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Cotton C rop
SUPPLEMENT

O M M E R C IA L

&

IN D E X

INANCIAL

HRONICLE

TO CO N T E N T S
P aoe .

Cotton Crop S ummary of the U nited States,
Cotton Consumption in the United States, Cotton Goods, Prices Leading Makes in United States,
*
Cotton, P rices Low Middling l *69-1807,
Cotton Consumption in* the South,
..................................
Cotton S pin-dues in the United States,
Cotton Consumption in Europe, ..........................................
G reat Britain 's Exports of Cotton Goods,
Cotton and Goods, Prices in L iverpool,
Manchester G oods Market , Monthly S ummaries, L iverpool Cotton Market , Monthly S ummaries,
Cotton S upply and Consumption of the W orld ,
Overland Movement of Cotton, ..........................................
Cotton Crop, Details of. ..................................................
New Cotton Crop and its Marketing ,
S ea Island Cotton Crop, ...................................................
Interior Towns Cotton Movement,
..................................
F all R iver Mill Dividends.
-

WILLIAM

B.

DANA

PINE STREET,

c o r n e r of

COMPANY,

PUBLISHERS

PEARL STREET, NEW YORK.

r E n t»r«! (Pwii-Jinx to »ot o f nonarri**. in 1S97. b r Wo m a n B. D ana OoMpa NT, in offloo o f (ho Librarian o f Oonxroaa, W aablnotoo, D. V

Entered according to A ct o f Congress in the year 1897, by
W IL L IA M B. D A N A COMPANY,
in the office o f the Librarian o f Congress, W ashington, B . C.

C otton Crop—U nited States.
PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION
FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER i, 1897.

COTTON M O V E M E N T AN D CROP
OF 1896-97.

Tailing3 for Consum ption-N o r t h ...... ......................................
S o u t h ................... ........................

1896-97.
Bates.

1895-96.
Bates.
1,670,744
915,810

1894-95.
Bales2.154,170
S53.352

Our statement of the ooMoa crop of the United States for
3,007,522
Total aousum ptlon................. ..2 .887 ,047
2,586,554
Export#—
the year ending Sept. I, 1897, will be found below. It will | Total, except Canada b j ra il— ..5,968,422
4,646,084
6,719,713
99,092
00,828
be seen that the total crop this year reaches 8,711,011 bales, To Canada uy rati........................
while the exports are 5>968,4§3 bales, and the spinners' tak­
4,712,912
Total e x p orts........................... ...6,045,270
6,818,805
-1,038
42,171
ings are 2,N67,(H7 bales, leaving a stock on hand at the close | Burnt durtm? y ea r........................ .
0,808,493
of the year of 77,013 bales. The whole movement for the
Total distributed....................
7,303,554
Deduct—
twelve months is given in the following pages, with such
Stock net rteorean<i and foreign
suggestions and explanations ss the peculiar features of the j cotton Im ported........................
*24,268141.081
year appear to require. The first table Indicates the stock at
Total cro p ................................. ...8,714,011
7,102,473
9,892,766
each port Sept, 1, 1897, the receipts at the ports for each of
* Net addition.
the past two year#, and the export movement for the past
year (1898-97) in detail, and the totals for 1895-98 and 1894-93.
Consumption In the United States and Rurope.
Receipt* /or Ymr
mdinsj—
Port*.

3*pi~ U
im .

m

boolean*. litflifft* usKumn
Alabama-.. 291,7*$ i w w
Tejta*........ u m jm MW***
m m
*M »«!
Oeortf*....
So.C*rTin*
479,185 m u m
JWMM m ,m s
Tfwftttfefc.*.
7U,7U :m ,m *
N«w Tortr.
• ia m
Boston...... • M W I • m a n
BalUmoro.
**s,m *13.075
PhlU.,. ...
*ss,<m •45,434
Portland. ,
. .... ... ..... ...
i . Pr'nc, kn
Total*Till* year
h**t rear
#*wpr, ft.

B rptru I'm , aivtta* Seel. », ISB?.
Great J ChanBritain. f mL
« * « .« »
ua.4ia
7*1*13)
«**•■«
m aw
ltV.SH"
05.431
m e 13
844,330

Other
AMP**

l o r n 437jm
. . ... . ..... .
1 ,7 » MMW
....... . . . . . .
...... 15,3St
...... ......
......
1,300 S.9W
>
SM 2 40.9S7
.7V

8,750

m um

* .W ,
H *>
3,101
.M

3,9S3
.......
.......
.. ..

S.SOI
.

Total.

United States.—
The

tm jm !,0S4,1<H
>!
37,180 180,538
30",!«4 um ,7&
s .m
JkMO
m .x s i m jn *
mi

m jm
4S,V*$
300,407
4,»3i
W.WM
m

m , 7*4
■nun
vm jm
888J S
ES
177,744
18,100
wm
60,231
B .O
O S4

season of 1896-97 has throughout

Stock J been disappointing. Few if any encouraging features in the
StpLl, i
iwo. i cotton manufacturing industry of the United States can be-

mentioned.

Sanguine expectations have abounded, but the

........ ^
8,141 | surroundings have proved so adverse that each glimmer of
I.4H2 | apparent promise has soon vanished and hope been deferred.15,848 j
...... i The financial returns of the mills for the twelve months clos­
8,045 ing with Aug. 31,1897, have consequently been very far fronti,4i» satisfactory. It is highly gratifying to be able to add that
mi
so there seems to be excellent reason for thinking that since the
39.714 first of August a marked change has taken place in indus­
1*179 ;
trial affairs. As yet the new movement has not extended so
too )
l # » l far as to have fully reconstructed the spinning conditions.
......
Consumption has without doubt become more active, and

under the influence of better consumption and smaller pro­

!
duction stocks of goods have lessened. The policy pursued
-***•*'** SJUS.847 113,738 608,745 2^43,0^45,0«8.42* 77,01s 1
in July and the early part of August continued would have?
5.SM.S75 ClWUm 106^13 46*3,444 u m s m
n.7i».-i3i2*o,oes relieved the mills from the burden of old accumulations;
S
T
'
<»* (* * «< » o f the receipt* at these pone which It would have been wise if that eourse could have been fol­
arrived bv rail overland from Too.ic.nee. *c.
.

j lowed for a time longer. There are so many spindles in the
! country now that only very active consumption can keep up
with a full product.
I The season which lias just closed opened when the elec­
! tion excitement was at its height. It is not using immoder­
ate language to say that never has the country passed
through such an ordeal. As early as January 1896 theprobable seriousness of the impe< ding contest began to befelt and have an influence on our industries. The previous;
six months, that is the last half of 1893, had been fairlyTear Sntiing September t.
prosperous, and during that period cotton spinning espec­
1890-97.
1895-90. | 1894-95.
Receipt* at the shtpp'gp rte.balee
8,316,525
5,394.875; 7,882,163 ially had enjoyed a time of active production and consump­
Add ehipmesta from Tennessee,
tion. But beginning with January 1896 the situation grew
Sm.. direct to m anu factorer*..,
873,004
851,788;
1.157,251 j
steadily worse, consumption decreasing month by month
Total..........................................
7,689,529
0,240,663
9,039,414! and goods accumulating. In July and August 1896 some
MaaaliicfcnredSouth, not included
A-bore*.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. _
1,024,182
915,910
853,352 mills stopped wholly and many in New England were run
on short time under an agreement to curtail production
T o ta l C o tto n C r o p fo r th e
T e a r ...............................b a l e . 8 ,7 1 4 ,0 1 1 7 ,1 6 2 ,4 7 3 9 ,8 9 2 ,7 6 6
with a view of materially reducing the enormous stocks
The result of these figures is a total of 8,714,011 bales which had collected. In September the same policy was
(weighing 4.383,819,971 pounds) as the crop for year ending continued, though less generally followed. Thereafter a.
August 81, 1897, against 7,182,473 bales (weighing 3,595,775,- buoyant sentiment and not judgment controlled action.
534 pounds) as the crop for the year ending August 31, 1896. That change was induced by a more hopeful view of the
The distribution of these crops has been as follows:
result of the election and by increasing confidence in a d.e The foregoing shows that the total receipts at the A tla n tic
a n d G u lf s h ip p in g p orts this year have been 8,818,525
bales, against 5,394,875 bales last year and 7,882,163 bales in
1894-95; ard that the exports have been 5,963,422 bales, against
4,846,084 bales last season and 6,719,713 bales the previous
Beason, Great Britain getting out of this crop 2,913,847 bales
If now we add the shipments from Tennessee and elsewhere
direct to manufacturers, and Southern consumption, we have
the following as the crop statement for the three years.

THE

STATES.

justed, abundant crops have been growing, and a
highly important incident of the situation is that
the surpluses we have raised are all needed by
Europe.
Thus a natural recuperative movement has
begun ; our people are accumulating an enlarged
capacity for consumption through the crops which
have just begun to be marketed and which are meeting
as rapidly as they reach the market an eager demand at
high prices. Already there are striking evidences in busi­
ness circles of the fresh life animating our industries, the re­
sults attained being recorded in bank clearings, in railroad
earnings, and in the markets generally showing more or less
improvement and a steady progress. It is not too much to
say under these circumstances that after a twelve months of
unparalelled trials the outlook as the season opens is full of
promise, a new term of prosperity for the cotton goods
industry having actually begun.
Of the various departments of cotton manufacture print
cloths have probably during the season been least favorably
situated. Even the efforts made in the closing months o f
the previous year to put the market in better shape by re­
ducing stocks of goods through a reduction of the output
signally failed, and similar efforts this year have accom ­
plished comparatively little. A t no time during 1896-97 has
there been more than a very meagre margin for profit and
there have been periods when, based on the ruling price for
the raw material, the current selling price has netted a loss.
W ith the resumption o f full time in the mills last October
stocks began to creep up and by the 19th of December the
accumulations in Fall River and Providence were 2,276,000
pieces ; during January a moderate reduction was notice­
able, but it was not until, as stated above, on February 8,
when Mr. M. C. D. Borden of the American Printing Co.
purchased and withdrew from the market 750,000 pieces
that any considerable depletion was noticed, said purchase
decreasing the combined holdings at Fall River and Provi­
dence, Feb. 13, to 1,173,000 pieces, the smallest total since
the close o f February 1896. By agreement among the print
cloth brokers no statements o f stocks have been issued
officially since Feb. 13, but a close approximation has been
arrived at each week, and the figures indicate that notwith­
standing a reduction in out-turn at times since the Borden
purchase was consummated, stocks increased again until
August 1 1897 they stood at about 1,540,000 pieces. Since
that date increased consumption has begun to absorb old
accumulations as well as current production, the stock
of cloths August 31 being about 1,150,000 pieces.
Features of the current season’s print cloth market have
been the continued very low rates prevailing and the narrow
limit within which prices have fluctuated. To be sure the
quotation has gone no lower than in July and August
of 1896, when 2'44 cents for 64x64s was recorded, but the
average price for the season has been lower than ever be­
fore reached, having been only 2 9-16 cents, the range being
from 2 7-16 to 2% cents. In 1896-97 the range was from 2-44
to 3'06 cents and the average about 2% cents.
Without attempting to follow the course o f the market
more in detail, we give the following, which shows at a
glance the relative position of the raw material, printing
cloths and other standard goods on the first day o f each
month during the past three years._________________________
©5
s* s
q
1 1
£ a;

Tear E nding with August 31—

Cts Cts.
538 5
5*2 5
5k) 5
5>4 5
1897.

Cts.
2-50
2-62
262
2-62

Cts.
7%
8=8
89)6
8ia

Cts. Cts.
6
5
6
5k
6
5 k)
5% 5k
1896.

Cts.
306
312
3-31
319

Cts.
67,8
513lt.
5618
53s

Cts. Cts.
6
5k
6
5k
5k 5k
5% 5 k
1895.

Cts.
2-88
2-88
2*75
2-75

5
5
4*s
412
4is
4k)
4is
41s
5

2-50
2-50
262
256
2-56
2-44
2*50
2-50
2 62

7 15ie
7k
7 5Jb
7ka
713,6
7k
71)8
^ le
713,6

5%
558
54
514
514
514
514
5k
538

300
2-75
2-75
2*50
2-50
2-50
2-44
2*44
250

5k
53,6
5!«
6
6k 61Sle
611,8
611,8
7k

5k
514
5
5k
5k
5k
53s
5k
6

2-68
2-57
2*50
2-50
2-87
2-81
2-81
2-88
3-06

S
§
s
§
q

1 3
i
1 •
S
i £ S
e> 84 0
0

1896.
Cts.
S e p tl 71316
Oct. 1 8
N ov.l 713,,
Dec. 1 75,6
Jan. 1
Feb. 1
M ar.l
Apr. 1
May 1
Junel
July 1
A u g .l
Sept.l

6k
61=16
71,6
6 « ie
738
738
712
7=8
7716

5k
5%
514
5*8
5
4%
43*
4%
4 7e

^
S’ a «
•|| P
^
§
0 q

s
-2
-3
|
b

1895.

5*4
5k
5
5
43»
4k
4k
4k
5

Standard
Sheetings.
Lancaster
Ginghams.

cided victory for sound money ; this sentiment led to a re­
sumption of work on full time by a large portion of the
cotton mills before the close of October.
Thus matters stood when the outcome of the election be­
cam e an assured fact and the fear and strain the public had
so long been under was actually removed. It is perhaps no
cause for surprise that in such circumstances a feeling of
•extreme hopefulness should have gotten possession of manu­
facturers in all parts of the country, and in nearly every de­
partment of trade, and that a resumption of work should
have become almost general. The belief for the time appar­
ently was that the threads could be taken up just where they
had been cut in January 1896, and production and consump­
tion could go on just as if it had not been stopped by the freecoinage agitation. Of course it is easy enough to see now
that the belief was a mistaken one and the expectation un­
reasonable. The result to spinners was that stocks in­
creased again, many mills were forced to stop and others to
run on short time; yet the production so far exceeded con­
sumption that the accumulations o f goods in January 1897
were just about as large as they had been at any previous
date. Another incipient revival occurred with the approach
o f spring. In the second week of February two transactions
were reported which had a tendency to improve the tone of
the markets and to increase purchases. One of these was
the dissolution of the steel rail pool and a drop in the price
<of steel rails from $25 to $17 per ton, after a drop previously
iin December from $28 to $25 per ton. The other transaction
w as ithe purchase by Mr. M. C. D. Borden of the American
Printing Company, Fall River, of 750,000 pieces of print
cloths (64x64), the total stocks of print cloths of all sizes at
that time being 1,934,000 pieces.
The drop in steel rails had the immediate effect of enlarging
sales of rails very considerably. Orders from railroads were
speedily booked to a large amount and important export
•orders were likewise secured and filled. On the other hand
it was reported that the dry goods department presented a
more animated appearance, buyers having increased in
numbers. The better feeling too was stated to have ex­
tended to other markets, the improving sentiment very
naturally being infectious. The influence of these larger
•sales and new hopes lasted only a few weeks, the results of
•the revival so far as cotton goods are concerned being that
purchasers of these goods showed great conservatism in
their operations, only taking a sufficient supply to satisfy
immediate wants and then retiring. Of course the end was
a fresh disappointment to spinners. It is easy enough now
to see that this outcome was likewise reasonable. How
could trade, which was then at so low an ebb, recover to
■any decided extent, with an extra session of Congress in
•anticipation at which the tariff was to be overhauled and
with no agency capable of inducing a sudden or any revival
in the consuming power o f the people in sight or fore­
shadowed. For an indication of the state of industrial
affairs then existing consult the reports o f clearings and
railroad earnings for February 1897, bearing in mind that
Tailroads are a chief and very efficient source of new energy
when onoe profitably at work. It only remains to add that
on the 15th of March the legislation with reference to the
•tariff was begun. It was July 24th when that legislation
was completed and the bill signed by the President. A
further act was that the President the same day sent his
currency message to Congress, and as a result of the an­
nouncement it contained, public confidence in the reform
o f our currency at the next session of Congress was strength­
ened.
The foregoing recital of the leading incidents o f the year
has special usefulness and interest to-day. It brings before
the reader the events and influences which have led up to
the existing situation and aids one in making a correct fore­
cast of the future. Through this recital we see that every
hindrance to the resumption of a general consumption of
commodities by the public has been removed except the cur­
rency dislocation, which, be it remembered, produced it;
and furthermore we see that the people have good reason for
the belief that when Congress meets currency reform will
be in progress and as soon as possible thereafter will be
effected. Fortunately at this juncture, too, a forceful agent
for industrial recovery has developed. While these hin­
drances to a revival, from the election down to the
adjournment of Congress, were being overcome or ad­

UNITED

Standard
Sheetings.
Lancaster
Ginghams.

OF

Low MiddVg
TJpVd Cotton.

CROP

Standard
Sheetings.

COTION

Low MiddVg
JJpVd Cotton.

4

? !
I 1
^ ©
O

1894.

