving

Metropolitan.......
Citizens’..
Nassau.....---....
Market

St. Nicholas....... *

.

1.465,231

2,5431720
2,6921739

1,564,000
10,082,051
1,666.219
2,288,451
2,850,042

2,758,424

82,403
980,115
110,240

312,938

19,185
111,184
291,926
30,043
131.6:10
26,738
44,176
10,609
231,432

21,180
214,384
494,750
458,443
46,479
39,769
24,419
10,738

....

,

631,083
19,258
18,465
453,766
498.238
241,116
105,000
5,553
164,643
171,421
10,423
988,140
4.131,330

deposits
$8,550,638
4,871,811
6,232,924
4,985,295
3,431,697
9,301,144
3,712,274
2,816,895
2,175,964
2,516,171
5,569,905
2,826,504 '
1,144,071
3,911,513
1,641,203
895.490
2,830,753

,

Legal

Tenders.

$4,406,668
1,859,165
3,807,666
2,110,733

1,768,524
3,611,347
1,176,978
1,436.719
914,85)9

2,161,585
3,147,127
856,855
569,517

-

794,288
5,377,020
7,326,424
8,104,941

4,865,135
3,007,428
3,094,203
1,626,645
4,375,229
1,889,776
1,421,359
2,769.763
1,614,610
1.321,000

900,000
797,578
482,310
128,659

134,682 ^ 557,950
131,130
20,049
11,308
7,148
88,916
322,838
49,147
293,406
196,260
16,000 1.078,300
4^ 266
132,194
16,433
4,514
129,421
504,800
61,219
.757,774
26,311

Net

-

*

6,611,129
1,495,699
1,892,484
2,439,062

1,893,736

494,118
403,699
250,819
1,462,937
600,450

3,159,854

*

8,2*0,107
5,741,373
2,060,186
932,998
963,698
460,933

1,817,721
679,500
371,977
1.291,879
403,781
385,000
2,869,000
527,344
817,219

975,759
865,618

.

,v

■:

•':•;■'■

■'

THE CHRONICLE.

September 29,1866.]
Shoe and Leather.

5.848,500
3,930,450
4,094,385
3,863,612
1,204,104
1,768,90S
1,475,361
5,242,29*2
15,795,436

Continental
Commonwealth.
Oriental
Marine
Atlantic

.

Imp. & Traders.
Park

O

13,570
6,146
25,630

Bank’g As’n

Mech.

t

-11,581
14,337
128,142
32,634

1,219,547

Exchange...

Corn

Grocers’
North River.......
East River—....
Mannf. & Merch’ta
Fourth National...
Central
Second National...
Ninth National..,..
First National
Third National....
N. Y. Exchange...
Tenth National....

9,300

20,103
21.713
8,417
34,469
6,551
7,900

19,675,701
1,610,554
1,306,284
1,230,744

268,616
13,032

35,199

Sept. 15,1866
Sept. 22, 1866
Sept. 15, 1866

Sept. 22, 1866

Inc.. $1,970,662

Specie

Inc..

Circulation..

805,242

....Dec.

previous week

weeks

fol¬

Deposits
Legal Tenders

Dec.
Dec.

$449,^84
345,043

follows with the returns of previous

*

Circula-

July 7 ...$257,534,833
July 14.. 259,133,434
July 21.. 255,965,018
July 28.. 256,612,071
Aug. 4.. 256,808,717
Aug. 11.. 258,263,063
Aug. 18.. 261,951,924
Aug. 25.. 265,901,065
265,399,607
Sept. 1
Sept. 8.. 268,941,669
Sept.15.. 270,806,504
Sept.22.. 272,177,166
“

Legal

Specie.
tion.
Deposits. Tenders.
$9,865,266 $27,296,530 $205,799,611 $79,541,638
12,451,684 27,804,172 207,190,043 75,541,977
10,860,147 27,579,020 213,049,079 80,524,992
9,701,046 27,249,812 214,582,926 84,705,814
9,448,900 27,311,549 ' 214,156,705 86,235,079
8,424,209 27,528,522 214,232,263 86,861,834
7,545,513 27,796,904 214,310,576 84.800,071
6,834,077 27,958,464 218,119,450 86,283,483
6,381,600 27,807,834 225,191,282 92,622,808
7,455,910 28,506,288 225,107,991 90,194,254
7,857,869 29.360,371 224,844,647 90.773,282
7,662,611 28,770,381 224,394,663 90,428,189

Capital
Loans

Specie
Legal Tenders
Deposits

49,889,015
802,922
24,528,368
41,803,120

*

637,655,787
598,705,726
430,324,808
523,226,814
494,810,975
654,655,346
617,950,320
686,864,052
691,403,135
667,299,212
605,290,424

Decrease..
Increase...

24,906,925
42,836,971

Circulation

National Banks.—There

9,527
378,557

Increase... 1,083,851

9,601,273
Decrease..
9^05,817
4,544
leading items of the banks show an increase in most of them.
The capital increased $200,000, the loans $898,356, the deposits
$1,083,851, and the legal tenders $378,557. All the named items
were, do doubt, increased by the admission of the Bank of the Re¬

July

7.

July 14
Jniy 21

kept.

1

24,040,254

Sept. 8
Sept.15
Sept. 22

50,095,890.

24,134,918
24,528,358
24,906,925

60,320,068
49,889,015
50,787,371

Aug. 4

49,682,529
43,164,321
48,530,454
*8,591,763

Date.

B’ks.

Capital.

June 16.. 1,653, ..:
June 23.. 1.653
June 30.. 1,653

as

(Marked thus * are
not

National.)

Bowery

Broadway
Brooklyn

City
City (Brooklyn)....
Commerce

Commonwealth...
Continental
Com Exchange*
Croton

..

Currency
Dry Dock*
East River

Eighth
Fifth
First
First (Brooklyn). .
Fourth
Fulton
Far. & Cit.(Wm’bg).
Gallatin

Greenwich*
Grocers’
Hanover

Importers & Trad
Irving.-

-

LeatherManufact’rs.

Long Isl. (Brook.)

Manhattan*

Manufacturers’...
Manufac. & Merch.*.
Marine
Market

Mechanics’.....
Mechanics’ (Brook.).
Mech. Bank. Asso...
Meehan. & Traders’.
Mercantile
Merchants’
Merchants’ Exeh...
Nassau (Brooklyn)
National
New York
New York County..

compared with the two previous
Sept. 24.

Sept. 17.
$41,900,000 $41,900,000
93,825,678 94,788,268

Loan*

Specie
Legal tender

316,771
20,977,954
14,283,681
14,624,281
40,014,189
24,344,545
386,465

notes....
Due from other banks
Due to other banks...

Deposits

Circulation (National).
Circulation (State)...

Below

we

828,830

20,303,416

r

12,964,896
16,231,871
88,357,208
24,345,328
851,401

June

July
“

“




Legal
Tenders.

$41,900,000
94,878,709
314,204
21,580,730
12,523,647
16,343,306
39,149,497
24,295,875
356,075

95,995,866 441,689

..

L

22,786,738 40,935,853 24,057,765
95,002,698 863,776 22,242,659 39,770,363 23,804,526

Friday.

Amount.

Periods.

Last Paid.

100 3,000,000
25

100
100
100
50
100
25
50

100,000
500,000
5,000,000
300,000
600,000
250,000

66
•Jan. and
Jan. and

Jan. and

66..

6
4

.

•

5
6 115

..

6

....

100 10,000,000 Jan. and July.
100
750,000 Jan. and July.
100 2,000,000 Jan. and July.
100 1,000,000 Feb. and Aug...
100
200,000
100
100,000 ..Quarterly.
30
200,000 Jan. and July...
50
350,000 Jan. and July...
100
250,000 Jan. and July..
100
150,000 Jan. and July...
100
600,000 May and Nov...
Jan. and July
100
100 5,000,000 Jan. and July...

115

....

8 140

..

6
5 120
6
5 125
5 118

.

....

’66

ISO

120
110
lv8

’66........6 10B

Aug.

’66
’66

5 lo 8

5 117

’66
’66
’66
’66
’66
’66..
’66
66
’66

"

600,000 May and Nov.

10

3*
4

5
5
10
10
5
5
5

66
’66
’66
’66
’66

July.

1,500,000 Apr.and Oct... Apr.
200,000 Apr and Oct.. Apr.
300,000 Jan. and July..
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
’66
1,500,000 Jan. and July...

6
5

..

«...

....

•

•

•

.

....

...

106V
•

,

.

....

St. Nicholas’
Seventh Ward
Second.
Shoe & Leather....
Sixth
State of New York.,
Tenth
Third
Tradesmens.
Union

....

•

...

....

Williamsburg City*.

.

1,500,000
200,000 May and Nov..
2,000,000 May and Nov...
1,000,000 Jan. and July.. .
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
1,000,000 Jan. and July...

1,500,000 May and Nov...
k.600 000 Jan. and July.

...

Ill
115

5

6
5

....

IS*
•

»

.....

.....

...

5 100

♦♦ •

5 104

6

•

•

•..

...

5

•

.

110
•

•

5 112
6 116

6
5 110

....

•

•

•

112

5
5
5
6
6
6

’66
’66
’66
’66
’66
66
’66

fi

....

15

138* ‘

iis
130

no
-

-i

li2

5 120
122
9 1
6 1....
5 115
5 110

’66

j

_

’66

..5
4

.

_ r

105V

5 125

'

5 l60
7 148

105V

’66 ....,..C
’66
- 108
’65
6 109X
’66
C 111
’65
€ ,105
Nov..’66
e>no*
{
July ’66
t
July ’66
’66
7* 140
.’66
122
...t>122

.XX

•-

150

5

’66

1,000,000 Feb. and Aug..,
600,000 Jan. and July.
300,000 May and Nov

....

114V

’66
5
412,500 Jan. and July..,
4 105
1,800,000 Jan. and July.., iJul, ’66
’66...5&=«c 111
2,000,000 Feb. and Ang..,

Republic

100

....

5

July... July ’66

2,000,000

....

6 110

’66
July...
’66
600,000 Feb. and Aug...
’66
400,000 Feb. and Ang...
’66
2,050,000 Feb. and Aug...
252,000 Apr. and Oct... Apr. ’66
’66
500,000 Jan. and July...
’66
400,000 Jan. and July...
’66
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
’66
2,000,000 Jan. and July...
’66
600,000 Jan. and July...
’66
500,000 May and Nov,..
’66
600,000 May and Nov...
’66
1,000,000 May and Nov...

3,000,000 June and Dec
1,235,000 Jan. and July... July
4,000,000
1,000,000
300,000
1,500,000 April and Oct... Apr.
3,000,000 Jan. and July... July
^riland Oct...'July
800,000 Jan. and July...; July

...*

5

500,000 Jan. and

and

•

....

..

..

300,000 Feb. and Aug... |Aug. ’66
’66
422,700

Phcenix

1

•

....

’66.

Peoples’*

401,544

•

300,000 •Jan. and July...
66
200,000 Quarterly
66
800,000 Jan. and July
’66
3,000,000 May and Nov
66
200,000 Jan. and July
66
450,000 Jan! and July
300,000 .Quarterly.
July ’66
‘66
400,000 Jan. and July...
100 1,000,000 May and Nov...
’66
50
’66
300,000 Jan. and July...

160,000 Jan. and

L19
105

....

66
66

1,000,000

Pacific
Park.

413,000

4
5 117
6 102
6
5
12

66

1,000,000

L39

—

..

July...'July

Bid. Ask*

5 137

July
July 66.;
July... July ' 66
May and Nov... JMay. 66
•Jan. and July... lJuly 66

’66
’66

Ocean ...’.
Oriental*

$507,371
355,864

Dividend.

1,000,000
400,000

North River*

,—Circulation.—
State.

Deposits. National.
25
$94,836,170 $m335 $25,019,436 $42,587,020 $28,633,008
16...... 96,047,000 453,600 21,610,000 40,407,000 24,145,000

23
30*..

286,894,545
287,048,950
288,403,775
289.021,085
289,510,820
291,179,045
291,851,815
292,214,720

1,000,000 Jan.

—

Specie.

$284,566,675

North America

:

Loans.

351,401
336,465

Capital. Circulation

Ninth

Sept. 10.

give the comparative totals for each week for the last

three months

STOCK

50
Bull’s Head*
25
Butchers & Drovers
100
Central
50
Central (Brooklyn)
25
Chatham
100
Chemical
25
Citizens’

NewYorkExchange.
*

344,773
356,075

o «

S3

America*
America (Jer. City)
American
American Exchange.
Atlantic
Atlantic (Brooklyn).

returns:

Capital...

B’ks.

Aug. 4.. 1,656’
Aug. 11.. 1,656
Aug. 18.. 1,656
Aug. 25.. 1,658
Sept. 1.. 1,653
| Sept. 8.. 1,G59
I Sept 15.. 1,659
I Sepc 22.. 1,659

Capital.

Companies.

decrease in State circulation of $14,936.

lootings

Date.

282,555,440
283,627,605

7.. 1,653

decrease in specie of $12,069; an increase in legal tender
notes of $174,538 ; an increase in amount due from other bauks of
$1,318,785; a decrease iu amounts due to other banks of $1,607,Metropolitan
590 ;an increase in
deposits of $1,656,981 ; a decrease in Nationa Nassau*...
a

" 868,168
363,405

National Banks author¬

July 14.. 1,654 July 21.. 1,655

280,263,890
281,234,460

BANK

a

circulation of $783, and
The following are the

Circulation.

1,650
$271,262,165
27*2.878,895
1,650
1,650
274,653,195
1,639$414,921,479 276,540,510
June 2.. 1,650
277,379,660
June 9.. 1,650
278,905,675

Boston Banks.—The footings of the weekly statement of* the
Boston banks, which we give below, show a decrease in loaps of

$962:595;

were no new

May 5.
May 12..
May 19..
May 26..

Specie. Circulation. Deposit*.
$866,981
$9,431,664 $38,275,788
852,773
9,442,146
37,707,567
849,770
9,427,363
37,575,560
826,096
9,482,473
37.270,884
825,978
9,516,724
37,244,034
835,158
9,543,472
36,639,226
9,566,783
811,230
36,942,311
807,071
9,575,534
36,025.288
806,815
9.589,574
41,162,627
826,345
9,608,410
41,604,903
9,605,817
802,922
41,093,120
793.395
9,601,273
42,836,971

49,009,316
48,935,067

Aug. 11
Aug. 18
Aug. 25

21,312,504
20,992,376
20,393,826
20,060,536
19,863,685
20,412,323

July 28

24,290,816
24,262,817
24,240,925
24,295,875
24.345,328
24,344,545

during last week. The National Bank of Portland, Oregon,
designated as a depository of public moneys. National
Bank circulation to the amount of $363,410 was issued during the
week by the Acting Comptroller of the Currency. The total cir
culation of National Bauks is now $292,214,720. The securities
held by the United States Treasury to-day amounted as follows:
For circulation, $332,065,800 ; for public deposits, $38,709,500.

public to the Clearing House Association.
The following comparison shows the condition of the Philadel¬
phia Banks at stated periods :
Legal Tenders.
Loans.
$20,546,695 $48,892,594
20,311,668
49,493,405

380,980
202,734

has been

The

Date.

316,771

24,116,795
24,104,997

ized

Clearings.

Increase... $200,000
Increase...
898,356

793,395

22,432,817 40,549,379
21,101,481 39,192,620
20,817,159 38,619,847
21,688,693 39,028,518
22,071.251 39,856,550
21,580,739 39,149,497
20,303,416 38,857,208
20,977,954 40,014,1S9

318,779
295,241
333,670
323,083
264,863
314,204
828,830

$511,182,914

following comparative statement
shows the average condition of the leading items of the Philadel¬
phia Banks for the last and previous weeks :
Sept. 22.
$14,842,150
50,78 T,371

3

10
17
24

Aggregate

Philadelphia Banks.—The

Sept. 15.
$14,642,150

96,672,749
95,771,749
94,915,075
94,819,253
95,387,808
94,878,709
94,788,268
98,825,673

No returns from the Traders’ Bank.

July

:

Loans.

‘

are as

589,990

The several items compare as

Sejpt.

6
13
20
27

$90,428^89 Total, $370,778,300.
The following comparison shows the progress of the banks since
May 5, in respect to number, capital, and circulation :

:

Loans

“

58,000

Aug.

667,299,212 82
$605,290,424 32
25,299,652 92
21,128,960 74

The deviations from the returns of the
lows

1,224,854
14.419,226
15,308,321
1,553,042
8,611,105
3,643,483
3,084,582
839,810
1,398,500
246,085
1,402,560

$272,777,166 $7,662,611 $28,770,381 $224,394,663

Clearings for the week ending
Clearings for the week ending
Balances for the week ending
Balances for the week ending

'

662,683

913,000

9,665
7,143

116,417

1,280,891

Totals

4,496,268

1,000,000
307,758
77,000
12,044
283,500
1,100
2,837,755
1,620,000
270,000
945,768
447,249
797,021

55,871

798,436

Dry Dock

93,000
505 954

636

2,483,100

508,000
572,000
810,995
238,486
681,450
364,332
1,344,617
7,755,652
789,038
609,994
189,517
250,839
290,188
5,197,758
4,159,771
505,249
2,218,060
1,604,716
1,359,020
283,809
805,800

550,553
213,927
28,370
265,000

138,394

1,655,679
7,612,400
3,063,060
3,430,117

1,262,800

2,969,168
2,319,149
8,822,595
1,080,839
1,675,313
1,229,425

9,582

14,900 933

3,807,400

12,842

55,297
15.712
72,637

1,199,912
1,607,506
1,036.124
1,694,982
17,069,387

Bull’s Head

898,100

395

ug.

.

ijuly

■

^

r

_

^

A*

...*

....

.

.

.

_

....

.

.

.

.

’66

3*l

—

• ••»

.

;1

v:

.

[September 29,1866.

CHRONICLE.

THE

396

EXCHANGE.
(REPRESENTED BY THE LAST SALE REPORTED OFFICIALLY ON EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28.)
YORK STOCK

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW

STOCKS

Satur

SECURITIES.

AND

Mou.

Tues.

Wed.

STOCKS AND

Fri.

Thurs

Railroad Stocks.

—

—

•Satur

SECURITIES.

National.
United States 6s, 1367
registered. 130#-133#
do • do
coupon.
6s, 1868
do
do
6s, 1868....
registered. 130# 111#'111#
do
do
coupon. 111#
6s, 1881
do
do
6s, 1881
registered. 111# 111# HI#
HI#
do
do
6s, 5-203
coupon.
do
do
6s, 5-20s
registered. 108#i 103.# 108#
108)1
do
do
6s, 5-20s (2d issue)
coupon
do
do
6s, 5.20s
do
registered 108#t 108)1i 108#
do
do
Os, 5.20s (3d issue)
coupon
do
do
6s, 5.20s,
do
....registered 108#
do
do
6s, Oregon War, 1881
- •
do
do
6s,
do.
& yearly).
do.

Chicago and Alton
do

do

135
136

Ill# 111# HI#
HI# 111% 111#
111# 111# 111#
108%

preferred

.100

108% 108% 108#

do
do
Chicago and Rock Island
Cleveland, Columbus anc
Cleveland and Pittsburg.

.

•

preferred x.

50
50
50
100

.

.

Delaware,

—

coupon.
6s, 1871
registered. 100 104#
5s, 1871
coupon.
5s, 1874
5s, 1874
registered.
98# 99
98# 99
5s, 10-40s
coupon.
99
5s, 10-40s
registered.
6s, Union Pacific R. R.. .(cur.).
105# 106
105# 106
7-30s Treas. Notes—1st series. 105#
105# 106
105# 105# 106
do
do
do
2d series. 105#
105# 10£# 106
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do

do

Hannibal and St. Joseph
do
do
preferred

,

99#

—

“—

—

State.

California 7s
Connecticut 6s

guaranteed.

do
do
Milwaukee and Prairie dn Chien
do
1st pref..
do
do
.
do
do
do
2d pref..
Milwaukee and St. Paul
do
do
preferred

—
—

1860-62-65-70.

—

—
—

100
—

War Loan

War Loan

87

95#

Kentucky 6s, 1868-72

—

99

—

——

36#
68#

35#
67%

49

—

ill# 112

.

36# 36# 37#
68# 68# 71
112# 112# 112
—

—

—

—

87?,'

87

89
89#
122# 121#

—

122# 123

U7# 120
—

—-

—

75#
79#

75#

76
78

80

76#

78# .79
80

“81
-

—

—

52#

52#

50
50
100 121# 121#
100 121# 121#
50
100
50
100
40
100
100
112#
100 113
100 85# 84#
.100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100 106# 107#

—

—

-

124
121# 122
121# 121# 122

124#
123#

76
—

Joseph RR.)...

78#

79

—

80

79#

99

—

Pittsburg, Fort Wayne

99#

Reading

106# 106# 106# 106#
64# 64#
65# 65
65# 65#
65#

106
65

—

81#

81
79

—

—

20#
112# 112# 114
114%
85
85# 85# 85#
—

—

—

—

53#
72#

55

—

—

—

52
—

—

..—

—

65#
98

112

.\ —

-

73#

72#

71#

72#

45

45

Virginia 6s, coupon (ex coupons)

73

72

73#

74#
72#

72%

Atlantic and Great Western, 1st mort
Buffalo, New York and Erie, 1st mort.,

Municipal.

Chicago and Alton,

Brooklyn 6s

Jersey City 6s, Water
New York 7s
do
6s
do
5s

—

.

Loan

-

Ashburton

Central.

Consolidation
Cumberland
Delaware and Hudson

Pennsylvania
Schuylkill

Mountain

Spruce lliil

Wilkesbarre

Wyoming Valley
£<2$.»-Brooklyn

—

.

(Brooklyn)

52#

51#

48
—

53

153

54

—

55
151

55#

o
o

Brunswick City

5th mortgage,

o

o

4#

4#

4#
57
40

55#

111

46#

45

73#

46#

72#

1877...

•.

HO#
89#81

—

:
■]
—

100#
99
..

99

96#

96#

1888

2d mortgage, 1868
River, 1st mortgage, 1869
2d mortgage, (S. F.), 1885
)

.1

34#

100

100

34#

33#

34#

54

20

Cary

2d mort.

—

50

Canton

92

2d mortgage...... *
do
estern, 1st mortgage
do
2d mortgage... .
1 and St- Joseph, 1st Mortgage
1st mortgage, 1869-72
Consolidated and Sinking Fund

do
Ireat
do

—
—

50

Williamsburg

1st mortgage, 1868
2d mortgage, 1879
3d mortgage, 1883
4th mortgage, 1880.

—

55

do

do

do
e,

50

Improvement—Bos ton Wat er Power

117# 116#

J52#

100

New York

116# 117

116

3d mortgage, conv..
4th mortgage..

20

Metropolitan

29#

26%

—

50

Manhattan

1st mortgage
Income

1

25
20

£ Harlem
Jersey City and Hoboken

29#

16

50
100
.100
100
100

100
50
50
100
100
10
100
100

Hampshire and Baltimore

Lehigh & Susquehanna

Citizens

—
—

—

100

Sinking Fund.

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy; 8 per cent...
Chicago aud Milwaukee, 1st mortgage
Chicago and Northwestern, Sinking Fund —
do
do
Interest
do
do
Extension
1st mortgage..,,,
do
do
do
do
consolidated

93
—

Miscellaneous Shares.
Coed.—American

do
do

do
do

9S

6s, Water Loan
6s, Public Park Loan
6s, Improvement Stock

29

106# 106# 106# 106# 107#

100

100

Toledo, Wabash and Western
50
do
do
do
preferred.... 50
Railroad Ronds:

—

29#

100
100

Third avenue

zz

_

107# 107# no# 114#

Terre Haute
do
preferred. 100

St. Louis, Alton and
do
do
Second avenue
Sixth avenue

65#

74#

110

100 105},'
50 -15*,
100 30)*

and Chicago

Stonington
—

-

—

100

79

79

79

81

-

60

—

New Haven and Hartford
Norwich and Worcester
100
Ohio and Mississippi Certificates
do
do
preferred....
do
Panama
100

.

1C2

-

-

—
—

do
7s, War Loan, 1S78 ..
Minnesota 8s
Missouri 6s
do
6s, (Hannibal and St.
do
6s, (Pacific RR.)
New York 7s, 1870
do
6s,1867-77
do
6s, 1368-76
do
7s, State Bounty Bonds
North Carolina 6s (ex coup, ns)
do
6s. (new)
Ohio 6s, 1870-75
do 6s, 1881-86
Rhode Island 6s
Tennessee 6s 1868
6s 18'.K) (ex coupons)
do
6s, (new)
do

54#

55

55

57

56#

57
98

56#
98#

33%

103

mortgage, 1875

>

3d

3

convertible, 1867

100
100

Telegraph.—American

United States
Western Union
Western Union,

100

100
Russian Extension.100

1< K)

Steamship.—Atlantic Mail

100
.100

Pacific Mail
Union Navigation

Union Trust
United States Trnst

Gold

Montana Gold
New Jersey Consolidated
New Jersey Zinc

Smith and Parmelee




98

do

116

do

8s, new, 1882.

-mthem.

107# 107#

93

7s.
1868
90

25

—

x,
■al

1

15

34

34%

14#
32#

83

Income

14#
32#

1st mortgage
6s, 1883

14#

13%
2d mort...
8d mort...

Copper... 15

25

25

10

—

52%

53 ‘

£

54# 53#

—■—i

103#
96#
82

82#

2d, income.

30
—

80

80

32# 30#

5

52

94

7s, convertible, 1876.
7s, 1865-76

5o

100
25
10<»

95#
95

6s,1887
7s, 1876

—

13#

do

Missouri, Land Grants.

—

100

100
100

100

100

Sinking Fu:
2d mortgage,
tLii
Goshen Line,

5

Mariposa Gold
Mariposa preferred
Minnesota Copper

Saginaw L. S. & M

117
220

55#

do

50

Copake Iron
Benton Gold

Rutland Marble

—

100

Mining—Canada Copper

Quicksilver

117
LI 6# 116# 117
219
219
L0
106# 106# 107
06

25
100
100

Trust.—Farmers’ Loan and Trust
New York Life and Tru -t

Quartz Hill

99

—
—

100

Nicaragua

Consolidated Gregory
Gunnell Gold

57

•

....100

Tt'ansit.—Central American

„

—

—

100

Michigan 6s

Spring

48# ■49

—

—

—

-Louisiana 6s

do
do
do

138

—

-

Registered, 1860
6s,"coupon, ’79, after
do
do 1877
do
do 1879

Indiana bs,
do
5s

do

do

Georgia 6s
Illinois Caual Bonds, 1860
do
do
do
do
do

—

—

—

100

99# 100

99#

35#
67%

.100

Harlem.,
do
preferred

115# 116#

116#

..

106#
106#
106#

Zd series.

do

—

.1(M)
.KM)
.1(M)

Erie
do preferred

109

—

do

Lackawanna and Western....

Eighth Avenue
—

•

138#
47#

100
.100
.100
.100
.1(M)

—

-

.

109# 110# in#
110# in#

lu8

—

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy
Chicago and Great Eastern

109

129

100 128
100 109
.100

American Gold Coin.

TW Fri

Wed.

Tues.

Mou.

r i

2d mort
Interest

77
93

81

81

.vh-v

.WIIH?.I>JIL ■■■

-V*' w."WSv

;''V:

•

-

T

;\ /;'*

\;r:v” 'v'>.

-■■{’?<

K

j;

•.•

397

THE CHRONICLE.

September 29, 1866.]

LIST.

NATIONAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL SECURITIES

American Gold

9,415,250

1860
do
1858
do

coupon.

,
.......

do

o

do
do
do
do
do

Jan. &
Jan. &

coujxtn.

|

of 1865

171,069,350
8,202,900

Mar.&Sept.|l904 j
July 1895

'769,518,000

7.30,Jan. & Julyjl868

2,109,000
648,000

688,000
2,472,000
8,000,000
2,073,750
525,000
1,288,887
1,758,406

1,386,570

Coupon Bonds.......

da
do
do
do
do
do
War Loan Bonds....
Indiana—State Bonds
do
do
do
do
War Loan Bonds
Iowa—State Certificates
War Loan Bonds
do
Kansas—State Bonds
Kentucky—State Bonds
do
State Bonds
Louisiana—State Bonds (RR)..
do
State Bonds (RR)..
do
State Bonds for B’ks,
Maine—State Bonds
do
War Loan
Maryland—State Bonds
do
•
State Bds .coupon. |
do
StateBds inset ibed j

Jan. &
7.30 Feb. & Aug.! 1867
30 Juu. &Dec.:18(>8

2,371,725
1,778,677
241,000

1,157,700
236,000
2,058,173

1.225.500
200,000
300,000
200,000
447,000
3,204,000
516,000
3,942,000
5,398,000
532,000
4,800,000
'8,171,902

3,192,763
1,727,000

do
State Bonds.coM/70n.
Massachusetts—State Scrip
do
do
do
War Loans....
do
do
State Scrip
do
do
do
do
War Loan

672,000
220,000

....

6,429,000
1,150,004

2,450,000
1,088,000

...

250,000

Michigan—$2,000,000 Loan

1,750,000
216,000

do
do
Renewal Loan
War Loan
War Bounty Loan...
do
Minnesota—State Bonds
do
do
do

1,122,000
345,000
250,000
602,000

Missouri—State Bonds
do
State Bonds for RR..
do
State Bonds (Pac. RR)
do
State Bonds (H,&St.J)
do
Revenue Bonds
New Hampshire—State Bonds.
do
War Fund Bds
New Jersey—State Scrip..
do
War Loan Bonds..
New York
do
do
do
General Fund
do
do
do
do
do
Bounty ds “ up’ns
co
“
do
rcgist’dl
do
do
do
do
do
Canal Bonds.
do

do
do
do
do
North Carolina—State Bonds..
do
do State Bonds (new)

13,701,000
7,000,000
3,000,000
431,000

5:45,100

1,650,000
.

95,000
731,000
700,000
1,189,780
500,000
800,000
909,607
442,961
900.000

800,000

25,566,000
702,000

...

4,500,000
9.749.500
3,0: (0.000

2,400,000
679,000
6,168,000

3.691,000

Tennessee—Improvement Bonds

2,347,340

Railroad Bonds.
New Bonds
Vermont—War Loan Bonds.

Virginia—Registered Bonds.
do
Conpon Bonds. ..

-^do

New Bonds

....

Wisconsin—State Bonds
do.
-Certificate*...




in* 111*

lii* lii*

do

Water Loan...
York&Cum.R.
B.&O.R.con® )
B. & O. RR.. (
Park

99

99

106*
106
106

106*
106*
106*

Water Loan

!

3,500,000
1,000,000

Stg.

1,949,711

740,000
583,205
6,580,416
1,265,610

993,000
634,200

Water Loan

do

.

1,500,00c1

...

Railroad Debt

do

99*

820,000

5,000,000
554,000
197,700

Me.—City Debt

Boston, Mass.—City Bonds
do
City Bonds
108* 108*
do
City Bonds
108*
98*

*

N.WWirg.RR.

Bangor,
108* 109
do
108* 108*

Quarterly

[Brooklyn, N.Y.—City Bonds....
do
Improve’t St’k
Pub. Park L’n.
Water Loan...
Pros. Park L’n

do
do
do

1,281,000
121,540
5,550,000

ramous.

2,115,400
13,911,900

i,650,boo

21,888,398

12,972,000
8.951 200

600,000

do

May & Nov.
Jan. & July

Water Bonds...

Dubuque,
do

Io.—City Bonds

do
do
do
Jersey City,
do
do
do
do

Park Bonds.....

Railroad Bonds.,
Water Bonds..'.

N. J.—City Bonds,
''
City Bonds,
Water Bds.
Water Bonds

Water Stock
CrotonW’rS’k
CrotonW’r S’k
W’r S’k of ’49
W’r S’fc of ’54
Bu. S’k No. 3.
Fire Indem. S.
Central P’k S
Central P’k S.

102
79
80 ”

81

81*

Central P’k S.

C.P.Imp.F. S.
C.P.Imp. F. S.

Real Estate B
Croton W’r S.
Fl.D’t. F’d. S.
Pb.B.Sk. No. 3

July var.
July ’71 ’72
,

1870
Jan. & July pleas
do
1868
1878
do
do
pleas.
May &Nov 1868
Jan. & July 1875
1878
do

July

1S771

106* 107
106* 107

do

1874

99*

do
do
do
do
do

1875
1877
1866
1868
1871

9u*
99*

1874
Jan. & July
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

May & Nov
Various.

var.

lilO

99* 100

95
92

65*

1900
65*
1860
1S65
1868
1870
1875
1881
1886
’68-’71

00

2,147,000
900,000

100,004'
483,900

1,878,900

190,000

402,768
399,300
3,066,071
275,000
2,083,200
1,966,000
600,000
1,800,000

2,748,000
150,000

.

’93 ’99

154,000

NewYorkC’nty.—C’t House S’k
do
do
Sol.Sub.B.R.B
do
do
Sol.S.&Rf.R.B
do
do
Sol.B’ntyFd. B
do
do
RiotDam.R.B
Philadelphia,

Pa—City Bds,old

CityBds,new
City Bds,old

do

do
do

CityBds,new
Pittsburg, Pa.—City Bonds
Railroad Bonds

do

Portland, Me.—City Bonds
do
Railroad Bonds,
94

65*
65*

Providence, R.

102,0001

99

do
do

1,000,000
2,500,000
1,400,000

2,000,000
949.700

4,996,000
1.442.100
652.700
739,222

2,232,800
7,898,717
1,009,700
1,800,000
985,326

1,500,000

600,000
500,000
300,000

Railroad B’ds

City Loan..

Rochester, N. Y.—City Bonds...
Sacramento,

Railroad....

Cal.—City Bonds.,

do

San Francisco,
do
do
do
do
do
do

200,000
150,000

City Bonds...

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

70

I.—City Bonds.
T? Oil
/I t)1

895,570
490,000

t*AO

do
do

var.

var.
do
Feb. & Aug. 1871
Jan. & July 71 ’94
Jan. & July ’68 ’90
Apr. & Oct. 1868
90
do
1868
Jan. & July long
do
Jnn. & Dec ’71 ’78
Jan. & July ’84 ’95
do
’86 '95 89
do
Jan. & July ’67 ’88

do

911.500
219,000
100,000
425,000
60,000
150,000
200,000
3,000,200

600,000

Vol. B’nty L’n
Vol.Fam.AidL
Vol.Fnm.AidL

County B’ds

Real Estate....

260,000

1.496.100
446,800
1,464,000
»

Sewerage
Water
Harbor
’...
Wharves
Pacific RR....
O. & M. RR....
Iron Mt. RR

484,000
239,000
163,000

457,000
429,900
285,000

...

_

C.&Co’tyB.
C.&Co’tyB

C.&Co’tyB.
<\&Co’tvB

Whmihgton, Del.—City Bond*..

4

523,000

425,000
254,000

Improvement..

Cal.—City Bonds,
City Fire B
City Bonds,

(Asked

.

’65 ’69
’70 ’82
1879

97

var.

