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W

HUNT'S MERCII.O'TS' MAGAZINE,
aapaasBNTTiNo thh; [ndustkial
Entert

MoordtTig to Ant of ()on«TeaH,

(1

VOL

In tli«

and oommkkoial intbrksts

SATURDAY. 0(;TOBER

55.
3i:!hc

l»«w York

Satfof—

do.
...£110e.
The Investors' Supplkment of 160 pafieH Is issued every other
month, on the last 8»ttirdnysor Jannnry. March, May, July, Bei'tomber
knd Novemlier, and furnished without extra charge to all gubscribors
of the ("HKoNici.E (or six muiith.s or longer.
The Statk and ('itv Siii'ri.hMKNT of 184 pages is also given to every
yeartf/ sub^oi iber of the Ciiromoi.p'.
SuliscriptiiiDs will Ik" continued until definitely ordered stopped.
The publtslicrs rannot be responsible for reniittaooes unless made by
drafts or Vost Otllce money orders.
File covers arc sold at 50 cents each, and to new suhscrlbers for a

rear one

flic

covei

la

supplied without charge

;

postage on the same

is

B cents.

Terms of AdTertislnir— (Per
Onetime
One Month
Two Months

Incli space).
$3 50 Tliree Months (13 times). .$25 00
" ).. 43 00
II 00 Six Months
126
18 00 ll-welve Months (52 " ).. S8 00
London Airents:
I

(4 times)..
" )..
(8

Messrs. Edwari>8 A SMirii, 1 Prapors' Gardens, E. C, will take suberlptioiiB and advertisements, and supply single copies of the paper
at Is. each.
Co.jPnblinheri),
viiLiAM B. DANA C'Wll«l>IAm B.
WILLIAM B DANA.\
Street,
j^^^
JOBK O. FLOYD.
poST OFFICB BOX 958.
(

DANA &

winiam

29, 1892.

NEW YOHK.

tkarM.)

(Stoekt

tCotton

bnlt*.}

(Orain
(P«t roltum

biuJuU.}
bbU.')

Boston
ProTldenoe....

Hartford

New Haven
;4

prlntftle.il

Worcester
Portland..,

Lowell
Now Bedford
Fall Bivor^

Total

New Bngland..

Pblladelpbta.
PIttsbarK

Baltimore
BulTiito

WaBtlinitton
Kocbester.
rlrracuae

WllmlDKton....
BInKhamtoD....

Total Mlddl*

Chicago
Ctnclonatl

MllwankM

CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.

Detroit

The following table, made up by telej^raph, etc., indicates
that the total bank clearinp^s of all the clearinK houses of the
United States for the week ending to-diy, October 89, have
been $l,302.in3,287, against $1,178,064,809 last week and
11,187,108,487 the corresponding week last year.

Cleveland
Columt>as

iDdluu polls
Peoria
liraod Kaplda
l,»itni{t.oa

Saalnaw

Toul Mlddl* Westers
tan Franotaco,
Portland,

Wtik, BntUu) October S9.

OLEAKINOft
Bttunu by TfU^apK

•talt

1891.

1892.

Per 0ml.
+1.1-2

Phllkdelphla
Baltimore

72.8;3,vni
12,'93,418

»5M.267.)>52
78.747.084
66,081.260
11,300.000

OhleaRo
Bt. Louis
Orleans

93.^69,0ll0

74.07'.',0l)O

+2.' 3

21.616,9:4
7,994,441

18,389,807
9,12S.6t6

+ 17

$922,7^6,310

(71^9,583,824

150,1)17,219

lfil,0I7,903

fl,C78.7<3,6lB
223.419,768

(960.601,730
216,606.767

+136

$1,167,10>),4.H7

_+ll-6

ITaw York...........
Boaton

f624,09P,380
89,809,286

aw

Seven cities, 6 days
Other cities, 6 days
Total all cities, 6 days...
All cities, 1 day
,

Total

The

all cities for

week..

Tl,802,168,287

full details of clearings for

the

+:4-2
+29-8
+18-2
7

-134
+15-4
+3-8
+3-2

week covered by

the

Lake

City.

'ieattle

Vticoma
{.on Autieles.

Great Kalli.
llHlena*.....

Spokane*
Total Paoiflo

Kansas City
^linuea polls
-t.

Haul

omaba
IJunver

Oalntb
Joseph

^t.

ties

Moloes

Wlotalta
Ltuo«>la

Topeka
Total Othar Wastam..

above statement will be given next Saturday. We cannot, of
them to-day, bank clearing being made up by
the various clearing houses at noon on Saturday, and heuce in
the above the last twenty-four hours of the week have to be
in all cases estimated, as we go to press Friday night.
Below are our usual detailed figures for the previous week,
that is covering the returns for the period ending with Satur-

Kort Wortb.

day noon October

BlrmlMhasa

•ourse, furnish

with the comparative totals in 1891, It
will be noticed that contrasted with the preceding week there
is only a slight gain in the total of clearings, notwithslandmg
the more geufral observance of the holiday which occurred on
In comFriday last than that of the previous Wednesday.
parison with the corresponding period of 1891, which covered
a full business week, the exhibit is very satisfactory, the loes
in the whole country being but 0-6 per cent, while outside of
New Yi rk there is an increase of 2-0 per Cent. Our statement
lia* been further extended b;^ including Fall River and Sagi22,

.

NO.
cities in

1,427.
the Uaitod

IFmIi

do.

do.

thk umitkd statbb.
oahtnitMB. O. d

naw, and it now embraces sixty-nine
States and four in Canadt.

Chronicle.

Terms of Subscription—Payable In Advance:
For One Yenr
flO 00
ForSlx Moutli8
6 00
Eiiinix'an Siilmcrlptlon (IncliulInK imiitnffel
12 00
EurniioHii Sub.icrlminn 81x Months (innludinir postng^.
7 00
Aniiiiiil SubHcriptfon In London (IncludinK i>08tase)....S2 10a.
Six Mo8.

op*

A Oo., In tlM oOoe of tha Ubiwrlui of OongiM*,

roar 1893, by Wm. B. O411A

St. iKinIs

.New Orleans
t,oaiavllla
tialvflstua

lloasioD

KIcbmond
'^jftVKUuab

lAemptaia
Niubvllla
\ilanta
Norfolk
Uiillaa

Waco
'h»tl«DO<ii(a..,.

JaoksouvUla*....

Total

Soatbam

Total

all

OaUlda New York
Uontraal
Toronto
Uallfas
UaatUton

VotalOauda.
Mot moladed la totAla.
'

U,0i3.>2:i

'

"

0nrt OM.

u

THE CHRONICLE.

702

There seems

THE

STAT£

yiTIJ)

CITY

interior

Jitf/k^Wtm.

See pages 734, 735, 736, 737, 73§ and 739
fitate

for our

rates

[VOL. LV.
to

have been a

drawn more money to thisAs a consequence our banks are feeling that

ruling here have

centre.

their position

is

a

little

better assured.

ing this fact the market for call

and City Department.

from~ the
the high

less active call

for currency this week, wliile also

Notwithstand-

money has been

active,

not so much however because of the low bank reAll advertisements with relation to State and City Bonds
serves as for the reason that borrowers have generally
will likewise be found on the same and following pages.
declined to renew time loans maturing this week at the
current rate, and therefore some of

TITB

them have been

re-

sorting to the call loan branch of the market for the

FINANCIAL SITUATION.

time being; we learn also that other borrowers hav&
becoming been able to renew maturing loans in Boston and Philamore absorbing, and for the time being there is a dis- delphia on better terms than demanded here. Tho
Some
position in financial circles to put off new undertakings. future of the market is a little uncertain.
prevail.
must not be interpreted as meaning that the cus- anticipate that easier rates will now
We
correct,
but
it
seems
tomary ante-election lethargy prevails. Nothing of the This view may prove
kind is observable ; on the contrary, general businesi early to anticipate an end to the demand from
South, especially since the cotton crop is so
is active, manufacturers as a rule are fully occupied, the
while many departments are fairly profitable, consump- late that it has only just begun to move in any considIndeed erable volume. Then, as regards the West, the embargo
tion in some cases being ahead of production.
it is as true now as it has been of the earlier weeks and in the marketing of wheat may in part account for a
months of the canvass, that the country has seldom, if temporary lessening in the requirements of that secInterest

in

the approacliing election

is

ever, engaged in a Presidential contest with less inter-

ruption to business occurring.
fact, it is still true that

But while

Wall Street

is

this

is

the

just at present

tion.

prise

Moreover, another influence interrupting enterto induce a

and which may consequently tend

short period of greater quietness in

money everywhere

more conservative, and showing an may be the near approach of the election. It should
evident disinclination to engage in fresh enterprises. be remembered also that it was the large decline in deIn ten days more the problem will be solved, and what- posits that increased the bank reserves last Saturday^
ever be the result the restraint we have noted will, we besides, notwithstanding the increase, the banks rebecoming a

little

may

ported only 12,332,425 surplus, whereas five of tho
assume, be removed.
notable occurrence of the week has been larger institutions held $3,045,900 surplus.
Money on call, representing bankers' balances, ha»
the culmination of the rapid marketing of produce in
a grain blockade. We have often spoken of the phe- loaned at 7 and at 3 per cent, averaging about 5^. Re-

The most

nomenal movement

of produce during the past

three

months. An evidence of the eagerness of farmers to
hasten forward their crops has been the almost constant complaint of a lack of cars which has conee from
the Northwest; there were too few cars because more
grain was moving than ever before more even than

—

last year

when

crops were so exceptionally large.

At

newals have been

made

at 6 per cent

trust companies quote this

figure as

and banks and
the

minimum.

good supply and the offerings ar»
increasing.
The demand is fair but objection is made
by borrowers as noted above to the ruling rates which
are 5 per cent for thirty days and 6 per cent for all
In commercial paper busidates beyond that period.
ness is a little more active, there being a limited demand
by the city banks, while a moderate out-of-town inquiry
The supply is very fair, but not
is still maintained.
large, and it should increase from this time forward
as is customary in the settlement of fall purchases.
Rates are 5^ per cent for sixty to ninety day endorsed

Time money

is

in

seems that the elevators are nearly
filled and the announcement comes from Chicago
that there
are
at
present
in
the
yards of
that city thousands of cars loaded with grain and
small place to store it.
Statements of much the same
character are made with regard to the cities farther
west, and indeed the East is in but little better shape, bills receivable
5i@6 per cent for four months
the New York Central Eailroad having posted Thurs- commission house names, and 6@6ii- per cent for
day on the Produce Exchange of this city 216,000 good single names having from four to six months
bushels of wheat for which there was no room in to run.

length, however,

it

;

the owners that they must take
would be "put afloat," which means
shifted
from cars to boat.
So great is the
congestion that the leading roads of the Northwest are now reduced to almost no available cars
for the freight offering, some of them having been
forced even to issue orders to take no more new freight
at present they cannot move it and they could not
ita elevators, notifying

care of

it,

store

if

or

it

—

it

they could move

it.

As a

result

of this

There was some expectation in London at the close
week that further withdrawals of bullion from.
the Bank of England would necessitate another advance in the Bank rate, although it was thought possible
Russia and Austria might abate their demands, as both
During
countries are supposed to want to float loans.
this week tha Rothschilds have obtained £1,000,000 ia
the open market for Russia, and this appears to have
relieved the situation somewhat, for the cable reof last

ninety-day bank
to
discounts
which were already ported
of sixty
ruinously low, further declined. It would seem as if bills in London on Thursday at 2^ per cent ; but
Talues must have reached a point at last to arrest yesterday the
was higher again, the cable
rate
rapid marketing. European consumers probably need reporting it at 2| per cent.
An Associated Preu
state of affairs prices

of wheat,

our surplus this year ; they will get it for next to cable says that according to the St. Petersburg
nothing while our producers will net a very small re- Bourse Gazette, the Russian Government has on deposit
turn for their year's labor. When Congress meets we £10,000,000 in London, £4,000,000 in Germany, and
shall probably hear that " option sales " are the cause £5,000,000 in Paris;
the Gazette adds that these
mi the low prices.
figures show that Russia is not in urgent need of a loan.
all

October

Tho

THE CHRONICLE.

29, 1892.]

open market rate at

Paris

is 2| per cent,
at
Frankfort it is 3 per
cent.
Yesterday the Bank of Germany adTanoed
its rate to 4 per cent,
the rise probably being
due to withdrawals of gold, presumably for Austria and Russia.
The Bnnk of England, according
to our special cable, lost £249,921 bullion during the
eek ; this, as our cable aho advises us, was due to tho
export of £753,000 (of which £500,000 were to Russia,

Berlin Sj

])cr

cent and

TOS'^

at

The Chesapeake

9c

Ohio

in iti

September itatement

£130,000 to Egypt and £123,000 to other points),
the import of £11,000 from China and the receipt of

furnishes further evidence of tho fact that the iio«

against cotton and breadstuffa and by a few loan drafts.
The operations of the arbitrage houses hare made little

September 1891, resulting in a gain in net of $64,331.
For the three months from July 1 to September 30

provement expenditures which were such a feature ia
£492,000 from the interior of Great Britain. The the reports of the year preceding, no longer inflaenoe
Bank of France gained £48,000 gold, and since the last results to the same extent. In other words, it is found
report the Bank of Germany shows an increase of about possible to reduce expenses because of the elimination
of some of the heavy payments of that character. Thai
jE288,000 of this metal.
Foreign exchange has been actire and lower this with an increase of $41,125 in gross receipts, expenaes
week, influenced by offerings of commercial bills for September 1892 are reported $23,206 less than for

Compared with Thursday of last gross earnings have increased $130,881, while expeniea
week the market opened on Monday at unchanged have been diminished $71,097, raising the net earnfigures.
On Tuesday the Bank of British North ings from $767,154 in 1891 to $959,132 in 1893.
America reduced long to 4 84, and the Bank of Mon- Against the net of $959,132 the fixed charges for the

or no impression.

treal lowered this rate to 4 84^, leaving the short rate

at 4 87.
long to

On Wednesday Baring, Magoun & Co.
4 84 and short to 4 86^, while the

reduced

Bank

of

quarter were about $700,000,
$259,000.

leaving a

The Chicago Burlington & Quincy

for

surplui o£

September

presents a pretty good return, though heavy expenditures are still a prominent feature, gross earning!
having increased $422,462 and net earnings only $105,-

Xorth America lowered the sight rate to 4 86^.
On Thursday the Bank of Montreal reduced long to
4 84, and yesterday Brown Bros. & Co. reduced the
«ity-day rate to 4 83^, the market closing quiet 323. For the nine months to Sept. 30 gross earning!
and steady at 4 83^ to 4 84 for sixty-day and 4 86^ have increased $4,900,713 and net earnings $744,769.
British

Rates for actual business were After deducting the fixed charges the surplus for the
4 85i to 4 86 for short, 4 86 stock for this period is $2,564,226, against $1,952,772 for
to 4 86i for cable transfers, 4 82 to 4 82^ for prime the corresponding time in 1891. The Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul for the month is not able to make a
and 4 81f to 4 82 for documentary commercial bills.
very favorable statement, there being a decrease of
The Pennsylvania Railroad statement of earnings for
September will probably be regarded as disappointing. $214,951 in net earnings, entirely because of an increase
gain in earnings was looked for as the result of the in expenses. For the three months, however, from
heavy passenger traflic connected with the Grand Army July 1 to September 30, net earnings are $97,057 better
The Philadelphia & Reading
Encampment at "Washington ; instead of that we have than for last year.
a loss. In the Baltimore & Ohio case, as was seen last return for September has also been issued, and
For
week, there was a noteworthy increase. But it is to be we have obtained the results by telegraph.
remembered that the so-called lines east of Pittsburg the Coal & Iron Company there is a loss of $445 620
and Erie, on which the Pennsylvania's monthly re- in gross receipts but a gain of $69,673 in net receipts.
turns are based, do not include the line to Washington, The Railroad Company shows $39,962 increase in gross
to 4 87 for sight.

4 82J

to 4 83 for long,

A

and hence the

increase on that part of the system does

not appear in the figures furnished. Mora ver, this extra passenger traffic had the effect of interrupting the
coal movement for a time on part of the system, and with
the Pennsylvania of course the coal traffic is a very important i tem. Finally the gains in earnings both last year

and the year before on the Eastern lines had been very
large— 1379,218 last year and $351,606 in 1890—so that
the comparison is with very heavy totals. It is proper
to state that in the net results last year the showing

had been less satisfactory, though the year before there
was quite a considerable gain.
The loss in gross the
present year

is

not large, being only $61,533, but as

was attended by an augmentation

it

of $131,848 in ex-

and $15,595 increase in net.
The Lehigh Valley
figures are for August and exhibit an improvement of
$20,328 in gross and of $41,148 in net.
The Central
of New Jersey, which is now operated by its own
officials, for September
shows $71,660 increase in
gross and $63,680 increase in net.
The New York
Susquehanna & Western, another anthracite coal road,
reports gross increased from $158,124 to $163,932
and net from $71,295 to $76,441. We also hare
the September statement of two of the Pennsylvania
Railroad anthracite coal companies, namely the Summit Branch {and the Lykens Valley. The combined
gross receipts of the two companies are $225,679 for
1892 against $179,248 for 1891, and the combined net

is $193,381.
On the Western earnings $33,976 against a
an increase of $108,562 in gross eirnings, 1891 of $13,156.

penses, the loss in net
lines there

but a

still

is

heavier increase in expenses ($163,657), thus

The

together a loss of $1,154,718.
The following is our
asual coonparative statement for the Eastern lines.

below expenses for

made np from returns colshows the week's receipts and shipments
of currency and gold by the New York banks.
lected

following statement,

by

us,

On the Eastern and
Western system combined therefore the loss in net
reaches *i248,476.
For the year to date there is a deW-k mn4tt>t Octotm
crease in net on the Eastern lines of $952,463, and a
decrease on the Western lines of $202,256, making Oomnor..
leaving a loss in net of $55,095.

deficit

W.

ISSt.

Total cold ajia Iei[»l tanders...

S.T. Baola. N. r. Bank*.
•4,118.000
BJO.0OO

•3.un.uou
I.SM.0OII

(4.810.0001 •1.7>)0.0«M> Gala.

*8«8,oie

7AaMe
•ItS.i

.

THE CHRONICI.E.

704
With the Sub-Treasury

operations, the result

M

is

WuH

Ending October

Out Of

Into

28, 1892.

Banka,

Baiikt.

»4.700,000 Sain.
13.300.0O0!Lo98.

«116,00C
SOO.OOf

»17,616.000 Sia.OOO.OOO LoaB.

tSJA.OOC

»4,8ie,O0O
12,800,000

SaDknMnteTlnr movement, as above
Sub-TreaBnry opei-atlons
Total golrt

1*11 <1

iearal

tendera

.

-

SttOhanfin
Bank HoUUtut.

Bullion holdings of European banks.

Sold.

Total.

*

t

0oia.

Silser.

i

Sillier.

S

Geroaany

10.730.liOO 1B.909.1100

XMlierlauds..
If at. B'lKlnin

27,839,0ij0

3,187,000

8.992.000

10.159.000

3.046.000

AaK.-Bnn'T

Total.

1.623,000

1,689.000

22 224 062

22.224.062

62,544,fKK) 49.998.0011 102,642

.101

33.832.500 11.277 500
6.485.000 18,767.000
3.554.000 B.104.000

46,110.i>0C'

1.389.33:>

101

2.773,867

22,212,001

9,658
4.188

ilOf

85[525.8i:f 205.944,082
Vot.thli week 141,978.619 R7i60f,858 229,584,875 120,418.2^9
ot. prey, w'k 141.H0«,378 »7,625,S97 229,231,775 121.0H2.0«8 86.423.333 20e,4s5,101

THU BOSTON & MAINE— READING
ALLIANCE.
Obviously an alliance such as that perfected this
week between the Reading, the New York & New
England and the Boston & Maine opens up possibilities
The
of great advantages to all the roads concerned.
would really appear
only point regarding which there
to be any question is as to how far these advantages
of, or realized, without danger of incurring the opposition of other roads, either within or
without the combination. We are bound to suppose
that the parties interested have carefully considered

can be availed

as

well

and

as every other phase of the matter,

also that their policy will be

to

conciliate rather than

to antagonize competing interests,
transportation of coal

the

especially in

—for under any other policy

the

anthracite coal combination would speedily be disrupt-

ed

—and

skill

yet in the carrying out of

and ingenuity

will

their plans

more

probably be required to guard

against missteps in that direction than against troubles
from any other source. To say this, however, is not
taking.

not only a powerful railroad

—say roughly 4J

million souls,

;

COAL CONSUMPTION

IN

CEXgUS VEAR 18S9.

Bituminout.

Anthracite.

Totai.

Ton*.

Maine
is

England States in 1890 had »

and the conclusion seems warranted that now the numThat geographical division
ber is about five millions.
also embraces some of the largest and busiest manufacturing centres in the whole country. Pennsylvania,
New Jersey and New York, in which the lines in the
Reading coal combination are situated, likewise embrace large manufacturing districts, but the products
are mostly different from those turned out in the New
England States. It should be noted, too, that the three
Middle States mentioned have a combined population
(Censas of 1890) of 12,700,800. Wtien these facts are
stated, it becomes evident what a field for the profitable
interchange of business between the two sections exists.
But there is an added advantage in the fact that the
New England section possesses a peculiarity which disWhile it is
tinguishes it from other leading sections.
heavily in manufacturing and hence conengaged so
sumes large quantities of coal, it produces no coal
in a word it is obliged to get its coal from other
itself
To the roads in the Reading combination,
States.
which are miners, shippers and sellers of coal, this
means much. To afford an indication of the quantity
of coal consumed by the New England section, we have
made up the following statement from statistics conInformation of
tained in one of the Census bulletins.
this kind is of course very dilBcalt to obtain, hence we
do not assume the figures are exact,, and yet they are
probably close enough to answer for present purposes.

necessarily to imply doubts of the success of the under-

The Boston & Maine

New

population of 4,700,745

S

24,970.421
24.970.421
8r.21h.848 51,233.608 118.152.454
82.848.250 10.948.750 43,796,000

Bngland.

jMooe

this

companies on behalf of the
each gets in full the benefits to result from the
joint operation of the properties, but it gets no more.
As far as the Reading is concerned, the object of
course is to furnish it a hold on the New England
section for the interchange of traffic and the development of business. It must be admitted the field is an
According to the last United States
inviting one.
;

Census, the six

October 29, 1891.

OclobtT 27, 1892.

Banltof

LV.

gations by one of the
others

follows.

fVOTi.

New HampsMre
Vermont

system of large mileage, extending over four of the
Total
New England States, but its operations have been at- Massachusetts
tended with a large measure of success, dividends at a Rhode Island

Tom.

Tom.

318,754
352,244
185,183

580,232
834,569
373,891

S9S986

856,I'^6

1,2^8,692

2,144,878

3,274,133
533,498
964,967

6,396,060

686,813
559,079

high rate being paid on the stock of the company. The

Counectioul

3,121.927
505,017
935,533

experience of the New York & New England has not
been so fortunate, but the road will afford access to
many points in Southern New England, and will be
especially serviceable in connection with tlie Hartford
& Connecticut Western and the roads in the Pough-

Total

4,562,477

4,772,598

9,335,075

5,418,663

6,061.290

11,479,953

keepsie Briiige route.

no actual union

It will be

noted that there is
According to

of the different roads.

the accounts authorized by the

p.irties in interest,

those

holding control of the Reading have bought control of
the Boston & Maine and the New York & New England, and the three systems being thus under the same
ownership will be operated in close alliance, but other.

wise will retain their separate existence.

In other words

Ornnd tota l

1,03-*,515

1,900,500

Acouiding to this Statement, no less than 11,479,953
tons of coal were consumed in the six New England
States in the Census year 1889, about six million
tons being anthracite and about 5^ million tons bitumPractically the whole of this was supplied
inous.
from outside the New England section, as the only
State in that section which produced any coal in the
same year was Rhode Island, and that produced only
As the above figures relate to 1889, the
2,000 tons.
present consumption it is fair to assume is even larger.
Here then is a very important market for the product

no lease, no consolidation, no guaranty of in- of the anthracite companies. Of course it is not a
terest, no exchange of stock or bonds.
Whether profit- new market, that is it is a market which the Reading,
ing by past experience the Reading people have pursued together with the other companies, already supplies,
this policy so as to avoid a recurrence of the troubles but that does not make it any the leas important.
encountered in the case of the Lehigh Valley and the Moreover, under the expansion of population and the
Central of New Jersey, or whether other reasons have growth of manufacturing activity in New England,
influenced them in their action, the present plan is cer- there must be a steady increase in consumption from
tainly entirely removed from criticism.
It not only year to year, and this alone is an item of considerable
thwarts efforts at interference by the interposition of consequence. Not only that, but if the coal be suplegal obstacles, but involves the assumption of no obli- plied cheap enough no doubt room can probably be

there

is

OcTOUB

39,

THE CHRONICLE.

18M.]

706

found for increased quantitieB of anthracite in
with tlie Reading, Boston & Maine
New England working together, every facility and
vantage moat assuredly exists for furnishing

any traffic. It is a mistake, too, to aHume that coal ii tb*
and only business involved. As was said above in speaking of
ad- the population and manufacturee of New England and
coal the Middle States, the field for the interchange
cheap.
of traffic and commodities between the two sections ia
In addition, some traffic can doubtless be diverted to a large one, and a direcst all-ratl route will facilitate
the Reading route from some of the other routes to such interchange.
The New England States can send
New England. It ia this, however, that will call for the cotton goods, for instance, and in return receive iron
exercise of the greatest amount of care and good judg- and steel and manufactures of the same.
Then for
ment, for the difficulties attending such a movement are transporting paasengers between New England and the
necessarily very great, and the slightest mistake might South the new route will possess manifest advantages
At first thought it seems over that by way of New York. No doubt also a fair
lead to serious consequences.
a very simple matter to send coal destined for New traffic can be built up in the transportation of riw cotEngland over the newlj-formed Reading route rather ton from the South to the mills in New England, these
than over the older routes. But a little reflection will mills taking a large amount of cotton each year as ia
servo to show that there are obstacles in the way of known, and getting a good part of it by rail.
Much
such a course. Take for instance the transportation of has been said of the new route to be opened up between
coal to northern New England.
The Delaware & Boston and Buffalo and the great lakes by means of the
Hudson is vitally interested in that, having for years new alliance, but it strikes us that in that case the
supplied many of the markets in that section. route is very circuitous.
is
not probable that the Reading would seek
It
A feature of the alliance which will tend to disarm
to take any traffic away from that road, even if public criticism is that it does not partake of the nature
the Delaware & Hudson were not supposed to be of a monopoly. The Boston & Maine has a large mileage,
working in perfect harmony with the Reading combi- but there are other important systems outaide of its
nation, for in any circnmstances an attempt to deflect control, as for instance the Boston & Albany and the
traffic from that road would at once precipitate a conNew Haven already mentioned, besides the Old
flict, and that of course we may suppose the Reading
Colony, the Fitchburg, the Central Vermont, the
managers are desirous of avoiding above everything Concord & Montreal, &c. Whatever new business
else.
There are other powerful systems interested in therefore the Boston & Maine and the New York &
the coal or merchandise traffic of some part of New New England secure will be obtained in friendly
England which the Reading managers would also though active rivalry with a large number of
hardly wish to antagonize, if an understanding with competitors.
such roads does not actually exist and form part of the
present arrangement. The New York Central and
DWELLINGS
FAMILIES IN THE
Boston & Albany and the New York New Haven &
UNITED STATES.
Hartford might be mentioned among that class, the
It may be somewhat of a surprise to hear that the
latter road controlling now nearly all the rail routes
from Long Island Sound inland. In the matter of average number of persons to a family and also the
diverting traffic, therefore, the policy of the managers average number of persons to a dwelling in the United
Yet
will doubtless be to proceed slowly and with great cir- States have diminished during recent decades.
such is the conclusion emphasized by Census data.
cumspection.
It will be observed that in the table above we have stated The fact appears the more noteworthy in view of the
the coal consumption of the northern and the south- heavy immigration movement to the United States
ern half of New England separately. There are several which has occurred the foreign population being
reasons for this.
In the first place the greater part of usually more prolific than the native, as well as more
Boston & Maine mileage is situated in the northern closely huddled together and the decrease in the numthe
half, that is in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. ber of persons to a dwelling being especially remarkable
In the second place most of the New England manu- considering the increase in urban population, the
facturing industries are located in the southern half increase in the number of tenement houses and flats,
(Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut), and and also the increase in hotels, for under the designathe amount of coal consumed there consequently is very tion of a dwelling the Census includes hotels and boardmuch heavier than in northern New England, standing ing, lodging and tenement houses, as well as ordinary
The word family is also taken in its
in the relation of 9,335,075 tons to only 2,144,878 tons. dwelling houses.
Finally, the conditions under which coal is transported broadest sense, and includes not only the normal famevent, and

AND

—

—

to the States in southern

New En§|pnd

are different

from the conditions under which it is carried to northern New England the water route being so largely
used wholly or in part in the former case. Water
transportation of course is very cheap, and where the
Reading uses its Poughkeepsie Bridge route in competition with the water route, it will have to take the
traffic at low rates.
But even a low rate can be made
profitable provided the volume of tonnage ia large
enough, and of course there is always an advantage
arising from the avoidance of trans-shipment and the

—

ily, as

generally understood, but also

" all

larger aggre-

gations of people having only the tie of a
roof and table, as the

common

inmates of hotels, hospitals,

prisons, asylums, etc."

To a person

living in this city

who has not made

the fact that the average number of persons to a dwelling in the United
States as a whole is less than 5^ (5-45) will doubtless
a study of social statistics

come very much

as a revelation, since his observations
based on conditions here would certainly incline him
Of course conditions here
to a much higher estimate.

do not reflect conditions elsewhere, and yet it is qnite
Still, there are points to which the Bridge route will remarkable how little the averages for the various
form the shortest and most direct connection, and in political divisions differ from each other and from the

necessity of breaking bulk.

those cases that route

is

entitled to

and

will get the

common

average.

As would be expected, the Westera

.

THE CHRONICLE

706
division

and

—comprising in
States — shows the
this

Pacific

the

case

!^0L. LV.

far-Western and also the concentration of persons in hotels and

lowest average of

all,

apartment houses.

The average for New York City at 18-52, it will be
but even there the number to a dwelling is more
5-05.
North Atlantic divi- noted, is nearly 3^ times the average for the country
The
than five, namely
sion records the highest average of all, namely 5^ as a whole, and of course there is no other city that

—

These represent the two approaches this high figure.
The Census furnishes a
persons to a dwelling 5-87.
extremes, and the averages for the other leading divi- table to show the number of persons to a dwelling in.
That is, taking the each of 124 cities having in 1890 a population of
eion are comprised between them.
It appears from that table that
five geographical divisions into which the Census di- 25,000 or more.
vides the statistics, the average in no case runs up to 6 Hoboken stands next to New York in the large average
persons to a dwelling, and in no case quite down to 5
persons, while the average for the whole United States
The South
is Just about midway between the two.

number

of persons to a dwelling, the average in that

case being 12-80.

Holyoke shows 11-35 persons and

Fall River 11-20, but there are no other cities in the

Atlantic division shows an average which

is precisely list which run as high as 10 persons to a dwelling.
country (5-4:5 persons), In Chicago the buildings contain an average of 8-60
while the South Central has an average which does not persons, this comparing with 8-24 in 1880.
In St.
In the Louis the average is 7-41 against 8-15, in Boston 8-53
differ appreciably from the same, being 5 -47.

the same

as that for the entire

Korth Central

division the

number

of persons to

a

dwelling averages 5 'SS. Every division shows a lower
average than for 1880 and with one exception all have

against 8-26, in Baltimore 6-02 against

6-54, in

San

Francisco 6-34 against 6-86, in Cincinnati 8 '87 against
9-11.
Philadelphia reveals its characteristic as a city

lower averages also than for 1850. Such a general of homes, and shows an average of only 5-60 persons to
tendency both in the case of the newer and the older each dwelling, this comparing with 5-79 in 1880.
sections, in those with a dense population and in those About half the cities record a diminution between 1880
but sparsely settled, in those containing many large and 1890 in the number of persons to each dwelling.

As further illustrating Philadelphia's unique posiamong the largo cities, we may note that it has
In 1850 there were 5*94 persons to a dwelling in the 187,052 separate dwellings, which is one-half more
aggregate for the whole country; in 1880 the number than Chicago contains and considerably in excess of
was 5 '60; in 1890, as we have seen, but 5 '45. We omit the number possessed by New York and Brooklyn

cities

and those containing but few,

is

certainly note-

worthy.

tion

comparisons with 1860 and 1870, because in those
number of dwellings included both those
occupied and those unoccupied, while for 1850, 1880
and 1890 only the occupied dwellings were taken. In
the North Atlantic section the number of persons to
€ach dwelling in 1850 averaged nearly 6^ (6-31); by
1880 there had been a decline to 5*97, and by 1890 a
further decline to 5 "87. In the South Atlantic section
in the same intervals there was a decline from 5"71 and
5-49 to 5-45; in the North Central from 5-83 and 5-47
to 6-22, and in the South Central from 5-81 and 5-49
to 5"47.
In the Western division, with a total of only
41,891 dwellings in 1850 the average was 4-27; in 1880,
with 345,739 dwellings, the average had risen to 5-11;
in 1890, with the number of dwellings 599,836, the
average dropped slightly, to 5*05.

combined. In other words, while Philadelphia has 187,052 dwellings according to the Census, Chicago
hasonly 127,871, New York but 81,828, and Brooklyn 82,282, the last mentioned thus having more
buildings than this city.
Moreover, of the whole

years the

When we come
some higher

to the separate

States

we meet with

187,052 buildings in Philadelphia, 178,839
per

are

reported

or 95-61

comprise dwellings giv-

cent
to
ing shelter to not exceeding 10 persons each. In Chicago
only 75-46 per cent of the dwellings belong to that
class, in Brooklyn 70-35 per cent, in New York but

5018 per cent. That is to say, in this city about half
the number of buildings are occupied by over 10 perIn

sons each.

fact,

according to one of the tables in

the census compilation 28-83 per cent of the

ings (23,596 in
or

more

number) are houses

are lodged.

eights of

build-

which 31 persons
In Philadelphia less than threein

one per cent of the buildings

—

— only

675

and yet there are only three buildings all told out of 187,052 contain 21 persona
States altogether which average as much as six persons and over.
In Chicago the proportion of such buildto a dwelling, namely Massachusetts, Rhode Island ings is 4-78 per cent, and in Brooklyn 8-36 per cent.
and New York. The same three States also showed
Still more striking are the comparisons in the case of
averages,

the largest number of persons to a dwelling in the population. In New York 66-70 per cent of the entire
census of 1880 and in that of 1850. In the case of population 1,010,786 out of a total 1,515,301 is conMassachusetts the average declined from 6-51 in 1850 to tained in houses with 21 persons or more. In Chicago
ۥ34 in 1880 and 6-30 in 1890. For Ehode Island the only 182,875 out of 1,099,850 persons (16-63 per cent)
average was 6-59 in 1850, 6-68 in 1880 and 6-61 in 1890. live in that kii^ of houses ; in Philadelphia but
New York is one of the noteworthy exceptions where 35,660 out of 1,046,964 (3-41 per cent) ; and in Brookthere has been a marked increase, the number of per- lyn 207,250 out of 806,343, being 25-70. About fivesons to a dwelling having risen not only from 6-54 in sixths of New York City's population reside in houses
1850 to 6-58 in 1880, but further to 6-70 in 1890. The containing over 10 persons each. On the other hand,
high average for the Empire State, and also the increase not quite 57 per cent of Brooklyn's population, less
in that average during the last decade, are not dilEcult than 50 per cent of Chicago's, and hardly 13 per cent
to understand when we look at the figures for the lead- of Philadelphia's population is found in dwellings coning cities within its border.
The metropolis, for taining over 10 persons each. The facts are so inter-

—

instance, which in

1880 showed the large average of
16-37 persons to a dwelling, in 1890 had risen still
higher to 18-52.
Brooklyn during the decade has
increased its average from 9-11 to 9*80, Buffalo from
6-55 to 6-86 and Albany from 6-85 to 7-22. Thus
we see
reflected the growth of tenement house
population.

—

we present some

esting that

of

them

in tabular form.

mSTBIBUTION OF POPCLATIOK.

—

—

r~Phil'cWphia,-^ ^—Brooklyn.
Inhousea contain- r-New Yorlc.-^
Chicago.
Number. P. C. Number. P. C. Number. P.O. Number. P. C.
iTVlfrom—
913,078 87-21 819,632 43-36
250,008 WBO
688,927 6083
1 to !0 persons
938 249,681 SO'SS
98,228
11 to 20 persons
251,613 1880
368.048 32-65
3-*l 207,250 gf7Q
86,880
182,876 18-83
21 and over
1,010,788 66-70
,

v

.

.

Total

.1,616,301 100-00 1,099,860

10000 l,0ie,8M luOOO 800,343 lOO-tO

OCTOBKR

THE CHRONICLE.

29, 1893.]

707

New York which

have over 20 per- show that consolidations after the enactment of th*^
Inter-State Law had boon no more numerous than
dwellings containing from 21 to 30 porgona, 9,350 before the passage of that law ; on the contrarj
wore
dwellings containing from 31 to 50 persons, 6,460 from had been less numerous
and in support of that
61 to 100 persons, and 473 orer 100 persons. Among claim they presented a tabular statement prepared
other cities having a largo part of their population in under their direction of the yearly consoIidatioM
houses with over 20 persons, Jersey City has 23 "53 per from 1880 to 1888 inclusive, to demonstrate th©
Boston has only truth of the assertion made. The argument wa»
cent and Cincinnati 21 "92 percent.
13-93 per cent, Newark 10*25 per cent, St. Louis 10-14 intended as a reply to the criticisms current at tb*
per cent, Baffalo 8-09 per cent, and Providence 7-49 time that the new law and the rulings of the Commisper cent. In Baltimore but 2-55 per cent of the popu- sion under it were promoting the tendency to railroad
In fact, 85*87 per coisolidation.
lation is resident in such houses.
That several of
the provision*
cent of Baltimore's population is in houses having from of
the Inter-State
Law are calculated to have
1 to 10 persons, that city thus closely approaching that effect
admits of no question.
Manifestly,
Philadelphia in that respect.
however, it is impossible to determine the precise part
In reference to the number of persons to a family, played by tho Act in the consolidations which hav»
there has been a decrease for the United States in each occurred since its passage.
There are other influence*
and every decade since 1850, and the average is now affecting tho question aside from the operation
less than 5 persons to a family (4-93 persons), against of the
Inter-State Law.
Railroad consolidation*
over 6^ persons (5-55) in 1850.
This declining tend- were going on at a very lively rate before th»
of
that law, and especially in thd
ency is the more significant in view of the fact that the enactment
treatment of residents in hotels, etc., as members of a years immediately following the
resumption of
common family, ought to operate to increase the average, specie payments in 1879. That is one reason, too,
the number of yearlj
if there were not other causes at work to reduce the why a mere falling off in
average.
The same fact might incline one to think consolidations (if such could be proved to have
would not signify anything, since bethat the largest average per family would be found in occurred)

Of tho houses

in

•ons each, tho census found hj special tally that 8,313

;

many

the North Atlantic States, whereas the lowest average

cause of

found there, namely 4-69, while the South Atlantic
and the South Central are the ones showing' the really
high averages the one 5-25 persons to a family, and the
other 5 -30, and both recording an increase in the average
since 1880.
The North Atlantic with 4-69 persons to a
family and the North Central with 4-86 exhibit a decrease since 1880.
It is worth noting, too, that New
York notwithstanding its large hotel families, ete., has
a smaller number of persons per family than the country
4-84 against 4-93 and also smaller than
as a whole
Chicago (4-99), Philadelphia (5-10), St. Louis (4-92),
Boston (5-00), Baltimore (5-01), and San Francisco
(5-69), but Hot smaller than Brooklyn (472) where
hotels are not numerous.
With but few exceptions the

to that extent less

is

—

—

—

the

previous consolidations there i»

room for similar moves of the kind.
The Inter State Commerce Commission, in presenting^

to, accompanied it by the
owing to the annual additions to the railroad mileage of the United States, " there are each
" year more roads for consolidation, increased opportu" nities for absorption, new and greater inducement*
"for combination." But that was hardly a valid contention at the time it was made, when new railroad
construction was being prosecuted on a large scale, and

the statement above referred

remark

it

has

that,

force at the present time with

still less

road construction

As

down

new

rail-

to 4,000 miles or less a year.

a matter of fact, not only

to the country's mileage small

is the annual addition
now, but the most of it

average size of a family in the cities has decreased

represents branches, feeders or extensions to existing

since 1880.

roads,

and not the work of new companies. The Commission again recurred to the subject in their report for

THE TENDENCY TOWARDS RAILROAD
CONSOLIDATION.
Much

less is

heard

now about

the tendency towards

1890, but only to say that

"tionis

"no

still

active,

" the tendency

and the Commission

of consolid».
is

aware of

existing forces, legal or otherwise, that are at all

Of course " likely to bring it under control."
attempted on the
Whether consolidations now are more or are lesi
scale of that involved in the Reading combination, the numerous than before the Inter-State law, this latter
aet is sure not only to excite adverse criticism but view of the Commission that the tendency to consolidaactual opposition and hostility, as has been so clearly tion is still active is certainly amply supported by the
shown by the experience in that case. Bat it is not facts. So steadily is the absorption of the small and
railroad consolidation than a few years ago.

when an amalgamation

of interests

is

we have in mind. Those
magnitude attract public attention and
afford opportunity for press discussions.
There is another class of consolidations which, though not commanding the same degree of prominence, since they inthat class of consolidations

by

their very

Tolve smaller aggregates of mileage, operate just as
surely in the direction of the concentration of railroad

and the reduction of the number of independent roads. We refer to the absorption of the small
and minor lines into the larger systems, a process which
interests

while not

now

nevertheless

so

marked

as in

continues

some previous periods

—and

perhaps to a
greater extent than the ordinary observer imagines
to be the case.
steadily

The Inter-State Commerce Commission a few years
ago (see their annual report for 1889) attempted to

minor

going on, that one hardly realizes the
movement except when, in the compilation of statistics or in some other similar way, the matter is brought forcibly to one's notice.
In our work of
collecting the returns of earnings of United State*
railroads we are constantly made cognizant of the fact
that the movement continues actively in progress..
Hardly a month elapses but that some one or two or
more roads are eliminated from our statements for thatreason.
Of course the experience is not a recent one ;.
for years roads have been dropping out because of thesurrender of their identity by merger with other roads..
But for a long time the presence of that influence was
not revealed in our statements because in place of the
roads dropping out in that way we were able to get
returns from other roads which had previously refused
lines

extent of the

THE CHRONICLE.

708

to furnish exhibits of weekly or moBthly earnings.
Thus it happened that the number of roads embraced
in our statements not only did not show a decrease but
actually showed an increase, reflecting in this the

[Vou. LV.
Illinois Central.

New Orleann & Texas.
& Columbus.

Louisville

Dubuque & Sioux City.
Iowa Falls & Sioux City.

|

Natchez Jackson
Mississippi

it,

Cedar Falls & Minuesota.
Boutliern Division.

Teuneasee,
I

Atlantic

Atchison.
Gulf Colorado & Santa Fe.
St Louis Kansas City & Colorado.
St. Louis & ban Francisco.*

& Pacific.

industry displayed in extending the list. But now that Caliloruia Central.
California Southern.
the field has been thoroughly covered, and it is difficult
to obtain companies not already included, the dis- Columbus Rome.
Covington & Macon.
appearance of one or two roads a month becomes

I

I

Central of Gbiroia.
Chattanooga

<Jc

palpably evident in a diminution in the total number
of roads.

Reference to the compilation and review of gross
earnings for September, given in our issue of two weeks
ago, will serve to illustrate clearly the point we make.

The

compilation in question embraces only the roads

which furnish early returns of estimated gross earnings,
but from a comparative table given in that article it
will be seen that while our statement of earnings for

Cin.

Belma

I

I.ouiBVlIle Southern.
I
I

!

Jb
&

Denver Texas

&

Gulf.

& Nashville.
Anniston & Atlantic.
I

Atlantic.

CHESirpiiri.OHESAiEAKR

& Birmingham.

I

City.

Kentucky Central.

&

Mobile

Union Pacific.
Denver Texas & Fort Worth.
LoniBviLLE

Peusaoola

Columbui.

EiBT Tennessee.

& Mobile.

Rome & Decatur.

Oreeon Navigation.*
Fort Worth & Denver

Rome &

|

Anniaton

& Claclnnati.

Richmond & AlleghPny.

nnrn
OHIO

5
^ j,,,,,

^ g^^

Sandy.
New York Central
Ro'ne Watertown & Ogdensburg.
CHIC. Mil. & Sr. Paul
Milw.iukee & Northern*
Chic. & Northwestern... Milwauki^e Lake Shore & Weatern.
Cin. Ham. ADayton
Daytou Fort Wayne & Chicago.
Northern Pacific
Seattle Lake Shore <St Eastern.
^'"'^ Moiuea & Nortliern.
T)ira MOINES Nr>R x, Wi.kt'w >
UE8 MoTNHB NOR. & W11.8T N jjg, Moines & Northwestern.
J
Chic. Peoria & St. Lonis.. Jacksonville Southeastern.
j^g^

embraced only 77 roads, the statesame month of 1887 embraced 117 roads,
that for 1889 144 roads and that for 1890 151 roads.
On the other hand, during the last two years there has Missouri Kansas & Ti-.x. Kansas City & Paoiflo
Lake Erie & Wkstkrn
Fort Wayne Cincinnati & Louisville.
been a drop from 151 reads in September 1890 to 140 Alabama Great Southern Chattanooga Union.
Chicago i Indiana oal.
roads in September 1891 and now a further drop to Chic. & East Illinois
Dm 80. SHORE & Atf mrrr Detroit Mackinac & Marquette,
139 roads in September 1892.
Some persons not DDL. Hn Shobf * Atlantic j Marquette Houghton A Outonagon.
Ki-K citt Ft S. & MEMPH.
familiar with the actual facts of the case have con- KAN. CtTY * t. s X, Mrvph ^ Kansas f:ity Fort Scott & Gulf.
Kansas City Spriugrteld & Memphis.
strued this falling off in these two years in the number Chic. Rook Island & Pac. Dea Moiues & Port Dodge.
(Chic. Wiaconsin & Minnesota.
of roads reporting as an indication of a disposition on Wisconsin Central
< Wisconsin & Minncsotn.
CMinn>?sota St. Croix & Wisconsin.
the part of the managers to withhold the returns of
Cin. Jacks & Mackinaw.. Michigan & Ohio.
earnings.
The truth is, only a very few, and these B^-^-'^OHio
^Si^I^/n^S^lliland.
mostly
minor
roads, can be
classed as having
* Still reported separately.
dropped out for that reason
and except for
There should be no misunderstanding as to what this
the fact that so many roads which formerly reported
statement represents. It is not an attempt to show the
separately now have their earnings included in those of
other joads (having been merged in such roads and consolidations that have occurred during the last five
An exhibit of that kind would
their identity dissolved), the total number of roads re- years far from it.
have to cover a great deal more ground. We have
porting for 1892 would be even larger than for the month
in 1890.
Proof of this is furnished in the totals of earn- simply aimed to throw light on the tendency to consolings and miles of road.
Both are much larger than in idation by going over our statements of earnings dur1890, notwithstanding the number of roads is less. Tlie ing the last five years and noting the roads which durSeptember

ment

1886

for the

. .

i

i

5

;

—

151 roads reporting in 1890 had aggregate gross e trn- ing that period have passed into the control of others,
ings of only $43,381,520 the 139 roads embraced in or which have been so completely merged in others
1892 had an aggregate of $50,371,964. Still more con- iliat their earnings are combined with the same and no
The exhibit we think will be
clusive are the totals of mileage, for they show that longer stated separately.
the aggregate extent of road covered now is larger than found very interesting, and especially in showing what
before in 1890 the mileage was 89,793 miles, in 1892 large numbers of roads have passed into the control of
with twelve less roads it was nearly three thousand miles a few prominent corporations. Take the Cleveland
heavier, or 92,610 miles.
la other words, notwitn- Cincinnati Chicago & St. Louis, which has been develBtanding the falling off in the number of roads, the oped into a Vanderbilt system of considerable importance covering the Middle Western States. This was
compilations are more comprehensive than ever.
We have gone back over our records five years, to formed in 1889 by the consolidation of the Cleveland
;

;

1887, to see what roads have disappeared from our
earnings statements in this interval by reasou of lease,

Columbus Cincinnati & Indianapolis, the Cincinnati
Indianapolis St. Louis & Chicago and the Indianapolis

merger or consolidation, and must confess that we are & St.
a little surprised ourselves to find ho vv extensive the dusky
list

is.

We

give

it

below.

The names

inside

the

brackets, or which are given in double

columns, are
have been absorbed, the
names outside the brackets, or which are printed in
capital letters over the top, show the roads by whom
they have been absorbed. A few lines, while having
passed into the control of others and thus lost their
independent existence, still report earnings separately
those of

the

roads which

;

we have designated by a star.
Clev. Cix. Chic. & 8t. Louis.
Obv. Ool. Cln. & Ind.
Cairo Vinoennea & Ohlc.
Oln. Ind. 8t Louis & Ohio.
Cin. WabaeU & Mich.
IndUnapoUs & 8t. Louis.

these

Louis, and

&

since

then

the

Cincinnati

Cleveland, the Cairo Vincennes

the Cincinnati

Eastern have
the Peoria

&

Wabash & Michigan and

&

San-

Chicago,

the Peoria

&

been taken into the system. Of these
Eastern is the only one whose earnings
all

The earning.^ of the
Wabash & Michigan have been combined with those of
the main system only since the Ist of July.
Thus where we formerly had returns from seven
The Norroads we now have returns from only two.
are

still

reported separately.

& Western has absorbed four roads, namely the
Shenandoah Valley, the Scioto Valley & New Eug.and,
the Lynchburg & Durham and the Eoanoke & Southern.
folk

I

I

On. Sandusliy

<St

CleTcland.

I

Peoria

<b

Kastern.*

NOBFOLK & WESTERU.
Bbonandoali Valley.
Boloto

VaUey & New England.

Lynolilrarg

Roanoke

& Dnrham.

& Soutliem.

The Louisville &

Nashville likewise includes in

its state-

ments several roads which formerly reported separately,
and so does the East Tennessee, as also the Chesapeake
& Ohio. The Illinois Central has recently bought the

—

OeroBKR
Louisville

THE CHRONICLR

S9, 1803.]

New

Orleans

&

Texas, which had preyioiisly

absorbed tho Natchez Jackson & Columbus, and llio
Central within recent years has also acquired the Missisiippi & Tennessee besides including the Iowa lines and
the Southura Division in its statements of earnings.
The Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe now reports earnings
only in three great divisions namely the Atchison
System, the San Francisco System and the Colorado

—

—

Midland thus eliminating entirely the many other
roads wliich form part of the combination but under
the reorganization were completely merged in the

The Rome Watertown & Ogdena-

Atchison Company.
bur7 ijo longer appears in our statements because it i^
now incorporated in the returns of the New York CenAnd so wo might go on through the list. We
tral.

709
Hsyl 80,

MM.

...ans and dlHonoU, Inol. orerdrafU
8>Meka. bunds. Ao
Ihie fnini resnrro a«ontn
line from iHiriKH (iriil t<niikeni

Richmond Tercniaal

troubles) are pfactically the

I,04f)jt87

Central has also failed to

August the

Ist of

make

Illinois

returns.

MO.KIU
6T0.tM
60il.a51

7V8,10T

1,7»>.9H3
764.987
71,017
1,007,010
143.163
146.760
6I.A48

1.177.644

riiitl

19,038

Total

.

M«J

—

Sharta, both fides.
Cteared.
Total Value,
1,731,600
l«.a&4.000

June

.

"

44.5,000

1,0«X,048,800
698,313.200

1,698.750

21

wk. 4,223,800 277.800,000

Oct. 24..

'.118,800

25. .1,223.300
26 1,235,700
27. .1,268.900
28.-1,136,600

••

"
"
"

64,600,000
85,700,000
83,300,000
85,900,000
77,333,000

298,300
94,560,700 1,433,971
74.186,100
074,700
107,386,900 1.301.600
128,663.500 1,697.506
22,60'1,600

1,120.100

1.667,400
2.055,800

134,200
1^8,800
86.500
109,200
Holiday

9,100,000 106,300
8,000,000 118,800
5,000,000 78.300
7,200,000 111,700

t.ll<'.6t«

St'

5,8»!
6.18:i

6,252

318
312
289
303

&

S«Pt. so.
18M2.

Number

8

July

It,

Lowis uid dlsconnU, Inclad'c OTerdratu. tl8.S48,087
tocks, bODdii. ate
1.944.837

11*2.

10

Other real eiiiaui and nu'ritfagea owned...
Gold coin and certmcatea
BUver com and certincstes
Lesal tender notes and cert'fs of depoalU.
Bills of other banks
Bichannea fur I'leariiiK House
Current expenses and taxes paid
Premiums on LI. S. bonda
Otber resourcea

12j.9«4
175.879
11.56U
692,424
311.627

site

li!

11

ti;,4a2.188
1,988,8»7
3.150.768
1,590.306
381.229
805.H84
1,433.995
360.152
1.144.150
331,292

117.004,617
1,096.951
3.32«.tH3
1.24^fllH

6M,780
23,685
81.500
87.143

440 0i2
7.'! 222
117.719
106.709

"iw'sSS.Ul

Other

indbonkera

i

16.800.000
1,012,019
450.000
15.008
10.118,941
80.679
10.368.49S

»7.80O.0OO

sii.ooo

........

128.886.141

»27.9Sa.7«7

1,668,680
392,379
316,558
1.094.187
427.b87
1.14S.90'J

871,267
603,994
63.078
82.000
112.278

1,118.S14
485.000
21,600
10.837.167

U.467.878

liabilities

T-ital

«J»70.7a9
2.775.005
U'^.l'a
175,888
10.^77

698.465

(8.«U,61»
2.6«',0.4<;t

l,tr,2.81S

BI.888
176.6.«
20,168
61H.711
(17.286
J6i.U6«

.

'i54.163

62.J.735
1,06'>.292

210.710
1.039.55<
6.677
47,819
102.509

(18.521,178

120.862.006

(15.426,8(9

$1,362,000
3,44e.072
479.751
6.187
13.661.869
100.788
447.686
26,127

I1.3,\2.0jO

(1.362.000
2,361.430
487,551
7,457
10.740,430
100.261

(18.521,478

(20.062,906

I

Uue

to banks and
Other llabUitlos

baokera

Total

2,366.465
480.701
18.467
15,8.-.6.6I0

101.851
387.883

188.34ft
713..'.ea

373U

40.36*
116. 18S

874.2SI>

Sept. 30,

ALBANY.

July

12,

(16,426,350

Due from

Sept St,

18 J2.

I8S2.

1881.

(3,724.4!<6

(8,247.473
981.214
2,675,661
1,885.492

(9.4B7,8U

2l<8,0')0

288,000

6
775.562

reserve aneuts

2.014.fti7

Due from banks and bankers
Banklmi houie. furniture and flxturea. ..
Other real estate and mortKaxes uwued.
Oold coin and certiflcaies
Hilver coin and certiBcates
Letfal tender notes and certitl. of deposit.
Bills of other banks
exchanges for Clearing-Ronse
Premiums on United States bonds
Other resources

1,666,921

29S.0OO
23,803

.

InqiT^S
j/ia.t/ij
487.847
63,887
203.071
23,000
82.140

41.758
602,094
96.U19
151.u2t
23,650
46.800

(16,005.778

Total

1.095.864
26..3A2

802,577
49,714
512,186
7e.8»S
8.<,18»

36,188
115,810

(16.774.678

(15,300,691

(1,650.000
1,496,525
268.560
13.004
6,870,550
40.031
4,766,208

(1,550.000

(1.660.000
1,489,060

263.960
4.749
6,988,248
45.000
6,409.839

8.478.8M

(16,006,778

(15.774.678

(15,M039l

LiabiUtieilCapltal stock paid In

Surplus and undivided profits
Circulation outstanding
Dividends uiimld

Total

Sspt. 30,
1892.

W.tHllINGTON.

Number

26.611
787.465

881.149
1.815.M1

12

—

l,t>12.887

July

12,

1882.

12

(18,099
9.460

60.000
8.404.671

Sept. as,

M91
12

liesttiirces

Loans and discounts, tnctud'g overdrafts,

(7,969.758
1.679,129
1,133.170
644.798
1.0ei.27S

Stocks, bonds, .tc

Banklni; house, furniture and fixtures....

Other real estate anil mortgages owne<]...
Gold coin and eertltlcates
Bllver coin and certificates
Legal tender notes and cert'fs of deposit.
Bills of other banks

Exchanges

for Clearing

8..3U0

1.342.341
423.970
900.340
40.814
186.034
64.301
107.6H3
344,493

House

Current expenses and taxes paid
Premiums en U. S. bonds
Other resources
Total

(7.820,967
1,66».962
1.133.447
57K,i;72

1,063,764
8.300
1,303,437

594.838
704.511
23,417
192.597
S1.7i>3

72,952
S05.670

(7.378.430
1.736.178
1,111.528
517,779
988.267
74.160
1.370.288

42&30«

latMS
28,SM
114,108
48.810
85,821

186488

(16,850,106

(15,488,793

(14,617,0(1

(2,.575.000

(2.575,000
1,372.749

(3,676,000

UalHlUietCapltal stock paid In

Surplus and undivided profits
Circulation outstanding
Dividends unpaid
Individual deposits
Other deposits

1,431,293

580,080
7,580
10.726.48^
68.337

;

Due to banks and bankers
Other HabUlttes.

481..133

40.0U0

Total

(16.860.106
Sept. 30,
1882.

MILWACKEE.

Number

S

1.282,874

624,5*10

487,170

9.750
10,481.979
71.602
423.153
40.000

3,061
9,801,810
68.061

(15.498.793

(11,647,031

Ju<ll 12,

1892.

278,469
62,000

^/&1»»'
3

M7,852',767

W.800,000

4,6<l8.;ia

80,940
i.HiiK-

|lil.fVi0.834

167.5H8
908.642
3o,624
45,740
102.217

3b3,3li8

177 .2*8
1,217,208
440,8.'5
l,106.9i»<
iOiJ.B7B

fxians and discounts, including overdrafts.
Stocks, bonds. .»c

Due from reserve agents
Due from banks and bankers
Banking house, furniture and fixtures.
Other real estate and mortgages owned
0.'ld coin and certificates
Silver coin and certificates
Legal tender notes and oertlS's of deposit.

131.030339

(6.142322
1.425,163
1.00S.tl<0

261,688
75,000

(5.886,813
1.281,387
1.459.135
617,474

(5.814,010
1.016,618
1,263,48»

'<5,000

33l),6QS

28316

e8.8:>5

(68.067
8.U51
201.273
46,124
27.882

369.776
14.362
161.446
46,074
33,721

78,000
46,000
(44,630
08.708
(85,009
48,687
1S«,44«
53,138
18.070

(10,832,814

(10,835,391

(8.403.(0*

(960.000
778.488
314,800

(850,900
768.371
235,100

(860,000
75«,7»(
326.000

6.941.6I17

6305,437

6.U13,16ft

316,841
1.661.281

301,767
(.334,726

S.0<I0,57S

844,550
.

other banks
Hxctaanges for leorlng-Hons*
Premiums on U. S. bonds
Other resoorees
Bills of

I

831.310

tAaJiUUUt—

l,2«7.2u:)
405.0<)0

Capital stftck paid In
Snrr'
-'llvldedproflU

4Srt
9.829..->0i

Clr.

141,8-<l

Otii

»,888,965

3

J<«Bourc«—

Total

O'
l)u«i.

12,

#

I.09'i..i72

Surplus .ind undivided tiroflts
nrcuat tun outstanding
Dividends unpaid
ndlTldoal deposits
other deposits

1881.

tSl.OSO.SW

mm

reserve a«oiit«
f
l>ae from banky ana bankers
Banking house, furnttore and fixtures....

"1-

Jnlu

1892.

|10,51'*,418
.1,081.941

Ca;ilUI it.ick paid In

Sett.K.

Jieaourcet—

V'

20,

6

Hesimrcea-^
Loans and disoounta. Including overdraft!
Stocks, bonds. 4o

:

llvldedproflU
-landing

t.

1892.

