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'

HUNTS

MERCHANTS’

$
REPRESENTING THE

MAGAZINE.

§kw$j>aire*,

INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE

[Entered, according to act of Congress, in the year 1880, by Wm. B. Dana & Co., in the

office of the Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C.l

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1880.

VOL. 31.

C O NT ENTS.
THE

CHRONICLE.
Cotton Movement and Crop of

The Money Market and Specu¬
lation
267
Cotton Consumption in Europe 268

Railroad Earnings in August,
and from Jan. 1 to Sept. 1...

1879-80
Latest Monetary and
cial English News

270

Commer¬

277

News

THE

BANKERS’

Money Market, U. S. Securities, Railway Stocks, Foreign
Exchange, New York City
Banks, etc
THE

Commercial Epitome
Cotton
Breadstufts

276

Commercial and Miscellaneous

269

GAZETTE.

I Quotations of Stocks and Bonds 280

I

I
278

I

Investments, and State, City

and Corporation Finances... 281

COMMERCIAL

TIMES.

283 I Dry Goods
284 Imports and Exports
289

|

290
210

UNITED STATES.

NO. 794.

general traffic, in both passenger and freight departments,
is all the time increasing.
Rates, too, continue on a pay¬
ing basis. Two months ago it was confidently predicted
that there would be a falling off in railroad receipts during
July and August. Yet returns for both months are now
in and there is visible no sign of any change. This augurs
well for the future, as it would seem to show that the earn¬
ings of last year are not. as claimed in some quarters,
exceptional, the result of accidental causes, and not likely
to be repeated, but record an improvement which bids fair
to last.

Furthermore, the gain in net earnings is almost certain
to be larger, relatively, than the gain in gross earnings.
Through the substitution of steel rails for iron, the im¬
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is issued every Satur¬
provement of road bed, the introduction of economies in
day morning, with the latest news up to midnight of Friday.
[Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class every department of service, and the more systematic mode
mall matter.]
of conducting business, the percentage of operating ex¬
penses to earnings has been gradually reduced and is now
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTiON-PAYABLE IN ADVANCE:
For One Year (including postage)
$10 20.
much less than formerly.
Another reason for larger net
For 8ix Months
do
6 10.
Annual subscription in London (including postage)
£2 7s.
earnings is that as the general business of the country in¬
do
do
1 8s.
Six mos.
do
Subscriptions will he continued until ordered stopped by a written creases, the railroads get more return freight.
This being
order, or at the publication office. The Publishers cannot be responsible
for Remittances unless made by Drafts or Post-Office Money Orders.
carried in cars previously hauled back empty, entails very
Advertisements.
little additional expense, and is almost a clear net gain.
Transient advertisements are published at 25 cents per line for each
insertion, but when definite orders are given for five, or more, insertions, Moreover, as
already stated, rates are very satisfactory now,
a liberal discount is made.
Special Notices in Banking and Financial
column 60 cents per line, each insertion.
and there is no ruinous competition to force rates down
London and Liverpool Offices.
below the cost of transportation.
The office of the Chronicle in London is at No. 74 Old Broad Street,
and in Liverpool, at No. 5 Brown’s Buildings, where subscriptions and
Still another influence operating in favor of higher
advertisements will be taken at the regular r&tes, and single copies of
the paper supplied at Is. each.
prices is the steadily increasing demand for all classes of
WILLIAM B. DANA,
)
WILLIAM B. DANA & 00., Publishers,
The effect of this is seen in the high rates
investments.
JOHN G. FLOYD, JR. 5
79 & 81 William Street, NEW YORK.
Post Office Box 4592.
which the best stocks and bonds now command. The inquiry
A neat file cover is furnished at 50 cents; postage on the same is
comes not alone from the United States, but from foreign
18 cents. Volumes bound for subscribers at $1 20.
investors as well, and Europe is at present absorbing a
For a complete set of the Commercial and Financial Chroni¬

(Pximticlc.

cle—July, 1865, to date—or Hunt’s Merchants’ Magazine, 1839 to
1871, inquire at the office.

great many of our good dividend-paying securities.
But

THE MONEY MARKET AND SPECULATION.
The

of the stock market

during the past two
weeks is suggestive as giving evidence of the opposing
conditions and influences which at present prevail.
The
tendency towards a higher range of values reveals the
hopeful feeling with which the future is regarded, while
the irregularity which has characterized the market, not¬
withstanding this tendency, is proof that there are forces
at work to check any decided speculation.
In favor of an upward movement, there are certainly
many strong elements.
The marked improvement in rail
road property during the last twelve or fourteen months
is a fact patent to all.
Hardly less evident is it that all
indications point, not only to a continuation of this
improvement, but to a gain upon it. The volume of the
•crops will, without doubt, be large beyond precedent.
Then, as _we have frequently said before, the volume of
course




notwithstanding all these facts, it is evident that
speculation halts, not only on Wall Street but in almost
all our other markets.
Some operators therefore are feel¬
ing disappointed because last year they only had to make
a purchase, wait a day or two, and secure a large profit;
now their purchases
are as likely to be followed by a
decline as a rise, or what to them is even worse, a dead
calm.
They forget, but the general public does not, that
the rise of those days resulted in a net loss to most of the
participators in the prevailing excitement. Very many
were hurt at that time and for a period at least will pro¬
ceed with more caution now.
Besides, prices are so much
higher than they were a year ago that there is less room,
even if there were the disposition, for any such specula¬
tion as took place then.
Aside from these facts, however, there is another influ¬
ence acting which is really of controlling importance just
now; we refer to the condition of our money market and'

THE CHRONICLE.

268

Everyone knows that
rate among our banks here depends entirely
upon the demand for remittances to the West and South
to move the crops.
If the demand should be anywhere
near that of last year, it would need continued importa¬
tions of gold to enable the banks to respond.
Last year
immense amounts of currency were shipped to the interior,
and what is more, never returned—that is, stayed there,
and were apparently absorbed.
This makes it exceedingly
problematical what the wants of these sections will be this
year. But if called upon to make heavy shipments, can our
banks rely upon further receipts of gold from abroad ?
This is a question by no means easy to answer.
The

the money
the ruling

markets of the world.

balance of trade in

our

favor is smaller than at the corres¬

ponding date last year. This fact would make it more
difficult to draw gold hither, were it not that the takings
of securities

on

foreign account are now very large.

[VOL. XXXI.

consumption at 65,000 bales, but instead of
making the total for the four weeks 260,000 bales

the rate

of

(which it would have reached in four weeks at that
rate) he makes it 250,000 bales, deducting 10,000 bales for
holidays in August. With this explanation we give the
following summary of takings and consumption in Great
Britain and

on

in actual bales and in pounds,
lbs. each, and also the surplus in spin¬

the Continent,

and in bales of 400
ners’ hands.
Takings and
Consumption in
Europe.

Bales, 400 pounds.

Pounds.

Bales, actual.
Great

Conti¬

Great

Britain.

nent.

Britain.

Continent.

Great

Conti¬

Britain.

nent.

94,000
10,800,000
37,600,000
27,000
89,523
24,601
Surplus Oct. 1, ’79
Sept.
2,749,840 2,449,440 1,229,178,480 1,031314,240 3,072,946 2,578,035
i; 1880

(ba).

Deliver’s to

Supply to Sept. 1. 2,774,441 2,538,963 1,239,978,480 1,068,814,240 3.099,946 2,672,035
Cons’mpt’n same
time
2,726,621 2,366,095 1,218,800,000 993,600,000 3,047,000 2,484.000
Surplus Sept.1,’80

47,820

21,178,480

178,868

75,214,240

52,000

188,000

32,523,540 102,800,000
81,000 257,000
73,200 243,807
question involves therefore mainly Surplus Aug.1,’80 106,900
125,123,750 120,000 313,000
295,462
48,000,000
Surplus July l,’i0
the answer to the inquiry how much more gold Europe Surplus J’ne 1,’80
104,228,300 110,000 260,000
44,129,000
98,064 242,391
94,400,000
139,000 236,000
55,600,000
Surplus May 1,’S0
123,281 218,518
can spare,
ft is maintained that any very larg3 exports
will produce a panic there.
This does not seem so improb¬
According to the foregoing, the present surplus held
able when we bear in mind how the European reserves of
by English spinners is only 52,000 bales of 400 lbs each,
gold have dwindled down of late years. Formerly Great and the Continental surplus is reduced to 188,000 bales
Britain and the Continent were able to draw from our of same
weight, being a total of only 240,000 bales,
domestic production 30 to 50 millions a year to supply
against 249,000 bales last year and 301,000 bales the
wants and replenish stocks.
Now we are not only retain¬ previous year. In other words, out of our immense crop
ing all this ourselves, but calling for more besides. and the enlarged crops of Egypt and India, all that the
The situation therefore is interpreted as critical by world has left to be added to stocks on the 1st of October
(if
European writers, some claiming that a continuation of Mr. Ellison has made no error in his calculations) is about
the present conditions will force a crisis.
300,000 bales, that being the present excess in visible supply
The bearing of all this upon our markets is obvious.
If The rest has all passed into goods which have been distrib¬
the gold i§ shipped and Europe suffers, that suffering
uted among consumers. Surely, if these are facts, there need
could not help reacting upon ourselves.
On the other be no fear of our having to give away the present crop,
hand, if Europe is able to withhold the gold, and the even if it reaches the highest estimate. Below we give a
demand for currency to move the crops should prove
comparative statement of the takings and consumption of
heavy, there is the possibility of a stringent money market European spinners up to this date, in 1,000s of bales of 400
here, as it is known that only the large importation of gold lbs. each. The figures for previous years are as corrected
helped us out of the difficulty last year. It is this feeling, by Mr. Ellison in his circular of July 8.
<quite generally entertained, that acts to check speculative
Continent.
Great Britain.
Spinners’ Stock,
operations. And is it not wise under these circumstances Takings and Consump¬
’79-80. 1878-9. 1877-8. ’79-80. 1878-9. ’77-8,
tion.
to be cautious ?
There is, however, no impediment to
54
117
27
35
35 ;
94
regular trade. That continues to show very gratifying Stock 1st October
1,424
1,292
1,300
1,470
1,575
Deliver’s, Mar. 31,26 wks 1,752
«igns of progress, for prosperity now pervades every part

The

answer

to the last

*

'

COTTON CONSUMPTION IN EUROPE.

will
Mr.
Ellison’s August figures of European consumption which
we have just received by cable, being issued at Liverpool,
Thursday of this week. Besides, as it is only a little more

great length of our annual cotton crop report
prevent our giving much space to-day to a review of
The

than

a

month before his

yearly circular will be received,

figures is scarcely necessary.
great interest the October
review, which, through Mr. Ellison’s experience and
research, has really become the text book for all compila¬

any extended notice of these
The trade will await with

tions.
that the rate

greatest interest in the present report are
of consumption is not only still kept up to the

high weekly figure of former weeks, but 22,000 bales of
400 lbs. each are also added to the consumption of pre¬
vious months in Great Britain. With regard to the first fact
we must modify it as we did last month.
It will be
remembered that in July the weekly rate in England was
continued at 65,000 bales, but that 5,000 bales were
deducted for the Mossley strike and the holidays in con¬
nection with the wakes in the last week of that month,
making the actual weekly consumption 64,000 bales, as we
then gave it. So also in August Mr. Ellison continues



1,513
1,340

1,409
1,274

1,354
1,234

105

74

178

135

120

539

543

550

688

637

644

617

728

823

757

493

473

468

453

432

1,505
1,400

159

504

Supply

663

Consumption, 9 weeks...

553

Stock, May 31

Stock March 31
Deliver’s

Ap.& M’y, 9 wks

110

151

144

260

370

325

Deliveries, June, 4 weeks (a) 292

166

194

261

183

230

402

317

338

521

553

555

Consumption, 4 weeks... (b) 282

208

228

208

202

196

Supply..:
Stock, June 30
Deliveries, July, 5 weeks

120

109

110

313

351

359

281

213

344

204

160

195

Supply
Consump’n, July, 5 weeks

401

322

454

517

511

554

320

245

295

260

255

247

4

81*

t

-

77

159

257

256

307

243

202

169

139

124

105

324
Supply
Consump’n.Aug., 4 weeks (c)272

279

328

396

380

412

204

236

208

206

200

52

75

92

188

1^1

212

Stock, July

31'

Deliveries, Aug., 4 weeks

The facts of

1,616
1,576

1,779
1,620

Supply
Consumption, 26 weeks..

industrial system.

our

Stock, August 31

These deliveries for June include 57,140 American (equal to
64,850 bales of 400 lbs each) forwarded direct from quay to spinners,
but not deducted from stock by the Liverpool Brokers’ Association,
until June 30th.
which

This consumption in June includes not only the 260,000 bales
was the actual consumption of the month, but also 21,600

(of 400 lbs. each) which Mr. Ellison adds to consumption as
probable portion of the above 57,140 bales which had been con¬
sumed up to June 30th and not included in consumption.
(e). Mr. Ellison, besides the consumption of the month, has added
22,000 bales of 400 lbs. each to consumption of Great Britain during
past months; so we include it in this total, making 272,000 bale*
instead of 250,000 bales.

bales
the

September
<•

THE

11, 1880.]

—

1

a

-

We should hay© stated above that

CHRONICLE.

269

■

cable dispatch

earnings this year is more significant for that reason..
gives the average weights of deliveries up to Sept. 1, Among the roads showing a large increase, New York
1880, from Oct. 1, 1879, at 447 lbs. for Great Britain and Central & Hudson is first, and after that road come the
421 lbs. for the Continent.
Below is our usual table, large consolidated lines, which are operating a much
which shows the monthly record of consumption in all of greater mileage than last year—such as Northwest, St*.
Paul, Louisville & Nashville, Wabash St. Louis & PacificEurope during the year.
our

Central Pacific also shows

Bales per

Bales

Founds.'

Consumption in

week,

400 lbs.

400 lbs.

100,800,000
80,200,000

252,000
200,500

56,000
50,125

181,000,000

452,500

106,125

99,400,000

91,800,000

248.500
229.500

62,125
51,000

191,200,000

478,000

113,125

113,400,000

283,500

93,600,000

234,000

63,000
52,000

207,000,000

517,500

115,000

113,400,000
104,000,000

283,500
260,000

63,000
52,000

217,400,000

543,500

115,000

104,000,000
83,200,000

260,000
208,000

65,000

187,200,000

468,000

117,000

117,000,000
83,200,000

292,500
208,000

65,000
52,000

200,200,000

500,500

117,000

130,000,000
104,000,000

325,000
260,000

65,000

234,000,000

585,000

117,000

91,200,000
83,200,000

228,000
208,000

65,000
52,000

Total May

174,400,000

436,000

117.000

Great Britain,

104,000,000

260,000
208,000

65,000

83,200,000
187,200,000

468,000

117,000

128,000,000 (6)320,000
260,000
104,000,000

52,000

Great Britain, October, 4*2

weeks.
Continent, October, 4 weeks
Total October
Great Britain, November, 4 weeks.
Continent, November, 4*2 weeks..
Total November
Great Britain, Dec., 4*2 weeks

Continent, December, 4*2 weeks..
Total December
Great Britain, January, 4*3 weeks.

Continent, January, 5 weeks
Total January
Great Britain, February, 4 weeks.
Continent, February, 4 weeks

Total Februamj
Great Britain, March, 4*2 weeks...

Continent, March, 4 weeks
Total March

Great Britain, April, 5 weeks

Continent, April, 5 weeks
Total

April

.

Great Britain, May, 4 weeks
Continent, May, 4 weeks.

(a)

June, 4 weeks
Continent, June, 4 weeks
Total June
Great Britain, July. 5

weeks

Continent, July, 5 weeks
Total

232,000.000

July

Great Britain, August, 4 weeks....

Continent, August, 4 weeks
Total

Total from Oct. 1 to

Sept. 1..

..

52,000

65,000

117,000

100,000,000 (6) 250,000
83,200,000
208,000

65,000
52,000

Great Britain, Oct. to Ang., or 48
weeks
(e) 1,218,800,000

Continent, Oct. to Aug., or 48 weeks

52,000

580,000

183,200,000

August

52,000

458,000

117,000

t

3,047,000

2,212,400JKO 5.531.000

115,229

(a). This is really for only about 3*3 weeks, allowance being made for
the Whitsuntide holidays.

(&). These totals for July and August aie less than the aggregate of
65,000 hales per week, because in July holidays, <feo., decreased con¬
sumption 5,000 bales, and in August the same cause decreased it

.10,Q00 bales.
(e). These totals of consumption include (besides the above monthly
consumption) 21,600 bales, of 400 lbs. each, added to consumption by
Mr. Ellison in his July circular, and 22,000 bales of 400 lbs. added in
the

August report.

"We retain this form

very useful, although the
additions Mr. Ellison has made in July and August modi¬
as

being

fy the consumption for some of the earlier months. The
foot notes explain the total.
It will be noticed that the
average now for the whole year reaches for the Continent
close on to 52,000 bales per week, and in Great Britain
63,500 bales.
RAILROAD

earnings

in

AUGUST;

AND

FROM JANUARY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 1.
For the month of

August, 42 railroads reporting earnings
show an increase over August, 1879, of about 31 per cent.
For the eight months from Jan. 1 to Sept. 1,37 roads report¬
ing show an increase over the same period last year of
about 27-J per cent.
With August begins the new crop
Last year the crops were
year in the breadstuffs market.
very large, and the movement was early, giving the rail¬
roads a heavy traffi« in August, so. that the increase in




GKOS8 EARNINGS IB AUGUST.

63,479
51,750

993,600,000 2,484,000

increase of

$328,543. The*
principal gain in earnings must necessarily arise from the
heavier freight movement; but wherever we obtain the
record of passenger earnings, it is found that there is also
a relative
improvement in that branch of business. New
York Central & Hudson reports $72,000 gain in
passenger
earnings in August; the Grand Trunk of Canada the
last week in August
showed a gain of $33,428,
of which
nearly $9,000 was on passenger, mail
and
express
business;
the
St. Louis &
Iron
Mountain gained $140,239 in August, of which about
$42,000 was from passengers; the International & Great
Northern, out of $21,435 increase in August, made $8,000
of it on passenger business; the Flint & Pere Marquette
road, out of $16,081 increase in the last ten days of
August, made $4,500 out of passengers. There have
been, as usual, quite a number of desultory reports of
earnings not officially given out, or verified at the compa¬
nies’ offices, and as these are merely circulated on the
stock market, without any one to assume the responsibility
for their accuracy, it is hardly worth while to notice them.
The Union Pacific consolidated fines are reported for June
to have earned $2,601,551 gross and $1,690,084 net.
In September it is hardly to^ be expected that all the
roads will keep up their percentages of increase over 1879.
In September last year the earnings on some roads were
immense; Milwaukee & St. Paul had a business amounting
to $1,020,000; St. Louis & Iron Mountain, $591,075;
Illinois Central, $687,341; and other roads generally
showed a large advance from August.
A tardy crop
movement in September might cause a temporary decline
in railroad traffic, and already the Northern Pacific reports
a
slight decrease m August business, in consequence of the
slower shipments of wheat this year.
an

1880.

1879.

$

$

34,807
122,827
1,556,457

Chic. Milw. & St. Paul..

58,701
160,160
1,885,000
740,842
131,777
991,000

Chicago & Northwest..

1,771,314

1,326,957

126,144
75,091
434,164
25,627
396,472

86,695
77,329

Alabama GL Southern..
Burl. Cedar Bap. & No..
Central Pacific

Chicago <& Alton
Chicago <fe East. Illinois.
.

Chic. 8t.P. Minn. & Omaha
Cincinnati & Springfield.
Clev. Col. Cin. & Ind
Clev. Mt. Vernon & Del.1*
Denver & Rio Grande...
Flint <fe Pere Marquette.
Grand Trunk of Canada)
Great West’n of Canada^
Hannibal & St. Joseph..
Illinois Central (III. line).
Do (Iowa leased liues)

845,952
408,053
212,896
566,489
131,898

Indiana Bloom. <fc West.
Intern at’l <fe Gt. North...
Kan. City F. 8. & Gulf*.
Kan. City Law. & So.* ..
Lake Erie & Western*
Louisville & Nashville..

116,732
143,878
56,524
35,247
91,779
795,800

Memphis <fe Char eston..
Minneapolis & St. Louis* ;•
Missouri Kansas <& Tex..
Mobile & Ohio
N.Y. Cent. & Hud. Rir.
Northern Pacific
Paducah & Memphis*...
Peoria Dec.A Evansvillo
St. L. A.&T.H. main line*
Do
do (branches)
St. L. Iron Mt.& South’n.
St. Louis & 6. Francisco.
St. Paul A Sioux City....
St. P. Minn.& Manitoba.
Scioto Valley
Texas <fe Pacific
Toledo Peoria & Warsaw
Wabash St.Louis & Pac.Total

130.488

80.182

45,417
350,700
136,166

3,022,855
208,300
12,010
45,151
95,120
59,560
543,555
267,319
118,352

583.832
75,300
733,736

363.258

20,656
92,488
88,561
667,910

'336,469
141,533
494,704
107,273
107,520
122,443
45,655
27,872
45,602
443,749
19,721
25,774
306,333
106,147
2,546,029
210,927
7,868
14,901
67,665
43,764
401,316
181,431
97,867

232,579
32,384
226,073
127,269

188.940
29.205

1,185,325

820,087

17,120,295

Net increase

184,725
102,282

ended August 27.

$

$

*

23,894
37,333
328.543

157,010
56,477
257,264

tr

444,357
39,449

2,238
70,906
4,971
303,984
41,927
178,042
71,584
71.3n3

71,785
24,625
9,212
21,435
10,869
7,375

T

t;

•••••••#

n

r-

46,177
352,051
60,411
19,643
44,367

30,019
476,826

2,62T
4,142
30,250
27,455
15,796
140,239
85,888
20,485

f......

43.639

3,179
41,348
24,987
365,238

13,060,615 4,064,545
4,059,680

Three weeks only of August in each ysar.
t For the four weeks ended August 28.

t For ths four weeks

Increase. Decrease.

4,865.

THE CHRONICLE.

270
GROSS E ARNING3 FROM

JAN. 1 TO AUGUST

$

390,993

Alabama Gt. Southern
Burl. Cedar Rap. & No..

..

1,235.933

12,149,693

Central Pacific

Chicago Milw. & St.Paul

11,955,653
934,783
549,8 47
2,632.232
265,376
937,590
6,594,751

Chicago & Northwest...

Chic.St.P.Minn.ifc Omaha
Cincinnati & Springfield.
Clev. Col. Cin. & Ind....
Clev. Mt. Vernon &Del*.
Pere Marquette.

Flint

Grand Trunk of Canadat
Great West’n of Canada!
Hannibal & St. Joseph..
Ill. Central (Ill. line)
Do
(la. leased lines).
Indiana Bloom. <fc West..
Internat’l «fc Gt. North..
Kan. City
Kan. City
Louisville

■

Nashville

2,656,628
1,230,613
21,628,649
1,353,579

233,235

32,091

686,180

301,410

5,437,725
2,677,763

1,157,026

911,948
719,219

1,807,799

283,047
3,491,750
493,297
266.904

Philadelphia & ReadingGross earnings
1,282,835 1,303,522
Operat. exp. and rentals.. 996,578
956,813

Net earnings

241,086

675,503
177.404

780,391
5,131,807

900,171
7,564,264

Operat. and extr. expens.

23,606
287,976
74,272
930,119
769,994
207,343
23,683
119,780

Net

companies

as

earnings, operat¬

of July,
railroad
will furnish monthly exhibits for publica¬

tion.

earnings.....

«

—July.

Atlantic Miss. & OhioGross

earnings

Oper’g exp. (mcl. extr’y)..

,

1879.

$
145,585
102,700

$
138,224

42.885

50,263

87,961

r-Jan. 1 to July 31.—*
1880.

-

Burl. Cedar Rap.& North’n—

143,454

114,027

1879.

$
1,043,099
550,153

$
853,710
528,923

497,946

324,787

Exports

Sept. 1,

sf&b?'
Louisiana
1,504,054
Alabama
358,971
S. Carolina.
494,301
.

..

741,425
494,885
17,531

Georgia....
Texas
Florida
N. Carolina

103,245
701.225

Virginia...
New York

210,731*
214,325*
49,831*
30,597*
4,891*

.

Great
Britain.

1879.

1,187,305
302,408
507,021
704,752
582,118
50,710
135,815
508,383
147,808*
108,990*
01,323*
20,011*
3,900*

901,075
84,189

152,230
185,152
213,243

480,793
133,101

143,432
103,015

107,990
82,527

1,125,778
735,633

761,814
515,089

Net earninge

40,417

25,463

390,145

246.725

238,236
177,722

173,383
130,223

1,497,271

1,188,523

986,191
852,267

Tot.this yr.
Tot. last yr.

60,514

43,155

308,748

133,924

*
These figures are only the
arrives overland from Tennessee,

Chicago Burlington & QuincyGross earnings
1,566,661
Operating expenses
655,576

993,823
597,044

9,715,424
4,762,995

7,504,062
4,226,411

911,085

396,779

4,952,429

3,277,651

Chesapeake & Ohio—
Gross

earniugs

Operating expenses
Net earnings

Net earnings
Delaware & Hudson Canal

earnings
Delaw. & Hud.—Penn. Div.Gross earnings
Operating expenses
Net

earnings
New York & CanadaGross earnings
Operating expenses
Net

Net earnings

Rensselaer & SaratogaGross earnings

Operating expenses
Net earnings

Total of Delaware &

69,850

89,356
50,829

767,796
482,723

588,398
357,264

35,622

38,527

285,073

231,134

105,472

92,903
63,206

105,355
52,905

652,458
387,930

681,572

29,697

52,450

264,528

322,341

48,519
27,661

41,981
29,387

372,493
216,294

231,112
161,779

20,858

12,594

156,199

69,333

176,452
88,563

149,371
58,575

1,013,690
579,731

479,696

87,889

90,796

433,959

291,975

423,346

386,063 2,806,440 2,272,756

191.696

1,666,681

1,357,970

Net earnings

174,066

194,367

1,139,759

914,786

19,134
12,017

163,237
96,430

113,488
72,056

13,569

7,117

66,807

41,452

86,596

58,182
41,536

Dodge-

Operating expenses
Net earnings

28,184
14,615

Iowa CentralGross

_

Operating expenses, &c...
Net earnings

Naebv. Chatt. & St. LouisGross earnings

Operating expenses
earnings

New York & New

England—

earnings
Operating expenses
Gross

Net earnings




Baltimore.
Portland
..

5,001,072
4,447,270

*

57,335

ending Sept. 1, ■1SS0.

Chan¬
France
nel.

Other

foreign.

Total.

0,570 274,912 258,779 1,441,941
111,087
17,355
10,143
344,774
1.910 20,723 170,011
424,092
1,114 18,950 218,870
9,282 23,831
55,518 301,874

32,197
2,751
4,706
10,938
5,625

590

1,195
1,407
14.303

:i
050

35,783
257,005
050,826
133,102
41,593

27,047

122,073

10,447
1,177
8,912
1,479
47,909 107,821
200

40,743
94.420

......

......

25

190

2.554,509
2,058,514

Stock,
Sevt. 1.
1880.

003

3,289
03,555
0,707
3,859
3,129

........

215

35,087 399,324 870,041 3,805.621 137,419
49,3131419.005 940,733 3,407,505 59,110

portion of the receipts at these ports which
&c.

By the above it will be seen that the total receipts at the
Gulf shipping ports this year have been 5,001,672
bales, against 4,447,276 bales last year. If now we add the
shipments from Tennessee and elsewhere direct to manufac¬
turers, we have the following as the crop statement for the two
Atlantic and

years.
Year

Ending Sept. 1.

1870-80.

Receipts at the shipping ports
bales.
Tennessee, &e., direct to

Add shipments from

....

Total

i

Manufactured South, not included
Total cotton crop f*>r

1878-79.

in above...

5,001,672

4,447,276

576,725

474,255

5,578,397
179,000

4,921,531
152,000

tlic year (balesi 5,757,397 5,073,531

figures is a total of 5,757,397 bales as the
of the United States for the year ending August 31,1880.

The result of these
crop

that the running weekly statement of the
marketing of the crop has not been quite as full and complete
this season as it was the previous season, since the corrections
in preparing the crop report are somewhat larger. We now
give in detail the processes by which the above conclusions
It thus appears

have been reached.

Overland and Inter-State Movement.
cotton shows a further

•

earnings

Net

Philad’lp’a

771,671

earnings
Operating expenses
Des Moines & Fort
Gross earnings

....

year

manufacturers

249,280

of the United States for the

359,231

Hudson Co.’s roads—

Gross

Boston

S.Fr’ncisc j

Company’s roads :

Albany <fc SusquehannaGross earniugs
Operat’g expenses

599,551

899,281

590

22:904
245,207

earnings
Expenses
Gross

98,042

332,167 3,051,141 2,261,261
218,140 2,151,860 1,661,710

ending—

....

Net earnings

146,288

289,201

Receipts year

AND NET EARNINGS.

1880.

20,624

that the total crop

PORTS.
GROSS EARNINGS, EXPENSES

25,240

ending September 1, 1880, will be found below. It will be
this year reaches 5,757.397 bales, while
the exports are 3,865,621 bales, and the spinners’ takings are
1,624,805 bales, leaving a stock on hand at the close of the year
of 137,419 bales. The tables which follow show the whole move¬
ment for the twelve months.
The first table indicates the
stock at each port Sept. 1,1880, the receipts at the ports for
each of the last two years, and the export movement for the
past year (1879-80) in detail, and the totals for 1878-79.
seen

expenses and net earnings for the month
and from January 1 to July 31, of all such

ing

270,672
172,630

year

each year,

gross

316,639
170,351

Our statement of the cotton crop

2,432,457

89,665,718 24,417,752
24,417,752

gives the

33,251
17,627

COTTON MOVEMENT AND CROP OF 1S79-80.

August 27.

The statement below

54,660
29,420

St. Louis Iron Mt. & South’n—
Gross earnings
432,655

3,730,230

201,087

Grcss earnings
Operating expenses

9,472,302 7,998,190

316,709

Net earnings
236,257
Pittsburg Titusville & Buffalo—

1,112,493

882,846

92,331

Net earnings

1,073,217

2,664,577
828,244

2,033.496 1,595,102
174,386 1,363,757 1,180,357
66,632
414,745
719,739

241,018

303,699
Operating expenses215,868

■

522,808

850,239

999,615 9,396,914 6,845,469

1,302,505

Gross earnings

17,898,419

3,594,696
1,598,238

31,811
& Erie) —

2,147,139 1,783,291 13,486,801 11,351,495

Net earnings
Philadelphia & Erie-

207.396

96,768
560,275
329,308

161.524

3,449,644 2,782.906 22,883,715 13,196,964

Gross earnings

Operating expenses

104.293
70,655

69,653
197,418
153,781
2.088,360
149,646
162,363
843,829

905,031

492,779

403,580

'

.

$
324,425 2,666,033 2,158,945
292,614 1,815,849 1.636,137
$

$

Pennsylvania (all lines east of Pittsburg

436,841

3,491,181

125,374
848.251

Three weeks only of August in
i From January 3 to August 28.

Net earnings

1879.

1880.

$
450,298

J233,774

Operating expenses

481,821
378,531

1.134,402

647,9 43
429,267

113,083,470

1 From January 2 to

2,141,849

5,580,110

$

217.485
97.385
510,333

717,298
452,462

690,197
441,828

Missouri Kansas & Tex..
Mobile & Ohio....*.
N. Y. Cent. & Hud. Riv.
Northern Pacific
Paducah & Memphis*...
SC.L.A.&T. H. main line*
Do
do (branches).
St. L. Iron Mt. & South’ll.
St. Louis & S. Francisco.
St. Paul & Sioux City
Scioto Valley
Toledo Peoria <fc Warsaw
Wabash St. Louis «fc Pac.
Total
Net increase

9,601,520

3,928,022
1,016,246
789,874
974.684

Memphis & Charleston..
Minneapolis & St. Louis*

401,297
1,278.995
1,530,724
248,708
1,921,933
2,354,133

529,930
5,542,067

1,512,933

..

83 4,641

3,304,588

3,159,584

F. S. & Gulf*.
Law. & So.*...

$
136,044

Northern Central—
Gross earnings

,—Jan. 1 to July 31.-*

*

1879.

1830.

$
254.949

10.870.693

4,835,312
778,633
7,461,000

Chicago & Alton
Chicago & East. Illinois.

July.

/

31.

Increase. Decrease.

1379.

1880.

[VoL. XXXI

The overland movement of

for Southern
In the first
place, the railroad combinations which have been perfected
especially those of more recent date—and the improvements
now in progress in rails and ballast, not only over the main
stems but upon the Southern connections as well, all tend greatly
to cheapen the cost of carrying freight; for steel rails, solid
road-bed and unity of control are working out wonderful
this year.

29,261

16,646

151,594
96,249

133,590
91,869

1,176,299

971,477

681,121

635,722

55,345

41,721

495,178

335,755

205,056
133,735

189,003
114,851

71,321

74,152

growth

commerce

There are many reasons why this route
should go on increasing in popularity.

