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MERCHANTS’

HUNT’S

MAGAZINE,

§Uttns paper,
AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1873.

VOL. ] 7.

CONTEP) r s.
THE CHRONICLE. *
The Bank

Changes

of England and our

613
614
615

Improvement
Resumption Near‘i

Monetary
Is
Increase

of the Public Debt

in

Redeeming

the

Agents of National Banks....
Latest Monetary and. Commercial

617

.'

English News

Current Topics
Financial Review of the Month
615 Commercial and
of October
News
The Debt Statement for Novem¬
ber, 1873
617
THE BANKERS’ GAZETTE.

Miscellaneous

Quotations of Stocks and Bonds
New York Local Securities..
..
Investments and State, City and
Foreign
Exchange, Boston
621
Corporation Finances
Banks, National Banko, etc.
THE COMMERCIAL TIMES.

624

625

626
633
635

629 \ Dry Goods....
630 J Prices Current.

Cotton
Breaastufts

620
620

•

Money Market, U. S. Securities,
Railway Stocks, Gold Market,

Commercial Epitome

617

632!

®l)c €f)ronul*.
Financial Chronicle is issued on Satur¬
day morning, with the latest news up to midnight of Friday.

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Drafts

THE BANK OF ENGLAND AND OUR MONETARY

IMPROVEMENT.

general aspect of our monetary affairs cominues to
improve, fn some directions “there are surviving indica¬
tions that further trouble may occur, and vague rumors of
foreign complications were industriously circulated yester¬
day by those whose business or whose pleasure it is to
shake public confidence.
The rise of the Bank of England- rate to nine per
The

the London money
market. The purpose of the advance is to relieve the
pressure on the bullion reserve and to check the export of
gold. As Germany has ceased to take gold from England,
the United States offer the only destination to which gold is
flowing at present. Should the movement of gold this
way be stopped it will not embarrass our money market
in the least, though it would give great relief to the Bank of
cent

indicates




a

grave

crisis in

STATES.

NO. 437-

England, whose gold reserve is now below 20 millions
sterling, which is the limit that is never passed without
public anxiety. The high rate will no doubt check the
flow of capital this way, and it ma/ call home foreign
capital now lending here. Should this happen, our money
market will be somewhat drained, but it is believed that
there is not a large amount of call loans liable to this
contingency. Most of the foreign capital here is lending in
a more
permanent way and very little is in demand loans.
If, however, the efforts of the Bank of England may be
expected to fail to attract capital from this side, it will pro¬
bably be otherwise with Germany, from whose plethory of
capital the high rates of interest may attract a considerable
amount to England.
What is of still more importance is
that an import of gold from Germany into England is not
unlikely. The immense hoards of coin which Prussia has
been accumulating for the last two years are lying idle, and
are likely to do so for some time to come.
At least a year
or two more must elapse before the new coinage will be in
common use in Germany, and meanwhile a large part of it
in hank, so ss to be accessible.
Hence, under the attrac
tions of a powerful rate of interest, considerable sums are not
unlikely to gravitate towards London. In some such method
of relief lies, as would appear, the hope of the Bank to avoid
the necessity of appealing to the government for a suspen
sion of its restriction clause, as in 1847, in 1857, and in 1866#
Had the Bank, as the Chronicle ventured to suggest two
years ago, made the sacrifice involved in keeping thirty
millions of reserve instead of twenty millions, it would not
have been at present obliged to inflict on British commerce
and trade the ruinous rate

of

a

of nine per cent,

with

a

prospect

further advance.

market, however, there is but little anxiety
projected from these movements of the Bank of England.
We seem to have advanced beyond the sensitive stage of
convalescence. There are several points of hopeful interest
in the money market.
One of these is the fact that our
banks are growing stronger every day.
Greenbacks are
flowing out of their hiding places. National bank notes are
accumulating. Next week most of our banks will be fully
provided with their legal reserve.
Another gratifying feature is the improvement of pubhc
confidence.
The anxiety and depression prevalent last
week has spent its force, and now an increasing amount of
real solid capital is investing itself in many kinds of securi¬
ties, or is being deposited in bank with a view to such
investments. Of course, it is impossible to predict how
much longer the trouble may in some fitful repressed way
continue, but the monetary situation is full of encouragement.
As to the general course of the money market this Fall,
it is important to bear in mind that one very prolific cause
In

our

money

614
of last

CHRONICLE

THE

We

year’s stringency will be weaker this year.

refer to the railroad borrowers who

eagerly bidding
high rates for money, and absorbing out of the loan market
capital which ought to have been reserved for aceommo.
dation

to

mercantile business.

were

Those railroad borrowers

no longer in favor, the mercantile loans will
benefit of the easier supply of loanable capital.

being

Moreover, there has been such

teel the
„

>

This

given to the expan
suffer, of necessity, a
will diminish the demand for

far

it prevails, to the development

a

check

sion of business that its volume will

notable curtailment.

loans, and will tend,
of

ease

so

as

in the loan market.

Perhaps the weakest point in the financial position just
is the Savings Banks.
These institutions must be
warned in time.
They may have to pay out more money
now

than usual this winter.

Some of their

have allowed themselves to be

managers

it is feared

would

be so

[November8, 1873.

presented at the Treasury within

a

much

more

brief space of time than the resumptionists seem to think.
The prospects of specie payments then virtually depend
the

simple question—is the country nearly ready for
resumption? To answer this several things have to be
considered. In any country where gold is at a premium it is
a fundamental
principle of resumption that it enhances the
value of the dollar in which all contracts throughout the
country are expressed. Everybody who has debts to receive
would be a gainer, while those who have debts to pay would
be losers.
On the debtors resumption would operate as a
tax ; on the creditors as a bonus.
Secondly, it follows from what has been said that before
any attempt at resumption can be safely made without
oppressing the debtor class, and impoverishing the poor for
the benefit of the rich, gold must be at par. Nor must its
descent to par be a mere temporary movement like that
caused here at present by the derangement of the foreign
exchanges. Gold must be at par as its normal average
rate, and the premium must have disappeared forsonu time;
so that the disturbance of contracts may not oppress the
deb'.or class and lay upon them too heavy a share of the
on

persuaded to make invest¬
not so available as they
ought to be. Many of our Savings Banks, we know, have
been admirably managed.
Those which have not been
so fortunate should not lose a moment in
retrieving their
position and making themselves strong.
On the whole, then, the financial outlook is not so dark or common burden.
But this is not all.
Another condition is that the
so
threatening as it has been. We are probably nearing the
outskirts of the storm and shall soon be beyond its reach. country mu«t have an ample reserve of coin stored up for
It is gratifying that, far as the
panic has spread, not a dozen this specific purpose. This is a point of which the resump¬
banks have suspended, and among the mercantile commun¬ tionists are too oblivious. They point to us the 82 millions
ity failures have been few. Nowjthe obvious policy for us all, of gold in the Treasury, But how is that available ? Part
of it belongs to depositors.
whether bankers or merchants, is to grant
Only 55 millions are owned
to every solvent
debtor a cheerful extension as far as possible, so that honest by the Treasury, and that is not held for the redemption of
men
Every dollar of it serves other purposes, and
may have time to turn themselves. The panic has greenbacks.
the whole is a guarantee for the payment of the coin
paralyzed the machinery for exchanges. The distribution
of merchandise and the
moving of the crops have alike been interest on our funded debt, which now amounts to no less
interrupted. Settlement on a large scale for goods unsold than $98,508,498 a year. Now, apart from, this gold
is of course
impossible. A little liberality in the according balance for interest we must have a coin reserve for the work
of delay, a wise concession in the
spirit we have suggested of specie payments and of greenback redemption. No part
will be of no small use in
promoting the return cf healthy of the gold balance held as a guarantee for the payment of the
interest on the public debt can be used for this purpose. A
commercial activity.
sep arate fund, an independent coin reserve, must be pre¬
viously constituted, and this specie reserve must be
IS RESUMPTION NEAR ?
enough not only to provide for the first demand which is
The rapid fall of gold has stirred up a lively anxiety as sure to start
up at the first beginning of resumption, but to
to the approach of resumption, and not a few persons take
away all doubt about the ability of the government to
among us believe that the goal of specie payments is quite pay gold to any extent which may be required. In view
near.
Let u.i Bee what foundation there may be for this of the recent Treasury order in regard to silver coin, this
belief.
need of an ample coin reserve need not be further urged as
It professes chiefly to rest on the fact that gold is at a a
preliminary to any well-considered attempts at specie
lower premium than at any time since June, 1862.
Within payment.
a month
We have by no means exhaysted the list of preparative
gold has fallen from 111 to 106. Another like
decline, we are told, may biing gold down next month to precautions which must go before any successful effort
at resumption.
par. The price is declining. What is to stop it?
Enough has been said, however, to enable
In the next place the resumptionists say the Treasury is us to answer in the negative the inquiry whether specie
ready for specie resumption, even if greenbacks, which payments are near. First of all, the premium on gold has
is denied, should flow in rapidly for payment.
The not disappeared. Its fall is due to the perturbation of the
Treasury holds some 82 millions of gold. Before one-half foreign exchanges. When that cause is removed the gold
of this could be paid out to holders of greenbacks over the premium will, for aught we know, rise with a rebound.
In
counter, months would elapse, and the customs duties would other words, it is not our paper currency that is perma¬
yield as much more.” The gold balance of the Treasury nently gaining in value, but it is gold as a commodity that
would be thus replenished as fast as the redemption of is for the moment cheapening in value. And when this
greenbacks over the counter would drain it. All the time abnormal state of the foreign exchanges is over, gold and
this Treasury redemption was going on, greenbacks would greenbacks may return perhaps to their old levels, and will
pass freely in exchange for coin, and resumption would be show a considerable disparity.
However this
an
may turn
out, it is cert2in that
accomplished fact.
Now we agree at once with these men that if the country neither the Treasury nor the banks have any adequate
were
ready for specie resumption there might be no over¬ reserve of coin available for the purpose of attempting the
whelming Influx of greenbacks sent for redemption in coin at work of resumption. The greenbacks outstanding are SGI
the Treasury.
But on the contrary we believe that if the millions. The bank note aggregate is S48 millions. On
attempt were made prematurely, 80 or 100 millions of the morning of specie resumption the whole of this mass of
greenbacks or more could be presented for payment, and currency, amounting to 709 millions of dollars, will become
ments in such

“




securities

as

are

November
'x

*

.

615

THE CHRONICLE

8,1873.]
—

demand in coin. How large an amount of coin
reserve the Treasury should hold, and how large a sum the
banks should hold in order to make resumption safe and
permanent, it is not easy to determine. What is certain is
that the amassing of such a sum ot coin has not as yet been
fairly begun among us, and it offers one of the most formid¬
able impediments in the way of early resumption.
payable on

INCREASE OF THE PUBLIC DEBT.

Considerable discussion has been awakened by the
November statement of the public debt which appears to

they criticize is made out in no unusual manner.
apply equally to former debt schedules,
and are rather a trivial dispute about the method of book¬
keeping practiced in the Treasury, which we have no desire
to discuss, than about the substantial accuracy of the
statement that during the month of October we have made
an
addition to the national debt of $3,039,000, and that
statement

Th^ir strictures

owing to the pressure of the panic, the revenue has fallen
off, while the disbursements have increased, so that the
Treasury has had to raise funds by issuing
millions of
currency, 5 millions being greenbacks, and the rest frac¬
tional notes.

Such a new policy offers no very auspicious opening
been somewhat misrepresented. An analysis of the
of the fiscal year. But in view of the violence of the
official figures which are given elsewhere may therefore be
financial storm which has just swept over the country, we
of service. The total debt, as will be seen, is 2,141 millions
have

have reason for gratification that things are no worse.
2,138 millions on the 1st of October. This shows
During the first four months of the fiscal year we have
an apparent increase of 3 millions during the panic of the
made a net decrease of the debt to the amount of
past month. By some persons the increase is affirmed to
be more apparent than real.
The debt is at present com¬ $4,985,000. Since March, 18G9, the total decrease has
been $383,630,000, involving a diminution of gold interest
prised under the following general heads :
to the extent of $25,746,852 a year.
This achievement is
COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE PUBLIC DEBT, OCT. AND NOV., 1873,
Oct. 1,
Nov. 1.
without a parallel in the history of financial statesmanship,

against

.

.

-

$489,272,300
1.284,098,050

Funded 5 per cents
Funded 6 per cents

and it offers

gation of our

$1,723,870,350

Total funded debt...

of

tranquillizing suggestions in miti¬
disappointment at the temporary slight increase
us

some

of our debt.
which has been started is tbe funding
Total debt
$2,141,838,47q of the debt. There is such a perplexing multiplicity of our
From this table it appears that the funded debt has been public obligations, we are often told, that they ought to be
almost stationary during the month.
The rest of the unified into one funded obligation like the consols of
increase is in the unfunded obligations. These compare as England and the rentes of France. To give novelty to this
follows:
project the method of terminable annuities is suggested.
AND NOVEMBER, 1873.
UNFUNDED
It is now several years since we proposed this economical
Oct. 1, 1873.
Nov. 1,1873.
We are glad to see it revived, and
Greenbacks
$361,031,948 expedient of annuities.
Fractional currency
47,876,250 we
hope it will be thoroughly discussed. The time may not
678,000
Four per cents
be very distant when it will be found practicable.
At
Past due debt
14,226,290
Accrued interest
39,706,595 present, as heretofore, the scheme appears to be met by two
418,403,126

Unfunded debt.....

currency and
Another question
our

DEBT OCTOBER

Navy pension fund

14,000,000

Gold notes

27,569,880

Total

Less gold

j*

difficulties. First, there is not sufficient demand for such

annuities in this country. And secondly, in foreign coun^
$505,088,863 tries where annuities are in demand for terms of years,

.

balances

82,313,581

We have
thought, however, that before many years have passed
Leas currency balances...
4,312,156
foreign purchasers of terminable annuities must of necessity
Total unfunded debt.,
$418,463,126 become sufficiently free from prejudice to prefer an annuity
The greenbacks in this table show an increase of 5 mil¬ endorsed by the United States .Government to one bearing
lions, and the fractional currency an increase of 1£ millions. the simple endorsement of some private corporation.
there is

Total

a

competing supply from other sources.

$422,775,282

-Thus the

Treasury has borrowed 6£ millions by the issue Moreover, in our own country there are immense sums of
ot new currency.
But on the other hand the currency bal¬ money belonging to widows and orphans which should not
the Treasury "has risen 1 million, and the gold and must not be left to invest itself recklessly and helplessly
ance in
balance 2 millions. Moreover the Treasury has paid off
in bad bonds when a life annuity of the government would
millions of gold notes, so that its real balance of gold coin, better meet the public and private interests at stake. The
the property of the Government, is
millions more than raising of this question of government annuities is very
a month
ago. This will be seen from the subjoined table:
timely in this respect, however impracticable and prema¬
GOLD OWNED
TUE TREASURY OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER, 1873.
ture it may be supposed in other points of view.
BY

Oct. 1, 1873.
*

*

Nov. 1,1873.

$80,246,757

$82,313,581

33,935,400

27,569,880

Trcasury.$4ti,311,357

$54,743,701

Gold balances
Gold circulation
Tot. gold owned by the

Besides this amount of

liquidation, a further sum of past
paid off to the extent of fj- millions, the
figures for October being $15,756,130, and at present
$14,226,290. Putting these items together we should have
reduced the whole debt nearly 5 millions during the
month, had not the new interest, accrued since October 1,
been, as usual, added to the account. The interest amounts
to 8 millions, and throws the balance
to the other side,
showing an apparent increase of the total debt to the
amount of $3,039,000.
-Such is the_argument^ And we freely concede that it is
in the naajn correct,
But iU advocates forget that the debt
due debt has been




FINANCIAL REVIEW OF THE MONTH OF OCTOBER.
The month of October was

quite

as

important in its results to

its immediate predecessor. Numerous other
failures occurred in financial and commercial circles : liquidations

business

men

as

and prices at tbe Stock Exchange declined on
lower point than they bad touched
during tbe panic. Toward tbe close, tbe famous bouses of Hoyt
Spragues & Co. and A. & W. Sprague were unable to meet their
obligations, and this was followed by a renewal of tbe depres¬
sion which bad previously been passing off. To relieve matters
and make tbe situation clearer and better for tbe mercantile
classes, tbe banks maintained tbe “pooling” arrangement during
tbe month, though resolving to discontinue tbe same on Satur day, Nov. 1, and allowed tbe loan certificates to remain out
standing without important contraction. Tbe Treasury also
trenched ou its $44,000,000 reserve to tbe extent of about
went
one

steadily

or

on,

two occasions to a

61*5

THE

$5,000,000.

market worked closely, and none
having good collaterals were able
to
obtain
their
requirements without
At
difficulty.
bank, of course, the legal rate of interest was charged, but out¬
side, as high as £ of one per cent per diem was asked and paid.
but

The

money
borrowers

first-class

There

3465123054.

was

securities
to obtain

money

with

brokers

the

discrimination of collaterals that

much

so

available

in

ordinary times
while the banks

on,

that stocks

were

some

almost useless

were

I November 8, 1873

CHRONICLE.

so restricted business
sometimes forced on the

and the other Lake Shore difficulties between the Union
Company and its executive committee, together with the
mercantile failures and the inability of. the brokers to obtain
bank accommodation.
On the other hand, though the net effect
was less important, the rumors of expansion of the
currency, the
settlement of the Lake Shore loan late in the month, and the low
prices current, which attracted purchasers, occasioned spasmodic
rallies of 2 to 10 per ceDt. The lowest prices were made towards
the clone.
The volume of business was very large, and attended
case,

Trust

kept affairs on with considerable excitement.
The following table will show the opening, highest, lowest and
the Stock Exchange in a decidedly feverish and unsettled con¬
dition. The failures happening in different parts of the country closing prices of railway and miscellaneous stocks during the
checked the ability of the merchants to obtain discounts.
The months of September and October :
-October.-September.—
rates for commercial paper were very irregular, ranging all
Railroad Stocks—
Open. High. Low. Clos. Open. High. Low. Clos.
92#
92#
the way from 14 to 24 per cent; prime names selling at about 14 Albany & Susquehanna. 92#
92#
39
35
39
39 '
35
Alton & T. Haute, pref. 39
25
25
to 18 per cent.
16
16
16
The premium on legal tenders early in the Atlantic & Pacific pref.. 26
26#
16#
12#
12#
2
1#
2#
2#
1#
1%
1#
month ran as high as 14@2 per cent, but as the banks resumed Boston, Hartford & Erie
101
94
94
85
104# 100
$
Chicago & Alton
104
90
90
90#
93#
84# 85
currency payments this disappeared.
The failure of the Spragues Chicago, Burl. & Quincy 98# 98# 40
42
do
& Northwest’n 64#
64#
43#
45#
31#
led to ail sorts of wild rumors, and the names of some of the
64
64
65
71
do pref. 81#. 81#
do
54
8*
86
& Rock Island. 108#
do
90#
90#
108#
96#
80#
most prominent houses were involved, but no important suspen¬
19
23#
31#
22#
24#
16#
8*
Columb., Chic. &Ind. C. 30#
81
73
sions subsequently occurred.
79#
83#
79#
The Treasury payments of silver Cleve. & Pittsburg guar. 86# 87
73#
79
78
78

market, and this, in connection with other

amounted

to

attention.

.

causes,

The

few

a

hundred

dollars, and did not attract much

Treasury reserve, to successfully resume silver
payments, was entirely too small, and the policy adopted by the
Secretary in paying out sums of five dollars to each party having

claims

against the Government, h«d little oi no effect.
Government bonds were active, with the course of prices irre
gular, At times the demand was good from investors and savings
banks who had sold bonds in the panic to raise money, while on
the other baud the market was weak in the latter part of the
month, in consequence of depression elsewhere.
--Coupon bonds.--

5s ’81 fund. 6s’81 6s’81 5-20s

Oct.
1

coup.

....

....

108

...

.

113#
113#
113
112

lit#
115#
114#
112#
110# 111#
110# 111

115
114#

...
....

109#
109# 111#
Ill#
..

111
105
105
110# 103#

110#
110#

111# 105

110#
110
110
109#
109#
109

....

S

107

114# 114# 106
108# 110#
114# 113# 166# 107
107# 110
113# 113# 106# 106#
110
105# 106# 103# 110#
110# 111# 106# 106# 107# 110
110
111#
107# 109#
...

107

..

107
107
...

111#
111#
111#
111#
111#

110#
111# 106
110
106

....

110

104

....

106#
106
106
106#
108#
106

.&
107

109#
107# 110# 112#
108
108# 111
113
107# 103#
Ill#
106# 107#
108# 111#
108

22

....

....

....

....

108# 112

109# 112# 112

110
110#
110#
Ill#
109# 111#

....

.

113#

..

112#
112#
113
113#
114

104# 106# 108#

112
112
112#
115
105
114

...
....

....

...

s
109

112

108# H2
107# U2
108# 111#
106# 111#

Open’g 108# 112
115#
High'Btirg
Lowest 106# 109#

Closing iCO# 111#
CLOSING

PRICE8

Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday

....

...

...

....

OP CONSOLS

j for
mon.

Wednesday.,
Thursday.,...
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday...
Friday

....

AND

U.

Ill#
103#
108#
10S
107#
109
111#
107#
107#

111#
111#
111#
no#
109#
111#
113#
109#
109#

113#
113#
112#
112#
112#
113#
115#
110
112#

5-20,! 10-40

5-20,
’65

5<

7
8

92#
92#
92#

95#'
96

Date.

96” 9i#i

| 90

91#;

96#| 96# 91#
9 92# 96# { 96# j 91#
10 92# 96# 96#! 91#
11) 1*2# 96#1 96# I 91#

12j

18, 92#1 96#
19!

110

;.

106# 109#

106# 109#
106# 109#
108#
107
114
103# 107# 109
115
109# 109# 111#
110
103# 105
108#
112# 107
106# 108#
112#
.

92#
22
11

.

OCTOBER.

5-20, 10-40

..

)
;

|’65 o.il867.

93#

91#

93# 96# 91#

93#
93#
93#
92#| 93# ;

92#! 93#!
92#
92#
92#
92#

96#

93#
93#
93

93#

96# i
96# |
96#
96#

31#

91#
91#
91#

59#

50#

5i#

51#

73#

67#

50

66
90
19
33

105#

103#

103#

100
93
22

100
73
22

100

130#
37#

11

51

New Jersey
New Jersey Central
101#
23
N. J. Southern
.-...
N. Y. Cen. & H. R
104#
do
N.Haven & Hart. 136

38#
do

do

70
45

pref.

70#

91#

102~

116#

117#

135#
26#
70
45
84

93#

94#
101
70
44

70

91#
91#
91
91

96#j 96#. 92#
88#

light, and a
feeling predominated. Much interest was attached to iailroad bonds. A feeling of depression prevailed in this depart¬
ment, and prices declined to a very low point. The weakness
was most marked towards the close, when it was known that
some well-known companies would default on their November
In State bonds the business, as a rule, was very

weak

Indeed it is hard to

see

how this

can

be averted in the

face of late events.
The stock market

16

19#

38#

44#

83

83

83

54#

66

66

24#

24#

40
66
15

41
66
15

79

79”

79”

been




in the main

101
16
27
93

24
92

98#

98#
58#
69

65

22#
44
84

114
86

17#
95#
130

30#
63
32
100
90
103
65
21

22#
44
85
114
86

15

80#

l7#
81#

116#
21#

119#
22#

50
30
80
81
94
60
21

50
31
80
81 r
97
60
21

83

54#

100
16

57#

95

65
21

70#

44#
64#

115

108

27#

44#
64#

60
88

96#
86#

26#
68#

70
80
55

79

62
31

.70
44

80
55

35#

29#
>

Tol., Wab. & Western.
Warren
Miscellaneous—

American Coal.

Pennsylvania Coal
Spring Mountain Coal..

Cumberland Coal & Iron
Atlantic Mail
Pacific Mail....!

1

1

43

98#
8
65

35#
45

91

92#

92
62

92
62

67#

do
pref
West. Union Telegraph.

99
8
65

45

Mar1 p1 sa Land & Mng Co
New Jersey L’d Imp. Co

44#

68#

72

72
114
211

114
211

1
31
70
8
63
18
30

51
56
111
211

21#
49#

15#
32#

15#
33#

47

38

38

53#

53#

17
240
40

79
1
84
70

15

18
250

40#

15

240
40

247

40#

33#

37#

25”

27”

72
6

80

55
5

58

7#

is”

27

66#

84#
57#

23#

30

18
30
66

51
56
111
211

19#
44#
42

8
63

54#
84#
57#

73#
85#

80

53#
55
57
106

5

’

20
27
45
78

20
27

*

46#

52,

79
53

44#

60
59
68
109

47#

57
100

60
100

,

the lowest
the lowest

111£ to 107£,
price touched in
This decline was chiefly influenced by the arrivals of
about $9,000,000 gold from Europe, the prospective outflow of
coin from the Treasury, the weakness of sterling exchange, the
limited demand from speculators and merchants, and the conse
quent heaviness of cash gold, which cost at times 1-16@£ per cent
for carrying.
The Bank of England advanced its rate of dis
count from 5 to 7 per cent to check the outflow of gold from
Gold declined from

ten years.

London.

OCTOBER,31878.
tc

fc£

Date.

o

G.

?
o

.-3

o

Date.

"5

©

<13

is

G,

O

5

t/

G

G

A

o

o

o

.2

-to

o

R

O

«

23 108# 108# 108# 108#
.24 108#| 108#i 108# 108#
Thursday.... 2'H0#:il0# 110# no# Friday
25 108#1108# 1108# 108#
•Saturday
3,110# 1109# 1110# 110
Friday
26
Saturday
4 110* Jl09#jll0# 109# | Sunday
Monday
Sunday
5
27.108#)108#|108# 108#
j
I .
28,108# 108# 1108# 108#
Monday
6)110 109# j 110# lio# Tuesday
108#
Tuesday
7jll0#!ll0#|ll0# 110# Wednesday...29 108#! 108# ,108# 108#
Wednesday... 8)110# 109# 110# 109# Thursday.... 30 108# 108#|108#
.81 108# 108#, 108# 108#
Thursday
9 109#)109 |109# 109# Friday
111# 107# 111#, 106#
108# Oct., 1873
Friday
10,109
108# '109
114
1872
112# 115# 112#
11] 108# 1103#! 108# 108#
Saturday
1871..... 114# lll#!ll5
112
Sunday
12
1870
113# 111# 113# 111#
Monday-.
13 108# 108# 108# 103#
1869
130
128# 1132 129
Tuesday
14! 108# 108# 109# 109#
“
1868
140# 133#: 140# 133#
Wednesday ..15 103# 108# 109# 108#
“
1867
143#. 140#; 145# 140#
Thursday
16.108#;107# 108# 108
1866
146
145# 154# 146#
Friday
17 107 # ,107#' 108# 108#
“
1865
144#j 144# 149 1146#
Saturday... .18;i08#!l08#il08# 108#
“
192 1189 1227# 1223#
1864
Sunday
19! ....) ....|
1863
149# 140# 1156# j 145#
Monday
20[103#H08 |108# 108#
1962
121# 122 138# 1129#
Tuesday
2ljl0S#jl08#!108# 108#
Wednesday. .22il08#!108# 103# 108# S’ce Jah. 1. 1873'll2# h07#!319#. 108#

Wednesday... 1 111# 110# 111# no# Thursday

“
“

“

....

heavy, the weakness having
influenced largely by legal complications in the Grinnell
was

70
45
95
94

44

“

interest.

98#
79

125

100

100
70
44

100

91

135#
23#

St. Louis & Iron Moun..
St. L., K. City & N. Pref.

o

92#|

91#
22#
91#

'

35#

100

•78
35
58
85
115
92
15

91

89

26

98#

57#

91#
22#

23

105#
136#
39#
70
45

Pitts., F. W. & Chi.guar 94
Renssalaer ^Saratoga.. 104

-

58#
70#
117#

67
111
24

75

22
11
80
34

80
30
56
91

55

33

75

11

90#

111
24
33

67#

83#

91#

93#! 96#] 91
91# I

88
55

COURSE OF GOLD IN

96#
96#;
96#
96#1
96#

92#, 94# 95# 91
92#; 96# 96#; 91#
95#| 91
92#| 91

I 92#
96# 91# High’t. | Since | 94
jLowest) Jan. l.| 91#

88

50#
70#
91#

Milwaukee & St. Paul..
do pref.
do

....

92# |
92# |
92#|
92# i
92# I

78
86

90#

,

....

LONDON IN

AT

Monday
20
Tuesday
21
Wednesday.. 22
23
Thursday
Friday
..24
Saturday ....25
Sunday
26
Monday
271
Tuesday
28 j
Wednesday... 29
Thursday
30j
Friday
31;

13; 92#j 96# 96# 91#
14 92# 96# | 96#; 91#l Opening
Wednesday...15! 92#) 96# 96#| 91# I Highest
Thursday ,...16 92# x93# 96# 91#' Lowest
Friday
171 92# 96# 96# 91# Closing

Saturday
Sunday..

....

mon.

1] 92#; 94# 95# 91
2 92#; 95 | 95# 91#
3 92#) 95#| 96# 91#
4> 92# | 95# | 96# 91#

6j

113#
112# 107

1867.i

o.

107

.Cons U. S.,
for | 5-20,1

SECURITIES

8.

do
do
Lake Sho. <te Mich.South
Marietta & Cin.,1st pref.
do
2d pref.

85

100#

35#

107 - 108#
106# 109
1C7
109 >a
:

Cons U. S.

Date.'

Thursday

113# 107#
113# 107# 108#
107#
112#
106#
113# 108
108
1'5# 109
110
111# 105# 10>>#
112# 106# 108#

105#
scrip. 100

•

....

,

....

113% 114
114
103% 108
109%
109^
113# 114# lit
110#
113# 114# 114# 108# 108# 110#

Illinois Central

....

111
Ill#
Ill
109#

....

.

31

HO

114# 115
108# 109#
-115# 115# 109
115# 115#
107# 115#
107
110
107
108
114#
107}.'

15

27
28
29

....

S

109
108

It

20

5-20s 5-2os 5-20s 5-20s 5-20s 10-408 10-40s os
1864. 1865. 1865n. 1867. 1868. reg. coup. cux.
108
109
111# 113% 114
...
107# 109
....

,

18

1862.

....

-9
10

17
18
10.

reg. coup.
112

106# 112# 113# 108
109
108# 112# 1!5# 108#
109
115#

......

It
12
13

1873.

PRICES OF GOVERNMENT SECURITIES IN OCTOBER,

a
Col., Cin. & Ind.. 85
Del., Lack. «fc Western.. 100#
Dubuque & Sioux City..
Erie
59#
do preferred
72#
Harlem
130#
Hannibal & St. Joseph.. 37#
do
pref. 46#

November 8,

THIS <MffcONICLis.

1373.3

sharp advance in the rates

•There was a

of foreign exchange

October, and the market was in a better condition to
encourage exports. Sight sterling was strongest, owing to the
advance in the Bank of England rate and the generally unfavor¬
able advices from the continent. Under an increased supply of
commercial bills and the prospects of freer offerings of cotton
bills us well as through the general lack of demand for exchange,
the market afterward lost its strength, and sales were made at
considerable concessions from the nominal quotations given

Debt, less amount in the Treasury, November 1,1873
Debt, less amount in the Treasury, October 1, 1874..

68.5-20b’s,17
1....

Oct

STERLING EXCHANGE FOB OCTOBER,

107%®

S
8

“

“

109 @

....

107%® ....
106%@107
4*. ’.. 107%@107%

“

....

108%® ....
108 @108%

...

.

^

108%@108%

l".Y. i67%@107%’ i<)8%@i68%

“

?

i:.107 @107%
8'... 107 @

“

»»

9
10

n

108%@108%
108 @ ...
107%@108

....

106%@107

...

106%@106%
106%® 106%

...

{l....

107%@107%

14.... 107 @ ....
15.... 106%@107
16.... 105%®106

a*

“

>♦

“

“

r

108 @

.

.

107%@108

“

“
“
“
“

"
“

20..’.’. i06%@10b*%

108%@

108 @
108 @
108%®
108%@

23... 106%@106%
24.... 106%® ....
25....
26
27....
28....
29....
30....
31....

106%®

....

....
....
....
....
....

S.

“
“

“
“

106%@106%
106%@106%
106%@10b%
106%®
106%@166%

108%@108%
108%@108%
108%@108%

106%@109

108

....

Amount
accrued
outstanding, and not
yet paid.
Central Pacific
$25,885,120
$5I«,702
Kan. Pac., late U.P.EJ).
6,303,000
126,060
Union Pacific Co
27,236.512
544,730
Cen. Br’h Un. Pacific..
1,600,000
32,000

@108%

106%@107

int. paid

transp’tion by Unitea
States, of malls, &c. States.

$7,921,483
2,347.533
8,615.943
589,808
485,912
487/05

39,411
32,566

$782,295
1,167,167
2,60;,a*><
21/93

$7,1«9,1S7
1.130,365
6,014.534
567,914
476,545
480,5:3

9,S«7
6,731

,

2, 1864; they are registered boids, in denominations of $1,000, $5,000 & $10,000 ;
bear six per cent inrerest in currency, payable January 1 and July 1, and mature
0 years from their dat
.

CHANCES IN TIIE REDEEMING AGENTS OF NATIONS! BANKS.
The following are the changes in
National Banks approved since the

the Redeeming Agents of
30th ult. These weekly
changes are furnished by and published in accordance with an
arrangement made with the Comptroller of the Currency:
location

REDEEMING agent.

.

First National B’nk First National Bank of New

York, ap¬
proved in place of National Shoe and

N’thBenningon.

Leather Bank of New York.

Massachusetts—
Boston

at the close

When

Pay’ble Registered Coupon.
1874 («) $6,255,000 $13,745,000
Feb. 8, *61.
4,653,000
1880.(/ ) 13,762,000
Is of 188t....(G) 945,000
Is, Oregon War...... Mar. 2, ’61. ...1881
...1881 f 125.661,400
<3,659,950
is of 1881, July 17 and Aug. 5, ’61
1882
Feb. 25. ’62.
17,679.310 170,2:7,150
of 1862
Mar. 3, '63 ...1881
58,538,600 21,411,400
Is of 1881
Mar. 3, 64 ...1904
140,545,210 54,022,100
58, 10-408..
.Mar. 3, ’64. ...1884
946,600
Of 1864
1884A
24.798,950 33.2S6.050
June30,’64.
Of 1864
Mar. 3. ’65. ...1885
33,809, »G0 118,907,150
55,69UUU 146.942.LI0
186% new.... Mar. 8, ’65. ...1885
Mar, 3, ’6% ...1837
87,120,959 223,533,250
Mar. 3, ’65. ...1888
13,715,500
23/58,500
5s, Funded Loan, 1881. July 14, 10. ...1881 1162 657,700 112,047,300
Character of Issue.

3s Of 1858

Junel4.’5S.

...

...

Interest Accru’d
Overdue. Interest.

$110,975 (a) ?3')3,S33
39,039 (a) 368.300
7.025
(a)l8,90J
139,2.-5 (a) t,786.427
29.575 (6)5,637,-\H
162,514 (a) l,50J,000
492,940 (01.621.394
2.573
(6)2S,398
5/5 4 (6)1,742,550
6%9 4 (6)4.581,505
1,1 >4,519 (a)4,'152.662
2,185,437 (a; 6,213,034
159,500 (a)749 480
242,511 (c£; 3,433,812

Bearing Interest In Lawful Money.
Interest.
140.000

Principal.

3’a,NawDenslon..Act Iuly23,’68..Int. only appl’dtopens’ns.
4s, Certifs of indebtedness.. Act July 3, ’70..Dae in 1875

Phenix Nat’al Bank American Exchange National Bank of

Phenix

14,000,000
678,000

New York—
Havana

Second
Bank

Firet Nat’nal Bank. National Park Bank of New York, ap-

Warwick...

which int. has ceased since mat’y

$14,226,290

Debt Bearing no Interest.
Character of issue.
Amt. outstaud.
July 17,1861, and Feb. 12, 1862
Demand notes
$79,742
Feb. 25 and July 11. ’62. and March 3. ’63. .U. 8. legal-tender notes
350/52.206
June 8. 1872
Certificates of deposit
8,875,100
July 17,1862
Fractional Currency
)
a7<!, ,Q
March 3,1863, and June 30,1864
Fractional currency
) 47,846,149
MarchS, I863(iu $20,50,100,500,1,0005,000).Certifs. for gold deposited
27,569,830
,

_

Debt bearing Interest

in

Coin—Bonds at 6 p. cent
Bonds at 5 p. cent

Total debt bearing Interest in coin
Debt bearing Interest in Lawful Money—
Certificates at 4 per cent
Navy pension fund, at 3 per cent
Total debt bearing interest in lawful money...
Debt on which Int. has ceased since Maturity
DRBT BE 4.BING NO INTEREST—
Demand and legal tender notes

Certificates of deposit
Fractional currency
Certificates of gold deposited

Total debt bearing no interest
Unclaimed Interest.

groved in place of the Central Nat’l

^Fi

Warren

approved in place of the Ninth Na¬

Tennessee—
Cleveland.

tional Bank of New York.
Cleveland National Farmers’ and Merchants’ Nat’nal Bank
Bank
of Baltimore, approved in place of
the Second National Bank oi Balti¬

Ohio—
Ashtabula.

Ashtabula National I Importers’

more.

Bank

Ohio—

and Traders’ National Bank

of New Yoik, appproved as an
tional redeeming agent.

I

addi-

Vinton County Na¬ 'Importers’ and Traders’ National Bank
tional Bank..
of New York, revoked.
First Nat’nal Bank Third National Bank of New York, ap¬
proved as additional redeeming

McArthur.
Indiana—

Danville..

agent.