LeKal tender notes and crrUt'a of depuslt.
Hills of other banks
Kschmitieii fur learlng Uoiise
Garrent exiionses and tixes paid
Premiums on U. 8. bonds
Other resources

5,SS5

Condition of National Banks in Kansas Citt, New
Orleans, Brooklyn, Albany, Washinqton and MilWACKEH.—Through the courtesy of Mr. A. P. Hepburn,
Comptroller of the Currency, we have received this week abstracts of the condition of the national banks in the cities of
Kansas City, New Orleans, Brooklyn, Albany, Washington
and Milwaukee, at the close of business on Friday, Sept. 80.
From them and from previous reports we have prepared the
following, which covers the results for Sept. 30 and July 12,
1892, and for purposes of comparison the figures for last year

!"

Ou.ouO

I9.6U(

~ii27.196,WT'S3r80{.4««

Due from reserve agente
Due frr>m banks and bankers

<"

S.a.MI.411

»0.0ijO
t.231.4«t
(.293.0*0

Number

&

'Id in

L1.0tl4.098

1J78.687

Total

&

&
&

.T.tal

76oiei

14.6U.88u

•

added; on June 15, Delaware
Western, American Sugar common and
Western Union were added. On Sept. 31, Distilling & Cattle
Feeding was added.

t-'.

836.145
35.918

10,886.000

IndiTldual daimtlta

Other ileposlta
I)u» to banks and banken
Notes and bills parable

2.100

458,700 29,300,000 415,100 1,222
99,600 7,100,000 58,300
2.^0
155,600 11,100,000 209,000
319
142,900 10,100,000 99,.500
315
137,400 8,500,000 117,100
323
122,500 8,422,000 112,900
31G

New York & New England were

Due

1.478JIM

19.2:i6

.

&

given
„...„._.„
KANHAH CITY.

2,.1to.l^«

(•430(.na

13.626.000

OlTldunds unpaid.

Individual deposits.
Other deposits
Due to banks and bankers

(Sept. 25) are

18.130
148.662
77,127

2.5<7, on
81 ,395

4uriiliisaii<l unillrlilfKl proflta
Circuliiliori oulslandlug

658,000 45,222,000 396,800 1,572
Tot. wk. 5,783,300 396,833,000
From May 17 to 24 inclusive the stocks cleared were Chi
cago Milwaukee
St. Paul, Louisville
Nashville, Northern
Pacific pref. and Philadelphia
Reading. On the 25th,
Atchison, Chicago Burlington
Quincy, Bock Island and
Union Pacific were adied to the liit. On June 4, Chicago
Gas, Missouri Pacific, New York Lake Erie
Western and

Lackawanna

103,009
l,0(ii.8S7

.

,

256.200,000

9.807.800
July
977.583.000
Uiput.... 13,»l>a480
18.857.S00 1.268.000.000
g«pt
17. .1,263,000 85,700,000
Oct.
" 18..1,lS7,iOO 74,90(1,000
" 19.. 80rt,0OO 49,800,000
" 20.. 997,600 67,400,000

Tot.

Batanees, one tide.
Sheets
Shares. Value Shares. Oash.Otear'd

...

13.626.000

:..

Total
LUtbi:UU-K—

eubjoined statement inclu<lea the traasactious of the Stock
Eiichange Ulearing-Houso from Oct. 17 (Jo\vn to and including Friday, Oct. 28; also the aggregates for May (from 17th to
8l8t), June, July, August and September.
STOCK BXUII&MQB CLKAKIMU BOCI8B TRANSACTIONS.

M. —

l,88».ou

•I7,l>0.787 t*S.mi.48f)

l.iiHiUiflfJI Capital <to<-k paid In

,.

Stock Exchange Clearino-House Transactions.— The

"^i^

1.07'

flxturea....

other rtml u^talu and [iiortjcatfoa owlMd...
(iold oiln iind corlineaiua
MJTer ooln and oeninoatM.
Laial Mmler notes and oert'fa of depoelt.
Bina of other banks
Kieliwwea for I'lsarlnK ilduae
('urrent expenses and taxes pftld
ereralums on U. 8. bonda
other reaouroua

lliiikliti/ iioiiNe, furiiiriire

I

only cues, though since the

10

114.611.700 |ll,fl*1.76«
6,263.440
S,537,I)M

nilOOKliYN.
have stated above that very few roads had dropped out .Hnmber
/fr**ur(M —
of our statements of earnings by reason of the anwil- Lons A discounts, InolndiDKOTerdrsfti..
Mtooks. bon.lH. .ko
frtm
lingoess of the managers to continue furnishing return>. Due from resorvo atfonta
Due
h.iiiks and buikera
Hanklnu h. Mine, furniture and flxturea....
Among the more prominent companies, the Richmond oii.er real ertt^to and mortmgea oiraed..
Oold coin alKl oertl6o<tes
& Danville and the Central of Georgia (both involved silver coin and certldcates
in the

Julu It.
laM.

10

NBW ORKBANM.
Number

,ndlng

Icui

,11a
•

Due

to

Other

bunks and bankan
Itabilttlee

Total

:..

(10.532314

310.769

305,08»

678.876
(10.836,391

"To.ioMe"

.

THE CHRONICLF.

710

Ju'y

Sept. SO.

HT. JOSEPH.

4

*

8S.763.317

Due from banks ami

7je«7
7m'378
1MS50
"???»

.,''!'£?

oiBq««
iiOOTl

Danker!.

Bank'g house, fuinlt.&flxrea
OtherrealestateanflmortgaKOS owned....

Gold coin an.l certiflcates
Cilyer coin and certificates.

18,193,883
626.900
087,600
489,148
130.350
e,005
222,814
104.941
201.004
20,143
78,887
18,374

»».BS2.888

fls?lis
to /Si?
TSc'Ssn
>26.860

lilnSS'Tlsoounts, including overdrafts.
Stocks, bonas, i!c
lue from reserve aaents

fnVrtM
JSi'JS
"Jf'fH

.............

f*aalteude^note^.andoe^ts.of deposit....
MIb of other banks
Exchanges for Clearing House..
enrrent expenses and taxes paid
Premiums on U. S. bonds

5to'«b3
^JJ'SSi

srm«
ilol
!i?2Ka
S|.^

i?5-il5

Mr?no

irSS
31.600
""-^"^

Other resources

34,75:1

83,982

°'-'°*

.

»8,870,03S

t8.523,»36

$7,838,910

|2,O0D.on0

»2,000,000

|208^5

Total
•r£ftal'if/,^7nald In
|^filSl,l'n°fuS5'i'v&-WoflV.Circulation outstanding

|53 789

$2,000,000
381,779
209,600
105
8,295.050

"

21411

'^la
o oifl i u7
'•

Individual deposits
Otherdeposils........^
Due to banks and bankers

ibiis'biB

ii'
9 sS7'fini
!l,^tn,tiUi

DTvldfnds unpaid

e42«'lS0
x,iia,iBu

am

'44910

49,0:t5

1,810.471
60.000

liabilities

.

t8.522,938
JvljfiS,
185a.

18,870,036

T,.t^

Sept. 30,

DBS MOINES.

18I'2.

lean's aSdVlscounts, including overdrafts...
Stocks, bonds. &c
Due fiom reserve agents
Due from banks and bankers...^
Bank'B house, furniture and fixtures...

?2,619.;?"

$2,140,221
291.561
318,631
171,860
121,2. 8

Sept. 26,
1891.
~

»2.J<p.722
Mi.in

f*.9ef

IxhcSI

i

¥3^«
^?g-??2

q^«flfl7

JVAWa

kI'?m

69,95(1

,Sn'7ss

'JS'fS

?Sru

iSA'S^i
,S?'?TO

112,710
77,950
78,S63

'sV'.lS;

62.0.H0

qJ'toh

31,407

^?|'?S
JS'JS
10,5u0

7101

11.9118

,;'nn.i
11,000

l.'(,069

i"'"'"

iv.j^uv

13,290

t4,682,855

$4,580,830

$3,622,280

1700.000

1700,000

iZl'^

i?l'«So

$700,000
449.778
133.621

Other real estate and mortgages owned
Gold coin and certificates
SUvercoln and certiflcates
ie«al tender notes and certiflcates of deposit.
Current expenses and taxes paid
Premiums on Uuitod States bonds
Other resources
Total

Ca^tai'slo^paidln
Surplus and undivided profllB
•Circulation outstanding
Dlvldon.18 unpaid
Jnaividual deposits....^
-One to banks and banker*

?Sr9?fl

*M"?

Bills of otherbanks.......
Kxchanges for Clearing House...

,S?'?Qi

"52%
^^?S?
«o',,7
ca1'?c?
j.^^M V™'irJ
1,4/8, laJ
1,7^4,106
1

»4,682,855

Total

H,680,830

Bare.aii of Statistics lias issued its detailed

1,590
1.328,09'.)

909, U'9

Import*.

Sept. 30.

Sept. 30.

$62,949,429 $182,818,418 $653,851,496
900,0n7
3,376,6271
11,49 0,502
$62,<l4!t,526 $1S6, 195,045
,34,7,!198
Total
7?,993,023 221,719,564 653^47_aq5
liupoila
.
$11,900,893
Exwssof exportsovcrimportal
•EXJessotimiortsoTercxports lO.O-ia.Wr $35,524,519

-Domestic
1892. -ExportsForeign

j

1891.— Exports—Domestic

-.

Foreiga

?S1, 845,005
1, ,009^)80

Total

.$8-2 ,954,6S.'5

215.040,48 $627,670,105
3,168.032
9,917,865
$218,'i08,519 $637,592,970

61 ,504,737 194,500,13'
Imports
Excessof exports over itn ports $21,319,348 $23,-. Off ,387
Excegsof imports over exports
(lOI.Il AND SILVER— COIN AND BULLION.

1392.— Jixports— U o Id — IJom

.

Foreign
Total
Silver— Domestic
Forciyii

Total
Total exports

—Gold
Silver

Total
Excess of exports ovei imports
Excess of Imports over exportsl

1891. -Exports—Gold— Dom..
Foreigu
Total

Silver— Domestic
Foreign
Total
Total exports

Imports— Gold
Silver

$3,

611,213
16,450
627,663
792.365
879^786
672,151
299,811
303,536
481,.'^45

7d5,0til

514,733

$223,324
121,968
$345,290
$1,142,736
1,391,837
$2,531,673
$2,879,863
$7,451,42S
1,581,405
$9,032,833

627.146,154
$10,446,816

863,534
0,227,103

6,763,019

Brunswick, Ga
BulTaloCk.N.T

545,547

200.093
52.860

Champrn, N.T

48H.54:s

225,'-44

Charlest'n, 8.C

51,281

Chicago, 111....
Cincinnati, Oa

1,5111,917
144,.578

198.54;
718,205

Corpus Christi
Detroit, Mich.
Duluth,Mlnn.
9aIveat'n,Tex
Huron, Mich..

307.760
325,072
10,283
44,U62
409,980
134,539
123,814

Bost.

&

I

$4.8.59,937, $14,678,043

_4,207w75|

9,17',335
$9,067,712' $23 857.998

$29,527,994
$2,179,268
5,579,980
$7,759,238
$21,768,756

1891.

$
70,015.988

10,993,342

55,470.599

Cliar-

lIllw'kee,WlB.

662,678
671,840
155,727
2,288,970
811,313
68.184

67,304,,861
10,X03
2,887,
2,701,,505
223,,739
12,053,,436

55, 748.73.'?

3,914

MS

65.845.291
2.181.719

,629,765

4-^4.960

,66>j.968

2.030,980
5,001.741
2,55-,930

762,361
,293,680
48-2,117
,063,580

1,817,,:165
2,305,,920
2,2-(2,,772
172,,119
755,,269
2,149,,511
652,,288
901,.^&^,
160,,398

.172,799
87,026

3,690,256
4,478,028
1,587,6'20

528,828

12,182,582

,883,743

0,737,89!)

750,066
775,666
51,026

69.387,803
2,732,791
508,371
1.972,997
10.231.988
8,680,021
8,079,323
4,727,168
1,870.523
13,866,778
6,742,773

llh

281,112
402,889
'98,814
1.638.507
1,37-2.689
10.98-)
Mobile. Ala...
New Orl'ns.La 3,3S3.748 2,717,332 17,3S6,.107 16,,899,191 78,473,172 87,148,379
8.929.h04
9.914.871
439,145
113,,292
48.218
7.021
Newp*t News
New Vork,N.Y 46,235,141 23.911,052 425.78:,,340 391 ,9i;«,592 279,979,072 269,887,974
b 81,914
6 62,874
b 24,779
2,198,,441,
2, 282,16,=i
Niagara. N.Y..
328,(;79|
422,439
17,487
5,247,678
7,807,898
707
17,,3831
Nomt,Va.,&o.
284,9'24
10l,iatj
768,677
837,170
23
128,,456
Oregon. Greg..
138.000
1,21-',
1.074,402
1.415,930
112,370
,282,368
Oswega'le.N.Y
,338,4116
1,873,738
172,816
1.278.028
1,16«,
193.077
Oswego. N.Y..
11,
102,473
2,700,374
2.371,165
771
201,988
Pensacola, Fla
,,94e,912 46,392.551 30,403,747
Philadera, Pa. 6,371.218 4,914,188 19,073,
72,160
638,489
2,393.242
18.933
885,
1,716,772
Portld.Ao.Me.
364,715
512,
2,994,670
4,421,880
81,578
414,715
PugetS'd.Wa.
51,
15,18)
15,781
1,293,337
8,885,877
8,3«S
Rlchm'nd, Va.
:,453.v09
2,28 J,
234,661
St. LoulB.Moa.
,646,759 22,060.152 34,187,068
3an Fran.. Cal. 3,121.017 3,571.937 32,977,
328,77>'
119,
0.878,!' 04
13.038,348
18.638
970,991
3avannah,Ga.
753,9.i0
3,918,
,684.889
4,271,094
2,453,088
821,992
Yermont. Vt.
,033.2'2H
866,
4261,610
101,7-5
3,"22,512
89a,9:!9
Wlllamette.Or
3,087,283
803
249.797
109,
134,059
1,703,928
vyilmrgn.N.C.

Mlnn'8'a,Minn

Totals,

(In

cludins

ail

oth' r Ulsts.) 72.993 , 023 62,919,526|853,447.106 627.148.151 665.317,908 637,592,970

«26, 882,705

RemaliUng

$30,042,734

30, 1891
warehouse September 30, 1892

In

o Interior ports to wUloh marohiQdlse o*a be traaipjtel without
appraisement, untler aet of Juno 10, 1830,
6 Incomplete, In the absence of stsitistios of exports to adjacent foreign territory by railroad cure and other land vehicles.

[From our own correspondent.
London, Saturday, October

$85,887,430
$10,214,866
13,685,551
$23,900,417
$61,987,013

$6,349,831 $75,757,689
830.301
1,882,347
$7,180,132 $77,610,536
$2,300,576
$8,274,120
5,044,214
^,2'i3,276
$7,344,790 $17,017,396
$14,524,922 $94,657,932
$9,875,331 $13,181,595
5,147.315 _11, 490,550
$15,022,646 $24,672,145
$69,985,787

15, 1892.

money moved somewhat upwards at the bethe week, but gave way again on Thursday; yet it

The value

of

ginning of
•eems probable that there must be a considerable advance
before the year is out, as the demand for gold is now very
strong. During the week ended Wednesday ni^ht as much
as £200,000 of the metal was withdrawn from the Bank of England for Austria. In the open market all offered for sale is
taken for the same destination, and it is expected that the

demand

will increase.

Germany

also is

withdrawing gold.

And

the Chilian Government has just concluded a contract
with Messrs. Rothschild for a loan of £1,800,000, the object
being to pay off a floating debt incurred by President Balmaceda and recognized by the new Government. It is properly

considered that the note circulation
of the

most important reforms

is

is

too large,

and that one

to contract the currency

•

be done, and of course a very
Further,
large part of the proceeds will be taken in gold.
there are rum jrs, which have been contradicted and repeated
very frequently, that the Russian Government is negotiating
in Paris for a four per cent loan of the nominal amount of 20
millions sterling. The Russian Government has already over
70 millions sterling in the metal, but it is certain that a large
amount will be taken in a week or two, whether this loan is
brought out or not. There is likewise a demand for Egypt
and for several minor countries. All these demands come in
the first place upon the Bank of England, and it is extremelyprobable, therefore, that we shall see a sharp advance in rates

The loan wUl enable

$20, 05,38 i $56,193,698
354.900'
5,835. 34
$20,460,282, $62,029,432
1

1892.

lest'wn,Mass

Boltlmore.Md.

9 mnnthn enAinq
September 30.

months eruUng
September 30.

.Exports.

$
5,447,489

$

statement of

For the 3
For the 9
months ended months ended

Fonlhe

9

$S,&22,2aC

:

montti of
September^

1892.

TBIOTS AND
PORTS.

Rem vlnlng in -warehouse September

the foreign commerce of the country for the month of September 1893 and 1891, and for the three and nine months ending
•September 30 1893 and 1891, as follows
MEECIIANDISB.

Imports

OUSTOHB DIB- Septsmbeb,

AND EXPORTS FOR SEPTEMBER.

.IMPORTS
The

$7,838,940

*

number

IVoL. LV.

IMPOSTS AND EXPORTS BT PRINCIPAL CUSTOMS DISTBICTS.

Sept. 25.
1801.

12.

^''^

l»f-

Ihunber

Other

)

.

this to

before long.
to 38J^d. per ounce
ounce, chiefly in response to the
advance in New York. Very little is offering in the market
and there is a good demand for India. For a wliile there may

The price of
and yesterday

silver rose

to 39M<1'

on Thursday

pw

be a further recovery, but the best informed are convinced
that before long there will be a sharp fall. The rise in silver
$6,152,970
$497,721
has been followed by a general advance in all silver securities.
TOTAL MRKCHANDISB AND COIN AND ntJLLION.
There has been more doing upon the Stock Exchange this
1892.—Exports— Domestic
$67,453,007 $207,783,73'; $724,723,837
Foreign,
2,796,333
7,939,302
26,511,591 week than for many months past especially the South AmerTotal
$70,219,340 $215,723,039 751,235,428 ican market has been very active and prices have risen conImports
70,779,104, 229,478,S02 677.317,522
Excess of exports over imports
siderably. Seiior Saenz Pena, the new President of Argentine,
$73,887,906
ExoessofimporiBovcr exports $6,628,764 $13,755,763
has been installed in office, an extraordinary session of Conannounces that he will pay18*1.—Exports— Domestic
$83,211,065 $223,690,894 $711,706,914 gress is opened, and the President
Foreigu
2.52 -',f83
9,042,547
20,543,988 special attention to finance. It is hoped here that he will be
Total
Excess of exports ver im ports
Excess of imports over e xporta

;

Total

Imports

$85,73 <,9 18 $232,733,441 $732,250,902
70.."i37,570 209,522,778 65 1,818.299
$23,210,663 $80,432,603

Excess of exports over im ports $15,196,378
Excess of imports over exportsl

strong enough to maintain order, and that the discontented,
knowing that he cannot be removed for six years, and feelinjc
that they are not powerful

enough

to eject

him by

force,

wiL

1

OcToora

THE CHRONICLE.

SO, 1893.]

att^mpta at disturbance. If the hope is realized,
President will soon be able to beffin negotiationM for
the final settloinont of the debt. Meantime the reports concerning the crops aro very favorable, trade is improving, and
the railway tralUc returns are dpcidedly increasing. There is.
then, good ground for hoping that the worst ia past. But at
the SHme time the speculation of the present week has bren
overdone and there would be no cause for surprise if there
were to be an early reaction. The new Chilian loan is regarded here very favorably. It is to bear 5 per cent interest
and the issue price is 95. It is already dealt in at a premium
of between 8 and 4, and the general opinion is that it vrill be
easily placed. The Brazilian exchange also continues to recover and there has been a good deal of business in Brazilian
Naturally the recovery in the securities of these
securities.
three States has encouraged speculation in all other South and
give up

thrn

all

tlie

Central American securities. The rise in Argentine securities
Qovernment and industrial— in Brazilian, Chilian
of'all kinds

—

and Peruvian

more than a fortnight, is
market value of about 13'>^

stocks, within little

equivalent to an addition to their
millions sterling.

The market

barley,

which

711

at the end of

much damaged,

The general expectation is that speculation will
extend from the South American to the North American
market if encouragement is given by Ne^York. For the
the
present, however, the general public is not doing much
trading is, speaking generally, by professionals. At the same
time there is a fair amount of investment in British Governin business.

;

ment and Colonial Government securities and in British railway stocks. The Continental bourses are firm.
For the first six months of the current year the ordinary
receipts of the Rusisian Treasury amounted to about 39%
millions sterling, valuing the rouble at Ss. of English money,
being a decrease compared with the corresponding period of
the previous year of £640,000. The total expenditures, ordinary and extraordinary, of the half-year somewhat exceeded
60 millions sterling, being an increase compared with the correfponding period of last year of about 13)^ millions sterling.
Part of the expenditure, however, was on account of previous
years. Omifing this, ttie expenditures for the current year in
the six months exceed 493>^ millions sterling, being an increase compared with the corresponding period of last year
of over 9 millions sterling. Roughly, therefore, the Treasury,
compared with the first half of last year, was about 9J^

will not

it

be

fit

for

malting.

The scheme of reorganization of the Chartered Mercantile
Bank of India ia published to-day. A now bank called tb*
Mercantile Bank of India ia to be started with a nominal
and a-half iitcrling and a paid-up capital
amount, or three-quarters of a million aterling.
The Mercantile Bank of India pays the Chartered Mercantile
£37S,000 for good-will and assets in the shape of deferred
eharea, and the remaining £375,000 ia to l)e obtained as new
capital from the public. The new capital ia to be in the form
capital of a million

of half that

of preference abares, entitled to S per cent before the deferred
aharea receive anything. When the deferred sharea receive 5

per cent, both claasea are entitled to ahare equally in surplus
dividende.
The following return ehowa the position of the Bank of

England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols, ftc.

ximpared with the

last three yeixt:

isn.

last.
Oct.

for United States secuiities has

been fairly steady, but there has been no considerable increase

August promised «o wcll7hMi

no that the greater part of

n.

*
Clreulttlon
Public deposlU

UJBKjm
4.U3.MS

12,M2,012

80,246.7«1
17.248,600

X<.44a.M
17J)e7.40^

23,(l38,9&a

27,3IH),128

28,000,861

19,S61,Mg

16,6«8.«64

1S,7B0.701

28,182.621
88 1-16

11,101,224
10.703,234
83 1-16

ILKO.SOS

26,085,514

T..

8.339,720

12,804.673

15,467,066

bullion

S.<)28.0«2

t2.M0JM

BMerTO

41M

Prop.ssaeUtollabllltlM.perat.
_pflr
Bankrate
CoiMOI«2« percent
ClearloK-Ucuae retunu

rates for

2

3

075-16

045<
104.621.000

U.tMO.OlO

ct.

103,408,000

money have been as

Bank

Condon

10.800.077

Sas-lS

6
04 7-16

OTM

174,380,000

161.827.00

6

Intereit

aUov*4

foriepotiUbt

Trade BUI:

Billt.

kj

follows:

Open Market Batet.

DUc't H'$»
Joint

g
cq

Four
Ihree
Six
Six
Stock At 7(ol«
Four
MonlhB MonthM Montht Montht Montht Month* Bank: CaU. Day.

2
"
18 2
" 28 2
••
80 2
Oct.
7 2

Three

14 2

1

® - m®iM
- 2X« - 1H@114
-,2 ® - 1^®1M
- «H® - 2H® - 1«®2

®- IM® ->

i«e- IM®
1 ® - IM®
1 ® - IX®
IK®!"*

The Bank

2«®^

l)i®~=Ti9~ 1«®2~ 1»®2

7«3t

Bopt.

••

M

*

t
tS.87l.»20

4.628,SS0

OUKrieooTltlet

The

us*.
Oct. ie>

Z«.S«a.860

OUlsrdeposlU
Oirarnment •eoorltlM

ColDUKl

ia«o.
Oct. 18.

Oct. 14.

l«»

1H®2
1K«2

H
H
H
H
H
H

2M«2M
2MS2M

15<«2

1«®2
lk®2

2)«»ZN

2«« -

ft.

U
M
M
M

and open market ratea at the
now and for the previous three week

rate of discount

ohief Continental cities

bave been as follows:

8

millions sterling less favorable.

Bank

exciting apprehension
in Spain itself as well as abroad. According to the return
for the 8th October the note circulation amounted to nearly

The

position of the

of Spain

85}^ millions sterling, an increase compared with the end of
1886 of about 68 per cent. At the same time the loans and
discounts were under i3% millions sterling, a decrease during
the past 5% years of llj^ millions sterling, or over 46 per cent,
while the advances of all kinds to the Treasury exceeded 33
millions sterling, an increase during the

5%

years of about

66 per cent.

According to a report drawn up by M. Cochery for the
Budget Committee, the military expenditure of France since
the Franco-Grerman war has somewhat exceeded 15 milliards
or over 600 millions sterling.

This

is

Oct 14.

ia

exclusive of the

war

in-

demnity to Germany, and also exclusive of the outlay upon
the navy neither does it include the cost of constructing
strategic railways. There ia much dissatisfaction caused by
the new protective duties. The revenue ia falling off and

increase

over

per cent.
According to the Timet the British harvest was not nearly
« impleted on the 1st day of October. On that day there was stil 1
Jiiuch com in the fit Ids in seven English counties. There was
a considerable quantity to be cut in five others as well as ia
Wales and Scotland. The wheat crop is the worst of the
present generation except 1879, the general average being only
is

18J/j

Sept .XSL

Bank Open Ban* Open Bank Open Bank 09*n
BaU. Marktl Bate. Market Bate. Market Bate. Mark»t

Intereet at

S
3
3

Hamburg
•Vankfort

Amsterdam

~~i>r

'~Hi

Parts

i

2

8
3

~«~ ~h'

8

iH
SH

2«
2M

IH
2

?i®iHI

m

i-H

3
3

2

3

a

«

ZM
iH

IK

4

3
8
3

SK

a

SH
2M

4

SM

4

2M
IX
8M

St.

PetenburK.
Madrid

6M

4

6M

4

Hi

4

Hi

4

6

4M

tH
8X

4W

4

6
4

6

Copenhasen...

4

8)<

6
4

3«

....

««

BruBsels

lii

Hi

4

Hi,

The following shows the imports of cereal produce into th »
Cnited Elingdom during the first alx weeks of the season
compared with previous seasons:
1892.

;

there is likely to be a large deficit this year.
In spite of the depression in trade the railway traffics of the
United Kingdom are still increasing. Comparing the estimated
receipts for the first 15 weeks of the current half-year with the
estimated receipts for the corresponding period of last year on
17 of our principal railways, there is an increase of £317,000, or
nearly one per cent, of which £119,000 is from passenger receipts and £98,000 from goods.
During the past six years the

Sept 80.

Oct. 7.

Rate* of

IKPOBT8,
1891.

(mportsofwheat.owt. 8.S22,107

9,504.00.1

Barloy

3,064,491
1,692.614
139,403

3,184,5SO
1,628,581
196,139
805,696
4,855,537
2,386,873

Oate,

Peaa
Beans
Indian oom.

near

512,287
2,099.895
1,822,304

1890.
10,062,782
3,507,935
1,539,387
123,233
273.737
4.670,882
1,701,407

1889.
7,298.185
2,849,593
1,823,858

144,653
522.134
3.914,29»
1,944,86 X

Supplies available for consumption (exclusive of stocks

September
Wheat

1892.
owt. 8.822.107

2,38ri,873
(mimrtaot floar
Sales ot home-grown. 2,782,255

Total

13,991,233
1H9S.

1B91.
9,.=>04,C05
1,8 -'2,305

3,337.063

14,713.373
1891.

1889

1R90.
10,062,782
1,701,407
5.276.376

7.298.r8S
1.944.861

17,040.565

15,225.7S»

1890.

5.982,7 IK

1889.

29i.
30s. lid.
34s. lOd.
Overprice wheat week.278. 9d.
298.
328. 3d.
378. 2d.
Average price, season. .288. 7d.
The following shows the quantities of wheat, flour
naize afloat to the United Kingdom:
Tliisiettk.

mieat
nour, equal

Latlteeek.

qr8. 1.579,000
353,000
to qrs.
372,000
qrs.

1,512.000

364,000
410.000

1891.
1,521.000
1»9,000
204.000

4A
9d

anA

1890.
1.652,00 o

142.00
388,00

BoKllali PInanelal Markets— Per Oakle.
an average crop. In some districts it is only
The daily closing quotations for securities, Ac, at Londoa
and in some not better than a quarter. PotaS9
have mififered seriously from disease and frost, and even are reported by cable as follows for the week ending C

82'7 per cent of

half an average
toes

on

1):

^

)

,

THE CHRONICLR

712
Hon.

Sat.

Thur:

Wed.

Tuet.

rn.

39l,s

London,

3916

d 3971,
oi
39)8
393l6
96%
96111,
96i3i,
Oonaoli,new 2 H per ots. 9613
'..
96%
96%
do foraooonnt
9613is 961S,B 96%
99 27>« 99-27^ 99-27»i 99-20
I*'oli rentes (in Parls)tr. 99-25
121
121
121
121
121
U. B. 4>«9 0f 1891
8838
88=8
88%
88=8
88%
Oanadlan Paclflo

Uver, per

96%
96%

,

81''8

8338

8314

82%

102%

102%
136%

102%

102%

99-10
121
88I4
82=8
102's

IStfl*

137

,

Ohio. iMll. * St. Paul..,
nilnois Central

Lake Shore

Si's
102HI
136>4

I36I9
7158
71>4

ptef

^ommevctaX ^n&

71i«
7114

113»8
27i«

113M

113 14
27

7II4
II314
26'e

109%
41%

110

51°8
5768

110
41
52

109%

5138
5738

30

30

4114
283g

41^8
2838

7m

27J4
109>«

4118
37I8

Paoillc

71B8
7114

113H

2(1 cons
109 J4
do
Horfolk & Western, pref 40 \
Paclflo pref... 5138
BTorthem
5734
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia & Beading. 297a

Wabash

136'ii

711s

40''8

70'^8
lioimville A Nashrllle
IIH
Merloan Central 48...
Y. Central A Hudson. 113
H.
H. Y. Lake Erie & West'n 27

Dnlon

2714

71%

40=8
521s

40=8

52%

57%

:,7i«

57 14

20%

301*
41 >4

3018
41'8
2si«

411s
27'.

27%

Hews

W^isctllvintatts

—

Imports and Exports foe thk Wkkk. The following are
New York for the week ending (for dry goods)
Oct 20 and for the week ending (for general merchandise
also totals since the beginning of the first week in
Oct. 31
the imports at
;

January.
rOSBIOH IMFOBTS AT
for Week.

Dry Goods
Tstal
Kinee Jan.

NBW TOBK.
189Z

$1,577,743
7,837,091

$2,397,186
$1,777,694
7,066,569 . 7,584,558

$3,061,578
7,460,374

$9,414,834

$9,463,755

$9,362,252

$109,244,339 $126,814,969
9en'l mer'dlse. 292,313,777 317,239,639

$96,470,779 $104,812,165
327,960.397 35b, 887.513

Tot*142 weeks. $401,558,116 $444,051,608 $424,431,176 $463,699,678

The i-nports

of dry goods for one week later will be found
ia our report of the dry goods trade.
following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
The
•{iecie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for th«
week ending October 25 and from January 1 to date :

XPORT8 PBOM NBW TORK FOB TRB WBBK.
1889.
Prev. reported.

—

Parties desiring guaranteed st9cks and bonds payin? six
to seven per cent will be glad to consult the list offered in
our adverti.sing columns to-day by the well-known house of
Charles T. Wiug
Co.

&

— Brokers' Quotations.

N. 1. and Brooklyn Was Securities

SAS COMPANIES.

Bid.

Brooklyn Oas-Llght

1

OA8 COMPANIES.

Ask.

1890.

1891.

1893.

$6,342,558
272,122,139

$7,205,609
280,226,185

$8,393,648
292,622,159

iWllliamsbarg
. 142
OonsoUdilted Oaa
ll7»4ll«Io' RonilRHs
Jersey City A Hoboken.. ISO
|iMetropollc»n( Brooklyn). .117
Metropolitan— Bonds
110
..... Manicipal— Bonds, 78
.|ll^5
lIatual(N. y.)
140 145
Fulton Manicipal
.llS9
Bonds, 68
10(»
102
Bonds. 68
. 1(12
SVassanf Brooklyn)
150
Equitable
. 180
100
People's., BrooklynK
96
98
|l36

1.10

The following table shows the exports and imports of specit
«t the port of New York for the week ending Got. 33 and
ince Jan. 1, 1892, and for the corresponding periods in 1891
1890:

City Railroad Secnrities
Atlantic Av., B'klyn.St'k. 130
Gen. M.,53,1909...A&O 102
Bl'cker St. ii Fai. V. -Stk. 29
1st mort., 78., 1900..JifcJ 110
Sr'dway b 7t)iAy. -St'k 195
1st mort., 5s, 1904 .J&D lOi
3d mort., 6s, 1914...J&Jil03
*34il04
B*way Ist, 58, fru
anil 58, int. as rent., '06.1 94

— Brokers'

Exporti.

Imports.

^oUi,

Week.

SirieeJan.l.

Week.

Since Jan,\

107
16,1

I

rk.N.& E.Blv.— Stk.ll50
Consols. 78, 1902 ...J&D 115
Ory Dk.K.B.A Bat'y— Stk. 1121
Isf mort., 7». 1893. .J&D 100

155
120
125
101

'dent.

Quotations,

I

220
110
110

!

'

i

I

.

.

j

—

Auction Sales Among other securities the following, not
regularly dealt in at the Board, were recently sold at auction.

By

Messrs. R. V. Harnett

&

Co.
Bonds,

•Shares.

25 Thurtier-WhylandCo. pf. 91 is
32 Central National Bank.. 138 «
200 Saratoga Nat Carbonic
*15forlot
Acid Gas Co.
Bonds.
$10,000 Metropolitan Ferry
108%
Co. 1st .=>8, 1937
$10,500 The Halifax St. Ry.
Limited 6s, 1916, Jan.,
Co
3 p. c.
18*3, coupons on

& Camb.

$525,000 Mor

GapKRCo.

Ist6s. 1921

1
I

$25,000 Co o( Hamblen

& C. G. RK.
<!;o bonds
S,451M:. ACum. GapKR.
a*?^ turn tia n# n.,
...«
$75,000 63 of Grauger
Co., Tenn., to M. A C.
(Tenn.)

.M.

1*16,000
r

#,^n
for

In*

lot.

G. RB. Co
$50,00'! 69 20-y'r bonds
of Morriitown. Tenn.,

toM. &C.G. RR.Co...

By

Messri. Adrian H.

MuUer

&

Son

:

Shares.

Shares.

943 Brooklyx City BB.217'«-217!^
20 Greenwich (ns Co
Hi's
50B'dwavA7tU Ave RR.C0 200

5Thurb.-WhylandCo..pfd. 95
149 Southern Telegraph Co. .$5 lot
20 Johnson Manuiact'g Co. $1 lot
'^l lot
35 Colorado Cattle Co
150 Wa.<hingt.!n Irnpt. CoW-SO lot
230 U. a Telphone Utn. Co. .$4 lot
250 U. 8. Telepljont! Mfg Co.

3 Ceriif.

lONyaik

WBW TOBK

U2

jDry Dock K. B'yA B.—
Scrip
jool
iKlKhth At.— Stock
1260 375
BiKhthAv.— 8crip,es,1914 105 109
;42d & Gr'nd St. P'ry— Stk 275 390
Ist mort., 78, 189a. A*0 100 103
11
42rtSt. Manh.* at.N.Ave.l 64 8«
Ist mort., 68, 1910.. MAS 111 11*
2d M,, income,88
JAJi 63i 68
Hou8t.W.St.A P.F'y— 8tk.'200 ...._
Ist mort., 7s, 1894.. JAj;iO0 107
Ninth Ave
130 140
So ond Ave.- Stock
|125|128
Istmort., 58, r909.MANjl03'lnS
Sixth Ave.— Stock
ll9H 20S
iThird Ave.- New stock.
201) 205
l8t M., 68, 1937
JAJllOlia
1!
Twenty-third St.— Stook..'275
''
1 at mort. 78.1893
.100 103

30
112
200
108
103

I2IS
Brooklyn City— Stock
B'klyiicrosst'n 68., 1908 108
Bkn.C'ydkN'n58.1938 J<SJ(105
'Central Crosstown- si'k.. 140
1st mort., 6«,li>22.M&Nill5

Memb.

N. Y. Prod.

+6t5-$650

Eiohantte

axFOBTi jlhd ixpobts of spboib at

111
120

.

$6,723,035
307,150,799

Total 42 weeks. $278,464,697 $287,431,704 $301,015,807 $313,873,834

A«k

Bid.

1

i

$10,521,952

1.

Dry Goods

tor the week..

[Vol. LV"

'

J891.

1890.

1889.

<l«n'l mer'dlse.

and

:

Elec.

L.&Pow.Co. 75

1 N. Y. Law In.'<titute....1<100
Trustees' Certificates ..$4 lot
1 RiKbt y Y. Boe'tv Lihr'y.* i-50
25 Terre H. A led. RK, Co.llOie
22 Boston A N. Y. Air L Ry
com. A *174'^0 scrip... 3
80 Seiieoi Falls A Wate'loo
Gas Light Co ..i'25 per share 53,S9l Oriental Miuinu Co
$5*50 lot
l.O.iO
common
20 Central Trust Co
1,840 Oriental Min. 'o..pfd..$2 lot
27 Merchants' Nat Bank... 149
50 N. Y. A Lehigh Coal Co. .200
425 Wide West Gr'vel .>lin,Co.*3 lot
Jionds.
5 Imp. & Trad. Nat. Bank. 616
100
10 Lawyers' Surety Co
$5,000 Dry Doc E. Br'dway
36 Coney I.&Bi'klynRB.Co.l62>«
A Battery RB. 78, 1893,
101 4 int.
J&D
13 3dATe RE Co (ei riKhts)208^l
2 Alliance Ins. Assoc!' o. 85-87 >« $4,000 Dry Dock E Br'dway
20 United State- Trust Co. .890
A Battery RR. 5 p. c scrip,
loiie&int.
1914. FAA
50H. B ClaflinCo.oom
107's
10 Lawyers' Title Ins. Co...l55'« $5.0 '0 Jersey Citr 68, coup.
110«8
bonds, 19(14. AAO
15 Corn Exchange Bank
2,55's
50 Brooklyn Eley RR. Co.. 34
$1,000 Thorapson-Hous Elec.
441 Meroh. Nat. Bant. 147 is-148
Co. col. trust 58, 1919.94^8 A Int.
15 Wmsburgh Gas L. Co... 135
.$750 Southern Teleg. Co. 68. $6 lot
.

Sreat Britain
Pranoe

86,221,393
18,410,228

-.

26117

West Indies
fezloo
Bonth America

$255,506
1,000

if.'

SUver.
Britain

W«itt rcdies

Since Jan.

Mextoo.
Booth Ajnerica
All otlierooantrieB..

.

Total 1892
Total 1891
Total 1890

San Antonio

4,700

1.

Week.

Sittee

$292,775 $15,134,435
523,139
1,300
966,473

<*ermany

.

"6.566

lonnn

$256,500 $58,043,353 $252,530 $7,2^3.984
38,47-^ 75,369,944 3,070,63.) 21.997,542
35,789 18,781,608
2,425
7,531.364
Bxporu.
Imporlt.
Week.

SreA

"i',020

1,256,598
10,500

Total 1892
Total 1891
Total 1890

914.150
706,806
41,053
664,601
186,790

asifi

7;6i7;284

All other countries..

$32,428
4,733,151

$24i',250

38,215
541,245
25,912

$292,775 $17,230,719
875,116 15,383,187
5,200 14,730,559

&

183,040
3,760

981
$191,258
7,200
409,827

J*n.l.

;

S21,014
335.737
100,855
366,067
668,720
764.141
66,545

^^xnUiUQ ana ^in^ncivCl.

....

LIBERTY NATIONAL BANK,
Central BuildInK, 143 Liberty Street.

$2,322,079
1,805,898
5,912,643

C. TINKHB,
gotiations with Mr. C. P. Huntington, President of the South- HRNKT OUAVK8,
HUNK?
ern Pacific, which have led to very positive reports of the QBO. F. BAKKR,
J. B. MAXWULL,
sale of the road. It is authoritatively stated to-day

—Messrs. Redmond, Kerr

&

Co. offer in the

Cheonicle

TO-day a limited amount of Cleveland Cincinnati Chicago
&
7*y ^^ mortgage 4 per cent gold bonds, due
foQi at oi and
1*91, » 81
accrued interest. These bonds are a direct obligation of the C. C. C. & St. Louis Railway, coming
ahead of
over 137,000 000 stock upon which regular dividends
are
paid. Investors are invited to give this offer
their attention.

^oI^Td ?°^° f^ Stanton offer to-day the New York Providence & Boston gold 4s, due 1943, New Haven
& Derby 6 per
cent consols, and other selected bonds. They
also wUl pay the
mt^est on quite a list of city, county and other
securities du»

York.

JAMES CHSISTIB. Clishler.
DIRECTUK.8.

Aransas Pass. —There have been same ne-

that
nothing; has been consummated, and it is not at all sure
that there will be. It is reported that Mr. Huntington, who
is in the West, wUl go over the Aransas Pass Road before
he returns to New York,

New

S300,00V
CAPITAL.,
ACCOUNTS OF BANKS, BANKBRS AND MERCHANTS SOLIOITBD.
HBNBT GBAVUS, Vle6-Pre«id«n»
HBIfKT C. TINKER President.
a. F. C.

YOUNG,

WM. BCNKI.K.

DUMONT CLARKE,

H.

O.

J.

A.

HON.

FAHNBSTOCK,
G. A. HOBABT,
GARLAND.

JNO. H. 8TAR1N.

Spencer Trask

a.

Co.,

BAVKBRS,
16 Consreas St., Boston.
10 \raU St., New York.
Providence.
Albaay.
Members of New York and Boston Stock Kjtohanges.

INVESTMENT SECURITIES.

THE MERCANTILE NATIONAL BANK
OF THK CITY OF NEW YORK,
No. IBl Broadway.
$1,000,000 Snrplas&Proflts, $1,030,009
WIIXdAU P. ST. JOHN. Prsaldent. FR8DBBICK B. SCnONCK, Oaihlei.
JAMBS y. LOTT, Assistant Cashier.

Capital^

-

1

I

ACCOUNTS SOIilCITED.

1

OcfTOBBB

THE CHRONICLE.

20, 1802;.]

The following wer« the rata*

i^he ^Bankers' (Sa^ette.
DIVIDBNDH.
When

jram« of Company,

Romn

Cent.

Payable

.

of domfMtio

fork

azohaogi

'»n

W«w

at the underinentionod citinfl to-day: Savannsn. hurioff,
discount. Helling V^ discount to par ; Charla ton. buring
diacount, selling
par to 1-16 diacount ; New Orleant,

«

^

hank, nar; commerMAl $1 discount; St Ix.iiiii, 8lic. per
$1,000 discount bid Chicago, 3.5o. per $1,000 premiom.
Dslted NtateH Kondfi.— Quotations are as follows:
;

Book! Olo$td.
(Dayinetutit*.)

Hallroada.

&

WnttTtciwii

Toledo

A

Dbin

(Viit.

Ourt. (qusr.)
com. (quar.)

Ik
1

Not.
Not.

Oct.

Anipricnn Kxoliunge

3>a

Not.
Not.
Not.
Not.

Oct.
Got.
Oot.

Noxanu

4
5
3

Nntlonul City
Blato of New York
ma«**«Mai>**Aaa.
American DlatVt Tfloii'h (qunr.)
Erirjr

Trow Dtr.

A

Telniiliiiiic
Tel. iqr.)
rrtiit.
ll'kb'g pf. (qr.)

A

Inlerett

Not. 25

1

Not.
Not.

m

to Not.
1 to Not.

1

Not.

Not.
750. Not.
2
Not.

7
2

to
1 to Not.
1 to Not.

15
lb

22
2rt

Oet.

Oel.

0<X.

Oet.

24.

2»

29.

27.

98.

•100 "» 10olt'Mon^'•to '• nooia

•U4\«IU\MI4\ -lUH '114?
*114\»1H\M14:1»MI4\ 114%

•107^i•107l•|•107, -lO", •107'.
•i09%'no9\iMor.?i •ii>ii\ •lottS
*112% "ir^V •112\ 'l\'J\ -112*
*115"4'115'4 •Il»i4*ll5i4ni5i4
•118 I'lia rll8 'Hi i'H»
Tlllals tbeprlOA Uiil at cue moraiait uuard ; no $ale wan iniMe.
Ooremment Parcha8«8 of Sliver.—The following shows
the amount 0* silver purchased to date in October by the
Government. Tlie department having purchase 1 the arnouot
of silver required by law for the month, no further offers will
be considered until Wednesday, the 2d proximo.

WALL, 8TKEKT, VRIDAY, OCT. 38. 18<»!>-a P. M
The Moner Market and Financial Sitaation.—The great
event of the week has of course been the announcement of
the Beading and Boston & Maine alliance, which is quite a«
remarkable in

Oct.

23.

•If ••••••••*• ..rA|}.
4«, 1907
reit.
is, 1907
oonp.
«x, our'oy,'95
T»g.
6s, our'oj-,'96....re(t.
6«. our'c?,'97....reK61, our'cj-,'98....re)}
6«, 0T'ey.'99
red

to Not.
to Not.

2.">

Oel.

Period*

SI to

.Not. 1 1 to

Kniika.

Now

713

geographical combination as in its finanthe fact that New York & New England
'stock is said to be positively controlled, the destiny of that
rojid would seem to be final ly settled, and as a necessary result the stock will eventually drift out of the market, where
it has beeu facile prineeps among the speculative foot-balls
for many years past,
n
The first thing to be observed in regard to this latest
move on the great railroad chess-board is the circumstance
that it appears to have been conducted in an open-handed
way throughout, and the stocks of the three leading railroad:* have been brought undf r the control of capitalists havin :;
harmonious views, by purchase in the open market of so much
stock as was necessary to give a suiH<-ient ownership.
No law
has yet been passed forbidiling individuals from purchasing
and holding a majority of the stock of a corporation, and,
further than that, there are at least two important cases now
pending in the courts in which the actual owners of a clear
majority of the stock of a raiiro id com()any have been held
to lie the rightful parties to control the corporation as again-^t
other directors who were technically in possession through
the votes or authority of former ownf-rs.
It is rather difficidt to predict the course of the local monev
market during the next two month*, but there is not much
apprehension of a violent squt-eze in call money such as we
have often had in these months. Nor is it easy to estimate
very closely the effect of the present inflation by the compulsory Lssue of Government legal ttnder notes against the
monthly purchases of silver. That this steady "output" of
notes has had a decided influence on our markets during the
current year is one of the elements in the situation that
should not be lost sight of.
The open market rates for call loans during the week on
took and bond collaterals have ranged from 3 to 7 per cent,
the average being 5}^ per cent.
To-day rates on call were
5 to 6 per cent.
Commercial paper "is quoted at 5^@6
per cent.
The Bank of England weekly statement to-day showed
a decrease in bullion of £2.50.000, and the percentage of reits

Ounce*
Previously reported..
Octotier

•me

montb

purekand.

5,413,000
1,220,000
1,364,000

'^4

"
26
"
28
•Local pnroliases
•Total in

Ouneet

offered.

From

cial beaiings.

to date

..

local piirohases of

7,997,000

eaob week are not reported

68.'23:J.500'

& New England mortgage 4s
A and B are now traded in on the

Reading
series

;

LoaoR and

dlBO'tB 45-.',333,900 Deo.7,

1

Borplas reserve.

&

Railroad and Migcellaneoos Stocks.-The interest of the
stock market h-^s centred mainly around a few specialties
in which the greater part of the week's transactions have

1890.

The New York & New England and Phila. &
Reading stocks have naturally been very active in vie w of the
final development of the Boston & Maine alliance, and the
first-named closes at 45iii against 44'^ last week and Reading at 58}^ against 581^ in our last. There has been so much
said of tius new combination in the daily press and its good
results remain so much a matter for future demonstration
that It is unnecessary to comment further upon it here.
The Distilling & Cattle Feeding stock, formerly known as
the Whiskey Trust, has shown very large sales, and closes at
633^ against Oofg last week as there is no definite information for the public, the dealings are presumably for the
account of insiders, or possibly sales have been made by a few
parties who have resolved to consume less whiskey, and who
are therefore less buoyant in their sentiments a!>uut Distilling
& C. F. Chicago Gas remains steady on continued large dealings, and it
is stated that the next quarterly dividend
will be l\^ per cent instead of IVi.
The other industrials
have also continued in favor as speculatives, and Sugar, Tobacco, Lead and Linseed Oil are traded in quite freely, with the
result of daily fluctuations noted in the tatile below.
Western
Union Telegraph has not been very active since the increase
in ctock was approved of on Tuesday, an 1 the general belief
taken place.

60,812,700
62.331.600
40.5, 602,400 402,166,000
3,49;<,800
5. 576,000
41G 100.600 398,765,WOO
82 210,100 78,333,800
34, 2.-jl,20O 21,212,800
99,566,600
99,691,475

2,332,425 Inc .1,793.375! 12,391,150 Def.124,875

Foreign Exchange.

—

Sterling bills have been easier, owing
to the better supply of commercial drawn ag linst cotton.
The congestion in the grain trade works against a large
amount of bills from this source. Tnere have been at times
moderate silee of securities for London account. Actual rates
of exchange are: Bankers sixty-days' sterlmg, 1 82^04 83;
demand, 4
86 cables, 4 86,^4 86I4'.
Posted rates of leading bankers are as fallows:

m%m

October 28.

Amsterdam

bankers
yrankfortorBreiDewlrelohmarkslb'nkers
(Kullders)

;

;

Sixty Days.

Prime bankers' sterling bilia on London.. 4 83>934
Prime com meroia.
...........
4 82 «4
'.'.
D,H)amentary commercial
4 81^(»4
ParlB bankers (francs)
5 20»s»5

84

94'^a<>

Demand.
4 8d>s34 87

H2'4

82
20

40»40li(i

95

now is that the directors next week will vote to distribute 10
per cent as a stock dividend. Silver bullion certificates are

5 181695 171*
40<i«940>4

95*a995'«

&

&

Oct. 25.

191.100
O.H11.400 Inc.
39,700
460,8H5,100 Dec,7, 297.900
70,(i49,300 iJeo.l, 33.200
Specie
Le^al tenders
46,904,400 Inc. 1, 102.100
Beserve held.... 117,553.700 I>ec,
31.100 116, 491,300
Leeal reserve
115,221.275 Deo.l, 824.475 104, 100,150
Circulation

and income bonds
Philadelphia Board

&

64, 130.700

Set deposits

o

at pretty good prices.
Atchison bonds are steady on the company's favorable earnings the Atlantic
Pacific 4s, guaranteed, are ttie lowestpriced first mortgages of the Atchison system. The Northern
Pacific and Chicago
Northern Pacific bonds are steady at
their recent figures. Louisville New Albany
Chicago consol.
63 jumped up to 104 Wednesday on small purchases said to
have been in consequence of listing at the London Stock Exchange. The Chicago Gas L.
Coke firsts have sold freely
above 90 and close at 90}^.

59,:372.700

....

Monday

&

$

60,422,700

BurplUB

till

'

a surplus over the required reserve of $3,333,433, against
$539,050 the previous week.

Oapital...

::::::

$0-8345 » «0-8«90

—

and

1891.

4, 423,112

—

The New York Clearing-House banks in their statement of
Oct. 23 showed a decrease in the reserve held of $31,100

Oct. 24.

* I

Coins. The following are the current quotations in gold f o r
various coins:
tKivurel^ns
94 83 «$4 88 Fine silver bars..
85 •
85ia
Napoleons
... 3 8)
9 3 90 Five ti<»aos. ...... — 90 s —95
X X Reiclimarks. 4 70 9 4 80 Mexican dollars.. — 66is» — 67H
25 Pesetas
4 75 a 4 85
Do uaoKiumaro'l— — 9
Span. Doubloons. 15 5.5 a 15 70 Peruvian sols..... — 61 • — 62
Mex. Doubloons. 15 55 915 70 GngUsb silver.... 4 80 9 4 90
PlneKold bars... par 9^4 prem. U.S. trade dollars — 70 9
State and Kallroad Bonds.— Sales of State bonds at the
Board have included $28,000 Ark, 7s, L. R. & Ft. S., at 19®
Red K., at I'im^i; $3,000 I'enn.
201^; $9,000 do., N. O.
seiilt. 3s at 78 buyer 3; $1,000 N. C. sp. tax, VV. N. C. BR., at
iJi ; 7,000 Ala. class "A' at 102.
Railroad bonds have been in good demand on the general
list wiihiul any large speculative business in particular issues.
The Reading income bonds have been remarkably quiet during the excitement pertaining to the great New Eagliud deal,
which has kepi the Reading stock active, and the best single
point for the Reading lUi^omes seems to be in the fact that
the company assumes no n w liabilities in the way of guarantees.
The Reading statement of earnings for September has
been published, and whatever the result of the remaining two
months of the fiscal year ending Noveml>er 30th, the increase
in net surplus over last year is already sufficient to app.irently
ensure the full payment of 5 per cent on all three issues of
preferred income bonds in February next. The new Pnila.

;

Differen'sfrom
Prev. week.

3,270,112*0-8345 » *0-S6ftO
313.000 $0 H625 » #«)-8050
840,000 »0-8563 » «0 8585

«

the loUowluK week.

serve to liabilities was 41-35. against 40*8S last week the discount rate remains unchanged at 3 per cent. The Bank of
France shows an increase of 1,300,000 franca in gold and
2,825,000 francs in silver.

1892.

Pneepaid,

•

'

Oel. 22,

.

I

dull at 85^4.

-

.

.

.

THE^CHRONICLE

714

NEW YOKE STOCK EXCKXHG^r-ACTIVE STOCKS
HIOHEST AND LOWBST
Batnrday,
Oct. 22.

Honda}-,

Tuesday,

Oct.

Oct

24.

89% 40
•4

95i«
'85 5(

68
129

29%
23
•60
-41

955,

87
58>4
I29I4
2936
23>s
...
...

39% 40%

4

62

971«
7914

123

lien

97>«
81
123>4
1161s

143
8318 84

'142

5314 53=8
118''ell9i<
65
651s

291s
•73

135
•153
*l6ia
52I1

5
•32

29i»

75
135
154
171s
52af

5

35
•10% 12
148 148
•134 136
99% 100
11
•36
251a
78

951s

22%

22''8

6OI3
•41

601s

26.

39%

39>e

4I8
95I4

•4
9514

147

22I4
•6014
•41

142

22%

28, and since JAN. 1, 1893.

Oct.

Oct.

27.

150

Atchison Top.

<fe

Santa Fe....

& Paoiflc
& Ohio

Atlantic

Baltimore

Canadian Paoitio

-,

57% Canada Southern

129
29

Central of New Jersey
Central Pacific

22% 22% Chesapeake & O., vot. tr. cert.
Do
do
Ist pref
Do
do
2d pref

•41

145

150

150

Chicago

4

Alton

102% 103% Chicago Burlington * Qulnoy.
61% 61% Chicago &. Eastern Illinois
61
99^
99
Do
pref.
99% 99% 100
79''8 80%
79% 80% Chloasro Milwaukee & St. Paul.
8II4
80% 811s 80%
I2314 123% 12314 I2314 123% 123% 12278 12276
Do
pref.
116 1161s 115% 116% 115% 116 Chicago & Northweetem
116% 117
141 143
Do
pref.
83% 84% 83% 84% 82''8 83% 82% 83% Chicago Rock Island *Paclfic.
5314 53%
52% 53% 62% 52% 51% 52% Chicago St. Paul Minn. &. Ova.

102%

lOS'e

•61% 62
•99
S9^

•119 120 •119
120
II914 120
65% 65% 64% 65%
651s 65'e

30
•73

30%
75

I3514 135i»
I5314 1531$
•161s 17's
521s 521s
•5
6

•33

35

•10%

12

135
100

135
100

11

Ills

-37

39

26%
781s

2518
781s

26%

133
104
69% 70
26
27

22

21''8

133
103

98
30

98

30
75
134
153% 154

30

•73

73

134

134

30
75
134

'

118

35

•33

36

•31
•10

148

146

•10% 11% •10% 11%
148

146

99% 100

pref.

Oleve. Clnoln. Ohio.

Do

i.8

De

52

Do
pref.
5% EastTenneeseeVa. AOa
35
Do
1st pref.
11%
Do
2d pref.
148 EvansvlUe & Terre Haute

135% 134 135
99% 99%
100
11
11%
•11
11
11%
38%
•37
38% •36
39
25
25%
25
25
25
7778 78%
78
78% 77% 78
13;^% 133%
132% 133% 133 133
103 104
103 104
103 104
69
69% 69% 6878 69% 69
26
26% 25% 26% 25% 25%
135% •134

pref.

133% Delaware & Hudson
154 DelawareLaokawanna^West
16% Denver <& Rio Qrande

100
11
•37
25

'146
•134

Do

* St. L. ..
pref.
29% 29% Coliunbne Hocking Val. & Tol.
•73
75
98

133%
153% 153% 163
17% 16%
le's le^e •16
52
52% 51% 51% 51%
b%
•5
•4% 5%
6

32

120

64% 65

•20

22

•20

26%
63%

45
242

26=8
63'e

48

247

26% 26%
63

46^8

242

64
49
247

26% 26%

62

63

44% 49%
242

248

19% 19iV 19% 19% 19% 19%
18% 19% 18% ISTg 18% 18'(,
65% 6714 •66% 67% 67% 67%
11% 11% •1014 im •10% 11%
•40
4018 •40
40
40% 40
•1814 191s
18% 18% •18% 19
50 14 507e
49'8 50%
50% 51%
•1!2

•29
•74
•23
181s
571s
22is
•61
-35

8%

•40

24
30
78
25

ISH
58»s,

221s
621s
36is
8'8

44

•22% 24
•29
30
•74
23''e

23''e

•29
•74
23^8
15
57^8

23

•21% 23

78

17% 18%
58%

57 '8
•22

61% 62%
35

6178

30
78
23'78

17%
59%
6178

35

8% 8% '"8% ""8%
43
42

26% 26%

61

62

44% 45%
'242

247

19%
18%
66%
10%
39%

78

23% 23%
15% 16%
58% 59%
•22

23

61% 61%

32
8%
37

37

8%

•451a

Do

& Western
pref.
& Mich. Southern.
Long Island
Louts ville A Nashville..
Loulsv. New Alb. & CTilcago..
Lake Erie

. .

Do

Lake Shore

86% 36%
Ills

2918
•45
•75

11% •11%

29I4

49
77

40% 41
181a

181s

12
27 14

27 '»

12-,

2514 25%
66% 67
*15ii

46
83

36% 36%

17

46%
83%

2J
'45
•75

ll'^e

29%
49
77

40%
18%
12%
27%

41%
18%
12%

2478

26

27%

64% 67%

•15% 17

46% 47%
83% 84

•45
•75

40
1778

12
27
24
64

49
77
407e
18

12%

27%
2478

64%

•15% 17

46% 47%
84% 85%

45
77

77

24

77
24

16% 16%
68% 59
•22
6178

35

8%

23

Jan. 19 27%
Jan.
5 80
Jan. 19 140%
Jan. 1 112
Sept. 23
Sept. 1

14% Jan.
Jan.

402 103% Sept.
150
8
Feb.
620

18
14

1.018
27,466

24

Mar.

June
June

54% June
34% Jan.
84

2,267
1,070

35

107%

15%

5
6

7
2'

Oct. 17
Sept. 15
July 7

Do
<fe

West., pref.

tr.

pref.
certs.

8% Richmond A West Point Ter'l

42

Do

300 19
100 19
30 70
350 21%
12,455 15
366,570 38
100 19%
600 57%
320 36
3,215

Do

•44
•75

Toledo
7

Aug. 27
Feb. 26
Jan. 19

•15% 17

46% 46% 46% 46%
84
84% 34
85%

Do

Wheeling

Do

A Lake

17,112
1,660 34%
7
2,520,
1,880. 23

100 45
75
14,298

pref.
pref.

17,343
5.887

3

Jan.

7

Mar.
Aug.
Mar.
Aug.
Aug.

18

l*
3

1»
48%
la20% Jan. IS
33% Jan. 18
65% Jan. 4
42% Jan. 8

91 June 21.
119% Mar. 5

22% Jan.
81% Jan.
45

Jan.
Jan.

6

4
4

34%
%
77% Mar. B
59
252

Mar.

8

June S
23% Feb. 11
19% Oct. 2T
69% Aug. 23

72%
24

Jan.
Jan.