/

271

THE CHRONICLE,

11, IS80.J

September

changes in the transportation problem. Rates that would not
cover expenses a few years since leave a good profit now, and
promise to be far above the required rates of the future.
Hence, the district which can reach a market over a given road
is constantly widening.
Then, again, business connections
between Western and Southern merchants are becoming
more intimate, as these avenues for commerce become more
effective.
So we see St. Louis first, and now Louisville and
Cincinnati, assuming quite important positions as cotton mar¬
kets, sure to develop into greater influence hereafter. Further¬
more, and in the direct line of these developments, the Northern
mills find it to their interest to use this route because in so

the cotton to their very doors without anytrans-shipment. Of course, however, the
changes in each year’s movement must be influenced, and its
natural development modified, by the increased or decreased
yield of those districts through which the roads pass. To
show the progress made in the total, or gross, overland ship¬
ments, we give the following statement of total crop and over¬
land, and percentages of increase and decrease of each, for a

the

crosses

Mississippi, Ohio and Potomac rivers,

given in

as

the statement which follows.

many cases it brings
cost of handling or

series of years.
Total

Gross

Yield.

Overland.

Bales.

Bales.

1879-80

5,757,397

1,181,147

1878-79

5,073,531

891,619

Crop of—

1875-76
1874-75

1873-74

.

Per Cent.

Increase

32*47

Increase

5 45

Increase

28*54

693,640

Increase

7*26

Increase

8*91

3*94

Decrease

9*50

4,669,288

636,886
703,780

Decrease

Increase 21*81

Increase

52*42

3,832,991

461,751

Decrease

8*09

Decrease

7*11

4,170,388

497,083

Increase

6*10

Increase

4,485,423

1876-77

Of Overland.

Increase 13*48

4,811,265

1877-78

Per Cent.

Increase from season of ’73-4 to

The facts this statement

’79-80 Increase 38*05

presents

are very

23*56

Increase 137*61

interesting. It

that the progress in the overland marketing of the
crop has been constant and decided,' except as stated above,
when short crops have temporarily modified the development.
Thus, in 1873-74 this movement covered only about 12 per cent
of the total yield, but last year it reached over 20 per
cent; furthermore, during the same period, while the crop has
been increasing 38*05 per cent, the overland has been increasing
137*61 per cent. These results sufficiently show the growing
appears

importance of this movement.
In determining this year the portion of the crop forwarded

by each of the different overland routes, we have introduced
no new features.
And yet, to prevent any misunderstanding,
our usual explanation is necessary.
our usual plan of counting each hale of cotton
outport where it first appears. This is a simple rule,
applying to every part of our annual cotton crop report. In this way
we not only preserve the unity of the report, and therefore simplify it,
hut, as a consequence, also make it more intelligible and less liable to

First—We have followed

at the Southern

error.

overland we consequently deduct all
shipped by rail from Southern outports to the North. For
instance, from New Orleans, Mobile, &c., frequent shipments are thus
made, an account of which is kept, but it is all included in the crop of
New Orleans or Mobile, &c., as the case may be, when it appears there,
and therefore when the same cotton appears again in the overland, it
must of course be deducted, or it will be twice counted.
Third— We deducttfromoverland, likewise, the small amounts taken
from the Southern outports for Southern consumption. They, also, for
the sake of unity and simplicity, are counted at the outports where they
first appear. But, as is well known, the entire Southern consumption is
made up in an item by itself and added to the crop. Hence, unless these
small lots which thus go into Southern consumption from the Southern
outports are deducted somewhere, they will be twice counted.
Fourth— We also deduct the arrivals during the year by railroad from
the West and South at New York, Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia and
Portland. Those receipts reached these ports by coming across the
country, and appear in our weekly totals, becoming a part of the receipts
at the ports, under the heads of “ New York ” and “ Other Ports,” but
now have been divided up and included under each separate city,
according to the amount thus received by it during the year, cs in¬
dicated in the first table of this report.
All this cotton, then, hav¬
ing been counted during the year, must now be deducted as has been
Second— From the gross carried

cotton

,

done.

With these

explanations, our detailed overland movement
given below will be readily understood. Of course, in making
up that movement we have followed the plan which was first
suggested andacted upon by ourselves fifteen years since. Up
to that time this item had only been sl crude estimate, based
npon the Memphis and Nashville statements. Now we have
made it as exact a record as any other portion of the crop total.
Below7 is our usual outline map or diagram, by the aid of which
one can readily trace the course of the movement where it




C
D

Illinois Central RR. and branches.
St. Louis & Southeast’rn RR. (from
Shawneetown and Evansville.)
E Cairo & Vincennes RR.
P Evansville & Crawfordsville RR.
G Louisville New Albany & Chic. RR.
H&K Jeffersonville Madison & Indian¬

RR. and
Memphis Branch.
Through route viemphis to Norfolk.

0
R
T
U

Chesapeake & Ohio RR.
Orange Alexandria & Manassas RR.
Washington route, via Richmond
Fredericksburg & Potomac RR.
Richmond Chesapeake & York Riv.

V

Railroad.

apolis RR. and Madison Branch.

Ohio & Miss.
Ohio & Miss.

Baltimore & Ohio RR.
Louisville & Nashville

O
P

Mo. Kan. & Texas RR. connection.

Springfield & Ill. Southeastern RR.

I
L
M

Increase and Decrease.

Of Crop.

A
B

RR., Louisv. Branch.
RR., main line.
in Ohio of the Balti¬

Connectior s
more & Ohio RR.

W Southern route from Richmond
& Norfolk.
X Short Line RR., Louisville to Cin¬
cinnati.

By examining the above diagram, and with the aid of expla¬
our previous annual reports, nothing further
will be needed to explain the following statement of the move¬
ment overland for the year ending September 1, 1880.

nations made in

Bales.

479,686

Shipments for the year from St. Louis
Carried North

over

Carried North

over

Carried

over

Illinois Central Railroad from Cairo, <fec...
Cairo & Vincennes Railroad.

70,199
99,226

Mississippi River above St. Louis

106,823

Carried North

over

St. Louis & Southeastern RR

None.

Carried North

over

Evansv. & Terre Haute RR

Carried North

over

Carried North

over

Jeffersonville Madison & Indianapolis RR.
Ohio & Mississippi Branch

40,139
128,082

Shipped through Cincinnati by Louisv. Cincinnati & Lex. RR
Receipts at Cincinnati by Ohio River, &c
Carried North otherwise

or over

79,169

59,222
103,344

.

296

other routes

Shipped to mills adjacent to River and to points above Cincinnnati

14,961

i

Total carried overland

1,181,147

Deduct—

Receipts overland at New York, Boston,
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Portland
Shipments fromSt. Louis, Louisville, &c., to
Louisville, St. Louis, New Orleans, &c

522,375

9,098—531,473

Southern consumption and shipments inland
from*—

9,058
4,047
221,714
1,156

Galveston
New Orleans

Mobile

Savannah

28

Charleston

4,461

North Carolina ports

12,346—252,810

Virginia ports
Less

shipments inland heretofore deducted—
13

Mobile from New Orleans

167,277
5,517

New Orleans from Mobile

Savannah from Mobile, &c
Norfolkfrom
Total

now

Wilmington & Mobile

7,054—179,861— 72,949
604,422

to be deducted

Leaving the direct overland movement not else where count’d! 576,725
As stated above, these items are deducted—(1) so that “Southern
Consumption ” can be added to the crop in one item; (21 because “ Ship¬
ments Inland” have once been couuted as receipts at the ports named.
*

1 This total includes shipments to Canada by rail,
18,257 bales, and are deducted in the statement of

year

which are this
consumption.

According to the above, the total carried overland this year
1,181,147 bales, against 891,619 bales last year, and the move¬
ment direct to manufacturers this year reaches 576,725 bales,
against 474,255 bales a year ago. This shows an increase over
last year of 289,528 bales in the gross movement, and of 102,470
bales in the net movement. We now give the details of the
entire crop for the two years.
wras

Louisiana.

Exported from N. Orleans:
To foreign ports
To coastwise ports
To Northern ports,

...

...

*

are

1878-79.

2,101

462

1,946

1,909

32,197-1,733,199

,

4,595-1,442,638
177,724

167,277

150

53

56,620
4,595—

73,313

228,545

1,501,654

4,086—

255,273

1,187,365

we have deducted these two items, except 13
deducted at Mobile as received there from New Orleans.

In overlatid

which

.

1,243.746
191,926

Ac.,

Manufactured*
Stock at close of year
Deduct:
Received from Mobile
Received from Florida
Received from Galveston
and Indiauola
Stock beginning of year..

product of year

1879-80.

1,441,941
255,014

by river anti rail*

Total

,

bales

CHRONICLE.

THE

272

fVoL* XXXI.
North Carolina.

Alabama,

1879- 80.

Exported from Mobile: *

243,886
1,327
359,651

2,751—

Receipts from Pensacola.
Stock beginning of year..

.

680

363,612

•

•

362,408

the overland

movement.

Texas.

5,839
197,955

Deduct:
Received
at
Galveston
from Iudianola, &c
Recovered from wreck
Stock beginning of year..

4,290

4,672
231,228

505,454

593,391

5,346—
6,406

933

5,346—

10,569

57—

135,946

57—

57

131—

131

135,815

*

Virginia.

Exported from Norfolk, <fcc.: *
To foreign ports
To coastwise ports
Taken for manufacture....

257,065
497,607

203.536

10,326

9,925

354,592

378

Nor¬
3,289—

Deduct:
Received from Wilmingt’n
Received Irom Mobile....
Stock beginning of year..

768,065

386-

568,439

7,440

56—

56

4,054
3,000
386—

568,383

761,225

product of year

“
Norfolk, &c.,” exports are made up this year as follows: To foreign
ports all the shipments are from Norfolk; to coastwise ports all the
shipments are from Norfolk, except 160,875 bales shipped from Rich¬
mond, Petersburg, Ac.
*

1,039
3,828—

11,273
582,118

494,885

Total product of year

106,302

Of these shipments 4,461 bales went inland by railroad from Wil¬
mington, and are deducted in overland.

Total

...

603—

106,245

folk, &c

To

5,625—

68,011

67,878

product of year...

Burnt
Stock at end of year,

349,145

296,035

Mexico)
Mexico, from Eagle
Pass, <fcc.
To coastwise ports*
Burnt and manufactured...
Stock at close of year

of year..

-1878-79.-

,

69,916

1,204

358,971

Exported from Gal ves’n.&c.:
To foreign ports (except

1879-80.
35,783

•

1,106—

1,255 bales local consumption, will be found deducted in

/

Burnt
Stock at end of year

Deduct:
Stock beginning

*
Under tlie head of coastwiso shipments from Mobil© are included
220,459 bales shipped inland by rail and water, all of which, with

-

Expt. from Wilmington, &o..
To foreign ports
To coastwise ports*
Taken for consumption

Total

product of year

Total

770
320—
98

13
347
320—

Receipts from N. Orleans.

.

123,214
239,303

111.687

Burnt and manufactured...
■Stock at close of year
Deduct:

1878-79.

,

Tennessee.

Shipments—
*
Coastwise exports are made up as follows: 189,261 bales from Gal¬
veston; 8,694 bales from Iudianola. Included in coastwise exports are
0,058 bales carried from Galveston North by rail, which are deducted in
overland.

Florida.

Deduct

39,681

16,984
-

17,580

56,716

.-

Shipments from K. West t
Stock beginning of year
Total

Shipped from Nashville to

49

-

Charleston, &c

56,716

17,531

product of year

*
These figures represent this year, as heretofore, only the shipments
from the Florida outports. Other Florida cotton has gone inland to
Savannah, Mobile, «&c., but we have followed our usual custom of count¬

ing that cottou at the outports where it first appears.
t These shipments from Key We3t are a portion of damaged cargo of
the ship Mary E. Riggs (on the way from Now Orleans to Bremen),
wrecked on the Florida coast last year.

Shipped direct to manu-

423,296

460,110
1,786

796

233,012

10,730
Exported from Brunswick, <fcc.:

6,500

Total

Add shipments to
turers direct

59-

Deduct:
Received from Mobile and
New Orleans
Received from Beaufort,
Charleston, Ac
Received from Florida—

8—

721,494

5,962

5,517
2,473
603

Upland *
Se*a Island*

4,946
2,465

3,672

Stock

beginning of year—
Upland

3,355

1,679
8-

8ea Island

13,952

14—

16,742

*

Total product of year

704,752

741,425

to

South Carolina.

To coastwise
Island

374,097
5,169
119,485

ports—Sea

7,424

4,344

Exported from Georgetown,
<fcc
Burnt
Stock at close of year—

Upland

1,897

1,232

9,200
4,450

Sea Island

256—

503,514

216
19—

514,427

Deduct:
Received from Florida-

Upland
Sea Island
Received from Wilmiugt’n
Rec'd from 8avann’h,&c.—

Upland
Sea Island
Stock beginning

of

product of

2,286

-

14

431

408

2,490

1,400

216
19-

Sea Island

*

1.333

year—

Upland
Total

877

5,120

year

1,852
9,153

494,361

113-

7,406

507,021

Included in the exports from Charleston are the exports from Port
Royal and Beaufort, which were as follows this year—1879-80:
To Liverpool—28,267 bales Upland and 300 bales Sea Island.
To coastwiso ports—4,512 bales Upland and 1,371 bales Sea Island.




New

from

1,045-

799,856

-

667,789

'

manufac¬

Ten¬

522,375

342,698

576,725

474,255

1,099,100

816,953

Bales.

1879-80....
1878-79....
1877-78....
1876-77....
1875-76....
1874-75....
1873-74,...
1872-73..,.
1871-72....
1870-71
1869-70....
1868-69....
1867-68....

ending

States for the year ending Sept. 1,
............................

5,578,397
179,000
5,757,397

give the total crop

2,439,039
2,498.895
1866-67.... 2,059,271
1865-66.... 2,228,987

Years.

1850-51.... 2,415.257
1849-50.;.. 2,171,706
1848-49.... 2,808,596

1847-48.... 2,424,113

1835-36....
1834-35....
1833-34....
1832-33....

Bales.

1,860,479
2,170,537
2,484,662
2,108,579
2,394,203
1,688,675
1,639,353
2,181,749
1,363,403
1,804,797
1.425,575
1,360,725
1,254,328
1,205,394
1,070,438

Consumption.

*

These are only the receipts at Savannah from the Florida outports,
and, being counted in the Florida receipts, are deducted here. Besides
these amounts, there have als* beeu 22,253 bales Upland and 4,485
bales Sea Island, from the interior of Florida, received at Savannah
during the year by rail.

Exported from Charleston, &c.:*
To foreign ports—Upland. 337,349
To foreign ports—Sea Isl'd
7,425
To coastwise ports—Upl’d 145,378

474,255

each year since 1833.
Bales.
Tears.
5,757,397 1861-65.... No record. 1846-47....
5,073,531 1860-61.... 3.826,086 1845-16....
4,811,265 1859-60.... 4,823,770 1844-45....
4,485,423 1858-59.... 3,994,481 1843-44....
4,669,288 1857-58.... 3,238.902 1842-43....
3,832,991 1856-57.... 3,056,519 1841-42....
4,170,388 1855-56.... .3,645,345 1840-41....
3,930,508 1854-55.... 2,932,339 1839-40....
2,974,351 1853-54.... 3,035,027 1838-39....
4,352,317 1852-53.... 3,352,882 1837-38....
3,154,946 1851-52.... 3,090,029 1836-37....

we

Tears.

1,679
755,377

576,725

Except the shipments to Now Orleans, Norfolk and Charleston,which
included in the New Orleans, Virginia and South Carolina crops.

Below

10,879

Sea Island

shipments

Total crop in the United
1880..................

1,156

Upland

12,950

product detailed above by States for the year
September 1, 1880
Consumed in tbe South, not included
;

8

Manufactured
Stock at close of year—

69,555

Total

18,391

4,782

1

28,444

York, &o

*

ports—Sea

To foreign ports
To coastwise ports
Burnt

87,691

1,659—

are

303,679

109,984

105,337

Stock at
Memphis and
Nashville at beginning

Total product
nessee*

Georgia.

Exported from Savannah;
To Foreign ports—Upland
To foreign ports—sea Is’d
To coastwise ports—Upland
To coastwise
'Island

Shipped from Memphis to
Charleston, &c

49

1,659- -1,010,487

7,139—1,322,231

:

Shipped from Memphis to

Deduct:

574,811

834,945
Memphis and Nash-

vi/le at end of year

17,035

596

To foreign ports
To coastwise ports
Stock at close of year

in
Mississippi,

Tennessee,
Stock in

Exported from Femandina, &c.:*

386,657
47,360

403,811
76,336

From Nashville
From
other
places

has been to the cotton manufacturing industry
With spinners in our own
country, the season began under circumstances of great prom¬
ise, but with European spinners the outlook at the opening
was very unfavorable.
And yet onr reviving industries had,
even last July and August, given a certain impulse to England’s
trade; but Liverpool and Manchester were inclined to look
upon the improvement as merely a temporary spurt, not
believing permanent relief was possible in view of the
wretched harvest and the extreme prostration which had so
long prevailed there.
We have not room at the present time, nor is it necessary, to
recall the features of the rash speculation which, beginning
under such conditions and about that time, passed over this
country in the last half of 1879 and the early part of this year,
with the suddenness and violence of a tropical storm. It is
sufficient to say, it created so great a demand for European pro¬
ductions that every cotton spindle in Great Britain and on the
Continent was soon in motion, and profitably employed. This
abrupt change in Europe from intense dulness to activity, from
a losing to a profitable trade, came of course very unexpectedly,
and was generally looked upon as merely a temporary revival.
The

past

year

of the world

c?

a

surprise throughout.

September

But it

seems

THE

11, 1880.]

that this Yiew also

was

incorrect, and that

CHRONICLE.

an

end

had actually come to the unusual depression which had reigned
over the whole world during late years; for when our specula¬
tive mania subsided and the unnatural demand for English

goods from the United States fell off, a new demand set in
from other countries, carrying on and continuing the improve¬
ment which had been so marked.
By the last trade returns of
Great Britain, we notice that the exports of cotton goods for
the month of July were about 33 per cent greater than for the
same month last year, and that almost every country is a
sharer in this enlarged movement.
Under such circumstances as these, the consumption of cotton
in Europe for the coming year ought, it would seem, to promise
well, and yet its extent is a question of some uncertainty. It is
admitted, we believe, by all, that there has been no increase in
spindles in Europe djiring the past eighteen months. If this be
so, we find it difficult to understand how the spinning capacity is
equal to even the present estimated weekly consumption, and
still less how it would permit of any increase this year. But, on
the other hand, if the Eastern demand on Manchester for
goods is to be kept up to the present extent, and a better home
demand springs up—as there is every reason to anticipate will
spring up under the influence of the better crops—the total
requirements of Europe for cotton ought to be in excess of the
year now just closing.! We shall have to defer the determination
of these doubts, however, until after Mr. Ellison makes up his
annual figures on the first of October.
With regard to the United States, the year in review has
been a very satisfactory one so far as the consumption of goods
Some spinners suffered by stocking up the raw
is concerned.
material when the cotton craze was at its height, but as the
demand for goods was active, the prices for them kept up well
even after cotton had materially declined.
To show the fluctu¬
ations in print cloths, we give the following statement of daily
prices during the year.
.

1, 1879, TO AUG. 31, 1880.

DAILY PRICES OF PRINTING CLOTHS FROM SEPT.

Oct.

Sept.

Bag.

Nov. Dec.

Jan. Feb.

1.... I3 IB
2.... l316
3.... 1*16
4.... 4316

3ia
3ia
3ia
3ia

4H

4*16

8.

114
414
4q

47rt
47b

39ig 414

47r

478
478

47r
47r

478
478

5*8
538

47s

8.

538

478
47r

53r
53a

•

•

•

•

6....
7....
8....
9....
10....
11....
12....
13....
14....
15....
16....
17....
38....
19....

414
414

4*0
1*8
4*8
4
4
4

8.
4

3i2

8.

8.

3*p
33;
33;

4H
4q

8.

4ia

3%

4 ia

478
478

313,. 4ia

8.

413

23....
24....
25....
26....
27....
28....
29....
30....
31....

3*a
3*2
312
3ia
3i2
8.

3ia
3ia

37a
37r
37r
37r

8.

4

8.

413,8

8.

H.

II.

4**ig 8.
41316 478

478
478
478
478

5**16 558

51r
0I4

4%

8.

478

5
5
5
8.
5

4!316 43;

414
4H
414
414
4k

5Hl6

558
55g
5r>s

47s 53s

478
478
478

4%

Hb
414

55q

5

5%
534

8.

43;

Apr. May.

558

53a
538

538
■538
51316 53s
53s
578

8.

578
578
578
s.

578
078
578
578
578
D78

5ia
5ia
5ia
5ia

8.

578
53;

8.

5ia
5ia
5ia
5ia
5ia

34

0

5*38
558
5»8
8.

59ie

53s

55r

8.
5*3

478 5ia
8.
478
478 5ia
478 5ia

478
478
3%
4!a
47s
3%
i9l6 478
8.
3*8
43r
478
20.... 3®h
37R
45r
478
8.
21.... 8.
43;
37R
22.... 39ib 3**16
43;

378

8.
53«

4131P
413i(5 478
413ifi 478 538
41*16 8. 53a

S.

4316 3ia
s.

H.

Mar.

r>5«

8.

June

4

*R
43s
4%
438
8.

43s
43r
438
4I4
414

8.

4ia
4ia
4ia
4ia
4ia
4ia

53r
538
53s
538
53s

8.

514

4ia
4ia
4 ia
4ia
414
414

8.

514
514
5
5
5
5
8.
5
5
5
5
5

8.

4q
414
4
4
4

4116

4
4
4
8.
II.
4
4
4
4
4
8.
4
4

4316

8.
5

4Lj

8.

July A.ug.

414
9.

414
4i8

8.
4

4
4
4

3**16
315ie
8.

37s
3*4
3%
3\
33;

273

We have in the above

graphic indication of theextremely favorable balance the year’s work nets American,
spinners, except those who saw fit to buy their cotton at highest
prices. Unfortunately, the number who finally lost their reason
and stocked up, under the prevailing excitement, was large;:
and yet, as already stated, even their balance sheet is a good
one, for the home demand for goods was so active as to absorb
the production at pretty full prices, while in many cases, if not
in most, spinners had sold their production ahead and only
bought cotton to cover. To indicate approximately the profit
to the manufacturer, we give the following, taking cotton at a
price at which a considerable part of the crop went into the
a

very

articles named.
Standard

Prin

Sheetings.

Cloths.

Cents.

Cents.
1200

12-50

Cotton, say cost
Waste in manufacture

Cost manufacture and

2.12:

2-20

6-30

12.76

21-00

26-88

yard
Selling price of goods per yard, say

7-37

3-84

900

4-84

Profit per yard
Profit per pound, say

1-63

1-00

45r

700

Total cost per

selling, per pound

pound

Cost per

With the trade in such

condition, there

be

surprise
year’s results. In the first place these figures express so
large a profit, no one needs to be told that under its influence
production has been driven and spindles have been increased.
With regard to the latter point, we estimate at the lowest fig*
ure over a half million spindles have been added during the
year in the Northern mills, and we are inclined to think that
the spindles in the whole United States now reach about
11,500,000.
Still, the census result will probably be issued
shortly, and we shall then possess actual returns instead of the
estimates which are the only resource the country has had sinee
our census in 1875.
Of the one fact, however (the increase in
spindles this year), no assurance is needed that the growth has
been rapid during the last twelve, months, for the mills have
been working profitably and to their utmost capacity.
But there is another feature of the year’s business which is
by no means a favorable one. We refer to the fact that our
export trade in cotton goods has not only not grown but has
decidedly fallen off. We are indebted to Mr. Niinmo, Chief of
the Bureau of Statistics, for the last year’s figures, and give
them below in connection with the results of previous years.
a

can

no

at the

EXPORTS OF COTTON MANUFACTURES.

4

4
4
4
8.
4
4
4
4
4
4
8.
4
4
4
4
4
4

4
4
4
4
8.
4
4
4
4
4
4
8.
4
4
4

8.

Year ending June

3%
33;
3%

31*16
31*16
378
8.
4
4
4
4
4

37e

1880.
Colored

Yds. 37,758,166
$2,956,760
Uncolored goods.. Yds. 68,821,567
goods

Do

Value.

Do

Value. $5,834,541

Other rnanTs of. Value. $1,190,117
Total
tures

1879.

45,116,058
$3,209,285
84,081,319
$6,288,131
$1,356,534

30.

1878.

1874.

37,765,313 4,600,447
$2,959,910 $660,262
88,528,192 13,237,510
$7,053,463 $1,686,297
$744,773
$1,422,287

cotton manufac¬

exported. Val ue. $9,981,418 $10,853,950 $11,435,660 $3,091,332

S.

sorry-looking statement for a trade that
the reader will put
The relative position of cotton and goods can better be
table, which shows
determined by the following comparison of prices on the first the actual cost of manufacture and the profit our spinners
secured out of the home demand, and will remember that this
day of each month of the past three years.
home demand absorbed the production at those rates, he will
Year Ending with August 31—
cease to wonder at the result.
Manufacturers are not going to
1979-80.
1878-79.
send
to
China
1877-78.
goods when they can get more for them at home.
First
This condition is however, a temporary one;—under the present
Day
Low
Low
PrintPrint£ £
■2 ? Print- Low
stimulus of price spindles will increase rapidly, we shall very
MiddVg
ing
ing Middl'g 'S
Each Middrg
ing
'I
^
soon have more than can be profitably employed on the home
£ £
Cloths Upland £ V Cloths
M'nth Upland O Vi Cloths Upland
Cotton.
64x64. Colton. 35 05 64x64. Cotton. CQ
trade, and the foreign demand will then have to be cultivated
64x64.
to get rid of the surplus. When that time is reached, the export
Cts.
Cts.
Cts.
Cts.
Cts.
Cts.
Cts.
Cts.
Cts.
movement
must become a permanent feature of the trade; but
8
7*4
Sopt.. 111*16
814
1H*16
33;
1*16
3**16 105s
8
Oct... 10li6
3ia
10ia
7%
until it is reached the movement is necessarily spasmodic and
1078
814
3916
3lli6
....

538
5 3s

478

....

478

....

....

55r
55g

8.

4*r

....

37s
378

This is

a

very

appeared

so promising a year ago. Still, if
this statement by the side of the foregoing

*

Co

*•

....

«

.

Nov..

11

8

Deo.

12*16
12*! 6

Jan.
Feb.

.

.

4q

91a

7ia

9

4!*i6

87s

7ia

9

47a

0ii6

,

12ia

9

5*8

91s

Mar..

12iiiQ

914

April.

914

May..

125a
Ilia

5°8
55q

June.

Hi*

4*16

9716
10516
H°16
12i*16

4
4

.

July.. 11*16
Aug.. 10i&la

914
914
814
814

5

11

7ia

314
314
314

7

339

10ia

7k

3316

10*16
9**10

814
814
8q
8q
8q
814

101*46
11

714

33a

7*4

31116

1018

7ia

414
439

11

7»a

121r

8q
8ia

11*16

7ia

11316

ftia

419

Ilia

7ia

Note.—Sheetings—Agenta’ prices (for Atlantic A)

Cloths—Manufacturers' prices.




are

given.

31*16
37s
4

33a
3ia
314

3*16
3*16
3*8
3*8

Print

uncertain.
In this connection, it is well to remember that

with lower

prices of cotton our position is greatly strengthened as a
competitor in foreign markets, for the reason that the
goods we send, say to China, measure 2*85 yards to a pound,
while the Manchester spinner gets about 6 yards out of his
pound of cotton. So, too, lower cotton ought to give us a
farther advantage, inasmuch as freights on the raw material
to Manchester thus become a larger proportion of the cost.
Furthermore, the Chinese will not buy goods after they reaeh a

THE CHRONICLE.

271

We do not, therefore, see anything but a tempor¬
ary set-back in this trade in the falling off of our exports this
year, and believe that our manufacturers are in a condition to
engage in it profitably, largely and permanently, as soon as their
power to produce goods shall have grown beyond the home
consumption. The present year’s decreased movement is un¬
fortunate, as our goods have thereby lost in part a position we
had slowly, laboriously and at considerable expense been gain¬
ing for them during the last few years. But we shall expect to
see a recovery this year, and then we must address ourselves to
remodelling our navigation laws and otherwise fostering this

certain

little more to be added to complete our record
goods trade for the year. One circumstance has pre¬
vented as large a consumption of cotton as might otherwise
have taken place, and that is the turning on to finer goods of
the most of the machinery which was suited to the change.
The reason for this was the greater profit in the finer makes,
and the result has been that some of our largest mills have
actually used less cotton than last year. Still, the total taken
by our spinners is in excess of any other year, and we should
say that altogether the consumption has increased about 9 per
cent. Were it not that the laws in our larger manufacturing
States restrict labor in factories as to hours, &c., longer time
would have been made and the consumption have been greater.
With these explanations, we give our usual statement of the
takings of cotton North and South during the past season.
Total crop of tlie United States, as above stated
bales. 5,757,397
There is very

of the

Stock

baud commencement of year

on

(Sept. 1, 1879;—
At Northern ports
At Southern ports
At Providence, &c\, Northern interior

44,343
14,702—

59.110
05,943

G,S33—

markets
Total

Year ending

price.

trade.

5,823,345

supply during year ending Sept. 1, 1880

has been—
Exported to foreign ports during the

Of this supply there

3,865,G21

year

foreign cotton included
9,137—3,850,431
18,257
Sent to Canada direct from West
Burnt, North and South*
3,331
Stock on hand end of year (Sept. 1,1880)—
At Northern ports
00,109
At Southern ports
77,310— 137,419
At Providence, &c., Northern interior
Less

3,999—1,019.540

markets

Total takings by spinners in

United States, year ending

September-1,1880
:
Taken by spinners in Southern States, included in above total.

1,803,805
179,000

Total

1,024,805

takings by Northern spinners

UP* Burnt includes not only what has been thus

destroyed at the

Northern and Southern outports, blit also all burnt on Northern rail¬
roads and in Northern factories. Every tire which has occurred, either
in a mill or on a railroad in the North, during the past year, we have
investigated; and where there was cotton lost, have sought, and in
almost every case obtained, a full return of the loss.

takings by spinners to have
been 1,803,805 bale3, of which the South has taken 179,000
bales and the North 1,624,805 bale3. We find it necessary, on
account of inaccurate estimates that are being made on the
basis of our figures, to repeat what we have so often said
before,—that a considerable portion of tlie takings of cotton
every year since prices Were so low has been to supply the
demand of worsted, woolen and knitting mills. Consequently
no safe conclusion can be reached from those takings as to the
consumption per spindle of our cotton mills. Last year we
estimated that spinners had consumed more cotton than they
This year, although there has been a further
had taken.
enlarged consumption, they have added to their stocks. The
following statement will show the actual takings and estimated
consumption for a series of years.

|Voi. XXXI.

Crop of

Weight in
pounds.

Number

of bales.
Louisiana
Alabama

....

358,971

Georgia
So. Carolina..

Virginia

—

Total crop..

741,425
494,361

353,659.725

761,225
106,245

356 253,300

230,372,226

1,295,631

50,041.395
634,859,190

5,757,397

2,772,448,480

No. Carolina.

Tenn., &c

248,011,617
716,215,304
183,035,723

494,885
1,501.654

Texas

September 1,1880.
Average
weight.
501*15
476-00
509-89
477*00
466-00
468-00
471-00
490-00

1,1879.

Year ending September
Number

Weight in

of bales.

pounds.

Aver’ge
weight.
502-34
46200
497-93
478-00

292,421,156
548,562,630
180,453,815
336,871,450
232,671,936
264,741,433
61,905,835
482,577,264

582,118
1,187,365
362,408

704,752
507,021
568,383
135.815

1,025,669

458-90
465 78
45581

47050

t

481-55

5,073.531

473-0

2,400,205.525

According to the foregoing, the average gross weight per
season was 481*55 lbs., against 473*08 lbs. in 1879,' or
8*47 lbs. more than last year, which indicates 15*51-per cent
increase, in the total weight of the crop. Had, therefore, only
bale this

pounds been put into each bale as during the previous
season, the crop would have aggregated 5,860,422 bales.
The
relation of the weights this year to previous years may be seeu
from the following comparison :
as

many

.

-

Average

Crop.
Season

of

Number

1879-SO
1878-79
1877-78
1870-77
1875-70
1874-75
1873-74

The

"

foregoing

of Bales.

Weight
Bale.

per

481*55
473-08
480-10
408-28
471-46
468 00
469-00

2,772,448,480
2,400,205,525
2,309.908,907
2,100,405,086
2,201,410,024

5,757,397
5,073,531
4,811,205
4,485,423
4,009,288
3,832,991 •
4,170,388

are gross

Weight, Pounds.

1,780,934,705
1,950,742.297

weights.

and its Marketing.
The last table, showing the comparative weights of the
crops for the last few years, furnishes of course the only true
measure of the extent of each of them.
It is too early yet,
even if we were disposed, to give any estimate of the coming
crop. All the reports up to the present time indicate a condi¬
tion promising a yield even greater than the crop covered by the
foregoing review. One thing is certain—for nobody questions
it—and that is, that the date of the maturity of the plant in the
various States is still (after all the summer changes) about as
we indicated it was in our acreage report of last June.
It will
be classed as an early crop; whereas the one which has just
been marketed was classed as a late crop. Yet the plant is, as
last year, by no 'means everywhere equally advanced. In the
Atlantic States it is decidedly earlier than a year ago ; but in
the Gtulf States it is no earlier, and in a very considerable sec¬
tion of those States it is later. It will be remembered that in
portions of Mississippi and Louisiana the crop was last year
fully as forward as in 1878, while in Texas it was very early.
As bearing upon this question, and- being useful for future
reference, we bring forward our data with regard to the receipt
of first bale and the total receipts to Sept. 1st of new cotton for
several years. First we give the date of the receipt of first bale.
The New Crop

Date of
•

1874.

