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pttattctaU
AND W
HUNT’S

MERCHANTS’

f t

mm

MAGAZINE,

g k W S S fr p * * ,

representing the industrial and commercial interests of the united states.
Entered, aooonUng to Act o f Congress, in the year 1393, by W ss. B. D ana & Co., in Uie office o f the Librarian o f Congress, W ashington, D O.]

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 18h3.

VOL. 57.

NO. 1474.

W e e k E iu tin o S ep tem b er

C h r o n ic le .

I8Q3.

Terms of Subscription—Payable la Advance:

New York . . . . . . .

m .m jm

m .im , m

*SL2£..........

F or One Y ear..............................................................................$1 0 00
For SLt M onths..................................................................... .
6 00
8©*t*i
European Subscription (t n e ia d ln g p o s t a g e ).....,............ 12 00
European Subscription Six Months (including p ostage).
7 00
Annual Subscription in L ondon (Including p osta g e)— 8 2 10s.
S i m ..... .....
Biz Mos.
do.
do.
do.
....* 1 1 0 * .
fsrtiuBeta
The tstvBSTOK** SCTK.BM8ST of 160 page# W issued every other woroeatar............. month, on the last Saturday* of January, March, M ay, July, September Portland.... . . . . . . .

K «r-

and November, and furnished without extra charge to all subscriber*
o f the CUR0 5 1 CUE fo r six months o r longer.
T h e Static A » o CITT S c r i-u tw a a T o f ISA p a g e * 1* also g iv e n to every

pearig anbaeriber o f the C brosticijs.
Buoacriptions w ill be continued until deHuttely ordered stomped.
T he puMUher* cannot be responsible for remittance* unless m ade by
d rafts or by Post Office or Express m oney order*.
File cover* are sold at SO cent* each, and to new subscribers for a

( . «
e9.003.0e4
4. 106.000
1. 6 *5.536

1.*41.646

llbti
m oa

n&sn
1,403.174
706.404
437,151

sm jm

Fail R i v e r ...............
Total New England..

642.7*6
1 m W Jm
.'Smwp

60.627,647
14.101,038
14.311,071
8,389.013
4.863.736
1.617 996

Philadelphia.....
PttM oarg... . . . . .
Baltimore............

a»®u«...........

W tm h in g ttm . . . . .

year one flie covet I* supplied without charge; postage on the same la
18 oents.

I t c i t iM r .......... .

Terms o f Advertising—(P e r Inch space).

Binghamton......

O n etim e .................................. f 3 SO I Three M onths (13 time*) ..$ 25 00
One Month
i t tim es).. 11 00 Six Month*
(26 “
43 00
T w o Months
(8 "
IS 0 0 1Tw elve Months (52 “
58 00
(The above term* for one month and upward are fo r standing cards.)

Ifni

f

w illia m

street, N E W

Y O K H ,.

p urr O r n c « B o x 958.

The fo llo w in g table, m ade up by telegraph, etc., indicates
that the total bank clearings of a ll the clearing houses of the
United States fo r the week ending to-d a y , Septem ber 23. have
b een
t r t f .V A .m . against ♦801,714,890 last week and
11.115,884,012 the corresponding week o f last year.
GrwAF*il*+..m rn .....
ux * *
A»mtia*rqa«fr.
CtkAnrsros,
6» T eu K / eep k .

fle tu r n i

F a t FwKrw X, premier *A

U N .

1803

IJh Idhifl -»»« **»•»*****»»»*«
Kenr Orleaa*

kSAS.I8S.SSS
56.407,534
A5.AS8.S3H
H A T I.O IS
W ,» 3 ,3 7 7
li.7 S l.A J 0
A.JJ9.AJ7

f 6.13.053.8 IS
7A.887.A03
69,088.761*
1 3 .0 6 0 ,6 )8
87,653,000
13,388,870
8 ,« 3 J ,H 8

-3 A -7
—24*8
-2 4 * 2
- 6*5
-3 1 -7
—23*5
-1 0 4

Seven ei l»«. S riey, . . .
Other clslee. 6 d » y » .................

•JAS.SU.S00
88.72A.709

•793,633,108
i l l , 366.396

-3 0 7
-3 0 * 1

Total ail eltlea, S daye.—
A i l cttiee. i day— -----------------

kSA7.BS6.700
128.91H.8A7

•»8S.8B7,50A
182.188.J68

-3 0 * 8
-2 9 * 3

K e w Y o r k _ _—
_
Philadelphia .............................

324,975
40«,277

'" W w iM

-28-5
-3 6 5
-15 1

=sn

a tj

ICiaMftpoU*..

task* .......
# , PW ......
le »I.
▼er . . . . . .

JfM pk.. ...............
W
*
»Ifcria

Lincoln..
Wtchsi*.
Tanaka..,.
Jfr«aa<mi,.... . . . . .

Ho’ClUiuen.t ..

Igrlntffliilrf, M
-»A
fOlAi Otfcar WiiUnL.
8t, LcmU.. . . . . . . . . .

60,000 163
10,637.271
12,247.793
6.48:1.137

W

i t

-

8*6

48
-= m
+0-2

-MS
x li

’ "'I

—33 0
—9 8

-2 5 1

6*1,725
601.964
893,000
02,828.2*j6

-2 3 8

73 309,400

—26*4
- 41*0

■+*2

-36 9

51

iM M b.oa

8 0 .1
,1 1

3.0*7.
4,300,.

6.766,
H S:
h

-1 6

=sa
—82 0
i

trn.wi

sa-m i
M

- 54*5
—i l ‘5
-6 0 0

100,0
12U.I

— 43*0

216,395
115,754
97,41.1,386

—29 8

U *
.H

4K

40E
277

- 80S

221.667

-76^8

iso.uxi

* ^tU O
M

10.257,430
1 ,0 1 6 /

eu.ns +is 1
S O
fcii.M

13.748.5A2

128,395

w

- S 8 -*!
- M l

- 6 0 a!
-o u t

Tout! Pacific.
Per C m t

T il
610,4,17

-2r5

A ??

-&
;*s;
IM W - 4 7 1
M
48-8;
350,(96 —

f W k .t r
Gwton ---...........

CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.

-23*9
-27*0

6 1 * .t »
40388

A k ron.......• » » ..<

m

59.1 O 886
'*
8,430.580
1,540,902
1,1 *7 315

-1 1 9
-8 0 4

wmm*** .......

-2 8 'S

~ 2 4 ‘2
-2 4 1
-1 8 0
-1 6 5
-7 0
-1 3 0
-1 3 8

-5 8 7

London A g en ts:

t n t x t A M a, DANA.)

iTirfi

102,511.826

mnwmutm...,

P. Cimt

»1,315,678
(12,015,475 s

270,400
111,890,08,

S S t e :;:

1 93
8* .
396,786,187

smjmi

Total M lddla-.

W e e k E n A 't S e p t. 9 .

-35 2

-2 9 I
-1 6 7
-1 5 9

m i#

Messrs. E dwakimi A Bttirn, I Draper*' Gardens, E. C „ will take sub­ CWbm b m ..
scription* and advertisement*, and supply single cople* o f the paper
a t Is. eaei
Qrw* J |
*a rifts*...
w iijiA u a
v W I L L I A M I t . D A N A * <«>., P u b l i s h e r s ,
M X tn g u m . . . . . . ..
J oa n a. rtoT D .

92.163.467

SioS?:??s
1.460.220

1*241.851

10.

jP. C e m .

7.993.04*1

i
£uS#»

d

M l -T5B*
10.655.177 —24 0
-43 6

J.OKUh*

m s

tjM m ?

ssies -66 2

wjO.ti

u w -»

,

I,«W ,6I3
636,7111

» «

aia

SA W
B

«U 70
S T .n i^ a t

■SEffl
13908.8.7

-9 4
-5 0 0
-2 4 9

—I* 0

=£?
-81 8

-4 6 a
-4 7
-1 3 8

—46*7
“t*17‘4

-19*8

“ ^5H
7,461,649
4,215.275
3,94 1,*4Q
2.233.732
U,a70.0'R>
1,106.4 1U
1,154,023

—26*9
—44*1

6582,777

—55*0
-31*4
-34*8

358,300
276^53
«

54.337
21,008.430
17,918.540
5,0 «9,790
3,052 211

-20 9

■d
-3 9 8
-27*7

-7 *9
N«w Orl—nt.......
-47*1
W&1
LoS U UI#. . . . . . . . . .
Jt
—
3»’0
Mrncton...........
The full details of clearings for the week covered by the
—45*1
H o u »to a .... . . . . . . . .
m
m
-24*9
2,070,155
a b o v e statement will be given next Saturday. We cannot, of a i c h m o a d . . . . . . . . . .
630
.....
J W -rHI
coarse, furnish them to-day, bank clearings being made up by But mi n»k . . . . . . . . .
Mempiii* . . . . . . . . . .
—Si
A
w
the various clearing house* at noon on Saturday, and hence in kllanta
i
26:8
592,508 —
the above the last twenty-four hour* o f the week have to be <Jiiarle«t<m .t. .
N orfolk.........
525,01 i
Dallas.......................
“i l l
In a ll cases estimated, aa we go to press Friday night.
4
W a c o ................
3 *»,3 3 - 1 6 5
u 5
Our usual detailed figures for the previous week, covering F o r t W o r t h . . . . . . . .
55,710
B ir m in g h a m ...........
the return* for the period ending with Saturday noon.
123.C60 r g l
C h * u * o u o * » .. . . . .
—43*0
1 , a wll 03 the comparative totals in 1893, are given below. Jacksonville. . . . . .
8 s e
3-.3U.2u3 ^=5T2
The aggregate of exchanges shows an increase of nearly T o t a l B c m th e rn .
•evenly-two million dollars over the previous week, the gain
7.10.088 1041 -20*3
Total All ..............
at N-wYork being forty-nine millions. Contrasted with the
*
—23*6
Sod,30*.9t7
OotsKJe New York..
corresponding period of 1892. all but four of the cities record
10,831,686
!<*«»<, and in trie aggregate for the whole country there is a Montreal . . . . .
i
0 427,070 -f*!l l
ds'crease of 31 '9 per cent. The roost important percentages of W h
767,010
decrease this week have been at Birmingham, 87'6 per cent; BsmUton ....
H.rlM ZZ±f»
bSi
17 817,003
20,004,867
Total Canada.
Spokane 78-7, and Chattanooga 72’2 per cent. Gains are re­
• Notluoluded la totels.
t PabllOAtloa dUcuntlound fur the present.
corded at Los Angeles, Binghamton, L wll and Waco.
oe
Total ail cities t o t week

t779.S5A.6J8

§1,116,886,013

-3 0 * 4

THE CHRONICLE.

4F8
TH E

STATE ATil> CITY DEE AkTMENT.
See

pages

523,

524,

525,

and

526

for

our

State and City Department.
A ll advertisements with relation to State and City Bonds
will likewise be found on the same and following pages.

THE FIN A N C IA L SITUATION.

Here is another “object lesson” for the instruction of
the people of this country. The United States Senate
has, the larger portion of this week, been discussing
and defining its own situation as a branch of the legis­
lative power of our Government. After a debate thus
prolonged, the conclusion reached by the leaders of
both political parties now composing that body is that
the majority, be it large or small, can perfect no busi­
ness so long as there is in opposition one, two, three
or more of its members who choose, and possess
the required physical endurance, to continue
to discuss the subject before it. Moreover, it has in
like manner also been declared that within itself this
respected old body has no authority to change this con­
dition, because the members have the same right to
discuss without limit a proposed rule that they have to
discuss a proposed law. Reduced to the smallest com­
pass these conclusions mean that in contested matters
the Senate’s function as a legislative organization is ex­
tinct ; that in such cases its surviving powers are
strictly limited to obstructive work. We cannot believe
that these results, which the week’s discussions author­
ize, will be acquiesced in many days, even by the Senate
itself. For if they all be accepted as true, the Senate
would be speedily called upon to show cause before the
bar of public opinion why such an effete organization
should exist at all. Pardon us for recalling the old
pick-axe which had eDgraved on one end of it, “ if
there is a way out I’ll find it,” and on the other, “if
there isn’t a way I’ll make it.”
Of course the apparent deadlock in the Senate over
the silver repeal bill bas arrested the improvement in
the situation which has been so marked a feature since
the House passed that measure. Manufacturing, mer­
cantile and other business interests, besides commercial
movements, the money market, and foreign exchange
rates, have all more or less given evidence of stagnation
or an actual adverse movement; the latter has been
particularly noticeable in exchange, which has advanced
a cent and a-half since last Friday with some talk at
the close of gold exports soon. At the same time there
* are evident signs that this could all be changed and
enterprise and activity substituted in a comparatively
short period, for they are seemingly awaiting the favor­
able action of the Senate. The character and strength
of this feeling is well indicated by the movements in
the stock market, prices rising sharply on the faintest
rumor that progress is being made towards a settlement
and falling on reports that obstructive tactics are being
renewed.
Money continues to accumulate at this centre. The
bank statement of last week showed a gain of 17,635,325
in surplus reserve, making $27,147,075 since August 12,
and bringing that item up to $10,601,700 above the
limit of 25 per cent of reserve to liabilities, against $16,545,375 below that limit on August 12. The interior
movement of currency has also continued this week in
favor of New York, so that the surplus reserve will be

[VOL. LVII,

further increased to day. Notwithstanding all this,,
money is very conservatively held. It has been cheap
on call because there is so little disposition to put it
out beyond reach or speedy recall. On time it is only
loaned on high-grade collateral, and even then infrequentlyforperiodsexceedingninety days. Anoteworthy
fact this week has been the retirement of bank notes by
a few of the New York institutions who took out circu­
lation last month at the time when currency was so dif­
ficult to obtain.
The extremes for money on call represented by
bankers’ balances have been 5 and 2 per cent, averag­
ing 3. Renewals have been made at 3 to 4 per cent,
and banks and trust companies still quote 6 per cent
for loans over the counter. It is true that these
low rates have been in part due to the lighter
business in stocks, but they are mainly the result of a
pressure of unemployed money which under other
conditions would be readily loaned for fixed periods^
or would be placed on commercial paper. For time money
the rate is 6 per cent, although, as was the case last
week, exceptional loans have been made at 5, all for
ninety days. The demand however is not urgent, prin­
cipally for the reason that business in stocks is dull
and commission houses can obtain all the accommoda­
tion they want in the call loan branch of the market*
For commercial paper one feature is the transaction of
some little business by a few institutions in this city, so
that the purchases are no longer confined to
near-by interior cities. This makes a better feel­
ing in the market. The offerings of paper,
while large, do not appear to be urgent. The
very best endorsed names now sell for 7f to 8 per
cent; four months’ commission house names are
quoted at 8 to 9, and good single names having from
four to six months to run, 9 to 11. The Clearing
House Loan Committee have canceled $4,835,000 loan
certificates this week, leaving the amount outstanding
$29,700,000, and cancellations have been liberal at
Boston, where the amount issued has been reduced to
$8,390,000.
The Bank of England on Thursday reduced the
minimum rate of discount to 3£ per cent. The cable
reports sixty to ninety-day bank bills in London 2
per cent. The open market rate at Paris is 2 | per
cent; at Berlin it is 4£ per cent, and at Frankfort 5
per cent. According to our special cable from London
the Bank of England gained £486,215 bullion during
the week and held at the close £27,376,216. Our cor­
respondent further advises us that the gain was due
to the import of £338,000 (of which £125,000 was
from Egypt, £104,000 from Australia, £66,000 from
Brazil and £43,000 sundries), to receipts from the in­
terior of Great Britain of £198,000 and to exports of
£25,000 to Egypt and £25,000 to Spain.
The foreign exchange market has been dull but
strong this week, and especially towards the close
appeared distinctly to feel the effect of the delay
in acting upon the silver repeal bill. The principal
factors are the scarcity of bills and the steady demand
for remittance for settlements. The light supply of
cotton bills is explained by the fact that the movement
of the staple is late, and moreover it was retarded by
the crisis. The home spinning demand i3 held in
check by the partial suspension of mills and theEuropean inquiry has been retarded by the derangement
of Eastern exchanges. Grain is moving with rather
greater freedom, but bills against these shipments do
not make exchange rapidly, and besides it is re-

THE

S eptember 23,1893,]

ported that some of the Liverpool merchants are trad­
ing between the two markets in such a way as to re­
strict the export movement. The arbitrage operations
have had little influence upon exchange. The follow­
ing table shows the daily changes in rates by the lead­
ing drawers.
r r*.

M o n ..

Tue<>.

W pdne- .

T b u r s .,

F r i_

83

Brews Br •»— {sSaau* . * »
5 days..
M s g & m & Co.! s m t .....
Bank BrittA
j
days..
M o. Americau f Sight----B m kot

& j$ ..

MaatreaJL.»..<Sight.....
Canadian Bank t a; day#..
of Commerce.« Sight----Heidelbaelt. lek- f m day*..
eiheteif 4 0 j 1 SHfhi,....

ii

S e p t -15. Sept. 13. S co t. U*. Sept. »>. Sept. ill. Sept. 28.
mu
81-J#

'Barics.

4 83

U

4 8T-*
4
4 83X
4 S8&
4 S3
4 3«3<
4m%
4

£3

fcb i

sm

*m

SSS4

m
MX
m

1

&

W rT
S4

m i

S3 s
1* ss
5
S3

iA n rd * * « * » ILm.” ' : 4

l ^ 6
85
87

sti*

s i*

mn
m u.

8 f
sm

8$*-4
8 m -7

87

m

097, and the total of all other articles exhibiting again
Ex-port*
from 0 . JH

p k o v im o f s . o o t t o * a * d

issa.
At*. •
•

UR.

* McmUu.

d«#tul- S M onthi

rcTMOLCOM.

m
dW&mt, j8

........ . i
Q tm n tttin .
'
1
}
W&**1.hn*fc. J3.WO.M! 73jrs.?tii ia.*43.»V, 7S.7SO.V1S m j m j t m g l m m i
tO.Stfi.OOl IJStAJnr lo/iAXM'e
m j T ® , ',1577,510
ri.-mT ..bun
W h»,\ . ha.
-Cars ..-MOt.

»<w * io.wt.v k ;i t e j m j m
ttA W M ii; * U » , e e

3 ,V 4 ,c * f

e e jM J tS i

ss.vi>4.sa« SO.lWl.lMI
1
IS.S57.01II

Tot-bm®.. m w . i s . ia.iiB.7fo •ri.iw.owi m . u m . n * &M91344 1W.BS1.XOI
Va/UM.
*
»
i
I
s
i
W b'ilt Hour. l7.7JS.7Xr 1«X2M,9»1 17.t8»,«ai H7.OXO.SI8 n .'& X * 3 iw,i»4.4#l
C m * iawfci.
hfft,»7: U JI 1.730
tja a m . * u m .w
U .m 'i
m ,im '
m j m ‘ i.iio .ia i
» r « - . . . .. ....
m jm
sii.M ?
0»»1 4' meal
91.017
774.111
m & a- u m jm
;w «
B t t t » r .........
i:.4B7
(W
.S.SI0
1,744315
VW
.3US
7 U -40
Br.trto®*.. siioM C K m , m M » i w m j n *
* u . i M .s ts l a y m j m i
tH A to jm
CnRno......... 8.43J,isi[ m h i W i i *
4m

k u

reduced. Allowing for the changes in stocks, the
amount of coal disposed of this year as compared with

$7*

M

o f six millions.
o r im e ir w r r r r r ,.

current during the progress o f the month that
anthracite had been rather slow of sale. As compared
with the corresponding month last year the output
was diminished 383,070 tons. At the same time stocks
of anthracite at tide-water shipping points were in­
creased from 733,440 tons July 31, 1893, to 860,175
tons August 31, 1893— that is, with a decrease of 333,070 tons in production, there was an increase of 126,729 tons in stocks. Under the larger production of
August last year, tide-water stocks had been slightly

84*

The market closed firm yesterday at 4 811 to i 85
for C day and 4 87 to 4 874 for sight.
O
IUtes for
actual business were 4 84 to 4 844 for long, 4 861 to
4 86f for short, 4 87 to 4 874 for cable transfers,
4 831 to 4 33i for prime and 4 83 to 4 83] for doc­
umentary commercial bills.
Gold arrivals at New
York from Europe have been small, the New York
bringing 612,000 and the Ems 64,000, The Touraine
brought 61.242,400, chiefly in Spanish coin, in tran­
sit for Havana,
The Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, Mr. Worthing­
ton G. Ford, has furnished us this week with copies of
the preliminary statements of exports of breadstuff*,
provisions, cotton and oils for the month of August,
and from them we have compiled the subjoined table.
It will bo observed that the aggregate value of these
exports for the month this year was #44,817,527, or an
excess of fully three and one-half millioas over August
o f last year, the greater part of which occurs in breadstuffs,
Compared with 1891, however, there is a
decrease of nearly three and one-quarter millions, the
shipments of wheat and flonrshowing a loss of #9,337.-

m tro n m

ports

the two years preceding is as follows.

Ik

H
Z
m

489

C H R O N IC L E ,

*8^51.510 113.583.108
12,018,98*
134,122,403

&i r u m , m

ii.uT3*7 5ij.--s.i39i 4i.wa.asf t n j m & i lS.on.2->l‘:i78.SSfl.XT3
* t o - !1 .1 1 0 * cottio anil
in all m onth. and roar*.
S u r e - a l H t b e » M * e ftxnraa are S t i a l on the m onthly prelim fnor
return, leaned i t j the S i i n t e o f S ta iM k r . ami e o r. r .M a t 9 * per rent
■of the total evpurte of fin a.letuir, and Cotton, and 9i» per cent of I’ro-

VlUona and OI>.

A further noticeable feature of the foregoing is the

steady and considerable falling off in the average export

value of wneat. In August of 1891 this average value
was 61 03* par bushel, but in 1892 it h id dropped to
841 cents, und in the current year was only I0.j
cent?, (A m also shows an appreciable decline, but
not so raiical a? wheat. The averagj value in A lg i?t
1-Mi was 07] cent*, in 1892 it was 57] cents, and this
year it has declined to 50§ cants per bushel.
7'he statement of anthracite coal production for the
mouth of August, issued this week, conSrms the re­

Janu ary 1 V> d 113 ujr 3J.

August,
A nthracite C oal
1893.

1S92.

mi.

1893.

1892.

1891.

Ton*.
Tbn*.
Ton*.
Ton*.
Tons.
4tock b^glatiing..
Ton*.
701,175
703,634
057,838
751,432
535,652
731.44(5
of period ......
8,e»I,839 3.146,435 27,007,481 20,720,149 21.902,808
PredocUon...... .
s .m t o ?

Total iuppfr.. 4,042,21* 4.393.3H 3.850.009 28.2*S5,&52 27,474,581 25,438,520
830J75
048,900
m um
018,000; 800, ITS! 691,399
SCt and ot period
tM rpoM d o t . . . .

3,1.82,030 8.701,91ft 3.201,1 m !27,403,177 20,7ai,l82 24,783,620

Thus only 3,182,039 tons apparently were disposed of
by the companies in August, 1893, against 3,701,915 ton3
in August, 1892, a contraction of over half a million
ton?. Of course this can not be construed as an actual
falling off in consumptive requirements to that extent.
It simply indicates that the financial disturbances
affected the coal trade the same as other departments of
business, making both wholesale and retail dealers cau­
tious about giving new orders. However, it must be re­
membered that conditions in the anthracite trade last year
under the formation of the coal combination early in the
spring were rather exceptional, the steady advance in
prices and the declare 1 policy of making further advan­
ces having operated to induce pretty liberal purchases,
both by consumers and dealers.
If we compare with
the amount disposed of by the companies iu August of
the previous year, the difference is reduced to very
small proportions; in other words, iu August, 1891,
3,201,169 tons were disposed of, a3 against the 3,182,039 tons for August, 1893. None of those results
allow for the changes in the stocks at interior storage
depots, but the public is always in the dark on that
point, no official information regarding these stocks
being available. For the eight months to August 31
the amount of coal disposed of is still considerably
ahead of other recent years, the total being 37,405,177
tons for 1893, against 20,783,182 t ns for 1892, 24,189,020 tons for 1891 and only 22,232,980 tons for
1890,
Due feature of the output for the late month
deserves to be noted, and that is, that the Schuylkill
region fared better than in the months preceding.
Only 125,400 tons out of the 383,070 total decrease in
the amount of coal mined fell upon producers in that
regiou, while the reduction in the Wyoming region
reached 250, (49 tons. The Lehigh region, however,
fared best of all, its decrease being only 1.102 tons.
What a change the result for August marks in the
case of the Schuylkill region i? evident when we exam­
ine the figures for the eight months to August 31.
For this period there has been a decrease iu the output
of that region of 371,300 tins, while the output of
the Wyoming region ha3 increased 780,703 tons
and the Lehigh region 477,938 tons.
The New York Central report for the year reaches
us too late for analysis this week.
We may state how­
ever that the income account shows that the five per
cent dividend was fully earned in the twelve months,

490

THE CHRONICLE.

with a surplus above the dividend of $87,770, against
$62,216 in the fiscal year preceding. At the end of
the nine months to March 31 the company had been
$186,814 behind the previous year, but the results for
the June quarter (which had not previously been pub­
lished) proved very satisfactory, there being a gain of
$1,043,505 in gross earnings, a gain of $383,373 in net
earnings and a gain of $212,368 in the surplus above
the dividend, and this had the effect of changing the
outcome for the year.
Current reports of railroad earnings are beginning to
show signs of improvement. Of course earnings still
run behind the totals of a year ago, but the ratio of
decrease is becoming smaller. For the second week of
September our preliminary statement on another page
exhibits a decrease of 11-82 per cent, which compares
with a decrease of 14*38 per cent for the first week of
September and a decrease of 17*02 per cent for the
fourth week of August. As regards net earnings, we
review to-day the results for July in another article.
A few roads, which are very prompt in making
their returns, have also this week furnished ex­
hibits for August. The Baltimore & Ohio is
one of these; its statement indicates that the
gain in passenger business from the World’s Fair
fell much short of counterbalancing the loss in freight
earnings resulting from the extraordinary prostration
of all our industries in that month. The loss in ag­
gregate gross receipts for the month is reported as
$225,169 ; this, however, was met by a contraction of
$207,725 in expenses, and thus the loss in net was re­
duced to only $17,444. For the two months from July
1 to August 31 the company lost $199,654 in gross, but
gained $144,112 in net. The Chicago & Northwestern
does not supply monthly statements of n e t; in gross
the road lost $459,848 the late month. The Pittsburg
Cincinnati Chicago & St. Louis, one of the lines in the
Pennsylvania system, reports a decrease for August of
$182,954 in gross and of $77,693 in net, and the Pitts­
burg Youngstown & Ashtabula, another Pennsylvania
line, reports $39,416 decrease in gross and $20,788 de?
crease in net. The Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis
has lost $96,834 in gross and $47,066 in net.
The following statement, made up from returns col­
lected by us, shows the week’s receipts and shipments
of currency and gold by the New York banks.

[VOL. L V Ii

■

THE SENA TE’S POSITION ON THE R E PE AL
BILL.

The public has been not a little disappointed at the
methods of the leaders of the repeal movement in the
Senate. Of course in such cases outsiders are not best
equipped for judging of the requirements of the situ­
ation; besides they are so intent on securing the end
sought, they naturally under-estimate the difficulties.
But after making allowance for all that, there appears
to be a lack of nerve and boldness in the course of pro­
cedure not in keeping with the seriousness of the situ­
ation and of the unanimity of public opinion back of the
majority. Senator Yoorhees has in plain and fitting words
this very week stated that he recognized the “ mighty
power—mightier than the nation itself”—of the opinion
urging promptness in the movement he is directing.
And yet up to the time we write there has been no
corresponding action looking to the suppression of the
few who with such effrontery stand “ in the way of
proper reform and needed legislation,” although that
few represent only a very small portion of the
total population of the country. For public sentij
ment is fully up to the idea that no rule or practice,
however long established, should be continued that in­
terferes with, as Senator Hoar expresses it, “ the right
of the American people to legislate through their
chosen instruments to redress grievances, to enact
new laws and to repeal old ones; and that that great and
supreme constitutional right ought not to be smothered,,
or destroyed, or murdered, under the pretense of pre­
serving freedom of debate when that is nothing more
than a pretense.”
Many of our Senators, we fear, do not realize how
severely the present crisis is bearing upon our mer­
chants and bow alarmingly this pressure is increasing
day by day instead of diminishing. The banks have
recovered themselves and there is no longer need for
immediate anxiety in that direction. Money has also
become what is called “ easy,” and most likely this
feature in the situation will grow still more conspicu­
ous. Legislators whose circle of duties lies outside of
commerce are perhaps resting too securely on these
changes, giving them undue importance. In a sense
they are very important, but the benefits of the changes
are limited in their scope and afford no security
whatever against wide mercantile insolvency.
We do not wish to be misunderstood. The future
has looked to us exceptionally hopeful, because the fear
and consequent suppression of enterprise which has Be­
long restrained the spirits and energy of our people
was we thought about to be lifted and a speedy chance
BeBult with Sub-Treasury operations.
given for full industrial activity again. It cannot,,
however, be too soon understood that what has really
been gained thus far by the public at large is due to
little more than a sentiment—the discounting of ex­
pectations. To be sure, the currency hoardings which
were very nearly prohibitory of commerce have been in
The following table indicates the amount of bullion part released, and a goodly number of our furnaces
in the principal European banks.
and factories that had stopped have once more
started up. This, however, has occurred in the
expectation that what the lower House began so
satisfactorily the Senate would soon complete. The
holder of good securities has also for the time being
been benefitted, and so has the man whose resources
are ample and credit consequently beyond a peradven­
ture. But the great majority of our merchants who
have their capital invested in their business or who de­
pend in a large measure upon floating their paper, and
W e e k E n d in g S ep t.

R eceiv ed b y
S h ip p e d b y
N . Y . B a n ks. N . Y . B a n k s’

t2, 1893.

N et In te rio r
M o v e m en t.

G old_______________ ____ ________ . . . . .

$7,534,0U0
1,911,000

$2,097,000 Gain.$5,437,000
504,000 Gain. 1,407,000

T otal gold and legal tenders___

$9,445,000

$2,601,000 Gain.$6,844,000

In to

22, 1898.

Banks’ Interior movement, as above

Out of

N et C hange in

B a n ks.

W e e k e n d in g S ep t.

B a n ks.

B a n k H o ld i n g s .

$9, 6,000
12,100,000

$2,601,000 Gain. $6,844,000
10,100,000 Gain. 2,000,000

Total gold and legal tenders....... $21,545,000 $12,701,000 Gain.$8.844,000

S ep tem b er

B ank of

21, 1893.

S ep tem b er

22, 1892.

G o ld .

T o ta l.

G o ld .

Silver.

*

England..........
France............
G erm any.......
▲ nst.-Hung’y
Netherlands..
Nat. Belgium.
Spain................

S ilv e r.
Jt

S

*

S

27,376,216
67,374,658
30,061,500
10,680,000
2.358.000
2,684,667
7.917.000

50,855,615
10,020,500
16,286,000
6.940.000
1,342,333
6.271.000

T o ta l
M

'27,376.216 27,928.869
27,928,869
118,230,273 67,085,000 51.639.000 118,724,000
40.082.000 36,444,250 11,814,750 47,259,090
26.966.000
9.509.000 16.912.000 26.421.000
9.298.000
3.165.000 7.409.000 10.574.000
4.027.000
2,937,333 1,493,667
4,481,000
14.188.000
7.610.000 5.056.000 12.666.000

Tot. this week 148,452.041 91,715,448 240,167,489 153,729,452 94,324.417 218.053,869
Tot. prev. w’k 148.071,946 91.716.920 239.788.866 153,053,660 94.364.833 247.418,493

S eptember 23, 1893.]

THE

C H R O N IC L E .

especially those who are carrying stocks of goods not
readily marketable—all these are daily finding their
burdens more difficult to carry. One must go among
them and hear an occasional confession of the almost
desperate situation in which they find themselves, and
must be in direct and close communication with mer­
chants in various sections of the country to appreciate
the increasing severity of the strain they are under
and the hopeless spirit in which the proceedings at
Washington are again being watched.
The term “ easy ” as applied to the money market is
at present an extremely deceptive term. It means little
more than that money is readily obtainable by those
who are not in urgent need of it; in other words, that
it can be had on prime security, say at 6 per cent, and
on first class commercial paper at say 8 per cent. These
are much lower rates than have for weeks been current,
and yet borrowers at those figures are evidently not
numerous, for although these better rates prevailed
during the week ending September lGth loans and dis­
counts, according to last Saturday’s bank statement,
fell off #4,088,400. Moreover, to represent the actual
monetary situation, it is needful to add that the rates
mentioned are not much of a guide in forming an
opinion in times like these, as to the price at which
the average borrower, especially borrowers on lower
classes of paper, could be accommodated, and are no
measure whatever of the difficulties merchants have to
face whose assets principally consist of stocks of goods
in no degree a necessity, and consequently just now ex­
tremely slow of sale. Hence it is obvious that until
the cause of distrust is removed, actual relief cannot
reach the average merchant, and that the longer the re­
moval i3 put off, the greater the loss suffered and the
harder it becomes to meet maturing obligations and
current expenses.
These suggestions have a special interest for those
legislators also who appear to think that oar richer
people make up the body of those who are interested
in the repeal of the 1890 silver law. What has been
said points directly to the class of our workers which is
suffering moat by the delay and which is concerned
moat in having the rej>eal hastened. Senators must
certainly see that the suffering class is not our banka and
other money lending institutions, for they ought to find
profit in high rates, and if they are the “ money sharks’’
they are stated to be, their desire for repeal would
seem to have a flavor of disinterestedness at least.
Neither are the sufferers to be found among the holders
of good securities, the richer class. Their profit lies in
putting out their surplus at large interest or in getting
as many of these good securities at the low figures now
prevailing as they can; and as the way is open for them
to borrow if they want to at the legal rate, they can
purchase without limit, if they choose, or, if they pre­
fer, they can use their funds at interest. Either course
is thus open to them, and hence if they are eager to
have the repeal bill pushed it cannot be because they
need the relief.
The truth is that if we take the country through,
those who are in greatest danger and have the most
at stake at this moment aro the large number engaged in
commercial ventures. They are solvent but not rich,
being compelled in part to depend upon borrowed capi­
tal. But they include the most enterprising of our peo
pie, foremost in progressive work. All these classes are
most anxiously looking to Congress for some sign of a
disposition to give them the chance to recover them­
selves. The alternative presented to choose between is

491

the sanctity of an old custom in the Senate on the one
hand and on the other the acquiescence of that body in
the right which is the prerogative of a free people to
change its laws when the majority determine a change
to be for its benefit. Shall our merchants go into bank­
ruptcy, or shall the Senate continue to give us a repre­
sentative government ? There is no other question up
for discussion.
MA SSA CHUSETTS MA -VUFA CTU RIXG
IN D U STRIES.

The Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor,
under the direction of Mr. Horace G. Wadlin, the
Chief of the Bureau, has issued its report on the Man­
ufactures of the Commonwealth for the year 1892-.
The report is in the usual complete statistical form,
and as reflecting the industrial conditions which pre­
vailed in the year in question, and as showing the
progress and extent of manufacturing activity in one
of the most important manufacturing States in the
Union, it possesses considerable interest.
These returns grow in usefulness with each additional
year that they are issued. Moreover, Mr. Wadlin is
sustaining the reputation established for the Bureau by
his predecessor, Mr. Carroll D. Wright, now United
States Labor Commissioner. He is constantly extending
the field of inquiry and making the report more compre­
hensive. Incidentally it is worth noting that the work
done by nearly all Massachusetts bureaus and commis­
sions is generally of a high order, the Board of Rail­
road Commissioners, for instance, having long ranked
as one of the best in the country. The statistics on
manufacturing are collected under a law passed in
1886, and the present volume therefore is the seventh
report made by the Bureau. These reports are not
intended to be annual censuses, and consequently the
aggregates given do not comprise the entire manufac­
turing industry of the commonwealth. Mr. Wadlin
states the purpose to be “ to show present industrial
conditions, to exhibit the trend of industrial progress,
to note industrial decline if it occurs, and in connection
with other similar reports previously issued or to be
hereafter prepared in the series of which this volume
forms a part, to supplement the results obtained in the
census at periods widely apart, by data obtained an­
nually from the leading establishments, covering a
large percentage of the annual output.”
Nevertheless the Bureau is each year making the
annual statistics more comprehensive and more repre­
sentative. In 188? the number of establishments en­
tering into the comparisons was only 1,027, in 1888
the number was 1,140, in 1889 it wa31,364, in 1890
there was an increase to 3,041, in 1891 a further in­
crease to 3,745, and now for 1892 the number is up to
4,473. This latter, however, fails to show the full
number of establishments from which the Bureau se­
cured returns : it comprises only the establishments
for which comparisons could be made with the results
for the year preceding; in the case of several hundred
other establishments the returns covered only the 1892
figures and therefore had to be excluded from the com­
parisons. Altogether Mr, Wadlin had returns from
nearly five thousand establishments—in exact figures
4,935 establishments. Even this number may appear
small, when it is considered that the Massachusetts
Decennial Census of 1885 covered 19,072 establishments.
But a bare contrast of that kind is misleading, since it
endows the absent establishments with exaggerated im-

492

THE CHRONICLE.

[Von. L V ll.

portance. Those establishments are nearly all minor number employed 271,399 against 260,419, an increase
concerns—some of them of hardly any consequence of 10,980 or 4-22 per cen t; the greatest number 352,whatever. We get a truer idea of the comprehensive 939 against 335,919, an increase of 17,020 or 5"07 per
nature of the 1892 statistics by comparing the product cent; and the amount paid in wages $141,156,063,
for that year with that of 1885 ; the 19,072 establish­ against $133,036,009, an increase of $8,120,054 or 6T0
ments reporting in 1885 turned out goods valued at per cent. The establishments in the aggregate were
$629,444,927, the 4,935 establishments reporting in kept employed to the extent of 69’31 per cent of their
1892 goods valued at $676,621,503, the latter thus capacity in 1892 as against 68 56 per cent in 1891.
being larger than the former.
These figures confirm what has already been said,
These remarks bear on the usefulness and extent of that the year was a pretty good one—both for manufac­
the exhibits. Most interest no doubt attaches to a turers and wage earners—though, as we shall see when
comparison of the 1892 results with those for 1891, for we consider the industries separately, there are some ex­
that indicates the changes which occurred in the late ceptions to the rule. It will not escape notice that the
year and at the same time reflects the business condi­ highest percentage of increase shown by any item
tions which prevailed in that year. The Bureau has in the foregoing is that giving the amount paid in
returns from 4,452 identical concerns for these two wages, namely 6TO per cent. That, however, does not
years. The number of the establishments included for mean that employees had their wages increased in such
the two years io the various industries actually foots amount. It means that there was better employment
up 4,473, as stated further above. But in some cases for labor—that there wa3 work for a larger number of
the same firm or corporation is engaged in conducting persons, evidence of which statement of course is fur­
two or more establishments in different towns and nished in the fact that the average number of persons
sometimes in different industries. The plan adopted employed in 1892 was 13,515 larger than in 1891. The
has been to consider each establishment, whether man­ rate of wages does not appear to have been materially
aged in connection with another or not, as a unit, and higher. The average earnings for the whole year of
to credit the whole number of firms, partners, corpora­ the entire body of employees was only $6’72 above the
tions and stockholders to each industry, but to count amount for 1891, that is average earnings were $452’21
them once only in making up the final total. Thus it in 1892, against $445’49 in 1891, the increase being
happens that while the returns received cover 4,473 only 1’51 per cent, part at least of which increase fol­
establishments, they represent only 4,452 firms and lows from an increase in the length of time worked.
corporations. At the outset we may note a continu­ However, it is not well to predicate too much upon
ance of the tendency observed in previous years, namely these averages, since so many considerations affect
the tendency of manufacturing concerns to assume the them, as has been pointed out by us on previous occa­
corporate form of management, Of the 4,452 concerns sions. The pleasing fact is that there should have
reporting in 1892, 861 were corporations and 3,591 pri­ been room for an increase in the number of employees,
vate firms. In 1891 out of the same number only 815 and that the change in the average yearly earnings was
were corporations and 3,637 private firms. In other on the right side.
words, during the year 46 private firms were converted It is of some importance to knowhow the increase ininto corporations. While the increase is not large, it business in 1892 compares with the rate of increase in
derives significance from the fact that it is in line with the years preceding. Of course it is not possible to
similar changes in previous years. With the decrease make a comparison of that kind on the 4,452 concerns,
in the number of firms, there has been a decrease from included in the foregoing, but a table is furnished to5,856 to 5,758 in the number of partners, and with the show the value of goods made (product) for 1,195
increase in the number of corporations there has been identical establishments for the last five years. From
an increase in the number of stockholders from 37,384 this it appears that the product of these 1,195 estab
lishments was $351,554,862 in 1888, $363,497,233 in
to 39,601.
When we come to examine the business and opera­ 1889, $374,685,195 in 1890, $373,932,435 in 1891 and
tions of the 4,452 concerns, we find just what we should $393,913,653 in 1892. There is no way of determining
expect to find, that is, an increase all around. These the influence of price in affecting these results from
statistics cover the calendar year 1892, when trade was year to year, an element of course of very great conse­
greatly stimulated by the phenomenal crops raised the quence. Taking the results as they stand, however,
year preceding. In the last half of 1892 the financial they show an increase for 1889 of $11,942,371, or 3’40
situation and the reduced crops then being harvested per cent; an increase for 1890 of $11,187,962, or 3’0S
exerted an adverse effect, but not enough to offset the per cen t; a decrease for 1891 of $752,760, or 0’20 per
advantages derived early in the year from the large crops cent, and an increase for 1892 of $19,981,218, or 5’34
of 1891. Taken altogether the year was one of consider­ per cent. The latter increase is almost exactly the
able activity and a heavy volume of trade, and manufac­ same as the 5’37 per cent increase in the aggregate for
turers in Massachusetts evidently shared in the activity. the whole 4,452 concerns. The conclusion therefore
At all events the 1892 totals—speaking of the manufac­ based on these comparisons i3 that the year 1892 was
turing industries as a whole—are all larger than the cor­ one of much larger expansion than the average of the=
responding totals for 1891. The aggregate capital in years preceding.
vested is reported as 8445,405,459 against $431,691,711 We have stated above that while for manufacturers
in 1891, being an increase of $13,713,748 or 3 T8 per generally the year was a good one, there were exceptions
cen t; the value of stock used $377,394,119 against to the rule in the case of some special industries. In
$361,078,213, an increase of $16,315,906 or 4-52 per this latter remark we have reference more particularly
cen t; the value of goods made and work done—'.hat is, to the margin of profit left to the manufacturer on the
the product—$651,528,562 against $618,347,697, an business of the twelve months. It deserves to be
increase of $33,180,865, or 5’37 per cent; the average pointed out that the excellent results in the cotton goods
number of persons employed 312,146 against 298,631, industry contributed greatly to make the general re­
an increase of 13,515 or 4-53 per cent; the smallest sult favorable. We have several times of late taken

h'EPTEMBIE 23, 1803.1

THE

O H K O N 1C LE .

493

occasion to advert to the exceptional prosperity which financial disturbances and the industrial paralysis
the cotton goods industry enjoyed in the late year, reached their worst stage and railroad traffic fell off
citing facts and figures in support of the statement: most heavily. The reduction in expenses which is
the statistics now before ns furnish further striking shown reveals a feature of railroad operations that will
evidence to the same effect. The matter has especial no doubt become more pronounced in subsequent
interest at the moment, since the New England mills, months. Here is a summary of the figures for July
now that conditions in their trade have changed, are and also for the seveu months to July 31. The con­
enforcing very important redactions in the wages of trast between the showing for the*e two periods marks
the great change in business and railroad conditions
their operatives.
The Bureau has returns from 158 establishments in which occum d with the beginuing of the second half
that industry. It appears that the gross value of the of the year.
product of these establishments iu 1892 was $91,967,Ju ly.
J m uary 1 1 J u ly 31.
a
815, against $89,558,854 in 1891. But while there wa3
(12©
an
an increase of 21 million dollars in the product of the
1893.
m
Inc. ur Dec
1892.
fnc or Dm?.
mills, the cost of the materials used in the manufacture
i
i
*
*
*
*
M.S24.8I7 50,720,17^ -2,895,320 374,929.416 366,001,209 +8,938,207
fsara’
of the goods, chiefly on account of the lower price of G rots e x * . .ii
Oper.
.
42,170,093 - 1 /0 4 .8 9 3 •260,095,146 2 >7,150,812 +8.038,301
cotton, was only $17,940,690 against $52,058,721 in Net earn** lfi.SSQ.6l? 17.SH.063 -1.290,430 l08.8S4.370‘ lM ,SH ,887 —10.007
1891, thus effecting a saving in that way of over 4 mil­
Two large roads which must have sustained heavy
lion dollars, against which the amount paid for wages
lo33es are not included in our statements the present
increased not quite a million dollars, being for 1892
time, having failed to make returns. We refer to the
$25,614,246 against $24,657,967 for 1891. The result
Northern Pacific and the Missouri Pacific. It is also to
is, that after deducting from the value of the goods the
be remembered that the comparison is with rather poor
cost of the materials and the amount paid in wages,
results a year ago. The Southwestern group and also
there is left in 1892 a balance ( “ profit and minor
the Northwestern group then made very good exhibits,
expense fund” the Bureau calls the it»m) of #18,412,but the trunk line roads and some others did rather
873, against only $12,842,166 iu 1891. How very
poorly, and in the final result our statement at that
exceptional this result is, appears when we contrast it
time recordel a loss in net. In other words, the pres­
with the result in another large industry, namely boots
ent loss is additional to a loss last year. The following
and shoe?. There the value of the product by 731
gives the totals back to 1888.
establishments increased from $99,394,318 in 1891 to
$108,347,615 in 1892, but as the cost of the materials r «<*4
Net Jutmlngs
Oc.M n -a r .+ w ,.
IV, r
consumed increased from #58,601,177 to #65.181,630, numl.ee
Tear
roxr
Incrtat* nr
tear
Incrmm err
o/rcuu.
0 l. „
P n t M In, tUcrc.-M.
IteCTtWH.
G im n,
or 64 million dollars, and the amount paid in wages
JulV.
*
*
1
»
!
I
*
increased nearly 2 f million dollars more, or from s « ( M i i i . M I . r - i
IS.5W.37S + s , m « 8 <
15,4*2,100 - I t f i O M l *
$24,096,158 to $26,701,109, the balance left to the u m UM>: js.W M .8io
+ s ,b »m » \ I f ,757,99* H .tr o ,: s-i + 3 ,i7 S ,S «l
imo t iM r
5n.S3-e.aBr +SjS#’\*»2! 17,772.991
manufacturers for profit and miscellaneous expenses is w a t m t r .s i .- . f - m .iO ‘,578 *3,040.8301 18,919,33# 18/111,310 f i / m o i o
• S M O s n s m . m , n s MJMO.TM)
+ M j » ; . 4 18.570.8S7 lu.'sm sm
-7W .S 1S
was actually less in 1892 than in 1891, that is, it was
W>.»;*,Sj7 '*.720.17+
i T . m .i m -1.290.4S8
$16,404,876 against $16,696,983, The manufacturers J*n. J t«
of leather fared much better, as the balance in thoir r « > s i
m ss ( » « + + « ,
•f1fi.ftfi.fi6n 78,48i,$88 8 # 15 f,480 —0/0 7 .1
case increased from $2,679,389 to #3,157,223. The v m {
,m
f t i / a i / e s - : 92,110,711 #1,708,02: •
+10,747.784
H8$
*81,711.638 103.S3S.U7 9 M 0 8 #
090f *8.197,047
woolen goods trade seems to have shared in the pros­ iM t f( t W }»'SU M *
tis ■
s s& .tm M i ■ +®,S03,3*r xmjntMVA
* 0 /0 3 ,7 6 8
perity of the cotton goods trade, as the balance for that
WS,SM,W* 1 * #,S41,38$; U 3.77i.8IS 110.381,810 *§*990,003
f
sfit f t t l >s n y m , i ta 15*6,001,209- f #,928,207 f IfiK /Sl, f~fl 108.84
-10,007
industry at #7,221,333 for 1892 compares with only
Analysis of the returns for the present year brings
#6,398,333 for 1891. On the other hand the worsted
goods establishments show a balance of only $1,616,714 oat one very ynportant feature. Hist of the Missis­
againat $1,804,331, and the manufacturers of carpet­ sippi and north of the Ohio the roads evidently suf­
ings a balance of only #1,282,731 against $2,172,679. fered very much less from the effects of the crisis than
The paper and paper goods industry reflects greatly did the roads in other sections of the country—in fact,
improved results, the balance for 1892 being $7,139,308 taken collectively, they suffered comparatively little.
against #5,981,540. In metals and metallic goods 348 It is true many of these roads gained greatly iu their
establishments have a profit of $6,193,966 against passenger earnings by reason of the travel to the
$6,115,090, and in machines and machinery 324 estab­ World's Pair, but that was also an influence with
lishments show a balance of $7,359,861 against Western roads, even though to a less degree. The
fact that the roads in the territory east, of Chicago did
$7,185,733.
poorly iu July last year, while those further west in
many ir stances reported qnite heavy gains, is of course
R A I L R O A D 1VET EA RN I N OS FOR J U L Y .
also a factor in the comparisons. And yet making the
Our statement of net earnings for July reflects the allowance for all these circumstances, it is yet very
unfavorable conditions which prevailed during that evident that t ie troubles in the industrial and finan­
month, and shows a loss in both gross and net. The cial world have borne mo3t heavily on the interior and
causes responsible for this result are well known, and remoter sections of the country.
have been stated by us at length in previous week*, so
The roads north of the Ohio in our classification
it i3 not necessary to rehearse them here. Suffice appear under four separate groups, namely the Trunk
it to say that the falling off in gross earnings on the Bine, the Anthracite Coal, the Eastern and Middle,
129 roads which have contributed returns is $2,895,239, and the .Middle Western. The coal group is the only
or 4'8o per cent, and the falling off in net earnings $1,- one of these that shows a loss in gross for the month,
290,436, or 7'36 per cent. In both cases the decrease is and thero the decrease has followed almost entirely
smaller than might have been expected, though of from the contraction in the mining operations of the
coarse it was not until the following month that the Reading, the Coal & Iron Company reporting a falling

THE CHRONICLE

494

off in gross receipts of $802,218, which was attended
by an even greater reduction in expenses. These four
groups also, with one exception, all show gains in net.
For the Trunk Line group the gain is $376,356 or 8"91
per cent, and only four of the twelve roads report any
losses. For the Middle Western group the gain is
$268,687, or 34-79 per cent; the exceptional ratio of im­
provement in this case is due to the very heavy increase
($325,442) made by the Illinois Central, but even with
that excluded, while there would be a loss, it would be
small. For the Anthracite Coal group the gain is
$24,304, or 1-56 per cen t; this is not large, and yet all
but one of the seven roads report an increase. The
Eastern and Middle is the group which has a loss, and
ten of the thirteen roads are found contributing to i t ;
but as the falling off in the aggregate reaches only
$48,950 (6-50 per cent) it is not of very great conse­
quence.
Now contrast with these results those for other groups.
Consider first the gross earnings; here we find a de­
crease of $537,830 in the Northwestern group, a de.
crease of $644,960 in the Southwestern group, a de­
crease of $1,058,829 in the Pacific group, and a de­
crease of $270,077 in the Southern group. In the net,
the losses, though smaller in amount, are proportion­
ately even heavier. Thus the Northwestern group re­
cords a loss of $346,422, or 14-62 per cen t; the South­
western group a loss of $392,099, or 22-39 per cent; the
Pacific Coast group a loss of $761,266, or 19-61 per
cent, and the Southern group a loss of $219,641, or
12-80 per cent. In each of these groups a few roads
are found which are able to report better net than in
July, 1892, but the roads which have fallen behind
greatly outnumber them, and moreover the increases
are nearly all small, while the losses quite generally are
pretty heavy. In the Mexican group there is a loss in
both gross and net. This group comprises three roads,
and they all share in the decrease.
Taking the whole 129 roads from which we have
returns, 77 have suffered a reduction of their gross
and 74 a reduction of their net. The more conspicu­
ous losses, or rather all those exceeding $30,000, are
shown in the following.
PRINCIPAL CHANGES IN

In c re a se s.
lUlnoIs Central................
Pennsylvania (4 r-dsltGrand Trunk (3 roads).
Canadian Pacific...........
M inn. St. P. & S. Ste. M ,
H. Y . Ontario & W e st..
Buff. Rock. & Pitts........
W a b a sh .............................
Central of N. J ...............

,t
1
|
.

G R O S S EARNINGS IN J IIL. V .

$ 3 4 0 ,1 7 0
1 13,634
97,335
67,172
62,4 6 2
46,705
4 0 ,1 0 4
35,4 8 2
33,941

Total (representing 14
roads).......................... $8 3 7 ,0 0 5
D ecreases.
Union Pac. (9 roads). . . $92 f ,276
Phil. & R. andC. & I.Co.
816,093
D enver & Rio G rande..
291,685

|k

Atoh.Top.& S.Fe (2rds.)‘
Chic. Mil. & St. P a u l...
Chicago Burl. * Quincy
Louisville & Nashville.
South. P aclficie roads).
Mexican National..........
Cin.N.O.&Tex.P.(5rds.)
M exioau Central...........
Clev. oin- Ch. & St. L ..
Burl. C. R. & North . . .
Minn. & St. Louis...........
Mexican International.
Texas & Pacific...............

$ 2 9 0 ,3 7 4
269.231
264 ,7 6 2
147 ,0 6 2
128,018
85.4 0 4
7 9 ,7 2 7
72,688
61,4 9 8
3 9 ,3 8 4
38,4 5 8
32,7 6 6
30,9 7 7

Total (representing 34
roads)..........................$ 3 ,5 6 9 ,4 0 3

f The gross on Eastern lines decreased $2 6 ,6 2 5 and on W estern lines
increased $1 4 0 ,2 5 9 .
PRINCIPAL CHANGES IN N E T EARNINGS IN J P L V .
In crea ses.
Illinois Central............... $32 5 ,4 4 2 Chicago Burl. & Quincy $ 1 6 7 ,6 8 0
Balt. & Ohio (2 roads)..
161,555 Atoll.Top.<fc S.F e (2 r’ds)
167,5^1
Pennsylvania (4 r 'd s)t.
157,954 Mexican Central...........
130,658
Grand Trunk (3 roads).
71,485 Louisville & Nashville.
100.148
Buff. Rook. & P itts........
31,248 Norfolk & W estern........
62.2 5 7
■Chic. Burl. & North___
30,9 2 7 Mexican International.
45,7 7 7
Western N. Y . & Penn..
39,521
Total (representing 12
Lake Erie & W estern ...
33,8 5 2
roads).......................... $778,611 Minn. & 8t Louis...........
30,8 9 8
Kan. C. Ft. 8. & M em ...
3 0 ,8 3 b
Union Pao. (9 roads)...' $724,402
Denver & Rio G rande..
189,709
Total (representing 22
Ohio. Mil. & St. P a u l...
170,067
roads).......................... $ 1 ,8 9 3 ,3 9 5

t The net increased $ 1 3 7 ,2 4 2 on Eastern lines and $ 2 0 ,7 1 2 on West­
e rn lines.
It will be seen from the foregoing that the Union
Pacific has furnished a good portion of the aggre­
gate decrease, its net having been reduced almost
three quarters of a million dollars ($724,402); very
(Considerable losses are also reported by several other

[VOL. LV 1
I.

roads, namely $189,709 by the Denver & Rio Grande,
$170,067 by the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul, $167,680 by the Chicago Burliugtou & Quincy, $167,591 by
the Atchison, including the St. Louis & San Francisco,
$130,658 by the Mexican Central, $100,148 by the
Louisville & Nashville, &c. The large gains of course
are not very numerous. The Illinois Central has
$325,442 increase and the Baltimore & Ohio $161,555
increase. These figures all relate to July. The
Baltimore & Ohio has now reported its figures also for
August, and for that month the showing is different in
character; we refer to it on a preceding page. In
addition to the Illinois Central and the Baltimore &
Ohio, the only roads whose gains in net for July
exceed thirty thousand dollars, are the Pennsylvania
with $157,954 increase, the Grank Trunk with $71,485
increase, the Buffalo Rochester & Pittsburg with
$31,248 increase, and the Chicago Burlington & North­
ern with $30,927 increase.
8ECTION OR
Gr o u p .
J u ly .

G ro ss E a r n in g s .

N et E a r n in g s .

1892.

1893.

1893.

*
$
16,710,P81 16,509,005
6,912,180
7,653,341
2,136,458
2,135,733
3,445,072
3,099,287
6,703,330
7,241,160
5,214,456
5,859,416
9,328,395 10,387,224
5,329,924
5,600,001
1,044,151
1,235,009

1892.

Inc. o r D e c .

*
4,800,648
1,575,353
703,075
1,040,954
2,021,883
1,358,932
3,120,150
1,495,102
334,550

$
4,224,292
1,551,049
752,025
772,267
2,368,305
1,751,031
3,881,416
1,714,743
525,955

+376,356
+24,304
—48,950
+268,687
—348,422
—392,099
—701,206
—219,041
—191,405

8-91
1*56
6-50
34*79
14*62
22*39
19*61
12*80
36*39

Tot.. (129) r’ds 56,824,847 59,720,176 16,250,647

17,541,083

-1,290,436

7*36

30,226,743 30,291,891
-65,151
8,942,039
9,703,520
-761,481
3,688,843
3,436,904
+261,939
6,890,800
5,809,090 +1,031,510
14,478.829 14,669,690
-190,861
11,332,597 10,491,404
+341,193
19,945,312 21,634,090 —1,718,778
10,491,715 10,047,042
+447,673
2,834,593
2,740,734
+93,859

0*22
7*85
7*64
1862
1*30
8*02
7-93
4*45
3*42

Trunk lines..(13;
Anthra.coal (7)
East & Mid..(13)
Mid. W est’n.(20)
Northwest’n(lO)
8outhwest’n,(12)
Pacific Coast (19)
Southern.... (32)
Mexican....... (3)

1 t o J u l y 31.
Trunk lines..(13)
Anthra.coal..(6)
East & M id..(12)
Mid. W est’n.(20)
Northwest’n (10)
Southwest’n (ll)
Pacific Coast (19)
Southern. ...(27)
Mexican........ (3)

P . O.

*

fa n .

114,730,563
25,693,666
12,742,272
23,330,001
48,770,979
40,389,196
64,455,166
36,426,537
8,391,033

112,988,037
24,871.332
11,969,607
21,577,643
47,628,490
38,493,193
65,698,028
34.891,293
7.883,586

T o t.. (121 r’ ds) 374.929.416 365.001,209 108,834,270 108.844,307
N o t e .— i n c l u d e d

under

T runk Lines.
B . & O., East o f Ohio.
B. & O.. W est o f Ohio.
Clev. Cin. Chic. & St. L.
Peoria & Eastern.
Grand Trunk o f Canada.
Chic. & Gd. Trunk.
Detroit Gr. H av. & Mil.
Ohio & Mississippi.
Pennsylv, East o f P. & E.
W est of Pitts. & Erie.
Grand Ran. & Ind. sys.
Pittsb. Youngs. & Ash.
Wabash.
A n t h r a c i t e G o a l.

Central of New Jersey.
N. Y. Ontario & W est.
N. Y . Sus. & W est.
Phlla. & Reading.
Coal & Iron Co.*
3ummit Branch.
Lykens Valley.
E a s t e r n a 7 id M id d le .

Adirondack.
Allegheny Valley.
Buff. Roch. & Pitts.
Camden & Atlantic.
Hoos. Tun. Sc W ilm .
New York & Northern.*
Northern Central.
Staten Island R. T.
Stony Clove & C. Mt.
Ulster & Delaware.
West Jersey.
Western Md.
Western N. Y. & Penn.
M id d le W e s t e r n .

Chic. & W est Mich.
Cin. Jack. & Mack.
Cin. Ports. & Virginia.
Det. Bay City Sc Alpena.
Det. Bans. & Nor.
Flint Sc Pere Marq.
Illinois Central.
Endianap. Dec. & W .
Iron Railway.
Kanawha & Michigan.
Lake E. Alliance Sc So.

the

head

-10,097

0*01

op—

M id d le W e s t . — ( C o n c ' d )

Lake Erie & Western.
Louisv. N . A . & Chic.
Manistique.
Pitts. M. & Ch.
Sag. Tus. & Hur.
Sag Valley & St. Louis.
St. Louis Alton & T. H.
Toledo Sc Ohio Central.
Tol. Peoria & W .

Union Pacific-(Coat’d)
Oregon Ry. Sc N av. Co.
Union Pac. Den. Sc Gulf.
St. Joseph & Grand Isl.
All other lines U .P . sys.
Central Branch U. P.
Montana Union.
Leav. T. Sc S. W .
Man. A l. Sc B.
S o u th e r n

R oa d s.

Bir. & Atlantic.
Carolina Midland.
Char. Cin. & Chic.
Cheraw < Darlington.
fc
Chesapeake & Ohio.
Ches. & Ohio Southwest.*
Cin. N. O. & Tex. Pac.
Alabama G’t Southern.
New Or. & N. E.*
Ala. & Vicksburg.*
VickD. Sh. Sc Pac.*
Gidsden & Attala Un.*
S o u th w e s te r n .
Atch. Top. & Santa Fe.
Georgia Railroad.
Ga. Southern & Fla.
St. Louis & San fcran.
Current River.
Gulf & Chicago.
Kau. City Mem. & Bir.
Denver & Rio Gr.
Ft. Worth & Rio Grande Louisville & Nashville.
Houston E. & W . Texas.* Macon & Birmingham.
Kan. City Clin. & Spring Nash. Chat. Sc St. Louis.
New Orleans Sc So.
Kan. C. Ft. S. & Mem.
Norfolk & S uthern.
San A nt. & A. Pass.
Sflverton.
Norfolk Sc Western.
Ohio River.
Texas & Pacific,
Paducah Tenn. & Ala.
i’ ex. Sab. Val. & N.W .
Tennessee Midland.
P a c i f ic C o a st.
Petersburg.
Canadian Pacific.
Oregon ImDrovement Co. Rich. Fred. & Pot.
Rich. Sc Petersburg.
Rio Grande Western.
San. Fran. Sc North. Pac. Sav. Am. & Mont.
South Bouud.
So. Pacific.—
South Carolina.
Gal. Har. & S. A .
W est Va. C. & P.
Louis. Western.
Morgan’s La. & T.
M e x ic a n R o a d s.
N. Y . Tex. & M ex.
Mexican Central.
Texas & New Orleans.
M exican International.
Pacific System.
Mexican National.
Qnion PacificOre. Sh. L. Sc Utah N or
N o rth w e s te r n .

Burl. Cedar Rap. & Nor.
Chic. Burl. & North.
Chic. Burl. & Quincy.
Chic. Mil. & St. Paul.
Des Moines N. & W.
Iowa Central
Keokuk Sc Western.
Minn. Sc St. Louis.
Minn. St. Paul & 8. S. M.
Quincy Omaha Sc K. C.

* For month only.

N A SH V IL L E

CHATTANOOGA & ST. LOUIS.

The annual report of the Nashville Chattanooga &
St. Louis for the twelve months ending Jane 30, 1893,
shows that the company passed through a year of
rather unfavorable conditions in a very creditable
manner. The company earned and paid 5 per cent
dividends on its enlarged amount of stock, and at the

September 23, 1893.]

THE CHRONICLE.