4
4

2

8
6

37% Mar. 2»
91% Jan. 28
33% Jan. 4.
2278 Jan.
Feb.

65

36%

79
41

74

4

11

Feb. 16Jan. B

Mar. 11

113% June

July 14 11%
July 14 22%
July 6 4S7e
Jan. 19 108

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Oct.

Feb. 251116% Jan
41% Jan.
July 1 14% Jan,
Sept. 13;

Apr.

1

Oct.
6
Oct. 13
Sept. 15

29%
52%
88

50%

Oct.

32% Jan. 19 4778
63% Jan. 19 85%

30>

8
3
7

T
»
4
4

17

Feb. IS
Feb. 11
Jan. 4
Jan. 4

4,430 237eOct. 27 40% Jan.
2,291 64 Oct. 26 80% Jan.
15% Sept. 15 21% Jan.

Erie

pref.

June IT

714 157e July 11 25
3,323 10 June 8 15% Jan
22,895 22% June 8 33% Jan

A Gulf.

Wisconsin Central Co.
iniiicellaneouii Stocks,.
American Cotton Oil Co

Do

39%

624 103

pref.

4

30% Jan. B
67% Jan. B
46% Apr. 29^
6% June 27 17% Feb. 1*
Sept. 12

1,006

A Ohio Central

Do

Oct. 26
Jan. 19
Sept. 15
Sept. 7
Oct. 25

35%

pref.

Union Paotfio
Union Pacific Denver
Wabash

Jau. 12
July 13
Sept. 15

37

105

40%
40% 40
17% 17% 17% 17%
12
12%
12% 12
26% 27% 26% 27
2378 24%
24
24
64% 64% •62% 63%

Sept. 21
Sept. 28

100 68
278 110
200
6%
1.015 14

pref.

Rio Grande Western

70

47%

6
IS

Apr. 18.
Apr. 18
Mar. 5

84% Jan.

31
24
2 139
117
15
25 21%

200 72 May 19
300 32% Sept. 16

38,997

pref.

Peoria Deca"^ur & EvansvlUe.
Philadelphia & Reading
Pittsburg Cinn. Chio. & St. L.
Pitts.

Aug. IX

120
9 Sept. 23 18 Jan.
300 37% Sept. 29 56 Jan.
515 17% »?ept. 19 26% Jan.

pref.

Oregon R'y & Navigation Co.
Oregon 6h. Llnf&Utah North

6178

40

•15% 17

Jan. 22 144

Jan.
Sept. 16 110
978 July 19 15% Jan.
35 Sept. 16 56% Feb.

<Si

112% 114

45
•75

i

95%

10,475 104
1,175

2!

54 Mar. 9
Jan.
June 23
9% Jan. 7
30% June 21 51% Jan. 11
7% June 22 20 Feb. 29
xll9%Jan.l5 151 Sept. »•

1,965 20%
1,848 69%
2,310 120
10 95
7,900 64%
9,730 20%

100

Sept.

80% June *
149% Apr. "
T.
167% Feb. 29
19% Jan. S

4

.

42

106

IOC'

pref.

107
Do
pref.
112% 114 St. Paul Minn. A Manitoba...
36% 36% 36% 36% 36% 36% Southern Paoiflc Co
11 Texas A Paciflo
11% 11% 11
11% 11
•28% 2878 •28% 29 Toledo Ann Arbor A N. Mloh.
28% 29
104

500

327

111% 112% 112 112
112% 112% 111% 112% Rome Watertown AOgdensb.
•7% 8
8
7% 7% •7% 7% -7% 7% St. Louis Southwestern
14% 15%
Do
pref.
15% 15% 15% 15
15
15% 15
43 St. Paul A Dnluth
45
45% 43% 44% 43% 44% 43
4e>s

105 105
107 107
105 105
1121a 1141s 114% 114% 112% 114

200 15
45

2,925

26% 26% New York Lake Erie & West'n 25,705 24% Sept. 14
61% 62%
3,260 61 Sept. 12
Do
pref.
44% 45% New York A New England
419,840 3078 Aug. 24
•242 247 New York New Hav. & Hart
224 Jan. 15
19% 19% New York Ontario & Western 10,635 17% Sept. 15
18% 19% New York Busquehan, West. 17,120 10%Jau. 4
68% 69
3,530 41% Jan. 2
Do
pref.

70
15

66 Jan. 6
1,105 12278 Jan.
2,100 133% Jan. 19

Iowa Central..

Ill's 112%
•71*

»

1,682

19%
19%
69%
10% •10% 11 Norfolk A Western
40
Do
39% •39
•18
18% 18% Northern Paolfio
19
50%
Do
50% 51% 50
22
22'4 Ohio & Mississippi
22
22
•^9
29% 29% Ohio Southern
30
-74

H

Illinois Central

.

O

52,936 32% May 21 46% Jan. 4.
100
4 Apr. 21
578 Jan. %
3,523 92% Oct. 8 101% Mar. la
100 86 Oct. 26 94% Jan. IS
2,100 54% Sept. 15 64% Mar. S
1,300 111% Jan. 19 145 Feb. 29
18 28 Sept. 2 35 Jan. 4
6,835 21% Sept. 16 28 Jan. 14
205 59 Jan. 9 64% Jan. IS
38% Jan. 9 44% Jan. 21
200 139 Feb. 4 154 July 2846,445 95 Sept. 15 110% Jan. 2»
250 60 Aug. 8 70 Jan. a
1,259 96% Sept. 28 104 Feb.
159,700 75% Apr. 2 84% Aug. 1
1,049 120% Jan. 19 1287eMar.
8,963 111% Sept. 15 12179 Mar. ft
141% Jan. 12 147% May 2?
30,109 75% June
94% Jan. 7
4,100 44 Jan. 19 54% Aug. B
200 103% Jan. 20 123% June S
6,185 59% Sept. 16 75 Jan. 7
130 05 Jan. 15 99% Aug. 151,225 277e Oct. 5 40 Mav 18

400 119

Great Northern, pref

•JO
22 Louiaville St. Louis <& Texas
22
133 134% Manhattan Elevated, consol..
1341s 135ie I3418 1351* 133% 134% 133% 134
107% lOTS Michigan Central
108i» •1071a 1081* '107% 108% 109
109
108
•17
-16% 17% i6% 17% Minneapolis & St. Louis
•17
17
18
17
171s
46is 46'f
45% 45% 45% 46%
46
Do
pref.
47
47
46
14% 147| Missouri Kansas & Texas
1478 147e -14% 15
14'8 147e •15
151s
26I4 26V)
25
25%
•25% 26
Do
26
26
26
pref.
26
6258 63
62% 63% 61% 62% 61% 62 Missouri Paciflo
6318 631s
•35
*35ia 3711 •35% 37
'SO<s 37
37% *a5% 37 Mobile AOhlo
•83
•83
87 Nashv.Chattanooga&St. Louie
•83
•80
•80
87
85
87
87
109 78 110 New York Central & Hudson.
110 110
110% 110% 110 110
1097eiio
16% 16% New York Chic. & St. Louis
I714 1714
16
16% leij 16% 16% 16
72
80
•75
•75
75
75
Do
1st pref
75
80
75
80
35% 36%
3614 36i« •36
36
Do
2d pref.
36
371s •35% 36Vi
21''f.

Highest

Stock*.

•60%

61

'145

87

RR.

Active

sales In 1893.

Lowest.

Shares.

39% 89%
4% 4%
94% 95

22% 22%

61

Range of

Week,

28.

_„,

39% 39%
•4% 4%
94% 94%

Bales
of the

BTOCKS.

Friday,

Thursday,

•40%

104^8 10314 104ie
61
•611s 62I2

39

251s
78>4
1331s
1041s 1041s
6918 69'e

Wednesday,
Oct.

OCTOBER

FRIOBB.

•85% 86% -85%
86
86
87
57% 57% 57%
58
58% 5714 58
'128
127"sl29
1281s 128% 129% 129
29
•28% 30
•29
•28
30
...

•11

132%
26
•20

414

941a
•86

147*1147% 147
10416 104% 104
62

25.

for week ending

[Vol LV.

4

4
B

4
4

Aug. 18
Oct. 2ff

129,355 78% Jan. 19 115% Aut 25
111% 113% 112% 114% 110% 113% 110% lll7e 110% 111% Am. Sugar Ref.Co
Do
6,375 90 Jau. 19 107% Aug. 19
102'8 104% 104% 105
pref
102% 103% 102% 102% 102% 103
92% 94
93% 94% 93% 94% 92% 9379 92% 93% Chicago Gas Co., trust reo'ts. 126,116 71% Jan. 2; 94% Oct. 25
8,255 28% May 24 43% Oct 5
Colorado Coal A Iron.,.,.
41% 42
41
41% 40% 41% 40% 41% 4078 41%
2,433 102 Jan. is!l20% Oct 24
119% 120% 119% 119% 118% 120
118 118
118% 113% Consolidated Gas Co
Distilling A Cattle Feed'gCo. 238,915 44% Mar. 9 68% Oct 28
65% 67
66% 68% 67% 68% 65
68% 63% 66
9,354 104% July 7 11978 Oct 7
115% 117
116% 117% 115% 116% 115% 116% 115% 116% General Electric Co
4,503 91% Mar. 7 135 Oct 5
134 134% 134% 134% 134 184
133% 134
133% 134 National Cordage Co
625 100 Jan. 4 123%Ang. 17
117% 117% 117 117% 116 116
i>o
pref.
'115% 116%
117 117
45% 47% 47% 48% 47% 48
48,756 30% Mar. 24 48% Oct 27
47% 48% 47% 48% National Lead Co
96% 96% 96 'a 97
3,346 81 Mar. 24 99% Aug. 28
pref.
Do
96% 96% 96% 96% 96
96%
12% 127e 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% 12% North American Co
2,400 11% May 18 1878 Jan. 4
22% 22% •22
200 19 June 14 29% Jan. 4
•22
24
23% •21% 23% •21
24 Oregon Improvement Co.....
31% 32% 31% 82% 31% 82% 82
2,520 29% Sept 16 40% Jan. 4
32
32
32 P.^ciflc.Mail
51% 51% 50''8 SO's 50% 51% 50% 50% 50% 50% Pipe Line Certificates^
25,000 50 Oct 17 64% Jan. 18
198% 199% 199% 199% 198% 200
363 184 Jan. 4 200% May 11
198% 199% 198% 200 Pullman Palace Car Co
86
86% 85^'8 86% 85% 85% 85% 85% 85% 85% Silver BuUiou Certificates
332,000 82% Aug. 12 95% Jan. 4
88
89
38% 38% 37
2,680 31% July 11 50% Mar. 10
88
38
33% 37% 38% Tennessee Coal A Iron .......
102 105 102 105 102 105
130 92 Feb. 23 108 Apr. SI
100 100
100 105
p*ef.
Do
98% 9!)% 99% 09% 9S
15.734 82 Jan. 19 100% Aug. 18
99
98% 98% 08% 98% West«m Union Telegraph
'

XkfiM

H« Mm* i>rl««4 bid ana asked;

no

eale

made , 6filoes Irom botli £soti«ages. x £x dlrideBd.

I

—
Ootobeb

h

V

.

'

.
.

.

Ranga ftalM) <» 1892.

Oct. 28.

IMACIIVE BTOCKI.

Bid.

Iiidlc'nton unllHtcd.

Ask

LowtMl.

All>»iiv

\'

li

(

170
•3
160

100 160
83
LinoH.lOO

•iiiihiinnn
irloiiK Air

Sti

ic

pn-t
100 141
Y. Air l.lue pref..lOO 100

*

BoBton

.S.

100 SO
86
BulTiilo K(i('luMtL>r Ji Pittsburg. 100
rrofi<rr<Ml
100 87
01
100
Burl. Cilar KnpliU 4 Nor
100
Cellar FiilUA MlnneHntn
166
50
Clevolniid A I'lttHburif
100
Cohiiiihln * (iri't'iivUlo pref
100 "S'i
I>e» MoliU'.4 A: Kort UoUce
100
20
Prt-ferrtMl
Dululh Ho. ^<hllrc <fc Atlautio H .100
100 29
Prcri>rrf(l«100
Flint A Hero Mnrquotto
100
PrefurriMl
4>«
100
Georslii PnelHcIT
Gr. Dajr Win. *8t. P. tr.reo....lOO : I2»e
10<i
Iloiistiiii A TfXiis Central
6
Hnxiklyii Kli'vnlcJ

34
34

1)

70

Keokuk &

100
100
100
St L. Cong. 100
100

160

Feb.

Jan. 130

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

A

9>«

30

5
14

12^1

30

tt

11
18

So price Friday

i\.\

14

June
July

10^8 Apr.

May

9
20

Mar.

21
61

61

Aug.

Sept.

100
110

77'* Feb.
100 Fob.
4i«
314 Mar.
151»9 143 >H Jan.
1073i Apr.

May
May

June
Sept.

Jan.

June
June
Jan.
{

f\ Indioatu tustual
<M.30.

A

."(an

35
160
86

17%

12

14

8>ii

. .

SECURiriES.
4

A,

36%

100

niarellBueoua Stock*.
Adams Express
1 00 :150
Amerloan Bank Note CoTI
Amerioan Express

Jan.

100
100
100
Preferred
100
Brunswick Company
100
Cblo. Juno. Ry. A Stock TarJs.lOO
2'i'* Apr.
Preferred
100
87 Mar. ClllEena' Oas of Brooklyn
100
7 Jan. Colorado Fuel pref
100
13 14 Auir. Columbus A Hooking Coal
100
8\ Oct. Commercial Cable
100
96 Jan. Consol. Coal of Maryland
100
14 Jan
Edison Electric Illuminating. 1 00
6 Sept. LaoIedeOas
100
la's Sept.
Preferred
100
26 May Lehigh A Wilkosbarre Coal II
60 May Maryland coal
100
100 Apr. Minnesota Iron
100
100
1121a Apr. Xational Un8>-ed Oil Co
5 Jan. National Starch Mfg. Co
100
155 Aug. New Central Coal
100
113i«July Ontario Silver Mining
100
26 Jan. Pennsylvania Coal
50
61 Sept. P. I/orlllard Co pref
100
16\ Jan. Postal Telegraph— Cable H
155 Apr. Quicksilver Mining
100
179 Aug.
Preferred
100
11 Apr. Texas Paciflc Land Trust
100
59\ Apr. U. 8. Express
100
10*4 July Wells. Fargo Express
100

A

Ainer. Telegraph

Cable
Amerloan Tobaooo Co. H

:

50
120
87

43 Feb.
lie Feb.
80 Jau.
124^ 106 Oct.
114>i 96 Jan.
7>8July
72 Apr.
80 >g Jan.
68

108

110

164
28
;106

169
31

Class B, 59
Class C. 4a

Cnirency funding 48

Arkansas— 6s, fund. Hoi. 1 S9g-1!)00

8

do. Non-Holtord
7s. Arkansas Central
1914
l.oul.><iaua— 7«, cons

160

KR

Stamped 4s
Missouri-Fund

New York

e6'a

We

1910

Capital Surplus

4

9413 Rhode Island— 6s,

for the

Loam.

New York

week ending
(00)

Oct.
in all cases.

Specie.

Legata. Deposits.

Bank of
Manha'tanCo

2,noo,o
2,030,0
2,000.0
2,000,0
3.000,0
1,000,0
1,000,0
780,0
300,0
600,0
1,000,0
3U0,0
400,0

Karchants'
Mechanics'
America.

Pheoix

——

City

Tradosmeu's
Chemical
Mercliaatfl* Exch'go
Oalliitin National...
Butchers'A Orov'rs*

Mechanics' A Trad's
GreenwlL-h
I<oa^hpr Manufac'rs

20

,0

600,0

Sevouth Na'ioual...

30i),0
l.'iOO.O

State of New York.
AmeriAaii Exch'go..

1,«B3,
l,69"l,
9rf7,

2,009,

2,105,0
4i!t,0
2,'i97,3

I1,H10,0
11,068,0
7,'iiH,

I

7,949,0
17,l8;<,v
4,

'75.0

11,6:19,5

1,50-',0

5,5.^'2,0

30a,2
434,7
m:<,9

1,711,1-

n*,!>
268,9
220,0
lb3.8
610.5
349,

137,11

370,0

2,630.0
1, 057.0
3,392,7
1,842,8
2.540,6
14,617.0
12,606,6

.120,0

1,815,.T
3,3!*3,0

17,320,0
1H,H02,T

1,016,2

42'i,7

Irvine,

A

Pultoa

St. .Vichnlas

A

11,841,6
.\92 >,8
2,292,3

Leather..

K.tcli lugo.

259

1,000,0

Continental
1,000,0
Orioolal
300,0
Importers' A Trad's! 1.600,0
j

Paik
Kast River
Fonrlh -iatlou.il

I

First

3'IO,0

oial
^'atioua' .....
.N.-ti

Thlnl National

N.Y.

.s'at

Exchange

Jlowery

New York County..
<ierman..\mt?rlcau..
Cbise Natl inaL

.vreuue
Oerman Kxchange..

Flf^Ji

Germanla
ITntleil Sia'cs
In

Unc

.Va'lon.il

....

of the .Metrop

Wo»tJ3ide
Seaboa'd
Sixth National
W6«t»^rn Nattona'.
First Sv.1., Br'klyu
SoutUaru Natioual.
To»nl

150,0
600,0
1,000,0
3 '0,0
230,0
200,0
740,0
500,0
100,0
200,0
200,0
510,0
3')0,0

Garlic d

FUIU
Bank

a.ooo.o

250,0
3,200,0
2,000,0

Central National
Second National

Ninth

33','.;

446, V
275,7

780,0
600.0
500,0

Nas.-.aii

Mark.t

2,78l',9

Hlti.t

873,'
3!0,8
BSO,"
1,-91,3

Sl)0,0

Cilu.'n.s'..,— -. ...

Shoe
Corn

447,0

460,0

......

_

3,S19,7

1,SOO,0

,.

-.200,0
•.!00,0

3 10,0
200,0
6U<:,o

200.0
2,100,0
300,0
1,100,0

127.813
127.709,

8
15

..

127.701),

..

12 ',6.-.6,
128,056

Roaton.*
"

"

8l8,.->

12.^4
4
1,'J31,«

260,2
421,3
5,514,8
2,H97,7

5,921,

391,5
469.8
2V4,4
7 26,8
206,9
205,7
34T,4

6)3,0

5H,

•

i,:l

8,779.8
3,151.7
11,471,8
0,029,1
3,40.'.0

014,4

5.7il'-'.4

l,14i*,1

607,3

17,980,9
3,216
3.3 !6.2
4,301,1

2,<no.i
2,857,0
7,573, 'i

140,8

308,6

•^.229,>1

4.i.5,0

;i«l,0
45'2,0

3.3 |i,0
0.419,1

4.S.S6,e

2.U^,o
23,13-1.0
'24,H12,0

3.081,0
2,1,871,1
6.0.17,4

1,507,2
2,93",0
3,16-1,1
2, SI (1,1

14,040,3
6,53l).6
2,-lia.l

3,172,3
7,149,7
6,21»,7
4,1'29,0

1,896,0
4,59i,l
2,39 S,0
4,l61',il

807.9

1,783,0
11,35S,6
4,981,0

14'2,0

2,-244,a

•.•46,7

3^2,3
2,2>?7,7

4,><S

3,19'i.:l

5.43.1,0

5-i7,3

607,0

5'i8,7
6.10,6

465,'
201,1
7,030,3

909.3
5S1,9
544,9

95,>1

1,84 i,4
1,30'<1,0

247,1

P,i'n,0

559,9

_

19H.7
305, •

19,7.'3,1

276.1
1,100,8

1.632,

731,5
1,055,0
14 ',.1
1,116,9
853,6

2.t)P4.8
4,12.'.l

577,1-

164.1

401,9
2,30,1,0

K,ili,0
2,9 7,:<

1«,00'2.

1,875,0

51!>,5

0(1,5

HI,
l,56'l,

676,8
4,214,0
308,2
414.9

1,1««,2

Hi, 4

1'29,7

376,7

1,014,9
1,14 ',2
153,4
4,101.0
6,083,0
100,2
3,738,3
1,6 95,0
9u:,ll
3J;<,"
3,1.54,3

2H6,8
451,»
2,207,0
2,486,8
172.H
1,492,4
1,378,0
081,0
668,1
1,841,9

647,3

>'02,1

73,2

240,7

6,<;l«.3
l.;(76,9

636,0
710,0
382,4
2,608,3
972,5

i-;o,o

3,23 ,0

148,
195,6
l,4'Jo,5

593,3

2(K),4

lir,,5

294,8

61«,0

l,5in<.2

4:i3,9

76

',4

983,1
314,1
008,4
314,0
775,0
240,0
2,409,5
85H.0
120,2

61^,2
602,9
26H,B
615,9
253,0
354,0
151,0
1,494,5
2'n,0
383,4

"
"

4,6JH,0

5,59'l,3

2,150.0
23.810,0
29.503,5

Lt^U.

974100
,

JD«Po»«».t Oirc'Vn Clearingu

S

$

9

4G.3, '39l,I 71,907.0,48,134.5 47'A41I>,7 5,576,5 774,118,5
4J9, 52^,0 71,7S ',5 45.10^.3 4'8,183,0 5,571,7 632,I>U»,1
452, 333,9 70,649,3 46,904,4,460,-85,1 5,611,4 676,008,0

8...

61,642,

Ifli,

Cl.61'2,

164, ''50,H

61,642,

103,

..

3.5,793,

15...
22...

33,7!)3,

9.790,6l 6,42H,5|l4e,866,4 4,a?6,7 113,009,8
9,8S7,2| 0,v'06,3,149.1M«.3 4,"3i,0 104,030.5
10,005,21 6,974,5 147,737,2 4,857,0 96,897,3

110 f,30,0
110, 381,0
110, 316,0

33,793,

Ask.

166.,037,7 7.3,41.1.0 51,7.38,8 480,522,9 5,645,2 688,939,1
«61, 903,5 71.021.0 5 1. 6.! 1.1 470,59 <,8 6,674,6 613,279,9

104,7

5«,0

11?,8'!9.0 3.529,0
112,i90,o 3.532,..
Ill,>a4.0i3,562.0

30,337,0
29,411,0
28.471,0

* U't; onUt two ciphtn tn all these ft^ureJi,
delphla, the item "due to other banks."

tlncladlan. (or B>stoa

83,188,7
72,955,1
78,698,2

and Phils

Miscellaneons and Unlisted Bonds.— Stock Ex. prices.
IHIscpll'tne'viiv

Amor.

Bon'N.

!>INcellaneon<4 RoDd«.

\V.iter Work-t -lat 63.
lat con t. 5*, K
OahabaUo.-a Miu.— l»t g, 73..

Peoplo'3 (*aa

Co,

Ch,J n.&3. Yds. -Col.t.g,59
olorndt Fuel-Oen. 6i

Pr

&

C.

>

l3t g 63. •105

c*.er

A G

Security Cor 1st con3. g 63.
\Ve<tern Union Toleg. -78..
Wheel L E&P.Coii Istg.Ss

—

9719b.
i:5>*b.

Unli^ie4 Hond^.
Vlckt.— C pnsol. 53, g.
Vioks. A Morld i»i68

Col. .6 Hock. Co \l <fe l.-(S\ g
Conaol'ii O lal -Convert. 63... 'lOtVJ.
Cons.Ua^ Co .r'hic— lstgii.53
ajt.b.
Denv. (,'. Wat.Wk< Uon.K-3.5
Kdison Eloo. 111. Co. -Lit 03 . 103 b.
Eq litablu O. .ft P.— 1st 83... lU'iai.
HunderHoa BriOfro -Istg. 64.
Hoboken Laud
Ira i.-ff. 03
Mntail Union Teles.— 61. g.. Ill=i4b.
National
.Mttj.— NtOi. 107 b.
ui thwe-^tern *r -le^rftph—78. 107 "ab
< tila Water Co.—0», k
100 b.

87iab.

Ala.

70 6.

&

.\>Unia

A

Cliarl.— 1st 78

100

A

NOTC— "t"ludl»te3 prlce](,i(; "a" price <uk(1. * Lateit price tklt irMk
Bank Stock List. Latest prices of bank stocks thii week.
B.VNKS.
BANKS. Bid. "AsitHid. Ask.
BAMIC8.
Bid. Ask.

—

[

i

3,0

M.l

5,61*5.7

2,537,0
5,0.50.0
1,.
590,0

11.79.f.O
6.016.11
1,8'28.«

b.

117>«b.

Oomstock Tanndl — In-. 43..
lOHb.
Qoorgia Padllc— Ist 6a g.... loo b.
2d ni >rt. Income
Consol 5a, g
"eT'b
Income53
b.
Mem ACharle^ton—Con. 7 g. 95 b.

Sard

ll,14.',0

2.6S0,0
10.113,0
0.139,7
3,430.0
3.920.7
8,624,3
5.921,3
5,191,9
2,134,7

b.

I03^b.
i -'d
g 63.
Coil— Ist g 63
»9 b.
unOle— lat g. 63 105 b.

Cllir,.k?> ...

Pleai. Valley

'

1.017.2
20.033,8

6,58
3,-8^,1
21.509.1

Bid.

62
72
1913 lomioft
lOlia 102%
1913
1013
76
76%

$

15...
22...

8

28.

6s. consolidated bonds
6s, consolidaiod, 2d series, rests.
6s. deferred t*st reo'ts. stamped.

$

1,S''5.6

2,2/.'j,2

Oct.
Oct.

5b
38

Specie.

$

22...

Oct,

4,579,11

2,550,0
1,081,2
8,708,9

21

Boston and Philadelphia Itanbs

Phlln.<

23,9ol,l

8; 3,3
4'0,8

1,000,0

—

"
"

City,

..

Oot

1,8»W,0

565.1
7S,9

Dot.

25 Feb.
27 Mar.
72
82 Jan.
4i>9 27 Jan.
42 Oofc.
: 40",
32 Sept. 46 Hi Feb.
f 36
10 May
It's
12 AUff.
:
40
37«9 Apr.
4.M« Jan.
t
280 300 276 Feb. 300 >9 Auk.
114 Feb. 118 Jan.
75
80
37 Jan.
87>« Aug.
3>« Mar.
3
4
4% Jana
17
21
16 Mar. 22>4 Jan.
12 July
15>«Mar.
61
44 Apr.
64
63>aOct.
140 Jan. 148 Oct.
tl48

26

Virgmia—68. old

4%

1...

11.8'i4,6
2,866, H

417,'2

5,S72,;

Hauo.er

Oct.
"

368,0
948,0
250,7

5,3o5,l

8,326,.'S

70o,n
1,000,0
600,0
600,0

1,276,0

2,6S1,»

1,0110,0' 1,561,9

•JOi\0

38'.,

430,0
660,0
578,0

24,124,"'
3,823,-'

Mer'-antile
Pailiic
RepMlilic.
Chatlia tt
People's

.\mertca

777,0
2,421,6

1,(100,0

19.1,*

Broadway

Ii

73'2,0
1,990,-'

1"7,4

Commerce

Nor-

1,810,0
1,456,0
1,544.7

10,980,0
10,840,0
7,438,9
5.H77,0
16,810,2
4,614,0

6,981,1

6,000,0
5,000.0

........

$

$

$

$

York.

66%

19% June

24
22

settlement, 6b

Siirvlas.

N. York.

S»pt24

New

4I11
4''9

100
1919 1231a 126
oou.. 1803-1804 102

Banks.

Ba.nks.
(OOsomltlcd.)

New

90

omit two ciphers

Oct.
Dot.

25 >« Dot.

S.C. (cont.)— Brown consol.68.1893
Tennessee 68, old
1892-1 898!
Compromise, 3-4-5-08
1912

4^

I

South Carolina— (is. non-fund.lsSS

105
94

29%

Feb.

17'4 Apr.
57i« M^r.

SECURITIES.

Ask.

Bid.

1893 100
JAJ 30
1900
10
1898
15
3

RR

Biiecial tax, Class

Consolidated 4s
6s

Bank Statement

22, 1892, is as follows.

Chatham

»>«

190

1894-1-95 103

City

SECURITIES.

7

26

io<m 79% May 107

23M 24 >*

Actual sales.

Ask,

Bid.

49>aJiilr
123 Aug.
89 Jolir
125 Cot.
115 Oot.
14>a Feb.
108 Oot.
93>aJiui«
94<4 Jan. lUiflOot.
99 Aug. 110 Got.
12 May
18>«Jaii.
148 Jan. 164 Sept.

:ii3i>B

1

BiQhml.

JulT
40 Apr.
Mar. 151 JoM
July
79 Mar.
Mar.
4>iJaD.
Jan.
32 BeDl^
Jan.
26 FeV.
May 38>« Fab.

1434 Apr. 150i,jnlrj

:i23
112

.

New York— 6s, loan
1906 101 >4 102
North Carolina— 63, old
106
1906 105
Funding act
1906 95 100
19^0 95
96% Now bonds. JAJ
1892

6

to

33
128
76
1

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES.—Sr^TB BONDS OCTOBER
Alabama— Class

Lottut.

33
100 150
100
100
100 26

Fran. 1st prof

$aU$J

Anif* (mitt) in 18M.

Ask.

Bid.

Haute... lOO

Carolina
Toledo Peoria A Western
Toledo at. L. A Kansaa City II
Vlrgijil* Midland

Oct.

7''8

4
:

65

^t. 1,.
.~<uuih

150 Ml Oct
23 19 May
Jnly
IIH Aug.
Aug. 25 AUK.
Mar.
ll^s Aug.
Fob.
35 ig June

Mar.

3
87

8

Mav
88% June

Oct.

Jan.

Jan.

latest price this week.

;

Mar.
Feb.
Jan.

8>4 Apr.

Worrii* & Ks?ox
N. Y. Lack. A Western
». Y. & Norllurn pref
20 >« 15
60
Norfolk & Soutliprn
50)«
Feorlailc Eastern
100
9
12
8
162
PltM. Pt. Wajne A Chicago.... 100 l.%3>j 155
Rensselaer A (Saratoga
100 176 182 161
Kichmottd Terni"! tr. receipts. .100
6^
40 >a
Do
pref. tr. receipts.. 100
flt. Joseph A Grand Island
100
9
*

32

Sept.

80
7

7

13

60 87
60 105
100
50 :i&i>e
100
100 : 20
100 56

Pri'fiTrc'd

Mexican Nuttonal

Jan.

78 \
38
7
150

l>ts Muiiics

Prfferrcd
Lo«i<v. Kviinsv.
Prpforred
WalioiiinK (^oal

May 102

lOUOot.

Hues. ...100

<'oiitral Ipaftod

Kanawba.V- .MIohlean

Feb.

S.-Sin

88>«

'.

lUluots

160
12*
100
31

STOCKS.

A Ter.

Alton
Preferred

nt. I>oiils

B.'lli'vUli. A- Soiiili. III.

716

IHAOnVB BTOOKf.
H tndloatea onlUtod.

BigkiMt.

Hnllroitil Nlork*.
Atl^iiili

:

.

THE CHRONICLE

39, 1893. J

NEW VORE STOCK EXCHANUE PRICES (ContlnwA)—INACTIVE
V

.

212

218

(lal atln

3)5'

Am. li^xch... 166
Bowery
309

160
315
274
190
140

(SarheUl

40J

America

Broadway

. .

Bntchs'ADr. 185
Central

Chase

139
150

.....

Chatham

400
.
Chemical
4400 4S00
City
t.O
480
Citizens'
156 165
Colomhl.* ... 275
Commerso... 108 20;
Continental 131 136
Corn Kxch.. 250
iieposlt
114
120
East Uiver.. 150
llh Ward... 2)0

100

J

Kirth Ave....
Klfta
Kirat

2000 .....
320 335
2500

lr»tN..8.I. 110
'4th Street.. 170
201
Fonrih

Geiman Am. 125
O-rman Ex.. 3

— 330
160
Greenwich

S7S

311

355

<ie:'niania

..

Hanover.

Hui.

...

River.. 150
Trad'a' OnO

Im. A
130
Irving
Leather Mfa* 236
UO
Line la
185
Manhattan
Marketib Cul 220
Me haulcs'.. 180
>t'ch»'ATr.' 180
Mercantile .. 220
Merchants'.. 149
Merch'ts Kx. 130
ai.
.Metroiiolitan
.

G30
200
3»S

.

Metroi>o;is..

400

Mt

2..>0

Morris..

Murray UiU 300
207

315

Vr»« u.

...lieo

NewTork.. 30
S.Y. Co- aty 630
N.Y.Vat.«.x 130
120
Muth
H>lh Ward.. 170
S. America. 165
Oriental.... 230
198
Psclflc
Park
305
People's
300
Phenlx
171
'ruduce Ex. 130
Republic
171
Soatioar J

200
'200
23,1

165
140
8'(

. .

Second
Seventh

ShooA

1731.J

140
127

210
335
335
180
13S
180
180

335
125

Le'th 162

Mcho

240

160

.Y. 115

130
Its

_ 107
Tradesm'u's 109
Un'.l State 210

215

St.

Staieol
T- IrJ

as.

Watlem

W«'t Side

130

1'20

2-&

J

THE CHRONICLK

716

22.

"
100
"
100
2d preferred
oeton A Albany £oJton; 100
"
100
BostOD A Lowell
"
100
Boston A Maine
"
100
Central of Mass.
"
100
Preferred
"
100
OUc.Bar.AQaln.
1st preferred

.

40'4

3914

95i«
*132is

95>«

-951a

...

120»sl20i9

•17%

9558

85

85

85

20
85

70

70

70

70

:.7^

37'ij

1738

204

204%

18314
1914

182
183

182

183

46

47

17%

.

183%
18% 19

371s

3758
571*

ID'S

15=8

16

1514

15^

45
92

a

loij

48

47

49

9314

9414

45
95

49ie

93%

96%

18>4

50
IKO^ 181
49 »e

o
(

'Vsii "I'st^
5014 50%

"isH 18%

sm

."iOSs

334

.84

si'

72%
39

57%

S738

128
15

128
15

44%
94%

455$
9.T%

•65

66

ns
50%

505(1

448

Sept,

Jan.

mMcellaiieons Sitock*.

55% 56

5578

Mar. 141137%

208

208

208

35% 35^

9%

"
Calumet A Hecla
25
Canton Co
(Balt.J.lOO
"
Consolidated Gas
100
rle Telephone (Boston). 100
General Electric. "
100
"
Preferred
100
Lamson 8tore Ser. "
50
Iiehl'h CoalANav 'Phil.j
50

290

ir.Eng.Telerlione^.BisCnJlOO
Worth American. (Phil.).100

•60

*72ia
6OI4

958

35i«
959

•72 ij

290
74

289
74

60%

May

114%

July

69%
26%

17% Sept

47% Sept
137 164% Jan.
5,233 53% Sept.

208
34'4

9%

9'-s

'285
*72'«

9%

290

290

290

287

•72% 74

•72

60% 61

61

6138

•46% 47
47
47
47
11578 11578
11714 ll6i« lie's 11568 116
118i« '117% 118
118 118
117% 117%
•16
•16
16
17
17%
16
5414
54
54% 54% 54I8 54ie
53% 54
6OI4 60H
•60
60
62
60
1258 1258
13% 13% "l238 1238 12% 12%
17i« 1738
1738 1738
17% 17%
47

17

53% 53%
62

"17" "if^i

WestEndLand..

(Bost'n).
asked prices:

4,397

43

S8
2,335

43%

July
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

104%

.lulv

290
73

115»« H6'e 117
117% 11818 118

»16

79S
7
32 253

.>»%

61% 62%

72 1«
187

8,997

207

33%

61

289

60%
47

47

3413

g's

207

208

24%
5s%

Sept. 151
Aug. 25!

110% 111% 16,210 7868 Jan.
102% 102%
1,135 99% Jan.
206% 207
207%
323 192 Mar.
33
33% 31% 33%
5,041 30 Sept.

102% 104

60%

26

50%

57%
40%
34%
50%
232

10%

H

May 17
Jan. 4
Mar. 3
Jan. 9
Mar. 16
Jan. 5
Jan. a
May 11
Jan. 3
Mar. 3
Feb. 11
Feb. 15
Jan. 4

June 17
Feb. 18

Jan. 15

May 28
17% Jan. 5

4578

73

Aug. 15
Aug. 23

62% tict. 28
47% July 14
7
Aug. 10
May 12
55% Feb. 12
62 Oet. 3
18% Jan. 3
20% May 10

1197s Oct.

120
21

Feb.

May
16% Jtffl.

12

no sale "waa made,
Bid.

Inactive Stocks.

Ask.

Price* 0/ Oet. 28.

Westing. El.

tr.

(/Josto)i).100

50

"

rec.H

Bonds— Boston.

(£a».).100
82% 87%
A Providence (Boston). 100 250
Ounden A Atantic pf (PhUa.) 50 25

Ask.

Bid.

Inactive stocks.

Water Power

AUanta A Charlotte

,

2%',

39

1.

,

At.Top.A8.F.100-yr.4g.,1989, JAJ 5 82%'
100-ycar income 5 g., 1989. Sept. ' 5S% 58%
Burl. A Mo. Kiver Exempt 6s, JAJ 116%
Non-exempt 68
1918, JAJ
Plain 4s
1910, JAJ
105
Chic. Burl. A Nor. 1st 5,1926, AAO 104
1918, JAD 103%
2d mort. 6s
Debenture 68
1896, JAD ,101%

Boston

.

"

Ask

Bid.

Bonds.

Pa. AN. Y. Canal, 78. ..1906, JAD 137%
115
Consol. 5s
1939, AAO 110
105
Perkiomen, Ist ser., 53.1918,
Phila. A Erie gen. M. 5g.,1920, AAO 113
100%
1920, AAO
Gen. mort., 4 g
8678 87
Phila A Read, new 4 g., 1958, JAJ
77
Ist pref. income, 5 g, 1958, Feb 1
70
71
2d pref. income, 5 g, 1958, Feb. 1
62% 631*
3d pref income, 5 g, 1958, Feb. 1
2d, 7s
1893, AAO 103
1911, JAD 132
Consol. mort. 7s
Consol. mort. 6 g
1911, JAD 120
ImproTementAl.6 g., 1897, AAO 105

Q—

I

50
8
"
50 60
let preferred
"
50
59%
2d preferred
Central Ohio
{Ball.). 50
"
100
inukrl. Col. A Augusta
Connecticut A Pass. (Bos(on). 100
"
92
93
Connecticut River...
100 226
Chio.Burl.AQuincy48..1922,FAA
Delaware A Bound Br.(PAi/o.).100
Iowa Division 4s
1919, AAO
95%
"
H»r.Port8.Mt.JoyAL.
50 82
96
Chic.A W.Mich, gen. 5s, 1921, JAD
Con.M.,5 K..etamped.l922,MAN
Kan. Cy Ft. S. A Mem. (Boston) 100
1942
Consol. of Vermont, 58.1913, JAJ
94%
Phil. Read. A N. E. 4^58
"
100
BPreferred
1942
Current River, 1st, Ss.. 1927, AAO
48
"
100
K. CltyMem. ABirm.
Det. Lans. A Nor'n M. 78. 1907, JAJ
106
1952
Incomes, series B
Little Schuylkill
(PhUa.). 50
Eastern Ist mort. 6 g., 1906, MAS
Phil. Wilm. A Bait., 43.1917, AAO
71%
Manchester A Law.. (£os(o»i). 100
t ree.Elk. AM. V.,l8t, 68.1933, AAO
Pitts. C. A St. L., 78.... 1900, FAA
Maryland Central
(Bait.) 50
Unstampedlst, 6s. ...1933, AAO U20
Po'keep.sie Bridge, 6 g. 1936, FAA
Mine HiU A S. Haven (Phila.). 50
73
K.C.C.ASpring.,lst,5g.,1925,AAO
8chuyl.K.E.Side,l8t5 g.l935, JAD
"
HesQuehouiug Val
50
54
K. C. F. S. A M. con. 6s, 1928, MAN 102'
Steuben. AIud.,l3tm., 58. 1914, JAJ
orthem N. H
(Boston). 100
K.C. Mem. A Bir.,l8t,5a,1927, MAS
1894, AAO
United N. J., 6 g
Worth Pennsylvania. (PhUa.). 50 '85%
K.C. St. Jo. A C. B., 78. .1907, JAJ
Warren A Frank., l3t,7s,1896,FAA
Oregon Short Line. ..^ioston;. 100 23% 24
L. Eock A Ft. 8., Ist, 7s. 1905, JAJ
Bonds.— Baltimore.
Pennsylvania AN. W. iPliita.) 50
Loul8.,Ev.ASt.L.,l6t,6g.l926,AAO 111%
Atlanta A Charl., Ist78, 1907, JAJ
Bntland
(Bo»(o»i) 100
4
2m., 5— 6 g
1936, AAO
Income 63
1900, AAO
Preferred
100
Mar. H. A Out., 6s
70
1925, AAO
Baltimore A Ohio 4g., 1935, AAO
6eaboard A Roanoke. (Bait.) 100
Exten. 6s
1923,JAD
Pitts. A Conn., 5 g...l925, FAA
••
let pref erred
100
,
Mexican Central, 4 g... 1911, JAJ
67
69
Stalen Island, 2d, 5 g.l926, JAJ
West End
,(Bos(on). 50
72% 7258 1st consol. incomes, 3 g, non-cum. 28%
Bal. AOhlo 8.W.,l8t,4%g.l990, JA,I
"
Preferred
50 87
87% 2dconeol. incomes, 3s, non-cum.
CapeF.AYad.,Ser.A.,6g.l916, JAD
West Jersey
(Phila.). 60
60% 61% N. Y. A N.Eng,, Ist, 7b, 1906, JAJ 119
1916, JAD
Series B., 6 g
"
West Jersey A Allan.
50
20
Ist mort. 68
1905,JAJ 111
1916. JAD
Series C, 6 g
Western Maryland..
(Ball.). 60
15
16
2d mort. 6s
1902, FAA
1930, MAS
104% Cent. Ohio, 4%g
"
Wllm. Col. & Aupusta
100
Ogden. A L. C, Con.6s.l920,AAOf
Charl. Col.AAug. Ist 78.1895, JAJ
"
Wllmlngt'nAWeiaon
100
Inc.68
„192()
Ga.Car. A Nor. 1st 5 g..l929, JAJ
Wisconsin Central... (Boston). 100
16
17
Rutland, 1st, 68
1902, MAN
1900, JAJ
North. Cent. 6s
Preferred
"
loO
46
2d, 5s
1898, FAA
6s
1904, JAJ
"
Woro'»t.Na8h.ARoch.
100
Series A, 5s
1926, JAJ
Oatawissa

May 13

115% Aug. 25
107% Aug. 19
210
300

185 117 July
50 14% Feb.
488 48% Jan.
314
935

Mar. 31
Feb. 13
Jan. 4

Sept. 151 28% Mar. 25
Oct.
87 Apr. 6
40 Oct. 26
Jan.
Jan.
56 Sept. 28
Jan.
62% Feb.

11338 112^8 114i« 1105ell3i4 llflTglll^
10438 104% 102% 102% 102% 103

111

Am.Bng'rKettn.1I ("Boston;
"
Preferrea
'•
Bell Telephone ..
100
"
Bost. A Montana
25
"
Butte A Boston..
25

180

•180s 182

84% Aug. 1

Oct. 15 55
July 28| 8
Sept. 131 23
Sept. 12 92

180 180
160
180 180
556, 5b\
556g 55%
65 7e
•32
•32
33
5 31
32
32
33
8-pt.
32>s
'29'"
29i42911j6
12o,43R 193i!, Jan.
291*
28^ 29^1,, 28l°i6 29»ie
293i,
*6
*6ia
100
7
6%
Mar.
'OM
5
4014 "46%
40
40% 40
3,610 36% Sept.
40% 4078 40''8 41
230 230
230 230
230% 230%
236 x223%Mar
230 230
230
*7S8
*7'«
758
7%
300
7% 7% •7%
8
7% June
55T8

55%

H)

Feb. 18

June IS
Mar. 9
183% June 30
185% Oct. 17
19% Oct. 27
48 Oct, 27
1105s Jan. 28

8 209

95% Sept.
75% Apr.

25
4,475 25%
313 46%
8,537 50%
102 112
635 14
36,222 31
3,74 5 75
63

18%

135

18123

.Ian.

17
80
17
70

4

S

100% Mar. 15

15%

46

Jan.

578 Jan.

Mar.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

5%

•70
38

50%

Highest.

46%

33

6

•19%

45%
95%

95

110

•5

1.5

•65
•18
503g

67

67
l!^l4

15
4414

2,734
2,350
14,610
18,100

•45

127

127

o

79% 80%

39% 39%
5558 55%
57
57%

37% 40
5568 55%
57
57%

5C
5778

10238 l(.i3%

85

85

72%

55%

56

56
57»4

85

841a

4
160 84
130
50 116
154 199
59 173
6,765 159

135
123

201

I83J4

*70

9568

204I4

,

Lowest.

39% 50,555 32% May

132
121% 121

132%

*17

•

Shares.

23.

39

•95

121
204
181

'

Oct.

39%

3938

96

Week,

Friday,

27.

...
43
43
44
48
43
IO4I6 10i»e 104 101% IO3I4 1041* 10338 103%
80 'e 81=%
80>« 8II4
80
80%
7958 fcOTe
"46
46
46
471a 47%
*47'i ....
•5
*5
'5
6

(Boston) . 50

.

Oct.

39%

132i«

'17
'43

43

"
100
Onion Paeilc
United CoB.of N. J. (PMla.J 100
Westerns. Y.AParPAiia.;. 100

Bid and

39%

204ia .203% 2041s 204
181
182 182
181 181
181»s 182>s 182 I83I4 ISA

"
100
Fltohburg pref.
"
100
Fl. A Pere Marq.
"
100
Preferred
Hunt. ABr.Top.rPAiio;. 50
"
50
Preferred
"
50
tehlgh Valley
Haine Central ^£o>ton;. 100
"
100
Mexican Central
"
100
K y. A N. Eng.
"
100
Preferred....
irortliem Central (Bait.). 50
orthern Paoillo (PhUa.).lOO
"
Preferred
100
Old Colony.... (Boiton).lOO
Pennsylvania.. (Philaj. 50
"
PWladel. A Erie.
50
"
PMla. A Reading
50

*

40

Thursday,

26.

Oct.

Oct.

120

120
204

Ohio. Mil. A at. P. fPAa.>.100
Ohio. A W. Micli. (BostonJ.lOO
"
100
Oleve. A Canton
"
100
Preferred....

Bammit Branch

Wednesday,

25.

24.

Oct.

'95 ij '95 "s

& Ohio (BeUt.J.lOO
(

Tuesday,

Monday,
3938

Fe fBo««<m;.100
"
100
AtUmtlo A Pao.
8.

Bkltbnore

Range of sales in 1892.

of the

Saturday,
Oct.

A

[Vol. LV.

BOSTON, PHILA.OELPHIA ANU B\£4TI»0RE STOCK iSXCHANWES.
Bales
l^r Share Prices — not JPer Centum Prices.

Active Stocksi
f Isdloatea onllated
Atob. T.

J
J

.

.

106

87% 89
82
32

81

30

99%
115%
68
110

111

106
102

106%

.

.

I

I

MISCKLI.ANEOCS.

Alloaez Mining
(Boston).
"
Atlantic Mining
Baltimore Traction..
(Bait.)
City Passenger KK... (Bait.).

Bay

State

Gas

Boston Land
Centennial Mining...
Port Wayne ElectricU
Prauklin Mining

Prenchm'u's^BayL'nd
Huron Mining

n Inols Steelll

25
25
25
25
(Boston). 50
"
"
"

"
"
••

10
10

1

10%
29%

1%

118
97
102
;i02ia

107
93
92

107%

93%
93

92% 93
102%!
102 102»a
100% 101
114 114%
118 119

110%
1925, AAO 108
4%8
110% 110% Piedm.A Cum., 1st, 5g. 1911, FAA
i'lii*
105%
Pitts. A Councils. 1st 78. 1898, JAJ 114
114
JAD 110%
Virginia Mid., Ist 68. ..1906, MAS 112
1911 MAS 110% 110%
1900, FAA 118
2d Series, 63
1916, MAS
68.1927, JAJ 118
3d Series, 68

Val., 7 3 los, 1886, JAJ
1078 lAtlantic City 1st 5s, g., 1919,MAN
29% Belvidere Del., Ist, 68..1002,

78

31% 31%
5%
7

7%

25
25

77»

8

6

4%

25
lOO

95

Bonds.-Philadelihia

Allegheny

14

Catawisaa, M., 78
Clear tletd A Jetr., 1st,
Cdnnecting. 6s
1900-04.

MAS

Dei. AB'd Br'k,lst, 7s.l905,FAA
:Etston AAm. l8tM.,5s.l920,MAN
Elmir. AWilm.,l8t,6s.l910, JAJ.

1

»tlae

tbu wMk.

77
4lh Series, 3-4-58
1921, MAS
1 926, MAS
98
5th Series, 58
Weat Va.C.AP.l8(,,6g.l911, JAJ 107

117

126%
111%
119%

5% Hunt. A Br'dTop,Con.58.'95,AAO
Lehigh NaT. 4%8
109
1914, Q—

2d 6s, sold
1897, JAD
KekTsarge Mining....
"
85 11
11% General mort. 4%8, g.l924,Q— F'
Met.Trac. Co
(PAt/ol)....,
137
Lehigh Valley, 1st 68... 1898, JAD
Morris anal guar. 4. (P/ii(a.).100 "so'
2d 7»
1910, MAS
Preferred guar. 10
'•
lOO 202%
Consol. 6
1923, JAD
Osceola Mining
(Boiton) 25
33% 34 North l'»nn. Ist, 75.... 1896, MAN
PQllluau Palace Car..
••
100 199 200
Gen. M. 76
1903, JAjI
••
Qotncy Mlnlig.... ..
25
Pennsylvania gen. 6«, r..l910, Var
"
Uoutrack Mu.iijk...
25 155
158
Convol.68, c
19U5. Varl
"
Thom.Europ.E.Weldl!
loo 10
Consol. 58, r
1919, Var
Uulteil (iH» m|it.
(PMl.)...
63
Collat. Tr. 4% g
1913. JADI
f Oaluted. t And aectned tntezesu
1 LMt
••

117

99
108>4

West'I. y.C. Consol. 6 g.l914, JAJ
Col. A Aug., 6s.. 1910, JAD

86

102% Wllm.
110

11178

103

MISCELLANEOUS.
Baltimore— City Hall 68. 1900, Q—

Fundmg6a

1900.

O—

West Uaryl'd RR. 63. .1902, JAJ
134
1916, MAN
Water 5s
130
1916, MAN 122 >«
Funding 58
113
1930. JAJ
Exchauge 3V!i»
.74%
75
128
Virgmia (State* 3«, vew.1932, JAJ
1900, JAD 109%
128% 129% Chesapeake U OS. 6s
1910, JA1> 114%'.
121
Consol. Gas, 6s

112%

,

1939.

5a

BouitaOle o«a.

•!»

I'l' ;

JAJ 100% 101
,., 109% 110%

t

F

OOTOBER

THE CHRONICLE.

29, 1802.J

NEW TURK STOCK EXCHANeK PRICES
RAILaOlD XWD MMOBL. BOWPt.

I

Ajnor. CotUiii Oil, dub., 8 «.1900!

iwy

lOloCtif
Wl

fHW

4n ISSa.
HightML

Q-F

113>4

107 >« Jan.

81%
S8
67

118>«June
85aii Juue

Feb.

May

66% Jan.

July
74 Jan.
Atl. * PHC.-'Jimr, 4 (f....l'J37 ........ 70k|
litlOJ * Jl li'4
10 Aug.
14>4Jan.
W.D. liuv. tis
Jan. 120MI Sept.
Brookrii Klev»lMl«t.6.K.l»V!-l A A O 116 b. Ill
lUOSJ *. J! ioa>«b. 1 05 >e Jan. 110 Juue
OkO. ai>uUi.-lBtKUitr.,As
A 81 101>4 100 Mar. 1047, Feb.
1913
M.S.
67 Sept. 88 Feb.
Oent.C)».—SAW. l«tooi\.5«,'29 •-••••••' 72>»
Osotral of N. J.-Ooiiii.,7i.l899 Q-J„ 111 b. 115 Jan. LIO June
190-2
4 N 122 b. 120 Jan. 123>i Mur.
7ii
Ooniiol
109 « Jan. 114 June
Qeneral luortuaKP, ft «--1987iJ * J Ill
100 b. 109>«Jan. 114 June
Leh.AW,H..i-i.n..7>i,a8'i>.ia00l
»«»2|M4N
-...
94 Jan. 102 Aug.
do.
105 >a Jan. 111 Juno
.5»....192l J 4 J 110>*
Am.
i;.l,6s..l8'.l8iJ
4 J •110 b. 109 8upt. LIS June
OentrBi
Feb.
Oheo. 4'iMi> Moru.e H..IJ11'A * O 114 b. ll4>«Apr. 119
103 >« Jan. 107
1939
4^ N 104%
l»t wii«ol.,S K
847, May
1U!)2 M A 8 78!<»
78 >* Oct.
Gfcii. ^Sis.tf
76 Jan.
81
H.4A.DIv.,Utoon..2-4K.lS»89lJ 4 J 79
Aug.
80>4 June
2doon.,4K...1989;J 4 J 77 b. 75 >« Jan.
do
Ohio. Bnrl. 4 Q.— Con.,7».19l)3lJ 4 J •123 b. 12mi Jan. 126
June
1913 M 4 N 103
101
D«benture,fta
Jan. 105i« Apr.
1903 51 4 8 \OTJk 103 Oct. 114 Jan.
CouvortUiU'.Sii
19i2jl'. 4 A •asigb,
Deuvtir l)lvl»iOD,48
91 >a Fell.
9t>« June
88>«u. 87 Sept. 91 1« Ai.r.
Kebra»lt»KxteuBlon,4ii.iy27iM
4 K. Ill.-lgt,«.f.,6s.l907 J 4 I) 115 b. 112>aJaii. 118>«.MBy
Ohio.
1934 A 4 O 119 b ll;t Oct 12314 July
CooBoL.tiic
General vousol. l»t,5«..1937'M 4 N 102>«
97 Jan. 104 Ai)f.
A N 103 b. 97'« Jan. 104>«Ai)r.
Ohicut!oAKrle-l8t.4-5g.l9H2
Oot'b'r 41 b. 42i«Oct.
Inconie, ."iB
1982
53% Feb.
Ohio. Oa«l-. 40.— l»t,.'i(C.1937 J 4 J 90i«
36 Jan.
94% June
OhlcMII. A8t.P.— Con.78.1905 J 4 J 128 b I2514 Jan. 132>4 June
l«t,8i<ulline8t DIr., 68.1909 J 4 J ll5>tt>. "12 "11 Jan. 110i«A|.r.
U8 Juno
l8l, 8o. .Mlu. DW., 69. ...1910 J 4 J 116 b, U3WJan.
l»t.Cli.>\il'ao.W.Ulv., .'58.1921 J A J 109»ab. 106
Juue
Jan. 111
Clilo. A.Mi). Klv. L)lv., S8.1926 J 4 J 103 >4b. I0U>4 Jan.
106 Juue
Wis. A .MiiiQ. Div., 5 K..1921 J 4 J 100 nt
103 Jan. 108
May
1914 J 4 J 108 a. 103 Jan 108% Aug.
Terminal, D K
Oen. M., 4g.,8erle8 A...1989 J 4 J *91'4b. 86 M Jan.
92>s June
Mll.ANor.—l8t,c<)U., 68.1913 J 4 » •114 b 111>4 Jan. 117
Aug.
OBic.AN.W.—Couaol., 7s. .191.5 <J— F -138 li, 137 Feb. 142 Apr.
1902 J 4 D 12S'sb. 123>« Jan. 127 "4 May
Coupon, gold. 7e
Blnklnn fund, 68
1929 A 4 O
114'sScpt. 120 Mar.
Sinking (uud, 58
1929 A A O lOTi^b. 1 OS's May 111 June
Blnklii>r fund debeiiy58.193;i M 4 S •109 b, 105
Apr. 109 Aug.
4 N 106
107
25-year dei)«uiure, a... 190.4
1 OS's May
Mar.
Eiteu8iou, 48
1926 F 4 A 96 lab. 96 Jan. 100 »s Jan.
Ohio. Peo.A8U Louis— 5i?. 1928 M 4 8 9^08^. 96
Mar 101 Apr.
Ohio. K-LAfac— 6s,coup.l917 J 4 J 124 b. 121
Jan. 126% June
Extension and col., 58. ..1934 J 4 J 100%
9978 Sept. 104)s May
1931
4 8 96
30-year debeut. Sa
94% Sept. gSisFeb.
Ohio. 8t.l^.&PiU.-Con.,5g.l932 A A O* 109i*b. 105
Jau. 110 May
Ohio. 8t. P. iM. 40.— 68....1930 J 4 D 121 isb. 120
Feb. 124>«May
Cleveland A Canton— 5.. .1917 J 4 J 01 b. 88 Jan.
95 >« June
D 130 b, 128>s Jan. 13538 May
0. C. C. 4 I.—Con8ol..7 g.l9H J A
General oousol., 6 K
1934.1 4 J 121 >«b, 118>a Jan. 123 July
O.C.C.A«l.L.-Feo.AK.48.1910 A 4
78%
78% Oct. 83 Feb.
Income, 48
1990 April. 28
26 June 34 i» Feb.
001. Coal 4 Iron— 6 g
1900 F 4 A •103 b. 99 Muv 1037 9 Oct.
F 4 A •68 a. 66 Sept. 74 Jan.
Ool. Midland— Con., 4 g...l940
Ool.H.Val.ATol.— Con.,5g.l931 M 4 8 92 b. 87>9Jau.
98 July
General. 6g
1904 J 4 U 98 b, 93 Jau. 105 May
118 <sb, 115^8 May 119 Apr.
Denver A KloO.— l8t,7 g.l900 M 4
1936iJ
85'6b. 77% Jan.
lBt«ou80l.,4g
96% Oct.
•68 a. 60 Oct.
Det. B. CltyAAUiena- 6g.l»13 J
80 Feb.
A
4078
DeuMac'.AM.-L'dgrant8.1911
36 Apr. 44^8 Oct.
Dal. 80. 8h. 4 All.— og.... 1937 J
101 b. 95
Mar. 105 May
K.Tenn.V AU.— Con.,5g.l9S6
95
90 Mar. KM) Feb.
KnozvlUe A Oblo, 6 g. . . 1925 J
100 b, 9614 Juue lOS Jan.
EUi. Lex. ABl(f8au.-5 g.l902|M 4 8 97 «
81
Mar. 100 Aug.
Ft. W. A Ueuv.City— 6g..l92l'J 4 D 101 b.
98>« Jan. 105
May
eaLH.Adan An.-\V.Dlv.let,5g.:M
98 b. 9508 .May 98% Apr.
4 8 115i«b. 114 Sept. 118=8 Feb.
Han. 4 8t.Jo8.— Cons., 68.1911
minolB Central—4 g
1952 A 4 O 100%
96'9 Jan. 102% Sept.
1919
4 N 129 b. tl06 Feb. 130 Aug.
Int. 4 Gt. No.— let, 6 g
4 8
Coup.,6 g., tr.reo.8tmpd.l909
73% July 82 Jan.
lOwaCeutral— l8t,5K
1938 J 4 U 90
88'8 Sept. 96 Feb.
Kentucky Central— 4 g
1987 J 4 J 85
81 Jan.
86 June
KtagsCo. Kl.— l8t, 5 g....l925 J 4 J •100 a. 97 ij Feb. 102>s Juue
LaoTedeGas— lBt,5g
85 14 May
1919 Q—
85
80 Mar.
Lake Erie A West.- 5 g
1937 J 4 J 111 a. 107>4 Jan. 114 June
L.8hore— Con. cp.,l8t, 78.1900 J 4 J 120'4b, 119 Sept. 124>« Oct.
Consol. coup.,2d,7s
1903 J 4 D 123%
121% Feu. 136 May
Longlsl'd- 1st, con., 5 g.. 1931
113 Apr. 117 Aug.
General mortgage, 4 g..l938 J 4 D 94 •«
91 Jan.
9718 Aug.
Lonls. A Masb.— Cons., 7a. 1898 A 4 O 111 b. 110% Oct. 115
Feb.
1930 J 4 J 119 b. 117>«Jan. 121i« Juue
M.O. AMob. l8t,6g
do.
2d, 6g
1930 J 4 J
108 Jan. no's Apr.
Qeneral.eg
1930 J 4 U 118iS8b. 115>4 Jan. 119>«May
Unlfled, 4g
1940 J 4 J 83 >•
78% Jan. 831s Oct.
Nash.Fl.ASb.- l8tgtd.5g.'37
4 A 100 b. 98 Feb. 10179 June
LoiUa.N.A. ACh.— l8t,68.1910'J 4J' 110<«b. 10878 Jan. 113 June
Oon8ol.,6 g
1916tA 4 O 102 b. 99 Apr. 105 Sept.
Louis. 8t. L. ATexas— 6g.l917|F 4 A 94<9b. 87 1« Jan. 100
Aug.
Metro. Elevated— l8t, 6 g. 1908 J 4 J 117i«b. 113>9 Jan. 120>4 Juno
8d,68
4 N 108 b. 105 •« Jan. 110 Juue
1899
Ml0h.Cent.— l8t,oon.,78..1902
A N 12279b. 121 May 124i« Apr.
Oonsol., 5s
1902M4 K 107»sb. loe"* Mav lOSi* Apr.
HU.Lake8b.4W.— l8t,6g. 1921 4 N 127'ab, 123 Jan. 128 July
Kxten. 4Imp.,5 g
1929 F 4 A 106% 104 >« Mar. 110 July

M

M
Q-M

I

M

4N

M

M

M

Ftriod. (M. 28.