1875.

Receipt of First Bale.

1870.

1877.

1878.

1880.

1879.

Virginia—

Aug. 19

Nnrfol lr

This statement shows the total

Taken

by

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

Bales.

Bales.

Bales.

Bales.

Bales.

Bales.

Northern mills
Southern mills

1,062.522 1,211,598 1,288,418 1,398,298 1,416,960 1,624,805
145,079 145,000 147,000 148,000 152,000 179.000

Total takings from crop.
Estimated consumption
in United States

1,583,960j1,803,805
1,225,000 1,310,000 1,435,000 1,530,000 1,625,000 1,760,000
1,207,601 1,356,598 1,435,418 1,546,293

We think the last line in the

foregoing table furnishes a

close approximate to the actual consumption of the United
States each year since 1874-75.

very

parison.




So. Carolina—

Charleston.... Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. 13 Aug. 21 Aug.

Georgia—
Atlanta

Sep". 14 Aug. 14 Aug. 22 Aug.28 Aug. 10

Aug. 22 Aug. 10

C July 30 Aug. 2 Aug. 7 July 25
7 Aug. 20 Aug. 2 Aug. 7 Aug. 3
12 July 28 Aug. 2 Aug. 3 Aug. 2
8 Aug. 10 Aug. 9 Aug. 11 Aug. 3

Aug. 1 July 18
Aug. 9 July 22
Aug. 9 Aug. 4
Aiig.14 Aug. 2

Savannah—
From Ga....
From Fla
Macon
....

Columbus

..

..

Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.

Alabama—

Montgomery.. Aug. 11 Aug. 4 Aug. 12 Aug. 10 Aug. 2 Aug. 9 Aug. 2

-

Aug. 12 Aug. 5 Aug. 13 Aug. 11 Aug. 3 Aug. 4 Aug. 10
Aug.12 Aug. 14

Mobile
Selma

Louisiana—
New Orleans—
From Texas. July 13 July 13 July
4<
Miss.Val. Aug. 12 July 13 Aug.

10 July 10 June30 July 7 Aug. 8
4 Aug. 10 July 31 July 31 Aug. 8
Shreveport.... Aug. 13 Aug. 7 Aug. 0 Aug. 9 Aug. S Aug. 7 Aug. 13
a?

Mississippi—

Aug. 14 Aug. 14 Aug. 9 Aug. 18 Aug. 14
Vicksburg....
Columbus"..
Aug. 21 Aug.28 Aug. 17 Aug. 24 Aug. 20 Aug. 27 Aug.21
..

Arkansas—
Little Rock
Tennessee—
Nashv.lle.

Aug. 14

....

Memphis
Texas

Aug. 15 Sept. 3 Aug. 30 Sept. 4 Aug. 18 Aug. 14 Aug. 19
Aug. 19
Aug. 12 Aug. 23 Aug. 23 Sept. 1 Aug. 12

—

Fr’m Br’wnsv July 9 July 10 July 7 July 13 \Tne30
First other... July 23 July 17 July 9 Aug. 1 July 17 Julv 2 July 12
DeWitt DeWitt DeWitt Galv. Lavaca DeWitt DeWitt
Where from
County
County County County County County Countv

£

*

..

5 Aug. 13 Aug.12

Aug. 16 Aug. 1 Aug. 17 Aug. 27 Aug. 8 Aug. 14 Aug.12

Augusta

of bales and of the crop this year we have
We give last year’s statement for com¬
..

Aug. 12 Aug. 30 Aug.21
Aug. 13 Aug.28 Aug. 18

Wilmington..

Galveston—

Weight of Bales.
The gross weight
made up as follows.

No. Carolina—

Passed

through New Orleans at this date.

275

THE CHRONICLE

September 11, 1880.J

already stated, that the crop must be beginning of the year (27 bales), we have the
classed
early one. But in some respects a better indica¬ total supply and distribution.
This
.
tion are the arrivals of new cotton to Sept. 1, though, on account Stockyear’s crop
Sept. 1, 1879
of the corner in futures, a more persistent effort has been Total year’s supply
Distributed as follows:
made than ever before to market the cotton as fast as picked.
These dates show, as

following

as

the

as an

bales. 17,023
319—17,342
bales.
9,389

Exported to foreign ports

NEW COTTON TO

ARRIVALS OF

Stock end of year

SEPT. 1.

Leaving for consumption in United States
1876.

1875.

1874.

1877.

Charlotte, N. C

4

Charleston, S. C

......

Augusta, Ga
Ailanta, Ga
Savannah, Ga
Macon, Ga
Columbus, Ga
Montgomery, Ala..
Mobile, Ala
New Orleans, La..

226
None.

32

1,421

396
500
51
247

74
190
175
320
38

..

Shreveport, La
Vicksburg, Miss
Nashville) Tenn
Memphis, Tenn
Galveston, Texas....

*

Estimated;

no

1,500
898
150
216
114
429
40

212

342
00

38
28

80

1
48

2,706

6,218

5,282

117
3
227
113
72
304
58
419
56
46
None.
1

1,051

1,408

1,589
50

4,765
1,286
723
795
530

1,113
*

187
200
10
48

29

1
140
103
12
521

2,550
1,800
350

12,438
135 1,217
425

76
604
185
734
277
18
3

1,103
23 L
125
40
80

8,091 10,527 10,517

2,467 21,402 13,336 33,571

8,981

8,103

5,373

return received.

early movement of 1878 was greatly delayed in the
Mississippi Valley by the yellow fever epidemic. Last year
the same cause impeded the movement at some points. This
year, as stated above, a special inducement for haste has
-

our

spinners have taken of

of stock in spinners’ hands at the
following useful table shows the
and movement of Sea Islands since the war.

accounted for by differences
close of the two years. The
crops

1,798

>

..

We thus reach the conclusion that

Sea Island cotton this year 9,389 bales. The fact that this is
less than the takings of the previous year is probably to be

808

*

Total all porrs to

September 1

7

195
.

253
0

1880.

1S79.

1878.

20,704
27
bales. ‘ 20,731

halos.

The

existed in the cornered condition of the market.

Foreign Exports.

Crop.
Sect son.

Geor¬

Flori¬
da.

gia.

13,318 3,420
13,776 2,052

1879-80
1878-79
1877-78
1876-77
1875-76
1874-75
1873-74
1872-73
1871-72
1870-71
1869-70
1868-69
1867-6S
1866-67
1865-66

14,739
11,214
8,950
8,313
8,825
10,764
5,624
8,753
9,948
6,703

3,608
1,669
1,213
1,110
1,408
1,269
1,567
4,934
9,225

10,402

6,296

6.371

11,212 10,015
2,428 10,957

South
Caro¬
lina.

Tex¬

Total.

as.

Great Conti¬ Total
Brit'n. nent. exports

26.704
9,968
'2 22,963
7,133
30 24,825
6,448
29 17,823
4,911
77 14,996
4,756
204 17,027
7,400
8,759 920 19,912
13,156 1,100 26,289
8,755 899 16,845
7,218 704 21.609
7,334
26,507
18,682
5,608
21,275
4,577
32.228
11,001
19,015
5,630

13,729
10,456
12,394
11,865
11,591
13,139
16.986
22,847
14,991
19,844

3,294

22,776

1,940

15,388
19,707
30,314
18,086

1,851

America Consump¬ * Stock,3Au1g..
tion

17,023 9,389 319
27
12,698 10,366
127
16,295 9,451
13,234 4.068 1,048
12,936 1,915 527
382
15,046 2,192
18,873 2,113 593
1.667
23,469 1,523
15,584 1.596 370
19,905 1,672 635
24,716 1,399 603
17,239 1,888 211
156
19,859 1,670
30,706 1.597 410
18,231 1,100 485

2,242
3,701
1,369

1,345
1,907
1,887
622
593
61

152
392
145

Total.... 144,969 65,114 112,6o2 3,965 326,700 254.313 21,501 275,814 51,369

and Consumption.

Sea Island Crop
We have
ness

*

again to acknowledge our indebtedness to the kind¬
shippers of Sea Island cotton,

The column of “American Consumption” in this

receivers the exact number of bales of Sea Island received.

Hence, the following results thus obtained are as accurate as
make them.

we can

Movement of Cotton at the Interior Ports.
Below

give the total receipts and shipments of cotton at
and the stock on the 1st of September of

we

the interior ports,
each year.

Year

1879-80.

1373-79.

v,—

6,228
3,686
3,051

8,157
2,630
2,101 '

Receipts at Savannah,bales
Receipts at Charleston
Receipts at New York. &c..
Shipments to Liverp’l from
Florida direct

424
355
244
581
425
380

100,493
85,460
51,004
123,045
111,788
403,811
81,850

162,108
87,171

2,039
2,060

163,521

87.100
59.208

87,200

M’tgomerv, Ala.

132,387

Selma, Ala

Nashville,Tenn.

100,009
336,129
48,542

380,697
47,300

1,273

Total, old ports.

977,592

977,875

3,088 1,028,489 1,018,058 14,119

Dallas, Texas
Jeflcrson, Texas
Shreveport, La.

43,233

Vicksburg,Miss.

37,601
22,297

43,067
27,435
80,595
37,031

Memphis, Tenn.

..

'

59,491
132,923
100,683

27,469

80,655

Columbus, Miss.

18,718

87,859
02,133
39,382
332,437
248,069

St. Louis, Mo...

22G
59
210
3S
30
137
7
249
4
246

22,359
47,413
18,801
87,711

47,203

Ciueinuati, 0...

13,77G

13,318

Tot. Sea Island crop of Fla.

Shipm'ts. Stock.]

Receipts.

Shipm'ts. Stock.

103,617

.

Charlotte, N. C.

211

430

Ending Sept. 1, 1880.

Augusta, Ga..
Columbus, Ga..
Macon, Ga

..

,

Year

Ending Sept. 1, 1879.

Receipts.

Eufaula, Ala
Griffin, Ga
Atlanta, Ga....
Rome, Ga

Florida.

table includes burnt

in the United States.

of the various receivers and

through whose assistance we are able to continue our annual
report of that staple. As our readers are aware, no record is
kept of the export movements of Sea Island except for the
ports of Charleston and Savannah. For the Northern ports,
Custom House manifests furnish no guide. We have found it
impossible, therefore, to perfect these figures except by special
correspondence in every case with the consignee or the shipper,
and in this way following every bale of Sea Island, after it
appeared at a Southern outport, until it either had actually
been exported or taken for consumption. We should also state
that for the shipments of cotton direct from Florida to ports
other than Charleston and Savannah, we have in the case of
each consignment, at the time of its receipt, procured from the

....

02.213

39,280

1,101
1,858

332,101

247,087

51,087

124,384
111,992
409,809
81,338

48,932
70,123
95,436
53,143
31,229
41,109
27,259
107.223
80,721
42,321
485,992
314,219

-

927

1,320
628

6,384
755

49,083
70,058
95,000
53,019
31,176

75
124
616
157

40,325
27,071

921
195

105,779
80,043
42,238
479,686
314,905

1,093

83

682
329

7,467

1,172

Total, new ports 1,053,110 1,051,099

4,220 1,403,707 1,394,383 13,544

2,030,708 2,029,574

7,908 2,432,196 2,412.141 27,663

Total, all

Georgin.

The

8,230

Receipts at Savannah
11,533
Receipts at Brunswick, &c.
44- -11,577

44-

8,280

Deduct:

0,228

8,157— 8,157

Receipts from Florida

2,052

3,420

Tot. Sea Island crop of Ga.

South Carolina.

Receipts at Charleston
Shipped from BeaufortCoastwise
To Liverpool

13,415

9,308

1,371

1,451

Deduct:
Received from Florida
Tofe. Sea Island crop

300—15,080

-10,819

5,120

3,080

TOTAL EXPORTS OF COTTON TO FOREIGN

Texas.

1875.

2

N. Orl’ns.
Mobile...
S. Car’] ina

22,963

Georgia..

Tot. S. Island crop of Texas
Total Sea Islar.d crop of tlio
United States

2G.704

The distribution of the crop
Supply Year ending
Sc))t. 1. 1880.
of—

Stock

Sep: 1.
1879.
S. Carolina..

Georgia

19
8

Florida
Texas

Crop.

Supply

9,985
9,966
3,420
3,428
13,318 13.318

How
•

Distributed.
Stock

....

Total....

From the

Island this

....

27 26,704 20,731

Texas....
Florida
No. Car..

follows.
Of wh ich Ex¬
ported to—

1880.
200

59
•

•

.

•

Great
Havre
trib't'n Brit'n.

9,725
3,369

13,318

5,450 1,975
598
430

198

319

26,412

Ex¬

ports.
7,425
796

1877.

275,130
423,235
224,284

281,713

370,218
236,449

44

337,480
298,540
258,235
1,362
36,374

27,267
108,693

121,169

494,374

434,158

New York

15,375
67,212
445,172

Boston...

36.259

Philadel.
Baltim’re
P’rtl’d Me
S.Fr’cisco

26,090
44,567

58,078
40,007
29,114

30,844
32,316

431

393

415

Virginia

.

1878.

1879.

1880.

75,310

305,874

379,266

314,774

354,086

401,904
353,817
17,035
68,011
203,536
370,847

424,092
301,874

124,470

133,102
41,593

225,174
5,277
56,677
159,357
401,959
127,874
25,144

5S.367
9,176
486

596

35,783
257,065
650,826

26,389
95,203

122,073

127

215

Total fr’m

U.states'2,084.410 3,252,994 3,049,497 3,346,640 3,467,565 3,865,621

.

3,624 1,121

4,745

3,502

3,562

65

....

For'gn

430

-•••••

....

Total

1876.

995,270 1,363.005 1,204,591 1,453,096 1,243,746 1,441,941
123,214
164,093
111,687
243,683
218,703
131,341

..

Lear'g
Sep. 1. for dis-

..

Philadelphia




Total

as

.

)ftew York...
Boston
Baltimore.

Net

has been

PORTS FOR SIX YEARS.

Exports (bales) to Foreign Ports for Year ending Aug. 31.

From—

2

Receipts at Galveston....

Ports

given in this report will be found the for¬
eign exports the past year from each port to Great Britain,
France and other ports, stated separately, as well as the totals
to all the ports.
In the following we give the total foreign
exports for six years for comparison.
In the first table

7,133

9,90G

of S. G.

shipments in this statement include amounts taken from
ports for home consumption and amounts burnt.
Exports.

these interior

....

13,729 3,294

65

17,023

foregoing we see that the total growth of Sea
year is 26,704 bales; and v* ith the stock at the

Below

we

give a detailed statement of the year’s exports

from each port, showing the direction which these shipments
have taken. Similar statements will be found in all our pre-

j vious crop reviews, and a comparison as to the extent of the
j total
movement to each port can therefore be made with back
years.

THE CHRONICLE,

276
1

*

Gal¬
New
Orleans. Mobile. veston.

To—

84,189 213,243

901,675

Liverpool
Hull, Ac..

„

„

t

„

.

Char¬

Savan¬

leston.

nah.

m’th, Ac.

6,576
265.320
9,592

10,143

71,153

4,480

Amst’d’m
Rott’rd’m

Antwerp

.

Ghent....
Reval
Cronstadt

^

(

f

.

.

-

^

f

.

ports.

9,282
23,831

1,810

1.114

20,723

18,950

„

T

t

-

-

„

.

„

.

.

21,198

34,376

14,463
47,909

3,212

1,125
12,046
1,110

6,151
9,855

t

,

......

6,610
6,616

57.286

19,206

31,598

Total.

2,602
2,856

*

39,754

89,641

some

„

„

,

.

*

......

5,335

27,647

35,847
389,732
9,592
293,584

2,522
1,526

2,522
21,861

28,631

999

2,422

47.310

1,550

1,125

„

1,825

......

650

9,936
12,330

4,390
37,315
3,365

„

.

*

.

^

4.390

3.072

15,667
4,541

2,020

3,275

Riga

151,548
35,748
3,275

H e1singfors
Christi ’na

5,627

5,627

1,300

Gefle

6.530

••«>

T

.

—

_

.

~

0

1

9

*

4,180

4,825
5,990

1,540

1,974

5,515

•

5,831

Nor rkoping
Canesh’n.
Uddervalla, Ac
Malmoe
Barcelona

•

v

#

.

r

Santand’r
Palma

t

t

.

70,726

1,650
21.283

„

„

„

r

m

.

#

.

.

.

.

.

6,103

3,514
1,260

m

1,260

5,‘5'ii

Malaga...
•bruhna..

9

1,275
.

2,388

7,325

1,300
16,870

17,647

1,646
......

..

20,951

......

.

.

.

.

t

.

.

1,210

1,275
1,650
129,986

550

550

2,200

7,711
300

300

de

Majorca..

.

„

......

„

.

0

500

.

Mahon....

Pasages
Oporto....
Genoa....
Salerno...

Naples....
Trieste...
Vera Cruz

Tampico

...

.

....

.

.....

25,053
2,700

^

2,950

^

4

.

.

.

.

.

.

......

8,435

3,910

10,275

1,220

1,350

#f#tt.

1,300

......

......

1,045
3,461

......

1,250
......

„

••••••

......

.

1,150
1,045
55,334
5,270
1.300

.

2,268

2.268

20,488

26,327

v

5,839

168

.

Tahiti
Other for-

.

1,15 J

t

....

..

500
12

......

......

12

...

......

......

25

168
25

1

1

......

......

.f

eign p’rts

Total.... 1441,941 111,687 301,874 344.774 424,092 650,826 122,073 409,354 3865,621

Exports from Charleston to Liverpool Include 23,567 bales from Port Royal,
f "Dther Ports ” include the following shipments:
From Wilmington. 22,964 bales to Liverpool, 1,195 to Cork, 1,177 to Havre,
4,477 to Bremen. 1,526 to Hamburg. 2,310 to Amsterdam, 2 to Christiana,
Norway, 2,020 to Cronstadt, and 112 to the Continent.
From Norfolk, 245,237 bales to Liverpool, 1,407 to Cork or Falmouth. 1,479
to Havre, 853 to Bremen. 2,522 to Bremerhaven, 3,072 to Reval, 1,*210 to
Barcelona, and 1,250 to Genoa.
From Boston, 133,101 bales to Liverpool, and 1 to other foreign ports.
From Philadelphia, 40,743 bales to Liverpool, 200 to France, and 650 to
Antwerp.
From San Francisco. 190 bales to Liverpool and 23 to Tahiti.
From Florida, 596 bales to Liverpool.

*

(Commercial gnglisTx Hems
KATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON AND ON LONDON
AT LATEST DATES.
EXCHANGE AT LONDON—

August 28.
Time.

OnParis

Paris
Antwerp....
Amsterdam.
Amsterdam.
Berlin

Hamburg

...

Frankfort...

'Vienna
Bt.Petersb’rg
Madrid
Cadiz
Lisbon
Genoa

Copenhagen.
Alexandria..
New York...

Bombay....

Short.
3mos.
•

•

Shanghai....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

*92%® 11*97%
24% @24%

....

47%
47%

....

*

*

@12-3
@20-00
@20-69
@20-69

Time.
Short.

Aug. 28 Short.

*

44

Aug. 2^
Aug. 28

44

3

1)

....

*

Latest
Date.

25-52%@25-57% Aug. 28 Short.
<4
12-4% ®12-5
Aug. 28

•

•

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.

25-32%@ 25-42 % Aug. 28
25*50 @25*55
Aug. 28

Short. 12-2
3 inos. 20*06
20-06
20-60

.

_

_

^

mos.

Rate.

25-36
1214

2050
20-50
20-50
117-70

18-42

@18-45

....

....

30

days
44

•

•

•

Is.
Is.

•

....

8%6d.
8%od.

28 3

mos.

27*50

26
28
28
28
28
Aug. 28

3 mos.
Short.
4 mos.

98
4 81

Is. 8%d.

44

Is.

44

3s. 9%d.
5s. 2%d.

....

85ied.

[From our own correspondent.!
>

London, Saturday, August 28, 1880.

Business of all kinds has been upon a yery

•

restricted scale
during the past week, but the money market having become
easier and harvest work having made satisfactory progress, the
tone has been good, and there is still considerable confi¬
dence in the future. Business will remain quiet for a few weeks,
as there is now much pleasure-seeking ; but a good trade is
expected daring the autumn months, and there is reason to
believe that it will be of a sound and fairly remunerative
character. Improving trade does not, however, increase the
supply of mercantile paper, and the discount market rules, in
consequence, decidedly quiet. The rates have of late been
declining, but the Bank rate still rules at 2^2 per cent. Any
important downward movement has been checked by the export
demand for gold from the Continent to the United States, the
inference being that before long the Bank of France will be
compelled to raise its terms. Most of the foreign exchanges,
however, keep favorable to ns; but in these days when there
is so vast a quantity of foreign stocks afloat, and when the
future of Stock Exchange and Bourse operations is so uncer¬
tain, the exchanges are very frequently quickly affected.- We
seem, nevertheless, to be tolerably certain of cheap money for




cent.

per

The total

has been increased to the extent of

reserve

£393,338, and the Treasury Balance has been augmented by
£1,032,462. The Bank, however, is doing ■ very little discount
business, there being a decrease of £75,691 in the total of
“

other securities.”

The demand for money throughout the week has been very
moderate, and the market closed with an ,easy appearance at
the

subjoined quotations

:
4 months’ bank bills..... 21ea>214
6 months’ bank bills
2%@2%
4 & 6 months’ trade bills. 2% w3

2%

Bank rato

Open-market rates—
30 and 60 days’ bills

2
2

3 months’ bills

@ 21a

The rates of interest allowed

deposits

discount houses for

Per cent.

Open-market rates—

Per cent.

are

by the joint-stock banks and

subjoined:

*
Per cent?

Joint-stock banks..:
discount houses at call
Do
with 7

Anuexed is

a

1%

or

1*2

1%

14 days’notice

statement showing the present position

of the

England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Con¬
quotation for English wheat, the price of
middling upland cotton, of No. 40 mule twist, fair second
quality, and the Bankers’ Clearing House return, compared
with the three previous years:
Bank of

sols, the average

1879.

1880.

£

Circulation,excluding .
£
Bank post bills
28,830,295
Public deposits
6,970,019
Other deposits
24,875,930
Go vernm’t securities. 16.358,886
Other securities
16,838,111
Res’veof uotes&coin 16,857,257
and

Coin

•

1877.

1878.

£

£

28,512,845 27,069,015 27,900,545
4,302,420
3,441,090
4,876,922
31,080,385 20,624,222 23,013,944
15,930,087 14,867,178 14,910,568
16,932,400 17,433,083 18,519,555
9,929,458 12,128,674
21,305,510

bullion in

25,029,219

departments.. 28,687,552 34,848,355 21,993,473
Proportion of assets
40-82
56-78
to liabilities
52-49
5 p. c.
2 p. c.
Bank rate
2% p. c.
9434
97%
Coil80ls
97%
45s. 2d.
49s. 3d.
Eng. wheat, av. price
43s. 9d.
6d.
6%d.
Mid..Upland cotton ..
73ied.
both

9%d.
lO1^;!.
mule twtst....
Clearing-House ret’n. 79,411,000 68,415,000 74,861,000
Very- little gold is being shipped from this

43-88

3p. c.
95*4
63s. lOd.

63jgd.

9%d.

No. 40

80,730,000

country to

America, but a further amount of £245,000 has been sent from
Germany and £104,000 from Havre. Further shipments will,
it is understood, be made. The supply of silver is very limited,
and the market is steady in tone. In the market tor Mexican
dollars there has very little change. The following are the

present prices of bullion:
Bar
Bar

gold, line

gold, containing 20 dwts.
Spanish doubloons
South American doubloons
United States gold
German gold coin

d.

s.

GOLD.

coin

73 9 ®
76 3*2®
76 3X4@

peroz.
per oz.

5 grs. gold

d.

peroz.
per oz.

standard. 52*2
standard. 52%
peroz. 56%
peroz. 51%
per oz

Quicksilver, £7 Os. Od.

following

are

Discount, 3 per cent.

the current rates of discount at

cipal foreign centres:
Paris

..

Amsterdam....

..

Brussels
Berlin

..

..

Hamburg

..

Frankfort
Vienna
St. Petersburg

..

..

.

..

Bank

Open

rate.
Pr. ct.

market.
Pr. ct.
2

2%
3

3%
5
5
5
4
4

d.

73 10 @

per oz.

peroz.

Chilian dollars

The

s.

per oz. standard. 77 9 @
silver, per oz. standard. 77 10*2®

silver.

.....

Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.
Aug.

a

very satisfactory, and the propor¬
to liabilities has risen from about 52 to 52jJ6

reserve

Cake silver
Mexican dollars

28*17 %@ 28*22% Aug.
....

tion of

Bar silver, fine
Bar silver,oontain’g

.

@47*4
@47%

indications at present of

of values.
again

25*36%

52Hio@5‘2%

Calcutta....

Hong Kong..

Pate.

range

no

The Bank return is

2

2

,

Seb’stop’l
Gottenb’g

higher

19,210

......

there being

time to come,

'

94,426 442,801 2554,589
12,285

„

-

f

+
Other

more.

12,285

t

Havre....
Rouen....
Bremen
Bremerhaven...

Hamburg.

Balti¬

152^230 185,152 430,793

Cor* Fal-

..

New
York.

| Vgl. XXXL

2%
2%
3
3
3
3
6

Genoa
Geneva

Bank
rate.
Pr. ct.
4
4

Madrid, Cadiz &
Barcelona
Lisbon & Oporto

Copenhagen....
New York
Calcutta

4

5%
3%a>4

®
®
®
®

■©

the prin¬
Open
market.
Pr. ct.

3%
3%
6

5%
3%

4%@5
4

during the past week has been warm and sultry.
only in sufficient quantity to freshen
of grass and roots, and without impeding to any im¬

The weather

Some rain has fallen, but
the crops

portant extent^the ingathering of the harvest of cereals. A large
proportion of the crop of wheat and spring corn has now been
gathered in, and it is the opinion of some that the yield is prov¬
ing to be rather larger than had been anticipated. The samples
sent to market up to the present time show, however, consider¬
able variation in quality, and some of it exhibits evidence of
having been hastily gathered in. Taken as a whole, however,
the yield of agricultural produce in this country this season

considerable, and it will undoubtedly be a
The yield of cereals is satisfactory, and there is
an abundance of roots, grass and
other green crops. The
autumn seems to promise to be very favorable, and the quality
of cattle food which will be secured will be more than can be
consumed, the supply of stock iu the country having somewhat
diminished. The wheat trade, and, indeed, thei trade for all
will be very
full average.

277

THE CHRONICLE

11,1880.]

September

The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
produce is, in consequence, rery quiet; but as far as
specie)
from the port of New York to foreign ports for tha
that is concerned, the trade recognize the fact that the supply
week ending September 7?
of wheat in Europe is reduced to Yerj& narrow limits, and that
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.
as soon as there is some assurance that the lowest point has
1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.
For the week....
$6,007,457
$8,087,836
$6,217,157
$8,061,108
been reached, millers will feel disposed to acquire a larger stock Prev.
reported.. 182,798,575 230,949,918 221,061,748 272,810,992
of wheat, and bakers of flour. Some think that prices hare
Totals’oe Jan. l.$183,806,032 $239,036,754 $227,278,905 $280,872,100
already declined to their lowest point. There is certainly rather
The following will show the exports of specie from the port
more disposition to operate, but at the same time a little delay
of New York for the week ending Sept. 4, and also a com¬
may yet be beneficial to buyers.
parison of the total since Jan. 1, 1880, with the corresponding
Owing to the absence of so many from business, the stock totals for several previous years:
i
markets during the week hare been greatly wanting in anima¬ Sept.
1— Str. Acapulco
Panama
Am. gold coin..
$4,000
tion.
Payta, Peru
Am. gold coin..
400
Propitious weather and* an easier tone in the money
1—Str. C. of Austin
Nassau
Mex. silv. dole.
3,998
market, combined with the fact that there is every reason to 1—Str. Alps
Jacmel..*.
Am. silv. coin..
6,581
London
Am. silv. bars.
16,000
believe in a further development of our trade, give confidence, 1—Str. Oder
and the value of most national stocks has had an upward ten¬ Total for the week ($26,579 silver and $ 4,400 gold)
$30,979
Previously reported ($3,462,606 silv. and $2,124,502 gold).
5,587,108
dency. Foreign government securities do not attract much
attention, but a steady tone prevails.
It is even possible that, Tot.since Jan. 1, ’80 ($3,4S9,185 silv. and $2,123,902 gold) $5,618,087
Same time in—
I
Same time in—
Same time in—
although prices are high, there will be considerable buoyancy 1879
$62,450,072 1871
$54,817,902
$12,182,320 1875
in the autumn, as there has undoubtedly been an important 1878
42,171,442 1870
47,419,404
10,298,307 1874
41.241,392 1869
1877
23,034,296 1873
25,274,067
increase of prosperity in the country. To a considerable 1876..,..
57,252,820 j 1868
65,352,056
39,638,632 1872
extent, however, the change has been anticipated.
The imports of specie at this port for the same periods have
During the week ended August 21, the sales of home-grown been as follows:
wheat in the 150 principal markets of England and Wales Any.
30—Str. C. of R.de Jan’ro.Danisli West Indies. Am. silv. coin..
$2,600
amounted to 11,844 quarters, against 18,862 quarters last 30—Str. Felicia
1,344
Venezuela
Am. silv. coin..
Am. gold coin..
9,140
year; and it is estimated that in the whole kingdom they were
For. silv. coin..
16,018
Arden
Am. silv. coin..
Hayti
1,298
47,400 quarters, against 75,500 quarters in 1879. Since harvest,
Gen. Werder
Germany....
For. gold coin..
49,980
a period of 52 weeks, the sales in the 150 principal markets
31—Str. Herder
For. gold coin.. 1,715,540
Germany
have been 1,411,995 quarters, against 2,492,128
quarters; Sept.
1—Str. W. A. Scholten ..Germany
2,010
.Am. gold coin..
while in the whole kingdom it is computed that they have been
1—Str. Canada
France
For. gold coin..
505,130
1—Str. Santiago
Cuba
Am. silv. coin..
2,617
5,648,000 quarters, against 9,968,520 quarters in the previous
For. silv. eoin..
61
2,750
Am.'gold coin..
season.
The decrease is therefore 4,320,000 quarters. W ithout
For. gold coin..
80
...U. 8. of Colombia...Gold bars.
500
Athos
reckoning the supplies of produce furnished ex-granary at

kinds of

the commencement of the season, it is estimated that the fol¬

lowing quantities of wheat and flour have been placed upon
the British markets since harvest. The visible supply in the
United States is also given:
1878-9.

1879-80.

1877-8.

Imports of wheat.cwt.58,943,397 50,944,563
Imports of flour
10,192,915
9,048,531
Sales

of

1876-7.

54,023,057 45,168,926
7,920,694

6,567,376

home-grown
i

24,474,600 43,197,000

35,005,000 35,218,100

Total
Deduct
exports
wheat and flour

93,610,912 103,190,099

96,948,751

86,954,502

1,772,427

1,704,063

909,633

92,014,656 101,317,672

95,244,713

86,044,869

41s. 6d.

49s. lid.

54s. 7d.

15,966,899

9,749,498

3,857,726

produce

Result

of

1,596,256

Av’ge price of English
wheat for season (qr.)
46s. Od.
Visible supply of wheat
bush. 14,200,000
in the U. S

The following figures shows the imports and exports of grain
and flour into the United Kingdom since last harvest, being a

30112——SSttrr..

..

..

«

.

Am. silv. coin..

...Cuba

Saratoga..

Am.

3—Str. Oder
3—Str. Cimbria
3—Str. Claribel

For. gold coin..
For. gold coin..
Am. gold coin..

Germany
Germany
Porto Rico

For. gold coin..
Am. silv. coin..

3—Str. Crescent

City

,

1876-7.

The following table shows the receipts and payments at the
Sub-Treasury in this city, as well as the balances in the same,
for each day of the past week:
Balances.

Payments.

Receipts.

4...

Sept.
“

6...
rr

cwt.58,943,397

50,944,563

54.023,057

45,168,926

Barley

12,203,167

10,095,466

14,132,213

12,626,914

“

8."

“

9...
10...

12,000,931
1,618,054
1,753,284
38,835,114
9,048,531

com

12,620.289

12,427,938
1,925,764

2,873,624

1.399.269
4,629,284

39.014,338

33,850,664

7,920,694

6,567,576

EXPORTS.

1879-80.

1878-9.

1877-8.

Wheat

cwt. 1,393,565

1,594,632

1,610,646

Barley

30,477

108,921

64,001

Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian
Flour

i

corn

96,122
104,360
85,179
746,786
207,691

111,174
29,116
22,483
619,239
177,795

1876-7.

859,977

52,714

15,104
20,612
20,588
245,015

88,279
24,169
31,954
520,561

93,392

49,656

“

$
1,148.354 32
1,412,709
2,953,587
1,147,624
1,166,418
1,101,949

■

Exports for the Week.—The imports of last

those of the preceding week, show
a
decrease in both dry goods and* general merchandise.
The total imports were $8,143,151, against $8,711,183 the pre¬
ceding week and $9,082,752 two weeks previous. The exports
for the week ended Sept. 7 amounted to $8,061,108, against
$8,331,306 last week and $7,254,272 two weeks previous. The
following are the imports at New York for the week ending
(for dry goods) Sept. 2 and for the week ending (for general
merchandise) Sept 3:
week, compared with

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.