4 9 5

same time the state of its finances was further improved, them the surplus for the present year is only #45,884
so that the close of the year on June 30 found it in against $101,126 for the previous year. Of course the
easy circnmstance3. The road is controlled by the loss the last two months is the result of entirely excep
Louisville & Nashville, but its management i3 separate tional conditions, and for that reason it cannot be taken
and distinct, Mr. J. W. Thomas, who has guided the as affording any guide to the probabilities for future
destinies of the property for so many years, and under months. A great deal will depend upon how soon it
whose care it has attained its present position, being may please the United States Senate to take action on
still the executive head of it. The system is not a the momentous question now agitating and unsettling
large one as systems go now, but it runs through an all business interests. When trade resumes its wonted
excellent section of country and has in recent years activity, the Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis man­
netted satisfactory returns. The operations for the agement, we may be sure, will see to it that their road
late year were based on 810 miles of road. Daring the does not lag behind.
current year 75 miles of additional road, mostly short
extensions or branches, will be in operation, raising the
-4 B A N K N O T E C U R R E N C Y S Y S T E M .
total to 885 miles.
E dinburgh , Sept. 8,1893. •
Considering that the cotton crop in the South the
The E d itors o f the Com m ercial an d F in a n cia l C h ronicle :
last season was short and that the iron trade was in a
D e a r S irs .:— There are one or two points of importance in
state of great depression— conditions which would affect present currency discussions that appear to be overlook ed,_
the road both directly and indirectly—the property’s and it may not be impertinent for one who was conversant
earnings were remarkably well maintained. As compared with the discussions that preceded the passing of the Bank
with the twelve months preceding, the decline in gross Charter Act which has since regulated the currency of Britain
to draw attention to what formerly exercised the British Par­
earnings was only about 4 per cent, the total being
liament to as great an extent as silver and gold are at present
15,131,779 for 1892-93, against #5,353.288 for 1891-92, occupying the attention of Congress.
while the decline in net earnings was only about 14 per
To begin with, there is no widespread recognition of the un­
cent, the total net being #1,992,374, against $2,029,008. doubted fact that the use of money is a refined kind of barter
The company had larger interest charges to meet— called exchange, but essentially and certainly b a rter. A nd
#891,915, against #829,905— but the expenditures for i in order to have successful barter that shall be y>rofnable t o
! iioth parties there must be a valuable consideration on both
improvements were only #51,355, against #118,112;
-ides. Money is not and cannot be money unless it is in­
taxes were #120,410, or bat slightly different from the trinsically valuable. Money may be represented by paper
amoant for the year preceding, and the rental of the notes, silver, nickel, copper or bronze tokens—even in short
Western & Atlantic was #420,012.
The aggregate transactions by word of mouth; but nil representathx money
charge against net earnings heuce was #1,483,697 in o f every kind in order to be really and permanently useful
1892-93, against #1,488,639 in 1891-92; deducting must be convertible, and always and instantly convertible,
into real money. Now what is there among valuable things
which there was left a balance applicable to dividends all the world over suitable for money? Nothing but gold .
of #508,676, against #540,368 in the previous year. Nothing equal to gold. In all tile world and during all time,
The five per cent dividends called for #500,000, and historic and prehistoric, gold has been the one standard o f
thus there remained a surplus of #8,676 over and above value. There cannot be more than one standard. There
all charges and the 5 per cent dividends and expendi­ seems some confusion about the money standard—there is
none about lineal or cubic standards. The British Parliament
tures of #51,355 for improvements. This surplus was
discussed many substitutes for gold, and amongst the rest
independent of the income received from investments. various kinds of credit, but they were driven to the conclusion
The company issued #649,000 of its first consolidated that credit was not sufficient alone, not even the best; that
mortgage 5 per cent bonds, and these, with #200,000 no credit except national credit was of the least use; and that
out of #300,000 held in the treasury at the beginning the point to which national credit could be used was the
of the year, were sold, leaving only #100,000 in the minimum amount of circulation during a given past period.
I Ail further circulation must be gold, or paper and inferior
treasury at the end of the year. The company also
j metal representative of gold, actually in the national vaults,
sold the #1,057,000 of Louisville & Nashville unified 4 ■The Bank of England was appointed to conduct the business'
per cent bonds it had held, realizing therefor #838,117, on behalf of tlje nation and is controlled by the government
which was just about the cost of the securities to it on of the day. There were various banks which at the time had
its books, in this way it was able to make a further the right of issuing notes. These were permitted to retain,
reduction of its floating debt, ^notwithstanding the their right, restricted to their then minimum circulation.
They were permitted to issue whatever further amount o f
outlays required on construction and equipment ac­ notes they might desire, but for ail such notes they must have
count. A year ago we noted a reduction in the amount actually in their possession an equal amount of gold coin.
of bills payable from #2,164,138 on June 30, 1891, to Practically the banks keep an excess of gold, varying some­
#1,546,844 on June 30, 1892 : now for June 30, 1893, what in amount, but always in excess of their legal require­
the amount of the bills payable is down to #550,617. ments. A ll banks that issue notes are under constant inspec­
tion and weekly supervision, and all notes issued are in case
Ontside the bills payable, the ordinary current liabiliof insolvency a first charge on the bank’s assets. Since the
ities for interest, accounts due, &c., were only #785,022. passing of the act no bank note has ever been dishonored.
The current assets were #842,172, of which #556,938 When banks have failed, the other banka have at once taken,
was in cash. The company also held #893,572 of con­ up their notes. Silver is legal tender to the extent of #10.
vertible investments in the shape of stocks and bonds. Copper to 50 cents. A ll other money is of course full legal
tender.
Since the close of the year the company has suffered
It has been insisted on that gold has appreciated and at a ll
of course in common with other roads from the intense events has varied in value during the last 50 years. This m ay
disturbance of business all over the United States, and or may not be true absolutely, but it is of no consequence in
its earnings have fallen off, For July the loss in gross regard to currency questions, because it is not the absolute
was only #19,145 and in net but #7,798 ; for August, value of gold which rules but the relative and international
however, the loss was #96,834 in gross and #47,066 in value ; and it is just this constant international value which
gives gold its importance as being useful and alone useful aa
net, making for the two months a decrease in net of
money. The absolute value of gold is an unascertained and
*54 ,864. The charges were not materially different uoascertainable quantity. W e might as profitably attempt to
for these two months in 1893 and 1892, and deducting ascertain the absolute quality of truth or of justice. The-

496

THE CllllOJSiCLE.

absolute value of gold no doubt varies in different countries
and has done so in the same country at different times. An
ounce of gold annually is in Britain at the present time worth
about 33 years' purchase. Fifty years ago it was not worth 25
years’ purchase. In Holland, Austria and Turkey different
values obtain. But that has nothing to do with the use of
gold as money. A n ounce of American fine gold is just equal
in value to an ounce of floe gold whether in England, Hol­
land, Austria, Turkey or Timbuctoo. And it is the inter­
national equal value of gold which makes it valuable for use
as money, for gold is everywhere desired and desirable for
exchange. W hen an international equality in value of silver
or copper can be or has been established, these metals will then
be— paitially according to their bulk and weight—useful as
money, but not before. During the last 50 years the exchange
value of gold in London has not varied above a few pence an
ounce.
It might be thought that national credit was a good enough
basis for a money currency, but it is not so. On the verge of
a great war (with Russia) British stock sold for weeks at a
little over 60 per cent of its face value. United States bonds
have not always been above par. If the currency was based
on national credit alone, at a time of trial the government of
the day would certainly cease putting out notes because they
would wish to maintain credit and would find it difficult.
Everybody would then begin to hoard and a crisis and panic
would be almost certain. A thoroughly sound currency with
a good gold back is one essential of DatioDal prosperity. In
what way is it to be attained ? In different ways. The sys­
tems that have stood the test in Europe might be considered.
No doubt tlte wisdom of Congress will be equal to the task if
they once get clear of the fallacy that there can be money
without gold. Gold is the one medium of exchange, and
there is no other. In a time of trial the fear that money can­
not be obtained or that gold cannot be obtained always has
and always must cause hoarding, and then of course an ab­
solute want of money or want of gold follows, and a panic
with its attendant frightful evils is the result. Every good
system of currency must be calculated to withstand a time
of trial.
There is a very common fallacy in the use of the expression
It is used to mean representative money with­
out a geld back; it is also used to mean an abundant supply of
money, on the assumption that an unlimited supply can be
provided by the national tieasury or by the banks. That is
not so.
W h y did France and Germany take means to
prevent their gold going to America a few weeks ago ? The
phrase means also a low rate of interest. But low interest
depends on abundant capital and money is not capital.
If
a bank has $100,000 in gold and puts out against it $100,000 in
notes, there is not two hundred thousand dollars of capital
but one, although there is $200,000 of money.
Confidence
makes capital abundant because it is all put out. A time of
trial makes capital (then called money) tight because it is
hoarded.
A Subscriber.

cheap money.

R a i l r o a d G r o s s E a r n i n g s — C o r r e c t i o n . — Through a
typographical blunder the names of the Kansas City Subur­
ban Belt and the Kansas City Pittsburg & Gulf were trans­
posed last week in our table of gross earnings for the month
of August, and the figures in each case placed opposite the
wrong name. Correctly the earnings of the two roads should
have been given as fo'lows :

'

------- Gross Earn ings------- . .— Mileage— ,
1893.
I s 9 2 . Increase. 1893. lo 9 2 .

$

$

Kansas Cby Pittstmrir & G u lf..2 2 ,4 0 3 6 .424 + 1 5 .9 4 9
Kansas City Suburban B e lt........26,623 17,120 + 9 ,503

187 81
35
35

S t o c k E x c h a n g e C l e a r i n g -H o u s e T r a n s a c t i o n s . — The
subjoined statement includes the transactions of the Stock
Exchange Clearing-House from Sept. 11 dowu to and includ­
ing Friday, Sept 22 ; also the aggregates for June, July and
August in 1893 and 1892. .
STOCK EXCHANGE CLEARING HOUSE TRANSACTIONS.

■ Shares, both sides.— .
—

Cleared,
Month—
Jane, 1892.
July, 1892.
Aug., 1892.
3 mos....
June, 1893.
July, 1893.
Au?., 1893.
3 mos....

16,684,000
9,807,800
13,998,480
40,489,780
17.190.700
19,685,700
17.569,400
51,445.800

Total Value.
$
1,041,048,200
699,313,200
977,583.000
2,717,944,400
1,016,900,000
1,100.000.000
961,300,000
3,078,200,000

-------- Balances, one side. --------. Sheets
Shares. Value Shares. Oxsh. Clear’d.
$
$
1.598,750
94,566,700 1,433,971
1.120,100
74,186,100
974,700
1,657,400 107.388,900 1,301,600
4,376,250 276,139,700 3,710,271
1,682,000
90,200,000 1,789,800
1,796,300
88,100,000 2,752,500
1.470,200
73,900,000 2,329,200
4,918,500 252,200,000 6,871,500

6,885
5.886
6.188
17,954
6,395
6.015
6,882
19,292

|V o l ,

■ Shares, both sides .— .
—
Cleared. Total Value.

.--------- Balances, one side.--------. Sheets

Shares. Value Shares. Cash.Cleared .

s
Sept. 11. .1 ,3 2 5 ,8 0 0
“ 1 2 . . 835,000
" 1 3 . . 75 1 ,3 0 0
“ 14. . 666,500
“ 15. . 526,900

8 2 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0
5 4 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0
4 6 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
4 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 0 ,4 00,000

Tot. wk. .4 ,1 0 5 .5 0 0 2 5 1 ,8 00.000
W klastyrl,5 9 9 ,8 0 0 31 2 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 )
Sept. 18. .
“ 19. .
“ 20. .
" 2L. .
" 22. .

7 5 4 ,6 0 0
5 71,800
55 1 ,4 0 0
4 9 2 ,2 0 0
4 2 7 ,9 0 0

4 3 ,2 0 0 ,0 0 0
3 3 ,8 0 9 ,0 0 0
34 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0
27 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0

Tot. wk. .2 ,8 0 0 ,9 0 0 1 6 3 ,2 0 0 ,0 0 0
W klastyi'4,513,300 2 9 8 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0

LVII

$
$
6 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 190 ,8 0 0
4 000 ,0 0 0
9 8 ,4 0 0
3 ,7 0 0 ,0 0 0
86,5 0 0
2,8 9 0 ,0 0 0
5 3 ,4 0 0
6 0 ,6 0 0
2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0

323
304
299
292
280

334 ,4 0 0 1 9 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 4 8 9 ,7 0 0
517 ,0 0 0 32 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0 4 6 4 ,1 0 0

1,503
1 ,4 5 7

101,700
66,2 0 0
68,6 0 0
5 0 ,7 0 0
4 7 ,2 0 0

67,9 0 0
4 7 ,1 0 0
44,0 0 0
4 6 ,3 0 0
4 1 ,9 0 0

3 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
2.4 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0

69,9 0 0
6 4 ,9 0 0
6 5 ,2 0 0
3 2 ,0 0 0
2 9 ,4 0 0

298
289
273
264
266

2 1 7 ,2 0 0 1 2 ,8 0 0 .0 0 0 261 ,4 0 0
4 5 0 ,2 0 0 2^ ,3 0 9 ,0 0 0 3 5 7 ,3 0 0

1 ,395
1 ,1 8 2

The stocks cleared now are American Cotton Oil com m on,
American Sugar common, Atchison, Chicago Burlington &
Quincy, Chicago Gas, Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul com­
mon, Chicago & Northwestern, Cnicago Rock Island & Pacific,
Delaware Lackawanna & Western, Distilling & G it tie Feed­
ing, General Electric, Louisville & Nashville, Manhattan,
Missouri Pacific, National Cordage common, New York &
New England, New York Lake Erie & Western, Northern
Pacific preferred, National Lead common, Philadelphia &
Reading, Union Pacific and Western Union.

$$fccme la *s =©cmmeieciaX
l

Uteres

From our own correspondent. I

L o n d o n , Saturday, September 9, 1893.
The Directors of the Bank of England have made no change
in their rate of discount this week, to the disappointmet of the
outside market, which thinks that there might have been a
reduction with perfect safety to 4 per cent. The coin and
bullion now amount to about 26% millions sterling, and the
reserve is a little over 16% millions sterling. The demand for
gold has stopped for the time being, while some is comiDg in.
But the Directors are evidently apprehensive that if they
were to put down their rate) the outside market would fall
further, and the withdrawals of gold would begin again. In
the outside market the competition for bills has been very
active all the week, and the rate of discount is now down to
3 per cent. The bill brokers and discount houses have low­
ered the rates they allow on deposits to 3 per cent for money
at call and S% per cent for money at notice, but the jointstock banks have made no change.
The India Council again offered for tender on Wednesday 40
lakhs of rupees in bills and telegraphic transfers. Somewhat
over 45 lakhs were applied for at prices ranging from
Is. 3 l-32d. to Is. 3 3-16d. per rupee, but no allotments were
made. Later in the day, however, there was a special sale of
half a lakh at Is. 6%d. per rupee. It has been known for some
time that the Council, after much contention with the finan­
cial authorities at Calcutta, had decided to fix upon a mini­
mum price of Is. S%&., and it is understood that the small
sale on Wednesday was made for the very purpose of assuring
the market that the Council would act up to that, for the
pre-.ent at all events. The exports from India are very small
and trade throughout the Empire is very quiet; but the Council
hopes that the exports will now increase, and besides that the
locking up of money in the Presidency treasuries will so de­
plete the Indian money market that it will compel the Indian
banks to apply for drafts in considerable amounts. It is
hardly probable, however, that this will happen for some
time yet, and the general opinion, therefore, is that the
Council will have to borrow within the next month, for it has
large payments to make in October. The demand for silver
for India and China continues good, and the price, after
falliDg to 33Jgd. per ounce, recovered on Thursday to 34d. per
ounce, and yesterday to 34%d. per ounce.
Business on the Stock Exchange continued active at advanc­
ing prices up to Wednesday. Particularly the American de­
partment was active, and a very hopeful feeling prevailed. On
Wednesday, however, there was some set-back, and since then
prices have somewhat receded. This is the slackest season of
the whole year. Holiday-making is later than usual, and the
attendance on the Stock Exchange is therefore very small.
The fact to some extent accounts for the undoubted truth that
the general public is doing very little, and that therefore the

September 23. 1S93, |

THE

49 T

C H R O N IC L E .

rise of the past fortnight is mainly due to professional buying.

Members of the Stock Exchange, however, are very confident
that next month there will be a decided improvement in busi­
ness. Then holiday-making will practically' b ; ort-r, the at­
tendance at the Stock Exchange will be fa*l, and the city gen­
erally will resume its usual appearance. The expectation will
probably he verified if New York continues strong; but all will
depend upon that. At the end of last week, as already stated,
in this correspondence, the Banqne de Paris et des Pays Bos
concluded an agreement with the Russian Government for the
conversion of the Russian 6 per cents of 1883 into a 4 per cent
stock, and there has been a marked advance in Rus-ian bonds
in Paris. The old 4 per cents are now about 1001.,'. As the
Russian fleet is about to visit London, the bop- is very general
in Paris that the enthusiasm of the French for the Russian
.Alliance will be heightened, and that the conversion, there­
fore, will be a great success. As yet the great Jewish capital­
ists have made no sign of opposition, but probably they will
make their indignation at the treatment of the Jews in Russia
felt before the operation is over.
The French Finance Minister intimates that he will imme­
diately take in hand the conversion of the French 4‘ j per
cents, a very large undertaking, requiring for its co mp ete
success considerable time, assured peace and an easy money
market. The prospect has further stim uli ted business on the
Bourse, and the market is very firm. The opinion is begin­
ning to grow here that as the French Uovenunent contem­
plates so large a conversion operation it will induce the Bank
of France to relax its hold upon the gold held by it, and that
therefore if the American demand for the nit til springs
up again it will be largely supplied from Pari*. The news

The imports since January 1 have been as follows:
1892.
£
33,485,244
34,877,931
36,793,194
34,920.272
35,035,738
32,777,479
33,497.585
34,844,365

1893
£
39.125,«.48
29,758,7
34,069,41 5
3 \125,359
36,*3V > 5t
31.868.792
3 3 .2 9 2 .7 1
35.002,035

I mports .

January........
Februarj —
March............
April. . ..... »l ay ................. .
June............ .
July..............
August...........

— 5 *3 "

1893.
£
18,026,019
17,093,309
19.432.91 4
April— . . .... . 16,617,977
17.9*2,460
May..... ..........
June................ . 1 8 .7 8 5 , l~ l
July................. 19,651,374
A ugust........... 19.530.i79

1892.
£
19,116,704
19,328.753
19,665,332
17,-65,876
17.783,909
18,070,318
19,463,397
20,051,320

Difference.
£
—1,120.685
—2,235.4 4 4
— 232,478
—1,247,-99
+
56,491
-r 7 J4.953
+
187,777
— 521,152

146,959.492

151,375.929

-4 ,4 1 6 ,4 3 7

E xports.

J IH ila r y ...........
February.......
March..........

8 months—

Per m .
— 5*85
— 11*56
- 1*18
— 6*93
+

0*21

-f 3*95
0*96
2*50

+
-

— 2*81

The exports o f foreign and colonial produce since January 1
show the following contrast:
1893.
£
4.786,274
2 -2
5.690.367
1,356,184
6,043.220
4 .7 -6 ,O il
*1,Hi 2,192
4 ,:w ?,«3 7

3 months —

1892.
£
4,123,616
5,728.772
3,586.389
5.515.838
0,95 »,447
4,618,260
5.971,207
l.376.509

Difference.
£
+ 657.623
+
4.180
+ 123.978
-6 8 0 .6 5 4
+ 338,773
t 147.753
-1,138,71.-,
7,872

+ 15*92
+ 0*07
+ 2*22
-1 2 * 4 3
+ 5-09
+ 3*17
-1 9 * 1 0
*18

41, >*7,796

R e- exi *
orts ,
January..........
February.........
Mhreft,............
A pril...............
May..................
JflUC..............
l o i r .................
August............

42,557,063

-3 0 9 ,2 7 2

— 1*33

Per Cl.

The following shows the Imports of cored produce into the
United Kingdom during the first week of the new season
compared with previous seasons :
is r j

fnitK>rt«'>f«rlm »t.cwt. M 23,361

lU r o » ........................
O u t * .......................................

Pv+1.................. . . . . .
Beam........................

bull mi corn ................
F lo u r .........................

issn
1.037.0 IS
333,.>0 3
331.010
20,595
1 1.371
374,590
183,328

1802.

from Spain continues disquieting, and the crisis in Italy is

minds not to be induced by whatever may happen to sell upon

P er Ot..
-1 3*92
—14-67
— 7*34
— s-oo
+ 5-14
— 2*77
— 0-61
-f *45

-1 5 ,1 0 2 ,0 3 6
231,019,613
9 months.... 265.917,577
The exports since January 1 have been as follows:

growing worse. Cholera, too, is spreading.
On Thursday morning news reached here o f the revolt o f
the Brazilian fleet, and later it was stated that the fleet was
blockading Rio. The intelligence, however, bad much less in­
fluence upon the pricts of Brazilian securities than might
have been expected. Not much of them is floating in the
market, and apparently the holders now have made up their
a large scale ; indeed, it is very doubtful whether they could
so sell even if they wished. Another rising is reported from
the province o f Tueumao, in Argentina, but It is treated here
as a small affair; and in sympathy with American securities
almost all Argentines—Government and industrial—have
risen during the week.
The Board of Trade returns for August are fairly satisfac­
tory, comdd-ring all the circumstances. The value of the
exports of British and Irish produce and manufactures was
slightly over W j millions sterling, a decrease compared with
August o f last year of a little more than half a million ster­
ling, or about 21. per cent. The falling off is almost entirely
in coal, due mainly, no doubt, to the great coal strike. On the
olher hand, the exports of cotton are decidedly better. They
have been very large both to India and to China. There Is an
increase generally, especially to Turkey. For the first eight
months of the year the value was very nearly 147 millions
sterling, a decrease of somewhat under 41/ millions sterling,
or about 2*| per cent. During the first three or four months
there was a very great falling off : during the remainder of
the period, however, until August, there were signs of im ­
provement. It would seem, therefore, that the shrinkage in
our foreign trade has practically come to an end. For the
month the value of the imports was 85 millions sterling, a
small increase of neatly £153,000, or somewhat under >, per
cent. For the eight months the value of the imports was not
quite 200 millions sterling, a decrease compared with the
corresponding period of last year of somewhat over 15 mil­
lions sterlings, or rather more than 6J£ per cent.
The coal strike still continues, but it is evidently breaking
down, The majority of the strikers have returned to work in
South Wales, and in England great distress is reported from
different districts. There is in consequence much bitterness
of feeling, and there naa been a good deal of rioting during
the week. The interruption to trade in consequence of this
quarrel is strikingly shown in the railway traffic receipts.
Taking seventeen of the principal companies of the United
Kingdom, there was a decrease Last week of £157,000, of which
£152,000 was from goods. For the half year up to Saturday
night last the decrease was nearly £792,000, of w) i -h £053,000
was in goods.

Difference.
£
-5 ,3 5 9 ,3 5 0
—5,119,183
—2,703,781
—2,794.913
+1,301,213
— 908,637
— 205,312
4- 157,720

U M 57
a da,785
41.67*4
292,033
807.5.00
013,250

1,680,635
213.233
338.1113

fs?,.v,t

131.33d
8 27.253
277,637

1S90
1,13 2.363
332 801
277,401
31,307
27,634
7113,758
282.303

Suoolies available for consumption (exclusive of stocks on

Sep.emher 1):
1893.

1992.

W lie.it................ ow t. 1.133 . 1 6 1
Import* o f flou r.........
O ia.j.W

1891.

1890.

1.660.635
277,63?

1,887,808
183.326

■: <2.303

T o U l ....................~ 3*> 7.0 :> 2 ~ 3 3 1.918
1893.
1892.
Aver, price wheat week.25*. 3d.
29». 14.

2 4 5 5 .7 6 t
181H.
416. id .

2,105.028
U j9».
3 l< 0>f.

Salat »f home-grown.

500.832

373,618

1. Is 1.363

284.880

590.382

The following shows the quantities of wheat, flour ard
maize afloat to the United Kingdom:
T h u week.

W h eat ...............qr*. 2,347,000

Floor,equal to qr».
More.................qra.

345.000
391.000

naMiVDtrk.

1892.

1891.

2,353,000

1 . 8 2 1 ,0 09

1,60.1,000

323,000
470,000

2-5,01*0
025,000

l-l.tOo
152.000

The rates for money h3ve been as follow s:
*
*2
£
§
-

Aug. 4
* u
•
” 18
* V>
*
8c.Pt. ‘1
8

1M erest tM aumt

'ip m M a r k il H a iti.

fv n U p o n il* by
----- —
D is c’ l W h
J o in t
T h rtf
T oa r
sir
Three
T ou r
S ix
Stack A t 71011
Month* M onth* M onth* Month* M on lh rM on th * B ankt. CaU, D a vi.

. ..

_..... .. . ................._
...... . .
Km * IJillt.
T rade Bill*.

3 !s h # - ■ *

*s*i8 M # *q a #a** a q a a iis w a iq
t , 0 4 * - 0 4 * - 4 a - *H » - mm 1 -WwAi-. A H U4«ST« ‘ « - , * m ~ <4 a % i . 4 - 11 i - i 4* -<t. a - 6 a - 5 a s m . - ->h < -m m - « a m « a i q » «4*1
s
5 Shp* -8 M 4 -•>.»* - » « * «
aqa« tn m t

iii

iq

24
■1
14
f>4
»4
34

m

24
3.4
»4
n

m
m
m
»H
m
n

The Bank rate of discount and open market rates at the
chief Continental cities now and for the previous three weeks
have been as follows:
S ep t 8,
Interest a t

S e p t 1.

B ank
O v en
B ate* M arket

B ank
Oprn
H a t* . M arket

•2H

B erlin ...........
Hans burg.. ....
Frankfort......
Amsterdam....
Brussel* .......
Vienna.,,...,,..
8t. Feterahnrg
Madrid... . . . . . .
Cercnbiseo...

Messrs.

§.
s
"5
3
4
44
5
1

i

44
44
44
S4
m

4
44
§
4

Anjr. 23.

i
m
m

s
8
24
4
4
44
«4
&
6
34 .. J S L .

Pixley & Abell write
Si-otember 7 :

0»«n
Market

Any. 18.
Bank
Open
R a te , M arket

m

m

t*

B ank
B a le ,

as

5
5
5
6
*
44
&
34

5

>4
S«
4
»4
&

r
>
5
4
3
4
44
5

m

4

m
m

44
44
44

m

2H
4
44
5

4

follows under date o f

Gold—There is still but small Inquiry for gold, and the Bunk contf ntiea to receive the chief am ounts o f tiara and coin. Since our last*
tliH Baiik ti& bmwclit £420,000 and baa sudd £48,000, o f which £.49*-.
K
00 o la fo r tile United States. A rrivals : Australia, € 1 37.0 00; South
Africa, MdSSt0 0 0 ; 0ttiil, € 2 ,0 0 0 ; u nouns laud, £ 7 ,0 0 0 ; West Judies,
*31.000 ; total, £315.000.
Silver—A num ber o f -mall requirements have sufficed to k eep the
market steadv. and for delivery at once 3HL baa been paid to-d ay.

'THE CHRONICLE.]
A r r iv a ls : N ew Y o rk . £ 6 0 ,0 0 0 ; Chill, * 4 8 , 0 0 0 ; W est In d ies, * 3 , 0 0 0 ;
t o t a l , £ 1 0 9 ,0 0 0 . Sh ip m ents to C alcutta Sept. 1, £ 1 0 ,0 0 0 .
M e x ic a n D ollars—There h a ve been fe w r o c e n t dealin gs in th ese coin,
a n d 3 3 % d . is abo u t the n e arest price. A r riv a ls fro m N ew Y o rk , £ 3 3 , -

■000.

The following table shows the exports and imports of specie
at the port of New York for the week ending Sept. 16 and since
January 1, 1893, and for the corresponding periods in 1892
and 1891:
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF SPECIE AT NEW YORK.

The quotations for bullion are reported as follow s:
GOLD.
L o n d o n S ta n d a rd .

S ep t. 7 .
8.

' 3ar-srold, fine— oz.
>3ar gold, contain’#
24 dwts. silver..oz.
span, doubloons, o z .
U . S. gold coin ...o z .
German gold coin.oz

77
77
73
70
70

A ug.
8.

d.

SILVKR.

31.

L o n d o n S ta n d a rd .

S ep t.

d.

9

77

9%
9
4
4

77
73
76
70

7. A u g .

d.

d.

9
Bar silver, fine. ..oz. 34
Bar silver, contain0%
ing 5 grs. gold..oz. 34%
9
Cake silver...........oz. 30%
4
Mexican dollars..oz. 33%
4

S ii4
S iJ i

37 X
33)6

The following return shows the position of the Bank of
'England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols, du..,
compared with the last three years:
1893.
S ep t.

6.

£
C irculation........................................ 26,171,365
3,315,567
Public deposits...............................
•Other deposits................................. 28,748,729
9,989,341
Government securities................
Other securities............................. 24,037,429
Reserve.............................................. L6,551,930
Qoid and bullion............................. 20,273,295
t?rop. assets to liabilities' per ct. 51 5-16
5
‘Bank rate ....................... per cent
97%xd
O onsols 2% per cent.......................
•Clearing House returns.............. 131,495,000

1892.
7.
£
26,231,935
3,453,294
31,701,099
11,201.150
24,600.762
17,799,632
27,581,567
50 5-16
2
90 15-10
109,424,000
S ep t.

1891.
1893.
9.
S e p t . 10.
£
£
25,731,375
24,693,980
5,297,712
2,653,262
-31,608,734
27.815,145
10,163.055
14.224,237
28,089,893
20.885,443
17,282,391
13,993,545
28,563,766
22,237,525
48 a
45%
2%
4
95 3-16
95 9-16
137,487,000
98,439.000

B u i n a a F i n a n c i a l T la rtte ta — P e r C a b l e .

Sat.

’BUver.ner oz.................. d
Qon*Ois,ne w, 2 % per ote.
do for account.........
F r’cii rentes (in Paris)fr.
<U 8. 4s of 1 9 0 7 ...............
.
Canadian Paolflc.............
Colo. Mil. & St. P a u l....
Illinois Central.................
Lake Shore........................
I^ u is v ille & Nashville..
JMexloan Central 4 s ........
V. Central & Hudson.
.•N Y . Lake Erie & West’ll
do
2d eons.............
orfolk < W estern, preb
fc
Northern Pacific pref. . .
■
Pennsylvania....................
i P hiladelphia & Reading.
til nlon Paoiflo.....................
’■Wabash pref.....................

■ M'
S

Mon.

Wed.

lu es.

Thurs.

Fry.

34%
34%
9 7 i'ie 97%
9713,6 9745*16
X 98-30 9 8 0 5

34%
34%
34
33%
9713,6 9713,6 9718,6 98%
98
97%
97%
981,6
97*17% 96*35% 98*42% 98-45

77Aa
62%
96
126
56%
54
106
16%
77 h
23 %
25%
52
9%
22 %
16*

76%
62%
96%
125%
55%
53 St
105%
15%
753t
23%
24%
51%
9%
22%
16%

^ u m r a e r c ia l a n a

76%
61%
96%
125%
55%
54
105%
15%
77%
23%
24%
51%
9%
2*38
16%

76%
62%
96%
125%
55%
5334
105%
15%
75%
23%
24%
51%
9%
22%
16%

77%
62%
96%
126
54%
53%
106
16
76
23%
24%
51%
91%
22%
16%

77%

63%
96%
125%
54%
53%
106
153,
75%
23%
24%

51%
10%
22%
16%

Week.
Great Britain.............
France...........................
Germany......................
West Tndies.................

following interest­
i n g statement, furnished by the Comptroller of the Currency,
sh ow s the amount of each class of bonds held against national
ban k circulation and to secure public moneys in national bank
depositaries on August 31.

$16,67 7 ,6 4 7
17,990,102
25 ,4 5 3 ,1 0 0
626,145
7,0 9 3 ,8 8 5
15,468
2,000
1 ,1 34,670
1 ,0 13,420

$

South America...........
All other countries..
Total 1 8 9 3 ...........
Total 1 8 9 2 ...........
Total 1 8 9 1 ...........

Public Deposits
in Banks.

Bank
Circulation.

* 1 ,1 7 0 ,0 0 0
1 ,5 8 8 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,5 6 3 ,0 0 0

$ 1 5 ,6 5 2 ,0 0 0
2 2 ,2 3 9 ,3 5 0
1 6 6 ,2 0 4 ,8 5 0

$ 1 6 ,8 2 2 ,0 0 0
2 3 ,8 2 7 ,3 5 0
1 7 8 ,7 6 7 ,8 5 0

$ 1 5 ,3 2 1 ,0 0 0

2 0 1 ,0 9 6 ,2 0 0

Exports.

Silver.

Week.

Great Britain.............

Total Held.

E x p o r t s f o r t h e W e e k . — The

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT N E W Y O R K .

For W e e k .

CD G o o d s ........
ry

1890.

Week.

Since Jan. 1.

West Indies.................
M exico....... .................
South Am erica...........
AH other countries..

* 7 5 4 ,1 5 0 $ 22,200,096
132,198
1 87,300
60,405
495.928
660
6 ,540
68,553
39.694

600
78,8 9 6
49,4 5 3
40,062

*2 ,9 3 7
7 8 7 ,4 4 0
596
4 4 ,7 5 2
8 5 0 ,4 3 5
1 ,0 12,283
1 23,797

Total 1 8 9 3 ...........
Total 1 8 9 2 ...........
Total 1 8 9 1 ...........

$821,095 $ 23,124,429
4 69,905 16,145,144
8 14,712 12 ,3 8 2 .3 4 4

169,278
220,515
50,620

* 2 ,8 2 5 ,2 4 0
1 ,7 88,496
1 ,4 8 8 ,3 1 6

*267

o f the above imports for the week in 1893, $358,608 were
American gold coin and $2,063 American silver coin. Of the
exports during the same time, $5,200 were American gold
coin and $500 American silver coin.
— Messrs. Coffin & Stanton oiler to investors a selection of
corporation and municipal bonds which they state will net at
current rates 5 to 8 per cent.

City Railroad Securities—Brokers’ Quotations,
Atlantic A v .,B ’ klyn.St’k.
Gen. M., 6s, 1909...A& O
Broker St. A Fai. F. -S tk .
1st mort., 7e., 1900-.J&J
Br’dway & 7taAv.—St’k ..
1st mort., 5s, 1904 .J&D
3d mort,, 5s, 1914...J& J
B’way 1st, os, gn.......’ 24
2nd 5s, int. as rent., ’05.
Brooklyn City—NewStock
B ’klyncrosst’n 5s., 1908
Bkn.C’y& N ’n5s,1938.J&J
Central Crosstown—St’k ..
1st mort., 6s, 1922.MAN
Cent. Pk.N .A E.Riv.—Stk.
Consols. 7s. 1902 ...J & D
Clirist’p’r A 10th St.—St’k.
1st mort., 189 8 ...... A&O

Dry D k .E .B .& B at’ y - S t k . 1 2 0

180
100

100

100

90
159
105
100
140
115
116
105

.... .

1st, g„ 5s, 1932.......JAD 100.......
S c r ip ............. — ------- . . . 95 100
Eighth A y .—Stock .............. . . . . 250
Eighth A y . - S crip, 6s, 1914 105 110
42a A Gr’ nd St. F ’ ry— Stk. 300 ........

102
30
108

42d St. M anh .A S t.N .A v e .
1st mort., 6s, 1910.. M AS
2d M ,, incom e,0a---- J&J
160 |H o u s t.W .S t.A P .F ’y —Stk.
1st m ort., 7a, 1 8 9 4 ..J A J
1 0 5 "! N inth A v e ..............................
Se iond A v e .—Stock,

...J
....

00

68

110
64

200 ____-

104 .
125
105 110
]
102
1st mort., 5s, 1909.M&N
215
Sixth Ave.—S to c k ...........
140 145
Third Ave.
1st M., 5s, 1937.......JAJ 1 0 7 ....... .
Twenty-third St.—Stodk— . — 300

120
140
130

N. Y. and Brooklyn Has Securities—Brokers’ Quotations.
G AS CO M PAN IES.

105
139

123
105
108

143
150

1891.

1892.

1893.

$ 2 ,8 8 8 ,0 6 0
8 ,3 7 7 ,7 8 9

$ 2 ,3 2 4 ,0 8 4
7 ,3 2 6 ,5 7 4

$ 2 ,4 4 1 ,9 3 8
6 ,5 3 8 ,5 a 9

$ 9 ,6 5 0 ,6 5 8

$ 8 ,9 8 0 ,5 3 7

Ask

85

Do

bom......................1
..........

175
80
40

Auction Sales— Am ong other securities the following, net
regularly dealt in at the Board, were recently sold at
auction.
By Messrs. R. V . Harnett & C o.:
Shat'es.
1 2 0 Iin p ’ t’ rs ’ & T ’ d’ r s 'N a t. B k .5 5 0

B y Messrs. Adrian H. Muller & Son :
Bonds.

S h a res.

$ 1 ,0 0 0 U lste r & D el, R R . 1st
con s. 5 s , 1 9 2 8 , J & D ............... 9 3 %
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 O liatt. R o m e , & C ol.
R R . 5 s, g u a r a n t e e d ............ . 3 5

6 6 7 G rand M eza L a n d & C at­
tle Co. o f C ol., $ 5 0 e a .$ 3 0 lo t
2 B an k o f the State o f N .Y . 11 0 %
1 7 M anh attan L ife lu s . C o .. 4 7 0
5 0 T h ird A v en u e R R . C o ... . 1 4 7

$ 2 ,0 8 9 ,5 6 4
4 ,9 4 3 ,1 0 0

T o t a l ............
$ 1 1 ,2 6 5 ,8 4 9
S i n c e J a n . 1.
O v y G o o d s........ $ 1 1 1 ,7 6 2 ,8 3 9
<Gen’ l iner’d ise. 2 7 4 ,3 6 7 ,1 7 6

100

100

........

Bid.

120
120
100 102

110

100

People’s /B rooklyn!-----

G AS C O M P A N IE S .

Bid. Ask.

7 5 T h ird A v e n u e R R . C o........ 1 4 6

following are
She imports at New York for the week ending for dry goods
.Sept. 14 and for the week ending for general merchandise
Sept. 15 ; also totals since the beginning of the first week in
■January.
and

Imports.

Since Jan. 1.

$ 2 1 9 ,4 1 7 ,2 0 0

T o t»l
I mports

Since Jan. 1.

$ 2 40,714 $27,93 6 ,2 2 8
7 00,976
7,3 3 2 ,2 3 9
1 3 ,2 90,894
5 ,2 5 8 ,6 9 4
24,218
51,323
117,066
1 ,1 3 0 ,0 2 6
50
115,464

$ 6 28,145 $69,37 8 ,2 9 2 $1,0 8 3 .0 2 t $ 5 5 ,1 1 4 ,8 6 8
7 4 '',2 1 0 5 8 ,69 ,073
52,505
6,5 3 0 .7 5 6
105,008 74 ,9 5 6 ,1 0 6 1,534,823
4,5 9 8 ,1 7 3

U. 8. Bonds Held Aug. 3 1 , 1 8 9 3 , to Secure—

C u r r e n c y 6 s .........................

'Imports.
Week.

Since Jan. 1.

m is c e lla n e o u s H e m s

'.B o n d s H e l d b y N a t i o n a l B a n k s . — The

K&smriptum o f Bondi.

.

Exports.

Gold.

S en t.

The daily closing quotations for securities, & c., at London
are reported bv cable as follows for the week ending Sept. 22 :
London.

[V ol. L V II.

$ 7 ,0 3 2 ,6 6 4

O e n ’l m er’ d ise.

* 8 6 ,7 5 5 ,5 9 0
2 9 2 ,1 9 0 ,0 6 2

$ 9 1 ,0 3 4 ,4 2 2 $ 1 0 0 ,1 1 8 ,8 7 6
3 1 4 ,9 0 7 ,8 8 0 3 2 4 ,2 3 6 ,2 8 4

fu n k in g an d fftn a u c ia l.
THE MERCANTILE NA TIO N AL BANK
OF T H E C IT Y OF N E W Y O R K ,
N o. 1 9 1 B r o a d w a y .

E b u d 3 7 w eek s. $ 3 8 6 ,0 7 0 ,0 1 5 $ 3 7 8 ,9 4 5 ,6 5 2 * 4 0 5 ,9 4 2 ,3 1 2 $ 4 2 4 ,3 5 5 ,1 0 0

The
i n our
THe
Month_’

imports of dry goods for one week later will be found
r< port of the dry goods trade.
following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
from the port of New York to foreign ports for the
ja n e , 1 8 0 2. iding September 19 and from January 1 to date:
July, 1892.
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.
A m .. 1892.
. . . . . . . . . .
1890.
3 m o s.... 40,•.
1891.
1892.
July,’ 1893. 19*085,7t o i f i S l l 'e f i O
Aug., 1893. 1 7 ,5 0 9 ,4 0 c 8 ,5 1 2 ,6 6 0
3 m o s....

$ 1 0 ,5 5 1 ,9 8 4
2 4 7 ,8 2 2 ,2 1 6

$ 7 ,1 4 2 ,2 0 6
2 7 2 ,5 0 0 ,4 0 2

C a p ita l.

-

$ 1 ,0 0 0 , 0 0 0 1S u r p lu s F u n d ,

ACCOUNTS

Samuel
1893.

$ 8 ,0 9 6 ,2 8 6
2 5 7 ,0 0 9 ,7 0 1

61.445,800230,702,308 $ 2 5 8 ,3 7 4 ,2 0 0 $ 2 7 9 ,6 4 2 ,6 0 8 $ 2 6 5 ,1 0 5 ,9 8 7

-

$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 9

WILLIAM P. 8T. JOHN, President. |FREDERICK B. SCHHNCK. Oa.Mor,
JAMBS V. LOTT, Assistant Cashier.

B AN K ER S AN D

D.

D EAL ER S

S O L IC IT E D .

D
IN

a v is

&

Co.,

IN VESTM EN T S ECU R IT IES.

NO . 4 4 W A L L S T ., N E W Y O R K .
Sa m u e l D . D a v is ,
Member N. Y . Stook Exchange.

Oh a s . B. V a n N ostr and

THE CHRONICLE.

S eptejibbr 23, 1893,]

Che B n n h e x s ’

C fe je tlje .

D IV ID E N D S .
S'ame «./ Company.

Per
Cent.

W/ieri
Payable.

R a ilr o a d s .
C h a rtiere................. ....................
Norfolk ic Southern iquar.)___
Plttsb. Youngtrths < A r t.. prof
fe
do,
do.
comm on.
Sunbury & L ew istow i)...............

B ank s.
T r u s t C o m p a n lti.

Chatham National iqm ir.).........
Brooklyn Brooklyn iqnar.;,.
Long I-Ltml f,.,vT.,KkMyiio;uai

*« iM d la u e o u t,

B rooklyn City RR. iqnar.).........
Consolidated 6 s s or N. Y.tquar.
Equitable Gas 1.. o f N. Y, Iquar.
Fultot* H an Gas, B klyiM quar.
Nas.au G as.B k’ lyu q u a r .i..,..
Journessy A Burnham, pf.iquur.
Ohio Fall* Car M(*., pt. iqaut.i
P roctor A Gamble, pref. iquar.i

Books Closed.
{Days inclusive.J

499

a moderate supply of commercial bills, while sterling loans
are falling due now, and foreign buying of our securities is
checked by the delay in repealing the silver-purchase law
To-day actual rates o f exchange were : Bankers’ sixty dava
sterling, 4 84@4
demand, 4 86Ji@4 86?4' ; cables, 4 87@

The following were the rates o f domestic exchange on Flew
York at the under-mentioned cities to-day: Savannah, buying
% discount, selling par @ Jg premium; Charleston, buying
10 Sept. 30 to Oot. 10
H & h discount, selling par; New Orleans, bank. $3 OOpremi-’
25 S e p t 16 to Sept. 25
uni. commercial, SI 50 premium; Chicago, 73c, premium
2 -----------to ---------St. Louis, 75c. premium.
Posted rates o f leading bankers are as follows :
sjsept. 28 to Oet. l
2 S e p t 22 to Oct.
2 S e p t 23 to Oct.

2
1

2 to Oet. 2
to
3 to Oct. 16
to

to
1 S e p t 21 to Oct. 2
2 S e p t 26 to Oct. 2
15 O e t
2 to Oct. 15

September

22,

S ix ty D a y s .

Prime bankers’ sw rllug bills on L ondon..
Prime eotumenslal..............................
Documentary com m ercial................
.
Paris bankers i francs)......................
.
Amsterdam (guilders) bankers...................
Frankiort or Bretnenireicbnutrkayb'nkere

D em an d.

4 87 * 4 87l«
831*

4 84.1*94 85

4 8384*4

4 S3 ® 4 83H
5 217*® 5 211* 5 18% ® 5 18%
39t5l « » 4 0
40», ,0 4 0 %
94% ® 947s
95%8954t

United States Bonds.—Quotations are as follows;

W A L L S T R E E T . F R I D A Y . S E P T E M B E R M . I S 9 3 - S P . !*I

The Money Market and Financial Situation.—Our banks
continue to gain currency rapidly anti tire Clearing-House
certificates have already been largely reduced. The turning
point o f the crisis was clearly reached on August 28th, when
the famous vote on repeal was taken in the House o f Repre­
sentatives, and although action in the -Senate ia d e la y e d to an
exasperating degree, there is no wavering or thought o f com­
promise by the friends of repeal, anti before- long the vote
must be taken, and the result is a foregone conclusion.
The BaDk of England rate has been further reduced to 'A\4
per cent, and it must be quite astonishing to our silver men
that a distressed gold country' like England can keep money
at such easy ran- that every borrower with good collateral
can get all the money tie wants at 3® 4 per cen t-y ea r in ami
year out—except in brief periods of extraordinary stringency.
Our railroads are beginning to show some improvement in
their gross earnings as compared with the returns for August
and tiic early part of this month. There w no doubt that
business will revive gradually when financial matters are set­
tled, but it is now autumn and new enterprises in the way o f
railroad building or other industrial development could
hardly lie entered into upon a large scale until the approach
of another spring.
The prices of investment bonds and dividend-paying stocks
are now worthy of attention. To those who have firm belief
that the will of a majority in the National Legislature must
ruh— this case not a bare majority but a very decided ma­
-in
jority—the future o f the country- cannot seem very uncertain,
and the merit# o f particular securities based on good proper •
ties now deserve their consideration.
The annual report* of railroads for the year ending June 30,
now coming out from day to day, are often more encouraging
m the amount of gross earnings than in the rates received for
freight and passengers and the resultant net earnings. There
has been such a constant reduction in freight rates through­
out the country for years part that it seems a* if a change
must now be inevitable, and better rates must be established
to enable the roads to earn a fair interest on their cost.
The open market rates for call loans, daring the week on
stock and bond collaterals have ranged from 2 to 5 per cent,
the average being3 per cent. To-day rates on call were 2 to
» per cent. Commercial paper is quoted at
to 9 jx c.
The Bank of England weekly statement on Tnursdav showed
an increase in bullion of *488,000, and the percentage of
reierve to liabilities, was 53-82, against 52-58 last week; the
disc mnt rate was reduced from 4 ' o 8 !^ per cent. The Btnk
of -ranee *h.,w» «n increase of I,419,0o0 franca in gold and
707.000 francs in silver.
The detailed .'latement of the condition of the ClearingHouse banks baa i**» n discontinued f ,r the present, and w II
not again he issued so long as there are any loan certificates
outstanding. The total*, however, are furnished as u- uhI.
and the ti«ure» lor lad Saturday (Sept 18) as compiled with
three of the preceding Saturday show an increase tti (be reterve held of $3,51)6,800. there being a surplus o*er the
week" * 1 r>*****
*1
°-601-7W against $2,983,325 the previous
Jw m
S t p i i®.

*
Capital ............... 60,42*2,700
S«r*»»r§.. . . . . . . . . 71.5' 4.SO'
y » ‘ m *n*i
*
392.**« ,8 0 0
12,72,.«,>o
M**-l < p H 4 # .. 377, 73,000
}*5 A S | l,,
3p*-ei*
73 4 >0.9. 0
IskmUl IttdliW .,*. 3 i.4 6 3 .2 io
lO i.r t n .I c o
L e a » t im tt v e . . .
V4,316.4l)«
B u r p im r

.

tH ffer en 'sp -m n
F r e e . m eek .

1«92

S ept, 17.

1^91
S e p t 19,

»
♦
*
....... .
60.422.71)0 60,772.700
...............
67,390 5 *0 64.06*. PW
*
Dre-.i njJi.sno *73, 1 1,5)9* 4. 4. •-9. )00
J(,e ,..,1 4 ,*,io
5,5 .xs.-O
3,601,8 >0
li,c .9 ,4 5 .“ OO 4 9 1 .-3 -.-*00 * 0 6 .3 »,4 O O
tn e .4,1 -6,000 75 71 .4 0 ) nil , h 1,0 0 1
l u e . :, n , s o o 3 2 ,. 26.900 4 .,Jl J,7f*0
f»c.8,ft06,ftiio 127.818.80 • t o o .3 >8.7vO
t e c . 8 7 I.I7 5 1*3, >30,225 10 1.019,1)0

) 0.fcO l,J00'lnc.7,6j5,325 _ 4 .9 7 3 A 7 .) _7,756,750

foreign Exchange.-Sterling e x c h a n g e h a s b e e n n o t a b ly
strong a ll Uto Week a n d prices nave advanced nut with*tumlrng the reduction in the Bank of England rate. There is only

tr2 s ,.

,reg.

-Meb. • 98

f t

* 98
*110
MU

* 93
•no
*ni

f t

* 98
*110
4s, 1907............cou p , d r t a n . *111
*111
69,onr,c y ,'9 5 ....r w :. S . A J. *102 • 1 0 2
* 10 2
*102
e »,o a r ’c y ,-9 6 ....r e g . J, & J, *104 -104 *104 *104
Be, oar’ov,’ 9 7 ....r e g . J. k J. *106
*106 * 100 *106
8s, oar'oj-,’9 8 — rear. J, Jr J. *109 *109 *109 *109
-111 ■t i l •111
Ajunia K o imoB ora wvvae inurmag ouaru ) lit, ...
H

* 98
*110
m i

98

110
111
*102
*104
*106

* 10 2

*104
*106
*109
•111
.

*109

*m<a

Government Ptm-hase# of S ilre r.— The following show s
the amount of silver purchased in September by the Govern

ment.

Ounce*
offered.

Ounces
purchased.

Previously retverted... . . . . . 1.361,000
-eiUember 15.......................
18 .....................
*
*
2 0 .............. .
470.000
280,000
T otal................................. 2,611,000

P r ic e p a id .

1,164,000
40,000

1.519,000

295,000
30,000

*

$0-7540

it

............

a

............

a

............

a ............

$0-7540

Coins.—Following are current quotations in gold for
coin*:
Sovereign*........... * 4 84 *►** 82 nnonlivor bare.. - 74 » _ 7 5
Naseteea*......... a 85 9 3 90 F ive ft .ajyil.. . . . . . — 90 9 — 9 0
v :>
:
. . . . .
: , « 4 80 Mexican aoilars. - 58% » — 39%
25'terete*........... * 75 J 4 S3 i Do unoouiiaoro’i ------» — _
8t>*n. Doubloon*. 15 55 O lS 7 ft PernrUMi *oUi......—53 » — —
Me*. Doubloon*. 15 55 » I 5 75 :Rngtt»b stiv e r .__ 4 80 -» 4 90
----------------._
H ue g old h » r * ...

p*r »■ * prem. tJ.8. tra d e d ollar* — 60

«

_

_

Slate and Kailroail Bonds. —Salesof State bonds at the Board
include only -mall lots, except $9,000 of S. C, tis, nou-fundable, at 1 ?s.
Railroad bond# have had a fair degree of activity at prices
generally easier than the best figures of last w eek / There is
a lack of animation caused by the waiting attitude in finan­
cial circles and the fear o f further delay in getting the objec­
tionable iatv wiped out. Tliere has been some small buying
of Reading income bonds, reported to be for account of New
York parties,, but it is unfortunate that the agitation in
heading matters consists altogether in criticism of the mana­
ger* without any definite proposition for other management, or
any financial plan, and such general criticism, rather personal
in character, seldom amounts to anything. In the tangle o f
Northern Pacific affairs the consol. 5a close rattier better than
Erie 2 d* were very weak to-day, clewing
at 70J^. Among the popular bonds o f the Board which
have Usually engaged the attention of investors the AtchiBon
1st I* ch>... at 73! ,'. Chen. & Otiio 4 V s at 73, Rock Island
coupon 5s at 93 -8. U*-n. Electric debenture 5s at 78, Hocking
Valley 5* at eti, Louiev. N, Alh. & Chi. consol. 6e at 95, Mo.
Ran. & Tex, 1st 4a at 77»q. Nickel Plate 4s at 94>qj Northern
laciflc 1rt 8« at III". Pittsburg & West, lfjt 4s at 79, Reading
KHirrel 4s at 8 'L , St. Louis A Iren Mt. 5s at 74, Scioto Valley
A N h. 4s at 74, Texas & I’acif. 1 st 5s at 70. To those who
have bren accustomed to follow the prices o f these and other
leading bonds in the anti -panic period, the above figure®
will give an idea of their reladve - landing at present.
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks,—The stock market is
still sluggish, waiting for the great desideratum at Washingt m. Prices have been tolerably steady, notwithstanding the
dull business, and this ia a good sign of confidence among
holders, as it shows that there ia less disposition dow to throw
stocks overboard at any little check in their upward rnoveo ent. Railroad earnings are growing somewhat better than
they were a few weeks ago, and there is little doubt that busin— activity will revive whenever the financial question is
.*
settled. The principal activity has been in Chicago Gas, Gen••rai Electric. Hisiilling A Cattle Feeding, Sugar, Western
Union, and emong the railroad- in Atchison, Burlington, St.
ja o l. Rock Island. Louisville & Nashville, Reading and New
England. The la-i named has advanced to 2 Gj.j, possibly
ln>m the negotiations for a New York terminus, and the other
stocks jpe without essentially new features. Nat. Lead was
active to-jisy, breaking from fftjfj to 25Jg on rumors o f pass­
ing the dividend. The market closed dull, with Chicago Gaa
and General Electric weak.

THE CHliONICLE.

500

[ V L.
O

LVII.

-NEW YORK STOCK E X C H A N G E — A C T IV E STOCKS fo r w e e k ending SEPTEM BER 2 2 , and since JAN. 1 , 1 8 9 3 .
H IGH EST AND LOWEST PRICES.
Saturday,
Sept 16
2 0 3f

Monday,
Sept. 18.

19
25*
3
71
*69
71
*7 4*9 76
*74%
48
43
48
109 ir y
108
16=e
16*9 lb^s
135
*130 140
83% 833.
82%

Tuesday.
Sept. 19.

Wednesday
Sept. 20.

20
19% 2 0 3.
187s 2 0 *.
2X
-2%
23j
3
*2*4
70% 70^
69
70
71
74% 74%
756 *74*4 75*i
47 78 48
48
47=8 47 ^
108
108 108 *108 109
17
17
167e 17
168
140 140
135 •132 137
833
835*8 84%
83*9 S47.

Thursday,
Sept. 21.

Friday,
Sept. 2 2 .

Sal es
o f the
Week,
Shares.

STOCKS.

A c tiv e R R . S t o c k * .
20*8 20*9 Atchison Top. & Santa F e ....
19 7» 20*.
*2 % 2 % Atlantic & P a c ific ................
*2
2%
71
71
*69
72
75
75 Canadian Paoiflc.
'74=a 75
*47*9 48*5 47% 47%
108 108
108 108
167g 1678 167a 1678
*134 138 *134 138
83% 83%
83% 84*9
;Chioago & Eastern Illinois—
92
92
•92
93%
Do
pref.
61
61%
atro M ilw aukee* St. Paul.
60*9 6 m
116% 116% 116% 116%
Do
pref.
99*4 994.
99*9 9978 C h ic a g o * N orth w estern.......

Range of sales in 1893.
Lowest.

40,880
20
315
400
925
995
1,275
512
33,796

Highest.

