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THE
)

•

&.

_

4

♦

jjmmerr{a| &

m

§»nte’ fcctte, iSSfimmiwial tKme*,
A

Ponitot, and $n<mtanre Innvnal

WEEKLY

NEWSPAPER,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

VOL. 9.

NEW YORK, OCTOBER 23, 1869.

Bankers and Brokers.

Wm. &

Bankers and Brokers.

Jno. O’Brien,

V.

A.

BANKER* AND BROKERS,

B.

Van

Bankers and Brokers.

Dyck,

STOCK, BOND AND GOLD BROKER,

’

WALL STREET,

66

NO.

Continue to give their attention to the

Purchase and

-

ale of Stocks

on

30

BROAD

STREET.

"

Com¬

mission,

Hatch, Foote & Co.,

AND TO THE NEGOTIATION OF LOANS,

Also* continue to receive money on deposit, subject
graft, and allow interest on daily balances.

to instant

BANKERS
AND DEALERS IN GOVERNMENT SKCURITIE

)

GOLD, Ac.
No. 12 WALL STREET.

Wm. R.

Utley & Geo.
Dougherty,

W.
BANKERS

Jesup & Company.

BANKERS AND

BROKERS

AND

NO. 11 WALL

M. K.
egotlato

Government Securities, Stocks. Gold and Specie
Central and

Southern Securities and Bank Notes;
Union Pacific Railroad Sixes; State,

City, Town,
County and Corporation Bonds; Insurance, Manutac
luring and Bank Stocks, BOUGHT AND SOLD.

Bonds and Loans for Railroad

Cos.,

Contract for

Iron

or

Steel Rails,

Cars, etc.

Locomotives,

nd undertake

all business connected with Rati wars

Duncan, Sherman & Co.,
BANKERS,
CORNER OF PINE AND NASSAU

STS.,

CIRCULAR

Letters

IBBTJB

CIRCULAR NOTES AND CIRCULAR LETTERS
OF CREDIT,
For the

of Travelers abroad and in the United

use

FOR

world; also,

For use in

C

of

Europe, east of the Cape of Good Hop

r e

1st, 1869.

MORTON, BLISS * CQ.
Bartholomew House Bank, >
Loudon, October 1st, 1869. >
The Hon. JOHN R">SE (late Minister of Finance for
the Dominion ot Canada* joins our firms this day,
which will be continued under the style of MORTON.
ROSE & CO.
L. P. MORTON, BURNS A CO.
*

t>.

T.

Brownell & Bro..-

£

BANKERS A

BROKERS,

*

ti
f

28 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK,
Stocks, Bonds, Government Securities and'Gold
Bought and Sold exclusively on commission.

Accounts of Banks, Bankers and individuals receiv¬
ed on favorable terms.

References:!

J. II. Fonda, Pres. National Mech.
C. B. Blair, Pres. Merchants’ Nat,

*
J • -1
Banking Ais. N.Y.
Bank Chicago.

)

Messrs. ROBERT BENSON & CO. j

Capital and Reserved Fund

Draw
London Joint Stock

lvjnuujn.

Accounts received and Interest allowed on same.
Stocks and Bonds nought and sold at the New York

>

—*

SeLLECK, 37Piae S*,Hjfl

Sterling

LONDON

12,500,000,

AGENCY,

A. D.

or Sixty Days on PARIS,
Bills at Sight or Sixty Days, on

West Indies South America, and the United State

MR. WALTER WATSON (late Agent for the Bank
ot British North America, New York), is this
day ad¬
mitted a partner in our firm.
New York, October

pit

TRAVELLERS,

THE CITY BANK

COMMERCIAL CREDITS,

.

MR. WALTER «. BURNS RETIRES
this day from our New York and London firms.
MORTON, BLISS 4b CO.

Citizens Bank of Louisiana?

DRAW at Sight

Statee, available in all the principal cities of the

Office of Morton, Bliss & Co.,)
Nxw Yoxx, October 1st, 1669. - f

MERCHANTS,

12 PINE STREET,

STREET, NEW YORK.

NO. 228:

on

Bank,

Marcuard. Andre 4b Ce
Baring, Brothers & Co,
Fould & Co;
r
London,
Paris
In sums to points suiting buyers of Sterling or Francs.
.

Stock Exchange. RAILROAD LOANS NEGOTIATED

Warren Kidder & Co.,
JANKERS,

James Robb, King & Co.,
No, 56 Wall Street.

NO. 4 WALL STREET. NEW YORK.
Orders for Stocks Bonds and Gold promptly uxe*
cuted. FOUR PER CENT INTEREST ALLOWED

depot.* subject to check at sight.

9n

No. 4 7

DEALERS

[Successors to Bowles, Drevet & Co.]
76 State Street. Boston,
19 William Street, New York
Paris and the Union Bank of
London*

Bills

on

Bbown, Lanoabtxb & Co.,

Richmond.

Baltimore.

IN

GOVERNMENT

Stocks, Bonds and Gold bought and Sold exclusively
Commission. Interest allowed on Deposit Accounts

S. G. & G. C.
m

AGENTS

Ward,

73

SAML. THOMPSON’S NEPHEW,
SONS.

a

Starling Exchange business.

Drafts

on

arts

*i

j

.

•

'

.

Frank & Gans,

HANKERS
■-

BANKERS AND BROKERS
No.

32 Broad Street, New York.

ALL UNITED STATES

AND

DEALERS IN U. S,

GOVERNMENT SECURITIES,




/

SECURITIES,

MERCHANTS, BANKERS » l»
others, and allow interest on daily balances, si Ufleet
to Sight Draft.
on

favoradle terms,

and promptly execute orders for the purchase or sale
ef '

Gold,

State,

Federal., and Railroad

Securities.
No. 50 EXCHANGE PLACE.

STOCK8, BONDS. GOVERNMENT SECURITIES,
bought and sold

FOREIGN EXCHANGE and GOLD
on the most favorable terms.

INTEREST allowed on deposits either In Currency
Gold, subject to check at sight, the same aa with
the City Banks.
ADVANCES made on all marketable securities.

State,

City,

CERTIFICATES ol Deposit issued bearing interest.
COLLECTIONS made at all points of the UNION

and BRITISH PROVINCES.
LOANS negotiated on FOREIGN

PRODUCE, In store axd afloat.
attention to this branch of our
have unusual facilities

AND DOMESTIC
We Invite particular
fc*«lne*a, in which we

County

ASD

or

!

•

Taussig, Fisher & Co.,

Englau

tbsUn^wTsiltes ticketB ^rom Kur°Pe to
l ra

'

Gibson, Beadleston & Co,

ABM. BELI

Ireland add Scotland.
Bankers furnished with Sterling Bills of Exchange,

s

STREET, BOSTON.

BANKERS,
and

ST„ NEW YORK.

Government Securities, Gold, Stocks and Bonds 61
every description bought and sold on Commission.
Southern Securities a specialty.

Make collections

Successors to

BROKERS,

Solicit accounts from

Cortis,

BROADWAY, NEW YORK
*

AND

Buy and Sell at Market Rates

6<Z WALL STREET, NEW YORK.

Rider &

Pearl Sr Co.,

64 BROADWAY & 19 NEW

POB

BARING BROTHERS A COMPANY.
•28 STATE

JETT

SECURITIES

on

CIRCULAR LETTERS OF CREDIT FOR TRAVEL
;
LEBS IN ALL PARTS OF EUROPE

Lanoastes 4b Co.,

Wall Street, New York.
AND
BROKERS,

R-ANKEBS

No. 12 Rue de Is Palx, Paris.
,

t

D. F.

BANKERS

McKim, Brothers & Co.,

Bowles Brothers & Co.,

X. G. 'PEARL.

RAIL

ROAD

BONDS

BOUGHT AND SOLD,

Loans Negotiated for R.B. Com Mantes
G.
38 PINB

COPELAND,
STREET, NEW YORK

.

614

THE

CHRONICLE.

BauVeri and Brokers.

[October 23, 1869.

Financial.

Financial.

BANKING HOUSE!

Banking House of

or

Jay Cooke 8c Co.,
New York.

Philadelphia,

Washington.
No.
We

Wa

2 0

Buy. Bell

L L

and

YORK

at most liberal rates, al

esuee ot

and Bonds of LAKE
SUPERIOR AND MISSISSIPP
RAILROAD COMPANY, and execute
orders for pur
chase and sale of

Stocks, Bonds

Check, allowing
general Banking Business.

a

Banker and

deposits
Investments carefully attended

Gold.

BANKERS,

0

-

.

CO.,

I8SUED BY

and state

at best

etc- b0“gllt

ana Loans

Negotiated.

N.

BANKER

SECURITIES

AND

B B O K K

GOLD AND

RAILWAY

GOLD,

and Exchange^
DEPOSITS RECEIVED SUBJECT to SIGHT
DRAF
And Four Per Cent interest allowed

on

Balances.

Securities have
attention.

Collections made

on

MAKING LIBERAL ADVANCES.

Dally
Interest

especial

Henry H. Ward.

all Southern Points.

AND

37 WALD

BROKERS,

STREET,

John P.

Marquand,

George H. B. Hill

Stocks, Bonds and Gold, bought and Sola
Business Paper Negotiated.

mission.

on

com

approved

Brands of No.
Scotch Pig Iron,
IN YARD, ON DOCK, AND TO ARRIVE.
In lots to suit purchasers.
Apply to
HENDERSON

1

BROTHERS,

Borneo

Domestic
HOPE

Sc

and

Bagging,
IRON

TIBS,

STREET, NEW YORK,

(Brown Brothers & Co.’s Building,)
Receive money on denosit,
subject to check at sight
allowing Interest on daily balances at the rate of iou

per cent per annum, credited monthly.
Issue Certificates of Deposit
bearing four cent In
terest, payable on demand or at fixed
periods.

Negotiate l.oans.
Fxeeute promptly orders for *he
purchase and sale
of Gold, Government and other Securities
on com-

aiis»lon.
Make collections on all parts of the
United States
and Canada.

144 Water Street.

Addison Cammack

Osborn

8c

Cammack,
‘

84 BROAD STREET.

Slock s,

State Bonds* Gold and Federal

Securities,

Co.,

market rates of interest.
7

BOUGHT AND SOLD ON

Particular
meats

■Fin
*

Attention

paid! to Invest*

in Southern State Ronds.

86 SOUTH

e '
r».

S

h i rt

s,!r ’

No.* 160 BROADWAY, NBW YORK,




STREET, NEW YORK.

Issue

*

t

*

Securities,

on

commis¬

sion.
Gold

Banking Accounts

may

opened with us upon the same
ditions as Currency Accounts.

be

con¬

Bailroad, State, City and other
Corporate Loans negotiated.
Collections made
the

everywhere in
States," Canada and

United

Europe.
Dividends and

Coupons collected.

A SEVAN PER €ENT

GOLD LOAN.

$6,500,000.
The Kansas Pacific

Railway now in successful oper¬
City to Sheridan, proposes to build
an extension to Denver, Colorado.
The Government
has granted Three Millions of Acres of
the finest
lands in Kansas and Colorado, which are
mortgaged
for the security of a loan of
ation from Kansas

$6, fit 00,000.
This loan is secured In the most effectual manner.
It represents a road in profitable
operation, and will

open the trade of the
connect It with the

Rocky Mountain country, and
great markets of the East. It la

considered to be one ot the best loans in the market.

EVEN BETTER IN SOME RESPECTS THAN

The loan has thirty years to run,
principal and in¬
terest payable in gold, semi-annually, seveu per cent.
The coupons will be payable

Frankfort, London,

Sight Drafts and Exchange payable In all
parts of Great Britain and Ireland.
Credits on W, TAPSCOTT & CO.,
Liverpool. Ad
vances made on

ment

consignments.

Orders for Govern

Stocks, Bonds and Merchandize executed.

or New

semi-annually in either
York, and will be free

ft-om Government taxation. The bonds for the pres
ent are sold In currency at 96, with accrued interest.

Clrcnlars, maps, and pamphlets sent on application.

DABNEY, MORGAN Sc CO.,

COMMISSION.

Tapscott, Bros. 8c Co.

MANUFACTURERS OF

'

purchase and sale of Gold and all

53 EXCHANGE PLACE.

N. Y,

M. K. JESUP Sc COMPLY.
12 PINE

HATTKRS^AND GENTS’ FURNISHGOODS,

our

GOVERNMENT SECURITIES.
C. J. Osborn.

BANKERS,

J. B. Carter 8c Co.,
8c

STREET, NEW YORK.'

WALL

FOR SALE BY

Beebe

.,

BANKERS,

No. 7 Bowling Green, New York.

BALE

o

UNION BANK OF LONDON.
Deposits In Gold and Currency received and Inte¬
rest allowed on balances
exceeding $1,000.

NO. f>9

_

Gunny,

Chas. H. Ward,

Established 1820.
Orders in Stocks. Bonds. Gold and Government Se¬
curities promptly filled
at usual rates. Foreign Ex¬
change negotiated. Draw Bil's on the

SCOTCH PIG IRON,
the

Wm. G. Ward.

John J. Cisco 8c Son,

Miscellaneous

All

Deposits.

BANKERS,
54 WALL

New York.

.

on

Ward 8c \,C

Marquand, Hill 8c Co.,
BANKERS

COUPONS,

STOCKS, BONDS AND

Stocks, Bonds, Gold

Southern

GOLD

BUY AND SELL ON COMMISSION

R,

Particular attention paid to the
purchase and sale

-

Dealers,
times, on approved collaterals,

first-class

AND IN

EXCHANGE,

I* WALL STREET, NEW YORK.

,5v.

of the United

Coupons, and execute orders for the

GOVERNMENT

Worthington,

HX3CBXB N. T. STOCK

current

DEALERS IN ALL ISSUES OF

an<f

18 Nassa

4

W.

at all

date,
rate, and

Street, New York,

made upon approved Securities.

COLLECTIONS made,

Co.

NKEItS,

Removed to Nos. 16 and

SECURITIES, GOLD,

SiNS&LSSES* 8T0CK8ADVANCES

at fixed

or

We buy, sell and exchange all
issues of Government Bonds at cur¬
rent market
prices, also Coin and

B A

No. 40 Wall Street, New York.

CurrentRates^6^6^ an<* interest allowed

demand

Advances made to

Co.,

&

•

on

available in all parts
States.

COMMERCIAL CREDITS,

Vermilye

or

Certificates of Deposit issued, pay¬

at

&

Currency

bearing interest at

EUROPE

Morton, Bliss 8c

Daily
Gold.

with National Banks.

able

FOR

to.

WI1LIAM ALEXANDER SMITH
.r

as

ALSO,

services for the purchase and sale
of Gov¬
ernment and all other
Stocks, Bonds and

all

on

Persons depositing with us can
check at sight in the same manner

AN®

Wall St.,

allowed

Balances of

CIRCULAR LETTERS OF CREDIT

"

on

.

Circular Notes

(Formerly cashier

Interest allowed

Interest

throughout Europe.

TRAVELERS,
AVA1LABLEJN ALL PARTS OF

Member ot New York Stock
Exchange,
of Ihe Metropolitan Bank,
and late
of the firm of H. Meigs.
Jr., & Smith).
Oners his

S3 WALL STREET.

SON,

And Letters of Credit available

Meigs,

Broker, No. 27

liberal

AND OTHER PRINCIPAL CITIES
;

JAY COOKE & CO.

Henry

-

.

on

H.METZLER S.SOHN Sc CO.Frankfort
JAMES W. TUCKER Sc
CO., Paris.

WE NE

OAN8,
terest, and transact

and Gold

t

terms.
ISSUE BTLLS OF EXCHANGE ON
I1AMBRO Sc
London.

and Gold.

on ATE RAILROAD AND
MUNICIPAL
receive Deposits, subject to

Cities.

Receive Accounts of Banks and Bankers

O. J

GOVERNMENT BONDS.

-

and Members of Stock

Exchanges in both

STREET, NEW

Exchange

Dealers in U.8. Bonds

and

STREET. N. Y.

flKvSsf** INTERFAX ON CHT8TOCK8.
—The interest

the Cltv

on

the Bonds and Stocks of

an

November

B.J3WEENY.
vu.uiuvii.j
offree, in the New Court House.

t

.

The transfer books will be closed FRIDAY, October
1st ’ 1809
?
a
■
*
*v~ *-t RICHARD B. CONNOLLY, Comptroller.
.

Department of Floanee, Comptroller’s Office* New

York, September 24th, i860.

186&J

October 23,

IHE CHRONIC!.!!.

]

Financial.'

Financial.

SEVEN' PER CENT

First
r

515

■A* Choice

FiniLiicial.

Security.

THE LOUISIANA. STATE
“

.

y,

ComrUMe

Per

7

Mortgage
SEVEN/PER

Sinking Fund

'• *

•

Cent

Bonds.

A few only are offered for iale ta

GOLD,

CENT

i

tM»

market, at IS.

FREE OF GOVERNMENT TAX.
These bonds are a safe and desirable
purchase, and
at this low rate pay about 10
per cent Interest.

Gold Bonds

*T

A. R.

Nearly tO Fer Cent Currency.

OF THE

‘

\

| it ?

'

'T 1* ’•

SELLECK, 37 Pine Street,

Agency Citizens’ Bank of Louisiana.
■

V

Danville, Urban a* Bloomington and
Pekin Railroad Company

First Mortgage

WE OFFER FOR SALE, UPON FAVORABLE

Bonds

TERMS,

OF ILLINOIS,

$200,000

OF

Principal and Interest Payable In Gold at the Far¬
mers Loan and Trust Company, New York.
Coupons payable First of April and
October,

City of Louisville 7 Fer

N. Y. Sc OSWEGO MIDLAND R.R.

having20 years to
on

the

C^nt

|

Interest payable semi-annually,
first days ol April and
October, at the
run,

THESE BOND3 CAN BE REGISTERED.

Free! of Government Tax

BANK OF AMERICA.

*

:

■

in this city.
A special tax

has been levied to meet the Interest on
sinking fund of the city amounts

these Bonds, and the

SIX MILLONS OF DOLLARS PAID-

to about f20i,005 per annum.
The City of Louisville has
'

Total Issue

-

Capital Stock
The Bonds

are

a

-

-

-

$2,00 9,000

UP

$3,000,000

SUBSCRIPTIONS.

STOCK

No

bonds issued

to

rt-.ve.iue

$20,000 per mile of road

built and in

running order, BE TNG ONLY

ABOUT HALF THE ACTUAL CASH

Lengtu and Topography.

COST.

The road is

economy

for cash

being built with great

valuable mines of coal.
the line

in the most

the whole line

The local business will make

will be

Valuable Connections.

It is

operation.
the

The line has lately been consolidated with

Indianapolis and Danville Road, making

miles under

over

and

pleted at
of any

being rapidly constructed, all graded

iron and a large amount of rolling
The whole road WILL BE COM¬

LE8S

average

any

par

to nearly 200.

There is

a

day, selling as high as either of them, which
makes the convertible clause a valuable option.
We have PERSONALLY EXAMINED THE ROAD,
and consider the bonds a CHOICE SECURITY; we
therefore take pleasure In recommending them to in¬
vestors as SAFE, PROFITABLE AND RELIABLE.
A large portion of the loan has already been sold.
We are authorized to offer them lor the present at
95 and accrued interest in c urrency.the Company re¬
serving the right to advance the price without notice.
At this price THEY PAY TEN PER CENT in currency

—nearly FIFTY PER CENT MORE THAN THE
SAME AMOUNT INVESTED IN GOVERNMENTS
Gold and all marketable securities received in ex.

change at highest market rates. Bonds forwarded by
express free of charge.




York

are

All

mortgage bonds

running from the City cf
good, and the interest

to these.

For the investment of trust

,2fioY wrw’rt
e.
Nassau-st., New York.

NO.

tive and

accrued

interest

in

DEPOSITS received from Individuals, Firms. Banks,
Bankers and Corporations, subject to check at
sight, and interest allowed at the rate of Foub per
cent per annum.

'*■

*

*

t

*

?

.

11X6(1 dfttfiS

COLLECTIONS made on all accessible points In the
United States, Canada and Europe.
Dividends
and Coupons also collected, and all most promptly
accounted for.
ORDERS promptly executed, for the pnrehaseand
sale of Gold; also, Government and other Securi¬
ties, on commission.
INFORMATION furnished, and purchases or ex^ changes of Securities made for Investors.
GOTLATiONS of Loans, and -Foreign Exchange
effected.

M

Co.,
H 1

1

No. 14 WALL STREET.

R. T. Wilson

8c

Co.,

LATE

WILSON, CALLAWAY Sc CO.f
Hankers and Commission

Merchants,

STRiBt, jptW

44 Bi^OAD
zbfec, /
GovernmentBecurltiee, Stocks, Donds and sdold

\

-

GEORGE OPDVKE & CO.,

Bankers, 25 Nassau St.

.

Interest* allowed upon deposits of GeW sad Cnr»
rency, sntyect to Check at Bight. Gold loaned If*
merchants and Bankers upon favorable terms.' T~

conserva¬

'

<

OTHER SECURITIES.

-

Circulars,
»

v

-

CERTIPICATES OF DEPOSIT issued, bearing Font
per cent Interest, payable on demand, or after

No. 94 BROADWAY & No. 6 WALL STRBTST.
DEALERS IN GOVERNMENT AND

Prise par and

currency.

Co.,

STREET,

&
BANKBB8, 1

sagacious capitalists in exchange

for Government .Securities.

NASSAU

Lockwood

nothing better; and in ex¬
change for Government Bonds they give a
large increase of income, besides capitalizing
the premium. They are meeting with rapid
sale, and we have been gratified to find that
they are taken chit fly *by the most

25

/

(Corner of Cedar street.)

other

or

funds there is

-

No. 14

Geo. Opdyke &

4

pamj>6lets, NjL. on hand for distribnttojb*
<Sc., M
^
JL

BANKER 8,

BANKING HOUSE OF

per

reasonable prospect of the stock of this road, at no
distant

Wm. A. Stxphjbts
G. Fbancis Opdykx.

mile that the Midland is. Among the
bonds now off ring we know of none equal

name

The stocks of several of the principal lines of Illinois

selling at from above

railroads

issued.

Comptrollers

Gkobgk Otdykk.

These advantages

promptly paid, although some of them are
mortgaged far more than double the amount

of the owner if desired.
are

on

New

EIGHTEEN

time, and maybe registered in the

ever

City

GEO. K. SISTABE.
24 Ka8sau-st.

com-

of the best pay¬

November,

For Sale

large and

and it will be

competing line.

issued

THOUSAND DOLLARS PER MILE, are CONVERTI¬
BLE INTO STOCK AT PAR, at the option of the

holder, at

at

office.

aggregate cost far below that

securities

f.

THAN

a

ing roads leading from the metropolis, and
its First Mortgage Bonds one of the safest

Profit of the Investment.
bonds

an

;

cannot fail to make it one

PLETED BEFORE THE 1ST OF JANUARY NEXT.

The

and

Transferable

It shortens the route

profitable local business

and bridged, the track laying at the rate of one mile

'

May

year.

important roads in the

facilities, which must furnish it

Completion of the Road.

.

INTEREST PAID

City to Buffalo 70 miles,
Oswego 45 miles; it traverses a

to

Its present
upward of 11,900,000.

(7) SEVEN PER CENT CITY STOCKS.

populous district destitute of other railroad

management.
At Indianapolis it connects with the Pennsylvania
Central, Baltimore and Ohio, also with several other
lines at Danville, With the Toledo, Wabash and West¬
ern, and at Pekin with Peoria, making a new through
direct route to Illinois, connecting Philadelphia, New
York, Boston and Baltimore with Peoria, Keokuk,
Burlington, Omaha and the far West.

per day, all the
stock provided.

of the most

200

one

The road is

November; and

completed within the ensuing

one

regularly.

No. 40 WALL-ST.

from New York

in

now

done, and
50 miles ad¬

manner ;
in

always met its financial

are

(over 400 miles) it is expected

State of New York.

In addition the Company provide for a large throu jh
business, having as MANY VALUABLE CONNEC¬

TIONS EAST AND WE9T AS ANY ROAD

thorough

ditional will be finished

FIRST CLASS PAYING ROAD.

a

100 miles

;

and

WILLIAM ALEXANDER SMITH & CO.,

The road Is 117 5-100 miles Jn

length, the only East
and West line connecting the Cities of Danville, Urbana, Bloomington and Pekin on the line of the old
Emigrant Road. This section has been justly named
the Garden of the West, and is noted for its large
agricultural and manufacturing products, also for its

promptly

from taxation alone Is

With its comparatively small debt, and the conserva*
tive policy which has always marked the management
of its finances, the -e Bonds constitute one of the safest
and most desirable investments now offered in this
market.
Tne Bonds can be registered at the transfer
agency
the Farmers’ Loan and Trust Company* New-York at
the option of the holder.
Any further particulars can be had on application
at our office.

road under construction;

issue limited

first mortgage on the railway, its

rolling stock, depots, machine shops, lands, and the
entire property of the Company

on

obligations

<

bought and sold on the most liberal terms. Merchants
Bankers and others allowed 4 per f.ent on deposits
The most liberal advances made on Cotton, Tobbacco
Ac., consigned to ourselves or to our correspondent
Messrs, K, GILLIAT A CO., Liverpoa

'

516

THE

CHRONICLE.

[October 28, 1869

Real Estate Sale.
'

■

=-

-

Real Estate Sale.

JL

O. H. PIERSON, Auctioneer.

O. *1.

By A. D. Mellick, Jr., & Bro,,
ACCD0X1U8 AND DEALERS IN K1W JERSEY REAL ESTATE,

J

PIBR90V, Auctioneer.

By ‘A. D. Mellick, Jr., &aBro.,

6 PINE STREET, N. Y.
AUCTIONEERS AND DEALERS IN NEW JERSEY
WEAL

ESTATE,'6

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, AT 12.30 P.M.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26,

ON THE PREMISES,

PEREMPTORY

SALE

OF

THE

ON THE

PINE

STREET, N. Y.

AT 12.30 P.W.

PREMISES,

ELEGANT AND WELL-KNOWN ESTATE OF

A B 8 O L U T E

P.

A.

P1LL0T,

ORANGE,

ESQ.,

N.

BT ORDER OF

has long been known as one of the most elegant
vicinity of New York ; it comprises 140 acres, situated one
from the North Orange Station, on the slope of the famous

in the

mile

W.

J.

This property

C.

EMMET, JR., ESQ.,

OF THE MOST DESIRABLE
PROPERTY IN THE VICINITY OF

Morristown, N. Jv,
and

the best

improved of

Orange Mountain, in the immediate vicinity of the handsome
the
Moorris
residences of Dr. V.arcy, General McClellan, George
Hecker,
beautiful,
Francis Tomes, and many other prominent New York
gentiemer.
The Location is

and

Commanding

Unsurpassed

3 A L E

any ever sold at auction

E'sex

one

Railroad.

The

on

the line of

situation

is

most

of the Loveliest Views in

New Jersey.
of the property most magnificent and extended
views are obtained, acknowledged to be among
the finest in the embracing the
picturesque valley in which the town of MORRIS¬
United State?, embracing the lovely Orange
Valley, Newaik, New TOWN is located. FORI1 NONSENSE
York City and Bay and the Narrows, and all the
beyond, and in the
intervening
From any part

-

immediate foreground the

country.
The property

has been improved for the past thir;y years, and is
diversified, embracing deep
ravines, brooks of the purest spring water, and magnificent
in

Charming Pocahontas

fine condition, with a surface well

The

property has been divided into villa plots of from one-fourth

trees.

of

The mansion is very spacious, 70x90, and contains

thirty

over

and is peculiarly adapted for a summer hotel, an institu¬
tion, or a home for gentlexen of taste; it is perfect in all its
appointments, haviog every modern convenience.

an acre

bidder.

to

A

room*,

The grounds about the house
been

are

beautifully improved, and

three acres, and will be

large

amount

of

positively sold to the highest

money

has been expended in

patting
The

Fropeity in

a

Fine

have

well cared

for, drives and walks, beautiful lawns,
lakes,
fountains and cascades, rustic bridges, ornamental trees and

shrubs,

Lake.

the streets

being

handsomely graded

as

vard C mmLsioners.

Condition,

if done by the Boule¬
The neighborhood is
unexceptional,
as

adjoin¬

large stable and coach-house, hot-houses, graperies, &c.
Spring ing the elegant residence of the late E. BOONEN GRAVES
water from the mountain top is thrown over ail
parts of the Esq., and of W. C. EM ME V, Jr., Esq.
grounds; everything pertaining to the house and grounds is ol the
TERMS—10 per cent and the auction fee of 810 a
moat substantial description.
plot on the
The famous Orange Iron and Sulphur
day of sale, 30 per cent more <n the 25th day of November, when
Spring is near the mansion
deeds will be delivered, and; the balance can
and will be sold with it.
remain on bond and
a

THE PROPERTY IS TO BE ABSOLUTELY
SOLD,
Divided Into

ATTRACTIVE
TO

VILLA

FIVE

The residence will be sold with

This is

a

parcels.

rare

SITES

A. D.




25

ACRESacres

small

apply to COUDERT BROS., 43 Wall

MELLICK, JR. & BRO.,
N*. 28

tions.

buildiogs erected

All

on
on

the map will be sold with restric¬
such plots must cost not Ie38 than

Streat

A FINE COLLATION WILL BE
SERVED BEFORE THE
SALE UNDER A LARGE TENT.

Illustrated maps,

showing the views from

the

in readioess six

days before the sale.
special train will leave the

of land.

opportunity to buy elegaDt property in

For passes and maps

street, and to

some

The plots lettered

85,000.

OF FROM

ONE

mortgage.

A.ML

Free peases now

foct of

property, will be

Barclay street

ready.

An efficient Police Force will be in
attendance.

Foil

particulars at the office of

A. D.

MELLICK, JR. & BRO.-,
16 Plif street, New York*

at 10

W'"V-

Wl1”
4

4

mantel
SM&w* (Staff*, (Stommmfol fiwfle, §aitwag
Panitor, ami §asmum** fmmuil.
A WEEKLY
REPRESENTING

NEWS I* A PEL.
S

THE INDUSTRIAL AND
COMMERCIAL INTERESTS Of THE
UNITED STATES.
i

VOL. 9.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1869.
CONTENT8.

year by uncurrent money,
of the exploded

THE CHRONICLE.

A

Foreign Loan
Reduction of Taxation
Business Changes at the South

617
613
-

The Paet and Future
The Louisville

Purchase
ment

519
620

Convention....

of Bonds

by Govern¬

system.

Changes

in the Redeeming
Agents of National Banke
LatestMonetary and Commercial
English News
Commercial and Miscellaneous
News

521
521
523

621

THE BANKERS GAZETTE
AND RAILWAY MONITOR.

Money Market. Railway Stocks,
U. S.
Securities, Gold Market,
Foreign Exchange, New York
City Banks, Philadelphia Banks
National
Banks,

etc.

Sale Prices N.Y. Stock

Exchange

| Railway News
I Railway, Canal, etc., Stock List.

j Railroad, Canal and Miscellane¬
ous

Bond List

626 I Southern Securities
527 I Insurance and
Mining

528
529

530-1

Journal

..

532
532

THE COMMERCIAL TIMES.

Commercial Epitome

533 I Groceries
534 Dry Goods
536 I Prices Current

Cotton

Tobacco

Breadstuffs

687
538
643

636 1

<&l)‘e Chronic!*.

The Commercial

Financial Chronicle isissued
every Satur¬
day morning by the publishers of Hunt's Merchants'
Magazine
with the latest news
and

up to

TERMS OF
For Thu Oommkboial
to

midnight of Friday.

SUBSCRIPTION—PAYABLE

IN ADVANCE.

city subscribers,

others, (exoluslve of postage,)
For Six Months
...77... $10 00
7^4 Chhomclb will be sent
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to subscribers until ordered
discontinued by letter.
Postage is 90 cents per year, and is
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WILLIAM B. DANA A OO.,
JOHN «. FLOYD, jb.
Publishers,
J
79 and 81 William
Street, NEW YORK.
Post Officb Box 4,592.

ForOneYear

[

16^* Remittances should
Office Money Orders,

invariably be made by drafts

or

Post

A FOREIGN LOAN.

Mr. C. S. P.

Bowles, a prominent American banker, of
Paris, has written to the Secretary of the
Treasury, with the
object of reviving, in a somewhat new

broken banks, and other incidents
Still the benefits of the National

banks may be purchased at too
it is urged, should be content to

high

a

price, and the banks,

receive four per cent
interest,
instead of six per cent on their bonds. This
project has often
been proposed, and there is
nothing new in Mr. Bowles* ver¬
sion of it.
Nor, indeed, has it anything to do with his pro¬

posed foreign loan.
The

principles on which Mr. Bowles rests his scheme are
first, that Europe is the reservoir of capital, and second¬
ly, that we can draw from that reservoir,
presenting our own
terms and
fixing our own rate of interest He points to the
two ;

great French loans to show how abundant
money is in
Europe, and he asks us why, with the credit of this
great
country, we should not get in Paris and London as much
money as we want, at

this, he says, and
doing of it. The
poses to issue at 4

ing 6

Financial Ohboniolb, delivered
by carrier
ana mailed to all

and

NO. 226.

per cent

low

rate of interest.

We could do

immensely in annual interest by the
Tri-currency Consols, which he pro¬

save
new

per cent, would take the

place of the exist¬
he supposes that the holders
to make the exchange. These

Five-Twenties, and

of the latter would be
are

a

glad

the essential features of bis

differ,

as

of which

plan, which does not much
will be seen, from other schemes for
foreign loans,
a

number

always proposed at every session of
What Mr. Bowles fails to show is by what
magic
he will induce persons, who can
buy our 6 per cent bonds at
90 or lower, to
give 100 for bonds having only four percent
interest. It is true, he
says that our credit will receive an
impulse if we pay off the principal of our bonds
immediately
in gold. But
suppose this were so. How are we to get the
means to
pay off these old Five-Twenties? Must we not
get
these
are

Congress.

form, the defunct
means bv the sale of the new
bonds? And must not
scheme of a foreign loan. He
proposes to us ;o issue a new the new bonds be sold before the
old ones can be redeemed ?
series of 4 per cent non-taxable
bon Is, the interest on which
How, then, can the new bonds be sold at the enhanced
shall be payable in
price ?
London, Paris, or New York, at the option The advance which would be
of the holder. These
produced by their payment
bonds, he thinks, can be negotiated at might benefit a
clique of speculators, but it would be at an
par, if, before we negotiate
them, we pay off our matured advance loss to our National
Five-Twenties in gold. The National
Treasury, if
banks, he says, would should be tried and the scheme itself must any such scheme
at once
inevitably be abor¬
accept the new bonds, and receive four per cent instead tive.
But this is not all. Can Mr. Bowles
of six per cent as at
really think, on
present. In this Mr. Bowles is right- reflection for a
moment, that our credit would be
The bauks are creations of the
permanently
Government, and may be com¬ raised abroad if we could, by some
pelled to accede to this proposition by a law
mauceuvering, adopt his
passed for that scheme? What are the facts? We find our annual
interest
purpose. Indeed, there are a large number of the friends
of too heavy a burden to be
the National banks who are of
easily borne. To reduce the
opinion that the banks ought burden by one-third we
to receive no more
pay oft' our whole debt in gold,
than four per cent on such bonds as
they and pay it off with borrowed money. By this
deposit as security for their currency. One half of the
pay¬
profits ment with borrowed money we are to be enabled
of the
currency-issuing privilege ought, they claim, to be the so to improve our credit that we
can borrow at four
per cent
property of the Government. Our National
when we previously had to
banking system
pay six per cent
is a great benefit to the
Mr. Bowles
country, and offers advantages to the proposes to raise 1,200 millions for us
at four
per cent, that,
country far superior to any ever enjoyed under the old
system witn its proceeds, we may pay off 1,200 millions of debt now
of State
banking, under which many millions were lost every at six
per cent Supposing, we say, that the substitution were




.

THE

518
to be

attempted, who does not

be to

lower

our

see

[October 23, 1809,

CW0N1CLE
—i—k

that the efff&t of it would productive efficiency.

credit father than to raise it.

For

Wherever we'turn it is evident that

what-| legitimate |cifmraeirce afd tradefare less profitable than for

deranges and disturbs large masses of bonds, always merly. Complaints are general that small capitalists feel it
tends to depress them in the market, and to unsettle their almost impossible to carry on their business and to stand up
value as investments. If Mr. Bowles had been more convers- against the fierce competition which they have to sustain with
ant with Wall street, and with the ingenious schemes for fund¬ the more ample capital of others around them.
There is evi¬
ing our national debt which have been discussed there during dently a great change in progress in this respect. * Formerly
the last seven or eight years, he would not be so surprised as the small capitalists; in this country seemed ’to have almost
he seems to be that his own schemes has found so little favor. equal facilities in every department of business with men of
As to this writers statements that Europe is the centre
larger means; but the tide of events now is settling rapidly
and source of capital, we are not sure that we understand his in the opposite direction, and there
is more and more tenden¬
meaning. We remember, in the early years of the war, the cy to accumulate capital in large masses. We have several
London Times used frequently to repeat this axiom, and times
pointed out in the Chronicle the inevitable result, as one
argued from it that as John Bull would not lend us a penny of the effects of paper currency and of the inflated and unstable
we must stop
fighting. This financial argument, if Mr. Bowles value which never fail to be developed where the specie standard
wishes to repeat it, we must confute now, as we did then, by
monetary equilibrum is lost.* The same law which we have
pointing to our immense popular loans, especially the earliest shown to rule in Wall street is growing every year more per¬
Five-Twenty loan of 1862, and the last Seven-Thirty loan of vasive in its force, and more general in its sway, until it
18C6.
The former of these was made when the resources of embraces almost all
departments of our industrial life. These
this country were undeveloped, and in confusion at the out¬ tendencies are well
worthy of more attention than they have
ever

break of the war;

and the latter when, after we had passed
through the struggle, and was exhausted with the stupendous
struggle through which we had passed we still contrived, in
one single year, to raise
among ourselves, and without foreign
help, no less than 1,800 millions of dollars. We point to
either or to both of these great loan efforts of this
country,
and we challenge Mr. Bowles to produce in the financial his¬
tory of France, England, or of any other nation, aught that
will compare with them. They are, and were, the wonder of
foreign nations, and the glory and triumph of our own. How,
with these vast resources, we are still compelled to
pay so high
a rate of interest is a
question to which many answers have
been given. As to the methods by which we are to
put mat¬
ters on a more satisfactory footing, there is also
great diversity
of opinion. But assuredly the goal is not to be reached in
the way pointed out by Mr. Bowles.
REDUCTION OP TAXATION.
A

.

involved.
And

in

the first

show that

our

our

financial statesmen.

internal

revenue

It would be easy to
taxation has contributed not

little to increase the

disadvantages of small capital its, and to
absorption by their more opulent rivals. This
discussion is, however, foreign to our present purpose, which
is simply to point out one of the directions in which our taxreform machinery should operate.
Whatever taxes tend to
clog our internal industry, to fetter the productive powers of
the country, to give large capitalists undue advantages over
small capitalists, to check the operation of our producers, and
a

facilitate their

to hinder

the free

circulation

of

our

industrial wealthi-all

such taxes should be forthwith

repealed as pernicious. This
principle applies of course, in the first place and most directly,
to our internal taxation, both that levied on manufacturing
industry, and especially on the product of skilled labor. One
of the chief points of the fiscal policy of any nation should be
to unfetter industry, and as far as possible to guard against
all interference on the part of revenue officials with the processes
session of Con¬ by which the labor of its population imparts new values to

strong effort is to be made in the next
to obtain a remission of a part of the Internal Revenue
taxation. There is no doubt that apart of the depression and
languor which afflicts the material interests of the country and
impairs its productive power, is due to the pressure of
ill-advised and unwisely laid taxes. In consequence of the
vigor
and fidelity with which the Internal Revenue Law has been
administered we have a surplus of fifty millions or more in the
Federal Treasury. It is the pressure of this excess of income
on
expenditure that has given new impetus to the question of
remitting the taxes, and has made it possible to give a favor¬
able answer to the demand. In a few weeks
Congress will
assemble, and it is well to look over the whole ease and to lay
down som3 general principles by which we can
guide ourselves
to a right decision of some, at least, of the
important points
gress

received from

the rude materials of wealth.

These fundamental

principles of taxation are universally
theory. But the difficulty is, that in practice
nothing is so difficult as their wise application. Still the
attempt has to be made. Congress will have the agreeable
task of taking off some fifty millions of taxes, and what we
have to do is to decide which are the most galling, the most
mischievous, the most obnoxious to just objection, the most
opposed to the true principles of fiscal science, the most detri¬
admitted in

mental to the best interests of the country.
We do not design in this place to give an

exhaustive state¬
Congress ought to do in revising the internal
revenue tax list.
We content ourselves with simply laying
down the paramount principles which must be obeyed and
pointing out the general direction of the path which Congress
ment of what

place, taxes cannot be allowed to re¬ will do well to take. The details of the lax reform will come
as
they are. The people will not submit to the pressure up for frequent discussion hereafter. For if we mistake not,
of heavier taxation than is needful to pay the interest of the fiscal
questions are destined to assume a prominence before
debt and the expenses of an economical administration of the Congress greater than has ever been accorded to them before
government. Were the material interests of the country in this country.
vigorous and unimpaired, and had not their prosperity been
Whatever difference of opinion may be provoked with
deranged by the unprecedented monetary spasms of the last regard to the taxes to be taken off and repealed about thos e
six months, it might be practicable to
keep up the present to be left standing, there is we presume little doubt. There
scale of taxation, so as to secure a handsome annual
surplus to are the taxes on spirits, on tobacco, on stamps, and for a
be devoted to the reduction of the principal of the debt. De¬ time we
fear the income tax. With these honestly assessed
sirable as that policy might be, however, it has to be made and
faithfully collected, we should probably be able to repeal
subordinate for the present to the paramount
almost all the reBt of our internal taxation and thus relieve
obligation of
.preserving the material prosperity of the country a and our domestic producers from a weight whioh ’it felt
be
Qf preventing an impoverishment of the national wealth and
oppressive and may *00$ become
intolerable.
main

^




ober

23, 1831.]

THE

CHRONICLE,

519

BUSINESS CHANGES AT TIE SOUTH—TIE PAST AND FUTURE. chase of
grain and wheat now is a surplus, to be sold for oash.
As one result of the
political, social and commercial revo¬ In this way too is the condition of
£the South improved and
lution which has passed
over the Southern States, there is a its prosperity placed on broader and
firmer foundations. ./■/
marked change in the method of
The large cities of the West are
doing business. Formerly
making an effort to extend
the proprietors of
large estates made purchases for the their trade with the South, and
every fresh railroad built isia
multitudes of hands whom
they employed. The planter was new means of securing a foothold there.
There is a value
a sort of small
jobber, or large retail dealer who provided end a certainty to the Southern
crop which makes the promise
for those dependent
upon him everything they needed in the of a sure and stable
business, and none are keener to discover
way of clothing, food, shoes, medicines, &c., &c. He
new relations tuan the
business men who are to take
pur¬
advan¬
chased his supplies in
large quantities, both of domestic and tage of them. There is an evident
disposition,* and one
imported goods, buying either of the dealer in the large strongly developed in the
South, to institute a system of
cities or of the merchant of his
neighborhood, who kept in manufactures. They have water power, and
they propose to
store a large stock.
With the changes effected by the war utilize it. They have iron and
coal, and they can utilize them.
came a
change here. The planter no longer had hundreds They have cotton ; why should
they not spin it ? There 4s a
dependent on him. He had to make purchases only for climate and a soil favorable to a most
diversified industry, and
himself and family. His former slaves became
grouped in there is no reason, not easily overcome, why they should not
families, and family self-dependence began. Each was*the have the busy centres which are so
frequently met with in
purchaser of what he needed or desired. He supplied his other portions of the Union. If
population is needed, ^that
own wants.
Forthwith there sprang up a host of small
shops will come when enterprise is rewarded and labor is well
paid.
in the South,
managed Lby ignorant and incompetent men, If capital is needed, that will flow in where it
may confidently
who soon failed and went out of business. The old
dealers hope for profitable investment. Whatever
may happen, the
grew stronger from month to month and enlarged their busi¬ future can be but
prosperous and bright. The cotton
crop of
ness.
They drew around them a new class of customers. 2,493,000 bales has a valuation of
$280,000,000. To this
The negroes on their small
holdings produced such crops as may be added the value of rice and tobacco, and
sugar and
they could, and with the proceeds purchased goods. It was corn, and the very
large sum that is realized in the produc¬
no
longer dealing by wholesale. The small tools of the tion of the minor crops which now form an
important element
farm and garden, the iron and tin ware and
crockery for in Southern agriculture. 1
houses, harness for animals, shoes, clothing, groceries; in fine
A recent writer in a Mobile
paper suggests that the cotton
all the varied wants and needs of an
agricultural community crop should be kept at its present dimensions in order that the
became matters of individual and
separate interest to the present high price may rule.
He therefore discourages
whole people, and a new
phase came over Southern trade.
emigration and any means by which the volume of labor
The minor villages, the corners and cross
roads, buyers would be increased. The fallacy herein suggested finds no
from which were heretofore unknown in
Northern mar¬ favor among the
thinking classes at the South, which shows
kets, familiar as they were in Southern centres like
a
disposition to produce to its utmost possible limit.
Mobile,
Savannah, Macon, Charleston, &c., &c., now deal directly Scarcity cannot be
organized, nor should it be, so long as
with the North ; and there has also
grown up a wider any man is without clothing or
food or a roof to shelter
and more general system of commercial
traveling than has him. Increased and cheapened pioduction must be the rule
ever before
prevailed at the South. These travelers go from in every enlightened
community. It is the only path to genNew York and Philadelphia, and from the
manufacturing eneral comfort, happiness and wealth.
towns, and solicit direct trade with those with whom business
The conclusion briefly stated of these remarks
is, that the
was
formerly done by the intervention of the Southern South is
growing stronger and richer every year; that it
jobber or merchant.
offers such a market as it has never done
before;'that
So too the general business of the
South, which was small manufactures are to be instituted there
; that the changed
at the end of the
war, has steadily increased, and is course of business
demands an increase of
currency and a
assuming large dimensions, while it is in a more healthy con. new method of
dealing on the part cf the great commer¬
dition than ever before. The merchants come
North thi* cial
centres, and that in the new development of so
season with cash or
large
requiring very short credits, while the and populous and important a
portion of the Union, the
vastly increased number of independent “customers” in the whole
country will find its prosperity expanded, quickened
Southern States enhances the demand for
goods both in quan¬ and assured.
tity and variety. At the same time the demand for the finest
class of goods is
THE LOUISVILLE CONVENTION.
increasing. The new wants and methods of
trade are the direct outgrowth of the new
Before the war, Southern Commercial
system of labor.
Conventions were
This changed business at the South
requires for its transac¬ common enough. There was, however, much of fretfulness
tion an increased volume of
currency. Business transactions and dissatisfaction in them, and
they were most emphatically
are more
numerous, and the interchange of commodities sectional. Since the
war, this has all
i.

