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A

ilaiUvay |H<mitor, and insurance iournat

WEEKLY

NEWSPAPER,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE
UNITED STATES,

VOL. I.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1865.
CONTENTS.
THE CHRONICLE.

Government Secu¬

The Decline in
rities

Currency Depreciation and tlie
Gold Notes
Southern States’ Debts
The Death of Collector

The Cholera ami the Quarantine
The New South American War..

644

.

641

y

64-2
643

King....

G43

643

Railway Analyses. No. 7........
Foreign Intelligence
1....
Commercial
News

and

644
6lG

Miscellaneous
C47

THE BANKERS GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL
TIMES.

Money Market, Railway Stocks, U.
8. Securities, Gold Market, For¬

Commercial Epitome
Exports and Imports

eign Exchange, New York City
Banks, Philadelphia Banks, Na¬
tional Banks, etc
Sale Prices N. Y. Stock Exchange

Cotton Trade

Breadstuff's
651

654

National, State, etc., Securities...

655

Dry Goods Trade

Prices Current and Tone of the

Market .;

THE RAILWAY MONITOR AND

Epitome of Railway News

662

INSURANCE JOURNAL.

665 1 Railway, Canal, etc., Stock List...
Insurance and Mining Journal

Railroad, Canal, and Miscellaneous
Bond List.
666-67

j Postages

C6S
669
670

to

Foreign Countries....
ADVERTISEMENTS.

INDEX TO
Insurance

656
656-57
659
659
660

Companies

671 | Bank

Announcements, etc

672

(ttljroniclt.

NO

21.

ly paralysing to public and private credit.
And the chief
place among its causes must undoubtedly be assigned to the
undue expansion and
consequent weakness of spme of our
banks. The reports of our
city banks, says a daily newspaper,
show that a very
large increase in loans has been made by
“

such banks

as

have

large country connections.

This is^no

doubt, caused by the circumstance that some of the interior
expanding beyond all safe limits, and have
had to seek accommodation here in
We may
consequence.
mention one country bank as an
example. Its capital is two
hundred and fifty thousand dollars, all of which is
invested
in government
bonds, and placed at Washington as security
for circulation, or for
government deposits. Notwithstanding
banks have been

this investment of its available
means, the officers have actu¬
ally lent to their customers no less than four millions of dollars. Under the recent
pressure ib need not be wondered at
that this institution had to sell
amount of Seven-thirties/5

at a

sacrifice

a

considerable

and Financial Chronicle is
The merchants,
issued every Satur¬
operators, and other persons who re¬
day morning with the latest news by mail and telegraph
ceived this accommodation were/not slow to enter
up to
into the
midnight of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every#iorning
with all the Commercial and Financial news
of the banks that granted it. They were carried away
of the previous day spirit
with the same
up to the hour of publication.
contagious example of expansion, and

The Commercial

plunged
recklessly into speculations attended with unusual risk. The
warning was, therefore, not uncalled for which Mr. McCul¬

,

TERMS OF

SUBSCRIPTION-PAYABLE

[Canvassers for Subscriptions
For The

Commercial

IN

ADVANCE.

are not authorized to make

Collections.']

loch is

Financial Chronicle, with The Daily
Bulletin, delivered by carriers to city subscribers, and mailed to all
and

banks

others

_

$12 00
and Financial
Chronicle, icithout Tiie Daily
Bulletin
:
For Tuk Daily
Bulletin, without The Commercial and Financial n) oo
For Tiie Commercial

Chronicle

WILLIAM B. DANA &
CO.,

5 oo

Publishers,

(Chronicle Buildings,)
60 William
Street, New York.

THE

DECLINE IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIES. "

One of the
cent

most

noteworthy facts

stringency is its effect

in

connected with the

as

much

as

the

re¬

depressing the prices of all des¬
The gold-bearing securities
short
currency-bearing obliga¬

tions, though the latter are regarded
usually as the more sen¬
sitive, and have hitherto suffered most
severely in time of

pressure. Such wide fluctuations
and it is not the least

are

much to be

deprecated

important of their mischievous

that

they tend

curities

as a

We are at

In

public confidence in government se¬
stable investment for trust funds and similar
fidu¬
The practical question

was

now

the bottom of the decline.

attempting the solution

if we

;

effects

to shake

ciary property.

can,

on




arises, whether

problem, we must find
instance, the revulwhich has been, for the moment,
equal¬

by what

brought

of this

causes, in the first

the soundness of which

But this

depends

expansion of credit

continued high prices.”
speculators in breadstufls,

on
to

cotton, and other commodities

was not the
only means by
which the banks weakened their
position. During the nego¬
tiation of the last 230 millions of
seven-thirties, it was ob¬
served that an
unusually small

aggregate was taken in the
Nearly all was absorbed in the interior, and
passed in some cases into banks whose means were already
Atlantic cities.

criptions of government bonds.
have suffered

reported to have uttered on a recent occasion that tlje
compromising themselves by “ discounting paper

were

too

deeply pledged by prior engagements. Indeed Western
officers, during the last week or two, have been seeking
accommodation here, whose accounts showed that
they held
seven-thirties to an amount
cquaHo three or four times their
capital. From motives into which we may enquire more
particularly hereafter, these institutions have been induced
to load themselves
up with a burden of seven-thirties, tenforties, and five-twenties far beyond their strength. They
ventured in fact to invest in these and in other
descriptions
of government
paper not available for paying their debts, so
large a portion of their means, that- they found themselves
under the
necessity of refusing accommodation to their cus¬
tomers, or of depending on their correspondents here to an
extent which no sound conservative bank
officer, in the most
bank

THE CHRONICLE.

642

[November 18, 1865.

tranquil times, could contemplate without grave apprehension. chasing power of our. greenbacks is supposed to be greater
While the money market was easy, and accommodation or less. It is on account of this popular belief, which is part¬
could be had at a low rate of interest, no harm seemed to* ly right and partly wrong, that so mnch interest has been
taken in the task of regulating the price of specie. By keep,
come of this reckless expansion, and the frail barques which
ing gold down, it was imagined the value of the currency was
were carrying so much sail and so little ballast, seemed to
be making a prosperous swifl voyage. At the same time the kept up, however large might be the issues of legal tenders.
This is much as if a gardener, ordered to keep his conservecontractors who had received in part payment considerable
amounts of the second series of seven thirties under a pro¬ tory at a given temperature, should neglect his fires and de¬
vote his chief attention to tampering with the thermometer.
mise not to sell them until four months had elapsed from
the date of issue, were raising heavy loans on them at 4 or Every one who has learned the simplest rudiments of finan¬
cial science is aware that depreciation of the currency is &
5 per cent interest.
When the rate, however, was advanced
The shrinking of the value of the paper
to 6 and 7 per cent, these contractors became eager to sell sign of redundancy.
dollar is caused by the fact that there are too many paper
out.
Large amounts of the seven thirties were thus pressed
dollars afloat.
If this paper were redeemable in coin on de¬
on the market, and had to be offered at a concession in price
mand, the depreciation could not advance beyond a fractional
to tempt purchasers.
Such was the state of things when the usual autumn de¬ limit; as the notes would be presented for payment, and the
mand set in for money to move the crops.
The interior volume afloat would contract itself to its just dimensions. If,
banks which ought to have reserved their strength to meet however, the notes be not redeemable, there is no such sponThe elasticity with which
this drain upon their resources, had been venturing beyond taneous limitation of the issue.
a redeemable currency adjusts itself to monetary exigencies
their depth, and had locked up their available means in secu¬
rities which had already begun to depreciate upon their is gone. And as these monetary requirements vary greatly
hands. At this critical moment too, came Mr. McCulloch’s at different times, the irredeemable volume of the currency,
from its rigid inelasticity, may be insufficient toward the
recent contraction loan which absorbed some of the com¬
close of the year and redundant three months later. Now,
pound interest notes held as reserve. This loan could have
our
paper money system, the price of gold, if uninflu¬
been easily disposed of had it appeared a few weeks earlier, under
enced except by the currency, might be a true measure of the
but cooperating with the other causes of derangement, it
But the
added for the moment another element of weakness to the redundancy and depreciation of that currency.
trouble is that as gold coin is our international medium of
position ot the banks. Moreover, they were suddenly called
to pay off the government deposits, and at the same time exchange, it is from this and other causes exposed to a num¬
ber of perturbing forces, which modify its price independently
the general iic ltitu
in the public mind was increased by
Hence, the
the near approach of the Congressional session, by the threat¬ ot the movements of our domestic currency.
ening aspect of some of our foreign relations, by the agita¬ price of gold would not be an infallible measure of depre¬
ciation in all cases.
tion of the financial atmosphere, by the clamor for rash im¬
But as we have ,said, there are other causes besides the
mediate contraction of the currency, and by the partial
cessation of the foreign demand for our securities, due to the oscillations of foreign exchange which increase the incertitude.
Among these is the interference of government,
rise in the Bank of England rate of discount.
As every great change at the Stock Exchange now-a-days which assists in preventing the price of gold from being a
is referied to some clique movement, it has been rumored correct indicator of the purchasing power of our paper cur¬
and in some quarters believed that a party of very large rency. We do not here discuss the general policy of such
capitalists in our three great cities, forseeing the probability interference, but simply point out the fact. The first time
of financial trouble, have been operating in government se¬ that public attention was very specially called to this inter¬
curities for somp time past, their efforts being directed first ference was in the summer of 1863 when Mr. Chase secretly
and suddenly sold a very large amount of coin and took
to stimulate the demand that prices might rise, and then to
sell at the highest point of the popular excitement before the measures at the same time to make money tight. The re¬
fall. Row there is no satisfactory evidence of any such rep¬ sult was magical. Mr. Chase had only to show himself at
rehensible combination, and the report" of it is founded on the Sub-Treasury and the price of the precious metals at once
,

still it is not improbable that the heavy
sales made a
or two ago by certain large dealers in gov¬
ernment securities, precipitated the fall in prices, though the
capitalists who are responsible for those transactions proba¬
bly acted without any compact or mutual understanding.
However this may be, it is certain that the late depression
in government securities is a natural result af the undue ex¬
pansion of credits on the part of banks, which have suffered
severely for their want of caution, and will, it is hoped, gain

simple conjecture

;
week

wisdom from

dear-bought experience.
obtain, the causes we
ceased, for the most part, to oper¬

Erom the best information
have mentioned have now

we can

Already we observe that government bonds of all des¬
criptions at the present low rates are attracting investors.
Shrewd capitalists for some days past have been freely pur¬
chasing ; and unless public confidence receives some new and
unexpected check, it is probable that for the present our fed¬
eral securities have reached their lowest point.

ate.

CURRM^JttEPRECIATION AND THE NEW GOLD NOTES.

premium on gold is commonly regarded as an index
depreciation, and as gold ranges lower or higher, the pur¬

The
of




Gold-fell swiftly 25 per cent. A few months
later, in April, 1864, the same experiment was tried again;
but this time it produced a panic, the memory of whioh will
long live in Wall street. Gold instead of going down went
higher than ever before, and soon afterwards Mr. Chase re
signed. The history of the numerous attempts made at vari¬
ous times to control the price of gold will be curious and
instructive; and since with the close of the war the chief
reasons for secrecy have passed away, Congress will, it it
hoped, order the facts to be fully published as soon as con-

gave way.

public interests.
Now, it is affirmed that the policy of controlling the price
of gold is not -exploded, and that the government sales
of coin have been so adjusted to the condition of the market
as to check any advance.
In confirmation of this view we
are pointed to the fact that since July last the price of gold
has been almost stationary, the explanation being that when
the price shows a tendency to advance, the Treasury
are large, and when the price goes down the Treasury
are stopped.
This manipulating and regulating of the price
of gold may or may not be apparently useful. But, whatever
be its other effects, we may be certain that it makes theprio®

sistent with the
-

sales
sales

,

THE CHRONICLE.

November 18, 1865.]
of gold

artificial, and prevents that price from being an accu-.

rate measure

On the

of depreciation.

itself this
It does not en¬

currency

regulating process has no effect whatever.
hance the purchasing power of greenbacks, or prevent the
^necessaries of life from being more costly now than when
gold was at 280. Indeed all schemes which attempt, by tamp¬
ering with the gold market, to bring down prices that depend
on inflation of the currency, are as wise and as efficient as
would be the attempt to control the temperature of a house
by

chief apprehension, we believe, which is expressed in
Wall street, relative to the new gold notes that have just made
their appearance in business, is that they form a part of a
The

policy, and that they may be in some way man¬
ipulated with a view to operate on special occasions up¬
on the price of gold.
That policy, however, in this particu¬
lar instance, would be so threatening of danger that we shall
mischievous

believe a man so conservative, cautious, and
experienced as Mr. McCulloch will venture upon it.

be slow to

SOUTHERN STATE DEBTS.

that a meeting has lately been held at London
of the holders of Southern State bonds, and a committee
has been appointed to look after their interests and take such
action with regard to the matter as may be necessary.
It is difficult to conceive any reasonable grounds for doubtWe notice

iDg that

the Southern States will ultimately keep good faith

Were it simply a question of honor,
there would certainly be no mistrust of the payment of the
principal and interest upon all their obligations; for the
Southern people have never, as a section, rendered themselves
with their creditors.

open to the charge of deliberate dishonesty toward their
creditors: on the contrary, they have established an unques¬

tioned reputation for financial integrity. The question then
must be considered as centering simply in the ability of
the States to maintain their burthens.
In the absence of any statistics showing the amount of

owing by the respective states at the close of the war,
it is impossible to ascertain what is the precise amount of
their obligations. The only possible method of attaining
a
proximate estimate is to take the published returns for
the periods next previous to the rebellion ; from which it
would appear that the aggregate obligations, absolute and
contingent, for ten Southern States, including Tennessee,
amounted then to 8112,000,000. Since that period there has
probably been no material change ; for although small debts
may have been paid off, yet new obligations have probably
been incurred to an equal amount. President Johnson’s for¬
mal announcement that State obligations created for the
sup¬
port of the insurrection cannot be recognized, leaves no ques¬
debt

•

tion that the entire

repudiated.

war

debts of the Southern States

must

be

The debts contracted previous to the rebellion

therefore, alone to be taken into account. It appears,
from the latest reports previous to the war, that the indebt¬
edness of the respective States was then as follows:
are,

Date.

Amount

o

^

i Foreign

1881

Alabama
Alabama

I860

83,445,000

Arkansas..Principal and int

....

1858
I860

Louisian*
Louisiana....

Domestic

..••»••'

2,582,178

Georgia

’.
10,023,908

3,691,574
8,000,000
1,051,422

[Absolute debt

8,844,667

883,000
2,670,750

7.000,000

B>ktJ
Mississippi .... [Repudiated]

) U. S. Surplus Revenue

I860

l Absolute debt

) Absolute debt

1860
i860

16,027,178
8,092,622

Florida

1859
8

j

....

J Liab»8 for

N. Carolina..

S. Carolina.. V Conting’t

I860

Tennessee

1859

Virginia
irgmia

.

“

Conting’t “
[Absolute debt

)

Total debt




jCoQtiDg,t

"

To this aggregate must

be added an unknown amount of
interest, accumulated during the rebellion. Few
of the States have been able to
pay their interest during that
time, so that it would not, perhaps, be far from the truth to
estimate that $35,000,000 must be added to the above total
arrears

on

of

account of arrearages ;

which would make the present lia¬
really about $145,000,000. To provide for the pay¬
ment of this back interest, the States would have to borrow
the amount, or issue bonds or
scrip therefor; as it is not
bilities

supposable that they

regulating the thermometer.

17,023.903
7,000,000

9,978,505

7,742,996

12,799,000
80,190,816

16,648,667

11,280,000

41,470,816

643

in a condition to raise that ^um
by taxation, and at the same time time to provide for the
accruing interest. Nor is this all. Each State will find it
necessary to borrow a considerable amount in order to repair
damages to public property, and other losses incident to the
war.
Probably not less than $50,000,000 will be required
are now

for these purposes.
The question then -

really is, will these States be able to
support an aggregate debt of $200,000,000 ? It must be
taken into account that they have to sustain their share of
the federal burthens, amounting probably to an annual
charge
of $60,000,000.
Estimating the average rate of interest
upon the State debts at
per cent, the annual interest charge
would aggregate $13,000,000.
This, added to the federal
burthens would make the total annual debt charges upon
the
ten States, say $73,000,000
per annum. Can these States
support this enormous liability, equal to the whole expendi¬
ture of the United States previous to the war 7
The question
is a serious one yet we think there is no reason to doubt their
ability to do so.
A majority of these States hold valuable assets, available
as security for the
payment of their debts. Immediately
before the war, six of the States above specified held assets
as follows, consisting of stocks, bonds, school funds and real
property, viz.:
Date.

1860
1859
1860

Assots

Georgia

$5,597,057

Louisiana..

1860
1860
1859

Virginia
®

9,804,918
7,663,140
6,000,000

North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
*

8,744,847

i Producing property

10,057,540

(

25,299,930

Non producing property..

Total assets

35,857,470
$68,167,482

Thus it appears that, before the war, about
of the State debts was covered by assets.

sixty per cent
The value of
these assets has doubtless been materially impaired by the
war; but it is, perhaps, not unreasonable to assume that their
depreciation will be but temporary.
It appears from the United States census, that in 1860 the
aggregate value of real and personal estate in the ten States
was $4,836,000,000.
If, after a moderate period, the pro¬
perty represented by these figures will yield a product equal
in value to that of 1860, then the basis of revenue in the
South cannot be considered to have been permanently re¬
duced. The collection of $73,000,000 of revenue as above
estimated, would amount to an assessment of about
per
cent upon the wealth of the States specified, as it stood before
the war, and as it may be estimated say two years hence,
when recuperation will have made large progress.
In paying this the South has peculiar means for re-imburs.
ing icself. It has a monopoly of its chief staples; so that no
competition can prevent it from adding its taxes to the price
of its cotton, naval stores, rice and tobacco. The Southern
States are, therefore, in a position to throw their burthens
upon the world-wide consumers of their exportable products.
This is no fanciful advantage: it is one which, from the natu¬
ral laws of trade, must be realised in the future history of
the South.

The

ability of the South to sustain its burthens may be
$112,082,987 further judged by a comparison of the resources and liabili-

644

THE CHRONICLE.

ties of the other States,

Assuming the federal

taxes of the j

remaining States to average $190,000,000 per annum, and
the interest
upon their State debts to be $18,000,000, we
should have,

their total federal and State

[November 18,1865.

Sydney Smith once declared that railway carriages would”
England until a bishop should be burned in
one.
Possibly, though we hardly expect so much, the suicide

j travel locked in

burthens, an ag- j of a Collector of the Port of New York may lead
people in
gregate of say 8200,000,000. The census of 1860 gives the j this country to reflect
upon the enormous abuses of this
par.
total wealth of these States at 811,322,000,000.
Supposing | tisan system, now established among us. In the case of the
the losses attending the war to have
equalled the gains since : present chief of the Treasury Department, we have a
strik¬
1860, and not reckoning as wealth the federal and State debts
ing and commendable instance of departure from this system
created for war purposes, inasmuch as
they represent so • When the portfolio of the Treasury was resigned
by
much wealth
destroyed, it may be assumed that the present j Fessenden, Mr. McCulloch was invited to assume
it, not in
wealth of these States stands at about the same
point as in j virtue of his political weight or influence—for it was not
pre¬
1860.
The annual burthen of
8200,000,000, as above esti-1 tended that he wielded much of either—but because he was
an
mated, would amount to a fraction over I f
per cent upon experienced financial agent of the government, and
as

might be

the entire wealth of the
country, exclusive of the ten States
alluded to above.
So that it appears that the Southern lia-

presumed to know something of the business working of the
great Department which he was requested to administer. Is
it not plain that our extension of this
principal of selection
throughout the subordinate machinery of our public offices,
must result
favorably for the public interest, as well as exert
a wholesome influence
upon the tone of political life
among

j
less, in proportion to their resources, than -those •
of the other States.
Considering the richness of the agri¬
cultural resources of the
South, and how indispensable its
products are to the commerce of the world, it would appear
that whatever proportion of burthens the other sections can
us?
With the enormous increase of our
public debt and,
carry, the Southern States can bear also.
consequently, of the action of the government upon the forUntil the labor system of the
South^is reorganized, and ! tunes and the affairs of individual citizens, it has become
its banking and
transportation facilities arc recuperated, the vastly more important than it ever before
was, that experi¬
federal and State taxes will
press upon them with much ence and intelligence should constitute the decissive
qualifica¬
greater severity than upon the North; and, during that i tions of
applicants for office, and that men properly qualified,
period, there may be considerable embarrassment and irre- j when once installed in
positions of trust, responsibility
gularity in the management of their State finances, so and routine, should not be displaced save for
flagarant dere¬
that forbearance on the
part of all holding their obliga-1 lictions from duty.
bilities

are

J

tions should be shown them.

Rut these obstacles will be

==

THE
The

more

than

—

'

only of temporary duration. It will be a matter of much
regret, if Southern statesmen, from taking a narrow view of
their situation and
prospects, ex hi bi-t any disposition to favor
repudiation of legal State obligations. It is only by show¬
ing an inflexible determination to meet existing liabilities
that they will be enabled to
negotiate the further loans re¬
quired for repairing the public losses through the war, and
for placing the State institutions in a condition of
efficiency.
Honesty toward public creditors; a firm faith in the com¬
mercial destiny of the
South; a cheerful acceptance of the
existing public situation ; and a wise encouragement of negro
labor, are the essential features of a policy which would en¬
able the South ultimately to fulfil all its
obligations, and to
contract any new ones that
may be deemed necessary to the
public welfare.
-

DEATH OF COLLECTOR KING.

j

commonly painful circumstances*attending

the death of the late Collector of the Port
of New York were
not needed to ensure a
general and sincere feeling of sorrow
at the premature
demise of so

Of

course we are

not

so

sanguine as to expect such

a revo¬

lution

to-day, or to-morrow, or the week after ; but we think
it our duty to the commercial
community to protest, upon
all becoming occasions,
against the existing system, and to
express the hope at least, that something less frightful than
an
epidemic of suicide among office holders of character, may
be found sufficient to arouse the
public intellect and the public
conscience to the dangers and the
disadvantages which that
system involves.
THE CHOLERA AND THE QUARANTINE.
The

application of the cabin

passengers of the Atalanta to
the Health Commissioners for deliverance from their irksome
detention upon that vessel has been

published.

No sickness

they declare has appeared among them since they left Lon¬
don, except a single instance of consumption; and while
acknowledging that the safety of a large community should
not be sacrificed, they
imploringly ask whether their “captivity” is actually necessary.
The case of these passengers is one of
peculiar, hardship
and is in itself a sad commentary upon
the brutality dis¬
played on the other side of the ocean, in permitting a vessel to
leave port, known to have dangerous
sickness on board.
Instead of detaining passengers whose condition, if huddled
together on shipboard involved extreme hazard to their lives '

respectable a citizen and pub¬
King. But-they may very
fitly fix the attention of reflecting men upon the way in which
the administrative functions of our
government have gradual¬
ly come to be distributed, and upon the extraneous services as well as to the health of their
fellow-voyagers, those hav¬
now
expected and demanded by political parties of the per¬ ing the matter in charge actually hurried several such
per¬
sons to whom those
functions are confided.
sons on the vessel to
perish, as well as to communicate their
it seems to be, on all
hands, agreed that the unfortunate disease to others and convey it to another country.
mental condition in which the late Collector was led
to take'
We execrate the atrocity of the endeavor, on the part of
his own life resulted from the
annoyances and excitements of Doctor Blackburn to plant the yellow fever among us from
his new position,
growing out of the pressure put upon his the Bahama islands, denouncing it as a crime against the
time and upon his
sympathies by the swarm of applicants civilisation and moral sense of the age. But he had the
whose claims to office in the Custom House it was held
to
extenuating excuse that he was doing it as a belligerent act.
be his duty to consider and
pass upon.
lie was compelled to The authorities at Havre and elsewhere who suffered per¬
act not
simply as the executive head of an important execu¬ sons sick with cholera to be shipped to New York were cer¬
tive department of the
Treasury, but as a member of apoliti¬ tainly more culpable than the rebel conspirator at Nassau.
cal party. In short the
general verdict is that Mr. King was
It was the misfortune of the cabin passengers to fall into
killed by the doctrine of “ rotation in office ”
among party ad¬ the hands of such men and be compelled to cross the ocean on
vocates.
board of p vessel the steerage of which was reeking with
lic

man as




the Honorable Preston

'

November 18, 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

filth and

pestilence. When they discovered the fraud of
they had become unwittingly the victims, they
adopted a
course, perhaps the most judicious under the
circumstances.
But, although they have thus far escaped the pestilence which
was raging so near them, it has been
deemed proper
by our
officers at Quarantine to detain them in the lower
Bay, lest
by reason of their proximity on board the vessel to the per¬
sons among whom the epidemic
has been raging they have
possibly been infected, and might thus introduce it into the
eitv of New York.
It becomes,
therefore, an important
question to determine whether that apprehension is warranted;
and this involves the whole subject of the
propriety of quar¬
antines as a safeguard against cholera.

645

with fair
prospects of ultimate success. This
being the case,
the rigor of our officials
is amply justified.
The quarantine
system in operation at the
port of New
York has been
greatly improved within the last few years.
In its present form it
may be relied upon for the sequesteration of yellow
fever, and other diseases of a similar charac¬
ter.
Its efficacy in the matter
of cholera is now on trial. It

which

is

evident, however, that the Quarantine Commissioners
and
not means at their
disposal adequate to
the exigency.
The floating hospital will hardly
meet the re¬
quirement, if many vessels should arrive at this
Health Officer have

port in a
only must pa¬
tients be
accomodated, but suitable provision must be made
Observations have been from time to time
carefully taken for passengers and seamen who do not exhibit
for the purpose of ascertaining in what form the
symptoms of
contagion of the disease.
cholera manifested itself, hpw
long ti e danger exists, and
In one particular the cabin
whether it is contagious at all.
passengers of the Atalanta justly
As usual, the doctors disa¬
complain. Their judicious conduct'
during their voyage
gree in many of their conclusions, and yet the same
general tended to their exemption from
facts have been discovered alike in
attack, while death was mul¬
India, England and Ger¬ tiplying victims around them.
They have arrived at their
many. They show that there does exist a
fomites, perhaps destination, and are compelled
tu remain in oar harbor im¬
a fungus of cholera, and further
(which fact is of the greatest prisoned on the same vessel
which brought them
importance) that it often occupies a month in
developing it¬ exposed, in the event of unsuccessful endeavors at over, and
self.
disinfec¬
During that period, while the person is
apparently tion, to imbibe the contagion at this
well there is actually more
port which they had es¬
danger of contagion from him, caped on their
voyage, and, perhaps, for that very cause, to
than after the peculiar
symptoms have set in. Yellow fever introduce it on
shore. It is manifest that whatever
and other diseases are different in this
course
respect; incase the ought finally to be
adopted, there is no propriety nor wisdom
disease does not manifest itself in a few
days there is little in thus confining them
upon shipboard ; and it is also certain,
occasion to apprehend its
appearance. This known peculiarity that if similar
criminal carelessness is
of the cholera is
kept up in the matter of
undoubtedly the occasion of the apparently shipment of
passengers from Europe, the accomodations at
unwarrantable detention of the
passengers of the Atalanta.
the disposal of our Quarantine
Commissioners will be totally
There has been much
controversy in regard to the pro¬ inadequate to the
exigency.
priety and utility of quarantines. Doctors Rush,
A
Hosack,
condition similar to that of the
Atalanta.

Not

.

Potter, and President Jefferson protested against them. In
England the General Board of Health, after a careful investi¬
gation, recommended the entire discontinuance of all
quaran¬
tine establishments,
substituting for them a strict code of in¬
ternal hygienic
regulations ; and declared their belief that
quarantines afford no public security,
having always failed to
prevent the introduction and spread of
epidemic diseases.
But the good sense of our
community has never permitted
the adoption of views so
extreme.It must be
acknowledged
however, that the systems of quarantine which have been
-

c

quarantine at Sandy Hook has
.repeatedly been pro¬
posed ; and a contract exists between the United States and
the State of New York
authorising the latter upon purchase
by the General Government to take possession of that
prom¬
ontory for that purpose. Many causes have
operated to di¬
vert public attention from this
fact, but the present occasion

has led to

its

should
be

renewed consideration.

The public authorities
conditions of the purchase should

delay no longer; the
complied with, and such buildings erected

as the comfort
and others may require.
But the experience of the Atalanta
should lead us not
tolerated have very
merely
frequently been oppressive, and often to improve our
quarantine system. The European author¬
useless.
This is attributable either to the
incorrectness of ities, it is
easy to perceive, will not, except a
the
special agree¬
principles upon which they are founded, or to the careless
ment be made with our

and inefficient

the

manner

in which

they were carried out.
possibility of excluding cholera by means of a
rigid

rantine

we

have

doubt.

Of
qua¬

of passengers

care

eases

government, exercise any proper
prevent persons infected with cholera or other dis¬
from leaving for this
country. Should not, therefore,

to

Whatever difference of
opinion our Government enter at once into
exists on this
negociations to secure
subject among medical men evidently arises such
irom the
vigilance \ No means more likely to prevent the
peculiar mode of transmission of choleric
spread
contagion, of the cholera to this country could be used. Let the
which differs
pas¬
widely from that of other diseases. Professor
sengers also understand upon leaving that
Petterkober of Munich has demonstrated
they will be sub¬
by careful obser¬ jected to rigid quarantine
vations, verified by comparisons with others made in
regulations in case of sailing in
Eng¬ company with infected passengers, and
land, France and India, that contact with
they will refuse to
persons having the take
disease does not
passage in any vessel bound for America
communicate it; but that it'is carried main¬
except her san
tary condition shall have been satisfactorily certified.5
ly through the dejections. Not an
instance of cholera was
We shall take
discovered in Bavaria in 1854 that did not
deep interest in the discussions that will
havft that origin.
be had upon these
Cholera poison, he
subjects. They will lead, we trust, to a
declares, may be in a person from one to
twenty-eight days without manifesting itself; a fact which perfecting of onr quarantine system not only in this port,
hut also at Boston,
furnishes a measure for the
Philadelphia, and elsewhere; and to reg¬
distance to which it may be car¬
ried from one
ulations with other countries where the
infection exists. If
place to another.
to these measures we add a
Hence the detention of
thorough, reformation of the in¬
exposed persons at Quarantine ternal
must
somewhat rigorous
hygienic regulations of our cities, we shall he able to
; it should be
prolonged for at “ take heart and banish fear.”
least thirty
days, if we would prevent dissemination of the
.pestilence. The evidence
already at hand, we are satisfied,
s ows
THE NEW SOUTH AMERICAN WAR.
that when thus
managed the system of quarantine is an
It is probably fortunate for American
u&portant check to the
interests in the Pa¬
spread of the disease. Sicily, and a cific that our
great part of
newly appointed Minister to Chili is about to
Italy and Greece, have secured
exemption thus far, make a short tour in Europe before
proceeding to his port at




no

[November 18,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

646

with the Northwestern Company were the fob
of our diplomatic affairs consolidation
in that quarter of the world meanwhile to our present excel- lowing:
1. The original “ Galena <fc Chicago Line,” extending from
lent and experienced envoy Mr. Nelson.
Chicago to Freeport
121 miles.

Santiago, leaving the management

The coast trade of

California and Oregon with the South

2. The “Dixon

Air Line,” extending from

the Junction, 80

miles west of Chicago, via Geneva, Dixon and Fulton, to
greatly increased during the past four years, and
the east end of the bridge below Fulton
108 •
as a great part of the business of Peru is carried on through
3. The “ Beloit Branch”
21 «
£ «
Chilian ports, the major part of that trade may be safely said 4. The “ St. Charles Branch”
5. The “ Fox River Valley Line” from Elgin north to Rich¬
to be in danger of disturbance by the blockade of the coast
mond near the Wisconsin boundary
35 “
of Chili which the Spanish admiral, Parega is reported to
Vv
Making in all
1
have recently proclaimed. In this state of things it is plainly
owned in full by the company, and the following lines held
of paramount importance that we should be represented in
under perpetual lease :
83
Chili by a Minister of experience who will be able to com¬ The Chicago, Iowa <fc Nebraska R. R..
The Gjedar Rapids <fc Missouri
bine a prior assertion of the rights of neutrals with a wise The Beloit &, Madison
1..
forbearance towards the peculiarly sensitive and excitable
Total owned and leased
belligerents with whom he will have to deal.
This Galena.^ & Chicago Union Railroad Company was
The Spanish blockade is likely to be declared a mere
chartered January 10,1836; but, with the exception of ma¬
paper blockade ” we presume, by the neutral powers con¬
cerned, since the force under Admiral Parega’s orders is well king preliminary surveys, nothing was effected by the com¬
understood to be almost rediculously inadequate to the work pany for the subsequent ten years. , An amended charter
was
granted Feb. 24, 1847, which provided for the re-organit will be expected to perform.
Neither England nor France
izationofthe company, and increasing the capital. Under
both of which Powers are very seriously interested in the
this act the company organized on the following April.
oommerce of Chili and of Peru, can be expected to acquiesce
For the purposes of construction the line, was divided into
in the exclusion, by mere proclamation, of French and Eng¬
three divisions.
In March, 1848, the first division extending
lish subjects from that commerce, and Mr/Nelson’s duties
from Chicago to Elgin, 43 miles, was placed under contract,
will, therefore, be materially simplified by the good under¬
and completed to Desplaines River June 1, 1849, and to
standing which he is well known to have established with his
Elgin Jan. 22, 1850. The second division extending from
colleagues of the diplomatic corps at Santiago.
Rockford to Elgin, 50 miles, was commenced in1 the spring
The Chilian government seems to have put itself almost
of 1850 and opened for business to Huntley Sept, 15, to
as far in the wrong as the Spanish Admiral, and if it be true
that Spanish residents of Chili have been ordered to the in¬ Marengo Oct. 18, and to Belvidere Dec. 3, 1851, and to
terior, and their property confiscated, it will be the obvious Cherry Valley March 10, and to. Rockford Aug. 2, 1852.
The third division from Rockford to Freeport, 28 miles, was
duty of the American Envoy, and of all other Ministers re¬
commenced early in 1852 and completed by Sept. 1, 1852.
presenting the enlightened States of Christendom to exert a

Pacific has

.......

..,

“

The Beloit Branch from Belvidere to

Beloit, 21 miles, was
for putting the earliest possible stop
to hostilities, conducted on either side with so little regard. opened Nov. 14, 1853.
The Chicago, Iowa & Dixon Air Line which commences
to the usages of modern international law, and the modern
at Junction (Turner), 30 miles west of Chicago and extends
sentiment of mankind.
A pressure of this sort was exerted successfully in the re¬ to Fulton, was authorized by an act passed Feb. 12
1853. That portion of the line from Dixon to Fulton was
cent war between Peru and Spain, in which the same Admi¬
ral Pareja was so conspicuous an actor; and we entertain constructed under the charter of the Mississippi & Rock
little doubt that with judgment and forbearance as well as River Junction Railroad Company which was consolidated
decision on the part of the foreign diplomatic corps in Chili, into the Galena.& Chicago Union Company. Construction
was commenced in the May following and the road opened
our merchants interested in the affairs of that Republic will
to traffic—to Lane, Jon 10, and to Dixon Dec. 4, 1854, and
soon see the existing imbroglio as wisely and as effectually
thence to Sterling July 22, to Morrison Sept. 23, and to Ful¬
solved.
ton Dec. 16, 1855.
The extension to the bridge below Ful¬
ANALYSES OF RAILROAD REPORTS. No. 8.
ton was made in 1860.
This bridge was Jbuilt by the Chi¬
CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY.
cago, Iowa & Nebraska Railroad Company.
It extends
strong

moral

pressure

(Continued from Chronicle, No. 20, p. 614.

over

the new terminus
The western channel was

the eastern channel of the river from

appendix to the first yearly statement of the con¬ to Little Rock Island, 2,800 feet.
solidated Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company, it is crossed by a steam ferry.
The St. Charles Air Line Branch was opened from the South
pertinent to take a brief retrospect of the career of the com¬
panies which in July 1864, and after, entered into partnership, Branch Depot in Chicago to Harlem, 10£ miles, Jan. 1,1850.
and also to say a few words in relatiofi to the railroads This branch was constructed by the Chicago, St. Charles &
leased and operated by the company.
The Galena & Chi¬ Mississippi Air Line Company and purchased by the Galena
cago Union Railroad Company was the pioneer of the group, Company * In the same purchase were included the large
and indeed, with a single exception, was the earliest railroad depot -grounds on the South Branch, which were connected by
in Illinois.
The Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company side tracks with all the railroads entering the city.
In July, 1862, the Galena Company obtained a perpetual
originated in the Illinois & Wisconsin, which subsequently
became the Chicago, St.'Paul & Fond du Lac and then the lease of the franchises of the Albany Bridge Company, hav¬
Chicago & Northwestern, each change of name having been ing the right to maintain a ferry or build a bridge across the
preceded by financial difficulties and liquidation. The Pen¬ Mississippi; also a lease of the Chicago, Iowa & Nebraska
insula Railroad i9 yet isolated from the general system of Railroad from Clinton to Cedar Rapids, 82 miles, and also a
lines owned by the company. Each of these is worthy .of a lease of the Cedar Rapids & Missouri Railroad. The first
distinct history, which we give briefly in the following out¬ named of these roads was in operation at this time, but of
line statements, beginning with the
the latter only a small section was completed.
The lessors
have since extended the line to Boonesboro on the Des
GALENA AND CHICAGO UNION RAILROAD.
The roads owned by the Galena Company at the time of Moines River, 122 miles from Cedar Rapids, and about




As

an

}30

November 18,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE

miles from its future terminus at Omaha

1850-2

the Missouri.

on

647

CHICAGO AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY.

bridge over the western channel of the Mississippi was
On the 19th
August, 1849, the Legislature of Wisconsin
completed after the consolidation of June, 1864.
granted a charter to the Madison & Beloit Railroad Com¬
The Beloit & Madison Railroad was built by a distinct
pany, authorizing it to construct a railroad from
Beloit, or
company, and has been operated, as far as opened, by this from any other
point on the north line of Illinois, viz.:
oompany. It was completed into Madison in September, Janesville, Madison and
La Crosse, to a point on the Missis¬
1864. This road, yet under lease, is virtually owned by the
sippi at the line of Minnesota near St. Paul, and also from
The

12896 1885594--7340672.

Company as successor to the Galena Company, Janesville to Fond du Lac.
By a subsequent act, approved
nearly all the shares haring been converted into Northwest¬
February 8, 1850, the name of the Company was changed
ern preferred stock.
The Fox River Valley Railroad was to that of the Rock River
Valley Union Railroad Company
also chiefly owned by the Galena Company and what little and its
powers extended.
was not, was purchased by an issue of bonds.
On the 12th
February, 1851, the Legislature of Illinois
The following table traces the principal features of the
chartered the Illinois & Wisconsin Railroad
Company, with
finance of the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad
through the powers to construct a railroad from
Chicago to the north
whole history of the company :
Northwestern

Year.

1849—60.

40#
42#
84#
92#

•

187#
211#
249#
249#
259
9.435,721
259
9,339,390
259
9,354,514
261
261
261
294

9,352,481

Operat’g

427,686
211.310

48,964
87,362

473,538
799,013

187,396
859,199

Net
,—Dividend—.
earnings, exp’sea. earn’gs. Rate. Ain’t.
$48,525
$18,626
$29,994 10#C $23,383

695.507

1,326.706
2,330,189
4,143,656
6,552,163
8,429,043
8.979.S04

I860
1861....
1862
1S68

i

Gross

$433,429

1S5--63
1858-54
1854-55:
1855-56
1866-57
1857-53
1868 (8 m03.)....
1869

-

line of the

/—Railroad—s
Miles. Cost.