Indiana—
Madison.
Illinois—
Paxton...

National Br’h Bank Metropolitan National Bank of New

York:, approved.

First Nat’nal Bank. Commercial National Bank of

Chicago,
approved in place of Manufacturers’

National Bank of Chicago.
First Nat’nal Bank. First National Bank of Chicago,

Wisconsin—
Evansville.

ap¬

proved.
New National Banka.

The

only National Bank organized during the past week:

Official No.

2,129—First National Bank of Central City, Col.

Authorized capital $50,000;

?aid in Cashier, $50,000. Joseph A. Thatcher, President; 1873.
oung, capital Authorized to comqience business Oct, 31, FrankC.
Catest

ftlanetarji ani> dammercial CEnglisI) Neu)0

RATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON, AND ON LONDON
AT LATEST DATES.
EXCHANGE AT LONDON—
OCTOBER 24.

TIME.

OH—

Amsterdam...

Antwerp

Hamburg

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.

LATEST

BATE.

DATS.

..$415,852,978

Vienna

Amount

*n^ere1**

$1,723,370,850 $89,184,001

$14,678,000
14.226,290

Lisbon
Milan
Genoa
Naples
New York
Rio de Janeiro
.

..

144,780
354,308

TIME.

•

•

•

short.

14

16

%i

Oct. 24.

3 mos.
short.

BATE.

3

mos.

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

*

•

....

.

.

•

•

•

Pernambuco..
Montevideo...

•

•

60

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

.

•

1 per cent,
48.

td.

....

60

....

Alexandria....

days.
....

Total...
$2,197,627,613 $39,706,595
debt, principal and interest, to date. Including interest due not
presented for payment
$2,237,334,214

dis.!

l.!0%@1.103-16

•

....

Shanghai

• •

*

days.
•

•

is. 5d.

11290

620%
Hfe%

.

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

....

Oct. 24.
•

short.

Sept. 13.
Sept. 9.
Sept. 29.
Sept. 23.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct
Oct.
Oct
Oct

2895

....

•

Sept 8.

Valparaiso

2538

....

Oct. 24. 60 days.
Sept. 28. 90 days.

•

12-04
25-42
20 06

44

•

•

....

Singapore

•

....

Hong Kong...

23,504

•

•

•

Calcutta

$415,352,978

•

Oct. 24.

•

6.26%@ 6.26%
120 @120%
31%@31%
49%@49%
90 days.
32%®52%
3 months. 30.00 @30.10
30.00 @30.10
30.00 @30.10

Bombay

$361,031.948
8,V7.%000
47,376.149
27,569,880

•

•

•

Bahia
Buenos Ayres..

$678,000
14,000,000

•

•

Berlin
Frankfort
St. Petersburg
Cadiz

Outstanding.
$1,234,093,060
489,272,303

121 @12 2
short.
3 months. 25.80 @25.85
20.62 @20.66
short.
25.32%@25.42%
3 months. 25.75 @25.85
11.65 @11.70
«

Paris
Paris

....

Recapit illation .

additional

$351,308

Authorizing acts.

Aggregate of debt bearing no interest

as

ank of New York.
First Nat’nal Bank. Fourth National Bank of New York,

Pennsylvania-

...

on

Albany, N.Y., approved
redeeming agent.

4,520

Aggregate of debt bearing Interest in lawtul monev
$14,678,000
$144,520
Debt on Which Interest Has Ceased Since Maturity.
Principal. Interest
A to 6s, Bonds
Matur’d at varl’s dates prior to Jan. 1,’37.
$57,665
$64,174
Jis, Mex. indem
Matured at various dates in ’51 and ’52...
1,104
85
•’8,Bonds
1.650
22
Matured Dec.31, 1867
,68, Bounty L sep
Matured July l, 1849
8,500
226
5’s,Texas indem....Matured Dec.31, 1864
174,000
9,450
Ss.Bonds.
Matured Jan. 1,1871...
10,000
625
6s. 5-20s. (called)....Matured Dec. 1/71. and Mch. 7 & 20, ’72..
12,916,800
145,720
MQ@6eTr. notes....Matured at various dates from ’38-’44
82,575
2,670
M0a6s Tr. notes... .Matured at various dates in ’47 and *48...
6,000
206
6s, Tr’y notes
950
Matured at various dates In ’48 and '49...
57
3@6’s, Tr’y n’s
Matured at various dates in ’58 and ’59...
106
2,000
I’s, Tr’y notes
Matured March l, 1863
3,150
378
73-10’s,3years
Matured Aug. 19 and Oct. 1,1864.....
19,250
1,438
5s, one year
Matured at various dates In 1865..
81,1C5
4.C67
5’b, 2 years
Matured at various dates in 1866
55,809
3,775
I’s, Com. Int. n’s....Matured June 10, ’67, and May 15, ’68
456,680
91,704
7 3-10’s, 3 years
Matured Aug. 15,1867, and June 15 and
July 15,1868
265.500
22.146
I's, Certif. of ind... .Matured at various dates in 1866
5,000
313
4.5 & 6’s, Tern .1
Matured Oct. 15,1866
78,560
7,343
8s, Certifs. (called).Matured monthly since Dec. 31,1870
5,000
394
Agg. of debt

New York, approved in place of Con¬
tinental National Bank of New York.
National National Albany Exchange Bank of

New York—

Aggregate of debtbearing inter’t In coin. 736.232,400] 987,137,950 5,116,946 34,067,05g
(a) Interest payable Jan.& July. (6) May & Nov. (O March <fc Sept., except
e) Reg.
coupons $50 & $103 paid annually In March. (d) Feb., May, Aug. & Mot
$5,000: coupon $1/00. (/) Keg. 1,000, $5,000, $10,003; coupon $1,000. ( 0 $50, $100
« $500.
(A) Keg. $50, $1(X), $500, $1,000, $5,000 & $10,000; coupons, $50, 100, $5oO &
$1,000.
Debt

Rhode Island-

...

Debt bearing Interest In Coin.
Authoriz¬
ing act.

Boston Nat’al Bank Metropolitan NationalBank of New
York, approved in place of the Cen¬
tral Natioual Bank of New York.

following is the official statement of the public debt,

appears from the books and Treasurer’s returns
of business on the last day of October, 1873:

_

1,970/ 60

1,623,320

Balance of

Total issued
$64/23/12 $1,292,470 S20.447.9S6
$4,538,813 $15,909,172
The Pacific Railroad bonds are all issued under the acts of Juiv l, 1862. and July

Vermont—

ft3

.

United

„

Western Pacific
Sioux City and Pacific—

Interest

repaid by

paid by

Character of Tanne
onaracier oi issue.

108 @108%

THE DEBT STATEMENT FOR NOVEMBER, 1871.

.

Interest

107%@108

21.... 107 @ ...
22.... 106%@106%

Range..

The

Companies, Interest

Payable in Lawful Money.
Interest

$3,039,578
$15,517,228
$368,082,559

.

..

“

105%@107%

107%@107%
“ If;;;; io6%@io6% ‘ ’i67%@io7%
>>

days.
3 days.
Oct. 17.... 106%@106%
107%@107%
18.... 106% @106%
107%@108
19
.....S
60

3 days.

60 days.

Bonds Issued to the Pacific Ballroad

,or,a

1873.

2.111,8?3.476
2,133,793,898

Increase of debt during the past month
Decrease of debt since March 1,1873
Decrease of debt from March 1,1869, to March 1, 1873..

eariy in

below:

617

23.
18.
16.
15.
22.
16.
22.

•

•-«

•

....

....

•

•

•

•

6 mos.
•

•

•

•

«...

....

....

3 mos.

106%
26
26

48%

44%
26@'6%
51%
Is. 10 ll-16tf.
U. 10 %d.
45. 3%<Z.
58. 10 %tf.
51%

51%
96%

.

Total

Amount in
Coin..

the

currency.....
Special deposit held for redemption of certificates of deposit
*J3dbr’
provided bylaw.

TOUI




I From oar own correspondent. 1

London, Saturday, Oct. 25,1873.

Treasury—

$S2.S18,59l

4,312,755
as

8,875,000

$95,500,787

A

sanguine view has been entertained by some regarding
course of financial affairs, and the result has been that
the value of most classes ot securities has considerably improved .
more

the future

s.

is by no means so favorable as could
have been desired, the increase of strength being due chiefly to
the further amount which the directors have borrowed on the
The bank return, however,

There have been

but few movements of importance in

bined with the other causes

they have been absorbed by the export demand. It is expected
our incoming supplies will also be sent away.
The silver
market is dull, and prices are lower. The following quotations
that all

the circular of Messrs.

t

Last year, when there was some excitement
in the money market, the bank directors made it a point to reject
at once any bills having a finance appearance ; but it is believed
that until recently they modified this restriction, and under
certain conditions tock them in. Latterly, no doubt, they have
been compelled to enforce the rule vigorously, and we now find
that the Bank of France has been compelled to adopt similar pre¬
offered for discount.

But it is not a question of a demand arising out of
abundance of commercial or other kinds of bills, but of a

s.

per oz.

per oz
per oz.

caused by the wants of Germany for coinage
and the additional supplies required to carry on the
trade between this country and the United States, owing to the
want of confidence which has lately prevailed.
As, according to
the latest advices we have received, there appeared to be less
disposition to force produce for sale, there are grounds for be¬
lieving that credit is being restored, and that the negotiation of
bills of exchange will be resumed with facility at an early date.
The present bank return is disappointing, because we require a
jkrger supply of gold, and a much stronger reserve, and the stock
of bullion shows a decrease of nearly £300,000.
There has, how¬
ever, been a return of rates from provincial circulation, so that
there is a small increase in the total reserve of notes and coinThe liabilities of the hank have diminished largely, and the pro¬
portion of reserve to liabilities which was last week, 31 1-5 per
cent, is now rather more than 341 per cent.
The demand for money throughout the week has been of a
very moderate character, and the rates of discount been very
irregular. Short-dated and three months’ bills are taken at 64 to
6£ per cent, but six months’ bank hills are scarce, and having
been sought after, have been taken as low as 4f and 5 per cent.
The position of affairs is an anomalous one ; but it is, nevertheless,
believed that the Bank will be compelled to keep up the rate,
and strengthen its reserve by borrowing on stock. The present
quotations lor money are as follows :
scarcity of gold
purposes,

standard.

77

Bills

on

peroz.
per oz. none here.

9

s.

@

73 9
....

d

...

**.*’.

($74 0
©

SILVER.

> per oz.
5 grs. Gold, per oz.

Paris have

d.

standard, 77 9 @
standard. 77 11 @

s.

Bar Silver, Fine
Bar Silver, containing
Fine Cake Silver
Mexican Dollars
Five Franc Pieces

d.

s.

standard, nearest. 4 10%©
standard, nearest. 4 11 ©

per oz.
per oz.
per oz.. none here

d.

j

no price

4 9% ©
©

continued in demand, but the German

more favorable to
The recent loans for Turkey

exchange is

cautions.
an

Pixley, Abell

COLD.

...

’

the

The importations of gold have been small, and

bullion market.

stock. The uncertainty prevailing, com
which have existed for so long, viz ,
for bullion
are from
dear coal and a high charge for labor, are clearly diminishing the
Langley & Blake:
extent of our trade, and as a result the other securities of the
bank continue to fall off.
There need be no apprehension that BarGold
Bar Gold, tine
money will become dear by any pressing demand for discount
Bar Gold, Relinable
accommodation, for the inquiry is diminishing every day, and South American Doubloons
United States Gold Coin
extra precautions are being taken in the selection of paper
security of government

IV

(November 8, 1873

THE CHRONICLE

018

this country.
and Egypt, amounting to £57,000,-

sterling of nominal stock, and which have been introduced
year, have met with so very limited a success that they
must be considered a failure.
It appears, however, that the two
governments are greatly in want of monev, and they have hit
upon plans of financial reforms, which are to give confidence to
present holders, aud to tempt new investors. The persuasive
powers of the financiers of those countries nust, however, be very
great if they succeed in convincing the British public that there
are no breakers ahead.Considerable alarm would be occasioned
000

this

government came forward for money so frequently, and
and it is therefore scarcely necessary to remark
that English investors are alarmed at the rapidity of the increase
of the debts of Turkey and Egypt.
The Turkish Government
talks much of the vast resources of the country, but admits that
if

a

solid

in such amounts,

they require developing; and English capitalists contend that
undeveloped resources of a country, peopled with Turks; are not
a very
sound security. The Egyptian Government have limited
their fiscal reform to the publication of a budget for the first
time, and this after borrowing nearly £30,000,000, and asking for
£30,000,000 more !
Messrs. M'Calmont, Brothers & Co., announce
authorized to receive subscriptions to au

ling iu C

per cent

that they are

issue of £2.000,000 ster¬

improvement mortgage

bonds of the Philadel¬

Beading Railway Company. The bonds will be issued to
the price at which they will be
instalments extending to the
Per cent.
Ter cent.
2d of February next.
Interest is payable in gold half yearly in
4 months’ bank bills
5 ©6
Bank rate
7
6 months’ bank bills
5 ©6
London ou the 1st of April and 1st of October, and interest
'Jpen-inarket rates:
4 and 0 months’ trade bills. 0 ©7
30 and 00 days’ bills
A
accrues from the commencement of the present month.
The
3 months’ bills
0A%Wi
The rates of interest allowed by the joint stock hanks and dis¬ principal is to be redeemed at par within twenty-four years by an
accumulative sinking fund of 2 per cent per annum. The pros¬
count houses for deposits are as
:
follows

Per cent.

5 ©...i
5 @. ..

Joint stock banks
Discount houses at ca.l
Discount houses with 7 (lays’ notice
Discount houses with 14 days’ notice...

...

following are the rates for money at the

The

leading Con¬

tinental cities:
Bank

Bank

Open

percent, percent.
Paris
Amsterdam
Berlin

Frankfort
Vienna an d Trieste...
a

Madrid, Cadiz and Bar¬
celona
6 (nominal.)
Lisbon and Oporto....
7
Si. Petersburg
VA
Brussels
t>A

Hamburg

Annexed is

Open

market
per cent, per cent.
rate,

rate, market,

Turin, Florence

and

Rome

statement showing the present

5

6

7
7A
5

4A

position of the Bank

England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Consols,
quotation for English Wheat, the price of Middling
Upland Cotton, of No. 40 Mule Yarn fair second qualitj ,
and the Bankers’ Clearing House return compared with the
four preceding years :

of

the average

1809.
£
Circulation, including
bank post bills
23,560,940
3.508 435
Public deposits

1871.

1870.

£

A

1872.
£

1873.

26,794,134

£

19,404,541

21,871,212

20,545.192

10,228,930

13,171,697

11,571,691

8,591,966

8.109,529

18,789.890

21,099,162
2A P-c.
9»%d.

21,635,268

19.609,051

19,435,899

UA p. c.
93 d
40s. Id.
.

..

"No.40 mule yarn fair 2d

....

Is. 3d.

58,484,000
♦Prices October 16,




15

3.878,359
19,103,056
12,499,360

‘

and bullion in

Uplandcotton

25.083,575
4.094,448
23,958,163

1

of notes and

Consols.
Mid.

201,023

15,471,615

17,852,909

deposits

Reserve
coin

Coin

14,511.953

18.058.722
12,651.631

14,847,805

Other

26,017,085
6,094,663
19,463.792
13,256.546

•23,827,405
4,626,864

47s. 3d.

5 p. c.

6 p. c.

7 p. c.

92%d

92?* d.

92Xd.

58 s. 8d.
9 13-16d.

60s. 2d.

9Ad.

IfccL

Is.

2Ad.

♦Is. l&d.

56s. 6d.

....

l/» 2#d.
61,656,000

Is.

*JAd.

80,795,000 108,835,000 137,845,000

phia &

in sums of £200 each, aud
limited will be 87.V per cent, with
bearer

the

is

pectus states that the present net revenue of
company
sufficient^ to pay the interest aud sinking fund on this loan and
on
the existing debt, whilst continuing its usual dividend of 10

share capital.
of colonial wool wTere. brought to a close on
Thursday evening. The arrivals amounted to 103,226 bales, and
106,548 bales were catalogued. Respecting the condition of the
market, Messrs. Hoare & Hudson remark that—
Owing to the small supply of Australian wool, the sales, as was
generally expected, opened with a firm'tone, at fully the rates of
th?- preceding series ; and as they progressed buyers showed more
eagerness to operate, and hence prices assumed an upward tend¬
ency.
This change was strongly apparent in good combing wools,
which, being limited in supply, were freely competed for, and
commanded an improvement of Id. per lb. Clothing wool sold
well at the full rates of last series, no advance having been estab
lisbed. Snow-white Cape, in consequence of the very large sup¬
ply offering, was somewhat difficult to sell at the commencement
of the sales, hut buyers subsequently came forward, and the
reduction which had taken place in prices was fully recovered.
Cape fleeces, especially those of fine staple and condition, have
sold freely, and have in some few instances realized somewhat

per cent on its
The public sales

higher prices.

series has been large,
and -from the Conti¬
nent.
All the better descriptions of wool have been keenly com¬
peted for, neither the panic in the United States, nor the advance
in the bank rate of discount from 5 to 7 per cent, which took
place during the progress of the sales, having had any perceptible
The attendance of buyers throughout the
both from our own manufacturing districts

tlie wants of buyers.
contracted character of our trade, and the dis¬
position shown in many branches of business to effect further
retrenchment, it must be admitted that these sales have passed off
effect in curtailing

Considering the

in

a very satisfactory manner.
Dear coal and the high price

influence upon

of labor continue to

the trade of the

have a marked

manufacturing districts,

Profits

November 8, 1878. j

THE CHRONICLE.

619

been

strengthened
he entered the
and uncertain that several mills are only if themateriallyin London and since York had timeroom, was that
partners
New
allowed them,
It is remarkable, therefore, that the raw
they would pay the creditors in full. It was probable that in
material should continue to command so free a sale. O ur export two
months’ time the liabilities would be reduced to about
trade has also fallen off, the declared value of our exports of
£50,000, and there would be £50,000 or £57,000 to meet them.
woollen yarns in the first nine months of the year having been
Mr. Cooper, in answer to questions stated that many of the bills
£3 962 517 against £4,543,358, and of woollen manufactures
were drawn by Messrs. Drain & Co., of Havana, and when they
£20 342,559 against £25,825,400 last year. The shipments of the had been
taken up that firm would have no claim against Messrs.
latter show, therefore, a very important diminution, a large pro¬
Clews & Habicht, which would to that extent relieve the estate.
portion of it being due to the contracted character of our trade
It must be understood that there was no question whatever about
with the United States. As the panic did not commence until the
the perfect solvency of the Havana house, and it had been an¬
middle of last month, later returns are pretty certain to show
The wool sales have, nevertheless, nounced that Messrs. Brown, Shipley & Co. had on that or the
more significant results.
closed with a very firm tone, and it is fully expected that prices previous day accepted the bills of Messrs. Drain. As trustee,
-"‘will be well maintained during the remainder of the ye^r. The lie had received within the last few days £6,000 or £7,000
from America, and
there was in hand £12,000.
Since
prospects as regards supplies from Australia next year are favor¬
the
in bankruptcy had been
presented, liabili¬
able.^ The quantity of wool taken for export during the series ties petition amount of about £70,000 had boen cleared
to
the
is estimated at 45,000 bales.
The fifth and last series of sales for
the current year will be commenced on the 27th of November, off, and this was very good evidence of the ’ bona Jides
of the debtors.
Mr. Fenwick said Messrs. Clews & Habicht were
and there will probably be an available supply of CO,000 bales,
most unwilling to oiler any composition’
They had been unable
including 30,000 bales from the Cape of Good Hope.
to
become so small
working short time. *
■

ve

has been very little, change in the state of the corn trade
this week, but a quiet tone has prevailed. The supplies afloat
are laro-e.and millers in consequence are not desirous of acquiring
There

aj

prepare a reliable statement owing to the magnitude of their
business, but they had no doubt of their ability in a short time to

pay 20s. in the pound.
An adjournment having been suggested,
tlie Chairman remarked that the liabilities of the firm were run¬

stocks. The average prices for England and Wales for last

ning off at £2,000 a day. A creditor observed that it was of the
highest importance that Messrs. Clews & Habicht should have
1872.
1871.
1869.
1873.
1870,
ample time t6 realize their position. Another creditor said that
46‘1
56‘ 6
58' S
47'3
...60‘2
the New York firm were coming forward in the most honorable
42-11
36T0
36‘5
38 6
..43‘1
22‘2
23‘ 3
A.y 6
23‘ 2
w a
aa a
...24-2
24‘2 way, and were willing to become trustees themselves. Mr. Fen¬
wick said the firm could not act as trustees, but were willing to
The following return shows the imports and exports of grain render
any assistance in their power. Resolutions were then
into and from the United Kingdom since harvest, vis., from Sept. agreed to that Mr. Arthur Cooper, 114 George street, should be
1 to the close of last week, compared with the corresponding appointed trustee ; that the affairs of the estate be wound up by
liquidation and not in bankruptcy ; and that Mr. Hazlewood, Mr.
periods in the three preceding years:
Howard, and Mr. M'Master act as a committee to aid Mr. Cooper
IMPORTS.
in winding up the estate. The proceedings closed with a vote of
large

week were:

1871.

Peas
Beans

190,444
352,952

53,669

Indian Corn...
Flour

3.161,544
" 815,219

4,134,983
727,833

.....

thanks to the Chairman.

747,977

1,469,164
126,799
161,090

575,263
3,651,968
502,411

3,616,284

644,005

English market Reports—Per Cable.

closing quotations in the markets of London and Liver
pool for the past week have been reported by submarine telegraph
The daily

as
EXPORTS.

Barley

an

to

1,477

34,304
32,667

one

2.032

11,060

2,866
2,909

7

markets, which at

440,201
1,664
203,791
25,024

754,210

3.373
635
372

6,484
1,098

Oats
Peas
Beans
ludian Corn..
Flour

The stock

53,486

785,503
3,104

cwt.

Wheat

1,776

12,992

11,134

313,110

631
237

period showed

a

tendency to

pressing sellers, and hence Turkish,

Egyptian and Peruvian stocks have experienced a considerable
fall. United States Government bonds were rather flatter to day,
but werejirm during the other days of the week.
The following
were the closing prices of consols and the principal American
Consols

United States 6 per cent 5-20 bonds, ex 4-6
do
do
do
do
do

92%@92%
xd. 91/«@ 91%
91 @ 91%
.xd. 93X@ 93%
90%@ 96%

drawn
1865 issue,
'
1867 issue,...
5 per cent. 10-40 bonds, ex 4-6
5 per cent Funded Loan, 1871, ex 4-6
xd.
Atlantic and Gt West., 8 per cent. Debent’s, Bischoffsheim’s ctfs..
Ditto Consolidated Bonds, 7 per cent., Bischoffsheim’s certificates.
Ditto 1st Mortgage, 7 per cent bonds
Ditto 2d Mortgage, 7 per cent bonds
Ditto 3d Mortgage
Erie Shares, ex 4-6
do preferred....
Ditto 6 per cent'. Convert ible Bonds,
Ditto 7 per cent Consolidated Mortgage Bonds
Illinois Central Shares, $100 pd., ex 4-6
Illinois and St. Louis Bridge, 1st mort
Louisiana 6 per cent. Levee Bonds
Massachusetts 5 per cent, sterling bds, 1900
New Jersey United Canal and Rail bds
New York Central $100 shares
Panama Gen. Mort. 7 per cent, bonds, 1897 ...

Penns3dvaniaGen. Mort. 6 perct. bds, 1910...
per cent,

bonds,

ex

a

4-6

material decline

mm
oo%@
54 @
34 ©
72%@
593*©
27%®
3936®
56 ©
96 ©
923*®
82
99
42
93
,

9

91^
56
36

73%
603*
27%
393,
57

last

on

“

@ 47
@ 95

993*@10034
76%
99
98
42

76% @
97 @
97 @
40 @

“

“

Stock

of the accounts of the firm.

Mr. Hazlewood, of the

92%

90%

U. S. 10-408
New 5s

Tha

fort

^

93

3

.

1867

96%
60%
90%

—»

:

.

90

92%
92%
92%
96%'
90%

91%
95%
90%

90%

90

89%

92%
92%
96%

daily quotations for United {States 6s (1862) at Frank¬

were:

973*

97>;

Frankfort,

Liverpool Cotton Market.—See special report of cotton,

Liverpool Breadstuff8 Market.—This market closes quiet at
advance of Is. in peas.
sat.
b.

$ bbl
spr)..^ ctl
“
(Red Winter)
“
“
(Cal. White club) “
Corn (West, m’d) $ quarter
Barley (Canadian).. ..$ bush
Oats(Am. & Can.)
$ bush
Flour (Wesiern)
Wheat (Red W’n.

d.

27 0
5

11
11
13
32
3
3
Peas (Canadian)... $ a uarter 40

10
3
0

6

4
0

Mon. * Tues.
d.
s.
s. d.
27 0
27 0
5
11
11
5
11 10
11 10
13 3
13 3
32 0
32 3
3 6
3 6
3 4
3 4
41 0
40 0

Sat.
d.
75 0
72 6
72 6

8.

Beef (mess) new $ tee...
Pork (Pr. mess) new $bb!.
Bacon (Cum. cut) new$ cwt
Lard (American) ...
“

“

Bheese(Amer’n fine)

Liverpool Produce
spirits turpentine is

28 0
11
5
11 10
13 3
32 3
3 6
3 4
41 0

0
0

38
40

68

0
6
0
0
0

-

11
5
11 10

13
30
3
3

41

75
72
38
39
68

Fri.
d.
27 0
11 5
11 10
13 3
32 0
3 6

8.

3

41

4
0

have each de¬

Wed.
8. d.

Tues.
s. d.
75 0
72 6
33 0
40 0
68 0

3
6
6
4
0

■

0
6
0
9
0

Thnr.
s.
d.
75 0
72
38
39
63

70
38
39
67

Petraleuai(reflned)... .$ gal
“
(spirits)
Tallow (American)... & cwt.
Cloverseed (Am. red).. “
“
Spirits turpentine

Sat
8. d.
O
9 O
16 0

Mon.
d.
9 0
16 0

1
1
39
45

1
1
39
45

2%
1
9
0
6

s.

2%
1
6
0
6

Wed.

Tues.
d.

8.

8.

9

0

9

16

0

16

1
1
39
45

2%
0
6
0

d.
0
0

1
-

2%

1

39

0
6

45

0

6
0
3
0

Thnr.
d.
8.
9

16
1
1
39
45

0
0

3
0

Fri.
d.

s.

9

16

0

1
1

6

40

0

45

2%

was

0
0

2%
U

6
U
6

..

would be reduced to a nut-shell. There could be no doubt the
estate was in a good position, and, from conversations with

Messrs. Clews & Habicht, he was certain that the partners took a
ftvorable view of their affairs. Hi’s own impression, which had




due November 1 on the Denver & Rio Grande
railway bonds were paid on aud after that date at
banking-house of Rutten & Bonn, 52 Exchange Place,
The coupons

(narrow gnage)
lie

,

-c

{.
.

;|

b
0

33
33 6
34 6
34 6
34
33
called to the chair. The room was crowded
by the creditors of the company. Two members of the firm were
London Produce and Oil Markets.—These prices are generally
in attendance to give any explanations that might be requiredt
lower.
but on the suggestion of the chairman they were allowed to
Thur.
FrI.
Wed.
Tnes.
Mon.
Sat.
£ s. d. £ s. d.
retire to an adjoining room. The statement of total liabilities
£ s. d.
£ s. d.
£ s. d
£ s.d.
10 0 0 10 0 0
10 15 0
was: “To creditors unsecured, £242,398.”
This, however, in¬ Lins’dc’ke(obl).$tn 10 15 0 10 15 0 10 15
62 9
62 9
63 3
Linseed (Calcutta)....
63 3
63 3
63
cluded £169,720, debts incurred for account of Henry Clews & Co.,
of New York, a great part of which will, it is expected, be pro¬ Sngar(No.l2D’chstd)
29 0
29 6
29 6
on spot,
cwt
29 6
29 6
29 6
94 0 0 94 0
vided for by other parties on account of Henry Clews & Co. The Sperm oil. T.... $ ton 94 0 0 94 0 0 94 0 0 94 0 0
34 0 0
34 0
34
0 0 34 0 0 34 0 0
34 0
“
total assets were computed at £248,609.
The chairman said that Whale oil
30 9 0 30 9
31 0 0 31 0 0 30 9 0
31 0
Linseed oil..
“
if the assets were realized it was anticipated the whole affair

Exelnnge,

*

Frd
7 5* «

Is. lower.

•

“

fine

68

0
0

75
72

s.

Market.—Tallow has advanced 9d. and

Rosinfeom. N. C )...$cwt.
“

38
38
40

Mon.
s.
d.

Thnr.
d.
28 0

Wed.
s. d.

Liverpool Provisions Market.—Lard and cheese
clined during the week.

On

statement

92%'
92%'
92%
96%
90%

account.

>

Thursday the creditors of Messrs. Clews, Habicht & Co.,
American bankers, Old Broad street, city, assembled [at the office
of Messrs. Cooper Brothers, accountants, city, in order to hear a

Tues.

92%
92%

U. S.6s (5-20s,)1865 old.,

Thnr.

'Wed.

Mon.

Sat,

Consols for money

97

933*
@ 83
@101

The Bank rate

Friday’s quotations.

has been advanced to 9 per cent.

an

securities this afternoon:

Virginia 6

London Money and Stock Market.—American securities close
at

100

improvement, have been flat during the last two days, owing
the heavy sales of securities made on continental account.

Paris and Berlin have been

shown in the following summary:

■

134,099
544,842

Wheat

1870.

4,784,922

.

1,127,383

6.981,740
1,104,310
2,031.341

.

5,471,987

.

1872.

7,816,409
1,786.945
1,559,865

1873.

cwt.

►

,

<

*

\'

TOPICS.

CURRENT

Columbia Mills.—The fol¬

Hoyt, Sprague & Co. and the

statement made in an editorial in the last

lowing letter corrects a
Chronicle

2.—National bank currency in circulation; fractional currency
received from the Currency Bureau by U. S. Treasurer, and dis
tributed weekly; also the amount of legal tenders distributed:
Notes in
Circulation

Week

ending

347,840,038

347,919,548

Oct. 18,
Oct. 25.

York, November 1,1873.

Oct. 4...

Oct. 11.

:

New

[November 8,1873.

CHRONICLE.

THE

620

348,229,680

348,191.900

Fractional Currency.--, Leg. TenReceived. Distribute a. Distrib’d-

1.116,800
1,247,000
1,187,000
1,050.000
978,£00

1.486,880
365.600
33.800

6,911.400
2,101,000
600,082

605,000

1,403,000
Chronicle:
348,350,949
Nov. 1.
246.600
217,000
Speaking of Hoyt, Sprague & Co., in your issue of this date
United States Public Lands.—The following
They obtained a been prepared by Commissioner Drummond, of the statement ha
you say “ they have mills in Columbia, S. C.”
General Land
grant of the water power of the Congaree, at Columbia, on pay¬
Office, for his forthcoming report. During the last fiscal year
ment of $
and agreed to build mills, but so far have not
done so.
This has been a great disappointment to the citizens of public lands were disposed of as follows, the figures representing
acres in Found numbers :
Columbia, and also of South Carolina generally, as the establish¬
Cash sales/...-.
1,626,266
ment of mills there was looked upon with great expectations of
Located with military warrants.
214,940
3,793,796
good results to the state and because such mills at Augusta, Ga., Taken for homesteads
Located with agricultural college scrip
653,446
and elsewhere have proved highly profitable.
Certified to railroads
6,083.356
•^1 Bend this merely for information, as I know your desire to be Certified 10
wagon roads
76,576
"rfectly accurate in all your statements.
Yours,
238,548
Approved to States as swamps

Editor Financial

Certified
Certified
Certified
Certified

COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
Imports and Exports for the Week.—The imports this
week show a decrease in both dry goods and general mer¬
chandise. The total imports amount to $4,522,092 this week,

$5,830,093 last week, and $4,918,000 the previous week.
$5,952,3S5 this week, against $6,404,434 last
week, and $7,430,526 the previous week. The exports of cotton
against

The exports are

the past week were 22,864 bales,
The following are the imports

(for dry goods) Oct. 30, and for
merchandise) Oct. 31:

against 16,161 bales last week.

at New York for week ending

the week ending (for general

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NHW YORK

1872.

1873.

$1,734,488
4,753,137

$1,358,683
3,163,409

*4,173,103

$6,485,160

254 961,780

325,458,794

$6,487,625
370,086,711

$4,522,092
340.230,827

$331,943,954

$376,574,336

$344,752,91 ^

1871.

$1,159,035
3,011,u68

'Total for the week..

Previously reported....

$259,134,883

Since Jan. 1

.

report of the dry goods trade will be found the importsof
dry goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of specie
from the port of New York to foreign ports,for the weekending
In

our

Nov. 4:
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.
1870.
1871.
1872.

,

1873.

$5,181,358

Previously reported..

.

Since Jan.1..-

$5,5*4,262

$5,227,617

$5,952,385

152,948,422

200,282,465

194,540,084

244,407,089

$158,129,780

For the week

$205,846,727

$199,767,701

$250,359,474

The following will show the exports of specie from the port of
New York for the week ending Nov. 1, 1873, and since the

beginning of the year, with a comparison for the corresponding
date in previous years :
Nov. 1—Str.

City of Montreal,
Liverpool—

Oct. 29—Str. Scotia, Liverp’l—
Silver bars
$139,003
Oct 29—Sr. Westphalia, L’ndon—
Silver bars
9,300
For Hamburg—
Silver bars.
37,038
Nov. 1—Str.Oceanic, Liverp’l—
Silver bars
17,493

Silver bars
Nov. 1—Str. Abyssinia,

$58,800

Liver¬

poolSilver bars
Nov. 1—Str. Hermann,
don—
Silver bars

155,752

Lon¬

44,125,112

Total since Jan. i, 1873

$44.551,85g
Same time in
1868
1867
1866

Same time in

$63,449,464
58,221,222
54,703,235
29,248.68*

1872
1871
1870

1869.

The

been

1865..

$67,942,601
43.837,332
55,585,777

25,288.21s

...

imports, of specie at this port during the past week have

as

follows:
City of Montreal,
Liverpool—

Gold
Oct. 29—Str. Pereire, Havre—
Gold
Oct. 29—Str.Thuringia, South¬

...

vana-

13,108

Gold
Silver

Oct. 28—Sir. City of Mexico,
Vera Cruz and Havana—
G Jd

353,320
179

ampton—
Gold
Oct. 30—St. City
HavanaGold

2,000

21.093

335,550
of New York,
26,536

53,500

Silver

$960,650

Total for the week

12.760,087

Previously roported
Total since
Same time in
1872
1871
1870

$13,720,737

January 1, 1873
Same time in

.$5,206,549
..

.

8,402,517|
.11,108.919

.14,778,528

i869

'|

1868
1867

6.380,793
2,870,374

1866

9,018,582

National Treasury.—The following forms present a summary
of certain weekly transactions at the National Treasury.
1.—Securities held by the U. S. Treasurer in trust for National
Banks and balance in the Treasury :
Coin

For

Week

ending

Circulation

ForU. S.

Deposits.

Bal. in Treasury.—,

Total.

Coin.

Oct. 4.... 392,655,000
Oct. 11.. 392,711,000
Oct. 18.. 392,630.100
Oct. 25.. 392.689.000

15,715.000 408.370,000 81.430,360
15,665.000 408,376,000 80,082,107
15,753,000 408,383.100 80,552,863
15,873,000 408,562,000 81,888,513

Nov. 1..

15,834,000 413,686,100

597,852,100




cer-

tificatee.

Currency, outst’d’e.

4,689,256 34,142.700
4,348,676 30,948,400
3,215,239 29,147,400

3,164,530
-

820

Approved to States for internal improvements
Indian scrip locations

190,775
14.223

Total in round numbers

13,030,606
11,864.975

Disposal of the previous year
Increased disposal

1,165,631

The cash receipts, under various heads, amounted to $3,408,515.
The surveys during the same period show a total of 30.488,133
acres.
Surveyed during the previous year, 29,450,939 acres.
Increase in number of acres surveyed, 1,037,194 acres. The total
area of the land in States and Territories is 1,834,998,100 acres,
and making proper deductions, 1,218,443,605 acres are yet to

surveyed.
Texas Pacific—California & Texas Construction Company.
The first great fact to be noticed in regard to the Texas Pacific
Railway is, that it has sold no bonds, and that the general public
is not damaged by its embarrassments. The Cal. & Texas Con¬
struction Company was organized for the purpose of building the
Texas & Pacific Railway, and had a capital of $10,000,000, of
which $9,000,000 had been subscribed, $6,000,000 called in, and
$4,000,000 paid in cash. The subscribers to this stock, it is
understood, were not only liable for the $2,000,000 which had
not been paid in, but also for the balance of the $9,000,000 stock
suDscribed. The persons interested in the Texas & Pacific were
a^so interested in the Construction Company, but at the beginning
of the panic nearly all were weakened, and some were obliged to
suspend. As the work of construction advanced the California &
Texas Company gave its paper when it was deemed advisable, or
when cash was not ready.
Some of this paper, aggregating
$300,000, fell due on Tuesday, and the company bowing to the
prevailing stringency, was unable to obtain the money to meet
its obligations.
The company have 300 miles of completed, equipped, and
operated railroad from Shreveport to Dallas ; from Marshall to
near Texarkana, and from Sherman toward Paris; and 140 miles
in addition are graded, bridged, and supplied with ties, ready for
the iron.
Besides the railroad partially and wholly completed
and its equipments, the company have a most valuable land grant
of over 10,000 acres per mile from the State of Texas to strengthen
the basis of their securities. The Construction Company have as
resources the first mortgage bonds of the railroad company,
amounting to $35,000 per mile, secured by lien on the road, its
equipment, franchises, and government lands, several millions of
bonds secured by the Texas land grant, and about $2,000,000 of
uncalled and uncollected assessments on stock, a large proportion
of which is due from men who are able to pay.
Its liabilities
are generally held by banking institutions and strong men, in
large amounts, and a meeting of the creditors will probably
.

speedily arrange for extensions and curtailments.
The Philadelphia Ledger says: “The Construction Company has
issued notes and incurred liabilities

to a very

large amount,

aggregating, as it appears, some $7,000,000. Of this amount
about $4,500,000 are represented in notes maturing at various

Oct. 28—Str.