1877.

Dry Goods

General mdse...

$1,497,0^3

2,578,643

Total week
$4,075,726
Prev. reported.. 227,388,511

1878.

1879.

1880.

$2,000,241

$2,560,571

$2,719,297

3,085,246

$5,085,487
192,915,743

5,033,246

5,423,854

$7,593,817
$8,143,151
209,909,550 337,028,726

Totals’ce Jan. l.$23l,464,237 $198,001,230 $217,503,367 $345,171,877

In

of

dry




report of the dry goods trade
goods for one week later. •

onr

will be found the imports

Gold.

$

$

$

732,837
1,396,311
2,165,588
1,057,712
2,367,053
2,155,293

89
27
25
21
47

42

Currency.

82,551,710 85

82,613,467 51
83.016,213 88

83.118,607 56
82,040,625 32
81,073,155 43

6,020,593
6,975,234
6,360,487
6,348,005
6.225,353
6,139,479

49
96
64
76
20
56

9,374,796 51

—The Ontario Silver Mining Company announces its fiftyninth dividend (for August) of 50 cents per share. This dividend
makes $2,950,000 thus far paid out by this successful company.

BANKING AND FINANCIAL.
FISK

©xymmcrcial autU^lscjcllatieaxts Hexus.
and

40
30
01
67
89

8,930,643 59

Total

BANKERS

Imports

210

7,652

Tot. since Jan. lf’80 ($3,672,873 silv. and $14,365,243 gold).$l 8,038,116
Sa?7ie time in—
Same time in—
Same time in—
1879
$8,585,806 1871
$7,632,509
$16,586,221 1875
4,614.254 1870
7,900,432
1878
14,800 716 1874
9,884,124
1877
3,077,410 1869
10,661.830 1873
5,748,917
1876
2,916,347 1868
3,620,146 1872

ft

14,998,^41
2,002,965
2,722,069
31,031.235
10,192,915

1,351
1,805'

and $3,585,2*73 gold)
$3,615,138
Previously reported ($3,643,013 silv. and $10,779,965 gold)..14,422,978

Wheat
Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian
Flour

4,184

Total for the week ($29,360 silver

imports.

1877-8.

499,277
770,740
2,195*
469

U. S. of Colombia... Am. silv. coin..
Am. gold com..

estimate of the movement for the year :
1878-9.

387

17,800

Gold bars
Gold dust

period of 52 weeks; they must be accepted as an approximate

1879-80.

gold coin..

Sc

AND DEALERS

HATCH,
IN GOVERNMENT BONDS,

And other desirable In\ estment Securities,

No. 5 Nassau Street,

New York.

Buy and sell all issues of Government Bonds, in large or small amounts,
prices, and will be pleased to furnish information in
reference to all matters connected with investments in Government
at current market
Bonds.

We are

prepared to give information in regard to first-class Railway

Securities and to execute orders for the same.

Buy and sell all marketable Stocks and

Bonds on commission, at thE

Stock Exchange or in the open market.
Receive accounts of Banks, Bankers, Merchants

and others, and allow

daily balances; and for those keeping accounts with us we
collect U. S. coupons and registered interest, and other coupons, divi¬
dends, &c., and credit without charge.
interest

on

fjp3 We give special attention to orders from Banks, Bankers, Institu¬
city, by Mail or Telegraph, to buy or

tions and investors out of the

sell Government

Bonds, State and Railroad Bonds, Bank

Stocks, Railroad Stocks, and other securities.
We have issued the Seventh Edition of “ Memoranda Concerning
Government Bonds," copies of which can he had on application.
FISK Sc HATCH.

CHRONICLE

THE

278

No national banks

«f

«-

of each class of bonds

Range since Jan. 1, 1880.

organized daring the past week.
I

»

t

The following dividends have
Name

in prices since January 1, 1880, and the amount
outstanding Sept. 1. 1880. were as follows :

The range

3pie Jpaulijevs' (Gazette.
li «

u

recently been announced:
rer
Cent.

of Company.

1 Yhcn

Hooks (dosed.

Payable.

(Days inclusive.)

Railroad*.

Chicago Si N. West. pref. (quar.)..
N. Y. Cent. & H. River

(quar.)

Highest.

Lowest.

S

*»

[Vet* XXXI.

Ik

Sept.

0

Oct.

28 Sept. 17 to Sept. 2S.
15 Sept. 10 to Oct. ID.

Sept.

30

101 ^

6s, 1880
ep.
68, 1881
cp.
cp.
5s, 1881
4*s, 1891..cp.
48, 1907
cp.
6s,cur’ncy.reg.

July 27 10478 May 20
9 107* May 26
4 104* Apr. 2S
2 L1130 Aug. 2
Jau.
2 11030 Sept. 3
Sept. 9
Apr. 21 130

103* July
102* Aug.
10630 Jau.
103
125

Amount

Sept. 1, 1880.

Registered.

Coupon.

$12,181,000

$2,676,000

162,653,800
299,127,200
172,091,500
532,242,350
04,623,512

51,201,400
181.283,250
77,908,500

205,999,000

strength in
bonds, and some inquiry for the low-priced
Oct.
15 Sept. 21 to Oct. 15
bonds or “fancies” of the list. Arkansas railroad issues are
stronger since the defeat of the Fishback amendment ; North
FRIDAY, SEPT. 10, 1S80-5 P. M.
Carolina special tax bonds have shown a little life, and Virginia
Tlie Money
Market and Financial Situation.—The
deferred bonds have been a trifle stronger. All this is based on
strength of the general situation remains unchanged, but the the old idea that another turn in the political wheel may shake
stock market this week has been quite irregular. The reports
of railroad earnings for August and for eight months of the things up a little, and as it is impossible to lose much on these
calendar year are published on another page, and in one low-priced State bonds, any change that can take place must be
for the better.
respect they are even more encouraging than the reports here¬
Railroad bonds show a fairly active business with a good
tofore published, inasmuch as we have now reached the months
demand for all the investment classes. The bonds dealt in
when earnings were so large in 1879 that the railroads need
on speculation have not sold as heavily as in the preceding
only equal their business at that time to make handsome week, the Erie second consolidated
making total sales of about
profits. There has been a new departure in regard to railroad $3,000,000.
business ; a new standard of comparison has been established
Miscellaneous.
Atlantic ifc Pacific Tel. (quar.) —
Western Union (quar.)

%
1^4

practical of all observers of railroad statistics—will

make the inquiry whether this road or that road will be able
in the next twelve months to match its earnings in 1879-80.
The past is known and certain—the gross earnings, operating

interest and rental charges, the amount of dividends
paid and earned, are all matters which may be figured up for
the past year and the net results ascertained. At the present
outlook there appears to be no good reason to think that the
leading railroads can not keep up their earnings to the stand¬
ard of the year, just closed; and as they made large profits
in that year, it is on the assumption of equal prosperity in the
next that the prices of their stocks are kept up.
It is"hardly
necessary to remark that circumstances not now foreseen might
easily arise which would seriously affect railroad earnings, and
a renewal of the former strife and cutting of rates would alone
be sufficient to knock off earnings without any reduction

expenses,

whatever in the gross tonnage.
The money market has been very easy for call loans, and the
current rate to stock borrowers has seldom been over 3 per
cent, while Government bond dealers have paid 2 per cent.
Prime commercial paper is quoted at 5@5/£ per cent.
The Bank of England on Thursday showed a gain for the
week of £53,000 in specie, and the reserve was 52 11-10 per
cent of liabilities, against 4913-16 per cent the previous week ;
the discount rate remains unchanged at 2/6 per cent.
The last statement of the New York City Clearing House
banks, issued September 4, showed a decrease of $964,175 in
the surplus over legal reserve, the total
surplus being

$5,679,400, against $6,643,575 the previous week.
The following table shows the changes from the previous week
and a comparison with the two preceding years.
1880.

Differ’’nccs fr’m

Sept. 4.

precious

Loans and die. $311,042,800
05,434.700
Specie
Circulation
19.342.300
Net deposits. 297,180,800
..

Legal tenders.
Legal reserve.
Reserve held.

Surplus........

14,541,400

week.

Inc .$1,204,700
Inc.
20.900
Dec.
54,500
Iuc.
703,900
Dec.
794,100

1878.

1879.

Sept.

0.

Sept.

7.

$257,380,800 $243,432,900
19,753,800
21,372,300
220,035,000
40,088,900

10,953,100
19,002,300
210,711,200

50,083,500

Iuc.

$190,975

$50,058,900

$54,177,800

79,970,100 Dec.

773,200

59,842,700

07,030,000

$74,290,700
$5,079,400

Dec.

$904,175

$3,183,800

$13,4=.8,800

bond market has
inactive, but prices show firmness at 1103/s@
110^6 for the coupon fours of 1907. At the Treasury purchase
on Wednesday the offers to sell bonds to the Government for
the sinking fund amounted to $6,796,800, of which $2,500,000
United States Bonds.—The Government

been rather

accepted, including $1,823,500 6s of 1881, at 104'65@104,70,
and $676,500 5s of 1881, at 102*65@102 72.
Closing prices of securities in London for three weeks past and
the range since January 1, 1880, were as follows:
were

Aug.

Sept.

Sept.

27.

3.

10.

Range since Jan. 1, 1880.
Lowest.

Highest. *

100
10534 100
104* Apr. 15 106* Jan. 12
113* 114* 114* 109* Jan. 2 114* Aug. 3
106* Jan. 2 111* Aug.31
113* 114* 114

U. 8. 5sof 1981...
U. 8. 412s of 1891.
U. 8. 4s of 1907...

The closing prices at tlie New 1 ork Board have been as
Interest
Periods.

6s, 1880
6s, 1880
6s, 1881
6s, 1881
5b, 1881
58, 1881
4*s, 1891

reg.
coup
rcg.
coup.
reg.
coup.
reg.
coup.
reg.
coup.

4*28, 1891

48,
4b,
6s,
6s,
6e,
6s,

1907
1907

cur’cy, 1895..reg.

cur’cy,
cur’cy,
cur’cy,
6b. cur’cy,
*

1896..reg.
1897..reg.
1898..reg.
1899..reg.

J.
J.
J.
.T.

£
Q.
Q-

?:
J.
J.
J.
J.

This is tlie price bid




«fc J.
& J.
& J.
& J.
Feb.
-Feb.
-Mar.
-Mar.
-Jan.
-Jan.
<fc J.
& J.
<&
&
& J.

; no

follows:

Sept.

Sept.

Sept.

Sept.

Sept.

Sept.

4.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

*102* *10214, *10214 *i02L *102U *10214
*102L '*10214 *102i4j *10214 *10214 *10214
*104* *104*! *10450; *104 50'* 104 50 j* 104 58

*104* *104* *10450 *10450*10450 '*10450
*10250 '10250 *10250 *10250*10250 *10250
*10250 *10250 *10250 *10250*10250 ,'.*102 50
*11050 *11050 *11034 *11034)*11034 ;*iio34
*11050 *11050 *11034 *11034|'UG34 ! iio34
‘lOOL *10914 *10914 10930 *10930 *10930
IIOI4 *11014 *110* llOL *11030 *11030
*125
*126
*127

j*125

*126

!*127

*52812*128
*i29L *129

*126

j*127
*128

j*I29
*130

is

more

Southern State

by the earnings of the past year,—from Sept. 1,1879, to Sept. 1,
1880; and now the stock broker—who is, in fact, the
most

Railroad Bonds.—There

State aud

*126
*127
*128
*129
*130

sale was made at tlie Board.

*126
*127
•*•128
*129
130

*126
*127
*128
*129

*12910

Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.

—

The stock market

irregular, and every advance of 1 or 2 per cent
is quickly followed by sales to realize, and a consequent reac¬
tion in prices to tlieir former position. The market has sel¬
dom been more mixed, or apparently uncertain, than at the
present time.
The general position undoubtedly favors
strength in prices, and there is no decline in the confidence
everywhere manifested in the prosperity of the country at
large; but there appears to be a supply of stocks ready to feed
the market as soon as a rise of 1@3 per cent is established.
There is now, as always, a great deal of talk about the position
of leading operators; and if we could believe all that is said
about them, we could recognize their hand on both sides of the
market at once, and in almost every sale that takes place at
the Boards It is not improbable that there has been a consid¬
erable amefont of long stock held, with the idea of selling on
the first increase of activity in the Fall, and this stock is
thrown on the market as often as the advance in prices
furnishes any inducement to sell. Comments upon the railroad
earnings are made above. The Western Union Telegraph re¬
port for the quarter ending Sept. 30 (partly estimated) shows
net profits of $1,104,041, against $1,372,449 for the same quar¬
ter last year, although the net earnings for the year ending
Jane 30, 1880, were $5,146,639, against $4,239,778 in the pre¬
ceding year.; The quarterly dividend of 1% per cent was de¬
clared. The N. Y. Central & Hudson has declared the usual
quarterly dividend of 2 per cent.
has been very

Saturday,

Sjpf.
Tel.
Atl.&Pac.Tel.
Canada South.
Cent.of N. J..
Cent. Pacific..
Ches. & Ohio..
Do 1st prf.
Do 2d prf..
Am. Diet.

4.

74%

75

44

41

77%
74*4
19* 10*

70*
74*4
23
20
110

Chic. & Alton.

20

20%
110

Chic-Bur.& Q. 137 137%
01
Chic.M.&St.P. S9
Do
pref. 111 112*
Chic. &N. W.. 101% 104%
Do
pref. 123 126*
C.R.I.&P.new 110* 120
Ch.St.L.&N.O. 39% 40
Ch.St.P.M.&O 43* 44%
Do
pref. 83% 83%
71%
Clev.C. C.&l ^70
204 21
Col.Chic.&1.C
Del.&H.Canal 85* 80%
Del. Lack.&W. 89% 90%
Denver^ R.G. 72% 73%
Han.&St. Jo.. 41% 42%
85*
Do
pref 84
64
Hous.&Tex.C. *00
Illinois Cent.. 1134 114
33* 34%
Lake Erie&VV
Lake Shore... 107% 108%
Louisv.&Nash 131
Manhattan.

Mar.&C.lst pf.
Do
2d prf.
Mich.Central
Mobile&Ohio.
Mo.Kans.&T.
.

Mor.& Essex..

o.

24*

77
76% 77
43
44*
45
63
614 014 63
774 77% 76% 78%
74% 74%
20
20% 20* 21%
28
20
27* 28*
21
224 22* 22%
118
110
174 117*
138
138* 38 138
914 92* 91* 93*
112* 113* 13% 113%
104% 105% 03% 100
125* 120* 244 120*
184 120*
119* 122

44%

40

40*

44%
83%
71*
204
85%

45%
85%
71*
21%
87

91

73*
42*
84

03%
114
34%

108%
138

Do

pref.

72* 72%
19

85%
90*
744 73%
42% 41%
85% 82%
64
110
.14%
33*
35
110* :09
140

.40
28

964

24%
30*
11%
70*
28

132% :31%
40% 404 40% 39%
6 94 69% 69% 69%
25% 254 25* 25
30% 30 M 30% 80%
54% 54* 54* 54 -c
24
23*
23% 24
854 854 35% 34%

42" 4i*
20" 26%

42
26%

57%

58%

20*

87
92
74*
42*
84*

147

Sept.

8.

70

76

76*

30

133
41*
69%

03% 63” 63% 02” 62~

76%

79

75% 75%
20% 21
27% 27%

78%

80*

76

76

20* 20%
27* 27*

116% 117% 117%
137* 137* 137%
91% 92% 91%
113
113* 113
104% 104
125% 125% 1254
119

40*
44
84

44%
85

147

31*
7

4*
4*
95% 07

13i% 132%

4‘i’*

78

79*
75* 75*
10% 20
....

118

139
92%
113

105%

125*
119*
41* 42
44* 44%
85% 80^
72*
20% 20%
87
88%
91% 9 2%
73% 74
41
41*.
83* 84 '
♦044 00
115* 115%
34% 35%
109% 109%
143* 144*

18 *»*

41*

974 95% 97
24* 23* 24
35%
30% 34
112* 111% 112
*.... 70
70

132* 132% 131% 132%
40% 394 40%
69
68* 08%
244 244
25
30* 29% 30
54 " 52% 534
23*

35*

41% 43%

34% 35%

4l‘
*....

195

284 29%

20

574 58%

57%

29%
22*

32*
22*

77

77%

57% 57%

31
23
794 794
50* '57*
22*

30

i%

These are the prices bid

date,

were as

3%

04*
38%
694
104%

and asaed: no sale was made at the Board.

Total sales of leading stocks for the week
and the range in prices for the year 1879 and
4o

43%
198

29%

47
47
Do
pref. 47% 47%
77% 77%
79
774 77*
Do 1st prf. *77
1*
1%
i*
1%
1*
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
Sutro Tunnel.
94
95
94% 94% 93%
94* 94% 95*
Union Pacific. 93% 944 94
37%
'38%
38
38*
394
30%
38% 384 394 38% 39%
Wab.St.L.& P.
Do
69* 08% 69% 08% 70% 08* 65% 08% 69% i 67%
pref. 08
100* 107% 104(0 107U lOBVi lOoM 103* 104% 1044
West. Un.Tel. 105* 107
*

....

119

120
41

20
20%
85% 86%
904 91%
73* 74
40% 41%
82% 83*

144
29
0

....

43

39* 40* 39%
68
68* 69
25% 24* 254 24*
30% 30
30% 80
54* 53%
54% 54
23* 23* 23
24
85% 344 34% 34*

29%

Friday,

Sept. 10.

70
43
82

90 "
97%
24*
25
37* 304 36* 35%
112
112
111*
112
09*
714 69% 70

70* 70*
40% 41%

L95
27
20

Thursday,
Sept. 9.

Wednesd.

1104 115 110
34* 33* 34%
111
108% 109%

28%
6%
7

13i% 13i*

57% 584
*04.

40* 41
44* 45%
83* 85%

92

St.L.A.& T.Il.
St.L.I.M.&So.
St.L.& S.Fran.

Tuesday,
Sept. 7.

70

2 / * 2. *
20% 27
0%
7
0%
7*
5
54
94* 95% 90% 91*
24
24% 24* 25
304 30% 86% 37%
111
111* 111% 112
71
71*
69* 70

Nash.Ch.&StL
NewCent.Coal
N.Y.C.&H. K. 130%
N.Y.L.E.&W. 894
Do
pref. (59
N.Y.Ont. & W. 25%
Northern Pac. *30*
Do
pref. 54*
23*
Ohio Central..
Ohio & Miss... 34*
Do
pref.
Pacific Mail... 4i4
Panama
Phil. &Read’g

134

Monday.

Sept.

follows:

ending Thursday,
from Jan. 1, 1880,

September

Sales of

Range since Jan.

Week,
Shares.

| Loic. High

Highest.

Lowest.

Year 1879*

May 17 74*2 Jan. 14! 45*4 78*2
1,300 40
Canada Southern—
89 7e
45
May 25 90*4 Mar. 8, 33*2
94,210
Central of N. J
100*4
118
Aug.
7i
75
99*gJau.
2
1,0G3
Chicago A Alton
Jan. 26 111*8 134*2
June 2 152
4,350 113
Chic. Burl. A Quincy
93*2 Sept. 7f 343s 82 *e
66 ^ May 25
Chic. Mil. & St. P.... 171,797
7434 102 s4
99
May 10 1137b Sept.
4,043
Do
do pref.
4958 94*2
106
Sept.
87*r
July
9
102,720
Chic. A Nortliw
7678 108
7,530 104 Feb. 10 126*2 Sept.
Do
do pref.
150*2
8 119
204
Juue
100*2
June
11
11,830
'Chic. Rock I. A Pac..
28
5
25*8
Jan.
261
9*2
May
11
26,005
Col. Cliic. A Ind.Cent.
38
89*8
88*s
Sept.
9
60
May 25
28,302
Del. & Hudson Canal
94
68*2 May 25 947s Mar. 22 43
Del. Lack. & Western 119.450
41*2
22May 25 44 ^ Sept. 2 13*4
49,335
Hannibal & St. Jo...
34
70*8
63 *2 May 25 8678 Sept.
27,812
Do
do pref.
79*4 10034
99*2 Jan.
2 116*4 Sept.
9,860
Illinois Central
28*2
1 16
3838 Mar.
20*4
May
11
33.580
Lake Erie A Western
108
67
Mar.
111*8
Juue
95
2
95,401
Lake Shore
35
89*2
86*8 Jan.
8 164*2 Apr.
5,150
Louisville A Naehv..
72*4
21
July 22 57*2 Mar. 16 35
37.580
Manhattan
98
75
May 17 98*4 Aug. 2 7334
33,285
Michigan Central....
53s 35%
28*8 May 25 49*4 Jan. 27
18,466
Missouri Kan. A Tex.
May 24 112*2 Sept. 9 75*8 104*2
9,318 100
Morris A Esrcx
Mar. 5 35*2 83
47*2
Juue
1 128
11,900
Nashv. Chatt. A St. L.
139
137
Mar.
31 112
122
May
11
19,360
N.Y. Cent. A Hud.Riv
21*8 49
48
7s
Feb.
2
30
June
1
N.Y. Lake E. A West. 233,544
47
May 25 73 7s Feb. 2 37*2 78*8
5,020
Do
do pref.
40*2
20
May 11 36 Jan. 14 116
3,600
Northern Pacific
Jan. 13 + 44*4 65
393a May 24 60
4,244
Do
pref.
6
7% 333s
67,520 23 May 25 44*2 Mar.
Ohio & Mississippi..
Mar. 8 103e 39*2
17 62
27*2
May
33,050
Pacific Mail
182
2 195
Sept. 7 123
Jan.
200 168
Panama
2
7238
Jan.
3
13*2
July
60,910
Phila. & Reading
56"
Feb. 17 13
34*2 May 25 66
24,610
St.L.Iron Mt. &South.
3*8 53
48
Feb. 2
25 *4 May 11
St. L.& San Francisco
4*8 60*2
33
550
May 11 60*4 Mar. 8
Do
pref.
9% 78*2
60
300
May 11 83*2 Mar. 9
Do
1st pref.
11
9738 Jan. 19 57*2 95
80
May
21,290
Onion Pacific
Jan. 27
26*2 May 25 48
15,190
Wab. St. L. & Pacific
25
73*2
Aug. 5
51*4
May
54,760
Do
do pref.
116*2
Feb. 24 885s 116
86%
June
2
78,375
Western Union Tel..
....

price here is for new stock, sold for first time June 11.
Sept. 25. J Range from July 30.
At the recent meeting of the managers, the
was drawn up and signed by the five
trank lines :
The Truuk line executives in full meeting have this day agreed for
themselves, and the Trunk lane Executive at a subsequent full meeting
and acting as a standing committee, for the Joint Executive Committee,
have this day agreed upon and hereby direct the immediate restoration
and the strictest maintenance of all east-bound rates to full tariff prices
*

Lowest

t Range from

all

following order
representatives of the

freight, including horses,

classes of

sheep, all live stock and

r-Jan. 1 to latest1879.
date.-

-Latest earnings reported-—,
1879.
Week or Mo.
1880.

Range for

1,1880.

279>

CHRONICLE.

THE

11, 1880.]

Eastern
July
Flint & Pere Mar.4th wk
Gal. Har.A San A.June

Aug

GrandTrunk.Wk.eud.Sept. 4

Western.Wk.eud.Aug.27
Hannibal A St. Jo. 4th wk Aug
Gr’t

Houst. A Texas C. June

Illinois Ceu. (Ill.). August..
Do

265.376

233,285-

652,458
1,901,783

681,572

70,354

2,238,533

303,683

19,134

163,237

113,488'

30,043
16,808

605,748

547,652'
1,363,825
686,130

247,633 1,613,051
937,590
28,012
91,482
172,290 6,807,444
89.378 3,159,584
42,716 1,512,933
163,798 1,400,833
494,704 3,928,022
107,273 1,016,246
789.374
26,596
974,68 4
44,539

31,822
50,233
86,596

Kans.C.Law.ASo.3d wk Aug.
Lake ErieA West.3d wk Aug.
Louis v. A Nash v.4th wk Aug
Memp. A Chari... 4th wk Aug
Minn. A St. Louis.3d wk Aug.
Mo. Kan. A Texas.4th wk Aug
Mobile A Ohio
August
Nashv. Ch.A St.L. July
N. Y. A Canada
July

7,005
10o,3i)O
2 5,012

281,842
44,094
92,452
212,693
105,227
62,048
195,329
566,4S9

‘

'

‘

452,462

2,141,849

143,301
9,003
92,903
80,516
140,900
28,18 4
32,387

131,898

(Iowa).August

IndianaBl. AW.. 4tli wkAug
Int. A Gt. North. .4th wk Aug
July
Iowa Central.
K. C. Ft. S. A Gulf .3d wk Aug.

549,847

2,682.232

.

131,434

25,997

DubuqueAS.City. 4th wkAug

$.

197,464
21,050
25,255

22,596

Clev.Mt.V. & Del.3d wk Aug.
Del. AH.Can.. Pa.Div..July.
Denver A Rio Gr 1st wk Sept
Deuv.S.P’kA Pac. July
Des M.& F.Dodge. July
Det. Lans. & No..4tli wk J’ly

1880.

$9,118

$12,636
245,060
27,543

Chic. A W. Mich..3d wk July
Cin. Ham. & D...July
Ciu. Sand. A Clew 12 dye July
Cin. A Spriugf. ..4thwkAug
Clev. Col. Cin. & 1.4th wk Aug

58,182
16,619

690,197

492,779

10,118

9,443

441,828

283,047

5,580,110
647,943
429,267
2,656,628
1,228,613
1,176,299
372,493

3,491.750
498,297
266,904
1,807,799

16,518
144,508

5,993
6,828

20.955

15,356
107,450
136,166

109,835
106,147

151,594 133.590
41,981
48,519
N.Y. Cent. A Hud. August....3,022,855 2,546,029 21,62S,649
N.Y. L. Erie AW. Juue
1,661,812 1,230,419 9,091,064
..

189,003

205,056

324,425
210,927

450,298
208,300

Northern Pacific .August....

2,666,088

1,353,579

1,073,217
971,477
231,112'

17,898,419
7,665,092.
2,158,9451,112,495

307,489

11,811

11,347

Ogd. AL. Champ.2d wk Aug.
PiMl.AElizabetht.2d wk Aug.
Pad. A Memphis..3d wk Aug.

1,134,402
1,202,674
3,491,1S1
911,948719,219
905,031

17,070

29,542
247,600

N.Y. AN. Engl’d.July
Northern Central. July

5,610,015
2,677,763

229,385

168,623

225,037
7,659
6,241
96,768
125,374
3,813
2,088
Pennsylvania
July
3.449,644 2,782,906 22,883,715
295,671 18,196,964
Peoria Dec. A Ev. August
45,151
14,901 2,083,496
1,595,102'
Philadel. A Erie.. July
308,699 241,018
7,998,190
Phila. A Reading. July
1,232,835 1,303.522 9,472,302
270,672'
316,639
Pitts. Titusv. A B.July
54,660
38,251
Ports.Gt.F.ACon.July
18,596
14,709 1,013,690
771,67L
Rensselaer A Sar. July
176,452 149,371
560,275
848,251
St.L.Alt.AT.H. ..3d wk Aug.
32,543
22,555
329,308
403,580
Do
(brehs). 4 th wkAug
13,270 3,594,696 2,664,577
18,760
St.L. Iron Mt.A S.4th wk Aug 143,816
98,924 1,660,238
875,844
47,600
St. L. A San Fran. 1st wk Sept
62,000
Sl.P.Minu.AMan. August
232,579 138,940 1,942,669
313,160
56,630
St.Pau) A Duluth. July
675,503882,846
St. Paul AS. City..4th wk Aug
42,071
30.113
184.087
210,555

6,683
219,513
42,131
900,171
780,391
21,527
1,431,000 7,564,264 5,131,807
256,321
New York City Banks.—The
following statement shows-,
but vouchers will not be paid or allowed by us till the commissioner first
the
of
the
Associated
Banks
of New York City for thecondition
examines, certifies and approves them. Such agreements must be filed
week ending at the commencement of business on Sept. 4, 1880 r
in the office of the commissioner immediately, but in no case later than

on

and enforce at once aud permanently and
notify all shippers accordingly: We hereby notify you that our compa¬
nies will not participate in any rates billed after to-day at less than the
full printed tariff on the ocean basis, as agreed, and will set up the
through rates and the proportion on our lines to correspond and will
net refund upon any special arrangements said to have been heretofore
made, except by voucher showing the detail requiring such allowances;
dressed beef.

Please so order

Wednesday morning, the

14th inst.

Exchange.—There has been no

9,468

Scioto Valley
IstwkSept
South. Pac.of Cal. July
519,000
Texas A Pacific ..4th wk Aug
53,148
rol.Peoria A War.4tli wkAug
33,021
Union Pacific
July
1,988.000
Wab. St.L. A Pac. 4th wkAug 328,330

Average amount

animation in exchange, and

falling off in the movement of specie towards this country.
sterling bills to-day the actual rates are about 4 81 for 60
days and 4 83^ for demand. Cable transfers are 4 84.
The following were the rates of domestic exchange on New
York at the undermentioned cities to-day : Savannah, buying
selling A@/£ off ; Charleston, buying 3-16@XA off, selling
par @ %; New Orleans commercial 250 discount @ par; St.
Louis, 1-10 discount; Chicago, 50@60 discount; Boston, 45c.

Capital.

Banks.

no

For

discount.

Quotations for foreign exchange are as
bills on London.

Documentary commercial
Paris (francs)
Amsterdam (guilders)
Frankfort (reichmarks)
Bremen

(reichmarks)

The folio wing, are
Napoleons

3 83

X X Reichmarks.
X Guilders

4 73
3 96

Span’ll Doubloons. 15 60

@$4
86
3

@
@
@

4
4
@15
@15

86

76
00
75
60

4 83*2@4 84
4 82*2@4 83

8L*2®4 82
5 25 @5 2178
39 %@ 40
94 @
94*2

4

2438
39%
94
94

94

Silver *43 and *28.
Five francs
Mexican dollars..

—

Do uncornmerc’l.

—

English silver

Mex. Doubloons.. 15 55
1 1358® 1 14*4
Fine silver bars
Fine gold bars
par@*4prem.
Dimes & *2 dimes. — 99 %@ par.
..

....

Prus. silv. thalers.

Trade dollars
New silver dollars

—

—

coins :
99 %@

92 @
88*2®
87 @

4 70
—

—
—

94*2

@

par.
—

95

—

89*2

—

88

@4 80

69
— 99
99%@par. *2
67 @
99 *4 @

—

and the totals from Jan. 1 to
The statement includes the gross
earnings of all railroads from which returns can be obtained.
The columns under the heading **■ Jan. 1 to latest date” furnish
the gross earnings from Jan. 1 to, and including, the period
given below.

are

mentioned in the second column.
*

Albany & Susq

.July

..

AS.Fe..June
Atl. A Gt. West.... June
Atl. Miss. & Ohio. July
Atl. A Char.Air-L July
Bur.C.Rap.&No. .4th wk Aug
Cairo A St. Louis .2d wkAug.
A tch.Ton.

$58,701

105,472

720,000
368,456

145,585
59,093

51,430
9,525

Central Pacific.. .August....1,885,000
Ches. A Ohio
July.
238.236
Chicago & Alton 4tli wk Aug 172,727
Chic. Burl. & Q.. July
1,566,661
Chic. & East. Ill. 4tli wk Aug
35,428
Chic. Mil. A St. P lstwlrSept 275,000
Chic. A Northw. August
1,771,314

Ckic.St.P.Miii&O 4th wk Aug




42,107

Chemical
Merch’nts’ Kxch.
Gallatin Nation’l
Butchers’&Drov.
Mechanics’ & Tr.
Greenwich
Leather Man’f’rs
Seventh Ward...
State of N. York.
American Exch..
Commerce

Broadway
Mercantile

$34,807
89,356
410,808
301,272

-Jan. 1 to latest datc.1879.
1880.

$390,993

$254,949

767,796

588.39 8

3,704,353
2,421,668
1,048.099

2,753,019

138,224
460,843
45,661
45,698 1,285,938
231.968
6,010

1,884,109
853,710
381,938
884.641
145,303

1,556,457 12,149.693 10,870,698
1,497,271

173,383
145,870
993,823

4,835,312
9,715,424

18,331
226,615

7,739,001»

778.638

986.191
3.304,588
7,504.062
529,930
5.768.682

1,326,957 11,955,053 9,601.520

31,7.04

934,783

717,298

2,000,000
2,050,000
2,000,000
2,000,000
1,200,000
3,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
600,000
300,000
1,000,000

1,000,000

0,392,000

6.421.900
8.416.900
7,332,000

4.503.400
9.813.800
3,209,000
0,146,600
3.455.400
1,5«3,100
12.532,600
4.491.900
4.211.300

800,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
1,000,000

15,705,1-00

422,700
1,500,000

Republic
Chatham

People’s
North America..
Hanover

450,000
412,500
700,(XX

1,000,000
500,000

Irving

Metropolitan

....

Citizens’
Nassau
Market
St. Nicholas

Shoe & Leather..
Corn Exchange..

Continental
Oriental
Marine

Importers’ & Tr..
Park

Mech. Bkg. Ass’n
North River

Fourth National.
Central Nat
Second Nation’l.
Ninth National..
First National..
Third National..
N. Y. Nat. Exch..

Bowery National1
N. York County..

Germ’n Americ’n
nhase National..
Fifth Avenue....

