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A

WEEKLY

NEWSPAPER,

:

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE
UNITED STATES.

VOL. I

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1865.
CONTENTS.

either

‘reights of Ship-owners and the
Warehouse System. ......... -.
■ha Wyoming Valley Coal and the

£13

5 4
6!4
515
010

Present Scarcity
Railway Analyses
Railways in Canada

617
518
519

Literature.

520
620

Foreign Intelligence
Commercial

and

News

Miscellaneous
621

THE BANKERS GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL TIMES.

[oneyMarket,Railway Stocks, U.
8 Ek)curiiies,Gold Market, For¬
eign Exchange, New York City
Banks, Philadelphia Banks, Na¬
tional Banks, etc
die Prices N. Y. Stock

Commercial Epitome
Exports and Imports

523

Exchange
ational, State, etc., Securities...

526
527

Cotton Trade
Breadstuff's
Dry Goods Trade
Prices Current and Tone of the
Market

523
628-29
680
631
582
534

THE RAILWAY MONITOR AND INSURANCE JOURNAL.

Epitome of Railway News
Railroad, Csnal, and Miscellaneous
Bond List.

637 1 Railway, Canal, etc., Stock List...
Insurance and Mining Journal/...

541

Foreign Countries....

542

538-89

| Postages

to

640

INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.
Insursnoe Companies

543 J Bank Announcements, etc

544

Financial Chronicle is issued
every Satur¬
day morning with the latest news by mail and telegraph up to
midnight of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every morning
with all the Commercial and Financial news
of the previous day
up to the hour of publication.
and

TEEMS OF SUBSCRIPTION—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
{Canvassers for Subscriptions are not authorized to make

for The

Commercial

Ohrokiole

and

Bulletin,

without The Commercial

10 00

and

depressing.

But there is no doubt that some corrective
wild, mischievous speculation in cotton
springing up both here and in Europe.
A second topic which is
attracting some attention is the
charge brought against some of the National Banks in the
West, and elsewhere, that part of their funds are lent to per¬
sons who are
engaged in speculative risks. connected with
pork and grain. On enquiry we do not find that this
charge
is sufficiently proved,
though no doubt there are banks in all
our
large cities who have been discounting paper the good¬
ness of which
depends on continued high prices.
Another point which is commented on with earnest
and
perhaps undue severity is the supposed effects of the large
needed of the
which was
was

Department, which

Financial
5 00

WILLIAM B. DANA & CO,
Publishers,

give

Treasury

another page, it will be seen
that the amount of
government money in the Banks was
$45,974,009 on the 30th September last. Now it is
urged that while we are paying so high a rate of interest for
all the loans we raise,
private persons owning National Banks
ought not to be permitted to hold so much public money

free of interest.

Collections.]

Financial Chronicle, with Thk Daily
Bulletin, delivered by carriers to city subscribers, and mailed to all
others....
$12
lor The Commercial and Financial
Chronicle, without The Daily
Bulletin
for The Daily

by Continental or by English buyers. On the prices of
dry-goods, the effect, it is believed, will be

government balances which the national banks are
permitted
to hold.
By reference to the official statement of the

©fje Cljronicb.
The Commercial

17.

cotton, produce, and

THE CHRONICLE.

fall Street Topics. -...
low to Contract the Currency....
fr. M cCulloch on Our Finances..
'etroleum Investments
.....

NO

the

ed

we

on

It must,

however, be remembered that
receipts and disbursements of the Treasury are so diffus¬
and so large that it is
impossible to prevent the accumu¬

lation at certain times of considerable balances.
Besides,
the public are not
generally aware of the fact that higher

security is now required than formerly for the government
deposits. Up to June last the security required from the
National Bank depositaries was 25
per cent in government
securities, and 75 per cent in approved private bonds. Now
WAIL STREET TOPICS.
no
The leading
private bonds whatever are received, but the whole of
topic of discussion in Wall street is the ef¬
the security exacted is to be in
fect likely to be
government bonds. Hence
produced here by the sudden advance in
no bank is allowed to hold
the Bank of
deposits to a greater aggregate
England rate of interest. By some persons it is
than it has thus given
argued that this change will produce a
security for, by actually placing the
heavy fall in American the bonds with the
securities at the London Stock
Department at Washington. It is true,
Exchange, and will cause
them to be
indeed, that the public should be informed of the amount
shipped back to this market in considerable
amounts. If this should
turn out to be true, there is no deposited in each of the National Banks, and as without such
information the monthly statement
doubt that our
required by law of the
money market would be unfavorably influ¬
condition of Treasury is
enced, that the exchanges would be for the moment
incomplete, it will no doubt be given
still fur¬ hereafter.
ther against
us, that gold would
go up while Stocks would go
On the threatened inflation of the
currency by further is¬
down, and that general depression would
prevail. But the pre¬ sues of more National Bank notes, there is but one opinion
vailing conviction in well informed circles seems to be that in
conservative circles.
It is reprobated as mischievous and
the American
securities in
Europe are too strongly held for indefensible. We are glad that similarly sound views are
any such results to
happen, and that if a few weak holders prevailing the
in
West, as may be seen from the following
Wv
compelled to sell out, their stocks will be
eagerly taken up very judicious observations in the Chicago Tribune;




(Chronicle Buildings,)
60 William
Street, New York.

.

THE

514

depreciated and
is

“Speculation has been encouraged and fostered by a
inflated curreucy, till prices are swollen to such an extent that there
not currency enough in the country to meet the requirements of the busi¬
community. As a remedy to this, some of our Eastern political
economists are clamoring for an increase in the circulating medium;
ness

amend
the

aggravate the evil. Suppose Congress should
Act so as to increase the issue 1300,000,000,
market would be only temporary ; for speculation
would again run wild, and prices would speedily advance till the extra
issue of $300,000,000 of National Bank currency was completely absorb¬
but this would only
the National Banking
easiness in the money

would again be just in its present position.
the law of gravitation,
With a depreciated cur¬
rency, the evil is aggravated ten-fold ; for we have not only the natural
desire for speculation to contend against, but we have also to encounter
the want of confidence felt by the holders of the currency.
The only other topic which is attracting public attention
here is the announcement that the Secretary of the Trea¬
sury is considering the policy of receiving deposits of
coin and of issuing therefor gold checks which could be used
by speculators to make their deliveries, and by merchants to
pay their customs duties. The project is not favorably re¬
the money market
of inflation and contracticn is as sure as
and there is no way to avoid its consequences.

ed, when
This law

urged in opposition
by eminent banking authorities, who argue moreover, that it
is
part of the functions of government to become the cus¬
todian of coin, or to perform for the people the duties of a
bank, by receiving specie deposits for safe keeping.
ceived.

Various

financial reasons are

no

HOW TO

CONTRACT THE CURRENCY.

[October 21,1865.

CHRONICLE.
the Bank
time

actually resumed

prescribed.

specie payments before the
.

greenbacks] and other government legal ten¬
ders have for the most part been absorbed, we may per¬
haps with advantage impose some similar gradual method
of specie redemption on our National Banks.
But before
any steps can be taken toward this object, the immense
mass of redundant currency which is afloat must be perma¬
nently withdrawn and removed out of the way. And if as
After

our

suggested, our greenbacks are gradually con¬
verted into compound interest notes, the older issues of
these notes meanwhile being gradually funded, we mayhope to be able to get back to specie payments without
the general prostration of credit which have usually at¬
tended such movements. The process may be long but it
will be efficient, conservative and safe.

is

elsewhere

MCCULLOCH ON OUR FINANCES.
McCulloch’s Indiana speech, the financial part of
MR.

Mr.

in full, is generally regarded as a
summary of the policy he will recommend to Congress in
his forthcoming report.
The chief measure in this policy on
which public attention fixes are the contraction of the redun¬
dant volume of our p>aper money, ;and the gradual restora¬
tion of the currency so that the paper dollar shall be equal to

which

we

give elsewhere

the dollar in

gold.

of inflating and depreciating the current money
It is currently reported that a strong pressure will be
of a thriving commercial country imparts for the moment
brought to bear on Congress, with a view to obtain power
an exciting and delusively profitable stimulus to industry
for the National Banks to increase their circulation beyond
and trade.
It relieves the pressure of debt; for the creditor the 300 millions now authorised by law. The emission of
is obliged to receive payment in a currency of less value than
notes is so profitable during a suspension of specie pay¬
that in which the obligation was incurred.
The productive ments that we need not wonder if such a mischievous scheme
energies of the country are exalted, and funds are supplied has been dreamed of by some of the advocates of inflation.
in abundance for enterprises which must otherwise have
It is clear,: however, that any project of this kind will meet
been unattempted.
But how different is the work of recovery the determined opposition of the Secretary of the Treasury,
and contraction! It is next to impossible to get back to a
of every citizen who understands the true interests of the
specie basis without disaster and monetary spasms; for now country. To allow the banks to increase the currency on the
the pressure falls on the debtor wThile his creditor has the ad¬
one side, while the people with great cost and effort are di¬
vantage. And since the debtor class is always more weak, minishing it on the other, would be to impoverish the many
more numerous, and less able to bear losses, there is a much
for the advantage of the few, and by causing the most ruin¬
greater amount of individual injury than when it was the ous fluctuations in prices it would spread discontent and suf¬
creditors who wTere suffering. Accordingly as money rises
fering among the industrious masses of our citizens.
from a low valuation to a higher one, trade stagnates and
But contraction of our paper money, it has been said, is found
credit is prostrated; wages are depressed, bankruptcies be¬
to be practically impossible ; and even if further additions
come numerous and prices fall.
Now these evils are all the can be prevented, Mr. McCulloch, in the present condition
more severe in proportion as the transition is abrupt and
of the National Treasury and of the public credit, must fail
spasmodic. Hence the delicate process of resumption of coin in all his attempts to curtail the currency. In proof of this
payments 'should be gradual and conducted by successive statement, we are pointed to the noteworthy fact that the
steps; for the national industry thus escapes the violent shock, least movement towards contraction makes money tight, and
and the people are spared the disastrous revulsions, wrhich
that when this happens, the banks immediately begin to draw
would ensue if the currency were too suddenly and too vio¬
out their deposits from the government.
These deposits are
lently contracted. These points were well explained in 1816
paid off in greenbacks from the Treasury vaults ; and these
in Mr. Ricardo’s “ Proposals for an Economical and Secure
green-backs fill up once more the recently depleted channels
Currency,” by wThich chiefly the British government were of the circulation, thus restoring the disturbed equilibrium.
guided in the judicious measures instituted for the grad¬ An illustration of this argument is just now offered by the
ual resumption of specie payments after they had been sus
results of the negotiation of the new 50 million loan. Sev¬
pended for twenty-two years. The act passed by Parliament eral millions of old compound interest notes, which have
for this purpose in 1819 required the Bank of England from
long been imprisoned in the reserve-chests of the banks, were
the 1st of February, 1820 to the 1st of October in the same
paid into the Sub-Treasury. Now as these compound notes
year, to pay its notes in bullion of standard fineness at the were
legal tender and formed part of the 25 per cent reserve
rate of 81 shillings an ounce.
Erom the 1st of October
which the banks are required by law to keep on hand, their
1820, to the 1st of May 1821, it was to pay bullion at the
This circumstance
rate of 79 shillings and six pence an ounce; and after this place had to be supplied.
others to cause *a temporary scarcity in the supply of
last date it was to redeem its notes in bullion at the old
The evil would have remedied
a
mint price of £3 17s 10£d an ounce. The payment was to greenbacks here.
few days, but as while it lasted a rise in the rate of
be made in bullion because coin had gone out of circula¬
was produced, the banks, to escape the pressure and
tion; but two years afterwards the Bank was required to
their customers, called in their loans from the Sub-Treasury
pay coin, the resumption being complete. This method was
to the amount of moral millions of dollars, Bence/w
w suooe&sful awl the resem of coiir became so ample that
The process




as

combined with
itself in
interest,
oblige

iff

October

21,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

predicted a few weeks ago, the consequence of the negocia- ly funding the

51§

restoring specie payments, prevent¬
likely to be that almost as much legal tender pa¬ ing ruinous speculation, and terminating the reign of extor¬
per will be poured out of the Treasury as will be gathered tionate prices we do not pretend that it is perfect or final.
in by the loan.
If this should prove so, the gorged channels But if the prevailing rumors are correct some such expedient >
of the circulation, instead of being depleted, will be once for conversion and funding will be offered for the action of
Congress, and if any practicable improvements can be sug-;
again surcharged and overflowing.
In view of these facts then it has been feared that contrac¬ gested they will doubtless be
adopted and incorporated into
tion is an impossibility, and that every such effort to restore the plan.
a sound currency is foredoomed to miscarry.
We do not
PETROLEUM INVESTMENTS.
assent to this discouraging conclusion.
Our financial mala¬
The petroleum mania has, perhaps,
dies, though bad enough, inspire hope and not despair. The
sufficiently subsided to ■
right method of contraction, it is true, may not as yet have prepare the public mind for forming a reasonable estimate of
been hit upon.
But assuredly we are near to its discovery, the value and importance of the petroleum interest. There
nearer perhaps than our least desponding prophets suppose.
are few familiar with the recent
speculations in oil lands and
However this may be, it is certain that a man as practical oil stocks, who will dissent from the assertion that the organ¬
and clear-sighted as Mr. McCulloch, would not have spoken ization of petroleum companies has been a huge bubble.
Eleven hundred companies have been created, with an
so confidently of his policy of contraction if he were not
ag¬
sure of averting an ignominious and damaging defeat.
gregate par capital of $600,000,000. Perhaps fifteen per cent
Our experience so far has abundantly demonstrated the of that amount has been actually paid up, giving an
aggre¬
fact that the chief obstacles in the way of contraction are gate real investment of say $90,000,000.
These companies v
the call loans, of which the amount in the Treasury at pre¬ have been formed under representations that so marvellously
sent is over 100 millions bearing 5 and 6 per cent interest. productive were the oil lands that they would yield a hand¬
These call loans are as potent stimulants of speculation as some return upon the par value of the stocks.
It was the
broad deception that stocks, offered at one to two dollars
the inflated currency itself, inasmuch as they aggravate the
per
evil and prevent its cure.
share, would soon be worth ten dollars, which secured the
We conclude, therefore, that the paying off of these tem¬ subscription of sucji an immense amount of capital to a pure¬
porary loans to the banks is a fundamental part .of Mr. ly experimental enterprise., These extravagant pretensions
McCulloch’s plans. And it is a most fortunate circumstance were supported by a few conspicious instances of remarkably
that the currency balance in the Treasury is so ample, and productive wells ; and so impetuous was the mania for the
the receipts from taxes and from the sales of government pro- organization of new companies that none cared to put the
perty are so rapidly accumulating, that the payment of these question whether these cases were likely to prove to be the
all loans will be very much facilitated.
Probably it will rule or the rare exception. Such an intensity of furore was
not be deemed expedient, even were it possible, to pay oft’ the of course followed by a speedy reaction; and now that the
whole immediately. hOf the outstanding 100 millions per¬ sober second thought has come, it becomes apparent that not
haps one-fourth or 25 millions might with advantage be left the par value of the stocks, but the amount of capital actual¬
in the form of Clearing-House Certificates, bearing as at pre¬ ly paid up about represents the real value of the petroleum
sent 5 per cent interest, and payable on demand in green¬ lands, confirming the oft demonstrated rule that even in the
backs. It is found that on an average the sum w^e have most excitable speculations the public are tolerably reliable
mentioned is ample for the monetary requirements of judges of the value of schemes in which they are invited to
the banks in making their daily exchanges.
There will also participate.
»
It is generally estimated that the production of the present
be some further' advantages incidentally secured by the ar¬
rangement. The pressure on the money market must be year will reach about one and a half million barrels ; and this
calculation is confirmed by a comparision with the movement
severe and real to induce the banks to convert their ClearingHouse Certificates into cash ; and yet whenever the emer¬ of previons years. The exports have usually averaged about
gency is present, and is sufficiently urgent, these institutions 37 per cent of the entire production; and as the shipments
can relieve themselves; and the
stringency, if it becomes from all the ports, for the expired portion of the year,
unmanageable by'other palliatives, can be checked by the have been 433,025 bbls.—averaging 10,561 bbls. per week
temporary conversion of a part of the Certificates into green¬ and at the rate of 549,172 bbls. per year—it would fol¬
low that the total yield for the year would be about 1,464,458
backs.
A second expedient will, of course, be to carry steadily for¬ bbls. as the product of 1865; and estimating the average
ward the funding of the compound interest notes ; but from price at the well at $10 per bbl., it would follow that the
what has been said it will be evident that some further ma¬ value of the year’s product will be say $15,000,000.
From
this must be deducted 20 per cent for company and work¬
chinery is necessary. The contracting process must be ap¬
plied to the greenbacks as yrell as to the other legal tenders. ing expenses, leaving the net profit upon the year’s pro¬
Of this species of
This yields 13£ per cent upon the esti¬
currency the amount afloat is about 428 duct $12,000,000.
millions. The greenbacks must be eventually absorbed into mated $90,000,000 actually invested, or 2 per cent upon the
long interest-bearing bonds, and no method seems so practic¬ $600,000,000 of par capital. Considering the liability of
able for this purpose as
to convert them first into compound petroleum lands to become at any time non-productive, this
notes; and then, hereafter, to fund them as sufficient interest rate of interest cannot be considered an extraordinarily liberal
accrues, and they have gradually withdrawn from active use return upon the capital invested.
as
Petroleum investments are necessarily risky.
The lands
currency.
This process must at first be gradual, and
it
cannot be bought with any certainly that they cover oil, and
might not be practicable to carry it on at a more rapid rate
than about ten millions a month. If this scheme should be
ap¬ not unfrequeutly a large amount of capital is sunk without
proved, new legislation by Congress will have to be sought; result. Experienced oil men say that out of one hundred
for the only
authority Mr. McCulloch has at present to fund borings for oil, seven wells, producing in paying quantities,
greenbacks is to convert them directly into bonds, which has are the average result. It not unfrequently happens, there¬
hitherto seemed to be practically impossible.
fore, that companies who have invested a large capital in
Indenturing to suggest this method for gradually and safe¬ lands and boring, discover that they have no oil: on the
tion seems




currency,

516

[October 21,1805.

THE CHRONICLE.

before all others. • But if, on the other hand, he pays the
hand, more lucky corporations, with little outlay, strike
duties, it is the practice of the revenue officers to surrender
wells of extraordinary richness. The risks and chances about
the goods at once, without reference to freight charges. They
balance each other. There is some diversity of opinion as to
may be taken by the consignee or his agent, and disposed of
the
.

other

time for which the wells yield ; some maintain¬
ing that the limit is not over four years, and others that it
average

of business, while the ship-owner is entirely una¬
To prevent this it would be necessary to
is not less than seven years ; the truth, however, is that time
watch the goods, and keep guard upon the warehouse/ Some¬
has not yet been afforded for settling this question, upon
times the difficulty is obviated by privately employing some
which the value of oil lands so materially depends. At the
clerk or other official to give notice of such removal. This
present rate of 13£ per cent interest, the lands would be re¬
may be highly improper, but the fault lies in the system.
quired to yield for seven and a half years, in order to pay The
ship-owner is compelled to seek for justice as best he
back the original investment. It is by no means certain that
He may institute proceedings if the consignee is pecu¬
can.
the wells will, on an average, yield for that length of time ;
and it may, therefore, prove that the present returns upon niarily responsible—a resort often too precarious to warrant
the effort. In all other respects he is substantially at the con- oil capital, are too low to be ultimately remunerative. In¬
deed, the balance of probabilities -would seem to incline to¬ signees mercy.
The Shipowners’ Association are taking action in referward that conclusion; and, in accordance with this view,
rence to
At a meeting, held on Wednesday
this matter.
purchasers of oil lands now' decline to buy property at the of the
present week, they adopted a memorial to the Hon.
fabulous prices current a few months ago.
A large amount of the capital invested in oil lands is ren¬ Hugh McCulloch, Secretary of the Treasury, which we give
dered unproductive through bad management of the finances elsewhere, asking his aid in securing relief from this hard¬
They explain at length that the lien of the shipown¬
of the companies. Many of the corporations have been ship.
ers for the freight necessarily depends for its validity upon
formed with a cash capital adequate only for the purchase of
his retaining possession of the goods.
This he has a right to
the property, the working capital being left to be provided
do until the lien is discharged by the payment of the freight.
by the sale of stock. The public, as might have beemexThe government however, to secure its own duties on them,
pected, have failed to purchase the reserved shares of such
sends them under “ general orders” to the bonded warehouse,
companies, and they are consequently left without working
where they are held and delivered up ‘to consignees as we
means.
A very important proportion of the oil companies
have already stated, on payment of duties and storage, ir¬
are in this condition, the shareholders being dissatisfied and
the managers in disgrace.
There are but twTo ways of escape respective of any question of freight. The goods are thus
taken out of the possession of the shipowner by the supreme
from this condition of affairs. The shareholders may consent
to make further contributions, for working capital; or the power before his lien is satisfied, and placed entirely beyond
lands may be sold and the proceeds distributed. After so his control, and the possession being lost .the lien is also
much mismanagement and, in some cases, semi-dishonesty on lost.
The Secretary is therefore besought to extend them some re¬
the part of the promoters and directors of the companies,
the shareholders cannot be expected'to have the confidence lief, and the memorialists suggest that freight be paid by the
necessary to encourage further subscriptions of capital; so storekeeper on receipt of the goods in store, and added to his
that the former expedient is not likley to be adopted to any charges on the goods to be collected before or on delivery.
Such interference of the government we do not think advis¬
important extent. In the event of re-selling the lands, the
able or necessary, for if only notice were required to be given
companies would realise much less upon their properties
than they had paid for them; and after the extravagant ex¬ to the shipowner before the withdrawal of the goods by the
penditures of management were deducted from, the proceeds consignee, so that his claim could be enforced, it being under¬
of the sale, the stockholders w'ould probably receive less than stood and declared that the act of government in placing the
half the sum they had invested.
We apprehend, howrever, goods in store is not to affect the lien for freight, the relief
that, in very many instances, the duped stockholders will pre¬ would, it seems to us, be perfect.
The justice of such a course is very clear; the practice
fer this alternative; which, at least, will have the recommenda¬
tion of revealing to them the end of their losses.
Fully two of the government at present being .evidently wrong. It is
thirds of the eleven hundred existing companies will have to a departure from the equities of trade.
The freight is the
first obligation incurred, and ordinarily should be paid first.
submit to one.of these alternatives; and it is to be hoped
that the consequent vexation may produce such an impression Certainly the claim of the shipowner should not be preju¬
diced by any subsequent act of government.
No interrupupon the public mind as will render it impossible to repeat
the same excesses of speculation within at least the present ion to the ordinary course of trade, or the carrying out
of proper warehouse regulations would result, from the
generation
change proposed, while the rights of all parties would be
THE FREIGHTS OF SHIPOWNERS AND THE WAREHOUSE
preserved.
But while we sympathise with the prayer of this memo
SYSTEM.
The prepayment of freight charges has become a topic rial, we cannot approve of the endeavor on the part of the
of earnest consideration on the part of ship-owners. Their shipowners to institute in this port the same usage which
exists in California, where the freight is paid in all cases be¬
particular grievance grows out of the present warehousing
fore delivery of the cargo, the consignee being entitled in
system, which operates with peculiar hardship. Immediately
case of short receipts or injury to goods, to collect back an
upon the arrival of goods subject to duty, they are at once
taken in charge by officers of the Custom House employed amount equivalent to the loss or damage.
In support of this
for the purpose, and no regard whatever is paid to the indebt¬ position it is pleaded that the shipping business has become
edness for freight.
If the vessel is discharged by general greatly extended, and that it is impossible to know all the
order, all that part of the cargo not immediately claimed is receivers. Hence arises liability to losses from having to
sent to the bonded warehouse, to be kept for a specified time, deal with irresponsible men or men that are unreasonably
until the assignee appears and pays the duties.
If he fails tardy in making payments.

.

*

ware

of the fact.

It is, however, probable that this proposed change would
the duties the goods, at the end of the period, are sold
# auction, and the claims for duties and storage liquidated involve greater evils than those which it is contempt

to pay
£

in the w'ay




October 21,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Innovation should never be resorted to,
except actual amelioration may be confidently expected.
The importers and consignees in the event of the adoption
of the new system, would, for instance, be subjected to loss
and intolerable vexation in case that they happened to re¬
ceive goods from vessels not belonging to the regular line.
When freight is paid, delivery of goods is to be considered
as accepted; and a claim for falling short in
quantity or
for injury would be rendered difficult to prosecute success¬
fully 3nd especially against transcient vessels.
Again, the principle of law is established that freight is
due when goods are delivered in good order.
The landing
of the cargo in such condition during business hours, and
notice of that fact to the consignee is held to constitute a le¬
gal delivery. The latter must submit to all loss or injury
from the sea or weather, while the shipowner is
obliged to
make good all damages and losses from neglect, theft or
■careless handling.
It will readily be perceived that the
adoption of the rule to collect freight before delivery would
practically bar proceedings to require the shipowner to make
good loss or injury occasioned by his fault.
Besides, the loss and inconvenience sustained in this port
from the negligence or bad faith of
importers and consignees
are comparatively
light. The agents employed by the ship¬
owners always
charge a commission for the collection of the
freight, thus remunerating for the trouble and expense. In
case a
consignee or receiver is known te be a slow paymas¬
ter or a troublesome one,
part of the cargo can be, and often
is, withheld till full settlement has been made.
In the long run it will be found, we are
confident, that this
is the most practicable method.
The credit system is most
acceptable in this country. Business men always find that
ted to obviate.

this

-

determination, till within

1681
3

a

517

short period, became

unsuo-

cessful.

Persons

.

living at

distance not conversant with particu¬
prone to enquire why the deficiency of coal could
not have been made
up from the Lehigh and Schuylkill districts.
It is true that whatever difficulties existed
there, had
been overcome before the
great strike of the Lackawanna and
Wyoming Valley miners. The men were poor, and their
turbulent and unpatriotic conduct
during the war had aliena¬
ted sympathy from them.
They had no alternative in their
struggle with the capitalists but to yield.
lars

But there

and

a

are

were

difficulties which the colliers of the

Schuylkill coal districts could

amount of coal

required for

use

not

Lehigh

overcome.

The

in this country is steadily

the increase ; and the
supply has fallen short of the de¬
mand.
The production for the last five years was as follows:
on

in

1860, 8,119,199 tons ; in 1861, 7,878,667 tons ; in 1862,!
7,401,715 ; in 1863,8,979,854 ; and in 1864, 9,992,007 tons.
For three years the supply
from the Lehigh and Schuylkill

were as

follows:

1860

1864...:....

It will

Lehigh.
1.821,674 tons

1,738,377
1,351,054

1,894,713
1,928,706

Schuylkill.

8,270,616 tons
2,697,480
2,890,678
8,433,265
8,642,218

readily be perceived that the aggregate product
supply the deficiency of the Lackawanna
and Wyoming Valley coal.
The Lehigh being a pure an¬
thracite, very hard and dense, .requires a draught in
burning much stronger than the other varieties, and hence
would hardly make a desirable substitute even if it could
have been procured in sufficient quantities.
That of the
Schuylkill district is not so hard, and would be preferable;
in all business transactions a certain amount of
confidence but the
transporting business from those mines is a monopoly
must be bestowed, even at the risk of loss.
Credits almost
holding the miners and consumers alike in check. The
always obtain even among those prefering to do business on
Reading Railroad is unable to carry all the coal that is offer¬
cash principles.
It is evidently the more judicious course ed
; and hence there is no possibility of obtaining supplies
to make a
delivery and wait a little time before attempting from this quarter.
to collect the
freight. It will work as little inconvenience as
The amount imported for the last four years exceeded half
any method that may be adopted. The tardy and dishonest a million of tons
annually, running up in 1863 to a million.
must be treated
by themselves, without adopting a policy It will be seen that in 1861 the
product of the anthracite
tending to place honorable men on the same footing.
mines of Pennsylvania was considerably less than for the
previous year. There was in hand, however, almost a mil¬
THE WYOMING VALLEY COAL AND THE PRESENT SCARCITY.
lion of tons, the product of other seasons.
Hence, although
The miners of the
Wyoming coal district have resumed the Government had been added to the list of consumers,
work, having impoverished themselves and obtained little and the increased demand amounted to
350,000 tons, there
advantage by their long cessation from labor., But there is was no deficiency in the market. But in 1862 occurred a
now no
possibility of a reduction of coal this season to a freshet which for more than a month arrested business and
reasonable price, All, therefore, who
have not procured exhausted whatever surplus might have been on hand. Since
their
necessary supplies in advance, will suffer for their that time there has been no
supply in advance. The aggre¬
poverty or their ‘improvidence. Heretofore the strikes of
gate increase in production for 1862, 1863 and 1864 was
the miners of this
region have been successful, and they had 2,745,268 tons ; whereas the Government required fully that
raised the price of their wmrk to one dollar and
twenty-seven amount, besides the usual additions in private consumption.
cents a ton from
forty cents in 1860.
For the year 1865, an addition of a million and a half of tons
The extensive demand for coal or the
part of the Govern was required to make up deficiencies and supply the mar¬
ment, warranted these companies in paying
higher rates of ket. This is more than can be accomplished, and high prices
compensation. But with the return of peace this demand are inevitable.
ceased in a
great degree, and the price of coal began to fall.
Our dependence for coal, over and above the limited sup¬
The companies
accordingly resolved upon a reduction of plies from the Lehigh and Schuylkill mines, is upon the pro¬
wages. They stated this determination to the miners;
pro¬ duct of the Lackawanna and Wyoming Valleys.
Indeed, for
mising that the decrease in the rates should be proportionate domestic purposes, the Wyoming coal is
preferable to the
as
nearly as practicable to the decreased price of coal. The other. This district begins on the Lackawanna near
Carbopmen consented to a
reduction in May, but a proposition to
dale, extending to its confluence with the northern branch of
reduce the rates to 82 cents
per ton in July was resisted on the Susquehanna at Pittston, and onward thence to Wilkesthe plea of. bad faith.
They declared with a fair show of barre. The width of the coal measures on the Lackawanna
plausibility that no such decline had taken place in the price hardly averages two miles in breadth; but on the Susque¬
of coal as to warrant this
action of the companies.
Gro¬ hanna it extends from four to six miles, penetrating the
ceries, dry-goods, and other necessaries had
certainly risen. mountains on each side. On the western side of the Susque¬
Accordingly they refused to work, and all efforts to shake hanna, enclosed by the river and mountain, is the Valley of

^




:

could not be made to

the

[October 21,1865.

THE CHRONICLE.

518

Wyoming, the classic ground of America, which the

atrocious

massacre

of the Revolution and the immortal poem

of

the State of New York

andt parts of Canada are
Wyoming Valley. The interest of the collieries
and coal companies, it is easy to perceive, was opposed dur¬
ing the recent strikes, to the prolonged cessation from labor.
The demand for their product is constantly increasing. Three
years ago the Legislature of New York voted $500,000 to
aid in the construction of the Albany and Susquehanna
Railroad; and in 1864 authorized the extension of the Che¬
nango Canal to the line of the State of Pennsylvania for the
avowed purpose of facilitating the transit and cheapening the
as

well

as

customers

of

Campbell have consecrated for all future time.
shamefully neglected this Valley; and
yet its scenery, the glorious old Susquehanna, the rounded
summits of the Wyoming Mountains, and the distant Alleghanies, bathed and half-hidden in blue vapor, is not sur¬
passed any where on this side of the continent. It may be
that the atmosphere of Pennsylvania stifles romance; but
there can be no excuse.
In the summer, the traveller, wind¬
ing his way through the valley, passes a neat and prosperous price of coal.
The steps requisite to secure low prices in future consist
village every two or three miles, beautiful with tidy houses
and abundance of trees; on every side meadows of grass and principally in measures to supply the yards of the city of
fields of corn wave gracefully to the breeze.
The clouds New York. The capacities of the Lehigh district we have
above, as they move onward over the woody mountain sides, seen are limited, and those of the Schuylkill are restricted by
add their part to the glory of the spectacle;- while the Sus¬ the railroad and canal monopoly. Only the Lackawanna and
quehanna, rejoicing in its greatness, flows down the valley as Wyoming Valleys seems able to increase at once their
if unconscious that its agency had exceeded all others in supplies, and these are likely to be required by the western
Our artists have

and northern counties of

creating

a region of so much loveliness.
But the Valley of the Wyoming is now

New York.

Means should be

em¬

better known for ployed, therefore, to supply the city of New York, in part at
history.
We ought not, perhaps, to least, by foreign importation. The exhorbitant prices of
mourn this
as a
profanation.
In classic Greece, Mount the Pennsylvania product are largely occasioned by expens¬
Olympus, declared by Pococke to be the throne of the Jeyus ive railway freights; water transit can be had from
or hierarch who ruled the West, and was exalted
by Hesiod one-third to half the cost. The province of Nova Scotia has
with his subordinate Lama-priests to divine rank,has been com¬ coal in abundance, and it can be brought hither far cheaper
pelled, if reports are true, to lay oft' the classic for the utili¬ than it comes from the Schuylkill or Wyoming valley. It
tarian character.
A mine of coal having been found at its may be expedient and feasible to import from England. The
foot ample to supply fuel for all the forges of Vulcan, Olym¬ first duty of Congress, therefore, is to repeal the imposts upon
pus may yet derive greater glory from its coal than from its the imported article, and enable us to obtain cheap fuel from
ancient gods.
This may seem to the scholar like desecration, other countries.
yet so the new ever supplants the old.
Geologists have
ANALYSES OF RAILROAD REPORTS. No. §.
styled a former era the carboniferous age, because in it was
MICHIGAN SOUTHERN AND NORTHERN INDIANA RAILROAD.
produced this great staple; but we submit that the present
The Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana Railroad con¬
is the actual coal-carrying period.
It may be the age of iron,
sists of the several divisions and branches as shown in the
but neither iron or copper can be developed and made useful
following statement:
except by th4 ordeal of fire.
its coal than for

its

The introduction of the Lackawanna coal into market dates
back to

1829, when

taken off

on

Company.

seven

thousund tons

were

mined and

the boats of the Delaware and Hudson Canal

Last

Main line
Air line

Toledo to Chicago
Toledo to Elkhart

Detroit, Monrpe & Toledo line.Air Line June, to D. & Mil. June..
Monroe branch
Adrian to Monroe
Jackson branch
Lenawee Junction to Jackson
Lenawee branch
..Palmyra Junct. to Lenawee Junct..
Constantine branch
White Pigeon to Constantine

242.06 mile#,
133.20

“

59.12

“

,

83.60
41.90
2.50

“
“
“

4.18

“

852,000 tons were carried to market
Total (on which are 53.23 miles of side track)
616.56 miles.
This company owns the canal from Scranton up to CarbonTrack (with 0.75 miles Bide track) owned conjointly with Chicago
and
dale, twenty miles, and extending from one mountain-range Track Rock Island Railroad Company from Junction to Detroit 1.67 “
of Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad
to the other.
The Pennsylvania Company begun in 1850,
under permanent lease
3.21 “
and their product last year amounted to above 750,000 tons.
Total length operated by M. S, & N. I. R. R. Co
521.44 miles.
Their property is situated part at Dunmore and part at
This road, in its several divisions, traverses eight counties
Pittston, and comprises about six thousand acres. About in Southern Michigan, three in Northwestern Ohio, eight in
1800 men are employed in their mines, and they own the Northern Indiana, and one county (Cook) in Illinois. It
Gravity Railroad” now in process of construction. The has three several termini to the east, viz : Toledo, Monroe,
Scranton Company was four years later, and owns about and Detroit, all of which it connects directly with Chicago,
2000 acres of land, extending along the Lackawanna from which is its western terminus. At Toledo it joins the Lake
Scranton to Pittston.
The stockholders are the same sub¬ shore Line of Railroads, through which it reaches the seaboard
stantially as those of the Delaware, Lackawanna and West¬ markets. At Monroe it has direct access to Lake Erie and
ern Railroad Company.
Besides their own coal, this com¬ its. navigation. At Detroit it connects with the great Can¬
pany purchases and ships coal mined by the Susquehanna and adian railroads. These facts assure to the road a very large
Wyoming Coal Company, the Greenwood Company, and through traffic, for which there is only a single competitor,
several colliery firms.
The Lackawanna Iron and Coal and that, only so far as the Detroit trade is concerned. This
Company own about 1000 acres of coal land, employing over competitor is the Michigan Central Railroad. There is no
a thousand men and
mining annually about one hundred thou¬ difference, however, in the distance between Chicago and De¬
sand tons of coal, which they use themselves in the iron troit
by either line, each having a length of 284 miles. The
manufacture.
The Baltimore Coal Company owns property
country drained by the^Southern road has an extreme width
at Pittston and transports its coal down the
Susquehanna. of sixty miles, narrowing as it proceeds west, and towards
Of the other companies, are the Wilkesbarre Coal and Iron the Illinois line becoming limited to the immediate shore
Company at Wilkesbarre, the Wyoming Company, the Au_ of Lake Michigan. But from this territory, which is a fine
denreid, the Germania, the Franklin, besides collieries mined agricultural and well populated country, it derives from local
travel and traffic fully half its gross annual income and nearly
by firms and individuals.
The facilities for transportation and the popularity of the three-fifths of its net revenue, the rate of local carriage being
ooal from this district are such that as fast as it is mined it is
higher than the through rate, the average difference in favor
.

year

“

.

:

carried away ; JNew




York city, New Jersey, and Baltimore,

of

through carriage having been in 1864—65 for passengers 95

October 21,

especially during the progress of the late war; all
of which will be seen in the following tables exibiting the year¬
ly results of operations. For several years (1858-61) swamp¬
ed by debt, it has lately emerged from its difficulties, and be¬
company,

Jan. 1,1856
44
1857
4t

Mar.

44
“

44

January
"

1, 1858.

March

1, I860.

“
“
*•

1,275

135
109
111
111

1,087

no
123

113

1,135

1,337

..

44

Passenger.

567,184
704.^19

44

139,245
146,899
190.346
189,027

—

1S61
1862

571,314

1863
1S64

“
“

736.985

1865

“

Total.

156,247

831,818
990,851

1859

1,187,909
1,245.465
1,151,612

785,286

'

2.893.600
2.583.600

7.536.600

2.153.600

.

.

.
.

.

.

.

.

.

1864

.

.

1865

.

.

...

14.714.731

691,278
691,278

Total Property

17,512,128
16,911,265
16,927,012

16,962,212

$1,072,409

Available property and assets
Nominal assets
Profit and loss, Balance of Income.

2,187,124

72,656

AMOUNT AND

DIRECTION

OP TRAVEL.

Cost per
mile of

Years

20,705,032
15,823,144

1859.. 85.237
317,692 $ 402,929
March 1, 1S60.. 04,213# 275,773 ' 339.986#
“

1804.. 96,413

1863..135,197

“

096,16S

1863'.. 66.138

“
“

“

308,799# 15.663,978
13,902,242
337,640
16,544,660
390,723
23,690,068
576,895
33,260,240
831,365

304.052
280,546
330,585
480,482

1861.. 04,147#
1862.. 57,094

“

The number

14,114,858
11,488,097
12,312,051
11,142,989
12,930,716
18,040,202
28,212,298

of passengers carried eastward in

Y'ear
Jan. 1,

$29,701

25,105,231
29,478,370
41,730.270

Mar.

1, I860.

61,472:544

1861.
1862.
1863.

1864-65

Expenses

5,902

1864.

4,450
3,891

2,057

3,999

4,336
5,421

2,003
2,144
2,606

6,521

3.378

2,192
2,815
3,143

8,265

4,640

3,625

32,614
32,682

1S65.

76.43
61.50
58.21
50.09
49.45
48.07
51.80
56.14

1,049
1,498
1,477

3.534

32.584

DM.—

per

cent. Com.
10
50.81
58.88
10

$3,378
2,427

$3,489
3,475
3,401
2,393

$6,867

28,999
29,074
31,071
32,211
32,366
32,410

1858.
1859.

earnings per

,—Per mile^Df road.—,

road, &c. Earn'gs. Expen's. Profit.

ending
1S56
1857.

37,311,241
27,976,029

$18,994,217

and assets

and direction of travel and traffic on the road
The cost o f road and equipment per mile and
shown in the following statements :
<
mile of road are shown in the subjoined table:

Mileage of Passengers-—Number of Passengers—%
Total.
Local.
Thro
Ending
Thro’ Local.
Total.
53,800,963
14,020,845
39,240,118
Jan'aryl, 1858 .159,992
374,558 534,550
34,819,880

2,032,005

886,940

The amount
are

14,356,642
16,766,541
16,824,043
17,439,134
17,489,700

held, March 1, 1865, the

following property and assets:

2,171,477

$11,645,208

1,698,768

59
59

15,263,444

of
fixed prop.

491,865
1,346,855
1,411,067
1,523,786
1,560.043
1,560,182
1,653,382
1,663,568

59
59
59
59
69
59

712,678

15,193,670
15,238,379
15,260.663
15.257,S83
15,263.444

•••••••«

•*

527,607
676,932
698,245

15,337,170
14,742,754

18,790,325
18,631,968

THE COMPANY.

$418,457

$11,226,757

378
460
460
460
460
460
460
460
460
460

The company also

1,569,603
1.374,799
1.530,078
1,592,377
1,775.728
2,060,637

250,226

Total cost

.

.

44

149,310
139,219

1858

March 1, I860
•

Freight.
561,319

768.396

Ending
Jan. 1,
“

.

44

Years

18,994,217

.

.

I860
1861
1 362
1863

44

statement:
■Wood &
Gravel.

709,902

M. S. & N. I. R.R.—^ Steamers /—D. M. & T. R.R.—
Cost of
and
Cost of road.
& equip.
road.
Prop’rs. Length.
Length.
miles.
miles.

1,1859

Mar.

in the following

mileage of engines with trains is given

S,564,115

6.124.600

...

1S57
1S58

44

17,013,549
19,460,343
19,595,207
19,975,962
19,340,988
19,218,467

8,287,255

2,893,600
2.893.600

7,536.800

...

...

ending.
1,1856
44

$13,247424

603,084
449,560
245,047
224,311

...

Jan.

44

The

2,893,600
2,893,600

6,124,600
6.124.600

...

Y’ear s

1,089
1,218
1,245
1,460

20

$2,893,200

6,024,600

%

1,069

30
20

$518,224
2,840,349
1,990,943
1,277,007
1,336,762

1,910,000
8,593,000
9,343,000
9,721,000
9,719,704
9,750,707
9,527,078

FIXED PROPERTY OF

1,414
1,1H
1,072

23
30

948
929
934
958

86
97

lbtil.
1862.
1863.
1864.
1865.

*k

139

83
83
83

18o9.

“

Debt.

$5,800,000

5.983.200
6,081,800

...

Total of
All other
Liabilities. all acc’ts.

Funded

.

Guard.

$6,928,900
7.263.200

...

1860
1 861
1862
1863
1864
1865

Fre’t. gravel Total

Engines. Pass.
90
91
89

-Stock
Common.

...

1,1859

44

;

CAPITAL, DEBT AND LIABILTIES.

1858...

44

Cars in Trains

Locom’s

:.

.

...

,

of the most remunerative of enterprises.
rolling stock on the road has been as follows : _

Tear

ten

ending.

come one

Ending

condition of the company at the close of each
fiscal years is exhibited in the following state¬

The financial

competing line
these

mills and for tonnage 167 mills per mile. A
of the last
for the local business would have the effect of equalizing
ment :
charges. The result, however, has been an enormous revenue
for the work done, and a highly prosperous condition of the Years

The

519

THE CHRONICLE.

I860.]

1.996

Guar

10
to

Dividend paid August, 1865
5
400,798^, and westward 430,5664-.
The lowest and highest prices of the company’s stocks at
The earnings from passengers per mile in 1859-60 was
2.61 cents, viz : 2.27 through and 3.07 local; in 1860-61 the New York Stock Exchange Board for each month of the
2.68 cents, viz: 2.29 through and 3.17 local; in 1861-62 five years ending March 1, 1865, were as showm in the fol¬
2.33 cents, viz : 2.10 through and 3.26 local; in 1862-63 lowing tables :
COMMON STOCK.
1864-65.
1863-64.
3.02 cents, viz: 2.17 through and 3.26 local; in 1863-64
1862-63.
1861-62.
1860-61
Months.
98 @118#
53#@ 61#
22#@25
7 #@12
14#@18#
March....
84#@118#
2.70 cents, viz: 2.17 through and 3.40 local; and in 1864-65
22 @23#
55#@ 67#
12#@17#
9#@14
April
85#@100#
23 @26#
67#@ 88
11 #@13
10#@13#
May
93#@100
2.75 cents, viz : 2.33 through and 3.28 local.
68#@ 81
25#@2S#
10#@12#
June
10#@14

was

•

,

AMOUNT AND DIRECTION OF

Through tonnage—.

Tear

West.

Ending
East.
Jan. 1, 1856.. 13,468
1857.. 19,637

Total.

TRAFFIC.

Way tonnage

East.

West.

35,648 49,116 91,843
4S,484 68,121 85,774
“
1858.. 11,207 40,414 51,621 96,819
1859.. 36.996 17.724 54,720 127,614
Mar. 1,1860.. 78,872 27,416 105,288 162,039
44. 1861..103,190 34,500 137,690 187,234
“
1862..143,306 39,833 183,139 181,757
lb63. .193,262 53,370 246,632 213,664
1864. .183,475 6:i,430 243,905 200,361
“
1S65.. 126,631 68,038 191,669 223,941
“

44

,

Total.

Total T'ns car’d
lmile.

Tons.

October
November
Decemb’r.
..

January
February

..

GUARANTEED

earnings per ton per mile for the same years
2,768, 2,558, 2,817, 2,742, 2,292, 2,201, 2,092, 2,099,
2,296, and 2,883 cents and thousandths.
The gross earnings, expenses, and profits of operating the
road (including steamers) are given in the following state¬
Years

,

Pas’ng’s.

Jan.
“

1, 1856

44

44

1857.......
1853.......
1859

March 1,1860
“
“
•4
“
“

The

1861
1862..
1863
1864
1865

rate

-Gross
Frei’t.

May
June

to

July
August...

Septemb’r

October

January
February

..

earningsOther.

Total.

and character of the

as

since the completion of the
follows:

“

January, 1854
July,
“
January, 1855
July,
“

January, 1856
“
July,




Year....

10
7
5

road in¬

Cash.