1913
1870
1870
1873

July
May & Nov [1875
Jan. & July 1886
J.,A.,J.&0, 1890

99*

j

M.J.S&&D lv890
99* 99*
97
Apr. & Oct 65’82
05 ’74
do
78 ’79
65 ’85
67 ’77
72 ’73
70 ’78
Jan. & July ’65’71
65 ’95
do
1869
do
81 ’97
do
1897
do
65’79
65 ’82
Apr. & Oct. 1881
Jan. & July 1876
’79 ’87
do
1S88
do
99*
Apr. & Oct. 1895
Jan. & July
var.
do
1S79
do
1890
do
1871
do
June &Dec. ’69 ’79
96
1865
1871
65 ’72
Various.
Jan. & July 75 ’77
’65 ’80
Various.
Feb. & Aug 1882
Jan. & July 1876
June&Dec. 1883
’65 ’81
Various,
65’75
do
Jan. & July 77 ’83

Apr^ & Oct.
Jan. & July

Various,

94

var.

do

Union Def. L.

99*

do
Jan. &

B

var.

May &Nov. 1887
Jan. & July

Tomp.M’ket S

99

99*

do
do

650,000

Pub. Edu. S’k.

103*

1866
1872
1873

JAJ&O

125,000
130,000
600,000
375,000
122,000
118,000

Docks&SlipsS

J.Ap.J.&O

Jan. &

50,000
650,000
319,457
400,000

..

City Bonds...
Wis.—City, re-adj’d

93

79*

20,000
256,368

..

Newport, R. I.—City Bonds...
New Haven, Ct.—City Bonds..
New York City—Water Stock..

78*

299,000
571,000
360,000
913,000
1,030,000

City Bonds....

do
do

do
City Bonds....
New Bedford, Mass.—City Bds
New London, Ct—City Bonds...

1883
’71 ’89
’72 ’87
’72 ’85
1866
1874
1869

150,000
216,000

Louisville, Ky.—City Bonds....

Newark, N. J.—City Bonds

1894
71 ’74
’75 ’78
1883
1868
’73 ’83
1878
1886
1890

July

Railroad

Hartford, Ct.—City Bonds

do
Milwaukee,

’68 ’74

do
do
do
Jan. & July

Jan. &
Jau. &

City Bonds
City Bonds

Marysville, Cal.—City Bonds

var.

1867

..

Water Bonds

do
do
do

,,

do

Jan. &

'

Cincinnati, O.—Municipal
do
WTat er Bonds....
Cleveland, O—City Bonds
do
Water Bonds....
do
Sewerhge Bonds.
Detroit, Mich.—City Bonds

May & Nov. 1880
do
Jan. & July
do
do
Jan. & July
do
do
do

Municipal Bonds

do

Chicago, Ill.—City Bonds.
do
City Bonds
do
Sewerage Bonds

18901
1S70

167,000

South Carolina—State Stock..

Improvement Bonds

Alb. Nor. RR..

City, Pa.—City Bds.

do
do
do
do
do
do

’66 ’67
’80 ’89

192,585

29,209,000
do
Military L’n Bds 3,000,000
Rhode Island—State (War) Bds
3,889,000
do
do
do

J.,A.,J.&0.

lii* lii*

Mar.&Sept.
July
Quarterly

1,163,000

4,095,309

Domestic Loan Bonds
Pennsylvania—State Bonds
do
State Stock....

4,963,000

1876
’72 ’80 116
117
115
’72 ’92 98*
1880
110
1872
1870
1870
99
’60 ’65 100
’69 ’70 100
76’77 100
1879
100
1S79
100
1866
89
90
1866
87
98
May & Nov 1868
Jan. & July 1868
1881
do
Jan. & July ’76 *78
Jan. & July ‘66 ’73
’68 ’72 95*
do
dem.
67 .69

500,000
900,000

2,183,532
1,600,000

do

109* Baltimore, Md.—Improvement..
do
Miscellaneous,
105

do
do
do
Jan. & July
Jau. & July
do
Jan. & July
do
do
do
do
do
do
Jan. & July
do

3,050,000
6,000,000
2,250,000

536,798
634,653
379,866
-

606,000

May & Nov 1877
Jan. & July 1876

Jan. &

Payable.

RR. Bds.

$225,000
650,000
300,000

Water Loan

Buffalo, N.Y.—Municipal Bonds

..

Ohio—Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan:
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan

1882-

May & Nov.

CALLPORNIA-Btite Bonds
do
State Bonds large
Connecticut—War Bonds
Georgia—State Bonds
do
do
do new
Illinois—Canal Bonds
do
do
do Registered
,

July

1881

127,549,150

State Securities.
Alabama—State Bonds
do
do
do
(Sterling
* do
.do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do

July

103

May & No vJ 1884

.

Treasury Notes (1st series),
do - do
(2d series),
do
do
(3d series).

109*'

1874-

773.422.800

..

do
Union Pacific. RR. 3onds

1871

Due.

Jan. & July
do
do)
Jan. & July
do

136
136

July

icipai Securities-'
Albany, N. Y.—City Scrip....1.
do
do
Alleghany
do

135* 138
135
135

| May & Nov.

do .registered, f
1864
coupon. \
do .registered. |
1865 ...coupon. |
do .registered, t
1864
.coiqton. j
do .registered, j

....

1868]

1881
July
'Jan. & July 1881

1,016,000

coupon.

(l yearly),

Jan. &

282.718.800

—

(10-40s)

July

20,000,000

(

registered, f

Bonds (5-20s) of 1862

Jan. &

7,022,000

registered. j

OregonWar Bds (yearly)
do

j

registered. (

do

do

coupon.

,

July 1867

8,908,342

registered. (

do

Jan. &

Rate.

diked

140

-

r

Bid

Payable.

FRIDAY.

pal

Outstanding.

DENOMINATIONS.

Coin

National Securities.
Bonds of 1347
registered.
do
1348
,
coupon. I
do
do
do
do
do

Rate.i

Princi¬

INTEREST.

Amount

FRIDAY.

INTEREST.

Amount

[Outstanding.

DENOMINATIONS.

1,352,600
178,500
829,000

do
June &Dec 1894
Feb. & Aug ’70 ’83
Jan. & July 1873
Apr. & Oct. 65 ’84
Jan. & July 67 ’87
Apr. & Oct 73 ’84
J"
& July 70’81
f.m. A.&N, 1870
1880
go
1890
do
1890
do
’75 ’79
do
1875
do
0 ’73
do
Feb. & Aug 1868
F.M. A.&N 1898
1887
do
1898
do
1887
do
1876
do
1873
do
1883
do
1875
do
I860
do
67 ’76
do
1873
do

65’69

do

May & Nov. 1864
1867
1865

do
do
do

66’73

May &.Nov. 75-’89
do
do
do
do
Jan. & July
do
do
do
Jan. & July
do
-

Various.

Apr. & Oct

[Mar.&Sept.

Jan. & July
do

Various
do
Jan. & July
Jan. & July
do
Jan. & July
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

May & Nov.
Jan. & July

300,000

do
do
do

960,000

'

April & Oct.

1.133.500
1.000.000

838,076

Jan. &

’73-’76
'80-’81
'83 ’90
'77-’82
'65 ’81
'65 ’82
'65 ’93
’65 ’99
var.

1913
66’83

68’71
1885
1876
1893
65 ’82
65 ’82

65’76
88- 98
1884

’65’83
’65 ’90

’79’88
’71
’71
’65
’67
’71

’87
’83
’86
’81

’73

72’74
74’77
1871
1866
1875
1888
’77 ’78
1883

July 1884

various

66

THE CHRONICLE

398

[September 29,1866.

Exports of Leadlsg Articles from New York.

®l)e Commercial Simes.

188

CD

COMMERCIAL

EPITOME.
Fbiday

Night, Sept. 28.

The specula¬
tive movements
staple articles
have brought forward legitimate trade, and dealers have pur.
Trade

wears a

chased with much

more

more

confidence.

It is found that there is

:

C- Mt- OO

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active appearance.
which have taken place in many
much

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surplus in leading articles of merchandise; but rather that
there is a serious deficiency in the supply of many of them.
Cotton and Breadstuff's have been excited, with a large

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irregular. Pork declined early in the week,
but closed active and firm after ’Change to-day, at $33 for new
mess.
Lard, and other hog products have declined fully half
a cent
per lb., and close dull. Hogs are again coming to mar¬
ket freely—the receipts of the past three days being about ten

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Wool has become dull.
The advance asked in this market
checks the demand, the large stocks elsewhere being rather

pressed for sale.
Freights have seldom been duller from this port than for the
past week. Shipments of Cotton have ceased.
The value of exports from this port to different countries
(exclusive of specie) for the past week and since July 1, is
shown in the following table:

•

•

:

:

in

Beef has declined.

Dairymen are holding back
Butter and Cheese, and prices have somewhat improved, es¬
pecially for the finer sorts.
Groceries of all kinds were dull and drooping early in the
week, but to-day have been quite active. Of Coffee, the sales
to-day were about 8,000 bags, mostly Rio, including two car.
goes to arrive ; prices were kept private. Sugars declined
on Tuesday, but have been firmer since, and the sales to-day
were 3,000 hhds. and 1,100 bxs.
Naval stores have shown great activity in the past two d avs?
especially in Spirits of TuiRatine, of which the sales are 1,500
bbls.; and in Rosins, of which some 14,000 bbls. have changed
hands. The finer grades of Rosins have sold largely in the
range of $7@$8.25. Other Naval Stores firm, but without im¬
portant movement.
In oils, the only business of importance has been the sate
yesterday, of 150 tons (guage) English Linseed, at $1@$1.02£,
gold, per gallon, being a large decline, and completely unsettl¬
,
ing the market.
Hides and Leather have been quiet, but close firm. Hops
are quite unsettled.
At the close it is rumored that an order
for 1,000 bales has been received from England.
Metals show more activity in Copper, and a better general
business at full prices.
East India Goods are dull. Tallow
has been active and steady.
Whisky is quite unsettled.
Distilleries are again starting up, and present holders are dis¬
posed to sell. Fish have slightly advanced for Dry Cod and
Mackerel with more doing.
Foreign Fruits are nearly nomi¬
nal, awaiting fresh supplies.
Petroleum declined early in the week but with a large de¬
mand for export and home use, prices have recovered half
a cent per gallon.
thousand.

ifNif

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This

Since

To
week.
July 1,1866
Great Britain...'$1,230,818 $19,669,€41
France
208,736
2,128.010
Holland & Belg.
973,840
218,225
< Germany
1,967,235
268,080
Other N.Europe
N.E
199,583
610.214
Spain
..
81,314
Other S. Europe
2,256.309
330,349
East Iudies
6,750

632,550

China

Australia
Br.N A Colonies

863.033

25,854

I

|

To
Cuba. ..*..»»»«

| Hnyti
j Other W. I

1 Mexico

..

New Granada.
Venezuela....
Br. GuiaDa...
Brazil
Other S.A. ports
All other ports..

This
week.

$161,879
34,718
155,100

12,498
197,638
27,466

•
•

•

•
'

July 1.
$2,047,839
190,702

l,715,2i9
456,576
1,046,219
240,083

+*

a

a)Cj
i.

cc r- co o?

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.

CO

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t-o*

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53 co'
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•s

263,223

116,101
198,103

804,706
1,004,601

68,731

255,875

1,3*5,016

obtained by deducting the amount
the Chronicle from that here given ;

CO lO
t—

CO

t—

i-To * cf

'

a\

of

Since

The following table shows the exports of leading articles
of commerce from the port of New Yoik, since July 1,1866,
the ports of destination and the total since January 1, and
for the same period in 1865. The export of each article to
the several ports, and the total for the past week can be




•
•

:S5

in the last number of

•

•

o

^2-2

•

: PJ 0> OD

.

j-sa
i ° 0^3AiWPP>^0-4

V- ® *-■
0.0 as

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ooo

September 29,1866.]
The

1,

of Cotton at all the ports

ing at a glance

leading

imports of certain

shows the foreign

following table

the movement

Leading Articles.

Imports of

11,492
528,875

Coal, tons .... 11,026
Cocoa, bags...
511
Coffee, bags
19,606
Cotton, bales.
3
Drags, &c.
481
Bark, SPemv
Blea p’wd’rs
300
..

Briinst, tns
Cochineal...

3,398
523,941

1,903

141

1865J
2,442
230,143

28,109

24
8
3,150

Gums,crude
Gum, Arabic
Indigo

53
270
1

Madaer
Oils, ess

137

Gambier

...

3,196

'...
Gunny cloth .
Hemp, bales..
Hides, &c.

474 Articles

4S.146;Cigars
8,854 Corks

28,953

1,845

19,918

4,088

90,645

14

1.838
83S4

Bristles!

14

3,276,Rice
Spices, &c.
2,066j Cassia

581
847

14,037
3,780

Molasses

195,371
110,438

53

4,403

Metals, &c.

451

613!Saltpetre
60,373 Woods.
128,526,

•

20.406

tlie Week,

”24

478,778 247,725jPeanuts, bags.
400,409
—[Provisions—
98,434 *818,925
Butter, pkgs

34,849

12,700

52,336

Barley

seed... 1,277
10,439
Flaxseed

119,134
42.323

Beans....
Peas..
C. meal,bbls.
C. meal,bags.

152,865
178,254

Grass

Buckwheat &
B.W. flour, bg
Cotton;

Copper,
Copper,

bales

..

1,207
1,500

Hops, bales.

Leather, sides
J

.

2

Lead, pigs
Molasses, hhds
& bbls

5,743

2,455

278,336

941

6,287

37

1,257

Spirits tnrp.

Including barley

34.847 i

....

•

1,463

:

and ad¬

•

•

•

•

4,980
3,878
752,299 360,965
9,650

7,136
3,569

106,795

-

-

steamer:

30
34
86
39
42

41

~

.

from New

of the

•

..

49
771
251

Total bales

Pereire, 49.

Total bales
bales

give our

York, and their direction

previous year :

.....

.

^

Exports of Cotton

(bales) from New T» ork

since Sept. 1, 1866
Same

WEEK ENDING

11,160

Total

time

to

date.

prev.
year.

5,174

76,447

19,110

19

2:0

5,174

16,466

19,320

....

•

.

•

& Texas
31
34#
37
40
43

table showing the exports of Cotton
for each of the last four
weeks ; also the total exports and direction since September
1, 1866; and in the last column the total for the same period
we

EXTORTED TO

•

Sept.

;

*

;

11.

.....

50,626
86,460

Liverpool...i
Other British

Ports

|

...

Britain

French ports

Bremen

Other

28, P. M.

the past week show a decided
bales, against 4,853 bales the

September 1st
the
Liver¬
Havre, 402

Spain, Oporto
All others.

and Gibraltar

•

•

•

.

500
....

....

....

j

271
50

j

524

522
50
203

-

*

•

♦

«

....

•

....

682

251

203

j

49

344

289

•

682

49

....

j

...

V

....

_

844

....

..

....

2S9

*

Total to N. Europe

3,959
3,959

....

ports

25.

7,333

J

Hamburg

COTTON.

18.

19

....

and Hanover

Sept.

!

....

Total French

Sept.

j,

....

.

...

reduced to barrels.

7,314

....

.-

Total to GY.

Friday, Sept.

30
33
36
38

barque : Thomas Terry, 771,
per steamer: Hermann, 251. Total

Below

rough,
i

per

To Bremen

....

•

i

To Genoa per

319,807 470,095
407,729 460,555
95,085
93.870
128,992
94 331 200,945
78,615
46^991
89,650
82,347
6,066
•

Middling

To

....

•

Mobile.

To
ter,

•

•

N.

Florida.

$ tt> 30
33
36
38
40

1

•

•

2,176
66,635

The market closes fever¬
quotations:
Orleans

New York the past week have
follows:
Liverpool per steamers: Hecla, 71Scotia, 943; City of Manches- '
129; Malta, 712: Edinburgh, 273; Scotland, 1,634. Per ships: Hi¬
bernia, 197; Columbia, 212; Thornton, : 58. Total bales
5,174
Havre

81,769

..

+40,000

19,571 248,656

Week has been excited

during all the

Exports of Cotton from
amounted to 6,245 bales as

12,695

receipts at all the ports
increase, having reached 7,691

2,185

5,707

....

The

63

t Estimated.

Good Middling

Havre
Other

t Including bags

malt.

29

....

26.965

Middling

•

78,762

2,967

Hogs,

bush

24,871

Low

8,404

39,277
2,361

bbls
4.566
”65
Tallow, pkgs.. 2,655 129,041
Tobacco, pkgs. 1,328 50,338
16,165 Tobacco, nhas.
60,019
1,465
No

34

....

....

....

....

Ordinary
Good Ordinary

Same

....

Rice,

1,059
1,461

....

Upland

and since

....

11,484
32,258
43,269

•

237
197
736

438,720,Starch
Stearine
Spelter, slabs..
Sugar, hhds &

Dressed

328

•

40

Rice, pkgs.....

'

*

'

foot up 19,000 bales.
ish and unsettled, at the following

....

•

55,6001,681,036 1,589,100j Wool, bales
Whiskey, bbls
Hrv
LI fcOfl
17
6,530

Naval Stores—
Crude trp,bbl
*

+239,080

127
237

Hemp, bales...
Hides, No

409
85
236

Beef, pkgs. ..
Lard, pkgs...
Lard, kegs...

224,859

447,527
15,527
6,028
8,980
1,211

Grease, pkgs.

1,800

Pork

5,541

Driedfruit,pkgs

128

Eggs

75.322

bbls...
plates.

15,777

Cut meats...

42,837

672

8.S47

“

....

1.554

of the week

Jan.l. time’65
80,556
285,352

5,264
Tar....

Pitch

Malt..

682

47,07*’

ending Sept. 28, sine e
follows;

87,0751,735,6902,235,655 Oil cake, pkgs 4,367
Wheat, bush.120,4631,795,041 5,388,415 Oil, lard.
Oats.
146,208 5,55S,S16 6,532,745
33,148
Com
1,156.19017,852,9457,917,640,Oil, Petroleum. 33,148
208
Rye

1,383
18,702

....

followed sub¬
than before. The de¬
speculative. Spinners are
makes, are not
selling well; and shippers have done nothing'for several days.
The crop accounts continue unfavorable, and Southern par¬
ties in the trade are confident of extreme prices.
The sales

121.623
!9S.7(b

112,5U8

week.

Breadstuff*?—
Flour, bbls..

....

....

78,532

24,670
135,534

210

Fustic..

time’65
13,765

4,171

....

.

.

Canal and River,

The market

78,522
26,510
2,943

180,311
136,919

4,309

Same

Since
Jan. 1.

This
week.
71

„

1,383
16,466

17,473

By Railroad,

*

44.768

....

January 1.

1,350

Total

42.103

receipts of domestic produce for the week
and for the same time in 1865, have been as
[Of the items left blank in 1865 no record was made.]
Since
This

Ashes, pkgs...

t

66,677

978

Jan. 1,

*

41,923

128,543

•

....

,

The

•

Logwood ... 1,047
1,911 j Mahogany.

Domestic

Receipts of

259

l.

1,461

588,669 919,000

6,433

!

Produce for

2,665

2,519
3,171

8,599 91,628
1,934 25,436
1,789 2,300
3,950
4,178
551
2,021
83,221

3,222.423 1,972,967
3,334 599,335 427,552 vancing. A slight pause on Wednesday was
4,629 433,549 193,330 sequently by even greater excitement
180 284,162 291,196
2,441 677,227 808,718 mand, however, is almost entirely
18,(.56 572,217 347,782
82.601 4,885,271 3,375,249 not buying freely, for goods, except a tew
•

Ginger
Pepper

i

17

Cutlery......

Raisins

1,891

....

....

STOCK

PORTS.

8,999
3,035
2,665

602

5,025

3,372
3,035

to

NORTH.

Total.

for'gn.

Britain

Virginia, Sept. 28.
Other p^ts. Sept. 25.

$12,511 $1,170,647 $537,430
4,732 131,021 116,154

Hides,undrsd.

France Other

1,059

reported by value.

20.015

631

Watches....

Linseed

!

949

16,049

13

Jewelry, &c.
Jewelry

2,666

1.

Sept. 28

N. Carolina,

18,575
7,332

51,925

8HIP-

Florida

470,078

338,530

5,037

9,689 Fish
3,621 Fruits, &c.
2,5121 Lemons
2,048! Oranges....
46,785! Nuts

3,761

202
76

Hides,dres’d
India rubber..
Ivory

92,479

317,024

goods.. 93 015

21,417 Fancy

2S,094
9,042
3,683

Hair

Wines

25,084 Wool, bales...

604

13
108

876

Champ, bkts

1.910

1,118
194

Flax
Furs

9,682
892
5

341,252
329,063
636,579
15,627
11,640

253,500

4.637 Wines, &c.

106,807

Soda, sal....
Soda, ash...

26,111

138

201 Tea

84.891

35
Soda,bi-carb 2,000

'.

Opium

4,792,255 2,638,729

Great

5,763

Sept. 21.
Mobile, Sept. 21
Charleston, Sept. 21.
Savannah, Sept. 21Texas, Sept. 14
New York, Sept. 28*
N. Orleans,

34,407

......

3,408 Tobacco......
2,585 Waste

3,086
2,607
7,381
3,459

380

Oil, Olive...

Tin slabs,lbs

hhds,
bbls.. 5,971
760 Sugar,bxs&bg 4,710

9,759

...

16,359

Tin, bxs....

SEPT.

429.109

587,731

7,964 Sugar,
1,700 tcs <fe

942
957
19.169

Cr Tartar

138,836

3,106

Steel

14,558Rags.:.

19,427
13,293

7,257,691

Spelter, lbs.

3,182

46,652

645

Lead, pigs..

1 TO—

m’nts

since

PORTS.

3,019
155,795
119,611
205,585
59,769

10,172
202,850
307,203

SEPT.

EXPORTED 8INCE

rec’d

1865.

and

mentioned.

'Stocks at Dates
'

stocks, &c.:

(bales) since Sept. 1,

Exports of Cotton

Receipts and

time

Jan. 1,
1866.

the
week.
Hardware...
Hardware...
329
Iron.RRb’rs

times,

4,819
382,320

week.
Buttons......

For

Same

Since
Jan. 1,
1866.

For
the

since Sept. 1,. show¬

the total receipts, exports,

the week ending Sep. 22, since Jan
1866, and for the corresponding period in 1865 :
[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.] Same
Since
at this port for

articles of commerce

399

THE CHRONICLE.

8

251

779

387
....

....

137

775

771

500

•

•

•

•

....
....

....

....

..

—

Tolal Spain, etc

....

|. .....

8

771

|

779

....

| 19,957

I 8,146 4,311 6,245 ! 18,702
previous week, making the total receipts since
Grand Total
17,473 bales. The exports for this week from all
ports The Growing Crop.—The reports we have received this
only reach 8,541 bales of which 6,808 bales were to
week indicate a return of brighter weather in the South, but
pool, 34 bales, were to London, 49 bales were to
worms
bales to Bordeaux, 29 bales to Barcelona, 200 bales to Malaga^ they show that the rains of the past few weeks, and
which the damp warm weather has helped to multiply,
251 to Bremen and 771 to Genoa, as follows:
-Exported this week to—
Total
injured the crop, but to what extent cannot so soon
B’deaux BarceLiver771
6,245 and must, of course, depend much upon the future.
Exported from—
251
49
63
5,174
New York, bales....
29
34
no confidence in the statements that the crop is
or
602
200
Boston, bales.......
....

the

have

be known
We put
destroyed,
nearly so. Without doubt, the prospect now is not as favor
few weeks since; this is^perhaps especially so in
able
Alabama, Louisiana and Texas; but there is still the promise
The total foreign exports since September 1, from all the
of
fair yield,
ports, pqw reaches 34,847 bal^, Below, we give our table of
....

....

.

.

.

New Orleans,

bales..

.

.

1,631

bales.

6,808




....

....

.

402

Charleston, bales....
Total this w’k

.

.

....

34

451

....

....

29

.

*m

.

....

251

....

200

....

771

1,634

8,544

as a

a

The

following are the receipts of Cotton at this port for
the week, and since September 1:
This
week.
Bales.

J.

.

|.

.

.

This
week.
Bales.

Since

Sept. 1.

2,105

5,726

276
1.377

1,763

From
South Carolina
North Carolina

4.ia5

2,874

From
New Orleans
Texas
Savannah

Bales.

Mobile
Florida

“

Per Railroad

431

1,348

“

1,060

10

“

Sept. 7.
**

14.

“

21.

21,967

The

following are the receipts of cotton at Boston, Phila¬
delphia, and Baltimore for the week, and since Sept. 1:
From—
New Orleans
Texas
Savannah
Mobile
Florida
South Carolina
North Carolina

3,008

/—Philad'phia.—>
Since

This

-—Baltimore.—,
This

Since

Sept. 1. week. Sept. 1.
448
.'...

week.

2,330

—

207
530

....

40

1,507

81

4

28'

13...
20...

“
“

.

.

27=..

.

Aug. 3...
“

7,005

930

4

“

“

Sept. 7...
“

July

6..

it

14...
21...

“

*

.

.

.

6.880

9.(505

91.801

35® 30

?8@ —

3,643 10,960

3,311

91,628

30(W,37

xte—

1,046

7,497

*)<}

88.115

Xte—

6,378 83.221 35® 36
9,119 112,087 nominal.
3,176 110,715 35© 30
3.777

99,337

-©—

Xte—

xtexte-—
—te—
9-K5®

34(0.35

148 @149
148 @...
lktelX 144%©, 144%
1
@1% 115%@145%
Xte — 148% @149
X(® - 145%©,—
—te
@-^7—
Xte — 144 @—
Xte — 144 te—
Xte — 143 ©143%

By steam.

Mobile.

Sept. 22.—By mail we have received one week’s later dates
The receipts for the week ending Sept. 21 were 77*2
bales, against 479 bales last week, and the shipments were only 1*22

from Mobile.

bales, all of which were to New Orleans, against a shipment of 1,540
leaving the stock on hand and on shipboard, not clear¬
ed, of 26,436 bales. The following are the weekly receipts, sales, and
exports, for a series of weeks, and the stock, price of middling,
rates of freight to Liverpool and New York, and
price of gold at the
bales last week ;

close of each week

:
,

Date.

Receipts.

July 6

Sales.

Exp’s

Freight

Price of To
To New
Stock mid. L'pool. York.
30,496 30©— %
1% te X
25.2(57 29© -i0 X
1% te %
5
84,978 31© 32 /«
i>; ® ? 8
35.108 31 @32 X
IX @ X

.

Price of

•

.

144@147
145@143

Xte—

148@149
145©149
144@146

Sept.
Sept.

.

.

•

.

.

200
150

401

307
^286
187
194
115
37

Stock.

7,584 nominal —
21®
7,015
6,599
21®
5,602
21©
9,401
21®— %
8,924
20®— %
9.173
20®21 %
20(7/21 %
8,674
20©,21 %
7,605
5.919
20@21 %
20© 21 %
5,789

616
957

1,004
1,202

151
100

771
784
37
686

50

1,263
1,860

.

.

.

Price To Livermid.*
pool.

169

Specie, ex-revenue tux of 2c.

,

To New

@9-16
@9-16
@9-16
@9-16
te©@%
teX
te X
@9-16

Price

York.t
1 @—

gold.
147®...

1
1
1
1

1
1
—

—

@9-16 1

te-

115@146

te~
te-

145® —
143@144
143@143%
143@144

@—
@—
®@—
®—
te—

teX

145@147

143©146
143@146
140@143
111 @143

+ Per steamer.

BREADSTUFFS.
Friday, P. M., Sept. 28.

.

152)4®—
150% © 151

2.012

.

9,499 98.604
5,998 93.597

it
4 i

.

100

205

27..
3..
10..
17..
21..
31.
7.
14.

*

*

725
38S
5S3

13
20..

it

1,352

252

*8© .%
Xte% (<r —
hte—
xtex
X(®X
%©> i-i6 XteX

4,(582

1,003
1,479

.

.

6,000

Stock.
9,136 108,506
4.476 100,783

-

Rece’ts. Sales. Exp.

Date.

147

Price
"old.

1.108

1,705
1,354

.

31...

Sales. Exp.

149@150

xte■

Xte—
XteXteXte-

117 bales to New York, and 52 bales to New Orleans. Below
give the receipts, sales, and shipments for a series of weeks, and the
stock, price of midding, rates of freight to Liverpool aud New York,
and price of gold at the close of each week :

—

To Liver- To New
York.*
pool.

Price
Mid.
34® 30
31(7/ 35
35@36
85© 3(5

6,7 0
8,300
0,800
5,025
10,000
5,150
3,700
3,620

.

10-,17...
24...

“

2,509
1,386
1,461

©-

*

were

tt
—

Freights
3,277

2,872
2,300

®31
@32

X
X
X
X
X
X
X

we

t;

—

to Malaga per brig Pablo; 402 bales to Bordeaux per ship Lis¬
bon, 883 to New York, 1,213 to Boston, and 613 to Philadelphia. Stock
on hand
Sept. 21 was 91,628 bales. The receipts, sales, and exports for
a series of weeks, and the stock,
price of middle g rates of freight to
Liverpool and New York, and price of gold at the close of each week
since July '6, were as follows;

6,.

1,683
3,176

30
31
33

®@@@©te@@@©—

Freights.
401
1

were

“

557
623
794

3,883
4,274
5,535
5,105

.

23

New Orleans, Sept. 2*2.—The mail returns for the week ending Sept.
21 show the receipts to be 2,643 bales, against *2,01*2 bales last week.
The shipments far the last week were 3,311 bales : of which 200 bales

July

267

—

....

401

bales 4,014

4.500

3,852

X
X
X
X
X

Price

York.
gold.
xte— 152@155
xte— 146@148
xte- 146@148
X te¬ 143@149
xt®— 146©148
X@r- 149@150

15.—We have received one week later statement by.
The receipts for week ending Sept. 14 were 37
bales, against 146 fast week, and the shipments were 169 bales,
against 1,860 last week. The shipments for the week ending Sept. 14

(4

Rec’ps.

3,822

903

To New

pool.

Galveston, Sept.

1,082

174

.

Unset’ed
Unset’ed
30 @—
31 ®30 ®-31

586

To Liver-

mail from Galvestou.

Aug.

Date.

950

1,121

■

—

81

784

receipts

1,089

.

4,433 31 ®32
4,379 33%@34
4,158 34 @—

564
362

450
350
320
320
125
280
480
.729
.355
690
045

-—Freight for Dpl’d—.

2,322
4

Norfolk, &c
«fcc

201

478

....

30
17

New York,
Railroads

.

.

“31..

5,541

v—Boston.—,
This
Since
week. Sept. 1.

299
308
866
' 350
7*23
314
688
943
480

17..
24..

“

51

...

26..

Aug. 3.

1,768

Foreign

2.655

19.!

“

Bales.

12

“

Sept. 1.

Norfolk, Baltimore, &c.

621

Price of
Ship¬
Date. Rec’ts. Sales. ments. Stock.
mid..
626
620 1,274
4,708 31 ®32
July 5.

Since

646
72
634

Total fflr the week.
Total since Sept. 1.

Total

[September 29,1666.

THE CHRONICLE.

400

gold.

The whole market for flour and

grain develops great
strength, even at the speculative advance which lias been es¬
tablished in the past fortnight.
The floods at the West have
so
interrupted communication that supplies, present and pros,
pective, are very small.
The heavy rains have undoubt¬
edly inflicted some damage, and the accounts from foreign
crops are such as to give reason to expect an export demand
at relatively high prices. The local and coastwise demand is
large ; and, except of corn, the stocks in store are small.
Flour has come to market moi*e freely ; but as the views
of consignors are generally above present limits, a large pro- .•
portion of the receipts are going into store. The trade has
bought freely, and there has been some speculation. Prices
close at a material advance, resting wholly on. regular de¬
mand.
The flours most in request are the better grades of

Spring extras, and they

arc

sparingly offered.

and has had an upward tendency
throughout the week, although millers have bought only
702
572
148©149%
687
2,927 32,868 32®— X
Aug. 3.....
ix te x 145© 140% sufficient to supply pressing wants.
There is a pretty liberal
815
10
1.350 32.333 30®— X
1% te x 145© 146%
17
7:34
1.627 31,410 30®— X
1% te % 149®—
delivery at Chicago and Milwaukee, but not sufficient to pro¬
25
1.513 1.850 3.320 29.(563 30®31 X
IX te % 150©152
31
1.420 1,900 3.547 29,009 30®31 X
mise any decided accumulation of stocks.
ix te’X 144® 145
640 1.3U0 3,802 25.847 M8! 30 X
Sept. 7
XX te X 142® 144
14
479 2,9uO 1,540 24.786 30®31
Corn has come to market in very large quantities, b it on
X
1% te X 143@144
21
122 25,436 32@33 X
1
4,000
® % 142® 145
a
speculative demand from the West, based on reports of
The demand through the week has been general and active, and
prices have advanced 2 cents, the market closiug for low middlings at injury to the crop by frost and flood, it has mostly gone into
30@31, aud for good middlings 36@37.
store, the stock being increased to about 2,500,000 bushels.
Savannah, Sept. 22.—The receipts for the week ending Sept. 21 were British
shippers have been able to do but little, although
1,237 bales, against 494 last week ; and the shipments this week wTere
1,433, of which 1,216 bales were to New Y ork, 186 bales to Baltimore, and favored by lower freights and higher exchange.
The coast¬
31 bales to Boston.
Below we give the receipts, shipments, prices, <fcc.,
wise trade has bought freely, and the close developes con¬
for a series of weeks :
siderable strength, free from speculative features.
It seems
Stock-.
Price Mid..
Receipts. Shipm’s.
July 6
2 198
12,374
certain that the receipts at this market will be considerably
13
2,146
J3....

“

20
27

“

“
“

1,070

850

5.018

672
826

...

1.9(H)

4,310

2,750
2,750
3,200
1,500
1,600

1,017

151 ©152
150© 152

Wheat is very scarce,

149©151

...

“

...

“

“

“

10 ni

“

“

Aflg.
“
“
“
“

20
27

4,299
673

3

a
O•

10.....
17

24
31

V

( J

31
32

u IHU\

32

1,4.33
844

11,096

1,631

10,309
9,349

2,'57
.

*Xf\

10,800
11,270

i 4

Sept 7

1.782

1,543

5,205
4,156

1,4.33

3,950

te-

®32%
32%©.‘30

te—

31

te—

30
30
31

@31
@31

0,144

14
21

te-

“

“

©31%

Charleston, Sept. 22—The receipts for the week ending Sept. 21
amount to 950 bales, against 1,089 bales last week.
Shipments for this
week amount to 3,176 bales, against 1,683 bales last week, of which
1,634 bales were to Liverpool, per ship President Fillmore ; 709 to New
York, 402 to Boston, and 431 to Baltimore. Market has been steady, and

£rices have advancedsales, and exports for for series of weoks, and 645
lies. The
receipts, from 1 to 2c. Sales a the week amount to the

stock, price of middling, rates of freight to Liverpool and New York,
and price of gold at the close of each week since
July 5, were as fol¬
low#;




reduced for the balance of the

season.