5k
5
5
5
5
5*
5*
5*
5*

COTTON

CROP

OF

TEE

The foregoing facts with reference to cotton, goods in the
United States and the facts we give below with reference to
the manufacture and consumption of cotton goods in Europe
are a full explanation for the disappointingly low prices
which have ruled for the raw material. Higher prices than
have been obtained were looked for, the statistical position
of cotton having been exceptionally strong. But the con­
ditions of the cotton goods industry the world over have
served to prevent any considerable rise in value, notwith­
standing the fact that the world's available supply has for
some little time past been much lower than in any season
since 1890; indeed,even lower comparatively than then, that
is if due allowance be made for the important increase in
consumption since 1890. Belief in higher prices was some­
what encouraged by the rise in September last, but the up­
ward turn was only temporary, prices graduallly receding
until 6 11-16 cents for low middling cotton was touched in
December. Bet ween that price and 7 1-16 cents the quota­
tions fluctuated during the succeeding three months, after
which the general tendency was upward until May 15, when
Til cents was reached for low middling uplands. Subse­
quently fluctuations were within d narrow range, the quota­
tion rising to 7% cents in July and reaching 7% on August
30. In only three years since 1869-70 {1801-99, 1893-94 and
1894-95) lias the
average price of cotton for the
season been lower than in 1896-97. For the purpose of show­
ing how this year’s prices compare with those for previous
years, we have prepared the following, compiled from our
records, which indicates at a glance the highest, lowest and
average price of low middling uplands in Mew York for each
season since 1869-70:
H ig h .
1 8 9 6 -9 7 .
1 -0 5 -8 S
1 8 9 4 -9 5
1 3 8 3 -6 4
1 S 9 2 -9 3 .
1 * 9 1 -9 2 .
1 8 9 0 -9 1
1 9 8 9 -9 0
188889
1 8 -7 -8 8
1 8 8 6 -8 7
1 8 8 5 -8 B
1 8 8 1 -8 5
1 8 8 3 -8 1

....

8%
,
.... 7%
.... 8%

....

B » ,t

...

8% .

— -5 2 * 1 *
....I l k
. . . ,I O U H
------ l l ' l *
. . . . 9 1 * ,a
. . . 1 1 * ,,

t o «?.
0 ti„
S U 19
S '*
6%
a hi
7%
M%
9 **
9 > t«
8k
8%
»%
9%

A v’ tjr.

L m o.

A tt'g e

»%

10%
11%
1 0 1 3 ,0
11%
1 0 7 ,g
l l » ! t ie
1 1 3 ,,,
l« * 8
15
1 6 3 ,0
19%
2 1 7 .8
1 6 3 ,0
23%

1 0 S ,.,

m g A.
1 8 8 2 -9 3 . . . .. 1 2 ', , 5
1 9 9 1 -8 2 . ....1 2 * 1
1 8 * 0 -8 1 . . . . . 1 2 5 „
1 8 7 9 -8 0 . . . . . 1 3 k
1 8 7 8 -7 9 . ....1 3 1 ,
1 8 7 7 -7 8 . ....1 1 1 5 ,0
1 8 7 8 - 7 7 ------1 2 * * 5 ,
1 8 7 5 - 7 8 . . . . . 1 4 **
1 8 7 4 -7 5 - ...1 6 %
187374
1 8 7 2 -7 3 . ..._ 2 1 %
1 8 7 1 -7 2 . ,.,.2 6 %
1 8 7 0 -7 1 . ....2 0 %

a n ,,
1 0 1 ,0
87.(5
9 k
10%
10%
13%
13**
18k
IS
13%

10%

1889-70 ... , 3 1 k

18%

7 *1 8
7%
6
’ "4
8
7 «,
8k
1 0 1 * ,,
10
9%

9

P rior to O ctober 1 . 1674, quotation* w ere by old cla rifica tio n , which

wae about Sgc. higher than new.

What has been said above applies particularly to the
Northern mills. But Southern manufacturers, although
affected in less degree by prevailing adverse conditions,
have nevertheless suffered. Speaking generally, the mills
have been quite fully operated during the season and con­
sumptive capacity has been increased by the starting-up of
a numberof new establishments; but the profit has been less
heretofore, and on many lines of goods no profit has been
the complaint. Some classes of heavy colored cottons have
especially been in over-supply, and in an effort to reduce
accumulated stocks the milk running on them have latterly
been working on short tim e; the inability also to obtain a
supply of the raw material on terms that would enable the
mills to make goods at ruling prices has forced other man­
agers to stop operations partially or wholly.
As was to be expected, there has been a further extension
of spinning capacity at the South this year. When we con
sider the amount of territory covered, the natural advantages
enjoyed, and the further fact that, while cotton manufacture
in the South has made ratdd advances in late years the ag­
gregate number of spindles in operation is barely as great
as in the oitv of Fall River, there is good reason to believe
that for some time to come our annual report of
spindles will show a gain over its predecessor. In
pursuance of the plan so successfully followed by us
for over a decade, we have gathered this year as full
information as is obtainable bearing upon the operations
and development of Southern factories Within the past
month not only have we procured from each mill returns as
to actual consumption of cotton in bales and pounds and the
number of spindles and looms added, working and idle, the
past year, but have also secured considerable data with re­
gard to new mills now building and contemplated additions
to existing plants. The returns made to us, as in former
years, have been extremely prompt and complete, so that
we can today give the actual condition in these particulars
of almost every factory in the South. The aggregates of our
detailed returns arranged by States are as follows, It

UNITED

STATES.

5*

should be remembered that these figures include (1) mills in
operation all this year; (2) new mills started up during the
course of the year, and (3) also a few mills which have been
in operation this year but have stopped temporarily and
expect to start up again in 1897-98 :

States.

AT o f
o.

M ills.

N um ber o f
Spindles Loom s,

V i r g i n i a . ..........
N o . C a r o lin a , .
S o . C a r o l in a ...
G e o r g ia .........

11
147
64
07

183,497
852,221
994,740
677,825

4,420
19,164
28,144
19,041

A la b a m a ...........
M i s s i s s ip p i. . . .
L o u is ia n a . . . . .
T e x a s . ................
A r k a n s a s — ,,
T e n n e s s e e ........
M i s s o u r i,..........

32
8
3
4
1
20
3
9

212,088
70.S8S
58,952
29,160
8,000
05,836
11,752
57,^02

3,921
2,000
1,534
844
60
2,344
358
088

K e n t u c k y .........
T o t a l . 1896-97.

375

3,197,545

352

2,770,2*4

70,010

16
20
19
15
IMS
10
18
13
14
16
20
16

Consum ption.
Bales.
30 767
207,615
320,038
225,500
72,069
18,957
15,835
12,090
677
20.915
3,151
22,302

Av'rage
W'gnts

Pounds.

409*92 I t , 377,5 IS
459*84 123,059,275
464*84 148,767,042
475-08 108,167,531
474*30
481-08
483-07
511*44
480-35
474*78
479*83
481*«3

34,182,672
9,119,807-*
?,4 1 7 ,0 2 L
0,183,270
325,197
14,203,122
1 ,511,905
10,756,911'

1,024,482
17

409-48 480,071,335

915,810

470*12 480,543,SSO*

853,352

82.873

T o t a l , 1896-90.

Average
No. Yarn.

470-74 401,706,255-

T o t a l, 1894-1©.

322

2,370,281

55,390

T o t a l , 1863-94.

391

2,167.242

52,195

15*8

723,329

403*84 335,509,957’

T o t a l , 1892-93

314

2,082,197

40,207

15 7 -10

733,701

402*93 389,650,057'

T o t a l , 1881-92.

283

1.938,62-1

40,608

U *

081,471

403*56 315,903,286'

G en s. t n t . 79-80

104

561,300

12,329

13

188,748

464

87,010.889'

ftOTE.—Much rew machinery has been put in operation within the
last few months, Increasing the number of spindles appreciably
without affecting consumption to any extent.

Our returns indicate a continuation of the tendency at
the South to build larger mills or increase the spinning
capacity of old ones. The number of spindles per mill in
the last season reached 8,5*26, against 7,767 in 1895-96, 7,389
in 1894-95 and 6,751 in 1893-94. The number of spindles in
1896-97 aggregated 64 per cent more than in 1891-2 and 15J4
par cent more than in 1895-98.
The returns for the last six years include, as here­
tofore, only the spindles in operation and those shortly"
to start up again. In a subsequent table for the whole
country we include those idle for a year or more, omit­
ting only those that are old and useless and permanently
out of employ.
It further appears from the returns
made to us that there have been 10 old mills running
27,8*34 spindles stopped, and 33 new mills running 188,446.
spindles started, making a net addition of 23 new mills run­
ning 160.622 spindles during the year. Moreover, the total new
spindles added this year is 437,361 net, showing that 266,639
of these spindles have been an increase in the spinning ca­
pacity of old mills. Aside from the above, we have knowl­
edge of 10 new mills containing 124,500 spindles which
expect to start up within a short time, and there are 15
mills in course of construction but which will not be in
operation until after the first of January. Extensive addi­
tions to old mills aggregating fully 150,000 spindles are aka
contemplated in the near future.
There is one other branch of the cotton goods industry'
which claims attention—we refer to the export movement,,
which this year has shown a further and decided expansion.
While the shipment s to South America, Mexico, Continental
Europe and the Central American States have been lessthan in 1895-96, there have been very important gains in the
exports to China, Japan, Africa,Great Britain, BritishNorth
America and the East Indies, the movement to China hav ing more than doubled after an increase of over 100 per
cent the preceding season, and the shipments to other coun­
tries in Asia and Oceanica have risen from $606,475 to $1,971,969, The table below does not include cotton goods ex­
ported to China via Vancouver, B. C., which reached aheavier total than in the preceding year. For the fiscal year
1897 these shipments were 34,845 packages, containing 24,574,600 yards, against 36,7*20 packages or 18,027,600 yards in
1893-96, 21,230 packages or 18,398,000 yards in 1894-95 and
80,309 packages or 20,589,000 yards in 1893-94.
In the table below we merely give—as stated above—the
aggregate exports as reported by the Bureau of Statistics.
By referring, however, to the detailed statement published
in the CHBOsn t.E of August 21, page 3-34, we find that the
shipments to China increased 00,033,757 yards, or over 80 per
cent, during the season, and that there were an even greater
ratio of gain in the exports to some other countries. The
official record o f the last five years is as follows;

0 0 1 TON

6

OF

THE

UNITED

S1ATES.

Takings and, OonsumpVn. 1891-92. 1892-93

Y ea r Ending J un e SO—

E xp orts o f Cotton
M anufactures.

1893-94.

1894-95.

1 895-90.

1 896-97.

Bales.
Bales.
Bales.
Bales.
Bales.
Bales.
—
N o r t h e r n m i l l s ................ 2,212,032 1,747,314 1,013,971 2.154,170 1,070,744 1,802,505
915,810 1,024,482
723,329 853,352
081,471
733,701

Taken
1897.

'C c l c r e d G o o d s .......... Y d s .
Do
Value.
r U n o o lo r e d g o o d s . . Y d s .
Do
Value.
O t h e r m » n T * o f . . Value-.

CROP

1890.

1895.

1894.

1893.

88,409,441 58.747.729 58,407,743 01,538,458 43,010,108
$4,770,291 $3,419,158 $3,444,539 $3,854,935 $2,802,402
230,123/103 106,891,039 125,790,318 124,349,278 100,770,000
$18,511,389 $0,639,199 $7,034,078 $7,039,851 $0,300,022
$3,750,058 $3,879,039 $3,310,593 $2,845,897 $2,700,871

T o t a l c o t t o n m a n u fa c ­
$11,809,355
t u r e s e x p o r t e d . Value. $21,037,008 $10,837,396 $13,789,810 $14,340,083

T o t . t a k in g s f r o m c r o p 2,893,503 2,481,015 2,337,300 3,007,522 2,580,554 2,887,047
52,131
47,217
101,387
108,240
123,900 310,932
8 t o c k h e l d b y m i l l s ___
T o ta l y e a r’s su p p ly —

3,017,403 2,791,947 2,445.540 3,054,739 2,747,941 2,9 3 9,1 78

OonsumpVn (estim ated)—
N o r t h e r n m il ls ............. 2.025,000 1,950,000 1,075,000 2,040,000 1,780,000 1,835,000
853,352 915.810 1,024,482
723,329
783,701
081,471
S o u t h e r n m i l l s ................

.A similar exhibit covering India’s shipments we have also
T o t a l c o n s u m p t i o n — 2,700,471 2,083,701 2,398,329 2,893,352 2,095,810 2.859,482
•given for a number of years by way of comparison. It
T o t . s u p p l y a s a b o v e . . 3,017,403 2,791,947 2,445,540 3,054,739 2,747,941 2 .939,178
should be borne in mind that if we were to go back to 1876 L e a v ’ g m ill s t ’ k s S e p t . 1 310,932 108,240 47,217 101,3871 52,131 _ 7 9 , 0 9 0
India's total would be very small, the value for that year
The foregoing leaves stocks in spinners’ hands at 79,696
having been but £663,000, or say less than 314 million dollars,
bales, and shows that the United States consumed 2,859,492
while that of the United States for the same year was
bales.
37,722,978. The record for the last six years has been as
E u r o p e . —Although during the latter part of the year
.follow s:
ending with the first of September 1896, manufacturers in
1891-92.
1892-93.
1893-94.
1895-90.
1896-97.
1894-95.
•Cotton .
Europe looked more hopefully towards the then approaching
£
£
£
£
£
£
season, yet for several reasons, as the weeks passed, condi­
5,771,033
4,974,133
0,773,482
0,73'*,830
5,072,024
•Twist & y a r n s 7,173, >08
tions grew less instead of more encouraging. W ith con­
1,204,002
1,208,425
1,327,175
1,018,750
'M a n u fa c t u r e s 1,323,800
1,400,050
sumption in the United States greatly restricted as already
8,100,057
7,035,035
7,138,080
0,242,558
8,344,560
T o t a l . . . ....... 8,496,474
described—even the November election, which so many felt
T h e o ffic ia l fig u r e s a r e g iv e n in ru p e e s , a n d w e t u r n t h e m in t o p o u n d s
must be a turning point, bringing no relief—a very import­
-s t e r lin g o n t h e b a s is o f t e n r u p e e s t o a p o u n d . T h a t o f c o u r s e d o e s n o t m a k e
a ll o w a n c e f o r t h e d e p r e c ia t io n o f t h e r u p e e , b u t u n d e r t h e c ir c u m s t a n c e s it
ant demand on Europe, not for cotton goods alone or
iP r o b a b ly m a k e s t h e c o m p a r is o n a s n e a r ly c o r r e c t a s it c a n b e m a d e in v a lu e s .
It will be observed that the shipments this year record a mainly, but for wide classes of merchandise, was materially
■■small increase over the total for 1895-96, and are therefore curtailed. The partial withdrawal of so important a cus­
greater than in any previous year. A t the same time India’s tomer from the various markets always has some adverse
export tra de in cotton goods is much heavier than that of influence on every industry, but in years when other causes
the United States, the aggregate value o f her shipments for serve to contribute to an unfavorable status the same with­
drawal is evidently more harmful.
1896-97 having been £8,496,474 or $41,400,000.
In this case, India, parts of South and Central America,
As to the number of spindles in the United States there is
but little to be said. An appreciable amount of machinery and, in the early portion o f the year, Turkey, all developed
was idle August 1 1897, mainly in the North; but the stop­ conditions increasingly adverse to the growth o f the Euro­
page was only temporary, and has been very largely started pean cotton goods trade, and especially detrimental to Eng­
sup since then. The aggregate net increase in spindles at the lish spinners. Chief among these centers of derangement
North has been moderate this year, reaching about 100,000 was India. The extent of the failure of the food crops in
spindles. At the South, according to our returns, through that country was not fully realized until about the last of
new mills and additions to old factories, there has been a September a year ago. Soon after that date a sharp rise in
gain of 445,341 spindles. With this year’s changes the num­ wheat at Liverpool and engagements of wheat at San Fran­
ber of spindles in the whole country at the close of 1896-97 cisco for India signalized the real condition of affairs.
and of the previous five years would be as stated in the sub­ Those events announced that India during 1896-97 must not
joined table. It should be said in explanation of our com­ only fall out of the ranks of exporters of that serial, but
pilation of total spindles that this statement represents all would be compelled to draw upon foreign stocks to satisfy
mills whether in operation or not (except such as have been her needs. This latter fact was obvious proof o f the decided
closed with no present intention o f starting up again), shortage, inasmuch as in no previous year so far as the
whereas the details of Southern mills by States given pre­ records show had India been forced to go to Europe or
viously represent only mills in operation in some portion of America for supplies of wheat. The features of a famine
became more marked in November and thereafter, on
1896-97, or about to start up.
account of the failure in a large section of the October rains.
Spindles.
1893-97
1895-90.
1894-95.
1893-94.
1892-93.
1891-92.
Even that, however, was not the last or the worst o f the
N o r t h ............. 13,900,000 13,800,000 13,700,000 13,550,000
13,475,000 13,275,000
trials India has had to contend with the past season. A bout
3,450,537
8 o u t h ..............
3,011,190
2,433,248
2,291,064
2,160,028
2,002,809
the first of January the bubonic plague began to assume alarm­
17,350.537 10.811,190 10.133,248 15.841.064 15,041,023 15.277.809
T ota l —
ing proportions—first at Bombay, where in consequence
American spinners close the year with moderate stocks business was almost paralyzed, and later spreading to
o f cotton. The takings through the year of Northern and Kurrachee and other places, with like baleful effects.
Southern spinners have been given as below :
These circumstances and conditions, we hardly need to say,
Total crop o f the United States as before stated....... bales.
8,714,011
have kept industrial affairs between Great Britain and
Stock on hand com m encem ent o f year (Scot l , 18961—
India in a very disturbed and unsatisfactory state all the
A t Northern porta......... .......................
70,990
A t Sonthern p orts................................. 151.688 - 222,678
year, improving only slightly the last month or two as the
A t Northern Interior m arkets..............................
4 ,0 5 6 - 226 734
fact developed, according to the current reports, that the
Total supply during the year ending Sept. 1 ,1 8 9 7 .......... 8,940,745
monsoon was turning out fairly well. Transactions,
O f this supply thors nas onen exporteu
to foreign ports during the year....... 5,968,422
however, were not very materially reduced in the yards and
Less foreign cotton ln o lu d e u _ bales.
_
77 ,511 -5,8 90,9 11
Sent to Canada direct from West...........................
76,848
pounds of goods sold by reason of the famine ; that condi­
Burnt, North and South.......... . . . ........................ .
5,935
tion tended rather to take away from the sharpness of the
Stook on hand end o f year (Sept. 1 ,1 8 9 7 )—
A t Northern p o r t s ..............................
42,351
demand and so lower the tone of the market, and with that
A t Southern ports
...........................
31,664— 77,015
A t Northern Interior m arkets..............................
2,989—6,053 698 the values of goods; thereby the profitableness of the trade
T ot. tak’gs by spinners in th eU .8 . for year end. Sept. 1 ,1 897 2 887 017 suffered rather than the volume. But soon after the first o f
Taken by Southern spinners (luoluded in above total).......... l ’,024’ 482 January, the much greater scourge mentioned, the bubonic
disorganized all business with Bombay and
Total taken by Northern spinners....................................... 1,862,565 plague,
Kurrachee and forced trade with India to be con­
-B u rn t Includes not only what has been thus destroyed at the North
ern and Southern outports, but also all burnt on Northern railroads and fined almost wholly to Calcutta and Madras. The re­
In Northern factories.
“
sults of the year from both of these disasters have been not
These figures show that the total takings by spinners North only a very considerable falling off in the shipments ol
and South during 1896-97 have reached 2,887,047 bales, of goods to India, but this slackened demand from Great
which the Northern mills have taken 1,862,565 bales and the Britain’s chief customer has likewise gone far in making
Southern mills 1,024,482 bales. Our summary of takings and the Lancashire cotton goods trade unprofitable. A further
consumption on the basis o f no stocks in the hands o f Northern loss of business, as already indicated, has occurred by rea­
spinners on September 1, 1875, reaches the following results. son of a shortened demand from South and Central America.
The width of our columns compels us to omit the results of Various causes have helped to restrict the movement in
the years 1875-76 to and including 1890-91.
those directions, especially to the Argentine Republic and