'

being

active, a large quantity of circulation is requisite
to keep
pace with the accelerated rate of the
community.
There is a change also in the method of
moving the crops.
Formerly, the factor who took the product of a great planta¬
tion

more

working

this crop.

one or two hundred

hands, made advances

on

changed, several comat the South, but in
each there has been manifest far more of a national
spirit
than had animated their
predecessors.
The last great
gathering was at Louisville, Ky., on the 13th inst., to which
delegates appeared from 29 States. ' Of the whole -number,
(more than 620 in all,) 277 were from Southern States, 107
mercial conventions

having been held

The merchant also made advances. Now the
quantity of cotton is raised by a score or more of
men? from Western, and 32 from the Eastern and Middle {States.
with each of whom a
proportionate credit is created at the The Convention had for its
presiding officer Ex-President
factor’s or the merchant’s. The
negro comes in also as a Fillmore, and on the roll of its
delegates were many promi¬
proprietor, and he has his four bales or his twenty bales to nent merchants and
representative men of business from the
sell. The
community is raising its own food far more than various States from which
delegates appeared.:' There was
formerly, hence there is a renewed activity in domestic manifest a generous
patriotism, a comprehensive public spfrifc,
exchanges, anc| jhe oottop whjch formerly went for the pur* a forbearing
disposition and an intelligent view of 'the great
same




520

THE

86.On

CHRONICLE.

cereals of the country in the development of its resources, so
that all sections should be benefited. If local or sectional
ideas obtruded themselves, or if politics appeared, these

[October 23,1869.

ditions and industrial resources wa3 reported, b As the General Agent in this matter M. F. Maury was recommended,
Chinese immigration provoked a marked dissonance of opin-

opinions were checked or modified, and the action taken was ion. It was concluded to leave that matter .to the States and
good of all.
to private interests. The debate on this question was mainly
In arranging the business of the Convention, committees confined to Southern
delegates, and considering the fact that
were
appointed, and reports were made on the following the Convention at Memphis was so decidedly in favor of Asia tic labor, the result reached here shows
•ubjects:
perhaps not so much
1. On Southern Pacific Railroad.
a
change in Southern sentiment as it does the general discus¬
2. On Railroads in General.
sion of the subject and the expression of hostile views by
Direct Trade with Europe.
4. On Immigration.
men who were not members of the
Memphis Convention, but
Finance and Banking.
for the

who have reviewed its action.

6. On Manufactures and

Mining.
7. On the Mississippi Levees and Improvements.
8. On the Tennessee river and its
Improvements.
9. Oi River Navigation, Canals and other
Improvements.
10. On Agriculture.

On the

subject of “ Banking and Finance ” the Committee
following report, the recommendations of which it
will be seen, coincide in the main with the views and plans
ippi expressed and proposed by Senator Sumner:
made the

11. On continuous Water Communication between the Missis
river and the Atlantic seaboard.
12. On the removal of obstructions to a

cheap and

through the Mississippi into the Gulf.

<

easy

1. The wealth of a country consists in the net value of its produc¬
tions, and all financial measures must be determined in the light o f

outlet

18. On Miscellaneous Business.

.

this fact.

With regard to the Southern Pacific Railroad there
three

2.

were

from a committee of the late convention at
i
.
Memp , a
ajo lty and minority report from the committee appointed by the present convention. A vast arrav of
1
1
statistics was given, and the whole
subject was reviewed at
great length. The conflicting views related chiefly to the
Of th, red, „nd .. lb. HU of lalilud. in which it
should be constructed; but the route finally determined
upon
... on the 32d
I..,ing to th. fcgU.tlo. of Co..
gress the terminus on the Mississippi river.
Closely allied to
this question was a discussion of the influence of this railroad
in inducing immigration, in opening new
markets and in puttiDg an end to the difficulties with the Indians. The resolu°
tion embodying the views of the convention
upon this point
reports,

tut

i

•

„

one

i

0

m..

.

.

^

i •

.

#

was as

,

n

•

,

.

.

j

a

«...

1. A free banking law, with efficient and certain

=
measures

for

KT*
until specie payments

are

leg2al

Saints

resumed.

of the Government will allow.

8PP,i?d Sor,fa8ter tlha" U

nefinSe
In

case

national bank currency is

ba fa™iebed

.caD
“nd«r and second to the
stated, preference to be given first to the South the conditions here
West, until the whole currency in circulation be equalized upon the
basis

population.
Secretary of the Treasury to regulate all his actions
by the wants and necessities of the Government, and leave the people
to manage their money markets and their business in their own mi
ay.

follows:
*

.

Currency is not a product of a country, and is not property, but
medium to facilitate the exchange of property.
3. Currency values of property and an irredeemable currency reguI late themselves by each other, so that except temporarily, the amount
Gf irredeemable currency in circulation in no manner regulates the
ease
°f the money market, or influences the rate of interest.
4.
irredeemable currency retards production by the fact that it
Measures the value of property so unsteadily a. to destroy conedeoce.
It prostrates industry, unsettles society, and should be and can be bail

only

l)‘rect the

.

Resolved, That this convention memorialize

Congress to grant the
just to a Southern Pacifie railroad from San Diego, Cal., via the junction of the rivers Colorado
ii
Av
and Gila, along the valliy of the Gila, and south oi the same to El
1 ,je Proceedings of a meeting of Southern gentlemen held
Paso, on the Rio Grande, and thence to a convenient poiut near the in
82d parallel of north latitude east of the Brazos or near that river in mi Washington in July were • submitted to the Convention.
,,
.»
.
4
the Slate of Texas; to which main trunk feeder-roada
maybe built
proposed to planters to sell their products
from Leavenworth, St. Louis, Kansas City, Cairo,
Vicksburg, Memphis, for gold only, and asked for the establishment of banks under
New Orleans and Galveston on the east, and Guaymas, Mazatlan and
i
•
n
.
•
T
4
San Francisco on the west, and such other roads on the east or west as State ldws on a gold-co,n baslaIn regard to taxatloa ‘he
may be desired, with equal right of connection to all.
Convention asked for a repeal of the law of 1801, providing
The second subject in the order of business was “ Railroads for a Direct Land Tax. The
tax, they allege, i3 not imperatively
in General.” The committee wisely refrained from
right of

way

and such subsidies

as

may seem

an

0

These gentlemen

.

.

specifying
They recommended co-operation in railroad
management, the remedy of breaks and obstructions in railway lines, the connection of tracks and uniformity of guage.
In their resolutions they
urge the building of railroads to the
Gulf ports, in order to make an outlet for
produce which
local

seeks

market in the

West

Indies, in Mexico and South
America, and they advocated the system of low fares to persons
intending a settlement. They also recommended the
construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad.
“Direct trade with Europe” was the third

subject which
€ngaged th® time of the Convention, we have not the space to
give any portion of tbe interesting discussion upon this point,
The Committee recommend tbe organization of
steamship
lines between this country and Europe, and the
subsidizing of
the lines by Congress. They ask for a modification of the
navigation laws so that Americans may purchase foreign
ships; they demand the abolition of the tariff on shipbuilding
material, and they ask Congress to declare ports of entry all
cities in the West and South which have a
population of
100,000 and upward.
The general subject of
“Immigration” attracted much attention and elicited a spirited debate. The convention favor¬
ed the introduction of a million
Europeans, and a comprehen.
•ive plan of enlightening Europe
upon the advantages of the
region below 36° 30', and of making known the climatic con-




,

.

.

.

needed by the Government, and its collection would fall
heavily upon the South. In the North and West the tax was
collected at the time, but the condition of affairs at the South
required it to stand over until after the war. On the subject

objects.

a

.

of

revenue

the Committee recommend the modification of the

tariff.

They also said that “ the present system of Internal
simplified so that the revenue
shall be derived from a few sources, and those such as tax the
I follies, extravagancies, and vices of the people, rather than
the honest industry of the country. They recommend that
the Internal Revenue should be collected from taxes upon the
following articles : Licenses, stamps, tobacco, liquors, distilled spirits, and from land sales, fines, and forfeitures.”
From these sources they anticipate a revenue of $327,000,000, a sum deemed more than sufficient to meet the expenses
of the Government to pay the interest on the debt and to
provide a sinking fund of one per cent, which, in thirty years,
Revenue taxation should be

would liquidate tbe debt.
The Committee on the “Mississippi Levees” favored the
construction of these works on a general plan to be inaugurated
by the Federal Government. It was remarked that under the
former system of labor the planter had often scores or even
hundreds of hands whom he at once could set to work if
occasion occurred, but that now no such force was at his dis¬
posal.
A report was also made in favor of the improvement of tbe
.

October 23,

1869.]

THE

CHRONICLE.

521

Tennessee

river, the removal of obstructions from the
Cateat fllonctarg and Commercial
Mississippi, and such a regulation of bridges as will secure
(fttjjUaf) Nemo
navigation from needless obstruction, and at the same time
I From our own Correspondent,
j
afford reasonable
facility for railroad and other traffic across
London, Saturday, Oct. 9, 1889.
these streams.
Notwithstanding the dulness of trade, and the unfavorable reports
which

The report on continuous Water
Communication between
the Mississippi River and the seaboard
was in the interest of
what is called the “ Central Water
line,” through Virginia.
But that part of the
report was modified and altered and no
State interest was

however,

especially commended.

dicidedly and with good

was

The

markets of the world.
The twelfth
treated of

Whereas, All the

harbors and bars

and navigable waters of the
belong properly to the United states,
purchase of Louisiana and Florida from Spain, and by the articles by
of
annexation of Texas ; and
by treaty with the mother country ; and
whereas, the development of the industry
and creation of trade over
the countries, States, and Territories are
dependent upon these harbors
and bars ; therefore be it
resolved,
1. That it is the
duty of the Government of the United States to
protect and improve these bars and harbors to an extent indicated
by
the present and
prospective trade of the same.
2. 1 hat in consideration of the
foregoing premises, and the reasons
assigned for the same in the accompanying report, this Convention does
recommend to the Government’s
fostering care and improvement, the
bare and harbors at the
ports of Wilmington and Savannah ; Mobile
Bay, at Atchafalaya Bay, at the Sabine Pass, at Galveston
Bay, at the
mouth of the Braxos
River, at Pa^e Cayallo and at Pass Aransas.
This concludes a
general review of the action of this

Gulf and Atlantic

coast

Convention, which adjourned to meet next year at Cincinnati.
It was as we have
said, harmonious, and though it is without
its recommendations, as the mature thought of
business, are worthy of careful study and considera¬

power, yet
men

of

tion.

foreign ports. The
themselves, however, seem to be operating^to a
very trifling
extent, the large shipments which have been made of late
having been
merchants

manufacturers’ account, and,
consequently, at the manufacture!*'
With regard to this
phase in the cotton trade, Messrs. Hocken,
Bird tfc Co., of
Manchester, state :

on

risk.

The most remarkable feature in
connection with the export t ade has been
evidenced in the continuous abstention of
merchants from purchasing for •«>
unusually long a per od iu this market, while, at the same
time, it is well
known that our
shipments have not only been ample, but even more than
sufficient to eupoly foreign
requirement-, and the only inference that can be
ravvn from this state of
things is that manufacturers and others, finding it
impjssib'e to realize a profit at home, have
consigned their productions, to an
unusually lirge extent, to foreign houses, in the
hope that their returns may
show a prr fit, or at least save them
from a Iopb. If this view be
correct, it
wou d appear that the
regular merchant is thus restrained, or
ground, by consignors who are willing to take such risks as kept iu the back
he refrains from
«

subject in the order of business above given,
by a Committee “ on Harbors, Channels and
Bars of the Atlantic and Pacific
Coasts.” They offered the
following preamble and resolutions which were adopted :
was

constantly received respecting the trade of Lancashire,
large
quantities of goo }s continue to be
consigned to

Convention,

in favor of cheap
transportation so as to bring the products of the West into
safe competition with
production elsewhere in the governing
reason

They have at least the merit of directness and they
designed to develop the resources and advance the pros¬
perity of the country. The Convention brought men of all
parts of the Union together and so far effected an
exchange
of ideas which cannot fail to

venturing upon.
With regard to our
exports of the principal textile fabrics to the
United States, it
appears that, in the first eight months of the current
year, we sent away as much as 214,413,160

yards and lbs., which are
Dearly 44,000,000 yards and lbs. more than in the
corresponding period
in 1868.
There is a very large increase in the
exports of cotton and
linen piece goodfl, but of worsted
goo is the improvement has been
trifling. We have also carried on a good trade with France, and there

has been

be beneficial.
we shall have occasion to

BONDS PURCHASED
We

On

some

of the

speak hereafter.

BY THE GOVERNMENT.

published last week a detailed statement of each
purchase of
bonds thus far made by the
Treasury Department, and the total amount

held at date.
Since that time an official statement has
kindly been fur¬
nished us from Washington,
showing the total amount of each class of
bonds purchased up to the let of
October; the totals differ materially
on several classes from
those

published by us, in consequence
inaccuracy of the reports of purchases giveu in the daily journals, of the
which
were
necessarily used as the basis of our compilation. To the official
figures of the amounts held at the beginning of the
present month,
however, we have added the amount of the purchases of each class of
bonds since made, and the statement
given to day, and regularly here¬
after, io the Banker's Gazette of the Chronicle,
may be relied upon as
correct.
The principal
discrepancies which appeared between our fig¬

ures and the official statement we e in
the issues of I860, old and
new,
and in the coupons of 1867.
The following official statement from
Washington shows the amount and description of

Five-Twenty bonds
purchased by the Secretary of the Treasury from
May 1st to September
50th, 1869, inclusive :
Authorizing acts. When payable. Registered.
Coupon.

Feb. 25th,
March 3d,
June 30th,
March 3d,

1862
1864
1864

May let, 1822

Nov. 1st, 1884
“
“ 1884
“
“ 1385

1865
“

“

“

“

“

July let, 1885
...

“

“

1887

“

.

“

1888

Total

6,486,700
705,400
2,34-<,600
2,574,900
3 340,10)
2,852.350
252,000

18,590,050

3 l,50J

Total.

6,526,200
705,400
'

4,977,600
1,244,1'0

12,968,350
13,245,90 >
1,575 500

34,100,950

7,326,200
3,869,090
16,3)8.450
16,098,250

1,857,500

52,691,009

CHANGES IN THE REDEEMING AGENTS OF
NATIONAL BANKS.
The following are the
changes in the Redeeming Agents of National
Bicka for the week ending October
21, 1869.- These weekly
changes
are furnished by,
and published iu accordance with an arrangement
made
with the Comptroller of the
Currency.
LOCATION.

Connect! ut.
Hartf rd...

Tennessee.
Nashville

.




NAME OF BANK.

The Mercantile Na- Thx. National
Hide and Leather Bank
t.onalBank.
of Rcston,
approved in pace of The
[ Suffolk National Bank of Boston.
The Third National The Louisville
City National BanV,
Bank
approved in addition t-» The Fourth
National Bant of New
York, and
The Third National Bank of
Cine nnati.

diminuition in the

shipme ts of goods to the HanseTowna
[very important at the present time, when so many
assertions are made that the
foreigner is depriving us of a large part
of our trade. The
following figures show the exports of the principal
fabrics to the United States, France and the
Hanse Towns,
during tha
first eight months of the present and last two
years :
are

TO

THE UNITED STATES.

1867.

Cotton piece goods
Cotton yarn

Linenpiece goods

....yds. 60,258,307

Linen thread.
Silk piece goods
Woolen cloth

1868.

58,418,883
1,123,697
54,512,005
837,184
■

..yds.

2,851,158

....yds.

2,979,063

.

Carpets and" druggets
Worsted stuffs
Total

253,983
2,096,396
2,257,847
51,008,956

170,5C8,931
-

Cotton yarn
Cotton piece goodB.
Cotton thread

TO FRANCE.

....lbs.

3,203,364

...yds.

29,779,980
46,4)7

.lbs.

..

Linen yarn

-

1,229,757

....yds.

14,036,742

Total

Cotton yarn
Cotton piece goods
Linen yarn

2,402,503
21,726,308
84,999

1,799,628
2,352,811
5,668,971

Linen piece goods
Woolen yarn
Woolen cloth
Carpets and druggets
Worsted stuffs

—

.yds. 57,331,350

..

lbs

Linen piece goods
Linen threau
Wo len yarn
Woolen cloth

..

..

Carpets and druggets
Worsted stuff 1...

.

lbs.
lbs.

yds.

5,691,551
290,186

13,279,193
357.975

yds, 30,796,252

599,628

10,674,668
46,531,176
26,759,300

55,705,352
6,009,623
6,071,050
224,332
15,118,795
3**36,760
89,305
34,451,834

Total

144.766,401
The London cotton market has been firm this
week,
rise has taken place in the

1869.

80,887,616

1,291,101
72,189,126
839,699
296,828
2,102,948
3,922,801
52,881,549

214,418,160

1,153,099

29,151,730
146,899
2.234,375
3.047,800
2,714,300
1,869,776
677,: 50

11,386,201
52,381,520
20,848,066
52,792,860
5,215,309
6,890,423

152,700
12,587,913
641,445
105,366

45,197,936

144,432,017

and a further
quotations. At Manchester, a moderate
amount of business has been
transacted, but the improvement in prices
has been slight and partial.
With regard to the trade of this city,
a
report states :
Tho market has again relapsed into a state of
sluggishness and comparative
In the early part of the week the
Liverpool cotton market im»
proved upon the receipt of advices regarding the new
crop of not quite so
Javorable a nature as had been
anticipated, and this market responded so far
as to enable producers to make
sales at prices for which
they had praviouily
contended, but had not been able to obtaia. Since
Wednesday, however, a
much quieter feeling has supervened, and
any improvement which occurred a
few duya since has disappeared. The week’s
business has been an average
one, and has been tolerably well distributed
market. This has relieved both spinners and through all sections of the
manufacturers, who have got
rid of their stocks, although at a
sacrifice, and some new contracts have been
made, which, on t <e present scale of production, will
keep them engaged until
the end of the present month.
Usually, November is one of the dullest months
of the year, and producers like to have
contracts which will carry them* into
December; but at present bn ers appear to have done as much as
they wish,
and to-day they have made few
inquiries, and any downright offers which they
have made have been at lower prices than
producers hive yet taken, except in

depression.

exceptional cases.
The following figures

some

give the actual yield of cotton produced iu the
the two last seasons, which also
as the Commissioner can
procure from the adjoin¬

Bombay presidency and Scinde in
includes

REDEEMING AGENT.

no

•points which

are

subjects discussed

are

s

,ch returns

ing native States

:

1867-8

....

Indigenous
Exotic.

bales

1868-9
Ba'es

178,182

131,963

145,802
323,984

re lease of yi Id in 1868-9.

118,866
24\829
78465

522

THE

CHRONICLE.

The cnfavorableness of last season is strikingly shown
by the heavy
decrease in produce compared with the comparatively small difference
in the extent of land under cotton, which was
only 15,459 acres less
than in 1867-8

while,

;

as we

have

the yield

seen,

was

showing the quantities of cotton in stock, the
quantities imported, exported and forwarded inland for consump¬
tion in September;
Cotton

--Americanbales.
cwts.
in

stock

-Brazilianbales.
cwts.

331,538

43,616

4135

141,589

4,851
16,904
81,888
109,723

633,406

and the difference

674,739

....*.*.’.*.*.*

102,976
61,554

17969

8l’,688

709,080

hardly be more than made up, especially should
(be Matoaka (now 147
days out) prove a lost ship.
From the river Plate accounts
tally very closely with those from

737,441

next.

-Eaet Intlianbales.
cwts

61,413

196,893

Total

on

August 81, 1869
99,466
Do Imported duriig
Sept., 1869
12,543

present date.

290*

Cape

return

a

Queensland

Adelaide
Swan River
Van Dieman’s Land
New Zealand

less by 78,000

Arrived to

All 1868

910,669
56,066

New South Wales and
Port Phillip...

bales.
Annexed is

[October 23, 1869.

251,031

can

Australia, but little if any increase this year, and no
promise of any
We have, however, in
calculating tBe Cape imports, to bear in
mind that this year a
during Sept., 1869..
409
94
32
33
considerably increased quantity has been shipped
49
301
direct to the United States, when
Total
compared to the last few years.
112,103
430,770
92,016
133,998
490,802 1,556,822
Cotton exported durEnglish and low foreign wools do not participate eo far in the
ing Sept., 1869
11,215
43,G58
7,72G
11,539
62,040
201,433 improved tone of
Do forwarded in’and
Colonials, and the latter especially show a decline
for cons’ption durwith very limited demand
; Russian and East Indian,
ing Sept., 1869
however, being
41,290
17,417
159,537
25,187
GO,014
235,937 the
only grades of which stocks are at all in excess.
Total
52,505
203,195
25,143
30,770
131,660
437,425
Iron continues in
Cotton in stock on
demand, and prices are very firm. From MiddlesSept 30, 1869
59,598
227,575
64,873
97,222
305,202 1,119,397 borough it is stated that the returns of makers' stocks for
*——.Egyptian
September
Mi;cellan’s-^
Total
show a considerable
bales.
cwts.
bales.
cwts.
bales.
cwts.
decrease, the figures being 68,810 tons, against
Cotton in stock on
68,613 tons in the previous month. The
August 31, 1869
24,463
103,289
8,203
railway warrant stores also
32,002
426,782 1,347,317
Do imported during
show a decrease of about 6,000
tons, and they now stand at only a
Sept., 1869
5,497
25,914
10,335
31,374
322,522
906,109 little over
Do forwarded from in¬
40,000 tons. The consequence of this state of
things has
land towns to ports
been that prices are
during Sept., 1869..
82
considerably firmer, ^nd makers are unwilling to
22
197
*2,143
2,968
book orders at present rates. The
Total
prospects of the winter trade in
29,982
129,2S5
18,538
65,519
749,501 2,316,394 this
Cotton exported durdepartment are very satisfactory.
ing Sept., 1869...
660
3,111
1,961
5,953
83,608
205,749
Do forwarded inland
Although the value of money is rising on the Continent,
chiefly in
for cons’ption durGermany and Holland, there has been increased ease in the
ing Sept., 1869
7,493
money
30,133
7,992
15,846
143,806
472,090 market
here, and a further decline has taken place in the
quotations.
Tota
8,153
39,244
9,953
227,414
21,799
738,439 The bank minimum remains at 2£
Cotton in stock on
per cent, but in the ©pen market
Sept. 30, 1869
21,82)
90,041
43,720
8,585
522,087 1,577,955 bills which will arrive at maturity iu the course of the current
year are
discounted at 2£ to 2J per cent. The
♦Piekings.
supply of money has been
increased this week by the
The following statement shows the
payment of the dividends on a portion of
imports and exports of cotton
the public debt, and as the
into and from the United
supply of bills is limited, the brokers have
Kingdom from Sept. 1 to Oct. 7 :
been seeking for them
during the last two days. The banks and dis¬
Imports. Exp’ts
Imports. Exp’ts
i

Do forwarded fr’m inr
land towns to porta

48,828

48,308

72,552

215,079

*

,

,

....

•

..

•

•

•

.

American
Brazilian
Bast Indian

cwt i 5,825

13,010

55,800
314,255
6,001

9,242
77,099
,759

Egyptian.

Wheat has continued iu

Miscellaneous

11,975

count houses are, much more

2,071

403,910

borrow, and,

anxious to lend than merchants

are

to

as matters appear

at the present time, there seems to be
no
tendency to an immediate or early rise in the official minimum.
The following are the present
quotations for money :

102,781

sluggish state, and a further decline of
has taken place in the quotations. Millers, iu
1868.
1869.
1868.
1869.
Percent. Per cent.
the face of tolerably large
Ppf npnf Ppr
supplies from all quarters, evince no dis Bank minimum.... 2 @...
4 months, ba’k bills
2X@2X 2X@2X
position to operate freely or to run into stock. ,Our importations Of Open-market rates:
6 months’ ba’k bills 2X@2Jrf
2J*@2X
30 and 60 days’ bills 1X@1X 2X@2X 4 and 6
trade bills.. 2X@2X 3 @8)4
wheat, flaur and Indian corn continue large, and are considerably in 3 months, bills
1X@1X 2>*@2X
excess of last year.
Of barley, beans and peas, however, they are
The rates of interest allowed
by the joint stock banks and discount
much less. The statement of imports and
houses are :
exports is as follows :
a

about Is. per quarter

•

oonf

FOR

THE WEEK ENDING OCTOBER
.

Wheat

cwt.

Barley

826,276

536,951
242,707
130,286
26,892
71,047

18

392

7 317

66

27,455

—

corn

346,232
*178,685

Wheat

3,980,641
314,241
809,741

Barley
Oats

Peas..'i

138,971
1,517,747
628,962

corn

159

107

*858

72,948

2,55S,27S

84
1,721
410
....

891

2,371

70,124

061,963
866,830
81,588
355,946
1,238.266
297,173

444

1869.
49s. fid.

1868.
54a. 4<L

Barley

37

8

44

9

24

7

26

11

Oats..

(1S67.
63s. 53.
40
3
25
9

1866.
52s. 2d.
41

23

4
1

1865.
41s. 4d.
30
20

4
6

The number of

grain-laden vessels on passage to th;s country from
ports east of Gibraltar is about 630, against 880 a month since, and
640 at this time last year.

With regard to the state of the wool trade, it is remarked that
within
the last ten

days there have been eome inquiries, and small sales have
been made at full rates, chiefly of good sound fleece and
scoured wool
though low faulty and seedy Australian and Cape have also been asked
for. Altogether we have a sound
healthy market, and prices, if they
do not advance, are at any rate not at all
likely to recede ; the future
will of course much depend on the
supplies to come forward next year,
and if all

’68.

’69.
1X

.1)4

IX

do

14

do

remain

firm, but in France there
to the present time the diminution in
trifling. The following are the rates of
the leading Continental cities :

discount at

At Paris
Vienna
Berlin

2)4.

4
4

...

The Paris
as

low

as

Op. m’kt—»
1868.

2)4

U4

5

4

5

8)4
4

'

1869.

2)*-3

124-2
2)4

Frankfort. 2)4
Amst’rd’m 2)4

12-

the

1)41

-

Disc’t houses, 7 days notice .1)4

is still considerable ease, and
up
the supply of bullion has been

225

4,834
prices of Englialqwheat, bar!
,

I

1)4

Germany the rates of discount

-

5,406
1,199

’69.

1
,.l
..

B’krate-N
1868. 1869.

Thejfollowing figures show the average
ley and oats in England and Wales for last week, compared with
four previous years:
Wheat

Iu

(fjEFT. 1).

30,017

39,512

Beans

160

3,092

’68.

Joint stock banks
Discount houses, at call

15,959

301,146

627

SINCE THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE SEASON

Indian
Flour

Imports. Exports

8,767

125,607

Indian
Flour

1869-69

,

Imports. Expo’ts.
79,579

O.its

Peas
Beans

3.

1869-70

r-B’k rate—>

1868.1869.

TurlH

2@2X
6

5

Brussels ..2)4
Madrid... 6

4X
3X

Hamburg

3X

St.

.

Petb”g.

—

7

5

r-Qp. m’kt—
1868.

—-

2)4

1869.
—

2)4-8 2)4-3
1)4
6)4

—

-5)4

4
6)4

exchange remains low, short bills having been negotiated
12^d. Gold is in fair demand for export, and all our

25s

importations continue to be absorbed. Silver is also firm and is
inquired for on Continental account; but Mexican dollars, owing to an
absence of a demand from China, are
vtry quiet. The following prices
of bullion are from Messrs. Pixley’s Circular :
GOLD

s.

BarGold
do
do

fine
Iieflnable

Spanish Doubloons
South American Doubloons...
United States gold coin

peroz.standard.
do
do
per oz.

do
do

Nominal.

77
77
77
75
78

76

d.
9
9
11
0
9
4

8.

d

@@77 Wf
@—
0
@76
0
@74
@—

SILVER.

d.
d.
per oz. standard nearest.
OX @
5 grs. gold..
1
do
@ — —
peroz.
@ - quiet per oz.
Spanish Dollars (Carolus)
none here.
per oz.
Five i'rauc pieces
per oz.
11X &
Quicksilver, £6 17s. per bottle; discount 3 per cent.
Bar Silver Fine
do
do containing
Fine Cake Silver
Mexican Dollars

—

we hear from the colonies is
true, these will certainly show
In the Stock Exchange the more
important feature is the flatness of
increase, and should this be the case, we believe the
the foreign market. Consols have also been flat, but 6-20 bonds have
consuming
power of this country and the Continent is quite capable of
taking off continued to rule firm. Atlantic and Great Western, Erie and Illinois
everything at even a higher range of prices than those now current. Central
Railway shares are very flat. The highest and lowest prices o f
As to supplies in 1869, we seem
likely, after all, to show but little if Ooneols and of the principal American securities on each day of the
*ny increase on 1868, Up to the present we stand as follows;
week are subjoined:

no




■■

£ 4 -

October 23, 1869.]
Oct. 9.

THE CHRONICLE.

Monday. Tuesday. Wed’ay. Thu’ay

Consols
U. S. 5-20’a, 1882....
U. 8. 5-20s, 18*4.
U. 8. 6-20S, 1885
U. 8. 5-208, 1887..
<J. S. 10-408, 1904....
Atlantic & G’t West.
consol'd moit.b’ds
Erie Shares($100)..
Il’inois shares ($100)
...

..

93

-93% 93%-93%
S3%-84% 84 -84%

81

-83

81

-83

Fri’ay. Sat’day.

The failure of the banks to which the
bonds were issued, and
which were
expected to pay the intereat upon them
semi-annually,left
these obligations
unprovided for, and since 1841 the State has been in
default in regard to them.
The Legislature of Arkansas at its last
session passed an act authoriz¬
ing the issue of new bonds in payment of the
principal and interest upon
the whole debt. The new
bonds amount, with back
interest, to the
sum of four million four
hundred and twenty-five thousand
dollars; they
have been issued, and are now

93%-93% 93%-93%
-84% 84%-.... 84%-84% 84 -34%
81

84
81

-83

-83

81

-83

8L

-83
8S%-83% 8S%-83% 33%-84 83%-.... 83%-....
82%-82% 82%-82% 82%-82% 80%-.... 32%-.... 83%-84
82%75%-<6% 75%-7 6 75%-76% 76%-....
75%-75% 75%-76

...

27

-28

28
24
94

-29

28%-28% 28%-.... 27%-27% 27%-24% 24%-24% 23%-24% 22%-23%
23%-23%
94 -95
94 -95
93 'a -94%
93%-94%
The following return shows the
present position of the Bank of
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of
Consols, the average
value of English wheat,
the
40 mule yarn,

years:

23%-24%

94

-95

-93

Bank post bills
Public deposits

1805.
£

1866.
£

1867.
£

Reserve

Coin and bullion
Bank rate....
Consols
Price of wheat
Mid. Upland cotton...
40 mule yarn, fair 2d

7 p. c.
89

4%

1808.

079,S61
7,557,442
18,802,8)0
12,894,872
17,164,! 97
14,681,999
24,1(9,034

22,801,769 24,586,250
7,228,737 6,266,199
17,454.673
12,419,043
22,149,550
5,074,151
7,494,841
12,786,346 16,467,506

25,297,000
5,306,62 i
18,022,446
15,039,716
16,054,123
11,060,' 30
20,707,945

2 p. c.

p-c.'

24%d.

63s. 5d.

8%d.

quality

3,971,069

19,642,125
15,211,953
10,377,534
10,212,458

19,477,92

Is. 9d.

Is. Id.

Is.

2%

10%d.

2s. 6d.

41s. 4d.
-

24,834,293

2 p. c.

89%
52s. 2d.
15d. ‘

94%

9i%

*

p. c.8

93%

54s. 4d.

49s. 8d.

*12% d.

l%d. *ls. 2%d

COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
Imports

and

Exports

Week.—The imports this week
slight decrease in dry goods, but are about the same in
general
merchandise, the total being $3,737,789 against
$3,904,031 last week,
and
for

Tennessee Debt—The biennial
report of the Comptroller of the
State of Tennessee, as submitted to the
General Assembly, shows the
following relative to the State finances :
To balance in the
Treasury Oct. 1,1867, $689,950 54.
Less the follawing credits: Over checks iu
banks, $30,016 30 ; paid
members of the Legislature
by Dr. Stanford, Treasurer, $1,932 84;
Bank of Tennessee
money, $311 64 ; Tennessee National Bank, Mem¬

1869.
£

£

25

Other deposits
13,606,498
Government securities 9,811,242
Other securities
24 086,476

show

ready to be exchanged at the American
in this city ; and provision has been
made by
law for raising a sufficient amount
by taxation to pay the interest upon
these new bonds as it becomes due.
This act of the State nf Arkansas is
honorable to its people, ani
they
will find it
advantageous to themselves in the growing
prosperity and
improved credit of the State.

Exchange National Bank

price of Middling Upland cotton and of No.
fair, second quality, compared with the four
previous

Circulation, including—

the

a

523

phis, $58,142 71, making a total of $90,403
49, which left an actual
balance in the
Treasury of $499,547.
Amounts paid into the
Treasury on warrants issued for the two
yearsending Nov. 30, 1869, and on previous issues, $5,387,629 55.
Grand total received and in the
Treasury, $5,887,176 90.
Within the same time there has been
paid out of the
$5,857,967 06 ; leaving in the Treasury Oct. 1, 1869, $29,209 Treasury
54.
The following gives the
receipts and expenditures for the first year
ending Oct. 1, 1878 :
To balance in the
Treasury, Oct. 1, 1867, $499,647 05.
Payments into the Treasury on warrants issued this
year, and on
former issues, $2,545,747 49.

Payments out of the Treasury on warrants issued this
$5,888,204 the previous week. The
year, and on
exports are $4,149,217 this former issues, $3,023,945 52,
leaving a balance in the Treasury on the
week, against $6,284,857 last week, and $5,011,442 the
1st of October, 1868, of $23,319 02.
previous week.
The exports of cotton the
The following gives the
past week were 11,433 bales, against
receipts and expenditures for the second
year, ending Oct. 1, 1869 :
7,921 bales l ist week. The following are
the imports at New York
To balance in the
for week
Treasury, Oct. 1, 1868, $21,349 02.
ending (for dry goods) October 15, and for the week
Payments into the Treasury ou warrauts issued this
ending
year, and cn
(for general merchandise) October 16:
previous issues, $2,842,209 06.
FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR
THE WEEK.

1866.

,

Drygoods

1867.

1868.

$2,100,437
General merchandise..
2,961,544

$1,451,270

Total for the week.._ $5,061,981
Previously reported... 234,801,422

$5,281,277
198,228,013

Since Jan. 1

3,830,0 -7

$1,577,323

$1,319,456

3,794,136

2,418,333

$5,371,459

$3,737,789
240.316,760

197,685,2.6

$239,863,403

$203,509,290 $202,056,065 $244,054,549
reportof the dry-goodstrade will be found the
importBoi dry
goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the
In

Payments out of the Treasury on warrants issued this
issues, $2,834,348 54.
Balance iv the Treasury 1st
October, 1869, $29,209 54.
The following is a statement of the State
debt proper :

former

1869.

our

Turnpike

Bank of Tennessee
Railroads

1866.

Previously reported....
Since Jan

The

1

following

1867

$4,6S0,159
150,544,644

142,909,242

Total

$4,030,169 66
The State has loaned to
turnpike roads $545,000 in bonds.
Tho following is a statement of the
Railroad debt:

“

$156,125,800

Havana,
Spanish gold
city of Wash¬
ington, Liverp’J,

63,600

16 -St.

3,000

Silver bars
1,500
13—St. China, Liverpool,
British gold .'.....
200,000

State bonds loaned
Bonds indorsed by ihe State
Funded interest
Interest to July 1, 1866

S lver bars

British gold
16—Su Lafayette,
Cold bars
Silver bars

Havre,

49,400

240,000
1,545
32,500
9,730

$26,412,000
.

2,196,000
8,213,046
2,806,477

Total

port of New

Bri ish go’d
Americau go’d...
14—Sc. Morro Castle,

Mexican do lars..
24,000
12— St. Hammoni», Faris,
Gold bars
43,938
S anishdoubrns.

Foreign coin

151,976,583

$3,344,606 66
735,553 00

Funded Interest

Claim of the United States

:

...

“

18t9.
$4 149,21.7

$3,351,454
128,807,937

$155,224,803 $147,264,985 $13 >,159,391
will show the exports of specie from the

York for the week ending Oct.
16. 1869
Oct, 12—St. Hammonia, London,
British gold
$111,600
“

1868.

$4,355,743

658,000 00

...

Total....

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE
WEEK.

For the week

$1,228,866 66
1,000,000 (0
410,250 00
48,000 00

Hermitat'ePurchase
State Capitol

exports (exclusive ofspecie)from
foreign ports, for the weekending Oct. 19 :

the port of New York to

..

year, and on

$34,127,524
vs.

assumed, $130,804.
Claim of the Ur iled States

assumed, $380,756 24.

vs.

Edgefield and Kent^ky Railroad

Memphis and Clarksville Railroad,

This added to the former
total, makes $34,639,084 89.
The total debt,
including State debt proper, bonds loaned to turn¬
pikes, bonds loaned to railroads, is, by the above
figures, $39,264,244 55.
Since the war there have been loaued
to the railroad
companies, in
bonds, $18,292,00 >, and to turnpike
companies, in

bonds, $55,0 0—
making a total of $13,847,000.
The following
600
despatch is of interest in this connection :
Foreign coin
Mexican dollars..
33,900
25,410
Nashville, Oct. 18.—In the Senate, to-day, the
16—St. Alaska,
Aspinwall,
Gold bars
following resolutions
61,701
were
American silver..
unanimously adopted :
63,389
Total for the week
Resolved, That the people of Tennessee will never
signalize their
$1,010,513 restoration to the control of
Previously reported
public affairs by countenancing, in
27,383,254
any
manner, a disregard of their public
Total since Jan. 1, 1869
obligations.
Same time in
Resolved, That under strict retrenchment and
$28,393,797
| Same time in
rigid economy in all
1868
other respects, all the avaiable revenues
$66,840,470 | 1859
and resources of the State
imv7
“

14--St. Main,

Bremen,
Foreign silver....
14—St. Main, London,

43,000

should be

1858

1866
1865

faithfully appropriated to the payment of the interest on
bonded debt, and the
security of the principal at maturity, for
which they are in honor bound.
Mr. A. J. Fletcher,
Secretary of State of Ten esiee, in a letter to
the New York Times remarks that
statements to the effect that the
business of cancelling old bonds and
issuing new ones has been conducted

1857
24,253,204 1 I 1856

1Sh4

our

36,422,507 1 1855
37,214,859 | 1854

1868

1

1882.
1881

1 1858

1860

The

2,700

41,062,911

j1852

imports of specie at this port during the past week have

been

in a careless manner, without full and
accurate record of
all untrue, and that all the

transactions, are

proper books have been kept and the
business conducted with the
.usual care practiced in such
Oct. 12—St. Deutschland,
operations.
He says further :
Bremen,
Gold
$20,021
Gold
u
$116,160 Oct. 13—St# Donaii, Rio
“
Janeiro,
Any able business man, if he could be untrammeled, can take
12—St. Russia, London,
Gold
3,210 of the finances of
Tennessee, and by a judicious management charge
Total for the week
of the
State’s lien on her railroads,
redufee the debt of the State in twelve
$137,391
Previously reported
months to nine million dollars—a sum
14,565,429
that the people of the State
Total since January 1, 1869
would not be conscious of.
Half of the entire debt rests
$14,702,^20 road
Same time 1868
upon the rail¬
v
...........
companies who pay their interest without difficulty, and who are
6,078,849
The State Debt of Arkansas.—The State
already considering the project of buying in the bonds of the State to
of Arkansas in 1827 and an
extent sufficient to
1838 issued bonds to the amount of one
extinguish their entire liability to the State.
million seven hundred and This would
8
certainly be sound financial policy on their pact, and as the
venty-two thousand dollars, to establish a banking institution in that
Louisville and Nashville Railroad
State.
Company has done so, strong hopes
are entertained that other
as

follows:




,

<

....

companies will follow.

524

THE CHRONICLE.

(.October 23, 1869.

,

“

Your correspondent gives the new bondholders the
comforting as¬
that their interest will not be paid for ten years. The duration
of the suspension of the payment of the interest
on the State debt will

The rates of

surance

depend

upon the action of the Legislature, now about to commence.
Some of the ablest men in the State are members of that
body,

including learned lawyers and experienced business men and
large property holders.
Of course no prediction can be safely
made as to the duration of the
suspemion, but lhere is no reason why
payment should not be resumed in two years.
Debt

North

of

Carolina.—A

few

weeks

ago

we

published

freight from New York
First
class.

St. Loifis
Louisville

westward

S?cond
class.

Third
class.
98
90

$1 80
1*18
1 CO
1 00
95
98
82
80

Milwaukee

Chicago..
Oirclnnatl

Indianapolis

121

Toledo

1 00

Cvilumbus
Cleveland
Buffalo
Detroit

are now as

Fifth
clast.

86
80
65
65
62
64

75
75
70
74
61
60
51
40
54

07
50

follows:

Fourth
class.

65
65
50
60
48
50
42
40
84
25
87

52

52
42

from a pamphlet
80
by Mr. Willson upon the debt of North
90
72
47
Carolina, and bearing particularly upon the new special tax bonds of
Western R. R. Gazette.
that state.
The author of the pamphlet
informs us that the notice
in the Chronicle brought him
Sales of Real Estate will be made this week
many letters in regard to the value of
by Messrs. A. D.
those boDds.ardhe calls our attention to the 5th article
Mellick, Jr. & Bro., (now of No- 6 Pine Street) at
of the new con¬
two of the most
stitution in regard to the creation of debt, which
delightful places in New Jersey—at Morristown, on Tuesday, and at
provides as follows :
Orange, on Thursday. There are probably no two locations anywhere
Sec. 5 provides that “unt;l the bonds of the State shall be at
par the
General Assembly shall have no
in the vicinity of New York better known for
power to contract anv new debt or pecuniary
delightful country resi¬
obligation in behalf of the Stat *, except t >
supply a casual deficit, or for sup¬ dences than these.
A very great attraction in both
places is the
pressing invasion or insurrection, unless it shall, in the same hill,
levy a society, which is
special tax to pay the inter* 6t annually. Ai:d the General
exceptionally good, aud renders these two towns in
As-embly shall New
have ro power to ^ive or leDd the credit c f the State in
Jersey very pleas nt places for homes throughout the whole year.
aid of any person, asso¬
ciation or corporation,
Morristown is thirty miles from New York, and the
except to aid in the completion of such raiiond* as
may be unfinished at the time of the
property offered
adoption of this constitut on, or in wh:ch comprises about 84 acres of
the State has a direct pecumary
land, beau'ifully located on a southeastern
interest, un'.ees the subject he submitted to a
direct vote ot the State, and be approved
by a majority of those who shall vote slope, with a very fine view, including Pocahontas Lake, in the fore¬
thereon.”
ground. It has been handsomely laid out with well
Sec. 8 provides that ‘‘every act of the General
gra 'ed streets,
Assemblyjlevyin? a tax shall and ia ih fine c
extracts

.

—

state ihe special object to which it shall be
no other purpose.”

applied, and it shall be applied to

It is to be observed that the constitution
places no limit as to the
amount of bonds to be issued for the
purpose specified, and hence a
further issue beyond the present $10,000,000
might be made. It is
cow rec mmended
to the authorities of North
Caro’ina that an
amendment to the con titution ehould be
immediately submitted to
the people and adopted,
limiting the issue of bonds positively t>
the amount now authorized, the
adoption of puch an amendment
would have an important effect
upon the value of the bonds.

Kansas Pacific Railway.— A
correspondent of the New York
Timet, under date of Sept. 26, writes in regard to this road as follows :
While acknowledged to be at least as
deserving as the Union and the
Central Pacific, the Kansas Pacific was not as
lucky as its compeers;
for when the line had been built to a distance of 393
miles, Congress
suddenly shut down on any further subsidy. However, the road was
last year, by private enterprise, pushed out some
miles further, and it
now abuts at Sheridan,
406 miles west of the Missouri River.
From
Sheridan preparations are under way to extend the line 225 miles to
its natural terminus at Denver, whence it will connect with the Union
Pacific, by the “Denver Pacific Railroad,” anow actively under con¬
struction and to be finished this
year.
THE

Government

GOVERNMENT LAND

is well known, was of the alternate
section within twenty miles of the road on each side.
This gave the
Company above six million acres of land lying between Kansas City
and Denver.
It is worthy of remark, in passing, that this
provision on
the part of the Government
(by which the railroad receives only the

-alternate

or

“

as

odd-numbered”

section) is regarded by the people here
for it completely baulks the speculators
who would, otherwise, absorb
large tracts of land to hoi 1 for a rise.
At the same lime, parties buyi g lands in bulk from the railroad com¬
pany and settling them with actual settlers, are enabled to obtain,
under the Homestead law, the
adjoining (“ even-numbered”) sections
as

exceedingly wise

an

one,

from Government.
ACTION

OF THE RAILWAY

CORPORATION—LAND SALES.

To people ihe wilderness ih ough which the road
the first care of the corporation, and to this end
were

taken.

The

-

runs was,

of course,

judicious measures
Company has been selling and is going to sell, at
«.

80 to 820

other New York gentlemen.
The property is to be soil
absolutely, and has been divided into
beautiful villa sites of from one to five acre-*.
many

Full detai's iu regard to both these sales will
be found in the adver¬
tisement of the Messrs. Mellick, on
page 4.
—We take pleasure in
calling the attention of

capitalists
desire to engage in the manufacture of a
popular and staple article,
to the advertisement of Messrs.
McAlister A Co., in another column.
Corn Shellers are
required by every farmer, and (he fact that this one
took the premium at the

who

Maryland Institute, where brought in
competition with others claiming precedence in the country, is
very
strong, if n t conclueite, evidence of its superiority. There are very
Lw businesses more
permanently lucrative and satisfactory ii their
tesults than the manufacture of
agricultural implements.
The Business

in oper¬
ation.
Ill. Central.,
708

to

movement

confined

our own

countrymen; for, owing to the systematic organization of
the National Land
Company, which works in concert with the Kansas
Pacific Road, very large sa es of land have of late beeu
made to Eng¬
lish, German a d Swedish colonists. Here, for instance, are two or
three illustrations.
They are samples from among many.'
ENGLISH

1. A

AND GERMAN

single English colony,

COLONIES.

few weeks ago, bought 30,000 acres of
land here.
The tract i9 to be divided
among no less than twelve hun
dred different families, the families of well-to do
English farmers and
artisans.
I saw a sere of these
families, who have already arrived.
They bring wi h them the means to stock their fai ms, and build them
selves bouses, and they have
already bought mowing machines, feed
for their cattle, Ac.
2. A Ge man colony has
24,000

acres

north of Junction

PasLoco- eenger
mot’s,
cars.
170
96

Earnings

-

Ratio of

May 1 to

operating

Oct her 1.

expenses.

Landun
sold,
acres

j-

.

the first year of its operation, are
equally gratifying with those of the
Ibinois Central Railroad, after twelve
yeaiB.
Their respective obliga¬
tions are quoted
to-day :
Illinois Central 7 per cent currency Construction Bonds
119
Central Pacific 6 per cent, gold, 1st
mortgage bonds
93#
The two causes, which, in
great part, have given the high standing to
the securities of the Illinois Central
Company, on both sides of the

Atlantic—large surplus earniDge, with the proceeds of land sales, which

together have been invested in their own bonds—are the same which
give great prominence to those of the Central Pacific.
The honorable and judicious
manage Lent of the Central Pacific Com¬
pany, together with the great value of their
property, entitle their

securities to the fullest confidence.
We are prepared to

Railroad

buy and sell the Securities
Compaoy at the current market rates.

a

recently bought

some

of the Central Pacific

FISK A

each, and that the sales have b< en made to over 2,000
different individual. The price h s va»ied from $2 to $6
per acre.
The gross receipts of the Kansas Pacific
Company from these land
sales have reached the large
aggregate of above $600,000, which
would make the price per acre
something less than $3. These sales
are
increasing in a wonderful ratio, while the perfect satisfaction which
emigrants have found in the climate, soil and rich agricultural rewards
of Kansas forms a powerful attr: ction with those who
hear from
Nor is this

Central Pacific Railroad
compares with that
as follows :

64
$3,763,186 (cur'v)
526,000
Cen. Pacific
J
2,812,705 (gold)
690
172
101
7,200,000
1 or 8,656,516 (cur’y)
55
Thus, it will be seen the results of the Central Pacific, attained
duting
.

acres

their old neighbors such good accf unt^.

of the

of the Ilbnois Central Railroad

must hereafter

low prices, fat ms to actual settlers.
In a general wav, then, I may state that the Kansas Pacific
Road
baa this y ar sold upwards of 275,000 acres.
With unimportant
exceptions these saLs have been made to actual settlers, as, indeed,
is sufficiently evinced by the fact that the
purchases have been from
very

Thursday, comprises the
magnificent estate of Mr. A.P. Pillot, about 140 acres, situated one
mile from the North
Orange station, on the elope of the famous Orange
Mountain, and in the immediate vicinity of the handsome residences of
Dr. Marcy, General McClellan,
George Hecker, Francis Tomes, and

Miles

was

The concession,

property to be sold at Orange, cn

GRANT8.

liberal in it-« grants of public land to the builders
of the Kansas Pacific Roa 1; and it is
mainly to this circumstance that
the already-mentioned
astonishing progress of the State of Kansas is

attributable.

mdition.