12ie July 31 36*8 Jan. 16
1% July 25
53s Apr. 29
5 i% July 27 977e Jan. 24
66 July 27 90% Jan. 16
31*2 July 27 58% Jan. 16
84 July 26 132% Jan. 21
12*8 July 26 26 Apr. 6
126 Aug. 16 145% Feb. 1
69% July 26 10378 Jan. 21
100 51 Aug 2 1 1 72% Jan. 25
32 85 Aug. 17 105 Jan. 23
93% 93i4
80,377 463s Ju ly 26 83% Jan. 23
60% 60=.
60% 61%
59% 61
60*9 61%
116 116
470 100 July 26 126 Jan. 23
116 116
116% llo % 117 117
6,350 84 78 July 26 11638 Feb. 1
i?9% 100
99
9 9 % 99*9 9 9 7e
98% 934,
128 Aug. 18 146 Jan. 20
Do
pref.
65% 66 Chicago R ookT sland* Paoiflc. 23,610 51% July 31 8938 Jan. 23
647e 65%
64% 64% ' £4% 643
6 4 7e 6 6
64*4 65%
3,880 24 July 29 5838 Feb. 9
34 =t 33% 34
34% 35*4
34*9 35
35
35*4 Chicago St. Paul Minn. & Om.
34
33% 34%
106 106
100 94 Aug. 23 121 Feb. 3
Do
pref.
*105 107 *105 107 *105 107 *105*9 108 *105*2 108
3 3 % 3 4 Cleve. Cinoin. Chic. & St. L ...
5,086 25 July 26 60% Jan. 23
37
35
36*s
33*9 35
36% 36%
37
36*4 36%
76 July 24 98% Jan. 30
Do
pref.
20
21
19
20 Columbus H ocking Val. &Tol.
5,310 11% Aug. 2 32% Jan. 19
-19% 20
21
19% 19%
19
19%
19
69 *
*......... 69
59% Aug. 2 73% Jan. 17
69 *......... 69 * ....... 69
*t3% 69 * ...
Do
pref.
120% 121% Delaware & H u dson..........
1,337 102% July 26 139 Jan. 27
*119 121
120 120
119 120
1195a 1195s 120% 121
6,512 127 July 27 156% Jan. 27
141% 14 L% 1405e 1403j 14 L 14L% 140% 143% 142*9 143*9 141 144% Delaware Lackawanna *W est
8% July 13 18% Jan. 21
10
10% 10%
Denver & Rio G ra n d e.......
29% 29%
871 24 July 19 57% Jan. 23
30% 30%
30% 30%
2 9 * 30
Do
pref.
29% 293j
5% Feb. 4
% July 3
*%
%
**4
% East Tennessee Va. & G a .......
**,
%
’%
1
*4 1
*8
*8 .........
*8 .........
*8 ....... .
10 June 3 35% Feb. 3
*8
15
*8 ___
Do
1st pref.
-2
5
2 July 7 11% Feb. 3
-1
*2 ___
*1
*2
5
4
Do
2d pref.
86
86 Evansville & Terre H a u te....
410 63 Sept. 6 152 Jan. 12
*83% 86
85
*83% 86
86
86
*83% 86
85
25 100 July 27 142% Feb. 7
*113 116 *112 115 *110 115
115 115 *110 115 *110 115 Great N orthern,pref..........
S2% 92% Illinois Central....................
94% 94%
6 c0 86 July 18 104 Jan. 25
92% 92%
93% 94
63
93
92*9 92*,
302
8%
5 July 25 11 Jan. 25
7*9
■7%
*7%
8
8
8
*7*9
8
7 78 7 78 Iow a Central........................
7*9
-20
22
22
50 12 J u 'y 27 37 Jan. 16
*20
*20
21
21
*20
22
*20
21
21
Do
pref.
850 12% July 27 25% Jan. 14
16
16% 16%
16
15% 16
*16
16*s
16
16
16
16%
69
69
230 53 July 31 82 Jan. 18
67% 67% * 68*9 69
*63% 69%
*68% 70
pref.
67*9 69
Do
3,124 104 July 31 134% Apr. 8
121% 122% 121 % 121% 121*4 121*4 1213a 122
120 1 2 1 %
121*9 122
90 July 27 118% Jan. 21
-93% 96
*3 3
96
*93
96
*93
96
‘ 93
97
*93
96
17,364 47% July 26 773e Jan. 21
54% 55%
54% 55
56%
5338 54*4 55
53% 56
54=8 54%
8% July 27 27 Jan. 14
14
14
14% 14%
14% 14% *14*4 15*9 *15
55
‘ *3
15
16
4 Aug. 22 27% Jan. 16
*6
8
*6%
7%
*6%
*6%
7%
*6%
8
7%
129% 130
128% 129% 128% 129% 129% 129% 129 1-29*9 128*9 129%
3,359 100 . July 26 174% Jan. 13
90
SO
90% 91 Michigan Central.................
270 7 9 7s Aug. 21 108% Apr. 8
*90% 92
90
90
*90*s 91*4
91
91
6 Aug. 3 ' 19% Jan. 14
*10% 12
850
11
11
1 0 % 1C%
11
11% *11
11*9 10% 10% Minneapolis & St. L,. tr. rects
32%
July 31 49 Jan. 16
510
M9
29
30
29
29
29
29
29
29
*29
33
Do
p ref., ir. reots
July 19 16 Jan. 25
11% i . %
11% 11% *11% 12% *11% 12%
420
11*4 11*4 *11*9 12*4 Missouri Kansas * T e x a s ___
100 133e July 27 2838 Jan. 16
19%
‘ i8% 19% *18% 19% *183 19% *18% 19%
*.834
18% 18%
Do
pref
4
3,4L4 16% July 26 60 Jan. 21
25% 26
25% 26
26
26% Missouri P aoiflc......................
26%
26% 26%
2578 2 o 7e 26
150
6% July 26 3 5 7sJ a n . 5
*13% 11
14% 14%
14% 14% *13
15
1-4*9 14%
13*8 13*8 Mobile & O hio..........................
*60% 7o
*60% 65
*60
65
83 55 Aug. 14 90 Apr. 18
*61
70
*60
65
60
62
102% 102% 102% 102% 102 102% 102% 102% 102% 103
1,846 92 July 26 111% Jan. 25
103 103
13%
9 70 July 18 20 Jan. 17
125
-13
*12
13
13
13
*12*9 13%
13% 13% *i2 % 13
100 45 July 26 78 Jan. 23
58
58
58 *
*54
58 *
58
. . 58 *......... 59
Do
1st pref.
18 July 26 41 Apr. 5
*z4
25% *22% 25
**2^ 25
*23
25% *23
*23
25*4
Do
25
2d pref.
7% July 20 26% Jan. 25
15% 16
14
15 *
4
15% 1558 14% 15
15% 13%
147s 15*4
>& West’i 10,805
150 15 July 26 58 Jan. 24
32% 32%
33% 333»
Do
pref.
16,952 16% July 31 52% Jan. 17
24
24% 23%
26
27%
25% 26%
24% 25
25
24% 26%
* .9 2 % 200 -192 199% 192*9 192*9 192*i 192*9 *190 195
220 192% Sept. 19 262% Jan. 18
193*4 195*4
8 Aug. 31 38 Jan. 24
9
10% 10%
2,500
’8
8%
8
10%
10
11%
*9
11
14% 14%
2,497 1» July 18 19% Jan. 20
14% 14%
14% 14 % 14% 1 4 * New York Ontario
Western
145g 14% 8 14% 14%
1|8 July 27 I 213s Jan. 23
I
2,190
14
14
13% 14
13% 13%
13% 13%
13=8 13=8 13*9 13*9
1
45
45
*43
44
405 a l Aug. 18 1 733a Jan. 23
45
45
44
44
44
44
Do
**5% 4o%
new pref.
9% Jan. 10
5% July 31
!oik &
16% July 19 39% Jan. 23
Do
pref.
18% Feb. 14
3% Aug 19
5,733
758 t 7 %
7%
7*2
7 78 7*8
7=8
7*9
7 7a 8
7 78
8*9
2,331 15% Aug. 16 503& Feb. 6
24
24
23*3 24%
23% 23%
23% 23%
21*9 2 3 7
fe
Do
23% 24
pref.
11 July 22 25 Feb. 1
" i7
19
*15
18
18
*15 ........ *15 ......... *15 ........ <
25 M ay 16 49 Jan. 25
i *25
*25
50
50 i *25
50 **25
50
*25
50
*25
50
5 32 Aug. 21 84% Jan. 23
~*3
47
*43
47
*43
45
45
47
*43
50
*40
50
7 Aug. 2 25 Jan. 16
50
*8% 10%
8%
-8% 10 Z *8*9 10%
8%
*8% 10%
*8*9 10
4 July 26 18% Jan. 21
307
8% £ 8*9
*o%
8*4
s* 4 :
9% = 8%
8*9
*8*9
9
*8*9
9
21,790 12 July 29 53% Jan. 25
lb% 18% 18% 18% 18% 1838 185a 19*9 18 78 19*8 19*8 1 9 V
956 11% Aug. 2 21% Jan. 24
15
*15
16
15% 15%
14% 14%
15
15
15% :
15*4 15%
25 40 July 27 62 Jan. 24
49 *<47
50
Do
*48% 52
.*48% 51
*48
51
49
*48
51
pref.
i% Aug. 10 112 Feb. 3
3,890
i338
.. * W
13*9
3%
3%
t3%
3% 3 13*4
3%
Ter*], tr. rects.
13*4
3*9
:3=s
3%
1,595 10 Aug. 24 43 Feb. 6
13
13
Do
*xb
*17
19
pref., tr. rects.
18 8 17
17 -*4 6
18
17
17
16 Mar. 16 22 Jan. 25
....................
40 Sept. 6 62% Jan. 28
Do
pref.
7% Jan. 18
3% July 31
200
*4%
5%
iOUi8
*4%
5% L*4*9
*4%
5
5
5
*4%
5*9
.
5%
6 July 26 15 Jan. 18
450
9
9
Do
*9
*8%
*9
9 % ^ 9%
9%
*S7b 9
pref.
6%
9*4
1 0 0 ' 22 Aug. 19 47% Jan. 18
*26
27
26% 26% *25*9 27
*25
28 g
*25
27
*25
27
90 Aug. 24 108 Jan. 30
*95 luO
Do
95 100
•95 100 S-95 100
-9 5 100
*95 100
pref.
104% 104% -103 107 e
lu5% 105% *103 104% *103 107
” 124 95 July 27 116% Feb. 14
*105 108
l,t>4ifi 17% Sept. 15 35% Jan. 16
18% 18%
18% 19
18% 18%
IS
18*4 S
18% 13
18*4 18*4
4% July 28' 11 Jan. 19
7%
7 % 'Texas * P a cific.
1,179
-7
7
7%
7%
*7
7%
7
7%
9
*7*9
7 Aug. 9j 40% Jan. 31
*9
10 r
.
565
9%
9*a
9%
91.*9
9
30
10
9*9
9*3
22% Aug. 29 50 Jan. 17
*25
30 r
.
*22
*22
3u
*25
30
30
*25
3o
*25
30
67 fep t. l l j 85 Jan. 7
Do
•65
7*
*65
70% *65
70% *65
*65
"4 5
75
*65
7o
pref.
15% July 26 42% Jan. 27
21% 2 1 7h 213a 21%
21% 2 l
21*9 2 17., 21*9 21*4 217e 227s 1
5 July 26 18% Jan. 16
250
*6%
7 1 •
*6
7 1
7
7
7
6
6
-6
7
6*9
5% July 3 L 12% Feb. 9
2L5
*7%
8
7%
7% 1
*7
8
*7 %
7 %
8
7*4
7V
7*9
10 July 27 26% Feb. 7
Do
15% 15%
15%
15%
15% 16
16
p r e f.1 3,36l|
le v
1538 1578 15% 15%
4l0i 10 July 26 23% Jan. 17
ellng
lo>% 13% t 13
13% 13% \
13% *13% 13%
“ 13% 13%
13% *13
45%
Do
375 31 July 27 67% Jan. 17
*43
45% *43
45% 45% *43
45s
45% 45%
45
45
pief! |
4% Aug. 16 15% Jan. 23
750
7
7
6%
6%
-7
8
1
*6*4 7*4 '
1 ir ifa c e lia n e o u B S t o c k s .
24 July 26 51% Mar. 3
34% 34%
33%
34
34% f 33
317a d
33%
3-1% 35
33% 33%
50 July 26 84 Feb. 14
1 .0 9 0
Do
68
68%
pref
69
69
68%
0 8 7e
68% 69
68*9 6 i%
69*8
141,540 61% July 31 134% Feb. 6
Suga
86%
84% 88
86%
87*9 5
88
85'*% 8 7
86
8b % 86*a 87*e
1,781 66% July 31 10-1% Jan. 19
Do
p ref.
87
87
85
85*4 85*4[ 8 5 % 85%,
86%
86%
85*9 85% 8<>
1,120 43 Ju ly 31 121 Jan. 3
75
75
76
77 |
A
77% 7 8 %
74
74
76%
74%
74%
76 %
06 75 July 31 110% Jan. 3
92
9 !
Do
*90
*90
94
pref.
*90
9u%
92
*90
93
July 31 94% Jan. 21
8 5 , 2 7 2 ; 39
58
59% C
58% 59%
5 7 ^ 6 5 S 3.
5<>78 6 0 7e x 5 » 3 s 5 9 %
5 7 5e hi
170
S% Aug. 29 25% Feb. 7
10 C
11
10
8%
8%i *9
11
10
10 1 *9
*9
1*'
6901 17% Aug. 15 72 Feb. 14
25%
*21
23%
2 5 j '24*9 26 C
24
25
26
*24
26
65%
979 108 July 27 144 Jan. 20
‘ 129 130% 128 128
1 2 8 % 1 28% 129
129
127*9 128*9 128 128*9 C
43,2861 12 Ju ly 31 66% Jail. 3
23% 24% ’L
2 l 3 o 22
2 1 % 2 2 % 22% 21
21% 21*8 20% 21%
24.849; 30 Ju ly 29 114% Jau. 16
47
46% 47%
46% 43
45% 47%. G
48%
46%
47%
4 6 78 45%
5,973 17 Aug. 25 ||147 Feb. 10
26
25% N
26=f 125% 25% ♦24
:* 5 %
124
26*91 125*9 2 6 % J?6
100 122 Aug. 23 118% Jau. 20
pref.
;b*0
60 i
67
65
*J55
65
,'55
65
:5 5
65
1 ;5 5
33.608 18% July 27 52% Jan. 21
29
29%
29% 29%
25*9 2S78 5
28% 29%
28*4 28%| 2 3 % 29%
3,632 48 July 26 96 Jau. 20
Do
pref.
71
70*9 71
71
T***. 7u*i 70% 7 0 %
71% 71%
68«% 71%
2% Aug. 16 11% Mar. 29
1,630
*5%
5%
5%
5*9 5% N
5%
*5*9
5%
5%
0*9
5*9
5V
8 Aug. 28 21% Feb. 3
10
*10% 13
*10
13
■10
12 0
*10% 13
15
12-9 1 2 % *10
8% July 27 27 % Jan. 2
2,171
15
15
15
14%
15 F
15%
15
14% 15
15%
15%l 1 5
8,000 52% Jan. 18 70% Apr. 8
*65% ___ P
64
64%.
6468
1.350 132 Aug. 1 206 Apr. 12
171 171 P
137 1 69
172 172
169 170
168 168
170 170
5,000 62 June 29 84% Jan. 14
•73% 75 8
77
74% 747e
*75
*74% 76
505 10% A ug 10 37% Jan. 14
15% T
16
14% 15% *14% 16
*15
16
*15
15*8 15*8 15
20 59 July 31 102 Jan. 31
Do
pref.
61
61
61
61
290 17 Aug. 17 60% A pr. 18
33 33 u
30
33
33
*30
35
*32
35
35
*30
35
rimon T eievran b___ 30.001 67% J n lv 26 lO l .Ian. 50
81% 82*9 8 l 7a 82% W
82*8 82*8 823s 83=6 x81=s 82*9
82*>a 82%
> ulfl
1f
.w
\
*These are bid and asked; no sale in
20
*2 %

i

,

x Ex diy.

1 Old. certs.
1

t First instalment paid,

2d instalment paid.

THE CHRONICLE

S eptember 23. 1893.J

501

XEVY YOUK STOCK E X '*if VNtlE PRICES (Continued ) —IN A C T IV E fifl’OOTS'.
’
S ep t.

I nactive stocks.
f Indicates unlisted.

22.

R a n g e (n a te s ) I n

Bid. ! Ask.

L o w e s t.

K a llr o a d S to ck s.
A lbany A S u-iu.-U nm a-----------100 155
B eilevlile < South, Hi. p ref...... 100
fc
Boston & S . T. Air l i n e p re t.. 100
10
22
Brooklyn E levated fl.................. 100
2
Buffalo Rochester A PtttJburg.lOO ! • 5% 27
76
Preferred....................................100
40
Burt. Cedar Bapltlst & Nor.........100
19%i 20 %
-Central Pacific..............................100
Cleveland ARU tsbnkg............... SO 145 ISO
6% 8
~
D es Moines & P ort Dodue------- 100
P referred...................................100 25

150

1893,

H ig h est.

Aitg. 165% Feb.

f\ In d ica tes actual sales,J
S ep t. 2 2 .

I nactive Stocks.
F Indicates unlisted.

Bia.

L o w e s t.

14
8

Toledo Peoria A Western......... 100
Toledo 8 t L . A Kansas City F........
Virginia Midland.......................100

Slay 102% Jan.
Aim. 41% Jau.
J lla c e lla u c o u * S to c k s .
37 Jan. Adams Express.......................... 100 135
75 July 86% Jan, American Bank Note Co F.............. 46
45 July 65 Jan. American Express.....................100 107
16% July 29% Jan. Amur. Telegraph A C a b le...... 100 79
4%
135 July 157*4 Jau. Brunswick Company.................100
4 July
9% Jam Chic. Juno. By. & Stock Yards. 100
22 Feb. 24 Mar
Preferred..................
100
8
5 July
14% Jan. Citizens' Gas o f Brooklyn.......100
7*4
1J i' U ti 3... s-inre A
!
A * .100
'
20
18
11 July 32 Jaa. Colorado Fuel & Iron, pref...... 100
Preferred *................................. 100
14% Sept. 23 Jan. Columbus A Hooking Coal.......100 j 9%
Flint & Fere Marunette.............100
45 Aug. 77% Jan. Commercial Cable.................... .100
Preferred.................... . ............ 100
Consol. CoaS of Maryland........ 100
...................... 100
5 July 14% Jan. Edison Electric Illuminating...100 93
<ir. Bay W in .4 St.P. t r .r * c ,...1 0 0 :
11 June 29% Jua. interior Conduit A Ins. C o .....1 0 0 .......
16
Prelerred trust recto...............lo o ; 13
3
Houston 4 T exas C entral.........100
%M
axi Laclede Gas................................ 100 1 14
2% Aug.
80 June 91 Feb.
Illinois Central leased d u es-----100
Preferred................................. 1001 55
Il% ! it) Sept. 14% Jau. Lehigh A Willtesbsrre Coal u ...................
Kanawha A M ich igan ............ . l i d ,
Maryland Coal, pref.................. 100 50
Keokuk & Des M o in e s .............lo o
30 July 28 Apr. Mictiigan-Penltisidar Car Co...100 .......
P referred....................................100
Preferred................................. loo .......
I. -aisv. Evansr. 4 b t L . Cons. 10*1
9 Atlg. 2 7 M a r .
Preferred....................................100
47% Feb. 49 J an. Minnesota Iron...........................100
14 V 13% 9 July
National Linseed Oil Co....... ...100 17
Lou. s . A. <k Chit. tr. re e 'to .. 100
16% Sept
Stationing C oal............................ 50 ....... . ......... loO Star. 100 Mar. National Starch Mfg. Co............100 . . . . .
Preferred................................... 50 ................... 1105 May 105 May New Central Coal.................... ..l o o
Ontario Silver Milling................100
7%
M exican National........................l o o
. ...............ISO A u g . 163 "Star, Pennsylvania Coal..... .............. 50 250
Morris A E ssex.......................... 50
» . Y. Lack. & Western...............100 . . . . . . i ...... - 99% Aug. 114 Jim. P. Lorulliri! Co. pref.................100
Norfolk & Southern.....................100 47
40
....... 50 June 60 Feb. Postal Telegraph—Cable F ..
4
7
3 Aus.
9% Jan. Pullman Palace Car righto..
P e o n * & E a ste rn .....................,100.
1.............1 4 0 J u i v 156
Pitts. Ft. Wayne A C hicago___100 1 4 6
l-’eb. Quicksilver Mining.................... 100
1%
30
23 Aug. 42 % Apr.
Preferred................................. lo o
Pitta. A Western jtf---------------- 30 26
1150 Aug. 179 Feb. Texas Pacific Land Trust......... 100
Rensselaer A S aratoga.............. 100; 15s 160
8%
50
Rom e Wat.A Ogdensburgb — 100 106 107 ; 09% Aug. 112% Jan. U, 8. Express..............
a t. Louis Alton A Ter. H a u te ...lo o
16
30
20 Aue. 37% May t! s. Rubber preferred
70
....... 4 5 0 July 150% Mai Wells. Fargo Express ,
ISO
Preferred................................... 100 110
•No price F rid ay ; latest price this week.
1A etual sales
93
19

2 1 % Sent.

7

142
49

134

no

May
May

1*
0

6

7
260

May
Jan.

Aug, 160

Jan.

10
55
80
1*0

120% F eb.

92% Feb.
9% Apr.
10S Jan.
93% Jan.
109 Jan.
111% Jan.
293a Jan.
185 Mar;
31 J an.
131 Feb.
71 Jan.
26 Jau.1
74% Feb |
25 Jan.
67 Apr.
106% Jan.
10078 Jan.
69% Jau.
41 Jan.
34% Jan
A ue. 11% Jan.
Sept. 19 Apr.
June 300 Mar.

82 “ Feb

00
2%

H ig h e s t.

14
17

100 "A u g.
82
65% Aug.
* June
7
80 May
93% Jan.
55 Sept.
80 June
85
5 July
ISO Feb.
26 May
30
71% Aug.
98
40 Aug.
9% Aug.
48 Aug.
60
25 Jau.
60* 55 Aug.
92% Sept.
77% Aug.
64 M ar.
60
14% July
20
6 July

10
300

in 1893.

R a n g e (sa les )

Ask.

83% F eb.

16% May

13% May
2 Mar.

3 % F e b ..)

12 Mar, 20 Feb. ,
8 July 13% Fob.
45% Aue. 70% Jan.|
51 Aug. 99 Jan.
125 Aug. 150 Apr.

N EW Y O R K STOCK E X C H A N G E U H lC K v -,VYVl7>; BONDS SEPTEMBER S 3 .
SECURITIES.

A»k.|

Alabama—Class A , 4 to 5 ____ 1906 90 100
Class B. 5 s ............................. 1906 9.4 105
C!**» C, 4 - ...............................1006 85
95
Cntrency funding 4*......... ,.1 9 2 0
90
93
A-kat .a - - 6 e .U m d .U o l l - * > 1900 12
i i. S o n H olton! ........
7*. Arkusaas Central R E ............ .
2
t e a l s h w * - " » . eons....... .........1914 108
....
X w courts. 4 s.................... 1914
90

M ssourt-F un d..............19941995 10O

SECURITIES

I

Bid.

SECURITIES.

Ask

Bid.

i
1S93 100
9 .0 . ( e o n t .) — B r o w n o o n s o l .6 8 .1 8 9 3
! North Carolina—6**, uld .......... JAJ
30
. Funding a c t ............... . ------- 1900
10
New bonds. J A J ........ 1S02 ISOS 15 . . . . .
1%
5
2
CdnsollUatBd 4 s ___ .. ......., i » i o
02 100
j 6 4 .......................... ........ .........1919 117 „***
6s. consolidated-lioude.................
6s, consolidated, 2d series, reots.
Rhode Island—6s, eou . 1893-1691 100
South Carolina—«*. naa-fumUB^S
1% 6s, deferred Put ree'to, stamped.
!%

A sk.

00
70
101
M
S
07

107**
107
70

........ 1 7

-Miscellaneous and Unlisted Bonds.—Stock Ex, prices.
S e n York Ciiy Bank Statement for the week ending June
30, 1803, to as follows. W e om it two ciphers (00) in all cases.
MlaCUlUUlPoUe Itwildn.
U *iet* IN i>*7o u * B o n4««
K
BANKS.
, - People’#
A €, I l » l g. 0a, *100 tla
8 . y tU.~"00i*ixg ,§.*|
Oo , OlUcAffo ... 52 I g. 0#, 90 b.
<
C a p ita l S u r p lu s L o a n s . S p e c i e . L e g a l * . D e p o s i t s . W W e 8001.—
(00a omitted.)
ooa. ifo.
0OL .4 HocY Co tS ..S 1. -04, it ! 95 » , : ' Plwax. V ik llc r C o a l - l a t g . 0 «
*
t
. ;\Proctor it
l #t %. 0®
. m ■■
£Uo* of Now York.
e©a*A'»ii* f 37|jia.—
l*|)g«.5«! y r b J 0 m w l » j C r # o k C o a l N i g 0s,.
840.0
2, *97.2 u .I ovj
hU&MMBB Co........
. ..... ; l V?«sMrn Union TeNgr.—* . 100 b.
1:312:8 a,m m l u : . ; , Dour, a W»4-Wfe#-—

More
.........
Moshaales*,...
America.,........
Phoalx............
C ity.................
TradossteB's..
C hem ical............... .
MerrJuutts' Kxcu'ge
e*Uatta K atie**!.,.:
Batchers'A I>roVr«'
Mechanics' A Trad'd
Greenwich..............1
Leather Manufac'r*:
Seventh National...
State of New York.
- ajarieas Exefc'ge..,
Commerce.... . — ___ .
Broadway...... ..........• 1,060,0
Mercantile,............. . 1 ,000.0
Pactflc..................
R e p u b l i c . . . . . . ------

Chatham..............

p?

8.174.0
1M 5M
470.3
3.035.0
14,489,5
2,«3S ,7

w

nm

» S ,8

a
ss

!:l l;3

158.2

u

3.101,8
i m
1.692.2
0o8»a 3.305.2
2*272,0 10.753.0

242.3

121.0

304. J

495.4
i ,244,0

.

3.064.3 18,91b*, 1 1,525.9. i,568.51

5.004.6
1.014.1
1.1
<0
5 ,4
450.0
8433
9*0,7

1.016.31

P*:»\
IM -

1.939.7
5.151.7
i , l l ; ! 13,092.4
34«,8
2.675.0

North A m t h » . ..
H aaovet.— ............

| 2 fe r r :::::.

Nassau.....................
M arket* fttU oa...
S t Nicholas............
•fhee A Leather.............. .......
Cora Exchange....... 1,000,0

C o n tin e n ta l................

471,2'

9*8,1
874.5
977$

9.084.3

2. ^70,4

4 ,1 7 “ , 1

2, 201, 1.

‘ •I?!:!

n m t.Q
Oriental...................
431.7
XtaMMeaf A Trail'*' 1.500,0 5.700.3 *v,S*p,e t.zr>
3,0
Park....................... . **00<
a 1.053,7 '
R e s t E l v e r .................
4« : l
1.007.7
FoilU.-. National.... s J w m
lu.JW.v
Central National.... *.ttm ,® * 2 f f l
nscoo-I Natter,*!,... ' M CI
p i.,7
Ninth ft athmai......
im ,o
3.060.3
First variresMii,,... - 500.0 7.940,0 3 a,<KTA3
Third National......... 1
130.2 6.010.8
3410.0
N .Y . ft at. Bxiihauge
1.490.2
im &
546.4 2.960.0
250.0
Bowery........ .

German-A aiencan... Chase National.......
Fifth Aveaae,....... .
German Exchange.,
OertnaiUa............... .
Cuitoit Burt**.........
Linooio...... ..............
Garden! ..................
Fifth N ational___
Bang of the Me tree

West aids............ .

4 7d .»l

335.0

People'*....... —

New York County..

1.979.0

385 .0

m

209.0

750,S
i

552.6
817.8

ml ill
500.0
100.0

200,0

Seaboard
Sixth National........
W iw ni Nations)., S.lOO.f)
3 0 0 ,0
n m * A . Br'klyn.

2,8(15/1 Brnria W m m r C o,

I, MM
2 ..« a ,»

fed11,8

3 1 8 .5

733,v
200.2

234.2

notK—*hn
v *

u rw f4 ;

f:Mem ^ C h n r t t H t o n — Con *7 *
* o r in o

1

5 b.

88 b.
2I b

10 b*

- T .a fo-it p r i e o i i P » vr»*k

New York City, Boston and ThilAdelphia Banks:

U5 1 ‘ 7,8
304 M l 8
403.937 1
398.780,3
445,002,5

7.675,6 S tp t 2 ..-,,
150,097,3 7,333.1 4.11*1,6033,731.4 3,S19 4 60.678.5
3,871,5
**
0 . . . . ! H4.042,!* 150/136,1) 7,323,0) 4.244,0 12', 193.9 9.058M 59,108.9
4.151,0
* 10..
*
....... ISO,.)40,1 7,»1S,Si 5,133,8 127,303.1 d ,266,2 0 9 ,0 0 1, U
2 .. 'Uffll Phlla.*
3,11*3,1) »ept. 2... . . 35.793.7 104,246,":
48.05’ ,0
83,423,0 1.074.0 39.638.5
7,170,3
41,3(8,0
91,914," 5.540.0 0 0 , 0 0 0 ,2
“
9..
....j 35,703.7 102,944,0
4..
‘09,4 ..J 35,703,7 103,370,!)i
24.778,0
7V4!>3,« 5.H80.0 61 194,0
10..
601.7 1,070,0
* lip om it i i?o cipher* in. all these totirm , f Including, lor Boaion a»4 FbUft
3,)W,0: 33.'41,0
*5,146,0 daipblA. the item “ due to other Hbxbh***

1 'J p

15,010,8

)b£S k S M A - AafcZ
[100
145

3, t9^ri
3.3*1,7

9.816,4;
4.852.-

...

%

| f Pal <
Qst
*
*,3!«).8
U gais. I Deposit*.» Ci-re'Vn
B a n k k } Sufpiusr : L m m . ! SPteU,
« •»?..'•
3.-W3,* j** York
*
t
f
s
$
10,1!S*,3
*82.017,5 AOS.' 4b,2l*S,»42.S 33,177,0.370.602,4
6.XJ7,t
H
20.. 532,C 7,9 tOi.6i>7,4 bf.»li0,9 33,831,4 .170,4 ft),b 4,740*2
B ep t 2... 132,017 S ni.>.iK!i, t.;8s,(w«.9 3».0T4,» i» : * M im
*,7*3,a
132.017,7
. 1.2 <SJ,3«0,‘l 3V..MM :<J3.7u7,T f A S M
U.-W1.B
973.460,9 31,413,3 377,27J,G 127246
“ U *.
K
2 ,5 **(

ij k i

543.5
438.0
481.1

h. W h m l. U Evfe P .O i m I - N t g 6 c

25

|’ n l U i * ? 0 B o n d s .
#•*4 E iter U »n U? g. 6«*.
M lm n Ki“i%111. O o.-N 45» . 1 0 3 t). A la , A V ic k H .—C o n s o l. 5 s „ * .
Vtcka,
g»i«isubic Q .st r.-iu tfis ... 1 88 h A 'U n U h *2. MeHd Nis«t h.».......
504.0
& C h a r i.— 1 7 . .
1.981.0 i C T
Heml«rnon Brliliro ~3at g. 0#J 0 5 U.
C o r a # to c k T a o n e l —I n n , 4 s . .
B altokvtt Is i« 4e Imp.—ir 6*! ..........
ju 1
301,5
PiiO—
2.097.0 w i t s #
M.ich.wl*«tiin. Car l«t 3». h.<... 1 ..... \iGeo. m o r e 1stc o0«i o«. .etfs . . . . . .
Kg ..
2*1
in
a
....
4
,% 5S| Matiial V a i m Tei«sf,—
b
8 * 8 ,3
*0
574.3
■S.SP1S m u t m a i Bi&rch M fg ,— ItiOn. | y b. -\ Cautol. 5st g . cild . . . . . . . . .
,’\ G H
301.3
1.677,# N on h w m m m TmU%%r»ph~-:7*.'i 100 h tB O IQ5.4. Ott*.. . . . . . . . . . . .

803.0

7,22!,4 23.350.0
3.443.0
, 108,0

L589,3

Del. a m m m , l * i 5 « ...______!

1,332,1

471.5

2,70

442,-8

292.5
795.9
29t,0

017.0
192.0
687,2
237,8

8/31 ,,
4,848,0
Soudwrn kstteasl.. 1, 0 0 0 ,0
300/2 2/258,0
k m i
Total...
m,mtjf 7i.ilmM 414.400,7 «t)iw xho.m i n #i» «9g5r
*X6T E .-S o detaiitd *tacement ha« been i m t a IU199 Vw if 19,

i ¥6
180
no
450
450
3900
400
135
100
125
240
140
0-00
2“ 00
; 'f i f

BANKS.

Bill. AS*.,

Gallatin........ 434
darflulil........
Gorman Am, U 5
German E x,,
rid
Germania.... juii
Green«rieh.. 150
Hanover.— 400
iOU Hun. Hirer,. 150
Im.&Trad’a" 540
Irving. .... .. im
Leather Mfa* 210
150
Lincoln........ ___ _
Manhattan.- 175
ITS
Markets Pul 22
t?.7
Meehatiiea’ .. NO
270
Melts’ & T r,’ 150
Mercantile.. 2J0
Merchants'.. 140
M uch’ts Ex. 125
Mcirortoll,..
M t Morris.. 450
117* ‘ Murray Hill

205
148

’ 185** 200** New Y"ork... i f

liAA'ES.

S .Y . Co’aty 605
___ 1 N.Y.Nat. E* 110 130
Ninth. ..... 110
........ UHh Ward..
N. Amorloa. 150
. Orient.at.... 220
330
Pacihc...... . ISO
Park,,........ 205 305
«oT* People's....
Phonix..— 105
175
*240
Produce Ex. .....
..... Roiuiblla,... 160
Seaboard... 173
240 Second........ 3b0
Seventh — 125
185 Shoo<& Le'th ...... 115
#6 Nicholas. ......
235
Too”
Southern...
152
Stated N.Y. 107 L15
137
100
ti Third...... —
w
175 Tradesru’u'ft
Ua’ d Staten VsT* 225
ISO** Western ... 103
W«#t Side .
235

THE CHRONICLE.

502

[VOL. LV II.

BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA AND BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGES.
E T

Active 8tocks.
f Indicates unlisted.
Atoli. T. & 8. Fe (B o sto n ). 100
A tlantic & Pao.
4
4
100
Baltim ore & Ohio ( B a lt J .100
1st p referred
4
4
100
2d preferred
“
100
Baltim ore Trac’n . (P h il.). 25
Boston & A lbany ( B oston ) .100
Boston & L ow ell
“
100
Boston & Maine
4
4
100
Central o f Mass.
4
4
100
Preferred
4
4
100
Chio.Bur.& Quin.
4
4
100
Chio. Mil. & St. P. (P h il.). 100
Chic. & W. Mi oh. (B o sto n ). 100
Cleve. & Canton
4
4
100
P referred___
4
4
100
F itchburg pref.
4
4
100
Hunt. & Br. Top. ( P h i l a ) . 50
P referred
4
4
50
Lehigh V alley
4
4
50
Maine Central ( B oston ) .100
M etropolitan TrsLO.(PhU). 100
M exican Cent ''\( .B o s to n ). 100
N. Y . & N. Eng.
4
4
100
P r e fe rr e d ....
4
4
100
Northern Central (B a lt.). 50
Northern Paoiiio (P h ila .). 100
P referred
4
4
100
Old C o lo n y .... (B o s to n ). 100
P enn sylvania.. (P h ila .). 50
Fhiladel. & Erie.
4
4
50
Phila. & Reading
4
4
50
Philadelphia Trac. 4
4
50
Summit Branch (B o s to n ). 50
Union Pacific
4
4
100
United C os.of N. J. (P h ila .) 100
W esternN. Y. &Paf P h ila .) . 100
M is c e lla n e o u s S to c k s .
Am. Sug’rRefin.H (B oston ) . . . .
P referred.........
4
4
B ell T eleph one..
4*
100
Bost. & Montana
4
4
25
Butte & B osto n ..
4
4
25
Calumet & H ecla
4
4
25
Canton Co.......... (B a lt.). 100
Consolidated Gas
4
4
100
Erie Telephone (B o s to n ). 100
General Electric.. 4
4
100
Preferred........... 4
4
100
Lam son Store Ser. 4
4
50
Lehi’h Coal&Nav. 'P h il.) 50
N.Eng.Telephone (B oston) 100
North A m erican. (P h il.). 100
W est End L an d .. (B osV n ) ___
* B id and asked prices;

20
203s
*2%
2%
.........
70

Tuesday,
Sept. 19.

W ednesday,
8ept. 20.

1878 20
20
23a
23e
70 ......... *6 9 " " V i"
1914

....... 1101 *
.........I l l
177e 177e
18
18
1818 1818
202 2021* 202 ...... 2021 * 2021 *
179 179
179 179
.........179
155 1561* 154 154
15
15
*14
15
......... 15
48
48
8314 843s 82% 83i* 83i* 84^8
603| 6 II 4
61
60% 603e 60
......... 30
......... 30
1
i*
1*
3
3
21*
3
3ie
314
79
79
791* 8 OI4 78i* 79i*
35i* *35
*35
35i4
50
*49
310s 32i*
313s 313s 313s 31i*
114 .........
114 114
114 115
93
931*
93
93i*
921* 93%
7i*
8
8
8
*8
241*
25
25
241s 241* 24
......... 63
*60
63
....... . 63

190s

2038

........ 125
.........I l l
181* I 8 I4
203 203
175 179
153 154
*14 .........
*48 .........
830a 843i
607s 6114
*34.......
334

79

4

79

*48 .........
323s 32i*
93i*
*8
25
*60

94
___
26is
63

71*
73*
7%
714
7%
23% 2378 233s 233s 23i*
172 174
173
174 174
5014
5018 5014 5018 503& 5018 50i*
......... 26
*25
*25
26
'......... 26
918 9316 9316 9%
914
9i*
93,6
82% 8214
821* 83
82
82
82i8
"51*
213s 2 1 ^
2114 22
211* 2 1 %
215s
‘220 ..... '220 i* 2221* 22114 221 % 222
41*
41*
"4%
* 41*
4 7e
*5%
5%

8
23i*
174

7i*

7%

*2 4 1 4 .......

174

174

5014

26
9H
8218
2178

222

4 78

Thursday,
Sept. 21.

Friday,
Sept. 22.

Sales
o f the
W eek,
Shares.

Range o f sales in 1893.
Lowest.

Highest.

12% July
11& 5 Aug.
H
*69
70i* *691* 72
56% July
.........125
125 130
125 Sept.
*110 115
110 Aug.
18
18
18
18ie
1,055 16% Aug.
___
2011* 202
202 203
155 195 July
179
.........179
7 1 7 0 May
154*" 154
151 153
125 130 Aug.
*14 ......... *14
110. 10% July
50
50
*48 .........
50 46 Jan.
83% 833ft
8378 84% 11,330 69% July
603ft 61
61i*
6,100 46% July
6118
26% July
960 50c. Sept.
* % .........
*%
4
4
4
4
2,552
2% Sept.
79i* 791* 79
79i*
253 69 July
35i* 3515 *35
100 29 July
*49
50
*50 ___
46 Aug.
321* 327s 327g 33
1,911 293s Aug.
23 112 Aug.
94i* 943ft 94
94i*
1,833 69 Aug.
146
*8 ......
5 June
734 7%
6,262 17 July
26
27
257s 26
62
62
25 44 July
......... 63
*67% 681*
66% July
830
5,288
8
8
8
3 78 Aug.
*233ft 24
*2338 2 3 70
616 15% Aug.
174 174
35 165 Aug.
1,543 46% July
5014 501* 50% 50%
200 23 Aug.
*25
91* 9 io ;e 295s 91516 14,300 61,6 July
82i* 82%
82
82%
1,482 58 Aug.
5 July
5,124 15% July
21% 2 158 21 % 22 %
x220 220
220 ...
48 216 Aug.
41*
4%
4%
41*
1,590 3 h July
s

36% Jan.
4% Jan.
97% Jan.
135 Feb.
122 Jau.
29% Jau.
227 Feb.
200 Feb.
178 Jan.
22% Feb.
62% Feb.
103% Jau.
8338 Jan.
49% Feb.
6 Feb.
19% Feb.
95 Feb.
40% Jan.
56 Jau.
62 Jan.
130 Feb.
150% Jan.
13 Jan.
52 Jan.
102 Jan.
70% Jan.
18% Feb.
50% Feb.
221 Feb.
55% Jan.
35 Jan.
267s Jan.
142% Feb.
9% Apr.
42% Jan.
232% Mar
7% Jan.

10
14
27
13
18
24
6
6
26
14
14
21
23
S
3
3
6
12
9
27
6
2&
16
17
13
23
6
0
6
27
16
2
&
12
27
13
24

Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jau.
Jan.
Jan.
Apr.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

6
19
27
16
17
21
18
10
16
16
18
20
2
20
23
4

1978 2014

1978 20i*

31,782

865a 873s 26,309 62 July
851* 87
847e 873*
8634 8814
86 i0 8714
86
86
85
85
1,447 66% July
85i* 8578 85% 86
86
86
189 189
18 91 190
*
1881* 190
189 189
190 191
91 166 July
21&8 2l3i
21i* 2112
21i* 217e 22
22
1 ,210 15 July
21% 223e
2 1 78 2 1 78
838 81*
1,740
5 Juiy
8i*
8i*
838 830
8
8%
814
8 i*
8%
8%
•
v277 ...
24 247 July
r
277 .. .
276 276
280 280
276 278
277 277
*55
63
65 May
56i* 56i* *56
56is 56°g
57i* 57i*
57
56% 57
267 50 July
57
57
41
41
41
41
41
41
4034 41
41
41
........ 41%
48 36% Aug.
45% 47%
5,446 33 July
473s 473e 463a 47
46i* 4714 4634 48
47% 48
*70
80
73
73
*70
75
*70
80
*70
80
15 44 Aug.
*70
80
19
19
*1814 . . . .
220 12% July
1914 *1814 19
I 8 I4 I 8 I *18
4
18% 18%
50
49
49
497q 49 7e
*481* 51
491s 4 9 7s 4934 4978
48 46% Aug.
*50
52
52
*50 ___
53
53
*50
52
52
13 47% Aug.
53i
5i*
5i*
534
5%
*5%
6
5i*
5i*
2 7e Aug.
435
5%
*5%
133b 131*
9% July
1338 1338 *13% .
133a 13i*
14
*13% .....
14
875
no sale was made.
87
88
87
87
1881*190

Inactive Stocks.
P rices o f Septem ber 22.
A tlanta & C hanotte (B a lt.).1 0 0
Boston & P rovidence (B oston ).1 0 0
Camden & A tantic pf. (P h ila ,). 50

Bid.

250
20

4
4 50
Catawissa.......................
1st preferred.........
4
4
50
2d preferred...........
4
4
50
CMitral O bio.............. (B a lt.). 50
Chari. Col. & A ugusta
4
4
100
Connecticut & Pass. (Boston).100 |120
Connecticut R iv e r ...
4
4
100
Delaware & Bound B r.(P toto.).1 00
Flint & Pere M a rq ... (B oston ). 100
45
P referred......................
4 100
4
80
Har.Ports.M t.Joy& L. (P h ila .). 50
Kan. C y F t . 8. & Mem. (B oston ). 100
P referred .....................
4 100
4
K. City Mem. & B irm .
4
4
100
62
L ittle Schuylkill....... (P h ila .). 50
M anchester & L a w .. (Boston). 100
Maryland Central—
(B alt.) 50
Mine H ill & S. Haven (P h ila .). 50
65
51
N esqu ehon ingV al....
4
4
50
Northern N. H ............ (B oston ). 100
North Pennsylvania. (P h ila .). 50 79
Oregon Short L in e ... (B o sto n ). 100
8
Pennsylvania & N .W . (P hila.) 50
R utland.................... (B oston ). 100
Preferred.................
100
Seaboard & R oanoke. (B alt.) 100
1st preferred............
“
100
W est E nd...................... (B oston ). 50
57%
Preferred.....................
4
4 50
7e
W est Jersey..................(P h ila .). 5<
West Jersey & A tlan.
*'
51
Western M aryland..
(B a it.). 5<
Wilm. Col. & A ugusta
4
4
101
Wllmingt’nA Weldc n
4
4
lOo
Wisconsin Central. < oston 1 . lo o
B
Preferred . . . . . . .
*
•
10<
W oro’et.Naph.&Pmh.
“
lOo
mfh < k l i . a. n e o
j

S h a re P r ic e s — n o t P er C e n tu m P r ic e s .

M onday,
Sept. 18.

Saturday,
Sept. 16.

0 8.

A llon ea M ining....... <B oston \. 2r
Atlantio Mining.......
“
2f
V 'iy PassengbJ H R ..
(B a lt.). 2 f
B *y State Gas----------- (B oston ). 5<
“
10
Boston Laud.................
C m ten nial M in in g ...
4
*
lc
Fort V. ayue EJeotrict
4
4
2f'
FraDkiin M in in g ....
4
4
25
FreDchm’n’sB ay I.’ nd
4
4
5
H »ron Mining................
4
4
20
II inois Steel ..............
• 100
*
K ^arsarge M ining....
4
*
2ft
M t ip - anal guar. 4. (Phila. 1.100
Preferred guar. 10
“
100
Osieola M iniug.. . . . . . (Boston,). 2«
P liman Palace Car..
10 (
Q Inoy Mi m ug_____
4
4
2f
T>Tiarack M ining...
“
2.f
c
T h o n i.E u ro p .E Weldt>
4
4
1C*
Uaiteu Ga** Im pt
(Phil.,).
W»tOT
**
■

*35
s%
*9
3%
2%
4%

’ **6
i6 %
It 9
105
UO

Ask.

Inactive stocks.

Bid.

Ask.

21%
W esting. E lectric___ (B o sto n ). 50
B o n d s —B o s t o n .
At.Top.& 8.F.100-yr.4g.,1989, J&J
25
2d 2%-4s, g., Class A . .1989, A&O
Burl. & Mo. R iver E x e n p t 6s,J&J §t....... 110
50
N on-exem pt 6s.............1918, J&J
50
Plain 4 e.......................... 1910, J&J
52
Chic. Burl. & Nor. 1st 5,1926, A&O
2d m ort. 6 s................1 9 1 8 , J&D
Debenture 6s.............. 1896, J&D
Cbic. Burl. & Quincy 4 8.. 1922, F&A
Iow a D ivision 4s....... 1919, A&O
Chic.&W .Micb. gen. 5s, 1921, J&D
50
Consol, o f Vermont, 58.1913, J&J
Current R iver, 1st, 5 s ..1927, A&O
Det. Lans.& N or’n M. 7s. 1907, J&J ....... 90
Eastern 1st m ort 6 g ...!9 0 6 , M&S
I ree.Elk. &M. V .,lst, 68.1933, A&O
UnBtampedlst, 6s----1933,A&O §.......... 116
K.C. C.& Spring., 1st, 5g.,1925, A&O
K C. F .S .& M . con. 6s, 1928, M&N \ 85
K.C. Mem. & B ir.,1st,5s,1927, M&S
K.
C. St. Jo. & C. B ., 7 s.. 1907, J&J
L. R ock & Ft. 8., 1st, 7 s .. 1905, J&J $ 82
Louis.,Ev.&St.L.,1st,6g. 1926, A&O
10
2m., 5—6 g ................. 1936, A&O
50
Mar. H. & Out., 6s....... 1925, A&O
Exten. 6 s................... 1923, J&D
M exican Central, 4 g . . . 1911, J&J
74
1st consol.incom es, 2 g, non-cum.
2d consol, incom es, 3s, non-cum.
58* N. Y. & N.Eng,, 1st, 7s, 1905, J&J
106
1st mort. 6 s................. 1905, J&J
2d in o n . 6b....... ......... ly 0 2 , F&A
100
55
Ogden. &L.C., Cou.bb. ..1920.A& O
16*
L u o .6 s...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 9 2 0
Kuilauu, 1st, bn............ 1902 d&>
2d, 5n........................... 1898.E&A
*6%
B o n d s .—P hilaciel m ia
„ ,
Allegheny Vai.,7 3 10s,
J&J 101%
Ai lanlie City 1st 5b, g.. 1919, M&N ........ luO
Belvidere Del., 1st, 6 s ..1902, J&D 109
1 12
•50
Cata^ibsa, M., 7b____ .1900, F&A
y
CleartieiO &.)et).. ls i, os. 1927, J&J 112 l i o
Connecting. 6 b ......l9 0 o -0 4 , M&S
Del. & B’d Br’k, iat, 7s. 1905, F&A 120**
E***iou& Ain. lstM .,5b.ly20 , Al&N 102 IO j
El in 11. & Wilm., 1st, 6 b .1910, J&J-j 1 »*
Hunt. & B i‘d Top,< :oD.f>B_'95.A&0! 100
Lehigh N a v .4 % 8 ......... 1914, %—J lu 3 % .........
2d 6s, g old ...................1897, J&D 107^ ------0 *>
General m ort. 4%s, e .l9 2 4 .Q --F l .........l o t
. . . . . . Lehigh Valley, 1st b s ... 1898, J&D 10 a -* lOo
2d 7b........................... 1910,M &8 laft
Coiibol. 6 ......................1923, J&D l i 7 l
le d
North Fean. 1st. 7b___1896, M
.&.N l o »
2 6 % ' Gen. M. 7s....................1903, J&J 122
i r 1 , Penunylvania gen. 6s. r ..l9 io . Varl
.
•l o 1 Cnu-J .Oh,t
o
......... 1905, VpxI 1*5
145
CoDbm. OS. r . ............... 1919, V«T 113
Ctdial. T i. 4% g .......... 1913, J & I 'I ........
Fa a N. 'i • a n a l,7 » ... 1906,J&V .......
ti
y e , . . . k 1 090
1 ...

. 1.4.U «cL iu tii inteitbL.

1 L a s t yrice thl« w eek.

134%
104%
212
34%
12
320
72%
65
50%
114%
119
26%
54%
61%
11 %
18

Bonds.
Perkiom en, 1st ser .,5 s .l9 1 8 , Q—J
Phiia.&Erie gen. M. 5g.,1920, A&O
Gen. m ort., 4 g .......... 1920, A&O
Phila & Read, new 4 g., 1958, J&J
1st pref. incom e, 5 g, 1958, Feb 1
2d pref. incom e, 5 g, 1958, Feb. 1
3d pref. incom e, 5 g, 1958,Feb. 1
2d, 7 s............................ 1893, A&O
Consol, m ort. 7 s ......1 9 1 1 , J&D
Consol, m ort. 6 g .........1911, J&D
Im provem entM . 6 g., 1897, A&O
C on.M .,5 g.,stam ped,1922,M&N
Phil. Read. & N. E. 4 s ............. 1942
Incom es, series a ‘. ................ 1952
Incom es, series B ..................1952
Phil. Wilm. & Balt., 4 s. 1917, A&O
Pitts. C. & St. L., 7 s . ... 1900, F&A
P o’keepsie Bridge, 6 g . 1936, F&A
8chu yl.R .E .S ide,lst5 g.1935, J&D
Steuben.&Ind.,lstm .,5s. 1914, J&J
United N. J., 6 g ............ 1894, A&O
Warren & Franh.,lat,7s,1896,F&A

Bid. Ask.
100
99

ii’i
100
68%

33% 3414
22% 23
17% 18
107 107*8
123
102
89
45
20
10

104
90

111%
io s
102% 104
102

Atl!n°tn i c l f r f ! tLn! ? 8f l 9 0 7 , J &J
ad
r
115
Incom e 6s....................1900, A&O
100
Baltimore Belt, 1st, 5s. 1990, M&N
97>»
Baltimore & Ohio 4 g ., 1935, A&O
100
Pitts. & Conn., 5 g ...l9 2 5 , F&A 107%
Staten Island, 2d, 5 g.1926, J&J
Bal.&Ohio S. W .,lst,4% g. 1990, J &u lu 4 105
CapeF.&Yad.,Ser.A..6g.l9L6, J&D
90
denes B .,6 g ...................... ..1 9 1 6 , J&D
90
Senes C., 6 g ................ 191b, J&D
90
Cent. Ohio, 4% g .......................1930,M&S
92
Chari. Col.&Aug. 1st 7s. 1895, J&J
I0u%
Ga.Car. & Nor. 1st. 5 g .,1 9 2 9 , J&J
85
8«>%
Nurth. Ceut. 6r................ 1900. J&J
111
6s....... ............................ 1904, J*suJ
I 14%
Sene? A. 5 s...................lp*2 b, J&J
109
4 % s...........................1 9 2 5 , A&O
Piedm.&Cum., 1st, 5 g . 1 9 il, FotA
FiLLb. & Coun«llu. 1st 7b. 1.898, J&J 108 109
Virginia Mid., 1st 6 s ...l9 0 b , M&8 107
109
2u denes. 6 s..................1911 M.&8 107 109
3d rteneb, 6 s .. . . . . . . . . 1 9 lo , M&8 luL
4th Series, 3-4-5s. ...1 9 2 1 , M&S
6th Sernas, 5 b.............. 1926, M&S
93
West Vu. < 1
Ibt, 6 g .1911, J&J 103
104
WeKt’ *. N.O. consol. 6 g.1914, J&J
Wilm. Col. & Aug., 6 s.. I9lt», J& l)
MISOtLL.ANb.oUb.
Baltimore—City H all6s.l9O 0, —.J
F u n d in g 6 s..................1900, Q—J
West daryl’d HR. 6s..i90*2, J&J
Watei 5 s .. . . . . . . . . . . . 191o, M&N 117% 118
Fuudiug 5 s ........... ...1 9 1 6 , M&N ......... 18
Exchange 3% s............1980, J&J
99% 100
Virginia (State* 3s, i>ew. 1932, J &J
6 %
bo%
Chesapeake u a s. 6 s ....... 1900, J &D i o n * 106
CousoJ. Gas, 6 s . . . . . . . ...1 9 1 0 , J&t* lO a % ---- 5 s ....................................1939. JJ ,/
98
LO
U
108% .....

S eptem ber 23, 1893.]

THE CHRONICLE.

508

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES (Continued.l-ACT/rfi BONDS S E P T . 2-2, A N D FOE T E A S 1S93.
C lo sin g R a n g e ( s a l e s ) in 1893..

R i n .B.-uii as k Misc SL. B omBBi I n te r 3** P r i c e

t e r to d . S e p ‘ .'12
.

L o w e s t.

O to s’ n g R a n g e (s a le s ) i n 1893.
P r ic e
P erioMl. S e p t 22
d .I
L o w e s t.
H ig h e s t.

iRailroad and M iscel . B onds . I n te r ’

B iy lie s L

Pae.of Mo.—Sd eAten.5e.193s
& J‘ 104%b. 103% July 108% Jan.
A lter. Cotton O il,deb,, 8 * .}9 0 g
F , 109’-!, 101 Aug. 114% Jan.
A D 109 b. 108 Sept. 1 1 5 % Apr
33% Feb.
Mobile A Ohio—New, 6 g ..l9 2 7
A t.r o o .A 8 .F .-1 0 0 -y r „4 g .l9 8 9 J d» 3 73%
83% July
44 July
57% Jan.
; General m ortgage, 4 s..,1 9 3 s 2 I- 8 51
63
Jan.
29 July
2d 2 %-4a, *., Cl. * A” ___ 19*9 A A O 42%
*
57 Jan.
Nash. Ch. A S t -t a -le t , 7S.1913 J & J 125
117 Aug. 130 Jan.
50 May
100-year income, 5 g -----.1939 dept.
57%
A & O 103
101% M ay 105 Feb,
. Con., 5 g ............................ 1928
50 Aug. 71% Jan.
AtL A F ac.-Q u ar,4. * . — 1937 . . . . . . . .
97 Aug. 103 Mar.
11% Jan.
N .Y .Cent.—Debt E x t .,4 s .1905 M & N 100
5 May
W.D. toe., 6 s .................... 1910 J & J • 5%b.
1st, ooupon.7s.................1903 J A J '1 2 0 b. 116 July 124 Feb,
B rooW a Elevat'd l e t ,6 ,ft .I M A A A O' 109%a.:100 Aug. 120% Mar.
D eben.,5s. coup., 1834..1904 M * 8 102 b. 101 Aug. 108% Jan,
Can. SoaUt—1st, 5 s ......... 1308 I . *£ * 104%a. 99 July 107% Feb.
J
N. Y. A H a rlem -76 .reg. 1900 M & N ’ 116 b. 114% Aug. 119% Feb.
93% Sept. 103% Jau.
2d,S s................................1 9 1 3 M A S 97%
Feb.
K. W. A O «d .-C o n ., 5 a ..1922 A & Oi’ ll O b. 103 July i l o
f 35% Aug. 70% Jan.
C ent-G A —S.& W. latoon.5*.*29 . . . . . . . . *38
89% Aug. 99% Feb.
N. Y. Ohio. A St. L.—4 g-.-1937 A ,fc 0 94%
Central o f S . J .—Coua.,7s-1899 i Q—.
J il2 % b . n o % Aug. 116 Star.
105 July 111% Jan.
May 122 Feb.
N. 3'. Elevated—7s...............1906 J A j n o
Consol., 7 « ........................1902 M A N 113%b, l i s
N .Y . U-ok. A W .- ls t , 6 a..1921 J * j 1 2 1 b. 117% Aug. 131 Feb.
General m ortgage, 5 f ; - } » § 7 J & J I08% b.;i02 A U g . 112% Apr.
----i Construction, 5s...............1923 F A A 105 b. 107 June 114 Jan.
Leh. A W. B „ eon. ,7 s, as d . 1800 Q—-M - 1 0-1 h. inn Sept, 110 Jan.
<
100 Apr.
B t.Y .U E .A W .-lat,oon.,7g.l920 M & 8:129
120% .-Vug. 139% Jan.
July
do. m ortgage, 5 a ...... 1912 M * 5
53 July 105 Feb.
; 2d consol., 6 g ..................1969 J A D 70%
Aug. 109% Feb.
A x . Dock & tusp.,5*---- 1921 J A: J*
Central Pacific—Gold, 6 s .. 1898 1 & J
101% Aug. 109% Jan. I 1 Long 1hick ConsoL,6 * .. . 1936 V * O 115 b. 122 Jau. 125 Feb.
76 Aug. S6% Feb.
S. Y. O . A W.—Ref. 4s, g.. 1992 M A 8 81
110
Sept. 113 Feb.
Ches. A Ohio—M ort.,6 g ..} 9 U A A O
90 Aug. 106 Feb. • Consol. 1st, 5 * ................ 1939 J A D * L01 b. 97% Aug. 108% Jan,
le t consol., 5 ...................1939 M A N
98 July 107% Mar.
S en. A%s, g . . . ................. 1992 M A 9
01% Aug. 35% Feb. ;N.Y.Sus.AW.—ls tr a f.,5 *.1937 J A J 104
K .A A .D ir.,lM eO D .,21g. 1989 J A J
Midland of .V. J.. 6 < ....1 9 1 0 A A 0 112 b. 107 Aug. 120% Mar.
70 Aug. 32 % I’ -:,.
Serf. A W .-100-year, 5 *.1990 J A J ............ 81% May
90 Jan.
do 2d c o m ,4 * ...1 9 8 9 J A J *73 .
68 Aug. 30 Feb.
91 Jan.
E U m U x .A B l* 8 » m -5 * .1 9 0 2 M A S 91%
38 Sept. 101 Feb. 1 Md-AWanh. D tv,-let.5 g.1941 J A J ............ 80 July
100 Aug. 118 Feb,
O d e , Bari. A Q.—C on .,7«. 1903 J A J 117%b. 109% July 121% A p r . , N orth .Pam—1st,coup.,6*.192S J A J 107
.
|
General, 2d, coop., 6 *..1 9 3 3 A A 0 92 b. SO Aug. 115 Feb.
D ebenture,5i...................1913 M A N 94%b. S3 Aug. I02% Jan .
Convertible 5s................. 1903 M A s lo o
89% July 108% Jan. : . General, 3 d ,coup., 6 * .. 1937 J A D 71 b. 60 Aug. 108 Feb.
24% Aug, 74 Feb.
Denver Division, 4 »....... 1922 V & A SO o. 87% Sept. ; 94% Jan. i j Consol, tuort., 5 g ............ 1989 J A D 35%
93 June 95 July
N ebrarta E xtension,4s. 1927 M A H S3%b. 79% Aug. 1 88% Jan. ;
Col. tr. gold notes, 6 a ... 1898 M A N .........
35% Aug. 80% Feb.
Chic. A £ . IU .-ls t,s .f..6 a .l9 0 7 J A _ 112
Chlo. A S . P . - l k t , S k — 1940 A A U 43
103 Aug. 116 A p r .'
Consol..6 * ........................1934 A A O 116
116 Sept. 123% Mar. j North. Pac, A Mon.—6 e .. .l 9 3 8 M A S 48 b. 50 Aug. 89% Feb.
93 July 104 Feb.
General consol. 1st,5*.. 1937 M A S
93% Aug. 103 Apr, ! ;North. Pao. Ter. C o . - 0 g . . 1933 J A J . . . .
C h t o » * o A E r ie -ls l,& * ...1 9 8 2 M A N
37 July 103% Feb. 1 OhioAMlss. —C ons.s.f.,7s.1898 J A J 105 %b. 102 Aug. 112 Fob.
Incom e, Ss........................1982 Oet’b'r 3o u. 20 July
44% Jan. : I Consol., 7s........................1998 J A J I05%b, 103 Aug 110% Mar.
O d e . G as L. * C .- I * t ,5 i t .l 9 3 7 J A J 82%
70% A tig. 92% Keh. lOhioRouthern—1 st,6 * ...1 9 2 1 J A D 10U%b. 98% Ail*. 109 Jau.
C kte.M U .A S t-P .-C on.7s.1905 J A J * 122 b. 119 Aug, 129 Apr. ! 1 General more., 4 g .......... 1921 M A N ’ 19 b, 40 Aug. 64 Jam
.
107 b. 103 AUg. 114% Apr. I [Omaha A BE.L ouis—4 g . . . 1937 J A J ............ 60 Feb.
68 Jam
1st, Southwest Dir., 6«. 19090 A
109 t> 108 Aug. 116% Feb. : Oregon Imp. Co. -ls t .6 g .1 9 1 0 J A D -97 a, 90 Aug. 105 Feb.
.
lat.Ho. Min. Div,. 6 s ....1 9 lo J
32 Aug, 67 Fab.
107% 103 Aug. 112 May . Consol*. 5 g ....................... 1939 A A 0 48
l*l,Ch.AP*e.W .DSv„ 5 s .1921 J
*100 b. 97
C W e.A M o.R lv.D lT ., 5a. 1926 J
Aug. 105 Apr. ; G r e .R -A N a v .C o .-ls t.6 g .i9 0 9 J A J 1 0 2 b. Oil Aug, 112 Mar.
81 Sept. 94% Feb.
. 10$%*. 93 July 103 Apr. ; , Consol..5 g ......................... 1925 J A D *81
W ls.A M lu a .D lv ., 5 g ..l» 2 1 ;J
J 105 b. 98 July 109 Jane j T ttasylvarita— Is. e .......1943 M A N . . . .
102% July 103 July
Term inal,5 g ...................19 U .J
*»4%m 86 July
S en. M< * *.» *«*
A— *
PA C o.—4% g., oou p on
1921 J A J 107 b. 102 July 110% Apr.
95 Apr.
UD“* “*., 4 «• series **...- 1989;J
|•
107 b. 105 Aug. 115 Feb. J P«>. Deo. A Kvansv. 0 * ..1 9 2 0 J A J *100
100% May 104 Mar.
MR. A Nor.— t, oob., 6s. 1
-U
CWo. A f». fir. -C o n so l., 7 s ..19151 % ~ F KM b. 120 Sept. 138 Jau.
Evansville Dlv., 6 * ....1 9 2 0 M A
95 a. 89 July 105 Feb.
,
2d m ort.,5 g .....................1926 M A N
Coupon, gold, 7 « .............19021,1 A ' (> 120 l> 117 July 123 Mar.
50 Aug, 72 Feb.
59% Aug. 88% Jam
Staking fu n d ,6 a .. . . . . . . .19291 a a O S U 3 b. 109 July
Phil*. A Read.—Gen., 4 g-1958 J A J 08%
Fob.
Sinking fund, 5 s..............1929 A A O ............ 100 Atsg.
1st pr«f. Income, 5 g ........ 1958
34
20 Ju ly
76% Jam
Jau.
14% Aug. 70 Jam
Staking fund d eben „5 ».1 9 3 3 M A N it00
2d pref. Income, 5 g ........ 1958
23
104% July ,112 Feb,
R
U
July
62% Jam
85-year debenture, 5 ... 1809 M * KjlOO b. 100 June 10 6 % Mar.
3d prof. Income. 5 g ........ 1953
*
A
72 Aug. 88 Apr.
Extension. 4s...................1926 F A A 81
90 Aug. i 98 Jau. | Pittsburg A Western - 4 g. 1917
A
Feb.
106 %b. 102 Aug. I l l
93 Aug, 100 Mar. ! Rich, A Daev. -C o n .. 0 g .. 1915
Calc. Pec. A 6 t.L g ta is-5 g .1 9 2 s M A n 94
c m . H.I.A Pae.—6 * ,o o a p . 1917 J & JT.-O b. m
172 I). 60 All*. 78% Mar.
July 123 Jau. ! Consol.,5 <......................... 1936 A A
Extension and c o l.,5 * .. . 1934 J A J 93%
83% Feb.
150 b. 140 Aug.
sa July 101% Feb. 1Rich. A W .P.Ter.-Tru«t,6g . 1897 F A
80-year debetu. 5s.......... 1921 M A rt' 90
Bcpf. • 97% Feb. j Con. l i t A 00 L trust, 5 g . 1914 M A S 1 23% 115% An*. 52 Feb.
'
Okie. 8t. P .M . A O .—6 s . . . .1 9 3 0 3 A W i S i
51 Aug. 78 Feb.
Aug ,123 M»r. SRto O. Western—1st, 4 g . . l ’J3a:J A J 66 1
C leveland A Canton—5 . . .191’ J A .1 ss i ■ i s H
74 S e p t.; 96 Jam
92% Apt, (8L Jo. A Or. Island—6 g,.1925JM A T», 70
C. C.C. A I.—C onsu l.,7 *.1914 J * 1 1 1 1 5 1 118 May 119 May
b. 95 All*. 103% Jam
8t h . A Iron ML 1st e*L 3».*97'F A A 99
General consul., 6 « ....... 1M34J & J 112 1 U S Aug. '132% Feb.
2d, 7 g ................................ 1897 M A N* LOm b . 94 Alt*. 109 Apr.
a C C .A S t .U -P e o .A E . 4 s .1940 A A O 70
Cairo Ark. A T eka*. 7 g .. 1897 J A D *100 a. 95 Sept. 104% Mar.
58 Aug 79 Jan.
Inoome, 4 s . . „ ................... 1900 April.
16• 12 Aug. 20% Jau.
Gen. R‘ y A land g r .,5 g ..t » 3 ! A A O 74
1). 60 Ait*.
90% Jan
OoI.Coat A Iron—6 * ........ 19001F * a ! 95
b.100 Au*. 114% Apr.
81.1., A San F r .-fl «,,C L B .1 9 0 6 M A N 106
Aug. 100 Jan.
Ool. M idla n d -C on ., 4 g ...l 9 4 0 F A A 40
106
b.100 Au*. 114% Apr.
Aug. : 67 Jau.
8 g.. Class C.....................1906 M A N
Ool.H. Val.ATol.—Con.,5g. 1931 M A a 86
General mart., 6 * .......... 1931 J A J 103
b 99 Au*. 111% A p t
74 Aug. I 94% Jau.
General, 6 * . . .....................l .f '4 J A U 88 b. 82% Aug.
a. 50 A u*.
68 Apr.
99 Apr.
Bt. 1* So. West.—1st, 4s. * ..1 9 8 9 M A N 6 0
Denver A R toG .—ls t .7 g 1 9 0 . M A N112 b. 112 July 119
2d. 4s, g., In com e............ I.)-,.* I A J 1S%«. 12 July ; 28% Feb.
Apr.
l* te o n »o i,,4 g ............... .1933.3 * _
js F .M .A S .-D a k . E x., 8 g .l9 1 0 M A N U 3% b. 109% A 11*. 119% Apr.
. ........................
_
j ; 74 b. 71 Juiy 88%
Feb.
p e C R .a t y A A r p e n a -0 g .l9 1 3
J A
J * 6 0 a. 6 0 S o p l 71
Jan.|
a.I l l Ail*. 123% Mar.
1st consol,, 6 g ................ 1933 J A J 113
p et.M a c.A M .—L-d g r a n t».1 8 ll
A *
Oi 2 2 %b. 20 June 40
J.m.
1
do
reduced t o 4 % g .. J A J 98 %a. 07 Au*. 103% Apr,
—
’
p a J .a o .8 h .A AU.—5 g ....lB 3 7 J A
J- 92%
90 July 103
Apr.
! Montana Extension, 4 g .l» 3 7 J A D 85 %b. 79 Au*. 91 Jam
76 Mar.
E .ren n .Y A G .-C o m . 5 g . 1956
M A
N 86 b. 81 July 94
Ap A
67 July
[San A. r ..Aran. F ,—1st,6 g . 1916 J A J
Knoxville A Ohio, 6 g .. . 192.5
j A
J 100 a 92% Amr. 104% s 1st,Feb. g !. .....................1943 J A J fto
l g.
52 Aug. 60 A U g
A A 50 %b. 40 Au*. 92% Jam
;9e»tue K B .A fe .-lst.g u . 0. 193 1 F
J 4
11 8 l *«
66 Aug. 101
Apr.
G a L H .A ».A n .-M .A F .D .lst,5 g .
M A
N 0 1 a. 92% A lit-. 97%
Feb.
99 Apr.
See'ty C orplN , Cord.) 1st eon.iis.M A N 72 n. 70 Muy
Han.A8S. Joe.-C on a.. 6 s.lV U
M A
8
l l u b 106
Aug.
Bo.Car. - 1st, 6117% Feb.; p . 1 9 2 0 ............ | 95 b. 105 Moy 100 Feb.
g .,ex cou
Hous.A Tex.C.—Gen. 4s, g. 1921
A A
O 60%a., 59
Aug.
Apr. 100% Jan.
60 . 70 Jan.A r iL — g .......1009-10 J A J <t o l a 97
Fao., .
6
U llnou cen tra l—4 g ...........1952
a A
0.1 00%
«9 % A us. 105Mar.ft.,. Partite, Cal.- -6 ,g. . . ... 1805 12 , A A O 108 -.1 0 7
A u*. 1 16 Feb,
..
U
.
. . . . .
.
Ian A 0 4 No.—1st, 6*. .1919
MA
S
HO hJ 100
July
.113 Apr.
97% Jam
lst.fton»oL ,*a!d, 5 * . — 1938 A A O 93%
93 Apr.
2d 4%-5*.......................... 1909 H A ft! 5 8 ......................
—
b-: 50 July
72% "
Fen. j 8n. FaeUe. N. Si. - 6 * ..........1911 J A J 95 a. 100 Au*. 105% Fob.
7s b. 72 Juiy 90 Feb.
Iow a Central—1st, 5 g ....... 1938 J * 0
05 Feb.
Tenn.C. I. * Ry.—Ten. L)., 1st, 6* A A O , 75 b. 74 Ail*
Kentucky Centra!—4 g . . . . l a s 7 J A j *81 b,: 80 Aug. 87 Apr.
95 % Jam
70 Juls
Blrrn. DlT., 6 * .................. 1917 J & J 77
K ings Oo. Kl.— 1st. 5 g .,,,1 9 2 5 J A J 90 a. 90 Aug, 103% F«m ! rex. A Pan, —1st, 5 * ........... 2000 J A D 7 0
81 Jam
69 J uly
I^ole-leGaa—1st, a g ........1919 O—F
78
I 70 AU*. 87% Jan, i 1 2d, iuoorne, 5 * . . . . ...........2000 Marsh. ia % b .: 13 July ; 29% Jam
Lake Erie A West.—5 g ,...1 9 _ ’ j * J 109 b. 106% Au*. 113 Feb, I T ul.A . A. A N . M. - 6 < ........19*4 M A N *05 b 103 Jan 4 0 0 % Jam
L. ftttore—C on.op., 1st,7*. 1900 J A J 115 b. J13 July 119 Jam I T ol. * Ohio Cent,- 6 * ........1.935 J « J .102 b. 100 Au*. 10W Apr,
con sol, o o o p .,2 d , 7 s ......... 1903 J A D 120 b. i l l
Aug. 122% Jam
.Tol. Pen. A West.—4 * ........1917 J * J 70 b, 70 Sopt. 81 Jam
L oo*fa t'd — 1s t ,e o n .,S g .. 1931 o - J * 110%b. H I
AU*. 90% Jam
48
A k . 1 1 8 % Feb. f To,. 8t, L. A Kan. a -6 * ..1 9 1 6 J A O .3 7 %
General m ortgage, 4 g .. 1948 J a D *.H
90 July • 96 Jam j Colon Paoifio—6 * ..............1 8 9 9 .1
A J 107
103 Au*. xlu% Jam
Louis. A Nash.—Cons., 7S.1898 A A O 10,»%b.;10« A n* 113 Jam j
ataklngfund, 8»................. 1803 M A a ..... sJ8
Au*. 105% Fob.
..............N.O. A Mob. 1st, 6 K....... 1930 J * J 1 1’3 8 0 .1 1 0 Aug. 123% Apr.
73% Jam
July
Callat. trust 4 % .................1918 M A N
43 b. 48
40.
2d, 6 * .........1030 J A J 100 be 100 July 110 Fob. | Gold 6s. Art. trust n otes. 1894 F A A ■.*4%b, 72% Au*. 102% Jam
>
General, 6 * ......................1 9 3 0 J A l> l i t b. 1«7 July 119% Apr.
Kan. Pao. D eu .D iv.-6 *.1 8 8 9 M A N*;lt)7%b. 109 Aug. 11 a % Apr.
Unified, 4 * ...................... 1940 J A- J ' 77 b, 75 July
83% let,. ;
letoonaoi.,6
....1 8 1 9 M A N *8 b. 86 Au*. 112% Apr.
N asb.Fl.Asm — fat <61,5 *.‘37 W * 4 * 9 5 8 0 . 95 Au*. 101 Mar. j
Oregon Short U n e - 6 s . . 182J F A A 85 b. 80 Au*. 10 0 Jam
Lonls. H. A. A Oh.—1st, 6 s. 1910 J * j n>5
80% lam
Sept, m
Jam
10 0
0 r .S .K A U t'b N .-0 o u .5 * .1 9 l9 A A O ay
52
Au
75% Jam
O onsol.,6 * ...................... 1916 A A O it 4 a, 82% A n*. 109 Jam > C.P.Demdt Gulf com 5 *.1030 J A D 4 1 %i>. 39% a u *.
Louis, fit. L. A Texas—8 * . 1 9 1 7 F A A 4 . b. 77 July 98% Jam j Union E levated—to * ......1 9 3 7 M A N 105%m §8% Au*. 117% Apr.
’
M etro, elevated—1st, 6 *.18 03 J * J 115
36 Apr.
108% Aug. 1X6% Fen. s sYlrttlniaMld.—Gen. m..5s, 1930 M A S 7 7 %b. 7 1 A n *
2 0 , 6 s ...............................1899 M A N 105%b. 100 July 106% Feb,
do
stamped guar. M A N 77%
77% sopt. 86 Apr.
M ich .Cent.- 1 s t , e o n .,7 s ..19 (2 M A N U < b. 113 Aa*. 122% Apr. i W abash- 1 s t ,O * ................71939 M A N '0 2
i)3
July 400% Apr.
82% Jam
Oonsoi., 5# ...................... 19 ,2 .M A S 10 5 b. 100 Aug. 106% Apr.
2d iO ort*»*e,5 * ..._ ....,1 » 3 9 . F A A. 7 0 %- 60 July
38 Jam
M UXaksSh. A W .-ls t ,6 * .1 9 2 1 M A N 123 b. 115 July 127% Jam
July
a j 2 4 m 19
Extern * Im p., 5 « ........ 1920 F A A *101 b. 97% An*. 109% Jam
We-tBnnre Guar.. 4s....... 2361 J A J 93%
91 July 103% Feb.
M , K. A T .—1st 4s, <......... 1090.1 A D 77% I 69
Au*. 82% Feb. ! West, N. Y. A Fa. —1st, 5 *.1937 J A J ,00
94 AU*. 105 Feb.
. 2d. 48,<.............................1990 F A A 38% j 27% Juiy
50% Jam j
2d rnort.............................1 9 2 7 A A O 22%
14 Aug. 33 Jam
Mo, P a cific--1st. con., 8 *.1 9 2 0 M A S . . . . . . . . <11 Au*. 113 M ar.' West. Un. T eL -C ol. tr., 5s. 1938 J A J 101
95 AU*. 10 8 Jan.
3d. 7s................................1906 M A N 103 b. 1 0 « Aug. 115% Apt. i WD. Cent. Co. -1 s t , 5 * ...... 1937 J A J * 7 2 a. 6J
AUg. 92% Jam
12 AU*. 36 Feb,
loaorae, 5 R ..... ..................1937
12
Par. offtTi. —1st, ex .,4 * . 1938 F A a 07 a. 93 All*. 102 Jan.
Not*—-'li‘ Indicates price b u t ; "a** price a s h e d ; the Kan*c is made np from actual sales only. * Latest price this week. t Trust receipts.

