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W xmitlt

oniflittiiJlf
AND

HUNT'S MEIK'IIXNTS' MAGAZINE,
aaPRKSBNTlNO THE INDUSTRIAL AND OOMMKROIAL INTERESTS OP THE UNITED STATES
enter* oooordlnc to Aot of Oonxreu. In the year 1892, by Wm. B. Dana A Oo.. In the om«« of the Ubraiian of Oonxiea*,
MhloKton, D. a
<t

VOL

SATURDAY. 0(;TOBKR

55.

For the month of .Sopteratji'r tlio decreiie from a year ago
reaches O-I) \teT cent in the whole country, and o'ltside of New
York the gain is 2 6 per cent. The aKgrofcate since January
1 eibibits an excess over 1891 of lO'l per cent.

CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.
The

total for

the whole country shows a decrease contrasted

September.

rith the similar period of 1801 of 16'2 per cent.
iriak

lndin« October

1892.

ITwkXnd'i

I.

1891.

P. cmi.

i9»2.

P.

Cm.

eiS,i7V,86«

804,400,674

(l.S21,9«4)

12.691,466)

bala)

(1.18H.5011

(IIP.IKW

bu* lU't.)

(lt<,tii'.',ilii.'>

(lU.8i(p,725

Tork...

-30-3

036.»39,Uri

Beaton

879.9T7.640
21.160.400

Iharw.)

(Groin

(PtlnUvm

(i-C

t>bH.)

.000

(6,(t«,000)

(-48

01

(ns8.B0O
(16,303.0601
(- 82-4'

(-S1-5
,

+ 325

(-514)

(66.000)

(-87-2)

8a.78f.727
4.787.000

112.700,630

Botion...
Providence....

(1.743,786)

Hartford

7.976.78!
6.193.7S9
6.676.988
6.281.389
5.61".S29
2.803.191
1,764.181

New Haven.,

8aU» o/—
(StKtti
ICotfon

6.801300

llartfird
New llATeD...
BprtDKUe d

l.tJ!5.S!8

2.27?,797

-18-7

1.70e.l(ir

1.774 .il7n

—16

l.xii.r.oi

l.iss.'S;

1.282.181
l,S68.H;i
1.3V1.468

-12-3
-12-1
-13-4

+88

Wore.

1,222,408
1.279.471
1.270.28
1.281,060
662.311
343,881

—

1,178.108
^S4.81^

-36

8.'4.78^
4t:0.4.0

+188

104,130,57^

127.940.042

~18<

e8.fet,i7«
14.188.136

72.354.967

-4 8

Pltttlurit

t3.123.4tli!

+8-1

Baltimore

ia.M8,«ii

13,803,840

-3-2

8,t^9,4ee

8.871,(J8i)
1,0.S7,>I83

+180

Lovell

N«w Eed

Kl.Sbl

ord..

M«« Ergkntf.

TottI

2

^rlngfleld

...

woioester.....

Portland
Lowel'
New Bedford

101,361.284

-tS-el

Total N. Kn.

BuBaK

1.831886
lt04,«l

WashitiirtoD...-

Riicbeeter

,.

...

8(6.274
8(8,8«2
2S8.600

Toikl Middle.

110.6C4.8C8

Srretuee
WlinjinKtoD....

Bln«bamtoD

C8.7Be,(»l:
IS.t:&&.200

Cb'csgr
Cli ell

>ti

I

7.840,417
7,011.852
5,5&4,I61
S,&i6,l00
1.118,7*7
l.i74,S3S

+ 28-.',
+2-7

+ia«
-1-5

—O-O
-10-7

MllwuLkee
Ditrcit

CleTeihUd
Colitntbati....

iDdtaiapillf

Pecra
Graua Ki<i>ldr
LexitRioD
Total

i

8^,01^

8/124,433,031

».«7T.17«.7W

201,047,4</0

108.42O.4OO

83J)38.323
68.754.760
51,113.380

78 8M,4B0

18,27 O.MO

BBDf rmxlaio

X,UK,1X0

Ponland.
gallLakisClij

l.ClO,i>i7
l,OS5,tSr7

Sealtlr
TacciXia
i^oa AD^elee....
Great Kalla

_+10

268.000

-l-l
+«7-i

113,349.777

-21

114.712,247

+1^

1.4t8.52tl
8f,»,885

618.032

-S8-1

3.1i.tl,BliO

1.8&e.b76

19.60^.670
2.400,000
1,400.000
8V6.2(.8

1.204.06B

ibbJUb

7.0,(X.O

£47.721
728,418

..

276.000

BuKalo
Waablngton.
Kocbester
^vraCQse
WllmlnKton
BlQgtaamton

—

+ 19-8
+118
-5-1,

+22-3
-0-3

+ 20-9
-US 3

857,;i87

-tl38
-7-»
-t28 9

~+3-6 T46,»13,185

+ 158

-12

-112
+ 13 t
+7-6

-87
-18 8
-88

14,737,018
1,988,206
"

26.481,443

Kantaa Citj.

8,877,397

10,032,7 13

Mlnteiipclle..

8,4^H,'.'U0

5,^8aj;0!>

8,7:8,4i4
5,120,090

-I'll

-1;

1

1,070,67
1,1215,008

+ blJU

83«,vl*
673,383
273,482
t,405,715
800,380

+ 10-1

+ U-6

-»-5
-8-1

7,71H,3M
3,769.717
3.3;'3,.'ili5

.

1,112,900

Omaba

»,X79,iSi-7

4,(-0;,221

Denver
Uuiutb

B.ei 0,000

1,800,000

4,088,041
2,316,4 18
1,513.150

Paul

l,bVl,3M

Bt. Jopepb...
*kiul fitf....

604,628
002,701
4U,0:;0

836,360
923,087
610,734
e55,«23
386,836

~4a,281,a92

~88,0t,8,897

887,148
1,100,784

Lea Moiuei...
WIcbiia
lilDColD

Topeka
Total Otbar Westarn.

+

7 6

+12-8
+31-7
+36-6
-22-3

+ 190

10,£81,673
8,088,080
6.871,788

1.875.865
986.911
992.717
509.487

+ 8-5

600.048

404.901
+ 50
"+108 "~44.3S242o

Mcnpbla
Norlblk
Dallas

ton Wonb

+ 48
-14 8

22,690.929

6.710,897
4,700.000
3.383.732
2.117.139

+121
-2U2

6.387 .i»«
3.085.093
2.r»4.44u
2,031 ,101
1,518,308
1.248.8U1

80U.00O

— 12'i

6<.0.U0O

—16-5

634 .e91

06<J.0OO
il8,00(,

Naabvllle

21 SC6.240
8,7i8,. 63

403.106

Bonaton
Klchmoud

977.U<iO

-13 4
-33 5

a49,oou

+14

,

Bliuilntiban)

Waco
CbatlanoLiga

l.8o7,n3
l,U'.i6.l23

l,U2S.u6«

-40
—10

-10M<

-233

— 27-b

+

1-7

•tiai

703.6)!i

OalTeatoD

+ 18
+ 17-3
4;-.ui

1.V43.81'

6,«18,;:10

724,230
738.307
877.673
505.800
643.681
asi.oto

Bava&nah*

2,328.416
l.l72.6i.8

6S.bl8.«42

Kew

300.02 ,038
76.268.52lf

+7-T
+2-4
+4-8

4.U-S

+ur»

283.016363

+U-T

«6.61S.«7S
65.844,080
SS.220.322
31.400.057
0.073,700

67.956^17
86.670.473
83.731.078
0,076.800

+8-8

v^
+00

+S-3 4,444400.720 8332.981.774 +18-0
S.712.429.300
547.642.850
255.808.971

21.0.13.833

214.015.123

14.838.400
5.731.07«
7.878.783
4.333.849

Milwaukee...
DetroitCleveland

808,167,727
64.657.260
3l.8:«.611
20.116.839

I83.78'',100
00,18"-.76O

KO.SW.COO

—
(^Iambus.

»60.7».-.2^fl

2.706,9I?9

623.178.130

669,720,214

4an Frautnsoo
Portland

78,235,619
9,823.18 <
8,0S7,282
3.704.471

50^.70 J,.57t

3.786.3.^3

l':t.»;il.030

Los Angeles..

71,095.217
8.836.250
7,152,202
4.6.0.362
3.' 87,379
2.772.048

8.250,8>3

27.622.729

S7,424,»55
853 8.1MI
27,7j7,082

+0-X
-5-»
-0-t

Total Pacia<

89,113.5i8

101,387,781

-61

815,604,166

880.068307

—4-7

44.839.205
38 «»1.845

41.627,010

+7-7
—2-4

23.2.16.7 8<!

19.357.206 +280
16.980,270 +37o
lS.35i,872 t35-8

302,047,581
298,680,872
193.62'. 150
212.188.S17

328.213.237 +10-6
238.108.018 +212
161.318.81" 1-17 8

198.5-4S.519l

170.1 :»,1 76

l/exluxton

. .

Salt Lake CIt;
Seattle

TaoomH

Sanaaa

....

Cltr.-

Mtnneapolls..
3t. Paul....

Omaba....
Denver
Dulutb

.

23,351.681
21,916,213
7,172,8^8
8.091,873

..

St. Josepfc

...

4,115.28|-

4,673,330
2,131,223
2,631,272
1,681,406

39.2117,070

8.:M».l«5 +27-1
29-7
.''.173.807

-HWS

2.028.6241 +5-1

+12^
+114

18,581.941

-•^

066,414,175
70,410,07

+U4
M4 8

00,717,27'

+37-3
+17-3

151.8.'i0.468

73,174,180 -80
57,157,172 +17-0
36,881,296 +12-8

87.822.517
87,727.786
38.811.579
38,655.010
20.708.1 79I

29,300383 +31-3
•fO-O

19,419,040

2.181,117 +18-J
1.601.938 +6.4

2118d,289

10,076306 +21-0

15.138.370

11.510.422<

+4-3

1.306338.068 +18T)

Tot otb'rW.

185.337,838

165.796,236 + 11-8

1.540,8l6.rj2

St.Lonla....„.
New Orleans..

101,704,686
27,128,785

07.411.603 +4»
32.486.212 -10-4
26.756.737 +10^

896388.705

827.117.061

334.060.312
281.215,031

358.347.451 -O-O
200308312 +4-2

17300370 -20^
11.200.060

0,207.71

....

7.906.719
6.785.839
3.018.352
3.336.490
1.861,807
2.020,351
2,402.000
1.880,000

Naabvllle

Mempbts
Dallas

+ 188

Norfolk
fort Wortb...

+ 5-2
-12 2

Cbaitauooga..

+ 18-2
-318

Total Bonth.

+10-5
-11-2
-2-7

rotalaU

Blrmlngbam..

Waco

2t(0.502.918

91.16.1.47U

OO.S'JO.Sat

-tri)

00,896.000

e.340.U0 -1-4
7.541.730 +4-8
6.078.814 -4-8
3.254.237 +12-X
4.205.253 —22-8
1.721.771 +13-4
2.146.200 -«-5

oi3Ja,8:o

02.047,407
88,777.000

4.112.032
1,712.000

224.843.200

4.811,306,836 5303,498,240

—41-0

+»7
-18-a

+7'0

—

70338.817 10-ft
82,000337 +16-*
84.701311 +6-3

71,463,007
06,460,078
.34,637,083

86331384

-4-7

87,500.123
24.001,966

-14S

2.030.022.640

+2-2

21.421,606
20.405,800

-(*8

10333,40s
17303,000

-20

2.075.0.i7.881

23.470318 -12-7
23.812,106 -17-»
17372.000 i-rs

-0-3 46.180.601317 41.040,390303 +10-1

I-

Qotalde W. T. 2,082.907.002 l.OeO.978.040 +2-0 18,380.112.483 16,700,484377
Our compilation of sales, &c. , for nine months ia as follow

— au'6

mn(

-12-7

-SO

4,013,869,208 +10-7

82.1.^4,941

00.713,280
10.831.342

10,877.830

-u-4

75.568351
66.I5L.5I8 +10-S

78,120.'.92

12.072.039, -.>S-1

2,882.138

lll.7S7.2i>

5.3i0.531.011

+0-4

Uonston
aicbmond

4 10

H5-5
t-lSl

72.300,770
30.141.139
18,179.182

Ualveston

+ 1-0
+i»e

fl2-4

+12-9
+io-»

Tot.M.Weat

Peoria

9iand Kaolda

3.-.-:i

i

+16-7

3300.4.^2.581
487.(M7,75"
221.5.W.8.V
229.751.1M191.337.07

13.161.900
8.016.680
0.064.047
3.963.435
1,837,832

...

+ha-i

.

Xint Xant'.l, 1831.

}lonthi, 1802.

7

-112 2

Dsscr<yt4oii.l Par VoliM
lor Quontltii!

!

-1-6

-191

177,801.700

487.ll<4.076

- + 31

11.406.218
6,726,300
860.000

York...

20.026.600
17.174,748

2.792.487,4811 2.417.420371
606,374.0661
M0301363
67S.09r',777
630372402

463.270.000

12,fil0.0O4

1.081.184.720 1.S02.804.I149

alall

Ontalde

""48.738.0S5

56.111.480

-6-8

34.121,08? +0-8
6.478.488 +19-1
6,285.717 +1-7
S.517.541 +6-6
3.404.001 -1-2
1.017.500 +12 3

3O.I0.').280

1,277.210

Total Bootbera

6g..^03.6t6

Loalsvllle.

-ai2

2.14u,4:i7

Atlanta*

6S.57631i

+3^
+118

23.72<l.32'

Cincinnati....

Lincoln

5,707.203

iOe.UtAI

Loaiaville

+ 7-6
—OflS

-0-0 4.16>.852.97S 3]900.283.279

438.882.684
82.429.150
31.818.421

Ohlcago

.

5,870,«t>«

-1-2

+ 180
+182

+11

4A.13it.729

40.123,226
31.262.118
17.8*>.6J3

468,223.630

Topeka

22,b»4.20»
7,424,801
7.632,218
8,748,017
3.267 ,'.36
2,080,041
1,727,128
1,470.644
741,700

LonlB
Orleani

New

To

Total Middle

Sioux Ctt; ...
Dea Moinea.

-2-0 ~21,108,002

-0-6

«1.5 16.189

6.31t:',003

Indianapolis..

103.874,026
14,418.700
8,7»«,3«1
6,885,496
5.41H,«o3
3.8)5,800
1.341,876
1,861,550

462.852.480

291.877.492
69.8a»,788
59.6«.\a21
:4,37n,S49

Pblladelpbla.
Pittsburg
Raltlmcre....

Wictaita

~»S4l«847a

Total Paelllc.

St.

+10-3

414,08«

1.0»8,7!10

E|.okane*

et.

+ 64

-9 4
+ 46
+13
+ 12-3
-428
+231
+38

i,ioo,coo

Helena-

+14
+158
+7 2

236,600

+8^0

l-l

62.512,412
40.007.713
44.036.600

48.80L5T8

-!-8

+ 121
+8 2

+1-

"l40.b4 8,111. "35.1:42,3.0

MiddltWestim

71.678.384
14.880.843
18.081.676
8,078.484
1.636,627
1,808,632
910.647
811.944

1.478,756
78IJ(il
788.954

93.e67.480
IS.S«8,500
8.768.697
e.712,167
6,>86.073

+w»

-7-1

436.250.438

.

PblUdeUtala....

P.m.

20.717.600
7.670.011 «:i
6.094.580 +8-«
4.906,619 +137
6,029,721 +5-0
6.195,885 +01:
3,120,480 -10-4
1,811,128 -I-9-6

4a6.997,9.^6

-2-:i

n;»fie;

ster....

tatu

-12-7

6.Z8<i,00<i

Poitlmd

1882.

2,777,468,234 3,322,620,Sa» -10-i 20.800,180,404 St.2S«.
i5o«k(
,M1

...

E»roTldenoe...

N«w

Sint ttonUu.

P.C

1891,

Sejit. 21.

New Tork.
1893.

NO. 1,42 f.

1892.,

8,

10,769.610

18,107,6181

17,»19,40o'

^ctiuii

^txr'fi

Valiu.

Par Vatut

Actutd

Aftr\*

PriM.

81,610,493
3581710J10 02-7
Val. |i7l7lOI777 {
»308.U1.9o<) (306,165,961 70-9
(1,321,812 uo-i
(1,188.050
(1,732,001 54-4
(3,181,450
(1.180.106 1661
(740300

.n«fcl8b-a
"**'•*{

RR. bonda..

Uov't bondsl
State bonds.
Bank stooka

60,1 (18,257
)

(4,870.767105

ttsTSM'MUB 60^

(260.lit7.30J (105.306301

(1325,90J
(2.4')'l,tOO

(1,6«0,346

l.lll,'.^iM

76-1
115-a

I.i:s.j.i7 ^rl
(2.2Jl.-.'7l 114^3
'

Montreal _
Toronto
Ualllax
Uamllton*
Total Canada.

*Motloolud*l

I

la total*.

6.684.7tlU

1,136.UU0

+'6
+S6

46
+8-0

-11-3

-Id
+8-0

18..:>6.289

~+a-2

ToUl... (6120370217 (8302100001

03-0

(6412,16-j8W UJt^tStiMt

6r7

33.181.000 (:i.ai7.4<to <M iioe
io.o«2.tas 67 1-tOe
15301.000
Pet'l'n.bblai
'fii-j*
14,t25,70<l (f^
24,674.50.1 («r7,U7,020 CM-30
(Totton.bls.l
•
l,738,005,niO II,
Uiaitt.basb. 1311,913.80: (1.1U»^'176 ,siHo.

Total Taln-l

(8,0110801631

|5.l

Far table •relearlaga br tele«ra»b eee !•«« STM.

THE CHRONICLE.

66B

[Vol. LV.

There can be no doubt at all of the fact that busiis improving, and of the further fact that our
APTM£1<IT. merchants and bankers are in a sound
AIID CITY
condition.
The
See pages 607, 60§, 609, 610 and 611 for our State quarterly
statement of failures which we published last
and City Department.
week was a suflicient guaranty of the latter assertion
All advertisements with relation to State and City Bonds

THE

Dff

STATE

ness

;

will likewise

be found on

tlie

same and following pages.

THE FINANCIAL SITUATION.
The week has been signalized by the official announceTnent that arrangements are now completed for the
meeting of the " International Monetary Conference,"
The time
called by the United States in May last.
and place agreed upon for holding the conference is

a total aggregate of liabilities of

insolvents

in the

whole country during the three months ending with
October 1 reaching only 18f million dollars is a pretty
strong affirmation of the healthy condition prevailing
in business circles.

that head.

Nothing more can be wanted on

We imagine that our merchants and bankers

have been for so long facing a possible crisis on account
of our silver currency that they have been led into very
conservative ways and are in truth in better shape toA significant circumstance
Brussels, November 32d, and notification to that effect day than for many years.
3d to each of the bearing upon the same thought is that our commercial
was accordingly cabled on October
governments which have signified their willingness to paper market is now so often reported short of the deAlso, as to the growing
be represented. Sixteen European States have accep- mand for^ first-class names.
ted the invitation to send delegates; they are Austria-

Hungary, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Great
Britain, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Koumania, Russia, Servia, Spain, Sweden and Norway
and Switzerland. Consequently the act of our Govern
ment on October 3d completes the preliminary work.

activity in business, that

is a point on which there can
be no question either. We proved most conclusively in
our annual Cotton Report of September 10th such to be

the condition of the dry goods trade, and we have had
of late evidences of the widening of the circle of

bank clearings, in railroad gross earnings,
and in the better reports coming up from so many
A fact of interest in connection with the above is a
statement by Mr. Jesse Seligman, who returned from departments of trade. These facts taken together are
velopEurope on Wednesday. It has been known that while most promising signs of industrial health and develop
abroad he was requested by the Government to advance ment.
The rise again in foreign exchange yesterday wasladisthe interests, in a kind of semi-official way, of this proIt came as an unpleasant reminder of the
posed Silver Congress. He now states that he did appointment.
what he could in that matter; that he saw the principal one weak spot in the financial condition of the country.
The
Foreign Ministers of Finance, and that the favor with Still, the rise must be but a temporary advance.
which the conference was received was greater than he greater activity of business is likely to give us a closer
It will encourage those who believe good money market, and that will tend with other conditions
anticipated.
may come out of the deliberations in prospect to know to keep exchange down until towards the end of the
that a practical man, of so large experience as Mr. year at least.
Our banks have sent a good deal of
Seligman, speaks hopefully.
Moreover, everyone must money to the interior this week ; they have gained
at least feel a degree of satisfaction at the near ap- from the Treasury, but not so much as the October
proach of the conference.
The sooner it meets interest payments would seem to call for, and as a consooner
the
we shall know the results, and sequence of the tn'o movements they have met with a
we have the assurance now that if no event further loss in reserve. The money market has, however,
defers
the
assembling
of
the delegates,
tluir remained during the week without any very material
deliberations and conclusions will be quickly public change until yesterday. A temporary influence adverse
property, and not much longer be subject for surmise to higher rates has been that some of the banks, notaand dispute. The plan has been pursued most indus- bly those which are depositaries for city funds, have
triously by the President, and no doubt with an honest had large amounts to loan as a result of the heavy
purpose to reach through it a solution of the silver payments for taxes, which began this week. But yesproblem. One recent occurrence has been construed terday call loans were bid up to 10 per cent said to be
to be adverse to the success of the undertaking, and due to operations connected with the paying off of
that is the change of Government in Great Britain. Speyer & Co.'s loan of $3,700,000 to the Georgia CenAs there never has been any reason to expect England tral Railroad.
would remodel its currency system under the SalisMoney on call has loaned at 10 and at 4 p«r cent, averbury administration, we cannot feel that the coming aging about 5 renewals were made at 4 to 5 per cent,
of the Gladstone ministry into power is any set-back while banks and trust companies quoted 4 per cent as
activity in

—

;

to

the enterprise

,

that

if the purpose in
the minimum, although the majority obtained 5 per
chance of success cent. Time contracts were in fair demand and the
before, that chance cannot be said to have been diminsupply of money was abundant ; the transactions were
ished in any degree by the change.
The great ques- very light, however, because the views of lenders and
tion in oar mind is and has been all along— what
pur- borrowers are so diverse as to rates, and many maturing
pose has our Government in pressing the matter ?
Is loans have not been renewed for this reason
quotations

calling

;

the conference

is

to

say,

had any

;

a bi-metallic agreement between the United States
and the leading European powers that is to be the ultimatum, or is our Government willing to accept something of a very difiEerent sort ? The invitation
sent
out to the Euiopean governments speaks of
increasing
the use of silver— does that express the
objpct ? We
increased the use of silver in 1878; again
wemcreas d the
use of silver iu 1890.
What has been the result here ?
What must be the result of a wider similar experiment
?

it

on good Stock Exchange collateral are 4 per cent bid
for sixty to ninety days and 5 per cent for four to six
months, but lenders want 5 per cent for the former and
6 per cent for the latter.
Commercial paper is in
good supply and is moderately increasing, but
there are a

market

mand
the

number

of first-class

names held

off

the

in anticipation of lower rates as soon as the deincreases,

middle

of

which
the

it

is

expecttd will be about

month,

and

the

makers of

,

1

I

•crroBKB

8,

THE CHRONICLE.

1893.]

56T

to
sppoar to be willing
wait,
as The World's Fair at Chicago is also qnit« a factor in
rates stimulating activity, both in it« pr«tent effocta and ia
no urgent need of money
they
are 4^ to 4} per cent for sixty to ninety day en- the prospects it holds out for next year.
Altogether,
doried bills receivable; 5 to 5| per cent for four the industrial outlook wean a very aa«nring aspect.
months commission house names, and 6 to 6} per cent Even the iron trade is gradually getting into very mach
for good single names having from four to six months better shape, and prices for pig metal, if not actaally

Iheso

notos

are

in

;

higher, have perceptibly stiffened.

to run.

The European markets were without

It seems desirable to bear these facts in mind, since
There was said to be a better feeling the statements of bank clearings do not on their face
in London in American securities, and discount rateS reflect the improvement which is in progresa.
We
continue easy. The cable reports sixty to ninety day have this week prepared the figures for the month of
bank bills in London J@l per cent at Paris the September, and find that as compared with the corresopen market discount rate is 1} per cent, at Berlin it ponding month last year there is a decrease of 492
is also 1} per cent, and at Frankfort IJ per cent.
Our million dollars, or 0-3 per cent. But in interpreting
•able reports that the Bank of England lost £767,359 these figures it is to be remembered that we are combullion during the week, and that the holdings of gold paring with exceptionally heavy totals for last year,
ky the Bank of England are now £30,890,110. The September 1891 having been the only month in the
loss of the week, we are also advised by special cable to first three-quarters of that year which showed an
ma, was due to the import of £17,000 (£6,000 from increase in clearings.
Then also speculation on onr
India, £6,000 China, and £5,000 from other countries), Stock Exchange, though fairly active the present year,
to the shipment of £689,000 to the interior of Great has been on a much sm^ler scale than in the same
Britain, and to the export of £95,000, of which £40,- month of last year
not only that, but a very large
000 went to Copenhagen, £30,000 to Egypt and £25,- proportion of the stock sales this year were cleared
000 to other countries. The Bank of France shows a through the new Stock Clearing House, thus reducing
decrease of £118,000 gold, and the Bank of Germany, ordinary bank clearings to that extent.
If we exclude
since the last report, a decrease of £2,127,000 of this New York from the totals, and take simply the clearings outside of New York, we find that instead of a
metal.
Foreign exchange has been generally firm this week, decrease, there is an increase of 2-6 per cent, and this
and yesterday nominal rates were marked up a half follows an increase last year too. The subjoined statecent by some of the drawers, though later in the ment in our usual form furnishes the comparisons both
day on dearer money the market became weak with and without New York.
MOMTHLT OIAilllHOS.
and so closed.
The light supply of commercial
bills was one reason
for the advance, this conCI«irin«s, Tbtol Att.
OUaritif Ontild* .V*up Tork.
Month,
dition being in part due to the fact that cotton
IS9Z.
1891.
P.Ot
1882.
1881.
P.m.
ia relatively higher here than in Liverpool, thus tem.
«
t
t
porariiy at least checking
the export movement Jannuj—. 6,653,361,766 4.907.201,252 +13-8 «.104,748,*» «.010.20i.8e6
February
6,207,327,071 3,973,069,963 +31-1 1.969358.136 X.4«e,522,847 +18-1
There has been a good demand to cover bills previously Uarcb
5,2G6,216,774 4,S8t,llS,7SO +26-1 2,036.649,251 1.788.013498 +1W

special feature

during the week.

;

;

.

old

in anticipation of easier sterling rates in October,

and which could not be replaced with new bills because

1st qnar.. 10,166,807,611 13,174,380,936

+226

6,110,176,186

+6-8 2,010,732,883

5.464.737,9«1

+UT

AprU.

6,066,250,253

4,809,379,066

>Uy

6,.)30,866.160

4,809.892,260
4.378,933,019 +12-7

2,060,:0i.624

l,BIS,501,Ml +S-1
1.803463,738, +7T

2,127,562,977

1,833,420,307: +14-1

16,051,«»2,J3B 13.988,204,8341 +7-5

6,188,991,491

6.e50.075.S9«} +«-6

of the high price ruling, and also because of their June
scarcity.
There have been a few loan bills drawn, but Sdqaar...

4.931,575,714

6 months. 31,208,598,747 27,17S,685.2«9 +14-9 12,299,167,880 11,116,813,347 +10<
the offerings have been promptly absorbed. Compared
4,637,637,395 4,392,464402 +6-6 2,059,160,683 1,914,347,814 +7-«
with Friday of last week the market opened unchanged July
4,53l,9.>8,969 4,180,813.168 +8-4 1,99-.3<6,S18 1,777,345,136 +1»*
4<unut
on Monday with all drawers posting 4 86^ for long and September. 4,811,365,836 5,301,488.«4» -9-3 2,082,907,402 1,980.978,040 +«•«
but
Brown Bros, and the Sdqiur... 13,971,002,200 13,876,800.589 "+0^ 6,080,944,803 6.e71>.671,030 +7-8
4 88 for short,
months 46.189,601.947 41.019,390,808 +10-1 13,388,112,483 l«,78e.484.M77 +0-6
Bank of British North America reduced to
We have stated that stock sales in New York the
4 86 for the former and 4 87^ for the latter, and on the
ioUowiug day Baring, Magoun & Co. also reduced to present year were smaller than those last year. This
these figures. On Thursday the Bank of British North arises chiefly out of the fact that in September, 1891, a

America advanced to 4 80J for sixty days and 4 88 for period of great speculative activity prevailed. Alto•ight, and yesterday Brown Brothers and Baring, Ma- gether 6,853,516 shares were sold in the month this
goun & Co. returned to the same rates, the market clos- year, against 11,176,232 shares in September last year.
ing weak, as already stated.
For actual business the The following gives not only the number but the value
dosing rates were 4 85A to 4 85J for long; 4 86^ to of the share sales, by months, in the two years.
ALM OP arooKS at thk hiw tobk stock BXOR&!«OC.
4 86f for short; 4 86f to 4 87i for cable transfers;
1891.
4 84J to 4 85 for prime and 4 84i to 4 84^ for docuF«4UM.
tfimtk.
Number
mentary commercial bills.
of Share*,
of Skartt.
Par.
Aaual.
Par.
Accounts regarding the condition of trade, as already
t
t
aid, are encouraging. The volume of business is large, Ian.... 9JI8S.043 933,019,100 633.383,777 6.418,788
*48,4S93«S
t7f,48S3«T
671,380.447 *,«76384
and the tone confident. The whole of the com crop is now Feb... 11,434,111 914,071,600| 481,004.977 3344378
1*4.«»;.0«S
tUmta. S,9a8.»44 773430,800
r;
matured and safe from frost, and with that element of
Utqr 80,340,100 2.4»9.»0,600 l,68836e.40i:i*,641,4«l:l.Sa43a03*0 439.460,74*
doubt removed the crop results are generally satisfac- AprU.. 6316.142 665320.840 8474M.99W 7.US.818' 4003043*01 4*S.9e3,61»
tory.

The

season has not yielded such exceptionally

large harvests
full

as

that of last year, but

we have

raised

average crops, and there are also very considerable

surpluses left over from

This ensures a large
traffic to our transportation lines, and though prices
are low, yet it seems likely we shall be able to find a
market for all the grain and produce wo have to sell.
1891.

Max....
June..

4,17<I,466

670346.6*)

84*.4*7,487

4.<88L*S*

414.444.000

37*3*3.S8«

6374,727!

t04.6374M

83*347348

S37MU|

800388.6**

sn3t74OT

Mqr. 18.860.826 1.480303,084 1.042.670.251 17.460.661
6mM.. 48.71M25 4.28*3*8.824 *,4n.439,055 2038«.2*6

l,T04.6ae,44A,t.0»,714,0at
*.01S,0«e.946, I.868.1443W

SaO,4M400

1SI>304,U*

67i.S04.*50

3*4.018.440

3:0301316 11.1743Si l,o;«3a83v>

ge*,4»Ma*

3.t7,66;,S30

Aiunut

8,413,874
6,447,178'

496,409,702

S20,303,4I9 3,164,4171
3*1,170.007! 63I!V.38I

Sept-..

6,853314

400,468400

Sdqr. 16,914,068 1.131,488,16*

8d0.280,6<)l »>,176.0S8 1.043,48 -.«0»

i.oo73**3ai

Jalr~..

Sms*..

,

64.640,498 6.717.141,777 i3ei,710.»14 60.168367 4 374,75;, 166 «.7a6,444.1*»

THE OHRONICLE

568

value of the share transactions is thus
September
seen to have been only 3T9 million dollars in
last year, a dethis year, as against 592 million dollars
Allowing an average of
crease of 213 million dollars.

amount

according to our usual
2i checks to each transaction
decrease of 213 millions would alone inmethod, this
Tolve a loss in bank clearings of 532 million dollars, or

the

The market

rvoL. Lv.

work going on in

of

branch of railroad

this

operations.

The Denver & Eio Grande submits

a strikingly fav-

That was

orable exhibit of net earnings for August.

month when

made

the road

a heavy gain in gross

the result of the extra passenger

receipts in part as

Templar
shown in the Convention at Denver. It appears from the statement
But in addi- now received that while gross earnings increased as
total of these clearings for the country.
attended by an augmentation to the loss in that way, there was a saving iu bank much as 1161,345, this was
Exchange tion of only |!9,385 in expenses, thus leaving net of
clearings through the operation of the Stock

more than the

entire

amount

traffic

derived from the holding of the Knights

of decrease

Clearing House, as already said. According to the records $451,461 the present year against only $399,501 last
an improvement of over 50 per cent. The Louisof that Clearing House, the saving amounted to about 500 year
In brief then, it is evident that except ville & Nashville also has a good statement for the samo
million dollars.
for the changes in the clearings arising from stock month, its gross having increased $121,821 and its net

—

New York, the exhibit would be quite $32,968. The Mexican Central with gross increased^
from what we find it to be. Here is a state- $25,773, was able to effect a reduction of $49,125 in
ment showing separately the clearings at the leading expenses; hence the net stands at $240,736, against
$165,838, the figures being stated in Mexican currency*
cities for a series of years.
BAKK CLEARINGS FOE SEPTEMBER AT LEADISO CtTIES.
The Central of New Jersey increased its gross $6,902, but
1892. 1891. 1890. 1889. 1888. 1887. 1886. 1835.
(000,000s
has a loss of $27,236 in net. The Oregon Improve$
omitted.)
*
New York... 2,778 3,322 3,092 2,699 2,679 2,633 2,606 2,101
193 ment has lost $49,035 in gross and $36,465 in net. The
252
230
271
285
439
398
360
CUoago.
332
294
267 Wabash shows an increase of $41,957 in gross and an
336
331
409
370
Boston
380
189
249
238
251
292
232
300
277
Ptillitdelplila
The Chicago Burlington &
increase of $21,216 in net.
72
60
75
81
78
102
97
9i
St. Louis....
49 Northern reports net of $106,757 against $81,362
the
72
59
71
71
72
73
Ban Fran'co.
78
44
52
53
51
63
62
48
Baltimore...
60
Louisville New Albany & Chicago $131,138 against
33
28
51
45
42
54
65
Pittsburg...
60
36 $93,160; the St. Paul & Duluth $78,233 against $48,41
41
44
42
53
ClDclnuati...
62
55
31
23
18
34
33
Kansas Citj.
45
42
39
290; the New York Ontario & Western $121,873 against
19
28
23
25
21
Kew Orleans
27
32
32
$95,600; the Kansas City Fort Scott & Memphis $123,Total
4,317 4,832 4,515 3,919 3,381 3,856 3,670 3,004
253
149 170 against $113,836; the Toledo & Ohio Central $02,471
301
227
199
Other cities..
491
447
the Savannah Americus & Mont195 against $53,097
Xotalall... 4,311 5,303 4,992 4,250 4,134 4,083 3,869 3,153
Outside N.Y. 2,033 1,981 1,909 1,551 1,455 1,100 1,263 1,052 gomery $18,177 against $13,513 ; and the Rio Grande
NI.N"E MONTHS.
Western $95,336 against $94,119. On the Minneapolis &
(000,000« 1892. 1891. 1890. 1889. 1888. 1887. 1836. 18S^.
emitted.)
on the Ohio
St. Louis net is $51,990 against $64,177
Kew York... 26,800 24,260 27,675 25,808 22,213 24,824 23,628 18,405
OWoago
on the Buf3,712 3,209 2,964 2,137 2,273 2,153 1,871 1,629 & Mississippi $155,618 against $165,889
transactions in
different

;

;

Jtil|i$ll>$i;$$

;

;

Boston
Pbllaiielphia
St.

3,624 3,477 3,312 3,433 3,152 3,251 ?,933
2,792 2,417 2,756 2,663 2,321 2,360 2,017

LouU....

899
596
574
565
518
363
335

Ban Fran'co.
Baltimore...
Pittsburg . .
Cincinnati ..

Kansas

City.

New Orleans
Total

Other

cities.

827
655
637
501
487
328
3.i8

827
613
565
586
470
387
351

721
615
475
475
411
230
330

653
601
453
126
379
297
297

667
609
498
371
420
295
281

598
151
419

290
370
200
260

2,413
1,668

557
414
430
270
322
159
213

40.808 37,056 40,991 37,643 33,073 35,729 33,112 26,510
1,382 3,993 3,771 2,807 2,351 2,019 1,639 1,304

45,190 41,019 11,765 10,455 35,421 37,778 ilim 2^814
OutsldeN.Y. 18,390 16,789 17,090 11,647 13,211 12,951 11,153 9,10!)
Total

all..

This brings out another feature in these returns,

namely the

that the Western cities as a rule present greatly enlarged totals, Chicago, St. Louis, Cincinfact

Kansas City and Pittsburg all recording increases
over September last year; in fact, all but the last
mentioned have heavier totals than in the corresponding mouth of any other year. The Atlantic cities, with

falo

Rochester

&

Pittsburg $90,935 against $107,183,

&

and on the Philadelphia

Erie

$166,363

against

$205,148.

The

made up from returns colshows the week's receipts and shipments
of currency and gold by the New York banks.
lected

following statement,

by

us,

WttK Bndlnt OctotKr

Received bv SMpped by
T. Banks. H. F. Binkn.

7, 1892.

Ifet Interior

Movement,

If.

(2,121,000
691,000

ioia

Total Kold ana

leffal

tenders...

With the Sub-Treasury

$3,08D.0OO Lots. $339,000
l,02i,000 Loss. 3,131, COO-

»3,015,000

Joireiicy..

$7.;06.000 Lo«s.tl,090.t01>

operations, the

result

is

as

follows.

nati,

the exception of Philadelphia, have decreases, and San
Francisco and New Orleans likewise fall behind their
totals of last year.

movement we may

The

great contraction in the cotton
suppose has played a prominent

BmMne

Bftnks* Interior

is

known, new railroad construction

The same

il, 105,000 LO8S.$4,u90,000'

16,300,000 aaln. 2,100,000

$21,115.000 t23 405,000 Lo39.$l.()9il,000

.

following table indicates the

ia the principal

European banks

amount

of bullion

and

this week,

at the-

Jiresponding date last year.
Oc-ober

JMtko/

ber 30 2,519 miles of new track in the
aggregate were
laid in the various States and
Territories.

Bank BolMnf,

18,100,000

Total goia and legal tenders

in the

United
States at the^present time is progressing at only
a moderate pace. The Raihoay Age of Chicago has
prepared
a statement showing the new road built during
the
current year, and finds that from January
1 to Septem-

IfetOhanoein

Bankt.

movement, as above 13,015,000

Sub-TreasTiry ope atious

The

Out of

October 7. 1892.

part in the decrease at the Crescent City.

As

Into

Bankt.

Week

SUver.

i
England
Fr.Dce
GernaBj-..

October

6. 1892.

Gold.

»

1

S,

1891.

Total.

Ooid.

SUwr.

Total.

£

i

£

£

2S,8llO,38»
20.890,110 23,6(10,883
07,050,780 61.E07.617 118,668,133 52,637.000 50,1.52.000 102.739.006
83.317,250 11.105,750 11.423,000, 33,«3«,500 11,115.600 44,582,00*
10,720,tOO 16,t'22,0CO 27,612,0t>0
6,474.001' 16.515,000 21,090,000
3,16f.000 7,386,000 10.551,000
9.530,00«
3,554,001
5,9; 8,00(1
1,360,000
2;9O0,0O(i 1,450.000
3.016.000 1,523,000
1,689,000

26,800.110
..

Aut.-Bun';.
N«ili<rlaLds..
Nit. B')gluni'

roi .tt 1b ti eek u^.ieu.iiA f8.11>,307 282,»83.543 l21.6lI.8Sa 35.238.500 206,850.388
11(1 6«3.«lli-. N9.1.5rt.7;)l'235,820,41« 123.39i,011' 35,458,417 208,851, 33«

Pot.otiT.w'k

publication estimates that the total
for the year will
• The division (between gold and silver) given in our table ol coin aiid
bu lion
not fall much below 4,000 miles.
and the Bank of Belgium made from
But at that figure it the bestm tbe Bank of Germany obtain; in neither case Is is olaimed to
estimate we are able to
It
would be less even than last
be aoouratP,as those banks make no distinotiou In their iveokly returns,
year, and in fact the merely repurting the total gold and silver, but we believe tbe division
smallest in any year back to
close approximation.
1885.
The activity of wo make is a receive tbe foregoiuKresults weekly by cable, and while not
Note.— We
business is .the more noteworthy
in view of the small all of tbe date given at the head of the column, they are the r6turni>
Issued nearest to that date— that is, the latest reported hgiires.
..
..

OCTOBER

THE CHUONICLE.

8, 1803.J

THE GOVERNMENT'S LAIIOER REVENUE
AND IMPROVED FINANCIAL CONDITION.

enlarged receipts

66i»
from custom* duties. Ai to the iotho internal revenue taso«, that

creased receipts from

id presumably owing to a natural growth in the conweek to the increase in the gol<l sumption of tho articlci taxed. Such a growth (tb*^
We
The usual monthly result of industrial oxpmsion) has alwavt been the exholdings of the Govorumont.
reports have sitco then been made public and they not perience aft<r each n-peal of tiioso revonuo imi)ott«»
only confirm what wo ou that occasion said, but al<to and we are having a liko illustration of tho country'*
show a greatly strengthened coaditiou of the Treasury development now.
This improvement in condition has been
finance?.
For tho reason cited the Treasury Depirtment, it

referred lust

wholly secured through an increasing income. It will
te remembered that in our review of the Government
figures for tho fiscal your ending with June 30th 189a

would seem, has pastel through tho flnnnclal strait*
which have for so long embarrassed Government operaIndeed, the better revcnuo now obtained rentions.

(Chuonicli:, July 9, pages 41 and 42) we stated that
there was " promise of a better income during the new
"
fiscal year just begun," both from "internal revenue
and also from " customs duties." It is tho fulfilment
of that promise which is now imparting the new life

ders the outlook, both present

to tho Treasury

Department.
For the reader to realize how radical the changes in
Government receipts from the two sources mentioned
have been since June, it is only necessary to state two
Tho customs payments in 1892 from
or three facts.
January to June inclusive (six months) were $92,1 GO,.
000 or an average of $15,360,000 per month, while
from July to September inclusive (three months) they

increase in revenue over last

were $52,087,000, or an average of $17,502,000 per
month ; internal revenue receipts from January to June

more than the average increase in revenue for
Hence a part of the gain i*
pretty sure to be absorbed in extra payments which fall
in the current month, as for instance the interest dae
October 1 on the public debt and consequently the
same gain in holdings during future months cannot be
All we can say is that the
predicated on tUeso figures.
Government revenue has begun to increase in both of
its important branches and it looks as if tho averafe
monthly minimum increase during the remainder of
1892 ought to bo between 3 and 3^ million dollars.
Another point of added strength these exhibits diaclose is that the gold item in the Treasury holdings of
cash increased even more than the net cash. The net
gold reported October 1 was $119,395,509, whereas on
September 1 the same item was *114,15G,317, showing

were *70,48G,00O, or an average of $12,748,000, and
from July to September they were $42,665,000, or
an average of $14,222,000. This shows average
monthly receipts from theso two sources during the last three months of $31,784,000, compared
with an average of $28,108,000 during the

first six

monthly increase of over 3^ milAlmost equally good results are reached
lion dollars.
if we compare the total receipts from all sources for the
last three months with the same three months a year
ago, the total for the three months in 1892 being
$100,445,000, again8t$91,18G,000inl891, or an increase
of $9,259,000, averaging $3,080,333 increase per month.

months

of 1892, or a

This dtcided growth in revenue, especially in
customs revenue after the passage of a higher tariff
It must not be forgotten,
law, may excite surprise.
however, that in some measure it is probably a consequence of, and to be accounted for by, the changes in
the customs laws which have been made by the "Tariff

Act

and the " Customs Administrative Act,"
having gone into operation Aug. 1 1890.

of 1890"

the latter

hopeful.

According

and

to tho first of

prospective, 'luii©

Octobei exhibits the

Treasury has gained during September in the net cash
This, to be
more than the month's
September, and nearly two

holdings in sub-treasuries $5,050,960.
sure,

is

nearly 1^ million dollars

millions

the last throe mouths.

;

that the total gained during the last

month $5,239,192.

1 the net gold
was reported at only $110,444,392; but on July 1 it
was $114,342,360, just about the same as on September
1; while on May 1 it was $119,909,750, or about the
same as on October 1. If we go back to April 1 the total
will be found to be larger than any of those mentioned,
being $125,815,040. We cite tho figures for previous
months to remind our readers (1) how unfortunately
low the gold holdings recently dropped a fact indeed
which seomei as much as any other single fact to
engender the distrust in Europe which has been such
a conspicuous feature of late and consequently (2) to
show that the present total is still small. We are
aware that tho banks let their gold go into tae Treasury very unwillingly. That is natural, and yet the
banks ought not to lose sight of the circumstance that

It will be

remembered that on August

—

—

In anticipation of certain provisions of these laws
becoming operative the imports of the articles affected
increased in 1890-91 to such an extent that during the
fiscal year of 1891-92 the imports of some of the sime it is of chief importance that the Treasury should proarticles fell below ordinary requirements, making sent a strong front, for the whole outside world gauges
Then again the stability of our currency largely by the gold holdlarger purchases needful for 1892-93.
there was probably a little loss in imports in 1891-92
due to a loss in general business activity that year,
while now perhaps the inflow is in a degree stimulated

ings of the (rovernment.

Moreover,

it

is

a fact that

tho Treasury has the
much gold is while our

the only period during which

opportunity to accumulate
banks are sending currency to the interior—a good part
imports the current year, no of the year that item is almost constantly depleted by
acting in favor of enlarged
doubt there is another cause contributing to the same end, current disbursements. Hence the need for improving:

by better trade prospects.

But besides

these influences

not only a contributing the present opportunity. We subjoin our usual corapilsr
it
tion of Tretisury cash holdings for Sept. 1 and Oct. 1.
-1S92.is an unending monthly emission of nearly 4i million dolOr.'. 1.
Sfnl.\.
notdingtbtiTrfatiirrrlnSnb-Titiu'Ux.
$114,1.^6.317 $11'.>.<»».^.50»'
under the operation of Ket Kold cola and liiUllon
lars in legal-lender silver notes
•..-;o,i34

and that

is

our currency.

influence but

it is

This

is

likewise a cumulative force, because

—

which prices of commodities have no doubt become deranged, perhaps inflated, thereby opening wider and

NetfllveriolUiininmlltoii
U. 8. Treasury iiotfs, act July
Legal tenilcr notes
MuttoiuU bank notex

U 18»0....

S.IS'^.Ol'*

^.•20•,55l
6.1i22.Mta

.•.1-<J.4S."»

<!.T-:7.''»8

7.T01.863

,!;-'.'''?-2)i
13.S ^7.J
FraoUoual »UTer
wider the way for tho outflow of (gold) the better but
S14'.<.70i.li;«
S15 4,7J9,He
Total Gov't cash In »»b-treasurle«
undervalued currency. Of course enlarged import?, Amount In national banks
i.v4»fi.ai»
ia.7*2.3J4
Total caiib In bunks and 80b-tre»»urt«». :|165,M4,4M S170.3MtSS»
from whatever cause induced, mean in a general way

THE CHRONICLK

570
Thus

far, in

contrasting the net cash,

we have been and continuous increase established in the years prec eding.
The company controls altogether, in whole or in

referring to amounts in sub-treasuries only. The Government also has balances in depositary banks, though
the agggregate is small now. It will be noticed that

these balances were again reduced slightly last month,
80 that the total on October 1 is below 15^ million dollars. Hence, though the net cash in sub-treasuries

we have

is,

as

than on September 1,
September have exceeded the

stated, $5,056,960 larger

the Government receipts in

actual payments only $4,811,149; that is to say, the increase of cash in sub-treasuries and depositary banks
together is $245,811 smaller than the increase in the

This latter fact is important in estimating accurately the month's surplus.
There is but one other point which we need refer to.
What we have just said suggests whether a renewal of

sub-treasuries.

may not be among the possibilities of the
Some may ask, if the Government is to
have nearly 5 million dollars a month over and above
ordinary disbursements, why should it not take in bonds
bond

calls

near future.

to meet the sinking fund requirements

»ny means follow from the
that the Secretary

is

facts

?

It does

not by

we have brought out

The

assured of any such surplus.

remembered,
over September 1891,
was stated at only 83,840,031
»nd for the three months ending with September the
increase this year, as has been seen, averaged only $3,086,333. Any further surplus than is indicated by this
additional revenue must be the result of deferred pay.
ments or must be required for the quarterly interest
periods, unless it be assumed that the ordinary disbursements are to be less than in 1891-92, an assumption
which no one at present has any warrant for. To be
sure the Secretary of the Treasury is presumed to have
acted on the policy of carrying a small balance and
yet it is not quite certain whether the small cash holdingshave been wholly policy or part necessity. But
whether they were the outcome of a matured policy or
were a work of necessity, it is hardly presumable after
the experience the country has had this year that any
financial officer will be bold enough to carry eo small
increased revenue in September,

it

IVOL. LV.

will be

but the road directly operated
and on which the accounts are based comprises only
2,858 miles, or rather that was the average mileage for
part, 4,731 miles of road,

the twelve months.

;

ings, the effect of the inclusion of this additional mile-

age has been to reduce the average gross and net
earnings
per mile of
road.
Thus the gross
per mile on the 2,857 miles in 1892 was only $7,430.
against

$8,541

per

mile

on

the

2,250

miles

in

1891, being a decrease of over eleven hundred dollars a
mile, while the net per mile stands

;

a balance again while our currency continues

In the year preceding the average

was but' 2,250 miles, so that the increase has been
somewhat over six hundred miles.
The additional
mileage comprises the Kentucky Central and several
which had previously been operated
other roads,
separately, namely the Alabama Mineral, the Pensacola & Atlantic, the Cumberland Valley Branch and
It is through this
the Clarksville Mineral Branch.
addition to the mileage that the company was able to
increase its gross receipts over two million dollars
during the year, or from 119,220,728 in 1890-91 to
$21,235,721 in 1891-92 net earnings at the same tim«
having risen from $7,162,284 to $7,443,599.
But while it is true that except for the enlargement
of the mileage no increase in receipts would have occurred, yet even on the old mileage, as already stated,
the showing is very good, and much better than could
have been expected. There are figures in the report
which enable one to determine just what the results
have been on this old mileage. The additional road
consists of lines newly built or of lines which have a
much lighter traffic than that of the Nashville, and
hence notwithstanding the heavy increase in total earn-

$3,182.

To show how

at

82,604, against

this falling off has

been caused,

the report furnishes a statement to indicate what the

averages of gross and net per mile would be without

the additional mileage, and that statement affords a
basis for

determining the aggregate changes for the

year on the old mileage.

With the added mileage

in its pres-

«nt deplorable shape.

eliminated, the gross earn-

ings per mile in 1891-92, according to the statement in
question, would be $8,481 against $8,541 in 1890-91,

net earnings per mile $3,094 against $3,182.

LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE REPORT.

falling off in gross earnings

of

Here

and
is

a

only sixty dollars per

In reviewing previous reports of the Louisville & mile in the late year, after a rise in the average per mile
Nashville we have called attention to the striking in the previous decade from $6,112 (1880-81) to $8,541
record of growth and development which the history of (1890-91).
The falling off in the average of net per
this company presents, attesting the way in which the mile is eighty-eight dollars, after a rise during the
interests of the company have been looked after and the decade from $2,363 to $3,182.
Applying the loss of

and income of the system enlarged and extended, sixty dollars in gross per mile to the 2,250 miles covered,
and at the same time reflecting the expanding industrial the aggregate falling off in gross earnings would be no
activity of the South, which the Louisville & Nashville more than $135,000, and applying in the same way the
has done so much to foster and promote. In the report loss of eighty-eight dollars in the net we get an aggrenow before us, covering the fiscal year ending June 30 gate loss in the latter of not quite two hundred thous1892, this is still the most prominent feature, for there and dollars $198,000. Roughly it may bo said that net
traffic

—

faai

and

been a further heavy addition to the gross receipts earnings
also a small

in

1891-92

on

the

mileage

operated

in

addition to the net receipts,
both gross and net the largest ever reached.

Of course

in the late

making 1890-91 were somewhat less than 7 million dollars and
gross earnings somewhat over 19 million dollars.
In
year the company operated a 1881-2 gross earnings on 1,912 miles were not quite 12

larger mileage than in the year preceding, which accounts for the increase in that period, and consequently

deprives

it

of

special

significance.

And

million dollars and the net earnings about 4^ million
dollars.

Such favorable comparisons are both surprising and
As our readers are aware, prevailing conditions in the South during the year were not what

yet even

allowing for that circumstance the showing, as we shall
presently gee, is a very satisfactory one, and
indicative

gratifying.

of the progress made, especially

if we bear in mind the
unfavorable conditions which prevailed during
the
whole of the twelve months and the very noteworthy

could have been wished, the price of cotton being very
low and the iron industry being in a state of great
'

depression.

It is true that cotton does

not constitute

I

October

8,

THE CHBONIOLR

1802.1

heavy item of freight proportionately in the
a
tratHc of the system, having formed only 1-G per cent
very

of the total in the late year.

And

yet the effect of a

571

sum, and hence there

ii a small deficit, $'^5,867.
On
the basis of 4 per cent dividends, the r»t« of the UtMt
payment, there would be a surplus of nearly a quarter

low or high price for that staple is very important in of a million dollars, instead of the deficit given.
affecting the
purchasing power of planters, and
Ai regards the company's finances, the.v are in omj
through that the general prosperity of the Southern condition. As is known, $4,800,000 of 8tu7k waa iiMed

As regards the depression

States.

in the

iron trade,

the Nashville has lines running through the mineral

early in the fiscal year

The company

and sold

to stockholders at 70.

new unified 4
from thoie per cent bonds, to represent improvements, betterment*,
regions, and the poor prices ruling for iron made it etc. and to pay for the purchase of Nashville Chattanecessary for the road to grant further reductions in nooga & St. Louis stock.
Counting the $2,536, OW ol
rates, low though these rates already were.
This these bonds reported in the Treasury June 30 1891, tb
reduction is reflected in the general average per ton company had altogether $4,340,000 of bonds at its diaper mile realized on the lines of the system, posal.
As $1,206,000 are reported still in the treasnrj
which average for the late year was only 9-32 June 30 1892, evidently $3,074,000 were actually dismills on the new and old mileage combined, against posed of during the year.
In our analysis of the Nash9'70 mills in 1890-91 on the old mileage alone, whereas ville Chattanooga & St. Louis report, a couple of week*
we should have expected an increase in the average as ago, it was seen that that company held $1,057,000 of
the result of the inclusion of the added mileage. When the bonds, received by it in payment for the Louiswe remember that in 1889-90 the average was 9*84 Tille & Nashville's proportion of the new Chatmills, and in the years preceding still higher, the tanooga stock issued.*
As regards the floating
regions of the South

and gets a heavy

also issued $1,804,000 of

trafific

,

steadily-declining tendency of rates

Of course the

large proportion of

freight, such

as

is

clearly revealed.

bulky and low-class

coal, iron, &c., necessarily

debt, the Nashville reports only $174,996 of

able

June 20 1892, against

makes the 30 1891

—that

is,

as

much

million dollars during the year.

cent per ton per mile for several years, and yet

rent liabilities

noteworthy nevertheless that on a Southern road like
the Nashville and which has a considerable merchandise traffic this average should be smaller than on
many large Western systems. For instance, on the
Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul the average during the
same twelve months was 1*026 cent per ton por mile
and on the Chicago & Northwestern the average for
the year ending May 31 1892 was 1*02 cent per ton per
mile, the average on the Nashville, as we have seen,
being 0"93 cent.
Altogether, the traffic results of the road must be regarded as quite satisfactory, and the loss of only #135,000 in gross earnings as compared with the year preceding, when the same basis of mileage for the two
years is taken, is especially creditable not alone be-

—

cause of the xinfavorable conditions prevailing in the

but also because some of the competing systems make much less satisfactory exhibits. The East
Tennessee, for instance, will for the twelve months,
we should say, show a loss several times as large we
have not the figures for the full twelve months, but
for the ten months to April 30 there was a loss of
$633,453, this including the results on the Louisville
Southern and Mobile & Birmingham.
We need hardly state that notwithstanding the earnings were kept up remarkably well, much less was
earned for the stock in 1892 than in 1891. The company had heavier charges to meet, income from investments fell off, and at the same time some of the roads
operated separately in which the Nashville is interested,
yielded quite unprofitable results.
As an illustration
of the latter, we may note that on the Georgia Railroad
property, which the Nashville operates jointly with the
Central of Georgia, there was a loss in the late year
late year,

;

to the Nashville of *124,695, as against a profit in the

year preceding of ^60,658, making a difference on that
item of nearly two hundred thousand dollars. Allowing for
stock

all

on

charges and deductions, the profit for the
the

operations of 1892

is

$2,360,133,

as

against $3,056,226 on the operations of the year previous.

The dividends paid out

of the $2,350,133 profit

—namely 2^ per cent declared
cent
for
July —

for 1892

8 per

in

call

slightly

January and
more than this

in

June

there was a reduction of over three

general average low, and the figure has been below a
it is

pay-

bills

as $3,294,574

The

total of

all

cur-

June 30 1892 was only $4,155,058,

in-

cluding the $174,995 bills payable and also interest due
in July and August, and likewise the $1,056,000
for the 2 per cent dividend paid in August. As against
the $4,155,058 current

liabilities

the

company had on

the same date $3,456,329 of current assets, besides

$710,807 of actual cash, making together $4,167,136.
It also held, as already stated, $1,266,000 of Unified 4

per cent bonds unsold in

its

treasury.

RESULTS ON CLEVELAND CINCINNATX
CHICAGO £ ST. LOUIS.
In the Cleveland Cincinnati Chicago & St. Lonis^
President M. E. Ingalls has built up a system of con-

and one capable of commanding a
and it is easy to see from a
study of the company's reports that he understands th»
needs of the property and has definite ideas as to how it
should be operated so as to secure in the long run tha
siderable magnitude,
large

amount

best results.

of business;

The system has been

raised to

its

present

dimensions and commanding importance almost entirely
through his energy and foresight, and he is evidently
managing the property on broad lines, with a view to

on a firm and enduring basis of prosperity.
no attempt to gain merely temporary advantages in its operation to make simply a good showing for
placing

There

it

is

—

ayearortwo,8acrificingthe future to the present. Doubt
less it would have been pleasing to the stockholders to

have received larger dividends, especially in the late year
under the heavy increase in earnings which occurred,
but it was Mr. Ingall's belief that the money could be
more profitably employed in other directions in paying for needed improvements and betterments, thua
raising the standard and efficiency of the property
and he has therefore applied it in that way.
A large proportion of the company's traffic is through

—

traffic

must
Not only

destined to or from the seaboard, and

therefore be

moved

at low average

rates.

but the lines of the system are situated in thft
Middle Western States, where there are a great many
competing roads, and this also operates to keep rates
down, since the company is of course obliged to accept
It was this
business on as favorable terms as its rivals.
that,

THE CHRONICLE.

572

[Vol. LV.

stock from three to four per cent, but owing to the
and forming exceptional requirements mentioned the surplus was
part of the present system, the characteristic of a very not large enough to permit the payment of the addilow average freight rate per ton per mile, and the same tional one per cent. The actual surplus above the
characteristic is maintained on the enlarged basis of three per cent dividend is $80,741, to which should be
In the late year the average was somewhat added the 137,635 profit derived from the operation of
mileage.
better than in the year immediately preceding, and yet the Cincinnati Wabash & Michigan, making together
amounted to only 71 hundreths of a cent that is less $118,376. An extra one per cent on the stock would
than three-quarters of a cent per ton per mile. Of have required 1280,000. Mr. Ingalls says it would
course some other roads might be mentioned whose have been easy to have paid four per cent dividends by
average is even lower than this, but these are nearly all charging only normal amounts for cross-tics and resystems having an exceptionally heavy traffic in coal and pairs of locomotives, but it was thought better for the
minerals and comparatively little general merchandise future interest of the stockholders and the company
We may perhaps fairly compare the average that the outlays in question should be made
freight.
on the Cleveland Cincinnati Chicago & St. Louis with and the condition of the property thereby imthat on the Xew York Central, to which indeed the road proved.
This analysis is useful in demonstrating that the
acts as a feeder. On such a comparison it is found
that the rates of the two systems correspond veiy failure to show larger profits for the stock follows enthat it is not
closely, for while the average on the Cleveland road is tirely from the circumstance mentioned
71 hundredths, on the Central it is 70 hundreths. The due to an increase in interest and rental charges or to
year before the Central's average was 74 hun- an unsatisfactory volume of traffic and business. Traffic
and earnings have grown fully as much as expected.
dredths.

the old Cleveland Columbus Cin-

situati on that gave

cinnati

&

Indianapolis,

now merged

in

—

—

As a matter of fact, the Cleveland road forms part of Thus in the late year the tons of freight carried inthe Vanderbilt trunk-line system, and in order to be creased from 7,801,377 to 8,524,986 tons, the tons one
serviceable as a connection of that system, as well as mile from 1,221,509,961 to 1,286,461,846, the number
to be able to move traffic at a low average of cost, its of passengers from 4,975,023 to 5,268,171, and the
condition and efficiency must be kept up to a high passengers one mile from 102,342,125 to 172,269,935.
Beariug on the position which the road This increase in traffic is evidence that the road did
we may note that not fail to participate in the benefits resulting from
in the late fiscal year (ending June 30 1899) it last year's large graiu harvests and the prosperdelivered to the Lake Shore over a million tons of ity of the farming industry.
The improvement

standard.

liolds in the Vanderbilt combination,

freight— 1,066,440 tons— (this comparing with 862,104
tots in the year preceding) and received from it 382,370 toES, this comparing with 290,731 tons in 1890-91.
In other words, nearly 1^ million tons were either
received from or delivered to the Lake Shore during
the twelve months. The entire tonnage of the Cleveland road for the year having been 8,534,980 tons, this
ia

therefore over one^ sixth of the whole.

Another im-

portant connecting line is the Chesapeake & Ohio; 418,825 tons of freight were delivered to that road in 1892
i^ainst 259,648 in 1891, and 340,864 tons were received
from that road against 296,931 tons, the total both
ways being 759,689 tons against 556,579 tons. In this

is

also

on

in

reflected

the

gross

nearly three-quarters

rose

substantially

preceding— that

the same

is,

of

a

receipts,

which

million

dollars

mileage as

from $13,134,438

to

in the

year

$13,818,115.

In the net however, for the reasons mentioned, there
was an increase in merely the small amount of $39,000,
the total having risen only from $3,940,446 to $3,979,The fixed charges were actually somewhat smaller,
573.
being $2,570,174 for 1892 against $2,592,709 for 1891.
During the last three years gross earnings have increased
from $11,453,992 to $13,818,115, net earnings only from
$3,619,925 to $3,979,573, while in the same interval
the yearly fixed charges have been reduced from $2,760,823 to $2,570,174— results which bring out in bold relief the enlightened and conservative policy which has

must be taken at low rates. If we
aid the tonnage to and from the Chesapeake & Ohio to
that to and from the Lake Shore, we get a total of been pursued.

case, too, the traffic

3,208,505 tons, which is over 25 per cent of the company's entire freight tonnage.

The

finances of the

property are in good shape.

During the year the company sold the $2,700,000
To put the property in the condition in which it is the Wabash & Michigan division bonds held June 30 1891,
desire of the management to have it, and which its ai-d bills payable now are only 1403,425 against $2,287,situation and surroundings call for, heavy outlaws for

944 by the last report. Including these bills payable
have been and accrued interest, as well as the August dividend,
necessary. Especially has this been the case with many the total of all current liabilities Jure 30 1892 was
of the lines acquired duiing the last two or three years, $3,312,158, against which the company held $1,772,671
which have been deficient in these respects. Of course, of cash and of accounts and bills receivable. The
part or the whole of the cost might have been management estimate that during the current year
charged to capital account, but that policy did not about a million dollars will be required for expenditures
commend itself to the management. The report states on capital account, to enable the road to take care of
that during the late year $483,921 was charged to the increase of business expecteel from the World's
renewal of cross-ticp, an amount largely in excess of Fair, and this amount it is stated should bo supplied
ordinary renewals «!44,710 for inter-locking at various
by the sale of stock or t.he sale of bonds.
repairs,

improvements and

betterments

»

either

;

railway junctions; *209,855 for rebuilding bridges;
#173,401 for 20 new locomotives purchased and

charged

UGANDA AND BRITISH HAS! AFRICA.

to
expenses; ?;51,650 for 10 new pasBcnger coaches
$78,100 for new freight cars
and
extra heavy expenditures in a number of other
•directione.
President Ingalls remarks that the direc-

The British Government has, it appears, finally deThe decision is the more
cided to abandon Uganda.
suggestive, occurring as it does so soon after the advent

tors had hoped to increase the dividend on the

of Mr.

;

;

common

Gladstone to power.

The Government has

October
.iLjiiod

8,

aud tho

give,

ti)

THE OHRONICLR

1802.]

JJritish

Kml

Africiiu L'oiiii)uiiy

has agreed to accept, twelve thousand pounds for tho

purpose of rendering possible a somewhat respectable
lu a few months, it ia expectoil, the evac-

evacuation.

uation will bo completed.

Considering tho

peculiar

and unpleasant condition which has prevailed in that
region for years past, and considering especially the experience which tho agents of the British East African
"Company have had since they interfered in Uganda
affairs, it is 'loubtful whether even Lord Salisbury, had
lie remained in power, would have encouraged continued occupation.

The

secret of

what many

will

consider an unfortu-

678

For tho lar;;or part of tho lost two yoari tlio company has had leu encouragement. Troablo sppetrs to
have arisen just in proportion as they neared Iiaka
Victoria Nyanza.
It culminatc<l whoa tho expeditionary force reached tho other lido.
They fonnd
themselves in immediate
coUiaioa with the king

and

tho chiefs of Uganda.

The

situatioo

becMne

complicated through
tho differences between the missionaries and the peculiar religioos ia-

greatly

consistencics of the king.

The Uoman

Catholics have

boon longest on the ground, and they claim, in con«equence, priority of right and privilege.
It is not
denied that important concessions have been mada

to them.
The Protestants are of more recent date
unable to maintain the position it but they have been singularly successful, and in
assumed in Uganda, and which it conld hardly help as- consequence of having got King Mwaoga on their
suming without both money and men from the Imper- side and into their way of thinking, they made
ial Government.
These tho Government has refused encouraging
progress
for a time and
enjoyed

nate step

lies

Company

finds itself

to grant;

and the opinion prevails that the misfortune

in tho fact that the British Eajt African

involves not only the loss of

Uganda

to

British East

Africa, but the failure of the entire East African ex-

periment.