464.800
1,936,000
1,229,000
1,336,000
1.943.200
1,015,000
4,602,400
570.200

3,000.000
600,000

1,000,OOOi
500,000
500,000
500,000

1,000,000
1,000,000
300,000

400,000
1,500.000
2,000,000
500,000
240,000
250,000

3,200,000
2,000,000
300,000
750,000
500,000

1,000,000
300,000
250,000
200,000
750,000
800,000
100,000

15,468.800
5,411,000
3.760.000
2.478.300
4.967,000
3.373.800
1.414.900

2.314.500
7.300.900
3.051,100
13,812.000
1.870.900
2.472,000
2,071.400
2.287.100
3.395,000
3.773.100
5.494.900
1.645.100

3,526,000
20,563.700
I7,8ls,700
884.600
889. v 00
926,900
17.409.200
*>,631,600
2,429,000
4.860.200
1 8.887.0'ju !
9.781.100

95.500
301.700
37,000
124,000
43,400

•-

140.700
354.300
446.900
122.900
46.500
132,000
219.100
124.400

458.400

3.468.200
522.200
707.400

255,400,
126,000
16,500

485,000
143,600
548.400
2,848.000
4,050,600

95.0OC

119,000

*

Circula¬
tion.

$

9.200.000

495,000-

4.239.300
7,748,000
6,298,000
4.200.100

553,300
44,500

7.812,390
3,306,000

267,000

11.821.300
2,512.700
1.317.100

400

1.100'

1.794,500

12,829.800
3,942 800
2,072.000
1.208.800
918,000
876,000
2.275.400
853,500
2,851.000

651.200
691.200
244,700
180.000

2,700
476,50037,000'
585.000
445,000
1.284,800

285.000
410.700

12.543,000

576.200
170.700
143.800

4.231,000
3.690.100
2.294.800

179,700-

189.800

2.262.900

1,123,000

196.100
158.400
185,000
607.300
288.800

3.751.500

45,000
5,400

3.320.0(MJ

87.009

13,072,000

361.800

152,800
04,505
84.500
63,400

1.921,909
2.183,30j
2,054.800
1.915.100
3,444.090

496.200

840.300
293.000
405.800

783,100
162.300
185,000
1,085,900
460.400

185.500
396.300

414.200
337.200

1,064,500

41.600
635.000

994.600
3.222.100
178.400
4

1
'

3.625.900

1,672,000
483.000

1,476,000
3.857.200

2,574,000
125.800
32.000
1.484.800,
i 8,800
1.260.700
219.800
2.270.700
761.9(0
3,614,760
278.800
1.315.900

l,380.00Uj

2,918,200

800,000
4*6,000
45.000
20 7,300
3.000

432,700
446,3X1

217.300
271.4U0

6,038,300

780,300-

260.000
575.900

3.909,000
23,023.800

,53j,o90

20.654.90C

524,500

568.400
1,040 100
691.400
17,000.300
9,588.000
2.702.006
5.673.400
15.337.700

158,300

21,300
70,100

.

6,U65,109

450.000
4.600

165.400

37.800
106.300

1.418.300
2,228.600

897.400

2.510.500

115.000
91.000

760.000

11,339,900

840.200
772,600
231.000
250.400
208.700
302.300
83.800
393.000
348.700

119.300
283.100
61,000

1.514.900

10.802.300
1.000.600
1,105.000

1.347.900
1.941.900
4,039.706

180,000
1,090,400-

223.400
810,000-

1,470,000
45,000
90,000
450.000
797.700
207.100.

225,000
180,COO154,800

1.334.900

19,342 300
60,475,200 311,942.800 65.434,700 14,541.400 297,180,8X1

Total..

of previous week are as follows :
deposits
Inc. $763,900
20.0)0 i Circulation
Jec.
54,500791,IOC i

The deviations from returns
Loans and
Specie

other
than U. S

$
248.000
214.300
282,200
495,000

$

039.500

2,957,200
909,100
S.537.000

Legal
Tenders.

2,208.000

1.476.500
920,000

300,000
200,000
200,000
600,000
300,000

1,000,000

East River

Latest earnings reported.—w
Week or Mo.
1880.
1879.

Ala.Gt. Southern .August....

City

Pacitic

The latest railroad earnings

latest dates

Union
America
Phoenix

Fulton

Demand.

quotations in gold for various

$4 83

Sovereigns

:

82
80*2
79*2

@4
48> /5>4
4 79
@4
5 27*2@5
39*2®
933s@
933e@

4 81

Mechanics’

Specie.

t

I
New York
Manhattan Co...
Merchants

Tradesmen’s

Sixty Days.

Sept. 10.
Prime bankers’ sterling
Prime commercial

follows

Loans and
discounts.

of

Net dept's

discounts

Legal tenders

Inc. $1,261,700 1 Net

I c.

Dec.

280

THE

CHRONICLE.

QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND

BONDS

[Vol. XXXI.

IN

NEW

YORK.

£f

U, &. Bonds and active Railroad Stocks

arc

quoted

on a

previous

page.

STATE
Bid.

SECURITIES.

Alabama—Class A, 2 to 5
Class A, 2 to 5, small
Class B, 5s
Class C, 2 to 5
Arkansas—0s, funded
.

7s,
7s,
7s,
7s,
7s,

Ask.

~~6S*
~72*
70

...

90

78*
20

L. Rock & Ft. Scott iss.
Memp. & L. Rock RR

SECURITIES.

Bid.

Missouri—Os, due 1882 or ’83
6s, due 1886
6s, due 1887
6s, due 1888
6s, due 1889 or ’90
Asylum or Univ., due ’92.

102

Funding, 1894-95
Hannibal & St. Jo., 1886..

.

L. RP.B.4 N. O. RR.
Miss. O. & R. R. RR...
Arkansas Ceniral RR.

do
do
1887..
New York—6s, gold, reg.,’87
6s, gold, coup., 1887

Connecticut—6s

Georgia—6s
7s, new
7s, endorsed.
7s, gold
Louisiana—7s, consolidated

6s, loan, 1883
6s, do 1891
6s, do 1892

49 *

Michigan—6s, 1883

Railroad Stocks.
(Active previously qxioted.)
Albany A Susquehanna....
Boston & N. Y. Air L., pref.
Burl. Cedar Rapids A No...

107
§46

66*

Cedar Falls A Minnesota...

67
•

Central Iowa
do
1st pref
do
2d pref
Chicago A Alton pref
Cin. Ind. St. L. A Chic
Clev. A Pittsburg, guar....
Dubuque A Sioux City
Frankfort A Kokomo

29
63
41
125
84

,

•

•

•

65

124”
70
200 ”

....

35”

—

10*%

Louisv. N. Alb. A Chicago..
Memphis A Charleston

96" 07”

Metropolitan Elevated

N. Y. Elevated
N. Y. New Haven A Hartf.
N. Y. Ontario A West.,pref.
Peoria Decatur A Evansv..
Pitts. Ft. W. A Chic., guar.
do
do
spec’l.
Pitts. Titusville A Buffalo..
Rensselaer A Saratoga
Rome Watertown A Ogd...

113
170

pref.

do

Btonington
Terre Haute A

H4*
174

§25*
§124*

8t. Paul A Duluth

..

....

§31*

....

A.A O
coup, off, J. A J.
coup, off, A.AO.

do

107
107
107

Bid.
115

new
new series

63
130

*

33
65
130

Small

Ohio—6s, 1881
6s, 1886

....

166”
105

117*
58*

Wells, Fargo A Co

1099*

iio"
i7*

103*

5s, LaC. A Dav., 1919.
1st So. Minn. div. 6s, 1910.
1st m., H. AD., 7s. 1910..
!hic. A Northw.—Sink, f’d
Int. bonds
Consol, bonds
Extension bonds
1st mortgage

§23?*

121

115*

90

101*
111
109
106
,

Chic. A Mil., 1st
Winona A St. P., 1st m. ..
do
2dm....
I. C. C. A Ind’s—1st, 7s,

109
119
119
107

113*
120* 122

....

111*

*

120

132*

135

7s of 1871.
1st con.,g’d..
)el.A Hud.Canal—1st m.,’8+
1st mortgage, 1891
do
extended.

lii"

115

*

*

6

111

do
do
do

40'

113
2d mort.. {114
A
1st con.,
tl27
{127
1st,

Prioes nominal.

m.,cp.
1st m., reg
Huds. R., 7s, 2d m., s.f.,’85
Canada South., 1st, int. g.
Harlem, 1st m., 7s, coup..
do
1st m., 7s, reg—

....

93*
110%

.

.

.

do
do

2d
3d

•

H2*
93*

S3*

•

•

•

•

....

91%

225”

is”

u"

55

56*

§39*
§28

....

t

1st mort., West. Div.,
1st mort., Waco A N.,
2d C., Main line, 8s
2d Waco A N., 8s
Inc. and ind’y, 7s

7s..
7s.

{....
108
108*
108
105
106
115
117

„

Int. A Gt. North.
Lake Shore-

1st 6s,gld.

.

....

70*
40*
122
105
112

70*
41
123
110

117

107*
109*

108
111

_

_

T

.

-

.

_

....

•

w

^

103
103

„

78
65

103*

109

117* 118*

Miscellaneous List.

Chic. A E. Ill.—S.

Income bonds...
Chic. St.P.A M’polis—1st, 6s
Land grant Income, 6s....
Chic.A Southwest.—78, guar
Cin. Lafayette A Ch.—1st m
Cin. A Spr.-lst, C.C.C.AI.,7s

•

•

•

....

T

-

-

-

....

120

....

Indianap.A Vine.—1st,7s,

do

""

*ioi%

.

{125

{120

....

•

•

•

•

93

1?

»

T

•

•

*

T

T

,

.

.

.

::::

•

*

•

•

•

105
40

Tennesssee State ooupons.
South Carolina consol

Virginia coupons
do

consol, ooupoils...

E.Tenn.A Va.-6s.end.Tenn
E. Tenn. Va. A Ga.—1st, 7s.
\ 03* ‘
Stock

.

t

do

2d 6s. 1899...

*

*

*

•

•

•

•

t

.

.

.

t

t

t#

f

....

96~ | 96*
112*

lii jl 12

1134
117

....

....

Equipment bonds
6s, 1909
;
lo.K.AT.—Cons.ass..l90
2d mortgage, inc., 1911.

!l20

+ And accrued interest,

....

....

•

,

.

•

•

•

.

t No price to-day; these are latest quotations made this week.
ek.

7
45
17
90
82
40
25

118
105

no
no

! :
97
95
+ 107
+

115
H14

41*
10
40
10

99
100
no
118

118
42
20
•

•

•

20

90

9 • • •

RAILROADS..
Ala. AChat.—Rec’rs ctfs.var
Atlantic A Gulf—Consol
Cent. Georgiar-Cons. m., 7s
Stock
Charl’te Col.A A.—Cons., 7s
2d mortgage, 7s
Stock—
East Tenn. A Georgia—6s..

•

*

-

85
70
35
20
115
100
98
105
100

66*

t

sterling..

12*

STATES.

•

•

95
60
no
72
34

....

....

.

20
85
115
no

(Brokers' Quotations.)

...

•

86*

i

95

*

,

114

70

....

St.L.VandaliaA T.H.—lstm
2d mortgage, guar
—
South Side (L. 1.)—1st mort
Union A Logansport—7s....
U. Pac.—South Branch

...

.

40

N.Y.AGreenw. L.—1st,7s, n.

....

•

67*
30
no
65
11
5

“ B ”

108*

Southern Securities.

96'

....

....

t

lid”

118
115
2d mortgage, pref
{103
do
100
income
Belleville A So. Ill., 1st m.
St. P. M. A Manit’a—1st, 7s. 109* 112”
2d mort., 6s, 1909
101*
Tol.Peo. A W.—
Pur. Com. rec’pts, lst,E.D 130
129
1st mortgage, W. D
Burlington Div
1st pref. inc. for 2d mort.
68"
A
1st pref. inc, for consol...
71
97
Wab. RR.—Mortg. 7s of ’79.
T.AWab.,lst ext.7s,
110* 112
1st St. L. div.7s,ex mat.cp.
104

a

.

105

gr

So.Carolinar—Con., 6s (good)
New imp’t cons
J.
117
Texas—6s, 1892
M.A S.
105* 106*
7s, gold, 1892-1910 ..J.A J.
105
7s, gold, 1904
J.A J.
107
107* Virginiar—New 10-40s
Past-due Coupons.—
102* 105

Equipment bonds, 7s, 1883
Consol, conv., 7s
{103
Gt. Western, 1st m., ex cp 108

•

•

108

no
105
85
85
45

m.

116

2d mortgage ext., ex coup

•

111

105

....

....

4th mort...

•

18

2d mortgage
St. Jo. A Western stock

69
83

•

84*

do
2d...
103* 104*
New
{104* 106* St. Jersey So.—1st, 6s. new
Joseph
A
Pacific—1st
m.
90
94
68
81

•

104
102

Island—1st mortgage.
96* 98” Long
Midland of N. J.—1st, new.
78*
Income,
“A ”
80

77
79

....

•

....

.•>.

109* Georgia RR.—7s
105
6s
m.,7s,’93,ex cp 104
107
Q. A Tol., 1st, 7s, ’90,ex cp.
Stock
nod”
Hi.A So. Ia., 1st m.7s,ex cp :100* 104
Greenville A Col.—7s, 1st m.
Hannibal A Naples, 1st 7s
7s, guar
120*
St.L. K.C-A N.R. E.A R.,7s
107*" 107* Macon A Aug.—2d, endors.
122
Omaha Div., 1st mort., 7s 112
115
Mem
phisA Cha’ston—1st,7s
{122
Clarinda b., 6s, 1919
118
St.Chas.B’dge.lst, 7s, 1908 108* 109"
Stock
:.
117*
North Missouri. 1st m., 7s 118*
Mississippi Cent.—, stm. _<e
116
120
West. Un. Tel.—1900, coup.
116
2d mort., 8s;
103*
119
1900, registered..
Miss. A Tenn.—1st m., Ss %
106*
Spring.Y’y W.Works—1st 6s
1st mortgage, He, B
111
112
Oregon R. A Nav.—1st, 6s.. 106% 107% N. O. A Jacks.—1st m., 8s...
102
102%
INCOMB BONDS.
Certificate, 2d mort., 8s...
103
Central of N. J.—1908
86
87* Norfolk A Petersb.—1st, 8s.
{88
93
Chic.St.L.AN.O.—2d m. 1907
78
80
1st mortgage, 7s
{103*
Col.Chic.AInd.C.,inc.7s,1890
2d mortgage, 8s
46* 47*
118
Cent. Iowa coup, debt certs. {73
Northeast., 8. C.—lit m., 8s.
C.St.P.A M’s L. Gr.,In.6s,’98 {112* 112*
2d mortgage, 8s
101
Ind’s Bl. A W’n—Inc., 1919..
45
Rich.A Dan.—1st consol-, 6s
85*
Tnd’s Dec. A Sp’d, 2d Inc...
64
eT" Southw. Ga.—Conv ,7s, *86.
124
Int. A Gt. Northern—2d Inc
Stock
76%
108*
Leh. A Wilkes B.Coal—1888
75
S. Carolina RR.- Oat m., 7s.
Lake Erie A W’n—Inc.7s,’99
67
68
Stock
Laf. Bl.A Mun.—Inc. 7.
69
70
7s, 1902, non-enjol »ed
105* 105%! MobileA O.—1st pref. deben
84*
Non-mortg. bonds
64
2d pref. debentures..
64*
West Ala.—1st mort.,8s....
50* 51
112
3d
do
85
2d
mort.. 8s, gua?
39*
{103
....1 4th
do
39 1 Western N. C.—1st m., 7s,..
•

*'

Consolidated 8s
Stock
•
Galv. Hous.A H.—7s, gld,’71
Gr’nd R. Alnd.—lst,7sj.g.gu
1st, 7s, Id. gr., not-guar...
1st, ex. 1. gr.,78

Kansas A Nebraska—1st

95

108
100
•

mortgage.

45
102

0.0.

111*
A St.L.—1st, 7s
97* Indianapolis
2d
109

105

105*

m.,g’d L. 8. AM. S.,7s.
90
Denver Pac.—1st,7s,id. gr.jjr
Erie A Pittsburg—1st m., 7s +100
Con. mortgage, 7s
105
90
7s, equipment

....

1st mort.,

F.c’y 1907

do 2d

•

100
106
40
100
90

112% Evansv. A Crawfordsv. -7s.
117
Flint A Pere M.—8*, l’d gr’t
117

•

111*
do
new bonds,
Cleve. P’ville A Ash., 7s
Buffalo A Erie, new bds..,
Buffalo A State Line, 7s.,
Kal’zoo A W. Pigeon, 1st,

118

108*

t

113

••

ids*

r

52*
62*
88* 88%
84%
62

1st

....

tf

106*

f

105
92

....

{101
{106
{108
Cedar F. A Minn., 1st m..
114
nd. Bl’m A W.—1st, pr<
77
1st mort., 7s, 1906

51*

2d mort

m..

m

7S

bs. IVT77

RAILROADS.

111% 112*

m..

2d mortgage
Arkansas Br., 1st mort...
Cairo A Fulton, 1st mort.
Cairo Ark. A T., 1st mort.
St. L. Alton A T. H.—1st m.

.iuu.

Atch.AP.P’k—7s,gld

m. {186

St. L. A Iron Mount’n—1st

iSK
85

.l^uteE.w

(Brokers' Quotations.)

100

108* 108%
Col. Chic. A I. C., 1st con.. {90
99
do
1st cons. 7s,
99*
do
2d con...
Erie—1st mort., extended.. {125*
do 1st Tr’t Co.ctfs.ass.
2d mortg., ext’n 5s. 1919.
105*
do 2d
do
ass.
3d mortgage, 7s, 1883
107%
do 1st
do
suppl. {93
4th mortgage, 7s, 1880 ...
iod%
St.L. Va.AT.H., 1st g.7s,r97
5th mortgage, 7s. 1888 ...
iii%
do
2d 7s, 1898 nod”
1st cons, gold 7s, 1920
*-121% 121%
do
2d gtd.7s, ’98
{115
117
62"
Long Dock bonds
Rome Wat. A Og.—Con. 1st.
120
125
{....

....

....

....

....

JN. V

Ill

•

•

,,,,

....

registered

110* Bost. A N.. Y Air-L—1st m.
ni4%
Chic.ACan.So.—1st m.,g.,7s
116
•

Cleve.A Pitts., consol., s.f.
do

....

99*
99* 100
106* 107*
106*1

..

100

T

§12"

i3i

129*
129*

{107
San Joaquin Branch
Cal. A Oregon, 1st
105*
State Aid bonds
104*
Land grant bonds
Western Pacific bonds.. 108*
South Pac. of Cal.—1st m. 100*
Union Pacific—1st mort.. 112*
116
Land grants, 7s
116
Sinking fund
{114
Registered, 8s
105
Collateral Trust, 6s
Kansas Pac.—
1st m., 6s, ’95, withcp.ctfs 117*
1st m., 6s, ’96,
118
do
Den. Div. 6s ass. cp.ctf... 110*
do
1st consol. 6s
»7*
Pacific RR. of Mo.—1st m. 108
2d mortgage
{109*

do
do

6i

27

St.L.I.M.AS.—1st 7s,prf.int.
2d int., 6s, accum’lative

111

1st m., Cnrondelet Br...
St.L. A S.F.,2d 6s.class A.
do
3-6s, class C.
do
3-6s, class B.
do 1st 6s,Peirce,CAO
do Equipm’t 7s, ’95
South Pac. cf Mo.—1st m.
Texas A Pac.—1st, 6s, 1905..
Consol. 6s. 1905
Income and land gr’t, reg.

•

•***

100

Ohio Cent., 1st m., 6s, 1920.
Peoria Dec. A E’ville, 1st 6s
Pacific Railroads—
Central Pacific—Gold bds.

Pennsylvania RR—
Pitts.Ft.W.A Chic., 1st

114
t

S. Y. Elevated—1st, 7s, 1906
Nevada Central—1st m. 6s.
Ohio A Miss.—Consol. s. f’d

•

#

59*

Ohio Central—Inc., 1920....
Peoria Dec A E’ville—Incs.

106
106

1st Construction's, 1930.

Denv. A R. Grande—1st,

.

do '
assent’d
Am. Dock A Impr. bonds,
do
assented
Chic.Mil. A St.P.—lst.8s,P.D
2d mort., 7 3-10, P.D.,1898
1st m., 7s. f g’ld,R.D.,J902

117*
117*
120
120
114

Albany A Susqueh., 1st m
....

....

D2% 113*
106* 107

116

liu*

Income, 7s

....

*

....

Adjustment, 1903
Lehigh A W. B., con., g’d

•

*

116

....

assented

*

Morris A Essex, 1st m ...
do
2d mort.

Sinking fund
Joliet A Chicago. 1st m...
UU
LUII9* LUUp*» 1*1
Louis’a A Mo., 1st m., guar
do
cons, reg., 1st.
do
2d 7s, 1900. {104
do
cons, coup., 2d
8t. L. Jack. A Chic., 1st m. 114*
do
cons. reg.. 2d
Miss.Riv.Bridge.lst,s.f,6s
Louisv. A Nash.—Cons.m.,78
Chic. Bur. A Q.—8 p.c., 1st m
2d mort., 7s, gold
Consol, mort., 7s
124” 124*
Cecilian Branch, 7s
5«, sinking fund
101*
Nashv. A Decatur, 1st, 7s
Chic. Rk. I.A P.—6s, cp.,1917
120* L. Erie A West—1st 6s, 1911
117
6s, 1917, registered...
Keok.A Des M., 1st, g., 5s.
98* loo
assented.

•

ll”

....

do

•

100*
106* 106*
102*
105
105*
100*

4.

f

Convertible

121
no

{109*

Coup., 7s,’94
Reg. 7s,’94

no
106

{111

2d consolidated....
1st m., Springfield div

....

lid"

6s, 1887
6s, real estate
6s, subscription
N. Y. C. AHud., 1st

Consolidated

102” 103”

....

Stock Exchange Prices.
Balt. A O.—1st 6s.Prk.b.l919
Bost. H. A Erie—1st m.
4 i”
1st mort., guar
4i”
Bur. Ced.R.A North.—1st,5s
94
94
Minn.A St. L., 1st, 7s, guar {105
Iowa City A West’n,lst 7s
112
Central Iowa, 1st m.7s, 1899 103* 104

Central of N. J.—1st m., ’90.
1st consolidated

127
no

•

N.Wisc.. 1st M., 6s., 1930..
St. P.A Sioux C.lst 6s.1916
Del. Lack. A W.— 2d mort.

do
do

Railroad Bonds.

Income

93
102

....

111

Consol, mortgage
:. St.L.A N. O.- Ten. lie
1st con. 7s

114*

120
120

103

*?s

•

BONDS.

X

Pullman Palace Car....

Chesap.A O.—Pur. m’y fund
6s, gold, series B, int. def.
6s, currency, int. deferred
Chicago A Alton—1st mort.

,

AND

do

111%

....

STOCKS

Mash. Chat. A St. L.—1st
N. Y. Central—6s, 1883

116
117

lid*

,

Registered gold bonds....
Sinking fund
do
registei
Iowa Midland, 1st m., 8s..
Galena A Chicago, exten.
Peninsula, 1st m., conv

§'i%

142’'

3ilver Cliff Mining
Standard Cons. Gold Mining

....

*

Oregon Railway A Nav. Co. §

pref

S.-west div., 1st 6s, 1909.

do
do

si%

§72”

Quicksilver

115
114
114
118
115

....

118
63
48* 50

Montauk Gas Coal
N.Y,AStraitsvilleCoalAIron
Ontario Silver Mining.

Pennsylvania Coal

1st m., La C. Div., 1893..
»st m., I. A M\ 1897
i st m., I. A D., 1899
1st m., C. A M., 1903
Con. sinking fund, 1905...
2d mortgage, 1884
1st m„ 7s, I. A D.Ext.,190

Syr. BiL gh. A N. Y., 1st,

Adams Express
American Express
United States Express

Mariposa L’d A Mining Co..
do
do
pref.
Maryland Coal.

MISCELLANEOUS

7s, convertible
Mortgage 7s. 1907

Miscellaneous St’ks.

American Coal
Boston Land Company
Boston Water Power
Canton Co., Baltimore
Caribou Consol. Mining
Central Arizona Mining....
Central N. J.Land Imp
Climax Mining
Colorado Coal A Iron
Consolidation Coal of Md..
Cumberland Coal A Iron....
Deadwood Mining
Excelsior Mining
Gold A Stock Telegraph....
Homestake Mining
La Plata Mining. .
Leadville Mining
Little Pittsburg Mining ...

AND

23
25
25
90

6s, ex matured coupon....
68, consol., 2d series
6s, deferred
D. of Columbia—3*65s, 1924.
Registered;
Funding 5s, 1899

Consol. 4s, 1910

•

40
32
32

31*
31*

6s, new, 1867
6s, consol, bonds

* •

•

3%

6s, new, 1866

class 2
class 3

Ask.

37

Virgina—6s, old

Special tax, class 1
do
do

seourtTies.
Rhode Island—6s,coup.’93-9
South Carolina—
6s, Act Mar. 23,1869.) Non-fundable
)* ••
Tennessee—6s, old

6s,
6s,

1868

New bonds, J. & J
do
A.AO
Chatham RR

100

§21

Indianapolis

Texas A Pacific
do
do trust certif.
Toledo Peoria A Warsaw..
United N. J. RR. A Canal
Warren




,

Funding act, 1866

106*

;

Coupon gold bonds

40

Long Island

do

do
do
do

109
110
112

1st

67*

Harlem
Ind Bloom- A Western
Intern’l A Gt. Northern
Keokuk A Des Moines
do
do
pref.

sr

107*

Ask.

do

•

do

Bid.

Carolina.—Continued..
No. Car. RR., J. AJ

6s, do
1893
North Carolina—6s, old.JAJ

RAILROAD

do

SECURITIES.
N.

108

be.

may

BONOS*

Ask.

6s, old, A.A O

7s, 1890

Prices represent the per eent value, whatever the par

1f No q
quotation

106
110
96
105
97

41*

#»••

108
112
98
107
100

42*

95
95
113
80
115
100
103
100

105
105

100

105

90
118

102
100

+99
36
105

106
125
105
109
112
103
102
no
127
117
106
107
100
105
8
75
34
112

112

100
38
107
no
130

•

no
111
116
•

.

•

•

t

•

••

...»

....
....

....

....

r

1-

no
10
85
86
114
114

99* 101

to-day; latest sale this week.

*

^

September 11,

281

THE CHRONICLE.

1880.J

Funded Debt.

■ji uncs tmeuls

First mortgage bonds
Less bonds retired by

AND

STATE, CITY AND

Second mortgage bonds
St. Paul & Pacific bonds,

CORPORATION FINANCES.

ANNUAL

“

REFOKTS.

(For the year ending June 30,

1880.)

30.620

$2,933,108

40,178
37,304

Operating expenses (being 4433100 per cent
State tax -3> 3 per cent on gross earnings
ending June 30, 1880
Earnings for year
“
June 30, 1879

of earnings)

$1,300,512
$86,559

$2,933,108

1,900,528

“

$1,032,579

Increase

54310

Percentage of increase

road owned and operated by the com¬
1880, was 656; the miles of new road built during
98, and the miles of road relaid with steel rails

The number of miles of

pany June 30,
the year were
were

101.

of Mr. George Stephen, President, has the follow¬
ing : “ There have been expended on improvement of the road¬
bed, purchase of right of way, fencing, water stations, etc.,
$340,676, and on new equipment, $497,021, which sums have
been provided for from funds reserved for that purpose at
organization of the company, while more than ordinary expen¬
ditures for maintenance and repairs have been charged to oper¬
ating expenses. The real estate purchased and permanent
improvements represented by the sum of $357,185 in the gen¬
eral statement comprise the lands acquired by the company for
Union Depot at Minneapolis and ground for additional yard
room and work shops at St. Paul, new general office building
and large freight warehouses at St. Paul, and other property,
which add materially to the value of the company’s assets.
The report

in the construction of about 200 miles
west bank of the Bed River, in the
Territory of Dakota, all of which they expect to have completed
and in operation before the close of the year.
The sales of land by the company during the year for cash
and on credit have amounted to 268,741 acres, representing the
sum of $1,209,928, from which has to be deducted the amount
credited and the liability incurred to settlers for cultivation
under the terms of the company’s contracts, $300,706. The
total cash received over and above the expenses of the depart¬
ment, as principal and interest on land sales, and as considera¬
tion for real estate disposed of by the company, has been
$597,672, which sum is applicable to the sinking fund for
retirement of the first mortgage bonds. Of this issue, $161,100
in bonds have already been purchased and canceled, and a fur¬
ther amount of $379,100 has been called in by the trustees for
redemption on first of July. The land grant of the company,
all of which has now been earned by the completion of the line
to St. Vincent, in accordance with the provisions of the act
of Congress, amounts to about 3,848,000 acres, of which there
The company are engaged
of railroad, chiefly on the

“

have been sold to date 1,087,974 acres.

“Although unusual opportunities were

repeatedly afforded

bondholder of the old company to join the majority in
the reorganization proceedings, there are still outstanding
bonds of the $2,800,000, $3,000,000 and $6,000,000 issues,
amounting in all to $256,500, the distributive share on which—
$54,207—lies in the Court depository subject to payment on
presentation of the bonds. A few of the holders of these
bonds, instigated by an insignificant local element personally
hostile to the new company, have taken proceedings to reopen
foreclosure decrees by which the company came into possession
of the property. These suits are still before the Courts, but are
regarded as of no moment to the company. A similar suit
on the $15,000,000 mortgage was effectually disposed of by
the decision of Mr. Justice Miller at the last term of the
to every

United States Court in St. Paul.”
ASSETS AND

LIABILITIES, JUNE

30, 1880.

Assets.

Cask in bank
Cask in hands of J. S.
to pay

$653,181
Kennedy & Co.,

matured interest on bonds

Cask in bands of Treasurer of trustees
gage bonds sinking fund
Due from agents and
Union Depot stock

293,108—$946,289

first mort¬

419,354
$196,458
20,000

other roads

Cost of railway, equipment and lands
Less bonds redeemed by sinking fund

$1,365,644
216,458

$57,264

Stock of fuel on hand
Stook of material, machinery department
Stock of material, road department.
Construction material

46,057
184,290

283,378

570,990

$31,297,028

161,100

31,135,928

$33,839,974
Liabilities.
and individuals

coupons
coupons
Accrued interest on bonds to

yet due and payable




July 1^1880, not

123,200

payable July 1,1892.. .*
“
Sept. 1, 1881..

8,000,000
366,000
120,000

$16,324,900

15,000,000

$1,522,707

«

_______

first mort¬
the limit
($7,000,000), have been placed on the

Chicago St. Paul Minneapolis & Omaha.—The
bonds to the amount of $1,450,000, completing

gage

named in the mortgage
Stock Exchange list.

Galveston Houston & Henderson.—The following notice

has

been issued to stockholders, under date of September 1:
A special meeting of the stockholders of the Galveston Houston &
Henderson Railroad Company of 1871 will be held at their office, in the
city of Galveston, on Friday, October 1, at 12 o’clock M., for the pur¬
pose of acting upon the following resolution, adopted by the Board of
Directors of this company, at a called meeting held in the city of Galves¬
ton, on the 28th day of August, 1880.
Whereas, An agreement was entered into on the 21st instant,
between the President of this company and the trustees under the mort¬
gage trust deed, dated December 16, 1871, by which the said President,
acting in the name of the company, surrenders possession of the road to
“

“

said trustees.
“

Resolved, That the said agreemeui meets the

sanction of this board,

and is recommended to the adoption and acceptance of the stockholders
of the c«mpany, at a meeting to be called by order of the
as
soon as the same can be held, the said trustees, however, to account to
this company.
“
A full representation of stock is earnestly requested."

President,

Metropolitan Elevated.—The second mortgage bonds

for

$2,000,000, of which the whole amount authorized to be issued
is $4,000,000, maturing November 1, 1899, and bearing interest
at the rate of 6 per cent per annum,
New York Stock Exchange list.

have been admitted to the
The trustees are Messrs.