Oats, Barley and Rye have been active at
partly speculative.
The following are the closing quotations :
Flour, unsound

38 bbl $7 50@10 TO
Superfine State & West. 9 75@10 50
Extra State
11 25@12 50
Shipping R. hoop Ohio. 11 75@12 25
Extra

..

Western,
to good

Double Extra Western
and St. Louis

11 00@13 00
13 25@16 25

Southern supers

12 00@13 60
Southern, faney and ex. 13 75@16 50
Canada,

common

choice extra
Rye Flour, fine and

to

@

.

super

fine

Corn

6 00® 7 25

Chicago
bushel

Spring
'.

1 90® 2 60
2 00® 2 55.

®
2 75® 3 05

White..

2 S5® 3 25

Corn, Western Mixed
Western Yellow
Western White

Rye
Oats, Western cargoes...

Jersey and State
Barley
Malt

Peas, Canada.

meal, Jersey and

Brandywine

per

Milwaukee Club
Red Winter

large advance,

Amber do

com¬

mon

Wheat,

a

4 80® 5 15

White beans

..:

90®

92

..®

93

®

96

1 CO® 1 30
44®
58
60®
63
1 20® 1 35
1 35® 1 50
®
@
....

*"

’>

--''
■:.. V

Kl'V’• • :v'•'

•

•

•

•••

>

'

‘ ''

*'

V:Lfe;;;rv^^'V:--..

'

•

" *
-r "■ *'

•••■.••'.'•":•■

•:;

■•

it*'*-' -*t'

'

-

: *•'

-

■". ;;• • •

'-'-•••••'

-

'. •.-,_ - :•

.

•''

■

•

.

*

-1866.
For the w’k. Since Jan. 1.

82,085

1,710,955

3,440
131,395
1,309,555
13,260
51,580
152,995

meal, bbls
Wheat, bush
Corn, bush
Rye, bush
Burley, Ac., bush
Outs, bush
Corn

'

*

*■'

'•

* 'q
••'•*•"

V

*
.

*

1 "'

•-

■

■

•' '

•

‘

v

'

' ’*~
'•>,.

' '•

•

.

■

1,831,890
16.663,410
447,365
682,710
5,374,455

FOREIGN

Flour,
bbls.

219,440

? £ i£

>*

•'.

-■

•

401

21$, (A) E do
inch 14, Rox-1865.
bury A 4 4 21$, Appleton A 36 inch 22, do B 40 inch 21, do D 20, do
For the w*k. S’e Jan. 1.
W 48 inch 82, do shirt N 30 inch 19, Pocasset Canoe 39 inch 24, do K
80,195
2,235,655 ?6 inch
19, do H 28 inch 14, Canton 28 inch 121, Newburyport 28 inch
1,675
239,080
187,205
5,388,415 12$, Phoenix Cotton Manuf. Co. 39 iuch 23$, World Wide 36 inch 18$,
19, (A) L Fine sheeting 30$-inch 21$, (P) L do 36$-inch
20, (P) E do 33 inch 20, (A) N Fine shirting 29

7,917,640
247,725
818,925
6,532,745

760,335
16,070
111,770

346,965

EXPORTS.

C. meal,
bbls.

3’

33 inch

RECEIPTS.

Flour, bbls

.

T:^:. ••-■■

THE CHRONICLE.

The movement at this market has been as follows :
•

‘

•

t**. •'. • -•: - y-s -V :

'••
■

September 29, 1866.]
■

’*

•-

Wheat,
bush.

Rye,

Corn,

Oats,

bush.

bush.

bush.

237,772
5,240,483

Grafton 28 inch 14, do 30 inch 15.
Bleached Sheetings

and

Shirtings

are

rather

quiet, with the

ex¬

some leading makes of 7-8 and 4-4 goods, which are
sold close up to production.
Some makes have been advanced
one-half to one cent, but it has checked trade.' Lonsdale is sold at 34c,
Rockdales are active at 31 cents. York Mills are sold up at 45,Wamsutta

ceptions of

14,, C^noe 27 inch 13 Grafton
27$, Aquidnecks 4-4 21. do 7-8
709
848
Br. N. A« Col. this week
since July 1 96,611 14,751
20,594 ”"566 19$, White Rock 36 inch 33, O J Rathbun 7-8 19, Social Mill Co.,
N. Y. 4-4, 21, 30, do C 7-8 18, Manville R 24, do XX 4-4, 26, Bos¬
810
We*t Indle«», this week.
4,652
2,493
4,151
since Jaly 1 62,638 26,719
600
16,336 ton 18 inch, Kent River 3-4 1*2, Rockdale B 4-4, 31, Gold Medal 4-4, 26,
36,109
Harvard 35 inch 22, Montemaire, 7-8, 21, Uxbridge imperial 4-4 27$,
810
Total Export, this week 12,187
5,300
250.125
3,341
9,342
since July !
228,792 41,991
5,300 5,389,683 205,790
Waltham L 72 inch 62$, do X 33 inch 23, do W 42 inch 30, do M 81
133,711
since Jau. 1,’66.. 712,523 108,347
265,205 204,500 9,436,293 950,968
inch 77$, do N 90 inch 85, Bartlett Steam Mills 83 inch 24, do 7-8 22$, do
same time 1865.. 1,011,782
94,306 1,634,602 160,000 1,706,435
54,100
4-4, 30$, Newmarket 38 iuch 22, do 36 inch 25.
Chicago.—The following tables show the movement in breadstufts
Drills are fairly active for export, at steady prices.
Globe
during the week ending Sept. 22, and from January 1st to date, with Steam Mills are sold at 20 cents, Massachusetts fine 19, heavy 25, and
comparative statistics:
India 24.
Gt. Britain, this week..
“
“

•

Bince July 1

“

mm-

316

19,187

7,638
125,302

188,674

40, Washington 7 8, Hallowell |,
f, 14, do 7-8, 15, Auburnville 4 4

“

......

“

“

“

“

“

“

“

—Shipments.

-Reeeipts.Since

fc

Last W’k^
Jan. 1.
Flour, bbls
1,123,203
58,519
5,991,889
Wheat, bush... 607,216
Corn
632,717
28.430,146
Oats
126,487
6.440,470
Rye
42,339
964,049
Barley...
62,076
345,304

Since

Same time

Jan. 1.

Last w’k.

1865.

57,967 1,067,963
648,506
442,446 4,800,672 4,560,688
609,390 27,976,072 17,870,410

761,387

5,790,964
19,624,032
7,854,274

7,620,016

30,509
32,980

692,411
621,775

849,102
341,808

18,688

IvIovement

Eastward
by Canal.—The following
what there was afloat last Saturday ou canals destined

Buffalo,
ending;
Sept. 24... .-7
Sept. 17

From
week
.

6,805,246
296,549
142,369

will show about

for tide-water

:

Corn.

Oats.

888,890

169,760

Barley.
22,2-20

16.660

149,371

1,003,380

217,292

22,870

40,970

281,631
23,717

1,892,270

387,052

45,110

57,630

1,935

305,348

715

210,127

22,305

239,838

2,021,314
2,428,980
1,883,139

Wheat.
132.260

Flour.
790
3

Tot’l, Buffalo 14 d.‘
F’m

»

S’e time
1865.

790

1,145

Oswego, 9days.

Total afloat
Previous week

Corres’ding time,*05.

Rye.

28,484

129,044

387,052

73,594

57,6:30

319,742

41,921

614,341

392,664

48,270
51,072

at Lake Ports.—Receipts at the following lake ports for
ending Sept. 22 :

Receipts

the week

Flour.
bbls?.

Wheat.
bush.

Corn.
bush.

Oats.
bush.

Barley.

Rye.

bush.

Chicago..:

58,519

597,216

11,888

355,165

30,110
37,396

33,396

136,487
10,194
23,976

62,096

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit

632,717
11,869
57,891

bush.
42.339

76,714

5,S96

6,2*23

1,727

63

63,823
41,382

48,434

79,311

82,227

Totals.
Previous week
Cor. week, 1865

137,913 1,062,491
892,617
114,667
934,604
106.765

176,880
167,816
352, m

708,374
918,442

1,073,067

.

3,612
2,420

58.133

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
Friday, Sept. 28,1866, P. M.

Dry Goods Trade this week has been hardly as brisk as
during the two previous weeks. The advance in cotton and
the unfavorable reports from the South has tended to pro¬
long the active season and holders of goods are everyway
satisfied with the month’s business.
It has been altogether
The

one

of the most successful month’s for

The sickness
and the
ness

South

a

long time.

has made that trade rather backward

a cash busi¬
The demand from the

disposition of most merchants here to do

has somewhat

restricted trade.

West continues active for seasonable

goods, while the trade in
There has been talk of ad¬

others is

merely nominal.
vancing prices during the week, but with the lateness of the
season there will be great
risk in so doing, and both agents
and jobbers are disposed to act with caution.
They have
learned wisdom from the results of advancing prices last
some

year.
Brown

Sheetings

and

Shirtings have been less active until within

a
day or two past, when the advance aud firmness in the cotton market
has caused a renewed demand for heavy goods. Prices have fluctuated

Corset Jeans are in fair request and prices are steady; Indian Or
chard sell at 16 cents, Canoe Ii'ver 15, Hallowell 15, Uucas 15, New
market colored 17,and Silver Lake brown 20.
Canton Flannels were more firmly at the reduction noticed last
week. Globe A A sell at 27, Columbia‘26, Mount Vernon 25$, Nashua
A 27$, Youug America 24, Clay 22, Excelsior 2*2, Eagle 22.

fairly active, and prices are firm. Ham¬
Stripes sell at 31 cents, Willow Brook Checks 22$, Wauregan 3x3 23, do 6x3 24, Albany 3x3 13, do 6x3 14, Louisiana plaids
22$, Ringgold fast plaids 20$, Simpson’s Chambrays 22, Philadel¬
phia 16.
Ticks are in light demand, except for the leading makes.
Willow
Brook Ticks 47$, Farmer’s aud Miners 52$, Albany 13$, American 20, Glen
Alien 3 4 13, Chattanooga £ 16, Concord 4-4 22, Pacific Extra $ 30, Paific 4-4 40c, Willow Grove 30 Sacondale £ 13, West Branch 4-4 32$, do
No. 2 $ 25, Windsor $ 21, Henry Clay 3-4 19, Suwanee 4-4 23.
Denims and Cottonades are fairly active at last week’s quotations*
Ashton Glenn brown Denims
sell at 20 cents, do blue 21,
Homestead brown 21, do blue ,22, Peabody blue 17$, Woodland 16,
Burlington 14$, Madison brown 19, Providence blue 19,Charter Oak 81,
Albany 17$, and Wauregan 22, Yantic 21, Arlington 25.
Print Cloths continue rather inactive. There is more inquiry than
Stripes

and

Checks

are

ilton

last week, but no

Holders

particular chaDge in prices.

are

asking

a

slight advance, owing to the advance in cotton, but we hear of no sides
above 13$ for 64x66.
J
Prints continue to be steadily called for, and the leading makes are
sold up or sold to arrive. There is talk of an early advance in the leading
styles. Arnolds were last sold at 17c. Merrimac W 21, D 20, Garner’s 21 $,
Amoskeagpink 20$, do purple 19$, do shirting 18$, do dark 18$, Swiss
rubyl9$, Dutchess B 16$, Lowell dark 17,do light 17,Naumkeag6$, York
Mourning 17$, Spring Valley 13$, Wamsutta dark 16, light 16, Dusters
16, Hamilton purple 20, do Chocolates 19, Sprague’s fancy styles 26$,
Double purples 26$, Shirtings 26$, Solid colors 19, Canaries 19, do Chintz
19, Orange polkas 20, Indigo black and green 19$, do green and yellow 20,
do blue,green and yellow 20, Madder rubies 19, Shirting 21$, pink frocks
21, Purple do 20, Staple style light colors 19$, do dark colors 20, German
plaids 19$, Fancy style light colors 19$. Columbia, full madders 16$,
Concord madders 17, do purples 18, do pinks 18, do plain shades 18,
Glen Cove full madders 13$, Wauregan fancies 18, do rubies 19, do pinks
19, do purples 19.
Jacconets are not very active. White Rock, high colors 20, do plain 21
Ginghams are in fair request for leading styles.
Glasgow sell at 26
Roanoke 19, and Lancaster 27.
Cambrics are in fair demand.
Saratoga 10$, Milton Mills 12$, Hal¬
lowell 14$, Pacific 14, and Adriatic 14.
«
Mouslin de Laines are still in active request and prices are very firm.
Pacific and Manchester are sold at 28, Pacific armures 30, do Robes
de Chambre 3*2$@35, Pacific and Manchester all Wool 42$.
Linseys are active and the leading makes are closely sold up. Miners
Flannels 45 Stillman A Co’s 35$, C. S. A Co’s 32, Black Hawk 32$,
Saco 40, S. C. Carr A Co’s 30, Saxony Mills, all woool, 40$, Wool
Filling, 32, Laurel Dale, 31$, White Rock 32$.
.

Flanel8 are active and firm. White Standard Flanels sell at 85 for
No. 8 and 77$ for No. 4. Plain Scarlet and Orange range from 87$ to
65 cents.

dull for all but particularly desirable makes. The divisions
M irket and the large stocks of goods on hand causes
goods to be passed at considerable concessions and prices are nominaL
Slater’s black range from f 3.50@4.50; cotton warps $2.15 for No. 1,
$2.05 for No. 2, and $1.95 for No. 3, 6-4 Leicester ladies’ cloths $1.60.
Cassimeres and Satinets are only in demand for the leading makes*
There is considerable activity in the trade, but from holders pressing their
goods upon the market at nominal rates. Merchants’ Woolen Company
silk mixed cassimeres sell at $1 87$, Warumbo Manufacturing Company
doeskins $3, Broad brook A $2, heavy fancy cassimeres $2 12, Swift River
Co.’s heavy fancy cassimeres $1 87, Clenham Co.’s sackings $1 65,
_

Cloths

are

of the Wool

$ a cent lower than last week. Jobbers
by temporarily reducing prices, but they
have been compelled to advance them again. Standards are held at 22@
22$c. Atlantic A is sold at 22$, Indian Head A 37-inch 22$,do B 80-inch
18, Nashua extra A 36-inch 21, do fine D 86-inch 20, do XX 22$, Wal¬
tham F 40-inch 27, Wachusetts 22, Bristol 40-inch 20, G. Washington
heavy 36-inch 21, Griswold 3-4 12$, Indian Orchard W 33-inch
75c, Monson A Brirafield Snipsic Woolen Co.76t Evans, Sea20, do B B 88 inch 20, do C 37 inch 22, do A 40 inch 24, Massachusetts
grave, M«*»on A Co’s. $2 @9. 25, Evan9, .Seagrave, A Co., silk mix¬
A 4-4 21, do B 4-4 21, Medford 21, Newmarket Manuf. Co. 36 inch 21
ture $2@2 25, fancies $1 75@2 26, double twist $1 87@2 26; S. A
do do heavy D 36 inch 22,
Atlautic sheeting (P) A 37 inch’ H. Sayles, do fancies $1 25@l 75; Mechanicsville C., do fancies $i 76
22, do (A) H do 37-inch 22, (P) H do 37-inch 22, (A) D Medium @2 25, F. M. Ballou A Co., fancies 1 76@2 26.
Hoop Skirts are fairly active at unchanged prices.
sheeting 87 inch 20, (A) P do 37 inch 19, (A) V Heavy shirting 80 inch
but little.

Some makes

are

have tried to attract trade




»loom and anvil 50c, Rockl md satinets 75c@35c, Monson Wool-

•-

prices. Crash bleached 15c, do
unbleached 16c, Huckabuck bleached 20c, do unbleached 21c.
Foeeio
oods have moved very freely, both at auction and private
tale. The
ding styles of dress goods, alapacas, merinoes, bombazines,
etc, have
intaioed prices, while some other goods are rather slow.
Woolen go ds have been in demand for the leading makes of coatings
American Linen

is steady at former

155
2,634

2

2,319

Braids & bds.. 10
Silk & worst. .12
Silk & cot ton. 44

8,172
10,342

Cotton Goods’ Market, London
Wool Sales, etc.—In reference to these markets, our own correspondent
in London, writing under the date of Sept. 12, 6tates :
Manchester, Sept. 12.— Business in shipping yarns has somewhat
increased, and the transactions have been to a fair extent. There is,
however, a want of buoyancy in the market, ami the transactions con¬
cluded have been at fully the late decline in the quotations.
As re¬
gards home trade yarup, there has been but little animation'and in
the small amount of busit ess done, spinners have submitted to a slight
concession in price.
Cloth has commanded but little attention, and as
regards several descriptions, the quotations rule next to nominal.
Prices are generally lower.
Annexed are some of the principal quo¬

10
Shawls...
Worsteds.. ..348
Delaines
3

quality
Second quality...

Common

quality

5

quality..

Second quality
Best quality

....

GOLD

56

Reeds

lb.

17
19

45 Inches—
64
66
lb. oz. lb. oz.
9 0
10 0

oz.

72

lb. oz.
10 8

Weights..... 8 4
9d. 15s. Od. 18s. Od. 20s.

Prices...... 13s.

20

MANUF’S
Cottons

Od.

70
d.
26
28
30

26

90
d. ’
30
32

80
d.
28
30
32

100
d.

72

lb. oz.
lb. oz.
lb. oz.
11
8
10 .4
11 0
17s. 3d. 20s. Od. 22e. Od

Ginghams

Shawls ........7
Gloves
3
Worsteds... .156

2,319

Worsted yarn. 11
Braids & bds. 15
Cot. & worst.128

9,908
57,855

importations of dry goods at this port for the week endiug Sept.
27, 1866, and the corresponding weeks of 1864 and 1865, have beeu ns
:

silk

do
do

$101,397

299

M&nufaclures ol' wool...
do
cotton..

39
203
108

...

flax....
Miscellaneous dry gooas.

734
1515
319

22,681

718

Total
WITHDRAWN

69

$264,614

PERIOD.

THE SAME

Manufactures of wool...
do
cotton..

272
silk.... 157
flax .... 448
Miscellaneous dry goods.
77

2222

$921,665

Total
Add entfd

forconsumpt’n

Total thrown xpon

92,424
5o,885
264,614

718

$96,866

909
7032

75,931
137, UK)

do
do

$683,458
189,993
280,709
252,643
151,243

1455
520
271
928
319

6493 $1,558,046

INTO THE MARKET DURING

310
77
42
271
209

$565,328

1208

-1866.Value.

Pkgs.

7032 $2,903,108

AND THROWN

FROM WAREHOUSE

SEPTEMBER 27, 1866.

450,737
750,106
372,741
135,917

1586

8,920
101,137
30,479

$263,699
2,903,108

21,151
63,001
62,890

19,791

883
324
168
635
216

$365,690

2226
3493

silk

....

do

flax

....

7941

234,736
104,461

57,164

*3,166,607

5719

THE 8AME PERIOD.
416
159
$63,458
118
74
22,379
66
52
83,446
262
213
54,976
146
17
2,420

$278,893

666

93,585

307
90
628

78,517

144

161,434
40,831

1835

$653,290

718

264,614

Total entered at the port. 2553

$917,904
$917,1)04

Miscellaneous

drygoods.

Total

Add ent’d for consumpt’n

DETAILED
The

$187,210
37,298
66,051
76,235
6,524

..66

515
7032

$226,6^9
2,903,108

1008
3493

$373,318
1,558,046

7547

$3,129,787

4501

$1,931,364

239 $139,958
48
23,636

Carpeting... .114

Cot.




PORT OK NEW YORK FOR THE
SPECIE) AT THE 21, 1866.

ENDING SEPTEMBER

given in packages when not otherwise

5,401

Chains & an. 126

Copper

Total

1455 $683,458

35,459

Pkgs. Value.
21
Braids &bds.,14
Hdk’s
Gloves

fUtotoofti*. .■ 11

tt’i

5,092

..

159

f

244

9.783

2

5,534
$429

3

923

„w

m©

2,899

1,471 71,226
Lead, pigs... .645
4,067
Metal goods.. .24
5,714
Needles
4 2,606
14
7,885
Nickel...
Old metal
2,813
tons

952

4,809
719

Sasparilla.. ...34
Soda,bi crb.2,000

46

Iron, other,

2,312

Prus»..8

11,864

tons

21,188

Potash, bich. .31

850

tons

Iron, sheet,

35 13,370
16,464

Opium
do

Iron, pig,

13,348
43,814

’

7,497

.8
Saddlery .... ..17
Steel
3,106
Tin, bxs,..16,359

Plated

ware

sal... 1,118
194
ash

6,124
6.163

69

2,956

•

755

108

40,940

Spices—
Ginger...

109

Pimento.

Other

Verdigris
Furs, &c—
Fruits, &c.

4,690
Spool
17
manuf’s of cotton.
5,9S8
123
43,748
203 $79,143 Hose
23,056 Cottons
21.904
80
5,365 Colored
520 $189,993
834
Total
2
Worsteds... 660 827,597 Prints
2,128
8
Hose
14,764 Ginghams
37
manuf’s of bilk.
610
4
2
1,313 Muslins
Merinos
56 $93,245
6,859 Silks
Worsted y’m.27
10,142 Emh’d mus’n.ll
Velvets ,rf, f;29 "25,417
Lasting* ...... 1
236 Velvets, . .,,31 12,792

Blankets
61
Shawls
35
Gloves .......13

do
Ii: l/o
Liv.' *' *e....
Lieroui ...1,730
Oils
7
do ess
137
do linseed.345
do olive...380

Sponges

Laces

146 : $6,524

lotal

1,997
53 21,797
21,831 <utiery...:
20
2,986
1
455 Guns
500 15,483 Hardware.... 329 36,295
Iron hoop,tns.53
3,066

do
do

of the movement the past week,

Pkgs. Value.
& worst.211
88,129

1,245
1,344

Suspdrs&elas.S

$66,051

Total

24,501
872

Gambier... 3150
Cubebs
Gums, crude. .53

Saltpetre.....'.

CONSUMPTION.

FOR

303

1,491

Corsets........6
Straw goods.. 49

specified.]

..

Furs

ENTERED

of wool.

362

$2,141

gloves.. .5
Matting
83

...

Paints.

ending Sept. 27, IS66 :

manuf’s
Woolens
Cloths

MISCELLANEOUS.

Lea'r.

3,070
450
1,711

$76,235

262

Total

....

$2,412,910

STATEMENT.

following is a detailed statement

Pkgs. Value.

5,016

..20

.

$854,864
1,558,046

92.813

HOUSING DURING

cotton..

....

Pkgs. Value.
Pkgs. Value.
Pkgs. Value.
Other
;
1,157
Jewelry. &c.—
China, Glass <fc E.
Miscellaneous—
jewelry
14 24,729
ware—
Baskets
.60
2,228
Watches...... 17 33,461
3S1
Bottles
Buttons
141 31,637
China
189 11,018 Leather, Hides, &c.—
867
Bristles
.14
1,621 Burr stones
Earth’nw’e.. .940 33,664
Clay
688
Glass
20,137 34,007 Boots &shs. ..49 5,023 Cheese
33
2,260
Hides, dress
Glassware. ...338 11,379
202 77,76S Cigars
12,511
ed
Glass plate... .95 14,046
Coal, tons.11,026 24,126
Hides, undress¬
Drugs, &c.—
4,732
ed...
82,601 Corks
317
..31
Alkali
557
Cotton, bales..3
115
7,766 Patent leather.2
Acids.
38
Clocks
31
6,478
970 Liquors, Wines,
Ammonia, sal.10
Cocoa, bgs...511
7.160
&c.
394
Arrowroot... 200
.....146
1,<03 Coflee, bgsl9,606 347,615
8,204 Ale
Argols
214
93,015
33 1,290 Fancy goods
Aniline
3,182 Brandy
2,248
Cordials
130
412 Feathers
Alum
4,942 Gin
13
2,7.86
.40
1,727 Flax
Albumen
1,406
3,334
200
1,586 Fish
Porter
Bark, Peruv.481
7,144 Rum
2
238 Furniture,.... 10 1,109
Barytes
188 1,611 Whiskey
2,122
517 Grinds!ones
5
Blea powder.300
5,415 Wines
5,037 60,250 Gunny clothl845 50,081
Cream tartar.. .8
1,974
Haircloth
6
2,990
Chickory
75
487 Champagne, .676 4,452 Hemp
4088 47,007
baskets
Cochineal
24 2,460
Honey
72
4,364
1,098 Metals, <fcc.
Cudbear
23
535 35,892
10
Bronzes
1,489 Hops

-

do
do

MANUF’S OF FLAX.
Linens
223 $67,455
Thread
39
8,780

arabic.270

1,186,279
mak’t 2940 $1,186,279

Manufactures of wool...

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs. Value.
22 $6,309
10
2,859

1

DRY GOODS AND

[The quantity is

AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK.

Pkgs.
Value.
2878 $1,193,607

1,902

3

216 $57,164

Total.

Braids ......s. .1
Silk & worst... 2

WEEK

-1865.-

Susp. & elas.

13,9®

IMPORTS
(OTHER THAN

WEEK ENDING

689

7,498

17
Straw goods. 39

WAREHOUSING.

4

,manufa’s of cotton.
Cottons..., ...66 $23,114

price.

CONSUMPTION FOR THE
-1864.Value.
Pkgs.

7,580

Corsets

7,939
1,770

Vestings

416 $187,210

Total

The

ENTERED FOB

4,859

Laces

and the United States, the business doing is very limited. Good
wools support the recent improvement in prices ; but

follows

8,0:30
2,289

3

Millinery

Total ./....118 $37,298
MANUF'S OF SILK.
Silks.
......9 $17,137
Velvets
3,059
2
Ribbons
47
40,262

and fine fleece

IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS

3.550

Embroideries 13

6S2

1,975

168 f234,736

Spool

11,656
5,897
3,185
65,838

Carpeting.... .34

The

wools are somewhat lower in

2

Colored

MANCT’S OF WOOL.
55 $27,505
Woolens
3,047
Cloths
7

Bales—The unfavorable harvest weather has had
the effect of causing a quieter feeling to prevail at these sales, and the
biddings have ruled lesc active, with a tendency to lower prices.
chief buyers are from our own manufacturing districts, the demand ou
Continental account being comparatively trifling.
The French, how¬
ever, are taking a moderate supply of produce ; but for Belgium, Ger¬
greasy

$11,669

t

London Wool

many

MISCELLANEOUS.

..

3

FOR

ENTERED

Pkgs. Value.

50 Inches—
64
66

635 $104,461

Total

21,913 Leath.gloves. 9
do
4
60,194 Kid
1214
2,686 Matting
4
4,478 C.othing

20
61

Total

2,396

5,646

6

,

37£ YARDS.

56
lb. oz.
8 12
14s. 6d.

2.568
1,137

32
34
36

34

Thread.,

Hemp yarn..310

Braids & bds.
Silk <fe worst.
Silk & cotton
Silk
linen..

712

6
4

$92,813

290 $89,483
1
1,314
3,018
5
8,250
29

Linens
Laces
Hdkfs

213
425

Vestings

97 $31,843
63
18,040
12
3,048

Velvets
Laces...':

manuf’s of flax.

324

Velvets
Ribbons
Laces
Cravats

$365,690

3

Pkgs. Value.

ue.

12,802
21,130

Crapes

OF COTTON.

Colored

Va

MANUF'S OF SILK.
65 $122,594
Silks

5,272
62,298

883

Total

Ginghams....

d.
22
24

GRAY 6HIRTINGS,

END

18

60

50
d.
19
21
22

16#

17

7,965

8
Cot <fc wos’d.163

Prints

d.

15

14
15

14

34

. .

4,996

9,765

319 $151,243

Total

82

Total

1,477 I

Braids & bds.

Susp. & elas. .12

53

Hose

718
750

EXPORT

40

12 16 to 24 30
d.
d.
14
13

d.
8
9
14

d.
15
17
18

TWIST FOR

MULE

Common

16 to 24

6 to 12
d.
8
9
15

Numbers.

2
3

Hose.».
Merinos
Wors. yarn

28,796

Feath. & flow.. 38

$895

Spool

156,544

..

goods. .87

Straw

2
1
1

......

38.404
9,1 S9

Carpeting... .129

38 to 42
d.
20
22
24

23 to 32
d.
17

$79,566
3,507
6

Cloths

24,812

WAREHOUSE.

FROM

Braids & bds.
Hdkfs........
Gloves

177

Woolens

54

Corsets

928 $252,643

Pkgs.

OF WOOL:

784

5

Millinery

8,373
616

3,697
15,712
25,693

9
39
Embroideries. 27

gloves.2S $28,999

Leath.

,

Oilcloth
Clothing.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Pkgs. Value.
MANUF'S

Matting

6,952

.55

..

Total

34,143

WITHDRAWN

EXPORT.

TWIST FOR

Hemp yam

271 $280,709

Total

tations :
WATER

269

Sewings

Cotton Yarn and

Manchester

2,000

.'....2

Hose

8
12

Kid gloves

'manuf’s of flax. '
.814 $220,767
Linens
Linen & cot
.2
955
Laces
2
805
Hdkfs
17
11,541
Thread
38
11,623

1
3

Vestings

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs. Value.
14
7,783

Laces
Gloves
Cravats

and better lines.

Best

[September 29, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

402

Bananas
Currants..... ..
Lemons
Nuts..,
Oranges
Pres’a ginger...
Plums

Raisins....
Sauces and pres.
Other

Instruments—
Mathematical.-4

Mfltlcal,93
f

?u4

7,756

1,909

.

4

Wire

5,088

44,891

113,650
.

740

978

20,406

Pepper

107

2,393
4,629 Stationery, &c.—
.63 12,993
2,441 Books
646
180 Engravings... .6
Paper
521 23,762
2,372
8,006
58
2,542 Other
18,056 Woods—
7,855
2,321 Cork.
210
124

Fustic

Lignumvitae
1,093

6,861|

....

Logwood,lbs.260

Rat tan....,

tr,

1,332
1,047

228

1,1

Ina. rubber.. .76

5,540

Ivory
13
M achinery... 467

30,737

3,823

mant

Marble &
do....

2,844

Maccaroni

60

121

Molasses...3,780 95,111
Onions
290
.....

paintings.16 11,581
Paper hang... .9
1,457
Oil

702

Plaster

Perfumery... .77

8,123

Pipes...:

6,408

126

Pdatoes

127

Provisions

138

Rags

56

Rosin
Rice.
Salt

3.024

289

6,433
12,562

2,151

Sago flour

332

Seeds

Linseed...14,037 69,085
Soap
9
810
Sugar, hhds, tes
and bbls. .5,971 329,944
Sugar, boxes &
bgs
4,710 101,318
Tapioco
437
.87
Trees &
Tea
Twine

plants..

Toys

Tobacco.

Waste...'

8.722

9,682 198,861
200
1,018

187

892
5

6,553

28,866

566

Wool, bajes.2666 224,164
Ollier
1,263

T0t8).M,m

CURRENT.

PRICES

WHOLESALE.
goods deposited in public stores

All
or bonded
warehouses must bo withdrawn therefrom, or the
duties thereon paid within one year from the date of
the original importation, but may be withdrawn by
the owner for exportation to Foreign Countries, or
may be transhipped to any portof the Pacific, or West¬
ern Coast of the United States, at any time before the

expiration of three years from the date of the original
importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be subject to the same rules and
regulations as if originally imported there; any goods

remaining in public store

or

bonded warehouse be-

SondGovernment, and sold regarded as abandoned to
three years shall be under such regulations
le

as

the

I

d

Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe. Mer¬
chandise upon which duties have been paid may re¬
main In warehouse in custody of the officers of the
oustoms at the expense and risk of the owners of said
merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three years, shall be
entitled to return duties, proper evidence of such
merchandise having been landed abroad to be furnish¬
ed to the collector by the importer, one per centum
of said duties to be retained by the Government.
In addition to the duties noted

below, a discrim¬
inating duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no reciprocal treaties
with the United States.
On all goods, wares,

and merchandise, of the
growth or produce of Countries East of the Cape of
Good Hope, when imported from places this side of the
Cape of Good Hope, a duty of 10 por cent, ad nal. is
levied in addition to the duties imposed on any such
articles when imported directly from the place or places
of their growth e* production ; Raw Cotton and Raw
Silk ezcep*fd.
The tor in all eases to be 2,240 ft.

Ashes—Dutyf**15 $ oent ad val.

$ 100 ft

Pot, 1st sort.
Poarl. 1st sort

@ 0 50
12 00 @ 12 50

•*••••

ft.

Anchors—Doty: 2* cents
and upward
#

10

94 @

Of"209 ft

Beeswax—Duty, 20 $ cent ad val.
American yellow
^ ft
40 @
Bones— Duty: on
Bio Grande shin

invoice 10 $ cent.

41

@ 30 00

$ ton

Bread—Duty, 30 # cent ad val.
$ »>
Navy....

-6|
54

Pilot

@
©

Crackers

14

Breadstuff*—See special report.
Bricks.
Common hard
Croton

......per

10 50 @ 11 50
16 00 © 17 00

M.

40 00 (yj 45 00

Philadelphia Fronts

Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs hair, 1 ^ ft.
American, gray and white... $ ft
75 © 8 00

Firkins
Half d) kin 1ubs

©
35
88
85
82
34
27
29
26
23
20

..

..

Welsh tubs, prime

..

second quality
North Pennsylvania— Firkins
Wehh tubs,

..

..

We6te n Reserve—Firkins
Westtrn 8»ates—Firkins, yell >w
Firkins, sec >nd quality

..

..

.

Firkins, store packed..
Firkins, common

..

..

Cheese—

V

Factory Dairies

43
43

@
©

40

on

38
36

@
@
@
@

@

..

..

..

@
@

14
14
10
13

..

.

@

16

..

Westtrn
Farm Dairies
Wester >
Common
Ohi> Dairies....:

51

(ft

©

34

81

27
25
22

174
16
17
16
14
17

©
@

©

wax

ft.

Sperm, patent,

Refined sperm,
Stearic

$ ft

city.

Adamantine

-

Cement—Rosendale

bbl

Chains—Duty, 2$ cents $ ft.
One inch and upward —... $ ft

50

@
@
@

53

-2f @

24

@

1 75

40
30

..

..

43
81

@

other than bituminous,40 cents
$ bushel.

Liverpool Orrel..$ ton of
Liverpool House Cannel

240 ft

..

Cocoa—Duty,*i cents $ ft.
Caracas. ..(gold).(in bond). $ ft
Maracaibo .(gold)..
do
Guayaquil .(gold)
- do
.

.

@ 15 00

© 17 00

©

9 00

22 ©
@
..
14 @

22

8 50

Anthracite

144

Coffee—Duty: When imported direct in Ameri¬
can or equalized vessels from the place of its growth

production; also, the growth of countries this side
the Capeof Good Hope when imported indirectly in
American or equalized vessels, 5 cents $ ft; all other
]0 # oent ad valorem in addition.
Rio, prime, duty paid
gold

or

do good
do fair
do ordinary
do fair to good cargoes
Java, mats and bags.....

Native Ceylon
Maracaibo

Vamm




s

*t

ft

...

gold
.gold

gold
gold
gold

$ ft

,

,

•

Bolts
Braziers’

•

,

..