It

had been openly stated before the deci-

Government was made known that if the
needed assistance were refused all would be over with
the new settlement, which was to regenerate Africa and
give a new impetus to British trade and commerce.
When tho company was organized all that it asked for
was a royal charter. Having got it, it commenced its
work under what seemed highly favorable auspices,
and for a time gave fair promise and what might bo
sion of the

called encouraging evidence of success.

It

now

virtu-

some

precious

immunities.

It

is

one

of

tha

and contentment,
as well as prosperityf in Uganda, that the king has s
sort of passion for changing his creed.
lie has been
converted from Paganism to Popery, from Popery to
Protestantism, from Christianity ho has lapsed back
into Heathendom, to find himself later a Mohammedan,
and all this more than once. When Roman Catholic
greatest hindrances to peace, quiet

he has been merciless in his treatment of the Protestants;
when Protestant he selects the victims of bis ire from
the ranks of the Catholics; and in his Pagan and
Mohammedan moods he is brutally cruel to Roman
Catholics and Protestants alike.
Additional compli-

Government to save it from dis- cation has resulted from tho fact that the Roman
The company may be blamed for its Uganda Catholic missionaries claim to be under the protection
but the Uganda enterprise was vital to of France, while the Protestants claim British pro-

ally asks the Imperial

solution.

enterprise,

anything like real success.
In the
It was in 18S8 the charter was granted.
same year the strip of tho Zanzibar coast extending
from the northern limit of German influence to tho
the Umbre
was ceded to the
right bank
of
company by the Sultan for a period of fifty years;
and by treaties with the native chiefs all this territory,
running north and south between the limits named,
and extending westward as far as Victoria Nyanza, was
secured.
The total length of coast was 700 miles, tho
total area being estimated at 150,000 square miles.
The company's capital was £3,000,000 sterling. The
customs revenue realized in 1888 was |i36,000; in 1889 it
was 850,000, a gain by no means discouraging for the
Anew town was planned and proceeded
first year.
with at Mombasa, and extensive improvements were
undertaken and vigorously prosecuted at the fine harbor of that place. Arrangements were made to build
a railroad which should connect Mombasa and Lake
While using every legitimate means
Victoria Xyanza.
for the development of trade, the company was faith-

tection.
It was not only because th e expeditionary force to which
wo have referred experienced difficulties at the hands
of Mwanga and his chief men, but because the Protest-

ant missionaries were reduced to a state of desperation,
that the East African

Company

felt itself

compelled to

During the course of last year grave complications arose, and Captain Lugard was sent with a
small body of armed men to protect the traders and
Captain Lugard was compelled to
the missionaries.
adopt severe measures. The King fled, and the British
interfere.

officer

proclaimed his throne vacant.

pears that the

Roman

Meanwhile,

it

ap-

Catholic priests suffered terribly

during the trouble and confusion. Rumors came to
the west to the effect that the Captain had treated the
unfortunate men with great cruelty. The French Minister for Foreign Affairs called upon Lord Salisbury to
explain.
Lord Salisbury, of course, would do nothing
until he received Captain

Lugard 's papers.

What these

papers contain has never been fully disclosed. Tho
feeling prevails in Great Britain, at least, that he only

In some way France has been satisfied.
the suppression of did his duty.
matter it It is natural that in such circumstances there should be
slavery.
In carrying out its purpose in this
was brought into collision with several of the native a disturbance of trade and enterprise in East Africa, and
ful to

its

pledge to exert

itself for

but by bringing an armed force of 1,000 men that the company should feel itself embarrassed. The
The railroad
field it prevented what threatened to bo a works at Mombasa are at a standstill.
dangerous uprising, awing the chiefs into submission. has not been constructed; and the British Government
Before the close of 1889 an expeditionary Jforce had is equally unwilling to help in this matter.
It is thus made apparent that affairs look rather dispenetrated as far as the shores of Victoria Nyanza, and
a portion of tho projected railroad had been con- couraging in British East Africa. The most important
structed.
Roads also were being cleared along the fact of all connected with the affair is that the evacprincipal trade routes.
The sources of the Tana were uation and abandonment of Uganda leaves the whole
explored: and stern- wheel steamers were ordered from Upper Nile country to the Germans, French, and the
tho Clyde. Up to this time things seem to have gone Congo authorities, all of whom are said to besorambliog
chiefs,

into the

on smoothly and

prosperously.

for the territory.

THE CHUONICLE.

574

COTTON CONSUMPTION AND OVERLAND
MOVEMENT FOR SEPTEMBER.
The subjoined aggregates

of overland

month

the

ceipts, exports, etc., for

of

morement,
September

HovevMnt from Receipt! Receiptt BXPOKTS SINCE 8BPT.
since
Sept. 1
1892.

B»vt:,\ 1892 to
Oct. 1 1893.

re-

are

the same as those presented in our issue of last Saturday in condensed form. The returns reached us by
telegraph so late on Friday from the various railroads
and ports as to prevent any more extended use than

given in our Cotton Keport in the customary weekly
One cause more than any
statement of overland, etc.
other has served to keep the movement of cotton dur-

ing the first month of the season down to very moderate proportions when compared with the corresponding
The
period of the three years immediately preceding.
is the lateness of the crop, but as the
cause referred to

[Vol. LV.

Galveston
El Paso, &o...

New

Orleans.

atoclM

Sept. 1
1891.

Oreat
Prance.
Britain*

179,837

24,391

4.098

ssn

3,000

179,721

2)1,354

16.SJ8

39,747

..

Mobile

11,157

35,017
3,630
39,017

U359

15,359

57,91»-

3,664

8,664

1,99S
89,6*8

6,150

6,150

9,807

3,200

3,800

13,085

51,789

56,676
5.644

274,(00
6,000

6,506

Savannah
Bmnswlok, to.

109,
8,

6,728

Oharleston
Port Ro7al,&o.
Wilmington.....

55,866
5
19,074

WaBhln«t'n,&c

28

Norfolk

23,609

Wert Point....

15.247

lIewp'tNew«,4o.

949
691

New York
Boston
Baltimore

1.491

PhlIadeIphla.&o.

2,5»4

3,619

178

5,644
2,882

3,821

10.892

only 522,553

say that

9,919

78.H68

690,674
201,896

eS3,891

386.813

Oreat Britain exports Include to the Channel.

*

to

28,500

15.138

154,468

40,031

18,927

732.236

it

6,703

3,178

408,355

Total 18«8

Total 1890

Suffice

76,480-

11.078

190,908

heretofore in these columns,

them.

88,407

Florida

876,823

refer to

18W.

630

B«,367'

Oct. I

Total.

5,378

Total 1891

unnecessary to further

Oontinsnt.

133,456

reasons for delayed maturity have been fully discussed
it is

TO—

1892

1

ai/nce

Using the facts disclosed by the foregoing statements)
bales have come into sight in the month this year,
we shall find that the portion of the crop which has
against 826,933 bales in September 1891 and 860,374
r»ached a market through the outports and overland,
bales in 1890.
and the Southern consumption, during September
OTBELAND MOVEMBKT FOE SEPTEMBER.
this year and the two previous years, is as follows:

f^The gross movement overland has been only 33,257
bales,

and of

this total 14,008 bales,

cent, have been

carried

via

other

decided falling
seasons.

shipped via

The

off

points

The amount

consequently

from either

net for the

over 43 per

or

St. Louis.

of the

month makes

exhibits

a

previous two
a

more

1892.

Beoelpts at the ports to Oct. 1

1891.

1890.

405,355
23,946

676,823
31,109

732,236
26,138

1

420,301
58,000

707,932
49,000

758,374
43,000

-bales.

487,301

756,932

801,374

bales.

Net shipments overland during same time
Totiil receipts

bales.

Southern consumption since September

favor-

Total to Cot.

able comparison with previous years than does the gross,

1.

The amount

of cotton marketed during September in
but at the same time the aggregate net is only 23,946
1892 is thus seen to be 369,631 bales less tlian in
bales, against 31,109 bales in 1891 and 26,138 bales in
1891 and 314,073 bales less than in 1890,
To dethe previous year. The details of the whole movement
termine the portion which has gone into the hands of
overland for three years are appended.
Northern spinners during the same period we hav«
OVBBLAND D0BING 8EPTKMBBR
prepared the following:
1892.

1891.

1890.

—

i.mounl shipped
Via St. LoulB
Via Cairo
Via Hannibal
Via EransTllle
Via Louisville
via Canclnnati
Via other routes

hipped to mills, not Included above
Total gross overland

14,008
3,051
6,378

138
3,876

14,990
9,297
7,726
96

6,926
9,471
6,692

2,862
1,125

3,108
2,360
5,603
1,146

32,257

48,559

35,546

3,414

339

5,974
1,834

1,434
1,705

1,178

319
920

Dtduel—
Overland to New York, Boston, &o.

Between interior towns
Galveston, Inland and local mills
New Orleans, Inland and local mills...
Mobile, inland and local mills
Savannah, inland and local mills
Charleston, inland and local mills
N. Carol'a ports. Inland and local mills.
VlTKlnla ports, inland and local mills.
Total to be deducted

At Northern

Interior markets

60
1,571
2,136

814
170

5,875

1,630
41

1,209

37

129
516
49

695

1,157

487,301

10,744— 427,280

210

5,361
3,409
6,486
1,194

819

Total receipts in September 1892, as aDove
bales.
Stock on hand commencement of year (Sept. 1 1892)—
At Northern ports
284,675
At Southern ports
131,861— 416,536
Total supply
Of this supply there has been exported
to foreign ports during Sept. 1892. . . 172,960
Less foreign cotton included
1,654—
Sent to Canada direct from West

914,581

171,306
1,647
48

Burnt North and South
Stock on hand end of month (Oct. 1 1892)—
At Northern ports
293,488
At Southern ports
297,086— 590,574
Northern interior markets
6,742 — 770,317
Totaltakingsby spinners during September 1892
114,264
Taken by Southern spinners
58,000
Taken by Northern spinners during Sept. 1892
86,264
Token by Northern spinners same time in 1891
106,814

M

1,808

8,311

125

17,450

Decrease in takings by Northern spinners this year. .. .bales.

The above

9,408

LeavlnK total net overland'
23.946
31,109
26,138
•This total inciuaes shipments to Canada bv rail which ainnn
'" '''" '"^«»' '^ 1^91 --^^6^3 I'Slt
an"'l"lloV\r2,^4'S4"K.

EKCKIPTS, EXP0BT8 AND SPIKNEES' TAKINGS.
In no year since 1888 have the net receipts
at

20,550

had up
a decrease from the

indicates that Northern spinners

October 1 taken 86,264 bales,
corresponding period of 1891 of 30,550 bales a«id a
loss from the same time of 1890 of 49,595 bales.
to

AMOUNT OF CROP NOW IN

SIGHT.

*

the
In the foregoing we have the number of bales which
ports in September been so small as in the
current
season.
The falling off is of course most marked when has already been marketed this year and the two
contrast is made with the past two years.
New Orleaug previous seasons. An additional fact of interest is
the total of the crop which was in sight on October
has suffered the greatest loss, the aggregate
net at that
1, compared with previous years, and this is shown in
port for the month having been only
52,357 bales, or
the following :
l«ss than one-third of the total
for September last year.
At all other ports diminution of receipts is
shown, Gal1892.
1890.
1S91.
veston, however, being affect«d
to the least extent
Total marketed, as above... .bales.
487,301
756,932
801,374
but even at that port the decrease
has been 35 per cent' Interior stocks in excess of Sept. 1.
tS,90O
35,251
70,000
Foreign exports have been of
'Botal In sight
satisfactory volume conbaltt..
522,552
826,932
860,274
sidering the slow movement
of the crop, and have
This indicates that the movement daring September
reached 172,960 bales against
201,895 bales last year of the present year is
304,380 bales less than in 1891
and 355,685 bales in 1890.
and 337,722 bales less than in 1890.
•

October

THE OHKONICLE.

8, 1893.]

WEIOnT OF BALKS.

To

furnish a more exact measure of the receipts

Oct. 1

wo

676i

OCTOHRR 13th AND 2lHT 18113 I.CtiAL lIoLIDAVM IN NcW
up to TOKK Statk. -Thu National Commeruial B«ak of Alb*iiy hM
prepared and wnt us the followinK
:

give below our usual table of weight of bales.

Sams
1891.

Nvmbtof
SaU$.
Eonlstauk

Alabama
0«or)fia*

Bonth Carolina.

WIgMin
POHHtU.

137,340
88.367
16,673
118,718
39.173
24.163
13,408
65,860

75,411.239
20.178,600
8.617.960
60.448.831
19,730.265
12,026,89:
6,828.694
42,379,533

Sam*

frVdin

Uonlh of Stplembtr, 1893.

1890.

Avtragi Ateraif AvTOOt
WtieKi. WHght. WeigM.
548-38
500-00

587-96
497-26

62000

80000

509-18

601-25
606-29

508 67

641-61
300-38
.^25 00
502-46
506 00
406-31

An Act to

deflignate October twelfth, •tghteen

hundred aad

ninety-two, the four hundrc<lth annlvenuiry of Um discovery of Aiiierica, ii holidav to be obaerved in the
ance and payment uf billN of exchanife, bank ohaoka
promissory notus and in tlio closing of pubUc ftlBfiw.
Ari-RiivKii hy thn Ooreroor April 18 1893. Pa«««d. thrM-flftka btU^
I

pruaeut.

The

I'eojtle

of the State of

New

York, repreietited in 3«nat«

and A$Hembly, do enact a» follow*:
Section 1. The twelfth day of October, eixhteen hundred
and ninety-two, being the four hundredth anniversary of th«

discovery of America, shall fur all purpoaea whatsoever in r^
to the presenting for payment or acceptance and of th*
protesting an'l giving notice of the dishonor of btUa of exXHuenee.Ae..
604 00 change, hank cbeckii and promiMory notes, be treated
and
Total
487.8C1
231.621,914 61636 50934
.Ml-40 considered a^ the first day of the week commonlv called Sonday and a public holiday, and all such billii, checks and no(M
* IncladlDK Florida.
otherwise prescintable for acceptance and payment on ioid
It will be noticed that the movement up to October day, shall be deemed to be presentable for acceptance and payment as is provided by law for the payment of bills, oheoka,
1 shows an increase in the average weight as oomparod notes and otherwise
due on the first aay of the week called Sunwith the same periods of the last two years, the average day or a public holiday ,and said twelfth day of October ,eighteen
hundred and ninety-lw£, shall be considered as the first day of
this jear being 516*36 lbs. per bale, against 509*34 lbs.
the week commonly called Sunday and as a public holiday for
per bale for same time in 1891 and 511*40 lbs. in 1890.
all purposes whatsoever in re-spect to the transaction of business in the public offices of the counties of this State.
DRT GOODS TRADE IN SEPTEMBER.
g 3. This act shall take effect immediately.
This law went into effect on April 18, 1893, and the question
There was a material falling off in the amount of
new business recorded at first hands in September, due as to its application to paper dated on or before that date
should be considered by holders of such paper.
in a great degree to the indifferent demand during the
the
proclaim a
Agents were, however, well Joint resolution autborislng and directingfour President toanniversary
second half of the month
hundredth
Keneral holiday, oommemoratlnK the
of the discovery of America, on the twenty-flrot day of October,
employed, as a rule, in charging up and making deliveighteen hundred and ninety-two.
The quieter
eries on contracts previously secured.
Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representativen of the
market was partly natural, but there is no doubt but United States of America in Congress assembled. That the
President of the United States be authorized and directed to
what it was intensified by the exaggerated reports cir issue a proclamation recommending to the people the observculated by the daily press of this city, and made the ance in all their localities of the four hundredth anniversary
of the discovery of America, on the twenty-first day of Octomost of by competing points, regarding the cholera ber, eighteen hundred and ninety-two, by public demonstrasituation.
Buyers were scared from making their tions and by suitable exercises in their schools and other places
of assembly.
usual visits, and for some days were decidedly shy 0|
Approved, June 29, 1892.
even receiving merchandise handled here. The locaj
In accordance with this resolution the President issued a
TlrKlnla

north CaroUna.

497-74
509-30
496-48

50308

508-12
499-10

80716

pect

.

jobbing trade was seriously affected, and the jobbers
shut down on further purchases from agents until the
trade recovered its equanimity, which it did towards
the close of the month. The tone of the market,
while quieter, was in no degree weaker than previously.
Print cloths and allied fabrics were strong early in the
month and always firm, while bleached cottons in low
and medium grades were occasionally dearer. slight
advances here and there being noted also in colored cottons.
Stocks are generally reported in good shape in
all leading makes.
Reports from different parts of the
country are encouraging, and coUectiona continue

1892.

low

3-50
3-80
3-50

1..

a..
8..
4..
6..
6..
8..
9..

10..
11..

1?

n

14..
16..
16..
17..
18..
19..

70
21..
22..
23..
24..
25..
26..

3-yd.
ttawi- ffing- theetard. nam: ing».

6>4
6>4
6I4

7
7

5'e
516

7

...H.. .„.

It
6\
'6\

6%
6%
6\

6%

"^>
6
'8

3-50
3-50
3-50
3-50
'3-56'

3-50
3-50
3-50
3-50
3-80

..

"sit"

3-50
3-50
3-50
3-50
3-"50'

77
28..
29..

?^•

SO.

7»,g

7

en
6>i
6>4
6>4
6>4

3-50
8*60
3-50
3*80

5^
5«9
SH

7

6H

519

7
7

"7—*

"6h"

SH
5>8
5%
5^

?
7

7
7
.„.

'3-56'

6I6,g 3-50

so abundantly blessed our people."
The general holiday law of New York State provides that
any day appointed by the President of the United States as a
day of thanksgiving or fasting and prayer or other religiou,
observance, shall be treated and considered as a public holiday
in reference to the presentment or protest of paper.

Sheet- Lanr S'th'n
low
ing
ingi, cotter 3-yd.mid- elotht, $tand- Ging- theet
ham* ing:
dtinff. 64S64; ard.

5>«
..

I?"

2-75
2-75
2-88
2*94

8H

2*94

7

7
7

7

'I

r4'
8»ie

ti

7

2-94
2-94
2-94
2-94
3-00

7
7

5>fl

5>9

7

7
7

7
7
7

3-00
3-00
3-00
7"J8
813,8 3-00

7

7l5l8

300

the

189*.

official

7

7
7
7
7
7

7

7
7
7

7

ntb

5%

0/ Loan,

5\

Jnl'rt
Pav'le

Amount OttUtMdtDt.

Anunmt
IniMd.

R««t>t«nd.|

lUat.

CouiNm.

IXml-n-a Loan. 1891

5\

5\
h\
5\
6«
5\
5%

7
7

7

INTBRBST-BBARINa DDBT.

!>\

7

7

the close of business September 30, 1808.

5\

7

53i

Continoed at a p. c. Q.-M.
r'dedL«ui..l907 Q.-J.

tg,

41,

BeTd'it CertWe'*.

AcKTMiate aiol'd'K
B'dato Pao. RR.

taso.ooo.ooo «aB.astjoo
....
740.848.100 «se,lS3,000 t74.4S8.TM

40.01S.7M

tSSJSiMO
SM.tss.no
7«.a*o

74.408,790

1.0S0.8eO.S80 ft10.4ST.a0O

IWS,(WI.170

DBBT ON WHICH 1NTBRB3T HAS CIASID 8IM0I MATUfUTr.
randed Loan r>f 1891. matured Septembers, lSSl..tI,OM!TM 00
Old debt mniurod at Tarloni datea prior to Jana.
arj 1. IWl, and other Itema of debt matored at
„. . „
1.480.015 88
Tarloas dates nbaeqnent to January 1. 1801

$l.MEl,'<iOO

00

1.47a,S4S88

...8...

3-00
3 00
3-00
3-00

6J8
5««
5'9

5's
5>«

7
7
7

...8...

5%

7
7

7

7
7
7

300

S^s

y— "iW

7

...a..
...H..

sis"
6i«
6>4

30,

stntement of the United
The
States public debt and of the cash in the Treasury at
is

'<7ott'n'JVin<-

...8...

s-sd'

7

" In the churclies and in the other places of assembly of the
let there be expressions of gratitude to Divine Providence for the devout faith of the discoverer, and for the
Divine care and guidance which has directed our history and
ppople,

following

1891.

1

Ooten Print- Sheet- Lan- S'th'n

i mid- cloth*,
go dUng. 64j«4

clause

DEBT STATEMENT SEPTEMBER

satisfactory.

H

proclamation July twenty-first, appointing Friday, October
and containing the following

31, 1803, as a general holiday,

8>e

8^

7
7
7

714

7

300
300

7

7H

7

IH
7'4
7'4
7>4

...8...

«}'•

U'

8*00

300
8-00

7

7>4

7

?>

7

11
It
5H
8H

Anresiate of debt on which InUreat haa
iliiee

matnrttr

(

t8,8t0a« IS

18,888,786 86

DKBT BRABINO NO INTBRBST
|S484n.0M 08

Lasal-tendernotaa
Old tfenand notee
National Bank note*
Redemption aooonnt.
Fraoilonal currency
t,au amount aiUmated aa loat or deetroyed

7>«

A<gT«cateof debt bearlns no Inureet

eS.847

1

.,..,.._...

w

tl8.y.8.8Se
8,878,984 00

8.908.«aBai

8WS,tTM4*

W

THE CHRONICLE.

576

CERTIFICATES AND N0TE3 ISSUED ON DEPOSITS OP COIN AND
LEOAL-TKNDER NOTES AND PURCHASS3 OF SILVER BULLION.
Classljlcation of C«r((/lcat«s

In the

In
Circulation

The transactions of the Stock Exchange Clearing-House
from September 26 down to and including Friday, October 7,
also the aggregates for Jl.iy (from 17th to Slst), June, July,

Amount

Treasury.

Issued,

and Nota.

August and September are given in tabular form below,

:|25.345.59j!$121.210,389 ;»H6,M5,B89
2,619,4-7 S26,S19,827 829,468.304

boldceniBcates

STOCK EXCHANGE CLEAEING HOUSE TKASSACTIONS.

'

BIlTcr certiflcates..

17,290,00(1

'.8,860,000

107,001,850

970,000
5,482,*S6

Currency certificates
Treasury notes of 1890

112,184,833

It3t.417.552 »572.352.076 »806.769.Bg 8

AlereB'ate o f certWcate.

RECAPITULATION.
August

Sep!. 30.

Classtflcation ot Debt.

585.031,080 00
2,536.705 26
879,658,574 37

535.031,170 00
2.510,145 26
878,976,848 87

Interest-bearinK debt

Debt on which Int. has ceased.
Debt bearing no Interest

Increase or
Decrease,

31,

1882.

1892.

90 00
D. 26,620 00
D. 081,725 50
I.

.

D.708,2» 60

060,518,164 13

967,226,419 63

606,760,628 00

Ajgreoate of debt, including
certiflcates and notes

CASH
Cold— roln
Bold Ooln.

1.573, 237,792 13 1,582,6S1.949 63

1164,550,488 37
» 70.' 55,422 21-1240,605,903 68

EiiTei-^oiiifs::::::::::;;:.:
Ba^bsidiary co'"-;;-;;;;;".:;::::;:;::;;:::-;-;::

^?-iiMi5 2?
'^-^iSi II-

;•

(old Issue)

S

iS
^2aY'„5, VS
7,i01,652 12-

'^•oin'f-.^o

miuTmi

m

68,19<,001 93

87
45
ll,6b3.702 82
27.''.590
bOf<,'.iH

Deposits In nat'l bunk deposi aries-gen'i acc't..
Blsbui Sing officers' balances

3,Si2,fclO

4.—

16.2.o,338 01

»777.804,693 43

Aggregate

DEMAND

Slteets

.

-B-k. 5,978,500

309,400,000

From May

47,000
33,700
47,100

310
297
292
280
269

416,800 21,000,000 299,700

1,443

104,400
81,400
70,000
73,400
87,600

127,500
132,500
162,100
127,500
111,300

6,100,000
4,700,000
4,500,000
4.0:10,000

4,700,000

87,700
S4,'J0O

& St.

3D8

660,900 38,800,000 541,400 l.olS

17 to 24 inclusive the stocks cleared

cago Milwaukee

315
302
317
306

7,600,000 120,000
7„500,000 114,400
9,500,000 143,500
7,100,000 90,600
7.100,000 72,900

Paul, Louisville

and Philadelphia

Atchison, Chicago Biulington

& Nashville,

were ChiNorthern

& Reading. On the 25th,
& Quincy, Rock Island and
On June

4, Chicago
Western and
New York & New England were added; on June 15, Delaware
Lackawanna & Western, American Sugar common and
Western Union were added. On Sept. 31, Distilling & Cattle
Feeding was added.

to the

list.

New York Lake

Gas, Missouri Pacific,

Erie

&

|U«,565.98a 00

^vercertlflcate.

TrealuJy DSte, of "96:.......::......:..:
Fund for redcmp. of nucurrent nat'l bank notes
Ontstandlnii checks and drafts
DUbursinj: olMcers' balances

AKency accounts, 40
Gold reserve
Ket cash balance

='?»nfl<*> 00
112.484;3.3S 00-1600.769,633 00
6,2a2.414 vo
5,002,653 89

XS
8,749,297 87-

^i'l?,i'.!.',2

(100,000.000 00
31,!:95,918 34

»777,K04,5ii2 43

?128,152,844 68
131,895.918 34
$2,743,573 €6

month

Increase during the

BONDS ISSUED IN AID OF PACIFIC RAILROADS.

stanillng.

27,236,512

Transportation

the U. S.

13,401,580

2,413.808

t
658,283 30,144,581
5,469,385
438,410 25,825,5;-

527,543

1,970,500

1.628,320

24,000
29,658
24,425

1

6,627,655

4,083,569

2,732,352

London, Saturday,

6.927

1,879,340

2,722.984

9,3«:

2,318,590

191,311

24.834.021

68 191.147

U,

1893.

too, keeps people nervous,

as the Continental

demand

for

The deiiand is not strong enough yet to
allow of withdrawals from the Bank of England— indeed all
sovereigns arriving here go into the Bank; but on the other
hand all the bullion is bought up for Austria. Up to the
present time the Austro-Hungarian Government has accumulated, chiefly from America, about 5 millions sterling, and it
is

increasing.

2,149,2-9

969.363 94.118.790

Sept,

Though there is not much change in quotation;, and the
money market continues very sluggish, rates have been firmer
during the week. The Building Society crisis does not directly affect the city, but it shows that the distrust which has
prevailed for two years among the capitalist classes has now
spread to the working classes, and it warns all bankers, thereThe uncertainly respecting silver,
fore, to be on their guard.

K gold

Service.

t
383,277 37,430,520
94,645 9,632,953
408,548 39,665,56'

1,600,000

Balance

pay- oflnter'st
paid by
m'ts; 5 p. c.
netearntTifls. the n.

By cash

By

paid by

vet paid.

6,308,000

Unl'n Pacific
Cen.Br.U.P,
Wes*- Pacific
Bionx C. & P.

Interest

accrued
and not

Cen. Pacific. 25,883,120

Kan. Pacific.

Jnf. repaid by Companies.

Interest

Principal
Out-

[From our own oorresponaect.

on .onn.a nn
39,139,048 09

o,«n,- „
.131.895,01b 31

Aggregate
Cash balance in the Treasury Ausust 31. 1892
Cash balance In the Treasury September 30, 1892

0/ Jiailway.

Balances, one side.

.

LIABILITIES.

ce'tlflcates

Namt

74,500,000
68,000,000
97,000,000
66,800,000
63,100,000

3. .1,225,300
4. .1,068,800
5. .1,511,700
6. .1,138,900

Union Pacific were added

*S'?f S'2s2 ?S

Silver certiflcates

wk. 3,987,400 252,100,000

Pacific pref.
454,725,733 31

*f -JZ^vgl §i
pl-JI|-^nn

Currency certiflcates
National bank notes
Other— Bonds, interest and coupons paid, awaiting reimbursement
Minor coin and fractional currency

Cold

Tot.

THE TREASURY.

IN
•••

Paper-Lcnai tender notes
Treasury notes of 1890
Gold certiflcates

D. 9,381,157 50

.

7.-1,033,800

Oct.

Certificates

the Treasury

—

80,000,000
50,100,000
46.400,000
36,300,000
39,300,000

Sept.26.. 1,304,200
" 27.. 760.700
" 28.. 70-', BOO
" 29.. 570,200
" 30.. 643,500

eiM55,580 00 D. 8.636,902 00

and notes offset by
an equal amount of cash In

Shares, both sUles.

Shares, Taluc Shares. C'.ish.Clear'd
Total Value,
Cleared,
itmilh—
$
$
$
May.... 4,731,600 256,200,000 4.45,000 22,500.500 29«,300 2.190
June. -.16,684,000 104104«,200 159.S750 94.566.700 1433.071 5,885
July.... 9.S07,300 699.313.200 1120100 74.186.100 974,700 5,SStS
Aupiet.l3,99S,480 977,533.000 1657400 1073S6.90O 1301.600 6,183
Sept. ...18,857,800 1268000000 2055800 129663500 1697,500 0,252

Tot.

AjT^cffate of Interest and noninterest bearlDK debt

n^OL. LV.

expected that the loan for 20 millions sterling intended to
all the gold required will be brought out in Dacembar,
In the meantime the Austrian demand will continue. But
though bankers are somewhat less ready to lend and discount,
there is so little demand for accommodation that it is very difflcult to put up rates. The quotation for three months' bank
bills in the open market ranges from 1 to lig per cent, but
most of the business is done at about 1 1-16 per cent. On
Thursday Treasury bills amounting to £1,305,00 were offered

is

Totals

Ie4.R23.S12l

obtain

—

Clearings by Telegraph
Stock Exchange Clearing
House Transactions.—The subjoined statement covers the
clearings for the current week, usually given on the first page
of tlie Chronicle, but which on account of the lengtli of the

other tables is crowded out once a month. The figures are
received by telegraph from the leading cities. It will be
observed that as compared with the corresponding week of
1891 there is a gain in the aggregate of 5-7 per cent. So
far as the individual cities are concerned, New York exhibit

an increase

of 0-7 per cent, notwithstanding the operations

of the Stock Exchange Clearing-House, which have caused a
considerable diminution ot exchanges through the banks.

Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago and St. Louis record
gains, but there is a loss at New Orleans.
Week Sniini

CLKABIlfOB
i?efunw by Tete^aph,

1882.

Kew York

(634,294,479
66,588,660
71,999,763
13,595,762

Boston
Ptdladelpbl*

BmlUmore.. ...„.„„

,

Ohleaco......

Bt

Lonla
Tew Orleant ..„

,

BoTen cities, 6 days
Otber cities, G days
Total

All
.

all cities,

cities, 1

Total

6 days...

day.

all cities

* JEstiniated.

forweek

,

October 8

1891.

P«r Cent.

97,46:, 000
•21,OC0,OD0
8,534,406

(629,678.704
84.196,219
66,521.934
11,148,000
76,646,000
18,136,197
8,624,294

«942,4eS,094
159.927,288

(882,850,348
160,964,248

-H8-8

tl,102,382,380
192,019,468

(1,033,814,694
190,878,241

+8-6
+0-8

$1,284,401,848

$1,224,082,835

+5-7

-t-5-8

for tender; £1,200,000

an average of about
bills

at a little over

The

were disposed of in 12 month.?' bills at
and £100,000 in 6 months'

2 3-16 per cent

\%

per cent.

market is still very quiet, there being
metal on offer, and the demand being very light.
silver

little

of the

The price

has slightly declined, to SSigd. per ounce.
The Building Society crisis seems to be abating. Withdrawals of deposits are still going on, and it is not impossible
that there may be some more failures; but on the other hand,
the fctrength .shown by the Birkbeck Bank has made a very
favorable impression, and one of the societies that had to
close its doors has reopened them this week.
The Engiiih Bank of the River Plate has been reorganized,
and at a meeting of the shareholders and creditors, called on
Thursday, it was announced by the chairman that business
would be resumed on the first of October. He spoke hopefully,
considering all the circumstaoces.
There is a somewhat more hopeful feeling in the Stock Exchange this week, though there is no increase in business.
The holiday season is practically over, and it is expected that
business will somewhat revive in October, as it usually does.
The steadiness of silver, too, is regarded as a favorable cir-

THE CHRONICLF.

OrT'-inr-U 8, ISOi.

mmt

lell
cunjstance, and the plethora of money, It is argued,
before long, liut there is no fign as yet that the general pubIt is hotdiug aloof altogetlu'r
lic shares in tlie better feeling.
from utarketsi, and there are too many unfavorable influences

to render

it

likely that business will

become very active

£808,000. If they can Im readily r*alia>xl, tho prooMdt, with th«
foregoing, would amount to about two niilUon* •t«rlinK, and
would reduce the liabilitlei from nomowhat over Are millioiM

in the

The uncertainty respecting silver ailects all
connected in trade with the eilver-using coun-

early future.

•who

are

tries,

and makes

it

impossible for

them

to operate largely.

though less acute, is not at an end.
And about thirty otticers have been arrested in Argentina on
a charge of conspiracy against the Government. On the other
hand there has been a marked recovery in the Brazilian exchange, which is generally attributed to the determination of

The

577

crisis iu Australasia,

the Qovernment to guarantee the notes issued by
Upon the Continent quotolions are wonderfully well maintained, though business is almost as Inactive as it is here. The
preparations for resuming specie payments ore inspiring great
hopes in Au&tria and Uungary. There is a contldencd that
has not been felt for a long time, and new projects of various
kinds are being actively prepared. In Paris it is still believed
that an attempt will be made to convert the 4J.J per cents bebankE<.

fore the end of the year, and it is predicted that this will leid
to such a shifting of investments as before very long will
stimulate an active speculation. For all that there is much

tcrliog to about thrfe millions alerllng. AgaiDH th« Uttar
balance Argentine and Uruguayan lecuiitle* are held which
were valued in October, 1800. at a little orrr £9,800.000. Thaw,
it la presumed, cannot be realized for a oooaiderable time to

come.

The following return showa the position of the Bank oC
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of oonsol*, Sec, •
eompared with the last three years:
u»t.

two.

1K>1.

fffW. ii.

Sn>i. ss.

8q>(.

U.

a
M.IM.1M

OthardcpotlU ....
9oT*nuim ncurllln

*

Mjvr.ooo

(4.120.K0

u.««*,u>

«,Sa7,a80
tl.6SP,M(l

Olronlctloc
Pobllodtpotltr

M
t.187.150

tI.I07.K0

S3oajas
W.IMtJBt

ti.ooi.««r

t0,t84,«86

ll.4l^Jl»

U,761,1M
tl.TMXMO

a
S.M0.07S

M.7»IJM

17.»M.7»t

t7.SM.«M
la.7M,HI

U,»70.IM

RM«rr«
OoinwiO bullion.. ..„
Prop.uaaulollablllUM.paret.
_p*rot,
Bank rat*

tlMMJUa

l«,S0B.»3t

n.oti.asg
<i

*nt

OtbarraoorttlM

Conioli

3M

»7<'1S
I«t.tfi8,000

P*r MDt

rates for

10».P31.00O

*

OlwrlnK-UcuH retarnt

The

HH
S
M ll-l«

*»ii

money have been as
Opm Marlwt

anxiety respecting the course of events in Spain. A
by Senor Sagasta, the leader of the Opposition, has made an Un^n
unfavorable impression, and there are rumors tliat a military
plot has been discovered. It is said, indeed, that the plot was
10
hatched by Stock Exchange "bears," and that the Govern- Aug. SB
••
ment has taken full precautions. But military disaffection Sept. i
'•
g
in any form is a serious matter. With regard to the Ameri••
1(1
can market, the disinclination of investors to buy is increased
'•
23
by the unfavorable reports that for some time have been ap-

Dank

Ml»-&f

follows:
Interett al lowtt
far dtvflUbt

Jtatu.

-*

speech

M 13-14
UJ,>O.C00

Tradt BUI:

IliU$.

DtK't

B'm

Joint
Stock At 7 tola
}tonth$ Uontht'MotWu Montlu Montht StontKt Bank». CaU. Dam.
Three

Four

iSi - 1M«
11-lS 1««
15-ie-l 1M«
war iHa
1

Four

IkrM

sue

-3 »
- 8«« - 3 a - iM«*
-.2M» - 2 a - iMa2
-pHa - 1««« ii««2
a- ma - 2 « -imatM iM<»2
•

Six

h
K
M
M
K
M

»«a-

UMiH

2Ma «MaSM

The Bank rat» of discount and open market rates at the
The prospectuses, when
pearing of American breweries.
chief Continental cities now and for the previous three weeka
issued a few years ago, promised a steady increase in business
been as follows:
and profits, and in some cases asserted that a practical mon- have
opoly had been secured. The business, speaking generally, it
Styt. 3.
Sept. 88.
Stpt. 10.
strt.9.
Batet 0/
now appears, has seriously fallen off, the profits have de(ntere<t at
Bank Op<n Bank Op«n Bank Op«n Bank 09*n
creased still more, and everywhere competition is increasing.
Bate. Market BaU. itfarkn ilato. Market Bate. Marlut
The public ought to have been prepared for the result, but
5431
«&lMi
Paris
2X
they were not and their disappointment shows itself in dis- Berlin
8
8
8
1»
IH
IM
S
in
3
8
S
1«
3
1%
IM
QamburK
trust of other American securities.
z
3
8
i
Franktort
S
IK
3
The home trade of the United Kingdom is still wonderfully AjBsUrdam....
IW
IK
IM
Hi
2X
w<
good, considering the gravity of the crisis through which the Brasaels
tH
IM
IM
IM
IM
4
sa
t
4
SH
4
Hi
the prospect is regarded less hope- Vienna.
country has passed. But
3H
t
it. Patersbarg.
4
4
fH
S«
4
Hi
fully than it was a little while ago. It is feared that the Build- Madrid
6
6
s
S
4M
*H
4W,
*H
must intensify the depres'^ion. Very many of GoDonhatren...
ing Society crisis
4
4
4
Sii
4
an
8X
_8)jL
the societies have been in the habit of lending largely to
Messrs. Pixley & Abell write aa follows under date oC
speculative builders; they will not now be able to go on doing

~H

;

m

60,

and where

possible

no doubt they

will contract their ad-

vances and it is feared that that may lead to difficulties in
the building trade and throw large numbers of work-people
out of employment. Besides, the faihires of some eecieties
and the danger of other failures inflict losses upon the depositors and shareholders, and so reduce their purchasing power.
At the same time the depression in the cotton and iron trades
A meeting has been held beis growing deeper every day.
;

tween the representatives
their work-people, but no

of the cotton-spinners

was arrived

and those of

except that a
vote of the operatives is to bo taken. It is generally believed
in Lancashire that the reduction of wages by 5 per cent will
be resisted. On the Clyde shipbuilding is languishing. The
number of vessels under construction is very small, and no
new orders are coining forward. It is expected, therefore, that
a reduction of wages will be attempted, and in any case workresult

at,

people will be thrown out of employment. At Sunderland a
meeting between the ship-builders and their work-people has
just been held, and a reduction of 5 per cent in wages has been
Agreed to. The agricultural classes, too, are loud in complaint.
The harvest has been bad, especially the hay crop, and prices
are ruinously low. Food for cattle, too, is dear, while prices

are unremunerative. The outlook for the coming w inter is
consequently not bright.
From the Baring balance-sheet, published this week, it appears that the money at call, bills receivable, and remittances
to come forward, amounted on August 31 to a little under
flCO,OCO. Sundry debtois owed £180,000; and the private
property of the partners still unsold was valued In October,
1890, at £852,000. The assets, therefore, readily realizable,

about a million and a quaiter sterling. Securities,
other than South American were valued in October, 1890, at

amounted

to

September 33
Gold— Little change has taken place la this market, and the demand
for bars Is unabated. At the Bank £115,000 has been received and

£20,000 has been tnkenfor export to Malta. Arrivals— Brazil, £S1,000;
South Africa, £54,000; Australia, £101,000; CtUna and India. £1-16,000: West ladies, £82,000.
Silver— There have only been very slight changes in silver, and a
good business has been done for India at 33<4d. The price is zfW
3S»8d., at which India would buy. but there seems little offering. Arrivals—Now York, £3»,000; South Africa. £5,000; West ladles, £30,000; Chill, £7.000; total, £131,000.
£60,000; Colombo, Sept. 16, £2,000;

Bombay,

Shipments- Hiogo, Sept. 16.
Bombay, Sept. 16, £145,600

Sept. 22, £118,700.

Meiioan Dollars— These coin have not altered from 37iid., and snndrj- parcels have been placed for the East at this fleuro. ArriraU
from West Indies, £14,000. Shipments— Penang, Sept. 16. £151,000;
Ilong Kong, Sept. 16, £9,467

The quotations for

bullion are reported as follows:
8ILVIB.

00IJ>.

Lomon StariOard.

S«pt. 22.
•.

4.

Sept.is.
t.

Sept.
Zxindon standard. Sept. a.

Bar gold, fine.. ..OS.
Bar Kold, contatn'e

77 lOM

77 10

«Odwts.allTer..oz.

77 lOJji
78 10
76 5

BarallTer, eontalnIng 6 RTs. gold. Of.
77 lOX
o«.
CakaallTcr
73 10
Mexican dollarj_oa.
7« 6
76 4«

ipan.doublooni.ot.
n.S. KOld coin
German gold coin...

Ti!

Hi

U.

d.

d.

BarallTsr

oi.

38}<

38K

4m

41!<

S7«

37«

The following shows the importa of cereal produce into th
Qnited Kingdom during the first three weeks of the aeaacna
oompared with previous seasons:
UIPOBTS.
1891.
1892.
4,541.892
tmportsofwheafccwt. 4,739,662
1,143,438
1,146.021
Barley
1.052.823
Xti;.........:........ 1001063
52,176
120,855
Peas
203,075
495,222
Beans
970,334
2,855,158
Indian com
824,42s
nourT.„." .::.::: i i7»io7

1890.
5.167.780
1,341.932
'iOO.344

1889.
3.».'i7,570

SX.VlOO
V'-fi^Z
'Jl.SSU

66,»0S
83.842

275.840

2.475J83

2.0lb,70«
i.o«2.2ia

»io,%oi

THE CHRONICLE.

678

GtoVERNMENT Revestje AND EXPENDITURES.— Through the

Supplies available for consumption (exclusive of stocks on

September

1):

1891.
4,544,892
824,428
790,690

owt, 4,739,862
1,175,107
Imports ol flour
Bates of home-grown. 1,098,703

7,013,472
1892.
Arer. price wheat W6ek.29a. la.
Average price, season. .29s. 2d.
Total

1889.
3,957,570
1,062,212
2,325,870

1890.
5,167,760
910,301
2,343,112

6,160,010
1891.

1892.

Wheat

8,421,173
1890.

363.
398.

MaUe.„.

qrs.

7,345,652
1889.
29s. 5d.

Id.
5d.

32s.
33s.

5d.
9a.

30s. 2d.

1890.
2,010,000

190,00a
185,000

172,000
516,000

BaxltKta Flaanclal OTarMtew— Per Cable.
The daily closing quotations for securities, &o., at liondon
are reported by cable as f oUows for the week ending Oct. 7
Mon.

38^8
96lsie

%

per ots.
Oonsoli,iie w, 2
97
do iToraccouiit
IVoh rentes (InFaria)fr. 99-80

V

121

B.iaot 1907
Oanadlan Pacific

79
99 >s
134
Loul«Tllle& Nashville.. 68
68%
Mexican Central 48
K. Y. Central A Hudson. II3J4
H. Y. Lake Erie & West'n 25=8
108
2d cons
do

383ie
97I,„
971,6

IhHrs.

Wed.
38>4

?7>
97%

?7>
975i6

38%
97%
97%

8838
8038

136

136
7014
6978

113%

114%

Sept. 29
Sept. 30

New York

2638

27>4

26''8

108%

109%

401*

40%

51=8

52%

53

40^8
5178

57
30
40 14
25

56%
30%

56%
30%

4038

1038

25%

25%

2468

7014

70%

109

for the

Total
Knee Jan.

14,780

281

U,868

18.872
17,210

14,063
13,736

257
S5i
43

moB. 144.S47

iiMM

Pensions.

~i~

een'l mer'dlse.

1,'288

~~i
10.5S2
11,582

»
6.873

30%
414
25%

13,414

764
248

April...

15,589
14 751

12.706

1,766

12,908
12,122

4.073

14,235

7.048

%

week

in

$1,941,806
6,388,741

13.053
11.81a

2.243

84,571

15.488

1.144

84.033

15.185

852 81,841

14,121

$13,158,145

$8,330,547

$103,028,795 $116,845,878
269,721,431 291,090,293

$90,818,950
306,828,218

$96,756,001
329,088,880

May....
Jane...
July....

Aog....
Sept..

9

.

15,512
15,051
17,682
15,291

of dry goods for one week later will be foun ^
in our report of the dry goods trade.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
specie) from the port of New York to foreign porta for the
week ending October 4 and from January 1 to date :

XPOBTS rSOM HBW TOHS FOB THB WBBK.
1890.

1891.

1892.

$9,768,989
266,063,432

$5,183,542
286,007,186

Total 39 weeks. $258,851,589l$255,783,088 $275,832,421 $291,490 .728
The foUo wing taoie siiows tntj exports and imports of specie
at the port of New York for the week ending Oct. 1 and
since Jan. 1, 1893, and for the corresponding periods in 1891
Bnd 1890:

HBW

TOBK.

Week.

Mexico
Bonth America

Week.

SiTiee

Jan.l

"i',944

914,150
305.651
39,501
590,001
182,090

$28,990 $58,727,639
75,018,572
85,986 18,685,556

$7,233
5,638,334
60,589

$6,560,722
10,691,991
7,233,047

ji.TOO
37,296

All other countries..

Total 1892
Total 1891
Total 1890

1.

Exports.

2,197

90
142
111
836

3,736
4,138

Week.

$32,428
4,496,901

$5;2¥9

289

Ordinary.

"

"~i

I
35.663
1.519' 27.482
i,2oe] 29,425
1,038 31,098
1,023: 32.756
1,018 28,941
915 37,249

Germany

West Indies
Mexico
Booth America
All other countries..

Total 1892
Total 1891
Total 1890

1.

Week.

$307,750 $14,556,510
523,139
1,300
950,973
38,215
541,245
25,912

1,098

Pen-

$35,536
86,170

4,076

Sinee Jim.l.

$21,014
335.737
100,855
345,072
480,519
624,938
61,327

$307,750 $16,637,294 $125,776 $1,969,462
000,609 13,172,364
2,350
1,528,816
226,150 14,6-^1,147
56.804
5,295,928
Of the above imports for the week in 1898
$5,289 were
American gold coin and $90 American silver' com.
Of the
exports during, the same time ?28,990 were
American gold

If.Bk-

In-

Rfd'p lotaL

Fund.

sions. terest

t

t

i
2,462

•17,588

1,C80

2,851

11.776

17.310
9.518

380
702

2,279

23,981

2,440

31,725
31,491

81.172
18.760

264

2.355

1,540

26,881

8.521

738

14,188

18.831

18.721

719

2,082
2,275

2I.6I4' 13.663

2.823

1,699

5.094

469
415

1.801

39,799
20,738

1,867

23,936-

64lj 82,081

13,974

725, 28,917

15,170

9 Sfonths of 1892.

Sept.

Tatue,

Pieces.

Pieces.

Talue.

$
Uonble eagles

9

108,008
23,192
12,006

2,160,160
231.920
60,030

1,034,405

5,172,025-

'5

'13

69

"l7'»

143,211

2,452,123

776,100
52,100
1,272,100
1,250,100

776,100
26,050
318,025
125,010

8,893,174
12dOid-'ii

4,199,095
1,024,061
2,223,294
1,240,449

3,350,400

1,245,185

27,544,883

8,686,899

566,100

28,305

7,805,202

390,265

3,936',10"6

"39,301

25,999,482

259,995

Total minor

4,496,200

67,606

33,804,774

650,260

Total coinage

7,989,811

3,764,914

Half eat^los. .........

Three dollars
Quarter eagles
Total gold .........

Standard dollars

Dimes
Total silver

728,146 14,562,920
893,412 8,934,120

2,656,032 2S,669.23S
4,199,095

Three cents. .........

One cent.............

IN

64,005,689 38,006,397

Legal Tenders and National Bank Notes to

Oct. 1. The Comptroller of the Currency has furnished
us the following, showing the amounts of national bank
notes Sept. 1, together with the amounts outstanding Oct.
1, and the increase or decrease during the month
also the
changes in legal tenders held for the redemption of bank
:

notes

up

to Oct. 1

National Bank Notes—
Amount outstanding Sept. 1, 1892..
Amountissued during Sept .........
Amount retired during Bept

Amount outstanding Oct.

Imports.

Sinee Jan.

1,107

2.883 21,954 274,51ft

1,

$172,549,827

$775,210
6i4,ll9

1892*

Legal Tender Notes—
&.moant on deposit to redeem national bank
notes Sept. 1, 1892
Amonnt deposited during Bept
Amount reissued^ b'nk notes retlr'd in Sept.

131,091
$172,680,918

BiXvtr,

great Britain
France. ...... ........

3,839

CoiNAOK BT United States Mints.— The following state,
ment, kindly furnished us by the Director of the Mint, showB
the coinage at the Mints of the United States during the mom b
of September, 1893, and the nine months of the year.

—

$6,220,393
18,410,228
26,117,350
6,735,175
9,000
1,224,993
10,500

Trance..... ....••....
Indies..........

Sinee Jan.

12,502
11,916

581
128

t
37,891
29.811
29,419
27,130
27,558
31,722
34,30«
28,885
28,001

)

OHANaBs

Imports.

0old,

ereat Britain

13,727
14,652

i
i
246 2,603
838
789
891 2,447

m08. 1B9.000 113.600 21.438 9.573 283.8U 153.073 60.854 11.430 17,846263. OOa
* Includes $39,581 disbursed for premiums.

Quarter dollars

$8,833,008
246,950,080

Exports.

11,985
9.490
11,807
12,899
11,975

l4o.o:w 108,683

$

13,478
12,654

$10,814,422

SPBOIB AT

14,169

1,488

$3,549,888
7,264.534

XFOBTS USO ntPOBTS OF

15,873

29,074
28,499
81,219

Rcd^p. Total.

14.557

$2,909,926
10,248,219

1889.

18,994

2.057
1,680

2,401

Tnum Red'p. MUe'l lotal.
Rev'ut Fimd. ITrcee
t

23,077

ISr.Bk.

In-

fifarcb..

$2,588,720
5,477,767

$7,934,885
250,916,704

%

*
31,590
30.756
30.04a

1,727

terest. Fuiid.

Feb....

The imports

Prev. reported.

%
2,129

2.230 15,404 281.832

57

Total 39 weeks. $372,750,-i26 $407,936,171 $397,647,168 $425,844,881

For the week..

i
159
57

16,980
18,837

1.

Dry QoodB

West

14,618
17.805

Jan

5178

$8,066,487

Ben'l mer'dlse.

212
417
270

Ordinary.

1892

1891.

1890.

OtMtems.

lotal.

DI8BUKSEMENT8 (OOOS omitted).

NBW TOBK.

rOBBION IMPOBTB AT
1889.

12.422
13,050

9

(for general merchandise)''

January.
for Week.

13,831
18,123

AUK...

109
40 »8

week ending ^or dry goods

also totals since the beginning of the first

Dry Goods

12.189
12,134

27%

and for the week ending
;

t
11,911

16,783
16,415

Sept....

CggmmeycmX and W^lsadX^wtans Hews
Imports and Exports for the Week. — The following ar^
the imports at

17,891

Feb....
March..
Apnl...
May....
June...

II414

108%
39%

39>8
2459

*

Jan

70%
70%

113%

69H

70

Inter'l Bed'p. Mine'

100%
136%

II314
2578

69%

1891.

N.Bk.

Bev'ue Fund. S'rces

8838
80^8

100%

88=8

135

68=8

56%
29%
39%

we

iV.Bfc.

Ouatoms.

July....

99-70
121

81%
100%

88=8
8OI4

99%

134%

Fri.

3838

99-57% 99-47% 9965
121
121
121

9914

orfolk* Western, prel. 39ie
Horthem Pacific pref... 5Hi
56\
PennsTlvania
PlinadelpMa& Reading. 29%
.........

33»6
97118
971,6

89%
79%

88''6

&

St. Paul....
CaUo. Mil.
nilnoifi Central..........

tTnion Paoifio
Wabash pief

Tuet.

99-70
121

and disbursements

1892.

1891.
1,627,000

3**.O05
535,000

Sat.

for the month of September. From
obtain the figures for previous months
and in that manner complete the statement for the nina
months of the calendar years 1892 and 1891.
KECEiPTS (OOOa omitted).
receipts

and

flour

Last week.
1,754,000

445,000

London.

courtesy of the Secretary of the Treasury, we are enabled to
place before our readers to-day the details of Government
previous returns

The following shows the quantities of wheat,
maize afloat to the United Elingdom:
This week.
qrs. 1,656,000
Wheat
nour, equal to qrs. 323,000

[Vol. LT.

$26,089,794

$43,650
614,119

600. 69

\motmt on deposit to redeem national bank
notes Oct. 1, 1892
$25,489,325^
* Olrcnlatlon of national gold banks, not
Included above, $105,842,

According to the above the amount of legal tenders on
Oct, 1 with the Treasurer of the United States to
redeem national bank notes was $25,489,335. The portion of
this deposit made (1) by banks becoming insolvent, (2) by
banks going into voluntary liquidation, and (8) by banks reducing or retiring their circulation, was as follows on the first
of each of the last five months
deposit

:

OCTOBBR
Depotiu by—

THE (CHRONICLE.

180a.J

8,

JUH4

July

I.

AUQtut

I.

"

Oel. I.

a*pt. I.

1.

*
740.614

T
757,794

t
904,788

898.73.%

ft.l72,34()

B.ooi.aia

5,08tJ,67S

5,005,3 i J

Mi.lr.I

WSmI,
Th ttnr* at—

21,700,»O4 21,072.500 30,483,315 30,091.338 19,58 v.'

'Tl..*

A,

i

Hiiil.ilu

the condition of the Liberty Natiorml
Bank at the olo^o of bu^iacss Sept. 30 indicate') a growth of
business. The titul resources were $1,630,607; loan^ an<l dixoounts, $(tfl!t.r)l7; individual depoiita subjiict toclie^^k, $713,500.
id din-ctorw are prominent busine-iH int>n; their
Thi'
found in the card of tlie bank appt>aring regunam
larly I'l iiii> V.IIROXICLE under '•Baukiug & Financial."
'

—We are

receipt of advance page) of a book by Mr. S.
entitled "American Kailroiids a.>J Investments,"
F. Van
which will soon l)e brought out in London and sold by ElllngCo., Royal Exchange, and in New York by
ham, VVilson
O. P. Putnam's Sons. Mr. Van Oss has been known as a
writer on American railroad subjects.
in

0«

&

—The National Cordage Company have declared the regular
piT

quarterly dividend of 2 per cent on the preferred and 8
cent on the common stock of the company, payable on the

day of November next. The transfer books
October 15th and reopen November 2d.
—Messrs. Spencer Trask

& Co.

1st

on

will close

offer in the State and City
city of Colum-

Department of the Chronicle $80,000 of the

bus, Ohio, bonds. Ai this city has large resources the loan
merits careful attention.

The movement of breadstuSs to market is indicated in the
tatement below, prepared by us from the figures of the New
York Produce Exchange. We flrst give the receipts at

Weetem lake and river ports, arranged so as to present the
comparative movement for the week ending Oct. 1, 189:J,
and since August 1, for each of the last three years:
Ji«e«ii>t<

Hour.

dt-

Whtat.

Com.

Rye.

Barley.

Oatt.

BmKiSUu

8,088,807

2,583,750

S86,66'>

110,334

»i,010

187,000

464,660

68,120

...

110,62«

MllwankM..

3<,3S0

3.17.M0

ia<J,070

Bu.se

itM.

2.01(1.31)0

Oulutta

l.-m.MO

Mlnne«polt».

I.SM

876.800
soi.eos
81.001
S7I.18X
<4,9ao

903,300
10.404

6,800
64,187

10,106
39.1GH
«.ZUO

13.325

228316

42.182
ia».S75

238,700

330.100

t21,.'<-.!2

8,»S7,M7

3.7U3.711

7.oe«.ssz

I.2'>1

1.251.184

2,433,206

3.383,384
2,207.447
2,48a,01«

25,450,012
23.468,72-:

21.o55.5S8

22.343.18i

22.49.-,.iei

Toledo
Detroit.
Clereland....
Bt. Loull..

1,801)

.

Peoria.....

Tot.wk,

-OS.

wk.'Sl,

Buiewk.tlO.

IA8.23i

8.8S0.0M

18W

3,067,816

|I8,8S0.I)18

1891
1880

2,il(i.0<«

i.i2s.aao

«1.01»,a06
23.108.071

310

Sinet Attt.

42,700
16,051
2.SI10

64.100
43,610

01.472
4.200

1,232.878

1,722,348

3JV,S86
700.6S1
88.408

9,041,024

2.26«.7ij

5,310,063
7.202.245

7.424.7T4
1.057,651

The receipts of
week ended Ost.

flour and grain at the seaboard ports for the
1, 1893, follow:
Barley,
Xye,
Flour,
Wheat,
Corn,
Oals,

At—

Boston
Montreal

bblt.

72.936
31.91.')

...

PhlliKlelphlii

5ti.-iciii

Bamini>r.-...

Biolimoud...

T.^.TilS
;>.3.50

MawOcleaua.

12,0<J0

bush.

btuh.

2,388,200
331.115
327.908
42.-,5U

758,300
178,;U2
79,750

906.900

1S8.14'2

21),'i01

90,464
11,372
12,480

126.828
52,00J
16,531
21,387

biith.

12,278
83,600

Do

28.8U0
2,410
34,508

1,430
2,768
12,000

3.(j00

10,111

000

1892.

1891.

1890.

1889.

Week

Week

Week

Week

OtI. 1.

Oct. 3.

Oct. 4.

bbH.

331,404

286,736

bush. 1,173,047
181,077
1,272,103
283,443
134,739

1,099,199

519,395
519,212
1,164,986

Oel. 5.
184,1.')9

213,133

Wheat

Com

0»t»
Barter

Bye

3,324,109

Tetal

107,863
1,330,051
305,472
160,373
3,303,163

from—

Wheal.

19,000
CtooluoAll
2,000
Boiton
378,000
Toionto
94,000
177,000
MoatrMl
PhlhMleliihta.... 1,719.000
Peoria
81.000
IncllitnaiMilla....
546,000
Kaimai (Mlf.... 1,177,000
Baltiiuorn
1,935,000
Mtnueaunllit.... 2,960,000

On MluUMppt..
Od lakre

Boa ton...
Norfolk
Moiitmil
PtiUail.l
BaltlBi'roi
K.Orl-118.

Flour.

542,380
370.S11
967,191
419,410
95,377

328,496
62,031

603,<ill

71,025i
10

.

ii;

B(«A.
212,625
5S,114
76.774
7<

235,194

.484

45.989
2,853

Bbl:
132,.M7

Tot Oct. 1 .'92.17.902.000 10,915,000
Tot 8«vt.24.'U2.44.962,000 9,799,000
Tot Oot 3, '91.37,755,058 7,546,581
Tot Oot 1, '90.17.059.092 8.721.126
Tot Oct 5. '89.18,819.813 11,'S11,971

Bye.

Peat.

Bu$h.
113,510

Buth.
26,868

311,387

337.669

12.000
38.000
47,000

"7|6oo
8,000
31.000
85,000
88,000
19,000
7,000

lisiooo

7,101.000 758,000 750.000
0.680,000 773,000 100,000
5,851,381 3,169,113 1,368,017
1,021,888 581,165 8,331,075
5,015,610 1,183,019 816.987

H. T. and Brooklyn Uas 8«caritie»— Brokers' Qaotatioiiih

eA8U0MPANIK8.

Bid.

BrooklTuOaa. Light
OonsolfdattMl Uuh
Jersey City ,fr Koboken.
Metropolitan— Bonds
ICatuaUN. y.)
Bonds, da
Kassaai Brooklyn)
Scrip
People'tiBrooklyn<

Ask.

(

135
118

130
lis
130

OAB COXPAKIKS.

,

<

Bid.|Aak

.WUllamsborK

no

MetropoU tan( Brooklyn)
Mnnlolpal— Bonds, 7s. .
Pnlton Mnnlolpal
.

140
100
150
100
93

Bonds, 8s
Eoo) table
Bonds, 6s

„

...^

lOJ
137
1U3
134
104

Bonds, 68

i

I

ll»
108

l.„_

111
117

140
107
ISO

9S

Cltr Railroad Secarities— Brokers' Quotations.
Dry Dock K. B'y A B.—

AUantto AT..B'klrn.St'k. 120
Oen. M.,59,1909...A&0 102
Broker 8t .& Fal. t: -atk. 29
Br'dway

it

7«., 1900..

Borlp

BUibth

I

9B

At

100

30
112

43d

10«
105

7tbAT.--St'k.. 1H5
101
103
104

Stook.
250 360
ElKbtbAT.— 3ortp,6s,1914 105 108

•iOO

JiJ 110

1st mort., 6s, 1904 .JitD
Idmort., 5s, 1914...JdU
'24
B'way 1st 6s, nu
Snd 6s, lot as rent., '05.
Brooklyn Olty—Stock
B'klyncroufn 6s.. 1908
Bkn.o'T*N'n5s,1938 JJtJ

43d8tManb.A StN.Ave. 63 54

A Or'nd St PTy-Stk. 260 ....«
AAO 100 103

1st mort, 7s, 1893.

MAS

let mort, Bs, 1910..
111 111
"'
H„ Income, 8*.. ..JAJ 6* OS

3d

94
203
108

Honst W.StA P. Vy-8tk. 300
lat mart, 7s, 1894..JAJ 100 107
103 • jNluth Ave
180
jSeuind Are.—8took
113 lis
Isl mort, 5s, f909.UAN 103' lOS
150
SUth Are.— Stook
198 -iOI

310
110

101>s

1st mort., 6s,192a.M<ftNill5
dent. Pk.N.A E.R1V.— Stk.!
Consols. 7s. 1908 ...JAO 116
Dry Dk.K.B.« Bat'r—Stk. 1117
lit mort, 7s, 189S..J*D|100

I

120
120
101

I

Third Are.— New stook... 310 316
JAJ no 112
1st M., 5s, 1937
Twenty-third St— Stock.. 250 ....„
100 103
Istmort 7«. 1S»3

—

Auction Hales Among other securities the following, not
Mgularly dealt in at tlie lioard, were recently sold at auction.
By Messrs. K. V. Harnett <ft Co.
Share:
Sharet.
30 Portsmouth A Suffolk
35 Market A Fult'u Nat. Bk.230
Water Co. oommon
930
SO Nut. Bauk of the BepubBoiuIm.
173>»
Uc
171
810,003 Metropolitan Ferry
• Nat City Bank
Co.lst5A,1937(L 1.KR.CO.).107

By

MuUer

MeBsr«. Adrian H.

& Son
Shares.

Shares.

100

5 Lawyers' Huroty Co

7 TUurbiT.Wh.vliindCo.iirf. 9T
IBaiikoC X. Y.. N.B. .4....230'4
13 Union Trust Co., N.Y....700

100 North Star Mining Co.,
Cal.. $10 eBch...'?liOM)o per «b
25 Michigan Peninsular Ciir
100>«
Co. pref

l^nuUtng audi l^timuctal.

....

LIBERTY NATIONAL BANK,
New Verk.
M00.08*
AoconifTS or banks, bansbbs and mbrchants soucitbd,
HBNKY OaAVBS, Vlo*-Prwl4«l'.
HBNRT C. TINKBK Prealdant
Central Balldini. 143 LIberir Street.

OAPITAL.

JAMBS CHRISTIK.

Cashier.

DIKK4'T<>K!4.

IIBNRY
IIK.VHV

H.

C. TINKHB,
OK.WKS.

C FAHNIMTOCK,

i.

A OAKLANU.

HON.

W.M

DL

IJKO. r. BAKKlt
J. H. MAXWKL.U

V

;kk.

JNu.

O. A.

UU8AIIT,

Spencer Trask a Co.,
10 Wkll

BiuA.
1,477

59.501

18,286

IS.liSO

St.,

New

Heoibara of

York.

BAXKBHa.
16 Concrera 91., Boetoa.
ProTldenee.

New Tdrk and Boston

^took Kxobuuea.

INVESTMENT SECURITIES.

THE MERCANTILE NATIONAL BANK
OP TUK CITY UP NKW TmtK.
Na. l»l Itroadwar.

Rlclun'iui

466,840
S'metlmei
1801 ..il.874,8.'>l 1,349,916

iiiooo

t,

N.NewH..
Tot. weekll,763.629

35,000
8,000

a.000

15,000
1,000
833,000
181.000
330.000
09,000
100,000
300,000
9,000
7,000
500,000
100,000

306,000
172,000
28,000
105.000
10,000
0,000
15,000
2,334,000
717,000

66,0<)0

1'4,905

21,377
15,236
25,' 96
96,119
4,107

10.000
30,000

2,395,199

2,891,163

Oaf.

igo,6(>ii

0,000

9,000
94,000

3,006,000
OooanalArlver 1,304,000

Alkaay.
B\uh.

NewYork

Com.

i¥.m
171,000
117,000

51,000

nlloat....

The exports from the several seaboard ports for the week
ending Oct. 1, 1892, are shown in the annexed statement:
Exportt

13,04)0

S1U,(KMI

102.000
60,000
503,000

;53,0O0

174,000

l>,<i^i.<iui>

80,329
"ot. week. .437,902 3,805,846 1,324,850 1,536,103 16,198
Week 1891 408,662 2,t>65,237 l,429,0e0 1,082,522 110,779 652.772
Below are the ml sliip.ueats of flour and grain fro:n
Weatern lake and river ports for four years:

Flour

18.000

bu»h.

btish.

2 0,92.i
21l,.^09

3OU.00O

n, Loull

tlMJl.

3,000
12,000

'

0«tr<>lt

OentralCrosstown—St'k.. 110

8,870

I.