Fiscal

9,352,081
9,352,081 1,777.541
9,407,152 2,193,295

286,162

20

16
17

1,277,726

Dividend January, 1864
Dividend July, 1864, on consolidation

Total dividend in 15 years...

15

15

489,814
686,517
820,193
1,063,745 1,252,042
1,295,493 1,120,S51
921,252
719.555
927,233
620,328
823,021
546,420
810,491
632,201
909,211
811,185
942,936
804.605

1,506,710
2,315,787
2.416,344
1,640,807
1,547,561
1,369,441
1,462,752
1,720,396

78,782

123,948

646.519

22

986,524
1,095,590
301,115

20
5

4

241,024
120,528
180,8:34

2

3
5

301,420

8

482,272

6

915,569

:

361,704
180,852
180,852

174# $5,616,370

....

following shows the cost of road and
penses, &c., per mile tor the same years :

the

earnings,

%

Coat of
road p. m.

Fiscal years.

1849-50
1850-51
1851-52
1862-53
1853-54
1854-55..1855-56
1866-57

Earnings. Expenses. Profits.
Rer mile of road.

$10,193

>

21,399
24,730
33,259

$1,198

$457

3,040

•

1,166

3,403

2,081
2,763

6,140

36,218
85,832
85,832

85,832

8,383
4,669
4,385
6,203
2,890
2,491
2,285
2,499

4,501

6,689
36.071

3,699
3.724

5,575

6,215
6,509

3,224
3,105
3,484
3,613
4,898

6,604
6,592

6,S10
8,403

Mileage

Fiscal year.

of trains.
633.288

.

(8months)....

926,023
1,153.894

5o2,0.;8

612,753
404,032
394,713
375,176
330,926
31*,153
389,339
465,876

738,355

808,235
866,444
936,018
1,123,454

1860

.

Passengers

/

Number.
471,325

1,273,791
1,297,945

3,108
3,197
3,535

$261,430
354,498
838,114

ending with

commenced.

Legislature of Wisconsin, approved

March 10, 1855, the consolidation of the above

panies

two

com¬

authorized; and the consolidation was perfected
same month, the consolidated
company
assuming the title of the Chicago, St. Paul 6z Fond du Lac
to the

was

30th of the

Company.
At this

period the Illinois & Wisconsin Company had
completed their road to Woodstock, 52 miles from Chicago
and the Rock River
Company, their road from Fond du Lao
to Chester, 18 miles.
The object of the
Chicago, St. Paul & Fond du Lac Com¬
pany from the beginning was the extension of their line from
Janesville northwest, via Madison, &c.,to St.
Paul, and from
Janesville to Fond du Lac, and
ultimately to the'mineral
region of Lake Superior. Application was made to Congress
for a grant of lands in aid of both these
lines, which grant,
chiefly through the efforts of this Company, was obtained in
June, 1856, at which time Congress granted six sections per

mile to the State of Wisconsin to be used in aid of the
construction of the lines of road
the

same

year an

designated. In the fall of
extra session of the State Legislature was

3,353,000

25,906
32,644
35,421

3,506,000

40,791

carried into effect

886,344
685,307

690,808
344,887
842,347
832,443
381,188
499,421
497,638

511,710
at

,

Mileage.

25,616,758
40,913,166
42,794,995
28,567,721
27,854.767
28,690,023
33,3 8.698

47,740,877
47,521,169
49,166,289

the end of

$6,023,800 $3,S99,015 $66,133
6,026,400

act of the

was

8.524.200

24,753,939
80,791.207
31,420,941
17,422,871
17,996,390
15,810,583
14,162,324
13,749,643
16,607,182
20,402,129

681,500
85,806 1S59
1,857,159
520,500
41,443|1860
2,682,167 1,382,"00 276,369 1861
4,334,800 1,910,000 505,013 1362
6,441,500 2,814,330 514,2461 and—
6,013,000 2,958,015 672,7*3; 1863

an

this line

18,516

Tons,

$136,971 $38,950 1857
397,571
37,699 1853

By

on

3,901,015
3.623.200

-Tonnajje

,

debt

struction

called, at which a contest arose between different railroad
companies seeking to have these; lands conferred upon them.
The result was that the lands
upon the northwestern line
were
given by the State to the La Crosse & Milwaukee Com¬
pany, and those upon the northern line to the Wisconsin &
Superior Company, a corporation chartered at the same ses¬
sion, October 11, 1856. Thus the Chicago, St. Paul &Fond
du Lac Company were deprived of the
grant of lands, main¬
ly if not wholly obtained by its own efforts.
Eventually, however, the contestant companies agreed to
consolidate, and having obtained the legislative sanction by
two acts dated Feb. 12 and 28, 1857, the consolidation was

Mileage.

The share capital, bonds and
floating
each fiscal year have been as follows:

38.15
38.35
53.08
89.56
44.95
42.91
65.98
67.46
66.14
59.96
58.52
55.4(1
50.29
51.58
58.29

8,180

8,678

9,704

(8 months)

8,179
9.960

Exp.
per

$741

1,809

6.261

ex-

annum.

1,874
1,599

The business of the road for the ten
years
1863 is shown in the
following table:

1857

149,973
853,155

8
3

The

1867
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863

47,711
62,914

State, and to unite and consolidate with any other
company in the State of Wisconsin; and the work of con¬

6,027.700
6.028,300
6,028,400

3,414.700

6,028,400
6,028,400

20,265

No separate statement of the
operations of this road for
the five months
ending with

May, 1864, has been published.

The gross earnings
of the Galena & Northwestern

the 5th of the

following month, the
retaining the name of the Chicago, St. Paul dr
du Lac Railroad Company.
Subsequently, but in the
year, the land grant railroad companies of Michigan
on

consolidation

Fond

together same
were—January, $273,875 56, February, $317,839 43, March, were also taken into the consolidation, which now possessed
$390,355 10, April, $421,363 04, May, $466,830 10, ma¬ all the land grants for railroads from Fond du Lac north¬
king a total of $870,263 23.
ward to the State line, and thence in separate lines to Mar¬
The following table shows the fluctuations of Galena stock
quette and Ontonagon.
at the New. York stock
The financial revulsion of 1857 carried down with it, and
exchange for the last four years of
the separate existence of the
suspended for a time, all further progress of the Chicago,
company.
1860-61.
1861-62.
1862-63.
1S63-64.
St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad Company; and in conse¬
62#@73#
60#@66#
66#@ 71#
90##100
£0u£a8t:•
73 @82#
63 @66#
67#@ 74#
100 @114
September
quence the Michigan Companies retreated from the consoli¬
76#@80
66#@60#
70#@ SI#
103#@112#
07# @78#
69#@71#
79#@ 88
108#@114# dation, ar'd abandoned the grants to the State again.
November
55 @73
80 @ 86
69# @74
104 @113#
80 @ 83#
08#@67#
63 ©71#
103#@109#
Early in 1859 re-organization was proposed as the only
63
65#@69#
86#@ 96#
JS2SI;
66#©74#
65#@79
88#@ 95
remedy for the troubles of the company, and the sanction of
68#@74
90 @95
67#@70
55 @73#
the Legislature of Wisconsin (that of Illinois being already
66#©68#
91#@ 96#
*y
55#@6I
66#@70
97#@112# Ul#@140
June.
66 @61#
92 @107
69#@72#
138 @146
granted) having been obtained to such a proceeding, the en¬
55 @82#
tire property of the Company was sold, June 2, 1859, the
80#@74
66#@112#
90#@146
.

,

•

■

••••■



I IMI

THE

648

[November 18,1866»

CHRONICLE.

1863-64.

1863.

being the purchasers; by whom a new company
on the 6th of the same month under their pre-

bondholders
formed

was

sent

27#@3S
32 @38#
32 @37#

July.

g^pgtg^ber

36

October.
November.
December.

@47#'

..

comprehensive title.

the* road was in operation b om Chicago to
Janesville, 92 miles. The 18 miles already completed trom
Fond du Lac to Chester remained as isolated as in 1855,
At this time

January.

43#@5G#
@21
@16#

February'.
March

5681

....

.

43#@40
45#@56
47 #@56
65#@8S

(£23

..

@44#

£*#@39#
32

@35#

@77
4S#@65#

50

^#@54
34 @46
38

47

@26
@43

April

Ma
Lay.

1364-65.
48#@68

@00

20#@34
21#@35
21#@32
26

@30

28#@35#
the road had been extended 17 miles further , June
27# @88
20#@53
The company now bent all their energies Year........
:— 26 @43
te fill up the gap between Janesville and the northern sec- j
The preferred stock which was issued
2d morttion of the road, which was accomplished in the summer and j
bonds, and those for consolidation purpose ha~s underfall of 1859.
In the tall of I860 and early in 1861, the line I gone the following fluctuations:
May.
March.
June.
January
Feb unary.
April.
72 @91# 86
70 @97
71 @87
65 @65
61 @67
@94#
was extended to Appleton, 20 miles further, and in
1802 to 1801
July.
August.
September. October. November. December
Green Bay, 28 miles. This completed the main line of the 1864.
84 @03
S5#@91# 77 @86# G7#@31
75 #@85# 69#@78#
March.
June.
May.
April.
January. ^February
road from Chicago to Green Bay, 242 miles.
48 @65# 32#@62
48 #@63#
61 #@71 # 60# @66)
58#@64
1865..
except that in 1857
north to Oshkosh.

Railroad Company whose
Lake Michigan to Rockford oh

In 1863 the Kenosha & Rockford

line extended from Kenosha on

o

c

-ranging in the eighteen months between 48 and 944.
O
O

o

embarrassed and foreclosure

River, 73 miles,j became

Rock

first for the

.foreign Netos.

and sale followed.

bought in by the bondholders, the
company was re-organized : but eventually the securities of
the company were exchanged for stock of the Northwestern
The

property having been

company.
*
Thus the lines contributed

,

GREAT BRITAIN.
LONDON AND

LIVERPOOL DATES TO NOVMBER 4.

The money market exhibited more ease during the week, and it
is believed that the pressure has passed away.
The favorable bank
returns of last week contributed to the restoration of confidence,
and a reduction of the Bank of England rate of interest is looked
for.
In the early part of the week there was an active demand for
short loans to meet the half-monthly settlement in shares and for¬

by the Northwestern company
to the consolidation of July, 1804, had a total length of 315
miles, viz.: from Chicago to Green Bay 242, and from Ken¬ eign stocks, and consols exhibited a decline of 4 per cent.

There

the Bank and at the private
houses, and the general market was active. But money was
The accounts of the company before the reorganization of j
plenty at 6£ for good three months’ bills. This description of pa1859 are not available for statistical purposes. Those pre- j per was eagerly absorbed for investment, a fact that indicates the
general impression of
in the money
For
sented since that event show the following results.
J six months trade bills approaching ease 8'per cent. market. eve of
a
On the
the rate is
The financial condition of the company on the 1st April, j
settling day the pressure for short loans was more active, aud 8
• j per cent was exacted for short loans on stock securities.
yearly, has been as follows :
The Board of trade returns for the month of September and the
Total
Balance
Oilier
Share
Funded
April
Amount.
Income.
Liabilities.
Debt.
1st.
Capital.
proceeding eight months of the current year have been published,
$7,438,326 and the results account for the extraordinary absorption of gold.
$93,461
$75,830
1860
$7,269,035
323.580
10,823,299
326,962
7,279.000
1861
2,893.759
11,817,527 The exports for the nine months are a little under the amount of
264,676
562,615
1862
8,035,000

osha to Rockford 73 miles.

..

was an

..

13.147,136

854,178

226,642

8,335,000

1863

R.R. Purchase.

......

....

....

..

1863

..

The

..

..

10,131,239

10,849,939

Locomotive

dates

was

thus:

Number of Cars

«

Pass.

Freight.

28

24

..

28

..

51

81

697

..

accounts
Years

...

...

$18,861

505,188
671,534

35,222
35,422

451,495

(year!... 241,226
“
“

309,309
376,098

And from net earnings were
Year

,

Ending.
April 1, 1860

18G1
1S62
1803

..

..

11,615

22,199
24,903

Aver.
miles

disbursed:
Sundry

7.373

Interest
bonds. Arc.

Accounts.

$46,959

on

$10,554
9,110

13,247
14,907

174.600

Surplus
to credit.

$93,401
230.119
239.035
291.563

Earning? Expense:

operated.
166
200
213
228
315

oer

*

mile.

$2,317

$1,470

2,819
3,993
4,750

1.335

$847
1,484

2,042

1.951

2,706

2,044

...

per

per
mile.

per
mile.

....

Expenses

Profits

cent.
'

63.45
47.35
51.15
56.96

Cost of
road per
mile.

$38,342
49,823
52,280
53,045
47,300

regular accounts were published after 1803. WeJiave
thus a financial interregnum of 14 months to J une 1, 1804,
when the new company began operations.
The gross earn¬
ings of the two consolidated roads for the year ending 31st
May, 1864, amounted to $4,681,807 40.
?
The following table shows the prices,.of the Northwestern
stock at the New York Stock Exchange for thef two and a half
years ending June 20, 1805 :
]•




in August were £14,lf)8,G48.

lind that tiie increase
September, 1804, is made
manufactures. In cotton
j manufactures the increase is from 4,300,035/ to 4,778,728/, or 478,[ 693/; in linen, from 075,507/ to 764.826/, or 289,319/; in woolen
Looking at particular items of export, we

September, 18G5, as compared with
up by an increase in every department of

of

manufactures, from 1,833,242/ to 2,352,223/, or 519,981/; and in cotton yarn from 729,408/ to 1,384,585/, or 655,117/.

and worsted

849,719
1,083,054

119,925
130,347

Taxes.
,
State.
r. S.

$11,098

27,984

following reduces the cost and earnings, &i\, to their
proportions per mile of road:

No

14,687,942
17,316,681

$384,659
720.705

The

Fiscal term.
1855-60 (10 mo)..
1860-61 (9 mo)
.
1S61-62
1862-63
1864 (June 1) ...,

£104,294,713
123,404,161
1 19,717,877

Total.

Mail,.fee.

$212,7m

Apr.l I860 (l(Vmos).$153,167
1861
1S62
1863

The expoits

Nine Months.

Month.

£14,542,862

18.63

18G3. The fob'

and expenses were as shown in the following*; ]£ js to be observed that the increase in value is accompanied by
increase in quantity, and is therefore not merely the result of in¬
creased price. Cotton piece goods, for instance, have increased
Cross Earnings

Pass'nger. Freight.

Ending.

Total.
426
669
670
728

402
641
639

..

The earnings

“

84,700
116.950
189,771

Engines.

1st.

“

$61.0,86

88,198
100,743

equipment on the road at-the same

April.

Assets.

61,691

equipment.
$766,132
$176,832
31,125
1,333,034
20.075
1,461.065
19,750
1,986,933

$6,401.7%
9,312,749

Other

Materials
on hand.

$32,480

Securities
on hand.

C.,St.P.&F.du L. New constr'n

1st.

*k

previous year, but considerably above those of

owing are the returns :

o

o

1860
1861
1862
1863

the

1

Against which is charged—

April
1860
1861
1862

active demand for discount at

falling .off in the imports2,108,906
for the
being 2,665/779ewt, and 17,723,333 cwt res¬

W
Villi regard to imports there is still a
tioni of wheat. In September,18G5, the importation was
cwt. ; and in the nine months 13,674,439 cwt.: the figures

previous year
pectively.
The imports of raw cotton are stiil on the increase. For the
month they were 899,030 cwt, and for the nine months 5,460.070
cwt; and the corresponding quantities in 18G4 were 053,211 cwt,
and 5,323,211 cwt.
There is also a very noticeable increase in
The following table shows the number of
month of September in 1863, 1SG4 and 1865

the imports of cattle.
animals imported in the

1368. *

Oxen, bulls and cows,
Calves

12,936
5.341

53,840
5,499

:

1364.

1S65:

17,336
7,526
65,625

27,036
6,012
79,770
15,012

Sheep and lambs.....
9,279
Swine and hogs.
,
The figures lor the nine months show the same result. Sheep
lambs alone increased in 1865, as compared with 1864, from 322,31b
to 507,209; and oxen, See., from 99,783 to 146,359.
With reference to revenue prospects it is also interesting to note
the continued increase in the tea imports.
The increase for the
month is from 7,224,561 lbs to 7,912,950 lbs, and for the nine months
from G6,656,068 lbs to 73,394,418 lbs. Sugar also shows an increase
for the month from 639,057 cwts to 988,668 cwts, and for the uiue
months from 6,767,761 cwts to 7,867,609 cwts.

and

November 18,1865.]
The

THE CHRONICLE.

computed real value of principal articles imported has also

made up to the end of August.

For the month the figure is
£21 142,430* about £800,000 less than in August, 1864.
oSffhth month the falling off appears very considerable, from On the |‘
£141,nf2 477 1° 1864 to ^>115,670,434 in 1865, but the latter figure ap-!
oroaches that of 1863, which was £118,099,465.
The falling off1
from 1864 is no doubt caused by the fall in the price of cotton, for
the less quantity of 1864 was worth £50,504,190, while the inereas.
d auantity of 1865 is worth only £29,944,508—a falling
off of
hpen

£20,000,000.

about

649

From these returns it
appears that there has been
increase in trade in
September,

amounting to

203,OOOf.

an

extraordinary
total of 552,-

a

The trade of Paris has been
unfavorably affected by the cholera.
It is estimated that the
flight of the public in consequence of the
panic has caused a loss of a hundred million francs to the
city.
The French Emperor meditates
an important
reform in the col¬
lection of taxes by the
gradual suppression of the Receivers Gen¬
eral, and the substitution of branches of the
Bank of France, a3

show the immense development of the internal trade j; depositaries of the public money.
It is
formally stated that the Spanish Government is about to
of England, and the large amount of money required to pay inereasj profit by the recently inaugurated alliance with France, to
ed wages and expenses for raw or unmanufactured staples.
lay the
foundation of a commercial
treaty between the two countries, which
The demand for bank, mining, and railroad shares has been
very ; will open up a new field for
Spanish trade, hitherto much cramped in
limited, but prices are generally well sustained, in view of the ! its
foreign relations.
pressure to sell and the active demand for money. The shares of j
The failure of the
groat baukiug house of Schmidt, of Berne, is
Overend, Gurney & Co. are quoted at 9£.
announced.
The State of Berne is,
There have been some purchases in the Confederate
report says, a creditor for
.bonds, and | 100,OOOf. Many wealthy individuals and communities are
the quotation has advanced from 71 to 8.
involved
for considerable sums, but there will
also be much loss sustained
Subscriptions are invited for the formation of the Pennsylva- ! the smaller
by
householders and laboring classes.
nian Lubricating Oil Lands Company, with a proposed capital of
j The Government of Holstein has
published a report on the finan¬
£300,000, in 15,000 shares of £20 each. Provisional contracts of cial situation of
the duchy,
j
showing that at the end of the mouth
puichase have already been concluded for valuable plots of land I of
May
exceeding 700 acres in Venango County, Pennsylvania. In - work¬ after the last there remaiued a surplus of 600,000f iu the Treasury,
expense of the federal execution had beeu
ing these lands it is proposed to confine the first operations of the
paid.
company to developing one plot of land of about seventy-two acres,
for which payment is to be made in £8,000 cash and 6,000
paid-up
COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
gbares, and should this prove satisfactory the company will secure
the transfer of the remaining portion of the estates. It is estimated
The Activity of the Southern
Trade.—The shipment of
that this plot of laud can be tested in six months, and that the de¬
posit and allotment money of £3 per share is all that will be called, goods to Southern ports continues extremely active. A very
large
until the result shall have been proved. The profits are estimated number of vessels are
plying between New York and the various
at £24 per day for each well, and therefore should
only fifty wells ! ports on the Gulf, and the pressure for freight is so
great that all of
be productive, and work only 250 days in the year, the return would
be £300,000, whilst the cost of working expenses for 100 wells them, especially the steamers, are loaded with the utmost dispatch.
The steamer Key West, to sail for
would not exceed £50,000.
Apalachacola to-day (Saturday,)
The Import and Export Fresh Provision
Company has been commenced receiving goods on Wednesday, and so great was the
started for the purpose of purchasing live stock in
Australia, and anxiety to ship, that drays of goods, which went into line at
eleven
preserving it by certain patent processes, and supplying foreign o’clock on
Wednesday, remained there in order that they might not
countries with it. It is stated that meat can be
bought at a penny lose their turn to
a pound in Australia, and the directors look forward to
unload, until the afternoon of Thursday, placing
very large I
profits. The capital is put down at £100,000, to be subscribed in : a watchman over them during the night. The line of carts on
10,000 shares of £10 each, 3.000 of which are reserved for Aus¬
Wednesday night extended from pier 12 up West-street, through
tralia.
1
Albany, Greenwich to Courtland-street.
Advices from Calcutta state that an English
company is in course
The steamer sailing a few
of formation which proposes the embankment of the whole river
days before to the same port was loaded
so
frontage of the Hooghly, from Prinsep Ghat to Chitpore-bridge,
quickly that she was detained four days after being loaded to re¬
with landing what ves, steam and hydraulic craues, and suitable
land- ceive her mails. This eagerness to
ship goods applies particularly
ing sheds and warehouses. The cost of the undertaking is estimated jj to vessels
up for all ports south of Savannah, and
at £3,000,000 sterling, and it has the
especially for
support of men of undoubted j Mobile
and New Orleans. The
wealth and position.
shipments include every article of
machinery, farming utensils, household goods, groceries, liquors, &c.
THE CONTINENT.
These returns

.

PARIS DATES TO NOVEMBER 4.

Imports

There has been considerable

.

agitation on the Bourse during the
week, in consequence of political news respecting anticipated trouble
with the United States on the Mexican question, and also on
ac¬
count of apprehensions that the news of the fresh revolt in
Algeria
was more serious than had been
represented by the official accounts.
There was an active demand for discounts, the returns of
the Bank
of France showing an increase in discounts of
42,629,000f, and a
decrease of 12,249,000 in bullion. The statement
produced some
uneasiness, but it is understood that the drain of specie will be
only
temporary, being required for internal purposes rather than for ex¬
portation.
Considerable interest has been excited by the rumors of the
re¬
tirement of M. Fould, founded on the numerous
cabinet meetings,
and the evident indications of
important financial changes. But it
has transpired that the
contemplated changes relate to a reduction
jn the expenses of the government, and the information
produced a
favorable impression. It is said that M. Fould has
succeeded in
impressing upon the Emperor the necessity of retrenchment, and
that a reduction of
30,000,000f. will be effected in the
reduction will not cover the chronic deficit in French Budget. This
fiuances, but
the announcement of an
attempt at retrenchment has produced a
favorable effect.
of

present.

adoption of the policy of retrenchment,
Bekie, the Minister of Agriculture, to raise a
300,000,00017 for public works has been abandoned for the

Superior Council of Commerce charged with the
inquiry relative to
banking and currency, has examined the Barons James and jj
Alphonse de Rothschild, and several eminent bankers and
financiers,!

dustry.

to the

effects of the Bank of France on commerce and inThe proceedings are secret, and considerable
interest is

Manifested

in the result.

The Customs returns have
been published. The value of
im-;
ports for
consumption in the first nine months of the preseut year

amount to

2,014,747,000f; in

the corresponding period of 1864 the

J®ountThe 1,855,558,OOOf, and in
was
wOf.

1863 the amount was 1,796,290,value of the exports in the first nine
months of 1865

.

399,OOOf; same period 1864,
same period
1,875,427,OOOf. During the first2,228,583,OOOf; of 1865, the
eight months
®Porta were
1,770,097,OOOf, and the exports 1,932,846,000f.




for the

Week.—The following

are

the

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR THE
WEEK.

1863.

Dry goods

1864.

$967,630
2,241,154

1865.

$1,005,297
2,222,274

$2,771,802
3,402,858

Previously rep’ted. 166,042,725

$3,227,571
189,271,660

171,618,096

Since Jan, 1

192,409,231

Gen’l merchandise.

Total for the week.

$3,208,784

$158,251,509

$6,174,665

177,787,750
report of«the dry-goods trade will be found the imports of
dry-goods for one week later.
In

our

The

following is

statement of the exports (exclusive of specie)
port of New York to foreign ports, for the week ending
November 14, and since January 1st.
a

from the

EXPORTS FROM

NEW

YORK

1863.

For the week

FOR

THE WEEK.

1864.

Previously rep’ted..

12,311,932
149,012,435

$3,298,161
187,860,801

151,324,367

191,158,462

January 1..

'

1865.

.

$6,416,566
136,627.882
141,942,898

In the commercial

The

relative

Exports

imports at New York for the week ending (for drygoods) Nov. 9,
and for the week
ending (for general merchandise) Nov. 10:

Since

In consequence of the
the project of M.
sum

and

j

department will be found the official detailed
imports and exports for the week.
The following will show the
exports of specie from the port of
New York for the week ending Nov. 11, 1865 :
statements of the

Nov 10.—Steamer Saxonia,
Hamburg—
German silver.
American gold
Nov. 11.—Steamer City of Boston,
Liverpool—
American gold
Silver bars
.

Total for the week

$1,000
65,400
50,000
80,000

Previously reported

$196,400
$25,288,218

Total since Jan. 1,1865..,..

$25,484,618

THE CHRONICLE.

650
Same time

| Same tii

m

$40,953,852
39,690,402

*...
•...

1855...

41,808,743
65,776,700
23,835,114

1869

1858

SILVER COINED.

1857..
1856..:

50,613,812
3,299,337

1864
1863
1862
1861
I860

33,387,376
26,492,161
85,215,667

1854...
1853...
1852.-

21,788,085
23,255,910

.

244,000 half dollars.
40,000 dimes.
284,000

Statement

of the

United States Treasurer

for

October.—

following is the Treasurer’s monthly statement for October 31»
1865, showing the amount to his credit at the dates of the several
last returfls, as specified below, in the Treasury, and with the sev¬
eral Assistant Treasurers and designated depositaries ; and also the
amounts for which drafts had been issued prior to the date of this
statement, but not yet reported as paid, and the balances remaining
The

date

subject to draft; and also the amounts of transfers
depositaries, ordered by the Secretary of the Treasury,
but not yet reported as paid or credited ; and also the amounts to
his credit unavailable, being the amounts deposited in the mint and
branches, and amounts withheld by Assistant Treasurers a'nd de¬
positaries in States late under insurrectionary control:
same

to and from

Date of
last

Amount

In what

deposit
in coin.

Drafts dr’wn

Total
amount on

Balances

and payable,
but not paid,

subject
place.
deposit.
to draft.
Oct. 31..Treasury U. S.,
Washington. $2,872,775 88 $26,353,659 87 $2,181,466 65 $24,172,193 32
Oct. 31..Asst. Treas’er,
Boston
3,750,103 36
3,S77,317 33 1,094,250 23
Oct. 31..Asst. Treas’er,
New York... 22,713,280 30 33,521,269 18 2,429,384 66
Cct. 81..Asst. Treas’er,
Philadelphia. *282,883 21
644,984 77,
2,454,760 85
on

return.

Oct. 81..Asst. Treas’er,
St. Louis

330,284

24

824,729 43

559,122

39

265,607 04

4,128,793

44

3,261,921 22

2,003,965

96

1,257,855 26

414,014

54

1,727,449 40

1,037,S62 62

689,586 78

6,342 69

16,457 96

14,836 80

1,620 26

15,082

54

34,347 47

441,7S0

96

—

Sept.SO. .Asst. Treas’er,

San Franc’co.
Oct. 14..Asst. Treas’er,
New Orleans.
Oct. 21..Asst. Treas’er,
Denver

City.
Oct. 28..Asst. Treas’er,
Charleston...

Oct. 31

.Depository

pieces, valued at

...

Oct.

81..Depository

Oct.

31..Depository at

at

59

15,388 50

1,009,957 09

2,159 06

101,310 19

77

639,713 49

15,408 69

103,509 25

287,941 55

1,090,995 26

31..Depositary at
Louisville

6,765 13

214,703

62

1,023,815 75

81..Depository at
Pittsburg....

5,576 93

706,327 85

921 85

706,406 00

44,602 39

486,660 35

7,393 24

1,750 00

27,559 26

27,934 01

Oct. 81.. Depository

Chicago
Oct. 14..Depository
Santa Fe

at

451,281

Wis

1,128 04

28..Depository at
Omaha City,
Neb

10 00

Aug. 31.. Depository

1,123 04

81,672 39

1,929 97

29,742 42

at

Ter

765 75

60,064 69

81,080 03

18,984 66

470 00

177,609 66

33,263 88

144,240 78

354 61

Aug. 15.. Depository at
Oregon City..
Oct. 31..Depositorv at
St.Paul, Minn
..Depository at

460 62

12 05

448 47

—

Memphis

Oct. 31..Depository

331,284 79

....

of

the

1,193 24

297,049 31

..Late U. S. De-

—

posi’ries

8,012 86

289,036 46

two smaller items of similar character.

one or

Total
.

4,046 31
29.773,859 66

76 86

1,797,404 09

35,037,129 15 106,894,124 16 13,266,312 90
282,883 21

3,990 24
27,976,455 47

93,937,118 93

exports thus given does not agree exactly with the annual
exhibit of the Secretary of the Treasury, but is from the official
record, and is nearer than the usual proof of the last four years :
Exports from the United States to Foreign Ports for tlu
Year Ending June 30.

and assay offices

3,185,267 00

Unavailable funds in the
late
insurrectionary
States

Total amount

on

3,186,267 00

717,590 00

88,563 00

629,036 00

deposit

and subject to draft...
Add excess of transfers.

110,296,931 00 13,355,066 00
2,965,610 00

Deduct unpaid drafts...

113,262,591 00
13,365,066 00

—

97,751,422 00
2,965,610 00

100,717,032 00
809,507 00

Amount to Cr. of Treas¬
ury of United States
$99,907,524 00
Total amount of availa¬
ble coin
$34,754,245 94

United States Branch Mint

in

$99,907,524 00

a statement of the operations at the United
mint in San Francisco during the quarter ending

States branch
September 30 :—
[$6,170,876 93

Gold bullion

deposited
Gold bullion parted.
Silver bullion purchased
Silver parted

..

GOLD

824,500 double eagles
10,500 eagles.....
9,500 half eagles
6,120 quarter eagles

889,620 pieces, valued at

69,718 75
79,196 67
49,548 46

COINED.

6,490,000
105,000
47,500
12,800

f6,655,800

-1864-

Value.
V

1,034,794 $1,,569,287

Oil, sperm, galls
Oil, wnale and other fish, gls.
Whalebone, lbs.
Spermaceti & ep. cand’s, lbs
Fish, dried or smoked, cwt..
Fish, piskled, bbls
do
Fish
kegs

Quantity.

603,186
229,472
228,284
74,793 )
8,750 j

‘

851,066
416,406
648,099
624,129
192,506
73,756)
12,190 f

1,,483,593

2,056,511

676,733
76,946
921,131

429,310

$6,066,006

Total product of the sea...

Value.
,398,063
488,957
798,563
184,608

967,913
588,111

$4,81,914

PRODUCT OF THE FOREST.

headings, M
Shingles, M
Boards, planks, &c., Mft...

4,260,076
128,993
2,606,881
7,936
1,121,387

106,563

80,708

136,901
394

Hewn timber, tons
Other lumber
Oak bark and other dye
Manufactures of wood
Tar and pitch, bbls
Rosin and turpentine, bbls..

44,103
30,344
132,298
6,742

9,458,966
137,229
8,064,264
87,289

1,642,976

293,564

865,281
7Q,7S3
55,551
468,626
474920
908,050

102.666

11,956
17,025

7,156
2,418
48,904
360,950

237,991
613,704;

61,313
372,945

Total product of the forest.

194,575

2,549,056

Ashes—pots and pearls, cwt.
Ginseng, lbs
Skins and furs

295,129
2,226,275

\ $10,427,902

$14,342,068

PRODUCT OF AGRICULTURE.

Of Animals—

Beef, tea

flfi\

.

Tallow, lbs
Hides
Horned

cattle, No
Butter, lbs

865,855
236,547
6,733,748
4,216,804

42,046,054

Lard, lbs
Hogs, No
Horses, No
Mules, No
Sheep, No
Wool, lbB

.

66,071
6,191

805,111

20,896,435
47,761,329

0,140,031
6,688,007

236;ll9 \

*

4’334'776

218,243,609 18,658,280
166,336,696 16,755,570
96,363
9,467

lbs

j

1,296
.

' 8,661
......

355,722

f

317^597 }

110,886,446
97,190,765
9,199

832,233

86,907
72,6-24
39,185

9,801
155,482

39,504

178,434

$61,118,647

Rye meal, bbls.

S754,I95

2?’M704

4,096,684

1#°l§>272
833,757

Rye, oats, &c

kegs and boxes’....
Potatoes, bush

126,456
60,443
617,630

682,268
*13,581

Onions..-

174,602

Apples, bbls

494

Rice, tes

do bbls

81,439,138

23,681,712

257,948
8,684

Indian corn. bush.
Corn meal, Dbls

3,496

364,618
$3,404

12,323,327
11,260,798

821
15

132,542

36,160,414
4,390,055
10,119,476

Wheat, bush
Flour, bbls.

0,215,260
117,573

*59,995,057

Vegetable food—

3,023,011

178,382
65,197,914

0,738,486

5,509
85,172,415

Cheese, lbs
Pork, tes

J-

*-185.931

63,792,754

.•

do

ing is

THE SEA.

Quantity.

Biscuit, bbls

San Francisco.—The follow¬

OF

-1863-

do bbls
Hams and bacon,

34,754,245 94

deposited in minta

The grand total of

domestic

do bbls

sus-

ended.
pei
Oct. 81.. National Banka

♦Leas overpaid

United States.—The Journal of

Commerce
prepared, from the official report, the following table, showing
the total exports of domestic products from all of the ports of
the
United States. Our readers will notice that the shipments of
pork
and beef are given in barrels, instead of barrels and tierces.
It
may be that the actual quantity shipped has been reduced to barrels, by computation, but the probability is that all of the packages have been added together indiscriminately without classify,
tion.
Until the year last given, the actual shipments of petroleum
were not recorded, and the total in previous statements was
only the
accidental entry of a chance shipment from some of the smaller
ports. The true figures are now registered.' For the year ending
June 30th, 1864, the total includes 9,980,654 gallons crude
petro¬
leum, valued at $3,864,187 ; 11,646,749 refined do., valued at
$6,087,967 ; 1,144,769 gallons “ coal oil,” valued at $154,091, and

831,284 79

at

Newbem,N.C




Commerce

has

Staves and

Olympia, W.

Ain’t

a

at
....

...Deposit’y at St.
Croix
Falla,

—

Oct.

view to

479,276 11

...

Oct.

were

84,374 47

Cincinnati...

Oct.

000

6,781*300

during the past three months nearly $7,000coined at San Francisco, in a building erected with
a
coinage capacity of $5,000,000 per annum.

PRODUCT

1,025,345

126 000

628,620

that

seen

at

Baltimore
Buffalo

4,000

Total number of pieces coined.'
Total value of gold and silver coined

It will be

at the

[November 18,1866.

85,588,949

8,657,847

3,358,*#
1,349,765

262,357
6,999

87.991

957,394
660,324
473,911
136,260
487,140
84,917

'

129,100
96,105

463,212

183*969
5,442

$9°, 164,367
Cotton, Sea Island, lbs
do

Other

Tobacco, unmanufac’d, hhds
do
do

cases

bales

Flaxseed, bush
Cloverseed, bush
Hemp, tons
Brown sugar, lbs
Hops, lbs

'

627,747
6>$52,405
10,857,239
111,896
7,685 19J52,076
26,586
40,759
2
889,654 A185,706

lO?’80*

646

:

Total product of Agricul..

™,348

880,348
8,864,081

$180,681,526

132,521
11,860,390

J.

109,906
i’986
2,986
14,411 j
,411J

j* 22,845,936
J®

1,708
39,747

g».g
*$*7

1,751

525,151

,

5,851,165

$150,457,784

November 18, 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

651

MANUFACTURES.

Quantity.
258.901
8,214,661
6,610
2,633,391

Wax, lbs.
Refined sugar, lbs.

Chocolate,lbs.
Spirits (from grain)galls. .
clo
(from molassesjgalls
do
(from other matrl’s).
.

Molasses,

Beerfale,^porter & cider g'ls
doz. bottles.
do
linseed oil, galls.

1,390,610
1,064,717
950,245
19,465
84,431
101,507

Spirits of turpentine, galls..

68,565

Household furniture
Carriages, cars, <fcc
Hats

Saddlery
■•••••
Candles, adamant’e, &c.lbs.
Soap, lbs
...........
Snuff, lbs
Tobacco manufactured, lbs.
Leather, lbs..:
■

Boots

.....

6,608.881
9.097,664
44,924
7,025,248
2,203,284
1,214,468
29,011
279,892
584.901
257,239
19,861

and shoes, pairs

Cables and cordage, cwt....

Gunpowder/ lbs

gait, bush

Lead, lbs
Iron—pig, cwt.

and rails, cwt...
Nails, cwt
Castings, cwt
Other manufactures of....
Copper, brass, &c
Drugs and dyes
Cottons—Printed and col’d.
do white other than duck
do duck
do other manufactures
Hemp bags, &c
Bars

4,680

12,463
77,279

..

Wearing apparel

-.

.

Earthenware
Combs and buttons:
Brushes and brooms
Billiard apparatus

§59,937
5,702
721,386
527,115
186,848
23,239

1,180,641
211,910
47,455
216,991
407,851
19,908
143,301
32,548

41,825

101,244
25,073
81,751
87,988
1,389,302
620,128
188,010

.....

120 645

6,485^39i

1,027^931

8,185,088
28,277
8,587,472

790,872
16,813

3,631,070
373,598
1,415,775
653,497
48,963
296,088
18,718
46,618
37,422
484,113
76,516
5,379,270
432,570
2,356,851
401,411
66,639
50,239
948,612
93,222
690,256
67,591
66,817

824,762

2,500,000
39,949

409,050
48,208

150.330

277,838
22,684

635,519
223,752
29,240
12,940
80,911

29,527
10,839

66,959
411,055
5,957,193
1,026,038
1,955,102
630,558
254,751
69,526
1,951,576
123,656
950,451
88,244
43,036
146,718

14,500

....

.....

147,623

36,435

Umbrellas and parasols
Morocco, &c
Fire

-

$170,418

1,100,623

27,669
29,861
143,777
1,282,008
764,547
259,183
157,711
1,110,918
736,524
13,633
3,384,544
634,574
1,829,009

25.131

Value.

841,458
1,8«'3,332
18,612

361,084
1,686

2,908,436

galls

Quantity.

$80,899

1,855,098
32,290
256,956
417,965
16.130

38,593
6,979

......

3,123
18,719

engines.....

Printing materials
Musicalinstruments
Books and maps....

Stationery..
Paints and varnish
...

Glassware
Tinware
Manufs of pewter and lead.
Marble and stone
Ind. rubber b’ts & sh’s, prs.
Do. other manufactures of.
Gold and silver leaf, &c.

......

51,711

...

Jewelry, &c
Trunks and valises
Lard oil, galls
Oil cake
Bricks, lime and cement....

1,259,063

Unenumerated manufac’s...
Total Manufactures

Coal, tons
Ice, tons
Petroleum, crude&refd galls.