8 $

iiS

ir*

II

K

T

f c

S

!

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE PK(C E 8 -(CoatlntiedY- I N A O V I V B BONUS— S E P T E M B E R i'2.
SECURITIES,

Bid.

sE C U K rriE s.

Rail road Bonds.
**nr.k g x e A u tig t P r ic e s ,)

Alabam a M I C -ls t , *.. * n a r..l»2 S
A -T ; * 9. F . - Id. is . Class B 1989
Ool. Mid. 1st, g., 6 s . .. .......... 1936
A an Ur A D a n v .-ls t
6 s . .1917
A .. * F a c , - M W. D „ *n. 6s.. 1907
B slt A Ohio—1st, 6s, Park B .1919
void................................... 1925

108

Ill

■ h i* n v ta a W r iA m o i r h e a s » r » s b a la t s w t u n u t a

B, & 0 .— JOSS, tnort., *old ,5s.l9 89
W. Va. A Pitt*.—1»t, *., 5s,.1990
B. A 0 . 8 . W „ 1it, *., 4 %*.,, 1990
Monon. River, 1st.*..*, 5 x ...l« 1 9
Cent*! Ohio Reor.—1st, 4% , 1:13 0
Ak. A Cb. Jun 0 . - 1st,*.5s,*u. 1930
Best. fit. Tun. A W.—Deb. 5* 1913
Brooklyn Elevated—2d, 3 -5 «. 191.>
Brunaw ek A W'n—1st. *. 4s, 193S
-MM. K b. A Pitts.—Gen., 6s. 1937

Bid.
*110

A»fc.

8ECURITIEB.

Hills

1*., let, 6 a .1921 I l l
......... B . K .A P .—Boeb
Knob. A Pitts.—Cone. 1st. 0S.1922 113
99% 1 UI%
•104%
Burl Oed. Rap. A No.—1st, Ss. 10 0 6
Oonsul. A on 1 at. trust, 5 s .-.1934 *75 ...........
1
Minn. A St, L.—let, 7a, *U ..1927 100 { . . . . .
•98
.....
Iowa C. A W est—1st, 7 t— 1909
>%•!. Ran. I. v . * N - •«*. « « .! '/ '(
i«L 6 s ..................................1921
91%
C,
Ohio— lol.*Oln.M.lst,,+%e 19*39
,.V,. nry 7 ’ *,-•
». r v
*
*
*97’ * •OO"

THE CHRONICLE.

504

[V ol. LVII

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES .— IN A C T IV E BONDS—f Continued]—S E P !E M B E R 2 i .
SECURITIES.

Bid.

Ask.

SECURITIES.

Bid.

Ask.

SECURITIES.

Bid. ! A sk1

Northern Pacific—( C ontinu ed.)
......... E .A T.II.—Mt. Vernon 1st 6s .1923
Sul. Co. Br. 1st, g.. 5s.......... 193C
HelenaARedM ’ n—lst,g., 6s. 1 937
103
E v.A R icli.—1st gcn.5s,g.gu.l931 *
DulutliAMauitoba—lst,g .6sl 936
93%
93
104
Evans. A Indian.—1st, con s.. 1926
Dul.AMan Dak.Div.—Ist6s.l9 37
Flint A P. Marq.—M ort., 6 s ... 1920 1T2’
Cceur d’Alene—1st, 6s, gold. 1916
104*4
*90
97
Gen. 1st, g .,6 s ..................... 1938
*102
Ban Joaquin B r., 6 s.........
Cent. Washington—lst,g.,6s.l938
P ort Huron—1st, 5 s ............ 1939
9434
Fla. CeD A Pen.—1st g. 5 b....4918
N orfolk & South’n—1st, os.g. 1941
*98
97
*9 5 ' “ 95*4 Norfolk A West.—General, 63.1931 *118
C. A 6 . Div., e x f., g. {
62
1C6
Ft Worth
R. G.—1st g., 5 s..1928
New River, 1st, 6 s ............... 1932
Im p. & E xt., 6s......................1934
100
Gal. Har. & San Ant.—1st, 68.1910
Adjustm ent M., 7 s ................1924
90
Gal. H. &B. A .—2d mort.. 7 s -.1905 *
Mex. & Pac. Div., 2d 6 s ___1931
Equipment, 5s.................... . .1908
114
Ones. A O .Clinch Yal. 1st 5s.................1957
114 115
Ga. Car. & Nor.—1st, gu. os, g.1929
98
RoanokeASo.—1st, gu. 5s. g .!9 2 2
,Ga. So. < Fla.—1st, g. 6s........ 1927
fe
jGrand Rap. & Ind.—Gen. 5a.. 1924
Scioto Val. A N. E.—1st, 4s,.1990
Warm 6pr. Val., 1st, g. 5 s.. 1941
73 ^ j 75
24
Ohio A Miss—2d consol. 7 s . . . 1911 110
Ches. O. A So. West.—1st 6s, g.1911 *102 ........ 'G. B. W. & St. P.—2d ino. tr. rects.
Spring.Div.—1st 7s............... 1905
Housatonio—Cons, gold 5s___1937 102*4
2d, 6s....................................... 1911 *55
.1 1 5
General 5s...............................1932
N .H a v e n * D e rb y , Cons.5s..l918 100
Oh. V .— en .con .lst.gu.g,5s.l938
G
Ohio R iver RR .—1st, 5s.......... 1936
Hous. & T. C.—Waco & N. 7s..1903 104
Chicago & Alton—S. F., 6s---- 1903 110
*103
Gen. g .,5 s ...............................1937
118
Oregon A Califor.—1st, 5s, g. 1927
100
103*2
Debent. 6s, prin. A int. gtd.1897
Oreg. Ry A Nav.—Col.tr. g ..5s.l919
Bt. L. Jacks. A Chic.—1st,7s
Debent. 4s, prin. A int. gtd.1897
Miss.R. Bridge—1st, s. f., Cs.1912 *100
........ Pan. Sink.F’d Subsidy—6s, g. 1910
Illinois Central—1st, g., 4s ...1 951 *100“'
lenn.-P.C.CA8t.L.Cn.g.4*28A1940
Chic. Burl. A Nor.—1st, 5s— 1926
99*2 101
Do
do
Series B ......... 100 !.......
1st, gold, 3*28........................1951 *92*2 . . . .
Debenture 6 s ......................... 1896
*100
P .C .A 8.L .-lst,c.,7s................ly o o
Chic. Burling. < Q.—5s, 8. f . . 1901 101
fe
Pitts. Ft. W. & C.—1st, 7 s... 1912
Spring!'. D iv.—Coup., 6s___1898 105
Iow a D iv.—Sink, fund, 5 s ..1919
92
100
2d, 7 s .................................. 1912
91
Sinking fund, 4 s................. 1919
3d, 7 s....................................1912 12 li*
C. St. L. A N. O.—Ten. 1., 78.1897 *109 113
Plain, 4s...................................1921 *80
Cli.St.L. AP.—1st,c on.5s,g.. .1932 It?
95
Ohio A Indiana Coal—1st 53.1936
Clev. A P .—Cons., s. fd., 78.1900 116
2d,'6 s .........'..........................1907 .......
Chi. Mil. A St. P.—1st,8 s,P .D .1898 112*s 115*2
Gen. 4*23, g., “ A” ............ 1942
2d, 7 3-10s, P. D ................... 1898 112
il3 “
St. L .V .& T .H .—1st, 6s., 7s. 1897 106*2 108
1st, 7s, $ g ., R .D ................... 1902 119
Dub. A 8. C.—2d D iv., 7s ...1 894
2d, 7 s.................................... 1898
1st, I. A M .,7 s .......................1897 111
2d, guar., 7 s........................ 1898
Ced. Falls A Minn.—1st, 7s.. 1907 *85
1st, I. A D .,7 s .......................1899 115
95
Ind. D. A Spr.—1st 7s, ex. cp.1906
G d.R .A I.E xt.—1st, 4*2S,G.g. 1941 *98
1st ,C. & M .,7 s .......................1903 119
1st, I. A D. Extension, 7 s ... 1908 120
Ind.D. AW.—1st 5s, g .,tr.re c..l9 4 7
12 2*2 P eo.A E .-Ind.B .A W .-lst,pf.7s.l900 106
2d, 58, gold, trust receip ts.. 1948 ......
Ohio Cnd.AW.—I s tp r e f.5 s..l9 3 8
1st, La C. & Dav., 5e.............1919
Peoria A Pek. Union—1st, 69.1921 106
1st, H. A D., 7 s..................... 1910 117*4 120
2d m ortg., 4*ss...................... 1921
1st, H. A D .,5 s ..................... 1910
99 100
Ind. Ills. A I o w a —1st, g, 4s.. 1939
65
75
67
Pitts. Cleve. A Tol.—1st, 6 s... 1922
Chicago A Pacific D iv., 6 s.. 1910 111
Int.&G.N’n—1 st,6s,g.............. 1919
Mineral P oint Div. 5 s.......... 1910
100
Kings C o.-F.E l.,lst,5,g.,gu.A .1929 *
89
Pitts. & L. Er.—2d g. 5s, “ A ” . 1928
C. A L , Sup. D iv., 5s.............1921 *100
Pitts. Me. K. A Y .—1st 6s......1932
Lake Erie & West.—2d g., 5s. 1941
95
97
Fargo & South., 6s, A s s u ...l9 2 4
Pitts. Painsv. A F.—1st, 5 s . ..1916
. . . . . . L. S. A M. So.—B .A E .—New 7 s .’98 109
Inc. conv. sink, fund, 5s___1916
Det. M. A T.—1st, 7 s............1906
L2l*4 Pitts. Shen. A L. E .—Ist,g .,5 s.l9 4 0
95
Dakota & Gt. South., 5s___ 1916 *101*2 103
Lake Shore—Div. bonds, 7s. 1899 *113 117
Pitts. A West.—M. 5s, g 1891-1911
111
Mil. A Nor. main line—6 s ... 1910
Pitts. Y ’gst’nAA.—1st, 5s,eon.l927
Kal. All. A G. R .—1st gu. 5S.1938
106
M abon’g Coal R R .—1st, 58.1934 101
Ghic.AN.W.—30 year deb. 5s, 1921 *
Pres. A Ariz. Cent.—1st, 6s, g.1916
Escanaba A L. 8. 1st, 6s___1901 *106
2d incom e 6 s ..........................1916
93
LehighV.,N.Y.—1st gu.g.4*2S.1940
Des M. A Minn.—1st, 7 s___1907
Lehigh V.Terrn.—1st gu, 5s,g. 1941 103
Rich. A Danv.—Debenture 6 s. 1927
90
r
Iow a Midland—1st, 8 s.........1900
Litchf. Car. A W e st—1st 6s. g.1916 «
Equip. M. s. f., g., 5s............ 1909
100
A tl. A Char.—1st, pref., 7 s ..1897
108
Peninsula—1st, conv., 7 s ... 1898 *115
Chic. & Milwaukee—1st, 7 s .1898 109
N."Y. A R ’way B .—1st, g. 5s. 1927 *100
do.
Incom e, 6s___ 1900
Win. & St. P.—2d, 7s............. 1907 121
Wash. O. AW.—1 s t,4s,gu. cy. ,1924
55
37*i
Mil. A Mad.—1st, 6 s............ 1905
N.Y.AMan.Beach.—1st, 7s, 1897
Rio Gr. June.—1st, gu., g., 5s.l938
95 102
N .Y.B.AM .B.—1st con. 5s,g.l935 *95 102
Ott, C. F. & St. P.—1st, 5 s .-1909 102*2
Rio Grande So.—1st, g., 5 s ... 1940
Northern 111.—1st, 5 s.......... 1910 102*2 ioii®
St. Jos. A Gr. Is.—2 d in e .........1925
BrookrnAM ontauk— 1st,6s. 1911 100
1st, 5 s ..................................1911
Ch.Peo. & St.L.—Con.1st,g .5 s.1939
Kan. C. A Omaha—1st, 5 s ..1927
95
C .B .I.A P .-D .M .A F . D. I s t 4 s .l9 0 5
St. L. A. & T.H—2d pref. 7s. .1894
Louis.Evans.ASt. L.—Con.5s. 1939 *
68
99
53
le t, 2*ss................................1905
2d m .inc. 7s............................1894
Louis. ANash.—Cecil. B r.73..1907 101 106*2
98 100
Extension, 4 s................. .1905 .......
E. H. A N ash .—1st 6s, g ....l9 1 9 110
Dividend bonus..................... 1894
40
Keokuk A D e s M.—1 st,5a.. 1923
Bellev. & So. 111.—1st, 8 s ...i8 9 6 106
108
Chicago & St. Louis—1st, 6s. .1915
St. Louis Division, 1st, 6 s... 1921
Bellev. A Car.—1st, 6s..........1923 100
Chic. St. P. & Minn.—1 st,6 s... 1918, *120
Clii.St.L. APad.—lst,gd.g.5s 1917
2d, 3s....................................1980
97 '100
8t. Paul A S. C.—1st, 6s....... 1919 *119
Leb. Branch E x te n s io n ___1893
St. Louis So.—1st, gd. g. 48.1931
78
Chic. A W. Ind.—1st, s. f., 63.1919
70
Nashv. A Decatur—1st, 7 s ..1900 *....... 117"
do
2d in com e,5s.l9 31
General m ortgage, 6s.......... 1932 109 109*2
8. f.,6s.—S. A N. A la .............1910
Car. A Shawt.—1st g. 4 s — 1932
77
85
Chic^-AiWest Mich.—5 s ,..........1921
10-40, gold, 6 s...................... 1924 .........
St. L. A S. F —2d 6s, g., cl. A . 1906 106
®jn liam . A D.—Con. s. f., 7s.l905
Equip., 7 s ............................. 1895
105*2
2d. gold, 4 12S.......................... 1937
Pens. A A t.—1st, 6s, g o ld .. .1921
General 5s............................... 1931
Cin. D. A l i ’n—1st, gu. 5s, g. 1941
94*4
Collat. trust, 5s, g ................1931
1st, trust, gold, 5s................. 1987
80
CJlev. Ak. A Col.—Eq. A 2d 6s. 1930
Lou.N.Alb.ACh.—Geu.m.g.5s.l94(J
65
Consol, guar., 4 s.................. 1990
63
68*2
O.C.C. A St. L., Cairo div.—4s, 1939
Kan. City A 8.—1st, 6s, g ...l9 1 6
92*s
8t.Lou.Div.—lstco l.ts’t4s,g. 1990
Ft. S. & V .B .B g .- l s t , 6 s ...1 910
80 ........ Mauito.S.W.Coloniza’n—5s ,g.l934
Spring. ACol.Div.—1st,g. 4s. 1940
Memphis A Chari.—6s, g old .. 1924
Kansas Midland—1st, 4s, g.1937
W hiteW .Val.Div.—lst,g. 4s. 1940
St. Paul & Duluth—1st, 5 s___1931 105
.....
*i‘o o ‘
Cin.Wah.AM.Div.—1st,g. 4s. 1991 '92%
::::::
M exican Cent. Consol.—Is, g.1911
2d m ortgage 5s.......1......... 1917 10J 1U3
Cm. I. St. L. A C.—Ist,g.,4s.l936
St. Paul Minu A M.—1st, 7 s.. 1909 10658
. Consol , 6 s............................... 1920
M exican National—1st, g., 6s. 1927 *75
2d m ort., 6 s............................. 1909 1133* ___
Cin.8an.ACl.—Con.1st,g. 5s, 1928
Minneap. Uuiou—1st, 6s___ 1922 *1 i 0 __ ^
*19
O ’ Col. Cin. & Ind.—1st, 7s,s.f.l8 99
Mont. Ceu.—1st, guar., 6 s.. 1937 108 110
116*2
Consol, sink, fund, 7 s .......... 1914 *116
1st guar. g. 5 s ........................193
Michigan Central—6s..............1909
95
98
C.3Ve. <£ Mah. Y .—Gold, 5 s . ..1938 *100
East. Minu., 1st div. 1st 5 s .1908
*107
C ilum bia& Green.—1st, 6 s ...1 916
San Frau. A N. P.—1st, g,, 5s.1919
lo o
2d, 6 s........................................1926
South Carolina—2d, 6s....... ,.1931
Bat.C.AStrgis.—Ist,3s,g.gu .l989
D 1. La< k. A W .—Mort. 7s
1907 *125’ ......... Mil. L. S.AW.—Conv. deb., 5s. 1907 * i o i ”
Incom e, 6s.............................. 1931
Syra. Bing. & N. Y .—1st, 7s. 1906 120 130
Mich. Div., 1st, 6 s................ 1924 114 ........ So. Pac. Coast—1st, guar.,4s. 193’
Morris & Essex—1st, 7 s___ 1914
Ashland D ivision—1st, 6s ..1925 *114
Ter.RR. As’n of S t.L .-lst,4^8.1939
07
Bonds, 7 s ............................. 1900 105
Texas A N ew O rlea n s^ lst,7 s.l9 0 5
*99
78 o f 1871............................1901 113*2
Sabine Division, 1st, 6 s....... 1912 101
104
1st, con., guar., 7s.............1915 120 130
Iow a Extension,' 1st, 7s.......1909 104 120
Consol. 5s, g ............................1943
89
Del. A Hud. Can.—Coupon 7s, 1894 It 5
Third Avenue (N. Y).—1st 5a, 193
95
105
Pa. D iv., coup., 7s................ 1917 130
Tol. A. A. & Cad.—6s................ 191'
100
A lbany A Susq.—1st, gu.,7s. 1906
Toledo A . A. c\ G’ d Tr.—g. 6s. 1921
c
127%
95
# 1st, cons., guar., 6 s..........1906 *114
Tol. A. A. & Mt, Pi.—6s.......... 1919
100
Rens. A Bar.—1st, coup., 7s. 1921 *136
Minn. A Pac*.—1st m ortg., 5s. 1936
Tol. A. A. & N. M.—5s, g........ 1940
32
......... T.AO.C.—Kan. A M ., Mort. 4s. 1990
D enver City Cable—1st, 6 s ... 1908
90
Minn.St.P.AS.S.M—lstc.g .4 s.l9 3 6
69*2
D env. Tramway—Cons. 6s, g.1910
Mo. K. AT.—K. C. A P ., 1st, 4s, g. 1990
Ulster A Del.—1st, con .,6.,5s. 1928
98
92
Metropol. Ky.—lst,gu . g.6s.l911
Dal. A W aco—1st, 5s, g u ..,.1 9 4 0
Union Pacific—1st, 6s.............. 1896 1037g 104*2
Denv. & R. G.—Im p.,g., 5 s .-.1928 *63
Missouri P acific—Trust 5 s .. .1917
1st, 6 s.......................................1897 104*4
90
Duluth A Iron Range—1st 5s. 1937
95*2
1st, 6s...................................... 1898 105*8 106
70
E . Tenn. Va. A Ga.—1st, 7 s... 1900 106
Collateral Trust, 6s.............. 1908
8t L.AI. M .~ A rk.B r.,lst,7s.l895 100
Divisional 5s.......................... 1930 *100
Collateral Trust, 5 s.............. 1907
Mobile A Ohio—1st ext., 6 s... 1927
1st ext., gold, 5 s ...................193'
36
St. L. A Cairo—4s, guar....... 1931
Kausas Pacific—1st 6s, g ...l 8 9 5 101
.........
Eq. A Im p., g., 5s.................... 1938
50
1st, 6s, g ............................... 1896 102
io o “
Mobile & Birin.—1st, g., 5s.. 1937
1st, 7s..................................... 1918
C. Br. U. P .—F. e,, 7 s.......... 1895
110
A labam a Central—1st 6 s ... 1918 *100
Nash. Chat. A St. L.—2d, 6 s.. 1901
Atch. Col. A Pac.—1st, 6 s... 1905
IOS"
Erie—1st, extended, 7 s.........1897 107 110% N. O. &■ No. K -P r. 1., g., 6a..1915 105 116
Atch. J. Co. A W.—1st, 6 s... 1905
2d, extended, 5s.....................1919 *102*2
N. Y. Central.—Deb. g. 48___1905 101
U .P . Lin. A Col.—ls t,g .,5 s. 1918
3d, extended, 4*ss..................1923 *102*2 i o s "
N. J. June—Guar. 1st, 4 8 ... 1986
Oreg.S.L.AU .N.,col.trst.,5s.l919
4th, extended, 5s................... 1920 110 115
Utah. A North.—1st, 7s.........1908
Beech Creek—lat. gold, 48. .1936
9 5 % 97*s
5th, extended, 4s................... 1928 *101
Gold, 5s................................ 1926
Osw. & Rome—2d, 5s, g .,g u .l9 l5 k
102
1st, con., g., f’ d, 7 s ...............1920
U tica & Bl. Kiv.—4s g., gu.1922 *100 101
Utah Southern—Gen., 7 s . . . 1909
90
R eorg.. 1st lien, 6s................ 1908
Extern, 1st, 7 s................... 1909
N. Y. N. H. & H .—1st, rear.48.1903
103
90
B. N. Y. A E.—1st, 7 s.......... 1916 *120
Valley R ’y Co. of O.—Con. 6s. 1921
......... N. Y. & Northern—1st, g 5s. 1927 *104*2
N. Y . L. E. A W.—Col. tr.,68.1922
Wabash—Debenture, Ser. A .. 1939
2d, 4 s .......................................1927
, Funded coup., 5s....................1969
Det. A Chic. Ext. 1st, 5s, g ..l9 4 0
85
97
99
......... N. Y. Susq. A West.—2d, 4*23.1937
Buff. A 8. W.—Mortg. 68___ 1908
No. Missouri—1st, 7 s .......... 1895 10214 102*3
90
92
Jefferson—1st, gu. g. 5 s ___1909
St.L.K.C.AN.—R.E.&RR.7S.1895 101 1 0 1 %
........ ......... N. Y. Tex. A Mex.—Ist,4s,gu.l912
Coal & R R .—6s.......................1922
North’n Pacific—D ivid’d scrip ext .
St.Charles Br’ge—1st,6s.. .1908
95
.........
Eureka Springs—1st, g., 6 s ... 1933
James River Val.—1st, 6 s... 1936
West. Va. C. A Pitts.—1st, 6s. 1911
E vans. & T .H .—1st,cons.,6s.. 1921 114
Spokane A Pal.—1st, 6s.......1936
Wheel. AL.E.—1st. 5s, g o ld ...1 926
86
98
l st, general, g., 5 s ................ 1942
St.Paul A N. P.—Gen., 6 s.. 1923 *i06”
E xtension A Imp, g., 5s.......1930 ......... . . . . . .
*No price Friday; these are the latest quotations made this week.

F o r i7 I U o e U * n e o a « & U n l i s t e d B o n d s —See 3d p a g e preceding.

THE

TSPTEMBEB 23, 1893.J

iu u e s tm s u t

C H R O N IC L E .
R oads .

5 0 5
Latest Eartangt Reported.

W ee h o rH o

1893.

1892.

Jan.

1 to Latest Dots.

1893,

1892,

Great S orth’ n—
s
*
4
9
959,280 9*1,057 7,975.307 7,544 641
8 t P. M. 4t M. IA ugust..
East, o f Minn A ugu st..
107,60S* 11*1.64 i
713,593
705,768*
Montana Cent August___
89,253
96,248
756.893
742.054
Tot, system . A u g u st... 1,150,232 1,181.940 9,445.794 8,992,464
O r.P.Wal. A Br. June -----1,825
2,446
11,455
11.0223,094
3,516
G o lf * C hicago..A ugust...
25,862
22,701
j h * I n v e s t o r s ’ S u p p l e m e n t , a p a m p h l e t o f 150 p a g e s
H artsville.........J u n e ..........
419
459
5,858
5,561
Hooa.T 0 n.&WU.; Angust. . .
3,2 -5
3,819
24,320
23,344
e m ta in s e x te n d e d ta b les of th e S to c k s a n d B o n d s o f R a il­
29,151
29.637
H onaE.AW .Tex A ugust_
_
r o a d s , a n d other Companies, with remarks and statistics con­ Humest’nAShen A n gu s t ___
12,125
11,300
82,509
90,191
Hutoh.&Boath'n August___
7,937
46.149
11,104
49,223
c e r n in g th e in c o m e , fin a n c ia l s t a t u s , e t c ,, o f e a c h C o m p a n y .
Illinois Centra!. August___ 1,853,035 1,591,017 13,543.602 12,156,731
lnd.Dee.A West. August ...
63,007
36,118
276,812
I t is published o n t h e l a s t S a t u r d a y o f e v e r y o t h e r m o n t h —
329,250
In.A G c.S ortli’n S.lwkSept
69.019 108.847 2,651,822 2,484.656
t i t . , J a n u a r y , M a rc h , M a y , J u ly , S ep te m b er a n d N o v em b er,
41,400
Ilnteroc. (M ex.i ft k Sept. 2
32,350 1,436,1*92 1,362,636
51,408 1,279,533 1,280,484
Iowa Central. .iJJwkSept.
48,99"
a n d is fu r n is h e d w ith o u t e x t r a c h a r g e to a ll r e g u la r su b 1,630
Iron B a ilw a y ...: August___
3,207
26,038
22,451
$ e m b e r s o f t h e C h r o n ic l e ,
6.117
KanawhaAMieb * * wk Sept.
21
244.093
7,8.81
259,342
4,605
6,050
Kan.C. Cl. AHp 2dwkSept.
22X.276
216,404
The G e n e r a l Q u o t i l i o n s o f S t o c k s a n d B o n d s , o c c u p y i n g K.C.P.S.A-Meui •2dwkSept.
■' 81.327
94.681 3,218,114 3,346,915
K.C.Muii.A Kir •2dwkSe.pt.
22,018
17,317
726,313
s i x p a g e s o f t h e C h r o n ic l e , a r e p u b l i s h e d
o n th e
I h lr d
730,0501 .6*20
110,01 4,511
K. C. Pitt*. A G. advtksept.
38,666
S a t u r d a y o f ea ch m o n th .
Kan.C. Sub.Belt 2 d wkSept.
109.094
4,923
3,661
76,673
•226,870
Kan.CW y.ASW 2dwtrSepi.
0.108
6.317
230.623
Keokuk * West. •2dwkS,p;.
-■ 1 •
269.63
9,551
9.578
272,038
I,.Erie All. A So. A u g u st....
6.434
52,578
6,376
52,453
RAILROAD EARNINGS.
L. Erie & West.. iidwksept.
77,364 2,536,945 2,41-2,208
6.4.654
48,36!*
51,134
Lehigh A H u d .. A u g u st....
380.508
291,853
Latest Earm ngs Hep or it a
Jan. 1 to Latest Date.
lasng L-lauJ----- -'*i wli Aug 1-29.542 136,226 2,661,474 2,657,040*
Roads,
1 ,0 ala.A* Mo.Kiv. J u n o ........
203,780
34.563
3.8,188
205.041
1893.
1882.
1893. 1 1892.
Week or Mo
38,590 1,-257,662
31,843
Iginis. Ev.ASCL. 2dwk8ept.
974,189
Loillsv.A.Vasbv.
k ->•;•*. 313,750 431,080 14,006,519.14,785,304
s
•
I *
»
76,7X4
l.ouls.5. A. A Ch. -JdWkSept,
65,955 ■2,417,403, 2,214,453
Adirondack____J u ly ............
3 1.58-2
14.272
101,007
90,871 l.oa,8t.I-A Tex. A u gu st., . .
42,238
59,968
200,741 2 ;3 .7 i9 1,528,190 1,455,292 Macon A Birin. A u g u st... .
Aucgneny Vat. July..........
6,027
4 s ,J i‘2:
4,034
48,949
Atefc.T.As. S V . 2<lwk.-ri,r. 785,953 334.924 20.w54.sOl 2«.53x,O90 Manrtiea A A ug. J u n e ------7,017
757
80s
6,253
a t L. & San F 2dwk Sept. 174,120 208,805 6,073,509. 5.992,323 Maaiatiqae........ A ugust___
131
70,470
23-2
79.165
A re, t o ta l... Jdw ksept.
32.530,423 MeuiBlllsAChss. istw kS ept
*27,903'
16.97X
936,200
935,938
AtlautaACtoar.o J u n e . . . .
375.102
53.309
354.438 :Me«l**.in *Vnt. Jdw ksept. 140.105 149,3x7 5,514,664 '>,368,907
50,475
Atlanta & ftor*a M a y ..... .
3.992
33.225
31,355 Mextoaa luter'l .lnjy
7.375
148,329 161,005 1,217,61 * 1,042,321
2
B A G . Last Line* August___ 1.693.041 1.853.993 12,541,*.fl*i 12..6;«,33<i : S e x National . jadwk8**pC
76.715
00.090 2.086,93* *2.993,030
Western Line** August___ 506.903 561,119 4.087,7*0 3,900,363 : Mexican B'w aylft k Sept. 9
50 3X1 2,146,4*21 2,121,516
S -,472
T o t s i ............August......... 2 , 1 8 9 . 9 4 3 2 , 4 1 5 . 1 1 2 1 6 . 6 0 9 , 4 3 6 10.799,699 Milwaukee & S I> itb w k J ’ str
62,183
854,449
:
55,3*,!
796,608
BaL AO.Sou th a . 3 4 v k tj* ,,t
53,870
55,120 1,812.305 1,820,162 Mineral lc»og<- A agu-t___
711,979
11,009
11,437
87,89*3
Bath St Haai’ ntlK j one . . . . . .
1,02)
10.405 Mlaeeap A st. I, August___
‘
1.757'
10 .3sl
127,613 174,213 1.127,846 1,259,908
Btr. A Atlantic. August___
1,485
3.541
20,720
27,331 M.StP. ArS.S.M 2*lwk.xept
55,03' 2.305,893 2,048,214
53,701
Blr.Sb.ATena.FC Juno . . . . . .
4,314
•21.2065
M o.K an.A Tex.. 2d wk Sept,
195,35! 214,*22? 6.4x8,; 1*> 6,304,885
Broonlyn K!,-v. -Mwk.Xepf.
28.551:
33.595; 1.310,251 1.207.406 Mo.Pae.AlrouM ■* wk X„pt. 455,060 599.0- 0 17,247,554 IX,116,650
21
Jtaa.Rwli.ABlW 2 ,1 wkxcpt.
62.794
67.809 2.405,970 2,205,469 Mobile A Birin. 3d wk July
3,3*24
3,727
Bur.O.Bap. A S 1st w keep 1
89,650
y -.g x o , 2,559,293 2.707,749 Mobile A Ohio August.
208,961 2 49.30S 2,126,152 2,143,2**0O n i t a * A ti.. j m y ......
148,147 131,162
430,965 MOnt. A A * x,G ! • J tily
458.164
I*
]
48,500
83,000
427,434
611.223
2J w kS .pt, 424.000 415,000.14,022,265 14,278.971 NawOhnAWtl,. August.
330,93*2 447,766 3,249,977 3,360750
Okr.OnB.GAOi. J u n o ........
3.568
15,448 Nt-vada Central Jon*- . . . . . .
1,1*12
22,78,8
*21.451
3,709
4,274
13,703
Car. Midland,... AtiRn.it....
3 ,9 -0
37,008
5,127:
35,278
151.917
28,84*2
143,354
31.167
Ccntraiof X .1.. Ju ly.......... 1,291.469 1,247,529 8,418.396 7,981,829 X Jersey A S .Y . June .......
NewOrl.ASo’n .. 4;hwk Aug
*2,248
87,172
77,696
1,51*3
Central PaciHo. Ju ly.......... 1,249,578 3,370,059 8,001,349 8,164,579 N .Y .C A H .R ..
August . . . 4,063.91 1,081.441 30,600.957 29.179,488
Central o i 8. C .. J n tie .........
7.650
65,045
5.712
49,970 N. Y. U 1. A ft June
■2,668,634 •2,742,7*29 14,488,3*7 14,793,203
C m t .C i u & t 'M t x A u g u st...
8,500
93.621
00,400 N. Y.Pa.A' >»!*.*..
10,635
036,160 590,742 3.3? 8.9! h 3.3*6,685
Chart*.-FnAs** Jfoiie........
57.119
3 SO, 189
331.319 X Y .A X K u e ... J u n « .........
41.292
3,098,570 2,900,003
Char.Hum.A sto. August .. .
7,ooo
88.237 -S .Y.AN'orth'n , JtUht
88.473
9.500
100,090
362,421
’
61,316
h i'.378
August . . .
CliUfiiuu l..ik,- . .1tun,........
5,(11 f,
26.967
24,386 N. Y. Out. A ft 2 IwkMept.
4.612
70.HH 2,731,545 2,4 33.0 :il
77,467
Cberaw.&DarL. J u ly ..........
1,2711
i.. *78
43,574 X.Y t a « f A W . Gttly
1*97,04*2
050,570
16 i, 167 160.136
Che«, A Ohio---- Ydwket-pr, 190,904
217,193 7,073,467 6,980.463 Norf. ASOuUi’ n ijiiiv ........ .
34,011
84.71s
266,478
257,376
C t e s . 0 . &.S.W Ju ly ..........
1-0,917 lox .779 U H X .I P 1.207,615
Chic. Bur. A N o . J u ly ..........
171.973 150.562 1,352,137 1.1-22.124 Norfolk A W ext.jgdwkaept. 202,459 220,85 i 7,015.540 6,671.087
377,00*
364,706
4*2,011
N'tbr.-i-ru(8.C-.) J.m. ......
CM-'. Bur- A U ,. J u ly ......... 2,940,371 8,214,136 21.925,383 21,440,975 Nortb’Bcentral. July ....... 666,165
507,606 1.060,715 3,916,106.
Cfilc.A K a n . ill. Silwkghpt.
9 3 .7 4 1
91,941' 3,080,079 2,799.336 NorUierni'a.-Ule :i l * k May 41**233 3UX.37!. 7.000,640 7 ,7 483 42
“
Chicago A Erie, J u ly ........
280,900 207,372; 1,717,170 I1,571,01 1
........... J
.
36,763
96,581 1,843,353 1,971,818
Wlk.Ct.IMae*. b it Wk May
»»
‘
-2
J2 8 ,0 t- »> ii n *.*io 3,43 ,-**>
2..<40,332
so
1.866,641 *2,762,008 15,736,360 l x ,533,208
X P .A ft-1
Ch J K.AU.S.Y. April .......
188,687 203,3431
925.836 cooreA W'em.! August___
831,281
O
est,(July..........
2,‘2*28
Chio.’M11 . A 84.p i 2dw kK ep i
7 16,310'22,49 8,106 22.76 5,837 Ohio A .Miss.......'A u gust___
3*55,900 422,341 2.74 >*.*170 2,602,4X3*
Clilo. AN*thw*n. August___ 2,6482.076 3,002,523,20,016,092 20,722.352
.-*43.095
490,197
Ohio Hire r _____ Ist-wkHepl.
20,09?
*21,190
Qhle.BM.A8.Ia3 Itb w k lu iy
32,942
705,220 oluo8oau».-rn.. August . . !
769,199
60,76"
4*3,410
*110,480A *.73‘2
*
Chic. K it L A P ,. A u g u st.... 1.802,712
12,334,3x2 11,402,955 Omaha A St. L . .
288,15*2
4H ,2«*275,282
J u u o _____
44.617
CSlie.8t.P.M.AO July ......... 556,202
4,422.474 4,71-2.143 Oregon im p. 1 0
3V?,(J.Vl 3*2.401* 2,171,066 ‘2,105,58*2.
....
—
m,
l,
Clue. — W .. .Mien JdwkSept.
A ..
37,346
1,362,909 1,349,74.1 Pa.l.Tetib.vAii,. July
*207,706
120, *207
10 , 1*22
2-2,.,7.1
August___
CIO. tie. A Ports. IAugust. . .
6,762
45.147
45.141
117.146
149.396
l'etiu. Milil'U. .; August___
17,096
18,59*2
C!n. Jack A Slur, a.twkKirt.
1 3 .1 - k
17 i,-2 u
493.184
Peidisyleant A .. IJ u l f .......... 0,552,047 5,576,072 10,437,464 38,274,124
C ln .X O .A T .P latwkKept
60,335
2,711,224 2.951,014 PconaOr«.JkRv "Jlw kF eoi.
593,615
612,13*2
J 3,451
17.530
Ala»Ot, South, j 1 stwkKept
22 .8-5
1,133,600 1,178,055 Petersburg........jJ u i r . . . . . . .
336,663
337,41*2
48.695
43.504
N.Orl. A M , E.il*t.wkSept
17,151
8 4 0 .0 8 - ,
8-7.317
Pttlla. A E rie. . . Sjuiy___. . .
451,193 42 t ,3**5 3,604,232 2,748,113
A 1 A Vlcksh istw k r . pt
a
7.01*
3*6.67,'
401.662 I'lu ia,* k-’-ufr J-i.v ..........
1,967,378 1,881,253 12,70*2,314 1*2,665,781
7 W » Sis, A F.l 1st wkgept
0,197
345,990
32x.:<75
3,024,171 3,826,002 •25,112,011‘18,092,209
CMUA ir. Co.e. J a lj
Erlaoget S y s t ; u t wkKopt 113,582
3,427.792 5,«< 7 ,9 U
Total hath (Ym .: J u ly .. . . . . . 4,891,x52'5,707,945 87,004,3*20 30,757,990
Clnn. North** 11 -August .
13,14'*1,903
13.605
.«
Lehigh Valley,'Mag*........... *» ***n^ai ,1.567,163 7,13r,*53 6,902,235
O n . port*. St V—
-'August___
26,374
163,723 r i-.JLtr.A C k . A u g .!-* ..,. *1,400,781
179,2i >
2
*25,293
2.5,14 S
•2,477
•2,710
Col. A M *y»v. A a g u -i___
1.512
9,643
9,330 1'itt.Shen.AVE.f August___
61,095
3«,'2"2
242,109
315,380
O e r . AkrixiACo 1 *t wktapt
l '. l o 66.3.314
677,025]
•>16,771
PIWAh, A W est. j A ugust___ 124.153 119,131 1,055,701
Clev. Can. A »*j.Jan*>........
193,090
373.080
440,797
5294*76
411,846
57,164
Plttr,Cl.A ini August___
59,472
XT’,!
CLClB.Cb.AS.L 2dwkScI;f. •205.961
9,6J2,97li! 10.226,267
212,067
243,707
25,203
Pitt#. Pa. A 1*. August...
31,568
Poo. A E asfn . in tw k A o c
31,32*2
898,221! 1.026.355
1.925,026 1,637,049
Total system,, 2dwk8i-.pt.:
50,585
*17,381
t ie r . A Marietta I st wkKcpt
5,000!
220,608 r o t . Young..v,A. August___ ;
7,194
228,799:
970,943
94,622 134,0*58
975,654
O il. Newb, A i,.'J u n e . . . .
3,7711
•21.604 l*t. Kora! A Aug.
3.4051
33,012
145,320
110,894
14,748
13,458
C ot II. V. A ToL JnJy.......... 306,665
277.5611 1,953.766 J.933,524 Pi. Roy, Aft*.Car. JUU«........
158,635
130,985
17,303
14,065
Juno .......
0 »U h ««ru ee& B J u ly ,.........
370.015
32.163!
5 5 .5 -361,704
181,773
171,848
20,872
25,149
A ugust___*
Coiu.-s & I .,,* - .. A ugust.. . .
18,670 tiuinoj O.A K.fr.. Ju ly..........
6,03 j :
16.572
451,065
476.925
lish.Fr'ksb. a
54,45*1
53,54 1
Conn. H irer.___J u n e ........ .
562,970
............: 583,350
210,363
213,690
28,393
31,51*1
Current H irer.. 2 .iw k.-„i,t.
I3.'l,774 Ittob. APetersk*.
1,783
•2.072
109.070
430,376
367.213
6,267
14,710
p e a r . A B io Gr. -IdWkSepT, 122,0011 100,118* 5.191.425 6.282.501 Kio t i t . Sou til’ tl. IxtwliSepti
1,798,998
Kio Or. ft * «t'n ..
■
Vi, '.1*1
58.500 1,555,029
p e s. t t - S o . A W, A ugust___
33,511
*270,261 Bag.TukCOiaA H. •/ilwkSept.
38,995
202,270
76,072
. 85,930
12,558
14,453
A u g u st....
geCBayC, A A ip . A n g u « ,....
27,7i>0
239,461
24.807
301,270
52,860
55,85*2
8,452
8,014
ig.Val. A r t V J u ly .......... ‘
X>et.Lan*'gAM*> 2dwk -< r,|.
■
■33,659
833,673
2 0 ,0. x
-,i:.,7 i7
30,550
St. L. A. A T. H. •* wk Kept.
34.630 1,096,708 1,001,067
21
» ttiutJig.K .A A a , 2dwk « « p t
41,514
1,390,584 xt.L.Keti'ewi.xo,
53,673 1.',,-*.
17,554
19,3x0
*2,320
1,951
A u g u st... .
JJ>*!nt.h a It loo.. June . . . . .
0 5 ,4 19
8,239
133,007
26,741
82,700
95,800 3,238,884 2,892,452
B.Tstio. Va..v G,» i»t w k-.'i.t
81,0*92 112,630 3,739,040 4,128,700 .-'.l,..X*Mi*h-.» i-n. •Jdwkfeopt.
135,387 192,799 1,114,057 1,249,143
Elgin. J ot A East A n g iin ___
511,385 st. Paul A Uui'tli A u g u st..,.
71.167
76,935,
“
895,051
972,357
770.838
1 Ju ly..........
*
119,001 109,422
EurekflSprings. Jut.« .........
7,622
30,304 Situ Am.A
6,376,
14,123
3,861
3,114
542
39*2
B raQ sia.rpii- a adw kx. ;.>
0,581
263.154 s.mderev. A Ten, J u ly ...........i
259,234
8.5 to
579,260
14,882
557,438
20,106
6. Fran. AN. Par. u n v k s t p
Bran*. A B leb.. 2 dwk.— n<.
322,6 U
3*26,801
31,000
43,405
8av. A id. A Mon, AliglUt. ...
grnnsv, & % 11 SdwkNept,
29,545
AM
90 & M 2
S.'*i't934
1,552,427 1,053,202
F itch b u rg ...---- July............
6 11.71 ! 043,498 42409,842 4,176,437 x.iv.Pln, A West, J u n o _____
38,970
50,644
‘f ij 5*06
8,000
I lint A P.Merrp. 2d trk Sept.
47,569
51.47*1 2,008,277 *2,012,530 Stiverton............ A u g u st,...
150,759
157,865
28.570
30,74*2
Sioux City A No. M a y .........
F loren ce,,......... in ,..-..........
9,802!
10,012
80,165
1,6 »*
112,694
147,708
13,500
14,700
South Bound___ AUgUSt....
Jrt.tMnt..v i-. -.Oi J u n e ........
99,029*
97,667
Paeltle Co. ft -W . A E loU r A u g u st....
18.168
23,971
2 0 1,068
210.841 so.lai.
314,809 319,158 2,484,510 2,385,307
(
B. A Ju ly..........
tools * Att. t v August___
786
9,805
6.792
1,210
571,100
049,283
83.936
81,752
Louis's West . Ju ly..........
Georgia RR------ A u gu st....
98,990 118,46®
846,598
918.712
385,030 374,379 2,079,809 2,721,702
Morgan’eLAT. Ju ly......... .
Ga-CaFla A S o June . . . . . .
40, c v ;
842,280
22,111
90,980
116,068
132,718
19,178
17,991
N .Y .T .A M - a . July,
Geo. 0o, A F la ... tAmnftt.
54,038
533,370
484.825
56.475
927,836
147,618 140,251 1,074,859
Tex. A N , O rl.. July
p e o r je fo A w -n j,
3,976
3,333
21,0*29
23,417
957,246 037,297 7,892,188 0,783,197
Atlanttesj-s.d. Ju ly..........
Gr.Rap,&iB<3 ... *26wkSept.
38,235
54.190 1,593,18*3 1,730,024
Pacino syutem Ju ly — . . . 3,047,-200 3,195,167 19,773,236 19,460,901
a n . k . A l t.W. -JJwh-ei.t,
7,329
315,2.99
346,702
4,004,410 4,132,404 27,165,504 26,244,008
Total or a ll.. July
Other lines.... JdwkSept.
2.900
170,65-2
147,871
49,484
908,328 908,669, 0,103,109 5,487,593
70.079 2,056,349 2,247,378
^ w £ P : c j J 'i'y .......
445,359 435.278 13,762,001 13,725,174
A rizona L6 7 .- July........... 148,698 151,380 1,206,828 1,111,18(5
108,676
72.080 2,500,490 *2.512,277 ,
577,399
568,384
74.159
66,842
25,128
30.084
789.176 * New M ex.Gly. J u ly ..........
736.437
AND

II a iI r o a d

J u t e llig e ttc e *

2,221

506

THE CHRONICLE.
L a test E a rn in g s Reported.

KOAD8.

Week o r Mo | 1893.

| 1892.

Jan. 1 to L a test Date.

1893.

1
$
$
$
85,400
95,407
852,306
South Carolina.. August___
6,062
13,441
608
South & Nor. Car. J u n e ........
8,145
9.251
55.175
Spar. Un. A Col. J u n e .........
603,275
147,149 155,405
Stateu Isi. R. T. Ju ly..........
25.902
14,028
11,062
StonyCl.&CM t.. Ju ly ..........
86,092 105.599
828,700
Summit Branch. August___
69,792
709,086
99.833
Lykens Valley A ugust___
TotT both Co’ s August___ 155,884 205,432 1,5 *7,786
131,758 1,450,102
131,811
T exas & Pacific. 2dwkSept
4,244
35,111
4,453
Tex.S.Val&N.W August—
19,655
339,004
26,577
Tol. A. A. AN.M. 2d wk Apr.
48,576 1,356,448
43.197
Tol.&OhiolCentc 2 d wk Sept.
642,135
22,114
20,555
Tol. P. A W est.. IstwkSept
55,061 1,241,873
36,541
Tol.St. L .& K .C , 2d wk Sept.
2,177
6,641
2.058
Tol. < So. Haven A pril.........
fe
54,613
54,660
235,060
Ulster & D el — Ju ly..........
Union Pacific—
Or.S.L. A U. N. J u ly .......... 480,141 699,201 3,679,657
281,300 383,465 2,136,810
Or.Ry.& N .Co. Ju ly..........
387,759 490,972 3,138,649
U. Pao. D. A G. Ju ly..........
32.201
816,571
20.998
Bt.Jo.AGd.Isl. 2dwteSept.
AU other lines. Ju ly.......... 1,504,363 1,964,124 11,539.229
Tot.U.P.8ys. Ju ly.......... 2,734,330 3,6 '5 ,358 21,173,359
91,133
589,610
60,316
Oent.Br.AL.L. Ju ly..........
63,032
82,606
480,258
Montana U n .. Ju ly ...........
15,204
2,228
2,375
Ju ly..........
Lea v. Top. AS.
23,970
2,999
Man. A l.A Bur. Ju ly..........
2,485
Ju ly.......... 2,828,874 3,750,150 22,022,684
Gr’nd t o t a l /
88,804
Verm ont Valley June .......
W abash.............. 2dwkSept. 308,600 316.600 9,494,943
5,502
47,562
8,926
Wab. Clies. < W. J u n e .........
te
964,120
198,487 208,563
W est Jersey....... Ju ly..........
786,732
84,026
91,268
W .V.Cen.A Pitts August___
27,31.2
198,814
42.556
W est Va.& Pitts. J u n e ........
791,793
West. Maryland. A ugust___ 119,010 124,535
65,000
74,600 2.475,214
W est-N .Y. &Pa. Istw kSept
30,410 1,083,860
30.557
Wheel. & L. Brie 2d wk Sept.
2,151
2,039
11,891
Wil.Ckad.&Con. J u n e .........
53,176
336,540
44,543
Wil. Col. & Aug. J u n e ........

1892.
$
830,794
11.261
51.941
614,543
28.221
848.819
686.812
1.535.631
4,222,906
31,499
280,265
1,324.583
649,983
1,516,383
7.837
225,9 L4

Latest Gross Earnings by Weeks.—The latest weekly
earnings in the foregoing table are separately summed up as
follows:
Our preliminary statement of earnings for the second week
of September covers 58 roads and shows a loss of 11 *82 per cent.

Atoh. Top. & San. Fe Sys*
St. Louis & San Fr. Sys.
Balt. A Ohio Southwest.
Buffaio Roch. A P ittsb’g.
Chicago < East. Illinois.
fe
Chicago M ilw. & St. Paul.
Chicago &We8t Michigan
Cin. Jackson & Mackinaw
Cleve. Cin. Chic. A St. L ..
D enver & R io Grande . ..
D etroit Lansing &Nortk.
Duluth S. 8. A A tlantic...
Evansv. A Indianapolis..
Evansv. A R ichm ond___
Evansv. & Terre Haute.
Flint & Pere M arouetta.
Grand Rapids & Indiana.
Cincinnati R. & Ft. W ..
Grand Trunk o f Canadat
Intern’l A Gt. North’n ...
Kanawha & M ichigan___
Kan. City Clin. A Spring.
Kan. C. Ft. 8. & M em .,..
Kan. C. Mem. A Birm . ..
K au.C . Pitts A (S u it:....
Kan. City Suburban Belt.
Kan. C. Wvan. A N. W ...
Keokuk * Western..........
Lake Erie A Western.......
Louisv.Evansv. & St. L ..
Louisville A N ash ville...
Louis. N. A lbany A Chic.

Minn. St. P. A S. Ste. M._
Mo. Kansas A T exas.......
Mo. Pac. & Iron M t._____
N. V. Ontario A Western
Norfolk A Western..........
Peoria Dec. A E v a n sv...
Pittsburg & W estern.......
Rio Grande W estern.......
St. Joseph & Gd. Island.,
'fit. L. Alt. & T. H..............
Si. Lou is Southwestern..
Texas & P a c ih c ..............
Toledo & Ohio C entral...
Tol. St. L. A Kan. City. „.
W abash...............................
Wheeling & Lake E r ie ..

1893.

1892.

S
B
785,953
174,420
53,870
28,551
62,794
424,000
190,904
93,744
100,557
668,829
37,346
13,180
265,961
1.783
122,000
23,658
41,514
6,594
2,221
29,545
47,569
38,255
7,3 29
2,900
445,359
69,019
48,997
6,147
4,605
81,327
17,317
4,511
4,923
6,317
9,578
69,654
34,843
343,750
76;789
140,405
76^716
58,472
5 j;7 0 1
195,351
455,000
77,457
202.459
17,530
50,565
32,900
20.998
30;530
82.700
131,811
43,197
36,541
308,600
30,557

8
884,824
208,605
55,120
33,595
67.809
415,000
217,493
91,841
128,048
746,316
44,221
14,898
315,828
2,972
190,100
26,023
53,673
8,540
2.587
28,804
51,476
54,190
11,781
4,70 7
435,278
108.847
51.408
7,8 SI
6,050
94,684
22,918
1,620
3,661
8,108
9,5->1
77,364
38,590
43 4,980
65,955
149,3*7
96,056
50,384
55,037
214,227
599,000
70,704
229.851
18,451
47,881
58,500
32,200
34,630
95,600
131,758
4k, 576
55.061
316,600
30,410

Total (58 roads)............ 6,489,102 7,359,664
Wet decrease (11 -8 2 p. o. 1
............
............ 1
* Includes Colorado Midland both years,
t W eekending Septem ber 16.
$ Week ending September 9.

In crea se.

$

9,000
1,903

741

10,081

D ecrease.

#
98.871
34,185
1,250
5,044
5,015
26,589
27,491
77,487
6,875
1,718
49,867
1,189
68,100
2,370
12,159
1,946
366
3,907
15,935
4,452
1,807
39,328
2,411
1,734
1.445
13,3 >7
5,601

2,891
1,262
1,791
27

10,834

7.7 0
6.747
91,230
8.982
19,341

8,088

6,753
2,6 84

53
............

1,336
18,876
144,000
27,392
92 L
25,600
11,202
4,10 J
12,900
5,379
18,520
8,000

147
54,464
......... .

^ For the first week of September our final statement covers
73 roads, and shows 14*38 per cent loss in the aggregate.
Is/ w eek o f S ep te m b er .
Previously rep’d (50 r’dsl
Burl. (Jed. Eao. < North.
fc
Gin. N.O. A Tex. Pao.5 rds
Glove. Akron A Columb.
Cleveland A Marietta___
Duluth So. Shore & Atl .
East. Tenn. Va. A Ga .. .
luteroceam o (M e x .)l___
Kan. City Mem. A Birm.
Kan. C. Wyan. A N. W ...
Keokuk & Western..........
Momonis & Charleston...
Mexican R a ilw a y !..........
Minn. St. P. A S. S. M ....
Onio R iver.........................

1893.

1892.

*
8
5,917,633 6,902,16
89,656
9 <,280
113,582
146,907
18.107
20,894
5,006
7,198
39,630
50,6*0
81,0 <2
112,63o
41,400
3 2, *50
16,307
21.507
6,4 L4j
8,103
9,165
9,551
27,903
16.978
62,8*9
5L.117
53,397
52,65
2 >,097
21,190
30.400
44,000
14,88 2
20,166
22 114
20,555
35,739
55.781
65,000
74,60t>

In crea se.

*
59,025

9,050

D ecrease.

*
1,043,561
8.624
33,325
2,587
2,192
1 i ,030
31,543
5.200
1,694
386
10,925

11,712
742
1.093
3.991,034
'
13,600
2,343,940
5.284
3,209.892 San Fran. & No. Pacific.
1,559
»29,687 Toledo Peoria A West’ n..
20,045
12,502,280 Toledo St. L. A Kan.City.
Western N. Y. A P en n ...
9 600
............
22,692,874
696,216
Total (73 roads)............ 6,659.4L8 7,778,021
82,083 1,200.694
636,271
20,356 Net decrease (14*38 p.c.L
........ 1.118,606
22,042
t Week ending September 2.
23,728,42 3
89,861
Net Earnings Monthly to Latest Dates.— The following
9,643,962
34,397 shows the gross and net earnings to latest dates of all railroads
920,210
721,461 furnishing monthly statements. The compilation includes
146,497
690,800 every road from which we can get returns of this character,
2,318,381 and in that form is given once a month. Early returns are
1,000,650
13,995 published from week to week, as soon as issued, but for the
412,701

* Includes Colorado Midland in 1893 and 1892 both for the week and
the year to date.
t Includes Milwaukee & N orthern for all periods.
,
a Figures cover only that part o f m ileage located in South Carolina.
b E arnings given are on whole Jacksonville Southeastern System.
0 The business o f the Lehigh Valley and Lehigh A Wilkesbarre de­
partm ent s is included in 1893. d Includes earnings from ferries, etc.,
not given separately, t M exican currenov. e Tol. Col. & Cin. included
fo r the week and since Jan. 1 in both years. /I n c lu d e s only h alf of
lines in which Union Pacific has a h a lf interest.

2 d w eek o f September.

|V o l . L V II,

925,026
870,562

convenience of our readers all the roads making returns are
brought together here in the week in which we publish our
monthly article on net earnings— say on or about the 20 th of
the month. A paragraph mark (*jf) added after the name
of a road indicates that the figures for that road have not pre­
viously been given, but appear for the first time in this
issue.