33 @39#
26 @39#
24#@‘29#
22#@27#

26#@33#
27#@30
42#@50# 28#@31#
85 @50# 31 @40#
26#@38# 35#@41#
23 @33
36#@41#
33 @88
39#@43#
27#@34
40# @49#
17

@50#

Total

44

22

@106#

94#@156

44#@107

Side

Main

3rp(

Companies.
1. Great Western:
Sarnia Division.

143
127
130
140
132
140

125#@165

Side
Main
track. track.

Miles,
single

Cost of
road and

track. track.

track.

Equipm’ta

406.16

$23,000,104

229.00

50.50

116,00

10.66

149.25
239.50
118.50
333.00
168.75
59.00

25.75
27.50

1.25
4.00

2.50

lph Divii

Riviere du Loup line...
Central Division

5
5

25

102

..

1864-65.

,

@150
@166
@143
@143#
@140
@149#
113#@140
125#@147
124 @137
132 @132
134#@156
140 @146#
135 @151
141 @146
130 @135
185 @147
132#@140
133 @142# 135 @140

/—MAIN LINE—. /—BRANCHES—\

2. Grand Trunk:

..

52#@ 60#
55#@ 64#
61#@ 74
72#@ 85
80#@ 85#
82 @ 85
86 #@.107

22#@49#

..

3#
3#

1863-64.

94# @109
98 @110
108#@122#
110#@119
111 @117

49#
47#
58#
64

prepared the following statement showing the
length and cost of the Railways of Canada, including the con¬
necting lines in the United States, owned and worked by Ca-

Scrip, st’k:

5

@
44#@
47 @
57 @

@118#

STOCK.

1862-63.

46

67

53#@113

We have

cash

August, 1863
Febr’ry, 1864
August,
“
Febr’ry, 1865
August,
44

10

PER CENT

@74#
63#@ 70#
61

RAILWAYS OP CANADA.

»—Stock.—n Guar-

January, 1857

January, 1853

.

@113
@108#
@ 89#
@ 87#
@ 89
S4#@ 90
88#@ 99

22 @65#

1861-62.

dividends paid on the capi¬

.—Stock.—v Guar.
Cash. Scrip, st’k:
cash.

July,

Operat’g Prfl’sfm
operat’ns

expenses,

892,138 1,804,582 117,114 2,813,831 i;.352,555 1,461,270
1,244,129 2,016,&51 123,314 3,384,294 1,753,517 1,630,777
1,875,061 2,242,772 171,432 4,289,465 2,408,352 1,881,113

Chicago, have been

..

November
Decemb’r.

$1,520,675 $954,428 $120,927 $2,595,630 $1,319,154 $1,276,476
1,598.919 957,121 158,808 2.714.848 1,598,770 1.116,073
544,311
1,316,478 803,703 189,246 2.309,487 1,765,176
777.273
920,174
872,419 226,832 2,019,425 1.242,152
766,728
714,136 955,752 164,533 1.864,421 1,067,493
89,653 2,075,459 1,039,830 1,035,629
749,237 1,236,569
710,417 1.419,498 120,603 2,250,518 1,112,970 1,137,548

tal stock of the company

17 @24#
19 #@26
22 @26#
23 @30#
30 @44 43 @50

April

s

Ending

1860-61.

80#@ 94#
82#@ 92#
71 @ 85
57 @71#
68#@ 77#
68#@ 74#

78#@ 89#

88
77
79
79
77

37#@47
37#@43#
36#@41#
45 #@65#
55 @63#

10#@24#

7#@25

Months.
March....

were :

:

.

Year....

The gross

ment

17# @25

Septemb’r

51,841 143,184 192,300 28,082,924
77,919 163,693 231,814 37,524,532
86,364 183,183 234,804 28,532,565
79,279 206,893 261,613 30,893,589
77,973 241.012 346,300 45,744,920
73,755 260,9S9 398,679 56,423,071
87,812 269,569 452,708 66,468,104
83,330 296,994 643,626 81,141.241
108,713 315,074 558.979 86,303;4G1
103,891 332,832 527,501 77,882,529
332,832

23#@27#

24 #@32#
31 @39#

12 @15#
12#@14
19#@34# 13 @14#
15 #@23#
13#@19#
17#@20#
12# @18
16 @19#
10#(g)15
14#@16# 19 @22
12#@15# 20#@24#

13#@19

July
August...

3.

-

95.14’

3.75
29.75
20.75
8.75
9.93

175.25'
273.50

4

,

,

2.00
21.75
(

,

9

122.25
364.75
318.00
67.75

»

»

106.70

,

,

1.75

65,690,040

8,890,779

520

THE CHRONICLE.

.

[October 21,1866.

.

'

Coroorate

name

of

Companies.

4. Buffalo and Lake Huron..
5. London and Port Stanley.
6. Welland
7. Erie and Ontario
8. Port Hope, Lindsay and
Beaverton

*/■—MADT LHVE—>. ^-branches—, Miles,
Main
Main
Side
Side
single
track. track. track. track. track.
161.02
8.75
1.25
171.02
26.25
24.00
2.25
25.00
25.00
17.00
17.00
•

.

43.00

«

,

•

.

*

•

*

.

•

.

♦ •

2.50

l

••

Millbrook and Peterboro’
Branch

•

0. Cobourg and Peterboro’..
10. Brockvflle and Ottawa...
Castleford Extension...
Perth Branch
11. Ottawa and Prescott
18. Montreal and Champlain.

.

,

,

-

,

52.00
82.00

8.30

Point
—

17. Arthabaska

Chemung

and

,

•

2,654,917
1,432,647

89.42

2,485,425
149,807
50,171

45.00

1,208,719

4.00

89,400

85.00

.

,

0.25
0.50

28.00
17.00

Chambly
Granby to Stukely
16. Peterboro’ and
Lake

,

99.34

801,792

0.76
-

2.83
12.75
12.00

792,514

13.00
12.50

►
.

1,307,117

0.50

Bound’y Line to Rouse’s

IS. Carillon and Grenville
14. 8t. Lawrence and Industry
15. Stanstead, Shefford ana

69.00

-

i

,

11.54
2.00
5.66

,

\

,

,

,

••

::i

•

4.00

.

.

•

Three
85.00

Rivers

Total in operation

••

1,309,210
804,000

:

••

54.00
81.00

6,403,046

1,017.220

56.00

..

,

,

Equipm’ta

28.00

13.50

28.00

Cost of
road aDd

••

••

2019.01

201.89

172.05

149.25
59.00
2.S3

25.76
8.75

1.25

201.08

34.50

1.25

246.88

1818.83

167.89

170.80

17.04 2164.06

17.04

2410.89 $103,036,908

Of the above railways the following sections are within
the United States:

Portland Division (G. T.)
Detroit Extension (G. T.)
Montreal and Champlain....
Total

Leaving in Canada
Hamilton and Port Dover....
Peterboro’ and Chemung Lake
Extension (No 16)
Gooderich Harbor (B. & L. H.

Railway, No. 4)

,

,

,

,

,

••

.

••

17.00'
10.00

0.87*

176.25
67.75
2.83

is

the northern than on the central
through the prairie region
from Minnesota to the base of the Rocky Mountains ; and
the
explorations (of Governor Stevens and others) have furnished
significant and reliable information, removing entirely all doubt as
to it being a serious difficulty in crossing either of the
mountain
ranges. In the Flathead country, and on the great plain of the
Columbia there is less snow than in the prairie region east of
the
Rocky Mountains. Indeed throughout the entire extent of the
route, cattle and stock keep in good condition without fodder. The
quantity of stock in the interior of Washington and Oregon, and
east of the mountains which thrive and live solely upon the
winter
grass is very large.”
The importance of this route for commercial purposes is
argued
with great force and cogency. It is not probable that a
continental
communication will be established through British America fora
long series of years, if the United States provide for a railroad on
this Hue.
On the Pacific side, Oregon, Washington, Vancouver’s
Island and British Columbia are tributary to this route; and on
the eastern side of the Rocky mountains, the basins of the 8t
Lawrence, the upper Mississippi, upper Missouri, and the Red
river of the North. More than half of the railroad capital of the
country is directly concerned in its recognition.
route..

snow

absolutely less

on

It is notorious that it is small

The effect of this route

on

the

commerce

of the Pacific

*

y

27.87# miles in construction.

J

f iterature.
Charter

of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company.—Organization
Proceedings, By-Laws and Appendix, 1865.

The charter of the Northern Pacific Railroad, Public Act No.

186,

The

“

can

hardly be exaggerated. Puget Sound is marked out by nature for
a great commercial
entrepot, and is the only point ever likely to rival San Francisco. This route will give it to the United States
with all its grand elements of naval strength. Otherwise it will be
occupied by Great Britain, which has a rapidly increasing commerce
and a large naval station in those waters.
This route is the shortest between Asia and our interior, our At¬
lantic ports and Europe.
This is shown by the following table oq
page
o
r

42d

:

>

*
m.

m

ill

To Seattle.

From Amoo
From Shanghae
From Canton
From Calcutta

3,850

WI_

«

*

—

-

To 3. Franc'co. DllTnoe.

4,110

—

260

6,140
6,430
approved by President Lincoln, July 2d, 1864. It em¬
300
6,900
6,140
240
powered the corporation to construct and maintain a continuous
8,730
8,970
240
railroad and telegraph from Lake Superior to Puget Sound in the
The distance from St. Paul to Seattle, on Puget Sound, is
1,764
territory of Washington, with a branch to Portland in the State
miles. ; whereas from St. Louis to Benicia it is 2,482 miles, and
of Oregon ; and granted for the purpose the right of way to a
Memphis to San Francisco 2,366 miles. This is all important in
hundred feet on each side, and patents of land on the route to the
the matter of securing the East India commerce.
amount of twenty sections per mile in the territories, and ten sec¬
The reader must determine for himself to what extent these ar¬
tions per mile in the states,—an aggregate of 47,360,000 acres.
guments for the northern route are conclusive. They certainly as¬
The proposed line is known as General Stevens’ Route,
having sure the importance of
securing the Asiatic commerce, amount¬
been first suggested by the late General Isaac L. Stevens when
Governor of the territory of Washington. It possesses the advantage ing to hundreds of millions of dollars, to this country, whether we
make Seattle, San Francisco, or even Panama our western entre¬
of being the shortest and the most central line for a Pacific Railroad.
From the head of Lake Superior to Puget Sound its distance is pot for that purpose. Our own steamship lines ought to perform
the carrying trade of the Pacific, and our railroads do the business
about 1,760 miles. The mountain ranges are depressed and
easily of the continent.
overcome.
But little heavy grading or tunnelling, or
trestle-work,
is required : water, timber and Btone are in ample
quantitities
The soil is fertile, and the mineral wealth,—gold, silver, platinum,
quicksilver, copper and lead.—abundant. The county of the Red
GREATnBRITAlJ^
:
~
and Saskatchewan rivers, British Columbia and Jfcs Hudson
Bay
LONDON AND LIVERPOOL DATES TO OCTOBER T.
Company would find in this Road the outlet of their trade. The
was

.

Joreign Ncros.

oost of construction is estimated at

The Northern Pacific Railroad

§120,000,000.

The successive advances in the Bank rates of interest from 4j, to
which it had been raised dast week to 5 per cent on Monday,

Company, organized in Boston, to 6 per cent on Thursday, and 7 per cent on Saturday, October
September, 1864, and its directors are promoting the necessary 7, created considerable surprise. The advance, in part, had
been looked for, but the unusual act of a further movement
work of obtaining subscriptions ; two years being the limit
speci¬
fied for this purpose. The pamphlet before us contains the trans¬ during the intervals between Court days, produced a sudden
actions ; also, in the appendix, the report made by Hon. Mr. Aid- andrdepressing influence. The rate is still less than it was last
year at this time, when the charge for discount was 9 per cent., al¬
rich of Minnesota to the House of Representatives in
April 1860, in though the specie reserve is now half a million less.
favor of this route. This document shows this line to be the shortest
The present successive advances are understood to have been
of any proposed to the Pacific coast;
caused by the large amounts absorbed by recent
affording at once “ greater
foreign loans, the
proximity to Asia, shortest distance between water lines, greater recovery and immense activity of the cotton trade; the extensive
operations of private and joint stock concerns, which required large
proximity to Europe, it is the shortest and most direct route be¬ sums to
carry them on, without any prospect of immediate returns;
tween Asia and Europe.”
It has the easiest gradients. “ The the probability of heavy losses in the agricultural districts from the
sum of ascents and descents from St. Paul to Seattle
(or Vancou¬ cattle disease, and the manifestations of the potato blight, which
ver) is 21,787 feet against 29,387 on the Central, 48,791 on the are becoming more apparent. The combination of all these causes
35th parallel, and 38,350 on the 32d parallel route.” It touches sufficiently accounts for the action of the Bank, which inspires con¬
fidence rather than alarm from its conservative character.
Missouri river at the mouth of the Yellowstone, and near the
The rise, however, on the rate
during the last week in the quar¬
Great Falls ; and the Columbia at the head of steamboat
naviga¬ ter, when many merchants have unusually large payments to make,
tion.
would scarcely fail to produce a
depressing result. Consols and
securities of nearly all kinds receded in
The objections on account of the
price, but they subsequently
severity of the climate, and rallied. The discount
houses and joint bank raised their rates to a
the depth of the snow are utterly
untenable. It is much colder on corresponding extent with the
prices established by the Bach &
the Russian and Canada roads.
> The report says :
England,
>
in




October

21,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

At the commencement of the week the discount showed 4
per
cent at call, 4£ per cent at seven days’ notice, and 4^ per cent at 14
days’ notice. The banks offered 4 per cent for deposits.
The higher rates are drawing a considerable
supply of money from
the Continent. The applications at the bank for discount
scarcely
experienced any decrease, although the business of private and jointstock prices was sensibly affected.
The State of Massachusetts has effected a loan

cription of £424,000 in 5

by private sub*

per cent stock, with semi-annual divi¬

dends payable in London. The loan was issued at 75.
It is the intention of Messrs. C. Moore and Co.; the well known
shipowners, to establish a monthly line of packets from London to
Calcutta, sailing the 5th of each month,
commencing the 5th De¬
cember next.
The

prospectus of the Tasso Brazilian

Gold

Company (limited)

521

Aug. 15, Depositary

at
Santa Fe....

.

1,750 00

July 22, Depositary at

87,753 87

Memphis....
Sept. 23, Depositary at

30,705 84

7,053 03

331,284 79

Newbem....

261 48

831,284 79

242,708 14

2,952 00

239,756 14

32,652,622 48
Less overpaid
631,012 31
Late U. S.
depositaries

suspended
National Banks

-

4,046 31
........

45,974,009 77

76 86

8,990 24

8,546,636 95

42,427,872 82

Total..

Mints,branch mints and 32,121,610 17 116,308,975 67 20,444,060 93 104,130,034.79
Assay Office.......
3,185,267 16
Unavailble funds mlate
3,185,267 16

insurrection’ry

States

Total amount on
depos¬
it and subject to draft
Deduct amount of trans¬
fer drafts
Add amount

717,590 00

88,563 54

629,030 55

120,211,832 92 20,532,614 47
107,944,338 50

....

issued, with a proposed capital of £200,000, in 40,000 shares of
10,477,979 50
10,477,979 60
overpaid..
£5 each. The first issue is to consist of 20,000 shares, but of these
259,875 51
Total
only 14,000 are offered to the public. A contract has been made
109,733,853 42 20,792,489 98 97,446,850 00
Duduct amount over¬
for the purchase of the estates of Senor Tasso, at
drawn
Pianco, in
Parahyba, Northern Brazil, on which eight gold-bearing lodes are Deduct drafts payable,
8,524,995 56
but not reported as
stated to have been already discovered.
paid
20,792,489 98
A new undertaking is announced, under the title of the
Metropo¬ Amount to Cr. of Treas.
litan Railway Warehousing Company
(limited,) which proposes to
of United States
raise a capital of £600,000, in 30,000 shares of £20
$88,941,363 44
$88,941,863 44
each, the first
issue, however, being limited to 20,000 shares. The
Mr. McCulloch’s late
objects are
Speech.—The following extract from
to supply the want of warehouse and business
accommodation, in Mr. McCulloch’s late speech contains all
that he said with
the metropolis, in connection with the
regard
railway system, and to take to our finances :
advantage of the opportunity offered by the unoccupied ground near
And now a word in
Farringdon-road, and the railway works in progress there, for the
regard to our finances: You know that I did not
introduction into the heart of the metropolis
seek, as I did not expect to be,
of a block of build¬
Secretary of the Treasury. To this
fact I attribute in a
ings on a scale of unusual magnitude, which will combine
great degree,
railway have been manifested toward me the good feeling and indulgence that
communication below, warehousing accommodation
in the very
above, and a position I
trying and responsible
magnificent range of exhibition galleries on the uppermost
occupy. I accepted the office of
Sectetary of the Treasury
story.”
with great distrust of
At the half-yearly meeting
ability
to-day of the shareholders of the Bank with a sincere desire tomy conductto meet the public expectation, but
so
the affairs of this
of British Columbia a dividend was declared at the
great
as to aid in
rate of 10
per
restoring the credit of the government whichdepartment
cent per annum.
had been
damaged by the greatness of the public debt, and the
An arrangement has been arrived at between
uncertainty in
the British and regard to the duration, if not to the result of the war, and in
Canadian governments by which the former
bringing
up the obligations of the government to the
undertake to propose to
specie standard.
Parliament the guarantee of a loan to be
contracted by the latter
IRREDEEMABLE CURRENCY AN EVIL.
for the purchase of the Hudson’s
Bay territory, the interest and re¬
I am not one of those who
seem
disposed to repudiate coin as a mea¬
demption to be secured in the first instance on the revenues of the sure of
value, and to make a secured paper
territory, and certain Canadian securities also.
currency the standard. On
the contrary, I
belong to that class of persons, who, regarding an exclu¬
sive metallic
currency as an impracticable thing among an
and commercial
enterprising
people, nevertheless look
COMMERCIAL AND
is

....

....

....

....

*

“

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.

upon an

United States Treasurer’s

lowing

Monthly Statement.—The fol¬
is the United States Treasurer’s monthly statement for

Sep¬

tember, 1865, showing the amount to his credit at the dates
of the
last returns, as specified below, in the
Treasury and with the sev¬
eral Assistant Treasurers and
designated depositories ; the amounts
for which drafts had been issued
prior to the date of this statement,
but not yet reported as
paid, and the balances remaining at the
same date
subject to draft; Ithe amounts of transfers to and from
depositories, ordered by the'Secretary of the
Treasury, but not yet
reported as paid or credited;; and also the amounts to his
credit

available, being the

now

amounts

deposited in the Mint
branches, and the amounts withheld by Assistant Treasurers
depositaries in States lately under insurrectionary control :
Date
of last

return.

1866.

Amount
on

In what place,

in coin.

*»

,New

“

Asst.

2,744,283 70

York..’ 20,512,994

Treas’er,
Philadelphia.

"

Asst. Treas’er
St. Louis....’

31

Tr6&s

’Francisco...

O

11

Depositary

Cincinnati

..

Depositary at
Louisville...

'

,

„

Depositary at
Pittsburg...
Depositary at
Depositary at

637,959 31

4,150,867 40

49,399,681 04

1,925,193 46

47,474,4S7 53

Depositary

July a,

Depositary’at

1,053,582 05

3,830,154 36

2,339,739 98

1,490,414 38

2,591,369 70

64,784 62

2,536,585 08

39,348 13

22,793 58

16,651 55

1,745,325 69

60,565 24

1,684,760 45

117,210 14

4,295 50

112,914 64

989,452 22

1,608,228 13

3,388,683

55

24,580 61

•

-

.

141,903 33

2,597,680 35

7,397 85

1,090,611 60
........

1,016,828 50

6,676 93

215,838 75

654 60

10’241 04

562,235 02

16,738 61

424 27

213 05

1,128 04

10 °°
166 16

63,061 94
64,121 34

61,104 21

IK) 00

I’D,509 64

18,938 8»

52,113 21

policy.

By

a

cur¬

necessity,

common
of the
nations, gold and silver are the only true measure of
value. They are
the
necessary regulators of trade. I have myself no more doubt
that
these metals were
prepared by the Almighty, for this very
than I have that iron and coal
purpose,
were
prepared for the purpose for which
they are being used. I favor a well-secured convertible
paper currency
No other can to
any extent be a proper substitute for coin. Of course
it is not
expected that there shall be a dollar in coin to reserve for
every dollar of paper in circulation. This is not
necessary. For all ordin¬
ary home transactions a paper
currency is sufficient, but there are con¬
stantly occurring periods when balances between
countries, and in the
United States between its different
sections, must be settled by coin.
These balances are
insiguificant in amount, in comparison with the
transactions out of which
they arise, and when a vicious system of
credits does not too
long postpone settlements, they are arranged with¬
out
disturbing movements of coin. Whenever specie is needed for
such a purpose, or for
any other purpose, the paper
country should be convertible into it, and a circulation currency of the
which is not so
convertible will not be, and
ought not long to be, tolerated by the peo¬
ple. The "present inconvertible currency of the United States was a
necessity of the war, but now that the war has ceased, and the
govern¬
ment ought not to be
longer a borrower, the currency should be brought
up to the specie standard, and I see no
way of doing this but by with¬
drawing a portion of it from circulation.
consent

’

560,138 86

at

Aog.lB.Dep^tbS;

’

34,479 82

Croix Falls..

°®Pt. 16,




4,788,824 71

364 01

St-Paul

$

1,777,710 68

at

at

$115,597 61 $6,870,425 18

to draft.

2,868,322 18

.

“

'

531,012 31

™

Buffalo

,

and

Balances
subject

but not

deposit, repor’d paid.

-

Sept.16, Asst. Treas., N
Orleans
760,642 86
Sept. 9, Asst. Treas’er,
Denver City.
5,632 36
Sept. 30, Depositary at
Baltimore...' 1,474,727 80

Depositary

Drafts drawn,

amount
on

SeptSO, Treas’er U. S.,
Washington. $2,986,854 37
“
Asst Treas’er,
Boston
Asst. Treas’er

Total

deposit

and

irredeemable

rency as an evil which circumstances
may for a time render
but is never to be sustained as a

THE

I have

no

BUSINESS OF THE COUNTRY IN

faith, sir, in

AN

UNHEALTHY STATE.

prosperity which is the effect of a depreciated
currency, nor can I see any safe path for us to tread but that which
leads to specie
payment. The extreme high prices which now
prevail
in the United States is an
unerring indication that the business of the

country is in

an

a

unhealthy condition

We

measuring values by a
false standard.
We have a
circulating medium altogether larger than
is needed for legitimate business—the
excess is used on
speculations.
The United States are
to-day the best market in the world for foreign¬
ers to sell
in, and among the poorest to buy in. The
consequence is,
that Europe is
selling us more than she buys of us
rities, which ought not to go abroad,) and t^ere is (including our secu¬
a debt rolling
up
against us that mu9t be settled, in part at least, with coin. The
longer
the inflation continues the more difficult
will it be for us to
get back to
the solid ground of
specie payments, to which we must return sooner or
later. If Congress shall,
are

early in the approaching session authorize the
funding of legal tenders, and the work of a reduction is commenced and
carried on
resolutely but carefully and prudently, we will reach it
545,496 41
bably without serious embarrassment to legitimate business ; if notpro¬
we
212 22 shall have a brief period of
hollow and seductive prosperity, resulting
in widespread
bankruptcy and disaster. There are other objections to
1,128 04 the
present inflation. It is, I fear, corrupting the public morals. It is
80,938 61 converting the business of the country into gambling, and
seriously
diminishing the labor of the country. This is always the effect of ex¬
8,623 13 cessive
circulation. The kind of gambling
which it produces is not
158,511 M confined to the stock and produce boards, where the
yery terms which
215,184 25

THE CHRONICLE

522

by the operators indicate the nature of the transactions, but it |
spreading through our towns and iuta the rural districts. Men are J
apparently getting rich while morality languishes and the productive ,
industry of the country is being diminished. Good morals in business, j
and sober, persevering industry, if not at a discount, are considered too t
old fogy ish for the present times. But I feel that this is not the occa¬
sion for croaking, and perhaps l ought to apologize for the train of
remarks into which I have been led.
Whatever, financial troubles may
be before us, Fort Wayne will suffer as little from them as any other
city in the country. Good financial seed was sown here at an early
day.. If property is high, there are no incumbrances upon it. If expen¬
sive buildings are being erected, the owners are not indebted for them.
Business is done here on the cash principle. Our merchants generally
buy for cash and sell lor cash. We shall doubtless wake up some fine
morning and find our property worth apparently a good deal le9s than !
than at present, but if we have no debts to pay in a dearer currency ;
than that in which they were contracted, we shall have little to fear j
from any crisis that may occur.
are

used

is

•

WISE

LEGISLATION

NECESSARY.

inflation, and its effects up- j
am hopefnl that, by wise
legislation, we shall escape a financial collapse, and I um confident that
a grand future is before the United States.
I am hopeful that the currency may be brought up to the specie standard without those financial
troubles which have in all countries followed protracted and expensive
wars.
By the experience of the past four years we are led to the con¬
clusion that our people have a latent power that always inauifests itself
when required, and is equal to any emergency. I have faith, sir, that
as we have, to the astonishment of the world, raised
immense armies,
larger, I apprehend, than any single nation ever brought into the field,
and met the enormous expenses of the war without borrowing from
other nations, we shall also be able, without a financial crisis, to fund
our surplus currency and interest bearing notes, bring back the business
to a specie standard, and place the credit of the country on the most
stable and satisfactory basis. If we do this, we shall accomplish what
the soundest thinkers in Europe have considered an impossibility, and
what no other people but the free and enterprising people of the
United States, occupying the grandest country in the world, could ac¬
complish. But should we be disappointed in these hopeful expectations,
should no early check be put upon the issues of paper money, should
prices still further advance, and speculation be still further stimulated,
and the result thereof be extensive bankruptcy, depression, and hard
times, the grand destiny of this country and this government will not be
affected
The United States occupy the best portion of the temperate
zone of a continent, stetching out his arras to Europe on
the one side,
and Asia on the other, and producing all articles necessary for the sub¬
But, while I feel anxious about the present

on

5

the business and morals of the country,

I

sistence and comfort of the race. If cotton be king, he is, thank God,
enthroned again ; if bread be king, where should his capital be but in
this great valley of the Mississippi? This nation has within itself eve¬

[October 21,1865.

fully shows : That your memorialists represent to a very large extent
the shipowners of the port of New York, in reference to all matters af¬
fecting the general interests of commerce, and in their behalf respect¬
fully solicit the aid of the Secretary of the Treasury in securing relief
from the hardship caused by the operation of the existing revenue law
and regulations, whereby the lien of the shipowners, for freight
upon
goods imported into port is rendered ineffectual, and in many instances,
is practically destroyed.
The facts to which we invite the Secretary^’
attention are as follows : The lien of the shipowners for the freight car¬
ried on the voyage of importation—a lien recognized in every civilized
community—necessarily depends for its validity upon his retaining poasession of the goods. This he has a right to do until the lien ia digcharged by the payment of the freight. But the United States Govern¬
ment, through its revenue officers, for the purpose of securing the payment of duties on the same goods, sends them under “ general orders”
to the bonded warehouse, where they are held and delivered up to con¬
signees on payment of duties and storage, irrespective of any question
of freight.
The goods are thus taken put of the possession of the ship,
owner
by the supreme power before his lien is satisfied, and placed en¬
tirely beyond his control, and the possession being lost,- the lien is also
lost. It is true that the great majority of the consignees promptly pay
their freight, without reference to the lien ; but it is also true that in
many instances irresponsible consignees avail themselves of the oppor¬
tunity afforded by the law of getting their goods out of the public stores
on
payment of duties and charges only, and thereby evade paying the
freight, which is thus wholly lost to the shipowner.. The fact that the
time when the goods may be withdrawn is uncertain, and the
rapidity
with which business is transacted, make it impracticable for shipowners
to watch the delivery at the Bonded Warehouse, so as to intercept the'
goods, even if the lien could legally be reinstated by such a process.
Your memorialists submit that, inasmuch as the actual carriage from
foreign countries to our own ports is the first step toward the raising of
revenue by duties or imports, it is manifestly just and equitable that the
carrier’s lien for his freight, instead of being embarrassed and defeated
by the Government, should rather receive its protection and aid.
In this view, and rely rag upon the justice and liberality which char¬
acterize the present administration of the Treasury Department, your
memorialists request that the Hon. Secretary will, either by regulation,
or by such recommendation or representation as may properly be made
by him to Congress in aid of the passage of a law ior this purpose, ex¬
tend to the shipowners the much-needed relief which they require as
above set forth. An effectual remedy would be afforded if the freight
due could be paid by the storekeeper on receipt of the goods in store,
and added to his charges on the goods, to be collected before or on de¬
livery. Or if notice were required to be given to the shipowner before
the withdrawal of the goods by the consignee, so that his claim could
be enforced, it being understood and declared that the act of Govern¬
ment in placing goods in store is not to affect the lien for freight. The
object, iu either case, being simply as a check upon dishonest or irre¬
sponsible consignees, and not an interruption to the ordinary course of
trade, your memorialists believe that a Treasury regulation or act of
Congress securing this result would be cheerfully acquiesced in by the
entire commercial community.

rything thftft is needed to make it the greatest among the family of na¬
tions.
Coal and iron in juxtaposition and inexhaustable supply. Moun¬
tains and valleys rich enough in gold and silver to furnish the world,
for all time, with what may be needed for circulation and other uses.
The Ketchum Trust Sale.—The following stocks and bonds
Copper and lead and other minerals in no less abundance. A soil of
wonderful fertility, a climate salubrious and diversified, and, above all
belonging to the estate of the late firm of Ketchum, Son & Co., were
republican institutions, and an energetic and again united people.
sold at auction on Wednesday last by E. II. Ludlow & Co.:
CAPITAL AND LABOR IN THE SOUTH.

it is true, sir, difficult questions

We have,

growing out of the

STOCKS.

war,

yet to be settled, but I have an abiding confidence that they will be
settled as they come up for settlement, in such manner as will
strengthen the Union and add to our national renown. The labor
question of the South is one of these questions ; but if there be no
outside interference, it will not, I apprehend, be a very difficult one.
On the contrary, it is quite likely to be a self-adjusting one.
The plan¬
ter needs the labor of his former slaves, and the high price which
Southern products will command for years to come will enable him to
pay liberally for it. The colored people will soon learn that freedom
from slavery does not mean freedom from work.
The interests of the
two races will not long be antagonistic.
The whites will need the
labor of the blacks, and the blacks will need employment. There is
as much danger to be apprehended from the unwillingness of the latter
to labor for a support, as from an indisposition on the part of the former

fair wages. Like all other economical questions, it will be set¬
tled by the necessities and interests of the parties. Fortunately for the
solution of this question, and the well-being of laboring men generally,
.capital is not supreme in the United States. It does not, as,in most
other countries, hold labor under its control, and dole out to it just such
remuneration only as will make it most productive. Labor is a power
in this free country, with its cheap lands, which are within the reach of
all industrious men, and dictates terms to capital. There la no part of
to pay

the world where labor is more needed than iu the Southern States, nor
where it will soon command better prices.
This labor question at the
South will, I doubt not, be satisfactorily arranged in due time, for the
best interests of all concerned.
But I have trespassed too long upon

par

$100

SOI Mechanics’ National Banking Association, .par
10 Bank of Kentucky
...par
17 Farmers’ Loan and Trust Company
par

50
100
25
100
1(H)
100
100

*105#

260
10
20
10
5
9

100
3
250
43
22
20
26

16

other business which came up was the question
freights upon goods in bond. The following
memorial ,to the Secretary of the Treasury upon this subject was
unanimously adopted :
To Hon. High McCulloch, Secretary of the Treasury of the United
Wednesday,

among
of the collection of

States

:

The memorial of the

l

«




Shipowners’ Association of New York respect* ’

par
par

par

Indemnity Fire Insurance Company
par
United States Fire Insurance Company
par
Warren Co. (N. J.) Railroad Company
par
St. Louis, Alton, and Terre Haute Railroad, par
Illinois Central Railroad
par
Toledo, Wabash and Western Railroad
par
Marietta and Cincinnati R R, first prcferred.par
;
par
Oswego and Syracuse Railroad
Union Pacific R R Scrip, 10 per cent, paid, each
Peoria ahd Bureau Valley, leased at 7 per cent
par
per annum
Elmira, Jetterson, aud Canandaigua Railroad,
—,

5#
50
57

64#

‘>A

11

100
100

135#
37

SO¬

40#

SO

88

1,000
89

100

42

par

100

Stockbridge and Pittsfield Railroad, leased at 7
per cent per annum
par

100

70

140
500

94

Bonds.
3 Warren Co. (N. J.) Railroad 7 per cent 1875.each
2 Lackawanna and Bloomsburg Railroad 7 per ct.
1875
1 of 500; 1 of
2 Lackawanna and Bloomsburg Railroad exten¬
sion, 7 per cent 1885
1 of 100; 1 of
2 Lackawanna and Bloomsburg Railroad income
7 per cent 1867
1 of 70;
2 Weet Jersey R R, 6 per cent 1883..1 of 100;
1 Lackawanna and Western 7 per cent 1871
2 Springfield
per

Shipowners’ Association—Memorial to Secretary McCul¬

meeting of the Shipowners’ Association of this city,

Company....‘
Sterling Fire Insurance Company

95#
121

'

BONDS.

50
21
12

a

Cairo City Stock
Croton Fire Insurance

leased at 5 cent per annum
35

18

loch.—At

96

96#

Accept, again, my thanks for your courtesy, and for the at¬
have given to my desultory remarks.

your time.
tention you

-Price.

Shares.
200 Fourth National Bank.

9
5

25
4

4

City, Illinois, 8

1 of
1 of

cent 1878.. .each

1,000
1,000

Michigan Central R R, 8 per cent, I860 .... each 1,000
500
United States 6 per cent, 1867.. .3 of 1,000 ; 6 of
State of Kansas 7 per cent, 1884
..each 1,000
1,000
Des Moines Valley R R, 8 per cent, 1887.. .each
1,000
Great Western of Ill, R R, 10 per ct, 1868. .each
Cleveland, Painesville and Ashtabula (Dividend
Bonds) Railroad, 7 per cent, 1880....
each
Cleveland, Painesville and Ashtabula (Special
Mortgage Bonds) R R, 7 per cent, 1874 . .each
Racine and Mississippi Railroad, 8 per cent,
1875, (first division, first mortgage)..... .each
Racine and Mississippi Railroad (2d Division) 8
per cent, 1876, 1st mort
each

80
102
90

107#
119
57

88#
98#

Also, for account of whom it may concern.
Toledo, Peoria, and Warsaw Railroad, 7
each
cent, 1894
80 Shares Clinton Fire Insurance Company.... par
5 Bonds

per

L000

100

74

80#

98

October 21,

the chronicle.

1866.J

®I)C Hankers’ <&a?ette.

523

operating for higher prices

strong, and, if possible, will
same time, the tone of the mar¬
ket is decidedly in favor of the bear side; and further decline
October 20, 1865, P. M.
a
in prices would seem not
The Money Market.—‘Monetary affairs have been, during
improbable from the prevailing tone
of monetary affairs.
the week, in a condition closely bordering upon panic.
The following have been the closing
A
combination of causes has tended to produce a greater scar¬ quotations at the beginning, middle and close of the week :
Oct. 17.
Oct. 14.
Oct. 20.
city of currency than has been experienced at any time since
Canton Company.
41*
39*
Quicksilver
the issuing of legal tenders.
48
49*
49*
The Western banks have had
Mariposa
12
11
11*
Cumberland Coal
for several days an unusually active demand for money, for
40
47;*
45*
New York Central
100*
97*
94*
Erie
91*
90*
86*
purchasing produce, which has compelled them to draw upon
Hudson River
108*
106*
103*
their deposits in this city. The flow of currency to the
Reading
115
116*
113*
Michigan Central....114
114
South is also largely increasing.
Illinois Central
137
137*
The bears in stocks, in or
132*
Cleveland and Pittsburgh
77
7S*
72*
embarrass their opponents, have employed every
der to
31*
30%
29*
| Northwestern preferred
Northwestern
66
66*
62*
means in their power to produce either an actual
Rock Island
109
106
108*
stringency |
Fort Wayne
101
98%
96*
or the apprehension
of such a condition of things, having
j The English capitalists visiti
the United States in con¬
withdrawn their balances from the banks and borrowed
sustain the market.

are

At the

:

j

large
to be held off the market. The rapid
operations, and the general extension of
manufacturing, have very largely increased the supply of
bills offering for discount.
The funding loan has withdrawn
nearly forty millions of compound interest notes from hoard,
causing an equivalent contraction of the circulation, and has, I
at the same time, induced the hoarding of interest
bearing
amounts of currency
increase in business

notes

heretofore in circulation.!

These combined

sources

nection with the interests of the Atlantic and Great Western

road, have had an interview with the Directors of the Erie
road, with a view to making arrangements for double track¬
ing the Erie from New York 'to Salamanca, and combining
the running arrangements of the two roads; tho
requisite
capital to be procured in London. As yet, the negotiations
have come to no definite result, but it would seem
probable
that the project will be consummated.
of

demand have

United States Securities.—Governments have been
operated to produce an extreme stringency; j
which again intensifies itself by) producing a caution under seriously disturbed
by the stringency in money and the pros¬
which both banks and individuals seek to increase their re¬ pects of the funding process. The news
by the Scotia, hav¬
serves of currency,
thereby stimulating the contraction of ing excited apprehensions of a decline in Five Twenties at
the actual circulation.
Some of the banks have been com¬ London and a rise in the gold
premium on this side, has
also produced a disposition to sell Five Twenties. Parties
pelled to pay out their compound interest notes, in order to
meet the pressing demands of depositors ; and, in some cas¬ unable to borrow money have thrown their securities
upon
es, legal tenders have been bought at a premium of TL@f the market, and banks driven for currency have been com¬
per cent.
pelled to realise upon their Governments. A large supply
On call loans, the rate of interest has ranged
of Seven Twenties especially has come into the market in
nominally at
at 7 per cent; but, in
many cases, a heavy commission has this way, producing a decline in the 2nd series to 97—a fall
been added.
To-day large amounts could be readily loaned of If since last Friday. The old issue of Five Twenties
to stock firms at 9 per cent.
The banks are contracting their has declined 2J-; new issue, If; Ten Forties, It, and 1 yr.
loans as much* as possible.
Private bankers report their Certificates, f.

Eastern balances drawn down much lower than usual, and
those having balances owing from Boston find

The decline in Five Twenties has lessened
ments to

induce¬

funding loan, the subscriptions to
gettingthem in.
reported at $40,000,000, for the whole coun¬
The very accive demand for discounts is a
prominent fea¬ try. Compound interest notes also have declined, in sym¬
ture.
Cotton bills, produce commission bills,
drygoods pathy with the discouragements to the funding process.
commission and grocers paper are
The following were the closing quotations for
accumulating rapidly upon
leading gov¬
the market.
Bankers give these borrowers a preference over ernment securities at the beginning, middle and close of the
stock brokers; but they find it
impossible to take one half
Oct. 14. Oct. 17. Oct. 20.
the quantity of bills offered, and make their selections with
U. S. 6’s, 1SS1 coup
107
107%
107*

difficulty in

which

*

the

subscribe to the

are now

•

unusual

care.

second class
viz:

Prime bills

names

vary

are

discounted at 7@8 per cent;

widely and have to day high rates,

9@ 15 per cent.

Railroad

and

Miscellaneous Stocks.—The

in the
money market has checked
for a rise in stock.
Brokers,

derangement

U.
U.
U.
LT.

S. 5-25'b, c. o. las
S. 5-20's, c. n. iss
S. 10-40’s, coup
S. 7-30 Treas. Note
2nd Series
U. S. 6’i, certif. n. is»

Gold Market.—The

105*
102%
93*

1

104%

102%
93*

103*
101*
92%

rOCO v*\

98

97

98*

98*

97*

general tendency of the premium

on

the late active speculation
gold, during the week, has been upward, the lowest price on
having found it difficult to bor¬
Saturday last being 144|, and the highest yesterday 146#.
row, have been compelled to throw a considerable amount
At the same time, the demand for customs has been less
of securities on the
market, producin g a general decline in than of
late, and the exports moderate. Owing to the con¬
quotations, ranging from 2 to
per cent. There has been tinued
large imports and the high prices of produce here
however, no selling to realise money, on the part of the out¬
having prevented an increase in the exports, the anticipations
side public; which has enabled the bull
cliques to maintain of
large shipments of specie at no distant date have been re¬
prices better than they otherwise could. The bears have
vived.
The advance in the Bank of England rate of dis¬
used every effort to
put down prices, so as to enable them to count to 7
per cent has raised an expectation that English
cover their
large outstanding “ short ” contracts ; they have firms here will be called
upon for remittances in specie.
been partially
successful, and yesterday and to-day have These are the considerations that have most
prominently
bought quite largely, especially of Erie, Reading, Michigan contributed to the
rise in the premium.
Southern and Cleveland &
Pittsburg, at the same time put¬
The following have been the highest and lowest
quotations
ting out a considerable line of “ short ” options of 30 and
for gold on each of the last six days:
60 days. These new sellers’
options will encourage the bulls
Highest. Lowest.
Highest. Lowest
xo h .Id
144# 144# Oct..18
up the market, so as to enable them to sell out, at a Oct. 14
146# 146#
Oct 16'.
145# 144# Oct. 19
146# 146#
fuff Vaen the contracts have to be covered. The
Oct 17.....




clique^

146#

145#

Oct 20.,

146#

146

THE CHRONICLE.

524
The
amount

receipts of specie for Saturday and Wednesday
to $785,820.

The transactions for last week at the Custom-house and

Sub-treasury

were as

follows

Sub-T;REASURY.

,

Receipts.

08

1,860,665
1,864,926
4,634,148
7.860,888
2,978,721

Oct 12
Oct. 18
Oct 14

Balance

97
60
73
90

$21,662,912 57
Sub-treasury on morning of Oct. 9....

during the week.

Saturday evening
during the week

on

1,906,266
6,368,640
6,136,690
8,293,161

49

76
62
79

Custom

2,185,542 38

Ending

House.

Sub-Treasury

,

Changes in

.

Payments. Receipts. Balances.
Julyl.... $1,643,507 $32,420,347 $27,420,613 $42,827,099
“

8....

"

15...
22....

“
“

29....

Aug.

6....
12....
19....

“

“

1,493,592
2,834,349
2,378,662
2,516,631
2,943.682
2,790,322
2,072,490
3.254,659

26,804,905
24.213,367
22,965.427
23.598,588

39.420.398

83,213.240
27,620,621

48,420,270
53,075,464

31,012,926

60,489.802

33.675.5-33
23,991.766
20.866,095
30,954,029

60.940,689
58,627,293
53.396.378

dec

59,522.061

incr

2^236,726

26.097.010
24.819.346
14.930,586

3,665,972

27,040.040

17,107,883
33,576,1*24

16,699.260
23,696,866

19,774,593
27.426,545

28,602,389

24,504.101

25,408.765

24,335,221

14....

1,991,742

21,552,91*2

19,367,370

“

75,070,454

7....

2,715,437
2,999.351
2,623,310
3,590,114

incr

61,699,358
68,235.442
71.340,775

70,972,166
69.898,621
67,713,079

“

26....
fcept. 2....
‘r
9....
“
16....
•*
23....
“

30....

Oet.
“

Balances,
dec
$4,999,734

23*403,204

33,2*24,646
26,305,162

Totals •••#«••

“

“
11

dec

3,501,701
8,999,872
4,655,194
7,414.338
450,887
2,313,396
5,230,915
6,1*25,683

Bankers’

days

Bankers’

days

Sterling, 60
109#® 109#

Sterling, 3

110

Merchants’

Francs, long date....
Francs, short date....

@ 110#
108#® 109
5.18# @5.17#
6.15 @6.12#

average

Antwerp

Loans

.

Amsterdam
Frankfort
Bremen
Prussian Thalers

Hamburg

5.20 @5.17#
40#@ 40%
40#@ 40#
78#@ 79
70#@ 71#
3o#@^36#

$6,756,872
5,814,868

Tradesmen’s
Fulton
Chemical....
Mercht. Exchange..
National
Butch. & Drovers..
Mech’s & Trad’s....
Greenwich
Leather Manf.......
Seventh W ard......
State of N. Y
Amer. Exchange...
Commerce

6,606,968
8,177,067
2,324,077
5,919,549
2,7i1,069
2,192,344

684,S64

2,314,024
1,819,294
886.689

2,849,495
709,668
5,128,245
9,409,235
8,788,545

61,816
66,158
19,592
123,356
48,478

Citizens’

Nassau
Market
St. Nicholas
Shoe and Leather..
Corn Exchange....
Continental

Commonwealth....
Oriental

Marine
Atlantic

Imp. and Traders..
Park
Mec. Bk. As
Grocers
North River
East River.........
Man. and Mer....»




9,037
40,000

103.794

904,731
1,361,290
194,175

16,263
1,464,185
818,422
269,430

16,451
266,660
47,240
41,524
124,916
117,197
24,252
112,811
23,081
209,004
95,305
60,842
66,575

Irving
Metropolitan

.

4,208
30,966
91,318

19.866

1,901,922

2,447,022

153,223

459,233

66 592

1,534,S89
1,684,189
8,938,584
1,370,433
2,867,789
2,611,539
2.834.233
2,906,330
2,851,600
8,250,614
2,007,687
1,157,459
1,727,602
1,106,495
4,287,440
13,101,642
1,787,051
1,139,500
1,711,519
844,624 '
1,591,955

22,690

43,702
313,743

3,706,331

People’s

321,407
25,096

256,655

Ocean

North Amer
Hanover

8,7 i 5
17,336

970.778

Mercantile
Pacific

4,703,659
1,790,793
1,891,703

"

25.610

5.885,398
2,828,552

Chatham..

$150,000
14,322
149,416
128,757

146,604

Broadway

Republic

Circula¬
tion.

Specie.
$8,933,921

6,975,045

.