COTTON

CROP

OF

THE

UNITED

STATES.

7

Brazil, loss of last year’s crops in the first-named coun­ itself soon stamped out. As yet reports about the monsoon
try by locusts being the more prominent of these. Busi­ are partial, and so far as we have heard not wholly satis­
ness with Turkey likewise began the season unfavorably, factory; but the drought has broken and the rains
but a very considerable improvement has developed since the have been fairly abundant up to this date; besides there is
calendar year 1897 opened; there has been a better trade in still time for a more full and general rainfall. Assuming
progress with Syria ever since Ju «e, 1896, Beyrout having that this feature turns out favorably, there is reason in the
been free from the disturbances which afflicted Armenia.
belief that India will absorb at least as large a quantity of
Still another influence has been adverse this year to a goods in the season ending with October 1 1898, as it took
profitable trade in Gre ts Britain, especially during the early in the season ending with October 1 1896. W e make no
months of the season, and that is the course of the market mention of the political disturbances, a recent development
for raw cotton. This no doubt would have been of little in India, believing the country will soon be quieted, and
account had every other condition been favorable. It is that this condition will have little influence on the year’s
impossible to mark up prices of goods to meet advances in consumption of goods.
cotton unless the demand for the manufactured article is
Aside from India and short crops of breadstuffs in
fairly active. Whenever the trade already is slow, tending Europe, there is nothing but the decline in silver
to worse conditions instead of better, and has to be dili­ or a war in Europe that can be suggested as a possible inter­
gently cultivated, an upward movement in the raw mater­ ference with trade development throughout the world.
ial can be met only by stopping spindles and de­ Since the two Emperors have just met, the two supposed to
creasing consumption. In 1896 the spring and summer be the most likely belligerents in the world, and have over
development of the cotton plant had encouraged the the same board broken bread, eaten salt and drank health
idea of a large crop. Hence when the sensational re­ and peace to one another, where lives the man who would
ports of very low condition were issued in August and dare to even whisper that word—war ? As to the new de­
September and the price of that staple advanced a cent a cline in silver, we leave that for each reader to draw his
pound, manufacturers were in but few instan ;es prepared own conclusions. Speaking for ourselves, we are getting to
for it, while they could only book orders at the old range of be a little skeptical about a fall in silver having any in­
values. Then again when in October the incorrectness of fluence a Manchester merchant cannot easily surmount.
these reports became assured and cotton dropped, buyers of The anticipated embarrassments of a drop from 61d. to 30d.
goods went over to the opposite idea of a big yield and we have seen successfully labored with—good evidence of
would order only on the basis of still lower values. All the success being mills just as active, and paying just as
this seriously interfered with transactions; for it is well arge dividends, after the decline as before; having seen all
known that now-a-days English spinners expect tocovercon- that we think the manufacturing cotton-producing public
traets for goods with purchases of cotton futures. In this can afford to look on with equanimity while the decline
way they insure the contract and make engagements for from 30d. to 20d. per ounce is in progress.
Reference has been made above to the material decrease
weeks and months ahead. Only when they are running in
that manner—taking orders in advance to be filled when the this year in the shipments of goods by Great Britain to
old ones are executed each order when received being cov­ India; the falling off has been large, but not as large as cir­
ered at once with cotton— tliat a profitable all-around cumstances seem to indicate it would be. The movement
to China and Japan is also less than in 1895-96, but the ship­
twelve months is secured.
But the American reader may ask how is it that such con­ ments to those points ware notably heavj that year ; there
ditions as have been described can exist and yet Great is a satisfactory gain over 1894-95. The takings by the
Britain’s spinners consume almost if not quite as much cotton United States and by South and Central America show a
as they consumed the previous year, when the total con­ falling off. W e give below a statement showing first the
sumed was the largest for five years ? The answer to that shipments of goods and yarns by Great Britain to India,
question illustrates the peculiar character and strength of stated separately for tsvo years, and In subsequent columns
the cotton goods industry of Great Britain. Its spinners and the similar figures for China and Japan given together.
manufacturers sen l their goods to every country in the Each movement is presented in three columns ; the first
world, so that ordinarily when one consumer diminishes his column covers yarns in pounds, the second piece-goods in
takings the loss is made good by others. Another fact is yards and the third the total of both yarns and goods in
that usually home consumption is large ; this year it has pounds. Three ciphers (000) omitted.
GREAT BRITAIN’S EXPORTS.
been very large—s:> large that although the exports of yarn
------- -— To India.----------> r-To China and Japan.-*
Tarn,
Goods,
Total,
Tarn, Goods,
Total,
and goods reduced to pounds show a falling off of about
1896-97.
lbs.
Yards.
in lbs.
lbs.
Yards,
in lbs.
68.389,000 pounds, home consumption has developed to an Oct.-D ec. q n a r ... 11.548
535,699 113,586 5,095 133,666 30,365
505,910 105,996 7,955 157,963 38,043
extent sufficient to cover the deficit in the foreign move­ J»u.-M ar. q n a r ... 9,032
A p r.-J une qnar ... 12.5-15
430,670 94,577 7,898 149,480 36,370
ment. This of course does not mean that Lancashire trade J u ly -S e p t q u a r .*13,000
525,000 113,000 10.000 1G8,000 42,000
is always profitable. It lias been far from profitable this
T ota l............... 46,725 1,997.279 427,159 30,948 608,108 146,778
season, as already shown. But the noteworthy faot is that
1895-96—
Oct.-D eo. qnar . .. 9,540
467,792 98,592 8,797 186,088 44,222
the adverse conditions which have prevailed have been so Jon.-M ar. qnar. ..13,048
550,533 117,852 7.703 202,443 46,242
A pr.-June q u a r .. .14,332
582,009 125,648 7,961 135,351 33,727
cxtieme that if they could have been foreseen, a much
July-Sept. q u a r ...12,529
626,532 131,800 11,106 178,038 44,999
worse state of trade would have been thought inevitable
Tota l............... 49,069 2,226,866 473,892 35,507 701,920 169,190
than baa been realized. Soane spinners have made money,
'E stim ated tor tile quarter on the July m ovement.
as tbv-y always do. But taking an average of the whole
W e give in connection with the foregoing a gen­
trade, we presume the capital, after allowing for deprecia­
eral compilation which covers
the
total exports
tion of plant and wear and tear, has not earned interest.
from
Great Britain to
all
countries of cotton
As to the future, the coming year is expected to show an
goods and cotton yams and also a total of both, reduced
improvement* Under present circumstances the conditions
by us to pounds to perfect the comparison. The results
of the cotton goods trade of Great Britain ought to prove more
by quarters only are given here, the statement by months
favorable. A feature that does not promise important change
appearing in our cotton rejiort generally the third Saturday
is the trade of the United States with Europe. We assume that
each month. That the reader may not be misled, we
onr trade with the outside world, notwithstanding the de­
repeat with reference to this statement what we have just
cided improvement in business here, will the coming twelve
said with reference to the previous table, that for the last
month* be restricted by and under the provisions of the
two months of the last quarter of the current season the
new tariff. Short crops of breadstuffs, too, may interfere
figures are estimated on the basis of the July movement,
with the usual consumption of goods on the Continent.
the official statement for those two months not having been
On the other hand India ought to be a much better
published as we write. Three ciphers are omitted.
customer of Great Britain. Presumably there will be
GREAT BRITAIN’ S COTTON GOODS EXPORTS FOR TWO YEARS.
--------------18B8-S7.------------ , ________________________ _
some evidences cropping out from time to time of last
Tarns. Piece Goods. Total. T i m s . Piece Goods. TotalL
(OOO’ a omitted.)
pounds.
Yards.
P ou nds. Pounds.
Y m is
P ou nds.
year’s plague; we have already seen published statements
1,248,37 L
311,247
08,389
1,271,047
819.485
1st q u a r . - O c t , - D e o . . 67.191
that reflect unhealthy conditions prevailing in Bombay 24 *' - J a n . - M a r . . 6 >,959 1,244,752 310,608 04,066 1,832,4 03 320,070
1.088,845
280,015
68,840
1,220,470
808,310
JU
“
— A p r .-J u n e . 06,097
*
still. That was to be expected, but it is only reasonable to 4 th " —J u l y - S e p t . 4 08,000 1,305,000 3*8,000 68,279 1,413,124 311,382
presume that with the experience the authorities have had
T o ta l ....................... 267,247
4,046.066 1.2*9.870 273,574
5.243.074 1,298.259
'B u ttm a t e d f o r t h e q u a r t e r o n t h e J u ly m o v e m e n t .
any new development will be kept under and the disease

8

COTTON

CROP

OF

TEE

UNITED

STATES.

ther rise o f 3-32d. was recorded by the 4th. A reaction o f
l-32d. occurred on the 5th, but by the 8th prices had gone
up 5-32d. more, middling uplands being quoted at 4 27-32d.,
the highest point reached without exception since March,
1893. During the remainder of the month there were almost
daily fluctuations, and notwithstanding the extremely dis­
couraging report issued September 10 by the Agricultural
Department, the general tendency was downward, the close
being at 4 ll-16d. for middling uplands, or a gain of 13-32d,
from the final August price, but a loss of 5-32d. from the
highest price of the month.
October.—Manchester—The goods market was less favor­
ably conditioned in October. A number of adverse influ­
ences served to reduce the volume of business, among which
were the continued high price for the raw material, the
prevailing distress in India due to failure o f the food crops,
and the disappointing demand from America. Furthermore,
for Eastern markets other than India the demand was quiet
1894-95.
1896-97.
1895-96.
and the same was true of South America. As a result, in
many instances where machinery was fully operated lower
8
§•■3
<
0
Liverpool.
s*!
0 1
prices than those openly quoted had to be accepted; in fact
P
h
9 s
«O Si
fe
C
P
C
O
not only was difficulty experienced in booking orders at
8,
reasonable prices, but a frequent occurrence was the cancel­
d.
s. d.
d.
d.
s. d.
d.
d.
d. s. d.
5 4 % ling of orders for India. Short-time was to some extent
317,, 6
5 7
Bept. 3 0 ... 4 H ,6 7)4 5 1014 423,2 7
Oct. 3 1 ....
73,6 5 8 M 3632 5 78 5 4 ^ resorted to, and in most of the important manufacturing
4113S 71,6 5 7^i 43,
Nov. 3 0 ... 4 H 32 71,6 5 71* 411,6 71s 5 7% 3°S2 525,2 5 2ij»
districts many looms were wholly idle. Yarns were marked
A vera ge)
7% 5 86,2 42332 71,2 5 7% 3®32 5 78 5 4
Sep.-Nov. S
down %d. during the month, and the decline in shirtings
61616 5 5
Dec. 3 1 ___ 4
4 1732 718 5 6 % 31,S 5>s 5 0
reached from %% to 3J^d. Exports of yarns and goods from
Jan. 3 1 ___ 315,6 611,, 5 4
7% 5 6 ^ 23132 5 ii 4 I l l s
4 "8
6 H 5 Ah 3
1
Feb. 2 8 ....
4132 Ou ie 5
438
55,2 4 10i« Great Britain were 105,291,000 lbs., which compared with
Average J
7
6 % 5 4i„ 4la
3
5 6
55,6 41113 112,334,000 lbs. in October, 1895. Consumption was estimated
Dec:-Feb. J 4
331^ e,25r , 5 3% 41332 615„ 5 e h 35,B 521,2 5 1% the same as in the preceding month. Liverpool— During
Mcli. 31 .
41832 Olo i6 5 64» 3»8
5 2
April 3 0 ..
615,f 5 4
414
the first half of the month the cotton market tended
M ay 3 1 ...
4i«
6li,e 5 3** 41,6 6 7a 5 6% 3 78
6°32 5 3 h
Average ?
515,6 5 2% downward as a result of improved crop advices and the con­
613,b 5 32a 47*4 611,2 5 62, 358
418
Mar.-ik’y 3
sequent increasing of crop estimates, middling uplands fall­
315, 6 621, 5 6h 311,6 529, 5 2 8
4
June 3 0 ... 4 532 678 5 4
329,,. 6212 5 5 % 311,6 53* 5 1
ing from 4 ll-16d. on Sept. 30 to 4 7-16d. on the 16th. of Oct­
July 3 1 ...
4« 2 61&1P 5 5
6131(|5 413 4%2 71*32 5 912 4132 6°16 5 4*2
August 31. 418
ober, or a loss of J£d. Subsequently, however, reports o f
Average f
5 2^
6
P ue-A ua 3 48ie 6 78 5 4is 4124 6 7s 5 7lg 3 78
killing frosts, in conjunction with the previous heavy de­
Here we see that the season of 1896-97 opened with manu­ cline, led to more active buying, under which quotations
factured products ruling higher in value than at the same gradually rose, reaching 4 17-32d. for middling uplands on
time in either 1895-96 or 1894-95, but the raw material was the 24th. A reaction to 4 15-32d. occurred on the 27th, no
also higher. Subsequently the comparison became less confirmation of frost reports having been received, but the
favorable, and for the entire year 1896-97 we find that the market recovered to 4 17-32d. on the 27th, and so closed.
average price of middling uplands in Liverpool has been The loss during the month was 5-32d.
higher than in 1895-96, whereas on the other hand shirtings
November.—Manchester.—The market for cotton m anu­
have averaged only about 5 shillings 5J^d. per piece this factures during November was even less satisfactory than in
year, against 5 shillings 6i£d. in 1895-96.
October. Not only were transactions restricted in volume,
W e now add by months the course of the Manchester goods but prices realized were as a rule uuremunerative. A t the
market during the season closing with August 31, 1897, and opening of the month there was some disposition shown toalso the Liverpool cotton market in the same form for the make purchases, as with the success of the sound money
same period. These summaries have been prepared for this candidate for the Presidency o f the United States an im­
occasion with great care, and the details will we think prove provement in business was anticipated. But the hope
an interesting and useful record for reference.
proved groundless; besides that the India famine and situa­
September.—Manchester.—The month of September opened tion became increasingly unpromising, so that at the close
on a fairly prosperous outlook in the manufacturing dis­ of the month many leading descriptions o f goods were quite
tricts of Great Britain.
Before the squeeze in cotton, unfavorably situated. Short-time was frequently resorted
during the months of August and September, a large stock to rather than accept the exceedingly low prices offered.
of cheap cotton had been bought by spinners, and as a conse­ Exports o f yarns and goods were less liberal than in recent
quence the mills profited. This too resulted notwithstand­ months, reaching 99,185,000 lbs. against 106,402,000 lbs. in
ing the rise in the value of the raw material led to a mark­ November o f the previous year. Mr. Ellison’s estimate of
ing up of quotations for manufactured products to a point consumption in November was the same as for October.
which checked in some measure dealings for home trade as Liverpool.—While at the beginning of November the ten­
well as for export. Merchants lacked confidence in the per­ dency of prices for the raw material was upward in antici­
manency of the advance. Towards the close of the month, pation of a more active market after the settlement of the
with the easing off of prices the demand improved again, Presidential contest in the United States, the general trend
but altogether it was reported that transactions had been of quotations later was downward, the heavy crop move­
of a smaller volume than in previous months of the year, ment, together with the decreased demand from Liverpool,
and the conditions were much less promising than at the inducing the decline. Middling upland was quoted at
opening of the month. Yarns and goods exported from 4 17-32d. on the 2d, rose to 4%d. on the 4th, but fell back
Great Britain (all reduced to pounds) were 109,518,000 lbs., again to 4 17-32d. on the 6th. On the 9th there was an im­
against 104,019,000 lbs. in September 1895. Consumption of provement to 4 19-32d, which quotation was maintained
cotton was estimated by Mr. Ellison at 64,000 bales of 500 until the 14th, when there was a recession o f l-16d., followed
lbs. each per week in Great Britain and 87,000 bales of like by a further loss of 1-16 on the 16th and declines of l-32d.
weight on the Continent, or, stated in 4001b. bales (Mr. Ellison’s on the 18th, 19th, 21st and 23d. On the latter date mid­
unit of comparison in previous years), the total would be 80,000 dling upland ruled at 4 ll-32d. and so closed, after fluctuat­
bales for Great Britain and 102,500 bales for the Continent. ing up and down in the interim. The falling off during the
Liverpool.— Prices for cotton were wholly under the control month was 3-16d.
o f advices from the United States during the greater part of
D ecember.—Manchester.—The Manchester goods marketSeptember. Very unfavorable crop reports on the 1st and in December showed a slight improvement in the margin
2d led to gains of 3-32d. and %&. respectively—the latter between cotton and goods over November, for although
being the heaviest increase in one day since 1870—and a fur­ there was a further easing of prices on both cloths and yarn,.
Shirtings
per Piece.