H
M
M

g

con.,

8d,7»

4 D
4 A
4N
4 N
F 4 A
J 4 J'

1990 J
1990 F
S g. 1920 M
1906 M

PacofUo.— Iat,ez.,4g.l938
Sde^CeaaedSs

1938

80
46

b.

79 Juue
45 1« July

112>«b. 106 >«

115 b, 112i«Jan. 117
•97 b, go's Aug. 100
105 Hib lo2% Jan. 109

AOTB— " b " indicates price bid ; " a " price asked

;

the

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHAMttE
SECURITIES.
Railroad

Bid.

.

1

I

1958
1958
2d pref. Income, 5 g
1958
3d pref. Income, 5 g
Pittsburg & Western— 4 g.l91"
Kioh 4I)anv.— Con.,6g..l91
Con8ol.,5g
1936
Rich.AW.P. Ter. -Trust,6g. 1897
Con. Ist A ool. trust, 5 g. 19 1
Rio G. Western- Ist, 4 g..l93y
St. Jo. A Gr. Island— 6 g..l925
|8t.L. Alt. AT. H.—l8t, 78.1894

4
J 4
A 4
F 4
M 4
J 4
M4
J 4
St. L. A Iron Mt. Ist ext. 3s.'97 F A
1897 M 4
2d,7g
CalroArk. ATexas, 7 g.. 1897 J 4
Gen. R'y A landgr.,5g..l931 A 4
SUL. ASan Fr.—6 g.,Cl.B.19i>U M4
1906
4
6 g., Class C
General mort., 6 g
1931 J 4
St. L.8o.We8t.— 1st, 48, g..l989 M 4
198!) J A
2d, 48, g., Income
8.P.M.AM.— Dak. Ex., 6 g. 1910 M4
4
1933
let COU80I., 6g
reduced to 4 >s g
A
do
Montana Extension, 4 g.l937
San A. A Aran. P.— I8t,6g.l916
l8t, 6

*

i>

62%
82

J •108

b.

O 75
A

77isb.

50
79
N •97
104
S

J

b.
b.

JoM

123 ki

Apt

II5>4AU»
Juna

10*)

ll5iajiuia

130
114

Jan.
Oct.
Oct.

Jau.

June

Get,

106'« .Mar

122'«Ani
109>«.>far
116 Jai,

108% May
107 Juna
119
Mat

103>«8ept.
QAL. U-.
96% Mar
95 Jan.
10 Jan*
lie>«Mar.
HI Apr.
una. jit
»0% y.-

82
103

Feb.
Feb.

109% Apr.
115% June
115 June
llliaHept.
««7e Mar.
66 July
104% Feb.
71% Jan.

112
96

June

Feb.
10979 Juna
Feb.
108 Jan.

UO

71%

Mar.
900b Juna
79% Aug.

67

72%

41% Juue
76% Jau.
93% Sept.

83
100

Ill
Ill

June 115

b.

106% Jan.

83I4

b.

1

67

May 115
July

Ill

72%

sales only.

Bid.

Ask.

4

*

Juna
Jan.

27 July 37% Jan.
•118 b. Ll6%Jau. 119% Aug.
119%b. L18%Jau. 123% Juna
101 a. 97 Jan. 103 Apr.
90% Mar
90 b. 87% Jan.
87
68 b. 65 Apr
25 M»y
61 Jan.
70 Aujr.
70
97 Julr
91 b. 90 Apr.
05%b. 105 Sept 108% Mar.
15 -ia. 14 Apr.
22 Jan.
102J8b. 101
Feb. 107% June
112 b. 111% Oct. 116 Mar.
102

97
100

101

June 108

Oj 737ab,

72

A

4 HI 71 b.
4 N 117
4 N 81
4 Nl 80>«b
4 N 105%
4 Al 80%
'
J:

'

40

Sept

68% Sept.
110

Jan.

76% May
79% .May

Ud'^Jan.
103% Jan,

b.

78 TI ocwt.
O % bept.
35 July
,

Mar

114% June
110% Feb.

108%

92%

Feb.

109% June
82% Juno

101

64

6714 b.
9559

N1112%b. 109

Juna
Jane

85% May
34% .Mar
104

Sept. 74%
Sept. 100
Feb. 112
Jan. 114

4 A

Mar.

108%jana

MAN 11158b.
A AjlOo

made up from actual

Apr.
Apr.

'305ea.

MA

PEICES-CContlnued). —INACTIVE

Feb.

Jun
Mar

b,

106%

MAS
19181M A N

Collat. trust 4ia

Jan.
Feb.
Feb.

107% May 109% Feb.
104% June 109 Mar.
86% Mar.
82=8 Oct.

C—

Gold 63, coi. trust notes. 1894 F
Kau. Pac.-Den.Div.-6 g.l899
l8tcon8ol.,6 g
1919
Oregon Short Line— 6 g.. 1922 F
Or.S.L.AUfhN.— Cou.5g.l919 A
U.P.Den.AGuitcon. 5g.l939iJ
1937lM
Onion Elevated— 6 g
Virginia Mid.— Gen. m.,58, 1936 M
stamped guar. M
do
Wabaah- lst,5g
1939 M
2d mortgage, 5 g
1939. F
Debent. M., series B
1939 J
West Shore— Guar., 48
2361 J
West. N. Y. 4 Pa.— Ist, 5 g. 1937 J
1927 A
2d mort., 3g., 580
Weet. Un. Tel.—Col. tr., 58.1938 J
Wis. Cent. Co.— l8t, 5 g
1937 J
Income. 5 e
1937..

Feb.

86% June

112
85
June 100

Sept. 108^8 Jan.
Oct. 101=8 Sept

109

113
113
109
69

Jana

139% Aug.

Feb.
Feb.
37 Jan.
80>4 Jan.
1105 July
(»'» Oct.
74 V» v.,uirt

75

Mar.

105
101

A lomb.

1926

g

Ak.ACh.Juuc.-lst,K.5s,gu.l930 105%
Boat. H. Tun. A W.-Deb. 58.1913
Qrooklvn Elevated- i«l,3-58.1915
96%
120
Brunswick A Wn-lst, g. 4a, 1938
111% iull. Boch.vt Pitts.—Gpu., 58.1937
I06"
Boch. A Pitts.— 1st, ti.s
1921 119"" 121
In
n,>n.o:i.iiirM i.t,««.i!>2'J 1 17
120
No pnoe Friday: these are th latest uuoia tiou« ma<ie tui» wtMA.

91

7008
J

ran.

105
139

69%
53%

SeattleL.8.AE.—l8t,gu. 6.1931
80. Car.— 1st, 6 g.,ez oonp.1920
Inoome,68
1931
1909-10
A
80, Pac, Ariz.— 6g
A
80. Pacltlc,Cal.— 6 g.... 1905-12
4
9ti%b. 9739 Oct.
1938
1st, consul., gold, 5 g
4
So.PaciJo, N.M.-6g
1911
106 b. 101% Jan.
4
91 a. 89 Feb.
Tenn.C. I. A Ky.— Ten. D., 1st, 6
4
Blrm. Div., 6g
191
94%b. 91 Jan.
4
84%
76% July
Tex. 4Pao.— Ist, 5g
2000
25 July
2000 March 3OI4
2d, Income, Sg
1924 M 4 N 102%
96 July
Tol. A. A. 4 N. M.-6g
1935 J 4 J 107 b. 102% Jan.
Tol. 4 Ohio Cent- 5 g
1917 J A J 81 b. 77 Jan.
Tol. Peo. 4 West.- 4g
So Oct.
6 g.. 1910 J A D 89%
Tol. 8t.L. 4 Kan.
4 J 111 b. 11038 Jan.
Union PaoiUo— 6 g
1899
Sinking fund. 8a
1893
102 %b. 102% Sept.

May

is

J

. -

0. 8. W., 1st, g., 4%«...1990 •107
Monon. River. l.-I ir.,g. 5»...1919
vlent'lObio Kcor.— 1st. 4%s. 1930 102% ...>•
B.

(gtoek Ezehaitge Prieet.)
.Mid.— Ist, g., guar.. 1928
A'Jaatic A Danv.— 1st g., 68. .1917
Aj. a Pac- 2d W. D., gu. 6s,. 1907
B lit. 4 Ohio— 18»,68, Park B.1919 117
6e, gold
1925
Ojus. iuort..goll. 58
1988 ii's
W. Vtt. A PItt-t.— l.it. g.. 5s..l9<in •104

Range

76%

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

g

Jon*

106

. 1

Ist pref. Income, 5

Kw

132

J

SECURITIES.

Ask.

Bonds.

A.abama

83

54%
May 113

BiglutL

118

J

.

M
M
M

48,

ItOS.

LumtH.

1

* D 118 b. 113 reb.
Oeoeral mortgage, 4«...l938lM 4 8 61%
ai'aOot.
iraah.0h.4SLl..— lit, 7*. 1U13 J 4 J 127 b. 126% Jan.
1928!a 4 O 102>« lO^ifOot
Ooa.,ag
M.T. Central-Extend., 58. 1893 M 4 If I02^h, loll* May
1903 J 4 J 124 b. 123>« Jan.
Ut,ooupon,78
D«ben.,68.ooup., 1884.. 1904 M 4 8 107
106 Oct.
H. Y. 4 Harlem— 78, reg. 1900 M4 N 122 a. 119itHept.
R. W. 4 Ogd.— Coo., 5«. 1922 A 4 0112 a. nil* Apr.
M. Y. Ohio. 4 St. U-A K.. 1937 A 4 O 90>«
95 Jan.
M.Y. ElevaU«l-7»
1906 J 4 J 1144b. Ill July
M. Y. Lack. A W.— lit, 6s.. 1921 J 4 J 129 a. 125 Jan.
1923 r 4 a' 14 a. 109 Aug.
OouHtruciloa,5l
,N.T.L.K4W.-lit,oon.,YK.1920 M 4 8 136><b. 184«4 Mar.
1893 J 4 D 104 >4a. 02 >• June
Long Dook. 78
1935 A 4 0119 b. 117MApr.
CoD8al.,6s
1969 J 4 D 107
adoaasol.,6 g
103>a8«pt.
110% Apr.
N. Y. Ont. 4 W.-l8t, 6 g..l9l4 H 4 3
Conaol. l8t.5g
1939
4 Dil07)4b. 100 Jhu.
N.Y.8a8.4W.-l8tref.,»g.l937 J 4 J 106 b. 103 Jan.
Midland of N. J., 6 g... 1910 A 4 O 115%b. US'* Oct.
Norf. 4 Soutli — l8t, 5 g...l9il M 4 N 103 b. 98
Apr.
Norf. 4 *'.-lOO-year, 5 g.l990 J 4 Jl 9ti«a. al
91 r\nt
Oct
Md.AWash. I)l7.-l8t,5 g.l941 J 4 J 90780. 90>4 Aug.
Nortb.Pac— iBt. coup., 6g. 1921 J 4 J 117 b. 115 .Ian.
General, 2d. coup., 6 g..l933 A 4 oiim
'll>«Oct
General, 3d, coup., 6 g..l937 J 4 Dil07 b. l06<4Julr
Ti
198'.» J 4 D 73'4
C0080I. morl.,5g
71 a....*
8ept
Ohio. 4 N. P.— let, 5 g...l940 A 4 O 75»9
74 Oct,
North. Pac. AMon.- 6g...l93H H 4 8 89
8
Oct.
North. Pac. Ter. Co.— 6 g..l933 J 4 J 106 a. 04 Oot.
Ohlo4Mis8.— Cou8.8.r.,78.l898 J 4 J 112 b.
1
Jau.
Coogol., 78
1898 J 4 J 112 b. 110 Mar.
ObtoSouthern— iHt, 6 g...l921 J 4 d:i12
106 Jan.
General mort., 4g
1921 M 4 Ni 63
61 June
62 <i Apr.
Omaha A St. Louis- 4 g ..1937 J 4 J
g.l9lO
Oregon Imp. Co. 'lst,6
4 DIOS b. 99 >• June
1939
Consul., o g
4 O 63>sb. 63% Oot.
Ore.R.4Na7 Co.— lBt,6g.l909
4 J 110 b. 10978 Jan.
1925
CousoL.Sg
4 D| 00 a 88 Sept.
4 J 100 U. 105<S8 Jan.
Pa. Co. —419 g., coupon. ...1921
Peo. Deo.AEvansv.— 6g..l920
4 Jl-103 b. 101>4 Sept.
4 8 101
100 Apr.
EvansvUle Uiv., 6g.;..1920
1926 M 4 N
0^1 a. 68
2d mort., 5 g
Aug.
Phlla. 4 Read.— Gen., 4 g.l958 J 4 J 86 "sb. 83% Jan.
M0bUe4Oblo-Naw,aK..ie27

M

4S

AND FOR rEAR

il«,

Baiumao axd Muobl. BoaiM.

!

i

Sd 4s,g
Mo. Paolflo— Ist,

717

(ContlanttX—AOTIVB BOmJS OCT.

rfa<«f>

AVTop.*«.F.-100^yr.,4g.l9H9,J * J 84
1989 Bepl. •S8»«b.
XOO-jeur lucoiiie.Ai:

U. K. 4 T.— l8t

-

4

Jan.
Jan.
Sept,

Apr.
Jan.

83% Feb,
77% Jan.

117
85

87
Lv«
107

85

50

Oct.

Feb.
Feb.
Apr.
Jan.
Jan.

103% 101%
99
J1103%
33%b. 31% July 35«sFeb.
J 101
100% Jan 106% Job*
Mar. 95% Jus
Jl 91 a. 90
..' 33
33 June 42% Jan.
b.
t Coupon ofi.
Latest price this week.
J

Jan.
Jan.

105 7g June
105 Mar

01

BONDS—OCTOBER
SECURITIES.

28.
Bid.

Sorl Ced. Rap. 4 No.— l8t, 58.1906 104
Coasol. 4 collat. trust, .58... 1934
Minn. 4 St. L.-l9t, 7s, gu..l927
Iowa C. 4 West.— lat. 7».. ..1909 100
Oed. Rap. I. F. 4 N., Ist, 6h.1920 100
1921
89
lat, 6a
C.Ohio— Ool. 4Cin..M.lst,4%9. 1930 93
lent. RB. 4 Bank.— Col. g.58.1937 •31
1937
Chat. RomeA Col.— Utd g
—<Vn.- I'M. .).. I'l"'i
«ni. of V.

•—

Aak.

IDS

97
>••••«

1

"

6

1

THE CHRONICLE.

718

VB.ICES.—INAOTIVS BONDS—rOontinuedJ-OOTOBER 28.

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
8ECUEITIE8.
68, 1895!

& O.

106%

1896 *107is 108
1897 *108i4
1900 '108
1939 ^*97
1900 *103i«
1918 *104

50.Tear 58

&

O.— Pur.
Clies.
6s, eold, series

1938
M. fund, 63.1898
1908
A

59.. ..1940
Spr. Val., let, g 59. .1941
Chei. O. & Bo.West.— l9t 69, g.l911

Craig Valley— l8t,

g.,

Warm

9714

15

*77>s

104>4

1893 102 14
1903 119>4

& Alton—l8t, 7s
SlnBng fund, 63
Louis. & Mo. Eiver— Ist, 7S.1900
1900
2d, 7s
St. L. Jacks. & Cbic— l9t,78 1894

Ga. Bo.

2d income, trust rects
1937
Housatonio— Cons, gold 58
N. Haven ADerby, Con8.59..1918
Hone. AT. C— Waco A N. 78.. 1903
1937
Istg., 5s (int. gtd»
1912
Cons. g. 63 (int. gtd)
1921
Gen. g. 48.(int. gtd)

1911
2d, 68
Ot. V. -Gen.con.l8t,gu.g,58.1938

Chicago

a—

Gal. Har. & San Ant.— 1st, 6s. 1910 *101
Gal. H. & 8. A.— 2d mort., 78. .1905
1931
West. Div., 2d 68
Ga. Car. &Nor.— Ist, gu. 58, g.l929 100

1927
& Fla.— 1st, g. 6s
Rap. & Ind.—
79' GrandW. & St.P.— IstGen. 5s.. 1924
68.reot8.19H
G. B.
113

J

Bid.

116>«

Debent. 6e, priu. A int. gtd.1897
Debent. 4s, prin. A int. gtd.1897
Dlinoie Central— 1st, g., 43 ...1951
1951
let, gold, 3138
1051s

112
103

116

Mlss.R. Bridge— Ist, 8. {., 68.1912
Chlo. Burl. ANor.— 1st, 58....1926

1950
Cairo Bridge— 49
1898
102»s
Springf. Div.— Coup., 6s
Ohio. Burling. & Q.— 58,
1921
Middle Div.—Reg., Ss
Iowa DiT.— Sink. lund, 59.. 1919 105 107
1919
95% O. St. L. AN. O.— Ten. 1., 7^.1897
Sinking fund, 4s
1897
1921 "86%
Plain, 4s
1st, consol., 73
103 14
1907
Chic & Indiana Coal— 1st 58.1936
2d, 63
1951
CM. Mil. A St.P.— lst,88,P.D.1898 117 118
Gold, 53, coupon
124,
1951
1898
125
ki2d, 7 3-108, P. D
Memp, Div., Istg. 43
1902 *127
2d Div., 7s ...1894
Dub. A 8.
l9t, 79, $ g., K. D
I23I4
Ced. Falls AMinn.— let, 7s.. 1907
let, La Crosse Division, 79.1893
1897 123
Ist.I. & M.,7s
Ind. D. A Spr.— 1st 78, ex. cp.l906
1899 124
Ind.D.AW.— I8t58. g.,tr.reo..l947
Ist, I. & D.,7s
1903 128 132
Ist ,C. & M,, 78
2d, 5s, gold, trust receipts.. 1948
let, I.' & D. Extension, 78. . .1908 129
Inc. M. bonds, trust receipts
1919 105
let, La C. &Dav., 58
Ind. ma. & Iowa.— l8t, g, 4s. 1939
1910 12618
let, H. & D., 78
Int.AG.N'n— l8t,68,g.,coiLOir.l919
1910 103 107
1st, H. & D., 58
Kanawha A Mich.—Mort. 48.1990
Cbicago & PaciHc Dir., 69. .1910 117
Kan. C.Wyan.AN.W.— I8t,5a.l938
Mineral Point Div. 58
1910 103 ioi" Kings Co.- F.El.,l8t,5,g.,gu.A.1929
1921 103
O. & L. Sup. Div., 59
Lake Erie A West.— 2d g., 5e.l941
1896

Debenture 03

s. f ..1901

C—

Iowa Midland— I8t,
Clbic.

Win.

L. 8.

116>4 1171a

105

109 <s
ll'S

7s... 1898

Mil. ife Mad.— l3t, 68
1905
Ott. 0. F. & St. P.— Ist, 58.- 1909
Northern 111.— Ist, 5a
1910
Ch.Peo. cfeSt.L.— Con.l8t,g.53.1939
O.E.I.&P.-D.M.& F. D. 1 St 43.1905
let, 2^28
1905

Extension, 49

i"l2

106
105

100
79

50

1905

Bt.Lou.Div.— I8tcol.ts't4s,g.l990
Bnring.&Gol.Div.— l3t,g.48. 1940
White W.Val-.Div.-lst.g. 48. 1940

92

Cin.Wab.&M.Div.— Ist,g.4s.i99i

'91 14
94I2

I. St.

C— I9t,g.,4s.l936
1920
—Con.lst,g.5s, 1928

L. <t

,

Ol.Col. Cin. & Ind.— Ist, 7s,9.f.l899
Consol. sink, fund, 7s
1914

100
*65
*90
78
"9415
9714

107
112
1141.I

Cleve.

& MaU. v.— Gold, 53...1938

Colorado Midland— Ist,

g.,

ios'

63.1936 iio'

Byra. Biug. & N. Y.— let, 7s.l906 129
Morris A Essex— 1st, 7s
1914 141 143
Bonds, 7s
I9O0
780f 1871
1901 1201a 12i

29's

112i« 113

..

.1893

A Decatur— 1st, 7s.. 1900
1910
f.,63.— S. AN. Ala

Nasbv.
8.

107
114
108
118
*1135s

1924
1937 '103 «
50 year 53, g
Pens. AAt.- 1st, 63, gold. ..1921 101
Collat. trust, 59, g
1931 102 19
Lou.N.Alb.ACh.— Gen.m.g.58.1940 78
10-40, gold, 69

1st con. Tenn lien, 7e
i:il5
Mexican Cent. Consol.—4s, g.l911
1st, eons, income 3a, g
1939
Mexican National- let, g., 68.1927 9713
2d, income, 6s, "A"
1917
44 Hi
Michigan Central— 68
1909 1151s
Coupon, 5s
1931 112
Mortgage 43
1940 >1C0
Mil.

Beech Creek— ist, gold, 48.. 1936

& W.-ioLtr.;6V.i922 113
iqko 8214
-w^-Mortg. 68::::i958 '101
Jeflereon— let, gu. g. Ss ... igoQ
E.

Osw. A Rome— 2d, 5s, g.,gu.l915 105
Utlca A Bl. Riv. -48, g., eu.l922 'IOII4
N. Y. N. H. A H.-lst,'reg.f 1903 106
N. Y. A Northern— let, g., jj 1927

8.

102
Coal&KR.-6s...
iovo
Boreka Springe- let, gV, S8!'.!l933
Byane. A T.H.— l8t,cons.,69..192l
Mt.

vemun— IstGs

Bui. C».
*

HraBrh— Ist.

*• P^'*

1923
«r..'58'l9S0

J!«d»y! ttu>»e

M«

ta« t«tMt

2d,4e

100

78... 1911

1905
1932
1936
1937
g.l927

90

107
95
117

120

OUs 94
95
83
1161a

97

103
*96

70
95

lOOig
751a
i02i«

1900 '110

P.C.A8.L.-l3t,o.,78

W.

103
100

123

Penn.-P.C.CA8t.L.Cn.g.4issA1940
Do
do
Series B

A C— 1st, 7s.. .1912

1912
1912
8. fd., 78.1900
Gen. 4ia9, g., "A"
1942
St. L. V. & T. H.—let, 68., 78.1897
2d, 7e
1898
2d. guar., 79
1898
Gd.R.Al.Ext.- lst,4ias,G.g.l941

138
137

i40"

'129

1201a

no's
107

no's

Peo.&E.-Iud.B.AW.-l8t,pt.7s.l900
Ohio tnd.AW.— l9tpref.59..1938
Peoria A Pek. Union— 1st, 69 .1921 113
1921
2d mortg., 413S

100
117

72

115

Pitts. Cleve. ATol.— Ist, 63... 1922
Pitts.
L. Er.- 2dg. 5s, "A". 1928
Pitts. Mc. K.
1932
1st 63
Pitts. Painsv.
F.— 1st, 5s. ..1916
Pitts. Shcn.A L.E.— l8t,g.,5s.l940
Pitts. Y'g9t'n&A.—l9t, 59,con.l927
Pre9.
Ariz. Cent.— I9t, 69, g.l916

95

Rio Gr. Junot.,l8t,guar.,g.,53.1938
Rio Grande So.— 1st, g., 58... 1940
1925
A Gr. Is.—2d inc

lOHs

84

A

AY.—
A

1927

N.Y.OntAWn.— Ist,refun.4s.l992
N. Y. Susq. A West.— 2d, 4iss.l937
GeB. mort., 5e, g
1940
N. Y Tex. A Mex.- I8t.49.«ii.l^tl2

«u»tau»u Hade

mT^^

St. Jos.

85
108

Kan.

A Omaha— Ist,
A r.H— 2d pref.

C.

5s.. 1927
78. .1894

62
8338

92

70

104 104 1«
1894 104's
6215 65
1894
115
Bellev. A Bo. 111.— 1st, 8a. ..1896
1923
110
70
Bellev. A Car.— 1st, Gs
Ohl.St.L.&Pad.— Ist,gd.g.5sl917 loo's
115'
St. Loui9 So.— 1st, ffd. g. 43.1931
do
2d income, 5s. 1931 72 "4
1932
Car. A Shawt.— 1st g. 4s
115
105
St. L. A S. F.— 2d 63, g., cl. A.190U 113
lom Equip., 73
1395 100
1931
93 >a
General 5s
1937
76%
l9t, trust, gold, 59
1990
tiTt
Con90l. guar., 4s
Kan. City A S.- 1st, Gs, g. 191
Ft. S. AV.B.Bg. -Ist, Gs... 1910 •90
86
Kansas Midland— Ist, 49, g. 1937
1931 1071s
St. Paul A Duluth— 1st, 53
1917 '103
2d mortgage 5s
St. Paul Minn A M.— Ist, 7s. .1909 109
1909 115
2d mort., 63
1922
Minneap. Union— lat, 6s
Mont. Cen.— 1st, guar., G3..1937
1151s
46
1937 100
1st guar. g. 5s
East. Miuu., lat div. 1st 5s.l90S
San Fran. A N. P.— 1st, g., 5s.l919
1931
South CaroUua-2d, Ga
80. Pac. Coast- lat, guar., 43. 1937
rer.RE.As'nof at.L.-lst,4ias.l939
'Texas Central- lat, s. 1., 78. ..1909
1911
1st mortgage, 78
Texas A New Orleans— l9t,7s. 1905
1912 104
Sabine Division, 1st, 6s
Third Avenue (N.Y).— 1st 5s, 1937 1121a 114
1917
95
97
ToL A. A. A Cad. -6s
Toledo A. A. A O'd Tr.—g. Gs. 1921 11314 114>«
991*
PI.— 6a
1919
Tol. A. A. A Mt.
1940
90
Tol. A. A. AN. M.— 5s, g
105
Ulster A Del.— 1st, con.,6.,59. 1923 103
1896 1061s
Union PaciUc— 1st, Ue
let, Ga
1897 107%
87
1st, 63
1898 110
90
Collateral Trust, Gs
1903
87
Collateral Trust, 53
1907
80
112
Kansas Paclllo -lat 6s, g...l895 105 107
lat, 6s, g.
189G 107 110
1895 100
C. Br. U. P.— F. c 7s
"sET
82
Atch. Col. APa«.— Ist, 63...1905
83
112
Atch. J. Co. A W.— lat, 63... 1905
80
U.P. Liu. ACol.— lst,g.,58. 1918 *73
Oreg.S.L.AU.N.,coi.trst.,59.19l9 104% 103
1908
lOl"*
Utah A North.— 1st, 7s
1926 70
101
Gold, 58
Utah Southern— Gen., 7s ..1909 lOlis
1909 101
Exten., 1st, 78
108
102
Valley R'y Co. of O.— Con. 63.1921
Wabaah- Debenture, Ser. A. .1939
1895 106% 108
ilO
No. Missouri— 1st, 7s
St.L.K.C.AN.— R.E.AEE79.1895 105 >« 1061a
63
8t.Charie9Br'ge— lst,6s...l908
88
West. Va. C. A Pitts.— 1st, 6s. 1911
1071a
Wheel. AL.E.— Ist. 5e, gold... 1926
1930
Extension A Iinn. tr.. 5s
St. L.

A.

2d m.ino. 78
Dividend bonds

.

1990 *92i«

—

&

76

'125

L.S.AW.— Conv. deb., 53.1907 '106 13
Mich. Div., 1st, 6s
1924 1221*
Ashland Divisiou—lst, G8..1925 1221a
Incomes
108
let, con., guar., 7b
191.5 '135
lii9
Minn.A St. L.— 1st, g. 78
1927 128
Del. & Hud. Can.— Coupon 7s,1894 1051s
Iowa Extension, 1st, 78
1909 130
Pa. Div., coup., 7s
1917 137
2dmortg., 78
1891 100
Albany & Susq.— l8t,gu.,7s 1906
128
SouthwestExt.- 1st, 78
1910 '122
let, cons., guar., 6s
,1906 117
Pacific Ext.— let, 63
1921 105
Bens. <fe Bar.— Ist, coup., 78.1021 143
Impr. & equipment, 63
1922 100
Danver City Cable— 1st, 68.. .1908 981s lOlis Minn. A Pac—
let mortg.,5e.l936
Denv. & B. G.— Imp., g., 53. ..19'%^ *84
Miun.St.P.AS.S.M- l8tc.K.4s.l938
Duluth & Iron Kauge— let 56.19» 7 100
Mo.K.AT.— K.C.iSl'P., Ist,4s,g.l990
E. Tenn. Va. & Ga.— 1st, 78.. .1900 111
'Dal. A Waco— let, 5s, gu.... 1940
Divisional 5s
1930 103
Missouri Paeillc— Trust 5s. ..1917
1st ext., gold, 5e
1937
65
let coll., 58, g
1920 *8S
Eq.&lmp.,g.,5s
1938
St L.AI. M.-Ark.Br., let, 79.1895 105 "4
Mobile <k Birm.— let, g.,58..1937
Mobile A Ohio— let ext., 68.. .1927 'lllis
Alabama Central— 1st 68... 1918 100
St. L. A Cairo
4s, guar
1931
Brie- lei, extended, 78
1897 112 116
Morgan's La. A T.— 1st, 68.. ..1920 '112
2d, extended, 58
1919 115
l9t, 78
'I2II4
8d, exteuded, 4is8
1"!l923 IO7I4 107% Nash. Chat. & St. L.— 2d, 63.. 1918
1901
4tb, extended, 58
!l920
New Orleans A Gulf— ist, 63 .1926
eth, extended, 48
1928 102 104
N. O. A. No. E.-Pr. 1., g., 63.. 1915
let, con., g., I'd, 78
1920 '1361s
N Y. Cent.—Deb. g. 43
1905 100
Keorg., 1st lien, 63
1908 '112
N. J. June— Guar. 1st, 48... 1986
B. N. Y. & E.— iet, 78
iqiR I36I4
Bt^-.

E.— l8t,48,.1990

2d, 78
3d, 73
Clev. A P.-Cons..

95

,

Funded coup., 5s

N.

9514 Oregon A Califor.— Ist, 53,
Oreg. Ry A Nav.— Col.tr. g..59.1919
Pan. Sink.F'd Subsidy— 63, g. 1910

100

871s

A

Ohio A MiS9— 2d consol.
65% Spring.Dlv.— 1st 78
General 5s
Ohio River RR.— Ist, 58
Gen. g.,5s

iigis

*75%

'79

Clinch Val. Ist 5s

Pitts. Ft.

96% Manito.S.W.Colonlza'u- 58,g.l931
Memphis A Charl.— Gs, gold.. 1924 *90

Green.— 1st, 68.. .1916
„2d, 68
192G
Del. Lack. <feW.— Mort. 7s
1907 '125

H.Y L

Scioto Val.

115

'i02"

Cent. Washington— l9t,g.,68.1938

1934
1924
1908
1957

100
95

120

Coeur d'Alene— 1st, 6s, gold.1916
Gen. l9t,g.,63
1938

RoanokeASo.— lst,gu. 58,g.l922

116

1980

2d, 33

Leb. Branch Extension

Manhattan Ry.—Cou3. 48

Oolumbiaiilc

HelenaARedM'n— I9t,g.,6s.l937
Dulutb&Manitoba— lst,g.6sl936
Dul.AMan Dak.Div.— lstG9.1937

128

II414 115

N. O. A Tex.— Ist, 4s. ...1934
2d mort., 53
1934
Louis. St. L. A Tex. —2d g, 68. .191'

130

1936
6s. .1923

Imp. & Ext., 6s
Adjustment M.,
Equipment, 53

111

Loii.

106>«
iiesi 117

AN. P.— Gen.,

102
36 14

.......1911
let 58
SmithtowiiAPt.'Jeff.— i's't.Ts 1 901 '105

Louis.Evans.&St. L.— Cou.53.1939
Louis. A Nash.— Cecil. Br, 78.1907
10038
E. II. A Nash.— Ist 68, g....l9l9
1920
Pensacola Division, 63
St. Louis Division, 1st, 68... 1921

& S. C— l9t, 69
1919 121
& W. Ind.— 1st, s. f., 63.1919
1932 116 117
Chic. & WestMioh.— 53
1921
(Bin Ham. & D.— Con. e. f., s.1905 i22%
2d, gold, 4129
1937
Cln. D. & Ii'n— let, gu. 5s, g.l941 93
gs's
Tin. Jack. & Mac— 1st, g., 5s. 1936
Clev. Ak. & Col.-Eq. & 2d 68.1930 "99 "a
O.O.C. & St. L., Cairo div.— 48, 1930 *92
Paul

St.Paul

Norfolk A West.— General, 69 . 1931
New River, 1st, 69
1932

11418
'122

54

General mortgage, 6s

Oln.

102'

Spokane APal.— 1st, 6s

103
Mahon'g CoalRR.— 1st, 53.1934 109
A
LehighV.,N.Y.— 1st gu.g.4ia8.1940 104
1916
2d income 69
Lehigh V.Term.— 1st gu 58,g.l94l 110 nils Rich. ADauv.— Debenture 6s. 1927 •85
75
Litchf. Car.A West.— let 68. g. 1916
Equip. M. 8. f., g., 58
1909
1898 iliis
Longlsland— let, 78
Atl. A Char.- 1st, pref., 78.. 1897 '102
1900 •83
N. Y. A R'way B.— let, g. 58.1927
do.
Income, 6a
1927
2dinortg., inc
Wa3h.O.AW.-l9t,4s,gu.cy.,1924
221s
N.Y.AMai..Beach.— let, 78, 1897 100
Rioh.AW.Pt.Term.— 68. '97, tr. rec.
N, Y. B.AM. B.— l9t con. 58,g. 1935
Col. trust 09, 1914, tr. rec

Ohio.

Consol 68
Cin.San.&Cl

102'

Brookl'nAMontauk— l8t,63. 19 1

ifl

Keokuk & D69 M.— I9t, 58..19^3 95
Ohio. St. P. & Minn.— 1st, Gs... 1918 123
Bt.

1906
AT.— 1st, 78
Kal. All. A G. R.— 1st gu. 53.1938

75

Lake Shore- Div. bonds, 78. 1899 114

& Milwaukee— 1st, 73.1898
& St. P.— 2d, 73
1907

I

AM.

Bid.

1071s

100

101
So.— B.AE.—New7B.'98 112

Det. M.

1900 123
122
114

8s

Peninsula— Ist, conv.,

110

105

SECURITIES.

North'n PaGiflc- Divid'd scrip ext. 100
James River Val.— let, Sg. .1936
.

101
100

72i«
*62

—

Fargo & South., 68, AS8U...1924
Inc. conv. sink, fund, 53
191C
1916
Dakota &Gt. South., 59
Mil. &Nor. main Hue— 68.. .1910
Oalc.&N.W.— 30 year deb. 59, 1921
E8canaba <fe L. S. let, 63
1901
DeeM. & Minn.— let, 73. ...1907

Ask.

& Indian.— 1st,

cons. .1926
""Unt & P. Marq.— Mort., 6a. ..1920 118
1939;
1st con. gold, 58
1939'
Port Huron— Ist, 5s
Pla. Ceo &Pen.— istg. 58.. ..1918
vt Worth&B.
72
Istg., 59..1928

Svans.

Div., est., g. 58
West. PaclUc— Bonds, 6s. ...1899 *108ifl
No. Railway (Cal.)— I8t,-fis.l907
C.

SECURITIES.

Ask,

Bid.

Central Faciflo— Gold bds,
Gold bonds, 6s
Gold bonds, 69
Ban Joaquin Br., 68
Mort. gold 53
Land erant, 5s, g

[Vol. LV.

.

,

iTvr JiUacellaBeoa*.* (7nUstedjBoiid»—See 3d page pre«edlnc.

1

.

OcroBBR

..
.

.

,

THE CHRONICLE.

19, 1803.]

719

BOAS*

IttUjCatmCttt

Samtnfi

Latttt

\WMkorMo\

Utporttd.

Jan. 1

1891.

•

•

t
G.B»yW.*8t.P.|Beptemb'r,

4S,9S4

Beptemb'r.

2,89ft

OUU AUblOMW

Uoos.Tun.AWII Aaiout ••
8,378
aalIlMt'n^kabeo septemh'r.
14.000
IIulob.ABouth'n Septemb'r.
10,823
llUnoUOentr'l. July
1,468.380
lnd.Dea.AWeat Roiitemb'r.
50,013
In.AQtNorth'n 3d wk Oct 103.738
llnteroo. (Mez.i Wk Oct 8
28.'t00
Iowa Central... 3d wk Oct.
4 7. -27 5
Iron Rallwav... Sfptemb'r.
3.531
J'k'nv.T.AK.W. July
40.151
KanawliHt^Mtch 3d wk Oct
6.094
Kan.O. (;i.ABp 2d wk Oct
6,344

Tht Intkstors' Stjpplkmknt, a pamphlet of 150 pages
eontaine extended tablet of the Stocks and Bonds of Railroada, and other Companies, with remarks and statistics concerning the income, financial status, etc., of each Company.
It is published on the last Saturday of every other month
Viz., January, Afarch, May, July, September and November,
and is furnished without extra charge to all regular tub-

-

—

Chroniclk.
Tht General Quotations of Stocks and Bonds, occupying
tix pages of th« Cbroniclb, are published on the third
Saturday of each month,

K.O.F.B.AMem. 2d wk Oct
K.C.Mem. A Blr. 2d wk Oct

Kan.C.WyAN.W Septemb'r.
Keokuk A West. 2d wk Oct

$eribers of the

RAILROAD EARNINGS.
Lalett Xomtntrf

BOIIW,

Seporud

Week or Mo

1892.

AUackenyTu..

8cptcnil)'r.
3<t

Jan. 1 to LetUtt Dal*.

240,191

A*eh.T. ia.Ftk.

M wk Oct
wk Oct.
wk Oct

8tL.4i8knF..
Color. Uldland 3d
Total
3d

wk Oct
AUanUtAChar.- AuKiiat
Atlanta

& Flor'a

Septomb'r.

AtlanUAW.Pt. AUKU8t
B.AO.£aetLiDea 8cptcuU>'r,

WMtem Lines Sepicmb'r.
Total

Scptciuli'r.

wk Oct
BatHA Ham'nas August
Bal.<kO.Boathw 3d
Blr.

A Atlantic.

Blr.Bh.ATenn.K
Brooklyn Kiev..
BaS.Rooh.APItt
Bor.C'.Kap.&N.

Oamdrn A

Bcptemb'r
AuKUSt
3d wk Oct
3d wk Oct

IstwkOct

Atl.. AU»;U8t

OanadlanPaoinc 3d wk Oct
Oar.C-um.G.tCh. Aumist
Car. MliUanil... 8ei)teaib'r.
Central of Oa... June

1891.

1892.

1891.

238,064 1,925,1.'S0| 1.871,882
830,118 29.629„573 27,B46,2»<2
212.379 7,190.139 6,762,936
37,330 1,163,572 1,636.658
1,120,290 1.079,827 38,573,297 36,045,875
54,411
61,409
460,135
529,188
9.649
10.51
30.430
32.789
271.078
283,395
1,954,.'>61 1,810,646 14,644,768 14,184,946
650,365 512,302 4,603.368 3,095,093
2,604,926 2,322.948 19.248.135 18,280,039
54.293
53.831 2,126,664 1,978,139
857,21!)

214,946
48,123

2,S5S
3.369
23,363
38.179
64,766
109,411
174,796
469.000
1.214
7,838

2,633
4.084
30.703
38,087
20,393
154,560
131,865
36,073 1,491,070 1,400,004
63,439 2,547.097 2,252,337
88,044 3,156,279 2,725,939
157,731
605.761
582,202
441,000 16,695,972 15,628,700
3,590
18.567
29.167
6,340
44,906
44,551

544,928

OntralotN.J.. Septemb'r. 1,343,298 1,271,638 10.637,071 10,416.476
OenCralPaciflo.. AUKUst
Omtralof B.C.. Ailirust

1,475,144 1,610,944 9,639.723 10,785.909
6,636
7,707
64,029
64.936
Obu.Cln. ACblr Septemb'r.
10,742
13,737
100.142
113.366
OiiarlMt'nABav AuKUst
32.655
41,545
418.979
507.592
Ohar.Buni.cftNo. Septemb'r.
13.051
15,584
102,995
83.184
Oheraw. a Darl AlIKUSt
5.736
6,25'.i
49,100
65,318
Otaeraw.ASallst. AuKUsit
976
1.328
11,548
15.276
Obea. AOhlo... 3d wk Oct
199,754 216,168 7,020,152 7,352,386
OhM. O. <k B. W Septemb'r. 205,606 210.221 1,602,522 1,699,661
Chic. Btir. & No, Aucuct
1,352,8S8 1,318.622
230,464
187.65
OUc. Hurl, ik U. Septemb'r. 1,135.598 3,713.136 29,306.771) 24,406.057
CSiio.A East. HI 3d wk Oct
96.600
91.900 3,279,586 3.026,671
Chlcak'O * Kne. August...
250.48
235,401
1,807,044 1.700,715
Ohlo.MU.ASt.P 3d wk Oct. 787.763 779.696 25,627.662 22,351,105
OhlckN'thWD Septemb'r 3,207,880 3,186,213 23,930.232 20,656,797
Ohlo.Feo.&S.L.I 3d wk Oct
28.327
24,540 1,044,336
911,814
Ohio. K'kl.&P... Septemb'r. 1,970,799 1,847,489 13,463,404 12,060,388
Ohlo.Bt.P.&K.O 3d wk Oct
108.072
100,534
Ohlo.8t.P.M.<][U. AllRUBt
789.483 686,329 5.500,626 4.561,819
Ohlc.ikW. Mico 3d wk Oct.
47,018
36.764 1,606,275 1,417,024
On.Oa.di Ports Septemb'r.
6.803
7,232
51,944
50,294
Oln.Jack AMao 3d wk Oct
15.820
13.174
563,838
585,429
On.N. O. AT.P 'Jd wk Oct
79,932
91,«39 3,295,469 3,378,800
Ala.Ut.Boutb 2d wk Oct
30,150
40.917 1,343,448 1,448, 3:t6
H.Orl. AN. E. 2d wk Oct.
26.806
26,148
955,235
876,858
Ala A VIokeb d » k Oct
10,787
16,172
453,833
474,646
Vloia.Sb.&P •2d wk Oct
16,433
401.221
12,066
453,276
BrlanKer Bysi 2d wk Oct. 159,742 190,309 6,447,207 6,629,977
Otam. North wn. Sept«mb'r
1,7;^ 8
1,902
15,342
15.596
Olii. PorU. A v.. Septemb'r.
27,534
26,221
190,608
180.263
Col. A Majsv ."^eiitemb'r.
1,311
10,810
1,264
9,540
OleT.AkroDiSzCo :d wk Oct
21,59
19,55J
779,848
739.802
Clev. Can. & So. August
4.- 8,241
100.645
68,52
561,880
OLUIn.Cb.AH.L 2a wk Oct 305.864 283.239 11.231,185 10,686,053
Feo. A East'n 2d wk Oct.
41,810
33.775 1,402,109 1,304, -202
OeT.AMarlettu Septemb'r
31,128
211,496
31,704
254,596
CJoL H. V. A Tol Septemb'r
321. 8H4
344.626 2,461,740 2,373,858
OoLBhawneeAB 2d wk Oct
14,(19'
15.728
554.41
427.973
Oolnsa A Luke. Septemb'r.
3.932
22,326
2,750
21,335
Oonn. River
AU^UHt
104,08^
112,732
781,918
721,563
Current Klver.. 2d wk Oct
4.695
2,920
158,640
123,097
DsnT. AKIoQr. 3d wk Oct. 162,300 197,800 7.278,611 6,795,'262
DeaH. No. A
Septemb'r,
39,249
35,991
299,740
240.759
DeLBay C.AAIi. Sept'-mb'r
32.750
272.208
33.450
347,.551
DetLans'KANo 3d wk Oct,
28.023
988.185 1.007.771
28.344
DulotbB.S.AAti 2d wk Oct
45,424
46.709 1,815.597 1,7.59,748
Duluth A Wlun. Septemb'r.
5.65'2
10,141)
89,438
54,297

W

B.Tenn.Va.AOa 2d wk Oct

Elgin Jol.A£a«t. Septemb'r.
TUlt.AInd'pll«;3d wk Oct.
Mrtntr. A T. a 3d wk Oct
TUelibaTK
AuRuei:
FUnt.AP.Mara. 3d wk Oct
Florence
August
Ft W. A Rio Or Septemb'r.
6lL Car'la A Nu. Au^^iat
GeorKia KR
JAuKust
Geo. Bo. AFIa.. Septemb'r.

Geornet'nAWn

Augu.st

133,200
75,805
7,363
25,736
691.269
54.521
2.098
34,463
24,661
118.419
65,328
3.255

148,260
62,147
620.286
510,664
305,8-23
7,115
287,970
24,723 1,027,118
976.570
641,698 4.868,105 4.546,958
57.507 2,307,555 2,337,409
2.086
22,779
27,685
3tt,096
255.800
192,229
136,358
7,919
73,553
121.751
916.742 1,153,504
59,896
550.152
550,204
2.930
30,771
27,912
48,751 2.018,847 1,939,413
398.648
359,855
9.249
183,819
4,484
198,469
62,483 2,615,964 2,483,085
429,017
70,841 2,790,957 2,707,979
26,459
897,153
878.318

er.Bap. AInd.. 3d wk Oct
54,61
Otal.B.AFt W. 3d w» Oct.
9,637
Other lines ... 3d wk Oct
5,021
Total all lines, 3d wk Oct
69,269
Trunk... Wk Oct. 22 439,202
Ohlc AOr.Tr. Wk Oct. 1
73,247
Det.Gr.H.A&L. Wk Got. 1
28,769
Great North'nSt. P. M. A M. SeptemVr. 1,413,808 1,302.276 8,958,347
Eaatof Ulnn. Septemb'r. 125,607 158,179
831,375
Uontua Cent Septemb'r. 111,320 106,404
853.374
Tot, system. Septemb'r. 1,650,736 1,566,859 10.643,095

nnd

7,231,578
728,934
940,908
8,901,480

•

A

Bo Beptoinb'r.
L. Erie All.
L. Erte
West 8d

A
LnhUbA

wkOct

.

105.460
22,448
80,914
9.574
7,044
78.810
43.310

Hud.. Septemb'r.
IvOblKb Valley.. July
1.723.602
L. Rook A Mem. 2d wk Sep.
7.656
Lonn: Islaud
3d wk Oct
81.995
Louis. A Mo.Hiv, July
38,910
Lonls.Ev.ABt.L 3d wk Oct
38.712
Loulsv.ANa.siiv 3d wk Oct
470,875
Louls.N. AACb 3d wk Oct
67,860
Loulsv.N.O. AT 4tbwkMay
05.788
Lon.BtL.ATex, 3d wk Oct
13,924
MaulstUiue
Septemb'r.
660
Mar. A Nor. Oa. August
21.044
Memphis A Oba.H 2d wk Oct
20,092
tMeilcanCent.. 3d wk Oct 179,069
(Mex.Natlouai 3d wk Oct 113.229
IMeiican R'way Wk Oct 8
52,770
Milwaukee A No 3d wk Oct
40.252
Mineral Kan(;e.. Septemb'r.
11,039
Hinneap. ASt.l. t^epteinb'r.
170.054
M.BtP. &8.S.M Septemb'r. 262,47
Mo.Kan.ATex. 3d wk Oct 232,568
Mo.I'ac.AIronM 3d wk Oct
601,000
Mobile A Ohio
Septemb'r.
272,741
Nasb.Cb.AStL.. Septemb'r. 448,127
N.JerseyAN.I. July
31,829
New Orl. A So'u Septemb'r.
11.256

rON.Y.C.AH.R, Septemb
N. Y. L.E. A W. August
N. Y. Pa. A Ohio August
K. Y.AN.Eng., June

r.

N. Y.ANorthn, .Septemb'r.
». Y. Out. AW., 3d wk Oct
N.Y.Busq.A W. Septemb'r.
Norf. ASouth'n. August
Norfolk A West.. 3d wk Oct
N'theast'uO. C.I Auprust
North'n Central, Septemb'r.

Northern Pacitlc 3d wk Oct.
Wis. Ct Linos. 3d wk Oct
N.P.A W.Cent 3d wk Oct
Ohio A Miss
IstwkOct
Ohio River
2d wk Oct
Ohio Southern.. Septemb'r.

Omaha A SI. L..

Septemb'r.

4.212,115
2,677.501

644.705
"(ii'.oes

70,667
163,932
31,420
235,258
32.886
650,070
707.825
130.779
838,604
111,236
22,625
53.792
47,393
393,000

OreKon Imp. Co August
Pennsylvania .. Septemb'r. 6,098,024
Peoria Dec. AKv. 3d wk Oct
17.854
Petersburg
August
39,714
Phlla. A Erie... August.
513,035
PhUa. A Read'g Septemb'r. 2,164,923
CoalAIronCo. septemb'r, 1,902,649

LaUM

1892.

1893.

to

Dale,

1891.
I

83.374
3.047
34.499
8«>si
3,30 <
30.009
10.097
17,830
103.700;
132,0m
8,166
71.930
00,041
1,001,806 10,084,527 10,063,149
43.103
371,077
306,817
126,991 2,992,796 3,080,224
I

00.935
2,705
39,820
7,755
6.327
108.841
30,440
29,213
9,833
6.455
07,668
37,618
1,086,109
10,101
80,277
42.053
35.061
443,535
60.929
72.337
11,106
2,607
33.747
195,296
83,367
67,092
39,026
14,106
200,70<i

1,023.529
20,982

l,3H6.73l5

35,642
006,863
489,833
396,036
20«,639
249,418
342,240
3,841,404 3,607,130
831.042
888,818
246,304
212,40«
311,131
318,174
69,407
03.901
2,832,093 2,.569.391
833,301
312.60S
372,795
8,612,574

439,019
3.t7«,004
233.040
1.172.7831 1.231.640
17.190,069 15,983,029
2,640,7341 2,287,104
l,423.762i 1,483.424
514.343
405.800
79,823
102,330
343.9,5o{

1,086.020

1,211,303

6,232.93ol 5,733,143
3,577,.545| 3,3.37,'292

2.313, 2o:' 3,105,872
1,343,579, 1,369.703
93.403i
106.937
1.430,023; 1,248.793

265.530 2,202.999 1,668,607
259.637 7.531,065 7,502,410
535.000 21,679,000 19,904,000
277,075 2,411,170, 2.439,612
479,955 3,803,877, 3,372,071
158.335
27,907
175,183
13.583
122,973
9.5,773
4,128.055 33,391,603 31,998,431
2,940,268 20,235,363 19,550,584
699,624 4,636.743 4,532,716
2,906,004 2,918,416
380,771
47,388
412,966
64.934 2,808,240 2,443,709
15!j,124 1,277,039 1,218,550
288,776
214,020 7,831.648 7,272.023
431,758
501,273
36,788
625,919 5.219.439 4,979.824
641,633 19,548,920 19,413,.582
105,843 4,607,503; 4.133,060
747,476 24,216,4'28 23.546,643
107,295 3,211,368; 3,219,406
20,336
547.194
592,956
416,081
56,309
403,636
355,693
48,513
421,822
442,035 2,588,5811 2,678,011
6,159,557 50,593,735 49,5'27,125
15,323
692.992i
697.283
376,377
363,317
41,753
510,324 3,261.1481 3.299,262
2,124,961 16.853,349 15,970,414
2,348.269 15,893,432 14,612,823
4.473.230 32,746,782 30,582,692

TotttlbothCos, Septemb'r. 4,067.572
Lehigh Valley August ... 1,548,770 1,528,442

Mar. A Ch Septemb'r.
Pitt8hen.AL.E Septemb'r.
Pitt8.&West sys 2d wk Oct
Pitts.

PlttYoung.AA. Septemb'r.

Pt Royal A Aug. August
PtRoy.AW.Cu. August
Pies.iVtAriz.Cen. July

QuincyO.AK.C. Septemb'r.
Klch.&Dan.ays. July
A Petersb. August

Rich.

Rio Gr'de South. 3d wk Oct
Rio Gr. West
3d wk Oct.
Sag.TuscolaiH, Septemb'r.
8tL.A.AT.H.ll't. 2d wk Oct.
.

StL.Ken'et&So Septemb'r.
StL.Soutbw'ru. 3d

StPaulAUul'tb
B.Fran.AN.Pao
Saudersv.ATen.
SanAnt.&A.P..
Bav. Am. A Muu.
SUverton

wk Oct

Septemb'r.'

2d wk Oct
Septemb'r'

Juno
Septemb'r.
Septemb'r.

BlouiCityANo. septemb'r,
South Bound... August
Booth Carolina
8o. Pacitlo

.

Septemb'r.

Co.—

Oal.Uar.AS.A. August
Louls'a West.. August

Morgan' sL AT. August
M.Y.T.AMex August
Xaz.

A

N. Orl

.August

August
August
August
CoastDlriCal.i August
Atlantlosys.ii.
Paolflo system

ToUlof

all..

Sou. Dlv. (Call .\ugust
Arlxona Dlv.. August

Kew Mez. Dlv. August
Spar. On. A Col August....
Btaten I«l. R. X. August
utonyCI.ACMt. August....
immit Branch. Septemb'r.

8

Lykens Valley Septemb'r.
Tot'l both Co's Septemb'r.
Tonn. Midland.. Septemb'r.
Texas

A

Tex

ValAN.W

8.

PaoiUo. 3d wk Oct
[Septemb'r,

3d wk Oct
3d wk Oct
Tol.AOhloCcnt. 3d wk Oct
Tol. A. A. A.s.M
Tol. Col. ACin..

Tola O.CemEit

Septemb'r.

A West.. 2d wk Oct
Tol.BtL.AK.C. 3d wk Oct

Tol. P.

3,466
3,952
41,109
35,565
49,594
47,52
141,462 161,979
15,999
25,518
19,169
26,476
13,099
16,830
26,401
27,932
947,430 1,107.020
28,158
27,712
16,425
10,862
54.600
61,900
12,345
11,554
35,260
35.^50
2,949
2,718
113.400 134,500
226,419 182,777
19,954
20.912
849
738
107.037 137,830
51,174
52.820
13,500
16,244
41, '200
33,073
17,926
119.089 154i548

28,824
286,537
1,878,645
1,115,256
146,573
172,665
74,496
201,081
6,986,986
238,521

531,303
2,067,367
89.493

32.878
239.678
1,775,633
942,531

248,133
262.669
75,016
191,343
7,705,820
224.922
209,472
2,006,92-2

77,406

l,148,942i 1,091.344

25,708
3.438,533
1,475,561
688,292
4.730
639,196
373,815
64,143
303.19'
116,133
963,867

16,370
3,386,135
1,240.360
683,051
6,571
722,276
357,070
82,620
311,301

1,201,367

2,722,923
614,748
3,306,778
134,075
1,025,130
7,844,918
7.817,
1,034,731
3.558,274 3,540.671 23,018,906 23,571,788
4,593,055 4,510,257 30,336,944 31,416,706
251,598 267,03" 1.472,259 l,484,a5«
819,403 608,307 5.080,332 4,271,6-i4
147,693 156,786 1,298,881 1,283,993
681,327
656,027
78.629
88,587
87,230
70.993
10,071
11,661
726,034
746,957
132,824 134,125
41,603
44,635
16,461
15,036
946,769
962,870
114,057 109,'244
689.74S
793.434
111,622
70,004
225,679 179,248 1,761.310 1,636,912
149.021
138.064
17.620
17.515
173,353 208,935 5,080.527 5,406.262
32,18S
35,652
4,155
4.751
26,367
20,241
»7i',i60
274,212
6,253
6,829
31,083
32.890 1,281.283 1,170,483
18,434
16,831
745.084
773,734
22,605
21,826
47,724
43,444 1,739.270 1,550.648

360,127
84,165
417,166
21.127
149.836

355,283
81,657
376.533
20,736
134,441
973.536

2,745.434
656,134
3,138,863
137.213
1.077,072
9'

. ..
.
.
.

—

.

THE CHRONICLE.

720

Jan. 1

to

Latest Dat*.

Kg ADS.

2(J

I

week of Octobber.

1892.

Kanawha A Michigan
Kansas City

&So, HaveD

Tol.

&

Del Dnion Paciflo—
tJlBter

.

>Or.B.L.&U.N.

4,981,166

Or.Ev&N.Co.
U.Pao.D.&U.

3.40-',7i5

Clin.

6,830

.

Onio River

Bt.Jo.*tM.Isl.

690,017

AUotherlines.

Cent Br.AL.L.

13,644,821
26,110.871
403,222

Tot. coiit'led

A T. H. Br'cues
A No. Pac.
Toledo Peoria A Weat'n..
Western N. Y. A Peun..
St L. Alt.

Inereate.

Deereatt

6,327

105.460
22,443
9,571
20,092
22,625
35,260
19,954
2^,605
75,700

Vol. LV.

7,l7i<

6,Ut

10-1,341

A Spr..

Kan. City Ft. 8. A Mem..
Kan. City Mem. A Birin
Keokuk A Western

Memphis A Charleston.

1891.

,

31S
2,831
7,992

30.440
9.8)3
33,747
2J,336
35,550
20,912
21,826
75,700

259
7,655
2,289

26,580.0^13

Tot.U.l'.Sjp.

Montana Un

436,695
19,509
26,307
532, ill
26,846,318
121,568
10,959,376
1,120,770
822,204

.

&8

lieav.Top.

Man.Al.&Bur.
Jointly owTieil

Grand total.
Vermont Valley
Wabash
West Jersey
W.V.Cen.A Pitts
Western of Ala
West.N.Y.

Pitts.

2,854,812
87,396
1,034,S94
611,143
£4,589

& h Erie
Col. * Auff

Wheel.
Wil.

Total (75 roads)
Set lncreasei3 67 p.

The following
suits for

Wrightsy.ATen.

* Fljnires cover only that part of mileaRe located in South Carolina.
tEaruiugs elven are on whole Jacksonville Southcastero System.
6 Kansas City & Pacific included in both years d Includes earnluga
Irom ferr e.i, e to., not given separately. {Mexican currency. /Fitjures
Include Eome Watertown & Ogdensburg.

Latest Gross Earulngs bj Weeks.— Toe latest weekly
•amings in the foregoiDg table are separately summed up as
followB:

Ist

week

2d week
3d week
4th week
1st week
2d week
3d week

3'4l per cent gain in the aggregate.

1892.

of October.

1891.

857,'21fi

830,118
212,379
53 8)1
36.073
63.439
441,000

Inereate.

Deereau.

&

Ohio Southw
Brooklyn Elevated
Bait.

Biitfali'

Koih.

Pitisb...

rtr

Canadian Pacific
Chesapeake tte Ohio
Chlcaco <fe East, Illinois..

214,946
54,293
38.1/9
61.766
469.000
199,754

ghlcairo Milw. &8t. Paul

96,6 '0
7!<7,76:s

hicasro Peoria ife St. L. ..
Chicago 8t. P. & K. City

2.S,327
108.'i7

Chicago & West Michigan
Oln. Jackson * Mackinaw
Colorado Midland
•Denver & Rio Grande..
Detroir Lan.sing

& No

Ivansv. & Indianapolis
Evausv. & Richmond
Kvansv.
Teire Haute..
Flint & Pere Marquette.
Qrand Raidds & Indian.
Cincinnati E. & Ft. W..
Other lines
QrandTruuk of Canada.
*fe

Intern'l

&

Gt. North'n

...

Iowa Central

Kanawha & Michigan
Louisv. Evans. & St. L..
Louisville & Nashville.
Louis. N. Albany & Chic.
Lomsville St. L. & Texas.
.

Mexican Central
Mexican National
Milwaukee tStNorihern..
Mo. Kansas & Texas
Mo. Pacific & Iron Mt
Kew York Ont. & West.
•Norfolk & Western
Horthcru Pacific
Wisconsin Central
Peoria Dec. & Evansv...
Eio Grande Southern
Kio Grande Western
St. Josepli & Gd. Island..
Bt. Loui s Southwestern.
.