,

,

Baltimore...'.

„

Detroit

Portage Lake

,

.

81
30

.

Nutgalls Blue Aleppo
Oil Anise

32

Oil

45
45
30

Oil

..

..

Cork*—Duty, 50 $ cent ad val.
Regular, quarts
Short

65

gross

Tapers

..

50
12

Mineral

Phial

--

©

;

34 @
©
©
24 ©
88 @
©
25 ©

124
25
40

24

..

85
90

80

..(gold)
46

46

1 CO

@
@
@

1 10
5 874

4 •

(gold)

■

5 50
1

(gold)

..

20

10} @
-2

©
©
@
@
18 @
60 @
40 ©
50
30
24

,..

Seneca Root.
Shell Lac
Soda Ash (80 $ cent)

4
70

50

©

<0

70
40

....

7 874

@

..

Senna, Alexandria..
Senna, East India...

Brimstono, $10 $ ton; Flor Sulphur, $20 $ ton. and
15 ^ cent ad val.; Crude Camphor, 30; Refined Cam¬
phor, 40 cents $ ft.; Carb. Ammonia, 20 $ cent ad
val.; Cardamoms and Cantharides, 50 cents $ ft;
Caster Oil, $1 $ gallon; Chlorate Potash, 6; Caustic
Soda, 14; Citric Acid, 10; Copperas, 4; Cream Tartar,
10; Cubebs, 10 cents $ 1b; Cutch, 10; Chamomile
Flowers,20 $ cent ad val.; Epsom Salts, 1 cent
lb; Extract Logwood, Flowers Benzola and Gam¬
boge, 10 $ cent.; Ginseng, 20; Gum Arabic, 20 $
cent ad val.; Gum Benzoin,Gum Kowrie, and Gum
Damar, 10 cents per ft: Gum Myrrh, Gum Senegal,
Gum Geeda and Gum Tragacanth, 20 $ cent ad val.;
Hyd. Potash and Resublimed Iodine, 75; Ipecac and
Jalap, 50; Lie. Paste, 10; Manna, 25; Oil Anis, Oil
Lemon, and Oil Orange, 50 cents; Oil Cassia and Oil
Bergamot, $1 $ ft; Oil Peppermint, 50 $ cent ad
val.; Opium, $2 50; Oxalic Acid,4 cents $ ft; Phos¬
phorus, 20
cent ad val.; Pruss. Potash, Yellow, 5;
Red do, 10; Rhubarb, 50 cents $ ft: Quicksilver, 15
$ cent ad val.; Sal ASratus, 14 cents $ ft; Sal Soda,
4 cent $ ft; 8arsaparilla and Senna, 20 $ cent ad
val.; Shell Lac, 10; Soda Ash, 4; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
$ ft; Sulph. Quinine, 45 $ cent ad val.; Sulph. Mor¬
phine, $2 50 $ oz.; Tartaric Acid, 20; Verdigris, 6
cents $ ft; Sal Ammoniac, 20; Blue Vitriol, 25 $
<*Ant ad val.; Etherial Preparations and Extracts, $1
« ft; all others quoted below, frbe.
—.dd. Citric
(gold)
554 ©
Alcohol
4 60 © 4 70
$ gall.
24 @
25
Aloes,Cape
ft
50 ©
75
Aloes, Socotrine

Berries, Persian
Bi Carb. Soda, Newcastle.. .(^old)

45

TO

.

(gold)
Sugar Lead, White
(gold)
Sulphate Quinine, Am
^ oz.
Sulphate Morphine
Tartaric Acid.....(gold)
$ ft
Verdigris, dry and extra dry
Vitriol, Blue

29
60
45

3f @
80
2 ?5
7 50
53
50
124

....

Duck—Duty, 30
cent ad vaL
Ravens, Light
16 00
$ pee
Ravens, Heavy
20 00
Scotch, Gourock, No. 1 per yard.
v
Cotton, No. 1
$ yard
85

orax,

Assafoetida
Balsam Capivi
Balsam Tolu
Balsam Peru..;.

@
@

Rhubarb, China

SI ft; Bleaching $ ft; Crude Brimstone, ;$6; Roll
10 cents Powder,80 cents $ 100 ft Refined

-.

8 25
7 25

Salaratiis
Sal Ammoniac, Refined
Sal Soda, Newcastle

Drug's and Dyes—Duty, Alcohol, 2 50 p?r
gallon; Aloes, 6 cents $ ft ; Alum, 60 cents $ 100 ft;
Argols, 6 cents $ 1b; Arsenic and Assafoetida, 20;
Antimony, Crude and Regulus, 10; Arrowroot, 80 $
cent ad val.; Balsam Capivi, 20; Balsam Tolu, 30;
Balsam Peru, 50 cents $ ft; Calisaya
Bark, 80 $ cent
ad val.; Bi Carb. Soda, 1$; Bi Chromate Potash, 3 cents

Antimony, Regulus of
Argols, Crude
Argols, Refined
Arsenic, Powdered

:..(eold)

Sarsaparilla, Bond
Sarsaparilla, Mex

@
©
©
©

...'.

(gold)

Quicksilver

24

60
....

@10 00
@ 8 25

Phosphorus

'

....

@

..

8 50 Ch
4 874 ©

Peppermint,pure

Prussiate Potash

19

..

@
@

9 60
2 95

'

/

Opium, Turkey....

Cotton—See speoial report.

Alum

..

Oxalic Acid

©
©

,

-

Bergamot

@‘ * 8

7
2 00

...

Oil Lemon

Cordage—Duty, tarred, 8; untarred Manila, 24
untarred, 34 cents $ ft.
234
224 ©
Manila,
$ ft
..

...

@

7|

-

do

OllCassia..

other

Tarred Russia
Tarred American
Bolt Rope, Russia.

30

(gold)

Madder, French, E. X. F. F.
Manna, large flake

45

©
©
@
©
©
©
©

34

@

85

@
@
©
@
@

.....

53
13

^ IS 00
@
<&

.

76

Dye Woods—Duty free.

Camwood

(gold). ..$ton
Fustic, Cuba
Fustic, Tampico
Fustic, Savanilla
(gold)
Fustic, Maracaibo
do
Logwood, Cam peachy.
(gold)
Logwood, Hond
Logwood, Tabasco
(gold)
Logw’ood, St. Domingo.;.
Logwood, Jamaica
Limawood
(gold)
Barwood
(gold)
Sapan Wood, Manila...

..

..

..

@28 00

Si 60

@ 28 CO

25 60

@

....

@
@

@
@
..

..
.

..

..

..

@110 00
@
@

..

...

..

..

..

..

Feathers—Duty: 30 $ cent ad val.
^ ft
SO
..

..

-

@
@

85
70

'-V ‘

-

,

..

22 50

Prime Western
do Tennessee
o

(fo
(3^ 81 00
@

....

Fish—Duty, Mackerel, $2; Herrings, $1 ; Salmon
$3; other pickled, $1 50 $ bbl.; on other Fish,
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller pkgs. than bar¬
rels, 60 cents $ 100 ft.
Dry Cod
$ cwt.
7 50 @ 8 25
$ bbl.
&
Dry Scale .... ..I,
Pickled Scale
$ bbl.
6 50 ©
..

....

Pickled Cod

bbl.

:

8 00

Mackerel,No. 1,Mass, shore .
Mackerel, No. 1, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 1, Bay
Mackerel, No. 2, Bay ............
Mackerel, No. 2, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 3, Mass, large
Mackerel, No. 3, Halifax
Mackerel,No. 3, Mass
Salmon, Pickled, No. 1
Shad,Connecticut,No. l.$ hf. bbl
Shad, Connect cut, No. 2
Herring, Sckled
$ box
Herring, No. 1
\.
$ bbl. Herring, pickled

(0

...

20 60
17 6Q

©
©
©
© 21 00
© 18 00
....

..

..

14 25
-

14 00

.

....

4ioo

40 00

60

50
5 00

9 00

Bi Chromate Potash

(gold)

Bleaching Powder
Borax, Refined

Brimstone, v.rude.. $ ton.(gold)
Brimstone A

Roll
$ ft
Sulphur
Camphor-Cm: de, (in bond). (gold)

@ 12 UO
©
44

m.

Brimstono, Klor

,

Castor Oil Cases
Chamomile Flowers.
Chlorate Potash
Caustic 8oda

$ gallon
$ ft
...(gold)
(gold)

Cobalt, Crystals.. .in kegs. 112 fts
Cochineal, Honduras
(gold)
Cochineal, Mexican
(gold)
Copperas, American
Cream Tartar, prime
(gold)
Cubebs, East India.

Epsom Salts
Logwood

8
2

©

Gambier

Gom
Gpiq
Gum
Gum

<f£ 4 cask

^ box

do Bunch.....
Currants
Citron, Leghorn

4 60
-

8 70

24

..

©
©
©

3 75

154
83

16

©

194

Almonds, Languedoc

1

18

Dates

3

88

©

89

©

88

do
do
do
Sardines
do
do
80

82

Sicily, Soft Shell

18

29 ©
46

.$box
# hf. box
...tP qr. box

Figs, Smyrna

64

8ft

..

88
19

$

Srazil Nuts.

80

©
©
©
@

28 ©

Shelled

15

...

89
20
17

©

12 ©
....

124

10

*

Walnuts, French........

1

©

Provence

Filberts, Sicily

....!..gold $ ft

18

©

Drikd Fruit—

$ ft

Apples

Blackberries
Black Raspberries
Pared Peaches.

10 ©
25

-

H4

©

80

80 ®>

. ••v««•••••»

85

—

©

81

17 ©
40 ©

*

Unpealed do
Cherries, pitted, new

88

Kowrie
Gedda

© ....
© 4 65

15
BI

$ ft

Prunes, Turkish

$ oz.
bales

Gamboge
Ginger, Jamaica, bl’d, in bbls ....
Ginseng, Southern and Western..
Gum Arabic, Picked
Gum Arabic, Sorts
Gum Benzoin
(gold)

@

Fruit—Doty: Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds, 10; Almonds, 6; other

Raisins,Seedless
do Layer

2

Extract

Flowers, Benzoin
Folia, Buchu

18

Ginger, 50; Green Fruits, 25 $ cent ad val.

bulk....

Cardamoms, Malabar

Flax—Duty: $15 ^ ton.
Jersey
*

nuts, 2; Dates, 2; PeaNnts, 1; Shelled do, 14, Filberts
and Walnuts, 3 cents $ ft; Sardines, 50; Preserved

Camphor, Refined.
Cantharidos

Cutch

Coal—Duty,bituminous, $1 25 $ ton of 28 bushels
80 ft to the bushel;
sfi 28 bushels of 80 ft

Sheathing, new
Sheathing, yellow.

Carbonate Ammonia,in

naceti and

Madder, Dutch

foot, 3 cents $ ft.

Annato, fair to prime

4 cents.

Batter and Cheese.—Duty:
Butter—
New York 8tate—Fresh pails

Licorice Paste, Greek.........

C«FP«r—Duty, pig, bar, and ingot, 24; old copper
$ ft; manufactured, 35 $ cent ad val.; sheath¬
ing copper and yellow metal, in sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches wide, weighing 14 @ 34 oz. 48 square
2 cents

18
45

21

Damar

Furs—Dufcy,10 $ cent.

Myrrh, East India
Gum,Myrrh, Turkey..
Gum Senegal.
(gold)
Gum Tragacanth, Sorts
Gum Tragacanth, w flakey.(gold)
Hyd. Potash, Fr.and Eng.. .(gold)
Iodine, Resublimed
Ipecacuanna, Brazil

8

8 85

5
4

Beaver, Dark.... $ ft 1 50 © 2 00
do
Pale
1 25 © 1 50

4 75

Jalap

2

Bear, Black ...$1 skin 5 00 @16
do brown.
4 00 © 8
Badger
'.
90 © 1
Cat, Wild
90 © 1
do House
10 ©
MMMMMftt
5 00 @10

rn^iper Berries
Lac Dye
Lioorioe Paste, Calabria
lAeoorioe, Paste, Sloily

.

.

Gold Prices—Add

prices.

premium on gold for ourrezey

(Quotations nomiual.)

>

North, and East.
No. I.

Fes, silver

4.

00
00
50

50
20
00

9* ®T* 99

Western.
No. 1.

..
.

..
..

..

1 25 @ 1 50
1 00 © 1 25

5 00 @10 00
4 00 @ 7 ft
40 © 1 00

•»

40 © 1 00
10 © 20
8 00 @ 5 0

„

«9999

..
..

3 00 @10 00
I 00 @ 2 25

do Cross
do Red
do Grey

60 © 1 25

..

..

8 00 © 6 00
1 00 @ 2 00

50 © 1 00

..

125©8 50..100©250
5 50 @10 50 .. 4 50 @ 8 00
1 50 @ 3 00 .. 1 00 @ 2 50
3 00 @600.. 3 00 @400
10 @
35 ..
10 @ 25
5 00 @ 8 00
3 00 @ 5 00
20 @ 80..
20 @ 30
70 @ 1 00 ..
65 @ 90

Lynx
Marten. Dark
do pale

Mink, dark
Muskrat,
Otter

..

Opossum
Raccoon

Window Polished Plato
$ square foot; larger
cents $ square foot;
larger and not over 24x39 inches 6 cents $ square
foot; above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
cents $ square foot; all above that, 40 cents $ square
foot; on unpolished Cylinder, Crown, and Common
Window, not exceeding 10x15 inches square, 1*; over
that, and not over 16x24,2 ; over that, and not over
24x30, 21; all over that, 8 cents $ lb.
American Window—1st,2d, 3d, and 4th qualities.
(Subject to a discount of‘25 @ 30 $ cent.)
6x8 to 8x10
$ 50 feet
5 50 @ 7 25
8xto 10x15
6 00 @ 7 75
11x14 to 12x18
6 50 @ 9 25
12x19 to 16x24
7 00 @ 9 50
7 50 @ 11 75
18x22 to 20x30
20x31 to 24x30
9 00 @14 50
Glaee—Duty,Cylinder

or

not over 10x15 inches, 21 cents
and not over 16x24 inches, 4

@ 16
@17
@18
@ 20
@ 24

10 00

24x31 to 24x36
25x36 to 30x44
80x46 to 32x48
32x50 to 32x56
Above

11
12
13
15

00
00
00
00

English and French Window—1st, 2d,

3d, and

00
00

00
00
00

4t^

18i@

do

16 @

Laths, Eastern
$ M
Poplar and W. wood B’ds & Pl’k.
Cherry Boards and Plank .'

do

14^@

Oak and Ash

do
do

Tampico

12*©
I4|@1

>

$ lb

Maracaibo
Maranham
Pernambuco

Id.

..

do
do

..
..

Tampico and Metamoras... do
Bahia
do
Chili
do
Wet Salted Hides—
Buenos Ayres
Rio Grande
California
Western

(Single Thick)—Discount 2’> @ 30 per cent.
$ 50 feet
6 00 @7
6 50 @ 8
7 00 @ 9
7 50 @ 10
12 00 @ 15
13 00 @ 16
15 00 @18
16 00 @ 20
18 UO @ 24

6x8 to 8x10
8x11 to 10x15
11x14 to 12x18
12x19 to 16x24
20x31 to 24x30
24x31 to 24x86
24x36 to 30x44.
80x45 to 82x48
82x50 to 32x56

..
..

..

$ 1b gold.

..

do
do

Gunny Cloth—Duty, valued at 10 cents or

yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ fl>.
Calcutta, standard
yard
83 @

less

33*

Hair—Duty free.
Bio Grande, mixed., (cash)..
Buenos Ayres,mixed

@

Foreign

.

45
30
50

/

1 10

34
82

@
@

35
83

12

$ lb

@

15

Hardware-

brands . .nor di z 15 @ 17
d>
ordinary makers
13 @ 15
Carpe iter’s Adzes, besi. quality
24 @ ..
do
ordinary
21 @ ..
Cotton Gins, per saw
$5 less 0 $ cent
Narrow V rougbt Butts
List 5 $ ct disc.
List it $ ct a iv.
Cast Butts—Fast Join
Axes—Cast steel, best

India Rubber—Duty, 10 $

List 25 $ < t adv.

Door Bolts, Cast Bbl

L st 20 $ ct. *' is

Carriage and Tire Bolts

List 40

.

.

List 10 $
Li t 30 ^
List 20 $
L s 50 $

Tiunfc
Stocks and Dies
Screw Wrenches—Coe's Paten*
“
Taft’s
5m tbs’ Vis’8

$ ft 24

Framing Chisels

dis.
ct dis.
c

.

ct. dis.
ct. dis

@

26

Old List '5 $ ct. adv

List 41 $ ct. alv

insets

handled, in sets

Augur Bitts
do

c

Lis

“

Short

per

Sing
Cut Tacks
''hit Brads

Rivets, Iron..
Screws, American
do
English
Shovels and Spades

.Lirt 40
List 20
doz. New List 10
List 10
.

$ <-t. a lv
$ ct. dis.
$ ct. dii.
$ ct. dis.
Lisioi&lo $ ct. dis
Li>t 55 $ ct dis.
List 25&30 $ ct. dis.
List l< «fe-2* $ ct ois.
List 20 $ ct dis.
List 5 $ ct. dis
8@
8*
List 25@30 $ ct adv.
..

Hay—North River, in bales $
100

fts, for shipping

@

1 00

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $25; Jute,
$15; Italian, $40; Sunn and Sisal, $15 $ ton; and
Tampico, 1 cent $ ft.
$ ton 375 00 @ 400 00
American, Dressed
do

Undressed

Russia, Clean
Jute.
Manila....
Biaal

(g°ld)
(gold)

$ ft

Hides—Duty, all kinds, Dry
10 $1 cent ad val.

or

@
860 00 @175 00
110 00 @135 00
It# @
144 @
15

Salted, and Skins

60

65
65
1 tiO
70

t—

165 GO
Swedes, assorted sizes
Bar, English and American,Refined 120 00
do
do
do
do
Common 150 00

@

95
75
65

@"
90
@ 1 10
@ 1 10
@
90

@170 00

@

@

....

@155 00
@150 00
@155 00

145 00

HorseShoe

145 00

Rods, 5-8 @ 3-16 inch
Hoop

125 00 @180 00
160 00 @220 00

..

$ft

Rod..

Sheet, Russia
Sheet. Single,Double and Treble..
Rails, English.. .(gold)
$ ton
do

American

Ivory—Duty ,*10 $ cent ad val.
$ ft

East India, Prime

Billiard Ball

African, West Coast, Prime
African, Serivellos, West Coast..

10* @

11*

23* @

25

7

@

55 00 @

85 00

9

....

@ 90 00

@

3 75

@

4 50

8 25 @ 3 60
2 00 @ 2 50

..

net

..

@ 10 75

..

net

Pipe and Sheet

@ 11 00

t«eatlier—Duty: sole 35,upper 80 $ cent ad val.
38 @
cash.$ ft
Oak, Slaughter,light
38 @
do
do
middle... do
43 @
Go
do
heavy.... do
45 @
do light Cropped
do
51 @
do middle do
do
19 @
do bellies
do
do
33 @
Hemlock, B. Ayres, Ac..l’t do
35 @
do
do middle, do
do
do
do
do

heavy .do
California,light, do

87
82
34

Orinoco,etc. l’t. do
do
middle, do
do heavy., do
do & B. A, dam’gd all
weights

do

r

do
do
do

do
do

do

do
do

@
@
@
35* @
31
@
83 @
31 @

.....

middle do

heavy, do

30
22.
88
?5

Slaughter
Oak, Slaughter in rough, light.. do
do
do
do mid. & h’vy do

-

@

Buenos Ayres
Montevideo
Bio Grande

@
19*@

Orinoco

n,@

1

221

20*
IS.

18*

Cedar,
Spruce, Eastern

$ M feet

"White Pine Merchant. Box Boards

(American

20

@
@
@
@
@
@
©

10
10
50
5
4

$ cubic ft.

$ ft

Rosewood, Rio Janeiro
Bahia

do

@
@
@

8 cents $ gallon.
'
$1 gall.

New Orleans
Porto Rico
Cuba Muscovado

.30
16
!6
16
15

@

20

16
14
14
1 00
8
6

..

@
@

75
<0

42

do Clayed
English Islands

@

55
45

@

46
60

....

58 @

Nails—Duty: cut 1*; wrought 2*; horse shoe
$ ft
@ 7 25
Cut, 4d.@ 60d
100 ft
cents

...

Clinch
Horse shoe,

Copper..?

Yellow metal
Zinc

32

$ ft

forged (8d)

@
@

8 75

:

20

spirits of turpentine 30
$ gallon; crude turpentine,rosin, pitch, and
tar, 20 $ cent ad val.
4 75
Turpentine, soft..
$ 280ft
3 0U @ 3 50
Tar, American
$ bbl.
do foreign
©
Naval Stores—Duty:

,

,

..

@
@

,,

,

8 76

lbs.)
Spirits turpentine, Am....f gall.
Oakum—Duty free

..

4 10

9* @

Rosin, common
strained and No. 2
N o. 1
Pale and Extra (280

,

©
3 75 ©
4 00
©
6 50
©
8 .'0 ©
-66 ©

Pitch
do
do
do

,

12

$ ft.

Cake—Duty: 20 $ cent a
City thin oblong, in bbls.... $ ton
do
in bags
Western thin oblong, in bags
....

•

•

•

5 <0
7 f0
9 50

68

val.
57 00
51 00
51 00

© 56 00
©
@ 51 50
....

Oils-Duty: linseed, flaxseed, and rape seed, 23
ents; olive and salad oil, in bottles or flasks, $ I :
burning fluid,50 cents $ gallon; palm, seal,and cocos
nut, 10 $ cent ad val.; sperm and whale or other fish

(foreign fisheries,) 20

$ cent ad valorem.

Olive, quarts per case
do in casks.
Palm

5 75 @
ISO @

;.

$ gall.
$ft

....

....

Whale
do refined winter

11* @
1 75 @
130 @
1 50 @

178
135

Sperm,crude

2 60 @

....

$ gall

Linseed, city

do
winter, bleached
unbleached...
do
do
Lard oil
Red oil, city distilled
>
do
saponified
Straits
Paraffine, 28 — 80 gr.,...
.* ..
Kerosene
(free)...

..

...

-

2 90
l 90

12

....

@
@
@

2 95

1 00 @

1 u5

..

1 10
...

..

@
@
@

50

@

64

..

170
2 00

free.

Southern Pine
White Pine Box Boards

'

50

14
12

Port-au-Platt, logs

@

17
20
12
12
12
10

f..

Mansanilla
Mexican
Florida

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

25

wood)
do
do
do

@300
@250
@200
@1S0
@250
@200
@120
@100
@175
@140
@110
© 60
@130
@ 90
@150

Rosewood—Duty

Port-au-Platt, crotches.
Nuevitas
Mansanilla
Mexican
Honduras

00
00
00
00

..

Lumber, Woods, Staves, Etc.-Duty

Rosewood and

..

...

@ 90
@ 65
@ 40
@120

Paints—Duty: on white lead, red lead, and
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents
ft; Park
white and whiting, 1 cent $ ft; dry ochres, 56 cent*
$ 100 ft: oxides of zinc, If cents $ ft ; ochre, ground
in oil, $150$ 100 ft ; Spanish brown 25 $ cent ad val.
China clay, $5 $ ton; Venetian red and-vermilion,
o5 $ cent ad val.; white chalk, $10 $ ton.
Lithrage, American
$ ft
12 @
1.3
Lead, red, American
12 @
13
do white, American,pure, in oil
@
16
do while,American,puie, dry.
@
15
Zinc, white, American, dry, No. 1.
12
10 @
do white,American,No. 1,1 noil
10 @
12
Oc>re,yellow,French,dry ^1100 ft
2 50 @ 3 50

@
@
@
@

38

poor all
do
in rough.. cash.

Hme—Duty: 10 $ cent ad val.
Rockland, common
$ bbl.
do
heavy

.

_

Oil

8 25
8 50

Lead.—Duty, Pig, $2 $ 100 ft ; Old Lead, 1* cents
$ ft ; Pipe and Sheet,2* cents $ 1b.
Galena
$ 100 ft
@
gold
.
@ 6 87*
Spanish
German
g<>ll
6 87* @
English.
gold
6 87* @ 7 25
Bar

.

....

cents

....

150 00 @200 00

.'

..

..

@100 00
@
@ 65 00

Store Prices—,

Bar

„

..

Cedar, Nuevitas

1 GO @ 1 65
75 @ 1 35

r

..

..

logs

Hoi asses—Duty:

,(iroid)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)

..

..

Domingo, ordinary

St.

do
do
do
do
do

00

Iron—Duty, Bars, 1 to 1* cents $1 ft; Railroad,
70 cents $ 100 ft; Boiler and Plate, 1* cents $ ft;
Sheet, Baud, Hoop, and Scroll, 1* to 1* cents $ ft;
Pig» $9 $ ton; Polished Sheet, 3 cents §1 ft.
Pig, Scotch, No l(cash) $ toD....
47 00 @50 00
Pig, American, No. 1
48 00 @ 60 00
95 00 @100 00
Bar, Swedes,assortedsizes (in gold)

8croll,

$ foot

do

Lumber, 20 $ cent ad val.; Staves, 10 $ cent ad val.;

Dry Hides—




@

92* @
70 @

do

Horae Shoes
Planes

@

..

..

Mahogany, 8t. Domingo, crotches,

65
55
65

@

’is.
dis.
<bs.
d:s.
dis.

Locks—Cabinet, Eagle

<io

$

7$ $ ct.
list 74 $ ct.
Li t 7? $ ct
List 10@20&7# $ ct.

Door L‘C'8, Latches & Escutcheons.List

do
do

8/*

cent ad val.

$ ft

Oude
Madras
Manila
Guatemala
Caraccas

East India,

List.

Loose Joint.

Hinges, Wrought, Strap and T.«..

Firmer

@

13 00 @
12 00 @ 1

$ C

Ox, Rio Grande
Ox, Buenos Ayres

$ M.

HEADING—white oak, hhd.

Horns—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.

Nail

Door Knobs—Mineral
“
Pore lain
Padlocks

85

Ovals and Half Round
Band

Hog, Western, unwashed

u

14

do

Indigo—Duty free.
Bengal
('old)$lb

@

40

80
30
2)

14

.

Mahogany, Cedar,

of 1865

50
50
00
50
00

Gunpowder—Duty, valued at 20 centsorless

.

13

.-

Para, Fine
Para, Medium
Para, Coarse

$ lb, 6 cents $ lb, and 20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
oent8 $ lb, 10 cents $ lb and 20 $ cent ad val.
..
@ 5 00
Blasting (A)
$ keg of 25 lb
Shipping and Mining
..
@5 50

Sporting,in 1 ft cauisters. .$ lb

@

26

49 square

7 50

@

@
@

STAVES—
White oak, pipe, ext* a
do
pipe, heavy
do
pipe, light..
do
pipe, culls..
do
hhd., extra.
do
hhd., heavy
do
hhd., light .
do
hhd.,culls..
do
bbl., extra..
do
bbl., heavy.
do
bbl., light...
do
bbl., culls..
Red oak, hhd., heavy
do
hhd., light

free.

Hops—Duty: 5 cents $ lb.
$ ft
Crop of 1866

..

.'

@
@
@

28 @
29 @
19 @

Honey—Duty, 20 cents $ gallon.
Cuba, .(duty paid).(gold).$ gall.

do

..

Black Walnut

11 @
12*@
11 @

Coutry sl’ter trim. & cured
do
City
do
Upper Leather Stock—
& Rio Gr. Kip ..$ $ cash.
B. A.
Sierra Leone
do
Gambia and Bissau
do

75
25
75
50

less,

Gunny Bag's—Duty, valued at 10 cents or
$ square yard, 3; over 10, 4 cents $ lb
Calcutta, light and heavy .. $ pee
55j@

Maple and Birch

11 @

do

Texas

Dry Salted Hides—

80 00
4 00
55 00
80 00
60 00
35 00
100 00

Clear Pine

gold

California

California, Mexican
Porto Cabello
Vera Cruz

qualities.

Rifle

[September 29,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

404

21 00

@ 2< 00

40 00
80 00

@ 82 00

38 00

@ 83 00

@ fO 00

do

grouniinoil

$ ft

Spanish brown dry—..$100 ft
do
ground
Paris white, No. 1
do
do Am

Whiting, American
Vermilion, Chinese
do
do
do

Venetian

in oil.$ ft
$ 100 fts
$ 100 fts

C.
$ ft

Trieste
California & English..
American
-

N 0.)

8 @

1 50 @
8

@

9

8 75

@
@

4 00

2j @

2

..

1 65
1

20

135
80

$ owt

10

....

I 70
@ 1 25
@140
@
40

@

@

8 28

I

September 29,1866.]
Carmine, city

...39 lb

made

clay^
Chalk....'.
China

39 *on

.

bbl

Chalk, block
Chrome yellow

» ton

.

Pc t r ol cu in—Duty: crude,
cents 39 gallon.

Crude, 40 @ 47 gravity
Refined, free

•

Residuum

.

•

•

•

Ginger, race and African
Mace

Nutmegs, No. 1

..

5^
42
28
5 00

39 bbl.

©
©
©
©
@

4 SO
© 2 40
© 2 50

Provisions—Doty: beef and pork,
hams, bacon, and lard, 2 cents 39 fi>.

^ bbl.

Beef, plain mess.....
.do new do

13 00 © 18 00

32 75 © 33 00

©
31 00 © 31 2>
00
80
©
16* ©
©
ID ©
m ©
14$ ©
141 ©
©
©

3$ lb

kettle rendered

19*
,

..

Hams, pickled
do
dry salted
Shoulders, pickled
do
dry salted

39 bbl.

Beef hams....'
Bacon.

Rags—(Domestic).
©
I ©
10 ©
5 ©

1
11

Canvas

Country mixed
cents, and uncleaned 2 cents

39 B>.

12 SO © 14 00
9 25 © 9 62*

39 100 lb.

Carolina
East India, dressed

100 fl>.

46

$ bnsh.

Turks Islands..

1 to
2 50
2 85

3? sack
Ashton’s ...(sold)
-.VorthingtonV...

Liverpool ground
fine,

fine, J effreys «fc Darcy’s
fine, Marshall’s

do

bbls.

Onondaga, com. fine
do
do
do
do
Solar coarse...
Fine screened

...

do
F. F

1 95
2 90

60

00

42

$ bush.

52
48

Pkff.
bgs.

3

do

45

©
©
@
©
©

553
50
25
25

Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 2* cents; refined and
partially refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent 39 Jb.
Refined, pure
Crude
Nitrate soda

....39

..

gold

18

©

••
..

9*
4

©
©

Seeils—Duty; linseed, 16 cents; hemp, * cent 39
lb; canary, $1 $ bushel of 60 lb; and grass seeds,
30

$ cent ad val.

12

$lb

Clover.

12*

©

8 00 © 3
4 50 © 5
27 00 © 23
8 55 © 3
© 2

39 bush.
CfiDary
39 hush.
Linseed, American, clean... 39 tee
do
American,rough.39 bush
do
Calcutta
....gold

Timothy, reaped

©

Bombay

do

12

9*

...

do
Loaf.
Granulated.
Crushed and

do
do

6

12

white

in ©

9*
10*

18*
14

.

©
©
©

powdered

©

coffee, A

White

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

Nos. 7 to 9
do 10 to 12
do 18 to 15
do 16 to 18
do 19 to 20
.

1°|

1{i
hi

121
12i
8

10i
11*
13

14t
15i
15f
174
161
164
154
15

Yellow coffee

Sumac—Duty: 10 39 cent ad val.
Sicily
39 ton 100

cent ad val.

Brandy-J. & F. Martell.. .(gold)
Otard, Dupuy & Co
Pinet, Castillion & Co

(gold)
(gold)
(gold)

Renault & Co
J. Vassal & Co
Jules Robin
Marrette & Co..

(gold)
(gold)

Hennessy

(gold)
(gold)

United Vineyard Propr...(gold)
Vine Growers Co.....
..(gold)
-

(gold)

Loger freres

(gold)

Other brands Cognac
Pellevoisin freres
A. Seignette
Hivert Pellevoisen .:
Alex. Seignette
Arzac Seignette
J. Romieux

(gold)

Drop and Buck..

75
00
00

60
75

12*

lli©

39 lb

Silk—Duty: free. All thrown silk. 35 39 cent.
11 00 © 12 00
Tsatlees, No. 1 © 5
$ ft
10 oO © 10 50
Taysaams,superior, No. 1 © 2 ...
do
medium, No. 3 © 4....
.8 50 © 9 50
Canton, re-reeled, No. 1 © 2
8 50 © 9(0
Japan, superior

11 50 © 13 00

■

9 00
12 50

do
Medium
China thrown.
Italian thrown

..

Skills—Duty: 10 39 cent ad val.
39 lb (cash)
Goat, Curacoa...,
do Buenos Ayres
go d.,..
do Vera Cruz
gold
do Tampico
gold....
Matamoras

gold...

Payta..

gold....

Madras, each .;...cash

do Bolivar
do Honduras
do Sisal
do Para
do VeraCruz
do Chagres
do Puerto Cabello

cash....

..gold$B>
gold
gold
gold....
gold....
gold

gold....

gold,...

.

© 10 50
© 18 00
©

.

©

..

©

45

40 ©

57* ©
@
42 ©
..

65 ©

-

50 ©
50 ©

40 ,©
55 ©

55 ©
65 ©
65

©

54* ©

45 ©

Soap—'Duty:* 1 cent 39 lb, and 25 39 cent
Castile

39 B>-

Spel ter—Duty : In pigs, ban,

39 100 lbs.
gold.. 39 ft
nates, foreign
.do domestic............




....

©

...

©

5 25 © 10 00

©

....

12* ©

39 ft

St. Croix

Gin—Different brands

Whisky—Scotch and Irish .(gold)

(cur.)

Domestic—N. E. Ram

Bourbon Whisky
(cur.)
Corn Whisky (m bond)
Wines—Port
;...(gold)

(gold)
(gold)

Burgundy Port
Sherry

...(gold)

Madeira..
do
Marseilles

(gold)

(gold)

d>
Sherry
Malaga, sweet
do
dry
Claret, in hhds

-(gold)

(gold)
(go d)

.....(gold)

incases

..(gold)

Champagne

12*

Tea—Duty: 25 cents per lb.
Hyson, Common to lair
do
Superior to fine
do
Ex fine to finest'.
Young Hyson, Common to fair ...
do
Superior to fine ...
Ex fine to finest...

Gunpow. & Imper., Com. to fair
do
do Sup. to fine,
do Ex. f. to finest

do
H. Skin
do
do

&Twankay,Com, to fair,
do
Sup’r to fine.,
Ex f. to finest.do
Uncolored Japan, Com. to fair ...
do
do

do
do

Sup’rtofine..

Ex f. to finest.