The

HATCH,

Bankers and Dealers in Government
Securities,
No. 5 Nassau Street.

&1)e

Bankers’

(©alette.

DIVIDENDS*
The following Dividend has been declared
during the past week:

Banks
American Exchange
Nat. Mechanics Bkg. Ass
National City
Pacific
"
UnioD National

PER

WHEN

CENT.

NAME of company.

pay’ble

4
5
8
4ex
5

Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

1.
1.
1.
1.
1.

Oct. 19.

s
1
5

Oct. 18.
Oct. 20.
Nov. 15.
Nov. 1.

Oot. 18.
Nov. 1.
Oct. 28.

miscellaneous.

Columbia Oil
Clinton
Wilkesharre Coal Sc Iron
Rutland Marble
B allroad.
D. D. E.

B’dway Sc Battery...
Cin., Ham. Sc Dayton

BOOKS CLOSED.

2*
m
5s.

Nov. 1.
Oot. 27.

Oct. 19.
Oct. 19.

Oot. 20

.

City, (130 miles west of the Missouri,)
upon which ooe hundred and twenty families are to be
Friday Evening, October 82.
established.
8.' A Swedish
The Money Market.—There has been
colony, a year ago, bought 15/100 acres south of
little change in money
Salina. gThis colony has
already sent out over two hundred familie .” ihovements, the
general course of the market having been steady




October 23, 1869.]
and easy.

For the first half of the week

tances of currency were

^Orleans

THE CHRONICLE
some

considerable remit¬

made to the South,

principally to New
but yesterday and to-day these
shipments have ceased.

;

Within the week several lots of
currency have been received from
Louis, amountiog in tie aggregate to Learly $500,000
; some
remittances have also been received from New
England and from
St.

Philadelphia.

The operations of the Sub-Treasury have been in
favor of the market, its disbursements in the
purchase of bonds
having been $3,500,000, while its receipts on sales of coin have
been only $2,600,000.
Upon the whole, therefore, the course of
currency movements has not been unfavorable to ease. The
banks,
however, appear to anticipate an outfbw of money for
moving the
pork and cotton crops, and hold themselves in readiness to meet it.
The remittances to other sections would be
upon a much larger
it possible to send out small notes ; the lower
denornioations of currency, however, remain
very scarce, and as the notes of
denominations over $100 are of little use far
crop purposes,

scale,

were

remains here.

It is estimated that the banks have
orders

money
their

ou

books for

The

$2

$5,000,000 ot small currency which they cannot execute.
Treasury has thus far issued only $42,000 of small notes of the

denomination,

an

i

no

important

amouut is

before the
of the

expected to be ready

beginning of November; after which period the wants
South are not likely to be
important, although considerable

amounts may

have to
ing of the hog crop.

go to

Ohio, in connection

with the forward¬

In discounts there has been a fair
movement, though perhaps less
has been done than last week.
The banks have
lately increased
their line in merchandise

525

Oct. 15. Oct. 22. I
Oct. 15. Oct. 12
Tennessee Sixes, x c
62
61 #
I Louisiana Sixes
.68
67
Tennessee Sixes, new
55
63# | Louisian* f»ixes, lev<*e
64
64#
North Carolh-a Sixes, old. 47
47# Louisiana Sigh's, levee... 83
North Carolina Sixes, x.c 41#
38
, Alabama Eights
92
9i#
North Carolina special tax
sa# Ge rgia Sevens
91
91
Virginia sixes, old
60
60
Mis80ur Sixes
86#
87#
Virginia Sixe.-, new
52
52# nouth Carolina Sixes, n’w. 65#
67
....

Railroad Miscellaneous Stocks.—In the Stock market there
a
good deal of speculative activity, and mainly in the

has been

direction of

higher prices. The effects of the late panic are disap¬
pearing, and confidence ia steadily leturning. With the uncertainty
as to the
money market preserving a moderate ease, through the
next four weeks, there is,
however, no disposition to press any
extreme advance ; and
yet, with the present un:avorably low range
of prices, operations for a decline a>e undertaken with
some caution.
Ti.e chid Iratuic ol

the

market has been the Vanderbilt Stocks.

The

expectation of an early consumma'ion of the arrangements for
consolidating New York Central and Ha Ison River has caused a
general advance in the stocks under Mr. Vauderbilt’s control, New
York Central having sold
up to 194, Hudson River to 175, and
Harlem to 149fc. The advance in these Shares has
produced a more
buoyant feeling in the market generally. L ike Soore also has been
quite firm, advancing from 89$ to 9i£. Pacific Muil has advanced
from 56£ to 62|,
owing to the Company having made arrangements
with the Panama Railroad
Company for pro-raling on passenger
and freight traffic, on tern s which will enable the
steamers to com¬
pete better with the clippe s taking the Cape route and with the
Pacific Railroad. Erie has been weak,
owing to the strikes in the
Company’s workshops ; the price touched 29. The following have
been highest and lowest
prices for stocks during the week :
The following have been the
highest and lowest prices for stocks
during the week :

paper, and are now disposed t»hold them
prepared for taking more produce bills. Prime paper is
curremt at 9@12
per ceDt.
United States Bonds.—The bond market
rim.ins dull Harem
130# Ohio & Mississippi
27#
26#
though, perhaps, rather more active than last week. The market Hudaon River
162
Northwestern
73#
7<#
Paciflo Mail
do
62#
66#
85
preferred..
83#
having stood the test of a severe depression in financial affairs >ew York Central...
194
177
Rock Island
108# 105
Erie
29
32#
Fort Wayne
84
85#
generally, the dealers appear to have recovered confidence in the Heading
95
97#
St.Faul
65
70#
Michigan Southern..
94#
do
89#
present range of values, and have bought rather more
preferred
82#
79#
freely this
At the close, there are indications of an
week. The savings banks and other financial
effort, by a few promi¬
institutions have
nent operators, to intlnence the market in favor of
also been moderute buyei-9 of bonds, af er
lower prices,and
having been out of the

selves

.

....

....

...

...

....

.

market for

some

time.

the market closes weak.

The Government has

bought $3 000,000 of
The following were the
bond9 during the week. The foreign bankers have
closing quotations of the regular board
not been
buyers
to aDy important extent
compared with those of the six preceding weeks :
; which is somewhat singular
considering
Sept 10, Sept 17. Sept 24. Oct. 1. Oct. 8. Oct. 15. Oct. 22.
that advices from
Europe indicate a probability that bonds may Cumberland Coal
31
31
30
26#
27*
-

....

be wanted for the reinvestment of
coupons,

and tbit this probibility is strengthened by a rise in gold of nearly two points. Prices,
as will be seen from the
subjoined statement, compare closely with
those of list

Friday.
The following are the
closing prices of* leading government
securities, compared with preceding weeks :
L. 8.6’a, 1881 coup
U. 8. 6-20’a, 1862 coup
U. 8. 5-20’a, 1864
44
U. 8.6-20’a, 1865
44
U. 8. 5 20’e, 1866, July cpn
U S.5-20’a, 1867, coup
U* 8. 5-20’a, 18b8, 44
U.S 10-40’s.
44
Pacific Sixes
.

Sept. 17. Sept. 24.
121#

120#

121#
120#

121

121#

120#
119#
:m#

319#
119#
119#
109#
103#

...

....

....

Oct. 1. Cct. 8. Oct. 15. Oct. 22.

119#
121#
119#
1-9#

120

120#

120#
119#
119#

118

118
118
118

118#
109#

119

109#
107#

109

108#

....

Purchases of bonds by the Government durin

107#

119#
120#

119#
121

119#
119#

119#

117#
117#

117#
117#
117#

117#
108#
107#

120

Oct. 20,

1862,

“

coil

.

“
“

Total Bends
5-20’s of
“
44

5-20’a of

—

1864, reg..
1864, cou
1865, reg....
1865, cou...

“

Oct 21

$50,000

now

1862, reg.
1862, cou.
1864, reg.
1864, cou

i23,cbb y.y.v.

“

“
“

“

held

li 8#

107#

Oct. 23. Oct. 21.
new, r. $30,000
’65, new, c. 166.000 1,000,000
’67, reg.... 160,003
’67, cou.. .1,451,000
’68, reg ...
20,000

’65,

’68,

cou

by the Treasury, $60,844,000,
$6,668,700
'

56,500

3,290,000
5,116,9i 0
2,586,000

follows

;

5-20’a of 1865, new, reg....
$3,578,200
“
1865, new, cou
16,210,850
44
’

1867, re*
1867, cou
1868, reg
1,505,200 I
' “
1868, cou
Bonds.—This class of securities has

44

as

13#

Canton Co

204#

Erie
Hudaon River....

...

3,076,150

16

16

61#
172#
83#

68#
175#
83#

182#
35
164

127

SO#
89#

preferred

74

85#
109#

111#

Wayne

87

Illinois Central
Ohio & Mias
Milw & St. Paul.
44

52

17
72

:il#xd!05#

Rock Ielanu
Fort

62#

88#
178#
94#
95#

183#
96#
101#

Mich. Southern..
Michigan Central
Clev. and Pitta d.
Northwestern....

12#

197

37

Reading

44

56

78

12

15#
66#

12#

Pacific Mail
New York Central

....

31#
76#

44

prt
Tol., Wab. & W’n

85

78#

....

13#

....

Mariposa pref....

..

j the past week have
been, on Wednesday, $2,000,000; the total offered
being $8,271,“
000; on Thursday, $L,000,000, the total offerings
amounting to
$5,034,000. The bonds purchased were as lollows :

5-20’s of 1862, reg....
“

Quicksilver

88
137
31
72
82
77

94#
92
130
101
72

83#
107#
S7
139

28#
71#
82#
70

13
•

158
93

12#
•

•

158
96

82#

85#

120

....

89#
€9#
83#

99#
72#
84#
108#

101#
82#

85

131
27
67
80

«

133#
28#
68
>

55

82#
59#

12#
52#
16#
60#

50

16#
66*
177

187#

32#
158*
94*

31#
171*

90#

93#

....

124

122*

102#
71#

100

83#
106#
85#

83#
105#

134

135

71

&5

27#

26*
69#
C2#
65#

67#
81#
64*

The Gold Market.—For the first half of the week the
transac*
tions in gold were confined almost

exclusively to the legitimate
foreign exchange and customs duties,
and the price remained
steady at 130@I30£. Within the last two
days there has, however, been some baying on speculative account
business connected with the

—the first symptoms

since the panic of the 24th ult. of a revival of
speculative transactions. These purchases appear to have been
based upon an idea that gold was
unnaturally low at 130 ; and the
buying on this account induced further purchases by parties who

have been “ short” since the culmination of the wild
last month. From these causes the price

speculations of

to-day advanced to 1311,

but

again fell back to 131£ at the close. The market has been
sup¬
plied with sales of $2,000,000 of gold by the Treasury; the customs
1,696,000
demand ha9 been moderate, and the
State
been without
shipments of specie nominal.
The Gold Room is still
important feature. The leading issues were Tennessees, and the
conducting its business ex-clearing, and
North Oarolinas. Of these latter the “
among the more conservative dealers there is a
special tax” bonds were
strong feeliDg in
weak, and declined from 46 to 39£, though the cause is not favor of permanently dispensing with clearing arrangements. An
apparent. Early in the weak, the Tennessees were weak, but effort to introduce into the Stock Exchange a department for the
transaction of business in gold, was
advanced later, on the strong position
rejected by the Board as inex¬
against repudiation takeD
by the Legislature of that State. Soulhern securities were quiet pedient at present.
Quotations.
44

1863, reg.
1865, cou.

44

16,816,500

327,000

and firm.

The
with

following are the closing prices of State bonds compared
the preceding week:




1

-—,

Open-Low-Hign-Cloa*
ing. eat, eat.
ing.

Saturday, Oct. 16.... ISO 130
Monday,
44 18.... 130# 130
Tuesday, “ 19.... 130 130

180# 130#
130# 130
130# 130#

Total

clearings.

/

Balances
Gold. Currency.

,

•

•

•

•

•

-

•

*•

THE
Wedn’day, “ 20
130
Thursday, “ 21.... 1730%
...

Friday,

“

22.... 131

130

130%

13 >% 131%

130% 131%

Current week... 130
130
181%
Previous week.
1730% 130
132
Jan. 1 ’69. to date... 134# 128%
102%

1698.

130
130^
131%

131%

ending Oeiober lb

f*oans

9
Treasure received from CaiilorLia
-

*•

Specie
Circulation

—*

ISO}.

130%

The
two

by

s'earner

$21,513,526

$
97,5(10

137,391
240,435
2,000,000— 2,475,326

paid out.

Treasury sales of gold

Total reported supply
Withdrawn fur export
Withdrawn for customs
Specie in banks Oct. 16

23,988,852
$10,105,513
3,167,192— 4,177,705
20,399,070

Total withdrawn and in banks
Excess of withdrawals over
reported supply

Foreign Exchange—Has showed
owing to a grain in the demand from

$24,576,775
587,923

steady hardening tendency,
importers, with an inadequate
a

supply of bills, notwithstanding that the exports from this
port and
Southern exports of cotton h ive been
liberal.

the

October 1.
London Comm’l.
107%® 108
do bkrs’/n# 108%®
108%
do
do shrt. 106% ® 1*
7%

Paris, Iona

October 8.
108 ® 108%

169

@1(9%

109%® 109%

5.22%(25.20
5.20 @5.17%
5.28%@5.22%

.

do short

Antwerp

Swiss

Hamburg

5.ix%®5.17%

5.23%@5.22%

.

5.20

5.16%@5.15
5.20

35%@ 37%

@5 18%

®5.18%

35%@
40 %@
40%
40 %@
40%
H remen
18%
78% ®
Berlin.^
70%@ 70%
70% @
The transactions for the week
at
Amsterdam
Frankfort

40 @
40 %@
78 ®

Treasury have
Oct.

been

Custom
House.

Receipts.

$310,000 00
408,000 00
514,000 00
660,000 (>0
374,000 00
292,000 00

as

follows

c5%
40%
40%
73%
70%

October 15.

October 22.

107%® 108%
109 @109%
1U9%@ 1C9%
5.18% @5.17%
5.15%@5.16

108% @ 108%
10U3..'® 1*19%
109% @ 110
5.16 *@5 15
5.13%@5.’2%
5.17% @5.16%
5 17% @5.16%
36 @ 3(3%
40 %@ 40%
40% @ 40%
78%@ 79
71%@ 71%

5.20
5.20

@5.18%

@5.18%
35% @ 35%
40% @ 40%
40%@ 40%
78 %@ 78%
7C%@ 70%

the Custom House aod riub-

:

Receipts.--

-Sub-Treasury.

—Payments.
Gold.
Currency.
Currency.
$650,178 11 $1,583,678 21 $1,952,218 23
$44S,9?6 41
Gold.

610,527 10
843,951 50
810,435 90
931,07S 02
317.632 98

Total. $2,553,000 00 $4 213,803 61
Balauce, Oct. 15
85,045,732 72

202.127 77
3,246,830 40
1,528,520 89
232,358 43
370,473 08

50,726 10
272,704 27

1,013,822 30
130,647 18
61,890 85

7,163,983 78 $3,512,008 93
5,609,62S 36

3)4,985
3,315,823
320,512
2,359,099
1,451,405

34
55
27
00

21

$8,230,751 78

Increase
Decrease

the totals for

July
July

255,424,942
257,00^,289
July
259,641,889
Juiy
260,530,225
Au/.
7. 264.879,357
Aug. 14. 266,505,365

Aug. 21.
Aug. 2S.
Sept. 4.
Sept. 11.
Sept. 18
Sept. 25.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

262,741 133
261,012,109
202,549,839
2G*,804,533
268,496,024
263,441,828
2. 255,239,649
9. 250,749,974
16. 248,537,984

Banks,

Banks.

Atlantic
Atlas

Blackstone
Boston

Boylston
Columbian...
Continental

..

Eliot

Everett
Faneuil Hall....

Freeman’s
Globe
Hamilton
Howard
Market

Massachusetts..

Maverick
Merchants’
Mount Vernon..
New England...
North

...

Old Boston

Shawmut
Shoe & Leather.

Washington

1,066,763 00

New York City Banks.—The
following statement shows the
condition of the Associated Banks of
New York City
ending at the commencement of business on October for fhe week
1(5, 18(39 :
-AVERAGE AMOUNT OF-

we

Capital.
Loans.
$750,000 $1,608,845
1,500,000
2,540,797
1,500,000
3,146,747
1,0<1Q,0C0 1,8S1,049
500,000
1,465,412
1,000,000
2,196,779
1,000,000 1 900,603
1, ('00,000
2,399,910
200,000
534,673
1,000,000
2,532,057
600,000
1,455,165
1,000,000 2,388,461
750,000
1,429,938
750,000
1,813,424
800,000
1,436,468
800,000
1.843.431
400,000
909,642
3,000,000
6,057,230
200,000
597,644
1,000,000 2,279,838
1,000,000
2.262.431
900,000
1,968,384
1 000,000
2.215.659
1,000,000
2,386,700
2,000,000
3,822,944
1.500,000
600,000
2,000,000
750,000

....

3,345,513
1,063,240
3,253,969
1,898,085
3,417.306

Third
300,000
B’kof Commerce 2,000,000
B’k of N. Amer. 1,000,000
■*B’k of l{edemp’nl,000,000
B’kof the Kepub. 1,600,000

City
Eagle
Exchange

1,000,000

Legal

Deposits. Tenders.
179,929,467 46,737,263
183,197,239 48,702,728
188,431,701 51,859,706
193,622,200 54,271,862
196,416,413 56,101,627
200,220,008 56,056,834
196,952,711 54,730,089
192,021,546 53,070,^81

188,754 539
191,101,086
188,82 <,324

185,390,130
180,230,793
183,124,508
179,214,675
178,642,936

give

as returned to the

18, 18G9.

First
1,000,000
Second (Granite) 1,600,000

701,794 63

$571,739

series of weeks past:

Specie.
tion. ~
23,520,267 34,217 973
30,266,912 34,277,945
31,055,450 34,178,437
30,079,424 34,110,798
27,871.933 84,068.677
26.003,925 33,947,985
24,1’4,499 33,992,257
21,594,510 34.0 28,104
19,409,102 33,999,742
17,461,722 3(3,960,035
14,9(2,066 33,964,196
14,5:33,109 33,972 759
13,968,481 33,996,081
15,902,849 3 (,169,409
21,513,526 34,178,925
20,399,070 31,217,114

Boston Banks.—Below

National

a

a

Aggregate
Clearimrs.

846,763,301
676,540,290
711,328,141
558,455,091
614,4 5,487

614,875,683
5*2,821,627
566,650,530
52,792,834 603,801,341

55,829,782 556,889.275
51,487,867 791,753 344

51,259,197
50 025,081
54,209,083
62,017,583

662,419.788

989,274,472
792,893,774
628,380,862
53,229,5)4 534,390,262

statement of the Boston

Clearing House, Monday, Oct.

Specie.
$3,328
1,806
8.586

7,142
1,018

3,902

149*,728
10,876
23,893
14,116
882

14,547
1.586
12,860
21,915

240*784
3S,4S6
45,085

1,433
7,494
107,416
12,260
75,842

12,300

4,530,531
885,744

9,680

4.745.660

L. T. Notes.

$148,975
361,307
220,833
181,150
157,920

330,667
158,958
84,369
42,286
375,208
101,226
252,143
lll,f01
98,917
89,057
245,449
94,740
624,185
93,849
375,142
225,600
430,279
171,738
234.617
396,000
320, *29
131,357
424,009

51,250
399,745
748,900
62,000
689.617
285,993
756,537
2! 6,883
207,643
116,171
143,564
182,575
156,334
61,5(0
266,911
289,859

20,007

2,937

1,859.253

follows:
1,211,916

*

Circula¬

258,368,471

Suffolk
Traders’
Tremont

.$85,747,527 40 $4,542,865 36

.

3.
10.
17.
24.
81.

State

$89,259,536 33
Payments during week 3,512,0U8 93 12,773,617 14
8,230,751 78
Balance Oct. 22..

are

Loans.

July

are as

Deposits.
Dec.
Legal Tenders........ Inc

.

following

•

overlaud
ports

Imports of specie from foreign
<'oin interest

Dec $2,211,990
Dec. 1,114,416
Ino
88,189

:

Specie in banks Oct.
“

[October 23, 1869.

The deviations from the returns of
previous week

General movement of coin and bullion at New
York, for the

weeks

CHRONICLE.

14,186

4,414,401
17,756
2,847,623
1,683,832
13^862
1,961,447
17,133
3,420,9'6 160,209
*2,612,180
51,979
3,723,301
10.867

Deposits. Circula.
$443,407
$443,559
595,878
783,712
1,158,239
794,965
578,394
598,471
670,667

443.104

654,835

795,673
668,563
796,526

637,645
847,102
298,477

100,116

1,185,170

686,691
365,416

540,086

1,245,5)1

367,025

639,410
471,628

242,739
444,119

427,468

363,170
394.662

826,< 01
289,562
2,074,483
346,363
6*8,332
616,869
995,701

244,875
1,820,140
176,342
798,562
794,988
364,622
596,601
359,4:J3
99T,055
751,815
178,250
704,679

636,320

862,072
952,352

603,408
377,965

919,243
638,453
981,541

694.146

789,135
785.800
174,8i2

1,893,652
626,024

1,298,455
478,820
871,219

972,328

594,722

800,000

664,602

795,(X 0
457,912
344,285
798,125
794,405
397,600
129.800
646,825
495,828

633 610
Loans and
Circula¬
1,000,000
Legal
Capital. Discounts. Specie.
729,662
tion.
Deposits. Tenders,
1,000,000
$3,000,000 $8,709,207 $4,100,877 $892.9 i 9
1,084,850
Manhattan
Hide & Leather. 1,500,000
$6,869,583 $1,935,118
2,050,000
5,778,563
509.859
10,207
Merchants'
674,853
3,973,825
872,171
Revere
3,000,000
2,000,000
6,231,052
1,519,646
884,344 5,929,312 2,429,494
Mechanics
1,391.174
2,000,000 5,904,824
492 803
Security
200,000
Union
621,981
558,067
3,177
4,562,328
926.418
482,256
1,500,000
4,424,2.0
266,433 493,076 3,399,666 1,221,941 Union.
1,000.000
America
2,421,562
45,021
818,556
3,000,000 7.263,455
2,464,531
Webster
7 315.813
Phoenix
1,060
1,530,000 2,622,026
1,967,016
2,292
l,800,u00
3,94 (,076
818,116
6^0,101
519,000
City
3,007,517
668,3C8
it,ggg’ggo 4,5(0,356 1,013,971
Tradesmen’s
2,793,029
Total
51,667
47,100,000 104,551,8311,151,254 11,376,043
1,000,000
2,953,501
33,177
Fulton
763,495 1,449,861
34,446,808 25,313,494
560.07
(300.0(H)
1,931,473
211,678
Chemical
1,509,798
* Not
519,602
300 000
received. Same as last week.
6,311,178
501,742
Merchants’ Exchange.... 1,235,000
4.453,750
1,155,201
3,011,780
53,t 03
450,022
National
2,376,790
1 500,000
939,s71
3 208.732
223.821
The deviations from last weeks
Butchers
493,622
1.218,516
are as follows :
397,625
800,000
2,313,10)
53,000
201,600
Mechanics and Traders’.
1,032,31 0
406,6(0
600,000
1,9 0,185
27,330
195,720
Greenwich
1,177,656
384.420
200,000
Capital
1,147,951
3,003
Legal tender notes
Leather Manuf. National
Dec.
799,616
637,850
132,813
Loans
600,000
.....Dec. $394,348 Deposits
3.096,837
536,382 205,293 1,525,993
Seventh Ward, National.
l ee.
444,893
638,446
500,000
.^.wu
1,245,090
83,189
Specie
Inc.
177,493
State of New York
59,542 Circulation
736,045
2:9,800
Dec,.
2,000,000 4,353 590
75,202
583,169
452,000
American Exchange
3,309.250
1,067,963
5,000,000 9.986.565
608,236 979,250 5,314,467
Commerce
Philadelphia Banks.—The
1,573,125
10,000,000 22,830.573
925 075 5.889,250
is the average condition
6,241,050 4,7)8 798
Broadway
1,000,000 6,129,309
45.200
900,000 4,604,725
Ocean
1,388,349
of the Philadelohia Banks for the week
1,000,000
2,048.015
32,416
798,328
941,712
Mercantile
preceding
378.019
1,000,000
3,065,277
90,570
481,140
2.4:57,605
Pacific
737,347
18,1869:
422,700 1,806,819
15,184
4,819
1,314,160
Republic
316,ISO
2,000,000
4,854,121
893,068
856,3'2 3,516,0 8
Chatham.
613,921
Total net
450,000
2,185,1:52
126.508
130,897
Banks.
2,495,554
Loans. Specie, L. Tend.
Capital.
People’s
589,525
412,500 1,298,649
Deposits. Circulat’n
85.444
5,996
1,078,46)
North American...
2)6.891
Philadelphia
$1,500 000' $5,040,OOf $155,000 $1,166,000
1,000,000
2,4)3,292
89,602
$3,338,000
4,152
Hanover
1,886,395
North America
259.500
1,000,000 3,815,925 65,737 1,090,442 2,8731,497 $1,000,000
1,000,000 2,261,496
253,(85
290,834
1,359,724
774,000
Irving
346,(04
Farmers’ & Mech.. 2,00'',000 4,724,875 23,035
500.000
1,700,000
11,000
193,378
1,222,968 3,494,625
716.400
1,4^0,000
Metropolitan
431,0(0 Commercial..
4,000,000 10,'.79,323
778,674 2.2'3,'3)
310,000 2,271,000
2,100
Citizens
4,627,311 1,352,900
518,000 1,212,000
622,000
400,000
1,152,418
18,311
Mechanics’
131,880
800,000 2,328,000
1,101,742
Nassau
316,589
400,000 1,082,000
1,000.000
480.860
1,918,982
41,770
Bank N. Liberties
3,979
1,6 9.816
Market
500,000 .2,496,000
223,466
1,000.000
6n5,000 1,906,000
2,805,372
461,000
150,549
557,547
Southwark
8t. Nicholas.
1,889,493
559,048
250,000 1,487,900
5.536
1,000.000
2.614,924
434,700 1,322,800
03,667
219,947
750,028
8hoe and Leather
1,113,4(74
525,548
Kensington
1,500,030
250,000 1,153,675
3.701,300
4,926
27,170
298,000
901,780
975,161
224,455
2,207,000
Corn Exchange...
Penn Township...
752.500
1.000,000
2.937,559
500,000 1,288,716
32,000
5,993
186,250
871.242
1.692.634
Continental
178,075
320,0 0
Western
2,000,000
8,541,642
120.339
400,000 1,315,080
568,857 2,109,225
1,419
392,179 1,349,264
Commonwealth..,
6,560
978,000
750.000
2,889,(80
Manufacturers’
54,051
233.127
570,150 1,522,000
2,4:50,019
Oriental
261,000
692.527
839,245
448,192
300,000
1,3 9( 51
11,052
B’k of Commerce..
4,966
Marine
1,('36.,94
250,000
845,949
204,960
218,505
400,000
588,123
214,7370
1,524,380
200,510
360,000
1,2 0.130
Atlantic
280,750 Girard.
1,000,000 3,381.090 27,000
300,000
7-'3,000 2,423,000
1,044,924
19,912
596,000
99,67 L
735,016
Importers and Traders’.. 1,500.000 7,'51.048
228,68-1 Tradesmen's
200,000 1,258,222
3,115
320,990
316,145
503,454
812,929
179,039
Fark
7,272,893
1,933,587 Consolidation
2,000.000 11,797,236
300,000 1,113,143
517,301 1,028,000 14,4e2,855
238,940
773,460
270,000
Mechanics’ Banking Ass.
3,333.157
500,000
1,157,880
16.2&5
City
400,(00 1,208,514
307,914
*900
Grocers’
1,4 00,% l
381,8U
748,204
363,068
720.528 Commonwealth
300,000
848,570
6,299
2,015
300,000
973,666
North River
681,339
106.244
223,380
733,463
212.860
400,000
1,145.274
22.510
1' ,047
Corn Exchange....
East River
1,011,431
500,000 1,750,000
190.40
3^800 307,000 1,254,000 450,000
350,000
902,791
15.017
283,500
Union
30 ',000 1,265,000
Manufacturers & Mer
569,(59
181.810
500.000
2,000
1.157.018
266,000 1,317,000
6,028
219,000
677
Fourth National
First
749,319
150,538
1,000,000 3,491,000
5,000,000 15,785,090
1,082,000 2,844,000
418,216 2,936,797 12,058,412
798,0(0
Central National
Third
8,880,604
300,000
3,000,000 10,618,924
983,771
1.58,073 1,8 0,000
941,966
849,265
267,943
2 537,019
Second National
8,674,995
Four h
’366j666 1,321,876
200,000
270,000
613,928
Ninth National...
1673,572
1,048,648
553,113
300,887
133,625
1,000,000 4,577,551
Sixth.
34,799
838,145
150,000
480,000
First National
3.769.635
1,165,9 )8 Seventh...
103,000
315,000
135, U00
500,000
3,019,185
322,606 350,851
Third National
3,474.027
260,000
6M,000
1,080,491
160,000
481,000
219,000
1,000,000 8.577.230
31-8,972
796,702
New YorkN. Exchange.
8,608,922 1,518,148
Eighth
275,000
825,000
300,000
1,147.494
244,000
198,000
560,000
27,893
268,330
Tenth National
643,800
2:8,163 Central
750,000 2,527,000
1,000.000 2,030,100
73.500
569,000 1,057,000
684,000
912,100
556,0)0
Bank of Republic. 1,000.000
0)National
Bowery 7.482
250,000
821,317
1,875,000
22 (,000
9,744
417,500
365,000 1,145,000
Bull 8 Head
720,366
247,198
200,000 1,570,' 63
Exchange
300,000
5,565
6,793
899,000
National Currency
1.716,427
226,000
705,000
175,060
’00,000
245,872
5,266
2 0.701
90,000
Stuyvesant
105,403
200,000
420,813
Total..,
2,134
Eleventh Ward
4i2,2lH
16,055,150 61,657,364 284,568 12,380,187 37,024,082 10,599,394
200,000
435.230
883,736
Eighth National
48,87?
250,000
938,ICO
4.807
250,000
676,086
American National
25:1,218
The deviations from last week’s returns are as follows :
659.151
500,000
11,479 419,555
Germania
577,201
2-34,109
702,717
4,096
655,332
Manufacture & Builders
57.H50
257,879
241,563
70,000 Capital
Legal Tenders,.. Decrease, $440,170

Banks.

New York

returns

....

,

following

Monday,October

...

-

.

.

..

.

...

c

....

..

Total,,

t




S3,910,300 248,537,984 30,399,07034,217,114
178,643,936 53,229,504

Loans, ,....^
Specie. t,

Increase. $59,440
Increase ' 19,45?
,

Deposits

Decrease.

CIrculgfiqp.A’©create.

.

*

78,4)3

“ V53

i

October

-28,-1869,]

THE

CHRONICLE,

^

527

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK
EXCHANGE,

REPRESENTED BY THB LAST SALE REPORTED OFFICIALLY OM EACH DAY

OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, OCT.
22, TOGETHER
WITH THB AMOUNT OF BONDS AND NUMBER OF SHARES SOLD AT BOTH
BOARDS IN THE SAME WEEK.

do
de
do
to
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

•

do

130% 130

—

130

A

Thurs

U.

e

Fri.

130% 130%

119% 119% U9% 119% 119%
120
119%
119%
120%
120% 120% 121
115% 115% 114%
—

—

—

——

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do

do

do

—

Eric
do pref

Rnnrifl

do 6s,con.,’79,aft.’60-62-65-70
do
do
do 1877
do 1979
do
Indiana 5s

—

—

Michigan 6s, 1878

87%

6s,(Han. & St. Jos. RR.)

.

.

63%

New York 6s, 1872
do
68,1873
do
do

do

(reg.)

North Carolina,6s
do
do

87%

—

—

—

—

——

87%

108

—

47

47%

spoc’l tax) 44% 44
40% 40%

43%

South Carolina

72

6s, old

39

88

—

—

—

40

47%
39%

40%

43%

43%

—r

6s (new,

6s, (new)

—

—

68

-

Tennessee 5s
do
6s (old)
do
6s, (new)

x61
x60% 161
x60%
54% 54
55% 54%
*5U% *50%
x50%

Viromlnfift.

53

6a, (new)
6s, (reg.)

—

—

54%

*62

53%
—

55

—

—

do

6s

100
100

—

100

—

100

Continental
Corn Exchange
Fourth
Hanover

100

IlOO

Mechanics

125%

103%

No.
33

109

Ill

25

115

Hatti

RO

Merchants Exchange

—

143

1 Oft

lull

1 Qfi

19Q

lull

50

Nassau
Ninth
North America
Ocean

—

100
100
.100 108

r

50
_100

Park

Phoenix
Sh^e and Leather
State oi New York
Tenth
Union

20

'“

119

—

114

-

—

166%

109

100
lOO

112

100

Miscellaneous

Uojti.—American

Stocks

:

25
50

Ashburton

Central.

■•00

Cumberland
100
Delaware and Hudson... 100 123%

Pennsylvania

50
50
50

Wilks Barre

Gas.— Citizens

Improvement.—Boat. Wat.

—

—

—

Er/ims.—Adams

—

14%

14%

50

36%

100
100 58%
100
100 58%

52%

36% 36%

...

36%

—

36%

36%

58

58% 58% 58% 61%

56

57%

33%

—

58

—

—

20% 20

—

8

16%

17

12%

fa Bro, Aft-

57%

56%

35%

—

.

Union Trout* M r..p

—

35%

57

57%
2C%
8%
16%
12%

120%

13%

—

60

—

^

—

.

.

—

—

600

6,800

2^00
149

30,16

—

—

604

69%
82%

4,810
4,712
970

—

184% 188% 191
134

191

189%
136%

135

7,610
192

120

100 27%
100

27

BO

26%

27%

27%

27

85%

85

85

96%

96%

96%

3,300
2,479
11,804

—

222

64
77

.100

do

66

25

5C0
200

—

65%

93

let mort
consolid’ted

67
78

65%

65%

4,650

80

—

300

—

6,000

—

—

—

l.OCO
500
5,000

88

.

J

107%

,

92%

—

—

—

92

3,000
—

8S%

.

88%

89

10,000
15,000

91
—

—

94

——

80

Dayton, 1st

do

do
do
do

94%

—

8,( CO

2d

—

8,000

73

—

—

78

—

77%

6,000

—

77%

—

m

77

77%

41,000

“

—

-

do

2d

m.

fit.h

—

—

85

84%
v

mortgage

Jos., 1st convertible

—

—

99

i

—

—

—

—

—

84
82

2,000
20,000

—

82%

—

22,000

..
—

—

—

—

—' —

—

83

Mariposa Trustee 10s certifies'es..
Michigan Central 8s, new, 1882....
old

do

7,000
16,000

—

Chicago, 1st
Great Western, 1st mortgage, 1888.
Great Western, 2d mortgage

do
20
75

—

—

15 Harlem, 1st mortgage, 1S69-72
34 Hudson River, 1st mortgage,1869.
60
10 Illinois Central bonds
97 Lake Shore, div. bonds....
......
55
15

—

2d mortgage, 1879
3d mortgage, 1883..i........
4th mortgage, 1880..

5
34 iHan. & St.

117
84

83
43

44
121

19,000

—

—

20,000

—

*

5,000

—

Michigan Southern, SinkingFund.

——.

—

do
do
2d mort.,7s...
98%
Milwaukee and St. Paul, 1st mort.. 89
89%
10
do
do
2d mort
do
do
8s 1st mort 100%
40
do
do 1st Iowa... —
100
Morris and Essex, 1st mortgage...
do
do
2d mortgage... 91%
do
' do
construction...
New York Central 6s, 1883
do
do
6b Real estate
2,100
90
do
do
125
6s 1887
do
do
7s, 1876 .........
N. Y. & New naven 6s

98%

98%

98%

—

——

83

—

20,000

-—

—

100%

100%

23,000
3,000
1,000
11,500
8,(00
8,000

85

—

-

20,000

91

—

—

—

91%

91%

100
91%

—

90%

—

.

2,000

—

—

300

700

99

Jersey Central new
” do
1st

do
Co

Ohio and
dc

do

2d

Mississippi, 1st mortgage

do
do
do
2d mort.
do
do
do
"
3,980
_3d mort.
Pacific 7’s, guar, by St. of Mo
7(5 St. Louis, Alton'& “Terre H, 1st m.
do
do
do
2d, pref
855
do
do
do
income.
8t Louis & Iron Mountain, 1st m..
880 Toledo & Wabash, 1st mort., ext..
900
do
do
2d mortgage.
150
do
do
equipment...
do
700
do
cons, con
3C0 Lon0- Dock bonds

—

6,000

—

—

98%

95

90

99
95
90

'■

~~1~

"

—

Warsaw, lst,E,D

100%

18,000

95

95
—

90%

17,0(0
6,000

"

—

92%

—

"

81
89
84

—

8,0(0

—

—

—_

92%
81%

4,000
2,000
16,500

84
'

84
87

...

-s*

2, COO
“““

—

**■

consol, bonds

do

Toledo Peoria fa
Western Union 78

97

—

r

—

1,235 Pittsb’g, Ft. Wayne & Chic., 1st m.

'

—

88%

120

—

—

123%
69%
81% 81% 82%
83
88%

67
81

100

pref

do

Galena fa

-

American
500
American and M. Union.100 36
Merchants’ Union
.100
United States...
100 58%
Wells, Fargo &Co
100 22%
Mining.— Mariposa Gold
100
Manposa preferred
100 16%
Quicksilver
100 13%

Miscellaneous—Bankers

27%

122%

<—

Telegraph.—WesternUnion,.. .100
Pacific Mail
Union Navigation

2 i%

—

100

Steamship.—Atlantic Mail

28%

124

.

10$

Cary

27

—

Pow.100

Brunswick City Land

Canton

27

fa

"do

rin

—

144

do

do
do
do

do

124%

—

1,100

Delaw’e, Lackawan. & West, 1st m.

104

—

—

\ferehnnto




—

124% 123%

109
50

Manhattan

,

Ill

Mississippi..

—

Glevelandand Toledo., Sink’gFund
CoL, Chi. & Inch Central laf.

100

100

Metropolitan

_

—

scrip.

Cleveland and Pittsburg, cons
do
do
4th mortgage..

—

100

.

6,660

"

88%

60

do

11 Q

Central
.....’
Commonwealth
Commerce

31%

—

—

—

Q1 IS

123
65% 68

67
81

-pref... 101)

do

do
do
do

Gin

_

—

“T

100

equip, bonds
11,000 Chicago, R. I. and Pac, 7 percent..

1875

100

do

do

2,000

93

:

30%

—

—

91

Bank. Stocks
American Exchange
Bank of America.7
Bank of New York.

30%

—

..

.Torflpy City Wflfflr Loflll

New York 5h, 1870

230
460

109%

30%

~

preflO
20,000
Railroad Bonds:
17,0 »i American Dock & Improvement 7s
377,000
86,000 Central Pacific gold bones
93
.....
Chicagoand Alton, SinkingFund,
5,000
do
do
1st mortgage...
11,000
Chicago,Burl’ton & Quincy, 8 p. c.
52,0(0 Chicago & Milwaukee, 1st mort...
271,W0 Chic &
Northwest., Sin V ing Fund.
34,Of 0
do
Interest b’nds
do

*

93

1,600

—

..100

Toledo, Wabash and Western.
—

Municipal:

Rrnoklvn fifl. WfltprTjOftH

849

1,000

.

—

—

10,408
1,986
4,215

—

58,000 Panama
100
Pitts., F’t Wayne&Chic. guar. — 84% 84% 84%
95% 96
Reading.
50 96
43,000 Rome,Watertown &Ogdensburg —
31% 32
3,000 St.Louis, Alton & Terre Haufe.l00 30
59
do
60
do
do pref.100

.

—

Ohio 6s, 1870

do
do

Ohio and
do

64%

87%

.

71% 71% 71% 71%
84
83% 83%
106% 108
107% 107% 106% 105%
75%
77
77
76
77%
24% 24%
24% 24% 24%
98
99% 93
98
97
110% HO

* 2d pref 50

do

New Jersey.
Norwich & Worcester

—

-

——

—

7s, State B’yB’ds(coup)
dip

87

.

84%

—

Michigan Central

do

88%

Missouri

160

71%

84

800
2U0
-100

:

—

—

'

8s,'...

_

71%

New Haven ana Hartford
100
New York Central
160 182
New York and New Haven.... .100

—*

-

161

MariettaandCincinnati, 1stprel 50

do

—

-

143

—

4,000 Morris & Essex

—

64

200

1,118

50

Milwaukeeand St- Paul

—

—

144

.....100 31%

do

500

91%

64

do

6 000

123

IftfiO

So.

—

Macon and Western

—

92

rillfiAta

18

—

101% 101% 100% 101% 100%
143
145% 144

100

95,000 Long Island

92

......

18

—

—

100

109% no% :io 112 110%
110
111
Harlem
137
138
146
50
149% 146 145
165
Hudson River
174
166% 171
100
172% 173
Illinois Central
135
100
•loiiet. &
Chicago
40,000 Lake Shore and Mich. South.... 100 90% 91% 62% 92% 98% 93%
—

—

—

Vask’tS

—

mmm

7ft

Frl.

Hannibal and St. Joseph
.100
103,000 Hannibal and St.
Joseph pref.. 100 108

—

6s

do

W*d. Thom

s

—

—

Mon. Tu*a.

u

«

State s

Holt fVirntfl

Satur.

173,00(1
do
do preferred.... 100
138,500 Chicago, Burlington and QuincylOO
40,000 Chicago and Great Eastern
100
20.000
Chicago and Northwestern
100
65,500
do
do
pref.100
Chicago, Rock Island and Pac..l00
191,300 Cleveland, Col. Oin. and Ind. ...100
79,000 Columbus C. fa Ind. Cent......
1,298,500 Cleveland and Pittsburg
50
46,350 Delaware, Lackawana and West 50
28,000 Dubuque & Sioux City
.1' 0

—

_
_
do
do
do

STOCKS AND SECURITIES.

Railroad Stocks
Boston, Haitford & Erie
$55,500 Central ol New Jersey
26.600 Chicago and Alton

6s, 6-20s(’62)coM»on
6s, 6-20s do registd
6s,5-20s ('te)coupon 119%
119%
119%
6s, 5.20s do registd
115%
6s, 5.20sC65)coupon
119% 119% 119% 119% 128
6s, 5.20s do regist'd
115%
118
6s, 5.20s (’65 n.) cpn 117% 118
117% 117%
118
118% 117% 117%
6s, 5.20s do registd
6s, 5.20s (1867) coup 117% 118% 118% H8 117% 117%
118
118% 117%
6s, 5.20s do regisd
6s, 5.20s (1868) coup 117%
117% 117%
6s, 5.20s do regisd
6s, Oregon War 1881
6s,
do. (1 y'rly)
107%
107% 107% 107% 107%
6b, Currency
coupon.
5s, 1871
5s, 1871 ..registered.
5s, 1874
coupon.
58,1874 ..registered.
108%
5s,10-40s ...coupon. 108% 108%
108
108
107%
5s, 10-40s .registered.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do

Week's Sales

'

American Gold Coin (St'lc Exch'ge)
National s
United States 6s, 1881
coupon.
do
do
6s, 1881 ..registered

Tues.

11

Satnr. Mon
i on \s

1

STOCKS AND SBCCRITIES.

^

_

—

83

’

87

85,000
i;oou

83

28;00a

88

i,0T,

528

THE CHRONICLE.

$1)£ Hatlmajj ittonitor.

[October 23,1869.
BALANCE

Capital stock
Bonds

Contingent fund

EXPIANATIoFl^^

Heserved fund
Profit and loss
Dividends unpaid
Debts due by the Co

1. The Table of
Railroad, Canal and Ollier
on the next
page, comprises all Companies of which the stock is sold in Stocks,
any of
principal cities (except merely local corporations), or upon which dividends are the
paid.
Quotations are always given of the per cent value, whatever the
par of the stock may
be.
The figures just after the name of the
company indicate the date of the CHRONSCLX in which a report ot the
Company was last published. A star (*) indicates
leased roads; in the dividend column
x—extra; s=stock or scrip.
Til© Tables of
Railroad, Canal and Ollier Bonds
occupy in all, four pages, two of which will be
published in each number. In
these pages the bonds of
Companies which have been consolidated are sometimes
given under the name of Consolidated
The date
Corporation.
brackets
immediately after the name of each Company, indicates the time given in the state¬
at which
ment of its finances was made.
In the “Interest Column” the
abbreviations are as
follows : J. Sc
J.=January and July ; F. Sc A-=February and August; M. Sc S.=
March and September; A .Sc
0.=April and October ; M. Sc N.=May and Novem¬
ber ; J. Sc D.=June and December.
Q —J.=Quarterly, beginning with January;

BHK&T, AUGUST 81.
...$3,800,000 00 R’way building, grounds.$3,407,284 76
937,000 00 Heal estate, land
and
427,875 65
dwellings....
182,817 43
150,000 00
252,011 41

Bonds purchased
T.mlinson Bridge stock..

7,097 00
62,895 64

88,000 00
8,883 67

Equipment engines and
cars

Wood,

$5,12G,789 70

s

ock, and tools

254,000 00
on

hand
I eb;s due the
company,
including accounts due
fr m the N. Y. & N. H.
R. R, Co. adjusted, and
funds i ahandsjof agents
Connecticut River Bridge
steamboat Orient
NiW Whirf, New Haven.
Windsor Locks and Suf
field R R. Co.

258,440 07

454,697 48
176,577 36
196,083 81
45,828 67
1,344 18

Cash

158,327 87

o

Q.—F.=Quarterly, beginning
March.

with February; Q. M.=Quarterly, beginning with
3« The Table of United States
and State Securities will bs
published monthly, on the last Saturday of the month.
4# Quotations of Southern
Securities are given in a separate
Table.

!

At the

tive

meeting of stockholders it was resolved
pe: mission to issue $3,000,000 new stock.