Mid. TJpl’d
Cotton.

1 Shirtings,

Shirtings,
per Piece.

Mid. Upl'd
Cotton.

Our totals of pounds in the foregoing are of course inexact.
We prepare them ourselves and believe them to be fairly
close approximations. It must be borne in mind also that
the current year’s figures are estimated for the last two
months of the last quarter, but the previous year’s results
are the completed official totals in all respects, except that
the aggregates in pounds are prepared as just stated.
These total results show what we have before set out,
that measured in pounds the export movement has been
smaller the current year than last year. But if our estimate
for the last two months of this season, is not excessive, the
shipments have been almost as great as in any one of the
last thirteen years, the period during which we have kept
tlit; record in this form, only excepting last year and 1894-95.
To complete this record we give below a brief summary of
prices, the statement being made to cover the last three years
so that the figures may reflect the comparative situation.

COTTON

CROP

OF

TEE

the decline for goods was not so great as in the raw ma­
terial. Business, however, was rather quiet as a rule, only a
fair aggregate trade being reported, but at the close spinners
were stated to be pretty well under contract. Manufactur­
ers were not as favorably situated as spinners. During the
last few days of the month the demand for China ex­
hibited some improvement. The exports of yarns and goods
from Great Britain in December reached a total of 108,772,O lbs., which compared with 100,748,000 lbs. in the same
0O
month of 1895. The estimates of consumption were tinchanged. Liverpool—The general tendency of the market
for the raw material in December was towards a lower level
of quotations. Fluctuations, however, were within narrow
limits, and at times the decline was ariested, but compared
with the closing November price the final December quota­
tion recorded a loss of Jgd. The opening was at 43gd. for
middling uplands, from which figure there was a drop of
l-32d. on the 2d and a further decline of 3-32d. on the 4th
and 5th. Part of the loss was recovered on the 7th, but the
succeeding week witnessed a falling off of 7-38d. after
almost daily changes. A drop of l-32d. on both the 16th
and 17th carried the quotation down to 4d.; from the latter
date to the 22d there was a further decline to 8 81-32d., be­
tween which price and 4 l-82d. the market ranged the re­
mainder of the month, closing at 4d.
J a n u a r y .— Manchester.— No favorable features developed
in January. In a few lines of goods a satisfactory business
was done, and in some others the turn-over left no reason
for complaint; but in most descriptions comparatively few
new orders were booked. India continued to be the moat
unfavorable point in the situation. First the famine, which
was bad two months ago, lias since then been greatly aggra­
vated; the Southwest monsoon rains were so deficient that
the summer-grown crops also became very short over a wide
extent in the northern half of the peninsula. Later and in
addition to the famine the bubonic plague assumed the fea­
tures of a great disaster; its proportions were alarming in
December, but in January they increased both in extent and
severity until trade and industry were paralyzed in Bombay.
As a consequence the tendency of prices of goods in Man­
chester was downward all through the month. A t the close
of the month a reduction in running time or the stoppage of
some machinery seemed inevitable. Yam s and goods ex­
ported from Great Britain were during the month 108,921,000 lbs., against 108,618,000 lbs. in January 1896. No change
was made in the estimated weekly rate of consumption.
Liverpool —The condition of trade in Great Britain and the
United States was reflected in the cotton market. There
was no activity displayed, notwithstanding the decrease in
the movement of the American crop. Middling uplands fluc­
tuated around 4d. all through the month, dropping a 1-16 or
1-82 one day and recovering it the next, and finally closed at
3 15-16d., or a decline of i-18d„ as compared with Dec. 31.
F ebr u a r y .—Manchester, The adverse conditions stated
last month depressed the cotton goods market during Feb­
ruary. In addition the troubles in Crete and the complica­
tions incident thereto had an unfavorable influence. As a
consequence the cloth market was in a very unsatisfactory
state, great difficulty being experienced in obtaining new
orders except on terms which left little or no profit; in
some instances an actual loss was accepted to avoid stop­
page of looms. Short time and stoppage of machinery was
likewise resorted to in Lancashire and there was some talk
of reducing wages. Spinners, while little better off than
weavers, were operating on small margins. The outward
movement of yarns and goods from Great Britain exhibited
an appreciable decrease, reaching only 91,564,000 lbs.,
against 110,031,000 lbs. in February, 1896. The estimated
weekly rate of consumption was unchanged. Liverpool —
The market for the raw material was dull and without
features of importance during the early days of February,
fluctuations being within narrow limits. The opening was
at 3 r.-10d, for middling uplands, and on the 8th the quota­
tion was 8 29-’ 2d, On the 11th however, a decline of l-16d.
.
occurred and on the 13th there was a further drop of l-16d.,
which was recovered on the 16th and followed by a rise of
1-32*1, on the 17th. Subsequently an improved demand set
in, causing a hardening of rates, prices advancing l-32d. on
the 20th and on the 23d. A further gain of l-18d. was se­
cured on the 26th and l-32d. on the 27th, which carried mid­
dling uplands to 4 l-32d,, or 3-82d. above the opening.

UNITED

STATES.

9

M a r c h .— Manchester—The situation in Manchester was a
trifle more, satisfactory in some departments than it had
been in the previous month, but as a rule there continued to
be great dissatisfaction at the slow character of the de-1
mand, so slow that notwithstanding the increased cost of
the raw material efforts to obtain better prices were unsuc­
cessful. The inquiry for export presented no special fea­
tures.
Altogether, therefore, manufacturers were less
favorably situated in respect of margin than in February.
The position of spinners was more favorable, orders booked
during the opening days of the month enabling them to
hold out for more remunerative prices. Yarns and goods
exported from Great Britain reached a larger total—110,133,000 lbs.—than in the preceding month, and were but slightly
smaller than in March, 1896, when the shipments were
110.427.000 lbs. Estimates of cotton consumption remained
the same as in February. Liverpool—The news from the
East, foreshadowing war between Greece and Turkey,
brought about a decline in quotations during the early part
of the month, which was checked, however, at the begin­
ning of the second week by advices from America indicating
a considerable overflow in the Mississippi Valley. This lat­
ter influence, in conjunction with an improved demand,
stimulated a temporary advance, but as a result of more
warlike reports from the East the advantage was almost
entirely lost before the close of the month. From 4 l-32d.
on March 1 middling uplands declined to 3 15-16d. on the 6th,
recovered to 4d. on the 16th and fluctuated between that
figure and 3 15-16d. subsequently, finally closing at 3 15-16d.,
or a loss of 8-32d. from February 27.
A p r i l .— Manchester,—There was no material change in the
conditions from those which prevailed in the market for cotton
goods during March, except such as were produced by the
advance in cotton. Had spinners and weavers been dis­
posed to accept prices offered for their products, a large
business would have resulted; but these prices were as a rule
so unremunerative that they were only accepted as an alter­
native to stopping machinery. The famine and bubonic
plague in India, the slack demand from the United States,
the war in Southeastern Europe, were adverse influences
affecting the market. At the close of the month both spin­
ners and weavers were less favorably situated than for many
months. While yarns had been marked up }^@3-16J. during
the month, goods were in many cases quoted no higher than
at the close of March, notwithstanding the increased cost o f
the raw material. Exports of cotton manufactures from
Great Britain for the month were only 90.864,000 lbs., against
101.787.000 lbs. in 1896. Estimates of consumption unchanged.
Liverpool.—The market for the raw material was a rising
one, being influenced in that direction by advices from the
United States indicating a backward condition of the crops
generally and a further spread of the overflow in the Mis­
sissippi Valley. On the first of April middling uplands stood
at 4d., but had risen to 4>,£d. by the loth. A reaction o f
l-82d. occurred on the resumption of business after the
Easter holidays, but an upward turn immediately followed
which carried the quotation up to 4J^d. by the close of the
month.
Ma y .— Manchester.— A combination of unfavorable cir­
cumstances served to make this month less satisfactory than
its predecessor. The fall in Indian exchanges and the drop
in the price of silver interfered materially with transactions
for the East, and the declining tendency of the raw material
led purchasers generally to confine their operations to ur­
gent present requirements. As a result producers, already
not fully supplied with orders, had to face a restricted de­
mand, and in order to keep machinery in motion were in
many instances compelled to do business on a basis leaving
practically no margin for profit and in cases an actual loss
was accepted; towards the close of the month these condi­
tions led to some curtailment of production. A reduction
of 5-16@a|d. in yarns is to be noted during the month and
shirtings were reduced about U^d. per piece. Exports of
yarns and goods from Great Britain in May aggregated
98.656.000 lbs., against 97,687,000 lbs. for the month in 1896.
The rate of consumption by the mills was estimated the
same as in previous months. Liverpool.—The market for
the raw material presented no special features in May. The
general tendency of prices was downward and trade on the
whole quiet, the demand from spinners being light and the
news from America not of a character to stimulate opera-

10

COTTON

CROP

OF

THE

tions. Middling uplands opened the month at 4J4d., de­
clined l-32d. on the 4th and recovered the loss on the 10th,
but fell back again on the 11th. On the 18th there was a
drop of l-32d. to 4 3-16d, and by the 18th the quotations had
fallen to 4J.£d. The lowest price of the month—4 3-32d.—
•was reached on the 21st, but there was a recovery to 4}&d.
cn the 26th, and the market so closed.
J u n e .— Manchester—11 .o conditions which prevailed in the
goods market in June we re better than those experienced in
May. At the opening of the month there was but little new
business in progress; a marked improvement shortly set in and
tjre aggregate volume of transactions became heavier, and
at better rates than had previously been obtained. Not only
did the demand for India show improvement, partly as a
result of the upward tendency o f exchange, but there was
greater activity to the dealings for other foreign countries
as well as for home consumption. Furthermore, advices
from India encouraged the hope of a still better inquiry
from that quarter later on. Part of the decline in prices in
May was recovered in June, even though the raw material
remained almost stationary. There was a general loss of
time in the month due to the Whitsuntide holidays, Satur­
day, the 5th, and Monday, the 7th; also to the Jubilee, the
Jubilee day being Tuesday, June 22. Other than that the
mills made better time than in May. Yarns and goods ex­
ported from Great Britain were smaller in June than in any
preceding month of the season, reflecting May business
rather than June business, sufficient time not having elapsed
for any considerable shipments to be made on account of re­
cently booked orders. The exports reached only 90,495,000
lbs., against 108,841,000 lbs. in June, 189». The previous
month’s rate of consumption was maintained. Liverpool—
The market for cotton ruled quiet very nearly all through
the month, and the fluctuations were within narrow limits,
advices from America having but little effect either way.
On June 1 middling uplands ruled at 4%d., rose to 4 o-32d.
on the 9th and dropped to 4 3-32d. on the 12th. The 16th
found the quotations again at 4J^d., and after infrequent
fluctuations of l-32d. up or down during the remaining days
of June the close was at 4 5-32d.
J u l y .—Manchester.—The hopes of an active trade in the
cotton goods market during July, which developments in
the preceding month encouraged, were not fully realized.
A fair aggregate of transactions was recorded, the sales of
some lines being somewhat in excess of production, and the
month closed with a larger volume of orders on hand than
at the end of June.
But manufacturers found it very
difficult to do business on a favorable basis, for although
there was a better demand for many descriptions of goods,
the limits of buyers were such as to leave only an exceed­
ingly narrow margin for profit. Exports o f cotton goods
from Great Britain were below anticipations, reaching 103,518,000 lbs., against 118,409,000 lbs. for the like period of 1898,
the decrease being largely in the shipments to India. The
outward movement to China and South America was also
less than a year ago. The preceding month’s rate of con­
sumption was maintained. Liverpool.—The chief factors in
shaping the course of the market for the raw material were
crop news from the United States and the statistical posi­
tion of the staple. The general tendency of prices was up­
ward, but more favorable crop advices served at times to
check the advance or bring about a temporary decline. At
the same time, and considering the small and rapidly de­
creasing visible supply, the rise in value was decidedly mod­
erate. On July 1 middling upland was quoted at 4 5-32d.,
advanced to 4 7-32d. on the 2d and 4 ^ d . on the 6th. The
following day it receded to 4 7-32d., but on the 14th it moved
up to 4 9-32d., and at this figure the market closed on the
30th, having fluctuated within narrow limits in the interim.
A u g u s t — Manchester —Very little o f a satisfactory charac­
ter is to be recorded of the cotton goods market in August.
Derangement of exchanges with the East, owing to the
declining silver market, brought business with that quarter
almost to a stand-still for the time being, and there was a
noticeable falling off in the demand for home trade. Manu­
facturers opened the month fairly well under contract in
some lines, but additional orders were hard to obtain except
at figures actually showing a loss. In fact contracts for the
East for forward delivery were accepted at quotations which
only a decline in the price of the raw material would save
manufacturers from loss. Some mills were run on short-

UNITED

STATES.

time and a few shut down entirely pending an improvement
in the trade situation. Reports from the Continent gave
evidence of an unsatisfactory outlook, and it was stated
that spinners in Germany and France were endeavoring to
combine to work on short-time. Liverpool. - As during July,
the market for cotton was controlled almost wholly by crop
reports from the United States. Upon the resumption of
business after the holidays middling upland was quoted at
45-16d., or l-32d. higher than at the close of Julv, but fell
back to 4 9-32d. on the 4th. Reports of drought were mainly
instrumental in causing a recovery to 4 5-16d. on the 7th.
The quotation receded to 4 9-32d. again on the 9th and fol­
lowing the receipt of the Bureau report, which was more
favorable than expected, prices eased off and by the 18th
middling upland had fallen to 4 l-16d. Less favorable crop
reports gave an upward turn to values subsequently which
resulted in a net gain o f 3-16d. by the 24th, the ruling
quotation then being 4k,d. From this figure there was a
net decline of %d. during succeeding days o f the month, •
*
the close being at i% d ., or a loss of 5-32d. from the final
July quotation.
We now add our usual tables o f consumption and supply
of cotton. These figures are not the takings of the m ills,
but the actual consumption of the mills, and are in all cases
expressed in bales o f 500 pounds, not JfiO pounds as heretofore.
Europe.
CoTixwmpUon.
Bales 500 lbs.
1868-67 . . . .
1 80 7-68 ........
186 8-09 ........
180 9-70 ........
1 8707 1 ..
18717 2 ..