Oct. 27—Str. Oceanic,Liverp‘1—
Gold
$5,324
Oct. 27—Str.Egypt,LiverpoolGold
150,040
Oct. 28—Str. Morro Castle, Ha¬

v

9,350
$426,738

Total for the week

Previously reported
r

10.223

76,909
51.228

be*

FOR THE WEEK.

$2,018,835
4,466,325

1870.

Dry goods
General merchandise...

for agricultural colleges
for common schools
for universities
for seminaries

29,147,400

dates within the next ten or twelve mouths. These notes are
what are known as “five name” and “three name” paper.
The
names of McManus, Baird, and Col. Scott are on all the $4,500,000,
and the names of Messrs. J. Edgar Thompson and H. Houston
are included with the other three on about $1,700,000 of the four
and a half millions.
This paper, as it has matured, has been
carried as best it could by the four indorsers during Col. Scott’s
absence in Europe, whose business there was for the purpose of

negotiating a loan to meet the liabilities mentioned. With every
expectation of success in his purpose, the crisis of September 18
overtook him, and he returned without the much-needed aid to
meet the liabilities awaiting him, which are divided as follows:
$4 500,000 in indorsed notcs, $1,700,000 in loans on collateral and
personal security, $600,000 on unsecured obligations in the shape
of drafts, &c., and probably a quarter of a million of other float¬
ing debt, the whole aggregating, as we have said, some $7,000,000.
To attempt to meet such an amount in the present condition of
the money market seemed futile, and the parties yesterday yield¬
ed to the force of circumstances which they could not control,
and some $300,000, we understand, then maturing, was defaulted
upon, though but one note of $25,000, belonging to a failing
party at New York and sent to this city for collection, was
actually protested. To avoid the formality of protest and all
trouble hereafter, Mr. John Welsh has been authorized by power
of attorney to acknowledge waiver of protest in all cases of
maturing notes unprotested,

'

November 8,1873. j

THE CHRONICLE

affairs of Messrs Claflin & Co. and the Spragues, is almost unparal¬
leled, aud redounds greatly to the credit of our leading merchants
and business men. The deliberation and entire absence of any¬

Petersburg’ Railroad.—Messrs. Reuben Ragland, S. A. Plum¬
mer and W. R. Mallory sold at auction, in New York, October 29,
10 600 shares of the stock of this company, to close a partnership,

The terms include $250,000
with interest at 6 per cent.

thing like panic in these

cash and $250,000 due August 1,1875.
Mr. Ragland is president of the com¬

The whole amount of the capital stock is $1,324,200. The
Petersburg, Va.f to Weldon, N. C.
Buffalo, Corry & Pittsburg.—The final transfer of this road
to the Allegheny Valley Company was made recently.
The road
is 43 miles long, from Corry, Pa., northward to Brockton, N. Y.,
on the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern.
It is said that the
Allegheny Valley Company intends to build an extension from a
point near Brockton to Buffalo, a distance of about 50 miles.
Messrs. Fairbanks & Co., of 311 Broadway, paid in gold the
coupons due November 1 on bonds of the Lamoille Valley, Mont¬
pelier & St. Johnsbury and Essex County railroad companies, com¬
posing the Vermont division of the Portland & Ogdensburg Rail¬
road line. The coupons were also paid at the First National
Bank of Boston, where the registered bonds’ interest is paid.
The road is under the management of men whose own business
enterprises have been successfully conducted.
pany.

Wednesday, that paper of the California and Texas Construction
Company engaged in building the Texas Pacific Railway, had
gone to protest, bearing the endorsement of Thomas A. Scott, J.
Edgar Thomson and other leading men identified with the Penn¬
sylvania Railroad. This gave rise to all sorts of rumors in
regard to the latter Company, but these have been positively
denied, except that the Company has to-day declared a scrip divi¬
dend of 5 per cent, redeemable on the 1st of March, 1875, with
the option on the part of the company to redeem it at any time
after ‘six months.
The scrip is receivable at par for unpaid
instalments on stock allotments, due from the 1st to the 28th of
this month. At the present time it is probably considered a bet¬
ter policy for this company to pay a scrip dividend than to attempt
the payment of so large an amount in cash.
Added to the causes already mentioned, the advices from Lon¬
don have been unfavorable, and have increased the difficulties of
the situation by causing fears of serious trouble abroad. On
Saturday, Oct. 31, the Bank of England advanced its rate one
point, to 8 per cent, and to-day made another advance to 9 per
cent.
The bullion in Bank declined £73,000 during the week
ending Thursday. These advances in the Bank rate are precau¬
tionary, and made to prevent the further outflow of gold, but
they show, to say the least, a feeling of apprehension on the part
of the Bank managers, and that they think it neccessary to take
very decided measures to strengthen themselves.
The principal
Associated Press dispatches, to-day, were as follows :

BANKING AND FINANCIAL.
Banking Bouse

of Henry Clews & Co.,)
32 Wall street, N. Y.

\

all facilities and

Bills of

interest allowed

Exchange drawn

Continent;

received

accommodations granted usual with City Banks

in addition thereto

on

on

all daily balances.

London. November 7—12‘30 P. M.- Consols for money. 92%@92%; for the
account, 92%i&92%. United States five twenty bonds, 1865s, old, 92% ; 1867s,

England, Ireland, Scotland and the

96%

RAlIifttOA D BONDS.—Whether you

wish to BUY

or

;

ten-forties1, 90%.

Erie Railway shares, 34%.

The rate of discount in the open market for three months bills is 9 per cent,
which is the same as the Bank of England rate.
3:30 P. M.—The amount of bullion withdrawn from the Bank of England on
balance to-day is £34,000.
4 P. M.—There is a great depression in all stocks on the list, and the market
is flat. Erie railway shares, 32.
4:30 P. M.—The rate for money at the Stock Exchange on government secur¬
ities is 8 per cent.
Consols for money, 92; for the account, 92%@92%: United States five-

Travelers’ and Mercantile Credits issued available

throughout the world.

*

opelmions is most noteworthy.

The Street had not recovered from the effect of these commer¬
cial embarrassments when the news came from Philadelphia, on

road runs from

Deposit accounts of Mercantile firms and Individuals

621

*

SELL,

write to

Erie railway shares,

twenty bonds, 1865 old, 91%; 1867s, 95%; new fives, 89%.

HASSLER & CO.,

31%.
The Bank of France gained 6,000,000
week.
The associated New York City

No. 7 Wnll street. New York

francs in specie during the
banks are doing remark

ably well, and report to-day $23,065,000 of legal tenders and
$15,000,000 in specie, making together a total reserve of about
214 per cent of their total deposits and circulation. They have
74 BROADWAY & 9 NEW STREET,
gained about $6,000,000 in legal lenders in six days past, and
New York.
expect to continue gaining for some days to come.
Stocks bought and sold on commission, for investment, or on
Money
and high
margin. Privileges in Stocks and Gold negotiated.
Circular the week,on demand has been irregular1-32 down during most of
but was quoted to-day from
to 7 and 6 per
explaining privileges mailed to any address.
cent per annum.
Commercial paper has been almost at a stand¬
S. W. Lapsley.
J. E. Bazley.
LAPSLEY & BAZLEY,

BROKERS

'

still.

Cash Advances made on Cotton.

R. M. WATERS & CO.,

all)e Bankers’

alette.

DIVIDENDS.

Dividends have been declared during the past week :
Per
Cent.

When
P’able.

Nov.

Books Closed.

Albany
Boston, Concord & Montreal, pref
Elmira & Williamsport
Cincinnati, Sandusky & Cleveland, pref...
Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac....
Catawissa (Pa.), pref
Pacific of Missouri, quar

$5

Pennsylvania
Banks.
Nassau
National Back of State of New York

3

2%
3

Nov. 15.
Nov. 13.
on dem
Nov. 1.

5

scrip.

4 free.
4 free.

Nov. 15.
No 7.
Nov. 10. Nov.ltoNov.il.
Nov. 10- Nov. 1 to Nov. 10.

*

Friday, Nov. 7, 1873—6 P. M.
The Honey Market

and Financial Situation—The past

but closes with

price bid, no sale was made at the

were

able to

announce

,

Nov.

.6.

7.

lff% *106%

Ill
111% 111
113% 113% 112%
106% *106% *106
106% 106% 108%
107%
107% 108
109% 109% no
111% 111% 110%
111
111% no
105% 106% 105%
*105% *105% 105%
109% 108% 108%

>

E

Board.

Range since Jan. 1.

,

,

each class

Amount Nov. 1.—>

Registered.

Highest

Lowest.

Coupon.^

5s, funded 1881—conp.. 106% Oct. 17 116% Apr. 25 $162,657,700 $112,04 i,oUU
May 24 193,012,000
reg.. 109% Oct. 20 119
68, 1881
89.724.350
6s, 1881
6s, 5-20’s, 1862

coup.. 111%
105
coup

Oct. 17
Oct. 1‘

6s, 5-20’s, 1864
coup.. 106% Oct. 17
68, 5-20’s, 1865
coup.. 107% Nov. 3
6s, 5-20’s, 1865, new coup.. 109 Nov. 6
6s, 5-20’s, 1867
coup. .110 Oct. 17
6s, 5-20’s, 1868
coup.. 110 Oct. 17
5s,10-40’s
..reg.. 103% Oct. 11
5s, 10-40’s.
coup.. 105 Oct. 10
6s, Currency
reg.. 107% Sept. 30

to the banks that

they had effected such an arrangement for extensions with their
creditors that they would not require the accommodation pre¬
viously asked for; and yesterday, at the meeting in Providence
of creditors of A. & W. Sprague and the A. & W. Sprague Man¬
ufacturing Company, the appointment of trustees of the debtors
property was unanimously accepted, and a committee of five ap¬
pointed to represent the creditor’s interests. The spirit of mod¬
eration, wisdom, and generosity shown in the adj ustment of the

Nov.

5.
108

in prices since Jan. 1, and the amount of
outstanding Nov. 1, 1873, were as follows:

a more

Messrs. Claflin & Co.




This is the

of bonds

renewal of

a

Nov.

4

The range

depression in financial circles,
hopeful feeling, based upon a decided im¬
provement in several important particulars. On last Friday, Oct.
31, the embarrassments of the Sprague firms, and reported dif¬
ficulties of Messrs. H. B. Claflin & Co., caused a gloomy feeling
which was certainly justified by the great importance and wide¬
spread connections of the houses involved. On the next day
week has witnessed

beep

Nov.

.

3%

3%
1%

Nov.

3.
1.
period.
J5s, funded, 1881, ..coup.
.coup
Quarterly. *106% *108
111% 111%
.reg. .Jan. & July.
6s, 1881
reg
112% 112%
coup. .Jan. & July.
coup..May & Nov. 106% 106%
.coup..May & Nov. 106% 106%
.coup..May & Nov. *107% 108%
6s, 5-20’s, 1865
coup.
no
110%
,coup.. Jan. & July.
112%
coup.. Jan. & July. 112
112
112
t
.coup. .Jan. & July.
*106
107
..reg.. Mar. & Sept.
106%
coup. .Mar. & Sept. *106
!
108%
..reg..Jan. & July. 108
*

Int.

Railroads.
Boston &

have

Treasury Department issued Nov. 1 the seventh call for tlie
redemption of the five-twenty bonds of 1862. This includes:
Coupon bonds, $50, No. 10,201 to 10,600, both inclusive ; $100, No. 30,751 to
34,000, both inclusive; $500, No. 15,8)1 to 17,6>0, inclusive; $1,000, No. 36,001
to 41,000 inclusive—total, $4,500,000.
Registered bonds, $50, No. 1,316 to
1.410, inclusive; $100, No. 10,301 to 10,550, inclusive ; $500, No. 6,101 to6,300,
inclusive: $1,000, No. 25,001 to 25,650, inclusive ; $5,000, No. 7,901 to 8.100, in¬
clusive ; $10,000, No. 10,101 to 10,320, inclusive—total, $500,000. Grand to*al,
Of the amount outstanding (embraced in numbers as above)
$5,000,000.
$4,500,000 are coupon bonds and $500,000 are registered bonds.,
Closing prices daily have been as follows:

56 Broad Street.

Company.

Securities

dull and lower, in sympathy with gold, and in consequence cf
the smaller demaud at home and the depression in London.
The

Buy and Sell Cotton Contracts for a Commission.

The following

'

United States Bonds.—Government

Closing prices of securities in
Oct.
24.

»

U. S. 6s, 5-20’s, 1865
U. S. 6s, 5-20’s, 1867
U. S. 5s, 10-40’s . .w
New 5s

123%
118%
118%
120%
120%
121%
120%
115%
116%

June

9

Apr. 28
Apr. 30
Apr. 29

170.227.150

17,679,800
25,745,550
33,8(9.700

33,286,050

118.907.150
146.942,100

June 13

55,691.000

May 28

87.120,950

223 533.250

13,715,500
140,545,200

23,758,500

June 10

July 14
Aug. 25

1161/ Mav 31

54,022,100

64.623.512

London have been as follows :
Nov.
7.

Oct.
31.

23%
96%

93% !
96% I

91%
91%

91

90%

|

91%
95%
90%
89%

,

Since Jan. 1.
Lowest.
Highest.

91% Apr.
92% June
88% May
86% May

18
13

20
19

96% Oct.
96% Oct.

^

10
18

92% Jan. 81
92

Oct.

4

$

622
State and Railroad

Bonds.—State Bonds have been

$6,327,3-89 80; due depositors, $5,229,185 18; excess of asset
$1,098,184 62.
The daily highest and lowest prices have been as follows:

ne¬

Railroad bonds have shown but a moderate business
within the range of prices given below. Many of our quotations
of “ Miscellaneous ” bonds and “ Southern Securities,” which are
not quoted at the Board, are almost; nominal, and cannot always
be taken as a certain standard by which securities can be sold or
purchased. In the present uncertain period we endeavor to give
prices which will convey as correct an idea of market values as
it is possible under the circumstances to furnish.
In regard to
bonds recently in default the following is from the Railroad
glected.

do pref
Lake Shore.
Wabash
Northwest
do
pref.
Rock Island
St. Paul
ao
nref....
At.& Pac..nref.
Ohio & Miss...
Centra) o: X.J.
...

...

Han. & St. Jos.
do
nref.
Union Pacific..

72.000

450,600

51,000

225,025

mortgage land grant gold 7s
Leflvenworth Bridge 7s
Leavenworth. Lawrence & Galveston :
Kansas City & Santa Fe 10s
New York & Oswego Midland :
Second mortgage convertible 7s
Second mortgage non convertible
7s
Peninsular of Michigan 1st mortgage gold 7s
Port Huron & Lake Michigan 1st mortgage Is....
St. Louis & St. Joseph 1st mortgage gold 6s
St. Paul & Pacific

Canton
Cons. Coal

Maryland Coal.

& Frankfort.

N. Y. & St. Louis.

36,COO

Boston.

87.500

New York.

97.265
63.000

New York.
New York.

30,000

New York.

105,000
210,000
48,000

London.
London.
New York.

do

Boston, llartf. & Erie.
Del., Lack- <fc Western.

pref.

Col., Chic. & I. C
Panama
West. U11.

6s Tenn., old
6s Tenn., new
6s N. Car., old
6s N. Car., new

63
63
‘17

*63%

*32
*15

*32
Ml

9

*15

*8

*8

85
64
6 8%
57
42 %

65

85%

S3

80%

61%
57%

66%

*32

*45

*

*9

*8
86
8J

85

*82
70
L’d Gr’t
57?*
Income.
42?*

~

70%

*62 J*
*20

15

41?-*
-

The latest railroad

.

100

*99
97

.

101
*98
*96

.

.

....

.

t

f

101

101

*99

100?*

100

100%

96

97%

Since Jan.l.

July 28! 19

96?*

Nov.
Nov.

Railroad

$nd Miscellaneous

46
*15
25

»

25

4 9#

47”

*15

47”

*46
48

....

493*

46 X

•18#

39

13

*11

*45

55

16

21

..

26

’

263% 2734

*78

*59
*46
40

60% "523*

!%
82 %

15?* 163*
163* 173*
79
80\
45?* 48k

25” *203*

,26?* 273*
*773*

79%

46k

48$
.

55

40V
133*

7

713* Jan.

6 130

Jan.

6
Oct. 15
Nov. 8

Feb.
76% Feb.
57

100# Jan.

1! 70# Jail.

15i 82
Sept. 30! 86

Jan.
Jan.

Whole

year

1872

—,

Lowest, j Highest.
4 89 Nov. 11 101 % Apr. 2
1 107’* Feb. 12130 Apr. 25
4\ 30 Feb. 5 75% May 20
4' 60 Mch. 2i 87 May 20
15! 83# Nov. 11; 98% Mch. 30
2 64 Nov. 11 80% Apr, 4
4 66?* Jan. 5 230 Nov. 23
3! 83% Nov. 111102 Nov. 25
11101 Nov. 31,118?* Apr. 2
21 j 51 Nov. 11 64# Apr. 1
24| 72# Nov. 111 83 Jan. 20
29!
!
24j 40 Nov. II 51% Apr. 1
7, 98 Oct. 4 113# Jan. 15
3! 3# Jan. 2! 11% May 18
7; 91
Dec. 13 112# Mch. 16
7; 28 Nov. Ill 59# Jan. 17
3 44 Sep. 18; 71# Jan. 19
4 28# Jan. 5 42 Apr. 1
11 19% Jan. 5 42% May 21
6; 72 Jan. 2 148?* Oct. 26
67# Sep. 18, 82?* Dec. 23
2: 25# Jan. 13. 49# Dec. 6
lj 30 Jan. 13 59 Oct. 21
7! 53% Jan. 2 103# Oct. 22
29 88?* Sep. 181 99?* May 20
8 59 Jan. 6: 80?* May 24
6i 60# Jan. 11 88# July 6
29! 56# Jan. 4 95 May 21
8) 76 Jan. 6 107 Oct.
23;
.

Oct. 28 110
May
Oct. 311 58# Apr.
Nov. 3j 28
Mch. 17.!

'.

j...

earnings reported are as follows:
Latest earnings reported.
» Jan.l to latest date.

1873.
1872.
1873.
$469,251 $547,928 $4,371,710
23,794
27,063 1,053,450
139,998
126,968
963,673
Bur.,C. Rap.& Minn. Month of Oct.
Central Pacific
Month of Sept. 1,392,125 1,251,688 10.183,178
Chic. & Northwest. Month of' Oct. 1,451,827 1,433.918 11,486.359
Month of
Erie
Oct. 1,882,421 1,817,369 16,436,629
Illinois Central
Month of Sept.
876,113
741.782 6,050,012
39,107
58,680 1,227,367
Indianap., Bl. & W.. 2d week of Oct.
93,736 2,924,689
80,696
Kansas Pacific
3d week of Oct.
374,573
398.568
Lake Sli. & Mich. S.'3d week of Oct.
203,514
191,841 1,634,124
Marietta & Cin
Month of Sept.
148.745 5.875.114
144,461
Michigan Central... 2d week of Oct.
Milwaukee & St. P.. Month of
Oct. 1,012,704
950,945 7,431,116
371,344
356,232 2,752,519
Ohio & Mississippi.. Month of Stpt.
75,126
87.329 .2,940,971
Pacific of Missouri.. 3d week of Oct.
274,567
296,502 2,304.880
St. L., Kans. C. & N. Month of Oct.
47,310
45,718 1,889,660
St. Louis & Iron Mt. 3d week of Oct.
112,378
151,973 1,168,764
St. L., Alton & T. n. Month of
Oct.
13,510
11,972
490,445
do
branches. 3d week of Oct.
122,167
118,053 1,070,918
St. L. & Southeast.. Month of
Oct.
112,593
115,140
Tol.,Peor. & War... Month of Oct.
124,613
145,845 4,676,642
Tol., Wab. & West., 2d week of Oct.

1872.

$4,381,309
893,037
818,019
9,307,443
10,344,896
15,742,680

5,750,520
1,059,426
2,956,168
1.408,843

5.303,404
5,741 145
2.515,581

2.820,842

2,347,250
1,772,970
1,179.178
395,411

4,651,883

Tlie Gold Market.—Gold has still been weak, and on Tlmrsday the price touched 106^, the lowest price yet made in the
present downward movement, and tlie lowest since J une, 1862.
To-day, on the advance of the Bank of England rate to 0 per cent,
the price showed a re-action, and closed at 107^-.
The principal
cause for the low range of gold seems to he found in the fact
which we have frequently referred to of late—that there is no
demand for it.
Neither merchants nor speculators furnish any
support to the market, and as gold is now merely a commodity,
the price naturally goes down.
It is difficult to see how the
present decline has the slightest bearing upon the resumption of
specie payments, as the Government was never in so poor a con¬
dition to undertake the accumulation of specie for the purpose
of redeeming its notes in coin.
The decline is one of the acci¬
dents of the situation.
On gold loans the rates paid to-day for
carrying were 3-64, 1-32, 6, 4, 7, 3, 7 per cent gold and flat.
Custom receipts of the week were 1,263,000.
The following table will show the course of the gold premium
each day of the past week:

4

Jan.

2

Feb. 7
Mch. 17

6

6
1
1
3

61109% Apr.
5; 106% June 17

Stocks.—Tlie stock market

greatly depressed again by the gloomy aspect of finan¬

affairs, and nearly all the leading stocks touched yesterday
to day, the lowest figures yet made.
There was a'better
feeling at times to-day, and a recovery in prices, but the market
closed weak.
The Pennsylvania Railroad has declared a scrip
dividend, which is a disappointment to those who expected cash,
but it may not be impolitic for this immense company to fortify
itself by keeping on hand a pretty large cash balance at the
present time. The Receiver of the Union Trust. Company, which
decided some days ago to resume business and double its capital,
makes a statement to November 5,1873, showing; Total assets,
cial
and




rn 3*
•

Atlantic & Gt. West. Mouth of
Oct.
Atlantic & Pacific... 3d week of Oct.

This is the price bid, no sale was made at the Board.

has been

•

1*

52
15
21

,

Jan.

Nov.
1 80
Jan.
Oct. 31 j 83% Jan.
Jan.
61104% Sept.
Nov. li 107% July

•

16}*
17 >*
81

Roads.

Jan. 20
84
Sept. 30; 97
.Tune 28
80
Sept. 19 loll., Feb. 10
61# Nov.
f»i 89 Feb. 4
57
36
101
100
100
96

l! 39,% Jan.
5j 43% Feb.

56
35
38
13

Maryland Coal

Lowest. 1
Highest.
62
Nov. 5 86
Met. 19
62
Nov. 6 86
McL. 17
18
ov.
5, 34% Jan. 30
Oct. 11 19
43?* Oct.
1 56#
7
Oct. 23! 15?*
9
Oct. 151 23

57 X

41%

t—

16
35

*7

*7%

....

*58
43

7.

*17

....

*43
*7

gold..
Un.Pac.,lst

•

6.

*32

,—

Nov. Nov.

62
*02
IS

....

Cent. Pac.,

do
do
Erie let M. 7b
N. J. Cen. 1st 7s..
Ft Wayne 1st 7s.
RocjC IeldlstTs...

Nov.
5.

....

6s Virg., old
do
consolid.
do
deferred.
6s S.C., J. & J....
6r Missouri

v.

7| 52% Feb.

44% Oct.

Express.

Consolidated Coal

Closing prices daily,and tlie range since Jan. l,have been:
Nc

lj 62% Apr.
7: 79# Jan.
25! 3ft% Jan.
141 49?* Jan.
6106# June
11 10# Feb.
l ino' June

Nov.
Nov.

15
21

Nov.

Wells, Fargo & Co

A. check, on the other hand, is an order on the
will not stand.
bank to pay so much money, and the payee must use due dili¬
gence in collecting it, or the money the order proposes to transfer
will lie there at his risk.

o.

Feb.
Apr.
Feb.
Feb.
l! 97% Feb.
15! 75% Jan.
14i 85 Feb.
6; 91
Feb.
14 117% Mch.
.5:106#
19 140
7j 69#
7 82

Nov.

,

N o v.

85% Nov.
1 % Nov.
79# Nov.

25

Canton

Reply—Tlie county is still liolden for the payment. The coupon
is payable on and after the dates specified. The promise to pay
at a bank is different from a check drawn upon a bank.
The
former is an agreement to be there with the money on a given
day.: If the holder of the promise does not come for it, and he
should afterward sue the promiser tor the money, the debtor
might pay the funds into court, and hypleading that he had
always been ready to pay the money at the place specified save
his cost, but lie would still be bound to pay the face of the obli¬
gation. To sustain this plea, however, he must have been ready,
not only on the day first specified, but every subsequent day, to
meet tlie demand, so that if the banker fail and shut up, the plea

1.

21% Oct.

United States

:

Iowa. Oct. 27. 1873.
Editor of the Journal of Commerce:
I hold the coupons of a county bond which were made payable at Jay Cooke
& Co.’s Deccmbi r 15, 1872, and June 15, 1873. which I neglected to collect and
To whom must I look for their paymentIs the county still
now hold.
lioldeu for their payment or not y
"
“ Iowa.”

Nov.

77# Nov.
90
Sept.
35?s Nov.
56% Nov.
57# Nov.
32% Oct.
31# Oct.
53# Nov.
80# Oct.
21# Nov.
43% Nov.
12# Oct.

American Express

obligations.”

80

Jan. 1 to date 1873.
sV
j
Highest, j

25
76
41

do
pref.,
Pacific Mail
Adams Express

months such bonds have been

153*
163*

2U* 22‘*

*-53* 663*

sale was made at the Board.

Telegraph.. 43# Nov. l! 94?* Feb.
18
Sept. 30i 46# Jan.
Quicksilver

comparatively unsalable, and the result is that they are left without the means

of Commerce lias tlie following

: no

14% Nov.
16% Nov.
77# Nov.

Hannibal <& St. Jo

default now for the lirst time. All the roads named above, and now in de¬
fault, with exception of the Union Pacific Central Branch, have been engaged
in the construction of new or renewal of old lines which they could not ex¬
pect to pay for out of their income. They have properly depended on the sale

The Journal

pref........

Rock Island
St. Paul
do
pref
Atlantic & Mciiic pref.
Ohio & Mississippi....
Central of New Jersey.

do
do
Union Pacific.

8*

*20

16%
17%

39% 39%
*12
13%

13

asked

823*

163*

233*

from Jan. 1, 1872, to this date was as follows:

Northwest.

premium for gold the amount in currency would be about $1,220,000, are in

to meet their

•

44

"13

do pref
Lake Shore
Wabash

Of this amount $1,457,025 is payable in gold, and adding 8 per cent for
the premium on gold, which would be $100,631, the currency requisite for
these payments is $1,841,824.
“
Some of these are old acquaintances.
The Peninsular, Port Huron &
Lake Michigan, St. Louis & St. Joseph, and St, Paul & Pacific have not paid
for some time, we believe. The Chicago & Michigan Lake Shore defaulted on
an issue whose coupons were due in September; the Leavenworth. Lawrence
«fc Galveston on its own bonds last July. The others, six in all, with a total
of $1,149,925 due, all but $235,000 payable in gold, so that at 8 per cent

some

•

•

*39%

N. Y. Cen. & Hud. R...
Harlem
Erie

“

For

-

Lowest,

$1,741,190

of bonds in order to meet this cost.

45%

,

:

Total

*77
47
*49
*57
*47

60**

*45

82

17
25

25% 27%

76

S*

33%

45# 50

•

45

This is the price bid and

The entire range

73
*14
*20

25

“47%
*55

....

*

*

27

65
40
14

New York.

52.500

i2%

*40
3.8

•

433* 443*

16%

28%

76

43
47

45

•

22

i5%

85

*15
*19%

23}*
45

*

48% 51#

28%

ii”

Wells, Fargo..

j N. Y., London,

26%

,2:

16% 16#
17 % 15%

....

56# 54
60?* 621*
3 6*
363*
31/4 3534
533* 55>*
843* 86 4

51#
86

S3
16

18%

....

*

563* - 533*
83**
24
22J*
46#
443*
1234 123*
22% 22#
223*
*
85 M
85#
1%
1%
*13*
«...

*....

25

62

603* 633*
853* 363*
35
353%

23
45

83

*80

62

843* 863*

1%

17%

43% 49#

643*

56

....

S3

18
80

80J*
103 1033*
SS# 89X

61X
853* 863*
343* 35

423* 13
22# 23%

1%

Nov. 6

78

60%

47

47

16%

*10
*18
25

*62

87#
23?* 2534

27

*20

Nov. 5.

59

*85%

80

Pacific Mail....
Adams Exp....
American Ex..
United States..

Boston.

57

Nov. 4.

853*

21% 23%
56%
1%
1%
79% S2%
16% 18
14#
16%

Quicksilver....
do
pref.

New York.

21,000

First mortgage main line land grant gold 7s....
Second mortgage main line land grant gold 7s..
L'nion Pacific, Central Branch, 1st mortg. gold 6s.

613* 64
S5X 873*
3434 86 >4

West, Un. Tel.

Boston.

I

77% 81
10234 1023*
89>* 43%

Panama

Place of

Kansas Pacific:
First

80% 83#
102 102#
4234 43#

Col.Chic.&l.U.

payment.
payable.
$189,000 N. Y. or London.

Burlington, Cedar rapids & Minnesota gold 73..
Burlington & Southwestern Is mortgage 8s..
Chesapeake <fc Ohio 1st mortgage gold fi*s—
Chicago & Michigan Lake Shore 8s of 1871

*

Bost., H .& Erie
Del., L. & West

1 ON WIIICU^DEFAULT HAS BEEN MADE.
Interest

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday,

573* 643*
3334 873*
81% 35
54
57%
83
37 3*
213* 25
44% 47

Harlem
Erie

Wc give below a list of the bonds whose
was
on
the 1st of November and not paid. Of these the St. Louis and Southeastern
promises to pay before the end of the month, and the Burlington, Cedar
and Minnesota expects, wc believe, to make payment soon. The list, perhaps,
is not entirely complete, but we do not think that more than two or three
other issues of bonds whose interest is due this month can be added to the
number.
COUPONS DrE NOVEMBER

Nov.3.

79)4 83%
9934 161
44
41)4

N.Y.Cen.&H.R.

due
Iiapid

half-yearly interest

Monday,

Nov. l.

Saturday,

Gazette:
“

(November 8,1878.

THE CHRONICLE

Quotations.
Open- Low- High- Clos,

I
Saturday,
Monday,

est. ing.
ing.
est.
Nov. 1. ...108% 108% 108?* 108#
“
3 ...108# 107# 108# 107?*

Tuesday,
“
Wednesday, “
Thursday,
“

Friday,

“

4.
5. *//.i67%’io6#
6. ...106% 106% 107

ioV%

Total

Clearings.

,

.Balances.
>
Currency.

Gold.

$33,367,600 $1,021,748 $1,130,703
44,376,000

....Holiday

107%
106%

36,812,000
46,105,000

7. ...106% 106% 107# 107#

45,790,000

1,144,000

1,256,656

i,"314,245* i,*473,877
3,544,949

1,399,812

1,727.301

3,536,288

-

THE CHRONICLE,

8, 1878.]

Novem

108# 106* 108* 107* $206,450,000
108# 108# 171,410,000

Current week

108# 108#
week
to date!.112 # 106#

Previous

Jan#?1873'.

follows :

as

November 7.

,

60 days.

prime bank¬

London

ers’ sterling
Lon. good bankers’.

..

..@105#
@105#

Paris

(bankers)

Antwerp

@10t#
5.35 @5.37# 5.28#@5.30
5.33 #@5.35 f>.26#@5.28#

5.26#@5.28#
5.3 2#@5.35
39# @ 39#
38#@ 39#
91#@ 94#
92#@ 93
40 @ 40# 40#@ 40#

Swiss..

Amsterdam.-.

Hamburg...
Frankfort
Bremen

russian thalers....

94#@
@

92#@ 93
70 @ 70#

94#

71

71#

House

32#@5.33# 5.27#@.
5.32#@5.33# 5.27#@5.28#
5.31 #@5.32# 5.20#@5.27#
39#@ 39#
40#@ 40#
93 #@ 93#
94#@ 95
40#@ 40?8
40#@ 40#
93#@ 9.1#
94#@ 95
70#@ 70#
7t#@ 71#
5

House and £ul*

»4

if
»<

“

Total

Payments.
Currency.
$592,740 25 $416,299 94
513,785 36
799,837 90

—Receipts. -

$128,000

1...
3...
4..
5...
6...
7...

..

-Sub-Treasury,
Gold.

Receipts.
ti

@.

follows:

Custom

Nov.

108

@103#

105

The transactions for the week at the Custom

Treasury have been as

days.
@108#
107#@108

days.
106#@106#
106#@106#

107# (#108
107#@lu‘

...

3

tiO

Lon.prime com.st-er. 102
r

October 31.

,

3 days.

314,000

Gold.

Currency.
$732,203 87
384,738 15

$1,058,551 35
1,020,018 74

Holiday
360,000
200,000

QUOTATIONS IN BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA, BALTIMORE, &C.
—

$1,399,812 $1,536,288
821,500 007, .35

119# 107#
Foreign Exchange.—The market for exchange has been still
further depressed, and on Thursday the nominal rates for prime
bankers’ sterling were reduced to 105^ and 108, while sixty-day
bills were, in fact, sold down to 10.j@105£ for prime, and 104
104f for good bills. Demand bills were comparatively firm, at
I07£@108 for prime. Commercial, bills sold at 104@10C| for
documentary on bankers, and 10o£@102 on merchants. Even at
these low rates very little business was done.
To-day, on the
foreign news, rates were advanced, and prime bankers’' sterling
bills were quoted at 1054@10o.} for sixty days, and 108@108^ for
short sight, the .latter being active, but sixty day bills nearly
nominal. There was much irregularity in the rates of different
bankers. The absence of any large demand has been the prin¬
cipal cause of the prevailing weakness. Nominal quotations are

1,166,637 27

1,074,394 80

1,096,009 55

633,740 79
405,172 S3

901,083 94
885,425 95

‘710,736

915,473 26

574,437 48

86

371,302 55
425,294 02

....$1,263,000
$48,952,474 87 $3,808,764 82
$19,267,427 43 $5,352,092 81

Balance, Oct. 31...
Balance, Nov. 7...
Boston

Banks.—Below

National Banks, as
Nov. 3, 1873:

give a statement of the Boston
returned to the Clearing House on Monday,

Capital
$75U,000
1,500.000
1,500,000
1,000.000

Banks.

Atlantic
Atlas
Blackstoue
Bosun

Loans.

200,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

Broadway
Columbian
0 mtinental
billot
Everett

Specie. L.T. Notes. DeposIts.Circnl

$1,654,500

600,000

BjyUtou

we

$01,000
7,f.00
23,590

3,103,000
3,677.000
2.280 000

5,000

1.631,000

20,ICO

4:»6,O0U
2,431.200
2,124,000
2,631.000
673.(00
3.063,200
1,532,400

12.000
28,(00
17,100

$127,000

$176,000

179,030
366.300
103.100
72,000
49.300
237, U0

932.400
1.502.100
734,300
657,000

4,000

563,000
710.000
831,000

14

4,400

29,000
20,200

2,207,400
1.470.O00

6,000

213,000
65,030

1,000,000
800,000
800,000

2,22o.3JU
1,573,(100

27,700
J 1.009

23j,!00

2.1 9.000

400,000

1,162.100

7,300
2l.0e0

58.300
71.400
"666.000
77.400
156,500

1,000,000
300,000

HlObe
Hvnilton
Howard
Mirket
Massachusetts

1,000,000
750,000

Maverick
Merchants.
Mount Vernon

3,000,000
200,000
1,000,0)00
1,000,000
900,000
1,000.000

New England
North
Old Boston
8hawmut
Shoe & Leather
Btato
S ltfolk

1,000.000

2.000,000
1,500,000

6,904.100
6/0.00G
2,552,000
2^65.(00
1,901.300

368,000

2,715,000
2.881,100
3,5 6.00C

8,000

S3.500
46,000
117,000
....

16,0(0

600,000
2,000,000

Traders
Tremont

Washington

First
Second (Granite)...
Third
Bank of Commerce
Bank of N. America
B’k of Redemption.
Bank of Republic...
.

City
Eagle
Exchange

Hide & Leather.....
Ravere

3.02T.000

1,398,400
3,3Oi».UO0

60,000

750,000

1,853,000

35,030
4,”00
23,030
233 000

1,000,000

3,761,100

1,600 000
300,000
2,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,500,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

4.66J.2U0
1.501,000
5,014,100

1,000,000

Union.../.

1,500,000
2,000,000
200,0*30
1,000,000

Webster

1,500,000

Security

27,100

1,967,10C
4,513,000
2.9-9.200
2 ,(03,000
1,907.100
4.050.00G

3,396,100
4.462.300
P56.000
2.655,000
2,4'7,<00

500.000
500.000

2.306.000
750,00)

500,000

Commonwealth
Central
Manufacturers

40,<‘00

2,200

4,000
65,000
....