989,163

12,159

53,490

278,911

67,289

182,364,146

50,459495

11,722,847

89,877

298,950
126,923

433.794
5.978
9,257

23,214
15,985
10,326
49,450

15,705"
4,9S4
278,364
870,267
485,293

59.721

36.000

139/271
78.297

105,819
93,427

Net

Deposits.
$9,381,894
5,256-004
4.852.968
8,845.751
3,373,613
7,985,61 S
3,231,618
2,242,591
2,003,253
2,475,462
5,889,573
1,805,055
923,646
1,660,S15

1.389.387
743,876
2,027,181
656,375
4,111.667
6.435.387
8,602,188
5,930,251
2,130,271
2,840,863
1.513.562

8.68.1,153”
1.571.562
1.263,2892,765,478
1,669,05S
1,426,581
6,174,044
1,062,493
1,909,711
2,225,139
1,241,105
1,988,53*2
1,734,702
2,052,198
8,275, S*26

32,592

109.777

931.678

66,485

100,000

66,070

43,882
116,867

1.584,526
958,855
3,461,394
11,735,942
1,351,859
1,006,209
1,487,994
623.968
1,184,257

90,932

208,558
26.565
36.450

609,004
135,422
8,019
13,941

12,723
23,770

191,975
1,295

150,§W

hWM

15,897

21,400

previous week

are

Dec.$6,140,330

I Legal Tenders
)

752,250

Dec. 8,052.557

,

,

drawal of Western balances to meet the pressure for accom¬
modation by the produce dealers of Chicago and Cincinnati.

The reduction in loans is less than

expected. The large
specie is partly owing to the payment of Novem¬
ber coupons, and partly to the sales of coin :by the Sub
Treasury.
The following comparison shows the totals of the Banks’
Statements for each week of the current year since July 1:

Legal
Tenders

$*2,634,772
1,506,754
858,655
887,881
484.365

3,36S,183

Circula-

Legal
Average
Deposits. Tenders. Clearings.
tion.
216,585,421 15,S54,990 5,81S,445 191,656,773 60,904.445 473,720,318
218,541,975 19,100,594 6,001,774 198,199,005 62,519,708 875.504,141
221,285,082 20,400,441 6,250,945 200,420,2S3 60,054,646 550,959,312
222,960,305 20,332,903 6,589,766 193,790,096 52,756,229 517,174,956
222,341,966 20,773.155 7,085.454 186;766,671 46,956,782 494,854,139
219,102,793 19,400,880 7,656 370 178,247,674 43,561,973 576,961,322
215,459,342 20,163,292 8,050,361 175,738,185 43,006,428 463.488.275
210,827,581 19,604,636 7,639,575 174.593,016 45,583,980 492,697,789
209,423,3*15 16,023,615 7,93-2,414 179,083,676 54,249,808 372,124,309
211,394,370 14,443,827 8,509,175 180.316,658 57,271,739 395.963,678
214,189,842 13,755,824 8,814,142 179,353,511 56,320,734 434,257,876
215,552,881 14,604,159 9,104,550 177,501,735 53,153,235 427.195.276
215,879,454 14,22-2,062 9,294,805 177,820,789 54,0 IS,475 893,503,668
231,818,640 13,648,182 10,645,S97 183,830,716 57,665,674 463,352,116
22S,520,727 18,470,134 10,970,397 188,50l,4S6 58,511,752 572,703.232
227,541,884 15,890,775 11,722,847 1S2,364,156 50,459,195 699,848,496
Loans.

July 1....
July 8....
July 15....
July 22....
July 29....
Aug. 5
Aug. 12....
Aug. 19
Aug. 26
Sept. 2....
Sept. 9 ...
Sept.16....
Sept.23....
SeptSO....
Oct

7....

Oct. 14....

Specie.

=•

Philadelphia Banks.—The

following comparative state¬
condition of the leading items of
Philadelphia banks for the last and previous weeks:

ment shows

the

the average

.

Circulation
U. S.

Oct. 17.

61,403,865

Loans.

Date.

479,211

2,944,418
95,026
489,744

136,953
213,575

338,122
574, i 03
1,982,435
3,481,167
1,979,588
654,660
623,741
280,683
911,867
576,362
270,226

Ffthriiarv 6.

....

“

306,189

1,323,000
459,711
829,478

754,193
489,359
805,000

184,000
746,000
848.496

118,640
729,300
141,623
520,980-

3,265,910
825,842
859,111
255.855

285,060
622.856

mwi Jj

16,201,787 Dec...

201,670

6,
April 3,
May 1,
•Tune

5,

July 10,
Aug. 14,
Sept. 4,
Sept. 11,
Sept. 18,
“

Oct.

25,

3,
Oct, 10,
Oct. 17,
*

Banks

it

tt
<t

tt

64,529,713

44

49,693,065

49'93R573

t*

49^607,233
49*924^281

4b
44

44

1,262,258
1,258,782
1,187,700
1,153,931
1,106,242
1,079,635

50^096,499

44

...'

44

$4,504,115
2,793,468
4,893,173
5,346,021
5,893,626
6,441,407

1,343.223

50,522,080
51,726,389
53,095,683
60,188,778

u

Circulation.

Specie.
$4,510,750
1,803,583
1,702,776
1,389,264

$37,679,675
48,059,403
50,269,478

49^228^540

Mn.rp.h

49,742,036

Deposits
$28,429,lt8
89,845,968
38,496,337
38,391,622
38,316,847

p;717,758
6,758.585

44,794,824

41,518,578
41,344,056
44,561,743
33,417,473

6,989,217
6,980.826
7,007,727
7,014,580
7,038,403
7,056,984
7,082,197

38,347,232
37,238,078

7,084,667

1,089,880
1,092,755
1,037,705
1,060,579

49,682,319

36,252,038

37,0S2,478

37,461,269

37^405^333

Troy—The

following is an abstract of the last
quarterly returns of. the banks of Troy, New York:
of

1,126,545
305.106

23,874
883,693
867,198
976,040
2,470

1,060,579

following comparison shows the condition of the Phil¬
adelphia banks at stated periods since 1865 :
January 5,1863
January 3, 1865

616.S26

$69,718

Inc....
Dec...
8,636,319
6,588,369 Dec...
86,262,038 Dec...
7,084,667 Inc

,

$14,44*2,350
49,682,350 Dec...

The

681,000
975,467

$14,442,350
49,742,037
1,036,705
4,537,012
6,960,567
87,238,078
7,082,197

Legal Tender and

Demand Notes

781,662
661.013

was

increase in

Deposits

-Average amount of-

4,291,017

City

122,400

The decrease of

other Banks
Due to other Banks

1,036,774
1,020.121
235,110
158,807
1,504,400

7,086,7S2
6,375.147
4.247.232

9,157

15,890,775

Inc.

Circulation.;

...

Loans and

431,419
1,778,918
1,660,688

8,653,496
282,225

r

Oct. 10.

:

Discounts.

2^55,667

16,387

Inc. 2,420,641

following statement shows Capital
Loans
City of New Specie
York, for the wreek ending with the commencement of busi¬ Due from

Banks.
New York
Manhattan
Merchants
Mechanics
Union
America
Phenix

1,056,900
5,996,519

$978,848 J NetJDeposits

Dec.

’

Specie

the condition of the Associated Banks of the
Oct. 14, 1865

11,001,678

269,821
898,780
886,570

30,483

$227,541,844

New York City Banks.—The

ness on

1,051,800

•

follows:

as

6.177.297

6,536,084
3,105.333
8.7*29,679
4,098,288
1,073,544
2,185,542

business
in Exchange. —The Scotia’s advices temporarily strengthened
the. rates, but the market has fallen back again, and closes
easy. The increasing supply of cotton bills has a tendency to
keep down the rates on London and Paris. We quote :
an

*

The deviations from the returns of the

..

Foreign Exchange.—There has been

•

50,465
12,002

467,533
..

•

$8,052,557 in legal tenders is the most
prominent feature in the statement,—a change partly attri¬
69,898,621 68 butable to the
payment of compound interest notes into the
$89,265,991 87 Sub-Treasury for conversion into the 5-20 bonds, and partly
21,552,912 57
to large exports to the South and the West.
The decrease
$67,713,079 30 of over six millions in deposits is owing chiefly to the with¬

following table shows the aggregate transactions for
week from the 1st July :

Weeks

Bull’s Head

4

$19,367,370 19

The
each

Dry Dock

*

$2,374,164 04
1,288,567 69

$2,863,662 89

Decrease

66,901
1,2*8*531
6,600,307
8,281,843
221,789
913,875

...

Receipts.

Payments.

Oct. 9
Oct 10
Oct 11

Deduct payments

Central
Second National.
Ninth National..
First National...

Manufacturers’..

:

Custom House.

Total
Balance in

[October 21,1865.

*.,

Troy City National....

First National
Central National
Union National
Merch’ts & Mechs’ Nat.
United National
Mutual National
National State
National Exchange ....

Banks

of

Deposits.

Profit!.

513,984
358,000
334,282
241,013

36,485
27,306
51,823
20,986

363,475
244,482

Circulation.

Loans.

Manufacturers’ Nat..

76,876
43,938
10,864
27,245
59,402
8,440

636,689

132,300

677,125

685,977

430,000
267,100
197,078
199,473
148,750

410,986
307,922
1,100,492
165,806

100,000

462,582

179,735
188,763
87,500

249,437
971,143
108,210

369,296

602,235
644,276

,

*

Pittsburg, Pa.—-The following figures

show

twenty banks of Pittsburg, Pa., on the
1st instant, compared with the returns made on the 1st of

the condition of the

July last;

October

THE CHRONICLE.

21,1865.]

Oct, 1.

Jnly 1.

$9,699,762

circulation,
National circulation
Deposits
Loans and discounts
Coin, legal teuder and bank notes.....
Due from banks
United States securities

Old

$9,629,400

6,291,676
6,340,100
13,900,240
14,062,832

Capital

4,624,134

2,962,893

6,633,900
12,713,743
13,616,062
7,163,684
2,649,388

12,127,396

11,271,963

6,743,273

National Banks.—The

following is a list of national banks
authorized during the week ending Oct. 14. Those organi¬
zations marked with a * represent old banks, whose conver¬
sions have been long pending and are but just completed.
Those banks marked f are those whose application were filed
and approved prior to July 1, 1865, and their organization
delayed for for various causes:
~
Location.

Name.

*Mifflin

County

Nat. Bank of

Capital.

.Lewiston, Pa..........

.{.First
fFirst

Fredericksburg

$100,000
100,000
50,000
100,000

St. Soseph, Mo
Independence, Iowa...
Fredericksburg, Ya....

♦Yermont

St.

Central
First
♦National

Boonesville, Mo

Albans, Yt

200,000

100,000

Staunton, Ya

Exchange

52,400

.Lansingburg, N. Y
. Savannah, Ga........
Monroe, Michigan
{First
.Flint, Michigan
*Firsfc
Frederick, Md
f First
Lawrence, Kansas
City.New Orleans, La.....

100,000
100,000
100,000
100,000

....

City
f First

399,804,213

The whole number of national banks
an

authorized

now

capital of.

401,406,613

Amount of circulation issued to the national banks for
the week ending
Saturday, Oct. 13

3,615,750
194,182,630

Total

$197,798,380

The

following national banks have been designated by the
Secretary of the Treasury as additional depositories of the
public

Central National Bank, Boonesville, Mo.
Bank, Oshkosh, Wis.
The following comparison shows the
progress of the
national banks, in respect to number,
capital and circulation,
from J11I3 1, 1865, to latest dates :
money:
First National

Date.
“

1,
15.

Banks.
(«

1,378

U
•

•

Aug. 6,

•••••••••••••.•a

u

19,

••••••••••••••a

u

“

Sept. 2,
“

“

“
“

Oct
“

9,
16,
23,
80,

7,
14,

Circulation.

146,927,975

864,020,756
877,574,281
890,000,000
894,104,333
394,960,333

154,120,015
165,794,440

9m-mmmmmmmmmm

u
U
u

a

397,066,701

172,664,460
177,487,220
179,981,520
183,402,870
186,081,720

1,573
1,678
1,592

u
ii
mm

Capital.

340,938,000

1,667

a

•

1,447
1,604

898,334,201
399,354,212

191,411,480
194,182,630

401,406,013

197,798,380

1,630
1,549
1,556
1,560

895,310,333

Foreign Banking.—The
Bank of

following is the statement of the
England for the week ending Oct. 4, 1865 :
ISSUE DEPARTMENT.

Notes issued

Government debt....
Other securities

£11,015,100

Gold coin and bullion.

£27,090,285

12,440,285

3,634,900

£27,090,285

£27,090,285
BANKING DEPARTMENT.

Proprietors*capital... £14,553,000
Rest

Public deposits
Other deposits
Seven day <fe other bills

Government securities

3,823,042 Other securities
6,891,910 Notes...

18,798,588 Gold and silver coin..

An increase of circulation of
An increase of
public deposits of......
An increase of other
Deposits of
No change in Government
An increase of other securities o£
A decrease of bullion of
An increase of rest of
A decrease of reserve of

to

£10,384,209
24,170,280
4,362,125

743,552

593,626

£39,660,166
The preceding accounts, compared
vious week, exhibit:

£39,660,166

New reserve.,
Notes in circulation and at the branches..
Drafts drawn by the bank on the branches
of the bank payable in Paris or in the

4,000,000

8,881,685
141,806,967
183,000,822
34,859,717
1,333,167
6,852,249
1,427,623
752,993
15,547,955

provinces
Accounts current at Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Dividends payable
Various discounts
Re-discounts

0

883,268,625 0

Treasury account

_

Surplus of receipts not distributed
Sundries

53
91
18
0
75
25
17
36
3

1,492,882,332 84

pre¬

Government stock reserve
Ditto other securities
Securities held
Hotel and property of the bank

& branches

Expenses of management
Sundries

BANK

(Marked thus *

are ®

£

'

470,917,716
365,405
337,843.018
320,168,102
41,893,800
12,627,600
14,075,800
9,136,100
31,583,900
21,974,275

securities.
1,647,964
776,982
11,864

2,002,497

0

0
28

7,947,942
192,217,046
149,468,712
31,418,901
1,411,124
5,928,512
1,427,623
752,993
9,502,599

-

87
96
0
75
65

17
36

48
1,450,576,567 67

44

492,683,502 93
339,873 90
285,511,991 48
304,379,301 0
48,254,931 90
12,630,300 0
13,996,100 0
9,273,700 0
31,110,900 0
21,626,275 0

73
5
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

674,900

658,200 0

0

465,450
60,000,000
12,980,760
36,646,487

470,450 0

60,000,000 0
12,980,750 14
36,449,737 91
1)0,000,000 0

8,443,492 0
1,524,264 23
11,753,520 84
1,492,882,332 84

STOCK

0
0

14
91
100,000,000 0
8,440,244 0
1,474,238 48
10,204,310 98

1,460,676,567 67

LIST.
Market.

Dividend.

Periods.

Amount.

e3
83 ri

Bid. Ask.

Last Paid.

133

100 3,000,000 Jan. and July... July
America
100
American*
500,000 April and Oct... Oct
American Exchange* 100 5,000,000 May and Nov... May
100
Atlantic*
300,000 Jan. and July... July
50
Atlantic (Brooklyn)*
500,000 Jan. and July... July

Bowery*
Broadway*
Brooklyn

-

Bull’s Head*
Butchers & Drovers’
Central*
Central (Brooklyn)..
Chatham*
Chemical*
Citizens’
.

City*
City (Brooklyn)*—
Commerce*

Commonwealth*....
Continental*
Com Exchange
Croton*

.....

Currency*
Dry Dock
East River*

Eighth*
Fifth*
First*
First (Brooklyn)* ...
Fourth*
Fulton*
Far. & Cit.(Wm’sbg)
Gallatin
Greenwich
Grocers’*
Hanover*

Importers &Traders’
Irving*

.

LeatherMannfact’r s *

Long. Island (Brook.)

Manhattan
Manufacturers’*....
Manufac.&Merch"nt@
Marine
Market*

Mechanics’
Mechanics’ (Brook.)
Mech. Bank. Asso.*.
Meehan. & Traders’*
Mercantile*
Merchants’*
Merchants’ Exch.*

Metropolitan*
Nassau
Nassau

....

(Brooklyn)..

National
New York*
New York County*.
Ne wYorkExchange*
Ninth*
North America*
North River
Ocean

Oriental

438,100
8,960

2

14

Companies.

Pacific

£1,288,2 58

n

CREDITOR

Cash and bullion
Commercial bills overdue
Ditto discounted in Paris
Ditto in the branches
Advances on bullion in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on public securities in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on obligations and railway shares
Ditto in the provinces
.
Ditto on securities in the Credit Foncier
in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
.
Ditto to the State

....

with those of the

The following is the return of the Bank of France, made up
Oct, 5th, ’file return for the previous week is aided i




182,500,000
7,044,776
22.106,750
4,000,000
834,850,575

.

Previously

July

Reserve of the hank and branches

National.)

authorized is

Sept. 28,1865.

182,500,000 0
7,044,776 2
22,105,750 14

Capital.

$1,602,400

Previously authorized
1,592, with

Capital of the bank
Profits, in addition to capital

100,000
300,000

represent an authorized capital of

Oct. 5, 1865.
f.
c.

DEBTOR.

100,000

....

These banks

525

Park*

Peoples’

Phoenix*

Republic*

St. Nicholas’*
Seventh Ward*
Second *
Shoe & Leather
Sixth*
State of New York..
Tenth*

Third*
Tradesmen’s*.
Union....

Williamsburg City..

25
50
50
25
100
50
25
100
25

100
50
100
100
100
100
100
100
30
50
100
100
100

1,000,000 Jan. and July...
300,000 Jan. and July...
200,000 Quarterly
800,000 Jan. and July
2,000,000 May and Nov
200,000 Jan. and July
450,000 Jan. and July
300,000 Quarterly
400,000 Jan. and July...
1,000,000 May and Nov...
300,000 Jan. and July...
10,000,000 Jan. and July.
750,000 Jan. and July...
3,000,000 Jan. and July...
1,000,000 Feb. and Aug...
200,000
100,000 .Quarterly.
200,000 Quarterly
259,150 Jan. and July...
250,000 Jan. and July...
150,000 Jan. and July...
500,000 May and Nov...

100
30
20
100
25
50
100
100
50
50
50
50
30
100
30
100
25
50
50
25
100
50
50
100
100
100
50
100
100
100
100
100
50
50
50
50
100
25
20
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
40

..

..

..

..

.

.

.

-

Jan. and July...
5,000,000 March and Sept.
600,000 May and Nov...
160,000 March and Sept.
1,500,000 April and Oct...
200,000 May and Nov...
300,000 Jan. and July...
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
1,500,000 Jan. and July...
500,000 Jan. and Jnly...
600,000 Feb. and Ang...
400,000 Feb. and Aug...
2,050,000 Feb. and Aug...
210,000 April and Oct...
500,000 Jan. and July...
400,000 Feb. and Ang...
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
2,000,000 Jan. and Jnly...
500,000 Jan. and July...
500,000 May and Nov,..
600,000 May and Nov...
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
3,000,000 June and Dec
1,235,000 Jan. and July...
4,000,000 Jan. and July...
1,000,000 Jan. and July..,
300,000 Jan. and Jnly..
1,500,000 April and Oct..,
.3,000,000 Jan. and July..,
200,000 Jan. and July...
300,000 Jan. and July..,
1,000,000 Jan. and Jnly...
1,000,000 Jan. and July..,
400,000 Jan. and July..,
1,000,000 Feb. and Ang..
300,000 Feb. and Ang..
422,700 May and Nov..
2,000,000 Jan. and July..
412,500 Jan. and July..
1,800,000 Jan. and July..,
2,000,000 Feb- and Aug..,
1,000,000 Feb. and Ang..,
500,000 Jap. and July..
300,000 May and Nov
1,600,000 April and Oct.
200,000 May and Nov..
2,000,000 May and Nov..
1,000,000 Jan. and July..
1,000,000 Feb, and Ang..
1,000,000 Jan. and July,.
..

.

lie
103

12 200

July
July
July
July
May
July
July
July
July

5
7

li2X
4»hI

—

7 130
6

..5 & 5 ex.

.

6 176

May
July

6 107* 110

July

July

100

July
Aug

108*

Oct

94

16

.

8
July
4
Jnly
6
July
July .5 & 3 ex.
.10 205
May
July ...7 & 5 ex.
96'
Sept
May
—
Sept
Oct

97#

6
6
5 110
4 96
4 108
5

Aug
Aug,

99

6

May
July
July
Jnly
July
Aug

127

Oct.

July
Aug.
110
July
July ..5 &5 ex 112
July
106
May

115

Nov

July

6 110# 111
July
July ...5 & 5 ex. lie' ne
Jnly
4
July
April
114 115
July
July
Jnly
104 105
Jnly
110
July ...5 & 6 ex.
Jnly
90
Aug
Aug,
May
July .6 & 10 ex. 146 150
July :.
5110
July
5 95 loo’
Ang
5109
Ang
6 99 ids'
Jnly
May
—
4100 105
April
June

.
.

,

.

.

May

—

...

May
6
Jnly ...........6 ...
Ang..
5
July ...6 & 4 ex. 126
50 1,600,000 May and Nor.. May
--..6 <ii
5v

140

600,000 Jan. and July,, .'July

...

11

4|

*v

lia
•

rnm

mm*

ih‘

526

THE CHRONICLE.

[October 21,1865.

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.
(REPRESENTED BY THE CLOSING SALE REPORTED OFFICLSJLLY ON EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, OCTOBER
20.)
Mon.

S&tur.

SECURITIES.

Tne».

Wed. .Thur.

~l

American (Sold Coin
National.
United States 6s, 18(57
registered,
6s, 18(58
coupon.
6s, 18(58
registered.
6s, 1881
:
coupon.
6s, 1881
registered.
(5s, 5-20s
coupon.; 105 is
6s, 5-20s
registered., 102
6s, 5-20s (2d issue)
coupon] 102%
do
5s, 5.20s
registered:
6s, 5.20s (3d issuJ)... —coupon]

I
Oregon War. 1S81
do.
do.
(i yearly).

1871
1871
1874
1874
5s, 10-40s
5s, 10-40s
do
do
do

coupon.

registered.

102

!

|

:

'

—

93% 93%

93%

—

92%

registered.

do

98%
98%
98%
98%

98%

98%
1 97%
97%; 97%
98%; 98%

9S%

97%

98 ■! 98

97%

98%}

—

j

115

—

97%

97%
|
86

6s, 1878
6s, 1883
7s, 1868
7s, 1878
1

HR.)...

■

nn

•

'

•

1

|

■

85

!

,98
‘oo

—

83

72

| 82%

71

82%

|

S4

Municipal.

114

63

-

71%

68% 5S

89
63

i00% 99% 97% 98
[
29%

i
28%

99%

95%

28%

99%
116

26%
96% 96%
113%

71

100
100
.100
50

—

preferred.... 50

97

a

97

97

97

97

97

96

2d mort

2d mortgage
Income

97

98

Interest

Extension....
1st

2d

do

.

4th mortgage

do

101

2d mort.

do

95

95

Chicago, extended

Harlem, 1st mortgage, 1869-72
do
Consolidated and Sinking Fund.....
do

1

Hudson

2d mortgage,

1868

River, 1st mortgage, 1869
do
2d mortgage, (S. F.), 1885
do
3d mortgage, 1875
do
convertible, 1867

j

5s, 1868

103

Illinois Central 7s, 1875
Lackawanna and Western Bonds
Marietta and Cincinnati, 1st mortgage

1

5s, 1870

5s, 1873
5s, 1S74
5s, 1875

102%

107

Michigan Central 8s, 1869-72
do

5s, 1876

do

8s, new, 1882

.

Michigan Southern, Sinking Fund

5s, 1890

do
2d mortgage, 7s.
do
Goshen Line, 1868
Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien, 1st mort....
Milwaukee and St. Paul, 1st mortgage
do
do
Income

miscellaneous.
100
100

Canton, Baltimore.;

.100
100
ioo
100
ioo
50
50
IOO

Central Coal

Central American Transit
Cumberland Coal, preferred
Delaware & Hudson Canal
Harlem Gas
;
Manhattan Gas Light

Mariposa Mining
Metropolitan Gas

New York Gas

70

—

_

—

1 *
41% 4k 1

37

47%

37
47
147

12

|
x

143

40% 39%
50

|

45% 45%; 42% | 40

147

11%

11%

11%

11

’

Nicaragua Transit

Pacific Mail Steamship

united States
Telegraph
Western Union Telegraph..
,...

-..1001

49% 49%

174
49% 50

72

73%

72

70
i

170

48%. 48
70

86

Mississippi and Missouri, Land Grants

do
do
do

42

,

do
do ;

Toledo and
do
do
do

do

43

45

do
do
do

6s, subscription
7s, 1876
7s, convertible, 1876.
'
Ohio and Mississippi, 1st mortgage
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne aud Chicago, 1st mort..

do
do

—

100
50
100
100
100

—

90

New York Central 6s, 1883
do
do
6s, 1887
do
do
6s, Real Estate

do

do

do

do

St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute,

100

Scrip

Wyoming Valley Coal.,

98

do
do

5s, 1898
5sJT. Loan, 1868

.

63%

114

74%

.

American Coal
Atlantic Mail Steamship

*

21%

do
do
2d mortgage
Hannibal and St. Joseph, Land Grants

6s. 1887
5s, 1867




64%

Erie, 1st mortgage, 1868.
do 2d mortgage, 1864.*
do 2d mortgage, 1879
do 3d mortgage, 1883..
do 4th mortgage, 1880
do 5th mortgage, 1888

Galena and

6s, 1876
(is, 1S78

do

,

do

83

New York 7s. 1875

do

74 =

Toledo, Sinking Fund
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 1st mort

coupon

Pennsylvania Coal
Ouinksilver Mining

do

do
do
do
do

do
Cleveland and

iioo

Jersey City 6s, Water Loan

do

22%

116

-

76

50 H6% 115% 115
100
preferred. 100
71% 70

mortgage..
mortgage
Chicago and Rock Island, 1st mortgage
Cleveland and Pittsburg, 2d mortgage
do
do
8d mortgage, conv.

83% I

100

do
do

do
do
do
do

9S%

6s, Water Loan
6s, Public Park Loan.

>

J08%
132%

137% 134

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, 8 per cent...
Chicago and Milwaukee, 1st mortgage
Chicago and Northwestern, Sinking Fund.

!'

98%

Wisconsin 6s, War Loan

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

84

—

100 101

;.

do

do
do

I

**

:

5s....

do

86%

i 107% 105
137

7

Buffalo, New York and Erie, 1st mort., 1877.
Chicago and Alton, Sinking Fund

~

.

,

6s, Long Loans

do
do
do

89
84

85

100

do

do

do

97% i

Rhode Island 6s
South Carolina 6s
Tennessee 6s. 18(58

Brooklyn 6s

100
..100

Railroad Ronds:
Atlantic and Great Western, 1st mort......

-

1870.
1875
1881
18S6

Virginia 6s.

do

91

72%

101

j

r

do
do

-

127

100
100

Toledo, Wabash and Western

j

102

i

100

preferred
preferred

|

...

j

-

|

..

6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,

Marietta and Cincinnati
do
do
1st
do
do
2d

i 77

1

i

!

<

!

78%

|

76

72%

50

do
do
Second avenue
Sixth avenue
Third avenue

1 76%;

79

—

\

do
6s, (Hannibal and St. Joseph
do
6s. (Pacific RR.)
New York 7s. 1.870
do
6s,1866
do
•
6s, 1867
.do
6s, 1868
do
6s, 1872
do
6s}1873
do
6s, 1874
do
6s, 1875
do
6s, 1877
do
5s, I860
do
5s. 1868
do
5s. 1S71.’
do
5s, 1874
do
5s, 1875
do
5s, 1876
do
7e. State Bounty Bonds
North Carolina fis
*
Ohio 6s, 1868

-in is<

-77

86

100

Reading
St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute

Missouri 6s

77
103

91%

1138

100
50
100

.

,

Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago

7s, War Loan.

66

100 108% 107%

i

Morris and Essex....
100
New Jersey
100
New York Central
100
New Haven and Hartford
.100
Norwich and Worcester..;
100
Ohio and Mississippi Certificates
do
do
do
preferred....
Panama
100

74

30% 29%
65
62% 62%
i 109% 107
106

50

Hudson River
Illinois Central

Mississippi and Missouri

6s

129%

6

50

preferred

do
do
»
guaranteed...100
Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien
100
do
do
do
1st pref.. .100
do
do
2d pref... 100
do ‘
Milwaukee and St. Paul... •.
100
do
do
100
preferred

Michigan 6s, 1873

do
do

preferred

.

2|s

105

100; 91%
100! 85
..100
100

Michigan Central
Michigan So. and N. Indiana

1860
1862
1865
1870

78%! 77%

—

50!
.100;

Long Island

:
—

Kentucky 6s, 1868-72...

do

50[

60 >

McGregor Western

97%!

127

100

Indianapolis and Cincinnati
Joliet aud Chicago.

i

Iowa 7s, War Loan

do
do
do
do
do

100; 31%; 31%

Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati
Cleveland and Pittsburg.

Harlem

129

130

preferred.......100! 66%; 65%
..100,109 .109

do

Erie
do preferred
Hannibal and St. Joseph
do
do

—

j

100 132

Delaware, Lackawanna and Western
Eighth Avenue

-

Fri.

ur.,

;

100j.

Cleveland and Toledo

5s

Louisiana

preferred

Chicago and Northwestern
do

Indiana 6s, War Loan..
do
do

do

Chicago and Rock Island

,

Wed

122%
i

100
100'

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy
Chicago and Milwaukee...;

—

93%

coupon

State.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do 1877
do
do 1879
War Loan..

102
il01%!l01%i
102% 102% 102% 101%

j

6s, Certificates,

6s, coupon, ’79. after

do

107% 107%]
j 107
104% 104% 104% 103% 103%

Tue».

10
100;

Chicago and Alton

107% 107% 107% 107% 107

Mon

Railroad Stocks.

Brooklyn City

Central of New Jersey

j

coujxm.!

California 7s, large
Connecticut 6s. 1872
Georgia 6s
Illinois Canal Bonds. 1860
do Registered, 1860
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

1*46%

registered. j

Union Pacific R. R.. .currency.
7-30s Treas. Notes
1 stseries.
do
do
do
2d series.
do
do
do
3d series.

do
do
do

120%;

Satar

SECURITIES.

.

6s,
6s,
5s,
5s,
5s,
5s,

Fri

do
do

do
do

‘

104

2d mort...
3d mort...
1st mort...

2d, pref....
2d, income.

79

Wabash, 1st mortgage
do
do

do

do

1st mortgage, extended.
2d mortgage

IntereetBonds......
EqtBpawR,

.,,

103
96

90%

79

21,1865.]

Amount
i Outstanding

pal

&

Payable.

Rate-!

Bid- |

do
......registered.
185S....,
cpujwn.
do
.registered.

)

119

\

do

do

Jan. &

do

282,746,000*

Jan. &

July 1881

\mS: [.! 1«,*'«P00
1,258,000

3,423,000'
3,926.000
803,000

California—Civil Bonds.,

War Bonds..
Tax Exempt.

do

Georgia—State Bonds
do
do
do

j 8,000.000
\ 2,073,750

B'ds.J 2,000,000

7
7
6
6
6
7
6
6

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
War Loan Bonds.

i

-

i

!

2:3(5,000, 6

Indiana—State Bonds
do
do
do ...
do
War Loan Bonds

! 5.325,500 5
2%

Iowa—State Certificates
War Loan Bonds
do
Kansas—State Bonds

>

| 2.058,173: (5
*
i 1,225,500 7

200,000
800,000
>
200,000;
Kentucky—State Bonds
j 4,S00,000
do
State Bonds
’800,000;
2,000,000
do
War Loan
Louisiana—State Bonds (RR)—
516.000
Maine—State Bonds
do
War Loan

8,171,992
„ 10O

6

700,000
250.000

6,500,000;
250,000s

1,000,000

700,000

750.000,

Ohio—Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do

100

96

'OS '74
1871
dern.
'67 .69

,

■

1

:

;

90
i 95
I 76

100

1878
1883
186(5

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
ivYo
do
do
do

.

.

I 95*

76

83

Aug. 1876
short

Jan. & July var.
i 98
Jan. & July '71 ’72
102
11870
101
*
do
do
pleas.
1868
do
1878
do
clo
pleas. .....

::::;

500,000.
800,000

909,607;
442,961
900.000

800,000 ; 5

I

May & Nov.; 1868
;Jan. & July: 1875
1878
1
do
Jan. & July 1S95
Various. ; var.
1865
1866
1872
1873
1874
1875
1877
1866
1868
1871
1874

i 6
743.000

3,050,000!

6.000,000'
2.250.000

6
6
6
6

500,000 6
900.000; 6
192,585 5

1,212.000, 5

236,000 5
•4,500.000! 5

9,129,5851 6
705,336! 6
1,015.000;
379,866;
2.183,532
1,(500,000!

;.

4,095.309!

2,400.000 6

679,000; 6

6.168,000
23,209,000

3,000.000
4,000 000

1.708,000
1,310,000
1,125,000,
12,799,000
2,871,000
175,000

Vermont—State Certificates.
do
War Loan Bonds
! 2,DiK»,(H>0
Virginia—Inscribed Certificates. 18,264,642
.

Railroad Bonds

f

85

12,624,500

300,000!

►■3
rc3
a
a

s?
5S

A

A
a

1-5

::::h
98%;

9S

:::■!
96% j
96% i

do

do
do
do
Pittsburg,
do

....

96%, 97
97

....

9S

375,000

122,000
118.000

650,000,

....

6

9i ‘

S3

10
911.500

.

425,000
(50,000

j

Stock..!

2,147,000
900,000
100.000

483,900

1,878,900

Bu. S’k No. 3.1
Fire Indem. S.j
Central P'k S.1
Central P'k S. j
Central P'k S. j

190,000 j
402,768

Union Def. L.
Vol. B'ntv L'n

Sol.S.&Rf.R.B

Sol.B'ntyFd.B
Riot Dain.R. B
a.—City Bds,old.
CityBds,new
City Bds,old!

Pa.—City Bonds

Railroad Bonds.

1

11867
1865

....

....

....

70

.

•

do

Ci&Co’tyB,

...

'60’73 85

&Nov.i’75-’89
do
do
do
do

...

i'73-’76

...

i'80-'Sl
!'83'90

::::| 97'
...

....

....

j'65’93

....

var.

Apr. & Oct.

'65'99: 90%
1

1866 j

.

Various,

200.000

150,000 7
6

446,800

1,464,000’

i'65'82

Jan. & July '65 '76'
Jan. & July,’88- 98
1884
do
Jan. & Julyi’65 ’83
do
*65'90
do
i’79’88
do
'71 '87
do
'71 ’83

.

239,000 6
6
6

429,900 - 6
285,000; 6

1,352,600*10

178,500 10

329.000! 6

1,133,500 6

300,000 7
960,000 ; 7
1,000,owl 7

94%

i’65’82

do

00

do
do
do
do

'65*86;
'67'81;
’71 ’73
72 ’74
>’74 ’77;

May & Nov. 1871

>Jan. & July ;1866 1
do
'1875
do
il888
do
j ’77 ’78

’April & Oct.; 1883
dsn, & duly;1884

88

91

—

1913 i 72
'95 ’83 95

do
i'68’70
Mar. & SeptJ 1885
Jan. & July|1876
do
11893

600,000
500,000
300,000

100

—

i'65 ’82

500,000
1.500,000:

100

...

j’77-’82j
& July'65’81

Various,

163,000
457,000

...

i

Jan. & July
do

1.800,000

523,000
425,000
254,000;
484,000

1

do
do
do

2.232,800

2t5aOOO
1,496,100

1

...

Jan.

552.700
739,222

j

...

!

Y,442,100

j

1878
1866

1864 i

May

2,000,000
949.700
4,99(5.000

,

'1883

1873 !
do
Jan. & Julyi’65’ 69
do
do
do

I 1.009^700

j 60

lApr,

| '67 ’76

May & Nov.

7,898.717

'

i

6

1.400.000

....

1

do

2,500,000

Sol.Sub.B.R.Bi

CityBds,new

;

1,000,000!

.

....

'1873

490.000

j

....

do
do
do
do

895,570 6

Vol.Fam.AidL
Vol.Fam.AidL
—C't House S'k

97
100

Aug 1887
May & Nov. 1876

Tomp.M'ket S

Docks&SlipsS

97

I

Feb. &

102.000

Pb.B.Sk. No. 3!

-1887
1898

do

Pub.Edu. S'k.!

Fl.D’t. F'd. S.

85

!l868
July!l898 :

do

1,800,000 6
2,748,000 6
150,000 5
500,000! 5
154,000 5

Bonds...!
Bonds...j

....

3|

Jan. &

(500,000

Real Estate B.,
Croton W'r S. I

do
Railroad B'ds!
do
City Loan
|
Rochester, N. Y.—City
i
!18<iS i
do
City
1870
do’
do
Railroad
j
1875
do
98 ‘ 98% i Sacramento, Cal.—City Bonds.,
do
11S81
do
County B'ds
do
;i8S6 1 99
Louis, Mo—Municipal
'65-'71
May & Nov.
Real Estate....
do
92“ 93
var.
Various.
do
Sewerage
91
var.
91
do
do
Improaement..
101
99
Feb. & Ang. 1871
Wider..
do
97
! Various.
Harbor
do
55
Jan. & July
Wharvec
do
1877
do
Pacific RR
do
1868
76
O. & M. RR....
do
84
! var. ! 84
Iron Mt. RR
do
i var.
San Francisco, Cal.—City Bonds.!
1 var.
do
City FireB.
97
Jan. & July,1870
do
\’
City Bonds.
1
Jan. & July ’S! ’95
C.&Co’tyB.
do
’85 ’95Jj 70 !
do
C.&Co’tyB.
do
3
•
i • • •
C.&Co’tyB.
do

do

&Nov.|’70 ’73!
do

399.300

Railroad Bonds,
Railroad Bonds.

18(55

•

May
1

3,0(56,071
275.000;
2,083,200
1,96(5,000

C.P.lmp.F. S.!
C.P.Imp. F. S.

j

Apr. & Oct. '73 ’84
Jan. & July ’70 ’81
May & Nov. 1S70 1
do
1880
Feb. & Aug 1890 j
1890
do
May & Nov. ’75 ’79;
Apr. & Oct. 1875 .

150,000
200.000
3.000.200

CrotonW’rS'k
CrdtonW’r S’k!
W’r S'k of ’49
W'r S'k of '54

Water

94

& Aug:'70 ’83;
& July 1873
& Oct.1’65 ’84
& July ’67 '87>

Feb.
Jan.
Apr.
Jan.

100,000

84%

!

8

219,000

July 1860

do
do

May &Nov. 1887
Jan. & July!
i
i
do
June &Dec. 1S94

6

..

907.000

do
do

90

7

|

LAN

!

Feb. & Aug 1882
Jan. & July 1876
J line &Dec. 1883
! Various. >’65’81
!
'65 '75
do
i Jan. & July '77 ’83i
var. j
Various,
do
; var.

500,000

Mass.—City Bds.

93

i

Various.
65 ’72
Jan. & July 75 '77
! Various. I’65’80,

1:30,000

*

var.

1

Jan. &

1.200 000

003,000;

::::!

Apr. »fc Oct. 1865
July 1871

125,000

.

j

95%i 96
96% 100
89 ,90

.

Jan. &

400,000

i

Ct.—City Bonds.,

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do’
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
'nty
do
do
do
do,

.100

97

!

319,457

Newport, R. I.—City Bonds
New Haven, Ct.—City Bonds....
New York City—Water Stocks. j

...

1

99

do
; var.
do
1879
do
1890
do
1871 !
June &Dec. '69 ’79

(550,000

City Bonds—

New London,

..

....

20.000

Wis.—City, rc-adj'd

INew Bedford.

j
!

!'S1 ’97' 96 ;
'65 ’79 ....!
’KtS ’S2!

,

256,368
50,000

[Newark, N. J.—City Bonds
City Bonds.... .1
do

95

'65 ’95 86
1869
85

do

7
7

Cal.—City Bonds

do
Milwaukee,

|

1,189,780,

Wiscovj»iN—State Bonds
do
War Fund Bonds.•
do
Wax Fua^Ctrtif.,,.

Maysville,

j 100

.

..

City Bonds
Water Bonds

...

July’65’71 —‘

do
do

7

j

Water Bds
Ky.—City Bonds

98
.

j'68’78 109%:

Jan. &

r*

City Bonds.

do
do

.100

|

Louisville,

<o

■

i’72’73

299,000
571,000 7 Apr. & Oct”, j 1881 .
360,000 6 Jan. & July 1876
do
'79'87!
913,000 7*
!l88S
do
1,039,000 (5
6 Apr. & Oct.’1895 Jj
6 Jau. & July

Railroad Bonds..!
Water Bonds
I
N. J.—City Bonds.;

-

....!

,78 ’79

,

Park Bonds

do
do
do
Jersey City,
do
do
!
do
do

var.

j Feb. &

731,000
700,000

...

Hartford,

1877
!
’76 ’78| 57

|'73'78

do
do
do
do

95,000

..




97*

216.000

'

Bonds
Railroad
Ct.—City Bonds..

96

~

5,550,1)00

Water Bonds.

do

f 100%

I’65 ’85' 95%
1'67 ’77 100

6
6
6
6

Water Bonds — |
O—City Bonds
'
Water Bonds.
do
do
Sewerage Bonds.
Detroit, Mich, -City Bonds.
do
City Bonds...
do
City Bonds...

78
98

^

1,281,000
121,540

87% Dubuque, Io.—City

...

101

i’65’74 ....!

<,

5
6

do

!

!

100
100

100
i’65’82 94

1,063,000
634,200

Cleveland,

do

535,100;

do
State Stock...
do
Military L'n Bds
Rhode Island—State (War) Bds.
South Carolina—State Stock...
State Bonds
do
Tennessee—State Bonds
do
Railroad Bonds.
do
Improvement Bonds

.do

98

94%l

1,650,000; 6
2,500,000; 8

..

jj

96* *

Jan. & July 1867
do
.11883
Jan. & July!’71 '89!
do
>'71 ’87!
do
|’71 ’85 80 ‘
do
j 18(56

;...

Domestic Loan Bonds

..

97
97
97
97
97
97
99
84

!j 98%. 100

!M.,J.,S,&D. 1890

1,949,711 4%

Bonds —

i

1890-j

5
6

Stg.!

! 87

84

,

1875
July 1886

J.,A.,J.&0.

4,113,860
I
791,050

"Water Bonds
O.—Municipal

Cincinnati,

6

583,205 4%

’City Bonds—^...
Sewerage Bonds ..

do
do

'

do
1870
Jan. & July 1873

197,700 6
740,000 6

N.Y\—Municipal Bonds!,
Municipal Bonds
Ill.—City Bonus
|

do

5)5

436,000!

Pennsylvania—State Bonds...

Buffalo,

j

J.,A..J.&0. 1870

554,000 6

Improved St’k
Pub. Park L'n.i
Water Loan. ■ >

'

do

‘Mar. &Sept.i 18(55
Jan. & July 1868

Minnesota—State Bonds... -. —
539,000 ! 6
Missouri—State Bonds
do
State Bonds for RR... 13,700,000;
7.000,000
do
State Bonds (Pac. RR)
3,000,000
do
State Bonds (II, &St.J)
do
Revenue Bonds
New Hampshire—State Bonds...
do
War Fund Bds
do
War Notes....
New Jersey—State Scrip
War Loan Bonds..
do
New York]
do
do
do
General Fund.
do
do
do
do
do
Bounty Bonds
do
Comptroller's Bonds
do
do
do
do
do
Canal Bonds.
do
do
do
do
do
do
North Carolina—State Bonds

do
do
do

116

94

8

2.100.000!

!

Water Loan

Brooklyn, N.Y.—City

97
98

-Jun. & Dec, '(58 '74i
do
:'(55 'SO;
Jan. & July '71 ’78

6
5
6
7
6
7
6
7

6,500.000;

State Bonds
State Bonds
War Loan

do
do
do

too

Jan. &

Water Loan

..

Quarterly 1890
Quarterly ,1870

1.727,000 6
1,200,000 5

1,000,009 6
5,000,000 6

do

Mar.&Sept.l’GO '67' 95%
Jan. & July;'80 '89! 95%! 96
8(5
I Quarterly j var. !
.jlUO

5

Michigan—State Bonds
State Bonds
do

i

j

May & Nov

do

96

6

3,500,000 6

Park

do

.

July
& July

do
do

6

War Loan

do

Jan.

5
6
6
6
6
6

4,800,000

Maryland—State Bonds
!
State Bds .coupon. )\
do
StateBds inscribed \ |
do
do
State Bonds.coupon.
Massachusetts—State Scrip, —
do
State Scrip
do
Bounty F'd L’n.

do

98% i
97 %

,

93

plea.
plea.
May & Nov. 1881
Jan. & July 1887
do

532,000

t
j

<}°

Chicago,

'72 '84

Jan. &

*

.,

Jan. & July'
do

7
7

3,942,OK)
5,398,000,

State Bonds (RR)—
State Bonds for B'ks,

do
do

do

1

I S6

2.000,000 ! 6

,

;

do
0885 !
Jan. & July 1880
do
1872 ;
Jan. &. July 1870 ,
70 i,.
do
18(50
!
do
1862
do
18(55
do
1870
do
do
11877
1879
do
1879
do

490,000 j 6

;

1872

Oct. & Apr.

803,000 6
28.000 6
1,116,500 6

|

do
do

& Julv 1877 j ..
do
‘ '78’80 113
do

'
525.000
j 3,747,000
; 3,293,274
j 1,700,900 .6

Illinois—Canal Bonds
do
Registered Bonds
Coupon Bonds
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Ja

o

I

York&Cum.R. j
B.&O.R.cow/) ( i
B. & O. RR.. f j

do

97

97 %
97
97
98

''

Certificates
State Securities.
Alabama—State Bonds....

1

Miscellaneous.

101%!l01%! Bangor, Me.—City Debt
...!
|j
do
Railroad Debt
93
! 93 j'Boston, Mass.—City Bonds
do
City Bonds
93#
do
City Bonds

May & Nov.! 1885
Mar. vfcSept. 1904
I
Jan. & July ,1895

6

Water Loan...

Improvement.. j

103% i 103% L
101
>102 !

300,000,000 7.30 Feb. & Aug.. 1867
,300,000,000,7.30 Jun. & Dec. 1868
230,000,000 7.30 Jan. & July, 1868 :
] Maturity 1 year
j 62,899,000

Debt

Connecticut—War Bonds

} Jan. & July 1SS1

50,000.006,

N.W.Yirg.RR.'

RR. BdsJ

'107 |
! 107#!

.

-j jjjj!

,1881

\ July

.

1879

600,000
4,96:3,000
820,000
1.500,000

do

|! Baltimore, Md.