Gross E a rn in g s. -----^,------N et E a rn in g s. ----1 ~~
------1893.
1892.
1893.
1892.
$
$
$
$
Adirondack IT
............ July
14,582
14,272
1,670 def.4,200
Jan. l to July 3 1 ___
101,007
90,871
27,026
13,831
Allegheny V a l l e y ..J u l y'
206,741
223,719
76,730
95.892
Jan. ’
522.961
. 1,526,190 1,455,292
552,578
r 3,008,323 3,267,229
878,550 1,013,533
22,497,005 21,254,859 6,335,432 5.996,017
Jan. 1 to July 31.
St.L.& SanFr.Svs.bJuly
719,349
750,817
251,211
283.819
Jan. 1 to July 31 . . . 5,045,245 4,725,417 1,595,302 1,619,679
Aggregate Total, bJ u ly 3,727,672 4,018,046 1,129,701 1,297,352
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___27,542,250 25,960,275 7,930.784 7,615,694
Baltimore A Ohio—
Lines E. O. R..b.1FAug. 1,683,041 1,853,993
690,860
683.593
Jan. 1 toAug. 3 1 ....1 2 ,5 4 1 ,6 9 6 12,839,336 3,9 76.256 3,964,472
July 1 to Aug. 31___ 3,305,779 3,475,7 L8 1,279,369 1,176,357
Lines W. O .R ..fo. IFAug.
506,992
561,1 L9
122,833
142.594
Jan. 1 to Aug. 3 1 .... 4,067,740 3,960,363
590.8 >6
529,556
July 1 to Aug. 3 1 ___
996,235 1,025,950
220,749
180,150
Total system ., b . IFAug. 2,189,943 2,415, L12
813,743
831,137
Jan. 1 to Aug. 3 L ....1 6 ,6 0 9 ,4 3 6 16,799,699 4,567.152 4,494,027
July 1 to Aug. 31 . . . 4,302,014 4,501,663 1,500,613 1,356,507
B. & O. 8ou th w ..b-..Ju n e
212.864
193,975
79,094
66,971
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 ___ 1,251,732 1,236,820
423,763
4 52,100
July 1 to June 3 0 ___ 2,659,308 2,643,742
957,892
999,214
310
Bath A H am m onds... Jane
1,621
• 1,757
424
3,564
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 ___
10.384
10,405
3,256
Birm. A A tlantic, b IFJuly
2,065
3,239
165
6 70
Jan 1 to July 3 1 ___
19,235
def.41
23,790
3,071
149,474
6 2,054
Br’kl.vn Elevated....June
154,953
60,141
951,3 2 L
Jan. 1 to June 30___
9 Jo,696
433,967
418.532
July 1 to June 3 0 ___ 1,947,131 1,334,652
842,896
790,710
Buff. R. A P itt s ..b ..J u ly
3l7,3L 0
108.556
277,206
77,303
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ---- 1,973,531 1,783,230
6L2,721
507,274
315,055
60,232
Burl. Ced.R.A No. aft July
2 75.671
73,622
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___ 2,159,632 2.256,739
460,457
602,038
Cam. A Ati. & 3rs. ill July
131,162
148,147
74,798
59,326
453.404
63,844
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___
439,965
40,938
Canadian Pacific, a.. July 1,863,267 1,796.095
690,937
681,943
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___ 11,323,265 11,618,533 3,760,207 4,001,426
Carolina Midland..H July
6,079
4,145
7,783
2,134
3,372
Jan. 1 to July 31___
3 L,94 L
31,293
1,053
Cent, of N. J ersey .a . July 1,281,469 1,247,523
541,752
523.077
Jan. 1 to J uly 3 1___ 8,4t3.336 7,uSL,329 3,253,219 3,309.040
527,102
Central P a c ific ..b ...J u ly 1,24 >,578 1,370,059
533,771
Jan. 1 to July 3 l___ 8,001,349 8.164,579 2,991 374 3,230,557
Char. Ciu. A Chic..IF. July
11. 70
9,905 def.8,128 def. 2,561
85,121
Jan. 1 to July 3 l ___
79,715 det.35.532 def. 19,031
4,612
Chautauqua Lake....June
5,616
43 J
2 24
Jau. 1 to June 30 . . .
26,867
24,3 66
9J4
2,151
4,276
4,9 73
def. 10 3
Clientw A DarL.blF- Juiy
1,139
Jan. 1 to Juiy 3L___
5 :,395
43,574
8,214
1 _,8 j 6
855,113
Chesapeake A Olnoa July
877,2 L6
293,374
301.796
Jau. i to July 3 l___ 5,801,965 5,44 i , 106 1,650,8 -7 1,308,720
139,917
Ches. A O. S. W .IFb..July
168,779
55, L79
51,673
Chic. Bur. & N o r ... b July
174,873
150,562
6 >.007
34.080
Jan. 1 to July 31 .. 1,352, 38 1,122, *24
44 ',4 i 7
3 9,600
Chio.Buri. & Q u m .bJuly 2.949,374 3,214,136
923,39 3 1.096,078
Jan. 1 to July 31
21,925,382 2 L,450,975 6,742,504 6,760,800
299,0 v2
Chicago & E. 111..a..M ay
360,150
134.129
70,616
Jan. 1 to M a y 3 i ___ 1,753,433 1,551,516
5 <4.942
500,800
Ju ly 1 to May 3 i ___ 4,o85.026 3,455. >76 1,487,823 1.252,311
Ohio. M.A St. P au l.a . July 2,593,355 2,862,586
736,334
906,401
48,^03.719 18,339,729 5,592,060 5,5->7,776
Jan. 1 to July 31.
148,291
164,958
13, >79
Chic. A W. M ich.......July
34,426
Jau. 1 to Juiy 3 1 ,... 1,090,500 l,O ol,9 8 2
172,766
278,833
Cin. Jack.& Mack. 1 b July 54,456
1
60,277
4,925
16,346
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 .... 3 9 5 ,L46
379,812
62,546
8 4.907
R oads.

THE CHRONICLE.

Skptembeb 28.J1898.J
,---- G r o ss E a r n i n g s ,—
1893
1892.
M ood s.

330,236
Oin. N.O.& T ax-P . fl a Juiy
2,339.201
Jan. 1 to July 31.
131.027
Ala.Gt. South’n.11 wJuly
Jan. 1 so July 3 1 .... 1,008,
91.271
N. O, A N o-ea st.! a July
38,773
A iab'a A Vicks.. tfa J uly
30,705
Vioka.Sh.APac. Ba J uly
629,012
Total sy stem ... Ha July
23,98*
Cln. Porte. A Vir. b July
152,828
Jan. 1 to July 31 —
90,678
Clay. Akrou A Col. b June
504,139
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 ___
July 1 to June 3 0 ---- 1,030,241
Clev. O n . C. & St. 1,. a July 1,205,252
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 .... 7.878,186
143,330
Peoria A Eaat’nPi aJ uly
956,899
Jaa. 1 to July 31 —
30,708
Clave. A Marietta. ..Juue
175,870
Jan. 1 to June 30—
322,346
Col. H. V. A T o l... bJune
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 — 1,647,111
9,569
Current Hirer.............July
97,7aO
Jan. 1 to July 31___
Den. A B. G ranoe-b.July
478,891
Jao, 1 to July 3 1 ___ 4,767,325
39.673
Des Mo. No. a w
July
2*8,768
Jan. 1 to July 31 —
35.206
Det.Bay C ity * A b b ’;Ju ly
276,170
Jam. 1 to July 3 1 ___
98,730
Del. Lana. A Nor a ..J u ly
03 <,445
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 —
67,394
Elgin Joliet A E .a-.Jun e
462,079
Jan. 1 to June 3o .
920,032
Ju ly 1 to June 30 ..
Eureka S p r in g s ___June
7,022
4 i,t 2 3
Jau. l to ju u e 3 0 ----ETMikv. A Terre U a 4 —
i
July 1 to Aug. 3 1 ,...
247.719
•2J6,yJ2
Flint A P ere .Mar.a', July
Jan. 1 to July 31 .. . 1,706.001
23,332
Ft.Worth A Rio O r.4 July
:
212,8m)
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....
Gadsden A A tt -U n 4 July
886
98,990
G eorgia... ........ a 4 Aug.
840.598
Jim. 1 to Aug, 3 , ___
179.882
Ju ly 1 to Aug. 31----flA S oa th 'u A F la .b " July
04,538
Jan. I to July 3 1 ___
479.533
Grand Bap. A I n d .f .July
237.398
Jan. 1 to July 3 t . . . . 1,733,102

339,338
2,110,031
141,933
998,563
117,503
51,011
38,899
703,739
22,842
135,439
87,743
472,561
067,044
1,260.750
s, 164,705
145,973
993,321
26,977
1-.7.633
278,677
1,555,964
19,571
112,101
770.576
4,983,104
31,832
231,276
27,650
210,591
102,019
064,940
63,887
398,010
8 1 5 ,1 3 1
6,970
30,901

257,330
2L6.0JC
1,663*033
21.181
105,973
M S6
118,469
010,712
2 2 1 .7 0 1
61,770
423,350
277,231
1.807.123
M
.
X
Grand T Pk o ( Can '. Jutv
346,640
348,758
Jaa. t to July 3 i ___ 2,238,880 2,3I*,3J3
3 5,038
Ohio. A Oran v Tr.lf July
68,331
Jaa. 1 to J t 3 1 ___
427,8*8
490,073
19.819
20,363
0 etC M -.fi. AM ! July
Jan. 1 to J n l j a t ___
1*29,012
137,401
&
0
O alf A C hicago.b < Aug.
3,516
3,004
Jaa, 1 to A ug, 3 t . . . .
25,862
22,701
floes. Tun. A Wtttu.1 Aug.
3,849
3.295
Jau. 1 to Aug. a t —
*4.44 t
21,320
B oast, & A W. T e x .. Aug.
29,017
20,1.51
July 1 to Aug. 3 i ___
08,737
58,976
nilnoi* C en tral,...a .Ju ly 1,789.736 1,149,560
Jan, 1 to July 3 1 ___11,690,567 10,565,714
tod. Dee. A We*i .-.July
38,87*
41,350
240,694
Jam 1 to July 3 1 ___
266,243
Iow a Central____ b.July
181.378
1*3,901
Jan. 1 to Juiy 3 1 ___ 1.030,033 1,020,313
Iron H allw ay___b t July
1,921
2,602
Jan. 1 to July 31 —
24,408
19,2* t
Kanawha A Mlch .bJ aly
28,550
31,065
203,109
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___
216,516
K ao. C. CUn. A Hpr. .July
21,296
22.639
Jan. 1 to July 31. . .
198,883
179,017
Kau,C . P U S.A M .a J u l y
3*8,996
322,517
Jan. 1 to July 31___ 2,758*583 2,758,999
Kan C. Men.. A is « Juiy
72,895
74,323
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___
620,178
599,165
Keokuk A W e e fn .b !.J u ly
28,239
30.302
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___
210,602
215,168
1. EneAU. A S o .a t .J u l y
a ,U 4
6,516
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ----46.20*
4 6 ,0 ,9
L . Erie a West'll toll July
282,978
300,106
Jan. 1 to Juiy 31 . . . 2,08 *,040 1,902.43*
l.ol«v Evaaa. A 8tJu.fat—
July 1 to Aug. 3 1 ----283,734
276,735
Uiuluv. A Naahv.b. J u ly 1,687,209 1,831,271
«I*B. I io ju iy 3 1 .... 1*2,405,919 12.00*,* 10
JLouUv. N. A. A C ..« July
317,001
29-1,257
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___ 1,931.829 1,792,097
H aoou A B te a w g -.'l.J a lf
5,518
5,320
Jan. 1 to July a t ___
33.278
42, .22
ManodUpir................. 3 uly
4,015
4,1*1
Jau, 1 to July 3 1, .
7 e .,3 4
7 0 ..3 8
Mexican Centra........Juiy
580,389
633,077
jifette & t o Jm y a l
4,039,493 4.459,(72
Hex. luteraatiimal. July
148,329
191,083
Jau. .4
J u iy 3 1 .... 1,217,612 1,0*2,321
Mft3o*5i*a
Jmy
315.433
400,837
Jan 1 to J uly 3 1 ___ 2,533,926 2,331,493
M
tZJSU tfe Sts
. iu lf
110.025
178,483
Jan. t to July 3 1 .,,.
999 s M 1,086,753
T
Minn.St. P.a 8.8. tl U n iy
349.000
297,338
Jan. 1 to'July 1 1 ___ 1,901,196 1,690,487
Mo, Eiui. Iron >1*1», J u n« 2.015,132 2.099,821
J »a . I to -June
12,740/J^4 12.419.20*
Sa*l..C>‘ A m. L .b , A n a.
447.706
350.932
l to Aug 3 1 ___ 3.219.977 3.360.730
,J • ’ 1 to Aug. 3 1 ___
762,622
678,601

•W E a r n i n g s , ------ei
1892.
1893.
*
$
78,000
72,738
567,702
502,702
29,784
17,093
168,956
193,668
11,000
21,000
1.000
1,000
4,000
2,009
122,734
113,331
5,821
5,844
25,08*
20,605
26,917
24.314
126,932
125,663
274,411
262,793
210,577
234,837
1,824,055 1,03 i,u22
20,326
38,675
34,464
277,871
0,090
3,507
35,496
33,019
163,320
14L,571
692,124
666,134
1,045
10,062
20,027
44,273
300,422
1 10,713
388,
2 ,0 0 , ,5 7 4
3
15,934
11,823
73,943
97.132
14,595
5,034
U u .7 65
67,506
16.011
35,05?
110,113
149.535
16.052
15,985
9*,230
109,439
242,859
207.202
2,239
3,517
19,807
S2»72a

507 I.
- G r o s s E a r n i n g s . ----->-

1893.

1892. •

4,274
21,451

3,798
18,708

R o a d s.

Nevada, Central....... June
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 ___
Now Orl.&South. .alt July
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___

- E e l E a r n i n g s . ------.

1893,
$
857
5,313

1892.
S
61
del.2,143

7,474
71,134

7,185 def. 1,248 def.1,887
78,498
def.406
4,007
N.Y.L.E.AW est’ n .e. June 2,668.683 2,742.739 4963,944 d947,851
Jan. 1 to June 3 0 .... 14,488,357 14,793,203<14,077,91444,635,849
Out. l t d June 3 0 ....2 2 ,3 8 9 ,2 3 0 22,992,93547,411,837 47,348,268

N. V. A N o r th e rn ..! July
57,370
55,559
13,261
13,643
N.Y. Ont. A W est.a. July
398,091
331,386
136,571
128,098
Jau. 1 to July 3 1 . . . , 2,204,072 1,942,953
504,80 L
474,447
N. Y. Sua. * W est-.bJuly
164.407
160,436
79,729
78,272Jan. 1 to July 31 . . .
997,042
950,570
428.324
416,762
Norfolk & Southern.July
34,718
34,011
8,438
9,224
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....
268.478
257,376
91,233
96,296
Norfolk A W estern.aJuly
802,515
300,334
190,671
252,928
Jau. 1 to July 31 .. . 5,879,338 5,385,143 1,504,280 1,502,980
Northern C en tral.b.J u ly
566.105
587,086
133,567
183,298
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ...'. 4,060,715 3,916,166 1,196,822
996,658
615,700
Northern P a cific.. b . Apr.
1,653,237 1,761,451
615,700
750.614
Jan. 1 to Apr. 3 0 ___ 5,857.913 6,625,461 1,719,363 2.401.749
July 1 to Apr. 3 0 ___ 20,150,477 20,877.014 8,163,968 8.756,394
W is .C e n U in e s .b A .p r.
121.090 431,069
121,520
135,168
Jau. 1 to Apr. 30.. . 1,533,139 1,663,712
393,166
506,230July 1 to Apr. 3 0 ___ 4,733,555 1,535,266 1,673,601 1,673,468
Tot. both C o .'s ..b .A p r .
2,077.947 2,192,520
770,219
836,062
Jau. 1 to Apr. 30 ... 7.141,102 3,309,194 2,113,029 2,903,030
July 1 to Apr. 30.
21,889,032 25,462,300 9,342,627 10,435,363
Goouee A W estern...July
2,226
1,126
329,546
Ohio A Mississippi, a July
323,597
82.626
81,355
2,391,262 2,270,139
628,775
Jau. I to July 31
424,006
29.882
67,404
08,531
Ohio E lv er.......... b .July
30,406
155,263
ja n . 1 to July 3 1 .. .
110,910
378,507
1*2,137
357,651
372,100
80,350
93,157
Oregon Itup. C o .a ..’ ] July
Jau. 1 to July 3 1 . . . 2,17-1,066 2,193.582
342.310
403,758
387,022
Dec. 1 to July 3 1 . . . . 2.475,712 1,493,420
450,040
20,172
21,571
Paducah Tenn.A A .t July
13,071
10,768
185,193
110,085
50,519
103,120
Jan. I to July 31 —
117.409
143,946
13,067
17,517
Tent*. Midland. ..I .July
3,089
6,5*7
55,002
57.326
99,990
43,745
139,036
Jan. 1 to Ju ly 3 1 ..
10,808
395,756
*73,231 Penn, •east l*. A !•„.!.July 5.512.017 3,573,672 1,530,507 1,393,265
3.916
2.903
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....3 9 .4 3 7 .1 6 * 88,274,124 10,365,973 10,250,703
56.066
40,107
20,712
Iu o.
L it e ! west P. A E. ..I uly
I tie . 140,259
598
991
63,015
Ia o.
la c . 704.218
Jaa, 1 to July 3 1 ___
37,046
29,643 Peoria D eo.A Kvaae.u*
136,350
70,180
July 1 to Aug. 31 . . .
138,610
157,234
153,146
65,-105
*0,759
4 1.309 Petersburg......... Y July
16,316
27,010
43,504
48,895
6,939
17.100
111.005
Jau. 1 U July 31
>
337.112
336.663
144,538
K H .y ii Philadelphia A Erie .July
67,735
100,789
454,193
121,361
77,599
36,030
84,960
Jau. I to July 31. .. 3.001.232 2,748,113
946,179
714.288
328,695
477.440 Phil*. A Beading— July 1.867.378 1,881,253
733,370
811,367
&
X
Jau. 1 u> July 3 1 ....1 2 ,7 9 2 ,3 1 4 13,665,781 4.599,959 0.440,791
94,683
86,929
Dee. 1 to July 31- -.1*.#10.681 14.517.303 5,802,528 6,227.002
614,11.9
599,066
Coal A Iron C o......... 1uly 3,021.47 t 3,828,692
42,295
15,646
18.052
10.300
i.
Jau. l t « July 31. 98.112,01* to ,092.309 d f.3 l6 ,J -U diet51,935
67.75.8
102,906
Dec. 1 to July 31 . .28,429,780 1.>.993.575 d f.2t7.0 3J
j.
12.5133,4.08
4,539
5 ,7 0 7 , 9 * 5
8 -2 5 .6 6 6
8 2 7 ,5 1 3
1.8,103
27,618
3 0 ,7 3 7 ,9 >0 4 ,2 0 3 ,6 1 7 5 ,3 8 8 ,3 2 8
3
S
9
J 4 .6 4 0 .8 7 S 5 ,3 0 .1 .4 8 9 0 ,2 3 9 ,5 1 5
20
885
1 8 2 ,9 3 1
D eo.
7 7 ,0 9 3
Dee.
3,160
def.6 ,7 Pltte. O. 0 . A 8t. I*, fi Aug.
5 9 ,9 8 8
In c.
6 5 .2 7 2
Jan. t to Aug. 3 1 ___
to e .
1,544
1,483
2 ,3 2 *
114
d e f . 1 ,2 7 3
Pttte.H er.dt0uio.bl .July
2,918
5,665
7,887
2 2 ,5 0 6
1 .9 2 9
482
Jau. 1 to J uly 3 1 ....
22.06(1
2,024
8.217
1 3 4 ,0 3 8
2 8 ,2 3 9
4 9 ,0 2 0
91,622
12.302
U ,5 5 i Pitta. Youngs. A A .Y A U g.
9 7 0 ,9 4 3
3 9 8 ,3 2 0
3 8 1 ,0 1 6
Jan. 1 to Aug. 3 1 .... 975,654
531,40*
205,962
2 5 ,1 1 9
2 ,2 3 1
2 ,9 7 3
20,872
3,*79,538 2,321,039 Muth.Om. A K .C .b ’ .A u«,
4 7 ,1 4 9
1 8 1 ,7 7 3
4 1 ,8 9 1
Jao. 1 to Aug. 31. ..
171.648
11,260
12,887
3 1 ,5 8 1
3 ,9 5 9
1 2 ,2 9 6
28,393
58,017
80,520 Rtoh. A Petersburg.’ July
2 1 0 ,3 0 3
5 1 ,4 1 9
6 5 ,3 3 4
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....
213,690
39,067
30,991
1 2 .6 3 2
5 3 , 5 11
1 8 ,3 6 3
Kleh. Prod. A P o t ..'J u ly
54,154
300,416
231,340
4 5 1 ,0 6 5
1 6 2 ,4 0 0
1 7 9 ,1 8 0
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....
476,925
d e l 243
d o t 197
2 4 9 ,7 0 8
8 5 ,0 2 5
95,57*3
Klo Grande West b . f July
197,917
2,01.0
uy
V ) 1 ,9 4 5
4 0 1 ,3 0 5
Jau, 1 to July 3 1 .... 1,308.929 1 ,4 4 7 ,6 0 8
6.270
9.114
1 0 ,8 9 8
5 ,8 6 2
2 ,4 1 9
Sag.Tus.A H uron."... July
15,070
56,323
60,237
6 1 ,0 1 9
2 5 ,7.04
1 0 ,5 0 5
Jan. I to July 3 1 ...,
73,381
3,718
2,982
8 ,0 1 4
3 ,7 7 7
3 ,5 7 2
8,452
7 1 ,0 o l
52,468 Sag. Valley A St. L. July
5 2 ,3 6 0
1 7 ,7 0 5
1 3 ,1 7 8
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ...,
55,582
33,650
61.485
1 1 4 ,3 1 1
8 1 ,1 0 0
7 1 ,3 7 0
3t. L .A . A T . U . b .J n ly
126,358
502,42*
581,69*
3 7 8 ,0 9 2
8 1 2 ,6 5 7
3 3 9 ,4 9 1
Jau. 1 to July 3 1 . . .
912,368
def.6,305 def. 13.339
1 8 4 ,0 4 8
d e f . 1 ,5 8 9
3 9 ,8 7 7
156,593
05.632
41,790 St. Paul A D ul___ b June
8 5 2 ,0 3 6
1 1 0 ,0 01
2 1 3 ,4 7 9
Jau. 1 to June 3 0 ....
827,450
5,5*8
9,305
6 7 7 ,.7 7
0 3 9 ,8 3 3
July 1 to June 3 0 .. . 2,105,37 5 1 ,3 3 1 ,6 1 2
62,548
65,178
417
6 17
07
Sanders. A Teunllle... June
711
412
1,232
13
2 ,7 2 2
d o t .2 1 9
Jan. 1 to June 3 1 ....
3,319
9,473
7,781
d «f 0 005
3 .8 1 0
109 411
San Ant. A Arau P..,July
1 1 >,001
105,567
139,419
8 3 ,0 1* d o f .d 1, >12
7 ?0. ii8
Jaa 1 to July 3 , ___
912.8 >7
837,974
797,509
9 3 .3 5 0
4 1.2 <8
‘ 3 .9 0 0
Saa rrau .v.s P o e .* . Aug
81.8J3
5 j « ,o 9*
1 5 7 ,0 .3
17 1,091
Juu 1 to Aug. u l ___
513,.> 0
94,233
76, 20
1 8 1 ,7 .(7
O 0 .0 3 J
a l,7 « 3
Jui, 1 w sag. 3 t ___
15».o75
5,18.751
63 0,J >2 Bay. Amv-r. wMout H .-uly
•2.732
1.1,141
4 7,9 74
3s,364
4,040,123 4,008,03 •
1 0 2 ,1 0 8
2 0 , JO0
27 J, t >J
J a u ,, to July i t . . .
297,892
io n ^ u o
11 ,1 0 l
SaV. PI a. A Western 59 ,t 8
3.01, < l i
2 1 7 ,1 9 8
2 0 1 .8 1 3
7 5 8 .2 5 5
Apr l to uua t ’---7 ‘9.450
0 .1 3 .0 3 3
5 7 3 ,/7 l
uef. 123
uau t t o J u u e J O . . . 1,512,117 1 ,0 1 0 ,2 0 2
780
5,1 *2 dei.o.B al Sllyeruia . . . ....... fl July
5 .2 1 3
3 .1 7 3
10,0 t l
6,372
1 9 .1 1 0
3 ,? 0 S
3 J .1 4 4
J»u. I to July .s i ___
3 0 ,9 .6
1,7*4
294
32,s00
44.331 South 0 0 4 nd. . ..a fl.ju ly
74 0
1 1 ,1 7 3
4,2.11
16,377
2 ,4 0 5
9 ( .9 3 1
2 5 .2 78
l o j.o a y
Jaa. , t u ja iy 3 1 ___
291. 97
131,233
1,-800,637 1,5-1 J GtiS South C arolina___1 iu lf
1 0 ,1 >9
1 1 ,0 7 2
8 2 ,1 1 8
1
87.857
1 * 7 ,5 0 4
1 6 3 ,0 0 3
7 i i , *s7
53,3 IJ
0 s ,2(3
Jau. i to nit] 31___
760.Jo6;
0 3 9 ,3 3 1
2 3 3 ,1 9 5
*23u ,l01
Nov. 1 to July 3 1 . . . , l.o o t,J J 3
S 9 i.2 (4
3 8 7 .1 /3
*1 0.200
southern paetne Co.—
4 2 ,0 4 0
5 0 .0 1 3
3 1 9 .1 5 3
*y 16,44 i
v»aL ,1 . s e a . Aut a July
314,809
♦ 7 0 -5 - 2
3 8 1 ,0 0 0
5 ii.2 t 7
Jau. I to July a i .. 2,481,510 2 ,3 0 , ,,3 0 7
4 6 ,13 t
77,0 V i
39,350
8 t,7 .s 2
39. 40
4 *.1,-50
8 o # ,6 i6
Louisiana (Vest.. oJu ly
83,336
2 5 7 , 1 19
2 9 .9.01
5 7 1 .4 0 3
Jau. 1 loJU iy 1 ,.
619 483
12 ...0- 7
118.191
1 4 .431
1 0 ,7 0 9
371.079
M’gau'a La. v r . o f a l y
9*5,030i
571,74J
3 2 1 .8 1 0
2 ,7 J i./0 2
4 * 3 ,9 7 0
Jau l to July 3 1 .. 2,u7!
237.1 *0
t t u .r u
4 ,6 * 0
3 ,7 0 3
1
l 7,9.14
N.Y. le x , a > 1 .-a .J u ly
iw. 73
2 ,3 78,6 0} 2.-.SS 1 . 1
1 0 ,3 3 0
31,.06 7
1 1 6 .0 0 0
Jau. 1 to July a l .
131,731
121,491
170.3 -.7
6 1,195
6 3 ,3 2 0
14 1,251
Texas as N. O .to...J u ly
l * 7 ,o l81
J ,223.427
3 7 0 ,3 1 *
4 U i,o 4 J
9 2 7 ,0 3 0
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 .. 1,074,Sod‘
200,581
3*5.445

THE CHRONICLE.

.r .5 0 8

,---- Groan Earnings.-----«
.
1893.
1892.
$
$

a N et earn gs here given are after deducting taxes.
b Net earr utrs hare given are before deducting taxes.
- A fter dei ictiug other expenditures for repairs, replacem ents and
general expenses, net incom e applicable to interest on bonds in Jul y
w a s $6 8,66 5,airaiust$130,670 lasty ear.an d for sevcnm onths$494,933,
against $589,397. M exican dollars are treated as equivalent to 80
cents United States m oney, and all depreciation beyond 20 per cent is
charged in the above items.
1 A paragraph mark added after the name o f a road indicates that
T
the figures for that road have n ot previously been given, but appear
|or the first, time iu this issue.
d A fter deducting proportion due roads operated on a percentage
basis, net in June, 1893, was $758,133, against $756,433 in 1892; for
six months to Juno 30, $3,425,210, against $3,426,902, and for the
nine months from October l t o Juno 30, $5,436,926, against $5,422.
378.
| Including incom e from ferries, &c.
|
j Tol. Col & Cin. included for all periods, both years.
f lucludes only one-half o f lines in which Union P acific has a part
Interest.
$ IucUidea Colorado Midland for all periods, both years.

Interest Charges and Surplus.—The following roads, in
addition to their gross and net earnings given in the foregoing,
also report charges for interest, &c., with the surplus or deficit
above or below those charges.
r - I n f c r ’ t, r e n t a ls , <Cc.—, ^ B a l . o f jVet E a r n s .Atoll. T. & S. F eS ys. July
St. L. & 8. F. S y s...J u ly
_
A ggregate total_ Ju ly
Butt. Roch. & P itts..J u ly
Cam. & A tl. & B rs...J u ly
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 . . . .
Chic.Burl. & Quincy.. July
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___
■Cade. & W est M ich ..Ju ly
Jau, 1 to July 3 1 ___

- Inter’t, rentals , c*e.-> r-Bal.

-Net E a rn in g s.-

1892.
1893.
$
*
Road*.
175,911
160,077
A tlantic system. b |July
|
957,246
937,297
1,315,669
Jan. i to July 3 1 .. 7,392,168 6,733,197 l,8d 8,410
Pacific Bystem . 1>..July 3,017,200 3,19>,167 1,275,344 1,301,803
Jail. 1 to July 31 .-19,773,336 19.460,901 7,093,802 7,302,295
Total o f a ll.b ___July 4,004,446 4,132,464 1,451.255 1,461,880
Jan. 1 to July 31.-27,165,504 26,244,098 8,962,212 8,617,966
Southern Pacific RR.—
Coast and South’n Cali­
467,677
416,628
fornia Divs.. .tl July
968.328
908,669
Jan. 1 to July 31. 6,103.109 5,487,593 2,397,806 2,179,676
45.861
A rizonaD ivis’ n..IT July
148.639
151,380
4 LG,93 L
304J08
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 .. 1,206,823 1,111,1*9
18,491
27,964
New Mex. Div...1T July
66.842
74.459
22 4,763
267,996
Jau. 1 to July 3 1 ..
568,384
577,399
79,634
75,255
Staten I. RapidTr.bH July
147,149
155.405
202,320
181,603
Jau. 1 lo July 3 1 ___
603,275
614.543
7,611
10,426
Stonv C l.& C . M ..bi: July
11,062
14,028
8,81 l
3,732
ja n . 1 to July 3 1 . . . .
25,902
28,221
7,460
Sum mit B ranch.. .ITAug.
86,092
105,599 def. 17,030
55,3ul
71,905
Jan. 1 to Aug. 31___
828,700
843,819
11,442
d e f.2 1,733
ljykens Valley..-ITAug.
69,792
41,461
26,081
Jan. l t o Aug. 31 . . .
709,086
688,812
13,902
def. 3 3,888
T otal both Co’ s..ITAug. 155,83 4
81,332
116,369
Jau. 1 to Aug. 3 1 ___ 1,537,786 1,535,631
. 55,200
Tenn. Coal I. & RR ... July
----479,400
Jan. 1 to July 31...................
53,269
70,210
Texas & Pacific.........July
471,339
502,365
194,783
706,888
Jau. 1 to July 3 1 .... 3,756,785 3,446,392
2,685
1,065
T ex. Sab.V. & N.W.H July
4,717
5,647
9,636
6,901
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ....
30,867
27,046
51,562
59,667
T oledo& O . C en t...b July
164,458
167,703
374,904
333,213
Jan. l t o July 3 L .... 1,131,71.8 1,040,251
23,919
22,466
Tol.Peoria&West.MTAug.
86,315
85,138
133,043
154,347
Jan. 1 to Aug. 3 L___
620.021
629,408
36,483
38,049
July 1 to Aug. 3 L___
158,953
157,712
24,243
25,790
’ U lster & Delaw’e...IT July
54,613
54,660
69,887
65,298
235,030
225,914
Jan. l t o July 3 1 ___
U nion Pacific—
184,465
317,813
699,201
Oreg.S.L.& U.N .b, July
430,141
Jau. 1 to July 3 1 .. 3,679,657 3,991,034 1,392,659 1,553,932
75,577
118,745
383,465
Ore. R y .& N .C o .b .. July
281,300
415,495
475, L31
Jan. l t o J m y 3 1 .. 2,136,810 2,343,9 40
58,756
490,972
140,365
U n.P .D .& G ulf.b.. .July
387,759
530.200
680,144
Jan. l t o July 3L .. 3,133,649 3,209,892
12,553
77,596
17,871
8t.Jos. & G d .Isl_ July
_
80,762
217,474
194,899
645,730
Jan. l t o July 3L ..
679,012
443,256
837,324
A ll other lines.bn July 1,*04,368 1,954,124
Jau. 1 to July 31.-11,539,229 12,502,230 3,576,391 4,76 L,341
779,607 1,482,118
Tot.Un.Pac.svs.bTT July 2,734,330 3.615,353
Jau. 1 to Ju’ y 31.-21,173,359 2 i , 692,374 6,160,146 7,692,718
2,665
16,280
91,133
■Cen. Br.&Le.L... b July
60.316
GJ6,2L6
101,103
235,527
Jau. 1 to July 3 1 ..
589,610
27.5 24
82,605
10,231
Montana UnionbH July
63,032
112,304
150.372
636,27L
Jan. 1 to July 3L ..
430,253
def.2,202 def.3,339
2,223
L e’ v.Top.&S.W.blT July
2,375
20,356 def. 17,458 def. 11,184
Jan. 1 to July 3 i . .
15 204]
2,485 def.3,464 def.3.015
M au.Alm a& B..b1| July
2,999
22,042 def. 14,079 def.10,676
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ..
23,970
Grand tota l.t___July 2,823,874 3,750,150
784,580 1,508.932
Jan. 1 to July 3 L ..22,022,684 23,723,423 6,301,984 7,932.751
243,571
240,329
Wabash, b ................... July 1,150.734 1,115,302
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___ 7,664,343 7,597,362 1,607,096 1,595,510
203.563
63,555
193,487
59,948
West Jersey & Brs.1T July
215,544
964,120
920,210
209.001
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___
34,808
44,006
104,715
W estern M aryland..July
109.435
184,644
566,265
194,43L
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___
672,783
784.564
235,420
223,944
959,195
Oct. 1 to July 3 1 ___
305,332
72,120
111,641
302,315
W est.N.Y.&Penn.bH July
596,146
639,196
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ___ 2,100,814 1,917,881
28,536
28.863
84,026
West Va. Cent. & P .Aug.
,
91,268
7 -6,73 2
JaD. 1 to Vug. 3 1 ___
721,461
291,036
24 >,535
56,673
54,837
174,094
July 1 to .\ug. 3 1 ___
174,851
4,171
4,657
W hitebreast f el Co..July
87,615
48,8o6
Jan. 1 1( .. uiy 31___

H oa d s,

fVoL. LV1I.

1892.
1893.
1893.
1892.
$
S
$
942,000
1169,533
919.000
t l l.5 5 0
285,000
275.000 def.33,789
8,819
1,227,000 1,1 9 4 ,0 0 0 1det.22,239
(178,352
71,083
59,161
36,873
18,147
9,014
9,538
65,784
49,783
60,438
62,821
3,406 def.21,383
830,000
815,076
98,398
281,002
5,810,000 5,705,527
932,501 1,055,273
32,759
23,999 def.19,180
10,427
230,081
111,466
167,367 deX.57,315

Roads.

Clev.Cin.L'liic.&St.L.July
Peoria & Eastern..rune
July 1 to Juno 3 0 ---Current R iver........... July
Dot. Lans. & N or___July
Jan. t to July 3 1 ___
Evan8\\ & Terre Haute—
July 1 to Aug. 3 1 ___
Flint & Pere M arq.. July
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ---Kan. C. Clin. & 8pr..July
Kan. C. Ft. S. & M ...JuIy
Kan. C. Mem. & Bir.July
Lake Erie & West’ n. July
Jan. 1 to July 31___
Louisv. Evans. & St L.—
July 1 to Aug. 3 1 ---Nashv. Chat & St.L Aug.
J uly 1 to Aug. 31 —
Peoria Dec. & E vansv.—
July 1 to Aug. 3 1 ----Sag. V alley & St. L ..J u ly
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ---San Frau. & No.Pao.Aug,
July 1 to Aug. 3 1 —
Tenn. Coal. I. & R R .. July
Jan. 1 to July 3 1 ----West Jersey & B r s.. July
Jan. 1 to July 31 —

1893.
$
218,383
36,802
411,620
6,692
26,400
186,626

ot B el Earns.
1892.
1893.
1892.
$
$
$
18,194
17,809
217,028
2,524
37,873 def. 3 2,19 3
454,519 df. 169,268
68,91 5
3,370
6,692 def. 5,617
8,651
26,400 def.9,789
183,923 def.70,213 daf.34,338

51,100
51,381
350,236
13,638
88,645
39,107
54.653
376,869

100,883
66,369
43,063
6,995
50.331
3,622
45,521
127,558
347,673
13,638 def.9,920 dof.10 ,656
88,937 def.54,995 def. 24,452
37,384 d ef.45,413 def.50,723
86,710
50,914
52.709
430,750
46L,103
356,759

94,087
121,668
244,697

82,003
122,693
244,319

51,017
4,556
25,896
17,312
31,687
60,300
422,100
28,193
1 2 ',7 7 0

50,129
4,556
25.896
17,075
34,188
24,515
114,032

151
7,823
45,884

def.5.2S3
53,864
101,126

15,276
19,163
def.988
def.779
def.8,191 def. 12,718
25,133
13,646
47,595
24,298
def.5,100
57.300
44,040
31,655
92,774
94,969

( A fter adding m iscellaneous income.

A N N U A L REPOR TS.
Fitchburg Railroad.
(F o r the year ending June 30, 1893.y1
The annual report is quite brief. It states that “ five new
iron bridges have been constructed in place of those too ligh t to
carry our heavy traffic and the iron viaducts approaching the
Hudson River Bridge at Mechanicville have been replaced by
earth embankments. A contract has been made with the
Boston Bridge Company to add an extra truss t ) this bridge.
Of new rails there have been laic! 4,383 tons and 265,467 new
ties have been used in repairs. On the Watertown branch
work double-tracking was commenced in October last, and
by the end of our fiscal year had been completed from W est
Cambridge as far as Watertown Station at an expenditure of
$55,519. The traffic on this branch had outgrown a single
track. The Brookline branch was completed at a cost of
$305,287 and was opened to the public Sept, 7, 1892. This
branch has a good freight traffic which will be largely in­
creased by the development of granite quarries at Brookline.
Of the amount charged to expenses for personal injuries,
8124,179 was due to the fatal accident at W est Cambridge
Sept. 10, 1832, and’ six claims remained unsettled at the close
of the year. A large number of old claims were settled dur­
ing the year, which also increased this expenditure beyond the
usual amount.
“ It will be noticed that the amount of notes payable at the end
of the fiscal year is much larger than usual. This is accounted
for by the fact that bonds of the Boston Barre & Gardner RR.
Co., $391,000, have recently fallen due, but owing to the
financial situation they could not be replaced by a corres­
ponding amount of new funded debt; and also it is to be re­
membered that no authority to fund floating debt has been
asked of the stockholders for several years, during which, as
will be seen from the reports, the expenditures for construc­
tion and equipment have largely increased.”
Tne comparative statement for four years compiled for the
C h r o n i c l e is given below:
OI’ ERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.

Total miles op er’ t’ d .

1889-90.
369

1890-91.
436

1891-92.
436

1892-93.
450

O p e r a tio n s —

Passengers carried.. 5,895,202
6,719,206
7,342,031
7,770,632
Passenger m ileage.
91,705,034 103,817,884 109,802,633 117,908,668
Rate per pas. per m.
1*91 cts. 1 8 7 cts.
1*92 cts.
1*87 cts.
Fr’ gilt (tons) m ov’d. 3,971,318
4.215,024
4,570,377
4,872.330
Fr’ t (tons) m ileage..390,079,322 437,219,636 496.160,278 525,027,360
0*94 cts.
1*004 cts.
0 941 cts.
Rato per ton per m .. 1*015 cts.
$
Earnings—
$
$
$
2,482,686
2,192,422
2,369,186
Passenger...... - ......... 1,755,765
4,935,723
4,666,173
4,387,900
Freight....................... 3,961,776
288,883
270,682
313,446
541,993
M iscellaneous.
T’l gross earnings.
Operating expenses.
T axes.........................

6,259,534
4,350,008
175,598

6,851,004
4,917,538
215,927

7,348.805
5,112,697
224,081

7,707,297
5,542,689
225,783

Total expen ses..
Net earnings............ .
P er c’ t o f op. ex. to
earn. (excl. taxes).

4,525,606
1,733,928

5,133,465
1,717,539

5,330,778
2,012,027

5,763,472
1,938,825

69-74

71*78

69-57

71-91

INCOME ACCOUNT.

R e c e ip ts —

Net earnings.......... ,
Disbursements—
Rentals paid............
Interest on bonds.
Other in terest.......
D ividends................ .
,

IS 89-90.
$
1,733,928

1690-91.
$
1,717,539

1891-92.
$
2,012,027

1,938,825

271,980
799,153
8,263
261,836

274,980
869.068
20,216
562,750

260,980
945,271
18,793
619,233

264,146
953,254
21,639
668.134

1,727,014
1,874,282
def.9,475 sur.137,745

1 907,173
SUi ,31,652

1,341,232
sur. 392,696

1S92-93.
$

THE CHRONICLE.

S eptember 23, 18C3.J

GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JOKE 3 0 .
1892.
1890.
1891.
S
S
4 n s e tt—
§
C onstruction---------- 33.525,313 3 7 ,3 7 8 .2 5 8 3 9 ,3 1 2 .6 8 9
3 ,9 1 6 ,8 3 8
3 ,9 4 6 ,9 4 0
Equipm ent................ 3,733,601
1 ,4 6 9 ,4 0 6
3,290,442
In v e stm e n ts................
2 ,1 3 1 .9 7 7
2 0 0 .3 9 6
452.97-1
C ash.................. .
.
557,313
1 ,1 5 3 ,5 7 5
1 ,1 6 0 .8 9 7
Bo:? and ew*h m;c’t» 1,095,053
6 7 a,8 4 0
1,01*2,418
Materials*: supplies
765,661

T otal................... 41,311,920

4 0 ,8 1 7 ,9 2 6

4 7 ,0 2 4 ,5 1 7

L m b U M ts—
7 ,0 0 0 ,0 ',0
7 .0 0 0 .0 0 0
r'tack, com m on . . . . .
7 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
s t o c k , pre fe rred —
1 3 ,7 7 5 ,1 0 0 1 0 ,1 9 7 .0 0 0 1 0 .4 9 7 ,6 0 0
F u n d e d d e b t ............. 1 3 ,5 5 4 ,6 0 0 2 0 ,8 0 1 .8 0 0 20,821,000
0 7 5 ,0 0 0
0 5 0 ,0 0 0
780,000
Motes payable..........
7 6 9 .7 3 5
7 6 0 ,4 1 3
Vouchers and acc'tsS3 >,071
2 3 1 .9 4 J
3 0 6 ,0 3 6
D iv id en d s..................
2 6 2 ,1 3 1
2 3 6 ,0 0 3
3 0 3 ,0 3 9
Interest......................
S11.5IB
2 6 i,1 6 »
412.084
3 tu . 1 <7
O ther accounts........
£ 7 3 ,1 9 7
2 7 3 ,1 9 7
P r o S l an d l«*>, »u r..
2 8 2 .6 7 2

T o ta l................... 41,811,920

4 0 ,3 1 7 ,9 2 0

4 7 ,0 2 4 .5 4 7

CONDENSED GENERAL BALANCE SllEET JOKE 30.
1893.
3

40,157.618
3 ,9 4 6 ,9 4 0
1 ,6 8 1 ,2 4 8
4 3 3 ,0 5 9
1 ,0 2 3 ,1 1 0
8 9 4 ,8 3 2
4 3 ,1 3 7 ,4 0 7
7 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
1 7 ,1 (0 0 ,0 0 0

2 0 ,4 9 9 .3 0 0
1 ,6 9 5 ,0 0 0
9 0 4 ,4 5 4

317.713
2 9 7 .4 3 6
2 5 0 .0 '7
2 7 3 .1 9 7
4 3 ,1 3 7 ,1 0 7

N e w Y o r k C e n t r a l & H uiR o h R i v e r R a i l r o a d .

(F o r (he y ea r en d in g J u n e 80, 1898.)
T h e p r in cip a l d a ta a s to o p e r a tio n s , e a r n in g s , in c o m e a n d
b a la n c e sh e e t fr o m th e a n n u a l re p o r t a re g iv e n b e lo w , b u t trie
fo llo w in g s u m m a r y o f to ta l r e c e ip ts a n i d is b u r s e m e n ts o f
t h e y e a r is o f m u c h in te re st.
e c x u A u r o r r i s e s c m . t k % « tions
nsa
R rto n m s ,

Cash balance July 1 .1 8 9 2 ................................. ........................... 81,092.345
snrpluA for year ended Ja n e 30, i * 9 4 ..................................—
0 7 ,, <t
Rebate on S ew York State Tax on e a r n i n g * - ..................
„ 9M »
West Shore H. It, newts * > & ................................ ......................
few.oOo
Jleecli Creek Baitrual stock sold .......................................•••-•
2 4 ,,3 0 J
RttlweUptton* for lacrcu*ed capital stock due Ju ly 1. 1893,
paid In advance ........................................................................... 1,127,600
Decrease, correot asset* ............................................................... 2,301.490
Increase,current llabtUtte*...... ...................................... -•
3>'»g*235
Special Kquip. Acer. Ke’ re fo r liedcui, o t -I per cent Gold Deo,
300,C60
.^9,068,130

Appropriation o f Rtmtircn.

Increase, cm istrucU onand equipm ent... .........................
83,404,633
Inc ease. West Shore It. S. cvu.tnm tiou accoun t...............
31.034
Inurease. 6, Y A II »t. It R. coustruolloo ncconnt ...............
44.224
InetM ae. Rom e Wat. * .< }» !. R, K, ceostrttetlOBaccount. ..
t » v ,io 8
Increase. O ouverneor at Oswegatchle ILK construction n e b
“ 7,441
Home Watertown A O r M ain, n o .b r lease...........................
„| h ,o3 *
Elevation o f track* o ? « llaricm Stiver........................................ ; b « .-o *
Sew shop- and yanl at DepeW.......... ............................................. 009.* »
Instalment on botid* and mortgage , . . . . . . ------ --------------- S W »
Fond tor redem ption f t 4 p e r c ut (told debenture*............
3 w .M 0
S tock o f Home Watertown A 0*<t R. f t . in treasury................. , 31,900
Mohawk & Malone Hallway stock (nominal v a lu e !....................
W
New York State t a x o n It,, -a*, ot c .p ita l -dock ....................
13,215
Unre coveted balance o f feint® against the U. 4. fo r tax oh 80
.
p e rc e n t scrip U .uc o l 190* cane, (.el— . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ..
13,101
*3,122,88*

1891.
1892.
A s s e t * -S
. *
1 5 3 ,5 9 5 ,2 9 4
Road aud e q u ip m e n t..............151,002,283
Special equipm ent.................. - 5,700,464
5 ,4 0 0 ,4 6 4
New shape, s c , at D epew ......................... .
Stocks and bonds .................... 10,034,635
9 ,3 9 4 ,3 2 2
Advances to oih er lines, real
estate, & c ................................ 1,169.701
4 ,5 6 3 ,9 2 9
5 ,0 2 8 .2 2 0
Dae by agent#. A c ..................... 5,280,791
3 ,3 .1 7 ,8 9 1
Supplies on h a n d ......................
3.072.813
3 .3 6 3 ,6 0 9
.......................................
2,891 277
1 ,1 6 3 ,5 4 1
N. Y. & Hitr. construed .® a c t 1,0 19,9 31
6 4 3,433
W en Shore c m struciioo a ce t......................
1 6 5 ,0 9 4
R W i Og. equip . Ac., a c c t..
140,230
Fund for redemp, o f 4 p c, debs
............

T h e sta tistics o f tru ffle , e a r n in g * , in c o m e , e t c ,, a r e s h o w n
in th e fo l l o w i n g tables, c a m p ile d l o r th e C h r o n i c l e :
o r in .v rM m .
1890*01
2 ,0 8 6

F r e ig h t and oth er c a r*.........
F loa tin g e q u ip m e n t.. . . . . . .
O p e r a tio n * —
P assenger* c a rried ..............

2,1 M 0

1 8 9 2 -3 3
2 ,0 9 6

1 ,1 3 2
l .l . s o
4 0 .5 * s
1HS

late*,motives ........................
«vd*m eadL .......

1 8 9 1 -3 2

1 ,1 6 9
lfeit>7
lO .-lH i
130

1 .1 9 7
1 .4 2 7
4 0 ,1 7 2
138

23,671.383
745,080,941
1'8 # d »
21,312."72
Freight tons' mileage* ....2 ,9 »0 .< '«6 .0 «S 8.830.043.593 3.833.105.713
- rate
- ..
0-74 c u .
0*70 ola.
O'TucIi*,
A v. * - per ton per mile..
2 0 ,0 6 7 .2 1 4

Passenger m ltr»K -.......... .

5»/.4oH.**27,

R a te per passenger p e r m - .
K r e k n t lions) m o v ed *-****-

i '* , l el*.
1 6 , 6 - 1 ,5 5 7

2 2 ,2 1 3 .0 3 7
6 8 7 ,0 3 9 .7 9 0
1 ’9 4 c u .
2 0 .7 2 1 .7 5 2

T o t a l I t A h i i t t f e * ........................1 8 3 , 3 5 3 , 1 7 3

1800-91.
652

1831-92.
810

locom otiv es
Fas.*,-nrer r e * . . .
Freight c a r * . . . , , . .
Other ear*..............
O p e m tm n x —
fh --'H i!.r * carried,

109
84
2,150
5

128
103
3,95 4
7

161
182
4,393
8

R ............ . p « * - I*, n .

2*57 . l -

>llle« operated . . .
E q u ip m e n t—

918.343

Total Incom e............... .......12,0 2 0 ,0 0 2
l>i>5„rse,ee*4r

7 7 ,3 5 1

1 4 ,4 1 0 3 8 3

14372,240
5,391,137
4.170.595
214.898
(5)1,471,415
300,0*0
20.318
14,5*3,363
isur.233,877

TfeMMHM for debenture* ____

300,000

M lsceilaiie*»u*...................................

7 2 ,2 2 2

5,303,704
3,967,816
214,-159
(5)4.171,415
300,000
0.2 45

* Total disbursem ents,. . . . . . 12,078,459
def.353,457
B a lo n r e ,.................

14,233.511
sur.133,321

R entals pal.! .................................... 4 ,1 5 2 .1 0 0
In terest 0 0 d e b t ............ ........- —
3 .8 3 4 .9 0 8
T a x e s on earnin'.'* and .cap ital.
274,89*4
IMvidcti.h*
.................... ...... 1 1 8 1 4 ,0 2 4 ,2 7 3

1802 9311,014317
227,423

2 - 5 2 el.s.

1892-93.
■ »
1.199,340
3.500,103
372,27(5

t a u t gruvH earn., 3.530,461
iq w u fr ~
V aiotenaaec nfW“ y 5 #
MTui'n’ -i ee o f equip. ! 2,130,931
Conduct, tralisp thin
OcneiaL .......—
1

3,041,802

5,353,237

5,131,779

f 712,230
406,515
2,323,722 \ 1,050.143
l 555,382

613,573
:c>n,37«
1,01)8,254
531,202

Total expen ses—
N»t earnings............
P e. op. exp. to earn.

2.323,722
1,619,582
54 93

3,324,230
2,0.-9.007
62 01

3,139,405
1,992,374
01-17

1830-91.
S
1,610,581
37.142

1891-92.
*
2,029,007
31,330

1892-93,
8
1,092.371
170,061

1,657,001

2,U8U,803

2.102.13.')

< 8281005
i 120.01.1
500,000
118,111
420,012

801,015
120,416
500,000
51,351
420,012

1,3)0,614
1,988,639
T ot. dU’u’ rsem'nts. 1,292,696
72,231
137,718
263,220
Ilai.uioc, surplus----o r .s e B i t balance shket gi nb 30.

1,983,007
178,733

2.139.851
1,110,610
60 27

rSCOME ACCOUNT.
1999-90.
9
1,4 10,610
19.801

32.2-*l,-7 7
14,614.817
68-80

*

>f etc.

1801-92.
s
1.211,515
3,801,904
339,838

31,130,113
14,339,512
68*47
1891-92.

2

1890-31.
#
982,199
2,731,S31
»
329,675

S a m m o t—

Passenger - ................
Freight......................
M all,ex., rent*. A c,

13.1-9.330
8,487,222
3,040,1*90
4.639,701
1.27-1,490
1,600,441

14.33u.512

1,218,594
1,163,104
47,176,243 46,763,910

SARStNOS AM> BXPE1CSES.

43,478,623

1890-91.

161
13 4
4,500
8

1989-00.
t
808.019
2,463,200
219,222

13,273.610
8,393,092
2,448,14 s
4 . 189,007
l.l* -,l> 1 7
1,421,001

S « r > /• '* *
Net c u m in . * .........
1 2 ,5 3 1 ,2 8 2
ftet., e n t a s e s , m v e - t a r t s ,d c .
8 8 ,7 4 0

2 - 7 't e t * .

1*02-93
810

enslght It.-®*, ear . 2.133,193
2.404.239
3.614.737 2.8.51.196
Freight (tun*. 1
m 215,030,899 25 3,07 3,211 307.174,139 333.338.356
Hat* i> r imi j. m. . iT S e t e .
.
1 ‘03 cl*.
1*03 etc.
1-07 <st«.

lirre ip h -

ts c o n n M x .o e s r ,

1.031,701

Pass, e .rrie.i 1 tulle, 33,1 "5.832 3 5 .7 6 l.s u

T . e ,! earnings................... 37,002,114
•
*
“
T N « e ..... ........a., ...... 10.365,628
Monifftt*c*wt*r... ,.., e
.s.s. *1.743,992
1.951.>H5
M 4*»f e itz m e t wi ear* ........ .
3,723,323
MmMtmtiixsitN' o f wmy s
,
8U8.423
Oener-tl .... ...... ..............
1,686.102
T a i « f .4 ............... a.......
i

1 3 9 ,1 4 1 ,6 8 3

OPERATIONS.
1889-90.
652

20,066,944
i .c:-;,,.>.»;*.!
1,889,.27
2,456,2 s 4
14.2-1
636,837
30-,7*i9

12,:. :i 1,262
06-91

1 8 1 ,7 6 1 .7 8 7

The sin isiics fo r fou r years, com p iled for the CHRONICLE in
the usual form , are us follow s :

21.4 *0.473
41,084,101)
i,* 8 m m
2,218,00 3
11,2*4
55*3,577
293,812

Total e x p e m e * ----- -------N'e.4earning* . ............ . .......
Per >'!. O f op< r. u p 's to earns

4 5 7 9 ,5 7 5
4 .1 3 7 .3 2 0
2 ,1 0 8 ,8 9 3
3 .2 8 5 .0 2 S
1 .2 9 7 ,7 6 5
4 7 5 ,0 6 0
2 5 5 ,1 1 8
3 0 0 ,0 0 0

The remarks of President J. W , Thomas will be fouatl on a
-mi.-* i|lie lit ige.

1802-33.
Net earning*............
•
8
•27.372,071
I t 9*7,-571
Total Incom e___ 1,4)0,414
£ .,.1 .5 5 5
to .h u r m m t .i t * -.V54£,2oi
15,324 lute l o t ........ ............ /
873.389
589.7 >6 T a x es........ ................ i
333.428
305, t-22 Biv blends..... ..........
83.882
Iraptoveraento...
411,936,691 Rental W. A A ll. HR

rtlSlKbl......... ............
Passengers ....................
Rents ........................................
Mail a n d e * p t m » . ........ ....
Telegraph..........
..........
Interest , ............ ............
Sli.-ceUaueotja .........................

809,129

1 0 ,0 9 9 ,8 9 6

N a-hville Chattanoog* A St. Louis Railw ay.
F o r the y ea r en d in g J un e 30, 1893 -

'K xelu ttve o t corapany’ * freight.
KAKSISU* ANtl k X C l.S fC -.
1*01*92.
i ~ " f h i.

1893,
$
1 8 6 ,9 3 9 ,9 2 3
5 ,1 0 3 ,4 0 4

Total assets........................... 183,353,178 184,761,787 189,141,688
L ittb tlU ies ..8 9 ,4 2 3 ,3 0 0
89,428.300
Paidt .1 S t o c k ............................. 89,428,300
1,127,000
Subs f.*r Increased s to ck ..............................
6 3 .0 7 7 ,4 3 3
63,0 77,333
Funded d e a r ............................... 85,377.331
3 4 2 ,OuO
292,000
I5c.il estate m rrgagee..............
387,000
S ccutitlcaucnniicd irou, leased
2 .8 2 7 ,2 0 0
due*........... '............................... 3,339,700
2,327,200
4 ,7 9 0
)• i , !-•!*!.• bunds...........................
-1.7.**»
4.790
3 ,0 6 1 ,2 1 4
3,719.035
Interest and (rentals ncorued.. 3,39 »,()3I<
1 1 .0 8 9
12,299
nuclalinwl m iorest — ..........
14.324
1 ,1 1 7 ,8 5 4
1,117,854
D iv id en d s...................................
Sv
*4,2"3
.10,6 50
pnchiltncd Ilivi leuds.................
30,073
33.821
3 .4 4 4.994
4,7 46,232
Wages, supplies. A c ...
3.832,833
1 ,5 4 6 ,3 4 9
3,335,905
Due other n>ada.4kc ................. 2,9 j D.003
W.-*! share cou-aructlou sect.
9,472
8 1 1 ,1 9 9
244,04-4
Rome W. 4 0 . cons’o account .
............
1 3 . 3 5 1 .3 1 8
13,64 8,224
Profit and l e s s .......................... 13.22d.02G

Cash balance Jtttt* 3 0 , 1 8 9 3 .............. ................................ ......... 8 2 ,9 4 5 ,3 0 7

M ile , o f road o p e r a t e d ....
E q u ip m e n t

5 0 9

911,783
333,428
142.017

1303.
1890.
1991.
1893.
A a trli—
8
*3
5
21,731.928
Road and equip. .. . 21.230,9*3 23,171.712 23,050.374
253,770
Mat-rt-,1' and sup's
104.282
M id ,
368.5B2
883,572
Sl.M li-am ! bolide .
395.477
995,477 2,040,572
30.699
Bill* reccW aM e.......
25,067
11,087
fL * * 2
55.447
Re. ,1 estate...............
54,124
49,128
58,007
311,335
Diiefrinu
143,160
170,252
311,800
191,137
Cash ou hand..........
410,20*5
54**999
057,640
647,919
Advances 40 W. A A.
............
80,035
4 ,9 ,119
T ota l..........

22 135.107

25,287,140

27,815,983

27,427,808

capital Stock...........
0,008,842
0,604,612 10,000,000 10, 000,000
Bonded debt .......... 12,307,0 *0 13.9<»4.(WO 1 1,151,00) 14,7.43,000
510,617
1,510,84 1
Bills payable............
355,885
2,101.*38
35,219
41,139
Bill line. Individ,,Ac.
57,590
52.100
398,159
39 1,320
Interest.. ................
300.222
390,416
14 4,557
143.193
Dividends...............
101,202
101.052
2uii,7d8
281,939
Pay-rolls. A c . ..........
121,422
210.828
M iscellaneous.........
............
....? • ? ? ?
1.281,237
1,309,108
Profit and loss......... 2.403,233
2 , . ->1,401
________
T otal....... ............... 22,430^107 237297, HO 2 7 ,8 45,983 27,127,80

510

THE
K ings County Elevated Railroad.

( F or the year ending June 30, 1893.)
The statement below has been compiled from the
the New York State Railroad Commissioners:
Grose earnings..........
Operating expenses. ..
Net earnings....... ..
Other Incom e............

1889-90.
$
556,736
159,484

1890-91.
$
811,069
566,243

1891-92.
$
879,887
560,159

244,826
517

319,728
542

T otal..................... .. .

159,970

245,343

320,270

Interest on b on d s. . . . ..
Other interest, &c —
B entals.......................
T axes............................

172,116
1,693
2,000
1,048

177,793
8,824
2,000
5,427

187,016
30,717
2,000
37,964

D educt

CH KCm CLE.

to authorize the directors to issue from time to time bonds to
an amount not exceeding §2,500,000 to provide means for the
payment of the bonds of the company maturing April 1, 1894,
reports to
for funding the floating debt, and for the payment of money
borrowed for any lawful purpose.
1892-93.
Kentucky & Indiana B rid ge.— It is rumored that a nego­
$
941,620 tiation is pending which, if successful, will relieve the first
563,823 mortgage bondholders of any uneasiness regarding the secur­
377,797 ing of their future interest. But in the meantime coupons
284 have been passed and the directors of the Bridge Company
have issued the following:
378,081

292,589
11,777
2,000
49,355

355,721
194,044
257,697
Total......... ............ .. 176,857
B alance........................ .d ef 16,887 sur. 51,299 sur. 62,573 sur.22,360
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JUNE 30.
1893.
1892.
A ssets—
1891.
$10,1^5,960 $10,193,725
Cost o f road and equip.$ 10,016,258
41.304
Supplies ou hand.........
27,745
38,203
140,285
130,249
Due by com p's and indiv.......
159,117
95,702
89,667
Cash on h and.......... ..............
93,337
8e«ond m ortgage bond sub’n
65,200
65,200
63,200
434,700
440,550
D eferred int. on 2d mort. b ’ds
422,550
do
do in process o f f ’d ..................
126.638
14,859
79,389
M iscellaneou s..............
96
T otal......................... $10,784,303

$10,924,9 LO

$11,164,722

L ia b ilities —

Capital stock, co m m o n ___
$3,250,000
Funded d e b t ................. 7,176,550
Equipm ent lease w arrants...
Loans and bills p ayable.........
153,000
Int. on bonds due and acc’d..
90,138
38,822
Due fo r wages and supplies..
D ue com p’ s an dindiv’ s ..........
32,800
M ortgage on real estate........
12,000
Int,on 2d m or.in process o f f ’d
M iscellaneou s..........................
Profit and loss (surplus).......
30,993
T otal....................................$10,784,303

$3,250,000

$3,250,000
7,188,700

$10,924,910

7,194,550
53,200
265.083
131,597
58,697
51,721
12,000

308^6 67
94,271
36,584
33,545

12,000

126,638

**952
191

* 2i‘,236
$11,164,722

N orfolk & Southern Railroad.
( F or the year ending June 30, 1893.,/
The results for the year ended June 30 were as below:
EARNINGS, EXPENSES AND CHARGES.

1891-92.
Gross earnings.............................................. ........
E xpen ses.................................................................
Net earnings..
A dd other income.
T ota l.. . . . . . . . .

1892-93.

384,435
310,206

437,160
299,056

74,229
10,654

138,104
3,010

$

84,883

141,114

Interest on bonds
T a x e s .....................
Other charges.......
D ividends..............

16,075
7,478
2,976
............

31,250
8,259
1,605
(4 p. c) 80,000

T o ta l.,...............................................................
Balance, surplus........................... .......................

26,529
58,354

121,114
20.000

D educt—

[VOL. LVII.

J3 P F o r o i l i e r R a i l r o a d R e p o r t s se e p a g e 5 1 5 .