23.200
23.500
233,'JOU
27,mo
19,000
1.03')
57.000
63.000

19,000
2,000

597.53d
453
175

7 i 2.300

38,000
76,000

Faneuil Hall
Freeman’s

7o6,2u0
796,430

215,000

144.009
63.0. 0

200,000

$446,0!$

796.0(,0
576,01)0
799,000
118,000
567 ,U(i0
353,41)0

1.150.100
408.400
339,030
681,000
694,000
499,000
910.200

85 0)0

357,0u0
243.100
448.000
352 .('4)0
417 01)0
244.5(0

439,000

2,335,000

1,595.4(0
176.01/0

1,077,000
1,020,0(0
810,000

790.300
796.0(,0
368,(09
598.000
523 0i)0
99D.Oc0

237,(00
1,014 200

141/00
237.000
132.390
280.000
229,000

1,070.(00
1.029,100
918,000
670,000

217.000
81.000
2 27.000
97.300
459,000

820 000

763.30
179.000
711,400
595.003
707.000
770,00J
171,000
793,000
596.2(10
830,000
793.200
456,0U0
34 l,(-0()
795.51)0
799.4(0

1.689.200

750,000

545.200

180,000
543.000

951,000
483.400

1,113.000

839,000

2,189,000

85.700

947.0 )0

1,620.000

515.200
120.000
203/00
232 000
36,000
208,000
261 wo
107 3 0
286.100
77 400
166.200

319/00

1,072,400
670.000
496,000
68 i,f'00
1,484,03 0

142,000

958,000
1,313,000

171.000

1.212.200

43.200
3,000

236,100
281,000

691.000

01)0
009

494.000
800.000
150.000

84,400

Pennsylva.,gen.m. conv, 1910.
BOSTON*
Maine 6s
New Hampshire,
Vermont 6s

$1,849,100

The total amount “due to other Banks.’’ as per

$9,045,400 $42,297,500 $26,139,100

statement of Nov. 3, is $17,101,700.

The deviations from last week’s returns are as
Decrease.
Increase.
increase.

Specie..

LegalTenders

The

following

Date.

Aug. 4
Aug. 11....
Aug. 13....
-Aug. 25
Sept. 1....
Sept. S
Sept. 15
Sept. 22...
Sept 29..

...

net. 6

Oet 13
Oct. 2) .,.
Oct. 27....

NOV. 3.,..




are

....

...

...
....

....

....

....

....

..;
...

39,530
517,100

Deposits
Circulation...'

Increase.:?!,017,000
Increase.

89,800

the totals for a series of weeks past:

Loans.

....

$7:1.500

follows

123,441.700
123,976,500
123,200.800
123,417,600
12 4,06 ■< ,000
123.523,800

119,832,700
119,463.000
120,327,300
120,197.900
120,559.900

Specie. LegalTender
10,955,600
1,526,600
lo/rs^.ioo
1,342,400
10,530,600
1,130,200
10,671,900
1,042,800
10.733,200
1.121.500
10.0". 1,300
1,0! >6,300
9,016,300
1.238,500
1.642,900
8,418,600
8,182,700
1,399.200

Deposits. Circulation
25,550,000
50,372,300
25,1:5.100
48,953,100
25.457.400
48.429.500
25.451.400
48,202,400
25,4 iO/. OO
48.712.500
48.169, S00
25.544.500
25.611.500
45.928.300
25.682.400
44,835,800
25.677,70
40,965,600
25,9 78.41)'’
40.849.300
26.061.50
41,016,700

1.863.400
1,608/ 00

S,308,300
9.003,200

1,728.900
1,809,900

7/50,900

40,957,000
41.250.500

26,090.10-

8,528.300

1,319.400

9,045,100

42.297.500

26,139,10

26.099.30-

Perkiomen 1st in. 6s.’97.
Phila. A Erie 1st 111.6s, ’81...
do
2d m. 7s. ’88......

97

6s

Massachusetts6s, Currency...
do
6s Gold, 1976...
do
58, Gold
Boston 68
do
5s,

do
do
do

96#

Chic., Bur. A Quincy
Cin., Sandusky A Clev. stock.

do
boat, ’85,
Pennsylvania 6s, 1910

Schuylkill Nav. 1st m. 6s, ’72.
2d m.,’82....
do
do
68,’95
do
6s, Imp., ’81..
do
6s, boat, ’88.
do
7s, boat,’89...
Susquehanna 6s, *94
Wyoming Va.ley 1st m. 6s, ’78.

122

BALTIMORE.
Maryland 6b, Jan., A., J. A O..

BONDS.

.

Marietta A Cin., 1st M.,7,1891.
do
do
2d M.,7,1896.
Norfolk Water 8s
Northern Cent., lstM.(gnar)
do
do 2dM.,S.F., V85

77

70*

-

Exempts

Parkersburg Branch

do
6s
do
7-30s
Ham. Co., Ohio 6 p.c. long bds.
7 p.c.,1 to5yre.
do
do
do
do
lg bds, 7 A 7.30s

45
49
49

Nesquehoning Valley.
12

i

43#!
14

j

14

43#
16 j

49#; 49#,

110
50

....

I

51

I

112# 113

,

pref
••••

CANAL STOCKS.

Chesapeake A Delaware
Delaware Division

Lehigh Navigation
Morns

pref

Schuylkill Navigation

RAILROAD BONDS.

LOUISVILLE.

Alleghany Valley 7 3-10s, 1896..

Belvidere Delaware,1st m.5,’77
do
do
2d M.,’35
do
do
3d M.,’87
Camden A Amboy. 6s, ’75
do
do
6 s,’83
do
do
6s, ’89
do
do mort. 6s,’89...

Louisville 68, ’82 to ’87
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
Loulsv. C. A

100
62

do

2d M., 6,1875...

do Lou.L’n(Leb.br.ex)€,’93
do Consol. 1st M.,7,1898....
Jefferson., Mad. A Ind

Louisv., Cin. A Lex.,pref
do
do
common.
Louisville A Nashville

Lehigh Valley, 6s, 1S98
do
do
do reg
do
do new 7s, reg., 1910

M.,6,1880...

2d M.,7,.

1st M., 7,1906—
Lex., 1st M.,7, ’97..
Louis. A Fr’k., 1st M., 6, ’70-’78..
do
Lonisv.Loan,6.’81.
L. & Nash, let M. (m.s.) 7. ’77..
do Lou* Loan (m.s.)6. *86-’87
do
do
(Leb.Br.) 6, ’86
do lstM. (Mem. Br)7,’70-’75.
do lstM.(Leb.br.ex)7. ’80-’85

’95.

Little Schuylkill.1st M.,7,1877.
Northern Central 2d m, 6s, ’85.
do
do 2d m, g, 6s, 1900
do
do 2d m. 6s. 1900...
North Penn. 1st in, 6s, ’85
do
2d m. 7s, ’96..
do
10s, chat, in., ’77 »
Oil Creek A Al. R., con. 7s, ’88.
Oil Creek 1st m. 7s, ’82
Penn A N. V. Canal 7s, ’96-1906

WharMs

special thx 6s of’89.
Jeff., Mad. A I,lstM.(IAM)7, ’81
do

con8ol.,6s,’94...

Connecting 6s 1900-1904
East Penn. 1st mort.7s, ’88
El. A W’msport, 1st m, 7s, ’80.
do
do
5s....
Harrisburg !st mort.6s ’83....
h.&B.T. 1st mort. 7s, ’90
do
2d mort. 7s, ’75—

6s,’97 to’98
Water 6s, ’87 to ’89..
"Water Stock 6s, ’97.

do

93

Camden A Atlan. 1st m, 7s, ’73.
do
2dm, 7s. ’80..
Catawissa, 1st M. conv., ’82....
do
chat. m. do
’88....
new 7s, 1900
do

Pennsylvania, 1st

Cin., Ham. A D.. 1st M., 7, 80...
do
do
2d M.,7,’85...
do:
do
3d M., 8,77...
Cin.. Ilam.A Ind.7s guar
Cin. A Indiana, 1st M., 7
do
do 2d M.,7,1877..
Colnm., A Xenia, 1st M.,7, ’90.
Dayton A Mich., 1st M., 7 81..
do
do
2d M.,7,’84..
do
do
Sd M.,7. ’88..(
do To’do dep.bds,7,’8l-’94.
Dayton A West., 1st M.,7,1905.
do
do
1st M., 6,1905.
Ind., Cin. A Laf,, 1st M.,7
do
(I. AC.) 1st M.,7,1888
Little Miami, 1st M.,6,1883....
Cin,Ham. A Dayton stock....
Columbus A Xenia stock
Dayton A Michigan stock ....
do
8 p. c. st’k guar
Little Miami stock

pref

Union pref

do
3d m. cons. 7s,
Junction 1st mort. 6s, ’S3
do
2d
do
1900

Covington A Cin. Bridge

24
48

20

Westchester.

do

•

51#

-

84

Cincinnati 5s

S3#

Little Schuylkill
Mdnehill

fwania
Philadelphia A Erie
Philadelphia A Reading
Philadelphia A Trenton
Phlla., Wilming. A Baltimore
United N. J. Companies.

89#

33

16

Lehigh Valley

Penns

83

CINCINNATI.

.

River

96 V

84'

preferred

do

pref

Norristown

80#

-

Central Ohio

pref

Harrisb’g, Lancaster A C..
Huntington A Broad Top.

95

do 3d M., S. F.. 6,1900
do
do 3d M. (Y. AC) 6,’77
do
do
do Cons, (gold) 6,1900
Pitts. A Connellsv., 1st M.,7, ’98
do
do
1st M., 6,1889
West Md.lstM., endorsed.6. ’90
do
1st M., unend.. 6,’90..
2d M., endorsed, 6/90.
do
Baltimore A Ohio stock

RAILROAD STOCKS.

do

98 iK

do
6s,190C...
do
1890, Park 6s
Baltimore A Ohio 6s of ’75...,
do
6s ol ’80...
do
do
do
6sof .85 ...
do
3dM.6a
Central Ohio, 1st M., 6

Camden & Atlantic
do
pref..
do
Catawissa
do
pref
Elmira A Williamsport.,

„

loi#!

do ’ 6s, Delence
Baltimore 6s of’75
do
1884

100
Pennsylvania 5s, coup
do
6s,’67,5-10,1st... 100
do
do
10-15,2d... 163#
do
15-25, 3d... *7# 108
do
95# 90#
Philadelphia 6s, old
101#
do
6s, new

Pittsburg 5s.
do
6s,

75

do
Coal Co. bonds.
Union 1st mort.es, ’83..

PHILADELPHIA.

do

gold, ’9',

do

Morris, 1st M.,6, 1876
do
2d M., 1876....

do
preferred
Vermont A Canada
Vermont A Massachusetts

West Jersey

’77

conv., ’82
conv., g,’94

do

SI
81#
6VI 6#

Port., Saco & Portsmouth..
Rutland common

Alleghany County,5s,coup...
Allesrhany City 6s

1(0

85

do

Manchester & Lawrence
161
Northern otNew Hampshire.. 93
117^ 118
Norwich A W orcester
50
Ogdens. & L. Cuarcplain
do
do
pref....
Old Colony

Northern Central
North Pennsylvania.
Oil Cre/x A Allegheny

[8

do

(New Hampshire)....
Fitchburg

do

reg...

CANAL BONDS.

Eastern

do

do

6s, g., 1910..

Chesapeake A Dela. 6s, ’87...
Delaware Division 6s, ’78
Lehigh Navigation 6s,’Si
do
HR, ’97...

Concord

Elmira A Williamsport
East Pennsylvania.../

65

m.7s,c. 1911

SunburyA Erie 1st m.7s,’77..
Sunbury A Lewiston 7s
Warren A F. 1st m. »e, ’96
100
West Chester cons. Is, ’91
West Jersey 6s, ’83
i)8
do
1st m. 6s, ’96
do
do
7S) ’97
Western Penn.6s,’93
do
do
6s, p.b.,’9
Wilming. A Read.,lstM.,7,190<
do
do 2d Mort, 190)

Connecticut River
Connecticut A Passumpslc, pf.
Eastern (Maas.)

do
7s.
New Jersey State 6s,
Delaware State 6s

g.

Phil.. Wllm. A Bal.,6s, ’84
Piu»., Cin. A St. Louis 7s

Cheshire, 6
Eastern Mass., conv.. 6, 1874...
Hartford A Erie, 1st M (new)7.
Ogden8burg A Lake Ch. 8s
Old Col. A Newport Bds, 6, ’76.
do
do Bonds,7, 1877..
Rutland, new, 7
Stansted A Chambly 7s
Verm’t Cen., 1st M., cons.,7,’86
do
2d Mort., 7,1891
Vermont & Can., new, 8
Vermont A Mass., let M. 6,’83.
Boston & Albany stock
;
Boston & Lowell stock
!
Boston & Maine
<
Boston A Providence
Cheshire preferred

m

Phlladelphla A Reading 6s, ’80
do
do
7s, ’93
do
deb. bonds, ’93

gold
Chicago Sewerage 7s
do
Municipal 7s
Portland 6s, building loan
Burlington A Mo. L. G.,7......

do

$49,7)50,000 $119,7)8,400

Total

Bid. Ask

SECURITIES.

Old. Ask.

SECURITIES.

STATE AND CITY

..

623

£

ST. LOUIS.
6s, Long Bonds
6s, Short do
Water 6s gold
do
?o (new)
Park 6s gold
do
Sewer SpecialTax 6f
North Missouri, 1st M.7o.,,..
do
2o M. 7n...-.
tlo
3d M. 7s...,
Pacific (ol Mo) 1st M. gld....
72
Kansas PaciOc stock
Pt»2ific RR of Mo. stock
*
And Interest
St Louis
do
Ao
do
do

99#

96#

.

—

i ’

THE CHRONICLK

624

QUOTATIONS of stocks and bonds in new york.
are quoted on a previous page ana not repeated here.

ana

active Railroad Stocks

cent

value, whatever the par

government Bonds

Bid. Ask.

sboubitixs.

568781

State Bonds*

do

do

63*
6 2*

%

new

do

do

new

deferred do

Georgia 6s
do
7s,
do
do

44
7
59

....

6. It.R.coup

to N.

do

ex

coup

new

do
bonds.

Louisiana 6s
do
do new Donds
do
do new floating debt
do
7s, Penitentiary

do

ao

do
do
do
do

22
8

9*

H'x
85*
83*

79
35

do
do
do

103

25

i66”
101

j*

104

HO*

112

ftlallroad Stocks.

(Not previously quoted.)
Albany * Susquehanna
Chicago & Alton
do
pref
Chic. Bur & Quincy...
..

Cleve. & Pittsburg, guar....
Dubuque * Sioux Citv
Harlem pret
Illinois Central
Toilet A Chicago
Long Island
Marietta & Cin., 1st preferred
do
do
2d pref

Michigan Central

72*

Mo.t Kansas & T
c.
New Jersey Southern
N. Y., New Haven & Hartford
N.Y., Prov. & Boat (Stoningt.)
Ohio & Mississippi, preferred.
Pitts.. Ft W. & Chic.,guar...
ao
do
special..
Rensselaer & Saratoga
Borne, Watertown & Ogdens.,
fit. Louis, Alton & T. Haute...

70

52'
82

99*
80

60

65

..

55
20

...

Spring Mountain Coal
wllkesbarre CoaP<fc Iron
46
100

247
42

55'

Mining Co.
pref,

J*
20*

26

6s, real estate...
68, subscription

Erie is*- Mortgage Extended
do
do
Endorsed.
do 7s, 2d do
1879
do 7s, Sd do
1883
do„7s 4th do
1830

96

7u
89

2d Mort

36

85*
[GO

93*
98*
95

90

£

»

....

i

.

I f-

American Central 8s
J ..
Chi. A Southwestern RR. 7’s

90

..

<

do
do
'
Col. A Hock. V. 1st 7s, 30 yrs
do
do
1st 7s. !0 yrs
do
do
2d 78, 2U yrs.

8

....

Chic. & Can. South. 1st m gl ‘
Ch.,iD. A V., I. div., l m gTd ’
Cleve., Mt. V. A Del. 7s, gol(
Connecticut Valley 7s, gold.
Connecticut Western 1st 7s..

8

....

S

....

89
76

92

..

66

99

97*

90*

91

63

£4*

Atchison A N ebrnska 8 p. c....
Bur. A Mo. River, stock
do
do
Land M. 7s..
do
do
2d 8., do 7s..
do
do
Sd 8.. do 8s..

•

.

•

a a •

• •

.

.

....

•...

90
•

•

•

.

....

80

A Miss. 1st 7’s, gld
2d 7s

•

Leav., Atcb. A N. W. 7s, guar
Leav Law. A Gal., stock
do
do
IstM., 108.
Louisiana A Mo. Riv. lPt m. 7
Logans., Craw. A S. W. 8s, gld
Michigan Air Line, 8s
Monticello A P. Jervis7s, gol<
Montclair 1st 7s, gold, guar...
do
7s, income
Mo., Kan. A Texas 7s gold...
Mo. R., Ft., 8. A Gulf, stock.,
do
do
1st. M,10i
do
do
2d M.,10i
N. J. Midlana 1st 7s, gold,gua:

....

.....

65

7tT

...

•

•

•

•

«...

....

....

....

....

60
55
70
50

55"

80~ 5“

North. Pac. 1st m. gold 7 8-10s
Omaha A Southwestern RR.8

....

Oregon A California 7s, gold.

....

....

••••

Pitts., Cin. A St. L. 1st 78

50
•

do
do
7s, gold....
Peoria A Rock I. 7’s, gold

99

100
75

12*

50
61
70

85*
94

.

....

....

....

~TT
....

•

•

2a 7s
Southern Minn, construe. Ss.
do
do 7s
St. Jo. A C.Bl. st M.t 10s.
do
do
8 p. c..
St. Jo. A Den. C.8s,gold/W. D
do
do
8s, gold, E. D
Sandusky, Mans. & Newark 7s
St.Louis, Vandalia A T. H. 1st
do
do
2d
St.L. A So’eastern 1st 7s, gold
St. L.. A St. Joseph,lst.68,gld
Southern Central of N. Y. 7s..
Teho A Neosho78, gold
Union A Logansport7s
Utah Central 6s, gold

i".’

branch,6s,gld

....

75

;

,

80
....

•

•

•

•-

....

....

•

•

•

do
do
do

""

do
do
do

6s

7s
stock

do
do

^

2ds, 6s
3ds 8s

w

52*

85

70
80
80
76
75
78
70
86
94
80
86
60
98
88
82
90
85
90
85
91
8
90

100
81
62
82
97
93
81
69
-

16
92
86
88
90
• ••

do
do

ChA Rnth. 1st m. end
do
lit M., 8s....

T<
v

80

ao
...

90

.

«

aa • a
• •

«

£

FAST DUX COUPONS.

....

77*

• •

62
a a# ••••••«

V

rm

....

New Loans.
Hous. A Tex C. }st m. 7s ext

stock

do

....

80

72“

95

8

40* *

Si
60

s

....

IF

75

2dm., guart’d 6s...
3d m..6s
4th m.,8s
RR., Ga., 1st mtg

do
do
do

60
....

70*

1st end
Income

s

•

•

“

83
90
15

P.. 1st 8s.

do
do

&
Mobile A Mont.. 8s gold, end..
&
Mobile A Ohio sterling
do
do
do
ex ctfs.
do
do
8s, interest....
do
2 mtg, 8s
do
do
do
income
do
do
stock
k Orb
do
do
cert’s,8s.
*
f;
K
do
7s
do
do 2d mo., 8s
do
a
3.C.,lstM.8s....
2d M., 8s
do
0
3X.,lstS,68
do
2ds, 6s
*
do
3ds, 8s
do
4ths,8s...
K
2d m., 6s.
do
do
3d m., 8s.
do
do
k ;h.,:
do
do conv. 7s.
do
Danv. 1st cons’d 6s..
r
Piedmont 8s...
do
do
lsts, 8b
s

60“

Steubenville A Indiana 6s

Walklll Valley 1st 7b,gold
West Wisconsin 7s, gold

70
75

95

Sioux City A Pacific 6s
Southern Pacific 6*s,gold
South Side (L. r.) 7s

Union Pac., So.

•

80

Rome A Watertown 7s....

“

•

....

Rome, W. A Ogdensburg7s...
Rondout A Oswego 7s,gold..

96

'

50

9$
8J

A Ohio, 10s,

do

....

55

2d 7s.
stock

* h
Montgom.A Enfanla 1st 8s,gld
end. by State of Alabama...

50
88
85

....

60
95
95

stock....,
do
do

do

....

98

A Charleston, 1st 7s.

::::) Montgomery A West
*

••

...

15
30
94
78
79
76
85
62
70
90
72
72

endorsed

do
do
6s
j
Memphis A Little E. IstM...
*
Mississippi Central, 1st m..7s
do
2dm., 8s..
^
Mississippi A Tenn., lstm.,7s
do
do conaold.,3

....

95

....

Haven, Middiet. A W. 7s
Newburg br’ch 7s, guar. Er.~.

88

J
Memphis
do
do
J
Memphis

....

22
9

AA* *

—

do
do

do
do

25"

r

72

do
stock
(
Greenville A Col. 7s, gnar....
do
do
7s, certif.
Macon A Brunswick end. 7s..
j
1
Macon A Western stock
1
Macon and Augusta bonds...

74
75

...■

••••

52
42
64

.(
Cheraw and Darlington 7s....
East Tenn. A Geoi gla 6s
1EastTenn.A Va.6b end. Tenn
]
E.Tenn.,VaA Ga., 1st M.,7s.
do
do
stock....

86*'

....

.

52

Charlotte Col. A A.,lstm.,7s.
do
do
stock
(
Charleston A Savannah 6s, end
s
Savannah and Char., 1st m., 7s

84

....

N.

86

•

85
88

87

2d 7s guar
N. Y. A Osw. Mid. 1st 7s, gold
do
do
2d 7s, conv

85

80

gold....

k*6" Georgia R. R., 7s
90

•

.......

72*

•

Hi
90
76

•

....

7s, 1876, Land Gr
78, Leaven. Brch
Incomes, No. 11. ;

60*

•

30

r

do

20*

•

1

do

8b

Central Georcria. 1st M..7s
do
do
consol. M. 7b
do
do
Btock

....

....

.

Kansas City A Cameron 10s..
Kan. C., St. Jo. A C. B. 8 p. c.
L. Ont. Shore RR. 1st m. gld ?i 5

45

..

•

c

No 16.

do

Ala. A Chatt., lst,M,8s, end...
Ala. A Tenn.R, 1st M..7«...‘.
do
2d M.,7s
Atlantic A Gull consol.
do
do
end. Savan’h
do
do
stock
do
do
do
gnaran.

*

....

•

r

Lake Sup.
do

*

•

95*

Kal. A White Pigeon 7s

92

•

2d 8s

83

101
89
76
35
70

•

....

.

Stock

*

85"

...

7s, Land Gr., gld
1
7s, e do nei

do

railroads, 6«

bailroadb.

....

*

Indianapolis A St. Louis 7s..
Ind. A Ill. C let m gold 7s..
Jackson, Lansin'/A Sag. 8s.
Jack., N.W.A S. E. lstm gl s' 4
Kansas Pac. vs, Extension, gbi
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do

equip...

Indianap. A Vincen. 1st 7s,gu:

K13*'

miscellaneous List.

Atchison, Top. A S. Fe 7s gld.

do

to

7s, new,

£8

.

S5

83

Lafayette, Bl’n A Miss. 1st M.
Pekin,Lincoln A Decatur IstM

Arkansas Levee bonds 7s
Atchison A P. Pk,6s gold
Atlantic A Pacific L.G. 6’s gld

^

do
do 7s, plain....
Grand River Valley 8s
...
Hous. A Tex. C. 1st g old 7s.

90*

Sinking Fund..

2d 7s, cur’y, ’91

....

.

50
101

Morris A Essex, convertible... 80
do
do
construction.
Winona A St. Peters 1st m
C. C. C. A Ind’s 1st M, 7s, S. KJ 95
La Crosse A Mil. Ss, 1st M

Del. A Hudson Canal 1st M....
Pacific RR. of Mo., stock...
PaclficR.of Mo. 1st 6s. gold ’88

do

85

•

Iowa Falls A Sioux C. 1st ,s.

95
99

60

•

on

do

97*

bonds, 7s

1

77

.

Indianap., Bl. A W..ist 7s, gl

95

96*

•

Flint A Pere M. 7s, Land Gr
Fort W.. Jackson A Sag. 8s.

73*

Bur., C. Hapids A Minn. 7s,gld

Rome A Watertown 1st M
Am Dock A Im.Co. 7.’86
West. Union Tel., 1st mort. 7s.
Long Island RR 1st M. 7s
Smith town A Pt. Jeff. 1st M...
St. Louis, Jack. A Chic. 1st M.
South Side, L.I, 1st Mort. bds

10s

....

d
d

96*'

70
60
85
65
68
70
76
80
80
65

consol. 68

do
do
do

....

□

75

W

ao

do
do
do

15
90

....
....

8

Evansville, Hen. A Nasnv.7s.

77

52*

7s.

6s, new.

60

•

.

8

5J?

ao

96
82

•••

50
62
50

75'
80'

80
to
70

• • • •

.

bonds.6s

end.,M. A C.R.R....

8s

ao

do

8

do

new

Mobile 5b

60
90

Chic., Danv. A Vincen's <s,g] d

Chic. A Mich. Lake Shore 8b
Des Moines Valley 1st 9s
do
do Land Grant 1

do
do

50*'

....

80'
85
54
52
62
75
72*
75
60!

Charleston, 8. C., 7s, F.L.bds...
Columbia, 8. C., 6s
Columbus, Ga., 7s, bonds....
Lvncbburg6b
Macon 7b, bonds
Memphis old bonds, 6s

T

...

s

72

8s

Augusta, Ga.,7s,bonds
Charleston stock 6s

50

•••

Chicago A Iowa E.S’s.... w
m. gld
2d mort gold

T

do

0

Evansville A Crawfordsv. 7s
Erie A Pittsburgh let 7s
do
2d 7s

94

do
do
guaranteed
Cedar Falls A Minn. 1st M

do

43

d

lOO'

Consol. 7s

do

...

...

t-

Detroit, Hillsdale A In. RR. 8

68*

6U
99
96
yo

New York A N. Haven 6s

Boston, H. A Erie,1st mort.

c

c

Securities.

Atlanta, Ga., 7s

c

tit

t

O’ <£

Chesapeake A O. let

0

•••

•

95

do
do
2d M.
A St. Pan 1 1st M 8s P.D.
do
do
do 7 3*10 do
do
do
7s gold R. D.
do
do 1st Mort. LaC.D
do
do IstM. I.AM.D.
do
do .IstM I. A D..
do
do
1st M I. A I...
do
do
1st M H.A D.
do
do
1st M. C. A M.
do
do
2d M
do
Marietta A Cin.. 1st Mort
Chic. A Milwaukee 1st Mort... 91
Joliet A Chicago, 1st Mort.... 101

Tol.. Peoria A Warsaw, E, D..
do
do
W. D..
do
do
Burl’n Div.
ao
do
2dM..

-

95
95
95

..

Peoria A Hannibal R. 8’s.

...

.

90
90
90
90
90
90
99

cities.

Dutchess A Columbia 7s...

.

do

Keokuk A St.
Carthage A Bur. 8s.
Dixon, Peoria A H an., 8s.
O.O. A Fox R. Valley 8s.
Quincy A Warsaw, 8b. ...
Ill. Grand Trunk
Chic., Dub. A Minn., 8s..

...

•

do
do
2d Mort.
do
do
3d Mort.
do
(•) 8 p. c. eq’t bds
Cleve. A Pitts., Consol, 8. F’d
do
do
3d Mort
do
do
4tb Mort
Chic. A Alton 81nking Fund..
lo
do
1st Mortgage...
,0
do
Income
Ohio A Miss., consol, sink. f...
do
Consolidated....
do
2d
do
Dub A Sioux C., 1st M...
do
do
2d div.
Peninsula 1st Mort., conv

do

M,7’s,
Paul, 8s....

60
90
60

...

g d

2d

Southern

...

55

..

d

92

do

Galena A Chicago Extended
do
2d Moit...
Chic. R. Island A Pacific
Morris A Essex, 1st Mort
do
do
2d Mort
New Jersey Central, 1st M., n
do
do
2d Mort.

do

Railroad Bonds*

M. Y. Central 6s, 1888
do
6s 1687




reg'd

Cm.,Lafayette A Chic. IstM.

pref

7s. 1876
7s, conv. 1876..

89*

Extn. Bde
1st Mort..
coup gld bds

7s,gof

.

97
93

Han. A Cent. Missouri 1st M..

Mariposa Mining Co..

do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do

Iowa Midland, 1st mort., 8s...
dan. A St. Jo. Land Grants.
do
do convertible...
Del.. Lack. A Western, 1st M.
<lo
do
2d M.
do
do
7s, conv.
Tol. A Wab’h, 1st Mort. ext’d
do
1st M. St L div.
do
2d Moil
do
Equip. Bds
do
Cons. Convert.
Hannibal A Napt^s, iBt M
Great Western. 1st M., 1888....
do
2d M. 1893...
Quincy A Tol., 1st M., 1890....
111. A 80. Iowa. 1st Mort

do

15*

American Coal
Boston Water Power
Cumberland Coal and Iron
Cent. N. J. Land Improv. Co. 45
240
Pennsylvania Coal
Canton Co
Delaware A Hudson Canal
Atlantic Mail Steamship

do

100

..

gld.

6s, 2dM.,s id

mada Southern 1st

Central Pac.7s, gold, conv..
Central of Iowa. 1st M, 7’s g d.

99*

bds.

Eastern, 1st Mort..
Col., Chic. A Ind. C., 1st Mort.

IYIlscellaneoiis Stocks

Land &
do

95*

Chic. A Gt.

i"

do
do
pref.
St. Louis A Iron Mountain....
8t. L., Kan. C. A Northern pref

Toledo, Peoria A Warsaw
Toledo, Wab. & Western, prel.

73*

93

65
8a

Morris * Essex

-

109*

*

92
92
81
70

do

do
do
do

102
105

New Jersey Southern 1st m 7s
Pitts., Ft. W. A Chic., 1st M....

103*

Clev., Col., Cin. & Indianap

93

81
Lake Shore Div. bonds
Lake Shore con. coup bonds.
do
Con.reg. bonds...
Pacific R. 7s. guart’d by Mo... 92*
Central Pacific gold Bonds.... 80
100
do
State Aid bds.
80
Western Pacific bonds
Onion Pacific 1st M’geBonds. 65* 66*
do
Land Grant, 7s.. 57^ 53
41* 42
do
Income 10s
Illinois Central 7 p. ct., 1875... lOu
90"
Bellev’le A S.Ills. R. IstM. 8’s.
95
Alton A T. H., 1st M
84
do
do
2d M. pref
'.3
do
do
2d M.income..
Cblc. A N. Western 8. Fund... 9-*
65
98*'
do
do
Int. Bonds
do
do
Consol. bde 7$*
do
do
do
do

105
105
lu5
105
105
105

6s, Canal, 1873
68, do
68, do
6b, do
6s, do
1874
5s, do
5s, do
6s, dogldl837....

California Pac. RR.7’s,

...

102
85
85

do
6s, 1888
do
7s, 1878
N«w York Bounty, reg
do cou
do

new

60
90
75
18

.

Bid. Ask

Houston A Gt. N. Int m. gl 17s
Internat’l RR, Tex, 1st m gid 7s
Ind., B. AW. Ext., lit m gl 7s
Tol., Wab. A W. mort. gla. 7s.
Texas A Pacific 6s, g
St. Louis A S. E. RR. con. m
Portland A Og. (Vt. div.) 6s g.

..

101

S.*

sboubitixs.

•

.

97

Cleve., P’ville A Ash., old bds.
do

*

'h
:h
div.)g. 7s ”...

Bur., C. R. A Mo. (M.

90*

Detroit, Monroe A Tol bonds.
Buffalo A Erie, new bonds

S5
85

Michigan 6s, 1878

87
103

•

Prices represent the pel

separate list.

Ask

.

...

J*.

a

...

1..

do
do
do

do

Cleve. & Tol. Sinking Fund
Cleve. A Tol., new bonds
do

6s, levee bonds

Kentucky 6b

..

do
do
do
do

do
dr

1st M.

Bid

BKCTUBITIKfc.

92

Mich. 80.7 per ct.2d Mort
Mich. S. AN 1. 8. F.7p.c....

25

do
8s
do
do
1875..
8s
do
do
8s
of 1910.
California 7s
do
7s, large bondB
100
Connecticut 6s.
Rhode Island fis
Alabama 5s, 1883
do
do, lo66
do
8s, 1886
do
8s Mont & Euf’la R..
do
88 Mab. & Chat. R..
do
Ss
of 1S93..
Arkansas 6s, funded.
do
7s,L. R. & Ft. S.iss.
do
7s, Memphis & L. E..
do
7s,L.R.,P. B.&N.O
do
7s, Miss. O. & R. Riv
do
78 Ark. Cent R
80
Texas, lCs, of 1876
Ohio 6b,1875
100
do 6s, 1881
do 6s, 1886

Illinois 6s coupon,’77
do
do
1879
do
War Loan
In liana 5s

2d
3d

do

8s, 1882
Chic., Bar. A Q. 8 p. c. 1st M...

1868.

Asylum bonds

do

do

Funding Act, 1866.

do
Special Tax
South Carolina fis....
do
do
Jan.& July.,
do
do
April* Oct...
do
do Funding Act, 1366
do
do Land C, 1889, J & J
do
do Land C, 1889, A AO
do
do 7s
of 1888.
Missouri 6b
d
Han. <fe St. Joseph.
io

20
28
20

Long Dock Bonds
Buff. N. Y. A E.lstM., 1877....
Hud. R. 7s, 2d M. 8. F.1885
do
7s, 3d Mort., 1875
Harlem, Con.M. A 8’kg F’d 65
Albany A Susqh’a, 1st bonds .
Mich. Cent., Consol. 7s, 1902...

90
85

bonds
78, endorsed

do
do
do
do
do
do

Bid. Ask.

BBCTO SITUS.

do
do

48
9

new

7s, Gold
North Carolina 6s, old
do
do
do
do
do

68
45

35

bonds
consol, bonds...

do
do
do

67*

32

Virginia 6s, old
4o

u N. Y. Local Securities ” are quoted in

be.

may

Erie 7s, 5th mortgag 1888
do 7s, cons. mort. gold bds..

U. S. Bonds.
(Quoted previously.)

Tennessee 6b, old

[November 8,1878.

Consol. ( oup

unphls City Coupons....

Vouhvlll** C!itv (IiimmnR

56
85
75
70
•••♦

625

CHRONICLE.

THE

November 8, lb<S.J

NEW YORK LOCAL SECURITIES.
Insurance Stock List.

Bank Stock List.

Marked thus (*) are
not National.
America*...
American
Atlantic

..

Head*.
Butchers & Drovers.
Bull’s

Central
Chatham

Chemical
Citizens’

400.000

25
100

City
Commerce...

Commonwealth

Continental

Corn Exchange*
Currency

...

Goods*

East River

Eleventh Ward*
Fifth
First
Fourth
Fulton
German

;••••;*

American
Germania*
Gree iwich*
Grocers
Hanover

1,000,000

100 10,000.000
100
750,000
100 2,000,000
100 1,000 000
100
100,000
100 1,000,000
25
350,00 >
25
200,000
100
150.000
100
500 000
100 5 000,000
30
’600,000
100 2.000,000
100
’200,000
25
200,000
40
800,000

...»

.

^

100

Harlem*

Manutctrers’& Build.*
Leather Manufactrs...
Manhattan*. ..........
Manut <& Merchants*.
Marine
Market
Mechanics
Mech. Bkg Asso’tion..
Mechanics & Traders..
Mercantile
Merchants

Merchants’ Ex
Metropolis*
Metropolitan
Murray Hill*....,
Nassau*
National Gallatin
New York
New York County
N Y.Nkt.Exchange..
N Y. Gold Exchange*
Ninth
Ninth Warn*
Nort i America*....,.
North River*
Oriental*.
Pacific*
Park

Peoples*
Phen'x

Republic
Security *

St. Nicholas
Seventh Ward
Second
Shoe and Leather
Sixtii
State ofNew York....
Tenth
f-lrd
Tradesmen’s
Union
West Side*....

1872

1871

i

000.000

J. & J.
J. & J.

M.&N.

and

10

10

Last Paid.

8
8

8
8

130

99*

May 1, 78...4
Jan., 72...4

24

24
20

Q—J.
& J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
ev.2mos
J. & J.

20
10
8
12
36
10
20
8

10
8
12
36
10
20
9
6
8
10
16

M.&N.
J.& J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
F.&A.

Q—J.

Adriatic

’68..15
July 1 73.. 12

Jan.,

5Lu

73...4

July 1,73...5

.

.

.

.

”65”
July 1,73...4
July 1.73... 6
July 1,73..15
July 1,73...5
800
May. 73.. 10
no
July 1,73.. -4 100
July, 173.3*
".6*
7
Jan., 73.3*
10
Aug., 73...5 '90*’ 125
16
Jan., ’73...4
6* JulylO/73.3*
8
July 1,73...4
7
July 3,78.3*
14
July. 78.3*
20
July, 73... 5
82
8
July 1,78.. .5
10
Mayl, 73...5 132*
9
*87}4
Aug., 78...4
7
May 1,73. .5
....

•

•

»

•

•

'

«*«•«•

J.& J.
J. & J.