Tests

of

$5,126,789 70
to

accept the legisla¬

Steel Rails.—The circular of Messrs. John A. Griswold
&

Co., of Troy, New York, thus describes their method of
can possibly be made.
testing steel rails :
1st. A testing ingot from each five-ton ladleful of
liquid steel is
WEEKLY RAILROAD EARNINGS POR THE
hammered iuto a bar and te ted for
LATEST WEEK REPORTED.
malleability and hardness, and
Road.
Week.
especially for toughness, by bending it double cold. Ia case any test
1869. 7~186S.
Inc.
Dec
Chicago and Alton'
..2d Oct
121,018 232,660
11.642 bar falls below the standard established as suitable for rails, all tha
Chicago and Northwestern
.2d Oct
310,993 350,913
39,912 ingots cast from that ladleful of steel are laid aside for other uses.
Chicago. Rock Island and Pacific.., .2d Oct..
130,200 126,673 3^527
Lake Shore and
“2 1. All the ingots, an! each rail rolled from
Michigan Southern. ..2d Ocr,... 283,463 259,066 2t;.397
them, are stamped
Marietta and < incimiati
.2d Oct...
with the number of the charge or ladleful.
25.255 6,058
81,313
A piece is cut from one
Michigan Central
.1st Oct...
102,507 107,301
4,794 rail in each charge, and tested by
Milwaukee and St. Paul
placing it on iron supports a foot
.2d Oct...
231,800 255,577
2:-!,777 apart, and
St. Louis. Alton and Terre Haute.
.1st Oci...
dropping a weight of five tons upon the middle of it from a
48,213
Toledo, Waoashand Western
.2d Oct..
height proportione 1 to the pittern of rail. A blow equivalent to a
96,286
£7,143 9,088
ton weight falling 10 to 15 feet is consi lered a severe
Hartford and New Haven Railroad.—The
teat.
We use a
earnings of this road five-tone weight falling from a less
for the years endiog August 31, 1868 and
height, believing that it more nearly
1869, were as follows :
represents in kind (although it of couise exaggerates in
severity) the
1S68.
1809
5* No reliable prices of Insurance Stocks

‘

.,..

..

.

.

,.

.

.

..

..

.

From passengers
44
44
44
44

$891,091 20
682,454 06

$978,880 50

114,709 50
65,621 28
3,452 35

....

freLht
expresses
mails
rents, etc

48

774,786
56,809
23,754
8,001

80

41
01

$1,697,334 39

$1,811,682 20

$326,427 99
96,318 14

$312,837 50
111,102 02

224,838 38
account and general expenses 325,867 95
Station repairs snd improvements
48,009 83
Lo.-t and damaged goods, gratuities, etc

243,616 91
347,886 94
55,2*7 82
7,677 36

Expenses, viz.:
Repairs ot road and bridges

Wood, coal and oil

Material and labor
new cars

and

Transportation

on

engines and cars, and

engines

3,472 79

$1,024,935 08

Net earnings
Interest and taxes

$1,078,378 55
733,303 65

8672,399 31
190,808 60

185,084 24

test of actuil service

in the track.
'
test rail does not stand the blow deemed
proper an 1
agreed upon, the whole of the rails made from that charge or iadleful
of steel are marked No. 2, and sold for use in
sidings, where their pos¬
sible breaking would do no great harm, and where their
greater hard¬
ness and resistence to wear would be
specially valuab’e.
“
In addition to this double test, the rails are
rigidly inspected for
surface imperfections.
“We believe that these teats render it
practically impossible for us
to send out rails of inferior
®
quality.
“
We further invite railway
companies to send inspectors to our works
to wi ness the tests
mentioned, and other testa and
“

In

case

a

inspections agreed

upon.”

Memphis, October 7.—The Board of Aldermen this afternoon
accepte 1
the offer, by J. E. Tainter, of New
York, of $109,000 cash for 520
shares of the Little Rock Railroad stock,

provided that said parties cau
give sufficient guarantee to a committee, consisting of Major Leftwitc'a,
Compared with the previous year, the gross earnings of 1868-9 show li. C. Brincklev, and F.-H. Cissel, that the road will be completed
an increase of
$114,347 81, with an increase in expenses of $58,443 47 within nine months, and that it shall never be run contrary to the
—making the increase in net earniDgs, $60,904 31. The balance re interests of Memphis,
maiomg after the payment of interest and taxes is $66,628 60 mors
For other Railroad Items, see Commercial and
Miscelthan that of the
preceding year.
laneous News, on a
previous
Balance

$181,590 81

$548,219 4i

page.

MONTHLY EARNINGS OF PRINCIPAL RAILROADS.
Chicago and Alton.
.-Chicago A Northwestern-^
1867.
1868.
I860.

^-Central Pacific- in gold-^
1867.

1868.

(94 m.)
$88,169

(850 m.)

51.881

60,029
83,156
95,828
121,702
174,812
181,297
200,550
812,109
128,166
75,871

Ll-y

1869.

690 m.)

...Year

1869.

1867.

$587,442

$681,656-

7,817,620

$819,766
340,756
361,145
816,368
401,893

869,858
866,404
850,564
751 739

1,101,778

£766,617
8488,835
5,688,609




•

.Oct
.Nov

—

1868.

..

.Dec...

..Year

..

Jan,.

658 782. ..Feb

740,949. .June..
661,793 .July..
790,328. ..Aug
915,020 ..Sep...
.

..Oct...
..Nov..
..Dec...

$98,510. Jan...
91,660. Feb
103,558. Mar...
109,526. .April.

81,599
98,4S2
108,461
95,416
95,924
108,413
126,556
121,519
125,065
119,109
121,403

84,652
72,768
90,526
90,535
106,594
114,716
121,217
142,823
132,387

..May

1869

(251 in.)

$92,433

78,976

..

.

123,383

.Year.. 1,258,713

..

111,037 May.
113,648. .June
•

140,473. .Sep...

_

-Ohio A

1809.

1867.

(820 m.)

Mississippi.—^
1868.
1869.

.

-

.

.

•

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

6,517,64

■

„

Y

ear

..

8,459,319

2,964,039

...

$343,?-90
304,115
326,8S0
415,758
869,625
325,501
821,013

392,942
456,974

506,295

511.820

412,933

330,373

1,258.284. .June...
1,167,155. ..July..
1,032,813. ..Aug...
1,321,139. ...Sep...

-Year..

1867.

168,162
171,736
156,065
172,983

220,788
219,160
230,340
204,095
171,499

2,307 930

1868.

(210 m.)

$127,594
133,392

149,165
155,388
130,545
140,408
143,986
204,596
196,436
210,473
174,500
157,379

1,923,862

224,621
272,454
268,369

297,625
276,681
297,512
f 444,624

1868.

1869.

(454 m.) (620-94 m.)
$308,587
$851,767
297,464
319,441
276,431
645,789
£01.952

^

362,900

316,708

419,000

378,436

( 508,000

JL440,300

341,885

568,380

g480,900

?566,40* ^558,386

*579,000

£599,548

...Oct...
..Nov...
..Dec...

* 591,209 g......
^.442,274 § 424,5^9 Y
I377,053 *°433,434. I

Year.

4,358,611

4,797,461 '

r-Mich. So. A N. Indiana.—*

1869.

1867.

(329 m.)
$384,119 .fan
320,634. .Feb..
386,527 .Mar.
411,814 .April..
404,646. ..Muy...
366,628. .June..
329,950. ..July...
353,569. .Aug...
473,546. ..Sep
..

4,670,014

(210 m.)
149,658
149,342
174,152

$292,047

1,149,258. ..Mar...
1,092,378. .April..
1,269,934. ..May...

410,825
390,671

4,371,071

(410 m.)

$871,218 ..Jan...
827,254. ..Feb...

...

.

.Oct

.Nov...
Dec....
Year

■

(524 m.)
$305,857
311,088

379,761
391,163
858,601
304,282
812,879

4281762

487,867
539,435
423,341
370,757

4,613,743

-St. L. Alton AT. Haute.->

(825 m.)
(340 m.) (340 m.)
(340 m.)
$369,228 $451,1:30.. .Jan... $242,793 $211,973 $180,366. .Jan—
321,202
330,233. ..Feb
219,064
231,351
216,080. .Feb...
883,507
420,771. ..Mar..
279,647
265,905
221,459.,..Mar...
436,412
460,287. .April.
284,729
252,149
214,409. April..
566,718
630,844. ..May..
282,939
204,619
218,639. .May..
458,190
678,800. .June
340,185
217,082
223,236. June..
423,397
586,342. -July.
234,633
194,456
192,364 July...
522,683
525,303. ..Aug..
322.521
287,667
275,220 Aug....
*21,024,045
724,514. ...Sep ..
365,372
307,122
292,803 Sept»».
51,037,463
...Oct...
879,867
283,829
.Oct.,..
S 556,917
..Nov.,
336,066
274,636
.Nov,,..
« 468,879
.Dec..
272,058
233,861
-Dec,...
..

(329 m.)

464,778

.Oct....
Nov..
Dec...

Year

362,783

333,952
>34,977
313,021
398,993

109,502. .July.
129,383. Aug..

1,294,095

304,097
283,669
375,210

1868

1867.

(1,157m.)

Michigan Central.

1867.
(329 m.)

,-Chic., Rock Is.and Pacific

1869.

4.712,248 13,429,534

..

(251 m.)

$94,136

608,780. ..Mar..
595,355. .April.
655 046.

18C8.

(251 m.)

'-Milwaukee A St. Paul.—.
(785 m.)

331,148 .April.
345 556. .May..
39J,6r5. .June.
353,736. .July...
501,666. .Aug..
501,258. Sept..

3,892,861 ^4,508,642

(708 m.)

7,160,991
1867.

.Mar...

-Marietta and Cincinnati-

(708 m.)

727,809
618,380

828,901

304,827. .Feb...

393,648

1868.

(1,152 m.) (1,152 m.)
696,147 $724,890
574,664
807,478
850.192
757,134
774,280 1,094,597
895,712 1 206,796
898,357 1,167,544
880,324 1,091,466
1,063,236 1,251,940
1,451,284 1,518,483
1,54’,056 1,574,905
1,210,387 1,135,334
918,088 1,001,892

$339,762. Jan...

.

686,165
444,443
518,800
672,551
626,248
549,714
763,779
889,966
931,529
685,400
681,040

417,071
440,271
477,007
6 J 6,494
625,242
709,336
788,680

1867

.

■

1868.

$647,119
624,871

o<

(431 m.)

..

•Illinois Central.

1867.

i

(280 m.)
$64,463
.212,604. ..Jan... $243,787 $276,116
86,937 £ 218,982. ..Feb....
157,832
275,189
81,396 g391,808. ..Mar
235,961
267,094
96,481 *5 485,048. .April..
282,165
279,121
106,836
568,270. .May
335,510
303,342
364,729
556,Of-0. Jane..
342,357 f 384,564
259,590
579,000 July...
354,244 A404 012
251,8o2
511,854 Aug...
415.982 g 558,100
262,770
597,500 Sept....
408,999 *436,196
296,422
.Oct
426,752 *£503.745
286,562
.Nov.. ,.
359,103 Y409,6f»8
842,743
Dec
330,169 (361,700

1,421,525 $2,300,767

(708 m.)

4 Ol'O

(280 m.)

1869.

837,827ad f 838,777

1,207,426j 1239,725
643,886

.

■{

436,399g I
437,502^ i

......

4,981,149

-Toledo, W b. A Western.-*

1869.

1867.

(210 m.

$132,622. .Jan....
127,817. .Feb...
175,950. .Mar....
171,868. .April..
157,397. ..May...
154,182 .Jane...
144,164 .July.

.

186,889 .Aug...
200,130. .Sept....
.Oct
•Nov:...
Dec..
.

1868.

(524 m.)
(524 in )
$362,021
$386,901
338,335
857,409
378,735
453,481
473.644
452,429
399,269
446,791
865,116
408,139
686,934^ 727,045

■

■.

"„Year~

(521m.)
$287,674
200,793
270,630
817,052
829,078
804,810
309,691
364,728
882,996
406,766
351,769
307.948

5,788,890

1868.

1869.

(521m.) (521 rm)
$278,712 $284,192
265,186

265 137

257,799
286,825
260,529

852,704
811,832

293 344

283,(33
484,208
450,208
429,893
828,279

899,488

4,013,900.

312,529
348,890

310.800
450,246
470,720

Qoto)w*28, 1869. J

THE

CHRONICLE.

629

RAILROAD, CANAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS

Subscriber* will coaler

a are at

favor by

COMPANIES.

DIVIDEND.

For a lull explanation of this
table,
•ee Railway
Monitor, on the pre¬
ceding page.

Railroads.
Allegheny Valley

*

fftviny

Last

Periods.

PRIOR.

I

Ask.

For

a

of any error

full

explanation

ceding

page.

table,

it*

5*

Cincinnati, Sand. ft Cleveland..

50

do
do
do pref. 50
Cincinnati and Zanesville
50

2,989,090
393,073 May & Nov. Nov., ’68

1,676,345
Mayl5..i00 10,460,900 Feb. & Aug.
2,056,750 May & Nov.
5,958,775 Quarterly.
Columbus, Chic. & Ind. Central’.lOO 11,100,000 Quarterly.
Columbus and Xenia*
50 1.786.800 Dec. & June
Concord
50 1,500,000 May & Nov.
Concord and Portsmouth
10O
850,000 Jan. & July.
Connecticut & Passumpsic, pref.100 2,084,200 Feb. & Aug.
Connecticut River
100 1,700,000 Jan. & July.
Cumberland Valley
50 1.316.900 April* Oct.
Dayton and Michigan*
100 2,400,000
Delaware*
50
891,206 Jan. & July.
Delaware, Lackaw. & Western. 50 14.100.600 Jan. & July.

Clev.,Col., Cin. & Ind.

Cleveland and Mahoning*
50
Cleveland and Pittsburg. Mar 27 50

Detroit and Milwaukee. June 27.100
452,350
do
do
pref.... 50 2,095,000
Dubuque and Sioux City*
100 2,142,250
do
do
pref. ..100 1,988,170
Eastern (Mass.)
100 3,883,300
EastTenn. Georgia, Oct. 9
100 1,290,067
East Tennessee and Virginia... .100
1,902,000
Elmira and Williamsport*
50
500,000
do
do
pref.. 50
500,000
Erie. April 17
,
100 70,000,000
do preferred
100 8.536.900
Erie and Pittsburg
50
962,990

Fitchburg
Georgia. May 29

Tables.
PRICE.

Last

ing.

Periods.

paid.

Date.

3y

’69
’69

sy

’69 2&15
’67
’69

sy
sy
5

’68

’69
Aug., '69

sy
3
5
4

July. ’69
April,’69

July,' ’69

77)4
97
‘24 >4

SIX

9u)4

97

98

75)4
88

90

PA R

Old

Colony and Newport
Orange and Alexandria
Oswego and Syracuse

100
100
50

4,943,4201 Jan. & July. July, ’69

482,400.Feb. & Aug.
100 3,969,001'
100 7,000,000
Quarterly.
50 33,840,762 May
& Nov.
50 6,004.200 Jan. &
July.
2,400,000 Jan. & July.

...

.

do

do
do
pref. TO
Pitts., Ft.W. & C. guar*. Aug. 21.100
Portland and Kennebec (new)..100

MX 97*

2,063,6551

Aug.,
Pacific (of Missouri)
Panama
°ct.,
Pennsylvania. Mar. 6
May,
Philadelphia and Erie*...
do
do pref
Philadelphia and Read. Feb. 2?. 50;2fi,280,350 Jan. & July. I Jan.,
July,
Philadelphia and Trenton*
100 1,099,120 Feb. &
Philadel., Germant. & Norrist’n* 50 1,587,700! April &Aug. Aug.,
Oct. (»ct.,
Philadel., Wilming. & Baltimore 50 9,084,300! Jan. & July. July,
Pittsburg and Connellsville
50 1,793,926
Pittsburg, Cincin. & St. Louis... 50 2,42:-',000
3.C00.0.0
19,665,000 Quarterly.

’69

4

*

20

July, ’69

25'

8sy

40

110

5

ib"
3^

110)6

ie

103)4 109)4

sy

iii'

4

5

’69
’69
’66
’68

100 3,540,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
100 4.156,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Grand Trunk (Can.)
100 14,367,950
Great Western (Can.)
100 17,894,695
Hannibal and St. Joseph
100 1,822,000
do
do
pref.... 100 5,078,000
Hartford and New Haven
100 8,300,000 Quarterly.
Sept., '69
Housatonic, preferred
100 2,000,000
July, ’69
Hudson River. Aprils
100 13.932.700 April & Oct. Oct., ’69
Huntingdon and Broad Top*.... 50
494,380
do
do
pref. 50
190,750 Jan. & July. Jan., ’68
Illinois Central. Mar. 27
100 25,277,270 Feb. & Aug.
Aug., ’69
Indianapolis, Cin. & Lafayette.. 50 6,185,897 Mar. & Sept. Sept.,’67
Jeffersonville, Mad. & Indianap.100 2,000,000 Jan. & July. Jan., ’66
Lackawanna and Bloomsburg.. 50 1,335,000
Lake Sho.& Mich. South. Apl.21.100
35,000,000 Feb. & Aug. Ang., ’69
do
do guar. 100
533.500 Feb. & Aug. Feb., ’69
Lehigh and Susquehanna
50 8.739.800 May & Nov. May, ’67
Lehigh Valley
50 16,058,150 Quarterly. Oct., ’69
Little Miami
50 3.572.400 June & Dec.
June, ’69
Little Schuylkill*
50 2,646,100 Jan. & July. July, ’69

5a

’69

’69
’69
’69
’69

5S.

Oct.,

105
3U

sy i

‘

5
4
4

sx

5
4
5

'4’

111

173

173*

.

Virginia and Tennessee
do

do

100; 2,941,7911

pref

100!

Western (N. Carolina)
Wilmington and Manchester
Wilmington and Weldon
Worcester and Nashua

65 y

100;
100i
.100

Chesapeake and Delaware
50
Chesapeake and Ohio
25
Delaware Division*
50
Delaware and Hudson
100
Delaware and Raritan
100
Lehigh Coal and Navigation.... 50
Monongahela Navigation Co.... 50

Morris (consolidated)
do

preferred

30)4
66

93)4 93)6

5
5

1%
P

93
82

94

100
100
50

50
50
50
50
50

25
50
25

Butler

Cameron
Central
Cumberland

100
100
50
50

Pennsylvania
Spring Mountain

10

,v.

Wyoming Valley

100
100

:

Gas.—Brooklyn
Citizens
Harlem

25

(Brooklyn)

20
50

Jersey City and Hoboken... 20

Manhattan

my my

€6
81

4'

ioix

4
2

61

15 & 80s

555,500

I

I

2,227,00UjJan. & July.;Jan., ’64;
1,147,018'
1

! 1,463,775|

1,550,000 Jan. * July. July, '691

1,983,568 June

& Dec.

June, ’69

S

1,633,850 Feb. & Aug.
15,000,000;Feb. & Aug.
4,999,400;Feb. & Aug.
8,789,8O0|May & Nov.
728,100!Jan. & July.
1,025,000!Feb. & Aug.
1,175,OOO.Feb. & Aug.
4,300,000!
1,908,207 Feb. & Aug.
2,888.977 Feb. & Aug.

Aug., ’69

"4

’69
’69
’67
’69

5
5
3
3

8,229,594

2,002,746;
2,907 850!

Aug.,
Aug.,
May,
July,

Feb., ’69

lbs.

Feb., ’67
Feb., ’67

6
6

|

1,'lOOjoOO Jan.

80

82X

§r
123
.

.

*'**

124
.

.

68
88
30

61X

is
29
10

68^
90
32
63
20
30
18

& July.‘Jan., ’65

Miscellaneous.

Spruce Hill

65"

75

Sy

Canal.

Milkesbarre

135)4

100

90

..

Ashburton
115
228

no
32
80

59X 60

V*

.

84*

29" 32X

7

...

36
11
22

lis*'

......

Coal.—American
U0*

141

32
10
20
84 y

1*

—

"

118

my 104

.

Schuylkill Navigation (consol.).
sy
do
pref.
sy
Susquehanna & Tide-Water
4
31)4 31)4 Union, preferred
54
56)4 West Branch and
Susquehanna.
58
58

110

%y 96X

117
139

5
5

Richmond and Petei'sburg
100 5 847,1001
Rome, Watert. & Ogdensburg .100; 2,500,000!Jan. & July July, ’69'
Rutland
100
do
100
preferred
|Feb. & Aug. Feb., ’691
St. Louis, Alton & Terre Haute.100
2,300,000|
do
do
do pref.100 2,040,OtiO
Annually. May, ’691
St. Louis, Jacksonv. &
Chicago*.100 1,469,429
Sandusky. Mansfield & Newark.100
901,341;
Schuylkill Valley*
50
576,050 Jan. & July. July, ’69;
Shainokin Valley & Pottsville* 50
869,450;Feb. & Aug. Ang., ’69;
Shore Line Railway
.100
635,200: Jau. ft July. July ’69
South Carolina
50 ff.SlO^D1
1
South Side (P. & L.)
100 1,S65,600
South West. Georgia.* Sep. 11.100 3,939,900:Feb. *
Aug. Aug., *‘69
Syracuse, Bingh’ton & N. York. 100 1,314,130'
'lerre Haute and Indianapolis
50 1,988,150: Jan. & July.'July, ’69
Toledo, Peoria & Ware aw
100. 2,700,000
**
'
do
do
do 1st pref.100 1,700,000
do
do
do 2d pref.100 1,000,009
Toledo, Wabash & Western
100 9,387,000
do
do
do pref.100 1,000,000.May &
Nov.'May, ’69!
Utica and Black River
100 1,497,700 Jari. & Julv. July, ’09
Vermont and Canada*
100 2,250,000.June <fc Dec. 'June,
’69'
Vermont and Massachusetts... .100 2,860,000 Jan. &
July, i Jan./ ’69
Virginia Central
100 3,.353,679

60
80

130)4 131

U2X

581,100 Jan. & July. July,
3
Ports. Sep. 18.100 1,500,000 June & Dec.
June, ’69!3 gold
Providence and Worcester
100 1,900,000 Jan. &
5
July. July, ’691
Raritan and Delaware Bay*
100 2,530,700
Rensselaer and Saratoga con .. .100 2,850,000
Aprii & Oct. Oct., ’69!
sy
Richmond and Danville..^.
100 4,000,000

Pennsylvania

May & Nov May,
July,
Feb.,
January. Jan.,

56
215

"6'

Portland, Saco &

130

"s'

Bid. Ask

Rate

.

Aug.,
May,
Oct.,
Oct.,
June,
Nov.,
July,

Jan. & July. July, ’69
Jan. & July. July, ’69
Jan. & July. July, ’69

Jan. & July
Feb. & Aug

oar

DIVIDEND.

Out¬
stand¬

ou the pre¬

par

50 2,241,250 Jan. & July.
50
Atlantic and Gulf.
100
Atlan. ft St. Lawrence* Ocr. 16.. 100 8.691.200
2/494,900 Jan. & July. July, ’69
59'
2
Atlanta and West Point. Sept. 18.100
4
1.232.200 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Augusta and Savannah*
100
7&8,700 Jan. & July. July, ’69
8X
Baltimore and Ohio
100 18,151,962 April & Oct. Oct., ’6!*
4
125
Washington Branch*
100 1,650,000 April & Oct. Oct., ’69
5
Parkersburg Branch
50
46
48
Berkshire
100
GOO',000 Quarterly. Oct! ’' ’69
Boston and Albany
100 14,9&1,100 Jan. & July. July, ’69
146^
Boston, Con. ft Montreal .pref. .100
800,000 May & Nov. May, ’69
Boston, Hartford and Erie
100 18,939,800
17%
Boston ana Lowell
500 2,169,000 Jan. &
4
133 ;iS4
July. July, ’69
Boston and Maine. Sept. 18.
100 4,550,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
5
1‘39X 139*
Boston and Providence
100 3,860,000 Jan. & July.
134
5
July, ’69
Buffalo, New York and Erie*.. .100
950,000 June & Dec. June, ’69
3X
Burlington and Missouri River .100 1,235,000
do
do
pref.100
380,000
Camden and Amboy
100 5,000,000 Feb. & Aug. Feb., ’69
119* 120
Camden and Atlantic
50
377,100
do
do
preferred.. 50
731,200
Cape Cod
60
801,905 Jan. & July. July, 69
Catawissa*
50 1,159,500
29
do
preferrwL-.
50 2,200,000 May & Nov. Nov!,' ’68
74)4
Cedar Rapids and Missouri*
100 5,432,000
do
do pref..
May
3X
Central Georgia ft Banking C0..1O6 4.666.800 June & Nov. May, "’69
& Dec. June, '69
5
Central of New Jersey
100 15,000,000 Jan. & July. Jan., ’69
...jl00^
Central Ohio
50 2,500,000 June & Dec.
50
Dec., ’68
50)4
do
preferred
50
500,000 June & Dec. June, ’tfe
3
Cheshire, preferred
100 2,085,925 Jan. ft July. July, ’69
84' 84)4
2
Chicago and Alton. Mar. 27
100 5.141.800 Mar. & Sept. Sept.,’69
144
5
143
do
do preferred.... 100 2,425,400 Mar. &
141
144
Sept. Sept.. ’69
Chic., Burling. ft Quincy. Aug. 7.100 13,825,025 Mar- & Sept. Sept., ’69
159
160
Chicago and Great Eastern
100 4,390,000
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska*..100 1,000,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Chicago and Milwaukee*
100 2,227,000
Chicago and Northwest. Aug. 21.100 14,590,161 June & Dec. June, ’69
5
71)4 71)4
do
do
pref. ...100 18,159,097 June & Dec. June, ’69
5
S4y 84 >4
Chic., Rock Is. & Pac. June 12..100 14,000,000 April & Oct.
et., ’69
sy 105* 105%
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton.100 3,521,664 April & Oct. Oct., ’69 5-s.
siy siy
Cincinnati, Richm. & Chicago* .100
374,100

discovered In

Stock

of this

Railicay Monitor',

see

Rate.

I*

*

STOCK LIST.

COMPANIES.

paid.
Bid

Date.

Immediate notice

as

Metropolitan

50
100
50

Williamsburg

50

New York

1,500,000 Mar. * Sept. Mar., ’G9

2,500,000
500,000 June

& Dec.

Dec., ’68 60 CtS.
4

2,000,000; Jan. & July. July, ’69

5,000,000
3,200,000! Quarterly. Aug., ’69
1,250,000 Jan. & July. Jan., ’69
1,000,000
I
3,400,000 April & Oct.
1,250,COO;Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’66
2,000,000;Feb. & Aug. Aug., ’69
1,200,000 Jan. & July 'July, ’69
1,000,000!Feb. & Aug.: Aug., ’69
386,000; Jan. & July. July, ’69
4,000,000;Jan. & July.; July, ’69
2,800,000!
I '
1,000,000 Mav & Nov.!May, ’69,
750,000; Jari. & Jnlv. July, ’69;
731,250
.......
4,000,000
July, ’66

28
2 0

60
28
50

84
Improvement—Canton
Long Island
50 3,000,000
iGy
Aug., ’66
52X 57
Boston Water Power
100
Louisv., Cin. ft Lex., prf. Stp. 11.100
848,315 Jan. & July. July, ’69
14
97' 98"
16
Brunswick City
do
c >nsol
50 l,6<fl 736 Jan. &
July. July, ’69
8*
sx
Cary Improvement
Louisville and Nashville
100 8.681.500 Feb. &
70' 70*
Aug. Aug., ’69
Telegraph—West.Union. Sep.25.100 41,068,100 Jan. & July. July, ’69
Louisville, New Alb. & Chicago.100 2,800,000
2
86*
acifle & Atlantic
Macon and Western
2
100 2,000,000 June & Dec.
3.000 (00 Quarterly. I July, ’6:1
SO
sy
June, ’69
Express.—Adams
Maine Central
100 10,000,000 Quarterly,
100 1.611.500
5
57
57
jApril,’68
Amer. Merchants’ Union
Marietta & Cin., 1st prf. Aug.21. 50 8,130,719 Mar. &
100 18,000,000
sc
&?.
20
Sept. Sept., ’66
say
United States
do
do
2d pref.. 50 4,460,368 Mar. &
100 6,000,000 Quarterly. May, ’69
3s.
Sept. Sept., ’66
"sy 55 58
Wells, Fargo & Co
do
do
100 10,000,0(10
common
20
2,029,778
20*
Steamship.—Atlantic Mail
Manchester and Lawrence
100 4,000,000
100 1,000,000 May & Nov.
uarterly. (Dec1, ’67
"5'
May, ’69
Pacific Mail
100 20,000,000 quarterly. Sept.,’69
Memphis and Charleston. 8ep. 25.25 5,312,725 June & Dec. June, ’69
3
62X 62X
Trust.—Farmers’ Loan & Trust. 25 1,000,000:Jan. &
Michigan Central. July 24
100 11,197,348 Jan. & July. July, ’69
5
July.;July, ’60
5
122 X 124
National Trust
.100
Milwaukee and St. Paul. May 29.100 7,151,069 Jan. &
4
69 X 69*
July. Jan., ’69 14s.
New York Life and Trust.. .100 1,(100,000; Jan. & July, j July, ’69
do
do
prer...l00 8,188,272
10
1,000,000J Feb. & Aug.! Aug., ’69
January. Jan., ’69 7 & 10 s 82
ssy
Union Trust
Mine Hill ft Schuylkill Haven* 50 3.775.600 Jan. &
100 1,000,000;Jan. & July. (July, ’69
4
4
105
106
July. July, ’69
United States Trust
100 1,500,000.Jan. & July.: July, ’69
5
Mississippi Central*
100 2,948,785
Mobile® Montg.pref. Aug. 14..
100 2,836,600i
Mining.—Mariposa Gold
8
$1,788,700
j
8*
Mariposa Gold, pref
Mobile and Ohio
100 8,693.400!
100 4,269,820
17
do
do Trust, certif. &.
Montgomery and West Point.. .100 1,644,104 June & Dec. Dec., ’67
2,824,000) Jan. & July.
4
Quicksilver. Apl. 27
Morris and Essex*
...100 10,000,000'
;.. 50
I Feb.,’65 5 gold! is x 13"
4.823.500 Jan. & July. July, ’69
88X
sy 88
Nashua and Lowell
100
720,000 May & Nov. May. ’69
5
Nashv. ft Chattanooga. Sep. 11..100 2,056,544
N. Y. & BROOKLYN CITY PASSENGER
RAILROADS.
Naugatuck. Mar. 20
100 1.818.900 Feb. & Aug.
'4’
iis "
Aug., ’69
Quotations by A. H. Nicolay, Stock Broker & Auctioneer, 43 Pine Street.
New Bedford and Taunton
100
500,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
4
New Haven & Northampton ....100 1,500,000 Jan. &
65
8
July.
70
NAME OF ROAD.
PAR STOCK. DIVIDENDS PAID, PER CT. BID. ASK.
New Jersey
100 6,250,000 Feb. & Aug. Allg., ’69
5
123
New London Northern
100
995,000 Mar. & Sept. Sept., ’68
4
Bleecker street and Fulton Ferry. 100 900,000 Year end. Oct.l, ’68.
New York Central Mar. v0
100 28,795,000 Feb. & Ang.
42X 50
4
189" 189X Broadway (Brooklyn)
Aug., ’69
100
do
do
do
do
200,000
inter. certif..l00 22,829,600 Feb. & Aug.
4
Aug., ’69
Broadway and Seventh Avenue
100 2,100,000
do
do
New York and Harlem. Apl. 3.. 50 5,500,000 Jan. &
53
60
4
July. July, ’69
145~ 145* Brooklyn, Bath & Coney Island... 100 99,850
do
do
do
do
pref.
50 1,500,000 Jan. & July. July, ’69
4
145
Brooklyn City
100 1,500.000
do
New York and New Haven
do
12
100 9,000,000 Jan. & July.
20i' 210'
5
July, ’69
135.X 186
Brooklyn City and Newtown
100
do
New York, Prov. and Boston
do
400,000
.100 2,000,000 Jan. & July.
July, ’69
sy
Brooklyn, Prospect Park & Flatb. 100 254,000
do
do
Norfolk and Petersburg, pref...100
300.500
Brooklyn and Kockaway Beach... 100 144,600
do
do
do
do
guar. .100
137.500 Jan. & July. July, ’69
's'
Bush wick (Brooklyn)
100 262,200
North Carolina. Oct. 2
do
do
100 4,000,000
6
Central Park, North & East Rivers 100;1,065,200
do
do
Northern of New Hampshire.... 100 3,068,400 June & Dec. July, ’68
46
4
June, ’69
107X 108" Coney Island (Brooklyn)....'*
do
do
Northern Central. May 10
lOOj 500,000
65
50 4.798.900 Quarterly. Aug., ’69
2
95
95* Dry Dock, East B’dway & Battery 100:1,200,000
do
Northeast. (S. Carolina). May 1.
do’69.
5
80
90
898,980
Eighth Avenue
100 1,000,000
do
do 68.
do
do 8 p.c.,pref
12
165
180
155,000 May ft Nov.
Forty-second St. & Grand St. Ferry 100 748.000
do
North Missouri
do
10
105
100 7,700,000
ii" i2" Grand Street ft Newtown (B’klyn) 100 170,000
do
do
North Pennsylvania
70
86'
50 8,150,000
74
75
Feb., ’69 5s.
Hudson Avenue (Brooklvn)
100 106,700
do
do
Norwich ana Worcester *
100 2.868.700 Jan. ft July.
5
110
July, *69
Metropolitan (Brooklyn)
do
100 194,000
do
Ogdensburg ft L. Champ. Sep. 4.100 3,040,900 Annually. Feb., ’69
8
65
66
Ninth Avenue
100 797,320
do
do
do
do
pref.100 1.994.900 April ft Oct. Oct., ’69
4
104
106
Second Avenue
100
do
800,000
do
•hio and Mississippi. Mar. 20.... 100 19,522,900
07
75
Sixth Avenue
26X 27
do
do
100 750,000
10
125
*
do
335
pref
100 3.344.400 June ft Dec. June,’69
sy 65
77
Third Avenue
do
do
100 1,170,000
12
>
Creek and Allegheny River. 50 4,259*450
187* 200
Quarterly. Oct ’69
sy 76 J6X Van Brunt Street (Brooklyn)
do
100
do
4
75,000




,

;

..

!5*

-

....

..

1*

.

..

......

....

....

..

.

.

..

.

.

..
..

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

/
/

THE

630

[October 23, 1869.

CHRONICLE.

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST.
Subscribers will confer a great favor by giving us Immediate notice of any error

discovered In

onr

Tables.

Pages I aod 2 of Bonds will be published next week.
r—*

INTEREST.

COMPANIES, AND CHARAC¬

•

eg o>

PRICE.

O as

Out¬

For a full explanation of this standing
Table see “ Railroad Monitor”
on a preceding page.

1 When
paid.

Rate.

Where

paid.

1

s >»
Z g

Bid.

X

1

<

Railroads:
New London North. (Jan. 3, ’69):

7
6
7

N. Of'L, J. dcOt. North. (Dec. 1,’6S):
1st Mort. for $3,000,000
2d Mort. for $1,500,000
N. Orleans A Mobile (July
1st Mortgage

1st Mort., construction
2d Mort. (funding) for $1,000,000

*68):

6

7
6

125,000

Mortgage
Improvement

250,000
100,000

(Oct. 1, ’68):

Mortgage
Mortgage
Funding Mortgage

North Carolina

110,500

in

<4
ii

44

New York

(certificates)

.

1873
1893

Mortgage of 1865
2d Mortgage of 1868
3d Mortgage
North Pennsylvania (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage

228,086

7

M.& S. Chari est’n
44
M.& S.
44
J. & J.

6,000,000
4,000,000

7
7
7

J. & J. New York
44
A.&O.

1895
1888

....

J. & J.
A.&O.

6
10
7

7

1,500,000

6
6

2,500,000
360,000

..

Northern, N. 1L (Apr. 1, ’69):
Company Bonds of 1854

Northern New Jersey (Oct. 1, ’68):

Mortgage (guaranteed)

Pittsburg AConnellsv. (Nov.1,’68):
1st Mort. (new) for $4,OCX),000
Baltimore Loan (now 2d lien)

....

...

....

95
•

....

«...

•

....

....

....

•

....

....

....

....

....

•

1867

Philadel.
44

•

•

•

•

•

....

....

....

....

78

80
...

Funded Interest
Portland A Rochester
1st Mortgage

88

166

no
88* 89

Q..-J. Baltimore.

6
6

130,600 j

6

A.&O.

7

6
6
6

44
44
44
44

44

Boston.

J. & J. New York

Irred
1885
1900
1870
1871
1877
1900

1874
18..

87

...

....

....

87V
84

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

Norwich A Worcester (Dec. 1, ’68):
1st Mort. (Mass, loan) s’k’gfund
Construction Bonds
Steamboat Mortgage

7

.1. & J.
J. & J.
F.& A.

300,000

8

J. & J.

2.050,000
850,000
546,000
221.500
1,780,000
101,861

7

J.& J. New York
44
.1. & J.
,J.& J.

7

A. & O.
J. & J.
J. & J.

3,170,000

7

....

1,388,000

7
6
6

249,962

6
6
8
8
7
6

200,000

10

6
7

400,000

124.500
45,000

Ogdensb. A L. Cham. (Apr. 1, ’69):
Equipment Mortgage

Ohio A Mississippi
1st Mortgage (E.

(July 15, ’69):

I)iv.)
1st Mortgage (W. Div.)
2d Mortgage (W. Div.)
Income Mortgage (W. Div.)
Consol. Mort. for $6,000,000

Consol. Mort. sterling
Oil CreFk A Allegh. 21. (Nov.1,’68):
1st

Mortgage
Old Colony A Newpot't (Dcc.1,’68):
Company Bonds
Company Bonds
Company Bonds
Orange, Alex. A Manas. (Oct.1,’68):
1st Mort. (O. & A. RR.)
2d Mort. extension ((). & A.)...
3d Mort. extension (O. & A.)...
4th Mort. extension (O. & A.)...
1st Mort, (O., A. & M. RR)
Va. State Loan (34 y’rs) s’k’g Pd

Osage Valley (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (5-20 years)
Oswego A Rome (Oct, 1, ’68):
1st

458,000

1,000,000
400,000
1,130,500
573.500

331,700
708,000

“

44

44

44

44

44
44

1877
1877
1870

’69-’78
1872
1872
1874
1882
1898
1898

....

....

66

90*
....

75"
....

....

F.& A.
A.&O.
M.& S.

Boston.

1877
1875
1876

M.& N.
.1. & J.
M.& N.
M.& S.
J.& J.
J. & J.

New York

....

84

Mortgage

Mortgage Construction Bonds.

44

44

Richmond
Alexand’a
New York

1873
1875
1873
1880
1882

•

•

•

....

....

....

....

....

,

„

.

.

•p

.

4

^

m

„

.

.

....

....

....

J. & J. New York

1888

M.& N. New York
44
F.& A.

7
7

M.& N. New York ’70-’80
44
M.& N.
1885

7,000,000
1,500,000

6

F.& A. New York
44
J. & J.

1916
1891

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

7

1888
1880

....

....

93

....

94

90*

...

1,150,000

7

Mortgage, guaranteed

1st

Mortgage, endorsed
Pennsylvania (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (Penn. IiR.)
2d Mortgage (Penn. RR.)

|

160,0001

.

Pennsylvania A N. Y. (Nov.l, ’68):
1st
Mortgage, guaranteed

Pensacola A Georgia (Apr. 1, ’67):

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
1st Mortgage (Tallahassc RR.).
Peoria A Bureau Val. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage,
guaranteed
Peoria Pek.AJacksonvjl and ,’69):
1st Mortgage
2erkiometi (Nov. 1, ’68):
Is*. Mortgage
Perth Arriooy AWoodbJJan.1,’69):
1st Mortgage, guaranteed......

2,283.840.
1,545,000 i
6,232,755!
.

3,520,728

j

206,000

,

18..

•

•

.

....

....

New York

18..

....

New York

18..

....

Philadel.

1880
1875
1875
1910
1890
’69-’71

J. & J.
A. & O.
A. & O.

44

London.
Philadel.

Q.-J.
' A. & O Harri6b’rg
Q’t’ly. Philadel.
...

1

8
7

255,000

..

Sink. F’d Mort. (Wat. & Rome).
Guaranteed (Pots. & Watert’n)
Sink. Fund Mort, (general)....
Rutland A Burlington (Jan. 1,’69):
1st M. (conv. into Rut. pref. st’k)
2d M. (conv. into Rut. com. st’k)
Sacramento Valley (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (gold)
2d Mortgage (gold)
St. Joseph A C. Bluffs (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (80 m. in Mo.)
1st Mort. (52 m. in Iowa)
2d Mort. (52 m. in Iowa)
St. L., Alt. A T. Haute (July 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (series A) sink, fund
1st Mort. (series B) sink. fund..
2d Mort. (series C)
2d Mort. (series D)
2d Mort. (income)
St. Ismis A Ivon Mt. (July 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
St. L.j Jacks. A Chic. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (guar.) $15,000 per m..
2d Mort. (guar.) $5,000 per mile.
St. Louis A St. Joseph (Apr. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (gold)

Philadel.

18..

97*
94*

....

....

....

....

1st Mort. (10 m.) tax free
1st Mort. (St, P.to Watab,80m.)
2d Mort. (land grant)
General Most., Tor $2,020,000

97

94
•

.

•

•

,

92"

J. & J. New York
44

44
....

18..
18..
18..

....

#

94
....

....

....

....

,t t

St.L., Vana. A T.Haute (Jan. 1,’69):
IstM.skg fd (guar.)for $1,900,000
2d M. skg fd (guar.) for $2,600,000
St.Piul A Pac., 1st Div.(Apr.l,’69):

T

;

....

General Mort,, sterling...".
Ist'Mort., West, l’e, for $6,000,000
2d M.,W. line (land) for$,3000,000
St. Paul A SiouxClty (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. for $16,000 per mile
Sandusky,M.ANew'rk (Julyl,’69):
1st Mortgage
...

Coupons
Schuylkill A Susqueh. (Nov. 1,’68):
Funded

Mortgage
Seaboard A Roanoke (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
3d Mortgage
!
Selma A Meridian (Apr. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
3d Mortgage
Selma, Rome A Dalton (Jan. 1,’69):
1st Mort. (Ala. & Tenn. Rivers)
2d Mort. (Ala. & Tenn. Rivers).
Gen. Mort, for $5,000,000, tax free
1st

8

J. & J. New York

18..

....

....

1,000,000:! 7

J. & J. New York

1887

....

....

;

; e

!




6
8
6
6
5
6

1,185,300|j

1st Mortgage
Philadelphia A Erie (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mort. (Sunbury & Erie RR.)
1st General Mortgage

Mortgage

New York

•

....

‘

ij

i

Mortgage

44

1870
1875
1872

....

2,697,000,

Silt. Cent. (Nov.1,’68):

8d General

7
6

2,594,000

2d Mort. (Penn. RR.), sterling
General Mort. (Phil, to Pittsb.).
State works purchase
Short Bonds (debentures)

44

1

Paterson A

Pemberton AHlghtsVn (Jan.1,’69):

....

London.

:

(Jan. 1, ’69):
Mortgage, guaranteed
Ramapo (Jan. 1, ’69):

A. & O.
A.&O.
F.& A.

7
7
7

316,000

Paterson A Newark

2d General

'

6

Philadel.
....

18..

New York

....

....

18..

....

....

....

....

7

J. & J.

Philadel.

1876

7
6

A. & O.
A.&O.

Philadel.

1877
1881

? f;t j*

44

44

ff

93

85*

82“

96

rl

Shamoldn V. A

1st Mortgage

Pottsv. (Nov.l,’68):

guaranteed.

Philadel.

7

O.
J.
J.
J.
J.
J.
O.
O.

6
6
6

J. & J.
A. & O.
A. & O.

Philadel.

7
6
7

F. & A.

Philadel.

7
6
6

J. & J. Baltimore.
44
J. & J.
F.& A. New York

7

J. & J. New York

7
7
7
7
7

F.& A.
M.& S.
A. & O.
M.& N.
J. & I).
J. & J.
F.& A.
M. & S.
A. & ().
M.& N.
J. & D.
A. & ().
M.& N.
M.& S.

....

T3

1898
1886
1889

1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1812
1812
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1876
1874

7
7
7
7

7
7
7
7
8

225,000 10
525,000 10

t

*

♦

t

....

1870
1871

44
44

44

7

....

88V
96
89

’72-’77

Philadel.

1893
1893

44

1884

44

91

’71-’76
1887

44

P

100* 100*

1880
1886
1880

44

London.

80
70

1900
•

T

-

♦

®

81
72

....

....

44
41
41
14
44
44
44
44
44
44
44
41
14

II

100
too
100
100
100
100

94K
94*
M*
94*
94*
94*
90*

1894
1894

J. &'J. San Franc.
44
J. & J.

New York

18..

Boston.
Boston.

Boston.}

1883
1895
1873

^Portland.

18..

100,000
50,000

8
8

m;& s. Provid’ce.
44
j.&d.

1877

1. (XX),000

296,000
V

7
7
7

M.& S. New York
44
M.& S.
44
M.& S.

1888
1888
1876

M.& S.
J. & D.

1882
188-1

229,200
3<X),(XX)
91,871

6
6
6

A.&O.
A. & O.
A. & O.

350,000

6

....

250, (MX)
650.000

7

350,000

7

150.000
450,000
400,000

7
7
7

Philadel.
44

-

1871

500,000

7

J. & J. New York 1873
44
’80-’87
J. & J.
II
1886
M. & S.
14
1890
M.& N.

600,000
161,600
1,298,000

6
6

J.& J. New York ’87-’88
II
’75-’76
J.& J.

6
6

41
’75-’9()
M.& N.
M.& N. Richmond ’75-*90
44
F. & A.

408,500
160,000

6

1875
1870

67,778

6

7

J. & J.
London.
J. & J. Richmond

13,500
130,500

6
7
8

J. & J. New Yo’-k
J. & I). N. Y. & R
M. & S. Philadei.

9,000,000

7

F.& A. N.Y.orLon

1,384,000

7

757,500
511,500

7
7
7

M.& S. New York 1880
44
J. & D.
’69-’74
14
1891
J. & D.

7

F.& A.
F.& A.

Rome, Wat. A Ogdensb. (Jan.1,’69):

•

44

7
6

416,(XX)

1st Mortgage, sterling
1st Mortgage, sterling
2d Mortgage, sterling

Philadel. A

1st Mort- (gold) convert,
Rock Ixl. A Peoria (Jan. 1,
1st Mortgage

....

Panama (Jan. 1, ’69):

1st

Ro<‘kf-, R. /. A St. Louis (Jan.1’69):
free
’69):

....

2,(XX),000
153,000
500,000

paid.

175,000

’68):

.

Pacific of Missouri (Mar. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage (gold )

1st

Convertible Bonds
Richm. A Petersburg (Oct. 1,
1st Mort,, convertible
2d Mort,, coupon and reg.
3d Mort. of 1865. coupon

875,000
875,(XX)
875,000
875,000
875,(XX)

Princpal payble.

Where

paid.

PRICE.

172,800

Sterling Bonds

94

....

44

(Jan. 1, ’69):

Richm., Ft\ A I'olomac (Oct.1,’67):

....

18..

198.500
375,000

Oswego A Syracuse (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage

....

Philadel.

500,000
200,000

Mortgage, guaranteed

Income Mortgage
2d

7
7
7
7

Boston.

400,000

860,000

2d Mortgage,
1st Mort. (Sara. & Whitehall)..
1st Mort. (Troy, Salem & Rutl’d)
Richmond A Danville (Oct. 1, ’68):
State Sinking Fund Loan
Bond guaranteed by State
Consol. Mortgage, coupon
Consol. Mortgage, reg
Roanoke Valley RIi. Bonds

Picific.:
Mortgage, land

1,000,600

860,000
860,000
860,000

Equipment, convertible
Reading A Columbia (Nov. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Rensselaer A Saratoga (Oct.1,’68):
1st Mortgage

....

3,OCX) 000
775,000

860,000
860,000

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Raritan A Vela. Bay (Jan. 1. ’69):
1st Mortgage, sinking fund.. ..
2d Mortgage

....

6,208.000

875,(XX)

f*rov., War. A Bristol (Dec. 1, ’68):

l(~
....

’69):

Bridge (O. & P. RR.) Mortgage
Equipment Bonds of 1869
Placerville A Sacrum. (Jan. 1,’69):
1st Mortgage
1st Mortgage (gold)
P>rt Huron A L. Mich. (Mar.1,’69):
1st Mort. (gold) for $16,000 per m
Portland A Kennebec. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage extended
Consolidated Mortgage

•

....