Oolong, Common to fair
do
Superior to fine
do

Ex fine to finest

Souchong & Congou, Com. to fair,
do
do
Sup’rtoflne.
do
Ex f. to finest
do

Duty pa'd.—>
© 1 05
© 1 85 •

90
1 15
1 40

P5

1
1
1
1
1

20
60
10
35
60
55

70
80
95

1 05
1 20
80
95
1 80
70
90
1 15

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

1 65
1 10
1 40
1 SO
1 25
1 50
1 90
65
75
90 *
1 00
1 15
1 80
90
1 20
1 70
80
1 05
1 70

$ cent ad val.

Telegraph, No. 7 to 11

4 85

4 75 ©

©
to
to
to

25
25
50
90

...

....

IS ©

60
55
43

70

55

cent ad valorem.
Lugs and Common leaf 39 ft

per

41
60

*

do

lbs

10*

©
©
©

lu
18
2)
21

©

45

8
4
80

©

10

©

9

©
©

1 00
1 00

©
©

82
28

•

...

.

.

.

..

9
25

Tlain.^ lb

do

Fine

(Virginia)—Ex. fine, bright...

do
do

do
do
do

Fine
Medinm
Common

Medinm
Common

30
21
...

52
45
52
47
88

Extra, pulled

Superfine
No. 1, pulled
California, unwashed
do
do
Texas

S8
20
80
15
82
27
82
18

common

pulled..-....,...,
..*

Peruvian, unwashed
Valparaiso, unwashed

S. American Mestiza, unwashed..
do
common, unwashed..
Entre Rios, washetT
unwashed
do

22
43
42
25
15

Donskoi, washed
Persian

African, unwashed
*

do

85
20
22
85

washed

Mexican, unwashed
Smyrna, unwashed
do

washed

Zinc—Dnty: pig or block, $1 50 39
2* cents 39 16*

55 00
25 00

Wrapper.
do

80 00
45 66
80 00

20 00
18 00

IS 00

25 CO

05 OS

58
50
67
CO
45

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

40

25
45
25
88
80
87
28

©
©
©
©
©

•

•

24
43

©
©
©
©

45

80
25
45
25
25

©
©
©
©

©

100

,.3916

13©

Freights—
To Liverpool :

39 16

Cotton
Flour
Petroleum

.....39 bbl.

$ ton

Heavy goods
Oil

:

39 bush.

Corn, bulk and bags
Wheat, bulk and bags
Beef
Pork ....;
To London

39 tee.
39 bbl.

:

39 ton

Heavy goods
Oil...

Hops

17

6

39 6hl.

39 tce*

0

::

39 bbl.

©

39 bush.

Steam):

g

39 bbl.
39 bush.

1

39 6bl.

4
85
30
5
8

6
0

6

0

39 ton

# bbl.
.

...39

39 bbl.

pork.

|9 ton
Wheat,in shipper’s bags.. $ bosh.
39 bbl.
Flour..'.
-

Lard, tallow, eat meats, etc 39
Albas, pot and pearl*

lot

9,

5

4*

20 0

39 tce.

..

Measurement goods
Petroleum

© 20
© 25

0
..@19
..@49

..

Oil
Beef
Pork....
To Have*:
Cotton.;
Beef and

Cigars (domestic).

Common Cigar*......*.

85
30
26

N.Y..

Seed and Havana, per M
Clear Havana.
do
do Codnecticut Seed

New-York Seed, Conn.
Penn.
do
do

70

10

9 @

* and * Merino

Corn, bulk and bags
Petroleum (sail) *
Heavy goods

(Western.)—Ex. fine, bright...

$3 50

10 39 ct. off list.
.20 & 5 39 ct. off list.
25 & 5 39 ct. off list*

full blood Merino

do
do

85

Common

3 60
8 50

Wool—Duty: costing 12 cents or less ^ lb, 8
39 lb; over 12 and not more than 24, 7 cents
over 24 and not over 32,10, and 10 39 cent ad valorem ;
over 32,12 cents $ ft, and 10 39 cent ad valorem; on
the skin, 20 $ cent ad val.
67
62 ©
American, Saxony fleece ....39 16

Flour
Petroleum
Beef
Pork
Wheat
Corn
To Glasgow (By
Flour
.".
Wheat

47*

6 00

cents

85

80
26

X lbs—(dark) Best Virginia......
do
do Medinm

Navy lbs—Best Virginia &

11*

.

©

12* ©
©
©
5 ©
12 ©

Medium

47*

19

15

Manufactured (in bond)—
10s and 12s—Best Virginia & N.Y.

do
lb 8
do
do
do

Vftl*

,

75

57*
57
60

55

,

Havana, fillers
do

4
8

••• •

Medium do do
Good.
do do •
Fine
do do
Selections do do
Conn. ar d N Y. wrappers
do prime wrappers
do fair wrappers
do fillers
New York running lots
Ohio
do
New York and Ohio fillers
Yara
-

do

and plates, $1 50

6* © .
11 ©

Tobacco—Duty: leaf 35 cents 39 Jb ; and manu¬
Cigars $3 per pound and 50

factured, 50 cents $ ft.

....

4 85

4 00 © 4 90
2 45 © 2 60
2 40 © 6 00
39 ©
40
2 00 © 8 00
90 © 1 40
115 @ 8 00
4 00 © 8 00
80 © 1 10
85 © 1 15
1 15 © 1 75
1 10 © 1 50
83 00 ©150 00
2 40 @ 30 00
12 00 @ 25 00

S.,American Cordova.,.

Tin—Duty: pig,bars, and block,15 39 cent ad val.
Plate and sheets and tern e plates, 25 per cent, al va'.
25
Banca
(gold)
39
21$ ©
Straits
(gold)........
22 ©
©
22i
English
.(gold)
Plates, charcoal I. C
39 6ox 15 25 ©
I. C. Coke
10 50 © 14 00
do
15 25 © 15 50
Terne Charcoal
do
Terne Coke
10 50 © 11 00
do

....

5 00 © 7 00
4 90 © 5 00

Wire—Dnty: No. 0 to 18,uncovered,$2to

American,prime,country and city

00

..

4
4
8
2

(gold)

Rum—Jamaica

100 ft, and 15
o. 0tol8...„
No. 19 to 26
No. 27 to 86

00
50
00

..(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)

Sheet

Cape
Deer, San Juan

5 20 © 10
5 25 © 10
5 00 © 10
5 20 © 10

..(gold)

Shot—Duty: 2$ cents 39 B>.

do
do
do
do

5 50 © 10 50
5 80 © 10 50
5 25 © 10 50

4 96 © 5 00
© 4 90
4 85 © 4 95
4 85 © 4 95

(gold)

(gold)
.(gold)

Other brands Rochelle..

do

00 ©195 00

Tallow—Duty: 1 cent 39 lb.

do

90

210 lb bgs.

.240

47

©

©
©
©
©
©
©
2 50 @

Cadiz

fine

11

lb; bulk, 18

Salt—Duty: sack, 24 cents $ 100

do
do
do

61

104 ©

Liquor*—Liquors —Duty.

fl>.; paddy 10

tv*.

cents

6*

94 ©

..

Melado

do
do

11

5

City colored

centrifugal

do
do

10* ©

Seconds

fair

do

,

refining

good
do
to good grocery

fair to

do
do
do
do
do

do

,

'

•

-

Cuba, Inf. to common

do

..

12$
13

17*

Sugar—Dnty: on raw or brown sugar, not abo\e
No. 12 Dutch standard, 3; on white or clayed, above
d,
No. 12 and not above No. 15 Dutch standard, uot refin¬
ed, 8*; above 15 and not over 20,4 ; on refined, 5; and
on Melado, 2* cents $ ft.
10* ©
Porto Rico
39 16
UK

1ft
15

..

White, city

11 ©
Hi©

American, spring,

Havana, Boxes D. S

,

24

154 ©

German

19*
19*

..

18*©

English, cast, 39 ft

"

-..

Lard, in bbls
do

1 cent;

©
18 00 @ 23 00
©
..

do extra mess
do
do
new
do India mess
Pork, mess, new
do prime mess....'.
do mess, Old
do prime, do

at 7 cents 39
cents and not above 11,
3$ cents 39 16 and 10 $

English, spring

©

...

ft or under, 2*cents; over 7
3 cents 39 1b ; over 11 cents,
cent ad val.
(Store prices.)

and

Wines

Steel—Duty: bars and ingots, valued

5 25

1 35 © 1 37
I 85 © ....
- •
© 1 40

Brandy, first proof, $8 per gallon, other liquors, $2.50
Winks—Duty: value net over 50 cents 39 gallon 20
cents 39 gallon and 25 $ cent ad valorem; over 50
and not over 100, 50 cents 39 gallon and 25 39 cen^
ad valorem; over $1 39 gallon, $1 39 gallon and 25 39

43

©

$1 bbl.

95
2!
22$
27$

95

•

.

Paris—Duty: lump, free; calcined,
$ cent ad val.
39 ton.
Blue Nova Scotia.
....
© 4 50
White Nova Scotia

(geld)
(gold)

Pimento, Jamaica.....
Cloves

25

20

Calcined, eastern
Calcined, city mills

92*©
21*©
20 ©
©

(gold)

Pepper,

23

92* ©

(geld)

Plaster

■

21 ©

(geld)

20 cents; refined, 4C

in bond

do

Naptha, refined

@
© 20 00
40
©
•

South Sea
North west ooast
Ochotsk
Polar

cassia

88 00

•

••

5 00
17 P0
15

Whalebone—Duty: foreign fishery ,20p.c ad vaL
39 *>
I 22* © 1 25

Spice*—Duty: mace, 40 cents; nutmegs, 50
and cloves, 20; pepper and pimento, 15; and
ginger root, 5 cents 38 lb.
gold 39 lb
Cassia, in mats
41* ©
45

© 20 00

16 00

39 Sal1*

..

405

THE CHRONICLE

$

0

0
6

*

1 00
10 00

6

6
..

v

8 0 © IQ 0

THE CHRONICLE.

406

It would appear

®l)c Hailtoag Jttonttor.
Hartford

New

Haven

Railroad.—The

earnings and
expenses of this road for the year ending August 31, 1866, were as
and

follows:

from this report that the road is doing a satisfac¬
tory business, notwithstanding its loss on American Stamps.
The earnings, &c., of the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad, which
is operated by the Great Western Company, were for the two years
ending December 31 as follows :
Year

Earnings from
“

$909,352 21
630,911 62

passengers

from freight
“
from expresses
Rents and wharfage

47,491 39
4,138 84

Dec. 31,
Dec. 31,

Balance applicable tor dividends
from which four quarterly dividends

declared.
At the annual

meeting held last week

passed merging
Company
with that of the Hartford & New Haven Company, the same to
be divided pro rata among the Stockholders. This is virtually an
increase of the capital stock by $150,000.
a

vote

was

the stock of the New Britain and Middletown Railroad

Great Western

(Can.) Railway.—The half-yearly earnings
of this road, as shown in the report lately issued by the London
directory, has been for the past five semi-annual periods as follows:
Half year

Operating
-s—
Pas’ngers. Freight. Rents. Total. Expense*.
£171 329 £021
£1-.29,684
£301,634 £135,o79
GROSS BARNWGS-

,

ending.

Net Expenses
Revenue.to earn.

,

^

Jan. 31,1864.

•inly 81,1864.
Jan. 31,1865.
July 31,1865.
Jan. 31,1666.

125, 82

189,081

154,125

157,874

139,821
205,131

144,028
181,071

577
730
716
837

..From the £240,101 shown

important item of

as

“ Loss

314,940
312,720

£105,755

£45.05

174,751
173,283
152,078

41.51
43.95
46.56
37.97

140.189

139,437
132,487
146,938

284,565

387,039
net

240,101

of the last half year,

revenue

conversion of American

Money ”
leaving the actual profits from operations
From this remainder there was paid interest on gov¬
on

£73,317 is to be deducted,

£166.784.

ernment loan £17.498 and

on

bonds, <fcc., £32,800

;

also renewals,

£23,665, which being deducted left £93,421 from which a
dividend of 2£ per cent for the half-year (£85,626) was declared.
,

COMPARATIVE
Chicago and Alton.
1864.

1865.

$273,875
317,839
390,355
421,363
466,830

(679 m.)
$523,566
405,634

368,273. .June.

(609 m.)
$541,005
482,164
499,296
468,358
585,623

565,145

747.942

326,870. .July

322,277

480,710

702,692
767,508
946,707

333,432. ..May..

355,270
835,985
409,250
401,280
357,956

1865.

716,378
563,401

•

1866.

*

..

.

..

..

•

13,429,643 15,434,775

Year..

—

Mich. So & N. Indiana.1864.

1865.

(524 m.)
$256,600
301,445

(524 m.)
$363,996
300,361

338,454

413,322
366,245
853,11)4

412,893. .Mar.

402,122

448,934
411,806

309,083
424,206
484,173
521,636
498,421
866,192

4,110,154

1S66.

v

1864.

532.911

506,640
625,547
"75,330
701,3»2
691,556
‘

914,052

7,120,465




,

.

OF

PRINCIPAL

243,178

.July

224,980
271,140

.

(182 m.)

(182 m.
$237,555
174,164
226,251
197,886
264,605

336,617
321,037

$305,554
246,331
289,403
186,172
227,260
311,180
232,728
288,095
384,290
300,707
261^141
190,227

3,095,470

3,223,088

.

.Aug...
..Sep...

331,494

..Oct..*
.Nov...
.Dec...

324,865

Year..

(708 m.)

(708 m.)
$582,828.

510,100
423,578
586,964
799,236
661,391
657,141
603,402

528,972
616,665
516,608
460,573
617,682
578,403
747,469
739,736
641,589
643,887
518,088

512,027.
516,822.
406,773.
507,830.
560,025.
467,115
586,074,

6,329,447

7,181,208

1864.
.

..Jan....Feb.
..Mar...
.

.April..
..May
.June..

..July..
■Aug.*..
..Sep...
...Oct....
..Nov...
..Dec..,

—

..Year

1865.

(251 m.)
$77,010

1865.

89,901
72,389
83,993
78,697
91,809
94,375
93,078
90,576
96,908
95,453

116,146

1,038,165

.

1,224,056

1864.

1866.

1865.

228,020

221,6:38

117,013

110,664

...Oct....
.Nov.
..Dec

3<>0,841
395,579

198,135
129,227

346,717
171,125

1,711,281

1,985,571

580,963

..May.,
June.

July.
AngSept
Oct.
Nov..

,.

Dec...
—

_Year..

(234 m.)

(284 m.)
.

106,689
146,943
224.838

.

170,555
810,594
226, S40

.

.

We

L., Alton A T. Haute.

149,855
155,730;
144,942
218,236
234,194
203,785
202,966
204,726

1865.

1866.

*

-

164,710

1,402,106

.

..Oct..
.Nov
.Dec..

.

.

.

..Year,.
.

-Year..

95.843

182,896
123,987
127,010
156,338
139,6*8
244,1x4
375,534

221,570

220.209

265,154

1865.

1866.

(285 m.)
$252,435
278,848
348.802
338,276
271,553
265.780
263,244
346.781

(285 m.)

(285 m.)
$282,438
266,796
337,158
843,738
365,196
335,082
324,986
359,665

3,966,946
1864.

(340 m.)

245,511. ..May..

.

121,904 .April.
242,560

.Jane.

209,199 ..July.
188,223. ..Aug..

....Sep..
....Oct..
...Nov..

..Dec...

1866.

(140 m.)
$30,840
37,488
42,088

41,450
48,359
68,118
50,308
49,903
60,565

Oct
Dec

(.247,028

—

56.871

Nov...,.

361,610

2,050,328 -3,926,678

802,696
332,400
278,006
346.243
275,960

1864.

-

875,534

401,466
365,663
329,105

413,501
460,661
*

490,693
447,669
328,869

4,504,546

—

1865.
^1866.
(340 m.) (340 m.)

$259,223 $267,641
239,139
246,109
313,914
326,236
271,527
277,423
290,916
283,130
304.463
253,924
349(285
247,262
344,700
305,454
350,348
372,618
412,553
284,319

3,793,005

—

Western Union.

(242 m.) (484 m.)
$144,084 $226,059. ..Jan...
139,171
194,167. ..Feb...
155,753
256,407. .Mar...
144,001
270,300. April..
188 738
316,438. .May...
325*91. June..
194,52*
f 271,798
304,917. July..
i 374.534 396,248., Aug...
Sept...
$379,981
g

269,448
224,957
223.242
268,176

3,311,070

—

A Western.

1865.

837,240

—Ohio A

2G0,466
309,261

—’

279,137
344,228

410.802
405,510
876,470

$210,329

—

$306,324

408,445

.Jan..

—

220,138

Michigan Central.

—

—

223.846

2,612,315

122,621 ..Feb.
124,175 ..Mar..

2,535,003

1864.

(242 m.)
$79,735

170,879
202,857
193,919
208,514
210,314
214,533
204,637
242,171
248,292
220,0*2
201,169

203,018
237,562
251,9 -. 6
241,370

99,662
86,4-2

(204 m.) (204 m.)
$173,557 $168*799
180,140
161,931
222,411
167,007
173.732
196,154
215,784
198,082
245,627
196,138
226,647
189,447
243,417
243,413

1864.

.

—

1865.

(201 m.)
$139,414

86,623
95,905
106,269

-Toledo, Wab.

(210 m.) (210 m.)
$170,078 $178,119. .Jan...
153,903
155,893. ..Feb...
202,771
192,138. ..Mar...
169,299
167,301. .April..
177,625
168,699. ..May...
’173,722
167,099. ..June..
162,570
166,015. ..July..
218,236
.Aug...
269,459
sept...
222,924
.Oct
208,098
•Nov:...
162,694
.Dee....,

2,084,074 J*990,69S

..

1866.

$131,707.

168,218
178,526
149,099

157,786

.Year

.

$98,181

...Sep..

April.

—

1866."
(234 m.)

217,159

160.497

Oct
.Nov
.Dec

(234 m.)

139,547
113,399

.Jan...
.Feb...
.Mar..

.Aug...
.Sept...

✓-Milwaukee A St. Paul.-x

338,499. ..July..
330,452. ..Aug*.

1864.

.July...

105,7b7

392.641. .June.

(210 m.)
$100,872
147,485

924, .2
310,443

116,495

46,474
6-4,993
83,702
131,648
126,970

1865.

J une..

.

..

$51,965

✓-St.

May...

290.642

.

84,897. .Feb...
72,135. ..Mar...
108,082. .April..
267,488. ..May...
262,172 Jane
170,795. .July...
116,224. ..Aug...
...Sep...

..Year..

April..

.

$121,776. ..Jan*..

—

—

.

$96,672 k$90.125. .Jan..
87,791
84,264. .Feb..
93,763
82,910. ..Mar..
7S,607
82,722. .April.
76,248
95,664. ..May..
107,525
106,315. .June.
104, OOd
96,f'23. ..July.
115,184
106,410. ..Aug..
125,252
Sep..

74,409

74,283
70,740

.

.Jan—
.Feb
March

(251//1.) (251m.)

$98,183

...Oct...
.Nov..
.Dec..

1864.

-Marietta and Cincinnati.—»
1866.

115,135
88,221
140,418
186,747
212,209

409,427. April.
426,493. ..May..

^-Cleveland and Pittsbi

1866.

$102,749

_

.

RAILROADS.

1865.

(234 m.)

(468 m.) (468 m.)
$690,144 $555,488.
678,504
474,738.
857,583
654,890.
606,078.
733,866
637,186
672,628.
646,995
644,573.
584,523
554,828.
712,495
641,848.
795,938
858,500
712,362
8,489,062

recent

(234 m.)

-Pittsb., Ft.W., A Chics
(468 m.)
$290,676
457,227
611,297
588,066
625,751

a

May...

(708 m.)
$327,900
416,588
459,762
423,797

1864.

(524 m.)
fan.
$314,598.
283,177. .Feb..

4,868,951

358,862
402,219
404,563

.

over the Occoquau has
Latrobe, of Baltimore?

planted at an early date.
meeting of the stockholders of the Memphis and
;>Charleston Railroad a resolution was passed to .-inquire into the
feasibility of building a direct line Irom a point in North Alabama
connecting with the M. & C. RR to Atlanta, Georgia, and the
procuration of a charter for such line. Such a line would bring
Memphis between 80 aud 100 miles nearer the seaboard than by the
i existing line via Chattanooga.
The Montgomery and Eufala, (Ala.) Railroad is progressing
rapidly, and all but twelve miles of the grading is completed. Track
laying is to be commenced forthwith.
The location of the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad is now being
staked out by the engineers, and construction is to be commenced
with as little delay as possible. * At

April..

.

..

1865.

406.373

Fredricksburg Railroad is being

The iron bridge

and will be

Mil. and Prairie du Chien.

.

278.891

518,736
735,082
922,892
77-,990..
778,284

923.886
749,191

$571,536

the Alexandria and

been contracted for with Messrs. Smith <fc

Jane...

.

1864.
.

on

rapidly pushed forward.

.Jan...
.Feb...
.Mar...

7,960,981

(797 m.)
$984,837 $1,001,007 $1,187,188. Jun
934,133
947,146
983,855 ..Feb...
1,114,508 1,256,567 1,070.434. ..Mar...
1,099,507 1,458,455 1.153,295. .April..
1,072,293 1,333,461 1,101,668. May
1,041,975 1,177,372 1,243,142. .June...
994,317
1,202,180 1,20.3,462. ..I uly...
1,105,364 1,331,046 1,290,3,0. ..Aug
1,301,005
1.336.615
>ep—
..Oct—
1,222,568 1.438.615
1,224,909
..^ov...
1,522,472
..Dec....
1,234,217
1,429,765

330,651
267,126
315,253

The work

Illinois Central.

(657 m.)

-

Tunnel.

sac

(182 7/1.)
$158,735
175,482
243,150
185,013
198,679

.

£......

present time very active, aud probably more is
doing in this direction than at any former period, both at the North
and the South. The following are a few of the enterprises id hand :
The Commissioners of the Troy and Greenfield Railroad invite
proposals for the completion of the road from Greenfield to the,Hoo-

1864

.

£51,861

large improvement in 1865 over the previous

✓-Chicago and Rock Island.

546,609

..Year.. 6,114,566

—

Railway.

1864.

729,759

.Nov..
.Dec..

.

3,840,091

(657 m.)

.Oct...

.

236,824

Erie

519,306
669,605

...Sep.
.

307.919

2,770,484

.

381,559. ..Aug..

623,744

£23,834

Railroad Progress.—The construction and reconstruction of

1866.

(609 m.)

£75,685

..

a

railroads is at the

EARNINGS

1864

(280 m.) (280 m.)
$230,503 $210,171. ..Jan..
207,913 .Feb..
275,282
304,885. ..Mar,.
299,063
370.889 .April.
253,480

807.803
252,015

MONTHLY

£205,634
181,800

Net Interest on
Revenue, mortgages
£141,983
£83,741
90,132
83,741

year.

Chicago & Northwestern

1866.

1865.

(257 m.)
$100,991
154,418
195.803
162,723
178,786
206,090
224,257
312,165
354,554
320,879

'

£347,617
271,932

1865
1864

—which shows

$459,196 61

of 3 per cent, each have been

Working
Expenses.

earnings.

Increase

earnings
..$1,591,804 13
Expenses for operating, repairs, new structures and equipments
and all other current charges including interest and taxes.
1,132,709 52

&c

Gross

ending.

Total

the

[September 29, 1866.

54,942
42,196

..Year..

687,078^

1866.

(157 m.)
$43,716
37,265
32,378
38,972
63,862
82,147

68,180
5",862
75,677

92,715
61,779
37,880

1866.

(177 m)

45,102
86,006
39,299

43,333
86,913
102,686
85,508
60,698

;

S-.V;-'

RAILROAD, CANAL, AND
out-

roads,

Last p’d.

Periods.

standing.!

MISCELLANEOUS STOCK LIST.

Friday.

Dividend.

Stock

Companies.

Marked thus (*) are leased
and have fixed incomes.

Bid. Ask.

Companies.
Marked thus (*) are leased
aud have fixed incomes.
New York and New

Railroad.

100 153,0001 Quarterly. July..l*
50 11,522,350!
50 1,919,0001
Atlantic & St. Lawrence*
100 2,494,900
Baltimore and Ohio
100 13,1881902! April and Octj Apr.. .4
Washington Branch*... 100 1,650,000: April and Oct; Apr.. .5
Bellefontaine Line
100 4,434,250!Feb. and Ang 1 Feb.. 3
Belvidere, Delaware
100 997,112 Quarterly, j let ...IK
Berkshire*
100 600.000 June & Dec. June .2*
Blossburg and Coming*
50 250,000
Boston, Hartford and Erie
100 8,500,000 Jau. and JulyiJuly. .4
Boston and Lowell
1,830,000
500j 4,076,974 Jan. and
JnlyjJuly. .5
Boston and Maine
100
Jan. and
July.
Boston and Providence
lOOj 3,160,000 Jan. and July: July. .5
.5
July

100j
Br adway & 7th Avenue
1 0j
Brooklyn Central
• 100
10
Brooklyn City..
Brooklyn City and Newtown.. .100
Buffalo, New York, and Erie*. .100

Boston and Worcester.

4,500,000
2,100,000

Buffalo and State Line
100
100
Camden and Amboy —
Camden and Atlantic
50
do
preferred.. 50
do

July July. .5

492.150

1,000,000 Feb. and Aug Aug.. 3*
366,000
850,000 Jan. and July July. .3)4
2,200,000 Feb. & Aug. Auir..5
4,988,180 Feb. and Aug Aug..5
378,455
682,600

081,665

60

50 1,150.000

Catawissa*..

Jan. and

2,200,003

Jan. and
Feb.

July July .3%

& Aug

50
Quarterly.
.2*
100 10,085,940 Jau. and July July. .2)4
July.
100 2,085,925
Chicago and Alton
100 1,783,200'iMar and Sep. Sep.. .5
do
preferred... .100 2,425,400! Mar and Sep.'Sep... 5
10,193,010 May & Nov.jMay .5
Chicago Burlington and Quincy.100
do
preferred
Central of New Jersey
Cheshire (preferred)

July;July. .4

1,582,169

2,384,931
406,132 Jan. and July! Jan.. .3
Jan. aud July July. .5
Delaware, Lacka., & Western .. 50 10,247,050
Des Moines Valley.
.100 1,550,050
952, ISO
Detroit and Milwaukee
100
do
do
pref.—100 1.500,000
1,751,577
Dubuque and Sioux City
* .100

pref. ....100 1,982,180

do

do

Eastern, (Mass)
100 3,155,000
Eighth Avenue, N. Y*
100 1,000,000
500,000
Elmirai, Jefferson,* CanandagnalOO
500,000
Elmira and

50

Williamsport*

do
do
Erie
do preferred..
Erie and Northeast*

pref... 50

-100

..100
.

....—

50

100
Forty-sec’d St. & Grand St. F’y.100
Fitchburg

Hannibal and St. Joseph.... r. .100 1,900,000
pref... 100 5,253,836
do
do
Hartford and New Haven
100 3,000,000
820,000
Housatonic
100

and Bloomsburg.. 50
do pref. 50

Oct. ..3

50
50

Lehigh Valley

73)4 78*
80)4

37
175

Little
Liong

6.632.250

Quarterly.

Jan. aud July
1,852,715 Quarterly.
50 1,109,594 Feb. and Aug
100 5,527,871 Feb. and Aug

50 2.646.100

Schuylkill*

Island

50

Louisville and Frankfort
Louisville and Nashville

Louisville, New Albany
Macon and Western
McGregor Westeril*

’835,000

July. .2)4

516,573 Feb. and Ang Aug.. 2
50 3,572,400 Jan. and July July. .5

Lexington and Frankfort
Little Miami—

July. .2

65

Aug. .2

Aug. .2
Aug.. 3*

& Chic. 100 2,800,000

..100 1,500,000 Apr and Oct. April. 3
.100
.100

Maine Central—1
Marietta and Cincinnati

1,447’060

2,029,778
6,586,135
4,051,744
1,000,000
6,9^2,866
9.381.800
1,089,700
3,014,000
3,082,000
1,014,000
1,000,000
do
preferred
100 2,400,000
Mine Hill & Sohuylkill Haven.. 50 3.708.200
50 3,000,000
Morris and Essex.
600,009
Nashua and Lowell
100

50
do
do
1st pref. 50
do
do
2d pref.. 50
100
Manchester and Lawrence
Miehig tu Central
100
Michigan Southern and N. Ind..l00
do
do
guaran.100
Milwaukee and Prairie Du ChienlOO
do
do
1st pref.100
'■ do
do
2d pref.100
Milwaukee and St. Paul
100

41
Sep Mar.. 3s
20
Sep Mar..3s
May and Nov May. .4
■luy 114%
Jan. and July July. 5
Feb. and Aug Aug.. 3)4 85* 85%
Feb. and Aug Aug. .5

Mar. and
Mar. and

Feb. and
Feb. and

Aug Aug. .4
Ang Aug*. 3)4

94
87
55

98
90

55*

Aug. 8)4 73* 73%
July. .4
Feb. and Ang Aug 3)4*. 82* 85
May and Nov May.. 4
Naugatuck.;
100 1,100,000 Feb. and Ang Aug..7
500,000 June and Dec June.4
New Bedford and Taunton
100
738,538
Now Haven, N. Lond., & Ston .100
New Haven and Northampton.. 100 1,010,000
and
New Jersey
50 4.395.800 Feb. and Aug Aug..5
700.000 Mar
Sup. Sep... 4
New London Northern
100
New York And Boston AirLine.lOC
788,047
New York Central....
.100 24,591,000 Feb. and Aug Aug.. 3




/•.:/

January.

68

Oct...4

29* 29*
Jan

.

83

.7

Jan. and July July. .4
Feb. and Aug Aug. .4
Quarterly. Oct...6

104)4
260

Feb. and Aug
Jan. and July

Cincin..l00 2,989] 666
354,S66

•

•

317,050;January.

25 1,575,963
25 3,228,595

..

Jan.. .2

June.8

June

50 1,633,350 Feb. and
100 10,000,000 Feb. and
100 2,528,240 Feb. and
May and
50 5,104,050 Feb. and
50 1,025.000

Lehigh Navigation
Morris (.consolidated)
do
preferred
a
100
Schuylkill Navigation (consol.). 50
do
preferred. 50
Susquehanna and Tide-Water.. 50
Union
50
West Branch and Snsquehamia.100
Wyominsr Valley
50

Ang

Aug.! 3

Aug Aug..8
Aug Aug. 10

Nov
Ang
1,175,000 Feb. and Aug
Feb. and Aug
1,908,207
2,888,805 Feb. and Aug
2,051,000

Jan.and July Jan.. .5
June .4
750,000 Quarterly.

25 1,500,000 Feb. and Aug Aug.. 3)4
50 2,000,000
100 6,000,000
100 2,000,000 Jan. and July Jan...5
100 5,000,000
Pennsylvania
50 3,200,000 Quarterly. July.. 5
Spring Mountain
50 1,250,000 Jan. and July Jan.. 10
Spruce Hill
lo 1,000,000 Jan. and July Jan...5
Wilkesbarre
' .100 2,175,000 Apr. and Oct
Wyoming Valley
100 1.250.000 Feb. and Aug Aug...,.
Gas.—Brooklyn
25 2,000,000 Feb. and Aug Aug....
Citizens (Brooklyn)
20 •1,000,000 Jan. and July July..4
644,000
Harlem
:
50
Jersey City & Hoboken.... 20 1,000,000
Manhattan...
50 4,000,000 Jan. and July July. .6
Metropoli tan
100 2,800,000
50 1,000,000 May and Nov May....
New York
750.000 Jan. and July July.. 5
Williamsburg
50
Improvement.—Canton 100.(16^ pd) 4,500,000
July 20
Boston Water Power
100 4,000,000
Brunswick City
100 1,000 000
300,000
Cary (Boston)
5
Telegraph.—American..........100 12,000,000 Jan. and July Aug.
United States
100 3,000,000
Western Union
....100 28,450,000 Quarterly.
Quarterly.
Western Union, Russ. Ex. .100 10,000,01X1
Express— Adams
100 10,000,000
American
..500 3,000,000
Wells, Fargo & Co
Ttansit.—Central American
.Nicaragua..

‘Steamship.—Atlantic Mail
Pacific Mail
Union Navigation

*

100
100

Merchants’ Union
United States

..

•

60

52

55)4
155

57

58

160

165

150*
54*
33*

54*
33*

56*
98

LOO”

6,000,666

100 4,000,000
100 1,000,000
100 8,000,000
100 7,000,000

—

Mining.—>‘Mariposa Gold....
100 5,097,600
Mariposa Gold Preferred... 100 5,774,400
Quartz Hill Gold*25 1,000,000
Rutland Marble

57

100 2,000,000

2,000,000
...... 100
Trust.—Farmers’ Loan & Trust. 25 1,000,000
*
New York Life & Trust.... 100 1,000,000
Union Trust.;
100 1,000,000
United States Trust
100 1,000,000

Quicksilver

152*

2,787.000
1,100,000

Ashburton
Consolidation
Central
Cumberland

.

152

May.. 5
Aug. .5
Aug..5
Aug.. 6*.
Aug..6

Miscellaneous.
Coal.—American

*••♦*•••

•vV

2,338,600 Jan. and July July. .6

Feb. and Aug Aug. .3
pref.100
862,571
Sandusky, Mansfield & NewarklOO
Saratoga and Hudson River... .100 1,02; i,000 Jan. and
Jnly July.. 2)4
Schuylkill Valley*
50 576,050
65
and Oct
Second Avenue (N. Y.)
100 650,000 Apr. and Aug
869,450 Feb.
Aug. .2
Shamokin Valley & Pottsville*. 50
Sixth Avenue (N. Y.)
100 750,000 Quarterly.
South Carolina
.100 5,819,275
Syracuse, Binghamton & N. Y.100 1,200,130
Terre Haute * Indianapolis.... 50 1,929,150 Jan. and July July. .6
200
Third Avenue (N. Y.)
100 1,170,000 Quarterly.
1,700,000
Toledo, Peoria, and Warsaw.. .100
do
do
1st pref.100 1,700,000
do
do
2d pref.100 1,000,000
June and Dec June.3
46)4
Toledo, Wabash and Western.. 50 2,442.350
do
do
preferred. 50 r 984,700 June and Dec Dec. 3)4 <2
Tioga.*
100 125,000 Jan. and July July.. 8)4
Troy and Boston
100 607,111 June and Dec Dec ..8)4
100 274.400
Troy and Greenbush*
811,660 Jan. and July Jan ..4
Utica and Black River
.100
Vermont and Canada*.
100 2,860,000; June and Dec June .4
Vermont and Massachusetts... .100 2,860,000; Jan. and July July..1)4
Warren*
*
50 1,408,300, Jan. and July July. .3
Western (Mass)
100 5,627,700| Jan. and July July. .5
Western Union (Wis. & HI.).
75 i,141,650; Jau. and July July..51
Worcester and Nashua

do

do

'

.«.

3,150,1501

Jacksonville & Chic*lC0

Sandusky, Dayton, and

Delaware Division
Delaware and Hudson
Delaware and Raritan

Jan. and

500,000

Oct.. .2

4,518,900j Quarterly.