8
7
10
20

£5:

J. * J.
M.&N.
F.& A.

......
•

4

M.&N.
M.&N.
J. & J.
J. & J.
F.&A.
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.

••••••

S
10
7
20
10
8

20
Mayl. 73.. 10
10
July 1,78.. .5
8
July 1,73.. 4
4
Mch., 73...4
12
July 1,73...7
8
July 1,73.. .4
10 • Julvl0,’73...5
12
July 1,73...6
10
Aug.10,78. .5
8
Jan., 78...4
12
July 1,73...6
!0
July 1,78... 5
10
July 1,73 ..5
8
Mny 1,73...4
10
May 1.73...5
10
May 1,73...5
8
July 1,73...4
6
July 1,73...8

6
8

12
10
8
12
10
10
9
10
10
8
8

•

••

•

•

•

•

150
....

•

•

•

•

.....

*iio *
135
100
135

ii»
83

ii4*

’io" "io" July 7,73.1.5
Apr. 1,72. .4

9

7
n

$

12
16
12
10
7
8
**•»-«»

May, 73...4
Apl.10.73.. .4
July 1,73...5
July, ’73...7
July 1,73...3
May, 78...5
July 1,73... 4
Jan., ’73...8
7 * July 1.73...4
7
July 1,73.3*
12
July 1,73...6
16
Aug. 1,73,.. 8
12
July 1.7S...6
10
July 1,73...5
7
July 1,73.3*
8
Feb., 73...4
July, 71.3*
9
Aug., 73...4
6* July. ’73...3
10
July 1,73.. .5
12
June, ’73...6
July, 78...5
8
M»y, 73...4
July, 71...4
8
July 1/73...4
12
July 1,73.. .6
10
May, 73...6
4
July 1/73...4
8
8
10
15
7
5
9

8
8
10
16
7

....

......

......

120

*i>6’

*

*90
••••••

.

•

...

83*
iis'

7
10
12
8
8
12
10

Brooklyn Gas Light Co....
Citizens’Gas Co (Bklyn..

......

*so*

•

•

••

......

......

......

••••••

iso

City R.R. Stocks and Ronds.

certificates

Harlem

Jersey City & Hoboken...
Manhattan

Metropolitan
ao

25
20

300.000

J. & J.
A. & O.
F.&A.

20
50
100

386,000
4,000,000
2,800,000
750,000

J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.

100
25

Nassau. Brooklyn.
do

.

...

20
10
7
10
15

20
10
7
10
15

5 000,000

‘66 1,000,000

certificates..

Mutual, N. Y

Q-F.

2,000,000
1,200,000

1,000.000

10

10
7

500,000

M.&N.

1,000,000
1,000,000

J. & J.
J. & J.

7

M.&N.

People’s (Brooklyn)
do
do
bonds.

4,000,000
1,000,000
300,000
40*),000

Westchester Countv

...

Williamsburg
do

....

M.& S.
F. & A.

10
10
7

Bleecker Bt.dk Fulton.Ferry -stock 100
900,000
1st mortgage
1 00
ortgage
614,000
Broadway dc Seventh Are—stock. 100 2,100,000
1st moitgage..
1000 1,600,000
:o 2,000,000
Brooklyn City—stock
1st mortgage
1000
300,000

Broadway (Brooklyn)—stock

100

Brooklyn dk Hunter's Pt—stock... :oo
1st mortgage bonds..
1000
Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn—stock 100
’

1st mortgage
2d
do
3rd
do

500
500
500
Central Pk, N. dk E. Rivet—stock 100
1st mortgage
1000
2d
do
1000
C>ney Island dk Brooklyn—stock 100
1st mortgage
!000
Dry Dock, E. B. dk Battery—etocdz 100
1000
lstmortgage
2d mortgage
1st

1000
Ferry—stock.. 100
1000
lstmortgage
Grand Street dk Newtown—stock.
20
lark Avenue—stock
50
1st mortgage
1000
Ninth Avenue—stock
100

mortgage

82d St. dk Grand St

lstmortgage

second

1000
50

Avenue—stock

1st mortgage
2d mortgage
3d mortgage

loou
10 0

Cons. Convertible
Sixth Avenue—stock
1st mortgage
Third Avenue—stock
1st

mortgage

Williamsburg
1 it

1000
1000
..

100

1000
100
1000
100

dk Tlatbushr-etocic.
1000
mortgage

'This

column




thows

last dividend

on

July 15.73...5
July 15,73. .5
Apr., 72.8*
Apr., 73...5
Jan., 72.7*
Feb., 73...5
Jan., 72...5

1(5
140
150

200

Atlantic

Bowery

..

Brewers’ & M’lst’rs

Broadway
Brooklyn
Citizens’

City
Clinton
Columbia
Commerce Fire....
Commercial
Continental
tCorn Exchange...
.

Eagle
Empire City
Exchange
Farragut

400.000

250.000

200,000
300,000

100
25
17
20
70
100
30

200,0)0

100
50

100
25
40
100
SO
50

250,000
800,000
200,000
200,000
1,000,000

200,000
800,000

20* * 26" 20" 20" Oct!, 73.10 iso*

210,000

Aug.'TS

lffi4

1872

100
160

July, 78

1911
1834
1885

F.&A.
M.&N.

1882
1890

J. & J.

Q-F.

1,200,000
420,000

M.&S.

1874-’76

J. & J.
J. & J.
M.&N.
A.&O.
M.&N.

850,000
200,000
150,000
815,000
750,000
250,000

A.&O.
M.&N.
M.&N.
J. & J.

Q-F.
J7& J.

2,000,000

2^000,000
WWW

125,000

7

io
10

10

20

10

5

10
10

10
10

10
16

10

10

—8,143
-377,067 10

io

—13,877
—1,955

ii

16.593 10

-59,857
98,818
85,139
99.483
30,532
—11,545
30.692
135,727
11,379

10
10
10
5

95

Aug.,73..5

*65*
’so*

75.
85
95

5
12
10

9

10
10
20
5

#

^

10

15
....

14

15

14

....

....

10
20

19,786

199,972
136,370

118,477 10
163,139 11
76,413 12
43,883 10
—137 10
13,772 10
—25,' 24 10
143,866 15
—895
849
—532

11
5
10
10
12

19,568

i14
10

iso'
*65*
75
ISO

90
60
80

*90
90

100
80
90
140

87*
95

85

10
20

10
5
20

11
20
12
18
16

i2

Julv, *73.10 155
July, 73..5
Julv, 73..5 *50*
July, 73. .7 120
July. 73. .4

20
12
20
16

16
25
6
20
16

July, 73.19 iss*
July, 73.10 !70
July, 72..5
July, 73.10 W
Aug., 73.10 130

53U

215,368 16

July, 73. .7
July,’73.7
July, 73. .5
July, 73. .5

140

116

26

131,693 io" io"
10
102,437 10

24,§ii

Sept./73..5
July, 73..5
July, 73.10
July, 78..5

10
11
20

4

10
20
12
18
15

80
70

is

i6
186,829 15
46.594 5* 10
-17,027
24.692
4,884
123,000
175,540

125
80

„

10
10
20
10

10

50.484
50,000

107,240
20,697
187,019

24

io" io" io" io" July, ’73..5
14

'

85

63,561 io" io" io‘
11
11
53,394 10
20
20
210.717 20
3.073

96

io" July, *73. .5
12* July/73.7*
Aug.,73.14
10
8k July, ’72. 5
15
17* July ,73.. 10
Ju’y.TS.. .5
8* 10
10
July, 72. .5
5
io
July, 72.. 5
5
10
Jan., 72. .5
July,’73...4
9*
10
10
July, 78. .5

26,798

6,800 5
91,859 10

65

10
10

10
4

16
10
12
12
11
12
10
10
16

'3*

io

18
23
11
12
12
12
11
10

20
14
16

12
10
10

3*
20

16

10
10
10
10
14
14

7
10
10
10
14
14

io

io

14

5
10

55

.Tn’y.
Oct.,
Julv,
July,

78. .5
73..6
73.10
’73..8
Aug.,73.10
July, 73..6
July, 73..5
July, 73. 5
!ulv,73.. 6

80

July, 73...

July, 72..5
July, 73 .5

75

iis*

165*
*60*
112*
170
140

i-8
75

July,71.3*
Aug.,73.10 i40

July, 73..5
July, 73..5
13* July/73...6
10
.Tulv, 73..5
10
Aug,, 7k.5
12
Julv, 7k.7
14
July, 73. .5

*85*
*70
*95*
"95'

100
100
130

i‘15*

100*

and profit scrip,

Prick

Rate.

New York:
Water stock
1841-63.
do '
1854-57.
Croton water stock.. 1845-51.
do
do
..1852-60.
Croton Aqued’ct stock. 1865.
do
pipes and mains
do
reservoir bonds
Central Park bonds. .1853-57.
do
do
..1853-65.

1852.
1870.

95
90

Consolidated bonds
175

Nov.*73
1873

"95*

Street
do

ftnp. stock'
do

var.

var.
var.

Brooklyn:

City bonds

do
1861-65.
.4
Local imp. bonds.... 1862-68.
do
do
....1866-70.
N. Y.Bridge bonds... .1870.
Park bonds
1860-71.
Water bonds
1357-71.
3 years.
Sewerage bonds
Assessment bonds...
do
...

800,000

44,01 U
—1.025 10

90

Aug., 73..5
July, 73.7
July, 73..5
Jan., ’66. .3
July, 73..5

100

266“

Bonds due.

1865-68.
Market stock
1863.
Soldiers’ aid fund
do
do
1863,
Improvement stock.... 1869
do
c.o
....1869.

July’70

J. & J.
J. & J.
J.&D.
F.&A.

io

July, 78. .5

no79-

City Securities.

Floating debt stock— 1860.

July*73

170,000

254,000
800,000
797,000
167,000

—24,456

33* 13

*

Dock bonds.

Aug/'fe
Aug.'

30J.000

208,000
750,000
200,000

20

Over all liabilities, Including re-insurance, capital
t Gone into hands of receiver since Boston fire.
Before figures denotes impairment of capital.

do

214,000

200 088
41.599

827,9*8
30,906 10
51,251
—13,675
31,603 20

200,000
200,000
200,000
204,000

17
Firemen’s
10
Firemen’s Fund....
150,000
Firemen’s Trust...
10
150,000
Gebhard
100
200,000
Gennan-Amencan 100 1,000,000
Germania
50
500,000
Globe
50
200,000
Greenwich
25
200,000
Guardian
100
200,000
Hamilton
15
150,000
50
Hanover
250,000
Hoffman
50
200,000
Home
•100 2,500,000
25
Hope
150,000
Howard
50
roo.ooo
Importers’* Trad.. 100
200,000
50
Irving
200,000
Jefferson
30
200,010
20
150,000
Kings Co. (B’klyn)
40
Knickerbocker
280,000
50
150,000
Lafayette (B’klyn)
100
Lamar.. *
200,000
Lenox
25
150,000
50
200,000
LongIsland(Bkly.)
Loriilard
25
300,000
Manuf & Builders’. 100
2 0,000
Manhattan
100
250,000
25
Mech.&Trad’rs’....
200,000
150,000
Mechanics’(Bklyn) 50
Mercantile
50
200,000
50
Merchants’.
200,000
?0
300,000
Metropolitan
Montauk (B’klyn).
50
150,000
Nassau (B’klyn)...
50
200,000
National
200,000
87*
N. Y. Equitable....
35
210,000
New York Fire
100
200.000
N. Y. & ionkers.. 100
200,000
Niagara
50
500,000
North River
25
350,000
25
Pacific
200,000
Park
100
200,000
Peter Cooper
20
150,000
20
150,000
People’s
Phenlx (B’klyn) ..
50 1.000,000
Relief
50
200,000
Republic..... .... 100
300,000
Resolute
100
200,000
25
200,000
Rutgers’
100
Safeguard
200,000
St. Nicholas
25
150,000
Standard
50
200,000
Star
ICO
200,000
100
200.000
Sterling
25
Stuyvesant
200,000
25
Tradesmen’s
150,000
25
United States
250,000
100
t Washington
200,000
Williamsburg City. 50 250,000

''to''

5
6

Feb., May Aug.& Nov.

Bid. Ask.

Months Payable.

1880

A.& O.
A.&O.
J. & J.

600,000
500,000

-

Interest.

July, 73

115.000

550.000

20

July, 73.10
is* July/73.3* ICO
Aug.,’73..7 1:0
165,898 14* 14* 14* 20
17
14
14
July, 78..5 103
52,163 13
10
10
10
July, 72. .5 55
—30,712 io
10
10
10
11
Jliiv, 78..5
11
10
10
July, 73..5 '70*
—10,613 10
8* July/73... 5 90
53,159 16 18 20

153,000
300,000

100
110

J. & J,

1,161,000

20

July.73.3* 50
July,’72..
Julyf78..7 180
July, 7a. .5
July, 73..5
July, 73..5
June,73.10 i«6’

184,271 16* i6" is" is" Aug./73.10 i«*
20'
185
20
20
20

200,000

Various.

278,000
700,000
100.000
164,000

20

255,321 20
—39,659

....

-i

Jan., *78...5
Jan., ’73...5

278,000

17
12
10

14,423

May, 73.... 152
July 15,73. .4

Q-F.

200,000

13
12
10

10
5
14
6
10

3,150
—16,557
88,323 17
27,845 10

200,000

50
25

10

10

200,000

Various.

J. & J.
J. & J.

Bid. Askd.

—

Various.
Nov. 1,73.10

J. & J.
J &D.
J.&D.

166 1,000,000

bighth 4venue—stock

7
10

1869 1870 1871 1872 Last Paid.

....

200.000

100
50
100
25

180

scrip...

ewYork

25

A£tna
American
American Excb’e..
Arctic

...

**-•••

10

Price.

100

[Quotations by Charles Otis, 47 Exchange Place.]

do

•plus,
Jan. 1.
Par Amount.
1873.*

’67...5

July,

J

street.)

Dividends.

Capital.

July 1,'73... 5
Jan..

J. & J.
J. & J
J. & J.

100
'500,000
100 1 50'),' 00
50
500.000
100
100,000
100
600.000 J. & J.
F.&A.
50 2,050,000
100
500,000 J. & J.
100
400,000 J. & J.
J. & J.
100 1.000.00C
J. & J.
25 2.000,000
50
500,000 M.&N.
25
600,000 M.&N.
100 1,000.000
M.&N.
J. & J.
50 3,0 0.0CO
5*0 1,235.000
J. & J.
100
50:',000
100 4,000 000
j.*& j!*
100
23,000 A. & ().
100 1,000,000
M.&N.
A.& O.
50 1,500,000
100 3,000, 00
J.&J.
100
200,000 J.& J.
100
500,000 J. & J.
100
500,000 J. & J.
100 1,500,0)0 J. & J.
100
200,000
100 1,000,000
J. & J.
50
400,000 .1 Ar. J
25
300,000 J. & J.
50
422.701
Q-F.
J. & J.
10n 2,000,000
25
412.500 J. & J.
J.& J.
<0 1,800 000
100 2,000,000
F.&A.
100
J. & J.
500.000
too 1.000,000
F.&A.
100
500.000 J. & J.
100
J. & J.
300.000
100 1,000,000
J. & J.
J & J.
100
200 000
100 2,000,OX)
M.&N.
100 1,000.000
J & J.
100 1/00,000
J. & J.
40 1,000,00'
J. & J.
50 1,500,000
M.&N.
100
200,000 J.&J.

—,

Importers’ & Traders’.

Gas

Periods.

(Quotations by K. S. Bailey, broker, 65 Wall
Askd

Bid.

Companies.

3,000.000
500,000
5.000,000
300,000
250,000
1,000,000
200,000
800,000
100 8,000,000
25
450,000
100
300,000

Bowery

Dry

Par Amount

100
100
100
75
100
25
25
25

•

Exchange

Broadway

Dividends.

Capital.

Companies.

1878
Aug. 73
1877
1876
1885
1888

Mav.’TS

140

189C
Aug.*78
1090

MAB.

rtocke, but date of maturity

oT boiute.

100
150

100

Jersey City

Water loan
do

....1809-71

Sewerage bonds
1866-69.
Bergenoonda
1868-60.
Assessment bends... 1870-71.

5
6
6

7
6
5
6
5
7
6
7
6
7
6
7

6g.

May & November.

1870-80
1875-79
1890
1883-90
1884-1911
1884-1900

Feb.,"May Aug.& Nov.

1907-11

do
do
do
do

Feb.,May, Aug.& Nov.
May & November.
do
do
do
do
do

do

7

do

7

6
7
7
7

7

do

do
do
do
do
do
do
May & November.

£

6
7
6
7
7
7
6
7

do
do
do

do
do
do

do
do
do
do

1874-98
1874-95
1871-76
1901
1878
1894-97

1873-75
1876
1889
1879-90
1901
1888
1879-82

95

*9i*
93
90
90
90

96

*91
91
99

91

*9i
98

98
99
95
98
102
97
98

99
97
96
99
103
98
99

90
97

91
98

1872-91

90

91

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

1885-91
1881-95
1872-95
1911
1915-24
1881-1902
various

103*

102

do

do

various

35

1877-95
1899-1902
1872-79
1874-1900
1875-91

95
95
96

January & July,

January & July.
do
do

do

do
do

do
J an., May, July & Nov.

95
37

95
95
90
95

65
95

96
88
96
96
91

86
96
96
96
96

626

THE CHRONICLE

%

n

or

oestments

STATE, CITY AND CORPORATION FINANCES.
EXPLANATION OF STOCK AND BOND TABLE3.

f

1. Prices of the mot Active Stocks an*d Bonds are given in the “Bank
era’ Gazette,” previously.
Full quotations of all other securities will he
found on preceding pages.
2. Government Securities, with full information in regard to each
issue, the periods of interest payment, size or denomination of bonds, and
numerous other details, are given in the U. S. Debt statement published in
The Chronicle on the first of each mouth.
3. City Bonds, and Bank, Insurance, City Railroad and
Gas Stocks, with quotations, will usually be published the lirst three
weeks of each month, on the page immediately preceding this.
4. The Complete Tables of State Securities, City Securi¬

ties, and Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks and Bonds
will be regularly published on the last Saturday in each month.
The publi¬
cation of these tables, occupying fourteen pages, requires the issue of a
pnpnleinent,, *vhich is neatly stitched in with the usual edition and furnished
to

all regular subscribers of The Chronicle.

INVESTMENTS—-RAIEROAD STOCKS.

\\!

Some remarks

were

made in this

column last week upon

the

present tendency in the demand for investment securities, and
comments were made upon the probable future value of New
York Central and Hudson stock and Lake Shore

stock, as invest¬
ments.
It should be distinctly understood that the remarks
applied to the permanent value of those stocks in the future, and
not to tlieir market price
during the next few months. It has
been suggested, for instance, that the Lake Shore
Company under
tlm pressure of its temporary embarrassments, caused
by the
operations of the late Executive Committee, may be obliged to
pass its February dividend, which would depress the stock. This
might be true without affecting our remarks, which referred only
to the earning
capacity of the Company when free from all diffi¬
culties, and honestly and efficiently managed.
As to New York and Harlem stock, another of the
regular divi¬
de nd paying class, the main line of road has been leased to the
N. Y. Central and Hudson for 401 years, at 8 per cent
per annum
on the stock, and interest on the bonds.
As the responsibility for
the payment of 8 per cent per year thus becomes a
charge on the
Central
and its

Company, it simply depends upon the ability of the latter,
regular payment is, therefore, regarded as certain. The

only uncertain element is in the various estimates put
upon the property of the Harlem Company retained for its own
use, and not subject to the lease.
This property is understood to
consist of valuable real estate below 42d street in this
city, and

also the Fourth Avenue Horse Railroad.

The franchise and
prop¬
have been estimated to be worth about

erty of the horse railroad
$1,500,000, exclusive of depot grounds, and the latter have been
estimated

high as $3,000,000, though these estimates may be
somewhat too high.
At the time of the lease the report was cir.
culated that the real estate would
probably be sold and the pro¬
ceeds distributed in the shape of a dividend to the stockholders.
as

But whether the

property is held for its income, or sold and the
proceeds distributed, the effect upon the stock is nearly the
same, as it may be presumed that the best use will be made of it

I

for the benefit of the

owners.
The last annual report of N. Y.
Harlem, which was for the year ending Sept. 30, 1872, was
published in the Chronicle of Feb. 1, 1873, on page loo, and
more
fully in the Railway Monitor of Feb. 15, 1873, on pages

and

As

a-

consequence of this policy we find that at the

date of the last annual

AND

‘

bonds.

[November 8, 1873.

report, March 31, 1873, on a road and
equipment valued at a cost of $28,721,723, there was a funded
debt of only $8,970,000, an
unusually small proportion in these
times, and a capital stock issued of $24,999,500, other
items
coming in on each side of the account, and making the
tota]
balance sheet $38,715,035. The following
brief table, taken from
the report published in Tiie
Chronicle, Vol. 16, page 847,
gives an abstract of the net results of the company’s operations
in each ot the past five years :
1868-9.
Gross

earnings

$4,451,974
Operating expenses., 2,183,820
Net. earnings
2,258,147
..

.

Rentals
Interest
Dividends

125.000

575,240
..

Suiplus
There is

.

957.821

-1809-70.

1870-1.

$5,231,979

$5,995,200

2,523,880
2,708,099
125,000
057,551

3,455,791
2,538,474
125,000

1,409,908

1,325,301

445,578

471,523

619,080

3871-2.

„

$0,028,287
3.405,459
2,622.828
125,000
617,751

015.650

1,229.400
,

050.010

1872-3.
>6,057.030
*1,517,783

3,130,287
125.000
021,570
1,510.041
8:2,853

point about the Rock Island reports that is not
very clear to the public, and that is the item of surplus each year.
Tlie so-called “ surplus” of 1872-3 was $872,653, and this
added
to the surplus carried forward from previous years makes the
very

large

one

sum

of $4,589,683 standing

on

the books,

report, as “ Profit balance of income account.”

given

as

or in the
No information is

to the manner in which this surplus has been used from

year to year, but it is fair to suppose that it has been put into
“
construction” on the main road and branches, or in advances to
the Chicago and Southwestern Railroad for construction, or

pay¬

ment of its

The latter roid is leased to the Rock Island,
and $5,000,000 of its gold bonds are guaranteed by the Rock
Island in currency, and now paid by it since the Chicago and
coupons.

Southwestern is in default.

If

we

deduct the annual interest

on

these bonds, say $350,000, from the year’s surplus above
given,
it leaves the net surplus ot Rock Island for the year, above its
known annual

Las

a

000

liabilities $522,653.

The Rock Island Company

land grant,

or

worth perhaps at a moderate valuation $4,000/
$5,000,000. The sales last year amounted to $126,778, or
an average
of $8 40 per acre ; tlie proceeds were invested for the
sinking fund. Rock Island stock has been for years one of the
most popular of our market, and has generally ranged from 110
to 115 per cent.
The reports of the company certainly show that
with judicious and honest management the company ought to be
able to pav at least 8 per cent per annum in dividends, and possi¬
bly increase that percentage in a few years. These remarks are
based upon no inside information of the company's affairs, but
merely upon its published reports, which are open to all.
South Carolina Bonds.—The Charleston News and Courier, of
October 24, says of the proposition to “ scale” the State debt:
“
It is quite clear that the holders of the bogus conversion
bonds and of the Blue Ridge scrip and of the Pay Certificates
and of the thousand and one miscellaneous claims agaiust the
State will eagerly agree to any plan which will give a value,
however small, to what is worth nothing in law and cost them,
next to

nothing. But what of the holders of undoubtedly valid

claims, claims upon which not the shadow of suspicion has been
cast; such claims as the bonds issued before the war, for example ?
They will feel that they are fleeced for the benefit of the holders
of questionable, or fraudulent claims.
They will argue that the
State is able to pay tlie ten or twelve million dollars of binding
and genuine indebtedness, and that there is no excuse for punish¬

ing them only that a ring of speculators and dupes be saved from
total loss.
But beyond these views there is one other view which
The Chicago and Rock Island Railroad is another of those will not be without
weight in the minds of thoughtful citizens.
It is one that must be pondered in its every aspect with the sole
classified as regular dividend
paying roads. There are few specu¬
purpose of doing what can best be done for the benefit of the
lative stocks in this market which command more
general con¬ people.
fidence than Rock Island, and this confidence is
The State cannot pay the principal or interest of the $20,000,probably based
upon the opinion formed of the real value of the company’s 000 of nominal debt, without imposing a rate of taxation which
property, as gathered from its annual reports, and upon the pros¬ will hopelessly ruin the people. It is an imperative necessity to
reduce the capital of the debt to a manageable amount, and this
pect that the company will continue to pay dividends of at least
only can be done by scaling tlie entire debt, or by recognizing
8 per cent per annum.
In stating that the confidence in Rock the valid debt and lejecting the spurious claims. But the holders
Island is based upon estimates of the actual value of
the of the spurious claims, it is said, control the Legislature and the
property, it may be said at the same time that there is little or courts, and, it is argued, will take good care to prevent any cancelment of their claims. Thpy are willing to compromise, it
no confidence in the
stability of the market price, for no stock in other creditors will
compromise. Hence the proposition to scale
past years has been more systematically worked up and down by tlie entire debt, good and bad, as the one open means for catting
strong speculative cliques, including officers of the company, who down the total debt to a sum which can be bandied with'reason¬
able ease. This is undoubtedly an unholy compromise with evil;
have been able to manipulate the market
price at their own it is
pa} ing those who have no legal claim upon the State, and
will.
The first striking feature in
regard to the management of lopping of! a part of the
property of those whose claims is incon¬
Rock Island, as compared with
every other prominent railroad testably jast.”
company, is the fact tliat the funded debt has not been increased,
South Carolina Bank Notes.—The United States Supreme
but the increase of capital account has been made
Court lias decided the case of the .State of South Carolina, ex. ret.
by ad¬
Wagner, against
ditions to the capital stock. These additions to
an appeal from the
capital, however, ! Supreme Court of Stoll, County Treasurer; question of the validthe State, involving, the
have not been in the way of stock dividends or "
watering,” but I ity of the issues of the bank of the State during the war. Tlie
tlie stock has been sold in the
market, generally at 110 to 120, | Court holds that as the faith of the State was .pledged for these
and the proceeds used for
improvement of the road, or at least ; bills, the holders were entitled, to uf®ly upon that credit and on
its pi election.
The credit of the State-could not be withdrawn
as large a proportion has been used
in that Way afi speculative
without-an open Ahd clear declaration to that‘effect, and such a
railroad companies are -accustomed tcruse, when
they sell stock declaration tvas not made until 1868 by tlie repeal of the charter,
45 ancL46.




“

627

THE CHRONICLE.

November 8,1878 ]

late to render tlie bills no tender in tlie present
Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad.—The .Treasurer of the Chesaompany
peake
former judgment. One other case peake & Ohio Railroad (’ompany has issued a circular to the
wfls decided by the decision in
this. Mr. Justice Hunt delivered ! bondholders in regard to the pecuniary condition of the company,
♦lie ooinion ’ and Mr. Justice Bradley dissented.
I1 that the circular says that the Board of Directors have decided
This
111
F
only way to re-establish the credit of the company is to
Illinois County and Town Bonds.—The Chicago Tribune fund its entire floating debt in income bonds to be paid out of the
says : “ As long ago as 1857 a bill was introduced into the Legis¬ net earniugs of the road.
It then continues :
lature of Illinois authorizing certain towns to subscribe to the
They have therefore authorized the issue of seven per cent twent3’-year
capital stock of the Ottawa, Oswego & Fox River Railway Com¬ income bon^s, to the amount of twelve millions of dollars, to be used in retir¬
pany, the said subscription to be approved by the vot^s of the ing the floating debt, and in funding the interest that ■will accrue on it# six
per cent
interest that will
several towns, &c. The authors of the bill did not wait until it accrue onbonds, to and including May 1, 1875 ; and also the 1. 1876. The said
its seven Tier cent bonds, to aim including July
could pass through the forms of legislation,but hurried it into an income bonds, principal and interest, are payable out of the net earnings of
enrolled act without its being passed at all.
Nevertheless, the road, interest semi-annually, and are dated Oct. 1. 1873.
“The proposition which I am instructed-to submit to all holders of this
nothing was done for some time, and it was not until 1870 that
company's bonds is as follows, namely : All holders.of six per cent bonds,
the road was built.
In the meantime, the promoters ©f the job having coupons attached, to surrender to the company nil coupons due on or
had obtained large subscriptions from the several towns of Lri before May 1, 1875, and to receive therefor the.face value thereof, less interest
8alle County, Kendall County, and from the towns of Aurora and to October 1, 1873, in income bonds as above described, at the rate of eightycents
the
St. Charles in Kane County.
Having obtained all they could beg live All holders ofdollar.
registered six per cent, bonds havingr
or otherwise obtain
from the credulous people along the route, assign to the said railroad company all interest that win coupons detached, to
accrue thereon to and
the officers of the road leased it permanently to the Chicago, Bur¬ including May 1, 1875, and to receive the value or amount thereof, less interest
to October 1, 1873, in
All holders
lington & Quincy Railroad. Then there was general discontent, | Tier cent bonds havingincome bonds as above set forth. the company of seven
coupons
all cou¬
to
followed by a refusal to pay taxes to meet the interest on the pons due on or before July 1. attached, to surrendertherefor the face value
1876, and to receive
bonds, and* at last came an appeal to the courts for protection. thereof, less interest to October 1. 1873, in income bonds as above set forth.
The Circuit Court of La Salle County enjoined the levy of taxes All holders of seven per cent registered bonds having coupons detached, to
assign to the said railroad company all interest that will accrue thereon to and
to pay interest on the bonds, and the Supreme Court of the State,
including July 1, 1876. and to receive the value or amount thereof, les9 interest
on appeal, has affirmed tlie decision.
The ground is that the law to October 1, 1873, in income nonds as above set forth.”
under which the issue cf these bonds was made Avas never
Messrs. Fisk & Hatch, in a circular addressed to the bond¬
enacted by the Legislature at all, and therefore, never was a holders of the
Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad Company, after ex¬
law. ’
pressing their deep regret at the default in interest state :
The following is a list of the towns issuing these bonds and the
The maturing interest could be met only by a special provision for the
amounts.
All the bonds bear 10 per cent interest:
purpose, at a time when such provision was peculiarly difficult, owing to the
which was too
—

This decision reverses a

—

case.

-

—

-

-

—

-

-

-

“

on

“

“

Kane

County—Township of Aurora

| fit),000

,

45,000

Kendal County

Township of Fox
Township of Kendall
Township of Oswego
LaSalle County-Township of Bruce
Township of Dayton
Township of Osage
Township of South Ottawa
Township of Ottawa

..

14,000
22,000
50,000
13,000
12.000

20,0(0
30,0(0
150,000
40,000

Marshall County—Township of Evans

unsettled condition of financial affairs. It could not be made except by an
appeal to the personal resources of the directors, and others interested in
the management of the company.
We have continued to urge it upon their
attention Willi all the force of argument and persuasion which we could

command. We could do no more.
Onr estimate of the great value and future destiny of the Chesapeake and
Ohio Railroad, and the ultimate security of the First Mortgage Bonds, re¬
mains unchanged, whatever may be the policy or ability of the Company as
to the present payment of interest.
The road itself is a substantial and en¬
“

eye of any oue who examines it, all
said of it and of its resources for a profitable traffic, and

during reality, which will justify to the

"that

we

have

ever

more.

$450,010

Total

•

District of Colombia
of the District of

Debt.—George E. Baker, Comptroller

Columbia, has written the following letter in

reply to certain inquiries about the District indebtedness
District

of

:

Columbia, Comptroller’s Office, |

Washington, D. C\, Sept. 25, 1873.
f
Sir : In repry to your inquiries, I have to say:
1. That the bonded debt of the District of Columbia does not exceed
$10,000,000, the limit fixed by Congress. The exact amount is $*1,434,200.
2. The interest on this debt has always been promptly paid by the Commis¬
sioners of the Sinking Fund.
3. The amount of certificates of indebtedness bearing interest, issued by
the Board of Public Works, and registered in this office, is $2,000.( 00.
4. No part of the school, police, lire, or interest funds arising from the pro¬
ceeds of general taxes, has been transferred to or issued by tlie Board of
Public Woiks.
5. The District of Columbia will suffer no loss by the failures of Jay Co''ke
& Co. and tlie First National Bank of Washington. Its balance on deposit

($6,000) i*offset by amounts due to the hank from the District.
Your obedient servant,
George E. Baker Comptroller.

Macoupin County (111.) Bonds.—The attorney for the bond¬

holders

the 25th of October obtained another judgment
on
against the county of Macoupin, Ill., in the United States District
Court, for $51,000, being the accrued interest on the bonds sold
to build the Court House.
This makes the amounts of judgments
$235,000, all of which, except $30,000 principal, is for interest
on

the bonds.

Muscatine City Bonds.—A Davenport, Iowa, dispatch of Nov.
3 to the Chicago Tribune says: “ The attorneys fur the holders of

“

We wTould, therefore, earnestly advise you not to sacrifice your bonds at
the Iowr prices which the unsettled condition of the times, the temporary want
of confidence in railroad securities and the non-payment of the interest now

due, might compel you to accept if they were

Bes Moines

forced to sale.”

Valley Railroad.—A dispatch to the Tribune has

the following:
“Des Moines, Nov. 1.—There lias been much excitement in rail¬
road circles yesterday and to-day, for the time having arrived
for the Sheriff to make a deed of the Des Moines Valley Railroad,

by virtue of tlie recent mortgage sale, the case was called in
a motion made to set aside the sale for fraud and want
of consideration.
The second mortgage bondholders allege that
the north half of the road was bonded for more than it was
worth then or now, namely, for $40,000 per mile, though the

court aud

mortgage covered the road bed, rolling stock, and land grant.
They also allege that a few of the officers of the Company ar¬
ranged that the lands could be bought by the stockholders and
paid for in bonds, and when this was done the officers took the
lands, paying therefor in bonds which were practically worthless.
The road was bid in by a committee representing the Keokuk and
Northwestern Railroad Company. The case is continued for fur¬
ther hearing Nov. 20.
The Keokuk and Northwestern Railroad
Company filed its articles of incorporation yesterday, setting
forth a capital stock of six millions, which may be issued for the
purchase of bonds and of any valid claims against the Valley
road.’"

~

the bonds of the

city of Muscatine have succeeded in exchanging
Erie Railway.—Mr. Lucius Robinson, acting president of the
some $242,000 of the bonds of that
city, issued mainly lor the aid Erie Railway, has addressed a letter to Mr. Edwards Pierrepont,
of railroads, the interest on which has not been paid for
inrny
counsellor at law, in which he states that a conspiracy has been
years, for new Muscatiue bonds, payable in twenty-five years, and discovered
among clerks of the company and others, to publish
bearing interest at G per cent, interest due and not* paid being certain extended statements, professedly taken from the com¬
included in the bonded amount. Creditors not represented in
pany’s books, but really altogether false, for the express purpose
this, hold bonds aggregating $100,000, which will no doubt he of damaging the company in London and New,York. Mr. Rob¬
settled in the same manner.
inson says that the discovery of the plot will enable the com¬
—The proceedings brought against the New Jersey Midland
pany to frustrate it.
Railway Company to throw it into bankruptcy have been dis¬
International Bridge at Buffalo.—The great International
continued.
Bridge across Niagara River from Buffalo to Fort Erie, in Canada,
Boston aud Albany Railroad.—Sealed proposals will be
has been completed.
Of the work the Buffalo Commercial
received by the Treasurer at his office, No. 40 State street, until
Advertiser furnishes a complete account, from which we quote
Wednesday, the 19th of November, for one million dollars, or the
following : “ To state the fact roughly but plainly, the entire
any part thereof, of the bonds of the company.
length of the bridge is about three-quarters of a mile. There are
These bonds are dated February 1, 1872, and are due February
nine spans in the portion on the main river and three in Black
j, 1892, with iuterest at 7 per cent, payable semi-annually.
Rock Harbor ; four of 190 feet in the clear, and three of 240 in
The Boston & Albany Railroad Company has declared*a half
the clear.
The first caisson was launched on tlie 13th of July,
yearly dividend of five dollars a share, payable on the 15th Nov.,
1870, and work progressed steadily up to the time of completion.
and added $14,600 to the previous surplus of $252,990 73,
making It must be remembered that the current of the river, at the point
the total reserve fund $257,590 73.
where the bridge is located, runs from five and a half to ten
Business of the road foi the year ending September 30, 1873,
miles an hour, according to the state of the wind. This was
was as

follows:

Other

sources

$7,561,159 63

Expenses,....

INCOME.

Freight
Passengers

$(3,221,183 26
3,319,358 30
257,4110 96

$9,798,032 52

Net
Dividends and interest..
.

2,236,872 89
2,222,318 67

$14,554 22

Canada Southern.—Mr. W. L. Scott, a director of the Canada
Southern Railroad, who has been charged witli the settlement of

throughout one of the greatest difficulties encountered, and fre¬
quently retarded progress. Then, too, the depth of water varies
from twelve to forty-five feet.
The ice in winter, some may
think, wrould damage the bridge in course of time, but the ice¬
breakers afforded ample protection and cut to pieces blue ice two
feet thick with

The

comparative ease.

respective weights of the different spans over the river

obligations of that company, says that the company will are as follows: 190 feet, 130 tons ^ 240 feet, 208 tons; 362 feet
probably extend its floating debt by giving additional paper, draw, 353 tons; and the entire quantity of iron used in the whole
instead of funding as was originally intended, and will probably bridge amounts to upward of 2,000 tons. At the request of Capt.
meet all its
obligations within the required extension. The Tyler, the English Government Inspector of Railways, who
opening of the International Bridge wrill add materially to the visited the bridge in November, 1871, on behalf of the English
resources of the compauy, and enable it to participate in a traffic
shareholders, one of the spans of 190 feet was loaded with 210
tons of iron rails, equally distributed over the fioor beams (a
which would prove profitable,
the




828

THE CHRONICLE.