Aver. 6 years.
18727 3 ...........
1 8737 4 --------18747 5 ............
1 8757 0 ..........
1870-77 ...............
1 877-78..................

Aver. 6 years

Conti­
nent.

Total
Europe.

2.048.000
1.895.000
1.972.000
2.130.000
2.244.000
2.412.000

1.362.000
1.384.000
1.169.000
1.267.000
1.525.000
1.040.000

Aver. 6 years.

Aver. 0 years.
1 89018911892189318941895-

9 1 ...........
9 2 .........
9 3 ..........
9 4 ...........
9 5 . . . .....
9 6 * .........

TotaX
W orld.

Worth.

South.

Total
U. S.

3.410.000
3.219.000
3.141.000
3.397.000
3.769.000
4.058.000

597.000
715.000
772.000
730.000
807.000
888.000

61,000
52.000
70.000
79.000
80.000
100,OoO

058.000 4.063.000
707.000 1.046.000
812.000 3.983.000
809.000 4.208.000
887.000 4.050.000
991.000 5.052.000

2.117.000 1.392.000 3.509.000

751.000

75,000

820,000 4.335.000

1.026.000 4.093.000 928.000
1.051.000 4.153.000 1.039.000
1.792.000 4.262.000
935.000
1.942.000 4.403.000 1.075.000
1.902.000 4,4 4 «,000 1.134.000
2.007.000 4.488.000 1.246.000

122,000
113.000
127.000
127.000
129.000

5.141.000
5.305.000
5.324.000
5.065.000
5.711.000
5.818.000

2.467.000
2.502.000
2.470.000
2.541.000
2.540.000
2.431.000

2.493.000 1.817.000 4.310.000 1.059.000

1878- 7 9 ................ 2.274.000
2,68 ,000
187980 ....................
188081 . 2.858.000
1 8 8 1 -8 2 ............... 2.912.000
1882- 8 3 ................ 2.995.000
1 88384 . 2.933.000

1 884- S5----- . . .
1 88 58 6 .....
1 8868 7 ...
18878 8 .....
18888 9 ...
1 8899 0 .....

United States.

G reat
B ritain .

2.077.000
2 ,2 )0 ,00 0
2.305.000
2.553.000
2.704.000
2.704.000

4.351.000
4.880.000
5.223.000
5.470.000
5.099.000
5.037.000

1.292.000
1.423.000
1.507.000
1.545.000
1.594.000
1.492.000

2.776.000 2.434.000 5.210.000 1.470.000
2.746.000
2.902.000
2.955.000
3.073.000
3.016.000
3.227.000

2.604.000
2.773.000
2.912.000
3.037.000
3.256.000
3.432.000

5.350.000
5.674.000
5.867.000
6.110.000
0,272,000
0,059,000

1.286.000
1.512.000
1.578.000
1.624.000
1.704.000
1.682.000

2.986.000 3.002.000 5.988.000 1.504.000
3.384.000
3.181.000
2.866.000
3.233.000
3.250.000
3.276.000

3.031.000
3.619.000
3.601.000
3.827.000
4.030.000
4.165.000

7.015.000
6.800.000
6.527.000
7.060.000
7.280.000
7.441.000

1.810.000
1.944.000
1,1-72.000
1.593.000
1.940.000
1.711.000

1.048.000
1.152.000
1.082.000
1,202,000
1.203.000
134.000 1.380.000

125.000 1.184.000 5.494.000
135.000
102.000
187.000
213.000
306.000
303.000

1.427.000
1.585.000
1.694.000
1.758.000
1.900.000
1.795.000

5.778.000
6.405.000
0,917,000
7.228.000
7.599.000
7.432.000

218,000 1.694.000 0.904.000
241.000
310.000
361.000
400.000
444.000
503.000

6.877.000
7.496.000
7.806.000
8.134.000
2.148.000 s ,420,000
2.185.000 8.844.000
1.527.000
1.822.000
1.939.000
2.024.000

377.000 1.941.000 7.929.000
557.000
032.000
679.000
671.000
803 000
861.000

2.367.000
2.576.000
2 5 5 1 .0 0 0
2.204.000
2.743.000
2.572.000

9.382.000
9.370.000
9.078.000
9.324.000
10023000
10013000

3,198,000 3.822.000 7,020,000 1,8 1 2,0J0

'7 00,000 2.512.000 9,532,000

3,2*5.000 4.204.000 t .529,000 1.778,000

9 62.000 2.738.000 1^267*00

* Figures of European Consumption for 1895-96 and 1896-97 m ay
be changed slightly by Mr. Ellison when he makes up his Oot. annual.

The foregoing clearly shows the course of the cotton in­
dustry in Europe and the United States. By including India,
the actual world’s consumption would appear as follow s:
World’s
Consumption.

Great Continent
Britain.

United
States.

India.

Total.

1880-81............. 2,858,000 2,365,000 1,694,000
297,000 7,214,000
1881-82............. 2,912,000 2,553,000 1,758,000
312,000 7,540,000
1882- 83....... 2,995,000 2,704,000 1,900,000
358,000 7,957,000
1883- 8 4 ........ 2,933,000 2,70 1,000 1,795,000
416,000 7,848,000
1884- 85........ 2,746,000 2,604,000 1,527,000
467,000 7,344,000
1885- 86....... . 2,902,000 2,772,000 1,822,000
504,000 8,000,000
1886- 87.......
2,955,000 2,912,000 1,939,000
5 6 9 / 00 8,375,000
1887- 88....... . 3,073.000 3,037,000 2,024,000
■617,000 8,751,000
1888- 89........ 3,016,000 3,256,000 2.148,000
697,000 9,117,000
1889- 90.... .
3,227,000 3,432,000 2,185,000
791,000 9,635,000
1890- 9 1 ....... . 3,384,000 3,631,000 2,367,000
924,000 10,306,000
1891- 9 2 ........ 3,181,000 3,619,000 2,576,000
914,000 10,290,000
1892- 9 3 ....... . 2,866,000 3,661,000 2,551,000
918,000 9,996,000
1893- 9 4 ....... . 3,233,000 3,827,000 2,264,000
959,000 10,233,000
1894- 95....... . 3,250,000 4,030,000 2,743,000 1,074,0 >0 11,097,000
1895- 96 ..........................................................
3,276,000 4,165,000 2,572,000 1,105,000 11,118.000
1896- 97 ....... 3,265.000 4,264,0^0 2,733 000 1.020.00 9 U .287.000
Note .—The above does not include American cotton consum ed in
Canada, in M exico, and burnt.

COTTON

CROP

OF

THE

Another general table which we have compiled of late
years is needed in connection with the foregoing to furnish
a comprehensive idea of the extent and the expansion of
this industry. It discloses Europe and America’s cotton
supply and the sources of it. The special points we have
sought to illustrate by the statements are, first, the relative
contribution to the world's raw material by the United
States and by other sources, and, second, to follow its
distribution.
W O R L D ’ S S B F P L T AN D D tS T S IB O T IO S O F COTTON’ .

VvHlM,

Crops.

and
Invisible
Supply
i beyin'ny

[ Of

y e a r ,’

7 o!al Balance o f year's supply.
Actual End, o f T ear.

Supply

United » / Other
States. Onmtr’s]

Total

Con-

C rop.

Bum
<fce.+

Visible, j

175)
42.000
48,000 89.000
3,938,000'1,006,000 808,000 44.000
ts&wse., i.oro.ooo #,054,009 2 , 181.000 4 ,173,0001
1 88 9-70 . i 1 ,210,0 00 :!,8 *1.0 00 2.744.000 4,434,000; 4,206.000j 1,080,0001 300.000 64.000
1870-71, 1,380.000! UBO,000| 1,788,000 5.406.00014.856.000 l,3 57,0001 705.000 68.000
334;
5,052.000 1,428,000 72,000
1871- 7 2 . 2,062,000 2.120,000 2.1593,000 5.022.000

1 8 0 6 -6 7 , L S19.000 1,742.000 1.784,000
1 86 7 -6 6 . 1.29 V 0 00 1.886,000 2.171.000

A v e r ’fc*;

339 0 ,000 ! 4,0 »6,000; 1,024,1)00;

............ L.S7G.OOO 2,544,000

4.404,000}4,335

55.000

3 .1
1878-73.! 1,980,000:3,488,000! 1,607,000} 5,093,00015,141,000! 1,270,000, 5 3
59.000
64.000
18714-74. 1353.000 3,678,000 1,856,000 5.531.000 5,305,000 1,344.050 674.1
1874- 75. 8^18,000 *,373,000 1,847,000 5.220.000 5,324,000 1)291.000 564.000 56.000
5,751,000; 5,665,000 1,385.000 491.000 68.000
1875- 76. 1,858.000 4,137.000 1^14,000
00,000
187677., l,870,000!3,940,000'1 5.401.000 5,711,000 1/»&*.00"-' 515)
1,518.00')
26U
5,918,000' 971,000 201,000 04.000
1877- 78.! 1,5^,000' <,3*0,0001,205,000 5.5 4 5,0 00 1
A verse;

..............3,817*000, 1,818,000

5.435.000 5,491,000;

1,118,000
187S-79. 1.232.000 4.510,000 3
1,515,000,
1879-80.
1.470.000
1880- 8 1 .
2.008.000
1681-82. ; 1,784,000 4 ^ , 0 0 0 5
1.292.000 8,440,000 1,880.000
I
1 888-84.

}l,Oi4T
000;:5^45,00&
!l
|i.mooo;6,6is,oooo

1882-88.

1*998,00015,1
88,000 1X7,000}
1

A rttt’m !

..............

5,623,000* 5,778,000 j 85-4,000, 160,000
89.000;
7.485,000} 0.917,00°j l,537,000l 107.000 J
0 3 6 6 .0 0 0 7 .2 2 8 .0 0 1
1,090.000 202.000
8 3 2 6 .0 0 0 7 .5 9 0 .0 0 0 136 3.0 00 560.000
7.135.00017.432.000 1 3 0 * 3 0 0 346.000

0,700,000:0,405,000!1,199.000!

. . . . . . :5377,00*)! 1,857,0001 ? .0 3 4 .0 0 0 jM 0 4 ,0 0 0

1894-05. 1.550.000 5.186.000 *.604,000

6,742,000' 6,877,000

984.000

1885-86. 1 3 4 S .0 O O ]5 i.9 9 4 3 O o | L .6 8 0 ,0 0 0 7 364.00017,<96,000 068,00*)
1899-97. 1.441.000 5,960,000 1,989,000 7342,0 00 1 73 0 6.0 00 9*9,000
1887-88, 1,473.000;6,400,000 1,680,000 8»OSO,000|8,134,OOO 772.000
1301,000* 4,463.0-«) 138 0.0 00
1889-90.

62,000

Ui9,000i63a0,000 2344300!
,;6»197,000 1313.00*)

IMIlSyOOoj 8,420,000
8 3 8 I3 0 P 8 314399

682,006
8*6.000

STATER.

li

less cotton than last year. Compared with the season of
1894-95, when the crop reached 9,892,766 bales, there is of
conrse a material decline shown by all the routes. In 1898-94
St. Louis handled nearly eight per cent more cotton than in
the current season, notwithstanding the much smaller yield.
W ith regard to the marketing through the Southern outports the changes reflect in part the alteration in yield of
the different sections. In the season just closed almost
every district produced more cotton than a year ago, but
the increase varied with locality. In the Southwest the
gain was greatest, a fact which the receipts at New Orleans
Galveston, etc., fully substantiates. The variations that
have occurred in the last ten years are shown in the subjoined statement:
P er cent o f Orov

4

f

R eceived at—

1

1
r-t

W llm in g t ’ n .& c .
N o r fo lk , A c . . . . ,
C h a rle s to n , A c .
S avannah. A c. •
F lo r id a . . . . . . . . .
M o b i l e .......... .
N ew O r le a n s -..
G a lv e s t o n , A c ..
N .Y ., B o s t ., A c .
T ota l th rou g h
a il p o r t s ........
O v e r la n d n e t ...
S o u th e r n c o n s u m p t io n ...,.

s
8

rri

r*

f

<g
H

§
§

s
r-

£

i
$

iH

03*23 02*78
08*30 06*02
05*47 05*19
11*69 13*56
01*04 00*48
03*35 02*77
34*42 25*27
17*06 15*60
Q8*7d 03*75

02*71
07*79
05*93
11*00
00*32
02*48
28*12
17*54
05*84

03*03
10*20
05*61
14*12
00*50
02*84
25*15
14*19
04*05

03*80
07*39
04*85
13*78
00*47
02*55
23*85
18*43
04*67

02*29
09*54
0 5T 8
13*22
00*30
02*95
27*71
13*27
04*78

02*97 02*38 03*13
11*85 10*42 14*05
05*95 04*50 05*76
15*32 15*24 13*71
00*59 00*52 00*49
03*48 03*37 03*09
24*00 26*99 24*47
12*23 12*03 10*22
04*45 04*95 05*07

03*31
13*91
06*30
13*70
00*49
02*96
25*38
09*83
03*97

78*22

75*32

79*68

79*49

76*29

79*19

80*79

80*35

79*99

79*83

10*02

11*89

11*89

10*90

12*79

13*27

12*21

12*14

12*99

13*88

11*76

12*79

8*63

09*61

10*92

7*54

7*00

7*51

7*02

6*81

T o t . U . 8 , c r o p - 100*00 100*00 100*00 100*00 100*00 100*00 100*00 100*00 100*00 100*00

In the above we have figured only what is called the net.
overland, as the remainder of the groat amount is counted
77.000
at New York, Boston, Philadelphia, etc., or at the S outhern
72.000 ports where it first appears in the receipts.
A t the same
70.000
104.000 time the entire gross overland reaches a market by some all­
128.000 rail route ; hence in measuring the total overland we can do
96.000 so correctly only by using the gross figures. To indicate there'
82.000
fore the progress made since 1877-7*. ™~ i.ir,,. the following
92.000

7 ,9 4 8 3 0 0 7,029,000

;

1 9 9 0 3 1 , 1,077,000; 8.187,000 1300300
1 89 1- 9 3 . 1 ,7 4 23 00 8,640,040 1312 , 000; 10 3 5 2 ,0 00 :0,8 7 6.0 00
1 89 2- 0 3 . 12 ,8 1 8 3 0 0 6 ,4 8 6 3 '0 4,172 000 8,607,000; 9,078,000
1 8 0 3 -0 1. 2 3 5 8 ,0 0 0 :7,184.00 2,196.000 9.832.000 9 . 3 2 4 ) » ;
189 4-96 2,186,000-9,640,m>‘>;1,625,0*Xi 11365,00*) *0088000
1 8 9 & -96 .'3 , 19^ ,000;831 A0O0JL388.0CW' 6,85O,0Ou} 10 0 13000

259.000
473.000
474.000
510)
487)
2 31,0

68,000
71,000
72,000
80,000
96,000
78,000

UNITED

1315.000]
2 3 1 0 .0 0 0
1 3 0 3.0 00
I3 OO3 OO]

427,000 80,000
10 < )
0 ,0 K
508 )
355.000 89.000
826,000 130.000
1018,000 190300
1331.0001 061.000 140.000

Crop o f

Total Yield.