Quicksilver

186,960
46,538
155,874

21,108
14,222

9,706
206,138
149,103
222,045
593,518
436,942
998,569
41,558
30,609
138,428

159,054
172,587
259,601
548,327
434,910
793,660
46,968
30,411
202,362
35,468
242,367
18,918
63,573
111,986
377,994

......

32,484

215,196
129,463
36,431
80,780
983,349
1,277,735
99,813
6,808,467

440,546

1,609,833
135,492

8,046,102

$40,889,673
$993,309

$37,416,271
173,038
47,496

$1,208,128

23,210,369

10,783,689
976,898
11,822,090
88,651,472

169,757
27,839

1,237,116

Gold and silver bullion
Gold and silver coin

*

......

29,592,912
44,608,529
6,494,252

Raw produce not specified..
Total exports of Domestic
Produce

feeling, especially

1864

Value.

278,127

3,778,794

$324,092,877

$320,035,199

&l)e Bankers’ ©alette.

'.’WWVN.-v-v

New York, November 17th, 1865.—P. M.

The Money

as some parties entertain a strong suspicion
that the government has taken a
very decided attitude toward

France; and the prospect of a disturbing discussion of the
privateer question, and of delicate relations with Canada,
arising out of the Fenian excitement, equally tend to induce
parties to keep their funds as, much as possible, under ready
control.

Much interest is felt in the
probable recommenda¬
tion of Mr. McCulloch relative to the
currency and national

banks; but

as

will be of

cautious and conservative

eration

a

there is a general confidence that his

has,

perhaps, less effect

measures

character, this consid¬
upon the market than

others.
The discount market is
of paper

marked

quiet. There is a very large amount
offering, but less disposition to buy than of late, a
preference being shown for the best known signa¬

tures and for short dates.

For the best names, the rate is

generelly 8@9 per cent, with exceptions at 7 per cent; a
large amount of good paper is discounted at 9@10 per cent;
for second class the rate
ranges at

Railroad

and

10 to 15

per cent.

Miscellaneous Stocks.—The stock market

has not yet recovered from the shock to

confidence, produced
by the late extraordinary speculations in Milwaukee and
Prairie du Chien stock.
have taken warning from
those

The

more

conservative brokers

the developments in that case; and
disposed to venture upon risky speculations find it diffi¬

cult to get

co-operation either from brokers

lend¬
approach of Congress, at which important
measures may be
early developed, has a tendency to check
operations for a rise. The outside public take very little in¬
terest in stock
movements, and merchants generally prefer
lending their balance* to employing them in street ventures.
ers.

The

or

money

near

The transactions in railroads
the maneuvers of
opposing

at

the board

are

little else than

cliques.

The aim of the bulls is
contracts, but the latter are
cautious of being caught in a “
corner,” after “ Prairie Dog ”
fashion: thus the two parties are
kept watching each other,
and the situation
changes little from day to day. The stocks
at present
being handled by the bull party are Michigan
Southern, Cleveland & Pittsburg, and Chicago and North
Western, common; but their operations are kept stationary
by the bears refusing to take “ shorts.” The general tone of
prices, on the railroad list has been weak, except on the spe¬
culation stock, on which a rise has been
engineered.
to draw the bears into “ short ”

The “

corner

Market.—Monetary affairs

”

on

Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien is about

have steadily
closed; most of the “ short ” contracts having been covered.
tended toward greater ease
during the week. The demand Many parties in the interior have
suffered, so that the loss
from ’Change brokers has diminished in
consequence of a lull by street
operators here is not so great as was at first sup¬
in speculation ; and there has been less
disposition to invest posed.

in business
paper.

But for an active demand from brokers
dealing in government securities, there is every possibility

that the rate

on

call loans would have declined

one

To-day

per cent.

a few transactions in government collaterals are re¬
at six per cent; but the prevailing rate on demand
ported
loans is 7 per cent weak. The drain of
currency southward
has almost
ceased, for the

Rock Island is somewhat unsettled
by a disagreement be¬
tween the old and the new
directors; the latter

having placed
the former preventing them from paying
$750,000 far the purchase of Mississippi and Missouri rail¬
an

injunction

road,

upon

on account

of the Rock Island

Company.
slight speculative movement on the minor
moment, exchange at New Orleans coal stocks.
Lehigh and Susquehanna coal has advanced
and the other Southern centers
being at present in favor of from 7 to 11;
Schuylkill from 7 to 9; Wyoming Valley has
New York. At the same
time, there is a shallow arrival of also bounded
up about 8 per cent.
currency from the West to the East; so that, upon the whole,
Railroad bonds and State stock have been
there is probably an increase in the
depressed in
supply of
the demand is diminished.
The banks are in an easier
more

freely. Both banks

into the future.

ent

combining

There

are

while consequence of the decline in
government securities, with
which they come in direct
competition. Some sales have
lending some¬ been made for the
purpose of purchasing seven-thirties.

several circumstances at pres¬

to produce a "strongly conservative feeling
among lenders. The general inflation of
prices is regarded
with

mistrust; the Mexican situation produces




a

money,

position, and are
and private bankers, however,
exhibit a moderate caution in
putting out their funds, and
avoid, as much as possible, making
arrangements extending
far
what

There has been

an

unsettled

The
stocks

following are the closing quotations for leading
Saturday last and to-day:

on

Nov. 17.

Cumberland Coal

~.

Canton

Company
Mariposa

43#
45

New York Central..
Erie

Reading
Michigan Southern
Cleveland and Pittiburgh,

4

13#
96#
92

114#
76#

93#

Nov. 11.

43#
44#

11#
96#
92#
115

75#

94#

“

65 %

preferred

k‘

,

Pavments.

1.991,742
2,561,580
1,932,368

Securities.—During the first half of the

21,552,912
21,530,488
39,363,735
24,7518,070

2,433,163

150

25',408,765

.2.687,656

Chicago and Rock Island.

Changes in-

Sub-TreasuryReceipts. Balances.

3,590,li4

104%
102%

Fort Waj-ne.
Milwaukee and P. du Chien.
Ohio and Mississippi Certificates.

United States

Custom
House.

33%

Chicago and Northwestern.

11,484,939 / 14,784.631

Balances.

69,898,621
67,713,079
04,973,528
60,157,697
55,076,045
58,376.337

24,335,221

19,367,370
18,799,937
84,547,904
20,717.008

1,073,544
2,185,542
2,739,550
4,815,831
5,081,051
3,299,692

incr

Foreign Exchange.—There has been an increased activ¬
securities, of all kinds, showed a strong
downward tendency. The unsettled state of our relations ity in exchange during the week;.and notwithstanding the
with Prance and England, and reports of the countermanding verv'liberal supply of bills,—as shown by a rise in the ex¬
of measures in course of execution for reducing the military
port figures to over six millions per week and the continued
force in Texas, have had a tendency to produce mistrust.
At large direct shipments of cotton from New* Orleans,—the
the same time some of the bankers have been compelled to rates are
higher. Sterling is fully a per cent above the elosrealise upon their governments, in consequence of the delay ing rates of last week. We quote:
in the Treasury Department in delivering the new Five- Bankers’ Sterling, 60
Francs, short date..
517%@5.15
Amsterdam
.'
40% ® 40%
(lays..
10S%® 109
Frankfort..
40%®) 40%
twenty bonds for which they had subscribed ; add to which Bankers’ Sterling, 3
7S ® 73%
110 @1101* Bremen
days
a
Prussian Thaler
70% ® 71 %
107%® 108%
partial movement throughout the country to realise upon Merchants’

week, government

.

•

this class of securities in order to

invest in business pursuits.

considerable amount of

From this combination of causes, a

35%® 36%

Hamburg'

5.22%@5.18%

Francs, long date

following statement shows
gold interest bonds and Seven-thirties have been thrown up¬ the condition of the Associated Banks of the City of New
market. The leading dealers in government securi¬ York, for the week ending with the commencement of busi¬
on the
ties deemed the movement favorable for purchasing, and ness on Nov. 11, 1805 :
The public, on the
have taken most of the lots offered.
Average amount of
Legal
Net
CirculaLoans and
tion.
Tenders.
other hand, have concluded that at the decline, they were the
Discounts.
Deposits.
Banks.
Specie.
88,050,914 $1,893,599
$179,166
New York
$6,919,S54 $2,432,833
4,1S1,100
939.518
14,226
1,4S8,168
5,058,8S0
cheapest securities on the market, and during the last three Manhattan
855,516
4.36S,550
147,750
840,903
Merchants
6,604,165
3,922,306
549,525
266,006
125,755
days have come into the market as large buyers, producing Mechanics
5,591,317
New York City Banks.—The

**

.

general advance in quotations.
The latest report respecting the 5
maturing on the 1st December is that
on presentation.
The course of prices is shown by
quotations, for leading securities, at
a

and close of the week
U.
U.
U.
U.
IT.
U*

S.
S.
S.
S.
S.
S.
IT. S.
U. S.

per

they will be redeemed
the following closing
the beginning, middle

:

14.Nov. 17.
105%
105%
102
101%
100%
99%
100
99%

Nov. 11. Nov.

105%
101%
100

99%
91%
97%
97%
96%
96%

10-40’s,

yr's certificates

...

7-30's 1st series
7-30's 2d Series
7-30's 3rd series

The Gold Market.—Gold has

91

97%
97

96%

.

96

91%
97%
97%
97%
97%

been without any note¬

worthy change. The demand for customs has been moder¬
ate ; but, as the Sub-Treasury has sold less ,than formerly,
the premium has shown considerable strength.
The ship¬
ment of gold has been rather larger than of late.
On Satur¬
day last European steamers took out $130,000 of specie, and
on Wednesday the Java took about $550,000 in gold bars.
The Persia brought in $40,220 in specie; the Havana
steamer also brought a small amount.
The following have been the highest and lowest quotations,
for

gold

on

Highest. Lowest
1474 147

1464
1474
1474

11...:
13

Nov.

14

Nov. 15
Nov. 16.
Nov. 17

1464

146#
147

1474 147
147 146f

The market closes rather week, in consequence of
sales by the government to-day.
The Sub-Treasury has-ebmmenced the issue of

supposed

City

4,339,714

..2,S76,626
2,157,639
5,389,814
2,711,823
2,262,810
2,307,777

Sub-treasury

were as

follows

Custom-house.

Receipts.

Fulton

Mercht. Exchange.
National
Butch. <fc Drovers.
Mech’s & Trad’s...
Greenwich
Leather Manf.
Seventh Ward
State of N. Y.
.

$419,272
621,135
476,124
301,468
299,293

49
14
35
79
94
415,872 12

PavmentB.

Receipts.

$1,172,835 06
1,046,962 58
1,364,490 02
2,532,338 53
3,729,465 07
1,638,884 29

$1,200,671 16

Total
Balance in

$2,433,163 83 $11,484,939 55
Sub-treasury on the morning of Nov. 6

7
8
9
10

11

payments during the

Balance on Saturday evening
Decrease the during week

The following
Oct. 7th:

week

1,956,839 82
2,186,606 64
3,363,328 48
3,516,416 36
2,551,769 40

144,306

641,423
654,472

1,612,223

770,832

..

.

7,848,066
2,846,420

Ocean

Republic
Chatham

People’s
Irving
Nassau

Market
St. Nicholas
Shoe and Leather.
Corn Exchange....
Continental
Commonwealth....
Oriental
Marine
Atlantic

Imp. and Traders..
Park
Mec. Bk. As
Grocers
North River
East River
Man. and Mer
Fourth National...
Central
Second National..,
Ninth National....
First National

Dry Dock
Bull’s Head

.

51,158

40,526
123,594

22,203
60,438

1,755,0*0

-

976,322

1,695,061
*

837,151

1,559,079
13,067,491
10,918,S92
1,0S5,780
5,393,652
3,141,821

.

55,02S
2S,517
83,064
15,968
26,505
29,477
14,439
16,78S
99,231
67,961

916,857
437,690

The deviations from

1,754,346

238,S55

209,780
893,715

7,657

33S.610

9,294
9,156
.

589,174
857,768
258,509

242,079
450,315
1,740,000
420,968

179,222
2,959
13,454
205,117
1,285
1,497,055
1,159,530

19,153

187,060

2,576.942

1,786,617
1,393,517
5,535,251
1,039,666

21,927
109,475
222,500
69,917
291,252
890,001

41,626-

1,079,070
4,200,753
11,986,410

$224,005,572

Totals

59,23S
29,093

1,754,628

2,421,167

2.571,837

399,033
14,944
4,956
304,000
38S,600
483,131
32,432
260,035

25,655

3,000,585
1,090,034

1,719,857

6,629.155
7,174,174
S,066,80 6
2,347,816

14,313
9,357

124,206

2,617,437
2 357,441
2,970.000
2,821,928
8,257,270

569,558

298,950
129,698
440,000
9,783
8,781
21,017

47,099

1,343,16S
2,305,178

Citizens’

1,965,071
3,G59,536

369,539

2O,S03

9,447,STS

Metropolitan

155,001
260,759
838,914
447,737

148,400

38,741
125,860
64,655

2,693,305
1,626,584

418,191

731,563

1,725,600
817,176

20S,4S6
41,436

2,500,626

North Amer
Hanover

245,858

1,476,607

13,817

59,702
50,861
17,766

3,677,43S
1,086,705
4,8S4,715
1,971,621
1,466,192

Mercantile
Pacific

800.644

1,821,778

104.391

369,136
842,959
1,063,347
174,911

5,086,050
8,736,013
18,458,712

2,286,747
5,325,786

1,014,884
842,260
325,952

3,682

232, SJS
62, SOI
65,557
15,100
117,537
28,293

3,051,410

66S.333

90,749
8,569
40,000

27,047

-

1,060,713

28,881

8634)88

904,S31

Broadway

as

-Sub-Treasury. -

6




1,827,798

Amer. Exchange..
Commerce

the Custom-house and

Novmeber
November
November
November
November
November

Deduct

.

Manufacturers’

:

1,804,466

24,683
22,198
251,605

34,938
194,910

Tradesmen’s

.

The transactions for last week at

297,0S7
8,901,944

259,059

gold certifi¬

cates.

3,173,248
7,788,532
3,409,865
2,717,616

31S,470

1,212,281

....

each of the last six days:
Highest. Lowest.

Nov.
Nov.

4,331,283
6,723,581
3,910,258

Chemical

5-20's, 1862 coupons.
5-20'e, 1S04
“
5-20* s, 1865
“
1

cent legal tenders

3,595
15,523

139,888

Union
America
Phenix

15,51S
119,16S
50,108

22,889

11,995,201 :13,825,209

the returns of the

1,666,600

862,798

3,284,402
1,793,458
1,338,185

2,551,667

2,057.522
1,072,375
1,784.134
1,744,292

1,742,140
3,026,027
893,127

■

382,869
230,318
829,834

766.S50

496,2S9
754,000
260, b00
648,000
770,168
181,594

1,641,477

832,300

9,902,217

210,160
536,255
3,495,205

3,140,725
10,643,044
1,404,978
S6S,733

1,261,987
695,319

1,116,215
9,594,165
11.418,456
772,664

5,411,791

2,S99,610
187,292
1,051.125

463,583
194,416
876,789
291,063
809,953
2,285,711
3,525,577
274,755'

1,418,199
947,S74j
25,000

280,612

71,495

174,199,442

47,913,S83

previous week are

follows:
Inc. $3,880,611

Loans

Specie

Circulation

The
crease

Net

Deposits

,

Dec. 1,720.067 Legal Tenders
Inc.

tnc. $660,768
Inc. 135,169

535,82S

large increase in the loans
specie is perhaps chiefly

in

is unexpected. The de¬
owing to the transfer of

the Sub-Treasury. An im¬
in legal tenders, in conse¬
$14,784,631 86
55,076,645 31 quence of the increased influx from the west and the diinin
ished efflux southward; the fact of the amount remaining al¬
$69,886,277 17
most stationary under such circumstances is due to payment
11,484,939 55
of about $1,500,000 into the Sub-Treasury on account of
gold deposits from the banks to
portant increase was expected

..$58,876,837 62 subscriptions to the funding loan.
3,299,692 81
The following comparison shows the totals of

table shows the aggregate transactions

since

Statements since Oct,

7th;

the Banka

November 18, 1865.]
Loans.

THE
Circulation.

Specie.

CHRONICLE.

Legal

Average

Deposits. Tenders. Clearings.
13,470.134 10,970,397 1SS,501,4S6 5S,511,752
572,708.232
227,541,884 15,890*775 11,722,S47 182,364,156 50,459,195
699,348,495
224,030,679 15.5S6,540 12,838,441 174,192,110
Oct 21....
46,169,855 RTO lfifi 864
219,965,639 14,910,561 12,923,735 173,624,711
Oct. 28
46,427,027 575,945.580
JNov. 4 — 220,124,961 13,724,268 13,289,381 173,538,674 47,778,719 563,524,873
Nov.ll— 214,005,572 11,995,201 13,825,209 174,199,442 47,913,S8S
Oct 7....
Oct. 14....

225,520,727

653

Ditto in the provinces-

Dividends payable
Various discounts

33,663,494 0
1,062,814 75
9,527,339 56

-

Re-discounts
Surplus of receipts not distributed
Sundries

1,427,623 17
752,993 36

14,327,920 51

588,441,862

Philadelphia Banks.—The
vnent shows

following comparative state
leading items of the

the average condition of the

Philadelphia banks for the past and previous week:
Nov. 7.

$14,442,350

■Capital Stock
Loans

$14,442,350
48,043,189

48,509,360
1,050,251

Specie
Legal Tenders
Deposits
Circulation

Nov. 14.

955,924

15,752,478
34,741,494
7,064,866

.........

15,303,891
34,582,031
7,064,766

Inc
Inc

following comparison shows the condition
adelphia banks at stated periods :
Loans.

3,

Oct, 10,
Oct. 17,

49.682,319

Oct. 24,
Oet. 31,

48,959,072

Nov. 14,

Specie.
1,092,755
1,037,705

49,924,2S1
49,742,036

63,043,139

Oct.

..

100

Deposits.
38,347,233
37,238,078
36,252,038
35,404,524
34005,024

7.056,984
7,082,197
7,084,667
7,074,066
7,069,S14
7,004,766

1.086,774

955,924

34,582,031

following national banks
during the week ending November 11 :

Name.

159,463

of the Phil

National Banks.—The

thorized

448,582

Circulation.

1,060,579
1,052,357

48,317.622

466,177
44,327

Dec..
Dec..
Dec..,

The

Date

...

Dec..

were au¬

Location.

Georgia National Bank

Capital.
$100,000

Atlanta, Ga
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Weston, W. Va

First National Bank

National Exchange Bank
Total capital

is 1,663, with a total
cap¬
ital of
?
2
$403,708,793
Amount of circulation issued to the national banks for the
week
ending Saturday, November 11, is stated at

Previously.

,

.

$3,054,110

....$210,266,040

No additional national banks

Treasury

as

during the week.

designated by the Sec¬
depositories of the public money
were

The

following comparison shows the progress of the
national banks, in respect to
number, capital and circulation,
from Oct. 7th

:

Date.

Banks.

7,

“

14,
21.

44

Circulation.

399,854,212
401,406,013
402,071,130
402,573,793
403,308,793

ii

“

Capital.

104,182,630
197,798,380
*200,925,780
*203,877,355
207,212,930
210,266,040

4<

Oct

“
“

“

28,
4,

H,

14

i:

a

403,708,793

Foreign Banking.—The
following
Bank of England for the week

is the statement of the
ending Nov. 2, 18G5:

ISSUE

DEPARTMENT.

r

.

%

Kotes issued

£27,162,265 I Government debt.... £11,015,100
Other securities

I Gold coin

3,634,900

.....

and bullion.

£27,162,265

12,512,265

£27,162,265

BANKING DEPARTMENT.

Proprietors'capital... £14,553,000
Rest

Government securities

3,181,692 Other securities
4,163,517 Notes
12,979,790 Gold and silver coin.,

Public deposits
Other deposits
Seven day <fc other bills

vious

proceeding

£9,240,964
20,144,578
5,314,960

715,538

538,041

£35,416,040
accounts, compared with those of the pre¬

week, exhibit:

An Increase of Circulation of.
An Increase of Public
Deposits of
A Decrease of Other
Deposits of
A Decrease of Government
Securities
An Increase of Other Securities of
An Increase of Bullion of
A Decrease of Rest of
A Decrease of Reserve of

-

£15,101
369,835
800,143
67,054
140,840

*

8,590
2,317

*...

18,815
The following is the return of the Bank
of France made
up to the 26th ult. The return for the
previous week is
added:
'
.

DEBTOR.

Capital

of the bank.....

Profits, in

addition to capital
Reserve of the bank and branches
r<ew reserve

Notes in circulation and at the
branches..
Drafts drawn
by the bank on the branches
of the bank
in Paris or in the
payable
provinces

Treasury account
Account*

...

......................

current at Paris




7,767,270
348,429.871
349,973,70S
19,459,300

36

72

430,775,953 54
2,146,9SS 10
329,572,672 29
326,201,963 0
26,731,454 50
10,2S0,300 0
13,834,000 0
9,052,700 0
30,715,900 0
21,921,780 0

22
96

0
0

9,139.600

8

13,755,300
30,967,500
21,647,480

0
0
0
0

646.100

0

8,726,700

0
4S0,650 0
60,000,000 0
12,980,750 14
36,440,737 91
1)0,000,000 0
8,441,402 0
1,770,622 82
10,339,2S5 42

644,000

459,650 0
60,000,000 0
12,980,750 14

36,449,737 91
109.000.000

0

8,475,344 0
1,952,270 58
11.287,817 23
1,460,635,442 26

Expenses of management

1,432,310,159 72

The chief features in

jhe return compared with that of the
preceeding week, are an augmentation of 42,G29,000f in the
discounts, of 20,672,000f in the circulation of notes, of 21/
290,000f in the deposits, and a decline of 12,249,000f in the
coin and bullion.

BANK

STOCK

Capital.

LIST.

Nov. 2. 1863.
f.

c.

182,500,000 0
7,044,776 2
22,105,750 14
4,000,000

0

889,642,025 0
8,063,168 32
132,745,209 14
153,972,830 29

Oct.. 26,1865
f.

c.

are

America

Atlantic*
Atlantic (Brooklyn)*

Bowery*
Broadway*
Brooklyn

| Bid.: Ask

Last Paid.

ZD

j

I
I

—

Eighth*

:...}

Fifth*

First*
First (Brooklyn)* ...
Fourth*
Fulton*
Far. & Cit.(Wm’sbg)
Gallatin*
Greenwich*
Grocers’*
Hanover*
—

Irving*

LeatherManufact’ rs*

Long Isl. (Brook.)*

.

Manhattan*
Manufacturers’*
Manufac. & Merch.*.
Marine*
Market*
Mechanics’*
Mechanics’ (Brook.)*
Mech. Bank. Asso.*.
Meehan. & Traders’*
Mercantile*
Merchants’*
Merchants’ Exch.*..

Metropolitan*

...

....

and
and

July..i ’July
July... July
200.000 .Quarterly..... Oct
800,000 Jan. and July
July
Nov
2,000,000 May and Nov
Jan. and July
200,000
July
450,000 Jan. and July
July

12j

...

....

.

..

300.000

J
.! 100:

Currency*
Dry Dock

•*5| ....!
.10

103

.6

.

.Quarterly

Oct

,106

7130 j
6! ....!

.

and

July... July
aud Nov... ;Nov

.5 & 5

ex.| —!
6i

and July... Julv
and July. . 'July
100 i
750;000 Jan. and July... !July
100! 2,000.000 Jan. and July...
July
100! 1,000,000 Feb. and Aug... Aug.

Commonwealth*....
Continental*

...

..51111*1112

300,000:Jau. and July... July
500,000 Jan. and July... July

1,000,000 Jau.
300,000 Jan.

135

..4!

.

5,000,000;May and Nov... Nov

400,000 Jan.
100! 1,000,000 May
50i 300,000 Jan.
100:10,000.000 Jan.

Commerce*

,..

500,000; April and Oct... Oct

1

.5 132

.

..

100
25

City*
City (Brooklyn)*

Corn Exchange*
Croton*
5

3,000,000,Jan. aud July... July

..

o

—

100
30
50
100

200,000
100,000

..

Quarterly...... !Oct

200.000 Jan. and
259,150 Jan. and

....

108

.5108
.5.100

I

...

.4] ....
.5 110

...
...

15
3

.

July... July
July... July

inn
100

4
5

250,000; Jan. and July... !July
150,000! Jan. and July... July .5 & 3 ex.
500,000jMay and Nov... Nov
10 205
{
i Jan, and July... July .7 & 5 ex.
100; 5,000,000|March and Sept. :Sept
.A 94*
30; 600,000;May and Nov... iNov
5
20;
160,OOOiMarch and Sept. Sept
100j 1,500,000 April and Oct
Oct
25 :
200,000 May and Nov... Nov
50; 300,000 Jan. and July...
Lj
100! 1,000,000;Jan. and July...
6 110
July
100 l,500,000;Jan. and July...
5 93
July
50
500,000;Jan. and July... Julv
5
50
600,000 Feb. and Aug.-.. Aug..
5 175
50
400,000 Feb. and Aug... Aug..
5
50 2,050,000 Feb. and Aug...
Aug..
30
210,000 April and Oct... Oct..
5 100
100
500,000 Jan. and July... July
5 100
100
400,000 Jan. and July... July
10
100 1,000,000 -Tan. and July... July
6 110
25 2,000,000 Jan. and July...
July .5 & 5 ex. 110
50
500,000 Jan. and July... July
100
50
500,000 May and Nov,.. Nov
5 100
25
600,000 May and Nov... Nov.
5
100 1,000,000 May and Nov. .7 Nov
50 3,000,000 June and Dec
June
5 Ill
50 1,235,000 Jan. and July... July
5 100
100 4,000,000 Jan. and July...
[July . ..5 & 5 ex. 119
100 1,000,000 May and Nov... Nov
5
100
300,000 Jau. and July... July
4
50 1,500,000 April and Oct... Oct.
5
100 3,000,000 Jan. and July...
5 115
July
100
200,000 Jan. and July... July
9
100
300,000 Jan. and July... July
6 121
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July... July
5 104
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July... July ..5 & 5 ex.

100j
100!

:

...

...

96

.

U LL

.

.

95”

.

.

....

....

....

....

Nassau*

Nassau (Brooklyn)..
National
New York*
New York County*.

NewYorkExchange*

Ninth*
North America*
North River*
Ocean*

..

115
113

.

—

....

.

.

.

....

....

.

....

113

..

«...

.

....

....

....

..

.

.

.

.

.

.

.
.

.

120
..

....

50
50
50
50
100
25
20

Peoples’*
Phoenix*

Republic*

....

..

.

Williamsburg City..

400,000 Jan. and July... July

1,000,000 Feb. and Aug...
300,000 Feb. and Aug...
422,700 May and Nov...
2,000,000 Jan. and J uly...
412,500 Jan. and July...
1,800,000 Jan. and July...
2,000,000 Feb. and Aug...
1,000,000 Feb. and Aug...
500,000 April and Oct..
300,000 May and Nov
1,500,000 Jan. and July..
200,000 May and Nov...

100
100
100
100
100
100
100 2,000,000'May and Nov...
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July...
100 l,000,000,Feb. and Aug...
40 1,000,000 Jan. and July...
50 1,500,000 May and Nov...

..

5

00 OOO'Jan. and July....

.

.

.

6
4
5
Nov
5 150
July . .6 & 10 ex. 145
5 110
July .
5 95
July .
5 109
Aug..
Ann-..
r, 100

....

.

.

....

«...

.

Aug..
Aug..

.

....

.

Oriental*
Pacific*
Park*

...

140

.

.

..

••»

•

.

.

......

7,650,991 48
149,619,583 63

137,058,596 37

Periods.

1

25
50
50
25
100
50

Bull’s Head*
Butchers & Drov.*..
Central*
Central (Brooklyn)*.
Chatham*
Chemical*
Citizens’*

Tenth*
Third*
Tradesmen’s*
Union*

0

Amount.

100
100
100
100
50

American*
American Exchange*

868,969,875 0

<000,000

£

1

**

East River*

Market

I

i

(Marked thus *
Nutional.)

St. Nicholas’*
Seventh Ward*
Second *
Shoe & Leather*
Sixth*
State of New York*.

1S2,500,000 0
7,044,776 2
22.105,750 14

Dividend.

^Companies.

Importers & Trad;*.

£35,416,040

The

413,526,952 22

Sundries

207,212.930

retary of the

36

CREDITOR.

Cash and bullion
Commcial bills overdue
Ditto discounted in Paris
Ditto in the branches
Advances on bullion in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on public securities in Paris
Ditto in the
provinces
Ditto on obligations and
railway shares
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on securities in the Credit Foncier
in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto to the State
Government stock reserve
Ditto other securities
Securities held
Hotel and property of the bank & branches

$403,308,793

Wmle number national bank authorized

Total

26

0
75
44
17

$400,000

Previously authorized

'

l74~607635,442

200,000
100,000

...

28,363,120
1,129,783
8,760,770
1,427,623
752,993
12,062,296
1,432,340,159

90
....

....

.

.

.

•

•

•

•

•

....

100
110

Julv
Nov

Julv
Nov

.

101
6
5 101
5

.

4114
..6 & 4 ex. 127

.

.

Nov

.

July

Ang.

July
Nov

July

.

.

.

.

....

101
....

.

,

•

•

5

-4

121

.

.

i
{

[November 18,1885.

THE CHRONICLE

654

EXCHANGE.
SALE REPORTED OFFICIALLY ON EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17.)

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK
(REPRESENTED BT THE

CLOSING

Sfctur.

SECURITIES.

Mon.

National.
United States 6s, 1867
registered.
do
do
6s, 1868
coupon.
do
do
6s, 1868
registered.
do
do
coupon.
6s, 1881
do
do
6e, 1881
registered. 105*
do
do
6s, 5-20s
coupon.\
do
do
registered. \ 1003*
6s, 5-20s
do
do
6s, 5-20s (2d issue)
coupon 100
do
do
....registered
5s, 5.20s
do
do
do
coupon 99*
6s, 5.20s (3d issue)

105* 105* 105*! 105*
101*1101* 101* 102 102

106

100

j 99*

100*

99*

-

99*' 99*

99*

do

7-30s Treas. Notes—1st series.
.2d series.
do
do
do
...3d series.
do
do
do
6s, Certificates,

do
do
do

91

91%

90*

91*

-

97*
98*
96*
97*

97

97

97

96*
96*
97*

96*

96*
96*
97*

96

97*

97*

96*
96*
97*

97

96*

97*
116

77

77

74*

Third

138

115 X 115

75*

I:101

102

76*
100

100

jlOl*
_

-j 70
_

67

"

1

i\

97

J

28* 29

97

96*
29

‘285~

Atlantic and Great Western, 1st mort
do
do
2d mort

.100

avenue

Toledo, Wabash and Western
50
do
do
do
preferred.... 50

50

-

50

Railroad Bonds:

do

do

96*

-

Buffalo, New York and Erie, 1st mort., 1877...
Chicago and Alton, Sinking Fund
do
2d mortgage
do

96

96*

95

96

96

96

Income

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, 8 per cent... 112

112

Chicago and Milwaukee, 1st mortgage
Chicago and Northwestern, Sinking Fund....
99*

993

Bounty Bonds

82*

83

86

Loans

87*

87*

War Loan
Municipal
95

96

6s, Water Loan
6?; Public Park Loan...
6s, Improvement Stock

97

3d mortgage, conv..
4th mortgage —

do
do

do 2d mortgage, 1864.
’.
do 2d mortgage, 1879
do 3d mortgage, 1883
do 4th mortgage, 1880
do 5th mortgage, 1888
Galena and Chicago, extended
do
do
2d mortgage
Hannibal and St. Joseph. Land Grants

98

100

99*

.

Canton, Baltimore

100 44* j 45

Central Coal
Central American Transit
Cumberland Coal, preferred
Delaware & Hudson Canal

100
100

50

100

43
146

100

100 146
50

Harlem Gas
Manhattan Gas

Light
Mariposa Mining
Mariposa Preferred
Metropolitan Gas
New York Steamship

188

135

;14C

44* j
50*|

—

li*; n* 13* 13*
16
115

100

Scrip

100
50

Pennsylvania Coal
QuRksilver Mining

100

100
.........

100

,100

182

47* 47*
58

70

112

no*
94
:

92

43*

Nicaragua Transit
Pacific Alail Steamship

100*

Mississippi and Missouri, Land Grants

44*

—

150

50

100 11*| 11?
16
100

101

102

Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien, 1st mort....
Milwaukee and St. Paul, let mortgage
do
do
Income

100

.

75

Toledo, Sinking Fund
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, let mort.
do
2d mort.
do
do
100
Erie, lBt mortgage, 1868

Michigan Central 8s, 1869-72
do
do
8s, new, 1882
Michigan Southern, Sinking Fund
do
do
2d mortgage, 7s
do
do
Goshen Line, 1868

American Coal
Atlantic Mail Steamship

Wyoming Valley Coal

100

-

do
Consolidated and Sinking Fund
do
2d mortgage, 1868
Hudson River, 1st mortgage, 1869—
do
2d mortgage, (S. F.), 1885
do
3d mortgage, 1875
do
convertible, 1867.'.
Illinois Central 7s, 1875
Lackawanna and Western Bonds
Marietta and Cincinnati, 1st mortgage.

Miscellaneous.

United States Telegraph
Western Union Telegraph..

1st mortgage

2d mortgage
Chicago and Rock Island, 1st mortgage
Cleveland and Pittsburg, 2d mortgage...-

Harlem, 1st mortgage, 1869-72

New York 7s, 1875
do
6s, 1876
do
6S, 1878
do
6s, 1887
do
5s, 1867
do
5s, 1868
do
5s, 1870
do
5s, 1873
do
5s, 1874
do
5s, 1875
do
5s, 1876...
6e. 1890
do
do
6s, 1898
do
6s.F. Loan, 1868

do

Interest
Extension

do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do

do
do
Cleveland and

Jersey City 6s, Water Loan




50*

100:113 113* 114 i
.100 75* 75*

i 103* 104* 104
Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago.
100;102*
i 114* 114* 114*
Reading
50,114*
St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute.
44*
100 : 43* 43* 42
71
do
preferred. 100!
do
do
Second avenue.
100
100
Sixth avenue

74*
75

78

Brooklyn 6s

do

! 46

100,
100;

76*

v

Virginia 6s, coupon

do
do
do

45

preferred
preferred.. —100

97*

__

—

76*

100
100

77
,

6s, 1886

Wisconsin 6s,

McGregor Western

91

-

Morris and Essex
100:
New Jersey...
.
100
New York Central
100 96*
New Haven and Hartford
100 165
Norwich and Worcester—
100
28*
Ohio and Mississippi Certificates
do
do
do
preferred....
Panama
:
100

6s, 1875
6s, 1881

Rhode Island 6s
South Carolina 6s
Tennessee 6s, 1868
do
6s, Long
do
5s

*.

Mississippi and Missouri

(Pacific RR)
New York 7s, 1870

do
do
do

Long Island

do
do
guaranteed... 100 150
Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien
100
do
do
do
1st pref.. .100
do
do
do
2d pref... 100
Milwaukee and St. Paul
:.. .100
do '
do
preferred

Loan

do
6s, 1866
do
6s, 1867
do
6s, 1868
do
6s, 1872
do
6s, 1873
do
6s, 1874
do
6s, 1875
do
6s, 1877
do
6 s, 1866
do
5s, 1868
do
5s, 1871
do
5s, 1874
do
5s, 1875
do
5s, 1876
do
7s, State
North Carolina 6s
Ohio 6s, 1868
do 6s, 1870

50
100
50
100

Indianapolis and Cincinnati
Joliet and Chicago

Michigan Central
Michigan So. and N. Indiana

Louisiana 6s

\

—

.

Marietta and Cincinnati
do
do
1st
do
2d
do

(Hannibal and St. Joseph RR.)...

32*

.

do

Michigan 6s, 1873

6s,

—

—

do

do

91:

Kentucky 6s, 1868-72..

do

—

.

_

116

„

100 105

—

•

6s,

—

.

Ene

Georgia 6s

do

Chicago and Rock Island.
Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati..

—

.

Illinois Canal Bonds, 1860
do
do 6s,‘coupon, ’79, after
1862.
do
do
do
1865.
do
do
do
1870.
do
do
do
do 1877
do
do
do 1879
do
do
War Loan..
do
Indiana 6s, War Loan.
do
5s
do
2*s
Iowa 7s, War Loan —

do
6s, 1878
do
6s, 1883
do
7s, 1868
do
7s, 1878
do
7s, War
Minnesota 8s
Missouri 6s

preferred..

do

do

.

Delaware, Lackawanna and Western.
Eighth Avenue

State.

California 7s, large
Connecticut 8s, 1872

•

preferred
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy
Chicago and Milwaukee
Chicago and Northwestern
do

99*i 100

6s,

5s, 1871
coupon.
5s, 1871....
registered.
5s, 1874'.
coupon.
.registered.
5s, 1874....
5s, 10-40s
coupon.
registered.
5s, 10-40s
Union Pacific R. R.. .currency.

10
..100
120
100
.100
111
111
.100
no*
.100
< 82*
.100 33
34*
i 65
.100 65* 65*
65*
105
i 105 !108* 66*
.100 105
108*
-1127 1128
.100
128
l 92*
50 94*
; 93* 93*
j
50
50
.100
i 92* 92*
.100 92*
83 ! 84
.100 S4
.100
.100
50
80
50
.100
i
107*|108* 108* 109*
.100'134 I
135
—-

Chicago and Alton
105* 105* 105* 105* 105*

T/itir

.

Central of New Jersey

Oregon War, 1881
6s,
ao.
do.
(i yearly).

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

..

do
do

Railroad Stocks.

Brooklyn City
do

Wed

•.

SECURITIES.

Eli-

147*

147)6

American ©old Coin

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Wed. .Thar.

Tue».

48*

do
do
do
do
do

Ohio and

do
do
do
do
do

6s, Real Estate
6s, subscription
7s, 1876
7b, convertible, 1876

1
1

102

Mississippi, 1st mortgage

Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago, 1st mort..
do
2d mort... j
do
do
do
do
3d mort...
do
St Louis, Alton and Terre Haute, 1st mort...
do
do
*
do
2d, pref....
do
do.
2d, income.
do
Toledo and Wabash, 1st mortgage
do
1st mortgage, extended.
do
76
do
2d mortgage..
do
do

do

Intere»tBond»......

do

do

Bquipwexjt

91

1

6s, 1887

103

102*

102*

95
90

91
—

—i—

—-

—-

■

—

77
—

4

November 18,1865.]
i

J-gAuir

t..i

- mi

THE CHRONICLE.

-

NATIONAL, STATE
Amount

DENOMINATIONS.

INTEREST.

OuuUndiug.

Rate.

|

655

AND MUNICIPAL SECURITIES’ LIST.

Princi*

MARKET.

St

Bid* | Asked

Payable.

Amount

DENOMINATIONS.

INTERE8T.
Rate.

-registered. j

••»•••

Jan. &

Jan. &

July

July

1867
118

1868-

5

Jan. & July 1871-

20,000,000

5

Jan. &

July

1874-

\

282,746,000

6

Jan. &

July

1881-

^nWjrBds (p|) j. cmm..

1,016,000;

July

1881
1881

105%

1882-

102
100

}

.g

S

-

do

registered.

July.:

Jan. &

514,780,500
1864.... coupon,,

do'

do

do
do

100,000,000
50,000,000

.registered.