Texas & Pacific
Toledo a.nn.A.&Ko.Mich.
Col. <k Cincinnati.

Ohio Central

Bt. h.

<fe

. .

Kan.City.

Wabash
Wheeling

& Lake

Erie

Total (54 roads)
Ket increase (2-41

48.123
162,300
28.023
7,363
2,880
25,736
54,.521

54.611
9.637

779.6^6
24.510
100..i34

36,764
13.174
37.330
197,800
28.344
7.115
2,196
24.723
57,507
48,751
9, -'49

. .

462

4,7 10

8,067
3,787
7,538
10,254
2,616
10,79J

35,500
3.^1

248
684
1,013

2,986

5,860

388

.5,021

4,484

fi37

429,017
126.991

10,185

76,810
81,995
38,712
470,87.1

67,860
13,924
179,069
113,229
40,252

50,9 15
7,755
67,668
80,277
35,061
443. .135
6iJ.9i8

11,1

'6

601,000
70,667
23s,25i
707,823
130,77»
17,854
16,425
54,600
25,800
113,400
173,853
26,367
6,253
31,083
47,724
315,000
30,771

195,296
8), 367
39,026
25>,6H7
585,000
64,93
214.020
641,633
105.843
15,328
10,962
61.900
25,600
134,500
208,985
20.241
6,829
32,890
43,444
303,000
27,844
7,710,567

232,5'i8

1

p. c.)

23,253
3,660
1,661

9,142
1.718
3,651
27,840
6.932
2,818
16,2 ;7

2 9! 8 62
1,22s

27;669

16,000
5,733
21,238
66,192
24.936
2,526
5,563
7,300

200
21,100
35,132
6,126

576
1,807

4,280
12,000
2,927

378,673
185,667

193,006

•Decrease due to strike of trainmen, October 15th to 18th.

Our
roads,

final

statement for the second week of October covers 75
3'67 per cent gain in the aggregate.

and shows

2d week of

October.

1892.

Previously rep'di47 r'da)
Cin. N. O. & Tex.Pac.5 rds
Cleveland Akron & Col
Oleve. Cin. Chic. A St. L.
Peoria & Eastern
Col. Shawnee &. Hocking.
Current River
Dttluth S. 8. ft Atlantic.
BastTenn. Va. & Qa

Flint* Pere Marqu6tt3
erand Raj>ids & Indiana
Cincinnati E. AFt.W..
Other lines

Interp'i

A

Qt. North'n

. .

7,310.236
159,742
21,597
305,861
41,810
15,728
4,695
45,424
133,200
55.440
53,926
9,931
5,659
111,594

1891.

6,976,689
190,309
19,559
283,239
33,775
14,097
2,920

Inereate.

118,470,

77.388
30,567

2,038
22,625
8,035
1,631
1,775

46.70rf

148.260
54,365
49,039
9,872
4.995

Deereatt

S
410,935

November
.

ffroM JSarnings.
1892.
1891.

Jtoads.

Jaa.

$
NewJera.aSept. 1.343,298
1

$
1,271.638

to Sept. 30. ..10,637,071 10,416,476

1,285

59
864
_ 6,876

2-H
401
4-07
3-90
3-67
2-41

323, 39J

305,250
185,667

.

-iret Barninj;*.

1892.

$

$
592,610
4,135,384
304,364
1,921.902
959,132
1,722,167
9,854,226
1,114,926
7.216,743
2,807,139
156,752
959,274

—

1891.

529,030
4,387.745
240,033
1,648.812

—

Interest Charges and Surplus. The following roads, in
addition to their gross and net earnings given above, also
report charges for interest, &c., with the surplus or deficit
above or below those charges.
'-Inter^t, rentals, c«e.-s ^Bal, of Net Earn*.^
1892.

15,060

2-66

191,133
336.103
465,853

767.154
1,616.844
9,109,457
1.329,877
6,217,909
2,710,082
171,013
943.163
71,7913
65,468
343,364
328,936
July 1 to Sept. 30...
499,537
466,892
146,016
134,787
436,603
Kan. C. Ft.S. A M..aSept.
430,901
113.992
151,470
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30... 3,633,776 3,394,880
818,851*
937,515
July 1 to Sept. 30... 1,223,776 1,163,353
301,647
347,646
37.768
Ke»kuk A Weat'n... bAug.
37.345
13,062
14,403
252,936
Jan. 1 to Aug. 31...
253,933
78,239
98,464
Northern Central. bSept.
650.070
625.919
232,490
194,375
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30... 5,219,435 4,9 79,824 1,4)7,472 1,515,769
163,932
N. T. Sus. AWost-.bSept.
158,124
76,441
71,298
Jan. 1 to Sept, 30... 1,377,059 1,218,550
568.904
535.561
Penn. (east P. A E.).Sept. 6,0l>8,024 6,159.5i7 2,032,995 2.216,378
Jan. 1 to Sept 30.. .50,598,756 49,527,125 14,528,591 15,181,053
Llneswestof P.AE.Sept.
Inc. 108.563
Deo.
55.095
Inc. 2,570,613
Jan. 1 to Sept. 3J...
Dec. 202,256
Phila. A Beading... Sept. 2.164.923 2,124.961 1,091,483 1,075. 88«
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30. .. 16,853,319 1=.,970,414 7,619.5 49 7,308,584
Dec. 1 to Sept. 30. ..18, 734,873 17,656,526 8,527,231 8,003.234
CoalAIronCo
Sept. 1,902,649 2,348,269
212,948
143.275
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30.15,893,432 14,612,232
471,806
18,533
Dec. 1 to Sept. 30.17,677.854 16,218,658
514,130
28.399
Total bothCo's....8ept, 4,067.572 4,473,230 1,301.431 1.219,163
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30.32,740.782 30.5«2,693 8,091,3 .5 7.327,116
Deo. 1 to Sept. 30.36,412,727 33,875,184 9,071,364 8,036,633
Lehigh Valley
Aug. 1,548,770 1,528,442
448.624
407,476
Deo. 1 to Aug. 31.13,325,703 12,177,242 3,260,211 2,4J0,73 2
Fraa.AN.Pac.aSept.
Ban
89.777
93,126
40,516
44,918
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30...
648,872
642,278
310,610
239,161
July 1 to Sept. 30...
271,533
377,023
122,299
134,447
Summit Branch
Sept.
114,057
109,244
12,881
def.4a9
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30...
962,876
946,769
68,162
44,007
Lykens Valley
Sept.
111,622
70,004
21,115 deM2,73»
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30...
793,434
689,745
47,196 def.32,372
Total both Co's .Sept.
225,679
179,248
33,976 def.l3,15fl
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30... 1,761,310 1,636,512
115,378
11,636
TeBB.Coal,!. ARR..8ept.
*o2,800
69,600
Feb. 1 to Sept. 30...
•619,900
449,300
VThltebreast Fuel Co. Aug.
f5,236
6,690
Jan. 1 to Aug. 31...
159,879
50,34*
July 1 to Aug. 31...
t9,893
5,SS3
a Net earnings here given are after deducting taxes.
b Net earnings here given are before deducting taxes.
« Bessemer Divlaion (De Bardeleben Coal A Iron Co.) Included only
in 1892.
t About $1,500 deducted from earnings
In July and August and
placed in the equipment and real estate sinking funds. To make a fair
comparison this should be added to the net earnings for this year.

Soads.

1,075
4,887

P.ei.

22l,'J83

19.

Jan. 1 to Sept. 30. ..29,306,770 24,406,057
OWo. M.ASt. Paul.aSept. 3,109,375 3,093,609
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30. ..23,316,858 20.077,971
July 1 to Sept. 30... 8,586,335 7,770,167
Col. H. V. ATol...b.Aug.
3)6,334
332,134
Jan. 1 to Aug. 31 .. 2,139.856 2,029,232
bSept.
I»w» Central
189,768
181,452
Jan. 1 to Sept. 30... 1,375,918 1,244,669

2,106
1.327
28,000

439,20i
103.738
47.275

7,896,234

.

&

15.82i^

6.094

Ijake Erie & Western
Long Islaod

Toledo
Toledo
Toledo

47,018

216,16-(
91, "00

27.101
2,567

Increase.

Amount,
$

1891.

included.
$
$
of Sept. (81 roads). 8,.56:),889
,341.901
of Sept. (82 roads). 8,898,604
,707,471
of Sept. (74 roads). 8,715,315
379.212
of Sept. (77 roads). 11,9 I4,910 11 439.057
of Oct.. (72 roads). 8,609,816 8 286,436
of Oct.. (75 roads). 8.627,733 8 ,322,488
of Oct.. (54 roads). 7,896,234
710.567

CJhesaneakeAOhioaSept.
939,734
898,609
Jan. 1 to Sept 30... 7,021,894 6,703,882
July 1 to Sept. 30... 2,819.320 2,688,439
Ohlc. Burl. AQuin.bSept. 4,135.508 3.713,136

$
Atoh. Top. A- San. Fe ''ya.
Bt. Louis & Snn Fr. Sys

1892.

Net Earnings Monthly to Latest Dates.— The table following shows the net earnings reported this week. A full
detailed statement, including all roads from which monthly
returns can be obtained, is given once a month in these
columns, and the latest statement of this kind will be fonnd
in the Chkoniclk of October 22.
The next will appear in

C«nt. of
3<J teeek

151,559

EARNINGS.
.

number of roads

the issue of

show

456.809
305,25^

comparison of the weekly re -

WEEKLY GROSS

For the third week of O.'tober, the 54 roads which have thus
far reported results,

8,627,738[ 8,322,48-i
o.l

will furnish a
past.

290
958

""7'79

a series of weeks

Period and

312,8-i9

&Pa

West Va<t

Ban Francisco

if

Chlo. Burl. A Qaln..Sept.
810.000
Jan. 1 to Sept. SO... 7,290,000
Kan. C. Ft. S. AM.. Sept.
90,830
July 1 to Sept. 30...
277,383
San Fran.^b No. Pac Sept.
17.075
July 1 to Sept. 30...
51,362
Tenn. Coal, I. A RE.'Sept.
53,200
Feb. 1 to Sept. 30...
425,600

1891.

1892.

$
$
795,186
912,167
7,156,676 2,564,226
89,375
23,162
274,671
24,265
17,192
23,441
61,607
71,037
36,000
def.400
194,300
288,000

1891.

$
821.658
1,952,771
62,095

72,975
27,736
82,840
33,600
16l,20a,

:

:

OCTOBIB

THE (CHRONICLE.

89, 18«S.]

ANNUAL REPORTS.
New Orleans & Texas Paciilc Railiray.
(For the year ending June 80, 18U3.>

Cincinnati

Mr. 8. M. Felton, the PreMileiit. says in his report that In
1891-93 tlie tonuiiKe was 2,181,436, an increiuie of 17T,0U.S. or
8'88 piT c«'ut. The number of tons carried one mil* was
407,745.894, an inert ai.e of 68,172,412, or 10 per cent. Of the
total tonnngft uariiod 6r43 per cent was tlirouKh, and 88'.57
per cent local. The revenue per ton of freixiit was $1 46
the rate per ton per mile 0-78 cent atcainst 0'88
aKiiii'st $1 55
cent till' jirovious year, the d<-cro!i8e beini; cauHOd by the
transpi)rtatii»n of a larger proportion of Iow-cIohs freight.
The uumlwr of paxsen^ers carried during the year was
922,91,1, an iiicrtase of 26,688, or 3 97 per cent.
The number
of iMissen^iers moved one mile was 41,626,475, a decrease of
The earnings per passenger mile de608,039. or 1 '65 per cent.
crea^ied from 2*34 cents to 2*24 cents.
;

As

to tlie Cincinnati terminals the report savs that the terminal exiJinsfs in Cincinnati diirin;< the tiscal year, occasioned by the want of sufficient depot and yard accommodations, were §l;iO,221, against $11J3,506 in 1890-91.

The Prej-idfnt remarks: '-The expenditures by your company arising from the failure of the city to comply under this
neadiriR with the requirements of the lease now exceed the
sum of $1,100,000. As stated in the report for 1886, your
board is of the opinion (and in this it is sustained by eminent
counsel who have examined the case) that this claim is a just
and vaUd one against the city; that it will \ye awarded under
arbitration, ami when so awarded can be enforced against tiie
city or be deducted from the current rental payments " * *
" The ooniinued depression in business in the South has
seriou-ly affected the net revenues.
While the actual tons
moved show an increase, the revenue per ton, as shown elsewhere, has decrea-sed largely. This was offset in part by a
decrease in the cost per ton per mile, but the most serious
effect of the depression is shown in the decreased revenues
from passenger traffic. These decreases, coupled with the increase of §liM),onO per annum in rent payable to the city, has
made it impa^siblp to earn a dividend on the stock. The situation outlined in the last report in reference to the negotiations
with the representatives of the city for an extensiion of the

remains unchanged."
The tables of statistics compiled in the usual foroi for the

721

l>ama Qreat Southern Itailrno'l at Chattanooga and glTlnit it
access to prnctically all iho manufacturing industrini of that
city.
The Clialt'inooga Union Railway Com (wny owns ai>out
86 miles of main track and 6^^ miles of sidings.
The severe depression in Southern business i<i reflect«d in
the results of op-ration of the Alabamt Oreat South-rn RR.,
but to a K'SH extent than with novae of its competitors. Ths
physical condition of the propertr is reported as improred
and in condition to reap the full benefit of any rsrtvol in
business.
Statistics for four years have been prepared for the Chbon*
lOLB as follows
AUIISOS AND BXPBNill.
1888-80.

Earningt—

$

PMiiengers
Prclrtt

411.4.54

1.171,516
102,008

&0

Mall, expreis,
Totftl

as follows
1888-89.

Wles of mad op'V'd.

336

1889-90.

336

1890-91.

336

Total

Op. ezpeu.<& taxes..

$3,600,859
2,510,603

$4,309,144 $4,379,143
2,728,181
3,024.502

Net earnlnes.... $1,145,256 $1,580,963
Per.

et.

1,881,939
1,417,209

624,988
67-87

880,753
70-11

444,730
76-37

1890-91.

1891-93.

Netesmlngs

38.5.483

Per osDtotsxp. to earns...

77-17

ntCOMB AOCODNT.
1888-89.

Reetipt*—
.Netoarnlngs

Bevenne

$

Otber lucume
Total
THxtturtementM

9

•

628,988
40,009

«

880,783
40,000

441,730
20,000

415,463

668,988

620,781

464,730

Interest ou bonds
Int. on fiimlel iirreara
KeJemp. of funded arrears

196,262
197,598
51,738

226.411
11.HI7
39,h20
306.790
28,189

248.220

Dividends
Miscellaneous

209.931
38,825
97.062
291,045
26,793

445,598

663,656

349,382

def.30,135

Rur.5,332

612,887
sur. 7,894

—

Total

Balance
'

63-31

69-06

years
1889-90.
Miles operated

1889-90.
$1,580,963

1890-91.

Total

Balance

751
$

$
5.600,713

1891-92.

$

3,18'i.S8'2

5,947,359
3,085,491

5.944,793
3,037,067

2,413,831

Net earnings
Deduct—
Interest on bonds
Kentals. Ac
^ink'trfuudfor equip, bonds

2,861,868

2,907,716

895,350
754.115

824.195
1,135,316
100,145
llOp.c) 6OO,00O(I0p.o.)50O,OO0(5p.c.)250,OO0

IMvliends
Total
Surplus

:..

\\RRnaa-ji
ji,eoz,»o/^

2,162,967
250,864

2,149,465
712,403

2,3r9,656
598,060

Wisconsin Central Railroad.
CFor the year ending June 30, 1892.^
On the Wisconsin Central Railroad lines, as given in the
Northern Pacific annual report for the year ending June 30,
1892, the earnings and expenses for three years were as
follows

:

EABNINGS AKD EXPENSES.

EarningM—

$

1890-91.

1891-92.

$

$

3,741,347
1,259,857
212,510

4,018.923
1,357,196
167,945

4.780,344

5,245,714
3,357,269

5,543,964
3,496,238

1,888,445

2,047,726
63-06

1891-92.

$1,354,641

$1,137,688

$912,000
232,878

$912,000
115.906

$912,000
179,828

$984,043

174

90,000

3.447
180,000

$1,234,878
def.$89,621

$1,211,353
$369,610

Vtttxut—
Inteie.-^t

1890-91

7f>X

3.437.205
Passenger
1,136,250
Mail, exiiress and miscellaneous... 207,889

INCOME ACCOtJHT.

Bcttirineut rental..

*

Richmond & DanTille Railroad.

73-77

$1,145,257

Cash rental

1,14S

fFor the year ending June 80, 1892.^
The Chronicle has received a st it^ment for the year ending June 30, 1892, given below in comparison with previous

$1,137,688

freight only.

1888-89.

•
*

Tbaae Icems are not given in report.

Frsight

Net earnings

Diviaeuils

1889-90.

385,463
30,000

1889-90.

68-6?

447,81*

1,942,9S9
1,362,237

of op. expen.

toeamiugs
•

$1,354,641

$4,337,498
3.199,810

•
l,vg»,»99
134,134

1.957.36^

33(>

—

1891-93.

1,8-28,377

1891-92.

Optrations
No. of iMM. carried.
e9.'(,2.'!8
813.852
896.255
922.943
Ko.of iKi.s.s.ciir. 1 ml. 3-»,i83,703 42,666,890 43.324..'>11 41.6^6.475
2-25 cM.
Katcpr. pass. iir. ml.
2-32 cts.
2-24 ota.
2 .S4 eta.
Tons freight nitived* 1,737,060
l.!)23,:i06
2,004.418
2,181.426
Tons fr't lu'vM I iiil«298,9IO,667 332.873.387 354.572,982 407,745.394
Bate per ton per ml. 0-88 ot«.
0-92 cts.
0-78 cts.
088 cts.
Earitinys
PadspiiKer
$794,399
8959,119
.?9S9.975
$933,144
FrelKhl
2,672.1.=il
3,12-2.674
3,154.057
3,177,270
Hailservice
96,815
105.749
107.1'49
105.882
Express senioe
60.527
81.980
88,601
85,622
Hlscallaneous
32,467
39.:i61
39,622
35.58.>

$

1,688.578

(iross earnings
Operat. expenses and taxes.

:

OrEBATIONS AKD FISCAL RESULTS.

1S90-91.

517.088
1,307.040
118,811

Oper.ezpeotcs and taxes 1,303,115

lease,

Chbokiclb are

1849-90.

$
823,116
1,321,102
112,447

60,000

Total

Operating expenses

Neteamingg

140,•^74
cr.

896

60,000

$1,152,002 $1,184,121
$202,638 de(.$46,433

Alabama Great Southern Railroad.
CFor the year ending June 80, 1892.^
The annual report of President S. M. Felton remarks that
the total tons moved shows an increase of 11-6 per cent as
compared with the previous year, and while the load per car
was increased 10-2 per cent, the tons per train 10-7 percent,
the cost per train mile decreased 3-8 percent and the expenses
per ton per mile reduced 12-7 per cent, yet the average rate
received decreased 15-3 per cent, an amount so large as to
offset the economies inaugurated in the train movement.
Ttus redu3tion is caused by lower rates on raw materials to
keep the various manufacturing enterprises in operation and
by a larger percentage of low-clasa freight. In passenger
traffic the results are much worse, the total revenue decreasing 13-4 percent.
The capital expenditures during 1891-92 were $406,866, comprising the cost of additional buildings, the purchase of 600
cars, remodeling yards, and construction of 1-46 miles of side
tracks and 0-61 m'ile of branch line. There were sold £100,000
of general mortgage bonds, and the car trusts outstanding
June 30, 1892, were $492,863, including interest, against $126,412 June 80, 1891.
During the past year the board acquired by purchase of a
majority of the stock of the Chattanooga Union Railway
Company the control of the Chattanooga Belt Railroad, thus
adding very materially to the terminal facilities of the Ala-

(exol. taxes). 2,970,157

P.

otofexp.toearns. (exel.taxes).

1,810,187
62-13

64 00

Wheeling & L (fee Erie Railway.
fFor the year ending June 80, 1892.^
The annual report of Mr. F. R. Lawrence, President, remarks
that "operating expenses have been increased, arising in part
from the operation of an increased mileage, which could not
l>e expected to immediately produce additional earnings equal
to the cost of operation, and in part from the fact that in order
more economically and successfully to maintain the position
and business of the company among competing railroads, it
was found advisable to improve materially the physical condition of the property. Much extra labor and material have
tlierefore been put into structures, track and improvements." • • »
" The remark in the last annual report to the effect that the
company had been subjected to the fixed charges upon the
entire issue of bonds required for the construction of the
Wheeling Division, but had only received in part the income
to accrue therefrom, may to a substantial extent be here repeated, for in connection witli the relations of this company
to the Wheeling Bridge and Terminal Company at Wheeling,
still further delays arose beyond those noted in the last annual
report, so that the l>enefit8 received by the company from the
traffic at Wheeling were but nominal until the first day of
February last and it is only during the last five months of
the year now imdcr review that the company lias begun to
derive a substantial return from tlie large outlay caused by the
construction of the Wheeling line." • • *
" Since the mouth of August, 1831, the earnings liave been
materially diminished by the discontinuance of the connec;

:

:

THE CHRONICLE.

722
&

Ohio Railroad formerly existing at
tion with the Baltimore
Orrville and Monroeville, caused by the fact that the BaltiOhio Company, having acquired control of the Pittsmore
Western Railroad Company, had built ita own line to
burg
a direct connection with the latter. The decrease in our
earnings thus occasioned at Orrville and Monroeville for the
year ending with July last, as compared with the previous
year, amounted to $86,426— a very serious item and when it
IS recollected that the comparative figures now presented are
under this disadvantage, the fact that as the result of the
year's operations this shrinkage has been overcome, and
5152,000 beside has been added to the gross earning-* of the
company for the year, the wisdom is more than ever apoarent
of the policy which has made this company in a marked degree independent of others, by _buildiDg up a traflfic which
originates upon its own line and is controlled by itself." * *
" While this report is intended to embrace only the year
ending June 30, 1892, it may not be amiss to so far anticipate
the future as to point out that the expectation of an improved
business during the succeeding twelve months has been fully
borne out during such part of that period as has elapsed prior
to the completion of this report, the business during the
months of July, August and September, 1893, having been
much larger than during any previous three months in the
history of the company."
Statistics for four years have been compiled for the Chronicle as follows
EASNIiiaS, BXFBN8ES AND CRABOEB.
1891-92.
1889-90.
1890-91.
1888-S9.
Earnings from—
S
$
$
$
rreight
648,661
815,192
962,706 1,104,038
Passenger
175,480
146,564
154,177
178,474
Mall, express andmlscell's*. 75,270
150,612
78,050
84,125

&
&

;

structure will be in most respects entirely similar to the more
recent structures of the Brooklyn Elevated road.— iJai/rood
Oazette.
—The 50-year five per cent bonds authorized for the construction of these extensions wiU be offered to the stockholdeirs at 92J^ and accrued interest
subsciiptions in accordance with the terms of the circular will be received by theCentral Trust Co. from Monday, the 31st inst.. to Thursday,
November Bd.
The authorized issue is $8,000,000 on the
Northern division and $1,000,000 on the Southern division,
but the bonds will only be put out as money is required, and
it is expected that a considerable surplus beyond the cost of
construction will remain in the company's treasury.
;

Central of New Jersey.— The application of Attorney-Genappointment of a receiver for the New
Jersey Central Railroad came before Chancellor McGill in
Jersey City. Several of the lawyers were unable to appear,
and Chancellor McGill set the case down for November 15.
eral Stockton for the

Chattanooga Southern.- In the United States Circuit
Court at Chattanooga, Tenn. on the 24th inst., .Judge Key
ratified an order of Judge Newman of the Georgia Circuit of
the Federal Court in foreclosing the mortgage of the Central
Trust Company against the Chattanooga Southern Railroad.
Chesapea^.e & Ohio. The earnings and charges for th»
first three months of the fiscal year July 1 to Oct 1 are re,

—

ported as follows

1,047,419
649,331

1,225.305

1,430,128
917,123

:

Gross earnings
Operating expenses

$2, 819,320

1,960,188

Net earnings

$959,132
700,000

months

All fixed charges, 3

Surplus over

Gross earnings
870,495
Operating expen. and taxe8.568,337

[Vol LV.

all

charges, 3 months

Colorado Fuel* Iron Company.

$259,132

—A joint

meeting of the
stockholders of the Colorado Fuel Co. and the Colorado Coal &
Net earalDgi
302,153
398,088
452,535
513,005 Iron Co. was held Oct. 20, to act oa the proposition to consoliDeduct—
date the two companies. The vote was unanimous in favor
Interest paid
150,066
187,500
290,542
301,133
Mvidends paid
144,886
144,000
225.000 of consolidation, which was perfected Oct. 31 by the incor167,000
Hlseellaneous
761
19.782 poration of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. The directors of th«
new company are as follows John C. Osgood, Henry R.
Total
294,932
331,500
458,303
545,915 Wolcott, Dennis Sullivan,
John L. Jerome, Charles H. Toll,
Balance
8ur.7,226 saT.66,533 def. 5,768 tur.32,910 William
H. James, J. A. Kebler, of Denver; Paul Morton, of Chicago; E. J. Berwind, C. F. Meek, E. K. McHarg,
'Inol. interest, rents, <Seo.
Ernest Thalmann, of New York; W. H. Graham, of Pueblo.
CONDENSED BAI.ANCB SHEET JUNE 30.
Executive Committee, J. C. Osgood, Henry R. Wolcott, John
Atteti—
11:92.
1891.
Boad and equipment
$15,716,739
$15,718,739 L. Jerome, Dennis Sullivan, J. A. Kebler. J. C. Osgood was
Stocks of other companies
835,000
895.000 elected Pnsident, Henry R. Walcott First Vice-President,
Belt Kallwaj- construction account
146,>t41
92,305
Cash
27,233
89,844 Paul R. Morton Second "Vice-President, J. A. Kebler, Third
Suppllei on hand
63,904
37,178 VicerPresident and General Manager,' C. T. Schenck, Secretary, A. C. Cass Treasurer. The consolidated companies will
Total
$16,735,181
$18,835,602 be known as the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company,
LiabtlUiet—
Georgia Southern & Florida— At a meeting of the first
Stock, preferred
$4,500,000
$4,500,000
Stock, common
6,000,' 00
6.000,000 mortgage bondholders at Baltimore on Wednesday the folBonds (see Buhplembnt)
5,930,000
6,0u6,000 lowing committee were appointed to look after the interest
of
Interest onhonds
10H,375
104.792
Current liabilities (net)
49,122
154,870 the bondholders in the foreclosure proceedings. Messrs. H.
Income account
151,267
118,357 P. Smart of Savannah, WilUam C. Shaw of Baltimore, D. U.
Herrmann of L. Levy & Co., New York; Charles Watkins of
772,770

:

Total

$16,735,181

$16,885,603

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.
—

Afrhison Topeka & Santa Fe. At the annual meeting of
Btockholdets held in Topeka, Kan., all of the acts of the present management were unanimously approved. The vote
cast was 693,221 shares, which is the largest vote ever cast at
an Atchison annual meeting. The only changes in the board
of directors were George A. Nickerson, of Boston, and
Eobert Harris, of New York, who took the places of Warren
Sawyer and O. W. Peabody, of Boston.
The earnings for the fiscal year have already been published in the Chronicle, but these did not include earnings
from miscellaneous properties, which results swell net earnings by $1,000,000 additional. Tons of freight carried one
mile on Atchison increased 372,881,318; St. Louis & San Francisco 31,511,276 and Colorado Midland 5,413,250, a grand total increase for the general railroad system of 809,305,844
tone one mile.
Boston & Maine. This company awarded their |2,600,000
new 4 per cent bonds to Messrs. Gay
Stanwood of Boston at a price not made public.

—

&

Brooklyn Elevated. —The contracts were awarded on Oct.
15 for extensions of the elevated road in Brooklyn. About one
and one-halt miles of structure is to be built
the Twentyixth ward from the terminus on Fulten Street at Schenck
Avenue, thence through Fulton Street to Crescent Avenue and
through Crescent Avenue to Jamaica Avenue to the entrance of
Cypress Hills Cemetery, aggregating in all about 4,000 tons of
iron work. This work was awarded [to the Edgemore Bridge
Works, who are to commence the erection early in December
and complete the same March 1. The contract in South

m

Brooklyn was awarded to Cofrode & Saylor for about 6,000
tons of iron to be erected from the present terminus of the
Brooklyn Elevated road at Fifth Avenue and Thirty-eighth
Street, through Thirty-eighth Street to Third Avenue, and
thence along Third Avenue to Sixty-seventh Street, with a
branch at or near Third Avenue and Thirty-ninth Street to
Thirty-nmth Street Ferry. This work is to be completed June
Both of these structures will be reallv extensions of
1, 1893.
the Brooklyn Elevated, with which agreements have already
been made for operating the lines as soon as completed. The

Richmond, Thomas B. Gresham and Charles D. Fisher of Baltimore, and Henry Rice. The committee will take the necessary steps to place the property in the control of the bondholders pending the foreclosure. See advertisement in this
issue.

—

Inter-State Commerce Law. Justice Brewer, sitting in the
United States Circuit Court of Appeals, at St. Paul, has
rendered an important decision in a suit involving the interpretation of the [long-and-short-haul section of the InterState Commerce law. The case on which the decision was
rendered was that of the Chicago
Northwestern Railway,
plaintiff in error, against John Osborne, defendant in error.
The defendant in error, plaintiff below, recovered a judgment in the Circuit Court of the United States for the Southsm
District of Iowa for the sum of $225 for alleged overcharges
on corn shipped from Scranton, Iowa, to Chicago. The action was brought under the Inter-State Commerce Act of
February 4, 1887, 24 stat., 879. The facts material to the inquiry are as follows
The plaintiff shipped a number of cars of corn from Scranton, Iowa, to Chicago, at 18 cents per 100 pounds, which was
the local rate. He afterward discovered that there was a
through rate of 38}^ cents to New York City, and that the defendant road got for its proportion of the through rate a
much less eum than the local rate to Chicago. As the shipper
was sending all his grain to Eastern points, and by his ignorance of the difference between the local and through rates
paid out more money than he had needed to have paid, he
brought suit to recover the alleged overcharge, and the lower
court allowed his claim, and Judge Brewer reversed the de-

&

cision.
In his decision

Judge Brewer says

:

Where two comnanles ownlnit oonnectlnK
Joint throuirh tarlir they

lines of roads unite Is

»

form for the oouDectIng roads practically a

new ami indei>eudent liuo. Neither company is bounil to adjust Its
own local tariff to suit the other, uor compellable to make a joint tariff
with It. It may Insist upon chargiu£; lt9 local rates for all transportation over its line. If. therefore, the two companies hj agreement moko
over their Hues or any parts of their lines, such a joint
not a basis by which the reasonableness of the local tariff of
To illustrate : On the defetdunt's road tba
is determined.
distance from Turner to Chicago is thirty miles; an the Lake Shore
line from Chlcaeo to Cleveland it is 200 or 300 miles; the defendant
(jompany may charge 15 cents for transporting grain the thirty mile*
from Turner to Chicago, providing that be, in fact, only a rtiasonabla
eLarge for the service, although the Lake Shore company charges no
more f«r transporting it from (^oago to Cleveland and Uie tact th^k
a joint

tariff

tariff Is

either line

;

:

OcronER

.

THE CmiONICIA

29. 1892.]

tha rata nn caoli line In tS cniitn tur tho <tl.<tnnce named will not prevent tlio tu-ci cdinpnnlKH from ninklnx a Joint tariff fur ffrnin ahlinmil
from Turner ti> Cli-volaml of I'J coma l«»i ihan ttin local tarllr of
citlu-r.
That \v« may not b« ral^nnilorntood we do not mean ^> Intlmato ibal ilm two comp mlaa, with njoliit line, can make n tariff fr 'm
Turnfr to CUniilauil liU'hxr than from Fiiruor to lliiffaie, or for »nr
other Intcrini'dlatp (lolnt lictwi-on t'loreland and Biiffilo, for when tlin
two coin|Minl0!« by thrtr Joint tariff make a now and Indoponiient llua
that new and hidoi>oud«*ut line may ttoootne auhjeot to thu lotii^-anil
abart-haul claUA'i,
Itnt what we mean to deoluo la tliat a tliroiiich
tartir on a Joint line la not tlin standard hy whiuh tile separata tarlfT o(
•ither company Is to bo ini>ftsnroil or oondemiml.
The ilennnc'iutlon of tlio fourth snotlou la aicalnst eioh anpirata oomluon rnrrh'rfor lla violation of the "long-andahort-haul" oiaii^o, on
Ita own lino. Tlio InnKoaKoU: "That It ahull be unlawful for any c >m
mon Barrier aubji'ot to the provlaloua of thia aot to obari^n or roonlre
any Kroat<-r nimiuMiaatlon In the nKKregate tor the tranaportatlou of
paasLMiKnrs or of llko kind of prop'irlr. under aubntautlally aluiilar otrcumttanooH and ooiidltloni. for a ahortor than for a louiter di.itiknae
OTor the aiiniK line. In tho aamo direction, the ahorter boln« Included
within the loutfor iliatance." The use of tho word "line" la "lunlfloant.
Two oarrleiH may use the aarao road, but each haa Ita acparate line.
The defendant may lea-so trackage righta to any othor railroad oomIiany; but the Joint uae of the same track doea not oroato llie "aauie
Ine," ao na to oompol either company to graduate Ita tariff by that of
the other.
Again, at tho time of the passage of thIa not, Joint through tarlffa
were well kn»wn. aa well as the fact that they woro generally lesa
then the auni of iho local tariffs, and not distributed between tho a«vera". companies making them ncoordlng to tho mere matter of inlleago
In tlila act Joint tariffs are recogulied; and It Congresa had intended
to make the local iHriffanDordluute to or moaaurod by the Joint tariff,
ita langnngo would have been clear and ai>eelllo.
It Is worthy of note that in the debatoa which attended Iho passage
of tills bill through tho two houaea, and while thla matter waa under
discussion, It wav again and again said by those paitlclpating In the
deflates that the line formed under the Joint tarlll of conueotlng companies win one separate and Inlepeudent from that of either of the
cnnuectlng com|ianles: and also worthy of note, that In tiie actual admlulalration of allaira tiy the Inter State Commerce Commission the
^
aaino thin« 1ms been constantly recognized.
Apiilylng these proposltloua to t'le case at bar, a oonoluslon la easily
reached. There Is no pretense that any shlnpernt Soranton. oi other
point on the defendanfa lino farther from Chicago than that, waa
charged less for shipping grain to hlcago than the plaintiff. In other
words, there was no violation of the "long-and ahort-haul" clause by
the defendant in respect to ita own line; nor did the defendant, acting
with e.isterii comjianlea. on the line made by Ita road \n connection
with theirs, eh irge or receive for grain shipped from Scranton or any
point west, to any eastern point, lisas than a through tariff. In other
words, the defindant did not separately or In connection with other
companies, violate Section 4. It avails the x>lalntiff nothing that he
was unaware of this through Joint tariff at the time ho made the
ehlpmeuts which are the basl.s of this cause of action No false statement was made to him. He made no inquiry In respect to Its existence.
The matter of pubilcnthm was by the act. as It then stood. lelt to be
4etermlned by the commission. Of course, the defendant waa under
no oommon law or atatnto obligatiuu to advise the plaintiff where or
bow he had better ship his grain. It fulfilled its legal obligation when
It published Its local tariff, and advised him truthfully in respect to
»ny rates In respect to which he made special Inquiry.
I^'or the rtasoiia aiiove stated, on the facts as thoy appear In evidence,
the Jury should have been Instructed to Hnd a verdict tor the defend
ant. The Judgment of the court below will be reveraed, and the ease
remanded for further proceedings In accordance with this opinion.
'

—

Minneiipolis St. Panl & Sanlt Ste. Marie. This company
has had its stuck placed upon the list of the New York Stock
Exchange, and its statemtnt contains tho following
Present
mileage owned and operated is as follows
Wisconsin Division, Minneipolis to Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., 490"94 miles;
Minnesota Division. Minneapolis to Valley City, N. D., 285-43
miles Minnesota, Division, Hankinson, ^f. D., to Merricourt,
N. D.. 92-32 miles St. Paul Branch, Cardigan Junction to St.
Paul, Miun., 5'34 miles; St. Croix Branch, Dresser Junction
to St. Croix Fall><, Wis., 4'Oa miles; Knox Branch, BrantTfood to Knox Mill, Wis., 4'57 miles Camden Place Cut-off,
Camden Place to Northtcvyn Junction, Minn,, I'Ol miles;
total. S83'05 mles.
Aa extension 12 miles westerly frjm
Merricourt is under construction and 100 miles northwesterly
from Valley City, N. D,
STATEllENT OF EABSLNGS, EXPENSES ASD nxED CHABGEg FOB YSAB
hKDlNO JCSE 30, 1892.
:

:

;

;

;

Groaa earnings
Operating cipenaes, &e

$3,0.i5,004

1,945.164

Net earnings
Fixed charges and taxes
Interest ou bonds
Terminal charges
Taxes

$1,109,840

1,046,957

tsenger cars, 23

;

$62,883
Locotnotives, 69 pas-

:

;

sleeping cars, 5 ; dinin; cars, 3 official car,
express oars, 4 combination
;

1 ; baggage cars, 7 ; mall and
<:ar8, 6
freight cars, 4,196.

;

;

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET
Astelt.

JI7NE 30, 1 893.
LiabilUies.

Coat of road andequlpmcut
$37,662,617
•Aberdeen Uismnrck
AN. W. Ry
5,394,232
Eeal estate and other
prop Inveatm'nta...
182,737
F-st -Mort Con. Bonds
held by the Co
1.600,000
Treasury stock
225,600
Due from agents and
conductors
204,712
Due from individuals
and corporations...
360,982

Capital atook.coin mon $14,000,000
..
prefd...
7,00t',000
Minn & Paciflc First

Due from Miun. St. P.
& Buffalo S. 8. Co...

Billa

and supplies on hand
Cash on hand
" New York office.

273,061

Materials

"

I.«ndou

Profit

and

Total
'

Line

la

office

loss aco'nt.

Mortgage Bonds
M.S.Ste.M. AA. Flrat
.Mortgage Honda
M. St P. Ab..'(..M. First
Mtg. Con. Bonds....

Income

certldoatea.

Audited vouchers and
accounts

Pay rolls (Including
June pay-rolla)

264,916
67,552 Accrued lutereat (ino.
July
1
coupons,
268,0.34
135,373
$432.925)
111.003 Taxes accrued
$46,750,825

3,436,000
8,280,000

10,834.000
771,000

441,688
148,771

payable (includ-

ing car trust notes)
Central Paciflc R'y
Co (loan account)..

graded and bridged from Aberdeen,

457,580
798,593

802,506
30,686
$46,750,825

Total
8. D., to

the traction company at 8U0.
This line of track runs dUtfonally across the city from
the Grand Street Ferry to the West Shore Railioad Ferry at
tho foot of West Forty-second Street. It uses the tracks of
tho Broadway line from Twenty-third Street to Thirty-fourth
Street.

New York Stock Exchansre-Now Secnrltle.s Muted.—Tha
Ooveming Committee of the New York Stock Exchin^e have

added to tho

lists for dealinifs the following
ATcnisoN T )rEKA A 8\WTA Pe Railroad.— •4,122.000 aaoond mortgage gold coupon 4 i)or cent honda, Claaa A. The Commltte» on Stock
List la emiiowernd to add fiom time to time, a* Issued, amounta of these
boiida up to *-io.o0(i.0i>(); al.so $),U00,00u aeoond mortgage 4 per cent.
Claaa B, gold coupon bonds.
KDISON Ef.KCTHIO Ir-I.tlMtNATISO COMPAKT OF Nsw YoRK.— ^50,000
additional flrjt convertible gold 6 per eent bonda, making the total
amount Hated .*3, 100,000 als« .4.300,000 additional capital stock, mak:

;

amount Uatod $6,10J,000.
lymnviu.K A Nashvii.lb R\ilro*d.— $500,100 additional unlBed
fltty-year gold 4 per eent bonda, maklag the total amount on list at

ing the total

Louisvit^LB St. lyotjis A Tbxas RAti,WAr,— $360,000 additional flrat
mortgage gold 6 per cent bonds, making the total amount Hated
2.800,000.
Mkxican Centbat, Railwat.- $9,341,100 additional capital stoek.

making the total amount listed $47,841,100.
Minneapolis St. Paol A 8»nLT Ste Mabib Railway.— $14,000,000
common and $7,000,000 preferred capital stock,
Sdutiiebn National Bine.— $1,000,000 capital stock.
Third Avenue Railboad. -$1,000,000 additional capital atock, making the total amount Hated $5,000,000.
West Viboinia Central A Pittsbctbo Rah^wat.— $200,000 additional first mortgage gold 6 per cent bonda, making tho total amount
listed $3,000,000.

A

New York & New England.— special meeting of the
stockholders of this company will be held in Boston on Monday, November 31, to act upon the following matters
1. To ratify, oonflrra and approve the lease of the Providence A
Springfield Uallroad Company, heretofore executed on the 1st day of
(October, 1890, which lease will be submitted at the meeting for the
:

approval of the stockholders.
2. To ratify, confirm and approve the lease of the Merlden Waterbury A Connecticut Rlrer Railroad Company, the execution of whlofc
was approved by the board of directors of the New York A Wew England Railroad Company, on the 27th day of September, 1S92, whlen
lease will be submitted at the meeting for the approval of the stockholders.
3. To accept the provisions of an Act of the General Assembly of the
State of Rbodo Island and Providence Plantation, passed April 22,
1892, authorizing and providingfor the Inane of bonds by thla con.pany.
4 To consider the expediency of reconsidering ao much uf the vote ot
the stooliholderB passed March 8, 1892, aa contemplated the poiilble
exchange of ahares of the preferred stock for conaolidated bonda.

Northern Pacific.— Since the editorial was published in Ihe
Chronicle last week it has transpired that the collateral of
the Northern Pacific securing the" floating debt consists of
about $10,000,000 of Northern Paciflc consol. fivPB (siened but
not issued, and carrying no interest), $1,335,000 (.'hicago
Northern Pacific bonds of an assumed value of $936,250 and
$3,620,000 St. Paul
Northern Pacific stock. The last two
items are a portion of the $11,713,980 securities referred to in
President Oakes's remarks as owned by the company, deducting which the estimated value of unuledged securities is

&

&

$8,166,730.

—Dow, Jones & Co. give the following from official sources

:

The

$44,664,000 of consol. 5s given in the August statement
and bear interest. The $4"), 339,000 listed include
$1,365,000 held by the company and not bearing interest. The
$47,411,000 it) the annual report include the $3,347,0.10 bonds
set aside for the preferred stock.
The $58,000,000 referred to
by Mr. Baxter at the meeting include $10,389,000 which have
been signed but do not bear interest

are issued

.Mail— Panama lUllroad.— The Pacific Mail Steamthe Panama Railroad have been unable to
agree upon terms for the renewal of their alliance. The
Steamship Company is reported as looking towards the partially built Inter- Oceanic Railway of Honduras, having its
G-ulf terminal at Puerto Cortez and i's Pacific port in the Gulf
ship

53,5ti2

Equipment owned by the cotnpany

Metropolllan Traction (;©.— Tho Fortv-twcond St. & Grand
Home Railway, known aa the " Orern Line." ha«
been acquired by the Philadelphia Conipanr, and a majorltr
of the $760,000 of stock turned orer to parties connected
with
Street Ferry

PriCifle

$874,661
118,733

Surplus

723

Blsmarob, N.

D

Company and

of Fonseca. The Panama R. R. Company is in the market
for steamers to run both on tlie Atlantic and Pacific oceans in
connection with the road after Feb. 1, 1893. Possibly some
adjustment will yet be made on terms fair to both the railroad
and the Paciflc Mail Company.

—

Philadelphia & Reading. The comparative gross and net
earnings for September and the ten mouths of the fiscal year
are given on page 720.
Philadelphia & Reading— Boston & Maine— New York
England. The first definite and positive information
concerning the so-called Reading-Boston & Maine-New
York & New England deal came out on Wednesday, when
President A. A. McLeod of the Reading Company was elected
President of the Boston & Maine Railroad. From the information given by different parties it appears that several

—

& New

Philadelphia capitalists owning large amounts of Philadelphia
Reading stock have purchased a heavy interest in
Boston & Maine, and stockholders in those two companies
have purchased in the open market a controlling interest in

&

New York & New England
of

stock. There if; no amalgamation
an^ of the companies and no guarantees or at>aumption of

liabihties.

There

York

is

a report of a possible future exchange of

New

Maine on the

basia

& New England stock for Boston &

CHRONIOLH

lltB

124

of three shares for one, but this, if contemplated at all, is a
plan for the future. The N. Y. Sun's financial column on
Wednesday had the following remarks as to this plan '• The
deal involves no guarantee. However, if the distribution of
coal proves profitable, a consohdation will follow on the basis
of three shares of New England common to one share of BosMaine common is now apMaine commoQ. Boston
ton
proxi nately $18,000,000 $6,500,000 will be required to take
up the New England common on the basis suggested. As
New England earns no dividend on its. common, the burden
Maine will
of paying the dividend on the increased Boston
Consequently an increase of 25 per
fall on that company.
cent in the amount of that stock will mean a reduction of 25
per cent in its dividend rate. In other words, it will become
a 6 per cent instead of an 8 per cent stock. On this basis its
market price will be 135, or about the value of thrte shares of
:

&

&

;

&

New

England."
Wtiinesday, the 26ih

the regular monthly meeting
Maine directors was held in Boston. Thire
of the Bosioii
were pre^t-nt the Hon. Frank Jones, Piesident of the corporation the Hor. William C. Whitney and George G. Haven,
Gen. Samuel 0. Lawrence, Jcseph S.
from New York
Ricker, Aivan W. Suiloway, Richard Olney, Waller HunneDr. W. S
well, John W. Sanborn and Joseph H. White.
Webb and William T. Hart were absent. The resignation of
William T. Ilait as director was received and accepted, and
Reailing, was
President A. A. McLeod, of the Philadelphia
chosen to the vaijancy. President Jones then referred to the
large interest held by Mr. McLeod and a sociates in the stock
of the Bust in & Maine, and stated that in view of the fact he
decided to resign the presidtncy of tlie road in favor of Mr.
McLeod. The resignation was accepted and Mr. McLeod was
unanimously chosen President.
President McLeod suggested the advisability of creating tlie
position of Chairman of the board of direct-irs, and a resolution to that effect was passed and Mr. Jones was elected to
that ofHce, where he will continue as the executive head of
the corporation. He was also chosen Vice-President. The
board then adjourned, transacting uo other business.
On being asked the significance of this alliance President
" While the Boston
Maine system has, in
McLeod said
recent years, made great progress in tonnage and revenue,
and has become the greatest railroad system in New England,

On

inft.,

&

;

;

&

&

:

yet

it

has remained isolated, comparatively speaking, from

It is well known that the
sections of the country.
manufacturing industries on its lines are more numerous and
exceed in output and value those of any system in the country, and if they are to continue to expand they must extend
and enlarge their markets. On the other hand tiie net-work
of railroads controlled by the Reading covers one of the most
populous regions of the country, and would consume, if the
New England industries had access to them, probably a
greater portion than any other section in the United States, to
say nothing of the vast territory beyond, more easily reached
by the Reading lines than any other. These regions are
naturally tributary to each other, and the proposed alliance,
by bringing these great industrial regions into more intimate
relations, cannot fail to be of great advantage to both, and
the consequent advantage of the railroads that at once connect and serve them. The interchanging of trafSc will be
very large and will greatly increase the revenue of both
systems, each of the roads contributing to the other what it
does not now possess. The relations will be very much of the
nature of that now existing between the Boston
Maine and
the Canadian Pacific, which has proved so advantageous to
both companies. Much of the traffic referred to must be
moved by rail. The products of those manufacturing industries is substantially all-rail traffic
hence the great advantage
of more intimate relations between these two regions and
their railroads. It is very clear to me that in addition to furnishing the transportation facilities required to reach these
new markets, this alliance will necessarily tend to stimulate
all those industries on the line by opening up new markets,
and thereby increase greatly the volume of the traffic. It was
with this prospect in view that I and
associates have
taken a large interest in the stock of the Boston
Maine,
with perfect confidence that the alliance will greatly increase
its value.

many

&

[Vol. LV.

through the Lehigh

Valley line, the best line,
grades
between
Buffalo
and
the lakes and tidewater.
This alliance will f^rm one
through line over its own rail, extending from the great lakes
to the St. Croix River, and will give to Boston and vicinity a
new and independent trunk line of railroad to Buff do and the
West, The tendency of modern times is to consolidite great
interests in fact, protection against sharp competition compels the owners of great prooerties to come together. It makes
them strong financially and enables them to serve the public
to better advantage, by giving them through trains without
the ani'o.ving delay.- so usually experienced by broken connections at junction points, to say nothing of the incidental
trols,

having

the

lowest

;

economy
" All

in operation.

the advantage of stockholders as
well as to the public. I may add, I think, with propriety,
that the vigor and ttrength of the present B-iston
Maine
systtm is largely, if not wholly, due to its policy of alliance
and consolidation, bringing added traffic to the" lines. This
alliance is but another step in the same direction, but of larger
this, of course, is to

&

scope and comnreheuds a wider field.
"Of course, the main feature is the alliance between the
Boston & Maine and the Rfadiug, but as the New York &
New England will necessarily be used as a conneciion between
tlieni with great advantage for a considerable portion of the
traffic, the friends and others of the Reading hav^ deemed
it best to acquire a large interest in the stock of that company."
Dow, Jones & Co. on Tiivirsday had the following comments:
We have authority to say that Reading i)eople have absolute
control of New England stock. At present there is no idea of
any exchange of New England stock for Boston & Maine.
"Reading will not discontinue its coal business by water
between New York and Boston and Philadelphia and Boston,
but wiU increase its merchandise traffia by the Bridg' and the
New England and Boston & Maine route. Reading, asa company, has not'iing to do with the deal in B istoa & Maine and
New England. It a-ssumes no obligations whatever.
"Reading has $6,000,000 of stock of the Phdadelphia Readirg & New England Railroad Co., which it got in consideration of its guarantee in the reorganization ot the PoUjjhkeepBie Bridge.
These guarantets amount now to $300,000 a year.
The $6,000,000 of stock is now expected to be made very valuable by the increased traffic to be thrown over the Poughkeepsie Bridge.
"The Philadelphia Reading & New England Road is now
earning on its own merits enough money to meet its fixed
charges. Its traffic has increased 60 per cent since the consolidation of the roads in the system. Hence any additions
to the traffic from the present Boston
Maine deal will go
towards dividends on the stock. Reading will commence at
once to throw business over the Poughkeepsie Bridge under
the new deal.
" It is considered not so much the coal business that will
tell as the general merchandise movement which will be concentrated by all these lines over one route. Eich system
wants what the other hasn't got. Boston & Maine has a double
track from Boston to Worcester; New England has a double
track from Worcester to Hartford; the Central New England
& Western and the New England make a double track for
Reading from Hartford to Poughkeepsie Bridge."

&

Philadelphia Reading

ing and Boston

& Maine

;

my

&

" There can be no doubt that the Reading system, comprising as it does 6,000 miles of road, with one arm reaching to
Buffalo and the great lakes and the most extensive fleet of
vessels plying these waters, with intimate traffic relations
with the various lines of railroad reaching all parts West and
Northwest, and the others reaching the South and Southwest
through Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, will be a
still greater advantage to the Boston & Maine than even the
Canadian Pacific. It will in no way interfere with any of
the existing alliances, but all will be worked together to produce the best results for the property. This alliance will also
greatly add to the passenger traffic of the Boston & Maine,
not only from the travel incident to the commercial and business interchange between the regions traversed by these Imes
and the improved facilities afforded for its accommodation,
but through an efficient and united through service,' similar
to that now in operation over the Reading between Washington and New York, which is not not excelled by any service
in this or any other country.
The alliance, having the control of the only through all-rail route, will command a vastly
increased proportion of the travel between the southern portions of the country and the coast and lakes and woods of
Maine. Please do not omit to note that the Reading con-

<fe

New England.— At

Philadelphia,

&

Oct. 24, the bonds of the new corporation, thePhila. Reading
New England Railroad Company were exchanged for the certificates representing the securities deposited with the Fidelity
Trust Company. Some remarks upon the prospects of this
company will be found at the end of the Philadelphia
Read-

&

item above.

—

Richmond Terminal. Th<? stockholders of the Richmond
Terminal Company at an adjourned meeting in Richmond
this week changed the date of their annual meetings from
the second Tuesday in December to Thursday after the first
Monday in September.
Col. W. E. Strong, J. C. Maben, W. H. Goadby and John
Rutherfurd, of the Richmond Terminal Advisory Committee,
have left for a tour of inspection over the Richmond Terminal system of railroads. They propose to make a thorough
examination of the physical condition of the property.

—

Western Union. At the meeting of stockholders of fh«
Western Union Telegraph Company to take action upon the
resolution submitted by the board of directors, authorizing an
increase of the capital stock to $100,000,000 from 186,199,852 08
by the addition of $13,800,000 of new stock, the increase
was approved of, leaving to the discretion of the board of
distribution of the new stock. On the let of
directors will decide how the new stock shall
be distributed. There is talk of a scrip dividend of 10 per
cent, which would use up $,8620,000, leaving $5,180,000 in the
treasury.
directors the

November the

—

Wheeling & Lake Erie. The directors of this company
have decided upon additional improvements upon the Wheeling end of the line, which will bring it into close relations
with eight or nine important manufacturing establishments,
and which will make a large increase in its business from the
Lakes. In view of the outlay necessary to reach this new
business it has been thought best, until these improvements
have been made and paid for, that the dividend on the preferred stock should not exceed 4 per cent per annum. It is
estimated that the new business will add very largely to the
net earnings.

:

OoroDER

.
.

iHB CHRONICLB.

29, 1802.1

725

COTTON.
Fbioat.

([Commercial HJimcs.

'i^he

p. M.. October 2«, 1H»8,

THI MoVBMRNTor TnB(;uoi',aHlndicateil liy '.I.
,rrs
from the South to-night, is given below. For tit
,.«
ending tbia evening the total receti>t.n have re;..,
:....151
bale*, tgainnt 333,032 bales ttie preooding six days and 2.'>9,138
balee the preTumii vi^yi, making the total Tfi>-\\iin imce the

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.

Fbioay Nioht, Oct. 28, 1892.
The progress in the fall trade is saii8f8ct<»ry, «ome improve- Istof Sept., 1812, 1,418,423 balen, againat 3,143.383
ment beinK shnwn over the correspoiidinR date last year. the same oeriod of t891, showing a decreaae since
Speculation in cereals has increased, but the presHurc of supto an unusually low range. An immense movement of grain is reitortcd at the West, fllliog the
«levators and warehouses and causing a heavy bloukaile of
loaded cars. The detention of cars at interior poinis reduci's

1893. of 724.9.')9 baler.

plies has forced values

transportation facilities for.west-bound freights from this localilarge crop of rice has been safely housed and threshing
commenced. The first killing frost was reported from the
ty.

A

but the news failed to stimulate the market. The
gradual removal of quarantine restrictions by countrids that
cotton belt,

had closed their ports against the United States under faar of
is permitting the expaosion of the export trade agnin.
Lard on the spot has been in light request and values have
declined, sympathizing with a break in contracts. The close
was easy at 8@8-25o. for prime City, 8"90c.. for prime Western
and 9'25c. for refined for the Continent. The speculation in
lard for future delivery has been dull, and prices haye de.
clioed in sympathy with the West, where "long" holders have
been selling to realize profits.
is
cholera

ntlLT OLOSIMO PKIOBS OV

T.kJiD

FnTOBBS.

Bat,

October delivery

o.
o,
o.

November delivery

Mon.

Tust.

O-OS
8-35

9-10

9-15
8'35
7-98

8--10

Thur.
9-00
8-16
7-85

We<i.
fl-l.'S

8 31

KMtipttal—

n-.-sat

OalveatoD

7,809

9,386

FH.

nxo.

7,836
2,317
9,997
1,352

61,410

3317
83,516
10,833

68,824
12,696
83,375
X8,718

46

46

2,732
3,015

19,479
30,583

768
150
835
724

7as
8S7

WMh'Kton.&c
5,655
5,028

3,209
2,583

407
670

800
915

634

493

852

482

199

290

264

280

Cotalsthleweek 77.022

.'i7,754

Norfolk

West Point...

3,157
8,829

1,487
2,685

8,239
8.442

•irp'tN'8,40.

New York
Baltimore
PHUsdelph'a.Ac

8339
724

261

1,776

54.008 42,128 44,775 57,464 333,151

The following shows the week's total receipts, th'? total since
Sept. 1, 1892, and the stock to-night, compared with last year.

"ri.

prime and $15*817 50 for clear. Cut-meats have
been taken slowly and prices for bellies have weakened a
trifle, but the close was steady at SJ^* BJ^c. for 10@12 lbs.
average pickled bellies, lOQlOJ^c. for pickled hams and 7'g
extra mess,
7J^c. for pickled shoulders. Beef unchanged
|6@$6 50; packet. $6 7.5(«$7 50, andfamily, SSfflSlO per bbl.;
extra India mess, $ll(n$13 per tierce. Beef hams are firmer
at $18 pcT bbl. Stearine is firmer at lOJ^c. in hhds. and 1()%C.
in tcs. Oleomargarine is firm but quiet at SJ^c. bid. Tallow
has been moderately active and prices ha\ e advanced a trifle,
closing steady at 4 9-160.
Butter is firm but quiet at 1^%(9iZ%%c. for creamery. Cheese
is fairly active and firmer at 8%@10i^c. for State factory full
cream.
Coffee continued under neglect on country orders, but has
been bouijht freelv by jobbers, principally frim olferings

6,974

13,333 16.072

Tkur:

r«d.

BlPsso,dra...
Orleani... 17,692 16,436 19,479 10,815 0.097
.HoMle
1,887 2,057 3,686 1,220 1,131
riorldk
i»v»nnah
18,670 7,675 18,398 »,701 10,074 9,216
13,596
Bransw'k.dto.
8,983 6,468 3,136 6,059 4,811 8,934
Ohuleston
Port Koyal.&f
WllmlnKtoii....
4,196 1,315 1,525 1,505 2,478 3,301

HeetipU

^•ll5

for extra

ruM.

JTon.

Dew

890

7-93
January nellvery
7-93
785
7-7H
Pork has been in light request and the close was weak at
|12(a$12 25 for old mess, $13@$13 25 fur new mess, $12 50 tt $18

balee for
Hept. 1,

ThU

Since Sep.
Week.* 1, 1892.

Gtalveston...
ElPaso,<S[0.

New Orleans.
Mobile

61,429
2,317
83,516
10,323

Florida

Savannah.

..

BrnnB.,<bo.

;

Oharleston
P.

Stoek.

1891.

1892,
to

Ottober 28.

..

6S,824
12,598
32,375

Royal.Ac

Wllmlnirton

13,715

.

WaBh'tn,&c
Nortolk

West Point.
KwptN.,&o

New York.

46
19,479
20,582

763
857

.

Week.

857

724
1,776

4,2t'3

131,718

135,653

174,959
23,775

267,612
25,805

126,754
3,192
82,441

180,299
14,292
123,711

81,08^1

19,397

32,288
18,151

76,648
27,017
1,568
205,170
16,000
10,159

... .M

....^

147,055
96,143
4,158
2.073
9,894

463

278.863
12,000

2,021
11,391

2,.')30

..

1891

349

390

Ptill'dera,*<

1892

422,288
9,199
691,720
97,899
5,433
428.667
51,307
199,256
371
64,158

5,188

9.179
2,585

Baltimore.

Since Sep.
1, 1891.

365,543 63,063
17,077
2,108
285,684 105,270
62,760 15,181
2.932
406
315,755 56,340
44,177
9,092
125,938 30,637
11
173
56,390
9,329
HI
88
69,143 28,753
63,500 19,886
2,573
942

3,829

Boston

ThU

13,171
8,103

6.698

and to be shipped. Prices a'ivaiiC'^d and close firm.
rotale
^33,\^\ 1,418.423 350,489 2,143,382 936,434 1,110,023
Rio is quoted at l&%c. for No. 7; good Cucuta 21c. and in* Eight days.
terior Padang 29>^c. to 80c. Contracts for future delivery
in order that com parisoQ miy be made with other year, we
were active, KtimiTlated by increased value cf coffee at primil
points and a renewal of investing demand on lacal and Euro- give below t he total s at loaii ai Dort s for six jeaoQS.
pean account. To-dHy additional strength is found in unfav- iecxlpuat—
1891,
1887.
1892
1890.
1889.
1888
orable crop accounts from Brazil. The close was steady with
afloat

•

flellets

lo-O.io. i.Ian

Hov
Deo

1.=>-Coo.