George J. Forrest and Arthur Leary, and the payment of prin¬
cipal and interest of the bonds is guaranteed by the Manhattan
Railway Company.
Nevr York City Finances.—Mr. John Kelly, Comptroller,
has issued his annual statement for the year ending July 31,
1880, showing that the total receipts into the city treasury for
the fiscal year were $65,104,402, and the disbursements $65,331,259. In commenting upon the decrease in city debt, Mr. Kelly
does not refer to the fact, which ought to be stated in that con¬
nection, that the absolute debt of the city payable from the
sinking fund and taxation has been considerably increased since
1877 by the issue of new bonds. The decrease in debt has
been mainly in the item of assessment bonds, which wwe
always considered as a temporary debt, to be paid off from the

fjroceeds of assessments

specified property. But under

on city bonds were issued and the
egislative authority regular
proceeds used to pay off those assessment bonds. The final
shifting of the burden from property assessed and saddling the
debt on the city was one of the transactions which was the
legitimate result of the New York City method of financiering,
in which temporary obligations are issued to pay not only for
improvements but even for current expenses.
Mr. Kelly remarks of the growth of the city’s debt: “ The
bonded debt of the city of New York amounted fifty years ago
to a very small sum,—less than one million dollars.
Within
that period it increased, however, to an amount considerably
more than one hundred millions; for the last three years it has
been decreasing. Previous to 1870 the bonded debt increased
very slowly ana steadily. For thirty years after 1830, with ^
only trifling fluctuations, the yearly average increase of the
amount of stocks and bonds of the corporation was but little
The exact amount at the
more than half a million dollars.
beginning of the year 1830, after deducting the sinking fund,
was $889,639; at the beginning of 1860 it was $17,541,544.
At
the beginning of 1870 the net debt was $47,791,840, being an
increase of $30,250,296 during the preceding ten years, or an
average increase yearly of $3,000,000. The principal part of
this increase, however, was after the year 1862, in consequence
of the civil war expenditures and the enhanced prices and ex¬
travagance, public as well as private, growing out of the expan¬
sion of the currency of the country. In the year 1863 the net
bonded debt increased from $21,695,506 to $26,185,190, and in
1869 from $35,983,647 to $47,791,840, or nearly twelve million
dollars during the latter year. In 1870 and 1871 the net debt
increased from $47,791,840 to $88,369,386, principally through
the corrupt and fraudulent acts of certain city officials, the
history of which is well known to the public. The gross
bonded debt attained its maximum in 1877, but a large reduction
was made in the net amount during that year, mainly through
the operation of the sinking fund. Since that date both the gross
and net debts have been largely reduced. The amount of the
gross debt December 31, 1877, was $148,821,057, and at the
close of 1879 it was $142,447,400, showing a decrease in the
gross debt of $6,373,657.”
The amount of the net debt on December 31, 1876, was
$119,811,310, and on December 31, 1879, it was $109,425,414,
making a tptal decrease of $10,385,896, the annual decrease
being as follows :
4
.

Date.
Amount December 31,1876
Do
1877
Do
1878
Do
1879

railroad companies
$1,100,707
12,888
matured prior to July l, 1880..
matured on binds to July l,’80.
285,911

Audited bills unpaid and due

Unpaid
Unpaid

$7,838,900

$33,839,974
GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.

formerly

Mails
Track and station rents.

161,100

________

The report of this important consolidated company,
the St. Paul & Pacific, give3 the following as the earnings for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1880:
$47,777
Passengers
$672,047 Rent of leased line
20,467
2,084,711 Miscellaneous
Freight
1
Express

“

$8,000,000

Capital stock

& Manitoba Railway.

St. Paul Minneapolis

trustees

Total decrease

Net debt.

$119,811,310

117,700,742

113,418.403

109,425,414

$

Decrease.

2,110,563
4,282,338
3,992,989

$10,385,896

THE CHRONICLE.

282
BONDED DEBT IN

1879

AND

fVoL. XXXI.

The rate of tax

1880.

on

the assessed valuations for 1880, amount¬

to $1,143,765,727, will probably be 2*53 per cent, against
following comparative statement of stocks and bonds ing
assessed valuations $1,094,069,355 and tax rate 2*58 per cent
August
1879,
shows
the
outstanding
1,
and August 1, 1880,
An act was passed by the Legislature last winter
amount of the bonded debt of all classes at those dates; also in 1879.
the amount of bonds and cash in the “ Sinking Fund for the exempting the capital stock of certain corporations from taxa¬
Redemption of the City Debt,” and the net bonded de'bt at the tion for local and municipal purposes. It is estimated that the
city may be deprived of assessed valuations of more than
same dates:
Amount.
Amount. ’
$20,000,000 by this act, and lose over half a million dollars
Classification of bonds.
Aug. 1, 1879. Aug. 1,1880. of its taxes for the present jrear.
Besides the contingent
1. Bonds payable from taxation, under the
loss of taxes on this account, the city may suffer a much
several statutes authorizing the same... $96,190,515 $91,364,169
2. Bouds payable from the sinking fund, un¬
greater loss under a recent decision of the United States
der ordinances of the Common Council.
18,467,143 Supreme Court relating to the method of assessment of the
18,741,143
3.
The

Bonds payable from taxes raised annually
and paid into the sinking fund for their

shareholders of banks.

redemption, under section 8 of chapter
383, laws of 1878
A. Bonds payable from the sinking fund,
issued to refund old issues, under section
6, ctapter 383. laws of 1878
5. Assessment bonds, issued for local im¬
provements completed prior to June 3,
1878, the date of the passage of chapter
383, laws of 1878, and payable from
assessments and the City Treasury
15. Assessment bonds, issued after June 3,
1878, for local improvements contracted
for or commenced prior to that date, and
payable from assessments and the City
Treasury, under the statutes authorizing
the work, as provided by chapter 383,

1,810,755
6,900,000

6,900,000

12,780,400

807,500

1,164,500

475,500

$137,391,314 $136,957,419
32,135,530
34,361,420

$105,255,783 $102,595,999
9,775
800,000
2,561,000

215,132

16,252,300

2,286,900
16,350,442

$124,878,859 $121,448,474
larger amount of bonded
is shown elsewhere to be
outstanding on December 31st of each year is accounted for by the
issue of revenue bonds after the first of January, in anticipation of
taxes, to be redeemed when they are collected at the close of the year.
REFUNDING THE BONDED

DEBT.

An act

(cliap. 552) was passed at the last session of the
Legislature exempting future issues of stocks and bonds bear¬
ing interest not exceeding four and one-half per cent per
annum from municipal taxation, as follows:
Section 1. The Commissioners of the
New York for tbe Redemption of the City

“Sinking Fund of the City of
Debt,” when duly authorized
by ordinance of the Common Council, may, bjr concurrent resolution,
direct that the bonds and stocks of sail City, hereafter issued pursuant
to law, shall be exempt from taxation by said City and by the County of
New York, but not from taxation for State purposes; and all bonds and
stocks issued pursuant to such authority shall be exempt from taxation
accordingly, provided that said bonds and stocks shall not bear interest
-exceeding the rate of four and one-half per cent per annum.
Section 2. The bonds aud stocks of the City of New York, issued
pursuant to the provisions of this statute, shall express upon their face
the fact that they are exempt from taxation by the City and County of
New York, but not from State taxation, and shall refer to this act, and
the ordinance of the Common Council, and the resolution of the
Commissioners of the Sinking Fund authorizing their issue.
to

Under the provisions of this law, the city will be enabled to
issue bonds and stocks bearing a lower rate of interest than
heretofore. On November 1,1880, a portion of the bonded debt
will mature, which may be refunded under the provisions -of

chapter 383 of the laws of 1878, and the stocks so refunded
will be issued, under the act of 1830, exempt from taxation.
APPROPRIATIONS, VALUATIONS AND TAXES FOR 1880.

The total amount of appropriations made by the Board of
Estimate and Apportionment in the final estimate for the year
1880 is $29,667,991 98, including $25,000 authorized by chapter

<56, laws of 1880, for the improvement of Tompkins Square,
against $30,247,750 20 in 1879, also including special appro¬

priations under acts of the Legislature. The sum of $1,500,C00 is deducted from the total appropriations for 1880, on
account of the general fund applied for the reduction of taxes,

against $2,500,000 in 1879. The surplus revenues of the
Sinking fund for the payment of interest on the city debt,”
were transferred from the general fund to the
sinking fund for
the redemption of the city debt, by section 2 of chapter 383,
laws of 1878, which formerly went to the general fund, and the
amount available for this purpose in 1880 is thereby reduced
$1,000,000. The total amount of valuations of real and per¬
sonal estate in the city of New York, according to the return of
“

Taxes and Assessments

for

1880, ds

$1,143,765,727, against $1,094,069,335 in 1879, making
of $49,696,392.

an

in¬

The tax levy not having been confirmed at the date of this
report, the exact amount is not yet determined. It is estimated
follows:

Appropriations for State purposes

Appropriations for city

purposes,

inel. interest on city d«bt.

Less amount supplied from tbe gene: al fund
Add estimated

amount to

_




$3,571,322
26.096,669

$29,667,991
1,500,000
$28,167,991

supply de lcieucy in tbe actual

product of tbe tax levy
Total estimated tax levy for 1880

real estate

ou

personal estate

ou

croton water rents

personal
August 1, 1880,
$9,325,478
11,663,202
133,945

Total

$21,122,626

can ever be collected, and therefore should nob be con¬
sidered available assets of the corporation.

passed at the last session of the Legislature
(chapter 550) appointing Edward Cooper, John Kelly, Allan
Campbell, together with John S. Lawrence (since deceased),
George H. Andrews, and Daniel Lord, Jr., Commissioners to
revise, vacate and modify assessments for local improvements
in the city of New York, confirmed by the Board of Revision
was

and Correction of Assessments.
This Commission has been duly organized and has given
notice by publication in the City Record and Daily Register, as

required by the law, to all

Total bonded debt, less sinking fund

as

real and
on

ASSESSMENT COMMISSION.

Note.—The exhibit in the above table of a
debt on the first of August of each year than

crease

on

An act

155,000

Issued in anticipation of taxes of 1878
[ Issued in anticipation of taxes of 1879
Issued in anticipation of taxes of 1880

Commissioners of

on

portion

City Treasury, as
provided by statutes authorizing the
work, and chapter 383, laws of 1878...

the

of taxes

follows:

were as

11,996,600

assessments and the

•

arrears

'

The large amount of personal taxes remaining unpaid are
accummulations of arrears from the year 1852. A very small

issued for local im¬
provements contracted for or com menced
after Juue 3, 1878, and payable from

Revenue BondsIssued under special laws
Issued in anticipation of taxes of 1877

The total amount of

estate, and of unpaid croton water rents,
Arrears
Arrears
Arrears

laws of 1878
7. Assessment bonds,

Deduct sinking fund (investments and cash).

ARREARS OF TAXES AND CROTON WATER RENTS.

3,589,507

769,280

$28,937,272

persons

affected by such

assess¬

ments, that the notices required by said act must be filed
before November 1,1880, with the Comptroller of said city, and

duplicates thereof with the Counsel to the Corporation. Refer¬
ence is made for particulars to the notice of the Commissioners
published in said papers.
The following statement shows the total amount of assess¬
ments for local improvements confirmed prior to the passage of
the act (June 9,1880) on which arrears are due; also the balance
remaining unpaid ou April 30, 1880, which is subject to the

action of the Assessment Commission, viz.:
Total amount of assessments for local improvements con¬
firmed prior to June 9,1880, on wliicli arrears are due.
$28,524,761
Amount assessed upon the city
$3,239,587
Amount vacated by tbe courts
2,651,897
Amount paid by property owners
14,175,428—20,066,913
..

Amount remaining

$8,457,847

unpaid April 30,1880

VACATIONS OF ASSESSMENTS.

The amount of assessments vacated

during the

year

by decree" of the courts

ending August 1, 1880,

In tbe Bureau for tlie Collection
In tbe Bureau of Arrears

was:
$37,551
498,560

of Assessments

$536,112

Total

The object of the Assessment Commission previously referred
to is to revise and settle assessments for local improvements on

basis of justice and equity satisfactory to the owners of prop¬
erty, as well as the city, and thus avoid litigation and future
a

vacations of assessments.

New York Ontario & Western.—The stockholders of this
company are making inquiries as to the manner in which the
cash balance of over $9,000,000 is being handled. No information
has been made public of the contracts let out for work, if any,
nor of the definite plans for the construction work to be under¬
taken. The stockholders also inquire whether it would not be
far more economical for the company to spend its own money
and throw open all contracts for close competition rather than
do its work through the medium of a “construction company.”
A construction company usually works only for very large

profits, and if this present company should charge but 30 per
cent more for its work than other contractors, even this per¬
centage would absorb about $2,700,000 of the railroad’s funds.
Heretofore, the mediation of a construction company in railroad
building has been supposed to be warranted only by the lack of
cash resources and the necessity of having a syndicate or com¬
pany to furnish the money ana take the securities of the rail¬
road in payment. Some of the New York Ontario & Western
stockholders are now exceedingly anxious to get out of their
stock and get into the construction company, and wish to know
how it can be done. A full and plain account of what has
already been undertaken, and what is proposed to be done in
future, would be most acceptable to the stockholders, and might
do much to keep them good-natured.
Ohio & Mississippi.—The Receiver’s statements of receipts
and disbursements in the months of June and July have been

furnished

as

follows:
RECEIPTS.

band at 1st of month
Cash from staiion agents
Cash

on

Cash
Cash
Cash
Cash

from
from
from
from

Total

conductors

individuals, RR. Co’s., &c
Adams aud Am. Express Co’s.
P. O. Department

June, 1880.
$38,985

365,703
5,956
;

18,783
726

July, 1880.
'

4o2,328
•->»909
23,446
747

2,127

21,649

$432,281

$659,111

DISBURSEMENTS.

Vouchers subsequent to

Pay-rolls
Arrearages
Cash

on

$142,641
134,230
378

Nov. 17, 1876...

“

“
“

233

THE CHRONICLE.

11,1880.]

September

...

“

...

hand at end of month

155,030

$334,955
131,703

The ©muwcrcml

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.

191,615

$432,281
$659,111
Telegraph.—The Western Union Telegraph
Company have issued their regular quarterly report for the
quarter ending September 30, ana have declared a dividend of 1%
per cent, payable on October 15 next. The following is from
the report: In the report presented by the Executive Com¬
mittee at the last quarterly meeting of the board, held June 9,
1880, the net profits for the quarter ending June 30 (May being
partially and June wholly estimated) were stated at $1,201,185.
The official returns for that quarter showed the profits to be
$1,017,466, or $183,719 less than the estimate, which left a sur¬
plus on July 1, 18S0, of $403,255. The statement for the cur¬
rent quarter is as follows, and the actual figures for the same
quarter in 1879 are given for comparison : 18SO.
1879.
$403,255
Surplus, July 1
$772,469

Friday Night,

Total

Western Union

ending Sep¬
returns for
July, nearly complete returns for August,
and estimating the business for September
(reserving amount sufficient to meet the
claims of the Atlantic & Pacific Telegraph

The net profits for the quarter
tember 30, based upon oliioial

Company, under existing

agreements),.will

be about.

From which

appropriating—

Interest on bonded debt
Construction

1,104,041

1,372,449

$1,507,296

$2,144,919

$107,000

$107,000

300,000

136,080
20,000
10,426
50,000

20,000

Sinking fund appropriations

Purchase of
Heal estate

30,000

telegraph stocks and patents....

Surplus, after paying dividend
For the fiscal year of the company,

$457,000
$1,050,296
717,570

$323,506
$1,821,413
717,538

$332,726

$1,103,875

ending June 30, 1880, the
full returns for the last quarter give accurate data for sum¬
ming up the business, and show the net profits for the year to

have been
The cash surplus at the beginning of

$5,146,639 45

the year was

Making

Of this there has been paid :
Regular dividends to stockholders
Extra dividendof 1 percent from surplus
For interest on bonded debt and sinking
funds
For construction of new Hues
chase of stocks in telegraph

772,469 91
$5,919,109 36

$2,870,241 25

410,035 00
468,517 13

and pur¬

and tele¬

phone companies
For patents

-

For real estate

Reaving surplus July 1, as above,
This shows the net receipts

1,353,632 49
320,130 00

93,298 35— 5,515,854 22

of
$403,255 14
in 1879-80 to have been $5,146,639,

1878-79. The dividends paid were
the previous year, and the dis¬
bursements for new construction, telegraph stocks, real estate,
&c., were $1,767,000 in 1879-80, against $820,000 in 1878-9.
against $4,269,773 in

$2,870,241 against $2,295,304

—Messrs. Drexel, Morgan & Co. and August Belmont & Co.
have placed on the mai*ket $3,500,000 of the Louisville &
ville Railroad Company’s general mortgage gold bonds, which

Nash¬

the rate of 6 per cent.
issue of $5,000,000, the remainder
having been taken for permanent investment, and they are se¬
cured by a mortgage covering 840 miles of road, including the
main line and branches.
A sinking fund has been created by
the mortgage, adequate in amount to retire all the bonds prior
to maturity, with the right on the part of the company to
run

until 1930 and bear interest at

These bonds are a

.

part of

an

jinxes.

834

The movement in all

Sept. 10, 1880.

descriptions of merchandise continues

large, stimulated, by comparatively low prices and the liberal
requirements of legitimate demands. The staples of agricul¬
ture are taken freely for export, and the principal imports are
passing rapidly into consumption. In fact, it would be difficult
to imagine a sounder state of trade.
There are complaints*
however, of serious drought in the Northeast, and of excessive
rains in the Southwest and on the Atlantic Coast, which may
yet cause some injury to important crops.
The course of the provision market has latterly been down*
wrard in sympathy with advices from the West, where the
speculative movement has about subsided. To-day pork sold
on the spot at $15 90@$16 for regular and $16 25 for repacked
mess ; September and October options were respectively quoted
at $15 80 and $15 90. Bacon has been active in the West and
closes at 6*75c. for long and short clear together for December
delivery ; quoted here at 9c. Lard has also declined in sym¬
pathy with the Chicago markets; prime western sold on the
spot to-day at 8*35@8*32}£c.; do. for September delivery sold
at 8'35@8*30c.; November, 8 *30(8)8 *27/£c.; December, 8*25;
seller year, 8*22^@8*17^>c.; January, 8*30(6)8‘25c.;
the Continent quoted at 8*65c. Beef and beef hams

lower at $18.
Butter and
firm and in fair demand. Tallow is quite activp.

and the latter

were

ing is a comparative summary
1 to Sept. 4.:
1879-30.

Pork
Bacon
Lard

lba.
lbs.
lbs.

61,118.400
699,375,798
333,117,962

refined to
were

quiet

cheese ruled

The follow¬
experts
of aggregate
from Nov.

1878-79.

Increase.

Decrease.

2,690,000

63,808,400
683,618,944

15,756,764=

297,563,152

35,554,810

51,311,574
2,690,000
active,
Rio coffee has not been
but has been much more

Total., .lbs. 1,093,612,070

1,044,990,496

firmly held, and latterly fair cargoes have been quoted up to
16@16Mc. The supply shows considerable reduction within a
month; mild grades have been only moderately active, but
have ruled pretty steady for all descriptions, at prices show¬
ing no marked change. There is a very fair supply of mild
coffee here. Rice has met with a fair demand at the former
quotations of 5@7c. for domestic. Molasses has been quite
dull for both foreign and domestic, and prices have remained
nominally the same as last week. Raw sugar has sold to a fair
extent at steady and unchanged quotations, though at the close
the tone is more in buyers’ favor, the stock being pretty lib¬
eral, and the refined product selling slowly. Fair to good re¬
fining Muscavado has been quoted at 7M@‘7%c., and centrifu¬
gal at 8%@8%c. The following shows the statistical position
here at the dates given :
n/tds.

110,142
Stock Sept. 1,1880
110,142
8.718
Receipts since Sept. 1, 1880 —*
11,647
Sales since Sept, l, 1880
107,213
8toek Sept,. 8, 1880
107,213
78,018
Stock Sept. 10, 1879
78,018

Boxes.

9,364
2,060
2,030
9,394
27,605

Bags.
825,725

Melado.

7,131

112,852
41,894

896,683
588,677

7,131
2,778

Refined sugar has receded a fraction, with the demand less
the quotations to-day are 10/£c. for crushed and pow¬
urgent;
draw them by lot, paying 110 and interest for bonds so drawn.
dered and 10%c. for granulated, with a better trade at the
The Louisville & Nashville road for the fiscal year ended June
close.
30 last earned $7,435,843 gross and $3,227,643 net, and since
The market for Kentucky tobacco has shown increased ac¬
then has earned $727,100 gross in July and $795,800 in August.
tivity
in the past week, the sales amounting to 2,472 hhds., of
The bonds are offered at 102 and accrued interest, but the
which 2,172 for export and 300 for home consumption. Prices
bankers reserve the right to advance the price at any time.
are without essential change, lugs being quoted at 4%@6c. and
—Messrs. Robert Glendinning & Co., of Philadelphia, have leaf
6^@12^c. The market for seed leaf has been quieter;
removed to their new building, 303 Chestnut Street, where they yet a very fair business has been done, and sales for the week
will continue to buy and sell on commission, for investment, or are 1,197 cases, as follows: 400 cases 1879 crop, Pennsylvania,
carry on margin, all securities dealt in either in the Phila¬ private terms; 140 cases 1878 crop, Pennsylvania. 12%c.; 100
delphia or New York Stock Exchanges, having equal facilities cases 1879 crop, Ohio, 8c.; 24 cases 1878 crop, New England,
for executing orders in both cities. Advances made on market¬
private terms; 533 cases 1879 crop, New England, 10%@12c.t
able securities. Money received on deposit and interest al¬ and wrappers 22@28c. Also 800 bales Havana, 82c @$1 15.
lowed. They call special attention to the private wire which
Naval stores have ruled firm and quite a fair legitimate trade
connects their office directly with New York, affording excep¬ has been effected. Strained to good strained rosins quoted at
tional facilities to customers dealing in New York securities.
$1 50@$1 55, and spirits turpentine 36c. Petroleum has ad¬
—The New YY>rk, New England & Western Investment Co. vanced and shows much strength ; refined inbbls. sold at 9%c.
offer the unsold portion of the first mortgage gold bonds of the Crude certificates closed at 95c. bid, after selling at 96%c.
Wheeling & Lake Erie Railroad Co. at 95 and interest, and Wool has been selling rather better, owing to somewhat lower
report that the bonds are selling freely. A stock allotment is prices. ^Metals are firm, with the exception of tin, and fully
made to early purchasers of the bonds.
40,000 tons steel rails were sold for next year’s delivery. Ingot
—Mr. Charles T. Wing, the well-known dealer in investment copper-quiet at 18%c. for Lake.
Ocean freight room was weak and lower, and the grain ship¬
securities, offers to the investing public, through our advertising
ments have been somewhat increased thereby.
Grain, to-day,
columns, some choice consols, having a long time to run and
to Liverpool, by steam, 5%d.; cotton, %±; provisions, 20(g) 37s.
bearing a high rate of interest, which will, no doubt, repay an
6d.; grain to London, by steam, 5%@5%d.; flour, by sail, 2s.;
examination into their merits.
to Glasgow, by steam, 4%d.; do. to Bristol, by steam
grain
—The Deadwood Mining Company announces its ninth divi¬
do. to Hull, by steam, 5%d.; grain to Cork for orders
dend (for August), payable at Wells, Fargo & Co. on the 20th. 5^d.;
quoted
5s.; do. to Avonmouth taken at 4s. 7^d.; case oil to
Transfers close on the 15th.
The present dividend makes
Levant, 27c.; crude petroleum to Havre, 3s. 9d.
$225,000 its stockholders i \ r e received




CHRONICLE.

THE

284

The

COTTON.

following is

cotton at all the

Friday, P. M..

'

September 10, 1880.

date:

The Movement of the Crop, as indicated by our telegrams
from the South to-night, is given below.
For the week end¬

ing this evening (Sept. 10), the total receipts have reached 61,117
bales, against 42.082 bales last week, 21,123 bales the previous
week and 8,396 bales three weeks since; making the total
receipts since the 1st of September, 1880, 82,335 bales, against
43,974 bales for the same period of 1879, showing an increase
since September 1, 1880, of 38,361 bales.
The details of the
receipts for each day of this week (as per telegraph) are as
follows

:

[V0t« XXXI.
our usual table showing the movement t>f
ports from Sept. 1 to Sept. 3, the latest mail

RECEIPTS SINCE
SEPT. 1.

Ports.

1880.
N.Orlns

1879.

8av’h..

1,600
1,320
3,533
7,669

Galv.*.

4,787

Mobile.
Char’n*

N. York
Sat.

New Orleans

Port Royal, &c.
Savannah

Tucs.

Wed.

Fri.

3,101

463

466

586

1,727

367

829

256

180

876

1,389

2,917

1,029

1,838

1,049
2,281

....

....

2,334.

....

....

4,286

3,676

2,828

7,096
3,557
12,282

....

....

3,175

Total.

990

2,283

....

....

Galveston

Indianola, &c...

Tennessee, &c..

675

2,788

....

....

135

Florida

1,498

2,712
5,806
275

89

428

325

200

....

....

63

808

....

....

447

....

....

Norfolk

467

484

....

....

....

16,744

at—

Charleston
Port Royal, &c
Savannah

Indianola, <fcc
Tennessee, &c

...

Total since Sept. 1.

1,628

28

28

264

2,196

13

13

978

5,542

489

....

11,096 10,862

usual table

s

489

61,117

showing this

1879.

1878.

3,786

1,435
4,892

1877.

1876.

3,932
1,876

1,339

7,656

2,119

957

6,239
2,039
5,216

29

....

8,388
9,149

19,550
11,710

4,556
2,358

12,468

747

447

181

57

599

1,628

693

691

168

363

28

15

38

14

78

2,209
5,542

514

915

296

1,061

707

850

164

2 330

489

28

32

52

1,436

61,117

30,054

47,431

12,109

41,457

82,335

43,974

73,329

17,994

63,030

City Point, &c
Total this week

451

16,744
10,795

Florida...;
North Carolina
Norfolk

747

:

....

Galveston

our

10,795

747

the totals for the corresponding weeks

7,096
3,557
12,282

Mobile

8,616

9,315

1880.

New Orleans

1,006

....

....

-1,471

....

1,089

....

For comparison, we continue
week’s total receipts
and
of the four previous years

....

1,518

6,474 14,754

2,883
....

260

Totals this week

1,480
....

....

9,628

The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total of
38,671 bales, of which 37,402 were to Great Britain, 199 to
France and 1,070 to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as
made un this evening are now 151,941 bales.
Below are the
exports for the week and stocks to-night, and a comparison with
the corresponding period of last season.
BXPORTED TO—

ending
Great
Sept. 10. Britain.
N. Orl’ns

5,301
9,700

Savan’h.

Galv’t’n
N. York.

France.

Total
this
Week.

Conti¬
nent.

6,109

Mobile..

Charl’t'n

6,109
....

....

....

....

....

10,246

199

....

Other*..

6,046

.

5,301
9,720
....

1,050

...

....

....

....

8TOCK.

Same
Week
1879.

1880.

1,558

39,215
3,964
9,207
17,137
15,238
54,946
3,734
11,500

....

20

....

....

Norfolk-

11,495
....

6,046

....

....

....

4,944
.

.

.

.

719

1879.

4,741

4,070
8,602
11,445
28,453
209

7,500

37,402

199

1,070

38,671

7,221 154,941

66,372
-

Tot. since

Sept. 1..

44,702

199

1,070

45,971

12,971

....

....

*rne exports tnia weelt under the head of “other ports” include,
from
xaore, 4,U42 bales to Liverpool; from Boston, 604 bales to Liverpool;

Philadelphia, 500 bales to Liverpool.

Norf’k*

914

399

Other..

908

851

rhis yr.

21,218

Last year

Bal-

foregoing statement it will be seen that, compared
with the corresponding week of last season, there is an increase
in the exports this week of 31,450 bales, while the stocks
to-night
88,569 bales

than

they

this time a year ago.
In addition to above exports, our telegrams to-night also
give
ns the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not
cleared, at
the ports named.
We add also similar figures for New York,
which are prepared for our special use by Messrs. Carey, Yale &
more

On

10, AT—

New Orleans
Mobile
Charleston
Savannah
Galveston
New York

Other ports
Total
*

were at

Great
Britain.

4,291
2,000
500

3,800
3,335
14,000
1,000
28 926

Shipboard, not cleared—for
FYance.

Other

Foreign
6,260
None.
None.
None.
949
None.

216
None.
None.
None.
None.
500

Coast¬
wise,.

716

Total.

....

....

.

.

....

.

.

.

.

....

4,000

....

....

....

...

....

.

....

....

...

....

.

.

.

....

....

....

....

—

....

....

.7,300
5,431

.

34,924
2,767
6,353
17,153
6,325

63,414

....

......

1,045
3,000
10,000

7,300 145,011

311

•8

5,750

54,263-

.

10,779
2,000
1,250

None.
750

4,500
1,724
None.

7,986

considerable

improvement in prices of cotton
delivery the past week, though the speculation has
not been very active.
Receipts at the ports have continued free,
but there have been general reports of bad weather at the South,,
which, it is claimed, threaten to reduce the aggregate yield, and
in the advance of prices the later months have fully shared.
The
rumors with regard to the nature of the
reports of the Southern
exchanges which were current on Thursday caused a strong ad¬
vance on that day.
This morning the opening was buoyant in
an advance at
Liverpool, but many operators took the opportunity
to realize, causing irregularity and weakness.
Cotton on the
spot was quiet for the first half of the week, but more recently
there was a better demand for export and consumption. Yester¬
day quotations were revised. Ordinary and strict ordinary ad¬
vanced |c.; good ordinary and' strict good ordinary advanced lc. ;;
low middling advanced l-16c.; strict low middling and middling
unchanged. Grades above reduced £c. Stained good ordinary
advanced 7-16c.; other grades, 5-16c.
To-day there was no quot¬
able change, but the fine grades of new cotton were offered to
arrive at easier prices.
The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 522,500
bales, including
free on board. For immediate delivery thetotal sales foot up this week 6,429 bales, including 2,568 for
export, 3,831 for consumption, 30 for speculation, and —— in
transit.
Of the above, 1,325 bales were to arrive.
The fol¬
lowing are the official quotations and sales for each day of
a

for future

the past week:

Sept. 4 to

UPLANDS.

Sept. 10.

Sat.

Ordin’y.#lb

8916

Strict Ord..
9116
Good Ord^. 10116
3tr. G’d Ord 107i6
Low Midd’g 1118
Str. L’w Mia H716

8.300
6,008
*14,977

Stock

28,436
1.964
7.957
8.837
9,230

2,000

39,969
13,234

45,314

109.627

•

NEW ORLEANS.

Mon Tnes

8916

Sat.

Mon Tnes

Ills

1118

Wed

Th.

8?16

810!6
9716
10^16
109ie
11316
U716
11H16
121lo
12oi6
121*16

8triot Ord.
9h6
Good Ord.. 10116
Str. G’d Ord 107i6
Low Midd’g 1116
Str. L’w Mid

like
Middling... lliiie
Good Mid.. 12316
Str. G’d Mid 127,6
Midd’g Fair 121516
Fair
1991«

Mon. Toes

Sat.

8916
8916
8®16
89.6
89.6
g;i«9316
93l8
93,6
93.6 , 9*16
93.6
lOhe 10116 IOI16 10316 103,0 10ke lOke i 10316
107i6 107i6 10916 10916 109i6 109.6 10916 109,6
1114

Ilk

Ilk

il716 H716 11916 119,6 119.6
Middling... Hn16 111*16 llUl6 111316 lH3i6 1113.6
Good Mid
123ie 12316 12316 12*16 125i6 125.6
Str. G’d Mid 127i6 I2'j6 127 i0 12916 12916 1‘-916
Midd’g Fair 121016 121o16 i2io16 13116 iSke 131i6
Pair
139j6 139i6 139i6 131*16 13i*i6 1311.6

Ordin’y.$!b

TEXAS.

89i6
9*16

9a16

Fri.

Wed

Th.

Fri.

8916
81516
9716
9916
9316
10516 l°3ie 107i6
101116 10916 101*16
Hi!16 Ilk 11516
H710 H916 119.6
111*16 1H3i6 1113,0
12ho 125i6 12316
12516 129ie 12716
121316 13116 1215.6
137,6 13716 1311,6 139.6

STAINED.

Good Ordinary
Strict Good Ordinary
Low Middling

Sat.

$ lb.

83,6

Middling

81516
99ie
10?16
101316
HO,Q
11916
1U316
12316
12716
1215,6
13916

ilk

ilk

n®ie
111316
325.6
129.6
13116
131116

11916 11»16
1U3i6 msig
12*16 12*16
129i6 12916
131-16 13k®

Wed

Mon Toes Wed

83.6
815.6
911.6

ilk

131116

13ltl*

Til.

Fri.

89i6
81516
93,6
99i6
103.6 107jl6
109.6 101*16
Hk
115.6
11916
119.16
1 113,6 Hike
3-25,6 123.6
129.6 127i6
13l16 121516
131*,6 139ie

83.6
83,6
815.6 81516
91116
9ll16 91118
109,6 109,6 109,6 1109,6
8I016

9»16
107,6
H

*16
11916

1231S6
12716.

121*1*

139,6®'

Til.

Fri.

85g
9k

8*8
9k

10
10 78

10

1078

market and sales.
SALES OP 8POT AND TRANSIT.
SPOT MARKET
CLOSED.

Ex¬

Sat.. Dull & irregular.
300
Mon
100
Quiet
irregular
Tues. Irregular
614
Wed Firm
100
Thurs Steady; quo. rev. 1,054
Fri.
400
Steady
.

.

Total

Con-

Specport. sump. ul't'n

.

12

1,000
7.209

Leaving

Included in this ann um are 477 bales at presses for
foreign ports,
the destination of whicli we cannot learn.|
iMsa




....

....

13,920

There has been

Lambert. 60 Beaver street:

taPJ.

....

....

.

3,300

Under the head of Charleston is included Port Royal, Ac. under the head of
Galveston is included Indianola. Ac.; under the head of Norfolk is included City
Point. &c.

from

From the

are

86

....

..

1,352

Tot. this
week..

487

....

....

.

,

Total.

....

....

4,000

299

NT. Car.

....

....

810

....

Foreign

....

....

....

....

354

City Point, &c..

....

....

Wilmington....
Moreh’d City,&c

Week

3,300

558

Stock.

Other

France.

*

Brunswick, &c.

Receipts this w'k

Thurs.

753

...

Mobile

Charleston

Mon.

Britain.

2,124

Florida

Receipts at—

EXPOR rED SINC E SEPT. 1 TO—

Great

2,568

165
808
454

1,017
696
691

3,831

Tran¬
Total.
sit.

-

....

....

....

....

....

_

.

.

....

30
30

....