I

93

99

i’70’821

do
do

Jan. & July var.
1913
do

4
5
6

97%

!’65 ’69!

do

|

'.. ..16

City, Pa.—City Bds.

do

\ 514,7S0,500 6 ' I May & NOV.jllKS
Mav& Nov'1884

Pacific RR. 3ouds of 1865
'Trpa*urv Notes (1st series)
do
do
(2d series)
(3d series)
do
do

do

Alleghany

J

1100,000,000 '

!HS

....

July, 1874 -j

1,016,000

Ins

...

Water Loan
Alb. Nor. RR..

July ’70’74

Jan. &

$90,000
225,000
850,000
300,000

Scrip

City Scrip

do
do
do

t

Jan. &

■

Albany, N. Y.—City

July 1871 <

20,000,000

\

coupon . (

f0

Jan. &

i 121

ISOS-}

!

do

Vuion

July

l

!

I

(5-30S) of 18«2-r-„|X3:
do
1864
do
1865

July 1867

7,022,000

registered, j
OregonWar Bds (yearly) i coupon..
do
do (> yearly) f
BMd,

Jan. &

I

coupon.

Municipal Securities

1146

Aiked

Bid-

Due.

Payable.

Rale. I

Asked

146

Gold Coin. ••••••• — j
National Securities.
Bonds of 1^17
w
registeredI , j 9,415,250:
coupon.
1848...
8,908,1342
do
do
registered, i
do

American

MARKET.

pal

Outsijiuding.

DENOMINATIONS.

Princi-

INTEREST.

A. mount

MARKET.

Princi

INTEREST.

f

denominations.

do
do
do
do
do
uu
do

MUNICIPAL SECURITIES’ LIST.

NATIONAL, STATE AND

,

01681

October

527

THE CHRONICLE.

85

.r.

97

528

THE

CHRONICLE

®I)C Commercial ©imes;

[October 21,1865.

For

Same
time

the

Since
week. Jan. 1.
Coal..
6,784 269,227
Cotton.
bales
70
42,229
Coflee
bags
669 519,957
Molasses ..hhds
872 124,119

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.

169.615 Sugar.. /.boxes

The

stringency in the money market has
during the past week, but

had the effect to

bbls & tcs

clog

bags

244,190

prices has been felt in the markets for domestic
produce—
Breadstuffs, Provisions, and, finally, Cotton.
Foreign merchandise,
except dry goods, are in light stocks, and have remained
firm. In¬
deed, we have noticed a considerable business
in metals, for
arrival,
at full prices.
Groceries have not been active, but
prices are with¬
out the slighest
yielding. The announcement of shipments of su¬
gars from France to this market has
produced no weakness; for
Canada, which a short time ago was
shipping us sugars, was buy¬
ing to day in this market.
upon

136,325

Cotton, bales

leading

Since

time

Jan. 1.

1864.

Past

91,323
24,909 Crude Turp.’
Flour
bbls 22,292 1,066,122
1,796,660 Spirits TurCorn meal...
984
97,285
92,449
pent’e.bbls
2
Wheat, bush
984 1,654,82310,871,529 Tar
85
Corn
139,503 2,326,276
731,626 Rice
tcs
Rye
155,496
Tallow lOOlbs
86
Beef, tcs. &
Tobacco,pgs. 1,118
bbls
584
“
76,630
73,610
lbs.
Pork... .bbls
1,553
98,685 115,625 Oil— Sperm, 409,367
Bacon,100 lbs
951
285,022
824,981
gallons....
Lard....
592
193,679
475,898 Oil—Whale..
CheeBe
2.201
338,200
369,022 Oil—Petro’m
Butter
116
77,115
.

.

2,914

.

773
40

3,180,013 4,

speculative

8,392

184,599

17

12,070

3,122

..

6,475 Seed—Clover
bags
1,2S6 Staves.... M
405,567 Oil Cake, 100

724

6,i98

gall 8

Oil—Laid...

29,626

17,627

lbs

:

l,396Whaleb’e .lba

284,180
124,956

60,952 1,
13,621 437,027

....

116,639

1,218

130,045
129,226

....

....

436

5,898

—

<-

time
1864.
670

Jan. 1.

.

.

Sun,

Since

week.

8,549

The decline in cotton and
Breadstuffs are elsewhere noticed. The
decline in Pork at one time reached
Ashes—Pots,
six dolla rs
casks
per barrel, but of
this decline more thau half had
Ashes-Pearls
been recovered at the close of
busi¬
casks
ness
to-day, Dressed and live hogs are somewhat lower.
Bees wax..lbs
Lard de¬ Hops.. .bales
clined, and partially recovered. Beef has
Rosin
bbls
advanced on

articles of

•

Past
week.

r

time

1864.
336,663 225,827
384,928 578,225
47,586 106,944

379

.

Same

Since
Jan. l.

3,726
6,028

The exports from this
port of some of the
domestic produce have been as follows :
Same'

its most decided effect

demand.

320

...

and

658,654i Teas...
104,916 Wool. ...bales

.

Sugar... hhds,

Friday Night, Oct. 20.

the wheels of trade

56,533

.

...

the
week.

1864.

..

.

For

322,616 9,076,00816
39
30,558 428,849
11,295

....

84

10,485

21,794
13,694

18,320

515,997
187,310

499,484
484,452

.

..

With respect to
EXPORTS
Pork-packing prospects at the West, we learn
that the prices of live
(EXCLUSIVE OF SPECIE) FROM THE PORT OF NEW
hogs at the various markets rauge from
YORK TO
eight
to ten cents
FOREIGN
PORTS FOR THE WEEK
per pound, with prospects of a late
ENDING OCT. 17, 1865.
packing season.
The packers at the West are
Quan. Value.
doing very little at present, and are
Quan. Value.
Quan. Value.
DANISH WEST INDIES.
the principal
Beeswax, lbs6,198 3,198 Mfd tobacco,
speculative buyers of Pork in this market.
322 $3,542 Jewelry, cs
Coal, tons
8
1,892
lbs
HAMBURG.
6,924 1,295
Petroleum, having declined, moved
Sew mach,
Lard,
actively to-day for export— Tobacco, cs. .-.232 13,511 Effects, c2 cs..34 2,261 Live lbs... .9,412 1,149
2
the shipments to be
415
stock,head60
mainly made from Philadelphia. Hides and Staves, No.l6,S00 1,660 Wool, bales 14 2,230
Empty casks...60 7,400
Seeds, bags. ..392
1,600 Petroleum,
300
Leather, after a long period of dullness, were
Hay, bales
90
Preserves, cs... .6
200
375
galls
quite brisk to-day. Rosin
112,136 51,395 Oats, bush....400
Fruits and Fish are firm.
2,972 25,328 Segars. cs
250
1
86 Matches,
Building materials show no abatement Tea, chts
CS....20
50
395 Hides, No ....159
240
583 Hardware,
of the extreme
cs.,.79
Drugs, cs
43
l,00o Preserves, cs .241
prices lately ruling. The dry weather in
1,482
2,700 Machinery, «p.. .1
the lum¬ Sew mach, csl,459 60,473 Oil
200
ber regions will most
cake,lhs237,711 5,794 Furniture, •... .9
probably greatly reduce our supply of lumber Mfd iron, pkgs. .4
152 Machinery, cs...5
800
751 Mfd wood,
for the
Sheep guts, cs .1
pkgs.7
701 Hardware, cs.... 5
100
300 Cora, bush...
coming season. Freights have not been
.380
475
Wine, cs
9
active, but rates Ext logwood,
100 Shoes, cs
for
,

.

grain have

upward tendency.
receipts of domestic produce for the
week, and since July 1,
have been as follows :
RECEIPTS OT DOMESTIC
PRODUCE

FOR

This

Oats
Corn

Rye

WEEK, AND SINCE

July 1.

12

....

THE

Since

week.

.

Ashes, pkgs
Breadstuffs—

Flour, bbls
Wheat, bush

4,368

Crude turp bbls..

Spirits turpentine
110,520 1,169,747
Rosin
161,040 4,081,009
Tar
106,451 4,037,772 Pitch
879,752 9,285,414 Oil cake,
pkgs
13,734
864,8871 Oil lard

Malt

3,205
253,752

Barley

Grass seed

636

Flaxseed

257,200,Oil, Petroleum,......
1,079.972 Peanuts, bags.....
47,057

786

Peas
Corn meal, bbls..
Com meal, bans.
B. W.Flour,
bags
Cotton, bales

29,917
51,501

17,163
2,211
781
26

29,115

Copper, plates
Copper, Dbls

140
99

Dried fruit,
pkgs...

115

Grease, pkgs
Hemp, bales
Hides, No

Hops, bales
Leather, sides

33
269
909
349

*

38,796

Lead, pigs

Molasses, hhds....

1,047

Naval Stores—

We give below

r

741
5

1,918
50

15,275
45

9,219; Provisions—

10,967

Beans

3s 9

6,520

45,680
26,580
76

Butter, pkgs.....

Cheese
Cut meats

85.828(Sugar,

hhds & bbls

3.084.Tallow, pkgs

562,063; Tobacco

235,453

5,016

2,724
7,430

61
,

2,623
54,510
51,165
16.476

72,360

comparative statement the
receipts of a few
leading articles, per all routes, since Jan. 1,
1865, and for the same
period last year:
Since
Jan. 1.
519.170

Cotton, bales
Com meal, bbls
“
“

Oats, bush
Beef, tcs and bbls
Pork, bbls
Bacon, etc., pkgs
Lard, pkgs

79,600

210,015
95,505
92,355

Choese, boxes, etc
501,185
Butter, firkins, etc— 515,735
...

Rosin, bbls
Crude Turp., bbls
Spirits turp, bbls

as

.

-

Since
Jan. 1.
9.222

9,817

97,428
26,770
14,677

66,710 Hops, bales
272,275 Whisky, bbls
273.455 Leather, sides
193.455 Oil—sperm, bbls
360,125' “ whale, “
366,945 4“ petrol., “
13.365 “
lard,
“
11,552 Whalebone, lbs
6.998‘

20,825
49,970

time
1864.

22,947
13,465
234,275

23,785
21,910

147,395
93,610
39,045

262,670
1,722,500 1,848,400
28,883

.....

72.588

416,370
5,130

581,200

54,585
66,842
573,325

10,190
608,900

imports from foreign ports of a few
leading articles for the
1,1865, and for the same time last year, have

week and since Jan.

been

Same

!

14,260
5,695,25010.493.605 Tobacco—domes,
pkg 139,170
10,428,360 6,337.545
“
foreign, do. 18,145
316,140
354,380Tallow,
11,905
1,454.260 1.160,355 Wool, pkgs
dom., bales
96,775
6,284,875 8,039.645 Wool, for., bales
46,185

Barley, &c., bush

The

,

j

follows:




180
330
254

.

9,333
2,400
426
171
270

67,437
899

Dental matl, cs. .1

Whisky, csk
Clothing, cs

Miscellaneous.:..

Calfskins, roll..2'
Butter, lbs...5,058
.4

..

Hams, lbs.. .1,040
Pkl

fish, bbls....9
Rye flour, bbls 10
Brandy, bbls....5
Alcohol, bbls
.5
..

91

Potatoes, bbls .91
Onibns} bbls.. .91
Paint, pkgs
7

Codfish
70
Mfd tobacco,
lbs
2,558

Soap, bxs... 1,000

D’d fish, bxs. .100
Furniture, cs... .5
Drugs, cs
4
Shoes, cs
1
Hoop skirts, cs .2
Sew mach, cs
.1
Mfd iron, pkgs. 13
Coal, tons
5
Oakum, bals...20
Ilay, bals
25
48

Trunks, pkgs .53
Hardware, cs...50
Corn, hush..1,548
Wheat, bush..984
.

Fire crackers,
bxs
..80
18
Rifles, cs

Oil cake,

....1,594,339 42,761
Flour, bbls.. 1,972 18,734
Staves
6,000

500

$61,995

QUEENSTOWN.

galls
73,280 53,590
Condmilk
88
1,697
Glassware,pkgl25 7,629
Plank, pcs
18
300
Mfd wood,
pkgs68 2,426

Hardware,

cs .236

...3

BRITISH NORTH
AMERICAN

8
79

Carriage, pkgs .16
Maizena, bxs..250

POT OVIT'Q

R iron, tons .12
Hams, lbs
996
425 Beef, bbls
30
Spts turp, bbls. .2
862 Cheese, lbs —151
1,600 Wine, pkgs.. 236
178

1,300

153

65
162
113
64
292
83

144
65
105
96
63
309
200

Gin

Rum,

250
345
93

pun

Champgne,

2,126
3,204
746

cs..41

295

Iron, tons
70
Dry goods, cs .1
Tin plates, bxs200

6,750
6,306

Machinery,
Staves

228

1,700

$139,831

Staves

MARSEILLES.

44,280

Petroleum..42,354

Books,

cs

Potatoes

1,741

Hams, lbs.. .1,359
Molasses
113
Clocks, bxs
7

6,552
22,917

'

....

9
2,480

1,030
6,150

Lard, lbs...86,310 23,268
225 Exps pkgs, cs. ..2
326
5,800 Hay, bales... .400
606
169 Bran,
bgs
500
600
290 Oats,
.500
750
bgs
382 Beans, Dbls.... 60
620
Gas flxt, cs
1
200

$202,460 Glassware, cs.. .1
BRITISH WEST INDIES.
Mfd tobac,lbs5,676
Flour, bbls.. 1,920 15,616 Matches, cs....20
Cora meal,bbls320
1,633 Paper, reamsl,000
Pork, bbls
30
1,230 Hams, lbs... 1,920
Butter, lbs ..3,0S1
1,168 Hardware, cs ..30
Cheese, lbs .583
134 Stationery
5
Tobacco, hhds .2
622 Shoes, cs........1
Oil meal,
lbs20,000
597 Shooks
2,425
Oars, No
48
625
43,000
Kerosene, gals285 ‘ 197 Hoops ft..15,000
Lumber,
Shooks...
200
250 Salt, sacks.... 250
Candles, bxs.. 100
427 Coal oil.gls..7,450
Beef, bbls
50
1,600 Hoops, bdls. .384
Bread, pkgs... 150
750 Cider, cs
50
Beans,

Cotton, bis 7,611 1,711,547
Cora, bush.77,689 69,118
Cheese, lbs216,200. 35,050
Bacon, lbs..80,106 17,685
I R goods, C8....1
385
Tobacco, nhds.15 1,980
Dbls....50
Staves, No.,7,800 1,850 Beans,bnsb ..300

50
20

10,000

•.

30,561

133,586

.1
cs... 1
..

$29,469
751
CUBA.
1,550 Apples, bbls ...21
110
1,314 Machinery, cs.325 28,311
550

150

1

bxs

3,306

Brandy, pkgs.. .58
Vinegar, bbls..50
Leather, sides.. 25
Beef, bbls

Tobacco,

24

.90
8

1,734- Piano
2,162 Miscellaneous

.

LIVERPOOL.

150
300

..

$32,587
52,223

18,708

...

ROTTERDAM.

galls

-

lbs

1,170
Lath,
418
Flour, bbls. 1*4,430 127,200 Nails, bdl.... 1,880
kegs.... 350 2,786
Corameal, bbls454 2,312 Agl implte,
pkg94 2,779
2,291 Pork, bbls
.548 16,260
Machinery, cs.. .4
309 Pepper, bgs .1,642
273
9,545 Lumber, ft 299,323
278 Petrol, galls.7,147
4,457 Tobacco, hhd .5 11,000
114 Hay, bales....204
1,700
327
Miscellaneous....
415 Onions, bbls..538
67
1,105
136 Cora, bush..5,883
5,5S0
65 Hardware, cs.. .47
$247,523
TTAVUTT
1,230
92 Alcohol, pipes..15
1,257 Carriages
4
139 Whisky, pk.... 43
1,050
3,706 Effects, cs...... 16
465 Mfd tobaccol8,893
3,300
4,690 Fish, pkgs
11
125
228 Mfd wood,
pkgs.8
102 Cotton
689
R

260

Miscellaneous....

863

tobac.851,799 116,864
cs
20
7,283
Kerosene,

$1,911,523 Segars,
LONDON.

257
74

5,600
1,403
1,398

Petrol, galls.1,981

Petroleum,

mach, cs..20

Mfd

Com, bush:12,500 11,500 Books, cs
Clocks, bxs
6,234
LOUGH FOYLE.
Furniture
815 Com, bush.36,000
34,400

.

Oars, No

AUSTRALIA.
..349
4,465

Drugs,pkgs
Sew

indies.

2,284
855

256

$40,434

BRITISH

400
178

*

806

Miscellaneous....

1,000

2

413

Elour, bbls... .602
93
Beef, bbls
Lard, lbs ....5,950
Bread, pkgs... 192
Leather, rolls s .2

Com meal

...

Beef, hhd

3

200
200
225

.1
1
Silk waste, bds .2

$210,442
dutch west

..

225,150 Tar, bbls
2,540,860 3.224,975 Rice, tierces
244,365 227,165 Ashes,
pkgs

Flour, bbls
Com,
Rye,

time
1864.

seed,bgs21

Miscellaneous....

Tobacco, bis,. .12
Candles, bxs...95

a3 a

Same

Clover

Photo mtl, cs

819

741

-2,369
3,214
2,759

973

3,296
37,536

4,023

..

14,657 Tobacco, hhds
4,431i Whisky, bbls
[Wool, bales

63,423

oils, cs
1
Roots, bgs
9
Cotton, bale...249

56,893
5,256
9,748

150
114

12,147
2,847
18,810

Ess

28,323

‘600

1,648: Starch
2,141 iStearine
1,639; Spelter, slabs

217

4,866

1,684
1,361
107

Beef, pkgs.
Lard, pkgs.
Lard, kegs.
1, Kegs.
6.323 | Rice,
pkgs

340,431
2,315

22,290
9,795
.72,092
4,233

388,610

1,377

Pork

July 1

204,187

325

Eggs

Since

7,086

10,540
10,584

..7
Tobacco, bales429
Apples, bbls ...15
Glassware, cs.,16
Flour, bbls
26
cs

Sponge, bals...51

week.

258

2,200

Segars,

Extract, bxs..700
Tobacco, hhds 25

JULY 1.

This

....

Wheat, bush

bxs

an

The

...

337

670

172

1,420
380

490
610

1,814
351

1,000
6,788
2,725
360
600

5,384
790
206

Matting, roll...77

2,176

cs......9

482

Buttons,

October

21,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Quan. Value.

Quan. Value.

218

Onions, bbls... 87
Paint, pkgs ....33
Sew mach, cs...7
Furniture, cb.,.14

Furniture, cs
8
Potatoes, bbls. .75

1,216
210
925

Nails, kegs.... .30
Animal carbon,
102

11,162

Copper tubes .800
cs
-100
packing yarn,rls30
10
Ale, cks

1.124
300
865
350
300

hhds

•

Gin,

bxs

13

Tallow, lbs..8,635
Cotton waste,
bale

1

10S
115

.

Packing, bxs....3

Sand paper,

Woodware. pkgs3
Mfd iron, pkgs.73

Cutlery, cs.....<3

Leather goods,cs2
Bacon, lbs... 5,750
Tobacco, cs — 30

1,338

Miscellaneous....

913
300
181
142

320

.10

.

12,100
1,735

Petroleum

....

653
200

3,638

...

Flour, bbls

.680
India rubber, cs.l
..

Stationery,pkge.21

Hoop skirts, cs. 11
22
Coal, tons
IRgoods,cs....5
Lumber, ft..18,900
Mfd iron, pkgs.. 3

Hardware,

cs.. .72
Sew mach, cs.. .6

Hardware,pkgs.

3,467

2,947

3,056
1,250

1

belting,

1
Tobacco, bxs .250
Hams, lbs
586

325
836
475
100

2,829
610
194

Stationery,

1,515

cs...2

200

_pkgs
Rope, coils
Toys, bxs

75
5
2

[

3,684
170
475

Dry goods,

Beef, bbls

Paint, pkgs

6

Oars

..200

Oakum, bis

20

....

Miscellaneous....

1,184

Agl implts.... .63
Lumber,ft. 141,467

2,773
2,462
4,750
2,373

Tobacco, hhds ..6
Tobacco, bis.. .14
Starch, bxs..U50

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.

Woodware,
pkgs

13
37

cs

271

1,805

Hardware,

cs ..19
Sew mach, cs.. .2

1,002

Furniture,bxs.

Drugs,

421

Woodware,pkg. 18

Preserves,

8.062
2,150

126

18,727

Spices,
D'd apples, bbls.3
Beef, bbls
200

2

cs

16
cs
cs...

292

1,200
691
107
114

2,228
1,269
1,750
1,100

50

Hardware, cs....3

1,034' Leather cloth,cs 4
2.239 Ptg mat’1,
pkg..l
2,439 Coal, tons
881
Wine, bxs
60

Miscellaneous....
BRAZIL.

Pork, bbls

750

2
42

4,000

cs...81
11
cs

112

Stationery,cs... .2

Clothing,
Tobacco,

Mfd tobacco,
lbs

90

8,931
425
88

$38,385 Miscellaneous....

Flour, bbls. .1,075 14,135
Rosin, bbls... .150 1,818

Steel

SPECIE)

.$3,402,121

AT THE PORT

OF NEW YORK FOR

Glassware....87 4,494
Glass plate... 167
25,260
Drugs, &c.—
Acids

87

12,870
1,590
1,448
2,528
1,224

Ammonia, sal. 24

Afgols
Alum

7

Aniline colors. .4

Aluminous cake.
Barytes

Bismuth

619
354

2

1,287
8,149
4,906
1,606

Blea powd...650
Balsam copaiva.

Camphor

..

chalk
Cream tartar..75
cwcw

Cochineal..
Cutch

Owns,
do

17

.........

crude. 183'

17,090

’184

7,997
1,938
7,739

arabic.207 14,180

copal... 19

f&go
*P«cac

195
•

218
.,15



■

419

180
425
68
..

Opium

.1,777
25

Paints

Potash, hyd.. .10
Potash, prase.10
Reg antimony.20

Rhubarb
Shellac

2,609
11,702
21,518

7,115
10,669
8,846

16,751
1,718
934

,1,989

Soda, Bicarb.2300

5.979

do Caustic..75
do Sal.... 382
do Ash...598

Sponges

Sulph, zinc

..

74
.30

Sumac
Vanilla beans..2

Vermilion
Other

30

84,039 Furs, &c.~

mi Felting

..2

Dried fruit
Raisins
Lemons
Nuts

7,811

99,118
12,630
21,083

Oranges

Plums
Sauces & preser.

938 Instruments—

10
92
10

Saffron

bales
Clocks

20
12

50

4,663
2,966
1,218

6,609

97,261

33

167S8

Cocoa, bags

..

Pnffpp

bags

Effects

3.075

Musical

52
16

Optical

Surgical

Jewelry, &c.—
1,210 Jewelry

...1

......

Watches

30
37

595

3,321
2,831

10,509
9,130
458

110,905

75,498
1,365 Leather, Hides, &c.—
1,671 Bristles.
82 18,632
16,677 Boots & shoes.7
889
4,302 Hides,dres’d. 361 140,783
724

1,371
732

Hides,undressed

Homs

Leather, pat

100,794

1,496
6

4.500

1,347 Liquors, Wines, &c.—
8,318 Ale
695
5,461
Brandy
240
8,182
Beer

50

359

Tea

Fish
Fish
Grain

6,0*28

91,101

Trees and plants
Waste
498
W'ool, bis ....379
Other

16,432
37,635
2,862

Toys
331 14,038
Tobacco....1,009 20,687

Fancy goods.... 131,588
Feathers
12,180

12,432

.

Imports

397 '14.697
60 247
'
648

Total

459

$2,771,124

Exports for the Week.—The
following are the
imports at New York for the week ending (for
drygoods) Oct. 11,
and

and for the week

ending (for general merchandise) Oct. 13

:

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR
THE WEEK.

1862.

Dry goods

1863.

-

Geu’l merchandise.

$1,461,767
1,601,903

Total for the week.

$2,953,670

1864.

$1,379,385.

1865.

$752,593
2,212,005

1,400,976

$3,866,618
2,771,124

$2,780,261 $2,964,598 $6,137,642
140,209,059 180,431,162 148,964,068

Previously rep’ted. 138,371,211
Since Jan. 1
In

our

$141,321,881 142,989,320 183,395,760 165,101,710
report of the dry-goods trade will be found the imports of

dry-goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the
exports (exclusive of specie)
from the port of New York to
foreign ports, for the week endiDg
OctoberT7th, and since January 1st.
EXPORTS

FROM

NEW

1862.

For the week

YORK

FOR

THE

WEEK.

1863.

1864.

$6,077,436

1865.

$2,880,417 $4,615,612 $3,402,121
Previously rep’ted. .113,962,701 185,386,184 175,260,196 124,880,986
....

.

Since

January 1. .$119,040,137 138,266,601 179,865,808 127,783,107
department will be found the official detailed
statements of the imports and
exports for the week.
The following will show the
exports of specie from the port of
New York for the week
euding Oct. 14, 1865 :
Oct. 13.—Steamer
Lafayette, Havre—
Gold bars
^>210,300
14.—Steamer Allemanq*,
Hamburg—
In the commercial

“

Gold bars..
Silver bars

401,155

German silver
14—Steamer City of Washington,

“

American

29,337

1,000

Liverpool—

180,994
39,384

gold

Total for the week

Previously reported

„.

Nut galls
Oils
Oil, cod
Ess Oils
Olive do

86,846

Spices—
Cassia

Cotton,

356

Tin, (slabs, 6,478)
ibs
304,576 81,769
Wire ........140
1,113

THE

13, 1865.
[The quantity is given in
packages when not otherwise specified.]
Quan. Value.
Quan. Value.,
China, Glass, & E’ware—
Quan. Value.
Lac dye
762; Furs
257 139,758
Bottles...
$527 Lie root
4691 Hatter’s
China
goods,
198 13,241
Madder
184 35,107)
&c
6
Earthenw’e 1,143 30,074 Magnesia
1,569
25
1,167 Fruits, &c.—
Glass
3,082

5,173

6,897
Linseed,
bags
7,200 28,698
Soap
930
4,098
Sugar, hhds, tes
and bbls...350 10,606
Sugar, boxes and
bags
3,726 73,316

12,572
8,610
16,230
2,02S

Corks

6

Seeds

33,978
1,984

142

Gold bars

WEEK ENDING OCT.

774

110,699

Silverware
2
Tin, bxs. ..13,753

IMPORTS
OTHER THAN DRY GOODS AND

2,420

Spelter,

$46,932

Grand total..

87

2,250

358

cs

504

Window glass,

Saddlery

104

5,314
12,717
1,073
7,108
5,183
1,320

396
170

Statuary

988

Cigars
Coal, tons.. 6,784

4,189
1,667
33,886

Rags

Rosin
Rice
Salt

2,317
1,885

Clay

948

Provisions

6,069

Bags

Bricks
Buttons
Cheese

..1

21
13

1,160

.40
Ptg mat’l, cs.. .23

1,577

Shot, kegs

420
720

$16,163

.3
7
1

'

483
684

Sew mach, cs. .44

Drags,

..

Potatoes

581

5,638

314

..

Petroleum.. .3,000
Ginsing, cks ..61

866
86

ware

Per caps

1,215
3,089

..

Rattan
Other

2,778
1,708

Old metal

CISPLATINE REPUBLIC,

$6,909

366

8
2

$51,563

Hardware, cs ..A
Woodware,
pkgs
94
Pumps, pkgs
.5
Clocks, bxs.. ..24

50,855

.

Needles
Nickel

85

18,478 Miscellaneous781' Baskets
58

.7.376

lbs

210

Mahogany....

729

Lead, pigs.10,784 60,269
Metal goods .29 15,055

63

30
cs.. .14

Preserves,

bars

1,521
230
315
315
510
221
10S
262
122
54

21,301

Iron, R R

1,530

CHINA.

2,458

cs.. .4

.

Pumps, box

1,500

Cheese, ibs..1,527
Alcohol, bbls., 100

254

638
168

150

Lard oil, galls.202
Machinery, cs.252

Tongues, bbls..
Pistols, cs
7,322 Harness, cs

Cheese, lbs....760
Cocoa, bags....70

Woodware,

cs

80
521
955
123

3.550
440
853

Beather

.9

cs

80
.40
1

Soap, bxs
300
Tobacco, cs
2
Linseed oil,gls.200
Pork, bbls.. ...10

238
380
152
369
780

952
120
200
124

tns

Sew mach, cs

168

Gin, cs
200
$89,510 Tinware, bxs... .5
Pictures,

Coal,

2.S16

..

Kerosene,
gals
4,912
Soap, bxs.... .180
Hams, lbs
615
Butter, lbs... 1,277
Paint, pkgs
.14
Perfumery, cs.. .4
Drugs, cs .r
59
Lumber, ft...1,196

150
Cora meal, bbls. 88

248

250

1

5,641

-fis

1,471

359
Iron tubes... 200

Plated

6,530

Logwood, M

912

141

5,855
India rubber.844 38,312
Ivory
24
9,075
Machinery... 113 12,171
Molasses ....872
21,86
Oil paintings.. 10
5,469
Plaster
1,012
Perfumery.... 26 4,307
Pipes
8,008

2,419

Fustic

203

92,122

19

Hops

10.864

60

9,627
4,234

3,541

Hemp
Honey

13,825

Cork

22.318

tons

600
300
228
238
150
462
840

9

7,212

16o
hoop, tns.. 5

tons

1,213

50
3

cs

Carts

2.479
1,938

Soap, bxs .4,500
Lumber, ft .58,962
Bice, bgs
126
9S6 34,552 Rope,"pkgs
Pork, b%ls
92
2,482
Codfish, qtl...861
6,557 Hoop skirts, cs. .3
830
Pkd codfish,
Nails, kegs
16
112
bbls
90
885 Oakum, bla ....30
142
Bread, pkgs
69 Shoes, cs
3
30
2,707
Tobacco, bais.. 52
1,526 Packing, b’ls....1
173
Pepper, bags... 21
212 Twine, bale
1
110
Shingles... .30,000
374 Preserves,cs..210
1,220
933 Furniture, cs.,113
Sugar, bxs
24
839
Candles, bxs.. .20
90 Fans, cs
3
140
488 Linseed oil, gls.60
Drugs, cs
14
100
Lara oil, galls.. 39
93 I R goods, cs.. ..2
476
212 Matches, cs... ,15
Furniture, cs.. .12
260
29
Beef, bbls
870 Muskets
10
2,000
Shoes, cs
1
152 Tacks, cs
6
104
Mfd iron, pkgs.. 2
425 Sew mach, cs
.5
332
Nails, kegs—107
860' Clocks, cs
3
120
Paper, rms
60
389 Cotton gin.
1
102
Pamt, pkgs.... 300
731 Paint, bbl
1
173
Cartridges,bxs 300 6,000 Lumber, ft..l8,9Sl
1,156
Tobacco, hhd....l
676 Iron, bars
100
134
Miscellaneous....
1,968 Mfd iron, pkgs. 75
2,946
MEXICO.

Irons,

Clocks, bxs
6.686 Teeth, pkg
3,995 Feed, bgs

208
130

..

3
cs.,14

Glassware,

4.479
460

Cutlery, cs
8
Lard, lbs...19,767
Soap, bxs
.1.030
Powder, cs
12
Butter, lbs..6,473

814 Pumps, cs
2
Sugar, bbls
68
Copper, still
1
Pork, bbls
9
7,703 Wine, pkgs
16
1,716 Rice, bgs
30
1,548 Gunny bags,bis.12

—

goods

3.566

6,364
196
920
51
20 Coal oil, gls .2,433

Hardware, cs
7,
Potatoes, bbls.100
codfish.... 20
Pkd
Onions
50

Agl implts,pkg.28
I R

NEW GRANADA.

Hardware, cs.. .73
Drugs, pkgs.... 96
Flour, bbls... .402

187
151
160

Matches, cs .... 10
Lard, lbs... 19,700
Cheese, lbs ...783
Butter,lbs.. .2,100
5
Tar, bbls
Pitch, bbls
5

.

.87

-.
..

57
11

Haircloth

10,260
42,653

Engravings .12
;.107
Paper

1,814 Other
40.385 Woods—

Iron, sheet,tns21
Iron, other,

336
80
307
311
829
401
765

Tranks, pkgs .52

$56,558

Books

Iron, pig,

1,010
1,583

Woodware.pkg.il

11,070

Iron

1,000

800

4
cs

469
704
160

....

Hair

113

Nutmeg

2e6

98
39

Guns
Hardware

Ginger

Mustard

1,44§

Quan. Value.
Grindstones
112

5,053
2,033

47,045 Pepper
10,454 Stationery, &c.—

-

Brass goods...3
Bronzes
.1

Cutlery

Quan. Value

Cinnamon

254

9,966

Metals, &c.—

10,747
1,695

..59

galls

1,736

$109,834 Miscellaneous....
460

15,215
cs

Cutlerj% cs
5
Lumber, ft..27,493
Nails, kegs
20
Furniture, cs...57
Spirits Turp'ne,

1,622

HAYTI.

Flour, bbls.. 1,»75
Hams, lbs. ..1,448

gals

Hardware,

139

1,778
1,091

Cha V s & anch. 38

Cotton
gins.bxs 13
Cart axles, bxs..6
Gunny bags.. .200
Shooks
410

bxs

Dry goods,

Wines

Champ,bas. 1,291

Petroleum,

173

Billiard tables,

Whisky

398
392
442

Tea, pkgs
.6
Candles, bxs.. .40

140
150

Machinery,pkgs 24

240
599

30

Porter....

1,153

Perfumery, bxs.S3

31
62
..145
4

Gin

85
ISO
621
747

—

Quan. Value.

Cordials

2,573

.

pkgs
5
Oakum, bxs... .20
1,066 Furniture, cs... .2
100 Hops, bis
17
047 Lard, lbs
....7,621
126 Rice, bags
20 280 Preserves, cs.. .16
1.670 Beans, bbls
20

100
Drugs, CS.......53
Steel springs..

Tar, bbls

Lard, lbs
7,941
Hams, lbs
310
421 Paper, rms....200
Matches, bxs .40
1,174 Bread, pkgs.. .230
1,443 Drugs, pkgs
81

Carriages, pcs.. .5
Telegraph mtl,

225

Quan. Value

490
187

529

Total since Jan. 1,1865
Same tune
1864

in

$35,806,051
36,007,879
45,811,727

1863...
1862
1861
1860

18o9•••«•§•
18o8

•«*•

•

•

•

•

3,288,282
40.069,472
60,019,525
22,613,748

| Same time in
1857
1856

29,090,684
24,784,763
32,353,393

1855...
1854
1853
18

.

•

•

•

•

•

•

••

•

•

•

17,630,354
21,922,987

London.—The Scotia brings
Barings’ circular of the 6th, from
we
quote:

which

-

Cocoa—Of 130 bags Trinidad a small
part
and 81s@86s 6d for
good to fine red.

only sold at 63s for gray

Coffee quiet without material
change in prices. The sales have
comprised 1248 casks, 147 barrels, 682 bags Plantation
Ceylon at 78s(3)
80s for low mid, 80s
6d@83s 6d for mid, and 88s@90s for fine bold ;
254 casks, 14 barrels,
1810 bags Native Ceylon at 65s@67s for
good
ord, 67s 6d@68s for fine ord, and 69s@70s 6d for bold and
superior;
627 cases, 1367
bags Neilgherry, Ac., 79s 6d®85s 6d ; Madras at 88s
6d@98 ; 100 pockets Native ditto at 71b@71s fid; 116 half-bales short

THE

530

[October 21, 1865.

CHRONICLE.

of the rate of
effect in Liver¬
Sheathing j pool and Manchester, caused speculative buyers to retire ; and un¬
der the pressure of a very tight money market prices
given
in prices. ! way, aud the close last evening was about 4 cents belowhave highest
the
Average price of English Wheat for the week ending 30th ult. was 40s |
lOd
73,888 qrs returned. White American Wheat 46s(7M8s; Winter, j quotations of Monday.
Red46s@47s; Spring 44s@46s per qr ; American Flour 24s@27s per!
The receipts at this market are on a very large scale, although
barrel.
not
large for the past week as for the previous week. We see
Cotton—The market has fluctuated, and prices at one time during
the week gave way about -£d per lb, but to-day there is more animation
probability of an early diminution of the receipts. A trade cir¬
full prices. At Liverpool the sales for the week are 179,000 bales ; j cular estimates the stocks in the shipping ports at about 355,000!
mid Orleans 24^d per lb.
j bales.
Hemp—Russian dearer; St. Petersburg Clean £31. 10s(3£32. Small i
At to-day’s market the demand was limited, and prices weak.
sales of Snrsogan Manila at £40. 1400 bales fair to good current eold j
at £36@£37, and holders now ask a further advance.
j The following wore closing quotations :
Jute—A fair demand at the public sales, and 3260 bales mostly j
CJpland Florida. Mobile. & Tex.
realised at full rates, from £12@£20. 5s for common to good fair.
48
49
Ordinary, per lb
,.
48
48
About 12,000 bales sold for arrival from £19 10s@£20. 10s.
....
51
52
52
53
Saltpetre—8000 bags Bengal eold at 23s 3d(d23s 9d for 11 to Sfd Good Ordinary.
Middling
57
58
58
59
per cent.
59
60
61
62
Indigo.—The declarations for the sale to commence 10th October Good Middling
Middling fair
amount to 10,221 chests.
The receipts of Cotton at this market for the week ending last
Iron.—Welsh firm ; rails and bars £7 (V? £7 10s' f. o. b. in Wales.
Scotch pigs 57s 10 for mixed Nos. on Clyde.
evening (Thursday) were as follows :
Linseed firm.— Calcutta on the spot commands 6Is 6d, and Bombay
6,261 Charleston....
638, with very little to be had at these prices. Two parcels of Arch¬ New Orleans
1,612 North Carolina
angel, arrived here, sold at 50s per 408 lbs delivered in Hull. For ar¬ Galveston...
rival
business in Calcutta or Black Sea ; 100 qrs Bombay, Septem- Mobile
7,850 Norfolk, Ac...,
176 I Per Railroad..
ber-October shipment, sold at 63s L. A. T. Imports since 1st January
Florida
886,861 qrs against 364,896 qrs last year. The quantities afloat from Savaur ah
3,413 j Foreign ports.
the East Indies by last advices were as follows : Calcutta to London
182,392 qrs against 159,858 qrs in 1864, Calcutta to Liverpool 22,019
Total for the week
27,626
qrs against 15,400 qrs in 1864, Calcutta to Hull 33,042 qrs against
Previously reported
309,699
19,387 qrs in 1864, Bombay to London 3,846 qrs against 329 in 1864,
337,325
and Bombay to Liverpool 8,519 qrs against 14.090 qrs in 1864.
Total since July 1st....
58,895
Linseed Cakes.—The market has improved, and the demand has in¬
Same time last year
creased.
The exports last week were as follows :
Molasses.—140 puns sold, St. Kitt’s at 16s 6d, St. Vincent’s at 15s
7,611
6d, and Tobago at 13s 6d.
To Liverpool,
689
Naval Stores.—Spirits turpentine lower, sellers at 44s 6d on the
To Havre...
249
spot and to arrive. Petroleum 3s Id refined Pennsylvanian, and £20 To Hamburg,
bags Guatemala

berry green Mocha sold at 80s@81 6d, 221
68s@73s 6d. 6552 bags Santos bought in at 61s@65.
Copper firm—Tough Cake <t Tile £36, Best Selected £89,
£91, Y. M. Sheathing 8-£-d
Corn—The market is steady without material alteration

realised i

for

The probability of a further advance
the Bank of England, with its probable

middling.

discount by

on

so

no

at

n.o.

'

.

.

From

Bales.

From

no

,

...

Baes.

*

quoted for crude now shipping.
Lead quiet.—Common pig £20.
Oils—Fish : Sperm continues firm, and the nominal quotation is £110,
pale seal £46, pale southern £47, cod £49 10s(«)£50 ; all
offered at £34 10s has changed hands.
Linseed: there are buyers on
the spot at 87s 6, without sellers under 37s 9d.for the next two
delivery the price is 37s@37s 3d. Rape:,the value of
re¬

English has

57,338

Previously reported,

the East India

months’

8,549

Total for the week.,

65,887

Total since Jan. 1..
Same

3,296

time last year

COTTON STATEMENT, OCT. 10.
Bales
refined in fair demand at £48
10s@£49 10s ; refined cotton is in improved demand at £35 10s@£37 Stock on hand Sept. 1, 1865
83,239
10s, according to quality ; Crude £29 10@£30 ; niger £42, and Madras Receded past three days
16,285
ground nut £45@46. Olive : large quantities of Mogadore have changed Received previously
97,738— 113,973
hands at £50, and in some instances £51 is reported paid, there are,
197,212
however, still sellers at £50 10 ; Seville sold at £53, Malaga at £53 10s,
8,149 ;
and
large parcel of Tunis at £52 ; various cargoes sold c. f. & i. to the
Exported past three days
74,167— 82,816
U. K. Cocoa nut firm, as importers generally hold for higher prices,
Exported previously
and stocks in second hands have met with free buyers at 47s(u)478 6d for
Ceylon, and 50s for Cochin with customary three month’s prompt. Palm
Stock
hand and on shipboard
114,896
firm at 42s for fine Lagos, and palm nut is worth 36s.
The following are the comparative arrivals, exports and stocks of
Rice quiet. The sales are 2,500 bags Necranzie Arracan 10s 3d.
Rum quiet and little doing.
Colton at New Orleans for ten years, from Sept. 1, each yer.r, to
Spices.—Pepper : Black firmer, 1,000 bags Penang were bought in Oct. 10 i
BALESat 8 8-16d.
400 bags white sold 5^d@5£d for ord Singapore. Ginger :
Stocker
Exports.
Arrivals.
230 barrels Jamaica brought from 64e@34s for good ord to fair bold,
114,896
82.316
113,073
with fine from £5 5s@£8 ; 220 bags African went at 36s.
150 boxes 1S65
4,344
6,895
5,664
Cassia Lignia (mouldy) found buyers from 90s@92 for pile 3. 160 pkgs 1 804
6,523
7,536
Cassia \^ra were bought in from 40s@45s. 50 cases mace were mostly 1863
933
237
held for Is 3d for raid.
1362
11,907
1,789
Sugar.—The market is quiet but very steady. Of British West In¬ 1861
212,369
89,165
228,620
dia 2,700 hhds sold, including at public sales 866 casks Barbadoes from
1860
180,013
118,646
272,636
85s@41s, 321 casks Jamaca from £2s@36s 6d, 166 casks St. Vincent’s 1859
148,028
89,159
206,936
from 32s@35s, and 29 casks, 200 barrels Sundries from 33s@33s 6d.
1858
112,201
36,689
141,569
9,196 bags Mauritius-were partly disposed of at 32s@39s. 528 bags 1857
145,538
64,016
202,559
Bengal good yellow Gurpattah were brought in at 37s@37s 6d. 3.371 1856
bags Penang found buyers at 84s 6d@35s 6d. 1,015 bags Native Mad¬
COTTON STATEMENT, OCT. «>.
Bales.
sold at 298 6d@34s 6d. 579 bags Natal sold at29s@36s. Privately
24,290
about 6,000 bags Mauritus sold at 28s 6d(rt)41s, also 350 tons Havre at Stock
hand 1st September, 1865
27s 3d ; 1,600 bags grainy Jaggery at 29s 6d, and 700 bags Bengal at
Received this week
12,010
37s 6d@39s 6d. Foreign :
240 hhds, 69 barrels Porto Rico sold at 34s Received previously
55,540— 67,592
@35s for brown, and 36s@41s for yellow. 72 hhds Cuba Melado sold at
91,882
288 6d.
The private transactions comprise : 3,830 boxes Havana at
Total
38e@38s 6d for No. 11^ to 124 ; 24,000 bags clayed Manila at 33s 6d@
Exported this week
..
;
9,105
34s; 10,000 bags unclayed ditto at 30s 6d@31s; 900 hhds Porto Rico
Exported previously
26,379 88,874
37a 9d@38s ; 3,770 bags brown Pernams at 33s ; 450 cases brown
at
Burned Oct. 5th and 6th (about).
3,390
Bahia at 82s 9d, and 300 hhds Cuba Muscovado at 36s 6d@37s6d.
Tallow active, and 48s realised lor New St. Petersburg Y. C. on spot
53,008
year, 49s December, 49s 9d@50s January to March ; for March only
Stock on hand and on shipboard, not cleared, Oct. 6, 1865.
there are buyers at 50s, aud few sellers under 50s 6d.

ceded

to

£47, and of

foreign to £47 10s ;

NEW

ORLEANS

a

on

—COTTON,

*

>

.

.

MOBILE

ras

on

or

Spelter

dull at £21.

SAVANNAH COTTON

all,

public sales this week have been 19,940 pkgs, nearly
without reserve. In prices no important change. Oolongs still in de¬
Stock Sept. 1
mand for America at full prices. Common Congou ls@ls Id per lb.
Received this week.
Tin.—English firm ; blocks 93s, bars 94s, refined 97s, straits 91 s@ Received previously




Tea.—The

91s

STATEMENT, OCT.
Uplands.

tended steadily downward
quotation on the Nova Scotian’s

The market has

current

since Monday, when
news was 62 a 63c.

281
888

....

27,022

1,467
3,018
2,856

1,693
’

186

Stock Oct. IS, 1886

810

1,879

Total

Exported since Sept. 1

Island. Domestic.
286

1,215

6d.

COTTON.

13.

Sea

167

V-\
rr

■

October 21,18t>5.]

THE

CHARLESTON COTTON

CHRONICLE.

STATEMENT, OCT. 12.
Sea Island.

362
333

1,610
9,173

150

QUOTATIONS.

Upland.

1,556

Stock on hand Sept. 1, 1865

Received from Sept. 1 to Oct. 4, 1865
Receipts from Oct. 5 to Oct. 11
Total

531

receipts..

845

12,339

Exports from Sept. 1 to Oct. 6, 1865
From Oct.. 6 to Oct. 12, 1865

695
121

8,915
1,568

Total exports

816

10,4 S 3

Good,
Fine.

32d@35d

Mobiles. ...f.

42d@50d

21
21

Uplands
Orleans

Fair.
Good fair.

Ordinary.
Middling.

Sea Islands

@..
25$@..

@24

56d@68d
•

..

@24£

•

..

@• •
(d>..

EXrORT8.