'weight greater than that of a continuous train of locomotives |
covering the span), and left in that condition for three days.
This test was highly satisfactory, the deflection
being found to !
be only about one inch, and the truss
returning exactly to itsj

operating

expenses can be relied on. This sum is about
$400,000 more'than
the annual interest on the bonded
debt; which amounts to $1 077 847 50 in
gold (exclusive of income bonds* which* by the terms of the mortgage ar*
not

yet entitled to interest).

on the removal of the load.
The bridge has been leased to the various railroads
cross it for twenty years.
The roads are the Grand

which will
Trunk, the
Great Western, the Canada Southern, the New York Central, the
Erie, and the New York, West Shore & Chicago. Most of these
railroads have already constructed their approaches to the bridge,
and will commence sending trains across at as early a day as
possible. The entire cost of the bridge in round numbers is not
less than $1,500,000.

,

connecting

Kansas Pacific Railroad—Default in Interest.—The Kansas
Pacific Railroad Company having defaulted on its semi-annual
interest, due Nov. 1, the directors have issued the following
circular to the bondholders, explaining the condition of affairs :

os

economically as can be done. They feel deeply
w-tich it w-as not in their power to avert, and which mortified by this calamity
could not have
happened
but for the extraordinary condition of the
money market, at a time when the
semi-annual interest had to be provided for.

The directors of the Kansas Pacific Railway Company regret exceedingly
that the crisis in the money markets of the country, and the impossibility of

b ir
h

realizing on the securities of the Company, compel them to stop payment on
the coupons of the bonded debt for the present.
They look upon this measure
as a

great hardship to the bondholders, and have used every

It is. therefore, without

increase in the business of the road, almost certain that thecounting on anv
floating debt of
the Company can be extinguished in about two
years by its earnings - and if
the Company should be successful in
nlacing their securities now in hand
consisting of first mortgage bonds upon brach lines and real estate securities
the floating debteou’d be paid at once, and the
earnings of the road used for
the speedy payment of coupons. The
Company therefore invites the holders
of bonds to appoint a committee to confer with the Board of
Directors ner
sonally or by letter, to examine the condition and effects of the
Company and
decide upon the wisest course to be pnrsued in the
premises. The security of
the bonds is undoubted, and the floating debt once
extinguished, the regular
payment of interest in full hereafter will be more than
secured, estimating
earnings only upon the present business of the road, and without
calculating
upon any increase of same, but which may be reasonably
expected as the
of Colorado and Kansas increases fast, and as the
population Arkansas
line
built to the
River, now just finished, will secure it the business of
Northern New Mexico and the Upper Arkansas
Valley. We hope that the
bondholders will not sacrifice the securities they hold,
and beg them to be
assured that the Board of Directors will use
every effort in their power to
bring about a speedy resumption of payment of interest, and run the road

former condition

b

^November 8, 1873,

Robt. E. Carr, President.
Adolphus Meier, Vice-President.
Carlos S. Greeley, Treasurer.
B. W. Lewis, Jr., j
S. M. Edgkll,
f Directors in St
F. M. Meister,
Louis.
[
John D. Perry, j

effort to avoid it;

but even the proposition of the
undersigned directors and other large stock¬
holders to loan the Company $2,000,000, in securities, to be used as a bonus to
raise the necessary means to meet the interest on the bonded debt, and to

liquidate the greater part of the floating debt,

was of no avail; the money
procured during the present pressure. The Company has large
assets, besides a land grant of more than 5,50.1,000 acres of land, the proceeds
of which, when realized, will pay the largest
part, if not the whole, of the
bonded debt, before the same matures, and by which it is provided with a
sinking fund that, in proportion to its bonded debt, is probably larger than
that of any other railroad in the United States. But the construction of the
road and its equipments, as well as the aid given to the
building of two branch
roads, viz
(a) The Arkansas Valley, from Kit Carson to Las Animas, on the Arkansas
River. 55# miles,
[b) The Junction City and Fort Kearney road, from Junction City to Clay
Centre, 83# miles (both of which were necessary to secure permanently to the
main line the business of the country reached by
them), has cost more than
the capital received in proceeds of bonds and stock, and thus a
floating debt
has accumulated, which, in the
present monetary condition of the country,
cannot be carried, and must be liquidated as soou as possible.
The road must be run and kept in good order to meet the demands of its
increasing business, and we can assure you that it is in excellent condition,
and has a sufficiency of rolling stock and locomotives. The
earnings of the
road over operating expenses for the last year were $1,494,447
41; and although
the gross earnings of the present year are not in excess of those of
1872, the
expenses have been less, and we believe that earnings of $1,600,000 over the
could not be

I

Milwaukee City Bonds.—The attorneys of the parties who
recently obtained judgments against the city in the U. S. Dis¬
trict Court on the Beloit and the Oshkosh
Railway bonds, have
effected a settlement of the difficulties. It was found
that, with
authority to issue scrip and the unexpended balance of a fund,
the judgments could he adjusted to the satisfaction of the bond¬
holders.
The committee will, at the next
meeting of the council,
recommend such action as may be necessary under this
plan of a
settlement of the claims.

South Side of

Long Island.—Messrs. Nicholas Wycoff and

Elbert Floyd Jones, trustees of ths first
mortgage extension
bonds of the South Side Railroad of
Long Island, by vote of the
Board of Directors, and by virtue of the conditions of
the

mortgage, yesterday took formal possession of the road, in conse¬
quence of default in the payment of interest due in September.

J

MONTHLY EARNINGS OF PRINCIPAL RAILROADS.
Atlantic & G. W.
1872.

Atlantic & Pacific.

1873.
(604 m.)

<567 m.)
$351,342

$374,718

334,210
372,397
374,273

324,210
420.250
434,845

441,877

1872.

423,524
423.514

428,983
431,761
465,995

(328 m.)
$30,594
69,844
9C.831
87,543

471,774
.404,900

108,838
103,116
116,206
100,633
91,946

5,257,983

554,203
469.251

Ohio., Danv. & Vin
1872.

$41,558
43,952
46,997

49,516
50,139
52.104

54,416

56.169

326,268
401,251

417,327
439,581
389,829
358,743

49,440
604.830

4,462,625

Marietta & Cin.
1872.

1873.

(284 m.)

$152,578

$170,023
162,585
180,467
190,562
185,683

142,407
150,784
145,858
158,718
154.587
14 J,550

185.953

181,868
173,469
203,514

162.521

191,841
208,977
207,911
204,196

....

L. & S- East.
1872.

1873.

$36,840

(358 m.)
$83,126
101,825

37,514
41,467

[ *

39,211
38,875

43,461

114,423
110,710

119,758
119,019

42,258
„

99.524

96.842

113,162
123,714
122,467

f 100,272
S 118,058
®
98,717
g 72,809
766,856




1873.

(715 m.)
$505,586
484,022
558,533
607,678
593,641
505,314
505.808
580.908

667,819
786,333
616,024

(788 m.)

$475,897
542,008
690,017
675,840

576,790
763,481

6,988,479
St. L. A Iron Mt.
1872.

1873.
(212 m.)

(212 m.)
$173,707 $146,160
156,292
163,254
132,055
229,260
173,66a
203,140
187,*'25 230,300
180,786
195,480
178,867
181,243
201.190
194,155
194,000
205,500
213,325
203.731

387,565
426,223
474,188
580,432
594,769

..

.

.April..

.may...
.Jane..

July...

555.005

.

..April..

117,542
150,673
143,455
180,480
171,945

..Oct

....

231,886

233,551
367,685
241,985

‘2,351,342

3,856,990

91,138
95.853

206,299
227,443
230,518
200,224

219,051
199,958
201,769

251,313
286,244
274,567
••••••

256,719
203,585
250,934
249,342

'302,881

329,000
(403,781
g

“
l

1,896,86S

.

1872.

..Jan....
..Feb....
..mar.
.

..April.
..may...
..June..

..July...

..Aug.
..Sept....
..

..Oct....
..Nov....

.Year...

1,070,459
1,029,957
1,196,700

'

1,303,304*
......

1873.

1872.

1,511,781

$101,075 $100,327 $189,606 $150,567 $1,339,389
99,441 90 441 191,738 194,786 1,294,710
109,830 112,569 300,783 300,719 1,498,408
114,842 124,045 322,«75 352,298 1,528,250
125,286 133.758 341,843 332,763 1,479.945
315.363

136,178

100,860 121 276
117,408 156,973
124.203

$320,669
255,471
245,360
178,154
180,127

1,680.969

1,585,368
1,451,762
1,582,531
1,776,420

Pacific of Mo.

Ohio & Miss.
1873.

1872.

(517 m.)
$312,848

(393 m.)
$272,472
239,733
290,710
276,290
250,523
263,2y0
•232,286
304,083
356,194
408,254
319,024
283,836

(393 m.) (471 m.) (471 m.)
$283,605 $246,830 $227,897
291,630 237,778 261,346
338,725 327,404 344.633
338,708 295,160 320.991
307,520 269,559 301.521
290,470 286,738 272,610
255,424 265.906 267,734
801,998 316,199 325,093
371,344 317,910 382,098
384,193
326,667
260,404

3,526,695

3*575,060

265,628

260,127
227,225
184,037
148,691

158,526
200,757
250,856
306,248
344,335
360,056

149,093
202,605
215,426

..

1873.

1872.

(337 m.)
(337 m.) (248 m.) (248 m.)
$166,078 $144,209 $108,188
$79,591
140,552
169,454
100,439
165,392
177,515
105,456
154,641
170,218
102,191
147,540
170,218
117,904
149,832
94.522
114.601
165,260
130,145
90.070
151,532
108,038
181.863
167,496
127,852
130,292
114.488
177,085
178,302
128,161
201,648
115,140
112,593
178,169
103,110
102,613
90,856

(628 m.)
$439,780

1,888,923

6,008,9^

1,270,216

1,323,476
1,225,708
1,459,360
1,635,* 91
1,764,788
1,558,424
1,483,480

1873.

151,445

1872.

1873.

(1,136 m.)
$1,412,36 8
1,549,28 5
1,735,736
1,694,543

17,591,629

8,651,645

Mobile & Ohio.
1872.
(517 m.)

312.614
323,231

3'1,774
349,382 328,188
341,968 343,785
442,822
310,345
223,241

168,453

2,952,004

1873.

1872.

(212 m.) (212 m.) (672 m.) (672 m.) (1,074 m.)

100 868

1,451,827

Lake Shore & M S.

1873.

431,948
460,646
447,313
510,792
462,868
432,056
614,175
565,811

1872.

1873.

......

St.L. A. ,A T. H. Tol.,P.& Wars’w. Toledo,Wab. A

1873.

230,109
227,640
216,354
207,854

1873.

-

$207,874
224,393

St. Louis, K-C &N-

220,618
229,924

672,917
748,634
876,413

$81,299

..Year..

211,057
260,194

724,983

..Jan....
..Feb....
mar....

..Nov....
..Dec....

(530 tn.) (530 m.)
$228,830 $183,275

687.630

659,362
609,846
783,255

(642 m.)

..Sept....

235,159
296,502

575,393
559,871
648,955

(433 m.)

1,193,209

1872.

1872.

(1109 m.)
$580,499
562,949
651,952
544,035

$63^,429
531,627

1872.

..June..

1,074,779

Ind. Bl. AWest’n. —Xans. Pac’c.^

Mo-, Kan. & Texas.

1,012,704

6,957,771

1873

1,364,006

811,961
950,945

§ J 702,838
S 1 513,787

Cent’i.

8,026,750

..July...

900.376

426,316
482,205

497,261

137,634
102,431
126,124

..AUg...

488,349

s

881,692
696,475
698,063

..may...

$752,467
765,249
9«.7,258
1,034,02?
1,256,072
1,292,143
1,240,987
1.284,094

12,272,060

744,782

..

(1,459 m.)

846,394

412.218

5,156,326

.Oct
.Nov...
.Dec

Year..

423,716

402,477
424,614

379,879
409,254
419,197
488,352
559,882

1873.

(1,314 m.)
$774,856
714,122

$352,538

373 217

431.315

.Aug....
.Sept....

(569,236
§ 805.799
«
929,210
834,320
767,800

205,698
:

.Jan
.Feb..
march

1873.

1872.

(649 m.)

352,604

(1109 m.)

—

(1,018 m.) (1,310 m.)
$460,985 $334,715

694.015

974,460
1,132,920
1 356,378
1,313,790
1,211,765
1,258,500
1,392,125

(600 m.)
$371,708
332,902

1,433,048
1,067,386
859,779

1872.

A St. Panl.

1872.

£852,860

ChLc.& N. western

1873.

540,756

Illino

>

(971m.)

Mil-

1872.

12,900,121

..Year..

1,329,422
1.515,382
1,541,958
1,754,821
1,717.593
1,685,384
1,774,570
1,918,247
1,882,421

Chicago & Alton.

1,285,567
1,299,990
1,007,125

..

565,728

679,333
603,955
581.168

576.783

1,029,927

®t.

Michigan Cent.

1.271.628
1.254,688

Oct..
Nov....
Dec

18,839,669

1872.

(284 m.)

139,998

Jaly...
Aug....
Sept....

1873.

1,294,056
1,464,209
1,527,993
1,767,986
1,607.492
1,518,911
1,653,292
1,758,062
1,817,369
1,704,374
1,392,615

351,576
426,283
432,139

55,000

144,901

$1,333,310 $1,316,831

408,849
465,517
432,928
394,485

340,675

65,608

.Jane..
.

(1,222 m.)

'

.April.,
.may...

88,637

(956 m.)

$358,612

..

1873.

(1,050 m.)
$592,223
571,836
875,762
949,598
1,380,922
1,133,272
1,272,510

.mar....

108,100

Erie

(391 m.)

341.104

72,273
79,098

.

96,696

1872.

59,501

47,259
57,375
55,290

78,346
85,561
77,387
82,682

995,959
1873.

Jail
Feb..

.

98,592
84,622

1872.

(132 m.) (391 m.)
$47,515 $320,022
49,107
340,791
49,773
372,974
39,132
381,112
60,481
373,619

$61,363

64.581

Clev. Col.Cin. A I.

1873.

(132 m.)

1872.

(261 m.)

66,725
74,242
73,834
98,420
113,834
126,968

597,224

632.538
547,928

^-Central Pacific—^

1873.

(261m.)
$65,319
64,476
69,346

105.352

96,567
85,344

447.252

1872.

(328 m.)
$86,854
87,619
122,348
112,275
98,800
116,231
126,435
119,989

80,759

423,396

Bur.,C. R. & Minn.

1873.

W.

1873.

(628 m.)
$370,290
405,110
471,301
446,527

Union Pacific.
1873.
(1038 m.) (1,038m.)
$273,936 $374,926
491,783
534,115
565,861
708 259
1872.

741,802

881,266

470,598

890.442 1.007,831

541,192

835,459
743,383
789,568
863,754

969.863
876,883
837,278

483,899
642,209

593,504

980,706

621,351

915 727

..

........

757,850

489,341
532,894

......

8803,006

November 8,

(THE ~ CHRONICLE.

1873.]

Exports of Leading Articles from New Yorlt.
The following table,compiledfrom Custom House returns,show'
the exports of leading articles from the port of New York since

Commercial Ctmes.

$l)e

629

January 1,1873,

commercial epitome.
Nov. 7,1873.

Friday Night,

merchandise have in the past few days deelooed more general weakness than has been witnessed since
the panic in securities set in, last September.
Exchange on
London has been dull, even at a material decline, good mercantile
hills selling' in currency at loss than the par rate in gold, or more
exactly at 109($109£. Freights have continued high ; there has
been renewed depression in the market for railway securities ;
the decline in gold has discouraged many holders ; the supplies
of leading staples of domestic produce have materially increased
at all points; the demand for imported goods has suown no im¬
provement ; and, in fact, there has not been a single leading in¬
fluence exerted towards an improvement in business affairs. On
Thursday, there was more the appearance of thorough discourage¬
ment among commission houses and persons trading in mer¬
chandise than had previously been witnessed during the present
crisis
To-day, with the Bank of England rate advanced to 9
The

markets for

cent, there was some re-action in gold, but no very decided
improvement in exchange, and some of the leading staples
touched the lowest prices of season, with trade generally dull.
The following is a statement of the stocks of leading articles
of domestic and foreign merchandise at dates given:

to all the principal foreign countiiei,and also the
totals for the last week, and since January 1. The last two lines
show total values,including the value of all other articles besides
those mentioned in the table.
l‘Ot-at)W(NT)-Mr-(

a

tcs. and bbls.

Pork.*.*.'. .".*.*- *

1M85

•

Tobacco, foreign
Tobacco, domestic

h*1^.

Coffee, Rio
Coflee, other
Coftee, Java, &c

d)

bags.
bags.

■

&SS
13,961

20,050
16,838
61,428
4,788
7,401
6,254

hhas.

Melado

22.660

boxes.

gnSar!”

6,500
81,836

37,847

51,019

hhds.
1,515
bhds.
4.737
bbls.
502
No. 136,500
bales. 21,327
bbls. 46,475
bbls.
5,300

Molasses
Molasses
Hides
Cotton
Rosin...
Spirits Turpentine
Tar

bbls.

«

Jute and Jute Butts
Manila Hemp
Ashes

26,100
8,900

bags.

Linseed

45H

®

aS

119,500
47,254
63,211
4,678

150,700

bags.

7,500

bales.
bales.
casks.

Os

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•

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26.085

59,156
4,086
1,820
25,720
200
20,100

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43,942

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130,850

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the

and the low rates of exchange,
Yesterday tne rates paid for
grain were 14d. for wheat to Liverpool by steam, and 12£@13d.
for corn and wheat by sail; 13£d. for corn to London by sail; 9s.
9d. for a vessel with wheat to Havre, one to Oporto 9s, and one
to Cork for orders 9s. 6d.; flour to London, by steam, 4s. 3d. The
demand for vessels to load petroleum has been increased by a
decline in that staple.
To-day 14d. w^s paid for wheat to Liv¬
erpool by to morrow’s steamer, but for next week’s steamers corn
was shipped at 12$d.
Petroleum has declined leading to more activity, and closes at
14£c. for refined in bbls.; crude in bulk, also lower at 5c. bid
and 5£c. asked.
Strained rosin has been dull and unsettled;
quoted nominally at $2 60@$2 65.
Spirits turpentine fairly
active and lower at 39@40c.
Tallow is lower at 7c. for
prime. Whiskey has declined to 90@91c. Hops have been fairly
active, but prices a little weak at 40@48c., as in quality for new
,

Kentucky for

the week have been only 400 hhds., of which 250 for
export and
150 for consumption ; prices have been weak, with lugs quoted

•XI®!!2tj*©qoooo5©tt©©

S. to too .loinsit-ocoap

c*

i

—

.

<?* rr *r»

_■

.

s' *

wheat and corn early in the week,
to business.
were also obstacles

The sales of

co c* ©
OO W W

•o*

5*3 w

well supported. The speculative values put upon

The tobacco market has been dull.

—

A ©

18,000
7,700
11,548
10,000
129,850

Freights have not been active, owing to scarcity of room

crop.

—

—

—

00

berth, with only a moderate number of vessels for charter, and
rates have been

©t

© ao to o

a >»

325

160,400

9,050
284

bales.
bales.

Saltpetre

2,882

895

bags.
casks.

Rice, E. I
Rice, Carolina—
Gunny Cloth (Cal)
Gunny Bags

326,647
3,319

73,441
40,936
302,689
3,095
5,938

© TT

»

o **
•H

36,686

16.363

40,353
42,650
mats. 144,352
bags.
5,3c5

hhds.

Cocoa....

"

47,288
23,687
20,516
35,178
5,360

©

OS CO

©

-1873.Oct. 1.
Nov. 1.
18 058
15,488

28,029

bbls.

Rppf

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1872.
Nov .1.

.
.

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6i@7£c., and leaf 8£@13c.

Of seed leaf tobacco the only sales
on private terms ; 200 do. Pennsyl¬
vania, 6£ffi)8£c., and 350 cases Ohio, 6£@7£c., all crop of 1872.
Spanish tobacco is also dull, and we have only to note sales of 200
bales at 75@90c., currency, duty paid.
Provisions have been generally depressed. Pork, for an excep¬
tion, has been well held, and there has been a steady business in
new mess at
$15, while Western prime mess has sold at $15 50,
but these transactions have been in a jobbing
way.
Lard has
declined, and prime steam sold at 7£c. for early delivery. 7£c. for
December, 7£c. for January, and 7£c. for February. Bacon has
been dull on the spot, at 8@8£c. for long clear, but for December
and January there has been a good business, at 6fc. for
long and
short clear together ; this figure, however, shows a decline. In
ent meats the business has been
mainly in bulk lots for local
consumption, at rather easier prices ; but in dry salted shoulders
in boxes there has been some business
reported at 4£c. for Decem¬
ber delivery,
showing a decline. Beef has met with a steady,
moderate demand for new, at $10 per bbl for plain and $12 per
bbl for extra mess, with city extra India mess in tierces at
$26.
To-day pork and beef were quiet, but lard further declined, with
sales of prime Western steam at 7c. for November and
7fc. for
January. Bacon was unchanged in prices, but less active. Butter |
has been irregular, with medium qualities
depressed. Cheese I
has been dull; fancy factories
quoted at 14£c., hut good to prime I
ranging from 13 to 14c.
are :

100

cases




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THti CSRONlCtt).

B30

From the foregoing statement it will be seen
that, compart d
with the corresponding week of last
season, there is.a decrease in
the exports this week of 18,133 bales, while the stocks

Imports of Leading Articles*

following table, compiled from Custom House returns
foreign imports of leading articles at this port since
to-night are
1,1873, and for the same period of 1872 and 1871:
26,736 bales less than they were at this time a year ago. The
[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.!
following is our usual table showing the movement ol cotton at
all the ports from Sept. 1 to Oct. 31, the latest mail dates.
Same
Same
Since
Since! Same

The

buows

Jan.

the

Jan. 1
1873. !

Jan. 1.
1S73.

time
1S7'2,

Earthenware—

I6/S91

China
Earthenware....

45,528

•

36,590:
10.197
4,8111

Opium

42,131
1,119

Soda bi-carb....
Soda sal

Furs..’...,
Gunny cloth

5,947

f

5.195
3,633
107.175

10.131

1,539
17,636
42.5)1

2,238

3,80S

3,305

3,518

915

1,135

567,3/*

567,880

101,272

117,256

143.U

Tory

Jewelry. &c.—
Jewelry

Watches
nseed

Molasses

$17,105

703,026

440,731

Cork
Fustic

333,583

331,365

83.019

38A’4

8H.89S
118,141

236,141
209,750

175 3t2

4,161 Woods263.199
46,65!

410,219 •297,631
124,7
92,066
*

Receipts of Domestic Produce for tlie Week and since
January 1.

The receipts of domestic
Since
Jail. 1.

This
week.

112

Ashes...pkgs.
U reads tuffs—
Flour..bbls.
Whea'L.bus.
Corn

'

Oats

r

f

Rye
Barley, &c..
Grass sd.bgs
Beans, bbls.
Peas,bush..
C. meal.bbls
Cotton..bales.
Hemp ..bales.
Hides
No.

produce have been as follows :
This
week.

Same

time ’72.

5,9551

Pitch
Oil cake,

6,184

79.1SS 2.841,233 2.335.855
944,414 27,138.036 li,205,191
fill.419 2i.3j2.645 36.22I.5S0
314.450 9,774,825 11,002.957
1.3 U
912,865!
376,853

201,.-61

35.914!
122.589!
182.470:

8,605
915

757,333:

31,595
76
64;

13,119!

2,319,S11

42,616

Leather.sides
Molasses, lids,
Do.,
bbls
Naval Stores—
Cr.turp bbls

*-

*

*

*

92
601

Solrits turp.
Rosin

Tar

.

Stearine

171

65,*07{

Tallow, pkgs..
Tobacco, pkgs....
Tobacco, Iihds....

64.503

Whiskey, bbls....
Wool, bales

519,423
28.056

5.141

83,614

71,137

1,791

....

Sugar. hlids

3,447

484.156;
34.7141

569

Beef, pkgs
Lard, pkgs
Lard, kegs

31,326

9.102'

3,250

Pork

2,811,25* Sugar, bbls

....!
23,063!

*

Eggs

539,519
15,931

159,171

747 917
22,362
541,986
30.446 1,725.018 1,473,687
3,276
437,189 266,190
7,068
412,192 394,569
36
122.111
114,136
1.079
22,3(‘3
22,225
3,052 333.143 295.025
200
22.671
23,954
573
11,076
9,823
7.705
280.597 277,919
2:5
17,176
21,289
758
1,118
681
4.399
1,808
45,891
83,824
155,092 209,739
2,(37
680
105,133
61,294
163,570 157.246
5,537
Dll
60,103
81,197

5.13! Rice, pkgs
Starch
“

51!

Same

1,894
162.055

135

Butter, pkgs....

351,959

5,447,
,873!

5,555

3,918

Cheese
Cutmeats

116.511
173,070
172,7*1

Since

Jan.l. time ’72

1,687

....

pkgs...,

Oil, lard
Peanuts, bags
Provisions—

1,714.349, 3.131,84)
76,925j
101.13 J

2.11!
1,455

Hops...hales.

v

1

Dressed hogs.

No.

93,812

....

80,213

COTTON.
Friday, P. M., Nov. 7,1873.

By specialtelegrams received to-nightfrom the Southern ports,
we are in possession of the returns showing the receipts, exports,
&c., of cotton for the week ending this evening, Nov. 7. It
appears that the total receipts for the seven days have reached
128,114 bales against 108,030 bales last week, 100,452 bales the pre¬
vious week and 78,756 bales three weeks since, making the total
receipts since the first of September, 1873, 508,692 bales against
780,812 bales for the same period of 1872, showing a de¬
crease since September 1, 1873, of 182,120 bales. The details of
the receipts for this week (as per telegraph) and for the corres¬

ponding weeks of the five previous years are as follows :
Received this week at—

ifaw

1873.

bales.

30,223

Tennessee, &c

34.287

14,361
17,991
3l,lt8
12,763

22,375
5.-38

8,582

34,135

5,286

31.403
6,253
6,950
13,463
6/50

2,991

2,422

11,852
11 517

18,869

341

205

366

495

1.101

2,318

3,669

2.160

19,992

18,279

123270

10,506

7,763

1,273
6,683

128,114

133,703

105,400

132,065

95,269

"74,997

39 S

724
1.989

Florida
North Carolina

j

Virginia

598,692

780.812

565,195

|

678,536

530,690

394,528

for the week ending this evening reach a total of
52,223 bales, of which 36,253 were to Great Britain, 10,134 to
France, and 5,836 to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as
The exports

this evening, are now 292,043 bales. Below are the
exports and stocks for the week, and also for the corresponding
made up

week of last

Exported to—
Weekending
G. Brit.
Nov 7.4/. 29

NewOrleans.
Mobile
Charleston...

....

2.782
6.167

Savannah

IHi.

Sent. 1




Contln’t

21/98
597
:

-

36.253 !
161,854

Total this Same w’k
1872.
week.

1873.

....

2,396

2,436

77.’. 50
19,4)9
1\875

816

10J31
31,093

29,815

5,178

9,768

8,317

11,831

fS

3,231
14,612
1,066

22.227

....

....

2,150

....

13,137

880

6,922

$30

Texas
New York...
Other px>rts..
Total

France

Stock.

(

850
900

5.836
16,581

22,364
1,497

52,223

70,356

209.523

809.245

793

55.559

30,000

!J

292,043

114,331
24,501
18,15°
71/03
43,359
21,32?
25.000

313,779

JI,60W.

*

••

«

23,027
46,219
60,f: 24
11,116

8,331
10,653

3*298

4,883

‘

73,757

ids

1/52

,

75,307

’

51,404
17,141

58,101

l’,279

*

*r»o

14,440
71,538

56,919
16/53
27.070

*50

1*709

5,112
64,433

7,110

found

4*784

**65

....

125,601

20,959

10,745

157,305

237,497

255,410

151,528

56,331

31,080

238,889

284,175

301,070

1,511.

*924

conditions which have
no

Of i it3

19,000

of late surrounded

relief, hut have rather been intensified

ward movement has

been even more decided, and from the
closing price of last Friday, the lowest prices of the week (on
Thursday) showed a decline of 1 11-32c. for November, 1 19-32c.
for December, 1 23-32c. for January and February, 1 13-16c. for
March, and l|c. for April. From these prices of Thursday there
was some reaction towards the close, and to-day an advance of
£@£c. was established, the greater improvement being in the
early months. There was a large business after the second call,
with December closing at 13fc., January at 17-32c., February
at 13Jc., and March at 14 7-32c.
The total sales of this
description for the week are 11G,850 hales, including
free on board.
For immediate delivery the total sales foot up
this week 7,691 bales, including 3,208 for export, 4,180 for
consumption, 128 for speculation^ and 175 in transit. Of the
The following are the closing
above 385 bales were to arrive,
quotations :
Upland and
Florida.

Ordinary

Middling

11%®-..
12%®.’...
12%®....
13%®....
13%®....

Good Middling

14%©...-

.per n>.

Good Ordinary
Strict Good Ordinary
Low Middling

New

Mobile.

11%®....
12%®....
13%@....
13%®...'.
13%®....
15%®....

11%®....
12%®....
13%®....
13%®....
13%®....
15%@....

"12%©....
13

Texas.

Orleans.

@....

13%®....
13%®....
15

give the sales of spot and transit cotton and price of
Uplands at this market each day of the past week :
Below

we

Exp’t.

.Spec-, Tran-

sump.jula’ni sit.

74
586

371
750

238
689
1.621

722
801

4,180

Total,

j Ord’ry.
I

12%

Holiday:
1,005
1,563
3,157

46

73

175

128

7,691

12%

I

1

bales.
700.
200

1,000

.

1,500
400
S00

2,400

13%

100
300

1,200

800

13 5-32
13 3-16

13%
13,4
13 9-16

POO

1,100

600
8(0
200
800
400
400
.200
m

1.900
1 800
400
100
300
300
300

13 19-82

13%
13%
13 15-16
14

3.70)

14%

3,100

500
-100
500
100

14 5-32
14 3-16
14 7-32
14 11-82

13

..13 3-32

...13%

500...
800....
300...

.

..133-16
13%
.

.13 9-32
..13 5-16
13%
.13 17-32
..13 9-16
.13 19-S2

.13%

...

13%

....

....

....

14.11-32
14%
14 7-16
14 9-16

For January.
13
100...
...13 1-16

116...
300...

.

2,900 .:....
..14 1-32
1,300
..14 ’.-16
1,400

13 *9-o2

1,100

13 15-16
13 81-32

1,200..
700
100
100

1,000

S00
700
700

14

14 1-32
14 5-32

14 3-16

14 7-32
14%
14 9-32

14 5-16

1,900
•100

14 13-32

1,000

14 7-16

400...
400...

1,000...

13 21-32

2.400

2,300

3,000
1 100
500
600

14 11-82

...14%

144
14 17-32

14 9-16
14%

14 1 i-;6

14%

13 9-16

700
500.:

131-32 |

13%

200

13 9-32
13 5-16

2,700

I

1,500

10 J

3.000... ....1311-32
53%
2,400...
100... ,',...13 13-82
13 7-16
1,500...
13 15 32
1,300...
13%
1,300...

13%

cts.

oales.

1,000

13%
.13 25-32
.13 31-32

is a statement oi

...13 7-82
:3%

2.200....

....

free on board)
low middling or

13 3-16
.

.13 21-32
.13 11-16
.13 23-32

300...
700...

13%6

13%
13%

14 17-32

1,600....

13%
12%

41,700 total Dec.
60 >...

14%
14%

12%

cts
....

3,700....

14%
14%

....

j

bale5*.

1,400....

14

14%

10.600 total Nov.
For December.
200
12 31-32

cts

13%
13%

11%
11%

For forward delivery the sales (including
have reached during the week 116,850 bales (all
on the basis of low middling), and the following
the sales and prices :
bales.
cts.
For November.
500
.13
600
131-32
70J
13 1-16
200
13 3-32

Mid

Low

Ord’ry. Midl’g. dllng

13%

620

175

1,536

3,203

Good

1,315 !

-

9

Elec tion.

Total

PRICES.

|

SALES.

Con-

Saturday
Monday.

200....

1872.

25.7S7

4,984

during the past week. On the one hand, with gold lower, with
foreign exchange lower and almost unsalable, and with the
Liverpool prices for cotton tending downwards, shippers have
found but little encouragement, and have shown little disposition
to operate ; while on the other hand the further suspension of
work by spinners restricting to a very considerable extent the
demand for consumption, at a time when the difficulty of obtain¬
ing advances on cotton or obtaining funds with which to carry it,
has made its .sale imperative, could not but result in a general
demoralization of the market, marked by a daily decline in prices.
Hence we find that during the past week there has been great
depression, which the large receipts have tended to increase.
The price of low middling uplands, which were quoted last
Friday at 14-$ c., closed to-day at 13£c., being a decline of l|c.
To-day, with the advance in gold, there was a more
active demand both for export and consumption,
and the
close was with a steadier tone.
For future delivery the down¬

200
400

season :

8,542
2,110

47,319

Stock,

1 647,107

....

Wednesd ay
Thursday... .ci.
Friday

1868.

6,851
7,099

10,950
10,461

3,358

1869.

42.075
13,401
15,205
32,734

32,265

7.7)8
18,039
35,393
7,142
6,354

Orleans

Mobile
Charleston
Savannah
Texas

1870.

1871.

1S72.

.

cotton have

71,704

630,668

120,545
376.381

Pepper
Saltpetre

*v

Florida..
No. Carolina

The unfavorable

1843,638 1,763,042 1,611,161
$1,375
I2.i,432 10J.768
1323,85; 1,535.528 1,313,591
321,572 275,921
371,459

Logwood....
Mahogany..,

5,713

4/8}

470,578 j

....

153,372
175,540
92,213

42,973

by value—

5,547

65,173

Total.

6,3<5

500

2,560
1,808

28,012 ’
13,316 j
1,279
6,986 !
72,536 !
6,616 j

Total this year

146.312

14,674

4.484

5,7*1

Total last year

143,482
166,081

26,320

59.1K7
90,398

120,555 : 157,336

42,069
3,974

Oranges

1.297
736,213

1,599

5avannali
Texas
New York

63.605

11 $0,251 1,322,434 1,136,772
811.453
751,290 972.541
Nuts
li 15,241* 1,247,246
656.771
Raisin3
111,191 Hides undressed 10226,787 9.686,217 10838071
(Rice
706,310 ,87,088 687,77?
1 ,S70 Spices, &c.—
521.587
383.201
239,283
Cassia.
15,620
91,24.'
73,187
79,277’
85,335 Ginger

5,957
10,465
6,313

75,226

924.219
860 208

4,797

j 176/09

38 $61 i

Charleston....

Virginia
Other ports..

401,440

408,257

107.191

.

Coastwise
Ports.

Oi lid

Britain. France. For’gn.

1872.

|

Mobile

142,20S

10,774} Lemons

47.132

Bristles

Hides, dressed..
ndla rubber...,,..

New Orleans

57,131
4,077

36,09/01 gars
1,6 20, Corks
9;,93i Fancy goods
49,250 Fish
40,993 Fruits &c.—

15,018
7,213
137,681

Hemp, bales
Hides, &c.—

6,310
4,918
957.763 1,112,961

EXPORTED 8INCB 8EPT.1 TO—

8EPT.1.
Great

1&73.

7,019
5,493

805.lS4iiA5.206

4,146! Wines
5,831;Wool, bales
eel

SINCE

943,603 1,07,,$90

2,52lj Wines, &c.—
10.691; Champag’e.bks

512!

45.W0
11.061
6,019

Hair

receipts

2,379;Article8 report-

72,625
60,972

6.891

510,131

10,237, Waste

710

Flax

Soda, ash

20,722 Hags
931,651 Sugar, libds., tes
4,897! & bills
iSugar, boxes &
25,456! bags
23,557’Tea
39,711 Tobacco

5.0J4

37.82 .*
1,035
69.603
58,209
48,4.3

Oils, essential...
Oil,Olive

Tin,boxes
Tin slabs, 1 os.

125.852'

1871.

242.069 802.276 491,831
4358,209 9,281.661 7,846.291
196,825
198.782
186,144
905,956 927,200
923,188
4753,155 5,980,558 5,813.799
113,703 .35,201 180,910

Steel

5,599

6,223

G70
607

525.626

Iron, 11 It bars.
Lead, pigs
Spelter, lbs

42.591|
10,513:

40,177
9,723
5,413

3.533

Madder

3.271

54,100
500.512

14 > 352|
98,1*20
Coal, tons
29.1271
27,213!
Cocoa, bags
991,202 1,22! .710,
Cotl'ee, bags
11,454
3,425
Cotton,bales....;.
Drugs, &e.—
33,063:
Bark, Peruvian. 14,509
27.391’
Blea powders... 28,730
22.134
19,107
Brimstone, tons
5 497
7,170
Cochineal
1,350
Cream Tartar...
2,019 •
Gambier
ll,83i
40,626
4,868
5,317
Gum, Arabic....

Indigo

6.072

Hardware

11.69C;

41!,403: 597,378

Glass
Glassware
Glass plate
Buttons

t

17.708
53.017

time

time
1872.

PORTS.

Metals,&c.—
Cutlery

Shina, Glass and

If

[November 8, 1878.

700

^14 5-32
..14 3-16

14 5-10

13%

100... ..,,13 23-32

1,000...