....

FUTURES.

Sales.

Deliv¬
eries.

465
90S

54,400

1,000

64,600

1,068

92,000

600
500
200

1,117 107.100
1,750 77,900
1,121 126,500

1,300

6,429 522,500

4,300

700

The daily deliveries given above are actually delivered the day pre¬
vious to that on which they are reported.
~
•

The Sales and Prices of Futures are shown by the follow¬
ing comprehensive table. In this statement will be found the
daily market, the prices of sales for each month each day, and
the closing bids, in addition to the daily and total sale&L

September
oat

3

9
fc*i-s
© —•
a> o

a*®

P, Di
er>«£|
-r4 50

h-< M

P3

00 C5

CD 00

M

o3<m4

dg-^

E*®

g
O^opo
p a

S5?f

S^g*

So»g
P

® &
s*© ® p

03 (3

? ®
m

ao *

PoJ? SF'dS oa
?»«?* *»*d
r- S°
S-rP^. £§*£ on 2 pi”*
£p*£'*b
P_P.K—«-»■ p.^r.2
£U: r
^
g

eg:

*

p •

285

THE CHRONICLE.

11,1880. J

Pig;

—•

o»

® ®

g2g|

Q.

jr*

C5 ®

2

g*S-®

p

03

Pwo®

5,047

5,250
12,000

Total continental ports....

192,111

181,645

280,250

444,450

838,711
121,000
71,000

590,947

India cotton afloat for Europe.

785,250 1,213,950
195,000
160,000
48,000
14,000
23,000
3,000
105,320
81,289
9,387
11,019
1,000

gs?
P P

.

981

Egypt, Brazil, Ac., aflt for E’r’pe

a

Stock in United States ports

..

Stock in U. S. interior ports...
United States exports

(6

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10*69®

10*69—71 2,90
10*73

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66
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vio

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MM

MM

MM

r— m

MM

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oo

oo

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66

66

66

66

66

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M

wo

050

00 X

C-l

tOM

coo

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M M CX

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1 ©7**

1 ©CO

1 ©M -

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00 05

005

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MW

MM
MM

MM
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r— r—

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M M

MM

MM

OO

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M tO

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MO
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coco

M >—CX
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M
M

MtO°

to
CO

00 <1

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1

M

MM<1

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MM©

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1 ©

MM©
MM©

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1

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6

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00

too

CO o

©

66©

1 ©

1 ©

1 ©

1 ©

MMW
MMO

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Janury.

©

O

©

o

5,694

i i

1 ©:

I ©:

1 ©:

1 ©;

1 1

1

1 1

1

:

1:

:

l[

I

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1

1 1

Februay.

1— M

M 1—

MM

MM

MM

OO

OO

oo

OO

66

66

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6M

oco

00 GO

CXrf^*

MM

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1 ©0»

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05-10

M tO O
M >— O

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Hh#.

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to too

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to COO

ooo

646,600
67,800
8,120

Stock at Barcelona...

46,800

Stock at Hamburg




4,300

466,946

399,250

631,950

727,651

421,027

691,308

927,707

887,973 ]L,090,553 1L,559,657

6»ad

6^d.

filled-

16,272

1,000

737,491

429,896

699,260

934,592

218,000

136,000
68,302
78,645
180,517
3,482

322,000
20,000
195,000

296,000
29,500
123,450
160,000

3,000

23,000

399,250
699,260

934,592

49,600
92,111

121,000
18,000

466,946
429,896

498,711
737,491

59,250

631,950

896,842 1,098,510 1,566,542

1,236,202

figures indicate an increase in

the cotton in sight to-night

1879, an
date

bales as compared with 1877.
At the Interior Ports the movement—that is the receipts
and shipments for the week, and stocks to-night, and for the
corresponding week of 1879—is set out in detail in the following
and

a

decrease of 330,340

Week ending Sept.

10, ’80.

Receipts. Shipni’ts

Stock.

0 050

1878.

1877.

341,000
68,302

485,000
20,000

740,000
29,500

409.302

505,000

104,860
1,829
18,000
2,600

155,250
1,750

769,500
229,000

”

.

498,711

18,971

jf 1878,

telegraph, is as follows. The Continental stocks are the figures
•of last Saturday, but the totals for Great Britain and the afloat
for the Continent are this week’s returns, and consequently
brought down to Thursday evening; hence, to make the totals the
complete figures for to-night (Sept. 10), we add the item of exports
from the United States, including in it the exports of Friday only.

Total Great Britain stock

23,000

)f 339,360 bales as compared with the same date of
increase of 137,692 bales as compared with the corresponding

following exchanges have been made during the week:
*11 pd. to exoh. 100 Nov. for Jan.
I *14 pd. to exch. 200 Jan. for Feb.
*01 pd. to exch. 100 Oct. for Jan.
| *38 pd. to exch. 500 Dec, for Feb.
The Visible Supply of Cotton, as made up by cable and

Stock at Havre
Stock at Marseilles...

3,000

700

Total visible supply

The

49,600

3,482

1877.
444,000
321,000
48,000
105,320

9^7 m

597.000

180,517

18,000

1878.

Total East India, &o
Total American..

11*05; Tuesday
11*30; Friday, 11*20.
September—Tuesday, 11*30311*31; Thursday,

43tockat Liverpool
Stock at London

121,000

29,500

123,450
160,000

statement:

MMKk.

1879.

78,645

err

M M to

1880.

296,000

92,111

122,000
20,000
59,250
195,000

68,302

363,000
221,000
14,000
81,289

Egypt, Brazil, Ao., afloat

11*10; Wednesday, 11*15; Thursday,
for

136,000

7*8 d.

London stock
Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe

Inoludes 500 for August,. 1881, at 11*50.
Transferable Orders—Saturday, 11*09; Monday,

Notices

218,000
49,600

1879.

*

Short
11*39.

927,707

1 ,226,362

Liverpool stock

>

0

oo

1

691,308

Liverpool

Tota American
East Indian, brazil, dtc.—

C5

©]
li

MM

OCX

421,027

205,000
103,000
40,261
66,372
14,563

O

OO

•

727,651

9,387

1880.
.bales 379.000
100.000
American afloat to Europe....
71,000
United States stock
154,941
United States interior stocks..
25,550
United States exports to-day..
7,000

cx

1 ©:

700

to-day..

©

!

14,000

105.320

American—

M

,

444,000
321,000
48,000

363,000
221,000
81,289
11,019
1,000

Liverpool stock
Continental stocks

1 ©
M

15,710
7,000

These

I I

follows

The above figures indicate an increase in the cotton in sight to¬
night of 338,389 bales as compared with the same date of 1879,
an increase of 135,804 bales as compared with the corresponding
date of 1878, andacfecrawd of 333,295 bales as compared with 1877.
In the preceding visible supply table we have heretofore only
included the interior stocks at the 7 original interior towns.
As we did not have the record of the new interior towns for the
four years, we could not make a comparison in any other way.
That difficulty no longer exists, aDd we therefore make the fol¬
lowing comparison, which includes the stocks at the 19 towns
given weekly in our table of interior stocks instead of only the
old 7 towns.
We shall continue this double statement for a
time but finally shall simply substitute the 19 towns for the 7
towns in the preceding table.

M —

CX

66,372

Total visible supply

M CX

’

154.941

Price Mid. Upl.,

&

1 ©

mmm
MM©

Mr—O

103,000
40,261

Egypt, Brazil, Ac., afloat

MM

©O

•-»

10

October.

MM

MM

205,000

100,000
71,000

London stock
Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe

WM®

HMy

o

oo©

—

887,973 1,090,558 1,559.657

379,000

Total American
East Indian, Brazil, dtc.—

OOOm

mm to

M

05

......

Continental stocks
American afloat for Europe....
United States stock
United States interior stocks..

&

coo

oo©

700

Liverpool stock

n

mmcd
o o©

.

»

1,226,362

Total E^t India, <fcc
Total American

MM

1 ©P

40,261
3,482
66,372
5,694

totals of American and other descriptions are as

United States exports

woo

MM

oo

M M to

I

1

o"« cx ©

MM<1

o<ito

13,60 1 ,50

99©

MM

I ©©

35,60 24, 0

I ©00

12,70

18,000
154,941
15,710
7,000

Liverpool stock

MM©

CM

-100

CO

05

-i>

>-M©

tO©

180.517

American—

^

:

to-day..

Total visible supply
Of the aDove, the

®

: &

•

MMlo

MM©
MM©

•

•

•

*
f®

1

1 S to

•

0*

1,388

7,750

2,610

i

9

42,250

•

Amer’n cotton afloat for Europei

:

65,000

18,400

|

pi^ i
i :

;

35.000

Stock at other conti’ntal ports.

• •

.

®

3 :

1878.

16,649
31,272

Stock at Antwerp

•
»® •

pi.

1879.

28.800

37,750
10,000
7,750
12,000

Stock at Rotterdam....

S»r§

1877.

1880.

14.300

Stock at Amsterdam.

S^-pS?

ggg-,3

•*

P »5

00

O

bales.

Stook at Bremen

11.000

15.500

59,000

5,500

13,000

1,710
3,060
1,941

2,641
1,432

Memphis, Tenn..
Nashville, Tenn..

651
53

601

2,121
2,312
1,549
1,390
1,137
6,476

104

Total, old ports.

13,981

Dallas,Texas ...
Jefferson, Tex...
Shreveport, La ..
Vicksburg, Miss.
Columbus, Miss..
Bufaula, Ala.
driffln, Ga
Atlanta, Ga
Rome, Ga
Charlotte, N. C. *
St. Louis, Mo....

1,022

4,752

5,024
1,542

Augusta, Ga
Columbus, Ga....
Macon, Ga

Montgomery, Ala
Selma, Ala

...

1,401
956

Week ending Sept. 12, *79.

Receipts. Shipmft8
2,157
677

1,192

Stock.
573
560
781
732

2,185
529
711

3,076
1,603

1,651

725

10
37

8
110

1,007

11,887

15,710

10,102

8,222

5,694

866

376
191

2,078

2,011

1,012

500

1,113

1,231

400
553
377
14
123
112
200
15

6
347
460

42

751
490
42

•

•

•

•

1,653

1,636

392

397

1,210

....

3,356

2,679

569
94
831

204
130

1,017

124
159
20
95

214

2,992

503
500

852
600

1,154

1,142

778

1,009

390

400

1,236
277

119
893
32
232

83

io
271

3,352
3,160

2,723

2,064

514

2,323

Cincinnati, O....

672
600
964
495

Total, new p’rts

8,333

6,647

9,840

10.213

7,128

8,869

22,314

18.534

25,550

20,315

15,350

14,563

Total, all
*

This

year’s figures estimated.

The above totals show

creased during

that the old

the week 2,094 bales, and

into-night 10,016 bales

interior stock3 have
are

THE CHRONICLE.

286
than at the

period last year. The receipts at the same
3,879 bales more than the same week last year.
Receipts prom the Plantations.—The following table is
prepared for the purpose of indicating the actual movement each
week from the plantations.
Receipts at the outports are sometimes misleading, as they are made up more largely one year
than another, at the expense of the interior stocks.
We reach,
therefore, a safer conclusion through a comparative statement
like the following.
In reply to frequent inquiries we will add
that these figures, of course, do not include overland receipts or
Southern consumption; they are simply a statement of the
weekly movement from the plantations, of that part of the crop
which finally reaches the market through the out-ports.

more

same

towns have been

thermometer has ranged from 57 to 87 and the rainfall has been
one inch and thirty hundredths.
Last week, Friday, Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday were

cloudy, with rain

Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday; but the
clear and hot.
Average thermometer 79,
highest 89 and lowest 70, and rainfall one inch and thirty-seven
hundredths. For August, average thermometer 78, highest 90
and lowest 60, and raia on thirteen days, with a rainfall of five
inches and fifty-eight hundredths.
Nashville, Tennessee.—We have had rain during the past week
on four days, the rainfall reaching two and
thirteen hundredths
inches. The thermometer has ranged from 49 to 87, averaging
rest of

Week

Stock at Interior Ports Rec'pts

Receipts at the Ports.
1878.

1879.

1878.

1879.

1880.

23,51:
17,057
14,070
10,691

21,240

25,223

81.172

19,675
18,033

22,38S
20,691
15,528
14,410

30,136
56.423

“

9

**

16

6.879
5,949
5,287
3,782

**

23

4,083

3,272

13,148

12,527

“

30

2,503
3.045

10.859

8,932

11,005
8.346

3,462

8,691

6,238

8,396
21,123
42,082

5,999
6,593
9,979

7,463
9,598

75,103
71,950
66,198
56,662
49,031
41,507
35,473
29,864
27,762
21,770

6’.117

18,971

14.561

25.550

June 25

2

July

6,293
3,637
3,032
2,809

1878.

1880.

*•

13

8,673
3,069
4,657

“

20

5,699

••

27

15,784
26,750

4,843
4,875
13,920

47.431

30,054

Aug. 6

Sept. 3
M

10

15,494

13,966
13,049
11,477
7,301

were

1879.

1880.

4,832
4,384
3,645
1,243
1,119
2,149

2,210

8,403

802

10,988

1,335

10,917

2,059

3,612
3,828

410

3,028
1,890

2,657

829

2,787

4,713
10,217
85,019

19,021

2,549
5,460
16,378

The above statement shows—
1. That the total receipts from the plantations
1880 were 82,943 bales; in 1879 were 51,236

from Plant'ns.

...

*

2,154

4,939

858

86,090
64.897

since Sept. 1 in
bales; in 1878

86,559 bales.

2. That the

receipts

at

the

out ports the

past

week

61,117 bales, and the actual movement from plantations
64,897 bales, the balance being added to stocks at the interior

'were

Last year the receipts from
week were 35,019 bales, and for 1878
ports.

i

Weather Reports

the plantations for the same
they were 56,423 bales.

Telegraph.—In

large portion of
less portion of the Atlantic States, con¬
siderable rain has fallen the past week.
Dry and warm weather
is extremely desirable now, and these rains, if continued, cannot

the Gulf

States, and in

by

a

a

fail to do much harm.

Upon the whole, crop accounts are less
favorable, but still the prospect is that as much will be made as

ported disappearing.
be saved.

Indianola, Texas.—Rain has fallen on six days of the week,
hard, to a depth of two inches and fifty-two hundredths, but

extending only a short distance inland.
The thermometer has
averaged 80, the highest being 93 and the lowest 67. Cater¬
pillars have done great harm in some counties, but still the crop
will be

a

fair

Corsicana,

one.

Texas—We have had

the week,

one

fine shower during

doing good rather than harm. Picking is progressing
finely, and we will make as much as can be picked. Average ther¬
mometer 78, highest 92 and lowest 61.
The rainfall is seventy
hundredths of

an

on

was

Memphis, Tennessee.—It has rained

on

five days during the

week, with a rainfall of fifty-seven hundredths of an inch. !
Average thermometer 70, highest 89 and lowest 48. Crop
The August report will be fifteen
accounts are less favorab’e.
per cent under July and nine per cent under a year ago.
Mobile, Alabama.—It has been showery three days the past
week and has rained severely one day, the rainfall reaching two
inches and

'l'he thermometer has averaged
Crop accounts are
less favorable.
We are having too much rain, rust is developing
badly and much damage has been done. Picking has been in¬
fifty hundredths,

76, the highest being 89 and the lowest 62.

terfered with.

Montgomery, Alabama.—It has rained during the past week
four days, the rainfall reaching one inch and twenty-six hun¬
dredths. Average thermometer 77, highest 92 and lowest 59.
We are having too much rain, which ha?? injured the quality of
the cotton, the plant having been stripped by worms.
Weather
on

cool.

Selma, Alabama.—We are having too much rain.
It has
during the past week on three days.
We have had an

rained

unusually

severe

storm.

Madison, Florida.—Telegram not received.
Macon, Georgia.—It has rained on one day of the week, the
rainfall reaching ten hundredths of an inch.
The thermometer
has

averaged 79, the highest being 9J and the lowest 69.

Columbus, Georgia.—It has rained during the past week on one

day, the rainfall reaching twelve hundredths of an inch. The
thermometer has ranged from 70 to 90, averaging 80.
Savannah, Georgia.—It has rained on two days, the rainfall
reaching eighty-six hundredths of an inch, and the rest of the
week has been cloudy.
Average thermometer 79, highest 90
and lowest 66.

Galveston, Texas.—It has rained during the past week on five
days, hard, but confined to the coast, the rainfa’l reaching four
inches and fifty-one hundredths.
The thermometer has ranged
from Go to 88, averaging 78.
In many sections of the lower half
of the State caterpillars have stripped the plant of foliage, and in
the northern half the boll worm has done harm, but is now re¬

can

the week

73.

RECEIPTS FROM PLANTATIONS.

ending—

[ Vol. XXXI.

inch.

Augusta, Georgia.—The weather during the week has been
and dry, with a light rain on one day. Accounts favorable*
Picking progressing finely and cotton being forwarded freely.
Average thermometer 79, highest 92 and lowest 65. The rainfall
warm

one hundredth of an inch.
Charleston, South Carolina.—We have had rain during the past
week on one day, with a rainfall of two and twenty-two hundredths*

is

The thermometer has averaged 79, the highest being
89 and the lowest 65.
The following statement we have also received by telegraph,

inches.

showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3 o’clock
September 9, 1880, and September 11, 1879.
Sept. 9, ’80. Sept. 11. '79.

Feet. Inch.

Feet.

Inch.

New Orleans...".

Below high-watermark

..

11

10

12

6

Memphis

Above low-water mark...

3

,13

O

Nashville

Above low-water mark...

9

Shreveport

Above low-water mark...

10

6

0

4

Vicksburg

Above low-water mark...

2

9

Missing.

2

16

5

5

reported below high-water mark of, 1871 until
Sept. 9, 1874, when the zero of gauge was changed to high-water
mark of April 15 and 16, 1874, which is 6-10ths of a foot above
1871, or 16 feet above low-water mark at that point.
New Orleans

Dallas, Texas.—There has been no rainfall during the week,
Cotton Crop Report for Year.—Our annual cotton crop*
but the temperature has been unseasonably low, the thermometer
averaging 78 and ranging from 61 to 92. Much damage has been report for the past year will be found in our editorial columns
done by the boll worm, but the reported damage to the crop is
much Exaggerated, and the worm is now said to be disappearing. to-day.
The crop will not be an overwhelming one, as promised a month
Consumption of Cotton in Europe.—We have received to-day
since, but will be a good one.
Brenham, I'exas.—We have had one shower the past week, a cable dispatch giving the results in Mr. Ellison’s September
the rainfall reaching fifty hundredths of an inch.
Average
report, issued at Liverpool yesterday. In our editorial columns
thermometer 80, highest 92 and lowest 68,
Caterpillars have
nearly stripped cotton in bottom and black lands, but there will we give our usual review of these figures.
be a fair yield.
Sandy lands are but little hurt and will make a
Cotton Exchange Reports for Sept.—We publish below
full crop.
New Orleans, Louisiana.—We have had rain during the week the Cotton Exchange condition reports for Sept. 1, as received,
on six days, the rainfall reaching three and four hundredths
by telegraph :
inches.
1 he thermometer has averaged 78.
Norfolk Department.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—The first four days of the past week
The Norfolk Cotton Exchange, through tlieir Committee on Information
were cloudy and rainy, with a rainfall of two and fifty-five hun¬
and Statistics, composed of George L- Arps, Chairman, John N. Yauglian
dredths inches; but tlieJialance has been clear and cool.
Cotton and H. G. Reynolds issues the following report, covering tho State of
coming in slowly. Average thermometer 69, highest 83 and Yirqinia and tlie following Counties in North Carolina: Rutherford,
lowest 53.

Vicksburg, Mississippi.— Crop accounts in this section are less
Rain has fallen during the week on five days and
favorable.
has interfered with picking.
Columbus, Mississippi.—The first four days of the past week
were rainy, the rainfall reaching one inch and seventy-four hun¬
dredths; but the latter portion has been clear and pleasant. The
thermometer has averaged 76, the highest being 84 and the

lowest 62.
Planters here have reduced tlieir estimates fully onethird, caterpillars having stripped cotton generally, thereby des¬
troying all hope of a top crop.
Little Rock, Arkansas.—Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Mon¬
day of the past week were cloudy, with rain on the last three
days, but the remainder of the week has been clear and cool. The




Lincoln, Catawba, Rowan, Davidson, Iredell, Burke, Wilkes, Caldwell,.
Alexander, Davie, Forsythe, Yadkin, Stokes, Surrey, Rockingham*
Caswell, Person, Granville, Warren, Franklin, Nash, Wake, Hyde, Pitt,
Green, Cartaret, Craven, Beaufort, Tyrrel, Washington, Martin, Bertie,

Chowan, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, Gates, Hertford, Northampton*
and Halifax.

North Carolina and

Virginia.—86 replies from 38 counties.

Seventy-two replies show rainy and unfavorable weather, and 14
favorable weather; 22 report the weather more favorable than last

46 less favorable, and 18 the same as last year. Thirty-eight
report the cotton fruiting well and retaining squares and bolls, and 17
report it fruiting well. N iueteeu report the crop very good—from 10 to
50 per cent better than last year; 53 report it fair and better than last
year, and 14 report it poor and not so good as last year. Thirty-six
report picking not begun, and 47 that picking has begun. The gcueral
tenor of the reports shows that picking will be general by the 15th or
September. Seventy-nine show no worms; 6 report worms in five coim-

year,

■September 11,

THE CHRONICLE

1880.]

287

and ni3t, ding, superinduced by too much rain and worms, has been great, the
damage. average loss from these sources in the State being 22 per cent.
A majority of the reports indicate that since August 15 the weather
Mississippi.—153 replies from 35 counties, tbe average date
has been unfavorable in consequence of too much rain, causing shedding
and rust; and the report further says that since the average dates of being August 31.
reports received the bad weather has continued with great severity
The weather during the month has been very unfavorable to the crop,

ties, but little damage; 36 indicate plight damage by shedding
29 damage of 5 to 33 per cent by shedding and rust, and 21 no

within the past few days.

and much less favorable

Charleston Department
covers the State of South Carolina, and is prepared and issued by the
Charleston Cotton Exchange, through their Committee on Information
and Statistics, composed of A. Norden, Chairman, R. D. Mure, E. Willis,

ing aud blooming well and not retaining its squares and bolls. The
present condition of the crop is not good, aud decidedly worse than last
jear. The crop has ripened very early, and picking has commenced.
Tt was expected to become general about September 6. Army worms
have appeared in a great many counties, but have not done any positive
damage to th-» crop. The ravages of boll worms, however, are general,
aud in many instances very serious. It is estimated that the damage
from boll worms, shedding, rust and rot is 22 per cent.

Win. Fatman, L. J. Walker.

South Carolina.—62 replies from 30
date being Aug. 30 :

counties, the average

The character of the weather during August is reported by 27 as favrtc:
able and by 45 as unfavorable to the cotton crop, as compared with the
same period last year; 12 report it as more favorable; 5 about the same,
and 45 as less favorable; 22 report the cottou as fruiting well and re¬

taining its squares and bolls, while the remaining
able shedding.
As to the present condition of the crop
same time last year, 23 report the same to
and 30 not as good.

complain of consider¬

and its comparison with the

be better; 9 about the same,

Picking is universally reported as having commenced, and will become
general even in the upper couuties, by September 15.
No injury has been done by worms.
The damage to the plant by
ahedding and rust, as compared with its condition on July 31, is stated
by 17 to be very slight; 40 estimate the damage to amount to from 5 to
33 per cent, and averaging 20 per cent, while o report no damage at ail
from these causes.

Savannah Department*
report covers the State of Georgia and the State of Florida. The
report is prepared and issued by the Savannah Cotton Exchange, through
their Committee on Information and
ston, Clavius Phillips, J. J. Wilder, L.

Statistics, composed of J. H. John¬
G. Young and F. M. Farley.

Georgia.—83 replies from 51 counties.
The reports show that in the first part of the month of August there

too much rain for the cotton plant; then it became too hot and dry,
causing rust and shedding of forms and young bolls. The weather was
less favorable than in the same month last year.
Picking commenced
about August 15 in southern Georgia and about the last of the month in
northern Georgia, and in a few days became general.
Excessively hot
suns are opening and maturing the bolls unusually fast.
Worms apwas

in southern
andcrop
evenis there
Seared The
onlypresent
Georgia,
but little damage
prospect
of the
more promising
than on was
the
one.

date last year, but the >ield at this time last year was afterward
increased 10 per cent by second growth and an unusually late frost. As
the rains commenced a mouth later this year, we cannot look for much
result from second growth this season. During the last days of August
and the first of September this State was visited by a severe wind and
rain storm, which destroyed much of the open cotton.
same

Florida.—17 replies from

11 counties.

compared with last year, the plant not form¬

Arkansas* —167 replies from 33

counties;

average

date

August 31.
The weather has been very unfavorable in all tlio counties except two
(Desha and Sebastian), and is decidedly less favorable than last year.
The plant is not retaining its forms, and the bolls, present condition is
bad—very much worse than at this time last year. Owing to heavy
rains, followed by excessively bot weather, the crop has ripened very
suddenly; hence picking has beguu earlier than usual, and will be gen¬
eral by September 6. The army worms have made their appearance in
nearly all the counties, but the damage by them is slight. Boll worms
have damaged the crop very much. Shedding, rust and rot are com¬
plained of m all counties, the injury from these four causes aggregating
19 per cent.

Galveston Department
the State

of Texas, and was prepared and issued by tbe Galveston
Cottou Exchange, through their committee on Information and Statistics,
composed of J. D. Skinner, Chairman, Chas. Kellner, J. M. Northman. J.
M. King and T. J. McCarty.
Texas.—134 answers from 92 counties.
covers

This

as

Seventy-five report favorable weather during the month, 59 unfavor¬
able; 62 report the weather more favorable than last year, 21 about the
same, 50 less favorable; 75 report the cotton fruiting well and shedding;
40 report the present condition of the crop not as good as last year, 8
about the same. 86 better; 1 reporting 15 per cent, 2 25 per cent, 3 33
per cent, 6 50 per cent, 1 60 per cent and 6 100 per cent better; 132 re¬
port picking commenced, 2 not; 61 report picking general September 1,
9 September 5, 38 September 10, 26 September 15; 68 report damage
from worms and boll worms as follows: Six 10 per cent, 2 15 per
cent, 3 20 per cent, 11 25 per cent, 1 30 per cent, 11 33 per cent
13 50 per cent damage; 108 report no injury from shedding or rust, 17
some injury from shedding, 9 injury from rust.
Some counties that re¬
port serious damage by worms also report that, notwithstanding this,
the yield will be greater than that of last year.
—We call attention to the card of Mr. A. B. Shepperson. 25
Beaver Street, on the last page of the Chronicle, announcing
this year’s edition of his book, “Cotton Facts,” which will soon
be issued. It is of a size convenient for the pocket, and con¬
tains in concise shape the more essential statistics of cotton—
the crops, receipts, exports, consumption, stocks, prices and

was generally favorable
little too much rain during
injured by both rust and
shedding, but not by worms to any extent, though reported generally acreage, for a series of years. This is its fourth season of pub¬
throughout the State. The plant has not fruited as well as expected,
lication, and the present issue has, among other new features,
but better than last year. The picking became general about the 20th
a very carefully prepared statement by one of the most promi¬
of August. In the Sea Island section the condition of the plant is
reported slightly better than at this date last year. No injury from nent planters of the South, showing the actual cost of growing
worms, but rust and shedding have cut down the estimates 10 per cent.
cotton upon his plantation in Mississippi the past season.
Considerable damage was done to the cotton crop by severe gales during
the last ten days of August and beginning of September,
Gunny Bag3, Bagging, Etc.—Bagging has continued to be
taken very freely, and the inquiry is increasing. There have
Mobile Department
been sales of about 5,000 rolls at full figures, and at the close
covers the State of Alabama as far north as the summit of the Sand
Mountains, and the following Counties in Mississippi: Wayne, Clark, the market is very firm, with prices tending upwards. Holders
Jasper, Lauderdale, Newtouf Kemper, Neshoba, Nebaboe, Winston, are now quoting 10%@10%c. for 1% lbs., ll^@1154c. for 2 lbs.
Lowndes, Oktibbeha, Clay, Monroe, Chicasaw, Itawamba, Lee, Pontotoc, and
12@12/6c. for 2^4 lbs. Butts have not been very active,
Prentiss, Alcorn and Tisliamiugo. The report is prepared and issued by
and the only lots moving are small and for jobbing wants..
the Mobile Cotton Exchange, through their Committee on Information,
and Statistics, composed or T. K. Irwin, Chairman, Julius Buttner, S.
Prices are firm, and paper quality is now held at 2%@3c.,
Haas, G. Tlios. Cox and G. L. Hopkins.
while spinning grades are quoted at 3@3%c.
Alabama.—75 replies from 42 counties.
Comparative Port Receipts and Daily Crop Movement.—
The weather is reported as having been favorable in 10 of the most
productive and 12 of the small counties, and unfavorable in 14 of the A comparison of the port movement by weeks is not accurate,
most productive and 6 of the small counties. The general report for all
as the weeks in different years do not end on the same day of the.
the counties is less favorable than the same period last year, only 2 of
the large counties and 3 of the small counties reporting it more favor¬
We have consequently added to our other standing
month.
able. The plants are fruiting well and retaining squares and bolls in 7
tables
a
of the most productive and 9 of the small counties, all the other counties
daily and monthly statement, that the reader may con¬
reporting Fust and much shedding. In 12 of the most productive and
stantly
have
before him the data for seeing the exact relative
10 of the small counties the condition of the crop is reported to be as
good as, if not better than, last year, aud in all the other counties the crop movement for the years named.
The movement each month
is reported not so good as last year. Picking has commenced and is
since Sept. 1 has been as follows:
general in all the counties except 14, and will be in those from the 10th
to the 20th of September.
Worms have appeared in more or less num¬
bers in all except 11 of the small counties, and the damage is reported
Year Beginning September 1.
to have been small to considerable, the exact percentage not being given.
Monthly
Rust and shedding are reported in all the comities, and the average
Receipts.
1878.
1877.
1876.
1879.
1875.
1874.
damage therefrom is estimated at 13 per cent in 24 of the most produc¬
tive and 7 per cent in 18 of the small counties.
233,948
333,643
98,491
236,863
169,077
134,376
Sept'mb’r
Mississippi.—38 replies from 20 counties.
October..
639,264
888,492
578,533 675,260 610,316 536,963
The weather is reported as having been favorable in 5 counties and
779,237
Novemb’r
942,272
822,493 901,392 740,116 676,295
unfavorable in 15 counties. One county reports the weather as having
Decemb’r
892,664
900,119
787,769
821,177
956,464
been more favorable than the same time last year, 2 as favorable and 17
759,036
less favorable. The general report is that the plants are not fruiting
647,140
616,727
639,610 500,680
637,067
January
444,052
well and that there is much shedding. One county reports the present
564,824
447,918
449,636
479,801
472,054
333,324
condition of the crop as good as to better than last year, 3 equally good February.
302,955
March...
264,913
340,525
182,937 300,128
251,433
and 16 not so good. Picking has commenced in all the counties and will
become general from the 10th to 15tli of September. Boll worms and
166,459
158,025
197,965
100,194
163,593
133,593
April....
caterpillars have appeared in 13 couuties, but the damage has been
84,299
68,939
110,006
96,314
92,600
81,780
May
slight. The average damage by rust and shedding is estimated at 22
The weather during the month of August
about on par with that of last year, with a
the first part of the month. The plant has been

.

per

New Orleans Department
of Mississippi not apportioned to the Mem¬
phis and Mobile Cotton Exchanges; the entire State of Louisiana, and
the Stale of Arkansas south of the Arkansas River. The report is pre¬
pared and issued by the New Orleans Cotton Exchange, through their
</ommittee on Information aud Statistics, composed of Wm. A. Gwyn,
Chairman, W. H. Hawcott, W. A. Peale, Scott McGehee John Lawson,
Chris. Chaffe, Jr., and J. P. N. Baquie.
covers

that part of the State

Louisiana.—119

replies from

37 fparishes; average date

August 31.
The weather

last year.

during the month has been

^

Picking had commenced and become general about September 6.
worms,rust and rot have done serious damage,and the injury from




July
August...
Corrct’ns.

29,472
13,938
18,081
458

42,142
20,240
34,564
52,595

„

36,030
17,631
14,462
66,293

42,234
29,422
33,626

56,010
17,064
13,524

71,935

9,709

Total year 5,001,672 4,447,276 4,345,645 4,033,141 4,191,142 3,497,169

Perc’tage of tot. port
receipts Aug. 31 ..

9999

98 79

9836

93 23

Corrections

0001

01-21

01-64

01-72

00-28

10000

10000

100 00

100 00

100 00

Total port

receipts..

99 72

m*-

moat unfavorable, and as com¬
pared "with last year less favorable, the plant reported as not fruiting
well or retaining its spurs aud bolls. The present condition of the crop
Is not good, and is on the whole decidedly worse than at the same time
»»

88,455
54,258
67,372
42,714

June

cent.

^

Boll
shed¬

This statement shows that up to Aug. 31 the receipts at the
ports this year were 554,396 bales more than in 1878-79 and
656,027 bales more than at the same time in 1877-78. The receipts
since September 1,1880, and for the corresponding periods of

the five

previous years have been as follows.

'

THE CHRONICLE.

288

“

2....

5,669

1,848

“

3....

10,542
6,474

1,391
2,264
4,927
2,104

“

^

4....

*

5....

8.

“

6....

14,791
9,315
8,616
11,096
10,862

“

7....