.100

Chesapeake and Delaware
Chesapeake and Ohio

July July. .4
do
preferred
100 1,180,000
125
124
Hudson River.
100 6.563.250 April and Oct Apr.. 5
494,380
Huntingdon and Broad Top *... 50
190,750 Jan. and July July. .3)4
do
do
pref. 50
123)4 L23*
Illinois Central
100 23,374,400 Feb.and Aug Aug.
71
1,689,900 Mar. & Sep.;Sef) .4
Indianapolis and Cincinnati.... 50
412,000 Jan. and July July. .3
Indianapolis aud Madison.
100
407,900 Jau. and July July. .4
pref.. 100
do
do
Jeffersonville
50 1,997,309
95
Joliet and Chicago*
—100 1,500,000 Quarterly. july..i*
Keunebec and Portland (new). .100
Lackawanna
do

lid

Oct...8

3,068,400! May and Nov May8&4a

Canal.

52)4

Quarterly.

118
100

795,360 i

Wrightsville.York* Gettysb’g* 50

July, July. 4
Quarterly. I July
Feb. and Augj Aug.. 2)4

Jan. and July
500,000 Jan. and July! July. .3)4
16.570.100 Feb. & Aug. I Feb.. 4
8,535.700 Feb. & Aug.;Feb..3)4
600.000 Feb. & Aug.!Aug..5
3,540,000 Jan. and July; July. .3
750.000 April and Oct! Apr . .6

St. Xouis,

•

160

Mar 7s.

March
Jan. aud

1,508,OOO! Quarterly.

Ait

Bid.

ov May. .6
58
Pennsylvania
50 20,000.000 May and
218,100
Philadelphia and BaltimoreCentlOO
Jan. ..3
and
33*
Philadelphia and Erie*
50 5,069,450 Jan. and July July..6
116*
Philadelphia and Reading
50 20,240,673 Jan. and July Apr. .4
60
Oct
Phila., Germant’n, & Norrist’n* 50 1,476,300 Apr.
53*
Phila., Wilmington * Baltimore 50 8,973,800 Quarterly. July..6
50 1,774,623
Pittsburg and Connells ville
107* 107*
Quarterly.
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne & ChicagolOO 9,312,442 June and Dec July. .2)4
101
June.3
Portland, Saco, & Portsmouth. 100 1,500,000
Providence and Worcester
100 1,700,000 Jan. and July July. .4
Raritan and Delaware Bay
100 2,360,700
800,000 April and Oct Apr...4)4
Rensselaer & Saratoga consol. .100
500,000 April and Oct Apr... 3
129)4
Saratoga and Whitehall...... 100
800,000 April and Oct Apr... 8
Troy, Salem & Rutland .... 100
lii* Rome, Watertown & Ogdensb’glOO 1,991,900 Jan. and July July. .5
100 2,233,376
11:* HI* Rutland and Burlington
89*
138
St. Louis, Altou, & Terre HautelOO 2.300,000
71
May. .7
pref.100 1,700,000 Annually.
do
do
49
49*

50

Delaware*..

p’d

May. 5
100 5,000,000 Irregular
5,086,050 Jan. and July July. .4
1,500,000j Jan. and July July. .4

preferred. .100 2,950,500
Old Colony and Newport
100 8,609,600
Oswego and Syracuse
50 482.400
Panama (and Steamship)
100 7,000,000

392,900
1.255.200 Jau. and July; July. .3
Jan. and

Last

Periods.

standing.

do

500.000

1.591.100

FRIDAY.

out¬

3,077,000
856.400 Apr. and Oct
preferred.100
and Mississippi
100 19,822,86u
do

Chicago aud Great Eastern
100 4,390,000 Jan and JulyjJuly. .5
1,000,000
‘75”
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska*.. .100 2,250,000
Chicago and Milwaukee*
100 13,160,927
Chicago and Northwestern
100
69* 70
do
do
pref. .100 12,994,719 June & Dec.'Ju.63.3)4 112* 112*
6,500.000; April and Oct Oct ...6
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific.100
Cincinnati and Chicago Air LinelOO 1,106,125
Apr and Oct Apr ..4
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton.100 3,000,000
470,000
Cincinnati,Hamilton & Chicago.100
Cincinnati and Zanesville...... .100 2,000,000
113
Feb.and Aug! Aug. .4
Cleveland, Columbus, & Cincin.100 6,000,000
1,036,000 May & Nov.!May..4
Cleveland & Mahoning*
50
Jan. and JulyiJuly. .5
Cleveland, Painesville & Ashta.100 5,000,000 Jan. and July ; Jan. ’65 5 89
89)4
Cleveland and Pittsburg
50 5,403,910
121* 122
50 4,841,600 April and Oct Apr. ..8
Cleveland and Toledo.
Quarterly. July. .2)4
Columbus &> Indianapolis Cent.100
Columbus and Xenia*.
50 1,490,800 Jan. and July July ..5
Concord
50 1.500,000 vj ay and N ov May. .4
Concord and Portsmouth
100 350,OOO! Jan. and July July.. 3)4
Coney Island and Brooklyn..... 100
Connecticut and Passumpsic.. 100
do
pref. 100
do
Connecticut River
100
Covington and Lexington
100
100
Dayton and Michigan

Haven

Ogdensburg & L. Champlain..
Ohio

Dividend.

Stock

roads,

New York and Harlem ....
50
do
Dreferred
50
New York Proviuence &Bostonl00
Ninth Avenue
100
Northern of New Hampshire.. .100
50
Northern Central
North Pennsylvania
50
Norwich and Worcester
100

Alton and St Louis*
Atlantic & Great Western
do
preferred

Cape Cod

407

THE CHRONICLE.

September 29, 1866.]

100 10,000,000

80

Sep... 5 219
Mar and Sep. Sep.. 10
127*
Jan. and July July ..4
Feb. and Auu Aug....
Jan. and July July .4
Jan. and July July 5

ii-i*
220

14*

30*
Jan. aiid

July

25 1,000,000 Jan. and July
25 2,500,000

Saginaw L. S. & M.
Smith & Parmelee Gold..U 20 2,500,000

117

Quarterly.
Quarterly.

Jan... 5

64* 54*

Wr$;

WZWm

RAILROAD, CANAL

FRIDAY-

Amount

N. B.—The sums placed after
name of Company shews the

the
total

B.—The sums placed after the
of Company shows the total
Funded Debt.

Detroit and Milwaukee

do

sinking fund, (Ohio)

do )
Mortgage S’k’g Fund (Buff, ex

do
do
do
do
Jan. &

800,000
4,000,000
4.000,000
2.000,000

($10,112,584) :
Mortgage (S. F.) of 1834

Ja

700,000

Mortgage Bonds

f

do
do

Sinking Fund Bonds
Boston and Lowell ($400,000):

Mortgage Bonds
Buffalo, A. Y. and Erie ($2,395,000):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

Buffalo and State Line ($1,200,000):
let Mortgage
Income.
Erie and Northeast

....

Camden and Amboy ($10,264,463):
Dollar Loaus
Dollar Loan
Consoldated ($5,000,000) Loan
Camden and Atlantic ($983,000):

11871

Grand Junction

400,000

Jan. &

Mortgage

Central qf New Jersey ($1,509,000):

J’ne & Dec. 4877

2,000,000
380,000
200,000
400,000

Aug 1883
May & Nov. 4889
J’ne & Dec. 4893

Cheshire ($600,000):

Mortgage Bonds
Chicago and Alton ($3,619,000):
1st Mortgage (Skg Fund), pref
do

do

do

Feb. & Ausr 1870

M£y *fc Nov. 4875
Feb. cfc

May & Nov 4890

AugjlSOO

M’ch &

inconvert..

Bonds, (dated Sept. 20,1860)
Chicago and Gt. Eastern ($5,600,000):
Mortgage

Jan. &

600,000

Chicago, Rock Island cfc Pacific:
1st Mortgage....:
1st
do
(new)
Cine., Ham. A Dayton ($1,629,000) :
1st Mortgage
do

Cincinnati A Zanesville f $ 1,300,000):
1st

Mortgage
Cleveland, Got. and Cine. ($475,000):
1st Mortgage.
Cleveland A Mahoning ($1,752,400):
1st Mortgage
2d

do
do

3d

3,169,000
680,000

Dividend Bonds...................

Sunbury and Erie Bonds
Cleveland cfc Pittsburg ($3,880,848):
2d Mortgage
3d
do
convertible.
4th
.do

....

Cleveland and Toledo ($2,746,280):

Sinking Fund Mortgage

Mortgage Bonds of 1866

Con uciicut River ($250,000):

Mortgage
Conn, and Passumpsic R. ($250.000):
lit

1st Mortgage
umberland valley

($270,500):

Mortgage Bonds
Dayton and Michigan ($3,782,430):
1st Mortgage
2d
do
8d
do
Toledo Depot

Hinds
Delaware ($500,600):
l«t

Mortgage, guaranteed

DM., Lacka. A Western ($3.491,500):
lit

Mortgage, sinking fund

do
IjMkAwannaand Western
DesM
b Valley ($2,088,000):
2d

JAov




Soho*

A

SepjlSOS

1st

July’75-’80

756,000
2,000,000

1st

484,000

Jan. &

1,397.000

2d
80

July
May & Nov

1867
1880

1,300,000

Ma)r & Nov 1893

850,000

1st
1st

M’ch & Sep 1873
1875
do
Jan. & July 1S92

300,000

250,000

M’ch &

800,000

J’ne & Dec.

270.500

8

283,000

2,622,000
642,000 7
169,500 7

Memphis Branch Mortgage

....

($3,688,"385):

500,000 6

7

Jan. & July 1876
1876
do

6

O

Jan. &

Mortgage

500,000
500,000

6
6
7
6
6

Mortgage (P.& K.RR.) Bonds..
do
(
) Bonds..
do
Michigan Central\ ($7,463,489) /
Dollar, convertible
Sinking F’nd do
Mich.S. AN. Indiana: ($8,537,175)
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
Milwaukee A Prairie du Chien:
1st

1st

2d

July 1875

1,500,000 7 Jan. & July 1875
600,000 7 M’ch A Sep 1881
900.000 7 Jan. & July 1871

l,1740,000 8 Ap’J $ Q<?t, urn

Mortgage, sinking fund........

Milwaukee and St. Pam:

18—
18-

100

101

...

.

1875
1875
1890

....

.

....

103

103

....

102

May & Nov 1870
Aug 1875
do
do

.

102

Feb. &

April & Oct

,

...

.

103

.....

....

106X

Jan. & July 1866
1870
do

10

500,000

7

Jan. &

7

May &Nov.

7

April & Oct 1873

8

Jan. &

July 1882

8

Jan.

July

July 1866

*

do

....

7

7

May & Nov.

6

April cfc Oct

500,000
225,000

•

»

•

....

....

....

....

...

.

.

..

..

May cfc Nov 1883

7

•

May & Nov. 1872
Jan. cfc July 1869

6

•

102

1874

6 Jan. cfc July 1870
7 M ay ct; N ny 1890

1,804,000 7
300,560 '7

1873

• • *

•

%

•

1877

....

•

•

•

•

•

V

•

•

•

....

•

Feb. cfc Ant* 1883
do
° 1883
t

7 Feb. & Aug 1892
7 May cfc Nov. 18S8

85

55

2,362,800
300,000

6

Feb. cfc Aug. ’90-’90

70

....

314,100 6 June & Dec. ’70-’71
681,000 6 Apr. cfc Oct. 74-’75
399,000 6 Feb. & Aug. 1874

2.242.500 8 Feb. cfc Ang 69-72 105 108
4.253.500 8 April cfc Oct 1882 112* 112*
Mav & Nov. 1885

99

1877
do
2.253.500 7
651,000 7 Feb. cfc Ang 1868

95

4

855,000

402,000

7

7 Jan. &

July

400,000 8

do

1876

8,500,000 7 May* Not. 1915

....

....

....

...

39% 90

7 Jan. & July 1893
7 April cfc Oct 1893

8,612,000 7 May & Nov. 1877
1883
do
695,000 7

100

....

1891

1,000,000 7 Jan. &Julv 1875

~~

•

.

1881

903,000
1,000,000

4,600,000
1,500,000

Mortgage

Mississippi and Missouri River :
1st Mortgage, convertible
2d
do
sinking fund.:
1st Land Grant Mortgage
2d do
do
do
Morris and Essex:
Iftt Hortgag*, jttott&ff fond

30

7

1,092,900

2d
do
Goshen AiP-Line Bonds

Jan. & July 1867
1881
do

July 1877

1869
7 Feb. & Aug
1869
do
110,000 6
1,907,000 7 J’ne & Dec. 1885
192,000 7 May cfc Nov. 1875
1867
do
523,000 7

2d

Ap’l cfc Oct.

Jan. &

1,037,500
1,000,000

....

1883

1st

96

•••

...

1,000,000 7 Jan. cfc July 1885

..

($2,733,800)
$1,100,000 Loan Bonds
$400,000 Loan Bonds

Sep

do
do

Ang

Maine Central:

Jan. «fc July 1885
1S86
do

2,asi.ooo

Feb. &

960,000

McGregor Western:

1.619.500
1,108,124

6

1,300,000

1st Mortgage,
...
Scioto and Hocking Valley mort
1st

•

..

.

18S3

1,465,000

do

Mortgage

Marietta & Cincinnati

...

800,000 6 April <fc Oct 1870
1861
do
230,000 6
1862
do
250,000 6

Extension Bonds
Louisville and Nashville ($3,297,000):

Feb. & Aug 1880
do
1874

1,129,000

July

Mortgage

Feb. & Aug 1873
M’ch & Sep 1864
1875
do

900,000
500,000

6 Jan. &

Schuylkill ($960,000):
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
Long Island ($932,000):

July 1890

Jan. &

244.200

do

Little

475,000

99
97
95

Jnly 1870

800,000

Lehigh Valley ($1,477,000):
1st Mortgage
Little Miami ($1,400,000):
1st Mortgage.

6,000,000
379,000
1,250,000

Jan. Xr,

500,000

($800,000):

Mortgage, Eastern Division....
do

103

99*

Feb. & Ang 1882
May & Nov. 1875

187,000

Chicago ($500,000):
Mortgage, sinking fund

2d

101

102

July 1870

Jan. &

640,000

..

1st mortgage
Kennebec ana Portland ($1,280,000):
1st Mortgage
2d
do
3d
«do
La Crosse & Milwaukee ($1,903,000)

80

c

96*

600,000
364,000

Mortgage

1st

•

.

98*

Joliet and

1st

Jan. &

100
87

....

7

Mortgage

Joliet and N. Indiana

1885

July 1870

April & Oct 18S1
Jau. & July 1883

....

Jeffersonville ($621,000):

87*
89)*

1915

7
7

•

»

_

Indianapolis cfc Madison ($640,000):
1st Mortgage.

July 1898

Quarterly.
Feb. & Aug

Mortgage

Indianapolis and Cine. ($1,362,284)

Feb. & Ang 1885
1885
do
May & Nov. 1863

3,600.000

1S93

96
81
75

»

...

1883
1880
June & Dec 1888
M’ch & Sep 1875

6,837,000
2,896,500
2,563,000

Sterling

do
2d
Indiana Central ($11,254,500):
1st Mortgage, convertible
do
2d

91*

Jan. &

7bp($l,436,082):

Redemption bonds

Ap’l cfc Oct.4895

5,600,000

.

($13,231,000):
Mortgage, convertible
do

April & Oct 1868
Jan. & July 1888

•

•

....

do

Illinois and Southern Iowa :

Jan. & July 4 883
do
|18S3
M’ch & Sep4S90

356,000

648.200

CUn.,Pain. cfc Ashtabula ($1,500,000):

1st
1st

10
7

•

April & Oct

3,890,000

Illinois Central

May & Nov. 1877
Jan. & July 1893
Ap’l cfc Oct. 13S3

519,000
2.400,000

Chicago and Milwaukee ($2,000,000):
2,000,000
1st Mortgage (consolidated)
Chicago A Northwest. ($12,020,483):
1,250.000
Preferred Sinking Fund
1st Mortgage
Interest Bonds
Consol. S. F. Bonds, conv. till 1S70
Extension Bonds

1st Mortgage
2d
do

102
102

:

sinking fund

Huntingdon & Broad

Aug 1S82

909.000

do
do

2d
3d
do
Convertible

Ap’l & Oct. 4879
Feb. &

($7,762,840)

Mortgage

1st
1st

July4873

490.000

Jan. &

1,100,000

income

Chic., Burl, and Quincy ($5,754,406):
Trust Mortgage (S. F.) convert

Hudson River

6

....

....

July 1873

191,000

Mortgage
2d
do
sinking fund
Housatonic ($191,000):
let Mortgage
1st

Feb. &

1,700.000
867,000
4,269,-100

7
7

1888

927,000

Mortgage

1st

7

do

700,000

New Dollar Bonds

Hartf, Prov. cfc Fishkill ($1,936,940):

800,000

E. Div

Harr'isburg cfc Lancaster ($700,000):

May & Nov. 1876
M’ch & Sep 1S79

3,437,750
633,600

1866
Ap’l & Oct. 1
Jan. & July 1'69-’72
1870
do

500,000

800.000

Mortgage W. Div

96

7
7
7
7
7
6

1,000,000
1,350,000

Hartford cfc New Haven ($927,000):

450,000

do
Central Ohio ($3,673,000):

%

Jan. &

927,000

May & Nov 11872

600,000

Mortgage

2d

July 1879

7

1,963,000
1,086,000

Mortgage

Ap’l & Oct.

149,000

Great Western, 111. ($2,350,000):
1st Mortgage West. Division
East.
do
do
2nd do
do
do
Hannibal cfc St. Joseph ($7,177,600):
Land Grant Mortgage
Convertible Bonds

7

3,000,000
4,000,000
6,000,000
4,441,600
926,500
3,816,582

($927,000):

Jan. & July 1S72
B^eb. & Aug 1874

1,000,000

do

‘

5
6

59S,000

(incl. in C. cfc -V. W.):

do

1694

7

420,000
739,200

Mortgage, sinking fund

2d

Aug'1865

141,000

do
Cataicissa ($141,000):

1st

—

....

600,000

Sterling convertible

Mortgage

<

300,000 7 Jan. & July 1S63

Erie and Northeast ($149,000):

Feb. &
do
11865
Jan. & Jnly!l870
4870
do
do
4889

493,006

Mortgage

do

400

r—4

•

A n cr 1876

Pennsylvania ($598,000):

Gal. cfc Chic. U.

364,0001
250,000

TcVh Xr.

Elmira cfc Williamsport ($1,570,000):
1st Mortgage
Erie Railway ($22,370,9S2):
1st Mortgage
—
2d
do
convertible
do
3d
do
convertible
4th
do
5th
do

J’ne & Dec. 1867
M’ch & Sep 1885
Feb. cfc Aug 1S77

May & Nov.

7

Sinking Fund Bonds

.1

Jan. & July|’70-’79
do
“ 11870

100,000

do

do
do

East

Ap Jn Oc 1867

200,000

I

Mortgage

1st

[1895

Ap’l cfc Oct. 4885

Boston, Gone. A Montreal ($1,050,000)

734,000

do

do

150,000

Blossburg and Corning ($150,000):

1st
2d

July11883

1,000,000
500,000
589.500

do
Belvidere Ifeme are ($2,103,000):
1st Mort. (guar. C. and A. .
2d Mort.
do
8d Mort.
do

1875
1864

2d section

1,225,000
4:33,000

2d

do

—

2,500,000

Beliefontaine ($1,745,000):
1st Mortgage

May A N«v-

($900,000):
Mortgage, 1st section
do

T3

i

7
8

Eastern, Mass. ($1,798,600):
Mortgage, convertible.

Jan. cfc July 1875
do
1880

1.128.500

Mortgage

1st
1st

Ap’l & Oct. ,1866
May & Nov. i 1878

1,000,000

1S55
ia50
1853

do
do
do

1st

1876

do

481,000

Sterling Bonds

Baltimore and Ohio

1st
1st
2d

Rate.

Payable.

$2,500,000
1,000,000

"

do

Dubuque and Sioux City

Ap’l & Oct. 18-4

13,858,000
Consolidated Bonds
Atlantic A St. Lawrence ($1,472,000):
OSS,000
Dollar Bonds

1st
2d

mg.

Detroit, Monroe, cfc Toledo ($734,000):

1877
1882
1879
1881

Ap’l & Oct

($3,500,000):

Mortgage^convertible

1st
2d

J’ne cfc Dec. 1896

1,000,000
Mortgage (gold coupons)....
Atlantic A Ot. Western (*30,000,000):
$2,500,000
1st Mortgage, sinking land, (Fa.)
1,000,000
2d
do
do
1st Mortgage, sinking fund, (V. Y.) 1,014,000
1 st

1st

o&tstand-

Railroad:,

*

do
do
do

Princpal payble.

Amount

1

Railroad:
Alexandria and Fredericksburg:

2d
do
1st Mortgage,
2d
do

FRIDJLY.

INTEREST.

DESCRIPTION.

namc

Payable.

Funded Debt.

1st
2d

[September 29,1866.

N.

out stand

mg.

yv. f'

AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST.

INTEREST.
DESCRIPTION.

1st
1st
2d
2d

>' r

THE CHRONICLE.

408

1st

■/•"*• w ;r-

83

83

.

-

*

6i
....

* • •

v

409

THE CHRONICLE.

September 29,1866]

T

=m

!■

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST (continued).
tsta

Company show the total
Debt.

Funded

q5

ing.

8

Payable.

INTEREST.

FRIDAY

interest.

1 Amount

Description.

Princpal payble.

Descrutoow.
'd
TJ

•H

sums placed after the name of outstand¬
ing.
Company shows the total Funded

<

Debt.

300,000i

7

J

7
f.

...

Subscrip. Bonds (assumed stocks)

Sink. Fund B’ds (assumed debts).
Bonds of August, 1859, convert...
Bonds of 1865
New York and Harlem ($6,098,045) :
1st General Mortgage

Consolidated Mortgage

Mortgage

N Jork dndNew Haven ($2,000,000)

Mortgage Bonds
Mortgage Bonds .,
N. Y., Prov. and Boston ($232,000);
1st Mortgage....
Northern Central ($5,211,244) ;

> 6
7

April & Oct

6
6
6

6
► 10
6
6
6
6

•

April & Oct
do
Jan. & July
do
do
do

1873
1878
1885
1885

•

•

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

2A

if
£

3A

1:

91
82
76

84
78

2

o*

103
....

••

....

.

•

.

•

....

.

....

.

.

•

«...

®

^

....

....

100,000 7 Jan. & July 1874
Feb. &

1869

7

April & Oct

Jan. A July 1872
1874
do

7

1916

....

88*5 91
...

May & Nov.

1,029,000

1st Mortgage
Philadelphia and Erie ($13,000,000):

(Sunbury A Erie)....
(general)
(general)!
Philadel., Germant. A Norristown:
1st Mortgage
1st
do
do
2d

Convertible Loan

Philadelphia A Reading ($6,900,663);
Sterling Bonds of 1836....
do
do
do
Dollar Bonds of 1849
do
do
1861
do
do *
1843-4-8-9
....

Sterling Bonds of 1843....
Dollar Bonds, convertible
Lebanon Valley Bonds, convertible

Philadelphia ana Trenton ($200,000):
1st Mortgage.

Philadelnuming. A Baltimore:
Mortgage Loan
Pittsburg and GonneUsville:
1st MorkJTurtle Cr. Div.)
Fb'g, Ft. W. and Chic.: ($12,573,500)

mortgage

Pittsburg and Steubenville:

do
7 Feb & Aug.

:

Mortgage

Raritan and Delaware Bay:
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
9d
do
Convertible Bonds

Mch &

Sept 1884

575,000 7 Jan. & July 1876
1,000,000
5,000,000
4,000,000

7
6
6

April A Oct 1877
April & Oct 1881
April & Oct 1901

183,000 6 Jan. & July 1865
408.000

182,400
2,856,600
106,000
1,521,000
976,800
564,000
60,000

....

....

5 Jan. A July
do
5
6 April & Oct
6 Jan. & July
do
6
do
6
do
6
do
7
.

1867
1880
1870
1871
1880
1880
1886
1886

....

80

....

...

«...

....

....

....

1872

••••

5
5

Jan. & July

1866

Various.

68-74

7

Jan. &

7

April & Oct 1876

7

Mch &

Sept

1866

7

Jan. &

July

1870

....

....

7

June & Dec

1894

....

•

7

Feb. & Aug
do

1865
1884
1875
1875
1865
1874

1,000,000

do

(Wabash and Western).

1,500,000

....

....

....

6,200,000 7 Semi an’ally
do
5,160,000 7
2,000,000 7 April & Oct
200,000 7 Jan. & July
7
7

1890

7

1,438,000

8

Jan. &

7
7
7

400,000 7

340,000 7
500,000 7

do
do

...

Mch &

Sept 1879
1890
1880

7
7

June & Dec
Jan. & July

550,600

937,600

7
7

.

6
8

Jan. &

600,000

7

Feb. &

.

Feb. & Ang 1863
1863
do

July
Ang

5
6

April & Oct

7

4,319,520
850,000

Preferred Bonds
Delaware Division ;

1861
1867

V

—

•

•

•

81
81

70

•

•••

•

80
80

....

•

•

•

•

•

....

•

•

••

....

....

118

ns*

....

1883

1876

....

i03j<

1875

Jan. &

do

July

.

6

do

6

••»

•

•

•

•

....

*

....

1886

•

.

-»

.

« »

....

•

0

•

.

96

175,000 6 May & Nov. 1870
25,000 6 Jan. & July 1871

500,000

•

....

’68-”n
1875

96*
•

•

•

•

•

•

•

r

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

...

•

•

•

•

*

1877

Jan. &

July

*

*

*

1886

2,000,000 6 Ja Ap JuOc 1870
1890
do
4,375,000 5
1885
1,699,500 6

1st Mortgage
daw are and Hudson:

■*

641,000 7 Mch A Sept 1870

1st Mort£
Interest
.

•

....

800,000 6 Jan. & July 1878

Mortgage, sinking fund

....

Jan. A July
do

1865
1868

0

•

....

0

m

414,158 6 Mch A Sept
do
6

1870
1884

....

....

182,000 6 Jan. A July 1876

....

•

....

752,000 7
161,000 6

ge Bonds
mds

«v-

....

Loan of 1871.
l.o ~n of 1884

2,667,276

Mortgage Bonds

—

•

•

t

lorris.

750,000

1st

Mortgage (North Branch).

1st
2d

Mortgage.

96* 96*
88*
....

....

....

....

6

April A Oct 1876

690,000

Mortgage Bonds

Pennsylvania A New York:

6

May A Nov.

1,764,830 6 Mch A Sept 1872
980,670 6 Jan. & July 1882
586,500 6 May A Nov. 1870

...

94
....

*

85

■i

325,000

6
6

Jan. A July
do
do

2,500,000

6

May A Nov. 1883

....

1st Mortgage
West Branch and
1st Mortgage

....

•

•

•

450,000 6 Jan. A July 1878

...

•

•

•

Susquehanna:

Wyoming Valley :

....

•

1,1* '0,000

Coupon Bonds
Priority Bonds,
Union (Pa.):

....

•

....

1st

1866
1878

■

1864

6

Jan. A

July

7

Jan. A

July

1884

July
1,500,000 7
2,000,000 7 April A Oci

18—

...

....

24

1878

760,000

Mortgage

Miscellaneous:
Cincinnati and Covington Bn
1st Mortgage Bonds

....

/

**•

•

*

....

..

.

•

•

•

•

Jan. A

1st Mortgage.
2d ' do

....

{ississippi (Roc
1st

1st

’8

*

*

S

*

•

•

U4

•

*•—'

«

600,000

S

Jan. A

July

1881

....

600 000

Mortgage

7

Feb. A

Ang

1871

J

...

D

Pennsylvania Ci

.02*

Mortgage.

40

t

2d

500,000

Mortgage.

500,000

do

’IIIMMI

mm

7

Inne A Dec
- ran. A July

4

1873
1873

•

•

•

•

-

•:

»

|

-t

t

1st
f ff *

-

....

....

6

....

1876

3

do

....

Tan. A July 1875

Feb, & Aus vm

♦ •

•

••V

596,000 6 Jan. & >uly 1890
1890
do
200,000 6

...

\

10
10

%

—

A

Sacramento Valley:

• >.-•

-

•

399,300 7 Jan. & July 1873
554,908 8“ April & Oct 1878

2,356,509

(Baltimore) Bonds

Sterling Bonds, guaranteed

800,000 7 Tun. &Dec. 1874
800,000 7 Mch A Sept 1880

1,B00,000

•

•

....

300,000 7 Jan. & July 188^
300,000 7 Apr. & Oct. 1885
650,000 7 May & Nov. 1875
200,000 7 Mar. & Sep. 1882

Mortgage

do

Chesapeake and Delaware :
1st Mortgage Bonds
Chesapeake and Ohio ;

May & Nov. 1890
do
do

May A Nov.

2,000,000
1,135,000

Mortgage

Maryland Loan

July 1875
1888
1876

7
7

1871

500,000 6 Jan. & Juhr 1863
do
1867
180,000 6

Improvement

Feb. & Aug 1881
1881
do

*

Canal

1912 103
1912
1912
1884

7

July

do
do
152,355 7
600,000 7 Jan. & July

do

Guaranteed

••

800,000

n r M i 11 f M f t i i f {1111

Aug

(Toledo and Wabash)...

—

400,000 6 Feb. A Aug 1889

140,000

do

Feb. &

200,000

.

....

Reading and Columbia:

...

7

1,070,000

Dollar Bonds
Western A Atlantic :
1st mortgage, guar, by Georgia...
Western Maryland :
1st Mortgage
1st
do
, guaranteed...
York A Cumberland (North. Cent.) :
1st Mortgage
do
2d

...

516,000 6 Jan. & July 1884

250,000

Mortgage

•

,

1,000,600 7 Mch & Sept 1888

Rensselaer A Saratoga consolidated :
1st Mort. Rensselaer & Saratoga .
1st Mort Saratoga & Whitehall....
1st Mort. Troy, 8. & Rnt. (guar.) .
R. Water, and Ogdens. ($1,60 ,908) :
1st Mortgage (Potsdam & Watert.)
2d
do
(Watertown A Rome)
Rutlandand Burlington ($3,257,472) ;

1867

•••

.

($600,000) :
;
Mortgage (guaranteed)
Westchester A Philadelphia ($962,300)
1st Mortgage (convert.) Coupon ..
do
2d
registered
Western (Mass.) (6,269.520):
Sterling (£899,900) Bonds

200,000 6 May & Nov. 1868

Quincy and Toledo:

1st Mortgage
Racine and Mississippi (W. Union);

7

1875
1872

4,980,000 6 Jan. A July 1880
2,621,000 6 April & Oct 1875
1875
do
2,283,840 6

1,000.0)0
500,000

Mortgage

June & Dec

•

•

Warren

....

....

....

7

1st

350,000

....

2.000,000

Verm. Cen. A Verm. A Can. Bonds

—

....

700,000

(no interest)
Vermont and Massachusetts >

101

...

k

•

500,000

do

1st
2d

...

•

**

*

1875

($791,597) :

Vermont Central ($3,500,000) :

Aug 1870

•

•

July

Troy Union ($680,000) :
Mortgage Bonds

^

....

••

....

Jan. &

2d
do ’
3d
do
Convertible

98
98

•

7

Sinking Fund Bonds (T. W. & Iv.
Equipment bonds
Troy and Boston ($1,452,000) :
1st Mortgage

....

....

.

2d
2d

April A Oct

1,290,000

Syra. Bing, and N. Y. ($1,595,191):
1,400,000
1st Mortgage
:
Terre Haute A Indianapolis($G0,000):
60,000
1st Mortgage, convertible
Third Avenue (N. Y.):
1,180,000
1st Mortgage
Toledo, Peoria and Warsaw :
1st Mortgage
1,391,000
Toledo and Vabash ($6,653,868):
900,000
1st Mort. (Toledo & Wabash)
1st do
2,500,000
(extended)

....

7
7

1,000,000 7 Feb. A Ang 1900
201.500
May A Nov ms

Domestic Bonds
Staten Island:
1st Mortgage

....

•

....

Sterling Loan..'

lii

....

1874

1880
1887

•

....

do

1,150,000

do
do
, sterling
PhUa. and Balt. Central ($575,000) :




....

106

102

July 1896

Jan. A

346,000 7

Mortgage

1

95

1st Mortgage
Second Avenue:
1st Mortgage
Shamokin V. A Pottsville
lstMortgage
South Carolina:

416,000 7 April A Oct 1870

1st Mortgage
Pennsylvania ($16,750,124);

IPT*8;

April & Oct

-

....

Sandusky, Mansfield and Newark:

1,139,000 6 Jan. & July ’72-’87

Mortgage, guar, by Mo

.

Jan. & July irred.
Jan. & July 1885

225,000 7 Jan. & July ’70-’80

Pacific, (S. W Branch):

Mortgage

•

'.

do

1st

Panama :
1st Mortgage, sterling
do
do
1st
2d
do
do*
Peninsula {Chic. AN. W.) :

1st
2d

95

Feb. & Aug ’73-’78

7
7

let Mortgage

1st

1875
1886

6

7

Oswego and Syracuse ($311,500):

1st

1Rate.

Payable.

A

2,200,00G 7 Semi an’ally 1894
do
1894
2,800,000 7
1,700,000 7 May A Nov. 1894

Chicago:

Sandusky, Dayton and Cincinnati:
let Mortgage (extended)

....

...

1872
1893
1868

7

Oswego <t Home ($350,000).
1st Mortgage (guar by R. W. A o.)

do

....

)l

1st Mortgage
\
Ohio and Mississippi ($3,650,000);
1st Mortgage
,
do
2d
( W.D.)

1st
2d

..

r

OgdensburgandL. Cham.($1,494,000)

.

....

1887
94*5
90
1883
1883
90
1876 103
1876 111
1876 111

Mortgage

1st Mortgage
2d
do
3d
do
Akron Branch: 1st

1883

do

•

....

6 J une & Dec
6 May & Nov.
do
) 6
)j 7 Feb. & Aug
do
)| 7
do

Chattel Mortgage
horth- Western Virginia:
1st Mortgage (guar, by Baltimore)
do
2d
(guar, by B. & O. RR.
3d
do
(do
do
do
3d
(not guaranteed)....
do

.

May &yNov

May & Nov.
Feb. & Aug

•

•

1885

7
) 7
) 7

•

•

2d
do
preferred
2d
do
income
St. Louis, Jacksonville A
1st Mortgage
2d
do

2d

July

Jan. &

)’

Mortgage Bonds

1st
2d
2d

Jan. A

)

North Pennsylvania ($3,105,785) :

General Mortgage
Steamboat Mortgage

M’ch& Sep 1861
Jan. & July 1868

1873

6

North Missouri:

■

1876

July

^6

Sinking Fund

Worcester ($580,000):'

&July

6 Feb. A Aug

Plain Bonds

Norwich and

Jan.