I

15'40».

I

Raw

54,678
100,645
14,924

37,059

58.310
30,860
9,417
28,753
20.828
18,669

63,571
103.712
13,218
54,860
20.519
11,378
29,777
19,S85
26,265

49,718'

18,384
6,297
20,874
20,063
22,627

45.064
21,688
12,879
35,.'>21

30,468
14,914

43,494
92,598
11,215
48,607
18,327
7,578
28,454
30,347
8,654

350.489

343,188

303,215

279,536

289,174

(Jalv'iitou,&c

as follows

Oet.

15-23C.

Feb

15-150.

May

\!>-i>v.

Mch

Ai>ril

]

J5-05e.
14-95 .

Aug

H-»5c.
sugars were without btisiness of a testing character
I

and

prices rcmuined nominal. Tht-re has been no important
addition to supply. Centrifutjal quotel at]ab out SV^c. for 98deg. test a:i'l musoovido at 3c. for H9-deg. test. Eetined sugars have s< Id somewhat more treely at generally uni-hanged
Cut loaf quoted at 5%c. and granulated at 5c. Teas
>ates.
have stiffened in value and found increased demand. Rice
Bold with much freedom. Spices less active.
Ken'ucky tobacco has been in better dema'id and an advance
of %<t %i;. in i-rices was paid. Sales for the week were about
850hhds..mainlyfor export. Seed leaf tobacco has been quiet,
but steady, Siles for the week amount to 1,635 cases, as f. 1lows: 4.)0 cases 1891, State Havana, 12@23c. 150 cases 1891
Englanrl seed, 23 d 26c,; 175 cases 189l, New England Havana,
83Ji'^60c.; Smi cases 1891, Ohio, 7%-.* lie; 150 cases 1891, Zitnmers, V)%al\%c.; 150 cases 1891, Butch, 12i^011c ; 150 cases
1891, Pennsylvania seed, 15« 18c., and 200 cases 1890, Wisconsin Havana, 12 a 14c ; also 1,000 bales Havana, OScr^l 15,
and 600 b iles Sumatra, %i 6J@S3 80.
Straits tiu has been active at declining prices, owing to
weaker foreign advices, closing easy at 20-55c. Sales for the
week wer.^ about 500 tons. Ingot coppt-r has been quies and
prices have declined to ll-80c. for like. Leal has been dull
aiid values have w.'akened a trifle, closing at 4c. for domestic.
Pis iron is without change and quiet.
Refined petroleu'ii is dull and unchinged at 6c. in bbls.,
8'50c. in bulk and 6-60c. in cases; crude in bbls. 5-35c.; in
bulk2-85c.; naphtha, 5J^c. Crude certificates have declined,
closing at 50!^c. Spirits turpentine has advanceil, owing to
mall supplies and the close was firm at 31»^ids32o, Rosins
are firm at a further advance, closing at $1 30@1 85 for common to K od strained. Wool is firm but quiet
Hops are
dull but steady.
;

.

New

61,74'i

6.5,171

New

83.516

103,270

10,323|

l.'S.lSl

Savannah.

W'tPolnt, Ac
All others .

68,821
32,373
13,761
19,4^9
21,345
19,782

rr^t.thieweek

333,161

Orleaue
Mobile

Cnarl'et'n.Asc

Wllm'i?fn,*c
Norfolk...

74.752j
7,1H8|

41noe8ept. 1. 1418,423 2143,382 2097,467 1923.076! 1557,649 :038,745

The exports

for eight days ending this evening reach a total
213.622 hales, of winch 141,815 were to Great Britain, 7,930
to France and 61,317 to the rest of the Continent.
Below
tne exports for the week, and since September 1, 1892.
>f

ae

BtgM Dayt Ending
a^;,s>r"<l

B9voru
Qrtat

9rtt'n. franct

ialT«aton
Valaaoo, &a.,.
•iew Orleaai..

Oct. 38.

In—

Oonti.
tMflt.

JViMi

From

34pt. 1. 1892. to Oct 28,1382.
Bjtvyrffd *ft

Omt

Wuk. BrUiUn. Franct

Oonti.
1W1U.

T«l«,

7.yi

2,m

47.147
2.750

18.811

11,«2)

40..<3<

14,907

2).919

17.756

I7..-i04

SO.SS'J

63,98 i
1,950

5,850

19,278

24J!09

19,979

44,1SS
23.750

800

18,063
18,03a

U,S79

118,661
23,744
S2,47S

9.816

27.331

144.610
9.230
SI.S47

19,214

34.9.14

22,820

6.270
43.614

188.758
15,620
158,281

6,290

».58»

vioblle

'aviuiDab
iransirtok

8,783

«.S«l'

—

17,504

......

'VttmlnirtoQ...

8,l)0(J

9,1100

23.75,1

7,()1«

7,614

S3,035

16.047

106.619
23 742

683

tt,il7

16,082

13,693

1,300

.'barleflton

....

18.4-38

lorfolk

»e»t Point...

17 762

78.006

:«'portNw.,*»

York

won

Bolton
Saltlmore

9 017

•<«w

40b

1,655
5,799

3

8,863

1.300

141,315

7,9J0

61,147 313.6i3

5U,0U

50,277

179 883

746.084

Total, isai.... lai.»^i ~4S,111

66,871 275,966

605,480 ll7,838

243,136

Coi6.4M

17,480

i>hlla4*lp-a,a>'

Total

—

.

In addition to above exports, our telegrama to-night also
give us the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not
cleared, at the ports named.
We add similar figures for
New York, which are prepared for our special use by MessrF.
Carey, Yale
Lambert, 34 Beaver Street.

On
23 at-

Qh3
p

Kew Orleans...

12,363
6,909
33,000
13,900

None.

None.

None.
500
None.

1,000
6.000
18,000

Totall892... 143,305 55.244

91.172

Bavannah
. ..

Mobile
irortolk

KewYork
Otiier ports....

10.706
40.999
11.000
23,100
6,500
11,500
10.000
35,000

a

V

None.
None.
12,509

307,730

300.374
241.975

-^

;
,

»
B

s:

I

a>

Pi

» o (9
*

S"

i^'C

o

O —

KocnS
.1

SS.O

K>

;

5:
a

I

a.

I

Jwcco

too*

®

'

^

S -JO?
S ""OS

5

CD

(6
CO

1

,

2
**

aw

0°

o:

I

I

000
oco

2

>^6

2

<

to

1

OOOOD

u

Ci

>

c»»

O
K)tO
OSt-OD'^

00

2

tn<I

tF.

QCOO

OOOOCGO

000

0>

00 00

<
9

0000
toto

CO

QDCOMT
I

2

<1

ooooox

LOco
cbifr.'^co

cico^to

ccto

COtf.CD'^

GOO «•<

91.°°:

OOCCOOO
-J

o to

tico^M
OCX

QOOO
n^co

00 00

I^CO
e.=>:

ooccooo
cico^co

5
o

I

79,%

IiOwMlddUnK
Btrlot

opop

2

fl^CO

OH'IO''

6."':

Qococoo

ooooooo

2

it'it^

00 c»

I

5
9

citiU

tf'QtO'*

tOCitO^

CCOpOOO

QOOOOCD

a.":

Low Middling

Good MIddUng
Btrlot Good Middling
Middling Fair
Fair

,

GULF.

838
811,8
8i»ie
9i«
9^8

Sat.

y lb.

Ordinary
Btriot Ordinary

%>
7i«

GoodOrdlnary
Btrlot Good Ordinary

I?

7 '8

2

1

>
9

CJi rf^

8%

819
8^16
8=8
8'9

85i8
80a

8!>9

>
N

opop
o,c^

9''l8

97
913

9^18
91^18

00t»O00

COODOOO

oi":

opxooo

tOQO

9'8i«

inon Toe«
6i8
61a
738

Wed

6%

818
8=8

®
**

2

03 o,

a

CCGO
(3JOI

^
toc»
o.<»:
I

ODCOOCO

^

00G0CO3

ODODOCO

Low MlddUng
MIddUng
:.
GoodMfddUng
Btrlot Good MIddUng
MIddUng Fair

Btrlot

f,18
8 '8
9I9
Sii8
9l'l8 908
101,
10

;

STAINED.
Sood Ordinary
trlot Good Ordinary

Sat.

a lb,

I«w Middling
Middling

61a
5 'a
e'a

oiia

§^«

716,,

9=8

BrOTMABKIT
0LO8SD,

Biport.

53e

Bat'day

Quiet at

Monda; Quiet at
TupudaT Quiet
Wed'daj Quiet

!«

7"u

7^8

90
200
175
440
144

Thur'd'j Quiet at i,„ dec.
Friday. Q-t&Bfy.lisad.
ro»«i

1.049'

140.100
244.200
192.400
182,400
241.600
159,800

600 1.649

.160,500

400
...J

Futurtt.

290
200
175
440
544

200

I

»-

I

f--

the

^
2
*<

cooo
-j-j
00c;,

eo>;
to

ODQOOOO

CO

CO

XODOOO

CCCJI

oaco

CD -4

a

I

«

I

*<

9r:
CO

c»aDOf»
,»>C73

0003
-i-j
ooto

5
2
**

»r:

coo

03

1

2
*<

a

:

cooo

15

00 00

1

CO

ocooox

^
o
'*

h-

0000
ODQO

s

9
:

ooooooo

-4

ocob
I

00

9
,

CO

coop
coco
too,

cooo
0000
tor-

I

<1

""l

-1

^

o

*<

*

er:

:

en

ooooooo
ooob®co
cogs

CO

-

14:

_

^
I

500

QDCDOC»

OD

^ to

CCtD^O
KpM CO

to'

to

c;,

CO

>

^

I

<0w

l«:

CO

I

I

:

I

'

o

I

cooco

oco
I

-I
I

6L=18
7'8

Thk Salks and Pbiobs of FuTaasB are shown
by

jiUowing comprehensive table:

00^
ocn
^<1
ODO

2,18
81a
813,8
9i,«
9=8

SaU$of
„

"otal.

adv..

1,6 dec.

00

h- to

5718
5i3,a

6%

Con-

ooccooo

H

toe;,

CO

-ico'^-j

99,8

5',8
513,8

tract,

(£00000

«

to-)

«.":

Frl.

or SPOT AUD CONTRACT.
Oon- Spectump, ut't'n

o»

0D®OC0

c;nja

to

UABEET AND BALES.
IJe total sales of cotton on the spot and for future delivery
each day during the week are indicated in the toUowinK
Katement. For the convenience of the reader we also add
a column which shows at a glance how the market closed
on
same days.
8AI.I8

-Jd

"

9.®:

-j-'i^di

9"l6 10

613,8
7''8

5

«>

CO

oooooco

8H
8%

10

57,8

OOQO

-id

OOCEOOO

inon Tues W^ed Tt. Frl
514,8
613,8

5^

2

I

9
958

opoo

doi

7=8
8

%%^

10

^

001
oo,

6ie
61a
^38

2;i8

81s
818,8

Mto

;
a

do.
MCn
I

2
^

^01
CCS

§«!«
SSg
8Te
91,8
913,,

6ie
61a
738

61a
738

»ll8
86,8
81a
813,8

9^
Th.

03

to

CO

I

938

<

*

Cjicj,

COCOh-1

5^

It-CO

s,":
-J

l>

81
814
8»18
818,8

CD 00

-coto*^

to

00,
I

7I3
7^8
8l8

"

7'8

7%

Iiow Middling

.:

7'fl
7''8

2

QCttOOO

to

opopOOO

CO 00

»cn

51018
6°18

7ia

V>
§^«

Middling

Fair..

l>

5^8
614
719

5^

^^

QOOO

65,6

co

oio;

opop

00 00

>
5

OTon Xnes TTed Th. Frl.
6^16

O'c;,

coop

i«.-a

cJiCfl®

638

QOOOCOD
coci^co

O-.l-"-'''
I

-to

—

6

o.i*:

cJ'CJt^o,

1,649 bales, including
for export, 1,049 for consumption
for speculation and 600 on contract. The following are
the official quotatious for each day of the past week
October 22 to October 28,

Sat.

o

ccto
I

CO

00

cjii^

QOCpOOO

01

COODOOO
cooo^ti

Ota

opoo

I

CO

to

to O'

s

ooooooo

eft

ODOOOOO
Ki(i°K>

*.<»;

1

C.

00 CO

I

COCOtCT

oi»:

-4C0
00 00

5

coco

The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 1 ,160,500
bales. For immediate delivery the total sales foot up this week

CtO
bi--

OS

9.":

10

;

«JO
-

5^

2

ODCOCQO

?

OKIM

a,

(oA
I

ODQOOOO

.

CCQD

CCOD

;

00=

«9,"

W

C30

COW

CO

ODODOOO

1

rO

!».r

CJ,

ooooocc

Qcrz)

,f.-COCk.

,

s«;

2

*<
tool
*.=°:

CO

COQDOOO
**-Ci

000
oco

o'i
I

CO

-3r»o-J

5

I

5

»«;

6bcD®c6
0000

«

00

coco

COCO

-10

2."

66

^

coo

.8

00 00

I

ttob'-'co

I

ao

=

Id

:

809,649
371,048

Lancashire mill operatives is threatened
for Nov. 8. On Saturday a misinterpretation of the interior
movement through which the figures of five days instead of
six days were used for comparison stimulated sharp local demand and caused an advance of 18 points; but on Monday the
turn of values was downward again, with considerable long
cotton sold out. Tuesday morning the market was still weak,
but it recovered tone upon receipt of despatches stating that
killing frost had occurred at several localities in the cotton
belt.
During Wednesday and Thursday the bulls were disconcerted by the very indiilerent manner in which Liverpool
received the advices of probable frost damage to crop, and
that, together with large offerings of Novemter notices, had
a depressing influence. To-day the European advices are
more cheerful and our market responded with an average advance of 10 points, closing steady. Cotton on the spot has been
quiet at irregular rates, closing at a net loss of l-16c. for the
week. Middling uplands, 8 5-l6c.

y lb.

O

St,*

t3

•

A strike of

Ordinary
Btrlot Ordinary
Good Ordinary
Btrlot Good Ordinary

^

«^3

'-I

I

•
•

o

Speculation in cotton for future delivery has decreased in
volume and a feverish tone has prevailed among operators.
Reports of injury to the crop by frost appeared to have been
anticipated by the previous advance, and further neutralized
by tame foreign markets and unpromising advices regarding
condition of goods trade both in England and on the Conti-

UPLANDS.

IB

8>

C*®
'^

so

-4

628,754

28.615
24,910

87,976
77.308

•

"

n

117,600
60,047
76.254
44.241
17,275
18,288
262.363
32,686

1.500

O

B)

.

O

et-

b:

Stock.

57,359
71,671
50,500
38,200
6,500
14.000
16.500
53,000

g
a

s:E.o

I

25,266
35.110

(B

,

(0

Total 1891... 158,517
Total 1890... 104,647

a>

CD C*-

Ty*

Total.

wise.

32,911
18,333
3.500
None.
None.

GalTeston

o

(B

:

Coast-

1,379
5,430
3,000
1,200

Oharleaton.

IB- -

Shipboard, not cleared—for
Other
France. Foreign

QAn

t*<6

Leaving
Great
Britain.

:

[Vol. LV.

tB

&

nent.

«

THE CHRONICLE.

726

Oct.

«

«

I

5

I

I

I

5r
I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

*

I

I

I

I

I

InoludeB sales In September, 1892, for September, 1,700.

ThefoUowing exchanges have been made during the week
pd. to eroh. 400 Jan. for Feb.
pd. to excb. 100 Jan. for Mch.
pd. to exoh. 600 Nov. for July.
pd. to exoh. 500 Nov. for Jan.
pd. to exoh. 600 Nov. for Jan.
79 pd. to exch. 100 Nov. for June.
Even pd. to exoh. 100 Oct. for Nov.
•13 r<C to eioli. 4.200 Nov. for Deo.
•26 pd. to exoh. 11.000 NoT.for Jan.
•12
•24
•89
•24
•26

•27
•15
•61
•28
•43
•23
•23
•12

pd.
pd.
pd.
pd.
pd.
pd.
pd.
pd.

to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

exoh. 6,000 Nov. for Jan.
exoli. 100 Not. for Deo.
exch. 300 Nov. for Apr.
exch. 400 Nov. for Jan.
exch. 400 Jan. for May.
exoh. 700 Jan. for Mch.
exch. 200 Jan. for Mch.
exoh. 500 Jau. for Feb.

The Visible Supply of Cotton to-night, as made up by cable
and telegraph

is as follows.
The Continental stocks, as well as
those for Great Britain and the afloat are this week's returns,
and consequently all the European figures are brought down
to Thursday evening. But to make the totals the complete
figures for to-night (Oct. 28), we add the item of exports from
the United States, including in it the exports of Friday only.

—
October

s

.

THE CHRONICLE

29, 1892.]

1H93.

mookkt LtTorpooI
I00k*t Londun

1891.

646,000
11,000

1890.
53B.0OO
30,000

657.000
2.700
S3,000
17,000

SC9,000
2.400
58.000
8,000

balu. 1,007,000
8,000

Total Qreat Britain itook. 1,016,000
B.lOO
•

took at HniuhuTK

.....•...,

SO. 000

Ainntiinlain
at Itoltordaia....
at Autwerp
at Havre
at MarHnlllM......
at Barcelona............

16.000

Btook at Broiiion

took at

18H9.

44^,000
19,000
494,000
l,6r0
21,700
4,0'M)

200

300

200

6,000
153,000
10,000
32,000
5,000
26.000

3,000
113.000
3,U00
18,000
5,000
5,000

8,000
95,000
8,000
22,000
8,000
4,000

727

i:i.ooo

UOOTATIONS rOR MtODLINO OOTTON AT 0TH>8 MAaXITB.—
Below we give cloHinK quotations of middlinif ootton at Soa^<
th week.
Wttk

obo«»a qaoTAnom vob Mioouaa oottuh on—

amUnt

October 28.

Alter.

Man.

Tuu.

WKttm.

r*ur>.

7\

T'n

7'»

T'n

7"is

"•l«

""is

7«s

7'>i«

7»'is
7" s

few Orlaaiw
aoblle
Invaunah...

1\

Ih^rleston.

Vllmln«ton.

^\
T"*

805,000

210,600

167,600

779,600
20,000
601,000
55,000
613.023

Plilladelphla
\iiKUBta

43,057

631,000
3H.0O0
605.000
33,000
513,982
201,929
111,401

8,292.127 3,167,833 2,365,386

3, 134,912

470,300

214.7116

Of theabOTs, thetotalsot American and otiier descriptions areas foliuwe:
AmsTMctn
Uverpool stuck
bales.
g.M,000 486,000 271.000 270,000
322,000

Oontluentalstocks

Europe...

45,^,000

United States stock
United States tnterlorstooks..
United States exports to-day.

93>>,4-^4

1,110.023

28-<,774

102,000
601,000
613.023
244.708
43,057

178,000
632,000
335,347
40,463

afloat for

Total An srlcan
JSatt Indian, BroMit, de.—
Uverpool stock

43,569

79.000
605.000
513.9^2
201.929
111,401

Total East India, Ac
XOtal American

160,000
11,000
127,000
33,000
55,00«i

29.000
55,000

395,300

Sgypt, Brazil, <fcc.,anoat

7"l8

The

336,000

490,600

353,600
2,896,827 2,781,833 1,874,786 1,781,312

Total visible supply
3,292,127 3,167,833 2,365,386 2,134,912
Price Mid. Upl., Liverpool....
A'led.
4»8d.
SHisd.
5»i«d.
]>rioeMld.Upl., New York....
8<%o.
8%o.
OiSieC.
loaSc.

..

'

H

At THE INTEBIOB TOWNS the movement—that is the receipts
and since September 1, the shipments
stocks to-night, and the same items

•orreeponding period of 1891
followinK statement.

—is

set

out

for the
for the
detail in the

in

— ?£*' "
o ——

Sits

8<
7\

7\

«V

8<s

7"t,

7"l«

w

Bafaula

=

-

S= E= cs

B » <
' .J

50
Ol

I."

Ol

X.

»

«

—

r-

^

O
tf

Of

.*
:

:

:

;

2.

jr»p <?'ao:

S'S:
_..
.

71'
7'i

7',

T'B

8

T't
8

7"ig

7"l«

7''»

7l»,«

77b

7"e

8
7's

8

7<^
7's
7»8
73i«

Nashville

Natohei

other important

Nnwborry......

.

??
.

.

;

fci

p

t

1S80.

1891.

1893.

IH
7\

.... .....
Hhreveport ....

1891.

1990.

1892.

I

1890.

lSa&

1891.

63,353 108.211 142.M)0 2.34.47II
230.986 110.993 87.879 142.248 183,8^6 271.461
299,361^191.120 107,926 191.133 I8fl,2«3 318.165
375.820 259.128 148.672 268.127 225.870 352.000
380,121 228.052 104.967 310.863 261.186 3.^9.716;

289.487 :i»7.8TX

»0....

2411.938

366.001 162.87S

Oct. 7
•
14....

206,119
311.313

•

••

10....

••

t».

..

1

348.3S121S.46S
442,814 298.76t
13«.857 363.368

313,161
313,188 .•i»n.4S9 .133.151 244.706 335.34T2^'= .774 S92.927i .^74.973 3«0.7«ll

—

The above statement shows: 1, That the total receipts from
the plantations since September 1, 1892, are 1. .578, 563 balee; ia
1891 were 2,122,800 bales; in 1890 were 2.327,60.3 bales.
That, although receipts at the outports the past eight days
a,
were 838,1.51 bales, the actual movement from plantations was
only 360,739 bales, the balance going to increase the stocks at
the interior towns. Last year the receipts from the plantations
for the week were 374,973 bales and for 1890 they wera

—

392,927 bales.

by telegraph late Friday night it is impossible to enter so
largely into detail as in our regular monthly report, but all
This weekly
the principal matters of interest are given.
publication is of course supplementary to the more extended
monthly statements. The results for the week ending Oct. 83
and since Sept. 1 in the last two years are as follows:
October 28.

?*

Via Cairo
Via Hannibal
Via EvansvlUe....

o>w*kOSf^»o^ooii;aoD^xcc<DKiwu'OaDW«30ia3ao&o-jao
icuioD^h'^<03:D03aoMOOao#>.if^c;iwit>cut-jaoo-^coc&i^ooooi

1891.

_M

00^

!-•

^T'^J^I^.-P^

lU

M

c^

—

Deduct ihivments
Overland to N. Y., Boston, *o..

MIQ

Wppj-gOiOi^

— C— t-'it»0. OOO — c;t?Dy>0^0»i*-*J»cDO*-C:»— tCtOWt-'W

1.

aine»

Wee*.

Sept.

1.

"I

CD n"

48.721
23.783
31,308

103,734
58,446
43,409
1,563

30,987
13,675
11.866

Interior towns
Inland, 4c., from South

Between

260

550

715

18.043
9,356
18,401

12.120
7,01a
7,153

41,807

wojx — -^ow'-)

!-•

Sept.

6,183
5,090
3.293

..............

Via Jx)ul8vllle

CO

Sinet

12.139
7.346
7,486

Via Cincinnati
"kitiCrtto^coxh-i^O'Mb.'^aoobi'-wloa'cc »
O^MtOiFato«>'Oi^c;>ccwas«DOi^^uitoco<ei^ceoouMOcctoioi^'

Eight
days.

Shipped—

I,

tOOiX

7>i
!>%

R!»l<'l(?ll

Helma

! 1 1.522 !18,.388 130,328

wo<»«^o»-w:b•'^H-'«R7o^Cr-tDCw'b»'^«V^-

^ V WtOCTO*.*.^-';

8
7T,

RtetivU attht Port: SVkat Interior Tovtm. RM'ptj from Plant'iu,

n4»n»—

C^i00^0xlO— w*4i--*-t^u-jaotPiwOO-'J«tiicoo;co-^o»-i(o-iia

^

7V

7'»is

1892.
bowto'to'-J

HH

7'»i«

7''8

7O9
7'a

(;i>hiinbU8,Mlss

IS

8>|«

OVERLAND MOVEMENT FOR THE WEEK AND SINCE SEPT. 1.—
statement showing the overland movement
As the returns reach us
for the week and since September 1.

"^

P

8

Ti
fs
7'»
8«4

We give below a

5?Crj

p

8»„

e<'

olofling quotations to-day (Friday) Bt

j

The imports into Continental ports tho past week have
been 26,000 bales.
The above llKures indicate an increase in the cotton in sight
lo-ni),ht of lil,291 bales as comjparod with the same date
of 1891, an increase of 926,7-11 bales as compared with the
oorreeponding date of 1890 and an increase of 1,157,215 bales
compared with 1889.

week and the

7'.
7's

Southern markets were as follows:
Atlanta........
7M8 Little Rock ....
OoUiinbUH, Oa.
738
MontRomery..

gept.23....

for the week,

7',
7'9

8<i«

^'VC
7'»«

TH.
8
7«g

Ulnulnnatl..

38.000
33,000

156.000
8,000
148,300
41,000
42,000

Londonntock

7U„

Memphis....
It I,onls....
Houston....
U>alsrllle.

7''»

7'»
8I|«

8\

714
7»i*

7»s»i„

7»,„»«i

Receipts From the Plantations.—The following tab'*
Indicates the actual move<nenteach week from the plantatloofi
1,874,786 1,781,312 The figures do not incl'ide overland receipts nor Southern
oonsumption; they are simply a statement of the weekly
268,000 175,000 movement from the plantations of that part of the crop which
30,000
19,000
10'*,600
88,800 Qnally reaches the market through the outports.

2,896,827 2,781,833

Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe

H\
7"j„»%

7%

71>is

7k

B>«

S-s

7>»i«

Ti

7>'|«

7»»

8t

I.^ltliuore...

7*

7%»n„

7",
7'g

Ho^t4in ......

Total Eurovean iitooka.. .. 1,485,300 962,000
In(llaoutu>nnm)»tri)rKurope.
41.000
33,010
Amer.oott'nalloat for Europe. 455,000 632,000
&5,<)U0
EK7Pt,llra>ll,Ao.,atHforfe:'rpe
42,000
Stock In UnlU'il StutoH ports .. 036.484 1,110,023
Btook In U. 8. Interior towns.. 288,774 335,317
44,569
United States exporu to-day.
40,463

Xotal Oontlnent*l Stocks

Total TlBlble aopply

JW.

7%

7%
7\

7ikl»i»is

Norfolk

26,000

)j

am and other nrlnoipai ootton nutrkata for mcd i^r o

300

5,000
807,000
9,000
SO.OOO

Btook
Btook
Btook
Btook
Btook
Stock at QdQoa
Btook at Trieste

Amerloan

n

150,162

83,828

309,170

7,186

16,824
2,317
10,422

8,571
4,406
6,024

25,379
14,318
29,420

849
1,908

36,

U9

27,600
38,269

9.943

W M ^ 50 CO^J jO Ot MM Wp^5''Pf^|^^ W W >-'UM^i^QQC*U<D
a).jDO*-^y'^)--io;y""-'K;Myo:Ki(**iiOt.ao*»Xi*^U'-40'-e^y'0'

*kO»-c:coco-Jost»wtO-J-ja^-a:**0'tccx'-ctf*"Ci«otcoo<i-OJ

Leaving total net overland*..

^1

*

5 s

w
ca
M
"-co
»_-» ^P^^?*^ .^^>3*-w^*'-'i»5'',<o'*'Wp
wbb»w»Ma»MeocixV® Q«^^boO'y«cncoby'^*o^wi-<c H»
CO

t
]

240,053

1891.

1892.

In Bight and Spinntrt'
Takinge.

Since

Eiijht

Sept.

datjt.

1.

Bine*

Week.

Sept.

1.

333,151 1.418.42J 3.50,489 2,143.383
31.864 1-^0.5^9 64,827; 240,058
Netoverland to Oct. 28
toathem oonsumption to Oct. 28 17,000 116,000 13,000 109,000
Receipts at ports to

* Louisville HKiires

69,117

64,827

InoludlnK movement by rail to Canada.

— XOt:£xals,^^wa)^D^«aD*^--cs*JO(00(Cl»^^^GD*.o^3lO«©
k3Xkoxxoax>o<xtDOO->j^xto^wu*itk.toi-><^tcMco>--4aac«

UOX*'3Ci:D»0ai

19,001

120.599

The foregoing shows the eight days net overland movement
this year has been 31,861 bales, against 64.827 bales for the sama
week in 1891, and that for the season to date the aggregate net
overland exhibits a decrease from a year ago of 119,454 bales.

»o»Mca*-x — w

10x10 xutotoiox

29,563

31.864

pt>^-

Oct 28

tcx^orcc;ltoxcnotcx^^^JccXlC>•s]^A

x; ^UOa»^A^X'£CdCdC0Cd — )~>X->4X£

Total marketed
Caterior stocks In excess

" net " in hotU yean.

This vear's flinires estimated.
Including Friday of previous week.

382,015
27,58S

1

,655.022 428,316 2,492,438

160,140

Came Into sitilit dnrlnic week. 409,603
Total In slKbt Oct. 28

279,418

24.434
452,800'

3,771,851

1,815,163

The above totals ah w tnai the interior stocks have increased
371 OU
458,848.
during the eight days 27.58S bales, and are to-nigh 46,678 bales >orth'n6plnnerstak'g8toOct.28
leu than at tue same iwriod last year. The reui ipts at all the
It will be seen by the above that there has come into sight
towns have been 34,')97 bales less than the s me week last during thceight days 956,691 bales, against 453, 800 bales for the
year, and since Sept, 1 they are -170, 169 bales less than for the aame week of 1891, and tUat the ducreiise in amount in sight
^
"
came time^in 1891. tSS-u.
"
to-night as compared with last year ia 187,794 balee,
.^0
>

'

"^

'

THE CHRONICLE.

728

[Vol. LV.

—

Madison, Florida. We had heavy frost in this vicinity this
Weatheb Reports by Telegraph.— Reports to us by telegraph this evening indicate that killing frost has occurred morning. It has rained on one day of the week, the rainfall
being forty hundredths of an inch. The thermometer here
over a large and important portion of the South during the has averaged
63, ranging from 86 to 87.
week. In Texas, however, although frost Is reported none of
Sa/vannah, Georgia.— Rdin has fallen on two days of the
our advices say it was killing. The weather has been fairly week, to the extent of sixty-eight hundredths of an inch. Avfavorable for picking the past week as aside from a few sec- erage thermometer 61, highpst 84 and lowest 40.
Columbus, Georgia. Tt legram not received.
tions in the Southwest and in Alabama the rainfall has been
Augusta, Georgia. —Rain has fallen lightly on one day of
light
the week, followed by light frost. Cotton is coming in freely.
Oalvetton. Texas. "We have had dry weather all the week.
The thermometer has averaged 68, the highest being 82 and Ihe rainfall reached fifteen hundredths of an inch. The thermometer has averaged 59, the highest being 84 and the lowest
the lowest 53.
Polettitu, Te.'ras. Light frost occurred this week, but noth- 38.
Charleston, South CaroWna.— Hard frost occurred in the
ing harffied. "We have had one shower the past week, the
It has rained on three
rainfall rtachicg eight hundredths of an inch. The ther- interior of the State on Wednesday.
days of the week, the precipitation reacliing sixty-six hunmometer has averaged 61, ranging from 40 to 83.
dredths of an inch. The thermometer here has averaged 65,
Huntsville, Texas. There has been no rain all the week,
but light frost has occurred. I he thermometer has ranged ranging from 41 to 84.
Stateburg, South Carolina.— We have had light frost on
from 40 to 88, averaging 64.
Dallas. Texas. It has rained very hard on two days of the hills, but killing on low ground. There has been rain on one
week, doing considerable injury by beating out open cottoo, day of the past week, the rainfall reaching nineteen hundiscoloring the staple and retarding picking. There have dredths of an inch. The thermometer here has ranged from
been light frosts on two nights in north Texas, but no harm 37 to 83-5, averaging 60.
Wilson, North Carolina.— Heavy frost oct-urred on Wedseems to have been done anywhere. The rainfall reached two
inches and nine hundredths.
Average thermometer 57, nesday. We have had rain on one day of the week, to the
extent of eii^hteen hundredths of an inch.
Average therhighest 74 and lowest 36.
Han Antonio, Texas. Dry weather has prevailed all the mometer 55, highest 7S and lowest 33.
The following statemeui we nave also received by telegrapft
week. The thermometer has averaged 63, the highest being
showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3
86 and the lowest 30.
)'clock October 37, 1893. and October 39, 1891.
L/uling, Texas.
It has rained very lightly on one day of the
week, the rainfall reaching one hundredth of an inch. There
Oct. 27, 92.
Oct. 29. '9U
has been a light frost on one night. The thermometer has
Feet.
r-ot.
averaged 60, ranging from 36 to 84.
New Orleans
3-4
Above low- watermark.
29
Columbia, Texas. We have had no rain the past week. The Memphis
Above low-watermark.
1-9
10
thermometer has ranged from 40 to 84, averaging 63.
Nashville .....
Above low-water mark.
01
1
Below low-water mark
2 6
03
Cuero, Texas. The weather has been dry all the week. Shreveport
VlckS'urg
Above low- water mark.
0-8
07
A.verage thermometer 63, highest 86, lowest 40.
Brenham, Texas. No rain has fallen during the week. The
INDIA Cotton Movement itkom all Ports. TUe receiitat
thermometer has averaged 69, the highest being 88, and the and tipments of cotton at Bombay have been as follown for

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

lowest 43.
toe week and year, bringing the figures down to October 37.
Belton Texas. There has been light rain (drizzle) on one
BOUBAT BECBIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOB FOCB 18iR»,
day of the week, the rainfall reaching three hundredths of an
Shipments this week.
Shipmentt since .Vep(. 1.
inch. Fn St on two nights. The thermometer has averaged
Receipts.
53, ranging from 30 to 76.
Tear Great OontiOreat
ContiThis
Sine*
Total. Britain
Total.
Fort Worth, Texas. There have been light frosts on two
Brifn. netU.
nent.
Week. Sept. 1.
nights
Rain has fallen quite heavily on three days of the
2,000
31.000 3.000
23 000
week, to the extent of two inches and twenty-four hundredths. 18J2 '.'.::.' 2.000 2.000 2,000 29.000
1H91
i.ooo 1.000
27.000
29.000 6,000
63,000
The thermometer has ranged from 36 to 75, averaging 56.
18.90
3,000 12,000
15.000 8.000
42 000
i'ooo 4.000 10.000 24,000
34.000 10.000
39.000
Weatherford, Texas.— There has been hard rain on two days 1889
of the week, the rainfall being two inches and thirty-nine
According to the foregoing Bombay appears to show
hundredths. Average thermometer 66, highest 76 and low- a decrease compared with last year in the week's receipts
of
est 36.
Light frosts on two nights.
3,000 bales and an increase in shipments of 1,000 bales, and
New Orleans, Louisiana. Rain has fallen on two days of the shipments since Sept. 1 show an increase of 2,000 bales.
the week, to the extent of one inch and eighty-five hundredths. The movement
at Calcutta, Madras, and other India ports tot
The thermometer has averaged 65.
«he last reported week and since the 1st of September, for two
Shreveport, Louisiana.— There has been but a trace of rain years, has been
as follows.
"Other ports cover Ceylon,
the past week. Light frost occurred on Tuesday night and ruticorin,
Kurrachee and Oooonada.
kiUing frost on Wednesday night. The thermometer here has
averaged 59, ranging from 39 to 84.
Shipments for the week.
Shipments since Sept, 1.
Columbus, Mississippi.— The weather has been dry all the
Oreat
OontiOreat
„
„ ,
week, with heavy frost this morning. The thermometer has
Total.
Total.
Britain.
nent.
Britain. Oonttnent.
ranged from 33 to 88, averaging 71.
Leland. Mississippi.— Ice formed on Wednesday. The Oalontta—
1892
1,000
1.000
2.000
week's rainfall has been four hundredths of an inch. Aver1891
1,000
2,000
3,000
age thermometer 61-9, highest 89 lowest 33.
Madras—
Meridian, Mississippi.— Telfgram not received.
1892
1,000
1,000
8.000
3.000
11,000
1891
2,000
2,000
10,000
5.000
15,000
Liittle Rock, Arkansas.— hif^ht showers have fallen on three
days of the week, to the extent of eight hundredths of an All otherslfi92
3,000
7.000
3,000
13.000
20.000
mch. Our crop from present prospects is going to fall short
1891
14,000
7,000
21,000
of estimates as the yield is not up to expectations. The
ther- Xotal aU—
mometer has averaged 59'1, and ranged from 38 to 80.
1892
1,000
3,000
16,000
33,000
4,000
17,000
Helena, Arkansas.— We have had light rain on three days
1891
2,000
2.000
25.000
14.000
39,000
of the week, the rainfall reaching one hundreilth of an inch
EXPORTS TO BDBOPB FBOH ALL INDIA.
Frost occurred on three nights. The thermometer has ranged
from 34 to 84, averaging 57.
1892.
1891.
1890.
Memphis, Tennessee. There has been but a trace of rain the
Shipments
to all Europe
past week. The weather has been excellent for picking
This
Sitiee
This
Since
This
Sine*
from—
week.
Sept. 1.
meek.
week.
Sept. 1.
Sept. 1.
which makes good progress. Killing frosts occurred on
Wednesday and Thursday morning in this vicinity, doing con- Bombay
2,000
15.000
31,000
1,000
29.000
siderable damage, as the crop is late. Average
33,000
52.000
2,000
39.000
i'.ooo
thermometer Ill other ports. 4,000
here 55-3, highest 83-4 and lowest 35-5.
Total
6,000
67,000
64.000
3,000
6^,000
1,000
Nashville, Tennessee.— Rain has fallen on one day
of the
week to the extent of two hundredths of an inch. The therAlexandria Hboeipts and Shipments.—Through arranger
mometer has averaged 57, the highest being 81 and the oients we have made with Messrs. Davies, Benachi & Co., of
lowest 35.
Liverpool and Alexandria, we now receive a weekly cable of
Mobile, Alabama.— KiUing frost occurred throughout
the the movements of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt. The following
interior on Wednesday morning.
Many sections have finished are the receipts and shipments for the past week and for the
Sicking, and it will be generally completed by the middle of oorresponding week of the previous two years.
roveniber. The crop is very short.
We have had rain on
three days of the week, the rainfall reaching two
Alexandria, tlgi/pt,
inches and
1890.
1892.
1891.
October 26.
sixty-one hundredths. The thermometer here has
averased
^
«4, ranging from 41 to

—

—

.

—

,

86.

dfabama.—Killing frost occurred laRt night
We have had ram on two days of the week, the precipitation
reaching forty-five hundredths of an inch. The
thermometer
iJorefsromerj/,

here has ranged from 71 to 33, averaging 54.
Selma, .Alabama.— Telegram not received.
Aubtirn,

of an inch

Alabama.—The
^hlTr''''

first light frost occurred on Tues^^^^^'1 ^as been forty-five hundredths

SeoelptB ( can tars*)
This week
Since Sept. 1.

320 000
This
rfjcek.

Since
Sept.

210,000
1,125,000

240.000
1,059,000

1,236,000
1.

Sinu
This
Keek. Sept. 1.

This
leeek.

Sept.

1.

xportB(baleB)—
ToLlveri>ool
To Continent

13.000
6,000

Total Enrope
19.000
a. uantar Is 98 poacds.

90.000 2 4,000

68.000 15,000
19.000 4,000

62.000 17,000
2ri.000
7,000

74.000
23,000

87.000 19.100

97.000

i

1

—

.
.

.

October

4

,

i

—

t

M.lNcaBSTER Markkt. Our rejHJrt rwtoi ved by cable to-ni^b
roin Mauchoflter Htatos tbat tbo nuirk< t ih quiet for both yarim

We

give tha

prices fur to-day below and it-ave those (or previous
this and laitt year for ooiiii>arison:

weeks of

and

The

HhiriiiiKH.

yam

i-tock of

is

decreanng.

1892.

d.

:

d.

97a»
Ost. 7 6>« 97>f
" 14 (l>« a7><
" 21 6»s »7»8
" aa O'a 97>s

6%

80

tbt.

d.

4 10
4 11
5
3

82( Oop.
TwUt.

Mid.

Shirtingi.

Twitl.

•f^

laei.

OoU'n

SH

82( Cop.

UpMt

d.

4»,« ?>•
4(4
7's
7»B

».

97*
97H

d.

d.

d.

s.

96 a
96 a
96 7
96 7
96 8

8>4 lb:
BMrtingt.
d.

5
S
S
5
5
5

9
9

97^8

K.

97
97

9>*97

Hut

VpM

1

4N

.

4%

m
3
m
m

has b«en only nioder.ite the pa.st week, but the market h.ts
been fairly steady. There has been a considerable reduciion
in qunfatinnH within the la-st few dava, and thn close to-night

lY

at nj^c. for

reooup the damage. Ii'iirther, wo mii»t keep In aoooiiot both thn laranr
area planiol ami the Increased subailtiitlon of MIlAlin i(iiailty. wUTotk
la more prniliictlve than Ashtuounl or Ilamleb.
Tb« glniilnjc leaiillaol
lint to seed o|i to the present are fully as «oo«t aa tboee iil last jraar.
The rise of the Nile has pasrcl tli.il of liH7 Iwhioh was a daD«nroiMl*
hlffh onei nnil u.iuae«Mmi« nuxloty
The Oovernment and the Ui\g^
Hon ilepartinent are makuK 'treiiiiuus rfforls. lhoii»4n<U of man ar«
kept iil'iiig the banks dsjhaud nighi, aud we hope that Ihls active vIkIIauee will avert aoy dlS'i^ter. At the sinie time the po'-ltion give* aa
unoerlalnty til at^y rnilinitn of the crop result, (liven them ura iu>
neol lenls ami tluit weather continues as favorable from now forward
as It w.M at the s.iine tliuo laal year, the prohublllUes are In favor o( •
orop aa large a« last year.

Tub

lbs.,

OP UOTTOS 0)ODS prom ORBaT BRtTAIN.— 8.^low
give th« expDrts of cotton yarn, goods, &c., from Qreai
Britain for the month of September and since Octotwr 1 in
18UI-92 Jiad HKO-91, as ooiapile i by \xa tro.a Cn British B.)ar'i
of Tra<lrt riturni.
It will be noticed that we have rediic«'l
the movement all to poiin Is.
EXPtirtrs

'Htlumn the total for the name period of the previous year.
xpoRTsor corroM (balbsi raoM mkw tobk binoi sbpt i. ihu3.
Week BndinttKaporled to—

WOt

JottUof

Clot*.

All.

omitttA.

IMII-W 189041 180148.

1880-91. 18x1-98 TlWO-Bl

«s.aTs

14.

Oct.

20.

Talal
tinee

28.

Oct.

Sept. 1.

Tot, to Gt. Bbit'n. 13,861 15,Iti2 13,005 13,092

106.6 19|

119.341

683'

8,460

Havre

30:

52

100

400

30,

ItUer French ports..

Total Frsmob

92

100

400

633

8.460

822

99

183

80

3,173

1,945

1,150

"so!

i',476

6,140

10,981
13,068
12,468

J,249J

233.

1,666

8.663

86,487

6651

1.010

......

2,477

5,320

....

Bremen
Hamburg...

350

.

Tot.toNo.Edbopb 2,767

Lk,.

440,81 K

88.048
8«.(M8

a99.4U<l

7B,»«'<

74,»:<S

97.1«H

97,lt77

Ocoember...

480,912

8U.944

88.419

101,0:4

109.011

Tot.l8t guar.

IU,MV 7U,2S5

l,8<il,8J)4

1,8W,7»U 848,548 840.839

307,n»i

y*ar.

104.340
16,101

Other ports

MfiK)

Vrtot
prevtout

88.486
18,133

IS»<|-91.

IM~

Um

r<b.

Oetober

1891-99.

Oct

Otl.
7.

UlTeriHinl
11,411 11,22S 0.85!» 10.174
Hber British porta.. 2,130 3,9J4, 3,156 2 918

we

TamATKrtad.

iiiXPOKTii

inorease

2^

ti%c. for 2 lbs. and OS^c. for
lbs.
Jute buits have been quiet at 1 i^c. for paper grades and 2t^c.
for baguii g quality < n the Kpot.
is

729

or Uarro.t rrom ^few York this week show aa
compared with laat week, the total roaohinic in,On
4>S„ balea, against llj^i-tS bales laat week.
Below we give otur
41»„ UMual table, showiug the exports of cotton from New York,
4\
and the direction, for each of th« last four weeks; also th*
4»g
total exports and dir>-ction since Sent. 1, 18U3, and in the laat

d.
1

7^ 97'g
9 97
9 97 l>t
7H 97'«
7^ 97^8
9 97
5 1>«»6 »
4^H
JOTE Butts, Baooino, &c.—The demand for jute bairKini;
i

1

THK CHRONICLR

1P92.1

2«,

i

318.8U1

NoTeiub«r,..

Jannarr
February

2t.l1V

»«,778

85.891

109.85H

108.1)61

80,991

90,048

4as,774

4I8.3S'

83,M6

88,741

443. LSI

483, 1>

84.73S

80.75"

418,7S1

48S,7»H

8B.S00

81.8:11
8tl.:)0:

»lrt,881

Total 8 moi. iss,otu 135,880 8.5SS.USU 8,514,310 190.8S3 487.94V

883.388

Much

77.80:1

78.7,!v

lOo'

239

98,194

100,

ifco..

Orand Total

10H.7H1

84.B«5 l.2»5.70tl l,8>U,5i^ ^47,741

Total Spain,

108..104

88,188

'^palo, [taly,d!0
411 other

665|

8320

2.716'

1,010

16,458 17,128 14.353 lft7o47

118.681

AvERAOES OF Temperature and Rainfall.— As

169,898

of inter-

connection with our monthly weather reconl, we have
prep'ired the sul^joined tables, which show the State averaj^ee
of thermometer and rainfall in June, July, August and Sepest in

Tot. iA qnar.

18,54:1

prU

80.019

a8,7e3

373,401

Mar

18,841

S96.8»'.

June

17,488

80,808
90,494

893,71
881,474

847,911

Sfl7,8>)4

Total 8d qr.

.><l,.'M«

M.IS

75.518
78.800
70.n77

75.891
(W,682

tember

91.415
94.538
84.0'w

for six years, 1887 to 1893, inclusive.

889,935

888.SW

ia»,«ii» I99,37S 3,874,10H 8,708,70k 70J.88:f ro«,-«7i

893.381

905,7U
101.5«9
108,09!1

1898
1891 (tall)..

93-8

79,180

98.75»
98.779

9:<-4

57-;

74-8
74-.

79Ji2:i

9.S,489

103.387

18Ml>irull>..

97-8
91-7

88 3

7^."^

l889uo.idl

TotalSmoe..

50-

7:li.

1888 ?K..'i<l)
I8s7 (good)

9,1-3

98-4

53-0
58-9

94-4

JalT

83,108

417.S6''

410,801

AoKiist

99.900
83.!M4

40<t.BH>!

4U.9H9

39S,.«5

41»,70^

Beptembor

Toul

4th

8ei>eeni8*r.

Jrila.

T1urmom«Ur

!IS.395^

I.117,17^ l,ll«.!M1

.

qr.

8H5.W17I

809,811 4.8«H.3ai 4,951. 88W

1,818,784

BtocktnKB and soolu.

1318

Bnndry articles

1,805
83.300

83.918

Total egporta of eotton manafactgrw

1.8:i7.s«»

.

llie foregoing shows that there has been
United Kingdom during the twelve months
manufactured cotton, against 1,237,863,000

-^xp >rc»<t from the
l,21o,016,00(l Ibrt. of
Ids. last year, or a

i.

A

last three years:

PIECE OOODS AMD TABIIS TO PBlWOrPAL COffJITRIES IN

8K1TEHBEB, AMU FBOM OCTOBKB 1 TO SKPTEUBEB 30.

1893
1H91 (full)..
1890 (full)..

issmg'Kjd)

75-8

57-;)

74
7»l-h

7,->-a

57-4
H4-,
5S".
8<-l

93-8

77-1

9V8

9.5-8

»-.i-l

7-1-8

97-8
9>-i

89-4
4+;i
80-4
53-1

80-1
7)-.,

7s-

98-:

78-.'

108-8

78-H
»j-2
81-^

9.)-c

7.5-rt

98-2

l>»i Ofo id)
1887 (good) 100-8
9:i-<

83-4
68-H

774

85-.1

48-8

78-('

68H
58-

81-0

55-0

74-

Sj8888-:
«7-;
98-

5T8

74-7
74-1
77-H

81-1
81-,

78-'
77-1

91-7
91-4

87-9
81-4

79.1

87-8

78-:(

8B-i

94-n

81-1-

7B-:-.

9-1

8.1-1

78

-

9.-.1

78-4

98-0
98-4
91-9
89:1
97-4
98-1

88-

79-a

89-5

8:1-:

78-

8it-i
«,l-3

84-9
88-U

78-

08 8

80-8

94-9

64-9
57-8

79-1
7H-1

8^-8
9.1-0

fll-.i

9i-4
91-0

68

94-11

78;

8.1'

1899.

{

Oct.

1890.

1891.

1HU!.98.

1

fo S'lit. 80.

1890-91.

1

IHSV-M).

I

All Other ooui.trles

Tota. yards..
Total Talue..

398.385 418,700 418.18: 4.t'9l.3"l 4,951,198 5,071,583
X8,»U0 £4.317 £4.133 149.701 153,318 £33.049

5J-4
44-8
38-5
41-3

71-8
71-1
ge-8

88T
68-S

^

8.)-l

87-4

55-8
11-0
5S-J
35-:
41-3

r7v

93-

48^

71-9

T9-3
78-M
77-u
78-9
79-8

8'^•3

K-8 7»S

73-()

73-4
78-4

OtOKOIA.
1898
I8W1 (fail)..

Wi-j

I8>*)(fulll..

\n-

1880 («>o,l)
Irt'iS (KOodi
1887 (good)

98-3

8:i-«

9,9-8

4T-S
81-5

78-1

9 .--4

84-5
8«-7
80-^
18-8

97-.J

88-8

mn

99-8

78-L

101-^

8S-i)

80-4

93-3

63-1
80-4

91-0
93-8
94-8

66'

03-8

03-3

88-

910

88-0
88-

80-!

«8-0

7--8
79-9
»J-

9)

87-'

HO-H
80-1

919

8rt'

98-4

,'»-8

771

84-0

TO-

SO

94'

9.1-.-

*8-7

98-3

(W-8
84-8

79

1887 igoodl

77-1

98-4

U9-,

B8-:i

W-h

9

85-8

S.I-

97-.;

80-0
?*!-:

84

78-./

90".i
91-^

910
89-3
98-8

59-7

58
51-8
46-0
40-

0'LOKIDA.
18W8
1891 (fnl )_
1890 (rail).
1889 y..odl

88-0
8J-5

8.5

811

9»-

88'

80-

93-9

69-8

78-:i

93-4

9

91

8(1'0

93-M
itVA

79-H
MO-9

9.J-

.l.-i-4

79-0
81-8
80-U

91-3

80-3

9-8-;

53-:.

74-8
74-8
73-1
70-8
78-8

m

77-9
78-1
78-a
78-4
77-4

98-7

.39-9

88-0
98-9

80-5 >l-»
51-8 78-0
55-3 75»
50-5 78-a
47-8 71-9
51-0 7S-8

4laba.ua.
1198

1-4.4SU lOO.CiO n-.'WS 8.151.088 8,180,870 8,834,811
53,4f'rt 1t,:il<
tHl,8i'l
7:«,78ri
718,317
:w,6:il ;i8.riH0 47,-B7
571,rtr
801.701
8U.ai8
87,M..*-*
8'ls,tl13
a().»:19
811.88
348.37S 351.734
58.888 48.99U 48.980 1118.1.15 510,.S9i .307.18^
889.0' P«
81,874 88.881 35.383
S0H.S71
3«.4«9
8J,764 80,490 811.097
888,711
321,097 8»3«.i0

China and Jhphq
Bnrope (except Turkey),...
Boutn America
North AtiierlCA

68-0

94-8
9a-e
98-4
10>-i

Cah'li.va

18ul(tull)

Stptember.

Piece <;<mi<.
(OOOe omittnl.)

Bast Indies
Turkey. ICffvpt and Africa-

9V^
K«-:(

5«-'-

l«h-> (g.xid)

decrease of 22,8.i3,000 lbs.
further mactar of interest is tbo d'^stination of these
exports, and we have therefore prepared thj following
Btatem-'nts, Slowing the amounts taken by the priniiipai
countries during September and since October 1 in each of the

XPOBTS OF

t.OAK'LISA

307.058

l.t>ft>.88:t.

88.3.4UI aiT.ll,-

1.88-3.84.1

Total year...

7H,.'»7

79,800
T>,78
7«.l«a

IMMOIfulll..

18H9 (IJOO.I)
1888 Si«)d)
1887 (gixjd)

95-8
97-5
94-;
91-8
91-9
98-4

1-0

78-5

9.)'

7.-C

v*.',-o

835

711-

843
87n

81-4
54-

80-1

SO-'-

78-.S

98-0

8-)-|

8>-')

89-8
"8-3

83-

7;-8
78-9

5; -4

H8-)

89-4

81-5

988

ftt-H

7.S-U

9094-8
88-1

97-2

euti

807

9J-1

68-4

78

96-0

954

79-8

94-0

68-6

80-0

81-2

793

81

77-4
78-6

95-8
97 -o

57-0

79-0

8:1-3

8i-l.

u5-a

8:)-i

80'

9'l-8

51-(

7.H-8

91-.M
93-..

94-.S

83-.J

97-,.

84-3

81-0

95-r
97-H
97-0

80-7

88-ti

8;-i)
.11-7

«3:l
84-7

9-88

58-

95-1
95-

79-rt

9-.i-9

7»-h
78-9

8.-1)

941
98-

88-;

98-9
95-3

8'1-:

70-8

70-8

81-8

9t-.i

95-8
91-5

8.1-1

79-1
77-7

93

«a-8

790

93-7

3:i-u

9

83-1

M-1

94

93-u

T8-'
s-.-o

0-4-8

98-5

LUITISIANA
1898
18'Hfull).
1890 (fall)..
l'*8« Igood)
1888 (good)
1»17 (iood)

I

94-11

90-1

88-H
88-9

'

55-8
38-8
iS-3
53-11

58-8
39-«

71-a
75-a
78-7
78-4
74-0
78-a

Mississippi

rartu.
(OOOs umUCed.)

Holland

Germany.

-

..

0th. Kiirope (except Turkey)
Bast Indies
Chtua and Jj<paa

Turkey aud KKypt
All other countries^

Total lbs
TntHi valut*

3,088
8,358
8,849
4.453
8,98 <
3.130

8,801

8.4"!8

8.4.15
4,K9t)

8.157
4.184

5.U0I

4.l.'jl

8.'<l:i

8.991
9.981

34.808
88.883
48.914
45.594
8«.108
36.757

88,498
38,808
54.841
53,960
30,31O
34.879

85,308
34.UI1

56,367
|M,593
.'9781

047

3.4V4
1,013

97(1

18,037

11,881

10.139

80.900

88..1W

81,974

851.551

i.HA,*

£"78

il,ii85

835,159
118,171

936.483
£18.173

1,

£11,710

31..!78

1H9«
1891 (full)..
18(*Hfull).
l88»(g.iod.
1888 (Kood)
I8tf7 (good.

unimportant, others estiiuat- it at .^ to 10 per cent; but the latter admit that warm aud dry temperature during .October may almost

»({e

iij

97-1

66-0

77-1

«:;-4
8-8-7

80-'j
7.l-^
71-.'

I

98->.

480
533

73-

98-:(

85-5
86-7

9i-»

07-9

77-4

96-:i

IJ8-8

80-U

9-1-8

95-5

68-0
83-c)

97-8
94-«

98-7

80-7
49-7

Tvt-l

99'

79-8
78-'
HO--

78-7
7«-8
Te-f

95-3
98-9
100-3

83-0
5s-4
81-1
88•^

98-8

9.J-7

77-1
71-1

84-:-

81-0
81-8

90-7

80-5
83-8
«0-7

77-.

I

7k- 1
76-1

79-0
7o-3

AKKA.'4SAS.
1898
18H1 (full)..
ISUOUull)..
1889 (U,.o)
IWW (go dl
1887 (good)
1808

EaypTiAN Cotton Crop.— The following report on the
cotton crop in E^ypt was issued by the Alexandria General
Produce Asiociation, under date of September 30:
Frequent and more or 1cb« hearr f")?8 Uavo been reported durlnic the
Wkrly part of Sepli'inhcr. ARiHUit this tUo teiniwrature li»i li««ii warm
and favorable, wUioli ha« |iarll:»llv a.utralizpil the effect of the fcigi.
The first orop was a little late lii ri|>eniai?. but hii.i ripened evoniT and
has produced satisfactorily. The Ill-effects of the fogs are rather exfectcd U> appear In the soronrt crop, auil citlmatea lii respect of this
Iffer.
HeTeral of our corresponrtenta expre.is opinion that the rtain-

98-1
97-1

ii-oiVfuiiV..

18m (full)..
i»w (K..jd)
1888 (KOOd)
1887 (good)

91-9
95-8
98-3
93-8
98-5
89-3
94-7
97-3

54-:l

580

88-1

88-8
80-7

77-1

98-0

78-r'

9-8-3

3<)-(

97-M

80->

4r-3
48-M
55-4

80-'
78-2
75-8
7S-9

Vi-t

83-

mi

7«-i<

988
93-3
9I-3
97-0
98-9

89-7
55-0
80-0

8O0
6
5»-4

98 5

84-..

77-4
75-8
79-3
«|-8
79-7

981

80-8
il-0
53-8
80-<
81-0

98-9

89-4

814

99-4

68-8

VtV

88-9
85-1
88-1

R8-3

Bfll
98-5
97-

01-3
91-3
94-0
^9-5

50-5
30-8
.'>l-4

91-7

91-8| 51-8

k701 49-8
94-9|

486

»}«

78-8
78-3
77-9
-7-3
78-7
7»-0

5I-8
93-8' 54-4
80-6; 48-«
91-0 4IIT
t»<i\ 48-»
97-0 4«-7

7J-4

li:-t

7»8
74-a

740
74-0
8»-8
71-9

871 4ri

75-3

(B-l
581>
85-8
84-8
84-8

8;i-i

9rs
91-n

52-3

7ivl

71-J
74-«

70-8
ri-a

7.-.

77 :
7W-0

«rl
,»->

,.

•„

'.

TaxAS.
18P«
ln»l

74-4
81-9

««|-4

(full)..

18W (fall)..
1888 (good!

»!I'

98-5
98-1
91-4

80T,
«o-«

W8
78-0

fcS-9

88-6

79-5

99-U
97•^
97-7
93-4

78-3;

wH-ri

laiWigood) 94-5 83

lyfor the year vita full

.•<8-4

8r4

88-81
81-9'

14-1.

80-8

88-:

79-41

9J-0
»7'4
9J-8

81-1
81-4
81-0
80-4
79-7
64-11 80-0

The wnrds " fnU " and " good," above mean

8rop

or Kood.

tliat

03-6
99-9
98-7
89-«

8.3-8

67H

4M-8
48-8
SB-s: 65-0
49-7
9-3-J

71-e
76-0

T*
78-A
74'-

the axioregat*}

—

. ..
. ..
..
.
.

(

-

1

'

—
A

Weather Recobd For September. — Below we

give the

Tharmomster

Scptemhe.

July.

AUJTlSt.

1892. 1891. 1890.

1892. 1891. 1890.

iher mo meter
1893.

law. WW).

'.

^—-

Jjowest...A.veraiza...

95-0

580 530
750 770

99-0
57-0
78-4

91-0
67-0
76-0

93-0

96-0

94-0

600
789

83

810 530

79-0

77-41 73-8

94-0

84-0
53-0
71-0

910
59i)

73

39-0
5'JO
72-0

WAmin(jUm1000

m-1

95-0
80-0
77-0

83-0
80-0

95-0
60-0
78-0

Lowest

9--0
50-0

98-0
55-0

ATera*Ee..

^6o 731

98-0
51-6
77-a
9S-0

Htghest. ..
Lowest....

92-0
61-0

Aver.vrfe...

Willon..—
Hlgbest...
0\arU)tteHlKhest.

..

Lowest

80-0
76-0

Average...