Bales.
1896-07 . . . . 8,714,011
1895-96 . . . . 7,162,473
1894- 05 . . . . 9,892,766
120,000 1893-91 . . . . 7,527,211
A f « r ’« « i ............7j817,00011.979.0QM' 9 ,738,000EflgBMQQ
1992-93 . . . . 6,717,112
9 *6 ,0 ”*0 «85,0<X> 190,000
1 8 9 6 -9 7 .' i ,80 5 .0 0 0:».
1,758.000-10.198.000^ 10937000
1891-92 . . . . 9.038.707
To IMcwtrate $a# p em M tig $take the im l season, 1896-97, and the 1890-91 . . . . 8,655,518
18K9-90 . . . . 7,313,726
yeea.lt*. w ould he m follow ® :
1888-89 . . . . 6,935,082
# u p # ;* ---V is ib le a n d I n v is ib le s t o c k b e g in n in g o f y e a r . . . , , . , . . ...............
1,895,000
1887-88 . . . . 7.017.707
T o t a l c r o p d u r in * y e a r .. ........................................................................ 10,t98.<v>0
1886-87 . . . . 6,513,623
Total attpply—bales o f B Olb«..
O
............. .
Di,088,wu 189586 .6,550,215
...
1881- 85 . . . . 5,669,021
c o n s u m p t i o n ....................................... „ , , « , . , l ( M 9 7 t000
B u r n t, A c ., flu rin g y e a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 9 MJ00--10,457,000
1883-84 . . . . 5,714,052
1882- 83 . . . . 6,992.234
L e a v i n g r i s i b l e # to e lc .............................................
046,000
1881-82 . . . . 5,435,845
h e a r i n g I n v is ib le s t o c k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 633,000
1880-81 . . . . 6,589,329
Total risible and Invisible stocks at end o f year..
1879-80 . . . . 5,757,397
* This column cover® cotton exported to countries not covered by 1878-79 . . . . 5,073,531
IIscare* o f coaaom ptton, and cotton burnt in United States, on sea, and 1877-78 . . . . 4,811,265

n Europe

Orerland and Crop Hovement,.
O v e r la n d .— It is but natural that the volume of cotton
carried overland the past year should show an increase.
With a crop over
million bales greater than in the
preceding season the marketing of a larger aggregate by the
all rail routes was to be anticipated, particularly as the
increased yield occurred in great measure in the sections
which supply the major portion of the overland traffic.
At tb • name time the gain over last year is moderate, hav­
ing been but 91,812 bales, or 8 per cent, whereas the crop
exceeds that of 1895-1W by over 21 per cent. On the other
hand this year s overland falls appreciably below some pre­
vious seasons of very much smaller yield. In explanation of
this seeming inconsistency we can add nothing to our
remarks in the previous year's report that through the open­
ing of new railroads in the South a considerable amount of
cotton which formerly sought a market overland has in late
years found an outlet by rail to the Southern seaboard.
The changes from last year in the manner of marketing
this overland cotton have been quite decided. The routes
via St. Louis have handle 1 barely 2 !{ per cent more than
in 1893-66, but tha movement via Cairo has increased
about 12 per cent, and via Cincinnati the gain has been
almost 25 per cent. Heavier shipments have also occurred
via Parker anti Evan sville, and there has been a moderate ad­
dition to the amount carried by "other routes.” The Louis­
ville roads have in the aggregate carried about one per cent

Increase and Decrease—

Oross
Overland.

O f Crop.

O f Overland.

Bales.
1,282,211
1,190,299
1,867,104
1,253,850
1,290,012
1,800,482
1,666,145
1,429,192
1,460,180
1,411,920
1,292,167
1,200,279
991,960
1,049,070
1,217,215
1,134,788
1,090,067
1,181,147
891,019
693,640

Per Ol.
Increase21-6G
Decr«ase27*60
Increase 31 ’43
Increase 12-06
Decrease 25’68
Increase 4-43
Increase 18’35
Increase 5-46
Decrease 1-18
Increase 1-Id
Decrease 0 ’56
Increase 15-54
Decrease 0-78
Decrease 18*28
Increase 28 ’61
Decrease 17-50
Increase 14-45
Increase 13-48
Increase 5-45
Increase 7-26

P er Ot.
Increase 7-72
Decrease 36 -2 5
Increase 48-64
Decrease 02-84
DecrcaselB-32
Increase 8 06
Increase 16-58
Decrease 2-12
Increase 1-27
Increase 11*69
Increase 2-53
Increase 27-05
Decrease 5-44
Decrease 13 07
Increase 7-26
Increase 4-10
Decrease 7-71
Increase 32-47
Increase 28-54
Increase 8-91

Iner’se

Tnm’ftr,

Change from season of ’77-78 to '96-97

81-12

84*85

In determining tnis year the portion of tha crop forwarded
by each of the different overland routes, we have followed
our usual met hods;
F irst—Of counting each bale of ootton at the Southern
outport where it first appears,
S ta n d —
Of deducting from gross overland all cotton
shipped by rail from Southern outports to the North.
Third—Of deducting also from overland any amounts
taken from Southern outports for Southern consumption.
F ou rth —Of deducting likewise arrivals by railroads at New
York, Boston, Baltimore and Philadelphia, all of which have
been counted in the receipts from week to week during the
year.
With these explanations nothing further is needed to
make plain the following statement of the movement overland for the year ending September 1, 1896 :
1896*97.
i m ount shipped—
Via St. Louis..............................................
Via Cairo . . . ................ ................. ..........
VlaParfceT ................... ..................... . . . .
Via E vansville......................... ...............
Via Louisville ..........................................
Via Cincinnati........................ .................
Via o tte r routes.......................................
Shipped to mills, not Included a b o v e ...

574,055
274,165
24,056
2,653
137,107
151,489
105.938
12,798

1895-96.

1894-95.

560,880
245,616
19,955
1,681
138,302
123,668
88,644
11,553

948,804
35,414
3,784
189,758
178,020
169,590
14,511

Total 2rowi overland ......................... 1,282.211 1,190,209 1,867,104

COTTON

12

1896-97.

Deduct shipments—
Overland to New Y ork, Boston, &o___
Between Interior t o w n s --------- -------Galveston, Inland and local m ills.........
New Orleans,Inland and looal m ills...
Mobile, Inland and looal m ills............ .
Savannah, Inland and looal mills..........
Charleston, Inland and looal m ills____
N. Carol’s ports, inland and looal mills.
V lrgt la ports, Inland and looal mills..

CROP

OF

THE

1894 95.

1895-96.

327,815
5,231
6,525
22,906
7,049
5,146
11,862
3.802
18,841

578,025
33,520
5,366
33,613
18,284
3,506
14,131
8,351
15,057

409,207

Total to he deducted..

268,839
5,029
7,165
19,340
7,892
1,946
8,598
4,518
15,184
338,511

709,853

851,788 1,157,251

Leaving total net overland*........... . 873,004
* This total Inolnrtes shipments to Canada, &o., bv rail, which during
1896 97 am ounted to 76,848 bales, and are deducted In the statement
o f consum ption.
C r o p D e t a il s .— W e n ow proceed to give the details of the
entire crop for tw o years.
L o u is ia n a .
-1 895-96.E xported from N. Orleans
-1 896-97.1,619,068
To foreign p o r t s ..............1 ,9 8 4 ,1 6 9
301,544
To coastwise ports............ 272,191
To Northern ports, <fee.
7,085
8,018
by river and rail*...........
14,888
Manufactured*......................
12,255
.4,888
Burnt.......................................
8 ;i4 1 —2,287,407
39,184—1,979,136
Stock at close o f year.........
Deduct :
98,962
R eceived from M ob'le___ 118,889
Received from Galveston
1,019
2,455
and other Texas p o r t s .
Stock beginning o f y e a r ..
39,184— 159,092
67,855— 169,272
Total product o f y e a r .........

2,128,315

1,809,864

* In overland w'e have deducted these tw o items.

Total product o f y e a r .........

180,532
126,172
1,482— 308,186
11,860
4,578—

16,438

102,007
109,701
1,500
4,578— 217,786
2,503
10,157
5,407—

291,748

18,067
199,719

* Cnder the head o f coastwise shipments from Mobile are included
7,049 bales shipped inland by rail north and for Southern consum p­
tion, which w ill be found deducted in the overland movement.
T exas.
E xp'ted from Galveston,<fcc,:
To foreign ports (except
M e x ic o )...........................1,229,981
To M exico, from Galves­
ton, Corpus Christi, &e.
22,801
To coastwise ports*.......... 272,739
B u r n t.....................................
3,568
Stock at close o f year.........
15,242—1,544,331
Deduct:
R eceived at Galveston
from New Orleans, A c ..
180
R eceived at El Paso, &c.
from Galveston, &o___
Stock beginning o f y e a r..
57,043—
57,223
Total product o f y e a r .
________

755,999
36,900
279,675
57 ,043 -1,1 29,6 17
1,520

1,116,946

* Coastwise exports include 6,525 bales shipped inland and taken fo r
consumption, which are deduoted in overland statement.

Total product o f y e a r .........

17,603
16,291
.—

90,383

33,894

33,894

* These figures represent this year, as heretofore, only the shipments
from the Florida outports. Florida cotton has also gone inland to
Savannah, &c., but we have followed our usual custom o f counting that
eotton at the outports where it first appears.
G e o r g ia .
E xported from Savannah:
T o foreign ports—Upland 417,936
To foreign ports—S eals’d
1 8 ,2 0 4
To coastwise ports—
Upland*
..................... 363,166
Sea Island........................
61,735
E xp'd frm n Brunswick,&o.:
To foreign p orts— ......... 125,136
To coastwise p orts............
52,191
B urnt........ ................................................
M anufactured*................. .
1,088
Stock at close o f year—
Upland......... ......................
1,628
Sea I s la n d .........................
6,417—1,047,501
D edu ct:
R ec’ v'd from Ch’ ston, &c.
4,974
R eceived from Florida—
U p la n d t.......... ......... .
....
Stock beginning o f year—
Upland ...........................
21,352
Sea Island......................
2 ,2 3 1____________
28,557
Total product o f y e a r .........

1,018,944

S o u th C a r o lin a .
Exported from Charleston: /■
----------1896 -97_____ _ ,--------1895*
To foreign ports—Upland 267, *95
197,752
To foreign ports—Sea Is’d
2,933
2,965
To coastwise ports—
79,836
U pland*........................... 143,857
7,700
Sea Island.......................
7,044
Exported from P ort R oyal
and Beaufort:
To foreign ports—Upl’ nd
71,425
77,912
. To foreign ports—Sea Ia’ d
176
60
E xported coastwise
from Georgetown, & c___
2,073
1,644
8
8tock at close o f year—
569
Upland................................
18,531
Sea Island...........................
927— 496,955
57 2Deduct:
R ec’d from Savannah—
1,442
Upland.............................
48
125
Stock beginning o f year—
18,531
Upland.............................
14,370
572—
Sea Island........................
20,670
2Total product o f year .

386,324

14,420

476,285

371,904

* Included in this item are 11,862 bales, the amounts taken b y loca
mills and shipped to interior, all o f w hich is deducted in overland.
N o r th C a r o lin a .
E xported from Wilmington:
To foreign p o r t s ................ 206,794
T ccoastw iseports*...........
31,065
B u rn t...........' ....................
200
46,517
Coast’e f ’m W ashington, &c.
M anufactured.......................
1,674
Stock at close o f y e a r .........
222— 286 ,4 7 2
Deduct :
Stock beginning o f y ea r..
5,291—
5,291

132,531
37,4 9 6
' 2 2 ,51 i
1,478
5 ,2 9 1 -

1 9 9 ,3 0 7

349—

349

281,181

1 9 8 ,9 5 8

* Of these shipments 2,128 bales went inland by rail from W ilm ington
and with local consumption are deduoted in overland.
Virginia.

Exported from N o rfo lk :
To foreign p o rts ................ 200,275
To coastwise ports*.......... 539,711
Exported from West P o in t :
To foreign p o r t s ..................................
To coastwise ports............
140
Exp’ d fm Newp’ t News, &c.
To foreign p orts................
10,896
To coastwise ports............
712
Taken for m an u factu re___
13,908
Burnt......................................
538
Stock end of year, Norfolk,
WestPoint,New.News.&c.
36— 766,216
Deduct •
R eceived from N.Y'ork.&c
2,401
Received from W ilmingt’n
1,250
R eceived
from
other
North Carolina p o r t s ...
43,754
R eceived at Norfolk, &c.,
from West Point, &0___
1,189
Stock beginning of y e a r ..
2,906—
51,500
Total product of year .

i2 ,6 7 i

1,487,108

F lo r id a .
Exported from Pensacola, &e.*
To foreign p o r t s ................
72,320
18,063
To coastwise ports............
Stock at close o f y e a r...........................—
90,383
Deduct :
Received from M obile.......................
Stock beginning o f y e a r.................... —

STATER.

Total product o f year .

A la b a m a .
E xported from Mobile :*
To foreign ports................
To ooastwise ports............
Burnt.......................................
Stock at close o f y e a r .........
D educt:
Receipts from N. Orleans.
Receipts from Pensacola.
Stock beginning o f y e a r..

UNITED

53,822
289,091
9,930
134,018
14,629
2,254
13,885
565
2,906— 521,100
55
502
19,626
5 ,5 5 3 -

714,716

25,736
495,364

* Includes 4,933 bales shipped to the interior, which, w ith 13,908
bales taken fo r manufacture, are deducted in overland.
T e n n e sse e . Arc.
Shipments—
577,429
From M em phis.............
From Nashville.................
30,402
—From other plaees in Ten­
nessee. Miss., T ex., & c .. 7 8 9 ,9 4 8
Stock in Memphis and Nash­
ville at end o f y ea r..........
2 ,571— 1,4 0 0 ,3 5 0
Deduct:
Shipped from Memphis,
Nashville, &o.. direct to
Southern outports......... 181 ,1 0 2
Shipped direct to manu­
fa c tu r e r s ........................ 873,004
Stock at Memphis and
Nashville at beginning
o f year............................
18,399—1,072,505
Total shipm’ ts toN . Y „ &o.
Add shipments to manufac­
turers d irect......................

4 1 3 ,6 4 4
21,8 9 5
845 ,9 2 4
1 8 ,3 9 9 —1 ,2 9 9 ,8 6

177,121
851,788
2 ,114—1,0 3 1 ,0 2 3

327,845

268,839

873,004

851,788

353,267
12,849

Total marketed bv rail from
Tennessee, A c .* ................

336,653
62,742

* E xcept 37,834 bales deduoted in overland, previously oounted.
Total product detailed in the foreg oin g by States fo r the year
ending September 1 ,1 8 9 7 ................................................. bales.7,689,529
Consumed in the South, not in c lu d e d .............................................1,024,482

74,350
42,182
59
1,733
21,352
2,231— 907,418
2,182

5,446
403-

8,031
899,337

* Tiie amounts shipped inland and taken for consumption are deduoted
in overland.
t These are only the receipts at Savannah by water from the Florida
outports. and, being counted in the Florida receipts, are deducted here
Besides these amounts there have also been 15,056 bales Upland
nd 2 1 ,0 2 3 bales Sea Island, from the Interior o f Florida, received ai
savannah during the year by r a il

1,200,849

Total orop in the U. S. for year ending Sept. 1 , 1 8 9 7 .-bales
D elow w e give the total crop each year since 1869:
Years.
Bales.
Years.
Bales.
Years.
1 8 9 8 -9 7 .... 8 ,714,011 1886-87 .. . 6,513,623 1 8 7 7 -7 8 ....
1 8 9 5 -9 6 .... 7 ,162,473 1 8 8 5 -8 6 .... 6,550,215 1 8 7 6 -7 7 ....
1894 9 5 .... 9 ,892,766 1 8 8 4 -8 5 ... 5,669,021 1 8 7 5 -7 6 ....
1893-94 ..
,527.211 1 8 8 3 -8 4 .... 5,714,052 1 8 7 4 -7 5 ....
1 8 9 2 -9 3 .... ,717,142 1 8 8 2 -8 3 .... 6,992,234 1 8 7 3 -7 4 ....
1 8 9 1 -9 2 .... ,038,707 1 8 8 1 -8 2 .... 5,435,845 1 8 7 2 -7 3 ....
1 8 9 0 -9 1 ...
,655,518 1 8 8 0 -8 1 .... 6,589,329 1 8 7 1 -7 2 ....
1 8 8 9 -9 0 .... ,313,726 1 8 7 9 -8 0 .... 5,757,397 1 8 7 0 -7 1 ....
1 8 8 8 -8 9 .... ,935,082 1 8 7 8 -7 9 .... 5,073,531 1 8 6 9 -7 0 ....
1 8 8 7 -8 8 .... ,017,707

1,120,627

8 ,7 1 4 ,0 1 1

Bales.
4,811,265
4,485.423
4,669,288
3,832,991
4,170,388
3,930,508
2,974,351
4,352,317
3,154,946

Weight of Bales.
The average w eight o f bales and the gross w eigh t o f the
crop w e have m ade up as follow s for this year, and give last
year for com parison:

COTTON

■Louisiana....
Alabama......
Georgia*.. ..
So. Carolina.
Virginia......
No. Carolina,
Tenn’ssee.Ac

I

T & x& s... . . . .

1

Crop o f -

OF

, 1897.

N um ber
o f bales.

W eight in
pounds.

1,487,108
2,128,SIS
291,748
1,109,327
479,285
714,716
281081
2.225,331

785,758.125
1,079,480,085
148,018,858
540,963,311
231,183,978
345,958,280
137,542,498
1,114,935,338

Total crop 8,714,011
' Including Florida.

CROP

Year ending September 1 ,1 8 9 6 .

Average
weight.

N um ber
o f bales.

THE

Weight in
pounds.