....

1880
1887

•

....

Sew York

44

J. & J.
A.&O.
M.& N.
J. & J.
,J. & J.
J. & J.

175,000
25,0001
500,0001
952,000 j

....

93
•

1st Mort. (Turtle Cr. Div.)
Pittsb.. P W. A Chic. (Jan.l,
1st Mortgage (series A)
1st Mortgage (series B)
1st Mortgage (series C)
1st Mortgage (series D)
1st Mortgage (series E)
1st Mortgage (series F)
2d Mortgage (series G)
2d Mortgage (series H)
2d Mortgage (series I)
2d Mortgage (series K)
2d Mortgage (series L)
2d Mortgage (series M)
3d Mortgage

....

Northern
1st

945,000

Col. & Newark Div. Bonds

....

95

101

100

Shops N.C. ’72 ’78

....

•400,000

2d Mortgage (sinking fund)....
3d Mortgage (sinking fund)....
1st Mortgage (Y. & C. RR.)
2d Mortgage (Y. & C. RR.)
3d Mortgage (Y. & C. IiR

385,000
1,(XX),000

,

When

A.&
J. &
J. &
J. &
J. &
J.&
A. &
A.&

6

477,500

1st Mortgage
;
1st M Steubenv. & Ind. re-org.

....

7

2,255,000

Pittdb.,Cin. A St. Iouis (Sep., ’69):.

99

.

....

1869
1868
1875

327,339

Funding Scrip

Northern Central (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (Baltimore guar.)

•

88"

1877
1877
1872

7
7

276,500

Chattel Mortgage
2d Mortgage

.

87*
81*

1875

M.& N.
M.& S.

North Missouri (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st

•

18..

700,000
145,000

Northeastern (March 1, ’69):

1st

44

228,(XX)

Loan of 1866
Loan of 1867

91

1883
1876
1883
1883
1876
1887

8
8

1867

Consolidated Mortgage, gold

N.
N.
A.
D.

J. & J. New York
44
J. & J.
44
J. & J.

8
8

(Sept., ’69):

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Funded Interest

4 i

6
6
6
6
5

401,600

106,000
2,497,800
171,500

Phila., Wilm. A Balt. (NoV. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage, convertible
....

cr

7

I

Mortgage Bonus (various)
Bonus due

....

••

F.& A. New York ’73-’78
44
J. & J.
1881
44
M.& N.
1883

6

7
6

250,000

1st
1st

A.

A. & O. New York

6

1,059,500

1st

N. New York

....

6

Mortgage

New Yorkprov.A Zfcw£.(Sep.l,’68):
Extension
Norfolk A Petersburg

....

....

1889
1887

M.& N. New York
44
F.& A.

7

Consolidated Mort. of 1863
etc York AN. Hacen (Apr. 1, ’69):
1st

....

Rate.

182,400

Loan of 1849
Loan of 1861
Loans of ’43, ’44, ’48 and ’49
Loan of 1857, convertible
Loan of 1836, sterling
Loan of 1836, sterling
Loan of 1868
Loan of 1868

....

.

7

3.000.000

Mortgage of 1853

M.&
F. &
M.&
M.&
F.&
J. &

6
7
6

Sinking Fund (assumed debts).

Real Estate
Convertible (till Aug. 1, ’69)
Renewal bonds
New York A Flushing (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
J ew York A Harlem (Oct. 1, ’68):

A.&O. New York
44
J. & J.

8
8

1,842,600

| Subscription (assumed stocks).

1st

1886
1890

....

1, ’69):

N. Orl., Opelo.AGt W. (Jan. 1,’69):
New York Central (Oct. 1,
Premium Sinking Fund

J. & J. New York
44
A. & O.

Railroads:
Philadelphia A Read. (Dec. 1, ’68):

1871
1885
18?2

8
8

Mortgage Bonds

1st Mort.. extension
Convertible Bonds

J. & D. N. London
A. & (). New York
44
J.& J.

INTEREST.

TER OF SECURITIES ISSUED. Amount
Out¬
For a full explanation of this standing
Table see “ Railroad Monitor”
on a preceding page.

571,000

....

400,000

7
10

329,000 10
1,400,000
150,000

10
10

....

New York

Boston.
*4

....

•

•

•

•

i...

1919
....

1863
1863

J. & J. New York
F.& A. Sacram’to
M. & S.
M.& S.

45

50

1875
1881
1893
1893
1882

Boston.
44
44

500,000

7

1,100,000

J. & J. New York

1,700,000

7
7
7
7
7

4,000,000
-2,365,000

....

92* 93
92* 93
80
81*
80
81*

1894

44

1894

41

1894
1894
1894

76

7

F.& A. New York

1892

81

360,000

7
7

A.&O. New York
44
J. & J.

1894
1898

1,000,000

6

M.& N. New York

1893

522,000

7
7

J. & J. New York
44
J. & J.

1897
18..

8
7
7
7
7

M.& S. New York
44
J.& J.
II
J. & D.
41
J. & J.
J. & J.
London.
New York

1892
1892
1892

1,100,000

1,400,000
1,400,(XX)

710,000
120,000
700,000

1,200,000
780,000

A.&O.
F. & A.
M.& N.
M.& N.

.44
44

....

....

18..
18..
....

100,000

7

J. & J. New York

1,290,000

7

J. & J. New York 1875

860,000

7

J. & J.

97,000

7

J. & J.

217,000

7

73,000

7

79,830
52,000

665,000
838,500
241,000
....

700,000

44

1896
1875

Philadel.

1873

New York

1880

4*

187)

....

t

-

t

....

New York
Selma.

New York

•»

4

*

♦

....

7
8
7

J. & J. New York
14
J. & J.
41
, .*
A.&O.

1872

7

F.&A.

1872

^

Philadel.

1864

1887

81*
87*

14

■

COMPANIES, AND CHARAC¬
TER OF SECURITIES ISSUED. Amount

’

October

23, 1869.]

THE

CHRONICLE.

531

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS
Subscribers will confer

•.

For

full

a

Table
on a

see

explanation of

es a?

“ Railroad Moni

COMPANIES, AND CHARAC¬
TER OF SECURITIES ISSUED.
Amount

PRICE.

•SI

Out.

8

standing

When

Where

paid.

Rate.

preceding page.

Railroads:
heboygan A F. du Lac (J
1st Mortgage

INTEREST.

-

Amount

-

paid.

73- el
Ph^

For

Askd

Bid.

:

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage.
South Carolina
i

Domestic
Domestic
Domestic
Domestic
Domestic

Bonds
Bonds
Bonds
Bonds
Bonds

1898
1898

6
6

J. & D.
J. & 1).

1874
1876

5
5
7
6
7
6
7

J. & J.
’71-’85
J. & J. Charlest’n ’71-’85
44
A. & O
’69-’72
44
J. & J.
’73-’7‘J

(H)

563,5(X

(G)

377,01(
353,5(X
41,(XX
30,(XX

(I)

(K)
(special)....

J. & J.
J. & J.
M.& S

8

South Shore (Dec. 1, ’68):

1st Mortgage
South Side, L. I. (Oct.
1st Mortgage

1, ’68)

Southern Minnesota (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st

Mortgage, 10-20

6

A&O.

7

years..

20,000

Company Bonds
Muscogee RR Honda

•

•

pm
•

399,000

J.& J. New York

Sterling Mountain (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage

200,000

Mortgage

528,000

6

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

500,000
250,(XX)

6
6

1st

200,000

6

Sussex (Jan. 1, ’69):

Mortgage

Mortgage

1,720,000

1st Mort.

1st Mort.

Consol.

(Tol. &

Illy 75 m.)

900,(XX)

.

.

•

•

•

•

.

.

,

,

45,(XX)
1,455,000

(Quin. & Tol., 34 m.).

Mortgage (500

2,700,000

m.)

300,000
300,000
650,(XX)
325,000

....

Convertible Bonds
1st Mort., guaranteed
2d Mort., guaranteed

Union Pacific (June 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (gold), tax free.

....

Union Pacific, Cent.
i?r.(Jan.l,’69):
1st Mort. (gold), tax free
..

(gold), 140 m...
(gold), 253.94 in.

1st Mort. (Leavenworth Br.)
Land Grant Mort. for *500,000
Income B’ds (gen.) *10,000
p. m.
..

..

Union Pacific, S. Br. (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort. (gold), *25,000 p. m
Utica A Black River (Nov. 1, ’68):

Mortgage

Vermont Central (June 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

(consol.)
(consol.)
Equip. Loans of ’66 and ’67...'...

do
1869
Vermont A Mass. (Dec. 1, ’68):
ao

1st

Mortgage, sinking fund
Vermont
Valley (Jan. l, ’69):

1st Mortgage
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

2,240,000
4,063,000
6,303,000
600,000
361,000

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
3d (enlarged) Mortgage
4th Mortgage, for
*1,000,000
Income Bonds

Warren (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort., guaranteed
Westchester A Phila. (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage, convertible

2d Mortgage,
registered
West Jersey (Jan. 1, ’69):
Loan of 1883
Loan of 1896,1st Mort
West Shore Hud. Riv. (Oct.
1, ’68):

Mortgage

West Wisconsin
(May 1, ’69):
1st Mort. sterling fof
£800,000...
Western, Ala. (Jan. 1, ’69):
guar

Western Maryland (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mort., endors.
by Baltimore
1st Mortgage, unendorsed
2d Mort., endors.
by Baltimore.
2d Mort., end.
by wash. Co
West. Pennsylvania (Nov. 1,
’68):
1st
Mortgage, guaranteed......
Western Union (Jan. 1, ’69):

age




44

64

•

.

.

,

,

....

....

.

,

....

....

....

J’el,’71

6

44

....

3,000,000
1,5(X),000
1,000,000
50J.0C0

7
7
8
8

J. & D.
J. & D.

521,000

6

7
6

293,200

7

M.& N.

44

M.&N.
J. & J.

Boston.

A.&O. New York
Boston.
A.&O. New York
A. & O.

88
88
.

.

.

*

-

-

•

-

.

*

*

400,000
562,500

7
8

J. & J.
A.&O.

t

-

....

38,600
....

7

7

...

J. & J.

44

7

A. & O. New York

1888

200,000
400,000
300,000
300,000

1890

6

J.
J.
J.
J.

1,800,000

6

A.&O.

F, & A. New York
)

78

86

300,000

7

J. & J.

1872

....

....

200,000

7

J. & J.

....

300,000

7

M.& N.

150,000

6

1890

....

80
78

1890

1890

18..

1696

Brooklyn.

1875

....

....

18..

Boston.

....

1878

....

•

....

.

*

.

1874

....

1st Mortgage
42d st. A Grand
st.Fei'ry (Oct.l,'68):
1st Mortgage
.....:
Real Estate

203,000

7

J. & J. New York

18..

....

160,000
100,(XX)

7
7

J. & J. New York

1873

200,000

7

J. & J.

Philadel.

Mortgage

350,000

7

J.& J.

Mortgage

100,000

'7

J. & J.

130,000

7

165,700

Mortgage

Mortgages
Frankford ASouthw'k(Nc\.l,'68):

,

65

t

t

f

Philadel.

18..

.

Philadel.

18..

....

J. & J. New York

1877

.

.

.

.

7

J.& J.

Philadel.

1874

•

•

.

•

....

191,900

7

J.& J. Brooklyn.

1878

....

....

167,000

7

J.& J. New York

18..

100,000
ltXMXXl
100,(XX)

6
6

Newark.

6

J. & J.
J.& J.
J. & J.

1881
1880
1883

200,000

6

J. & J.

Philadel.

18..

700,000

7

J. & D. New York

1877

100,000

7

J. & J.

Philadel.

1874

....

250,000

7

J. & D. New York

18..

....

1,000,000
500,000

7

J.& J. New York

18..

100,000

7

A. & O.

Mortgage

200,000

7

J. & J.

Mortgage
Philadelphia (Nov. 1, ’68)
Mortgage

131,000

7

100,000

1st

Mortgage
Hestomv'le,M. A Fairin't(S, o.l ,’68):
1st Mortgage
1st

Mortgage

Mortgage

1st Mortgage (Broad street)...
1st Mortgage (O. & N.)
2d Mortgage (O. & N.)

■-

Philadelphia City (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage

Second Aven ue (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Second A Third St. (Nov. 1,
2d (now 1st) Mortgage...
Sixth Avenue (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
Third. Avenue (Oct. 1, ’68):

’68):

Mortgage
Real Estate Mortgage
'Troy A Lansingburg (Oct. 1, ’68):

1st

....

....

....

....

•

•

•

«...

•

•

•

....

•

•

•

....

.

.

.

•

•

•'

•

....

.

•

•

....

.

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

Mortgage

Bonds for interest
Loan of 1873
Loan of 188-4
Loan of 1897.
Gold Loan of 1897
Convertible Loan of 1877

,

89

•

•

•

67%
91

•

....

95
....

100

100

Troy.

1872

....

Utica.

1887

....

....

J. & J.

Albany.

1872

....

....

7

J. & J.

Philadel.

1869

6

J. & J.

Philadel.

2,000,000
4,375,000
1,699,500

6
5
6

J. & J. Baltimore.

1870
1890
1885

6

J. & J.

1878

500,000
1,500,000

1,000,000

7
7
7

M. & S. New York
44
M.& N.
44
J. & J.

1870
1877
1884

7

7

J. & J.
J. & J.

Philadel.

69,856

1865
1873

6
6
6
6
6

J. & J.

Philadel.

J. & D.
J. & D.

J. & J.
J. & J.

Pittsburg.

JerseyCity

....

...

....

1,201,850

1S86

Q.-J. Baltimore.
Q.—J. London.

Q.-J.
Q.—J.

Philadel.

44

44
44
44
44

95

....

....

....

....

....

....

1873
1884
1897
1897
1877

....

S3* 84*
81

82

87*

....

94^

95

82

82*

1887
18..

85

86

1876
1885

64
80

65

....

....

57,000

6
6

1st Mortgage
Boat Loan, sinking

782,250

6

267,010

7

A. & O.
A. & O.

Guaranteed Bonds

601,000

6

J.& J.

Philadel.

18..

1,761,213

M. & S.
I. & J.

Philadel.

362,500

6
6
6

1872
1882

1,000,000
1,250,000
325,000

6
6
6

3,000,000

6

M.& N.

Philadel.

1883

749,000

6

V ar.

Philadel.

1878

600,000

6

J. & J.

Philadel.

1878

1886

>..

Morris (Feb. 28, ’69):

fund
Pennsylvania (Nov. 1, ’68):

Schuylkill Navigation (Nov.l, ’68):
1st
2d

Mortgage
Mortgage
Improvement
Susq. A Tide Water (Nov. 1, ’68):
Maryland Loan
Loan of January 1,1878
.,

Pref. Interest Bonds
Union (Nov. 1, ’68)
1st

Mortgage

West Branch A

Mortgage

Susq. (Nov. 1, ’68):

Wyoming Valley (Nov. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage

miscellaneous

3.980,670

M.& N.

44

44

J.& J.
London.
J. & J. Baltimore.
44
J. & J.

....

....

....

80
60

1870

^

....

1885
1878
1894

^

....

I

.

....

.

.

....

....j

Quicksilver (Jan. 1, ’69)
1st Mortgage (gold)
2d Mortgage (gold)
Wi UnMmT*\4fp\; fiW.,

7

J. & J. New York

29,000

7

J. & J. Baltimore.

....

....

1885

17,000

7
7

J. & J. New York
F &A.

1879
1881

7
7

J. & D. New York
“
T.& J.

1879

,000,000

Mortgage

2,000,000

4,684,100

7

507,500
00.000

JIT.

....

,

92

94

....

...,

•
....

•

•

•

*

•

•

•

--

1879

m n* New York* 1873

.

....

:

Consolidated Coal (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st Mortgage, convertible
Cumbei'land Coal (Jan. 1, ’69):
1st

....

....

.

....

....

127,000

Dock A Imp. Co.(Jan .1,’69):
Bonds (guar, by C. RR. of N. J.)

•

,

•

....

mer.

....

,

....

18..

5,000,000

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

....

89

....

87,500
5,606,122
2,000,000

Mortgage

Monongahela Naviga. (Nov.1,’68):

....

....

....

•

•

.

*

*

• 1 ♦

•

....

800,000

..

Coupon Bonds

1st

....

.

.

743,654

1st Mortgage
Chesapeake a; Ohio (Jan. 1, ’69):
Maryland Loan, sinking fund
Guaranteed Sterling Loan

Lehigh Navigation (Nov. 1, ’68):
....

44

.

•

Canal:
Chesapeake A Delaw. (June 1,69):

Registered Bonds (taxfree)....
Registered Bonds (tax free)....
Delaware A Raritan (Jan. 1. ’69):
See Camden & Amboy Railroad
78%
Erie of Pennsylvania (Nov. 1, ’68):

....

7

44

44

.

....

•

2,089,400

Watervlict (Oct. 1, ’68):

....

....

....

100

....

1st

1st

102

....

95

....

....

Bonds having next Preference.
Delaivare Division (Nov. 1, ’68):

....

....

72% 78

....

.....

71

....

18..

1st

1st

82
80

7534
36*

,

J. & J.

Brooklyn.

M. & S. New York

West

....

1884

6
6
6

7

75

1884

7

1st

500,000

4,000,000.’

TO

J. & D. New York

..—

London.

Philadel.

1830

7

Delaware A Hudson (Aug., ’69):

18..

....

1,600,(XX

1st

81 &

....

1883
1896

....

700,000

55

1872

New York

& J. Baltimore.
44
& J.
44
& J.
44
& J.

*

14

1878

Philadel.

-

....

1868
1884
1900
1865

....

18..

....

SIX'

1890
1890
1890
1890

•

J.& J. New York

1st

(

1873

M. & S.
J. & J.

»

54&

1875

6
6

*

t

....

1895
1895

....

7

Mortgage
Utica,Clin.ABingh'ton (Oct.1,’68):

1860
1860
1859

•

J. & J.

t

....

1883

44

•

•

1881
18S6
1896

218,000

t

t

M (

1873
18(8

F.& A. New York

238,000
983,500

»

f

....

1891

....

....

J. & J. London.
M.& N.
J.& J. New York

.

694,000

1st

7

44

f

85 ’
85

1887
1885
1875
1882

511,400

Philadel.

•

-

75

1886

Philadel.

....

18..

.

90

8
6

f

700,000

6
7
7

1st

t

84*

J. & D. New York
44
J. & D.
44
J. & D.
44
M. & S.
44
J. & D.

6
6

44
44

576,887
197,777

Orange A Newark (Jan. 1, ’69:

.

82*

6

s? l

PS

.

82
77

494,000
23,500
990,000
736,000
138,500

1

J

7

Ninth Avenue (Oct. 1, ’68):

89
89

85

7
7
7
7

44

68,200

Metropolitan (Oct. 1, ’68):

8«*

722,500
850,000
154,000
1,273,500

Philadel.

1886
1886
1886
1873

D. New York
44
D.
44
D
44
N

J. & J. New York

....

’76-’77 101
1889

6

80
83

62)3

1878

J.& J. New York

Boston.
Boston.

....

79

18..

7

J. &
J. &
J. &
M.&

Harlem Br.,M. A Ford.( Oct.,1,’68):
....

1916

200,000

7
7
7
7

•

7

....

New York

....

725,000
146,000
528, (XX
80,(XX

•

7

....

F.& A. New York 1895
44
J. & D.
1896
44
J. & J.
’95-’97
44
M.& N.
1896
44
M. & S.
’71-’76

7
7
7

....

Eighth Avenue (Oct. 1, ’68):

1889

J. & J. New York
44
J. & J.

6
6

....

44

A. & O.

6

4,275,000

44

•

D'yD'k, E.ITdway ABat.(Oc.l,'6S):
1st Mortgage

•

J. & J. N.Y.&B’tn ’95-’99
44
J. & J.
’95-’99

6
6

386,000

(Mar. 1, ’69):
Consol. Mort,, 1st class
Consol. Mort., 2d class
Consol. Mort., 3d class
Consol. Mort., 4th class
Virginia A Tennessee (Oct. 1, ’68):

Mortgage,

1,600,000
1,600,000

>

J. & J. New York
44
J. & J.

6
6
7

114,000

Vicksburg <6 Merid.

A.&O.
M.& N.
M. & S.

1897

1st

1907

44

J. & J. New York

626,CKX

....

1878
1871
1893
188)3

44

....

8

rlst Mortgage
Germantown (Nov. 1, ’68):

....

1882

J. & J. New York

6
6

25,998,000
25,998,000

44

44

....

1,000,000

Cambridge (Dec. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
CenlralP.,N.A E. Biver(Oct.1,’68):
1st Mortgage
Coney Isl. A Brooklyn (Oct.1,’68):

...

....

1890
1890
1871
1865
1888
1890

14

44

1888

Mortgage

1896
1894
1886

44

44

Philadel.

Brook.,Pros.P.AFlatb'h(Oc.\,'68):
1st

1876

44

Q.-J.

7
7
7
7

500,000
360,000

Mortgage

1st Mort.
1st Mort.

500,000
300,000
1,(XX),(XX)
1,500,000
2,500,000
600,000

J. & J.

Green A Coates (Nov. 1, ’68):,

44

F. & A.
F.& A.
M.& N.
F.& A.
M.& N.
M.& N.
M.& N.
M.& N.

6

Street Passenger R.R.
Bleecker St. A Fulton A’. (Oct.1,’68):
1st Mortgage
Broadway A 1th Are. (Oct. 1, ’68);

,

....

F.& A. New York
44
F.& A.

A.&O.

•

,

1875
1880

F.& A. New York
44
J. & J).
44
A.&O.

7
7
10
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

2,5<X),0(X)
1,(XX),000

Tioy Union (Oct. 1, ’68):

‘•s

Boston.

A. & O. New York

7
7
7

1,300,000

Tt'og A Boston (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

1st

•

....

New York

....

,

,

1874

F.& A.

7

1,800,(XX)
1,(XX),(XX)

Tol., Wab. A Western (Jan. 1,

1st

J. & J.

1873

150,000

Mortgage.
'.
Brooklyn C.ANewtown (Oct.1,’68):
1st Mortgage
.•

1886

Philadel.

....

J. & J. New York

2d Mortgage
Wilmington A Read. (Nov. 1, ”68):
1st Mortgage
Wilmington A Weldon (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage,
sterling
Sterling Bonds
Sinking Fund Bonds of 1867

’77-’80

New York

....

7

Mort., endors. by N. Car
Wilming. A Manchester(Oct.l,'68):
1st Mortgage, 1st
pref
1st Mort., 2d pref.
(conv.)
1st Mort., 3d pref.

....

u

1st Mortgage (W. Div.)
1st Mortgage (E. Div.)
2d Mortgage (W. Div.)

3d

Macon.

3

1st

1898

J. & J. New York

7

_7

Sullivan (Jan. 1. ’69):

1st

Var.

8

350,000

Summit Branch (Nov. 1, ’68):

1st

Boston.

Bid.

250,000

.

Mortgage
Brooklyn City (Oct. 1, ’68):

1888

....

TJ

1st

’84-’90
’84-’90
’96-’(X
1887
’70-’75
’62-’?2
’65-’68

300,000

Staten Island (Oct. 1, ’68):
1st Mortgage

#

•

J. & J. New York
J.& J. Petersb’g.
44
J. & J.
J. & J. New York
J. & J. Petersb’g.
«<
J. & J.
44
J. & J.

6

•

....

..

t

1887

8

300,(XX)
817,(XXI

175,000

)
.

Southwestern, Ga. (Aug. i, ’69):

//* wu.,

Bpston.

Mortgage

Mortgage
Wil., Chari. ARutherf'dlfi an.1,’69):

1880

6
6
6
6
6

800,000

,

•

M. & S. New York

8
6

••

...

New York

750,000

3

1st

44

:

Mortgage

•

’88-’91
1892
1871

44

150,000

South Side, Va. (Oct. 1, ’68):
Consol. M. (1st pref.) for *709,0( l)
Consol. M. (2d pref.) for *651,'(X )
Consol. M. (3d pref.) for $5-10,(X 9
Va. State Loan (suspended)...
2d Mort., Petersburg
guarante j
3d

44

paid.

1st

A.&O New York
ft*
J. & J.

262,50C

Princpal payble.

Where

paid.

Whitehall A Plattsb. (Feb. 1, ’69):
1st

7
6

9 019 0.14

Jan. 1, ’69):
(«]

Sterling loan, £452,912 10*
Sterling loan, £59,062 11s. 6d.,

When

Rate.

PRICE.

1st

1,628,320
1,628,320

Augusta.

standing

page.

Wicomico A Pocomoke (Jan. 1,’69):

300,000
250,000

.

preceding

INTEREST.

Railroads:

-

264,000

subsidy)..

a

on a

Tables*

our

Out¬

full explanation of this
Table see “Railroad Monitor”

:

1st Mortgage
2d Mort. (governm.

BOND LIST.

great favor by giving us Immediate notice
of any error discovered in
Pages 1 and 2 of Bonds will be
published next week*

a

■

88 H

V

532

THE

CHRONICLE.

SOUTHERN SECURITIES.

INSURANCE STOCK-LIST.
Maraeu

bin Ahk

bonds, end. by Savannah..
Pensacola * Georg a 1st m 7s

Georgia 6a, old
14
tia, rew
“

7a, old
7s, uew

“

“

“

uew

Atanfa

55
15

70
-G
46

72*
50
50

Broadway
Brooklyn

cx

Soulh.

•

Mississippi 1st

*»

m. 7s.
“
3d
44

*4

44

“

4 4

44

44

x:ew

“

registered stock, old
“

“

4*

44

4‘

ritr

44

44

60

44

Securlt'©*.

Manchester 1
44
2d

44

U

Atlanta, Ga, 8s, bonds

44

Macon 6s, bonds

Memphis 6s, end. by Memp.

60

m

44

56
76

—

4

.

jNashville 6s

| 70
57

44

bs

44

79

S2

55

57*

International

60

62*

Jefferson.

84
72

86
75

King’s Co’ty(Bkln 20

40

42
35

Lafayette (B’klyn) 50

20

25

30
15

endorsed

“

...

Va. <fe Tenn lets 6s
2ds 6s
43d8 6s

Lamar
Lenox

67

75
71
82
70
72
66
72
61

44

44

4th, 8s
Virginia Central lsts, 6s
44

53

76
74

25
Manhattan
100
Market*
100
’
Meehan’ & Trade 25

44

“

94
100

stock

9G

“

stock.

3d

44

Norfolk &

.

44

stock
44
<fc Brnnsw'k end b. 7s
Macon «& Brunswick stock

f

44

...

44

44

endorsed...
stocks..
Gulf 7s bot ds

44

4*

74
34

..

7s
m. 6s
m. 8e
m

44

44

44

«*

4

36

....

....

Ti*

..

70

.

75
....

...

—

20

.

Rcpolule*

.100
.100
25
25
50
.

...

Security +

.

.

Standard
Star

.

COili-ANlLS.

Bennehoff
Bliven Oil
•Blood Farm
Brevoort
Buchanan Farm..
Central
Clinton Oil
Home
National

|

Bid.

28
35

40

.

Tradesmen’s....
United States...

.

.

..

1

•

•

1 50
...

.

—

It)

100
..

....

—

5

;United Pe’tl’m F’ms

4 5'
10

Companies.

5 U"

*60 **75
1 50

10

...JJ Union

1 75

*

*2S **32

2

;United States

13
70

“ii

7i
15 00 16 00

Albany & Boston....

Clack Hawk

Companies.

•la%

Bay State

Caledonia

Caiumet
Canada
Charter Oak

..15

U

Bullion Consolidated

15

6

—

Combination Silver
Consolidated Gregory.

...

Corydon
Grass Valley

10

....

....

New York & Eldorado

—

175

1 80

Owyhee

...

.

“27 ’*29

5

25

Gunnell Gold
Ham'
S.b <?*.
Harmon G. & S




100

1 30

1 85

20

2*66

2 05
60

Rocky Mountain...,

Smith & Parmelee.
Symonds Forks

•io

100

*

16

,

36

—

•

•

•

•

.

.

•

•

•

•

•
—-

•

•

•

.

66

...

,

.

,

.

•

r\n
Uv

April and Oct.
Jan. and July.
J

do

Feb. and

Aug.

Jan. and July
do
do
do
do
Feb. and Aug.
Tan. and July.
Feb. and Aug.
Jan. and July.
do
Feb. and Aug.
Feb. and Aug.
Tan. ami July
do
Feb. and Aug.
Ian. and July.
do

Jan. ’65.-5

10

12

10
10

•

.

6
10
10
12
10

.,

7

..

10
10
10
10
10
10
to

10
10
10

10
10

10
10
16
10
15

•

•

•

14
8

July ’69. .6

10
15
10
10
10
12
12
10

10
11
8j 0
11 10
10
8 10
12 12
10 10
10 10
8 10
8 10
10 10
7 11
7
10

10
14
1-2

10
in

July’69..5
July ’69. .8
Aug. ’69. .8
July’69. .5

Ju’y ’G9. .5

ApM ’69..5
July ’69..8
July ’69..6
Aug. ’69. .6
July ’69..6
Ju y ’69. .5
July ’69. .5
10 July ’69. .5
July ’69. .5
13 Aug. 69..8
5
•'Ug. 69 .5
Aug. ’69. .5
io Ju y ’69. .5
to July ’69. .5
u Aug.'69..6
10 July ’69..5
to July ’69. .7
10 July ’69..7
10 Aug. ’69. .5

10

io
10
6

5
10
10
10
7
10

Julv ’69. .5

10
16
10
10
10
10
10

li

5

’0
10

.6

July ’69. .5
July ’69. .1

July ’69..6,
July .69. .6*
July ’69..8
July ’69. .5
Jmy ’69. 5
25 July ’69.10
July ’69. .4
io io July ’69..5
18 *20 July ’69.10
12 12 Ju’y’69. .6

10

3*

’69. .6
’69. .5
’69. .5
’69. .6
’69. .5
Sep. ’69. .5
July ’69..5

is July ’69.

10
10
8* 7
10 10
10 10
8 10
20 20
10
15

July
July
July
July
July

10- Juiv ’69. .6

14

ii
10
io
10
10

’69. .6

'0

Ju y

10

July '69. .5

Companies.

Bid. Askd

|

..

..

...

Mendotat.

•

4

..

•

•

•

75
7 00
20

..24*
3^

..

66

30

....

7 76
....

,

Eagle River
Evergreen Bluff

•

5%

..

..

..

.16
..23 V
..

•

—

..—

2K

•

.

.

i

.

• ♦ •

•

-

.

m

,

•

....

..

1

.

Petherick
Pewabic
Phoenix

Pittsburg & Boston.
Pontiac

Schoolcraft
* 90 00 South Pewabic
'30
South Side
Star

.

.

.

..33

•

»

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

•

•

•

•

5*
3V

Tremont

.

.

30

..

1 63
1 26
•

•

.

....

6 00

..84

....

«

•

•

;

m

....

....

.

...

12 00
1 00
..10V
23 00 24 CO
10
..

5V

«...

9 •

,

.

..

76
6V

,

,,

25

,

....

.

,

.

....

.

..17
2

.

.

.

...»

..

..11X

Superior
•

.'.

....

.

....

..19

•

•

....

.

•

25

•

...

....

5V

Ogima

00 12 00 Resolute..:
Rockland
1 CO
St. Clair
.

..

•

Native

Quincy %

....

5
8

....

60 66 Mesnard
:... Minnesota

2
6

6V

-•

National

Central

Flint r-.teel River
Franklin
Gardiner Hill
Hancock
Hilton
Hecia
Humboldt
Huron
[sle Royale*
Keweenaw
Knowlton

..

49

’.

Dana
Davidson

Bid. Askd

Manhattan Silver.

’

Benton

.

Lake Superior
2 63 Madison
Manhattan
...

i £6

Allouez

Copper Falls

GOLD AND SILVER MINING STOCK LIST.
Bid. Askd

778 848

Bid. Askd

Concord

Companies.

„

’

65j Sherman * Barnsdale....—

56

10

25
20
50

#

do

do
500,000
723,988
do
200,000
266,099
do
200,000
265,877
530,000 1,177,492 Feb. and Ang.
200,000
330,424 Jan. and July.
200,010
329,240 March and Hep
150,000
238,875 Jan. and July.
do
280,000
382,382
do
150,000
182,719
do
300,000
532,490
do
150,000
220,117
do
200,000 341,884
do
1,000,000 1,550,395
do
500,000 1,202,104
do
200,000
680,526
do
200,000 405,085
150,000 186,000
do
do
200,000 262.895
200,000
do
429,161
300,000
do
427,267
150,000
do
218,610
150,000
do
828,845
200,000
254.0S4
do
300,000
420,892
do
210,000
379,545 Jan. and July.
200,000
865,478 Feb. and Ang.
1,000,000 1,371,935 Jan. and July.

350,000 436,717
200,000 397,873
200,000 281,215
150,000
251,364
150,000
215,986
1,000,000 1.581,471
200,000 300,965
800,000
661,18i
200 000
261,762
200,000
315,978
150,000
210,799
1,1)00,000 1,845,808
200,000
360,828
200,000
303,588
200,000 255,368
200,000
308,270
150,000 368,661
250,000
414,023
764,629
400,000
250,000 525,074
500,000 822,981

.

COPPER MINING STOCK LIST.

Hid. Atkd

Y. <fc Alleghany, par.. 5
Northern Light
Pit Hole Creek
25
iRathbone Oil Tract
|Rynd Farm
10

\fyj

Washington
Willi am sburgCity 50
Vonkers & N. Y.100

O'

COMFAiNIKH.

*

.100
25

Sterling *
Stuyvesant

.

PETROLEUM STOCK LIST.

26

.

Br’klyn 50

St. Nicholast

6s

.100
...

Rutgers’

9o

conv.7s

.

Republic*

86

Phoenix +
Reliei

25
25

.

—

People’s

82*
82*

Richmond & York R 1st 8s..
„d

75

30
30

Fre’ksb’g & Poto. 6s

“

..

stocks...

67*

82

m 8s
7e

“

82*

North River
Pacific
Park
Peter Cooper

2-j
25
80
78

8s

Richm. & Petersb. let
2d
44
44
3d

90 I 95

•Muscogee bonds....

,

Peiersbuig 1

44

..

m

.

.

70
72
84

79
80
60

m. ns

4th

New Amsterdam 35
N. Y. Equitable.3 36
N.Y.Fire and MarlOO
50
Niagara

225,779

'

,

400,000
200,000

500 000

lets 8s

“

44

82*

69
70

44

stock
Macon and Southwestern s'k
Macon & Augusta bonds
44
44
end bonds

Metropolitan * t. .100
Montauk (B’klyn) 50
Nassau (B’klyn). 50
National:
•7*
.

77
75
8o

83

Southside, 1st mtg. 8s
2d m giiart’dGs..

Southwestern Rit., 1st mig
44

65
73

'

44

Central RR. 1st mtg. 7s
k4

.

74
72

filed, int. 8s
Rich. & I an v. lsi cons’d 6s
Piedmont bra’h

103

Mechanics (B’kly) 50
Mercantile
.100
Merchants’
50

72
74
68

80
..

100

Lorillard*

84

70

2nds, 6s
3ds, 6s
4th, 8s

“

GEORGIA.

-Georgia RR. 1st mtg

...

40

Longlslftnd(B’kly) 50

65

Orange & Alex. * Man. l^ts

8s income.
stock

25
30

Knickerbocker..

•

#

2ds 6s
Sds 8s
4ths8s

44

25

100

Irving

Orange & Alex., lsts 6s,.
44

loo

Import’&Traders

6s

14

-

50

,

,

100 2,000,000
25
150,000

Hope

VIRGINIA.

8s, int
2 mtg, 8s

44

....

..

stock..

44

end

Mohl e & Montg. Rb, 1st m..
Mobile & Great North. l.-tsm
Selma and Meridian 1st ra 8s
Alabama & Tenn. 1st m. 7s.
feel., Rome & Dalt. 1st m. 7s.

“

42

,

.

200,000
150,000

15
50
50

Howard
Humboldt

Memphis & L. Rock lets, 8s.

Montgomery and Etualla 1st
8s, gold bonds, endorsed by

Atlantic

81

#

,

200,000
200,000
200,000

—

2nds,-7s

44

'

44

Montg’ry & West P. 1st, 8s..

44

57
75

100
50
50
25
50

75

Memphis and Ohio 10s..

ALABAMA.

44

6s...

*4

44

.

4

Virginia 6s, end
by State Term.
Memp. & Charleston lsts, 7t

Railroad Securities.

4

50

end.

44

Wilmington, N. C.,6s

44

7s..
st'ek

TENNESSEE.
East Tenn <fc Georgia fis

..

**

Germania
Globe
Greenwich
Grocers’
Guardian
Hamilton
Hanover
Hoffman
Home

65

57
72
79
39
82
72

by State
Columbia and Augusta let m

•Petersburg 6e

44

2d

44

| 78

Richmond Os
Savannah 7s, bonds

44

44

44

I

State of Alabama
Mobile and Ohio, sterling

•

82*

North Eastein 1 st mtg. 6s...

45 ! 50
67

New Orleans 6s bonds
44
“
Ids
Norlolk 6s

44

44

“

68
...

9 *

f

Gebhard

South Carolina Railroad 6s..

“

“

80

45

.

Memphis past due coupons..

44

.

guaranteed by State S. C..

Memphis 6s, end. by Memp

44

22*

CAROLINA.

Ohai leeton and Savannah Gs.

and Charleston Rai’road..

44

85

guar’d by state S.- C

new

44

80
90

75

Sparten-burg and Union 7s,

scrip,
Mobile, Ala., 6s, bonus
8s,
41

...

12*

Charlotte * S Carolina 7s...
Greenville and Columbia 6s,
guar, by State S. Carolina.

.Memphis Gs bunds, old

44

60

44

44

8()UTH

Lynch bury 6 s

44

44

30

89
75

44

jr^dricksburg 6s

4*

pfd 7s

4k

....

300,000
200,000
400,000
200,000
250,000
500,000
400, 000
800,000
200,000
200,000
150,000
204,000
150,000
150,000
200,000
150,000
200,000
500,000

last paid.

,

.

200,000
153,000
300,000
210,000
250,000

’68

235,269 Jan. and July.
June’64..5
437,452 Jan. and July. 6 io io July ’69.-8*
712,548 Jan. and July. 14 17* 14* July ’o9..7
289,093 Jan. and July. 7* 10 10 July ’69..5
10 July ’69. .5
810,566 Jan. and July.
430,652 Feb. and Aug. 10 10 10 Aug.’69. 7
495,379 March and Sep 10 10 11 Sep. ’69..6
210,241 May and Nov.
27'i;754 Feb. and Aug.
5 Aug.’69 .5
615,106 June and Dec. io 15 to June’69. .6
388,£66 Feb. and Aug. 12 12 14 Aug. ’69. ,8
326,135 Jan. and July. 20 20 20 July ’69.10
683,364 Jan. and July. 20 20 20 ; ug. ’69. 7*
427,977 ..Quarterly... 12* 14* 14 i luiy ’69. .10
857,918 Jan. and July. 10 12 10 Ju'v ’69..7
do
436,821
10 July ’69. .5
do
10 10 10 July ’69. .5
250,728
641,464 Feb. and Aug. 10 10 8 Aug. ’69. .4
£02,767 Jan. and July. 10 10 9 July ’69. .6
415.978 Jan. and July. 10 10 10 July ’69..5
2,066,854 Jan. and July. 14 14 16 July ’69..8
426,073 March and Sep
Feb.’69..5
532,877 April and Oct. 10 10 10 Oct. ’69.10
14 14
256,145 Jan. and July. 14
July ’69. .5
do
10 10 10 July ’69..5
347,685
186,473 Feb. and Ang.
894,449 Jan. and July. 10 io 14 ju’y ’6M0
do
3,
204,832
Jan. ’66..3
do
206,289
5 July ’69..5
do
to 10. 10 July ’69. .5
303,247
147,066 May and Nov.
May ’65. .6
259,659 Feb. and Aug. 10 10 io Aug.’69..5
Jan. and July. 10 12 10
955,475
July ’69. .5
282,419 Jan. and July. 10 10 10 July ’69..5
383,732 Feb. and Aug. 1C 12 20 Aug. ’69.10
224,746 Mar and 8;pt.
Sep. ’69. .5
235,860 Jan. and July. 7 7 5 July ’68. .5
do
8 10 10 July ’69. .6
242,293
do
10 10 10 July ’69. .5
650,682
do
5
Jan. ’66 .6
207,140
do
10 10 io July ’69. .5
3,966,282
.

300,000

.

44

,

& Little Rock & -Hate

62[

’66 ’6

#

200,000

Clinton
Columbia*
Commerce (N.Y.).IOO
Commerce (Alb’y)lOO
Commercial
50
Commonwealth
100
100
Continental *
Com Exchange.
50
40
Eagle
Empire City.... 100
50
Excelsior
30
Exchange
Firemen’s
17
10
Firemen’s Fund.
Firemen s Trust 10
Fulton
...‘i 25
Gallatin
50

Periods.

#

200^000

...

2d m 7s.
Chari. & Rutherf.
North Carolina 8s
stock

Augusta, Ga., 7s, bonds
-Charleston, ». C., Hs, stock.
•Columbia, S. C 6s
Columbus,41 6s, bonds

6s, “

6

5

Wi'.ra.ngton & Weldon 7s g’

Alexandria 6s

“

71

70

NORTH CAROLINA.

1806
1867

“

...

Citizens’

lets,8s 78* 7!‘*

Opel.lsts, 8s
2ds, 8s

N. Or. Jack’n &

.

City

cert, 8s
stock

6s

'Virginia ex-coupon bonds...

Bowery (N. Y.)

gd

V. Orleans & Jackson

coupons
bonds

25
25
25
25
17
20
70
ion
100

Beekman....

“

250,000
250,000
300,000

(Brklyn) 50

52
12

b’ds

new

44

50
25

2d
stock
& Ten i. 1st m. 7s
44
2d
“
“

...

registe’d s’ck

4‘

Arctic
Aetor
Atlantic
Baltic

72*

“

6s, new

44

Louisiana.

44

44

South Caro ina 6s, o d

Tennessee

12*

prof st’k
70

44

new

“

40

2dm 7s.

DIVIDENDS.

Capital. Netas’te

25 $200,000
Adriatic
50
AStnsi
300,000
American *
50
200,000
American Exch e.100
200,000

Mississippi Cent. 1st mtg. 7>

8s. Levi e
North Carelina, ex-conp
4‘

77
45

& West Point stock

Mississippi and

boude

6s, Levee

44

44

—

Louisiana 6s, ex-conpons...
“

44

44

75

Jan. 1 1869.

(*) are

write Marine Risks.

Savannah, Albany.* Gulf 7s-

5a

thus

participating, & (t)

reet.
Quotations by J. M. Welth 6c A rent*, 9 New Street.

Stale securities*
A labama 8a

[October 23, 1869.

11
..

1%

....

....

60

...

....

• •

• •

10
4*
Winthrop
Capital $1,000,000, in 30,000 shares,
t Capital $5t)u,000,in 100,00U shares
Capital $200,000, fn 20,000 shares.
^"Capital of Lake Superior companies generally $501,000' In 80,000.
....

..

....

October 23,

1869.]

THE! CHRONICLE

<&t)e tfommertial ^imcs.
C

.

Exports of .Leading* Articles from New York.
The

‘

:

3

th-

COMMERCIAL

everal

improved aspect of trade, and the

in business circles which

noticed in

we

cheeetul tone

more

last report seems

our

have

to

wholly subsided in the past few days. Since Tues¬
day many leading staples have declined in prices, and trade

following table, compiled from Custom House returns, showa
leading articles of commerce from the port of New'
6ince January 1, 1869.
The export of each article to the.

exports of

Yorr

EPITOME.
Friday Night, Oclobcr 22.

The

ports for the past week can be obtained by
deducting
amount in the last number of the
Cheoniolk from that here given.
4)

SSSS*

<s
56

32

co

00 © xt* ©
^

.

h

-*1*

r—<

higher for Crude,

on

>

£

decline,

some

more

Wool

has

much

o

Ashes...pkgs.

Breadstuffs—
Flour .bbls.
Wheat .bus.
Corn
Oats

Rye
Malt

Barley
Grass seed
Flax seed
Beans
Peas
C. meal.bbls
.

..

“

bags

Buckwh’t &

7,701

for

t!ie

Week

89,471

2,663,522 1,615,038
8,446,820
17,4‘*7,200

243,063
2,18j
12,592
54,319

5,146,625 7,627,499
268,6 i4
389.954
467,961
556,275
178,42! 1,203,104
8i2
20,036
86,: 59
2,723
16,896
71.267
915
81,005
a“),954
S.OcO
41,673
2"6,l8ti
2,071
75,012
116,387
603
187,286
226,725

B.W.fl’r pkg
Cotton, bales.

21,691

Copper..bbls.
plates.

439
351

Dr’dfruit.pkg

1,65?

16

2.5
71

3.20J
3 455
326.0)7
63,70.

726
424,8.54
31,602

2,802

1,135,644
6,037

19,401

11,161

Grease .pkgs.

Hemp ..bales.

HideB ....No.

Hops., .bales.

Leather .sides
Lead ....pigs.
Molasses nhds
A bbls
Na-val StoresCr. turpentlna..bbl




as

4"0

12,083
476,073
ll.3*i

24,928

3,527
3,755
50,428 2,265,931

132

,

12,595

8,^97
432,395
15,15:
6,583
30,010
3,974

9,142

• r.

o l- W

.

.

-

•

•

•

GO O
'His

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■

rt<

•

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TH

t-ab

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xf

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© © t-x _i,.x t-1© ao© co t-cor-*
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•

•

•

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•

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’

^ 50

55 *-X i-X^

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tlHWTQV)

.

•
•

oiox-xootoco

.
•

cr.

Hffi

T-x

■

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a>
<T.

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.ttooko:®
<0 0150

•

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t-C»in

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int-5!

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rr TT

c-o»n»

^ •§ ss
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•r^co

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<?* CO lO C4

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to

1-

ox IQ O rT © O lO © m <0 th (?* ©rin 00 Q
PC* XJI rr 30 ?o oc n*
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rr OT
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CO r-' CO
09
ci co
rH mo © xf CX TH CO N
cf

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x-H

•

t-

▼H tH

to 50

■

'£>09

■

O OX

•

>r Os

•ox

of

vH

rT

■CtOOSQOOT

>»

tc

H

x-.

■

os co -*■ to 001

•

5X

.2

£- i

-

TJ( rr

t-

•

'

50

rt

cS

t-

•

o

tj*

•

a

*°-

•

woosmwxC

fff

2

u

(-

•

51

•

t-x

.

50

(-

55 t-x I— co “ 50
(51 50
{^- xf

-

t -

os CS -x
CO rs xj(

xr in
53

-

t-x in m

-*C0xx<in-xO50(5»e0xJ<
O C-M-(x®HCOO((N

co

JO in

■

xjt xJ> (5X

■

‘

oT

rH

CiOt

CS rM

T-X

•
•

OX_—__TT 00^ 55 00

x^ in
fc* os

>50 00

t- t©

x*—*

8

Spirits
tine
Rosin
Tar
Pitch
Oil cake,

< .2

-S5

55

sc *n>

•x

Oil, lard

2:4

1,7.38
2'.0

15,043
816

.

Provisions—

Putter, pkgs....

Cheese
Cutmeat*

Since
Jan. 1.

19,671

51,3 0
4.9,::9»
68,194
7,830
86,547
9,501
670,913
65,423

Same
time ’68

171.024

Pork

540

69,825

Beef, pkgs
Lard, pkgs
Lard, kegs
Rice, pkgs—.—

63,148
8,071
553,325
28,015

oct

o

50 3i 6

w

H

■

1=1

8,2 4

00X50
•

•

•9

^

•

•

•

.