13%

,,,.18 13-16

40,800 total Jan.
For February.

13%
13%

200
300

1W,

13

13-$

November 8, 1878 ]

THE

Cl8.
100...
14%
no... ....14 13-16
100
14%
400... ....14 15-18
15
10<I
15 3-10
100...

bales.

bales.
»(W
200

:

13 5-l*»

^00

.

IOC'

WO:
020
100

SB;::

18%
...13 2 -32
....

18 1M«
l3^
18 Jj5-i«4

i313-16

.

10.350total Feb.

.13%

000

200

{]£
-v:l4*
lf}kH
14 9-16

j-32

400
30J
100
700
300

.

....

14%
......14 21-32

.

Soo” ...1H1-16
m:::....i4 23-:32
The

100...

14%

4 10

14%

400
100
600
500
300

U 3-16
14 7-32

...

200.
6M)....
..

15 1-16 1

15 3-32

200

....15 11-32

..

400...
200....

...15 9-16 1

.

8,ICO total March,

i

100
200
600
300.
100.
300
200
200

Estimated

11%

Consump hi from Nov. 1 to Apl .1, 5
Consumption for entire year

15%
15%
15%
.15%

Stock in U. S.

Mon.
14%

Sat.

Sales,futurelT,800
Sales, spot.. 1,597

14%
14 5-16
14%

U%
15 11-o2
15%
620

Wed.

Thura.

13%

13%

13 9-16

13%

13%

£

13%
13%

£

14

*

14%
14%

on

18,500

Taes.

13 15-16
14

U 5-32

15

o

14%

K

15%
22,900
1,345

174,826

23,935

160,013

64,425

83,464

55,161
91,663

mos

189,797

1,563

Telegraph.—There has been consider¬
able rain in the South the past week, interfering to a considerable
extent with farm work.
It has rained on two days at Memphis,
the rest of the week being pleasant; our correspondent adds that
cotton being so low and labor so liigb, that some of the freedmen
are abandoning their own crops and -working for wag^s.
It has
only rained on one day at Nashville ; at present the planters are
holding on to their crop. They have had rain on five days at
Vicksburg, and there has been a constant fog since Sunday, so
fhey have not seen the sun, and there has been no picking. It
has rained on three days at New Orleans, one heavy and two
showery. At Galveston it has rained severely, but without wind,
on more than half the days of the week, the rainfall
being
6 74-100 inches; as the week closes there is a favorable change.
has rained on more than half the days of the -week,
and the rest of the time it has been cloudy ; about all the crop
has now been secured in this vicinity.
They have had rain on
At Mobile it

three days at Montgomery ; the yellow
At Selma it has rained two days, the

.

15,600

25,500

16,823

188,063

529,000

London

202,250

233,000

731,250

721,000
23%000
13,000
35,000
28,000

at

Total Great Britain stock
Stock at Havre

99,750
10,250
21,000
23,000

Stock at Marseilles
Stock at Barcelona

Stock at

312,500

.-Shipments this week to—,
Great
Britain

1872..
J872.'.,
1871..

..

..

tlnent.
•

2,000
11,000

From the

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

Great

14,000

Con-

Britain.

Total.

tinent.

receipts.

that compared with last

appear

increase of 12,000 bales this year in the week’s
shipments from Bombay to Europe, and that the total move¬
ment since Jan. 1 shows an increase in shipments of 8,000 bales
fear

an

compared with the corresponding period of 1872.
Gunny Bags, Bagging, Etc.—No transactions of importance
come to our notice, the past week, and the
price is without

have

material change.
for domestic cloth,

There is still a fair demand from consumers
but outside of this there is very little being
done; lots of 50 and 100 rolls sell at 12(a)121c- cash. Ball cloth
is in some demand, and we quote 9A@10c. cash and time.
Borneo
is steady at 13@13|c. cash, but a round lot can be had a shade
lower. Bags are dull and inactive, very few sales being made ;
12c. cash is asked, but a quarter or even a half cent less would
not be refused.
The price for jute butts remains firm, and a very
fair business is being done, considering the disorganized state of
monetary affairs ; we quote lf@l|c. cash, with sales of some 2,000
or 3,000 bales at these figures.
The following figures are given
by Messrs. Willett, Hamlin & Co.
JUTE

BUTTS

1873.

——

Bis. Butts.

Stock in New York, Nov. 1.




*

AND REJECTIONS.

.

,.

.

.

!.
.

—\

Rejects.

1871.

1872.
Butts. B
39.150
15.000

s.

& R.

80,500
5,100

4,800
3,700

85.600
18.535
109

,.8,500

54,150

200

56,372

3,790

4,094

4.891

22,240

12,744

136,8iti

47,425

5,200

....

312,000

1,073.750

922,486
414,0%

137,000

1,208.000
174,000
165,000

24,500
15,000

Antwerp

Stock at other continental ports
Total continental stocks

European stocks

India cotton afloat for

Europe
American cotton afloat for Europe
Egypt, Brazils, &c., afloat for Europe....

1G4.000

72,000

60,000

Stock in United States ports
Stock iu United States interior ports
United States exports this week

294,953

297,186

15,000

318,779
59,272
29,003

1,814,902

2,014,051

1,869,448

Total visible
Of the

58,199

supply

109,444

8,700

109,(4)0
50,000
60,770

16,000

above, the totals or American and other descriptions are as follows:

bales.

165,000
318,779
59,272
29,000

109,000

696,152

701,051

688,962

67.000

297,186
60,776
16,000

•

72,003

386,000
113,486
217,000
414,000
50,000

1,118,250
696,152

1,313,000
701,051

1,180,486
683,962

1,814,402
3?»d

Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe

Egypt, Brazil, &c., afloat

233,000
420,000
174,000
60,000

2,014,051

1,869,448

9^-9;, d.

444,000
202,250
236,000
161,000

London stock

Total East

111,(00
95,000

62,000

85,000
106,000
137,000
294,953
58,199
15,000

..

India, &c

Total American

15,000

11,000
26,000

Total visible
Price

supplv
bales
Middling Uplands, Liverpool

426,000

.

These

figures indicate a decrease iu the cotton in sight to
night of 199,049 bales as compared with the same date of 1872
and a decrease of 55,040 bales as compared with the correspond¬
ing date of 1871.
Movements

of Cotton at tiie

Interior Ports.—Below

we

give the movements of cotton at the interior ports—receipts and
shipments for the week, and stock to-night and for the correspond¬
ing week of 1872:
r-Weekending Nov. 7,1873-%
Receipts. Shipments. Stock.

Augusta

..

Columbus
Macon

...

..

Montgomery.
Selma

..

..

Memphis...

.

Nashville....

..

..

..

..

10,240
2,480
4,079
1,047

11,818
1 ,G93

1.286

1.4S4
1,1.193

12,005
1,625

33,212

.—Week ending Nov 8, 72 -%
Receipts. Shipments Stock.

9.174

8,383

2,404

04

3.9S6

2,302
2,019

3,228
5,320
7,201
8,285

1,792
9,171
1,171

20,181
3,357

24,902

59,272

1,129

1,407
6,003
11,094
4,694
5,001
27,049
2,291

2,516
2,209
18,269
2,279

30,682

58,199

40,837

1,733

1,633

5.034

The above totals show that the interior stocks have increased

dur¬

ing the week 2,530 bales, and are to-night 1,073 bales less than
at the same period last year.
The receipts have been 7,625 bales
less than the

same

The exports

ot

week last year.

cotton

this week

from New York show

an

compared with last -week, the total reaching 22,804
bales, against 10,101 bales last week. Below we give our usual
table showing the exports of cotton from New York, and their
pirection for each of the last four weeks; also the total exports
and direction since Sept. 1, 1873; and in the last column tlie

increase

as

'

„

34,000
62,090

Week’s

Total.

701,000 201,000
902,000
7,000
050,000 244,000
894,000
2,000
701,000 321,000 1,052,000 14,000

2,000
11,000

foregoing it would

there is

.-Shipments since Jan. 1 to-,

Con-

487,006

92,750

Stock at Rotterdam

Liverpool stock

Shipments.—According to our cable dispatch received
to-day, there has beeu 14,000 bales shipped from Bombay to Great
Britain the past week and
bales to the continent, while the
receipts at Bombay, during the same time have been 7,000
bales. The movement since the first of January is as follows.
These are the figures of W. Nicol & Co., of Bombay, and are
brought down to Thursday, Nov. 6 :

15,000
67,000

35,000

Stock at Amsterdam.

Total

610,486
121.000

11,000
33,000
40,000

30.250

Stock at

497,000
113,486

12,000
14,000
33,000
6,000
23,000
31,000

Hamburg....-

Stock at Bremen
•

1871.

488.000

fever is slowly abating.
American—
rest of the week being
Liverpool stock
cloudy; last week’s dispatch ( which came late) stated that Continental stocks
during that week there had been three heavy frosts there. It has American afloat to
Europe.
rained on three days at Macon and four days at Columbus.
At United States stock
Savannah it rained two days all day and two days light
United States interior stocks
showers; a killing frost is reported this week in the interior.
United States expoits this week
There has been rain on one day at Charleston, with a killing
frost in some sections.
The thermometer has averaged 57 at
Total American
Memphis, CO at Vicksburg, Gl at Mobile, 59 at Montgomery, 02
East Indian, Brazil, &c.—
at Selma and Columbus, 68 at Savannah, and 60 at Macon.
Bombay

9,400
78,525

1872.

Liverpool

Stock

14%
14%
21,800
3,157

26,900

64.500

200,382

.

to Nov. 1

1873.

Weatiieu Reports by

.

7,171

Stock at

13 5-16'
13 15-32
13 13-16

14 1-16

1,006

I

13%
13%

13%
13 29-32

14%
18,\50

*

Fri.

13 5-16
'

1,350

we give our table of visible supply, as made up
by cable and telegraph to night. The continental stocks and afloat
are the
figures of last Saturday,'but the totals tor Great Britain
are this week’s returns, and
consequently brought down to Thurs¬
day evening; hence to make the totals the complete figures for
tonight (Nov. 7), we add the item of exports from the United
States, including in it the exports of Friday only for Great Britain,
but for the Continent the exports of the entire week.

The following will show the closing prices each day on the
basis of low middling uplands, for the several deliveries named:
Fri.

6,700

V isible Supply op Cotton as Made up by Cable and Tele¬

1(K)Nov< jnr f'eb.

spot.... 14%
November. 14 11-^2
December. 14 19-32
.January... 14 25-32
February.. 15 5-10
March
15 9-10
April
15%

55,570

11.699

graph.—Below

.......

100 Nov lor Dec.

On

153,812

115,444

., ..

January 1

Imported from Jan. 1

excli.600 Dec. for April,
S

“

l-ioc.

8,905

8,700

..

...15 3-16
,

For April.
•
100.... ....13 31-32
5,300 total April.
1
200.
1»
.

to Nov. 1

1872.
li>71.
Butts. Bts.& R.

16,956

..

Consumption from Jan. 1

..14 15-16
15

Rejects.

6,000

.

Consumption in October

MX
14%

,

shipments in November..

Probable supply to April 1, 5 mouths.

...14 9-32
14%

200

400...
200...

Bis. Butts.

14%

.

-187 i

,

M 1-32
14 1-16

..

...

cts.

100
300
500...:

following exchanges have been made during the week :

ixl to
pu. ;t

»ii(.

1 bales.

14%
14%

200....
100

For March.
100...
At)... .....13 13-16
200
13%
13 29-”32
100...
13 15-16
100...
14
1,500...
.14 1-16
100...
MX)....
11 3-16
1.000
100...
14%

*‘....14 3-16

1,'HW

Cts.

200...
00'J....
800....

...

.14

JT50

bales.

631

total for the

same

period of previous year.

t

■

New York since Sept.l , 1813

Exports of Cotton (bale*) from

WEEK ENDING

EXPORTED TO

Oct.

22.

Same
time
prev.
year.

Total

Oct.
29.

Oct.

15.

to
date.

Nov.
6.

92,663

Liverpool

9,280

12,542

16,061

21,698

95,455

Total to Gt. Britain

9,280

12,542

16,061

21,698

95,455

92,693

30

Other British Ports

Havre
Other French ports

816

2,168

1,177

Total French

816

2,168

Liverpool, Oct. 23.—The following are the prices of middling
6
qualities of cotton, compared with those of last year:
-Fair &
/-Good <fc/-Same date 1872r-Ord & Mid—%
_

Bremen and Hanover

350

350

....

Hamburg

....

Total to N. Europe.

*

*

Spain. Oporto&Gibraltar&c
•

Grand Total

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

81*8

....

....

....

1871.
bales.

1873.

1872.

bales.

bales.

204,230
90,070
34,840

857,950
111,400

93,809
15,331

4,730

27.750
11.230

8.923
13.693

108,005
86,598
8,882

272,440

Egyptian. &c. 11,840
W. India, &c. 2,150
E. India, &c. 75,990

*898

..

1872.
bales.

129,620

169,970

1873.
bales.

American.... 172,540
Brazilian....
12,500

....

Spain, Ac

Mid. Fair. Good
g’d fair—*
Fine.->
30
19
22
24
42
26
20
19
20
18
22
18
24
L.Mid. Mid. G.Mid. Mid. F. Mid. G.Mid
M F

8*
8*
9*
9%
9%
9 13-16 10
io*
Mobile.... 7* '8*
8*
9%
9%
9%
9%
10*
10*
N.O& Tex 7*
8*
8*
9*
9%
10*
10 5-16 10*
11*
Since the commencement ol the year the transactions on specula¬
tion and for export have been :
p—Actual exp. from
Actual
Liv., Hull & other exp’t from
-Taken on spec, to this date—*
outports to date-%
U.K. In

9,430

548

350

100

*

_

17
15

Upland... 7*

6,337
3,093

*198

‘ioo

Other ports

.

Sea Island
Florida do
Ord. G.Ord.

1,177

Total

[November 8,1873

THE CHRONICLE

632

104,198

98,171

22.8G4

16.161

12,542

following are the receipts of cotton at New York. Boston*
Philadelphia and Baltimore for the last week, and since Sept. 1/73:
PHILADELP’lA

BOSTON.

BBOE’TSFBOM-

New Orleans..
Texas
Savannah
Mobile
Florida
S’th Carolina.
N’th Carolina.

Sept. 1.

2,341
1,063
9,202

22,882
10,878
55,315

week. Septl.
984

5*, 692

BALTIMORE.

This
week.

2,068

[Since
Septl.

1.931

250

52

1*779

Since

This

Since
This
week. Septl.

*

*735

42*069

523

3.366

*

*

*

*

4*,iii

Sales this week.

*

*

*665

Trade.
American.. bales. 26.660
Brazilian
10,900

11,125

41,544

530

5,911

33

481

1,925

16.533

Tennessee, &c

5,481

17,797

510

2,858

104

700

38,624

195,032

Foreign
Total this year

33,872

Total last year.

192.400

West Indian.... )
East Indian

....

1,939

...

2,320

...

9,289

•

•

•

•

.

....

....

.

.

.

1,161

2,071

....

....

....

...

1,613
...

34.620

27.250

11,300

386,220

720.710

13,690

4.480
400

225.900

253,460

8,33D
5,260

400
250

90

i on

6.988

1,954

35,157

1,860

37,812

3,513 16,019

7,754

3.412

7.244

19,249

this

16,890
103,060
102,750
723, H10 1,083,570

14,630

1,980

10,970

11,790

7,420 4.900 66,570 3,136,510 3,666,450 61,120
-Stocks.
Imports.

54,250

60,010

4,160

1,630

date
1872.

Total.

This

1872.

day.

1,402,134

111.100

709,655
287,042
17,147
140,393

55,190
12,210
5,500
13,380
327,440

24,761 !2,953,035 :2,855.322

3,414,313

..

Total

857,942

night of this week :

*

follows:
Liverpool.

New York
New Orleans
Mobile
Charleston
Savannah
Baltimore
Boston

...

.

21,698
14,505

Havre.
816

Bremen.
350

Hamb’g. Barcel’j
413

5,469

5,583
.

1,025

..

.

.

65

2,036

....

1,262

710

69

1,122

Philadelphia

....

22,864
20,387
4,484
5,583
3,298
1,800
69
1,122

3.096

413

1,262

59,607

Liverpool, November 7—5 P. M.—By Cable FROM
POOL—The
market has ruled irregular to-day.
Sales
the day were 10,000 bales, of which 1,000 bales were
export and

speculation.

of

for

Of to-day’s sales 7,000 bales were
given as follows :

American. The weekly movement is
Oct. 17.

Sales of the week
of which exporters took
of which

bales. 75,000

speculators took

Total stock
of which American
Total import of the week
of which American
Actual export
Amount afloat...'.
of which American

9,000
12,000

Oct. 24.

Oct 31.

Nov. 7*

67,000

55,000

57,000

7,000
5,000

5.000
3,000

6,000
2,000

128.000

525,000
111,000

532,000
98,000

529,000
85,000

38,000

25.000

16,000

12,000

63,000
12,000
8,000
179,000
59.000

51,000
11,000
6,000
233,OOo

567,000

11,000
152,000

13,000

176,000
37,000

23.000
94,000
following table will show the daily closing prices of cotton for the week;
Sat.
Wed.
Mon.
Tues.
Thnrs.
' Fri.
Mid. Uplands. 8*© 8% 8*@.... 9*®.... 8*®-... 8*®... 8*®....
Mid. Orleans.. 9*®.... 9*®.... 9*®.... 9 ®.... 9 ®.... 8%®....
European Cotton Markets.—In reference to these markets
The

our

correspondent in London, writing under the date of Oct. 25,

states:




485,260

421,050

1871.
bales.

stocks
and1872. :
bales.

365,162

-295,636
229,910

118,719
Return of the quantities of cotton imported and exported
various ports of the United Kingdom during the week
October 23:

E. Ind. Egypt. Miscel.
Brazil.
Amer.
1.709
1.341
6,606
biles. 11.879
11.031
Imported
664
12
11.068
2,187
Exported
1.063
Alexandria, October 11.—The receipts and exports of
at Alexandria to October 11, were as follows :

in

same

time in 1872.
1871.

“
“

same

“

“

“

to

“

i

to Austria and

Austria, Italy and Russia.
Italy, 1672...,
“

'

’

...

........

CantarB.

203
113
583

5,915
7,119

1871

Cantars.

40,000

Stock about
Total crop

cotton

8,471

1872

“

15,014

328

all parts

“

32.5H6

590
...

.

1871...

Total shipments to

Total.

657

1872
1871....

“

“

ended

7,691
4,742
6,668

time in 1872..
“
1871
to France and Spain
in

at the

43.565
Bales.

Shipments to Liverpool from October 1.
“

255,214
274,564
208,580

78,0i8
111,300

Receipts from October 1
*

1878.
bales.

of 1872-73

• - •

2,298,942

BREAD STUFFS.
'

Friday P. M..

Nov. 7. 1873.

during the past week been an average decline on
bbl. Receipts have been large; there has also
been a material decline in wheat. Under these circumstances
holders have been inclined to sell, and have met with more free¬
dom the reduced bids of shippers, and have endeavored to stimu¬
late trade by concessions in prices.
Th« movement has conse¬
quently been large, so that stocks have not accumulated to the
extent upual at this season of the year.
But the course of the
Western wheat markets in the past few days indicates that sup¬
plies can be kept up by rail during the close of navigation at the
reduced prices. To-day good lines of shipping extras were offered
at $6@6 10, and broken parcels at $5 75@5 85, with choice super¬
fine at $5 50.
Wheat, as stated above, has experienced a very marked decline;
spring wheats have taken the lead in the downward move¬
ment, and the closing prices are the lowest in many months; best
winter wheats have shared to some extent in the depression.
There has

6,350

Total

....

....

Total.

266.940

194,193

59,607

particulars of those shipments, arranged in our usual form

on /icn

312,420

245,088

Imports, »Tan. 1 to Oct. 23

“

Total...

6,450 )
32.360 j

American, against 9| per cent, last year.
Of Indian cotton
the proportion is 61 per cent, against 64 per cent.
London, October 25.—The amount of business doing baa been
only moderate and prices show no material alteration. The fol¬

Deliveries
Stocks. Oct. 23

Total bales.

63,570
25,880
44,210

71,000
16,540

524,820

lowing are the particulars of imports, deliveries

Liverpool, per steamers Egypt, 2.903
City of MohWyoming, 4,327
Oceanic, 1,666 and 9 Sea Island
Algeria, 2.416
Abyssinia, 2.2)4
Elysia, 1,181 (via Glas¬
gow)
Castalia, 800 (via Glasgow)
per ships Casilda, 1,150
Cynosure, 1 332
Princeton, 1,263
21,698
To Havre, per steamer Europe, 801 and 15 Sea Island
816
To Bremen, per steamers Hermann, 150
K. P. F. Wilhelm, 200...
350
New Orleans— fo Liverpool, per steamers Trent, 3,725
Caledonian,
5,235 ...Louisiana, 2,558 (Mexican)
Oberon. 2,987
14,505
To Havre, per steamer Germania, 2,654
per ship Preston, 2,815... 5,469
To Hamburg, per steamer Germania, 413
413
Mobile—To Liverpool, per steamer Australian, 4,484
4,484
Charleston—To Liverpool, per steamer Penede, 2,775 Upland....
Puerto, 1,787 Upland and 16 Sea Island....per bark Maggie Hor¬
ton, 940 Upland and 65 Sea Island
5,583
Savannah—To Bremen, ppr bark Alamo, 2,036 Upland
2,036
To Barcelona, pei bark Nueva Buenaventura, 1,262 Upland
1,262
Baltimore -To Liverpool, per steamer Austrian, 1,008 and 17 bags......
1,025
To Havre, per bark Auguste, 65
65
To Bremen, per steamer Berlin, 710
710
Boston—To Liverpool, per steamer Marathon, 69
69
Philadelphia—To Liverpool, per steamer Ohio, 1,122
1,122

Dec. 31,
1872.

stock of cotton in Liverpool 21 per cent is

Of the present

last Friday, except Galveston, and the figures for that port
are the exports for two weeks back.
With regard to New York,
we include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Wednesday
New York—To
treal. 2.331

Same
date
1872.
46.490

To this

To this
date
1873.

This
week.

14,720

11,395 1,589,2% 1,151,383
389.211
636,918
11,03!
186,516
183,205
1,341
Egyptian
15.744
33
16,488
Smyrna & Gr’k
961
114,965
W. Indian
87,334
East Indian...
684,984 752,363

American...
Brazilian

5,100

1,940

lw

....

5,479

Same
Average
period weekly sales
1873.
1872.
1872.

year.

.

363

icle

The

Thursday

1,489,070

.

8,170 4,920

2j6i7

Shipping News.—The exports of cotton from the United States
the past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached 59,607
bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these are the
same exports reported by telegraph, and published in The Ch ron¬

are as

742,770

of cottox

Speculaport tion. Total.

4,540
Egyptian
8myrna & Greek ) „ Qfln

*

106
422

Total

*

Ex-

Total

1,684

[357

....

North’rn Ports

Virginia

23.680

533,740

SALES, ETC., OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS.

■

8,747

9.131

231,333

,

The

Since

42,280
11,040

275,020
606,310
637,950
301,726
394,002
The following statement shows the sales and imports
for the week and year, and also the stocks on hand on
Total

,

This
week.

132,030

evening last:

9.280

NEW YORK.

1872.

bales.

flour of 25c. per

Receipts at this market are pretty

liberal, and the movement

November 8,1873.)

THE

CHRONICLE

eastward from the upper lake ports has been very large, and there

Lor

*

this market is therefore

a

strong

by rail,

Wheat—No.3

SaperflueStateand West¬

Instore

Wheat

extras

do double extras
do winter wheat extras
and double extras

City shipping extras.
City trade and family
..

5
6

75© 6 10
50® 8 <10

50® 10 00
6 00® 6 50

8

mily brands
Southern shipp’gextras..
Rye dour superdne
Corn meal—Western, *&c.

Corn meal—13r’wine. &c.

...

50®10 00

..®

85®

Oats—Black

•

Chicago mixed
White Western, &c
Barley—Western

[

45®
47®
1 25®
1 50®
1 25®
95®

Canada West
State
Peas—Canada

3 20® 3 60
3 75® 3 90

The movement in breadstuffs at this market has been
-RECEIPTS AT NEW TORE.-

79,448

2,841,258

Q2C»

470

as

..

’47
49

1 45
1 60
1 45
1 25

follows

-EXPORTS 7ROSI NEW YORK.—■

-1873.
Same
For the
Since time Jan.
week.
Jan. 1.
t, iQ72.
.

90

®

2,385^855
172,791

-1873.For the
Since
week.
Jan. 1.

42,594

-1872.For the
Since
week.
Jan. 1

1,313,339

29,157

3,461
155,758
840,563 22,312,526

5,975

952,36:
168,211

Wheat, ous. 944,414 27 1 33 086 11,206,'191
480,320 10,390,29'
681.439 21,902,645 36,221,580 428,998 12,754,744
“
Corn,
870,620 23,4b9,79:
1.300
Rye,
912,865
376,863
43,767
935,350
678,791
Barley,&c.
200,864 1,714,319 3,134,846
40,048
22,65!
Oats...... 314,250 9,774,826 11,002,957
665
80
33,512
31.14,
The following tables show tbe Grain in
sight and the move
ment of Breadstuffs to tbe latest mail dates:
.

...

RECEIPT8 AT LAKE AND RIVER PORTS

1,

NOV.

Floor.

Wheat
bbls.
bush.
(196 lbs.) (60 lbs.)

Chicago...

.

..

.

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit
Cleveland
St. Louis...
Duluth

FOR THE WEEK ENDING

AND FROM AUG. 1 TO NOV.

55 090

31,725
m,593

4,838
5,275
26,727
7,450

730,520
863,579
71,749
64,073
7,750
121,140

Corn.
bush.

758,026
22,010
153,000
12,800
15,700
133,227

474,628
29,350

1.

Oats.

bush.
(56 lbs.) (821b*.)

94,156

15,960
27,500
79,227

195,548

Barley.

Rye.
bush.
bush.
(481bs.) (56 lbs.)
131,946
22,631
57,390
7,520
3,350
350
4,210
2,000
250
53,020
13,121

...'

on

Total....

109,982

21,000
124,456

104.000

104,000
240,215

157,800

395.298

462.611

31,943

66,038

609,772
101,737
399,234
171,804

423.325

2,337,149
46,218

....

584,930

80.566

25.405
125.000

54,089
50,000
92,159

200,000
62,335
81,472
117,079

233,814
268,922

282,152

50

4.184

104 480

210,486

200,000

175,000
226.594
949,746

2,896
75,000!

19,117
125,000

46,501

177,316
1,996,693

“

55,000
198.190

12,000

82.927

246,434

214.56®
92,092

1,724,225

142,245

299,668

2.684,435
2.756,447
2.475,158
2.332,195
2,155.547

1,940,777
1,918 817
1,917,894
1,451,867
1,227,203

2,857,309
4,681,296

1,109.717
3,238,513

10,472,784
10,969,645
Oct. 18, ’73. 8,535,944 12,356,583
Oct. 11., ’73.9,126,309 12,642,088
Oct. 4, ’73..9,801,655 12,496,654
Sept. 27,’73.10,688,609 12.288,020
Nov. 2, ’72. 7,453,804 12,295,517

“

....

4,472
4,082
90,000
116,052
21,1(2

8,61!,90S

“

5,712

*

Total in store & in transit Oct. 25,’73. 8,574,116
“
“

THE

bush.

630,066

485 354

V.

New York canals

“

Barley.

2,951,993

522,935

*

shipments

\monnt

bush.

\\ 1,397,663

“

i 28© 1
1 3«@ 1 38
1 40®
45
l 50®
55
l 45®
70
59
57®
70
68®
60
59®

Southern, white
Rye

9 00®10 25
6 50® 7 75
4 75.® 5 25

mealj “

Buffalo

Lake Shipments
Rail

Oats,

bush.

1,596,560

“

Corn-Western mixed
White Western
Yellow Western

6

brands
Southern bakers’ and fa

C.

at

Corn,

hush.

In «tore at
Chicago
In store at Milwaukee .r.
In store at Duluth
In store at Toledo
In store at Detroit
In store at
Oswego*
In store at St. Louis
In store at Boston
In store at Toronto
In store at Montreal
In store at
Philadelphia
In store at Baltimore

spring,bush.$1 23® 1

No. 2spring
No. 1 spring
Red Western
Amber do
White

5 15® 5 50
5 85© 6 25 I

ern

of Grain,
including the stocks in
points of accumulation at lake and
on the lakes, the New York canals, and

Wheat,

Grain.

$ bbl. $3 75® 4 50

Flour, bbls.

Nov. 1, 1873:

was

“

Flour.

Extra State, &c
Western Spring

+ And 7,490 bush, malt

In store at New York
In store at Albany

offered at

No. 2

Estimated.

Supply
granary at tho principal
seaboard ports, in transit

one.

Rye has been dull and depressed. Barley has been more freely
some decline, and the recent sales embrace
prime
Canada West at $1 60, and two-rowed State at $1 25. Oats have
been active and firm, especially for prime mixed Western.
The following are closing quotations :

1,183,899
942,137 507,914
354,514
2,600
40,900,870 42,837,199 19,529,599 2,295.4331,027,720
18,293,654 64,832.191 13,460,679 3,180,533 473,189
7,655,961 36,157,863 37,749,348 18,134,217 2,472,548 945,593

The Visible

against $1 30 yesterday, and No. 2 Milwaukee at $1 31@$1 32
against $1 34@$1 35 yesterday. The leading Western markets
broke down entirely.
In Indian corn there has been a steady decline, under free
offerings on sale. Prime Western mixed, which brought 60c. on
Wednesday, sold at 58£c. yesterday, and 58c. to-day. The close
was rather more steady in tone, owing to considerable business
for export.
The receipts at the Western markets have been
large, but there is no accumulation of stocks on the seaboard anc
the crop in the Atlantic States was deficient.
The position of the
on

283,033

Total Jan. 1 to date.
.7,863,838
Do. same time 1872
..6,099,313
Do same time 1871...

accumulation here. The principal causes of the decline
seem to have been the decline in exchange, depression in foreign
markets, and the scarcity and high rates of ocean freights,
together with sympathy with the depression which prevails in
all branches of trade. To-day No. 2 Chicago sold at $1 28@1 2&r
is no

staple

week,’72

633

DRY GOODS TRADE.
Friday. P. M., Nov. 7, 1873.

Trade has been stagnant for a week past, the attention of all
classes of dealers
being given more to the financial position of tbe
market than

to

the transaction of business.

At

tbe

opening
nothing definite was known relative to the A. & W. Sprague
Manufacturing Co. of Providence, or to their agents here, Messrs*
Hoyt, Sprague & Co. Tbe suspension of these concerns having
become a settled fact, however, and their statements showing a
large excess of good substantial assets over their liabilities, the
uneasiness caused by their suspension, was gradually decreased
toward tbe close, and the interest now mainly centres upon the
action of their creditors, who are endeavoring to devise some
satisfactory means of settling up the affairs, so as to allow the
concerns to proceed with their business.
There has been consid¬
erable excitement during tbe week over tbe rumors regarding
Messrs. H. B. Clsflin & Co., but as this firm showed assets about
40 per cent
creditors for

in

of their liabilities, and only asked their
average extension of four and one-half months

excess

an

on open accounts, which was
promptly granted, the excitement
has subsided. Messrs. Peake, Opdycke & Co. have resumed busi-

ness,

and while the position of finances generally is liable to ren¬

der temporary

suspension necessary with any of our dry goods
houses, it seems to be the prevailing opinion that the trade, as
the rule, are entirely solvent, and that no serious panic in thi8
branch need be feared.

The liberal auction

offerings of last week, and the fact that
147,478
importers as well as domestic houses were pressing goods upon
Oorresp’Lg week,’72. 151,078
724,034
the market at public sale, bad the effect of drawing a large
’71.
136,654 1,062,070 1,003,<*92
’70
160,045 1.549,286
318,771
attendance of buyers from tbe interior into this market, but their
’69. 200,210 1,992 140
450,483
presence has not been marked by any increase in the distribution
’68. 141,997
“
988,275
210,730
Total Aug. 1 to date.. .1,643,877 30,991.124 22,850,303
Same time 1872-73
through regular channels, and the week has been one of extreme
1,577.588 23,324,266 23,173,009
Same time 1871-72
1,840,612 24,575,738 16.148,978
dulness, with prices somewhat unsettled and rather favoring
Same time 187 )-71
1,881,629 20,816,196 7,611,170
buyers.
•Shipments of Flour and Grain from
Domestic Cotton Goods.—The principal feature of the mar¬
Milwaukee Toledo, Detroit, Cleveland, St. Louis and Duluth,
for the week ending Nov.
1, 1873, and from January 1 to ket during the past week has been a continuance of tbe decline
Nov. 1:
■in cotton fabrics begun last week and which has now extended to
Flour, Wheat
Corn,
Oats,
Barley,
Rye all classes of
goods. Brown goods have sustained a general
bush.
Weekending—
bbls.
bush,
bnsb.
bnsh.
bnsh
Nov 1, 1873
157,025 1,574.979 1,035,673
444,624 306.661
23,131 reduction of 4@lc per yard, and while nominally steady at the
Oct. 25, 1873
150,609 1,939,656 1.362,032
700,453 149,821
31,615
close are without buoyancy.
Corresp’ng week 1872 158,173 1,802,413 1,928,528
462,613 438,043
54,489
Bleached goods axe off i@l^c and
Corresp’g week 1871. 138,830
925,357
994,627
646,734
88,424
60,559 wide
goods, both bleached and brown, have sustained a decline
Corresp’g week 1870. 149,862 1,585,230
579,105
321,119 111,018
45,708
Total Jan. 1 to date. 5,313,660 48,450,397 45,710,357 19,548,260 3,329.347
1,220.735 of 2-£@5c per yard. Colored cottons are off in about tbe same
Same time 1812....- 3,775.710 25,963,197
62,934,842 16,910,323 4,468,113 1,067,181
Same time 1871
3,859,889 33,630,657 44,375,958 14,967,483 2,806,497 1,236.150
proportion. Prints have declined to 10c per yard for standards,
Same time 1870...
3,422,050 33,657,295 18,960,594 10,809,120 2,727,403 1,465,336 with
light offerings and small sales. There has been no decline
RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN AT SEABOARD PORTS FOR THE
in Canton flannels, as the season is well over and stocks are light.
WEEK ENDING NOV. 1. AND FROM JAN. 1 TO NOV. 1.
Bags are also unchanged.
Total

147.700

Previous week

.

“

2.054.357
1,909,996
1 786,272

1,099,963
1,180,262

“

“

m

720,821 295,916
43,972
854,586 463,546
45.374
533,570 392,933' 44,444
548,473 157,765
60,246
290,801 134,730
42,687
568,122 357.732
45,628
511,230 123,617
70,626
9,137,287 3,383.536 750,418
8,838,725 4,571,788
748,592
12,485.351 3,656.685 1,658,914
9,270,159 3,370,582 816 771
the ports of Chicago,

.

.

•At
New York

Boston

Portland*
Montreal

Philadelphiat
Baltimore

New Orleans
„

Total

Previous week
Week Oct. 18
Week Oct. 11
Week Oct. 4




Flonr,

Wheat,

bbls.
bnsh.
91.428 1,254,016
50.214
10,500

10,600
32,105

2,500
545,463

23,146

29.600

30,977
14,845

34,750

253,215

....

1,876.329

233,664 1,638,810
253,982 1,951.434
273,392 2,867,888

253,680 3,531,514

Corn,

bush.

Oats,

Barley,

bush.

bnsh.

bush.

703,580
94,150
15,500
60,925
58.400
24,500
61,327

401,197
63,872
10,000

247.023

17,140

25,326
1,500
4,000

1,000

500

39,900
13,250
43,705

88,000

1,018,382

621,824

1,584,826
1,451,917

768,946
433.539
404,587

365,849
319,072
215,433
73,018
51,018

591,083
611,084

403,869

.

.

Rye,

400

2,380
2,400
23,320
37,815
65,005
44,017
58,88i

Domestic Woolen
woolens has been

Goods.—The

demand for all

classes ot

extremely light. Clothing woolens have sold
way to meet the current requirements of the
tailoring trade, but beyond this there has been very little busi¬
Flannels still sell-moderately, and
ness, and the market is flat.
for the most part are held at steady prices.
Blankets are quiet,
but are very firmly held.
There has been no movement of im.
portance in worsted dress goods, the bulk of tbe stock having
gone into distribution last week through the medium of the
in

a

moderate

THE CHRONICLE.

634
auction Louses.

few essential

Prices

chiefly nominal

are

woolens, with

on

changes.

Foreign Goods.—There has been very little business done by

[November 8,1878.
I

do
do
do
do
do

1

..42

Forestdale .7, 36

A.. 36
i

Gem of the
dle

ample for the trade requirements.
The importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending
^Nov. 6, 1873, and the corresponding weeks of 1872 and 1871
hare been

follows:

as

—1871—

Pkge.

^Manufactures of wool
do
do
do

642

cotton..
silk
flax

Total

Value.
$263,489

554
549

171,965

447

602
676
484
935
623

462,905

915

Miscellaneous dry goods.

■-1872—•
Value.
Pkgs.

192,056

172,659

3,098 $1,263,074

1873

Pkgs.

$211,144
155,934

251
244
216
234

166,535

Value.
$99,722
69,680
103,184
46,423
91,869

318

182,8(2
279,625

3,370 $1,026,150

1,263

$410,8' 8

WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE AND THROWN INTO THE MARKET DURING THE
8AME PERIOD*

Manufactures of wool.,..