1865

(1040s)

do
do

coupon. )

.registered, j 172,770,100
•Union Pacific RR. Bonds of 1865
1,258,000
Ireatfary Notes (1st senes]
300,000,000
do

.

ifo *

(2d senes)........ 300,000,000
do
(3d series)
do
230,000,000
Debt Certificates..-_• • • •
55,905,000
do

State Securities.

iujuu-State Bonds
C^UWENIA-Cml

Bonds..;..;.;
CoKK.CTKtrr-Wa^Bonds.. „...
Georgia-—State Bonds
do
do
do

jixdtois—Canal Bonds.....
■do
Registered Bonds
-do
Coupon Bonds

3,423,000
3,926,000
803,000
8,000,000
2,000,000
2,073,750
525,000
8,747,000
3,293,274
1,700,900
803,000
28,000
1.116.500
490,000 i
236,000
2.000,000
6.325.500
2,058,173!
1.225.500 :
200,000 '
800,000
200,000
4,800,000!
800,000 !
*

...

.

•

State Bonds...
do
War Loan.....
Louisiana—State Bonds (R
State Bonds (R.
"do
do
State Bonds for B’ks,
Main*—State Bonds
do
War Loan
Maryland—State Bonds
do
State Bds .coupon. )
do
StateBds inscribed f
do

,

de

State

Bonds.coupon.

Massachusetts—State Scrip,
do

State Scrip

do

Bounty F’a L’n.

do

Michigan—State
do
State
do
State
d©
State
do

—

-

War Loan
Bonds
Bonds.
Bonds
Bonds

War Loan

Minnesota—State Bonds... ^—
Missouri—State Bonds
do
State Bonds for RR...
da
do
do

State Bonds (Pac. RR)
State Bonds (H,&St.J)
Revenue Bonds
New Hampshire—State Bonds...
do
War Fund Bds
do
War Notes....

3frw Jersey—State Scrip
do
War Loan Bonds..
Nrw York]

General Fund

*

do

6
6
6
6

6
5
2

6'

1,727,000
1,200,000; 5
6,500,000 6
2,100,000 5
6,500,000 ; 6
250,000 ! 7
1,000,000 : 6
700,000
750,000
700,000
250,000
539,000
13,700,000
7,000,000
3,000,000
436,0i)0
635,100
1,650,000
2,500,000
95,000
731,000
700,000

236,000!
4,500,000
9,129,585
705,336
1,015,000 ;

5
5
6
6
5
379,866! 6
2,183,532! 6
1,600,000; 6
4,095,309! 6
2,400,000! 6

do

Domestic Loan Bonds

Pennsylvania—State Bonds
do

„

do

State Stock

Military L’n Bds
IsLAND-State (War) Bds.
South
Carolina—State Stock...
Tennessee—State Bonds
_

679,000! 6
6,168,000 5
23,209,000' 5

Ehode

3.000,000 6

d*

4,000,000 6
1,708,000 6
1,125,000! 6

do

Railroad Bonds.

Virginia—inscribed Certificates.
do
Railroad Bond*

Wisconsin—State Bonds
do
do

do

War Fund Bonds.,.
War Fund perttf....



1

<

175,000 6
1,650,000! 6
18,264,642; 6
12,624,500 6
300,000, 6
L200 000 ! 6

Water

|

Bonds...I

57

do
do
do

|

...

1

j

Ii

j
Bonds....;
J.—City Bonds.!
City Bonds. j
Water

Railroad Bonds..!
Water

do

do

j
!

Park Bonds.....

Jersey City, N.

do

■

Railroad....
Ct.—City Bonds

Hartford,

do

Bds.!

Louisville, Ky.—City Bonds
do

—

City Bonds....

do

M.,J.,S,&D.

do

4%
5

98

101%

pUat.
1868

1878

pleas.

99% 100

8

7
6
130,000 ' 6
500,000 6
375,000 6
122,000! 6
118,000 7
650,000 9
17

4
6
7
5

6

200,000 ' 6
8,000,200 ! 6
2,147,000 ! 5
900.000; 5

100,000:
483,900

6
5
6

1,878,900 !
190,000 ! 5
402,768 5
399,300 6

3,066,071
275,000

6
6
6

Docks&SlipsS

500,000
154,000
102,000
895,570
490,000

Pub. Edu. S’k.,1

Tomp.M’ket Sj

Union Def. L.
Vol. B'nty L’n

5
6

6

Vol.Fam.AidL;

552.700 ; 5
739,222' 5

City Bds,old'

2,232,800 ' 6

7,898,717j 6
1,009,700 ; 6
1,800,000 5

Railroad Bonds.

Me.—City Bonds
‘

907,0001

Railroad Bonds,
Railroad Bonds.

1,500,000

I.—City Bonds...

600,000
500,000
300,000
200,000

Railroad B'ds

93

do
do

6

500,000

’
City Loan
Rochester, N. Y.—City Bonds...

85'

City Bonds...

150,000

Railroad

-

260,000
1.496.100 6
1881
do
98
99’
County B’ds
446,800 6
1886
St.
1,464,000 6
’65-’71
do
Real Estate
523,000 6
var.
do
92%
Sew’erage
425,000 6
var.
do
94
Improaement..
254,000 6
1871
do
98
100
Water
484,000 6
71 ’94
do
97
Harbor
’*239,000 6
’68’90 55“
do
Wharves
163,000 6
1868
do
85"
Pacific RR
457,000 : 6
var.
do
O. & M. RR
87% 87%
429,900 6
var.
do
Iron Mt. RR
285,000 6
var.
San Francisco, Cal—City Bonds,
1,352,600 10
’71 ’78
do
City Fire B
178,500 10
do
’83 ’93
City Bonds,
329,000 6
’85 ’93
do
70

Sacramento, Cal.—City Bonds...
.

’77 ’88

Apr. & Oct. Wes

dc-

'

C.&Co’tyB
C.&Co’tyB.
C.&Co’tyB.

C.^Cp’tyB.

....

.

!

Various.

:

1

var.

....

var.

....

July

June &Dec. 1894
Feb. & Aug ’70 ’85
Jan. & July'1873

1,133,500; 6

300,000 7

960,000 7
1.QQQ.00Q! 7

....

Apr. & Oct. ’65 ’&
July ’67 ’8'
Apr. & Oct. j’73
Jan. &

Jan. &

....

|

July;’70’8-

May & Nov.; 1870
do
•Feb. &

do

90"

Aug 1890
11890

do
do

95

....

July

do

....

95

1868
1898
1887
1898
1887

97

....

‘
'

....

Feb. & Aug
May & Nov. 1876
do
do
do
do
do
do
& July

....

\::::

Apr. & Oct. 1875
May & Nov.
Jan. &

...

....

1880

97"
97
97

....

'1873

....

;1883

11878

97

....

;1866
’67 ’7 3
1873 I

•

:...

*

*

*

95

’65’ 6 )*....
May & Nov. 1864
can.

1867

11865

....

3

9!
61
1
0
2
1
2

’83

85 "
....

97

....

....

«...

97

....

97

....

....

do
* j
do
3| 87%
do
9 90%
Jan. & July! var.

....

I 72’
Various. j’95’E 3; 95
Apr. & Oct. '1866
do

do

88

90%

1913

j’68’7 Oi

Mar.&Sept. 1885
Jan. & July 1876

do
1893
Various,
2
do
Jan. & July

97

94%

•

•

•

•

"!

!•::
bi

do

...

11884

....

3

Oj

’.!!
...

8: 85
7

3|

,

do
do

....

July ’

•

’67 ’68

93"

!’65’72

_

CityBds,new

do
do

96"

’65 ’80 I
Feb. & Ang 1882
Jan. & July 1876
June &Dec. 1S83
Various. ’60 ’81
do
| ’65 ’7c ;
Jan. & July ’77
93

2,500,000
1,400,000
2,000,000
949.700
4,996,000 6
1.442.100 6

Cit3TBds,new!

Providence, R.
82

93% 95’

Various.

do
do

Vol.Fam.AidLl 1,000,000

Portland,
90

Jan. &

.

6

Pittsburg, Pa.—City Bonds
do
do

....

July 1871

Various.

150,000 6

do
do

do

93

Apr. & Oct.! 1865

Jan. &

1,800,000 6
2,748,000 6

Pb.B.Sk. No. 3

•

86
85

1888
j 96% 100
Apr. & Oct. 1895 ! 89
90
Jan. & July
do
var.
11879
do
do
!1890
do
1871

8
7
6
7

600,000 6

CrotonW’r S.!
Fl.D’t. F’d. S.i

do
do

....

do

1,966,000 ; 6

Sol.B’ntyFd.B;
RiotDam.R.B;
Philadelphia, Pa.—City Bds,old
do

1865
!1866

....

109%

!’65’82|

125,000

2,083,200

Real Estate B.!

NewYorkC’nty.—C’t House S’k;
do
do
Sol.Sub.B.R.B
do
do
Sol.S.&Rf.R.B
do
do

var.

C.P.Imp.F. S.
C.P.Imp.F. SJ

do
do
do

100

Jan. & July-1876
’79 ’87! 95%
do

150,000 5

<

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

....

95%

Apr. & Oct. 11881

20,000
256,368 '
50,000
650,000
319,457 ;
400,000

911,500
219,000
100,000
425,000
60,000

New York City—Water Stock..
do
do
Water Stock.. j
do
do
CrotonW’r S'k
do
do
CrotonW’r S’k!
do
do
W’r S’k of ’49:
do
do
W’r S’k of ’54
do
'
do
Bu. S’k No. 3.;
do
do
Firelndem. S.
do
do
Central P’k S. i
do
do
Central P’k S.;
do
‘ do
Central P’k S,!
do

96

89%

j’65 ’79

do

Mass.—City Bds.
(New London, Ct.—City Bonds...
'Newport, R. I.—City Bonds
(New Haven, Ct.—City Bonds

do.

....

94

,’67 ’77 100
i’72’73

.

Jan. &

City Bonds

do

....

May &Nov.'l887

J.—City Bonds

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

101

100“

i’70 ’78
Jan. & July ’65 ’71
do
!’65 ’95
do
: 1869
do
! ’81 ’97

6
6
6
6
6

121,540
5,550,000
216,000
299,000
571,000
360,000
913,000;
1,030,000

,

Jan. & Dec.
Jan. & July
do
Jan. & July

4%
6

100
100

1890
’65 ’82
'65 ’74
’78 ’79
’65 ’85

5

City Bonds....

'New Bedford,

too

J.,A., J.&O. 1890-1 100%

6
6
6

do

(Milwaukee, Wis.—City, re-adj’d
Newark, N.
do

* I 87"

84

98%

6

Water Bonds..

do

var.

554,000
197,700
740,000
583,205
6,580,416
1,265,610
1,949,711
993,000
634,200

Maysville, Cal.—City Bonds

1877

Improvement Bonds 12,799,000' 6
2,871,000, 5

War Loan Bonds

do

1875

Feb. & Aug.
Various.
Jan. & July

Bonds

City Bonds.j
City Bonds
j

*

Dubuque, Io.—City Bonds
do

1873

...

Vermont—State Certificates
do

do
do

....

6,000,000

Sewerage Bonds. j,

!Detroit, Mich.—City

97%

90

6
6
6

j.

-Water Bonds—

....

1913
J.,A.,J.&0. 1870
do
1870
Jan. & July 1873
May & Nov 1875
Jan. & July 1886

.

1874

Various.

..

j,
Water Bonds—

do

11872

May & Nov.

j,
r

Water Bonds.. —'

do
do

Jan. & July var.
Jan. & July ’71 ’72
do
1870

1870
1875

Municipal Bonds

Cleveland, O—City Bonds

short

!

....

96

!l866

1865
1868

Water Loan...

\uea

1,500,000
3,500,000
1,000,009

1,281,000

Pub. Park L’n.

do

Aug. 1876

do
do
do
do
do
do

,

—

Stg.

Cincinnati, O.—Municipal

’67

Jan. & July 1860

City Bonds

Water Loan
Water Loan

Chicago, Ill.—City Bonds
do
City Bonds
do
Sewerage Bonds

plea,
plea.

var.

!

Debt

do

1870
1877
1879
1879

•1866
1868
1871
1874

Me.—City Debt
Railroad

Buffalo, N.Y.—Municipal Bonds

95 ‘

1865
94%
Jan. & July 1868
do
’73 ’78
do
,1878
do
1883
do
11866
Jan. & July 1867
do
!1883
74
Jan. & July!’71 ’89
do
1 ’71 ’87
do
I’71 ’85 74
75

y*

Park

—

116

Mar.&Sept.

|

B. & O. RR.. j

Brooklyn, N.Y.—City Bonds
do
Improve’t St’k
do

97%

’65’80

do

York&Cum.R.

B.&O.R.coup l |

do

’78 ’80 116
1872
’72 ’84 93

do
|1878
Jan. & July; 1895
6
6
6
6
6
6

do
do
do

97
97

Jan. & July ’71 ’78

Feb. &

do

97%

-J

1,212,000 ' 5
Korth Carolina—State Bonds
Loan
Foreign Loan
'.
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan
.•
do
Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan

97%
96%
96%
97%

Quarterly var.
Quarterly 1890
Quarterly 1870
Jun. &Dec.;’68 ’74
do

Water Loan...

mu.

’70 ’74
’65 ’69
’70 ’82
1879

July

do
do
do
Jan. & July
do

600,000
4,963,000 5
820,000 6

Boston, Mass.—City Bonds
91%
do
City Bonds

July ’80 ’89

900,000
192,585 ; 5

Ohio—Foreign
do

j

1877

Mar.&Sept. ’66

Jan. &

RR. Bds.

N.W.Virg.RR.

doj

100% Bangor,

9i%

19041

do
11877
Jan. & July;’76 ’78
Jan. & July! var.
do
’68 ’74
do
1871
dem.
’67 .69

850,000'
300,000

Miscellaneous,

do“

May & Nov .11881
;Jan. & July'1887

Various.

500,000

102
101

May & Nov. 1868
Jan. & July 1875

800,000

Canal Bonds.

"

100

Jan. & July! 1870
do
’70 ’77
do
1860
do
1862
do
1865

do
do
do
do

Comptroller’s Bonds
743,000
3,050,000
6,000,000
2,250,000

106%

1885

do
do
do
do
Jan. & July
do

do

do
do
do
do
do

105% 106

Jan. & July; 1880
do
|1872

3,192,763 6

900.000

Bounty Bonds

& July
do
do
Oct. & Apr.

4,800,000) 6
8,171,902;

500,000
800,000
909,607
442,961

do

6
Jan. & July 1895
7.30 Feb. & Aug. 1867
7.30 Jun. &Dec.!l868
7.30 Jan. & July 1868
6
j Maturity 1 year

Ja

Water Loan.,
Alb. Nor. RR...

Jan. &

5
6
6
6
6
4

225,000;

Baltimore, Md.—Improvement..

May & Nov.
1884-j
May & Nov. 1885

Mar.&Sept.

7
7
7
5
6
2,000,000! 6
516,000 6
8,942,000 6
6,398,000 ' 6
532,000 6

1,189,780
'

6

!

do
War Loan Bonds
Indiana—State Bonds
do
do
do
do
War Loan Bonds.
Iowa—State Certificates....
do
War Loan Bonds....
Kansas—State Bonds
Kentucky—State Bonds...

May & Nov.

$90,000

117%
96% 97% Alleghany City, Pa.—City Bds.
96
10G

7,022,000

‘

do
do

Due.

|

do

9,415,250 6
8,908,342 ' 6

[pa
Albany, N. 1.—City Scrip..:.;
do
City Scrip....

!

’do

146% 147%

MARKET.

pal

Payable.

'

^Se^nrttie.V ~
fi

Princi¬

Outs lauding

do
do
do
do

6
1 ’67 ’81 r
’71 ’73

I’72 ’74;
’74 ’77

May & Nov.'1871
Jan. & July;i866
do
do

do

1875
1888

I’77’78

April & Oct.; 1883
3 an. &

July'1884

...

•

•

•

.

....

...

...

•••

...

THE CHRONICLE.

656

[November 18,1865,.

leading articles, per all routes, since Jan. 1,1865, and for the same
period last year:

<&!)* Commercial ©imcB.

Same

COMMERCIAL

Friday

The markets

time
1864.

Since
Jan. 1.

EPITOME.
Night, Nov. 17.

Flour, bbls

Same

Since
Jan. 1.

630,940 239,725 Tar, bbls
2,987,515 3.618,425 Rice, cask
258,485 343,283 Ashes, eask

Cotton, bales

for

.

time
1864.

11,955

25,049

10,080

15,000
general merchandise presents no new features.
iiftri
Wheat, bush
0,952,42811,524,990 Tobacco—domes, pkg 163,675 248,883
feeling, there is less apprehension Corn,
speculative
*•
13,073,765 0,930,470
“
foreign, do. 22,000 23,840
kk
500,130 450.695 Tallow, pkgs
12,215
from the money market—a decline in gold, or other financial influ¬ Rye,
Bariev, «fcc., bush
125,960 ,25,290
2,383.845 1,837,870 Wool, dom., bales
157.070
52,450
7,429,020 9,9*7,290 Wool, for., bales
ences.
The season of activity in many of the* principal staples is Oats, bush.
95,073
Beef, tes and bbls
85,245
89,935 Hops, bales
24,859
48.730
213,080 277,765 Whisky, bbls
53,140 271,910
drawing to a close, while in one, particularly (Provisions), the sea¬ Pork, bbls
Bacon, etc., pkgs
1,890,600 2.0ftR«v(
96,890 247,570 Leather, sides
son of activity
Lard, pkgs
31,648 ^ fin’??
is jii3t begun.
!
93,085 199,775 Oil—sperm, bbls
^,za
75.533
«»»
565,225 456,540 kk whale, kk
70,607
Cotton has fluctuated materially, closing firm, with reduced re¬ Cheese, boxes, etc
Butter,1 firkins, etc..
581,725 409, f 85 “ petrol., kk
464,755 613,960
14,370 *k
kk
Jftrd,
5,175
Rosin, bbls
118.975
10,660
ceipts. Breadstuffs have been active, and Wheat and Corn have Crude Turp., bbls
7,563 Whalebone, lbs
28,257
585,500 651,900
7,408
Spirits turp, bbls
16,099
considerably advanced, with an active export demand.
Provisions have been dull and declining. A new feature, to-day,
The imports from foreign ports of a few leading articles for the
was an arrival of new Pork
upon the market. The prospect of week and since Jan. 1, 1805, and for the same time last year, have
Pork packing at the West indicate a fuller supply than can be suc¬ been as follows:
For
Same
For
cessfully marketed at current prices. The decline in Pork, to day,
Same
the
Since
time j
Snico
the
time
was
nearly a dollar a barrel. And the sales of Bacon for future
week, Jan.l.
week. Jan. 1.
1S04J
1864
Coal..
tons 4,120 291,741 213.713'Sugar.
.boxes
delivery indicate a decline of one cent per pound from the price of Cotton. bales 310 42,751 04,8O4‘ and bags
13,238 361,849 236,517
Coffee
a week
bags 11,902 578,512 679,9S9|Teas
pkgs 33.998 488,748 584,20;)
ago. The supplies of liog products now reaching the city
Molasses, .hhds
959 130,129 110,160: Wool
bales 1,313 53,847 110,311
are quite small, but
apprehensions of the effect of fuller supplies Sugar... .hhds,
bbls & tes :.. 1,967 255.403 195,071!
cause buyers to
operate with the greatest caution. The latest Eng¬
The exports from this port of some of the leading articles of
lish advices indicate increased supplies from Ireland, and a
sharp
reaction from the extreme prices that had been reached. The plen. domestic produce have been as follows :
Same
Same
tifulness, and comparative cheapness of Breadstuffs, will prevent
Past
Since
Past
Since
time
time
week.
Jan. 1.
1S64.
week.
Jan. 1.
cured meats going higher.
1864.
Crude Turp.'
4,751
25,005
Cotton, bales 13,875 148,925
575
Beef, Butter and Cheese close dull and heavy. Tallow has con¬ Flour bbls 31,196 1,171,963 1,867.366 Spirits Tur76
879
Corn meal...
3.310
pent'e.bbls
413
96,596
106,006
tinued active for export.
Wheat. bush 76,988 1,822,57011,119,594 Tar
5,898
1,423
Corn meal, bbls

While there is little

—

...

...

.

...

...

....
.

..

..

..

....

.

.

Corn

Groceries have been very

dull and depressed all the week. A
pretty general decline has been established in coffees, teas, sugars,
molasses, &c not very large, however. But to-day there was more
business in coffee ; two cargoes of Rio sold, and the market closed

Rye

more

Tobacco,
75,563

133,406 314,486
3.7:10
145,299 136,121
3S,174 3,381,671 4.585,800

1.660

105,738

117.809 Oil—

160
833,094
175,515 1.204,727
gallons
111
13,803 '440,937
490,780 Oil—Whale..
431,663 Oil—Petro’m
galls..
124,673
579,93611,158,98518,885,060
243
Oil—Laid...
31,301 429,751
Seed—Clover
7,450
11,875
bags
21,794
12,061
>,695 Staves.... M
14,385
413,S46 Oil Cake, 100
lbs
569,599 626,979
18,432
192,336 452,784
1,405 Whaleb’e.lbs

2.541

294.488

Lard
Cheese......
Butter

1,856
282

199,529
358,819
78,093

25

8,417

6,010

Ashes—Pots,

of the Chilie

jjgs.

40

2,204

“?82,4G3

Bacon,100 lbs

ports by the Spanish fleet, has led to
great activity in copper; about two million pounds have been sold
during the week, for present, and December and January delivery,
and the closing prices show an advance of four cents per lb. Tin
and lead are unchanged. Spelter and zinc have advanced. Iron has
been

Rice
tcs
Tallow lOOlbs

1,340

bbls
Pork.... bbls

with better tone.

blockade

155,496

Beef, tcs. &

,

The

W742,25S

242,473 3,154,449
:..

casks
Ashes-Pearls
paflVa

t

Beesw’ax..ibs
Hops...bales

16
1,991

Rosin., bbls

7‘Ai

197,289

—

12,119
40.297

active.

Sperm,

EXPORT*

Naval stores have becu

quiet. Fish and fruits have been taken (EXCLUSIVE OF specie) FROM THE POUT OF NEW YORK TO FOREIGN
PORTS FOR THE VVEEK ENDING NOV. 14, l 865.
freely by the trade, and close firm. Hides and leather have been
Quan. Value
Quan. Value.
very actiT0, but without improvement to quote prices.
Oats have
Quan. Value.
825
Rosin, bbls
2,830 Mfd wood, pkgs60
DANISH WEST INDIES.
.373
been more active, and are quite firm ; yet the business has not been
545 Tobacco, cs... 325 16,464 Cotton, hales ..80 50,985
Fancy goods, cs .3
1,132 Tallow, lbs.25,000 3,500
304 Ashes, bbls ..25
large. Wool quiet and unchanged. Hops steady. Gunny cloth Lard, lbs ...1,250
Rosin, bbls ...331 3,320
Butter, lbs .2,049
791
and bags have active and higher, partly on speculation.
$59,204 Flour, bbls... .500 4,300
120
Vanilla Cheese, lbs... .462
ROTTERDAM.
238
2
$45,081
hemp is rather weak. Other East India goods quiet. Whisky Clothing.es
Oars, No
75
120 Petroleum,
GRANGEMOUTH.
89,112 55.001
gals
Hams, lbs...6.043
790
(highwines) quite unsettled. Petroleum has been higher, closing Tinware, cs
Petm. gls .102,292 36,900
LIVERPOOL.
5
102
..

..

.

du

Freights have been active. The shipment have been steady, with
large quantities of wheat and corn, and some flour to Great Britain,
On Tuesday extreme rates were paid, but yesterday and to-day a
large business has been done at lower rates, with a downward tend¬
ency, especially for room for grain.
The receipts of domestic produce for the week, and since July
1?
have been

as

follows

This
week.
119

Ashes, pkgs
.

.....
.

...

111,368
466,974

Rye
Malt

2,996

Barley

.

Grass seed.
Flaxseed
Beans
Peas
Corn meal, bbls..
Corn meal, bags.
B. W.Flour, bags

114,930
984
920
972

...

Cotton, bales

Copper, plates

Copper, bbls
Dned fruit, pkgs...
Qrease, pkgs

Hemp, bales
Hides, No
Hops, bales

Leather, sides
Lead, pigs

2,454
1,717
1,202
1.444

16,174
169
384
50
269

8.444
915

46,370

Molasses, hhds....

5,145

f

1.596,542!
5,615,732!

Crude turp

bbls..
Spirits turpentine

give below

as a

”99
735

Rosin
Tar

*> 4

6,715

277,889; Oil, Petroleum

...

291,719
8,108

15,917
18,304

631

Eggs

164,260 Sugar, hhds & bbls
7,242 Tallow’, pkgs
! 738,‘ 97 Tobacco ..
14,657 Tobacco, hhds
4,431 Whisky, bbls

993

183

1,861,287 Peanuts, bags.....
12,359 Provisions—
56,863
Butter, pkgs
34,358 Cheese
82,174
Cut meats
34,263 Pork..
4,033 Beef, pkgs
430,461
Lard, pkgs
2,472 Lard, kegs
6,S61 Rice, pkgs
2,271 Starch
2,272 Stearine
2,622jSpelter, slabs

360

62,366

20.121

....

.

1.329
20

pkgs

56,161

Since

July 1.
23,598
10,950
84,514

28

Wool, bales

Naval Stores—




This
week.

July.

Pitch
197,181 5,258,481
391,510 ll,664,636;Oil cake,
60,604
576.481| Oil lard-.

Oats
Corn

We

THE WEEK, AND SINCE JULY 1.

Since

Breadstuffs—

Flour, bbls
Wheat, bash

..

;

RECEIPTS OF DOMESTIC PRODUCE FOR

3,323
323

1.834
188
—

130
1,100
385
s

..

.

840

28

7,141
1,353
932
2,010

375,554
464,608
6,820
37,195
59,134
11,863
10,506
819

4,127
41.146

5,883
2,724

8,430
2,844
74,592
57,122
23,246
84,955

comparative statement the receipts of a few

8,408 Cotton,
bales ...12,408 3,093,479
869
Drugs, pkg* ... 12
419 Corn,bush.147,833 132,071
.6
Furniture, cs
265 Wheat,bnsh69,903 119,370
Potatoes, bbls .51
162 Tallow, lbs226.389 32,278
Photo matl, cs. A
100 Bacon, lbs.165,028 32,080
Trunks, pkgs..60
200 Cheese, lbs578,395 92,323
1
20
100 Carriage
800
Nails, cks
427
93
Shoes, cs
3
200 Hams, lbs
150
Hoop skirts, cs..4
650 Machinery, cs... i
Corn meal, bbl325
2
440
1,700 Books, cs
Hoops
35,000 1,412 Tobacco,hhds.372 97,973
Peas, bgs
149
734 Oil cake, lb625,051 15,725
Miscellaneous....
1,463 Timothy seed,
bags
240 2,000
50
300
$19,772 Clay, bbls
HAMBURG.
Rags, bales ... .IS
1,100
Cond milk, cs.. 50
712
Petrol, gls..48,392 29,035
.200
5,500
Sugars, cs
34 15,892 Pork, bbls
Sew’ mach, cs .108
100
5.3S6
Preserves, cs.. .10
3,062
Tobacco, cs... 109
0,509 Stearine. Ibsl7,187
S00 Sperm oil. cks .. I
485
Skins, cks
1
150 Mahogany, lgs 196
3,500
Muskets, cs
3
630 Beef, tcs...:..391 10,030
Mfd wood, pkg. 11
290 Segars, cs*
1
360
Hardware, cs... .9
211
1,125
400 Hicles
Clocks, cs
5
8,000
Ext logw*’d, bxGOO
7,121 Cochineal. cer..52
Ess oils, cs.. ..50
4,767 Apples, bbls.. .30
336
Sew’ mach, cs.401 10,052 Clothing, cs
2 1,839
97 Furs, bales
3
1,157
Machinery, bx... 1
!.15
422
8,822 Clocks
Rosin, bbls—801
I R goods
1
1,000
6,310
Whaleb'c, lbs3,078
953
Cotton, bales..785 193,029 Miscellaneous*...
Tobacco, bales381 10.491
610
$3,664,049
Apples, bbls .. .66
LONDON
400
Pimento, bgs ..72
500 Naptha, gls.48,951 17,083
Books, cs
5
1,030 Potm, galls.56,129 35,600
Dry goods, cs.. .1
Tob'cco, hhdl,009 290,019
$297,035 Ess oils, cs
50 5,316
2,305
Rosin, bbls.. 296
BREMEN.
2,624
Tobacco, hhds 212 26,270 Oil cake, lbs99,952
Segars, cs... — 3
400 Flour, bbls.. 1,825 8,667
Flour, bbls....900
Pork, bbls
25

*

...

'

QUEENSTOWN.

Com, bush.29,374 26,350
CORK.

Corn, bush. 18,258 16,289
GIBRALTAR.

....55,404 34,036
BRITISH N. A.

Beef, bbls
220
Peas, bbls
300
Onions, bbls... 28
Com meal, bbl771

hhd77
Tobacco, bale8316
Shoe pegs, bbll89
Staves
7,200
Fustic, tons....27

4,519
4,987

690 Shoe

pr

pegs,

A

QnflW

1,846
1,664
74
4,087

.100 3,220
750 225
2
72
Apples, bbls....6
»
Petm, gls .6,651 4,ta>
Pork, bbls
Lard, lbs
Rice, bbls

...

..

Mfd tob,lbs.ll,943
Mfd iron, pkgs..3

Glassware, cs...2
Tobacco, hhds..5
L eather, sides.. 20

Pitch, bbls
8
Varnish, bbls...3

bbls...50
25
apples

Cement,
D‘d

Miscellaneous....

3,400
206
»»

l,w»
-1*
«

ISO
100
a*
83

$161,439
BRITISH

WEST INIUM.

Live stock,

hd.159 1W»

bales—550 .1-*"
CoiWal,bbl2,089 lMg
Cora, bush..4,532 5,0b
Bran, bgs
®3 3,547
w»
Hay,

Hardware, cs ..<»
Furniture, cs ..w

Drugs
I]**
Machinery, cs. .40

Flour, bbls..5,912
Peas, bgs....LOw

Beef, tcs
AJJ
Beef, bbls.....-!}

$361,614 Hams, lbs.. 11,0^
Guano, bgs..
Shoes, cs
1,200 Corn, bush.28.688 12,501 Pcrfum’ry,......g
bx8l5Q

712

65^
3,939
4,967

482

*248

103

_

bblsSC

150

.=•

1,800

Cora, bush. .2,000

,

Too stems,

COLONIES.

Flour, bbls 15,952 137,446

41

1

November 18, I860.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Quau Value.

Quan. Value.

,

Potatoes, bbll,165

3,418
1,467
21,423
6,332

bxs.6,llS
Lard, bxs .73,723
Butter, bxs. 14,949
645
Lumber, ft. 15,711
860
70
Ale, bbls
Pork, bbls ...599 23,514

Cheese,

.

7.975

Shooks

5,316

Cheese, lbs..1,400
Hoops
8.000
Bread, pkgs
90

Petroleum,
galls

200
2,000

1,000

Ilog skins,bbls.10
Carriages, pcs .5

1,200
1,390

.2

150

Itosin. bbls

41o

Mahogany,
logs...'

Staves

Furniture,

Kerosene,gls2,925

2,281
2,020

Bread, pkgs... 797

4,274

Books,

Caudles, bxs..629

Shooks
1.291
Mfd copper, pkgs2
Pkd C lish. bbl232

; .l
Miscellaneous....

1

15
Hominy, bbls.. 19
Chocolate, bxs.12
Rice, bgs
50
Beans, bbls

o33
Mfd tob, lbs.5,681
Oats, bush

Starch, bxs....37

$214,714

150

galls

125
75

Lard, lbs....5,252 1 1,333
Hams, lbs.. 10,643
1,541
Vinegar, bbls..50
550
Cheese, lbs..3,000
650
Potatoes, bbls.200
550

Beef, bbls

Paper

Ilams, lbs.. 15,292

3.505

11

3.856

Shoes,

cs.

Cond'd milk,
bxs

.

5

200
1,645

Furniture, cs. .19
Turpentine,
50
kegs
Apples,bbls. 1,128
Eggs, bbls
30
Cabbages,

430
6.468
918

.

Potatoes,

..

1,235
230

_

bbls

2,232

Silver plt’d ware.

192

Cabbages,

galls

:

crate's,

96

§10,433

Soap, bxs
600
Woodenware-,

14
.

1,850
1,340
1,227

Lamps, pkgs.. .49

Mf iron, pkgs. .20
Manuf d wood,

38,$13
15,910
2,819
641

9.552
18.014

Rice, bags

;

5U

Dried fish,bxs.300
Tobacco, bals.. 05

Bricks

165

1,942
2,671
1,379
442

5,000
..

.1

110

158
114

64
127

642
73
60
150
369

Perfumery,pkg.10
Mid Iron,

60
1.136

pkg.. 24

Miscellaneous

363

Drugs, pkgs .351

Paintings, cs..21S

Mfd tobacco,
lbs
3,261

..40

250
560

galls
Domestics,
Books, cs
Stationery,

8

107

4,400
29

Pkgs

630'

Pres d meats,
cs

26

2.719

435

Bran, bgs
200
Beef, bbls ....100

.S
cs. .10

1,428

Sew mach, cs.,18

1,172

974

148

Furniture, cs.. 545 9,030
Nails, kegs...944 5,884
Rosin, bbls.. .124 1,316
Carriages, pcs. 273 28,633
Lumber, ft..3,823 6,400 Confection’v, cs.3
Shooks,bdls.. .79
700 Matting, rolls.. .6
Cutlery,bxs.... 55
870 Gas fixt, cs
2
Lath*
SO,000
340 Earthenware, cs. 1
Miscellaneous....
175 Printing material,
*

HAVRE.

Sew mach, cs. 161

..5
4
cs..3

Portraits

Silverware,

Plated ware, C8..1

Books, cs
Segars, cs

9
2
Horses
4
Feathers, cs ....5
Hardware, cs ..60
Stationery, cs. ..1

Preserves,

Coffee bgs

cs ..12
..

.400

Potashes, bbls.75




Preserves,

240
920

Matches, cs
11
Spirits Turp, cs.8
IR goods, cs
.3

cs

.166

215
336

Trunks,

192

Woodw’e, pkgs32

..

pkgs..30

2.155
757
577
275

1.800

Potatoes, bbls. 100

1,868

Hav, bales....535
Billiard Tables,

$138,396

1,745
178

bbls

..

.100

950

50
21

263
224
50

Beef, bbls
4,000 Tongues, bbl
1
3,638 Lard, lbs ....5,000
1,589 Corn meal,
...

270
260

6,591
3,078

bxs

4

Combs,

.1

cs

Soap, bxs
125
Hops, bales... .16
Apples, bbls.. .20
Candles, bxs.. .35

307
Butter, lbs
Lard, lbs... .5,686
250 Cheese, lbs
.477
990 Nails, kgs .... 102
150 Oil cloth, cs
4
6.0 Tin, ingots
5

1,350

10
pkgs
Pork, bbls
80
Onions, bbls.. .50

Potatoes,bbls.200

Cora, bush....698
Oats, bush... .999

Perfumery, bxs.6

PORTO RICO.

Flour, bbls
Cora meal,

—

..

-

..

104
511
255
424
148

Peper, bgs. ...10
Shooks, pkgs.. .26
Brandy, pkgs .490

...

5,000
2.125
600

186
493
916
270

Vinegar, bbls..28

16,704
900

90

575
604
180
663

....116

441

11,302

Apples, bbls..

3,227

450

105
pkgs
Stone, tons.. 5300

Cotton, bales.602 146,548 Miscellaneous

101
7T0

Linseed oil,

Feed, sacks.. .901

$255,562

142
376
386

cs

Mfd

Lumber, pcs.. 70-1
Hams, lbs .2,564

Oars.

210

1,087
6S4
133
454

1,300
1,874
160
5:35
139

1,567

170
666

1.880

pkgs.2

211
3,800
2,237

Coal, tons
178
Agl implts. pkg59
Beef, bbls
5
Tongues, bbls ..5
Dried apples,
...

1,525
610

192

bbls
Paint,

118

400
895

$84,640
l'ERU.

Sand paper, cs..6
Wax, lbs....5,235
Furniture, cs.109

376
2,732
2,588
1,610
2,800

Lard, lbs... .7,S00
Hardware
Drugs, cs
Petroleum,

79

386
17,000

2,592
12,631

Trunks, pkgs. .80

12,960
50
777

3

200

2
pkgs. .2
Cheese, lbs .132
Harness, bxs
.2
Machinery, cs.. 92

125
35

Matting,

2

cs

Iron safes

Wine, pkgs

Mfd iron,

39
88

..

..

Grindstones
Carts
Pianos

Agl. implts,
pkgs

5,024

2
4
2

....

130
593

1,028

13

gins, cs.16

854
650
578

Oakum, bales.300
Lumber,ft. 106.837
Beef, bbls
320
Spirits Turp...50

2,180
1,500
3,157
4,735
1,250

Carriage

./..l

Flag stones .1,900
...

W oodware.

pkgs

787

3,840

Clocks, bxs
2
275 Oars, No.... 1,247
110 Oysters, cs
4
180 Leath belting, csl
420 Paint, pkgs
8

Drugs, es
10
Furniture, cs.,64

170

4

198
700
210

Blacking, cs ... 20
Sew mach. cs.. .2

3.054

Paint, pkgs

144
425

375

Mfd wood,

50

pkgs

Cotton

200

tes

152
150

Miscellaneous....
Tin, pigs
3

1,093

Pepper, bags... 17
Paper, rms ..1,000
Mfd Tobacco,

823

.

Cheese, lbs ...606
Iron safes
1
Bricks
10.060
Pork, bbls
50
Car pedestals. 123

105

Prtg mat, cs 100
Sugar mill
1
Perfumery, cs.145
Whiskey, bbls .30
1
Books, cs

50

1,864
82

356
288
625

..

248

2,241
425
25

131

...10

11

Grand total.

410

$71,314
.$6,415,566

118

pkgs

IMPORTS

(OTHER

AND'SPECIE)

TUAN DRV GOODS

WEEK

ENDING

AT TIIE FORT OF NEW YORK FOR THE

10tH, 1S65.

NOV.

[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.]
Quan. Vain.;
Quan. Value.
Quan. Value.
China. Glass, A.E’ware—
Nuts
14,931] Other
4,774
30
Bottles

China
296
Earth' nvv’e. 1,709

Glass..., ..1,298
Glassware

Glass plate

Drugs, Ac

..

.221

.25

..

1,353
16,361

4.781!

14
..

.31

Musical

!

1,840!

Optical

Chalk.............
Chickory

108

Cochineal..... 39
Cudbear
Cutch
Gambler

21
148
..

.2,50.2

Gums, crude.558
arabic.459
copniv..l3
copul.. 139

jAuligo

62
Iodine, pot... 16

Ippecacuhana...
Jallap—
Lac Dye...... 6S

„

Lie paste . .1,024
Madder
165
Nut galls
57
Oils
181
do Ess
.18
do linseed ..13
do olive....728
do Palm. ...42

Opium

31

Paints

Potash, hyd.. .19
do
do

prussl96
mur..25

Phosphorous..80
Quinine, sulph62

Rhubarb
Shellac

28
32

Sulphur Flour.