•

q
33

£

®

•

.

•

I- 00 50 I- O
-rf tch /• m
t- ®
»X

47,9'2

97,971

54,591

14,519

24,672

55 T— O to

ex

:

:
;

50151-

ox

-05
• xj<

-05

o o; th x»< m in

•

Otx

CO CO CO
<5* X7<

• -t«

!**-•'

-ox

1

55 O XU
t-x in

ox ox

is

.

2 t2

2*
2

a

ox

o

.

in co x*
ox x*
XT' O OX

05 00

-

•

OX O 50

•

•

O TH 00

•

t- *-«

»

•

OX

•

55 1—

CO

.NCOO

tX

:

ITS

©x*

.

•

O

T

;

'«P

CO

•

;

U5

•

x}< I'X t— 55
OX 55 55

:J8J@

• »-x th_

OOH t*
•

•

© 05

75,056
44,647
32.687

o-

to th
*5

iH

o

CO

Of

T-._t-55 OX

in' th

to

^

to"

5 s
«5

•
•

O. OX

55

Ol8cO

O. ® C* l-

33

t-

Q*

T—I

:S

•

-•

.©

CO

*

:

:

•

•

.S :gg2^5
-St
•

"cs

»
•

many. 2,5 5 194,391 139,876
Hoilan &Belg 6,848

X*

00

.
.
•

25

:

'00*'^"

r*4

CO

to

•

.

©

•

•

©

•

•

’

©

•

L—

•

TJ*

00 cx

:S8S
*

rS

£>

|

rl XJ> <

T—<

OX xt* in co M TX
rr Ot 10 © in 30 ©
OX ©
GX
-O^

T-I

.

•O

•

; 40^

*

•

•

2,560

co

(N xt* g

•

in t-x cx
© cn xr
T-*

CX

CO

•

1

•

•

00 09 to -*
(M © T-x . -1

.

m t-x 10

•
*

-tr

▼H

•

•

CO

•

rX

•

:

© to in
00 © ©

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1-

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Cp

.

Ol

ti r.

co

1-4

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© TH ,H <

^©§51

to"

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x;

in © 00 *

cx© r-i

sW;

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T-x

/~

•

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rjoor)

: »£3»

T-X

CO

-05

•

•

xt*
m
t-

*

xt*'
m

8 :8
40

•

•

27,047 13,813 41,425

t-'

’

.

W
03

m

of
os'

of

t- OX OS 00

•to

5

1 O

.3 ^ c 00
55
—<
S
3

£
PQ

X-X

I

-

ox

•

co © OX OX x-t< Xt* © GC T-x
t— •— rx a t- ox xr *0 o
•© (/ ox 1- 55in o*>m sx l-

T-I

t— c- in

55

▼-< CO r-t

t-

m

t—
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^

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;Mrotfcs -OX 0*r©^ © cT
2 xf" t-O: T-x
55 OJ T-x rH
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f- rr rX 55 co
t-x
t—m

tX

®

M a

OC® Mx»N
O 7X CO O
t-

O

-5^

oT

-T 50

t-x

©

h*"

in

Sh

r-l

<

fc£®,2 fajO®

60X34i,

:® :

'51*!
©

ft.

.

•

cs
©

faO^pcjpqOO^

i

:

:

&;

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0'S : ►
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® 6
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a

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tsa

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00 00
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^

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t-C055

V

GO

•

621
•

00 x*,H 00

■

o5

9.542

2,8*2
757
4,18'
•

•

OH

.

ha

o

•

xj> m 05 -X< 5S

55 00 OX C— OX m

O »

1,258
21,528

•

o n® t- I- CC 00 IO

833

2,255
11,366
93,758
74,609
137.213

1.220

.

3 OJ

9,861

•

.

^

1607309

143
•

m

Xji

11,619

233.2:6

96

T-x

• in os

2,607

56,253
11,522
15,105

5.684,

-

c»

.

100,606
89,016

54

125

O OS 55 xj- CO
xr cs l- xt; cs

co

40

•

63,887

539

Su^ar, hhds and
Whiskey, bbls....
Wool, bales

_

.8

8,319

907 623

4,626

Dressed hogs No.
Rice, rough bus a

>

CQ O

31 111

53,524 1,015,761

Eggs

Tallow, pkgs
Tobacco, pkgs...
Tobacco, nhds...

54.871
380.571

391.131

69,357

Spelter, slabs

IQ

CO Ci 10 CO

; OS^l- OX 55 fiO.
cnco
’

o

1

510.286

!>8

Starch
Stearlne

>

CO

2/09
16,210
1,53 5

oili petroleum...
Peanuts, bags..

•

o C'J

CO

.

*co

turpen-

pkgs....

00

Ger

This
week.

'
1

<

-x

©

«
<»

25

to on «o
©©CO©*H0OtH©O»
oo o © 30 © —'JuWOoce
wovaiJOwiauiij •j

-7

-ss

-x-(<5»

CO rX

and since

follows:

,

2 .9,b97 16,350.441
3 >,597 8,322.406

T—

.

CQ ® tt

o

Same
time ’68.

5,879

—io»©
*0550

XJ< 50 C- 50
irtH'ji

C.

•

2 2 92*•
s« o«

ZZ
±?

before, but the market

as

time in 1868. have beeo

80

♦

-

tH

S

active for

receipts of domestic produce fjr the week and since Jan.

Jan. 1.

rl

00

Jan* 1*

Since

r-l t-

xl<»

tf

uO

T-x

rx'.'J

i_j

This
week.

•

.

•

Receipt* of Domestic Produce

same

r-l

'X*n

lc

evidently gains strength.
Freights have been less active, bnt with large supplies of
grain at hand, rates to British ports have materially advanced,
closing, lor Liverpool, 9£@9£cd, for wheat, by sail, and 11@
lljd, by steam ; Cotton £d, by sail, and £@£d, by steam.
Provisions have been quiet, but
hog products, for future
delivery, are higher, prices for January delivery closing about
$28 for Mess Pork per bbl, 16|c for
prime Steam Lard per
lb, and 13j@14c for ‘ Cumberland Bacon. In Cheese we
notice sales of prime
Factory, for export to Liverpool, at 18c.

and for the

•

5Bd

Oranges.

remained

xf —• -X cr r-

.

.

*—

r-*

Havanna

C! o

©

a 5< t tp »
irtp.
in
H

•

GO

O* t-X

-X

arrived, selling at $4 50 for new layer
Rasins, 15@19c for new Figs, 13£c for new Currants, and
new

•C55^W5»«h
CcTtH
r-■ O

.

lx

New Fruits have

$8 50 for

...

C- CX

•n © —i

—

•

■
,

cr. <=>

oj

£3

Fish firm.

export.

The

r

lx

shade

Tallow at

Tl* © tH ■f' 50
©
50
L- <JX

O*

of

o

Hay is doing better. Hops have been active and firm,
with liberal
shipments to Great Britain. Whiskey is un¬
settled.
Building materials are lower for Lath, but higher
Brick.

tH iH

a>

&

lO

©_©

©

»- 'r>

ft.

r-t

XQ

55 h*
CC f—

H X}*

S -s

common

00 Xt* 50 xj«

co -t*
t— c» — -*• -:x
oJl-tCOOxi M5JO

■

:

•
.

<=>“3

%

CO 50

©©t-©cix>iocoin©.C'xj«cx:oco©’.x-=r-..
T^in^©_Tt< CO CO »" xt* ri © -r x> O -x © t£> CO to OX CX © CX Oo” Co" CO ©-H of
XT 50
©T-r.ninOOCOCO©©tr©©o6THTH,'^©<

H*

t.

weak.

for

50
50

Xt<

reduced

a

C9

-

-

C-«g
®Ho
OX
r-

supply to meet present
firmer, but closed dull.
East India Goods are
but firm.
quiet
Metals show a decline in
Pig Iron, but Copper, with a
business amounting to about four million
pounds packed for
future delivery, is lc
per lb higher.
Other Metals dull and
a

Oils have been

CX

in

D

© © ?o

© © l—

©

Petroleum has

—>*,

©CO©©'?"'©© —i35TdOt*t-W^CD(

20

ii.

35

fc-

wcoiotocOHOX-f® co cx ©_©.oo -w*
cx © co ot © ©‘ cx s « af <©
OTaOinSSin

2l»^ « oTsi

™

T}<

T)

t-. t«

g o*-ecoo/
GO CO CO
oT
»o

heavy.
slighily advanced for Refined,5 and is

t-m

©_t-x

T-H

dull and

demand.

rf Er “f
22
J05550^0TJ*0*rt50
ir-, -t- tn -tS

©

a

Cotton shows

are

•

xt^tH in

ojT

to

3>
O

^c decline on the week. Breadstuff close
dull, with Wheat, Rye and Corn fully 10c lower than last
Tuesday. Groceries show some depression in prices, and
Tobacco has slightly declined.
Hides and Leather,
owing to the approach of the season for
closing inland water transportations, have been very active,
and prices are slightly better at the close, with reduced stocks.
Naval Stores show some
activity, and business in Spirits
Turpentine, it having advanced to 48c, but Rosin, Tar, and

the

50—

a
CJ

has become dull.

Pitch

533

:

:®

5U

THE CHRONICLE.
Imports of Leading Articles.

The

following table,compiled from Ouetom House returns, show
the foreign imports of certain
leading articles of commerce at this port
for the last week, since Jan. 1, 1869, and for the
corresponding period

[October 23, 1869.

Receipts and Exports of Cotton (bales)since Sept. 1
Stocks at
RECEIPTS

PORTS.
1869.

1868.

New Orleans
Mobile
Charleston
Savannah
Texas
New York
Florida
North Carolina

88,672
3-1,231

90,479
26,198
17,479
34,755

For
the
week.

Since
Jan. 1,

Same

1869.

1868.

528
13J
S3
109
152
82
304
94

16,939

8,169

860,038

Earthenware...
Glass
Glassware
Glass plate
Buttons
Coal, tons

Cocoa, bagB
Coft'ee, bags
Cotton

Since
the
Jan. 1,
week.
1809.

lime

China, Glass and

EarthenwareChina

For

10,965
50.412

8,695
42,372

405,278

287,480

15,5-13
7,586

21,550

4,978
107,072

Metals, &c—
Cutlery

6,059
107.071
17,100

bales

2,222

5.805

Hardware

Iron, UK bars.
Lead, pigs
Spelter, lbs
Steel

Tin, boxes
Tin slabs, lbs..
Rags
889,615 Sugar, lihds, tes
820

& bbls

113
132

Same
time

1868..

Virginia
Other ports

32,541

1,993

838

S.515
4,285

2,947
4.683

6,773
1,978

805,887 607,9:50
439,359 342,365
9,203,124 5,135,985
4,198 135,424 218,311
12.632 998,586 733,820
89,805 3,313,509 3,764,683
98
86,600
42,493
'

8,129

345,958

373,706

14,544

690.767

462,512
686,555
28,945

EXPORTED SINCE SEPT. 1 TO—

Great
Other
Britain France Forign

4,385
10,280

io 1868:

[The quantity Is given in packages when not otherwise
specified.]

and

Rates mentioned.

34,751
70,750

13,93»
1,960
1,503
10/44

Total this year

290,379

Total last year

....

9,446
7,383
1,829

4,110

10,979
2.582 27,653
1,651
....

15,805
1,359

Ship

Total. to Nor.
Ports.

Stock.

1,015

13,667

260

1,029

26,266
8,742
1,589

3,678
26.289

58,009,
14,593
6.125

5,139

45,001
5,779

20.928
8 185

....

3,716

6,341

37,710

....

18,000

8i7

1/66

9 014
518

1*035

....

32,212

329

1/53

6,000

50,439

21,969

8,651

80,999 136,482 133/64

199,626 31,833

14,235

1,653

47,721

....

84,983 117,263

The market the past week has not varied
materially
towards the close. Early in the week there was a little
firmness and a slight upward turn in

until
more

prices, due, in a great
public advices by cable indicating an improve¬
14,804
803.385
Brimstone, tons 2,093
6,204 Tobacco
ment at Liverpool.
1,010
32,0 6
Private telegrams, however, reported
Cochineal
22
5,688
4,908 Waste
101
981
2,036
Cream Tartar..
1,664
lower rates, and the
1,53! Wines, Ac—
disagreement between the public and
Gambler
33,515
14,972
Champag’e.bks
2,206
95,251
72,365
608
Gums, crude....
505
Wines
657
160,780
private dispatches prevented any active movement, although,
85,605
1C4
Gum, Arabic...
2,60 2
2,599 Wool, bales
219
43,236
23,584
under the influence of these
78
Indigo
5,032
8,815 Articles report’d
public advices and of the small
Madder
9,022
11,255
by value—
stock on hand ready for immediate
*"*7
237
Oils, essence....
529 Cigars
$11,275 $069,331 $491,859
delivery, prices were, as
2
Oil, Olive
44,244
S9,39„ Corks
1,204 119,390 165,676
stated abovS, slightly' better, with a fair
20
664
Opium
824 Fancy goods....
54,738 1,695,153 1,116,930
inquiry for export
Soda, bl-carb...
1,840
74,328 107,392 Fish
14,243 598,147 372,966
and home consumption. An advance on all
Soda, sal
31,056
2,210
SO,! 82 Fruits, &c—
grades below
443
Soda, ash
32,818
32,561
Lemons
2,578 489,179 886,934
middling of i@£ctook place on Saturday, ordinary closing at
19
Flax
1,639
1,484
326
Oranges
690,20? 52'i,764
120
Furs
5,134
2 4-^c, good
4,982
Nuts
3,913 586,983 558,737
ordinary at 25£c, low middling at 26£c, and mid¬
it
5.320
Gunny cloth
9,414
Raisins
685
670,612 1,073.094
Hair
81
7.487
5,912 Hides undressed 116,061 8,490,363 5,482,079
dling at 26ic. Monday there was no change in prices, but
Hemp, bales
4,502
98,779 115,163 Rice
241,936 783,269
on Tuesday all
Hides, Ac—
Spices. Ac—
descriptions, except good ordinary, were Jc
Bristles
39
1,290
Cassia
1,042
90,728
177,950
25G
Hides, dressed.
15,300
7,17(/
higher. Wednesday, it becoming known that there was an
714
Ginger
39,185
28,290
India rubber
816
24 082
32,401
Pepper
223,814 191/77
error in these
545
Ivory
2,532
public Liverpool quotations, and freights being
1,906 Saltpetre
11,771 176,758
11,1330
Jewelery, Ac—
Woodsvery high, the market was less firm and a shade lower.
43
Jewelry
1/90
Cork
1,970
,r
520
155,3=0
Watches
17
915
9 9
Fustic
233
65,685
113,04;)
Thursday the public cable quotation suddenly7 fell to 12d,
Linseed
20,112 536,929 884,535
Logwood
463,740 205,455
Molasses
65!
153,393 169,925
Mahogany
81,292
78.32,, from 12-^@12jd, and the same rate was reported today;
and in sympathy with these reduced
figures, and under
COTTON.
the influence ofdarge
receipts and favorable crop accounts,
Friday, P. M., October 22, 1869.
our
own
market was lower and
heavy, and so closes
By special telegrams received by us to-night from each of to night at 26£c for middling uplands, and 25£c for low mid¬
the Southern ports we are in
possession of the returns show¬ dling. For future delivery there has been a fair business
ing the receipts, experts, &c., of cotton for the week end¬ at about the figures current last week, but the close is less
firm.
The total sales of this
description reach 7,250 bales
ing this evening, Oct. 22. From the figures thus obtained
(all low middling, or on the basis of low middling, except as
it appears that the total
receipts for the seven days have hereafter noted,) of which 1,550 bales were for
October, 300
reached 82,395 bales, (against 67,995 bales last
week, 60,022 bales at 25^-c, 100 at 25|c, 950 at 26c, 200 at^fiic; 1,650
bales the previous week, and 56,386 bales three weeks
since, bales for November, 50 at 25fc, 450 on private terms, 50 at
making the aggregate since Sept. 1, 1869, up to this date 25ic, 700r at 25£c, 350 at 25fc, 50 to November 10th on
356,784 bales, against 250,728 bales for the same period in private terms ; 2,050 bales for December, 200 average mid¬
dling at 26jc, 250 on private terms, 100 at 25Jc, 1,100 at
1868, being an increase this season over last season of 106,056 25£c, 400 at 25fc ; 500 bales for
January, 100 at 25£c, 200
bales. The details of the receipts for this week
(as per tele¬ at 25|c, 200 at 26c; 100 ba'es for February at 26c; also
200 bales for present
graph) and the corresponding week of 1868 are as follows :
delivery, free on board at Mobile, on
r-Receipts.—»
private terms; 100 bales to November 10th, free on board at
r-Receipts.Heceived this week at—
1869. 1868.
Received this week at-- 1869.
1868
New Orleans, on private terms; 100 bales do at Charleston
New Orleans
bales. 28,719 21,£08
Florida
bales
287
287
Mobile
at 24£c,
7,436
6,630 North Carolina
2,342
1,466
and 100 bales do do at 24fc; 400 bales do for
Charleston
9,496
6,170 Virginia..
11,716
4,292 December at New Orleans on
Savannah
15,616
9,960
private terms ; 400 bales same
Texas
4,591
Total receipts
8,816
82,395 65,764 at 25c, and 400 bales same month at Savannah at 24
Tennessee, &c
2,242
684
Increase this year
Jc.
26,682
The total sales for immediate
delivery this week foot up
The exports for the week
ending this evening reach a total 16,934 bales (including 1,980 bales to
arrive), of which
of 35,861 bales, of which 23,261 bales were to Gieat Britain 5,817 bales were taken
by spinners, 1,578 bales on specula¬
and 12,600 bales to the Continent, while the stocks at all the tion, 7,538 bales for export, 2,001 bales in
transit, and the fol¬
ports %s made up this evening, are now 160,580 bales. Below lowing are the closing quotations :
Drugs, Ac.—
Bark, Peruvian
Blea powders..

1,117
•

•

•

•

18,221
24,430
17,822

10,666

Sugars, boxes &
bags

26,965 Tea

measure

to the

....

,,,,

....

give the exports and stocks for the week, and also for the
corresponding week of last season, as telegraphed to us from
the various ports to-night:

Upland &

we

Week ending
Oct. 22.

#

Exported to

G’t Britaiu.
...

Mobile
Charleston

7,722

....

*
Total Same week *——S tock
Contin’t. this week.
186S.
1869.
1868.
9,023
16,745
3,225
68,834
63,535
970
4 62L
19,533
25,233
9,310
6,398
,

Ordinary....

Good

Low

....

Texas

,,,

....

11,301
130

...

...

From the

2,547
1,030

23,261

12,600

....

3,138

at this

....

13,848
1,160

35,861

1,226
6,614
....

15,685

26,481
11,593
18,000

19,445
9,204
22,260

7,329

6,500

160,580

152,685

foregoing statement it will be seen that, compared
corresponding week of last season, there is a increase

we

24%©....
25%®

25%©.

..

25%©....
26%©—

Middling

Below

Mobile.

24#©....

.# lb

Ordinary

-

...

26

©..

.

26%©—

New
Orleans
25 ©....
26 ©....

26%©....
26%©....

Texas.

25%©....
26%©....
26%©,...
26%©....

give the total sales of cotton and price of middling
day of the past week:

market each
To al
sales.

....

....

...

Middling

♦ *•♦■»

.

with the

Florida.

Saturday.

2,738
2,945
3,669
3,058

2,163

Upland &
Florida.

26%®....
26%©....
26%©....
2«%@26%
26%©....
26%©....

New

Mobile.
26%©....
26%®
27 ©

Orleans.
27 ©
27 ©....

26%@26%

27 @27%
26%©....
26%©....

...

.

26%©....

.

27%@

2,311
26%©....
Receipts and the Crop.—All the reports
with
crop this week continue favorable. Picking is

Texas

27%©....
27%@....

27%©....
27% @27%
27%©....

26%©....

regard to the
progressing very

in the

rapidly and the cotton is

by telegraph.

We see it stated in some quarters that there is a
disposition among
the planters to hold back the crop on account of the fall in
prices.

exports this week of 20,175 bales, while the stocks cold and frost which has being secured in good condition. The
been experienced in this
vicinity, and
to-night are 7,945 tales more than they were at this time a year likewise in the West, during the past week, does not appear to
have reached the cotton growing sections; and
they have also been
ago. The following is our usual table showing the paovement
wonderfully exempt from severe storms ever since the ingathering
of cotton at all the ports since Sept. 1,
of
according to the latest tionthe crop began. This is particularly satisfactory, as the condi¬
of the plant is such now, that more
mail returns. We do not include our
injury would be done by
telegrams to-night, as rain and wind than by frost even. Receipts are
coming forward
we cannot insure the
accuracy or obtain the detail necessarj very rapidly notwitstanding the low state of the Southern rivers.




October

TttE CHRONICLE.

23,1869.]

This is

undoubtedly a mistake ; there is no evidence whatever of
any such disposition.
On the contrary, there would appear to be
an effort making to market a fair portion of the crop as early as
possible.
India. Cotton and the Suez Canal.—Our mail advices this
week from India, under date of September 14th, continue favorable
The plant in most districts is reported as looking strong and healthy

though in
•

some

of the low lying lands it is stated that there

are

evidences of slight damage from excessive moisture. We have
been at considerable pains to learn the general opinion at Bombay
as to the possible extent of the yield of East India Cotton the coming
season.
Ot course it is far too early to form any idea of what is to
be the actual result, and the opinions we have received have tendec

only to indicate what is the possible extent of the crop in case al
things continue favorable to the end of the season. The highest
estimate received is about 400,000 bales in excess of the past year
(or say an export from India of about 2,000,000 bales), while the

lowest estimates show

figures furnish, we think, a fair indication of the present average
opinion at that point as to the possibilities of the crop—the majority
inclining to the higher estimate. There seems to be a diversity of
opinion as to the probable shipments through the Suez Canal. The
extent of the crop movement in that direction must, we think, depenc
largely upon prices for the raw material, on account of the excessive
charges for tolls, &c. At all events, sailing vessels will, we think,
hardly find it profitable to attempt the passage under any circum
stances, as it would be necessary usually for them to be towed
through the entire length of the Red Sea and the Canal.
Visible Supply of Cotton.—The following table shows the
quantity of cotton in sight at this date of each of the three past
seasons:

1869.

Stock in Liverpool

1868.

Stock in London.
Stock in Havre.
Stock in U. S. ports
Stock in inland towns
Afloat for Wreat Britain
Afloat for Havre

Total

Liverpool, per steamers China, 405....Manhatt n, 2,120
....Tarifa, 872. Donatl, 1,178... England, 1,992.. ..C ty of Wash¬

ington, 1,217

89,038

678,000
118,343

60,429
152,728

lu9,619

fc0,l4l

31,864
458.0UO
63,089

1,156,018

7,876

»

890
3

1,061

Silesia, 1,104
David, 1,411—Helen

2,113

Clinton, 2,8t5....Seabnrg, 1,235
6,611
Havre, per ships Wild Hunter, 259.... Ass m Valley, 3,498....per
barks Harriet F. Hussey, 1,884
7,448
Sea Gem, 1,807
To Barcelona, per bark Prosperidad, 805
805
Mobile—To Liverpool, per ship Lady Havelock, 2,353
2,363
To Havre, per ship Fieetwing, 1,359
1,359
Charleston—To Liverpool, per bark Annie Torrey, 2,462 Upland and
47 Sea Island
2,509
To

..

To Barce'oaa, per

260

brig > ella Dolores, 260 Upland

Savannah—To Liverpool, per steamer Zoe, 1,810 Uplands

per

Kentville, 2,300 Uplands
Havre, per schooner Maggie E. Gray, 1,029 UplandB
Boston—To Liverpool, per ship Assage, 9

bark
4,110
1,029

To

9

Total exports of cotton from the United States this week ....bales. 36,826

The

particulars of these shipments, arranged in

usual form,

our

are

follows:

as

Havre.

Liverpool.

„

New York... 7,876
New Orleans. 5,511
Mobile

Charleston...

Mar¬
seilles.

390

Bremen. Hamburg.Barcelona. Total.

3

1,051

2,113
805

Savannah.... 4,110

11,433
18,7r4

*2t;o

7,448
1,359

2,853
2,509

Boston

3,712
2,769

1,029

5,139

9

9

Total.. 22,363

10,226

Gold, Exchange
between 130

to

23,837

227,0)0

and

1,051

3

5 2,113

1,065

18,6626

Freights.—Gold has fluctuated the past week
181f, and the close to-night was 131f, Foreign

and

Liverpool.

By Telegraph

33.254

1,253,148

Robina, 92

To Havre, i e. steamer Lafaye*te, 890
To Marseilles, per brig Jnlia Kelly, 3
To Bremen, per steamer Main, 1,051
To Hamburg, per steamers Harmonia, 1,009
New Orleans—To Liverpool, per ships Pauline

Exchange closed fairly active with a restricted supply of bills. The
closing rates were as follows : 109f@109£ fur prime bankers 60 days,
109f(a)ll0 for prime bankers 8 days, and 10fc£@10S£ lor Loncon
prime commercial. Freights closed at i@|d by steam and fd by sail

1867.

4i>8,000

bales. 434,000
66,440
78,530
160,580
.25,548
342,000
68,920

Total bales

Exported this week from—
New Yobk—To

little under 300,000 bales. These

an excess a

535

from

Liverpool—

l Liverpool, October 22—4:30

1,270,197

These figures indicate a deficit in the cotton in sight to-night of
97,130 bales compared with the same date of 1868, and of 114,179

bales, compared with 1867.
The exports of cotton this week from New York stow an iocreaee
from last week, the total reaching 11,433 bales, against 7,921 bales last
week. Below we give our table showing the exports of cotton from
New York, and their direction for each of the last four
weeks; also
the total exports and direction since September 1, 1869 ; and in the
last column the total for the same period of the previous year:
Bxportaof Cotton (bale*) from New York since Sept. 1, 1869

P. M.—The market opened quiet this morn¬
ing and closed dull with sales fooling up 10,010 bales, ot which .8,00# bales
were taken for speculation and export.
The sales of the week have been
93,000 bates, of which 17,000 were taken for export, ana 21,000on speculation.
The stock in port is estimated at 434,Of’O bales, of w&ich 3b,000 are American.
The receipts of the week have been 71,000 bales, of which 8,000 are American.
The stock afloat is estimated at 342,000 bales, of whicn 33,000 are American.
For the convenience of our readers we give the following, showing the sales
and stocks at and afloat for Liverpool each of the last four weeks :
Oct. 22.

Oct. 15.

Oct. 8.

92,000
17,000

56.000

85,000
10,000
10,000
459,000
46,000
340,O H)
12,u00

Total sales
Sales for export
Sales on speculation
Total stock
Stock of American
Total afloat
American afloat

8,000
8,000
425,000
42,000
' 386,000
20,000

,

21,000
434,000
35,000
812,000

33,000

Oct. 1.
63.000

13,0t0
13,000
442,000
56,000

892,000
8,000

Trade

28.

5.

12.

Oct.
19.

to
date

]>rev.
year.

Report.—The market for yams and fabrics at Manchester is doll.
following table will show the daily closing public prices for the week
Private dispalchts, however, have quoted cotton lower through the week
except the last two days:

5,241

5,043

7,127

7,876

27,548

11,943

Price Midd.

105

25

Total

Same
time

week ending

EXPORTED TO

Oct.

Sept.

I Oct.

The

Sat.

Liverpool
Other British Ports

50

55

Total to Gt. Britain.

5,093

5,296

Havre.

461

559

Other French ports.

•

Total French.

•

•

•

559

703

Bremen and Hanover

461

614
966

Hamburg

Other ports

•

Spain, Oporto and Gibraltar &c

« • •

•

»

•

•

27,653

11,974

890

8,713

2,191

3

3

f.....

893

8,716

794

1,051
2,113

3,162
8,179

450
675

794

3,164

6,341

1,125

a •

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

•

*328

....

Spain, etc.

•

Grand Total

•

•

•

•

6,558

2,191

....

....

All others

Total

.

•

1,580

703

.

•

Total to N. Europe

•

7,876

7,127

« • •

7,134

....

*

....

7,921

11,433

*

••

37,710

....

15,618

pts of cotton at New York, Boston, Philslast week, and since September 1, 1869 :

delphia
NEW YORK.

PHILADELPHIA

BOSTON.

BALTIMORE.

RECEIPTS PROM-

This

week.
New Orleans.
Texas
Savannah

Mobile
Florida
South Carolina.
North Carolina..

Virginia
North’rn Ports.

Tennessee, &c.
Foreign

Since

This

Sept. 1.

week.

Since

This

Since

This

1,319

4*42i
6,787
2,169
4,927

• •• •

‘*70

101.

1,299

*340

*.!!!
7,841

1,2*18
1,517

1,981

472

15

•

•

•

•

"id
7
'

*323
10

15

....

*471

2,*902
•

•

•

“

Up. to arrive

Orleans

12^12i
12i(2>12|

Mon.

Tues.

12j®121
12i@12f

year.! 19,750

20

3*707

*483

2*.134

159

kets,

2,517

1,330

our

41

53

362

1,194

*109

*458

6

107,506
77,955

Liverpool, Oct. 9.—American cotton has been in good demand this
week, and prices have risen f to £c per lb. Brazilian and Egyptian
cotton shows but little variation in price ; but East Indian
produce,
although in good demand, has fallen about fd per lb. The total sales
of the week amount to 64,790 bales, of which 10,270 bales are on
spec¬
ulation, 10,410 bales are declared for export, leaving 44,110 bales to

the trade.
The transactions “ to arrive” continue large, and have been at advan¬
ced rates, which are barely maintained at the close.
The latest quota¬
tions are :
American basis of Middling, from Savannah,

ship named
llfd ; Any Port, November-December shipment, llfd, llfd ; Pern am
fair, per steamer, 12f<l ; Paraiba, fair, ship named llfd ; Maranhamfair, ship named 12f ; Broach, fair new Merchants, June sailing, 9fd ;
Dhollerah, fair new Merchants, June sailing, 9fd ; Oomrawuttee, fair
new Merchants, June
sailing 9fd ; Wee tern Madras, fair new merchants,
July and August sailing 8 13-16 per lb.
The following are the prices of American cotton,
compared with those
of last year:

Description.

<—Ord. & Mid—,

Sea Island
Stained

20
23
9
12
Ord. G.Ord. L.Mid.
10* 11* 12'
10j£ 11* 12
11
11* 12*
11
11* 12*

^-G’d &->
fine.
25 -27 30 -48
13 -14 16 -18
Mid.

Upland

The following are the
date and since 1866:

—Same date 1868-,

,

g’d fair

12*
12*
12*
12*

Mid.

Fair.

Good.

24
12

26
13

80
17

H*
1’*

..

-..

10*

..

-..

10*
10*
10*

..

-

•

•

prices of middling qualities of

12
12

cotton at this

_

3,277 10,534

797

4,981

2,846 12,114

4,598

443

2,810

2,651

9,862

....

correspondent in London, writing under the date of Octo¬

4,493

6,022
599

Fr.

ber 9, states:

507

12

Thn.

12i@12J 1* ©.. 12 ©..
12j(§H2i 12f@.. 12*@...

....

,

1*,594

Wed.

12i®12±
12i©12f

European and Indian Cotton Markets.—Id reference to these mar

•

1

5.558

Shipping News.—The exports of cotton from the United States the
past week, a« per latest mail returns, have reached 86,826 bales. So
far &9 the Southern ports are concerned, these are the same exports

reported by telegraph, and published in the Chronicle last Fri¬
day, except Galveston, and the figures for that port are the exports for
two weeks back.
With regard to New York, we include the manifests
only up to Tuesday night, to make the figures correspond with the offi¬
cial week.
Below we give a list of the vessels in which these ship¬
ments from all ports, both North and South, have been made:




“

r-Fair

2,558

Total this year 22,262
Total last

Since

Septl. week. Septl. week. Sept 1.

Uplds

“

1866. 1867. 1868. 1869.
Mid. Sea Island 26d. 16d. 24d. 23d.

Upland...

15

_

1366. 1867. 1868. J8f,9
8d.
10*d.l2*
Egyptian, li
6*
8#
9*
Broach... 9#
5
* 7
8*
Dhollerah 9#
5
6*
8*

_

Mid. Pemamb 15d.

8*
10* 12*
8* 10* 12*
8# 10* 12*
statement showing the

Mobile.... 15
Orleans... 15*

Annexed is a
stocks of cotton in Liverpool and
London, and &1bo the stocks of American and Indian produce ascer¬
tained to be afloat to those porta :
Stock In
44

1868.

Liverpool

London
American cotton afloat
44
Indian

Total

Bales

427,100
82,767

.

11,000

526,914

1,047,781

1869.

459,250
56,440
12,000
878,147

90^837

536

THE

CHRONICLE.

TOBACCO.

BEEADSTUFFS.

Friday, P. M., October22,1869.

Friday, October 22, 1869, P. M.

The total

exports of crude Tobacco for the past two weeks
from all the ports reach 7,824 hhds., 1,112 cases and
4,594
bales. Of these exports 3,224 hhds., 743 cases and
3,851
bales were from New York; 3,743
hhds., 277 cases and 563
bales from Baltimore; 120 hhds., 2 cases and 180 bales
from Boston ; 737 hhds. from New
Orleans, and 90 cases
from San Francisco.

The direction of the

shipments of hhds

Las follows: To Bremen, 1,164 and 120 stems; to
Havre, 1,219 ; to Liverpool, 795 ; to London, 134 ; to Dieppe,
1,024; to Genoa, 1,040 ; to Leghorn, 1,000, and the balance
to different ports.
During the same period the exports of
manufactured tobacco reached 217,419 lbs., of which
111,475
lbs. were to Liverpool. The full
particulars of the shipments
was

from all the ports were as
Exp’d this week from

follows:

Hhds. Cases.
3,221
743
3,743
277

New York

Baltimore
Boston

120

Bales.

3,851
563

2

Hilda.
Sterne.
27.
93

Tcs.
....

....

ISO

8

Mail’d.

Pkgs.

20,00J

....

152

....

Philadelphia

....

New Orleans
Portland
San Francisco

-

737

..

....

90

Total
Total last week
Total previous week

7.824

4

1,112

4,504

3,268 1,955
2,476
271

445

prices d'ooping.
Kentucky Leaf has been
though no general decline
been

8

157

The market for Tobacco the past

some cases

lbs.
197,419

....

120

250

156
165
161

169

217,419

114,551
80,793

week has been dull and

freely offered on sale, and
be reported, buyers have in

more

can

able to obtain

concession.

some

The low

gold and high freights prevent exporters entering the market,
and the sales for the week have

been

limited

about 400

to

[October 23, 1859.

The market for Breadstuff's shows

general decline in grain

a

during the past week, but closes rather more steady ; while
in flour the advance early in the week is
barely maintained.
The receipts of flour have shown some
increase, but the

demand has been active, and with

considerable stocks to

no

draw

from, prices steadily improved till the close of Wed¬
nesday’s business; with large sales.the demand was qu te
general. The West Indies, the British Provinces, Great
Britain and the Brazils, have all been
buyers, while the local
trade, having confidence in the stability of prices, purchase 1
freely. Stocks are undoubtedly smaller now than they were
a month
ago, which is a remarkable circumstance for thus
period of the season. All grades have shared in the improve¬
ment, and none more than good trade brands.
A portion of
the export business has been in unsound flours at
f>5]10@$5 85.
Wheat has declined 7@10c per bushel.
Supplies by
Canal are still kept back, but we have had liberal
receipts by
rail, and pretty free offerings from store. Besides, freights
have advanced 4d or about 12c per
bushel, which fact with
the pressure to sell, has caused the decline above noted in the
face of advancing Liverpool markets, and but amoderate rate
of receipts at the Western markets.
Supplies from the
Canal may be expected next week, when the
strength of the
market will be fully tested.
To-day, business was limited
mainly at$l 43 for Amber Winter.
Corn has largely declined. Liberal
supplies are expected
from the Canal within the next few
days, to meet which there
is only the home demand, and it is the
opinion of manv that
prices will have to decline to meet export orders. Ttie close,
however, is comparatively steady.
Oats have also been depressed ; the
pressure to sell was
early in the weak, very marked, and good cargoes went at
61c, but there is since an advance of 2c, and to-day was
active. The movement appears to be
quite light, and we may
not expect any considerable accumulation of stocks at
this

hhds, of which fully three-fourths are to the home trade, at
7fc@12c for Common and Medium grades.
Seed Leaf has also been very dull, and
prices for the most
part drooping. We have only to notice sales of 72 cases State, market.
low grade, at 12£c; 35 cases
Rye has declined under more liberal receipts by rail;
Pennsylvania, private terms;
Western sold to-day at $1
192 cases Ohio, 14c@45c for binders’ and choice
07£ afloat. Barley has moved
wrappers.
Spanish Tobacco has been but moderately active. Sales, more freely at about steady prices ; the supply, however, is
still small.
350 bales Havana, part at a private gold
Barley, Malt and Canada Peas remain nominal.
price in bond for
The following are closing quotations :
export, and the remainder at 97c@$l 07, currency, duty
Flourpaid ; also, 75 bales Yara, private terms.
Wheat,8prlng, per bus’ll. |1 15® 1 42
Superfine
$ bbl. $5 ro® 5 90
Red Winter
1 30® 1 38
Manufactured Tobacco is fairly active and
Extra State
6 15® 6 50
Amber do
1 42® 1 45
steady.
Extra Western, com¬
White
The following are the exports of tobacco from New Yoik
1 43® 1 60
mon
6 00® 6 25 White California
1 60®1 67$
tor the past week :
Double Extra Western
Corn,Western Mix’d,new
90® 1 03
and
,

<

.

EXPORTS

OF

TOBACCO

FROM

Hhds.

Liverpool
London

NEW

Cases.

293

....

....

Londonderry

173

.

Hamburg

32

Marseilles

34

,

1.000
71

124

Palermo

Sydney
Canada
British N. A. Col
British West Indies
British Guiana
French West Ind es
Mexico
New Granada
Danish West Indies
Dutch West Indies
Cuba

29
20

.

.

.

.

....

.

.

.

5

15
19
....

.

....

.

.

.

.

....

....

•

•

•

•

....

.

,

,

...

»

11,557
27
....

....

11,252
10,658

....

....

....

2

•

....

.

....

.

Argentina Republic

.

,

....

,

,

,

.

*

743

3,851

27

197,419

from

man¬

for the two week, from

...




FROM NEW

N. A. €ol. week..
Since Jan. 1
Went Ind. week..
Since Jan. 1

5,156,875

YORK

FOR THE

386,220

321,980
20,870

Flour, C. meal, Wheat, Rye,
bbls.

bbls.

12,359
631,192

bush.

433,249
10 14,714,830

342,270

AND

1,477,740
7,200,035

SINCE

JAN.

Corn

bush.

bush.

Oats.
bush,

bush

17',666 1,337,802

...

450

156,0o9

25,281

4.116

540

116,241
240,896

1.

Earley.

...

6.872

Since Jan. 1 from—
Boston
139,907

Philadelphia

2,022,140
222,0n&
7,910,975
17,120,165

120,255
259,795

WEEK

6,793
38,984
...

275,473 50,545
225
Total exp’t, week 26,989
440,508
1,215
Since Jan. 1,1869.1143,068 118,746 35,305,314
139,876
Same time, 1868.. 773,570 161,693 4,383,946
152,993

Baltimore

From Baltimore—To Bremen, 789 hhds, 93 do stems and 543 bales. .To
Liverpool
117 hhds...To Marseilles, 876khds..
.ToDieppe, l,024hhd8 ..To Bernice
2hh’a
To Havre, 837 hhds
To London, 60 hhds and 10 do manu¬
factured
To Montevideo and Buenos
Ayres, 261 cases... To Barbafoes and St Lucia, 10 hhds... To St. Kitts and a
market, 8 hhda... .To
Port Spain, 20 ba es
ToDemerara, 5 hhds, 16 cases.
From Boston—To Port Chalmers, 30 qr tierces
To Melbourne, 2 cases and
21 pkg«. ..To Africa. 62 hhds and 20 hf do....To Halifax and charlotte
town, 29 hhds.. .To British Provinces, 20 boxes and 61 half do....To
other foreign, 17 hhds aiid 15 hdf boxes....To
Hayti, 90 half baits
To ceyenne and Suri am, 2 hhds....To Port au
Prmce, 135 bales....To
St. Johns, N. F., 35 boxes.
From New Orleans—To Havre, 882 hhds....To Liverpool, 355 hhds.
From San Francisco—To Honolulu, 38 cases.,..—To Victoria, 22
and 4

bbls.... To China, 30 cases.

—

EXPORTS

follower

100,980
1,475

.

...

The exports in this table to European porta
are made np
ifests, verified and corrected by aD inspection of the cargo.

The direction of the foreign exports
the other ports, has been as toliows:

.

1,760

100

2,224

.

368

...

....

China

*

...

To
Gt. Brit. week....
Since Jan. 1

....

....

.

206,995
28,185
1,760
23,160
174,160

Wheat, bush
Corn, bush
Rye, bush
s
Barley, <fcc., bush

as

—

v

2,449,230
173,765
16,712,070
8,389,0130
259,580
915,645

2,345

FOREIGN

....

.

68,800

—

....

®

1868.—:
For the
Since
week. ' Jan. 1.

Since
Jan. 1.

week.

4.137
9,257

148

....

1869.

Corn meal, bbls

1 06
1 04
1 15
* 64
1 55

NEW YORK.

For the

1,731

.

AT

•

75
6

....

Venezuela

w

....

....

4
....

•

RECEIPTS

Oats, bush

...

o

Hayti

Total

^ ^ •

.

...»

...

fbe movement

Flour, bbls

.

•

....

Meal

75® 6 15 Peas, Canada
25® 6 25
in breadstuffa at this market baa been

7,130

....

.

Malt

4
4

....

....

....

50® 8 25 Barley

....

....

05®
02®
1 05®
61®
1 30®
®

Rye

6

12,215

....

.

Corn

1
1

6 85®10 00 Oats

Rye Flour, fine and super
fine

Yellow new
White new

and

J

....

....

.

6 50® 9 90
6 00® 6 65

extra

family

.

....

4

....

44
10

'

1,197

....

...

111,475
15,879

California...

2,421

,,,

....

Gibraltar

Southern,

.....

....

Genoa

Manfd
lbs.

....

.

....

.

22
459

Bremen

Leghorn

,

....

Glasgow

Malta

Bales. Stems.

....

.

St. Louis
Southern supers

TORE.*

27 156
28,939

27',4 48 1321766
"

78
90

....

651,495
661,891

8,933
46,969 1,633,093
68,403 5,531,681
61,856
7,202

10,658
76,733
617,221

23,061
10
3.847
We compile the following statistics from the Buffalo
Courier, for
which they are prepared by Mr. William
Thuratoae, Secretary of the
Buffalo Board of Trade, and their
accuracy may be relied upon :
RECEIPTS

AT

LAKE PORTS

Flour*
bbls.
At

Chicago

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit
Cleveland

cases

Totals.

FOR

THE

Wheat.
bush.

(L96 lbs.)
3J,005
23,814

(60 lbs)
556,795
716,866

82,630

119,151
115,995

88,410
4,754

44,8£0

132,618 1,652,157

WEEK ENDING

Corn.
bush.

Oata.
bush.

OCT.

16.

Barley.
bush.

Rye.

bush.

(56 lbs.) (32 lb«.i (48 lbs ) (56 l*s..
336,689 825,578
69,508
48,818
8,497
17,680
11,707
5,220
60,173
51,502
10,260
80,227
4,862

3.978

8,100

18,400

9-,175
4,550

1,270

412,183

115,167

66,068

"il?,821

October 23, 1869.]
Previous week

THE < CHRONICLE.

188,095 1,784,809

“

"

-66. 161,469 1,418,763
*65. 149,537 1,868,494

Comparative Receipts' at the

inclusive, for four

871,596 801.649,128,928

699,798

*67. 179,994 1,968,954

“

64,693

647,175
418,878
641,491

Correspond^ week, 68. 160,859 1,495,573

460,869

744,109

648,799 195,007

hat been a moderate demand for Greens and Japans, and a fair basi¬
hat been transacted in these kinds. Black Teat are
neglected
altogether. Wears unable to report any great animation however,
nets

878,969 169,660 79,689
164,747 116,970
889,455 83,191 68,605

and prices have been easy.
There has been, at the close, tome
in Japans, and some 8,700 half chests of these have been sold activity
to-day.
The sales of the week comprise 2,806 half chests of

porta, from August 1 to Oct. 16,

same

Greens, and. 7,178

years :
1869.

Flour

bbls.

1868

1,081,346

1867.

1,466,690

1,352,921

1

Wheat
Corn
Oate

bush.

15.648 019

16,072,190
8,733,686
12,442,696
1,601,612
1.097,514

10,719,871
4,610,056

Barley

585,628
473,846

.

Rye

16,186,654
8,978,069
7,876,162
1,960,550
894,847

do. of Japans.
There have been no imports of tea during the week, either direct
or otherwise.
We shall resume the publication of our general table
of the shipments of tea from China, and the
imports into the United
States, as soon as the movement of new crop becomes of interest.
The following, by telegraph from San Francisco, is of interest:
San Francisco, Oct. 20.—The steamship America, which arrived

C C£

*

I

9,889,780
li,867,117
2 275,550
831,883
128,422

here

to-day from Hong Kong, brings the following news :
a large business doing in tea for the American
market,
from theopeuing of navi principally medium and fine grades. We quote:
Good common $24, medium $27, good medium $31, fine $35,
1868.
1867.
1866.
finest $39.
1,628,280
1,237,483
1,636,020
The Mary Lee, with 466,733 pounds, and the Georgia Becker,
15,512,147
13,751,153
14,829,002 with 284,223 pounds, have sailed for New York. The Cedrick is
18,997,345
28,907,263
30,958,586 full and the Phaeton is engaged. The Herbert
Graham, Janet Fer¬
10,912,139
7,574,148
8,262,736

31,936,914

89,947,498

85,896,282

25,492,752

There is

Comparative Shipments from same ports
gation to October 16, for fvur years, viz.:
1869.

Flour, bbls

1,618,337
24,059,694
17,184,126
5,272,195
28,332
157,544

Data, bash...

Barley, bosh

Rye, Duah...

68,537
685,300

46,701,891
“

GRAIN

IN

”

42,392,577

Corn.
lmth.

bush.

8*1,998
1,131,669
1,029,930

&34,181
683,455
1,112,336

In Store at Chicago
In store at Milwaukee
864,000
Afloat on lakes for Buffalo and Oswego 759,323
Afloat on N. Y. canals krti- e water
2,604,404

140,124

l,t88,187

..

“

“

“

“

164,745

Oct.

Sept.
Sept.

“

“

“

fcept.

Eastward Movement from

ending October 16

Bariev,
bush.
6,948

60,951
364,800
3i6,848

26,057
178,273

237,724
697,170

418,225

212,255

26,479

8,099

863,466,

4,121,749
4,340,246
2...5,659,455 4,723,338
25...4,489,730 4,395,679
18...8,694,868 4,184,601
11...3,292,015 8,562,838

1,878,743
1,921,113
1,658,584
1,430,121
1074,484
1,218,514

663,101
515,979

Chicago, Milwaukee and Toledo for
Wheat,

bbls.

Weekending Oct. 9

Previous week
Cor. week, 1868
“

1867.
1866

Corn,

bush.

82,159
99,316
126,232
117,255
113,272

1,125,703
1,361.982
971,798
1,516,600
1,398,502

Chicago railroad shipments not included.

Oats,

Barley,

bash.

bush.