G E N E R A L IN V E S T M E N T N E W S .
Chicago Peoria & St. Louis.— Judge Allen of the United
States Circuit Court at Springfield, 111., has appointed C. H.
Bosworth and E, Ellery Anderson receivers for the Chic. P. &
St. L. RR., formerly known as the Jacksonv. Southeastern.
In New York the following bondholders’ committee has
been appointed: E. Ellery Anderson, Chairman ; Thompson
Dean, W illiam D. Guthrie, Daniel B. Hatch, Henry W . Put­
nam, Jr.
Cleveland Ca ton & Southern.— This railroad company
applied for a receiver, and the Court appointed J. W . W ardwell of Clev< land ana Frederick Swift of New Bedford, Mass.
•The reasons alleged are that me road’s net earnings have de­
creased fori y per cent within the last two months, owing to the
financial sirin. ency and the inability of ihedirectorstofloatthe
bonds of me company. It isasreit d that the road is perfectly
solvent and toll pay dollar for dollar. The appointment of
a receiver was deemed necessary to pieveni )i igation and the
direipa'ion of ihe funds of the company, and met with little
opposition. Mr. William Rotch of Boston, one of the heaviest
stockholders, said that the road had been in a very prosperous
condition., and lhat had it not been lor the >trin^ency in the
money rm rset it would have been able t >flnai i's bonds, meet
all obliga'ions at d pay a dividend to stockholders. Hie net
earnings of the year ending in June, 1892, were 835,090 over
the fixed charges, and §80,000 lor the year ending June, 1893.
1 be floating debt was the heaviest obligation, he said, and the
application fi r receivtrs was made simply to place the affairs
ot ibe compel y iu the hands ot the Court, wtiere they could be
administned to the advantage of all concerned without wast­
ing anything by the litigation that would necessarily follow
were that action not taken.
Con net l lent R iver.— A t the annual meeting this week it was
voted to issue bonds not exceeding $1.0.i0,uQ0 to p a yo ff the
indebtedness ot the tO id. toeboh Is to run n o t more than fifty
years and oyay. interest at 4 per cent.
Fitchburg.— S ockholders of the Fitchburg R .R . Co. have
been called to meet in Boston on the 27th and will be asked

The K entucky & Indiana Bridge Company has been unable to m eet
its interest, accruing on Sept. 11. 1893. The com pany has been In
operation since 1886, and during that period there has not been a de­
fault or delay o f even one day in m eeting its fixed charges. But the
present stringency o f the m oney market, com bined with the necessity
for the steel approach and for the change from steam to electric pow er
for its passenger business, has caused large outlays, to m eet
which the earnings have been used. To m eet these the com ­
pany had collateral which would under ordinary circum stances
have been sufficient to provide fo r them. The present finan­
cial panic has rendered it
im possible to
borrow
m oney
on these securities.
By the contract betw een the bridge com pany and the O. & M. Bail­
w ay Company, that com pany had the right to demand the construc­
tion of a steel approach on the K entucky side in 1888 It was post­
poned from time to tim e at the solicitation of the bridge com pany; but
in 1892 the demand was perem ptorily made, and it was neessarv
either to construct this approach or lose the contract w ith the O. &
M. Kailway Company, w hich am ounted to more than $70,000 a year.
As between these two alternatives there was really bu t one choice,
viz., to construct the approach. This expeuditure has added largely
to the value of the property and greatly Improved its earning
capacity. It w as constructed at a cost o f $113,000.
It was necessary also, in view o f the changed conditions surrounding
the passenger business, to use electric rather than steam power. * - The electric service has been delayed by reason of the inability o f the
company which contracted with the bridge com pany to furiiish the
necessary power. A new contract has been made, and during,,
the com ing w eek the bridge com pany is assured that the electric ser­
vice can be put in operation.
In view o f the entire situation, the bridge com pany hereby requests
a meeting of the bondholders of the com pany o f all classes, at 3
o’clock, on Thursday, October 12, 1893, at the office of the ootnoany,
to consider the situation and to determine what p olicy shall be onrsued concerning the future of the com pany. A full statement of the
affairs o f the company will then be submitted.

Leliigh T alley.— The following are the terms of an agree­
ment reached between the Lehigh Valley coal operators and
the Lehigh Valley Railroad Com pany: From October 1 , 1893,
to October 1, 1894, the Lehigh Valley company will purchase
the coal mined by the individual operators at a fixed price
upon a basis of 60 per cent of the price of coal at tide, the
coal to be paid for in cash on the 15th of every month.
A ll the coal purchased by the Lehigh Valley Coal Company
is to be turned over to commission men selected by the com­
pany and to be sold by them at a commission of 15 cents per
ton, and the circular rate is to be maintained.
Lehigh & Hudson R iyer.—For the quarter and year end ing June 30 results were as follows :
r-Q u a r. end. J u n e 3 0 .-,

e- Y ea r end. J u n e 30.—
.
1891-92. 1892-93.
$
$
391,342
507,168
198,935
342,561

Gross earnings.................
O peratingexpenses.........

1892.
$
112,306
54,112

1893.
$
139,154
95,708

Net earnings..............
Other incom e....................

58,194
5,198

43,746
20,141

192,407
5,198

164,607
20,141

Total.........................
Int., rentals and ta x es...

63,392
34,199

63,887
31,744

197,605
135,499

184,748
133,444

Surplus.......................

29,193

32,143

62,116

51,304

Lombard Investment Co.— The appointment of receivers
for the Lombard Investment Co. was on the application of
the New York Security & Trust Co. The Lombard Co. has
offices in Kansas City, Boston, New York and Philadelphia.
Chas. S. Fairchild, of New Y ork; M. B. W hitney, of W estfield, Mass.; Sandford B. Ladd and Frank Hagerman, of
Kansas City, were appointed.
Long Island.— The results for the quarter and year ending
June 30th were as follows :
< Q uar. end. J u n e 30.— Y ea r end. J u n e 30.—
—
,
1892.
1893.
1891-92.
1892 93
$
$
$
$
Gross earnings................1,091,860 1,1271926
4.1 7L 522 4,309,310
O peratin gexpenses....... 692,786
683,046
2,734,417 2 , 33,842
N etearnings..............
Other incom e...................

399,074
26,057

444,880
36.7 64

T otal............................
Int.,rentals and t a x e s ..

425,131
234,717

481,644
2 7 1 ,-3 8

S u rp lu s......................

1 0,414

2C9.8 36

1,431,105
81,139

1,466 i44
140,995

1,518,241 1,607.439
895,0 ,0
988,144
623.184

619.295

Louisville New A lban j & Cliicag i.—A t the annual elec­
tion in Indianapolis three of the directors re ired under me
by-laws, and Messrs. James E. Grauoiss, W . E. Counor and
Joseph H. Bond were chosen to till toe vaeanoie*. The last
two gentlemen replaced Messrs. N. Willis Bumstead and E. D.
Hawkins.
Louisville St. Louis & Texas.—First mort gave bondhold­
ers of this company have an pm no d Mr. Male, Presi tent of the
Atlantic Trust Co., Samuel D D ivis and Oi l. Jotin J. McCook
a committee to represent tuern during the receivership and
reorganization.
Louisville & N ashville— Chesapeake Ohio & Southwest­
ern.— A Louisville report says that the L iu i ville & Nash­
ville will absorb the line of me Gn--sapealrr Ohio & South­
i
western, running from that city t . Memphis,
lit ■pi ,n is for
the Louisville & Nashville to u t ; Che C.iesaueakh an i operate
it, and in return it will guarantee the interest aH I unit pay­
ments on all outstanding bonds of the latte r company.

September *23,1893.]

THE CHRONICLE.

M exican N a tio n a l.— The proposition of the Mexican Gov*
ernment to suspend the subsidy for three years from Sept. 11893, has been met by a counter proposition on the part of the
Mexican National bondholders. This is. that instead of a total
suspension of the subsidy, two per cent of the Customs receipts
should continue bo be turned over to the company (it has been
(Iper cent), from which payment for Government freight should
be deducted, and aBy deficiency of the earnings of the road
towards interest on the prior hen bonds made good. Any bal­
ance remaining of the * per cent is to be returned to the Mexi­
3
can Government, and with the deferred 4 per cent carry 6 per
cent interest. This proposition has been agreed to.
New fork & New England,—At Albany, Sept. 18, the ap­
plication of the New York New Eng, & Northern RR. Co, for
permission to construct its proposed road from Leggett's
Point, on the Harlem River, in New York City, to Brewsters,
there to connect with the New York & New England R.R.,
was heard by the Railroad Commissioners. Messrs. S. A.
R' ckafeibr, of New York City, and John W . Van Valkenburg and James Walters appeared in opposition to the appli­
cation in behalf of Mr. R amsey's proposed road, the New
York Boston Albany & Schenectady R.H , claiming that the
proposed road would take up portions of the route of the road
tn which they are interested. Chairman Beardsley, of the
comtnisatoo. said that as Mr. Ramsey’s road was incorporated
in 1880 and no work had as yet been done upon it, no consid­
eration should be granted the company.
Mr, Sherman Evarts, of New York City, representing the New
York & Northern Railroad, which runs from New York City
to Brew-Pr*. a- d is controlled by the New York Central Rail­
road, said no public necessity existed for the new road and
that the New York & Northern could easily take care of all
transportation business in that section. Mr.' A. A, McLeod,
who is President of the new company as well as of the New
York & New England, disputed this. He admitted that the
road was proposed as an entrance for the New York & New
England into New York City and would, it is estimated, cost
$40,000 a mile to construct. Mr- McLeod said the capital to
construct the road was ready, and he could assure lire com­
mission that the real could be rn »de a paying one from the
beginning. Another hearing will be given next Monday.
New York Pennsylvania A Ohio—New York Lake Erie &
Western. —Application was made before Judge Lacombo, in
the United States Circuit Court, by the New York Pennsylva­
nia & Ohio Railroad Company to compel the New York Lake
Erie & Western receivers to pay to the former company toe
rental of the roads due under the lease, which amounts to
nearly $,'>00,000, Counsel for the receivers claimed that the
Erie should not be compelled to pay the sum asked, as it was
now coa.-idered too large. They were willing to pay a fair
rental. Judge Laoouibe will hand down a decision soon.
New York Susquehanna A Western.—On another page
will be found an a(.struct of the new Terminal mortgage of
the New York Susquehanna < Western. The mortgage
fe
covers the important terminal property on the Hudson
River, opposite New York City, at or near 100th Street, which
the N. Y. S, & W. has acquired and is now engaged in im­
proving. The work includes a tunnel a mile in length, the
building of coal piers, freight Jocks, engine houses and other
terminal facilities. The bonds are 50-year gold fives aud
were listed last week on the New York Brock Exchange,
Northern Pacific —There has l>een a great deal of Northern
Pacific literature this week. The order for receivers’ certifi­
cates was signed, and the issue will be $5,000,000 trust certifi­
cates at 6 per cent, to run seven months, These will be used
to redeem collaterals for loans which are now estimate 1 to
be worth $2,000,000 more than the money advanced on them.
The security tor tlie certificates will be the above-mentioned,
which will he deposited m a first security, and the final se­
curity will he the Northern Pacific property.
Mr. Joseph B Williams, Vice-President, ha- issued a circu­
lar to the holders of the preferred and Comm n stock in
which it is stated that the board of directors has appointed
Mr, C, B. Wright of Philadelphia, and William L. Bull and
Charles T. Barney of New York as a committee to receive
the proxies of stockholders for use at the annual meeting to
occur on October 19th. “ The board deems it but fair to re­
mind you that while the extraordinary and continuous decline
in earnings and the pressure of financial and commercial con­
dition* made tt imperative for the company to submit to the
appointment of receivers, in order to conserve ail interest*
and protect the Company’s property, it is also to be reniemfaervd that during their term the company reached its high­
est prosperity. Since they assumed office tn 1880, and for the
first time, cash dividends have been earned and paid to stock­
holders (over $3,900,000 having been paid to the holders of trie
preferred stock) and lately, by |->rs mu! efforts and by their
own subscriptions an well, the 013,000,000 syndicate for the
retirement of the floating debt was created, and over $7,000,000 thereof already actually funded into the five-year collat­
eral trust notes.
“ Several changes also have occurred in our board during the
past year. M-uxrs, Yillard, R. G. Holston and E. H. Abbot
have retired from the board, and Me»«r*. Charles L. Golov,
Colgate Hoyt and D. 8. Wegg have notified the board in
writing that they will not accept re-election at the coining
annual meeting. These declinations create six vacancies to
be filled at the approaching election, and one other has also
been tendered. Deeming it fairer to stockholders that the term

511

of the board should, pending receivership, be shortened to one
year, the by laws have been changed so that at the coining
election the directors will be chosen for one year instead of
three years.”
The committee have arranged for the following persons to
be supported for the direction : Johnston Livingston, Charles
B, Wright. Charlemagne Tower. Jr., D. H. Houghtaling,
R. C. Martin, Cbarlps T. Barney, T. F. Oakes, Win. L. Bull,
J. B. Williams, J. B. Hasrgin and Wm. R. Merriam,
The opposition committee, consisting of Messrs, August
Belmont, J. Horace Harding, Brayton Ives, Donald Hackay
and Winthrop Smith have invited stockholders to give them
tin ir proxies for the coming election, They say in their cir­
cular : “ It is not their desire or intention to antagonize un­
necessarily any portion of the present board of directors. On
the contrary, they believe that the welfare of the property
demands an harmonious and equitable adjustment of conflict­
ing interests, and that such an adjustment can be effected,
and all classes of security hitlers can be adequately
represented without resort to the usual expensive and pro­
tracted schemes of reorganization. Nevertheless it must be
evident to all unprejudiced observers that a radical change in
management is necessary. It cannot be denied that under
its present managers the road has gone from a coadition'of
prosperity to bankruptcy. When the present board was
elected in 1890, the 5 per cent consols were selling at 93, the
preferred stock above 80, the common about 30, and the road
had practically no floating debt. A policy watch has resulted
in the present prices of the company's securities, and has
pine d upon it a floating debt of $13,000,000, requires little
comment.”
It is unnecessary to go at any length into the arguments
made before Judge Jenkins in Milwaukee regarding the can­
cellation of the Wi-consin Central lease and the lease of the
Chicago & Northern Pacific. A decision of some sort is exjeru-dou Monday, Sept, 27. Counsel James MeNaught of
Northern Pacific says: “ The only question for the Court to
decide on Monday is whether it will cancel the lease of Wis­
consin Central or refer the matter to a Master for the purpose
of taking testimony upon the controverted point as to
whether the lease, considering everything, is profitable to
the Northern Pacific, or detrim.-ntai to its interests."
Judge Jenkins made an order authorizing the receivers to
adopt a contract made with the Northern Pacific Steamship
Company of Goran, Glasgow, Scotland, which operates a line
of steamers between Tacoma and Hong Kong and other ports
of China and Japan,
Another petition waa filed by the receivers asking leave to
continue vale* of lands and to adjust land grants. The pe­
tition retr forth that two grants gave the Northern Pacific
Railroad 415,821,33d acres of land in Wisconsin, Minnesota,
North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon, of
which amount 8,391,678 acres have been sold. The answer of
the Farmers' t*m n$c Trust Company to the petition admits the
facts alleged in the petition, but asks the Court to direct the
receivers not to accept in payment for land the preferred
stock ot the Northern Pacific, which is declared to be o f little
or no value. Heretofore tie- stock has been accepted in pay­
ment on land contracts, but the answers ask that the receivers
be permitted to receive nothing but cash.
Philadelphia A Reading.—The Reading receivers have
issued a statement denying some of the many charges of mis­
management that have been published by Mr. Isaac L. Rice.
One of hii principal charges against the present receivers
was that they bad diverted business to the Lehigh Valley and
Jersey Central.
The receivers’ statement denies that the company has lost
any business to Atlantic City, but that it had this year about
five-eighths of the tr a v e l, or substantially the same as last
year. As to turning the milk business over to the Lehigh
Valley, it is asserted that the contrary is the fact, that the
milk business to P h ila d e lp h ia from the Reading’s own territo­
ry li » in -r-M-ed 204.U9 gallons in seven months, or about 5
per cent, while the Ltbigb Valley has given to it 688,127 gal­
lons at ll-tblehern as entirely now traffic.
In regard to the coil trade the receivers say :
The " lit,-toI figure* o f th<* coat trade show tin t in Ills first four
month- >i rtt* r * H u 's pre-amt year—Dooembor, 18»a. to March,
>
sso «, tw itiahtsH • III- 1 • anthracite Shipm an* lanrsa*e<t over
»ti
—
-it !
ih os- for the enrrespoudln* period of tli « previous year Hi 1.345 tons,

whl<- tto- Reading allipintsot- deer-ste- *4 314,501 tons, ami that in the
•ereed four months o f dux y e a r -A b r il. 1893, to July, m u —the total
aotbw eU e shipment* increased 449,981 tons and the Heading auipn-Mii- Increased 174,28'- tons.
As In the last four m onths the
K - . line tin- sold 38 11-10 p e rc e n t o f tint total tn erea seof the an­
thracite o u -b - ss o v - t th.- c.nrresimoding months o f last year, tt does
n o t ...... .. u if the pro taut management Is surrendering Its biislnese to
It* r iv a l-,

"A* to H -latement regarding tin contract for pea coal with the
i-M
etropolitan Steamship ihuupouy and the l’rovhlenoe & Stom
ngtwi
•steam
ship company, w
hich contracts the Reading had last year and
has not this year, the fact* are that the Reading Company had a large
stock of yea coal on haad at th - beginning of last year and m
ade a
c n . , < i n Its price* 1-1 obtain contract*, and did obtain them Tills
.
year, having no stock of oca coal. It has hold the prices firm and has
ly,
sold III) Its coni at satisfactory figure* and at higher figures than those

at w
hich these contracts w awarded this year.”
ere
Wheeling Bridge A Terminal Co.—President C. O. Brew­
ster of the Wheeling Bridge & Terminal Co, was appointed
receiver of the company on application made by the solicitor
for the Washington Trust Co. of New York, trustee under the
first mortgage of $3,008,000. The company owns bridges, tun­
nels and railroad lines in the vicinity of Wheeling, W, Va.,
which cost over $4,000,000, The company has failed, with
overdue interest charges of nearly $200,000.
__ .

*512

THE CHRONICLE.
% zvo x\s

and fiocwmews.

NEW YORK SUSQUEHANNA & WESTERN
RA ILR O A D COMPANY.
A B STR AC T CF TH E TERM IN AL FIRST MORTGAGE
5 PER CENT GOLD BONDS D ATED M A Y 1, 1893,
A N D D U E M A Y 1, 1943.
PARTIES.

N ew Y okk S usquehanna & W estern R ailroad Com­
pany , party of the first part, and the U nited States Trust
Company of New Y ork , as Trustee, party of the second part.
P R EAM BLE.

W hereas, In aDd by the terms of the agreement for the
consolidation entered into between the New York Susque­
hanna & Western Railroad Company and the Hudson River
Railroad & Terminal Company, which agreement bears date
the fifth day of April, lt-93, and was the basis of the organi­
zation and incorporation of the party of the first part thereto,
it was agreed that the said party of the first part should issue
its bonds to the amount of two million dollars, for the pur­
pose of raising money to build and construct the tunnel
and line of railroad, and to purchase, construct and equip
such properties outside of such line of railroad, as may be nec­
essary for terminals and other depot purposes, including
wharves, docks, dockyards and other yards, trestles or chutes,
engine houses, machine shops, rolling stock, locomotives, cars,
tenders, machinery and other implements, within the char­
tered purposes and franchises of the said Hudson River Rail­
road & Terminal Company, including the purchase of
riparian rights, and to be used for the purpose of conducting
the business for which it was organized, including the
handling and shipping of coal from said terminal.
FORM OF T H E COUPON BOND.
N o.—

fVoL. LYII.
P R O P E R T Y C O N VEY ED .

Now, therefore, this Indenture Witnesseth, that the party of
the first part, in consideration of the premises and of the sum
of one dollar to it in hand paid, and for the better securing of
the payment of the principal and interest of the bonds aforesaid
to be issued as herein recited and provided, hath granted unto
the United States Trust Company of New York, as trustee, the
party of the second part hereto, and to its successor aud their
assigns, all and singular the line of railroad with the branches
and connections thereof which was formerly known as the
Hudson River Railroad & Terminal Companv, and now is
part of the New York Susquehanna & Western Railroad Com­
pany, extending from the former junction point of the said
Hudson River Railroad & Terminal Company with the New
York Susquehanna & Western Railroad, as it existed before
such consolidation, at or near Little Ferry, in the Township of
Ridgefield, in the County of Bergen and State of New Jersey,
through the counties of Bergen and Hudson, in said
State, in an easterly direction, to a point on the westerly
shore of the Hudson River at or near Edgewater, in the said
Township of Ridgefield, County of Bergen and State afore­
said, togethf r with the following described land and premises,
situate, lying and being in said Township of Ridgefield, at or
near Edgewater aforesaid, to wit :
The First Tract . The premises within (lie boundaries
specifically described in the text of the mortgage as the first
tract contains thirty and 351-1000 acres, and, less the roads
and portions of roads included within the said boundaries,
but not hereby on v ey ed , twenty-eight and 412-1000 acres.
Being the same premises conveyed to the said party of the
first part by Cecilia Rush by deed dated April 4, 1892, aud re­
corded in the office for recording deeds, etc., in and for the
County of Bergen and State of New Jersey, in Deed Book,
No. 339, on pages 127, etc.
The Second Tract. Specifically described in the text of the
mortgage, containing fifteen acres more or less, Being the
same premises conveyed to the party of the first part by
Everett P. Wheeler et al. by deed dated April seventh, A . D.
1892, and recorded in the office for recording deeds, etc., in
and for the County of Bergen and State of New Jersev, in
Depd Book No. 339, on page 77.
Including, also, all the railway, ways, rights of way, depot
grounds, or other lands, all tracks, bridges, viaducts, cul­
verts, tunnels and other structures, depots, station-houses,
engine-houses, car-houses, freight-houses, wood-houses, ware­
houses, wharves, docks, piers, elevators and other terminal
erections and structures, water stations and other buildings,
and all machine shops and all real or personal property, in­
cluding riparian rights and privileges heretofore or hereafter
held or acquired by the said Hudson River Railroad & Ter­
minal Company, for use in connection with the said railroad,
including its franchises, extensions or connections, present
and future, or with any part thereof, or with the business of
the same, including all materials for constructing, operating,
repairing or replacing the aforesaid railroad, and all locomo­
tives, rolling stock, equipments, machinery and other personal
property of every nature whatsoever heretofore belonging or
appertaining to and now or hereafter exclusively used upon
or in connection with said railroad hereby mortgaged : all of
which property is hereby declared and agreed to be fixtures
and appurtenances of said railroad hereby mortgaged, and are
to be used and sold therewith and not separate therefrom,
and to be taken as a part thereof, together with all and singu­
lar the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances to the
said railroad, and the lands and premises belonging or in any
wise appertaining thereto, and the reversion or reversions, re­
mainder or remainders, also the estate, right, title, interest,
propeity, possession, claims and demands whatsoever, as well
in law as in equity, of the party of the first part of and in and
to the same and every part thereof, with the appurtenances ;
it being expressly covenanted by the party of the first part
that this mortgage is a first lien on the franchises and property
of every kind pertaining to the said Hudson River Railroad &
Terminal Company prior to said consolidation; to have and to
holdall andsingularthe premises and property, rights and fran­
chises hereby conveyed, with the appurtenances and privi­
leges thereunto appertaining unto the said trustee, and its
successor or successors, for the equal and p ro rata benefit and
security of the person or persons who shall at any time be the
holders of the said bonds.

U N IT E D STATES OF A M ER IC A.
$ 1 ,0 0 0
St a t e s o f N e w J e r s e y a n d P e n n s y l v a n ia .
N E W Y O R K SU SQ U E H A N N A & W ESTERN R A IL R O A D COM­
P A N Y T E R M IN A L FIRST M ORTGAGE F IF T Y -Y E A R
F IV E P E R CENT GOLD BOND.
T h e N e w Y o r k S u s q u e h a n n a & W e s t e r n R a il r o a d C o m p a n y
promises to pay the hearer, if not registered, or to the registered owner
hereof, if registered, the sum of o n e t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s , at the office
or agency ot the said Company in the City of New York, in lawful gold
coin of the United States of America, of or equivalent to ihe present
standard of weight and fineness, on the tirst day of Mav, in the year
one thousand nine hundred and forty-three, with interest thereon in
the meantime at the rate of five per centum per annum, payable semi­
annually on tlie first days of November and May in each vcar in like
gold coin, at the same place, on the surrender of the annexed coupons,
without deduction from either principal or interest of any taxes which
the said Company may he required to pay, or to retain therefrom by
any present or future law of either of the said States or of the United
States, said Company hereby agreeing to pay ail such taxes.
This bond is one of an issue of bonds amounting in the aggregate to
two million dollars, and all equally secured by and subject to ihe terms
aud conditions of the mortgage to which reference'is hereby made,
bearing date the first day of M ay, A .D . 18i)3, arid executed by the said
Railroad Company to the United states Trust Company of New York
as Trustee, conveying the railroad property, real and personal, and
franchises formerly of the Hudson River Railroad & Terminal Com­
pany, since consolidated and now forming part of the railroad of said
Company, as more fully set forth in said first mortgage or deed of
trust.
In case of default in the payment of said interest when due, and the
continuance of such default for six months thereafter, then the prin­
cipal of this and all other bonds issued under and secured by ihe mort­
gage hereinbefore referred to shall thereupon become due and payable,
subject to the conditions provided in the mortgage deed hereinbefore,
mentioned: it being provided that fully registered bonds without
coupons may be issued in sums of five thousand dollars each, in the
place and stead of coupon bonds, in accordance with the provisions of
said mortgage.
This bond may he registered on the hooka of the said Company at its
oihce or agency in tlie • ity of New York, and if so registered it will
thereafter be transferable only upon the books of the Company, by the
owner m person, or by bis attorney duly authorized, unless the last
preceding transfer shall have been to hearer, anti transferability by
delivery thereby restored, and it shall continue to lie susceptible of
successive registrations and transfers to bearer, at the option of the
ladders, but such registration shall not affect the negotiability of the
coupons attached thereto.
This bond, at the option of the holder, m ay he converted into a regis­
tered bond, which said registered bonds are secured by a he terms of
the mortgage hereinbefore recited, and are issued in sum.-Vif five thou­
sand dollars each. This bond shall not become obligatory until
authenticated by the Trustee’s certificate endorsed hereon properly
executed.
*
j
H O W BONDS A R E TO B E ISSUED.
I n w it n e s s w h e r e o f , the New York Susquehanna & Western Railroad Company has caused its corporate seal to be hereunto atlixed and
A rt. I. Upon the execution and recording of this deed
the same to he attested by the signatures ol its President aud Secretary,
and has also caused the coupons hereto annexed to be attested by the of trust, the party of the first part shall make and execute,
engraved signature of ita Treasurer this first day of M ay, A. D, one and the Trustee shall authenticate and countersign, the bonds
thousand eight hundred and ninety-three.
hereby secured. Upon the filing by said Railway Co. with
[ c o u p o n .]
$25 .
T h e N ew - Y o r k S u s q u e h a n n a & W e s t e r n R a il r o a d C o m p a n i
w ill pay the bearer twentj -five dollars in United States gold coin at, it:
agency in the City of New York on the first day of
is
.being
six rnentbs’ interest on its Terminal First Mortgage Five Per Cent Gob
.Bond JNo..........
Treasurer.
TfiE UNITED States T rust Co m p a n y . o f N e w Y obic hereby certifie:
that the within bond is one of the bonds issued in conformity with am
described in the within-mentioned mortgage.
U n it e d St a t e s T r u s t C o m p a n t o f N e w Y o r k ,
_
Trustee.
By
President,

The fully registered bonds are issued in denominations ol
$5,000 and are in form similar to the coupon bonds, with the
usual provision for transfer on the books,

said Trustee proper certificates, duly authenticated bv the
signature of its President or Vice-President and the signature
of its Chief Engineer, showing the amount of work done and
cash to be paid therefor, and also the amount paid for real
estate, rights of way, wharves, docks or other necessary ex­
penditures in connection with the construction and operation
of said railroad, the Trustee shall then deliver to said party of
the first part bonds aggregating at par such amount. If be­
fore the completion of the aforesaid railroad, including its
terminals and other appurtenances, the party of the first part
shall sell the whole or any part of the bonds" hereby secured,
then the amount realized from such sale shall be deposited with
said Trustee and be held by it subject to the order of the Rail­
way Co. in the same manner as though the bonds were to be
delivered upon the certificates of the President and Chief En­
gineer, as hereinbefore mentioned. And said Trustee shall

THE CHRONICLE

SrtTEMBER 2S. 1893.J

513

rs m ay contro
p«y out of the proceeds of said bonds remaining from time to .MAJORITY o f b o n d h o l d eRE PROCEEDINGS.l t r u s t e e i n
FORECLOSE
time in its hands the amount called for each month by such
A r t . IS .—It shall be the duty of the Trustee to take appro­
certificates,
priate proceedings to enforce the rights of the bondholders in
PAYM ENT OF PRINCIPAL.
case of any default, as hereinbefore provided, upon requisition
A rt. II. Bonds secured by this Indenture shall be redeemed in writing made by the holders of the majority in amount of
by the Raid.ray Co. on Slav 1. 1043, at the agency of the Com­ the bonds hereby secured then outstanding and unsatisfied,
pany in the City of Mew York.
but.it is expressly understood that such Trustee shall not take
UNTIL D E F A U L T TH E R A IL W A Y CO M PAN Y TO ENJOY PREM­ possession of the'slid property orariT part thereof, or file any
ISES UNDloTUKBKD.
petition or bill for the sale of the same, or for the foreclosure
A rt. III. Until default shall be made in the payment of the of this mortgage, if requested to forbear therefrom in writing
principal or interest of the bonds, or of some of them, and by the holders of the majority in amount of the bonds then
such default shall have continued for a period of six months, outstanding and unsatisfied. And in the event that the Trus­
the sail Railway Co. shall be permitted to possess and enjoy tee shall have taken possession of the said property, or shall
The said properly and the appurtenances thereunto belonging, have taken proceedings for foreclosure, or for the sale of the
and to take and use the incomes* thereof in the same manner and property, nevertheless a majority in interest of the holders
with the same effect as if this deed had not been made.
may direct the Trustee, by an instrument in writing, to yield
up and deliver possession of the property to the Railway
TRUST t o c e a s e w h e n b o n d s AND COUPONS AUK PAID.
A rt. IV. If the Railway Co. shall well and truly pay the Company, anil to suspend or abandon such preceding* upon
principal of said bonds and all intere-t thereon when the such reasonable terms and emditi ms as they shall direct;
same sh a ll become payable, and shall also pay the cou­ and it shall thereupon be the duly of the Trustee so to do upon
pons issued therewith, a c c o r d in g to the true intent and receiving proper compensation for i~s services: Provided,
meaning of these presents ; then and in that caw all the estate, however, that no such action of the bondholders shall extend
right, title and interest of the said Trustee in the mist hereby to or lie taken to affect any subsequent default, or to impair
the rights resulting therefrom.
created shall cease and become void.

DEFAU LT OF INTEREST FOR SIN

M ONTH*—TRUSTEE M AY

t a k e p o s s e s s io n .

BUT IN DIVIDU AL R IG H TS NOT IM PAIRED.

expresdty understood that no action by the ma
jttrity in interest of the bondholders shall in anv wa.v impair
tin* right of an individual b mdhol.ler. after a default has oc­
curred in the payment of the principal or interest, to bring
suit against the tori!way Company, either for the purpose of
Collecting the amount d u e or for the tor-closure of the said
mortgage, in which suit he shall join tie* Trustee as defend­
ant. and shall allege that the Trustee is disablei from acting
in protection of his interests by reason of the notion of the
majority in interest of the bondholders who control it in that
r.--!i*et; and upon proving that fact, he shall be entitled to
for. cl..... the s tid mortgage in his own behalf in the same
way that a bondholder would be entitled to act in the premi->- if the Trust*- under the mortgage lmd declined and re­
t r u s t e e . a y s e l l in c a s e o f d e f a u l t .
m
A r t . V I . if default shall he made as aforesaid, < r in tire fused to act in protection of his interests.
>
payment of the principal of any of the said bonds, or any
TRUSTEE MAY PURCHASE.
part th-reof, and shall continue for six months, it shall then,
Art. X,— At any salt* of the property, righ's and franchises
but not sooner, be lawful for the said Trustee to foreclose the
equity of redemption of. in and to the property hereby con­ hereby conveyed, the said Trust*-** may bid for and purchase
veyed by judicial proceedings, or to sell and dispose o f all th« same In behalf <f all the holders of the Bonds then due
and singular the railroad and premises tiereny conveyed at anil unpaid, provided it shall b * requested so to do by a ma•
public auction, notice having first been given by advertise­ jorit > in Interest of the holders of such bonds; and in case of
ments for six months, and to adjourn the said sai« from time such request and a satisfactory indemnity being te idered to
totime in its discretion, and if so adjourning, t >make such sale tip* Trustee, it shall be his duty to bid for an 1 purchase the
at the time ami |lace to which the same may lie so adjourned, xhpI proper y in behalf of all the holders of me boals hereby
and upon such sale to matte and deliver to the pureha-er or secured and then due and unpaid.
SELLING PROPERTY COVERED BY MORTGAGE.
purchasers of the proper, y so sold a good and sufficient deed
of conveyance.
A r t . XI
Nothing herein contained shall beheld to prevent
A fte r deductin g fro m the proceeds o f a n y such sale ju st -aid Railway Company from disposing of. free ! from the
allow a n ces fo r all disbursem ents and expenses, advances or hen of this morgng**, anv bonds or securities of other
liabilities w hich m ay h av e been m ade or in curred by the said corporations owned, or which in iv be at any time here­
Trustee white in possession, as w ell a s com pen sation f o r its after owned or held by i'. nor from selling shares, nor
Own fe rric* * , the Trustee s h ill app ly the said pro reed* to th e from collecting moneys due on capital stock suhseriotious
paym ent o f the principal o f su ch o f the aforesaid bonds as or otherwise, or for other things, nor until default
m a y be at that tim e unpaid, and o f th e interest w hich shall in the performance of the terms and provisions hereof,
have a ccru ed , w ithout discrim ination o r preferen ce, ratably, from receiving and using the income from the earnings of
t o th e aggregate o f such unpaid prin cip a l and accru ed in­ said railroad, nor from selling or di posing of such portions
terest : and if after satisfaction th ereof a surplus o f the said of the equipment, machinery and implements hereby conveyed
preterite shall rem ain, to pay over the ram - t.> the said R ailw ay at any time held or acquired for the use of the sud railroad,
C om pan y o r to w h om soever m ay be la w fu lly or equitably ns in the judgment of the Board of Directors of the R litwav
e n titled t o receive the -atne, or as som e cou rt o f com peten t Company mat have become unfit for such use, replacing said
ju risd iction shall d in ct.
old property by new. which shall thereti >on imm ?di itely be­
Upon any such sale or sales, whether under foreclosure come subject to tl«:lien of til"* •present* with the same effect
proceeding* in court or by virtue o f the poWeis herein give i, as if origirsaHv included therein; provided, also, that when
the bonds secured hereby shall if offered lie leceived in the any personal property shall be said, as hereinbefore allowed,
payment of any bid which shall be accepted at such sale at and not replaced by new property of a similar kind, the pro­
the value o f each bind and its accrued and unpaid interest, ceed* of sale shall be paid over bv the Railway Company to,
which value shall be fixed by the ratio of the amount of the and shall be held by, the Trustee, subject to the trusts herein
bid, with regard to the full amount then due and unpaid on created.
. . .
all of said bonds.
<
•
*
In case the Railway Compativ shall at any time desire to
d e f a u l t in p a y m e n t o f INTEREST—p r i n c i p a l m a y b e
have .any real property covered by this mortgage discharged
DECL ARED DUE.
from the lien thereof, the Trustee shall apd may release such
A rt. V II.—If default shall be made in the payment of the property on being satisfied that it is not essential or necessary
interest d u e up in any of th- aforesaid bonds, and such default to be retained, either on the Railway Company substituting
continue for the period o f six months, then the principal of in place of the property so sought to b ; released other prop­
all the bonds secure 1 hereby shall, at the option o f the Trus­ erty of at least equal value and subjecting the same to the
tee, immediately become due and payable, but a majority in lien of this mortgage, or surrendering to the Trustee for can­
interest of the holders of said bonds tiny, by an lostrume it in cellation bonds secured bv this mortgage to the amount of the
wri'ing filed with the Trustee, control its action in such re­ nronertv so sought to be released, or paying the proceeds of
gard, and either elect to have the principal o f the aforesaid such sale to Trustee, to bo applied in the purchase of such
bonds bee imp due as herein provided or waive the right to bonds, and such bonds so surrendered or purchased shall
consider the principal due by n»a*oa o f such default on such •
hereupon be canceled and never be reissued. And incase
terms and conditions as such majority shall deem proper.
the parries hereto cannot agree uonn any of these questions,
d e f a u l t e d c o u p o n s n o t a LIEN A PART FROM t h e b o n d . they shall be decided bv three arbitrators, one of whom shall
A rt. V III.—In case o f any default io the payment of the be appointed by each of Baid parties and the third chosen bv
interest coupons attached to the bonds at the time of their the two thus appointed; and the decision of such arbitrators,
maturity, the arid coupons shall cease to be secured by the or a majority of them, shall be final.
lito provided for by this mortgage, exceot in the hands of the
parties who shall hold the bonds to winch said coupons were
A rt. XII. Provides against liability of stockholders.
originally annexed, and in the hands of any other parties the
A rt. Xrtl. Provides that in case of default for one year in
said coupon* shall be an unsecured obligation, and the holders payment, of taxes the Trustee may take possession.
shall not be entitled to participate in the proceeds of the sale
ART. XIV. Provides that buildings must be kept insured.
of the proper tv covered by this mortgage until the entire debt
A rts. XV, XVI and XVII. Provide as to Trustee’s lia­
secured thereby is fully paid and discharged.
bility and change in Trustee,

A rt. V . If default shall be made in the payment of int* r st
due upon any o f the aforesaid bonds, and shall continue for a
period of six month*. it shall tie lawful for the Trustee to take
possession of and operate the railroad and property hereby
conveyed, and after deducting operating expens e, taxes and
cost of aerdfnl improvements, it shall apply the remaining
moneys arising th-refrom, ratably, to the payment of the in­
terest on -«id hood* in the order in which the same shall have
become due ; and after pajing all such interest to anidv the
same to Use sati-faeuou o f the principal of the said bonds
which may be at that ton? due and unpaid, ratably, and
without discrimination or preference.

R ut it «

514

THE CHRONICLE.

NASHVILLE C H A T T A N O O G A & ST. LOUIS
RAILW AY.

[V o l.

LVII,

The earnings and expenses per mile for the past four years
have been :
1889-90.
Gross earnings.................... $ 5 ,4 4 5 49
Operating expenses........... 3 ,281 98

A N N U A L REPORT FOR TH E FISC A L Y E A R EN DING
JU N E 30, 1893.

Net earntogs.................. $ 2 ,1 6 3 51

1 890-91.- 1891-92.
$6,0 4 8 01 $ 6 ,6 0 9 0 0
3 ,563 99
4 ,1 0 4 06

1892-93.
$8,3 3 5 5 3
3 ,8 7 5 81

$ 2 ,4 8 1 0 2

$ 2 ,4 5 9 72

$ 2 ,5 0 4 9 4

The gross earnings per mile for the past eight years have
been:

N a s h v i l l e , Tenn., July 1, 1893.

To the Stockholders:

18858 6 ...........................................................................................
$ 3 ,7 7 2 5 9
18868 7 .......................................................................................................... 4 ,623 7 4
18878 8 .......................................................................................................... 4 ,7 5 6 39
188889.......................................................................................................... 5 ,0 7 7 17
18899 0 .......................................................................................................... 5 ,445 49
18909 1 .......................................................................................................... 6 ,048 01
18919 2 ..............................................................
6 ,609 00
LENGTH OF ROADS O PER ATED.
93........................................................................................................... 6,335 53
Mato Stem...............................................................................................320'21 miles. 1892McMinnville and Bon A ir............................................................................. 68-28 miles.
The proportion of operating expenses to receipts for the
Huntsville Fayetteville & Columbia.........................................................113-50 miles.
Lebanon.................................................................................................. 29-21 miles. same period was :
Tracy City.............................................................................................. 20 00 miles. 18858 6 .........
60-40 per centSequatchie Valley................................................................ .............. 63-75 miles. 18868 7 ............................ ........................................................... 56 90 per centCentreville.......................................................................................................... 46-46 miles.
18878 8 .................................................................................
57-25 per centShelbyville............................
8-01 miles.
18888 9 ................
59-13 per centW est Nashville................................................................. .................
3 -20 miles. 18899 0 ................................................................................. ........60 27 per cent.
Western & Atlantic Railroad (Leased)................................ , - . 1 3 7 - 3 8 miles. 18909 1 ......................................................................................................58-93 percent.
18919 2 ........................................................................................... 62 09 per cent.
Total..................................................................................................8 1 0 -0 0 miles
18929 3 ...................................................................................................... 61-17 per cent.

The Board of Directors of the Nashville Chattanooga & St.
Louis Railway respectfully submit the annual report for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.
________

There have been completed, and will be operated during
the coming fiscal year, 75 miles additional, making a total of
885 miles.
BON D ED DEBT.
The Mortgage Debt as per last report was................................$ 1 4 ,1 5 4 ,0 0 0

The train mileage for the year was :
Passenger...................................................................................................... 1 ,2 58,829
Freight........................................................................................................... 2 ,1 3 1 ,4 9 0
Mixed..................................
279 ,9 9 1

First Consol. M. Five p. c. Bonds have been issued:
For the construction of 16 miles of railroad from Hunts­
ville to Tennessee River...............................................................
For the purchase and improvement of 17-45 miles of the
Centreville Extension . . . ..................'............................................
For the construction of three m iles of the Sequatchie
Valley Extension........ ....................................................................
Bon Air Extension two m iles.........................................................
In lieu of Tracy City Branch Bonds redeemed......................

T o ta l........................................................................................................ 3 ,6 7 0 ,3 1 0
3 2 0 .0 0 0
209 .0 0 0
60,0 0 0
40.0 0 0
20.000

T otal..................................................................................................$ 1 4 ,8 0 3 ,0 0 0
There have been redeemed Tracy City Branch 6 p. e. B’ ds.
2 0 ,0 0 0
Total Funded D ebt.....................................................................$ 1 4 ,7 8 3 ,0 0 0

There were issued $619,000 First Consolidated Mortgage
Five per cent Bonds, which, with the $300,000 held in the
Treasury, as per last report, makes a total of $949,000, of
which $849,000 have been sold, leaving $100,000 in the
Treasury.
There were also sold during the year $1,057,000 Louisville
& Nashville Railroad Company Unified 4 per cent Bonds, the
proceeds of which ($838,116 99) were applied to the payment
of the floating debt, which has been reduced from $1,546,844 41 to $550,617.
G E N E R A L RESULTS.
GROSS EARNINGS.

Passenger......................
Freight............................
M ail..................................
E x p re ss..........................
Rents and Privileges

$ 1 ,1 9 9 ,3 3 9
3 ,5 6 0 ,1 6 2
143 ,3 1 7
7 6 ,2 7 1
.
1 5 2 ,6 8 7

.

The earnings per train mile were :

65
69
88
96
9 6 —$ 5 ,1 3 1 ,7 7 9 24

Freight........................ .......... ....................................... ......... ............ ............ _ . . $ 1 6 7
Passenger....................................................................................................
112
EQ U IPM EN T.

The number of engines in service is 161, all of which are
in running order.
The engine mileage for the year was 4,605,302 miles, against
4,856,332 miles for the previous year.
The cost per mile has been :
C e n ts .

For repairs.......................................................................................... ..................
For engineers and firemen.......................................................
For water supply.................................................................................................
For watching and w iping................................................................................
For stores...............................................................................................................
For fuel.............................................................................

2 22
7-46
-60
-32
1-00
6-81

Total..................................................................................................................18-41
CARS.

The passenger equipment consists of :
Passenger coaches..............................................................................................
Baggage cars.........................................................................................................
Postal cars.............................................................................................................

108
36
10

T o ta l.................................................................................................................

154

Freight equipment:

Box cars..................................................................... - ..........................................2 ,2 8 2
OPERATING EXPENSES.
Stock cars............................................................................................................... 121
Coal cars................................................................................................................. 1,123
Maintenance of W ay..................................... $ 6 4 3 ,5 7 3 22
F l a t c a r s . . ...........................................................................
566
Maintenance of Equipm ent........................
3 5 9 ,3 7 5 8 0
Coke cars................................................................
173
Conducting Transportation........................ 1 ,6 0 5 ,2 5 4 43
60
General E x p e n ses...........................................
531 ,2 0 1
5 8 — 3 ,1 3 9 ,4 0 5 03 Ore cars....................................... ................... ..........................- .....................
Cabooses................................................................................................................. 175
N et Earnings............................................................................... $ 1 ,9 9 2 ,3 7 4 21
T o ta l................................................................................................................. 4 ,5 0 0

Deducting charges against income :

Interest..................................
T axes.............................................
Im provem ents..................................................
Rental Western & Atlantic R a ilro a d ....

$ 8 9 1 ,9 1 5
1 2 0 ,4 1 5
5 1 ,3 5 4
420 ,0 1 2

00
52
97
00— 1 ,4 8 3 ,6 9 7 49

Surplus..........................................................................................
Dividends...........................................................................................

$ 5 0 8 ,6 7 6 72
5 0 0 ,0 0 0 00

Leaving balance........................................................................

O th e r c a r s :
Pay car.............................................................................................................. . . .
Wrecking cars......................................................................................................
Pile driver...........................................................................
Cook cars................................................................................................................
Tool car...................................................................................................................

1
3
1
2
1

Total..................................................................................................................

8

$ 8 ,6 7 6 7 2

To this should be added :

Making the total ear equipment....................................... .........................4 ,6 6 2

Balance as per last report............................
# 849 N. C. & St. L. 5 per cent bonds sold..................................
1 ,058 L .& N . 4 per cent bonds sold.........................................
25
N. I. 8. & C. Co. bonds sold.................................................
Dividends on stock...........................................................................
In tere st......................................................................................
Decrease In current assets...........................................................

$ 1 3 ,8 7 4
8 4 9 ,0 0 0
838 ,1 1 6
2 5 ,0 0 0
7 5 .7 6 6
9 4 ,2 9 4
1 5 8 ,5 7 6

55
00
99
00
40
41
55

Total............................................................ .................................. $ 2 ,0 6 3 ,3 0 5 62

W hich is accounted for :
Decrease in current liabilities................... $ 1 ,0 7 9 ,2 3 5
Extension of branch roads........................
5 4 4 ,4 1 7
New equipment................................................
120,669
Construction account.....................................
68,111
Advanced to the WeBtern & At. R R .......
2 18,799

22
43
89
50
$32 ,0 7 1 67

COMPARISON.

The following statement shows the operations of the road
for the year ending June 30, 1893, as compared with the
previous year :
r -y e a r end. June 3 0 ,1 8 9 3 .- , ^-Year end. June 3 0 ,1 8 9 2 .- ,

N et earnings...
Int. bond. debt.
T axes............ . . .
Rent W .& A .R R .
Improvements.
Surplus.......

5,3 5 3 ,2 8 8 06
3 ,3 2 4 ,2 7 9 91

1,9 9 2 ,3 7 4 21
89 1 ,9 1 5 00
120.415 52
420,012 00
51,3 5 4 9 7 1,4 8 3 ,6 9 7 4 9
5 0 8 ,6 7 6 7 2

R O AD D EPAR TM EN T.

Steel rails have been laid as follows ;
Mata Stem................................................................................................ 38 26 miles.
McMinnville Branch......................................................................................... 5-59 miles.
Fayetteville Huntsville & Columbia Branoh.........................................
-90 miles.
Sequatchie Valley Branch.............................................................................. 4-37 miles.
Centreville Branch............................................................................................
*23miles.
Western & Atlantic Railroad......................................................................... 32-74 miles.

91— 2 ,0 3 1 ,2 3 3 95

Balance.

Gross earnings.5.131,779 24
Oper. expenses.3,139.405 03

There were built in the Company’s shops 170 new freight
cars and two new baggage cars; 61 coaches, 19 baggage cars
and 1,362 freight cars have been thoroughly repaired.

2 ,0 2 9 ,0 0 8 15
8 2 9 ,9 0 5 00
1 2 0 ,6 1 0 77
420 ,0 1 2 0 0
118,111 51 1 ,4 8 8 ,6 3 9 28
540,368 87

T otal....................................................................................................8 2 -lfm ile s .

The total mileage of steel and iron rails, July 1, 1893, is
shown in table below :
MILEAGE IN STEEL.

68 lbs. 60 lbs. 58 lbs. 56 lbs.
87-20
61-32
Chattanooga.................... 87*20 2-03
1-00
150-91
Northwestern.................. 1‘00
71T8
28 65-30
Western < Atlantic . . .. 71/18
&
2921
Lebanon .............
0-22
Shelbyville..........
17-15
311
McMinnville. . ..
17-00
f.
Hunts. Fayette. & Col.
37-63
Tennessee & Coosa —
1374
Tracy City
................. 5-60
31-73
Sequatchie Valley........
0T2
Centreville........
374
W est Nashville.......
0-37
Louis. & Nash. Treat’s.. 088
D iv is io n —

Total.

.165-83

5‘74

363*74

65’70

52 lbs. 40 lbs. 35 lbs. Total.
151*15
3-94
155*85
130-82
2921
1-22
1-00
3040
5072
110-52
128 18
37*63
1-47
2081
29-41
01-14
31-74
1-61 21-01 9-00
3-74
1*25
17841

21-01

900

809-46

fH E CHRONICLE,

September 23,
mileage is iron.

JJWrtw-

M c iB n n y ifle '.'

Jr-M

H tm ta v H le . F a y e t t e v ille & C o lu m b ia
S e q u a t c h ie V a lle y . . . . .......... - . . . . . . . .

Cetitreville.,...

RESOURCES AND LIABILITIES.

Ill Ha, 60 Its,

N orthw esterri,

...... ..............

52 Itm
.

»196

53 tbs.

379

211

3*22

li-7 9

... •
...........1S*47
•

...........iror

T o t a l.,

515

IS“41

25-86

Trial
11-96

679

18-14
0-87
5-33
30*26

16*01

73*35

CROSS TIES.

LED G ER BALANCES A R R AN G ED FOR COMPARISON.
R esources .
1893.
1892.
V is e d In v estm en ts—

Cost of Road nad Equipm ent............. $ 2 4 ,1 9 0 ,5 1 0 38
Purchase and Exten . of Branchs R d s..
5 4 4 ,4 1 7 4 3
In c re a se .......................$ 73 4 ,5 5 3 79 $ 2 4 ,7 3 4 ,9 2 7 81

$ 2 3 ,6 5 7 ,3 2 0 38
253 ,0 5 3 64
$ 2 3 ,9 5 0 ,3 7 4 02

Convertible Investments—

Cross ties renewed:
Chattanooga Division ..........................................................................111,370
Northwestern Division..............................
51,924

Bonds and Stocks.........................................
Real Estate.....................................................
Road and Shop Supplies............................

M eMmnville........................................................................................... 10,056
L eban on ..................................................................................................
9,502
CentrevlHe...........................................................................- ................ 10,031
Tennessee < Coo* i .........................................
fc
609
Western & Atlantic Railroad ..............................
51,065

Decrease..................... $1 ,2 6 2 ,9 5 1 98 $1 ,2 0 2 ,7 8 3
Current Assets—
Accounts due to this Road......................
$2 2 9 ,1 9 1
36.6 9 8
Bills Receivable...........................................
Cash on Hand..............................................
4 91.137
Cash in hands of Agents............................
6 5 ,3 0 0
2 0 ,3 4 3
Traffic Balances............................................

Sequatchie Division.......................................-....................... 8,072
Tracy City ............................................................................ 3,992
Hunisvii e Fayettevaie it Columbia........................................ 10.400

Total........................................................................................................

267,021

Bounrir.
11-37 miles of new side tracks have been constructed; 56-43
miles of new fencing built, and the track of the entire line
maintained in first-class condition.
BBIXKJES.

$3 9 3 ,5 7 2 0 7
55.446 6 0
2 3 3 ,7 7 0 32

BCUJODKW
.

$2 2 3 ,3 2 8
31,442
6 5 7 ,6 4 0
6 7 ,2 1 0
21,127

54
89
98
52
60

06
08
73
48
73

Decrease.......................... $ 1 5 8 ,5 7 6 55

$3 4 2 ,1 7 2 53

To W. A Atl. RR. Ino......... $2 1 9 ,7 9 9 91

$ 6 4 7 ,9 1 9 00

$429,119 09

$ 2 7 ,4 2 7 ,8 0 8 33

$ 2 7 ,8 4 5 ,9 8 3 16

Adranees—

LIABILITIES,

$1 ,0 0 0 ,7 4 9 08

1892.

1393.

C a p ita l S to r k —

$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0 0 0 0

F u n d e d D e b t—

Par value of Bonds o u tsta n d in g ___ $1 4 ,7 8 3 ,0 0 0 0 0 $ 1 4 ,1 5 4 ,0 0 0 00
Increase............................$ 6 2 9 ,0 0 0 00
Interettt T m b u tiim —
*
Coupon Interest due July 1 s t ___
$ 3 3 1 ,7 5 0 0 0
$ 3 3 2 ,3 5 0 00
Coupon Interest pastdur anduupatd
3 ,2 3 0 0 0
2 ,470 0 0
Coupon Interest accrued, but not yet
payable.......................................................
58,9 4 0 0 0
52,0 7 7 5 0
Interest on Current Liabilities accrued,
but not yet pay aide...............................
4 ,539 04
7 ,432 41

New depots have been erected at Centreville, Huntsville,
Farley, Hobbs Island, Carlisle, Boms, Albertville and Wyeth
Increase............................. $1,129 13
City. Waiting rooms at Asylum and Lily Flagg. Telegraph
C u rren t U a tn U tie s office at Antioch, Tool house, foreman’s house and laborer’s Aa-ounts due from this Road.................
houses at Farley, Carlisle. Albertville and Rayburn. Pump Audited Vouchers anil Pay-Rolls.........
Bills Payable..............................................
houses at TantaUon and Wyeth City. On the Western & At Dividend No. 50. .......................... ............
lantic Railroad new depot s were built at Kingston, Bol ton Dividend No. 5 4 ............................................
Dividends past due nod unpaid ............
and Kennesaw, and a new car shop at Atalauta.
TENNESSEE * COOSA HA it. ROAD.

$ 2 ,4 6 5 ,7 4 0 97

99

Par value of Shares outstanding........... $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 00

The iron bridges which were under contract last year have
been completed, viz. : Etowah and Chattahoochee rivers on
the Western & Atlantic Railroad; Town Creek and Stones
River on the Lebanon Branch: Rock Creek on the Columbia
Division, and Big Wills and Line Creek on the Tennessee &
Cooea Railroad. '

$2,0 4 0 ,5 7 2 07
56,6 0 6 60
363 ,5 6 2 30

Decrease...

.$ 1 ,0 7 9 ,2 3 5 22

$ 3 9 8 ,4 5 9 04

$39 4 ,3 2 9 91

$35 ,2 1 9 34
2 06,797 99
550,617 00

$ 44,439
281,939
1,546,344
124,999

29
39
41
40

124,999 39
19,557 20

18,1 9 3 65

$ 9 3 7 ,1 8 0 9 2

$ 2 ,0 1 6 ,4 1 6 14

The Huntsville Extension has been completed from Hunts­
S u r lu s ville to a point on the Tennessee River near Hobbs Island, a Protitpand Los*..............Inc.$27,931 26 $1,309,168 37
$ 1 ,2 8 1 ,2 3 7 U
distance of 18-68 miles, and n boat transfer established be­
$27,42 7 ,8 0 8 33 $27,84 5 ,9 8 3 16
tween that point and Guntersville, a distance of 20 miles, con­
J.
D. M A X E Y , Comptroller.
necting with the Tennessee * Coosa Railroad.
P IK E V IL U B EXTENSION.

The Sequatchie Valley Railroad has been extended 3-14
N'ewbnrg Dutchess & Connecticut Rallrjad.
miles to the mines of the Sequatchie Valley Coal & Coke
( F o r tlo y ea r e w lin g J un e 30, 1893.,/
Company, under resolution of the Stockholders and Directors,
adopted September 14, 1883, the Sequitehie Valley Coat &
From reports to the Biilroad Commissioners of New York
Coke Company having executed a contract guaranteeing the State the following ii compiled.
shipment of 300 tons of coal and coke per d ty (or a period of
1889-90. 1 8 9 0 9 1 . 1891-92. 1892-93.
ten vears.
$
$
*
CE N T R E V IL L E B R AN C H .

193,519
137,745

175,909
145.672

173 505
132,377

167587
135,179

45,771
326

As per authority given by the Stockholders September 12,
1882, your company purchased fr>m the Southern Iron ComNet earnings.
ny its Sine of road, extending from the terminus of the Other in c o m e ....
ntreville Branch in Lewis County, to Allan's Creek in
Wayne County. Tenn., a distance of 17-45 miles, in con­
D educ
sideration of that company erecting two new furnaces at Interestt— bonds..
on
Alien's Creek of a capacity of 50 tons per d*v each. These O t h e r I n t e r e s t , v o
T a te-.......................
furnace* have been completed, and one is in operation.

30,2 3 7
280

41,128
245

32,408
157

S

WESTERN A ATLANTIC R A ILR O A D .

Operations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1893, were :
ax- Bins.
P u - V f f ..............................................................

Kfright •—......................................................
M a lt.,... ...........................
E x p r e ss........................................................
Other w o v e - ...............................................

2 i ,562 79
49,233 6 9 -* 4 ,3 9 6 ,3 0 0 12

General espen.-**-..................

Net earnings ....... ..................................
R enta!.............................................................
T ax**................................

ri4,5i>7 »>
52

5 3 5 .2 7 6
467 ,2 9 6

IS—

420,012 00
9,944 2 3 —

429,960 23
*10,699 !

There has also been expended :
For »t«« r a il,
F o r steel

9 5 5 .6 4 0 95
*4 4 0 ,0 5 9 47

T o t a l .......................

Masonry................................

Now iron brtdse*...................
New Mali way b o d g e # .....,,,
N pw buildings.........................
New depots...............................
New water station*_ ____
_
New side trap**...... ................
New fence* and stock gap*.
New-coal ch afes... . . . _ ...
_
New shops at Atalaota____
Real estate.................................
Removing encroachments..

.............
.............
. . .......
.............
.............
...........
.............

........

26,884 25
3 ,707 73
24,7 0 5 36
2 ,118 68
4.247 33
4,831 11
1,736 23
U ,658 94
1,9 3 9 88
3,5 0 8 16
8,602 01
2 07 30
41 7 7 0 -

Total number of passenger* carried..................

2 L 776
17,597

21,390
11,160

Funded debt................. 1 ,390,000

10.000

Loans and bill* payable

22.100
1 5 .6 3 8
3 ,1 0 3

Open account*. .............
Audited vouchers, A x .,
Real estate mortgage*.
Profit and lorn w u rp .)..

108,112

* 2 .6 8 1 ,5 3 4

Total.............

* 2 ,6 8 1 ,0 3 4

990
18,432
50,0 0 0

B iK N IlIO S , KXPStraaS AND CHARGES.

1890 91.
$
123.847
3 5 .‘2 i6

31,901

Sot earning-'........
Other income . . . . . . .

1891-92.
$
129,835
38,893

1892-93.
$
140,310
3 6 ,1 3 0

88,631
330

1889 90.
$
Grass earnings. —
Operating expenses

90.942
2.823

104,180
300

341 .2 3 6

Total .....................
DfJi net—
Interesl on bonds----Ron m is............... ......... .. 10.275
Taxes.............................
Dividends.................... (3) 30.0 0 0

83,961

93,765

104,540

85.6 4 0
9,525
0 .290
(4) 40,0 0 0

38.880
9,525
6,832
(4) 40,0 0 0

39,2 4 0
9,525
10.614
(4) 40,000

T o ta l....................
Balance........................ sitr. 4,197

*180,675 62

Amount receive,! from eadh p#a*eoger...........
12 ,1 3 3 ,6 6 8
Average receipts per passenger per m ile............
Total tons of freight carried.......................................
1,044,314
Average amount received on each ton carried..
Total tons of freight carried one m ile............,,..1 0 7 ,2 4 6 .6 2 6
A vefage r e c e i p t s p e r t o o p e r mile ................ .............

Total number of passengers carried one mile.

21.5 5 3
6,964

Northern Railroad of Hew Jersey.
( F o r the y ea r a id in g J u n e 30, lWid.y
The following has been compiled for the CHRONICLE;

$ 8 .3 .1 1 2 24

Ballast.

11,575
641
6,183

Liabilities.
Capital a la c k ................ $1 , 100,000

.................... $ 2 , 5 5 4 , 4 5 1
0 3 ,6 3 2
1 .2 2 4
Real e s ta te .. . . .............
2 0 .8 2 6
Cash on hand ...............

Cost of equipment

Open accoun t*— . . . .
Supplies and materials
Due by agents ............ .

Maintenance o f w ay .................................... #418.500 13

32,565

11.3 0 0
6.612
5.804

O E S W U t BALAN CE S IIE E I J O S E 3 0 , 1 8 9 3 .
C ost o f roa d .

52.041 21

41,373

10,500
4,951
6,102

17.721
28,879

T o ta l.

30,517

11,400
409
.5 .9 1 2

Asw ift.

*3*5,041. 52
988,413 2 1

ocauAtt.sc, sxrr.xftKS.
Hatetenas.« of equlym
.-nt .................
('emlil, ting transportation._______

46,100

91.455
def. 2,404

95.237
def. 1.472

99,379
sur. 5,181

•3233
•0231
•9460
■00927

Respectfully submitted,
JJ, W. THOMAS, President.

O E S E R A I. B ALAN CE S H E E T tO S E 3 0 . 1 8 9 3 .

Asset*.
Cost of r o a d ................... $1 ,6 5 4 ,9 1 2
Cash on hand...................
39,1 3 9
Open accounts...............
2 0 2 ,0 3 5
Due by agents.................
9,243
Total.

..$ 1 ,9 0 5 ,3 5 9

Liabilities

Capital stock................... $1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
Funded debt,....................
6 5 t,0 0 0
Dividends unpaid................................ 22.5 0 0
Open account*...............
31 0 ,5 7 0
Profit and loss (surp.)..
8 ,283
T otal................................$ 1 ,9 95,359

516
3pxe

THE CHRONICLE.:
C o m m e r c ia l

rvoL. L v ir.
C

£ im e s .

O

T

T

O

N

.

September 22, 1893.
as indicated b y our teiegrams
COMMERCIAL EPITOME.
from the South to-n'ght, is given below. For the week ending
this evening the total receipts have reached 95.849 bales,
F r i d a y N i g h t , Sept. 2 2 ,1 8 9 3 .
against 53,703 bales last week and 28,117 biles the previous
Business in general merchandise has been somewhat irregu­ week; making the total receipts since the 1st of Sept., 1893,
lar and on the whole less active. The demand prevailing 180,720 bales, against 264,362 bales for the same period of 1892,
during the first half of the month was sufficient to provide showing a decrease since Sept. 1, 1893, of 83,643 bales.
buyers with a fair working assortment of staple commodi­
Receipts at—
Sat.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed. Thar a.
JtYl.
locus.
ties, and a strong disposition to conservative methods now G alveston......... 3,011 6 ,380 2,297 5,941 4,691 3 ,974
2 6 ,2 9 4
induces the withholding of further orders until new wants Velasco, & c ___ ...... ...... ...... ...... ......
208
208arise. Nevertheless the tone in commercial affairs is hopeful. New O rlea n s... 1,386 3,279 4,358 2 ,573 2 ,359 2 ,SOI 16,7 5 6
92 L 7 ,1 7 7
2 ,250
732
618
1,138
1,518
Breadstuffs have been handled quite indifferently by export­ M obile................
......
... _
100
..... ...... ___
100
ers, under the influence of rapid accumulation of supplies at Florida...............
Savannah.........
3,382
3,959
6 ,596 28,7236.951
3 ,1 3 0
4,705
the foreign ports, and that feature, together with a free mar­
...... ...... ...... ...... ......
674
674
Brunsw’k,& c.
keting of crops by our domestic growers, has created a weak Charleston........
436
1,783
1,593
582
6 ,182
913
875
Pt. Royal, &c.
...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ......
tone in grain and flour. Latest weather reports were con­
555
522
3 ;3
4,041
811
459
781
sidered good for wheat seeding and favorable for corn. Dur­ Wilm ington___
ing the current week there has been some improvement in
232
4 ,0 4 0
732
597
396
1,305
778
the iron and metals trade.
5
78
305
26
414
Lard on the spot has been in light request, but prices have
102
N’port N ., &c.
102
......
217
217
advanced with futures and the close was firm at 8-75$ 9c. for
prime City, 1010c. for prime Western and 10-35 j. for refined
......
......
Baltim ore.........
93
98for the Continent. The speculation in lard for future de­ Philadelph’ a &c
823
797
1
25
livery at this market was dull, but prices advanced sharply
Tot’ls this week 9.626 19,112 16 ,«6 8 15,219 14.782 20,2 1 2 95,8 4 9
in response to stronger Western advices and Western manip­
The following shows the week’s total receipts, the total since
ulation, closing firm.
Sept. 1, 1893, and the stock to-night, compare! with last year.
D A IL Y CLOSING PRICES OP LARD FU TURES.
F r id a y N ig h t ,

The M ovem ent

September delivery___ c.
October delivery....... o.