13

51,983
7,030

Hides, dres'd .411 158,626
Hides,undressed 97,043

Horns
1,015
1,131
2,771 Liquors, Wines, Ac.—
2,009' Ale
6S1
5,836
6,837 r Brandy
156
2,154
1,234; Beer
.^150 1,226
T.79
1,8541 Gin
2,695
,275
28,512; Porter
2,317;

Whisky

....212

Wines

24,644;

.2683

982; Champ,has .3238
2,947 Metals, Ac.—
Brass goods.. 10
7,351
Bronzes
2
3,731
Chai’s & anehl34

1111

Copper
Cutlery

1,035
2,591
28,20S
20,424

Guns
45
Hardware
143
Iron hoop,tonsoO

5,226

Iron, pig,

22.382

972)

.

5,530
127,
36,553
4,424!
19,947;

2,779;1
31,004
2,031

Steel
-

2

4669:

22
3

3,676

19,033

Spelter,
lbs.... .164,040

1,628 Silver

8.303

1,123!

905

Caps.
Saddlery

450

2

ware

773

.76.
Sponges
Sulph. Zinc.. .36
Vermilla !... .B0

4.112

Spices—

1,210!

Cassia

3.886

Ginger

Felting...:. ..57
Furs

120
828
368

120

Lemons

218

101,099.

Fruits, &c.
Dried fruit.. A..

Figs...

2,081'

8,708'

4,445!
2,745
211;

Nutmeg
Pepper

.Stationery, &c
12,SIS
5,152

.

Mace
Mustard

2.746

585

Cigars
Coal, tons...4120
Corks

5,874;

18,979;
—

Books .:

91

Engravings
Paper

6
94

11,29?
2

Cotton,bales.310
Clocks

16

30.917
3,470
2,158

Cocoa, bags.. 105
Coffee,
bags
11902 228,087
Fancy goods.... 150,476
Other
11,989
Feathers
10
4,745

Fire Crack
Flax
Fish

703
571

4

30,047
1,427

Furniture
Grain

635
397
525

Grindstones...
Gunnv Cloth .16
Hair
98
Haircloth
10

Hemp
Hops

691
308
India rubber.820
Ivory
11
Molasses

...

959

paintings.. 12
Perfumery,
.46
..

Pipes
Rags

17,968

4,996
13,700 s

10,332
87,738
4,727
2,597
29,454
8,249
5,122

13,829
17

Rice

Rope

200

Salt

Statuary
7.312
019j

Tin, bxs.. .30.022 175,282
Tin, slabs,
7532-504,458 103,303

1,369;
15,432

Furs, &c.—

6,468
29,993

Oil

Per

1,038

12,635

Cheese.......77

Clay

9,02010,372

9

4,312
6,50C
1,398
467

Lead, pigs. .1685
.48
.

6,60p

36,69C
1,58C

Machinery.... 29

I

262

5,345
1,290

146

53,824'

Sal
236
Ash....604-

Other

Bricks
Boxes
Buttons
Burr stones

1313

Metal goods
Needles
Old metal
Platina

4 00 i

3,954,

i

1.395
336

Bags

37,044

tons

6,896!

2,731;

2106

1,026
50,664!
34,727!

2,610
5,771

Logwood, M

Iron, R. R.
bars.... 5,157..
Iron, other,

1.982

Sago flour
Soda, Bic*b.. .700

tons

Iron, sheet,tns3S

1,686
13,568
2,730
10,867’
16,844
1,805
2,787:
3,077

,

2
84

.

Cork

tbs
470
Rattan
Willow
3,21c Other
Miscellaneous—
101
67,479 Baskets

..37 83,398
3,320,Leather, Hides, Ac.—
889i Bristles
39 16,251
4,12s! Boots A shots.3
374

15,720;

Camphor wood

596
13.566

Watches

1.’779!

5.070;

Caustic.176.

11

Jewelry, Ac.—
1,351; Jewelry

Salt Petre

do
do
do

7S
...

962

,

..

Argols

1,203 Woods—

3,968

10,296 Instruments
2,926! Mathemet ieal.. 1

—

Ammonia sal.
Arrow Root
23

Oranges

Plums
Raisins
Sauces & Prunes

44,6911

>

Acids

da
do

Blacking, bxs..12

125

108

2,327
8,369
1,472

1,500

260

11,759

..36

101

1

cs

1,100
630
103

Beef, bbls..
FireWorks

[ :do

Hams, lba.. .9,000

gals

308

gins,

Rosin, bbls
50
Candles, bxs... 20
Combs, cs
1

2.172
846

15

1,242
207

Horn combs, cs.6
Tortoise shell,

Petroleum.

Machinery, cs.,83

1,SC0

690

....

1,810

1

25

400
Soap, bxs
Tea, pkgs
15
Chimneys,bbls 19
Tinware, cs... 13

6,617
156
120
260

gals
2,949
Iloop skirts, cs .4
Tobacco, cs.... 20

2.017

Cotton
bxs.

1.050
189
173

Coal tar, bbls..20
Pistols, cs
1

.10
900

Shooks'
Lumber, ft.66,000

581
591

1,800

Miscellaneous...

gals

cs.. .74

Cutlerv.es...

1,298

Alcohol, bbls .256
I It goods, cs.. .5

3,722

291
868

2,054
138

244

,

93S

Perfumery, bxsOO

7,309;

773

*

Cement, bbls.367
Bacon, lbs. 15,280
Fancy goods, cs.2
Dry goods, cs... 2
Exps pkge, cs ..1
Hats, cs
2
Crockery, cs
2

Hardware,

5,749
859
1,726
28*8
1,481

5,648;

3,642
8,421

cs

.

155

2,110

..

Cream tartar..13

.

Shoe pegs,bbls.44

gals
7.611
Ilams, lbs.. .1,2*80

462

100

Woodware,

Kerosene.

180

Camphor.. ....372

21,663

Drugs,pkgs ..457 10,925 Shooks & II. .350
1.300 Lamps, pkgs... .6
Petroleum,
15.000
900 Hardware, cs .64
Hoops
galls .....78,850 58 983 Cordage, pkgs.. 23
3,347 Mfd iron,pkgs.127
Sew mach, cs. .50
2,025 Paint, pkgs....75
1,817 Carnages, pcs. 87
Prep’d flour,
Straw goods, cs. 5 r
3
590 Pianos
bxs
750
3.900 Sew mach, cs.. .8
1,018 Glassware, cs.. .6
Lumber,ft. 482,249 19,290 Gun packing,
Cocoa, bags... .20
Tacks, cs
78
bale
1,633
T....1
269 Saddlery, cs
8
Ag’l implts,
Nails, kegs
6S4 Lumber, ft..9,100
85
pkgs
207 10.539 Hams, lbs: 18,432
4,516 Hoop skirts, cs 3
Brandy, pkgs.. .2
265 Nails, pkgs
S
600 Umbrellas, cs.. .1
Pumps
41
3,009 Oats, bags....200
431 Tallow, lbs..3,899
Pick’d fish,

4.983

1,035

11.260

.

Petroleum,

6

677

4.155
13,812

Machinery, cs..85
Flour, bbls.. 1,715

Spirits turpentine,

.40

Matches

Aniline colors...
Annntto
Bark Peruvian 61
Blea Powder.476

$54,413
MEXICO.

935

47.200
4.214

1,420
6,955

Quan. Value.
cs

Oil cloth, cs ...18

Flour, bbls..4.111
Lard, lbs.. .13.962
Bread, pkgs...3:32

6.•'185

225

329

Beans, bbls.... 15

...

$92,143
BRAZIL.

101

904
91
410

Shingles .35,(XX)
5
Vats, cs
Sugar, bxs
10
Tomb stone

1.650

672
4.333
7,477

Codfish, qtls..511
Soap, bxs...4,400

392

Ag'l implts,1
pkgs

4.7S1

150

1.751

1,153

pkgs

Flour, bbls... .958
Pork, bbls,...546

3,850
50

Butter, lbs

Rice, bags

1,079 12,978

W oodenware,

20,264

HAYTI.

bbls

•

„

5,6*.6

..

Cordials,

Petroleum,
galls
39.334

629
228
175

bbls
Carts

pkgs

GENOA.

136

Perfumery, bx's.10
iron, pkgs.43

VENICE.

Tobacco,hhds.241 123,4S6

pkgs
.86
Cutlery, cs
..1
Bread ,* pkgs..... 5
...

Manf tobacco.
lbs
..37,385

$21,812

11,111

l

Miscellaneous....

Hardware,cs..802

Miscellaneous....

Pepper, bgs
5
I It goods, cs.. ..4
200 Drugs, cs
10
Blacking, bbls..2
150 Candles, bxs.. .30
3.789 Matches, cs... .7
2.777 Furniture, cs ..21

.11,990

Blocks, pkgs.... 3
Hardware, cs.,14

293 12.394

5

Shoes, cs.......1

....

cs

140

1

Paper, rrn s.. 7,000
Brandy, pkgs .25
Pork, bbls...; 50
Cheese, lbs.. 6,410

pkgs

cs.l

130

Onions, bbls..812

Glassware,

pkgs.. 12

Lard, lbs....8,5S7
Butter, lbs..2,950
425 Hams, lbs...1,606
7,421 Cheese, lbs ...390
12,445 Lumber,ft. .12,000

beads
1,000
Beans,bbls
.40
Corn, bush. 10,610
Lard, lbs...47,593
Hoop skirts,cs. 19
Photo, pkgs
3

Books, cs
Coal oil.

BUITISn AUSTRALIA.

*1

Pkl'd codfish.

178
267
215
473

Coal oil, galls.406

cs..

Iloop skirts,
Lamps, pkgs

1.227

11,371

Manufact’d iron,

pkgs
4
Perfumery,bxs. 50

122

425
217

Hay,bales ....100

Hardware,
Trunks,

3,022
2.281
1,805
1,19S
2,284

731

1,829
25

.

$123,795

600

500

Tobacco, pkgs.60
Furniture, cs .4*8
Hams, lbs.. .1,170

2.817

3,51S

Mfd tobacco,

503
215
2.455
1.950
999
328
102
122
1.30
130
975
639

Tobacco,hhds.804 123,615
Tobacco, cs
2
ISO

CUBA.

GUIANA.

560
600

330
790

Machinery.

3,902

.

4,800

44
Spars
Lumber, ft.73,617

298

..

Lumber, ft. 10,000
Corn meal,bbls.25
Oil cake, bbls. .20

$67,337

13,204

$16,508

137
100

500
120
375
60

62.731
3,910

.203

.

75
fish, bbls... 15
2,713 Tongues, kitts. .5
6,842 Wicks, bbls.... 5
5.890 Pickets, bdl s. .40
500 Cotton gius
1
150

Hardware, cs ..83
Flour, bbls .123
Lard, bbls.. 22,225
Lumber, ft. 19,534
Trunks, pkgs. .20
Sugar, bbls
.112
Butter, lbs..4.402
Steel, cs
3
Combs, cs
1
Fancy goods, cs .6
Lard oil, gals..243
Bread, pkgs.. .104
Furniture, ,cs 20
Tobacco, bales.24
Candles, bxs .30.
447
Soap, bxs

448
544
129
160
100
IOO
182

Pd

2.J50~

..

$15,020

12A70

pkgs....
18
Drugs, pkgs... 102
21)3 Pumps
....9
0,300 Carriages
3
200 Hay, bales
706
107 Hardware, cs
50

Corn, bush... .500
Bran, bgs ... ..150
Peas, bgs.... 100
Beaus, bgs
30

Drugs, pkgs

47

170 Irons,

Rice, bgs

6,000

Express Ppgs... 1

12,024

NAPLES.

$210,581

lbs

500

Guano, tons

696

2.520

4,131
10VJ00
Miscellaneous....

150

Pres’d meats,cs35
Cement, bbls.. .50
Miscellaneous....

Shooks

galls
200
Wheat, bush. 7,085
Miscellaneous...

pkgs
10
Vegetables,bxs.55

■

shoes.63
Photo. Mat
4
Books, cs
16
Sew macli. cs..24

1,308

Coal oil,gals. 1,500

Staves

500
262
305

Oysters,pkg. 1,700
Wood ware, pkgl2
Crockery, pkg.. .1

5,000

205

GRANADA.

Clothing, cs—19
Boots &

541

Staves

Petroleum,

280
520
63$
950
5.870

Shingles... .40,000
Rope, coils
5
Wine, pkgs.... 20
Carriages
3
Tobacco, lilids.21
Oil meal, lbs.5,000
Matches, cs... .50
Stationery, cs. .2
Beans, bbls ... .50
Onions, bbls.. 100

NEW

Dry Goods, Is.28

Quau. Value.

Nails,

2,372

$109,656

CANARY ISLANDS.

125
BORDEAUX.
225 Pearl ashes.
1.061
bbls
16
210 Tobacco, hhds. 388
121 Staves
27.600
161
156'
423
CADIZ.
389 Sew’g mch, cs..3
1.250 China ware, cs. 16

Codfish, qtl.... 29

Staves

.

66

Petroleum,

1.849
416
621

UK)

459

BRITISH

250
213

S3

Essbi!s,-cs

350
4(H)
140

orORTu.

9,732

Maple wood.
logs

Quan. Value.

Miscellaneou ?....

*8,723

125

Belting, bale...:1
Soap, bxs

cs... 3
2

cs

Whiskey, bbls..5

350
2.450
2o

136

Jew’lry'ashes.. 54

2,743

Rice, bbls
11
Trunks, pkgs...2
Tobacco, cs ... .1
Syrups, bxs —24

cs...

Machinery,

100
125

Apples, bbls...22
Dfcl fruit, pkgs.. 5

Quan. Value
1,000
3,000

Copper,cks.. ..14

Mahogany, lgs.75

.

657

Seeds
Linseed

530
6.397
4,600
8,279
5,219
2,539

1,207

5,765

16
Soap
1,17S
Sugar, hhds, tes *
and bbls..1,90T
101,584
Sugar, boxes and
bags ...13,238 103,482
Tapioca
2,383
.

Tea

33,998 444,753
210
9,758
Tobacco.. ..1406 43,748
Waste
797 25,392
Wool, bis .1313 142,783
Other
3,282

Toys

..

15.535!

1,084!

S,689!Total

$3,402,851

*

s

THE CHRONICLE.

6t>8

London.—We have, by the Persia, Baring’s Circular of Friday
3d November, and quote :
Our Colonial and Foreign Produce Markets have been very quiet this
week, and with a moderate amount of business, prices generally are

[November 18,1865.

from
from

84s@39s, 406 hhds, 96 tierces, 64 barrels crystalised Demerara
38s@45s 6d, 15 hhds, 8 tierces, 8 barrels Grenada at 83s, 58 hhds,54 tierces, 188 barrels Tobago from 31s 6d@34s, and 27 hhds, 16 tierces,
91 barrels Jamaica from 36s 6d@38s.
2700 bags Mauritius 6old at
29s@33s 6d for brown, 35s 6d@38s 6d for semi-crystalised, and 40s@

barely sustained. Sugar and Cotton quiet. Coffee firm. Breadstuffs 41s 6d for
yellow crystalised.
850 bags Gurpattah date Bengal were
dearer. Money in very good demand, the minimum Bank of England
bought in at 37s@37 6ds, but 731 bags Benares sold at steady prices,
rate of discount remaining at 7 per cent per annum.
CodsoIs leave off 39s
6d@41s for white. - .6050 bags common Jaggery Madras were with¬
88f@88f for money, 88$@89 for the account. Bar silver 5s l£d. Mex¬ drawn.
887 bags Natal partly sold at 35s@37s 6d for low to good
ican Dollars 4s ll^d. American Eagles 76s 2£d.
Doubloons : Span- mid
yellow. Privately 500 bags low syrupy Madras sold at 29s. For¬
sh 74s 6d, South American 78s 9d per oz.
Cinnamon.—The quarterly sales comprised only 1,000 bales Ceylon, eign : of 259 hhds. 33 barrels Porto Rico offered at auction only about
the whole of which found ready buyers at an advance of from 3d@5d- 40 hhds sold at moderate rates, 86s@39s. The only private transactions
consists of 60 hhds Surinam at 84s 6d.
per lb.; low to superior first sort from 2s 2d@3s 4d, low to fine seconds
Tallow—The market is steady; St. Petersburg Y. C. for this year
le lld@2s lOd, with low fourths to very good thirds Is 6d@2s 5d.
50s 6d, January to March 51s 3d, and March 52s 3d.
Rum.—About 880 puns sold, Demerara Is 8d@ls 9d, and good Lee¬
Tea—A considerable business has been done in most descriptions at
wards at Is 8d@ls 8$d.
full prices, and in some instances at an advance of Id per lb. Good
Cocoa firm.
50 barrels Dominica sold at 60s, and of 97 bags Surin¬
Common Congou Is Id per lb.
am, 76 sold at 76t@80s 6<1 for good red.
Saltpetre dull and nothing to report.
Coffee firm.
For Native Ceylon an improved demand, and prices
Tin—Prices of English have advanced 3s. Blocks 96s, Bars 97s, Re¬
are 6d@ls dearer.
The sales have 1 een 1,248 casks, 150 barrels, 429 fined 100.
Foreign firm; Straits 96s@97.
bags Plantation Ceylon at 75s@77s 6d for fine to fine ord, 78s@78s fid
American Stocks have been depressed during the past week.
Uni¬
for low mid, 79s@S3s for mid to mid colory ; 63 casks. 7 barrels, 2,410.
ted StateSc5-20 Bonds were sold yesterday at 63, but have rallied to¬
bags Native Ceylon at 66s@67s for good ord, 68s 6<J@70s for fine ord,
Our price is always quoted for the Bonds 1867-82.
and 71s@71s 6d for superior ; 185 cases, 257 bags Tellicherry at 74s@ day to 63|@6h£
Others are only saleable at a considerable reduction. Erie Shares after
74s 6d for small, 75s@76s for fine ord, and 80s 6d@S6 for mid to good
The new Erie Sterling Bonds
mid colory; 185 cases Neilgherry at 81s@84s 6d, 467 bags ditto garb- being at 52 are to-day 534@54.
premium.
Illinois Shares 81|<®82.
Virginia 6’s dollar Bonds have
lings and triage at 64s@69s 6d ; 741 bags Cochin were withdrawn, but been dealt "in at
40@42. Other securities neglected.
100 casks, 1,500 bags, chiefly sold at 71s@72s for good ord and 74s 6d
Liverpool.—The following report of the Liverpool market tor
@76s6d for find ord ; 299 cases, 15 bags Naidoobatum sold at 76s@80s
for low mid, and 84s 6d@88s for mid to good mid ; 33 half-frazils Mocha
general produce is for the week ending November 3d :
sold at 90e@94s 6d for mid yellow; 476 bags Mysore 78s@79s 6d for
Bark—The market is dull, and prices are rather easier both for Balti¬
pale, and 80s 6d@85s for colory, 32 bags Guatemala brought 69s
more and
Philadelphia, with little doing iu either. Naval Stores—No
@7 3s.
Copter—English firm at the late advance. Tough cake and tile £96, transactions of any importance passing. We quote the value of French
best selected £99, sheathing £ 101.
Yellow metal sheathing 9£d per rosin 14s 6d @ 26s per cwt. French spirits of turpentine dull at 45s
9d @ 46s per cwt.
Few sellers of foreign ; Chili slab £89 @ £90,-nominal.
lb
Petroleum—in better request. About 1,000 bar¬
rels refined Pennsylvanian sold on spot at 2s 9d @ 2s lid per gallon,
Corn—The market is firm, and prices of both English and foreign
Sales of spirit at 2s 6d per gallon
wheat have advanced Is @ 29 per qr. Average price of English wheat with 500 barrels to arrive at 2s 9d.
for the week ending 28th October was 42s 4d on 68,951 qrs returned on spot. Lard—Nothing doing in American for want of stock.
With
White American wheat 50s @ 52s ; winter red 48s @ 50s ; spring 48s a fair continental supply, prices have somewhat declined.
European
sells at 65s @ 85s per cwt as in quality. Tallow—The market has
@ 50s per qr ; American flour very scarce at 27s @ 80s per barrel.
Cotton declined early in the week
@ Id per lb, with a very been irregular, with but a limited business passing, and prices generally
limited demand, but in the last two days there Has been a better feel¬ tending downwards.
About 800 pipes South American sold at 60s 6d
ing, and part of the decline has been recovered. At Liverpool the sales per cwt. In London a decline of 2s per cwt from the highest price of
last week was submitted to; but yesterday the market became steadier,
for the week are 51,000 bales; mid Orleans 2Id per lb.
Linseed Cakes are os @ 10s dearer. New York in barrels £10 @ and closed for P. Y. C. on spot, 60s 6d $ for December, 60s 9d; for
£10 7s 6d.
January to March 51s 3d ; and 52s 3d for March only, making a decline
Hemp—200 bales Gunn at auction mostly sold from £16 Ids @ £24 of Is per cwt from our last quotations. Beef—Fine qualities continue
10s for low common to good.
Russian firm ; 35 tons at auction, chiefly to be much wanted, and extra prime mess brings from 85s @ 95s per
damaged, sold at full prices ; St. Petersburg clean held for £36. Small tierce. Middling and inferior descriptions almost unsaleable. Pork—
Little American here. Small lots are reported at 80s @ 90s per bar¬
sales of Manila of good quality at £44.
Jute firm ; of 6,t)(»0 bales at public sale about half sold, chiefly of rel.
Bacon—Owing to a considerable decline in Irish and home cured
the lower kinds, at about 20s per ton advance on the prices of last week, bacon, and the prices of American have rather given way ; we quote
viz., from £15 @ £25 5s for common to good, with rejections from £13 65s @ 72s per cwt the value of long middles. In London the market
has lately experienced a rapid decline of about 13s per cwt, and closes
10s @ £14.
About 20,000 bales sold privately, chiefly for arrival.
much depressed.
firm at £20 5s @ £20 10s for common pig.
Lead
Butter—Really fine qualities sell readily at the rates
Indigo—The market is firm at fully last sale’s prices. Stock of East quoted in our last. Inferior descriptions neglected. Cheese—The ar¬
rivals continue to be light, and although the transactions during the week
India 17,171 chests against 23,601 last year.
Iron—Welsh firm ; rails and bars £7 @ £7 10s f. o. b. in Wales. have not bee a large, holders are firm, and demand very full rates.
Scotch pigs 58s for mixed Nos. on Clyde.
East India and China.—The following are the latest telegrams:
Linseed—Arrivals this week are 20,793 qrs, but the market is firm
Bombay, Oct. 27—Cotton quiet and declining.
at Is per qr advance for available seed.
Calcutta saleable at 62s 6d c.
and i. Nothing offers in Bombay. Odessa sold at 59s 3d L. A. T.
Canton, Oct. 27—Tea unchanged.
Exports to date, 58,000,000
Wc have also an advance of 6d (5) Is per qr in distant seed, Calcutta pounds. Exchange on London, 4s 6d.
having made 63s c. f. and i. August-September shipment, and Azov,
Shanghai, Oct. 21—Tea declining. Silk quiet. Exports to date,
oading and to be loaded. 61s@6ls3dL.A. T. Also a considerable 87,000. Exchange on London 6s lfd.
quantity of Calcutta at firm prices.
Montreal.—Receipts of Produce from 1st January to date,
Naval Stores—Spirits Turpentine sell in retail quantities at 44s 6d.
Petroleum 3s@3s Id Refined Pennsylvanian.
via Rail and River :
Oils—Fish: Sperm £114@£115; pale Seal £48; pale Southern
1868.
1S64.
1865.
£48 ; Cod £50 ; Hast India £36. Linseed : the value on the spot has
89,385
37,888
Ashes, brls
declined to 36s 3d@36s. Rape continues to advance ; £48 10s paid
948,589
737,528
635,402
,
Flour, brls
or English Brown, £49 10s for Foreign, £50 10s@£51 English Refined,
4,961,982
4,172,206
2,301,389
Wheat, bush
£52 lOs@£58 Foreign Refined present delivery ; a large business in
783,237
189,167
Indian Corn, bush........
English Brown, delivery first four months next year, at £46 10s@£47 Pork, brls
36,884
19,397
34,700
but there are now few sellers under £47 10s@£48 ; Cotton £31, Refin¬
69,747
36,721
61,262
Butter, kegs
ed £36@£37 ; Madras Ground Nut£49@£50 ; Niger £43. Olive firm,
483,708
290,839
Peas, bush
and holders are disinclined to press sales at quotations ; Gallipoli £56,
6,088
10,629
1,801
Lard, brls
786
Sicily £55, Malaga and Seville £54@£58 10s, and Mogadore £50@50 Beef, brls
878
678
10s.
Cocoa Nut: only a moderate quantity offers 50s 6d@51s foj
Cochin, and 47s fid@48s for Ceylon; the quantity afloat is 1277 tons
Exports of Produce since 1st January to date, via St. Lawrence,
against 2637 same time last year. Palm, 44s 6d for best Lagos.
Portland and Boston :
.

*

.

....

.

.

...

....

c

In Molasses

no

sales.

firm, and 60,000 bags sold, Bassein 12s or 12s 3d ; old Necranzie 10s 9d, new 11b 10^d@12s 3d ; old Rangoon 10s 10$d, new 12s 6d
@12s 9d ; and a cargo of 800 tons Necranzie at 12s.

Ashes, brls.
Flour, brls
Wheat, bush
Indian Corn, bush
Pork, brls
Peas, bush

1600 bags Singapore partly sold at 3£d@
3-fd. 300 bags light East Iudia brought 3£d. 700 bags Zanzibar
Cloves went from 3d@3fd for ord to fine. 600 bags Pimento were
partly realised at 2£d. Ginger, 300 bags Bengal partly sold at 26s 6d;
Butter, kegs
300 barrels Jamaica brought from 63s@76s for ord to mid ; 650 cases
Cochin sold from 66s@73s for ord to mid. Nutmegs are Id per lb Lard, brls
dearer ; 80 cases went from Is 2d for small to 2s 2d for good bold. 30 Beef, brls
cases Mace realised from Is 7d@2s lOd for good to fine. 350 cases
Gassia Lignea were bought in from 108s@112s for thirds to good pile 1.
Spelter steady at £21 10s@21 16s.
Stock 1st inst 6687 tons against

Spices—Pepper, Black

;

10,816 tons last year.
Sugar has been in very limited demand at about 6d per cwt decline
rom last week’s value,
Of British West India 1250 hhds sold, inclu*

1864.

1365.

Rice

The market has been

23,149
188,751
673,833

623,897
1,193
401,361
60,624

80,868
401,961
2,802,164
.466
-

1,801

198

170,038
61,782
8,694

478

976

1863.

81,637
680,679
8,718,857
612,281
2,513
588,483
48,034
7,094
1,695

COTTON.

irregular and unsettled.

The adverse

Liverpool advices early in the week, caused a material decline, and
4iog at public sale part of 448 bbds, 29 tierces, 87 barrels Barbados, middling fell to 4pa5Xc for Uplands and Orleans. But the active




November 18,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

export, and the diminished receipts at this port, have led to some
speculative business, and prices have recovered about 2 cts per lb.
from the lowest point. Yesterday (Thursday) the business was
very large—exceeding seven thousand bales, but to-day, although

659
MOBILE COTTON

Stock in hand
September
Received this week

STATEMENT.

1, 1865 (bales)

24,290
9,647

Received

previously
firm, there is less doing, and the sales of the week are
about 20,000 bales, with stock estimated at 175,000 bales.
Exported this week
Factors having connections in the Carolinas, state that a tem¬ Exported previously

101,888—111,635

the market is

Burned Oct. 5 and 6th,

porary falling off in receipts from that quarter may now be expected.
It will be noticed that our receipts for the past week do not include
a

bale from North

Caro[ina; but the heaviest deliveries

185,826

Stock

have been

from Florida, and

by Railroad from the West. New Orleans
shows a great deficiency in her deliveries owing to tne non-arrival of

on

hand and

on

14,610
33,802
3,390 —81,893

(about)
shipboard Nov. 3d

Galveston.—The following is the Galveston Cotton Statement
Saturday, November 4.

for
‘

This Year.

Stock on hand Sept. 1, 1865...
| Received this week,.

steamers.

I

There is less

68,932

/

Florida.
44

45

48 '

49

49

51

7,245

52

52

50
53

54

55

56

57

‘

Bales.

2,681
496

Mobile
Florida

From

1,349
1,646
3,862

Norfolk, <tc...,
Per Railroad..

2,568

...

Foreign ports.

310

2,701
34,111

on

shipboard not cleared

22,163

17,991

.

quotations.

Total for the week

Previously reported

17,920
412,912

.

Since July 1
Same time last year

'

were as

follows

Trade.

American..... 4,470
Brazilian
1,900
West Indian... 1,460

13,875

Previously reported

Egyptian

8,080
East Indian. ..10,680

109,667

,

Since July 1st.
Same time last year

China &

123,542
8,392

Japan.

Total

Orleans.—Telegraphic dates are to the 15th November.
Market depressed.
Middling 50 a 52c. Exchange on New York
at par.
Freights easy.
Later.—A

telegram under date of the 16th quotes :
Cotton extremely dull; few sales at
50@52c. Gold 150.
ou New York stiff at
^ per cent premium.
are

to the

10th.

COTTON

Stock Sept. 1
Received this week.

3,724

42

a

% 2

i

-•

•

•

Specula¬
tion

11,450

630

4,130
1,460
5,090
27,820
1,180

•

770

Total
this week

4,480
•

490

460

230

2,080

13,130

15,920

/

This week.

American
Brazilian
West Indian....

19,313
13,300
,8,798
4,620
12,592

East Indian
China and Japan

Total

2,116
*

55,739

Sea Island.
281

5,249
40,104

Export.
2,500
1,600

7,800

Exchange Egyptian

Middlings 48

..

@..
@..

•.

•

@..

.

•

.

56

@50

51,130

Total
this Year.

290,420
299,970
93,340

@. .d
@• •
(cb

ft

•

@.

•

@68

To this
date 1865.

Same time
1864.

222,100

280,990

181,670
33,540
808,840
1,160,990
337,160

3,158,040

2,238,800

455,250
1,733,070

-IMPOBTS-

STATEMENT.

Uplands.

..

1,240
9,340

....

by mail

23

....

New

49 cents.

..

SALKS.

785
602
80

Total for the week

Good and
Fine.

22^@..d.

12,408

...

Fair and
Good fair.

*

:

bales.

t'

Upland

73,465

exports from this port last week

Ordinary and
Middling.

Mobile
New Orleans....
Texas
Sea Islands

430 932

Savannah.—Dates

11,452

Liverpool circular of the 4th of
November, and quote :
The improvement noticed at the close of last week
gave way on
Monday to great depression, under the American advices of large
receipts at all the ports, and a rapid decline took place, until on
Wednesday sales of Middling were made at 20d, or 23d per lb.
below our last quotations.
Yesterday and to-day there has been
more
enquiry, and about Id of the decline has been recovered.

ye

Bales.

1,495

4,573

Liverpool.—We have the

ending

Charleston
North Carolina

3,532

4,282

3,168

New York
Boston

On hand and

were as follows :

New Orleans,
Galveston...

To Liverpool
To Hamburg
To Havre
To Glasgow

Do

Mobile.
42

44

'From

The

Do

42

The deliveries of cotton at this market for the week

Savaor ah

42
46

40,144

Do

42

Ordinary, per lb
Good Ordinary
Low Middling
Middling
Good Middling
Middling fair

terday (Thursday)

& Tex

29,624
2,777

46,966

disposition in our market to act upon what are ; Received
previously
termed “ general principles,” as respects supply and demand ; but Received at other
ports
the aspect and feeling of the hour control the
principal transac¬
Total...
tions. The following are the closing quotations :
N.O.
Exported to Great Britain
Upland.

1860-61.

13,857
5,778
26,243
4,088

-STOCKS-

To this
date 1864. This

278,890
268,971
96,855

363,922
943,566
125,859

168,371
178,605
47,936
269,147
969,163
289,645

2,073,063 1,922,867

day.

64,140
26,750

Same date
1864.

43,100
163,440

23,530
14,470
9,950
13,900
833,830

14,850

100,570

323,070

496,250

10,790

BREADSTUFFS.

159

The market has been

strengthened, in the face of heavy receipts,
by favorable intelligence from Great Britain, and the near approach
49,977
of the closing of canal navigation.
2,545
39,637
2,280
Flour has arrived in large quantities, and has been somewhat
Stock Nov. 10, 1865.
9,640
‘-65
neglected by the trade, yet prices have yielded but a fraction. There
Charleston.—Dates to the 10th report the market very dull at is
considerable speculative feeling, while a few thousand barrels
46 a 48c for
middlings.
have been taken for export, at $8 25 a $8 35 for extra
State;
charleston cotton statement.
freight to Liverpool Is. 9d., and to London 2s. 3d. ; Exchange 160,
Sea Island. Upland.
currency. The market to-day was weak and a little lower.
362
1,610
Wheat has come to market at the rate of 100,000 bushels
Received from Sept. 1 to Nov. 1, 1865....
652
daily,
21,410
but prices, on the Persia’s news, were
Receipts from Nov. 2 to Nov. 8
95
2,425
slightly improved; but re¬
ceding yesterday la2c. from the highest point, there was a good
1,109
25,445
export and speculative demand. Deliveries may possibly be kept
EXPORTS.
up three weeks longer, and they may end in ten days. The weather
893
is now exceedingly warm and
15,556
sultry—so much so, that very severe
179 3,144
weather would be required to close the canal.
Through shipments
from Buffalo will cease this week. At the extreme West
18,700
1,072
prices
have materially declined,
Stock on hand,
although the shipments continue to be
37
6,745
mads for Buffalo and Oswego.
Receipts at Chicago and MilwauMobile—Our latest weekly statement, by mail, is to the 3d Nov. kee are
again on a liberal scale.
follows;
Oorp, on a liberal export and home demand, has ad?anoed five




.

2,105

-

THE CHRONICLE.

660

[November 18,1865.

bushel. The stock is large, but with no prospect of in¬ the weekly receipts of Flour and Grain at the places indicated for
crease.
Rye has been taken for export at steady prices. Oats the week ending Nov. 11 :
Corn,
Oats,
Wheat,
Flour,
Bariev,
hare been dull for some days, closing quiet.
Lye,
Bariev and Barley
bushels.
bushels.
bushels.
bbls.
bushols. bufclielg
Malt quiet.
279,884
86,558 57,969 25,040
28,402
183,714
Chicago
Milwaukee
294,830
12,929
2,365
16,971
2,5 G 2
The following are the closing quotations :
2,285
28 149'
cents per

.

.

.

Superfine State and Western. ...per bbl.

Flour,

Extra

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

8 15 (a)

Shipping Roundhoop Ohio

11

Southern, supers

Rye Flour, fine and superfine
Corn meal, Jersey and Brandywine
Wheat, Chicago Spring
per bushel
Michigan

Western Mixed

do

Western Yellow

Rye,

North River
Canada
Western

do
do
do

15 (cl
12 @

1

State

43,577

1,701

1,038

GS0,312

331,588

IS 0,7 08

63,551

18,358

648,513

345,902

113,840

71,026

follows

1 10 @

QUOTATIONS.

sponding week

I 30

Chicago arid Milwaukee

do
Amber Iowa
do
White—Western.
Indian Corn, Mixed!

1865.

Rye, bus
Barley, bus...

1S64.

29.143

955,101

336,171
116,470
495,214

7,506.855
23,606,820

'

930,242

1,012,995

1S64.

1861.

1S65.

25,377

24,970

860,823

463,950

Barley, bu....
Milwaukee.—The
and
ber

23,438,950
8,113,211

16,055
1,050

81,975

....

1,046,349
9,076,300
11,672,256

6,237,741

195,790
61,410

Oats, bu

Rye, bu

27

551,598
822,338

12.187,991
674,817
161,489

following table exhibits the receipts-of flour

are

to the 4'h November,

We quote from

a

again

a

large arrival of Black Sea wheat.

The

recent im¬

on flour ; and Gd per boll on maize.
Wednesday’s market opened strong, Amber Milwaukee wheat brought
25s to 25s 6d for good top extra quality ; Ghirka sold freely at 23s for
top quality. Flour in demand at quotations. Mai,re sold largely at 18s
in store, for prime mixed American.
At market to-day, holders were firm at Wednesday’s advance, but
only a small business resulted, as millers and dealers did Dot seem dis¬
posed to go more deeply into stock, until “China’s” letters were de¬
livered ; there is still a lingering belief that America will yet ship largely
of wheat ere the close of navigation.
Market closes steady.

Wool-

1865.
....

38

barrel

bHirPED.

Flour, bbls....
Wheat, bu....
Corn, bu

lbs.
lbs.
lbs.

29

per 4S0
.per 504
per 240

provement has been further followed up, and an extensive business done
at an advance of about Is per boll on ail descriptions of wheat; Is her

12,850,158
885,870
688,501

7,699,049

18,822

102,189

We have

1,0'0 939
10,538,576
12,594,596

22,712
...

10
10

:

1861.

1865.

28.402

v

.

10b lbs.

10

;

Glasgow.—Dales
trade circular

....

per

6.

nominal.
0 @ 10
6 @ 10
9 @ II
9 @ 30
6 @ 39
0 @ 28

:
received.

Flour, bbls....
Wheat, bus....
Corn, bus....
Oats, bus

(1.

fi.

Flour
Wheat.

following table shows the receipts aud shipments
Peas, Canadian. .4.
1, compared with the cone- Oatmeal, Canadian

in 1864

as

and Indian corn, at advancing prices. At to-day’s market there was a
steady consumptive demand lor wheat, at an improTement of 3d per
cental since this day week.
Flour was Is to Is 6d per sack dearer.
Indian corn had a pretty free sale at 30s per qr for mixed.

.1 50

@

weekly report, by the Persia, to Nov. 3d is

:

of Breadstufts last week and isince Jan.
:

1,0S0

Farmers being generally engaged with wheat-sowing, the
country
markets have been less liberally supplied, and in most of the
principal
Ones an advance of 2s per qr is reported.
In consequence of the visit
of the Priuce and Princess of Wales, no market was held on
Tuesday
but a steady business has been- done, from day to day, in wheat,1 flour'

1 17

1 40

Malt

Chicago.—r fiie

289

6,982

.

Liverpool.—The

1 15
47 (60
GO @
62

1

;

Barley
do

@ 15 50

25

Western

Oats,

9,500

.

Cleveland....

9 50 @ 10 85
11 00 (a) 16 00
8 25 @ 12 00
6 25 @ 7 00
4 75 @ 5 00
1 SO @ 1 88
1 82 @
1 89
2 00 @
2 35
2 40 @ 2 45
90 @
97
1 00 @
1 05
1 17 @ 1 20

do

Corn,

S 65

9 00.
8 25 @ 11 00

Southern, fancy and extra
Canada, common to choice extra

Milwaukee Club
Red Winter
Amber State and

30,2-96
6,611

.

S 80 @

Extra Western, common to good
Double Extra Western and St. Louis

do
do
do

86,6*6
27,562
88,070

Totals
.118,533
Previous week. .125.S10

$7 75 @ *-8 00

State

34,313
32,838
6,009

Toledo
Detroit

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.

•

Dry Goods Market 'remains dull and transactions merely
grain by rail aud lake, for the week ending Saturday, Novem¬ ! nominal.
Prices have not yet reached the lowest figures of the
j
*
0 r
**
13th, and the corresponding time last year :
I late summer season, but the fact that goods are accumulating quite
bbls.

Gate.
bu.

Corn.

Wheat.
bu.

Flour,

bu.