535,604

360,017
811,978

8,090

294,117 764,479
668,660 1,290,072
841,586 833,433
,129,770 477,609

33,075

597,000

bush.
•

•

•

•

21,140

141,762
5,505

week

Rye,

'

•

The week has been

27,675
16,018
186,773
154,316
64,733

118,164

Friday Evening, October 22, 1869.

5

of fair business in

Groceries, but
the various markets have not been uniformly
steady. We
notice the different fluctuations in their
appropriate places. As
a general
Fall trade in this line is fully equal to the
thing the
average of the season in other years, and everything indicates
a continuance of
activity till its close.
The check experienced from the late interruption of trans¬
portation is rapidly fading out, though still favorable weather
and steady gold rates have contributed to render business
good.
Raw Sugars, with an active business, have
steadily declined,
following the falling market for Refined Sugars, which have
lost from §c@£e during the week. The market for both Raw
one

and Refined closes without firmness.
Molasses has been very quiet, the

light supply of all kinds
The finer boiling grades, which are most
in demand, are almost
entirely wanting, and the inferior
qualities meeting with little or no demand.
a

20—Mart Edie, for Boston, with
pounds of black tea; Insulance, for New York, with
pounds of black tea; Stanley Castle, for New York, with
pounds of green tea, and the Argonaut, for New York, with
pounds of green tea.
Sailed since August

fair business in Green and

363,000
444,500
588,500

694,000

COFFEE.

prevailed for Rio throughout the week, and
prices have been maintained at the figures current last week. The
telegram from Rio under date of September 23d, received and pub¬
lished here on Monday last, gave both larger sales and shipments for
the United S ates; but the despatch has exerted no perceptible influ¬
ence on the market.
The stoc«s iu the United States are not large,
and that at New Orleans is reported as having been entirely closed out
during the present week by the sale of 8,200 bags. The sales are
25,472 bags of Rio, 4,500 do of Santos, 659 do of Maracaibo, 500 do of
Ceylon, and 160 of Laguayra.
Imports of the week have been limited to two cargoes of Rio, viz:
“Graf Von Annin,” 4,200 bags, and steamer “South America” 8,*58
bags. Last week the s!earner “Donati,” with 10/205 bags, was acci¬
dentally omitted in our account of imports. Advices from Rio Janeiro
are to Sept 24, and are given below:
The stock of Rio Oct. 21, and imports since Jan. 1, are as follows :
New
In Bags.
York.
Stock
88,654
Same date 1868. 139,783
in 1868

Japans,

Blacks are altogether neglected.
Coffee has been steady, and the sales in Rio and Santos of
some moment.
West India descriptions have been inactive.

Phila-

Balti-

delphia.

more.

11,700
38,300
249,765

74,068

9,536

601,207

.

218,160

67,571

Of other sorts the stock at New
several ports since Jan. 1 were as

8,000
5,000

,

1,500
2,500

2,666

19,666
13,081

Total.

2,800
2,800

109,8 ^4
198,083
964,499
904,514

York, Oct. 14 and the imports at the

follows:

Ne1 v York—, Boston Philadel. Balt. N. Orle’s
Stock. Import, import. import. import. import.

In tags.
Java..

*45,762

..

—

Maracaibo......

Laguayra
St.Domingo....
Other

..

..

..

6,436
2,613
2,056

220,546
261,518

17,287

..

943

20/43
64,005
16,164

5,239

..

Total
Same ’68

13,366

17,109
62,229

t943

*17,375

*4,834

..

Singapore

Ceylon....

New Savan. &
Gal¬
Orleans. Mobile.
veston.

5,50!)
8,200

617,200

Imports
“

*

restricting business.

In Teas there has been

good to fine Foo-chow, taels,

;

t

bush.

GROCERIES.
•

Moyune andTwankay taels, 39£@45

37@4l; common to medium taels, 31 £@36.

An active demand ha9

:

Flour,

“

Oats.
but-h.

generally favorable.

Shanghai, September 18.—Black Teas—There have been large
settlements. Advices continue favorable.
The reports of large available reserves of stock are confirmed.
The exports to date have been 40,500,000 lbs. In green teas the
settlements have been 46,000 lbs.
The packages are principally
for the American market. Stock 50,000 packages. Good to fine

55,381,315

Mil¬

Total in store and afloat Oct. 16..6,926,069
“
“
Oct. 9..6,312,051
“

guson, Carobel are berthed for New York.
The market for various articles of import is

808,316
1,022,175

16.

OCT.

Wheat.

Rail shipments from Chicago,
waukee and Toledo for week

1,130 784
939,147

51,085,386

SIGHT

In utore a*- New fork
In store at Buffalo

537

33,8:6

.

....

....

....

....

....

....

•

.

•

47,267

O o

..

P.O.

Ei

/

1,254

1,008

1,246

21,125
21,328

40.440

rs

....

1,109
18,762

7,693
1,163

Includes mats. &c., red need to bags.

Rio Janeiro,

•

....

...

....

....

09
cc *

1,008
1,379

1,246
207

©

S3
© *

284,395
334,539

+ Also 44,391 mats.

Sept. 24.—Messrs. Boje

Co.’s Market Report states

:

After departure of the Merrimack, on the 26th ult., transactionsia cof¬
fee remained limited to the want, up to the 31st ult., owingio the
unsettled state of our money market and the difficulty of passing bills
of

exchange.

On the Istinst. the banks came forward as takers, and a fair activity
in coffee was the immediate consequence, although the sterliog value
of the article hardly suffered any alteration, as the decline of 300 to 400
rs., to which holders gradually submitted, up to the departure of the
Southampton steamer on the 8th iost., was nearly balanced by the

Imports of the week have been quite limited in every depart¬ higher exchange.
“
ment, and there is no feature of special interest to notice in
Receipts from the interior were moderate in consideration of the
-

#

sea¬

averaging about 7,000 bags per day.
Gur slock is reduced to
The imports at New York for the week, and at the several about 70,000 bags, and the market closes very strong, the coffee dealers
being unable to replace their stocks but at higher prices.
ports since January 1, are given below under their respective
Exchange has, on the whole, continued in an up * ard tendency. The
heads. The totals are as follows:
rate on London gradually advanced to 19£@19fd for private bills, takers
Total at all ports
keeping back in consequence of the telegrams arriving almost every day
At N. York.
From Jan 1 to date-^
from the seat of war reporting a further progress of the allied arms.
this Week.
1869.
1868.
Since the 3d inst. some weakness manifested itself, and private paper
Tea.
40,569,136
32,250,161
was negotiated from 19£@19£d, closing firmer again at ?9f@19£d. Ti e
28,682
23,747
12,’ 553
964,499
904,514 banks offered to draw at 19d., however, obtained but very little money

regard to them.

son,

m

Coffee, other...

•

m

•

m

•

m

•

2,035
_.hhds.

2,054

’9is
....

284,395
643,829
621,282
636,661
837.488
17,643

334/89
423,726
642,571
389,374
390,397
10,925

In the same

There

Total hags of coffee
/
Vessels dearea and ready for sea
..
Vessels loading or about to load for the United fit ates.

TEA.

The week hat elicited




no new

feature in the trade in Teat.

at this rate.

We estimate coffee sales in the interval at 251,000

bags.

Vessels sailed for the United States since our last report dated 26th

August

.

rw....

period sailed for Europe 83 vessels, with together.

133,020
84,868

* • • •

....bags

13,858

81,100

THE CHRONICLE.

538

[October 28, 1868.
'

SUGAR.

Coflks*

'

Duty : When imported direct in American or
The market for raw Sugars has settled steadily since our last report,
equalised vessels from the
and closes at
lower quotations. The decline has originated in the place of its mrowth or production; also, the growth of countries this side the
Cape of Good Hope when imported indirectly in American or equalized ves
foil in the prices of Eefiaed Sugars and the consequent inability of sels, 6 cents per lb.; all other, 10
per cent ad valorum in addition,
Refiners to purchase at former rates, with the increased caution which do.Prime,autypaid
...gold 11|® 12
Native Oeyloa
gold 1TO® 19
o
will always attend the operations of buyers with the market on the
goo 4
gold 101® 111 Maraoaibo
.gold 164® 904
do fair
gold 94® 10
down grade.
Holders hate keen disposed to meet the necessities of do ordinary
Laguayra..gold 10f® 18
—gold 84® 9
St Domingo, in bond .gold
the situation, and hate continued to sell at the declining rates, as stock Java, mats sol
® 101
bags ....gold 28 ® 284 Jamaica
....gold 15 © 16
has been wanted, so that there has been a fair activity in the trade
Sugar,
maintained. Refined
•

M S •

•

..

Sugars have been uniformly active, but at con.
stantly weakening prices, which have dropped from i'S-fc, closing weak
at the reduction.
The sales include 4,212 hhds of Cuba, 571 do. of
FPrto Rico, 169 do. of Demerara, and 6,108 boxes of Havana.

Imports for the week at New York, and stock
Cuba,

hand October 21»

Cuba, P. Rico, Other, Brazil, M’nila,
♦hhds.
♦hhds.
kgs.
bg
210
1,831
13
16,

bxs.

Imports this week

44

...

...

1867

...

♦hhds.

*

2,035

..

.

Stock on hand
Same time 1868
44

on

follows:

were &s

108,906
80,420
51,602

84,691
55,791
36,535

147,546
44,522

29,494

Imports at the several ports since Jan. 1 have been
Boxes

,

1869

*Hhds
1869.
1868.

r

,

as

1868.

follows:
Brazil, Manila
bags. bags.
1869.

1869.

Imp's since Jan 1, atNewYork 354,773 203,671 307,990 319,194 135,786 281,531
“
44
Portland..
10 531
8,858 18,594
9,833
44
44
Boston.... 31,820 60,868
64,596
69,289 12,600 143,089
••
44
“
“

“

Pbiladel..
Baltimore.

“

32,575

N. Orleans

44

“

78,267

Total
*

37,586

51,615
27,397
61.581

543,829 422,736

67,505
61,743

71,590 49,650
60,560 10,955
12,398

9,615

....

....

521,282 512,571 208,991 427,670

Including tierces and barrels reduced to hhds.
HOIiASSES.

The amount of business done in these has been very light, as for
time past the better refining qualities have been most io demand

some

owing to their scarcity, while distilling grades are hardly asked for.
The sales made have been mamly of fine grocery Molasses to the
trade,
and in these some activity has prevailed, but necessarily limited
by the
email supply of such goods. The stock of all kinds is light. The sale*
ioclude 898 hhds of Porto Rico, 106 of Demerara, 168 St Croix, 64 do
of Muscovado and 428 bbls of New Orleans, including 800 bbls sold to
arrive from Providence.
The receipts of the week at

21, were as follows

on

667

..

hand
“

....

6,712

same

hand October

P. Rico. Demerara. Other.
♦Hhds.
*Ilhd8.
♦Hhds.
349
v

Stock

on

:

Imports this week

8,234
2,039

time 1868. ..11,616

....

44

44

44

44

Boston

as

44

44

44

44

Philadelphia

44

44

46,309
90,722

Baltimore
New Orleans

44

44

follows

:

22,805

11,721

bbls,
1869.

13,719
'

53,119
77,460
23,478

390,397

’762

18,199

Total at all ports
*

....

..

do Melado
do molasses

Brazil, bags

6

per lb
184® 144

14f® 16|
141®
11|® 114
124® 134
ltf* 124

® 84 Manila, bags...
11 ® 114
>044 Ilf Crushed
16 ® 164
Hav’a, B0X.D.S.N08. 7 to 9. 114® 114 Granulated
16 ® 164
do
do
do 10 to 12 124® 124 80ft White
141® 16|
do
do
de 18 to 16 12|® 13| Soft Yellow
14 © 14|
molasses*
Duty : 8 cents # gallon.
NewOrieans
..# gall.80 ® 95 I do Clayed.
45 ® 50
Porto Rico
53 ® 75 I Barbadoes...
48 © 65
Cuba Muscovado
48 ® 62 |
Spices*
Duty: mace, 40 cents; nutmegs, 50; cassia and
cloves, 20; peppvi an
pimento, 15; and ginger root, 5 cents $ fi>.
Cassia, in mats-gold
46®
47 | Pepper, in bond...(gold)
104® 104
Ginger, race and Af(gold)
12®
124 * Pimento* Jamaica.(gold)
19
Mace
(gold) .... @ 1 30 I Cloves..-..(gold) 26
264
Nutmegs
(gold) 1 00 ® 1 05 |
Fruit*
Duty : Raisins, Currants, Pigs, Plums and Prunes,
5; Shelled Almonds,
Almonds, 6; other nuts,2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts, 1; Shelled do, 14, Filberts and
Walnuts, 3 cents # I>; Sardines, 60; Preserved Ginger, 50; Green Fruits,
V oent ad val.
Raisins,Seedless.. # mat. 7 50®7 75 Sardines
# qr. box
® 18
do Layer, new. 42 box 4 6C®
Fige,8myrna
.# lb
© 16
do Valencia.old # lb
ao
15 ® ..
New
18 ® 22
per lb
do
do; new
19 ®
Brazil Nuts.
® 15
Currants,new
14 ®
# fi>
16
Filberts,Sicily
15
Citron, Leghorn
354® 36
Walnuts, Bordeaux
m
Prunes,Turkish
12 ® 14
Macaroni, Italian
® 18
Dates
Drikd Fruit—
® 12
Almonds, Languedoc
274®
Apples, Southern..# B>
® 9
8
do
Piovence
® 22
Blackberries
14 ®
do
Sicily, Soft Shell .. ® 16
Peaches, pared new
16 ® 20
do
Shelled, Spanish
40 ® 42
Peaches, unpared
6 © 8
Sardines
# hi. box
31 ® 32
...

.....

..

..

..

..

..

‘

..

..

..

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
Friday, P. M„ October 22, 1869.

....

....

337,488

44
44

..

....

1,238
1,188

♦Hhds
1869.
1868.
136,800
162,132
29,631
66,009

Total imports since Jan. 1 at New York
44
Portland
“

...

N. O.
Bbls.

N. o.

44

do
do
do 16 to 18
do
do
ao 19 to 20
do
do
white
Porto Rico, refining grades.
do
grocery grades .

-

Imports at the several ports since January 1 have been

14

Cuba,inf.to00m refining.. 11 ® 114
do fairtogood
do
11J® 114
do nr me
114®
do fairtogood grocery.. 12 ® 12|
do pr. to choice do
124® 124
do centrifugalhhds &bxs 10j® 13|

—

New York, and the stock

Cuba.
♦Hhds.
r

Duty ; On raw or brown sugar, not above No. 13 Dutch
standard, 8; on
wMte or clayed, above No. 12 and not above No. 15 Dutch
standard, not refined,
8#; above 15 and not over 20,4; on refined, 5; and on Melado 2# cents

2,7S2
434

17,637

The market has been unsettled and
since

our

generally unsatisfactory
prices has been
sheetings, at least negatively, as they have

last review.

shown in standard

More firmness in

not further declined ;

but in Prints there has been a decided
goods very low figures have been reached.
The decline has not yet produced the desired result o! a
lively
demand, but on the contrary business, as a rule, has been irreg¬
ular and not large in volume. The
prevailing opinion seems
break and

on

old

to be that the bottom has been reached and that the first
show of an,active demand would be followed
by a return to

Including tierces and barrels reduced to hhds.
SPICES*

higher prices. It is quite unsafe, however, to predict] the same
opinion in regard to prices was expressed two weeks ago and
proved not to be well founded, as a decline soon followed;
Cotton has been weak and tends downwards,
naturally im¬
FRUITS.
parting weakness to the goods market.
A very unfavorable feature of the market
In foreign dried fruit there has been a steady trade, but without
lately (so far as
any
particular animati n. New crop Raisins are arriving and have sold in a healthy tone of business is concerned) has been the rivalry
Bouton at $4 60 per box. A cargo of 9,000 boxes just received here and
hostility shown among various leading houses, which has
ia held at the same figures. The price is not regarded as
high under induced operations in the
way of “ drives” and the offering of
the fact of the short crop, and an improvement In price is looked for.
There is less speculative feeling in Almonds, and prices have
particular goods below current prices in such a manner as
dropped
off a little for one or two kinds. Sardines' (quarter boxes) have advanced frequently to disturb the whole market and
injure many
to 18c.: Figs have been sold quite largely at auction, some
8,430 drums parties without apparently benefiting any one. While a fair
and boxes and 180 cases having been disposed of in this
way. Domes- competition is much to be
desired, such action as that referred
tit dried fruit have been quiet.
Southern Apples and Peaches are the to above is much to be
deprecated. To-day there has been a
only kinds in market; the former are selling at 8£@l0c, the latter price
for sliced. In Peaches there is less activity ; Shore
bring from 19@20c. better feeling shown on the market, and trade was more satis¬
There has been

good business, at firm and improving prices.
Pepper and Mace continues to be firmly held, the former at somewhat
higher figures. Nutmegs are quoted higher also. Other spices remain
as ast quoted.
a

In

foreign green fruit Cartbageoa and Barracoa Cocoa nuts are jobbing
at former prices.
Malaga Lemons bri> g $13 per box from store. The
stock of domestic green fruit is limited to the later fruits.
Apples are

factory.

and
prices pre easier.
mixed Western $3 60.

1860

coming in from the Western part of the State rather more freely
Selected fruit brings from $4 00@4 60, and
Pears are selling from $12@18
per bbl.
Cranberries bring $9 00@10 00.
We annex ruling quotations in first hands :

now

Tea,

Duty: 25 cents per lb.

Hyson, Common to fair...
do
Superior to fine....

Duty r*aid^
78 ®

85
90 ©1 00

Ex fine to finest.. .1 05 Coal 30

do

Y’gHyson, Com. to fair... 72® 78
do
do

Super, to fine.. 82 @1 11
ExfinetoflneBt.1 25 ©1 JO

Ganp. A Imp., Com.to fair 85 ©1 00
do
Sujd. to fine 1 00 @1 25
do

do Ex. f* to finest.....

70

H. 8k. fcTw*kay,C,to fair. 68 ® 73
do Ssp. toftxe 75 ® 82
d9




The
uary

exports of dry goods for the past week,and since Jan¬

1, 1869, and the total for the
are

shown in the

-FROM NSW YOBS.

Exports to

Brit. West Indies...
Brazil

London...
do Ex f. tofln’st
do
nominal,
Uncol. Japan, Com.to fair.. 80
@
do
Sup’rtofine. 88
do
Ex f. to flnestl 05

Oolong, Common to fair.
65
do
Superior to fine... 75
do
Exflnefcoflnest-1 10
Bono & Cong., Com. tofalr
' ■:
do
8up*rtoftne.
£xf. to finest! 10
—

..

..

time in 1868 and

following table:

Domestics.

pkgs.

Val.

3
35

$461
6,049

Liverpool
f—Dnty paid—

same

....

....

Hambnrg
Leghorn

British N. A. Col

Mexico
bew Granada....—

Beyront (Syria)
Coracoa

Total thi s week..
38
Since Jan. 1,1869. ..18,092

Same time 1868
19,874
;
K
Wf • i860,....77,800

....

.

.

•

.

.

.

•

•

•

•

•

«

•

«

»

.

...

»

>•

«...

....

$6,610
1,953.478
989,001

*

Dry Goods.
packages.

Domestics.

Val.

$
• • •

FROM BOSTON.

pkgs.

• • • •

« •

•

•

•

17

5,671
6,082
3,936

4
13
3
4

.180
22
2

1.200

2,105
28,202

22

8|800
207

1

....

'245
4.811

4,098
MM

: $54J03

21

683.937

1.817,640
1 if' ‘
•

5,980
7,855
4

31,768

October 23, 1869.]
We

annex a

manufacture,
jobbers:

tew

our

THE

CHRONICLE.

particulars of leading articles of domestic

prices quoted being those of the leading

Brown Shirtings in

♦

spite of the late decline are sparingly dealt
in, though it is generally thought no further decline can possibly take
place. Brown Shirtings are very irregular in price, and such brands
as are
selling below relative value are liberally taken by buyers, while
the balance of the lines are
generally neglected. Agawam F 36 12+,
Atlantic A 86 15*, do H 86 15, do P 86 12$, do L 86 14, Appleton
A 86 16, Augusta 86 14$, do 80 13,
Broadway £6 12$, Bedford R
8010, Boott H 27 11$, do O 84 12$, do S 40 14$, do W 46 19$, Commonwealtb 0 27 8, Grafton A 27 9$, Graniteville AA 86 16$, do EE 36
16, Great Falla M 86 18,do S 88 12$, Indian Head 36 15$, do 30 14, In¬
dian Orchard A 40 16, do O 86 14, doBB36 12$, do W 3412, doNN86
14$, Laconia O 89 14$,do B 87 14$, do E 8618,Lawrence A 8612$, do C
86 16, do F86 12$,do G 84 18, do H 27 ll$,doLL86 12$,
Lyman G 36 14,
do E 86 16$, MassachusettsBB 86 18, doJ 80 12$, Medford 36—, Nashua
fine 38 14, do 86 15$,doE 40 18, Newmarket A 18, Pacific extra 86 16$,
doH86 16, do L 86 14, Pepperell 6-4 —, do 7-4 £6, do 8-4 40, do
9-4 46, do 10-4 60, do 11-4 66,
Pepperell E fine 89 16$, do R 86
14$,do O 38 13$, do N 30 12$, do G 80 13, Pocasset F 80 10$, do K 36
13$, do Canoe 40 17, Saranac fine O 83 14, do R 36 15$, doE 89 18,

Sigourney 86 10$, Stark A 86 15, Swift River 36 12, Tiger 27 9,

Tremont M 88 11.

Bleached Sheetings and Shirtings have also been unsettled and
weak on nr st brands, though trade has been more active than for brown

goods. At the close there was a feeling of more firmness, and prices
were steady.
Amoskeag 46 19, do 42 17$, do 54 26, do A 86 16,
American A 86 14, Androscoggin L 86 16$, Auburn 36 17$, Attawaugan XX 86 14, do X 86 11, Atlantic Cambric 36 24, Ballou A
Son 86 14$, do 81 11$, Bartletts 86 16$,do 38 14$,do3118$,BatesXX
38 17$, do B 83 14$, Blackstone 86 15, do D 87
18$, Boott B 36 15$, do C
84 14$, do E 36 12$, do H 28 11$, do O 30
13$, do R 28 10, do
W 46 19$, Clarks 86 20, Dwight 40
21, Ellerton 10-4 50, Forestdale 86 16, Fruit of the Loom 36 17, Globe 27 8$, Gold Medal 36 16,
Greens M’fgOo86 12, do 81 10$, Great Falls Q 86 16$, do J 88 —, do S
31 12, do A 82 14, Hill’s Semp. Idem 86 16, do 88 14$,
Hope 86 15,
James 86 14$, do 33 18$, do 81 18, Lawrence B 86 15$, Lonsdale 36 16$.
Masonville86 17,Newmarket 0 36 16, New York Mills 86 22$,
Pepper¬
ell 6-4 82$, do 8-4 46, do 9-4 62$, do 10-4 o7$, Rosebuds 86
15$, Red
Bank 36 12, do 33 11, Slater J. A W. 86 —, Tuscarora 36 18, Utica 5-4
82$, do 6*4 37$, do 9-4 65, do 10-4 70, Waltham X 88 —, do 42 18,
do 6-4 —,do 8-4 42$, do 9-4 47$, do 10-4 50, Wamsutta 46
28, do 40$
26, do 86 20, Washington 33 10$.
Brown Drills are quoted tfce same as last week, but have not ex¬
perienced much demand. Amoskeag 17, Boott —, Graniteville D 16,
Laconia 17, Pepperell 17, Stark A 17, do H 16$.
Prints, quite contrary to the expectations of many, continue to recede
in prices, and with the exception of
Pacific goods no standard brands
are now held above 12$c.
They continue in a rather mixed state.
Prices have been reduced on nearly all brands, but new work
opened
is held firmly by the agents at previous rates ; this condition of affairs
is to be deplored, as the only effect
perceptible is a diminishing of cor fidence among buyers.
The diversity of opinions put forth on the state
of affairs at present in existence is immense. Some state that a
speedy
resumption of previous rates is to take place, others, that the prices
will be reduced still lower, and still others, that the season’s trade is
over, and that affairs will remain in statu quo until the next season’s
opening. Printers are turning their attention to new stales for spring
work, and from what we hear, some very fine designs are to be pro¬
duced. Allens 12, American 12$, Amoskeag —, Arnolds 10$, 0
mestoga
12$,Dunnell’B 12$, Freeman 11, Gloucester 12-12$, Hamilton 12$, Horae
8$,Lancaster 12$, London mourning 12, Mallory] 3, Manchester 12$, Merrimac D 12$, do pink and purple 15, do W 14, Oriental 12$,
Pacific
18$, Richmond’s 12, Simpson Mourning 12, Sprague’s purple and pink
18$, do blue 13$, doshiitings 18$, Wamsutta 9$.
Print Cloths.-— The market in this line is still weak and unsettled
;
the decline in prints and the unsatisfactory amounts distributed, have

combined, with other causes, to depress the market. Printers, in view
of the prices to be obtained for their
goods, are mostly running on short
time, and purchase in as small a way as possible, and, in consequence,

539

Brown—Amoskeag AA 82, do A 24, Ellerton N 27, do O 24,
21$, Great Falls F 28$, Laconia 19. Bleached—Amoskeag A
27, do B 25, Ellerton W H 42, do N 80, Great Falls F 26$, Naumkeag
active.
do P

F 20.
Other Cotton Goods have

naturally been dull and weak, though

the prospect at the close is much more favorable. Bags have suffered
a marked decline, and are not specially active beyond present needs.
Checks.—Caledonia 70 27$, do 60 26, do 12 26$, do 11 22$, Eennebeck 25, Lanark No. 2 12$-13, Medford 18, Park No. 60 12, do 70 21,
do 80 24, do 90 27$, do 100 30, Pequa No. 1,200 18$, do 2,000 25, do

2,800 27$, Star Mills 12 18, do 20 22, Union No. 20 25, do 50 27$,
Watts No. 80 16.

Tickings.—Albany 11, American 14$, Amoskeag A C A 85, do A
29, do B 24, do C 22. do D 20, Blackstone Rivet 17, Conestoga extra
82 25, do 36 80, Cordis AAA 80, do BB 17$, Hamilton 26, do D 21,
Lewiston 36 86, do 32 32, do 80 28$, Mecs. and W’km’e 29, Pearl River
82, Pemberton A A 26, do E 18$, Swift River 16, Thorndike 17,
Whittecden A 22$,

Willow Brook No. 1 28, York 80 27$, do 82 88$.
Stripes.—Albany 11, Algodon 16$, American 14-15, Amoskeag
21-22, Boston 13$, Hamilton 22, Haymakei 16, Sheridan A 14$, do G
15$, Uncasville A 17, do B 16, Whittenton AA 21, do A 20, do
BB 17,

do C 15, York 2S.

Denims.—Amoskeag 80, Blue Hill 14$, Beavei Cr. blue 26$, do CO
18$, Columbian heavy 30, Haymaker Bro 19, Manchester 20, Otis AXA
28$, do BB 26, do CC 21, Pearl River 80, Thorndike 19,Tremotit 19.
Corset Jeans.—Amoskeag 15, Androscoggin 18, Bates 12$, Everetts
15$, Indian Orch. Imp 14, Laconia 16, Naumkeag 16$, Newmarket
14, Washington satteen 17$.
Cambrics.—Amoskeag 9$, Portland 7$, Pequot 9$, Victory H 8$, do
A 9$, Washington 9$.
Cotton Bags.—American $42 00, Androscoggin $42 00, Arkwright
A $42 00, Great Falls A $43, Lewiston $44, Ludlow A A $45, Stark A
$45 00, do C 3 bush $60 00, Union A $27 50.
Cotton Yarns and Batts.—Best Georgia Cotton Yarns Nos. 6 to 12
40, Best South Carolina small skeins 41.
Woolen Goods in desirable styles of cloths, especially plaids, are
jo
active lequest at good rate?.
Overcoatings are moderately active in
the finer grades, while even the lower and medium styles are much

improved. C-tssimeres in fine grades are in request at fair prices, but
lower grades are dull and inactive, even at large reductions below mar¬
ket rates. Flannels are quietly moving in small quantities for sorting
up.
Blankets are in good demand, and rates are fully maintained.
Kentucky Jeans are still dull, and rates are rather unsettled. The
Southern trade is ordering in small quantities; Western buyers are
hardly touching the goods however. Shawls are still enjoying an ac¬
tive demand, although, as the season advances, a slight falling off is
perceptible ; still the goods, in desirable styles, are absorbed readily
by buyers upon being opened, and all leading makes are sold very close
Rates are firmly maintained, and the business presents a very
up.
satisfactory exhibit for the whole season thus far. Arabs are in active
demand; the agents have ciders placed ahead, in some instances as
high as thirty days.
Foreign Drems Goods, in desirable styles, are in fair request, but
this branch of business sympathizes with the rest of the dry goods
market; in fact, the only trade that is apparently active is in the fur
line, and even that lacks the snap and vimoi tnesame period last year.
Astrachans appear to be the favorite among dealers, and some very
beautiful seta have been shown to us.
Sables, as usual, are in fashioD.
There is a great deal of irregularity in the auction rooms at this time.
The attendance is only moderate, and there are large quantities of
undesirable goods offering, which very much unsettle affaire. For de¬
sirable goods, or these to which the trade happen to take a fancy,prices
are higher than could be obtained, or than is asked for them at private
sale, and consequently profits are good. For low giades of goods, or
those which the tra^e do not want, prices are below cost of importation.
The present week is a slow one, but the indications fur next week, at
which time some new and seasonable goods are to be offered, are more
promising.
IMPORTATIONS OF DRY E00DS AT THE PORT OF NEW Y0BI.
The

importations of dry goods at tbis port for the week ending Oct.
21,1869, and the corresponding weeks of 1867 and 1868, have been as

goods have experienced a very limited business during the past follows:
ENTERED POR CONSUMPTION POR THE WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 21,1869.
days. Rates have been reduced a fraction, but buyers are still
1869.
1867
1868.
dissatisfied, and to induce a liberal distribution a considerable decline
Pkgs. Value.
Pkgs. Value.
Pkgs. Value
from present rates would be necessary ; 64 standard cloth is offered at
Manufactures of wool... 397
866
643
$309,808
$226,178
$155,128
8 cents, and 8$ for extra do,
do
468
although sales have been reported at as
cotton.. 402
473
134,699
184,271
111,827
low as 7£c, The Providence Journal of last week, in
do
424
690
silk...., 811
291,179
434,123
267,357
speaking of that
do
954
449
601
101,609
1.4,148
164,846
marktt, siys that the same causes as noted in our last report continue Miscellaneous flax
306
378
105,598
97,024
dry goods. 280
89,824
to depress the market, and the
printers are now working out the
balance of their fall styles, while some of them are already
Total
8/'18 $1,004,702
1,789 $725,245
8,785 $1,036,182
stopping to
repair, preparatory to their commencing on the spring or light styles. WITHDRAWN PROM WAREHOUSE AND THROWN INTO THE MARKET DURING
The tendency of the market is therefore rather to lower figures. The
THE SAME PERIOD.
617
following are the past week’s sales : 6,000 pieces 56x60, 6$c; 8,000 do Manufactures of wool... 657 $259,963
$154,562
$239,827
do
ti
cotton.. 127
97
36,184
81,258
26,602
56x60, 6£r; 8,000 do 60x64, 7$c, early in the week; 20,000 do 64x64,
do
silk
63
95
94.7S0
72,560
75,560
7$c;. 18,000 do 64x64, 7£c; 10,000 do 64x64, extra fine goods, high
at
do
flax
292
202
5D,320
68,846
66,663
count, on private terms—total, 54,000 pieces. The above sales were Miscellaneous dry goods 271
t-i
48
26,049
82,792
27,891
on thirty
days.
Total
1,021 $860,108
r
|
$415,353
1,442 $485,481
Mublin Delaines are in active distribution, as has been the case dur
Add ent’d for consu’pt’nl,789
-3® 1,086,162 8,018 1,004,702
725,245
ing the whole of the season past. Prices are unchanged, and there
4,039 $1,864,810
8,812 $1,451,540
being satisfactory to both seller and buyer is evidently the cause of the Total th’wn xpon maket8,281 $1,210,726
excellent business they have attained. Hamilton 20, Tycoon Reps 27$,
ENTERED POR WAREHOUSING DURING THE SAME PERIOD.
Lowell 20, Pacific Armures 21, do Robe deC 22$, do Alpacas 3-4 25, do
699
Manufactures of wool... 715
490
$247,986
$166,787
$268,669
do 6-4 27$-85, Pekins 25, Piques 22.
do
210
232
69,185
63,281
cotton.. 104
28,865
Ginghams are still in fairly active demand, and rates are without
do
100
45
silk
50
111,264
55,701
59,498
do
760
636
178,857
555
101,490
155,880
change. Agents, for all desirable makes, are sold close up, and stocks Miscellaneous flax
65
IT, 164
86,626
14,185
1,004
dry goods. 46
on hand are very small of
others. Allamance plaid 18, Caledonia 14,
Earlston 22$-25, Glasgow 16, Hampden 16, Lancaster 17, Manches¬
2.407
Total.....".
L824 $618,966
$422,901
...1,470 $527,014
Add ent dlpr fconsu’pt’n. 1,789
8,018 1,004,702
ter 18$.
9,785 1,036,182
725,245
.•••*
Cotton Flannels are somewhat firmer, and the trade in the goods Total entered at the port3^59 $1,252,259
5,192 $1,459,083
4,842 $1,618,658
these

seven




,

,

,

1

1

8531

•

.

540

THE

CHRONICLE.

Miscellaneous.
VALUABLE

Dry Goods.

MILLING

American
THE BEST

Manufacturing Property for Sale

THE

at

Great Bargain.

PIONEER

VIRGINIA, offers

MILLS,

AT

ALEXANDRIA.

inducements to

rare

a

Eben Wright 8c

Grain

92 a

Company,
Belknap Mills,
Columbian Mfg Company, Grafton Mills,
Warren Cotton Mills,
Sumner Falls Mills,
Boston Buck Company,
Gilmanton Hosiery Mills,
Cordis Mills,
Pepper Hosiery Mills,
Thorndike Company,
Otis Hosiery Mills,
And Arlington Mills,
Fancy

&

most

to 700 barrels of flour per
day.
The engines and boilers are of the best
construction,
and afford ample power to drive the twelve
pair of
burrs and other machinery.

Cumberland coal can be put in the yard at a cost of
*4 75 per ton, thus affording cheaper fuel than can be
supplied at any other place on the seaboard.
The supply of wheat is
ample, and can be bought at
prices much below those at other tidewater markets.
The comparative low cost of
fuel, wheat and barrels,
with the facilities for
getting products to Eastern mar¬
kets, gives this property superior advantages for mill¬

ing

purposes.

For

manufacturing of any description, this property
rare advantages,
owing to low cost of fuel,

possesses

abundance of cheap labor iboih male and
female), and
unsurpassed facilities for transportation by water or
railroads to any direction.
The property will be sold at a

great sacrifice, and is
worthy of notice of ihose desirous of a safe and profit¬
Apply to

46 LEONARD
St

WORTHINGTON,
Alexandria, Va.,

Or

WM. H. NEWMAN & CO.,
119 Pearl Street, New York.

FOR

STREET,

COTTONS AND

Bine Denim**.
Columbian Heavy, Otis AXA, BB, CC,
D, O, E, G
Union, Arlington, Oxford, Mt. Vernon, Beaver Crce
A A, BH, CC,
Thorndike, C. Haymaker, Palmer, Bos
ton, Northfleld, Pawnee, Farmers’ and Mechanics

WOOLENS,

>>rown

MANUFACTURED BY

Cordis

Brothers.

Sculng Silk,
lia'us and Orjranzines.
MIXTURE.CASSl-

INE ORGANZINES FOt. SILK

MERES.

Poulards and
'

Florentines,
Pongee Handkerchiefs,

And all kinds ot

floods,

PURPOSES TO ORDER.

AGENTS:

EDWARD If. ARNOLD Sc
102 Franklin

CHENEY Sc

SON,

Street, New York.

IWILLIKEV,
4 Otis

Street, Boston.

LEONARD BAKER Sc CO.,
210 Chestnut

TheodorePolhemus8cCo.

COTIONSaILDUCK

Vtelt Ribbons.
SILKS FOR SPECIAL

Brown and Bleached Good*.
Thorndike H. B. & C. Brown and Bleached
Sheetings,
Hingham, Farmers’ AA and Swilt River Brown Sheet¬
ings, 40-in. Rcc«y Mountain Duck, Bear, Raven’s Duck

Manufacturers and Dealers In

Warp Poplins,

CHAMPION

Separator

Stripe*.
Awning, Thorndike. B.C., Otis CC, Mount Ver
non, Columbus, Eagle,
Warren FF Fine sheeting:*.
blea. and brown.

Machine Twist,

Silk Press

■Will shell three times as mnch corn in
the same time
any other Corn sheller in nse, with one-half the
labor. It is compact,
easily handled, and costs less to
manufacture than any other hand Corn sheller
In the
market.
Took the first premium at the Ohio
Fair as also at
the Maryland Inst tute.
This Corn Sheller is
needed, wanted and will be
BOUGHT by almost every Farmer in the
land, as soon
as it is taken hold of
by a party with sufficient capital
to manufacture and
supply the demand. The under¬
signed have the exclusive sale of this Patent and
invite
capitalists to call on tnem and examine the Sheller
and
test its merits in
comparison witn any other Machine
of its kiud in

COTTON CANVAS, FELTING DUCK, CAR
COVER
ING, BAGGING, RAVENS DUCK, SAIL TWINES
&C. “ONTARIO’
SEAML4SS BAGS,
“
AWNING STRIPES.”

Also, Agents
United Stales Bunting
Company.
A full supply all Widths and Colors
always in stock
13 & 15 Li»pei.ard Street.
E. A. Brinckkrhoff,
Theodore Poliiemuh.
J. Spencer Tunner.
H. D. Polukmus, Specia

Street, Philadelphia

CHASE, STElVART Sc €n.,
10 and 12 German

Street, Baltimore.

C. B. 8c

the

BROADWAY, N.

ST

A/

Y.

m,

Bank Statements.

89 Leonard

NATIONAL

For the Sale
COTTONS

Wool

In New York, in the State of New
York, at the close
ol business on the 9ih day of
October, 1869:

No

Cor

Loans and discounts

banks

(as per
sche lule)
Due from other banks and bankers
(as per

I

schedule)
Ban xi rig house

5,189 20
350,(4)0 00
11,316 01

•.

Current expenses

141,020 55

Taxes paid
Premium

100 00

26,5'*) o0
2,G12,G36 99

Exchanges for Clearing-house..

Bills of other national

Fractional currency
Specie, viz.:
Coin

banks

(Including uicRles

....

20 000 00
2 982 10

7,994 06
130,000 00

Gobi Treasury notes
Legal-tender notes

485.000 00
500.000 00

3 per cent Certificates

*7,584,628 04

Cr.-LIABILITIES.

£3
SHOE

$2,000,000 00
90,000 00

Kent account

THREADS,
CARPET THREADS,

schedule)

486 472 88
I3i2i2 50

Dividends unclaimed

Barbour
99 Chambers

C. F.

State of New

TIMPSON,

Cashier.

York, County of New York.—Sworn
subscribed before me

to and
of October, 1869.

Correct—Attest.




W. J.

this sixteenth day of

Hakkis, Notary Public.

JNO. T. AGNEW, )
JAMES BRYCE. >
M. A.
MURDOCK,)

We

Street, Corner Church Street, New York

are

Shipman,

BROKERS,

BROADWAY, NEW

prepared to make cash advances
on

the spot or in transit.

YORK,
upon

Wool,

WORKS. PATERSON, NE W JERSEY

Thos. H. Bate 8c
MANUFACTURERS

DRILLED-EYED

NO. 1 WARREN

Co.,

Steamship Companies.

OF

PACIFIC

NEEDLES,

F/sliIng Tackle.
STREET, NEAR BROADWAY.

Mail STEAMSHIP COMPANY’S
THROUGH LINE

To California 8c

NEW YORK.

China,

Touching at Mexican

Porta

AND

John D wij

Co.,

MANUFACTURERS

OF

SALERATES,
SUPER CARR. SODA,

ScC.,

Nf. II Old Slip, New York,

CARRYING THE UNITED STATES MAILS.
On the 1st and 16th of
Each Month.
Leave PIER 42 NORTH RIVER, foot of
Cana! street
at 12 o’clock
noon, as above (except when those dates
fall on
Sunday, and then on tW preceding Saturday)
for

ASPlNWALL,

connecting via Panama Railway
irom Panama
touching at ACAPl LCO.
Departure of 1st connect at Panama with steamers
for SOUTH PACIFIC and
CENTRAL AMERICAN
PORTS. Those of the 1st touch at
MANZANILLO
One hundred pounds
baggage allowed each adnltd
with one of the
for SAN

Company’s Steamships

FRANCISCO,

(EXCLUSIVELY),

IX TENSION TABLES
Of Every Style and

Quality,

at

Greatly Reduced Prices.

WM.

HEERDT, Manufacturer,
150

Directors.

WOOL

NO. 50

Brothers,

xrJ»C. f.Bank New Coiner of
TIMPSON,
National
York,” do

“The Continental
solemnly swear that
true, to the best of my knowl¬

YORK,

E. J. Shipman

TWINES, FLAX, ETC.

$7,584,628 04
the above statement Is
edge and belief.

NEW

Exchange Place.

Mills 8c-

SEWING MACHINE THREAD-,
GILL NE1T TWINES. FISH LTNES.

28,39184
1,616 91

Interest
87,980 04
Profit and loss
20,327 08
National circulation
outstanding
562,729 00
State bank circulation
outstanding
2 979 00
Individual reposits
2,096,012 13
Certified checks
1.679,270 50
t)ue to national banks
(as
553 A64 56
Due to other banks and per schedule)...
bankers (as per

Broker,

LINEN

0,450 00

Discount.,
Exchange

WOOLEN*.

Abm. Mills

THREADS,

Fifth Hookft and

CapUal stock paid in
Surplus fund

of

AGENTS

or

DAVIS,

58 BROADWAY

Db.—RESOURCES.

national

AND

CHRISTY

BANK,

$2,162,705 15
Ov^rdralts
2 750 0 >
United States bonds to secure
circulation.
667,000 00
Orher Stocks,bonds and
mortgages (as per
schedule)
508,033 03
Dne from other

Stieet, New York.

MANUFACTURERS

%
\Q

4i/

Sc

REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF
THE

CONTINENTAL

J. F. Mitchell,

COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

Union, Apply immediately to
w. J. mcaliktkk <v r«M
ITS

Denims.

Columbian XXX, Otis BB, Warren A.B.D.X.
Ticks.
Cordis ACE, AAA, BB, Duck
AA.B^, Thorndike A.C
Swift River, Palmer, New
England.

AMERICAN SILKS.

Silk

as

Hosiery.

Pepper and Gilmanton Mills’ Sulloways
Shaker Socks, &c., &c.

Of Several MUU

ChiiNEY

Grafton

a

Shaker Flannels.

Otis Co.,

Sola Agents lor the sale of

SALE

Corn Sheller &

Belknap

Cloth, Imper
Reps Coburgs, &c.,&c.

Shirtings, Flannels, Rob Roy?, Casslmeres.Repellants
Cottonades, Domestics, Boys’ Checks, Sulloways,

HOODS COMMISSION MKBCHAm

able investment.

GEORGE Y.

Dress Good4,3-4 and 6-4 Roubaix
ial Chines, Alpacas,

PEABODY,

manufacture of 600

AGENTS FOR THE

Otis

134 & 13fl DUAVE STREET.

JENKINS, VAILL

Co.,

94 Franklin Street. New
York,
14o Devonshire street. Boston.

Manufactured in this Country offered for Sale
by
C. A. AUFFMORDT Sc
CO.,

complete and substantial structure; is situated
on the Potomac
river, with depth of water sufficient for
any class vessel to come alongside of the property.
The machinery consists of twelve
pairs of 44 feet
burrs, with cleaning and bolting appurtenances for the

\-

John S. 8c

QUA LIT IT OP

Black Gros

capitalists,

either for
milling- or manufacturing purposes.
The building is of brick, four stories and two atticst
It covers an area of 120x120 feet, and
in every respcc.

Dry Goods.

Silks.

OR

a

[October 16, 1869.

WOOSTER STREET.

BETWEEN PBINOE

AND [ HOUSTON

NEW 10

STUN

Baggage-masters accompany baggage

through, ancattend to ladles and children
without male protere
tors. Baggage received on the
dock the day befo r8

sailing, from steamboats, railroads, and
passengeed
who prefer to send them down
early. An experierc
surgeon on board. Medicine and attendance free.
For passage ticketB or lurther information
apply
the Company’s ticket
office, on the wharf, foot
Canal.street, North River, New York.
-

F# R* BABY, Agent,

October 23, 1869.]

THE

Finanoial.

Page, Richardson

■UNKEBIS,

70

STREET, NEW YORK.

Bills of

Exchange, Governments, Bonds
Gold, Commercial Paper, and all Negotiable

Interest allowed
r

on

Check.

Advances made

Deposits subject to Sight Drat

approved securities.
Special facilities for negotiating Commercial Paper.
Collect* ins both inlina and foreign
promptly made.
Foreign and Dome 3 tic Loans Negotiated.
on

Edward C.

Exchange,

Tlie City
AND

Gilmore, Dunlap 6c Co.,
108

and Commercial and Travelers’

Bank,

Sc

Dealers in

)

points and remitted lor
CHECKS

Street, Boston,

Galon 6c

Co,,

Liverpool.

E

HEARD

P. Hayden.

A

& Co.

BRJAD ST.

DRAW IN ELMS TO SUIT
the principal cities of
Germany. Switzerland,
.ngland, France, Svreden, Norway, Holland, Bel¬
gium, Russia, Italy, Spain, Denmark, &c.
Asue Letters of ired It for

Travelers,
available in all parts of Europe. -

Farmer, Hatch 6c Co.,
BANKERS
6c

78

BROADWAY AND

BROKERS,

Accounts of Banks and Bankers received.
Collec¬
tions made in the United
States, British Provinces and

Europe.

Exchange drawn

E. J. Fabmbb & Co.,

on

Milwaukee, Wis.

Levy 6c Borg,

.

M Iscellaneous

No. 41 PINE

STR..ET, NEW

In connection with the Manhattan

Memphis, Tenn.

Swan &

Savings Bank

BROKERS,

STREET, NEW YORK,

Government Securities. Stocks, Bonds and
Gold
Bought and sold on commission.
Otis D. Swan, Geo. P.
Payson, Wm. S.
Of the New York Stock

Alexander,Jr.
Exchange.

Blake
62

Brothers & Co.,

Wall Street. New York*
AND

28

STATE

STREET,

BOSTON,

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.
And

Oberge,

General

a

Banking, Collection, and Exchange

L. A.

WALNUT STREET,

Benoist 6c

Co.,

BANKERS,

CHAS. H. OBERGE

ST.

LOUIS, MISSOURI.

on all the principal
of the United States and Canadas. Also

Southern Bankers.

Drafts

Washington.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF XVASI1-

on

cities

L<’iitfoo and Paris for Sale.

NATIONAL BANK OF THE
OF MISSOURI.

STATE

in St. Louis.

INGToN.
H. 1). COOKE (of
Jay Cooke & Co.,) President.
WM. S. HUNTINGTON, Cashier.

ESTABLISHED 1837.

Government Depository and Financial
Agent of the United Stutes
We buy and Sell all classes of

Capital paid In
This
is

Government Securities
of the most favorable
terms, and give especial atlenaou to

as a National Bank

now prepared to do a
general banking business.
Government Securities, Coin, Gold Dust and Bullion
bought and sold at current rate9.

Special attention

Siven to collections Pres. (.’has.the Dick
H. Britton, throughout K. west
ames

Edward P. Curtis Cashier

Full information with
regard to Government Loans
cheerfully furnished.

at all times

S3,410,300

...