New York... 183,037

''

Tolado

Istmort.,

AMj.IIMUu BuMh-tOOn Bluk.B)U» BMll.S3lbt
Chloaao

2,140.000

BtHm

10,(HX)

21,000
6I>.\000
721,0<W
4,666,000 2,42^,000
9,000
15,000

7,4l)H,iMK)
l.'ill.'MMi

KUwaiikee
Oalnth

— The stjtcmi'iit of

buMh.

1,535,000

11.000

.If

OIllaaKii

1R74. ftDd July 13, 1883.

:0.

iMbOMO
6mm.

butk.

1.362,000

9,HlH.OO0
»Bo»t....
307,000

tookalaisnaanr

On't,

florn,

buih.

firXntk

lotul

BuDe

The viiiihlo Hiipply of grain, comuriting tha
'
•t the priiicifiiil I) iintf of occuinuLttlon •!
porii, Oct. 1, l>i9i:

27,70»,4«4 2e,89'i,615 36,388,0911 36,089,791 35.441),

aclol

67U

173,011

e7,«7«

75,153

22,657

661,71.1

S8.eMi

Capitals
WUililAM

81,000,000 I.Sarplaa&ProOla, $1,030,00 J
rURDIIRIOK B. SCliaNi'K iVuhlar
P. 8T. JOHN. President.
JAMKS V. LOTT. AasUtant Ossbler.
-

I

'(inov^TK S0E.IC1TKD.

THE CHRONICLE.

560

%}iz ganl^jets'

Posted rates of leading bankers are as follows:

%KztXU.

October

Name of Company,

Cent.

Central
"

H. Y. Sub.

&

"

IV. "Concord".
West, pref
CI.

&

*'

cownion

common

(quar.)....
1st pref. (quar.)
"
'
2d pref. (quar.)
Edison Electric 111. (quar.)
General Electric common (quar.)
Kat. Cordage pref. (quar.)
«'
"
com. (quar.)
*N. Y. Belt. <fe Packing pref
"
* **
com

Claflin

Oct.

Nov.
Nov.

\^

Oct.

—

Interest

to

Periods

21 to Nov. 10

i

Oct.

Oct.

15

13 to Nov.
8 to Nov.

Oct. 15

Nov.
Sov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

2

18^ 5 17ia»5 IG'e
40i4a405]8
osiaagssg

iO"*
9519'

w Oct.

3.

1.

Oct.
4.

100
114

100

Oct.

0:t.
6.

Oct.
5.

7.

•lOOU •1004 100 14
*114'« •114^8 1147^
114^8 11434 11459

•107

107

107

•logifl •lOSis
•112 *112ifl

IO913
II213

'115
•115
•115
•117»»
63, car'cy.'93....reg.|J. & J.l'117'fl •1171-2 •117ifl •1171s 'inhs
*Tlils"l3 the price Old at cue mormui uoacd; uo s-nu >v.i.s u.no

16 to Nov.
lOct. 16 to Nov.
lioct. 16 to Nov.

ftoTernment Purchases of Silver.—The following shows
amount of silver purchased in Ooto'jsr by the Govera-

\

223)

2

15 Oct.

Nov,
\

2

1

8 to Oct.

Oct.

Oct.

Oct.

*100l4
114-%
'114
48,1907
coup. Q.Jan, 'xll4 •114 *llll4
49,1907
•107
'107
reg. J. & J. •107
63, our'cy,'95
reg. J. & J. •109 ifl '1091s •109 1«
63, cur'cy,'96
'113 •112
reK...r. & J. 112
63, our'cT,'97
'115
•115
6i, cur'cy,'98....reg.!J. * J. 115
reg. Q.-Mch,
reg. y.-Jan.

the
Oct.

17I'

Oct.

15'Oct.

to

ment

8 to Oct.

to date.

15

Ounces

HoTE.-Last week several coupon notices were erroneously reported
in this column as dividends.
STREET, FRIDAY, OCT. r, 1S93-5 P. M.

October 3

WALL

Money Market and Financial Situation.-There

"

7
•Local purchases

is

Ounces

offered.

Interim dividend.

Tlie

85
811a

15 to Nov.

28

—

•'

Northwest Gen. Elec com, (quar)
*

Nov.

3

BUscellaneons.
American Tobacco pref. (quar.).

H. "B.

W

Bankt*.

N. Y. Produce Exchange
»

4 S7is®l 83

to

4

of N. J. (quar.^.. ..--....
M. CI. I. (B. C. M.pf)

&

Payable

ail's

United States Bonds.— Quotations are as foUovrs

Ballroada.
Boston & Maine
Conc'd

Books Closed.
(Days iticlusive.)

When

Demaiut,

Sixty Days.

7.

Prime bankers' sterling bills on London.. 4 86 34
--. 4 84143)4
Prime commercial
4 84i4<»4
Daonmentary commercial
5 193895
Paris bankers (francs)
40ii6»
Amsterdam (gnilders) bankers
95 a
Frankfortor Bremen (reichmarkstiynkers

DIVIDENDS.
Per

[Vol. LV.

purchased.

946,000
-24,000
64,000

,

Price paid.

650,000 $0-8315
374,000 $0-8390
173,000 $0-845i)

®
®
®

$0-8353
S0-840(>
*0.849(>

a $

1,197,000 $0-8345 3) $0-8400
•Total in month to date ..' 2,434,003
apparently a strong undertone in the financial markets, and
disturbing causes are removed the prevailing
now that outside
•The local purchases of each week are not reported till Monday of
confidence exerts its natural influence. It is not usual to the foUowKin week.
Coins.-The following are the current quotations in gold for
have a very active stock market just on the eve of a Presithe various coins:
^
„,,
dential election, and this year may prove no exception to
"
8458 » — 851*
$4 S3 ®$4 8^ Fine silver bars..
the coun- Sovereigns
rule, but there are many evidences of prosperity in
— 90 a — 9^
8i a 3 90 Flvefiajos
report of failures for the Napoleons....... 3 70 9 4 so Mexican dollars.. — (ifiia » - 67
try, and the latest of these is Iiun's
X XKelchmarks. 4
»
Do uuoommoro'l
4 75 3 4 85
past nine months of the current year, which gave the amount 25 Pesetas
— 60 9 — G2;
against $136,718,761 in the same Span. Ooubloons.lS 50 315 70 Peruvian 30ls
of liabilities as only $80,933,915
English silver... 4 80 « 4 9t>
Mex. Doubloons. 15 50 al5 70
~" ~~
period of 1891.
Flnegold bars... par 914 prom. t'.S. trade dollars — 70 «
The foreign markets seem almost ready for a new wave of
popular sentiment in favor of American securities and it reState and Railroad Bonds.— The activity in low-priced
mains to be seen what the next year will bring forth. It is dilH- Southern State bonds has continued, and the Arkansas /s railcult to say how great might be the influence upon the foreign road issues have sold largely. It is presumed that the buying
markets of a repeal of our silver purchase law, but if they is based on the hone of some sort of recognition to be obtained
once became convinced that the end of the silver infatuation for these old and long-neglecled State obligations. Sales at
had really been reached in this country, the effect on them the Board have included 85414,000 of Arkansas 7.s, as follows:
might be something like a new resumption of gold payments, $290,000 of the L. R. P. B. & N. O. issue at 14^ to 20, ,$71,000
and the demand for our flrot-class securities vrould then be Miss. O. & Red R. at 15 to 21^, $43,000 L. R. &Ft. S. at 14>^non-fundhard to supply.
22 and $10,000 Central RR. at 8?:^; $70,000 S. C. 6s,
The Western railroads continue to make good returns of able, at 23/-3K; 115,000 N. C. sp. tax (W. N. C. RR.) at 4i^-4;g
monthly earnings, and this week Denver & Rio Grande re- $1,000 N.'C. new 6s at 108i^; $6,000 N. C. Funding Act 66 at
ports a handsome increase in net for August.
lOW; .i;5,000 Va. 6s defd. at 71^; $3,000 Ala., Class A, at 101.
To-(lay the Hollins syndicate paid to Speyer & Co. a check
Railroad and miscellaneous bonds have shown a fair busiwhere influfor $3,889,206 to take up the Central Georgia loan, and thus ness at prices generally steady, except
The General Electric
completed the first important step in the Richmond Terminal enced bv special circumstances.
106i^ on the recent incandescent light
readjustment.
53 have risen to
The open market rates for call loans during the week on decision: Richmond' Terminal 53 and 6s have been
have^ranged from 4 to 10 per cent, active and strong on the prospect of a new reorganstock and bond collaterals
the average being 5 per cent. To-day rates on call were ization plan and the actual taking over to-day by the
4 to 10 per cent. Commercial paper is quoted at ^li@5% Hollins Committee of the Speyer loan to Central Georgia.
per cent.
The weakest bonds were the Chicago & Northern Paciflc five
The Bank of England weekly statement on Thursday showed per cents, which broke to 74 on Tuesday, for no other
a decrease in bullion of £767,000, and the percentage of re- reason apparently than the effect of sales by members of the
sn've to liabilities was 41"39, against 49'13 last -week the dis- old syndicate whose agreement not to market the bonds had
count rate remains unchaneed at 2 per cent. The Bank of expired; the closing price is 75).^.
Columbus & HockFrance shows a decrease of 2,950,000 francs in gold and ing Valley 5s declined to 92?^ in sympathy with the stosk
a decrease of 2,350,0C0 francs in silver.
Tennessee Coal & Iron 6s(Tenn. Div.), ex. coupon, went oft to
The New York Clearing-House banks in their statemont of 905^: and Iron Mountain 5s to 82?^. To-day the Union Pacific
Oct. 1 showed a decrease in the reserve held of SI. 639,750 Denver
Gulf firsts sold freely at 70=^-72 1^-71?.^ and the
and a surplus over the required reserve of $4,393,400, against Union Pacific gold note 63 at Qi%. Detroit Mack. & Mar. land
$5,051,075 the previous week.
grant bonds were active at 43 'g 4433.
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.— The stock market
1892.
Differen'sfrom
1891.
1890.
Oct. 1.
frev. week.
Oct. 3.
Oct. 4.
has been steady as a rule, and a few stocks have scored materChicago Gas is up to 8514', havial advances since our last.
ing reacted sharply from the bearish demonslrations in Chi0»pltal
60,422,700
60,772,700 60,812,700
result
Burplus
67,287,000
64,068,100 59,987,100 cago last week. General Electric closes at 119}4'. as the
Loans and diso'te 464,905,500 Deo.1,752,200 405,833,500 401,838,800 of the incandescent light decision, which is greatly to the
Olrculatlon
5,671,600 luo
29,400
5,621,600
3,507,600 company's advantage.
Distilling & Cattle Feeding closes at
Net deposits
476,598,800 Dec. 3,924,100 402,592,600 413,016,000
.59%, against 57 last weak, presumably on the facjs known to
Bpecle
71,921,000 Deo.l,522,<)00 64,158,800 93,798,300
Legal tenders
51,621,100 Dec. 117,700 39,592,100 20,906,900 insiders and the covering of some shorts. New York & NewReserve held
1:3,542,100 Dec.1,639,700 103,750,900 114,765,200
England holds its advance remarkably well around 44^5, withLegal reserve
119,149,700 Deo. 981,025 100,648,150 103,254,000
out a single definite fact having yet been made public regardrecent boom. Union Pacific has been active above 40,
Bai)laB reserve.
4,392,400 Dec. 658,675
3,102,750 11,521,200 ing its
and the larger net earnings of the company are spoken of as
Foreign Excn nnge.— Sterling bills have been steady the the cause for its better tone. The granger stocks and Atchipast few days without notable feature. The buying of securison have all been firmly held on their good reports of earnings
ties for London accoimt has not tliis week been a factor of
The Northern Pacific stocks showed their bet1.
much importance. Actual rates for exchange are Bankers' since July responding only slightly to the decided break
ter tone by
sixty-days sterling, 4 851^(94 85^ ; demand, 4 86^ (g4 86^
Chicago & Northern Pacific bonds. Richmond Terminal stock
/^ "«
^-4
cables, 4 86:'',(34 87ici,
been more active about 9, but the future would seem to
The f oUowmg were the rates of domestic exchange on New has
depend much on the amount of assessment to be made on tlus
York at the undermentioned cities to-day: Savannah, buying,
stock in the new plan, and that remains yet an unknown
discount to par Charleston, buying li
^^ discount, sellmg
quantity. Sugar has had a moderate business only, closing at
@3-16 discount, selling par to 1-16 discount; New Orleans,
110}^, against 108 Jg last week. American Tobacco has risen
©fS^ 5?' commercial, $1 50 discount ; St.Louis, 25c. per into prominence, and on the declaration of 6 per cent on the
«l,000 discount bid, offered at 35c.
Chicago, 50c. per $1,000 common stock closes at 116% in spite of the fire] at Kinney
;
:

;

;

&

.

m

:

:
.

U

;

'

Bros, factory,

,^^

,

CTOBER

NE>Y

THE CHRONICLE.

189?.]

YORK STOCK EXCllX^UE-ACTIVE STOCKH
fflOHaST AMD LOWBBr FBKMM.

Battirdar,
U<t. 1.

87'8

8,

3T'»

'4

Monday,

Tueaday,

Wudneailar,

Ocl. 3.

Oct. 4.

Oci. 5.

S8>«
•4
*a3Vt

38 ^a

88<Ih
4)«|

S99s

39

4>t

•1

l>3>a

38>

79'8 71)S9
52
52 V|
•118 120
62 >9 62 >*

39>4

'31>4

32

79>i

53

119%

62>4

30

70

77

134
105

73
133
.54

133
151

*i5% lti>«
48
48
•4%
•30

35

H
•145

11
149

•133

140

98H

93'4

80%

52

62 >4

39% 39

•4

30
77

135
154% 153 Hi
16>4 17>«
17

48>«

5^1 !>

•1%
•ami 33
11

11

147
132

14SH

98>9

11

'35
•23 "4

3C

-35

24>«

*23'4

•7r

75%

70

13l'«131i(, 131
104''8 104'6 106
GbVi 66>4
ee's
•23% 24>s 24
-20is 23
22 >4
433>t 133% 133
•104 105
104>4
•17
18
17>s
•10
4G>«
45>s
*14'« 14i»
•25
26
24'8
61>8 6l>4
'36
37 >« •36

-m

32

130
98>«
98

36
24
76
131
lOG
68
21
22 14
134
105
17>s

16

RR.

ActiT*

atorka.

Atolil»onToi). ABaiita r«....
AUantlo A ra«lllo

ii. BalUmore

f** «J»n»dlan

4

13%

43,028

4

"817 93%

Ohio

1.073

6%Jaa.

«
I

94% imm.
»4% Mar.

Ij

30 OI%Mar. li

lt«pl. 1 S

'
111% Jan. 19 145

5)15

9U%f>r|>t.2> 104

87,500 75% \
284 IVOki
8,450 111%
141%.! <:i. 1.'
40,355 76% June 8
12,915 44 Jim. 19

123 >«
prat.
bo
115 Chicago A North waatern .....

H
H

P»b.
Jan.
Jan. 1
Jan. 1
Jan. 91

MIO 29 (t«pt. Si as
5,><U2 3l%Hept. 16 3a
310 60 Jan.
61%
100 88% Jan.
41%
100 189 Peh. 4 IVl Jiiljr
S2,U30 95 H<<pt. 15 lluSJaa.
60 A 112. 1 70 Jan.

^8%Ohioa>oMUwaakaeABt.Paal

Do

64%

•i.iii

praf.

l>o

40% Jan.

ttmr 21
Apr. 31
IM>pt

M% Mar. 33

Paolflo

•SSJ'^*"*** Southern
'S25: Central of Hew J«r««.y
2»yOMitral Paolflo
3!l%ciiMaMak«AO.,Tot.tr.eert.
ea
iRt pr«(..
DO
do
48
Do
Sdpref...
do
147 Chloaico A Alton .....
•?*|Chloago BorUnitton A Qulnor.
fl Chicago AEaatornimnola....
llo%

BUhM*

LOWMt.

ataarM.

Pell.

•!% Ann.

^

11
1

Mjr.

f
*•
% Mar 3f
1)1% Jan. T
54% Aug. »
IOH%Jan. 20l23%Jiina 9

pref.

"i
•<

1

4

.Mar.

.'

8II4 8218
a2'8 53^
119>« 120
OS's 64%

M

11
148

140

10% 10%

•lO"*

50

---/.••

UU*«f MlwUIMt.

WMk,

80% 81% Chloago Rook Tiland A Paotflc
81% 82
62% 53% 52% 58% Chlcaio 8L Paul Minn. A Om.
118 119%
118% 120
pre!
Do
64% 05% 04% 66% Clevc. CInoln. Chlo. A St. L.
12,800 59%S<-pt. 10 75 Jan. 7
9i% 97
40 05 Jan. >5 9t'% Aug. I»
pref
Do
27 '8 30
30>9
28% 29it 29% 29% Coluni huB HooklDK Val. A ToU 21,740 27^4 Oct. 5 40 Mar !•
73
73
74
74
77
73
73 4
pref.
450 00 Jan. 6: 80% Jun* S
Do
•135% 130% Delaware A Rudaon
130
13C 130
13G'4 137
3.302 l-i2''rtJan. 8 149% Apr. 7
151
153% 154
153% 153% 153% 153% Delaware Lackawanna AWeat
6.400 I3H% Jnn. 19 167% Feb.
•16% 17% •10% 17% Denver A Rio tirande
17
2.750 15 Hci.t.2J 19% Jan. *
IO'b 17
'
"
"
5J% 50%
51
50% 50% 50% 51
pref.
7,550 45 Jan. H 51 Mar, »
Do
4% 4% EaitTennesiee Va. AOa
'4%
6
187
9% Jan. 7
5% '4% 54 •32
4 Juiie23{
35
•32
32
210 30%Jun«31 51% Jan. II
35
1 at pref.
33% 33%
Do
2il pref.
11
1,210
10% 10% •10% 11% 10% 10%
Do
7% June 221 20 Feb.
118
150
400 xll9%Jun.l5|l51 Sopt. »
148
140
Eransvllle ATerre Ilaate...

80>a 81%
52% 53>«
118b, 120
€2% «3i«

31
77
131

_.

o„.

*tn«« JA/f. I, ||

MM
of CM

Oct. f.

93 y

119

O'jrouiSU 7, anl

VTOOKI.

Oct.

.»
93 It 94%) •93% »1H •d3'a 94%
??.
•85 <9 86% '85>t 80%
87
87>ii •80
i2>
56 >4 SG>4
67'4
5)i% 57
57
67>« 59
SSVj 59i» ,51''
130 la:
181
i3mii3i\ 132 132
131
132 132
iSi,28>« 28!^ 28n8 29
29>«
29
29»H 2»\
29% 29% it^
23
23
23 >« 23^
283|) 23'Ib
233« 23>«
23% 23% 23%
•81
•60
•00
63
61
60 <4
62
61
61
01
03
•41
•40
•40
'10
43
43
42
42
10
4.1
43
113 147
143 147
147 147
143 147 -143
^ "uf* 98 98"8 »9>4 1U0
99^8 100>«
91»>« 100
97
^?.>
•69 »« 01
•59 >« til
•68 « 61
*59>8 61
•iO't. 01
•9(!
97>«
97 >«
UU>t 9U>«
97'* 97«ii
98
98 >4 .^?S
*7%
77'*
7»8 77%
77
78
7»>4 79»*
S»t.
78% 79% '''^
'i22>«123t 123% 123% 122% 122'8 122 >a 122 >« 123'4 123% 123%
114H1 11438 114>4ll4<>i, 114>all5% 115
115% 114^8 115% 114%
•93 •«
8li>i

mUnj

Tliunday,

•4

399g

for geek

681

137>«

98

130
98

140
98

10>«

10%

11

3G7,

39

39

23%

23''e

23% 23\

75 >s 751s 75% 76%
131>4 33i< 132% 133
106 100
1041a 100

07% 63%

38
24

1014

17i«

24J«.

76% 77%

135
140 Great Northern, pref
*i>7% 98% lUlnoln Central
11% 11% luwa Central
3.j% 38%
Do
24 Lake Erie A Western
24

77% 77%

pref.

Do

pref

330 lie Jan. 22 114
439 95%Hciit. I61IIO
965
g'feJuly 19i 16%
1,025 35 Sept. 16 50%
3.30.%

,

1.793

132%132'e 131% 132% Lake Shore A Mich. Sonthern.
104% 100 Long Inland
104% 106

68% 09% 08%
25% 25
22% •21
134% 133
107% 107%
10% 17% 17%

25%
241s 20
•21
23
22%
133
133>sl34>4
107 107
107%
45i«

140
98

11% 11%
39%

11%

30

130
98

08% 68%

08%
25%

26
•-0% 23
25

23
133

215
45,200
8,615

A NashvlUe
New Alb. * Chicago..
St. I.<iui< it

Texas

400

.

132% 132% MauhHttan Elevated, consol..
108% 108% lO-)- .Mlohl Kan Central.
ISU ^'*'* iS."* Minneapolis A St. Louis
'40% 47 »«
pref
45'8 47%
D^
14% j^ggonrl Kansas A Texas....
14% 14% 14

45% 40
40
14% l<^ •14% 15

lOi

27%

Jan.
Jan.

B
4

Feb. IS

Apr. 1*

Abr. 18
5 80
Jan. It) 110% Mar. 5
95 Jan. 18 112 June 17
64%Hcpt. 23 81% Jan. 3^

5,280 120

LonftvUle

Lonlsv.
Louisville

20% Jnu.
69% Jan.

Aug. 11

20% Sept.
14% Jan.

3.S7H 104
l.ior

103%

1,130
3,050

18

8

385 14
685 24

31
21

II

6|

Jan.

Mar.

T

1»

2139 Ang. 1»
Jan.
Mar. 6
Sept. 15117
Feb. 25, 21% Aug. 10
Mnr. 8 49%Aug.ia
20% Jan. IS
June

20
83% Jan. IS
20
June
•26% 27
pref.
27
20%
Do
27,775 54% June 7 63% Jan. 4
01% 62% 62% 62% 01% 02% 61% 62% Missouri Faoino
aO 37%U(oblle AOhIo
•35% 38
34% Jan. 27 42% Jan. 9
37% •35% 38
*87
•87
•<*6
88
88 lMa8hv.CbattanooKaASt.Loiils
85 Mar. 2t> 91 June 31
88
80
*8C
88
88
88
109% 1 10% {(ew York Central A Hudson.
3,027 l07%9cpt. 15ill9% Mar. 5
10S»8l08»B 108>s 109
109 108% 109% 109% 109% 110
•15% 16>« 16
17
17 New York Ohio. A at. Louis..
320 16% July 7 22% Jan. 5
16
17
10%
17
10% 16% 17
•72
•72
•72
•72
•72
•72
80
72 May 19' 81% Jan. 4
80
Istpref.
80
80
80
80
Do
•33 >« 35H *32'4 35
33% 31
•33% 39
•33% 85
300 82% Sept. 10| 45 Jan. 4
2d pref.
30
36
Do
Saifl 26%
20% 25% 26% Hew York Lake Erie A West'o 32,066 24% Sept. 14! 34% Jan. a.
24''h 25
25% 26 's 20
20% 26
300 61 Sept. 12i 77% Mar. 5
•61%
•63% 64
pref.
oOHi Gl%
64
64
Do
41% 43
43
44% 44% 46% 43% 45% 43% 45% 44% 40% New York A New England ... 357,772 30''8 Au.;. 24; 59 Mar. 8
215 250 New York New Hav. A Hart.
'244 249
100 224 Jan. 15 252 Jnn« S
245 218
245 247
246% 246%
-19
I8I9 16%
3,651
20
York Ontario A
18% 18% 18% -18%
— 18% 19% 18% 18% 18% 18% New York Busquehan.Western 28,910 17% Sept. 15! 23% Feb, 11
18% New
18-8
18
West
10% Jan. 4! 19% Oct. 516
lOHs
1G>4 17'e
17'^ 18
A
18
60
60
60
pref.
1,750 41% Jan. 21 69% Aug. 22
65
06
06% 67% 67% 67% 07
07
66
Do
•9>« 11
10 Norfolk A Western
•10
10
9 Sept. 23 18 Jan. 4
35
11
11
11
9% 9%
*9>a 11
Jan. 4
•37%- 38>s 38i« 39
5.50 37%8ept.29 56
pref.
Do
39% 3;t% 40% 40% •39% 40% 4U% 40%
19i«
18% 13% Northern Paclllo
19
19
1,240 17% Sept. 19, 26% Jan. S
19
19
18% 18% 19
18% 18%
pref. 00,413 47% Sept. 21 72% Jan. »
49% sole 50 "4 51
Do
SO'b
50% 5158 50% 51% 50% 50%
•20% 21 Ohio A BUsslaslppl
'18^ 20
•19
200 19 S«pl.28 24 Jan. »
-181« 20
•20% 21
20
20
20
26 Ohio Southern
•26
20O 19 Jan. 12 37% Mar. 3»
20
26 30 •26 30 •26 30
30
26
26
•76
•73
80 Orei!on R's A Navigation Co.
10 70 July 13 91% Jan. S»
•73
-75
•75
80
80
80
74% 74%
SO
•20
•22% 23
22
22
23
23
23
23% 23% 23% Oregon 8h. LInaAUtah North 1,580 21% Sept. 15 33% Jan. «
23
•18>4 18%
800 10% July 61 22% Jan. 4
18% 18% Peoria Deca'nr A EvansvUle.
18% 18% 18% 18% 18% 19
57'8 69
302,550 38 Jan. 19 65 Feb. 11
56 <• 57 H 57
I'liilailelphlii & Keaaini;
58% 58% 59% 58% 59% 5^% 59
•21
533 19%
2m •21 21% 21% 21% •20% 21% 21% 21% 22% 22% Pittsburg Clnn. Chlo. A St. L 1 ,575 57% Sept. 15 30% Jan. IV
5
Sept. 7 67% Jan.
59 61
pref
0138 01%
63% 61% 62
Do
60
01
59% 59% 60
35 38 Pitts. A West. pref. tr. certs
500 36 Sept. 21 45% Apr. 2»
-35
•35
•35
40
39
38
39
39%
38
919
8% 9'a Rlohniond A West Point Ter'l 41,473 0% June 27 17% Feb. 1»
9% 9%
9% 9''e
9% 9%
9% 10
4'i
pref
2,000 37 Aug. 27 79 Feb. 1»
41
41
Do
43'8 43-'e
43
43%
41
41
41% 44
35% Mejit. 12 41 Jan. &
Rio Grande Western
4 Mar. 11
68 Feb. 26
pref.
Do
240 110 Jan. 19 113% June 30'111
112% 111 112% 111%111% 112% 112% 112% 112% 112% 112% Rome Watertown AOgdensb.
0%Julyll ll%Jan. S
•8
l.OlOl
8% 8% St. Louis Southwestern
9
8% 8%
8% 8% '8% 8% •8% 9
1,922 14 July 11! 22% Jan.
pref.
Do
lO^B 10%
16% 16% 16i>8 10% 16% lo^e 16% 16% 16% 16S|
46''sJan.
4,110 39% July
47
48 'at. PaulADulnth
45
4479 47%
41% 41% 41% 43% 44
4481103 Jan 19 108 Oct.
pref.
103 107
108 108
Do
103 107
103 107
107 107
1651112 Feb. 2i 116%Jan.
•113% 114% 113 114% 114 114 '113% 115
113% 114% 113% 115 !8t. Paul Minn. A Manitoba...
3.000 31%8ei.t .13 41% Jan.
36% 36% 36
36% 30% 37
37% 37% 37% 37% 37% 37% Southern I'acltlc Co
7 July 1 14% Jan.
6,820
12
12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12
12% ll'Ja 12% 11% 11% Texas A Pacitte
Aug.
28% Toledo Ann Arbor A N. Mich. 2.1.50 23 Apr. 1 29% Feb. 2S
•26% 27
27
27% 27% 27'^8 28
27
27
27% 27
IS
45 Oct. 6: 62%
•45
100
•45
50 Toledo A Ohio Central
•45
•45
45
49
40
49
49
49% 45
79% Kept. 20 88 Feb. 11
•75
79
pref.
"75
•75
•75
•73
Do
•75
79
79
79
79
80
4
77.420' 30%i*ept. 15 60% Jan.
•38% 38% 38% 39% 33% 39% 39% 40% 39% 40% S9'8 4'0''e Union Paolflo
Jan. 4
7,141' 15% July 11 25
•16
18% 19% Union PaclUc Denver A Oulf
17
18
10% 18
17% 17% 17% 18
18'e'
4
10 June 8 15% Jan
1.750
ll%|W»baBh
10% 10% *10% 11
11
11%! 11% 11%' 11% 11%! "11
4
6,110 22% June 8 33% Jan
•24% 25
pref.
Do
24% 24% 23% 21% 24% 25
24% 25% 24%
40% Jan. ft
1.820 24%S<'I>t.
2G% 26% 20% 26% 26% 27
26% 26%l 26% 26%i 26% 26% Wheeling A Lake Erie.
80% Jan. 4
2,888 65 8<>p1.
pref
09''8
Do
69
68% 69% 69% 69"
69
70%| 09% 70%
08% 70
15% Sept. 15 aiHJMb *
•15
17 Wisconsin Central Co
•15
•15% 17
•15% ''
17
•15% 17
15
17
niacellaneoaa Stocks.
6,895' 32% Jan. 19 47'«Aug. 18
46
46%| 45% 45% American Cotton Oil Co
43% 43% 44% 44''e 45
46
45''a 46%|
1.219 03% Jan. 19 83^8 Aug. 1»
pref
Do
HI
82% 32% 82%', 81% 81%
81% 81% 81
81% 82% •82
31,30t) 78%Jiin. 19 115%AiMr. 2»
108% 109 108% no's. 109% 111% 110%110'e 110l9ll9"» 110% 110% Am. augarRef.Co
».329 <M) Jan. 19 107%Ang. 1»
pref.
Do
102% 192%
•101% 102% 101 102% 102% 103
103% 103% 102''8 102"sl
2
81% 80% Chicago Gas Co., trust reo"t8. 171,o7h 71% Jnn. 24 8.5% Oct. T
83
84% 83% 83 V 83% 85
80% 81% 8OS9 83
43% Oct. »
13.8.'i<)
28% Miiy
42
43
42
43
42% 43% 42% 43% 42% 42% 41% 42% Colorado Coal A Iron
10'.;
l.^ 118% Aug. SO
Jan.
3.180
Consolidated Gas Co
114''8 H4''8 115
115% 115% 116%11
116% 113 % 116
116% 116
Off% Distilling A Cattle Feed'gCo. 1I7.>16.'> 44% Mar. 9 67% Jan. 7
68%
595|.
57% .'>8% 59
57% 59% 57 'a 58% 58% 60
62.:W0 104%Julv 7ir.>''8 0ct. T
112% 112% 112% 113^8 114% 117% 117 117% 117% 119% 119 119', Oeneml EleotrloCo
Oct.
8.601 91%Mur. 7 13.5
.,
J
134% 134% National Cordage Co
134 134% 133% 131% 134% 134% 134% 136
134% 135
3,615 100 Jan. 4 121% Aofr 17
pref.
i)o
120 120
119% 120
120 120% 120 120% 119% 120% 119 120%
8..506 30% Mar. 24, 16%Aag. 3S
Lead Co
44% 44% National
44
44>4
43% 44% 44% 45% 41% 45% 41% 43
Mar. 21 99% Aug. 8»
1,742 81
pref.
'
Do
'
94
94
95
94% 94%, 94% 91%
94
94% 91% 94% 95
~
2,8M3 11% May 18' 18% Jan. 4
12% 13 North American Co
13 V
13
13
13
12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12
1>)
June 14 39% Jan. 4
115
24 Oregon Improvement Co ....,
•22
2',
•21% 23% •22
22
24% •22
24%| •22
25
4
4.2.'>0 29%!''rpt. 10' 40% Jan.
*29T8 30%
30% 31% 31% 31%' 31% 81% PncifloMall
30% 30% 30% 31
64% Jan. IS
185,000 50% Oct.
5'
31
51% Pipe LlnpOrtlHoatcs^
6r
53
53
50% 52% 32
51% 52%
I
46H 184 Jau. 4 300l*Marll.
Palace I'ar Co
196 198 Piulman
*195 198
197% 198
190 196
195% 195% 190 196
Jan. 482% Aug.
•83% 83% 83% 83% 83% 84
84
84% 84% 81%i 84% 65 Btlver Bullion C'ertlticatea... 689,000 31% July 12, 96%
11 .50%Mar. Ipr
7,010<
37 Tennessee Coal A Iron
-34% 35
374 36
35
37
38% 36% 37% 87
38
23 tO'f Apr.
92 Feb.
pref
•
Do
100 105 100 106
•100 10.%
105
'lOO 105
Jan. 19 100% Aug. 1»
11.91'J 82
9478 95%
95'4 96%
96% 97
96% ,96''f. 96% 90^8 96% 96% Western Union TelcgrapI'

om

2f8

6
37»«

20

•36
•80

I

I

1

|

I

!

1

,

•>

,

|

*

Xhese are the Vices

Iji

aud asked; no

aalo made.

6Frioe4

fro-ii

both

Ex'}>i:kug<u.

xKtdWUinl.

»

CHRONICLR

l^HE

582

[Vol. LV.

Wkather Record For August. —Below we give the rainfall
and thermometer record for the month of August and previous
months of this year and the two preceding years. The figures
are from the records of the Signal Service Bureau, except at
points where they have no station, and at those points they
are from records kept by our own ascents.^
Shermometet

vraoiNiA.
tiorSolk.-

Blgheat..
liOwest...

n-caiPLa.
WUmimtonBigheat.
.

Average..,

tvOdon.—
HigbeBt...
Lowest....
Average..

ViorloUa—
Highest,
liowest.

Average.
Hlgbest..

Lowest..
Average..

Vorganton —
Hlgbest...
liOwest....

Average...

fl.GAROL'A
CharUston.—
Highest...

Lowest
Average...
Statebwrg.—
Highest....

Lowest
Average..

CoZumMo—

Highest...

Lowest
Average

.

SSverQreen—
Highest....

Lowest

..

Average..

GKUUUIA.

Atmuta.—

Hlgbest...

Lowest
Average..
Atlanta.—
Highest...
Lowest....
Average..
Highest..
Lowest....
Average...

Oohimbus.—
Highest...
Lowest....
Average..
€torM.~
Hlgbest.
Lowest....
Average...
Hlgbest...

Lowest.

. .

Average...

WLOBIDA.
^wluonoiSe.

Highest...
Lowest....
Average..

ffampa.—
Highest...

Lowest
Average..
WitUTOiUe—
Highest..

Lowest

.

Average..
^aXUihcuati—

Highest
Lowest.

.

Average..

ALABAMA
^ontflpm'v.—
Higbest..
Lowest...
Average..
tlobUe.Hlgbest..
Lowest...
Average..

Selm*—
Highest.
Lowest...
Average..

May.

June-.

Jxa\i.

jluatMt.

1892. 1891. 1890.

1898. 1891. 1890.

1893. 1891. 1890.

1898. 1891. 1890

AHnAiU.

BIsiest.
Lowest.
Average..
.

VIHOINIA.

Jaaptr—
Highest...

Lowest
Average..

88-0
40-0

67-5

55-0
750; 76-g

()«0
«6-3[ 59-5

Highest....

B80

Lowest

45-0
74-5

Average...

6

830

930

89-0

83-0
78-3

5.H-0

67-E

78-1

lOVO 104-0

90-0
44-0
78-3

84-0
81-3

Lowest

88-0, 89-0
65-01 S.'J-O

73-8

74-0
92-0
48-0
71-B

8S-0
48-0
70-3

—

88-9

S70

47-t'

Lowest

Average...

taxrviumHighest„..

Lowest
Average..
•Chtnevville—
Highest....
Lowe.?t .
.

Avenige...
ailSSISS'PI.

?4-8

85-8
58-0
75-7

T3-8
85-0
42-0
77-0

870

92-0

59-0
74-4

640

920

78-9

94-0
86-0
80-8

940
«9-0
80-6

93-0
67-0
80-0

53-0
73'2

98-0
67-0
79-2

97-0
82-0
31-2

610
79-&

97-0
67-0
»l-0

93-6
57-0
77-9

94-0

90-!-

92-0

45'a
73-7

87-2
56-0
74-a

85-1,

68-1

890

81-9

78-1)

78-0

93-0

95-0

420

4S'(

70-0

102-0 10S-(i
61-0 eoQ

73-0

72-4

98-0
88-0
80-0

90-0
48-0
73-0

92-0
5«-0
74-0

.

y<ck«OUfv—
Highest.

Lowea^

j

Average..^

8-90

16

19

l-Bd

13

14

Kalnfall.ln

1-64

1-03

!5-a«

6-13

3-47

Davsrain..

102-0
54-0
82-9

3-53
10

6-38

4-8a

IS

9

8

8

28

17

9-31
14

7-05

5-12
19

419
111

10

15

7-RH
12

7-07

3- 77

0-52

5-86

13

5-Bl
14

14

6

14

14

12

B-93

4-84

1-45

4-18

3-7f

U

lOl-O
«2-0
81-0

98-0
4^i-0

97-(i

96-(

62-0
?8-5
94-0

610
79-2

ino-0

98-0
88-0
81-2

980
840

96-0
88-0
81-8

92-0
70-0
81-7

ir«m«n«t'n-

lUlnfall.ln
98-0
63-0
81-3

91-0
B7-0
81-0

80-8

99-0
68-0
81-0

05-0
86-0
82-0

97-0
54-0
78-9

92-0
65-0
80-6

93-4
88-0
81-1

91-8
69-8
79-2

91-0
65-0
80-0

Dars

Hainfall.ln

ICIO 101-0
B3-1

80-0

83-0

80-0

95-0
69-0
79-0

9

Halnfall.In

3-1(1

Days

47-(

880
ISO

980
«4-0
82-0

98-t
60-t

79t

103-0
«2-0
81-0

9ii-0

540
77-0

98-0
58-0
81-0

950 950
600!

8-i-O

74-0' 79-a

98-0

960

480

5S-0

sa-oi ;7-o

790

96-0
65-0

\

950 980
880 B7-0
78-0

81-4

94-0
H8-0
79-H

95-0

680
78-8

930
H2-0
79-3

89-0
88-0

9:i-0

930

67-o! Bl-0

82-1

79-4

B5-0
80-0

920

7S-4

rain..

4-?,2

Ratnfail.in

9.

17

13

j

'

3-03
7

CAROL'A

Days

rain..

Ralnfall.ln

Daya

rain..

rinlxmMa.—
RalnfalMn
rain..

M

4-,')0

18

8-28
17

4-Si 11-93

23

8

20

17

3-64

B-7«

6-98

6-59

18

13

8-79
14

6-98

»

3-711

6-07

8-31

6-88
18

5-35

4-42 10-48
9
15

5-.30

8-08
7

6-04

4-8D
10

4-73

8-98
13

518

8-78

7-07

7- 18

18

8

13

....

10

8-00
11

8-48

8-85

7

4-61
14

6-85

14

5-28
14

8-95
15

132

10-33

8

18

.S-W)

8-87

10-32

12

18

20

286

8-91
11

8-68

H

6-18
11

18

b

12

2-»2

4-13

8-18

4-38
18

1-13

2-90
10

1-KB

2-.')9

6

10

17

13

9-08
11

9-18
18

4-57

5-ae

7

11

4-83
15

6-30

1-SS

Day* rain..

4

8

8-98 12-87
18
15

17

It

11

9
18

10

1-38

17

8-31
14

18

13

18

5-01

9-84

9 78

813

3-93
11

7-25

8

4-73
11

S-89

8-28

....

S

17

....

11

4-47

3-70

4-13

6-41

91

M

11

16

18

18

6-82

17

ErergreenKalnfall.in

6

6 21

4-83

9

6-48

6-20

9

10

Ralnfall.ln
Days rain.

8ff-7

78-8

9-36

15

3-28 10-26
12
IS

H(*rganton.—

98-0 102-8 99-0
58-0 4b-o; 59-0
79-8 79-0 81-0

96-0
63-0
81-3

H
i-'ih

DavtraiD..

91-5

62 a 88-0

rain..

S-.'ST

OhwloUt-

95-0
86-0
81-0

687

CAR'NA.

Days

Hlgbest...
Lowest....

Average

Win

4-03

13

N.

Volumbua,—
.

2-79
7

.S-.Vi

8

RslnfalLln
DaTsraln..

iFuMon.—

Average...
Shrevevort.—
Higbest...
Lowest....
Average...
^/'d CottauBlgbest....

91
45-5
74-0

08-0 100-0
87-0 61-0
80-3 Sl-7

1

56-0
82-e

JLOUIS'NA
W. Orleana.Hlgbest...

.Vor/<*t-

8

50-6

8-19
18

6-76

8-16
13

Sl'l
1'

....
....

QBOROIA.
Atujatii.—
Kalnfall.ln

Days

rain..

8-95
7

I

^ 1

U

14

I

8-2

UCTOBEB

THE CHRONICLE.

lH»<i.J

S,

588

BOSTON. PMIL.VDKLIMIIA AND liVLTlXOKB HTOOE SXCOAIian.

t^ Share

Active Stocks,
f Indloalca nnllnted

_

T.

AU»ntln

* 8. Fe
A Pko.

Boltln.nrtt
Int

A

Hnlurdajr,
Oct. 1.

'
100
Ohio (Ball.jAOO

"
"

iMcferred

100
100

a.l I'r.tniTed
Kont'Mi .V Albanr I A>«(oii;.100
"
Bust. HI A Lowell
100

"

AMalne

100
Oi.lr.i; of Mosa.
"
100
"
i'l.irrrod
100
"
OLlc.Uur.AQuln.
100
Ohio. Mil. A St. P. fPhU.). 100
Ohio. AW.MIoh. rKnWonV.lOO
'•
Cifvp. A Cknton
100
•'
IT. f. rred....
100
"
riti'iii.iirtf pref.
100
"
Fl. A l-croMarq.
100
"
Preferred
100
Hant. A Br. Top. fPhUa J . fiO
"
Preferred
60
"
LehiKh Valley
50
Maine Central fAwfon^.lOO
"
Hezloan Central
100
"
a Y. A N. Enic.
100
"
Preferred
100
irorth><ni Central (Bait.). 50
orthern Paolllo f PAi/a.; 100
"
Preferred
100
gId Colony.... (Botton). 100
ennsTlTaula.. (PhUa.). 50
Phlladel. A Erie.
"
50
•'
PhUa. A Reading
50
BammltBranob Botton;. 50
'•
Onion PaolUo
100
United CoB.of Ht.J.(PkUa.)\O0
H>^<ll.||

37H

(Botton). \00

.

377a
414

0»
'.'.'.'.'.'

Prlcea — not Pur 0«a(uai Prle«a.

Monday,

Tueaday,

Oot. 3.

88 >« 88^

88^1

SB'S

'4

lii"

92

204

181

1«(J

180

17

•17

43

44

180
17
43

180

•17

IMOI4
IS

181
iao>4

97''a

99H

77

77

•35 \
S'l'g

129

4%

98

Ul

•17

43

43

99Tg

78
•47

78%

•8

83^8

55
89

73
36
88

89%

14><
42^8

14% 14%
43% 4491)

14% 14%
44% 46%

96

96

93

98

*18i«

19

187«

49^ 50

50%

96

•64'8

18^8
80^8

....

19%
52%

19

81
180

181
180 181
55^8 SS>f
55% 55%
•30
31
31
31
28% 2a%
285i« 28»B
*6
"6
7
7

»0
4
2 94
ISO

•
1

•17

IH

•1H% 18

48

43

•43

7H% 79%

99% 9U^
78% 79
47

181

88% 55%
32

29% 29%

47
a

se

36

86%

86

86%

58% 89

43% 48%
04
94%

4'4%

03
65

•64%
18% 19

94

mae«illane<>aa Stocha.
Ajn.8nK'rRetlu.1ir£o«ton>
1081* 108''8
Pref errea
"
101>al02>t
Bell Telephone ..
100 XI 98 200
Boat. A Montana
"
31>4
25 31
"
•8>«
8^8
BntteABoston..
25

74

17%

Ask.

17%

I7«f

285

94

120 63
1,402
10,650
81
8,585

47

46%

117% 119% 119

17% 17%

64%
2

37%
82%
58%

H I8CELLAI(EOI7S.

Freuchni'n'sBayL'nd
Huron Mining
Uinols Steel

"

8

"

25
100
25

"

t!

Kearsarge Mining

25
25
25
25
50
10
10
25
25

"

75o,

10% 11
28%
28
75

29% 29%
5

.

FAA

1900-04, MAS
9% 9% Connecting. 6b
12% 12% Del. A B'd Br'k, Ist, 7s.l908,FAA
13% 14 E<«ton& Am. l8t.M...'iA. 1920, MAN
4% 5%l Elmir. A Wilm., Ist, lis. 1910, JAJ.
Hunt. A Br'd Top, Con. 5s.'95,AA0
Lehigh Nav. 4%s
1914, Q-^
1897,JAD
10
11% 2d 6b, gold

General mort. 4%s, g.l924,Q—
147
(Phila.)..
Met. Trac. Co
Leblgb VaUey, 1st Us... 1898, JAD
80
Morris Canal guar. 4. (PAi7a.>.100
1910, MAS
2d 7s
"
Prelerrcrt guar. 10100 202
1923. J aDI
(Bo<fon). 25
34% 34%' Consol.6
Oaceola Mining
North Pouu. lat, 78....1«»6,MAN
Pnllnjan Palace Car..
"
196 198
100
Gen. M. 76
IMS, JAJ
"
Qnlnoy Mining
25
"
25 157 160 iPenuaylvnnia gen. 6s, r..W10, Var
Tamarack .Mining
. loo^. V..rl
Con^nl.S". <•
rhnniBon Fie. Weill'"
"
100
I

'

.

I listed.

M nd

aooroea Intereat.

1

Laat

prioa this

Jaa.

21
1

72% Jaa.
-- May
'^

Jan.

«
t

A
\
*

Mar.
.>4%Pea. 11
._
7 Pek. X»
80% Jaa. 4

.-

.

\

13

'

ti

118% Ao» ta
107% Aoc iL

78% Jan.
90% Jan.
192
80

Sept.

7

July

253

Feb.

Aug.lJ

43% May s7
17% Jan. i

125 117

Au)C.

3*

61% AUK. 1;
47% July iT

43

Jan.
47
914 43% Jan.
119%' 15,627 104% July

119%

Oet.

120
21

July

14% Feb.
i",146 48% Jan.
61 50% Feb.
590 12 May
1,975 16% Jan.

'

Jaa.

300
73

60% Jan.
i",862

IS

210

Mar.

Aiw.

^
M

Peb.

IS

33%

May IS

Oct. a
18% Jan. a
20% May 1«

62

Ask.
10%; Penna. ConsoL

58, r
1919, Var
1913, JAD
4% g
Conaol.5a
1939, AAO
87% Fa. AN. Y. Canal, 78... 1906, JAD
Perklomen, 1st aer.Ss.lOlS, ()-J
83
Pnlla. A Erie gen. M. 5c.,1920, AAO
58% Gen. mort, 4 g
1020, AAO
117
Phila A Bead, new 4 g., 1988, JAJ
lat pref. Income, 5 g, 1958, Feb 1
2d pref. lucerne, 5 g, 1958, Feb. 1
104
3d pref. income, 5 g, 1958, Feb. 1
2d, 7a
1893, AAO
103
Clonsol. mort. 7s
1911. JAD
92%! Consol.mort.6g
1911, JAD

Collat. Tr.

2%

103%
103

94%

96"

105'

102%
~
~

~

AAO
AAO
FAA
A
Po'keepale Bridge, 6 g.l936. FAA
ImprovementM.6

07

108
122

90

1897,

g.,

Con.M.,5 g..atamped,1922,MAN

Phil. Wilm. A Bait., 48.1917,
PltU. C.
8t. ti., 78. ...1900,

Scltuyl!K.E.81de,l8t5 g.l935, JAD<
8teQben.AInd.,lstm.,5B. 1914, JAJ:
UnltedN. J.,6g
1894, AAO;
Wuren Frank., lat ,7a,1896,FAA

A

|100%

Atlanta^ Char r,
Income 6s

|i22%

lat iS, 1907,

1900,

JU

AAO

Ohio 4g., 1933, AAO
Pitts. A Conn., 5 g...l923, FAA
BUten IsUnd, 2d, 5 g.l926, JAJ

A

98

Baltimore

67%

BaLAOhlo 8.W.,l8t,4%g.l990,
CapeF.AYad.,Ser.A.,6g.l916, JAD
1916, JAD
Series B., 6g
1916, JAD
Series C, 6 g

|iii%

JU

67

26% 27

..1930, MAS
Chart. Col.AAug. lat 78.1895, JAJ
Oa. Car. A Nor. I st 3 g. . 1929, JAJ
1900, JAJ
North. Cent. 6s
1904, JAJ
68
1926, JAJ
Series A, 5a
1925, AAO
4%s
Oxf.AClark.,tnt.gu.,6 g.l937,MAN

Cent.Ohlo,4%g
120
113
105

_192()
Inc. 68
Rutland, lat, 6a
190^ MAN [110
1898,FAA 1101%
2d, 5a
Sondt.— Philadel ->h|a

ouy Val.,7 3 U<f. 1896. JAJ
lAttoutic City Ist OS. g.. 1919, .MAN
IBelvidere Del., 1st, Us. 1002, JAD
Catawlaaa, M., 7b
1900,
Cbar. Cln.A Chiclst 5g, 1947. Cl-J
Clearlfttd A Jeff., 1st. o». 1927, JAJ

24%

An*. 38' .'»8%Ma».
4 114% Jaa.
July 13 80% Mar.

.

!

(Botton).
Allouez Mining
'*
Atlantic Miuiuf;
(Ball.)
Baltimore Traction..
City PasscnKerKK... (Baa.).
(Boston).
Bay State Gaa
"
Beaton Land
"
Centennial Mining...
"
Fort Wa> ui; JilectrlcU
"
Franklin Mining

Apr. «
Apr. 19

May

.'-

I

13% •12% "12%
17% 17% 17% 17%

f

4

U

13

10

Ifl

«2% rrV 11
137% May IT

Jan. 13

Mar. 14
Sept. 15

86% 8eut.

n
^
n

69 z223%Mar24 332 Jaaa IT
230 7% June 6 10% reb.

62

'

.
^

May If
%Mar.8»

17%8«pt.l9 3«%Jaa.

13,0S'8

118'4 118
118%
•16% 17% •16
17%
53% 53% •53% 54

Bid.

18% 16%

59%

raa.
Jaa.

'i

148,482 19*ia Juii. iif
3 Mar. 39

118

Inactive ttockt.

100
100

73

59

•

47% Kept.
164% J.
53%

400 81

1

•71

89%

59
47

19

46%Jnii. ^i

1,71H 80%
51 113
2,810 14
e6,S.%9 81
1,228 73

12»%l

285

285
76

•71

(£«<(.). 100

"
"

A

.'>iiv

23% J

,

(Botton). 100
82
Water Power
"
80
Boston A Providence (£o<«on) -100; 251 252 iWeatlng. El. tr. reo.H
50 27
.--•11
Camden AAtantiopf. (PAi7a.).
Bonds— Boston.
. .
9% 'At.Top.A8.F.100-yr.4g.,1989, JAJ
"
601
Oatawlsaa
"
6O1
60% 100-f ear Income 5 g., 1989.Sept.
lat preferred......
**
60
58% 59% Burl. A Mo. Kiver Exempt 6a, JAJ
2d preferred..
50,
Non-exempt 6s
1918, JAJ
(Bait.).
83
wenteal Ohio
"
1910, JAJ
100
Plain 4a
«harl. Col. A AuKusta
Caile. Burl. A Nor. 1st 5,1926, AiiO
Connecticut & Pasa. (Bo»(on).100!
"
100 225
1918, JAD
2d mort. 6a
Connecticut Klver...
Debenture 6a
1896,JAD
Delaware A Bound Br.(PAtJa.).100
"
50 'si'
Chlo.Burl.AQuinay4s..l922,FAA
Har.PorW.Mt.JoyAL.
Iowa DiTiaion48
1919, AAO
Kan. eyFt.8.AMem.(Bo»«on).100
Chic.A W.Mich, gen. r,K, 1921, JAD
"
100
f Preferred
Consol. of Vermont, 5s. 1913, JAJ
"
100
K. Cit} Mem.ABlrm.
Current River, 1st, 5».. 1927, AAO
(PAUo.). 50
71%
lilttle Bchuylklll
Det. LauB.ANor'n M.7B.1907, J,kJ
Hanohester A Law.. (Bo>f on). 100
E»8temlstmort.6g.,l 906, MAS
(Ball.) 50
Maryland Central....
free.£lk.AM.V.,lat,6a.l933,AAO
73
Mine Bill A 8. Haven (PAifa.). 50 72
Unatampedlat, 68....1933,AAO
"
50 83
HeequehoninKVal
K.C.C.ASpring.,lat,5g.,1926,AAO
(Boalon).lOO
KorUiem N. U
K. C. F. 8. A M. con. 68, 1928, MAN
Horth Pennajlvanla. (PAifa.). 50i "86%
Oiecon 8hori Line. ..fi*o»ton). 100! 23% 23% K.C.Mem. A Bir.,lBt,.'J8,1927, MAS
K.C. St. Jo. A C. B., 78.. 1907, JAJ!
Pennaylvanla A N. W. (PA«a.) 50!
L. Bock AFt. 8.,lst,7s.. 1905, JAJ
(Ba/f.)100
Balelf;h A Gaston ....
Louia.,ET.A8t.L.,l8t,6g.l926,AAO:
(BotlOH).lOO
Kutland
1936, AAO
100
70
2m.. 5— 6 g
Preferred
1925, AAO
Mar. H. A tint., 6s
6eaboard A Koanoke. (Baft.) 100
1923, JAD
'"
Exten. 68
100
let preferred
Mexican Central, 4 g... 1911, JAJ
.(Boston). 50
72%
West End
"
80 87% 87%
lat couRol. incomes, 3 g, non-cum.
Preferred.
2dconsol. income^., ijs, non-cum.
61
(Phila.). 50
West Jersey
"
25 In. Y. a N.Eng,, Ist, 7s, 1905, JAJ
50 20
West Jersey A Atlan.
1905, JAJ
16
14
Ist mort. 6s
(Salt.). 50
Western Maryland..
"
1902,FAA
2d mort. 6b
100 108
WUui. Col. & AuKusta
"
Ogden. A L. C.,Cou.6a.l920.AA04
100 110
WUmingfnAWeldon

Preferred
Worc'et.Nash.ARoch.

K.

1

63%
«5%
18% 18% •18% 18%
50% 51
50% .'S0%
181
180 180
180 180
55% 58% 85% 85% 55% 55%
31
81
31% •30
29i,« 29%
29% 29%
29',9

Thorn. Kurop.E.Weldn (Boston) 100
United Ua» Impt.
(PAif.)

Wlatoiisin Central... (B<w<on).100

23
92

108% 110% 110 111
110% 110% 110% 110% 110% 110% 8,595
100% 102
102% 102% 102% 103
103 103
102% 103
1,052
200% 200 200% 202 202
201 202
202 203
334
30% 31% 32
32
31% 83
33% 34
34% 35% 12,881
9
8\ 8%
9
9
9%
9% 9%
9% 9%, 1,259

[iVt««« 0/ Oct. 7.

AttanU A Charlotte

nr|>t

200

WeetKndlrfuid.. (BotCn)...
17% 17% 17%
* Bid and aakpd prices; no aale waa ma<te.
Bid.

8

Sept. IS

849

50% 81%

Oalomet AHeola
"
280 285
25 277 280 •278 282
28U 2S5
Oanton Co
(Balt.).lOO
76 •
76
71
"
OonsoUdatedGas
59% 58% 59% 59
100 5919 S9>< 59
89%
46>4
rie Telephone ^Botton;. 100 46
46% 47% 47% 47 >< 47
47%
Ueneral Eleitrlo.. "
112^ 113% 114 117', 117 117%
100 ll2i«113
•'
Prsferred
118 118
100 119 119
118 118
118 118%
•
•16
LamsoD Store Ser. "
18%
17
50
Lehl'hCoalANav 'PhU./ 50 531S8 53^ 53% 53 'a 53% 537e 5iTg 53%
60
60
61
62
62
62
M.En(c.TelenUone^B')W'n;100
61% 62
12l>8
1258
12% 12%
Worth American. (PKU.). XOO
13% 13%

inactive Stock*.

i'i

17

80
17

l.">

93
•65

84%AiHt.
63 Mar.

.1

76

15%
4t% 45%

15
4.^%

110% Jaa.

1.-,

"iih

"88'%!

88%

14%

2

I.

I

58% 89

189

14% 14%

,lnn.
-

•

5*4

80

Ma..
•ar.

JuaaS
18% Jaa* it
43%Jaa«n

17;

38

6

30
•54

Jg
loaeli

A

W 18S
15% Kept.
fl-

19% 19%
83% 83%
73' .1

83% 83%

Jaa. 4
Jaa. f
Mar. li
II
rok. li

I

Jan.

»'

85

•6
•0
•6% 7
7
7
7
'38% 38% 38% 39% 39% 39% 39% 40% 89% 40% 40
40%
227 228
227% 228
227% 227% 227% 227% 227 227% 227
•7% 8
WeaternN.Y.APa^PAUa.MOO •7»B 8
7^8
7% 7% •7% 7%
7% 7%
7''e
r'

91

Mar. •
Jao. • lOOH
I
Jaa. 12 183
.T.ia. 1% 128
a 809
.0.

-

10,087
10,000

80

•.»

5

\»o
72»

4«

98% 99%
7h% 78%

•47

47
6
-19% 20

83% 83%

129

14>g
41>9

95
64^ 65

82% Mar

AH,

43%

30

UAmmT

Loir***.

47,271

08

100%

•10%

.

84

"ii\ "59

Si

911%
•5

84

88% 89

132

47

19\ lOH 19%

7.

20.t%908%

18

99%

3S''s

88% 89%

180%
17%

49%

Sa^S

60
V19

89%

180% IHO

43

Oct.

180

771%

77%

84
.

W

waak,
abarM.

rrtdajr,

tHit. 6,

HO

43%
08%

g8<4

'47
•5

19

204

Thurailar,

»,

92

204

180

10
84

<)<•».

121

,

304

IttO

203

Wminaiikr,

•4><i

•03
132

talSMk

•of

Oot. 4.

110%
105% 106
110
118

127

Pledm.ACum.,l8t,5g.l911, FAA
Pitts. A Onnells. 1st 7s. 1898, JAJ

Virginia Mid., lat 6s.. .1906, MAS
1911 MAS
2d Series, 6a
1916, MAS
3d Series, 6a
1921, MAS
4th Series, 3-4-58
1926, MAS
5tb Series, 88
West Va. C. A P. Ist, 6 g. 191 1, JAJ
Weat'E. X.C ConaoL 6 g. 1914. JAJ

WUm.Col. AAug.,6s..l910, JAD 118

111%
119%

mSOELLAXEOUS.
Baltimore—aty Hall 68 190O, tJ-J
'
l'.'^'' ,'
Fundlug6a
.

110

111%
103

112%
134

13o%
113
12s

128% i'29%
1

2tl

West Mar)-l'd KB. 6s
Water 5»
Funding 58
Exchange 3%a

.

119

. 1

.

r.:4%

li'

19i<>.

.-i.ii.'

.

I

1930. JAj! 100%; 101
74 %l 78
VirgiutalSiate)38.l'ew.l932. JAJ
1!"'
Che8ai>eukeGaa.6s
Conaol. Gas, 6s.......... 1
I
5a
'

K.iiiir«>>io <a«.

"-

1

'V

i>9
.

109%

11% 113

>0% 101
10)
OB «
I

THE CHRONICLE.

584:

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES
4MII.K0AI> AND

(Continued).—4C7TFE

——

Otot-nt Range (talet) in 1892.
MISCEL. BONDS.'ij''?'!'' Price [.
fTi'S
Highest.
Lowat.
Period. Oct.!

i

fVoL. LV,

BONDS

AND FOB

OCT. 7,

I

Kailhoaj) AW) MiSCEL. BONDS.

.

Inter' St. Price
Period.] Oct.!

Lowest.

\

8 g.l900! Q-F iljl b- 107>4 Jan.
81% Feb.
4.t.Top.&8.F.— 100-yr.,4g.l989 J_ * J| 83ia
58%
53 May
1989 Sept.
100-year Income, 5 a
68 b. 67 July
AtL & Fac— Guar, 4 g....l937
10 Aug.
1910 J & J 11%
W.D. lno..69
«rookl'nEleTafcll9t,6,g.l924A & 0,117 a. Ill Jan.
Oui. Bonth.— lat cuar.. 58 1908 J * J 106-4 105^8 Jan.
South.— iBt guar.,
jOui.
101
100 Mar.
1913
Sd,68
72
67 Sept.
"Cent. Ga.—8 & W. lstcon.58,'29
115 b. 115 Jan.
OMitralof N. J.— Cons., 78. 1899 Q-J
N 123 b. 120 Jan.
1902
Coneol., 78
eeneral mortgage, 5 g..l987 J & J 11116 109 "a Jan.
lll2
1091s Jan.
Iieh.AW.B.,con.,7s,a8'd.l900 Q—
loOiab. 94 Jan.
1912
do. mortgage, 58
Dock A Imp., 5e.. ..1921 J * jillOiab. 1051s Jan.
Am.
lOQSijb 109
Sept.
CentTal Paclflc— Gold,6s..l898 J A J
117 a. lUijApr.
Ofces. AOMo—Mort.,6 g..l911 A & O
N 104% 1031s Jan.
1939
lBtoon801.,5 g
& S 7958
7936 Oct.
1992
Gen. 4»38,g
76 Jan.
B.AA.Dlv.,l8tcon.,2-4g.l989 J & J 79 14
do 2dcon.,4g...l989 J & J 78'sa, 751s Jan.
Oblc. Bnrl. A Q.-Con.,78.1903 J <Sz J 122 b.l21i3Jan.
K 102ial!. 101 Jan.
1913
£>ebeDture,69
& e 105 ta- 106 Sept.
1903
Oonvertible 59
1922 F & A gs b. 911s Fell.
Denrer Dlvle)on,4s
& N 88i8b. 87 Sept.
Nebraska Extension, 49. 1927
Cblc. A K. 111.— let,s.f.,69.1907 J A D 11534
1121s Jaa.
O 119
119 Oct.
1934
Con80l.,6g
102 14
97 Jan.
General consol. let, 59. .1937
N 103 >s
9714 Jan.
CUlcago&Erie-lst,4-5 g.l982
1982 Oot'b'r 43 b. 421s Oct.
Income, 58
86 Jan.
l8t,5g.l937 J A J 90W(
Cble. GasL.
A *127 b. 12514 Jan.
Oblo. Mil. ASt.P.-Con.78. 1905
114 b. 1121a Jan.
A
let. Southwest Div.. 6a.l909
llBHib. 113>sJan.
A
i8t,So.Mln. Div., 68. ...1910
A *110 b. 106 Jan.
let.Ch.APae.W.Div., 58.1921
102^8
IOOI4 Jan.
<.Tuc. AMo. Rlv. Div., 58.1926
10738
W!e. A Minn. Div., 5 g..l921 r A
103 Jan.
107i«b. 103 Jan
1914 r A
TernilnBl,5 g
9114b. 86I4 Jan.
-Gen. M.,4g., eeries A.. .1989 r A
114 b.|llli4 Jan.
.
6;il.ANor.—let,eou., 69.1913 r A
139 b. 137 Feb.
dilc.AN.W.— Couaol.,78..1915
Coupon, gold, 7s
1902 J A D 127 b. 123i«Jan.
SiLking Iuud,6s
'll4i«Sept.
1929 A A O
aicking fund, 59
1929 A A O lOTisb. 105>sMay
«lLkii!g fund debeii,, 58.1933 M A N 108 1j.Ii05
Apr.
•106 b. 1031a May
i6-jear debenture, 5
1909
Eitenelon, 4«
1926 F A A 97%a.| 96 Jan.
iCtilo. Feo. A St. Louis— .= g. 1928
96 Mar.
Otic k.l.APac— 6s. coup. 191 J A J 123 b. 121 Jan.
Ext^nelonand col. ,59. ..1934 J A J 101
9978 Sept.
95%
SO-j-eur debent. 58
1931
91% Sept.
Chic. Sl.L.APltt. -Con., 5g. 1932 A A O lOT'sb. 105 Jan.
•Chic. 61. r. M.
69. ...1930 J A D 121i«b. 120
Feb.
Cleveland A Canton— 5.. .1917 J A J 91 b, 88 Jan.
«. C. C. A I.-Con9iil., 7 g. 1914 J A D
1281s Jan.
General oon80l., 6 n
1934 J A J 120 b 1181a Jan.
<XC.C.A8t.L.— Peo.A K.48.1940 A A O 78i2b. 7958 June

Amet. Cotton Oil, deb.,

MAS

,

MA

M
MAN'

M&

M

,

M&

M
M
A&

MAN

MA

AC—

Q-F

MAN
MAS
MAS

104''8 Feb.

85
119

Feb.

June

J

l>.

a.
b.

N till
8 7o

M &
J « D
J A J
J A J
Q-F
A J
J A J
A 1>
Q-J"
A U
A A O
J A J
J A J
J A U
J A J
F A A
J AJ*
A A O
EAinis. St. L. ATexas— 6g.l917 F A A
Metro. Elevated— l8t, 6 g. 1908 J AJ

b.
b.

b9>a
ss-sb.

10013
f'4'4

109

b.

June

Norf.
Norf.

1051a Apr.
Jan.
94ifi .Tune

91 la Apr.
118i« May
I2314 July
101 Apr.
104'8 .\pr.
5334 Feb.

A

1983 J

A

Conso). niort.,5g
Cblc.

94% June
June
June
June

May
103% Aug

AN.P.— iBt, 5g...l940 A &

Ore.R.ANav Co.— I8t,6g.l909

921a Juue

Consol., 5 g
1925
Pa. Co.— 4i9g., coupon
1921
Peo. Deo.AEvanav.- 6g..l920

Aug.
Apr.

May

A

Phila.
Read.— Gen., 4
1st pref. income, 5 g
2d pref. income, 5 g

Aug.
Mar.
Jan.

Apr.

1041s May
98i« Feb.

May
July
Feb.
Feb.
Jau.
Jan.

g.

May
Apr.
Oct.

Sept. 118=8 Feb.
102% Sept.