Barley

Rye,

bu.

bu.

i

Tiie

| rapidly tends still to depress prices. The light demand from the in¬
terior will render

farther reduction necessary or

trade must be
very quiet during the wiuter.
Buyers keep iu mind the panic of
! last spring, and consequently purchase only for their immediate
Receipts aud shipments of flour aud grain for the week ending
wants.
The prices of Dry Goods have been of late far above what
Saturday, November 13th, since January 1st, and the correspond¬
the cost of manufacture demanded aud there is no reason for main¬
ing time last year, were:
.
^
taining them. The drouth and light supply of the summer season
Receipts.
—n
Shipments.
—»
Since
Same time
Since
Same time
are both things of the past aud prices must
now be governed by
January 1.
IStiL
January 1.
1864.
the cost of manufacture solely.
With some styles of white goods
Flour, bbls
310,388
259,370
424,2t'7
89o,960
Wheat, bush
9,424,132
8,596.548 there is less margin than with prints and some light grades. Inferi¬
8,5-iO,18S
8,726,115
Oats, bush
491,568
906.800
803,138
735,183 or
grades have decliued materially during the week while the price
Coro, bush
220,096
421,538
* 68,253
169,101
of standard goods remains about the same ; nominally at 33 cents
Barley, bush
118,104
72,548
36,075
12,115
169,795
Rye, bush
120,054
7,119
1,914 Cor Standard Brown Sheetings witii both agents and jobbers.
Eastward Movement of Flour and Grain.—The folllowing This is the price quoted by agents, but sales are made at a less
The tendency
will show the Eastward movement of Flour and Grain from the figure, and in some instances nearly one cent less.
is strongly downward with no signs that the bottom lias beeu
ports of Chicago, Milwaukee and Toledo, and destination of same,
yet reached.
for the week ending Nov. 11th, 1865, viz :
Brown Sheetings and Shirtings are in better supply with a
Corn.
Flour,
Bariev,
Oats,
Wheat,
Rye,
To
bbls.
bushels.
bushels.
bushels.
bushels. bushels
very, light demand, though there is less relative decliue in prices
Buffalo
34,888 251,610 241,375 279,475
18,000
than noticed last week.
Standards are quoted at 33 cents but are
104,871
Oswego
32,500
Port Col borne..
81,886
sold for about what, they will fetch.
This is the quotation for
39,500
14,400
Ogdensburg.... 6,557
Stark A, Amory, Indian Head A, Atlantic A, P A, A II, PH,
37,000
7,000
Cape Vincent...
and Appleton A, Phoenix Mfg. Co. 36 inch 30, 39 inch 31, SheDunkirk
8,373
3,090
Sarnia
5,326
tucket B 27 inch 23, A 30 inch 25, Pocassett Canoe 39 inch 334,
Windsor
14,000
K 36 inch 30, Family Cottons 36 inch 28, Tigers 21, Augusta
202
65,000
40,575
Kingston
Mills 4-4 32, i 27, Manhattan K 4-4 271, Appleton B 421, 0 29,
Port Dover
7,000
Other ports
2.S75
79,220
81,025
55,097
D 31, W 35, Shirtings E 271, N 29, Indian Queeu 36 inch 26,
7 CO
9,610
1,889
By Railroad.... 12,735
41,136
3,594
Pittsfield A 36 inch 26, Rocky Point Sheetings 26, Massachusetts,
69,026
By Canal
75,211 83,739
fine Sheetings 28 inch 26, do A 4-4 30, do B 31, Newmarket33
Totals
70,906 685,528 434,049 450.919 87,333 18,700 inch 28$ 36 inch 31, Atlantic heavy Shirtings A V 30 inch sell at
Previous week.. 65,967
530,815 614,173 128,222
9,143 65,876
281, do A G 27 h fine Sheetings AL&PL 361 inch 30, Atlantic
Weekly Receipts at Lake Ports.—The following will show ShirtiDgs P E 33 inch 28, Indian Head B 30 inch 28, E 48 inch
Total
Cor. week,’64




.294,130

16,971
6,664

2,865
3,799

206,743

12,889
20,313

.

2,285
1,433

2,562

7,007

r

.

.

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

♦

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

*

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

*

•

•

•

e

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

••

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

r

•

•

o

•

•

•

•

•

r

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

a

November 18, 1865.j

THE CHRONICLE.

Nashua Extra A 36 iuch 30, do fine D 36 inch 31}, Indian
Orchard W 25, B B 33 inch 261, C 37 inch 28, N 36 inch 29. and
Ji 40 inch 30.
Amoskeag A 37 inch 32}, do fine Z 36 inch 21.
Bleached Sheetings and Shirtings are also in light demand,
and prices teudiDg downward steadily. Amoskeag A 37 inch is

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK

52*,

been very abundant and prices

Large

are very

cotton..
silk
flax....
Miscellaneous dry goons.
...

much lower

B 22, Lowell dark and

light 23, Wamsutta and Dusters 21.
Drills are in light demand, and there are more change to note
in prices. Stark brown IT, are quoted at 31, Amoskeag 33},
Newmarket

quoted at 34, Indian Orchard 33, Massabesics, Amoskeag
Naumkeag 37, Bates 33, and Satteens40.

colored is
brown

in demand and steadier.

and bleached 37},

Cotton Flannels

in demand for finer grades; poorer grades
Columbias sell at 32}, Mount Vernon 30, Nashua A

lower.

goods prices

of

softening. American Stripes 3-3 are quoted at
33, 6-3 at 34, Albany ticks 27, Pittsfield 27, Amo3ueag A C A
SO, A 62}, B 55, C 40, D 42}.
are

Jacconets
are

are

request and prices are lower.
Slaters
quoted at 26c, White Rock, high colors, 26c, plain do 27c.

Mouslin Delaines
Eare

are

lower and nominal.

Atlantic

Coburgs

Cambrics
Mills

nominal.

are

Saratogas

are

1329
1238

$351,967
253,725

4751

Total th'wn upon mark't 3453 $1,186,438

2567

$605,692

5266 $1,887,672

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING DURING THE

Manufactures of wool...
silk....
flax

....

Miscellaneous drv goods.
Total
Add ent'd for

Total entered at the port.

in

light request and the supply

more

abundant.

In¬

37}.

quoted at 45 to 60.

Woolen Goods are in moderate demand from small dealers.
Prices are generally } lower.
are

in

some

S2.40 for No 2.

Cassimeres
Satinets

are

are

515

35

3,712

$129,769
939,322

30t9 $1,009,091

$215,895
127,761
144,423
112,784
6,049

1642
1233
1238

115,751
253,725

1508
4751

606,912
1,709,608

2SS0

23,S61

3,841
14,638
13,377

$369,476

45
1393

■'

6259 $2,316,720

STATEMENT.

FOR

movement the

print market is reported very
past week were 4,000 pieces at 19c for 64

Value.

,3S8
45
Carpetings ...240
Blankets..
46,
Shawls....
7

$201,045

Woolens..
Cloths..

.

*.

...

27,179

..

..

68,111
6,092
4,026

..

CONSUMPTION.

Pkgs.

Value.
8,910

Gloves...,
12
Worsteds,....478
Hose
Merinoes
1
Worsted yn. 67
.

..

.

Pkgs.

Value.

7
Braids & bds. 39
Cot. & wor'd.210

4,115
17,794
72,466

Lastiugs

193,627
3,267
490

...

.

17,329

To tal... 1553

are

619,451

MANUFACTURES OF COTTON.

Cottons
...604 £214.21S
Colored...
9S,970
Prints
12.663
...

Ginghams.

3
S

...

Emb'd mus’n

S95

2,961

Velvets...

...

1

•

210
3,933

Laces
7
Braids & bds. 14
llandk'fs.
30
Gloves....
32
...

$S7,764
9.136
802

5,388

Crapes....
Plushes...
Velvets....
9
Ribbons. ...36
...

Braids....

1

$2S1,805
549

Silk & wors’d 22
Silk & cotton. 22

3,727
66,451
7,011

...107
8

...

1435

SILK.

13,063

25,875

Linens
1063
Linen & cot..
2

Total

23,631
66,142

6,439

..

......

93
264

3,128

....

Laces..
Cravats
Raw

Spool
Hose

6,150

MANUFACTURES OF

Silks

OF

9,889
18,419

Total... .290;

FLAX.

Laces3
Hdkfs
19

5,495
15,418

Thread

Ilemp

65
yarn... 18

Total

17,572
2,713

1170

$323,552

Suspenders.. 15

8,012

MISCELLANEOUS.

Leath gloves. 20
Kid gloves...
5

$28,724

Embroideri’s. 32

5,931

141

786

28

4,945

Corsets
26
Straw goods. 32
Featb & flow. 4

FROM

Pkgs. Value.
19

28,266
8,745
7.808

Total....303

$94,715

1,698

726

A 14

>

2,068

Shawls
Worsteds
Delaines...

3
39
6

Pkgs. Value
13,802

1,381
13,641
3,375

Cot & wos’d. 31

—

Total

74
39-,

.....

10,914

Hdkfs

9
5

2,251
2,579

1

Spool

Ginghams

$43,968

2

984
460

$35,631

2

2,816

COTTON.

Emodmusl's

$18,443

OF

114

130

.

MANUFACTURES

Cottons
Colored

WAREHOUSE.
OF WOOL.

Pkgs. Value.

$8,975

2

...

Blankets

Total
MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks
Velvets
Total

IS
3

$37,203
1,681

Ribbons

15

18,958

Laces....

...

—

38

dull with but little

doing.
Foreign Goods are still
very abundant and moderately active
at the reductions.
The price of Foreign Goods has continued rel¬
atively lower than domestics during the season, as thev can be inported at a good profit while domestics are so
high.
sales have been
pretty well attended, and though
been spirited
prices were

The auction
bidding has not

remunerative.

$60,658

118
6

$31,453
1,893

124

$33,246

107

4,187

2

174

109

$4,361

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

Linens
Thread

*

MISCELLANEOUS.

:

Matting
Total
ENTERED

FOR

WAREHOUSING.

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

Woolens

Pkgs. Value.
122

Shawls

and Blankets

past

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

Straw goods

light demand at the prices of last week.
dull, and buyers purchase cautiously. Prices

for the

$177,864
1,709,808

532
407
99
451
19

18,839

following is.a detailed statement of the
week ending Nov. 16, 1865 :

The Providence

hand.

Flannels

No 1, and

in but

much reduced.
on

demand at $2.50 for cotton warps

lower and dull.

are

quiet. .The sales
xG4

5

ENTERED

33,246
4,361

60,658

109

Total

Print Cloths
are

43.007

DETAILED

Carpeting

are

124

$65,056

The

declining. Glasgow sells at 28, and Lan¬

yard.
Dickeys

Cloths

148
51

MANUFACTURES

Linseys have declined from 2 cents to five cents
per
White Rocks are held at 42}. Clark & Co.’s
50, Porter &
are

$25,254
33,935

consumpt’n 2695

Woolens

dian Orchard sells at

.

75
135
31
108

cotton..

$43,963
35,631

«AM£ PERIOD.

384

do
do
do

114
130
38

quoted at 22}, Milton

caster at 29.

Silesias

DUBES®

$247,116
939,322

753

consumpt’n 2695

WITHDRAWN

lower and

are

$1,709,808

MARKET

367

*7

....

22}, Faderal 23.

Ginghams

4751

THE

23,558
45,820
73,841
6,044

Clothing

ilton 32}.

94,915

$202,704

Matting

quoted at 31, fine do. 40, Manchester 52}, do. all wool 55, Ham¬

$253,725

323,552

THE SAME PERIOD.

MANUFACTURES

in little

94.640
17.881

$619,451
429,335
242,555

91
41
321

selling at 55 for Pearl River, 40 for Manchester.

are

9,614
80,226

INTO

Value.

1553
1435
290
1170
303

509

.

Denims

$101,364

-

THROWN

Pkgs.

25,657
44,390
73,457
5,S05

are

35, Manchester brown 40, Falls 36.
Stripes and Ticks are more called for, but with all other kinds

1238

AND

-101
S3
339

Pkgs.

are more

$939,822

WAREHOUSE

cotton..
silk
flax....

Globe Steam Mills 27}.
Corset Jeans

45o
32
65
590
96

1865.

,

$96,747

do
do
do

Total
Add ent'd for

numbers of job lots have been closed out during the week

68,179

Manufactures of wool... '27S

purple 25, Shirting 24, Dark 24, Light 23, Mourning 25, Dutch¬

26,

are

FROM

,

200,591
202,227

2695

WITHDRAWN

16, 1865.

ENDING KOV.

-1864.
Value.
Pkg« i.

$3!K),0Sl
78,244

315
267
845
231

Miscellaneous dry goods.

at almost any figures.
The demand is moderate, and prices tend
downward. Spragues National and purples are quoted at 24 cents,
last week. Madders 26}, Rubies
a reduction of four cents from
and Green and solid colors 26}, Blue and White 27}, Blue and Or¬
ange 28,- Canary Y 25}, Black and White and Shirtings at 27 };
American Print Works Madder 25 cents nett. For Columbia?,
Concord, Greene Co.’s and Wauregan there are no fixed prices.
Merrimack W is quoted at 29, D 28, Garners 27, Amoskeag pink
ess

do
do
do

at 37.}.

27 inch 19}, Continental 30 inch 25, Methuen 3*4 20.

Prints have

Manufiicturcs of wool... 1037

Total

Bartlett Steam Mills are still quoted 33 inch at 35 cents, do 4-4 40
cents, do 5-4 47}, do {■ 32}.
New Market 36 inch 37}, War*
renton H last sold at 25, Aquidnecks'4-4'2S, White Rock 3 inch
41, Canoe

1863Value.
Pkgs.

,

Waltham X 33 inch at 30, W 42 inch

quoted at 35 cents,

661

8

Worsteds.... 239

$52,037
4,998
91,294

Delaines
Worsted

Pkgs. Value.
8
3,036
varu

Braids& bds.
MANUFACTURES

Cottons
Colored

123
215

$3S,913

Prints

4
3

Pkgs. Value.

Cot. & worst.148

1,494

61,944

—

1,092

Total

...

.532 $315,895

OF COTTON.

43

Ginghams...

10.281

Laces

5

9

2,108

Spool

12

3,451
4,691

407

70,317

$127,761

3
6

4,478

Total
MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks

5

)

Crapes

5.

Velvets
Total

1

$112,369

Ribbons

17

4.855
741

Laces
Braids &

3

.bds. 10

14,358
1,166
4,393

Silk & wors’d
Silk & cotton

2,058

—

99

$144,423

4

881

451

$112,784

9

2,811

19

$6,049

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

IMPORTATIONS

OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK.

The importations of

16th, 1865, and
33 follows;




the

dry goods at this port for the week ending Nov.
corresponding weeks of 1863 and 1864, have been

Linens

446

Total

$109,902 Laces........

1

2,501

Thread

,

MISCELLANEOUS.

Matting
Total

7

$46S

Straw goods.

........

3

3,270

Susp
;

©lag..

ft

662

THE CHRONICLE.

PRICES

Maracaibo...

CURRENT.

22 @
20* ©

Laguayra
St, Domingo.

WHOLESALE.
All goods deposited In public stores or bonded
warehouses must be withdrawn therefrom, or the
uties thereon paid within one year from the date of
the originnl importation, but may be withdrawn
by
he owner for exportation to Foreign
Countries, or

may be transhipped to any port of the Pacific, or West¬
ern Coast of the United states, at any time before the
expiration of three years from the date of the original
importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be subject to the same rules and

regulations as if originally imported there; any goods
remaining in public store or bonded warehouse be¬
yond three years shall be regarded as abandoned to
the Government, and sold under such
regulations as
the Secretary of the Treasury
may prescribe. Mer¬
chandise upon which duties have been paid
may re¬
main in warehouse in custody of the officers of the
customs at the expense and risk, of the owners of said
merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three years, shall be

entitled to return duties,
proper evidence of such
merchandise having been landea abroad to be furnish¬
ed to the collector by the importer, one
per centum
cf said duties to be retained by tae Government.
to the duties noted below, a discrim¬
yy In addition
inating■ duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no reciprocal treaties
soith the United States.
On all goods, wares, and merchandise,

of the
growth or produce of Countries East of the Cape of
Oood Hope, johen imported from places this side of the
Cape of Oood Hope, a duty of 10 por cent, ad val. is

levied in addition to the duties imposed on any such
articles when imported directly from the place or places

[November 18,1865.
24

23*
18*

IT* ©

Copper—Duty, pig, bar, and Ingot, 2*; old copper

2 cents

^ ft; manufactured. 30 $ cent ad val.; sheath¬
ing copper and yellow metal, in sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches
wide, weighing 14 ® 34 oz.
square
foot, 3* cents $ lb. All cash.

Sheathing,

new

'

$ ft

Sheathing, &c., old
Sheathing, yellow..

50

&

31

@
@
®

..

Bolts.
Braziers’
Baltimore
Detroit

34

Portage Lake

81*
84
50
50
88

38* ©

..

@

..

Cordage—Duty, tarred, 8;

other

untarred, 3* cents $
Manila, Amer. made

26

©

Corks—Duty, 50 ^

19
26

5 50

4*
2 70

25
42

Paste, Calabria
Liccorice, Paste, Sicily
Licorice Paste, Spanish Solid...
Licorice Paste, Greek
Madder, Dutch
(gold)
Madder, French, E. X. F. F. do
Manna, large flake
Nutgalls Blue Aleppo

23

9*

9*
70

Oil Anise

3
4
10
*
5
3
8

‘

Phosphorus

•

Prussiate Potash

-

Quicksilver

.....

Cotton—See special report.

Drugs and Dyes—Duty, Alcohol, 40 cents $
gallon; Aloes, 6 cents $ ft ; Alum, 60 cents $ 100 ft ;
ft; Arsenic and Assafcetida, 20;

50
50

25
50
75
65
95
60

(gold)

Rhubarb, China

24

83
30

Oxalic Acid

gross

Argols, 6 cents

2 95

Opium, Turkey

Mineral

Phial

85
85

ice

Oil Lemon
Oil Peppermint, pure

cent ad val.

Regular, quarts
Short Tapers

Lico

50

60

t.

OiljCassia
Oil Bergamot

27

©

Tarred Russia
Tarred American
Bolt Rope, Russia

©

Gum, Myrrh, Turkey
Senegal
.'
Gum Tragacanth, Sorts
Gum Tragacanth, white
flakey...
Hyd. Potash, Fr. and Eng.. .(gold)
Iodine, Resublimed
Ipecacuanna, Brazil
'.
:..
Jalap
Juniper Berries
Lao Dye
Gum

.

untarred Manila, 2*;

$ ft

Gum Myrrh, Eest India

65
6 50

Rose Leaves
Salaratus
Sal Ammoniac, Refined
Sal Soda^Newcastle

(gold)

11

5*

Sarsaparilla, Hond
Sarsaparilla, Mex...
Seed, Anise
do Canary
do Hemp
do Caraway

45
30
24
6 50

...

$ ft
$ bush.
val.; Balsam Capivi, 20; Balsam Tolu, 30;
Balsam Peru, 50 cents ^ ft;
Silk ezcep'ed.
Calisaya Bark, 30 ^ cent
ad val.; Bi Carb: Soda, I
$ ft
20
*; Bi Chromate Potash, 3 cents
The tor in all eases to be 2,240 lb.
do Coriander
*8 ft; Bleaching Powder, 30 cents
$ 100 ft ; Refined
do Mustard, brown, Trieste
Ashes—Duty: 15 $ cent ad val.
Produce of Borax, 10 cents $ ft; Crude Brimstone, $6; Roll
do
do
California, brown,
the British North American Provinces, free.
Brimstone, $10 $ ton; Flor Sulphur, $20 ^ ton, and
do
do
15 $ cent ad val.;
English, white
Crude Camphor, 30; Refined Cam¬
Pot, 1st sort
$ 100 lb
8 50
24
phor, 40 cents ^ ft.; Carb. Ammonia, 20 <j$ cent ad Senna, Alexandria..
Pearl, 1st sort
^ 9 00
35
val.; Cardamoms and Cantharides, 50 cents $ ft; Senna, East India
t
Seneca Root.
Castor Oil, $1 $ gallon; Chlorate
110
Anchor*—Duty: 2* cents $ ft.
Potash, 6; Caustic Shell Lac
50
Of 209 1b and upward
Soda,l*; Citric Acid, 10; Copperas,*; Cream Tartar, Soda Ash
ft
11* ©
12
(80 ® cent)
10; Cubebs, 10 cents
7*
ft; Cutch, 10; Chamomile Sugar Lead, White
55
Beeswax—Duty, 20 $ cent ad val.
Flowers, 20 $ cent ad val.; Epsom Salts, 1 cent $
$ oz.
2 62*
ft; Extract Logwood, Flowers Benzola and Gam¬ Sulphate Quinine, Am
American yellow
^ ft
48 ®
50
Sulphate
9 00
boge, 10 $ cent.; Ginseng, 20; Gum Arabic, 20 $ Tartaric Morphine
Acid
cent ad val.; Gum
(gold)
Bones— Duty: on invoice 10
59
$ ft
cent.
Benzoin, Gum Kowrie, and Gum
Damar, 10 cents per ft; Gum Myrrh, Gum Senegal, Valerian, English
Rio Grande shin
^ ton
35 00 ©
do
Dutoh
Gum Geeda and Gum
Tragacanth, 20 & cent ad val.;
75
cent ad val.
Hyd. Potash and Resublimed Iodine, <5; Ipecac and Verdigris, dry and extra dry
Bread—Duty, 30
16
Jalap, 50; Lie. Paste, 10; Manna, 25; Oil Anis, Oil Vitriol, Blue.
Pilot
.....fllb
Of Lemon, and Oil
Orange, 50 cents; Oil Cassia and Oil
Navy
Duck—Duty, 30 $ cent ad val.
4*
Bergamot, $1 $ ft; Oil Peppermint, 50 $ cent ad
Crackers
10 ©
15
$}pce
16 00 1
val.; Opium, $2 50; Oxalic Acid, 4 cents $ ft; Phos¬ Ravens, Light
18 00
Ravens, Heavy..’
22 00 1
phorus, 20
cent ad val.; Pruss. Potash, Yellow,
Breadstuff's—See special report.
5; Scotch, Gourock, No. 1
81 00 1
Red do, 10; Rhubarb, 50 cents
$ ft: Quicksilver, 15
...$yard
120 1
Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs hair, 1
ft.
1 80
$ cent ad val.; Sal ^Eratus, 1* cents $ ft ; Sal Soda, Cotton, No. 1
* cent $ ft; Sarsaparilla and Senna, 20 ^ cent ad
American, gray and white... ^ ft
60 ® 2 25
Dye Woods—Duty free.
val.; Shell Lac, 10; 8oda Ash, *; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
Butter and Clteese.—Duty: 4 cents. Pro¬
(gold)
$2 ton
$ ft ; Sulph. Quinine, 45 $ cent ad val.; Sulph. Mor-. Camwood
(2H50 00
duce of British North American Provinces, free. *
85 00
phine, $2 50 ^ oz.; Tartaric Acid, 20; Verdigris, 6 Fustic, Cuba
Fustic, Tampico.
cents $ ft; Sal Ammoniac,
There is a steady local demand for Butter, but no
20; Blue Vitriol, 25 $
cent ad val.; Etherial
(gold)
23 00
rreat activity.
Preparations and Extracts, $ l Fustic, Savanilla
do
21 00
22 00
$ ft; all others quoted below, frke. Most of the Fustic, Maracaibo
Butter—
Logwood, Campeachy
articles under this head are now sold for cash,
(gold)
20 00
N. Y., Welch tubs, strictly fine,
(All Logwood, Houd
nominal.)
(gold)
19 00
do
do
fair to good
Logwood, Tabasco
(gold)
25 00
26 00
do
Firkins, str. fine, yel..
Drugs are firm and moderately active.
Logwood,f_St. Domingo
24 50
26 00
do
* fir. tubs, strictly fine
Acid, Citric
(gold)
60
3
®
Logwood, Jamaica
15 25
15 50
do
do com. to good.
Alcohol
gall.
Limawood
© 4 60
.125 00
Pa., fine dairy packed, yellow
Aloes, Cape
ft
25 @
26
Barwood
'
(gold)
30 00 @
do firkins, finer kinds, do
Aloes, Socotrine.
85 ©
Sapan Wood, Manila.
do common to medium
© 70 00
Alum
4* ©
4*
West. Re-erve, good to flue, yel.
Annato, fair to prime
70 ©
72
Feathers—Duty: 30 $ cent ad val.
com. to medium
do
Antimony, Regulus of
15
Prime Western
14* ©,
ft
95
Southern Ohio
Argols, Red
(gold)
*.. ©
do
Tennessee
Canada, uniform and fine
Argols, Refined
32
(gold)
31 @
do
ordinary, mixed
Arsenic, Powdered
3 20 ®
Fish—Duty, Mackerel, $2; Herrings, $1; Salmon,
Mich ,111.,Ind. &. Wjs., g. to f. yel.
Assafcetida
25 ©,
$3; other pickled, $1 50
40
bbl.; on other Fish,
do com. to me-d.
do
Balsam Capivi
1 20 ©
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller pkgs. than bar¬
CheeseBalsam Tolu
* (gold)
rels, 50 cents $ 100 ft. Produce of the British North
85 @
90
Balsam Peru.
Americon Colonies, fbke.
Factory made dairies
(gold)
@ 1 50
of their growth

o*

production

Raw Cotton and Raw

;

Antimony, Crude and Regulus, 10; Arrowroot, 30 $
cent ad

...

..

..

..

..

..

-

..

...

......

..

Farm dairies
do
do

Bark,

Calisaya
Berries, Persian

common

English dairy
Vermont dairy

Soda, Newcastle
Bi Chromate Potash

city

Cement—Rosendale

wax,

<3

^ bbi

40

84
28
200

Chains-Duty, 2* cents $ ft.

One inch and upward

$ Tb

e* ©

-

Coal—Duty, bituminous, $1 25 $ ton of 28 bushels,
bushel; other than bituminous,40 cents
^ 28 bushels of 80 ft ^ bushel.
Liverpool Orrel..^ ton of 2,240 ft
16 00
Liverpool House Oannel
28 00
•

90 ft to the

Nova Scotia
Anthracite

8 50
12 00

Cocoa—Duty, 3 cents $ lb.
Caracas—(gold).(in bond).. $ ft
Maracaibo

.(gold-)..
Guayaquil .(gold)

.

do
do

9 00

® 18 60

27* ®
..

19

@
©

Coffee—Duty: When imported direct in

23
60
20
Ameri¬

equalized vessels from the place of its growth
or production; also, the
growth of countries this side
the Cape of Good Hone when
imported indirectly in
American or equalized vessels, 5 cents
ft; all other
10 $ cent ad valorem in addition.
can or

Coffee has been quiet and transactions

Rio, prime, duty paid

do good
do fair
do ordinary
do fcir to good
cargoes....

9 ava, mats and bags




gold

light.

Peppers
Leon, bags

Bird
50
40

88
83

27

Bird

—

African,

Peppers—Zanzibar.,

12

@

18

24

@

••

Sierra

80

42*

Mackerel, No. 1, Mass, shore

@
®
6* @

45 00

<j$ ft

6
..

..

Caustic Soda

Cobalt, Crystals.. .in kegs. 112 fts
Cochineal, Honduras
(gold)
Cochineal. Mexican
(gold)
Copperas, American
Cream Tartar, prime
(gold)

Cubebs, East India

Cutch
Cuttlefish Bone

Epsom Salts
Extract Logwood
Flowers, Benzoin
Flowers, Arnica
Folia, Buchu
Gambler.

Gum Damar

34*

3 50

50
36

...ft

@
©
©
©
©
©
©

bales

©
92* ©
80 @
2* ©
31* ©
©
12
©
®
©
©
60 ©
•

•

•

40

$ ft

6*
,

8 00

<a 950
© 6 50
©6 50
8 00 © 8 50
28 50 © 24 50
..

17 50
IS 00
16 00

Mackerel, N

30
1 80
60
25

12 50
18 75

Mackerel, No. 8, Mass.

3 6060

©
©

© 10 on
© 13 00
© 14 00
©

40 00

50

Shad, Connecticut,No. 1.$} hf. bbl.
Shad, Connect cut, No. 2
Herring, Scaled
$ box

14

Herring, No. 1
Herring, pickled

$ bbl.

55
45
6 50

95
85

Flax—Duty: $15 $ ton.
Jersey
$ ft

20

©

9* ©

100

©
©

50
13
26
4
.12
80
31
70

9*

- -

i

::

©
©
©

60
50
9 0)

©

22

96

44

87*

40

•

@
62* ©

...(gold)

55
SO

#0

Fruit—Duty : Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds, 10: Almonds, 6; other
nuts, 2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts, 1; Snelled do, 1*, Fllbers
and Walnuts, 3 cents $ ft; Sardines, 50; Preserved
Ginger, 50; Green Fruits, 25 $ cent ad val.
11 60
Raisins, Seedless
$ cask
do Layer
5 00
$ box

do Bunch
Currants
Gitron, Leghorn

...

.:.

$ ft

Prunes, Turkish
45
1 0J

•

^

2*

42

(gold)

...

steady: Mackerel

..

•

oz.

.

Mackerel, No. 1, Halifax

5

©

12* ©

..

$

$ bbl.

$ bbl.

@

••

Gamboge
Ginger, Jamaica, bl’d, in bbls
Ginseng, Southern and Western..

Gum Arabic, Picked
Gum Arabic, Sorts
Gum Benzoin
Gum Copal Cow
Gum Gedda

..

24
..

gallon
$ 1b
(gold)

7

4* ©

Cantharides
Carbonate Ammonia, in "hulk....
Chamomile Flowers
Chlorate Potash

$ cwt
$ bbl.

40

Brimstone, Flor Sulphur
Camphor, Crude, (in bond), (gold)
Camphor, Refined
Cardamoms, Malabar
Castor Oil, Cases

.

2S

(gold)

Borax, Refined
r
Brimstone, Crude...(gold) $ ton
Am. Roll

Cod has been in fair demand and

steady, Herring dull. "
Dry cod
Dry Scale

Pickled Scale
Pickled Cod

Bleaching Powder
Brimstone,

1 75

@

55

Bi Carb.

Candles—Duty, tallow, 2*; spermaceti and
8; stearlne and adamantine, 5 cents ^ ft.
Sperm
*
$ ft

do , patent,
Refined sperm,
Stearic
Adamantine

..

Dates

Almonds, Languedoc
do
do

do
Sardines
do

d«

Provence

!

Sicily, Soft Shell

Shelled

*

« box

$ ht box

y qr. box

November 18,

1865.]
ft

Figs, Smyrna

Brazil Nuts
Filberts, Sicily
Walnuts, French
Dri*® Fruit—
N. State Apples
Blackberries
Black Raspberries
Pared Peaches

Unpealed do

THE CHRONICLE.
26

@
©

Western

80

U
16

..

$ft

@

15

•

16$
16*

©

16

16

@
@

85

North, and East.
No. 1.

Beaver, Dark....$ ft 2 00 @ 2 50
do

Pale

22
50

Bear, Black
do

...

..

..

do House
Fisher
Fox, Silver

..

..

do Cross
do Red
do Grey

Lynx
Marten, Dark
do pale

....

Mink, dark
Musk rat,
Otter

dark/.

Opossum

10 @

Raccoon

75 @ 1 00

Skunk, Black
do
Striped

70 @ 1 00
60
30 @

White

do

10 @

Calcutta, city sl’ter

00
60
00
25
00
00
00
50
75
00
00
50

30

5 @
50 @
50 @
25 @

20

5

do
do
do

6
6
7
7
9
10
11
12
18
15

do

qualities.
(Single Thick)—Discount 20 @ 30
6x8 to 8x10
$ 50 feet

8x11
11x14
12x19
20x81
24x81
24x36
80x45

82x50

to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

10x15
12x18
16x24
24x80...
24x36
30x44
32x48.

6 00
6 50
7 00
7 50
12 00
18 00
15 00
16 00
18 00

Ox, Rio Grande
Ox, Buenos Ayres

.-

32x56

Gunny Bag's—Duty, valued at 10 cents or less,
$ square yard, 3; over 10, 4 cents $ ft
Calcutta, light and heavy $ pee
28 @
29

Gunny Cloth—Duty, valued at 10 cents
square yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ ft.
Calcutta, standard
yard
24 @

Carthagena,
Guayaquil

48
44

<2>
<&

10

Hay—North River, in bales $
100 tt)s, for
shipping

60

©

49
45
12

66

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $25; Jute,
$15; Italian, $40; Sunn and Sisal, $15
t<*r; and
$ 5).

do

ton

Undressed

Russia, Clean

Jute
Manila
Sisal

320
200
400
200

00
00
00
00

(gold) .....$ ft
.

@835 00
00
t210 00
425

@215 00
@
13
@
..

Hides—Duty,

10

cent ad

val.

all kinds, Dry

American Provinces

Product
free.

or

Salted, and Skins,

of the

British North

(Nominal.)

The market is
quiet, and our quotations nominal.
Drv HidesB. A. & Montevideo
19 @
20
$} lb gold
gold
Buenos
do
21 @
Ayres
22
Rio Grande
do
17
18
..

.

.

Orinoco

do
d0
do
do
do
do
Tampico...
do
Matamoras
'
do
San Juan and Cent.
Amer... do
Maracaibo
do
.

California

California,

Mexican
Porto Cabello
Vera Cruz

,

,

.

.

.
..

Bogota,,




.

.

do

$ ft

Oude

@
17 @
18 @
164©

154©
16

@
©

100

Madras
Manila
Guatemala

75
90

75
70

(gold)
(gold)

Caraccas

@
@
@

@

374

2 10

1 15

Iron—Duty, Bars, 1 to 14 cents $ ft; Railroad,
Plate, 14 cents $ ft;
14 to If cents §1 ft;
Pig, $9
ton; Polished Sheet, 3 cents $ ft.
The market has been

moderately active at firm

Swedes, assorted sizes
Bar, English and American,Refined
do

do

do

do

Common

Scroll,
Ovals and Half Round
Band
HorseShoe

Rods, 5-8 @ 3-16 inch
Hoop

Nail'Rod
$ft
Sheet, Russia
Sheet, Single.Double and Treble..
Kails, English.. .(gold)
$ ton
do

American

50 00
49 00
..

Store
160 00
125 00
115 00
155 00
145 00

@ 52 00
@ 50 00
@ 92 50
Prices—,

@i70
@180
@120
@200
©155
@155
150 00 ©155
127 50 ©190
160 00 @225
10 ©
424 ©
74 @
57 00 @ 53
..

00

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
11
50

10 50
10 00
10 00
10 00

German

English
Bar

$ft

..
..

@
@
@

.,

@
12
16

Licatlicr—Duty: sole 35, upper 80
cent ad val.
on hand is
light, receipts small, and prices
advancing.
Oak, Slaughter,light
84 <a
3S
cash.$ ft
do

4L
41
42
47
18

do
do
do
do

Hemlock, B. Ayres,&c.,l’t do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do

do
do

middle, do

heavy

.

do

.....

California,light, do
do
do

middle do

.....

heavy, do
Orinoco, etc. l’t. do

35
8S
39

do.
middle do
do
heavy.. do
do & B. A, dant’gd all
.....

do

354
384
394

weights

all do
Slaughter in rough, .cash.
Oak, Slaughter in ro, gh, light... do
do
do
do mid. & h’vy do
poor

88
36
85

JLime—Duty; 10
Rockland, common
do
heavy

*>

174

164

44
44

<&

i3

@
@

@
@

14
10

1L

@

..

..

@

8

@

5
2 50

3 00

cents $ gallon.

"..

.<$ gall.
75
50
45

1 05

70
60
80

65

Cut, 4d. © 6d

Copper.

18

15

@

Nails—Duty: cut 14; wrought 24; horse
ft
(Cash.)

Clinch
Horse shoe,

20

@

..

^

20
25
55

@

Mansanilla

$ 100 ft

forged (8d).

8 00

shoe

@

8 50

©
©
©
©

ft

Yellow metal
Zinc

86
55
35

20

Naval

Stores—Duty: spirits of turpentine 30
$} gallon; crude turpentine, rosin, pitch, and
tar, 20
cent ad val.
Tar and turpentine,
product
of the British
cents

North American

Provinces, free.

cash.)

(All

The market has been

Turpentine, N. C
Tar, American
do foreign
Pitch

Rosin,
do
do
do

steady with lio-ht tranonntinn*
S 50 © 9 00
$ 280 ft
6 50 © 8 0<J
.»...^ bbl.
10 50
8 00

common and strained
No. 2
No. 1
Pale and Extra (2S0 lbs.)

Spirits turpentine, Am

^

7 25
8 (10
..

gall.
ft.

13 00
21 no
10

1

11 00
8 60
8 50
12 00
© 19 00
© 25 00

©

©

1

©

1U ©.

in

184

bags
oblong, in bags

52 00

....

50 50

@
© 51 00

Oils—Duty: linseed, flaxseed, nnd rape seed, 28
cents; olive and salad oil, in bottles or
flasks, $1:
burning fluid, 50 cents $ gallon; palm, seal, and cocoa
nut, 10 ^ cent ad val.: ?penn and whale or
other fish
(foreign fisheries,) 2U ^ cent ad valorem.
Olive, 13 bottle baskets
© 4 20
do in casks
2 20 ©
^ gall.
Palm
ft
13 ©
14
Linseed, city.
1 50 © 1 52
Sjf} gall
Whale.....
1 65 ©
1 70
do refined winter
1 SO ©
Sperm, crude
2 32 ©
2 35
do
winter, bleached
2 55 ©
i....
do
do
unbleached...
© 2 55
Lard oil
2 35 © 2 45
Red oil, city distilled.
...

........

do

saponified

20

Kerosene...

©

Straits

364
39*
41

354
39
40
34
87
86

.

.

.

4r
52

©
©
@
@
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

Paraffine, 28

—

80

1 30
1 85
55
83

©
@
©

gr. deodorized..

(free)...

Raiilfs—Duty: on white lead, red lead and
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents $ ft; Paris
white and whiting, 1 cent $ ft ;
dry ochres, 56 cents
$ 100 ft ; oxides of zinc, 14 cents
; ochre, ground,
in oil.
t

$150^ 100ft; Spanish brown 25 ^ cent ad val.;
clay, $5 ^2 ton; Venetian red and vermilion,
$ cent ad val.; white chalk, $10 ^2 ton.
Lithrage, American
ft
14
©
China

25

..

81
21

80
: 2

36

©
©
©
©
©

35
24
34
-

35
43

cont ad val.

$ bbl.
••

©
©

1 85
2 10

Lumber, Woods, Staves, Etc.--Duty
Lumber, 20 $ cent ad val.; Staves, 10 $1 cent ad val.;
cent ad
Rosewood and Cedar, free. Lumber and Timber of
all kinds,
unmanufactured, product of the British
North American Provinces, free.

18
45
15

,

@
@

The stock

do
do
middle...
do
<o
heavy....
do light Cropped
do middle d «
do bellies
do

14f @

Nuevitas
Mansanilla
Mexican
Honduras (American

Western thin

100 ft ; Old Lead, If cents

$ 100 ft

20

@

..

Cake—Duty: 20 <£? cent nd val.
City thin oblong, in bbls—^9 tun
53 00 @
do
in

$ ft; Pipe and Sheet, 24 cents $ ft.
Galena

@

17

75

Oil

3 00
8 50

‘

Spanish

logs
Port-au-Platt, crotches.
Port-au-Platt, logs

Oakum—Duty free

$ ft

@

cents

Ivory—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.

Lead—Duty, Pig, $2

50

English Islands

104

00
© 90 00

•?..