M

8....

“

9....

«lo...:

-

S.

Percentage of total

pYt reo’pts Sept. 10.

1,701
1,655

8.

7,341

3,085

50,462

10,473

8.

-

23,242

26,450
00-65

00-24

the receipts since Sept. 1 np to
more than they were to the same

This statement shows that

to-night are now 50,855 bales
day of the month in 1879 and 31,873 bales more thaa they
were to the same day of the month in 1878.
We add to the last
table the percentages of total port receipts which had been
received to September 10 in each of the years named.

India Cotton Movement from all Ports.—The figures
which are now collected for us, and forwarded by cable each

Friday, of the shipments from Calcutta, Madras, Tuticorin. Carwar, &c., enable us, in connection with our previously-received
report from Bombay, to furnish our readers with a full and
complete India movement for each week. We first give the
Bombay statement for the week and year, bringing the figures
down to

September 9.

BOMBAY RBCBIFTS AND

Shipments this week,.
Year Great ContiBriVn. nent

Total.

Great

Conti¬

Britain

nent.

3.000

1878

7,000

7,000 308,000 390,000

837,000
584,000
698,000

1,000 375,000 403,000

783,000

i.OOu

According to the foregoing, Bombay
compared with last year in the week’s
&
decrease in shipments of 2,000
since January l show an increase of
ment at Calcutta, Madras, Tuticorin,
week and years has been as follows.
CALCUTTA, MADRAS,

Year.

Great

Conti¬

Britain.

nent.

1880
1879
1878
1877

show an increase
receipts of 2,000 hales? and
bales, and the shipments
253,000 bales. The move¬

appears to

Car war, &c., for the same

712®7

7ia®7
7*2®7

u

Aug.
a

Sept.
4

4

93s® 10*4 6
9A4® lois 6
9ie® 978 6
9*6® 97g 6

KURRACHBB.

9*8® 97e 6

9

®7
@7

9*8®

9

d.

7Lj
7*3
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9

d.

d.

d

Total.

nent.

5
5
678
6laie 812®918 5
613ie 83i/3>9A4 6
6i3ie 8%®9a4 6
6l316 8%®9i4 6

»78®913 6
878®9b3 6
878®91s 6

7

7*16

table

showing the exports of cotton ffom New

for the

EXPORT8 OF COTTON

Exported to—

INDIA.

ending-

6»1S

112®7

4*2

6*19

U2®7

412
413

6^8

6

6

3
3

6*3

69,8

®7

6

613i<5.
61316.

®7

6

613lfl

York, and their

Same

-

Total

Aug.

Aug.

Sept.

Sept.

since

18.

25.

1.

8.

Sept. 1.

year.

3,432 10,768 12,071

Other British ports

7,241

3,432 10,768 12,071

14,969

4

9,296-

862

623

968

199

199

441

862

625

968

199

199

441

1,309

50

770
24

770
406
24

,1,200

1,200

5.421 11.986 13.470

16,36*

ports

Bremen and Hanover

....

406

Hamburg
Other ports

105

105

Europe

200

200

55

Ac
8.208

Grand Total

—

55

other

Total Spain,

50

1,309

Spain, Op’rto, Gibralt’r,&c
All

9,296

14,969

......

Total French

9.73T

Cotton at New York,

Philadelphia and Baltimore for the past week, and sine*

Boston,

September 1, 1880.
Receipts
from—

j

.

2,463

2.463

1,779
2,924

4,983

*"i*6

16

2,117
951
802
75
53

694
513

North, pts
Tenn.. Ac.

38
53

Foreign..

115

This
week.

Since

This

Sept. 1.

week.

Since

Baltimore.
Tli is

Since

Sept. 1. week. Sept.

1.

2,939

2,117

Virginia..

Philadelphia.

Boston.

This | Since
week, Sept. 1.

300

"306

131
40

131
40

’5V0

516

*’io9 "l09

115
1

This year. 10,706

14,514

471

471

109

1Q9

516

516

8,363

11,983

799

799

190

190

634

634

Lastyear.

1878.

1879.

4*s
4*2

period
prevVu*

7,241

Liverpool

show that the movement from

SXPORT8 TO EUROPB FROM ALL

412®7
1i2®7

678
613l6

(BALE8) FROM NEW YORK SINCE SEPT. 1, 1880.
Week

Mobile
Florida.
8 Carolina
N Carolina

follows.

6

period of the previous year.

same

Savannah

than Bombay is
bales less than same week
For the whole of India, therefore, the total
3 hipments this week and since January 1, 1880, and for the
corresponding weeks and periods of the two previous years, are

a.

d.

d.
s.
6 'a) 7
6 ®7

1 is® 7
3 ®7

8%®93s 6

Up Ids

direction, for each of the last four weeks; also the total exporta;
and direction since Sept. 1, 1880, and in the last column the total

279,000

80,000
102,000
58,000
47,000

199,000
193,000
112,000
79,000

8.

6131R 834'@938

73ie

Mid.

Shirtings.

The Exports of Cotton from New York this week snow an
increase, as compared with last week, the total reaching 13,470bales, against 11,986 bales last week. Below we give our usual

126,000

1880.

6

978

New York.

Conti¬

the ports other
of last year.

&a

7*2®7
®7

...

The above totals for this week

7*2®7
9

N. Orl’ans
Texas....

3,000

712®7

6

9*4®10

295,000
170,000

__

3,666

6

10^ 6

e.

JJplds

CotVn

8*4 lbs.

32s Cop.
Twist.

The Following are the receipts of

Great
Britain.

Total.

9*4® 10
9 3s®

Total to North.

Shipments since. January 1.

■

r

5,000 1,077,000
3.000
780,000
853,000
2.000
994,000
l,00o

TUTICORIN, CARWAR, RANGOON AND

Shipments this week.

7*a®7

Other French

Since
Jan. 1.

This
Week.

Total.

d.

6

d.

Havre

Receipt*.

| Shipment* since, Jan. 1.

1,000 355,000 482,000
3,000 249,000 335,000

1877

<<

9
16
23
30
6
13
20
27
3
10

Total to Great Britain

SHIPMENTS FOR FOUR YEARS.

1880
1879

1,000

July
*r

44

00-55

8.

9*4®10

d.

44

01-13

00-62

3,761
3,228
3,116
3,621
3,928

3,932
4,708

S.

13.115

31,480

[.

754

Mid.

Shirtings.

Twist.

8.

CotVn

8*4 lbs.

32s Cop.

1,407

2,996
3,414
3,111

1,008

1879.

1880.

-

1,734

4,630

616

comparison.

previous weeks’ prices for

1,38C

S.

1.246

4,799
4,224
7,116
4,108

5,454
5,124
4,878

82,330

Total

8.

5;708
4,051

1,064

1,918
1,691

408

8.

3,490

5,037

Sept.l —

and leaver

We give the prices of to-day below,

changed.

187*

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

[Vol. XXXI.

Shipments
to

alt Europe
from—

This
week.

837,000
279,000

3,000

1,000 1,116,000

3.000

1,000

Bombay
All other p’rts.
Total

week.

584,000
295,000

7.000

3,000

698,000
170,000

879,000

10,000

868,000

This last statement affords a very interesting
total movement for the week ending Sept. 9,

years up to

Since
Jan. 1.

This

Since
Jan. 1.

This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

comparison of the
and for the three

date, at all India ports.

Shipments.—Through arrange¬
ments we have made with Messrs. Davies, Benaclii & Co., of
Liverpool and Alexandria, we now receive a weekly cable of
the movements of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt.
The following
are the receipts and shipments the past week and for the corre¬
sponding weeks of the previous two years.
Alexandria Receipts

Alexandria, Egypt,
Sept. 9.

and

Receipts (cantars*)—

This week....
Since Sept. 1

'6,000

1,000

8,000

This

Since

This

Since

Sept. 1.

week.

Sept. 1.

Mrports (bales)—
To Liverpool
To Continent

250
604

250
604

250

Total Europe

854

954

250

*

1,000

week.

This
week.

500

250

250

-

500

Since

Sept. 1.
500

500

the
the Chronicle last Friday.
include the manifests of all
are

With regard to New York, wevessels cleared up to Wednesday

night of this week.

Total balcs-

Liverpool, per steamers City of Chester,
1,089
City of Richmond, 762
Arizona. 3.540
Abys¬
Olympus, 1,976
sinia, 1,332
Erin, 1,347
Tyrian,

Naw York—To

200
To Havre, per steamer Hermod, 199
To Bremen, per steamers General Werder, 377
Rhein,
148
l>. Steinman, 95
To Hamburg, per steamer Herder, 406
To Antwerp, per steamer Jan Breydee, 24
To Oporto, per bark Isoliua, 100 (Aug. 28)
New Orleans—To Liverpool, per steamer Caribbean, 3,300
To Vera Cruz, per steamer City of Mexico, 225
Baltimore—To Liverpool, per 6teamer Carolina, 550
Boston—To Liverpool, per steamers
186—Palestine,
218
Bohemian, 679.
Philadelphia—To Liverpool, per steamer Ohio, 291

form,

the receipts for the week ending

10,246

190
620*

400
24

10O

3,300
226
550
1,08$
291

17,044

Total

The

United.

reached
bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these
same expor:s reported by telegraph, and published in

particulars of these shipments, arranged in our
follows:

are as

usual

JBre- Ham- AntVera
pool. Havre, men. burg. werp.Oporto. Cruz.
Total.
10,246
620 406
199
24 100 .... 11,595
Liver-

New York
New Orleans
Baltimore....
Boston

Philadelphia

A cantar is 98 lba.

This statement shows that

17,044

News.—The exports of cotton from the
past week, as per latest mail returns, have

Aleppo',

1878.

1879.

1880.

Shipping

States the

3,300
550
1,083

225

3,525
550
1,08$

225

17,044

291

291
15,470

Total

'

199

620

406

24

100

received to date of disasters to vessel^
cantars and the shipments to all Europe
Sept. 9 were
carrying
trom
United
States ports, etc.:
cotton
were 854 bales.
City of Mexico, steamer, McIntosh, which was to hare sailed from
Manchester Market.—Our report received from Manchester
New Orleans, September 7, for Yera Crua, is detained at New
Orleans repairing, and will not leave for Yera Crus until the 16tb
i#-day states that the market if steady and prioes are un¬




Below

we

give all news

September 11,

Charleston, steamer, from Charleston for New York, with about 1,000
bales of cotton, left her wharf at 7 P. M. of Sept. 4, and at about
8 30 in attempting to cross the bar, went ashore on Pumpkin Hill
Breaker. About 500 bales of her cargo of cotton were taken off
and landed at Charleston on the 6th. She was towed off and taken
to Charleston.

freights the past week have been as follows:

Cotton

Mon.

Tues.

Wednes.

Thurs.

B16®38

B10® ®8

B16® **8

61S®38

Satur.

Liverpool, steam d. 516®38
sail...d.

Do

Havre, steam
Do

58

c.

sail

c.

Bremen, steam,
Do

....

sail

•

•

sail...d.

Amst'd’m, steam.c.
sail... d.

Do

Baltic, steam
Do

c.

°8

....

....

1116

“l0
....

®8

....

38
....

•

•

38
•

....

*8

....

....

38

®8
....

....

“is

“is

“is

....

....

....

....

....

58

58
....

....

58

•

....

Indian Corn has been active, and

51«®S8

*8

®8

°8

“is
.

.

.

38

3b

38

38

30

....

....

....

....

....

Liverpool.—By cable from Liverpool, we have the following
statement of the week’s sales, stocks,

Aug. 20.
Bales of the week
bales.
Bales American
Of which exporters took ....
Of which speculators took..
Actual export
Forwarded
Total stock—Estimated
Of which American—Estim’d
Total import of the week
Of which American
Amount afloat
Of which American

Spot.

?

Market,
12:30

p.m.

$

.Mid. Upl’ds
Mid. Orl’ns.

Dull
and un¬

Aug. 27.
66,000
46,000

46.500

4.200

5.300

7,000

5,900

3,700
657,000
443,000
17.500
15.500
154,000

4,700
3,600
624,000
421,000
30.500
24.500
129,000

1,460
5,600
3.300
617,000

48,000

29,000

Sept. 10.
48.000
37.500

31.500

115,000

3,600
1,270
4,200
4,800
597,000
379,000
32.500
17,000
119,000

38,000

53,000

399,000
40.500
12.500

Tuesday.

Wednes.

Thursday.

Friday.

Dull
and
easier.

Firmer.

Steady.

Firm.

changed.
7

7

7

71i0

71i0

7i8

7iie*

7116

71i0

7iQ

7%

73i0

J

Sales

5,000

7,000

7,000

Bpec.A exp.

1,000

1,000

1,000

10,000
1,000

8,000

10,000
2,000

1,000

5 P.

M.

£
-j

Dull

Quiet.

Quiet.

Steady.

and
easier.

Flat.

Quiet.

The actual sales of futures at Liverpool for the same week are given
•below. These sales are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause,

unless otherwise stated.

d.
6 V®29:* 2
®l&lb®2982

Delivery.

Delivery.
Sept.. 62932'&1516®2932

d.
G1^
69^3

Delivery,
Sept.-Oct...
Oct.-Nov. .'

Delivery.

Nov.-Dee

d.
673a

61*30® ig
6*4

Oct.-Nov
.Nov.-Dee.

63ie

Givis'®3132

8ept.-0ct

61732-3)12

Oot.-Nov

6i7sa

Feb.-Mar

6*4

Nov.-Dee

015is

Sept.

6732

Sept

63i33®i®i6

Oct.-Nov

Delivery.
6982

Jan.-Feb

6h»

Nov.-Dee

Delivery.

Sept.-Oct

69j2
6&16
7132

Dec.-Jan
Jan.-Feb

Nov.-Dee

61932
6933

Sept.-Oct

658®1939

Dec.-Jan
Jan.-Feb
Feb.-Mar

7
6»ie®1932 Feb.-Mar
6&16@u32 Sept

Delivery.
Oct.-Nov

7i 32
6i932
6H32

Sept.-Oct

69]0

Sept
Sept.-Oct

6 Be®«932

6932
6*32

Delivery.
Sept.-Oct
Nov.-Dee

6»ie

Mar.-Apr

6932
65i6
6ii32
6^

Delivery.
Delivery.
62i32
6H32 Sept.-Oct
7iift®332 Jan.-Feb
63s®i332 Oct.-Nov
6710®332
6Bio®2i32 Feb.-Mar
7U>32
638®1332 Mar.-Apr.. ..61332®716 April-May
658
6*2
May-June
61132®^ Sept.-Oct
7ii8
6U32 Sept

Delivery.

Sept.-Oct

4 50®

4 10®

4,rye mix”...
City shipping extras.
Southern, bakers’ and
family brands
South’n ship’g extras.
Rye flour, superfine..

4 50®
4 10®

5 25®

6 50

Corn—West, mixed
West’n No. 2
West, yellow
West, white

Oats—Mixed
.......

2 65® 3 05
3 20® 3 25

State, 4-rowed...
State, 2-rowed...

1

Friday, P. M., Sept. 10, 1880.

•

•

•

®
®
®
®
®
®
®
®

•

81

Peas—Can’da.b.Af.

97
03

09
OG^
06

5012
51^4
57
55
95

43
44
95

95

lFrom the “ New York Produce Exchange Weekly.”)

Receipts of flour and grain at Western lake and river port«
for the week ending Sept. 4, 1880:
Wheat,

Flour,
At—

1196 lbs.)

Chicago

41,000

bush.

(60 lbs.)

(56 lbs.)

Detroit
Cleveland
8t. Louis
Peoria....

6,727
2,275
44,093

124,666
814,686
330,952
128,500
724,985

1,350

19,350

2,150

52,407

695

Total receipts at same
for four years:

Bye,
bush.

35,110

237,865

6,705
74,500
82,255
153,750
6,682

12,942

1,546

22,400
76,620

16,855

201,250

,

6,561

8,000 41,425

795,723 184,009 101,462
784,500 317.349 216,025

ports from Jan. 1 to Sept. 4, inclusive
1878.

1879.

1877

bbls.

4,080,257

4,341,739

3,751,031

2,777,641

hush.

47,641,122
109,123,423
22,669,586

55,674,958
68,353,940
21,505,113

52,139,653
70,929,168
21,885,408

19,433,980
59,658,599
14,436,93

3,081,284

3,013,124

3,946,120

Barley
Rye
Total grain....

2,027,953

2,896,353

184,543,368

151,433,488

1,767,158

152,183,836

96,613,960

ports from Aug.

1879.

1878.

711,8u5

596,800

554,372

bush.

13,690,397
18,442,175
4,642,174
475,548

15,677,083

18,132,666
18,425,016
7,324,367

635,599

984,812

37,885,893

34,179,052

1880.

Rye...
....

12,514.724
4,430,046
572,387

3.317,289

3,283,487

bbls.

Flour
Wheat
Corn
Oats
Barley

bush.

(32 lbs.) (48 lbs.) (56 lbs )
418,593 89,458 31,348
17,550 68,150 19,450
46,368
2,678

2,624,425 2,971,650
3,975,483 2,466,206

Total
129,975
Same tine ’79. 112,314

Wheat

bush.

428,879 2,374,723

31,679

Barley,

Oats,

Com,

bush.

Milwaukee
Toledo

1877.

543,79
.9,142,455

14,991,00 4
3,791,067
598,107

1,015,239

1,224,178
46,121,466

827,231
29,339,884

Comparative shipments of flour and grain from the same
ports from Jan. 1 to Sept. 4, inclusive, for four years:
Wheat
Com
Oats..

1878.

1879.

1880.

Flour

1877.

bbls.

2,976,057

4,710,466

3,951,05i

2,923,941

hush.

45.921,546
93,916,042
18,529,048

49,314,136
60,829,877
15,780,874

38,439,642
59,552,544
14,383,385

1,800,294

2,214,187

2,440,211

17,926,165
51,453,698
10,936,063
2,341,580
1,589,539

161,889,644 130,861,939 116,585,309

83,347,028

Barley

1,722,714

Rye...
Total grain

BRE ADSTUPPS.

52
90
40
41
85

4 65® 5 00 1 White
4 70® 5 10 Barley—Canada W.

Western, Ac
Brandywine, Ac

®
®

51^®

Bye

Corn meal—

®

®1
® L
®1
®1

1 06
1 00
50
51

Red winter, No. 2
White

6 00
4 40
6 25

8 25
4 85
5 40

6 00®

Patents
Western

Total grain

Delivery.

Friday.

Oct.-NoV
Nov.-Dee
Dec.-Jan

Winter sliipp’g extras.
do XX andXXX...

Wednesday.

Thursday.

©ept

4 40®

Total receipts (crop movement) at the same
to Sept. 4, inclusive, for four years:

Tuesday.

Delivery.

Delivery.
Sept
Sept.-Oct

Delivery.
Sept.-Oct

■

Grain.

I

do XX and XXX...

Oats

Delivery.

Delivery.
Sept

closing quotations:

bbl. $2 60® 3 25 Wheat—
3 70® 3 90j No. 3 spring, # bu.$ 95
1 01
No. 2 spring
SpriDg superfine
3 45® 3 75
95
Red winter
Spring wheat extras.. 3 85® 4 25

Corn

63i®

Delivery.
Dec.-Jan

are

No. 2
$
Winter superfine

Flour

Monday.

8ept.-Oct

following

1880.

Saturday.

Sept

38%c. for October.
The

Duluth.

Futures.

Market,

No* 2
at

bbls.

)

Market,
5 p.m.

some

mixed for future

Flour.

Sept. 3. c

57,000
44,000
5,800
3,500

Dull.

improvement for the week, especially in No. 2
delivery. To-day the market was lower, and
graded closed at 43c. on the spot,with No. 2 mixed selling

prices show

Ac., at that port:

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and futures each day of the
week ending Sept. 10, and the daily closing prices of spot cotton, have
been as follows:

Saturday Monday.

latterly prices have im¬
proved, especially for prompt delivery. Receipts have been
but moderate at all points. To-day No. 2 mixed was %<§)%•.
lower, and sold for future delivery at 52c. for Oct.
Rye has been sparingly offered; sales at 87@88c. were fol¬
lowed by a material advance asked by holders. Barley remains
nominal at 90@95c. for No. 1 Canada. Oats have been active, and

....

.

though without much buoyancy. It is evident that farmers
will not market their crops freely at current prices, and receipts
at the West continue much smaller than last season. To-day
the market was weak—No. 2 red winter selling at $1 07% for
October and $1 08%@$1 08% for November; No. 1 white for
October, $1 05%.

Fri.

,

....

....

....

58
....

d.

sail

®8

....

Hamburg, steam, d.
Do

....

58
....

•

°8

.c.
c.

•

....

289

CHRONICLE

THE

1880 J

....

Rail shipments
weeks ended:

1,769,527

2,722,865

from Western lake and river ports for the
1880.

1879.

1878.

1877.

The flour market has been

Week
Week
Week
Week
doing rather better in the past
Ser*. 7.
Sept. 6.
Sept. 8.
4.
Sept.
week. There has been a brisker export demand, and the trade
0.
94,601
106,792
100,081
....bbls.
Flo*r
lias supplied its wants more freely. Prices early in the week
499,776
247,413
2,620,856
...bush.
446,609
Wheat
were somewhat depressed, especially for the medium grades
307,488
362,011
1,602,817
582,974
Com
323,261
627,430
384,737
985,132
from winter wheat of brands which have no regular or estab¬ Oats
84,090
52,541
77,327
50,048
Barley
40,328
209,540
8,773
59,517
lished position in the market. The improvement was most Rye..'.....
-decided in the low grades, the low extras taking the lead. To¬
993,998
5,137,970 1,316,419
2,132,330
Total...;
day the market was dull, and prices were barely sustained.
Rail and lake shipments from same ports for last four weeks;
Barley,
The wheat market was quite depressed early in the week,
Corn,
Rye,
Oats,
Week
Flour,
Wheat,
bush.
bush.
bush. ‘
bush.
ending—
bbls.
bush.
and on Monday No. 2 red winter sold at $1 03@$1 04 for spot and
58,048 111,517
Sept. 4... 134,502 1,849,543 3,310,268 993,935
44,146 118,074
984,925
^September, $1 05 %@$1 06 for October, and $1 07@$1 07% for Aug. 28...143,855 1,708,128 3,710.559
17,929 105,927
835,889
Aug. 21...154.798 2,160,733 3,668,957
12,578 96,299
.November; and No. 1 white $1 03%@$i 04 for September and Aug. 14...173,857 2,599,338 3,101,638 826,078
4$104%@$1 04% for October; also No .2 spring $1@1 01% on the
132,701 431,817
t., 4 wks.607,012 8,317,742 13,791,422 3,640,877
102,535 785,906
if’ks’79.,559,460
10,289,601
8,885,169
2,427,771
»pot. Ther# has since been some improvement in prices,




t

..

.*

,

rHE CHRONICLE.

290
Receipts of flour and grain at
ended Sept. 4:
Wheat,
bush.

Flour,
bbls.

At—

seaboard ports for the week ings, drills, tickings, cheviots, ducks and plaid osnaburgs were
slightly advanced by manufacturers’ agents. Print cloths were
Corn,
Oats, Barley, Rye,
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush. very quiet, but closed steady at 3%c. for 64x64s and 3 5-16@3%e.
291,116
117,115

1,154,832
349,775
5,500
306,165
15,471 423,380 194,850
42,500
26.470 1,163,300
2,325
71,679
56,198

116.887 1,636,438
62,150
70,356
2,850
17,492 312,581

New York
Boston
Portland
Montreal.,

Philadelphia
Baltimore
New Orleans

39,008
1,500

.

5,600
975

45

63,600
29,300

1,000
1,700

6,820

2,109.820 514,526
43,253
2,047,413 544,995 7,100 151,961
And from Jan. 1 to Sept. 4, inclusive, for four years:

251,851 3,669,528
Total week
Cor. week ’79.... 228,485 4,769,743

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

Flour... :...bt>ls.

6,575,096

6,855,623

5,894,062

4,607,519

bush.

82,208,400
103,587,742
15,304,447

86.048,130
78,341,874

62,427,763
78,717,478
15,601,214
2,483,515
3,117,901

13,085,571
60,577,927

Wheat
Corn
Oats

15,012,329
1,769,438
2,644,053

1,592,998
1,245,704

Barley
Bye...

12,160,579
2,172.850
1,209,889

204.439,291 183,816,123 162.347,871
89,269,816
Exports from United States seaboard ports and from Montreal
for week ending Aug. 28:
Total grain

....

Oats,

Rye,

bush.

bush.

bush.

bush.

1,436

80,996

1,397

48

10,860

81,044

12.257

5,210,838 1,529,317 18,141 113,701

9,246

bush.

bbls.

New York
Boston

73,763
13,338

1,741,049
214,156

1,133,988

13,170
3,185
7,702

839,286

243,340

489,501

61,382

Pnrtk^nd
Montreal

Philadelphia..

218,815

13,931

1,392,209

81.853

439

127.300

45,067

Total for w’k 111,602
Same time’70. 150,844

4,803,501

1,784,445

Baltimore
New Orleans..

Feas,

Corn,

Wheat,

Flour,
From—

,

1,200
16,567

grain, comprising the stocks in granary
of accumulation at lake and seaboard
ports, and in transit by lake, rail and canal, Sept. 4, was as
The visible supply of
at the principal points

follows:

Wheat,
bush.

In store at—

New York
Do. afloat (est.).

2,636,742
4,000
147,603

Albany
Buffalo
Chicago
Milwaukee

1,293,980

Corn,
bush.

2,326,245
1,000,000

77,094
7,300

6,763

Toledo
Detroit

1,290,000

347.000

248,100

3,766

70,000
2,444

35,000

85,000
888,970

On rail
On lake

3,716

20,529

144

4,611

450
50

60,632
812,500

39,390
419,800

62,767

5,700

1,958

12.594
262,871

104.044

107,746
28,660

1,827,000
2,028,000

On canal

3,667

22,019
3.300

164,630

3,726,000

2,133

Sept.

58,048

985,182

15,000

......

3,400,000

59,517
60,000
57,000
573,613
665,744

255,896
186,646

463,890

160.757
169.717

432,718
387,682

507,209

937,191

14,179,091 17,363,832 1,360,783
14,791,197 16.647,605 1.465,557

17,045,773 13,003,518 2,704,134

6, ’79

61,603
2,900

8,970

261.407

Aug. 14, ’80
Aug.
7. ’80

jobbers. Ginghams were taken freely, and there
steady demand for cotton dress fabrics.
Domestic Woolen Goods.—There was only a moderate de¬
mand for clothing woolens by wholesale buyers, but a fair dis¬
tribution was effected by cloth and dry goods jobbers, in
relatively small parcels. Low and medium grade fancy cassimeres and suitings were disposed of in moderate quantities by
agents, but transactions in worsted coatings and overcoatings
were mostly restricted to making deliveries in execution of back
orders. Repellents were in steady demand, but cloakings
moved slowly. Kentucky jeans and doeskins were more sought
for, but prices continue very low, and by no means remunerative
to manufacturers. For flannels and blankets there was a steady
hand-to-mouth demand, and stocks are so well in hand that
prices are steadily maintained. Shawls and skirts were quiet in
first hands, but there was a satisfactory demand for staple and
fancy worsted dress fabrics. Underwear and fancy knit woolens
were in fair request, but hosiery was quiet with agents.
Foreign Dry Goods.—There was an irregular demand for
imported goods at first hands, but the jobbing trade was fairly
active. Silks remained quiet, aside from the best makes of
black silks and colored silks of the newest shades, for which
there was a fair inquiry.
Satins and velvets were in steady
request. Black and colored cashmeres were more active, and
fancy dress fabrics were in good demand. Linen goods, white
goods, laces and embroideries were .only in moderate request,
as were clothing woolens.
was a

Importations of Dry Goods,

importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending
Sept. 9, 1880, and for the corresponding weeks of 1879 and
The

1878, have been as follows:
ENTERED

24,296

88,718
64,762
34 4,109
582,974

in fair request at first hands, and

were

active with

„

*

253,339

1,622,298
446,609

Ralfimnrp.

475

33,423
14.863

1,571,219

Indianapolis
Kansas City

54,200

28.500

585

26,000

Peoria

65,612

Prints

for 56x60s.

3 20,000

6,512
49,298
7.221

21,738

“PhilnifplnhiH,

15,471

76,976
84,000

Rye,
bush.

86,048

9,000

Montreal

bush.

1,646
103,762

194,433

St. Louis
Boston
Toronto

Barley,

Oats,
bush.

74,000
1,644,467
3,540,976

Duluth

Oswego

[Vol. XXXI

m

FOR CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK

Value.

928

Wool

1,245

Cotton
8ilk
1
Flax
Miscellaneous...

844

376,867
311,744
557,082

1.049
387

228,039
153,041

4,453 1,626,773

Total

725
404
127
392
169

Friday. P. M..

There has been a

Sept. 10, 1880.

continued brisk movement in dry goods the

1.418

1,363
1,297
1,393

370,434
759,256
251,941

1,468
1,309
1,647

$
621,242
446,487
863,739
204,^90

643

180.005

608

183,377

214
188
456
377

75,449
28.901

31.985

35S

724
438

274,870
107,480

194
625
931

148,197

119,036
50.344

699.927
569,385 2,912
1,902
6,033 2,120.089 6.450 2.319,735
7.935 2.6*0.47*1 9.36: {,019,662

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSE DURING

Manufactures of—
Wool
Cotton
811k
Flax
Miscellaneous

THE MARKET DUR¬

246,735
70,050
137,378
83,237

667

92,474

591,29o
,1,817
Ent’d for consumpt. 4.453 1,626.773
6.270 2.218.066
Total on market...

6,450(2,319,735

6,033 2.L20,0»9

294,966
99,503

Total

THE DRY GOOD3 TRADE.

$
558,363

WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE AND THROWN INTO
ING THE SAME PERIOD.

Manufactures of—
Wool
Cotton
Silk
Flax
Miscellaneous

Value.

1,337

$

Manufactures oi—

j Fkas.

Value,

Pkys.

.

9, 1880.

1880.

1879.

1878.

Pkys.

ENDING SEPT.

134,642

474

SAME PERIOD.
857

180,944

337,450

316
The jobbing trade was conspicuously active, and a
130
92,725
145
35,300
40,014
303
95
238,434
60,791
40
29,916
very large distribution of staple and department goods was
550
133,215
163
140,654
39,905 1,111
844
63,216
651
60,166
10
18,737
made by all the leading jobbers. Retailers are buying freely,
477,85.* 2,870! 865,040
716
Total
263,214 2,461
and with seeming confidence in an unusually large and healthy Ent’d forconsumpt. 4.453 1,626,773 6.033 2.120.089 6,450 2.319,735
5,16d|1.889.9«7 8,49-J 2,597,924( 9,320 3,184,775
Total at the port...
fall trade, but they—as well as package buyers—show no ten¬
Exports of Provisions.
dency toward speculation. The cotton goods commission houses
The following are the exports of provisions from New York,
have experienced a very fair demand, and prints, ginghams and
Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Montreal, Portland and New
dress goods were severally in good request; but there was no
Orleans, for week ending Sept. 4, 1880, and their distribution :
movement
of importance in woolen goods, and foreign
Tallow,
Cheese,
Bacon,
Lard,
Fork, Reef,
fabrics (though more active with jobbers) were somewhat irreg¬
To—
lbs.
lbs.
lbs.
lbs.
bbls.
bbls.
Values are generally steady, and a few
ular in first hands.

past week.

makes of brown and colored cottons have
because of

a

slightly appreciated

curtailment of production at some

of the manufac¬

turing centres, owing to the scarcity of water.
Domestic Cotton Goods.—During the week ending Septem¬
ber 7 the exports of cotton goods from this port were -2,027
packages, distributed as follows : China, 967 ; Hamburg, 236;
Hayti, 227; U. S. of Colombia, 220 ; Great Britain, 93 ; British
West Indies, 69; Brazil, 68; Venezuela, 54, &c. There was a
steady demand for cotton goods at first hands, in which all
seasonable makes participated, and the jobbing trade was quite
active. The tone of the market has improved, under the influ¬
ence of a brisk distributing trade and a lessened supply—owing
to the* scarcity of water at the mills. Prices ruled steady on
nearly ajl staple fabrics, and some makes of fine brown sheet¬



28
152

9
182
112
263

110
50
100

360
90
436

2/

Loudon

1,560

Liverpool....
Glasgow
Cardiff
Bristol

British ports.

Hamburg
Rotterdam...

Denmark
Antwerp

....

Brazil
Cent. Amer..
So. Am. ports
Cuba

Brit.N.A.Col..
Other count’s
Bremen
Total week

Prev’s week

110
289
123

354
220
6
....

..

.

16,000
12,500
207,500
126,000

818,600
136,000
741,100
824,000

83,7ou 1,116,64:0
8,202,236 3,251,723
198,025
583,42:4
75,840
175,275
402,039
194,325
453,625
564,300
136,325
47,500
-

90
93
143
49
177
113
47
....

4,687

2,164

5,530

3,396

109,763

286,700

77,000
60,500
78,760
113,600
124,300

12,600

528,675
1,082

1,558

Hayti
West Indies..

58,000

1,593,970

M

1,587
3,219
4,344

3,196

9.340
100,830
-23,099
148,991
6.762
10,186
40,738
3.725
14,640
65,785
8,640
1,250
2,500
473
10,100
297.361
1,358.945
6,371,322 10,392,913 6,002,447

28,391

.

......

—

769,251

4,384,239 11,287,293 5,905,480 1,924,815


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102