130
73% July 82
88'8 Sept. 90
81
Jau.
86

9T13 Feb.
80 Mar.
107 >« Jau.

Aug.
Jan.
Feb.

June

1021* June
8514 May

114

June

.

MAN
MAN

MAN
MAN
MAN
M &N

*

Ask.

(Stock Exchange Prices, j
.*U. A Pae.-Sd w. I)., tu. fft,.i9()7
B»lt. * Oliio— 161,6!', Park B.IMI9 117
gold
J9.J5
J»,
Oon9. mori.. gol 1. 6s
lOs,-; 'iii'
*

W.
"

V.o,

fill,

Bo prtce

^1.,

,.

^^

SECURITIES.
B.

Alabama Mid.— ist. g.. guar. 192S'
Atlantic A Daiiv.— Ist p., lis 19T7

,„,i„

90
119
112

PRICES-tContlnued).-IiV4CrjVi:

O. S. W., 1st. g., 4»j,8...1990
Moniiu. River, l.<t g.,u'. 5a ..1919
tleni'lOhio lleor.— 1st, 4iss. 1930

108

made Uil»l?5«!

14
101

1

«t.««.l

!>2'^

Apr
Jan.
Apr.

Apr.

Feb

1 1 1 12

Oct.
973B,Oct.

lOVj Jau.
9

91

Feb.
Jau.

76% July
25
96

37i4Jan.

123l9Ju£8
103

na

100
121
I

10

Ced.

July
July

102 >s Jan.
77 Jan.

22
107 14
116
102

Jan.

June
Mar.
Mar.

1081a June

97
100
851s
3413

104

June
June

May
Mar
Feb.

June
82% June

1091a

85 Oct. 101 May
11038 Jan. II419 June
102 14 Sept. V10'9Feb.
64 Sept. 7419 Jan.
9234 Sept. 100 Jan.
109 Fell. 112 .Sept.
1031s Jau. 114 Apr.
101
June 103 Jan.
72 Sept. 83 19 Feb.
68 '9 Sept. 77 19 Jan.
110 Jau. H6I4 Aug
7619 Way
85 Feb.
87 Feb.
79»a May
10318 Jan. 107 Apr.
78 41 Sept. 85 Jan.
50 Jan.
35 July
101% Jan. 10578 June
99 Jan. 105 May
3539 Feb.
3114 July
lOOig Jan IO6I4 JuM
90 Mar. 9514 Juaa
32

weet

June 4219JU1.
t Coupon oil.

7

ANo.— Ist,,5s.l906

A coilat. trust, 5s... 1934
A St. L.— l.st, 7s, t'U..1927
A West.— 1st, 7i.... 1909
Rap. I. F. A N., 1st, 69.1920
C.

1921
C.Ghio— Jol. &Cin.M.lst,4i9S.1939
Gent. KB. A B.ink.— Col. g.5a.l937
Chat. Rome A Ool.— G td g
1937
'"It. of N. .!.- Conv ileh. <;« I9oa
1st, 53

Apr.

90 19 May
75 May
70 Aug.
97 July

Sept. 108 la .Mar.

SECURITIES.

Iowa

July

1191a Aug.

Bid.

Ask.

10119 lOoi*
93>a

Minn.

A W'n— lst,''g. 48, 1938
Butt. Roch. A Pitts.— Gen., 58.1937 '93%
Boch. A Pitts.— 1st. 6s
1921 119

Friday: those are the latest auowtion.

65
61
90
105

CoufiOl.

Brunswick

f'ont.viilniVi

27 July
1161a Jau.
1181a Jau.
97 Jan.
87ii Jau.

BONDS-OCTOBER

Burl Ced. Kap.

Ak.ACb.Juiic.-l,st.K,59,eu.l930 105
Boot. H. Tun. A W.-Deb. 6s. 1913
100
Brooklyn Elevated— 2il. 3-58.1915 9a"

dn

Latest price this

Ask.

Bid.

A

66

9919 June lOlia Fob.
61 Apr.
7114 Jan.
lOO'eb. 1097e Jan. 112 June
89 b. 88 Sept. 96 Feb.
lOe'eb. 105=8 Jan. 10378 June
103 b. IOII4 Sept. 110 Feb.
97 b. 100 Apr. 108 Jan.
71 b. 68 Aug. 711s Mar.
8678
8318 Jau.
90=8 June
7658
7914 Aug.
691a Fob.
70
53% Feb. 7238 July
61 lab. 37 Jan.
67 Feb.
83 0. 80>4 Jnu.
86>4 June
tlOSia 1105 July 112 Jan.
75 b. 75 Apr.
85 Feb.
81 a. 75 June 100 Feb.
52
4114 Juno 72% Feb.
78%
76% Jan. 33 Jun
96I4
93ie Sept. 100 Mar
102 b. 105 Sept. 10838 Jan.
IOII9
101 Oct. 101=8 g,pt.
108%b. 10718 May 109^1 Feb.
104'»0. 1041a June 109
Mar.
82^8
82=8 Oct.
861s Mar.
11314!). Ill
J une 115
Apr.
113 b. 111 May 115 Apr.
107 b. 106% Jan. 111 June
7219 Jan.
07 July
691s

M

,-

YORK STOCK EXCHANWE

J

62 's Apr.

b.

C—

no's Apr.
1191s May
82 June
lOl's June

108 Jan.
11514 Jan.
79iib. 78% Jan.
*98 b. 98 Feb.
b.

b.

liuiidb.

A J
AD
A J'
A J
A S
MAN
J A J

60
103
66

AN

AN

Raiiruad

J

MA

I

Bid.

A

A D
A O

St.

MA

SECURITIES.

MAN

J

6 g.,
C
1906
General mort., 6g
1931 J A
L.So.West.- Ist,48,g..l989 M A
2d, 4s, g.. Income
31 b.
1989 J A
S.P.M.A.M.— Dak. Ex., 6 g. 1910
118 b.
120
l8t consol., 6 g
1933 J &
do
reduced to 419 g...
A
100%
MontanaExtension, 4 g.l937
A D 90 a.
San A. A Aran. P.— let,6g. 1916
A J 67 b.
Ist, 6 g
A J 67 b.
1926
3eattleL.S.Ai:.—lst,gu. 6.1931
A A 93 a.
105 b.
80. Car.— lat, 6 g„exooup.l920
i5isa.
Inoome,69
1931
80. Pac, Ariz.— 6 g
1909-10 J A J 102''8b.
80. PaeitlcCal.— 6g....l905-12 A A O lll>vb.
1st, consol., gold, 5 g
1938 A A O 96 "ib
80. Paciao,N. M.— 6g
1911 J & J U)6
renn.C.L ARy.—Ten.D.,lat,6g A A O 90
Blrm. Div., 6g
1917 J A J 93 b.
rex. A Pac— Ist, 5 g
2000 J A D 81
2d,iuconie, 5 g
2000 March. 31 "^b.
102 "aa.
rol. A. A. A N. M.-6 g
1924 M
Tol. A Ohio Cent.— 5 g
1935 J A J lOOHb.
Tol. Peo. A West.— 4 g
1917 J A J 80^8
rol. St. L. A Kan.
6 g.. 1916 J & D 8514
Onion Paciflc— 6 g
1899 J & J lllMb.
8lnkingfund.83
A 8 102 >ab.
1893
69 '8
CoUat. lru3*;4is
1918
6s, col. trust notes. 1894 F A A 9138
Gold
Kan. Pao.-Den.Div.-6g.1899 M A N llllS".
lBtoon801.,6 g
Ill b.
1919
Oregon Short Line— 6 g..l92v: F A A 104 b.
Or.S.L.AUfhN.— Cou.5g.l919 A A O 72J4b.
U.P.Den.AGulf cou. 9g.l93y J & D 7134
116 a
Onion Elevated— 6 g
1937
Virginia Mid.— Gen. m.,58, 1936
81 a.
do
SOkb.
stamped guar.
1051*
Wabash- 1st, 5 g
1939
2d mortgage, 5 g
1939. F A A 79%
Debent. M., series B
1939 J A J 38 b.
West Shore— Guar., 48
2361iJ A J 10278
West. N. Y. APa.— Ist, 5g.l937iJ A J 103
1927iA A O 33>s
2dmort.,3g.,5se
West. Uu. Tel.— Col. ti-., 58. 1938 J A J 10314b.
Wis. Cent. Co.— 1st, 5 g
1937'J & J *88 b.
33i8b.
Income, 5 g
19371

July

MAN
MAN

N;EW

AD

St.L.

Ulisa. lOS'sJan. 113 June
102 b. 99 Apr. 105 Sept.
95^8
87's Jan. 100 Aug.
llTiab. 113 "a Jau. 120"4 June
»d,68
1S99
108 lib, 10514 Jau. 110 Juue
Mich. Cent.— Isl, con., 79.. 1902
122 b. 121 May 1241a Apr.
coneol., 59
1902 MAS* 107'sl>. 10618 Mav 108 13 Apr.
MlLLakcSh. A V\'.— Isi.ug. 1921
N 127 b 123 Jan. 128 Julv
Exten. A Imp., 5 g
19*J9 FA A 106 b. IOII3 Mar. 110
July
M.K. AT.-lBt 48, g
1990 J A D 7!'%
79 June 83 May
4e,g
1990:F A A 46Hsb. 451s July
54% Jan.
Mo. Faciflo— let, con., og.l920M
112 b. 106 "a May 1113» Aug.
gd,7B
1906MA NJ17
H2iaJan. 117 Oct.
F»o.olM.^.— Isl, ei.,4g.l938,F A Ai 97 b. 90=e Auj,'. M>0 Jan.
8de-.teiifi,.rt 5s...
1938 J AJ»107'«a. 102:<8 Jan. 109 Juue
^OTB •• b " ludUates price bid •• a " price aslced : the Range is made up from actual sales only.

M

A
A

J
J
J

MAS
A J
MAN
H.—
J A J
A
F A A
2d, 7 k
1897 MAN
Cairo Ark. A Texas, 7
J A D
1897
Gen. R'y A land gr.,5g..l93l A A O
ASan Fr.— 6 g.,Cl.B.1906 MAN
Class
MA
A

95 1« .Tuue

go's Jau.
tl06 Fell.

Mar.

MAS
J A

A

May
Mav

13539

1241a

Feb.

June

Feb.
11919 Sept. 123>4 Apr.
nils Apr. II514 Aug.
O 9718
95 Jan. 100 June
J 114 b. Ill July 115i« June
J 1241a 125 Jan. 130 June
A 113 '8 109 Aug. 114 Oct.
137
I3414 Mar. 139% Aug.
D 103 %b. 1021a June 106>4May
O *117 b. II714 Apr. 122ie Aug
D 106 le 1031a Sept. 10919 May
A
110% Apr. 116 Jan.
D 107
100 Jan. 103% May
J 105 b. 103 Jan. 107 June
O 114 b. 116 Apr. 119 Mar
N IO314
98
Apr. IO319 Sept
J
93 Apr.
961a May
J 93% a. 9014 Au(
95 Jan.
J 116%
115 Jau. 119 June
O 111 b. 11238 Apr. 11 6 19 Mar.
D 107^1 1 0614 July 111 Apr.
D 73
71
.Sept.
80% Jan.
O 751s
74 Oct.
82 Feb.
89 lab. 8) Oct. 103 Feb.
J *106 a. 105 Jau. 10834 Apr.
J 11214a. 111
Jan. II5I9 June
J 11214 a. 110
Mar. 115 Juno
Ill lab. 106 Jan. lllisScpt
61i2b. 61
June 6678 Mar.

1920
1920
g.l953
195S Feb.
1958 Feb.
3d j)ref. income, 5 g
1958 Feb.
Pittsburg A Western- 4 g.l917 J A J
Rich ADanv.— Con.,6g..l915 J A J
Consol., 5 g.
1936 A A O
Rlch.A\V.P.Ter.-Trust,6g.l897 F A A
Evansville Div., 6g
2d mort.,5g

Mar.

Juue

126% June
110

A

.M

5 g.l990 J
Dlv.-l8t,5g.l911 J

North. Pao. AMou.— 6g...l938
North. Pac. Tor. Co.— 6 g.. 1933
OhloAMiss.- Cons.8.f.,78.1898
Consol., 79
1898
Ohio Southern— l8t, 6 g...l921
General mort.,4 g
1921
Omaha A St. Loui8— 4 g . .1937
Oregon Imp. Co. -Ist, 6 g. 1910
Conaol., 5 g
1939

13214 June
1161s Apr.

12714

ASouth.— 1st, 5g...l941

A W.— lOOyear,

Md.&Waah.
&
Nortb.Pac— I8t,ooup.,6g.l921 J &
General, 2d, coup., 6 g..l933 A A
General, 3d, coup., 6 g.. 1937 J A

114

llO'eb. 119
Sept. 123 Juue
12316". 121% J-ei). 126
May
iioisa. 113
Apr. 117 Aug.
96
91 Jau.
971s Aug.
I03,b. 1 1 1 14 A pr. 115
Feb.
11914 a. 1171s Jau. 121 13 Juue

109
116

A
A

A

2d consol., 6 g
1969 J A
N.Y. Out. A W.-l8t, 6g..l914 M A
Consol. 1st, 5g
1939 J A
N.Y.Sus.AW.— Istref.,5g.l937 J A
Midlandof N. J., 6g....l910 A A

Feb.
4138 Oct.
Apr.
Mar. 105 May
Mar. 100 Feb.
961a June 08 Jan.
81
Mar. 100 Aug.
98iflJan. 105
Ma.r
9559 May
98% Apr

b.

A A

126

120
Ill
109
107
100 Is
101

Juae

MAS

Feb.
Apr.
81'8 May
81
Aug.
8O14 June

117
142

May

6778 Jan.

A A O 111%

N.Y.L.E.&W.— l8t,con.,7g.l920
Long Dock, 78
1893 J A
1935 A A
Consol. ,6g

118
111
106
108

a.

M A 8107
M A N 121iab.

Aug.

June
June

36
95
90

A
MAN 94isb.
A J
MAS 99
98
J A D 101
MAN 114
9aia
MAS
114
A A o:ioo%a.
J

J A J125

N.Y.Lack.

MA

4439
101

132
106
105
I2319 Jan. 129
107 Sept. 110

June
June

MAS

D«c Mac.AM.— L'dgvant8.191 A A

118

J
A W.— l9t,63..1921 J
Construction, 59
1923 F

1231s Mar.

123
83
June 3418
May 103 "a

FA

A D117iab. 112 Feb.
B, 62
611s Apr.
A J127 b. 126% Jan.
A A O 102
103 >« Jan.
M A N1102i4b. 10114 May
J

M A

1892.

Highest.

J

114
114
102
111
113
119
107

Iiicome,-48
1990 April. 29
26
Coi, Coal A Iron— 6 g
A 103 b. 99
1900
Ooi. -Midland- Con., 4 g...l940 F A A 68
66 Sept. 74
Ctol.H.Val.ATol.— Con.,5g.l931
92 "s
98
871a Jau.
General, 6 g
1904 J A
98»s
93 Jau. 105
Denver A Rio G.- l8l, 7 g. 1900
120 b. 11539 May 119
»5l3
l8lconsol.,4g
1936 J A
77% Jau. 38 la
Det.B. CityAAfoena— 6g.l913 J A
65 a. 70 Jan.
80

MA

June

110

Con. lat
col. trust, 5 g. 19 1
Rio G. Western- l8t, 4 g..l939
St. Jo.
Gr. Island— 6 g.. 1925
St. L. Alt. AT.
l8t,79.1891
Iron Mt. Ist est. 5s.'97
St. L.

AC—

©al. 80. Sh.A Atl.— 5g....l937
S.Tenn.V AG.— Con., 5g. 1956
KnoivUle A Ohio, 6 g...l925
EUc. Lex. ABlgSan.— 8 g.l902
Ft W. A Denv. City— 6g..l921
Sal.H.ASan An.-W.Dlv.l8t,5 g.
Han. A St. Jo9.— Con9., 69.1911
nilnols Central— 4g
1952
[at. A Gt. No.— l8t, 6 g
1919
Coup., 6 g.,tr.rec.stuip(i.l909
Iowa Central— 1st, 5 g
1938
Kentaoky Central—4 g
1987
Kings Co. El.— l8t, 5 g....l925
taolede Gas— Ist, 5g
1919
iMMe Erie A W est.— 5 g
1937
(>. Shore— Con. ep., Ist, 79.1900
Consol. coup., ad, 78
1903
ttaug Isl'd— Ist, cou., 5 g..l931
General mortgage, 4 g..ly3»
tx)Ul3. A Nash.- Cous., *s.l898
M.O. AMob. l8t,6g
1930
do.
2d, 6g
1930
General, 6 g
193c
Dnllled, 4g
1940
Nash.Fl.ASh.— l8tgtd.&g.'37
touls. N.A. ACh.—l8t, 68.1910
Consol., 6 g
^1916

MobUe A Ohio— Sew, 6 g..l927
General mortgage, 4s. ..1938
Nash. Ch. A St.L.— Ist, 78.1913
Con., 5 g
1928
N.Y. Central— Extend., 53. 1893
let, coupon, 78
1903
Deben., 58, coup., 1884. .1904
N. Y. A Harlem— 78, reg. 1900
E. W. A Ogd.— Con., 59. .1922
N. Y. Chic. A St. L.—4 g... 1937
N. Y. Elevated- 78
1906

II314 June
8559 June
66% Jan.
74 Jan.
14>4 Jan.
1201a Sept.

YiiAR 1893.

<''?»'»» *<»nflre c««i«W<it
I

100
-98
87I9

October

.THE CHRONK'LE.

1802.]

8,

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
8ECCR1TIE8.

Bid.

PRICE.S.-/.V40r/V«
SECURITIES.

Axk-

BOSDS-fOmtbmtiJ^OVTOHBR
Bid.

1RU5 ion
CVHUA. A Indian.— !«i. conn ll)2U|
tl.>hl bonds. 6«
1806 107 .
rUnt A i*. Miir.i.-Mort., 6*. 1020,* IIU
l9t co;i. Bold, 3«
OoWi l>.>i:.N, ««
1807, 10s I.
1039
1000 10S>«'.
Port Huron— Ui. .'i>
Ban .liiiiiiuin Br., 6*
1030 *»1.>|
->
lino 07 !.
n». <Vn A IVn.— Isl .-. .*>«. .191-1
Mort. I-..
Worth A R. (I.—
Laii'i
a. 1000- 102 >«
^r
'.. tr. n-i.
'<al. Har. AHun Ant
UllSl 100
C. .\
1800' 108 ><
Gill. II. A 8. A. -2d
r.iiuilA.da
Wf.1 '
West. Hlv.,2d0»
No. I!.n;« "V (Cul.)— 1st, Us. 1007
IDJl
... 103 Hi "97>«Li;;;
0». Cur. A Nor.— 1st. gu. »«,« 1030
SO.yoiir ,'.«
•
V\ 1. M. lund. tis. 180M 100>t.U2
jOa.Bo. A Kla.-lst, g. 68
CJi«fi. A
1937
71
'Granil Rap. A Ind.-U.-n. 5a. .1034 •U3
61..
A
... 1008,* us
era!
-K. (T.. B» ... 1!)40
;Q. B. W. A8i.l>.-li.tt;ii.n'ct«.li)ll
Wai:
iKt.g 5».. 1011
2d Income, Ira^i !• .|>
Qousatonlc— 'n
Cbes. U. ^ o.V o»t.— 1st 0» .K- 1:1111 101
i>a
:t:it I'll.

Iflc— Gold b(ln,C«,

.

585
T.

wrjvMTUM

Aik.

I

131

I

,

101
101

I

1

I

n

.

I

74

I

1

.

103 >t

I

1

',

i^^

•

1

.1^

Oli.V.

<.

K.HavenAD'

lOllI

3d,e«....

nou.9. AT. (;.— \.
Ist g., 58 (Int. Kt.l,
Cous. g. 69 (li't. Kidl

'n.rou.Ul,t.'ii.f; 5». liiasi

18931 102

Mil >n— im, 7s.

1037
1012
ll>. Klver-lst, 7s. IHOO' llGlt'117
Gen. e. 49.(lut. gtil)
1931
1000* 112
2il,
Debeut. 0», prin. A Int. gtd.1897
et. L. Jiuka. AChlc— lsl,7i» 1804 103
Debcnt. 4s, prIn. A Int. gtd.1807
Mics.R. Bridge— 1st, 8. f.,e». 1012 105
Illinois Coutral-lst, g., 4*. ..1951
Chlo. Burl. A Nor.— l»t, 58.... 1026 103H
1951
1st, gold. 3109
19,50
I>rl)i-nturor^s
. 1806
Cairo nrldgo-ls
Ch!c. Burling, ^k: Q.— 5s,8. f.. 1901 102^
Snriugf. Dlv.—Coup, «8.... 1898
Iowa DIv.—Sink, fund, &s.. 1010 10338 ice
1921
Middle Div.-Reg.. 58,
1910 05 •«
Binkiiic (uud,48
0. 8t. L. A N. O.-Ten. 1., 7i.l897
86>«
Plain, 4s".
1021
1807
1st, oousol., 7a
1907
Chlo A luiliana Coal— 1st 59. 1030 101\ 102%
2d, 6s
1051
Cbl. Mil. A Su P.— l8t,8a,P.l) 1808
Gold, 5s, coupon
1951
8d, 7 3-lOa, P. D
189S 123 125
Menip. Div.,lslg. 4*
127 129
...1894
1002
l8t, 78, $ K., R. D
Dub. A 8.
2d Div., 7s
122%
l8t. La Croeao Division, 7s 1803|' 122
Ced.Fall9AMlnn.-Ut,79..I007
18071* 123
124
Ist, I. A M.,78
Ind. D. A Spr.- 1st 1*, ex. cp.l006
18!)0|" 1231, 125
let, I. A D., 7a
Iud.D.AW.-l8t5B. g..tr.rec..l047
10U3- 126>i 128
2d, Ss, gold, trust ri^coipts. 1948
l«t ,C. A .M., 79
Inc. M. bonds, tru'ji receipts ....
lat, I. A D. ExteUBloD,78.. lOOS 129
1019 10.51,
l8t, Lao. ADav., Ss
Ind. Ills. A Iowa.— 1st, g, 49. 1030
1010 12(1 128
iBt, H. A D.,78
Int.AO.N'n— Ist.Os.g.. cnu.olT. 1910
1010 IO6I4
Kanawba A MIoh.— Mort 49.1990
lst,H. A D.,58
liO
Kan.C.Wyan.AN.W.— l8t,59.1938
Oblcago A Pacltlo Uiv., 6s. 1910
Kings Co.- F.EI..lst,r>,g.,gu. A. 1029
Mineral Point Div. 59
I910I 102
19211* 103
ioo' Lake Erie A West.- Jd g., 58.1911
0.4L. Bup.Dlv., 53
Fai^ A South., 69, As.iu. 1924 110
L. 8. A H. 80.— B. A E.—New 78. '08
1010'
1006
Inc. conv. Hluk. fund, 5.'*
Det. M. A T.— 1st, 79
Dakota A Gt. South., .'^s.... 1910, ioi'ii
Lake Shore— Dlv. boud9,78.1800
Mil. A Nor. main liui-— 6s... 1010 115
Kal. All. A O. R.— iBt gu. 59.1038
OhIc.AN.W.— 30 year deb. 53, 1021 106S»
MilUoirg Coal RR.-l8t. 59.1934
Escanaba A L. S. Ist, Gs
1001 109
I^hlghV.,N.Y.— Ist gu.g.4'i!9.1940
Des M. A Minn.— lat, 78
1007, 122
Lehigh V.reriu.— lat gu 59,g.l94"
19001
Iowa Midland— 1st, 89
125
Litcht. Car.A West.— Ist6a. g.l916
Peninsula— lot. conv., 78... 18981
1898
Ijous Island— Ist, 79
Chic. A Milwaukee let, 78. 18981 114
N. Y. & R'way B.— 1st, g. 6a. 1927
1907, 12:^
1927
Wiu. A St. P.— 2d, 78
2d mortg., Itio
1905 111
Mil. A Mad.— 1st, 6a
K.Y.AMan.Beach.-l8t. 78, 1897
N.Y.H.AM.B.— Ist con. 5s.g. 1935
Ott. C. F. A St. P.— 1st, 58. 1909 1051s
1910 1051,
Korthern 111.— l8t, 59
Broukl'nAMontauk- I3t,6s.l011
1011
Cli-Pco. Afet.U— Con.l8t,i?.5<!. 1939
100
lat, 39
79
8inlthtownAPt.Jetf.— l8t,78 1001
C R.I. AF.-D.M. A F. D. Isl 4a. 1905
1905
Loula.Evaus.A8t. L.—Con.58.1930
l8t, 2Jcs
Extenirlun, 4s
Louis. A Nash.—Cecil. Br, 78.1907
1903
Keokuk A Des M. Ist, 5s.. 1923 95 100
E. U. A Xash.- Ist 68, g....l0l9
1920
Fen.sacola Division, Os
Chic. St. 1". A Mluu.— l9t,6s.. 1918 122»t
1910 121
Ist, 6s
St. Louis Divialuu, l.st, 63... 1921
Bt PaiU A S.
1980
Chic. A W. Ind.— 1st, e. i., 6s 1910
2d, 3.%
General luorteaee, 69
1932 lias
Leb. Branch Exleislou .. .1803
1921
Mashv. A Decatur— Ist, 7s.. 1000
Oilc. A Wtst .Mli-li.- OS
1910
S. f.,63.— S. A N. Ala
Cm Uuiu. A 1>. Con. s. t., 8. 1005
1924
1937
2d. cold. 4189
10-10, gold, 69
1937
60 year 59, g
Ciu. I). & Ir'n— 1st, gu. 58. g. 1941
05
99
Pens. A At.- 1st, 6», gold. ..1921
Sin. Jack. A Mac— lat, g., os. 1030
1931
CoUat. trust, os, g
C ev. Ak. A CoL-Eq. A 2d 69. 1930
Lon.N.Alb.ACh.— Gcn.m.g.5s.l940
C.C.C. A St. L., Cairo dlv.—Is, 1030
90
8t.Lou.Div.— Isicol.ts'tJis.g. 1000
Lou. N. O. A Tex.— 1st, 48. ...1934
91
1934
epring.ACol.Dlv.— lat.g. 43. 1940
2d mort., 5s
WhitcAv.Val.Dlv.- lat.g. 4s. 1040
Louis. St. L. A Tex.— 2<1 g, 6s. 1917
1900
Manhattan Ry.— Cons. 4a
Clu.Wati.&M.Dlv.— l9t,g.4s, 1901
93
90H
Manlto.S. W.Colouiza'u- 5s ,g. 1034
Un. I. St. L. A
94
l8t,K.,4s. 1036
1020 103
Consol ,69
Meuipbia A Chart— 6s, gold.. 1924
1915
Cln.8an.An — Con.l8t,g.53 102 -J, 106 «
Ist con. rcnn Ilcn, 7«
CI.C0I. Ciu. A tud.— Ist, 78,s.f. isoo!
•""• Mexican Cent. Cousol. ia, g.l911
1939
10141
COU80I. sink, fund, 7a
1st, eons. Income 3s, g
Cleve. A Mah. V.— Gold, .59. 1038 105
Mexican National— 1st, g., Cs.l927
1917
Colorado .Midland- 1st, g., 6a. 1030 103
2d, income, 63, "A"
1900
Columbia A Green.- 1st, 6s. 1910
Michigan Ceutral— 6a
1031
2d, 68
1920
Coupon, 5s
1040
1907 130
Del. Lack. A W.— Mort.
Mortgage 4s
8yra. Blug. A X. Y.— Ist, 78. 1906
Mil. L. B.AW.— Oouv. deb., 53.1007
1924
Morris A Essex— Ist, 78... 1014
Mich. Div., Ist, Os
UJ"
Bonds, 79
1900
AslUaud Divisiuu- Ist, 63 ..1025
7eof 1871
1901 120i« 12i
Incomes
1027
Ist, con., guar., 78
1915 135
MiniLA St. L.— Ist, g. 7b
1009
OeL A Hud. Can.- Coupon 78, 1894 1053» i06is Iowa Extension, Ist, 79
1801
Fa. Div.. coup., 78
1917
140
2d mortg., 79
1910
Albany A Susq.- 1st, gu.,7s 1006
Southwest Ext.— 1st, 73
130
1921
lat, cous., guar., 6a
1V06 117 1171s
PaciUc Ext.— 1st, 6s
1922
Reus. A Sar.— lat, coup., 7s. 19^1 142 >,
A equipment. 6s
Iiupr.
Dsnver City Cable— lat, 6s.., 1903 93 101
Minn. A Pac— 1st mortg., 58. 1036
Minn.8t.P.A8..8.M-lato.g.48.1038
Deny. A K. G.— Iuip.,g., 5s.. 19RS 83>s
Duliltb A Iron Range- 1st 59 1917
101>s Mo.K.AT.— K.C.AP.. I9t,48,g.l990
1 940
V.i. A Ga.— l8t, 78.. 1900 HI
K. Tenu.
112>,
Dal. A Waco— 1 st .">s, gu.
J>lvisloual 5s
1930 101
Missouri I'ucltlc — rrU9t 5s. ..1017
1920
l8t ext.. irold, 59
1937
l8tcoU.,58, g
JEq.Aluii>.,g.,5s
1938
St. L. AI. M.-.\rk. Br., Ist, 78.1895
Mobile A Birm.- 1st, g.,5s.. 1937
Mobile A Ohlo-lst ext., 68.. .1927
87
1931
Alabama Central— l9t 68... 1918 "98
St. L. A Cairo-43. guar
Erie— l9i, extended, 7s
Morgan's La. A T.— 1st, 63.... 1920
1897 112
19l!>
Zd, extended, 5s
1919
Ist, 7s
8d, extended, 4His....
1923
109
Nash. Chat. A St L.— 2d, 63.. 1001
Jf ew Orleans A GiUf— Ist, 68 1020
4U>, extended, 3s
1920
ftth, extended, 4s
1028 102 ioi' N. O. A. No. E.-Pr. 1., g., 63.. 1915
1905
l«t, con., g., t'U, 7s
1920
N. Y. Cent.— Deb. g. 4»
Beorg., l.Ht lieu, 6s
1008
N. J. June— Guar. 1st, 48... 1086
B.S. Y. A E.— 1st, 78
Beech Creek— 1 st, gold, 4s. 1036
1916 135>«
N. Y. L. E. A \V.— Col. tr.,68. 1023 106
Osw. A Rome— -d.38,g.,gu.l015
106 i«
Funded coup., 5s
Utlca A Bl. Klv. l.s, g., gu.1022
1069
921,
1903
Buff. A 8. W.-Mortg. 69.... 1008 i'oo*
'N. Y. N. II. AU.-lst.reg.»
Jefl'er.'iou— l8t, gu. g. 6s
N.Y. A Northern— Ist.g.,}! 1027
1009
1027
Coal A KK.— 63
2d,48
1922
N.Y'.OntAWn.— Isi,refuu.te.l002
Kureka Siiringa— Ist, g., 6s... 1933
100
IN. Y. Susq. A We>t.-2<1, 4i«s. 1937
Kvans. A T.U.— lat,cou3.,6s.. 1021 123
1040
Mt. Vernon— 1st 68
Geu. mort., ."is,
1023
Snl. Co. ISrauch- iHt. g.. ."js 1930
'l». Y. Tex. A M.;x.— Isl.ls,>fll.l!ll2
C"

1003 119

:m< .fls

i

103
85

I

'

.

C—

,

138
107
103

100 >t
67 •« 67%
•86

78

07
107
113
113
113
-lYo'ii

—

—

C—

—

,

.

C—

—

.

,

. . .

,

.

tien.

1';::

Ireun.-I>.C.CASUL.Cii.g.4>,«AlU40

Do
do
Soriea H
P.C.A8.U-l8t,c.,78
l»00
PltU. Ft. W. AC.— Ill, 71.. .1912 140
2d, 7«
1912 137
3d, 7a
1912 180
Olev. A P.— Con».,8. fd., 78.IS0O 130
Gen. 4i,«, g., "A"
1042 1101*
St. UV.A'T.U.— lat, 0<.,7(. 1807 110>*
2d, 79
1898 102>*
2d. guar., 78
1898
Od.R.ALEit.— lat.4<«>.n.K.I011

117

03
120 >4
29i«

111

74

87«, Peo.AE.-Ind.B.AW.-lst.pr.7a.l900
Ohio Ind.AW.—lstprBt..'i9.. 111.38
Peoria A Bek. Unlon-lst, 68.1931
2d mortg., 41*9
I93I
90
Pitta. Cleve. A Tol.— 1st, e«...ig23

113
77

I

A

lOO^s 101

Pitts.
L. Er.— 2d g. 5s, "A". 1928
Pitts. Mc. K.
Ist 6s
1932
Pitts. Puiusv.
F.— Ist, 58. ..1910

nil, 115
1241
114
108

iis'

;Pltt9.

AY.—
A

lOgie
110i«

97
118

'Hi

93

87
•94>*

.

,

80. Pac.

Coast- Ist,

guar.. -18.1037

rer.RR.Aa'uo{8t.L.-lst,4>M.t03U

'120
105
123
128
100
120

Texas Central- 1 st, s.

f ., 78.

Ist mortgage, 79

109
131

. .

OOP
191
1

Texas ANewOrleau9— l9t,78.190j

1012
Sabine Division, Isc. 6s
Third Avenue (JJ.Y).— IstSs, 1H37
1917
A Cad.—69
Toledo A. A. JtG'dTr.—g. 69.1921
10.i
1919
Tol. A. A. A Mt. PI.—6s
95
1940
Tol. A. A. A N. M.— 58,g.
Ulster A Del.— l«t,c<>n.,8.,5s. 1028
1806
Union Facltlo— lat, 08
70
67
1897
87
l9t,69
1898
Ist, 68
90
190»
Collateral Trust, 6»
82
1907
Collateral Trust, 5»
105 1051,
Kaulias r.icliio-l8lfl«, g...l89.'>
119
18»«
l9t,63.g
1895
C. Br. U. P.— F. c,78
112
121i«
Atch. Col. A Puc— let, 63... 1905
Atoh. J. Co. A W.— l9t, 09... 1905
105 110
U. P. Liu. A C<d.— I8t,g.,59. 191K

123
110

Tol. A. A.

104
113
95

I.

113

07

00%
103

106^
108%
lu»\
105%
107%
100
83
T.'V

......
,

8S%
75%

104
1908 103
Utah A NorUi.-lBt,78,
1936 70
Gold,58
Utah Suuihoru— Gen., 7I...1009 103
l.t,7»
K-r..,,
1009 101
Oreg.8.L.AU.N.,coi.tral.,5».l»l«

105

107%

101>«

>.

106
62I9

83
84
90

1

68.1921
A.. 1939

^^

<

':05

For msccUameou*

•67%....-

•<' ioa%'io7%

N,.. .-..-.

dt.L.K.C.Aii.— K.K.AKiSt.CharleeBr'ge- Is'
83>4
.. .
West. Va. C. A Pitta.— l.^t.
»2"| Wheel.AL.E.— lat. Sa, goia...iUJ6
;

Kx»fn"ii>"

i

mide uua wo a.

116%

no

Col. trust is, 1914, tr. rec,

I

Friday; these are tue latest quutationa

100

RioGr. Junct.,lat,guar.,g.,58.1038
Rio Grande 8o.-lst, g., 38...1940
64%
1935
St. Jo9. A Gr. Is.- 2d inc
87
Kan. C. A Omaha— Ist, .'Vs. .1927
70
107 109
St. L. A. A T. U- 2d prcf. 78. 1894 103
104%
1121*
189-1 103
2dm. inc. 78
621, 68"
105 109
Dividend bonds
1894
II714
Bellev. A So. 111.— l8t, 8s.. .1806
60
Bellev. A Car.- 1st, 69
1923
110%
97
CUI.8t.L.AP»d.— 1st, giLg.Sa 1917 lOOH
1131, 114>,
St. Louis 80.— 1st, gd. g. 48.103)
100
do
3d income, 5s. 1931
103
Cor. AShawt.- Isig. 49....193J
102 >•
St. L. A 8. F.— 2d Gs,g., cL A. 1908 i'ii"
189.'.
100
lOlM Id's Equip., 7s
*10li»
1931
General 5s
•8
1987
1st, trust, gold, 98
75
1000
66
Consul, guar., 4s
08
Kan. City A 8.— 1st, Os, g...l016
00
Ft. a. .V V K u.-. -Ist, 6s... 1010
-l«t. 48, g.l937
Kan-1st, 58.... 193
St. Fa.i
1017 103
2d mu.;
87
108
St. Paul Minn AM.— 1st, 73..1'»0!> 1091,
19()'.i
115
2d mort., 6s
Miuueap. Union- lst,e8....19'22
981,
Mont. Cen.— l9t, guar., 63.. 1037 114 115
1937 101
421, 44
l9t guar. g. 59
103
'US',
Ea3l. .Mmu., 1st dlv. Ist 59. liw-*
113
San Fran. A N. P.— Isf, g., Z>i.V.tV.>
1031
South Caroliua-2d, Os
ICO

.

jiu price

130%
las
131

Wa.9h.O.AW.— l8t,4».gii.cy.,1924
Rlch.AW.Pt.Tenn.—«9, '97. tr. rec.

231,

•100

,

1,-

141

Shen.A L.E.-l8t,g..59.1940

Pitts.Y'g.st'nAA.- lat, 5s,con.l927
Prcs. AArlJ.Ccnt.- l8t, 6«, g.l910
1916
2d income 69
Rich. A Danv.— Debenture 68. 102
Equip. .M. 9. f.,g.. 59
1909
Atl. A Char.— Ist, pref., '» .1897
19u<i
Income, 68
do.

*U0
115

..

...

!0;

100
120

l^...^s

()•

98

*90

.

,

U«u«t'al3s.

Oblo Blrer RB.

81

'94'

&

.<f

Imii>

i..

%s

l>>:<i(i

»»

107%
I......

i;aiuted.<*«ua*-8<)«M pact p(M«<l Ins,

THK CHRONICLK

586

Latest £arm.ing8 Reporiea

B0AD8.

Inxrjestmjewt

[Vol. LV.

WetkorMo

1892.

1891.

Jan. 1

to

Latest Dot*.

1892.

1891.

AMD

Gnu A Chicago.

August.

Great NortU'net.

The iNTESTORs' Supplement, a pamphlet of 150 pages
e&ntains extended tables of the Stocks and Bonds of Bailroads, and other Companies, with remarks and statistics eoneerning the income, financial status, etc., of each Company.
It is pvhlished on the last Saturday of every other monthvie,,

and

January, March, May, July, September and November,
is

furnished without extra charge to all regular

*mJ>-

Bcribers of the Chkonicle,

7%e General Quotations of Stocks and Bonds, occupying
fix pages of the Chronicle, are published on the third

Sstnrdar

of each month,

Latett

Earnmgt

WeekorMol

August....

Hoos.Tun.&Wil July
Hmnest'nAShen August
Hutch.ASouth'n August
mtnoisCeutr'l.

July

Ina.Deo.AWesi August
In. AGt.Norlh'n 3d wk Sep.

tlnteroo. (Mex.)
Iowa Central...

WkAug27

4thwk Sep.

Iron Railway... August....

J'k'nv.T.AK.W.

.July

KanawhaAMlcli ad wk Sep.
Kan.C.Cl.ASp. 3dwk Sep.
K.C.F.8.

AMem. 3dwk
wk

K.C.Mera. ABir. ad

Sep
gep!

Kan.C.WyAN.W August ..
Keokuk A West. 3d wk Sep.
L.Erie All.ASo August....

Reported.

Jan, 1

1891.

1892.

1892.

to

Latett Date.

1891.

AllMtlieny Tai.. Augnst
229,667 244,673: 1,684,959 1,633,818
A«cli.T.*8.Fe.. 4thwk Sep. 1,059,143 1,002,127 25,645,297 23,984,847
Half owned . . 4thwk8ep.!
49,886
48,7341 1,331,621 1,248,131
Total system. 4th wk Sep. 1,109,029 1,050,861 27,074,533 25,232,980

BtL.&BanP.. 4thwk8ep.| 253,973
Halfowned.. 4tuwkSep.l

AM.

.

228,026 5,199,694
47,921 1,304,419
275,947 6,543,551
1,326,808 33,618,084
67,613
405,724
7.622
32.789
271,078
1,892,019 12,654,776
480,140 3,918.345
2,372,159 16,573,121
75,534 1,960,267
2,633
3,728
27,329
19,178
131,197
41,629 1,372,640
77,175 2,353,890
92,957 2,807,632
157,731
605.761
581,000 15,294,972
3,724
17,353
4,381
37,141

4,919,650
1,222,404
6,142,054
31,375,033
467,779

jthwkSep.

I

2,424

2,894

971,057

794.899
82,913
108,699
986,511

East, of Minn. Augu-^t....
114,641
MontanaCent. .August
96,248
Tot. system. August.... 1,181,946

L.ErieAWest

RAILROAD EARNINGS.
Bo ASS

P.M.

.

i

23,883

7,544,539 5,929,302
705,768
570,755
742,054
834,564
8,992,360 7,334,621
21,631
13,274
89,700
104,749
61,107
47,377
10,584,527 10,063,149
320,575
313,714
,550,112 2,600,722

3,426
1,724
12,000
16,050
11,104
9,928
1,468,380 1,501,856
60,762
53.049
97.719 101,072
34,703
44,143
44,762 1,380,375 1,244,669
3.207
2,257
22,451
22,937
40.151
39,826
506,863
489,322
8,021
7,063
265,03
225,397
5.812
5,818:
225,710
218,588
92,752
95,187 3,481,366 3,233,403
20.616
21,095
753,665
798,111
33,000
24,733
215,390
183,281
9,090
10,236
278,572
284,792
6,218
6,812
51,961
47,505
109,548
91,583 2,588,679 2,363,312
46.478
36,430
289,961
274,933

Lehigh A Hua.. August
Lehigh Valley.. July
1,723,652 1,586,155
L. Bock A Mem
.st wk Sep
10,156
15,191
Long Island.... 4th wk Sep.
94,675
87,003
LoulB.AMo.Kiv. j(,iy
38,910
42.053
Louls.Ev.ASt.L 4th"wkSt.p.
51,216
44.171
Louisv.ANashv 4th wk Sep. 602,430 564,776
Louis.N. A&Cn IthwkSep.
97,954
89,625
Louisv.N.O. AT irbwkMay
v55,788
72.33
Lou.Bt.L.ATex. 4th wk Sep.
16,291
15,853
Manistique
431
August....
2,527
JTar. A Nor. Ga. July
17.246
Memphis A Cha- 2d wk Sep
27,706
27,934
(Mexican Cent., tthwksep. 210,714 198,493
(Mex. National 4th wk Sep.
136,939 115.740
IMexicanK'waj rtk Sep. 17
49,500
71,286
Milwaukee ANo ithwkSep.
40,737
57,765
MineralBauge.. August....
11,099
14,068
Minneap.ASt.L. Augnst
172,569 151,116
M.8t.P. AS.S.M. August...
241,035 237,459
Mo.Kan.ATex. IthwkSep. 322,566 311.926
Mo.Pac.AIrouM 4thwkSep. 937,000 865,000
Mobile A Ohio
Septemb'r.
272,741 277.075
MontereyAM.U April
57.970
72,863
Nash.Ch.AStL.. August....
447.760 493,357
N.Jersey A N.'X. July
31,829
27,907
.

21,60*1

365.099
3.349,997

423,823

1,423,76:'

3,220.689
233,040
1,123,333
14,672,304
2,104,656
1,483,424

474,479
79,163

373,312
99,728

243.950
1,055.261
15.809,794
2,436,692

958,791 1,070,790
48,958
5,720,888 5,214,429
302,931
3,238,161 3,098,028
4thwk8ep. 1,411,960
2.169,467 2,898,700
July....
51,288
1,234,520 1,253,941
August.
6.935
87,364
August.
30,436
92.831
283,395
1,258,325 1,048,033
August.
1,818,562
12.374,300
1,940,522 1,403,077
August.
526,460
3,582,791
Total
August.
6,871,158 6,723,501
2,345,023
15,957,091
BaLACSouthw. 4thwk Sep.
19,381,000 18,204,000
76,945
1,815,869
Batii A Ham'nas August
2,411,170 2,489,612
2,853
Blr. A Atlantic. August
297,661
293,593
3,536
34,003
Blr.Sh.ATenn.B July
3,360,750 2,892,116
20,721
111,472
Brooklyn Elev.. 4th wk Sep.
158,335.
175,183
45,511
1,295,109
8,974
Baa.Rocti.&Pltt 4th wk Sep.
12,297
84,517
109,390
90,467
2,062,020 New on. A So'u August
Bnr.C.Kap.&N 2d wk Sep.
99,883
2,401,201 (fJfl.Y.C.&H.U. Septembr. 1,212.115 4,128,055 33,391,603 31,998,431
Oamden A Atl. August
174,796
582.202 N. Y. L. E. A W. August.... 2,677,501 2,946,268 20,255,363 19,550,584
Canadian Pacltlc 4th wk Sep. 590,000
605.358 690,264 3,992,043 3,833,092
14,282,700 N. Y. Pa. A Ohiu July
Oar.Cum.Q&Ch. July
2,906,004 2,918,416
1,258
25.577 N.Y.AN.Eug.. June
N. Y. ANorthu. .Vugust....
Oar. Midland... August
61,216
49,804
332,208
362,718
5,200
38,211
N. Y.Om.AW.. 4thwk8ep.
Central of Ga... June
96,852
92,362 2,609,017 2,252,79*
544,928
Central of N. J.. August
162,557
119,743 1,113,127 1,060,426
1,311,944 1,305,042 9.293,773 9.144,838 N.Y.Susq.AVv. August..
Central Paclflo.. July
31,420
283.776
1,370,059 1,505,268 8,164.579 9,174,965 Norf. ASouth'n. August
Central of 8.C.. July
7,397
6,950
57,393
57.229 Norfolk A West.. 4th wk Sep. 204,058 198! 107 7,160,406 6,640,852
Ohar.Cln. ACbic August...
34.953
41,527
464,485.
398.872
9,500
14,058
89,215
99,629 N'theast'u(S. C.) July
Oliarlest'n A Sav July
653,200 612,108 4,569,365 4,353,905
35,005
46,345
386,324
466,047 North'n Central. August
01iar.8uni.&No, August. .
9,500
8,800
88,237
66.673 Nonoern Paoinc 4th wk Sep. 907.516 920,842 17,470,219 17,437,591
Oheraw. A Darl July
Wis. Ct. Lines. 4thwk S(;p.
168,28
147,242 4,271,513 3.794,941
4,978
6,215
43,364
59.066
N.P.AW.Ceut. IthwkScp. 1,075,803 1,063,084 21,741,732 21.232,531
Oheraw.&Salisb July
850
1,386
10,572
13,948
Obes. AOlilo.... 4thwk Sep. 308,189
4thwk Sep
81,678
84,311 3,100,132 3,112,111
275.458 7,022,212 6,703,882 OhioAMiss
Olies. O. A 8.
3(1 wk Sep.
Augu.<t
18,225
19,022
488,297
193,601 203,287 1,396,916 1,485,835 Ohio River
515,550
Chlo. Bur. A No. Autust
58,
56,309
416,081
230,464 187,657 1,352,888 1,318,622 Ohio Southern. Scptemb'r.
463,686
Chio. Burl. A Q. August
51,910
41,297
3,720.196 3,161.840 25.171,172 20.692,921 Omaha A St. L.. August
374,424
307,180
Ohio.A East. 111. 4thwkSep.
Oregon Imp. Co August
393,000 442,035 2,588,681 2,678,011
101,552
79,023 2,980.781 2,759.724
Chicago & Erie. August
235,401 250,485 1,807,044 1,700,715 Peuusylvauia .. August
6,226,607 6,212,376 44,500,731 43,367,568
Chic. Kal.A 8.
June
24,970
23,032
651,685
633,147
23,947
24,468 PeoriaDec.AEv. 4thwkSep.
OWo.MU.A8t.P. 4thwk Sep. 998,681 969i709 23,316,867 20,077,971 Peterslmrg
August..
39,714
41,753
376,377
363,317
Cblo.AN'thw'n. August
513,035 510.324 3,261,148 3,299,262
3,062.525 2,747,108 20,722,352 17,470,584 Phila. A lirie... August..
aillo.Peo.A8.L.I 4thwk Sep.
38,191
2,022,646 1,963,775 14.688,426 13,845,453
31,422
960,882
835.683 Phila. A Read'g August
OUo.R'kl.AP... Scptemb'r. 1,970,799 1,847,489 13,463,404
CoalAIronCo. August.. 1,971,337 1,947.729 13,990,783
,264,013
12,060,388
CliJo.8t.P.AK.(j. 3d wk Sep.
TotalbothCos. August..
131,957 110,681 3,566,692 3.161,131
3,993,984 3.911.506 28,679,210 26,109,468
01ilo.8t.P.M.AO. August
Lehigh Valley July...
788,183 686,329 5,500,626 4,561,819
1,723,652 1,586,155
CUc.AW.Mion 4th wk Sep.
65,251
2,710
28,887
51,108 1,463,115 1,304,533 Pitts. Mar. A Ch. August.
3,800
25,224
On.Qa. AP^'ts. August
7,350
38.122
204,113
37,822
245,428
6,858
44,922
43,062 Pitt.Shen.AL.E August
CIn.JaokAMac 4thwk8ep.
19,944
06,046
68,274 1,786,300 1,680,57»'
19.972
517,018
547,095 Pitts.AWest. sys IthwkSep.
Oln.N. O. AT.P. 3d wk Sep.
78,714
136,890 174,022
780,652
92,328 3,007,054 3,072,055 Pltt.Young.AA. August
978,672
Ala. 6t, South. 3d wk Sep.
30,516
13,687
222,615
34,569 1,226,620 1,313,507 Pt. Royal A Aug. July
27,171
130,579
K.Orl. AN.E. 3d wk Sep.
23.14(i
20,363
236,193
23,428
23,910
153,496
867,434
784,478 Pt.Roy.AW.Uai. July
Ala A Vicksb. 3d wk Sep.
9,777
75,016
13,026
13,099
16,830
74,496
415,818
419,697 Pies.AAriz.Cen. July
VlOKS.Sh. &P. 3d wk Sep.
7,551
163,416
13,
25,470
22,059
174,680
361,480
395,959 C^iiiucyO.AK.C. August
Brlanger Sysi. 3d wk Sep. 149,704 176,619 5,876,413
947,430 1,107,020 6,986,986 7,705,829
5,983,697 Kieh.&Dan.sy8, July
Cinn. North w'n. August
2,186
224,922
28,158
1,840
27,712
238,521
13,604
13,694 Kich. A Petersb. August
On. Ports. A v.. August
27,838
182,886
24,790
22,880
8,652
482,782
163,125
151,042 HioGr'de South. 4tuwkSei>.
Col. A MaysV- August
1,533
3d wk Sep.
1,280
60,800
59,000 1,859,797 1,738,633
9,499
8,276 Rio Gr. West
OHev.AkronACoi 3d wk Sep
23,422
23,020
11,632
11,60:
65,852
73,250
711,58
681,572 Sag.TuscolaAH. August
Olev. Can. & ao. July
88,055
75,673
986,516
461,135
34,930
33.890 1,029,113
389,712 81.L.A.&T.H.BV 3d wk Sep.
OLCln.Ch.AH.L 3d wk Sep. 330,539 301,319 10.165,835
2,530
1.995
22.759
13,652
9,719,308 St,L.Ken'et.ASo August..
Peo. A East'n 3d wk Sep.
41,553
39,897 1,265,351 1,185,421 St.L.Southw'rn 4th wk Sep.
149,130 153,926 3.112,827 3,002,193
OHev. A Marietta AUKUSt
29,18»
28,716
189,837
152,416 1,246,180 1,057,58»
210,368
222,892 St.PaulADul'tb August
Color. Midland. 4thwk Sep.
65,721
57,492 1,620,618 1,526,164 8an Aut.&A.P.. June
722,276
107,037
137,830
639,198
Col. H. V. A Tol. Septeuib'r.
321,884 344,026 2,464,663 2,365,813 Saudersv.tV Ten, August
5,833
551
548
3.881
Ool,81ia'wneeAH 3d wk Sep.
15,230
15,123
609,125
499,466
18,421
19.542
619.100
374,217 e.Pran.AN.Pac 3d wk Sei>.
Colusa A Lake.. August
6,033
5,100
304,250
18,394
43,455
36,194
322,641
18,585 Sav. Am. AMon August
Conn. River
August
112,732 104,087
781,948
207,273 231.64
1,373,143 1,500.7991
721,563 Sav.Fla. A West May
Current River.. 3d WK Sep.
3,946
4.827
August
137,715
12,000
13,766
51,145
66,376
111,429 Silverton
Deny. A Rio Qr. 1th wk Sep. 249,300 254,500 6,742,211
32,261
32,103
261,827
278,228
6,222,862 Sioux City ANo August...
DesM.No. A w Auuust
36,170
31,652
260,491
South Bound... July
14,506
98,207
204,768
DetBay (..AAli^ August.
28,867
32,377
239,458
843,771 1,050,720
95,000 120,469
313,057 South Carolina August.
Det.Lan8'g ANo 4thwkSep.
35,808
36,606
903,018
924,635 So. Paciac Co.—
DnluthB.S.AAtl IthwkSep.
66,490
67,584 1,726,159 1,663,850
Gal.Har.AS.A. July
319,158 343,761 2,335,307 2,367,640
Dnluth A Winn. August
8,065
5,049
79,289
533,091
Louls'a West. July
81,752
83,219
571,969
48,645
£.Tenn.Va.Atia 2d WK 8ep.
123,851 130,846
Morgan'sLAT. July
374,879 337,132 2,724,701 2,930,244
JOgln Jol.AEast. Septemb'r.
75,805
62,147
103,319620,286
N.Y.T.AMex July
116,083
17,994
16.893
510.664
Brans.AInd'pUt. 4thwkSi'p.
9,760
9,651
282,887
Tex. A N. Orl July
140,i51
927,836
890,689
150,274
265,978
Eransv. A T. H 4thwk Sep.
31,556
31,018
948,868
Atlantic sys.ii. July
937,297 935.436 6,733,197 6,869,332
904.050
ntohburg
August
691,269 641,698 4,868,105 4.546,958
3,195,167l%)53,481 19,460.692 20.031,117
Pacitlo system JiUv
Flint. A P. Mara. 3d wk 8ei).
54,716
55,560 2,065,043 2,091,937
Total of all.. July
4,132.46i 4,288.91 26.243.889 26.900.449
Florence
July
1,669
1,738
20,681
Coast DlvlCal.) July
223,423 247,311 1,220.661 1,217,176
25,599
FtW. ARloQr. August
23,871
27,450
221,337
Sou. Div. (Cal) July
153,804
635,246 620,700 4.2n6,929 3,603.317
Ga. Car'la & No July
20,465
8,660
111,697
Arizona Div.. July
151,380 160,020 1,111,188 1,127,207
65,633
Georgia RR
August
118,419 121,751
916,742 1,153,504
593,240
Mew Mex. Div. July
74,459
577,398
81,896
Geo. 8o. AFIa. August...
55,912
53,220
484,261
75.569
10,962
60,922
490,308 Spar. Dn. A Col. July
8,382
Georget'nAWi July
3,487
3,153
27,516
Isl. R. T. July
R91,89t>
155,405 143,797
614,133
24,982 Staten
er.Bap.AInd. 3d wk Sep.
53,177
52,83" 1,791,686 1,724,854 StonyCl.ACMt.. July
26,567
28,221
14,028
13,491
CJn.R.AFt. W 3d wk Sep.
9,734
9,310
354,025
837,525
317,291 Summit Branch. August
106,599 109,061
848,819
Other lines .
3(1 wk Sep.
5,271
5,035
17'i,510
619,741
Lykens Valley August
164,100
686,812
99,833
75,426
Total all lines. 3d wk Sip.
68,182
67,163 2,323,219 2,206,248
Tot'l both Co's .\nsust....
205,433 184,487 1,535,631 1,457.264
Brand Tmnk... Wk Oct. 1 434,324 424,912 14,579,fl49;14,195.596
ICenn. Midland.. .^ngust
127.506
120,444
17,813
20,515
Ohio AQr.Tr. Wk Sep. 24
71,294
67,847 2,717,710: 2,637,138 ITexas APacillc. IthwkSep. 208,603 235,981 4,539,410 4,817,834
Det.Or.B
Wk Sep. 24
29.291
20.863
868,3841
851.859 rox.8.VaiAN.w. August
27,4354.453
2.9851
31.*»7
Tot.8.L.&8.F. 4thwkSep.j

Agg. total
Atlanta dE Char.Atlanta &Flor'a
Atlanta A W.Pt.
B.AO.£astLiDes
Western Lines
.

.

.

. .

.

W

.

.

.

I

.

.

AM

October

8,

THE

1892.]

CHilONlCIJS.

687
.

NOTICE.
1Sg~ Otviiig

(o

an

we wore

ucclclont ns

uboiit

yolng lo |>ro««, we arc obllired to lonvo out our
usDiti quoinlloui and oiirnings.

aroti tamlngt.1802.
1801,

Roadi,
•
Elil. Lex. ic Blf 8.b Jan.
41.906
(10.399
Bldn .loltct A R.. Ha. July
Jan. I lo July 31...
467,415
FUnt.VPoro Mar.'i a. July
216,032
Jan. 1 to July 31... 1,683,033

-Ifel Karnlngi,-

1892,

•

ISOl.

9

•

def, 2 58

.57.326

13,403
24,400
130,835
63,456

475,230

434,903

60,740
06,560
873,138

10,836
128,299

225,111
1,686,199

204,760
430,669
14,747
106,709
17,408
104,524
89,919
478,497

i22,oea
244,543
31.993
306,123
34,506
148,393
94,488
483,681

ri».Cen.A Ppnin.btMar,

Net EarniiiTS .Itontlilr to Latoitt Oates.—The following
«Uow3 tho gross aail net oarninRS to latest date.s of all railroails
furnishing; monthly statements. The compilation includes
•every road from whicli we can Ret returns of this character,
and in that form is given once » month. Early returns are
published from week to wook, as soon as issued, but for the

monthly

article

the roads

all

brouglit together here in the

week

in

—

the month. A
of a road indicates that the figures for that road have not previously been given, but appear for the first time in this
issue.

Orois
1892.

.

Samingi

S

Roartt.

.

1

750,817

to July 31... 4,725,417

.

1891.

S
91.053
518.911
380,020

708,995
4,576,033

95.892
552,578
418,620

17,700
def.527
173,3»3 dof.l2,S84
935.831
836,783
5,6»5.305 5,282,834
20,878
2.58^
184,325
2,170
283,819
245,311
1,619,678 1,414,638

*

Potomac. ..UMar
1 tti Mar. 31...
Beech Creek
IIMar
Jan. I to Mar. 61...
Blrm.<& Atlantic. bH July
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Bait.

Eartiinga.

S

Total Atch. syg.b. July 3,OS9.660 2,945,873
Jan. 1 to July 31... 20,037,0;2 18,601,390
143,297
121,937
R'dal'tlyown.CalbJuly
953,761
Jan.! lo July 31... 1,003 168
Jan.

tfet

1892.

$

223,719
220,971
Allegheny VilleyHJiily
Jan. 1 to July 31.. 1.15.5,292 1,389,145
Mar. 1 to July 31.. 1.034,725 1,015.645
145,653
127,343
B'd8j'tlrown.(»a)bJHly
Jan. 1 to July 31... 1,029,367
973,401

Tot.8.LAS.F.8y9.bJuly

.

1891,

394,390

54,742

98,910

307,476
3,239
23,793

308,487
3,464
30,275

104,233
3,071

171,356
1,156
7,542

20,721
131,197

19,178
111,472

6,138
46,831

7,257
33.191

3l5,0.i5
Burl. Ced.R.&No.aH July
Jan. 1 to July 31... 2,256,739

272,673
1,830,204

73,622
602.038

49,539
513,165

120,231
424.471
6,197
33,830

59,326
40,939
2,134

48,777
47.110
2.922
13,537

."

Bir.Shef.&Tcnn.RbUJuly
Jan. 1 to July 31...

Cam.* Atl.A Bra. all July

13i,162
430.955
6,079
31,911
514.923

July 31...
Carolina .Midland. U. July
Jan. 1 to July 31...
I to

Central otGeoricla.June..

Char. Cln.&Clilc.UJuly.
Jan. 1 to July 31..
CherawA Darl'tonbJune

9,905
79,715
4,399
33,336
Jan. 1 to June 30...
311,574
ChlcaKO* E. Ill....bJaD.
July 1 to Jan. 31... 2,215,634

13,376
85,572
S,411
52,851
296,820
2.133,909
437,450
348,731
2,720,245 2,295,619
164,957
162,630
1.031,980
960,077
60,277
59,479
379,313
411,407
359,338
392,508
2,410,031 2,413,909
141,983
158,519
984,974 1,066,083
117.508
90,374
702,563
632,783
51,011
43,033
314,776
311,165
38,899
39,033
295,372
321,229
703,740
726,473
4,735,720 4,803,175
22,641
23,500
131,311
129.251
70,803
66,834
399,211
312,317
87,74i5
83,921

Chic. St.P. AK.C.HbDec.
July 1 to Deo. 31..
Chlo. 4 W. Mlch....aJuly
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Ctn. Jack. A Mack. H July
Jan. 1 to July 31...

Otn.N.O.&Tei.P.1IaJuly
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Ala. Gt.SoutirnHn July
Jan. 1 to July 31...
K.O.&No'east. Tin July
Jan. 1 to July 31...

Alab'aA Vicks.^IaJuly.
Jan. 1 to July 31...
VIoka. Bh.APac.a11July
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Total syatem... air July
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Cln. Porta. &Vlr.1I b. July
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Cln. Wah. & .Micli.air June
Jan. 1 to Juno 30...

Oler.AkronA Col.a.June
Jan. 1 to June 30...
July 1 to Jnue 30...
Clevel. Can.&So. bliJuIy
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Peoria A K. Div tra .luly
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Cleve. Lorain & Wheel.—
Jan. 1 to June 30...
Cleve. & .Marietta. Iljuly.

Jan.! to July 31...
Colorado Fuel Co. Juno
Jan. 1 to June 30
July 1 to June 30
Cumberland Val...T;Mar
Jan 1 to Mar. 31...
S*8Mo.Xo.AW..b.June.
Jan. 1 to June 30...
I)et.BayCity& Al.b^July
Jan. 1 to July 31...
D«t. l,iins.&Nor...aJuly
Jan. 1 to July 31...
Duluth & Iron R)fe.!IMar
Jan. I to Mar. 31...

«.T.Va.AOa.. .<;•.. Jan.
July

1

1,031.753
78,986

437,088
293,624
1,718,070

c

338,640
11 .July.
July 31... 3,212,240
Ohlc.AOrand Tr..1TJuly.
58,033
Det.Gr.H.AMll,.1IJuIy.
20,563
1 to

dolt A Chicago.. HbJuly.
Jan. 1 to July 31...

$

«

346,116
2,129,205
61,234
20,954

86,920
599,029
10,330
4,539

'

472,5tj2

967,945
83,055
461,133
143,073
993,324

445,170
902,536
75,674
389,713
157,917
893,.502

669,996
24,292
181,180

590,344
25,049
101,176

200,838
33,851
190.915
27,630
210,591
102,049
664,940

236,287
23,740
148,320
40,799
280,680
107,714
672,447

91,552
589,156

60,652
765,882
5,168,485

to Jan. 31... 4,695,986

670

1.032
71,144

»

S
def. 1,1 07

def.2.836
deM9, 171 dcf. 17,338

deM,441
6,991

140.513
;925,017

197
19,040
147,807
1,113.673

815,642
562.311
34,426
51,069
278,833
294,594
16,846
14,301
84,907
96,353
72,733
134,905
534,701
738.103
17,093
40,799
192,667
301,720
22,000
18,000
123,000
144,305
1,000
1,000
31,000
45,093
2,000
Nil.
20.000
61,413
114,831
191.701
910,368 1,V9J,644
5,327
4,62:)
17,913
8,39>»
12,053
26.822
66,428
117,.541
24,514
21,6(>2
125.663
lU.OUO
262,793
239.331
27,3r)W
32,016
165,186
13j,130
38,675
42,184
277,371
125,130
112,161
4,212
36,800
14,274
14),484
300,313

133,521
4.391
40,132
10,145
105,000
263,770

."^60

146
7,764
4.30a
404,428
297,718
2,115,097 2,070,588
5,221,740 5,120,509
12,338
13,267
53,862
50,097
19,301
12,163
def.59,3H df.l49,97l
36,991
23,342
232,005
217,491
;def.242

ro

129

e,5i3
12,841

5,774
227,392
9,026

22 1,576

deM3,339

def.1,099

39,791
6,939
62,711
1,232
9,475
139,419
797.509
16,437
117,696

49,437
12,219
84,061
1,712
6,728
143.411
727,267
18,330
100,234

3,521

def.5,.59l

94

83.623
87,890
162,140
19.054
119,003
17.441

90.417
71,830
196,566
18,721
97,171
25,233
462,850
•85,322
•650,787
58,330
332,095
95,661
400,147

.

def.2,561

«
96,067
563,704
14,275
6,063

def, 12
def.2,058
1,651

9

1,940
2,864
19,179
30,989
Hoo».Tuu.AWIlm..TrJuly
3,426
1,724
Jan. 1 to July 31...
21,631
13,274
tUlnoli Central. a. ..June 1,605,825 1,411,325
Jan, 1 to ,Iuiie30... 9,116,147 8.501,293
JtdV 1 to Juno 30 ..19,291,760 17,331,555
lad. Deo. A West.. If. July
41.359
51,180
Jan. 1 to July 31...
257,558
200,166
260,276
Int. A Qroat Ifor...1[June
296,072
Jan. I to Juno 30.. .< 1,684,301 1,689,317
b July
143,901
Iowa Central
128,628
Jan. 1 to July 31... 1,017,979
906,405
2,602
Iron Railway
bll July.
2,3.50
Jan. 1 to July 31...
19,244
20,680
lack. Tarn. A K. W. .July
40,151
39,826
Jan. 1 to July 31...
508,863
489,322
Kanawha A Micb..1l July
31,065
25,361
Kan.C. Mem. A B...aJuly
74,322
80,103
Jan. 1 to July 31...
599,164
639,674
July
Keekuk A West'n bll
23,950
31,833
Jan. 1 to July 31...
213,815
216,537
L.JErleAll.A South HaJuly
6,516
5,819
Jan. 1 to July 31 ...
46,019
40,693
L. Erie A West'n. b HJuly
300.165
307,003
Jan. 1 to July 31 .. 1,902,433 1,760,126
Leh.AHud.Rlver.nbJuIv
39.797
37,419
243,433
Jan. 1 to July. 31...
233,503
Little Rock A Mem. 11 June
31,627
41,594
521,216
July 1 to Jiine 30...
483.426
366,342
Louiav.N.O.ATex..b Feb.
308,718
716,768
686,430
Jan. 1 to Feb. 29...
Loulsv. St.I.,.ATex...June
51,617
41,943
315,936
Jan. 1 to June 30...
236,703
Ueni. A Char.
a. June.
99,280
104,881
July 1 to June 30
1,530,019
1.747,461
.Mexican National
July
400,337
324,943
Jan. 1 to July 31... 2,381,493 2,403,443
Mllw. A North. a.. .HJuIy
145,587
152,514
Jan. 1 to July 31...
942,255
929,845
Minn. StP.A 3.S. M.HJuly
287,333
221,652
Jan. 1 to July 31... 1,699,487 1,165,618
.