Domingo, ordinary

New Orleans
Porto Kieo
Cuba Muscovado
do Clayed

1 25
1 40

70 cents ^ 100 ft; Boiler and
Sheet, Band, Hoop, and Scroll,

bbl.. culls

OO
OO
OO
00
00
00

@150 00
@180 00
@ 95 00
@ 55 00
@100 o«
@ 80 00
@180 00

hhd.,-heavy

Molasses—Duty: 8

130

90

00

@140
@ 90
@200
@140
@100
@ 80

Mexican
Florida
^ cubic it.
Resewood, Rio Janeiro
^ ft
do
Bahia

nominal.

I64
16

do
do
do

55

t

19
17
16

@
154©
17 @
16 @
15 @
16 @

1 40

Kurpah

Pipe and Sheet.

Rio Grande, mixed..
(cash).. $ ft
Buenos Ayres,mixed
Hog, Western, unwashed

1 cent

'.

200
§250 00

wood)
Cedar, Nuevitas

Indigo—Duty free.

Bengal

@100 00

nhd., extra
hhd., heavy
hhd., light
hhd., culls
bbl., extra
bbl., heavy
bbl., light

St.

do
do
do
do
do
do

60

544 @
85 @

65 00
40 00

Sj9 M.

$ foot

do

70

@

African, West Coast, Prime
African, Serivellos, West Coast..

free.

American,Dressed

etc

less

Shipping and

Tampico,

*

25

or

80
65
55

East India

East India, Prime
East India, Billiard Ball

Gunpowder—Duty, valued at 20 cents or less
^ ft, 6 cents $ ft, and 20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
cents $ ft, 10 cents $ ft and 20
$ cent ad val.
Blasting (A)
$ keg of 25 ft
@ 6 50
@ 6 50
Mining
.
8 50 <a
8porting, in i ft canisters... $ ft
4S
@ 1 15
Hair—Duty

$ ft

§ 80 00

Mahogany, St. Domingo, crotches,

.

Para, Fine...
Para, Medium
Para, Coarse

6b

pipe, culls
"

..

Mahogany, Cedar, Rosewood—Duty

@ 18 00
@ 15 00

66

@

@ 4 75
@ 55 00

50
75 00
*6l) 00

free.

India Rubber--Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.

..

$

60
45

free.

is

@ 25 00
@ 30 00

hhd., light
HEADING—white oak, hhd

Produce of

# C

8ar

@ 10 50
@ 15 50
@ 16 50
@ IS 00
@ 20 50
@ 24 00

@
@

cent ad val.

4th

7 75
8 25
9 75

@
©
©

50
15

@ 27 00
@ 65 00

pipe, light

Red oak,
do

974

ft

00
00
00

per cent

@

of 1864

prices.
Pig, Scotch, Best,No l(cash) $ ton
Pig, American, No. 1
Bar, Swedes,assorted sizes (in gold)

00

18

96

the British North American Provinces

80
00
15

75
50
00

@
12*@
..

gold.

Horns—Duty, 10 $

00

75
25
50

©
©
@ 11
00
@ 14
00 @ 16
00 @ 17
00 @ 18
00 @ 20
00
@ 24
English 9,nd French Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and

26
22

Hops—Duty: 5 cents ^ ft.

10

00
50
00
50

20

do

Crop of 1865

foot; above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
cents $ square foot; all above that, 40 cents $
square
foot; on unpolished Cylinder, Crown, and common
Window, not exceeding 10x15 inches square, 14; over
that, and not over 16x24, 2; over that, and not over
24x30, 21; all over that, 8 cents $ ft.
American Window—1st, 2d, 8d, and 4th qualities.
(Subject to a discount of 20 @ 30 $ cent.)
6x 8 to 8x10
$ 50 feet ' 5 50 ©
25

12x19 to 16x24
18x22 to 20x30
20x31 to 24x30
24x31 to 24x36
25x36 to 30x44
80x46 to 32x 18
32x50 to 82x56.
Above

@

'

Glass—Duty, Cylinder or Window Polished Plato
not over 10x15 inches, 24 cents $ square foot;
larger
and not over 16x24 inches, 4 cents $ square foot;
larger and not over 24x39 inches 6 cents
square

'8x11 to 10x15
11x14 to 12x18

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

29
80

<|

:

STAVES
White oak, pipe, extra
do
pipe, heavy

12*
124

25 @
21 @

Honey—Duty, 20 cents $ gallon.
Cuba..(duty paid).(gold).$ gall.

75
75
60

@

Maple and Birch
Black Walnut

24 00
55 00
22 00
28 00
70 00

85 00
80 00

Oak and Ash

12

19

do

buffalo

21

*4

$ ft cash.

black, dry

Laths, Eastern
$ M
Poplar and W. wood B‘ds & Pl’k.
Cherry Boards and Plank

I64

11 @
11 ©
11 @

do
do

dead green

...

9
9

27

$ M feet

Southern Pine
White Pine Box Boards
White Pine Merchant. Box Boards
Clear Pine

18
17
20

P4©
S*@

..

Sierra Leone
Gambia and Bissau
East India Stock—

@

@
@
19 @

Upper Leather Stock—
B. A. & Rio G r. Kip
$ $2 cash.

00

..

..

Badger
Cat, Wild

.

Spruce, Eastern

164

18
16

do
do
do
do
do

trim. & cured.
do

do

18

16f@

$ ft gold.

00
50

..

brown...

Coutry sl’ter
City

No. 1.
..

17

do
do

California
Western

Western.

1 50 @ 2
75 @ 1
skin 5 00 @15 00
5 00 ©10
4 00 @ 8 00
4 00 @ 7
50 @
30 @
70
75 @ 1 50
60 @ 1
15 @
30
10’ @
6 00 @10 00
5 00 @ 8
.15 00 @100 00.. 5 00 @50
8 00 @10 00
2 00 @ 6
2 00 @ 3 50
1 50 @ 2
75 @ 1 00
50 @
2 00 @ 8
2 50 @ 4 00
5 00 @10 00
5 00 @ 8
1 50 @ 2
3 00 @
8 00 @ 4
5 00 @ 6 00
5 @
7 @
40
5 00 @ 7 00
4 00 @ 6
1 50 @ 2 00

do

Bahia
Chili
Wet Salted Hides—
Buenos Ayres
Rio Grande

@

16 @

Pernambuco
do
Tampico and Metamoras... do

Furs—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val. Product of the
British North American Provinces, free.
Gold Prices—Add premium on gold for currency

prices.

16

$1 lb cash.

Maranham

45
34

@
@
@

18
45

.........

Cherries, pitted, new

Maracaibo

17
38

©

..

25

'

;...cash.

Dry Salted Hides—

663

Lead, red, American
do white, American, pure, in oil
do

white, American, pine, dry.
Zinc, white, American, dry, No. 1.
do white, American, No. l,inoil
Ochre, yellow,French,dry ^ too ft
do
ground In oil
ft
Spanish brown, dry...
$ ltK) ft
do
ground in oil.^ ft
Paris white, No. 1
$ loo fts
do
do Am...,
^ 100 fts
Whiting, American.
Vermilion, Chinese
$ ft
..

..

15

@

154 @
9
©
1*4 ©
8 OO
@
H ©
1 50 @
8
4 25
..

..

Trieste
American

gold.

1 65
1 25
80

Ytnettim red, (N, C.)

V ewt»

5 00

do
do

©

14

i6
94
10
8 50
10

©
@
©

9
4 60

©
@
@

4 75

1 70
1 30
35

@
@ 559

6fS4

THE CHRONICLE.

C&rmine, city made.

China
Chalk

$
$ *on
.$ LbL
$ lb

clay

Chrome yellow

20 00
88 09
..

15

mace, 40 cents; nutmegs, 50;
cloves, 20; pepper and pimento, 15; and
finger root, 5 cents $ 16. (All cash.)
95 ©
C:issfa, in mats
....$ fl>
20 ©
25
Gimrer, race and African..

Spices—Duty:

© 25 00
© 40 00
@ 5 00

©

cassia and

49

Mace

l*etr©lomu—Duty: crude, 20 cents; refined, 40

$ gallon.
Crude, 40 © 47 gravity
Refined, free
.*
cents

do

39

f? gall.

©
©

in bon<l

Naptha, refined
Residuum

$ bbl.

52
7 50

©
©

54
S 00

$ ton.

Calcined, eastern
Calcined, city mllis

$ bid.

.
..

..
.

©

3

' ©

5 00

©

2 40
2 50

Provisions—Duty: cheese and butter, 4 cents
pork, 1 cent; hams, bacon, and lard, 2 cents

$ lb.

Produce of the British North At erican Pro¬
Free.

The market has been unsettled for pork,
dull. Beef steady.

Beef, plain

$ bhl.

mess

extra, (now)

do

mess,

do
do
do

prime

£ndia

00

14 00

mess.

75

25

do prime mess
do mess, Western
do prime, West’n, (old

and new).
$ lb

Lard, in bbls
kettle rendered

do

and closes
© 14 00
© 17 00

nominal,
nominal.
nominal.

mess

India

11

24

ii)

Hams, pickled
do
dry salted
Shoulders, pickled
do
dry salted

©
© 28

75

©
© 23 25
©
28?
29
©
22
©

©
15* ©
©

$ bbl.

Rags—(Domestic).

i*

City colored

.

©

5* ©

Country mixed

Su mac—Duty

13*
3

$ cent ad val.
$ ton 110 00

Ilyson, Common to fair

do
do

j

..

Superior to fine
Ex fine to finest

...

.

•

fine, Ashton's

do
do

..

fine, Worthington’s....
fine, Jeffreys & Darcy's

do
do

fine, Marshall’s

Onondaga,

com.

do
do
Solar coarse

bbls.
...210 1bbgs.

$ bush.

Fine screened

$I>kg.
240 16 bgs.

do

F. F

..
..

flue

do
do

..

•

do

8 50

2 .40 ©

©
@
©
43 ©
3 00 ©
3 00 ©
1 90

40

Ex fine to finest...

Gnnpow. & Imper., Canton made,

i

4 50
8 50
3 50

©

>

do Com. to fair
do Sup. to fine,
do Ex. f. to finest

do
do
do

:

j

If. Skin
2 50
do
2 00 ]
do
42 .
:

Sc

Twankay, Canton made

• •

..

do

1

Com, to fair..
Sup’r to fine..

do

do
do

'

50

...

■

© 2 50
©
©
©

Ex f. to finest.

j Uncolored Japan, Com. to fair
do
,

i

do
do

do

...

Sup’rtoflne..
Ex f. to finest

00

i

ft

Ex £ to finest

©

.

ii Oolong, Common to fair

70

Calcutta

©

©

Bombay

Shot—Duty: 2* cents $ lb.
Prop and Buck
$

14

©

medium, No. 3 © 4....

Canton, re-reeled, No. 1 © 2
Japan, superior
do
No. 1 © 3

10 00

11 00
1S 00
23 00

do
do
do

China thrown.
Italian thrown

Skills—Duty: 10$ cent ad val.

Product of the

British North American Prownces, Free.

Coat, Curacoa, No. i
do Buenos Ayres
do
do
do
do
do
do

VeraCruz

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

City
Honduras..’

r

*

$ lb

'

Payta

do

do

Sisal
Para
Vera Cruz

Ohagres
Port C. and Barcelona

$fi>.

21

©

21*

Spelter—Duty: in pigs, bars, and plates, $150 $ lb
nates,foreign
B>
©
10*
..
..

©

5 75
5 75
5 35

5 25

2
2
2
2

45
50
43
25
90

.....

American, Saxony fleece
do
do

Superfine, pulled
1, pulled
California, fine, unwashed

No.

do
do
Texas

70

lbs (Westevn.)—Ex. fine, bright...
do
Fine
do
do
Medium
do
do
do
Common
lbs (Virginia)—Ex. fine, bright...
do
do
Fine
do
Medium
do
do
do
Common
.

Navy lbs—Best
do

Medium

Common

Navy X lbs—Best
do

do

.*

Peruvian, unwashed

\

Valparaiso, unwashed

05

S. American Mestizo, unwashed..
do
common, unwashed..
Entre Rios, washed
do
unwashed
Sr: American Cordova

90
50
80

Persian

African, unwashed
do

washed

Mexican, unwashed
Smyrna, unwashed
do

washed

.$ lb

Medium..
Common,

.

65
55
...
..

..

©
@
©
©

©

©
©
©
©
©

Heavy goods

..
..

15 0

Corn
To Glasgow:
Flour
Wheat

..
..

..

$ ton

20 8 @22
..

$ bbl.

..

6 0

$ tee.

..

....$ bbl.

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

$

©

©

$ bbl.

$ ton

2
4

4*

*6
7

6*

© 2 8
*7*
©
7
©
© 6
© 22 0
© >5
© 4 0
© 8 0
..

..

lc-

c.

©

$ ft

Hops

Beef and pork
Measurement goods

@

:: ©

Heavy goods

! Oil
Beef
Pork
To Havre:
i Cotton

©30

3 0 @

$ bbl.

Petroleum

i

7-16
© 2 0
@ 5 6
@17 6
@20 0

..

Corn, bulk and bags...
*

d.

s.

6*
@
6*
6* @
© 8 8
© 2 6

■

j Wheat
'

16

:

Oil
Flour
Petroleum
Beef.
Pork

85
73

62*

24
•13
50
30
25
45
25
25
45

j®

$ ton

80
60

To London

10

1 00
70
60
78
70

©
©
©
©
©

d.

s.

$ lb
$ Dbl.

©
©
©
©
©
©

1 25

27
87
23

15* ©

Freig’iits-

Heavy goods

..

55
40
25
86
35
45

Zinc—Duty; pig or block, $1 50 $ 100 lb; sheet

Sheet

16*

1 10
1 00
80

65

70
67

2* cents $ lb.

H*
15*

.

75
70

©
©
©

22
43
45
25
15
35
20
22
35

Donskoi, washed

To Liverpool:
Cotton
Flour.....'
Petroleum

,

50
00
00
00

inquiry._

20
35
25
35
26
32
18

native

pulled

15
14
15
6
00

•

© 1
©150
© 30
© 25

©
©
00 ©
67 ©
65 ©
50 ©
37 ©

* and * Merino..’
Extra, pulled

42
35
10

•

70
65

$5)

full blood Merino

35
00
35

50

©

$ ct. off list.
30 $ ct off list.
8* ©
9#

North American Provinces, free.
Tlio market remains dull with moderate

©
©
©

52* ©
45 @
3‘2* ©
72* ©
©
05 ©
90 ©
75 @
@
20 ©
90 ©
60 ©
5) ©
72* ©

©

List.

77* ©

....

1
1
85
2
12

90
95
50
25
00
75
00

20

Corn, bulk and bags .:....$ bush.
Wheat, bulk and bags
Beef
$ tee.
Pork
$ bbl.

10
8
5
90
SO

2 75
00
45
00
45
00
00
20
25
1 75

6
2
3
1
8
8
1
1

©
©
©
©

f

Oil

10

5*25
5 25

1 25
4 00

(gold)*

24
50

40
25
S

7 t'O

©
© 5 00
© 6 00
© 3 65
3 00 © 3 50
4 00
© 4 90

.(gold)
(go d
.'.... (gold

20*

45

...

10 00
10 Oil

Wool—Duty: costing 12 cents or less $ lb, 3
$ lb; over 12 and not more than 24, 6 cents;
over 24 and not over 32,10, and 10 $ cent ad valorem;
over 32,12 cents $ lb, and 10 $ cent ad valorem; on
the skin, 20 $ cent ad val. Produce of the British

© 11 50

@

50
50
00
50
00

4 S5
4 00
3 50

....(gold)

cases

10
10
10
10
9

5 25

....(gold)

©

IS

Medium
Common

do




7

Common

do
do

do

$ ft*

©
©
©
©
@
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

5 75
6 00
5 75

cents

© IS 53
© 15 00

8* ©
10* ©
18* ©

% lbs—(dmk) Best

Bolivar

© 10 50

6 00
r» on

Telegraph, No. 7 to 11 Plain.$ lb

80

Manufactured (tax paid)—
10s and 12s—Best.
do
Medium

Madras

domestic

do
do
do
do
do

Havana, fillers

Soap—Duty: 1 cent $ lb, and 25 $ cent ad val.

do

.....

Medium do do
Good
do do
Fine
do do
.Selections do do
Conn, selected wrappers
do
prime wrappers
do fair wrappers .
do fillers
New York running lots
Ohio
do

Yara

,.

Tampico

Castile

12 75
14 50
11 00

do
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania and Ohio fillers

Matainoras

Cape
Deer, San J uan

I. O. Coke
Terne Charcoal
Terne Coke

Common leaf do

© 10 50

© 22 00
© 24 50

1

in

No. 0 to 18
No. 19 to 20
No. 27 to 36

Tobacco—Duty: leaf 38cents $ ft); and manu¬
factured, 50 cents $ lb.
The market has been quiet during the week, with
moderate sales of Kentucky.
5* ©
Lugs (light and heavy) $ $ (gold)
9*

i5

© 11 50

h 25

Wire—Duty: No. 0 to 18, uncovered, $2 to $3 50
$ 100 Jb, and 15 $ cent ad val.

14?

**»*

3 75
3 70

11 50 © 12 00
12 00 © 13 00

in light supply, and price*

Champagne

Tin—Duty: pig, bars,*and block,15 $ cent ad val.
u-uv.iv, .Wf tp V^VJU u
Plate and sheets and terne plates, 2* cents $ lb.
Banca
23
(scold)
$ lb
27* ©
Straits
(gold)
26*©
24*©.
English
(gold)
Plates, charcoal I. C
$ box
15 00 © 15 25

Silk—Duty: frte. All thrown silk. 35 $ cent
Tsatlees, No. 1 © 3
$ ft
11 25 © 18 00
Taysaams, superior, No. 1 @ 2 ...
11 50 © 12 00
do

do

do

Seeds—Duty; linseed, 16 cents; hemp, * cent $
lb; canary, $1 $ busheltof 00 lb; and grass seeds,
30 $ cent ad val.
13* ©
14*
Clover
$
8 50
© 4 00
Timothy, reaped.. *
$ bush.
3 00
© 3 10
Flaxseed, Arner. rough
© 26 00
Linseed, American, clean... $ tee
90 @ 3 15
do
Amoricau,rough. $ bush
do
do

©

©
©
©
©
©
©
©

,

14* @
0* ©

Crude

do

of the

nominal.
20 © 1 35
45 ©
1 60
70 © 1 90
nominal.
60 ©
70
80
©
90
©
1 15
25
©

do
Superior to fine
Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 2f cents; refined and j
do
Ex fine to finest
refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent $ lb.
partially
Souchong & Congou, Com. to fair,
Refined, pure
$ lb
..
©
22 j
do
do
Sup’rtoflne.

Nitrate soda

are

Marseilles

do
dry
Claret, in hhds

25
10 ©
50
40 ©
55 ©
05
nominal.
90 ©
I 20
30 © 1 50

Orange Pecco, Common to fine...

3 25

do

Tea—Duty: 25 cents per lb
The market is weak and little doing.

.....

<[9 sack

liquors

8berry
d >
Malaga, sweet....

17*

14* ©

$ ft

Salt—'Duty: sack, 24 cents I? 100 lb; bulk, 18
I Young Hyson, Canton made
$ 100 lb.
.do.
Common to lair
Turks Islands
.$ bush.
52* -j
50 ©
do
Superior to fine
Cadiz
©

Liverpool, ground

Wines and
firm.

..

American, prime, country and city

cents

•

cent ad val.

Brandy—J. & F. Martell..
llennessy
Otard, Dupuy & Co
Pinet, Castilllon & Co.

©200 00

: 1 cent $ lb.
Product
British North American Provinces, free.

2 00

Wines
and
Liqnors— Liquors — Duty:
Brandy, first proof, $3 per gallon, other liquors, $2.50.
Wines—Duty: value set over 50 cents $ gallon 20
cents $ gallon and 25 $ cent ad valorem ; over 50
and not over 100, 50 cents $ gallon and 25 $ cent
ad valorem; over $1 $ gallon, $1 $ gallen and 25 $

19

©
©

Tallo\r—Duty

13*
0*

Rice—Duty: cleaned 2* cents $ lb.; paddy 10
cents, and uncleaned 2 cents $ lb.
Carolina
$ 100 lb.
13 00 © 14 00
East India, dressed
9 50 © 10 00

10

Sicily

0*

2* ©
13

Canvas

©
©

15

1 75

©
©
©
©

.(gold)
(gold)
American, spring,
11
(gold)
English, spring
12
./gold)
Renault & Co
(gold)
Jules Robin
Snsrar—Duty: on raw or brown sugar, not above
(gold)
No. 12 Dutch standard, 8; on white or clayed, above
Marrette & C'o
(gold)
No. 12 and not above No. 15 Dutch standard*, not refin¬
United Vineyard Propr.. .(gold)
Vine Growers Co
ed, 3* ; above 15 and not over 20,4; on refined, 5 ; and
(gold)
on Molado, 2* cents $ lb.
Other brands Cognac
(gold)
The market has been very quiet during the week.
Tellevoisin f.eres
(gold)
Porto Rico
A. Seignette
m ©
$ lb
m
(gold)
Divert Pellevoisen
Cuba, inf to common refining
m ©
i;h i
(gold)
do fair to good
13* ©
Alex. Seignette
14 j
do
(gold)
do fair to good grocery
i H ©
Arzac Seignette.
mi
(gold)
do prime to choice do
Other brands Bochelle... .(gold)
14# ©
15* ■
do centtifugal ...
17
Rum—Jamaica
(gold)
-14* ©
Mel a do
St. Croix
8* ©
lov
(gold)
12* ©
13* ; Gin —Different brands
(geld)
Havana, Boxes D. S. N os. 7 to 9
do
do
do 10 to 12
13* ©
w* : Whisky—Scotch and Irish .(gold)
do
do
do 13 to 15
D omestic—N. E. Rum
14* ©
15*
(cur.)
do
do
do 10 to 18
Bourbon Whisky
17
15* ©
(-ur.)
do 19 to 20
do
do
18
Corn W hisky
17* ©
(cur.)
do
do
Wim s—Fort.
white
17 ©
18*
(gold)
Loaf....
©
20*
Burgundy Port
(gold)
20
Granulated;
Sherry
@
(gold)
Crushed and powdered
20
Madeira.
©
(gold)
15

White coffee, A
Yellow coifre

nominal.

12

White, city
Seconds

24
17
13
14

©
©
@
©

fishery, £ ad val.

f

...

I hi i

..

Beef hams

10

$

.

22

19

20

30

ad val.

German

Deef and
vinces.

23*

: bars and ingots, valued at 7 cents $
under, 2* cents; over 7 cents and not above II,
cents $ lb ; over 11 cents, 9J cents $ tb and 10 $

English, cast, $ lb

Whalebone—Duty: foreij

South Sea
North west coast
Ochotsk
Polar
•

or

cent

4 00

©,

28

1 40
9S

©
©
©
©
©

Steel—Duty

lb

Paris—Duty: lump, free; calcined,
$ cent ad val.

Blue Nova Scotia.
White Nova Scotia

(;0

Cloves

Plaster
20

30

]

Nntmejrs, No. 1
Pepper
Pimento, Jamaica.... ..(gold)

©

S2

..

[November 18,1865.

1
10

Wheat, in shipper’s bags.. $ bush.
Flour
Petroleum

$ bbl.

Lard, tallow, cat meats, etc $ ton
Asfcei, pot usd pearl,.............

6

6

10

November 18,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.
cent in
25 per

<£I)C ftailwajj ittonitor.

one

additional

an

presses,” which belongs properly to railroads.
Erik-Drew Stock Called in.—The Erie
Railway Company has
uotified Mr. Drew of their intention to take up his loau of
28,000

All influence in the Erie board prevents any arrangement with the
Atlantic and Great Western that would tend to array against them the
Lake Shore Company.. It is also stated that the

propellers, by

stock, and every additional prospect, it i3 said, of
cent within the coming four months.

This statement must be
very satisfactory to stockholders of rail¬
ways, whose tracks and cars are worn out doing business for “ex¬

Great Western Management.—In relation to
this important subject the Cincinnati Gazette publishes the followiu«:
Atlantic and

Erie

665

ownership of the

of the directors of that road,

shares of the stock.

Fourteen hundred shares have been

prominent

and the balauce will

be delivered

was a

of the disagreement. However this may be, it is a tact that al¬
though the Erie road receives ten passengers at Salamanca to one it
receives at Dunkirk, the managers afford better facilities to the Lake
Shore than to the Atlantic and Great Western.
A step was taken to secure au independent road to New York for :
the Atlantic and Great Western. To this end negociations were
opened !
for the purchase or lease of the Morris and Essex and Catawissa
road. We are able to state, on the highest authority, that the Morris !
and Essex road was bought outright, and the Catawissa leased for nine¬
ty-nine years, by the Atlantic interests. The- arrangements have all i
been made and concluded and the papers signed. But there is still a i
gap of one hundred and thirty miles between the Atlantic and Great '

this week.

cause

91.72

canceled,

The fuuds for this

payment have been derived from the recent English loan of £1,000,000, negotiated in London with Messrs. J. S. Morgan & Co.,
Sterne Brothers, and J. T. Mackenzie, on 7
per cent convertible

sterling bonds. These bonds were negotiated at 67 and 69,
bring about 110 in currency at the present rate of exchange.
Ottawa

anu

Prescott Railroad -—The Ottawa and
railroad of Canadi is to be sold. It will
probably go
hands of the principal creditors—the Ebbow Yale Iron

Prescotu"
into the
Company.

and

leaving New York, to make

•

It is supposed that this road will be of
Western and the terminus of the Catawissa road.
This it is deter¬
great importance when the
mined to build at once, and a charter has been secured for that
seat of government shall be
purpose.
fairly located at Ottawa.
The link completed, the Atlantic and Great Western will have a contin- i
Change of ,Cache in Missouri.—A bill has been introduced
nous broad gauge road under one management from Cincinnati to New
York, saving in distance one hundred and twenty miles, as
into the Missouri LegElature,
compared j
according to the recommendation of
with the route via Salamanca, and being the same as that via Steubenf Gov.
Fletcher, authorizing such a change in the railways of that
ville, Pittsburg, and Allentown.
We are also able to state that the English
capitalists decided, before Stale as will enable them to operate in conjunction with roads out

investments west of Cincinnati, but to ' of the State without change
of cars.
the Great Western and Atlantic road,
Michigan Southern Guaranteed Stock.—The settlements with
so as to carry the broad gauge
through to the seaboard with as little de-!
lay as possible, and make the entire line in all its appointments the the guaranteed stock holders of the
Michigan Southern Road are
most thorough and magnificent road in the world.
reported to reach $1,000,0(0. No statement was made of the af¬
Express vs. Railroad Investments.—The
Chicago Tribune fairs of this company by its treasurer in the annual report distrib¬
concentrate their

means

no

upon

says:

•

uted to the Stockholders. That
The American Express Company paid, in 1501, dividends on a
cap- : financial statements
ital of £2,000,000, amounting to 38 per cent in cash and 50
showing its
per cent in

stock. On its capital, thus increased
ready declared, in 1505, cash dividends of

paid

COMPARATIVE
f—Chicago and Alton.
1863.

1801.

1805.

1281 in.)

(281 in.)

$1()0.1HU
154,418
195.803

$201,903. .Jan..
252,583 ..Feb.

182.081

102,723

132,301

178,780
206,090

203,149. .April.
312,310. ..May..

145,542
149,137
157,948
170,044
170,910
150,869

18037
<009 in.)

(724 m.)
$984,337

$845,095

,..l>ee..

1,099.507
1,072.293

810,801
905,294

1.222.508

1,024,0-19
1,035,321

1805.
(724 in.

—

Michigan Central.
1863.
1864.

(285 m.)

(285 in.)
$252,435
273,848
348,802

$242,073
245,858
236,432
238,495

338.270

236,453

271,553
205,780
263,244
340,781

206,221
193,328
215,449
308,108

408,445

375,4S8
339,794
306,186

410,802
405,510
370,470

3,143,945

3,960,940

427,094
395,845
350,753

407,077
463,509
505,814
466,300
487,642

5,132,934

3,988,042
1800.

i

.

10,469,481 13,429,643

462,987

..Year

—

<150 in.)

..Dec...

1,105,304
1,301.005

366,598
461,965=

503.401

1,334,217

994.317

$337,350

407,088

.

...Oct
..Nov..

1,041.975

087,092

1863.

480,710

$458,950

934.133
1.114.508

(731,243

(468 in.)

281.304
290.109
413.180
551,122
405.915

$908,341. ..Jan..
880,039. ..Feb
1,240,020. ..Mar.
1.472.120. .April.
1.339,279 .May..
1,225,528. .June..
1,152,803. ..July.
1.304.120. ..Aug.
1,345,456. ..Sep..

948.059
S48.783
770.148

Pittsburg.

505.145

•

1,224,909

839.949

956,445

Year

.

1865.




421.303

519.300
009.005
729.759

710.378

0,114,500
1804.

(150 in.)
$501,231

425.047
300.802
270.0 TO

472,240

244.7T1

281.759

356.620

278,540

202.392

253,049

190,304
219,501
208,100
302.174
295.750

273.720
300.595
301.000
340.900
340,738

481,550

507,552

3,720,140

4,274,550

1279,137.
314,228.
337,240.
401,450.

.

.Feb

208.013

..May..

204,835
241,230

.Nov

.

.Dec..

.

304.445
338.454

.April.

490.093. ..Oct..
—

230,508
257,227

305.003. June.

.

$256,600

..Mar..

329,105. ..July.
413,501. Aug.
470.001
.Sep..
—

1804.
<524 in.)

$248,784

.

..Year

EARNINGS

189.145
238.012

308,106

330.051
207.120

315,258
278.891

358,802
402.219
404.508

375,507
332,000
348,048

4-18,934

3,302,541

4,110,154

411,800

1803.

$684,260. ...Tan..
696.738. .Feb..
.

886,511. ..Mar..
7:38,107.

April.
601,238. ..May..
650.311. Juno

612,127. .July..

718,010. .Aug..
759,405. ...Sep..

807,382. ..Oct...

(238 m.)
$35,047
31,019
30,912
43,058

44,835

00.000

00,301

72,452

.

—

.

3,095,470

AllliXUlO

1805.
(150 Mi)

1803.

<708

$525,930.

in.)

$299,944

351,759. May
310,049. .June..
July..

334.087
407.992

.

.

.271.085
275.0431

289,224

.

343.929
51l 305

—

.Aug*
..Sep...

—

.

—

478,570

Oct...
..Nov..

—

490.433
437.079
424.531

.

—

..Dec...

—

.

4,571,028

—

-

1805.

.

300.301. ..Feb..
413,322. ..Mar.

300,245. .April.

353,194....May..
402,122...June.
309,083....July..
474,700....Aug-.
484,173.....Sep..
521,030.....Oct...
—

.

—

.. .

.Nov..

.Dec..

(238 in.)
$— ...Jan..
...Feb..
...Mar.

—

—

..April.
May..

—

..June.

89.978...July..
—

—

—

....Oct...,
...Nov...

...Dec...

-

*.

Year..

.

.

OvyliLx tilt

1

>

(70S in.)

<708'//'.)

$327,900

;

180,408

1,917,100

$540,410. ...Ian.
522.555. ..Feb.
592,270. ..Mar..

410.588

459.702
423.797
400.373
510.1(H)

423,578
580.964
799.230
001.391
057.141

003,402

..

215,503
226,047

243,417
243,413
223,846

-

-—Marietta and Cincinnati.—.
1803.
'

491.297.
454.004.

.April.
..May

590,001. June.
527.888. ...5 uly.
001.548.,..Aug.
700.739 ..Sep..
021.819.
Oct..
Nov..
Dec..
—

..

—

..

0,329,447

2,512,315

180,240
181,175
‘

$180,048

193.919

181,9:15

1805.

,.

Year

—

..

1804.

1865.

(251 in.)

(251 m.)

91,809
94,375
93,078

(251 nu)
$98,112
86,020
93,503
82,180
73,842
110,180
108,051
112,155
120,057

90,570

117,604

$38,203

$77,010

53,778
00.540
04.300
35.320
40.700

74.409

58,704
52,804
7 7.112
83.059
70.764
68.803

710,225

Mil. and Prairie du Chien.->
1803.

(524 in.)
$395,980.. .Jan.

Year

—

1861.

Jan
418.711. ..Feb..
424.870. ..Mar..
311,540. .April.
.

.

170.879

203,514
210,314
214,533
204,637
242,171
248,292
220,062
201,169

182,085

...Oct..
..Nov..
.Dec..

—

202,857

100.569
182.055

.

—

$139,414

152,662

..Julj*..

—

(204 in.)

140,952

288.095. .Aug*..
381.290.....Sop .

321,037

1,959.207

.

...Dec

.

232.728.

I860.

(204 in.)

135,211

.

224.980
271.140
331.494
324.865
330.011

1864.

in. )

$123,808
115,394

.

227,200. ..May
311,180. t. J line.

243,178

190.435
201.134

—

103,627. .Aug..
131,885... Sep...

827,615

185,013

210.030

—

.Jan..
..Feb..
289,403. Mar..
180.172.,

198.079

210,729

84,483

534.300

120.798
144.995

923,880. ...Oct..
.Nov..

'71,352
83,940

‘

1803.

<204

$305.554.
240,331.

175.482
243.150

940,707. ...Sep..

51,281
76,136

(182 ID.)

IT 0,937
139.1 12
100.306

..

49.073

67,515

.

747.942. June.
702.092. July
707.508. ..Aug..

—

.Nov..
.Dec.

Year..

(238 in.)
$38,778
54,735

(182 in.)
$158,735

^-Cleveland and Pittsburg.—.

1805.

122,512

.

408,358. .April.
585.023. ..May..

.

RAILROADS.

1861.

$140,024'
130,225

.

482.104.
Feb..
499.290. ..Mar..

1S05

(408?/?.)

PRINCIPAL

(182 in.)

$5-11,005. ..Jan..

-

OF

/—Chicago and Rock Island.—-

1805.

<079 in.)

Rome, Watert’n & Ogdensb.
1S63.
1804.

18657

7,120,465

390,355

1803.
<524 in.)

$300,324. .Jan.

W., & Chicago.
1864/

914,082

.

<285 in.)

—

net condition. This financial op¬
eration further postpones the prospect of dividends on the common
stock, while it increases the amount thereof on the market.

Iich. So. North and Indiana.

Ft.

(408 m.)
$290,070
457,227
011,297
588,066
525,751
532,911
506,640
625,547
675,300
701,352
691,556

317.839

..Oct...
Nov..

Railway.
1864.

1863.

202.321

400,830

.

2,770,484

(724 in.)

$273,875

300,100

315,9-14. July
391,574. ..Aug..
399.002. ...Sep..

252,015

Erie

$232,208

1804.

221.709
240.051
280.209

343.985. .June.

320,381
320,879
307.803

1,673,700

(009 in.)

288,159. ..Mar.

224.257
290.540

153,294

MONTHLY

!

Chicago & Northwestern.

(2S1 in.)
$109,850
101,355
104,372

<

to £3,000,000, it has al¬
25 per cent, and 20
per

up

documuent does not contain any

89,901
72,389
83,993
78.097

90,90S
95,453

—

—

1,0:38,105

—

New York Central.-

<234 w.)

1804.
<234 in.)

$07,130

$102,749

70.132
44.925

$98,183.. .Jan..

115,135

$920,272

$921,831

790.107

807,590

88,177

140,418

9:36,587
1,059,028

911,395

1.105,664

100.907
111.200
71.587

212.209

74.283.. Feb.
70.740.. .Mar..
100.089.. April.
140.943.. .May..
224,838.. June.
177.159.. .July.
170,554.. .Aug..
228.025.. ..Sep..
..Oct..
Nov..
'.. .Dec...

839.120
841.165

1,064,435
1,029,736

818,512
840,450
1,079,551

1,055,793
1,273.117
1.450,076

1.041.522
1.045.401

1,196,435
1,157.818

1,157,813

1.039,902

69,353
155,417
205,055
138.342
112.913

1,247,258

88.221

180.747

139,547
113,399
108,218

178,520
149.099

117,013

1805.

1863.

(234 in.)

<056 in.)

1864.
(056 m.)

.—

..

—

—

1,711,281

Year

—

..

.

St. Louis, Alton & T. Haute.
1803.

1804.

(210 in.)

(210 in.)
$100,872

$109,808
110.003
120.310
123.115

147.485
100,497

113,798
123,949
118,077

149,855
155,730

130.373

153,470

218,230
234,194

144,730

203,785

143,748
102,921

1^34,918

144.942

2,084,074

—

—

1,500,000
—

—

—

11,009,853 13,230,417
1863.

(210 ill.)

$170,078.. J an..
.

153,903.. Feb
202.771....Mar..
109.299...April.
.

-•

1864.

1865.

(242 m.)
$80,321

(242 ill.)
$79,735

(242 m.)
$144,084

91.971
103.050
132.111

95.843
132.896

139,171

155,753
144,001

1:34,272

123,987
127,010

13S 7 38

.June.

152.585

156,338

194,523

..July.;

177,0*25
173,7*22
102,570.
213,553.
209,459.
2*2*2,924.

105,554

..Aug...
.Sep...

110,379

139,620
244,114

*271,796
*374,<2 4
375,534

..May..

.

...Oct...
.

.Nov...

.Dec
-

915.600

1,300,000
1,204,4:35

Toledo, Wabash & Western

1805.

202,900
204,720

157.780

I860.

(656 in.)
$899,478
581,372

..

..Year..

120,595
151,052
134,563

111,839

.,439,798

243,S40
221,570

220,209
265,154

2,050,322

.—

•

—

484m

[November 18, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

666

BOND LIST.

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Railroad

1st

2d
1st
2d

do
do
do
do
do
Jan. & July

j 2,000,000

j

400,000

Mortgage, sinking fund, (N. Y.)j 1.000,000
.......do

do

777.500

Mortgage, sinking fund, (Ohio)
do

do
Atlantic and St. Lawrence:
Dollar Bonds

j

.

1855
1S50.
1S53

Bdlefontaine Line:
let Mortgage (B. & L.) convertible. j

116,000

do

650,000

(I. P. & C.)

do
do

347,000

do
Belvldere heiaware:

i

do

Blossburg and Coming :
Mortgage Bonds

Boston, Concord and Montreal:
1st
1st
2d
2d

—!

;

|

May & Nov. 1S71

!

i

11889

I

Boston and Imeell:

Mortgage Bonds
Buffdo. Sew York and Erie:
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Buffalo and 'Stale Line:
1st Mortgage

400,000

6

426,714;

■

500,000'

|

Income...
Erie and Northeast
Camden and Amboy:

400,000,

6 *;Feb.
6

& Aug! 1883

May & Nov.-lSSO

} 4,209,400;

J’ne & Dec.ilS93

490,000:
493,000:

7
7

141,000;

7

|Feb. & Aug

900,0001

7 'Feb. &

450,000
800,060
800,000
950,000
1,365,800

7 iFeb. &
7 iMav &
7 i M’ch &
7 Ap’l &
7 j Jan. &

1,192,200

7 i

!

Mortgage

2d
do'
Catawissa:

i
I

Mortgage

Central of Sew

Jersey:

Mortgage
do

I

Angll370

I

Mortgage W. Div
E. Div

do
do
Sd
do
4th
do
Income
Cheshire

(Sink. Fund)
do

90
90

;

89#

I

....

1st
1st
2d

do
do

Jan. & July i 75-’80

!

Mortgage (Skg Fund), pref

6

530,000;

7
7
7

iMav &

2.400,000:
1,100,000;

income

I Jan.

1st

Trust

Mortgage (S. F.) convert..
do

do

1st

Mortgage
Chicago and~MHwaukee:
1st Mortgage (consolidated)
Chicago and Northwestern;
Preferred
let

2,000,000
2,000,000.