Sat.
9 '2 5
9-05

Mon.
9 -50
9 -2 0

Tues.
10-0J
9-75

Wed.
1 '*-25
9-65

Thu'S.
10 0 )
9 50

Fri10-1=>
9 75

Pork has sold rather slowly, but prices closed firm and a
trifle higher at $17 50{§i$17 75 for mess, $17 50@$19 50 for
short clear and $19 50;g$30 for family. Cut rnea’s have teen
firm, but quiet, closing at J2%c,($13k£c. for pickled bellies
13@ 10 It s ave., 10J£c.@llc. for pickled hams and 734'c.(a7J^c
for pickled shoulders. Beef was quiet but steady at $7 50,s$8
for extra mess, $10@$13 for family, §9.$$10 for packet and
$15(8)17 for exti a India mess. Beef hams are unchanged at
$16 50. Tallow has advanced and the close was firm at 5c.
Lard stearine is firmer at ll^'c. Oleo-steaiine is again higher
a t ll^ c . Cottonseed oil is firmer at 34c,@35e. for prime
crude and 39c @4Pc. for prime yellow. Butter is in light sup­
ply and firm at 19c.(®373£c. for creamery. Cheese is firm
and higher at 8J^c.(Sllc. for State factory full cream. Fresh
eggs are higher aLd firm at 19J^C.(g 20}£c. for Western.
Coffee quite unsettled but last week’s extreme valuation
modified by less promising accounts from primal- uoints.
Kio quoted at 17240. for No. 7, good Cucma 20% (fi31c. and
interior Padang, 23c @23J^c. Speculation in contracts was at
advancing prices early in the week, but the renewal of com­
mercial communications with Brazil brought increased offer­
ings at lower rates, and this market declined sharply. To-day
trading is light, with tone about steady, awaiting further in­
formation.
The following are the final asking prices:
Sept______ ...17-20c. IDeo................15-800. I M e t ................ 15'25o.
Oct.................16-70o. J an ....... ........ 15 4re. A p r .................15-ouc
Nov................ 16-30o. |Feb................. 15'30o. IMay............... .14 90o.
Raw sugars have sold to nearly the exhaustion of spot sup­
ply at further advance in price and close firm. Centrifugal
quoted 3 27-32c. for 96-deg. test and muscovado at
for
89-deg. test. Refined sugars firm and in good demand, with
deliveiies still very much behind the orders booked; granu­
lated quoted 5%c. Other staple groceries steady but less act­
ive than last week.
Kentucky tobacco has not attracted much attention, but
t prices were unchanged and firm. For seed leaf tobacco the
demand has been fairly brisk at steady prices. The sales for
the week were 3,383 cases as follows : 600 cases 1892 crop.
State Havana, 13@15e ; 150 cases 1893 crop, New England
seed, 22i§ 25o.; 425 cases 1893 crop, New England Havana,
19®60c.; 350 cases 1893 crop, Zimmei’s, ll@12}^c.; 450 cases
1893 crop, Pennsylvania Havana, 10^@14c.; 157 cases 1892
crop, Wisconsin Havana, 6@7J^c.; 100 cases 1891 crop, Wis­
consin Havana. 9^$10c., and 150 cases sundries, 7@33c.;
also 450 bales Havana, 63c. @$1 05, and 250 bales Sumatra,
$2 80@$4.
The market for Straits tin has been more active and prices
have steadily advanced on buying by "shorts” to cover con­
tracts, closing firm at 20 85c. bid. Sales for the week were
about 200 tons. Ingot ropper has been without change and
quiet closing steady at 9 80c..'for Lake. Lead has declined
slightly and the close was dull at 3-80c. Pig iron was un­
changed and quiet at $12 75@$15 50.
Refined petroleum is unchanged at 5-15c. in bbls., 2-65c. in
bulk and 5"90c. in cases; crude in bbls is quiet but steady,
Washington closing at 5 40c. in bbls. and 3’90e. in bulk;
naphtha Sj^c. Ciude certificates have advanced and the close
was firm at, 65% c . bid. Spirits turpentine has been quiet but
steady at 28c.(a281^0. RosiDS have advanced and the close
was firm at $1 Oljj'tSft 15 for common and good strained.
Wool has been in better demand and firm. Hop3 are dull but
steady.

Receipts to
Sept. 22.

of th e

Crop,

1 8 93.

Slock

1 8 92.

This Since Sep.
Week. 1 ,1 8 9 3 .

This Since Sep.
Week.
1 ,1 8 9 2 .

48,4 9 9
592
31,407
11,674
100
59,851
1 ,002
9 ,800

41,8 9 6
3.463
10,994
5,433

86,976
3 ,724
30,818
9,792

Savannah. . .
Br’ wickj&e
Charleston..

26,294
208
16.756
7,177
100
28,7 2 3
674
6,182

32,307
1,884
9 ,757

Wilmington..

4,041

N orfolk........
W est Poinl
N ’p’tN „ & c
New Y o r k ...
B o ston .........
B altim ore...
Pliiladel., &o.

4 ,0 4 0
414
102
217

5,131
3
7,677
438
436
467
375
689
2.579

T otals........

95.849

G alveston ...
Velasco, &o.
New Orleans
Mobile...........

1592.

1 8 93.
47,1C8

......

66.782-

......

48,8 1 7
7 ,930

68,4969 ,7 0 7

75,833
4,821
26,245
Q

4 6 ,2 0 0

5 0 ,5 8 3
1,050*
32,889-

4,936
3
4,913
3,121
198

8,607
8
8,497
3,427
438

6,538

10,318

7,616

11,420
1,871

963
1C4
351

1,474
653
1,017

6,800
4 ,2 6 0
8,081

268,265'
5 ,0 JO
1 2 ,2 6 3
6 ,1 5 3

180.720 120.328

264 ,3 6 2

331 .2 3 0

5 4 4 ,8 0 2

98
823

21,2 2 6

In order that comparison may be made with other years, we
give below the totals at leading ports for six seasons.
Receipts at—
Galves’n,&c.
New Orleans
M obile.........
Savannah...
Char’ton,&o
Wilm’ ton.&o
N orfolk ........
W. Point,&c.
All oth e rs...

1892.

1 8 93.

1 8 91.

1 8 90.

1889.

45,569
40,941
9 ,1 6 i
42,8 8 5
29,0 6 1
13 435
18,7 5 3
8 ,746
2,965

1 8 88.

26,502
16,756
7 ,177
28,723
6,182
4,041
4 ,0 4 0
516
1,912

45,359
10,994
5 ,438
32,3 0 7
9 ,757
4,939
4,913
3,319
3,302

51,931
59,454
11,692
50,580
19,591
6,262
8 ,166
4,558
4,152

40,1 0 5
2 3 ,9 9 3
3 0 ,0 4 2
4 3 ,7 U
12.2 1 4
5 ,8 9 3
4 3 ,3 0 0 - 3 5 ,8 7 8
13,4 9 6
2 3 ,4 1 6
5 ,536
2 ,7 8 9
7 ,3 2 2
9,353
7,562
1,618
2,3381.581

Tot.tliis wit.

95,849

120,328

216 ,3 8 6

2 11,522

191,832

128,399'

Since Sept. 1

180.720

264,362

506,622

5 36,458

472,799

302 931

The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total
of 44,418 bales, of which 23,021 were to Great Britain. 5,250
to France and 16,147 to the rest of the Continent. Below are
the exports for the week and since September i, 1893.________
Exrorts
from—

Week Ending Sept 23.
From Sept. 1,1893, to Sept 22. 1893
Exported to—
Exported to—
Conti­ Total
Qreat
Qrtat
Conti­
Franc t nent. Week. Britain. Franc
Tot**
Brit'n.
nent.
5,803

Velasco, &c....
New Orleans.,
Mobile & Pen.
Savannah .......
Brunswick.......
Charleston ....
Wilmington..
Norfolk............
W est Point...
N’ p’t News, &t
New York___

0,108

5,250
.......
.........
.........

170
1,059
6,607

Con
.........

11,053
170
7,107

6,803

5,250

10,106

3,827

6,607
900

900

0,007

4

....
......

49-5
2,374

10,731
2,900
4,120
777

4

17,842
5,851
1,959
1,779

Baltimore.-----Pbi!adelp’a,&c

5,73?
2,900
716
777

Total.............

2 3 /2 1

5,250

16,147 44,418

44,243

Total, 1 892 ....

?9.?50

5,24=.

540 45,535

73,050

3,324

6,607
ooa

....

.....
4,987

11,053495
16,307

958

14,503
100
4,940

2,103

29,019

85,425

B.346

12,8 4

91.836

2,128

i

3 J,473
7,853
1,779-

THE CHRONICLE.

September 23, 1S93.]

517

la addition t > above export?, our telegrams to-night also
T h e S a l e s a n d P e ic e s o f F u t u r e s a re s h o w n o y th e
give us the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not fo llo w in g c o m p r e h e n s iv e ta b le .
cleared, at the ports named. We add similar figures for
New York, which are prepared for our special use by Messrs.
-j=
Lambert & Barrows, 24 Beaver Street,
I ? l | f a l l i 2 |§ f i l l
Sg
v*
§4
2.
O n S h ip b o a r d , n o t c l e a r e d — f o r
*m%
ip i
a
a?I
L e a n in g
• s F p-s S';
S e p t. 22 af—
g
O th er
C o a stGreat
StOCK.
Eg-? i E £ ?
£=•*
■5
3
F r a n c e , F o r e ig n
T o ta l.
w is e .
B r ita in .
S -S l
£ -§
:m
; U l
§ H
la s s
ST«£
3i$
44
3,512
407
16,171
f: f Igf*
8,2-13
4.309
32.316
New O rleans...
ills
651
18,202
Galveston.........
4,854
802
X 1.893
28.906
:5i 2 :;S\'i
I **. i
Si
13,500
1.600
cOO
9.000
Savannah.........
32,700 M I I
: s: i s; i

m

It

ii-!i

n it
Iff

IEf

Charleston.......
M ob ile..............
N orfolk ....... .
New York........
Other p o r t ___

Total 18 92...
Total 18 91...

49.338
73,630

950
None.
4,700
lu .2 0 0
9,00u

20.276
7.930
2,916
116,454
16.079

~xc*a

P

h g

7 .0 5 8

73.023

258,207

§

= -i§~

15 00 0 4

32,314

10.630
9,520

33,088

800
None.
2,500
None.
None.

Issl

None.

5,000

Total 1 8 9 3 ...

None.
None.
None.
5,960
4.000

10,563

150
None.

22.836
20.189

6,223
19.486

89.026
121.825

455,778
407,803

None.
None.

2 ,2 0 0
-t.0 0 0

600

2-“
Speculation in cotton for future delivery at this market has
increased and very irregular values prevailed during the cur­
5§
rent week. For a while the tone was heavy, but subsequently
confidence revived and gradually brought about recovery of
a previous sharp lost in price. The buying was stimulated
upon the influence of a maintained good business with con­
sumers on the Liverpool market, the receipt of foreign baying
orders here, in part from the Continent, careful offerings and
full rates asked at Southern markets, and a less hopeful feel­ to' —
ing in regard to crop. The outside speculative element has 5 j ® o
been attracted by the features mentioned and broadened the 6 S i
8
line of dealing accordingly. Saturday opened the deal for the §
period now under review with an advance of 9 points, gained
principally through a ■overing demand, but the “ aborts”
were quickly disposed of and a sharp reaction left final rates
at a net loss for the day of t points. On Monday the
foreign news was tame, and advices from the South appeared
to indicate the starting forward of supplies with greater free­
dom. influences that alarmed the longs into free liquidation,
caused a renewal of short selling, and dropped the values 1
During the following day conditions were very irregular, in­
volving a temporary advance of 13 points, a decline trom that
of £3 points and final recovery to a net loss of only 3 points
for the day. variable crop reports furnishing principal influ­
ences. Wednesday's market was also unsettled, but resulted
in a gain of 5 points, and yesterday 13 points more were a d d ed
in consequence of a growing fear regarding crop outcome and
continuation of strong accounts from abroad. To-day the
opening was a shade better, but a full movement of supplies
at interior town*, foreshadowing large receipts next week,
caused a weaktr fteling at the close. Cotton on the spot ha
sold fairly well at irregular cost, closing at last week's rate.
Middling upland* 8*gC.
The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 1,998.900
bales. For immediate delivery the total sales foot up this week
4,291 hale*. Including 1,300 for export, 3,194 for consumption,
------for speculation and 200 on contract. The following are
the olflcial quotation* for each day of the past week—
September 10 to September 22.
UPLANDS.

N at.

O rdinary.......................
Strict Ordinary............
Good. O rdinary. . . . . . . .
S trict Good O rd in ary .
how M id d lin g ...... ...
Strict Low M iddling...
Middling....... ............ .

J Ioo T u c « W ed

S

5%
64
7 ,^

64
74
j I K

8'4
8 *1 ,
8 ’ tU - 8 4

G o o d M id d lin g ...........

8< 4,
8’ e
04
94

S »t,

GOLF.
O rdinary.......................
Strict O r d in a r y ..........
Good O r d in a r y ,.... ..
Strict O w l Ordinary .
Low Widrthn : ..............
Strict: Low MiddUas,.»
Middling ...............
Good Middling,
.......
Strict Good Middling .
Middling Fair___ _____

J lo n T u e » W e d

Si,a

«!!,,
7b*
yc, :
8*4 i
»4
8*«1*
»
I
»'t«
89,*
9-a,.

..................
STAIN ED .

64
6%

74

T*'is
8?l*
’" ‘ 18
9•■
's
6 '4 »
04
£*51

64
64
74
711,,
8«i«
8*.«
84

....... ! 5 >
•........

•}*»*

&*•
«4
7
7 is „

Shi

8 -V
8 i*i*

r4 s H
*
9
04

7 l H.

84
1*4
94

fiat'dav,
Monday
Twes4a?
WfxFflat
Thnr’rt’j
Friday..
Total.

htm aAf «fe i te »d
Qnset- at *t« dee-,
C
|t*l€?Sat % d e e ..
DOlct ..........
qu iet at 4 adv.
q u i e t .., .. ......

..................

1.300

1.300

1

O o n - Mpecs u m p . u l'V n

500
315
95
261
1,130
490
2,791

C -3
CC

-6
£

M

►
4 -am
© coo ©
m o *1

VS
0 10

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‘ I X O 'l
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^

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h
64

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S1
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SALES OF St*OT ASO CONTRAiTT.
p o rt.

Q -4
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ox ©
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6

ccaoc Q or- x © m
O

94

MAKKRT AND SALES.
m m MAMKwr

O
J WO 5
5? S
1 »»:
I a=:
•
x
0
OCXO'X
228 0
©w *- 5 £
w J
oo
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1
i 95
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04
74
74
74
7 “ „ i 7 0 , . I 7l»,a
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84 ! ft*»
«4

5%
6

fri

6
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74

ra.ef* tVert
m oo #

Good Ordinary ______
Strict Good Ordinary .
Low Middling..............
M iddling........................

'

a:

r K

8 >|,
84
8 »ig
8%
04
94

««!•
84
8 -'t«
84
04
94

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64
74

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8 l»p l
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914,1

Strict G ood M idd lin g.
M iddling Fair..............
F a ir .................... ..........

Th.

ST
e
64
74
V K

6

Che
**‘ I«

S §°3

►

s«5
10

I? i

n

00 .

■1
1 a:

csss

S >s
.i
s a®§.
©
or <
ZZi
t* oee1 2=S1
'<
6°
©
__ 9 ____ __S.
2
«® 5
©
S'
w *
-u *
i a :
7 ai

l« F l

F u tu ret

V-vJ
t

vou

-• !
...J

....

500
515
1,3^5
264
1,130
190

200

4.291 1.098.000

U $,G O O

) 94.300
250.fi >0
156.700
182.500
193,800

She following exchange* have bien undo during tlu week:
•lOpd.
•11 pd.
4 6 |L
m
4 J p,l,

tnflXch. 1.0 00One. for Nor.
to exBn. t o o Doc far dan.
to - xch. 300 <let. fo r No '.
to etch . 100 Nov. for Deo.

I 41
I 46
141
|4 9

pd.
pd
pd.
pd.

tn egnh.
M exeh.
to ccc.ii
to exoli.

tODD c fo r Jan.
t.TJM O f t O K S «v
i n [i ■ for Jan.
300 Jan. for M di.

The V isible Supply o f Cotton to-night, a* made up by cable
and telegraph is as follows. TheC m'.tn jntal stocks, a* wall as
those for Great Britain and the afloat are this week’s returns,
and consequently all the European flgiret are brought dowa
to Tliursdav evening. But t> make the totals the complete
figures for to-night (Sept. 22), we add tile, item of exports from
the United States, including in it the exports of Friday only.

THE CHRONICLE.

518

1892.
1890.
1 8 91.
1893.
Stock at Liverpool......... bales. 1 ,0 31,000 1 1 75,000 7 1 1 ,0 0 0 572.000
8 .000
9 .000
19.0 0 0
28.0 0 0
Stock at London..........................
7 3 0 ,0 0 0
600,000
Total Great Britain stock. 1 ,0 43,000 I.,183 ,0 0 0
5 ,500
2 ,900
3,000
Stock at Hamburg......................
8,000
77,000
5 0 ,0 0 0
Stock at Bremen..........................
6 7 ,0 0 0
15,000
14,0 0 0
2 0 ,0 0 0
18,000
3,000
Stock at A m sterdam .................
200
Stock at Rotterdam....................
200
300
200
9 ,000
8 ,0 0 0
7 ,0 0 0
4,000
Stock at Antw erp........................
347 ,0 0 0
169 ,0 0 0
322,000
Stock at Havre.............................
106,000
6 .000
11,0 0 0
Stock at M arseilles.....................
3 ,000
9 ,0 0 0
62,0 0 0
60,0 0 0
Stock at Barcelona.....................
86,000
25,000
Stook at Genoa.............................
16,0 0 0
14,000
7 ,0 0 0
4,000
3,000
3 6 .0 0 0
22.0 0 0
3 3 .0 0 0
Stock at T rieste..........................
568.700
5 64.200
358 .2 0 0
166.20*
Total Continental stook9.
Total European stocks . . . . 1 ,6 0 7 ,2 0 0 1 ,751,700 1 ,0 8 8 ,2 0 0 7 6 6 ,2ou
India cotton afloat for Europe.
3 5 ,0 0 0
3 6 ,0 0 0
2 8 ,0 0 0
31,000
A m e r.c o tt’ nafloatforEurope.
6 0 ,0 0 0
8 0 ,0 0 0
1 1 0 ,0 0 0
176,000
Egypt,Brazil,&c.,aflt forivr'pe
16,0 0 0
13,0 0 0
1 2 ,0 0 0
18,000
Stook in United States ports
331 ,2 3 0 544 ,8 0 2 5 2 9 ,6 2 8
2 89.864
Stock in U. S. interior tow n s..
96,7 5 6 14 2 ,5 0 0
108 ,2 1 1
63,353
United States exports to-day.
5 ,923
1 0 .2 3 2
5 .3 2 9
19,291
Total visible supply........... 2,1 5 2 ,1 0 9 2,5 7 8 ,2 3 4 1,8 8 1 ,3 7 8 1.3 6 3 .7 0 8
O f the above.the totals of American aud other descriptions are as follows:
American—
Liverpool stock............... hales. 7 8 4 ,0 0 0
9 7 9 ,0 0 0 5 1 6 ,0 0 0 23 7 ,0 0 0
Continental stocks..................... 4 4 5 ,0 0 0 3 9 3 ,0 0 0 2 1 1 ,0 0 0
57,000
American afloat for E u rope...
60,000
8 0 ,0 0 0
1 1 0 ,0 0 0
176,000
United States stock....................
3 3 1 ,2 3 0 5 4 4 ,8 0 2
5 2 9 ,6 2 8
289 ,8 6 4
United States interior stocks..
96,7 5 6
142 ,5 0 0
108,211
63,353
United States exports to-day.
5 ,923
10,2 3 2
5 ,329
19,291
Total American...................... 1,7 2 2 ,9 0 9 2 ,1 4 9 ,5 3 4 1,4 8 0 ,1 6 8
84 2 ,5 0 8
East Indian, Brazil, itc. Liverpool stock............................
2 5 0 ,0 0 0 1 9 6 ,0 0 0
1 9 5 ,0 0 0 3 35,000
London sto c k ................................
9 ,0 0 0
8 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,0 0 0
28,000
Continental stocks......................
119,200
1 75,700
1 4 7 ,2 0 0
109,200
3 5 ,0 0 0
3 6 ,0 0 0
2 8 ,0 0 0
31,000
India afloat for Europe.............
Egypt, Brazil, &c., afloat.........
1 6 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,0 0 0
1 2 ,0 0 0
18,000
Total East India, & c...........
4 2 9 ,2 0 0 4 2 8 .7 0 0 4 0 1 ,2 0 0 5 21,200
Total American.................... 1 .7 2 2 .9 0 9 2 ,1 4 9 .5 3 4 1,4 8 0 ,1 6 8
8 42,508
Total visible supply........... 2 ,1 5 2 .1 0 9 2 ,5 7 8 ,2 3 4 1,8 8 1 ,3 6 8 i , 363,708
Price Mid. Upl., Liverpool........
4 l i ]8d.
4»led.
4 lid.
53, «d.
Prioe Mid. U pl., New Y o rk ___
8 *80.
7*so.
8 i t i 8o.
lOise.

t W The imports into Continental ports the past week have
been 15,000 bales.
The above figures indicate a decrease in the cotton in sight
to-night of 426,125 bales as compared with the same date
of 1892, an increase of 270,741 bales as compared with the
corresponding date of 1891 and an increase of 788,401 bales
as compared with 1890.
A t the I nterior T ow n s the movement— that is the receipts
for the week, and since September 1, the shipments for the
week and the stocks to-night, and the same items for the
corresponding period of 1892—is set out in detail in the
following statement.

Q u o t a t io n s

[V o l . L'V II

for

M id d l in g C o t t o n

at

Other M arkets. —

Below we give closing quotations of middling cotton at South­
ern and other principal cotton markets for each day of the week.
CLOSING QUOTATIONS FOB M ID DLING COTTON ON—

Sept. 22

Satur.

G alveston...
New Orleans
Mobile...........
3avannah. . .
Charleston..
W ilm ington.
Norfolk.........
B o ston .........
Baltim ore...
Philadelphia
A ugusta. . . .
M em p h is....
St. L ou is___
H ouston___
Cincinnati..
L ouisville...

She

Mon.

Tu.es.

8 “i 8
8%
8
7 7a
71516
7\
7T
a
83a
8 >4
8=8
7%
8ia
8ia
8 316
83e
84.

8
715la
716m
7%
7 78
83a
8
8%
7 7s<*8
8%
8ia
8*16
8%
8

T
Vednes.

8 3is
8
71616
7%
7 78
75i
7 7a
838
844
8*8
7 ii ,e
8%
8 ii„
8*16
83a
8%

She
715,8
7 78
7%
7%
74t
84,
84,
8ia
7U ie
8
8
81,6
838
8ia

Thiers.

Fin.

81,6
8
7 78
7%

S he
8
7 7a
8
734
7 7s
838
814
8=8
71516
She

7%
7%
84,
844
81*
713,6
8
8
81,6
8%
8%

8316
8=8
8%

The closing quotations to-day (Friday) at other important
Southern markets were as follows.
A tla n ta. . . . . . . .
Columbus, G a .
Columbus,Miss
Eufaula............

7 7a
7^
7»8
7 7s

75s
7 78
734
7 7a

Little R o o k . . . .
M ontgom ery. .
N ashviH e..........
N a to h e z............

Newberry_____
R aleigh .............
S e lm a ...............
Shreveport___

7Ls
7i*
7%
7 U i6

R e c e i p t s p r o m t h e P l a n t a t i o n s . — The following table
indicates the actual movement each week from the plantations.
The figures do not include overland receipts nor Southern
consumption; they are simply a statement of the weekly
movement from the plantations of that part of the crop which
finally reaches the market through the outports.
W eek
E n d in g —

Aug.
“
Sept.
“
“
“

R ec e ip ts a t th e P o r ts .

1891.

1892.

17,394
16 —
5,703
31,429 11,878
2 5 ....
1 ....... 54,435 23,473
8 ....... 98,190 50,295
15....... 159,055 87,793
216,386 120,328
22.

1893.
12,248
12,434
17,034
28,117
53,703
95,849

S V k a t I n t e r io r T o w n s. R e c 'p ts f r o m P la n t 'n s ,

1891.

1892.

50,050
55,001
50,024
00,530
85,160
108,211

1893.

1891.

131,856 79,179 10,807
128,629 70,824 30,3SO
126,619 74,501 54,858
128,706 79,928 108,696
134,957 84,871 177,085
142.500 96,756 239.437

1892.

1893.

6,760
8,051 10,079
21,403 15,311
52,382 33,544
94,044 58,646
127,871107,734

The above statement shows: 1.— That the total receipts from
the plantations since Sept. 1 in 1893 are 201,310 bales; in
1892 were 278,223 bales; in 1891 were 558,904 bales.
2.— That although the receipts at the outports the past week
were 95,849 bales, the actual movement from plantations was
only 107,734 bales, the balance going to increase the stocks at
the interior towns. Last year the receipts from the plantations
for the week were 127,871 bales and for 1891 they were
239,437 bales.
OVERLAND MOVEMENT FOR THE W E E K AND SINCE SEPT, 1 ,—

o

%
a

O
B

We give below a statement showing the overland movement
for the week and since September 1, A s the letu m s reach us
by telegraph late Friday night it is impossible to enter so
largely into detail as in our regular monthly report, but all
the principal matters of interest are given.
This weekly
publication is of course supplementary to the more extended
monthly statements. The results for the week ending Sept. 22
and since Sept, 1 in the last two years are as follows:
1 8 92.

1893.
COOO
CO i f - C O Oi hO tO tO ^ 05 03 • tO © I—*tO CR tO CD Oi CO CO I—* CO CO 00
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CO CO to # - 05 0105 CO 05 CO 00 05 c n o

to

_© © # -

September 22.
Week.
Shipped—
Via St. Louis....................................

\

to

M oo

Via Louisville..................................
Via Cincinnati.................................
Via oiher routes, & o.....................

05 co to
GO#-CO

1^ 05 O o i * CRV M © 'L l CO CR<1 © © *0

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03

to

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to S
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to

^ C C M to
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M
tf-CRM
CR tOOKJCOCJiMMCO#-' to#- t 'cctO O© coCO
—
h
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O
co — osh- cocji — ©cocD,f-<ito<»a>: to <1 o « o i i - , a o © c o # -c o * -‘ 0, © c o
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M K )a }t 0 > -* O '© C O Q 0 < lt 0 # -M G D Q 0 -

Since
Sept. 1.

2,028
1 ,614
898

362
589
467

9 ,9 7 7
1,092
176
25
695
1,053
1 ,2 7 4

43*2
115
1,031

1 1 ,3 0 9
1,789
1 ,3 9 9
58
1 ,6 5 4
436
1,780

Total gross overland................
Deduct shipments—
Overland to N . Y ., Boston, dzo..
Between interior t o w n s .............
Inland, &o., from S o u th .............

6 ,383

14,292

6,168

18,425

1,138
8
852

4 ,1 1 0
20
1,811

1,418
58
612

3 ,1 4 4
164
2 ,1 8 5

1,998

5,941

2,088

5,493

8,351

4 .080

12,932

Leaving total net overland*..
4,385
•Including movement by rail to Canada.

The foregoing shows that the week’s net overland movement
this year has been 4,385 bales, against 4,080 bales for the
week in 1892, and that for the season to date the aggregate net
overland exhibits a decrease from a year ago of 4,581 bales.

j f - O . © M H 05
00 COCO
h 0 © O tO 3 to #-CO
H M H
C JlC O C O -JC .'i# -tO # ».tO © tO M
© © -3 0 1 C J 1 0 0 C 0 0 1 M © © # -© ^ 0 0

CO©

# - © © © © * - © 0 5 — o « o t o a o o 't o ; C O ©
W 0 2 C J > © aoC *© ^4C 500C 5t— CO^iOi.
‘

4 ,532
385
48

Week.

Total to be deducted.................

5°

O 1^ C5 M o 05 <5; 00

Pla Hannibal...................................

Since
Sept. 1.

1892.

1893.
-J r -©
—
CO CD CO t o ©
CO*
0 0 - a ^ j © f 0 0 l — © # -^ J tO M
0 1!
to © m to © © c o © o i© o o © -a o o .

t o CO to 01
M;
* -K )% V l'tO #* co co •

h-^JOi©CJ«C0-4O*©Ot!
© (3 0 r-, © © © t O t O C 0 i y i .

to # - M
© < i7 -

C U #R»

a

In Sight and Spinners'
Takings.

Week.

Since
Sept. 1.

Week.

Since
Sept. 1.

I— Qt <100

CO
05

OOvlHOttO'

ft H e*.
S

cn
CO©
^ 0 M M # -0 5 M
to to co # - © CO © M CR CR 0 1 M © C O to to o ' © © r f - b o
© t O © r - O t O < l > * C O h - © © C O — O O C R -J © U K ]C R — CRH-

■a S
3

M©C0K3
to © <1 CO © ■
co©o©oicnQicoto>t-©ai'vioai©<iGo-i<icooico^>
* LoulsvUle figures “ net ” in both years,
t Tbis year’s figures estimate,!.
■l Last year’s figures are for Sherman, Texas.

The above totals show that the interior stocks have increased
during the week 11,885 bales and are to-night 45,744 bales
less than at the same period last year. The receipts at all the
towns have been 15,178 bales less than the same week last
year and since September 1 they are 67,624 bales less than
for the same time in 1892.

Receipts at ports to Sept. 2 2 ........
Net overland to Sept. 2 2 .................
Southern consumption to Sept. 22

95,849
4,385
16,000

180 .7 2 0 120,328
4.080
8.351
4 7 ,0 0 0 14,000

264 ,3 6 2
12,932
4 4 ,0 0 0

Interior stocks in exoesa................

116,234
11,885

236,071 138,408
20,590
7,543

3 2 1 ,2 9 4
13,866

145,951

Came into sight during week. 128,119
Total in sight Sept. 2 2 .............

256,661

3 3 5 ,1 6 0

......

15,896

57.978

Ndrth’n spinners tak’gs to Sep. 22

It will be seen by the above that there has come into sight
during the week 128,119 bales, against 145,951 bales for the
same week of 1892, and that the decrease in amount in sight
to-night as compared with last year is 78,499 bales.

S eptember 28, 1893. J

THE CHRONICLE.

W e a t h e r R e p o r t s b t T e l e g r a p h . —Our telegraphic reports
from the South this evening denote that the weather has
been dry in almost all districts during the week, and that in
consequence picking i3 progressing rapidly. Advices from
Texas continue to point to a material decrease in the yield as
compared with last year. Worms are claimed to be doing
damage in the valleys of the Mississippi and Arkansas rivers,
and injury from rust, worms anti shedding is reported at
points in Arkansas and Alabama. The marketing of cotton
has been fairly liberal the past week.
D allas, Texan.—The crop in Texas is still deteriorating.
Rain now would hurt cotton but everything else is perishing
for want of it. Picking is active and will end sooner than
ever known. The thermometer has ranged from 62 to 100, aver­
aging 81.
H u ntsville. T exas.— Dry weather has prevailed all the week.
The thermometer has averaged 82, ranging from 68 to 96.
P a lestin e, T e x a s . S o rain has fallen during the week. The
thermometer has averaged 88, the highest being 100 and the
lowest 66.
Galveston, Texas.—We have had no rain all the week.
Average thermometer 61, highest 90, lowest T .
T
San A n to n io , T exa s.— W e h a ve had no rain during the
week. Average thermometer 82. highest 94, lowest 70.
Lading, Texas. —There has been no rain during the week.
The thermometer has averaged 82, the highest being 96 and
the lowest 68.
Colum bia, T ex a s.— Dry weather has prevailed all the
week. The thermometer has averaged 79, ranging from 61
to 94.
Cuero, Texas. —There has been one shower the past week,
doing more harm than good, the precipitation reaching thirtyseven hundredths of an inch. The thermometer has ranged
from 70 to 98, averaging 84.
B ren kam , T ex a s.— We have had no rain during th« week.
Average thermometer 83, highest 98 and lowest 68
B elton , T exa s.— The weather has been dry all the past week.
The thermometer has averaged 80, the highest being 00 and
the lowest 61.
F o r t W orth , T ex a s.— W e have had no rain all the week. The
thermometer has averaged 83, ranging from 66 to 99.
W ea th erford , T exas .—-Dry weather has prevailed all the
week. The thermometer has ranged from 70 to 98. averag­
ing 84.
J ’ew Orleans, L ou isia n a , —Xo rain has fallen the past week.
S
Average thermometer 83.
Sh reveport. L o u isia n a .— W e have had no rain during the
week. The thermometer has averaged 81, the highest being 99
and the lowest 6%
L ak e Charles, L ou isia n a —Telegram not received.
Colum bus, M ississippi .—Cotton is opening rapidly, hut the
picking season will be short. There has been no rain the past
week. The thermometer has ranged from 54 to 91, averaging
76.
L eland, M ississippi.— Dry weather has prevailed all the
week. Average thermometer 73-J, highest 93 and lowest 55.
M erid ia n , M ississippi .—Telegram not received.
L ittle R ock, A rk a n sa s.— The past week has been dry and
favorable for picking and planters are making the tuo-t of
their opportunity. Worms continue to do damage, but not
so much complaint has been heard this week as heretofore.
The thermometer has averaged 78 7, ranging from 58 to 95.
H elena, A rk a n sa s. —Grope are suffering from worms and
rust. There has been no rain all the week. The thermom­
eter has ranged from 53 to 93, averaging 74.
M em phvt, T ennessee.— Cotton is opening rapidly and pick­
ing is general. Complaints of damage by worms continue to
ootne in from the valleys of the Mississippi and Arkansas
rivers. We have had dry weather all the week. Average
thermometer 77-3, highest M-5 and lowest 54*6.
Nashville, Tennessee. —Dry weather has prevailed all the
week. The thermometer has averaged 75*6, the highest being
90 and the lowest 48.
M obile, A la b a m a . —The crop has been seriously damaged
by rust, boll worms and shedding. There has been no rain
the past week. The thermometer has averaged 80, ranging
from 64 to 95.
M on tgom ery, A la b a m a .—The weather has been hot and dry
all the week and crops are improving. Receipts are liberal and
there is much less disposition to hold cotton back. The ther­
mometer has ranged from 66 to 83, averaging 79.
Selm a. A labam a. —The weather has been fair and drv all
the week, but interior merchants do not seem to push the col­
lection of cotton with the necessary vigor. Average ther­
mometer 73, highest 90 and lowest 56,
M adison , F lo rid a .— Telegram not received.
Colum bus, G eo rgia .— There has been no rain during the
week. The thermometer has averaged 81, ranging from 66

Savannah, G eorgia. —There has been a trace of rain on one

day of the week.
averaging 81.

S tateb u rg, South C a rolin a .—The weather has been clear
and hot all the week and cotton is opening very rapidly. The
thermometer has averaged 75-8, ranging from 59 to 90.
Wilson, N orth C a rolin a .—Telegram not received.
The following statement we have also received by telegraph,
showing the height of the rivers at the points named at
3 o’clock September 31, 1893, and September 22, 1893.
Sept. 2 1 , ’ 93. S ept. 22, *92.
F e e t.

the week. Accounts from the crop are conflicting. Some [joints
in this section make favorable reports and others send unsat­
isfactory advices. Ricking is active and cotton comes in
freely. Average thermometer 78. highest 95, lowest 57.
Charleston, South C a rolin a , — There has been no rain the
past week. The thermometer ha* averaged 81, the highest
being 94 and the lowest 70,

F e e t.

3*3
3-7
09
1-9
2-6

3-5
5-8
1-6
41
6-6

New Orleans . . .
M emphis............
Nashville........... ___ Above low-water mark.
Shreveport........
Vicksburg.......... ___ Above low-water mark.

I n d i a C o t t o n M o v e m e n t f r o m a l l F o r t s . — T h e receipt8
and s upments of cotton at Bombay have been as follows fo1
the week and year, bringing the figures down to Sept. 31,
BOMBAY RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOB FOUR YEARS.

|S h ip m e n ts th i s w e e k . j S h ip m e n t s s i n c e S e p t. 1.
te a r

G r e a t OonU-i _ , , ; G r e a t 1 C o n ti­
B r ifn . n e n t. T o“ d . B rita in
r u n t.

■4,000
2 ,000
3 ,0 0 0
1,000;

I3 9 3 : .........
1892 .........

!1 I 5

..........

4,000
2.000
3.000
1,000

1.000
.........
1.000
2 .000

R e c e ip t* .
T h is
W eek.

T o ta l.

15.000
5.000
7 ,000
5 ,000

S in e*
S ep t. 1.

5 .0 0 0
2.000
•4,000
3 ,000

10.000
5.C0O
8.000
7,000

14.000
6.000
23.000
14.0 0 0

According to the foregoing Bombay appears to show
an increase compared with last year in the week's receipts o f
3,000 bale? and an in crease in shipments of 3,000 bales, and
the shipments since Sept. 1 show an in crease of 11,000 bales,
The movement at Calcutta, Madras, and other India ports for
the last reported week and since the 1st of September, for two
years, has been as follows. “ Other ports” cover Ceylon,
rnticorin. Kurraohee and Ooconada,
S h ip m e n ts s i n c e S e p t. 1.

S h ip m e n ts f o r th e w e ek .
G r ea t
B r ita in .

C o n t i­
n e n t.

Calcm it*-

1893........
1892........
1892........

Total a l l -

1593......
1592.. ..

C o n tin e n t.

1,C0Q

T o ta l.

1 ,0 0 0

1 ,0 0 0
3 ,0 0 0

......

Madras—

All o t h e r s ls 3 3 .........

G rea t
B rita in ,

T ota l.

1,000

1893........
1892........

1,000

1.000
1.000

■2,000
3 ,0 0 0

1 ,0 0 0

......

1,000

1,000

2,000
2,000

2,000
1.000

4,000
3.000

3 .0 0 0

■1,000

5,000

4,000

7,000
9,000

2,000
3.000

1,000
1,000

6.000
4,000

5.000
8.000

6,000

11,000
13,000

1,000

5,000

The above totals for the week show that the movement from
the ports other than Bombay is 2,000 bales more than the same
week last year. For the whole of India, therefore, the total
shipments since September 1, 1893, and for the corresponding
periods of the two previous years, are as follows:
EXPORTS TO aOROPR PROM ALL INDIA,

Shipments
to all Kurope
fro m —

1891.

1 8 92,

1893.

Since
week. | Sept. 1.

Sept. 1.

4.000
8.000

i o .ooo ;

U1 ether porta.
T otal...........

10,000

27.000*

11,000,

Sir*#
Sept. 1.

This
week.

1 This

This

S o m t i a j r ................

2 .0 0 0 :

4,000

5.000
13,000

3.000
3.000

8 ,000
2 2 ,0 0 0

6,000!

18.000

8 .000

30,0 0 0

Alexandria Receipts and S hipments,—Through arrange­
ments we have made with Messrs. Davies, Benacni & Co,, of
Liverpool and Alexandria, we now receive a weekly cable of
the movements of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt, The following
»re the receipts and shipments for the past week and for the
oorresponding week of the previous two years.
S le w a n d r ia , M o v p t,

189L

1892.

1893.

September 20.
Receipt* (cactar**)— .
T M ftw eek ....
Since Sept. 1 .

45.000
7 6 ,0 0 0

3 .000
4 ,000

7 0 ,0 0 0
119.000

T h is ! Since | T h is 1 S i n c e
w e e k . S e p t. 1,1 w e e k . S e p t. 1.

Experts (bales)—

Sinca
T h is
w e e k . S ept. 1 .

.........
1,000,

2 ,000
7 ,0 0 0

......... !
1.0 0 0 ;

4,000
5,ooo.

2 ,000
l.o o o

8 ,0 0 0
3 000

Total Bnrope_____ 1.000
A oantar !■ 98 Donnds.

9 .0 0 0

1,0001

9,000

3,000

11,000

To L iv e rp o o l............
To Continent.............

This statement shows that the receipts for the week ending
Sept. 30 were 3,000 cantars and the shipments to all Europe
1,000 bales.
Manchester Market.—Our report received by cable to-night
from Manchester states that the market continues firm for
both yarns and sheetings. Manufacturers are generally well
under contract. We give the prices for to-day below and leave
those for previous weeks of this and last year for comparison

The thermometer has ranged from 69 to 97,

A u gu sta, G eorgia .— The weather has been warm and dry all

519

1892.

1893.
32* Cop.
T w ist

8*4 lbs.
Shirtings.

<
1.
d. a. d.
*.
Ag. 18 a»s ® 7 % 5 7 L ,3 7
“ 25 fliTtoa?*) 5 7*9®7
6% ® 7% 5 7 >9*7
IPs ® 7*9 5 8 » 7
71,e » 7 ® 5 9 » 7
b
" 22 7*8 ®75t 5 10 1*7

A.
5
4*9
4i*

5
0
7

Oott'n
Mid. 32* C o p .
Twist.
Uplds

8 * lbs.
Shirtings.

a.
a.
«6
• 9 ®0
1
4 8 36
4*8
> 8 *9 3 6
1
4 *9
4 9 •®0
57s -a7
4%
4 U , * 6 >8 k>7H 4 10 ® 6
<
1.
414
4*4

a.
0
5T
s
b\

a.
® 6 7*
® 6 -h
nuk

«.

4 10

Oott’n
Mid.
Vplds

a.
a.
315.8
4
31518
3
315.8
2
4
3
4 '
4
5 J h st.

THE CHRONICLE.

520

E x p o r t s o f Y a r n f r o m I n d ia , t o C h i n a a n d J a p a n .— W e
:give below a statement of the shipments of yarns from India
to China and Japan during the six months ending June 30,
for the years 1878 to 1893 inclusive:
Jan. 1 to June 30.
1 8 7 8 .............................
1 8 7 9 .............................
1 8 8 0 .............................
1 8 8 1 .............................
1 8 8 2 ..............................
1 8 8 3 .............................
1 8 3 4 .............................
1 8 8 5 . . . ........................
1 8 8 6 ..............................
1 8 8 7 .............................
1 8 8 8 .............................
1 8 8 9 ..............................
1 8 9 0 ..............................
1 8 9 1 ..............................
3 8 9 2 ..............................
1 8 9 3 ..............................

To China (bales
4 0 0 lbs. each).
22,5 2 8
23.238
31,660
27.878
38,362
44.3 2 9
60,201
72,8 8 0
99.723
100,797
120,644
125,685
149,973
193,287
1 95,785
194,325

To Japan (bales
400 lbs. each.)
819
2,918
2,469
3 ,363
4,666
9 ,368
6 ,607
8,766
6,898
15,603
2 6 ,07 l
*28,102
14,646
5 ,342
15,874
6,338

Total
bales.
23,0 4 7
26,156
37,129
31,241
43 ,0 2 s
53,6 9 7
66,808
81,646
106,621
116,400
14 6,715
153,787
161,619
198,623
211,659
200,663

* These include. 4 5 hales of 300 lbs. each.

It will be noticed that while the shipments to China exhibit
but a small decline from 1892, the exports to Japan have ap­
preciably decreased.
H

a n d -B o o k

fob

C a b le R ecords of A m e r ic a n ,
a n d B r a z il ia n C o t t o n S t a t is t ic s ,

I/V1I,

J o t e B u t t s , B a g g i n g , & c .— Jute bagging has been in go id
demand during the week under review, and the market
continues firm. Prices are as last quoted, viz.: 4} { c. for 1%
lbs., 5c. for 2 lbs. and o% c. for standard grades. The market
has been steady for jute butts at former prices, but there has
been very little inquiry for stock. Quotations to-night are
1 l-16c. for paper grades and 1 % @ 1 % c. for bagging qualities.
T h e F o l l o w in g

are

the

G

ross

R

e c e ip t s

of

Cotton

st

New Y ork , Boston, Philadelphia and B altim ore for the pa>t
week, and since SeDtember 1, 1893.
BOSTON.

new

York.

This

S in c e

T h is

S in ce

Ph i l a d b l p h ’a
T b it

w eek .

S e p t . 1.

w eek .

S e p t.l.

w eek .

Receipts

N. Orleans.
T «x a».........
Savannah.
M obile.......

3,771
2,316
3,393

13,945
4,541
8,737

100
513
02
351
217
40

467
440

This year 10,792

30,593

S in c e
S ep t.

So.CaroPa.
No.Carol’ s.
y ir g in la ...
florthn pts
Tenn., &c..

8 \ LTIifORK
T h ie

1. w e a k .

100
1,733
165
475

D a il y

E a s t I n d ia n , E g y p t ia n
& C .— Mr. John Jones, of Liverpool, has just published his

[VOL.

S in e *
S e p i.

).

........
.............

.

1,580

10

2,949

in

1,702

3,603

.
794
2,224
20 1

2,321
375

113
1,232

113
1,756

.....

210

1,343
591

..........

4,000

5,548

1,355

1,379

2,713

5,602

4.5-0
829
1,214
790
2,515
twenty-third annual issue of the daily cable records of the Last yeaT,.. 21,819 53.275 2.052
principal cotton crops of the world, with considerable other
S h i p p i n g N e w s . — The exports of cotton from the United
useful information.
Following the plan of former years, States the past week, as per latest m ail returns, have reached
the pages are so arranged that the daily and weekly figures 20,941 bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerne ', these
for this year as received can be inserted side by side with are the same exports reported by telegraph and published in
those for the previous year. The scope of the publication has the C h r o n i c l e last Friday.
W ith regard to New York we
been further extended. The book will be found on sale at the include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Thursday.
ToUu, oater.
office of the Commercial Telegram Bureau, 19 Beaver Street.

Ne w

15 Messrs. Dan
Talmage’s Sons issued bulletin No. 5 on the rice crop of 1893,
summarizing it as follows :
R ic e

C r o p .— Under date of SeDtember

North Carolinar—Harvesting progressing under favorable conditions.
Outcome, 275 ,0 0 0 bushels.
South Carolina—Badly damaged by cyclone and subsequent rains,
which prevented repairs to plantations and recovery of crop from
“ salt.” Freshet now prevailing on Pee Dee and Waccainaw, threaten­
ing further reduction of yield. Outcome, 9 5 0 ,0 0 0 bushels, as against
1 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0 last year.
Georgia—Same general features pertain as in South Carolina. O ut­
come, 3 3 0 .0 0 0 bushels, as against 5 5 0 ,0 0 0 bushels last year.
Louisiana—Reports differ widely; majority are gloomy, yet not a few
■cheerful. Turn out in older and river parishes larger than anticipated
and also with m any in the Southwest, which m ay in part make up or
counterbalance further reported shrinkage because of drought aud
cold northwest winds. Weather conditions have in the main been ex
cellent. There w ill be a larger per cent of high grade than last year,
due to good seed and care in culture. The outcome is a subject of con­
troversy. but with advanced and promise of still higher values it is
hoped that the monetary result will exceed that of the previous crop.
E a s t I n d i a C r o p .— The following is from Messrs. Gaddum,
Bythell & Co.’s cotton report dated Bombay, August 13 :
In consequence of the Hindoo and Mahomedan riots during the
earlier part of the past-week, our market has been practically closed
ever since the departure of the last mail, and although it was nomin­
ally open on Wednesday last, the amount of business passing has been
almost nil.
In spite of the somewhat pessimistic Bureau report
which arrived from Washington last Friday, Reuter has since
sent us daily advices of declining markets on noth sides of the A t ­
lantic. This, of course, has had a weakening effect on rates here, and
quotations are about two rupees a candy lower than when we last
wrote. Reports this week from our various up country branches are
of a very cheerful character, and most of the districts seem to have
been enjoying just the kind of weather required. In several of the
Oomra districts the cotton plants are already flowering. We were
getting very nDxious about the continued scarcity of rain at Bhownuggur, but a telegram which we have just received from our representa­
tive there brings the welcome intelligence that a fall of one inch took
place there last evening. Bengal reports are also very promising.

The Bombay Prices Current of the same date says:
The telegrams to hand on Monday morning from the eotton-grnwring distiicts reported a fall of rain since the middle of last week
iu the Bengal and Oomrawuttee circles, ranging from 2St inches at
Cawnpore in the former to 13 inches at Khangautn in the latter; and in
all the districts of these two circles the cotton cron was flourishing iu
seasonable weather; the same report coming from Broach, where there
had beenno more rain, and where the crop prospects were good. Iu the
Dhollera circle, on the other hand, more rain was much w anted, ex eept iu the Wadwan district, where the plants needed flue w eather;
and the same was the case at Hubli, iu the DLiarwar circle. This
morning’ s news by wire is favorable upon the whole, though rain wns
still needed in the districts whi- h required it when the previous re­
ports were sent. A t Barsee, in the Oomra circle, the plants are in
flower.

the
cotton crop in Egypt was issued by the Alexandria General
Produce Association under date of August 31 :
E g y p t ia n

\

C otton

C r o p . — The following report m

The information received in August is favorable. The heat has been
intense and the watering has been regular and abundant, thanks to
the rise of the Nile. These circumstances have accelerated the devel­
opment of the cotton trees and their flowering. Blossoms and bolls
show abundantly, and their appearance is satisfactory The back­
wardness previously mentioned still, however, exists. It is estimated
at an average of twenty days for the whole of the crop. A ll our cor­
respondents are unanimous on this point. They inform us that in tlie
♦South of the Delta the first pickimr will not become general before
the 20th to 25th September, while in the North it will com­
mence from the 1st to the 10th October. The same backwardness ex­
is ts in the Fayoum and Upper Egypt. It is only these davs that pick­
ing has begun. Worms and fogs have not done any damage. To sum
up, our information is good, and leads us to hope that the ultimate re­
sult w ill be satisfactory; but the cotton planes have still to fear the
fogs aud bad weather which may come in September and October. In
consequence of the givat difficulty that the Government has always
experienced in obtaining exact information respecting the acreage
under cotton, we have reason to know that this year they will refrain
from seeking these particulars. W e shall therefore bo unable to insert
•the acreage in our r e s u m e s as we have done in previous years.

Y o r k —To Ltveroool, per steamers Arizona. 1 ,3 0 3 ........
Nomadic, 1 ,477 upland and 20 8ea Islan d___St. Paneras,
2 ,212 upland aud 102 Sea Island ___________________________
To Hull, per steamer Galileo, 6 2 3 ...................................................
To Bremen, per steamers H. H . Meier, 1 ,5 5 0 . . ..K a ise r W il­
helm II., 5 0 0 ................. .....................................................................
To Hamburg, per steamers, Dania, 5 7 . . . Gellert, 233 ........
To Antwerp, per steamers Belgenland, 2 8 4 ___Rhynland, 59
To Copenhagen, per steamer Araerika. 1 0 0 ................................
To Gottenburg, per steamer Veneiia, 2 0 0 ....................................
To Genoa, per steamer Montebello. 1,529 . . . - .........................
To Naples, per steamer Kiouprinz Friedrich Wilhelm, 4 7 5 ..
N e w O r lea ns —To Liverpool, per steamer Heiscbel, 1 ,2 7 1 ........
To Havre, per steamer Duptiy de Lome, 3 ,8 2 7 ..........................
To Hamburg, per steamer Valesia, 2 2 5 ........................... . .........
To Rotterdam, per steamer Irthington, 100 ..............................
B oston —T o Liverpool, ner steamers Cephalonia, 6 7 3 . ..K ansas,
8 4 6 — Lancastrian, 2 0 1 ........................................................ .......
To Yarmouth, per steamers Boston, 6 0 . . . Yarmouth, 4 0 . . .
Balt im o r e —To Liverpool, ner steamer Carolina, 1,159 .............
To Havre, per steamer Khio. 9 5 8 ....................................................
To Antwerp, per steamer Salerno, 1 9 5 .........................................
Ph il a d e l p h ia —To Liverpool, per steamer Indiana, 6 6 2 .............

5 ,114
623
2 ,0 3 0
290
343
100
20 0
1,529
475
1,271
3 ,8 2 7
225
100
1 ,720
100
1 ,159
958
195
662

Total............................................................................................................. 20,941

The particulars of these shipments, arranged in our usu. 1
form, are as follows:

New York.
N. Orleans.
Boston. . . .
Baltimore..
PliiladeFa.
T o t a l ....

Bremen J ’dam, Genoa
R
Liver< Ham- Ant£
and
Yarpool. Hull. Havre, burg, werp.de.Nanles.mouth. Tota'.
5 .1 1 4
62 6 ........... 2 ,3 4 0
643 2 ,0 0 1 .......... 10.7 2 4
1.2 71 .......... 3 ,tsz/
225
100 ........................
5 ,4 2 3
1 ,720 ....................................................................
100
1 ,8 2 0
1,1 M) ..........
953 ........ J
195 .........................
2 ,312
66 i ......... ...................... . .......................................
662
9 ,9 2 3

623

4 .7 8 5

2,565

938

2 ,004

100

20.9 1 1

Below we add the clearances this week of vessels carrying
cotton from United States ports, bringing our data down 10
the latest dates:
G a l v e s t o n — To

Liverpool—Sept. 19 •Steamer Monrovia, 5,803.
To H a v re -S e p t. 19 -Steam er K nutsfoni. 5,v5o.
N e w O r l e a n s — i’o Liverpool - Sept. 1 8 -Steam er Assaye, 2 ,0 0 1 . . . .
Sept. 1 9 —8teamer Iuventor, 4,20 0 .
To Hamburg Sept. 16 - Steamer Markomanuia, 1.000.
Sa v a n n a h — To Barcelona - Sept-. 16 -8team er Pelayo, 3 ,907.
To Genoa - Sept. 2 1 - Steamer Hispauia, 2,700.
B r u n s w i c k — To Bremen—Sept. 1 9 -S team er Bidswlrth ooo.
B oston — Co Liverpool - Sept. 1 5 —Steamers Citalonia, 1,079; Norseman,
1,065 upland and 50 Sea Islan d .......Sept. 1 8 —Steamer Cambroman, 706.
B a l t im o r e - T o Liverpool - Sept. l l - 8 t e a m e r Bairowm ore, 446.
To London - Sept. 17 - Steamer Michigan, 350.
To B rem en -S ep t. 1 5 -s te a m e r Stuttgait, 2 ,6 2 9 ........Sept. 20 —
Steamer Neckar, 595.
To Antwerp - Sepr. 14 - Steamer British Kins:, 1T0.
P h i l a d e l p h i a — T o Liverpool - S e p t . 1 9 —S t e a m e r B r i t i s h Princess, 7 7 7 .

Cotton freights the past week have been as follows
Satur.

Mon.

Tue$.

Wedmx.\ T hun.

Fri.

Liverpool, steam.rf
ki
%
761
7,«
....
....
—
Do
later., d.
....
___
...
Havre, reg. lin e d . 3J6&13€4
316
316
318
318
316
—
...
....
...
Do outside str.d.
....
Bremen, ste a m ..d.
532
5 2
nP
4 5<i3’3 l l e4 f32® U64 5 ,2 ^1I q 4
Do
la te r ... d.
S16
3l«
S16
316
S16
316
Hamburg, steamrf.
53S
*-32
332
B
82
Do
later .d.
31«
31S
3J«
31G
S18
S16
3u*
30'
30T
30*
3b*
30*
Ams’dam, steam .c.
Do
later., c. 35 04 0 * 35 3-40* 3 5 ® 4 0 * 35 04 0 * 35 3 4 0 * 35 3 40*
Reval, steam — d. 1^04 h
136 •
13e«
138.
136l
1!,gv
Do
la te r....... d. l 70j ® 932 17i 4® 932 ^761®yiJ 178»®932 176 4 ^ yS2 1,c i® a32
2
B’ lona, d ir e ct...^ .
3ia
310
316
316
318
S16
Genoa, s te a m ...d.
S16
3l«
3i«
3,8
31S
316
rrieste.v.Lond’nrf.
7-<
2
7S2
732
731
Vi
7.82
7
7««
Antwerp, steam , d. 764 * ’e
7«.
7S*
* Cents per 100 lbs.

THE CHRONICLE.

S SPTEJTBEK 28, 1893,]

521

To-day the market was dull and easier in response to weaker
advices from the West, The spot market was quiet and a
trifle weaker. The sales included No. 8 red winter at 70c. in
S ep t. 8 .
S ep t. 15. S ep t. 22
S ept, 1.
elevator and No. 1 Northern Duluth at 2f.£ 3 8c. under De­
67.000
54.000
81,000 cember delivered.
45.000
4.000
4.000
2 ,0 0 0

L i v e r p o o l .— By c a b le f r o m L iv e r o o o l w e h a v e th e fo llo w in g

statement of the week’s sales, stocks, &c., at that port:

Sales o f the week........... bales.
2 ,0 ( 0
Of which exporters too* ...
5.000
2 ,0 0 0
7.000
O f which speema*. rs t o o k ..
42.000
46.000
loitfoo
67.000
Sales A m e r ic a n .......................
3 ,0 0 0
8 ,0<>0
1 1 ,< 0 0
1 2 .0 0 0
Actual export.............................
54.1 00 62,000
41.000
53,00*
Forw arded,.................................
Total stock—Estimated............ 1,182,000 1,118,000 1,079.000 1,034,000
O f which American—Estim'd 905.000 865.000 831,000 784,1*00
24.000
2 4,000
19.000
23.000
Total Import o f the week.........
17.000
1 2 .0 0 0
15.000
1 2 .0 0 0
O f which A m e r ic a n ..............
3..0O0
3 ,000
30.000
40 000
Amount afl at______ ________
2 5 ,(0 0
2 0 ,(i 0 0
2 0 .0 0 0
30,000
O f which Am erican...............

DAILY OLOSING MOOTS O f NO. 3 RBD WIDTHS WHBAT.

September delivery
.0.
October d e liv e ry ............o.
>~-«njt>er delivery____ c.
Slay delivery.............

Man.
73%
74%
77*4
84 %

Sat.
71 %
7 1%
78 %
So

IF,.ft.
73
73%
77
83 %

73*%
73%
77%
84%

Thun.
73
73 %
77
837S

Sri.
721%
73%
781%
83%

The market for Indian corn futures has been dull and prices
made very little change until yesterday, when there was a
slight advance on Western manipulation and buying by
The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and futures each “shorts” to cover contracts. In the spot market the trading
day of the week ending Sept. 23, and the daily closing price»
has been very lisrhf, owing to absence of supplies, and yesterday
of spot cotton, have been as follows:
prices were wholly nominal, as the market was bare of stock.
To-day the market was firmer owing to the scarcity of sup­
Spat.
W e d n e t. T K u r t& y . Frida.
S a tu r d a y M o n d a y T u e s d a y
plies. but the speculation was slow. The spot market was
entirely nominal in the absence of stock. No. 2 mixed was
G ood
Market, l Moderate Easier.
Good
Steady. demand. Hardens. demand.
1:45 r . M.J demand.
quoted at 51c, in elevator. No. 2 mixed to arrive sold at
•I9l£c.(g51c. delivered, according to the time of arrival.

Mld.Upl’ds.

4 » !S

g a le s .......... 1 0 .0 0 0
8 p«e, exp.
500

4%

4=8

4%

4%

1 2 .0 0 0
2 ,0 0 0

1 2 ,0 0 0
1 ,0 0 0

14,000
1,500

15,000
2,500

fu tu re* .

Market, \
1:45 p . M-j advance.

A » ls

15.000
1,500

Steady »> Steady at Steady at
1-64 adl-* 4 de­
4-64 ad

cilne.

cilne.

Weak.

irregular.

cline.

raaee.

taste®.

Quiet.

Very
«te»Mjr

D A IL Y CLOSING PJUCK* O P H O . 3 M IX E D OOK.-L

September delivery..

.0.

October d elivery.......... e.
c.
November d elivery....... c.
,.e.
December d e liv e r y .....e .
day delivery.................o.

8ai
48%
48%
19
49%
51%

Man.
■19%
4 -%
49*8
49%
51%

Tues.
49%
18%
48 %
49%
51%

Wed.
49%
48%
48 %
49 %
51%

T h n r t.

49 ‘9
48%
491.
JO
51 %

JTW.

49%
49%
49%
60%
52 %

Qalet anc
•ie*d *.

Oats for future delivery showed only fractional changes
until yesterday, when buying by “ shorts" to cover contracts,
stimulated by reduced supplies, both here and at the West,
The opening, highest, lowest ant) closing prices of futuies caused an advance of About lc. per bushel. In the spot mar­
st Liverpool for each day are given below. Prices are on ket there has been a faiily active trade, and yesterday the
the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause, unleae otherwise sales included No. 2 white at 38V.g88t£c, and No. 2 mixed
at
Today the market was fairly active and
stated:
r r I k e p r i c e * a r e g x e e n in p e n c e a net 64tA*.
Tkut .- 4 63 m e a n s higher on continued buying by “ shorts’’ to cover contracts.
The snot market was moderately active and firm. The sales
4 o 3 S k d . a n d 5 01 m e a n t ti 1 -S4d.
included No, 3 white at 39c, and No. 2 mixed at 33J£c,
Market, ?
IK K {

J S S e.

■ « ! . , 8 e p i, i « .
Q pm
4.

September.
Sept. Oct .
O et.-N o »_..
N or.-Dec..
D ec.-Jan....
Jan .-F eb,...
Feb.-M ch...
Mcb.* April.
April-M a r May-Jane...

a«s*
4.
4 12
4 41
4 41
4 42
444
4 45
4 47
4 50
16*

4 41
4 40
€40
4 a
4 43
4 45
4 17
4 i8
its
4 *4

4 (4

J j* * .

V im .

4.
4 34

T o m .. S ep t. 19.

|
Open Bigh Lme.

4.
<
L *•
*
|
* 4i i l l
im 4S ; * 34
4 40 4 .1 !
I
iU 4 3 5 * m ; 4 34
4 40 441
441 4 4* tm 4 m 4M j 4 m
438 i m i 4 M
4 43 143
im 4 40 4 49 4 3 8
* 45 4 ( 5
4 47 4 47 [ 4 4Z 4 42 j * 10 4 40
4 4» * n o ; ■4 14 4 40 4 42 4 40
!
4 47 i 4 IS 4 45
4S2 4 61
4 54 1 1 1 1 i 40 4 49 ! 4 47 4 47

W e d ,, K e p t. *30.
'J u n B ie h

IS ,

|

T k s n u , 5***1. 3 1 .

L o u . C I O .,} 0®#n! H ig h

4.
A
7 4 37
4 35 ■4 m
4 3 6 ,4 35
4 36 ‘ 4 U
4 37 i 4 .‘ 7
4 30 4
4 41 4 42
4 44 4 44
4 46 4 49
4 48 4 48

A
43®

b r e a d s t u f f

I 4
135
' 4 u
4 3l
|1 34
‘ 4: 4 38
4 40
4 43
4 44
4 46

4

4 86
434

4 84
4 85
4
488
440
4 it

4 45
4 47

F r ! ., S e p t . 3 3 .

a*
i 4.
4

Low. JOk>«.

4.
A 1 4. j 4L | 6L j 4L
4 34 43® , 4 36 4 37 4
4 37
* m \ 4S3 4 33 I 4 M •4 S6 : * 34 ' 4 85
« * » 433 4 33 4 33
4>a 4 43 433 4 33
i 3 4 .4 3 4 ; 436 i
i U \ 4 3S 4 34 4 35 : 4 M * 3 7 4 36 4 37
4 37 i n
4 37 I4 19 ' 4 * 7 j 4 88
4 3 7 ;,
«*»
4 m i 4 » 4 48 j 1*9
4 41 i 39 ; 4 41 !
4 41 j 4 41 4 1 ! 1 4 42 4 48 : * 42 j i 4.3
*<i
April M a t
4«
4 U 4 *3 4 43
May J u n e .. 445 4 M ? 4 44 4 44 !