408,173

Jan.

Jan.

390.340
991,498
120,779

£
9randTr'k of Can
Jan.

making returns are
which we publish our
on net earnings say on or about the 20th of
paragraph mark (H) added after the name

convenience of our readers

Jan. 1 to .Mar. 31....
493.432
July 1 to Mar. 31... 1,23.-),012
103,23.'>
QeorEla lilt
liaJuly
Jan. I to July 31...
708,273
aa.Boutli'n A I'la bHJuly
61,770
Jan. 1 to July 31...
428.319
(irand Rap. A r. nyn.fjuly
232,903
Jan. 1 to July 31... 1,810,529

305,73"'

163.985
•792,572
45,051
286,321
119.491
571,749

*

ANNUAL REPORTS.
Loais Sonthwiisterii Railfray.
the year ending June 30, 1892.^
The first annual report of this reorganized railroad commonly known as the "(Jotton Belt," has juH been issued.
Attention is called to the fact that comparisons of results
for the fiscal year ending June 33, 1892, are mide against the
results of operation of the receivers of the So. Louis Arkansas
& Texas Railway companies, wha were in control of the property until June 1, 1891, the date on which it was turned over
to the Sc. Louis Southwestern Railway Company.
The milea'^e of the entire system June 30, 1892, was as
St.

CFor

follows
St. Loui» Soulliwiatern
:

Main Liuo

Company—
MagnoIiaBranch
Shrevoport Brauch

6*4
59'5

Total miles
St. Louis SoutliweaUm Ra>lway Company of Texas—
MainLlno
304-6 Hillsboro Branch
109-9
Bhcrmaii Branch
Fort Worth Briineh
972
Total miles
Tyler Southeastern Railway Company
Main Lino

581-8

New Miulrid Branch
Delta Branch
Little

Rock Branch

418'0

|

5-7

|

51 '4
40-8

•
i

|

I

|

—

40-^
591-8
88-6

1,322-1
SytUm
The General Manager's report remarks that the freight
traffic shows a fair increase over the previous year, which is
mainly attributable to the improved physical condition of the
property. Had it not been for special causes this showing
could have been much better.

Entire

Among these causes was the inability tocomm.ind sufficient
cars to take care of the business offering during the busy
season. .Se-^ondly, the Railway Commis-sion of Texas by reductions from established basing paints, such as Hou.ston and
Galveston fof-ed reductions in inter-State rates. Since the
close of the fiscal year the suit against the Texas Commi:<sion
hag resulted in an injunction, and steps have been taken to
12,461 def 25,807 restore old rates. Thirdly, the instability of rates during the
76,345
212,030, past year to and from the Southwest, brought at>out by com1,279,128 1,502,3811 petition between the several lines eager for the traffic.
71,402
15.351
83,488
5,034
67,784
35,051
149,535

92,342
4.717
50,134
14.340
110,3 J7
30,000
178.431

THE CHRONICLE.

588

Fourthly was the general depression resulting from the low
price of cotton.

,,

-

,.

.,,

The development of the lumber industry on the lines ot the
road is steadily growing:.
In regard to the lack of cars the General Maniger says:
" I would recommend the addition of at least 1,000 freight cars
and
to the company's equipment, of 60,000 pounds capacity,
and
of the most substantial build, to meet the requirements,
on
to stand up under the heavy class of tonnage prevailmg
Without increased facilities in the
this company's lines.
able
direction indicated, I cannot understand how we will be
lines
in the future to meet the increasing demands upon our
the
for transportation, should the tonnage contioue to grow in
future in the same ratio that it has in the past, which we
hope and expect it will."
The operations, earnings, charges, etc, of the combined
system were as follows in 1880-91 and 1891-93:
OPERATIOXS AND FISCAL EESnLTS.
1891-92.

1890-91.
1,222

Miles operated

1

Opemtions—
Passcusers carried
Passengers carried oue mile
Kate per passenger per mile

833,293
33,131,148

d4, ?oS'?„„
193,1^0

2-98 cts.
1,252.97^
251,t)47,375

222

3-

[Vol. LV.

Jane 33, 1893.^
The annual report of President M. H. Smith will be found
on subsequent pages of the Chronicle with many valuable
tibles.
Remarks upon the report are also given in our
editorial column'^.
The statistics for four years
below for the Chronicle.

Miles operated*.

449
315

480
345

510
416

14,067

15,710

17,047

(

415

5

270

Total*

Net earnings

238

5,193,630

5,276.618

6.126,650

191,67t»,lll

192,619,02'3

207,112,'239

2-42 cts.

cts.

carried

Freight

245

9,571,866

per mile
Freight (tons)

9,930,910

(toiis)

oue mile. 1077,221,842 1250,836,794 1293,687,263 1510,117,291
per ton
per mile
let.
0934 et.
0-970 ct.
932 ct.

1,292,893

918,388
261,555
1,131,243
220,215

Express

3,824,291
812,163

Transportation
Motive power
Maini'nccof cars..
ofway, &c.
General

INCOME ACCOUNT 1891-92.

Ket earnings
Other income

$812,168
125,100

Total

Average.

*

EARNINGS AND EXPENSES.
Earnings from-

1883-89.

1839-90.

1890-91.

11,325.235
4,036,362
419.050
368,139
450,610

12,815,951
4,704,769

422,770
406,294
466,221

13.113,965
4,800,633
431,026
427,425
417,625

14.631,260
5,137.017
507.136
455,627

Total gross earns. 16,599,396

18,846,004

19,220,72J

21,235,722

1,863,386
1,051,076

4,458,786
2,633,130
1,196,718
2,040,334
1,090,123

4,752,901
2,738.354
1.267,123
2,097,670
1,202,391

5,176.354
3,105,00s
1,505,317
2,404,712
1,510,731

Oper.ex. (excl.tax) 10,326,085
6,273,311
62-21
Pcrct.of ex.toearn.

11,419,092
7,126,912
60-59

12,058,444
7,162,285
62-74

13,792,122
7,443,600
64-95
1891-92.

Miscellaneous

4,164.505
2,218,266
l,0-'3,853

Net earnings

INCOME ACCOUNT.
1888-89.

1889-90.

1890-91.

677,109

7,426,912
638,686

7,102,235
657,217
60,653

6,9:0,420

8,065,598

7,880,160

401,112
397,721
15,000)
4,521,694
4,590,493
23,376
90,339
199,425
186,203

4,207,629

Receijits-

$

Net earniugs
Income from invest's

6.273,311

6a. RR. profit

$017,574
$19,694

Total
SlUTlus

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET (ENTIRE SYSTEM) JUNE 30, 1892.
Cost of rond and equipment
Constraction accounts

Keal estate
Investments in bonds
Advances to sundry agents

to

Total income

Disbursements—
Taxes
Rentals

Asselt.

$65,075,680
20,722
27,327
26,500
25,502

be accounted for

Curretit Ssscts, viz.:—

Interest on debt, &u..

Georgia RR. loss
Other roads, loss
Dividends
Total disbursements.

t
1

1,066,520

'i'a

66,545,627

$20,000,000
16,509,000 $36,509,000

Binds—
Second mortgage income

Equipment
Current

(4

...$20,000,000
...
8,000,000

per cent)

Assets—
Road, equipm't.

Timber,quar.l'd8,&c.
Stocks owned

28,000,000

trust notes (not due)

521,688

Srks&b'ds in trust.:
Bills Aacc'tsreceiv.
Materials, fuel, A.C..
Cash oa hand
So &No.A.advance3
NasTi.&D. advances.
Other r'dg. advances
Sinking fund, &c
Profit

and

1892.

$

$

77,790,155 88,157, 37 102,993,406
558,249
757,339
654, B93
2,224,834
4,721,,838
1.226,')24
5,749,852
4,751,,086
3,561,931
14,447,878 16,121,,944 16,407,229
3,649,822
3,456,33
3,395, 901
1,39(5,410
1,232,871
1,482,,595
493,432
924 ,349
710,807
51,130
333 ,332
505,560
001 ,027
846,878
923,041
913,330
985,032
1,354,,422
419,625
506 ,435
614,031
l,255,4s3

loss

Liabilities, viz.:—

Interest on

bonds— due and accrued

$155,233
770,023

Sundry accounts payable

102,837,490 109,7S5,2;il 123,304,959 133,471,138

Total assets

925,256

Liabilities

—

Stock
Miscellaneous accounts

Balance to credit of income
30, 1892

(profit

17,491

and loss) aoeount,'Juue

$66,545,1)27

Adirondack Railway.
(Tor thi year ending June 30, 1BQ2.J
The following has been compiled from reports made
New York State Railroad Commissioners :

Coat Of road
Ppst of equipment

139,587

174,697
128,422

161,786
123,512

22,796

46,275

38,274

30, 1892.
Liabilities.

"...

.$2,801,286
73,437
Cash on hand
21,556
Mlfloellaueous
24 .509
fxsflt aud loss (defoy). 1,256,908

*4,177,690

Capital stock

Open accounts

$2,600,000
82,154

Audited vouchers and
pay-rolls
8,904
Trustees certificates for
2d mortgage bonds... 1.486,638

—
k-.k.*ni.$4,177,69e

^- 1*. K^.- OS »!->«

*

.

Total
*

1891-92

18.')0-01.

$
162,383

GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JUNE

Sundry accounts
June pay-rolls, &e.
Income account
Profit and loss
Suspense account...

t

1889-90.

income

Interest

to the

EARNINGS AND EXPENSES.
Oross earnings
Operating e iienses and taxes

Bonded debt*
Billspayable

572,190

Total

I7et

1891,

$

$
73,730,905
522,434
1,974,434
5,507,234
13,966,^78
2,677,133
1,039,429
719,645
933,938
771,908
607,937
335,571

cfeo.

30.

1890.

1889.

Bonds owued

Liabilities.

First mortgage (4 per cent)

cent in cash.

GENERAL B\L.VNCE JUNE

Capital Slock—

Common

j)er

8.002,759
def.25,S06

per cent cash.

65,317

Total.

Preferred

6,824,206
7,604,323
7,223,933
sur.126,214 sur.461,275 sur.65si,227

Stock dividend 5 per cent.
4-aO per cent in stock aud 1-10

Receivers

238,055

265;5oi

;2,40j,367 112,400,000

V 5 per cent cash.
11

St. Louis Arkansas&TexasRailwayinArkansas
and Missouri, general account
Receivers St. Louis Arkansas & Texas Railway in Texas,
general account

410,810

(

11,594,800

Balance

$146,782
Cash
187,385
Sundry accounts collectible
Supplies and material on hand
232,352
First mortgage bouds St. Louis Southwestern
Railway Company in treasury (par value)
500,000

531,6M

Ofteratiny ex/tenses

$937,268
107,328
800,000
10,248

1801-92.

$
Freight
Pas.sengcrs
Mails

-

Other items

2 44 cts.

11,331,836

car.

4,636,462

Interest on 1st mortgage honds

eta.

Rate

$
854,039
3,551.967
230,455

Taxes

532
422
18,131

Rate per pass

19 cts.

* In the operating expenses are included in 1990-91 $1,039,160 for
betterments, against $129,267 in 1891-92

Deduct

373

4,334,175
Pass, carried...
Pass. c^r. 1 mile 167,067,522

4,849.654
def. 525,998

—

Motive power
Maintenance ol cars
Maintenance of way
General

as.

1331-93.
2,85»

91.

2,250

Freight cars
Roadway equip.
Operations—

1,458,297
1,053,836
293.541
1,927,459
1 '6,521

Total
Expenses
Transportation

1890

1889-90.
2,198

Equipment—

4,323,656

Frelgbt
Mail, express and misccUaueous

fully compiled

Locomotives
Passenger cars..

cts.

^

have been

HOAD AND OPERATIONS.
1888-89.
2,161

1,302,580
270,413,0 -8
1-32 cts.

131

—

Earnings
Passenger

NasliYille Railroad.

the year enditicf

856,146
3,290,722
l/6,78a

Frei;rlit, tons carried
Freiglit, tons, carried one mile
Kate per ton per mUo

&

Louisville

CFor

J

33,112,800 48,000,000
65,726,660 57,643.910
633,229
193,209
501,440
531,509
443,601 1 1,097,262
1,829,394
1,556,878

294.574
809,914
993.570
,777.030

656,226
50,935

1,272,779

liabilities. 102,837,496

000.000
,722,660

52,800,000
75,397,660
174,996
837,203
( 1,630,062
1,512,798
630,360
71,80a
416,258

109,755,241 123,304,959 133,471,138

The bonds deposited in trust have been deducted here.
Includes dividends and " due sundry persons."
Less bonds pledged.
Advances, etc.
„.
....

1i

Cleveland Abron & Colunil)ns Railway,
"""
CFor the year ending June 30, 1893,^
annual report shows that the capital expenditures of
§19,813 consisted of the re-payment of loans advanced to the
company by coal operators and manufacturers for the construction of branches, etc., to their properties, the re-payment
of these loans being contingent upon the amount of revenue
derived by the company from these new sources, The direc-

The

tors call attention to the fact that in addition to these capital

expenditures other sums were expended upon the betterment
of the property and charged to operating exiieuses, although,
these Buws represent permanent betterments of such a char-

October

8,

THE CHRONICLR

1602.J

ncter as to form additiona to the value of the proiierty, nnd
these ainoiiuted to 818,039.
In puisiKince of a contract made with the Akron
ChicaRo
Junction Railroad Company, the right of way was conveyed
for a Bmgle track through the vard in the
to that company
city of Akron, a distance of 3'8 miles; alto a one-half interest
in the right of way from the Akron yard to Warwick, a distance of ll'83niikM, with a one-half interest in common in
certain freiglit and passenger facilities between Akron and
SViirwiok, this company reserving to itself the right to 0]x;rate
C. J. RR. Co. the double
and to use in common with the A.
track formed by the construction of that company's main line
upon the light of way to conveyed, parallel to and adjoining
this company's main track for a diiitauce of 1562 miles.
The consideration paid for this grant amounted to $87,697, out
of which this company was obligated to expend one-bait the
cost of some additional right of way, tracks and structures between Akron and Warwick for the joint use of both parties.
The balance has been used as a fund for additional yards,

&

589

Cleveland Cincinnati Chicatro

CFor

the year en-Hiir/

UI-EBATIu:(S

operated June 30
EqiUp'tofC.C.V.dSt.L—

.Miles

Locoiuollves
ru.Hsenger cars
I'rclght oars

Earnings—

Miles operatod

195

H91-02.
1.85a

867
358

379
364

17,3j6

17,227

9

Passenger

way

?.....

Total

Netearnings

D-isb w rscments

3,824.201

»,60'!.21H

9,12i».417

12,888,810

13,585,88»

1,591.126

1.821,363
1.642,101

1,510,.')96

Main, of equip, and -nglnes
Transportation aud general
Car and engine service.....

Taxes

3,649,305

12,639,145

Total

Expenses—
Maintenance of

9

9

3.422,872
8,598,837
617,430

Freight
Mail and express

1.311,173
5,176,297
175,351
365,764

8,739,182
3,899,963
IXCO.ME ACCOUNT.
1889-90.

630,893

1.53.i,(l61

631,767

5,601,975
80,110
330,333

.3,888,204

9,187,212
3,701,404

9,838,541
3,746,841

1890-91.

4t

108,358
378,450-

1891-92.

A

ifi

3,899,963
323,162

3,701,404
328,761

3,746,844

4,223,145

4,030,163

3,990,916

1,788.256
936,585
1,320,000
14,940

2,123.303
476,137
1,318,322

2,293,642
276,532

4,059,781
163,344

—

Interest

Rentals
Dividends*
Miscellaneous

1890-91.

18S9-90.

1890-91.
1,6.0

Optralions—
Passengers carried
4,811.640
4,975,023
5.288.171
Passengers carried 1 mile.. 14M06,245 162,342,123
172.269,935
Rate per passcngcrpcr mile
2-294 cts.
2-219 cts.
2"248ct.H
Freight (tons) carried
7,890,910
7,801,377
^,524,980
Frelght(tons)carrUdlmlle. 1,199,144,271 1,221.509,961 1,246.461,S4&
Rate per ton per mile
0-694 eta.
0-705 cts.
0-710 cts.

Totalnet

Dresden branch) are given below for three years.
EARKIKGS A^D EXFBKSES.

HKUVVn.

15,055

improvements

The earnings and expenses and income account (including

AND PISCAL
1889-90.
1,829
857
316

November 1, 1891.
RBCiiut^
The report concludes: " Your property as a whole is in a
largely improved condition, and has a greatly increased capac- Net earuiugs
Rentals, interest, &e
ity for
traffic on account of the extensive
in the course of the fiscal year."

30,

>.

ness

made

Louia Kail way.

8t.

H92.^
The report of the President, Mr. M. E. IngalU, U an inleresting document, and will be found on another pag
togetlier
with the balance sheets June 80, 1891 and IMOJ. Comments
upon the report are also made in the editorial column.'*.
The statistics for two years compiled in the usuil form for
the Chro.nicle are given below

&

tracks, etc. It was necessary to expend this fund upon new
work of this character instead of applying it towards the reduction of operating expenses, in order to satisfy the claims
of the mortgagees of the property upon the fund derived from
the Palo of right of way covered by their mortgages.
Also, the Aliron Union Passenger Depot Company was incorporated for the construction and operation of a union depot
at Akron; this company assuming one-half the cost, being
$61,424 to June 80. In payment for which this company received 850,000 of the Union Depot common stock and $50,000
of its mortgage bonds. These bonds were sold at par, producing in cash $50,000, leaving a balance of §11,424, representing the cost of the §50,000 Union Depot common stock
held by this company. This union depot was opened for busi-

*

June

4,928,604
101.561

244,07'3:

1,340,000-

10,79.;

1891-92.
Total
Surplus

195

193

255,71
477.985
64,187

273,912
555,717
72,905

298,183
612,189
57,570

797,838
602,092

902,534
682,386

967,943
731,003

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.

195,796

220,148

236,910

1889-90.

1890-91.

1891-92.

195,796

220,148

236,940

37,033
87,564
16,467
50,000

38,220
110,635
12,632
50,000

39,583
123,711

Brush Electric Co. The United States Circuit Court
of Appeals has rendered a decision sustaining the decree of
Judge Coxe rendered in July, 1891, in the suit of the Brush
Company against the Electrical Accumulator Comoany. The
sole right to use storage batteries is now owned by tne Consolidated Electric Storage Company, the licensees of the Brush
Electric Company. Consequently this decision gives to the
Consolidated Electric Storage Company a monopoly of the
storage battery business throughout the United States for a
period of over ten years next ensuing.

191,114
4,682

Earnings from—
Passengers

211,487

213,291
-23,646

$

i'reiK'Ut

Mall, express, etc

Total earnings

Operating expenses and taxes

Net earnings

$

I>-COXE ACCOUNT.

$

Net earnijigs
Ditbunementa—
Bentala
Interest on bonds (net)

Kentof equipment
Dividends
Total

Balance
*

Of

tills

50,000

8,661

$19,813 was applied to capital expenditures lor wliich

capital tiad not been provided.

OENERAL BALANCE SHEET

tXTSB 30, 1S92.
Liabiiilies.

Bead and

cciuipmeut... $6,345,142
Materials and fuel
100,120
Akron Un. Dep. stock..
50,000
"
'•
'• oons.acct.
11,424

Stock

$4,000,000
Bonds (see Supplem'T). 2,355,000
Bills payable.
62,626
Accrued interest
44,250
123,082 Cuireut accounts
112,912
96,993 Kevenue for 1891 9J
73,640
28,624 Other accounts
106,9.56

Casb account due
Cash

|

1

|

I

Misceilaneous

|

Total assets

$6,755,390

|

Total liabilities

$6,753,390

5 on prd. iu all tlie years,
1890-91 aud 1891-92.
*

aud 4 on common

3,910,174
80,742

in 1889-90

and 3

in.

—

Colmubns Hocking Valley

&

Toledo.— Judge Ingraham

of the N. Y. Supreme Court has rendered a decision giving
judgment in favor of the defendants in the suit of James J.
Belden against ex-Judge Stevenson Burke and his associate
directors of the Columbus Toledo
Hocking Valley Railroad
Company, Winslow, Lanier
Co., Drexel, Morgan '& Co., and
the Central Trust Company. Mr. Belden sued as the holder
of §50,000 of the company's bonds, and demanded that he be
reimbursed, the bonds having fallen greatly in value since hi*
piurchase of them. The suit involved the question of the
proper use of the proceeds of the §8,000,000 bonds of the railroad company, issued in 1881, secured by a mortgage to the

&

&

Company. Judge Ingraham holds that thehas no right of action.
Detroit Mackinac &, Marquette.— The trustees for the land
grant mortgage have declarel a dividend of 3 per cent from
the proceeds of land sales for the six months ending Sept. 30.
the New The Central Trust Company will shortly issue notice as to the
date when the payment will be made.
Cliicago & South Side Rapid Transit (.illcy Elevated.)—
1891-92.
special meeting of the stockholders has been called for Dec.
$
5 to take action upon the proposition of issuing |3,000,000 ad229,383
141,126 ditional first mortgage bonds. The present mortgage of
$7,500,000 covers the road to Sixty-seventh Street, a distance
88,237 of seven and a half miles. The new issue will provide for a
1,071 branch
from the main line through Sixty-third Street to the
89,329 World's Fair grounds, at Jackson Park, about one and threequarter miles, and also, it is said, for another branch.
32,817
East Line & Red River.- At Austin, Tex., October 3, the
30,000
petition of bondholders for an order of sale of the East Tine
62,817 6 Red River Railway was considered in the District Court.
26,512 The order was granted by Judge Cochran, and the sale fixed
for January 24.
The press dispatch says: " An order was
also entered confirming the action of the receiver in widen$300,000 ing the gauge and providing for rolling stock contracted
500,000 for under an order of Judge Key.
It authorizes the receiver
Central Trust
plaintiff

Fonda Johnstoirn & GlorersTllIe RR.
(For the year ending June 30, 1892.^
The following has been compiled from reports
York State Railroad Commissioners

to

:

EABSINOS. EXFESSESjAND CIIARQES.
1889-90.

Net earnings
Other income
Total

A

1890-01.

$

S

227,393
139,560

228,594
141,741

87,833
1,213

Gross earnings
Operating expenses and tuxes

86,853
1,501

89,046

88,334

Interest on bonds
Dividends (10 percent

33,630
30,000

33,035
30,000

Total
Surplus

63,630
25,416

63,035
25,319

Deduct—

OEKEBAL BALAKCB SHBET JDNB
AtteU.
Road and equipment...
Real estate investments

Cash on band
Openaccounts
Slnklugfund
Sundries

Accrued interest
3'otal

30, 1892.
Liabilities,

$943,348
40,859
24,692
30,2:J5

17,461
3,231
10,500
.$1,070,326

Capital stock

Funded debt
lutcrest on landed debt,

duo and accrued
Loans and bills payable
Sundries

Froht uud loss (surplus)
lotal

10,500
62,196
2,504
188,863

$1,070,336

to issue certificates for $400,000 to pay the contractors for
providing the standard gauge and rolling stock. These certificates, and about $100,000 of floating debt which accrued
under the Cross and Eddy receivership, are given prior lieu
to the debt of the bondholders,"

.

THE CHRONICLE.

690

[Vol LV.

Missouri Kansas & Texas.- A large amount of new conGeneral Electric—The United States Circuit Coiu-t of ApNew York, Judge Wallace presiding struction in Texas reported as contemplated by the Missouri
lias Kansas & Texas is very premature.
All the railroad conand Judges Lacombe and SUipman sitting as associates,
rendered a decision aflSraiing that of the Circuit Court in the struction in Texas which this company propo-es to engage in
against the for some time to come is the completion of the line from
action of the Edison Electric Light Company
its present terminus. Boggy Tank, to Houston, a distance of 80
United States Electric Lighting Company.
The decision of the Circuit Court in favor of the Edison miles, and the connection of a disjointed portion of the road
Company was rendered July 14, 1891. It held, in effect, that from Smithville to Lockhart, 36 miles.
the incandescent lamps manufactured by the United States
Pittsburg Lake Erie & Chicago.— This is a newly-incorand other companies were infringements of the Edison patents.
The practical efiect of the affirmation by the Appellate Court porated company which proposes to build a line from Sandusky, Ohio, easterly to the Pennsylvania coal regions, a disii to give a monopoly of the manufacture of the incandescent
bulbs to the Edison Company, and also the right to claim an tance of about 160 miles. Surveys have been made and a
accounting and damages for infringements from the defendant more direct route than any now existing is the object in view.
companies. The Court finds that any possible form of in- The incorporators are Messrs. John Jay McKelvey. of New
candescent lamp that can be manufactured is an infringe- York John McKelvey, Henry C. Huntington, Charles A.
ment of the Edison patents. The claims for damages are Judson and W. V. Latham, of Sandusky, Ohio. The same
large, and the vearly value of the monopoly to the Edison parties have obtained a charter under the name of the New
Company is estimated at high figures. The Edison patent has York & Chicago Short Line, under which further construction is contemplated.
still about three and a-half years to run.

peals for the District of

;

John Good Cordage & Machinery Co.— At Trenton, N. J.,
6, the certificate of incorporation of the John Good Cordage & Machinery Company was filed with the Secretary of
State. The company will have an authorized capital of
$7,000,000. John Good recently withdrew from his alliance
The incorporators
with the National Cordage Company.
named are John Good of Far Rockaway, N. Y.; John G.
Jenkins and T. D. Hallowell of Brooklyn; Isaac N. Hibbard
of Montclair, N. J.; Martin Devitt and John L. Wilten of
Jersey City, N. J., and William H. Williams of Orange, N. J.
The principal place of business is to be Jersey City, and the
company is to manufacture cordage, binding, twine and simOct.

—

Richmond & Danrille. The coupons due October 1 on the
following bonds were not paid, but Receiver Huidekoper hopes
to pay some or all of them in the near future
Richmond &
Danville debentures, Richmond & Danville consol. Ss, Asheville & Spartanburg Ist mtg., Columbia & Greenville Sd mtg,,
Danville & Western 1st mtg., Georgia Pacific consol. 2ds. The
October coupons of the Northwestern North Carolina firsts
and Charlotte Columbia & Augusta seconds were paid at the
Central Trust Co.
:

Richmond & West Point Terminal.-At a meeting of the
board of directors of the Richmond Terminal Company, held

on the 7th, the question of reorganization was fully discussed,
commodities and machinery.
reports Mr. Good as saying that the chief aim and Messrs. George F. Stone, Wm. E. Strong and J. C. Maben
will be to extend the manufacture of rope and cordage under were appointed a committee on reorganizjtion. The board
his new process, by which he declared he can make rope half also instructed the Executive Committee to make a thorough
a cent per pound cheaper than any other manufacturer in the investigation into the physical and financial condition of all
world. The first step in that direction will be the enlarge- the properties in the Terminal system at the close of the fiscal
ment and extension of the present factory at Ravenswood, year, June 30, 1892, and to report the same to the board to enaL. I., and subsequently other factories will be established at ble the committee on reorganization to avail themselves of
different points in the United States. The existing machinery such information. The board officially state that all the published reports purporting to give detailed plans of reorganiza
factory in Brooklyn will also be extended.
tion are without foundation.
LonisTille & Nashville.— At the annual meeting of the
Santa Fe Prescott & Phoenix.— This road will extend from
stockholders held in Louisville, the stock represented was
366,807 shares out of 528,000 shares.
The present board of Ash Fork, via Prescott, to Phoenix, Arizona, a distance of
directors was re-elected fpr the ensuing year.
At their meet- about two hundred miles. The survey of the entire line is
ing the directors reorganized, with August Belmont, of Neir practically completed, right of way and terminal facilities at
York, as chairman. The election of officers was held, and all points secured, sixteen or seventeen miles graded from
resulted in only one change. The office of Third Vice-President Phoenix north, thirty-eight miles graded from Ash Fork
was left vacant by the resignation of A. J. Wood, of Nash- South, and a large force at work pushing the grading on this
ville, to be filled at au'jther meeting.
The other officers were part of the line as fast as possible. Eight miles of track were
re-elected as follows
Mlton H. Smith, President Stuart R. laid from Ash Fork South by Oct. 1, and materials for twelve
Knott, First Vice-President; A. M. Quirrier, Second Vice-Presi- miles more were on the ground and track laying progressing
dent J. H. Ellis, Secretary W. W. Thompson, Treasurer. as fast as possible.
A contract with the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railway
The annual report of President Smith will be found at length
Company provides for payment of an arbitrary 5 per cent of
on other pages of the Chronicle.
the gross earnings of the entire Smta Fe system of railroads
Minneapolis & St. Lonis. The annual meeting occurred at upon all business interchanged with S. F. P. & P. Ry. to the
Minneapolis on Tuesday the 4th instant. Prior to the stock- trustee of the first mortgage bonds, to be applied to the payholders' meeting the old directors met and filled vacancies ment of interest accruing.
This contract extends for thirty
occasioned by the retirement of Messrs. Bishop, Langdon and years and cannot be changed or abrogated withmt consent of
Clarke by electing Messrs. William L. Bull of the stock- the owners of 90 per cent of the stock of the Santa Fe Presholders' committee, Edward S. Isham and William Strauss. cott & Phoenix Railway Company.
Subsequently at the annual meeting Messrs. William A. Read
of Vermilye & Co., J. Kennedy Tod and W. H. Truesdale
Terre Hante & Peoria— Terre Hante & Indianapolis.—
were also elected as directors. By the above action the stock- The Vandalia line, which is the St. Louis end of the Pennsylholders' committee were given a majority of the new board vania system, has commenced to operate the Terre Haute &
of directors. The new board subsequently met for reorgani- Peoria line on a ninety-nine-year lease at a rental of 30 per
zation and elected William H. Truesdale, President; William cent of the gross earnings. "Tlie lessee is the Torre Haute &
A. Read, Vice-President; William Strauss, Treasurer; Joseph Indianapolis Railroad Company, which owns the line from
Gaskell, Secretary, and Edward S. Isham, general counsel
the Illinois border to Indianapolis, and also operates the VanThe Executive Committee is composed as follows:
H dalia from East St. Louis to the Indiana State hue, the Terre
Truesdale, as President ex-officio; William A. Read, Wiliiani Haute & Logansport, and the Indiana & Lake Michigan, with
L. Bull, J. Kennedy Tod. Resolutions were adopted at the • terminus at St. Joseph.
stockholders' meeting requesting the board of directors to
The new mortgage for $2,500,000 authorized by the Terra
take action toward restoiing the property to its own manage- Haute & Peoria stockholders in June has been filed this week.
ment and taking it out of receivers' hands. It is understood It is made to the Union Trust Co. and matures In 1942.
that a plan of reorganization will be at once submitted to the
security holders which ia likely to be acceptable to all parties
Toledo & Ohio Central— Toledo Colnmbns & Clncinnatl^j
interested.
^The increase of the common stock $1,651,000 of the Toledo^
In pursuance of the order of Receiver Truesdale, of the & Ohio Central was agreed to at the stockholders' meeting
Minneipolis & St. Louis R. R. Co., payment of coupons 10 and Sept. 29. This new stock, together with $1,000,000 in cash, is
11 (January and July, 1888;, of the Improvement and Equip- the price which the Toledo & Ohio Central is to pay for the
ment bonds, with interest, are being paid by the Bank of North Toledo Columbus & Cincinnati. The cash payment will be
America. Payments on the Improvement and Equipment provided from the proceeds of the sale of Toledo & Ohio Cencoupon No. 9, with interest, was also resumed. On June 30 tral western division first mortgage gold fives, due Nov. 1,
1893, the receiver reported all the bonds and the interest then 1942, which have been authorized for §3,501,030.
The mortunpaid as follows
gage covers the road and equipment and provides for the extension from the present terminus at Ridgeway, Ohio, to
Columbus, fifty miles. The completed portion of the road,
unpnid,
Amount Rate Interest ittclndiuff Toledo to Ridgeway, is eighty-two miles. It is expected to
J»»i«.
e/Bondi of
Pathose 0/
have the line from Toledo to CbltlhibUs in operation within
limed
Int. Annum^ July i.lHa2
tM,
,,
Mlnncarolls . ,,
to Merrlam Jnnc.
S455,000 7
*31,*'50
This will give the Toledo & Ohio Central a
$31,>J50 the coming year.
East Minaeapolls to White Bear
280.000
7
19.600
99.800 double track from Toledo to Columbus and a short route to
Herriani Junction to Albert Loa
»oO,000 7
66,500
133,0011 Chicago via the
Iowa BitenHou
Chicago & Erie.
I,015,0u0
7
71,050
3l!l,72.5
ilar

The Times

•

:

;

;

;

—

W

—

. .

Income...

SOO.OoO
036 000

7
7

l.SS'AOOO
Improvement and Equipment... S.Bbo.OOO

6

BontUW estern Extension
Pacific Eiten.l(in
Tot»l

$9,218,000

35,000
44,S20
82,920
339,700

1.'57,.500

200,340
124,38
1,258,500
1

$591,140 $i,335,095

—

A large list of city bonds is offered in the Chboniclk
to-day by Messrs. W. J. Hayes & Sons of this .city and CleTeland, and investors are requested to notice it.

OCTOHBR

8,

THE CHKONK'LK

lHi»'.'J

m^cpovta

%uA l^ocumeuts.

A

NASHVILLE RAILROAD.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS— FOR THE FISCAL YEAR

FORTY-FIRST

ENDED JUNE

80,

1892.

!'.'""!!"

fnrward

llroHohl

iM

LOUISVILLE

691

ru

1

I

:

Company is iNTiRMTin AfJotHT
THE CuNTHAL RAILROAD CO. OF OEORrilA.

wiiiou this

roud and Dependencies
owNnii, iirT NOT OPKRATin BY THIS Company.

Louinvllle t>>
tttPu-'o. Ohio <t Boutliw. It

Li.1,1,.:.:

:..,iJich,

GlMBVIlledc Princeton Br.,
(I«AMdtoOhloVal.RR. Co.

''

1'-^

"

!

'

"j^^
TSl-OO

'

liBil
,,,

40-00

„a

I

a, .;...,..j,. ,.,,,u. niuiuui)

20-70

66*70

To the Stockhohiem of the LouisviUe A Nashville RR, Co.:
The Board of Directors of the Louiaville & Nashville Railroad Compiiny respectfully swbmit their report for the fiscal
year ended June 30, 1893, aa follows
LENGTH OF ROADS.
The length of roads operated by this Company, and of those
in which it is interested, at the close of the fiscal year, June
:

80, 1892, is as follows

Total mlleags

The earniDKs and expenses in this report are based on an.
avefajte of 3.857*91 miles, as shown in Table No. VI. Attention is called to the tables submitted herewith for details of
the year's business
:

Income Account, Fixed Charges,
U. Profit and Loss Account.
I.

General Balance Sheet.
rV. Bonded Debt, in detail.
V. Securities Owned by the Company.
VI. Gross Earnings, Operating Expenses and Net Eamings,

Cjuutal Stock.

„

Ltnglh in MUa.
185-23

«

4
...
.._..
Mttiu Blent— r
LoulsTllle •
toNaghytlle
.

Biriuiuchnm Mineral Railroad
Nurth nroncli— Magella to Bilok-yard
Alice Branch
Fossil

T

^^
Vn.

by months.
Gross Earnings, Operating Expenses and Net EarningB,

8"02

summarized.

-89
-63

Branch

CAPITAL STOCK,
The charter authorizes the Company to increase its Capital
Stock to an amount sufficient to represent the full cost of the
road and branches in stock.
Under this authority a special meeting of the stockholder*
was held July 9. I891^at which meeting authority was givea

9'64

South Branch— Graces to Bessemer
MuBcoda Branch—810B8 to Musooda

11-57
1-20

12-77

Bine Creek Exten.— Blue Creek June, to Blocton Juno. 27-08
Dudley Branch— Yolande to Brookwood
9-01
Ploui'tT Branob—Chauiblee to Ooetbite
3 «6
Huntsrllle Branch- Beg!>emer to Oneonta
49-30
Gurley Creek— Village Sprlnffs to Comptona
4-05
Limestone Spur
1-lg
Belt Cteek— Palmers to Oomptons
4-30
Brown Ore— Spur-Oneonta to Champion
8-SO
Gate City Branch— Boyles to Trussville
17-14
Red Gap Branch— Gate City to Graces
10-28
Helena &, Biocton— Helena <Taooa) to Finey Woods
10-04

to the Board of Directors to increase the Capital Stock $7,000,000, thus increasing the Capital Stock to $55,000,000, which
is below the cost of the roads and branches of the
Company. Of this increased stock, viz,, $7,000,000— $4,800,000
has been issued and disposed of, leaving $2,200,000 yet to he
issued, and making the amount of Capital Stock outstandine
at this date $53,800,000.

sum

^*

BONDED DEBT,

161-84

Alabama Mineral Railroad—Attalla

to Shelby
Shelby to Caleta
Shelby to Columbiana

107-75
11-34
5-82
124-91
178-49
140-38
5-18
17-37
20-07
171-17
116-38

Mobile 4 Montgomery R'y— Montgomery to Mobile
Kew Orleans & Mobile RR.— Mobile to New Orleans.
Pontchartrain RR.— Poutcliartrain Juno, to Mllneburg
Bardstowu Hr .uch— Bard.stown JuucMou toBardstown.
SprlngHeld Branch Biirdstown to Springfleld
Knoxvllle BranrU— Lebanon Junction to Jellico
Cumberland Valley Braooh— Corbin to Norton
Memphis Line— Memphis Junction to Memphis
.

25913

Owensboro & Nashville Railway—
Owensboro to Adairville
Mud River Branch— Penrod to Mud River Mines

84-00
4-49

Clarksvllle & Princeton Br.— Princeton June, to Gracey
OlarksTiUe Mineral Branch— Hematite to Marion
Henderson Division Edgefield Junction to Henderson. 134-71
MadlsonvlUe Branch— Madisonville to Providence
16-20
- 8t. LoDla Division -Evansville to East St. Louis
16200
Shawneetown Branch— McJ.«an8boro Junction to Shawneetown.. 40-14
O'Fallou Bran«h—O'Fallon Junction to O'Fallon
6-00

—

88-49
32-00
14-10

&.

Selma Dlv.—Gulf Junction to Pineapple. 35-61
Escambia Junction to Repton. 29-36
.

Pensacola Divi.^ion— Floraaton to Pensacola
Pensacola & Atlantic RR.— Pensacola to River Junet..
Cincinnati Division— Loui.sWlle to Newport
I.exingtou Branch— La Orange to Lexington
Lou. Harrod-s Cr'k A West. RR.— Louisville to Prospect
Kentucky Central Railway
CoviUKtonto Liyln(59ton
149-88
Maysvilleto Paris
49*46
Paris Junction to Lexington
17-94
Estill Junction to Rowland
30-43

II.— Lines over which this Compa!«t runs its Trains,
THE EaRNI: G9 OF WHICH .\CCRtK TO THIS COMPANY,
Btrmlngham Mineral RR.— Blocton to Blocton Junction. 7-91
Piuey Woods to Blootou
14-41

lU.— Operated under Lease, Earnings

The bonded debt, as per Table 4 la st year's report, waa
Bonds Issued—
Unified Fifty-year Four-per-oent Gold Bonds
Additional Bonded Debt—
Kent. Cen. Ry.Co.lst M. 4 p.c. gold bonds.
Maysv.A Lex. RR. Co., N. Div.,7 p.o. bds.
Maysv.A Lex. RR. Co,, S, Div,, 5 p.c. bds.

64-97
44*54
160-28
108-65
67-01
11-16

247-71

22-32

7,142,000

„
Deduct _
Bonds „
Redeemed Ourino the Year.—
Gen'l Mort. canceled for the Bink'g Fund
Six p ct. CoUat. Trust Bonds redeemed..
Cecilia Br. Bonds canc'd forthe Sink. F'd.
Evansville Henderson & Nashv. Division
Bonds canceled for the Sinking Fund..
I]nitied50-year4pc. Gold B'ds redeemed
Pensacola & Atlantic RR. First Mortgage
Bonds canceled for the Sinking Fund.

side tracks, station buildings, ballast,
renewals of bridges, and equipment
For the purchase of Nashv. Chattanooga
& St. Louis Railway Company stock...
For bonds redeemed for Sinking Funds.

'

'

6,523 000
'

400' 000
219,000

^
Deduct—

$8,946,000
271 000
$8,675,000
$1,266,000

GENERAL RESULTS.
from operations for the year were :
Grosa Earnings
$21,235,72155
Operating Expenses, 64-95 per cent
13,792,122 47
results

Traffic,

35-05 per cent

$7,443,599 08-

Deduct Charges against Income—
Taxes

$4,860,878 03
613,164 77
5,374,062

30*90

Net Earnings
Ado— Income from luvestments

26-72
lu-50
10-92
8-38

Lines in which this Company is ISterested as Owner
op a Majority of the Capital Stock in the Company
THAT OPEKATKS the ROAD.
Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway
810-00
Nashville Kloi-cnco A: Sheffleld Railway

Ix>ason Georgia Railroad Lease
Loss on other roads, which is a claim
against them

$2,602,829 36

$124,695 02

128,00123

Net Income for the year

Deduct—

2 per eent Cash Dividend declared Jnly

1892

9,

104-83
10*06

252,696 26
$2,330,133 11

2'a per cent Cash Dividend declared January 7, 189-2
$1,320,000

82-13
11*78
10-93

00

1,056,000 00
2,376,000

924-89

Deficit

83

$2,069,536 2«
533,293 10

Deduct-

VL

Bridge and Connecting Track

847,000
255,000

Kentucky Central Railway Company First Mortgage
Four per cent Gold Bonds
Maysville & Lexington Railroad Company, Northern
Division. Seven per cent Bonds
Maysville & Lexington Railroad Company, Southern
Division, Five per cent Bonds

Interest, Rents, etc

87-42

.

$702,000

. .

The general

ous CoMI'ANIKS.

„
Henderson

"

purposes—
For miscellaneous betterments, such as

(Note.—There remained in the treasury of the Company
Four per cent Gold Bonds issued.)

v.—Operated under Lease for Account op the Vari-

West Point Branch— Iron City to Pinkney
Napier Branch- Summertown to Napier

30,000

271 ,000

Net Earnings from

Columbia to Shelllcld

30,000
17,000

of the Unified Fifty-year

2,931-57

Southern Divl»ion Cumberland * Ohio Railroad—Cumberland A Chill Juiwtion to Greensbarg
Northern Division Cumberlaud & Ohio Railroad-Shelbyville to Bloomflcld
Glasgow Railroad-GlasKOw Junction to Glasgow
Ellrtou & Guthrie liailroad—Elliton Junction to Elkton.
Jtlammoth Cave RR.— Gla.'^gow June, to .Mammoth Cave

1,000
25,000

Outstanding June 30, 1892
$73,397,660
Showing an Increase over last year in tbebond'd debt of
$8,673,000
The increase in the bonded indebtedness is accounted for as
follows
Unified Fifty-year Four per cent Gold Bonds Issued tor the foUowlnc

142-47

188-67
Nashville system

$168,000

Increase

& Decatur Railroad— Nashville to Decatur. .119-24
Shelby Railroad— Anchorage to Shelbyville
19-10
Railway Transfer— East Louisville to South Louisville. 4-13

d:

$75,668,660

,.

Nashville

Total LouisviUe

1,804,000

$6,523,000
400,000
219,000

Bonds redeemed during the year

Excess of
Fixed Chargbs Accrhino to this Company.
in

IV.— Operated for Account op the South It, North
Alabama Railroad Company.
Bo. & No. Alabama BR.- New Decatur to Montgomery.182-37
Wetumpka Branch— Elmore to Wetumpka
6-30

966.722,660

150-91

208-14

Psnsacola

eto.

III.

:

ownbi) absolutely or throdoh the ownbbsnip o! the eutirk

i.

4.781^

OO

$25,866 89

THE CHRONICLE.

592
The average length of roads operated was
ehowiDg for the year as follows:

2,8o7'91 miles,

^^^^3^

^^^^^^

Gross Earnings per mile..,.
Operating Expenees i>eriuile

Sroug/i I forward

$J4',<>-f9

OJ

31.831
66,308

7')

Bridges.
Ballast..

b9,376 17

Lmprovements at Corbin—
Tracks
Depots

Water

l5o-2S
nR.rn
""?•'"

Feueaeola ir Atlannc Kailroad
Cumbcrliiurt Valley Branch
Clarksville Mineral Braucli
Kentucky Central Railway

Shops, turn-table etc

of traffic

^Hslfi
>,Jo?i oi

shown by

500 73

77,079 10

Telegrath Line-

$3,182 79
the following table:
t3,094 73

is

16,041 10

Widening emba nkments
Difference in weight of new steel rail ou
$75,870 03
main lines replacing lighter rail
Diflterence in weight of second-hand steel
ou L. H. C. & W. Rll. replacing
rail
1,209 03
lighter rail

1890-91.

^1111
o,3Sb5o

i;i

27,350 74
13.193 2.1

Side tracks ou line
Filling Trest les

''

1891-92.

The growth

86
77
0)

$15.553 07
4,694 92
4,760 22
f44 79
1,497 74

Bdildisgs- Depots and platforms
Water stations
Tool and watch houses

comparison witu
Eliininate this mileage for the purpose of
last year and the result is as follows:

Net Earnings, per mile

9S

•<

_

f^I
613-^0

Total

station

Section houses

•
„

oIt.?!

02

2,018
7,805
1.437
3,334
1.911

New

™""'

Railroart....

Gross Earnings, per mile...
Operating Expenses, per mile

$15.374 13

^litsTl Engine houses, etc hou.=
a.j^a o
Coal bins aud sand

^HVl'f.
i.S2b 94

$3,182 79
$2,604 56
Net EarEingBperiiile
Gross Earnings arid Net
The decrease per mile of road in
iiJcluding in
Earnings compared with 1890-91 is caused by
mileage:
the Louisville & Nashville System the folio wiug

Alabama Mineral

[Vol LV.

99 50

Covington and Wilders, via Mllldale

39,236

Eeal estate bought

i

;

Culverts and cattle guards

Fencing on

O-fnify
Net
Eun'i/s. Expeii% Birn'(;s. ?-;te
[operating]
Gross
Oi'Crittyer
rer
ver
55
,a. Av- Earninjg Expensa.: Earninst
MIU. U;-4:g
Mile.
Mile.
crivjc.
G-rosa

Miles

H.173,802 $3,321,213 i\2ln 85 S3.505 27 ?2.705 58!
0,t<!a,8M 4,181.071 fl.112 94 3,749 23 2.383 71
11,911,138 7,371,011, 4.540.127 R,229 02 3.f<54 83 2.374 39
1:'.14<,?11 8,015,737 5.128,976 0,525 21 3.1170 12 2..'.48 09
l4,jei,S80 8,823,7821 6.4»7,003 7,130 44 4.417 30 2,722 14
13.817, IIH 8,101,780 6.743.3o4 0,901 13 4,074 38 2.8S8 75
13.070,70'. 8,12»,.'i06 4,950,288 8,7!;8 41 4.181 33 2.547 OS
7,707 80 4,8118 8.) 8,100 81
1,970,11112 8.9.53,202 «,0-J6,490
10,300 211 10,267,5:i5 8,092.708 8,1171 18 6,0.15 39 3,005 77
l2,l"l-04 10 .'>99,396 10,328,086 (1,273.310 7,879 08 4.778 07 2,903 11
I88II-90! J:;.iv8-i;5 18,818,003 11.419.093; 7,4211,911 8,573 19 5 191 03 3.375 58
1890-91. 'S 'j;,i)-32 10,220,738 12,05S.444 7.16'i,i'81 8.541 33 6 358 54 3,182 79
2.004 56
l$91-93. •.',»67-01 21,235,7211 13.702,122 7.413.590 7,430 50 4.835 94

1879-80. 1.100-58
188081. 1.708 h«
J8818-!. 'l,9i;-25
1888-83. |-.Wli-4:
1883-81. il.(!li7-61881-85, l.lfivSl
1885-96. |l.il48-.V2
If 88-87. .U43-.".li
Ig7-8.S. Is ()27'00
I

llt.Sn.Mi

1

3,460 05

East Ixmiaviile to
South Louisville to Shepherdsville

1,310 nj

02-78
6;-21
60-69
02-74
84-95

I.e.'tci's, on Nashville &
Eagle tunnel approach. Cinciminti Division.

Hog Kuu

Bumping

iBjrjIOVEMENIS AT

Engineering expenses— Cumberland Val. Br.
Euglneerlngexi>euses— Alabama Mineral RK.

Improvements at East

Ncw

St.

Improvements at

St.

3,420 00

959 13
390
450
17(1

271
111

lou
183 aj

scales, etc

.'^1,033,589

61

$2.166 91
2,987 91
6,721 64
346 20

650 00
398 00

beilaud Valley Branch
4,1 14

97

0,415 41
1,310 03

Cross ties

Frogs and switches
Fastenings

785 02
25,896 (H

$1,007,692 98

Total.

COST OF ROAD AND EQUIPMENT.

32,757 01

2,501 02

of road has been charged with the amount expended
on Construction Account, the cost of the Kentucky Central
Railway, the Clarksville Mineral Branch (under construction,
not completed) and also the discount on .$3,0i57,O00 Unified
Fifty-year Four per cent Gold Bonds, aud §4,800,000 of the
Capital Stock,
$14,836,169 rw
Making total addition to cost of road during year
88,157,230 90
Which added to the cost of road Juuo 30, 1891

515 CO

Total cost to June 30, 1892, as per table No. III. ...$102,993,406 34

The cost

$5.872 37
2,925 63
8,798 00

Lot:is—

$9,896 60
4,137 77
14,354 37

New OnLEANS—

Sidetracks at Wharf

Improvements at Moiule—

Hew machinery.

Mobile shops
Improvements at L*tonia—
New track. I/.tonia yard
New buildmgs

$22,403 54
5,267 24

At

the close of
were in the tracks

27,670 78

Improvements at Covisoton—

Improvements at Middlesdorouoh-

286 20

Alaliama Mineral Railroad

Rails

$12,733 18
3,238 65
1,153 19
202.53
14,489 59
639 82

Louis-

Engine house aud ash pits
Re-arr«ngemeut of tracks
Operator's house. South Covington tunnel.

etc.,
po.«ts, etc.,
po.-its,

Louisville Harrod's Creek h Westport Kail
road locomotives sold
Side tracks tiikeii up.
2d track, ShepherdaVille to Lebanon .Tunc...
2d track. Edglleld June, to East Nashville...
Machinery, Ilowell shops
Arch culvert, mile No. SO, Ciucionati Div...
Material left over from construction, Cum-

550 00

tracks

Improvements at

22198

716 19

—

Total

5,498 86

Connection with Venice iCarondeletEU...

New freight depot
New tracks

10,171 12
150 15

Deduct—

204 60

'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.

565 86
814 17
2,130 24
31,115 55

road— Alabama Mineral Railroad
road— Cumberland Valley Branch
value of ties— Alabama Mineral Railroad,.

Sundries— Depot

Improvements at Montgomery—
Water station
Band house
Yard tracks
Underpass at Montgomery

.

--7
.')'.

19,947 13
1,815 O'i

Cumberland Valley Bi-aueh
Street at Rose Hill -Cumberland Valley Branch

2,399 98

Roundhouse....,
Turn-talile .and ashpit

-J

773 -J;!
394 67

in public
in iniblic

IJiftercnceiu

Whistle
Whistle

$5,294 26

BlRMINOHAM—

7-1

$171 13
788 00

Change
Change

$1,500 00
899 98

New machinery, Birmiugham shops

10

15,255
1.138
2,131
1,044

$698 09
17 50

Graduation- Cumberland Valley Branch
Graduation— Alabama Miueial Railroad

638 88

post. College Street, Nashville.

$1,07'2

Coal bins— Lebanon Junction
" Y" at Pittsburg, Knoxvillo Division
Fill at EnL'ltsh ou Cincinnati Division
Surtacineditching on Cincinnati Division
Change of Hue on Cincinnati Division
Connection with Raleigh Springs Railroad
Ke-laying track with new steel between Princeton and
Gracey, Clarksville & Princetou Branch
Open waterway- Parts <Sc Maysville Branch
Undergrade cro.«siug, Paris & Maysville Branch
t ncline at Scrautou
Oil storage tRUk, West Pascagoula
Raising grade in marsh. Now Orleans Division
Livingston yard tiacks
Overhead Bridge— Ilendersou Division
Safety gales— Kvansviile
Automatic signals— Wabash Bridge
Legal expenses— Cumberland Valley Branch. $2,670 00
750 00
Legal expenses- Alabama Mineral Railroad.

64,853 78

.'

1,179 27

73
479 37

Track Scale—Taooa

235 88
235 65
145 76
1.775 00
123 36

IMPROVF.5IEST3 AT NASHVILLE—

Track down Front Street

13 85

1,.552

IMPROVEMEKTS AT EOWLAND—
Bowlaud yard tracks
tMPROVEMENTB AT NEW DkCATDR—
TInderpass at Uccatur

861.57

tunnel, Cincinnati Division

Madlsonville

33136

New machinery. New Decatur shops

$303 85

Decatur Division...

345,130 30

aud Shelby St.

4100

Tunnels-

.59-77

$128.035 80
217,144 50

St.

$1,269 92

Anchorage

TMPP.nVEMFNTS AT LouisvirxE—
Union Fasseupi-r D^-pot. Teuth and Br'iJway. $37,447 G8
2,442 09
Station and yard fence, Teutb and Bro'dway.
2.2S0 70
Supply oil bonse. Tenth and Broadway
Tracks nnil ballast, i>aaseugcr depot. Tenth
2,995 30
and Broadway
700 13
Train shed, Tenth and Broadway
Water fujvply, passenger depot. Tenth and
547 67
Broadway
452 10
raving Kleveuth Street
130 53
Platform. pa--seug<T depot. Tenth and E'way
2.G8S 29
Extending track. LonisvlUe yard
1,136 52
Side track, Teuth .Sireet
3,346 25
^rack, new yard. Oak Street
1,017 14
New machinciy, Louisville shops
422 08
'•A" Street oouueclion
Undergrade, Pope Street
5,896 69

Improvementto Broadway

$1,233 08
2,226 37

Second Tracks-

for improvemeats and
additions to the several properties were as follov.'s:
Cars Built in Compaxy-s Shops—
*„,„„„,
$23,192 34
6 passencer cars
2,174 -10
1 baugacc car
^* *
$30,360 74

Improvciiieiits to Charlton Street

.IS

12,553 49

way

McKenzie
Mannington

50-44
61-33
«l-?8
00-98
81-87
6S-53
82-I5

The expenditures during the year

Clerk's ofbce. Zaue Street
Imijrovcmeiit*, South Louisville 3 ards
New tools, Eant Louisville shops
Cistern, Sixth and Uill Streets

line

Water Supply—

COXSTKUCTION ACCOUNT.

Fbeight CAits BorciiT—
200 fruit cars
4B7 box cars

4,«'29 >'!

Ri.ght of

K

I

1,153

83 013 61
V>ft0
.

STEEL AND IRON RAILS.
fiscal year ended June

tlie

30, 1891, there

:

mie».

51

steel rails

586 69

Iron

rails

*2,120-39

17411

4,180 81

2,294-50

1,882 32

Includes 66-50 miles new steel laid on Cumberland Valley BrancU
In 1890-91, not included on page 13 of Annual Report 1890-91 a»
additions daring the year on new track«.
*

!

I

October

THE CHRONICLE.

8, 1892.]

Mi'tt

Brought t'oncird
Tliere liave been

1110

Clarksvlllc Mlucr.il Br.incli, Bteel

have been added to the Loui».
Pcu^BOOlft & Atliinlli- R'illrn.Kl. hIppI
Tliere

&

PAYMENTS

i.tgfjo

added during the year on ue w track^;

593

O.V

ACCOf .VT OF SINKING FrND.8,
.

Mid .S'Micb

It

North Ala-

Branches,

Dcel

Feb.
Mar.

1, 1892.
1, 1892.
1, 18113.
1, ISO I.
1, 1803.
1, 1893.

General Mortgm-o

June

1,

1...

lG0'2d

*-n
119-6S
5-23

R,\llrona, Btccl

Iron

532-no
.8outh

2,841-50

Total

During the past flsoil year several of the divisions
were ro-niensured, which resulted in a net decrease of

U to be deducted from the foregoing mileage

-01

2,811-40

During the year there were 126-13 miles of track re-laid with
steel rails, to replace old steel, and 8-60 miles to replace

new

Of

rails, at

a cost of $-J16,186 80.

amount $125,234 03 has been charged to Operating
Exi>en9cs and §90,053 83 to Construction Account, for ditference in weight of rails which were replace! by heavier rails.
•18 mile of old steel from main lines was used to replacs old
this

iron on Pontohartrain Railroad.
There are in track, therefore, on June 30, 1833:

North Alabama RR.,

Inn.

30.003
30,OU;i

.

.-.o.o.io

lO.OOil

31.80)
40,03')

1893. 211,812

$433,472
Sterling.. Nov. 1, 1892.
1, 181(2.

A North Alabama RR., sterling.. Dec.
South A Norlh Alabama RR., Sterling .May
Nashville & Decatur RR
Apr.
Hiiutli

1,
1,

1893.
189J.

3(),40J

.

53,460

.

30,l0-,i

.

19,000

rails

$586,750

GUARANTEES FOR OUTSIDE COMPANIES,

ETC., 1892-93.

Joint lease of the Georgia Railroad with the Central Railroad Company
of (Jeorgia—
Total yearly rental underlease
$609,000
Louisville & Nashville RR. Co's liability for half rental .... 300,000

By reference to the General Results statement it will l>e seen
that there was a loss on this lease for the past year o£
$124,695 03.
Sonthom Division Cumberland & Ohio RR. guar. Interest
$21,000
Nashville Florence A Sbeflleld Railway. $2,0J6,O0O of
five per cent bonds, guaranteed in terest
101,800
. . .

BONDS

Milf.
2,680-46
161-00

Bteel rails

Iron

Oct.
Nashville Dlv.. Deo.
Jan.

Total

Tofcil

old iron

&

.t

133,278

•04 of a mile.

Which

I

Kvansv. Uendersiui

2-13 ftl

aioel..

Iron

Alabama Mineral

Louis. Cin. & Lex. Ry. KlrsI Mort
Louis. Clu. A \As\. Ky. Second Mort
I'oosaoola ii Atlautlb Railroad
Cecilia Branch
--

12101

Ity. nnci

'JS.

I

Nash, eyatera:

247-71

Kentucky Central

ISJ:

.Mem|ihist'larks.,lfc Louis. Ry.8terllni(.. Au!t. 1, 1892. $'jn.5S0
^'
i..-'i..i- V Louis. Ky.Sto.-Iluij.. Fob. I, 1811.1.
It.'iit
:!
8ept. 1, 18t>2.
e.ojo

IN

THE SINKING FUNDS.

&

The

Tru<!tees of th^JIemphia Clarksville
Louisville Railroad Company First Mortgage hold the following bonds for

the Sinking Fund
117 Lonisv, A Nashv. Five per cent Trust Bonds. *l,O00eaoh.$l 17,000
18 Loulsv. A Nashv General .Mortgage Bonds, if 1.000 each.. 18,000
11 Pensacola A .itlautle RR. Fii-.st Mort. Bonds, $1,000 each
11,000
14 Nashville Chattanooga A St. Louis Railway First Mortgage Tracy City Branch Bonds, $1,000 each
14,000
30 Nashville Chattanooga A St. Louis Railway Bon Air Lino
Bonds, $1,000 each
30,000
03 Nashv. Flor. A Shefflelrt R'v First M. Bonds, $1,000 each
93,000
58 South A North Alabama RR. Five per cent Consolidate I
Jiortgage Bonds, $l,n00 each
58,000
34 Louisville Nashville Unified Fifty-year Four per cent
Gold Bonds, $1,000 each
34,000
:

Total

2.841-4G

Of the new steel laid, 80-35 miles is of the 58Ji-lb. pattern
and 98-38 miles of the 70-lb. pattern.
INTEaEST CHARGES FOR 1892-93.
The interest charges against Income Account for the fiscal
year 1892-93 are estimated as follows:
Bonds

Amount of

OiiUtantlina.

Consolidated MortKajro Bonds
1(17,070,000
City or Louisville, Lpiianou Branch Ext. bonds
3:i3,0G0

General Mortgage Bonds
Memphis A: Oliio KU. Sterllns: Mort(ta«e Bonds
Mem. ('.& I.on. KK. sterling Mort. Bonds

Interr'-t

$494,000
in,!>80

ll,45!S.00O

Branch First MortKago Bonds
Evan. HenT & Nusli. F)iv. First Mort. Bonds
Pcnsaeola Division First Mortaasre Bonds
iebanon-Knoxvillc Branch Bonds
Southeast & fJf. l.ouls Dlv'n First Mort. Bonds.
Southeast A St. Louis Uiv. Second Mort. Bonds.
Louisville & Nashville and South & North AlaCecilia

bama

Railroad Trust Deed Bonds.
Louisville & Nashville .ind Mobile & MontKouicry Railway Trust Deed B'>ndB.
Kew Orleans A Moliilo Dlv. First Mort. Bonds.

68'.i,8(>0

3,500,000
2,015,660
801,000
2,241,000
680.000
1,500,000
3.500,000
3,000,000

24'<,784

1,960,000

117,600

2,677,000
5,000.003

30O,0liO

NewOrlenns&iMiibilcDiv.SeooudMort. Bonds. 1,000,000
Ten-Forty Adiustiucnt Bonds
4,531,000
Louisville Ciucinnati & Le!C. Ry. First M. Bds.
2,8.50,000
Louisville Cincinnati A Lex. Ry. Second M.Bds.
892,000
Louisville Cincinnati & Lexington Ry. General
Mortgage Bonds
3.259,000
Fensacola <S Solnia Division Bonds
1,24-',000
Pcn8acoUi& Atlantic RK. First .Mort Bonds.. 2,970,000
Fivc]>er cent First Mort. Trust Gold Bonds...
5,129,000
First .Mort. 5 per cent 50-year Gold BondJ
1,764,000
Uniticd 50-year 4 per cent Gold Mort. Bonds.. 10.571.000
KentuchyCent.Ry.Co.lst Mort.4 p.c GoldBds. 6,523,000
Maysville it L<x. RR. Co. No.Div. 7 p.c. Bonds.
400.000
Maysvlllei Lex. RK. Co. So.Uiv. 5p.c.Bonds.
210,000
isci,udei> is

90 000

To be deducted from forogolnK

.

$9,633,000

total

60.000
271,860
10ii,500

02,440
19.5,480

74,880
177,270
256,450
Si, -200

422, 840

260,920
28,000
10,950

$90,000
160,0.'0
192,4iS0

60.000
53,880

21,000

$577,980

$77,357,660 .$4,289,994
Ti^Z"**' secure ,••.--, -i;--:
Deduct to
Loulsv.A Nashv.and So. <& No.
Ala. RR. Trust Deeds Bonds for $l,9b0,000,
included in foregoing
1,960,000
117,600
Total Loulsv.

<Sc

Kashv. Railroad Co

$147,000
136.504
260.570
120,000
177,150
22,880
72,000

$15,715,932

$051,104

&

15,000

& Nashv. RR. mort. debt and Interest.. $75,397,660 $4,172,394
debt of other companies in the system.. 15,715,932
951,104

l.i>uisv.

$91,113,592 $5,123,498

Deduct—

Interest on L<>uiB.itNnsh.RR.BondBlnTreaBurv
Interest on Ow ensbi.ro & Nashv. Ry. Ist.Mort.

Bonds, lu the Trust

Rent

of Cecilia

Branch

.

'.'.'.'

Rent of portion of Clurksv.&Prlnceton Branch

$143,020
72,000
60.000
12,040

287,060
Total estimated interest Charges for 1892-93

5,000
44,000
191,000

$515,000

The Trustees of the Nashville & Decatur Railroad Company hold the following Bonds for its First Mortgage Sinking
Fund:
200 Nashr. A Decatur RR. First Mort. Bonds. $1,000 each
$200,000
91 Loulsv. A Nashv. Pens.a. Dlv. First M. Bunds, $1,000 each
39 Nashv. Chat. A St. L. R'y Seven p. ct. Bonds, $1,000 each
41 Nashv. Chat. A St. L. R-y Five per ct. Bonds, $1,000 each
70 Tennessee State Three percent Bonds. *1.000 each
15 Tennessee State Six per cent Bonds, $1,000 each
4 Tennessee State Six per cent Bonds, .$100 each
2.9 South A North Ala RR. Five p. c. Con.M. Bd8,$l,000each
4 Nashville Corporatim Bonds, $1,000 each
10 Nashville Co poratloii Bonds, $500 each
2 Nashville Corporation Bonds, $:i0O each
5 Nashville Corporation Bonds. $100 each
2 Nashville Water Works Bonds, $500 each
5 Davidson Countv Bonds. *.50O each
13 Louisville A Nashville UuiHed Fifty-year Four per cent
Gold Bonds, $1,0J0 each

91.000
39,000
41.000
70,000
15,000

40O
29,000
4,00O
5,000

600
50O
1,000
2,500

13,000

$512,000

The Trustees of the Louisville * Nashville and South &
North Alabama Railroad Trust Deed hold the foUovvins bonds
for the Sinking Fund:
66 I>oulsvllle
$1,000 each

.%

Nashville

Five

per

cent

Trust

Bonds,

21 Louisville A Nashville and south A North Alabama
Railroad Trust Deed Bonds, $1,000 each
30 Louisville A Nashville Unltiea Firty-year Four per cent

Gold Bouds, $1,000 each

.$66,000

21,000
30,00O

$117,000

EQUIPMENT.