Av’age
weight.

| 528*38 1,116,948
» 507*18 1,809,864
507*35
199,719
487*65
933,281
I 485*39
871,904
495,364
j 484*05
4 S »ia
198,058
501*02 2,038,437

588,664,717
920,171,055
99.783,807
451,624,009
179,477,150
238,810,938
97,228.785
1,022,006,273

525*24
508*42
499*82
483*91
482*59
482*11
488*69
501*86

7,102.473

S .595,775,584

502*03

4,3^3,819,971 i

50308

According to the foregoing, the average gross weight per
bale this season was 503 08 lbs., against 502'03 lbs. in 1895-06,
orX’05 lbs. more than last year. Had, therefore, only asmany
pounds been put into each bale as during the previous sea
son, the crop would have aggregated only 8,732,187 bales.
The relation of the gross weights this year to previous years
may be seen from the following comparison :
Number o f Bales.

Weight, Pounds

Average
Weight
p er Male.

8 -1 4 ,0 1 1
7,182,473
9,892,766
7,527,211
6,717,1*3
9,038,707
8,855.5 IS
7,313,728
6,935,082
7,017,707
8,513.823
8,550,2X5
5,669,021
5,714,052
6,992,234
5,435.845
0.589,329
5,757,307
5,073,531
4,811.265
4,485,423

4,383.819,971
3,595,775,534
5,019,439,687
3,748,422.352
3,357.588,631
4,508,324,405
4,326,400,045
3,628,520,834
3,437,408,499
3,406.068,167
3,165,745.081
3,179,456,091
2,727,907,317
2,759,0*7,941
3,430,546,794
2,585,686,378
3,201,546.730
2,772,448.480
2,400,205,5 25
2,30o.90S,1107
2,100,465,086

5 0 308
502*03
507-38
497-98
499*85
498*78
499*84
4 9 613
495-66
485-35
4S6-02
485-40
481482490*60
475-62
485-88
481-55
473-OS
480 15
468-28

Crop.
Season o f—
1 8 9 6 -9 7 ............ .
1895-96 ......................
1894*95............ .
1893-94 . . . . . . . . . ___ _
1 8 9 2 -9 3 ..............
1891-92 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1890-91
1 8 8 9 -9 0 ......................
1888-39 ....................
1 8 8 7 -8 8 ......... . . . . . . .
1886-87 ......................
1 8 8 5 -8 6 ..............
1 8 8 4 - 8 5 .... ........ ...
1 8 8 3 -8 4 ..............
1882-83..............
1881-82 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 8 8 0 -8 1 ..............
1879-80 .
1 8 7 8 -7 9 ..............
1877-78 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18 76-7 7......................

New Crop and Its Marketing.
W e cannot speak as positively of the situation at this
point in the season as we are sometimes able to do. The
chief reason for lack of facts on which to base a judgment
is the backwardness of the plant. Compared with 1896 the
growing crop is a late one, and consequently more depend­
ent upon future developments and conditions than an early
crop. Then again, our acreage report showed that the
start in the spring as a rule was backward and other­
wise not favorable,
though Texas was an excep­
tion. Hitherto these early defects have not disclosed weak­
nesses, the conditions of growth in June, July and over a
large section in August having been less trying than usual,
so that the plant has no where met with any real disaster.
A t the same time the late feature is just as it was in the
spring, having in no degree been made good. In Texas the
dry weather which prevailed over a large part of the State
from early in July until after the middle of August caused
apprehensions of serious injury, but since rains have fallen
the outlook is improved.
W e hardly need to say that with these drawbacks it would
be very venturesome to give any forecast of the yield. No
crop ever depended to a larger extent than this upon future
developments and weather conditions. The general back­
wardness of the plant is clearly indicated both by the date
of the receipt of the first bale in the various sections and in
the total receipts up to Sept. 1. In Texas, to be sure, the first
bale was reported at Houston on June 30, the earliest date,
with one exception, in our record ; elsewhere first arrivals
have been from a few days to nearly a month later than
n 1896. The aggregate receipts of new cotton to Sept. 1st
have also been much below 1896, but that year they were
phenomenally large. Compared with other years the total
in 1896-97 is a full one; a fact due to the drought in Texas.
The movement in most of the States is very backward. By
reference to the table below It will be noticed that at all
points, except at Galveston and New Orleans, the arrivals of
new cotton have been small. An incentive to the forward­
ing of cotton this year is to be found in the fact
that at many mills in the South the stock of raw
material was practically exhausted before the close of July.
We bring forward our usual data bearing upon the matur­
ity of the plant, giving first the date of receipt of first bale.
This year the earliest arrival was at Houston from Texas on
June 80. Last year the first bale also came from Texas,
being received at New Orleans on July 10, and in 1895 the
same State furnished the initial bale, on July 11. There is,

UNITED

STATES.

13

however, little to be learned from a first arrival, but the
average of all the first arrivals is a better guide.
Date o f Receipt o f First Bale.
1891. | 1892.

1893. i 1894.

1893.

1897.

1896.

Virginia—
Sept. 7 Aug. 8
N o r fo lk .......... A u g.2 5A ag.31
j
No. Carolina—
C harlotte....... Aug.24 Sep. 1 Aug.24, Aug.29
Aug.13
Aug. 7 Aug.13
W ilm ington... A u g .lo:A u g 20 A ug.3t Aug.22
So. Carolina—
Charleston . . . Aug. 8 Aug.13 Aug. 7 Aug.15 Aug. 21 July 29 Aug. 3
G reenw ood....
Aug.31 Aug. 8 Aug.26
Georgia—
A u gu sta......... Aug.lO Aug. 11 Aug. 7 Aug.15 Aug.13 July 29
Aug.16 Aug.26 Aug.28 Aug.20
A tla n ta ..........
8avaimali—
From Ga___ Aug. 6 Aug. 1 July 29 A u g .ll Aug.12 Ju ly 28 Aug. 2
From F l a . Aug.12 Augr/26 Aug.12 Aug.15 Aug. 2“ Aug. 4 Aug. 6
July 29
Aug. 6 A u g .ll
A lbany............ July 24
Aug.lO
C olum bus.......
Florida—
Tallahassee.. . Aug. 7 Aug.31 Aug. 4 Aug,16 Aug.17 Aug. 5 Aug. 4
Alabama—
M ontgom ery.. Aug. 6 Aug. 8 Aug. 2 Aug.14 Aug.17 July 30 Aug. 4
Aug. 8 Aug. 7 Aug. 4 A u g .ll Aug.14 July 28 J iy 31
Mobile . . . .
Aug. 6 Aug.1‘2 A u g .ll Aug. 9
July 28
S elm a.......
Aug. 6 Aug.12 July 29 A u g .ll Aug.13 July 28 Aug. 4
E ufaula. . .
Louisiana—
New Orleans—
From Texas July 9 July 12 July 13 July 7 July 25 July 10 J u ly l2
Miss. Val, Aug.12 Aug.24 Aug. 3 Aug.14 Aug.12 July 23 July 31
Shreveport— Aug.14 Aug.24 A u g .ll Aug,16 Aug.14 July 28 Aug. 2
Mississippi—
V icksburg___
Sept. 3 Aug.26 Aug.18 Aug.30 July 22 Aug.14
Colum bus....... A ug.18A ug.27 Aug. 19 Aug.17 Aug.27 July 31 Aug.18
G reenville___ Aug. 18 Aug.23 Aug.23 Aug,30 Aug.28 July 23 Aug.13
Arkansas—
Little Rook___ A ug.l9;A ug,19 A ag.24 Aug.22 Aug. 30 July 25 Aug. 25
H elen a........... Aug.26 [Sept. 8 Sept. 5
Aug. 30 Aug. 5 Aug.26
21
Tennessee—
86
Memphis....... . Aug.22 Sept. 1 Aug.22 Aug.17 Aug.20 July 27 Aug.22
Texas—
G alveston..
July 23 July 13 J u ly2 4 July 13 July 11 Juiy23
Where from i
Bee jSanPat DeWitt D ew itt DeWitt
Where from | County! Bee Co. County County County
H ouston......... July 6,July 11 JuueSO June26 July 24 July 13 June30
SnD’ go
Wham frnm S DUVal Duval Duval Uvalde V’toria
Where from j iCountyCountyC<m nty County County
County

As an indication of maturity the arrivals of new crop
cotton to the 1st of September usually furnish a much better
test. But this is not so in the present season, when, as stated
above, there have been circumstances tending to hasten the
early movement. It will be observed that New Orleans has
received 50,653 bales, or 10 per cent more than last year,
and that at Galveston the arrivals have reached 39,122 bales,
against 71,786 bales in 1896.
A R R IV A L S O F N E W COTTON TO SE P T E M B E R 1 .

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

350
Charlotte, N. C .........
1
1
2
1
Raleigh, N. C ., . . . .
100
908
Charleston, 8. r ....... i , i ’o 5
674
197
148
38 9,623
Columbia, 8.
...... 1,000
*250
Augusta. G a..............
301
367
55 10,131
*300
285 27,342
Savannah, G a........... 8,168 2,003 7,275 3,005
Columbus, G a............
700
136
*500
335 15,004
843
878
759
592 6,200
Montgomery, A la___ 2,739
89
Mobile, A la ............... 1.28*
62
264
354
77 2,887
413
Selma, Ala................. 3,750
269
*100 *1,500
io o
Enfaula, A la___. . . .
040
82
241
275
225 1,426
New Orleans, L a___ 14,685 4,060 5,429 15,233 4,379 46,051
2
Shreveport, L a ..... .
225
56
9
7 1,855
4
Vicksburg, Miss.......
....
1
1 1,076
1
32
6
603
Columbus, Mies.........
17
8
212
Little R ock, A r k ___
tr T
rT-r
1
Memphis, Tunn.........
13
4
7
3 6,873
Galveston, T exas___ 27,404 12,181 7,708 17,550 2,877 71,730

*

20
822
1
15
*1,000
3,097
t 780
894
237
* 100
160
50,658
816
32
31
21
21
29,122

Total all ports to
September 1 ... 61.172 19,820 23,299 39,181 9,084 194,777 87,832
Estim ated; no return# received, t M acon, Ga.

Sea Island Crop and Consumption.
W e have continued throughout the season of 1896-97 the
compilation of a weekly record of the Sea Island cron, and
no effort has been spared to keep our readers well informed
as to the movement of this variety of cotton. As in former
years the correctness of our methods in compiling the totals
from week to week is pretty well established by the results
given below (which agree closely with the figures pub­
lished in the Chronicle of August 28), It will be noticed
that the crop shows a decided increase over 189/5-96, and is
therefore the heaviest yield on record.
F lo r id a .

----------1896-97________ ;----------1895-98.--------- .
Reo’ts at8avan'h,& c.bale821,023
18,048
Receipts at Charleston...................
10
Receipts at New Turk, Ac. 4,904
3,808
Shipments to Liverpool
direct from Floi-ida......................
.............
Tot.Sea Island crop of Fla.

25,927
G e o r g ia .
Receipts at Savannah....... 84,125
Beoehits at Bruo8WioR,&o. 1,8 73—85,998
Deduct—
Receipts from Florida....... 21,023
Reo’pts from Oharles’ n, &e
89—21,092

Tot, Sea W an d crop o f Ga.

84.908

21,064
77,419
1 ,2 8 8 -7 8 ,7 0 7
18,048
1 3 9 -1 8 ,1 8 5
60,522

1
+

COTTON

CROP

OF

THE

UNITED

STATES.
■y

Movement of Cotton at Interior Forts.

S o u th C a r o lin a .
,--------- 1896-97.--------- > ,---------1895-96.------10,579
Receipts at Charleston___10,988
199—10,778
Receipts at Beaufort, <&e..
176 — 1,1,164
Deduct—
768— 768
Receipts from Florida, &o. 125—
125

10,010

Tot. Sea Island crop o f S. C.

11,039
M is s is s ip p i.
R eceipts at N ew O rleans.............
Total Sea I. cro p o f Miss..

Below we give the total receipts and shipments of cotton
at the interior ports and the stock on the first of September
of each year.
T ow ns .

.......

L o u isia n a .
R eceipts at New O rleans.. -.........
Total Sea Isl. crop o f L a .

.........

T exas.
R eceipts at G alveston....... 1,614
R eceipts at Charleston.................—

346—
649
1,644

991

103,516

93,187

T otal Sea Is. c rop o f T ex.
Total Sea Island crop of
the United States............

The distribution of the crop has been as follows:
How
Distributed.

Supply year ending
Sept. 1, 1897.
Ports of—

Stock
Sept.l.
1896.

O f which
Exported to—

Total
For’art
Stock, Leav'g
Ex­
Net
Total Sept. 1, forDis Great Havre ports.
d :C .
Crop. Supply 1897. trib’t’n. BriVn

572 11.039 11,611
8. Carolina.
Georgia___ 2,231 64,906 67,137
25,927 25,927
F lorid a ___
1,644 1,644
T exas........
.........
.........
...
Mississippi
Louisiana .
New York . *196
196
Boston .. ..
Baltimore .
Pliilatlelp’a
....
.........

3.109
927 10,684 3,109
6,417 60,720 15,028 3,176 18,204
____
25,927
___
18 1,626
........
___ .........

2,999 103516 106515

7,414 99,101 47,758 10673 58,131

T o ta l...

t52
.........

* 120 G eorgia and 76 South Carolina,

144 i 1,883 7,395 19.278
13,911
13,911
10*2 3,354
3,252
575
575
....
.........

t 52 South Carolina.

From the foregoing we see that the total growth of Sea
Island this year is 103,516 bales; and with the stock at the
eginning of the year (2,999 bales) we have the following as
h total supply and distribution:
This year’s crop .......................................................................... bales. 103,516
Stock September 1, 1896.....................................................................
2,999
Total year’s supply ................................................ .......... bales. 106,515
Distributed as fo llo w s :
E xported to foreign ports......................................... bales. 58,431
S to c k e n d o f y e a r......................................... .....................
7,414—65,845
Leaving for consum ption in United States...................bales. 40.670

W e thus reach the conclusion that our spinners have taken
o f Sea Island cotton this year 40,670 bales, or 140 bales more
than in the previous year.
The following useful table shows the crops and movement
of Sea Island since the war, the figures for the seasons
1890-91 to 1896-97 being given in detail.
Crop.

Foreign E xp orts.

Season.
Flori­
da.

Geor­
gia.

South
Caro­
lina.

e o

83

v
>
©a

j !
Total.

51

1896-97. 25,927 64,906 11,039 1.644
1895-96. 21,664 60.522 l o . o i o
991
1894-95. 15.176 53,716
34
5,913
1893-94. 19,107 39,367
2.578
9,6*6 28,324
1892-93.
7,413
1891-92. 20,628 27,100 11,443
1890-91. 25.320 26,531 16,267
1865-90. 374,371 122.417 217,272 4,<2*1

*

Great Conti­ Total
BriVn. nent. exports

103,616 47,758 10,073 58,431 40,070
93,187 42,391 7,072 60,063 40.531
74,839 35,091 5,650 40,741 34.981
61,052 32,647 4,686 37.333 24,345
45,422 2<i,647 1,901 22,548 22.911
59,171 24,915 2,653 27,568 32.093
68,113 34,293 4,823 39,116 26.051
718,111 454,886 43,662 498,548 220,274

3
7,414
2,999
405
1,238
1,914
1,951
2,4<i 1
90

■ T o t a l . 511,878 422.913 281.935 6.690 1.223.416 092.628 51.720 774,348 4 i 2.4 55

* The column o f “ Amerioan Consumption” in this table tnoludes burnt
in the United States.

Exports.
In the first table given in this report w ill be found the
foreign exports the past year from each port to Great Brit ain, France and other ports, stated separately, as well as the
totals to all the ports. In the following we give the total
foreign exports for six years for comparison.
T O T A L E X P O R T S O P COTTON TO F O R E IG N P O R TS F O R S IX T E A R S .

Year ending Sept. 1 1897.
Receipts. Shipm’ts.