Sepl em ber.
SepL-Oet..
O et-N n v....
N cr.-D ec.,.
D ec.-Ja n ...
Jan.-Feb..
Feb.-M cb...
Mcb.* April,

.0.

;Op€» BighlL "*,

r
'
!
.'

4.
4 43 4 43 4 42
4 41 j * 41 ; 4 41
4 40 * 41 4 40
4 40 4 41 * 40
4*2 4 42 * *1
4 43 ■4 44 4 43
ft 45 j 4 46 |4 45
4 48 ; 4 48 ! 4 48
4 SO 4 SO 4 SO
4 5 $ 4 5 3 '4 52

s.

DAILY CLOSING PKIOBS OP NO. * MIXKD OATS.
m u.
W ed.
M on.
T u ee.
Tkun,

4 43
4 41
4 40
4 40
442
4 44
4 46
4 48

3’%
32%
November delivery.........o. 32%
33%
I»»em >«T dull very....... e.
Msy d eliv ery ......... ..— .0. 36%
c.

32%
32%
3*J7g
33%
30%

32%
32%
32%
33%
36%

32%
3%
327,
33%
36%

33%
33%
33%
34%
37%

FW
34%
34
34
34%
37%

Bye ha* been without change and quiet
FLOCK.

floe................. * bbi.Sl 7 5 0 * 3 20 Patent, w in t e r ..... *3 2 5 0 * 3 85
luperttae..., ............ 1 < 5 » 2 40 City mats extra*----- 3 85 » 3 90
ixtra, No. 2 .............. 2 00<» 3 50 Bye flour,snnerflne.. 2 9 0 * 3 25
Ixtta. No. 1 ............. 2 2 0 0 2 H Buckwheat f l o o r ...............9 . . . .
O
Hams .............. .
2 3 0 * 3 10 Corn m ctUttratght* ...........
3 00 9 3 80
W e s t e r n . 2 7 5 0 3 10
’•tool, spring........... 3 80 0 4 50
Brandywine..
2 85
fWkeat Sour la sacks sell* at prices below those tor barrels.]

mum.
aorta*, o e r b iu h ...
Bed winter Ho 3 . .
Bed winter.............
White .........................

O ata ~M lx e d ..y ba.
No. 2 m ixed...........
Ho, 2 white.............

607 9
7 ,% 9
60 9
02 9
33 % »
37 a
9
33 9

e.
78
73%
74
74
36
41
35
40

Corn, per bosh.—
Weet’u m ix e d . . . . .
No. 2 mixed . . . . . .
Western yellow . . .
Wee tern w h it e .....
ByeWestern, per bosh.
State and Jersey..
Bariev— No.aWesCn.
State 2-rowed........
State 6 -r o w e d .....

0.
10
51
51
50
52
50
..
..

9
9
9
9

53 %
52%
53
52

9
9
9
9
9

56
55

..

The movement of breadstuff3 to market is indicated in the
*50 statement below, prepared by us from the figures of the New
York Produce Exchange.
We first give the receipts at
453
Western lake and river porta, arranged so as to present the
comparative movement for the week ending Sept. 10, 1898,
and since August 1, for each of the last three years:

F r id a r . S e p t 2 2 . 1 8 9 3 .

The market for wheat flour has relapsed into dulness.
Buyers, owing to a weaker turn to wheat value*, withdrew,
and to make sales it was necessary to grant material conces­
sions, which holders for the most pan refused to do. There
has been a very fair trade in the market for rye flour at about
steady prices. Com meal has sold with a moderate degree of
freedom at unchanged values. To-day the market for wheat
flour was more active, particularly for spring bakers, which
were in light supply and firm.
Immediately after our last the market for wheat futures
advanced with a moderately active speculation on buying by
"shorts’’ to cover contracts, stimulated by large export clear­
ances, but subsequently prices gradually weakened under
seBing by “ longs,” prompted by dull and weaker foreign ad­
vances, increasing receipts at the Northwest and reports of
rain in the Southwest, thereby enabling farmers to resume
their seeding. The spot market has received a limited degree
of attention from the local trade, but the demand from ship­
pers wag slow until yesterday when there were moderate
buyer*. The sales included No. 2 red winter at 4c. under
December delivered; No. 3 red winter at Tf^'c. in ele­
vator: No, 2 bard winter at 5c. under December delivered,
and No. 3 w hite spring at 8J,Jc, under December delivered.

a t-

B ow .

IFkrat.
?b#
782. n s
351.060
1.633.008
l.s!»a.54<>
582, IO
O
306"6*»
29.200
689 13*
0J.0OO
449,260

Ohm.

Chicago ..
Mliwaak®®...
Iciatb.
yuaoeapoila.
role4o......... .
Dctr^Ht.___
Hey eland4L t o o ls ....
3* o r i * . . .........
(annas City.
ToLwk.%9.
(ame ws.*9*.
•sine wk,*91.
«ne« A u g . 1.
i m ..........
i « ......... .
1 * ^ 1....... .

m o .m
33JW

21S.SSS
......
2.832
4.083
n .m

1*£50
3 » . 10-t
357-150
m jm

6.124 4«4
7.717,166
aooi,sa«

28,266,209
*0,781.778
1,525.700 46.717,5*4
2.x if m n

O a ts .
M U k M lh *

B to 1990* B m h M

24,700

1*9.000
14 300
5330
405.675
166,000
38,110
3,917 m
2,708.066
3,461,981

2,616,40(2
211,000
......
17,09 •
31.242
S3305
324 920
69d.»00
279
8.782.148
2,797.333
*,899 547

20.041,62$ 21,307.13 »
15,870,543 19,073,37 5
19,699.760 19,933,719

B a rle y .

Bw.

Bu.56 16,.
W t, 782
27,686
184,0,1
18,180
. . ...
7,1/0
8,185
1.500
4,900

249
3.5.0

2*3,347
460.991
955.108

07,594
254,996
891.498

......

618 2^13
544,151
1.227,422 1,238 981
2.950.095 8.992,103

The receipts of flour and grain at the aeaooard ports for the
week ended Sept. 18,1893, follow:
Wheal,
bath.
Sew Y ork ...1 7 4 .9 6 2 ..391,575
Boston.......... 51,587
3 4,932
Montreal . . . 8.488
9 4 .4 7 0
Philadelphia. 45.243
6 1 ./4 6
Baltimore
93.892 359.508
Hlohmond. . . 3.425
8.581
Vew Orleans. 10,1.93
116,850

Com ,
buck.
27 9 ,2 0 0
9 4,401
2 7 1 ,1 0 7
78,8 3 2
120,416
7.890
9,723

Barley,
Oats,
hath.
hash.
737 .3 5 3 2 0 .2 0 0
2 8 8.9 20
1,79s
47,919
190,290
456 ,0 2 0
3,000
46,0 0 2
......

Tot. week..377.870 2,057,528 880.225 1,755,8 >8 21998
Week 1892 515.137 4,501.431 1,091.541 1,727.431 27,602

&
8.200
530

4,202

12,932
55,630

► THE CHRONICLE.

522

[Vol. Lvn,
1893.

1892.

Week. Since Jan. 1.

Week. Since Jan. 1.

65
29
3 ,490
233
1 ,235
297
88
97
1 ,436
61

3.085
1,173
25.610
4 ,719
8 ,977
5,935
13,702
1.626
3 342
37,145
2 ,0 0 0

43
1
1 ,472
265
1,981
131
323
54
264
1,2 l
116

3.863
1.179
67,866
4 ,3 2 7
12. 00
6,7«»7
11,6 6 7
2,606
4.771
33,545
2.161

7,031
4 ,350

107,314
2 4 ,1 5 0

5 ,864

150 ,7 9 2
13,345

T otal..................................... 11,381

Below are the rail shipments of flour and grain from
Western lake and river ports for four years:

131,464

5,864

164,137

Ne w Y o k e

to

S e p t . 19.

1893.
Week
Sept. 16.

1892.
Week
Sept. 17.
318,813

1 8 91.
Week
Sept 19.
26 9 ,4 8 0

1890
Week
Sept. 20
252 ,9 7 5

W h e a t.........
C o r n .. ... . . . .................
570.184
Oats......... ................. 1,4 7 3 ,6 8 0
7 3 ,7 5 6
Barley.......... .................
12,261
B y e .............. .................

1.1 2 0 ,4 1 2
386 ,8 9 7
1,337.201
87.129
7 8 ,3 0 2

8 6 5 ,1 5 4
3 2 6 ,7 3 7
1,9 4 1 ,2 9 1
2 0 3 .9 3 7
45,6 1 2

68 3,860
433,41 8
1 ,4 -3 .2 0 7
24 0 ,9 6 1
7 1 ,3 0 1

T otal.......................3 .2 3 6 ,2 3 0

3 ,0 0 9 ,9 4 1

3 ,3 8 2 ,7 3 1

2 .9 1 9 .7 4 7

Great Britain............................
Other European.......................
C h in a ..........................................
India.............................................
Arabia..........................................
Itrloa .........................................
West Indies................................
Mexico.........................................
Central America......................
■South A m erica........................
Other countries........................

T h e e x p o rts f r o m th e se v e ra l se a b o a rd p o rts fo r t h e w e e k
e n d in g S e p t. 16, 1893, are s h o w n in th e a n n e x e d s ta te m e n t:

T otal.....................................
China, via Vanoouver........

Flour...........

Exports
from—

Wheat.

Bush.
NewYork 1,014,989
Boston.. .
252 ,4 0 7
Norfolk.
Montreal
508 ,5 5 1
Phlladel.
94,1 5 6
B altlm ’re
821 .6 1 4
N. Orl’ns.
303,241
N. News.
Portland.

Flour.

Com .
Bush.
397 ,3 1 0
18,333
71 5 ,5 4 5
58,2 4 8
41,229
56,0 6 3

Tot. week 2 ,994,918 1,286,725
B’m etlm e
1 892 .. 1 ,856,748 320 ,7 8 1

B U s.
1 81,596
42,906
5,773
16,352
10.267
86,242
893
18,8 7 0

Oats.
Bush.
503,758
500

Rye.
Bush.

Peas.
Bush.
2 ,363
60,095

7 4 ,7 8 7

7 ,0 0 7

521 ,7 6 9
3 0 ,0 0 0

9 ,000

362,899 1 ,1 3 0 ,8 1 4

16,007

62,458

50,5 1 7

.........

9 .0 4 3

244 ,1 1 6

The visible supply of grain, comprising the stocks in granary
at the principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard
ports, Sept. 16, 1893:
Wheat,
bush.
In store at—
New Y ork........... ,13,631,000
D o afloat . . . .
5 4 6 ,0 0 0
A lb an y.........
Buffalo................. 1,5 4 5 ,0 0 0
Ohloago............... 1 8 ,5 7 9 ,0 0 0
M ilwaukee.........
947,000
D uluth................. 2 .9 3 7 .0 0 0
T oled o................. 1 .599.000
D etroit.................. 1,0 7 4 ,0 0 0
O sw ego...............
Bt. L ouis............. 4 ,5 5 5 ,0 0 0

Com ,
bush.
5 1 ,0 0 0
1 1 0 ,0 0 0
2 5 ,0 0 0
4 0 1 ,0 0 0
2 ,3 0 3 ,0 0 0

Oats,
bush.
93.0 0 0
2 3 ,0 0 0
4 0 , >00
1 2 4 ,0 0 0
9 2 7 ,0 0 0
16,0 0 0

85,0 0 0
5 ,000

59,0 0 0
2 1 ,0 0 0

1 5 8 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,0 0 0
2 ,000
2 4 ,0 0 0
6 ,000

7 8 .0 0 0
6,000
Cincinnati.........
10.000
9 ,000
Boston.................
1 8 5 .0 0 0
6 7 ,0 0 0
Toronto...............
9 0 ,0 0 0
M ontreal............
318 .0 0 0
8,000
Philadelphia___.
6 2 4 ,0 0 0
95,0 0 0
P e o r ia .................
1 1 5 .0 0 0
5 ,000
Indianapolis___
2 7 9 ,0 0 0
17,000
Kansas City___
4'*7,000
15,0 0 0
B altim ore...........
694 ,0 0 0
1 15,000
M inneapolis___ 5 ,5 0 7 ,0 0 0
On M ississippi.
1,000
On Lakes______ 1 .3 7 1 ,0 0 0 2 ,5 5 9 ,0 0 0
On canal & river1 2,2 9 6 ,0 0 0
506 ,0 0 0

6 8 ,0 0 0

5 ,0 0 0

10,0 0 0
217 ,0 0 0
220 ,0 0 0
5 5 ,0 0 0
8 ,000
172 ,0 0 0
11,0 0 0
2 ,000
7 4 6 ,0 0 0
2 7 5 ,0 0 0

3 0 ,0 0 0

Barley,
bush.

3,000

1 1 ,0 0 0
8 ,0 0 0

____

T

otals—

Sapt.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.

SSL

5 5 ,0 0 0
8 ,0 0 0
3 ,0 0 0

4 ,000
2 .000
2 ,000
14,0 0 0
1,000

4 5 ,0 0 0
0 ,0 0 0
5 5 .0 0 0
2 0 .0 0 0
53,00*
60,0 0 0
l.ooYi
20,0 0 0
4 5 .0 0 0
55.0 0 0

The value of the New York exports since January 1 has
been $6,313,467 in 1893 against $7,673,658 in 1892.
The demand for brown sheetings continues quiet for the
home trade but fairly good for export, without quotable change
in the price of leading makes of standard three-ya d or fouryard goods. Bleached shirtings are firmer and occasionally
yt c. higher for print cloth yarn grades. Medium qualities are
in fair demand and finer makes occasionally better bought by
the manufacturing trade
W id e sheetings, boih brown and
bleached, have been reduced 7% to 10 per cent for Pepperell,
Laconia, Androscoggin, and otder leading tickets, firm sales
being reported at the decline. The Slater, W o ids & Lane’s
kid-finished cambrics have been advanced i^c. per yard under
the influence of the rise in print cloths. Denims, ticks,
checks and stripes and other colored cottons have sold to the
home trade more freely than of late on auction price basis.
The export demand has been interfered wiih by the political
troubles in Brazil. Printed calicoes have ruled in stead v request
at low prices, but at the close of the week a firmer tone is
noticeable. Staple ginghams have b-en made 5J£c. and dress
styles 6c. in leading makes, with the exception of Lancaster
staples, which are quoted at 6c., after closing out the stock at
a lower price. Print cloths, with an improved demand, have
advanced to 3c. for 64x64s, but close barely steady thereat.
1893.
Stock o f Print Oloths—
Sept 15.
Held by Providenoe mannfaotuxerB. 1 7 7 ,0 0 0
Fall Elver m anufacturers................... 4 3 1 ,0 0 0

189*2
Sept. 16.
None.
None.

891.
Sept. 17.
2 5 7 ,0 0 0
3 1 1 ,0 0 0

None.

5 6 3 ,0 0 0

Total stock (pieces) ............... . . . 6 0 8 ,0 0 0

F o r e i g n D ry G o o d s . — There has been a falling off in the

3 2 ,0 0 0
3 ,0 0 0

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 6 ,1 8 9 3 ..5 7 ,3 3 1 .0 0 0
9 ,1 8 9 3 ..5 6 ,1 4 0 ,0 0 0
17, 1 8 9 2 ..4 1 ,3 6 9 ,0 0 0
19, 1 8 9 1 ..2 4 ,5 1 3 ,6 1 4
2 0 ,1 8 9 0 ..1 7 ,5 9 4 ,2 3 9

* From New England m ill points dlreot.

6 ,4 6 2 .0 0 0 3 ,1 0 6 ,0 0 0 3 3 8 ,0 0 0 3 9 5 ,0 0 0
5 ,6 5 7 ,0 0 0 4 ,0 7 3 ,0 0 0 3 5 6 ,0 0 0 349 ,0 0 0
9 ,7 9 5 .0 0 0 6 ,0 1 9 ,0 0 0 6 7 0 ,0 0 0 4 3 0 ,0 0 0
9 ,2 4 9 ,3 3 5 4 ,4 8 0 ,9 1 0 3 ,0 6 4 ,6 5 8
6 7 7 ,0 0 2
8 ,5 0 6 .8 3 5 4 ,1 7 9 ,7 4 7 5 3 9 ,9 0 5 1 ,3 4 4 ,4 7 0

T H E D R Y GOODS T R A D E .
N e w Y o r k , Friday, P. M ., September 2 2 , 1893.

Im p o r ta tio n s a n d W a r e h o u s e W it h d r a w a ls o f O r f O o o d i .

The importations aad warehouse withdrawals of dry goods
at this port for the week ending Sept. 31, and since Jan. 1,
1893, and for the corresponding periods of last year are as
follow s:
n
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1,729
602,987
7,466 1,037,063

Business in a regular way has made little progress this week.
The demand still comes forward in the shape of small orders
almost entirely, and it is quire clear that only extraordinary
price inducements can tempt buyers to abandon, even in a
modified degree, their hand-to-mouth policy. Such induce­
ments have followed on the heels of last week’s auction sale in
all lines of merchandise directly affected by it, colored cottons
and ginghams being offered at a low level of values never pre­
viously touched by reputable makes. Sales of these have
proved considerable, but still the demand has lacked fire, thu3
confirming the impression produced by the results of the auc­
tion sale, that the great majority of buyers are not yet pre­
pared to venture far beyond requirements in sight under any
reasonable conditions. These developments have somewhat
tempered the more cheerful tone noted last week, but a still
more repressive influence is exercised by the protracted delay
of the Senate in coming to a vote on the repeal of the Sherman
law. Until that law is repealed no improvement of any mo­
ment is looked for. A s noted below there has been an advance
in print clothes and some hardening in the prices of finished
goods most closely related to them.
D o m e s t i c W o o l e n s . — There is little of practical import­
ance iu connection with this week’s business beyond its con­
tinued attenuated character.
Buyers are still contenting
themselves with buying small lots of heavy woolens and
worsteds for immediate heeds, and the varied nature of the
assortment thus made up deprives it of any indicative char­
acter. Business for spring is very small, neither buyers nor
sellers having any inclination to press it at present. Dress
goods are in fair request for the better grades of staples and
fancies, but slow and irregular in price for low-grade wool
goods and cotton warps and mixtures.
D o m e s t i c C o t t o n G o o d s . — The exports of cotton goods
from this port for the week ending September 19 were 7,031
packages, valued at 1353,485, their destination being to the
points specified in the table below:

demand in this division, tuving beiog almost entirely in the
hands of a small class of traders. Prices of strictly seasonable
fancies which have sold slowly are weak and irregular in all
departments; but staples of good repute and favored specialties
are quite steady.

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THE CHRONICLE.

September 23, 1803,]

Swt

and

City DEfAflTMtNT.

TERM S OF SUB SCRIPTIO N.
C o m m e r c ia l a n d F in a n c ia l C I1 R O V IC L IS con­
tains 4 0 to 6 4 pages published every week.
S ta te a n d C ity S u p p le m e n t o f C H R O N I C L E co n ­
tains ISO pages published periodically
I n v e s to r s ’ S u p p le m e n t of C H R O N I C L E (a Cyclo­
paedia of Railroad Securities) contains 1 6 0 pages published

every other month,

_________

Subscription to CHRONICLE fo r on e yea r 6 1 0 .0 0 ,
w h ich in cludes e v e rv issue o f both S u p p l e m e n t s ,

T h e p u r p o s e o f th is S la t e a n d C ity O e p a r iw e ii l

is to furnish our subscribers with a weekly a dd ition to and
continuation of the St a t e an d C i t e S u p p le m e n t . In other
words, with the new facta we shall give, the am plification s
and corrections we shall publish, and the municipal la w s w e
shall analyze in the “ State and City Department," we e x p e c t
to bring down w eeily the information contained in the
S t a t e a n d C i t y S u p p lem en t to as near the current date as
possible. Hence if every Subscriber will note in his S u p p l e ­
m ent on the page designated at the head of each item a
reference to the page where the item in the C h b o n ic l e ca n
be found, b e will at all times poaseea a complete and fresh
cycljpeedia of information respecting Municipal Debts.
S O M E M A S S A 0 B U 8 B T F S A SSE SSM E N T S.

We give below statements showing the valuation of prop­
erty in a large number of Mueactrasetts cities and towns as
reported by the assessors for the year 1833, and aecomp wring
the late returns are the fi jure) for previous years taken from
onr State and City Supplement. It will be noticed that
while the total valuation of real and personal property in­
variably shows a net increase, the valuation o f personal prop­
erty even in some of the larger municipalities has been cut
down this year. A majority of the statements show an in­
crease in the tax rate.
Returns from Boston, Braintree, Fitchburg, Holyoke,
Natick and Salem were published in the C h r o n ic l e of August
12ih.
A r l in g to n . —The assessed valuation of real estate in this
town for 1803 is $3,438,803; personal oropsrtv. $878,871;
total, $6,88o,569. The Increase o? $334,818 on the total for
laat year is almost entirely in the valuation of real estat
The total tax on eacn $1,000 this year is $18 00 wnien la f t-30
less than was paid last year.
T ax valuation. 1893....#6.335.519 I T ax rata (per * 1 .0 0 0 ). • 9 ) ..# l « 0 9
Tax valuation, 1 8 9 1 .... « ,010,75s i Tax rate (per * 1 .0 0 6 ), >03 , 17-30
Tax valuation, 1*90. . 5,564,063 j Population in 1*90 w a s ........5,629

Brookline —The increase in the total valuation of real and
personal property in the town of Bro ikliae turn year is
$3,172,800, and the tax rate per $1,000 has been decreased 80
cents.
_
------------- ~AtM tt.il Valuation--------------- Kate o f Tax
_ Tear*—
Real.
Personal.
Total.
p r r $ 1,000
} 8 9 3 .................. *10,020,300
*16.179,700
*56,200,000 # l f O 0
1893 ................... 36,956,100
16.IXH.100
53,036,200 11-80

..................

34,473.400

16.257.100

50,729,500

1890 ...............
30,027,200
16.510,100
............
27,326,21X1
15,307,100
}**P ,...........................- ...........................*...............

-16.537,300
42.533.3fW
22,193,900

1100

9'00
12'0O
12-60

Cambridge.—The figure) of assessed valuation for Cam­
bridge tms vear snow an increase in real estate of about $ 2 ,000,000 while the personal property has fdlen of! $',20,008,
The tax rate for 1893 has been fixed at $18 -40 per $1,000, an
increase of 40 cents on the rate for 1892.
i----------------- A t t e s t e d

Teart—

Beal

V a lu a t io n ----------------- . B a le o f T a x

fe r to n a l

}8 9 9 ...... .......... #54.761,500

#17,500.1X9

I860................. 37.929,400

11,699,660

1892..................
1891 ...............
J g O - - ..............
1889
J38S..................
}8 f3 ..................

56.019.900
54,126.400
52,235.000
50,324,175
18,420.600
42.3s8.300

17,620,105
16,415,270
15.330,92.5
14,960,100
14,296,710
12,758.255

Total

per #1,000.

*70,281.6X9

74.240.CS5
70,581,670
67,574',925
05,284.275
62,717,3 40
55.3 46.355

49,629.060

#iO-40

16 00
15 50
1300
1 6-00
15 00
15-50

16 00

Chelsea.—The returns for 1893 from assess.>rs in the city
of Chels a show but veiy little change from the report o f a
ear ago, the total being an increase of l«ss th to $5 >0,1)00,
Waa this is above the average yearly increase, which has been
during the la-t decade bat $**),114. The tax rate has been
cut down from $15 80 to $15-60,

f

----- -- _ — A ssessed V a lu a tion ----------------Bate o f Tax
,

j - *-’

g g .............
J 5 9 1 .............
} g » 0 ...............
^ 8 9 . . , . ........
J 0 8 ? ...............
1 8 8 4 ............

-

k,u t

I5 I.I.V .

13.937,750

18.660,800
lx , 187.300
17,756.000
1?,42X,9O0
15.802,550

-

ferto n a l.
.

i- .

2,464,967

2.559,412
2,610.839
2,4,43.850
2,358,190
2.300.947

*21

Total.

i.-.

21,422,717

21,219.712
20,798,339
20.190,450
19,787,090
18,103.497

p er *1,000.
S i;-

15-80
18-00
17-60
17-80
16-40
18-00

523

Dedham. —Toe total assessed valuation for the vear 1893 is
$6,088,212, real estate being valued at $4,788,798. The tax
rate this year is $15-30 per
000 against $16 00 in 1892. Last
year’s total valuation was $5,980,349, of whica $4,738,611 was
real estate.
E v e r e t t .— T he assessed valuation o f the c it y o f E verett
this yea r show s an increase o f S i.361.599 on the returns f o r

1892 and tne tax rate has bj»n raised $t'40 per $1,00 l. Tnia
year’s figures and those for 1893 anl 1891 are given below.
Property is assessed at fair cash value.
,--------------- A s s e s s e d V a l u a t i o n . ----------------.R a le o f Tax

T ea rs B e a l.
P e r s o n a l.
T otal.
P e r -1,000
1X93................... $10.10.1,400 $5-19.400
11,299.300 $15'40
1692...................
9,430.1.00
531.100
9,93 4 300
14,00
1391.................... 8,317,600
463,250
8,780,350 14-50
G loucester . —Returns from Gloucester for 1893 show that
the valuation of real esate has oe-n increas d $374,150 and
that o f personal property $131,414. Real estate, we are in­
formed, is assessed at about three-fourths of it-, actual cash
value. The tax rate for 1898 is §16 50 against$15 40 last year.

.--------------- A s s e s s e d V a l u a t i o n . --------------- .B a te o f T ax

T ea rs—
B e a l.
P e r s o n a l.
T ota l.
p e r $ 1,000
1893 ..................*11.28,1,450 $4,223,730 $15,517,180 $16-50
1892.................. 10,909,300
4,102,316
15,011.616
15-40
1891.................. 10.226.530
3,986.491
14.213,021
15-40
1890...................
9.929.400
4,024.064
13,952,464
15-50
1889...................
9,637,340
3,778,693
13,411,033
15-00
3,996.088
13,050,098
17-50
1888 .................. 0,154,010
1880.................... 5,470.770
2,624,880
8,101,150
22-00
H u l l —The total assessed valuation for the year 1893 is
$3,810,506, real estate being valued at $3,637,954, Toe tax
rate this year i- $18'50 per $1,000 against $14-60 in 1693. List
year’s total valuation was $3,580,283, of which $3,423,938 was
on real estate.
Lawrence.—The assessed valuation of real estate in Law­
rence this year shows an increase of $693,709, hut the valua­
tion of personal property is le$* b.- $16,335 th in in 1893, mak­
ing the tot* 1net increase $679,485 The tax rate remains the
same. $18*80 per $1,000. Real estate is said to be assessed at
about 90 per cent of i's actual cash value.

,----------------- A s s e s s e d V a lu a t io n . ------------------. Bate o f Tax
T ea r s

B etti.

P en m n aL

T ota l.

per#1,000,

.............

#8,509,272
8,615,537
.........

#33,207,372
32,527,937
30,476,223

.............
.............
.............

..............

2 4 ,1 8 7 ,1 4 0

189 3 ....................

# 2 4 ,6 0 8 .1 0 0

1*92...................

23,912,400

1890.....................

1889...................
1888....................
1880...................

406-80
1680
14-80
.......................................... 29.640,947 15-20
.............
2 8 ,9 7 1,9 7 9
1(50 0
16-80

L o w e l l . — T he fo llo w in g table, g iv in g the latest report o f
aste-s d valuation from th e city o f L ow ell in co m p a n io n w ith
the figures <or previnos ye iw , sh ow s that the total valua ion
has tx-en increased $4,103,455 -i ice 1833. The ta x rate fo r 1893
is 40 cents less per $1,000 ttian th e rate fo r last year.
.---------------- A tte s te d V a lu a tio n ---------------- . R a teo fT a x
Tears—
R ea l Estate,
P erso n a l.
Total.
p e r $ 1,000
ISO*.................. #509449,490
#18,045,205
#08,804,695 #16-40
1S92..................
47,499.820
17,202,409
04,702,229
16-80
1890..................
45,316,! An
17,037,402
62,853,612
17-00
1889 ...........
41.114,005
15.639.H8t
59,753,079
16-10
42.535,745
15,160,815
57,0116,560
........
1888........ .........
1887 ..............
4 1,322.791
15.426,459
50.749,258
15-70
L yn n .— T he assessed valuation o f taxable o r o p » r v in L yn n
a« reported fo r 1893 sh ow s an increase o f $3,915,381 o u the
figures fur las’, year, the a dva n ce bein g aim »sc entirely ia the
v a lu i'io n o f real estate. The ta x rate n 80 cen ts higher on
each $1,000 than was paid last year. R e d estate is rep >rted
to be assessed a t a bou t three-fourths o f its a o t u d c t s h value.
,---------------- A tte s te d V a lu a tio n ---------------- R a te o fT a x
T earsReal
P eria n a l
Total, per #1,000.
1893 ................ #37,373,607
#12,585,042
#40,960,309 $10-20
1802 .................. 34.540.888
12,512,020
47,052,014
1540
1891 ............... 82,395,172
12,371,700
44,766,872
14-00
1890 .................. 29,390,332
11,340.046
40,730.378
15 00
18M0.................. 27,575,936
12,448,931
40,024,807
14*20
1888 .................. 20,342,939
6,881,141
33.224,080
18-00
1880.................. 17,913,543
5,470,192
23,383,735
17-00
1870 ...
14,277,212
6,640,903
20,027,110
17-20
M a l d e n . — Malden ’s total assess-d valuation has been in ­
creased $1,181,726 on the rep ort a i last y ea r. The ta x rate
the* yea r is 50 cents leas than in 1892. Real estate is assessed
at about th ree-fou rih s o f its actu al value.
-----------------A tte ste d V alu a tion ---------------- . R ate o f T ax
Tears—
Real.
P erson a l.
Total.
p er $1,000.
1893.................#18,839,850
#2,499,840
$21,339,606
#15-00
1*92............... 17,867,850
2,290,120
20,157.970
1550
1891 ........ ... 16,541,750
2.185,530
18,727,280
1500
. 15,167,1X10
2,090.475
17,257,475
13-10
1889 ............ 14.073,900
2.059,637
10,133,537
15-50
1889............... 13,2411.600
2,170.724
15,420,324
14-60
1987............... 12,377,630
2,020,230
14,403,880
14-50
1 882.............
9,139,250
1,86*1,809
11,003,059
13 60
M a n c h e s te r . — The total a -s-ssed valuation for the yea r
1893 ts $7,208,847, real estate b ein g valued at $3,768,162. The
tax rate >lu« yea r is $7‘ 0O p - r $1 000 against $0-80 in 1892.
Last year's total valuation was $7,157,744, o f w h ich $2,065,684
was real estate,
Ma r b l e h e a d .—P rop erty in M arblehead is assessed as near
as possible a t its actual cash value. The to til for this year
show s an advan ce o f $216,404 on the total fo r 1892. The tax
rate has been fixed at $17 00 per $1,000,an increase o f $1'40
on last year’s rate b u t $4'40 less than that paid in 1891.
--------------- A tte ste d V a lu a tion --------------- . B ale o f Tax
Y ears—
B eal.
P erso n a l.
Total.
per $1,000
1893................. *4,480.750
#934,600
*3,421,550 *17-00
1892 ................
4,307,550
837,596
5,205,140
15-60
1891 ................
4,213,800
-832,032
5,045,832
21-40
M edford . — A ccord in g to the n ew figures from M edford, the
total valuation o f property has increased $3,603,495 since the

THE CHRONICLE.

21

assfEsment was made a year ago. The tax rate this year is
$1'00 higher than last. Real estate is supposed to be assessed
at its market value.
.--------------- —Assessed Valuation.------------------. Rate o f Tax
Tears—
Real.
Personal.
Total.
per $ 1 ,0 0 0
1 8 9 3 .....................$ 1 2 ,1 7 9 ,5 7 5
$ 2 ,7 2 5 ,0 0 0
$ 1 4 ,9 0 4 ,5 7 5
$15-80
1 8 9 2 .............................................................................
1 1 ,2 4 1 ,0 8 0
14 80
189 1.....................
8 ,5 2 5 ,1 0 0
1 ,9 8 4 ,1 6 5
1 0 ,5 0 9 ,2 6 5
14-60
* MELROSE.— The assessors

have added this year about
$800,000 to the total tax valuation of the town of Melrose,
and the tax rate has been cut down $1-40 per $1,000. Prop­
erty is rated at fair cash value.
Total valuation. 1 8 9 3 ..$ 9 ,4 0 0 .1 3 0
Tax valuation, re n t___ 8,8 9 9 .4 7 0
Tax valuation, personal
500 .6 5 5
Tax rate, (p. * 1 ,1 0 0 )'9 3 .
$14-40

I Total valuation, 1 8 9 2 ..$ 8 ,5 9 6 .5 6 5
|Tax valuation, real____ 8,1 6 5 .8 5 0
I Tax v luation, personal 430 ,7 1 5
I Total ta x ,(p .$ l,0 0 0 )’ 92.
*1 5 -8 0

N a h a n t . — The total assessed valuation for the year 1893 is
$4,849,600, real estate being valued at. $2,299,359. The tax
rate this year is $0-50, the same having been paid in 1893.
Last > ear’s total valuation was $4,768,334, of which $3,208,104
was real estate.
N e w t o n . — The returns from Newton show an increase in
total valuation this year of $1,469,431, although the total of
ersonal property falls $479,094 below the aniount reported in
892. A slight increase of 20 cents per $1,000 has been made
in the tax rate. Real estate is assessed at market value.

f

,------------------Assessed Valuation.------------------. Rate o f Tax
Tears—
Real.
Personal.
Total.
per $1,0 0 0 .
$ 4 1 ,8 5 0 ,9 0 0
$1 4 -8 0
1 8 9 3 ...................... $ 3 1 ,7 9 0 ,0 5 0 $ 1 0 ,0 6 0 ,8 5 0
1 8 9 2 ...................... 29 ,8 4 1 ,6 2 5
1 0 ,5 3 9 .9 4 4
4 0 ,3 8 1 ,5 6 9
14-60
1 8 9 1 ..................... 28,0 0 4 ,2 7 5
9 ,5 2 3 ,5 8 5
3 7 ,5 2 7 ,8 6 0
15 0 0
1 8 9 0 ...................... 2 6 .6 4 0 ,5 0 0
9 ,5 1 8 ,5 2 5
3 6 ,1 5 9 ,0 2 5
14-60
1 8 8 9 ...................... 2 5 ,3 9 0 ,3 0 0
9 ,2 6 4 ,3 7 2
3 4 ,6 5 4 ,6 7 2
14-80
1 8 8 8 ..................... 2 4 ,1 3 2 ,6 3 0
9 ,1 4 6 ,0 1 2
3 3 ,2 7 8 ,6 4 2
15 20
7 ,4 8 1 ,8 3 0
2 5 ,2 0 0 ,1 0 0
1400
1 8 8 0 ...................... 1 7 ,7 1 8 ,2 7 0
Q u i n c y . — The total net increase in yaluation this year in
Quincy is just a little over one million dollars, notwithstand­
ing the decrease of $272,150 in total o f personal property.
The tax rate per $1,000 is 20 cents less than last year.
---------------------Assessed Valuation------------------- , Rate o f Tax
Tears—
Real.
Personal.
Total.
per $ 1 ,0 0 0
1 8 9 3 ....................$ 1 3 ,6 0 5 ,6 7 5
$3 ,0 3 2 ,3 9 5
$ 1 6 ,6 3 8 ,0 7 0
15-80
3 ,3 0 4 ,5 4 5
15 ,5 6 6 ,9 2 0
16-00
1 8 9 2 .................... 12,262,375
1 8 9 1 ..................... 11 ,1 5 8 ,1 2 5
3 ,2 8 6 ,9 0 5
1 4 ,4 2 7 ,0 3 0
..........

[You 1A II.

Tacoma, W ash .— The Tacoma News has presented to the
Clearing-House Association of that city the following novel
plan for making city warrants a basis for a local circulating
medium.
Permit the holder of any city warrants to deposit the same
at any Clearing-House bank, and receive credit up to the par
value of the warrants deposited in city funds. Terms of the
deposit to be as follows :
The receiving bank to deposit the warrants with the Clear­
ing-House, receiving credit there in city funds for the parvalue of the warrants. The original depositor to have the
privilege at any time of paying into the bank, in lawful
money, the amount of the original credit, and thereupon the
bank redeems an equal amount of Clearing-House certificates,
and returns the warrants to the original depositor. Checks
to be drawn by the depositor against this credit “ payable
through the Clearing-House in city funds.”
It is claimed that the City Council is unanimously in favor
of the scheme and that it has been approved by several of the
prominent bankers.

B o n d P r o p o s a ls a n d N e g o t ia t io n s .— W e have re­
ceived through the week the following notices of 1 onds
recently negotiated and bonds offered and to be offered fcr
sale.
a n d C i t y S u p p l e m e n t , page 65.>—
will be received until Sept. 28 by James BrowD, City
Comptroller, for the purchase of $200,000 of street improve­
ment bonds and §50,000 of sewer bonds. Both loans bear in­
terest at the rate of 4 per cent, payable A . & O., at the office
of the City Treasurer, or as the purchaser may elect, and ma­
ture October 2, 1923, with an option of call October 2, 1913.
The bonds will be of the denomination of $ 1,000 each and will
be free from State, county or city t a x .;
~~~
_ ;^ t
“ Auburn", T ill.— City Treasurer T. J. Nicbols writes the
C h r o n i c l e that no bids were received for the $20,000 of

A l l e g h e n y , P a .— (S t a t e

B id s

N E W LOANS.
Excellent Opportunity For In­
vestors.

NEW

N E W LOANS.

LOANS.

5 1-2 Per Cent Bonds
TO BE ISSUED BY

Duval

County,

Florida.

$ 5 0 , 0 0 0

FOB

Township Bonds for Sale. St. Johns River Improvement.
"D ID S are invited by the Township Committee of
the Township of S ad d le R iv e r , in the
C ounty o f B e r g e n , and S ta te o f N ew J e rse y ,
for the purchase of Bonds of said Township of de­
nominations of Five Hundred Dollars each. Said
bonds are issued pursuant to the provisions of
Chapter 186 of the Laws of 1888 of the State of New
Jersey, for the purpose of defraying the expense of
repairing, grading and macadamizing certain public
highways in said township, and are in denomina­
tions and of the par value of $500 each, bearing in­
terest at five per cent per annum (interest payable
semi-annually). The following schedule shows the
amount of bonds for sale and periods when due:

Total authorized issue $300,000 to run twenty (20)
years from Nov. 1st, 1892, with privilege of forty
(40) years, under Act of Legislature. v alidity af­
firmed by Supreme Court of Florida. Interest pay­
able semi annually in N ew York and Jacksonville.
Assessed value of taxable property *^ .^ 1 ,/69Msed
on one-third of actual value. NO OTHER DEBi ,
and $40,000 cash in treasury. Sealed bids received
for $60,o00 of this issue, deliverable Nov. 1st, isos
Bids opened on Oct. 9, next, at noon, at the Board of
Trade Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla. No bids consid­
ered at less than par. Interest to begin from date
of delivery, and payable 1st of May and 1st of Nov.
Address, CHARLES H. SMITH, Secretary,
Jacksonville Florida.

$78,000

Gold 6 Per Cent Bonds
DUE

$ 5 ,0 0 0 Bonds of
M AND AN , N. DAK.

Until further notice the undersigned will receive
bids for a Five Thousand Dollar ($5,000) series of
Water-works Bonds, issued by the City of Mandan,
North Dakota, in denominations of Five Hundred
Dollars $5o0) each, running twenty years straight,
due January 1,1914, and drawing 7 per cent interest,
the interest payable at New York City, the bonds at
the City Treasurer’s office, Mandan. The above is a
fine offer for investment, as the city’s affuirs are in
splendid shape. For further particulars
Address A. E. FLYNN, City Treasurer,
Mandan North Dakota.

$8,5( 0, due in ten years;
15.000, due in fifteen years;
15.000, due in twenty years;
18,500, due in twenty-five years:
21.000, due in thirty years.

C I T Y OF N E W YORK

8aid bonds »re dated August 1st, 3893, and interest
runs from the date th** bonds are sold.
The total «mount of bonds issued for the above
purpose Is $90,ooo (the balance of the issue having
been already sold). This constitutes the entire
bonded it debtedness of the township, and the offi­
cial valuation of the real and personal property in
the township for this year is $1,062,000.
All bios must be sealed in a wrapper, properly en­
dorsed with the name of the bidder, and a statement
that the bid is for township bonds of Saddle River
Township, and must be in the hands of H e rm an
B e c h te l, T o w n sh ip C le r k , Dundee L a k e .
B ergen C ounty. N. J ., on or bet ore SEPTEM
BEK *9TH. 803, at 8 P. M.
The Township Committee reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
P A R T IC U L A R S
Dated September 14th, 1893.
HENRY A. HOPPER, Chairman.
HERMAN BECHTEL,
>
Township Clerk.

J U L Y 1, 1901.

R E G IS T E R E D ,

FOR SALE BY

Blake Brothers & Co.,
28
5

STATE
NASSAU

STREET,
S T .,

BOSTON.

NEW

YORK.

6 PER C E N T BONDS.

We have several issues for sale
AT

PAR.
U PO N A P P L I C A T I O N .

Farson, Leach & Co.,

THE

HOME

PROTECTION

FIRE

2 W A L L STREET.

INSURANCE COMPANY,
Telephone* 114'J.
Having retired from business, offers for sale the fol­
lowing bonds: .
$30,000 Alabama Bonds, Class A.
$10,too Memphis & Charleston RR. First Mortgage
7 Per Cent Bonds.
BROOKLYN SECURITIES,
$17,500 City of Huntsville. Ala , 6 Per Cent Bonds—
tlfi.Ooo of which cover First Mortgage 2 0 1 M o n t a g u e S t r e e t , B r o o k l y n , N . X
upon city Water Works.
$10,000 Huntsville Gas-Light Co.’s First Mortgage
6 Per Cent Bonds.
ADDRESS

Frank A. Barnaby,

Arch’d. J. C. Anderson,

Home Protection of North .'Alabama,
H U N T S V IL L E , A L A .

P U B L IC A C C O U N T A N T ,
1 2 7 W a t e r S tre e t, ^
_
NEW Y O R K .

B O N D S .

S treet R ailw ay Com pany o f A nderson,
In d ian a , S ix p er cent SO- Tear Gold
Bonds. F irst M ortgage. Issue lim ­
ited to $150,000.
FARMERS’ LOAN & TRUST CO.,'N. Y., Trustee.
G ro ss E a rn in g s, first y e a r of
E le c tric op e ra tio n ,
- $ 4 2 ,1 1 3 0 0
E x p e n se s, sam e period,
2 0 ,3 9 9 0 0
N et E a rn in g s, sam e p eriod ,
2 1 ,7 1 4 0 0
An HoneBt Security. Attractive Price.

Campbell, Wild & Co.,
ANDERSON,

IN D IA N A .

M E R C H A N T S ’ N A T IO N A L

R A N K .,

R IC H M O N D , V IR G IN IA .
Collection* made on all Southern point* on best
term*; prompt return*.
JOHN P. BRANCH. Pre.ldimt.
JOHM y . QUDTN. Caab’r. Fb i d . R. Scon Vlce-Pres.

THE CHRONICLE.

the purchase of the $110,000 of 5 per cent straight 20-year
SCho 1 binds; Ttie securities are dated Septeub.-r I, 1893,
and $60,000 of the same will be detivered in 10 days from data
of sale. 323 000 in 3) days and §23,000 in 69 days.
Phe issue
is in anticipation o f taxes for the purpose of obtaining and
improving public school property.
Thf toial bonded debt of tbe district on September 1, 1893,
was $330,000, of which tbe following is a detailed statement:

bonds which were offered for sale on Sept. 6. The loan will
bear interest at the rate of 5 per cent, payable annually on
Julv 1, and will mature at the rate of §500 yearly from July
1 , 1894, to July 1,1933.
B a rro n , Wis,—The citizens of Barron have voted to issue
bonds for water-works.
gelding. Mieb.—Citv Clerk Thomas A. Welsh writes the
C h r o x i -'LB that toe $6,000 o f Are protection bonds off-red for
sale o n September 7 have been awarded to William Vincent,
of Manistee. Mich., for $5,800. Interest on the loan will be
payable at the rate of 5 per cent. The city has no other
bonded debt.
B oston , Hass.—(S t a t e and C i t y S u p p le m e n t , page 2 1 ).Trt asurer Turner’s success in disposing of Boston city bonds
at private sale baa been further emphasized this week by the
report yesterday that $750,000 of 4 per cent registered certifi­
cates had been taken bv the New York Life Insurance Com­
pany. On Wednesday, Sept. 13th, 31,014.500 of city 4s were
offered at public sale and only $125,000 of the loan was taken
on that day. as we stated last Saturday. The City Treasurer at
once stiver!Led the remainder at prices ranging from 100-50
to 102 and it is now reported that he has but $75,000 left.
Bonlder. Colo.—(State and C m 'S upplement, page 130.)
The election which took place at Boulder on September 12 to
vote on i-suing $50,000 of bonds to complete the water-works
resulted in favor of the proposition. Town Treasurer J. H.
Nicholson writes us that the bonds will bear interest at the
rate of 6 per cent and will be issued as soon as possiole.
Cohwton, N. ¥.—At the election which took place on Sep­
tember 7 to vote on issuing $ 12,590 of water-works bonds, the
people voted in favor of the proposition.
Canton, U rn .—{S t a t e a n d C i t y S u p p l e m e n t , page 28.)
Binds of this town are proposed for an additional water
supply.
Coin mbits, Ohio.—(S t vte and C u t S u p p l e m e n t , page 80;
Chronicle, vol. 56, p. 767).—Notice has teen received from
O. E, D. Barron, Clerk of the B >ard o f E JucOion of C tlu-nbus, that bids will now be received untii September 30 for

L oan s-

W h en D u e.

A AO.
J&D,

$3 3,000.. ..A p ril 1, 1901
35 ,000.D ec. 1, 1906

2 5 ,0 0 0 .. ..April 1, 1900

5s,

A,feO,

1 1 0 ,0 0 0 O et. 1 ,1 9 1 3

Interest on all of the district's bonds is payable at the Na­
tional Park Bank, New York City.
Dallas, Texas.—(S t a t e and C it y S u p p le m e n t , page 177.)
Five per cent bonds to the amount of $30,060 have bead voted
by tbe Council for a sewerage system iu East Dallas. The
loan is to run 30 years.
Dubuque, Iowa.—(S t a t e and C m ' Su p p l e m e n t , page 109.)
—Bonds of this city to the amount of $259,090 will be issued
to fund the floating debt. The new securities will bear inter­
est at the rate of 4 per cent and ruu 25 years.
Fort Benton, Mont,—Bids will be received until October 5
for the ptnchase of bonds to the amount of $14,000. Interest
will be payable at a rate not exceeding 7 per cent, and the
bonds will mature in 20 years, with an option of call after 10
years.
F r a n k lin C ou n ty, O h io .—(S t a t e

Lamprecht Bros. & Co,,
45 W A L L

S T ., S E W

1850.

F IS H E R

1893.

T h e United States Life
Insurance C o.

Ac SH A VF,

IN T H E

C IT Y O F N E W

B A N K KBS,

60.000Cleveland. Ohio, 6*. due 1*6. Price W end
M

futtMali
a s ,« » e i a » » i* « d . on to, «*, line late.
ufjfj sot&ro#$

m / m kvifcuML v t . 4*
(tolwnoiK Obi.*.

4m
,»

P riw l o t *

N etoher* B a ltim o re Stock E xcitan t,
H A L T I .n O R E , M D .

«#. PHm m m% m p - e.
l*rt» t « and l e & i i t .

M*p*e ttfter 7*. due tm G m k non
t.- M m
b
•• RE. t < . „
• Hit- * ... Priw to* arid ta<ermt.
m
>
., „ I
m , m Staten
Hottwof o . . u t
fgfaft M

cL s rs w fw a s sr a n w f

Interest.
Investor. » ■ >invtted toeeU. write, nr lartMmsjk et
<•
oar expeiMO, for price* on other choice bond*.

C. H. W H I T E & CO.,
KANKEKN,

72 B R O A D W A Y , N E W Y O R K .

TU B

Lewis

Investment

53 B roadw ay, N e w Y o rk .
H U R IO IP A L ,
S T R E E T R A I L W A Y BONDS
and
B A N K STOCKS.

W . J. Hayes

&

Sons,

RANKERS,

.w o i n k s ,

io w a

C o .,

.

g

Fifteen V e e r .' Sncceeerol Experience.
Send lor Pamphlet.
W. A. H OTCH KISS,

HEO, H . LE W IS
Preeldent.

G. R . Voss,

Commercial Paper,
Bond*. Stocks and Invwtment BoourlUee,
608 I'lKxT NATIONAL BANK BUILDING.

Omaha, Nebraska.

jo

7 Exchange Place,

lie ,I on

W an street,

New Fork.

Cable Andrew, - K 8 RNETU."

H ackett & H off,
4EAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENTS,
A6 N llrh lg a n ST,, IR Iltva u k ee, W U ,
Plr.t Mortgage, on Improved Milwaukee Heal
hnate. bearing six and .even per cent Inter*.
i l . . , i on hand. No charge to the Investor for oolectlng Interest or looking after taxe. and tire ln*ur
«r,oe. Ateoiute security,

|os. C . Piatt, C . E .,
C O M SCLTIN O E I O I N E G R
35 W all Street, N ew York,
And W aterford, N. Y.
E x a m in a tio n s.

G eo. M. Huston & C o.

B O N D AND S T O C K D EA L ER S
Dealers in MUNICIPAL BONDS,
We bay and tell outright*]} Western
Street Railwar Bead* and other high grad* In­
Municipal
and Stock*. We
vestment*.
cheerful*? fern L full and reliable In
eft
3 U -.H 3

GEORGE H. B U R F O R O , Preeldent.
a P. rttALKKIH...................................... Secretary.
A. WHKBLWHIHUT............... Amutant Secretary
WM. T. STANDkN................................... Aetnary
ARTnUHC. PBBBY....................................Caahler
iOHN P. MUNN-......................... Medical Director
(tKANf'8 COMMITTEE.
GEO.G. WILLIAMS-..........Pro* Cb.m. Nat, Bank
JULIUS CA TUN...................................Dry Good*
JOHN J. TUCKER...................................... Builder
B. H. PBItKIXS, J1L, Pro*. Imp. A Trader.' Nat. B'k.

to tbe m.nred the greatest possible amount of
Indemnity In the event. of death at Hie lowee*pouthie oreeent c « h outteR and the OUARANTBRO
INCOME POLICY which embrace, ever? valuable
C PrX J. PAID U
A A
P, *160.000.
feat.nr.of mwttoent insurance, and which In tbe
Choice Investments In the meet Conner** event of ad.er.itr overtaking the Insured may be
need a. fXILLA f KRAI. 8KC0ltlTY FOR A LOAN.
tbe extent tf the full legal rcerve value thereof
(loo Field In the Went
accordance with the tartn. and condlUon* of those
policies,
C IV OCR f ' C H T
M a r' < A rcn
31
U L ie I K&g<»..n improved land, j i - X e i s r z x ^ . % w M
i v 0® ? .
to low* and Kaatern Nebraeka. Sale and Dev table intdindent of Awifts*. » i Homo

am

Beerota.-,.

Edward M orton & C o .,

YO RK .

OFPICBBS.

BOSTON.

CHOI CE BONDS.

C it y S u p p le m e n t ,

FINANCIAL.

YORK.

CLEVELAND,

and

page 81.)—County Auditor Henry J. Ciren will receive pro­
posals until October 17 for the purchase of K-uwood Avenue
improvement bonds to the am mot of $8,000. Interest at the
rate of 6 per cent w ill be payable semi-annually, and the
bonds will mature at the rate of $3t0 j early from July 1,
1804. to Julv 1, 1913, with an option of call.
It wrep irted that $21,090 of turnpike bonds of this county
have been sold to the Fourth National Bank of Columbus,
Ohio.
Hiujuiam. Wash. —W. O. Bradbury, Town Treasurer, re­
ports to us that no bids were received on September 5 for the

PHICKS TO SUIT TUB TIMES.

Gonrecpandense (noises.

W hen D u e.

5s,
5s,

IN V E S T M E N T S
IK

Street Railroad and
Municipal Bonds.

L oans.

5s, A&O, $50,000-. ..A p ril 1, 1899
5s, A 4 0 , 25.000....... Oet, 1. IS99

FINANCIAL.

FINANCIAL.
C H O IC E

52 x

.

September 23, 1893.j

formation concerntna any w e»
fo rm a t H u <jotto*rotm any western s
cnrltT without coarge, M **ly qu *c mrge.
nailed * *ail appIlcauiU.
t
4«i»on circular m>
hew t.f,sue* of muaid pm thiiidf wanted.

B S PINElSTftEB Tj
O

s r.JL O lIS , MO.

. .

Hupervifiion.

R e p o rt* *

1

W hite & Clark,
CTINSl; I.T IN 4 . M G I N E E R 8 .
SPK O IA I . T Y .- T b e In v e .ilu n ilo n ol the
physical condition of Ind ustrial Prop­
erties and V alu ation o f the .awte.
T I N E S B U I L D IN G ,

-

P I T T S B U ttG .

THE CHRONICLE.

526

$34,000 of water bonds. The bonds bear interest at the rate
of 6 per cent, payable M. & S.. at Hoquiam, or in New York,
and will become due September 1, 1913.
H a m i l t o n , Ohio.— (S t a t e

and

Cit y

S u p p l e m e n t , page 81.)

— Five thousand dollars of fire department bonds have been
authorized by the Council.
Jenkintown. Pa.— Bids will be received until September
25 by Bvron McCracken, Secretary of the Town Council, for
the purchase of $26,500 of b trough bonds. The binds bear
interest at the rate of 5 per cent, payable A. & O, and mature
part yearly from October 1, 1894, to October 1, 1915. The
loan is free from all taxes.
K a n s a s < i t y , K n its.— (S t v te a n d C i t y S u p p l e m e n t , page
127.) Tbe people of Kansas City will vote at the fall election,
which takes place in November, on the proposition of issuing
$50,000 of bridge bonds.

Laramie, Wyo.— S t a t e a n d C i t y S u p p l e m e n t , page 183.)
— Bonds of this city to the amount of $100,000, for water­
works, wdl soon be offered for sale.
Marion, Ohio.— The Board of Education of Marion will
sell on October 2, 5 per cent bonds to the amount of $24,000.
North Tonawanda, N Y.— (S t a t e

and

Cit y

S upplem ent,

page 52.)

Thomas E. Warner, Village Clerk, no ifies tbe
C h r o n i c l e that the $52,000 of street p a v iD g bonds which re­
cently failed to sell, will probably all be taken up oy local
investors. Interest will be payable at a rate not exceeding 6
percent. The loan becomes due semi-annuallv, and the
bonds are payable at the Chase National Bank, New York
City.
Oakmont, Pa.— School district bonds to the amount of
$32,000 have recently been sold. The loan bears interest at
the rate of 5 per cent.
Oyster Bay School District No. 5, N. Y .— The Board of Ed­
ucation of this di-trict will sell at public auction on September
23, $10,000 of 4 per cent bonds. Interest on the loan is payable
semi-annually at the Glen Cove Bank, N. Y ., and both princi­
pal and interest are payable in gold. The bonds mature at the
rate of $500 yearly from October 1, 1921, to October 1, 1940.

C HICAG O .

Portland School District No. 1, Ore.—B mds of this dis­
trict to the amount of $100,000 have recently been voted.
Pick m a v C o u n t y , Ohio.— (S t a t e a n d C i t y S u p p l e m e n t ,
page 83.) S B. Evans, Treasurer of Picka vay County, writes
the C h r o n i c l e ihat $20,000 of 6 per cent bridge bonds, which
were offered for sale on August 28, have been placed with
the First National Bank, of Circleville, Ohio, at par. The
bonds mature in from 1 to 7 years.
Prairie Creek, Ind.— Ditch bonds to the amount of $23,000
have recently been sold at par to R. C. Davis, of Washington,
Ind.
() lanali, Texas.— City Treasurer R. F. Harbison writes
us tbat $13,000 of school bonds have been pledged to J. C.
Razin & Co., of Denison. Texas, for the erec im of a school
building. A n authorized issue of $25,000, of which $15,000 is
for scho Is and S 0,000 for water-works 13 as yet unsold. The
bonds bear interest at the rate of 6 per cent, payable M. & S.,
in New York. The school bonds mature Augu-t 1, 1943, and
the water-works bonds mature September 1, 1943.
Saddle River, N. J .— Bids will be received until September
29 by Herman Bechtel, Township Clerk, for the purchase o f
$78,000 o f public highway bonds in denominations of $500
each. The loan is dated August 1, 1893, bears interest at the
rate of 5 per cent, payable semi-annually, and $8,500 of the
amount will become due in 10 years, $15,000 in 15 years,
$15,000 in 20 years, $18,500 in 25 years and $21,000 in 30
years. This is part of an issue of $90,000, the balance having
already been sold. The township has no other bonded in­
debtedness, and its assessed valuation for this year is $1,062,000. F or fu rth er p a rticu la rs in regard to the above sale, see

advertisem ent elsewhere in this D epartm ent.
St. Anne, III. — It is reported that this city will issue bonds
for water-works.
Yernon, Mich.— A n election which took place at Vernon on
September 7 to vote on issuing $6,000 of public improvement
bonds resulted in favor of the proposition.

CHICAGO.

FINANCIAL.

The
Title Guarantee & Trust
EquitableTrust Company
Company
OF

1 8 5 D E A R B O R N S T *, C H IC A G O .

CAPITAL, PAID U P , ----------- $500,00(
SURPLUS,

- ----------- ----------

50,00C

AUTHORIZED BY L A W TO RECEIVE and ex
ecute trusts of every character from courts, corpora
tions and individuals Takes entire charge of estates,
real and personal. Acts as agent for the registra­
tion and transfer of bonds and stocks and the oay
ment of coupons, interest and dividends. A lega
depository for court and trust funds.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSIT S of money
which may be made at any time and with orawn aftei
five days’ notice, or at a fixed date.
TRU8T FUNDS AND TRUST INVESTMENT*are kept separate and apart from the assets of the
company.
DIRECTORS:
AZEL F. HATCH,
CHAS. H. HULBURD,
M. W . KE RWIN,
GEO. N. CULVER,
HARRY RUBENS,
MAURICE ROSENFELb
J.R . WALSH,
SAMUEL D. WARD,
OTTO YOUNG.
OFFICERS:
J. R. WALSH, President.
CHA8. H. HULBURD, Vice-President.
SAMUEL D. WARD, Treasurer.
LYMAN A. WALTON. Secretary

Illinois Trust & Saving!
Bank.
C H IC A G O ,

[V ol . L v n .

93, 94

C H IC A G O ,

Jamieson & Co.,
S T O C K S —H O A D S ,
Members New York and Chicago Stock Exchanges,
1S7

9 6 W A S H IN G T O N S T R E E T .

C a p ita l, p a id -u p ...............................8 1 ,6 1 ) 0 ,0 0 0
Undivided earn ings, Including
su rp lu s................................................
3 3 9 ,0 0 0
D eposited w ith S ta te A u d itor. .
3 0 0 ,0 0 0
GUARANTEES TITLES TO REAL ESTATE.
MAKES ABSTRACTS OF TITLE.
Offers In v estors In real esta te securities
protection afforded by no other system of
doing business.
Is authorized by law to act as Registrar of Stocks
and Bonds, Executor, Receiver and Trustee for
Estates. Syndicates, Individuals and Corporations.
Trust moneys and trust securities kept separate
from the assets of the Company.

DEARBORN

Private wire to New York and Philadelphia,

Loeb & Gatzert,
M ORTGAGE BANKERS
13 5 L A

SALLE

A. G. Becker,

IL L ..

Su ccessor

to

C A P I T A L A N D S U R P L U S , - 8 3 , 5 0 0 , 00<

HERMAN

IN TER EST AL LO W ED ON DEPOSITS.
This Bank is directly under the-Jurisdiction an.
supervision of the 8tate of Illinois, is a LEGA
DEPOSITORY for Court Moneys, and is authorize!
vo
as TRUSTEE, EXECUTOR, RECEIVER an
ASSIGNEE for ESTATES, INDIVIDUAL® an
CORPORATIONS.

V lO R T G A G E LO A N S
IN

o f f ic e r s :

«c C O . ,

TEXAS.
Per Cent and 7 Per Cent N et.
'lO COMMISSIONS charged borrower or lender
until loans have proven good.
(A

F R A N C IS

S M IT H

&

C O .,

S A N A N T O N IO , T E X A S .

M UNICIPAL SECURITIES
P IT T S B U R G

or
AMD

V IC D IIT Y

D e a lt In by

Jas. Carothers,
9 0 F O U R T H A Y E ., P I T T S B U R G . P A .

SECURE BANK VAULTS.

100 W ashington Street, Chicago. 111.

John J. Mitchell, President.
John B. Drake, Vice-President.
Wm. H. Mitchell, Second Vice-President.
Wm. H. Reid, Third Vice-Presided
James 8 Gibbs, Cash’r. B. M. Chattell, Ass’t Cash’
DIRECTORS
John McCallery,
John B. Drake'
L. Z. Leiter,
Wm. H.Reld,
Wm. H. Mitchell,
John J. Mitohe
Wm. G. Hibbard,
J. C. McMullin,
D. 3..8hipmar,
J.Ogden Armoa
Frederick T. Haskell

SCHAFFNER

S T R E E T , C H IC A G O .

First Mortgages for sale in large and small amounts,
ettlng Investors 6, 5*4 and 6 per cent, secured by
xxproved and income-bearing Chicago city property.
Principal and Interest p ayable In G o ld .
^nRRTCSPOVTIWWCE ROLT^TTWD.

C O R R E S P O N D E N C E S O L IC I T E D .
OFFICER8:
GWYNN GARNETT, President.
A. H. SELLERS, Vioe-Preeident.
ARCHIBALD A. STEWART, Secretary.
OH A 8. R. LARRABEE, Treasurer.
FRANK H. SELLERS, Trust Officer.
DIRECTORS:
Gwynn Garnett,
Chas. W. Drew,
W. D. Kerfoot,
John P. Wilson,
Horace G. Chase,
Edson Keith,
John G. 8hortall,
Geo. M. Bogue.
John DeKoven,
A. H. Sellers.
8amuel B. Chase,
COUNSEL:
W. C. Goudy,
John P. Wilson.
A. W. Green,
A. M. Pence,

STREET,

C h icago , Ills#

CO M M ERCIAL PAPER,
A. O. BL AUOHTKK, Member N. Y. 8took Hiohangr.
VM. V. BAKER, Member Chicago Stock Exchange.

A. O. Slaughter & Co.,
BANKERS,
1 1 1 -1 1 3 L A S A L L E S T R E E T ,

C H IC A G O , IL L S .
Chicago S e c u r lt le . B ought and S old .

GENUI NE
WELDED CHROME STEEL AND IRON
11 Round and Flat Bars and 5-ply Plates and Ang,«a.
f o r s a f e s , v a u l t s , sc .
Cannot be Sawed, Cat, or Drilled, and positively
Burglar-Proof.
CH ROM E STEEL
Sole Man'f'era in the U. S.

W ORKS,

B R O O K L Y N , N. Y .


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102