At the

& Decatur RR. First Mort. Bonds... $2,100,000
At Decatur RK. Stock
2,265,582
North Alabama RR. Sterling Bonds... 4,3il.350
Sciuth it Nurlh Alabama RR. 2d .Mort. Bonds..
2,000,000
joiiih li North .\labaiiia RK. i.ousol. Mort.Bds.
3,543,000
Loulsv. Ry. Transfer First Mort. Bonds
286,000
Owensboro it Nashv. Ry. First Mort. Bonds... 1,200,000
Shelby RR. Rent

.Mort.

A Nashv. Peusa Dlv. First M. Bonds. t^I.OOO each
A Nashv. General .Mortgage Bonds, $1,000 each.
A Atlantic Fir.it .Mortgage Bonds, $1,000 each

$75,397,660 $1,172,394

^ashTIllc
Nashville

South

5 Loulsv

191 Pensacola

160,620

FonEaoiyo, De-

.

:

44 Loulsv.

POBITKD WITH Trusters.
To secure Ten-forty Adjustment Bonds—

Lebanon-Kuoxville Brunch
$1,500,003
Lonisv. it Nashv. and Mobile & Montgomery
Railw;iy Trust Deed Bonds
2,677,000
Lonisv. Cin & Lex. Ry. Gen. Mort. Bonds...
3.-208,000
Pensacola .fc Atlantic RR First .Mort. Bonds.
1,000,000
Fensacola & Selraa Dlv. First Mort. Bonds.
898,000
Pensacola & Selma Dlv. First Mort. Bonds,
also as part collateral for Ga. Rlt. lease...
350.000

.f37o,000

The Trustee3 of the South & North .Alabama Railroad Company Sterling Mortgage hold the following bonds for the
Sinking Fund
90 000
40 South A North Ala. RR. Sterling Mtg. Bonds. SLOO,") etch ?40,000
210.000 235 Loulsv. A Nashv. f ive per cent Trust Bonds, .*! ,00(> each 235,000
121,540
54,600
13i,500
34,800

$86,990,660 $4,867,974

Deduct Bosds

.fe

$4,836,43«

clos9 of the fiscal year ended June 30, 189-3, the
equipment consisted of sixteen thousand five hundred and
fifteen cars and five hundred and eleven locomotives, all of
which have besn maintained in efficient condition at a cost of
§2,440,970 49, whicU has been charged to operating espense^i
The expenditures last year on this account were $2,037, 43i 58,
showing an increase of ^408,535 96.
There have been built during the year in various shops of
the Company (and by foreign roads to replace cars destroyed),
and charged to operating expenses, one hundred and
fifty-three cars, consisting of three postal, two coaches, one
express, one baggage, twenty-six cahoos", sixty-two box, on©
fruit, one flat, ti^o gondola (eight-wheel), one gondola (drop
bottom), fifty-two stock, and one wrecker.
There were bought and charge! to operating expenses on©
hundred and thirty-tlire? box cars, one uundred drop bottom,
gondolas and one hundred refrigerator cars.
There were bou/ht and chargsd to construction account

two hundred and

fifty fruit

cars and fi)ur hundred and ei«y-

seyen box cars; there were Iniilt in the s'lops and charged to
this account six coaches and one biggage car.

THE CHRONICLK

594'

This makes the equipment as of July 1, 1892, as follows
14,515
Car Equipment June 30, 1891
To which should be added two coachea and one caboose
3
omitted from last year's iuTentory

:

14,518

486
724

Charged to Operating Expenses during the year
Charged to Construction Account during the year

15,728

From

to be deducted
Oars destroyed during the year
this

is

:

414
15,314

To which should be added the following equipment
888
Kentucky Central Railway
248
Alabama Mineral Railroad
,

fensaoola & Atlantic Railroad.
On hand July

1,

Lo(X)MOTiVES.
80, 1891, the

65
1,201

16,515

1892

— At

foxir

The number of freight train miles was 8,975,863, against
8,001,118 in the previous year, an increase of 12-18 per cent.
The net earnings per train mile were 49 789 cents, against
53-516 cents in the previous year, a decrease of 6-96 per cent.
The number of mixed train miles was .593,898, against 315,381 in the previous year, an increase of 90-21 per cent.
The average number of cars hauled in each train was 17-75,
against 17'94 in the previous year, a decrease of 1-06 per cent.
The average number of tons carried in each train was 156-99,
against 167-42 in the previous year, a decrease of 6-33 per cent.
The average number of tons in each loaded car was 13-30,
against 13-83 in the previous year, a decrease of 4-13 per cent.
The average number of miles that each ton was carried was
75 miles, against 75 miles in the previous year.

NASHVILLE CHATTANOOGA 4 ST. LOUIS RAILWAY.
Your attention is called to the statement of general results
from the operations of this road for the past year, compared

June with the year previous
hundred and seventy-seven

the close of the fiscal year ended

Company owned

[Vol. LV.

:

For 12 mos. ended

locomotives.

June

There were destroyed during the year eight locomotives,
leaving on hand July 1, 1893, four hundred and sixty-nine
locomotives, to which should be added the following
Kentucky Central Railway
29
Alabama Mineral Railroad
3

30, 1892.
(810 MUes.)

Gross earnings
Operating expenses

nios. endued

June

30, 1891.
(672 Milef.)

$5,353,28-i 06

Net earnings
aud taxes
Improvements
Rental Western & Atlantic

For 12

$2,029,008 15

$3,943,303 74
2,323,722 39

3,324.279 91

:

Pensacola

&

10

Atlantic Railroad

Intercut

five

hundred and eleven locomotives on hand July

$1,488,639 28
$540,368 87
500.000 00

For comparison, your attention is called to the following
tables showing the number of locomotives, passenger and
freight cars on hand at the close of each of the past seven

Net surplus

$1,057,416 02
$362,165 33
333,427 98

$40,368 87

Surplus
Dividends paid

1,

1892.

118,11151
420,012 00

RR

42

making

$1,619,58135
$914,798 68
142,617 34

$950.515 77

$228,737 35

for the year

OWEN8BORO & NASHVILLE RAILWAY COMPANY.

During the past year all of the outstanding stock of the
Owensboro & Nashville Railway Company has been purchased
1885-6. 1886-7. 1887-8. 1888-9.1889-90. 1890-1.1891-2. by this Company, and the net earnings of that road have been
Itooomotives
389
389
413
428
457
477
511 carried into Income from Investments.
Passenger cars..
316
311
319
330
330
415
347
During the coming year the earnings and expenses will be
Kreightoars
10,123 10,907 11,681 12,215 13,954 14,168 16,100
included in earnings and expenses of Louis. & Nash. System,
Birmingham Mineral Railroad Compant.
By order of the Board of Directors,
liooomotiyes
5
5
15
15
7
Passenger cars
M. H. Smith,
AtrousT Belmont,
Freight cars
561 1,280 1,287 1,277 1,260
President.
Chairman,
OwBNSBORO & Nashville Eailwat Company.
fiscal

years
Louisville

I«oomotlves
Passenger cars..
Freight cars

A Nashville Railroad Compant.

2
6
30

2

4

4

4

4

6
17

5

5

5

5

32
299
294
293
Nashville Florence & Sheffield Railway Company.
Locomotives...
2
2
2
2
2
2
Passenger cars.
2
2
2
2
2
2
Freight care....
4
3
245
482
483
485

Your

attention

4

REPORT OF THE COMPIROLLER.

5

Accounting Department Louisville
Railroad Company,

2
2

480

called to the table below, showing the
excess mileage paid on foreign cars in last seven years
18|5-|?
$22,868 38
1888-87
172,000 00
1887-88
169,545 04
1888-89
113 107 26
1889-90
134480 00
1890-91
169,636 97
1891-92
158:046 41
is

:

PASSENGER TRAFFIC.
The number of passengers carried was 6,136,650, an increase
over the number carried last year of 850,033, equal to 1610
per cent.
The average fare received per passenger was 80 cents,
against 88 cents last year, a decrease of 9'09 per cent.
The aggregate number carried one mile was 207,413.239,
against 193,649,02S in the previous year, an increase equal to
7 '66 per cent.
The number of passenger train miles was 5,057,065 against
4,453,257, being an increase of 13-58 per cent compared with
last year.
The net earnings per train mile were 37-533 cents,
against 47'014 cents in the previous year, a decrease of 30-19
per cent.
The average number of passengers carried in each train
was 38-75 against 40-41 in the previous year, a decrease of 4-11
per cent.
The average number carried in each passenger car was
11'43, against U-92 in the previous year, a decrease
of 411
per cent.
The average distance traveled by each passenger was 33 00
miles, agamst 35-76 in the previous year, and the
avera°-e rate
per mUe received from each passenger was 3-44 cents, against
3"45 cents in the preceding year.

477 78 gross freight earnings, against $13,547,990 54 earned
in
theprevious year, an increase of 12-34 per cent.
The tonnage carried was 11,384,866 tons, against 9 960 916
^^^ previous year, an increase of 1,433,950 tons.
or f. ^I"'^*^cent.
14-38 per
The average rate received per ton was 70 cents, against 72-66
cents the previous year, a decrease of 3-86
per cent.
Ihe number of tons moved one mile was
1,510,117 391
'

P^ir

^

'"^ *^«
increase of
^e,430,023, orl6-i2percent, and the y«^''
average rate received
per ton per mile was -933 of a cent, against -970
of a cent In
the previous year, a decrease of 3-91
per cent.

Ttevenue derived from freight traffic
S14,083 477 73
Revenue derived from Company's freight
520,782 31

*14,604,a60 04 as per

Nashville

:

—
—

—
—

Very

respectfully,

Ccshman Quarrier,

TABLE NO. I.
INCOME ACCOUNT, JUNE

Comptroller.

30, 1S92.

Gross Earnings—

From
From
From

$14,601.260
5,137,018
507,136
45>,627
531,681

frclKht
pa.'tsenger

mails

Prom express

From

miscellaneous

04
61

53

04
33
$21,235,721 55

Total earnings

Dedu 't Operating Expenses—
Conducting transportation
Motive power
Maintenance of cars
Maintenance of way and structure
General expenses

$5,176.353 91
3,195.007 85
1,305,317 07

2,404.71179
1,510,731 85

,

13,792,122 47

Total operating expenses 64-95 percent

Net earnings from traffic 35-05 percent
Deddct Fixed ChargesInterest and rents
$4,880,878 05
Taxes
513.184 77

Less on other roads, which
Is a claim against them.
.

$7,443,599 08

$5,374,062 82

128,001 23

252,696 25
5,626,759 07

Net earnings

$1,816,840 01

Add—

Income from investments

533,293 10

Net income for the year

$2,350,133 11

Dedhct—
Two and one

half per cent cash dividend
declared January 7, 1892
$1,320,000 00
per cent cash dividend declared
July 9,1892
1.056,000 00

Two

2,376,000 00

June 30, 1891

$25.866 89
656,226 41

Balance to credit of income account June 30, 1892

$630,359 53

Deficit for the year
Balance to credit of income account
p. 27.

&

Louisville, Sept. 15, 1898.
Mr. M. H. Smith, President
I submit herewith statements showing the financial condition of the Company, and the re.iults from operation, for the
year ended June 30, 1893, as shown in the following tables
No.
I.
Income Account.
No.
II.
Profit and Loss.
No. III.— General Balance Sheet.
No. IV.— Bonded Debt.
V. Securities owned by the Company.
No.
No. VI. Gross Earn., Oper. Expenses, and Net, by Months.
No. VII.- Total Earnings, Operatmg Expenses, and Net.

FREIGHT TRAFFIC.
The earnings derived from the freight traffic for the year
Deductshow an increase of 81,535,487 19, the figures being *$14 083 - Loss on Georgia RS. lease. $124,695 02

l^imolfX'T

.

291

OCTOBKR

THE CHRONICLE.

1893.]

8,

TABLE

No.

696

II.

PROFIT AND LOS8 ACCX>OHT JUNE

30. 1893.

Creditt.

Debltt.

Balance to orcdit nf thl» aoooiint Juno 30, 1801
lotorMt reooivpd ou liomls in HluklDK Pund

Difference bet wwn imrcliiiw

year Oold Knur

|)t>r <'iMit

vrtliio

of 17

IliiudH iinil

UulWcd

«S0,934 OU Ten per oent Premium on 228 bond*
33,120 00
radeemed for Sinking Fund Aooonnt .
Tan per cent Prauilum on 1 alz per cent
3,330 00
Collateral Trust Bond redeemed

933.800 00

.

Fifty-

par vuluR of anme.

nil salo of 7 Deontur Lund ImproveiueuC A
Furnaco Coiiipimy Boudfl
To ralBr .^31 oiiforly AiUustment Bonds to par value..
DlffiT«iico between actualooetof oon»tructlng NaahvUlo
Klort\nco * BheHleld Railway and bonds received
Credits from varleua aouroe*

10000
933.900 00
3.932 81

Proniiuui

I

700 00 Dltoounton Five per cent Trunt nonds sold
ll,7aS 00 Dlaoount on IftO Natb. Flor. ASbeflleld By. Bond*
44,483 94
160 78

lOld.
UlSereiiou belwt^en actual oo«t of conatrnctloB BlriiiliiKbotn Mineral Kallroad and liondH received
Hiklance to credit of tbli aooount Juno 30, 1892..

)

9134,3&3 78

9184,3SC 78

TABLE No. III.
GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JUNE

80,

1893.

ASSETS.
Road

llxturc!)

LlABtLITlES.

COST OP ROAD AND EQOIPMENT.

Dr.

CAPITAL STOCK.

and vmiipmcut
$102,465,253 47
under con528,152 87

Cai'ital Stock Liabilitv.

Originalstook and subsequent dividends
9103,993,406 34
unissued
$84,007 40
757.338 71 Scrip l«8ued on stock dlvB... 12,872 60

Cost of Road and Bqulp't to Juno 30. 1892
Real estate, quarry and timber lands

96,880 00

INVESTMENTS.
Bonds Owned—
Ten-forty AdIuMmcnt Bondu
Sloes Iron A Steel Co. First Mortgage.
Eurekit Company First MortKaKe .....
Unthrle Rnliro id Klr>it Mt^.
Elkton
Fensacuhi A All. KK. Land Oniut Bds.
..<;

Lou.ANash. ami

Jlob.

Tot»l capital stofk and stock liablUty

$631,000 00

Unlllcrt 50-jcar 4 ji. o. (Join Mortgage.
I,ou. C'ln. A I-ex. Rway. Goo. Mort....

& Mont Tr.Decd

SoutliPin Iron Co. First .Mort Kate
So. A Ko. Ala. RR. 5 p. e. Cons. Mort..
So. & No. Ala. KR First .Mort. Sterling
Fensaeola A Atlantic RR. First Mort.

Sundry Railroad and other bonds

.W.OOOOO

General Mortgage Bonds

44,193 25
20.000 00
25,000 00
906,000 00
267,000 00
25,000 00
154,000 00
18.142 59
33.887 50
212,707 36

$11,488,000 00

Mem.Clarksv.A LouUv.RR.lst M.Bonds

2.015,6ti0

Memphis A Ohio RR. 1st Mort. Bonds..
NewOr. Mobllc&Tex. Div. 1st .W. Bonds
New Or. Mobile A Tox. Div. 2il yi. Bonds

3,500.000
5,000,000
1,000,000
2,970.000

Pensacola A Atlantic RK. Ist M. Bonds
Pensacola Division 1st Mort. Bonds. ...
Cecilia

$806,709 87
57,601 77

Nasbv. Florpnc«4fe.8lMiffleld R'y Stock.
BlrmluKbiim Mineral Railroad Stock.
Elkton A Guthrie Railroad Stock
Mobile A Monldonicry Railway Stock.
Bo. A .No. Ala. RR. Co Stock (common)
Birmingham RoUing Mill Co. Stock
Export Coiil Co. of Pensacola Stock...
Sundry Railroad and other stocks

159,250 00
15,175 00
10,543 20
17,199 06
34,600 00
75,000 00
48,807 34

I

1,738 00

1,226.624 24

Matekial and ScrpuES— In SBOPa

OFBOAD

Branch

l^lrst

Mortgage Bonds

.

1,396,410 24

L.&N.andMob.&Mont.Rv.Tr.Dee<lB'(l»
Sonth-East A St. L. Div. Ist M. Bonds..
South-East & St. L. Div. 2d M. Bonds.
Lobannu-KuoxviUe Branch .M.Bonds..
Pensacola A Selma Div. 1st M. Bonds..
Louisv. Ctn. A Lex. Ry. Is* M. Bonds...
Louisv. an. A Lex. Ry. 2d M. Bonds...
Louisv. CIn. A Lex. Ry. Oen. M Bonds.
City of Louisv., Lebanon Br. Ext. Bond*
.

1st Mort. 5 per oent 50-year (lold Bonds
Five per cent Collat Trust Gold Bonds.
Kent. Cent. Ry. let M. 4 p. c. G. Bonds.
Haysv. A Lex. RR. No. Div. 7 p.o. Bonds
Maysv. A Lex. RR. So. Div. S p.c. Bonds

TRUST ACCOUNTS.
Veduet—
Bonds Included

Slockt—
& Lexington Ry. Co..
South A North Alabama Railroad Co. .
Mobile A MontKomery Railway Co.
Southeast. & 8t. Louis Railway Co
Pontcbartrain Railroad Company
Nashville Chat. & St. Louis R'y Co....
Owensboro A Nashville Railway Co...
Henderson Bridge Co
Pensacola Railroad Co
LouisvUle Railway Transfer Co

. . .

Birmingham Mtucral Railroad Co
Alabama Mineral Railroad Co
Nashville Florence & ShefBeld R'y Co
Henderson Belt Railroad Co

In the

foregoing de-

Bonds, viz
Lebanon-Knoxville Branch Bonds
$1,500,00000
Louisville A Nashville and Mobile A
Montgomery Ry. Trust Deed Bonds.
2,677,000 00
Lmdsville Cincinnati A Lexington By.
General Mortgage Bonds
3,208,000 00
Pensacola A Atlantic Railroad First
Mortgage Bonds
1,000,00000
Pensacola A Selma Division First Mortgage Bonds
898,00000
.

3,070,959 75
1,125.500 69
3,272,906 12
294,000 00
4,632 37
4,978,538 75
2.'iO,728

00

892,000 00
3,25S,O0O 00
333,000 00
1,764.000 00
5,129,000 00
6,523,000 00
400,000 00
2 19,000 00

with the Central Trust Company of New York. Trustee, to secure
$4,531,000
Ten-forty
Adjustment

1,650,010 00

Louisville Cln.

1,500,000 00
1,248,000 00
2,8f 0,000

positee!

,

Incral Railroad

00
00
00
00
00
580,or)0 00
80 1 ,000 00
2,241,000 00
2.677,000 00
3,500,i)00 00
3,000,000 00

$85,030,660 00

Stocks asd Bonds held in Trdst bt the Central
Trust Comi'any of New York, Tbustee, fob TenrORTV Adjcstment Bonds and Unified Fiftt-tbar
VovB PER CENT Gold Mortoaob Bonds, viz.:
Bonds—
91,.'>00,000 00
Louisv. A Nash.. Lebanon-Knox. Br..
898,000 00
Lou. A Nash., Pensacola * Seima Div.
2,677,000 00
Lou. A Nash Mobile & Mont. Div
3,208,000 00
Lou. A Nash., L. C. A Lex. Ry. Co
900,0i)0 00
Pensacola* Atlantic Railroad
Al

00

Consolidated Mortgage Bonds
7.070,000 00
Ten-forty Adjustment Bonds
4,531,000 00
Unified 50-year 4 p. ot. Hold M. Bonds. 10,57 1 ,000 00

3,561,930 70 Evansv. Hend.A Nash. Ulv. stM.Bonds

—

$52,800,000

BONDED DEBT.

1,206.000 00

Stocks Owsed
Nashville A Dciutur RalU-oad Stock ..
Owensborn * NasUv. Rallwav Stock..

Alabama

Cr.

$52,703,130 00

Stock issued

Clarkavllle Mineral nriiuch
struction, not completed

JUTDOK LniB

0,079 OA

30,038 3ft
71,803 87

$9,283,000 00

Pensacola A. Selma Division First Mortgage Bonds, deposited with the Farmers' Ixian A Trust Company, of New
York, Trustee, as part Collateral for
Georgia Itallroad Lease

48

00
00
54
00
225.01000
60.600 00
19,750 00
501,000
2,850
47,062
690,410

350,000 00
$9,633,000 00
75,397,660

00

$25,276,958 70

Deduct—
Cost of Lou. Cin.

A

Lex. R'y Stock,

which having been added to Costoi
Road Is deducted from this account.
Cost of Ala. Min. RR. Bonds and Stock,
which having been added to Cost of
Road is deducted from this account.
Cost of Hi'oderson Bi-lt RR. Stock,
which having been added lo Cost of
Road is deducted from this account.
Bonds included In Bonded Debt depos-

$3,070,950 75
1,875,020 00

19,750 OO

ited with Central Trust Co. of N. Y
Trustee, to secure $4,531,000 Ten-

Adjustment Bonds, which having been deducted from the Liabili( Bonded
Debt). Is therefore deducted from this account, viz.:
Leb.-Knox. Br. Bonds
$l,.^0O.00O
Mobile A .Montgomery Div. 2,677,000
forty
ties

<fe Selma Div
898,000
A Lex. H'y GenMortgage Bonds
3,208,000
Pen.& Atl. RR. Ist M. Bonds 1.000,000

Pensaoola
Lou. cm.
eral

Pensacola A SelmaDlv. Bonds included
in Bonded Debt deposited with the
Farmers' Loan A Trust Co. of S. T.,
Trustee, as part collateral for Georgia RK. Lease, which having been
neducted from the LlabillllHS (Bond.
Debt) Is deducted from this aooount.
,

9,283,000 00

350,000 00
$14,598,729 75

Carried forvard.

$10,678,328 95
ijiOttisAK '*

Oarritd fontwrd.

%iMS,iqrrjUo

THE CHRONICLE.

596

$/2o,6rs,oj<) li

Srmtffht fcvu-ard

Bonds held in Trust bv Farmfr's Loas 6c Trcst
CoMPAKT OF New Vork, Trustee, for Five fek
CENT Trust Bonds.
Binnlngbam Mineral RR. 1st M. Bds..
Owensboro & Nasliv. Ry. 1st M. Bds..

&

SoutU

No. Ala. RR. 5
Nashv. Rens.

&

p. c.

&

S.

Bills

00

5,129,00000

.

1,512,797 63

600,000 00 Interest on Bonds due July
1st and Aug. Ist
$770,536 71
Unpresented Coupons
66,616 00

113,111 66

RE. TrH.st Deed Bonds (univestod)..
Union Trust Co., New York, to redeem
called Bonds of Cecilia Brancb
Trustees Memphis Clarksville & Louis-

41,000 00

837,202 71
Dividends Unclaimed
$42,479 73
Ca^h Dividend No. 36. pay1,056,000 00
able August 1, 1892

,

Due sundry Railroads and

1,690 33

1,098,479 73
531,582 86

Persons.

$4,155,053 81

Account— Surplus from Operations

INCOJIE

30 1892
Profit and Loss Account
Suspense Account

306,937 9o

Railroad (invested)

Trustees Memphis Clark.sville & Louisville Railroad (uninvested)
Central Tr.Co.,N.Y.,Trustee (uninv'd).

760 75
577 23

to

June
630,359 52

7i..8()2 87
416,257 00

.*.

488,059 87

57J,0S0 92

Nashville and North & South
Alabama ER. Trust Deed Sinking Fund Bonds

Louisville

.

372,823 56
182,196 10
90,429 89

$50,000 00

Trustees Louisv. Ciu. & Lex. Ry. sk. f d.
Union Tr. Co., N. Y Trustee Louisv. &
Xasli. acd SontU & No. Alabama RR.
Trust Deed Bonds (invested)
Colon Tr. Co.. N. Y.,Trnsree Louisv. &
Nash, and Soutb & Nortli Alabama

ville

$174,995 83

payable in July

BosDS AND Cash heid dv Trustees of Sikkiso
Funds.

pavable

payiible in July
$867,313 13
Vouchers for June, 1892,

Unclaimed on Pay Rolls...
Unclaimed on Vouchers. .

$250,000 00
350,000 00

Cons. Eds.
Div. Bds.

^riSfigyMo CO

LIABILITIES.

Pay Rolls for June, 1892,

Bonds held is Trust bv Farmer's Loan & Trust
CoMPANV OF Nkw York, Trustee, for Georgia
Railroad Leask.
IjOuisT.

Brought fori'

CURRENT

$3,929,000 00
l,2i.0,00J

[Vol, LV.

&

40,000 00

Eedeemid

ADVANCES.

& Decatur Railroad Co
South & North Alabama Railroad Co..
Mobile & Montgomery Railway Co
North. Div. Cumberland it Ohio RR. Co.
South. Div. Cumberland & Ohio RR. Co.
Elkton & Guthiie Railroad Company.
Nashvil'e Florence & ShelHeld Rv. Co.

Nashville

Hewand01dDecaturBelt&Ter.ER.Co.

$928,041 34
505,559 34
259,5"20 16
211.665 99
gl.304 80
520 66
276,600 2B
83.708 47
2,346,981 52

CURRENT ASSETS.
Due from

Station Agents

Net traffic balances due from other GO'S.
Duefrom AdamsandSouth'nExp.Co's.
DuefromUnitedState8Govt.,P.O.Dept
Duefrom sundry railroads and persons
Bills Receivable-Land Notes
BUls Receivable— Other Notes

70
58
52
83
1,014,131 31
169,685 23
1,404,048 56
$602,735
79.246
54,995
131,486

3,456.329 73
710,806 80

Cash

$133,471.138 20

Total

TABLE NO,

IV,

BONDED DEBT JUNE
,

$133,471,138 20

Total

30, 1892.

MaUirity.

DESCRirrioN.

$333,000 October 15, 1893.

City of Louisville. Account Lebanon Branch Extension Bonds..
Ten-forty Adjustment Bonds
Loui.sviUe Cincinnati & Lexington Ry. First Mortgage Bonds ..
Consolidated Mortgage, Main titem and Branches Bonds
Memphis & Ohio Railroad Sterling Mortgage Bonds
Memphis Clarksv. & Louisv. Railroad Sterling {Mortgage Bonds.

1894-1924.
January 1, 1897.
April 1, 1898.
Juno 1, 1901.
August 1, 1902.

4 531,000 Nov.
2,8.50,000

1.

7,070.000
3.500,000
2,015,660
801.000 March 1, 1907.
892,000 October 1, 1907.
2,211 ,000 December 1, 1919.
5X0,000!March 1, 1920.
3,500,000 March 1, 1921.
1,970,000 August 1, 1921.
5,000.000 January 1, 1930.
1,000,000 Jauuiiry 1, 1930.
11,458,000 June 1, 1930.
50,000 Novemlier 1, 1931.
5.129,000 Novemlier I, 1931.
1,764,000 May 1, 1937.
3,000,000 March 1. 1980.
10,571.000 June 2, 1940.
6,523,000 July 1, 1987.
400.000 January 1. 1906.
219,000' June 1, 1895.

.'.
O-Cecilia Branch Mortgage Bonds
Louisv. Cincinnati & Lexington Ry. Second Mortgage Bonds...
i-Evansville Henderson & Na.<hville Div. First Mortgage Bonds..
Pensacola Division First Mortgage Bonds
South-East. & St. Louis Division First Mortgage Bonds
Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad First Mortgage Bonds
New Orleans <fe Mobile Division First Mortgage Bonds

New Orleans & Mobile Division Second Mortgage Bonds
C General Mortg.age Bonds
Louisv. Cincin. <fc Lexington Ry. General Mortgage Bonds
First Mortgage Five per cent Trust Bonds
First Mortgage Five per cent Fifty-year Gold Bonds
South-East Ai St. Louis Division Second Mortgage Bonds
Unified Fifty-year Four per cent Gold Mortgage Bonds
Kentucky Central Ry. First Mortgage 4 per cent Gold Bonds...
Maysville & Lexington RR. Northern Div. 7 per cent Bonds
Maysville & Lexington RR. Southern Div. 5 per cent Bonds

A^monnt of

Coupons Due,

Rate of
Inter't.

Interest.

May

1,

November

1.

jHinuary 1, July 1.
April 1. October 1.

June 1, December 1.
February 1, August 1.
March 1, September 1.
1, October 1.
1.
June 1,
1, September 1.
.March 1, September 1.
February 1, August 1.
January 1, July 1.
January 1, July 1.
June 1,
1.
1.
1,
1.
1,
1.
I,
1, September 1.
.January 1, July 1.
January 1, July 1,
January 1. July 1.
1.
1,

April

December

March

May
May
May

December
November
November
November

March

June

December

2 48,780

121,540
54,600
62,440
133,500
34,800
210,000
117,270
300,000
60.000
682,860
3,000

256,450
88.200
90,000
422.840
260.920
23.000
10,950
,84,172,391

$75,397,66ol

t

$19,930
271,860
199.500
491.901

April 15, October 15.

a $l,000of these bonds drawn for Sinking Fund due Match 1, 1891. but not presented for redemption. Interest ceased on September 1,
1891. Also $40,000 of these bonds dr,awn for .Sinking Fund due March 1. 1892. Interest will cease September 1, 1892.
b *l,(i00 of these bonds drawn for Sinking Fund due Dec. 1, 1891. but not presented for redemption. Interest ceased on Dec. 1, 1891.
c ^77,000 of these bonds drawn for Sinking Fund due June 1, 1892, but not presentetl for redemption. Interest ceased on June 1, 1892.

TABLE

No. V,

SECURITIES JUNE

The following

is

a statement of the Securities owned by the

Bonds.
531 10-40 Adjustment Bond.s, $1,000 each
1,266 Unified Fifty-year Four per cent Gold Mortgage

Par

Value.

$531,000 00

Bonds. $1,000 eiieh ...
:.
1,266,000 00
50 Louisville Cln. & Lex. E'y Gen. M. Bonds $1,000
„,*'»<'b

43 Sloss Iron & Steel Co. First M. Bonds, $1,000 each.
i29 Eureka Co. First Mortgage Bonds, $1,000 each...
50 EUton iS: Guthrie Railro.id Bonds, «500 each
906 Pensa. & Atl. RR. Land Grant Bonds. $1,000 each.
287 Louisville & Nashville and Mobile & Montgomery
Trust Deed Mortgage Bonds, $1,000 each
25 Southern Iron Co. First M. Bonds, •{1,003 each....
154 ^5".'
.i/""*'' Alabama RK. Five per cent Consolidated Mortgage Bonds. $1,000 each
82 Pensa. & Atl. RR. First M. Bonds. *1,000 each....
17 South & Jionh Alabama RR. First Mortgage Sterling Bonds, $1,000 each
Sundry RaUroad and other Bonds
'.:.'.'.'.'.".
Iptal Bonds, Stocks and Bills Eecclvab'.e.
•

Thew Stocks,

30, 1892.

Company

:

Stocks.

Shares.

& Decatur RR. Co. Stock, $25 each...
Owensboro & Nash. R'y Co. Stock, $100 each...

32,932 Nashville

1,931
1,144 Nash. Florence&ShettieldR'yCo.Stk, $100eacli.

4,.550 Birmingham Miner.al RR. Co. Stock, $100 each.
691 Elkton St Guthrie RR. Co. Stock, $25 caih
50,00000
Ill Mobile & Montgomery R'v Co. Stock, $100 each.
00
262 South & North Ala. RR. Co. Stock, $100 each...
00
346 Birmingham Rolling Mill Co. Stock. $100 each00
00 *69,035 Kentucky Central R'y Co Slock, $100 each
750 Export Coal Co. of Pensacola Stock, $10(1 each.
'600 Lou, Harrod's Cr. & West. RR, Stock, $100 each
267,000 00
63 New & Old Dec. Belt Ter.& RR.Co.St'k,$100 each
25,000 00
*34 Pontchartrain Railroad Stock, $100 each
192 South-East & St. L. Rv Stock. $100 each
154,000 00
2,053 Term. RR. Ass'u of St. L. Stock, $100 each
32,000 00
150 Pensacola Railroad Stock, $100 each
Sundry Railroad and other Stocks
17 000 00
Bills Receivable, Laud Notes, etc
225'2"o 94

43,000
29,000
25,000
906,000

.

$3,570,260 94

00
00
00
00
17,275 00
11,100 00
26.200 00
34.600 00
6,908,500 00
75,000 00
60.000 00
6,300 00
8,400 00
19.200 00
205,800 00
15,00000
271,867 00
1,573,733 79
$823,300
193,100
114,400
455.000

$10,813,775 79
.$14,339,036 73

having been Included in cost of road, do not
appear on Trial Balance under the caption of "Stocks Owned."

OCTOBEK

THE CHRONICLE.

1893.]

8,

mldilinn to tho foresfoinj; fecuritios the Company nNo
llie following bomls nnd stock?, wliich are deposited
witli tlip CVntrul Trust Company of Now York, TruHtoe, to
secure the Louisville & Nusliville 10-40 Adjustment Bonds and
the Unified Fif ty-y ear Four per cent Gold Alortgige Bonds, viz.

597

owns

The Company alw owns 8^,000,000 Smith A North Alabioui
Company Second Mortgage Bondi, which have been
ilepositul with the Union Trust Company, of New York CItr

1..100 L.

Trustee, to necuro the Louisville
Niuthville Railroad Cotnpany $3,000,000 six per cent Sinking Fund loan of April I,
1830.
840,000 of these bonds, through tlie op?ratioii of the
Sinking Fund of said Lwisville
N»Hhvill.« loan, havo \>een
redeemed and canceled, thus rfducing the amount to 8I.09»,000 nnd the said Tnisf-e hold-i ^21,000 of the s.ime bonds for
this Sinking Fund which have not been canceled.
Bring unable to buy this issue of bonds to advantaee the Trustee has
bought $66,000 Louisville
Nashville Five-per-cent Trust
bonds and $30,000 Louisville
Nashville Railroad Company
Unified Fifty-year Fuur-per-cent Gold Bonds for this Sink-

III

Subjtft to

10-10

&

K.. I.<>li.-Knox Dr..

9PS

I,.

&

.v., Pi-iiH. ft

2,(577

I..

A

.v.,

:i.-.'o-i

I,. ,1;

X.

Moll,
i,.,ciii

l.iHio IViisiUMilii

&

»1,000

nacli

&

IMv.,!iil.0O0 cacli

U'x. ivyco.,

*i,(i()(iiii.

Atl. Kit. Co.. $1,000 oiicli..
|>. c, ijilOU.OOO I'Bcll.
i>. c, $l,0UO eacli...

$3,100,000
80,0(M)

Totnl Bonds

The Company also owns Sl,200,OOOOwerBboro& Nashrille
Railway Company First Mortgage Six-psr-cent Bonds and

flToCKA.

ClD. &Ix>x. Ry. Co. Prof.,«100 each. $1,500,000
10.000 I.. Clu. AXi-x. Hy. Co, Com., $1011 nicli.
l.OOO.OOO
20.000 Kn. ,V- No. Ala. KK. Co. Pref„*100each.
'J.OOO.OOO
ll.'J71.''o & No. Ala. KK. Co. Com,, $100 each.
185,000
•.;i,:i.C M.'bilr .Vr .Mont. Uy. Co., *100 each....
2,939,700

N.O.M.AT.UU. Co. as rcorg $100 each
fi St. I, Ky. Co., $100 each.
HH. Co.. $100 each
!0,-7-> Nanh. Chut. & 81. 1. Uv. Co.. $100 each
0,G;u OwiMiHb. ,fe Nashv. l!y. Co.. $100 each.
'

,

South Kast

7,ii»0 I'ontchnilruiii

$l,f>00,000

$3,929,000

1,127,400
2,930.700

4,000,000
980,000
740,000
3,3^.^,000

the issue of ?5il29,000 Louiiville & Nashville Five-per-cent
Trust Bonds.
The Company also owns $250,000 South
Noith Alabama
Railroad
Company Five-per-cent Consolidated Mortgage

S.ftSS.oOO

5,077,500
063,400

980,000

250,000

Bridtfi' Co., $101) each
2.-I50 rrns.'uolrt Itallronrt Co., $100 each

&

501.0(M1

Bonds and

& Trust Company,

1,909.01

10.720 UliiiiiiiL-ham Min'l UU. Co., $100eaeh.
19.690 Alfthaiiia Miiii'riil KK. Co., iflOO eaoll..
6,150 Nn.-'h. Klor.A .shcf. Ky. Co., $100 each..
395 Ueudersou Belt KK, Co., $50 each

road

Division, Bond^,

615,000

&

Pensacola&Selma
which are deposited with the Farmers' Liaa

$3.50,000 Louisville

285,000
100,000
1,972.600

1,000 LouIbv. Ky. TiauHrcr Co.. $100 eaoh...

Total Stocks
Total BondH and Stocks

Birmingham Mineral Rtilroad Company Fir*t
Mortgage Five-percent Bonds, which have b?en deposited
with the Farmers' Loan & Trust Company, Trmtoe, to secure

»S,-..000
2,000,ilO()

5.010 Itonihrnoii

&

ing Fund.

S12, 138,000

Share:

•i.-Joo

&

1,000,000

l.').(H>OI,.

I'l.

;

SIH.OOO
'J.OT-.OOO
3,'jo^.noo

Miu. lilt. Co. 4
50 Ahi. MlD. UK. Co. 4

ill Alii.

&

I'liitlril

Mine. UoHtlt.

$l,.'H)O.O<)0

Seltun l)lv..*l,000 cncll

Mont.

A-

&

Siib/frl lo

3llge.

lioiuU.

Kailrond

Nashville,

Trustee, as collateral for the Georgia Rail-

lease.

19,750

$25,790,350
$38,228,350

.•

TABLE NO. VL
GROSS EARNINGS, OPERATIK3 EXPEN.9E8 AND KET, BY MOSTH3.
RECXPtTCLATIOir.

(L.

&

N, ST^TEM.)

[Average for year, 2,857-91 miles
ViscfUan-

MmSTHS.

Passenger.

Freight.

Moil.

Ei}ires>.

Totil

eoua.

Earnings.

Operating
Expeimes.

]

P.el.ofExpt.
Earning*.

Net
Earnings.

to

$

July

1891

AiiKUSt

"

SeptcQibor

"

Octolier

"

l«'ovcml)er

"

Deconibcr

"

JaDunry
February
March

1892

1.274. ll-JlS
1,212, 570 2"!
1.237, 391 54
1,374, 971 01
l.SOi, 203 17
1,221, 152 05
1.071, 742 67
1,258, 719 82
1.229, 00.5 15
1,120, 751 04
1.151, 006 62
1,141, 207 04

474,703
4S2.363
472.779
459.812
396,973
437,241
387.697
393,165
404.962
377.805
412,994
431,527

92 39.974 01
63 40,203 28
41 39.800 68
20 47,739 29
22 42.038 82
33 42.797 04
69 42.941 64
26 44.181 5C
07 40,316 82
59 42,328 70]
74 42.893 20
55 41,92149

34.499
32,538
36,121
43,163
39,177
47,286
34,585
33,064
36.084
37.397

57
49
55
19

89
79
01

43,163
28,378
37,012
37.342
37,649
42,673
44.617
50,524
47.458
41.744
55,491
05,624

89
42
95
08
60
77

1,866.790
1,796,054
1.823,106
1,963,027
1,821,013
1,791,150
1.581.584
1,784,650
1.758.407
1,626,026
1.707,678
1,716,196

51
10
13

77
00
9S
15
14
17
82

62;).685 28

62-97
63-41
62-41
02-07
05-12

78

b05.895

O-i-17

87
65

1.175, 590
1,13^, 800
1.139, 322
1.218, 380
1.191, 357
1.185, 255
1.133, 431
1.093, 915
1.093, 889
1,156, 939
1.147, 666
1.117, •542

448,1.52

10
83

691,200
657,253
633.784
744,647

01

22
72

41

27
12

55
21)
2f<

AprU

"
"

May

•Juno

'•

I

Total

85
47

71-66
01-30
02-21
71-15
07-21

9"

6512

14.604.260 04 5.137.016 61 507.136 53 455.627 04 531.681 33 21.235.721 55 13.792.122 47'7.413.599 08

"
"

6t-95

70

16
47
4.5,211 89
35,916 30

11

80
97
02
56
10

21

54

690,710
004,518
46J,086
560,011
595.653

01

97
74
571

49
It

TABLE NO. VII.
TOTAL EARKINOS, OPERATING EXPENSES, AND NET.
KBCAI'ITnLAIION.
Percentage
of Gross
Earnings.

SO0RCE8.

Passenger earnings

24-190

Exiirisrt earnings

2145

,

Mull earnlogs
Train privllepes
Freight eariiings
Rent of passenger cars

2-388
•110
68-772

,

,

Rent of freieht cars
Rent of euKiues
Rents from other sources
Car detention, storage etc
WharfaKe and storage, Pensaoola,

,

,

Fla.,

("For the year ending
is

June

$

lo9091.
9

1891-92.

Oross enruiDM
Operating expenses

289.930
200,985

521.808
362,557

524,151
364,723

Notearnings....

£8,915
1,774

159,251
3,311

159.423
4,212

90,719

162,562

163,634

Total
Detlnel—
Interest on bonds..

Rentals
DlvidHuds

(7'4 p.c.)

Tuices

(7 p.c.)

87,379
8.340

Total.

Sarplus

15,000
8,666
43,500
20,213

..

roa'l

Cost of e(|iiliimcn t
Other perm. Investm'ts..
C:ishon hand

Open

:utoiiiitt

Totiil

20.300
42.000
42,16-

11

11

99
11

339 51
4,928 92
$13,792.122 47

& Delaware

$7.443..599

03

=3

Railway.
30, 1892.^

1391-93

1889-90.

1390-91.

Gross earnings
Operating expenses and taxes

360.069
243,903

376,144
257.527

399.867
237,940

Net earnings
Dednel—
Interest on bonds
Otberitems

118,161

118,617

111,037

51,9S9
12,303

7a46n

69,600

64.243
51,913

72,284
46,333

$

TotaJ
Surplus

GENEBAL BALANCE SHEET JUXB

30, 1892.

Assets,

$«oo,ooo
$761,210 Capital stock
250,000
78,753 Funded debt
1,000 Prollt and loss (surplus)
1 1,641
16,983
.

3,053
Total

11

99

11
.30

73
62

Reports to the N. Y. State RR. Commissioners have shown
the following
EAKNIilGS, EXPENSES AND CHARQKS.

162.467
1,167

Liabilities.

$861,611

4,739,243
62.783
143.240
197,505
75.373
17,434
6.897

$

1,8-26

.52,000
(7 p.c.)

380

Assets.

9,815,016 93

$

162,182

OENKRAL BALANCE SHEET JCSE
Costof

26,300
52.000
42.000
41,832

04
30
73
62

fFor the year ending June

30, 1892.^

EAKNINGS, E.XPESSES AKD CHAB0E8.

Other Incoiue

$2,145,812 68

Ulster

from reports to the N. Y. State R.R. Com'is'ners.
1889-90.

$8,977,105 54

$21,235.72155

Central Crosstown (N. I. City) Horse Railroad.

Following

$6,122,918 22

339 51
4,928 92

100-000

total.

Earnings.

14,604.260
62.788
143.240
197,505
75,378
17,434
6,897

•29a
-675
-930
•3^5
•082
•033
•002
•022

Bildgo tolls
Telegraph

Grand

$5,137,016 01
455.6^7 04 f
507,136 53 f
23,163 04 j

yet

Operating
Expenses.

dross Earnings.

$861,641

Costof rnad
Cost of equipment
Cash on hand

$3,029,638
271.697
42.855
59,820
Open accounts
45.334
Hai'l & sup's on hand.
21.057
Due by agents
Total..

....$3,470,449

69.6SO
42.377

30, 1892.

LiabUUiet,
$1,694,600
Capital stock
di-l.t
Fnniled
1 ,396,300
Interest on funded debt,

due

J2

necrued

Aud't'd vc'h's
Profit

<fe

Total.

4 pay r'U

loss (surplus)..

5.804
28,026
345,710

S3,470,44»

THE CHRONICLE.

698

[Vol. LV.

On the C. C. C. & St. L. proper 1419
tinned during the year.
tons of 80-pound rail and 10,062 tons of 67-pound rail have
been used in renewals in main track, and 56 and 60 pound rail
taken up also 128 miles of the track between Lafayette and
Templeton, used jointly with the Lake Erie & Western, have
YEAR
REPORT-FOE THE
THIRD
been renewed with 75-pound steel, making a total of 119'6
ENDING JUNE 30, 1892.
miles of new steel laid in main track. The entire main track
of the system, 2,348'70 miles, is now laid with steel also 44-07
For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, the earniags, ex- of double track, and nearly all of the sidings §483,921 34 has
been charged to renewal of cross-ties, an amount largely in
penses, charges, etc., have been as foJlows
96
Gross earnings of theC.C.C. & St.L. KaUway Co.,proper.$13.818,115 *J excess of ordinary renewals; $44,710 49 for interlocking at the
tf.s rf B.oaOperating expeuseg, Ineluaing taxes
various railway junctions. $'209,855 69 has been expended in
re-building of bridges 1,129 lineal feet of bridging have been
Net earnings
2,570,174 ^b re-built of iron; 5,544 feet of trestling have been filled. 41 miles
Interestand rentals
been ballasted, 57,412 cubic yards of gravel
$1,109,399-7 of track have
Leaving a balance to credit of income of
having been used for this purpose.
To wWoli should be added a credit from the coal and
„.„ or
ii,j4- zo
Ten coaches, costing $51,650, were purchased and charged
grain elevators and miscellaneous
to repairs; $78,100 has been expended for the purchase of new
$1,120,74153
balance to credit of income
Making total
freight cars, which was charged to repairs to keep up the deFrom which should Ije -deducted dividends on preferred ^gOO-OOO "" preciation of the property. Twenty locomotives, costing
stook at the rate of 5 per cent.
840,000 00 $173,401 25, were purchased and charged to repairs, in addiAlso dividends on common stock at the rate of 3 per ct.
tion to what was done in re- building and repairing at the com¥1,340^000 00
pany's shops.
Leaving a balance to the credit of income, from the
_„„„„ bi
.„
New shops and yards have been started at Linndale, and
¥89,741
operations for the year of
52 has been charged to repairs on account of the roundThe mileage of the company during the year vras substanti- $57,319 coal-chutes and shops that are partially erected there.
house,
ally the same as the year previous, the only difference being
All new side-tracks along the line have been charged to
that 45 miles of the branch from North Vernon to Rushville
was operated by the Cincinnati, Wabash & Michigan Company, construction.
By the Auditor's statement, attached, it will be seen that
and included in its earnings; and in May a contract was made
has been charged to construction
with the Lake Erie & Western Railway for trackage rij:;hts there
$174,575 00
new eanipment
over their main line from Cambridge City, Indiana, to New For change of line and improvements
30,237 85
For
Castle, Indiana, thus adding 14-25 miles of main track to the For 26M miles of siding at various points on the line
135,721 28
Whitewater Division, and connecting with the Peoria & East-

CLEVELAND CINCINNATI CHICAGO &
LOUIS RAILWAY COMPANY.

ST.

;

ANNUAL

;

;

:

;

*S^?tll

$310.534 11
766 04

Total

"ern Division.

The mileage
tained was

of track

from which these earnings were ob- Less balance on account

of sale of land

$339,768 07
Making a total charge to new work during the year
A very small increase of capital for so large a plant.
The company handled during the year over 8,500,000 tons o£
53412
Sidings
freight, an increase of over 9 per cent the tons carried one
2-178-59 mile, however, only show an increase of about 5 per cent, the
Total
The Mt. Gilead Short Line (2-5 miles),which was operated by chief increase having been in local business. The average reThe freight
this company, earned $4,524 81; operating expenses $5,059 63, ceipts per ton per mile have increased slightly.
showing a deficit for the years operation of $534 82, which train earnings also show a slight increase per mile. The passenger train earnings, including mail and express, are $1-0618
was advanced by this company.
The Kankakee & Seneca Railroad (42'5 miles in length), op per train mile, an increase of over 3 per cent.
erated jointly for account of our company and the Chicago
The two principal connections of the Company for business
Rock Island & Pacific, earned, gross, $79,530 81; net $3,660 94. are the lake Shore & Michigan Southern on the northeast and
The Cincinnati Wabash & Michigan Railway, from Rush- the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway on the southeast. For the
ville to Benton Harbor, on Lake Michigan (206-3 miles), and year ending June 30, 1893, we delivered to the L. S. & M. S.
including in its earnings the branch from Rushville to North Railway 41,695 passengers, as against 32,739, and received
Vernon, earned, gross, $834,895 41; net, $197,635 51.
from them 41,535 passengers, as against 40,377 the previous
-

_

1,600^
4407

Mainline
Double track

;

&

The Peoria
Eastern, from Springfield, O., to Peoria, 111.
(352 miles in length), earned gross, $1,833,143 91; net $523433 78.

Making, altogether, during the year, the total mileage of
track on all the system operated and controlled by this company, 2,957,02 miles. (See statement on page 21 of report).
Total gross earnings, $16,560,210 90; net earnings, $4,702768 94; being a gain in gross earnings over last year, of $1,196371 45 and in net of $293,659 32.
During the year there have been added to the track 26J^
miles of sidings, making at the close of the fiscal year, June
30, 1893, on the C. C. C. & St. L. Ry. proper, the mileage of
track given above; and, in addition to this, there were 5.87
milei of siding added to the Michigan Division, and 6-93 to
the Peoria
Eastern.
During the year your Directors sold the balance of the
$4,000,000 of 4 per cent bonds on the Cincinnati Wabash
Michigan Railway, and from the first of July, 1892, its earnings and operations will be included in those of the main line,
itbeing operated as the " Michigan Division " of the system.
For the year ending June 30th last its net earnings exceeded
the interest upon the $4,000,000 of bonds issued for its purchase by $37,635 51. In addition to this it has proved a very
valuable feeder for the main line.

&

&

The Peoria

&

Eastern Railway has been operated independThere has been a large im-

ently, as in the previous year.

provement in

earnings, owing to better crops and the atmore business from tbe fact that it had a permanent management, and it has earned its fixed charges and
a surplus of $68,915 14 $31,996 25 of which was used to pay
for new property, and the balance has been credited to the
deficit of the previous year which was due the C. C. C.
& St.

tracting to

it

its

of

;

L. Ry. Co. In addition to this, it has been steadily improved
during the year by the reduction of grades, filling of wooden
trestles, putting in new bridges, and permanent work, all
of
which has been charged to operating expenses. This will
enable the handling of larger trains, and if steadily pursued
for a few years will materially reduce its operating expenses
In pursuance of this policy, $123,502.28 has been expended in

rebuilding bridges and in fiUing trestles.
Ten miles of track
have been ballasted with gravel and cinders. The track is fast
getting into good physical condition.
No important extensions or enlargements have been made
during the year.
The trackage arrangement into Louisville
which was mentioned in the last report, is stiU in the
same
condition, the unsettled legal complications
of the Ohio &
Mississippi Railway Company preventing
the completion of
v^i
r
the proposed contract.
The iK)Ucy of improving the physical condition of
the property and charging the same to expenses has
been steadily con-

We delivered to that Company 1,066,440 tons of freight,
86-2,164 tons, and received from them 383,376 tons,
as against 390,731 tons the previous year. We delivered to the

year.

asagainst

& Ohio Railway 5,414 passengers, as against 4,759
the previous year, and received from them 11,290, as against
11.418. We delivered to them 418,835 tons of freight, asagainst
259,648 tons the previous year and received from them 340,864 tons, as against 396,931 tons the preceding year.
The fixed charges of the company for the past year have
For the coming year $160,000 must be
been $3,570,174 36.
added for the interest upon the $4,000,000 of bonds issued on
the Cincinnati Wabash & Michigan Division, and the earningsand expenses of that road will be inclu'led in those of the
main line from month to month; there will be some reductions, however, which will make the fixed charges for the
coming fiscal year $3,637,600. Your attention is called to the
gratifying fact that, while the management have increased
the gro3s earnings of the railway since the consolidation by
the addition and purchase of other lines and the growth of the
traffic from $11,453,992 66 to $13,818,115 96, they have at the
same time decreased the fixed charges from $2,760,823 81 to
Chesapeake

;

$3,570,174 26.

During the coming year there must be a considerable expenditure for new locomotives and passenger cars, in order to
take caie of the increase of business which we anticipate on
account of the "World's Fair" at Chicago. It is estimated
that at least $300,000 will be required for this purpose. There
is always upon 2,500 miles of road like this a demand for sidings to accommodate new business, and also for increased
facilities for passage of trains.
It will probably require $150,000 to furnish the facilities needed for this purpose. We must
expend in new freight station at Indianapolis and new freight
yards at Cincinnati to reasonably accommodate our business
an estimated amount of $150,000 more. We should build five
miles of double track on the Cincinnati Division and ten miles
on the Chicago Division, or fifteen miles altogether, at an
estimated expenditure of $350,000. Other payments which
have to be made from time to time will involve $150,000 morer
making an estimated expenditure during the coming year,
which should be supplied from the sale of either new stock or
bonds, of $1,000,000. In addition to these payments, the Company has purchased $1,000 box cars and 40 locomotives, payable in monthly instalments running through five years, and
as these payments mature they are charged to operating expenses, in order to keep the depreciation of the property good.
It will be seen from the report that the balance, after paying
3 per cent dividends, was $80,741 53. In addition to this,
there was a profit on the Michigan Division of $37,635 51 ;
making a total surplus of $118.377 04. Your Directors hoped
to have increased the rate of dividend to 4 per cent. This

OOTOBER
•would linvo
thiin

however, a«0,00(). <ir 1101.022 00 more
ThiH nmount wn»i nbsorbcd in tho excessive

;

them up

nnd to locomotives, which are nlluileil to
rt.
The reiu-on for the excessive clinrKe
el|.
fnct thiit in the last two years the roni,.'. eral lines, each of which
was sadly detljMii...
and the renewals of those and hringiii); them
cienit
ii;id
involved nn excescive charKP, and your
up to ^-l
Directiuii tliouKht it tetter to absorb this in the year just
closed rather than to attempt to raise the rate of dividend.
Tliere wiw also a lar^e charge for renewals of locomotives, to
wit, |17;i,|oi 26, which, in addition to the amount expended
in the shops, was more than the proper amount for that year
for the renewal of engines.
But, as stated in previous reports,
the company having been formed by the consolidation of various lines, has in service to-day a large nunioer of engines of
different patterns, different sizes, end many which are too
to (TroNs-ties

rl\!ii !;i'«

,

,

i

I

599

light for the niod<-rn us(-^ and, therefore, in order to brilMt
to the profwr standard, it reipilres the expenditure or
large Hunis of money, and it hns Immmi the effort of your maa*
agenient to do this without increasiii',; Ihc
irgcn.
It
would have he<-n easy to have paid the 4 [•
idend \tj
making noriir-i •'!"-—s for crosn-tien ami i. |.,...-. ..; Im^oraotives, hut it
that it is better for the future interest of the 8to<
that these charges should be made and
the condition of the company improved.
The employees, for the faithfulness and care with which
they have served the company during the past year, are entitled to our thanks.

n'(|iiirc(l,

shown.

Ih

THE OHROMCLF..

1803.]

S,

1

i

,

All of which is respectfully submitted.
By order of the Board of Directors.

M. E. INOALLS,
Pretident,

Cfncinnati, September 20, 1898.

COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET JUNE

80, 1891,

1891.

Laf. 2k Chicago

SCitiPlii.

Bond!!
acinoiii. Laf.

BoiulR
acolniiibus

A

ChlcsRO

RR.

326,000

A

Jk

275,000

Rush RR.

Ist

326.000
4.50,000

526,000

M.

Cincinnati Wabash * Michigan Ry.
Payments on Account of Purchase
2,762,265
Central Trust Co Tnis. Sink, Fund
under Ist Mort. St. L. Div
256,000
Capltnl Account of Fast Freight
Lines, etc
»8pecinl Bond Redemption Fund
Clark's Hill Elevator
filoanc Property, Haiidttsky

230

D 2,706,000
D 98,460

67,000

I 67,000

886,348

18,002

20,219

34il,03.'>

2.H83
10,000

I

A

2,217

D 349,055

A

I

I.

91,396,843 90,642.280

D

'

D150

D 8,000
636,000
D 34,000

I

""feiidoo

D

2,000

650,000

3,484

754,562

4,000,000
2,511,000
60,000

D 63.000

1,103,730
2,150

14,400
12,150

. .

I

1,000
1,000

D 1,774,519
D 110,000
D 110,000
1 129,681
1,366,202
D 3,757
380.207
D 49,149
382.322
403,425

360.bd6

•420,000
816,020

I

404,621
80.761

I

754,563

91,396,843 90,642,280

Total

28,000

500

500

. .

58,464

I

II.

1,000
1,000
Rayahle
2,177,944
Payable for Cairo Transfer.
1 10.000
•Equipment Notes
470,000
Bills Audited (incl. June Pay Rolls) 1,236,521
Accrued Int(>rcston Bonds, notDue
383,964
Coupons Uniiaid
431,472
SDlvldends Unpaid
15,378
Balance to Crcdltof Income Aoct..
735,278

151,820

102,230

C.

Bills
Bills

D 70,546

213,202

98.745

AL. RR Enui Bonds Unred.
I. AC. KR. Bonds Unredeemed
B. A I. RR. Bonds Unredeemed.

D 36,918
D 3,991
I 33.215
D 48,204
D 12,845

Oiflce

t

Total

A

A

10,000

161,381

s

meut and Post

689,000

745.000

St. L.

Dlv.) Mortgage Bonds
650,000
St. L. Ry. (C. W. A. M. Ry.
C. C. C.
Div.) Mortgage Bonds
4,000,000
C. S.
C RK. Ist Con. Mort. Bonds 2,483,000
8. D. A C. RR. Ist Mortgage Bonds
123,000
St. L. (Spring. A Col. Div.)
C. C. C.
Ist Mortgage Bonds
1,099,330
Bonds Drawn for Kcdiimptioo

111,000

"i'.sni

& Eastern Railway Loan
Account
235,981
199.062
Advances to Branch Lines
3,599,811 3,595,820
Cash In Hands of Treasurer
3.53,735
386.950
CMh In Bank to Pav Coupons
430,527
382,322
Cash In Bank to Rcileem Bonds, etc
15,045
2,200
Bills Receivable
67,224
8,760
Accounts Receivable, Balancesdue
from RR. Co.'s and others
689.088
618,541
:

D

1.50

C

D 2,762,263
267,000

Peoria

I

753,000

731,420

379,000

C. Ry. 1st Consol.
per j-.ent Bonds

I

.

,

t

879,000

I. St. L. A C.^Ry. General 1st
Mortsrage 4 per cent Bonds
6,823,t)00 7,459,000
14!>,000
B. A I. RR. Ist Mortgage Bonds.. ..
173,000
C. C. C. A I. Ry 1 St .Mort 8. F. Bonds 3,000,000 3,000.000
C. C. C. A I. Ry. Ist C on.Mort.Bonds 4.007,000 4, 129,000
C. C. C.A r.Ky.CJeii.Con. Mort. Bonds 3,20.5,(100 :),2O5,0OO
2,000,000
I. A St. L. RR. 1st Mortgage Bonds 2.000.000
.500,000
500,000
I. A St. L. Ry. 1st Mortgage Bonds
C. C C. A St. L. Ry. (C. V. A C. Ry.)
1st Mortgage Bonds
5,000,000 5,000,000
792,000
794.000
C. L. A C. KR. 1st Mort. Bonds....
C. A S. Ry. Ist Mort Bonds
2,000.000 2,000,000
125,000
C. AS. Ry. 2d Mort. Bonds
125,000
C. C. C. A St. L. Rv. (St. L. Dlv.) Ist
GoU. Trust Mortgage Bonds
10.000,00010,000,000
C. C. A St. I.. Ry. (W. W. Val.

Ry. 2d M.

C. C. C.
St. L. Ry. (C. W.
Ry,
Dlv.) Hort(cage Bonds
2,706,000
C. C. C. & St. L Rv. (.siprlnK.
Col.
DlT.) 1st .Mortifiiiro Bends
93,690
C. C. C. & 1. Ist Coil. M. Bonds
Capital Stock owned In Branch
Roads, etc
886,348

S>

I.

RR. Funded Con Bonds..
RK. .Mort. Boudsof 1P67.

Mortgage

275,000

526,000

4L
AL

Inc.orDte.

S

C.

AM
&

*

C.
C.

I.

Ry. 1st M.

Sprtngrtleld

Bonds

L

C.

4.'>0,000

Greens.

12,000

840,000

Ist

Bonds
Cincinnati

224,199

328,000

840,000

325,000

& Seneca

Bonds

D 215,757
r

1892.

S

oCapltnl Stock, Common
27,247,305 27,978,725
Capital stock. Preferred
10,000,000 10,000,000
''Capital Stock, C. 8. A C. Pref. A Her.
428,997
428,997
C. 4 I. KR. Ist MortgiKje Bonds....
294,000
294,000
OM!t,m)0
C. A I. RR. '-'d Mortgage Bonds ...

5.0il6,08l

M.

M. Bonds

80, 1892.

1891.

Tne. or Dee.
I

2d M.

Hope A Greens. RR.

3Kniikiikee

sVemon

$

75,194,110 80,290,192
215,757
562,652
786,852

Ist

RR

1892.

$

iConHtructlon and Equipment
IBIK Four Ornln Elevator
0«ii«ral Supplies

AND JUNE

LTABIUTlKa.

ASSSTS.

See page 13 of report for particulars. 2. Transferred to constniotlon. 3. These bonds are deposited under the C. I. St. L. A C. 4 per
cent Mortgage. 4. Transferred to Construction Account. .5. See statement on page 19 of report. 6 See statement on page 15 of report.
7. Assumed in purchase. 8. Monthly payments extending over a period of three years. 9. Payable August 1, 1832.
1.

(For

Comstock Tunnel Companj.
the year ending August 31, 1892,^

The annual report gives light as to the position of the comany and its prospects. The capital stock is $4,000,000, viz
,000,000 shares of §2 each par value. The funded debt of the
company, consisting of first mortgage 4 per cent non-accumuative income bonds, remains the same as at the date of the
last annual report, viz., $1,908,000. The unissued bonds in the
Treasury remain as last reported, viz., $861,000.
Tbe company has no floating debt. During the past fiscal year there
was applied to the payment of coupon No. 4. maturins November 1. 1891, the sum of S.'IS.IOO. Coupon No. 5, maturing
May 1, 1892. was passed for reasons explained to bondholders
in a notice sent to them at the time.
Since the date of that

bullion yield for the past year contained, in silver (at par)
With silver selling at
$1,411,395 79, in gold, $1,015,463 24.
82ig cents, which is equivalent to a discount of 36J^ per cent
(instead of at par, $1 29 29- 100), the loss to us in our income
from royalty thereon would amount for the past year to the
sum of $20,606 38, and the actual loss, figuring the actual diecount on silver during the year, has amounted to $18,147 55.'

.

notice,

the unfavorable conditions mentioned therein, the
report says, have continued in an aggravated form
silver
has fallen to the lowest price in its history, and the output of
ore has decreased to such an extent that for the month of
August, 1892, it amounted to only 8,633 tons, and for the
entire year to only 152,809 tons at the same time, its average
yield per ton has not improved, but remained about the same
as for the preceding year, viz.. $15.
The total tonnage, value of yield and average yield per ton,
of the same mines, for the six years past, we find to be about
Value of
A verage y
Fnr Ifieyew ending.
Nn. ofTmt.
ulfM.
per Inn
September 1, 1SS7
246,231
4.000,000
$16
1888
307,753
0,800,000
22
ISSO
262,143
20
5,200.000
1890
260,611
17
4.200,000
1891
209.025
3,175,000
15
1892
1.52.809
2,427.000
15
" In the foregoing statement we have made no allowance
for the discotmt on silver in giving the average yield per ion.
The lowest (juotation for silver was on August 12, 1892, viz.,
821^ cents the highest on August 19. 1890, viz., $1 21.
How
important a factor this is in our income, under our present
arrangement with the mining companies, whereby our royalty
IS regulated by a percentage of the value of the bullion in gold
com will be understocxl when we consider that the actual
:

;

After mentioning the new work that is recommended.
President Sutro remarks as to raising capital " It has occurred
to us that one solution of the difHoulty would be to form an
independent company, with sufficient capital to be able to explore our ground thoroughly and erect a substantial electric
plant and mill, and make other improvements which are
:

—

beyond our means all under some profitable arrangement
for our company, the details of which might be submitted at
a special meeting of the stockholders to be called for that purpose.
This is merely a suggestion, but it has met with great
favor among many of the stockholders to whom it has been
broached, and would probably lead to an income from sotirces
which, with our present or even prospective cash resources,
would have to remain entirely barren and ixnproductive."

Theboardhasdecidedtopay IJ^p. c. on coup, due Nov.

1,'92,

RECBirTS.\ND OISBCnSEMENTS, 8BPTEMBEK 1, 1891, TO AnODST 31, 1393,
Dr.
Balance as per last report
$103,605
71,401
Royally
10,816
Buck royalty paid by the Occidental Mining Co
12,038
Back ro; altv paid by the Alta Mining Co
4
13,674
Transportation.
15,091
Htsoeflancous reoelpUi

*22«,71B

Total
Cr.

'"-'•-

:<>nt«lnNevn<l»....
i.ntsln NewYotk

ostuald

:

<

...I

I..

I'tt-paring for "

tmnsiwrtation"

Coat of "Occidental drift"
Sundry disbursements, consisting mainly of
Balance
Total

Ie«(al

expanses.

$59,995
12,161
84,890
21,800
15,987
4,808
78,088
.'$226,719

THE CHRONK^LE.

f:co

COTTON.

QTomittercial 'gnnzs.