477

do
do
do
Miscellaneous

$187,866

159
87
241

46,035

121,369

dry goods. 863
1,827

Total
Add ent’d for

cotton..

silk
flax

$410,059
1,263,074

1,541
3,370

$491,701
1,026,150

69,203

consumpt’n 3,098

292
182

$216,350

15,581

475
220
102
257
487

Total thrown upon m’k’t. 4,925 $1,703,133

66,627

$114,813
45,341
54,227
43,989
22,294

00
206
598

112 030
76.541

20,153

1.338

$280,664
410,878

1,263

4,911 $1,317,851

2,601

$691,542

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING DURING SAME PERIOD.

Manufactures of wool....
do
do
do

463
192
118
705

$181,590
109,386

471
850
108
1,816

goods. 157

35,347

377

169.619
12,145

3,022
3,370

$558,166
1,026,150

cotton..

Silk
flax

Miscellaneous dry

76,320

172,726

Total...
1,685
Add ent'dforconsnmpt n 3.098
Total entered

We

at

the port. 4,783

annex

manufacture

our

36
...

....

....

do

....

do
do

do
do

BB.
C.
A.

..

V.... 30

36
..7-4

.10-4
11-4
36
Laurel D
36
Lawrence A.
do
D.. 36
do
S.. 36
XX 36
do
LL. 36
do
do
J.. 36
Y. 36
do

N.. 30

36

30
1
48
A.... 27

Broadway.

...

....

36
30
40
48
36
36
36

30

do
Y.... 33
do
Z.... 36
do
ZZ... 40
Star.. 36
do
do
do
40
do
do
46
Exeter A
36
Gilboa
36
Great Falls M 36
do
S 33
do
E 36

18
12j

36
36
29
.33
36
40
36
40
36

12

llj
9;
10
9
10

111
12
18
11

Mystic River. 36

10,

Masconomet. 40
do
..36
Nashua fine O 33
do
B.... 36
do
E
40
do
W
48
do
9-4
do
10-4
Newmarket A 36
do
D 36
Nevada A.... 36
Pacific extra.. 37

..

13,

12;
11
12

13.

...

18

...

Harrisburg A. 36

do
B. 30
Indian Head.7-8
do
48

35
48
11
12
10
12

Pepperell.... 7-4
do

..

....

8-4

.8-4

do

10-4

do

R

do

S

do
do

W

8

X

36
9-8
5-4
27

.

Chapman fine 86

Ho Cambric 36

14
16#
18#
6

14#

do
do
do
Canoe

....

..

do
do cambr. 36
Elmwood.. ..36

..10-4
Pittsfield A.
36
Pocaset Canoe 39
Portsmouth A 86

do

Fr’nklinMfgCo36

14

Ancona shirtgs...
do
fancy ....
do
mourn’ g.
do Jap. strip's
American
do
gn & ogn

10

11
10

10
11

21
25

58
76
66
96
do Non
40
Waltham F... 40
do
.5-4
do
..9-1
do
....10-4
do
11-4
Warren A.... 40
do
AA
40
Waterford W. 30
do
BB. 33
do
C... 36
do
A.
40
!
do
d’w 36
Wachusett... 36
do
30
do
40
do
48
..

..

.

do

ex...4-4

do

ex

do

No. 6.

..

..

..

17
15

13

..

....

..

..

.

23

..

..

.

Cordis AAA.. 32

..

10

do

do
do
do
do
do

11
8
8
11#
11#

11#

Garner's fancies..

9

do
do
do
do

do
do

A.... 32
A.... 30

I Methuen AA..

j

22#

do awning. ,.27#-30

I Minnehaha...
I

..

24
22

do

! Omega C

7-8

27#

...4-4

32#
16

..

14

Caledonia

Sprague’s froc’s..

w

9#

10

11

10#

Washington rbes.

10

22#
10

10

11#

10

pk&pur

13

G

shirtgs ■
robes

10

do
reds
do
purples..
do
pinks.,..
do
solids....
do
fancies
do
chnz rbs.
do
blue& wh
do
shirting.
do
Jap strps
do
monrning
Wamsutta

grn&oge.

9#
10#
9#

..

10
....

9
9
8#
8

10

fancies

11#

do

10#
10

do
shirtgs.
do fan & choc
Swiss rub.
do
do green&or.

do
do

..

10
10#

10#
11

11#

11#
11#
11#
11#
12

do T’rkey red
do palm robe

10#
10

dopurples...
pinks
mourning

11#

do
do

11#

rubies....
fancies..

11#

10

Glasgow

12#

'....

I Gloucester
(.Hartford

12#

Delaware

Home

( Lancaster

j Namaske

Glazed

7#

I

6# | Smithflcld...
7# I Washington
7#
Drills.

Brown
Great Falls
Laconia

13

7#

7#

High colors lc. higher.

Garner

D 13#

Mass

13

G 10

do

12#

12#

Poppere’l

Lyman H
Langley B

12

7#

...

7# \ Wauregan

7# | Peqnot
7# i Rea Cross

13

14
12#

13# |

Portland

13

12
15

9# | Peabody
11
j Randalmon
10# | Renfrew
14
I Union

Cambrics.

7# I Harmony

12#

Stark A

14 12#

22# I Columb’n h’ybl’e
18 "I
do XXX brn
11
j Haymaker

do
B...
Boston
Beaver Cr, A A
do
BB.
do
CC.
Chester D’k B

....

19

.

Caledonia,No.8..
Columbia, No. 70
Far.& Min, No. 5
Jas. Long. No. 10

16
16
14
14

Anchor
American

12

..

...

.

A.

.,

30

.....32

,

Boston
Cordis awning

......

Columbian

20

I

do BB
Checks.
I Kennebec

18.

| Lewiston A

20

I Nolan’s extra

...

|

Park Mills,No.50
Stripes.
| Eagle

.

10#
11#

30
14

I Lewiston A

|

do

Otis BB

11#
17

14
15#-1G#
13-14

19

Wamsutta.No.800
York I

13#

13#

Union Mills,No.l8

25

16-17

...

B....

Mas-abesic

Star, No. 1200....

15-15#

12#-13# j Great West
16-18 | Hamilton

Amoskeag

Thorndike B..
do
BB.
Uncasv’e UCA.
York
Warren AX A.,
BB....
do
do
CC....

21
21
13

22#

j Lewiston

15# I Otis AX A
14

..

do

Somerset

11

11
Domestic Ginghams*

14

Amoskeag A
Augusta

10
10#

grades

Denims.

...

do
York

do white

sol chks.

—

10
9#

Appleton

10

mourn..

do
frock
h’rcord..
do
do
fancy....
Oriental
do
robes....
do
purple...

9#
9#
9#

Boott

..

12

Mallory pinks....
do
purples..

11
8#

Arcadia.....
Ellerton....
Continental.
Franklin

dblpnk
Bar fncs

ruby&bk

Meirimac D fey.

12

do

11#
11#

...

12#

10
11

do

Simpson

10

10#
11#

purples 11
Q.kr sty 11
frocks..11#-12

do
do

purples .11-11#
10#

do
TRA...
Miner, shirt’s
Manchester
do
robes.

11#

do
purples
do
checks.
Freeman fancies
do
ruby....
do Swiss do...
do
frocks...
do
pinks...
do
purples..

do

10
11
11

11#
palm. ..11#-12
c& r plks
11
Hampden BB.....
12

.

..

10

do
shirt’gs.
Hartel’s fancies..
do
Swiss...,

11

Bates

9#
9#

.

11#-12

Arasapha

do

18

12#
11#
I
22
U#-13#
I Hampden CC.. 30
15
do
BB..
8#
11#
do
22
TRA
22#
I Hamilton reg..
27
20
i
do
D.
16
26
I Lewiston A..
36
211
23

do Old mdl
do
OT.. 6
do
CCA
do
A.V.7-8

10

Richmond’s

10

Whit.tent.onXXX

do

..

do
No. 7.
Easton

24
21
21
19
18
16

Peabody solid....

10

10#

Amoskeag

..

No. 3.
No. 4.
No. 5.

..

Conestoga A p. ..’•
do
' B p..7-8
A p.7-4
do

10

10#
11
11
10#

do
A
do
ACA...
do
do
do medal..
Pearl Rive*....
Pemberton A A
do
B....
do
E.
do
Bars
Pittsfield
Swift River..
Thorndike A..
do
C
Willow Br’k No 1
dor
36
do extra

No. 2.

j

..

monrning.

11

Amoskeag

Williamsville. 36

10

do

11#

...

B
36
Warren A A.. 36

.

11#

cheviot

....

..

Wessacnmcon

Oriental shirting.
do
polka....
Pacific Mills
do cambrics

11

pink

21

do

I

7-8

9#

suiting....

I

36

10

pnk chks

Winthrop AA.

do
shirting
Hamilton
do
checks
do
h’rcord.

10

.

do
do
do

Whitinsville.. 36
do
88

Prints*
Garners purple...
do
robe9...
do
shirting
Gloucester

Dunnell’s

do

..

7-4
8-4
9-4
10-4
11-4

do
do

Conestoga fancies
Carleton mourn’g

36

36
Swift River.. 36
Suffolk A..... 36
TremontCC.. 36
UCea
86
do heavy.. 40
do
48

do camb.
White Rock.. 86

86

do

Cocheco L
do
robes....
do
pinks ....
do
purples...
do
shirtings.
do
fancy

36
39

Washington.. S3
Wauregan.... 86

36
Pepperell.. ..6-4

15#

Jap. strps
Amoskeag
do
purples
Bristol pinks

30
27
36

...

N.Y. Mills.. 36
Pawtucet

....

....

....

Peabody
36

Loom

42
....6-4
....8-4
do' ....9-4
do
..10-4
Warn so t.ta. ..9-8
do OXX.... 36
do OHII
36
do....
5-4

..

the

Fruit of

do
do
do

Maxwell
36
Nashua E.... 36
do
5-4
do
9-4
do
10-4
Newmarket C 36
do
A 86
do
W 36

14
17#
20
19
19

Star.. 86
do
42
do .. 45

.

WalthamX... 38

Lin wood
36
Medal
36
Masonville... 36
Masconomet.. 36
do
33

20

Dwight D.... 40
do
do

Lyman camb.. 36

11#
14#
12
16#
21
23

X.. 36
do
Clinton CCC.. 36.
do
C
36
Davol
4-4
do
42
do
5-4

46

do
GB ..4-4
Lonsdale
36

12

Cabot....;....7-8

42

do

....

....

9-4

Langdon

12
42
16
45 18-18#
36

Omega B

I




Laconia
do

25

do

'

11#

10#

I Cordis ACE.,.. 32

Amosk’g ACA.

.

83
36
28

do
do
do

Ticking*.

Beaver Creek..

36
Lawrence S.. 31

Allens’fancies...
do
checks....

..

.36
36

..

Arasapha
Algodon
do
B
Albany

13#

do

40
9-4

P
do
B
Saranac fine O
do
R
do
E
Stark A
do B....

do
E
do
T
Mass. J
do E
do BB
do M
do standard
Maxwell
Medford

.36

B

do

Langley
Lyman C

G.. 30
S.. 33
W. 36

DwightX...

40-42#
11#

Langdon GB.4-4

Conestoga D. 28
do
do
do
Crescent

36

Boott B
do C
do E

do
do

.

do

Appleton A.. 86

Bedford R...
Boott S
do W
do FF
Cabot A
Continental C

do
do
do

..

..

.

do
do
do

16
13#

robes....
Anchor shirt’s
Albion solid
do
fancy

...10-4
....11-4

do
do
....12-1
do E fine. 39
do R
36
d (5 O
33
do N
30
PequotA
36

do. 40
39
Laconia O..
do
R..
37

37
36
37
P
Lflne 36
LL... 36

do

36
....
Blackst,neAA 38

I*

»#
10#

33
33
36 36
36
do L
36
do B
36
Thorndike B. 36
Tuscarora XX 36
do
45
35
Utica
do ex hvy.. 36
do
5-4
6-4
do
do
8-4
do
9-4
do
10-4
do Nona.. 36

H dw 36
CC... 34

do

2,907 $1,009,225

do

d’w 36

..

Au&Usta

do
do
James

410,878

Pepperell... 9-4

do

Atlantic A... 86

do

15

$598^47

1,644
1,263

Width. ]

36
30
33
36
36

..

Ind’nOrch.W

45
49
60

D
H.

110,742
18,759
20,954

151

6,392 $1,584,316

Width.
Indian Head.. 40
do

36
36

do
do
do
do
do

75,184

Sheetings* and Shirtings*

Amdskeag.... 36
do
do

$267,758

220
HO
566

particulars of leading articles of domestic
prices quoted being those of leading jobbers:

Agawam F... 86
Alabama.
Albion A

$1,833,445

597

84,965
92.989

do

Social C
do L
Suffolk B
do
A....

36

19

....

io#

21*.

36
83

Slatcrville.... 36

Indian Riv X; 36
Ind. Ofcii.AA. 36

few

a

Brown
Width. Price.

Adriatic.

$575,371
1,283,074

$198,448

Howe

12

36

Bate 8>

do

18#

Reynolds AA. 36

36

13#

Bay Mills

6, 1873.

Hope

8-4

li#
ll-ll# Red Hank.,,,

36

14

31
45

......

15
10
11

33

—

9-4
10-4
11-4
Pocasset Can. 3S
do
F. 80
do
FF. 36
Pride of West 36

18*

,

do

.31
86
33

do BB

CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK ENDING NOV.

ENTERED FOR

do
Bartletts
do
do

do
do
do
do

13#
12#

do
A.. 32
Hallowell Q.. 36
do
E.. 36
Harris..
36
Hill’s S. Idem 33

....

are

aO

36

M'..

5-4
.6-4

Pea not

Spin¬
.

So

Shirtings*

14

Gold Medal..4-4
do
89
Green G
36
Gr’t Falls Q.. 36
do
S... 31

5-4

.10-4
importers, but the market is beginning to look clear, the stocks
Z.. 33
having been well distributed through public sale. Retailers are Androscog’nL 36
do
AA 36
taking staple fabrics in moderate amounts to reassort their stocks
do
...,84
do
94
and Supply current running requirements. Prices are not at all
...10-4
do
satisfactory, and it is difficult to give quotations that are reliable ArkwrightWT 36
Auburn
36
on any class of imported fabrics.
The arrivals continue light, Ballon & Son. .36

but

Shefetlitg* alid

ttldUclifed
Amoskeag..

12#

Thorndike A....
do
B....

I

| ITncasville
Union

(

do

16-17
15-16

A...12#-13#

I Whit teuton A..
BB
do
I

(

20

C...

17

&

'Hi

12#

November 8,

1878.J

THE CHRONICLE.

GENERAL

GUNPOWDER—
Shipping V 25 ft keg.
Min. & Blasting

PEIOES CURRENT.

HAY—North

ASHES—Pot,1st sort # 100 ft

SALTPETRE—

River.shipping,# 1U0 ft

Crotons

“
bbl.
bbl.

Philadelphia ironts

*
Cement— Rosendale
Lime— Rockland, common—V
Rockland, lump
Lumber—Southern pine
White pine box boards

•

•

•

•

....

30
00
00
00
00
00
50

6 25

6 75
4 75

spikes, all sizes

11

00

25

to fair..

to tine..

of Scranton. Oct. 29:

14

12*

©

©
©
©

....

•

•

gold.
gold.
gold.
gold.
.gold.
gold.

Klo Prime
do good

do fair
do ordinary
Java,mats and bags

.

Ceylon

*•

©
©
©
©

“

©

20*@
19*@
26*@

id.
gold.

19

at

Savanilla
Mexican..

gold.

22

gold.

21*®

Sheathing.new (over 12 oz;# lb....
Braziers* (over 16 oz.)
American ingot. Lake
cash.

@
©
©
0

21

Spanlsh, ordinary.

Southern

“
“

@
&
©
©

“

50
18

;

gold
Castor oil, E.l.inbond, # gal..
••
Chlorate potash
Caustic soda

....

....

“

....

"

55

*•

©
©
©

“

$ a.

Ginseng,Southern

30

20
33
25

gold

Madder,Fr. E.X.F.F
Nntgals.blue Aleppo
Oil vitriol (66 degi ces)
Opium,Turkey.in bond
Prussiate potash, yellow
Quicksilver

....

37

gold

@

©

Quinine.....
peroz. 2 47*©
Rhubarb, China, good to pr.. ..# lb.
35 ©
Sai soda,Newcastle
gold 1 31*©
Shell Lac, 2d & 1st Eng
56^ ©
Soda ash
gold 2 56*©
Sngar lead, white
15^ ©
Vitriol, blue,common
11*@

FISH-Drycod

# cwt.

Mackerel, No. 1, Mass., shore,
Mackerel,No. 1, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 1, Bay..
Mackerel, No.2, Mass, shore
Mackerel,No. 2, Bay

FLAX—North River

5 00
new.. 25 no
is 00
16 00
15 01

14 00

....# ft

FRUITS—
Raisins, secaiess, new # frail
do
do
do
do

Layer,

new...

Sultana

Valencia, new
Muscatel, new.# box..

Loose

Currants,

# ft.

new

Citron, Leghorn
Prunes,Turkish,
Prunes, French

16

Ginger

2

62*
16

6
@ 28
© 20
@ 20

9*@

9V

5*@
27 ©

..# ft.
#

case.

12*
2 70

4*
12

10 ©
7 25 ©
28*©

7 50
29

34*@

Domestic Dried—
lies, Southern, 1S73, crop
}o
do sliced
do.
do
State, sliced
«lo
do
quarters
do
do Western..
reaches, pared new, Ga. & N. c
unpared, halves & quarters
m
...

Blackberries

;

.

15*

10*©

11

S* ©

8
9
9

8

©

8*

7
18
7

@
©

7

@

8

©

©

’-0*@
23 ©




under Cotton.

©

30
00
75
00

@

Barcelona

13 V

.
_

<3

©
©
©
©
©
0

#buah. 1 50

Hickory nuts
Obestnnt9
Peanuts. Va
do WH..fir’d tnhf bl

A’monds,JLanguedoc
do
do
do
do

’*21
9
11

24

10*

©

American cast. Tool
American cast spring
American machinery.,

©
A

H*

Tarragona.

4 00

# ft.

Ivica....

Shelled.

31

oakum

# ft.

8

33

©

10*

Oil- CAKE—

City thin,oblong,in bbls. .Vfon.gold
Western thin oblong, (dom.) cur....

7*©
7 ©

7*@

7*@

centrifugal,hhds. A Dxs
Mel ado....
molasses

to

5

Hav’a, Box.D. S. Nos.7 to 9
do 10tol2
do
do
do
do
do 18 to 15
do
do
do 16tol8
do

do

.

Havana. Box,

7V©
8*©
9*®

19 to 20

8V@
6 ©

white

7*@
5 V®

Brazil, bags

6 ©

Manila, bags
White Sugars, A
do
do
B
do
do
extra C
Yellow sugars
Crushed

9*©
n

@

Granulated

10

•••

6* *

TALLOW—AmericanV ft,
_

,

Hyson, CommoR to fair
do
Superior to fi-*'*

27
40
60
23
40
68
35
55
85
30

do
Extra fine to finest
Young Hyson. Com. to fair

Super.to flue

do
do

Ex. fine to finest

Gunpowder, Com to fair
do
do

8up.toflne

Ex. fine to finest

Imperial. Com to fair
«.o
Sun. to fine
do
Extrafine toflnest
Hyson Shin. & Twain, com. to fair.
do
do
8up.t.o fine
Kx. fine to finest
do
do

89

Whale,bleached winter.
Whale, Northern

70
63

Sperm, bleached wi ter.
Lard oil, prime winter...

1 70
66

PETROLEUM—
Crude,ord’v grav., in bulk, # gal..

@

1 20

©
@
@
©
©
&
©

91
42

©
30

©

English....

iiv

C.charcoal
Plates,char. Ternc

# oox

37*
72

5*
10*

©

14* ©

14 75 @
13 62* a
18 00 ©
©
10 04 ©
22 00 @
©
•

# lb

•

„

..

Carolina....

1.5 00
13 75

13 00
..

12 00
28 00

3

7V

^

# bush

'Mr

Liverpool, various

Boris! ” * .# sack!

1

©
@
©

£0

©

33

,

29*
27
1C. 00
9 75

VA©
9 ©

“

“

18
5
25
75
16
20

.2

fillers.

Pennsylvania wrappers. ’ll
Havana, com.to fine

Manufac’d,in“ bond, dark wrk.
bright work..
•»

WOOLAmerican XX
American. Nos. 1 & 2

43
40
52
40
27

#ft

California. Spring Clip-

15
55
9
60

©
©
©
©
©

110
25
45

©

27

35
35

3 10

©
©

ri
17
53
45

©

30

(rtl

©

32

25
19

gold.

ZINC—Sheet
To Liverpool :
Cotton
# ft.
Flour
# bbl.

Heavy goods. .# ton.

Corn.b’lk&bgs.#bu.
Wheat, bulk & bags..
Beel
# tee
l’oik
¥Lbl,
.

•

/—ptram.—,
s. d. s. rl.
%© —
5 0 ©—

CO 0 @70 0

32
19

1C

s.

>

35 0

©
©

....A
J2*@

12 @ —

13V£....

,

23
22
31
84
PS

8A1I8.

d.

9-16©
4 3

©....

....(a..-.

©

9V®

Smyrna,unwashed

©
©
@
©

17

Texas, fine
Texas, medium

©
©
©

27
32
26
25

unwashed.

Oil

SALTTurksIslands

28
45

9 50

Kentucky lugs,heavy (newerop^ .
leaf,
“
2.
Seed leaf. Conn. & Mass., wrprs. Vj2

FREIGHTS—
©

28
45
85

©

9 50

9*

RICE—

Rangoon, circled, gold in fond.

60
90

©

28*©

TOBACCO—

Common
South Am. Merino

Beet, plain mess.
Hams, pickled
Lard

15

©

PROVISIONS—
Pork mess # bbl (ne
Pork, extra prime..,

**84

.

: 45
1 73
67

c*@

Refined, standard white.
Naptha
....

72
1 r5
37
60
81
21
25

©
©
©
©
©
©

,,

Plates. I.

36
55
85
35
60
98
45

©

$ ft.g^Id.

•*

©

©

45
65
23
32
TO
22
35
55

Ex. fine to finest.

TIN—Banca

©
©

17
22

Superior to fine.
do
do

©

©
©

.72

Snp’

do
do

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

45

cur.

'

in casks

&

...

0 36 00

OILS—Olive, in csks # gall.
1 17
Linseed, crushers prices # gallon,

©

v@
7 \©
10 ©
10 &

Powdered

„

©

6 ©
7 ©

Porto Rico,refining grades.;
do
grocery grades

19*
19*
©

13

6V@

21

Sicily...

11

6 ©

prime, reflr.ing...
ralr to good grocery.....
pr. to choice grocery

do
do
do
do
3o

do
do

19
19

IS*

11.*®
9 ©

Cuba,inf.to com. refining
do fair to good refining

10
1 75
4 53

20*©

#ft

aprlng

American German

Straits

t

GUNNIES,—seereport

pale

.ft

tn

3
3
3
4

©

3 50
3 75

Walnuts, Bordeaux
Pecan nuts

19

©
©

new

do

5 00
2 25

2 55 *©

2 80

•1

00

00
00
00
a lfi 00
@ 15 00

©

39

2 60
3 I2.*@

Brazil nuts, new

II*

4 S7*@
2 20 ©
12 @

Dates

jj’ies,Smyrna,
Canton

©

!l*@

new

1
2
1
1

©
@
©

Filberts,Sicily

12*
40
15
50
00
90
62

©

extra

2 87*
2 90

NUTS—

3*
6

# gall.

pale

“

28
10
6
19*

51/^
19 <a
2 *@

...gold.

.

No. 1
No. 2

“

41*

7

“

“

3t*

>

8.5
50
?5
?5
19
45

2 80
2 85

3 25

Spirits turpentine
Rosin, strain’d # bbl
“

63
56 *

1 25
1 35
40
80 V

1 30

gold.

fi*

6

22

TEAS—

NAVAL STORES—
Tar, Washington
Tar, Wilmington
Pitch, citv

©

Ginseng, Western

Licorice paste, Sicily
Mid-der, Dutch..

’*75

54*©
84*@
6*0

“
“

Catch
Gambler

©

33

'*
..r.

©

21
20
17
25

English Islands.

....

©
©
©
©
©
©

27*
36

26

Cuba Muscovado
i;uba Clayed...
Cuba centrifugal and mixed

5 75

©
@

70

„

M

j

good to choice. # gall.

82
36
30
23

*'

9*@
14 ©

00

42

26
25
33

Orinoco,&c
rough

New Orleans
Porto Rico

3*

t

California

MOLASSES-

32*

“
13*
“
@ 2 37*
35 00 (5, 36 00
“
#ft.
3
2*@

Camphor. crude

.

&

33

Oak, rough
Hemlock. B.A

81*

@

38
30

1 80

1 77
91

cur.

17*©

do

LEATHERUnlon. cropped

40
38
40

3*®

rv
00

©
©
©

Bar

S 50
S 35

SUGAR—

00

IS*

©
©
©
©
©

.....

"

75
75
4U
15

American blister

@185 00

Pipe and sheet

“

16
26

“

German,

**

“

St. Croix. 3d proof

3
3
3
3

English.spring,2d & 1st quality
English blister, 2d & 1st quality

@

7 00
7 00
7 00
9 25
10 50

jp (fan
© 55 00
© 5 50

t

gold.

STEEL—
English, cast,2d&1st qvallty

....

.

11*

11
80
1!

A

Gin, Swan and Swallow
Domestic liquors—Cash.
A Icohol (8S per ct) C. & W
Whiskey

16

00 @160
17V©
5*©.
00 © 65
GO © 75

#100 ft gold

02*
22*
22*

! 00 ©
....
@
©

otemn

Brandy, foreign brands
Rum—Jam., 4th proof

@ 37 00
@ 31 iM
@ 27 00
© 45 00

English

COTTON—See BpecJal report.

gold.
' “

@
©

LEAD-

"

DYES—Alum, lump

1 25

13
12
SO

©

13*

@

102 50

....

do
Calcutta
Mace

18

-.

Hoop
120
Sheet, Russia, as to assort
gold.
Sheet, single, double & treble, com.
Rails, English. # ton .
gold 63
Rails, American, at works in Pa .... 70

25*

©

Ginger. African

SPIRITS-

@
STORE PRICES.
..

25

Cassia

do

50
35

.,..175 00

Scroll

23*
2 **

COPPER—Bolts

©
©

83 00

;

•

75

...

8*9

Cloves

©

Bar,Swedes

io*

©

Jalap.....
dye, good* fine
Licorice paste,Calabria...

40
20

English* Arheiican....

650
7 25

7 37*&

# ft

Nutmegs. Batavia and Penang
Pepper, Sumatra
gold
do
Singapore
Pimento, Jamaica,

14

25 00

Bar refined

24
25

@

©
©
©

10

....

2 50
8 00

©

7 75 ©
6 00 ©
6 75 ©
5 25 ©

SPICES—

14

SO 00

Pig,Scotch

m

@

©

17

2 85

11*

*13

Vft gold.
“
#ft
“

©

—

# 100ft, gold.

Plates, foreign
Plates domestic

14
11

@
©

n

cur.

Pig, American Forge

28

23
24

10

Pig, American. No. 2

22 *
21V
20 *

Laguayra
Sk Domingo

Lac

“
"

fiy

2 75 ©
2 25 ©
2 CO ©

Hemp, foreign

14
18
14
17
13

m<©

IRON- -Pig, American, No. 1.... # ton. 85 00

4 55

go

Cochineal, Honduras
Cochineal, Mexican
Cream tartar, prime
Cuhehs, East India

V ft gol d.

Crop of 1972.
Crop of 1871
Crop of 1870.

© 14 00
© 20 01)

•

“
“
“

HOPS—Cron Of 1873.. V lb

85
0G
35
45

21

gold.

Maracaibo

•

©

# ft
#busb.

new

1*

©
©

....

Flaxseed, American, :ouch,new...
Linseed.Calcutta V 56ftgold (tinre)
SILK—Tsatlee, No. 3 chop
# ft
Tsatlee, re-reeled
Taysaam,Nos. l & 2
Canton, re-reeled No. 1

18
18*

@

••

slaughter
Calcutta, dead green
Calcutta, buffalo

30
31
25

4
5
5
5

©
©

Bahia

12
2 25

©

5 30
5 40

COFFXE-

Argols.crude
lrgols,refined
Irsenfc, powdered
Bicarb.soda, Newcastle
Bi chro. potash, Scotch
Bleaching powder
Brimstone, crude, # ton
Brimstone, Am. roll

••

13*©
....

“

SPELTER

26
25
24

25*@

"

Wet Salted—
Buenos Ayres
Para
California
Texas
Eaet India Stock—

10*
8*

©

4 SO

3,000 tons steamboat
1.1,000 tons grate
9,000 tons egg..
3(1,000 tons stove
9,000 tons chestnut....
Liverpool gas cannel

DRUGS &

»*

#ft
gold

Timothy

24*

@

Chill
Pernambuco.
Matamoras

©

0
7

26

24

••

DrvSalt.—Maracaibo.# 1b gold

©
©
©
@

32
22

?5*@
2514®

"

Orinoco
California
Maracaibo
Bahia.

....

©
©
©
©

V ft gid

Montevideo
Corrientes
Rio Grande

75
73
75
00

11*@
a

Dry—Buenos Ayres

Calcutta

BUTTER AND CHEESE—
Butter-State, dairies, com.
do
Welsh
do
fine
West, tubs, good to fine
do
common
Cheese -State factory
do State dairy,common

4
8
8
5

HIDES—

00
00
00
00
00
00

@
©

10

Sisal
Jute

25
00
50
75
10
75

30
31
75
26
20

@
@
©
©
©
@
©

Paints—Lead, white,Am, pure, in oil
Lead.wh., Amer., dry
Zinc, wh.,Amer. dry. No. 1
Zinc, wh., Amer,. No. 1, in oil
Paris white, English
# 100 lbs. 2

Auction sale

8
@ 17
© 30
© 1
© 1
© 1
© 38

@

....

26
2.5
28
65
24
IS
4

Nails—10@60d.com, i'cn& sh, # keg.
Clinch, 1 to 8 in. & longer
Cut

4 00
14 00
28 50

SEED—Clover,

@230 00
115 00 @120 00
gold.225 00 @230 00
# ft •*
10*@
W«K
*«
9
8V©
4H
2K®

Russia, clean

# M.

1 00

@

....

Refined, pure
Crude
Nitrate soda

V ton..200 00

Manila,current

BUILDING MATERIALS—
Bricks—Common hard

4 25
8 75

©
©

HEMP—Am. dressed
American undressed

BREADSTUFFS—Seespecial report.

635

13*^
@

J.
*

40*6

636

THE CHRONICLE

'

[November 8, 1873.

Financial.

Commercial Cards

Miscellaneous.

Brown, Brothers & Co.,

Smith, Baker & Co.,

Brinckerhoff, Turner

No.

ST., N. Y.,

WALL

59

Issue, against cash deposited, or satisfactory guarantee
of repayment, Circular Credits for Travelers, in dollars
for use in the United States and adjacent countries,
and m

Yokohama and Hlogo,

E.

world.

COMMERCIAL CREDITS,
TRANSFERS
OF MONEY BE¬
TWEEN THIS COUNTRY AND ENGLAND, AND
DRAW
BILLS
OF
EXCHANGE ON GREAT

66%

ISSUE

W.

Pine

Japan.

COTTONS AIL DUCK

CORLIES,

And all kinds of

York.

Street, New

COTTON

CANVAS, FELTING DUCK, CAR COVER
ING, BAGGING, RAVENS DUCK, SAIL TWINES

CABLE

MAKE

Wm.

BRITAIN AND IRELAND.

&C.

“ ONTARIO” SEAMLESS

J. Wilcox & Co.,

Also, Agents
United

Baldwin &

Kimball,

LARD,STEARINE

14

WALL

STREET,

L A R D

L

O 1

Bunting Company.
Dnane

Street.

Cheney Brothers,

,

Deposits.
G. 8. KIMBALL.

T. B. BALDWIN.

States

supply all Widths and Colors always in stock.

AND

NEW YORK.

Interest Allowed on

A full

No. 142

BANKERS AND STOCK BROKERS.

Member N. Y. Stock and Gold Exchange.

BAGS,

“AWNING STRIPES.”

PRIME

LEAF

Co.,

Manufacturers and Dealers in

REPRESENTED BY

pounds sterling for use in any part of the

THEY ALSO

&

MERCHANTS

COMMISSION

Washington, Vestry & Greenwich Sts.

SILK

MANUFACTURERS,

SALES OFFICE:

Samuel A.

Gaylord & Co,

Hartford and South
59

BEAVER

BROKERS IN WESTERN SECURITIES,

'SALESROOM:

NEW YORK.

33 Wall

AND

Third st., ST. LOUIS.

323 North

477

BANKING HOUSE OF

F. R. Sherwin &
80 Broadway, New

we

invite

new

OLYPHANT Sc

unimpaired

desire

planatory circulars

on

J. S.&E. Wright & Co.,
9*2 & 94 Franklin street

take

to

limited risks.

241 Chestnu

Co., of China,
York.

Everett &
66

State

Otis Comv any,

Co.,

Rates

Street, Boston,

Government

Co.,

Columbia Mfg.

AUGUSTINE

HEARD

Sc

CO.,

Bought and Sold

LOANft NEGOTIATED.
Accounts received and Interest allowed on
which ma> be checked for at sight.

and

Laconia

“

balances

Co.,

Brokers,

NEW YORK.

Thorndike

CLARK, SPENCE & Co., Galle pnd Colombo
GILFILLAN, WOOD & CO., Singapore.

“
‘

a Gznkbal Banking Business, and give
particular attention to the PURCHASE AND SALE
OF
GOVKRNMENT, STATE AND RAILROAD

Received for Rio te Janeiro.

John Dwight & Co.,
SUPER CARR.
No. 11 Old

pf“ Deposits received subject to check at sight.
The

Cotton.

Ross &
91

SUCCESS IN WALL
Origin of Wall Street; Locking up
Greenbacks; Long of Stocks ; Bulls; Bears ; Profits
on “Puts” and “Calls,” costing $10 to |100: How it is
Done ; Out of Town Operators ; No Liability ; Show¬
ing how small investment may give large returns.
Cloth bound; 32 pages. Mailed on receipt of stamp bv
VALENTIN* TUMBRIDGE & CO.,
Bankers and brokers,

BAGGING, IRON TIES

SODA, Ac.

Slip, New York.

Bagging

F. COUSINERY & CO.

Commission Merchants
IMPORTERS

Co.’s

^

Ware.

OF

58

Wall

Crawfosd, Walsh,
Butt & Co
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

MEDITERRANEAN

PRODUCTS,

25 Sc 27 South William

St.,

Jewell,Harrison & Co.,
DEALERS,

LARD

OIL

MANUFACTURERS

AND

Markets.

No. 3 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK.




Cotton

21 WATER STREET NEW YOB£.

Mobile, Ala.

Brothers,
Factors
AND

OF

STEARINE.

Pure Lard Packed for West
Indies,
South American and European

,

Lehman, Abraham & Go., Lehman. Durr & Co.
New Orleans, La.
Montgomery, Ala.
Newgas8, Rosenheim & Co.,
Exchange Buildings, Liverpool.

Lehman

NEW YORK.

PROVISION

Manufactures.

Street, New York.

FRENCH

AND

Silver

Sc TWINE,

Walsh,Grawford&Co.,

Jobbing Trade ONLY Supplied.

39 Wall Street New York.

Jos. Bachman & Sons,
Gorham
Sterling

Street,

Dealers In

“QECRET OF
STREET

Smith,

Front

And Agents for

SALERATUS,

SECURITIES.

c

SANDILANDS, BUTTERY & CO., Penang.
Orders

Co.,

Cordis Mills.

MANUFACTURERS OF

Transact

Mf’g A

Co.,

Franklin Co.,

Messrs. VUMMLER & CO., Batavia and Padang
“
CHAS. THOREL & CO., Yokohama.

8 Wall Street, New York,

O

Mills,

Co.,

Boston Duck

STREET,

P. O. box No. 4860,

Coffee

Bankers

Works,

REPRESENTING

Commission, and

Cammann &

Higginson,

No. 87 BEAVER

Ronds
on

Mills,

Oriental Print

Warren Cotton

Stephen

Securities, Gold, Stocks

and

Advances made on consignments of approved mer
chandlze.

consignments of
also to ourfrlenda

Co.,

Mfg. Co.,

Androscoggin Mi Is,
Continental

MERCHANTS.

STREET.

Liberal cash advances made on
Cotton and Tobacco to our address;
in Liverpool and London.

Mfg. Co.,

Pntnam

COMMISSION

BROAD

Mfg. Co.,

Renfrew

AGENTS FOR

application.

R, T. Wilson &
AND

FOR

AGENTS

OF CHINA AND JAPAN.

44

BOSTON.

PHILADELPHIA.

street

Pepperell Mfg. Co.,

Ex

F. R. SHERWIN & CO.

BANKERS

NEW YORK.

69 Franklin street

accounts, subject to check at

Syndicates are forming according to our usual plan,
who

STREET,

New York.

104 Wall St., New

carry stocks on margins.

those

'

MERCHANTS,

Represented by

sight; also speculative accounts, for which we will

for

Co.,

BROOME

-

Hong Kong, Shanghai, Foochow Sc
Canton, China.

York.

panic with

Having survived the late

Co.,

&

Olyphant
COMMISSION

facilities,

-

NEW YORK

Street,

Manchester, Conn.

STREET,

COMMISSION

MERCHANTS,

& 185 PEARL STREET,

New York.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102