Eufaula, A la ..
16,018
16,348
M 'tgomery.Ala 129,784 134,389
Selma, A la.......
73,587
74,9 <7
51,128
Helena, A rk...
50.673
88,979
Little R ’ck.Arli
90,860
34,404
33,900
Albany, Ga___
56,900
57,750
Athens, Ga___
141,822 144,275
Atlanta,Ga___
Augusta, G a... 288,667 294,389
48,334
46,117
Columbus, Ga..
65,047
61,775
Macon, G a.___
63,232
63,342
Rome, Ga........
7,941
7,991
L’ville,Ky..A'et
Shreveport,La, 104,437 106,113
35,529
34,866
Columbus, Miss
57,800
59,170
Gr’ nville, Miss.
43,575
Meridian, Miss.
41,750
65^120
Natchez, Miss .
63(863
81,>-32
80,809
Vioksb’rg, Miss
67,154
65,688
Y azoo C., Miss.
St. Louis, Mo.. 563,404 574,055
23,544
23,544
Charlotte, N. C.
27,736
27,276
Raleigh, N. C.
311,256
Cincinnati, O.. 310 189
40,400
•40,400
Coluini'ia, S. C.
19,600
19,600
Greeuw’d. S. C.
Memphis, Tenn 561,747 577,429
30,402
30,256
Nashv., T enn..
70,851
68,251
Brenham, Tex.
53,351
53,651
Dallas, Texas..
Houston, Tex.. 1,415,738! 1,427,271

1892.
1893.
1894.
1895.
1896.
1897.
N. Orl’ns. 2,162,85'* 1,338,600 1,636,811 2,«'53,831 1,619,068 1,984,169
M obile...
37,866
36,486
34,66" 122,995 102,007 ISO,532
So. C a r... 350,212 217.550 404,453 499,142 27 8.689 341,829
G eorgia.. 610,839 446,473 587,632 649,021 440,466 561,276
T exas—
848,936 813,321 811,368 1,407,331 792,899 1,252,782
7,610
500
300
17,603
72,32u
No. Cari. 118,573 131,995 167,404 202,270 132,531 206,794
V irgin a.. 334,958 210,320 318,184 328,845
78,381 211,171
New York 802,014 723,044 792,135 803,47t
712,101 678,875
B oston ... 288,857 233,313 230,844 287,466 277,664 233,238
P liila d el.
22,192
20,791
33,981
67,352
9,471
13,100
Baltim’re 287,472 222,855 206,297 277,306 148,441 172,544
P ’tlnd.Me
4,095
3,108
Ban Fran.
“ ‘ *532
“ 7,225
16,283
36,763
56,684
Tot. from
U .States. 5,864,921 4,402,890 5.231.494 6,719,713 4,646,084 5,968,422

61
536
650
269
20
600
50
47
1,334
283
208
90
822
38
56
75
1,791
2,610
5 30
7,677
25
2,989
2,491
80
3,400
200
18.144

17,827
123.822
38,915
50,867
101,^4 0
33,990
5 1 ,I h7
92,032
184,915
49,989
* 1,090
52,088
6,384
84,215
28,729
41,700
33,391
50,222
66,887
54,219
571,564'
21,196
22,1741
226,436
35,600
17,076
429,712

Shipm’ts. Stocta
17,880
119,666
37,199
50,17H
100,882
33,457
50,314
89,796
181,785
48,847
57,643
51,911
6,583
83.195
28,053
40,274
31,980
47,560
63,308
52,283
560,880
21.196
22,734

228,162

35,600
17,076
413,644
21,895
22,1 1 2
64,445
68,581
4 4 ,145’ 43,661
1,160,793 1.,133,819

391
5,141
2,000
724
1,901
1,104
900
2.500
7,056
2.500
3,480200
502,498
701
1,426
1,900
3,04 a
3,633
1,996
18,328
485
4,056
18,173
226

6,000

50029,677

T otal,31 towns 4,622,364 4,697,882 45,076 3,843,798 3,755,904 120.594
Receipts and shipm ents are net figures in b oth years.

Shipments in this statement include amounts taken from
interior towns for home consumption and amounts burnt.
In the following we present a statement o f the year’s
exports from each port, showing the direction which these
shipments have taken. Similar statements have been given
in all previous reviews, and a comparison as to the extent
of the total movement to each port can be made with back
years. Contrasting the current returns w ith those for last
season, we find that there has been an increase in the
exports to almost all ports .
T o-

X
+
Galves­ Savan­ Char­ W m g N ew
leston.
nah.
ton.
Orleans. ton.

L iv e r p o o l
G u ll...........
M a- c h ’ te r
L o n d o n ...
L e it h ..........
B e l f a s t . -.
N e w c a s tle
G la strow ...
D u b lin .
G r i m s b y ..
M a r s e ille s
B r e m e n .. .
H a m bu rg .
W a r b u r g ..

2J(
815,301 205,517
67,022 y ?,29 9

§

N or­
folk.

N ew
York.

I
I

Other
P orts.

Total.

716.565 000,118 144,858 144,746
4,775
1,755
6,757
67,34* 81,155
5,194

8,690
5,4 *1
401,695 201(5 9 i

R o t ’rd am .
A n t w e r p ..

1,886
27,959

1,100
9.250
4,415

C o p e n h ’n .
C h r is tia n a
G e fl e ..........
u o t t e n b ’g
R e v a l.........

10,489

5,975

N a r v a .—
T em ando.
A l o s t a ......
L is b o n ___
O p orto—
B a r c e lo n a
M a la g a —
C o r u n n a ..
S a n ta n d er
F e r r o l........
G e n o a ........
L egh orn .
N a p le s . . .
T rie s te —
D o m .C a .a
M e x ic o ....
W . I n d ie s
C e n t. A m .
S o. A m e r .
J a p a n ........
C h in a .........

7,86 i
5,59o

7*8*6
2,753
300
100

650
420
79,202
3,<00
900
451
200
152,497

95,431 156,013 223,804 511,641 2683,771
63,78*
3,750
74.000
19,735 14,139 194.329
400 17,767
3,982
22,149
800
9,794
10,594
2,300
31,082
449
449
820
205
1,025
3,090
5.481
15,33*4
8,801 072,298
30,777
5,200*
450
650
208,584 134,884 108,088 25,053 8 i,8 1 0 99,350 1182,287
19,699
9.430 175,37811,089 30,239
1,900
1,835
3,735
1,100
2,206
9,907
7,535
28,584
60"
909 82,940
3,755
70,558
4,803
2.075
22,404
750
1,176
*420
1,000
iVeoo
4,165
4,105
29,278
100
37,178
11,125
3,700
25,439
5,595
300
IOO
4,305
4,955
4,597
6,017
1.000
23,621
70,83e 44,428
2 is ,7 s r
2,6oO
6,000
1,000
9u0
1.05L
200
43,337
74.475
281,412
5,442
1.000
1.00021,281
21,281
11,705
1,010
22,895
5,886
81,141
81,141
28,389
5,588
20
20
2
2
40
40
4,525 55,981
60,51 0
250
25U
..........

,.

28,732

700

...

..

boo

5,661

SO
O

5,170
15,399
22,801

T o t a l . . . . 1981,162

Exports (bates) to Foreign Ports f o r Tear Ending Aug. 31.

Tear ending Sept. 1 ,1 8 9 6

Stock. Receipts.

1

501,276 341,829 206,794 211,171 078,875 808,374 H045.270

K 1,258,782
* I n c l u d e s f r o m T e x a s C it y , & c „ t o M e x i c o , 21,940 b a le s .
+ I n c lu d e s f r o m B r u n s w ic k t o L i v e r p o o l , 90.59C b a le s ; t o M a n c h e s t e r , 6 ,7 5 7
b a le s ; t o B r e m e n , 19,139 b a le s , a n d t o S t. P e t e r s b u r g , 2,650 b a le s .
* I n c l u d e s f r o m P o r t R o y a l t o L i v e r p o o l , 71,601 b a l e s .
§ I n c l u d e s f r o m N e w p o r t N e w s t o L i v e r p o o l , 9,493 b a le s ; t o B r e m e n , 1,203
b a le s , a n d t o A n t w e r p . 2oO b a le s .
I “ O t h e r P o r t s ” I n c lu d e : F r o m M o b il e t o L i v e r p o o l , 129,848 b a le s ; t o M a n c h e s ­
t e r , 13,564 b a le s; t o B r e m e n , 33,170 b a le s , a n d t o H a m b u r g , 3,950 b a le s , b’r o m
P e n s a c o l a t o L iv e r p o o l, 66,732 b a le s , a n d t o M e x i c o , 6,588 b a le s . F r o m B o s t o n t o
L iv e r p o o l, 225,195 b a l e -; t o H u ll,3 ,7 o 0 b a le s , a n d t o H a li f a x , Y a r m o u t h , <&c., 4,2>3
b a le s . F r o m B a lt im o r e t o L iv e r p o o l. 74,230 b a le s ; t o B e lfa s t , 2,300 b le s ; t o L o n ­
d o n , 3,982 b a le s ; t o G la s g o w , 205 b a le s ; t o H a v r e , 8,801 b a le s ; t o .B r e m e n , 6 6,2 *0
b a le s ; t o H a m b u r g , 5,480 b a le s; t o R o t t e r d a m , 7,535 b a l e « ; t o A n t w e r p , 3 ,305
b a le s ; t o R e v a l, 1 0 o b a le s , a n d t o C b r ls t la n a , 426 b a le s . F r o m P n il a d e lp h ia t o
L iv e r p o o l. 12,075 b a le s ; t o M a n c h e s t e r , 575 b a le s , a n d t o A n t w e r p , 4r50 b a l e s .
F r o m P o r t la n d t o L i v e r p o o l , 3,108 b a le s . F r o m Sa n F r a n c i s c o t o L i v e r p o o l ,
463 b a le s ; t o J a p a u , 36,945 b a le s , a n d t o C h in a , 250 b a le s . F r o m P u g e t S o u n d
t o J a p a n , 19,036 b a le s .

a I n c l u d i n g ra il s h i p m e n t s v ia D e t r o it , P o r t H u r o n Stc ., 76,848 b a le s .

COTTOE

CROP

OF

THE

UNIT ED

STATES.

15

Combining the foregoing results with those for the half
year (published in the Chronicle of June 5, page 1096), we
As a matter of interest in connection with onr annual cot­ have the following exhibit for the nine months. It is there
ton crop report, we append the latest returns of dividends seen that thirty-seven corporations, with a capital of $22,of the Fall River mills, as they serve to confirm what 793,000, have paid out in dividends in the nine months of the
we have said about the condition of the print cloth and
present year only $539,450, or an average of 2-37 per cent,
cotton goods trade. The record is for the third quarter
against $1,077,825, or 4'80 per cent, in the like period of 1896.
of 1897 and makes a very unsatisfactory exhibit.
The
It s furthermore t o be noted that twelve mills have declared noamount distributed is even smaller than for the second quar­
dividends whatever thus far in 1897, and that the Bourne ancL
ter of the year, and compared with the corresponding period
Stafford mills stand alone as having increased the amounp
of 1896 the showing is very unfavorable. Twenty-four cor­ paid to stockholders over last year. In 1895 the average div­
porations have passed their dividends this quarter, and the
idend of all the mills was 4-80 per cent, in 1894 it reached
others, with one exception, have distributed, less than in 4.11 pier cent and in 1893 was 6 1 " per cent,______________
1896 The aggregate amount paid out for the second quar­
D ividends 1897. Dividends 1896. Increa se
N in e M o n t h s
ter of 1897 has been but $110,450, or an average of only 0'48
Capital.
or
1897 and 1898.
P . C. A m ou n t. Decrease
per cent on the capital. In 1896 the average dividend for
A m e r ic a n L in e n C o . . . . . .
-12,000the second quarter was 1-26 per cent, in 1893 it was 1*85 per
B a rn a b v M a n u f a c ’g C o ..
B a rn a rd M a n u fa c ’ g C o —
cent and in 1894 it was l '25 per cent.

F a ll R iv e r M ill Dividends.

Dividends 1897. Dividends 1806.
T s iB D Q C A im r a
1897 and 1896.

C a p ita l
P. C. A m ou n t. P.
9800,000
400.000

B o r d e r C it y M a n o r # C o . .
B o u r n e M ills . . . . . . . . . . . .
C h a c e M i l l s . ................. - .........
C o n a n ic u t X I l l s . . . . . . . . . . . .
C o r n e a M ills . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D * v o l Mills..............
H i n t M ills ................ ..............
G lo b e Y a r n M i l l s . . . . . . . .
G r a n it e M i l l s . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
M i Iis .. . . . . . . . . . .
K e r r T h r e a d Co
M e c h a n ic s ' M i l l s . . . ----------M e r c h a n t s ’ MLanaTa C o ...
M e ta co m e t M an o f g C o ...
N t u r r i g » « # « a M ill* -----O s b o r n M ills .
P a r k e r 1 ill.
rM
PoCmsmt M a x t o r # C o . . . . . .
B ie fa o r d B »i f l o o M f g . C o ..
Hchard Bo r
i
“ tn w on M m * .........................
m tn ore M a o o f g C o . . .
* 1 S p in n in g C « . . .

- . . M l Mills

......

.re Mills. ............

e M i l l * . . . . ...................

tafford Mills..... .......

W e n s M a r-.a fa ciu r'g C o.

‘eenm isfi Mill* . . . . . . . . . . .
ammn mm*

fcgf

W am psoou M ills........
Weetarooe M ills-...........
T o ta ls .
• O n < m p lt « U .f * S * •,>*».

400.000
600.000
130.000

100.000
400.000
680.000

w

!ass
700,000

5

. N o d iv id e n d . . .S o
.S o d i v id e n d . . . N o
.No -d iv id e n d . *2

1 1 *15888

-No
.S o

1
M

d iv id e n d .
d i'

l'H\

i*
’o

A m oun t.

Increase
or
Decrem t

d iv id e n d
d iv id e n d .

**,«00

ar
aiT ia«V <L

8.700

. N o d iv id e n d .
.No d i v id e n d .

lH

vdjAMi

.S o d i v id e n d .

l

ie,om
dividend.!
.No Idividand.
.No d i v id e n d .
.No d l v id s o n .
1
4,000
■S o 'dividofid.

.m

S ta fford M i ll * ...........
S t e v e n s M a n u f a c t u r e Co.
T e c u r a a e b M ills ....................
T r o y C o t . A W . M fg . C o . . . .
U n lo n C o t t o n M 'f 'g C o . . . .
W am panoag M i ll s .,....,..
W eeta m oe M i l l s ...........

.No

d i v id e n d .
. N o d lv t d a n d .!
.No id iv id e n d .!

No dividend.
-No dividend.
.No dividend.

m;
wo
T :M S :
i

s

io,o**j

’g g

. N o 1 iv id e n d .
d

T I + ' $U0,i6O
. On c e t u i o f P M M X K

1,000

;ooo

13.500
d iv id e n d .

50.000

S588

22,0oQ

4,200
24.000

12,000

21.000

10,W0

2^888
65.000

29.000
d i v id e n d .

36.000
d iv id e n d .
40.000
d i v id e n d .

15,0u0

16.000
d i v id e n d .

10.000

Itf.OrtO
11.250

iffl

550,t
550.1

lffi

500.1

i£
550,0i>0

d i v id e n d d iv id e n d .
d i v id e n d .
27.000
13,750
d i v id e n d .

ftS S
S
15.000
27.000
37.600
22.500
d i v id e n d .

30.000
40.000
45.000
22,500

+ 4 ,0 0 0
- 1 5 ,0 0 0 .
-4 ,2 0 0

-2,000

12.000
—5,800
—42,000
—46,000
-

-hioV
ooo
—5,u00
- 2 2 ,5 0 0
—20.250
-2 4 ,0 0 0 -4 ,00 0
—15,000 ■
- 1 ,2 5 0
—15,000
-

20,000

-3 ,9 0 0
- 3 6 ,0 0 0
—30,000

-6.000

-1 6 ,5 0 0
-5 ,5 0 0

+2.000
-5 ,0 0 0

-10.000.
—38,000
- 1 5 ,0 0 0 .
- 2 2 ,5 0 0
-1 5 ,1 2 5

T o t a l s ,.,....
. . . . . . . $88,793.000 2«37 < 539,450 4 80 $ 1 ,0 7 7 ,8 2 5 - 5 3 8 ,37&# I n c lu d in g a n e x t r a d i v id e n d o f 5 o e r c e n t f r o m r e a l e s t a t e .

.No dividend.
.No dividend.
t
o jm

i*j

B o r d e r C it y M a n ’ f g C o . . .
B o u r n e M ills ...............
C h a c o M i l l s . . ...............
C o n a n ic u t M i l l s . . . . .
C o r n e ll M i l l s , . . . ........
D a v o l M ills .................
F lin t M i l l s . . . . . . . . . . . .
G lo b e Y a rn M i l l s . . . ..
G r a n it e M ills ...........
H a rg ra v es M ill s .....
K err T h rea d C o ......
K in g P h il ip M i lt s ....
L a u r e l L a k e M i ll s .. .
M e c h a n ic s ’ M i l l s . . . . . . . . . .
M e r c h a n ts ’ M a m if a c ’g C o.
M e ta co m e t M a n ’f g C o ....
N a rr a g a n s e tt M i ll s ..............
O s b o r n M i l l s . . . . . . . . .............
P a r k e r M ill...................... ..
P o e a sse t M an u fa ct £ C o ..
R ic h a r d B o r d e n M ’ f g C o .
R o b eson M i ll s .........
s a g a m o r e M fg . C o .. . .
S a n fo r d S p in n in g C o .
g g M W M ftM IU *

IX tW

-1 7 J.5 C 0

t O n e » p t t * l „ f U 2 ,liW ,0 0 0

The above exhibit is of course a highly discouraging
one, and indicates the effect the decidedly tmremunerative
prices obtained for goods has had on the cotton*manufacturmg industry. Since about the beginning of August, how­
ever, the outlook has brightened perceptibly, and the pres­
ent promise is for a more active demand at better prices.