^Ixje

Friday, P. M., October 7, 1892.
indicated by our telegran: s
from the South to-night, is given below. For the week ending
this evening the total receipts have reached 191,1'20 bales,

The Movement off the Crop, as

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.
A seasonable business has

Feiday Night, Oct. 7,
been transacted in sti pie

1893.

articles
Killing frost

of merchandise, and a healthy tone prevails.
was reported in several Northern States, but all outstanding
crofs v.-cre tufhcitntly matured to escape injury. Foreign
demand for cereals has proven disappointing and supplies are
accumulatirg rapidly in seaboard markets. Speculation in
cotton continued upon an extensive scale, but in other merchandise was less active than during the preceding week.
Cholera inflw nces are still felt in business circles. The disinfection and landing of imported merchandise is nore rapidly
accomplisbed, but export trade vrith several South America
States and "West India Islands has been temporarily curtailed
by quaiar.tine tstablisLed in those countries against United
States ports.
The following is a comparative statement of stocks of
le iding articles of merchandise at dates given:

tgainsi 140.998 bales last week and r30,323 bales the previous
week, making the total receipts since the 1st of Sept., 18;?,
593,475 bales, against !, 038,9-32 bales for the same neriod of
^91, showing a decrease since Sept. 1, 1892, of 140,477 bale?.
iitctipts at

—

1892.
tibls.

tc8.

Tobacco, domestlo
Tobacco, foreign
Oolfee, Elo
Coffee, other
Ooffee, Java, &o

lilids.

bales.

bags.
bags.

mats.

Sugar
Bagar
Bngar
Melado

hlids.

boxes.
bags, &c.
bhcls.

Molasses, foreign
Molasses, domestic

hhds.
bbls.

Hides
Cotton
Boeln

No.
bales.
bbls.
bbls.
bbls.

BplTits turpentine.....

a»r
Rloe.E. I
Bloe, domestic

bags.
pkga.
...bags.
bags.

Linseed....
Saltpetre
Jute butts

bales.
bales.
bales.

Manila hemp
Bisal hemp
Finn'-

hhls.

and

saetfa.

1892.

1891.

Ocl. 1.

Sept. 1.

Oct. 1.

13,247
9,216
21,099
40,878
161,136
40,803
7,750
1,810
None.
276,435
None.
361
3,700
327,100
274,300
18,955

14,076
18,695
19,413
42,421
180,051
83,201
17,603
1,432
None.
292,305
None.
1,145
4,500

16,585
31,857
19,978
42,164
216,212
17,603
42,830

792

None
628.57d
None.
390
15,500
401,400
139,t97
25,998

263,671
22,557
1,829
2,583
17,000
1,500
9,271
12,500
06,700
None.
150
152.800

1,015
2,755
13,000
3,200
None.
12,000
61.000
None.

810
167.100

1,698

503
26,000

900
None.
19.800
50.5C0
2,700
ll,.iy7

139.970

Lard en the i-pot has made a sharp further improvement,
but the advance has checked trade. The close was steady at
8c. for prime City, 8-65c. for prime Western and 8-80c. for refined for the Continent. The speculation in lard for future
delivery has crntituied dull, but owing to decidedly stronger
advices from the West prices have advanced sharply.

rULT OLOHMS
„ ^
Octo^ier

PBIOBS OF LASD VUTIIBBS.
«o(.
Hon.
Tuer.
Wed.

delivery
delivery

o.

November

o.

January aelivery

o.

8-30
7-72
7'25

8-45

7-75

727

8,63fl

12,836

New

2,438
1,130

7,909
2,441

Orleans...

aiobiie

IKw,
8-i=0

7 95

798

7-18

7-55

Fri
8-75
7-P3
7-55

Pork has been taken moderately and prices have advanced
closing steady at ?ll-75(aS13 for old mess and S12-75@§13 for
new mess. Cut meats have been in moderate request and
prices have ruled strong, owing to the higher cost of hogs
closing at 8,34(3 90. for picliled bellies, 12@10 lbs. average6V
@7c. for pickled shoulders, and lOJ^gllJ^c. for pickled ham'st
Tallow has been in fair demand and steady, closing at 4i^c.
Coflfee has been much neglected by country trade, but
at light
dechne in price en parcels afloat attracted attention of iobbers
who purchased freely, and the market closes stronger Rio
IS quoted at IS^^c. for No. 7; good Cucuta
31c. and interior
Padang 29i^<a 8Uc. Contracts for future delivery have been
handled prmcipally on European orders, the local
speculative
element sliowmg indifference. Prices were unsettled
but toare tending upward on strong advices from
^y
Europe and
Urazil.
The close was steady with sellers as follows:
11-65C.
}^'ll°- IJ,"?
14-750. Feb
14-C50
14-700. Mcli...:......V.14-fc5o:

2St-

5P\
Deo

I

i

I

April

Mar
iuf

14-600
i i.i^n
^* *''*'

Eaw sugars secured fair attention, but were less active than
_
in the preceding week, and in the high qualities
cost declined
a fraction. Centrifugals quoted at SJ^c. for 96-deg.
test and
Muscovado at 8c. for 89-deg. test. Refined have undergone
a
liberal shading
price for the entire list without attracting
demand beyond ordinary trade orders. Cut loaf quoted
at
ji^c. and granulated at 5c. An
excellent business has been
done
spices at advancing rates.
Green and Japan teas are
firm, but black unsettled.
Seed leaf tobacco has been quiet but steady; sales
for the
week were 1,850 cases.
Straits tin has been moderately active, and
on firmer foreign advices prices have advanced to
20-45@30-50c.. and the
close was steady. Sales for the week
amount to about 230
^"^ot copper has
^^IL steady at llj^'c. advanced, but the demand was quiet
Closing
for Lake. Lead has been quiet
bit
steady, closing at 4-Ooc. for
domestic.
d»nge and quiet Refined petroleum isPig iron is without
quiet and eas er a
6-05c.,n bbls 8-55C. in bulk, and
6-80c. in cases.
Crude certi
flutes have further declined, and
the close was eas^at 5
^P'".'s of turpentine has advanced,
owing to reduced
«^J^xl.
have^teen qufet
r/adt a?^8?Tom 2'?]^f' '^- ^''^'''^ to
^j *, <!U(gi^ii^ for common
good strainprl
TP„„i
Wool .8 moderately active and firm. Hops
firm^eTbut

8,905
1,833

4,031

3,110

810

783

•

quien

Tola*.

8,105
3,142
7,369
1,431

6,861

57,008

aavannah

5,728

0,133

7,345

6,149

8 HOI

160

7.S60
4,523
1,964

6,193

Charleston

2,806

5,703

1,950

2,917

3,097

PortRoyal.&c
Wilmington
Wash'gton.&c

1,530

1,430

1,360

1,215

1,495

1,397
1,090

1,116

2,297
1,177

1,085

1,603
1,116

Brunsw'k, &c.

39,413
4.523
18,437

9

303

660

9

1,553
12
1,105
1,582

8,613
8,903
6,430

321

West Point...
N'wp'tN's.cto.
Ne-ff

3,142
31,062

160

321

502
117

1,075

12

York

Boston
Baltimore

297

1
'

71

Phlladelph'a,ii:c

260

15

"l6

117
91

7

fotalBthlsweek 25,127l 3S.073 31.945! 28,06ll 24 833 40,078 191,12(V

The following shows the week's total receipts, th-^ total since
1, 1892, and the stock to-night, compared with last year.

Sept.

Since Sep.
1, 1892.

This

Week.

Qalveston...
ElPaso.&c.

NewOrleans.
Ilobile

57,008
3,142
34,063
8,801

130

Florida

Savannah.

1891.

1892.

HeceiptB to
October 7.

..

BrunB.,J[C.

Oharlostou ..
P. Royal, Ac

Wilmington
Wash'tu,<&c
Sforfolk

West Point.
NwptN.,&f
New York.

39,413
4,523
18,137
9

8,613
12
8,903
0,130
321

190,161
7,235
86,419
25,374

Ttiis

Week.

Baltimore.

..

Phil'del'a,&e

117
91

833

Totnlfl

104,325

61,610
4,280
46,716

103,80S

13,033

20,891

17,970
3,109

29,361
11,613

265,531
7,000

791

13,8 lOj

3,161

165,265
11,000
9,064
3,127

630.818!

731,035

180,812
13,221

67

1,230

191.1201

88.673
2,576
90,285
13,709

218.165
13,120
91,366
105
33,935
47
53,509
30,211
1,480
1,106

368
200
834
395

1,313

1891.

2,621

87,551

2,519

1892.

210,513
1,860
278,740
57,118

14,997
160
67
119,183 59,444
13,471
4.765
57,603 23,197
11
93
22,003 11,128
25
19
24,141 21,192
11,708 16,753

965

Stocle.

Since Sep.
1, 1891.

48.3S7
1,126

1,075

Boston

5,627

.n96.175'29:>.3fi4 1,036,952

4,528
66,015

In order that comparisoa may be made with other year,
pve below the totals at leadinz ports for six seaons.
Secapti at-

1892.

Qalv'Bton,*c
New Orleans
Mobile

1891.

1833.

1889.

1890.

49,313
87,351
14,997
59,444
28,290
11,443
21,192

35,316
61.733
8,439
43,795
23,803

52,613
71.522
13,447
60,131
16,332

we

1887.

37,774
81,477

17,121
7,511

53,321
73,532
13,803
58,604
23,320
9.839
23,333
15,001
20,113

rot.thisweek

191,120! 239,361

296,119

ninPAHent.l.

596.473(1036. 932 1129.515! 991.7821 741.113 1182 833

Savannah.

..

Oh»rr9t'n,iStc
Wllm'gt'n,<S£C

Norfolk

60,150
31,062
8,801
39,113
18,446
8,625
8,903

W'tPolnt,&c

'6,751

\11 others...

5,969

13,653'

9,080,

21,213
13,033

30,421
19, =^81

1-2,513

5,962

273.609,

9,532
55,743
23,294
10,376
25.339
22,353
5 733

250.6111 276.876

The exports for the week ending

this evening reach a total
of 110,749 bales, of which 69,723 were to Croat Britain, 11,533
to France and 29,498 to the rest of the Continent.
Below are
the fi-»norts f or the week, and since September 1, 1892.
IVitk JBtuHna Oct ,

rr:

ertat
Brit'n. Franc*

Totat

Continent.

Week.
42,436

'iftlTeeton

3S,946

4,700

4,793

Velasco, *o....
Sow Orleans..

600
1S,66B

e,79S

2,758

m Sept.l, 1S9-Z.

to (let

7,

1832.

Exported tn~

Exported (0—

Mxportt

m

tSr

Fri.

\Tliiirs.

9,115 11,152

riorlda

m

Ac

Wed.

Tues.

.

8-70

8-55
7-75
7-30

JfOH.

Sat.

Galveston
El Paso, Ac...

Norfolk

Forlc
Irard

[Vol. LV.

ar«at

Oorjtt-

Britain. Franci

nsnt.

9,915

10.171

600

57,330
3,000

23,215

36,013

12,301

1,230
13,915

Mobile

Toft,
77,4S5
4,230
62,232

.... ...

aavannah
BruMwlcIt

....

Obarleston

....

13,829

11,768

ffilmloifton...

Norfolk

.TeU Point...
N'portNwB.ic
S«w York

29,188

1,651

10,781

15,432

6,150

5,150

2,006

5,206

5,209

16,4^8

65,350

..

2,006

13,561

29.1S8

13,829

4,061

7,117

30

2,837

.

6.->53

72,0St

3.321

131

6,888

5.801

Baltimore

185

18.;

5.804

3,0,7

Phlladelp'a,Ac

Total
Tot«1. ISBI...

69.;28

11,528

29,488 110.719

191,800

22.S?.'J

69.5S0

283.TC9

»>.:im

2r, !iRt

."ti.a^n l.il. «.'>«

274 9'H

40

SI -vl-

4^121

7^11

OoroBBR

8,

1892.

THE CHRONICLE.

J

In addition to above exportu, our telegrams to-nlKht alBo
give US llio followinx iiiiiDimts of cotton on ahipboard, n< t
add similar flguree for
cleared, at the [wrtH nanuid.
New York, which are pr«paro<l for our special use by Ueeaf.
Lambort. 34 Boaver Street.
Oarer. Vale

We

ftOl

mM g

1$

iff

^^sZ ».«?%

»i«so

&

if|f
^vS\

?'pS-

r

r-aS?

On Shlplmard, noleUand—/or
Oct.

7 at-

Leaping
Other
^a>ie«. Foreign

Great
Britain.

OoattMHtt.

Stock.

Total.

431

None.
None.
None.
None.
100
None.

None.
800

Other poru....

11.102
34,565
5.000
2,5J0
None.
10,700
5.600
16,000

4,725
8,000

None.
None.

31.395
43.742
13,000
12,000
None.
12,500
10.425
34,000

Total 1893...

85,467

7.252

40,456

3,887

137,062

Vew Orleans...
Qalveeton
Barannkli
OharlesCon. . ..
Mobile
Norfolk

New York

8,010
1,912
8,000
9,000

1.843
5,309

1,956

None.
500
None.
l.OOO

inli'iii'

I

69,690
44.9..0

P9

48.010
34.710
13,709
5.470

11,990
10.008

29,209

it

499,756

23,065; 200,398
20,665' 204.910

61,331
61.t82

i

«
•

to

0000

<\-i
csto

ocBaat

0000

I

ObCd

ceo

iht

S>9
6»8

6\

b%

7iis
7'i6

l>
7'ie

7'9
83;«
8l,e

7'8

S%

S'je

61a

5>Si8
611,8

V lb.

Ordinary
Ordinary
Bood Ordinary
Btrlot Good Ordinary
Low Middling
Btrlot Low Middling
Strict

5
MCOM"

8l3j6

9

7
7'4

7%

JflddUni?

7"i6

Bood Middling
Btrlot Good Middling
Middling Fair

8
8I4

Si'"

Fair

ODU'.

WW
MO

6

6^

6'8
78,8
7^,8
7li,8

7'8
88,8
87,8

9%

,

STAINED.

9»8
9%
Toe* HVed Tb.
511,,

5 'a

,

8j1,«
9>4

87.8

8%
8»8
9',e
9»|8

9»,8

»"ie

8

§^«
8«18
9I9
9>ii

nion Taes

Sat.

61^,8

f lb.

Low Middling

4;-3ie
5' 18

SI"
714

Middling.....

415,8

5

^>

53e

538
638
79,6

74"

93,8
duoo

MOO

port.

Monday

611
324
306

.-t*iidy at 's ad..

Tiie»d»v Firm atlinttdv.
WedMiiy (iiiiot A steady.
Thur'd'y Steaily at >4 ad,.
Friday., ijulet at !,« dec.

4,300

285

400

1

....

2,168

5,200

9

-1-1
coco
cooo

5
2
"•

xyiio'*

•••:

I

».»:

I

».-':

10

ex

»r;

».-^;

I

M

5

I

xo

''

cici*"

0:01

to

ax

XX

<

.

I

2

.

V*xcc

»»
XX

"<

»iti*M

-,-co

XX
is

2
•«

a

a.":

eiA*w

5ri

2
**

-jai

wos

2
"

o

'8

11

i
:

I

to

t'CS>*W

5
2
*^

cob
X-J
I

I

XX
WW
WW
I

XX 5

ii^u

oco

a

I

a

I

2

"•
:

Q

WO X
w
a

**

r:
l*-c

"

a»:

M
CO
xxcx xxcx
icio'm
MW O
XX ^ XX ^
tiM 2
ccci 2
ox
wto
»r:
->
X axcx
xxcx

«i

I

ss

I

I

18S

I

1

I

I

I

82

I

I

t

I

I

a

1:

a

II

>

81^16
938

t

9ili

I

«:

I

:

I

I

I

Id

«

Frl.
5»i«

11:

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

«

I

«:

I

li

270
362
685

I

I

4

1:

m

I

I

I

«:

:

111

I

|i
I

I

I

•

S
•*

I

V

li

*Inolndes sales In September, 1892, for 8epte'n')er, l,70a
^F* We have Included in tbe above table, and icliall continue eaak
week to give, the average price of future.'* each day for each month. Ik
will be found under each day following the ablirevlatlon '• Aver." Th»
average for each month for the week Is also given at bottom of table.

The folio wing exchanges have been mile
Future$.

Total.

6,411

I

6'''l6

7",8 7^

62,000
208,800
277.400
227.S00
314,000
277,400

•IS
',2
•12
•10
•18

7,358 l,36i'.000

The Salkb and Prices of Potubes are shown by the
oUowing comprehensive table:

pd

to
pd, to
pd. to
pd. to

eich.
exch,
exch.
exch.

pd. toexoh.

90J Nov. for Deo.
50J -Vov. for Uoo.
loi) D.-c. for

200 Oct.
1

for

Jan.
Nov.

-14 pd.
3* pd.
12 pi.
31 pd.

dariai< the Wdek:
toexoh. l.OOO Vov. for Deo.
to eroh. 103 Oou for Jan.
to oxch. 100 Jan. for Feb.
to exch. 500 Jan. for Apr.

,500 Ddo. for Jan.

The VisiBLESUPn.T of cotton to-night, as made up by cabia
d telegraphis as follows. The Coatiauatat stocks, %s well aa
oee for Great Britain and the afloat are this week's retuma»
a. d consequently all the European dgures are brought down
evening. But to make the totals the compIet«
fj Thursday
rtg res for to-night (Oct. 7>, we add t! e item of exports from
the Dnited States, including in it the e; ports of Friday only.
t

t.'

Total

I

COM

'4

Tb.

324
306

270
362
....

(XX

•->:

ocxcop
tow°to

I

M

8»8

SALES OP SPOT AKD COKTRACT.

Bat'day. Firm at i,* adv.

cc6_2

I

statement. For the convenience of the reader we also add
a column which shows at a glance how the market closed on
lame days.

SB«e-l Conul'l'n^ tract.

9t

I

:

I

I

Oonrump.

~J->C-J

5

X-1

^OM"*

er:
ar:
a
'•J
o
w
xxcx xxcx xxox axox

MAEKBT AND BALKS.

Xx-

03

XX 5

opopoop

obi
ccx

2

•«:

aco

.4

to

-^x°ob

Frl

The total sales of cotton on the spot and for future delivery
each day during the week are indicated in the following

SPOT MA SKIT
CLOSBD.

I

X
xxcx XXO-1
MM*M 96**
coo Qi
5
5 xx 5 XX ^ XX 9
ccw 2 »oto 2 t^i

2

2
'i

"
ox 2
».-!

2
"

a

-J^O-4

xxto**

•.":

opop
ob-i

^4

d-i

514
5»8
6»8

5

2

*.'

I

Bood Ordinary
Btrlot Good Ordinary

l.io>-'»

00 -I
tco)
to
ax 5 XX 5 XX 5 XX

81I8

7l--'i6

97,8

Wed

I

os-a**-!

7''8

f
8

8''8

w

60*6
o
XX 5

2

-4-i

X
xxcx xxox xxpx xxcx xxcx X

71s
77)8

V4

I

I

S^i"

714
7=8
7'8

QCXCOD

5 xop
MM

««:

xop

..J

C-.0

M

XX
<»<»
CO

5'h

61,8
6lt,8
714
7»8
7'8
81,8
838

'18
616,,

I

CO

-j«

2
"«

tCOi

Frl.

7»ie 7»8

V>
8^

xop
tiM

OCHtO**

«.«:

2

•.-':

a>

r:

8!>8

54

Vlb.

ratr

9h«
iTIon

Sat.

Ordinary
Btrlot Ordinary
Good Ordinary
Btrlot Uood Ordinary
Low MiddlinK
Btrlot Low Middling
Mlddilnx
Good Middling
Btrlot Good Middling
Middling Fair

-88
7=8
71»i6
8>«

I

i«<i

XXOX xxcx
00*6
-IX K K* I-

sr:

xop

oOo

CO:*"

to
t»
xxcx xxcx ocxcx
aci®« o>a. CD
tCC6
O MM O
XX ^ XX 5 QCOp ^ XX
yijii

6.1,8

6»9
7
7«18

a

X MM

xx

2

•.":

-)»l
(OQo

I

«i
CO
xxcx xxcx xxcx

xxcx
I

5

iiMM2

^

I

I

§8

to

i"

01

Old

Ji

2

QOOOCOO

XX

in

at

-i-io-a

»«:

«r»:
to
OOODOCO
I

•jM

I

»«:

xop

4]

uu>->2

<10)l-'''

to October 7.

ISon Taes IVed Tb.

:

-1

ODQCOQD

OOOCjQOD

IXQO

5
-Mh-S

•

w

CO

I

Bat.

I

xop

SOB

».":

o»

».°

OOODOOO

for speculation and 3,300 on contract. Of the above
The following are the of&cial quotation

DPLANOa.

i
2

^

<l<IO<l
i6(0®«6

Wi coos'*

bales were to arrive.

1

•

ID

•in

in a small yield.

day of the past week— October

coo

CCU<
ODOO

cccc

A

cox
I

was promptly replaced by a fresh buying element
and the market rtadily alsorbed all offerings. The
light showing of crop movtment in coiupaiison with
figures of one year ago increases the number of believers

for each

5

9

but

Foreign advices suggest a probable labor
strike in Lancashire, but the English market has re^pcnded
to the buoyancy here and added strength to the position
Temporary moderate fluctuations in price took place, but at
the close of each day's business a higher level was established
up to yesterday, when January eptions sold at 8*40c. To-day,
however, disappointment in foreign advices andanattemp
to realize on holdings has brought the first positive reacti on o
the week, eejual to about 3^c. decline. Cotton on the spot wa^
dull, but, symi^athi^ing with coiitracts, advanced J^c, closing
at l-16c. reaction. Middling uplands 8 l-16c.
The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 1 ,368,000
bales. For immediate delivery the total sales foot up this week
7,35S bales, including
for export, 2,158 for consumptio

I

-i»i©»i

530.8a7
221.3S4

Speculation in cotton for future delivery has continued
active, with a pronounced bullish feeling exhibited and a lib
eral addition made to prices.
A large percentage of the long
interest created during the previous week liquidated a
profits became satisfactory through the advacce in values

—

n

2.%5.156

I

Total 1891... 103,403
Total 1890... 107.155

3* P

THE CHKONICLK

602

1889.

1891.
633,000
14,000

1890.
460,000
29,000

Total Qreat Britain stock 1,039,000
4,700
Stock at Hamburg
58,000
Stock at Bremen
18,000
Stock at Amsterdam
200
Stock at Rott«rdam
7,000
Stock at Antwerp
323.000
Stock at Havre
8,000
Stock at MarseiUes
52,000
Stock at Barcelona
14,000
StockatQjQoa
35,000
Stock at Tcieate

489,000
2,200
18,000
2,000

300

200

300

,

6,000
161,000
10,000
44,000
5,000
30,000

4,000
101,000
3,000
12,000
5,000
5,000

8,000
52,000
4,000
22,000
9,000
6,000

519,900

330,600

152,400

117,800

Total European stocks.. .. 1,578,900
34,000
iQ.'.lacottonafloatforEurope.
A Jier. 00 tt'n afloat for Europe. 205,000

977,600
36,000
269,000
28,000
731,035
19L,133
36,110

641,400
33,000
395,000
31,000
426,294
107,925
31,328

484.800
41,000
342,000
25.000

Quotations fob ivIiDDUNa Ootton at Other Markets.—
Below we give closing quotations of middling cotton at Southem and other principal cotton markets for eaoi; day o th wee i.

367,000

,

647,000
4,300
53,000
17,000

[Vou LV.

1892.
.bales. 1,051,000

Stock at Llrerpool..
BtookatliOiidoB

8,000

346,000
21,000

'

total Continental stocks

35.000
636,818
186,233
19,451

B<7i)t,Braiil,4o..afltforE'r'pe
Stooii In Dnlt«d States ports ..
Btook In U. 8. Interior towns..

UnltcdStates exports to-day.

1,600
9,900
5,000

Iiondonstock
Oentinental stocks
India afloat tor Europe

Wedna.

TKurs.

71a
713

7I>18

7Hie

713,8

7^6

7h8

79l8
7'l8
73e

7»18
77,6
77,8

79,6
758

Oharleston.

Wlmlngton.

7H
7^
77,8

7^

Baltimore..
Philadelphia

8

77,8

71a
71a
71a
7!^
7»8

CiOBlsviUe.

..

7»a

175,000
46,000
395,000
426,294
107,925
31,328

190.000
44,000
342,000
368,658
124,545
51,482

36,000
23,000

33,000
31,000

484,400

7^
758

Atlanta

Oolumbus, Ga.
Columbus.Mlss
Bnfaula

711,8
719
7'a
79,8

Rook ....
Montgomery..

Little

I

I

Matohei

7=8

7%

7\
7\

77e
7i3i,
8i«
8

7'8
7'8
814

8S9,

7X^8»5,

z^8
7%

7%

71118

7" 16

713l«
Sig
7'«

8
73,

7\
7\

Newberry

7'a
759
714
7»i6

Nashville

l^
7»,«

at other important

The closing quotations to-day (Friday)
Southern markets were as follows:

73.800
41,000
25,000

370,600

83,6
7'18
79^8
71a
7»18

8ifl

75,«a38

..

474,000
197,000
269,000
731,035
191,133
36,110

7138

l^\i

73.

71a
7*,«
7 '8
7l3l6
83,8
77,6
7=8
758
71118
T's
758

71a
7'ii»

7i4'»h8

Olncinnatl

Raleigh

Selma
Shreveport

—

758
71*

....

Bboeipts From the Plantations. The following tabl«
indicates the actual movement each week from the plantationsi
figures do not include overland receipts nor Southern
2,304,502 1,898,278 1,181,517 1,120,685 The
oonsumption; they are simply a statement of the weekly
148,000 1.59,000 285,000 156,000 movement from the plantations of that part of the crop which
8,000
14.000
29,000
21,000 Snallr reaches the market through the outports.
165,900 133,600 106,400
Bte4ipU at the Port: St'kat Inttrtor Tovm. Rec'pttfrom Piant'ni.
flndtmr—

316,800
2,304,502 1,898,278 1,181,547 1,120,685

Sept. a....

Total visible supply
2,695.402 2,268,873 1,6«5,947 1,437,485
ftloe Hid. Upl., Liverpool....
47,6d.
4i3iBd.
5%d.
6>«d
frlceMld. Upi.,N6w York....
Siuc
8\o.
lossc.
lOSsc]

CT" The imports into Continental

18...,

83...

week have been

porta this

30...

Oct.

8,000 bales.

The above

71s
7i«
71I1S
759

Fri,

7%

74

77^^ia

7l4'»38

7V

Boston

Augusta.. ..
Uemphis....
*t. Louis

74

74

124,545
51,482

903,000
354,000
205,000
636,818
186,233
19,451

Bcn>t.BrazU, Ac, afloat
Total East India, Ac
Total Asaeriean

Tua.

71a
7'l6

Satur.

74
714
7%

34,000
35,000

—

Jfon.

Salves ton...
Wew Orleans
Mobile
Savannah...

Houston

390,900

TJtalAmsrloan
Ma<t Indian, Bratit, de.

October 7.

368.6.i8

ATnenean—

Uverpool stock

Wt*h tnOAna

Norfolk

2,695,402 2,268,878 1,665,947 1,437,485
Total risible supply
Of chaabove, thetotalsof Amerloanandotlierdescrlptlonsareaa follows:
bales.
Liferpool stock
Oontinentalstocks
Araerioaa afloat for Europe...
United States stock
VnltfldStateslnterlorstocks..
OnltedStatM exports to-day.

OLOSISO gUOTATIOKS FOB MIDDLINa OOTTOS OB —

an increase in the cotton in sight
to-night of 426,524 bales as compared with the same date
of 1891, an increase of 1,039,455 bales as compared with the
oorresponding date of 1890 and An increase of 1,257,917 bales
ta compared with 1889,
fiffurea indicate

At the Interior Towns the movement—that is the receipts
and since September 1, the shipments
week and the stocks to-night, and the same items
oorresponding period of 1891— is set out in detail
for the week,

for the
for the
in the

following statement.

7...,

1892.

1890.

1891.

1808.

1890.

1891.

1892.

181)0.

1891.

92,589

51.135

23,473

21.148

68,02i 126,619 101.204 54.858 21.463
88,630 128.708 131.421 108,696 52,382
85,160 134.957 183,603ii;7.685l 94.044

I

124,388 98,190 50,296 28,501
1T1,708 159.055 87.783 40,398
211,622 Sie.SKfl 120.328 63.363 108.211 112.500 234,479[239.137'l27.871
216.938 831.988 110.1)93 87.879 142.246 l')3.8-'6 271.464 965.001 162,378
2fl0.119 299.31)1 191.120 107.925! 191.133 186,233 3ie.l65'318.251 213.46S

—

1,
That the total receipts from
the plantations since September 1, 1892, are 634,074 bales; in
1891 were 1.172,156 bales; in 1890 were 1,223,870 bales.
2.
That, although the receipts at the outports the past week
were 181,130 bales, the actual movement from plantations was
only 213,468 bales, the balance going to increase the stocks at
t le interior towns. Last year the receipts from the plantations
for the week were 34S,2ol bales and for 1890 they were
316,165 bales.

The above statement shows:

—

Overland Movement fob the Week and since Sept. 1.—
statement showing the overland movement
As the returns reach us
for the week and since September 1.

We give below a

late Friday night it is impossible to enter so
largely into detail as in our regular monthly report, but all
This weekly
the principal matters of interest are given.
pubhcation is of course supplementary to the more extended
monthly statements. The results for the week ending Oct. 7
and since Sept, 1 in the last two years are as follows:

by telegraph
o

"ti^r^sr
•

Oi

•

V

-

»

;

PTi

OB

01
l(^

1891.

1892,

K)^
CO CD -1 1^ CC c.

Vice ^V-*oi *0' c; Vo;'cn w'ccV

If^

il. .,^ EiT

..

r,-

.. k.

f

..

nr,

,* ^. ^k j^

October

,...

7.

l-'OiOKUigt;o;toKI»OMffiat,t;5x^XIC--SMiffiSi.5«^C^£

Week.

1

Since
Sept.

1.

Since

Week.

Sept.

1.

Shipped—

M M rt «a MOjsi H- p u<

-.5

12.629
4,683
4,457

29,525
14,611
12,683

3,204
3,742

2,543

18,022
7,137
9,695
138
5,775
1,525
7,092

6,'283

9,181
7,994
15,392

17,127

.^'.O'

49,384

34,998

89,982

1,286

4,700

10.145
3,351
14,879
23,375

4,014
3,940
4,084

Via St. Louia
Via Cairo
Via Hannibal

i",8t'8
to

i;^

M

MMW

v< to

Via Cincinnati
Via other routes,

CnA-1»M-J

708
<Sso

Deduct shipments—

Ac.

96

Oj.ia>-Mec(»ce;

*-5^cg°«fflgEcgSaggoMgccS;

KM

WtawtOMCCK M

0005
I

t-

K*. fT^

^

KttMtOMMWMi^
r\t ^rt

ji •*

#.« -.*

#^

^

"*
.

,^—

C^COaO'i^
^_ • • * •

*

-

_

if

»ltO

,

M^c;O"Wt0 —
01

287

548

1,258

5,894

2,679
1,315
3,609

2.831

•^1

Overland to N. Y., Boston,
Between interior towns
Inland, Ac, from South

11,142

7,603

61,607
38 242 27,395
Leaving total net overland*.. 14,296
•Including movement by rail to Canads.
The foregoing shows that the week's net overland movement
this year has been 14,296 bales, against 27,395 bales forthe same
week in 1891 and that for the season to date the aggregate net
overland exhibits a decrease from a year ago of 33,365 bales.
,

W M CC0OQo'(, .,

i^KKOh-u-aaoa

1891.

1892.
Mi-'l-'h

-MM' lOM

In Sight and Spinneri'
CJito

_M-:J0;t5

S £ S? 'J * i' '"'"'""*>* P'-O " 35

'"-"is

» CO

Takings.

Wuk.

jra-5

M' oDM
5f

^

-sj

M

,1-

05

OOOOieo05MMOjt„'
t
f

M05ccroMa5c;ito

Southern oonsumption to Oct.

m

.^a5ioco^*i'*fcCoai<j'rf»QDb.QoooDVToa

it

C5r-OO^Mi*.x;;.#k:OC;«-,Ca.MM05*kX
'

iSi"""^*, "gires "net" In both years.
This year's flgurea estimated.

1.

^l^T^

Total marketed

'^^^

th.n for the

1

Worth'nspinnerstak'gs toOct.7.1
It will

Sept.

I.

218,416
22,34^

705,717 338,759 1,163,559
57,599 48,887i 135,204

14,2-16

Interior stocks in excess.

Totalin sight Oct. 7

Since

Week.

13,000

7.

Came Into sight during week. 240,764

interior
di^W^^r'^ "*iI%%^T.'^^^ theand are stocks have inireasei
to-night 4 930 bales
1^^^^ ^^ ^^^ "•''^ ^=*1««'
at the same period last year. The
receipts at all the

ttume^inm."''''^"'''''''^''''^^

Sept.

596.475, 299,364' 1,036.992
38,242 27,395
61,607
71,000 12,0001
70,000

191,120

Receipts at ports to Oct. 7
Netoverland to Oct. 7
05^1 ^J

Since

387,616

763,316
134,P20

,1,303,763
'

179,532

be seen by the above that there has come into sigbt

during the week 240,764 bales, against 387,641 bales for the
same week of 1S91, and that the decrease in amount in sight
to-night as compared with last year is 540,447 bales.

OcnOBIB

THE CHRONICLE

8, 1893.]

Wkathkr Rkports by TKLKaRAPH.— Our

608

reMemphis, lennessee.—'Uxo weather has Iwen dry and favorThe last rain waa on Septenbar
whole cotton able to cotton all the week.
Picking is general.
20.
The thermometer haa kTrraged 70
belt ezceptinK Texas* the weather hiia been dry durinfc the
the highest being 86 and the lowest SM. Srptember ralotell
week and very favorable for picking, which has made good ninety-eight hundredths of an inch, on five day*.
Texas, ond in the lotitheaiitern
liain has fallen in
progresB.
Nashville, Tennetsee.— There has been no rain the past we<>k.
portion of the Slate the heiavy rainfall and very high wind in- The thermometer has areraged 67, and ranged from 46 to 89.
During the month of September the precipitation was fonr
(errupted picking and did some damige to cotton,
has been showery on three days of inches and seventy-eight hundredths.
ft aalnfMon, Texan.— H
Mobile, Alabama.— We have had rain on two days of the
the week, the precipitation reaching thirty-three hundredths of
an inch. The thermometer has averaged 77, ranging from 69 week, the rainfall reaching thirteen hundreths of an inch. Fine
weather haa caused active picking. The crop, however, is
During Hcptember the rainfall was flfty-eight hunto 8S,
short.
The thermometer has ranged from 65 to 86, averagdredths (if an inch.
PaUatine, 7'f,T(M.— There has been one good rain the past ing 75.
Montgomery, Alabama.— The week has l>een dry and warm.
week, the rainfall reaching eighty-seven hundredths of an
inch. The thermometer has ranged from 63 to 88, averaging Picking makes good headway, and the crop is being marketed
Rainfall for the month of September ninety-eight hun- pretty freely. Average thermometer 72, highest 83 and lowest
75.
63. September rainfall two inches and sixty-eight hundredths.
dredths of an inch.
Selma, yUubama.— Telegram not received.
Hantnnlle, Texas. We have had showers on five days of
Auburn, Alabama.— About three-quarters of the cotton crop
the week, to the extent of fifty-two hundredths of an inch.
Average thermometer 74, highest 88 and lowest 00. Rainfall hsis been gathered. We have had no rain the past week.
for Septemlx'r thirty-three hundredths of an inch, on three The thermometer haa averaged 70-2, ranging from 58 to 8}.
Madwon, Florida. Telegram not received.
days.
Columbus, Oeorgia.—The weather has been dry all the
Dallat, Texas.— A small cyclone, with hard rain, in the triangle extending from Corpus Christi to Waco and from Waco week. Average thermometer 74, highest 81, lowest 68. Septo OalveBton beat out a good deal of open cotton, somewhat tember rainfall three inches and sixty-three hundredths.
Savannah, Oeorgia.—The weather has been pleisan'. all the
dkmaged quality and also interrupted picking. Otherwise no
considerable damage was done. In the reuiamder of the week. Reports from the interior as to yield remain about the
State the position is unchanged. We have had beneficial same. The thermometer has averaged 71. the highest being 84
ahowers on two days of the week, the precipitation being fifty and the lowest 57fc During the month of September the rainhundredths of an inch. The thermometer ha'; averaged 76, the fall reached 10 inches and ninety-five hundredths.
Augusta, Oeorgia.—The weather has been clear and pleashighest being 93 and the lowest 60. During the month of
September the rainfall reached twenty hundredths of an inch. ant aU the week. Cotton is opening r,ipidly and picking is
tian Antonio, Texar. — We have had good rain on three being pushed. No improvement in the condition of the crop
days of the week, the rainfall reaching ninety-six hundreaths is to DC noted since last report. The thermooieter has averof an inch. The thermcnieter has averaged 76, ranging from aged 69, ranging from 54 to 84.
Charleston, South Carolina. We have had no rain all the
62 to 90. Dating the month of Septemb«rthe rainfall reached
week. The thermometer has ranged from 58 to 84, averaging
one inch and nine hundredths on four days.
71.
September rainfall eleven inches and seventy-seven hunLulina, J>a:a».— There has been good rain on two days of
the week, the rainfall reaching eighty-nine hundredths of an dredths.
Stateburg, South Carolina.— The weather has been perfect
inch.
The thermomoter has ranged from 56 to 90, averaging
During the month of September the rainfall recahed two for harvesting, no rain having fallen during the week. .Most
78.
of the crop wiU be gathered by the end of Octob'^r, and the
inches and twenty-two hundredths.
Columbia, Tea-as.— Picking has been stopped by the very yield will fall sinrt of last year fully twenty-five per cent.
heavy rain that has fallen on two days of the week, to the Average thermometer 67, highest 82-5 and lowest 46. During
extent of four inches and eighty-five hundredths. The rain the m^nth of September the rainfall reached two inches and
wa3 accompanied by high wind and some damage to open eighty-eight hundredths.
H'il.Hon, North Caro/fna.— Telegram not received.
cotton resulied. Average thermometer 75, highest 86, lowest
Weklon. North Carolina. Light frost occurred on Monday,
Rainfall for the month of September eighty-six hun64.
the first of the season, and two weeks earlier than usual.
dredths of an inch.
The following statement we have also received by telegraph
Cuero. Texas.— Very hard rain with high wind on four
days of the wtek has interrupted picking, and a good deal of showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3
open cotton has been blown ou'. Quality has also been in- o'clock October 6, 1893, and October 8. 1891.
jured.
The rainfall leached three inches and ten hunOet. 6, '92.
Oct. 8, '91.
dredths. The thermometer has averaged 81, the highest
re«t.
re*t.
being 90 and the lowest 72. During the moath of Septembar
New Orleans
Above low-watermark.
36
40
the rainfall reached two inches and four hundredths.
Ueuphls
4-0
Above low-watermark.
20
Brenham. Texas.— It has rained on four days of the week, Na«hville
Above low-water maife.
4-3
11
Above low- water mark
1-8
the rainfall reaching one inch and forty-hve hundredths. Slireveport
02
Above low- water mark.
40
09
There has also been a gale of wind, b'lt less harm ha-s been VIcks>ur«;
done than would be expected. The thermometer has averINDIA Cotton Movbmbnt from all Ports.— The receipt
aged 76, ranging from 64 to 88. Rainfall for September one and tipments of cotton at Bombay have
been as follows for
inch and twenty-one hundredths.
trie week and year, bringing the figures down to October 6.
Belton, Texas. We have had hard rain accompanied by
BOKBAT B1S0BIPT8 AMD SBIPMENTS FOB FOUR 1 BARS.
considerable wind on two days, but no great harm has been

tclegrapliic

port* thiseTeDUig; iudioate that over aliuoHt the

—

—

—

—

—

done, except 1^) interrupt picking. The precipitation reached
one inch and twenty-five hundredths. The thermometer has
ranged from 54 to 88, a'-eraging 71. Rainfall for the month
of September forty-eight hundredths of an inch.
Fort Worth, Texas. Picking is active. There has been one
good shower during the week, the rainfall being forty-five

—

hundredths of an inch. Average thermometer 76, highest 93,
lowest 59. During the month of September the rainfall
reached forty hundre<:lths of an inch.
Weatherford, rea;a«.— Picking is progressing well. We
iiave had ene nice shower during the week, the rainfall reaching forty-two hundredths of an inch. The thermometer has
averaged 75, the highest being 93 and the lowest 58, Rainfall for the month of September sixty-thrte hundredths of an
inch.

New

Orleans, Louisiana.— Time has been rain on

two days

Shipmenu IMt week.
rear Oreat OmUintnt.

1892
1891

8,000

8,000

I8;K)

2.000
3,000

2I006
6,000

Bril'H.

i',0'06

1883

3,000

hundredths, on four days.
Columbus, Mississippi.— There has been no rain all the week.
Average thermometer 70, highest 88 and lowest 47.
Leland, Mississippi. —September rainfall one inch and
thirty-two hun^lredths.
Meridian, Mississippi.—-Telcgr&m not received.

Rock, /lrfcanao.''^-The weather continuos dry with no
present prospect of rain. CottOT is opening very rapiiilv. The
thermometer has rangwl from 56-9 to 81-8, averaging 70'8.
Helena, Arkansas. Dry weather is claimed to be working
injury to cotton.
Average thermometer 70, highest 84,
lowest 42.
Little

—

14,000
17,000
9,000
15,000

SMpments for the week.

month

likely cause damage.
The thermometer has ranged from 60
to 87, averaging 74.
September rainfall one inch and fifty-six

3,000
7,000

Continent.

Sept. 1.

Beeeipts.

Thin
Week.

Total.

14.000
18,000
12,000
22,000

Bine*
Sept. 1.

13000

3,000
o.ooo
3,000
2,000

32,000
21.000
19,000

According to the foregoing Bombay appears to show
a decrease compared with last year in the week's receipts of
:3,00c bales and an iticrease in shipments of 8,000 bales, and
the shipments since Sept. 1 show a decrease of 4,000 bales.
The movement at Caloitta, Madras, and other India ports for
the last reported week and since the Ist of September, for two
" Other ports
years, has been as follows.
cover Ceylon,
ruticorin, Kurrachee and Coconada.

of the week, the rainfall reaching eighty-one hundredths of
an inch.
The thermometer has avtriged 75. During the

of September the rainfall reached six inches and thirtythree hundredth-i.
Shreveport, Louftfjana.— Picking is progressing rapidly. A
light rain would probably be bsneHcial, but heavy rain would

SMptnents tine*
Oreat

Total. Britain

Oreat
Britain.

Can(tnent.

Skipmentt tlnee Sept.

I.

Oreat
Britain.

OonHttent.

i'doo

1,000
1,000

1,000
2,000

3,000
3,000

5.000
8,000

2.000
5.000

7,000
13,000

1,000
2,000

6.000
11,000

5.000
6,000

11000

4,000
5.000

11.000
20,000

8,000
12,000

Total.

ruta.

Oalootta-

1692
1891

Kadnw1892
1891
otbers-

2.000
1,000

1.000
2,000

All

1.000
2,000
Total

17.000

aU-

1892
1891

3.000
8,000

1.000
2.000

19000
32,000

The above totals for the week show that the movement from
the ports other than Bombay is 1,000 bales less than the same
week last year. For the whole of India, therefore, the total
•hipments since September 1, 1892, and for the corresponding
penods of the two previous years, are as follows:

THE CHRONICLE.

604

[Vol.

L

JuTE Butts, Baoging, &o.— The market for bagging conand there has been a goad volume of business
1891.
1892.
the past week. The close to-night is at 6c. for \% lbs., 63^c.
Since
TMt
Sinee
Thi$
Since
TMi
to all Europe
Sepl. 1.
week.
for 3 lbs. and 7c. for standard grades. Dealings in jute butts
Sepl. 1.
week.
Sejit. 1.
toeek.
from—
12,000 have been comparatively light on the basis of l%o for paper
2,000
18,000
14,000
8,000
Bombay
46,00C grades and
4,000
32,000
5,606
19,000
4,000
AQotheTports.
2J^c, for bagging qualities on the spot. A large
58,000 business lias been done for shipments, principally paper
6.000
50,000
5,000
33,000
12,000
Total
qualities, at IJaO- and I'^c. respectively.
Alkxandeia Receipts and Shipments.—Through arrangeLiverpool Stock. A re-count of the stock of cotton at
menta we have made with Messrs. Davles, Benachi & Co., of
Liverpool and Alexandria, we now receive a weekly cable of Liverpool was made on Saturday last, October 1, and it
the movements of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt. The following disclosed a deficiency compared with the estimated figures of
the
are the receipts and shipments for the past week and for
24,180 bales, the actual stock being 1,099,830 bales. The total
corresponding week of the previous two years.
of American was 939,463 bales, or 1,463 bales gie.iter than the
A-Uaandria, Egypt,
1890
1391.
1892.
running count; and of all others the aggregate was 160,357
October 5.
bales, or 35,643 bales less than the weekly estimate.
Beoelpts (oantars*)....
170,000
160,000
190,000
Memphis District Cotton Report. —The regular monthly
This week...,
546,000
399,000
356,000
Since Sept, 1
cotton crop report for the Memphis district, embracing West
TMt Sinet Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Arkansas and North
TMt Sinee
Sinee
Thii
week. Sept. 1. week. Sepl. 1. week. Sept. 1
Alabama, was issued by Hill, Fontaine & Co. on September
EXrOBT8 TO BOBOPB FBOM ALL INDIA.

tinues steady,

1890.

—

30, as follows

Irports (bales)—
Te Liverpool
To Continent

10,000
4,000

—

31,000

9,000
3,000

29,000
6,000

23,000 13,000
11,000 2,000

8 000

14,000 34,000 15,000 35,000 12,000 39,000
Tot al Europe
* A oantar Is 98 uounds.
This statement shows that the receipts for the week eni. ing
Oct, 5 were 180,000 cantars and the shipments to all Euroi e
14,000 bales.

—

Manchester Market. Our report received by cable to-nigi t
from Manchester states that the market continues firm for
both yams and shirtings, but that manufacturers cannot sell.
We give the prices for to-day below and leave those for
previous weeks of this and last year for comparison:
1891.

1892.

SH

32( Oop.
TwUt.
d.

"

573
23;6i8

" 30,6%
Oet. 7

d.

8.

d.

8

8.

®6

d.

2

8>«®6 3

®6 1
®6 5
96 6
®6 7

®7

4 9
®7>4 4 10
®738 4 11

6^ 'alH

Ibt.

SMrtingi.

Bap. 2 5% «6% 4
'•
9|513i8a678 4

" 16

OoWn

5

SH

Mid. 32» Oop.
Twist.
Uplds
d.

d.

316,6 7
714
4

Oolt'r
Ibi.

d.

8,

d.

®7%

5

9

8.

37

rt

1

1

7% ®7%

43,6
4-4

716

®73j

5
5
®7'8 5

479
4'«
413i6

m

ai7

1

a7

9
9

7% ®7%

and followed, as it was, by warm weather, caused heavy shedding ol bolls. There is general complaint throupliout the district of
poor fruiting and of damage to the crop from boll worms, rust and
shedding. The worms are reported principally from Arkansas, Picking has commenced in every State, but will not become geueial
throughout the distdct until about October 10.
The season, on an average, is about twenty days later than last year,
and serious damage to the crop would result from a frost earlier than
common. The prospective yield as compared with last year indicates
a decrease of 2.513 per cent, as follows
Mississippi, 2614 per cent decrease; Arkansas, 25^3 per cent decrease; Alabima, 25 per cent decrease; Tennessee, 24ifl per cent
eflFcct,

decrease.

The average date of killing frost in this district is October 25. and
the estimated yield as givcu above is based on the belief that the season
will continue favorable. A frost earlier than the average date would
materially reduce the prospective yield.

Upld

d.

®7'8 5 10 ®7
5 9iaa7

4

4 '16 739

Mid

SMrtingt.

4%

l»a'

4^8
416ie

91437 2

Cotton Consumption and Overland Movement to Oor. 1.
our editorial columns to-day will be found our usual

— In

:

durinfc September hfis in the main been favorable fo»
cotton, but lor the entire season 264 out of a total of 338 of our correspondents report it less favorable to last year.
The cool spell that prevailed about two weeks ago had a damaging

The weather

East India Crop Prospects.

&

—The following

is

from Messrs.

Co.'s report dated Bombay, September 9:
Crop prospects are rather better this week in the Oomra distriots. aa
has not been so heavy, and 'ceasionil sunshine givei
the rainfall
gromise of more farjrable weather. In Khandeish, the crops have
ad some days of sunshine, and the plants are tiowering freely and
growing strongly. Bhownugner and Dhollera districts have had very
heavy rain, and some damage has ensued, but the favoraiile weather
which now prevjils will do much to revive those plant-s that suftered
from the storm, and only a sm.ill percentage of loss will result. Broach
districts got rain during the week, but the plants are well advanced
and prospects continue favorable.

Gaddum,

Bythell

The Bombay Prices Current of the same date says
The exceptionally heavy and continuous raio which has fullen at
the presidinoy extended to parts ol the Molussil, and the tcle.tframs to
band on Monday from the cotton-growing districts reported a general
need of Hue weather. The heaviest f.ill of rain since the middle of
last Week has been at Dhulia, Broach and Bbowuugger, where it liad
ranged from 4 inches 79 cents in the former district to 4 inches in the
latter; but though a break was wanted, the plants continued to flourIn the Bengal circle the fall had been comparatively light, as it
ish.
had been also in the Oomrawuttee circle, excepting Dhuliii, and also
Nagpoie, where it had betn over three inches, and in that district, aa
well aa at Oomrawuttee, the crop was suffering; while the telegrams
from Kaugaum and Barsee reported that the plants were slightly d,imaged. At Julgaum the plants were iu flower but needed a spell of flne
weather. Mcautiuie, although the fall of raiu had not been heavy,
except at Veeruiugaum, iu the Dhollera circle, where the plants were
seriously damaged, and at Beawar, in the Bengal circle, where they
hadnotsuttci-ed, the telegrams to hand today repeat theory lor flue
weather from most of the districts.
The first gener.al memorandum issued by the Government is
dated Simla, August 30th, 1893, and is as follows:
The area of the early cotton crop in the Deccan districts of the Bombay Presidenec shows a decrease of 10 ler cent, or about 110,0(10 acres
under the normal. The decline is due to an untimely bre.ik in the rains
during the sowing period in June. Most other districts show an increase. In Berar the area uu Jer cotton is about O.i,000 acres, or 3 per
:

Overland movement brought down to October

1.

Domestic Exports of Cotton Mandpaotures.

—Tlu-ough

the courtesy of Mr. 8. Q. Brock, Chief of the Bureau of
Statistics, we have received this week a statement showing the
exports of domestic cotton manufactures for August and for
the eight months ended Aug. 31, 1893, with like figures for the
corresponding periods of the previous year, and give them

below:
QaantitUa of Manufactures of Cot- Month emHns Auq.
ton {colored and uncolored)
exported to—

Kingdom
Germany

1892.

yards

Dn'.ted

Other countries In Europe
British North America
Mexico

—

"

"
••

"

Central American States and

Uonduras

"

Cuba

"

Puerto Rico
Banto DomlEKO
Other West Indies
ArKentine Republic

"
"

Braiii

••

British

"
**

Dnlted States of Colombia.
Other oountrles In S.America
China
. .

Brit. Pos^es'ns in Australasia

and East Indies
Other cuunLrles In Asia and
British India

"
"

"
"
"

1,083,924

478,773
50.498
49.072
249.458
69),«4i
289.425

785.227
13.57r
38.77>
66.070
570.312
83,959

1,308,898

918,851

2)6,232

606,039
1.95 1,381
2.599,5
7.838

32,183
221.201

Oceanica
Africa

"
"

"

122.63H
1.452,705

"

12,581.92-

Total ralues of above

780.545
79,844
211,873
98,032

1,238.970
3,842,92.)

880.205

1773,714

mos. ending Aug. 31.
1892.

7f0.818
15,445
154,0)4
41,454
471,847

ether countries
Total yards of abore

31. 8

1891.

278.323

203,636
8,487,010
l.35<',34.

1891.

4.ea8.760
158,615
1.082.393
622.731
4,480.918

6.2)9.181

4.520.872
338.405

6.811.885
172,335
102.778

460,823
942.059
6.570.883
2.087.818
9.721.152
2.543,380
15,871.790
51.058.'.21

188.835
2.168.188
3.250.689
8Ji)8.971
5.725,880

218.3HS
1

l(f,2J0
517,103

5,003, 100

439.270
5.133,156
781.201
3,427.713
3.468.9.'0

12.420.959
70.874.878
14H.744
2,545,707
3,121.181
8.4»1,741
3.:;84,872

15,150,^56 184,516.281 131,198,265

1914,292
l-oea-

|7,394.75<1

t'oeis

»14,05'-

»15,06.,

12.267

1,848

193.102
62,716

t-0694

t8,640.583
|-0f59

Values of other Manufacture* ol
Cotton exports to—

United Kingdom

16(1

British

1.199
185.521

North America

Mexico
Central Amertcan

Honduras
Cuba

SUtes &

6126
6.82)

9.713

690

5,880
4,975

39.504
49,42;
4,373
3,688
37,901
22,983
61,442
88,311
29,842
43,490

51.704
84.248
3,492
7.130

73;^

5,84u

6.68t-

Bratli

Onlted SUtea of Colombia.!;!!!;;'
OUier countries in So. America....

Brttlab possessions In Australasia

Africa
Other oountrles

13,813
395.528
91,659

8.786

In

Asia

471-

11.145
l,5o0
1,968
3,779

6,107
3,538
4,008
(,829

and

::!::

18,561
180

18,207

318

2,537

742

rains.

The Following are the Gross Keoeipts of Cotton a
Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore for the pa^t
iieek.and since September 1, 1893.

:

ew York,

»175,860

39.839
771,018
91.774

460
8V0

;

Niw 7oKK.

Boston.

7.331

1,628
63,316
10,869

BrttlBh

Puerto Klco
Santo Domlntro
Other Went indies
Argentine Republic

Other countries
uoeanica

28^

cent below the average of the last flve years ; in the Punjaiin the area
about 125,000 acres, or 25 per cent below the tliial forecast lor last
year, and much below the average and iu the Northwestern Provinces
and Oudh ihe area is one-sixth leas than the normal.
In Madras, however, the area is 56,900 acres, or 133 per cent in excess of last year's, and 21,100 acres, or 27 per cent, over the normal
area. In the central provinces. Berar and Madras, the sca,son has been
very favorable for cotton, and the crop is iu good c inditlon, but in th«
other cotton growing areas it is backward, owing to the lateness of the
Is

TMt

from—

week.
N. Orleans.

8,807

6,132

34,381
39,770

Thit
week.

»26',213

»15Z,081

TMt

Sspt. 1.

week.

Since
1

:

aep(.

1

BALTIHOBI.

TMt

Sin««

UMk.

Sept. 1.

.

P.450

18.081

661

1,442
1,891

7.931

1,448
2,618
1.174

325

45)

~8.^

"V.siBS

1,300

2,648

tfoolle.,..

riorlda
io.Caroi'a.
So.Carol'a.
rirKlnla...

126,086
5,325
11.783

200 280

11,215,200

«8, 900.531

»9,855.783

160
12,188

^orthn pts
renn.. &a..
foreign....

11,506,785

180

922
251

393

307

1.502

1,154

Total Talne of other manntao

Aggregate Talue of all aottonBoodn tl,038.9-7 $1,098,373

PHILADILPH'A

SinM

18.817

raxas
lATannah

3:^88
40.112
28.383
25.305
45,250

7,231
28,393

Since
aept.l.

This year
tuist

year

.

18.313

100,335

9,738

49,4.38

187,317

12.2.10

609

2U8

26.352 "~8,008

1,219

88

1,074

"

781

2,106

3,126

7,758

8,149

6,915

80,84&

THE CHRONICLE.

3fcT0BltE 8, 1808. J

SniPPiNO News.— Tl»e oxnortH of cotton from the Unitod
Btat»9 the pn«t week, as per latest mail returns, have reached
14 :i78 bales. So far as the Soutlieni porta are concerned, these
»re the same exports reported by teleprapli and published in
the OniiONlCLK last Friday. Witli regard to New York we
Include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Thursday.
»itw

Total balti
YoRK-To Liverpool, ppr Bteamers Ariz <na, 800. ..Oallla,
l,'i!io....iriinil>(.Wt. l.Oia.-.Nomadlo. 3,815 ...Servla.

l."2i

2.0.">1 ....\VycMiilii»t.

To
To

Hull, PIT ateamcr KranilBoo. Z.ISO
llavro, per 8teaim<r LaToiirnlno, 30

Til

11,411
2,150
............... ...

Bremen, per stoaiuers HBrmaan, 600 ...Lahn, 220....

To AiiiHtor.Tanoipor'steainer R >tter(lam, 200 .......... .....
To Antwerp, per steamers Apollo, 600. ...De Ruyter, MS
....reiinl.uicl. «00
To a<'\\on. per steamer Weiriv,

--.

100

...................

Mv.rpiKil. per steamer L'mliitanlan, 4,468..

Hiw OKMe*N« -To

llnvre, f>,409

To Havre, per steamer
To Bremen pir steiimerClierr.skli, a,l50
T" HamlHirn, persteiimers Rheiiaiila, 1,150. ..Valesla, 1,700
aALVKSToN— To Liverpool, per steamer (Jolllngliam, 6,793

To Bremen, per steamer Daniel, 4.478
To Humbur).'. per steamer Eastern Frlnoe, 900.
gVTASN*!! — l"o Reval, per steamer Huntington, 2,900
Til OeUe. per steamer Huntlnntou, 1.200
To Barcelima, per steamer AraMiUi Prince, 4.200
To Genoa, per steamer .\rablan Prince, 2,0 '>0
OH.tRI-BSTON— To Liverpool, iier eteam.T Pelayo, 3,661
WILMINOTON— To Liverpool, per steamer SoutliwoM, .'i.loO
Norfolk— To Liverpool, per steamer Bavarian, 2,900...
LancasBoston— To Liverpool, per steamers Kansas, 1,333
--trian, 692 ...Pa voula, 610
Liverpool, per steamers Baltimore, 319.....
Baltimork— To

—

•--I,i48
Bremen, (wr steamer Weimar. 3,171
Antwerp, per steamer Olrant«, VOO

Gulil.),

To
To

30

822
200
1.7*5
lO)
4,40S
.5'*^'*

J,I5(I

2,850
6,79i
4,478

«()•>

talurdaii Monday,

gpot.

Market,

)

i:4S P. u.\

8,000
1,000

Market,
-ket,

atmdr

Market,
4 p. M.

at

I

:45 r. M.J

Obarleston.
Wllmln!?t'n
Norfolk....

BaraIr

i

Boston...
Baltimore.

1,667

3,471
2,150

Total.... 35,723

2,145

4,100

Oct.

IrrMnilar.

rim.

Qalat and

naadr.

Taee., Oct. 4.

Mon.i Oct. 3.

8mt., Oct. 1.

5,1!)0

2,W0
2,665
1|G67

Open H<gk l»w.
4.

i.

OlOfc

d.

Ofwn Blgh Low.
4.

4.

d.

4.

aiot.

0pm

Httk

Uv.

OlM.

d.

d.

4.

4.

419

4 21
4 21

434 183

119
419
410
121
121
426
129
131
481

4
4*1
4*1
«ti
1««
4*»
4*7
180
132
48S

....

....

117
416
411
417
421
423
121

418
4 18
118
lis
118
120
120
122
422
4 21
121
127
127
159 137 429

413
JCt-NOT.... 4 13 413 413 413
>IoT.-l>eo... 413 4 14 413 414
OecJan.... 415 4 IS 415 4 15
Jaa.-Feb... 4 171 117 4 17 1 17
rab.-Moh... 4ltl 120 419 420
Moh.-April. Hi 42! 4 22 4 22

4 17

4 26

4 27

428

128 4 32 4 29 4 82

OotobOT

413

...

July-AUK...

4 13

4 13

2.5

....

4 24
27

4 18

4 16

116
117
4 20
4 22
4 21

....

....

..

4 19

420 421
4 21 422
4 21

4 25

426 4 27
129 4 30
4 31

....

....

....

....

4 32

•••

....

....

Total

100 16.4iH

L'zzle, 5,595;

Oct. l-8teainer Liidgate, 6,263
,^,385
Tafna, 5,700; Tropea, 10,002.
To Havre-Oct. 3 Steamer Dumira, 4,700.
To Bremen -Oct. 6 - Steamer Tresco, 4,793.

•draoo*.

J'?!*?

4,200
2,050
3.664

15,877
12,176
10,350
3,664
5,150
2,900
2,665
o,33S

74,378

Below we add the clearances this week of vessels carrying
cotton from United States ports, bringing our data down to
the latest dates:
SiLTESTON— To LIveroool-Sept. 30 -Steamers

rirmat

adTano*.

highest, lowest an(5 closing prices of future*
at Liverpool for each day are g^vea below. Prices are on
the basis of Uplands, Low lliil>llmg clause, unless otherwise
stated:
Tkui : 3 63 meant
The prieet are irtven In penet atxd 9Uh.
lid., and 4 01 meant 4 1 '64d.

128 4

6,350

T\rm at
^

TaoM.

rirmat
2.64 ad.

The opening,

4

200

5,439 15,671

BtMdr.

•t«adr.

•taadr.

I

April-Mar.. 4 24

'sVeoi

5,150
2.900
2,665

12.000
1,000

Stwkdr at Staadr al
1 64 ad
putlallT

Mar-Jnne.. 127
June-July.

6,23 J

4'i.

14 000
1,000

vano*.

in our usual
BareeInna it
Genoa.

4'l.

15,000
1,500

raiir
buloM* nalDfaM
dolDtf.

rxiluret.

74,578

particulars of these sliipments, arranged
form, are as follows:
Bremen A.m»ter- Betat
and
d: Ua>n- da-n tt
LiverHull. Havre, burg. Aiitw'p, Qtjle.
pool.
"'"
"
82'2
"
1,945
30
Sew York. 11,411 2,150
5,409 e,"00
4.468
H. Orleans.
5,378
Qalveston. 6,703
4,100
SaTannali..

AH

14.000
2,500

4<«

Oood
damand.

900

200

Total.

Ooo4
4*nMn1
4»I«

«ld.Dpl'(U

Aezp.

rrittay.

Oood

10.000
2,300

•t«a<lr.

iaiM
1p«o.

Wedna. THurney.

dtfrnand.

Unlet but Moilcrat*

2,900

"•'il^

The

IVsmtay.

Virginia,

5-8teamer«

Oct. «.

Clot.

Opfll

d.

d.

d.

d.

421
121
422
423

4 25
4 25

4 2T

4 23

130
132
4 31 13« 131
4 37 139 137
439 111 439

d.

October.... (20
Oct-NOT.... 4 20
-lov.-Dec... 4 21
Oec-Jan.... 1 22
(an.-Feb ... 4 35
Peb.-Mcb... 4 27
Mch.- April. 4 2a
\pril.May.. 4 32
May- June.. 4 36

June July

.

....

i.

120
121 120
4 23 421
4 23 122
4 2a 125
428 127
131 1211
133 132
4 2.

1

1

4 36
....

....

428
4 81

133

4 35 4 36

425
4 27
4 30
4 32

....

....

d.

a.

4 2T
4 27

429

12.-

4.

125 127
125 127
125 427

4 31
4 31

431
1

4 31

434
489
41l'

....

d.

4.

425 125 125
426 125 4 25

4 25
4 29| 4 27

....

....

....

FrI., Oct. r.

High Loa. OUa. Open Bith Low. 01m.

OpenHith Low.

July-\.ag...

jr«w ORLBASS— Co Llverpoil-O 't. l-3teamer Emlliano, 3.250...
osta Rlcan. 4,261; West Indian: 1,900...
Oct. 4 Steamers
Oct. 6 -Steamer Electrician, 4,350.
To Havre-Oct. 5 -Steamer Paris. 6,330.
To Bireelon»-Oct. 3-Bulci Baroa'oaa. 408; India. 400.
8AVANM1H— To tiremen— Oct. 4 -Steamer Avoniuore, 7,734 ...Oct. 6—
Steamer Karoon, 5,823.
Cn.VRLESTos-Xo Liverpool -Oct. 4-Steaiuer 3C.;Cleara, 7,117.
To Bremen— Ooc. 1 -Steamer Kate, 4.651.
Norfolk- To Liverpool -Oct 3 -Steamur Olenocliil, 2,006.
BoSTOS— To Liverpool -Sept. 27— Steamer Bostonian, 250.
Baltimohb-To Liverpool—Sept. 30— Steamer Birrowmore, 185
Cotton freights the past week have been as follows:

Tbnm.,

Wed., Oct. S.

4.

4*i
4«S
42S

4 25
4 27
4 30
4 32

4 25
4 27

429
123
133
132
134 43S 134

430

4 87
4 39

4 37

4 37
4 39

4 87

....

....

410

4 27

4 8*

488

440
....

....

t

Satur.

Mon.

Tuee.

»64

"ei

«61

9«1

»64

'•i2

^32

l>3i.

5.13

d.

^Si
'32

'32

^32

*a2

"33

later. ...d.

'l6

H»
h»

'16

»16

3l6

»ie

he
he

Wednet. TKurt.

I

Liverpool, Oct..<l.

Do

later.d.

Savre, early

Do

Bremen, Oct
JDo

d.

later... d.

Hambarg,

Oet...d.

Do

d.

'l«
....

....

....

....

he

»18

Sl6

he

»16

....

....

....

....

---.

AiiUi'Jam,0.& N.d. iig^ai,, Ua4»7s2 n„»7.j H84®'32 "*64»''^a
Boval, Oct
d. »iea».a »16a»32 3ie3»j2 'l6®»3a Sie®*. 2
d.
...•
....
Do
...•
....
..•
>4
Barcelona, Oet..d.
H
H
^3i

k

Qenoa. Oct

d.

Meste, Oot.

d

Antwerp, Oct... d.
Antwerp, later. .d.

LrVBBPOOL.
«tate!nent of

3l«

h«

he

.

he

he

"64

"m

1661

«61

"in

'61

'64

'64

'61

'6*

^8

H

%

l8

%

week's

salo.=i,

storiks, &o., at

Sept. 16.

—

Sept. 23.

that port:
Sept. 30.

Oct. 7.