Louis, Alton A T. H. ($6,700,000);
1st Mortgage

1869

7

1

Northern New Hampshire ($151,400)
1st General

•aj’
•n

Railroad:

let Mortgage
3d
do
N. Haven & Northampton ($650,000)
1st Mortgage
New Jersey ($805,000) ;
Fei ry Bonds of 1853
New London Northern ($140,000)):
1st General Mortgage
New York Central ($14,627,443);
Premium Sinking Fund Bonds ..
Bonds of October, 1863 (renewal).
Real Estate Bonds

State Loans
2d Mortgage

FRIDAY
“

1

Railroad:

Naugatuck ($300,000) ;
1st Mortgage (convertible)...
New Haven
N. London ($766,000)

3d

Amount"

The

an

«

~

*

ft,"

-H.

PETROLEUM STOCK LIST.

INSURANCE STOCK LIST.—Friday.
Dec.

cn tims (*) we
participating, nd(t)
write

[September 29,1866.

THE CHRONICLE

410

Si,

Bid.
Last

Periods.

Marine Risks. Capital. Assets.

150,000

30

piemen's

204,000
150,000
150,000

17
firemen’s Fund... 10
Firemens Trust.. 10
Fttlton
25
Gallatin
50
Gabhard
100
Germania
50

200,000

500,000

200,000
1,000,000
200,000
200,000
200,000
150,000
400,000

Greenwich
25
Grocers’^60
-

15
50

800,000

Harmony (F.&M.)t 50
50
Homnan

50

Hope

200,000

50
100

Howard

Humboldt

152,057

300,000
200,000

349,521

201,216

Import’ & Traders. 50 200,000 1*8,82^
Indemnity
100 150,000 138,166
International
100 l,000,000 1,024,762

25

Bring

200,000

150,000

280,000

150,000

300,000
150,000
200,000

100
25

Lamar....
Lenox

Long Island (B’kly). 50

25 1,000,000

Lorinard*

Manhattan
100
Market*
100
Meehan' A Trade’. 25

500,000
200,000
200,000
150,000
200,000
640,000
200,000

Mechanics (B’klyn). 50
Mercantile
100
Mercantile Mut’l*tl00
Merchants’
50

Metropolitan * +... 100 1,000,000
Montauk(B’lyn). ..50 150,000
Hassan(B’klyn)... 50 150,000
Hational
7% 200,000
New Amsterdam.. 25
300,000
N. Y. Eenitable 3 35
210,000
200,000
N.Y.Fire and Mar. 100
Niagara
50 1,000,000
North American*. 50
500,000
850,000
North River
25
Pacific
25 200,000
100 200,000
Park
Peter Cooper
20 150,000
Phoenix t Br’klyn. 50 1,000,000
Relitt.50 200,000

100

Republic*

300,000

100

Resolute*

200,000

25

Rutgers’

St. Mark’s
St Nicholast

200,000

150,000
150,000

25
25

385,489
229.729
194,317

173,691
154,206

998,687
188,170

457,252
208,969

206,909

150.580
138,902

50 1,000,000 1,277,564

Security *t
Standard
star

60
100

200,000
200,000

230,903
217,843

sterling *
Stuyveeant

100
25

200,000
200,000

177,915
208,049

25
26

150,000
250,000

142,830
350,413

50
Washington
Washington *+....1W

400,000
287,400
150,000

569,623
581,689

Tradesmen's
United States

Williamsburg City.50

Yonkers A N. Y.. 100

Aug. ’66. .5
Aug. ’66..6
July’64 ..4
July ’66 .10
Aug. 5 p. 8.
Ang. ’66 5
July’04.3%
July’66.. 5
Aug. ’66 ..5
July’66 ..5

■Rliven

Brevoort

Brooklyn

600,000

151,539
550,301

..10

5
.100

Atlantic 1864
do
..1865
do
.1866
Commsr.1860
do
1861
do
do

do

.1862
.1863
.1864

do
do

Bid.

Asked.

.1862
.1863
.1864
.1865
.1966

•

....

..

Mar. ’64..5

•

..

July’64 ..5
Apr. '66..5
July ’66.. 7
July ’66... 5

.

...

.

Commercial

.100

Commonwealth

..10

r?nn»nlirlntpd of N.Y

Devon

....

....

1

..

....

Empire and Pit Hole

....

A

•

•

....

♦

....

....

_

.

,

.

m

-

••A

•

.1862

<0

.1863




25

....

2
..10
..

Enterprise
Equitable

•

•

•

.,5
..10

....

•

.

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

1
.10
5

Fountain Petroleum..
Germania
Great Republic
G’t Western Consol..
Guild Farm

Aug.’66.3X
Aug. ’66. .5

.

.

...

.

5
..5

Hoyd rick

Hevdrick Brothers

.5
..5
.4
.4

...

Hickory Farm
High Gate

.

•

.

•

....

•

•••

•

.

.

..10
..10
5
1

Homowack
Tuoxhanstible
Island

.

Jan. '66 ..5
Julv ’66 ..5

July ’66 .5
July ’66 .5
July ’66 .5
July'66 4
July’66... 5
July ’65 .10
July ’65 .5

Knickerbocker

.

Latonia &

-

SageR

Liberty

.

....

•

•

.

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

..10
2
5
..10

.

•• •

•

•

....

5
1

.

.

•

July ’66. .8
July ’66 .6
July ’05 .5
July ’66 .6
Aug.’66.. .5

MINING STOCK LIST.

.

July’66 ..5

Copper:

Gold

•

• •

•

•

•

• •

•

•

•

•

....

.:i

~

•

.

Central

Copper Creek..,

Copper Falls...

Copper Harbor.
Dacotah
Dover

...

•

*

Caledonia
Canada

•

•

•

*93

Crozier

90

75

_

1
45 00 50 00 Columbia
Consolidated Colorado... —
Consolidated Gregory...100 16
.24% 46 50
1
Corydon
25 6
1
Downieville
2%
1
Eagle
Gunnell
25 1
3%
*...
17 00 Gunnell Central
5%
1 50 2 00 Holman

5

....

■

•

•

•

•

....

m

m

•

....

m

.

.

3
3
8
1
4
1
1
1

95
00
00
90
00
20

70
CO

20
80 “35
80 17 25
00 6 05
82 1 83
00 1 00
27 1 28

....

Excelsior
Flint Steel River
Forest City
Franklin
French Creek
Great Western
Hamilton
Hancock—

Bid.

Knowlton..,

....

....

1

2

•

2

.

...

.25

•

•

.

....

8

.

1

1

•

Minnesota
.10

Portage Lake.

•

•

•

•

•

6 00
•

•

•

•

A *

»

•

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

66

1 01

.10

•

•

.13

40

2*50

2 70

2 80

West Fellows

•

Lead and Zinc t

....

•

t

6 40
6 75

Virginia City

5

•

6 SO
5 80

1 50

Union

AAA

•

2 50

ll 80 11 90

Texas

....

•

A

•

Bucks County.

•

•

•

....

66

9
•

•

•

•

52'66 52*50
».8 7B

Manhan
Phenix.

...

Redwood.../
Wallkill..
.

.

Iron:

•••

....

par

19 00 Denbo

3% 36 75

*

25

Quartz Hill
Rocky Mountain
13 50 14 00 Smith A Parmelee
•

.11

•

Superior-.

....

....

•

10
5
10

Montana
New York
Oak Hill

•

•

•

41*00

•

Ogima

Pewabic......
Princeton....
Providence...

•

9

5%

v

21 00 21 25 Manhattan

•

.19

Liberty
Liebig

....

1 00

•

Norwich

60 LaCrosse

40

-

.

Lafayette...

New Jersey C<
New York....

25

Hope
Keystone Silver........
00 >5 54 50 60 00 Kip A Buell
.

9%

-

....

..

...

•

....

....

..1863
..1864
865
866

•

•

....

•

..1866
...

t

Ada Elmore
par — 2 00
Altona
—
American Flag
— 3 85
2 80
Atlantic & Pacific
—
2 80
Bates & Baxter
—
4%
5 1 35
1
13% 15 60 15 75 Benton
Bob Tail
17%
i’io
73 1 25 Burroughs
2%
10 00 Cons. G.&S. Ore separating

3
26
3

Annita.

Hudson.
Companies.

Bid. Ask

Companies.

Bid. Askd

Companies.

.

1864
,.1865
.1866
..I860
..1861
..1862
..1863
..1864
..1865

•

W.Virg. Oil and Coal... .10
Woods & Wright
100

.

,

#-• •

•

..

.

..1863

•

10

...

Julv ’66 ..5

.-.1863
..1864
..1865
..1866
1862

• •

•

•

.

....

Watson Petroleum
Webster

20
7 90

10
10

Vesta

—

.

3

Venango (N. Y.)
Venango A Pit Hole

•

...

.

10

Union
10
United Pe’ti’m F’ms.... 2
United States
10

....

•

10

Tygart’s Creek

•

•

...

...

6

5
10

Titus Oil
Titus Estate

.

•

.

•

...

.10

Terragenta..

....

....

...

Ivanlioe
Ken. Nat. Pet &Min..

.

.

•

•

>.

Tack Petr’m of N.Y
Talman
Tarr Farm

.

Home

.

5

Sugar Creek

45

•

..

10

Success

...

42

....

•

/

10

Story & McClintock

•

•

.

.

.

..

.

4

Southard
Standard Petroleum

..

..20

Hnrmrinnfl

Aug. Feb. ’66
Jan. and July, July *66.
do
July’66.. 6
Feb. and Ang. Aug. ’66. “
F°b. and Ang, Aug.’66.,
Jan. and July, July ’66 ..5
do
July’66

•

10

Second National
Shade River.
5
Sherman & Barnsdale. .2%
Sherman Oil

.

Hard Pan

July ’66
July’65
July ’66
July ’66
July ’65
July '66

Feb. and

•

.

.

....

5
.JO
.100
10

.

HamiltonMcClintock.

Sep. '66.. .4

60

Rynd Farm

12
‘

.

2 50

Revenue

....

..

2#

President
3
Rathbone Oil Tract......
Raw son Farm

42

•

•

10

First National
Forest City

•

•

....

•

•

2

..

•

•

....

....

•

Simple

Petroleum Consol
Pit Hole C. No. 2
Pit Hole Creek
Pithole Farms

•

•

....

.

Everett
Eureka
Excelsior

•

....

•

..

Enniskillen

Fee

5

..

20
5
10

Pennsylvania Oil
Pepper Well Petroleum..

...

Emp’e City Petrol’m..

10

Oil City Petroleum
Oil Creek of N. Y.
Pacific
Palmer Petroleum

.10

.

.

8
Noble & Delancter
Noble Well of N. Y
25
10
North American
Northern Light
.10
Oak Shade
10
Oceanic
....100

....

....

15

1

N.Y,Ph. ABaltCons

.

....

Eclectic

.

•

N. Y. & Philadel

.

.

4 00

New York & Newark—

....

....

.

1865
1866
N. Y. Mat. ,1860
1861
do
1862
do
1863
do
1864
do
1865
do
do
1866
1859
Orient
1860
do
1861
do
1863
do
1864
do
1865
do
1866
di
1860
PacVfic
1861
da»
1868
do

*

.100 2 25 2 30
..10
Cherry knn Oil
.....
2
Cherry Run Petrol’m..
5
25
Cherry Run special....
..10
Clifton
2 10 2 25
Clinton
... ..10
.50
Columbia (Pbg)

July’66.3%
Jnly’66.3%
Feb. and Aug. Aug. ’66. .5
do
Aug.’66..5
Jan. and July Aug. ’66 .5
Feb. and Aug. Feb/66.3%
Jan. and July, July ’66 .5
do
July ’66 ..5

Companies.

do
do

*

*

....

Central

.

Mercantile. .1861

Mtrc'nTel860
do
.1861
40

25
....

•

.1865
.1866

do
do
do
do
do

60

.

.

MARINE MUTUAL INSURANCE SCRIP.
COMPANIES.

....

....

..

Jnly ’65. .5

Ask¬
Bid. ed.

Montana
5
Mount Yemon.......... 3
National
5
New England
10
New York
5
N. Y. & Alleghany
5
New York& Kent’y Oil.100
New York& Kent’yPct.. £

«...

1 20
50
20

5

..

California
Cascade

July’66 ..5
April and Oct Apr. ’66..4
do
July ’66..5
do
July’66 ..5
do
July ’66 ..5
Feb. and Aug. Aug. 66 ..4
Jan. and July, Jan ’66 .5
do
do
do

Monongahela A Kan

..10

Buchanan Farm
Bunker Hill

July'66 ..7

do

«...

10

Mingo

2

Bradley Oil

10
6

Marietta

Mercantile
Mineral Point

..20

‘Farm

60

33

2

Maple Grove
6
Maple Shade of N. Y.... .10

10

and Oil

5

Manhattan.

_

■RlnnH

Oct ’65.. .5

do
245,984 March and Sep
159,721 Jan. and July,
do
279,864
do
161,252
do
346,426
do
129,644
do
260,264
do
1,182.779
do
704,303
do
282,35*
do
197.633
do
150,135
do
211,178
do
1,322,469
do
228,644
do
1,192,303
do
150,646
do
216,184
do
235,518
do
311.976
244,066 Jan. and July.
222,199 Feb. and Aug.
1,175,565 Jan. and July,
do
601,701

160,000

20

People’s

Bergen Coal

Dec.’65...5

do
July ’66 ..5
do
July ’65 ..5
do
July *66 . .6
do
July ’65 ..5
do
July ’65 .6
and Aug. Feb.’65 ..5
Feb.

195,671

200,010

30
King’s Co’ty(Bklyn)20
Knickerbocker.... 40
Lafkyette (B’kly).. 50

Jefferson

Ang. ’65..4

Feb. and Aug.
Jan. and July, Jul y'66 . .5
do
July '66.3%
do
July’65 ..5
do
Jnly ’66. .5

200,000
100 2,000,000 2,485,017

Home

1 66 i'50

10
5 2 75 3 25
-Bennehoff & Pithole
2
Bennehoff Run..........10 6*66 6*40
Bennehoff Run Oil..... 5

6
22.1,30!* Feb. and Aug. Ang ’66 ..5
592,394 an. and July. Jnly’66 ..5
195,875 Jan. and July. Jnly’65 ..5
3,177,437 Jan. and July. Jnly ’66.3#
228,122 Feb. and Aug. Aug ’66..5
186,176 April and Oct. Apr. ’65..5
172,318 Jan. and July, July ’66 3%
do
July '66 . .4
163,860
do
July ’66 . .5
450,295
do
July '66 . .5
253,214
do
July'66 ..5
207,^5

150,000

10

*

10
10

par

McElhenny
McKinley

100

Beekman
Bemis Heights

149,024
156,068
215,079
149,755 May and Nov. May

200,000

Globe
50
Great Western* t.. 100

Guardian.....
Hamilton
Hanorer

140,324
230,3 2

July ’66...
July ’66.. 4
Jan. 65...5
Ang. ’66...5
Sep. ’66.. .5

McClintockville

10

par

Alleghany
Allen Wnght
Bainbridge

Bid. Askd

Companies.

paid.

.

Exchange..

Bid.

Companies.

Adamantine Oil

25 $800,000 223,775 Jan. and July.
JKtna...
50 200,000 205,976 Jan. and July.
American*
50 200,000 440,603 Jan. and July.
American Exch’a. .100 200,000 213,590 Jan. and July.
Arctic
50 500,000 501,543 Jan. and July.
Aator.
25 250,000 253,232 Feb. and Aug.
Atlantic (Br’klyn)..60
800,000 324,456 March and Sep
JMltiC
25 200,000 200.362 May and Nov.
....25 200,000 181,052 Feb. and Aug.
Btikmnn
Bowery
25 800,000 320,! 11 June and Dec.
25 200,000 248,392 Feb. and Aug.
Broadway
do
Brooklyn
17 153,000 241,521
Central Park
100 150,000 123,577 Jan. and July
do
20 300,000 378,440
Citizens’
City
70 210,000 314,787 Feb. and Aug.
do
Ctoton
100 250,000 231,793
Ootambia*
100 500,000 891,913 Jan. and July,
do
Commerce (N.Y.).. 100
200,000 212,594
Commerce (Alb’y).100
400,000 440,870 Feb. and Aug.
Commercial
50 200,000 244,296 Jan. and July.
Commonwealth... 100 250,000 268,893 April and Oct.
Continental *
100 500,000 1,199,978 Jan. and July.
Com Exchange... 50
400,000 86 ,970 March and Sep
Croton
100 200,000 168,32 Jan. and July.
Baffle
40 300,000 861,705 April and Oct.
100 200,000 212,145 Jan. and July,
Spire City
do
Bxcelsior
50 200,000 258,054
Adriatic

’

Askd

END.

1865.

•

•

•

•

Copake
..
pa/
Lake Superior.... .... .100
Mount Pleasant

50

Miscellaneous.
Russell File
Rutland Marble

6 00
5
25 31 50

Saginaw,L.S. AM..

85

.

V

..

vV

411

THE CHRONICLE

September 29, I860.]

'MuaffKH
i

SEVEN PER CENT. PER

ANNUM,

GOLD,

IN
ON

-

THE

First Mortgage Bonds of The

Alexandria

and

Fredericksburg Railway.
DIRECTORS.

of Messrs. Geo. D. Fowlk <fe Co, of New York.
No. 35 Wall Street, New York. ,
Washington, D. C.
do
do
Alexandria.
Mayor of Fredericksburg.

HUGH RICE
ALBERT G. BODFISH

JOHN A. WILLS.
HUGH B. SWEENEY
COL. JOSEPH B. STEWART

REUBEN JOHNSON
HON. MONTGOMERY

SLAUGHTER

R. W. LATHAM,

Vice-President, 16 Broad Street, New

York.

.

with accrued interest from June 1st, must soon command a
premium, as the Interest is greater and the Security as ample as that of a Government Bond,
We would respectfully call the attention of every one desirous of obtaining a high rate of interest upon their money to
the fact that they can now buy at par a Bond that has Thirty years to run, and pays seven per cent, per annum in gold at
the Ocean National Bank, in New York City, on the 1st days of June and December. The One Million Dollars of the above
bonds are issued under the provisions of the Charter granted to the Company by the State of Virginia.
The Security is a First Mortgage upon the whole property of the Railway, including the Charter and the franchise or
right of way, which of itself is worth the whole amount of the Bonds issued.
By referring to the map of Virginia it will be perceived that the only route by rail from Washington to Richmond i»
the one from Alexandria by way of Manassas Junction around by Gordonsville, a distance, all told, of one hundred and seventy- ‘
one miles, making a tedious circuit, which necessarily takes time to accomplish.
The other route now in use is the one by
Steamboat all the way to Acquia Creek, and thence by rail to Fredericksburg; this route will be discontinued immediately
upon the completion of the Alexandria and Fredericksburg Railway.
It has been for a long time the desire of the Railway Companies running North and South of Washington to secure the *
right of way and Charter, which the present Company has had the good fortune to obtain. This Road, forty-two miles in
length, runs from Alexandria to Brooks’ Station, and thence to Fredericksburg, making the distance by rail seventy miles
shorter than by the route first named. It will not have to contend with any opposition line, as it forms the only direct means
of communication between Washington and Richmond, and between the great through routes leading North and South of »
These

Bonds, which

are now

offered for sale by us at par,

;

these two central cities.

and will be completed early next season. One of
Vernon, to which, of course, the local travel is
very great, and will yield a large revenue, without taking into account the great amount of through traffic.
The Officers of this Road are gentlemen well known to the public. The President, General D. C. McCallum, for so
Jong the Superintendent of the New York and Erie Railway, and during'the late war the Military Superintendent for the
Government of all the Railways in the United States, brings to this Road his great experience and well known ability, which
road, which is now being vigorously worked, is all under contract,
the first Stations on the line, and but nine miles from Alexandria, is Mount
The

guarantee of its success.
~
Mr. D. R. Martin, the President of the Ocean National Bank, and Mr. Robert Turner, of Messrs. Turner Brothers,
Bankers, are the Trustees; their names are a sufficient voucher that the Bonds are amply secured.
When the Board of Directors last met we were authorized to dispose of these Bonds at par.
As the Securities of the United States have advanced so greatly in price, and bear a less interest than these Bonds, we

is of itself

a

large amount for sale at par. We will at present sell in moderate quantities at that rate, with ac.
June 1st. As we are confident that these Bonds are the very best investment now offered in the
market, we have no hesitation in recommending them to our customers as being a safe investment, and one that must
in a short time command a large Premium. We have Coupon Bonds for sale in sums of one thousand dollars each.
If desired, we will issue Certificates duly registered in place of these, to prevent loss in ease the Bonds should be
do not offer any

crued interest from

mislaid

or

stolen.

or other Securities yielding
the highest market rate.

Stocks

we

We would say to all parties having in their possession
will receive such Securities and allow for them in exchange

Any communication will be promptly answered.

& BELDSZT, Bankers.
37

U

I




YORK, Sept. Ut, 1866.

-V-

V

FISK
NEW

little or no return, that

Broad Street, N. Y.

3/’
0

.

.

■'
.

'

i

jj*

»*

«

.

■

-V

Machinery and

superior finish, and

and durability.

Paper Collars,

Thackston,

Tobacco, Note and Exchange Broker.
No. 12 OLD SLIP, cor. WATER ST.
NEW YORK.

E.R.Mudge,Sawyer&Co.
AGENTS

FOR

BURLINGTON WOOLEN CO.,
CHICOPEE HANUF.

Co.,

VICTOR 1l HANUF.

HILTON
about October 1st to

CO.,

HILLS,

new store

Nos. 43 Sc 45 WHITE STREET.

59

Bros.

LEON ARB

&

Co.,

STREET,

HILL

RIVER Woolen Manufacturing
FANCY CASSIMERES, new and desirable

Co.’*

Fall

Styles, heavy weights.
HARDING’S 3-4 and 6-4 Black DOESKINS,
extra heavy and of nnequaled finish.
POWHATAN HILLS. COTTON WARP
CLOTHS, superior color and finish.
ROCKINGHAH WOOLEN Co., Black CAi

SIMERES, all grades.
ROCK LAWN, all Wool Heavy Oxford and
DOESKINS and UNION

CAS¬

Fine all Wool White

CLAIRH”NT HILLS, Fine Oxford, Cadet,
and Blue Mixed KENTUCKY JEANS.

Extra Heavy 27 and 32 inch Bine and Brown JEANSI
manufactured expressly for Western t rade.
UNION CASSIMERES.

Co., N. Y.

3 >n. Wilton Brown, Mobile. ■
W. Mead Addison, Esq., Baltimore.
A. P. MERRILL, Jb,,
36 New Street, New York City.

COHHISSION HERCH ANTS

Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods,
-

'

including

a

HOSIERY and WHITE GOODS.

Smith

Cotton
All

Umbrellas &

Parasols,

49 MURRAY ST., NEW YORK.

Bankers, Merchants,
And others should send

by the

Broadway,
they have unsurpassed facilities for the rapid and

HARNDEN EXPRESS, 65




JEWELRY, * MERCHANDISE
Also for tL® Qollf>rt!pn pf pof w

wit, m

'

Duck,
and

Weights,

A LARGE STOCK ALWAYS ON

HAND,

THEODORE FOLHEMUS Sc

CO.,

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS.
59

Broad

Street, corner of Reaver.

Henry Lawrence & Sons,
MANUFACTURERS OF

CORDAGE

FOR EXPORT AND DOHEST1C
192 FRONT

USE,

STRFET, NEW YORK.

[ames A. Robinson,

Wardwell & Co.)
Importer and Dealer in Hardware,
(of the late firm of Neilson

Merchant,
STREET, NEW YORK. ,
All orders entrusted to him will receive prompt at¬
and

Commission

46 CLIFF

Best of references given if required.

solicited.

ENGINES,

PORTABLE AND STATIONARY

Steam

Engines,

Mills, Pumps, Cotton Gins, Hoistere, and General
Jobbing.
164 Duane St., Coir. Hudson, New York.

Metals,
THOS.

J.

POPE, 92 John Street.
Pig Irons, Ingot Copper,
Spelter, Tin, Antimony, &c., Old and New Railroad
Anthracite and Charcoal

Iron, Bloom Irons, Car Wheel Pig Irons.

Railroad Iron,

Consignments of Cotton, Wool, Hides, &c.,

tention.

CALORIC

ERICSSON

AMERICAN AND

FOREIGN,

FOR

J. A.

B o s t w i c K,

Steam and Street

COHHISSION HERCHANT
IN

S. W. HOPKINS Sc Co.,
69 & 71 Broadway.

Cotton, Prodnce and Provisions,

NEW ST., N. Y

40 and 42 BROADWAY and 63

Reference,

Bodlet, Bankers, N. Y.

TIlford &

GILLOTT’S STEEL

JOSEPH

OF THE OLD STANDARD

QUALITY.

Or Descriptive
GIL LOTT, Name and DesigWA It RANTED, fating Number

TRADE MARK :

NEW SERIES,
700 io No. 761.

AND

GOOD AND CHEAP, from No.
JOSEPH

Commission

Merchants,

TRADEMARK: GILLOTT,
BIRMINGHAM.
For sale

68 BROAD

STREET, NEW YORK,

sale, IN BOND, fine BOURBON an<l RYE

PENS,

JOSEPH

DISTILLERS
*

Roads,

FOR SALE BY

With

Designating
Numbers.

by

JOSEPH GILLOTT Sc SONS.
No. 91 John-st., New-York.
HENRY: OWEN, Sole Agent.

Round to Order.

Files of this Paper

Distilleries, Kentucky.

BLANK BOOKS,

STATIONERY,
ENGRAVING,
PRINTING,. AC., &C

Marsh Glenn,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT
LAW.

Strand Street,

or

Southern Texas.

J. M. Wardwell,
Burtis, French & Woodward,
J. H. Brower & Co., '

Corner of William St

YOUR

Hon.

VNew York City.

j;l'g“u^hin*.GUbert' 1 Taw?
j, % * r, ft esBw, geiftiBi

Loutrel,

kANUFACTURERS.

Strong,

Judge G. F. More, Austin, Texas.

SOLICITED BY

STATIONERS, PRINTERS AND BLANK-BOOK

jNew Orleana, La.
J. H. Reagan, Palestine, Texas.

Campbell

CUSTOH

Francis &

)

|

Sheridan,

26 EXCHANGE PLACE,

Galveston, Texas,

Is prepared to attend to, and collect promptly, all
Claims or other business committed to his charge in

Middle

Cooper &

references:

ip?

Widths

Speed, Louisville.

DWIGHT,

MANUFACTURERS OF

of erery description.

William N. Clabk, Jr.

WHISKIES, from their own and other first-class

AND

jut

William A. Gellatlt.

Joseph H Westerfied.
William H. Schieffelin,

Commercial

Agents.
STREETS.
G. N. CARLETON, A. M. FOUTE, New York.
R. B. SPEED, A. M. SUMMERS, New Orleans.
J. H. SPEED, W. B. DONOHO, Memphis.
W. M. COZART, J. J. STOCKARD, Mobile.
Consignments and orders solicited.
carleton, foute & co.
Njtw York, Feb. 1,1866.
References—Duncan, Sherman & Co., Bankers,
New York; I. B. Kirtland, Hill & Co., Bankers, New
York; Third National Bank, St. Louis, Mo.; Hon.
Thos. H. Yeatman, Cincinnati, Ohio; Hon. James
Speed, Attorney General U. S., Washington; J.
General

Offer for

GOODS,

DOUBLEDAY Sc

ETC,

170 & 172 WILLIAM ST.

superb stock oi

DRESS

ETC.,

GOODS, PERFUMERY,

AND

BROADWAY,

or

•

FANCY

Carleton, Foute & Co.,

J. M. Cummings & Co.,

IHPORTERS AND JOBBERS

"

INDIGO, CORKS, SPONGES,

-

Ogden, Fleetwood & C ., Chicago.
D. B. Molloy, Esq., Memphis.
Messr-. Porter, Fairfax & Co., Louisville, Ky.
Francis Surget, Esq. Natchez, Miss.H. B. Plant. E-q., Augusta, Ga.

,Tracy, Irwin & Co.,

•

DRUGS,

New York.

York.

Also, Black and White Heavy Double and Twist

NO. 400

CO.,

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF

Messrs. Crane, Bi eed & Co. Cincinnati.
E. Addison, Esq., Virginia.
Geo 8. Cameron, Esq., South Carolina.
Hon. W. B. Ogden, Chicago.

J

FAIR VIEW CO., Extra
FLANNELS.

.

SCHIEFFELIN BROTHERS Sc

REFERENCES:
Messrs. Duncan, Sherman & Co., New
U. A. Murdock, Esq., New York.
W. R. Dixon, Esq , Pres.MIoff an Ins.
Dr. W. N. Mercer, New Orleans.

Jeremiah M. Wardwell,

OFFER FOR SALE

Cadet Mixed
SIMERES.

;■

NOS. 38 BROAD AND 36 NEW

WASHINGTON WILLS,

Harding

Agricultural Implements of every

-•

•

SUCCESSORS TO

.

the most economical collar ever invented.

.

ti*

consignments of Cotton, To¬

op

George S. Mandeville, Esq., New Orleans.

Patent Reversible

remove

W. H. Schieffelin & Co.

mission.

Agents for the sale of the

Will

Jr.*

Mississippi. —

description supplied.
Southern Real Estate Bought and Sold on Com¬

silk, which it equals in

costs but half as much as real

Formerly of

bacco, and other produce.

Silk,

very

Commercial Cards-

GENERAL COHHISSION HERCH ANT
36 NEW STREET & 38 BROAD STREET,
NEW YORK CITY.
Advances made

Imitation Oiled Silk.
a

-

Goodman & Merrill,

SILK AND COTTON HANDKERCHIEFS,

Our “ Imitation” has

.i.X &

,

SUCCESSOR TO

and Manufactarers of

Oiled

’

—

Merrill,

-

CHINA SILKS,

EUROPEAN AND

-i

■

Importers of

E. S.

P.

A.

Co.,

BROADWAY,

No. 363

ppearance

)

*

-

-

-

Commercial Card*.

Commercial Cards.

S. H. Pearce &

•

-

'

•„

£ Jj.

[September 29, 1860.

CHRONICLE.

THE

412

45 Halden

Lane, New Ywk,

supply everything io our Hoe for Business,
Profesnionul .nd Prtvsts n*e,
I,ow PriSM,
We

'~rt.

-i >• ?,-M/<-it

?

THE CHEONICKE.

September 29, I860.]

..

—

—

.

Miscellaneous.

Miscellaneous.

Steamship and Express Co’s.

National Steam

City of* Keokuk New 8

Navigation Co.

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY’S

cent. Bonds!
per YEARS TO RUN.
20

THROUGH LINE

California,

To

And Carrying the

United

States Mail.
LEAVE PIER NO. 42 NORTH

RIV¬
ER, FOOT 5f Canal street, at 12
o’clock noon, on the 1st, 11th, and
21st of every month (except when those dates fall on
Sunday, and then on the preceding Saturday), for
ASPINWALL, connecting, via Panama Railroad,
withoneof the Company’s steamships from Panama
for SAN FRANCISCO, touching at ACAPULCO.
SEPTEMBER:

zanillo.

One hundred pounds

Baggage thecked through.

allowed eich adult.

experienced Surgeon on board. Medicines and
attendance free.
For passage tickets or further information, apply
An

it the Company’s ticket office, on the
Canal street, North River, New York.
F. W. G.

(limited.)
WEEKLY

TO LIVER¬
STEAMERS
POOL, CALLING AT QUEENSTOWN.
Leaving Pier No. 47, North Rivar, as follows:
SCOTLAND
Sails Saturday, Sept. 22
ENGLAND
“ Saturday, Sept. 29
ERIN
“ Saturday, Oct.
6
HELVETIA (Ogilvie)
“ Saturday, Oct. 13
Cabin passage, $ 100; Steerage, $30.

bring parties from
Liverpool or Queenstown, for $36 in currency.
Through passage to Paris, Antwerp, Hamburg,
Steerage passage tickets, to

1st—Arizona, connecting with Golden City.
11th—Henry Chauncey, connecting with St. Lotns
list—New York, connecting with Sacramento.
Departures of 1st and 21st connect at Panama with
steamers for South Pacific ports: 1st and 11th for
Central American Ports. Those or 1st touch at Man¬

wharf, foot of

BELLOWS, Agent.

Bremen, &c., at low rates.
Drafts issued for any amount,
in Great Britain or on the

Freight and Cabin Passage apply at
COMPANY, 57 BROADWAY.
And for Steerage Tickets, at the Passage Office of
the Company, 27 Broadway, and 275 Pearl street,
near

Fulton.
F. W. J.

Steamship Comp’y,
Under

contract

with

the govern¬

'

YORK,

For the carriage of the

AMERICAN EMIGRANT AID & HOME¬
STEAD CO.’S STEAMSHIP LINE.

These Bonds

THE AMERICAN, SCANDINAVIAN,
SIAN LLOYD
TEAMSHIP COMPANY

patch their First-class Vesselfe, with
Passengers, to

& RUS¬

will des¬

Freight and

Copenhagen, Denmark; GottenSweden; Christiana, Norway.

Southampton ;
burg,

Connecting with Stettin and St. Petersburg,
all the German aud Russian Ports
on
the Baltic Coast.

and

The luxurious cabin offers first-class accommodotions for travelling to England, France, Germany,
and ail the Northern Ports of Europe.

Freight will be received on through bills of lading
to all the connecting ports in E'^gland, Russia,
Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. Gooos
lor England and Scotland to be discharged at South¬
hampton.

New-York to St. Thomas
.First Cabin, $80
New-York to Para
“
$150
New-York to Pernambuco
“
i.....
$170
New-York to Bahia
“
$180
New-York to Rio de Janeiro
“
$200
.

..

Steerage jit half these rates, meals included.
experienced Surgeon is attached to each vessel.
For farther information, freight or passage,
.
Apply to
GARRISON & ALLEN, Agents,
No. 5 Bowling Green.
The elegant sidewheel steamship “ North America”
L. F. Timmerman, commander, will sail Saturday,
July 21,punctually at8 o’clock P.M. from Pier 43 N.R.
GARRISON & ALLEN,
An

No. 5 Bowling

Green

Office of E. S. Munroe & Co.,
No. 80 Bkoadway and No. 5 New st.,
New York, Sept. 22, 1860.

1

V

)
WE OFFER FOR SALE IN SUMS TO
.

For
Office.

freight or passage apply to the Company’s
No. 62 Broadway.

Communications addressed to
P. C.

WRIGHT, President.

PANAMA,

NEW-ZEA-

AUSTRALIAN
ROYAL HAIL COMPANY.

LANU AND

r

,

OPENING OF STEAM COMMUNICATION BE¬
TWEEN NEW YORK AND AUSTRALASIA
VIA PANAMA.
The service of the above Company will be com¬
menced from Panama to Wellington, New-Zeajand,
on the 24th June, by the Steamship KAKAIA,
fol¬
lowed by the KAIKOURA on the 24th July.