9J-7
58-5
78-6

84'

80-2

93-0
81-0

890

870

83-0

55-0
72-8

63-.I

7,l-6

9?-0
80-0
79-0

930

94-0
5-1-0

81-0
41-0
63-8

90-0

61-0
78-1

91-5
49-0

71-8

82-0
50-0
71-i

93-0

89-0

90-0
67-0
72-0

91-0
50-O
70-8

93-0
H8-0

770

93-C
53-0
77-0

030 920
520 510
762 71-4

97-0
51-0
78-3

97-0
58-0
77-0

93-0
57-0
77-3

920

93-0

82-0
78-0

53-0, 57-0

98-0
60-0
80-7

94-0
83-0

93-0, P20
59-0, 63-0

73'

90-0
55-0
7i-7

780

41-

700

91-0
74-0

490

89-0
5S-0
71-0

98-0

94-0
83-0

94-0

880

7,1-3

79-6

7-J-9

73-0

Hlarhest...

93-0
62-0
73-4

07-0
55-n
78-3

980
610

91-0

79-4

80-1

91-0
50-0
77-4

990

98-0

82-0
78-3

630

9>0
810

7-J-8

78-7

93-0
3 -1-0
73-5

98-0

9^-0
O'VO
79-3

736

A-veraae...

A.ver->i(re...

Average...

Moraantcn —

8j0
828

Lowest

fll-0

Averase..

68-9

570
705

93-0
54-0
76-8

87-0
4t-0

Lowest

9f0 950
67-0 850

Average...

78-0

79'

93'P
83-5
i5-6

95-3
82-3
77-0

Highest...

Highest....

Lowest
Average..

97-8
83-0
78-8

Highest....
.

Everifreen—
Highest....

Hiiftiest...

Waynesboro

640

990 980
75-1)
810

930

80-9

79-1

82-3

79-2

733

78-8

93-0
83-,)

94-0 tOi-O
800 80-0
76-8 7J-3i

91-0
85-0
77-0

94-8
49-4

99
431.
73-8

910
700
830

93-0
63-0
73-0

08-0
«l-0
73-1

93-0 100-0 100-0,
570 60-0 64-0,
79-0 81-8 79-8

94-0
83-0
73-0

96'8
79-8

80-8

93-0
84-0
73-8

93-0
81-0
79-0

93-0
80-0
78-6

97-0

000

98-0

830 810

6J'

540

Areraite..

77-0

91-0

94-0

78-2

63-ii

81-3

93-0

950 920
830 6)-0

99-0
81-n

91-0

64-0!

808

78'5

78-8

810

79-0

930

480

ATeraz^...

62-0
78-6

9.)0 100-0
81-0 5S-9
76-3 78-3

99-0
64-0
80-4

lOl-O

Lowest...

970

83-0

79-0

590

58-0

630

56-0,

550

47-11

71-4

70-0

7.2-7

72'

81-8

85-0
51-0
63-4

98-0
89-0
82-0

95-0
65-0
8j-0

95-0
65-0

920

910 94-0 911
70O 810 8-3-0
82-0

81-0

T9-2

89-0
83-0
73-0

89-0
61-0
76-0

90-0
68-0
78-2

95-0

03-3

92-8
00-8
74-6

93-4

91-7

87-7

90-4

35-2

83-6

59^
759

67-

58-7,

58

52-11

81-11

77-8

75-3

74-1

71-0

97-0

720

97-0
58-0

95-2
60-;
78-1

99-0
68-0
80-4

97-2
55-5
78-8

93-.?

92-3
53-2
74-8

93-0

91-2
82-0
77-2

90-0
68-0
78-0

93-0
8S-0
78-1

81-0
13-0
63-5

90-0
53-0
71-2

99

99-0
83-0
80-0

94-0
80-0

90-0
51-0
72-9

92-0
6!-0
73-0

8J-0
50-0
70-0

90-0

65"

780
99

5ao 658
79-0

Lowest

83-9
5 4-8
70-9

83-(

65 8

800
73-4

797

8W

101-0
63-8
32-3

770

88-u
79-8

5(5-!i

77-0

500
74-0

91-0
63-0
72-0

93-0
18-0
71-3

890

9S-0
43-0

98-0
53-0
77-1

83-0
49-0
70-4

93-8
49-4
71-1

9T0

94-,)

91-0

91-0

8'-0

600 53

79- -1

73-3

72-0

91-0
61-0
79-1

94-0
52-0
78-5

94-0
61-0
78-0

91-0
53-0
71-4

630
715

98-0
53-0
70-0

91-(l

37

9>-0

73-

62-11

717

47-0

62-0
71-8

50-0
71-0

50-0
70-1

1

AaKA-NS':"
Uttle ai:k.HUfieat.
Lowest....

840

83-'

93-0
68-0
77-0

97-('

98-0 103-0
65-0 61-(
80-4

970

930

91-0

9S-(

«2-0
7d-2

620
778

82-1

78-8

94-0
59-0
78-4

73-4

98-0
«5-0
78-0

97-0
88-0
80-0

9-<-0

97-0

94-0

83(

85-0

81-0

97-0
89-0
sa-0

Average..
Atlanta.—
k Highest.

..

El Dorado —
HUhest...
Lowest....
Averauo...
Biach Rock—

91-0
60-0
75-0

;;"!

Hlffhest... 102-0
50-0
79-9

...

Lowest....
AveraKo...

Htuhesc. .,
Lowest....

58-0
79-3

58
80-1

::::

....1

5(l-(,

77-7

53-0
73-9

101-0

43-0
78-5

91-0

92-0
51-0
70-9

83-0
50-0
71-1

51-0, 50-0
89-11 73-3

93-0

91-0

80-0

13-0,

430

77

71-5

73-3

1000 97-0 93-0
i'

94-0
80-0
75-5

91-0
44-0

93-0
60-0
80-3

80-4

93-0
52-0
79-2

800

93-0
5)-o
78-0

83-,j

97-0

Averajfe...

04-0
85-0
83-0

99-0
72-0

6i-l.

78-0

.

99-0

840

890
58-0
72-8

97-0
63-0
80-6

....

82-2

99-0
50-0
73-9

rBNNHJSK.

.

.

Highest.
Lowest..
Average.

970

93-0

93-0
80-0

510

51-1)

170

80-0

800

90-1
57-2
71-4

83

020

78-0

95-0
51-0
73-0

95-0

83-:)

93-9
91-3
77-2

98-0

68J
77-0

73-0

73-0

70-0

93-0
53-0
72-0

84-0
79-2

95-0
84-0

780

84-0
81-0

960

790

5rtj
79-3

93-0
55-0
78-8

90-)
59-0
75-2

91-0
59-0

97-0
59-0
77-7

970
820

93-0
83-0
80-0

99-0
63-0
78-8

94-0
53-0
78-6

98-0
61-0
81-0

95-0
81-0
73-8

94-1

78

77-4

90-5
53-3
72-0

93-2
53-4
74-9

90-0

580

94-0
53-0

79 '5

930 95-0
800 830

99-0
85-0

930

89-0

970
550 830

91-0
50-O

910

85-0

91-0

880

55-iJ

47

330 BOO

75-1

77-8

79-8,

89-0
60-0
71-8

67-7

70-3

69-2

980
530

960
830

98-0

83-8

98-0
50-0
78-1

930

73-7

99-0
5)-0
79-2

50-0
64-9

88-0
ao-o
75-1

91-0
61-0
79-8

90-0
69-0
81-3

87-0

87-0

Highest...
Lowest....

95-0

96-0

Are rase...

78-0

Lowest....

98-0
72-5

re rage...

750

Lowest

Are rase..

73-

—

HiKbest...

.

Lowest

Average...
AttfannaA.—
Highest.,
liowest
_ Average...
Oolumiiiu.—
Highest.
.

Lowest.
-Average..

.

Highest...

93-0
62-0
7u-0

Lowest
Average..
Wjrtyth.—
Highest...

9H-0

890
80-0

83-1

97-0
88-0
80-u

96-0 100-0 101-t
93-0 63-0 63t
78-J 81-0 81-4

Lowest
Average..

FLORIDA.

90-0

5S0

96-0
81-0
78-2

91-0

620
76-2

91-0

63-Oi 63-0

72-3

71-8

96-0

930

94-0

640

91-1
89-4

90-0
69-0

80

79-6

81-0

65-0
80-3

63-(i

79-5

700

78-6

730

53-0
75-8. 75-4

91-0
85-0
82-0

92-0
67-0

93-0
89-0
81-0

91-0

90-0
83-0
80-0

90-0
68-0
80-0

89-0
82-0
74-0

89-0
83-0
77-0

92-0
84-0
78-0

98-0
69-0
79-2

800
90-0

990

640

88-0

78-0

800

97-0 100-t
70-0 6979-3 80-2

700
81-0
93-0
62-7
78-0
92-0
63-0
79.7

920

92-0

80-0

800

780

78-0

92-0

92-n

640 890
78-7

78-5

89-o! 88-0

61-0

84-0 ^8-0
49-0 58-0
67-0 70-0
92-0
84-0
78-1

93-0
6')-0]

77-2

89-0
60-0
77-0
90-0
58-0
70-0
94-0
68-0
75-1

Lowest

Arerage...

91-0 100-0
tn-v 68-0
77-8 81-1

Lowest....
Average..

97-0

95-0

690

680
81-8

95-0
88-0
81-0

680
31-0

96-0
88-0
81-4

97-0
70-0
83-0

94-0
64-0
8J-4

iim.—

92-0

880
76-8

89-0
65-0
78-0

930
930
791

930 950
84-P 880

91-0

91-0
70-0

94-0

85-1'

tf Average...
I'icusville—

80-5

80-^

8-2-0

82-0

80-2

94-0
70-0
81-4

94-0
70-0
81-2

93-0
67-0

78-9

8i)-6

88-0
79-8

92-0
88-0
79-7

92-0
69-0
79-3

Highest....

88-0
67-0
77-4

94-0
61-0

93-(

94-0
89-0
81-2

90-0

61-0
80-8

93-0
88-0
90-4

93-0

690

680

71.-1

8J-0

80-2

98-0
72-0
81-8

94-0
70-0
80-2

90-0
69-0
78-2

88-0
63-0
78-0

83-0
67-0
7o*u

90-0
85-0
76-4

93-5

9.3(1

93-0
88-0

89-0
67-0

92
79-1

92-5
65-0
78-6

87-0
81-0
74-4

83-ol 89-0

781

89-0
76-4

93-0
63-0

78-1

.

Lowest

...

Average.
\aXialviiKe—

Highest
.

Average...

ALABAMA

880 70
78-7

79-0

92-0

700 830

630

78-

930

61-0
76-1

63-3
78-9

Jlon(0em'i/.—

Highest...
Lowest....
Average...
iloMle.Hlghest...

98-0
82-0
79-7

99-0
83-0
81-8

930

Hlgheat.

Lowest

95-0
65-0

Average...

790

98-0
81-0
80-5

Highest.

94-0

81-1

97(1
67(1
8J-0

93-0
89-0
79-0

89-0

ATerage...

820 790

87-('

94-0
83-0
77-S

95-0
85-0
79-

79-7

94-0

Lowest

93-0
57-5

Average...

550

93-5
5U-6

750

78-8

70-1

..

Lowest
Average...

96-0

820

WioQint-

Hlgbest.... 101-0 104-0

Lowest....
Average...

84-0
81-3

LOCIa'MA

94-0
83-0
8C-0

98-0
68-0
81-0

93-1

93-0
67-0

990

800

80-6

92-0
88-0
80-0

94-0
58-0
80-0

79-6

69

91-0
53-0
75-0

91-o' 90-0

90-5

89-0

870
801

805
77-3

93-0
53-0
78-0

03-0
83-0
78-3

89-0

93-5
67-E
79-6

98-5
61-0
78-9

91
45-5
71-0

108-0 100-0
67-0 81-0
80-3 31-7

58-0
82-6

91-0
85-0
79-B
90-0
ao-0
78-0

93-0

74-8

9t-0
58-0
78-0

l«-0
81-0
80-0

92-0
88-0
77-2

58'

79-4

90-0
65-0
73-0

810

91-0
57-0
76-8

57-0
78-8

Lowest...
A re rage...

Hlghest....

Lowest

840 680

Average..

78-1)

MhreWDort,—
Highest...

98-0
67-0
79-2

Lowest
Average...
•r'd Oottau-

94-0
80-8
97-0

940
«o-o
80-e
97-(

620 610

57-0
77-9

79

94-0

Hlghest....

Lowest....
Average...

31-2

90^

86-1'

63-1
78-9

81-9
VB>ertv5tllrHlghest.... 102-0 103-0
Lowest
51-0 600
Average..
790 80-0

CIttrujmUte—
Highest....

98-0
58-0
80-0

.

Average...

82-0
81-0

V^ctatmrv—
Highest...

79-2

M-0
82-0

950 980
580 87-(i

...
)

78-u

78-5

610

Vo'.umlnu.—
Highest... 1010 980
.

6i!-C

94-0

MIS3I8SPI.
Lowest ...
_Average

98-

93-0
87-0
80-0

92-0
83-0
81-2

81"

eo-i
79-(

97-0
67-0
77-3

94-0
88-0
81-4' 78-9

91-8
69-5

91-0
65-0
80-0

91-5
68-7
78-8

90-1
57-^
74-1

89-1
64-9
77-4

89-0
49-0
83-8

9S-0 102'8

99-0
69-0
81-0

96-0

490
73-5

62-ti

5'3-0

74-0

79-i

74-0

93-0
Sl-0
78-4

91
aJ
8

93-0
55-3
77-8

96-0
57-0
78-8

54-0
76-8

93-0
55-5
77-0

92-0
17-0
72-5

94-0

99-0

980

lOl-O
43-0
80-2

94-5

100-0 lOO-O
62-0 58
78-U 81-0

98-3
88-,J

57-0
82-3

820 580

hongvieiv—
HiKhest.... 101-0 100-0 1010
Lowest ... 33-0 80-U 59-0
Average.
SO-0 .82-6 61-4

61-0
81-1

51-5,

500 170

74-2

78-2

73-9

93-0
61-0
73-0

94-0

580

98-0
19-0
78-2

94-0
49-0
72-0

89-0
48-0
73-4

Arlington—
Lowest....
Average...

INDIAN

95-0 101-0 lOl-O
65-0
520 68
73-5 84-3 83-3

100-0 100-0
89-0 8-3-0
78-8 89-0

79-0

T.

OklaKama—

Lowest....

93-0
19-0
75-1

Highest....

91-0
57-0
74-3

98-0
58-0
77-0

94-0
58-0
78-0

97-0
54-0

99-0
49-0

770 793

•

June.

July.

August.

September.

1893. 1891. 1390.

1892. 1891. 1890.

1892. 1891. 1890

1892. 1891. 1890.

viBai.viA.
4-83
13

1-56
14

2-79

8-87

H-90

7

18

19

6-13

10-26
IS

587

6-33
14

S-63
10

8-22
17

l-S-i 11-99

2:(

8

20

B-7S

8-92

9-S8
17

1-3H

5

3

6-13
17

4-23

1-81

10

13

19

8-79
14

6-95

2-7i

1-37

11

8

6

3-«»
13

8-83
18

8-35

2-37

0-78

S-M

9

7

1-43 10-42
9
13

6-30

1-93

12

8

8

H

2-02

6-04

4-31,

7-53
6

3-53
7

4-90

8-93 12-87
15
18

1-73

5-18 11-77
17
10

6-06
15

u-w

17

6-99
13

7-25

1-33
12

8-73
13

7-07

2-f

3-07

3-60

12

7

H

IS

9-72
IS

8-13

»93

4-84
to

4-91

rou

8

21

4-82

0-77

.>*

8

S

....

15

Si-«

fl-61

IS

CAR'NA.
32

3-47
17

3-38

rain..

.VI

419

3-64

Days

12

rt-'-'C

19

111

10

15

18

13

6-59
9

B-51
14

3-77

0-53

5-89
14

3-7I1

6-07

2-31

48-0
73-8

Raleigh
Ralnfall.in

1-84

Days

rain..

}harkitte—
Ralnfall.in

Days

rain..

Ralnfall.in
Days rain.

14

6
1-15

18

6

7-18

U

12
6-21

1-18
13

3-83

2-4H

14

7

B-22
11

Ralnfall.in 10-32

3.

H-OO
11

1000 98-0

1-33

10-33

2U

8-96
15

8

18

6-91

,3-68

2 85

6-.30

CAROL'

47-0
76-0

43-0
73-7

Days

rain..

Ralnfall.in
92-0

79

95-0
51-0
75-7

94-0

10

6

1-81

6-85

11

8

11

10

ft

1-78

8-19

1l4

8-3Q

12

OluiTlaton—

95-0

8i-i

94-0
53-0
74-3

96-6
71-0
83-8

Horganton.—

930
500

92-0
87-0

98-0 102-0
93-0 33-0
78-7 80-1

Days rain..

77-»

93-4
66-0
81-

99-0
63-0

91-0
13-0
71-0

101-0
85-0
82-4

85-5

100-0 101-0
67-0 62-0
83-2 82-0

798 821

Ralnfall.in

92-0
65-0
80-8

93-0
680 82-0
78-8' 79-3

82-8

bl-8

81-0

Ualnfall.in

92-0
69-0
78-9

95-0

930
610

8)0 700

VUminnt'n-

92

7.)-

91-0
61-0
77-1

99-0 100-0

I

93-0

....

58-0
77-8

81-(

930
590 700
790 80-3

101-0 101-0
72-0 83-5
86-4 85-4

88-4

890

9-0
5y

83-0
83-0

94-0

!J.

8.3-0

99-0 98-0
85-0 48-0
S2-0 'TO

93-0
17-0
71-a

97-0
68-0
82-3

Ralnfall.in

91-0
54-0
73-8

B8-I

1000

791

830

Dafsrala..

87-8

90-0

P6-0

95-0
67-0
81-5

77-3

92-0
53-0
75-8

HirfoUc.—

89-0
84-0
78-8

99-0
64-0
77-0

99-0
67-0
81-8

520 800

54-0

97-0
53-0
80-4

370

72-7

93-0
65-0
73-0

lOS-0
82-0
81-0

98-0
68-0
81-5

63-0
80-0

98-0
80-0

94-0
50-0
70'0

92-0

470
74 8

Days

r lin..

11

18

h

12

17

8-31
14

.3-12

4-3H
13

1-13

6-01

934

Ralnfall.in
rain..

13

8

1-73
11

«-39

3-28

,5-.Sv

17

11

.319
12

8-78

6

1-13
11

9-lK
14

a-48
13

8-1 n

17

16

13

Eoergreen—
91-0
58-0
77-0
94-0
53-0
76-8

910

Ralnfall.in

60-0

Days

710
91-0
63-0
71-9

13

Ooliimbta.—

Days
98-(

97-0
68-0
82-0

95-0
64-0

47-5
70-1

95-0
85-0
81-0

93-0
69-0
82-0

9S-0
61-0
80-2

670 680
78-3

Bwitsville.—
Highest...
Lowest....
Arerage...

5«-(i

530

97-0
54-0
78-9

9«-0
63-0
81-8

97-0
87-0
82-0

910 9V0

79-9

94-0
56-0
78-2

83-0
67-0
78-6

loro

90

95-0
66-0
82-0

93-0
89-0
79-0

83-8

900
880 700

95-0
88-0
80-3

88-0

91-0
67-0
81-0

580 480
790

83-0

97-0 101-0
88-0 6b-0
81-2 84-4

85-5

93-0
83-0
81-2

79-6

90-0

72-0
82-9

78-8

78-2

99-0
63-0
81-0

792

920

71-0
82-7

Satnratt.

84-0
80-3

100-0 lOl-O 101-0
620 680 63-0
80-0 80-0 83-0

2-0

82-6

81-8

88-0
68-0
76-8

97-0
87-0
Sl-0

980

93-0

710 690
82-1

762

83-0

91-5

51-0
82-9

93-0
70-0
81-7

88-0

30-3

99-0
59,1

ATera'.ie...

86-0
52-0
71-8

1020

96-0
68-0

900
850

Ahilent.—
aignest... lOOO 104-0 98-0
Lowest.... 43-0 59-0 50-0
Average..
79-8 78-8 78-3
83,n Antonio.
Highest... 9S-0 100-0 95-0
Lowest.,.. 51-0 62-0 53-0

TeWon
92-0

79-1

80-0
74-8

AiMttn-

Bl-0
78-9

K. Orleam.Hlghest...

78-1

98-0
68-0
73-1

910

88

930
550

70-7

FaUstitie.—

92-0
65-0
78-0

75-

78-9

500

TBXAS.
Highest....

94-0
67-0
77-0

84-

730 780

73-2

90-0
49-0
70-0

Qalmston,—

Average.

92-0
84-0
78-9

Jqgper—
.

97-0
63-0
81-8

6"i-0

90-0 lOO-C
89-0 87-0
80-0 80-0

901,

Lowest

.

Lowest....
Arerage...

Highest....
95-0
68-0
79-0

68-.

82-0
7o-8

i

Aiistin.-

A.

tacHtonvHit.
Hlghe-it...

Lowest

61-11

-

HlKh93l...
Lowes'....
Averass...

Hivhest...

Highest...

Lowest

Average.-.

98-0

61-0'

9f0

KosGiusko—

^usiMta.—

.

93-0

7i)'3

87-0

95-0
«5-0
78-2

Average...

Lowest

91-0
5(-0
73-3

97-0
49-0
78-1

750

93-0

IVtMhpiiie.—

QBOumA.

Highest.

94-0
Bill
77-4

98-0

8.1-0

92-0
61-0
78-0

..

HIsaest.

93-0
53-0
75-4

93-0
45-0

804

91-0
51-0

9T0

Columbia-

.

91-0
83-0

730

83-0

StaUbw^.—

Lowest

91-0
57-0
77-7

Average..
Tort SffiUh-

0tuirl6st<m.—

Lowest

91-0
81-0
73-3

5i-0
74-1

890

B.CABOI^'A

?

95-0
61-0
77-3

61-0
72-0

90-0
53-0
71-2

Hfghes:... 87-0 83-0 92-0

^ Highest.

600

930
520
7S0

Hlarbe^t...

Lowest

98-0

Sejttem'beT.

1892. 1891. 1890.

97-0
85-0
82-9

600

Srooktiaven—

Elii^aest..

99-0
52-0
70-0

Highest...

7a

^u^ust.

-

95-0
85-0

BaUiah—

.

—

751

Lowest. ...
Ave raze ..

M. CAa'I.A.

^—

93-0
55-0

Lowest....

1392. 1891. 1890.

-

HlKbest...
Lowest....

L)we3t....
97-0

July.
1892. 1891.

ArdraEre...
Cur/cs/fate—

High-iSt...
91-0
5S-0
76-3

June.
1892. 1891. 1890.

VIBUINIA.
Nortolk.—
Highest...

[Vol* LV.

1

and thermometer record for the month of September
and previous months of this year and the two preceding years.
The figures are from the records of the Signal Service Bureau,
except at points where they have no station, and at those
points they are from records kept by our own agents.

rainfall

Lowest

D

1'

THE CHRONICLE.

730

Lowest
Average

2

.
.

rain..

9-18
18

U

,,

12

aBOBJIA.
Aiigiut >.—
Ralnfall.in

Days

rain..

1-H,H

4-47

3-70

15

11

9

8-11

14

1-

«-»)
6

6-49

2- IS

em

8

18

OcrroBER

Satn/aU.

OKOItOIA,
Attanlit.—
KnliKiill.ln
Diiyn rnln..
Aui'tinrulA.—
Ualiirilll.ln
rain..

Daya

(MumMw.—

BalnfalMn
Dararmln..
Jtonw.lUlnfall.lp

_Dm f%

rain..

lUlnrall.lii
Dars rain..

riiORIDA
JaekmnvUtiiUlnrall.lr

Dan rain..

Jampa.—

Rafnfall.ln

Days

rain..

Ralnfall.ln

Days

rain..

RalnfalUIn

Day* rain..

ALABAMA

montgom'v*Balnfall.ln

29, 1893.J

THE CHRONKJLE.

731

Smppiwa Niwt.—Tbe ezporta of cotton from the United
States the pact week,
per tatett mail retuma, have reached
180,389 bales. So far as the Southern ports are ooooemed. thwt
are the same exports reported by telegraph and published in
the Chboniclb last Fridar. With regard to New York w*
Include the manifests of all vessels clearod up to Thursdajr.
Total iaUs,
To«K—To Liverpool, miritOkmsrt CaSo, S,186
Hkllrr,
1.00H....HelveU», 1.616. ...8t Konaiu, 4,414
10,174
To Hull, per atoainnr HaraiiKo, 740
780
To London, peraceamer* Ani«rl< a, 1,286.. ..Mlablgao, 892. 9,1M
To Hmvre, p«r iteamer La BoiirK<>tn>f, 400
iOO
To Rrnmen. per «t('ain<<r Ilarnl. 80
tO
To Antwdri), pnr aiRamers Cliicago, 4S0.... Othello, 379....
....Kliynfuiid, t!47
1,479
»aw Oblbanb— To Liverpool, per teamen Aatronomer, 6,400
L>«<innnk. 4,H.')O...MezlO»n, 8,710
16.960
To Havre, por I'tnitnien Donau, 6,800. ...naverton, 4,210.. 10,fllS
To Broiuen, porairamer Olenmarli, 2,778
2,778
aALVBSTOH— To Ltvcriiool, per iteamen Aome, 8,307
Edenmore, 6.942. ...Tronto. 8.997. ...Whitehall, 7,206
24,883
To Havre, ix-r ateHiiior Maris, 4,S!'6
4,89tf
To Brpiiiim. iwr atnaiiier Zarapa. 4,031
4,981
To HaiiiburK, pvr ateamcr locbilunn, 16
19
VlLADco-To Liverpool, per steamer Klta. 8,500
8.809
Savannah— To Liverpool, per atearaer Latona, 8,286 apland
andOOOBea Island
8,978
To naroelona, per steamers Mar^>s, 3,430
Voloan, 2,361
8,811
To (J.'noH, pnr utoamir Vulcan, 3.682
8,633
OHABI.KSTON—To Bremen, i>er steamer Vera, e.S?.^
6,375
dOKroLK— I'o Uvxrpool, p«r steamer OlencoU. 3,650
8,680
West Point-To LIvorpool, per eteiimer Monrovia, 7.382
7,883
BOBTON—To LlveriM>ol, per steaiaern Columbian. 3,234. ...Otto-

m

aw

,

man, 1,712

..

Soyihla.

BJW8

3.'52

To Port au-Piinoo. per bill? Water Witch, 1
Baltiuorb— To Bremen, per steamer Munchen, 3,875
To Hamburg, per steamer Venetla, 100
To Kotterdam, per steamer Venango, 300

1
8,879

100

80O

Total

The

130,838

particulars of these shipments, arranged in our usual

form, are as follows:

Bremen

Hull

A Lon-

Liver-

Sew York.

10,174
S. Orleans. 16.969
Ftalveston. 21,512
Velasco
5,500
Savannah.. 8,976
Oharlest'n
Norfolk....

West Point
Boston....
Baltimore

Hotter- Baret-

Ham- dam d

t£

don. Havre.
400
2,918

pool.

tona

Port-

an-

dk

burg.Anluff). Oenoa.Prinee.

10.516
4,896

80

1,473

2,278
4,947

9,493
6,275

3.650
7.3S2
5,298

1

3,975
2,918 15,812 18,053

Total.... 82,481

300
1,775

9,493

1

Total.

18,047
30,263
34,375
5,50O
18,469
6,275
3,650
7,383
5,299
4,275

130,835

Below we add the clearances this week of vessels carrying
cotton from United States ports, bringing our data down to
the latest dates:
GlALVKSTON—To Liverpool -Oct. 22-8teamers Deptford, 6.189: Faetnet,
5.568; Zanzibar, 7,570 ...Oct. 75-8teamer8 Caledonia, 6,990;
SomerblU, 5 619 ...Oct. 28—Steamer Manoheuter, 5,215.
To Bremen -Oct. 22 -Steamer Mab, 7,406.

To Uamliurg-Oot 26-8teamer Snllesworth, 100.
To Antwerp-Oot. 26 Steamer Teutonla, 2,310.
Velasco— To Liverpool— Oct. 21— Steamer Tormore, 7.^0.
Nbw Obleans— ro Llverpool-Oct. 22 -Steamers Australian, 4,010;
Ramon de l.arrinaga, 5,850
Out. 27-Bteamer8 Buenaventura,
-

3,700; Professor. 4,S49.

ToBremen-Oct. 22-Steamer Thos. Anderson, 4,000

Oot.

25—

Steamer Freshfleld, 7,414.

To Hamburg - Oct. 22—:iteamer

Helvetia, 2,000 ... Oct 26 -Steamer

Markomannla, 11.
To Baro-loua- Oot. 20-8toamer Eastern Prince, flOO.
To Genoa-Oot. 20- Steamer Eastern Prince. 3,397.
Bavasnah- To Llveroool— Oct. 27-8tfaiuer luchmarlo, 8,782.
To Havre -Oot. 27-8t«'amer Newb3-, 6,260.
To Bremen -Oct. 27-8teamere Aislatiy, 8,885; Elsie. 6,222.
Brdnswick- To Liverpool— Oct. 15 -Steamer J. M. Lookirood, 9,983
.. Oct. 26- Steamer Dragoman, 7,921.
Chablkston- To Llverpool-Oct. 25-8teamers Ernesto, 6,8»Sj Qa»
0<.lln,

6,533.

To Bremen - Oot. 20-8*eamer Whitby, 5,850.
Wilminoton— To Liverpool— Oot. 22-8teamer Maultby. 9.000.
WB8T Point— To Llverpool-Oct, 22— Steamer Malvern. 7,611.
BOSTON— To Llverpool-Oot. 17— Steamer Michigan. 1,815. ...Oot. 18—
Steamer Phlladelphlan, 3,728
Oct. 20— Steamers Angloman,
"
1,595; Catalonia. 1.879.

BALxmoBis— To Llverpool-Oot. 14-Rt6amer Sedgemore, 3,658
Oot. 18—Steamer Caspian, 1,500
Oct. 20 -Steamer Rossmora,
3,825.

To
To
To
To
To

Havre— Oct. 20-Steamer Santanderlno.

1,300.

Bremen— Oct. 20-8teamer Dresden. 4,19H.
Hamburg -Oct. 26— Steamer Virginia, 550.

Amsterdam-Oot. 19 -Steamer P. Caland, 1,000.
Rotterdam -Oct. 20 -Steamer Ohio, 50.

Cotton freights the past week have been as follows:
Satur.

Man.

Tuts.

•e*

»6«

»»4

»M

»s*

....

....

• •••

....

....

•s»

»ai

ha

•si

•as

• •«•

••••

»i<i

*je

»i«

»i.

h»

*1S

•m

•s«

»M

•m

*^

•n

Liverpool, Oot..d.

Do

rallr'd.d.

Havre, early.. ..d. »M«»SS

Do

later ....d.

Bremen, Oot

Do

•

d.

Do
Ama'dam.O.
Beval, Oct

d.

....

& N.c
d.

rri.

»M

-•••

....

....

*>••

•

...

85*

35*

35*

S5«

80*

>l«»'4

'i»a^

'H1H4

*1»»^

"(M*-*

d.

Baroelona, Oot..d.
QinOk.Oot.-Nov.'i.
Trle8te,v.Lond'n(/.

Antwerp, Oot... d.
Antwerp, later.. d.
*

•*.

later... d.

Hiunbnrg, Oot...d.

Do

Wednet. Thur$.

Centa per 100 lbs.

....

....

....

M

H

H

"ww'a
»*•

....

\

.-••

30*

'si
*16

»sa
»!•

Ha

•is

'i«

»te

Hi
'm

'sj

Hi

»i«
'si

'm

^64

'e«

T«.

>»
ft

>9

H

H

>•

>•

H

.
.

.
.

THE CHRONICLE.

732
Liverpool.

—By cable from Liveroool we have the following

statement of the week's

sales, stocks,
Oct. 7.

week

ifeo.,

at that port:

Oct. 14,

Oot. 21.

Oct. 28.

bales.

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and futures each
day of the week ending Oct. 28, and the daily closing prices
of spot cotton, have been as follows:
Saturday Monday. Tuttday. Wednet. TKund'y. Friday,

apot.

Market,
1:46

Fair
business
doing.

Harden'?.

\

P. 11.5

Mia.Upl'd8.

41s

10.000
1,000

500

Bpeo,&exp.

In buyern'
favor.

Qttlat.

413

4'l«

10,000

Bales

Freely
offered.

600

Firm at

Market,

l

p, H.

\

Market,

4

\

P. M.

(

3-«4

<s>

Qaiet at
*-«4 l-ft4@2-«4

advance.

8,000

500

500

Very

Dull.

steady.

cline.

Very

firm.

cline.

miadv.

Hasy.

vance.

Steady.

Steady.

Tne«.. Oct. 23.

Open Hfoh tow.

Cto».

d-

d.

A.

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

October

4 28

4 28
4 26

4 26

4 27

4 27

4 26

424

4 27
4 27
4 29

4 27

4 25
4 26
4 25
4 20

424

4 28

4 24
4 24

4 24

42a

4 24

4 21
4 23

4 26

4 29
4 31
4 33

428

4 30
4!i3

4 24
4 28
4 23
4 80

4 33

i3i

4 37

4 35

4

4 40

4 37

4 40

*26
— 125

Oot.-NoT....

HoT.-Deo... fia
Dec-Jan.... 4 27
/an.-Feb... «29

reb.-Mch.
Mch.-Aprll

4 26
4 26
4 28

4 26
4 28

4 26

Open Stun Low.

4 80

4 32

4 32

4 32

iSi

4 33

4 34

.

4 27
4 20

36
4 87
4 40

34
4 37
4 39

4 88

36
4 38
4 41

April-May.. 4 37
Uay-Jnne.. 4 39
Jnne-Jnly.

4

4

4

30

4 37

440

31

4

4

428 4 24
20
4 31
4 34
4 3rt
4

4 26

42S
4 30

Oloi.

Open High Low.

439

4 35

4 36

4 30
4 32
4 3S

4 41

438 438

4 37

4 33

428

7714

80%
b2»8

Indian corn futures have been fairly active, and during the
half of the week prices were advanced, owin^; to a smaller
increase in the visible supply than generally expected and on
manipulation by Western operators; but later part of this
improvement was lost under " long" holders selling to realize
first

mixed at 50o. in elevator and 503^ 850J^c, delivered. Today the market was weaker, with "longs" selling to realize
profits.
The spot market was quiet and easier. No. 3 mixed
sold at 49(9493^0. in elevator and 49i^d50c. delivered; also
yellow at 51c. delivered.
Sol.

Mon., Oct. 24.

Fri.

73»b
73''g
75<>«

uAiLT oLosma prices of no. 2 mixed cokh.

1^

(I.

OLOSINQ PB1CK8 OF SO. 2 BBD WINTBB WHEAT,
Sal.
Hon.
Tuet.
Wed.
Ihnrt.
o.
77
76ia
77
76'4
75%
77S8
7738
o.
77
76
76%
7-J4
7!t
o.
79
7^ls
7714
Januiry^
SOig
0. 8038
80%
79%
79
MaiTh delivery
.0.
83%
83%
83
bSH
82«9
May deUvery
0.
85is
85%
86
8S^
8438
D,l[LY

„
NoTember delivery
Dewinber dellvei'y

October delivery

OIOi.

50

51

50»8
50''8

60%

."iOBa

51^8
52»8

52'4

5l''8

34'a
3638
3938

35%

3538

3538

3744
4014

37
40

4 26

28
4 30
4 33
4 36
:s7

Jnly-Auff...

Fri.

50

50«8
51ia
51'8

40i8
4018

49

49H
60^

50is
c.
."10%
b\H
SO'g
60
51»«
52>4
MaydHiJvery
0.
6214
52
t>2H
51H
Oats have Khown a fair degree of activity, and during the
fore part of the wei^k prii-es were higher in consequence of a
small increase in the supply in sight, but later there was a
moderate reaction, prices sympaihizing with the decline in
wheat and corn. The market to-day was lower.
DAILT OLOBINO PKIOES OF HO. 2 MIXBD OATS.
8at.
Titet.
Hon.
Wed.
Thuri.
Fri.
34i«
34i<
rteUvery
o.
34
35>4
35
October
SS^s
delivery.. ..o.
0.
DrtCemher delivery
o.
.May deUvery

4 26

4

Tkurt.

Wert.

49i8
i.''H

0.

November delivery
OoeemUer d-llvery
January delivery

Movemher
d.

4 26

Tuet.

.Won.

c.
0.

October delivery

The opening, highest, lowest and closing prices of futures
at Liverpool for each day are given below. Prices are on
the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause, unless oUierwise
stated:
The priees are given In pence and 64<A.
Thue : 4 63 menni
A05-6id.,a7id 5 01 meant 5 l-64d.
8at., Oct. 32.

December delivered

and ungraded red winter at 73@73}^c.

2

8,000

Steady at steady at Steady at Steady at
1-04 ad
2-04 den-M de- partially

advance.

under December de-

lu the spot market the demand from shippers hai
continued fairly active, and yesterday the sales included No.

Futura.
1:46

included N), 3 hard winter at 3i^@3J^c.
livered; old No. 1 Northern at 4i^c. over

profits,

Steady.

4^16

10,000
1,000

8,000

"long" huiders selling freely, prompted by the continued free
movement and weak foreign advices. The spot market
was lower, with exporters active buyers at the decline. Sales
crop

85.000
57,000
57.000
65,000
2,70(./
OI which exporters took
2,900
3,600
4,200
Of which speoolatorg took..
9.800
2,200
1,000
3,000
ales American
46,000
57.000
66.000
49,000
Aotaal export
4,000
11,000
6,000
4,000
Forwarded
6^,ooo
67,000
62,000
66,000
Total 8tor,k— Estimated
1,051,000 1,028,000 1,029,000 1,007,01.0
Of which American— Estlm'd 9o:i,000 877,000 8'. 5,000 851,000
4't,0(lO
Total Import of the week....
24,000
51,000
67,000
22,000
Of which American
35,000
54,000
36,000
Amonnt afloat
119,000 177,000 195.000 28i,OiiO
Of which American
106,000 165,000 185,000 2 75,00(1

Bales of tbe

[Vol. LY,'

34>a

35%
3-*%

34%

36i«
39is

37

prices have made a slight further
Barley has been quiet, but values are unchanged.

Rye has continupd dull and
decline.

V

Fine

bbl.

Wbeat

I

Ipoa
195a

Superflne
Extra, No, 2
Extra, No. 1
Olears
8tr»l«ht«
Patent, sprlDK
[

FLODK.
$1 70 a $2 00 Patent, winter
2
3

409
10a

2 15
2 25
3 00
K 40

|

I

e.*)

Rye

floor, superflne..

$4 00«.*4 35
4 15ff 4 20
3 2b'» a 55

9

Fine

I

3509 4^51
4 25<» 4

City mills extras

Com meal—
Western, &o

2

Brandywlne

|

flour In sacks sells at prices

....

909310
3 15

below tbose (or barrels.

1

OB^ni

Wheat—
Wed., Oct.

'26,

Oven Bigh Lmo.
A.

Clot.

a..

d.

4 28

4 24

Open Bloh Low.

d.

4 24

Thura., Oct. 27.

d.

Olo«.

Fii., Oct.

It.

d.

d.

2-1

4 22

4 21

4S2

4 21
4 21
4 22

4 22

4 21

4 23

4 21

4 23

4 22

4 23

4

2i

Jan.-Feb
Feb.-Mch.

4 27
4 30

4 24

4 25

4 24

4

2.1

4

4 27

4 27

4 27

4 27

4

4 33

4 20
4 31
4 34

4 30

20
4 31
4 34

.

4 28

.

4 SO
IIch.-April. 4 83
.

April-May.. 4t6

May-June

.

28

4 27

4 31

4 29
4 32

4

4

83

4:6 4:M 4.'44
4 87 438 4 36 4 37

4

4 32

4 35

4

2 s.

Red winter N'j
Red winter

Open High Low. Vui

424 4 23 424
MoT.-Dec.. 424 4 24 4 23 434
Dec-Jan.... 420 426 4 28 4 25

.... 4 24
Oct.-NoT.... 4 SI

October

<i.

It.

d.

,

4

23

4 25

4 23

42:

22

iSi

4 32

4 23

4 2.
4 23
4 2t

4 28
4 23

316

42t
428 481

4 25
4 2S
4 26

29

4 30

4 3U

4 30

4.81

4 32

4 29
4 3i

4»2

4 83

4 35

4.'Ml

437

4 33
4 86

4

4 35

4

4

June-July..
July- Aug...

428
4

0.

oprlne. oerbush...

32
85

137

«..

Wblte
;8t«— Mixed..* bn.
White
No. 2 mixed
No. 2 white

68

»

73»9» 74%
63 « 7^
70 a 76
31i«a 36
S9 1 46

at-

lea;/)-

market
and weak. Corn meal was with-

4:'i.2Ji)

l,721.00a
3Sl,410

Doluth.
MlnnHapollB.

184.5c!2

. .

57

62

62
77

Corn.

•

Iha

2,218,7 8

Barleu.

Oatt.

Bash.33

Bi/e.

Buiih.HUjg
I,fl77.n4
BJ5 "<I3
177,000
405,700
II..-

ClereUnd..

.

LouH

Peoria

636.600
214.4;»

7,Silfl

S 5.023

f2,ol9

Detroit

10.440

1

2,.-j20.«j

2,026
6.200

Toledo

St.

0i.I12

021.4 80

182,900
33,040
26.491
428 300

4,10
85,311

1

«

35,8
28i,0U0

291,400

EOO
86,690
6,677
1!6.2)>

a.e-^o

38,950
8,587,445

3,0 7.20

wk.'Ol.

340.672
295.4S8

3amewk.'eo.

283.598

7,902 818
4,111,144

4.175,«0.-j

05.416.15i

34.152.2

).i

35,420,48!

2.8'i9,070

82.520.820
33,332.90"

26.')»5.815

30.451,8')!

O,o83.01'2

28,768,197

29,006,840

11,519,875

Tot.wk,

Same

'92.

Since Atig.

primary points and no prospects of an early stoppige of
the large movement from farmers' hands. At the
close of
busineB^ Thursday the Ohio State Board report was
issued,
making the out turn of the crop in that Stale 40,000,000 bush'elB, or 5,000,000 bushels more than
previou*ly reported by the

The receipts of
week ended Ojt,

Government, and this caused renewed weakness. The
spot
market has declined, but at the concessions shippers
have
been good buyerg, their purchases for the week
amounting to
about 850,000 bushels. Yesterday the sales
included No, S
hard winter at 2?|c, under December delivered and
ungraded
red winter a^73@76J^c. The market to-day
was weak, with

Western, per bnsh.

2,082.17J

.

out change and dull.
The speculatire dealings in wheat have been moderately
active, but at declioing prices owing to excessive
supplies at
all

64
54

Rye-

ttiah.mibn BiLsh.b^

Vlllw>uke«...

ChlcMto

for flour to-day has been dull

52

43
48

State and JersBj.. 57
34%a ;<5%
Barley— No.2West'n. 76
39 » 40

Wheat.

Flour.

Bbu

FBI Oii-y, October 28, 1892.
The market for flour has continued stupidly dull and prices
in instances have been lowered 5@10o. per bbl., in
sympathy
with a dfcline in wheat. Corn meal lias been taken slowly,
but prices remain about the same and steady. The

46
..

West'n mixed
Steamer No 2
Western yellow
Western white

The movement of bn^adstuffs to market is ind cated in the
itatement below, prepared by us from the ti.?ures of the New
We first give the receipts at
York Pr )duoe Exchange.
Western lake and river ports, arranged so as to present the
comparative movement for the week ending 0;t. 33, 1892,
and since August 1. for each of the last three years:
Reeetptt

BREADSTUPFS.

Com, per bnsh.-

c.

82

187.0.=i0

1"

2.501.:<3i

1.310.73-

1,095 108

2,011.018

l,317,rte7

2,188,009

2,024,470

1,3)6,653

1.

1892
1891
1890

2.S29.937

flour

—

...

72,937
3s,915

Philadelphia. 52,116

Baltimore... 51.197

Richmond...

6,47.)

New Orleans.

11,745

7,803,853

and grain at tae seaboard porta for the

33, 1893, follow:
Flour,
Wheat,
Oorn,
bbl).
At
bath.
buth.
New York. ..2(10,477 1,541,015 826,800

BoBtOQ
Montreal

48,2

1

36,9)3
425,185
306,997
362,895
33,020
193,000

2il,499
39,460
13i,311
239.283
26,850
30,756

Oati,

biuh.

.Barley,
btisfi.

Rye,
buth.

6l,K-«

80,800

1<)1,620

503

201,8i0
123,171
19,000
8,000
17,607

23,710
18,400

1,375
3.332
3,000
38.960

917,100

634

week. .436. 862 2,902,0B5 1,549,909 1.511,351 101,328 128,051
3ai,397 3,tJl,820 729,26i> 1,136,617 415,457 564,678
Below are the rail shipments of flour and grain from
Western lake and river ports for four years:
Tot.

Weeic 1891

.
.

.

October

THE CHRONICLE.

29, 1892.]

1892.

1891.

1890.

Wtek

Oel. 25.

bbli.

298,539

buill.

763,217
448,781

1,418,032
310,62&

1,685,675

1,4.'S0,394

816,4*6
117,891

Wh«at

We«k

Week
3i
301,372

202,173
»»,826

Oel.

<>fl. '28.

Flonr
Corn..:.:.
Oafs

Barley
Bye...

^

:

1889.

Week
0(1.

ft)

aitea, valued at tl-i^.SSl. their dMtinatiun being I* the poiuta
«peolfled in tba table below:

20.

237,223

307,655

691,226
639.991
1,414.524
838.216
73,061

618.767
73ri.0fl4
l,30'^,0l)4

BOH.OtiO

122,148

8,287,679
8,057,021
3,541,050
3.232,020
The exports from the geveral seaboard ports for the week
ending Ott. 22, 1892, are shown in the annexed statement:
Total

1893.

Maw Toaa

Week, »ln»€ Jan,

Oreat Britain ....
Uthor European..
China

180

India
Arabia.

350
"66
623
77
119

Urioa
West Indies
Mexico

Hour,

Butli.

HewYork

8SI8.296

Boston...
Norfolk..

109,035

Montreal

250,217
302.819
318.958
278,888

riilUdel
Baltlm're
V. (>rrn».

Oal$.

Bbl:

Com.

Wheal.

Buah.

638

Ryt.

Buth.
17,620

Pea*.

121,665

876,178

213,733

165,010

34,763

44,674

716.843

221,!501

135,068

821,779

102,762

180.577
169.967

585

..

2.199,438

'"i

649
134
163
1.971

68

2,430

164,374
17,771

3,612

191.176
23,301

2,430

Total
China, via Vancouver..

182,045

3,613

314.477

Tot^l

41,239

*

From New England

The value

17,143

mill points direct

New York

of the

exports since January

have

1

>een $8,345,105 in 1892 against $10,033,763 in 1891.

B'niPtlme

1801

1,228

8.018
1,406

108,074
7,530
11,898
4,604
11,733
3,270
7,337
20,060
2.282

43,367

N.New«.
Rlehm'ud

Tot week 2,224,433

160
66
350
106

09,266
6,127
13,676
a,060
13,881
2,987
6,404
89.678
3,319

)tber countries. .

Bu$h.
3,435

87.207
48.220
4,820
16.277
31,961
24,000
1,185

409.568
59,058

America...

'South

Wttk. atnet /•)*. 1.

1.

4.887
1,401

8

6

Jeutral America.
Sxjiorta

1891.

to Oct. 25.

There has been a good demand for brown shaetings, particularly in the finer grades, and colored cottona have also
l)een iu good request.
The jobbing trade has not been placing many orders, but converters, flnishers and minufactur-

ing houses have taken considerable quantities on old orders
and placed further ones. The export business is quiet. Prices
are firm all round. Silesias have t>een raised |^c. per yard
during the week, and some makes of kid-flaished oamBarley,
brici i^c. per yard, on strength of the position of the print
buth.
cloth market rather than any increase in the demand.
S3.000
40,000 Bleached shirtings and wide sheetings are in moderate re5,000 quest at previous prices. White goods are getting well under

supply of grain, comprising the stocks in granary
at the principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard

The

visible

port*, Oct. 23, 1892:
Wheal,
In itnrt at—
buth.

Bew York
Do

afloat....

Com,

13,993.000
218,000

Albany
2,609.000
8.967,000
1.517,000
4.977.000
3,872.000
1,026.000
6,150.000
2,000
114,000
140.000

Buffalo

Chicago

Milwaukee
Dnluth
Toled*
Detroit
St. Leuls
Clnelnnatl

Boston
Toronto
Montreal

308.000

Oalt,

buth.

buth,

buth.

1,697,000 2,634,000^ 31,000
7,000
159.000
"iV.OOO
16,000
19,000
52.5,000
31,000
871,000
6,355.000 2,595,000 412,000
35,000
10,000
80,000

255,000
34,000
137,000
15,000
241,000

109,000
46,000
439,000
73,000
3,000
328,000
139,000
147,000
79,000
187,000
167,000
63,000
17,000
633,000
75,000

"isiobo

208,000
103,000
215,000
551.000
52,000
Kansas City.... 1.779.000
182,000
Baltimore
2,003.noO
305,000
Minneapolis
4,212.000
25,000
On MUsUitippl.
69.000
On lakes
3,969.000 1,233,066
•aeanal&rlvsr 1,208.000
722,000
Philadelphia.... 1,096,000

Peoria
IndlanaiwllB

.

Tet. Oot.22. '92 5»,402.000 12.753.000
Tot. Oot.15, '92.55,091.000 12,167,000
Tot. Oot.24, •91.34.644,251 2,831,^65
Tot Oot25, '90.19.713.025 7,206,443
»»t Oet26, '89.21,507.518 9,336,670

106,666
17,000
24,000
9,000
2,000
"e",666

3OS,0O0
225,000
425,000
61,000
42.000
37,000
13,000
62,000
69,000

isiobo
10,000
54,000
54.000
14,000

373.606
267,000

1893.
Stock of Print Clotht-

102.000

133.066
17,000

order for spring, particularly in the finest grades. Prints are
quiet in fall styles, while spring lines are not opened yet to
any extent. Ginghams are dull and irregular in dark work,
and some leading makes for spring have been reduced in
price, either directly or by increased discounts, the decline
amounting practically to J^c. per yard. Print cloths have
advanced 3-16c. per yard, to 3 ll-16c. for 64 squares, with the
market strong thereat and still tending upward.

'"iiobo

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.

Oct. 24.

Oel.

25

I

None.
None.
None.

191,000
314,000
None.

483,000
None.

None.

Outside speculators (est)

8.344,000 1,002.000 2,096,000
7,549,000 931.000 1,713,0"0
4,448,583 2,719.807 2,705,259
4.123,289 630,605 1,809.282
7,093,634 1,284.101 2,015,200

1890*

1891.

Oct. 22.

Held by Provlilence manufacturers.
Fall Ktver manufacturers

505,000

955,000

Total stock (pieces)

472.(HXl

Foreign Dry Goods. — Buyers have confined their operations in seasonable lines to immediate requirements, and these
have been small. Fancy and special lines which are not suitable for carrying over are irregularly offered. For spring
there has been a moderate business in fine cotton and woolen
fabrics, and iu silk piece goods, ribbons, &c., at firm prices.

Importations of Dry Gooda.
The importations of dry goods at this port for the we«k
ending Oct. 27, 1892, and since Jan. 1, and the same facta for

the corresponding periods of last year are as follows:
New York, Friday, P.M., October 28, 1892.
During the past week there has been a considerable amount H M
S
K
B
S
3 M
of business transacted at first hands, but the demand has not
s
o ISFlia
been generally distributed. In cotton goods the market shows E 2g
o s^

-

Silk

Flax

Wool

Cotton...

Misoellaneo

Uanufaclur

* very considerable divergency in the character of the demand
and some difference in tone, too. Buyers are paying marked
attention to grey goods, brown sheetings and colored cottons,

but are limiting their orders for bleached fabrics and spring
prints and ginghams to moderate quantities only. Bleached
shirtings and wide sheetings are steady with barely an exception, while other domestics are strong, with further occasional
advances quoted; printed fabrics are firm but ginghams weak.
The market is thus irregular, but, with the exception of ginghams, the irregularity arises from the hardening tendency of
certain descriptions and not from the weakening of anv.
Some of the largest agents and commission houses keep their
mills heavily sold ahead, and have difficulty in securing supplies rapidly enough to meet the calls of customers on back
orders in goods in best request. In other directions the present
demand is on a smaller scale than production, but there is no
noticeable accumulation of stocks, previous engagements not
having been fully worked off. In the woolen and worsted departments men's-wear makes are in a good position, but softwool fancies in dress goods are weak and a prominent feature
in the shape of "drives" with jobbers. The jobbing trade is
^uiet still, although some improvement on recent experience
18

noted.

Collections

coAinue good.

Domestic Woolens.— There has been but a very light demaiid for men's-wear woolen and worsted trouserings and
Buitings this week, neither heavy fall makes for immediate
delivery nor lighter spring styles being in request. Agents
are delivering spring lines as speedily as possible on back
orders and preparing for the coming new fall season. The
market is in a good position on all leading makes of both
woolen and worsted makes from low-grade all-wools up to fine
worsteds, and prices are steady. There has been a fair demand
ftir new styles of overcoatings, and cloakings have done moderately well. Cotton-warp cassimeres and other mixed stuffs
are slow.
Flannels and blankets quietly steady.
Staple
dress goods are also steady and in average request, but soft
wool fancies are still very irregular, all jobbing houses offering
more or less important drives in them.

Domestic Cotton Goods.— The eiporu of cotton goods
from this port for the week ending Oct. 25 were 8,430 pack-

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—
>

—

THE CHRONICLK

734

State awb City

J^tm^wmJ.

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
Commercial and Financial CHROiyiCL.£
40

tains

State

to

and

180

tains

con-

pages published every week.

64

City

Supplement of CHRONICL,E

con-

pages published several times each year.

Investors'

Supplement

of

CHRONICLE

paedia of Railroad Securities) contains

160

(a Cyclopages published

every other month,
Subscription to CHRONICLE for one year $10.00,
which includes ev^ry issue of both Supplements.

The purpose of this

State

and

City

LV,

ready for delivery upon surrender of such manuscript
bond. Just at the moment actual delivery is delayed by
a suit of Mr. Royall against the Council of Foreign
Bondholders of London, for compensation alleged Uy
be due him by the council, or the Virginia committee of
the council. An attachment has been issued in connection
with th suit, which it is necessary to remove before formal
delivery of the bonds can be made to the State. Members of
the committee who have been interviewed with reference tO'
this attachment decline to make any statement, except that it
is a matter that does not at present in any way concern the
bondholders' committee and that it is a private suit of Royall,
who was formerly the counsel of the Council of Foreign
Bondholders, against the couQcil, who he alleges has a monetary interest in the settlement which has been made, and that
this interest is attachable in the hands of the Planters' National Bank.
The bondholders' committee has really been
awaiting the action of the Council of Foreign Bondholders^
the defendants in that suit.

Department

to furnish our subscribers with a weekly addition to and
continuation of the State and City Supplement. In other
words, with the new facts we f haU give, the amplifications
ia

[Vol.

Cheyenne,

Wyo.— (State and City Supplement, page

129.

— The pre^s

report to the effect that a contract has been
awarded for improvements on the Cbeyenne City wat^r works
City Treasurer A. J. Pavs'nall
to cost $30,000 is erroneous.

and the municipal laws we writes us that no such contract has been awarded and that no
" State and City Department," we expect improvements are at present contemplated.
The water system of the city was completed in 1891 and
to bring down weekly the information contained in the
State and City Supplement to as near the current date as paid for by an isstft of bonds to the amount of -$65,003, the
possible. Hence if every Subscriber will note in his Supple- details ot which will be found in our last State and City
UENT on the page designated at the head of each item a Supplement. The net income from the system is about
reference to the page where the item in the Chronicle can $20,000 and it is u ed to pay for extensions, repairs and interbe found, he will at all times possess a complete and fresh est on the water bonds.
cyclopaedia of information respecting Municipal Debts.
Aricausas. An effort is again being made in the interest of
and corrections we

shall publish,

Bhall analyze in the

—

Equalized Taluation in the State of Washington.—
The work of the Washington State Board of Equalization
has been finished for the year 1892, and the valuations of real
estate and personal and railroad property in each county are

the holders of the defaulted State bonds. Messrs. Dos Passos
Bros., counsel for the bondholders, propose to bring at once in
the Chancery Court of Arkansas some cases to test the liability of the railroads in whose aid the bonds were issued.
brief history of th=se bonis may be found in the State and

given in the following table.

City Supplement, page

A

168.

— Equalized Yalualion
Comities.

TCeul.

Adams

$1 093,993
305.889
113,995

Asotin
Chehalls
Clallam
Clarke

2 ,994,226
4,,663,349

Columbia
Cowlitz

2 ,692,960
3,,33J,750
1,,096,654
362,75,^
],,093,532

,

Douglas
Fraiiklin
Garfield

Island

979,284

Jefferson

4,,351,177

Kiug

48,,519,750

Kitsap

2,,294,347
3>,127,452
1,,063,252

Kittitas
Klickitat

Lewis

6,,R07,858
3, 532,065
1,448,707

Lincoln

Mason
Okanogan

330,230

Pacific

,297,678

Pierce

39 ,777,580
874.560

Ban Juan
Bkagit

,569,333

Skamania

213,885

Bnohomisli

8,,409,327

Spokane

29 ,450,176

,

Stevens

1

Thurston

8 649,661

Wabkiakum
Walla Walla

Whatcom
Whitman
Yakima

,335,191

663,722
,229,995

..

13 382,915
13 ;345.065
....

Totals

,

2,,878,558

*234,172,&52

1892.Personal.
Railroad.
$320,.592
$360,024
186,201
895,373
"aii'Mi
290,482
793,819
"bi'.h'do
818,326
328,218
462,850
180,830
489,042
107,048
227,837
414,894
374,672
88,103
184.546
668,439
'l26',42i
7,359,895
1,248,056
587,454
'443',459
1,035,456
671, S62
"2601810
764,847
1,319,080
575,101
197,109
190,074
412,412
"56,743
546,766
5,531,429
675,178
71,858
"97,397
766,124
86,129
21,000
1,080,782
443,708
3,752,934
1,090,917
411,226
499,720
922,371
484,746
120,805
2.222,922
l,V6e'253
1,239.543
456,806
3,905,650
1,530,564
750,409
543,310

$39,469,247

$12,201,725

A comparison of the figures given above with corresponding
returns for last year shows that in the twelve months there
has been a decrease of $53,173,519 in the valuation of real
estate and a decrease of $13,679,352 in personal property, makiog the total of real estate and personal property $64,852,867

Bond Proposals and

Negotiations.—We have

re-

week the following notices of bonds
negotiated and bonds offered and to be offered foi

ceived through the
recently
Hale.

(Stats and City Supplement, page 147.)
improvement and sewer bonds of this city t j the
amount of $100,000 wUl s jon be offered for sale.
Anne Arundel County, Md This county has recently
sold $25,000 of court-house b>nds at 108, or a premium of
The loan bears interest at the rate of 5 per cent per
$3,000.
annum,
(State and City Supplement, page 157. >
Asherille, N.
This city is contemplating the issuance of bonds to the
amount of $100,000 for street-paving purposes.
Bridgeton, N. J.— (State and City Supplement, page 58.)
The Bridgeton Committee on Sewers has recommended that

Alexandria, Va

— Street

—

—

C—

—

bonds to the amount of $100,000 be issued for the construction
of a sewerage system.
Brooklyn, N. ¥.— (State and City Supplement, page 44.)
Bids were opened yesterday for SJ^ per cent permanent
water loan Ijonds of the city of Brooklyn, maturing January 1
1911, and also for Z% per cent tax certificates, payable three

—

years from date of purchase.
ported :

The following

rates are re-

WATEB LOAN BONDS.
$50,000 to E. A. Morrison at
50,000 to D. A. Moran&Co. at
100,000 to J. 8. Qiiintard at

101-125-

101-63
101-55.