63,000
86,000
70,000
85,000
3,100
1,300
2,900
2,900
4,900
4,300
10,400
9.800
56,000
flalea Amerioon
73,000
51,000
66,000
6.000
Aotaal export
4.000
11,000
4,000
57,000
: 4,000
Forwarded
70,000
G ,000
Total stock— Estimated
1,234,000 1,175,000 1,134,000 1,051,000
Of which American— Eetlm'd 1,034,000 979,000 933,000 903,000
Total Impert of the week....
8,000
19,000
24,000
23,000
7,000
11,000
Of which Atuerloan
22,000
18.000
28,000
Amount afloat
58,000
78,000
119,000
16.000
Of which American...
46,000
63,000
106,000
I

7,

1892.

flour has been almost at a standstill.

What

business there has been done has come ent irely from job
bers and confined to choice brands. Low grades are wholly
nominal Corn meal has met with a slow trade and values
have eased ofif a trifle. To-day the market was steadier in

little

tone, but the

'64

%

the week
bales.
Of which exporters took
Of which gpeoolators took..

flalea of

Fbidat, October

The market for

demand was slow. Corn meal was quiet and unchanged. The speculation in wheat continues slow and prices
9*1
have made but little change. In the fore part of the week
"32
there was a slight improvement based on steadier foreign ad'32
vices, but subsequently continued large receipts caused a re»16
action. There have been some complaints from the wiuter'16
wheat district-! of drouth retarding fall seeding. The spot
....
market has been quiet, but fairly steady. Yesterday the sales
included ungraded red winter by sample at 78c. delivered and
he
ungraded spring at 70.871c. To-day the market was moder"e4^'32 ately active and stronger on firmer foreign advices and con3l6a°32 tiuued reports of drouth in the winter-wheat districts. The
spot market was fairly active and firm. The sales included
....
>4
No. 2 hard winter at 3J4'^3^c. under December delivered and
ungraded red winter at 76 dTSJ^c.
3l6
1»84
D4.n.T OLOSINO PRIOES OP NO. 2 BBD WINTBa WHBAT.
Fri.

—By cable from Liveroool we have the following

tlie

BREADSTUFF S.

Sat.

October deUvery

November deUvery
December deUvery

Hay delivery

o.
o.
o.
o.

7^^
79%
81%
87%

Mon.

Tuet.

Wed.

78%

79

78%

79''8

8©!%

80

81%
87%

82
88

88

81 "^9

Thurt.
79ie

80%
8178

88%

FH
80>e
SI'S

82%
89>«

Indian orn futures have b3en very quiet and fluctuationa
have been confined within narrow limits. Tiie crop movement continues large and aU danger to the present crop has
been removed. Tlie spot market has declined, but at the concessions exporters have been good buyers and yesterday the
sales included No. 2 mixed at 5tc. in elevator and Slf^QjUc.
delivered; also ungraded at 49 gSlc. To-day the market was
quiet, but prices advanced in sympathy with the improvement
in wheat. The spot market was moderately active and firmer.
Sales included No. 2 mixed at 51!^451l^c. in elevafor and
51%'853)^c. delivered; also ungraded at SO'-^Qi-Jc.
D.4Il;,T OLOSmO PRIOM OP HO. 2 MTIBD OORIT.

The tona of the Liverpo.il market for spots an J futures each October deUvery
day of the week ending Oct. 7, and the daily closing prices Hovembcr delivery
Oeoember delivery
«f spot cotton, have been as follows:
HvdeUvery

Ftt.

Xon.

Tuet.

5m
52><

61%

Wed.
61V»

61'4

61%

51%
52%

Si"*

51''»

51

» '-H

53%

63

53

53>a

63'g

54>«

Bat.
o.
o.
....o.
•.

51

6m

63%

Thtart.
'g

sm

53 <

»4%

THE CHRONICLR

606

Oats have bsen quiet. Early in the week the market adTanced a trifle, but subsequeatly free supplies caused a deThe market to-day was a trifle higher, but quiet,
cline.
DAILY OLOSINO PBI0E8 OF NO. 2 MIXBD OATS.
Hon.

38>8

c.

37

3^''8

3G\

37

36%

3739
3858
41»«

37'fl

41%
41
o.
May deUvery
Rye is dull and nominally unchanged.
quiet and prices have eased off a trifle.
The followinz are closing quotations:

38i«
4II4

^00»*4

|

40

80» 2 15 City mills extras. .... 4 25 «>
95® 2 35 Bye flour, saperllue.., 3 25» 3 73
9 ....
Fine
2 409 3 00
3 103i 3 65 Corn meal—
2 90 » 3 10
We8tern,*c
3 659 4 30
3 15
Brandywlne
4 25a 4 65.
1

flour In sacks sells at prices

below those for barrels.]

c.

Com, per bush.—
Wesfn mixed
Steamer No 2

c.

48
70 « 86
79>2a 81
Western yellow ... 51
70 ^ 63
51
Western white
74 9 80
Wblte
RyeOats— Mixed.. y bn. 36 « 38
Western, per bush. 61
White
39 o 47i«
State and Jersey.. 61
36 9 37
No. 2 mixed
Barley— No.ZWeat'n. 72
39 9 40
No. 2 white
For other tables usually slven here see paire 579.
opring. oerbush...

Red winter No
Red winter

1..

S 54
55

67

67
73

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
Nbw York, Friday, P.M., October
is

7,

1892.

market
be monotonous read-

so little variation in the character of the

now

that stated reports are apt to
This week, for instance, has been very much like the
preceding one in all branshes of the dry goods trade. With
just

hand

at Fall River.

Stock of Print Cloths

ing.

but a moderate number of buyers in the market the demand
has proved quiet throughout, and purchases of any importance the exception. With mills running on full time and
free deliveries being made against existing; contract?, it is quite

some of the pressure lately prevailing mast have
been relieved, but the tone C3ntinues g03d and prices firm,
nevertheless. There is no sensible accumulation of stocks in
any makes governing prices, and the strength of the raw
cotton market is a disiinctly supporting eletuen'-. For the
spring season, engagements for which are nosv being made>
it is expected that higher pricea will prevail in most popular
spring and summer fine cotton specialties. Buyers are not so
readily disposed to concede the probability of a higher range
in staple productions, but there are very few who look forward to purchasing on better terms than are now available.
Despite this they are not in any hurry to make forward contracts and are proceeding in the same leisurely fashion as in
late years.
Domestic and foreign silk fabrics of all kinds
continue exceptionally strong, and some home manufacturers
have gone back on their contracts, owing to the high price and
difiiculty of obtaining adequate supplies of raw silk.
The
local jobbing trade has again been quiet, even with the added
attractions of several drives in both cotton and woolen dress
fabrics.
Belter results than this are reported from other jobbing centres in the West and Southwest, where a considerable
distribution has been in progress.
clear that

Domestic Cotton Goods.— The exports of cotton goods
from this port for the week ending Oct. 4 were 1,181 pack-

to Oct.

1892.
Since Jan,

93
76

1,178
6

17
47
439
32

4,073
1,297
68,464
4,627
12,150
6,806
12,899
2,865
5,021
35,857
2,236

1.181
1,849

156,295
15,194

3,494

2

India

Arabia
Africa
West Indies

71

404

Mexico
Central America..
South America...

Other countries.

.

Total

r>

Ohlna, via Vancouver,.
Total
I

"

3,030

From New England mill points

I

171 ,489

1.

194
59
676
306

3,661
1,271

^3

:

H

H
n
B

M
O XH
tctctoec
Cl'

t^ 00

X -J

I

M Oi W

o

to^
05M
003

M

o
to*- to to CJ"

cnt^toaiw

Wl-ClXX

c<itototo
to to 00 CO H-

tctooiF^ao
OP

M to a K to

Oiifc

10 ;3

w -^ -^

CO
OJ

o

Cid
coa
wen

tOCCOOtOO)

01

W*fcCOO:tD
K- OD tn to

'to'VjMOM
l(» tow vice

01
f-'QO

MMMtO

fflO
toco

bico^-ox

too

CD --J Ut
CO ^1 1- at 01

CD<JO-30i

M_to tn *.p

X p rfk^^JJ*

® <IM
tf^
1

O-'Ol

;DIO

^1

wCd

OO
toco

I

I

I

ptoj-J_*»cn

»
K>

to eg

Or

(£0

I

CO

ox^to"^
to X o to X

ox

cD'.oaj'- to

ODOl!D<C>eo

p

jO

to CD

O

(-•r-

O OM

to 1^ CD

XO

HOOK! to 00
tOOJtOXCO

OSWKJO

-^IX

01 OS

b
OS

gs

OCX w<iyi

•vjosocitt)
O' to 05

o:to

M^

CiCP-^*

to

:o»-'X'&.o
to to
to

XCXXM
w»xp-jco

a^

tor-owcnee

Si.

bl<l*— CCQO
i-'X»Jo»cn

O X !© o o

K
N*
I

OiOS^XH**^

(CI

ai

OS to

CD

ODO

_ato

X

W

o

58,116

w tolfxa
ccrf*tf--j*>.

I

s
*

I

O 01 Oi Oi V
wp_^pw
13,682 21,498

23.273

6,376

7,886

05--J(f^oco
CD CD 1^ CD

cc H- to ti

X

-jbt'ccc'^-'
Oi ** CO CD

M

tO-4Q0Wl-'

if^

^c;^x3s 1^
tociMco<ifie a.
O Oi O CD X s
-*
c'c;- CO *»'-'
X X X icto
i

X

I-* i)'

CD

^

'

!sa^

Cffl^JCC-^

tOhO'Oi

Mil

^

to-jo<iai
35,495 79,895

lOS.

VixVj'—

^

05 bi*** O" oi

poiptcp

tOCOMtCrf*
213,821

118,643

CD

m

» CC 00 X to
wwoix-g

Ci *^ Oi rt **

J^OS-.OX-J

01 at

op

as CO

t^.

tOOl^fc*en

tow

to
X X O* (^

MOJHh

tOH-

•-1M
H-tO

i

I

gDrfkQoVtO

en
on
0-.

-3 to

£

O

~J

b

-1

XOl'-OOO '5^
;-p<lK305^ a. xa,
CD**'

IP.

en
to

to to

'

•xos

*> to

H^ODXt-OD

direct.

v.'^^\^^}}^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ York exports since January 1 have
been $7 912,363 in 1893 against .S9,.5^4,579 in 1891.
^
New business brown sheetings has been moderate,
but
fairly distributed over va.ious
weights. Prices are firm! particularly in low grades.
Bleached shirtings also continue
film, if quiet, and together with
brown goods are stiU faW?
well under control of orders.
In colored cottons all hI.,P
ttt«nV'^"'A-'""<^'°^™^'^«« °f denims teing dVcu t
to obiam for immediate or near delivery.
Wide sheetings are

<71

ODtO

Vi

203,486

Oi
;r
IC

ClCO

3,494

799,000

a

182,679
20,807

59

445.000

357,000
None.

13

107,466
6,430
10,736
4,649
10,579
3,043
6,756
25,959
2,129

288
24
120
S84

442, (H)0

is a curious mixture
worsteds are concerned. Buyers are taking heavy-weights
for immediate use, are placing orders for, or receiving deliveries of, light-weights for spring trade, and aie ordering
sample lots for the fall of 1893 in heavy goods. In none, however, is new business of more than moderate dimensions, and
the aggregate is not la- ge. Available stocks are reduo^d to
very small dimension^", and ate mostly made up of indifferent
and out-of-style goods. The spring business laid out up to
date is generally satisfactory in point of volume. For the fall
of next year there are very few agents yet willing to accept
orders, and this reluctance is easier to understand than the
policy of those buyers who desire to do bu8ine?s several weeks
in advance of the regular opening, Satinets, cotton-warp
cassimeres and doeskins continue indifferently called for. Overcoatings and cloakiogs are in quiet duplicating demand. In
dress goods agents have been closing out some lots of fancies
at low prices, and appearances indicate that the unsold stocks
of these are larger than was suspected, a not unnatural result
of the popularity this seas.>n of the plain storm serge and
kindred fabrics. The spring business in woolen and worsted
dress goods is opening without spirit, but there is plenty of
time yet for a greater show of interest to be displayed.
Foreign Dry Goods.— A moderate business has transpired
in seasonable fabrics, the market being devoid of particularly
noticeable feature. Agents and importers are busy in securing orders for spring importations in line dress goods, silk?,
ribbons, linens, white goods, &c. Higher prices are demanded
for silk manufactures, but in other directions there is no
material deviation from previous range of values.
Importations of Dry Goods.
The importations of dry goods at this port for the week
ending Oct. 6, 1893, and siace Jan. 1, and the same facts for
the corresponding periods of last year are as follows:

Since Jan. 1.

IFecfc.

1890.
Oct. 4.

182,000
263,000
None.

5,000

(est.)

ment

1891.

^Ysek.

1891.
Oct. 3.

None.
5,000
None.

at present in this departso far as uien's-wear woolens and

4.

Great Britain ....
Other European.
China

Oct. I.

Total stock (pieces)

ages, valued at $71,181, their destination being to the
points
specified in the table below:

New Yoek

1392.

-

Held by Providence manufaotirers.
Fall River manufacturers

Domestic Woolens.— Business

'

There

important dimensions during the next few weeks no changes
have so far been announced in the price of any line of ginghams. Print cloths remain quoted at 3)^c. for 64x64s and
at SJ-gC. for 56x60s, with a quieter demand than of late.
As a
result the latest returns show a small unsold stock now on

Outside speculators

OBAtN,

Wbeat—

in steady request for moderate parcels, with a little more interest displayed in flat-fold cambrics. Agents report moderate
progress with white goods for spring trade, but jobbers show
a disposition to proceed cautiously in placing orders for these.
Business in fall prints at second hands has kept within moderate limits, neither staples nor fancies moving freely, while
ihe demand for indigo blues, shirtings, etc., has barely come
up to the late average. Specialties for spring have been
ordered to some extent. Agents are opening their lines of
spring ginghams, and business in these is likely to assume
;

1

Bnperflne
Extra, No. 2
Extra, No. 1
Clears
Btralghts
Patent, spring

[Wheat

38
4II4

Barley has been

FLOCK.
Vbbl. ¥1 70a$2 00 Patent, winter

Fine

Fn

Thun.

3858

35''a

December delivery

Sn^s

37i8
38^6
ll"*

Wed.
3«

Tue».

SS'^g

ScU.
0.
October deUvery
NoTeml)er delivery.. ..o.

[VouLT.

I

I

!

»

OCTOBHK

THE CHRONICLE.

8, 1893. J

State

City DEfAHTMtWT,

y^riD

607

In giving these fignrei we do not by any metiu

snme that they cover

all

the

little

town and ichool

m-

dis-

trict issues, many of which are sold to local investors
without ever being advertised or otherwiae brought t«
Commercial and financial CHRONICLE con- public notice. But at the same time it is not probtains 40 to 6-1 paKoa published every week.
able that any important loan has been omitted.
State and City Supplement of CHROKICLE conNoticeable among the loans for which we hare been
tains ISO pagi'8 published several times each year.
unable to obtain the selling price is the issne of
InvcstorN' Supplement of CIIRO:»ICLE (a Cyclo- 1,500,000 of 4 per cent bonds by the Sfcite of Ten-

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.

ptedia of Railroad Securities) contains
every other month.

160 pages

published

nessee.

The

securities are to

the proceeds, we are
Subscription to CHRONICLE for one year 9IO.OO,
which includes every issue of both Scpplkmests.

come

to

New York and

informed, will be used for the

our subscribers with a weekly addition to and
continuation of the State and City Supplement. In other
words, with the new facts we shall give, the amplifications
and corrections we shall publish, and the municipal laws we
shall analyze in the " State and City Department," we expect
to bring down weekly tlie information contained in the
State and City Supplement to as near the current date as

issue?, on which the State is
paying 6, 5^ and 5 per cent interest. Again, Boston
has issued during the month 1245,000 of 4 per cent
court house and highway bonds, all of which were
taken by the city's sinking fund, and although no
price is reported it is supposable that the loan was
taken at par. The only other large loan for which the
price could not be obtained is one issued by Lincoln,
Nebr«ska, amounting to 1276,000.
The tabulated statement of sales for the month indi-

possible.

cates that the

The purpose of thli State and
la

Citjr

purpose of retiring old

Department

to furnish

REVIEW OF SEPTEMBER BOND
A carefal

review of our State and city bond de-

partment shows that during the month
forty-eight municipalities

new

loans.

SALES.

The

reported

tlie

of

includes one State,

list

September

actual sale of
thirty-nine

and towns, several counties and two school disAccording to these returns the total amount of
tricts.
municipal bonds issued and sold during the month was
A table given below shows the details of
$5,907,952.
cities

thirty-four of these

new

loans, aggregating #3,167,752,

and also the price at which the bonds were awarded.
For convenience of reference we print opposite the

name

of each municipality the

icle page upon which a

full

number

question will be found.
Seitcmbeb Bond Sales.
Maturily.
Bate.
Location—
.Akron, O
Page
"
"

"

"
"
"
»'

"
"

of

the

Award.
100-90
101-375
101-11
100-25
100-25
103-77
102-053
101-09
105-18
102-716
106-787
106-02
102-238

S^js Jan. 1,1911
SJss Jan. 1,1911

.

,

,

. .

.

;

.

W

,

Total

Aggregate of sales for which no price
(from eighteen muuioipalltieg)
Total gales for September.

U

as

many

so

and

$3,167,752
reported
2,740,200
$5,907,952

is

still

good,

elements come in to vary
the demand for the
one must bear in mind

therefore

the

value,

loans.

Amount.

?66,000
100,000
100,000
••
1915-1910
200,000
Brooklyn, N.Y
3»as
"
200,000
1918-1919
Brooklyn, N.Y
3>sg
Sijs Oct. 1,1912
50,000
616, Buffalo, N. Y
" Buffalo, N.Y
50,000
3'ss Oct. 1,1912
25,000
, Butler County, O
16,000
Ss
It97
617, Cleveland, O
1902
95,000
478, Columbus,
4>a9
"
1893-1907
124,000
Columbuj),
08
Sept. 1, 1922
100,000
560, Duluth S. U,. Minn. 58
1893-1898
24,000
478, Fort Wayne, Ind. . 5s
1893-1902
19,000 11210
517, Hempsfd8.D.,N.Y 5»
10,000 110-00
Middletown, N. Y.. 08
20,000 102 -.50
661, MoutgonieryCo.,0
30,000 104-O(i6
Mt. Vernon, O
1893-1932
40,000 100-312
58
432, Newark,
103-75
1912
618, Niagara FalU, N.Y. 48
68
20,000 101-50
, Parkeiiiburg.W.Va.
Aug. 1, IS.'S
30,000 101-55
432, Passaic Co., N. J. .. 58
1902-1921 1,000,000 ) 100-50
38
561 PhllaaelpUia, Pa
101-15
101-45.
Scries A. 100-50 B, 100-55, and C to T,
1893-1902
31,023 100-07
Ss
479, Port«moutli, O
1897-1906
20,000 101-50
48
519, Bcadiu);, Mass
1942
100,000 10105
3>«s
479, Bochestcr, N. Y. .
"
1942
100,000 101-80
Rochester, N. Y
3>a8
"
1912
300,000 10175
Rochester, N. Y.'... 3>28
1893-1902
90,000 10009
48
432, Salem, Mass
18,000 101
South Bend, Waeh.. 7s
1902
6»
41,667 109-J92
480, BpriugllcUl,
4s g. July 1, 1902 g. 50,000 102 I'J
562, Spriugaold, Mass
1893-1898
142,000 ioo-.;5
432, Tonawauda, N. Y .. 68
1893-1902
2,958 102-50
68
519, Wyoming,
1911-1917
50,000 110 19
48
562, YoLkers, N. Y
1804-1903
25,100 109-888
68
480, Youngstown,
"
1894-1898
5,999 106-217
Youngstown,
68
"
1894-1898
2,005 100-00
Youngstown,
68

477, Broomyn, N. Y
"
Brooklyn, N.Y

for these securities

in view of the fact that

Chron- undertake,

account of the sale in

demand

September is acknowledged
to be one of the dullest months in the year for the
investment broker the present exposition would seem
It ij true that Brooklyn
to be decidedly favora'ile.
and Buffalo have made sales earlier in the year on
more favorable terms than those reported in the above
list, but on the other hand the 11,000,000 loan of the
city of Philadelphia sold on September 26 is the most
advantageous which that city has ever placed, and it
will be noticed that the 150,000 of Yonkers 4 per cents
A comparison of prices
also brought a good price.
received for securities issued by dilfereut municipalities
through the country is an extremely difficult thing to
and

For instance,
some of the issues

that

taxation,

are

exempt from

local'

others are free from both State and local

tax, while still a third,

and much the

largest, class are

Again, the purpose for which a loan
is issued has much to do with the market which it
finds, water, sewer and street bonds being deservedly
more popular than those issued in aid of railroads or
The laws in different States limitother corporations.
ing the nature of investments allowed to savings banks
and trust companies have also their part to play in
subject to both.

making or marring the demand
Looking back to our returns
find that forty-five

different

in special cases.
of six

months ago, we

municipalities reported

during March and that the total amount of these
was 18,150,500. Among the largest issues then
were those made by Arizona Territory and Cook
County, 111., amounting to $1,500,000 and tl, 350,000,

sales
sales

respectively.

In reviewing our reports since this department waa
established our attention is drawn to several conspicuously irregular awards which have been made by the
oflScials of

certain Western municipalities, and as

we

have had complaints concerning those sales from some
of the largest dealers in this class of securities the cirIt has hapcumstances may be worthy of mention.
A loan has been authorized by an
pened in this wise
ordinance which required that advertisements for bids
be inserted for a specified length of time in local and
New York papers. The advertisements have duly appeared, with a clause reserving the right to reject any
and all offers. Bids have been received, opened and all
:

THE CHRONICLE.

€03
!

—

their rejection.
this sort of favoritism to local capital

may bo

—

excusable in the eyes of the few, from a broader standpoint it is unquestionably reprehensible, and it should

:

be discontinued.

—

Fbiladelphia, Pa. A resolution has been introduced in the
Philadelphia Common Council and referred to the Finance
Committee directing the Sinking Fund Commissioners to at
once cancel all of the 6 per cent bonds of the city now owned
or hereafter acquired by said sinking fund toward the re-

313

We

Inesday of this week
New York State Finances. -On
State Comptroller, Frank Campbell sent a letter to Governor
Flower giving a very clear statemeat of New York's financial

tax, amount to the
$1,786,218 47, as against $390,357 54 the preceding
year, an increase of $895,950 93.
The revenue derived from tlie franchise and organization
tax on corporations is tlie sum of- §1,696,960 99, as against
$1,535,875 11, an increase of $161,085 88.
This large increase is the result of a rigid enforcement of
the law creating a tax upon corporations. As the result of
examinations and investigations which have been conducted

sum

Comptroller's Office,
Albany, Oct. 5, 1893.
the Oovernor:

have the honor to report that with the close of the fiscal
year, Sept. 30, for the first time in over half a century the
State of New York is practically free from debt.
I

NEW

*****

and commonly known as the inheritance

condition on September 30, the close of the last fiscal year.
The letter reads as follows.

LOANS.

of

NEW

LOANS.

PROPOSALS FOR

82,000.000 BONDS.
Sanitary District of Chicago.

CITY OF

Board of Education
Dated October

1,

5s.

1S92.

PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PAYABLE AT
THE NATIONAL PARK BANK.

4 Per Cent

SEWER BONDS,

NEW YORK

CITY.

True value of property, estimated
Assessed valuation for taxation
Value of school property owned by Columbus Board of Education
Total debt of Board of Education

1910,

PRICE ON APPLICATION.

$100,000,000
66,281,770

Total direct City debt. Including this Issue.

Spencer

&

Trask

Co.,

Less water-works debt
Sinking Fund

10 \PAI.I, ST.,
16

CONGRESS

BOSTON.

430,000
3,033,000

618,700
1,625,706

NEIT ¥OBK.
ST.

1,750,00#

11,012.000

Netdirectaty debt

1

thousand ($25,00'i) dollars, and each purchaser will
be required to take a pro-rata sha'e of short-ttme
and long-time bonds no bids at lesi than par will be
considered, and the right Is reserved to reject any
and all bids.
For further information apply to the Clerk of the
Sanitary District or the Chairman of the Finance

COLUMBUS, OHIO,

COLUMBUS, OHIO,

DUE

LOANS.

CITY OF

880,000

Sealed proposals addrepscd to the Board of Tnistoefl of the Sanitary Dlst rict of ChicaKo and endorsed
"Proposals for PurchaslnK Bonds," will be received
by the clerb of said Sanitary District at Room H,
Bilalto Buitdintr, CbicaKO, Illinois, until 12 M. (standard time) of Monday, the 10th day of October. 1892
The bonds fur the purchase of which said bids will
be received are the present and tlrst Issue of two
million dullars (f.2,< 00.000) worth of bonds of the
Sanitary 1 Ustrlct of Chicago, in denominations of one
thousand (11,000) each with interest at the rate of
6 per cent per annum, payable semi-annually on the
first day of May and November of each year after
1&92, and the principal payable at the rate of one
hnndred thousand ($100,000) dollars each year for
twenty years next succeediuK November 1, 1893— the
flrit payment to be made November 1,1803. Both
principal and interest payable at the office of the
Treasurer of said district.
Each proposal must be accompanied by a certified
eheck or cash of an amount equal to three (3) per
oent of the amount of the bid. All certified checks
must be drawn on some responsible bank, and be
made payable to the order of the "Clerk of the
Sanitary blstrict of Chicago." Said amount of three
per oent of the amount of the bid will be held by the
Banltary District uiiti all of said pr. iposals have been
canvassed and the bids have been awarded.
The bonds will be 8<*ld in lots of twenty-five thouand (|25,0o0) dollars and multiples of twenty-flve

at the

average rate of $1,000,000 a year.
Notwithstanding this
speedy discharge of the State's obligations, the burdens of the
people by way of taxation have steadily decreased year by
year, and the tax rate for the past two years has been the
lowest known to the present generation of taxpayers.
During aU this time the revenues of the State have constantly increased, and for the year just passed are the largest
within its history.
The revenues derived from taxable transfers of property,

ing further that thereafter $1,500,000 shall be annually appropriated to the sinking funds, so much of which shall bo distributed as each is now entitled to, and continuing until the
payment of the outstandina: 6 per cent loan so provided for.

NEW

11.

During the past ten years the State debt has been paid

demption and payment of their respective loans, and provid-

To

Vol. LV.

This fact cannot but be highly gratifying to the people and
to yourself, as well as to those associated with you in the administration of the affairs of the State.
The only obligations of the State now outstanding are:
First One hundred and fifty thousand dollars balance of
the canal debt, which matures on the first day of October
1893.
Tlicre are sufficient funds in the Treasury to the credit
of the canal fund to liquidate this indebtedness, and I hope to
induce the holders of th'-se securities to accept payment thereof
before maturity and upon satisfactory terms.
Second $300,000 of the Niagara Reservation bonds, which
mature as follows, viz $100,000 on July 1 1893, $100,000 on
July 1 1894 and $100,003 on July 1 1895 all of which are
held in trust by the Comptroller for the several trust funds of
the State, and they cau be canceled and paid at any time by
proper legislative authority. There are sufficient moneys in
the Treasury with which to pay these bonds after meeting
all the appropriations made by the Legislature, and now in
force.
The cash balance in the Treasury to the credit of the general
fund at the close of the fiscal year was the sum of $1,903,-

promptly rejected. So far so good; the law has been
The loan has been
complied with. See what follows
immediately awarded to some local party on a revised
bid without giving the outside bidders a chance to
amend their proposals or even time to receive notice of

While

I

$2,loy,300

Population, Census 1890, 88,103.

PRICE

AND FULL PARTICULARS FURNISHED
ON APPLICATION.

;

Cktmmittee,

Uoom

U, Rialtu BuildinK, ChicaKO.

THE 8AN1TAHV

Att©st:-FRANK

Ill,

DISTRICT Ol'^ CHICAdO.
By B. A. ECKHART,

850,000
City of Omaiia, Neb.,
5 PER CENT SEWER BONDS.

W ENTER.

THOMAS

F.

ssojooo

JUOGE.

September

8, 18»3,

W J.0 A H.

E.

City of Sandusky, Ohio,
DOCK IMPROVEMENT

FARSON, LEACH & CO.,
MEW YORK,

CHICAGO,
110 Dearborn Street.

a Wall

Street.

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.
i^ '""'Jjlj*'''* toandal dally
Ddw JONB8
troe.

;

ts a rear. Bamole codt

4CO.'Wbll/hS™,SB?oid8t[

Rollins
Sons,
NEW YORK.

36 WAL,L STREET,

WALL STREET, NEW YORK.
B08TOH.

THE FUTURE METR0P0IJ8 OF PUGBT SOUND
U destined to be the great Mannfacturins and Commercial Center because

tt

has

The Largest and Safest Harbor on the Pactffc Coast.

59.

Price and Partlenlarn on application.

&

H.

Co.,

FAIRHAVEN,
BELblNGUAM BAY,

Write tor special circular slvlng description ot the above bunds and price.

S75X>00

N E

&

CHICAGO.

PER CENT school: BONDS.

6

Harris
BANKEBS.

15

Denver, Coiorado,

Clerk Sanitary District of Chicago.
111..

W.

Chairman Committee on Finance.

President of Board of Trustees.

CmCAOO.

N.

Pacific

$18,000
County School

No. 32, State of Washington,
7 PEIt CENT BONDS.
Dated Sept.

1,

1892.

Dae

Assessed valuation
Total debt (includlDg this ISBue)
Price to net over 6

Sept. 1907.
»1,100,000
18,000

Per Cent.
FDRTHBR DATA ON APPLICATION.

C. H.
7*2

WHITE New York.
& CO.,

and ^4 Broadwar*

Send for our

full Hat

The Greatest Area of adjacent Agricultural Land.
The most Magnificent Forests of Timber In the irorld.
finest Natural Town Site and Water Front*
Immense Veins of the Best Coal In the West which

District The

of Investment Bonds.

produces a coke equal to Pennsylvania. Iron, Silrwlead, Gold- and other ores. Extensive Quarries of
Blue Sandstone for building purposes. Valuable In
formation can be bad of

THE FAIRHAVEN LAND

COItlPANyt

FAIRHAVEN,

WASHINGTON.

OCTOBKB

THE CHRONICLR

1893.]

8,

by this department, a larice number of corporations which
have heretofore eicaped the payment of this tax have been
plaocd ii|Hin our booka and are now beariuK their proporcionBto nhnre of th(> burden of taxation.
In submitting this brief utatement I can but congratulate
you and the people upon the healthy and proeperouH tlnancial

Athens, Oa.— Citjr Treasnrer A. 8. Mitchell writes iw that
at am election held in Athens on September 80 to vote on the
isMiance of $13*. 000 of bonds for wator-workH, tbn pro|i04ition was carried by a vote of 418 to 4. The bondi will t)««r
interest at the rate of 5 per cent per annum, payable iiomiannuallv, and will mature $1,000 yearly for 3V yearn, and the
remainder, $96,000, in 80 yearn. This issue of bonds wa«
voteil on last spring, but the election was illegal.

condition of the Stale.

Frank Campbell,
The following

show

figures

the condition

Comptroller.
o( the State

rea»ury on October 1 1893
Bitlmirp on hand o^'to^er 1, 1891
Cn»li received to October 1, 18U2
:

$7,5tll,7M
15.221,796

»22,771.547

Totnl
Payiui>nt» to October

Balance on

liniid

1

1892

October

I

19,323,4»4,

is

divided

93.418,053

among

—

B'-ston, Mass.— (State and Cmr Supplement, page 21.)—
The City Treasurer of Boston has been authorized to negotiatA
a loan of $42,000. to mature October 1 1913, with interest at 4

:

;

;

Fund, $378,400 Canal Fund, |1, 161,341
Common-School Fund, $47,530; Literature Fund, |3,161
Woman's Monument Fund, $43.
$19,496; Free-School

;

;

Also to negotiate a loan of $25,000, to mature Oetoher 1
1913, interest at 4 per cent, for the "Laying Out Streets" De-

;

partment.
Cass County,

have received through the week the following notices of bonds
recently negotiated and bonds ottered and to be offered for

Chicouce, Mass.— (State and City Supplement, page 33.)
--This city has voted in favor of establishing waterworks,
and City Treasurer J. D. White writes us that bonds for this
purpose will probably be issued early in 1893.

sale.

Altauont, N. Y.— Mr. M. A. Sand, President of the Board
of Water Commissioners, writes the Chronicle that the village of Altamont will issue 3^2 per cent water works bonds,
maturing at tho rate of $1,000 after fifteen years from their
date of i-8ue. The village was incorporated in 1890 and is at
present free from debt. The assessed valuation is $135,800,
and it is proposed to bond for 10 per cent of this amount or
The question of bonding for water works was favor$13,580.
ablv voted upon at a special election held in Altamont on the
30th of la^it July.

NEW

Mo.— (State and City Supplement, page 110.)

of Caas Coimty bonds hive refused to exchange
their securities for new 4 per cents at the rate of 65 cents on
the dcHlar, and as that was t>ie best offer which the county
judges would tuake the compromise has fallen through.

The holders

Bund Proposals and IVesoUatlont.—We

LOANS.

for the purchase of additio'ial land for the Citj

ST cent,
nspital.

;

NEW

Atlantic City, N. J.—(Statu and City Supplrmbnt. page
68.)— The Common Council of Atlantic City has vot<?d to purchase the plant of the Consumers' Water Company for $200,000, and to issue 5 per cent municipal bonds for that purpose.
Batavla. N. Y. It is proposed to issue bonds to the amount
of $800,000 for the construction of a complete system of sewerage.

1892

1,

the following funds General
Fund. 61,701,012 United States Deposit Fund, |45,397 ColMilitary Kecord Fund.
lege Lnnd Scrip Fund, |91.072
This balance

ft09

Clnciunnti, Ohio.— (State

77.)

$300,000 were awarded to the Citizen's National Bank of Cincinnati at 10 1 'SI. There were seven other bids for the loan
and the price is the best which has been paid for Cincinnati
bonds in a long time.

t^' For conUnuatlon of proposals see next pas**

MISCELLANEOUS.

LOANS.

INVESTMENT BONDS INVESTMENT BONDS
FOR

and City Supplement, page

— The city's 4 per cent 30-year viaduct bonds to the amount of

SALE.

FOK SALE.

CITY BONDS
AND
OTHER APPROTED SECURITIES
FOR IUVBHTORti

Toledo, Ohio,

ON APPLICATION

5s.

Astoria, Oregon,

LISTS

68.

FOB SALS BT

the

8tock

£xchsBKes.

COnnERCIAL. PAPER.

38

UWVESTmEIVT BACKERS,

68.

4 South CalTert Street,

7s.

BAIiTimOBR. IflARYLAND.

Fresno, California,

5s.
58.

Omaha, Neb.,
South Orange. N.

DKALERS IN

Blake Brothers

FISHER & SHAW,

Norway, Mich

New York and Boston

5s.

South

ol

58.

Springfield, 0.,

Membert*

J.,

St. Paul,

Saporlor Rapid Transit Co.,

&

NASSAU STREET,

NEIXT

YORK.

For price and
aloi

call

e% INVESTMENTS 6% W.
FIRST MORTGAGE GOLD BONDS,
AmoontK 8300 to 810,000.
eOLl) DEBENTURE BONDS,
3, 7 and 10 Veara,
i^TLANTIC TRUST C0„ NBW YORK. TRU8TBS
Amonnm SlOO to SI, 000.
A FEW CHOICS
7

10

full

partlcalars concernlnff

Lombard Investment Co.
13U

BROADWAY. KBW YORK.

MUNICIPAL SECURITIES

J.

llenit In by

Jas.
BO

Carothers,

FOURTH AVE., PITTSBURG, TA.

Hayes

&

Omaha, Nebraska.

for

Sons,
York.

MBWARK,

CO.,

M. J.

PTMIdeBt.
1.

1882.. .H<<.e»0 818 06
.

and Mass. Standard)..

lj.38t,486 00

bj former N. T. Standard.
(Am. Ex. 4M per sent Beserre)

a,U7,a0O 06

S,M6.1H 06

Snrplns
ijarplns,

POU0IS8 AB80LCm,T NON-rORniTABU A>T>B
glCCOSD TSAB.
In OASi orLAPSB the Pollor is coNTiinTBD IH roBci

Co.,

DK8 IHOINE8. IOWA.

I

INSDRAMCB

AM2I DOOD,
Ajaeu (Market Valnes), Jan.

$lso.ooo.
CAPrrAL Paid Up.
Choice InTesinients In the moiit Conserra*
tlve Field In the Weal.

nCyT
UCn

L.IFB

Liabilities (N.r.

THE
Investment

Miy RFB
alA rCn

BANK BniLDlNS.

The Mutual Benefit

BANKERS,
'Wall Strrat, New

as Ion* as ItsTalae will par for; or, It preferred, a
Pald-np pollor for Its fall ralne Is Issned In ezchange.
AfUr the seoond rear Polloleeare iNOOimsTijiLi,
eioept as against Intentional frand i and ojl rmtrif
tUmt at U) rM<d«nc<, transl or oceuponon am rsmaetd.
par east
Cash LOAini are made to the extent of
of the reaerre ralne, where Talld aaetan-nenu of tke
polioles aaa be made as eollatetal saenn i.
Losan paid immedtatalT apoo oomoletion and a*,
proval of proofs.

W

Onarsnteed Flrit Mort-

ga«wnnlmprOTMlluidl

n Iowa and Raatam Nebraaka. Safe and D««lrabl«.

OF

PITTSBURG AND VICINITY

we have

on or addreaa

Lewis

PER CENT FIRST MORTttABES.
Writ« (or DetorlpUon.

FIB8T NATIONAL

e«6

these and other Honda which
6

Bonds, SUMki and Inrettmaat PeoiriUe*.

Co.,

STATE STREET, BOSTON.

G. R. Voss,

Commercial Paper,

OlA rCil

uCn

I
(4 br deposit of Fim
MortKAtre Iaihur with nii Kastern trustee. FirrRBW
YIAHH' SUCCUSrUL KXI-KltllNCZ. BKTD FOH PAH-

PHLIT.

W. A. HOTCHKISS,
Aet't Searetar7.

BeashI and Hold.
CIEO. H.

LEWIS, GEO. A.

PrtsMant,

H^nA

for

I. lata.

Bankon,
LEWIS & CO., OBICAOO.

131* 1.A HAL.L.B

MTRBKT,

—

THE CHRONICLE.

HIO

[Vol. LV.

and franchises of the Hanover Water Company, and the remaining forty thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may
be necessary, to the repair, enlarge -nent and extension of the
plant and pip«, and the securing of a better supply of water
for public and private use.

Cleveland, Ohio.—(State and City Supplembnt. page 78.
by the City Auditor until October 10
for the purchase of 5 per cent sewer bonds to the amount of

—Bids will be received
$16,000.

Columbia, Mo.— City Treasurer H. H. Binks writes the
Cbuionicle that it has been the intention of the city to issue
bonds for water works, but a recent decisioa of the Suprems
Court has made it impossible for Missouri cities of the third

Hoho!fen, N. J.—{State and City Supplement, pag>» 59.)—
Common Council of Hoboken will receive proposils until October 36 for $35,000 of 30-year city bonds. Bidders are requested to state at what rate of interest they will
take the bonds, and also whether they shall be coupoa or regis-

The M*yor and

bomw

money in
class, in which Columbia is included, to
that way. The city is now talking of granting a franchise
to a water works company.

tered.

Columbus, Ohio.—(Statb axb City Supplement, page 78.)
—The 5 per cent school bonds of the city of Columbus were
sold to Messrs. N. W. Harris & Co. of New York. The loan
amounts to $liO,000 and will mature October 1 1913.
Corpus Chrlsti, Tex.— Corpus Christi has sold $90,000 of

—

Lewiston, Idaho. Bids for Lewiston street improvement
bonds to the amount of $10,000, bearing 6 per cent interest,
running ten to twenty years, wUl be received until November
7 1893.

—

Llthopolis, Ohio. Proposals will be received by the Board
of Education at Lithopolis, Ohio, until Thursday, October 30
1893, for the purchase of 6 per cent school bonds to the amount
The loan will mature at the rate of $500 yearly,
of $4,500.
beginning August 25 1894.

water- works bonds at par.
Glendalp, Ohio.— On September 38th $35,000 of 5 per cent
water- works bonds were awarded to Messrs. Seasongood &
Mayer of Cincinnati at 104-10. The loan is dated September 1
1S93 and payable September 1 1923.
Uauuibal, Mo.— (State and City Sctpplkment. page til,
aod Chronicle vol. 54. page 936.)— City Clerk A. Scheineman
writes the CHRONICLE that the qjty of Hannibal has sold
$J0.000 of elfctrio light bonds to Messrs. E. H. Rollins & Sons,
of New York, at 101"50. The loan will bear interest at the
rite of 5 per cent, payable semi-annually, and will mature in

Milwaukee, Wis. (State and City Supplement, page 100.)
Ordinances have been passed authorizing the issue of $300,000
of City Hall bonds, $150,000 of Public Library bonds and $50,000
of bridge bonds.

—

Montesano, Wash. The City Clerk of Montesano writes us
that 6 per cent 20-year bonds to the amount of $40,000 have
been sold to Messrs. Parson, Leach
Co., of Chicago.

1913, subject to call in 1897.

&

In connection with the above the City Clerk also states thit
the city's total bonded debt (including this issue) is $149,800:
sinking fund, $63 500; net debt, $86,300. The assessed valuation is $3,500,000; the estimated actual valuation, $10,000,000.

Omaha, Neb.— (State and City Supplement, page 119.)—
City Treasurer Henry Bolln will receive proposals uatil
October 10 1893 for $333,300 of 5 per cent district grading and
street improvement bonds.
The securities will mature, part
yearly, in from one to nine years after the date of their issue.

—

Hanover, Pa. Mr. W. R. Soliday, secretary of the borough
of Hanover, informs us that an ordinance has been passed
authorizing the issue of 3% per cent twenty year bonds, to be
dated Jan. 1 1893. The loan is to be exe-npt from taxation, and
the ordinance provides that the money realized from the sale
of the bonds be applied as follows The sum of sixty thousand
dollars thereof to the purchase of the plant, pipes, material

Richmond Co'inty, N. Y.—(State and City Supplement.
)—The Boird of Supervisors of Richmond tJounty will

page 53

receive bids until October 35 1892 for $45,000 of 35-year county
road bonds. Bidders are requested to state the rate of interest
which ths bonds shall bear.

:

MINNEAPOLIS.

PACIFIC COAST.

ST. LOUIS.
SAH'L

a.

UATLOKD,

JSl).

H. BI.B88Ultt.

Merchants National Bank Minneapolis Trust Co., Gay lord, Blessing
OF •iK^TTL.I?;, TTASHITVGTON.
AllKas Mackintosh, Pres.

Wm.

Uapttal.

I

Abram

I

Intereflt-bearinu: Certificates of
Saperlor Collection Facilities.

840,000

Deposit.

Correspondence Solicited

ST. LOUIS.

CA.PITAI., i50©,000.

Barker, Vlce-Prea,

T. Wickware, Cashier.
etc.,

S'^00,000 Surplus,

Salety Deposit Vaults.

K.«al Estate lioans.

Acts as Ene/utor, Trustee and Guardlau.
DHP08IT0BT FOB WILLS.

BOX

Bank,

Merchants Nat'l

POUTI..AND, OKEGON.
Paid Capital
81,000,000

LOBWENBKRO, Pres. JA8. STEEL, Vice-Prei.
1. A. MACRUM, Cashier.
SELLS SIGHT KXCIIANGE AND TBLEGSAPHIC TRANSVBRS, and ISSUES LETTERS

J,

or

L

CREDIT available thronRbont the United States
BILLS OF EXCHANGE on London,

DRAWS

M

Hill,

COLLECTIONS

MADE jn all sooessible polnu.

&

Guarantee Loan

Commercial Bank,
PAID-UP CAPITAL SaoO.OOO.
Six Per Cent Coupon Certihcate of Deposit, running
O le or Two years, Interest and Principal payable at
t le Merchants' EjcchanKe Nat. Bank, New York City
This i:«rtitlcate has a coupon attached, which can
b » cut ofT when due, and presented to any Bank for
p (yment, the same as a New York Draft. A most
o -uTenient mode of investing yo\u surplus money.
Wflfe fnr a oopv nf the CertitlcatB.
A. Bridohan, Cash. Orattan H. Whulkb, Pres

Bauk

Stocks, MortKHKes

J.

We

buy and sell outright all Western
Bonds and Stocks.
cheerfully furnish full and reliable information concerning any Western security without charge. Monthly quotation circular mailed to all applicants,
New issues of municipal bonds wanted.

805

Sons,

PINE STREEX,

Dealers in MUNICIPAL BONDS.
RaUway Bonds and other high grade

street

143 S-Portorj..^^

TACOIVA, WASHINGTON.
(OLDEST BANK IN THE CITY.)
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
Capital

8'J30,000

Harplus and CndlTlded ProBta

r Exchange PJace^
Cable Address.

IN

TEXAS.

In-

solicited.

Collections a specialty.

SAN FRANC ISCO.

The

First

OF SAN FRANCISCO,
HDUP1.U8.

...

B.

.

.

a. MtJKPBT. President.

.

K. D.

FRANCIS SMITH

& Co.,

SLSOCOUO

MUNICIPAL BONDS.
OUo, Perry-Payne

B>ld>K

BoatoB, ma»«., fi« State Street.
New York, 11 ixrall Street.

srao.ooo

Investment Securities
BOUGHT AND

Morgan, Cuhiar

JAMM MoFFiTT. V.-Pres. O.W.Krjw«.A8»t.CM*
PSHEKAI, BAdKING BUHIMBM^
AVCOVtiT» moi.iviT9P.

&. CO.,

CHICAGO.

BANKERS,

CAI..

UNITBD STATES DEPOSITARY.

CAPITAL,

NEW

"KHNNBTH."

Lamprecht Bros.
Oleveland,

National Bank

STREET. NO COMMISSIONS charged borrower or lender until
loans have proven good.
YORK.

^^j^j^

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS.

8100.000

C«rre>pondeQoe

j^j

MO.

ST. I.Oi;iS,

Mortgage Loans

BANKERS,

vestments.

Merchants National Bank

We

Municipal

MIBnV.,

&

Street,

ST. LOUIS.

aud Bonds.

Hayes

BROKKB.t«.

Geo. M. Huston & Co.
BOND AND STOCK DEALERS

Co.,

CORKE8PONDKNCE SOLICITED.

W.

Hodgman,

300 Nortb Fourtb

Dealers In the highest class of Minneapolis Secnrilea,

&

BOND AND STOCK

Butldlnar,

imiNNEAPOLilS

CHABLX8 HODOUAI

WHTTAKKB.

Whitaker

;

H. Wood

S.

GRADE MUNICIPAL BONDS
A SPECIALTY.

DIRECTORS.
Thomas Lowry. J^rst Vice-

President

INVESTMENT BANKERS,

TATOmA, IVASHIIVOTON.

HIQH

President; H. F. Brown, Second Vice-President;
Daniel Bassett, Third Vice-President; Clarkson
Llndley, Secretary and Treasurer; Isaac Atwater,
las. J. Hill, R. B. LauKdon, A. F. Kelley, W. G.
Horthrup, Wm. H. Dunwoody, C. G. Goodrich, Chas,
A. PlUsbury, A. H. Linton. P. B. Winston.

verpool, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Frankfort-on-theiin, and all the principal cities of Earope ; also on

H)nKEonK.

WESTERN BEC0RITIBS AND

lODWAElDS

P. O.
1,000.
Cable Address "Trust" Minneapolis.
Samuel

&

Co.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,

iaiNNEAP01.IS, MINNESOTA.

UNITED states DEPOSITARY.

A.
T

E.

SOI.D

BY

HACHFIELD,

ntm S^-R^ET, NEW VOBK.

Union National Bank,
CIIICAOO.
Pald-np Capital.
SnrpluS)

$2,000,000
700,000

A reffular

Banking Business Transacted. Acoonnts

of BazikB and Bankers, Mercantile and Manufacturing
Firms or Corporations, received on favorable tenns.
Foretim KxcnanKe Bouprht and Sold. Commercial
and Travelers' Credits, available in all paru of the
globe, issued. TeleKraphlo Transfers made with all
Unit«(
orlnclpa) European and Domestic Points.
Itatea and other flrst-olass Investment Bonds dealt

qO&BBSPONDBNOB 80LI0ITBD.

,

'

OCTOBltK

CHRONICLR

l^HE

1M)9.|

8,

Sarramento, Cal.— A special election will be held in Bacramontooii October 13, to vote on the insuance of 1100,000 of
boudK for levet» impioveinents.
Schenectady, N. Y.—(Statk and City Suppuement. paK*
City Treasurer of Schenectady reixjrcs to uh that
|10,oO(l of sewer bonds were sold to the Albany Suvinxs Dauk
for 118-QO.
The bonds l>eur 4 per cent interest and ore due
The bids were spirited, commencing at 108
October 1 1921.
and went by fractions to 118*50.

M.H-The

South Carolina.—(State and City Supplement, page

—A

U-legnipbic report received just as

we

158.)

are H'>in^ to press

Governor Tillman and Treasurer Bates of South
Carolina are in New York to confer with bankers on the substates thiit

ject of the refunding of the debt of that State.
The Le){islature of Soutli Carolina will meet shortly to act on a projKised
amendineuc to the law ao as to make the rate of intereitt <in
the fuudiiiff isMie i'{ per cent instead of 4 per cent, as the
plan now stands. On July 1 1893 |Q,506,037 of the outstandinK sixes will mature and the new bonds will be issued to redeem them. There are albo $6,000,000 of non-fundable bonds
outslandiuK which will be retired and new bonds to the
amount of $1.3.50,000 will be issued. It is understood that
Uovernor Tillman is here to select a banking lirm to handle
the new i88ue^.

West Cleveland, Ohio.—(State and City Supplement,
83.)
City Clerk H. C. Bragg writes us that on October I
school bonds of West Cleveland to the amount of $6,000 were
awarded toM. J. Rtdgers, of Solon, Ohio, at 102.10. The securities bear 6 per cent interest and mature at the rate of $1,000

—

page

yearly, from Oct.

1

1693 to Oct.

—

Wilkinsburg, Pa. The citizens of Wilkinsburg have voted
bonds to the amount of $da,000 for street
improvements.

in favor of issuing

Tonngstown, Ohio.— (State and City Supplement, page
The Citv Cleik, Mr. J. Howard Edwards, writes us that
on Octt)ber 3 twelve bids were received for Youngstown 6 per
cent street improvement bonds and the awards were as follows $10,000 of tidewalk bonds, falling due at the rate of
|2,000 yearly from October 1894 to October 1898, inclusive.
84.)

—
:

CHICAGO.

Chlcatfu Stock Bxchan^e.

DKAKBOKN STREET,
Ills.

R.

QLKNUINNIMa «

sewers and electric

PHILADELPHIA.

BRH8I. Member New York Stock Exchange
M. CUMMINQS. Member Chicago Stock Exchange

J. B.

&

Trust

9'J,

»*

Oc

9«

WASHINUTOM STREET.
S1,«U0,000

Depsslted with State Auditor.

111

&

Cummings,

BANKERS AMD BRMKEKM,
AND 113 nONROE STREET,
CHICAGO

.

ODARANTEBS TITLES TO REAL ESTATE.

anthorlsed by law to act aa Registrar ot Stocks
and Bonds, Executor. ReoelTer and Trustee for
Estates, Snidtcatee, liidlTldnals and Corporatlona.
Trust moneys and trust securities kept separate
from the assets of the Company.

CORRESPONDENVB SOLICITED.
OFFICERS;

QWYNN QARNETT,
A. O.

WM.

8LADOHTER, Member N. Y. Stock
V. BAKER, Member Chicago Stock

Exchange

&

Co.,

A. O. Slaughter

Exohaniie

BANKERS,

:CHICA«0, ILLS.

ha:^

CJhtenco Seearltlee

Bought and

Soli'.

C. Walker,
a. Shortall,

113

DEARBORN

ST.,

CHlCACiO.

INVESTMENT SECURITIES
BOUGHT AND SOLD,
Member Chicago Stock Exchange.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.

Cahn

&

Straus,
BANKERS,

Bdsou Keith,
Oeo. M. BoKue.
:a. U. Sellers.

John
John DeKoven.
Samuel B. Chase,

COUNSEL:
0. CkJUdy,

A. W. Qrean.

Henry C. Hackney,

directly

la

under the Jurisdiction and
Illlaois,

Is

a

LBOAL

OFFICERS:

John

J. Mitchell, Prealdent.

John

B. Drake, Vice-President.
.
H. Mitchell. Second Vlce-PresldenL

Wm.

Wm.

Jamea S Olbbs,

U. Held, Third VIce-PraaldaiK
B. M. Ctaattall, Ass't Cash*r

Cash'r.

John McCalTery,

DIRBCTOBS
John

Wm.

L. Z. Letter.

Wm. U. Mitchell.
Wm. O. Hibbard,

John

B. Drake"

U. Held.
J. MItcheU*

J. C. McMullin,
J. Ogden Armour*

D. B. Shipman.

Frederick T. Haskell.

The Jennings Trust Co.,
186

DEARBORN

ST.,

CHICAGO.

STEWART. Secretary.
CUAS. K. LARRABBE. Treasurer.

UIKBCTORS:
Qwrnn Oamett,
Chaa. W. Drew,
W. D. Kerfoot,
John P. Wilson,

W.

This Bank
to act as

A.

Ueorge

111-113 LiA MALiLiB STREET,
''

President.

A. H. SELLERS. vioe-Prealdent.

ARCHIBALD

CAPITAL. AND SURPLUS, - •3..i30.00a
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS.

DEPOSITORY for Court Moneys, and Is authortted
TRUSTEE, EXECUTOR, RECEIVER
400,UUO ASSIGNEE for kStaTBS. INDIVIDUALS and
and
CORPORATIONS.

Offer* Inveetorn In real eatate eecnrltlee
protection afforded by no other ayatem of
doing bnslnees.

SeonrlUee Hated In New Turk, BoetOQ or Chicago
oarrled on oonBerratlTe margliu.

Trust & Savings
Bank.
CHICAGO, ILL.

Illinois

•nparrlslon of the State of

'.I'iO.OOO

Is

Breese

lights.

CHICAGO.

urplHH

tfpeclai attenllon fflven to ont-ef-toim buelnemi. CJorreepondeoce eollclted.

O.

|

Undivided earnlngii, Inclading

YORK.

CO.,

California— San Bernardino.- Sydney Mee, Mayor. The
following statement concernmg San Bernarduio's debt and
valuation has been sent to the Chronicle by City Clerk W.
T. Harris. This city is in San Bernardino County.
Total d»bt Sept. 1 1892. $188,000 Tax rate per $1,000
S16 00
Water debt (68 luoluded
Popiilatloii In 1890 woa
4.01S
hitotal)
128,000 Population lu 1880 wa«.... 1.678
Tax valuation, 1892
4,617,000
The water works owned by the city were constructed in
1890 at a total cost of $130,000, which was defrayed by an
issue of 6 per cent municipal bonds.
The water supply is
from eleven artesian wells situated three miles northwest of
the city. From a ressrvoir bavmg a capacity of 1,250,000 gallons the water is distributed throUj^h more than tweaty-four
miles of pipe to all parts of the city. San Bernardino has also

Capital, pnld-np

PriTBte Wire to

LAS. WORMSBK. N£W YORK.

XOWEK * CO., NEW

to municipal debts received since th«
of our State and City Suppleicbnt,
Some of these reports are wholly new and others cover items
of information additional to those given in the SUPPLBKEirr,
and of interest to investors.

publication

last

Company
OF CHICAGO,

Members New York Stock Exchange,

Chicago,

STATE AND CITY DEBT CHANGES.
We subjoin reports as

Title Guarantee

-

18T-189

12, when $25,100 of 6 per cent street imiirovement Ixinds maturing, part yearly, from 1894 to 1903 brought a premium of
$3,48:3, and $0,999 of similar bonds maturing, part yearly,
from 1894 to 1898 brought a premium of $36^1. ;At the same
time small issues aggregating $2,000 were sold at par.

CHICAGO.

"Jamieson & Co.,
STOCKS— BOIVDS,

\^

—"-

were awarded to Coffin * Stanton, of New York, on thflr bid
Vine Htreet gutterlnit bonds, falling dun
part yearly from October 18M to 1896 Inclusive, were awarded
to H. M. Oarlick, of Youngstown, for |:i7S-8.t; $200 of Pearl
Strevt grading bonds, falling due one-half in October of 1894
and one half in Octolier of 1W>5, were awarded to R. M. Wallace, of Youngstown, for $208'00, and $1,850 of Moor Ulreet
guttering and curbing bonds, payable part yearly from Ocu>ber 1894 to October l8ya, inclusive, w«ra awarded to Wick
Bros. & Co., of Youngstown, for $1,290.
The last sale of bonds by this city took place on September
o(|10,,'il8; $870 of

I

1898, inclusive.

1

611

CAPITAL, PAID UP,

SURPLUS.

-

-

$500,000

- -

$50,000

NBOOTIATIIS OROUND RENTS

In the Cttr ot

Takea entire charge of aatataa. Aeta aa
agent for the registration and transfer of bonds and
Chicago.

Uohn

P.

WUaon,

A. M. Penca,

payment of coupons. Interest and
AnthorliedbylawtoreoelTeandaxeeutA

stocks and the

&

Herman

Schaflher
Co.
BANKERS,
COMMERCIAL PAPER,
100 Waehlncton Street,

&

trusts of erery ctiaractor

from oourta. oorporatlone

A legal

depoeltory for eourt and

and IndlTlduala.
trust funda.

IMTERBST ALLOWBD ON DEPOSITS of monsy.
Which

CHICAGO, ILL.
Fred. G. Frank

dlTldends.

may

be

made at any time and withdrawn

re days' noUea, or at a flxad data.
TRUST FUNDS AND TRUST

Bro.

.re kept separata and apart

ill T Effl'mWrff
from the aaaMa of tk«

Company.
LOCAL SECURITIES A SPECIALTY.
«• WASUIN«iTON MTREKT, CHICAGO.
Correspondanoe Inrlted.
J. B. WALSH, Prealdent.
1!IM liA SAI>L,E ST.. CHICAGO.
A tieneral Banking Bnelneee Transacted. ATLANTIC MUTUAL 1N8. CO. SCRIP
CHA8. H. BULBURD, VIce-Praaldenl.
FUflT MORTOAOB LOANS ON LMPROTBD CITY
Dealt la bv
FRANKLIN BATHRWAY, Secretary.
aSAL ESTATE FOR SAUL
AUGUSTUS FLOTD,
AMUH. D. WARD, Trsaaurar

M—liMllif t>ir>liH|ii

Mm*

HifcMlia

aft*r

hn^M A.

WAIrWNI,:!

THErCflKONICLE

612
Rattan.

[Vm- ly.

^ttiauctaX.

i&ottsm.

Waller I.

WOODWARD

& STILLMAN, INMAN, S W ANN& Co W.
MERCHANTS
16 to

COTTON MERCHANTS,

NEW YORK.

LEHMAN

BROS.,

COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

sl«ht.

ai well

BTRAUBB *

CO.,

at tbe

New

CO.,

Orleani.

STRAUSS &

CO.,
COTTON MERCHANTS
48 BROWV'ti BUILDINGS.

«*Utvt.

NBW YOBK COrPBB HXCHANOB, and
CHICAGO BOARD OF TUADB.

&

Hubbard, Price

Members of New York and Boston Btoek Exchanges

Co.,

NEW YORK.

General CoiiimisBion Merchants.
Members New York Stock Exchange, New York
Cotton KxchauKC, New York Prouuce Exchange, New

York Coffee Kzctaau^re, Chicago Board of Trade.
Orders executed on any ul ihe auove Kxctianges,
also for purchase and sale of cotton for future delivery In New Orleans and Liverpool. Liberal ad-

J. O.

Oko. H. Chuboh, Special

BLOBS.

Co.,

COMMISSION MBBCHANTS,

Exehanca Bnlldlns.
Laclna Hopklna Smith.
Bamnel Uopklna.

COTTON, COFFBB, BRAIN, PROVISIONS

Wisner,

* 18 ExctaanKe Place, Nevr York.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

!•

Geo. H. McFadden& Bro.
OOITOV MEBOHAirXB,
PMII. AiDBIiFHIAa

BICHMOND, VA.
Standard Branda of Floor for Shipment to
Cllmatea always on hand.

Warm

SULPHUR MINEg COMPANY
OP VIRQmiA.

Spencer Turner,
SnCCBSBOR TO

Turner

A

Co.,

MANDFACTUlUCit AMU UEALKB IB

SAIL

DUCK
*e,

Aauraa

^^AJlU

aU Wldlha and

Wo. 109

Co.,

NEW YORK, BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA
Bbllino aoemts fob Lbadiho Bkasds

and BLEACHED SHIRTING
and 8UEETING8,
PRINT8, DENIMB, TICKS, DDGKB, 40.
Towola, Qullte, White Gooda and Hoslerr.
Dnu$, Sketting; ,te.,
Export Trade,

W

Geo. Copeland

&

Co.,

129 PEARI.

STREET, NEUT

Cahoone

CO.

&

Co.,

POST, Banker,

State,

ST., H.

*

Conntr aad City Bonds.

Hatch

&

Foote,

nPINE STREET NEW YORK

INTESTMENT SECURITIES
American Exchange Bank
•

MO.

8300,000 Murplus,
I

PBTBR NICHOLSON,

•

S313.00V

PresldenU

ALYAH MAN8UK, Vice-President.
WALKER HILL. Casbler.

We aend dibwit to every

banking point In Mo.

WM. FRANKLIN HALL
BOOKS

ACCOUNTANT '*^^iTKD

New forma dealgned for booka of
Sattletrwnt of

tlS zeliange Building, 68

Fifth

aoconnt.

Ituolvmt EttaUt,

Bute

Street Boeton.

Avenue Hotel,

IdadUon Square, NEIV YORK,

COTTON BBOKEK8,

YORK

The largest, beat-appolnted and moat llberallr
managed hotel In the city, with the moat central
and delightful location.

HITCHCOCK. DARLING A

Wescott,

Membera New York Stock Exchange,

18

Colore. alwaya in

»«• atra*u

&

apedaltj.

CAB COTKBIMG. BAQQINQ,
BATBNB DUCK, BAIL TWIHB,
"AWNUJa" BTBIPB8.
anpply.

Fabyan

Cotton landed at Mills from Southern Markete

AMD AU. KUTDB 0>
OOTTOM CANYAB FELTINQ DDCK,

DHITED BTATE8 BDMTING

Bliss,

CO.

BROWN

HUth-Orade Prrltes. free from Ara

T.

ST. LOUIS,

VRBDERIG ZEREGA *

&

DREXEL BUILDING. BROAD

Capital,

UvnuraoL oomuupoKDint,
CO.,

Exchange Court,

BDCCBSaORB TO

and Prodnce Bzch'a.

AaBNCT OF

COTTON

New York, Chicago AUverpool

1

E. D. Shepard

AND

STOCKS.

BiinckerliofT,

Co.,

Private WIree to Boston and Pblladelpbte,

COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING, NEW
YORK, and NORFOLK, VA.

THE HAXALL CRENSHAW

&

NEW YORK.

AUG.

W. D. Rountree &

Orders exeonted in

J.

No.

Special attention K'ven to orders for cotton for
foreign or aomestlo shipment.

MEW YOaK.

NVW TOBK

of the Cotton. CoOee

Lapsley

BANKERS AND BROKERS,

ax William Street,

C0MM1S8I0M MERCHANTS,

Membera

Howard

ChnrleHCon, 8. C.

Oil,

BOBTHBKH FRODDGB

&

HIGH GRADE INTESTMENT8

COTTON aXCHANGB BUUiDINa

Aao

Crenshaw

BOSTON, MASS.

NBW YOBK PRODDCB BXCHANOB and
tbe

O. BLOSS & CO.,
J.
& Co., COTTON MERCHANTS,

OOTTOM. VOTTOM8BBD

(tsttaToa C. Eopklna.
Otaariea D. Miller.

Alao ordera for

PBICb, K.K1D tfc CO.,
Norfolk, Va.
«
PKICE, KEIII & AUA:HS, Limited.

Bpedal attention glren to correspondence with InMrlor Cotton Merobanta and Buyen jTor tbe porllUM and tale of Cotton both on apot and for fatnre

Hopkins, Dwight

Co.,

vances made on cotton consignments.

LIVERPOOL.

••• Sit. Cotton

OB-

GRAIN AND PROTISIONS
at the

&

H. Prince

BANKERS AND BROKERS,

NBW TOBK, LIYBBPOOL AND NBW

COFFEE

Maucheater, and at principal Oottou Centre*
on the Continent.

BsTannahand

York.

COTTON

M In New Orleani, Chloago and torelm markeu,
TRADBB *

New

16 to 33 \irilllam Street,

ZBODTB ORDERS FOB FUTDBB DBLIYBBT F.
LBANS COTTON BXCHANOBB.

Orden ezeoated on tbe at>ore EzetianKes

Co.,

COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

at the

NEW YORK.

&

Henry Hentz

No. 40 Exchanere Place,

MEMBERS OF THE STOCK, COTTON, COFFEE AND FRODDCE EXCHANGES,
New Yobk.

Sons,
New Yorfe,

6 Wall St,

I>6al6n In inrestment stocks and bon<ls.
Personal attention fflren at the N. T. Stook Bz.

Ne^v York.

tiSHMAN, DUBB & GO.i
Montgomerr. Ala.

Orleani, La.

&

ebanKe forthe paroliase and sale on oommlssion of
stocks and bonds for cash or on margin.
Interest allowed on deposits, subject to draft at

00TT05 OF AU- GRADES BUTTABLE TO
WAMT8 OF AMEBICAH SPINNERS.

New

&

T. Hatch

96 Broadway

22 WILLIAM STREET,

LMBILAX, 8TIBN * CO„

JEfoteA,

Arlhur Mtlvin HateM
Henry Praeott Uateti,
Members of N. Y. Stock and Produce Bxofaangea.

WALI. STREET.

OoTernment and iBreBtment Bonds.
Btooki sDd Bonda Boocbt and Bold on Oonmtwiaii.

00.

Massasoit House,
SPRINGPIEIiD, niANN.
THB BBBT-APPOINTED H0D8B IN WBSTHBN

NEW ENGLAND.

Convvilent for the tonrljt or bnalneas man. Near

Union OepoU

W. B. OHAPIN.

I


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102