Passengers and goods

will he forwarded from Wel¬

lington to Auckland, Otago, Nelson, Canterbury,
Sydney, Melbourne, and other parts of New-Zealand
and Australia, by the Company’* Inter-Colonial

for the conveyance
of passengers and goods from New York, at through
Arrangements are in progress

fares and rates to aU the

suit, Coupon Sixes of 1881, in denominations of $50
and $100. Interest payable yearly in gold. Also,
same class of bonds in $500, payable semi-annually
Jan. 1 and July 1, These bonds are called the Ore¬

Office of the Panama Railroad

Co., )
Tontine Buildings, No. 88 Wall St.,
V
New York, Sept. 24,1866.
)
38til DIVIDEND—THE B>ARD OF
Directors have this day declared a DIVIDEND of
FOUR PER CENT, out of the earnings of the
road for the three months ending 30th inst.,
and TWO PER CENT, out of the earnings of
steamers, sailing vessels, etc., payable to the stock¬
holders, or their legal representatives, on and after
•

October 5.
Transfer Books will he closed from the evening of
the 26th September until t^e morning of Oct. 8.
HENRY SMITH, Treasurer.
,

principal ports in the Aus¬

Office of the St. Louis, Jacksonville )
and Chicago Railroad Co.,
V
«I acksonvtlle, Ill., Sept. 20,1866.
)

tralasian Colonies.

opening voyages of the Company’s ships, in
conjunction with those of the Pacific Mail Steamship
Company, will be as follows: '
The

OUTWARD.

From New York, June 11.
From Panama, June 24.
From Wellington, N. Z., July

Arriving at Sydney Julv 29.

TIME.

COUPONS OF THE ST. LOUIS,JACK¬
SONVILLE AND CHICAGO RAILROAD COM¬
PANY, 1st mortgage bonds due Oct. 1, 1866, will be

on and after that day, at the office of Messrs.
K. JESSUP & CO., No. 84 Broadway, free of

paid

21.
'

From New York to Wellington, 40 days.
From Panama to Wellington, 28 day*.
To Sydney or Melbourne, 8 days additional.

HOMEWARD.

From

Colon, (Aspinwal) July 1!
Arriving at New York July 20.

M.

government tax.

W. M.




LARRABEE, Treasurer.

United States Petroleum Company,
VJ*
No. 38 Pine street.
v New York, Sep. 19, II
•

'

-

NOTICE.—1The Trustees of the UNITED
STATES PETROLEUM COMPANY have
this day declared a Dividend of Three Per Cent.,
for the month of Septmber, Inst., payable on ana

Monday, October 1.

The Transfer-hooks will be

Tuesday, the 25th Inst., and re-openei on
Tuesday, October 1 &
P. G. PENNING, Secretary.
close on

Niw York, May 38,11866.

HOWARD, Treasurer.

RR. Co., 1
Chicago, HI., Sept. 20,1866.
1
COUPONS OP INCOME" BONDS OF
the Chicago and Alton Railroad Company, due Oct.
Oct. 1,1866, will be paid on and after that date, at
the office of Messrs. M. K. JESSUP & CO., No. 84
Broadway, less government tax.

TIME.

Wellington to New York, 42 days.
Wellington to Panama, 28 days.
From Sydney hr Melbourne, 8 clays additional.
The iervice will be continued monthly in unisoi
with the foregoing dates.
Particulate of fares and freight on application t
Pacific Mail Steamship Company, OfficeNo. 59 Wal
St.,New York, or
.

D. B.

Office of the Chicago and Alton

BANK,

Broadway, New York..

LOAN OF

Hampshire.

$1,800,000.

Proposals will be received at the office of the

UNION TRUST COMPANY, No. 73 Broadway,
corner Rector street, until the 29th day of Septem¬
ber current, for a Io n of. $1,800,000 to the State of
New Hampshire, payable as follows :

$300,000 October 1, 1867.
$250,000 October 1, 1868.,
-

$250,000 October
$250,000 October
$250,000 October
$250,000 October
$250,000 October

1, 1 70/
1, 1871.
1, 1872.
1, 1873.
1, 1874.

Registered Coupon Boi ds of $1,000 each, will be
issued, beari- g date October 1, 1866, at six per ceqt.

interest, payable semi-annually, on the first dsyabf
of October and April, and tne principal at maturity,
at the office of ihe UNION TRUfcT COMPANY, in
New York.
No bid below ®ar will be accepted; parties may
offer for either or the series named, tbe highest bta

having the preference, unlil the series is exhausted.
The right to reject any and all proposals is reserved.
The Donds will bear date Ocioherl, 1866, whep in¬
terest will commence, but payment for the bands
may be made at. any time in October, November or
December, adding accrued interest.
Teese bonds are i -sued under the authority of a
recent act of the Legislature of the State, for tbe pur-

§ose of a more speedy extinguishment of th j State
ebt; will take tne place of the longer-authorized

bonds unissued, which have been destroyed byorder
of the Legislature; will constitute a large portion of
the indebtedness of the State, and be paid at matur¬

ity by an annual State tax.
'
J
For perfect security and remunerative interest tibia
,

loan is believed to be the most desirable investment
now before the public.
; L H. FROTHINGHAM, President.
Wm. F. Aldrich, Secretary.
New York,“September 17,1866.«

PROPOSALS

War Debt, hnt are precisely of the same rank and
tenor as the regular Sixes of 1881, and will he sold on
favorable terms

be had at par only, by ap¬

State of New

gon

more

-

t

320

Steamships,

YORK,
following named ports, at the following rates
of passage, payable in coin:

.

.

INVESTMENT.

CENTRAL NATIONAL

commencing in July,

For the

deemed secured beyond any per-

A limited amount may

plying to the

Mails, will despatch one o

FROM THE PORT OF NEW

are

RELIABLE 8 PER CENT.

each over 2,000 tons burden,
THE 2 nd OF EACH
MONTH

ON

$300,000

adventure, and unequalled as a

•

THE

"

^/

4

4

SMYTHE, Trustee.

Total Authorized. Issue

their

First-Class

New

RUSSIA.

PAYMENTS

IN THE HANDS OF

HENRY A.

BRAZIL

UNITED STATES AND

THROUGH

MADE AND COLLATERALS PLACED

ments of the

SCANDINAVIAN PORTS,
AND

SECURED

FULLY

HURST, Manager.

THE UNITED STATES A BRAZIL

BETWEEN

NEW

Payable at the Central National Bank;
In tbe City of New York.

The Office of the

COMMUNICATION

THE

payable at any Bank

Continent.

For

Mail

NEW STEAMSHIP

f-.

FOR

$300,000

,

•

Central Park Improvement Fund
Stock of 1895.
SEALED PROPOSALS WILL

?

BE RECEIVED

Comptroller’s Office until SATURDAY, Octo¬
o’clock P.M., when the same will be
publicly opened, for the whole or any part of the suga.

at the

ber 6,1866, at 2

of Three Hundred

Park

Thousand’ Dollars of the Central

Improvement Fund stock, authorized by an
Legislature of the State of New York,

Act of the

passed February 10, 1865, and by an ordinance of the
Common Council, approved by the Mayor, June 2,
1865.
The said stock will bear interest at tbe rate

of Six

payable quarter yearly, and the
principal will be redeemed June 1,1895.
The proposals will state the amount of Stock de¬
sired, and the price per one hundred dollars thereof
and the persons whose proposals are accepted will
thereupon be required to deposit with the Chamberlain of the City the sums awarded to them respect¬
Per Cent, per annum,

ively.

presenting to the Comptroller toe. receipts of
deposits, the parties will
be entitled to receive certificates for equal amounts
of the par value of the Stock, bearing interest from,
the dates of payments.
Each proposal should be sealed andindorsed “ Pro¬
posals for Central Park Improvement Fund Stock,’*
and inclosed in a second envelope, addressed to the
Comptroller,
...
/ tfS;(
The right is reserved to reject any or all of the bids
if the Interests of the Corporation require it.
« MATTHEW !•.*
BRiECNNA^, Comptroller. ,,
Dxpartm’t of Finamcz, Comptroller's Osnck* l
City of New York, September 25, 1866,
f
On

the Chamberlain for such

•

i'O*

f.

:

[September 29, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

414
Inraranoe.

Insurance.

Banks and Bankers.

The Mutual Life Insu-

Queen Fire Ins. Comp’y

Fourth National Bank.

OF LIVERPOOL AND LONDON.

BANOB COMPANY OF NEW YORK.

Authorised Capital

-

FREDERICK 8. WINSTON. President.

Subscribed Capital

-

R. A. MoCURDT, Vice-President.
I ISAAC ABBATT,

£2,000,000 Stg.
£1,885,220 Sts.

Paid up

$13,500,000 00

•ASH ASSETS. Sept, lit, 1865, otxb

_

toUtfoiUiS,

f Theo. W. MORRIS.

Actuary, SHEPPARD HOMANS.

Capital Sc
Surplus
----- $1,302,115

Special Fund of $200,000, deposited in the Insur¬
Department at Albany.

$5,000,000

Capital

STRE

NASSAU STREET, N. E. COR. PINE

All the Government Loans for sale.'

ance

Marine & Fire Insurance.
METROPOLITAN INSURANCE CO.,
NO. 108 BROADWAY, NEW

YORK.

$1,000,000

Gash Capital
Aaeets Hot. 1,1865, over

1,600,000

United States Branch No. II7 Broad¬
GEORGE ADLARD, Manager.
WILLIAM H. ROSS, Secretary.

Hanover Fire Insurance
'

January 1st 1886.
Cash

$400,000 00

capital

JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, President,
ROBERT M. C. GRAHAM, Vice President,
JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, Jb., 3d Y. P.

Huxtbt H. Portkr, Secretary.

$656,303 98
34,650 00

Gross Assets....

Total Liabilities.

President.
J. Remsen Lank, Secretary.

ASSETS, Dee. 81, 1865

-

-

Niagara Fire Insurance
COMPANY.

This Company

NO. 13 WALL STREET.

Chartered I860.
363 per

$2,716,424 82

insures against Marine Risks on

paid in gold will be entitled to a return
premium in gold.
MOSES H. GRINNELL, Pres't.
EDWARD P. ANTHONY, Tice-Prett
Isaac H. Walk**,

NEW YORK.

EIGHTEEN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS.

nine years the cash dividends paid to
Stockholders, made from ONE-THIRD of the net
rofits, have amounted in the aggregate to|
Bbr the past

dividend to dealers, based

principle that all classes of risks are equally
profitable, this Company will hereafter make such
cash abatement or discount from the current rates,
when premiums are paid, as the general experience
the

cfunderwriters will warrant, ana the nett profits re¬

maining at the olose of the year, will be divided to
the stockholders.
This Company continues to make Insurance on
Marine and inland Navigation and Transportation
Risks, on the most favorable terms, including Risks
on Merchandise of all kinds, Hulls, and Freight.
Policies issued making loss payable in Gold or
Currency, at the Office in New York, or in Sterling,
at the Office of Rathbone, Bros. A Co., in Liver¬
pool.
TRUSTEES.

Samuel Willets,
Robert L. Taylor,
William T. Frost,
William Watt,

Henry Eyre,

D. Golden Murray,

E. Haydock White,
N. L. McCready,
Daniel T. Willeis,
L. Edgerton,

Cornelias Grinnell, Henry R. Kunhardt.

S. E. A. Schleicher, John S. Williams,
Morgan,
William Nelson, Jr.,
er.

Charles Dimon,
A William Heye,
W. Hennings, Harold Dollner,

Joseph Slagg,

Jas.D.FisSr

Geo.
Francis Hathaway, Pa

q. J,Dnrajk,




rttary.

’

our

Correspondents.
of the United State

and Canadas.
WILLIAM A. WHEELOCK, President.
WILLIAM H. SANFORD, Cashier.

The Tradesmens
NATIONAL
391

BANK.

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
$1,000,000
400,000

CAPITAL
SURPLUS

RICHARD BERRY, President.
ANTHONY HALSEY, Cashier.

D. C. & R. H.
DEALERS

IN

U.

S.

NO. 16 NASSAU

$500,000 O
205,989 83

......

SECURITIES,
BANK,^

Buy and Sell at Market Bates:
U. 8. 6s of 1881.
U. 8. 5-20 Bonds.

$705,989 83

TOTAL ASSETS

Fisk,

STREET,

UNDER THE POUBTH NATIONAL

SURPLUS, Jan. 1st, 1866

U. S. 10-40 Bonds.

JOHN E. KAHL, Secretary.

Hope

U. S. 7-30 Treasury Notes.
U. S. Certificates of Indebtedness.
U. S. Compound Interest Notes.
And all classes of Government Securities.

John Munroe & Co.,
BANKERS,

J

Company,

Fire Insurance

OFFICE, NO. 93 BROADWAY.

Total Liabilities Losses Paid la 1865

-

-

-

-

26,850 OO

-201,588 14

-

This Company Insures against Loss or Damage by
Fire on as favorable terms aa any other responsible
Company.

ONLY FIRST CLASS RISKS SOLICITED.
Board of Directors:
THOS. P. CUMMINGS,
ROBERT SCHELL,
WILLIAM H. TERRY,
FRED. SCHUCHABDT.

HENRY M. TABER,
JOSEPH FOULKE,
STEP. CAMBRELENQ,
THEODORE W. RILEY,
JACOB REESE,
JNO. W. MERSEREAU,
D. LYDIG SUYDAM,

WILLIAM REMSEN

JOSEPH

GRAFTON,

L. B. WARD,
JOSEPH BRITTON,
AMOS

ROBBINS,

HENRY S. LEVERICH.
JACOB

REESE, President
CHA8. D. HARTSHORNS, Secretary.

AMERICAN
NO. 7 RUE SCRIBE, PARIS
AND

No. 8 WALL STREET, NEW YORK,
Issue Circular Letters of Credit tot Travelers in a

parts of Europe, etc., etc.

Also Of mnrercial Credits

Lockwood &

Co.,

BANKERS,
No. 94 BROADWAY AND No. 6 WALL ST.
Dealers In Government and other Se¬
curities*
Interest allowed upon deposits of gold and currency

subject to check at sight
and hankers upon

Gold loaned to merchants

favorable terms.

B. C. Morris &

Son,

STOCK COMMISSION HOUSE,
NO. 17 WILLIAM SI REST.
Government Securities, Railways, Petroleum,
Mining, Insurance Stocks and Scrip Miscellaneous
shares of' a 1.descriptions, bought and sold st the
different Stock Boards.

Bankers and Brokers.

Collections made In all the States and

ADAMS, KIMBALL Sc MOORE,

For the more thorough protection of all—both
Broker and “Principal”—our business will be con¬
ducted entirely on the basis of Certified Checks;
none given or received unless certified.
To more fully enable ns to carry oat this principle,

BANKERS,

Aaron L. Reid,
Ellwood Walter,

Joseph Walker,
James Freeland,

BROADWAY, N.

CAPITAL,

Twenty-one and a

Half per cent.

descriptions of Government Bonds-

Collections made in all parts

Co'.,

Capital- ----- $200,000 OO
Aaaeta, March 9, 1866 - - 252,550 22

The Company has paid to its Customers, up to the
present time, Losses amounting to over

Instead of issuing a scrip

paid in 15 years,

Caab

ORGANIZED APRIL, 1844.

^

CASH

$1,366,(

Aaeeta, Jan. 1st, 1866...

on

NO. 175

COMPANY.

OFFICE No. 85 WALL STREET,

Cash Dividends

RUDOLPH GAKRIGUE, President.

The Mercantile Mutual

One Hundred stud

$1,000,000
370,353

Germania Fire Ins.

Sec'y.

INSURANCE

~

cent.
JONATHAN D. STEELE, President.
P. NOTMAN, Secretary.

Tassels, Freight, and Cargo; also, against Inland
Navigation Risks.
Premiums

Has for sale all

equitably adjusted and promptly paid.

Losses

DIVIDEND THIRTY PER CENT.

$3,000,600.

Capital

City and Country accounts received on terms mos

SURPLUS, JANUARY 1st, 1865

49 WALL STREET.

Bank,

318 BROADWAY.

favorable to

CASH CAPITAL,

(inbitra.no* buildings,)

Central National

BENJ. S. WALCOTT.

Sun Mutual Insurance
COMPANY.

ROSS, Prealden t

STOUT, Cashier.

168,303 98

Surplus.

All losses

FIFTY PER CENT.

J. H.

No. 46 WALL STREET.

Eire.

equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
Scrip Dividend declared Jan. 10, f866,

r.

Designated Depository of the Government
D. L.

COMPANY,

insures at customary rates of pre¬
mium against all Marine and inland Navigation Risks
on Cargo or Freight; also against loss or damage by

premium.

Tenth National Bank,
No. 240_ BROADWAY.

This Company

If Premiums are paid in Gold, Losses void be paid
to Gold.
The Assured receive twenty-live per cent of the net
profits, without incurring any liability, or, in lien
thereof; at their option, a liberal discount upon the

Collections made for Dealers on best terms.

way, N. Y.

No. 14 Wall

Street, New York.
Buy and Sell at Market Rates Government Securi¬
ties, of all issues, and execute orders for the pur¬
chase and salt of STOCKS, BONDS, and GOLD.
Interest allowed on deposits of Gold and Cur¬
rency, subject to check at sight.
C.

POWELL, GREEN Sc CO.

Bankers 8c Commission
$8

MERCHANTS,
BROAD STREET, NEW YORK.

Canadas.

although starting with a sufficient capital, all parties
giving orders for stocks, of whatever description or
amount, will be required to cover same with proba¬
ble amount at time of leaving order. Receipts ior
such deposits given until stocks are delivered.
No Stocks

purchased or sold on
‘♦Option.*

Out-of-town orders solicited, and those complying
with above requirements will receive special ana

prompt attention.

\

Stocks, Bonds and Governments bought and sold
esKfustvely mI Commission,

u.-:

■■
.

;.

THE CHRONICLE.

[September 29,1866.

BANKERS,

PAPER

Commission.

promptly execute orders for the Purchase or
of Gold, State, Federal and Railroad Securities.

Brothers

Co.,

STOCK BROKERS AND
NO. 16 BROAD

Y

GOVERNMENT SECURITIES,
TAND OTHER STOCKS, BONDS, &c.,
bought and sold on Commission for Cash Only.
Deposits received subject to check at sight, as
with Banks.
DEWITT C. LAWRENCE,
Memoer New York Stock Exchange.
CYRUS J. LAWRENCE,
JOHN R. CECIL,
*

Butler, Cecil, Rawson & Co.

WM. A. HALSTUD.
FAHNESTOCK,
EDWARD DODGE,

H. C.

COOKE,
WM. G. MOORHEAD,
D COOKE,
H.

JAY

,

PITT COOKE.

In connection

with our houses in Philadelphia and

Washington we have this day opened an office at No.
Nassau, corner of Wall Street, in this city.
Mr. Edward Dodge, late of Clark, Dodge & Co.,
New
ton

of onr Washing¬
and Mr. Pitt Cooke, of Sandusky, Ohio,

York, Mr. H. C. Fahnestock,

House,

BANKERS,

Orders Promptly

Executed.

Wilson, Callaway & Co.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
BANKERS AND

Street, N. V.

Government Securities, Stocks, Bonds, and Gold
bought and sold on the most liberal terms. Mer¬
chants, bankers, and others allowed 4 per cent, on

The most liberal advances made on Cot¬
ton, Tobacco, &c., consigned to ourselves or to our
correspondents, Messrs. J. K. GILLIAT & CO., or
COLIN CAMPBELL & SON, of Liverpool.
deposits.

JL. P. Morton &

Co.,

Bankers,

will he resident partners.
We shall give particular

attention to the purchase,
SALE, and EXCHANGE Of GOVERNMENT SECURITIES Oi
all issues; to orders for purchase and ale of stocks,
bonds and gold, and to all bnsiness of National
Banks.
JAY COOKE & CO.

35

V

Co

&

ERMILYE

prepared to draw Sterling Bills of
Exchange, at sight, or 6ixty days, on the

.,

BANKERS.
No. 44 Wall

Street. New York,

Keep constantly on hand for

immediate delivery a

issues of

UNITED

STOCKS

STATES
INCLUDING

6
6
6
6
6
7
6

New Y6rk State 7 per cent.

n

suit purchasers; and also to
Circular Letters of Credit, on this

sums to

.ssue

Bank, for Travellers* use.

& 3d series

Bounty Loan.

ADVANCES MADE ON GOVERN
MENT STOCKS TO BANKS AND BANKERS

Interest allowed

lion of Dividends.

Duncan, Sherman & Co.,
BANKERS,
STS.,

ISSUE

CIRCULAR NOTES AND CIRCULAR
OF CREDIT,

LETTERS

States, available in all the principal

cities of the

world; also,
COMMERCIAL CREDITS,

Europe, east of the Cape of Good Hope,

and the United States.

Drake Kleinwort&Cohen
LONDON AND LIVERPOOL.
The

subscriber, their representative and Attorn e
In the United States, is prepared to make advances
on shipments to Messrs. Drake, Kleinwort & Cohen
London and Liverpool, and to grant mercantile
credits upon them for use in China, the East and
West Indies, South America, Ac. Marginal credits
of the London House Issued for the




SIMON DE
M Excbaa t

MAURY.^ JAS. L. MAURY.

R. H. Maury &

Co.,

BANKERS AND BROKERS

MAIN ST., RICHMOND, VA.
Sterling Exchange, Gold and Silver, Bank Notes,
State, City, aud Railroad Bonds and Stocks, &c,
bought and sold on commission.
fw* Deposits received and Collections made on

same

purposes.

VISSEB,

Place, Ntw

United States.

all accessible points in the
N. Y. Correspondent,

Tori,

H. G. FANT,

Vermilyb & Co.

T. H. McMahan & Co.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
and Dealers in Domestic and Foreign
Exchange.

GALVESTON, TEXAS.
Special attention given to Collections of all kinds,
having prompt and reliable correspondents at all ac¬
cessible points in the State, and
REMITTANCES PROMPTLY MADE IN SIGHT
EXCHANGE AT CURRENT RATES.
REFER TO

National Park Bank, Howes & Macy, and Spofford,
Tileston & Co., New York.
Second National
Bank and J. W. Seaver, Esq., Boston. Drexel &
Co. and 1). S. SteUon & Co., Philadelphia. T. F.
Thirkield & Co., Cincinnati. Third National Bank
and Jos. E. Elder & Goodwin, St Louis. Fowler,
Stanard & Co., Mobile. Pike, Lapeyre & Bre.,
New Orleans. Drake, Kleinwort « vofaen, Lon

President.

Eastern Bankers.

Burnett, Drake & Go.,
BANKERS,
B O 8 T O N.
GOLD, STOCK, AND BOND BROKERS.
Personal attention given to the purchase and salts

Stocks and Bonds at the Boston Brokers' Board.

Page, Richardson & Co..,
STREET, BOSTON,
114 STATE

BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON LONDO 1
AND

JOHN MUNROE Sc

CO., PARIS#

ALSO IRS UK

Commercial Credits for the purchase of Merchan¬
dise in England and the Continent. r
Travellers' Credits for the use of Traveller*
abroad.

Dupee, Beck & Sayles,
JAMES A.

BROKERS,
STREET, BOSTON.

JAMES BECK,

DUPES,

HENRY SAYLES

Western Bankers.
Lewis Worthington, V.-Prmt,

J.W. Ellis, Prest.

Cashier.
NATIONAL BANK

Theodore Stanwood,

THE FIRST

Of Cincinnati.
Collections made on all points
and promptly remitted for.

WEST and SOUTH,

Capital Stock,

$1,000,000. Surplus Fund, $250,OOO*
Directors.—John W. Ellis, Lewis Worthington, SL
B. Harrison, William Glenn, R. M. Bishop, Wiluaiu
Woods, James A. Frazer, Robert Mitchell, A. a
Winslow.
Edward P. Tesson.

Edward M. Tesson.

Tesson, Son & Co.,"
BANKERS,
(No. 45 Second Street, corner of Pine),
ST.

LOUIS, MO.,

Founded in 1847, under the Style
Teasen Sc Panjenw

of

J B. Chaffee, Pres.
V. Pres.
Geo. T. Clark, Cashier,
FIRST NATIONAL BANK

H. J. Rogers,

Of Denver,

ROB’T T. BROOKE

United

of Travelers abroad and in the

West Indies, South America,

H.

city and all accessible

Glover, Cashier.

Drafts, &c

No. 1014

CORNER OF PINE AND NASSAU

For use in

Deposits, subject to

Southern Bankers.
ROB’T

VERMILYE A CO.

on

Cheques at sight
Prompt attention given to the Co ec

Compound Interest Notes of 1864 A
1865 Bought and Sold.

use

€?>

Orders for Securities executed abroad

LIBERAL

For the

London,

Union Bank of

Government Securities, Stocks ana
Bonds bought and sold on Commission.

Per Cent Bonds of 1881,
Per Cent 5-20 Bonds of 1862,
“
“
1864,
44
1865
44
Per Cent 10-40 Bonds,
3-10 Per Cent Treasury Notes, 1st, 2d,
Per Cent Currency Certificates.

S. A.

NEW YORK.
Are

;

Government.

No. 22 STATE

-

March 1,1866.

Designated Depository and Financial Agent Of (At

STOCK

WALL STREET,

Bank,

RICHMOND, VA.,

OF

STREET, NEW YORK,

No. 44 Broad

Jay , Cooke & Co.,
BANKERS.

National

points in the South.

Buy and Se’l on Commission Government Securi¬
ties, Gold, Railroad, Bank and State Stocks and
Bonds, Steamship, Telegraph, Express, Coal, Petro¬
leum and Mining Stocks.
Currency and Gold received on deposit subject to
Draft. Dividends, and Int i rest collected and Invest¬
ments made.

TORRET, Cashier#

Collections made in this

Drake Brothers,

BANKERS,

late

favorable terms,

Bankers

liberal terms.

J. w.

First

subject to Sight draft.

Sale

NO. 16 WALL STREET, N.

on

MERCHANTS, BANKERS
and allow interest on daily balances,

Make collections on

Lawrence

Attends to business of Banks A

Solicit accounts from
and others,

And

&

1 «*<&»

NATIONAL BANK,
PHILADELPHIA.

i

24 Broad St.
Buy and Sell at Market Rates.
ALL UNITED STATES SECURITIES.
Have Removed to No.

Bought, Sold and Collected.
STOCKS,
BONDS,
GOLD, AND
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES
on

I

f

Gilliss, Harney & Co., The Corn Exchange

No.* 8 Broad Street.

Bonght and Sold

A. G-. OATTBLL, Prea’t
A. WHILLDIN, V. Prea’t

REMOVAL.

W. H. Whittingham,
COMMERCIAL

Bankers.

Southern

Bankers and Brokers.

designated depository of

the u. s.

Authorized Capital- - - - $500,000.
Paid In Capital
- - - $200,000
Transact a General Banking business comer of

DENVER, COLORADO#
CLARK Sc CO., BANKERS,
CENTRAL CITY,
1 COLORADO.
The Stockholders of the First National Bank: of
Denver, constitute the firm, and are responsible foe
all Deposits and Business transacted by the House.

Blake and F. Sts.
GEO. T.

Gilmore, Dunlap & Co.,
108

SC

110

West Fourth Street,

CINCINNATI, OHIO.
Dealers in

GOLD, SILVER, UNCURRENT

BANK

NOTES, and all kinds of GOVERNMENT BONDS,
COLLECTIONS MADE at all accessible
and remitted for on day of payment.

Checks on UNION BANK OF LONDON.

denwid Liverpool.

*
*

BALE,

THE CHRONICLE.

FIRST

MORTGAGE
OF

BONDS

THE

CENTRAL PACinC RAILROAD CO.
^

—

Interest at the rate

Semi-Annually,

on

State
20

TEARS

Georgia

of

PER CENT. COUPON
RONRS. ‘
SECURED BY MORTGAGE OP THE WESTERN
AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.

7

The undersigned, Agent of the State of Georgia,
offers for sale a limited amount of the above named

OP CALIFORNIA.
♦

[September 29,1806,

of Six per

Gent, per annum, payable
the First days of January and July.

Principal and Interest payable in IT. S. Gold Coin in the
City of New York.

Bonds, having twenty years to run; coupons pay¬
able in this city January 1st and July 1st in each
year. These Bonds are issued in sums of one thou¬
sand dollars, with interest at the rate of seven per
cent, per annum.
The State of Georgia, besides pledging its faith for
the redemption of these Bonds and payment ci.the

interest, hap executed to three Trustees. George B.
Carhartand Robert H. Lowiy, of the city of Hew
York, and Jeremiah Beall, of the city of Milledgeville. State of Georgia, a first and only mortgage upon
the Western and Atlantic Railroad as a Corporation.

On failure of the State to r deem said Bonds at ma¬
or in case default shall be made in the pay¬
ment of any half year’s interest on any of the afore¬
said Bonds, and such default shall continue lor the

turity,
;

Amount of Issue, $7,336,000.

In Coupon Bonds of $1,000 each.

The Bonds have Thirty Tears to run, and are secured by a First Mort-

gage, constituting an absolute prior lien on that portion of the Road, Equip¬
ments, Franchises, and Entire Property of the Central Pacific Railroad
Company* located in the State of California, and extending from Sacramento
City to the California State Line, forming *■ part of the GREAT PACIFIC
RAILROAD ROUTE, adopted and aided by the UNITER STATES GOVERN¬

<• c

The amount of these

First„

Mortgage Bonds to be issued per mile, is
limited by law to the amount of United States Bonds allowed and issued to
aid the construction of the Road, and the Mortgage by which they are se¬
cured is declared by Act of Congress to constitute a lien prior and superior
that

First Mortgage) is economically and judiciously applied to the construction and equipment
of the road, together with nearly $7,000,000, received from Stock Subscriptions
and other sources.
The First Mortgage therefore amounts to but about 35 per
cent, of the actual cost and value of the Property which it covers.
The road is now completed, equipped and running from Sacramento City to
Alta, a distance of 73 miles, and the earnings for the three months ending August
1st, were as follows, viz.:
<
May, 1866
June

portant reasons these bonds commend themselves
to investors and capitalists as a certain and reliable

security.

Circulars containing full particulars will he ftirnished, and inquiries will he answered at the National
Bank of the

Republic, in this city, by

“

Agent of the State of Georgia.
Yobk, August 31, 1866.

THE STATE OF GEORGIA proposed to fund its
past due Donded debt on the following basis, viz.:
It will exchange its new Seven per cent Bonds, dated

July 1st, 1866, for its matured Bonds and Coupon,

interest on the new bonds from that date accruing
to holders of Bonds and Coupons so funded.
Due
notice will be given of time and place of exchange.
.

JOHN
New

York, Aug. 31,1866.

SEVEN

PER

CENT.

FIRST

MORT¬

GAGE BONDS
OF THE

North

GOLD,

JONES,

Treasurer of the State of Georgia.

67,429 78
86,000 00

IN

CHICHESTER,

T. W.

$65,115 83

“

July

roads to the Southern Atlantic cities, the Northern
and Eastern cities, Gulf of Mexico,
and
Ohio Rivers, thus rendering it an exceedingly val¬
uable and productive property.
For many and im¬

Nkw

of the United States Goverement.

The aid received from the Government (in amount equal to this

'

The Western and Atlantic Railroad is 137 miles

long, running from Atlanta, Ga., to Chattanooga,
Tenn., making close connections with other rail¬

Mississippi

MENT.

to

period of six months after the said coupons shall be¬
come due and payable, then and thereupon the prin¬
cipal of all the Bonds secured thereby shall become
immediately due and payable, and the said Trustees
may proceed to foreclose and enforce said mortgage
lien at the request of the holders of said Bonds.

Missouri

Rail¬

The

earnings are steadily increasing, and are estimated at over $100,000 in
gold for the month of August—the official report for that month not having been

;
'

received at this date.

going vigorously forward—24 miles additional
being nearly ready for the cars—and it will probably be in full operation to the
California State Line—156 miles from Sacramento City—during the summer of
1867, when its earnings must be very large, as the entire trade of Nevada, and a
large proportion of that of Utrh, Idaho, and Montana must pass over its line.
It has been shown by reliable statistics that in 1863 over $13,000,000 in Gold
was paid for freighting goods from California to Nevada alone.
"This part of the Great Pacific Railroad Route is destined to be one of the most
profitable lines of railroad in the world, and its First Mortgage Bonds are among
'

the’ best secured and most desirable investments ever offered.
Over $1,000,000 has already been expended in grading beyond
Wwhich the road is now running, and the iron is bought and paid for

the point to
sufficient to

lajrthe track the entire distance to the State line.
'The Road has been completed and equipped thus far without the sale of a single
dollar of its First Mortgage Bonds, and they are now offered to the public for the
first time, after the earnings of the Road have reached the sum of $100,000 per
-month in Gold, only about twenty-five per cent, of which is required for operating
expenses.
%

The Bonds

offered at 95 per cent,

and accrued interest from July 1st, in
Currency. Orders may be forwarded to us direct, or through the principal Banks
and Bankers in all parts of the country.
Remittances may be made in drafts on New York, or in Legal Tender Notes,
National Bank Notes, or other funds current in this city, and the Bonds will be
Forwarded to any address by Express, free of charge. Inquiries for further par¬
ticulars, by mail or otherwise, will receive punctual attention.
.

Fisk &

Hatch, Bankers,

No. 5 Nassau

Street, N. Y.

N. B.—Ail kinds of Government Securities received at the full market price in

exchange for the above Bonds.




gage

Bonds of the North Missouri Railroad Com¬
Coupons paya¬

pany, having thirty years to mn.
ble in New York on January 1 and

year.
Before

bonds,

July 1, in each

accepting the agency for sale of these

we maae careful inqniry into the condition
and
prospects of the road, which was examined by
Mr. Wm. Milnor Roberts and others, on our behalf,
and their highly satisfactory report enables us to re¬
commend the bonde as first-class securities, and a
safe and judicious investment.

The proceeds of these bonds
($6,000,000 in all) will
be used in extending a road, already completed 170
miles into North Missouri, to s the Iowa State line,
where it is to connect with the railroads of Iowa,
and also westward
the junction with the Pacific

Railroad (at Leavenworth) and other railroads lead¬
ing up the Missouri River, so that the mortgage of
$5,000,000 will cover a complete and well-stocked
road of 889 miles in length, costing at least $10,000,000, with a net annual revenue after the first year
of over $1,500,000, or a sum nearly four times be¬
yond the amonnt needed to pay the interest on these
bonds, the income of the road of course increasing
every year.
The Railroad connects the great City of St. Louis,
with its 200,000 inhabitants, not only with the rich¬
est
sas

are

Company.

We offer for sale the Seven Per Cent. First Mort¬

The construction of the road is

.

road

portions of Missouri, hut with the States of Kan¬
and Iowa and the great Pacific Railroads.

The first

remainder

500,000 have been sold at 80 cents, and the
are now

offered at f-5 cents.

At this rate

they yield nearly 8% per cent, income, and~add 20
per cent, tp principal at maturity.
fv
Any further inquiries will be answered a our

office.

JAYf COOKE A CO.
OFFICE

OF

THE

CHICAGO

AND

GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY COMPANY, No. 37
WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK, September 25,

1866,—The Interest Coupons of the First Mortgage
Bonds of this Company dike October 1, will be paid
on and after that date (loss government tax), npon

presentation at the office of the Company in this
city.
H. MORGAN, Treasurer,


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102