BREADSTUFFS,

*

Stock Oct. 12.
COTTON

STATEMENT, SECT. 30.
This Year

hand Sept. 1,1S65
Received at this port this week
Received previously
Stock

'

.

13,857
3,214
10,016
2,933

on

.

Received at other ports
Total

,

likely to still further reduce the supplies that are to come forward
1,856
through that channel.
The deliveries at and
shipments from the principal upper lake
1S00-61.
markets, are, as will be seen by the statistics below, largely iu ex¬
3,168
4,409 cess of last year ; and but for the interruption of navigation on the
11,253 Erie Canal, we should have reason to
expect such liberal deliveries
980
at this market as would
depress prices to export figures.

29

GALVESTON

The deliveries at this market are
iuterupted by a serious break
in the Erie Canal, west of Rochester
an unfortunate event that is

30,020

Notwithstanding the limited quotations of Flour and Wheat

19,810

on

the

market, prices have materially declined, and close very unset¬
tled. This is owing to the state of the
money market here and at
western financial centres.
The leading receivers at this market are
reducing their advances on consignments, and otherwise lending

Exports

17,610
7,657
band and on shipboard not cleared
12,410
12,153
Liverpool.—The following is from the weekly report of the

On

Liverpool Brokers Cotton Circular, for the week ending Oct. 5.

Friday, proving that all the their influence against the late high prices. Some grades of flour
reported for Spinuing and for" Export throughout the last quar¬ have declined nearly a dollar a barrel, and wheat about ten cents
ter had actually gone forward for consumption, and the
figures confirm¬
bushel. There is as yet no export movement in flour and wheat,
ing the previous estimate and showing so very limited a supply on per
CAused renewed animation in the Cotton market, and a large busi¬ but there are steady shipments of corn.
hand,
ness was done at decidedly
Next week there will be
advancing rates, ©n Saturday the sales
large arrivals from the break in the ca¬
■were unusually extensile, with
prices still lising, and on Monday also a nal, when the
strength of our market will be fully tested.
large business was done at extreme quotations, the advance in the
At to-day’s market, Flour and Wheat were dull,
Bank rate to 5 per cent having been too generally
and prices very
anticipated to have
much influence. On Tuesday and
Wednesday the comparatively quiet irregular ; Corn rather firmer, and Oats firm.
state of the Manchester market was followed
by a reaction in Liver¬
The following are closing quotations :
pool and some irregularity and decline. Yesterday the market opened ;
with fresh activity and enhanced quotations, and 20,000 bales were Flour, Superfine State and Western. ...per bbl.
$7 70 @ *8 00
The official declaration of the Stock last

Cotton

Extra

sold, but after the

announcement of the further advance of the Bank
rate to 6 per cent business was checked and prices became weaker.
Extensive transactions in Sea Island have

8 00

Shipping Roundhoop Ohio

quotations of the higher grades are
lb.
American, continuing scarce and in general request, advanced
fully
3d per lb up to Monday, but closed about Id below the
highest point.

Southern, supers

per

Southern, fancy and extra
Canada, common to choice extra.Rye Flour, fine and superfine
Corn meal, Jersey and Brandywine
Wheat, Chicago Spring
per bushel

lb,

Egyptian has fully shared in the fluctuation of the market, having
attained an advance of 3^d
per lb in the early part of the week, but
closing at not more than 2-Jd per lb above last P'riday’s quotations.
The supply of Smyrna has been limited, and
prices advanced 2d to
3d per lb, closing about 2d above last week.
Attention has been much directed to East India
descriptions, which
advanced 3d per lb in almost all kinds ; the extreme
quotations cur¬
rent on Monday are not now obtainable within 4d to la
per lb, but the
supply is limited, especially in the medium qualities with staple. Ben¬
gal and Scinde are about 2d to 24d higher, but also close flatly.
China and Japan are
very scarce at 2d to 2^d advance, and are held
with

do
do
do

Corn,
do
do
do
do

Rye,
do

great firmness.

6

50

4 So

1

@
@

65

@
1 67 @

Milwaukee Club
Red Winter

2 00 @
2 25 @

Amber

Michigan, <fec
Western Mixed

75 @

Western White

..

Western Yellow
Southern Yellow.
Southern White

..

..

..

Western

..

North River.

1

Rye, Canada

“

@

8 50

8 75 @ 9
8 25 @ 11
H 50 @ 16
9 40 @ 11
H 50 @ 16
8 25 @ 12

Extra Western,-common to good
Double Extra Western and St. Louis

again been effected, and
raised 2d, and of the lower Id

The excited demand caused an advance in Braail of
fully 3d per
and the quotations are still 24d to 3d over those of last week.

State

1

'

7
6
1
1
2
2

00
40
00
40

00
25
00
10
73
75
20
30
88

@
@
@

@

90
• •

• •

(a)

15

@
@
50 @
68 @
@
10 @
18

1 18
1 20

To arrive ” the transactions have been
-^0
very numerous and exten¬ Oats, Western
sive, at prices quite up to the advance upon the spot, but
do
State
60
closing easier.
The latest
do
quotations were yesterday for Pernam, first quality, ship
Canada...........'
..
named 23d per
1
lb—Maceio, fair average, ship named 21^d—Egyptian, Barley
1 28
fair open, at sea 23d
do Malt
1 40 @
; ship named 22-jd and
1 50
23^d—middling fair, ship¬
ping or shipped 22d ; new, fair open, December or
January shipment
Chicago.—The following table shows the receipts during the
22Jd—Oomrawutte, fair and fair new merchants, July sailing 17d ; fair
new
merchants, July 17^d ; ship named 164d—Western Madras, fair, past week, and siuce Jan. 1, compared with the receipts during the
June sailing
16£d—Tinoivelly Madras, fair, September
Bengal, fair new merchants, August sailing 12d per lb. shipment 16^d corresponding week in 1804—
W eek,
Season,
Season,
Week,
The sales of the week amount to
*864.
179,190 bales, iucluding 98,800 on
1865.
1864.
1865.
Speculation, and 10,290 declared for export, leaving 70,100 bales to the Flour, bbls
952,376
818,018
15,026
Trade.
9,500,522
Wheat, bu
414,667
196,913
6,314,533
The sales
to-day will probably amount to fully 20,000 bales at ad¬ Corn
889,949
138,082 21.910,402
vancing prices.
Oats
7,024,979
436,300
The actual
export this week is not deducted from Stock, as it was Eye.,
790,925
799,459
74,684
27,960
not included in
the Stock declared on 29th ult.
602,202
Barley,
137,848
29,479
745,650
The
following statistics of the Liverpool market, are in lieu of
The following table shows the shipment during the week, and
oar
regular figures which having been discovered to be erroneous
since Jan. 1, compared with the corresponding week in 1 864
at the last
moment in
Liverpool, were withdrawn :
Week.
Season,
Season,
Week,
The imports,
<fec., into Great Britain during the first nine months of
1865.
1S65.
1864.
1864.
the year were
as follows
746,407
950,407
Flour, bbls
80,466
Wheat, bu
291,675 5,139,597 8,774,309
260,059
Import.
Homo Deliveries.
Corn,bu
577,284
io£r
Amer.
E. I.
Total.
Amer.
139,725 20,529,868 11,227,486
Total.
E.I.
202
1,063
1,929
169
' 843
416,748
546,087 6,910,995 9,533,849
1,542 m.b Oats, bu
4
lt>0
1,375
264,367
562,597
2,024
650
46,157
131
Rye, bu
41,857
1,170 “
Export.
133,386
135,650
Barley, bu
3,006
Stock 30 Sept.
20,400
..

,

.

.

....

....

Amer-

18fiR

jog?

36
45

*

tbe

***

Amerioen.
*

6

l£64

Total.

*>365




E.I.

Total,

659

21

213

304 m.b

473

5SG

23

505

597

Brazil.

W.In.

3,181

3,733
2,078

4,128

average weekly consumption of
W58

Amer.

609

comparative weekly deliveries

1865
~

EJl

Brazil.
2,995

“

1

were

E. Ind.

21,616

16,672
1864

Milwaukee.—The

Medlteran.

Flour,

.29,984
Total.

39,530 bales,

“

was

E. Ind.

Mediteran,

2,029

18,488

4,878

80,898 bftlee,

Total
Cor. time ’64

Wheat,

[Oats.

bbls.

Total.

5,729
4,698

W.In.

following table exhibits the receipts of flour
grain by rail and lake, for the week ending Saturday, October
4th, and the corresponding time last year :

and

bus.

bus.

17,049
4,152

829.022
109,093

Corn,

Barley,

Rye,

bus.

bus.

27,110 ' 6,914

5,748

5,412

20,068,

1,730.

5,558

bus.

2,101

Receipts and Shipments of flour and grain since January 1st,
and the corresponding time last year, were ;
'

532

THE CHRONICLE.
-Receipts-

Since Jan.

Flour, bbls
Wheat, bu

S'et’e ’64

238,031

857,989

263,909

7,734,312

7,922,769

434,996

787,069

203,297

407,510
61,590

6,951.680
238,716
59,519

7,985,983
597,564
167,213

21,775

12,115
1,789

Barley, bu

93,225
95,533

Rye, bu.
Weekly Receipts

133,702

6,595

Lake Ports.—The following will show

at

weekly receipts of Flour and Grain at the places indicated for
ending Oct. 14

the week

Flour,

Chicago
Toledo
Detroit

...

bushels.

56,596

.

Milwaukee

Wheat,

bbls.

84,620

.

..

Cleveland....

7,133

.

Oats,

Rye,

bushels.

bushels

877,558 137,848
27.110
5,414

6,914
70,124

Bariev,

bushels.

891959

414,567
850,022
80,061
92,640
51,531

17,058

.

Corn,
bushels,

74,714
5,784
6,539

11,270

8,445

8,811

.

750
546

638

23,215

•

•

•

two cents in the

early part of this week. The decline in
making by the mills, with an increase of
water, is having a depressing effect upon dry goods, and the
tone
of the market is easier.
Trade is unusually quiet at this
time and
figures nominal. Goods are accumulating steadily and the demand
lighter. Jobbers are doing a quiet business, buyers seemin» de¬
termined to wait for a concession from the present
very high figure
before buying, except for immediate consumption.
There has
been au unusually large amount of foreign goods thrown
upon the
market, which indicates that prices have reached their
highest
figure.- The result of this is that Domestics are for the moment
neglected, and with a better supply and lower cotton market there
one or

Since Jan-

246,203

Oats, bu
Corn, bu

the

-Shipments

S’e t'e ’64.

cotton and the better time

must be

concession.

a

•

Brown Sheetings

66,259

•

•

Eastward Movement

Flour

of

439,786 210,817
452,477 82,46S
Grain.—The

and

Shirtings

and

•

•

standard
Totals
.140,305 1, 494,821
981,283
Previous week. .129,436 1 ,2S3,987 1,078.575

[October 21,1866.

87,001
60,334

following

are

higher than last

week for'

goods, but the rise does not seem to be on a firm basis
shakey, with but a quiet demand. Should cot-

and the market is
ton still go

down these goods will fall.

at 37 cents for

Brown goods

are now

held

standard

grades. Atlantic A. P. A. A. H. & p
will show the shipments of Flour and Grain from the
ports of H. are held at 37 cents, as are'
Amoskeag Standards. Appleton
Chicago, Milwaukee, and Toledo, for the week ending Oct. 14,
Bs, Pocassett Canoe K, Lawrence C. and Stark A, Amory and
and destination :
Indian Head A are held at 38 cents.' Indian Head
Flour,

To Buffalo

Wheat,

Corn,

bbls.

bushels.

Oats,

bushels.

bushels.

763,065
77,600
31,150
26,306

478,625

386,950

46,749

Oswego

•

•

•

•

Pt. Colborne.

1.647

Ogdensburgh.

5,493
10,119

Dunkirk

Cleveland...

Saganaw....
Collingwood

.

\

•

•

•

Sarnia

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

m

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

9

9

•

•

•

9

3,000

29,525

•

9

•

•

•

9

•

0

0

0

9

•

•

•

•

200
•

•

•

•

•

••

•

•

•

•

9

•

•

26,250

•

85,000

•

7,579

Kingston.....

•

•

•

»

9

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

0

9

9

9

'

•

•

•

•

»

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

-

•

21,200

9

9

•

9

9

9

9

9

0

9

9

0

9

9

9

9

57£, B 30 inch 32 and Nashua A 36.
41; do family cottons i 32R Appleton C 32£, D 34, Shirtings E
28, Augusta Mills 35, £ do 30. Indian Queen 30. Pittsfield A
31, Rocky Poiut Sheetings 33, Bristol 29, Washington heavy, 34,
Griswold 224, Warren 36, Centra Mills 27 » Boston 32, Merrimack
30, Indian Orchard W 30, B B 324, C 35, N 36, A 38, S 35. Atlantic heavy Shirtings 30 inch 314-, do A G 30, do fine
Sheetings
364 inch 37, do Shirtings 35.

9

0

10,000
116,417
8,500
16,003
33,724

E 48 inchat ‘
Pocassett Canoe 39 inch

Eve

bush.

41,150

16,015

3,200

•

50

St. Cath’s....

Goderich....

•

43.125

Barley.

bushels.

Sheetings and

Bleached

Shirtings

in less demand and

are

121

099

9

9

prices are easier, owing to a. better supply, and the presence of a
ports..
25,400
19,288
large amount of foreign goods. The price of bleached goods has been
11 450
By Railroad.... 13,736
2,S59
3,106
4,801 relitively higher during the season, and now the goods are returning
to their proper place in the market.
Totals
The finer grades are still sold
91,906 1,120,965 642,999 420 778
3,106 46,272
Previous week.. 95,513
ahead of the supply, and there are but few goods in the market.
742,966 1,1 18,850 829,935
4,746 44,493
Liverpool.—Dates are to the 7th October. We
White Rocks are held at 50, Aquidnecks 4-4 374,
quote
Attawaugan XX
The same unprecedently fine Autumn weather
continues; and the 474, do water twist 52, Bedford O 28, Uxbridge imperial 424,
want of water is beginning to be
seriously felt by millers; thus the de¬ Palace Medal 42, Gold Medal 424, Ann Swanscott 44
424; 0. J.
mand is thrown more upon flour than wheat.
Large contracts for French Rathbun
flour sold f. o. b. are now
| 40, Social Mill 44 45, do £ 35, Manville R 424, X X,
maturing, and it seems to be thought that there
will be difficulty in finding the goods to
ship. There are at sea from 44, Narragansett A 45, do B 414, Lackawasset 44 41.
Montreal...

5,484

Other

.

1.047

New York to this
Indian corn.

•

•

•

•

9

port about 12,000 quarters wheat and 27,000 quarters

Tickings

quiet but steady, with nothing of importance to
The supply is increasing, and in some in¬
Tuesday’s market was rather quiet, but as there is so little wheat and
flour offering extreme prices were
paid. Indian corn declined 3d per stances prices are reduced. Amoskeag A C A’s are held at 82 4;
cental.
To-day’s market was quiet but very strong. Wheat sold in retail at A, 32 inch, 674, B 574, C 524, D 47, Willow Brook, 7-8, 70, and
very full prices, 9s 6d @ 9s Sd for Milwaukee, 9s lOd asked for fair 44,90; Atlantic, 7-8, 50; Concord, 44, 41; Passaic, 7-8, 36 ;
Amber, 9s lid paid in small quantities for winter and 10s for Philadel¬ Pacific extra
524, West Branch 50, No. 2 424, Windsor, 7*8, 38
phia. Flour in moderate request without change in prices, 24s 6d @
25s 6d is the nominal value of Western, of
which, however, there are Henry Clay 35 ; Pontiac, A heavy, 624 ; B heavy, 7-8, 524; Lo¬
scarcely any here. In Indian corn a fair business was transacted at cust Grove, 4 4, 65 ; do., 7-8, 524.
28s 9d @ 29s, being rather lower.
Stripes and Checks are in greater abundance, but prices are
quotations.
steady. Simpson & Son, No. 18, 46, Louisiana plaids 34, Ringold
8.
a.
s.
d.
Wheat, per 100 lbs.
fast plaids 34, Taylor 34, Roanoke checks 35.
Milwaukee and Amber Iowa
6
9
9 10
Denims are quiet, very, and there is an abuudant supply on hand,
red Winter
9
8
9 11
red Southern
though prices are steady. Amoskeag D, 28 inch, sell at 65, Ark¬
9 10
10
0
«.white Western
10
2
10
4
wright blue 45, brown 43, Madison brown and Providence
white
are

note from last week.

“
“

**

“

“

Southern

Flour,
“

per

10

Western canal, extra.
Canada, superfine
Phil., Baltimore, and Ohio, super
“

“
“
“

Sour and

9

blue 29.

0

26

0
0
0

Market and Indian Orchards sell at

“

Average price of wheat
Last

28

0

0

24

0

33

0

29

40 11

Last week’s deliveries from farmers

)1

I

coni.

Qrs,

Qrs.

11,212

20,098
6,018

,

Europe, etc
Since 1st September, 1865..
Same time 1864

11,211
45,301
286,294

26,116
92,629
94,138

Flour.
Brls.
Sacks.
850

/

same

figures. New

324.
Drills are in steady though quiet demand, and prices a shade
easier. India are held at 36, Amoskeag brown 37, Live Oak 32.
Canton Flannels are in quiet demand, with few goods in
market.
Printing Cloths have been active until the

pieces

were

a

present, when the

dullness in the market.

About 95,000

sold, mostly for future delivery, 64x64 on hand brought

32 cents.

Prints

are

•

704

•

•

•

5,494

1,054

6,494

5,013

35,942

81,826

650

look for

a

supply and the demand is quiet. Jobbers
prices, and are buying but just sufficient
A flight concession would cause a brisk
Merimacks are held at 34 for W, and 32 for

in better

,

high price of cotton at the close of last week caused a still
further advance in most standard cotton
goods* and prices ran up




quiet at nominally the

decline in cotton caused

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.

The

are

import this week.

Wheat.

America and Canada...

per qr.

73,888 qrs.
82,835

year

foreign

Corset Jeans

3

26

-

year’s

Corresponding week last

0

22

yellow

0
0

27

partial

white
Mixed and

27

24

extra

Indian corn, per quarter of 480 lb3.
“

■X

10

32
0
28
9
40 10

“

“

6

25
26

-

barrel of 196 lbs.1

concession in

for immediate wants*
business at this time.

32, black
31, Garners 32, Amoskeag pinks 31, purple 30, dark and
lights 29, mournings 28, Swiss ruby 30, Duchess B 27, Lowell
dark and light 274, Wamsutta 25j Columbia full madders 28, Con¬
D.

American Print Works

madder 31,

do. blockers

and white

cord

purples 30, Glen Gove full madders 23, Wauregan
pinks 32, purples 32, Green Co. fancies 31,

rubies 32,

fancies 3l<

rubies 32<

Ootober

madders and rubies 32,

blue and white 33, blue and orange

purples 33, shirtiDg prints 35.

34, pinks and
Ginghams are

FLAX.

23,488 Hemp yarn...118
10,292 5

..35
43

1513$877,554 Hdkfs
4
10,300 Thread

Total.,

steady. A lot of 150 cases of inferior
goods have been sold during the week by a leading jobber at 31c.
Manchester are held at 35c, all wool 55c.
are

Goons are steady, and for dark seasonable goods quite
firm.
Other styles are in less demand, and rates are a trifle
easier. For cloths, cotton warps are held $2.60 for No 1, $2.50 for
2, and $2.40 for No 3. Utica all wool beavers bring $3.50 for
light, and $4.00 for heavy. For cassimeres and satinets—Milville
bring $2.25 for all wool, and $2.25 a $2.75 for silk mixtures ;
pighton do $2.75 for plain and fancy ; Merchants’ Woolen Co.’s do
§2.621 for 34 and $5 25 for 6 4. Shaw’s diagonal cassimeres at
§1.75 for red mixed, do doeskins $1.65 ; Rochester grey $1.50,

Leath gloves. 11
Kid gloves...
6
Maftincr
72

$8,896
8,951

52

16,515

1,242

Straw

Pkgs. Value.
13
$5,607

Carpeting...

.

1,465

Value.

17,133
4,149

Cot & wos’d. 23

25,120

Total.. ..260

MANUFACTURES

Cottons

$16,410

47

.

.

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs.

6.183

OF

Colored

48

9,306
.

$68,963

COTTON.

15,833, Spool

1

...

72

-

-

Total..

$123,359

OF WOOL.

Blankets
144
Shawls
4.
Worsteds.... 53

.

13
10

Total.....360

WAREHOUSE.

FROM

MANUFACTURES

.

11,271
:

21,913

goods. 65

WITHDRAWN

Woolen

Woolens
Cloths

5.031

Susp & elast. 18

18 486

357

,

Clothing

8

Feath & flow.

30,697

Millinery

\

-

Embroideri’s. 55

9,528

....1713 $431,157

:
MISCELLANEOUS.

Louisiana plaids 24, Lancaster 36.

plough, loom, and anvil 70c. Suffolk mills fancy cassimeres
a §3.00, 64 tricots $2.75 for black, and $3 for brown.

OF

MANUFACTURES

Linens
Laces

*ess act^ve>no change in prices from last week.

Glasgow sell at 35,
Mouslin Delains

533

THE CHRONICLE.

21,1865.]

$32,315
MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks
Silk & Wors
Total

20
1

.

.

$43,074
168

Ribbons
Silk & Cot...

Laces

3,421

3
3

1,918

2

...

2,858

—

$57,439

.

$1.50

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

Linens

Goods are abundant, and prices have fallen off for most
styles. They can be afforded for less money than is asked for domes¬
Foreign

250

$57,410

Hdkfs

1

743

-

Thread

...

...14

7,523

Total..

$60,676
MISCELLANEOUS.

24
and are selling more actively.
Clothing
Suspenders.. 2
At an auction sale by Messrs. Haggerty & Co., on Tuesday, there
Total
ws a catalogue of French merinos, fancy dress goods, silks, etc.,
offered, a large proportion being from invoices recently received aud
Pkgs.
in seasonable styles. There was a good company present, but the
Woolens
167
8
bidding was not very spirited, and the prices obtained generally Blankets
Carpeting.... 40
showed a decline from recent sales. Fine black alapaca brought

tics,

4,730

.

Embroidery..

,

493

1

Straw goods. 46

754

9,079

—

$15,074

...

40-inch colored coburgs 63a65c, silk stripes 28a29£, silk
poplin 33a37^, all wool Saxony plaid 49a50, plaid fancy

Paris

mohairs 20a22, high colored Tartan check 31a32, silk figured pop¬
lin 39a41, silk plaid poplins 37£a40, 3 4 black check mohair challies35a36L 84 black crape 66a70, black bombazines $1 05al 30.
22-inch black lustrines 67^u71, 28 inch do. $1 05.

goods at this port for the week ending Oct.
19,1865, and the corresponding weeks of 1863 aud 1864, have been

Cottons
Colored
Prints

follows:
ENDING OOT. 19, 1865.
■1865.
1864.
Value.
Pkgs.
Value.
Pkgs
2034
622
$846,460
$150,714
1866
42
619,016
13,430
356
217
90,797
537,684
1713
S4S
141.236
431,157
360
43
30,965
123,359

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK

1863.
,
Value.
Pkgs.

Manufactures of wool... 1159

$394,224

cotton..

221

silk...
flax....
Miscellaneous dry gooas.

168
758

65,589
169.600

133,705

75

22,728

2381

$785, S46

do
do
do

Total
WITHDRAWN

WAREHOUSE

FROM

AND

1772

THROWN

6509

$427,142
INTO

THE

3IARKET

29

18,915

265
73

51,439
60,676
15,074

1823
1772

$803,427
427,142

723
6509

$228,467
2,557,676

3595

$1,230,570

7232

$2,736,143

22,368

73,218

376

86,434

29

3.992

53

1203

$246,616
785,816

3581 $1,032,462

silk
flax

44
5:18

Miscellaneous dry
Total
Add ent'd

$6S,963

$519,785

—

....

goods.

22,750

forconsumpt'n 2381

Total th'wn upon mark't

32,781
145,513

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING !DURING THE

$203,731
28,598
27.553

109,105

109
35
319

4,881

54

1015

$353,857

consumpt'n 2381

7S5,846

934
1772

do
do
do

.

cotton..

silk
flax

....

....

Miscellaneous dry goods.
Total
Add ent’d tor

415

$129,232

92
51
453

26,778

4

S3,861

.

Total entered at the port. 3396 $1,139,703

2706

32.315

SAME PERIOD.

417

Manufactures of wool

77,925
21,562
359,369

427,142

$786,511

Pkgs. Value.
Braids & bds. 9
7,466

132

Worsteds

60,234

Wore. Yarn..

63

Hose

2

690

21,713 Cot. & worst. 291

133,361

J).

2

$71,8S2" Emb. Mus....
27,769

8,310
1,246

16

13

Gloves
Hose

736

$347,480

2

1,703

OF COTTON.

11
116

1,868
6,005

Lai
Braids & bds.
.

1

736
411
165
234
13

$347,480

1159
6509

845,976
2,557,676

7668

154.480

266,936
63,016
14,064

163

2

411
Silks

113

$223,910

4

2,419

9
6

Laces

13,349

...

V elvets
Ribbons

5

.

519

$154,480

Cravats
5,922. Hdkfs

.

1,227

..

945

Silk&Wors

.

219
3

$56,597

Labes & cott.

3,551
3,452

5

3,776
266,936

Do. & Cot.. .165
5

.

MANUFACTURES

Linens..
Thread

7
6

.

Gloves...

Total

.

$5,357

OF FLAX.

1

1,182

Hdkfs.

.

11

4,582

234

$63,016

4

2,679

13

$14,064

655
MISCELLANEOUS.

Leath.gloves.

S

$11,179

Embroid’ies

.

1

206

Suspenders..

Total.

.

.

THE

CATTLE

MARKET.

Friday, October 20, 1865, P. M.
The offer of beef cattle fell short of last week by a thousand head,

DURING

260
96

1151
101
142

$124,288

cotton..

do
do
do

10,372

MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

$2,557,676

THE SAME PERIOD.

492
100

Manufactures of wool...

2,042

14,399

24

Shawls

>

r

t

Pkgs. Value.

Value.
$97,198

...

156
92

Spool

The importations of dry

as

WAREHOUSING.

MANUFACTURES

Crapes.

IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK.

FOR

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

Total..-,

*

32Ja33ic,

ENTERED

the

quality is fair and the number of good stock limited,
prices of the latter remains nearly the same, while common stock
was easier. The best cattle sold at 13c per lb, good to choice 16^c,
but

to

as

I7Ac, fair 12£c to 15|e, and common at 9c to ll£c.

A few cat¬

choice grade were reported above our top figure, but the
report needs confirmation.
At the close business was very dull, as there were no fresh
arrivals, and the few cattle left in second hands sold at Mouday’s
tle of very

prices.
Milch

cows were

in good

demand, and brought fully the rates

quoted last week, viz.: $125 to $150 for the best, and down to
$40 for poor,

thin animals,

decline, caused by the large receipts,
demand, the market closing at 10 to 12 cents for
to good, and 121 to 13* cents for good to prime, and 13|c

Yeal calves suffered a further

$3,403,652

and decreased
DETAILED

STATEMENT.

common

The
week

following is a detailed statement of the movement the past
ending Oct. 19, 1865 :

to 14c for extra.

Sheep, though plenty and dull at the opening, closed with rather
supply and a brisk inquiry, at an advance of half a cent on
MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.
the prices of last week, namely, at 81 cents for extra, 6£ to 8£ cents
*
Pkg3. Value.
Pkgs. Value.
Pkgs. Value
Woolens.. ..277 $143,488 Gloves
24
5,543 Braids &bds. 72
40,017 for good to prime, 5| to 61 cents for common to good.
Cloths
97
48,782 Worsteds....780 841,216 Cot. &wor’d.414 160,595
49
Lambs also improved, and sold readily as high as 10f cents per
Carpetings... 204 52,265 Hose
15,812
Total... 2034 $846,460
Blankets..
51
6,881 Worsted y’n. 40
11,194
Shawls
n
pound.
15,333 Lastings
9
6,334
Swine, however, were lower, partly owing to the increased receipts
MANUFACTURES OF COTTON.
Cottons
.871 $340,082 Velvets
30 * 11,780 Gloves....... 7
1,052 and partly to the poorer quality of the offering.
Corn-fed sold at
Colored
495 153,281 Laces
25
9,694 Spool
..141
35,627
46 10,584 Braids & bds. 12
3,867 Hose
219 48,250 the close at 13f to J4£ cents for live, and 164 to 171 cents for
i^ots
ENTERED

FOR

CONSUMPTION.

a

short

_

..

....

fcnbdmus’n

2

Total

1,158

Handk’fs

18

3,641

MANUFACTURES OF

SJ8

151 1259,872 Laces

g*Pe?

»et8

2

fllbbons.....

25

73

2,430

20,487
65,115

Gloves

Cravats
Raw

12
1
5
203

1866

1,788
3,471
126,301

Braids & bds. 13
Silk & wors’d 13
Silk & cotton. 38

L*OVMWMniim(MtMiummiin ftury•«*•*«•***




dressed.

receipts for the week were 5.909 beeves, 105 cows, 1,967
veals, 22,529 sheep and lambs, and 1,900 swine, showing a decrease
25,830 from last week of 1,014 beeves, and 4,841 sheep and lambs, and aq
$5§7i68A increase of 8 cows, 231 veals, and 2,000 swine.
The

SILK.

11.560

$619,016
10,415
10,415

THE CHRONICLE.

534
PRICES

Native Ceylon
Maracaibo

CURRENT.

Laguayra
Domingo

WHOLESALE.
duties thereon paid within one year from the dato of
the originn! importation, but may be withdrawn by
the owner for exportation to Foreign Countries, or
may be transhipped to any port of the Pacific, or West¬
ern Coast of the United States, at any time before the
expiration of three years from the date of the original
importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be subject to the same rules and
regulations as if originally imported there; any goods
remaining in public store or bonded warehouse be¬

yond three years shall be regarded as abandoned to

sold under such regulations as
Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe. Mer¬
chandise upon which duties have been paid may re¬
main in warehouse in custody of the officers of the
customs at the expense and risk of the owners of said
merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three years, shall be
entitled to return duties, proper evidence of such
merchandise having been landed abroad to bo furnish¬
ed to the collector by the importer, one per centum
of said duties to be retained by tae Government.
the Government, aud
the

In addition to the duties noted

below,

a

discrim¬

inating duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no reciprocal treaties
with the United States.
On all goodsy wares,

and merchandise, of the
growth or produce of Countries East of the Cape of
Good Hope, when imported from places this side of the
Cape of Good Hopey a duty of 10 por cent, ad val. is
levied in addition to the duties imposed on any such
articles when imported directly from the place or places
of their growth e» production ; Raw Cotton and Raw
Silk excep*fd.
^The tor i« all eases to be 2,240 ft>.

Ashes—Duty: 15

cent ad val.
Produce of
the British North American Provinces, free.
7 87* ©

$ 100 lb

Pot, 1st sort
Pearl, 1st sort

••

3 00

©

••

Anchors—Duty: 2* cents $ ft.
Of 209 B) and upward

12

$ ft

©

•

•

'

val.

Beeswax—Duty, 20 $ cent £
American yellow
ft

49

invoice 10 $ eent.
eent.
85 00
$ ton

Bones— Duty: on

Rio Grande shin

Bread—Duty, 30 $ cent ad val.
Pilot
^ ft

Navy

•

•

10

Crackers

50

©

»

©
52

©
©
©

4*
15

Breadstuf fs—See special report.

Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs hair, 1 $ ft.

ft

American, gray and white...

CO © 2 25

Butter and Cheese.—Duty: 4 cents.
duce of British North Ameiican Provinces, free.
The market for but'er lias been firm
week. Cheese is steady.

Butter—
N. Y., Welch tubs, strictly fine,
fair to good
do
do
do
Firkins, etr. fine, ytd..
do

do.
^

to medium

com.

Southern Ohio

•

Canada, uniform and fino
tdo
ordinary, mixed

Mich.,111.,Ind.
tlo

Wis.,
do

during the
45
43
43
50
48
45

©
©
©•

g.

com.

tof. v£l.
to mod.

43
43
40
34
83
85
33
80
83
82
36
80

©
©
©
©

©
©,
®

Vermont dairy

^

25

so
23

Adamantine

Cement—Rosendale........

Chains—Duty, 2*
One inch and upward

.

cents

43 bbl

©

©
..

4? ft.
¥ ft

40
50
40

31
29
1 S5

Cocoa—Duty, 3 cents ^ 1b.
Caracas ....(gold 1.(1 n bond)..43 ft
Maracaibo .(gold)..
do
Guayaquil .(gold)
do

©.

.

..

..

9 00

86
50
18

with the exception
and nominal.
22
Bio, prime, duty paid
gold.
©
do good
21
©
21*
do fair
20
19* ©
do ordinary
18 ©
IS*
do fair to good cargoes
IB* ©
20*
30 ©
34
Java, mats and bags..




,

,

@
©

©

42

@
©
@

54
10

flakey.. !
Ilyd. Potash, Fr. and Eng. .(gold)

gg
3 qa

’

5 go
^

.

Iodine, Resublimed
Ipecacuanna, Brazil
Ja!ap
Juniper Berries

2 50
5

La^ Dye
Lic>j ice Paste, Calabria

41

70

(cash)
(gold)

(gold)
(gold)
(gold)

81
20
25
75
S5

....

....

Sierra
(gold)

13
22

23
40

ft

54
43
56
50

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

75

13*
32
40

80
90
50
75
55

13*
80

©
@
©
4* ©
6
©
30 ©
1 25 @
©
24 ©
©

5*

30
45 00

..

•

30
50
36

©

©
@

92* ©
80 ©
2* ©
34* @
©
12 ©
©
..

..

©

32*
5

6*

<•<)
359
459

Peppermint,
Opium, Turkey

(cash)

pure

(gold)

n qq
5 59
4 50

COO

Rose Leaves
Salaratus
>.
Sal Ammoniac, Refined
Sal Soda,'Newcastle

(cash)

15 99
j 05

(gold)
(gold)

Sarsaparilla, Bond
Sarsaparilla, Mex.,.
Seed, Anise
do
do
do
do
do
do

4^ ft
$ bush.

Canary..
Hemp
Caraway

43 ft

Coriander

Mustard, brown, Trieste
do
do

do
English, white
Senna, Alexandria
Senna, East India.

Sennacalioot
Shell Lac
Soda Ash (80 43 cent)

...

...

24
35
75

*

85
50
13
26
4

9*
45
90

55
38
20

50
31
5/

(gold)

Sugar Lead, Wbite
Sulphate Quinine, Am
Sulphate Morphine
Tartaric Acid..... (gold)
Valerian, English

4)

oz.

2 S7i
9 09

4} 1b
49

Dutch...

do

Verdigris, dry and extra dry (gold)

29

Vitriol, Blue.

13^
Duck—Duty, 30 4? cent ad val
Ravens, Light
$ pee
16 00 @18
Ravens, Heavy
22 00
Scotch, Gourock, No. 1...
29 00
Cotton, No. 1

.42 yard

Dye Woods—Duty free.
Camwood
(gold).... 4$ ton
Fustic, Cuba
Fustic, Tampico
Fustic, Savanilla
(gold)
Fustic, Maracaibo
:
do
Logwood, Campeachy
(gold)
Logwood, Hond
(gold)
Logwood, Tabasco. /
-(gold)
Logwood, St. Domingo
Logwood, Jamaica
Limawood
Barwood..

(gold)

Sapan Wood, Manila

120

@150 00

..

44

06 @

22

66

@

22 00

20 00 @
19 00 @
25 00 @ 26
24 00 © 25
15 50 @16
90 00 @ 95
30 00
..

00
CO

50
00

w

65 00

@ 67 50

Feathers—Duty: 30 $ cent ad val.
Prime Western
do Tennessee

$ft

;

1 10 @

“

@

Fish—Duty,'Mackerel, $2; Herrings, $1: Salmon,

$3; other pickled, $1 50 $ bid.;

on other Fish,
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller pkgs. than bar¬
rels, 50 cents $ 100 ft. Produce of the British North

Americon Colonies,

free.

Dry Cod has become

scarcer

vanced.

Dry Cod
Dry Scale
Pickled Scale
Pickled Cod

.

Mackerel, No.
Mackerel, No.
Mackerel, No.
Mackerel, No.
Mackerel, No.
Mackerel, Nf.

and prices have ad¬

4j? cwt.
$ bbh
^ bbl.
4* bbl.

1, Mass, shore
1, Halifax
1, Bay
2, Mass, shore
2, Bay ............
2, Halifax...
Mackerel, No. 3, Mass, large
Mackerel, No. 8, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 8, Mass
Salmon, Pickled, No. 1
Shad, Connecticut,No. l.$ hf. bbl.
Shad, Com ect cut, No. 2
Herring, Scaled
$ box
Herring, No. 1..,
....

^

Flax—Duty: $15
Jersey
*

2*

51
45
39
24
5 50
2 25
22

California, brow'n.

95

85

70

45

.(gold)

.

Herring, pickled

bales

Ginseng, Southern and Western..
! Gum Arabic, Picked
(gold)
! Gum Arabic, Sorts
‘ Gum Benzoin
(gold)
I Gum Copal Cow

Quicksilver
Rhubarb, China

13*

80
28

43 ft

95
59

Prussiate Potash

...

oz.

Gamboge
Ginger, Jamaica, bl’d, in bbls

sa

$

...

.....

30
60
25
50
40
60

12

Gambier

Gum Gedda
Gum Dftmftr..,

«

42*

..

42

23
35
gg

Nutgalls Blue Aleppo

Oil Anise

Oil

@

•

4} gallon
4* lb
(gold)

43

Manna, large flake

19
26

are

7

25

*

Liccorice, Paste, Sicilv.
Licorice Paste, Spanish Solid... [
Licorice Paste, Greek
Madder, Dutch
(gold)
Madder, French, E. X. F. F. do

Oil Bergamot
Oil Lemon

Drug’s and Dyes—Duty, Alcohol, 40 cents 42
gallon ; Aloes, 6 cents 43 ft Alum, 60 cents 42 190 lb ;
Argols, .6 cents 43 lb; Arsenic and Assafcetida, 20;
Antimony, Crude and Regulns, 10; Arrowroot, 30 4$
cent ad val.; Balsam Capivi, 20; Balsam Tolu, 30;
Balsam Peru, 50 cents 43 lb; Calisaya Bark, 80 42 cent
ad val.; Bi Carb. Soda, 1*; Bi Chromate Potash, 3 cents
42 ft; Bleaching Powder, 30 cents
100 ft ; Refined
Borax, 10 cents 42 ft; Crude Brimstone, $6; Roll
Brimstone, $10 43 ton; Flor Sulphur, $20 42 ton, and
15 41 cent ad val.; Crude Camphor, 30; Refined Cam¬
phor, 40 cents
ft-; Carb. Ammonia, 20 43 cent ad
val.; Cardamoms and Cantharides, 50 cents 42 lb;
Castor Oil, $1 42 gallon; Chlorate Potash, 6; Caustic
Soda,l*; Citric Acid, 10; Copperas, *; Cream Tartar,
10; Cubebs, 10 cents 42 lb; Cutch, 10; Chamomile
Flow’ers, 20 42 cent ad val.; Epsom Salts, 1 cent 42
ft; Extract Logwrood, Flowers Benzola and Gam¬
boge, 10 42 cent.; Ginseng, 20; Gum Arabic, 20 42
cent ad val.; Gum Benzoin, Gum Kowrie, and Gum
Damar, 10 cents per ft; Gum Myrrh, Gum Senegal,
Gum Geeda and Gum Tragacanth, 20 4? cent ad val.;
Ilyd. Potash and Resublimed Iodine, 75; Ipecac and
Jalap, 50; Lie. Paste, 10; Manna, 25; Oil Anls, Oil
Lemon, and Oil Orange, 50 cents; Oil Cassia and Oil
Bergamot, $1 42 lb ; Oil Peppermint, 50 42 cent ad
val. ; Opium, $2 50; Oxalic Acid, 4 cents 42 lb ; Phos¬
phorus, 20 43 cent acl vab; Pruss. Potash, Yellow', 5;
Red do, 10; Rhubarb, 50 cents 42 lb: Quicksilver, 15
43 cent ad val.; Sal ASratus, 1* cents 43 lb ; Sal Soda,
* cent 42 lb ; Sarsaparilla and Senna, 2u 4) eent ad
val.; Shtdl Lac, JO; soda Ash, *; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
4) lb; Sulph. Quinine, 45 42 cent ad val.; Sulph. Mor¬
phine, $2 50 43 oz.; Tartaric Acid, 20; Verdigris, 6
cents 43 lb; Sal Ammoniac, 20; Blue Vitriol, 25 42
cent ad val.;' Etherial Preparations and Extracts, $ l
43 ft; all others quoted below, free. Most of the
articles under this head are now sold for cash. (All

Flow'ers, Arnica
Folia, Buchu

j

!. ’. ’

Gum Tragacanth, white

25*

Cotton—See special report.

(gold)

gA

”

Phosphorus
52

Mineral
Phial

Epsom Salts
Extract Logwood
Flowers, Benzoin

cent ad valorem in addition.
Coffee has been firm and steady

of Java, which is scarce

Corks—Duty, 50 42 cent ad val.
Regular, quarts
42 gross
Short Tapers.

Cutch
Cuttlefish Bone

Coffee—Duty: When imported direct in Ameri¬
can or equalized vessels from the place of its growth
or production ; also, the growth of countries this side
the Cape of Good Hope when imported indirectly in
American or equalized vessels, 5 cents $ ft; all other
10

1

Cobalt, Crystals.. .in kegs. 112 fts
Cochineal, Honduras
(gold)
Cochineal, Mexican
(gold)
Copperas, American
Cream Tartar, prime
(gold)
Cubebs, East India

® 13 50
©
®
©

S3

" ’*

Oxalic Acid

Chamomile FlowersChlorate Potash
Caustic Soda

•

35

..

Rope, Russia

Cardamoms, Malabar
Castor Oil, Cases

....

..

82*

33*

..

Cantharides
Carbonate Ammonia, in bulk....

3* ©

8 50

•

Gum Myrrh, East India
Gum, Myrrh, Turkey'.
Gum Senegal
Gum Tragacanth, Sorts

OiljCassia..
24* ©
©

Tarred Russia
Tarred American

Leon, bags.
Bird Peppers—Zanzibar.,
Bleaching Pow’der
Borax, Refined
Brimstone, Crude... (gold) 42 ton
Brimstone, Am. Roll
42 lb
Brimstone, Flor Sulphur
Camphor, Crude, (in bond).(gold)
Camphor, Refined

wax,

‘

50

Manila, 2*’

:d

Cordag'e—Duty, tarred, 3; um
untarred, 3* cents 42 lb.
Manila, Amor, made
42 ft

Bi eliminate Potash.
Bird
Peppers — African,

Coal—Duty, bituminous, $1 25 $ ton of 28 bushels,
80 ft to the bushel; other than bituminous, 40 cents
4# 28 bushels of 80 ft
bushel.
Liverpool Oriel..43 ton of 2,240 ft
..
©
Liverpool Gas Cannel
® 14 50
Nova Scotia
Anthracite

•

other

Bark, Calisaya
Berries, Persian.
Hi'Carb. Soda, Newcastle

1

Stearic

..

•

Portage Lake

Bolt

.

50

..

Assafcetida
Balsam Capivi
Balsam Tolu
Balsam Peru

17

©

Candles—Duty, tallow', 2’; spermaceti aud
8; stcaririe and adamantine, 5 cents
1b.
ft
©
Sperm
do , patent,
©
Refined sperm, city....
©

©
©
©
©
32* ©
..

Antimony, Regulns of
Argols, Red
Argols, Refined
Arsenic, Powdered

88
33

15

.

Bolts
Braziers’
Baltimore
Detroit

Annato, fair to prime

83
34
84
41
34

23 ©-

English dairy

.

..

,

Alum

Cheese-

Factory made dairies
Farm dairies
common
do
do

20

..

_

r

23*

quiet with jobbing transactions only.
Acid, Citric
GO
(gold)
©
Alcohol
43
43 gall25 @
26
Aloes,Cape
43 lb
S5 ©
Aloes, Socotrine

IS*
15

©
©
©
©
©
©
©

24

Copper—Duty, pig, bar, anil ingot, 2*; old copper'
2 cents 43 ft; manufactured, 30 $ cent ad val.; sheath¬
ing copper and yellow' metal, in sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches wide, weighing 14 © 34 oz.
square
foot, 31 cents 4R ft. All cash.
50
Sheathing, new
®
4? ft
Sheathing, &c.. old
©
Sheathing, yellow
©

Drugs

88
34

©

l

©
©
©
©

nominal.)

18*

1C
14

line-dairy packed, yellow' ..
do firkins, finer kinds,
do
do common to medium
West. Re erve, good to fine, yel.
Pa.,

do

44
40
46

Pro¬

17

£ fir. tubs, strictly fine
do com. to good.

1

St,

gW All goods deposited in public stores or bonded
warehouses must be withdrawn therefrom, or the

22
22
Id

[October 21,1868.

bbl.

S 00 @ 9 25
@6£0
@
@8 50
23 50 @ 24 50
@
17 25 @
..

..

..

..

..

..

13
15
15
12
12

00

00
25
50
50

@

@

..
..

@15 60
@ 13 00
@ 13 00
@ *40 00 @ ..
-

@
@
60 @
4S ©
.

••

..

62

50
6 50 @ 9 00

ton.

$3 ft

17

@

22

Fruil—Duty: Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds, 10; Almonds, 6; other
nuts, 2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts, 1; Shelled do, 1*, Filbert
and Walnuts, 3 cents 4R ft; Sardines, 50; Preserved
Ginger, 50;. Green Fruits, 25 $1 cent ad val
Raisins, Seedless
4? cask
do Layer
6 °0 @
$ b°x
do Bunch
@ 4 85
Currants
i4* @ 15
^ ft
Litron, Leghorn
28 @
Prunes, Turkish
.

Dates

r.

Almonds, Languedoc

do
do
do
Sardines
do

do

32

Provence

@

-

©
©

Sicily, Soft Shell

Shelled

.v.
$ box
....w.$ hf. box

qr.lws

«3

100
«
@
2*

.

—,....

50

Figs, Smyrna
Brazil Nuts. .Filberts,
Walnuts,

80

$^

*

Sicily.
French

..

..

30
13
40

Unpealed do
Cherries, pitted, new

.

Tampico and Metamoras.

.