Bank, having reorganized

Business connected with the
several
Department oi't be Government.

Sam’l A.

NATION AG

Stock

Freedman’s Savings Bank

on

Bond

SAINT

Broker#,

STREET,
LOUIS, MO.

CHARTERED BY CONGRESS IN 1865,

Office

Wasbiugtoif,

at

W.

D.O.j

M.

BRANCHES AT

Baltimore, Norfolk, Richmond, New Berne, Wil
mington, Raleigh, Charleston, Beaufort, Augusta,
(Ga.), Savannah, Macon, Jacksonville, Tallana'se,
Mobile, Huntsville, New Orleans,
Vicksburg, Mem*
Chattanooga, Louisville,
lardnsburg, New York and Washington. St. Louis
Collections promptly made.
These Banks are tor the Colored

people.

Deposits are now
$1,250,000.
D. L. EATON,
Actuary.
J. W. ALVORD, Pres’t.
JAY COOKE & CO., New York
Correspondent.

F.

STOCK

Hewson,

BMOKER,

Office No. 21 West Third street,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Refer to: All Cincinnati
Banks, and Messrs. LOCKWOOD & Co., New York.

DEALERS IN COMMERCIAL PAPER.
Buy
Sell Massachusetts and New York
State

Stocks.
Government Securities, Stocks
Bonds, and Gold,
bought and sold strictly on Commission.

Morton, Galt 6c Co.,
BANKERS,
150 West Main Street,
Louisville, Kv., dealers in
Foreign and Domestic Exchange, Government Bonds
and all

Local Securities. Give
prompt attention to
collections and orders lor investment of funds.

Lancaster 6c Co.,

BANKERS

A\D
CHANGE

No. 1113 Main

STOrK

AND

LANCASTER,
ROB T a.

MAURY

BROWN 6c CO
STREET, NEW YORK.

JAS. L. MABRY.

-

ROB’T

&

BROKERS,

T.

Deposits

accessible

on

Bank*

TITUSVILLE, PENN.,
-----

Deposited with U. S. Treasurer

RROOXK.

Deposits

G. C. HYDE, Cashier.

o

$200,000

secure

500,060.

Circulation

CHAS. HYDE, Pres’t.

Co.,

commission.

received and Collections made
points in the United States.

V. I.

PA.

Second National
Capital

,

Sterling Exchange, Gold RICHMOND, VA.
and Silver,
State, City and Railroad Bonds and Banl Notes.
Stocks &c.t
ocuight and sold

BANKER*.
PITTSBURGH

and

R. H. Maury 6c
BANKERS

*

Va.

Sc

CO.,
STREET, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND.

No. 23 NASSAU

McClean 6c Co.,

EX¬

BROKERS,
Street, Richmond,

BROWN, LANCASTER
No. SO SOUTH

S.
-

No. 1014 MAIN ST.

Sterling Credit*,

Correspondent, YERMILYE

on

J. M.

Weith,

J. M. Weith 6c Arents,
Late J. M. Weith &

all

& CO.

Geo. Abents

Co.,

DEALERS IN SOUTHERN AND MIS¬
CELLANEOUS S*CI

R.TIES,

J. L. BROKER
Levy,

The Tradesmens

STOCK

No.

NEW STREET.

Loans Negotiated*

AND

NATIONAL
291

Fanshawe,
Exchange Dealer, Lounsbery 6cBROKERS,
STREET,

BANK*

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.




29

RICHARD BERRY, President

-

Cashier"

BANKERS A

CiRONbELET

$
ANTHONY HALSEY

8

Gaylord 6c Co.,

and

NO. 323 NORTH THIRD

O

The

K.

Payson,

BANKERS AND
SO WALL

Securities

YO

STREET,

Shis, Nashville,

dealers in

Southern and

HIGH

Buy and Sell Exchange

Ceutral

London, Paris, &c.
‘

&

J. BELL AUSTIN.

C. J. Hatch & Co..

Cleveland, O.

S.

COLUMliUS, OHIO,

Do

PHILADELPHIA,

5 & 7 NEW STREET.

Stocks, Bonds and Gold bought and sold
exclusively
on commission.

Bills of

13

Commission Stock Brokers.

85 BRUIIL.

W. B. Haydbn.

business.

Austin

London.

BANKERS'
York,
Leipzig, Saxony,
AND

New

PARIS

BANKERS,

Philadelphia Bankers.

Alex. S. Petrie 6c Co.*

Knauth, Nachod 6cKuhne

AND

Hayden, Hutcheson &Co

AND JAPAN.
consignments of approved mer
chandize.

on

313

Advances made on consignments to oar
Correspon¬
dents, and orders for the purchase of Merchandise,
Stocks and Bonds, executed by Cable or Mail.
Travelers’ and Commercial Credits issued, available
n all parts of
Europe, &c.

LONDON

Jos. Hutcheson.

CO..

NO.

New York.

4

day of payment.

FOR SALE

OF CHINA

Advances made

Williams&Guion,
Street,

ON

on

xGENTS FOR

and Securities.

71 Wall

of

COLLECTIONS MADE at all accessible

Everett 6c Co.,
AUGUSTIN

Prompt attentior guaranteed.
Correspondents: Lawbenoe Bros.

GOLD, SILVER and all kinds

Co.,)

Circular Notes available for Travelers in
all parts of
Europe and the East.

tavannah, Ga.

New York

West Fourth Street,

GOVERNMENT BONDS.

J. PAR IS.

and

Merchant,

110

CINCINNATI, OHIO*

>LONjlK)N.

28 State

Sc

on

)

Marcuard, Andre

BANKER, FACTOR AND

Special attention given to consignments of Cotton.
Gold, Stocks, Bonds and Foreign and Domestic
Exchange, bought and sold.
Collections promptly remitted for
Orders solicited tor the purchase oi bales of Produce

6c Co.,

Robert Benson Sc
Co,,)
Munron Sc Co.

Anderson, Jr.

Commission

Western Bankers.

BANKERS,
State Street, Boston.
Credits issued

Dealers In Bills of
Stocks.

541

Boston Bankers.

SOUTTER & Co.,
NO. 53 WILLIAM

CHRONICLE.

No

NEW ORLEANS.

General Prrtner...
Partner In Commendum

collection* made

J. L. Levy.
E. J. Habt.
on all points*

8

WALL

STREET, NEW

YORK.

Government Securities,
Geld and Foreign
BI0SLB

P.

L0UN8BBBY,

Exchange*

WILLIAM 8, FANSHAWB

tfME' CHRONICLE.
Insurance.

Miscellaneous,

Fire Insurance

Kountze,

NO.

WALL

62

52 Wall Street. New York,

Deposits received from Banks and Individuals, sub

No* 4 Wall

Atlantic

Comp’y,

Mutual Insurance Co.,

HARTFORD* CONN*
Cash

$3,000,000 00
....$6,150,931 71

Capital

& Son,

NEW YORK, JANUARY 96, 1869.
The Trustees, in conformity to the Charter of the
C mpany, submit the following statement
affairs on the 31st December, 1868:

Springfield
FIRE Sc MARINE

Street, New York.

Premiums received

INSURANCE

CO.,

irom 1st

4600,000 00
4901,667 11

Premiums

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
Execute orders at the New York Stock, Government

and Gold Exchanges, In person, and transact a Gen
eral Banking. Exchange, and Brokerage Business.

Munroe
AMERICAN

&

Cash Capital
Assets

Cash

PARIS,

$200,000 00

I'SURtNCE
OF

DUBLIN, PARIS, BREMEN,
BERLIN,
FRANKFORT-ON-THEM AIN, VIENNA, etc.
STOCKS, BONDS and GOLD BOUGHT AND SOLD

on

North

DeFreitas

8c

Government Securities,

Gold, Stocks and Bonds,
bought and sold exclusively on Commission at the
New York stock Exchange.
Cashier

LETTERS OF CREDIT

$1,383,230 61

The

Company has the following

Mechanics.

FOR TRAV¬

stock, city bank and other stock*... $7,8$7,4&B
by stocks and other¬
wise
".
......\ 3,214,100
Real estate and bonds and mortgages
210,000
Interest, and sundry notes and claims
due the Company, estimated at
290,530

.•

James G. King’s Sons,

Cash

$500,000 00
245,911 93

Capital and Surplus, JuljrJLst,

Insures Property against Loss or Damage by Fire at
he usual rates.
Policies Issued and Losses paid at the office of the
Company, or at its various Agencies in the principal

cities In the United States.

Foreign

Bar Iron,

F

H.

Caktbb, Secretary.

F. Gbiswold, General Agent.

Queen Fire Insurance Co
OF I.IVERPOOL AND LONDON.
£2,000,000 Stg.
1,893,226
$1,432,840

*p<-clal Fund of $200 000

Deposited in the Insurance Department at Albany.
United States Branch, No. 117 Broadway, N. Y
GEORGE ADLARD, Manager
William H.

.

The outstanding certificates of tbe Issue of
1805 will be redeemed and paid to the hold¬

thereof, or their legal representatives, on snl
Tuesday the Second of February
next, from which date all interest thereon wf i
cease.
The certificates to be produced at the tU «
of payment and canceled.
ers

A Dividend of Forty
Per Gent Is
declared on the net earned premiums
of the Company, for the year ending 81 at
December 1848, for which certificates will tot

issued

on

and after

Tuesday, the Sixth ot April

next.

By order of the Board,
J. H.

CHAPMAN,

Ross, Secretary.

Secretary,

ULSTER IRON.
In lots to suit purchasers,

North British

Sc

CO.,

Eglesto:., Battell & Co.,
166 SOUTH STREET, NEW YORK.

Norway and Swedes Iron

Mercantile Insurance Co
OF

LONDON

fI

50 WILLIAM STREET,
CHAS. E.

Latham,

Stationers,

T. C. SCHUMANN,
*

INSURANCE (JOMI'ANV

OF HARTFORD, CONN.

Capital and 8urplu« $2,000 000.
Geo. M. Coit, Sec’y.

Eureka Self Binder*

Gko. L. Ch.ise, Pres’t

FIRE INSURANCE.
HARTFORD,/CONN.

CO.,
7
Capital and Surplus $1,400,000*

PHOENIX

OF

D. W. C. Sxilton, Sec’y.
P. W. LATHAM.

W. S. H. Moore,
Henry Coit,
Wm. 0. Pickersgilt,
Lewis Curtis,
Charles H. Bussell,
Lowell Holbrook,
R. Warren Westou,
Royal Phelps,

Losses promptly
~

Gaillard, Jr,

C. A. Hand,
James Low,

•

B. J.

Howland,
Benj. Babcock,

Robert B. Mintura,
Gordon W. Burnham
Frederick Chauncey
R L.

Taylor,

Geo S.

Stephenson,

William H. Webb,

A. P. Pillot,
William E. Dodge,

Paul Spofford,

•

Sheppard Gandy,
Francis Skiddy,

James Bryoo,
Daniel S. Hiller.

Charles P. Burdett,

Wm.

Sturgis,
Henry K. Bogert.

Samuel G. Ward,

WilliamB. Beater,

Dennis Perkins.

Samuel L. XfitCbsH,

Robert O.

Fergasaoq

James Q. De Forest.

.

H. Kellogg, Pres

adjuated.by the Agents here* andpald
In current money.

WHITE ALLYN 4c CO., Agents,
NO. 50 WILLIAM STREET.

J oseph

Caleb Barstow,

David Lane.

Proprietors and Manufacturers of

The Celebrated




„

WHITE, Assistant Manager.

Hartford

BROADWAY,

Nsw Yosc.

NEW YC i JLj

C.^ALLYN^’} A8R°cIate Mam * jrs

\"***^

FIRE

DEY STREET, NEAR

F

UNITED STATES BRANCH OFFICE,

description of bar and Sheet Steel.

18

EDINBURGH.

$14,044,635 31 IN GOLD,
tf

offer for sale at 91 and 93 John street, New York
and 133 and 185 Federal street, Boston.
They have also in stock their usual supply of every

Manufacturing

AND

PAID UP CAPITAL AND ACCUMULATED FUN

SONS,

Importers of Norway A Swedes Iron. Including
UB, A£B, SF, and other brands, which they

trustees:

J. D. Jones,
Charles Dennis,

AND

Successors to

&

~"ra;

Six per cent Interest on the outstand¬
ing certificates of profits uvtll be paid
to the holders thereof or their legal representative
on and after Tuesday the Second d
February next,

THE

Schumann

—-■...

■ ■

Including all the usual sizes and shapes ot

WM. JE SOP &

■

.$18,660,881 86

after

Authorized Capital. ..;
Subscribed Capital
Paid up Capital and Surplus

EXTRA QUALITIES OF

;

60
Qy

1868, 4745,911 93.

64 William Street.

BROTHERS

36

42
3,958,267 56
405,548 86

,

Total amount of assets

THIRD

JAMES W. OTIS, President.
R. W. BLEECKER, Vice Pres

SIGHT DRAFTS ON EDINBURGH & GLASGOW
STOCKS AND BONDS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.

E6LE8TUV

as¬

sets, viz.:

BROADWAY,

.<?

ELLERS.

&

Co.,

Cash Capital

EXCHANGE ON LONDON AND PARIS.

American

$3,081,080 49

*

Surplus

,

period....,

1S68... $6,807,97$ 81

Premium notes and bills receivable
Cash in bank ..r........r:...,\r.

INCORPORATED 1823.

Brokers, 17 Broad St*

1 terest allowed ou Deposits.
Refer to WM. H. COX, Esq
National Ban1’

ary, 1868, to 31st December,
Losses paid during the

Loans secured

Fire

BRANCH OFFICE 9 COOPER INSTITUTE
AVENUE.

Rathborne,
Bankers and

114

upon

nor upon

United States and State of New York

INSURANCE.

American

OFFICE

risks;

expenses

$324 345 60

Insurance

COLLECTIONS made in all parts of Europe.

policies have been issued

■

$9,845,973 11

Premiums marked off from 1st Janu¬

$201,000 00

FIRE

COMMISSION.

White,

2,563,003 81

fire risks disconnected with marine risks.

PROVIDENCE, R. I.

IAS. A. ALEXANDER, Agent.

YORK.

and

1868

Reports of premiums and

Sight and Time Bills on LONDON. LIVERPOOL,

EDINBURGH
HAMBURG,

No

same

COMPANY,

Cash Capital
Assets

BANKERS.
NEW

$6,782,969 89

.

Policies not marked off

Total amount of marine premiums....

life

American

NEW YORK.
Issue Clicular Letters of Credit for Travellers In all
parts of Europe, etc., etc. Exchange on Paris.

STREET,

.

on

1st January,

.

$392*426 62

...v

NO. 8 WALL STREET,

NASSAU

COMPANY,

Capital,

Assets.

Stoker, Taylor & Co.,

Marine Bisks,

ou

1868. .7..

OF PROVIDENCE. R. I.

BANKERS.

John Munroe & Co.,

21

Washington

INSURANCE

of its

January, 1868, to 81st Dec*

..."

Providence

Co.,

NO. 7 RUE SCRIBE,

OFFICE OF THB

STREET.

i£tna Insurance
Assets

Hardy

/

Agency,

NEW YORK.

ect to check at sight, and Interest allowed thereon at
FOUR PICK CENT per annum.
Collections made throughout the United States, the
British Provinces and Europe.
Governments Securities bought and soid.

H. C.

Insurance

i

BANKING HOUSE OF

Luther

[October 23, 1869.

,

542

JOHN D.

JONES, President.

CH.t R LES

DENNIS, Vhe-PredMeor/L

w* h» ir. j. ooBE)

J. D. HEWLETT,

asu vice-Prc

3d Vie'

October 23, I860.]

tttE ofliiotfidiift

PRICES CURRENT.

Oil lemon
.

'

August 14.

ASHES-

BEESWAX—

* 100

7

American yellow
V ft
BONES—
Rio Grande shin..V ton

41

©

....

BRICKS—
Common hard........ V M 9 00©
Crotoni
18 00© 20 00
Philadelphia fronts
40 00@ 42 00
BUTTER AND CHEESE—
Butter—
•

Creamery pails
State firkins, prime

50
40
86
40

State, firkins....
State, half-firkins, choice.
State, half-firkins, ordin’y
Welsh tubs, prime..
Welsh tubs, ordinary
Western, prime
Western, fair
Penn., dairy, prime
Penn., dairy, good

@ 55
© 42
© S3
© 43
@ 86
© 89
© 35
@ 32
® 28
@ 80
@ 27

28
87

29
30
26

28
25

* ft

Factory fair
Farm
Farm
Farm

dairies, prime
dairies, fair
dairies, common

50"

Skimmed
CANDLES—
Refined sperm,

Sperm, patent

dry

ex.

44

45

14

gold 17 00@

city

© 48
@58
© 27
© 21

56
25

Adamantine

20

Rosendale

* ft

COAL—

2 00©

Limawood

Sheathing,

Bolts

10>$@

....

@

Braziers’

88

Sheathing, &c., old
Sheathing, yellow metal

20

Bolts, yellow metal
Pig, Chile
American ingot

33
85
21
27
27
....

22k@ 23

CORKS—
1st
do
1st

32

©
@
@
©
©
©

Mineral
Phial v.

50

Calcutta, light & h’vy,

45

Balsam tolu
Balsam Peru...,
Bark petayo

3 50

Berries, Persian....gold

Biearb.soda,N’castfe“

Bi chromate potash

27

8 75

Bleaching powder
Borax, refined
Brimstone,cru. *ton gld45
Brimstone, Am. roll * ft
Brimstone, flor sulphur.
Camphor,
crude
(in
bond)...

....gold

Camphor, refined

©

S*$@
85

21

Carb, ammonia, in bulk.

Cardamoms,

Castor oil

@
©

00
8^@
4fc@
78

Cantharides.......

©
©
© 1
@4
@
©
©

19
Malabar... 3 25

Caustic soda

“

Carraway seed

Coriander seed

81
....

14}$

@
@

30
4X@
17*®

....

American undressed

Italian
Manila
Sisal

....

Ginseng,West
Ginseng,Southern
Gum Arabic, picked....
Gum Arabic, sorts
Gum benzoin,
Gum kowrie

Gumgedda

gold

Gumaamar
Gum myrrh, East India..
Gum myrrh, Turkey....
Gum Senegal
Gum

Gum

tragacanth. sorts.,

@
@
@
@
88 ©
...,@
40 @
55 @
55 ©
©
65 @

Licorice paste, Sicily...

Licorice paste, Greek...

Madder, Dutch

Matamoras

Oil cassia

Oil bergamot




“
“

Truxlllo

“

Rio Hache,
Curacoa ..V
Port an Platt

4
14

“

Bahia......

6}$

©

4}$@

5>$

“

21}$@

21 ©
....@

20}$@
18}$@
16
16
18

17
18
16
15

20}$@

gold.
“

Maranham

“

Pernambuco
Bahia
Matamoras
Maracaibo.... ,5
Savanilla

89
15
46

“
“

16
19

....

19

18}$
18

14}$

is*
17

if*

12>$@ i3}$
12}$@ 13>$
11}$©
12}$

Gambia and Bissau
Zanzibar.;
East India Stock—

14

12

28 }$@
19 @
80

24

city sit. ft lb gold

Calcutta, dead

@
©
@

^

@
©

....©

green....
Calcutta, buffalo.... ft ft
Manilla & Bat. buff., ft ft
'
HONEY—

13}$@

Cuba(duty p’d) goldftgall.

11

©
©

HORNS-

6 37>$# 6 75

Ox, Rio Grande

...

Ox, American

...4x6,
bds,
bds,

‘r

Copper
Yellow

@
@
@
@
@
@

88
metal

27
18

Zinc

NAVAL STORESTurpentine, soft ..ft 280 ft 8 50

Tar, N. County
ft bbl.
Tar, Wilmington
Pitch, city
Spirits turpentine.ft gall.
Rosin, common...ft 280 ft
“

“
“

strained

pale
extra

2

...

...

@2
@4
@5
@9
@

4 50
6 00

pale

...

30
40

@3
75 @3
87}$@3
75 @2
48 @
10 @2
25 @2

2
2 35
3 00

No. 2
No. 1

OAKUM
OIL CAKE-

3
2
2

...

ft n>

8

75
90
CO
80
48}$
20
80
75
25
50
00
11

City thin, obi., inbbls.ft ton.40 00@
in bags
@50 00
West, thin, obl’g, in bags. ..47 00@47 50
“

...

“

Olive, Mars’es, qte (currenejo ft case 5 00 @6 00
Olive, In casks.... ft gall. 1 47}$@ r..
Palm
Ip ft 10}$@
Linseed, city
ft gall.
96 © 98
Whale, crude Northern.. 1 10 @—
Whale, bleached
1 12}$@1 15
Sperm, crude
175 @....
Sperm, winter bleached. 1 98 @2 00
Lard oil, prime
1 45 @1 55
Red oil, efty diet., Elain
@ 90
Red oil, saponified
@
Bank
© 72}$
....

Straits

ft ft

Lead, white, Amer.,pure
in oil.

Lead, white, Amer.,pure
dry.

Zinc, white, American,
dry, No. 1.
Zinc, white, American,

@
©

85

10}$@

40

11

10}$@

11

....

©

13

....

©

11}$

8

©

9

@

8
275

32
26

\l*
MX

90
88
90
82

^Bargtea^American*.ft ft

8

21

•

Crude, 40©47grav.ft gall.

©
9
@300

::Hw

i bond, prime L.
g. to W. (110@115 test)

-

2}$
24}$

@

Standard vmtt..... 38}$@

ft ft

13
Timothy,reaped.ftbush. 4 25
Canary
* bush. 4 25

88}$

4*

13}$

@
©
© 5
© 2
@
© 2
© 2

....

Hemp, foreign

Llns’d Am. rough.* bus. 2 40
Lins’d Calc’a, Bost’n, g'd
Lins’d Calc’a, N. Y’k, “
gJLJ£
*

25

10

....

17}$
15

Taysaams, re-rld,

No 1,2.8

Canton,re-rld,fair to

ex

7 26© 9 00
do 6 25© 6 80

g^aj)ai^ medium to super’r. 8 00@11 25
Plates, for’n. * 100 * gold 6 25 @6 37}$
Plates, domestic.....* ft
9 © 12
SPICES—See special report.
SPIRITS—

Brandy—
* gall.
Otard, Dupuy A Co..gold. 5 5C@18 I00
Pinet, CastUIon & Co “
5 50@17 00

Hennessy

“

Marett & Co
Leger Freres
Other foreign brands
Rum—Jam., 4th proof.
St. Croix, 8d proof...
Gin, different brands

8

5 50©18 00

“
“

5
5

“
“

5
4
8
3

“
“

.

60@10
50@10
0O©18
50© 4
50© 3
00© 6

00
00
00
75
75
50

Domestic liquors—Cash.
Brandy, gin & pure sp’ts In b 1 85© 1 45
Rum, pure
1 85© 1 45
Whiskey
1 20© l 21
STEEL•

English, cast
English, spring
English blister
English machinery
English German

* ft

18
9

S*
15

11}$@
12}$©
14

American blister
American cast
Tool.
American spring....
American machinery '*
American German..
“

16

©

10}$© 16
©

%

10

19
13
13

©

10

SUGAR—See special report.

TALLO W—

23

©
©

13

■

American, prime, country
and city..* ft
TEAS—See special report.
TIN—
Banca
Straits

11)$@

* ft,gold
j...

* gall.

Six

8 62}$

7 87X
$ oo
8 25

3 50© 7 00

Port

2

Burgundy port

00© 8
85© 1
2 25© 8
1 00© 1
90© 1

gold

Lisbon

“

Sicily, Madeira
Red, Span. & Sicily...
Marseilles Madeira...

“

“
“
“
“
“
**
“

Marseilles port

Malaga, dry

Malaga, sweet

Claret
Claret.
WOOL—

*

88 ©
32 H©

*«

English
“
....©
Plates, char. I. C..* box 8 87}$©
Plates, I. C. coke
6 75 ©
Plates, Terne charcoal
@
Plates, Terne coke
7 87}$©
TOBACCO—See special report.
Madeira

11V

* cask

* doz.

'

1
1
85
2

70©
80© 1
00© 1
10© 1
00@60
60© 9

Amer,, Saxony fleece.* ft
Amer., full blood merino.

©
©
©
©

Amer., }$ and \ merino
Amer,, native & }$ merino
Amer., combing domestic
..

Extra, pulled
Superfine, pulled

40
£2
87

50

25
50

25
00
85
60
25
25
00
00

60
56
50

52:

%%
©

46

No. 1, pulled
© 40
California, fine, unwashed 28
California, medium,”
a
California, common,"
Valparaiso,
"
South Am., merino, “
82 @ 85
South Am., mestiza, “
27 © 83
South Am., creole, M
18
South Am., Cord’a, wash, 27 © 21
97 © 31
Cape G. Hope, unwashed.. 88 © 40

I £

Its

80

Texas, fine
Texas, ipedium
Texas, coarse

* ft
n>

11 v@

***

s.

10

4

d.

Wheat..b. Ab. 0 10 @.r..
@7 0

Beef .*...* tee.

Pork...-..*bbl
To Have* 1
Cotton
Tobacco....

®3*$>

by sail,

■

f

„...* ft
* hbd. 8 00"

Tallpw

ft

Lard...;'....;;

Measurementgoods.*'tdn’.10 06’
Petroleum

6 00 ©

ToMxLBOu*irx.-.*fbot. ff28 © *“*
To Sam Fbamoisoo,
by clipperT\
**

Measurement goods. *ft. (Tjo © 0
40
Heavy goods, r*...... v* ft-^
x©
v
,ft keg. 0 50 © 0 55
Petsolsum..* c.of
0 5fl ©0 55
R’rosd iron. * ton

•Nails...........
Coal

'

© 45
17 © 20
go © 85
28 © 82 ;
20 © 23

C’n,b*b.f*bti.
s

©

_

©

4>$@

.

..T.®

....

gold

....

25

Vermillion, Amerr. com,
Venet.red (NTC,) ft owt, 2 85
Carmine, city made, ft ft 18 00
Plumbago................
China clay
ft ton.28 00 ©29 00
Chalk.-..;....;1.....1.* lb
@
\%
Chalk, block
ft ton.23 00 ©34 00
....

7

Nitrate soda
SEED—
Clover

,—STEAM.—,
To Liverpool : s. d.
s. d.
Cotton
* lb
® x
Flour—* bbl 8 0 ©....
H. goods * ton 85 0 @40
0
Oil.r...
©50 0

....

it $

Crude

FREIGHTS-

95
90
95
27
T5
©16 00
© -- 6

....

Llv’p’l fine. Worthingt’s 2 50 @256
SALTPETREReflned, pure
ft ft
15}$@

16

@
©
@
@
© 3

48
©
@
45
@ 1 85
@ 2 50

44

11^
2}$

326

47

ft bush.

ZINCSheet

10

9 26
5 75

8 00

..

12

Chrome, yellow, dry....
15 © 85
Whiting, Amer..ft 100 ft 1 87}$@ 2 00

Vermillion,China...ft ft
Vermillion, Trieste
Vermillion, Calcutta....

ft 100 ft 8 00

East India, washed
Mexican, unwashed

8}$

19

S*

17

Tsatlee.No.2,4 & 5..* 1b. 8 25©10 50
Tsatiee,re-rld,No. 1,2, & 3 9 25@10 50

25
22©
26
28©
81®
do 2 in.
*50
35©
20
strips, 2x4
18©
“
.per m. ft., is oo@ 2100
MOLASSES—See special report.

ft 100 ft4 75
Clinch
<;
6 25
Horse shoe, fd (6d.)..ft ft 26

©25 00

14«gi

SALTTurks Islands
Cadiz

....©

Cut, 4d.@60d.

18 00
17

In bond

00

NAILS—

ft ft

Rangoon, dressed. .gold 5 25

Spruce
“
plkl}$in.
“

-

ft C,

80

White pine box boards
23
„Wh. pine merch. box b’ds. 27
Clear pine
60
Laths:
ft M. 2

_

©3 12}$

45

Paris white. No. 1

1

Crop of 1868..-..
* ft
do 1889 (good to prime)
Bavarian*...

Oak and ash

Span.bro.,gr’dfnoll.f»ft
24
20
40

Beef hams
Hams
Shoulders
Lard
RICE—
Carolina

Tsatlee, usual
© 7 25
Taysaams, usual, No. 1 &2 8 50© 9 00
’'aysaam,No.8and4
7 00@ 7 25

25
00
00
00
50
00© 80 00
00® 60 00
00® 45 00
00© 27 00
00@ 80 00
00© 70 00
85©
©

Zinc, white, French, dry 11}$@
IS @
Zinc, wh.. French, in oil
2 ©
Ochre, yel., French, dry
Ochre, “ground, in oil
8 w
*
@
Spanish bro., dry.ft 100 ft 1 00 @ 1

....©

HOPS—

13
10

70

.

Maple and birch

No. 1, in oil.

U}$@
11>$@
11}$@

9
10

Cherry boards and plank

Litharge, city
Lead, red, city

11>$@

cur.

8©

Black walnut
ft M. ft. 80 00@ 80
Bl’k walnut, logs ft sup. ft.
8©
Bl’k wain, figur’d & blist’d
22© 1
Yel. pine tim., Geo.,f»M.ft. 82 00© 33
White oak, logs, ft cub. ft. 45 U0@ 50
White oak, plank, ft M. ft. 50 00@ 55
Pop.&W.Wrd,b’ds& pl’ks 45 00© 45

Paraffine, 28 & 30 gr. lubr.

16

g£

LUMBER-

PAINTS—

“

j

14

18}$

12

“
“

Bird’s-eye maple, logs ft ft.

,

....

1 65
1 75

.

@

15 ©
....©

“

OILS—

\lH
13

City sl’ter trim. & cured
Upper Leather Stock—
bJ A, & Rio gr. klpft ftgld
Minas
Sierra Leone.,
cash

Calcut.

21}$

21
21
20
17
17

“

California
Para
New Orleans

83
70

@

22

@
@

“

Wet Salted Hides—
Buenos Ayres..* 1b gold.
Rio Grande
“

....

@
©
@

12}$@

“

Chili

..

@

13}$@

cur.

Payta

29}$

@

17}$@

“
“

Texas...*
Western

85

©
@

17}$@

Dry Salted Hides—

....

©

Manna, large flaks .v
Manna, small flake...,.,
Mustard seed, Cal...,

“
“

Porto Cabello
Maracaibo

....

11 @
....©
2 00@
95 ©
9 ©

“

Tampico
Bogota

25

81

“
“

Vera Cruz

....

29

“
“

San Juan

90
80
2

©

gold

Madder, Fry EXF.F. “

t

24

“
“

85
25
20

...

....©

“

7}$@

Ayres.. ft lb gold

poor

@

Rockland, common.ft bbl.
Rockland, heavy

a*
8

gold

,

Buenos

....

20 @

14

LIME—

“

11}$@

Montevideo
Rio Grande
Orinoco...
California

....

Lledtfcepaste, Sp., solid

....

Dry HideB—

25
81
5

tragacanth, w,
flakey
.gold 1 12}$@ 1 37}$
Hyd. potash, Fr. and
Eng
gold 3 50 @ 3 70
iodine, resublimed.......
© 3 50
Ipecacuanha,Brazil
@275
Jalap, in bead,,....gold
60
75
Lac dye...4
* 80 © 45
Licorice paste, Calabria. 89 © 39}$

ft 1b

Jute
HIDES—

1 12 © l 15
70 @
72}$
80
50
29
70

10}$

250 00@
gold.270 00@

Tampico

....

....

Gamboge

.

80
30

©

Russia, clean

Slowers, benzoin.,¥oz. 80 J$@ 60
ambler
gold
8 ©
*

....
....

1b for shipping
..@ 65
HEMP—
American dressed, .ftton.260 00@800 00

12

©
Cochineal, Hondur..gold 80 @
Cochineal,Mexican. “
....©
Copperas, American
1
Cream tartar, pr ...gold
80 @
Cubebs, East India.
28 @
Cutoh
6 ©
Epsom salts..,.
@
Exrtact logwood
.©
Fennell seed....,10 @

....

North River, in bales ft 100

@

22

22}$@

16}$

HA^-

46 00

28
©
79
@ 1 65
20
@
© 3 50

15ft©

Rio Grande, mix’d,V 1b gold 29 ©
Buenos Ayres, mixed. “
28}$@
Hog,Western, unwash.cur. 10 @

....

@

38

Chamomile flowers, * ft
Chlorate potash ....gold

60
25
50
45

p. c.

Snorting, in 1 ft canis’trs.fl ft 86© 1 08

47}$

light....

rough
good damaged

“

GUNPOWDER—
Blasting (B).... $1 25 1b keg. 4 00®
Shipping and mining
4 50©
6 50®
Kentucky rifle
Meal
6 00@
Deer
5 50©

....

..

“

“

Hemlock...8x4,per piece

yard

GUNNY CLOTH—
Calcutta standard

....

Assafoetida
Balsam caplvl

none

GUNNY BAGS-

12
40
COTTON—See special report.
DRUGS AND DYESAlcohol, 96 per cent
2 35 © 2 40
Aloes, Cape
* lb
17 ©
19
Aloes, Socotrine
75
@
Alum.,.;
3}$©
Annato, good to prime .
50 @ 85
Antimony, reg. of...gold
.@
12}$
Argols, crude
@
12}$
ArgolS,refined
gold 26 ®
Arsenic, powdered. “
2}$@
2%
...

-

“

“

40®
5 00@ 7 00

80
30
26
29
29

«

11

50# @ 5 00

....

81
81
31
28
31
31
28
30
80
40
28
23

26}$@

middle
light..
Orinoco, heavy
middle.
“

“

GROCERIES—See special report.

70

@
@

“

“

“

24 00@25 00
@
21 00@2S 00
12 50@13 00
@
@12 50
13 00@14 00
8 00@ 9 00
24 00@25 00
32 00@35 00
50©

FLAX—
North River
$ ft
FRUITS—See special report.

regular, quarts, * gro. 55 © 70
superfine
l 40 @1 70
regular, pints
85 @ 60

87}$
87}$
87}$

©
@
@

80
80

light...
California, heavy.

“

6 50® 7 25
5 00©
6 2o@ 6 5q

Mackerel, No. 1, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 1, Bay
Mackerel, No. 3, new
Mackerel, No. 2, Halifax
Mac’rel, No. 8, Mass.,large
Mackerel, shore, No. 2
Mac’rel, No. 8, Mass., med.
Salmon, pickled, No. 1
Salmon, pickled
ft tee.
Herring, scaled
f* box.
Herring, No. 1
Herring, pickled ....V bbl.

52}$

10}$@

ft bbl.4

PROVISION S—
Pork, new mess, .ft bbl.80 75 #81 00
Pork, old mess
©
Pork, prime mess
25 50
Pork, prime
28 50
Beef, plain mess
8 60 @18 00
Beef, extra mess
13 00 @17 00

....

@'45

28

Residuum

Liverpool, gr’nd.ft sack
Liv’pfifine,Ashton’s,g’d

42 @ 45
88 © 45

“

“

@ 40 CO

ft quint.
$ bbl.
ft bbl.

Pickled scale
Pickled cod
Mackerel, No. 1, shore

11}$

@

* ft

new

Dry cod

40

middle;

“

“

gold 26 00©

^Saganwood, Manila ..cur

27}$© 28

do

“

“

65 00©

cur.

Bar wood

15}$

....

St.Domlngodo

“

middle

“

light..
rough slaughter
Heml’k, B. A.,&c., heavy .

Logwood, Tabasco... “
@
Logwood, St. Domin.gold 20 00©
20 00©
Logwood, Jamaica

....

COFFEE.—See special report.
COPPER-

“

@ 16 00
@
....©
....©

“

....

....@

“

17 00©
15 00© 16 00

“
“

Logwood, Houduras.

9 50©....
Liverpool gas cannel
12 00@
Liverpool house cannel... 17 00@17 50
Anthracite,V ton of2,000 ft 8 50® 9 50

....

“

Logwood,Campeachy “

....

14}$@

Jamaica
Savanilla
Maracaibo

Logwood, Laguna

Newcastle gas,2,240ft

COCOA—
Caracas (bond) (gold) V ft
Maracaibo do
do
Guayaquil do
do

“

“

.

8

7
....

,-casli, ft ft—*
Oak, slaughter, heavy .... 40 @ 46
“
“
middle.... 88 ® 46
“
“
light
88 © 42
“
“
crop,heavy. 88 @ 42
“
«

72
62

....

Tampico

12

LEATHER—

11}$@

CEMENT-

English

Pipe and sheet

Fustic,
Fustic,
Fustic,
Fustic,

....

“-,6 50 @6
“ 6 63}$@6
net
@8
“
....@8

Bar

DUCK-

Ravens, light
V pce.15 00 ®
Ravens, heavy
17 00 ®
Scotch, G’ck.No. 1, * yd
@
Cotton,No. 1
“
@

....

gold.6 50 @6 62}$

German

12}$

16

®

ft 100 ft

Spanish

ii“

@

15

* ft

LEAD—
Galena

DYE WOODSCamwood —gold, ft ton. 150 00@
Fustic, Cuba. “
“
30 00©

6

Stearic

37X

10}$®

00@180 00
00@145 00
00©
00@
00@155 00
125 00@180 00
ft ft
8}$@
9}$

Nail, rod
Sheet, Russia
11 @
Sheet, sing., doub. & treb. 5}$@
Ralls, Eng. (gold) ..ft ton. 57 00©
Ralls, American
77 00©

45

2 89
8 10

120
120
120
120
100

Hoop

.

16*@ 17^
15 ® 16}$
16}$@ 17}$

...

Scroll
Ovals and half round
Band
Horseshoe
Rods, ft @3-16 inch

....

Tapioca
Verdigris, dry &
Vitriol, blue

....

—

12

2

89 00© 40 00
87 00© 88 00
S5 00@ 87 50
85 00@

Bar, Swedes, ordin.sizes.. 140 00©
Bar, Eng. & Amer., refined 95 00@100 00
Bar, Eng. A Amer.,com’n. 87 50© 90 00

‘iik

Napttoa, refin., 68-78grav.

86 50© 38 00

STORE PBIOXB.

1 80
SO

....

Factory prime

Pig, Scotch. No. 1..
Pig, American, No. 1
Pig, American, Nol 2
Bar, refined, Eng. A Amer.
Pig, American Forge

3 00
8

.

BREADSTUFFS—See special report.

r

00
00
75
21
90

77

Suicksilver J

@

OO :

4
6
3
8

©
85 ©
Phosphorus
Prussiate potash
34 ©
78 @
1 50 ©
hubarb, China
Sago, pearled
@
Salacratus.
©
Sal ammoniac, ref.
©
Sal soda, New‘le, ref.g’d
©
Sarsaparilla,H.,g’d,in b’d ....©
11 @
Sarsaparilla, Mex. “
Seneca root
30 ©
25 @
Senna, Alexandria
Senna, East India
20 ©
Shell lac
88 @
Soda ash (80 p. c.). .gold 2 25 ©
Sugar lead, w’e
“
©
Bulp. quinine, Am., V oz
©
Sulphate morphine, “
8 00 ©
Tartaric acid .gold * ft
50 @

7
40

...

8 75

6 75 ©
ermlnt, pure
OH vitriol
2 50 ©
Opium, Turkey. .gold. 8 50 ©

Oxalid acid

\

‘

1
...

The Duties on Foreign Imports were
pubashed in the Chronicle
trf

543

u..

Sjafl.

of2340*

12

©

0 @15

$

544

THE
Dry Goods.

IMPORTERS OF

STAPLE

AND

NO.

YORK,

Between Walker and Llspenard.

1

Bartholomew Home, opposite Bank

Frogs, and all other

TYRES,

Steel Material for

BENZON A
34 Old Broad Street,

CO.,

well

as

Old Ralls,

Correspondents In America:
Messrs. Jay Cooke & Co.; New York, Messrs. Jay
Cooke & Co., Washington, Messrs E. W. Clarke
A Co., Philadelphia, Mr. J. Edgar
Thomsow, Phila¬

Scrap Iron and Metals.

’S

Iron

Noe. 77 A 83

OUTSIDE LINE OF

delphia

Works,

Alia ad,

Wm. P.Cjdeand P. landlord
l,t00 Tons Each,

SAILING ON INTERMEDIATE DAYS.

From PIER 11

N.

R., at 5 P. M.

Connecting at Boston with Fitchburg, Boston and
Lowell, Boston and Maine and EasttmTiallroad, and
1 n New York with the Erie Railway. Freights taken
and through rates given to and from all points on the
above Roads and their connections. No charge lor
Whariarge In Boston.
WM. P. CLYDE,
Genl. Supt. and Agents Pier II N.R.
H. M. WHITNEY, Agent, Central Battery Wharfs,
'

'

•

S. W.
&

MANUFACTURERS OF CORDAGE
FOR EXPORT AND DOMESTIC USE.

Mum k Tifrljlielfr,

For Railroad Companies and Contractors in oonnec
tlon with the purchase and sale of both
Foreign and

American

Railroad Iron
AND

Street, New York.

Railroad Iron,
Street Rails and
Light
Rails for Mines.

152 FRONT STREET, NEW YORK

MEDITERRANEAN GOODS.

T

AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED

SPIKES.

Works, Philadelphia.

Manufacturers of Wrought Iron Tubes, Lap Welded
Boiler Flues, Gas WorkB Castings and Street

Mains, Artesian Well Pipes and Tools,
Gas and Steam Fitters’ Tools, &c.

SCHNITZER,

33 CENTRAL

WHARF,

IIOSTON.

15 GOLD

BALDWIN

Railroad Iron.

Wools of every descriptions
Gums
“
“

Opium and Persian Merries.
Canary and Hemp Seed,
Figs, Raisins, Boxwood,
Otto Moses, Ac

Cheapest and Best.

M. Baird

MATTHEW BAIED.

GEO. BUENHiM.

0HA8

T.PABBY

Thomas

292 PEARL 8TKEET, NEAR BEEKMAN STREET
NEW YORK

IRON.

IRON.

Rails,

currency for America, and in either currency or gold
(at the option of the buyer) for Foreign 1 when desir¬
ed, we will contract to supply roads with their

OLD BAILS IN TRADE FOB NEW
tarnished, receiving the difference in cash, and allow*
Ing the highest njarket price for their Old Ralls, and,
if necessary, receiving the latter after the
delivery of

Rails.

Orders for Foreign Ralls, both Steel and
Iron, vtl
be taken for trattauiisaion by Mall or
throngs the cable

HOUSE,

81 OLD BROAD BTBEET,
tar execution at a fixed price'In
Sterling or on com¬
mission at the current market price abroad when tbs
order is received in London; shipments to be made
at stated periods to ports in America asd at
tha low¬
est possible rates of freights. Address

Hopkins & Co.,

••A VI Broadway. New York*

Wire Rope.
STEEL, CHARCOAL and B. B., of the very best
quality, suitable for Ships. B‘gging, Suspension
Bridges. Guys, Derricks. Inclined Planes, Hoisting
purposes, Ac. A Large Stock constantly on hand at
JOHN W. MASON A CO.’S,

IRON

Iron Cotton Ties,

McGowan,

C O T TON

IRON BROKER.
7 3 WATER

U. States 2,000,000
4$ William St.

Bessemer Steel

of American and Foreign manufacture, rolled to
say
desired pattern and weight for Unial yard
and of
approved lengths. Oontr&cts for both IRON AND
STEEL RAILS will be made payable in United States

43 BROADWAY.

Wm. D.

AJfetsGold\ $ 17,690,3 90
AJfets in the

We are Mao prepared to rap*

J. Pope & Bro.
METALS.

Insurance.

The LiverpoolCf Lon¬
don & Globe Ins. Co.

prices.

S. W.

ARNOLD, Agents,
43 BROAD STREET.

or

LOUDON

cheap.

QUIN A




Co.,

All work accurately fitted to gauges and thorough
lv interchangeable. Plan, Material,
Workmanship,
Finish, and Efficiency lully guaranteed.

FOR BALING COTTON.

For sale very

6c

PHILADELPHIA.

BUTLER’S PA TEST COTTON TIES,

This Tie is made oi the best Belgian Iron, and re¬
vived the highest premium at the Louisiana State
Fair, for strength and simplicity.

REMOTE aelivery. at at theport SthSi
Canada and always any very lowest

United States

the New

WORKS.

Offer for sale

Liquorice Stick** and Paite.

We areal way s in a position to burnish all
sizes, pat.
terns and weight of rail for both steam and
horse
roads, and in any quantities desired either for TMMrRDIATK OR

ma?iIs'*ffi<n8athy i1).e<*a*rcme°*> °* STEEL OB DOOM

STREET, NEW YORK.
LOCOMOTIVE

ot

both AMERICAN and FOREIGN

ply

Morris, Tasker & Co.,

Companies.;

We beg to call the attention of
Managers of Rail¬
ways and Contractors throughout the united States
and Canada to our superior facilities for
executing
orders at manhfacturers prices, for all
deacrintloni of

current market

OFFICE AND WAREHOUSES:

T.

EQUIPMENTS.

Railroad

OLD RAILS AND SCRAP PURCHAS¬
ED AND SOLD.

Pascal Iron

description o

Railroad Bonds,

*■

Henry Lawrence & Sons,

every

AND

Buildings.

BURDON

Broadway, New York,

TOWN, COUNTY, CITV, STATE,

•

Boston.

71

Negotiate in Europe and America

Palm and Ornamental Iron Works of all kinds for

18 William

Hopkins London.
& Co.,
Street,

5 8 Old Broad

69

NEPTUNE, NEREUS and GLAUCUS,

AND

.

AND

Liberty Street,

Corner Broadway, New York.

COMPRISING

Rails, &c.

U. S. BONDS AND AMERICAN RAILWAY SECU¬
RITIES NEGOTIATED.

give special attention to orders for

Novelty

2,000 Tone Each,

Railroad Iron,
Old Rails,
Bessemer

NAYLOR,

as

SAILING TUESDA1 S,THURSDAYS A SATURDAYS

LONDON, E. C.

RAILS,

Railroad Iron,

Neptune Steamers,

of England.

208 So. 4th stree

Railway Use,

Miscellaneous.

METROPOLITAN STEAHSHIP CO

Gilead A. Smith,

HOUSE IN LONDON:

who

For Boston Daily.

Iron and Railroad Materials,

.

PHILA.,

CAST STEEL
Cast Steel

STREET,

11

80 State street.

CAST STEEL

Ginghams;, Ac.,

217 C If UR C H

j,

BOSTON,

99 John street.

FANCY

VELVETEENS,

Umbrella Alpacas and

.

NAYLOR & CO.,
NEW

British Dress Goods,
VELVETS,

j

■

N.B.FALCONER& CO
'

[October 28, 186#.

Iron and Railroad Material*.
■■

;

CHRONICLE.

TIES

MJLNUFA.OT U BID BY THE

ST., PITTSBURGH, PA.

Patent Nut & Bolt
(LIMITED).

Iron Cotton Ties.
The undersigned, 8ole Agents in New
sale and distribution of the

Birmingham,

to suit

WROUGHT IRON BUCKLE TIES.

Manufactured by J. J. McCOMB. Liverpool, respect¬
or

SWENSON, PERKINS * CO..
to

BEAVER STREET.

other

71 Wall st.

■

,

ARROW TIE AND SELF-FASTENING

hand, and for sale in quantities
Apply to

WILLIAMS Sc GUION,

York, for the

fully solicit orders for delivery in New York
ports in the United States, or at Liverpool.

on

purchasers.

Co.,

For Baling

Cotton,

BEARD’ 9 PATENT IROI LOCK AND

SELF-ADJUSTING TIE?,
UfisurpftMqd for. Stnrafth aad Rapidity of AdjustBlSfit*
BEARD A BRO',
.

•

*

_

-

>

•

-

|57

•

BROADWAY

'


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102