THREE-YEAE TAX CERTIFICATES.
$700,000 to The Dry Dock Savings Bank at
150,000 to The Kings County Trust Co. at
50,000 to The Dime Savings Bank at

100-13
100-125

10050
California— (State and City Supplement, page 137).
than it wag ia 1891. The total valuation for the year 1890
At the coming election tho citizens of California will vote on
was but $217,595,739, or $56,046,360 less than the amount a Constitutional amendment authorizing the refunding of the
less

State debt. The opposition to the amendment holds that as
property of State
The Virginia Debt Settlement.—The following item, which nearly all the California bonds ar^ the
funds nothing will be saved to the tax-payers by a reduction
we have found upon inquiry to be substantially correct, is in the rate of interest paid on the securities.
taken from the Kiernan News-Letter of October 24:
Ciimbrid^e, Mass.— (State and City Supplement, page
The last of the old obligations of the State of Virginia have 23.)— City Treasurer Wm. W. Dallinger writes the Chkonicle
been received by the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund that Cambridge will soon advertise for bids on a 4 per cent
from the Central Trust Company of New York, and they now 33-year issue of water bonds dited November 1 1892, and
aggregate over $24,000,000. Double schedules of these securities amouting to $45,000. The question of making anotlier issue
have been made, one of which has been deli 7ered and the for a high-service reservoir is being discussed, but no action
other deposited with the Central Trust Company. The securi- has as yet been taken by the city.

reported for this year.

have all been verified by the State officers and have been
List Miy Cambridge marketed a 4 per cent 30 year water
found to agree with the schedules made up at the Central loan at 106 09, while 4 per cent 10-year street and building
Trust Company. The State is now prepared to a cept formil bonds sold at the same time brought 103-26.
dehvery of the bonds from the Planters' National Bank the
Cleveland, Ohio.— (State and City Supplement, page 78.)agent of the bondholders' committee for this pu pose, and
—Proposals will be received by the City Auditor until Novemis
prepared to deliver to the committee a manuscript bond
in ber 15 for the purchase of $30,000 of 5 per cent sewer bonds,
accordance with the terms of settlemenS The n w bonds' are maturing
October 1 1895, and $74,000 of i]4 per cent bridge
nearly all engraved, and between now and Janu ry
1 will be repair bonds, maturing October 1 1897.
ties

{

—

—
OCTOBBH

)

THE CHRONICLR

29, 1892.]

735

C—

The citizens of Monroe will vote in NovemMonroe, N.
issue bonds to the amount of
ber on the proposition of utsuing $7,000 of bonds for electric
a city hall building.
light purposes.
Daronport^ la.—(State and City Supplement, page 107).—
NofthTlUe, Tenn.—(Statb and City Supplement, pAse IM.
this city to the amount of f71,000
Seven-year paving bonds of
J. T. Bell, City Recorder, will receive proposals until Nov. 2
been sold to Messrs. Parson,
bearing 6per cent interest have
for the purchase of $100,000 of 4^ per cent water booda.
Leach & Co. of Chicago.
New Yorlr, N. ¥.—(State and City Supplement, paxe 60.>
Davidson County, Teiiii.—The County Court of Davidson
At a meeting of the Board of Estimate and Ap|)ortionment
County has reconsidered its decision not to submit to popular
held last Tuesday a resolution was adopted providing for the
vote the proposition to issue |8«0,C00 of bonds in aid of tho
of bonds to the amount of |20,00() to run not less
TennetS' e Midland Uallroad, and the question will come up issuance
than twenty years and to bear interest cot to exceed 3 per
at the November election. The county has been asked to make
cent per annum. Ttie proceeds are to be used for preliminary
this subscription for the purpose of securing an extension to
surveys and borings on the site of the propoied new bridge
Nashville, which the company proposes to build if the aid is
across the Harlem River at Third Avenue.
granted.
The Aqueduct Commissioners have asked for an issue of adDelhi, Ohio.— Village Clerk F. D. Sanders writes the ditional new aqueduct bonds to the amount of $500,000, the
per cent sidewalk bonds, due
Chronicle that $2,263 of
proceeds to be expended upon dam construction which is now
October 15 1902, have been sold to the Cincinnati Savings under way.
Bank. The finance of the village are reported as follows
The Sinking Fund Commissioners voted yesterday to re-

Coming, N.

Y.

—This city will

|;3«,000 for the construction of

—

—

:

94,462 VlUapo tax (por $1,000)
318,000 School tax

$flOO

stock due
600 deem and cancel the 7 per cent city improvementhouse bonds
November 1 1892 and the 6 per cent county court
Del Rio, Tex.— This place has recently sold school bonds to also due November 1 1892. The total amount to be redeemed
the amount of $10,000.
is $-1,286,315 13 and it was decided to issue new revenue bonda
Detroit, Mich.— ;State and City Supplement, page 95.)— for a like sum.
City Treasurer Louis B. Litimeld writes us that the law auNIcholasville, Ky.— Bids will be received for the purchase
thorizing Detroit school bonds requires that the securities be of water bonds of this town to the amount of $43,000. Tha
made op'ional after five years, and it is probably owing to loan will bear interest at the rate of 6 per cent per annum atid
this fact that the bids received last week for 4 per cents to the will be payable twenty years from date of issue.
As we menamount of $300,000 were unsatisfactory.
Oneida County. N. Y.— County Treasurer C. F. Barnard
tioned last Saturday, th:! bids were all rejected, and the loan writes us that on October 24th 4 per cent county armory certhe present.
has been withdrawn from the market teg
tificates were sold to the Savings Bank of Utica, Dtica, N. Y.^
Fairbary, III.—Bids for $15,000 of 5 per cent water at the following prices
BoiKleU (lel)tl892

Tax

viiluatlou

I

1892

|

:

Certificates for $17,800 duo 1893 at 100-75.
bonds will be opened in Fairbury to-day.
Certifloatea lor $17,801> due 1S94 at 101-40.
Flushing, N. Y.—iState and City Supplement, page 47.)
Parkersburg, W. Va.— The people of this city will vote at
until November 1 by the Village Clerk of
Bids will be received
Flushing for 4 per cent street improvement bonds to the the coming election in November on the question of issuingbonds to the amount of $50,000.
amount of $36,000.
Paterson, N. J.—(State and City Supplement, page 61.)
Frankliu County, 0.—(State and City Supplement, page
80.)— Henry J. Caveu, County Auditor, will receive proposals Bids will be received by the Finance Committee of the Bjard
until Nov. 25 for the purchase of $20,000 of 6 per cent semi- of Aldermen until October 31 for 5 per cent 15-year sewer apto the amou it of
annual street ioiprovement bonds. The bonds will be in de- propriation bonds of the city of Paters
nominations of $1,000 each, dated Julv 1 1892, and will mature $14,000. Bonds wUl be dated Nov. 1 1892.
$2,000 yearly from Jan. 1 1894 to 1903. Both principal and
Pullman, Wash.—The citizens of Pullman have voted in
interest will be payable at the ofllce of the County Treasurer,
favor of issuing $24,000 of bonds for water purposes.
Columbus, O.
Redvrood City, Cal.— This city has voted to issue $35,000 of
(Jarfleld, Wash.— At tha election held in Garfield on Octo- bonds for a sewerage system.
ber 10th, to vote on the question of issuing $10,000 of water
Richmond County, N. ¥.-(State and City Supplement,.
works bonds, the people voted 86 to 7 in favor of the bonds. page 53).— City Clerk Franklin C. Vitt writes the Chronicle
The securities are to bear interest at the rate of 6 per cent that on October 25 the $45,000 of 25-year county road bonds
per annum, and to run for twenty years from the date of recently advertised were awarded to Messrs. D. A. Moran
their issue. Garfield has at present no bonded debt. Tlie Co., of New York, at 102-887, bonds to bear interest at theassessed valuation of taxable property for 1892 is $244,925, rate of S^ per cent per annum. Nine other bids for the loan
and it is stated by one of the town officials that this is only were received.
about 60 per cent of the actual value.
Sacramento, Cal.—The election held in Sacramento on Oct.
Olens Falls, N. Y.-;-(SrATE and City Supplement, page 13 to vote on the proposition of issuing $100,000 of boads for
Village Treasurer Henry Funey, levee improvements resulted in favor of their issue by almost
47.)
Bids will be received by
until Nov. 1, for the purchase of $167,000 of sewer bonds.
a unanimous vote.
Saltsbni^, Pa.— In November the citizens of Saltsburg will
{State and City Supplement, page 160.)
GreeiiTllle, S.
vote on issuing water bonds to the amount of $12,000.
This city wUl soon issue $15,000 of street paving bonds.

m

&

—

C—

—

Henry County, Ohio.— (State and City Supplement, page
80.)—Through an error made by one of our correspondent-! we
reported last week that Messrs. Lamprecht Bros. & Co. of
New York, were the successful bidders for $19,500 of Henry
County road improvement bonds. We have since been advised that the award was made to Seasongood & Mayer, of
Cincinnati, and not to the first-mentioned firm. 1 he securities bear interest at the rate of 5 per cent and $6,500 of the
prin'^ipal will mature November 1 1895, while the remaining
$13,000 becomes due November 1 1907, being subject to call
,

Shenandoah, la.— City Clerk J. B. Carter writes the Chron»
ICLE that bids will be received until November 15 for $20,000
of 5 per cent water bonds maturing twenty years from date.
Option of paying $2,000 yearly after eleven years is reserved
by the city.
Shenandoah is situated in Page County and the folio sviag
statistics regarding debt and valuation have been reported to
us this week.
$30Total debt 1892
$7,000 Total tivx per $1,000
2,440Assessed valuation 1892.. 560,000 Population in 1890 was
I

|

November 1 1902.
Sherman, Tex.— (State and City Supplement, page 178.).
La Junta, Col. Bids will be received by Town Treasurer —Improvement bonds of this city to the amount of $20,00(X
Louis, Mo.
R. G. Dalton until November 1 1892 for $38,000 of 6 per cent have been sold to Geo. M. Huston & Co., of St.
Sonthbridge, Mass.— (State and City Supplement, pageLa Junta water bonds maturing September 1907. The proceeds of this loan are to be used for the purchase, extension 30.)— This town has voted in favor of borrowing $11,000 for
and improvement of the plant now owned by the La Junta the purpose of constructing a sewer.
Water Company. The water works were built in 1892-3 by
Tennessee. JState and City Supplement, page 154.)
the Atchison
Fe Railroad Company at a cost
after

—

Tceka & Santa

of $30,000. The' annual revenue
of La Junta in 1890 was 1,439.

is

about $3,530.

—

Population

State Comptroller J. W. Allen has issued a call for $469.00a
of the Tennessee 6 per cent settlement bonds issued in 1883.
The bonds designated are those numbered from 1 to 580, inclusive, for $100 each, and those numbered from 1 to 411 inThey will be paid December 17th on
clusive, for $1,000 each.
presentation at the office of the State Treasurer, or at the
American Exchange National Bank of New York. Interest
on the bonds will cease on the same day.
An issue of 4 per cent 15-year Tennessee refunding bonds
has been negotiated with Frederick Wolffe of New York as
mentioned in tlie Chronicle of October 1st, and the bonda
which are at present called constitute the first instalment of
those to be redeemed with the proceeds of the new issue.

Llano, Tex. School bonds of this city to the amount of
w^ill soon be issued.
Los Angeli-s, Cal.— ((State and City Supplement, page
139.)— City Clerk Freedman G. Teed writes the Chronicle
that $39i,900 of 5 per cent outfall sewer bonds have been
awarded to Blair & Co. of New York, who offered a total
piemium of $9,904 for the loan. The securities mature at the
rate of $20,000 yearly from November 1 1893 to November 1
1911, inclusive, and he remaining $15,000 on November 1 1912.
There were in all thirteen bids received for this loan.
Magnolia, Miss. Ihis place is considering the issuance of
Trenton, N. J.—(State and City Supplement, page 62.'
This city has s ild $30,000 of 5 per cent sewer bonds to Edward
bonds for school purposes.
Marlborough, Mass.— (State and Citt Supplement, page C. Jones & Co. of New York.
27 ) The Common Council of this city has authorized the
Troy, N. T.—(State and City Supplement, page 54.)
issuance of bonds to the amount of $150,000 for water purposes. City Chamberlain J. F. Bridgeman writes us that the City
The loan will bear interest at the rate of 4 per cent per Council has not yet authorized bonds for the proposed new
annum, payable semi-annually, and will mature 80 years frcm sewers, but that they will probably be issued as public im$8,000

i

—

—

date of issue.

'

provement tx>nds under Chapter

670,

Laws

of 1892,

:

THE CHRONICLK

736

Point, Ala.— This place will soon hold an election to
on the question of issuing $30,000 of bonds for electric
ight and water works purposes.
"Whitestone, N. ¥.— The trustees of the village of Whitestone will petition the next legislature for authority to issue
bonds for the purpose of constructing a sewerage system.

West

-vote

Wyoming, Ohio.— On October 20 special assessment sidewalk bonds to the amount of $2,835 were awarded to the Cincinnati Trust & Safe Deposit Company at 103-60. The loin
bears 6 per cent interest, and matures at the rate of $283 50
yearly from October 20 1892.
Wyoming's total debt, including this issue, is $47,459. The
assessed valuation of real estate in 1891 was $952,240 of personal property was $188,430 total, $1,140,670. The population in 1890 was 1 ,454. Village is situated in Hamilton County.
ZanesTille, Oltlo.—(State aud City Supplement, page 84.);

;

bids received by City Clerk W. H, Shinnick for $24,600
of 6 per cent Maple Avenue paving bonds, maturing in from
one to five years, were not opened. Mr. Shinnick writes us
that the Circuit Court has granted a temporary injunction
restrainirg the city from selling these bonds intil certain
questions regarding the paving of Maple Avenueran be heard
and passed upon by said court, which convenes in Zanesville
on the 1st of November.

The

1

[Vol. LV.

statement is corrected to date by means of the official return?.
Madiisson the county eeat of Jefferson County.
When Due.
FryDiNO "C," Nos. 1 to 177LOANS—
FtraDiso, "A," Xos. 121-200—
Dec. 20, 1901
58, J&D, $35,000
Apr. 1, 1902
68, M&N, $72,000.... Nov. 1, 1892 5s, A&O, $5,000
Waterworks Fdndixg Bonds—
($8,000 yearly) to Nov. 1, 1900
4128, F&A, $100,000. Aug. 1, 1894
•Funding "B," Nos. 1 to 31—
Dec. 15, 1901 ($7,000 due yearly) to Aug. 1,1908
58, J&D, $26,000
- The city reserves the right to call and pay $2,000 yearly of either
of the funding loans, lettered " B " or " C."

FREEDOM FROM TAXATION.—These bonds are all

exempt from

city taxation.

PAR VALUE OF BONDS.—Those bonds are In pieces of $100
$500 and $1,000.
INTEREST on the -water- worts ftmding bonds is payable at the
National Branch Bank of Madison on all other bonds at the office of
j

the City Treasurer in Madison.

TOTAL DEBT, SINKING FUND, ETC.-The
shows Madison's

subjoined statement
fund held by the

total municipal debt, the sinking

city against the same, the water debt, and the city's floating debt,
the 1st of September of the years indicated.

on

1892.

Sinkingfuuds

1890.

1887.

$238,000
86,570

Total bonded debt

$254,000

$270,000

8,000

Net debt on Sept. 1
Water debt (included above)

«uid of interest to investors,

$151,430
$246,000
100,000
100,000
41,927
24,118
16,046
Floating debt
The sinking fund receives yearly about $8,000,
ASSESSED VALUATION.—The city's assessed valuation (supposed to bo actual value) and tax rate have been as follows
Personal
Total Assessed Tax Rate
Real Estate.
Property.
Valuation, per $1,000
Tears.
$20-24
$2,454,030
$2,0o9,730
$4,513,760
1891
24-60
2,477,340
1,434,905
3,912,245
1890
1,865,940
1,337,300
3.203,240
1888
POPULATION.—In 1890 the population was 8,936; In 1880 It was
8,945 In 1870 It was 10,709.

Indiana, Madison.—(State and City Supplement, page
87.)—J. T. Brashear, Mayor. We have this week received a
special report concerning the financial condition of Madison,
Indiana, from John A. Zuck, City Clerk, and the following

Massachusetts— Marblehead.—(State and City Supplement, page 27.) The following statement of the financial condition of Marblehead has been corrected to date by means of a
special report from William Gilley, Town Treasurer. In addi-

STATE AND CITY DEBT CHANGES.
We subjoin reports as
pubUcation

Some of
<>(

municipal debts received since the

to

State and City Supplement.
new and others cover items
information additional to those given in the Supplement,

laat

our

of

these reports are wholly

NEW

;

NEW

LOANS.

CITY OF

ST.
PROPOSALS
Four Per Cent
Gold Renewal

INVESTMENT BONDS

FOR
20-Year

the bidder.
The awards will be subject to the approval of the
Committee on Ways and Means of both branches of
the Municipal Assembly.
The city reserves the right to issue of the above
bonds only such an amount as will yield, at ttie price
offered, the one million one huadred and hftyflvethousaud dollars.
The bonds will be delivered on the 2Sth day of
against

payment therefor

Tent funds, at the office of the Comptroller
City of St. Louis, or. if the bliider so elects
proposal, at tbe National

York.

The undersigned

Bank of Commerce,

in curin the
In hts
in New

Bonds."
bond can be seen and further In formaat the office of the Comptroller of the

A sample

won obtained

dty of

St.

Louis.

EDWARD
JOHN

D.

TERRE HAUTE WATER-

ON APPLICATION

WORKS

NOONAN. Mayor.
8TBVENS0N, Comptroller.
A.

Ne^ York and Boston Stock

CO.

OF THE

Cily of Tcrre Haute, Indiana.
Paid-up Capital Stock, 500,000.
Total Bouded Indebtedness Outstand(>

DEALERS IN

ing, $622,000.

DATED jUNE

PAPER.

C01M9IERCIAL.

1,

&

Blake Brothers
28
S

Co.,

NEW YORK.

NEW LOAN.

PRICK AND FULL PARTICULARS FURNISHED
ON APPLICATION.

W.

YOilK,
Wall Street.

6c

Sons,

BANKERS,
MUNICIPAL BONDS.

Dealers in
street Railway Boudt and other hlRb m'ade

reatmenu

143
T

«"P«rt|;,>};t..^

Kxehaoce P^«ce.
Cable AddrMt,

10

BOSTOM.

$30,000

NEW BRIGHTON,
CENT SCHOOI.
PER
.^lay

'i,

Due

ISil'i.

PENN.,
BONDS.

diflVrent dates

Ironi I.S03 to l»Vi.
Real valuation.. »7.600,O0O Total debt
*''{-^S
6,80S
Asa'd valuation. 2.712,411 Population
Laws of Pennsylvania limit debt to 2 per cent of
valuation.
assessed
I
1

NEW

Hayes

Co.,

WALL STREET, NEW YORK.

Dated

FARSON, LEACH & CO.,

J.

&

Harris

CniCAUO.

5

W.

81.000 each.

of the United states of the present standard ot

IS

Price and Particulars on application.

'i

190B.

BANKERS.

City of Sandusky, Ohio,
DOCK LUPROYEMENT 6s.

115 Dearborn Mtreec.

1,

1899.

Principal may be registered If desired.
Both Principal and Interest payable In Gold Coin

N.

S75.000

OHICAGU,

ot

1,

weight and fineness.
Interest payable June and December In Chloago or
New York, at the option of the holder.

STATE STREBT, BOSTON.

NASSAU STREET,

DUB JUNK

1889.

OPTIONAI. AFTER JUNK

Coupon Bonds

reserves the right to reject any

•and all bids.
Proposals should be addressed to the undersigned
•nd endorsed " Proposals lor purchase of St. Louis
"City

6 Per Cent
Cold Bonds
OF THE

Exchance*.

;

Ibif/,

SIOO.OOO

St. Locis. Oct. 81. 1893.

Alemberfl ol the

LOANS.

First IVIortgage

FOR SALE.

Bonds.

By Tirtue of ordinance No. 16,685, authorlziug the
issae and anle of renewal b^nds of the City of St.
Louis, sealed propnaals for the purchaae of One
Million One Hundred and Fifty-five Thousiand Dol•lars (|1.155,00U) in said bonds, hereinafter described,
or any portion thereof, will be received at the
Majors offlie, in the City of St. Louis, until IZ
olclock noon of the Slst day of October. 1893, and
publlclr opened by the under^isned at said place and
Donr.
Said bonds will be dated November Ist, 1892. and
will each be of the denomination of $1,000 United
States Gold Coin, payai le twenty (20) years after
their date, and will bear interest from their date at
the rate of four (.4.) per cent per annum. Seml«anual interest coupons, payable on the first day of
May and November respectively, will be attached to
«acb bond, and both bonds and coupons will be payable to bearer, us he nmy elect, either at the National
B nk of Commerce, in New Vork In U. S. Gold Coin,
orat theofBceof the National B nk of Scotland, Limited. 37 Nlchol 8 Lane. London, England, in Sterling
At the rate of four dollars eiKhty-six cents six aua
•oe-balf mills (W86tt5) per pound sterling.
Bidders are request^a to state lu their proposals
the flat price oflertd in current funds per bond.
Proposals muct be accompanied by a deposit of
cash or certified check, payable to the order of the
Comptroller (and subject to his approval) equal to
Dve (5) per cent of tbe nomtuai amount of the bonds
bid for said deposit to be returned if the proposal
la not accepted, otherwise to be held subject to forfeiture to the city in event of Titilure on the part of
tbe b dder to comply with his proposal, or in case of
compliance to be retained as part of tbe purchase
money. A deposit in the required amount, to the
credit of the city, in tbe National Baukof Commerce,
Id New Vork, or at theofflce of the National Bank of
fiootland. Limited, London, England, will be accepted
as full compliance with the requirements relating to
deposits.
All proposals will be subject to the conditions and
reservations of this advertisement, and must reter
to same as a portion of the ugretmeut ou tbe part of

November,

NEW

LOANS.

LOUIS.

LISTS

Mayor's Office,

—

"KBNNBTH."

WHITE

Send for

full list

of Investment Bonds.

In-

W \LL STREET.
J,EW YORKi

Price to net 4 5-8 Per Cent.

FURTHER PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION.
So CO.,
C. H.
»2 and »4 Broadway, New York.

WALSH & FLOYD,
No. Vt6 Broad l«ireei.

STOCK BROKERS,
AND OKAI>BB8

IN lNTJt8TU.^NT SBCCBtTIB".

:

OCTOBKR29,

THE CHRONJCLR

1892.]

moDtioned

tion to the loans

in the report

TOTAL DEBT, SINKING FUNDS, Erc-Ttie aubjolned statMiMnt
ahowa Clinrlcatnn'a total municipal debt on tbe 20th of OoUiber
ISM
""*
and on the (Imt of January 1891 and 1800

below, the people of

Marblehead have voted to issue water bonds to the amount of
125,000.

,

This town

LOANSMUNIcir.n.

Oo.AAO.

is

in Essex County.
When Due.

BOSD8—

Is

MAH,
A40,

<Ri8,000....8ept. 1. 1803
1,500.. ..Oct. 7, 1804

4a, Tur., $195,500.... 1802 to

(Part duo yearly.)
payable at tUe town treasury.

BONDED DEBT on Oct.

1

Pertonal

;

Ttari.

PAR VALUE OF

58, A<fcO,
50,000
58, ,I&J,
23,000
18, J&J,3,391,112

Oct.

1,

1922

in 99 years
Jan. 1,1909
BONDS.—The bonds are coupon I>onds for $lOO,

$500 and $1,000.

INTEREST.—Interest Is payable

pons arc

all

;

In

1870

It

be the great Manufactarlnff and Commerolal Center because it has

The Largest and Safest Harbor on the Paolffo Coast.
The Greatest Area of adjacent Agricultural Land
The most Magiiillcent ForesU of Timber In the world.
The anost Natural Town Site and Water Front
Immense Veins of the Best Coal In the West which
produces a coke equal to Pennsrlvanla. Iron, Stlverlaad. Gold and other ores. Extensive Quarries o>
Blue Sandstone for building purposes. Valuable In
ormaUon can be had of

THE FAIRHAVEN LAND CODIPANY.
FAIRHATEN,

WASHINGTON.
6% INVESTMENTS 6%
FIRST MORT«AGE GOLD BONDS,
3,

TRU8TBB

Amounts 8100 to 81,000.
A FEW CHOICB

Lewis

Town

Treasurer.
This town is in LitchSeld County.
When Due. Net debt Sept. 1 1892.
LOANS—
$111.00t
Tow.s Bonds— 1885-1891Total debt Sept. 1 '91.
120,87ff
48, M&N, $54,000.... Nov. 1,1902 Sinking fund
2,574
48. MAN, 54,000. .. .May 1, 1893 Not del)t Hc|it. 1 1891.
118,302
($6,000 due yearly) to May 1,1901 ^
Tax valuation 1889
2,742,264
Deposit fund aud orders. .'i!0,278 Tax rate (i>er $1,000) 1891.$15-0<>
Total lUl>tK(^pt. 1 1892.. .114,278 Population 1890 wa«
6,188Sinking fund
3,277 Population 1880 was
5,142

Pennsylvania— Scranton,—(State and City Supplement^
Mr. John H. Fellows is Mayor. The following statement of the debt, valuation, &c., of the city of Scranton has
page 70.)

See next page for continuation of debt chanKea.

THE
Investment

Co.,

DES MOINES, IOWA.
.
Capitai, Paid Up,
1130,000.
Choloe Investments In the most Consorva.

live Field In the

rOB BALV BY

W. A. IIOTCHKISS,

INVESTMENT BANKERS,*
4 South Calvert SIreat,

BALTIinORE, niARYLAND.

6E0. H. LEWIS,

Act'K Seoretarr.

President.

Mortgage Loans

WILLIAm HENRY CHANDLER A
TVALDRON SHAPLEIGH,

IN

TEXAS.

Chemical Engineers and
Consulting Chemists.

NO COMMISSIONS charged borrower or lender D»
loans hare proren good.

FRANCIS SMITH &

Chemical Industries Inrestlgated, New Prooesset
Bzamined. Plans and Speclllcations of Works For.
Qlahed. Also Yearly Contracts for Consultations.
Oc 98,

CO.,
BAH AKTOWIO. TEXAS.

80 Brsadway, New York.

Jos.

O. Osgood,
BC Am. 8oc.

Co.,

MUNICIPAL BONDS.
Cleveland, Ohio, Perrr-Payne B'ld>|(
Boston, mass., RH State Street.

Wall

FISHER & SHAW»

I^ebentnre Bonds, Becur<
ed b7 deposit of First
Mortgage Loans with an Eastern trustee. Viniia
fKARs' anccissrui. Expkrixkoi. Scnd tob PamPHLrr.

Street.

Bonds,

C. E.,

specialty of reports

on

railroads

and

e«e

White

Stocks and Inrestms

FIB8T NATIONAL

it

f senrltles^

BANK BDILSINa,

Omaha, Nebraska.

ottaei

Investment properties.
E x am inations made In any part of the ooontrr

MUNICIPAL SECURITIES
OF

&

Clark,
COIVSVLTIXO EXGIKKERS,

PITTSBURG AKD YICINITT
Dealt In br

Examiners ot MIneH. Processes and Indas*
trial Establishments.

EXPERT EXAMINATIONS A SPECIALTY.
90
OiBors, The Times Balldinc, Kourth Ave.,
PITTSBl'RtJ, V.

The

Caliscraph Typewriter
STANDS AT THE HEAD.
THE
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO..
337 Broadway, New York.

Commercial Paper,

CO]VSUL.TIBiO EIVOINEER,
120 BROADWAV, NEIV YORK.
Makes

1 1

FOR INVESTORS

West.

G. R. Voss,

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

New York,

AMD
OTHER APPROVED SECURITIES

Qiy
OIA PCD PCI^T
rCJl uCn I

Rooms 97

Lombard Investment Co.

&

CITY BONDS

Clo^anteed First Mortgages on Improved lands
n Iowa and Eastern Nebraska. Safe and Desirable.

Wrlt« for Description.

Bros.
BANKERS,

MISCELLANEOUS.

Aiy pep f^CMT
vlA rCIl UCI^ I

PER CENT FIRST MORTGABES.

Lamprecht

sohool

Connectlent, Winchester.—{State and City SuppLEHEirF^
page 40.>—The following statement has been corrected by
means of a special report received from J. E. Spaulding^

810,000.

GOLD DEBENTURE BONDS,

130

city tax, •22-00:

was 48,956.

la deattued to

7

83^

;

;

49,984

MISCELLANEOUS.

BEL,L,INQUAni
THE FUTURE METROPOLIS OF PUGBT SOUND

7 and 10 Yeara,
ATLANTIC TRUST C0„ NEW YORK,

6,586,530
6,600,087
7,042,205

rate In 1891 tnoludea State tax, $4-75

fejff"

FAIRHAVEN,
BAY,

to

Taxvw

vi.cnoL
$21,433,031 •$28 -26
21,386,539
21,425,652
21,569,655

$«,5M,e0l

at Charleston City Treasury, cou-

LOANS.

Amounts 8300

Total Attrited
Valuatiftn.

Carothers,
Jas.
FOURTH AVE., PITTSBURG, PA.

M. A.

JOSEPH CI LLOTTS
STEEL PENS
ENGINEER
N08. 303-404-1 70-604,

Jos. C. Piatt, C. E.,

CONSULTING

%

^^•Sy^' **"»'• '2«'2»- I" 1800 the olty tax waa fc^OO and thj. s^l
POPULATION.—In 1890 population waa 54,055 In 1880 It wa*

tax-reoelvable.

NEW

Tax

•

—

Oct. 1, 1894
Oct. 1,1893
Oct. 1,1896

Real E$lale.
$14,878,430
14,800,000
14,726,565
14,527,350

1801
1890
1889
1888

South Carolina— Charleston.— (State and City Scpple.
MBNT, page 159.) John F. Ficken, Mayor. We have this
week received a special report from Wm. L. Campbell, City
Treasurer, by means of which the statement below has

A&O, 73,700
A&O, 91,500
A&O, 67,000

$8^'l^!n»

ASSESSED VALUATION.-The cltya aaaeaaed valuaUen (about
cash value) and tax rate have been as follows:

1892 wa» $225,500) floating debt, $44,500 total dulit, $270,000. Tbe town baa no sinking fund.
TAX VALUATION lu 1892 of real estate was $4,367,550; perlonal property, $,S37,S0Q; total, $5,205,146. Property Is assessed at
Its actual value. Tbe total tax valuation In 1891 was $5,045,832; la
1800 It wax $4,741,200. The total tax per $1,000 for 1892 Is $15-60; In
1891 it was $21-40.
POPULATION In 1890 was 8,202; In 1880 It was 7,4d7.

78,
7b,
78,

$a,03l!612

State Leglalature.

1020

been corrected to date.
Charleston is the county seat of Charleston County.
In consequence of the War the city's bonds became overdue,
principal and interest. The conversion bonds were issued to
M.tle this indebtedness. The $-50,000 o?.5 per cents due Oct.
1 1922 were recently placed by the city at 100*65,
TTAen Due. 78, AA"), $20,000..
LOANSOct. 1, 1897
CoNVKHsioN Bonds—
68, A&O, 91,500
Apr. 1, 1898
7», AiV:(). :i;(i-2.U)0
Oct 1, 1803 6s, A&O, 18,000
Oct. 1, 1898

$3,887,612

DEBT LIMITATION.—Theolty can laaue additional l)ODd«r>nlywb«a
authorUod by a two- thirds rote of lU oltlxens at a popular election
helA
In aooordanoe with a two-thirds vote of both the Olty Coonell
and th»

When Due.

WATKB BONOS—

MJtN, $15,OOO....NOT. 7, 1893

INTEREST

Total bonded debt

l,QANS-

4«,
4»,

1,1805

*;tO,OOO....Oot.

Tows N0TK8—

es,

78T

WATER FORD,

N. Y.

BvtBinatleoB and Reports far laTesiors

And

other styles to suit all hands.

TSS MOST FEEFECT OF FENSl

—

,

week from Mr.

J.

George

third cash valre)

Eisele, City Comptroller.

The

It will be noticed that the city has no
Comptroller writes us that the balance to the credit of the
general fund is sufficient to meet all outstanding warrants
and to pay for all contracts which are under way.
Scranton is in Lackawanna County.

floating debt.

—

Principal' Outsland'g.
Due.
NAME AND PURPOSE.
$219,000
Juno 1, 1893
J & D
1873 7
Consolidated loan
100,000
Dec. 1, 1896
J & D
2d series. 1876 6
do
July, 1893 to '96 >
6,000
J & J
1886 4
City Improvement
$1,500 yearly. $
July, '97 to 1906 )
20,000
J & J
....1886 4
do
do
$2,000 yearly. 5
July 1, 1907-''16 }
35,000
3 & 3
....1886 4
do
do
$3,500 yearly. {
22,000
Dec. 1, 1901
....1891 413 J & D
do
do
23,000
Deo. 1, 1906
....1891 41a J & D
do
do
22,000
Deo. 1, 1911
....1891 413 J & D
do
do
23,000
Deo. 1, 1916
....1891 413 J & D
do
do
15,000
July 1, 1896
J & J
1886 4
funding loan
July 1, 1901
15,000
J & J
1886 4
do
do
15,000
July 1, 1906
J & J
1886 4
do
do
15,000
Feb. 1, 1895
F & A
Municipal building. ..1890 4
20,000
Feb. 1, 1900
F & A
...1890 4
do
do
25,000
F & A
Feb. 1, 1905
...1890 4
do
do
30,000
Feb. 1, 1910
F & A
do
...1890 4
do
TAX FREE.—AH bonds Issued by this city are exempt from taxation, wltb the exception of tbe consolidated loan Issued In 1873.

LOANS—

Interest.

-

,

,-^

Rate- Payable.

When

amount includes occupations as well as other personal property*

;

popvilation 80,000.

New Jersey— Essex County. (State and City Supplement, page 59.)— We have received this week the report of
the Sinking Fund Commissioners of Essex County for the
year ending May 9 1893, and the statement of the county's
indebtedness given below has been corrected to that date.
The county seat is Newark,
When Due. Total debt May 9 '92.. $1,156,079
LOANS—
Road Bosds^

Apr. 30, 1901
July 1,1893
5s, J&J,
($10,000, duey'rly) to July 1, 1899
4"3S
$38,000... July 1, 1893
Subject to call at any time.
1893 & 1894
$4,807
48
,

78
78,

$516,500
175,129

1890
$533,000
138,832

$605,000
158,017

$691,629
226,254

$671,832
173,589

$446,983

Total municipal debt
Less sinking funds, &o

Netdebt

$465,375

$498,242

1891.

The sinking fund holds city bonds of the consolidated loan to the
amount of $97,000 and $50,000 of the iH per cent city improvement
loan.

Jamieson & Co.,
STOCKS—BONDS,
Chicago Stock Exchange.

DEARBORN STREET,
Ill§.

Private Wire to

FLOWER &
a.

Special attention itlven to ont-of-town bualnea*.

Correspondence solicited.

Bhiksi, Member New York Stock Exchange
D. M. CuiuiiKGS, Member Chicago Stock Exchange

i. B.

Breese
111

&

Cummings,

BANKERS AND BROKERS,
AND 113 mONROE STREET,
CHICAGO

Baonrttlei llited In

New

York, Boston or Chicago

oarnea on oonserratlve marglna.

A. O.

WM.

SLAUGHTER, Member N. Y. Stock Exchange
V. BAKER, Member Chicago Stock Exchange

A. O. Slaughter

&

Co.,

BANKERS,
111-113

LA 8ALLE STREET,

Henry C. Hackney,
ST.,

CHICAGO.

INVESTMENT SECURITIES
BOUGHT AND

CHICAGO.

&

Trust

Company
94

&

WASHINGTON STREET.

96

Capital, pald>np
81,600,000
Undivided earnings, Inclndlng
2'.j0,000

300,000

.

GUARANTEES TITLES TO REAL ESTATE.

This Bank is directly under the Jurisdiction and
supervision of the State of Illinois, Is a LEGAL
DEPOSITORY for Court Moaevs, and Is authorised
to act as TRUSTEE. BXBCUTOR, RBCBIVBR and
ASSIGNEE for ESTATES, INDIVIDUALS and

&

J. Mitchell,

John

Wm. U. .Mitchell, Second Vice-President,
Wm. U. Heidj Third Vice-President

by law to act as Registrar of Stocks
aod Bonds, Executor, Receiver and Trustee for
Estates, Syndicates. Individuals and Corporations.
Trust moneys and trust securities kept separate
from the assets of the Company.

John McCaffery,

Is authorized

Bro.

WASHINGTON STREET, CHICAGO.

President.

B. Drake, Vice-President.

James S Oibbs,

Cash'r.

B. M:. Chattell, Ass't

Cuh>r

DIRECTORS
John B. Drake"

Wm.

L. Z. I.elter,

Wm. II. Mitchell,
Wm. G. Hlbbard,
D. B..Shlpman,

H. Beld,

John

J. Mitchell"
J. 0. McMullin,
J. Ogden Armour*

Frederick T. Haskell.

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.

The Jennings Trust

OFFICERS:

QWYNN GARNETT,

President.

185

A. H. SELLERS, Vice-President.

ARCHIBALD

George C. Walker,
Edson Keith,
John G. Shortall,
Geo. M. Bogue.
John DeKoven,
:a. H. Sellers.
Samuel B. Chase,

A.

C.

W.

CHICAGO.

CAPITAL, PAID UP,

John P. Wilson,
A. M. Pence,

Green,

Herman

$500,000

SURPLUS.

$50,000

NEGOTIATES GROUND RENTS

In the CltT of

Takes entire charge of estates. Acts as
agent for the registration and transfer of bonds and
Chicago.

Goudy,

Schaflher

&

dividends.

Co.

BANKERS,
100 'WaHhlnston

Street,

payment of coupons,

from courts, corporationj

A legal

depository for court and

trust funds.

INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS of money
may be made at any time and withdrawn afte

Which

five days' notice, or at

safe
sure.
yenr»'
oi a dollar. Interrst and
principal net to lender. Send for pamphlet.

ELLSWORTH & JONES,
331 Chamber of

Commerce BIdg.. Chicago
Bank BIdg., Iowa Falls, la.
Kstahllshed 1871.

and

trnsts of every character

ILL,.

IOWA FARM LOANS
Are
and
31
experience

interest

Authorized by law to receive and execut«

and individuals.

COMMERCIAL PAPER,

First Nat'l

ST.,

STEWART, Secretary.
CHA8. R. LARRABEE, Treasurer.

DIBECTOBS:
Owynn Qamett,
Chas. W. Drew,
W.D. Kerfoot,
John P. Wilson,

W.

DEARBORN

Co.,

A.

without the loss

LOCAL SECURITIES A SPECIALTY
Oorreapondence Invited.

OrFICBBS:

John

doing business.

Member Chicago Stock Exchange.

OOBBBSPONDENCE SOLICITED.

J»

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, • 83,330,00S
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DEPOSITS.

OOera Investors In real estate securities
protection afforded by no other system of

CHICAGO,

SOLD,

Fred. G. Frank

Trust & Savings
Bank.
CHICAGO, ILL.

Illinois

stocks and the

Ohlcaco Securities Bougfat and Sold.

DEARBORN

:

"During the year the Sinking Fund Commissioners found
that the deposit in bank to the credit of war sinking fund
was growing exceedingly large. We endeavored to invest the
same in Government, State or county bonds, but after negotiating with several parties we found that there was no State
or county bonds to be had, and the premium on Government

COUNSEL:

CHICAGO, ILLS.

113

as follows

CORPORATIONS.

NEW

YORK.
OLBNDINNINO & CO., PHILADKLPHIA.
CO.,

Concerning the investment of the sinking fund and the
bonds paid and issued by the county, the Commissioners report

surplus
Deposited with State Auditor.

WORMSKR, NEW YORK.

8.

$510,0O0...Apr. 1,1895
510,000 ...Apr. 1, 1899

OF CUICAOO,
93,

185,361
970,718

valuation 1892... 166,191, 180
Tax valuation 1891... 154,726,945
Tax v.aluation 1890... 154,712,000
Tax rate (per $1,000).
$6-224
Population 1890 was..
256,098
Poi)ulatlon 1880 was..
189,929
Population 1870 was.
143,839
Ta.'C

War Bonds—

Title Guarantee

Members New York Stock Bzohfinge,

Chicago,

4,588
70,000

CHICAGO.

CHICAGO.

187-189

Sinking fund
Net debt May 9 1892..

$8,684.... Var., 1893-'97

5s, Var.,

58

of October of each of the last

1892
$605,000

97,934

$27-63
26-90

POPULATION—In 1890 population was 75,215; in 1880 it was 45,in 1870 it was 35,092. A local estimate for 1892 makes the city's

850

and the slnldng fund hold by

Total bonded debt
rioatlngdebt

$18,612,773
•18,046,314
16,385,R34
4,680,805

1,189,.540

The tax rate for 1892 Inoludos county tax, $5-13; city tax, $12-30:
school tax, $1000.

Etc.—Tlie subjoined statement

first

Property.

16,763,609
15,196,294
4,582,871

:

Total Assessed Bale of Tax
Valuation. «cr $1,000.

$1,067,385
1,282,705

$17,.545,388

"This

total municipal debt

the city against the same on the
three years.

Personal

Estate.

1892
1891
1890
1880

assessed valuation (about one-

and tax rate have been as follows

Real
Tears.

TOTAL DEBT, SINKING FUNDS,
shows Scranton's

rVoL. LV.

ASSESSEDiVALUATlON—The city's

of a special report received

by means

l)een corrected to date

L 4

.

THE CHRONICLR

738
this

—

'

a fixed date.

TRUST FUNDS AND TRUST INVESTMENTS
re kept separate and apart from tbe assets of tho

Company.
J.

R.

WALSH,

President.

CHAS. H. HULBURD,

Vice-President.

FRANKLIN HATHEWAY, Secretary.
BAMUBL D. WARD, Treaiorer
LTUAK A. WALTON. Ouklcr

;

OCTOBEB

789

Wh*n Du«. T»z Vkloatlon l<)02..«ia,20O,000
LOANS;- „
AMMsmentat>out40 p. e.Mt
fa a, #40,000... Auk. IS, 1890 8t»to tax (por«t.OOO) 1893.

Oh,

Countr tax (per • 1,000).
PopulktloD In 1890 WM..
Supplkmbnt,
Tex«s.—(State and City SUPPLKMBNT, page 170.)—
give below a statement of the debt of Texav, corrected by
means of a special report received from W. B. Wortbam,
Stale Treasurer.
Prtnetnai,-^—^
InleretL
LOANS—
Payable. JHitn Due. OuUland'jf.
PUR. .,__.
NAME AND PyRPOSE. _.
J^- S*FliiatlnK<lebthon<ln, 1R74, EOld 7k J di J Jan. 1, 1004
f288,00i>
M <fc 8 Aag. 5, 1010 898,300
Frontier defense, 1870, irnTd..
7i(
do
refun
ndlng-.
201,000
do
5
Ra<lemptlon 8tfttcdebt,1870,g. 6g J ft J July 1, 1906 1,647,000
luteroat payable In Lima.
Oot 1 18g2....l|S0,000

Total debt

We

—

.

.

I

.

KotlrlnK

out»tandlug bondu,

A J July 1,1000 1,068,000
Jan.
Jan.,
1899
2,630
July
1890
200,000
VALUE OF BONDS.—The 5 per cent bond* for retiring oatPAR
Htaiiilini; liondH are $100 and multlpleo
tlio other bonds are nearly all
1879

J

5

Retiring ontntandlng bonds. ..
Kevenno detlolonoy, 1885.. ..

4

;

!iil,<X)0eacli.

INTEREST

Is

payable

In

Now York and at the State treatnry.

DEBT. ETC.—The subjoined statement ihowii the State's
total debt on the tlrst of September of each of the last three years
180O.
1892.
1801.
Total bonded debt
$3,992,000
$4,237,730
$4,237,730
3,017,100
Of which held In State funds .. . 3,220,540
3,218,140
liOavlnK amount outstand'K.. f7a5,460
$1,019,590
$1,220,630
On Soptenibor 1 1892 the total holdings of the State Treasury for
generAl revenue and to the credit of tlie various funds c)f the Commonwealth wtro *'jr),289.085, iiieludlnK the following It<^ni8 Cash, .111,322,253; bond.'*, $8,966,832, and land notes fapprai«na/<:(/>, $15,000,000.

TOJAL

Lovenskiold, Mayor.
"We have received the following statement of the debt, valuation, etc., of Corpus Christi from Thos. P. Dunn, City SecreNo report from this city appeared in our recent SUPtary.

Texas— Corpus Chrlstl.— Oscar

C.

P1,EMENT.

:

Corpus Christi

is

in

LOANS—

Neuces County.

ASSESSED VALUATION.—The

assessed valuation and
tax rate at dlircreut periods have been as follows
Real Estate.
Tears.
Pers. Prop.
Total.
Taxp.9i.OQO
$2-75
1892

Total valuatten 1891... 83,155,134
Asseanment about ^ actual value.
State tax (per $1,000)
$1 66
3-75
Countytax (per$l,O00)
500
Iut.iiayal>leatl'"ounhN!it.Bk..N.Y. City tax (pcr.fl.OOO)
250
*!)0,000 Average school tax
Total debt Apr. 1 1S92.
4,387
2,474,433 PopiUation 1S90 was
valuation, real
Tax
3,257
rax Taluatlon, personal 680,701 Population 1880 was

H'»«n Due.

Watek works—

!ft90,000. . . .Feb. 1, 1942
Od,
(Subject to ciiU after Fob. 1, 1912)

F&A,

$577,621,608 $292,770,759 $870,392,367
3-26
499,522,828
282,.589,055
782,111,883
729,17r>,564
480,135,007
249,040,557
441,076,925
240,007,979
081,084,904
37.'i,890,594
2-25
245,121,395
621,011,989
197,167,030
114,303,106
311,470,736
149,793,301
244,510,.558
94,717,197
The personal property as reported by this State Includes railroad
property, which in 1891 was valued at $66,628,378, against $62,105,497

—

—

CHICAGO.
CHICAGO.
Pald-np Capital.

BAM'L

PACIFIC COAST.

^

(INCOKPORATED.)

A 8PBCIALTT.
CHABU8 HODQHAl

&

Hodgman,

BOND AND STOCK BROKKRSt
800 Nortb Fonrth

Street,

I.

We buyaDd sell ontriKht all Western
Municipal Bouds and Stocks.
We
formation cuncernInK any Western security without chftr^e. Monthly^ quotation circular mailed to all applicants.
New Issues of municipal bonds wanted.

PINE STKEET,

ST. LOVIS,

Straus,
BANKERS,

I,A

SALLE

ST.,

CHICAGO.

A General Banking Baslness Transacted.
TIBST MORTGAOK LOANS ON IMPROVED CITT
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE.
Members of the

Cliicago Stock Exchange.

MILWAUKEE.
Hackett

&

Hoff,

BEAL ESTATE AND INYESTMENTS,
96 inii'hlgan

St.,

milwaukco, Wis.

First Mortiiages on Improved Milwaukee Real
Ketate, bearing six and seven per cent interest
No charge to tile investor for collecting iutorest or looking after taxes and are Inaur-

always on band.

Absolute security.

Bank,
81,000,000

SIGHT

Prea.
JAS. STEEL,
MACKUMiCaahler.

KXCUANQK

Vioe-Pres.

AND TELB-

QRAPHIC TRANSVBRS, and ISSUES LETTERS
Of CREDIT arallable throughout the United States'
DRAWS BILLS OF E.XCHANOB on London,
Liverpool, Dublin, Parlj, Berlin, Franklort-on-theall the principal cities of Europe; also on

Main, and

made jn all accessible polntj.

Commercial Bank,
IVIO.

MINNEAPOLIS.
Minneapolis Trust Co.,
iniNNEAPOLIS, niNNESOTA.

C4PITAL,, »S00,000.

&

Cahn

SELLS

A.

Hong Kong.
COLLBc'tions

cheerfully furnish full and reliable In-

805

Merchants Nat'l
Paid Caoltal

616. 617 and 618 Blalto Building,

CHICAGO.

Correspondence SoUoited,

J.LOBWBNBKRO,

Geo. M. Huston & Co.
BOND AND STOCK DEALERS

for sale at the olSces of the Company,

rULL LNFORMATION UPO.\ APPLICATION
CORBB8P0NDENCB INVITED.

Saperior Collection Facilities.

POaTI.AND, OREGON.

^T. LOUIS.

•
•
81,000,001)
Authorized Capital,
Shares $100 Each.
7 Per Cent Guaranteed.

SBCUBED BT CHICAGO REAL E8TATB FIR81
MORTGAQES.
A LIMIT>!:D NCMBER of shares are nowolfered

Angus Mackintosh, Pres. Abram Barker, VIce-Pres.
Wm. T. Wickware, Cashier.
Capital, S-jOO,000|HurpIuB, etc., 840,000
Interest-bearing Certiflcates of Ueposll,
I

QRADE MUNICIPAL BONDS

Whitaker

TO INVESTORS.
Construction Co.,

&

DiDWABDS WHITAKia.

80IJC!1TBD.

Chicago Co-operative

JNO. H. BIJI8SIXS.

aATI,ORD,

ST. L,oris.
WESTERN BBCDRITIEB AND

700,000

rms or Corporations, received on favorable terms,
rorejsn Exchange Boaght and gold. Commercial
and TraTelers' Credits, available in all parts of the
ClolM, Isaaed. Telegraphic Transfers made with all
principal European and Domestic Points. United
fitateeand other flrst-ciass Investment Bonds dealt

A.

Blessing
Co., Merchants National Bank
OF SEATTIiE, IITASHINGTON.
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY.

A regular Banking Bnalness Traniacted. Aooonnta HIQH
Banks and Bankers, Mercantile and Manufaotnrlno

COBRBSPONDBNCE

The tax rate In 1890 Included: State tax, $2-00; school tax, $1-25.
In addition to these there were State revenue poll tax, $0"50 per
capita and school poll tax .$100 per capita.

Gay lord,

$2,000,00(>

Snrplns,

In 1890.

ST. LOUIS.

Union National Bank,

State's

1891.
1890
1889
1888
1885
1880
1874

Ohio Allen County. The following statement of Allen
Coimty finances has been received thia week from County
No report of debt was given in our
Auditor C. D. Critts.
State and City Scpplkment.
County seat is Lima.

-anoe*

i:

:

THE CHBONICLB.

29, 1802.

oonds was fo liigh that it would not be advisablo to
purchase the some; wo recomnipmled to the frocholdors
to advocate the passage of a law by the LoRUilaturo of
Fund Ctommissionere to
1802, allowing county Sinking
Tlie recommendation was approved,
invest in city bonds.
course, gave ub the opporand a law was enacted. Thi", of
tunity to invest the county's money to a Detter advantage
the war fund purchased one $10,000 U. 8. 4 per cent bond at
We Uiought it wi^e at this
par from the road aitikirg fund.
time to sell the $40,000 of the U. S. 4 per cent bonds held by
the war sinking fund, for which we received $40,350, and we
purchased $50,000 of Newark City 4 per cent water bonds.
" Though the efforts of our Chairman the Manufacturers
National Bank agreed to pay to the Commissioners 2 per cent
per annum on the average deposits made.
" Road improvement bonds amounting to $16,880 70 became
due during the year. They have all been paid and canceled.
The Board of Chosen Freeholders issued one road improvement
bond amounting to $1,154 69, which was purchased by the
road sinking fund as an investment on April 19 1892."

138

—

:

Real Eetale Loans. Satetr Deposit Vaults,
Acta as Exe/ator, Trustee and Guardian.
DEPOSITORY FOR WILLS.

P. O. BOX 1,000.
Cable Address "Trust" Rllnneapolls.

TACOMA, WASHINGTON.
PAID-DP CAPITAL

SitOO.OOO.

Six Per Cent Coupon Certificate of Deposit, running
years. Interest and Principal payable si
the MerohanU' Exchange Nat. Bank, New York aty'
This Certificate has a coupon attached, wbich can
be cut oif when due, and presented to any Rank for
payment, the same as a New York Draft. A most
convenient mode of luTesttng your surplus monef.
Write for a copy of the Certificate.
A. BBIsaMAN.Cash. QBATTANH.WHUI.IB.PrM

One or Two

Merchants National Bank
TACOniA, IVASHINOTON.
(OLDEST BANK IN THE CITTJ

Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
Capital
»-iSO.OQ»
DIRECTORS.
81 00, 000
Samael Hill, President Thomas Lowry, First Tic»- Surplus and Undivided Proats
;

Presldent; 11. K. Brown, Second Tloe-President
Daniel Basaett, Third vlce-Prestdent; Clarkson
Lindley. Secretary and Treasurer: Isaac Atwater,
las. J. nill, R. B. Ijiiigdon, A. V. Keller, W. O.
Northrup, Wm. H. Dunwoody, C. G. Ooodrlch, Chas.
A. PUlsbury, A. U. Muton. 1'. B. Winston.

S.

H. Wood

&

Co.,

INYESTMENT BANKERS,
Gaarnniee Loan BalldlnB*

MISiNEAPOLIS, mJSN.,
Dealers in the highest class of Minneapolis Securlles. Bank Stocks, Mortgages and Bonds.

OOBBWPOHDIKai aoLUmMD.

Correspondence

Collections a specialty.'

solicited.

SAN FRANC ISCO.

The

First National Bank
OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL..

UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY.
•
.
•
81,300,000
CAPITAL,,
8T30,000
SURPLUS,
3. a. MtmPHT. President. . D. Mobsah, Cashier

...
'

JAHB8 MorriTT,

V.-Pros.

Q.

W. Klinx. AssU Cash

GENERAi., B.^NKINiJ RIININKB!*.

ACCOUMTS HOLICITKO.

THE CHKONICLF,

740

[Vol.

-att.

^tuaucial.

®Otl0U.

©ottou.

Walter I. Hatch,

WOODWARD

Henry Preseotl Hatch,
Arthur Uelvin HtUtk
Members of N. Y. Stook and Prodaoe Exobanse*.

& STILLMAN, INMAN,SWANN&Co W.
MERCHANTS

NEW YORK.

New

New

A CO.,
La.

OrleaiiB,

York,

MBADSS &

8TBAD88

New

a,

CO.,

the

CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE.

CO.,
COTTON MERCHANTS
48 BKOWN'!! BUILDINGS,

NEW YORK.

Members New York Stock Exchange, New York
Cottou Kxchauye, New York Produce Exchange, New
York Coffee KxchauKe. Chicago Board of Trade.
Orders executed on any ot the above Exchanges,
also for purchase and sale of cotton for future delivery In New Orleans and Liverpool. Liberal advances made on cotton consignments.

LIVERPOOL.
d«Uvery.

J. O.

GEO. H. CHimoH, Special

BL088.

OIL.

'JM

aOKTUEHN FUODUUB

COKMISSION MERCHANTS,
Cotton Exehani* Bulldlnc.

NEW TOBK
t*nttaTiis C.

Hopkins,

Lncins Hopkins gmitb,
Bamael Hopkins.

Oharles D. Miller.

BLOSS & CO.,

W.

D.

IHERCHANTS,

No.

W. D. Rountree &

Co.,

E. D. Shepard

&

Crenshaw
ft

Wisner,

ExcbauKe Place, New York.

18

OOTTON MEROHANXB.

GOniniSiSION niERCHANTS.
AOKNCT OF

7

RICHMOND, VA.

8DLPHCR MINES COMPANY
OF VIRGINIA.
fro-.

Arienlo.

Spencer Turner,

J.

Turner

MANCFACTDBBB AND

COTTON
AND
C 'ITON

&. Co.,
L BALER IN

SAIL DUCK

AI.I,

and BLEACHED 8HIRTIN(<
and SHEETINGS,
PRINTS, DENIMS, TICKS, DUCKS, <tO,
Towels, Quilts, White Goods and Hosiery.

Geo.

Copeland

IKITED STATES DCNTIMG CO
"''''''•

'

r,

"" W'dths and Colors, always In
I OS

0aan* 8trM«.

&

Co.,

V

Foote,
NEW YORK

INTESTMENT SECIJRITIE*,
American Exchange Bank
ST. Eoms, mo.
•

8300,000 Surplos,
I

PETBB NICHOLSON.

•

8313,000

President.

ALVAH MANSUR, Vice-President.
WALKER HILL. Cashier

We send

dibict to every banking point

in

Mo.

WM. FRANKLIN HALL'
BooKfl

ACCOUNTANT ^u"!™*

New forms deslffned for books of

account.

Ssttlnnsnt of Iruotvtnt Eitatf,

as

Bzchanjte Building, 63 State Street Boftoa

139

PEARL STREET, NEW^ YORK

Cahoone

&

Avenue Hotel,

The

NEW^ YORK.

best-appointed and most Uberally
hotel In the city, with the most centnri

largest,

managed

and delightful location.

HITCHCOCK, DARLING &

Wescott,

Members New York Stock Bxchauge,

18

Fifth

inadlson Square,

COTTON BROKEK8,

specialty

*o,

ST., N.

DriUt, Sheetingt, tic, for Export Trade.

Cotton landed at Mills from Southern Markets

KINDS OT

AOIHTS

•toot"

ROWN

CANTAB FELTINQ DUCK,

CAB COVERING, BAGGING,
BAVENS DDLK, BAIL TWINE,
"AWNING" BTBIFES.

Co.,

Belliko agents fob Le.^dino Brands

8DCCES80B TO

Brtnckerlioff,

&

^EW YORK, BOSTON, PUIL.ADE1,PHIA
I

HlKta-Orade Pyrites, free

Fabyan

Bliss,

Warm

CO.

&

PINE STREET

Capital,

tdTBBPOOL CUBBMPUKDUTI,

PHKDKHK ZKRKUA *

CO.,

-Mandsid Brands of Flonr for Bhlpment to
Climates always on band.

POST, Banker,

Hatch

AND

Geo. H. McFadden & Bro.

Co.,

CountT and City BondB.

State,

COTTON EXCHANGE BUILDING, NEW
YORK, and NORFOLK, VA.

Vembers ot tbe Cotton, CoOee and Prodmoe Bxoh's

THE H AX ALL CRENSHAW

T.

DREXEL BUILDING, BROAD

COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

COTTON, COFFEE, GRAIN, PROVISIONS

&

SUCCESSORS TO

STOCKS.

IC

Exchange Court,

1

Private Wires to Boston and Philadelphia.

AUG.

Albebt L. Rounirex.

Co.,

NEW YORK.

William Street,
NEW YORK.

RonSTBEE.

&

BANKERS AND BROKERS,

ChnrieHton, 8. C.

O.

CUTTUNSEKO

Howard Lapsley

Special attention given to orders for cotton for
foreign or domestic shipment.

J.
& Co., COTTON

Hopkins, Dwight

5!i,

Co.,

COTTON KXCHANGB BDLLDING

PRICE, REID & CO.,
Norlolk, Va.
PRICE, KEID & AUAM!^, Limited.

Bpedal attention given to correspondence witb Ini^rlor Cotton Merchants and Buyers for the parChase and sale ot Cotton both on spot and for rnture

KesB

Members ot New York and Boston Stook Bxohangei

General Commission Merchants.

STRAUSS &

(JUTTON.

&

Hubbard, Price

Manchester, and at prlncipal Cotton Centres
on the Continent.

Orleans.

HIGH GRADE INVESTMENTS

NEW YORK PBODOCE EXCHANGE and

at the

and lorelsn markets.

CO.,

Sarannah and

NEW YORK COFFKB EXCHANGE, and

GRAIN AND PROVISIONS
as well

BOSTON, MASS.

COFFEE

at the

Co.j

BANKERS AND BROKERS

NEW YORK, LIVERPOOL AND NEW OR.
LEANS COTTON EXCHANGES. Also orders for

at the

New York.

&

H. Prince

COTTOM

MEMBERS OF THE STOCK, COTTON, OOFFEE AND PRODUCE EXCHANGES,

Chlcaiio

York.

Co.,

16 to 33 W^llllam Street, New York.
ZBCnTE 0BOKB8 FOB FUTUBB DELIVERT F.

NEW YORK.

Orde» ezeonted on the above Ezchangefl

New

6 Wall St,

COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

BROS.,

No. 40 Exchange Place,

New Orleans,

&

Henry Hentz

coninissioN merchajkts,

hi in

Sons,

sight.

LiKHUAN, DUBB & CO.j
Montgomer;, Ala.

LEHMAN

&

&

Dealers in investment stocks and bonds.
Personal attention given at the N. T. Stook Rxohange for the purchase and sale on commission of
stocks and bonds for cash or on margin.
Interest allowed on deposits, •abject to draft at

COTTON OF AT.T. GRADES BUITABLE TO
WANTS OF AMEBICAN BTIKSEBB.
LXHtlAN, STXBN

T. Hatch

96 Broadway

COTTON MERCHANTS,

22 WILLIAM STREET,

16 to

Ly

Massasoit House,
SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
THB BEST-APPOINTED HOUSH IN WBSTHaK

WALL STREET.

Government and Investment

00.

Bonds.

NEW ENGLAND.

Convenient for the tourist or business man,

Union Depots;
Stooks and Bonds Boosht and Bold on Commission.

NMi

„ . „,„
W. H. CHAPIN.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102