Wet Salted Hides—
Buenos Avres

50

California
Western

prices.
Beaver, Dark....
do
Pale
Bear, Black..
do Cubs

Silver

do Cross
do Red
do Grey

Lynx

Dark
Mink, dark
do pale

■

..

Marten,

3 00
2 00

dark

80

.

3 00

Otter

15
80
80
15

..

Opossum

.

.

.

2

"White

I

8

2
1
S
50 © 4
10 @
10 ©
10 ©
00 © 5
©
00 © 4
25 © 1
25 ©
00 © 1
00 © 3
00 © 3
50 © 2
15 ©

..

2
1

1
1
2
1

2 00
5 00

©
©
©
©
@
©
©
©
©
©
©

‘

1

4 00 ©10 00
2 00 © 6 00
• 10 ©
70
10© 75
10 © 20
© 6 00
©20 00
© 5 00
50 © 2 00
25© 70
50

Badger
Cat, Wild
do House
Fisher, Dark

Musk rat,

1 50 ©
1 00 ©
3 00-©

$ ft 2 00 © 3 00
1 50 © 2 50

6 00
4 00
40

.

6 00
20

3

.

00
50

.

S5

.

S

20
20
10
2

.

.

.

.

.

Calcutta, city sl’ter—$ ft

i

i

i
i

to

I

(Single

$ 50 feet

Gunny

00
50
00
60
00
13 00
16 00
1$ 00
21 00
9 00

Hair—Duty free.
Rio Grande, mixed..(cash)..$
Buenos Ayres, mixed

Manila
Guatemala
Caraccas.

do

Undressed

Russia, Clean
Jute....
Manila
Sisal

$ ton
5.

(gold):

l-

$ ft

Pig, Scotch,

free.

50
50

Hoop

50
50
00

do

less,

American.

African, West Coast,
African, Scrivellos,

65

©325 00

12

©
(ai

.

San Juan and Cent. Amer..

,

do
do

20*

19 ©
21
IS

'

West Coast..

Ecail—Duty, Pig, $2 $ 100 ft ;
$ ft; Tipe and Sheet, 2* cents $

©
©
17*©
1$ @
10i@
15i©
16i@

15i@
m©
ie*©
15 ©
16*©
©
©
..

22
19
18
19
17
10
~17i

16*
-

IS

m
15J
17f
•

00
00

75
50

ft.

..

©

9 87* © 10 00

Spanish

9 87* © 10 00
9 87* © 10 00
..
©
12

German

English

,

$ lb

Bar

..

EeatHcv^-Duty: sole 35,upper
Market dull and lower.
Oak, Slaughter, light
cash.
middle.
do
do
middle... do
do
do
heavy.... do

50

20

144
18
45
15

©
©
©
©

20
25
55
20

15
14

'

@

13
15

©
©
io ©
©
5 ©
2 50 ©

$ cubic ft.

$ ft

Rosewood, Rio Janeiro

75

©

17

(American

Florida

@180 00

Rosewood—Duty

Mexican

Bahia
i

@100 00
@ 80 00

......

Mexican

do

© 55 00

.

ii
8

8 00

1

-

Molasses—Duty: 8 cents $ gallon.
New Orleans..s
$ gall.

middle
bellies

35 ©

$ ft

40

Hemlock, B. Ayres,«fcc.,l't do
do
do middle, do
do
do heavy .do
,

©

39

©

38 @
37

3$

©
©

33 @

34

29 ©
20 @

34
24

80 ©

,32

36

©
85 ©

3$
87

80 @

36 ©

Lime-Duty; 10 $ eontad val,
Rockland, common
$ bbl.
do
heavy

..
..

34
43

© 2 00
© 2 00

Lumber, Hoods, Staves, Etc.—Duty
Lumber, 20 $ cent ad val.; Staves, 10 $ cent ad val.;
Rosewood and Cedar, free. Lumber and Timber of
all kinds, unmanufactured, product
North American Provinces, free.
.

M feet

of the British

21 00 © 25 00

55 00 @05 00

©

..

$ft

shoe, forged (Sd)
Copper

Horse

@

82
50

@

Yellow metal
Zinc

•.

35
2 <

@

..

@

..

spirits of turpentine 30
$ gallon; crude turpentine, rosin, pitch, and
tar, 20 $ cent ad val.
Tar and turpentine, product
of the British North American Provinces, free. (All
cash.)
7 50 ©
Turpentine, N. C
$ 280 ft
7 00 © 9 00
$ bbl.
Tar, American....
11 50 ©
do foreign
Naval Stores—Duty:

cents

W.

7 00
7 62*
8 50
13 00
20 00
1 15

Pitch

Rqsin, common and strained
No. 2
No. 1
Pale and Extra

do
do
do

(2S0 lbs.)
Spirits turpentine, Am....$ gall.
..

11

$ ft.

Oakum-Duty free

Oils—Duty: linseed, flaxseed,

© 8' 00
© Q 00
© IB 00
© lo 00
© 123 00

©

1

17*
13

©

Oil Cake—Duty:.20 $ cent ad val.
58 00
City thin oblong, in bbls.. v. $ ton
in bags
do
50 00
Western thin oblong, in bags ....
49 50

©

@
@ 50 00

and rape seed, 23

cents; olive and salad oil, in bottles or flasks, $1:
burning fluid, 50 cents $ gallon ; palm, seal, and oocoa
nut, 10 $ cent ad val.; sperm and whale or other fish

(foreign fisheries,) 20 $ cent ad valorem.
Olive, 13 bottle baskets
© 4 20
..
do in casks
$ gall.
2 80 © 2 35
Palm
$ ft
121©
13
Linseed, city,.
$ gall
1 45 ©
Whale
1 70 ©
refined winter

do

2 35

winter, bleached.’.

do
do

Lard oil
Red oil,

,

unbleached

do

,

2 35
1 20
1 30

city distilled
saponified
—

,

,

30 gr. deodorized..

S3

(free)...

©
©
©

©
©
©
©

2
2
2
1
1
1

65

50

87*
25
85
85
55
84

Painls—Duty: on white lead, red lead, and
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents $ ft; Paris
white and whiting, 1 cent $ ft ; dry ochres, 50 cents
$ 100 ft: oxides of zinc, If cents $ lb ; ochre, groun d
in oil, $ 1 50 $ 100 ft ; Spanish brown 25 $ cent ad val.;
China clay, $5 $ ton; Venetian red and vermilion,

$ cent ad val.; white chalk, $10
Lithrage, American
$ ft
Lead, red, American
do white, American, pure, in oil
do while, American, puie, dry.
Zinc, white, American, dry, No. 1.
du white, American, No. 1, in oil
25

do
Slaughter in rough. .cash.
Oak, Slaughter in ro; gh, light... do
ao
do mid. & h’vy do
do

Southern Pine,

..

Clinch....

do

40 ©

,

weights
all do

Spruce, Eastern.

Nails—Duty: cut 1*; wrought 2*; horse shoe &
$ ft (Cash.)
Cut, 4d.@6d
$ 100 ft
© S 00

cents

Straits
Parafline, 28
Kerosene

34 ©

middle do
heavy, do
Orinoco, etc. l’t. do
do
middle do
do. heavy., do
do & B. A, dam’gd all
poor

45

55

@

English Islauds

40

49 @
19 ©

do
do

do

15

44 ©

California,light, do

do
do
do
do
do

©

48

do
do

do
do

i.

1 (5
75

45 @

Clayed

do

@

..

90 ‘@
50 @

Porto Kico
Cuba Muscovado

Sperm, crude

do

light Cropped

©

30 $ cent ad val.

.

do
do
do

4
4
8
2

Old Lead, 1* cents

$ 100 ft

Galena

©

Prime

do

©1S5 00

150 00
;.

(Nominal.)

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

3 00
3 50

$ ft

Prime
Billiard Ball

Pipe and Sheet

46*
43
12

@ S5 00

..

Ivory—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.
East India,
East India,

do

do

©
T ©
10*
..
@ 57 00
..-

and Treble..
Rails, English.. .(gold)
$ ton
do

11*

10 ©

$ lb

Sheet, Russia
Sheet, Single,Double

do

gold

115 00 ©200 00

.....

Nail Rod

00
00

Dry Hides—




'

@220 00

210 00

160 00 ©170 00

and American,Refined 120 00 ©125 00
do
do
Common 110 U0 ©115 00
150 00 @200 00
Scroll,
140 00 ©150 00
Ovals and Half Round
Band
@150 (>0
HorseSlioe
145 00 ©150 00
Rods, 5-8 © 3-10 inch
122 50 ©190 00

©

310 00

50 00 © 53 00
4$ 00 @ 50 00
..
@ 92 50
/—Store Prices—,

Swedes, assorted sizes

do

©

..

B. A. & Montevideo :. %

©

1 40
1 15
90

Bar, English

Hides—Duty, all kinds, Dry or Salted, and Skins,
Product of the British North

10 $ cent ad val.
American Provinces

..(gold)

1 2*

Iron—Duty, Bars, 1 to 1* cents $ ft; Railroad,
$ 100 ft; Boiler and Plate, 1* cents $ ft;
Sheet, Band, Hoop, and Scroll, 1* to 1| cents $ ft;
Pig, $9 $ ton; Polished Sheet, 3 cents $ ft.

350 00 @400 00

...

jt

;.....

@
©
@
©

70 cents

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $-5; Jute,
$15; Italian, $40; Sunn and Sisal, $15 $ ter; and
Tampico, 1 cent $ ft.
American, Dressed

.
„

Mansanilla

do

2 10
1 30

©

70

Madras

Bar

00 ©

.

Nuevitas

do
do
do
do

@150 00
@180 00
@ 95 00

..

oak, hhd., heavy
do
hhd., light

do

52
36

©

75
90
75

Kurpah

24 00

46 ©
42 ©
10 ©

Hay —North River, in bales $
100 lbs, forshipping

©

1 40
1 00

...$ ft

Oude

4$ © 1 15

Ilog, Western, unwashed

73
65
55

©,

••

Indijro—Duty free.

_

8 50

lb

50

20 00

10
15
16
20
24
26
16

90 00 @100 00
..
@ 80 00

bbl., culls

Honduras
;
wood)
Cedar, Nuevitas
Mansanilla
do

@

Bengal

29 @
30
Gunny Clotlx—Duty, valued at 10 cents or less
$ square yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ lb.
Calcutta, standard
..yard
24 ©
Gunpowder—Duty, valued at 20 cents or less
$ ft, 6 cents $ lb, and 20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
cents $ lb, 10 cents $ lb and 20 $ cent ad val.
Blasting (A)
$ keg of 25 lb
..
© 6 50
Shipping and Mining
..
© 6 50
Sporting, in 1 lb canisters.$ ft

of

© 18 00
18 00 © 15 00

62* ©
52* ©

Best,No l(casli) $ ton
Pig, American, No. 1
Bar, Swedes,assorted sizes (in gold)

©
©
©
©
©
©
©

..
..

Mahogany, St. Domingo, crotches,
$ foot
St. Domingo, ordinary
do
logs
do
Port-au-Platt, crotches.
do
Port-au-Platt, logs.

..

:.

..

*

pee

r

43

10 $ cent ad val.
72* ©
...$ ft

Carthagena, etc
Guayaquil

..

Maliogany, Cedar,

60

@250 00
@200 00
@140 00
@ 90 00
@200 00
@140 00

..
..

free.

la ©

East India

$ M.

extra

HEADING—white oak, hhd

@

20 ©

$ C

Para, Fine
Para, Medium
Para, Coarse

9 25
9 50
11 75
14 50
10 00
17 00
IS 00

4 cents $ lb

Ritle

13

India Rubber—Duty,

Hag’S—Duty, valued at 10 cents or

$ square yard, 3; over 10,
Calcutta, light and heavy

@

Red

12 ©

gold.

buffalo

©

20 ©

do
do

black, dry

Ox, Rio Grande/
Ox, Buenos Ayres

© 7 75
© $ 25
© 9 75
©

0
6
7
7
12

.

..

Horns—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.
Produce
Provinces free.

Thick)—Discount 35 © 40 per cent.

6x8 to SxlO
8x11 to 10x15
11x14 to 12x1$
12x19 to 16x24
20x31 to 24x30
2lx31 to 24x36
30x45 to 32x4$
82x50 to 32x56..
Larger sizes do
21x30 to 24x30
82x43 to 34x50.

20 @

the British North American

Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th

English and French

qualities.

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

50
00
50
00
00

11 00

Above..

do
do
do
do
do
do

7 75

12 00
13 00
15 00

80x46 to 32x18
32x50 to 32x50

do

27 @
2$ @

of 1864...,

do

©
©
@
©
©

6 00

20x30
to 24x30
to 24x30
to 30x44

18x22
20x31
24x31
25x36

11 @

Hops—Duty: 5 cents $ ft.
Crop of 1865
$ ft

i

Cylinder, Crown, and Common
inches square, 1*; over
over that, and not over
24x30, 2i; all over that, 3 cents $ lb.
American Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th qualities.
(Subject to a discount of 45 © 50 $ 5 50 © 7 25
cent.)
6
7
7
9
10

11 @

,

50 00 © 55 00
75 00 @ 80 00
6U 00 @ 65 00
85 00 © 40 00
80 00 ©100 00

PPk.

pipe, heavy
pipe, light
pipe, culls
lihd., extra.
hhd., heavy
hhd., light
hlul., culls
bbl., extra.
bbl., heavy
bbl., light.

do
do
do
do

..

© 4 00

..

Black Walnut

STAVES—
White oak, pipe,

9*

..

cash.

Plank

70 00 @
$ M

Maple and Birch

21

'

foot; on unpolished
Window, not exceeding 10xJ5
that, and not over 10x24,2;

11x14 to 12x18
12x19 to 16x24

17

It ©

Cuba

i

16x24 inches, 4 cents $ square foot;
larger and not over 24x39 inches 6 cents $ square
foot' above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
cents $ square foot; all above that,"40 cents $ square

$ 50 feet

Oak and Ash

22 00 @ 25 00
28 00 @ 80 00

Boards

Poplar and W. wood B’ds &

Cherry Boards and

29

9 @

Honey—Duty, 20 cents $ gallon.
(duty paid)
$ gall.
1 83

.

and not over

8x10..
10x15

dead green

do
do
do

i
'

Glass—Duty, Cylinder or Window Polished Plate
not over 10x15 inches, 2i cents $ square foot; larger

6x8 to
8x11 to

'

East India Stock—

l

2 00 ©

.

.

I

17
18
13

9*@
9*@

Coutry sl’ter trim. & cured, do
do . do
City
do
Upper Leather Stock—
B. A. & Rio Gr. Kip ..$ $ cash.
Sierra Leone
do
do
Gambia and Bissau

Western.
No. 1.

North, and East.
No. 1.

18

17 ©
17 @ ’
IS @ '
10 ©
19 @

do
do
do
do
do

ft gold.
do
do
do

Grande

Rio

American Provinces, free.
Prices—Add premium on gold for currency

Gold

.

.

val. Product of the

purs—Duty, 10 $ cent ad

British North

.

©
@
©
©
©
©

White Pine Box Boards
White Pine Merchant. Box
Clear Pine...
Laths, Eastern

©

©

16

-

cash.
.

14

Black Raspberries
Pared Peaches

Fox,

Dry Salted Hides—

^

104©

cash.

©
m ©
14 ©

$ ft

Blackberries

©

..

15

■.*

Dried FruitN. State Apples

535

THE CHRONICLE.

October 21, 1865.]

Ochre, yellow,French,dry $ 100 ft
do
$ft
ground in oil.

Spanish brown, dry

$ luo ft

ground in oil.$ ft
Paris white, No. 1
$ 10U fts
$ 100 fts
do
do Am
Whiting, American
Vermilion, Chinese
$ ft
do
Trieste
..g Id.
do

do

'•

American

Venetian red, (N,

cwt.

$ ton.

©
©
15 ©
©
9 ©
9* ©
75 ©
9* ©
50 ©
8 ©
50 ©
©
50
©
45
©
20 ©
»

,

.

#

.,

o
M

1
3

.

3
1
1

.

80

4 50

©

14
14
15

9*
10

3 50
10
,

,

9
4 00
.

8 75
1 50
1 25
40

© & 09

536

THE CHRONICLE.
20 00

$ ton
# LbL

© 25 00
@ 40 00

..

15

Petroleum—Duty: crude, 20
cents
# gallon.
Crude, 40 @ 47 gravity
Refined, free
do

Plaster
20

5 00
49

@

87$
62$
53

39 bbl.

7 50

39 ton.

Calcined,

$ bbl.

@
©
@
@

.

4 00

eastern

Calcined, city mills

..

.

Free.

The market has been
unsteady with less demand for
Pork, and closes $2 50 lower. Beef firmer.

do mess, extra,
do prime mess
do India
do India mess

Pork,

39 bbl.

mess

(new)
,

mess

62 50
27
27 00

@
© 27 50
©
30 00 ©
‘29
24$ ©
29
©
2(1
©
23$
20 ©
23$
17 ©
17$
©
nominal.

do prime mess
do mess, Western
do prime,West’n, (old and
new).

Lard, in bbls
do

.

39 lb

kettle rendered

Hams, piekled
do

11 oo @ 13 75
14 00 © 17 00
nominal.
nominal.
nominal.

dry salted

Shoulders, pickled
do
dry salted
$ bbl.

Rags—(Domestic).

"White, city

Hi ©
5$ ©

12$
6$

2$ ©
11$ ©

Canvas

Country mixed

II

12

12$
6$

5j ©
Mice—Dnty: cleaned 2$ cents 39 ®>.; paddy 10
cents, and uncleaned 2 cents $ lb.
Carolina
33 100 ft.
©
East India, dressed
50 © 10 25
cents

cents

39 100 lb.

Turks Islands
Cadiz

...

do

39 100

2 20

39 sack

line, Ashton’s
fine, Worthington’s....
flue, Jeffreys & Darcy’s

do
do
do

4 10
3 40
8 40
3 40

fine, Marshall’s

Onondaga,

com. fine
do
do
do
do
Solar coarse.
Fine screened
do

bbls.
...

.

210 ft

bgs.
39 bush."

$ pkg.
240 ft bgs.

F. F

;

39 bush.

Liverpool, ground

2 40
1 75
38
43
42
2 75
2 75

on raw or brown sugar, not above
No. 12 Dutch standard, 8; on white
above
No. 12 and not above.No. 15 Dutch standard, not refin¬
ed, 8$; above 15 and not over 20,4; on refined, 5; and

on

Molado, 2$ cents 39 K>.

$ ft

©
©
13$ ©
..

c

1 -1$
17$
13$

Havana White
do

@
©
©
©
@
@
@
©
@
@
©

..

Yellow and Brown

Manila

13$
13$

Brazil, brown
Melado
Loaf
Crushed
Ground
White coffee, A

..

..

.

..

..

Yellow coffee

14$

15$
19
16$

13$
14
21$
20$

39Jton

bulk, 18
55

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

a

3
3
3
2
1

50
50
50
50
85
40
5)
43

©
©
©

©
©

66

8

..

14

7

©
©

American, prime, country and city
$ft

14$ ©

per

15

ft

Superior to fine
Ex fine to finest

do
do

110
1 40
1 55

Young Hyson, Canton made
do
do
do

.....

Common to fair

@

90
1 30
1 60

...

Ex fine to finest...

made..
do Com. to fair
do Sup. to fine.
do Ex. f. to finest

..

1 20

1 45
1 70

&Twankay, Canton made
do
do
do

..

..

Com, to fair..
Stip'r to fine..

1 50
1 80

©
@
©
©

1 85
1 60
1 90

.

Ex fine to finest

do
do

to fair.

Sup’r to fine.
Ex f. to finest

Orange Pecco, Common

to

©

1 00

©

75

fine...

©

1 50
SO

30

39 cent ad val.
Clover

39 lb
Timothy, reaped
39 bush.
Flaxseed, Amer. rough
Linseed, American, clean... $ tee
do
American,rough. 39 bush
do
do

Calcutta

14
8 50
2 SO
2 75
3 70

Bombay

15
©
© 4 00
©. 2 90
@ 20 00
© 2 90
©

Tin -Duty: pig, bars, and
block, 15 39 cent ad val.
Plate and sheets and terne plates,
2$ cents 39 1b.

Banca....

do

)
13

©

do

10 00
11 50

usual reel

© 10 50
© 12 00

none.

Japan, superior

12
11
13
23

No. 1 © 3
China thrown
Italiau thrown
do

00
00
00

00

©
©
©
©

Skins—Duty: 10 $ cent ad va!
Product
Pro\inces, Free.

British North American

Goat, Curacoa, No. 1
do Buenos Ayres
do
do
do
do
do
do

39 ft

Yera Cruz

Tampico
Matamoras

Payta
Madras

Deer, San Juan
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

42$ ©
42$ ©
©
65 ©
61
©
41 ©
©
40
©
58 ©
40 ©
60
©
50 ©
©
60 ©
60 ©
.

Cape
$ ft

Bolivar City
Honduras
Sisal
Para
Vera Cruz

.

,

Chagres

Port C. and Barcelona

13 00
11 50
22 00
24 50
of the

Gold.

<

.

,

46

@

,

45

47$
66
65

43
,

,

45

62$
42$
65
55
55
65
60
50

Soap—Duty: 1 cent $ ft, and 25 39 cent ad val.
Cat tile
$ft.
21$ ©
22

Spelter—Duty: in pigs, bars, and plates, $150 ^ ft

flates,foreign
4o

domestic.




:....$ ft

10$ ©
11

©

»

©
24$ ©
9 12$ © 9
11 00 © 13

do
do
do
do
do

7 ©
8$ ©
10$ ©
13 ©
IS
45
40
25
8
10

New York running lots
Ohio
do

10

Pennsylvania
do
Pennsylvania and Ohio fillers

8

27$
25
25

Havana, fillers
Manufactured—

10s and 12s—Best
do
Medium
do
Common

50
65

X fts—(dark) Best

Medium
Common

Navy X lbs—Best
do

&Q

Medium,..*
Common

50
421

©
©
©

16
14
16

©
©

57$ ©
45

90
80

.

do
do

16$
20
23

9

©
57$ ©

do
do
Medium
do
do
Common
fts (Western.)—Ex. fine,
bright...
do
do
Fine
do
do
Medium..
do
do
Common
fts
(Virginia)—Ex. fine, bright
do
do \
Fine
do
do
Medium
do ;
do .*
Common

11
15

35'

*65

l

66
90
£0
70

75
65

©
©
©
©
©
©
©

@

@
57$ @
75
65

©
©

C7$ ©

..,.

.

*

8
4

©
©

2
6

©
©

(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(go d)
(gold)
.(gold)

2 25
i
90 © 1
1 25 © i
4 00
© i
90 © 1
95 © 1
1 50 © 1
1 25 © 1

85 00

©15C

2 75
12 00

© 30
© 25

Wire—Duty: No. 0 to 18, uncovered, $2 to 13 50
$ 100 lb, and 15 $ cent ad val.
No. 0 to 18
10 ^ ct. off list
No. 19 to 26
Plain. $ ft

over

ct. off list.

8$ ©

Wool—Duty: costing 12 cents

cents

$

20

Telegraph, No. 7 to 11

9$

less f) 1b, 3

or

39 lb; over 12 and not more than
24 and not over
32,10, and 10

24,6 cents*
^ cent ad valorem;

82, 12 cents $ lb, and 10 $3 cent ad
skin, 20 39 cent ad val. Produce ofvalorem; on
the British
Provinces, free.
American, Saxony fleece
70 ©
39 lb \
75
do
full blood Merino
65 ©
70
do
$ and $ Merino
60 ©
65
Extra, pulled.
67 ©
70
Superfine, pulled
65 ©
67
No. 1, pulled
50 ©
65
California, fine, unwashed
87 ©
40
do
native...,
20 ©
25
do
pulled
/
35 ©
86
Peruvian, unwashed
85 ©
45
Valparaiso, unwashed
26 ©
27
S. American Mestizo, unwashed..
82 ©
87
do
common, unwashed..
18
23
Entre Rios, washed
do
unwashed
22 ©
24
S. American Cordova
43
48
©
Donskoi, washed
45 ©
50
Persian
....:
25 ©
30
African, unwashed
15 ©
25
do
washed
85 ©
45
over

the

North American

,

,

.

Mexican, unwashed
Smyrna, unwashed
do

20
22

Zinc—Duty: pig

2$ cents ^ ft.

or

block, $1 50

Sheet

70
60
55
70

62$
50
95
85
25

95
85
75
73
70

62$
78
70

62$

©
©

35

washed

©

25
25
45

100

ft; sheet

14

©

$ ft

00

nominal.
75 ©
90
85 © 1 00

....

Yara

Nary fts—Best

©

©

incases

Champagne

28$ ©
.

1. C. coke.

Common leaf do
Medium do do
Good
do do
Fine
do do
Selections do do
Conn, selected wrappers
do prime wrappers
do fair wrappers
do fillers

...

medium, Nr. 3 © 4
Canton, re-reeled, No. 1 © 2

$ ft

Tobacco—Duty: leaf 38 cents $ ft ; and manu¬
factured,^ cents 39 ft.
The market is quiet for both leaf and
manufactured.
Lugs (light and heavy) $ $ (gold)
9
5$ ©

14

Sills.—Duty : free. All thrown silk. 35 39 cent.
Tsatlees, No. 1 © 3
$ ft
11 25 © 13 00
Taysaams, superior, No'. I © 2
11 50 © 12 00
do

(gold)

English
(gold)
Plates, charcoal I. C.(gold)$ box

©

Shot—Duty: 2$ cents 39 ft.
Drop and Buck
39 1b

(gold)

Straits

dry

Claret, in lihds
do

©
©
©
© 5
© 6
© 3

,

@
70
75 @
80
85 @
90
1 05 © 1 15
] 20 © 1 25
1 30 © 1 85
80 ©
90
1 00 © 1 25
1 40 © 1 70
55 ©
65
75 ©
90

...

do
do

1 20

60

Ex f. to finest.
Uncolored Japan, Com. to fair
do
do
Sup’r to tine
do
do
Ex f. to finest
Oolong, Common to fair
do
Superior to fine
c..
do

1 65

©

Gunpowder & Imperial, Canton
do
do
do
H. Skin
do
do
do

1 25
1 50

@
©
©
©
©

..

...

Superior to fine

Souchong & Congou, Com.

Seeds—Duty; linseed, 16 cents; hemp, $ cent 39
lb; canary, §1 $ bushel of 60 ft; and grass seeds,

do"~

185 00

: 1 cent $ ft.
Product of the
British North American Provinces, free.

2 25
4 35

Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 2$ cents; refined and
partially refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent 39 ft.
Refined, pure....
$1 ft
@
22
Crude

..,

SheSry
d >
Malaga, sweet

110 00

io

(cur.)

Madeira
do
Marseilles

1S$

Tallow—Duty

Tea—Dnty: 25 cents
Hyson, Common to fair

( ur.)

Burgundy Port
Sherry

Sumac—Duty: 10 39 cent ad val.
Sicily

Whisky

Corn Whisky
Win s—Port

©
©

4 85
4 00
3 50
3 00
8 85
2 45
2 50

(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
Whisky—Scotch and Irish .(gold)
D• mestic—N. E. Rum
(cur.) Bourbon

..

5

St. Croix
Gin —Different brands

5
5
5
0
5

io ©

(gold)

Rum—Jamaica

10
10
10
10

©90
©
© 10 0
© 10

5

Alex. Seignette
(gold)
Arzac Seignette
(gold)
Other brands
Boclielle....(gold)

20$
19$

16$ ©

©
©
©
©

5 75
5 75
5 35

(gold)

Hivert"Pellevoisen

17

18f ©
....

© 10

6 00
5 75

.

or^clayed,

..

Nitrate soda

Renault & Co
(gold)
Jules Robin
(gold)
Marrette & Co
(gold)
United Vineyard Propr..
.(gold)
Vine Growers Co
..(gold)
Other brands Cognac....
.(gold)
Pellevoisin f.eres
(gold)
A. Seignette

Sugar—Duty:

New Orleans
St. Croix
Porto Rico
Cuba, Muscovado—
Fair refining
Good refining
Fair to good grocery

and conse

•

14

..

Salt—Duty: sack, 24

Wines and liquors are in
light supply,
quently transactions have been small.
Brandy—J. & F. Martell ...(gold)
6 25
Hennessy
6 25
(go(d)
Otard, Dupuy & Co
6 00
(gold)
Pinet, Castillion & Co. ...(gold)
5 75

24
17
13

3

Seconds

City colored

15

.

..

Beef hams

©
©
©
@

-

20
cents 39 gallon and 25
39 cent ad valorem ; over 50
and not over 100, 50 cents ^
gallon and 25 $ c^nt
ad valorem; over $1
$ gallon, $1 $ gallen and 25 »
cent ad val.
v

29

at 7 cents $

19

and

Liquors- Liquors
Brandy, first proof, $3 per gallon, other liquors,
*2.50
Wines—Duty: value set over 50 cents $ gallon

under, 2$cents; over 7 cents and not above U,
over 11 cents, 3$ cents $ ft and 10

or

jqo

© 225

••

3 cents $ ft
;
cent ad val.

American, spring,
English, spring ...;

and butter, 4 cents
pork, 1 cent; hams, bacon, and lard, 2 c°nts
Produce of the British North An eiicau Pro¬

Beef, plain

Steel—Duty: bars and i*gots, valued

...

Wines

val.

@

..

Ochotsk
Polar

24$
8

ft

North west coast

20

©

..

Whalebone—Duty; foreign fishery, * ad

South Sea

25
1 5.5
1 00

..

German

4 25
2 40
2 50

Provisions—Duty: cheese

$ lb.

(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(gold)

English, cast, ^ ft

Deef and
vinces.

©
@
97$ @
23 ©
©

Mace

Cloves

..

..

20
1 50

Pepper,
Pimento, Jamaica

calcined,

fi cent ad val.

Blue Nova Scotia
White Nova Scotia

cents; nutmegs, 50;
and pimento, 15; and
(All cash.)
$ ft
98 ©
99

Cassia, in mats
Ginger, race and African.

ft

Paris—Duty: lump, [free:

mace, 40
pepper

cloves, 20;

Nutmegs, No. 1

88
82
68
55
8 00

@
@
@
@
@

80

in bond

Naptha, refined
Residuum

ginger root, 5 cents 39 ft.

Spice*—Duty:

centa; refined, 40

39 gall.

..

cassia and

©

..

[October 21,1805.

I'rcightsTo Liverpool

:

d.

s.

Cotton
Flour
Petroleum.

^ bbl.

Heavy goods

$ ton

I? ft

Corn, bulk and bags
Wheat, bulk and bags

Beef
Pork
To

10 0

3$ bush.

@
6
@
6$
@23
..@19
..

39 tee.
spbbl.

London:

..

39 ton

@17 6
@ 25
..@17$
60 @
@36
26 ©
6
@
fit
@
..

i

..

39 bbl.

..

Petroleum..
Beef......
Pork.
!
Wheat
Corn
To Glasgow* :
Flour
Wheat

Corn, bulk and bags
Petroleum

....39 tee.
..39 bbL
39 bush.

...

..

39 bbl.
39 bush.
.....

Heavy goods

Hops...

39 bbl.
39 ton
6

39 tee.
3p bbl.

4

pork

39 bbl.
39 ton
Wheat, in shipper’s bags..39 bush.
Flour
39 bbl.
Petroleum

.

"

39 ton

„

.

6

7

«*

6
80
40

t
*

^

@
6 @
@
8 @

6

..

Ashes, pot and pearl../
To San Francisco
by clippers;
Measurement goods....... 39 foot.

40 ©

39 &>•

I©

Heavy goods

2

©
©
©
©

1
10

5
cut meats, etc

.

..

©
@
©
@
@
@
©
@

$c.

39

Measurement goods

Lard, tallow*,

..

..

Oil
Beef
Pork
To Havre:
Cotton
Beef and

© 1 6
@56
@ ... *
@20

..

Heavy goods..
Oil....
Flour

..

..

Oil

d.
i

s.

5-16©

10

October 21, 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

©I)t Haihoajj ill unit or.
Earnings,

Railroad

for

53

7

point with the Western Vermont road, and thus form a straight
through line from New York to Montreal, is a matter now settled
upon between the directors of the Harlem road and those of the

September.—The earnings of the

Vermont road.

principal railroads continue to increase largely,and in several instances

Stock to the amount of £1,300,000 has been sub¬

scribed for, leaving only £500,000 to be taken to secure the con¬
far ahead of those of 1864. There is a falling off of £92,447 j
struction of the road, which will pass
through the northern section
in the Illinois Central, and but a small gain in the Cleveland and j
of Berkshire
County, Mass.
Pittsburg. The comparison will be seen in the following statement: i
are

186-4.

$320,oSl
069,605
831,494
242.171
1,301,005
799,236

Chicago and Alton
Chicago and Northwestern
Chicago and

Rock Island.

Cleveland and Pittsburg..
Erie..

Illinois Central..

..

Marietta and Cincinnati..
Michigan Central
Mich. South, (fe North. Ind
Milwaukee & P. du Chien.
Pittsb’g. Ft. Wayne &, Chic
Rome,

18H5.

$399,602
930,375
384,290
243,413
1,345,456

Increase.
§79.221

62,796

1,242

round.

$711,399

12.9S

120,051
47 6,661

484,173.
223,025
759,405
131,885

85,498,726 $6,210,025

26,974
68,216
81,954

35.65

New York
railroad.

Harlem appear to have discontinued their monthly reports. This
is unwise, and admits of suspicion.
It is said that these roads are

doing business at very low rates in competition with the Pine, and
this probably explains also the small increase in the earnings of the
latter road, which should have been much larger, seeing that it Pas
this year a through business with St. Louis, 1.200 miles, while in
1864 the line was only open to Calion, Ohio, 700 miles. This mat¬
ter of competition is a loosing game to all engaged in it, and we

COMPARATIVE
1863.

1864.

(281 m.)

(281 m.)

$109,850
101,365
104,372
122,084
132,301
145,542
149,137
157,948
170,044
170,910
156,869
153,294

154,418
195.803
162,723
178,786

2,770,484

263,149. April-,

!

296,546
320,381
320,S79

839,949
956,445

948,059

1,099,507
1,072,293
1,041,975
994,317
1,105,364
1,301,005
1,222,563
1.224,909
1,334,217

848,783
770,148

731,243
687,092
816,801
965,294
1,024,649
1,035,321

° 1S64.
(285 m.)
$252,435
272,,848
348,802
338,276
271,553
265.780
263,244

$242,073
245,858

236,432

238,495
236,453
206,221
193,328
215,449
333,168
375,488

346.781
408.445
410.802

339,794
306,186

3,966,946

.

..Dec..,

$337,350

$290,676

366,598
461,965
462,987
427,094
395,815
850,753 *
4)7,077

457,227
611,297

688,066
525,751
532,911
606,640
625,547

463,509

675,360
701,352
691,556
914,082

605,814
466,300

487,642

6,132,984

742M66




144,995
170,937
139,142

160,306
210,729
210,030
196,435
201,134

..

708.714
705.496

...Oct..
..Nov..

—

—

545,943

....Dec,.

—

Year.

—

.

1,959,267

-Hudson River. 1S63.

(724. m.)
$908. ail. .Jim...

(150 m.)

886,039. ..Feb...
1,240,626. ..M<»r...
1,472,120. April..
1,339,279. .May...
1,225,528. June...

1,152,803. .July..
1,364.126. ..Aug...
1,315,456 .Sep..-.
...Oct
Aov...
..Dec...

...

1864.

$458,953

(150 m.)
$501,231

425.047

472,240

366,802

356,626

270,676
241,771
202,392
190,364
219,561

278,540
281,759
253,049
273,726
306,595
361,600

268,100
302,174
295,750
484,550

1865.
.

344,228. ..Mar..
337,210. April.

401,456. ..May..

365,663. June.

.

$248,784
230,508

257,227
268,613
264,835
241,236

329,105. .July.

189,145

.Aug..
.Sep..

238.012

413.501.

476,661

..Oct..
.Nov,.
.Dec..

..Year

308,106
375.567
332.360
348.648

3,302,oil

1864.

f24 m.)
256,600
304.445
338.454

330,651
267.126

315,258
278,S91

358,862
402,219
398,330
448,934

.

J.-sn

.

418,711. ..Feb..
424,870. ..Mar.,
311,540.

351,759.

.April.
.

May

.

310,049. .June..
.July..

..A'ag

478,576
496,433
437,679
424,531

4,571,028

6,329,447

511 305

...Sep...
..Oct...
...Nov..
...Dec...

..Year

—

1865.
.

738,107. .April.
601,238. ..May..

..Year

—

,

650,311

69.353

155,417
205,055
138,342
112,913

1.247,258

(238 m.)
$35,617

(238 m.)
$38,778

(238 m.)

(210 771.)

31.619

54,735

$109,808

60,006

110,603
120.310

43,058
44,835

60.361

49.673

71,352

.Aug..
759,405. ...Sep..

51,281

84,483

...Oct..

76,13G

.

.Nov..
.Dec...

.Year,.

—

—

87,cl5
83,946;.

113,798

123,949

.July..
A Ug..

118,077
130,378

S p..,

153,470

•

...Oct...
..Nov..

—

—

—
.

584.300

..Dec..

144.736

<

827,615

-

„*¥ear.>

*,084,074

—
—
—

1,038,165

in.

911,395

..May..

839.126

.June.

841,165
818,512

.

.

Year

—
..

..

790,167

840.450

1,079,5?>1
1,041,522
1,045,401
1,157,818

i860.

1864.
(656 in.)

(656 m.)
$899,478
681,372
915,600

$921,831
936,587
1,059,028

1.300.000

1,105,664
1,004,435
1,029,736
1,065,793
1,273,117
1,450,076
1,194.435
1,157,818
l,u39,902

1,204,485

11,069,853 13,230,417

Toledo, Wabash & Weste: BJ
"

1866.

^

1863.

(210 771.)

$170,078.

.Jan..
153,903 ..Feb..
202,771. ..Mar..
.

169,299. April..
177,625. ..May...
.

173.722. June..
162.570. ..July...
.

(242 m.)
$86,321
91.971

111,339

1,439,798

2,050,322

132,111
134.272

152,585
105.554
116.379

151,052

.Nov...
.Deo,..

134,563

.

m-

$144,084
139,171
155,753
144,001

95.843

...Oct....
.

(242

132,896
123,987
127,010
156,338
139,626
244,114
243,840
221,570
220,209
265,154

120,596

.

1865.

1864.

(242 m.)
$79,735

103,056

218,553. ..Aug...
.Sep....

202,966
204,726

120,057

95,453

867,590

204.785

143,748
162,921

82,186
73,842
110,186
10-8,651
112,155

96,908

1863.

...Oct..
.Nov..
..Dec...

144.942

93,503

68.863

(656

.

234,194

131,885

.

$98,112
86,626

710,225

..July.
..Aug..
228,025. ...Sep..

218.2361

.

S3,059
76,764

146,943.
224,83S.
177,159
170,554.

155,730

89.976
103.627

58,704
52,S64
77,112

106,689. .April.

149,855

.June.

718 016.

123,115

91,172 ..May..

.April.

60,540
64,306
85,326
40,706

Jan..
.Feb..
70,740. ..Mar..

160,497
157,786

—

—

53,778

—New York Central.

74.283.

147,485

36,912

—

1865.

..Year

—

(210 m.)
$100,872

—

—

(251 m.)

.

1864.

—

220,062

1864.

..Sep...

Lonis, Alton & T Haute.

1863.

242,171
248,292

(251 in.)
$77,010
74,409
89,901
72,389
83,993
7S,697
91,809
94,375
93,078
93,546

.

1,711,281

243,417
243,418

264,637

(251 m.)
$38,203

...Oct...
Nov...
.Dec...

168,218
178,526
149,099
117,013

1865.

June
612,127. July..

,

706,739

115,135
88,221
140,418
1S6,747

1864.

Jan..
..Feb..
...Mar..

'

'

690,061. .June..
527,888. ..I uly..
661,548. ..Aug...

212,209
139,547
113,399

—

1863.

76,132
44,925

St.

.

.

1865.

111,260
71,587

—

—Marietta and Cincinnati.—-

(234 m.)
$98,183.

106,967

—

2,512,315

..Year.

1864.

..Oct...
.Nov...
.Dec...

—

411,S06

72,452

1,917,100

—

201,169

—

(234 m.)

88.177

226,047

180,408

...

(234 in.)
$67,130

366,245. .April.
853,194. ..May..
402,122. .June.
309.083. ..July..
474,706. .Aug*.
484,173. ..Sep..

210,814
214,533

...Dec..

181.935

454,604. ..May

$102,749

215,563

180.246
1S1,175

—

1863.

366.361. ..Feb..
413,322. ..Mar.

203.514

...Oct..
N o v..

-

-Mil. and Prairie du Chien.-^

(524 in.)
$395,986. .Jan.

4,110,154

423.797

$180,048

182,655
182,085

.

416,588
459,762

170,879
202,857
193,919

160,569

(708 m.)
$546,410. ..Jan.
522,555. Feb.
592,276. ..Mar..
491,297. April..

$327,900

1863.

$684,260. ..Jan.
696,738. ..Feb..
886,511. ..Mar..

.

1865.

406,373
510,100
423,'578
586,964
790,236
661,391
657,141
603,402

.

185 211

140,952
152,662

I860.

(204 m.)

311,180...June.

—

(708 m.)

.

1S64.

(204 m.)
$139,414

232,728... July..
288,095.. .Aug..
384,290.... Sep..

3,095,470

(708 m.)
$299,944
271,085
275,643
2S9,224
33-1,687
407,992
343,929

Rome, Watert’n & Ogdensb.

(468 m.)

227,260...May

336,617
321,037

(150 m.)
$525,936.

(201 m.)
$123,808
115,394

186,172... April.

324.865

1864.

4,274,556

(524 in.)

185,013
198,679
243,178
224,980
271,140
331,494
;

1863.

Illinois Central.

340,7:48
507,552

1863.

(285 m.)
$306,324. .Jan.
>279,137. ..Feb..

243.150

r

^Cleveland and Pittsburg.-'-

(182 in.)
$305,5o4. .Jan..
246,331... Feb..
2s9,403.. .Mar..

175,482

1863.

Mich. So. North and Indiana.

,

RAILROADS.

1865.

$158,735

1865.

340.900

3,726,140

..Year

—

—

£669,605

5,902,383

1S65.

1865

(468 m.)

435,t>45
404,183

..Year

—

Pittsburg, Ft. W.,& Chicago.
1963.
1864.
(468 m.)

568,904.. .May.

.

727 193.. June..

405,510
376,470

8,143,945

(182 m.)

467,710.. April

(1S2 in.)
$14JO,024
130,225
122,512
126,798

(502 vi.)
$535,6to ...Jan..
461,165... Feb..
506,290...Mar.

688,171... July
743,359... Aug..
930,375
Sep..

299.607
473.186
651.122

PRINCIPAL
1864.

565,145

r——Michigan Central.
1863.

OF
1863.

482,054
519,306

..Oct...
.Nov...

10,469,431 13,429,643
(285 m.)

lt65.

359,888

..

391,574. Aug...
899,602. ...Sep...

Railway.

1,114,508

202,321
221,709
240,061
280,209

Both of

-—Chicago and Rock Island.—,

•

275,506

807.803

(724 m.)
$984,837
934,133

$232,208

will be connected by

commerce

accomplished by the connection of the Min¬
McGregor Western at Austin near the State
these roads are progressing rapidly to the

improvements, it will allow stockholders the privilege of subscribing
for new stock at par, at the rate of one share for every five shares
standing in their names.
;

315,944. July

1864.

(724 m.)
$845,695

(51)2 in.)
$273,876
317,839
390,355
371,461
466,830

of a year

Lehigh Coal and Navigation.-—This company notify stock
holders that to provide means forextending their railroads and other

812,316. May...
348,985. .June..

206,090
224,257

Erie
1863.

JTan...
252,583 ..Feb...
288,159. ..Mar...
.

1864.

(502 m.)

space

point of junction, and when united will form, via the Chicago and
Northwestern and the Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien railroads, a
continuous railroad route to St. Paui and Minneapolis.
A very
large and important trade is to be opened by this line; and the
Northwest, drawing from the valley of the Red River of the
north and the Saskatchewan, will develope resources not yet appre¬
ciated by the people of the seaboard.

EARNINGS

& Northwestern .-n

1863

252,015

1,673,706

-Chicago

1865.

(281 m.)
$261,903.

$100,991

MONTHLY

poiuts^of internal

This is to be

line of Iowa.

day.

,—Chicago and Alton.—

Paul.—Probably within the

nesota Central with the

fear the stockholders of all the above roads will find this out before

A New Railroad.—The Springfield Republican says, the ex tenBion of the Harlem Railroad northward from its present terminus
at Chatham, N. Y., to Bennington, Yt, so as to connect at that

St.

to

these extreme

The New York Central, the Plutlson River, and New York and

next dividend

Chien Railroad.-—This company

12.44

3.42

11.56
22.47
16.70
20.37

402.219

Total

du

60.70

4,451

93,077

675,360
S7,515

Prairie

59,807
84,045
44,370

4

408,445

Watert’n <fc Ogdens

0.51

and

will'pay on the first November the following dividends: On their
1st preferred stock 4 per cent, and on their 2d
preferred stock
per cent. The earnings of the road are sufficient to pay full divi¬
dends iu all the stocks of the company, but none can be paid to the
common stock until the
sinking fund bonds are extinguished. These
being convertible into 1st preference shares, which pay 8 per cent
per annum, the process of conversion is being rapidly consummated,
aud will probably be complete before the next dividend
period comes

260,770

706,789 dec.92,447

168,218

Milwaukee

Per ct.
24.73
38.94
15.93

138 738

194,525
*271,798

*874,0x4

—

..Year

.

484 m,

[October 21,1865.

CHRONICLE.

THE

538

BOND LIST.

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS
INTEREST.

Amount.
outstand- 0-

DESCRIPTION.

ICallroad :
Atlantic and Great Western
1st

Railroad:

400,000j 7

do
1882
do
1879
do
,1881
777.500: 7
do
4876
4.000,an) 7
6,000.000 7 ■•Jan. A July; 1883

,

6

484,000

Bdlefontaine Line:
1st Mortgage (B. A L.) convertible.
do

do

116.000; 7

(. P. & C.)

650.000; 7

do

347.000

7

do
do

j

ilSTO

do
do
do

2d

Income.
Erie and Northeast
Camden and Amboy:
Dollar Loaus
Dollar Loan
Consoldated ($5,000,000)
Camden and Atlantic:
1st Mortgage
2d
do*

S67.0i.HL 6

403,000; 7 Ap'l A Oct.! 1879
i

141,000' 7 Feb. A Aug! 1882

-

:

;

!

L
j

i

(Sink. Fund)....
do

....

...

■

•

i

•;

1,981.000 7 Feb. A Aug 18S2

1

1st
2d

do
do

•

J 1,000,000 10

Mortgage West. Division
'

East.

do

July'1865

j

j

8*2*2,000 7 Jan. & July 1883

.j

New Dollar Bonds
Tart
ford and Mew Haven:

661,000 6

1st

2d

do

j

;

Jan. A

July 1SS3

Feb. A

.

! 927,000 6
j.
;
! 1,037.500 7

Aug 1883

„

Jan. A Julv 1S76
do
4876

1,000,000 6

.sinking fund

1st

-.J

Mortgage

i.

do
2d
do
3d
do
Convertible

3,890.9)0 7 Feb. A Aug 1S70
110,000 6 i
11869
do
2,000.000 7 J'ne A Dec. 1S85

—

sinking fund.

1

101

1st

405

1,840,000 7 May A Nov.,:l877
do
1,002,09) 7
4867

|

]

....

do
Winds Cen tral
1st
1st

1st

i

....

i

.....'j 7,975,500 7 April A Oct!lS75
do
*jl875
2,896,500 6
do
1S90
.! 2,0S6,000 6

inconvert

do

2.400,000

!

Bonds, (dated Sept. 20, 1S00)

Feb

I
:

j 397

’ ' ‘

i
j

do

1st

Cincinnati and Zanesville:
1st

Mortgage
Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage
Cleveland and Mahoning:

.......

110

112

Mortgage

;

i

do

Dayton and Michigan:
Mortgage.

2i
do
3d
do
Toledo Depot Bonds
Delaware:
1st

Mortgage, guaranteed
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western:
Mortgage, sinking fund
Lackawanna and Western.........

1

Mortgage, sinking fund
Mortgage

2d

95
83
89

....

1 81
i 82

...

! SO

1

‘

do

1st

102

100
(

!

-

j
.... .

A Aug 1SS0 !
%1874 i

98

j

1,80*2,000]

7 Man. A

! 189*2

July4885

Q -V

,99
;

250,000'

M'ch A

6

Sep11378 j
90

J'ne A Dec. 1876

8-90,000

i

i

!

92%;

1

i

k,i qoo

Ap’l A 0ct.|1904
1
‘

109.500
283.000'
642.000
7

,.

J

85

900,000

Man. & Ju1jU371

I 1,300,000
j

i
(100

...

103

do

iMayNov

94% 94%
95

1883

85

1,804.09)’ 7 Feb. A Aug 18S3

1818-

do
do

41.9)0. “

300,504

Feb. A Aug 1892
do
4892

1,691,293!

1,000,000j
2,230.500.

Feb. A Ang 69-72
1882
1882
do

110

4,328,000 8
4,822,000:

...

May A Nov. 1885

97
90
94

April A Oct

I 2.194,000

do

Feb. A

1877
1868

iii” 111

j

682,000!

I

443,000: 7 Jan. A July 1891

'

Feb. A Aug 1893
1893

83!

fund

| 4,600.000
! 1,000,000

7
7

,

April A Oct

....

90

76%

|
- •
! 1,000.000 7 Jan. &Julyil875
’ 400,000!i 8 j
—•> — _
do
4876
688,556!
3,012.000

7

!

do

7 Mav A Nov.
do
691,000; 7 I,

3,500,000; 7
300,0)0; 7

Stonington;

98
90

100

Aug

:

1st
do
Oskaloosa
1st Land Grant Mortgage.

2d

■

j

Julv;1870
225,000 7 IMay & Nov. 11890

Mortgage, convertible .4.
do
sinking fund

M. Haven, M. London &
1st Mortgage

!

500.000 6 Man. A

Maugatuck:
1st Mortgage
401

I,
I

‘May & Nov. 1873

215,000!

Mortgage.'

100

960,000 7 ! April A Oct lS77

c

Mortgage, sinking fund

do
2d
do
do
Morris and Essex:
1st Mortgage, sinking

500,000 6 Jan. A July4875
1,500,0001 7 ‘Jan. A 3nlvjl875
600 000 7 iM’ch A Sep 1881

I

2d. .do.
1st
2d

11904

Jan. A July 1867
do
4881
do
118do
IS—

1,465,000 6

Mississippi and Missouri River:

i

•

2,055,500

162.500

do

1 st

do

903.09); 7 May A Nov. 1872
7 Man. A July|1869

do1

2d
do
Goshen Air Line Bonds
Milwaukee <i* Prairie du Chien

jioo

90

1,000,000.

I..... |! Milwaukee and St. Paul:fund
1st Mortgage, sinking

I

j

1st

73

1870
1861
1862

I

do
Michigan South. & Month. Indiana:

i

‘3

i

1881

do

7

Dollar, convertible
do
Sink. Fund,

1858

93

230,000!

Michigan Central:

98

do

106% 107

Sept 1861
April A Oct4873

250.09) I

Mortgage

Marietta and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage, dollar
1st
•
do
sterling...!

i

L

800.09). 6 April A Oct

1st Mortgage..
1st Lebanon Branch Mortgage,
1st Memphis Branch Mortgage

1
|

{

Extension Bonds
Louisville and Mashville:

|

103

i 85

500,000 8 April A Oct 1SS3

*.

! Little Schuylkill:
1st Mortgage, sinking fund....
| Long Island:
Mortgage
I
j

■

102

Mch A

392,000

3d
do
La Crosse and Milwaukee:
1st Mortgage, Eastern Division...
!
do
.do
! 2d
! Lehigh Valley:
"...
i 1st Mortgage
Little Miami:

•

!

4867

do

1,108,710, 6

|

Mortgage
Valley ,\
Mortgage Bonds

j

'Feb. A Augil873

| Feb.

1st

92

A Nov.

187.091

1st

|

do

6S5.000 7 May

.

Mortgage..
do"

i

1,157,09).; 7 jM’ck A Sep 1873
do
11875
1,7*28.500, 7

Connecticut and Passumpsic River:
Cumberland

7
7

Mortgage

2d

;

Sinking Fund Mortgage
Mortgage

I

1st

do

29X000

Mortgage
tidianapolis and Mad is
1st

1

|102%102%

Ay I860
1862

Jan. A J

500.000:
400.000

1

;

July|lS90

500,ooo;-

Connecticut River:




do

900.000

Cleveland, and Toledo:

1st

!

Nov! 1893

'

2d Mortgage
3d
do
convertible
4th
do

do

j 95

.

.

2d
do
Real Estate

|

96
85

May A Nov. 1S80

944,200, 7 M’ch A Sep; 1864
648.200 8 i r
do
;1S75

.

Sunbury and Erie Bonds
Cleveland and Pittsburg :

1st
2d

'98

•

850,099! 7

Dividend Bonds

1st

93

i

510,000; 7 Jan. A

Cleveland. Painesville and Ashtabula:

let

JulyjlSOS

A
do

1,300,000 7 iMay A

Mortgage
.

]

|

....

100
Jau. A Julv lS70^ ;400

ooo1

379.000
1,049 QQQ

do

.

■*-

Aug! 1885
j 1.250.000' 7
4 885
3,600,000* 7
756.000! 7 May A Nov. 1863
do
il890
j 2.000.000 6
Feb. A Aug! 1805
j 484 000

Fund

Mortgage

do

1

2,000,000 7 Man. A

Chicago and Hock Island:
1st Mortgage
Cincinnati. Hamilton and Dayton

do

7 Ap’l A Oct.; 189-1

I

Mortgage (consolidated)
Chicago and Mortluces tern:

1st
2d
3d

90

.

*2,000,000!
1

1st

1st
2d

Jan. A J ul v! 1392

467,000; 8 Jan. A Jnlvjl$S3
do
11883
3,167,000, S
680,000 ; 7 M’ch A Sep4890

Chicago and Great Eastern:
1st Mortgage
Chicago and Milwaukee:
Preferred Sinking
1st
Mortgage
Interest Bonds
2d Mortgage
Extension Bonds

iMay A Nov. 11877

1,100.000; 7 Ap’l A Oct.j 1882

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy :
Trust Mortgage (S. F.) convert
do

536.000

j

jjan. A Julyi'95-'S0

.

I

Mortgage, convertible....

2d

41

I.

600.000 7 Jan. A July 1866
ilSTO
do
364,000 10

Mortgage, convertible
do
Sterling
Redemption bonds

92

.

59X000 6 May A Nov 1S70
500,000 6 Feb, A Aug 1875

Mortgage

2d

408

j.

1

191,000 6 Jan. & July; 1877

Mortgage.

1st
1st

90

! 3,344.000 7 April A Oct 1S81

Harrisburg and Lancaster:

];

--;ioo

•

98%

April A Oct 1S68

Jau. A

1,350,000 7

i

90

-j

•

600,000 6’

income

101

927,000 6 Jan. A July 1870

Cheshire:

Mortgage Bonds
Chicago and Alton ;
1st Mortgage (Skg Fund), pref

100

1,336,000 7 May A Nov. 1875 497

do

Mortgage
j L Tart ford. Providence and Fishkill: '
J! 1 st Mortgage
j

90

450.000 7 :Feb. A Aug! 1890
800.000! 7 May-A Nov 1890
SOO.OOu 7 M’ch A Sepil865
950,000 7 Ap'l A Oct.11885
Jan. A July11876
1,365,SIX)
j’57-'6
do
1,192,200

E. Div

June A Dec!l883
i
-1-49.000 7 Jan. A Julv4870
4

10*2%
100
94
94

1,002,500

Land Gram Mortgage
Convertible Bonds.

I jj

i

Mav A Nov. 4875

600,000! 7

Mortgage W. Div

192
101

April A Oct4880

j 3,6:14,600

•

.

Central Ohio:

99%

|

x

961;

!
1

95

i
i
i
900,000! 7 iFeb. A Aug! 1870

-

4,000.000

'...] 6,000,000
convertible
do

do

do

!

\

July 1873

i

do
2d
do
3d
do
4th
do
Income

1st

i

jj'ue A Dec.; 1893

490.000; 7 I Jan. A

Mortgage

*

Mav ANov. lS68
M'ch A Sep 1879
do
4883

3,000.000

;

convertible

Mortgage

May A Nov.4889

4,269,400; 6

Mortgage

July4873

...

1,700.0001 6 'Feb. & AugjlSSS

•

Jan. A

1,000,000

■

Mortgage, sinking fund.....

2d

95% I

7 Ap'l A Oct. 1 1866
200,000, 7 Jan. & July 69- 1
4870
do
400,000, 7

Loan.

Ap'l A Oct. 1888

99

500,0001

Central of Mew Jersey:

1st
1st

1st

j 2,000.000! 7 J'ne & Dec. 1877
426,714; 7 May & Nov‘1872

Catawissa:

do

ANovJlS71

400,000; 6 Jan. A July4873

Mortgage
Mortgage
Buffalo and State Line:
1st Mortgage

\ 95

59S,000

Mortgage..

:

1st

1st
2d

.....

200,000j. 6

2d

100
100

590,000 5 Jan. A July 1872
672,69) 6 Feb. A Aug 1874

Mortgage.....

do
3d
do
4th
do
do
5th
eric and Mor

.

.

Mortgage Bonds
Buffalo. Mew York and Brie:

1st

1st
2d

•1870

300.000 7 |Feb. & AugilS65
do
48*15
‘200.000; 6
250.000; 7 ■Jan. & July! 1870
do
"4870
100,0001 6
do
118S9

Sinking Fund Bonds

Boston and Low ell

i

589,500, 6 Feb. A Aug| 1877
150,000' 6 May

Mortgage

Jan. A July 1S63
do
,1894

600,000 7

j

,

1,000.000 6 J'ne & Dee.! 1867
500.000, 6 M'ch A Sep 1885

....

Blossburg and Corning:
Mortgage Bonds
Boston, Concord and Montreal:
1st Mortgage
1st
2d

1st

i

'

300.000 7

>

2d section—

Imira and TT1 lliamspor

.

(guar. C. and A.)

w

Mortgage, 1st section
do

88^

34,000 7 Feb. A Aug 1876

i

a.

100% i!

i

Belvidere heiaware:
1st Mort.
2d 3Iort.
3d Mort.

1st. Mortgage
)ubuefue and Sioux City:
1st
1st

Mav A Nov. 1875
1S64
do

! 1,000,000

Mortgage, convertible.
do
dow
100^101 iii last Pen nsylvan ia:
102% ..<! Sinking Fund Bonds..

Ap’l A Oct. 1885

do
do
do

ti 2.500,000

-..-ll'

I

97
ioo

Ja Ap Ju Oc 1867
Jan. A July, 1875
‘1880
do

do
-

|: S6 h
" I

36S.000, 7 ijan. & July4S06
70-*79
do
4*2*2.000

extended...

do

o

:

Feb. A Aug 1887
J'ne & Dec. 1874

348,000;

Mortgage/convertible

1st

j.....1
85

$1,740,000

.

2d
do
96%; j Detroit. Monroe and Toledo:

Nov.j 1878

May &

! 1.000,000'

1853

’ 96% j

•;

OSS,000 6 ! Ap'l A Oct J1866

! 1,1*28,500’
1850
700,000
|
1853...........! 2,500,000

do
do
do

do

1

:

Mortgage (S. F.) of 1834

1st
2d
1st
2d

Income Bonds

1,000,000; 7

j

Sterling Bonds

do
do

!; Des Moines 1 'alley :
Mortgage Bonds

iAp’l A Oct. 1879
$*2,500,000
do
1882
2.000,UOOi 7 i

Mortgage, sinking fund, {Pa.)

do

MARKET*

Amount

•outstaudI
ing.

Pavable.

:

2d
do
do
Eastern Coal Fields Branch..do
1st Mortgage, sinking fund, (.V. Y.)
2d
do
do
1st Mortgage, sinking fund, {Ohio)
2d
do
do
A tlantic and St. Lawrence:
Dollar Bonds
:
Baltimore and Ohio

1

DESCRIPTION.

l

ing.

—

1876
1877
1883

May & Nov, 1915
Jan.

&July 1876

450.000! 7 M’ch & Sep 1861

200,000! 6 Jan. & July 1868

45

49

October 21,

THE CHRONICLE.

1865.]

539

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST (continued).
INTEREST.

Description.

( MARKET.

r*-

^

Amount
outstand

cJ

ing.

f ■

5 i

-

O -C

..

G

Payable.

I

Railroad:

1 5

New

Mortgage...

Bonds of October,

Bonds

.*.

Bonds

.'

1S63 (renewal)

).!

Fund B ds (assumea cieots)
Bonds of August, 1S59, convert..
Nero York and Harlem :
1st Mortgage .... '
Consolidated Mortgage

.

and Boston:

0 IMflv

1

Ja Ap Jit Oc
do

6

April & Oct

1,500,000 6 Jan. & July :
do
1,000.000 6
1
do
500,000 6
do
500,001 6

.

)
.

100.00C

.

i....
! S6J4

7

Jan. & Julv

30

1S74

7

1,494,000

.

2d
do
(noiv stock)
Ohio and Mississippi:

April & Oct

1st
2d

Mortgage (East. Div.).
(West. Div.
do
do
do ).
2d
do

1st
1st

850,000

750,000

Oswego and Syracuse:

79

Jan. & Julv 1872
do
1S75
do
1870

7
7
7

2,050.000

.

7,000,000

6

Jan. &

416,000

*.

7
7
7

1,150,000

.

1st

July

80

’72-’S7

.

.

do
Feb & Aug.

1S75’
1S72

Mortgage (Sunbnry & Erie)...
do
(general)

104

do

6

7
6
6

1,000,000

.

5.000,000

.

4,000.000

.

106.000
1.521.000

976.800j

do

5
5
6
6
6

6

182.400

2,856.000

Mortgage

.

do *
do

do

Mississippi:
Mortgage (Eastern Div.)

(Western Div.)

....

Reading and Columbia:
:

Raritan and Delaware Bay:

Mortgage, sinking fund....
do

Convertible Bonds
Rome. Watertown and
Ogdensburg :
1st Mortgage (Potsdam & Watert' I

Jd do
(do
do
1st
do
(Watertown & Rome
,do
Jg do
(do
Rutland and
Burlington:

1st

|d
6**

Jan. Sc Julv 1S67
do
1880

!!!!.*!! T

Mortgage
do

'

do

and Terre Haute:

preferred

do
Income
*
ttandush/, Dayton and Cincinnati:
1st
w

•

Mortgage (extended)
do

Bonds and

Scrip

Mansfield arid, Newark:
Mortgage..,,




7
8

399,30oi

Feb. &

1875

Jan. &

Aug

July 1873
April & Oct 1878

5 April & Oct ’68-’71
6
do
1875
6 Jan. & July ’66-’76
6
& Dec D’m'd

4,319,520’
850,OOO’
1,000.000
150,000

April Sc Octi
Jan. & July5

91

1868

Jan. &

1884

....

60,000 7

....

Fph

6

<£-, \

VI cr

7 | Semi an’ally
do
7 I
? April & Oct

j,Jan.
!

680.000 8
758,000 S

& Julv
do

....

....

do

Jan. &

1912 : 103^
1912 ;
1912 j 83
.

..

Mch &

Sept

Jan. & Jnlv
do

Mch &

1S2,000

6 IJan. &

750,000

G

1st

690,000

A

Naviga tion:

.

.

.

!

.

86

i

\

Schuylkill Navigation':
1st Mortgage

800.000 7 fun.
200.000 7 j
123,000 7 !1VIch
800,000 7

& Dec.
do
& Sept
do

1874

•

1862

do
.

....

201,500 7

I?eb. & Aug 1900
3Jay & Nov. 1875

•

Interest

1st

1st

•

•

76

1st

2d

90

90

81

81

!May & Nov. 1876

•

Mch & Sept 1872
nt
Jan. & July 1882
May & Nov. 1870

Jan. &
do
do
do

July
*

1S64
1865
3878
1864

•

.

•

Mortgage’.
do

....

....

1,290,000 7 J an, & July 1666

VK"f

....

(
•

•

22

L

Susquehanna;
450,000

Mortgage

Jan. &

July 1878

750,000

Jan. &

July! 1878

I
u

1,500,000 7 Jan. & July /18—
2,000,000 7 April & O a I ' 8 •
600 000

Feb. &

1st Mortgage.
do
2d

500,000
510,000

Jan. &

Aug

1871

•

75,593 6 I’’eb. & Aug 1878

45

1883

jMay & Nov.

Mortgage.

1st

• •••
•

1876

Miscellaneous:
90
80
77

-

78

•

1876

....

....

•

|April & Oct

200,000
993, (XX)
227,569
2,500,000 6

Mortgage.

Wyoming Valley;
1st Mortgage

i

•

Bonds, pref

West Branch and
<

23^'

•

* }

Union (Pa.):

....

1

70

400,0001 0 Jan. & July 1875
0 Feb. & Aug 1881

1,000,000

•

6

806.000

Sterling Loan, converted

Mortgage Bonds

.}

..

....

....

329,000

2,200,000 7 Semi an’ally 1894
do
1894
2,800.000 7-!
1,700,000 7 May & Nov. 1894

586,500

,..

Susquehanna and Tide- Water:

....

7i

1,764330
8 980,670

do

Improvement

1888
1876

937.500

Mortgage.

2d

do
do

440,000

Julv!.

'

93^ 94

•

140,000

1863
1863
1863

\

Sept! 1870

I

Jj

Maryland Loan.

1S71
1880

90

1865
1868

Mortgage Bonds

10?K;

80
61

•

90

1S70

2,778,341

Mon on gah da

i

1875
1875

1878

July

752,000
161,000

Unsecured Bonds.

«...

7 Feb. & Aug
do
7 !
do

80

1870
1890
1885

do

5

1SS9

1,000.690 7 iMch & Sept 1888

j

95
95

....

....

7

1684

July

900,0001 7

.

Mortgage Bonds

800,000 7 Mch & Sept 1879
250.000

Jan. &

7

Morris:
5.200.000

80
100

600,000' 7 June & Dec 1865

fund.

Erie of Pennsylvania:
1st Mortgage Bonds
Interest Bonds......

....

....

1

July

77

,00

175,000 6

800,000

....

6

95^ 98

jJune

1,699,500 6

Delaware and Hudson:
1st Mortgage, sinking
2d
do
do

oik 9ik

May & Nov.

564.000

1,800,000

Valley:

Mortgage

95

7

I

Delaware Division;
1st Mortgage

1885

1,000,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1881
do
18S1
500,000 7

Sacin-e and

louis, Alton

92

Preferred Bonds

....

do
do
do
do

5,160,000
2,000.000

1st Mortgage

2d

80
24

4,375,000;

Sterling Bonds, guaranteed

....

1S70
1871
1SS0
1880
1836
1886

400 000

Pittsburg and Steubenville:

1st

July 1895
April <fc Oct

2,000,000! 6 'JaApJuOc

Marvlnnd Loan

Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago:

Sacramento

Jan. &

»

2,G57,S43 6 Jan. & July 1886

Lehigh Navigation:

1st Mort. (Turtle Cr. Div.)

•

1882

Jan. & July 1863
do
1867

Mortgage Bone's

Chesapeake and Ohio:

oik

:

Mortgage

1st Mortgage
2d
do
3d
do

1875

Sep.

Mar. &

....

812,000 6

"

Philadel., Wxhning. <£ Baltimore:
Mortgage Loan
Pittsburg and Connellsville:

-

jMay & Nov.

...

Chesapeake and Delaware:
1st Mortgage Bonds

258,000 6

.1

2

1st
2d

1865

May & Nov. 1870
25,000 6 iJan. & Jnlv 1871
do
“ 1877
500,000 6

do

1st

1875

April & Oct 1S77
April & Oct 1881
April & Oct 1901

6

"408,000

.

-

Mortgage

1874

do

596,000 6 Jan. & ,uly 1890
1890
do
200,000 6

Mortgage

9SJ£

119, S00 6 Jan. & July 1SG5

do
do
do
Dollar Bonds of 18-19
do
do
1861
do
do
1843-4-8-9
Sterling Bonds of 1843.
Dollar Bonds, convertible

1st

....

92
78
78

iJan. & July IPS'7
*Apr. & Oct. 1885

7
7
7

300,000

1875

j

600,000 7

a
Canal
Cincinnati and Covington Bridge :

75

292.500

Philadelphia and Reading:
Sterling Bonds of 1836

do

152,355
-

do

jJan. & July

7
7

90

....

575,00C 7 Jan. & July 1876

Consolidated Loan
Convertible Loan

1st
1st

Mortgage

Guaranteed (Baltimore) Bonds

....

65

2 283 840

sterling

do
(general)’
Philadel., Germdnt. & Norristown:

2d

1,500,000

554,908;

Mortgage

2d

4,980.000 6 Jan. & July 18S0 103
2,621,000 6 April & Oct 1875

Mortgage....

1st
2d
Sd

...

do
1st
,
guaranteed. .. . .
York & Cumberland (North. Cent.):

1

Mortgage

1st

/ 90

1

,

Hudson and Boston
Western Maryland:

1,000,000 7 Mch & Sept 18S4

.

Philadelphia and Trenton

900,000 7 iFeb. & Aug 1S65
1884
2,500,000 7 |
do
1,000.000 7 May & Nov. 1875

900,000!

Albany and W. Stockbridge Bonds.

Philadelphia and Erie:

‘

74

550,000 6 Jan. & July 1883

Sterling(£899,900) Bonds
'

April & Oct 1870

346,000

1st Mortgage
Pennsylvania:

1st
1st
2d

1894

2.000,000
May & Nov. 1861
1,135,000 7 Jan. & July 1S67

Mortgage

1st

do
do

1st

7 !June & Dec

.

sterling.

do ’
do

1870

180,000

Dollar Bonds

*...

311,500 7 Jan. & July ’70-’S0

1st Mortgage

Pacific:
Mortgage, guar, by Mo

1st
2d
2d

July

.600,000

(conv. Into U. S. 6s, 30 yr.)

2d

....

79

1866

200,000

Mortgage (convert.) Coupon
do
registered
Western (Mass.):

92

32>i

....

jMcb & Sept

7 'Jan. &

650,000

do
j Vermont and Massachusetts t
1st Mortgage
Wai'ren :
1st Mortgage (guaranteed)
Westchester and Philadelphia:

....

90

7

300.000

do

1st Mort.

....

I860

April & Oct 1876

1,391,000

(extended)
(Toledo and Wabash)....

1st

Mortgage

7

340,000

Land Grant Mortgage
Vermont Central:

....

300,000 7 Feb. & Aug '1870

Ogdensburg and L. Champlain :

1,400,000

Union Pacific :

100
9S
98
30

96

do
do
do

do

87

|

.Jan. & July 1871

Aug

:

Troy Union :
Mortgage Bonds

....!
S6

7

94,000

2d
do
3d
do
Convertible

....

1873
1873
1885
18S5

200,000

(Wabash and Western)..
Sinking Fund Bonds
Equipment bonds
Troy and Boston :
1st Mortgage

....

1S74

1872

Mortgage, convertible
(N. Y.):
Mortgage

1st
2d
2d

!....
85

7 Feb. &

Mortgage

Toledo and Wabash :
1st Mort. (Toledo & Wabash)

i 03

...

1SS5
1877
1866

700,000

Toledo, Peoria and Warsaw
1st Mortgage

|105
!

2,500,001 6 April & Oct 1S75
do
860,IKK 10
1887

.)

1st

;•••

|102

j

1867

Third Avenue

^...

1868

220,70C

Norwich and Worcester :
General Mortgage
Steamboat Mortgage

do
2d
do
Peninsula:

i

1S93

150,001

.

1st

.

102

1S72

6
6

500.00C

(not guaranteed).

1st

•

35
do
i 1S83 ; So
& Auc 1876 100
do
1876 103

2,500.001 6 iJan. & Juh

.

Hampshire:

Panama :
1st Mortgage,

.

TsTrw 1

7 ’June & Dec

Terre Haute and Richmond:

....

1

232,00()! 6 Feb. & Aug ’73-’7£

Plain Bonds—.
North Pennsylvania:

1st

OOO

1st

<

*

Syracuse, Binghamton andNeic York:
1st Mortgage

....

92^

j

..

Mortgage Bonds
Chattel Mortga ere
North-Western Virginia:
let Mortgage (guar, by Baltimc
2d
do
(guar, by B. & O. ]
3d
do
( do
do

j

1 <571

OB

s

:

Staten Island:

/

T2

500,000

Mortgage

IstMortgage

1

‘i

'O

as

E «
PU <=*

x

Shamokin Valley and Pottsville

...

1
912.001)! 7 ^une & Dec : 1S66
1,088,001 ) 6 •April & Oct 1S75
i

Haven:

Mortgage....
Central:
Sinking Fund Bonds
....
..
York and Cumberl’d Guar. Bouds
Balt, and Susq. S’k’g Fund Bor'1*

do

4

3,000.000 7 Mav & Nov
1.000,000 7 iFcb. & Aug
do
1,000.001 ) 7

.

let

3d

Jnlj

604.000, 7*>

Northern

Northern New

Jan

r

1st

1

Au£t 1873

663,000 6
1,398.000 7 ;Feb.

..

.

Mortgage Bonds
New York, Providence

Railroad
Second Avenue :

...

6,917.59;3 6 May & No^ r! 1S83
2,925,000 6 June & Dec ; 1SS7
1

Sink

3d Mortgage
New York and New
Plain Bonds....

Feb. &

): 7

• ••

Sinking Fund

Real Estate

485, OCX

..

York Central:

Premium

<5

\

1869
1873

103, (XX)j 6

^Fer^BondsNorthern :
of 1S53
London

New
1st

7 ’Jan. ifc Jul]
do

$500, (XX)

..

7

.£3
«
Payable.

ing.

OG

j

Haven and Northampton:

\ft M°dogage(Ham'p; and Hami
*

"3

MARKET.
03

Amount
outstand¬

Description.

cs

r1

New

INTEB3ST.

.

—

June & Dec 1873

July 1879

90

92

»

540

THE CHRONICLE.

[October 21, 1865.

RAILROAD, CANAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS STOCK LIST.
Stock

1

out-

Companies.

!

Dividend.

standing.!

Periods

Market.

Stock

Companies.

Last

Railroad.

Albany and Susquehanna

and St. Louis
100:
Atlantic & Great Western, N. Y.100
Alton

do
do

do
do
Baltimore and Ohio

800,000! Quarterly.

;

Alleghany Valley

919,153)

Aug.. 1 )£

13.1S8,902 April and OcbOct.. .4

i 113)4 115

“Oc
100' 4,434.250 Feb. and Aug Aug

Bellefontaine Line

Belvidere, Delaware

100!
100!

Berkshire

Blossbiirs: and Cornins
Boston, Hartford and Erie

50'
100
500

997,112:

:127

'

600,000! Quarterly.

Periods.

and Boston Air Line.100’
788,047j
Central
100 24,386,000 j Feb.
and Harlem
50 5,085,050

,

Market

Last p’d. Bid. Askd

;

and Aug! Aug. .3

9534

j

75

preferred
50 1,500,000 Jan. and July! July. .4
Niagara Bridge & Canandaigua.lOOj 1,000,000 Jan. and July July. .3
idge
New York and New Haven
100 2,980,839
Quarterly. |Oct.. .4
New York Providence & BostonlOO 1,508,000
Quarterly. Oct...8

Pa...l<X) 2.500,0001
Ohio.loci 5,000,000
100

standing.
New York
New York
New York
do

100 1,347,192
50. 1,947,600!

Dividend.

out¬

p’d.: Bid. Askd

}Oct...l)i
250.000:June & Dec. June .2)4
8.590, (>00|
1
| 11*: 13
1,330,000 June & Dec. June .3)4 98 j 98)4
4,076.974 Jan. and July July. .4
116 ; 120
3.160,000 Jan. and July'July. .5 }124 j 126

Ninth Avenue
100; 795,360
Northern of New Hampshire.. .100 3,068,400 June and Dec; June.3
Northern Central.
50j 3,344.800 'Quarterly. iOct...2
North Pennsylvania
50:3,150,150
Norwich and Worcester.100! 2,338,60c)1 Jan. and July
July. .4

Ogdensburg & L. Champlain..
Ohio and Mississippi
do
preferred.
Old Colony and Newport
Oswego and"Syracuse
Panama (and Steamship)

80

114)4 115

117

120

94

88)4

62
100

101

.100; 3,077,0001
38)4
100 21,250,000)
I
Boston and Lowell
2734
.100! 2,979,000
January.
Jan..7
65
Boston and Maine
10i>!
100 3,609,600’Jan. and JulyiJnly. .4 109
Boston and Providence
100
50} 482,400 Feb. and Aug Aug. .4
Boston and Worcester
100 4.500.000:Jan. and JulVjJulv. .4*|127
;128
100 7,000,000} Quarterly. -Oct..6 225"
Brooklyn Central
.100!
492.150!
•
I.....!
Peninsula
100!
,|
j
Brooklyn City
O 10 1,000.000!Feb. and Aug Aug..3)4i...
Pennsylvania
?,
50 20,000,000'May and Nov May. .5
122
Brooklyn City and Newtown... 100i
866.000;
:
122)4
j...
Philadelphia and BaltimoreCentlOO
218,100:
Buffalo, New'York, and Erie... 100)
850.000 Jan. and July July. .3)4!...
Philadelphia and Erie
50 : 5,013,054
53
Buffalo and State Line
100! 2.200.000 Feb. & Aug.!Aug..5
54*
190
Philadelphia and Reading
50 20,072.323’ Mar. and Nov} Mai
114)4 114*
Burlington and Missouri River. 100; 1,000,000
Phila., Germant’n, & Norrist’n. 50K 1,358,100 Apr. and OctOct .4
Camden and Amboy
110
100 6.472.400}Jan. and July July. .5
126)4
8,657,300 Apr. and Oct!Oct ..5 123 127
Camden and Atlantic
50!
378,455
Pittsburg and Connellsville
50} 1,770,414
do
do
preferred.. 50;
632,600
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne & ChicagolOO, 8.181,126 Quarterly. :Oct...2)4 9734
Cape Cod
60
681,665’Jan. and Julv! July. .3*
Portland^ Saco, and PortsmouthlOO! 1,500,000! Jan. and July July. .4 96
Catawissa
50; 1,150.000;
36
Providence and Worcester
100)1,700,000 Jan. and July July. .4)4
do
preferred
50 j 2,290.000 Feb. & Aug. jAag. .8)4 66
Racine and Mississippi
100;
Central of New Jersey
.100! 5,600,000 Quarterly.
124*
Oct...2)* 120
Raritan and Delaware Bay
100; 2,360,700
Central Ohio
j
Reading and Columbia
50! 501,890
Cheshire (preferred)
100, 2,035,925
47)4 48
Kensseiaer
Rensselaer and Saratoga
50!
5U;
800,000 Jan. and July July. .4
buu,uuu
Chester Valley
50i
•.
871,900
102
mx Rome, Watertown & Ogdensb’glOO}-1,774,175 Jan. and July July..5
and Alton
100= 1,783,100 Feb. & Aug. Aug.. 3)4
Chicago
106
Rutland and Burlington
100’ 2,233,376
do
preferred
100 : 2,425.200 Feb and Aug. Aug.. 3)4:100
St. Louis, Alton, & Terre HautelOO 2.300,000
35
Chicago Burlington and Quincy.100; 8,376.510iMay & Nov.jMay..6 1*29)4 130
do
do
68
pref. 100; 1,700,000 Annually.
May. .7
68
Chicago and Great Eastern
100'
Sandusky, Dayton, and Cincin..l00j 2,989,090
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska
100 1.000,000
do
do
pref. 100 i
354,866 Feb. and Aug Feb..3
Chicago and Milwaukee
100' 2.250,000
57
Sandusky, Mansfield & NewarklOO'1 862,571
Chicago and Northwestern
100:11.990,520
30
30)4 Schuylkill Valley..576,000 Jan. and July July.. 5
50;
do
do
pref. .100 8,435,500 Juno & Dec.,June..3)4 64)4 6434 Second Avenue (N.
61
Y.)
100!
650,000; Apr. and Oct_
Chicago and Rock Island
loOi 6.000.000; April and Oct!Oct... 5
107*|107* Shamokin Valley & Pottsville.. 50: 869,450|Feb. and Aug: Aug
Cincinnati and Chicago Air LinelOO 1,106,125
Sixth Avenue (N. Y.)
j
_.
100! 750,000; Quarterly.
180
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton.1001 3,0;X),000|MayandNov.:May..4
95
Syracuse, Binghamton & N. Y.1001 1,200.130;
:..
Cincinnati and Zanesville
100' 2,000,000
:
Terre Haute and Richmond
50} 1,900,150! Jan. and July July. .6
Cleveland, Columbus, &Cincin.l00 6,000,000'Feb. and Aug Aug. .5
127 i!28
Third Avenue (N. Y.)
100 1,170,000} Quarterly. Oct.
Cleveland, Painesville & Ashta.100 4,000,000 April and Oct Oct.. .4
98 1100
Toledo, Peoria, and Warsaw.. .100 1,700,000)
Cleveland and Pittsburg
50j 5,253.625;Feb. and Aug' Aug p’sd 74 ! 74)4
do
do
1st pref.100 1,700,000!
Cleveland and Toledo
60; 4,654,800, April and Oct'Oct. ..5
101
do
do
|101)4:
2d pref.100 1,000,000
Columbus & Indianapolis Cent.lOO!
j
Toledo and Wabash
!
j...
50 2,442,350 June and Dec June.8
Columbus and Xenia
100) 1.490,800; Jan. and July! July. .5 j...
do
do
preferred. 50
984,700 June and Dec 'June .3)4
Concord
50' 1.500,000 Jan. and July!July. .3)4; 58
59
Tioga
100
125,000} Jan. and July!July..3)4
Concord and Portsmouth
100'
250,000;Jan. and July) July. .3)4i...
Troy and Boston
100
607,111,
i
Coney Island and Brooklyn.100j 500.000}
!
I...
Troy and Greenbush
100
274,400 June and Dec! June .3
•Connecticut and Passnmpsic.. 100;
892,900!
Utica and Black River
100
811,560 Jan. and July, July..2
do
do " pref.100: 1,255.200 Jan. and
Vermont and Canada
July)July. .3
7234
100 2,860,000! June and Dec; June .4
97* 100
Connecticut River
100; 1,591.100 Jan. and July. July..4
Vermont and Massachusetts... .100 2 214.2251
70
!
44* 45
Covington and Lexington
1,582,169
100'
I
!...
Warren
50 l’408,300;Jan. and July July..3
93*! 95
Dayton and Michigan
100; 2,316,7051
j
15 j...
Westchester and Philadelphia.. 50
684,036
Delaware
50,
406,132 Jan.and July July..3
Western (Mass)
}...
100; 5,665^000; Jan. and July!July..4 130 133
Delaware, Lacka., & Western
50 6,832,950 Jan. and July July psd.\ 165 1190
Worcester and Nashua
Des Moines Valley
83| 1,141,000 Jan. and July! July. .8
96* 79
100) 1,550,000;
;
!...
;
Wright8ville, York & Gettysb’g 50
Detroit and Milwaukee
317,050 Jan. and July July. .1
100
952.350
i
;
!...
Canal.
do
do
pref.....100 1,500,000!:
.!
|...
Chesapeake and Delaware
25 1,343,563
Dubuque and Sioux Citv
lOOi 1.751.577!
!
'...
Chesapeake and Ohio
do
25) 8,228,595
do
pref..... 100! 1,982,180!
|
-I...
Delaware Division
64
50 l,633,350;Feb. and Aug Aug. .3
70
Eastern. (Mass)
1UU
100! 3,155,000 Jan. aiiU U U1V
flail. and
99
U1J
July!July. .3 j 98
Delaware and Hudson
143 148
-.100 10,000,0001 Feb. and Aug Aug.10
Eighth Avenue. N. Y
100)1,000,000) Quarterly. |Oct
Delaware Junction (Pa.)
100
Elmira, Jefferson,& CauandagualOO)
398,910)
500,000 Feb. and AugjAug. .2)4:
Delaware and Raritan
100
iJan. and July July. .5
Elmira and Williamsport
50l 500,000 Jan. and July! July. .2)4!
Lancaster and Susquehanna.... 50
do
200,000!
do
pref... 50j
500,000 Jan. and July [July. .3)4;
83
Lehigh Navigation
50 4.282,950! May and Nov May. .5
Erie
116* 113
100116.400.100 Feb. & Aug. Aug..4 i 88)4 88)4
Monongahela Navigation
50
do preferred
'726,800]’
|
•;
..1001 8,535.700 Feb. & Aug. Aug..3)41 S3)4 85
Morris (.consolidated)
..100 l,025.000:Feb. and Aug;Aug. .4
Erie and Northeast
50!
400,000 Feb. & Aug.jAug..5 j
do
preferred
90
100 1,175,000 Feb. and Aug! Aug. .5
Fitchburg
100 3,540,000 Jan. and July July. .3
North Branch
103)4108
50
138.086
121..
Forty-seed St. & Grand St. F’y.100) 750,000: April and Oct i Oct 5..
Schuylkill Navigation (consol.). 50! 1,908,207
56
59
Hannibal and St. Joseph
100! 1,900,000
1
do
30.34
do
preferred. 50) 2,888,805 Feb. and Aug Aug. .3)4
72*
do
pref.. .100 5,253,836..
j
Susquehanna and Tide-Water.. 50) 2,050,070
i9* 21
Hartford and New Haven
100 2,350.000} Quarterly. ;Oct...3
Union
34
50 2,750,000
40
Housatonic
ioo
820,000
do preferred
do
50;
preferred
100 1,180,000 Jan. and July'July. .4
West Branch and Susquehanna.100
Hudson River
1,000.000 Jan. and July; July. .5
ioq. 6,218,042 April and Oct Oct... 4 i 105
105
Wyoming Valley.
138
50!
700,000 Quarterly. ;Sept. 4
Huntingdon and Broad Top
*.
! 50 617,500
!....,
I
Miscellaneous.
do
do
190.750 Jan. and July July. .334:
50
pref.
American Coal
65
25: 1,500,000 Feb. and Aug Aug. .4
Illinois Central
.*100 22.8S8.900 Feb.and Aug Au5&10s;
American Telegraph
Trwliono
100
1
10
Indianapolis and Cincinnati.... 50 1,689.900 Quarterly. a !Oct...4 !1 133)4 134
120
Ashburton Coal
50’ 2,500,000
Indianapolis and Madison
100
412,000 Jan. and July July. .3
Atlantic Mail
)
loo 4,000,000
Quarterly. iJuly.25 143 145
do
do
pref. .100
407,900 Jan. and July July. .4
Brunswick City
Jeflersonville
100j
50* 1,015,907
)
Bucks County Lead
j
Joliet and Chicago
5| 200.000
100; 1,500,000
Quarterly. Aug...1)4
Brooklyn Gas
Kennebec and Portland (new). .100)
25} 2,000,000 Feb. and Aug! Aug.
70 1 90
Canton Improvement
Lackawanna and
100} 5.000,000
Bloomsburg.. 50 835,000
Cary Improvement
!
600.000;
j
t
udu tdo Pref- 50! 500,000
Central American Trans
29
34
iioO; 3,214,300}
6
0.627.050 Qu
uarterly. Oct. ..2)4
,1128
Central Coal
IWI.
50 162
100; 9 <
Lexington and Frankfort..*..." 50i
?eb.
Citizens (Brooklyn) Gas
Little Iviiami
10
20i LOOO.OOO Jan. and July July..4
..100 2,981.267 Jan. and July,Jufy.
112 ; 113
Consolidation Coal, Md
.5
Juittie Schuylkill
Little schuvlkill
100 6,000.000
50 2.6-16.100 Jan. and July; July. .3 ! 60
Cumberland Coal, preferred .’...100 5,000,000
41* 42
I?n
Long Island
50i 1,852.715! Quarterlv. ;Aug..2
90
Farmers T
Loan and Trust
140
25 l,000,000,Jan. and July: July. .4
Louisville and Frankfort
50! 1,109,594 Feb. and Aug'Au^. .2
Harlem Gas
50
170 185
Louisville and Nashville
644,000
100! 5,605,834 May and Nov:May ..4
Hampshire and Baltimore Coal. 100
Louisville. New Albany & Chic. 100’ 2,800.000
500.000
j
International Coal
McGregor Western
50j 1,000,000
100:
j
1
|
Jersey City and Hoboken Gas.. 20 1,000,000
Maine Central
100j i,050,860! ..’.*!!!!'!.*!!.* j "!*!"!!I * *9
10
Manhattan Gas
170
Marietta and Cincinnati
50 4,000,000 Jan. and July July.. 5
165
50,' 2,022,484;
I
Mariposa Gold
100 12,000,000
11* 11*
do
1st pref. 50 6.205.404!Feb. and
Aug Feb .&?
43
45
Metropolitan Gas
00
100 2,800.000
do
2d pref.. 50 3,819.771! Feb. and Aug;Feb .3s
Minnesota
14
Manchester and Lawrence
50 1,000,000
Lawrence;
100: 1.000.000 Jan. and
New
July'July. .4 107
10 1,000.000
Michigiu Central
ioo1 6.315,906 Jan. and July Ju..4&6s:114 114)4 New Jersey Consolidated
Jersey Zinc
1
100 1 200 000
Michigan Southern and N. Ind..l00! 7,539,600 Feb. and
Aug Aug.iwd.i 71% , U-% New York Gas Light
50
0
LOOO.OOO] May and Nov May
do
guaran.100 2.183.600 Feb. and Aug'Aug. .5 }134 ! 140
New York Life and Trust
100
Milwaukee and Prairie DnChienlOO 2.938.073!
j...
60
j 60
Nicaragua Transit
d°
100 1,000,000]
do
1st pref.100; 2.753.500 Mav and Nov Nov. .4 !
100
Pacific Mail
do •
100 4,000.000} Quarterly.
do
2d pref.100 1,014,000 Mav and Nov Nov.
Aug .5
*90' *
.3)4i SO
Scrip (50 paid)
2io 230
Milwaukee and St. Paul
100 4,000,000
100 1,000.000!
'!
48
Pennsylvania Coal
50
173 175
d0TT,i, &
Purred
100 2,400.000 Feb. and Aug j Aug. .3)4' 60
uartz Hill
"Mine Hill
25 1,000,000;
Schuylkill Haven.. 50 3,700.000 Jan. and July July. .4 1112 113*'
uicksilver
*.
100
Mississippi mid Missouri.......100 3.452.300
July p’sd 48* 48*
*....

.

.

.

_

4

..

XX,

\

u

....

..

_

■» a

▼

n >■»

^

~

a!

-«

O nA

AAA

/~v

.

.

i_

■

a

.

r>r\

i

a-

170^!

„

.-

nm

...

»

rl

~i.

t~\1

-4

aaa

aa

.

.

,

,

--

|Aug..5

...

Morris and Essex
Nashua and Lowell

50

1001

Naugatuck
:..100
New Bedford and Taunton
100
New Ha*en, N.
Loud., & Ston .1001
New Haven and
Northampton.. 100

S!3/5^ey**<r *AV




3,000.000 Feb. and Aug Aug.
600,009’

I

.?

.3*.!

i...

!
4 j...
500.000 June and Dec' June.. ..U

1,000,000

.

738,533
1.010,000

1

(...

•

j...

100 4,395,800] Feb. and Aug: Aug. .5

ioo)

Rutland Marble

80

140

'm,m\,7).....’.‘...)i85

116

25

Saginaw Land, Salt and Mm

25! "2,500.000

l,666,o66

Union Trust...
100 1,000!000!
United States Telegraph
100 3,000,000 ' Feb. and Aug; Aug..4
~
United States Trust
100 l,000,000;Feb. and Aug'Aug. .5
Western Union Telegraph
'
UK)
Quarterly. )Oct....
Wilkesbarre (Consolidated)CoallOO 2,175,000
Apr. and Oct Oct....
Williamsburg Gas
50'
750.0001Jan. and July i July. .5

W oming Valley Coal.

50J 1,250,000

65

72

70

'i 0*

150

THE

21,1865.]

October

INSURANCE STOCK LIST.
Dec. 31,1864.

COMPANIES.

(*) are partici
and thus (+) write Capital.
Risks.

Harked thus

Net
Assets.

DIVIDEND,

•sJ’r*

Last

Periods.

Stock Fire:

100
™

Arctic.....

Astor.......

Atlantic

(Brooklyn).

50
25
25

.

Baltic.
Beekman.

.

.

f

Brevoort
Broadway......

Commerce

300,000
210,000
250,000
600,000
200,000
200,000

10C

200.000

SSSSSiBs:-::.::::™
Continental*
lw
Corn

SS?*—

Empire City
Excelsior.
Exchange

Far. Joint

500,000

400,000

• • •

St’k(Meridian)100

25

Fulton.Gallatin

™

100

Gebhard
Germania
Glenn's Falls
Globe

....

Goodhue*
Greenwich
'Grocers’
Guardian
Hamilton

50
10
50
100
25
50

15
50

Hanover

200,000

M»i
^
“0

Firemen’s......
J?
Firemen’s Fund
•
10
Firemen’s Trust (Bklyn) 10

Harmony (F. & M.)t — 50
7

250,000

50

Exchange

loO.OOO

200,000
150,000

100
(Albany)

300,000
153.000

^oo

Columbia*

50,000
150,000
200,000
200,000
200,000
500,000
250,000
800,000

200,000

Capital3 City ‘(Albany)... 100
100
Central Park
Citizens’
City

$300,000
200,000

200.000
200.000

25j

Bowery.

800,000
200,000
200,000
150,000
50,000
204,000
150,000

150,000
200.000

150,000
200,000
500, U00
100.000

200,000
200.000

.200,000
200.000

200,000
150,000
400,000
300,000

Hope

Howard
Humboldt

.100

200,000

Importers’ and Traders’. 50

200,000
150,000

Indemnity

100

International

100

Irving....

25

Jefferson

30

King’s County (Brook’n) 20
Knickerbocker

40

150,000

100
25

Long Island (Brooklyn). 50

200.000

...

•

Lincoln Fund
Lorillard*

50

50! 1,000,000
25 1,000,000
100
500,000

Manhattan

159,079;Feb. and Aug. Aug
4
474.177,Jan. and July.: July
10
306,652 Feb. and Aug. Aug4 p. sh.
289,454 Jan. and July. July
5 *so#
495.466
do
'July
do
229,835
iJuty
5
239,144
269,319' Jan. and July. J July
5
282,243!April and Oct. April
5
1,174,929;Jan. and July.'July
7
299,038 March and Sep Sep
50
227,675'Jan. and July.*July
401,922lApril and Oct. 'Oct
4
246,853 Jan. and July.! July
7
do
* July
255,112
5 102
146.024 Feb. and Aug. I Aug
57#
72,880
262,121 Jan. and July.: July
5
do
141,396
do
169,340
do
230,229
162,744 May and
225,241 iFeb. and

I

*

jJuly
i

Market*

100

Niagara

50
50
25

North American*
North River

Northwestern (Oswego). 50
Pacific.
25
Park...
ioo
Peter

Cooper
People’s

20
20
60
50
ioo
100
25

PhqEnixt
Belie*.

Republic*
Resolute*..*

Rutgers’

.

St. Mark’s
St. Nicfiolast

.

Security*!.....

50
50

Standard

Sterling *

Stuyvesant
Tradesmen’s

25
25

II*. .‘..*100
100

'25

25
United States
’ 26
Washington*...
50
Western < Buffalo)
100
50
City
Yonkers and New York. 100

Williamsburg

!*.!!”!

Nov.lMay
Aug.'Aug

do
do
213,413
159,054 Feb. and

do
do
184.916 March and Sep
298,778 Jan. and July.

200.000

100

*. .100
Mercantile Mutual*... .’.’ioo

83,120! 95
81,120. 90
48,660; So
84,120 80
78,700! 75
126,540: 72
103,8o0| 70

(H p.

c.

.

5
5
6

1862.

44

.:....

Sun Mutual.

j.

(6 p. c. Nov.)
Scrip of 1S62

Limit $1,000,000.!

44

Mercantile.

44
.

(Op. c. Feb.)|
Scrip of 1S58.
1859...!

90,730 60

44
44

1860... |
1 861...
1862...
*1S03...
1864...
I860

44
44

“
44

.

Limit $1,000,000.

186.300'
80.130

....

42,700

©
.©
©
©

69.470!

86,620'.
101,340! 80

..

(6 p. c.)j
Scrip of 1859....; 102,440

S

98

©100
© 92

1 862....

1^0,650 90
177,330 87
130,180 83

1863....

153,420 99

1864....

125,670 75
185,540 71

44

„

I860....

44

1861....!

44
“

I

.©....

195,000
549,000

Union.
>

£2

111,580!.

£

44
,

'

44

1865....

$500,000.

85
§89

© 81

77

© 73

Washington 1
Marine. (7 p. c.)

ISO 3
1 864.
1865

Scrip of 1863....
44

10,000 65
30,000 45
30,000 80

1864....
1855....

44

Limit

$500,000.

Bid.

Asked.

Companies.

1 00

1 45

Maple Shade ofN. Y.
Maple Shade of Phil.

Alleghany
Allen Wright
Beekman
Bennehoft' Reserve.
Bennehoft’ Run

12 35

N.York, Phila. and

12 45

of

1 20

1 25

(
Philadelphia.. C

23 75

2 00

Oceanic

60

1 34

1 37

70

Pacific.

30 00
25

Palmer Petroleum...

1 00

People’s Petroleum..
Phillips

50

50

Emp’e City Petrol’m
Enterprise

45

55

Sherman & Bamsd’le

Everett Petroleum
Excelsior
First National
Fountain Petroleum.
Fulton Oil
Germania
G’t Western Consol.
Guild Farm
Hammond..

75
70
50

95

Southard
Standard Petroleum.

..

85#

1 50

1 &5
63

Oil City Petroleum..
Oil CreekofN.Y....

79

Pit Hole Creek

Heydrick
Heydrick Brothers
Hickory Farm

Raw son Farm
Revenue

Rynd Farm

75

34
1 00

'75'

80

82

25 00
50
28 60

45 00

8 00
97

«0 00
1 02

Terrageuta

96

Titus Estate
Union
United Pe’tl’m F’ms.
United States
United States Pe- \
troleum Candle., j

1 02
1 00

35
14

2 10

24

28 65

Venango
Vesta
Watson Petroleu
■Webster

’l9’

McC’lintockville

Manhattan

65

Success
Tack Petr’m of N.Y.
Talman
Tarr Farm

Liberty
McElhenny
McKinley.

96

Story & McClintock.

75
52
2 75

High Gate

Home
Inexhaustible
Johnson’s Fulton Oil
Knickerbocker Pet’in

2 60

Titus^Oil
1 00

..

6 95
2 00

President...

—

July....

7 85
55

46

Noble & Delamater |
RockOll
f
Northern Light..

....

....

7 50

/

Clifton
Commercial
Commonwealth.
Consolidated of N. Y
De Kalb
Dalzell
."
Devon Oil

...

Asked.

Baltimore Consol j
Noble <fcDelamator

Black Creek
Blood Farm

Cherry Run Petrol’m

...

Bid.

Montana
Mount Vernon.....
National Oil of N. Y.

Bergen Coal and Oil

n

.

W.Virg. Oil and Coal
Wright (
J
Working People’s /
Woods &
Oil Creek

2 90
25

Maple Grove

Petroleum

f

MINING STOCK LIST.

*

| trl>

129,000
224,000

1863....
1864....
I860.

Limit.

Buchanan Farm
California
Cascade
Central

July
5
July., .r.5
Sept
5
July
.10

..

14k.

1S65..

j

...

1864...
1865...|

44

-©
-©

1663....

1864....i 180,790

1863...! 435,404*.

“

’

1S62....1

Limit $500,000.

Brooklyn

..

»v

44

44

Bradley Oil

..

1,000-000 3,177,437

Scrip of 1861

Brevoort

5
5
July.. ..10
July
5
July..
.5
July.. .8#
July. .-*.10
5
July
July
5

8,500,000

©.

Feb.)

Adamantine Oil....
..5 139*
..5
.10 !50
..5
..6
:5 64#

Aug. Aug
July, Juiy

do

Pacific Mutu¬
al. (6 p. c.)
j

PETROLEUM STOCK LIST.

..

566,543

Limit $500,000.

©.

44

Scrip of 1861...:
44

-©■
•©.

©.

“

Companies.

.

500,000

44

Gt Western.

5

.

©-

860....; 131,270

1861....1 105,770
1863....- 100,830
1804.... 1
53,610

44

Limit notjlxed

5
7

233,295
219,046 Jan. and July, July
do
249,874
July..
do
348,467
July
do
203,224
July..
110,905
253,079 Jan. and July. July
8
262,076 Feb. and Aug. Aug... ,.6
1,000,000 1,164,291 Jan. and July. July
5 110
June and Dec. June 6& 50 92
1,000,000
350,000
388,919 April and Oct. Oct..
4 101#
150,000
170,982 Jan. and July, i July
6
do
200,000 244,289
July ..7#
do
200,000 217,876
July
5
150,000
163,247 Feb. and Aug . Aug
5 97#
Jan. and July,
150,000
135,496
do
500,000
664,987
July.. ...6
do
200,000
249,750
July
5
do
300,000
481,551
July 8^ &20
do
200,000
232,191
July
.3#
200,000
208,016 Feb. and Ang. August. .7
159.336:
do
150,000
Aug
5
150,000
156,707;
do
Aug
4
1,000,000 1,241,874
do
Aug
7
okq ns*
200,900
263,035 Jan. and July. July
5
200,000
200,559
200,000
57
205,070
200,000
219,139 Feb. and Aug. Aug.
150,000
.5
180,310 Jan. and July. July
250,000
.5 115
343,665
do
July.
400,000
.4
600,527 Feb. and Aug. Aug.
QfiQ 91 O
200,000
150,000
159’226 Jan. and Juiy. July....

WMtogtyn*,,,400 640*000; 1,322,469
287,40Q! ^1,639




I

$500,000.

44

113,325 March and Sep Sep.
328,115 Jan. and July. July

.157,483
358,142

Limit

44

5

July
July..
Aug..
April
Aug
Sep

Limit $500,000.

“

1862...:
1863...
864...
1865...

“

I860...

Orient Mutu*
al. (6 p. c. Mar)
Scrip of 1659....I 138.570
44

1861...;

44

.

Aug.

350,000* 27# (a

July.)!
Scrip of 1S59...

5

.

©
©

255.000.

121,460

1864...,!

45

(6 p. c.

44

...-©...

44

! 80

1865...;
$1,000,000.!

44

-

“
44

Scrip of 1862

167,778!Jan. and July. July
491.869
do
July
do
403,183
July

234,925

44

1864...I

“

Per cent.

I860...
1861 ...!
1862...’
1868...

’

*

Commercial.'

o

159,602 j
224,6671 Jan. and July.!July
221,062
do
; July
261,138 Feb. and Aug. Aug
214,3731 March and Sep‘Sep

.©

Mutual of
Buffalo (7 p. c)

5
6

Marine:

Columbian*........

Great Western*

1860.

...

44

Limit

5

July

590,147{Jan. and July;'July

Feb. and
708,874 Jan. and
do
331,793
do
185,624
do
242,320
do
221,815
do
293,503
do
do
169,572

Mechanics’ (Brooklyn).. 50
150,000
Mechanics’ and Traders’ 25
200,000
Mercantile
100
200,000
Merchants’
50
200,000
Metropolitan*!
100 1,000,000
Montauk (Brooklyn).... 50
150,000
Moms (and inland)
100
200,000
Nassau (Brooklyn)
50
150,000
National.
.37#
200,000
New Amsterdam
25
300,000
New World
50
200.000
N. Y. Cent. (Union Sp.v.100
100,000
N. Y. E-uitable
35
210,000
N. Y. Fire and Mar
100
200,000

Limit

|

(6 p. C.)

Scrip of 1859...

1863...

49
“

N. Y. Mutual.

!

Per cent.

„

$1,000,000.;

.

1,000,000 1,079,164 April aud Oct.
200,000
228,083 Feb. and Aug.
200,000
261,586 March and Sep
280,000
150,000
300,000
150,000

Lafayette (Brooklyn)
Lamar
Lenox

293,142 Jan. and July. July
5
do
211,492
July 8i&30
122,248
187,467
200,645
440,084 Jan. and July. July 3i&50
203,363 March and Sep Sep
5
629,167 Jan. and July. July .ps’d
270,827 Feb. and Aug. Avi n>
K
347,723! March and Sep Sep
5
M
192,6311 May and Nov.
ay
233,536:Feb. and Aug.; Aug
4
319,027 June and Dec. June
5
132,306 Jan. and July.!July
5
264,366 Feb. and Aug. Aug
6
do
249,764:
Aug
10

200.000
—100
100 2,000,000 2,929,628 Jan. and July, July
Jan
do
50 200,000 214,017
50
300,000
do
433,998
July

Hoffman
Home...,

Limit

“

Kuituml, (Watert’n). b|
AibaSycity\\v.v.v/::::ioo

iSeS Exchange

Atlantic.
(6p.c. Feb.)
$
Scrip of 1864... 2,599,520*
:2,705,Q60

Columbian, j
(6 p. c. Feb.)
Scrip of 1862... I

paid.

—

joint
Adriatic

541

MARINE MUTUAL INSURANCE SCRIP.

an& itlining journal.

insurance

Mting.
Marine

1365.

CHRONICLE.

Companies.

Bid.

Royal Copper....
Quai’tz Hill
Consol. Gregory Gold.

1 00

Isle

N. J. Central Copper.
Aztec Copper
Clute Lead
New York Gold
Gunnell Gold
Huron Copper

Smith & Parmelee...
Knowlton Copper....

km

Asked.
11 50
1 75
8 75

1 00

60

25
1 50
70

4 00

5 00

50

Companies.

Bid.

fBoston Copper

Asked.

9 00

Corydon Gold
Eagle Gold
iPaihunkv Coal
!Canada Copper
i

75

jKansas-Color’do Gold
Gold Mining of Col’do
Hammell Gold
Manhattan Gold
Minnesota Copper ...
Missouri & Pa. Gold.

>■

THE CHRONICLE.

542
TABLE OF LETTER POSTAGES TO FOREIGN
COUNTRIES.
CSPThe Asterisk (*) indicates that in cases where
It is prefixed, unless the letter be registered, prepay¬
ment is optional; in all other cases prepayment is re¬

fill re<l

Not Not
Exc. Exc.

rCountries.

£

o.

ets.

Acapulco
Aden, British Mail, via Southampton

10
...

Alexandria, Prussian closed mail (if
mail
French

do
do

83
*38

prepaid 86c).,
by Bremen or Hamburg

do

io.
cts.

mail..

Algeria, French mail
*15
Arabia, British mail, via Southampton ...
Marseilles....

do

do

Ar dentine

39

Republic, via England

33
45

30

...

via

39

Co.) *80 *60
50 102

mail via Trieste

Austria and its States,

55

Prussian closed
mail

*30

Prussian closed

do

do

ml. when

do

"do

by Brem.

or

prp’d
Hamb’g

...

28

...

"60

>

by Bremen or Hamb'g mail
French mail

closed mail, via
open mail,
American

...

28

*15

*21 *42

England,

*27

5

by
21

do

do

Trir.ce
do

*30
28

...

Brunswick, Prussian mail
when
or

prep’d
Hamb’g ml.

...

*30
28

...

*15

do
French mail.
*21 *42
Buenos Ayres, via England
45
do
via France by French
mail from Bordeaux..
80
60

Canada

...

Canary Islands, via England
Cape of Good Hope, Brit, mail, via
Southampton

38

Brit, mail via




*10

45

80

do
do

Hamburg mail

...

...

*30

do

open mail,
British pkt

French mail.

do,
do

42

*15

do
do

by

Bremen

...

mail

or

...

6

28
*30

...

28

.

83

t.

by mail to San

8

Francisco
New Zealand,

British mail, via South¬

hampton...

83

r

Mars’ls 89 45
*80 *60
Nicaragu, Pacific slope, via Panama ... 10
do
Gulf Coast of
84
Norway, Prus. closed mail, (if p’paid,
British mail, via
French mail..

do
do

42c

*15

18

Marseilles
89 45
Frenchmail.... *30*60

do
do

*30

*21 *42

prepaid
Hamburg

22

New

5

when

...

*10
10

Granada, (except Aspinwall and
Panama,)
New South Wales, British mail, via
*35
Southampton...
do
do
\ Biiiish mail, via
21-

Bremen mail
Prussian closed mail
do
do when

do

28

Newfoundland....

*10

,

60

*21 *42,
Netherlands, The, French mail
do
open mail, via Lon.,
by Amer. pkt. „
21
do
open mail, via Lon.,
by British pkt
5

via London, by

Hanover, Prussian closed mail.
do
do

80
...

New Brunswick.

London, by-

French mail

45

do

21

Hamburg

prepaid

*21 *42

Frenchmail.... *21*42

do

from N. York....

from New York

do

28

*15

from Bordeaux

*15
24
1

*30
...

Montevideo, via England
do
via France, by Frn’k mail

Hamburg, by Hamburg" mail, direct
do
do
do

60

10

..

...

...

open mail, via
American pkt

45

(Strelitz and Schwerin,)

do

by Bremen and
Hamburg mail.
Nassau, N. Prov., by direct steamer

*42

do

39
30

(Strelitz and Schwerin,)
by Bremen or Hamburg

*21 *42
*15

*30 *60

mail

45
88

...

34

Prussian closed mail
do when ppaid

do
do--

*28
*15

*24

or

5
*30 *60

places excep:ed above
Mecklenburg, (Strelitz and Schwerin,)

Naples, Kingdom of, Prus. clos’d mail

paid. 40c)
by Bremen

21
...

to

mail

Pi its. closed mail (if

French mail

42

and Pacific coast
do

10

do
do

21

mail,.

mail, via Lond.
by American pkt
op. mail, via Brit, pkt

do
via Marseilles
Frenchmail.....

do
do

*30

Guatemala
German States,

French mail
Bremen mail

*22
87
33

open

French mail

33

45

do
do
do

French

Mauritius, British mail, via South’ptn

*15 *30

Gaudaloupe, via England

)

or Hamb’g mail, ...
French mail
*83
Nova Scotia—see Brit. N. American
Pro vs
*

do
do

by Bremen

46

*8S

66
mail..v
*21*42
Hayti, via England
45
.....
*21 *42
37 Holland, French mail
do
..
Oldenburg, Prus. closed mail, (if preopen mail, via London, by
60
American pkt.,.,.
paid, 28c)........ •#••• •«*
21
dot

53

Verde Islands, via England 29
in Fch, mail, via
Bord’x and Lisbon

60
34

33

45

Marseilles,
do

or

29

Mexico, (except Y’ucatan, Matamoras

Great Britain and Ireland

....

do

Bremen

do

do

do

72

Greece, Prussian closed mail, (if pre¬

do
do
do
when prep’d ...
Bremen mail
*10
do
do
*15
Hamburg mail
do
French mail
*21 *42
Brit. A. Am. Prov., except Canada and
New Brunsw’k not over 3,000 m.
*10
do
do
do
exceeding 3,000 m. ... *15

tpe de
do

Prussian closed mail...-.
do
do
when

do
do

Duchy, Hamburg

mail...

*21 *42

*33 *66

Bremen, Prussian closed mail,

do

Fraukfort, French mail

45

*40

.•

France, in Fch mail from

40

...
...

#15

....

Grand

Madeira, Island of, via England....

64

islands/via England

Duchy, Bremen

Martinique, via England

30

France

*21 *42

Grand
mail

68

36

via Trieste..

French mail

Duchy, French

mail

5

Hamb’g mail,

or

(except Luxemburgh)
Hamburg mail....
Gibraltar, French mail
do
open mail, via London, by
Amn. pkt
do
open mail by British pkt

(if

Bordeaux

do

by Br'n

do
Ecuador
Falkland

*21 *42

18

by Brem.

do

28

Grand

Malta, Island of,

...

Br’n or Hamb’g mail, via
Marseilles and Suez....

mail, when pre¬

paid

Majorca and Minorca, British mail;

(Eng- possessions.) Prus.

by

#39

Duchy, Prussian

closed

21

closed mail, via Trieste

5

84

do

do

prepaid, 28c)

Bogota, New Granada

do

*35
*20

pack’t
open mail, via London, by
British packet
Prussia closed mail, via

by

Bolivia
L

45

...

*15
#21 *42

closed mail

Grand

do

*27 *54

*42

*

Hamburg

or

Luxumburg, Grand Duchy, Prussian

do

Gambia, via England

by

*30 *60

Brazils, via England,

mail
Frenchmail

10
10

prepaid
‘21

French mail

by Bremen

do

...

...

39

Liberia, British mail

,

'

*

via Marseilles

do

6

49
45
5g
gQ
^

..,

Lombardy, Prussian closed mail, (if
prepaid, 40c)

21

American

via London, by

packet
do
open mail, via London,
British packet
Belgrade, open mail, via London,
American packet
do
open mail, via London,
British packet
do
by French mail,
Beyrout Prussian closed mail,
prepaid,'' 38cts)
do

...

*21 *42

Belgium, French mail
do
do

*30

when prepaid

do

*32

Indies, open mail, via London, by

63

30

Bavaria, Prussian closed mail
do
do
do

...

...

,

Eng-

French mail

.

French mail...

do

prov.

Marseilles,

*40

*gg

...

85

do

do
do

3

do

Denmark, Prus. closed mail (if pre¬
paid, 33cts).
do
by Brem. or Hmb’g mail

.

do
do
French mail

,

21
Brit, packet .
5
•...
*15 *30

do
do
do
French mail,
Costa Rica..
Cuba
Curacoa via England

in
Italy)Fch.mail.... *21 *47
Azores Island, British mail via Por.
29 82
Baden, Prussian closed mail (if prep’d
2Scts)
*30
do Bremen or Hamburg mail
*15
do Freuch mail
*21 *4^2
Bahamas, by direct st’r from N. Y. ...
5
Batavia, British mail via Southmnt’n ... 45
do
do

lan<1

'

4g

*39 #gg

Japan, British mail, via Southampton

...

by Br’n or Hmb’g mail.
open mail, via London, by
Am. packet.....
open mail, via London, by
Brit, packet

*15

do (except

60

*30 *60

Corsica, British mail by Am. packet

East

mail
do

prepaid, 88c)

do

72

30

French mail
British mail, via

gg
go

39

(if prepaid, 36c).....

do
40

’go

mail....
mail, via

Marseilles

<

Hmb’g mail, via

or

*27*54

Ionian Islands, Prussian closed mail,

Corfu—see Ionoan Islands

by Bremen and Harnb’g

do

;

55

Freuch mail

45
5

or Hanib’g mail
Marseilles and Suez...

53 I

Marseilles and Suez........
French mail

do

33

by private ship from New

by Beem.

by Br’n

do
do
do

10

do
do

45

ml.

°

.'..*25

do
Honduras
Indian Archipelago, French
do
British

45
34

...

by mail to San Fran., thence
by private ship
Constantinople, Prus. closed mail, (if

60

Aspinwall

York or Boston
Fch. imra.il (S'th Austr’a

Marseilles
do Br’n or Hmb’g

39

°

_

mail
Frenchmail

60

33

...

do

do
do

45'

do

Brit, mail, via Southampton
do
Marseilles

do
do

Ascension, via England

Australia, British mail via Sth’mpt’n
do
do
Marseilles

5
30

io.
cts.

”*

Holland, open mail, via London, by
British pkt
Holstein, Prussian closed mail, (if prepaid, 83c).
do
by Bremen or Hamburg

21

French mail

*°Cts.

10

Sloop, via Panama .».
Ceylon, open mail, via Loudon, by
American packet
do
open mail, via London, by
British packet..
do
do
do
Chili

Not Not

Esc.

'

Countries.

cts.

C. Am. Pac.

45

via France, in French
mail from Bordeaux

do

cts.

do

by Am. pkt
open mail, via England,
by British pkt.

de

Countries.

via Trieste

mail, via England,

open

Not Not
Exc. Exc.
I o. i o.

China, Brit, mail via Southampton
*30
*30 *60

[October 21,1865.

French

.

THE

October 21, 1865.]

543

CHRONICLE.

=2
Not Not
Exc. Exc.

i o.
cts.

Countries.

Oldenburg, by

Bremen or Hamburg

*13
*42

mail

*21

French mail

do

•”

Panama

Paraguay,

10

•••

British mail, via England.

45

...

British mail, via
Southampton

...

.

Marseilles

French

do

do

paid, 35c.).
by Bremen or

do

by French mail

Porto

Rico.

*60

33

45

30

do
do
do
Rom. or
do
do

Prussian closed mail
do
do when prep.
by Bremen or Hamburg mail
French mail

or

French mail

Hamb’g mail.'.

...

...

*21

Company insures against Marine Risks on
Vessels, Freight, and Cargo; also, against Inland
Navigation Risks.
Premiums paid in gold will he entitled to a return
premium in gold.

44

*28

Francisco;

No. *108
Cash Capital.'
Assets July 1,

cl’d mail (if
prepaid, 40c.)...

Sardinian States, Prus.

•

•

Saxe-Altenburg, Prussian closed mail

mium
Risks

rates of pre¬
against all Marine and Inland Navigation
Cargo or Freight; also against loss or dam¬

on

age by Fire.
If Premiums are paid in Gold, Losses will be paid
in Gold.
The Assured receive tweuty-five per cent of the net

FIFTY PER CENT.

profits, without incurring any liability, or in lieu
thereof, at their option, a liberal discount upon the
premium.
All losses equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
Scrip Dividend declared Jan. 10. 1855,

•

•

i

•

do

OFFICE OF TIIE

*

burg mail..

*30
28

,

,

,

*15
*30

cl’d

in
28
do
when pre.
*15
bv Brem. or Ham. in.
*21 *42
French mail

do
do
do

•

•

Schleswig, by Brem.

or

•

•

%

.

.

.

*35

do

French mail
open

•

m’l via Lon. by
packet..

Amer.

•

21

PLEASANT

AND

RARITAN AND DELAWARE BAY RAILROAD.
NEW YORK

From Pier 3, N. R.,

TO

MORRIS, Preft.
Sec’y,

156

'NOS.

AND

158 BROADWAY,

lation
Losses

a. m.,

"

sation.

many
want

with

N.

No. 12 Wall Street.

Rfmlr?4PITTAL’
SURPLLS, JANUARY

1st, 1S65

$1,000,000

V

et

Y.

sale at the various Railroad
Offices and Agencies.

MARINE RISKS AND SPECIAL VOYAGES.

Dry Goods.
GUITERMAN

2,550,000
1,000,000




„

.

Medical Examiner.

,

.

Secretaries,

63 LEONARD

) ISAAC

NEW YORK.

SfcYMOUl!

&LAUY~

Manufacturers of Ruches and
ISTett Goods.
llEADE STREET,

63

No.

UT

STAIRS,

NEW YORK

EDWARD L. CORLIES, Auctioneer.

By Kobbe & Corlies,

Stores Nos. 87 and
.

-'

SO LEONARD Street.

TUESDAY, Oct. 24,

At 10 o'clock, at the salesrooms,
LARGE AND SPECIAL SALE
OF

IRISH LINENS AND LINEN
a

GOODS,

credit of four months, for approved endorse^
PPaper, for all sums of $100 and upward.

ALSO,

HOSIERY AND HOSIERY
Catalogue and samples on

GOODS, GLOVES, &<*
the morning of sale.

OF

ST. ETIENNE AND

BASLE RIBBONS, MILLINE*

RY, GOODS SILKS, VELVETS, &c.,

On a'credit of four months,

S0MAISS

’

At 10 o'clock, at tue

ABBATT,
W. MORRIS.

Actuary,

ST.,

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25,
salesrooms,
LARGE AND ATTRACTIVE SALE

1st, 1865, oyer $13,500,0003

McCURDY, Vice-President.

j-TI1Eo.

OF

Shawls, Dress Goods, & Scarfs,

On

FREDERICK S. WINSTON, President.

a

BROTHERS,

IMPORTERS

C. Y. Wemfle, Secretary
S. N. Stebbins, Actuary.

COMPANY OF NEW YORK.

R. A.

and Steamboat Tick>

Policies are granted insuring against death by accG
dent while sailing in steamer or sailing vessels; also
for special voyages.
Full information, together with Tables of Rates, &c.,
can be obtained at the Home Office, or by application
to the State Agent.

■»

rIMIE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE
CASH ASSETS, Sept.

*

«

750',000

Henry Stokes, Pres.
J. S. Halsey, Ass. Sec.
Abram DuBois,

270,353

Losses equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
Chartered 1850.
Cash Dividends paid in 15 years,
253 per cent.
•
’
JONATHAN 3). STEELE, President.

a

TRAVELERS’ INSURANCE TICKETS
any length of time, from one day to twelve months

families, once wealthy, have thus been saved

X

COMPENSATION,

general Accident Policy for
TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS,
Weekly Compensation of
TEN DOLLARS,

;

policies that would have been forfeited for
of means to continue them, and. in several in¬

stances,

Fire Insurance Company,

granted
WITH

from utter ruin.

NIAGARA

If

-

connecting with trains for Red Bank, Long Branch,
From the great success of this Company, they are
Manchester, Tom's River, Barnegat and Tuckerton ; enabled to oiler superior advani ages to policy-holders.
and 4:15 p. m. for Highlands, Middletown. Red Bank,
Life-policies
Shrewsbury, Eatontown, Ocean Port, Brancliport, one, five, or tenare issued, payable in annual, or in
annual, installments; also, non-for¬
Long Branch, Shark River. Fanningdale, Squampum, feiture endowment policies, payable in ten annual
Bergen. Manchester and Tom’s River. Fare to Longpayments, which are paid at death, or on arriving at
Branch, $1.
any particular age.
Life insurance, as an investment,
The splendid steamer JESSE HOYT will leave as
has no superior, as it has saved millions of dollars to
above daily, at 10:45 a. m. for Camden direct,
through the insured, and thousands of families from ruin.
in five hours. Fare, $2. Excursion tickets, good for
Dividends are paid to policy-holders, thus enabling
three days, $3.
them to continue their policies, if otherwise unable
From Camden, take the West Jersey Railroad for
to do so.
Cape May and all parts of West Jersey.
This favorable feature has been the means of saving

Insurance.

eluding the travelers' risk. If issued
WITHOUT COMPENSATION,
they provide for death, if caused by accident; but in
case of injury only, the insured receives no compen-

$2,500,000

lioldcrs

SCSE,

granted, covering accidents of all descriptions, in

LIFE I NS UR-

’•
Capital
Cask Capital and Accumu¬

pro

GENERAL ACCIDENT POLICIES
are

ANCE COMPANY.

Paid
....
Dividends l*aid to Policy-

CAMDEN,

Daily, at 11:45

,

nPITE MANHATTAN

SOIMEB

TRAVEL.

damage by Fire

B. C.

X
CHEAP

$5,000,000.00
paid iu, & Surplus, 885,040,57

Wat. M. Whitney

All the profits in thf*

plan,

rata among the Policy
Holders.
policies to be incontestable after five
years from date, and non-forfeitable after two annual
payments. A loau of one-third of the amount of premiums will be made; also, thirty days’ grace given
payment of premiums.

divided

are on

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL

.

...

York, July 1st, 1865.

Policies of Insurance against loss or
issued on the most favorable 'T,e*-n*,s

the Mutual

are
All

for

CASH CAPITAL,

on

department

Street.

Pine
New

47
*21 *42

Sicilies, The Two, Prus. closed mail.
do

31

issued

secures a

Coiiijiainj,

Sicmnnirc

•

mail (if

prepaid, 33c.)

FIRE AND INLAND

•

*25
*27 *54

Ham, mail..

French mail.
Prussian closed

do
do

•

do French mail.. *21 *42

Saxony, King, of, Prus.

do
do

•

i

do
when pre.
do Brem. or Ham-

do

do
do
do

•

.

Agent.

injury causing disability, the insured receives a weekly
compensation until he is able to attend to his business,
such time not to exceed twenty-six weeks. The policy
covets all foi ms of Dislocations, Broken Bones. Sprains,
Bruises, Cuts, Gunshot Wounds, Burns and Scalds,
Bites ot Dogs; Assaults by Burglers, Robbers, or Mur¬
derers, the,action of Lightningor Sun-stioke,the effects
of Explosions. Floods, and Suffocation by Drowning or
Chunking, and all other kinds of accidents.
TEN DOLLARS

*30

...

Agencies.

the full amount assured is payable to tho family in
case of death caused by accident and occuring within
three months from the date of injury. Or, in case of

JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM. President.
ROBERT M. C. GRAHAM, Vice President,
EDWARD A. STANSBURY, 2d Vice Pres.
John C. Goodp.idge, Secretary.

•

28
do when pre.
*15
by Bre. or Ham. mail
*21 *42
French mail

do
do

1865.

This Company insures, at customary

do
French mail...... *21 *42
do
*23
do
Brem. or Ham. mail
do
*15 *3<>
Savoy, District of

do
do

are

$1,000,000
1,400,000

,

Teats, M.D., Medical Examiner.

E. H. Jones, Superintendent of
E. F. Folgek, General II ail way

LIFE AND ENDOWMENT POLICIES

Broadway, New York.

*37
*29
*60

...

WM. E. PRINCE, Vice-President.

„

S.

*42

...

Wm. II. Webb,
Henry J. Raymond,
Silas C. Herring,
Nicholas E. Smith,
Samuel W. Truslow,
Jamks R. Dow,
Richard A. McCurdy.
EDWARD A. JONES, President.

METROPOLITAN INSURANCE CO.,

*54

Joskpii Wilde,
A. A. Low,
Ciias. Curtiss,
Asher S. Mills,

ASHER S. MILLS. Secr^v
T. B. VAN BUKEN, Treasurer.

MARINE AND FIRE INSURANCE.

28

*15
*42

*42

*30

Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Nleiningen and
Weimar, Pr. cl’d m.

$2,383,487 45

MOSES H. GRINNELL, Preset.
EDWARD P. ANTHONY, Vice-Pres't
Isaac H. Walker, Secy.

Orison Blunt,
Howell Smith,
F. H. Lummus,
Wm. E. Princk,
Sylvester Teats,

Edward A. Junks,
Samukl J. Glasskt,
T. B. Van Bcrf.n,
Sylykstkr M. Bkard,
Robn rt Crowley,
William Ooit,
J. C. Dimmick,
IIk.nry Clkws,
Albert Wright,
John A. Isklin,
H. P. Freeman,

This

60

Sandwich Islands, by mail to San

do
do
do

...

$500,000

Capital
DIRECTORS:

*30

Prussian closed mail (if
prepaid, 40c.)
Russia, Prussian closed mail (if pre¬
do

34

30

Romagna,

do

ASSETS,Oct. 4, 1S64

42

Pap. States Prus. closed mail ...
do
French mail.,.. *2.7
do
Bremen or Ham¬
burg mail

paid. 35c.)
by Bremen

Authorized

49 WALL STREET.

42

21

by French mail, via Behobia
do via Bord’x tfe Lis.

Prussia,

*20

*30

Portugal, British mail, via England..
do
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail
do
do

OF NEW YORK.
OFFICE, 243 BROADWAY.

(INSURANCE BUILDINGS,)

*37
...

British mail, via Havana.

Travelers’ Insurance Co,

DIVIDEND THIRTY PER CENT.

pre¬

Hamb’g mail.

do

Bktiuil 3fnsramt
COMPANY,

53
60

30

closed mail (if

Poland, Prussian

S UN

/

LIFE

AND

45

British mail, via

do

do

NATIONAL

22

Peru

Philippine Islands,

Insurance.

Insurance.

i o.
cts.

.

for approved endorsed

notes, for all sums oyer

i

$100,

544

THE CHRONICLE.

Banks and Bankers.

Banks and Bankers.

Bankers.
COR. OF PINE and NASSAU

BANKERS,

»

Negotiate Loans and Business Paper, make Collec¬
tions, purchase and sell Government and other Securi¬
ties on Commission, receive money on deposit and
allow interest at the rate of four per cent per annum,
on daily balances which
may be drawn at anytime;
or

will issue Certificates of
en demand.

Deposit beariug interest

JOHN J. CiSCO. of the U. S.
JOHM ASIIFIELD CISCO.

ISSUE

Circular Notes

STREET, NEW YORK.

payable

Fire Insurance.

DUNCAN, SHERMAN & CO.,

John J. Cisco & Son,
No. 83 WALL

[October 21,1865.

For the

FIRE

Circular Letters of

and

INSURANCE CO.

Credit,

of Travelers abroad and in the United
available in all the principal cities of the
use

No. 4 WALL

States,
world; also,

STREET, N. Y
CASH CAPITAL,
$500,000*

Commercial Credits,
For

Treasury in N. Y.

STS.,

in

Europe, east of the Cape of Good Hope,
West Indies, South America, and the United States.
u»e

AGENCyT- BANK

1

OF BRITISH NORTH

AMERICA.

L. P. Morton & Co.,

Exchange bought and sold

T II E

WALL STREET,

prepared

to

Union Bank of

London,

in sums to suit purchasers; and also to
issue Circular Letters of Credit, on this

Bank, for Travellers’ use.
Government Securities, Stocks and
Bonds bought and sold on Commission.
Orders for Securities executed abroad.

Interest allowed

Deposits, subject to
Cheques at sight.
Prompt attention given to the Collec
on

rPHE

ing interest

Agency, and Designated Deposi¬

JOSEPH U. OR VIS, Pres’t

NO. 8 4 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

i

S!

!

favorable terms.

CO.

WORTH, Cashier.

j pointed Freight Agents of the Pacific Mail SteamI ship Company, w'e are now
prepared to receive
Freights for California.
messenger,
banker, i ton Territory, SandwichOregon, Nevada, WashingIslands, Central America
No.
139.
J and Western Coast of South America.
^
BROADWAY,
For rates apply at our office. No. S4
Broadway or
j Freight Office on dock, foot of Canal street.

York, August, 21. lSlio.

j.

•

I street."

JOHN

MUNROE

AJIEIIICAX
No. 5

tory of the United Slates.

CO.,

Steamers will sail on.the 1st, 11th and 21st of
I
each
month: those dates falling on
Gold Bonds and Stocks of all descriptions bought
Sunday, on preceding
; Saturday.
and sold on commission.
No stow freight received on day of
Accounts of Banks, Bankers, and individuals resailing.
1
Freight must be delivered on dock foot of Canal
ceived on favorable terms. g
~

Dividends, Drafts, &c

Government

|

Seven-thirty Loan Agent

*

tion of

on

J. L.

hT

"

WELLS, FARGO &

1
OF NEW YORK.
CAPIT \L.... $2,000,000 | SURPLUS.... $1-200,000
This Bank will issue Certificates o/ Deposit bear¬
New

’

OFFICE OF

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
$1,000,000
RICHARD BEiJRY, President.
ANTHONY HALSEY, Cashier.

I NEW YORK AND CALIFORNIA EXPRESS AND
NATIONAL PARK BANK
EXCHANGE COG PAN A,

.

draw Sterling Bills of
or sixty days, on the

Express and Steamship Co’s.

NATIONAL BANK.

291

t

Exchange, at sight,

MAURICE 111LGEK, President.
RUDOLPH GARRIGUE, Vice-Pres.
J( >11X E. K AI i L, aSecretary.

London and collec¬

T RAD *ES MENS

CAPITAL

NEW YORK.
Are

on

tions made in Great Britain and the colonies. Drafts
issued on Canada, Nova Scotia, New-Brunswick,
British Columbia and San Francisco.
Drafts for
small sums issued on Ireland and Scotland.

Bankers,
35

No. 2*1 PINE STREET.
WALTER WATSON, CLARENCE M. MYLREA,
and JAMES GOLDIE. Agents.

WITH A LARGE SLRTLL&
THIS COMPANY INSURES PROPERTY OF ALL
RINDS AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE BY
I IKE, ON FAVORABLE TERMS.

RUE

DE

Sl

|

Co.,

Broadway.

Our usual
Express will be sent by each
steamer, and will close at 10 a. m., on
sailing days.
Our Letter Bags will close at 11>£ a. m. For
con! venienee of our up-town
customers, a letter

BANKERS,
LA

Bills of Lading will be issued at No. 84

Package

I

i

PAIX, PARIS,

bag
No. 8 WALL ST It KMT, NEW YORK,
! be kept at the Metropolitan Hotel, and on the will
dock
Issue Circular Letters of Creel I lor Tre-velers in all i foot of Canal street.
<'< mrr ereiai Credits. j
parts of Europe, etc., etc.
Our franked envelopes will be on sale at the office
! of the hotel, and at our
offices, No. 84
.

JOHN T. HILL, Cash’r

Broadway and
street clock.
All letters sent through us must be in Government
BANKERS,
I envelopes.
19 & 21 Nassau Street, New York.
Sight Exchange on San Francisco for sale.
Telegraphic transfers of money made to all point!
RECEIVE DEPOSITS FROM BANKS, BANKERS | reached
by the wires on West Const.
v
ANi) OTHERS,
California Coupons bought at best rates,
i
And allow Interest on balances at the rate of Four per
Exchange on Dublin and London-. £i and
i On Paris, in sums to suit. For sale bv ' upward!,
cent

CULVER PENN & COf,

THE

■

NINTH NATIONAL BANK

j Canal

j

of the

563

City of New York,

BROADWAY, CORNER OF FRANKLIN ST.

A.

Takes New England money at 1-10 and New York
titatc }£ per cent, discount.
Checks on Albany, Troy, Boston,
Philadelphia,
tod Baltimore at par.
Interest collected, aud credited in Gold or Curren¬
cy as directed.

of

The United States 5 per cent., one
year, and two
year, and two year Coupou Notes, received on de¬

posit from regular dealers,

or

those

choosing

to be¬

market rates.
Will deliver new Fractional
Currency, at your
Bank, in sums not less than $1,000, per Express,
and bags of $50 1 cent and 2 cent, and $30 3 cent

come so at

coin, free of charge.

The above is in reply to numerous
terms. Any further information

undersigned.
The paid up Capital of this Bank
DOLLARS, with a large surplus,
JT. U.

inquiries for
by writing to the

PHILADELPHIA, PF.NN.,
J. W.

B

of

LUCKEY,

quick dispatch. Government and other securities
Bought and sold. Possessing every facility, will ex¬

ecute all orders and commissions at the
very
market rates. Refer by permission to S. C.

best

Thomp¬
Pres. 1st Nat- Bk., N. Y.. A. N. Stout, Pres. Nat.
Shoe & Leath B k, N. Y.. W. H.
Johnson, Pres. Han.
Bk., N. Y., James Buell, Pres. Imp. & Trad. Nat.
Bk.,
N. Y., S. K. Green, Pres. 3d-av.
Savings Bk., N. Y.,
N. L. Buxton, Irving Savings Bk., N.
Y., Hon. Geo.
son,

Opdyke. Ex-Mayor, N. Y., Hon. James
Harper, Ex-




TOHBEY, Cashier.

HUTCHINGS
•

BADGER,

BANKING AND EXCHANGE

& CO.

j'> MEXICAN
Express

Company.

Capital

$2,000,000

Shares

OFFICE,

20

PER

CENT

$100 each.

PAID

ON

SUBSCRIPTION.

{36 DEARBORN St., CHICAGO, ILL.

Trustees.

Collections made

on all parts of the Northwest.
Stocks, Bonds, Gold, and Government Securities
bought and sold on commission, either in New York
or Chicago, and carried on
margins when desired.
New York correspondent and reference,

Messrs. L. S. LAWRENCE & CO.

B URNETT, DRAKE
BANKERS,

&

CO,

BOSTON.
GOLD, STOCK, AND BOND BROKERS.
Personal attention given to the purchase and sale of

Stocks and Bonds

at

the boston Brokers’ Board.

Miscellaneous.
THE.

243 BROADWAY,
Interest allowed on call deposits at the rate of four
per cent; on deposits of three months and over, five
per cent, and six per cent on deposits of six months
and over. Any deposit may be drawn on ten
days’
notice, and interest allowed the eame as deposits on
call. Collections promptly made and returned with

V

liberal

on

terms.

is ONE MILLION

Banking and Collecting- Office

& I.

1 $50J,0t>0

Attends to business of Banks and Bankers

l J. T. HILL., Cashier.
New Yokk. July 22 1S05.

WW,

j Capital,

THE COM EXCUANGE-NATIONAL HANK,

ORVIS, President. '

J. NELSON

)

WHILLDIN, V. Prest. f

Stamps supplied—$20 with 4 $ ct. disc’nt

do
do
do
100
do
4X
do
do
do
1,000
4.%
do
All classes of Government Securities
bought and
sold.
Redeems for National Banks, at
present, without

Charge, using the Bills for the Army.
Receives National Currency at par, put
to credit
nnv Bank, or pays Sight Drafts for it.
't-SO Notes bought and sold at market rates.

WELLS, FARGO

A. G. CATTELL, Pres't.

Terms for Banks and Bankers Accounts:

Revenue

per annum.

DURANGO

E. DE C0URCILL0N....
.City of Mexico.
I, I., HAYES
.416 Broadway, N. Y.
CLARENCE A. SEWARD. .29 Nassau
St., N. Y.
..

,

HENRY SANFORD

59

,

Broadway,N. Y.

I.. \V. WINCHESTER.. .65
Broadway, N. Y.
PETER A. HARGOUS ...8 Pine
St., N. Y.
HENRY C, PLANT...... Augusta, Ga.
JOHN HOEY
59 Broadway, N. Y.
B, HAYNES
San Francisco,Cal.
HENRY R. MORGAN....24
Broadway, N. Y.
ISAIAH BABCOCK
69
.

Broadway, N. Y.

Agency for sa<eof Stock in New York, Office
of WILMERL ING, CORN WELL & IIECKSCHER,
No. 5 New St.
C»v»:iwh1' fur the
Company, BLATCHFORD,
SEWARD & GRISWOLD, No. 29 Nassau St.

SILVER MINES. North American
Office« No, 73 WILLIAM ST„ JV. Y,

D. VAN
No. 192

THE

NOSTRAND,

BROADWAY,
PUBLISHER AND IMPORTER

Mining & Engineering Works,
Offers for sale

large selection of American and For¬
eign Standard and Late Book*.
a

%* Send for circulars,

NEW STEAMSHIP LINE‘BETWEEN
NEW YORK AND BREMEN.

Working Capital
IN

OF

in

Lloyd.

-

-

$1,000,000

10,000 SHARES OF $100 EACH,

SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR SHARES, SINGLY OB
lots, received and prospectuses furnished at the

office of the

undersigned

every

hours of 10 A, >J, and i P, M,

day, between thi
\


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102