Sinking Fund

Mortgage

i

Sinking Fund Bonds

Chicago and Rock Idand:

Cincinnati and Zanesville

do

I

Cleveland. Palnesville and Ashtabula:
Dividend Bonds

900.00C!
1.157,000

j

convertiole

do

•;

a: ’j‘a

Cleveland and 7oledo:
Sinking Fund Mortgage
Con vecticut River:
let

Mortgage

M’ch &

250,000
:

85

161,000

do

J’ne & Dec.

do

109,500

Mortgage

3d
Toledo

do

642.000' 7

Depot Bonds

162,500'

Delaware:

7

|

do

do

IS¬
IS—

Mortgage, guaranteed
500,000] 6 'Jan. & July 1875
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western:
;jan. (fe July'l875
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
1,500.000
M’eh & Sep!18Sl
2d
600 000
do
Jan. & JbIv j.371
t*clsawanna and Western
900,000
1st




e

....

95
96

1

j

i

102

!io6"
*

'100

*

*

107

.....

do

do

May & Nov.
Jan. & July

903.000

j

960,000 ; 7 I April & Oct

500,0001 6 Man. & July
;

1870

|Feb. <fc Aug
do

7 i

do

300,56:

j

;Feb. & Aug
j 1.000,000 ! 7
do
i
j
| 2,230,500 8 Feb. & Ang
215,000; 8 April & Ocl
:
4,328,000 8
do

Mortgage, dollar
do
sterling

c, 1.691,293! 7

Michigan Central:

Dollar, convertible
do
do

Michigan South. & North. Indiana: j

]

1st Mortgage, sinking fund
do
2d
Goshen Air Line Bonds.

6S2,000l

*»i

7

.

do

do'

'695,000 7

7

93

94#
88

do

590,000 7
do
3.612,000 7 May & Nov,

i

111

1877
7 !Feb. & Aug 1868

400.000 8

do

J

112
108
108

1875
1876
1876
1877
1883

!

1st
do
Oskaloosa
1st Land Grant Mortgage

2d

J9-72
1882
1882

',«»

84

1893
1893

1,000,000 ;

1st Mortgage, sinking fund—#...
Naugatuck:
1st Mortgage (convertible)
ICO# N. Haven, N. London & Stonlngton:
1st Mortgage
,,.Jl03

,„..100

88

1,000,000! 7 Jan. & July

do

do
do
Morris and Essex:

85

'Feb. & Aug
7 |April & Oct
I

4,600.000l

Mortgage

Mississippi and Missouri River:
1st Mortgage, convertible
2d
do
sinking fund
2d

1892
1892

443,000 7 'Jan. & July 1891

Mortgage, sinking fund

Milwaukee and St. Paul:

85

tS83
1883

May & Nov. 1885

4,S22.000

2,194,0001 7
ACO AA/i
p*

Milwaukee <£ Prairie du Chien:

2d

85

1883

1,804.000 ! 7

41.000:7 1

Marietta and Cincinnati:

1st

95

225,000 7 May & Nov. 1890

1st Mortgage
1st Lebanon Branch Mortgage
let Memphis Branch Mortgage

' 92#

90

1,300,000 6 |May & Nov

Louisville and Nashville:

90

100

1872
1869

1,465,000 : 6.:May&Nov.

Extension Bonds

1st

Oct! 1883
1S61
1862

1,000,000

....

1st Mortgage, sinking fund....
Long Island:

do
Sink. Fund,

do

250,000: 6

Mortgage, Eastern Division....

1st

1862
1S58

do

230.000 6

little Miami:
1st Mortgage
Little Schuylkill:
1C3
100

1870

800,000 6 April & Oct 1870

1

fjehigh Valley:
1st Mortgage
100

!

600,000 , 8 ;April &

do

3d
2d

1961

283,000 8 'Jan. & July 1867
1881
do
2,655.500 8 I

do

1st Mortgage, sinking fund

1st

Dayton and Michigan:
1st
21

I

i:

.\p’l & Oct. 1904

j 1876

I

187,000 ' 7 Mch & Sept!l861
892,000 7 April & Oct 11873

1100 j la Crosse and Milwaukee:

SepilS78
j

.
..

685,000, 7 May & Nov J1881
:

i | Kennebec and Portland:
i 1st Mortgage
2d
i
do

July11885-

800,000

Mortgage Bonds
do

Jan. &

j

Mortgage

Cumberland Valley:
1st
2d

do
\ \ Joliet and Chicago:
;

do *

200,000 7 I

Mortgage

2d

:

1875
Jan. & Julv 1892

1408,740'

!

!Jan. & Julv 1866

600,000 7

400.000; 7

1st Mortgage

!

do

| 1,802,000

Connecticut and Passumpsic River
1st

112

M’ch & Sep 1873

1.70350a

98#
I

1590

do

364,000.10

| Jeffersonville;

Feb. & Aug 18S0
1874
do

j

Cleveland and Pittsburg:
2d Mortgage

100

600,Q001 7 Jan. & July lS66

Mortgage

1st

500.000

Snnbury and Erie Bonds

102#

....

1

j

2,086,000' 6

do

1st

1

Feb. & Aug 1873
M’ch & Sep 1864
1875
do

648,2001

95
l

1

7,975,500 - 7 April & Oct'1875
do
1S75
2.896,500' 6

Mortgage

July

'

500,000; 6' May & Nov 1870
500,000 6 Feb. & Aug'1875

Mortgage
; Indianapolis and Madison:

1890

850,000
244,200

.

j

Jan. &

sinking fund

Mortgage, convertible

1st

1893

510,000

.

do

?°

May & Nov

:

1,037,500 7 Jan. & July 1876
1,000,000 6 :
d©
.1876
!
!
,
191,000 6 Jan. & July,1877
i
!
!
3,890,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1870
do
1869
110,000 6 i
2,000.000 7 jj’ne & Dec.1885
l.S-i0;000 7 May & Nov.jl877
do
1867
...i 1,002,000 7

2d
do
Real Esrate

1S67
1880

do

-II

Indianapolis and Cincinnati:

90

:

Mortgage
.•
Cleveland. Columbus and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage
Cleveland and Mahoning:
1st Mortgage
1st

7

May & Nov.

379.000

do

3d
4th

1870

1,300,000

Mortgage

2d
3d

July

Jan. &

1,397.00C|

.*

94
|

1

do

2d

j

jlS94

1,249,000

Mortgage

Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton:
1st
2d

1st

41

1885
iS85
May & Nov. 11863
Quarterly. k915
Feb. & Aug 1885

484,00C1

96
96

Indiana Central:

Feb. & Aug'i
do
j

943’0OCj

j

-

927,000 6 Feb. & Aug 1SS3

Sterling
Redemption bonds

Sep 1890

Ap’l & Oct.

: Jan. & July'1898

756.00:

Extension Bonds
let

7

1,250,000
3^00,00C;

Interest Bonds
Consol

7 !

j

700,000 6 Jan. & July 1883

!

Mortgage, convertible.,

1st

11883

j M’ch

Bonds, (dated Sept. 20, 1560)
Chicago and Great Eastern:

I

:

do

1st

1882

JnlyilSSS

S.437,750 7 April & Oct 1881
633,600 7 Jan. & JulylS83

| Illinois Central:
92

& July 1892

467.000; S ; Jan. &
do
3,167,000 8 i
6S0,0(X! 7
&

iuconvert

..-1,350,000 7 Jan. & July,1865

Mortgage

2d

100
102
05

927,000 6 Jan. & July 1870

i
II
\
! 1,000,000 10 April & Oct 1868

Convertible

101

Julyjl870

99#

i

Huntington and Broad Top;

Nov.11877

j Ap’l & Oct.

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy:

do

sinking fund

do
do
do

1868
1879
1883
18S0

1,963,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1S82
1,086,000 7 ;May & Nov. 1S75

Mortgage

2d
3d

Oct.;18S5
July 11876
do
I 57-’ 62

600,000

149,000 7 Jan. &

Housatonic:
;| 1st Mortgage
j Hudson Liver :
1st
1st

Aug 1890
Nov 11890
Sep 1865

!

Mortgage Bonds

Chicago and Alton:

do

2d

90

....

I

!

1,002,500 7 June <fc Dec 1S88

I ! 1st Mortgage.

1

:

...V

Hartford, Providence and Fishkill:

:

100

94# 96

July 1873

!

I

3,000,000 7 May & No

j i Hartford and New Haven:
i; 1st Mortgage
j

100
•

.! 4,000,000 7 M’ch & S<
! 6,000,000 7 I
do
j 3,634,600 7 April &Oct'18SO

...

Harrisburg and Lancaster
New Dollar Bonds

....

Central Ohio:
1st
1st
2d

!

Land Grant Mortgage
Convertible Bonds

j 1882

IMay & Nov.'1875

600,000; 7

do

«

Oct.jlS88

7 Jan. &

*..| 1,000,000

do
East.
do
Hannibal and St. Joseph:

95#i 96
96

do

Grand Junction ;

.I!

I
jJan. & July;1873
I Ap’l & Oct.j 1879

j

Loan

6

j

Consoldated (*5,000,000)
Camden and Atlantic:

598,000 7 Ap’l &

!; Great Western, (111.):
jt 1st Mortgage West. Division

I

• 1,700,000
867,000;

Eollar Loans
ollarLoan

J

7 lAp’l & Oct. I860
7 IJan. & July:'69-’72
do
'jl870 j

200.000

I

!

7 J’ne & Dec. 1S77
7- 'May & Nov'1872

i 2.000.000

do

•

80
80

672,600 6 Feb. & Aug-1874

j! Mortgage

i

i

■;

!

:

July;lS73

Jan. &

5th

•

690,000 6 Jan. & July 1872

convertible

;

! 97#:
1

do

do

j! 2d

i

do

-

j Erie and Northeast:
!! i ■ Mortgage
Galena and Chicago Union :
: i 1st Mortgage, sinking fund.

■ |

6 ;

4th

•

.

!

convertible

.

I...... j

200,000

3d

do

|]
I...

2d

i

!

j

!.

do

1st
2d

i|

;

j 99 I

1

Sinking Fund Bonds

\ Erie Railway:
j! 1st Mortgage

j

Feb. & Aug 1S65
300.000
do
200,000'
jlS65
250.000 7 Jan. & July! 1370
do
i 1870
100,000 6,

...;

do
do

1st

i
1

i

I

84,000 7 Feb. & AuglS76
j l
j
300,000' 7 Jan. & July 1863
600,000 7 |
do
|1894

j

} Elmira and Williamsport:
1st Mortgage

J’ne & Dec. 1867
M’ch & Sep;1885
Feb. & Aug 1877

|

|

do
do
100#
100# 101 | East Pennsylvania:
102#'
! | Sinking Fund Bonds —

i

Mortgage

1 st

07
100

150,000

do

So

2d

Eastern (Mass.):
Mortgage, convertible...

;

500,000
589,500

1.000,000

(guar. C. and A.)

1st Mort.
2d Mort.
3d Mort.

1st Mortgage, convertible

96#! 96%I;Detroit, Monroe and Toledo:
|
|j 1st Mortgage
!Dubuque and Sioux City:
86 j 86 !
1st Mortgage, 1st section
2d section
! 1st
do

Jan. & July!1866 I
’70-’T9‘
do
1870 j
do
1870
do
do

422,0001

[ Detroit and Milwaukee:

.-!j

1866

368,000

extended...

do

do
do

1st
2d
1st
2d

$1,740,000; 8 Feb. & Aug 1887
348,000 7 J’ne & Dec.;1874
'!
i i
! 2,500,000 7 May & Nov. 1875
do
1864
; 1,000,000 8 :

Income Bonds

96#: 96# !

; 1,000,000 6 Ja Ap Ju Oc 1S67
! 1,128.500' 6 ;Jan. & July 11875
do
'1830
:
700,000| 6 I
:
2,500,000 6 Ap’l & Oct.'1885

Mortgage (S. F.) of 1S34

!|

j

!& & Nov. 1S78
ay

484,000

,

1

!

988,000

!
i

Baltimore and Ohio:
do
do
do

6,000,000

:

Sterling Bonds
do
do
do

4,000,000

,

1879
1882
1882
1879
1881
1876
1883

Ap'l & Oct.

$2,500,000

Mortgage, sinking fund, {Pa.)

x

Des Moines Valley :
96#! 96#;; Mortgage Bonds
.

2d
do
do
Eastern Coal Fields Branch..do

Payable.

ing.

Payable.

5

Railroad:
Atlantic and Great Western :
let

outstand¬

DESCRIPTION.

!

tag.

market.

Amount

-

outstand-

DESCRIPTION.

INTEREST.

MARKET.

INTEREST.

Amount;

3,500,000 7 ; May &

300,000 7 |Jan.
450,000

SOp.OQQ

45

47#

Nov

&July

M’ch & Sep
Jan: & July

1861
1868

»r>■*

•*’(

November 18,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

RAILKOAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

$500,000

51,000'

Mortgage .

New York Centred:
Premium Sinking Fund Bonds ..
Bonds of October, 1863 (renewal)
Beal Estate Bonds...

Plain Bonds

New York, Providence and Boston:
1st Mortgage

.

*

Mortgage (guar, by Baltimore).
do
(guar, by B. & O. RR.l
do
do
(do
do )
do
(not guaranteed)
-

Norwich and Worcester:
General Mortgage —
Steamboat Mortgage

3,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

jMay&Nov.
iFcb. & Aug!
do

do )...,

500.000 6
150.000 6

let

220,700 6 ; April & Oct!

2,500,000 6 i April & Oct i
360,000 10 j

do

7

2d
2d

do
(general)
do
(general);
Philadel.. Oermant. & Norristown:
Consolidated Loan
Convertible Loan

Mortgage

Philadel., miming. & Baltimore:
Mortgage Loan

Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago:
let Mortgage
do
do

Pittsburg and Steubenville:
1st Mortgage

Mortgage

Raritan and Delaware Bay:
1st Mortgage, sinking fund.
Convertible Bonds
Rome. Watertown and

1st Mortgage

(kT*

t

:::::::::::::

BQnausJcy,. Dayton and
let

Haute:
..

Cincinnati:

Mortgage (extended)
do



IKS

Scrip’.,*!,* ** .* f ’ | ’ * ,* *f

an^

....

.

April & Oct

.

.

.

1st

1st
2d

95
91

....

114

|

115#

••••!|

....

Feb. & Aug

Mortgage

....

80

Sept

2,200,000
2,800,000

do

do

Jun. & Dec.
do
Mch & Sept
do

do

.

1870
1890
18S5

Feb. & Aug
do

1863
1863
1863

July! 1875
Aug 1881

1,700,000;

Semi au’ally 1894
do
1S94
Mav & Nov. 1894

1,000,000

Feb. &

.* * 1

....!
....!

j!
"* j

-:|l
1

170
26

;

;

2,778,341

-j

S3

fl

90

590,000 6 May & Nov. 1876

90

i

xii

••

1,764,330 6 Mch &

.

do

Sept 1872
Jan. & Julv 1882
May & Nov. 1870

8 980,670

6
5S6,500 6

Improvement .*

75’
...

Susquehanna and Tide-Water:
Maryland Loan

806,000 5 Jan. & July 1864
do
1806 !
200,000 5 !

Sterling Loan, converted

Mortgage Bonds
Interest Bonds, prof

993.000

227,569

6
6

j 2,500,000

6

‘

j

Union (Pa.) :7
1st Mortgage

:

do
do

1878
1864

•

•

•

i 45
•

....

1

May & Nov.! 1888

2S

West Branch and

Susquehanna;
IstMortgage....

;

..!

450,000 6 Jan. &

July! 1878 j

750,000: 6 IJan. & July, 1S78

Miscellaneous:

Manposa Mining:
1st Mortgage*
2d

do

1,600.000
1

2,000,000,

Jan. &

July IS—
April & Oct ' 8

1st

Mortgage.

600 000

Mortgage,

600,000 7 June & Dec! 1873
5io,coo; t
i8T91

Feb. &

Augj 1871

,...

■

...

750,000 6 April & Oct 1S76

1st

....

ft

94

:

2d

i

»

9*

182,000 G Jan. & Julv 1876

Mortgage Bonds

77

1900

201,500: 7 May & Novj 1875
75,593 6 ;Feb, & Aug,' 1S78

Morris

Mch & Sept 1864

6

1

90
78
70

:::

1

.11 Wyoming Valley:
.!!!! ist Mortgage

! ”“!
;

90

June & Dec1 I860
Mch & Sept! 1870

!

Unsecured Bonds.

do

j

;Jan. & July; 1878 j 90

752,f>00 7 Jan. & July 1S65
do
; 1868
161,000 6

Branch:
|; NorthMortgage.
1st

••1

80
61

1374
1862
1871
1880

l>mm 1 Jan, ft Jhty

do

Lehigh Navigation:

....!! Schuylkill Navigation:
1
IstMortgage

1S88
1888
1876

Aug

! Ja Ap JuOc

600,000
900,000

Mortgage, sinking fund.

II

1879

Mch & Sept
do
do

jj

103
96
84

162#

1875

400,000110 Jan. &
329,00010 Feb. &

Jan. & July 1886

800,000 6

Navigation;
: MonongahelaBonds
Mortgage
••••!!

..

‘

do

80

L884

....

....

....

Mch &

rt

July

1,699,500! 6

Erie of Pennsylvania:
1st Mortgage Bonds
Interest Bonds

....

1875

!

1877

Delaware and Hudson:

....

91

Jan. & Julv

123,000
800,000i

6

2,000,000
4,375,000

Preferred Bonds

••••

*

1S81
1881

440,000;

m
St. Louis, Alton and
Terre
l9t Mortgage
2d
do
preferred
2d
do
Income

2,667,343

Sterling Bonds, guaranteed

90

....

Feb. & Aug
do.

800,000
200,000

1870

do

77

;i00

Delaware Division:

6,200,000 7 Semi an’alh
do
5,160,000
2,000,000
April & Oct

937,500

do

Jlf

|

1,800,000

Sacramento Valley:
1st Mortgage.

*d

1

140,000

Rutland and Burlington:

Bonds and

Jan. & July
do
do
do
do

Ogdensburg:

let Mortgage
(Potsdam & Watert.
2d
do
(do
do 1
let
do
(Watertown & Rome'
2d
do
(
do
do

„3d

106,000 6
1,521,000 6
976,800 6

250,000

May & Nov.

7 iJan. &

Mortgage Bones

Maryland Loan

j
|

••••

Jan. & Julv
do

1,000,600

do

1890
1890

600,000 6

| Chesajmke and Ohio:

•

j

408,000 5
182,400 5
2,856,600 6

do

do

i

....

Jan. & July
do

■

|Jan. & ^uly

....

i

800,000

Reading and Columbia:

$d

...

Chesapeake and Delaware:
1st Mortgage Bonds

1

680,000
758,000

do
Racine and Mississippi:
lBt Mortgage (Eastern Div.)
let
do
(Western Div.)

let

1st

••••

5

1,000.000
500,000

2d

93

j

25,000 6 |Jan & July 1671

Canal
Cincinnati and Covington Bridge :

75

98#
94# 95

6

400,000 6

95

April & Oct '68-'71
do
| 1875 96#
;Jan. & Julyr66-’76
June & DecD’m’d

6
850,000 6
Albany and W. Stockbridge Bonds j 1,000,000: 6
Hudson and Boston Mortgage
| 150,000i 6
Western Maryland:
1st Mortgage
596,000 6
do
1st
guaranteed
200,000
York d Cuniberland (North. Cent.):
1st Mortgage
175,000

*

let Mort. (Turtle Cr. DivA

r

66

692,000 6 Jan. & July

Pittsburg and Connellsville:

! 4,319,520;

do

j 92

1875

399,300 7 Jan. & Julv 1873
~ 554,908! 8 April & Oct 1878

;

Guaranteed (Baltimore) Bonds

1,000,000 7 April & Oct

564,000 6
60,000 7

j

,

SO

•••

>

Jan. & July

j

•••

...

|Feb. & Aug

7

600,000

Dollar Bonds

....;

•••

:

,

36

1

1st Mort. (conv. into U. 8.6s, 30 yr.)i
6 'Jan. <fc July 1896
Land Grant Mortgage
7 LApril & Oct
Vermont Central:
1st Mortgage.
2,000,000 7 May & Novj 1861
2d
do
1,135,000 7 ’Jan. & July! 1867
Vermont and Massachusetts;
1st Mortgage
934,600 6 |Jan. & July 1883

Mortgage (guaranteed)
Westchester and Philadelphia:
1st Mortgage (convert.) Coupon
2d
do
registered
T Ycstei'n (AXhss ) :
Sterling (£899,’900) Bonds

85
85

•••

j

180,000; 6

....

119,800 6
292,500 6

Sterling Bonds of 1843
Dollar Bonds, convertible
Lebanon Valley Bonds, convertible
Philadelphia and Trenton:

35^'|

|

Jan. & July 1868
do
1867

6

500.000

do

let

••••

1 92

90

3

7

300,000 7 iJan. <fe July IBS’1'
300,000 7 Apr. & Oct. 1886
650,000 7 IMay & Nov. 1875
200,000 7 jMar. & Sep. 1683

Union Pacific:

-

April & Oct
4,000,000 6 April & Oct

*

•••

1
1884

4.980,000 6 Jan. & July
2,621,000 6 April & Oct
do
2,283,840 6

600,000

do
do

Warren

•j

•••

74

Feb. & Aug 1866
do
1884
May & Nov 1875
do
1875
do
1866
7 [ Jan. & July 1874

152,355

Mortgage

2d

[)
5
2

258,000 6 May & Nov.

do
do
do
Dollar Bonds of 1849
do
do
1S61
do
do
1843-4-8-9...

2d
3d

j
!

Sept

5.000.000

Philadelphia and Reading:
Sterling Bonds of 1836

1st

i

80

April & Oct

! 30

s

S7
Julv!'72-’87

Mch &

! S6#;j
1.5

98),i iioo
! 98
j ••• .1 98

n

July

1,029,000

let
2d

900,000
2,600,000
1,000,000
1,500,000

do "

0

do
Feb & Aug.

575,000'

do
do
do

Mortgage Bonds

2
5
0

Jan. &

846.000

sterling
Philadelphia and Baltimore Central:
let Mortgage
".
Philadelphia and Erie:
let Mortgage (Sunbury & Erie)....

1,891,000

Convertible

0

1,150,000

,

July

:

Troy Union:

4

April & Oct

June & Dec

’3d

96

Jan. & July

Jan. &

416,000

Mortgage....'
do
do

88#! 89

so

1,400,000

Sept

1st
2d

5
5

500,000 6

July

Jan. &

(extended)
(Toledo and Wabash)....
2d
(Wabash and Western)..
Sinking Fund Bonds
Equipment bonds
Troy and Boston:

3 j
3 i

1,500.000 6

Jan. &

1,180,000

Toledo. Peoria and Warsaw

1874

1,000.000 6
500.000 6

800,000

Mch &

1st
2d

181 1 S6
1887 ':102

Aug

94,000

Mortgage

1S66

7,000,000

Mortgage

1st Mortgage, convertible

1877

;

do

Pennsylvania:
1st

ji

Aug|-73-’7Sj

JaApJuOcj
i

311,500

do
do

2d
do
Peninsula:

•

I 1868

750,000

Mortgage, sterling

IstMortgage

t.j Terre Haute and Richmond:

Feb. &

IstMortgage

•

Toledo ana T* abash:
1st Mort. (Toledo & Wabash)

2,500.000 6 Jan. & Jnlyi 1885

Panama:
ao

—

1S03

850.000

Pacific:
Mortgage, guar, by Mo
let
let

50#

June & Dec

700,000

1st Mortgage
Syracuse, Binghamton and New York:

|

ii

1872

2,050.000 7 'Jan.

(West. Div.)

600,000

-n-•[; Third Avenue (N. Y.):
let

1,401,000 7 j April & Oct

Mortgage (East. Div.)

Oswego and Syracuse:
1st Mortgage

;|

|
•

;

do
{now stock)
Ohio and Mississippi:

( do

—

1S83

300,000 7

2d

do
do

Novj

Mortgage

IstMortgage

6 iJune & Deo 1837 91 '
6 iMav&Nov. 1883
6 |
do
1883 j ••••! 90
7 !Feb. & Aug 1876 *100 .101
do
604,000 7
1876 |103
105

100.000

Ogdensburg and L. Champlain
1st Mortgage
1st
1st
2d

2,925,000
165,000
663,000
1,398,000

232,000 6 Feb. &

Northern Central:
Sinking Fund Bonds
York and Cumberl’d Guar. Bonds
Balt, and Susq. 8'k'g Fund Bonds..
Northern New Hampshire:
Plain Bonds
North Pennsylvania:
Mortgage Bonds
ChattelMortgage
North- Western Virginia:
1st

Staten Island:

1st

912,000 7 June & Dec 1S66
1,OSS,000 6 April & Oct ! 1875

Mortgage Bonds

2d
8d
8d

1873

Aug|

Shamokin Valley and PottsviUe:

7 Jan. & July! iSTl

6,917,598 6 iMay &

Bnbscrip. Bonds (assumed stocks).
Sink. Fund B’ds (assumed debts)..
Bonds of August, 1859, convert—
New York and Harlem:
1st Mortgage
Consolidated Mortgage
8d Mortgage
New York and New Haven:

I860
1S73

do

485,000 6 Feb. &

Ferry Bonds of 1853

Railroad:
Second Avenue:

Jan. & July

103,000

Payable.

ing.

I

and Hamp.)

New London Northern:
lit

3

t

and Northampton:

1st Mortgage...
let
do
(Hamp.
Now Jersey:

Description.

Payable.

market.

Amount
outstand¬

!

Railroad
New Haven

INTEREST.

I

3

ing.

(continued).

!

Description.

BOND LIST

! MARKET.

INTEREST.

Amount
outstand¬

687

34

,io

90

92

668

THE CHRONICLE.

[November 18, 1865.

RAILROAD, CANAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS
j Stock

Companies.

1

Dividend.

Market.

Stock

•

out¬

standing.

Periods.

Last

Companies.

p’d. Bid. Askd

Railroad.
10<»
5o

1.347.192

..."

■

1,947.000

Alton and St. Louis
K)(>
800.000
Atlantic & Great Western, N. Y.lO't
919.153
do
do
Pa...100 2,500,000
do
do
Ohio. 100 5,<X)0.000
Baltimore and Ohio

7....

.....

Quarterly.

,Aug..l#'
,.

100:13,188,002 April and Oct Oct. 1
100 1,650,000 April and Oct Oct... 3
100 4.434.250 Feb. and
Aug Aug. .3

Bellefontaine Line

Belvidere, Delaware

100
100

Berkshire

Blossbiinr and Corning
Boston, Hartford and Erie

50
100
500

New York and Boston Air Line. 100
788,047! :
New York Central
100 24.380,000 Feb. and
New York and Harlem
50 5,085,050
do
preferred
50 1,500,000 Jan. and

997.112
600.000 Quarterly
250.000 June A Dec.
8.300.000

Northern of New
Northern Central

.#■
Oct. .1#
.

i

100

...

Aug Aug. .3
...

....

Ninth Avenue.

127

'

Market.

Last p'd.| Bid. Askd

.

July
Niagara Bridge A Canandaigua. 100 1,(XX).000 Jan. and July
New York and New Haven
‘.100 2,960,839 Quarterly.
New York Providence A BostonlOO 1,508.000
Quarterly.

113# 115 ‘

Juue.g#'
11# 13
1.830,000 June & Dec. June .3# 98 j 98#
100; 4.070,974 Jan. and July July. .4
110 il20
100 3.100.000 Jan. and July
July. ,5 125 *120
100; 4.500.0<X) Jail, and July July. 4# 128
129

Boston and Lowell
Boston and Maine
Boston and Providence
Boston and Worcester
Brooklyn Central

.

Periods.

....

.

Washington Branch

Dividend.

out¬

standing.'
i

Albany and Susquehanna
Alleghanv Valley

STOCK LIST.

90#' 96),'

80
' 95

...r

July. .4
July. .3
Oct. ..4
Oct. ..3

795.300

114# ,115
117

Hampshire.. .100 3,008,400 June and Dee June. 3
50 3,344,800
Quarterly. Nov. .2
North Pennsylvania
50 3,150,130“
Norwich and Worcester
100 2,338.000 Jan. and July July. 4
Ogdensburg A L. C’liamplam. 100 °
AiU\
3,077,000A

1

—

Ohio and

C.

T

.

...

94

89# 90
62#

„

m.

110
100

*

....

U !..

Mississippi

..100 21,250,000

do

37# 38

28# 29

“....

preferred..100 2,979.000
January.
Jan..7
70 ■ 75
Old Colony and Newport
.100 3,009,(XX) Jan. and July July. .4
104 110
50
Oswego and Syracuse....
482.400 Feb. and Aug Aug. .’4
Panama (and Steamship).
.100 7,000,000
Quarterly. ;Oct..O -235 235
100.
492.150
;j Peninsula.
.100
Brooklyn City..
10 1,000,000 Feb. and Aug
Aug. .3#
>!. Pennsylvania
50 20,000,000 May and Nov May. .0
1*2#" 114
Brooklyn City and Newtown.. .100
300,000
| j Philadelphia and BaltimoreCentlOOj. 218,100
Buffalo, New* York, and Erie.. .100
850.(MX) Jan. and'July July..3#
..’i;,
Philadelphia and Erie
50 iJ.U-LO, Wi
Buffalo and State Line
5,013,054
UOK
100 2.200.000 Felx A Aug.
^:
Aug. .5 190
Philadelphia and Reading ...... 30 20.072.323 Mar. and Nov Mar
'
114# 114 v
Burlington and Missouri River.ion. 1.000.000
r
i
Phila., Germaut‘11. & Norrist’n. 50 3,358,100 Apr. and Oct Oct. .4
Camden and
105 !l0o#
Amboy
1"0 0.472,400 Jan. and J ul\ .July. .5 120# 120# Phila.. Wilmington & Baltimore 50 8.(557.300
Camden and Atlantic
Apr. and Oct Oct ..5 122 125*
50|
378.455
Pittsburg and Ooimellsville
50 1.770,414!
do
I
do
preferred.. 50
*182,6001
Pittsburg. Ft. Wayne A ChicagolOO 8,131,126! Quarterly. Oct...2# 104# 104#
Cape Cod
0u
081.(505 Jan. and Julv Julv..3#
Portland, Saco, and PortsmouthlOO1 1,500,000 Jan. and July July. .4
Catawissa
95 ' 98
50 l.i.vi.ooo
50# Providence and Worcester
100 1,700,000 Jan. and July; July. .4# — *
do
preferred
50 2.200,(XX) Feb. A Aug. Aug..3# SO
89# Racine and Mississippi
..100
Central of New Jersey
100; 5,000,000 Quarterly. Oct...2# 129
Raritan and Delaware Bay
Central Ohio
100 2.300.700
*.
Reading and Columbia
50
501,890
Cheshire (preferred)
;
100 2,085.925
47
48 j. Rensselaer and
Chester Valley
Saratoga
50,
800,000 Jan. and July July. .4
50!
871.990
102 ,104#; Rome, Watertown A
1,774.173 Jan. and Julv July. .5
Ogdensb'glOO
Chicago and Alton
100 1.783.1(H) Feb. A
Aug.,Aug..3#[103 *103 J Rutland and Burlington
100 2.233.370
*
do
preferred
100 2,425,200!Feb and Aug. Aug. .3# 103 ,105# j St.
Louis, Alton, A Terre IlautelOO 2.300.000
...!
44#, 45
Chicago Burlington and Quincy.100 8,370,510 May A Nov. N.5c&20* HI# 112
do
do
pref.100 1,700,000 Annually.
May. .7
*2# 76
Chicago and Great Eastern
100!
;.. .*
*
Sandusky, Dayton, and Cinein. .100 2.989,01X1
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska... .100 1.0iH).lX)0;
'
!.
do
*
*
do
.’154,866 Feb. and Aug Aug. /3
prof.100*
Chicago and Milwaukee
100 2.250.000
1
J 70 -80
Sandusky, Mansfield A NewarkltXK 802.571
Chicago and Northwestern .4.100 13.1(50,927
;
“...j
J 31#; ‘54
Schuylkill Valley.
50*
570.000 Jan. and July July. .5 i
do
do
pref.MOO 12,994.719 June A Dec.*Junes.3#| 05
05#; j Second Avenue *(N. Y.)
050,000 Apr. and Oct
100!
00
05
•
and Rock Island
Chicago
loO: 6,000.000 April and Oct Oct. .3 5 ilOS# DS#’ Shamokin Valley A Pottsville..
Cincinnati and Chicago Air LinelOO'
501 809.450 Feb. and Aug Aug. .3 !
j 70
1.100,125'
j
I Sixth Avenue!(N. Y.)
.100|
750,000 Quarterly. 1
128 ,133
Cincinnati, Hamilton A Dayton. 100' 3.000,000 May and Nov. Nov. .5
98
100
! Syracuse, Binghamton & N. Y.100 1,200,130:
Cincinnati and Zanesville
!
!...
HX)* 2,000,000:
!
*| Terre Haute and Richmond,.... 50! 1.900.150 Jan. and July
Cleveland. Columbus. & Cinein.100; 0.(XX).000 Feb.and
July. .0 j
Aug Aug. .5
Third Avenue (X. Y.)
128
128
100: 1,170.000 Quarterly.
Oct
Cleveland, Painesville A Aslita.l(X) 4,000.000 Jail.garni July Jail"
i—
Toledo, Peoria, and Warsaw.. .11)0! 1.700.000
Cleveland and Pittsburg
50| 5,253,025,Feb.and Aug Feb..5
do
92# 92#! j
do
1st pref.100! 1,700.000
Cleveland and Toledo
501 4,054,800 April and Oct Oct. ..3
-02 !■
100
do
do
2d pref.100; 1.000.000
Columbus & Indianapolis Cent.100
125 ! I Toledo and Wabash.
Columbus and Xenia
50. 2,442,350 Juneaud Dec June.3 i 50
50
1.490.800 'lan. and July July. .5
100|
do'»
do
Concord
preferred. 50i 984.700 June and Dec June .3#* 00
68
5) 1.500.000 Jan. and Julv Julv. .3#* 58
59 J Tioga
.100
Concord and Portsmouth
125,000 Jan. and July July..3#
100!
250.1KM) Jan.and July July. .3#
'! Troy and Boston.
100;
007,111 i
!...
Coney Island and Brooklyn
500.000
10<)|
Troy and Greenbush
Connecticut and Passumpsic.. 10o!
.KX); 274,400; June and Dec June .3
392.900
Utica and Black River
100
811.500 Jan. and July July..2 !...
do
do
pref.100! 1.255.200 -Jan. and July July. .-3
.•! Vermont and Canada
KH), 2.800,000 June and Dec June .4
Connecticut River
92
96
.100j 1,591,100 Jail, and Julv July. .4 104
Vermont and Massachusetts... .1(X); 2,214.225
43
45
Covington and Lexington
10c’ 1.582.1091...'
‘
Warren
Dayton and Michigan
50[ 1,408,300 Jan. and July July. .3
93# 95
100: 2.310,705
’2l'
Westchester and Philadelphia.. 50
Delaware...
084,030 i
50:
400,132 Tan. and July, July. .3
Western (Mass)
1(X) 5.005,000 Jail, and July July. .4
Delaware, Lacka., A Western
135# 135#
50: 6.832.950!Jan.and July Jan...3
105
183
Worcester and Nashua
S3‘ 1.141.000 Jan. and July July. .3 I. 96# 79
Des Moines Valley
100!
1,530,000j
-f..
Wrightsville, York A Getty rib’s 50
Detroit and Milwaukee
317,050 Jan. and July July. .1
100*
952.3501
*.
*
.

.

.

,,

_

.....

.

...

-*

~

-

.

..

._

*~i'

*

i!

*

—J

""

•

'

...

...

,

...

.

..

do

do

pref.

KX)!
1001

Dubuque and Sioux City
do

do

pref.

Eastern, (Mass)

.

Canal.

1,500.000;....'.

Chesapeake aud Delaware...... 23 1,343,563;
Chesapeake and Ohio
25 8.228,595

....

1,751.577)
..lOUj 1,962,180!

.1001 3.155,(MX)! Jan. and July : July
97
99
Eighth Avenue, N. Y
KX
LOOUAXM!' Quarterly. jOct.
Elmira, Jefferson,& OanandagitalOO! 500.(XX) Feb. and
Aug Ail ,2V
Elmira and Williamsport...... 50:
5(X).000 Jau. and July July. .2#
do
do
pref... 50 <
500.(MM):Jau. and July July. .3# j
87
Erie
1(X * 10.4(H). 100 Feb. A Aug.
92
Aug. .4 1 92
do preferred
,100i 8.535.7(H) Feb. A Aug.
Aug gi/* 80'« 84
Erie and Northeast
5t.l
400.(HMi Feb. A Aug. Aug.*.5
i
Fitchburg
..

:

Housatonic

KX*
KHO
lOOi

750.000*
UMXUKX)1
5.253.8.30

ji

'
;

i

37

2.350.(XH)i

Quarterlv. Oct ...3
\..:
820.000;...:..
l.lsO.txXfJan.and Julv-July..4
6.218.012) Amifand O^t:0ct. 4

....:

....

.

^

.„

Little *Minmi
Mir
Aittle Schuylkill

Aon^ Island

Louisville and Frankfort
Louisville and Nashville

6.627.050i

!

Quarterly.

OOt.. .2# 140
5l6,573i Feb. and AugjAug. .2 <
2,981.207 j Jan. and July July. .5
118
2.640.1(H)1 Jan. and July* July. .3
00

l,S52,71o| Quarterly.* ‘Nov. .2

McGregor Western... .*

100
100
50

Maine Central

Marietta and Cincinnati
do
do

do
do

1st pref.
2d pref..

Manchester and Lawrence
Michigan Central
Michigan Southern and N
do

do

.

Milwaukee and Prairie
do7,
do
'-ȣ

'

•

2,022,484

;

9

do

50/ 6,205.404 Feb. and Aug Feb .3*’. 59*
50’ 3.819.771 j Feb. and Aug Feb J# /
100 1.000,000
j Jau. aud July i July. .4

.

■

preferred. 50
50
50

••

•

.

•

•

61

'

do

preferred

,111
S2
iioo

-

Miscellaneous.

Brunswick City
Bucks County Lead
Brooklyn Gas

Canton

Improvement

Cary Improvement

Central American Traps
Central Coal..!

1.500,000 Feb. and Aug Aug. .4

.1(H)
50i 2 500 (XX):
..100
KK)

IS

34

20
40

112

112

...J

..

4,(KX)’000

5j

Quarterly. :July.25

200,(MX) I
7. j
2,(XX),(MX)I Feb. and Aug: Aug

..25
.100

5,000.000!

!

..j

000,(XX)!

|

•.

100; 3,214,300

il35

;
44# 44#

5
100! 2,000.000;
j
201 1,OCX),000 Jan. and J
uly, J uly.. 4

!

Cumberland Coal, preferred —100; 5,000,000:
!
Farmers Loan and Trust
25 l,OOO.OOo Jan. aud
July July. .4
Harlem Gas

35
4S

2.400,(XX); Feb. and Aug Aug. .3#!

07

3,700,000j Jan. and July July. .4 110
.100! 3,452,300i
j
i
Torris and Essex
50! 3,000.000 [Feb. and Aug Aug.
.3^.. f5
ashua aim xioweu
ua and Lowell
100!
«.. .7
100| 000.009;
atuck
Naugatuck
100 1,100,0C0 Feb. and
Aug Aug. .5
New Bedford and Taunton .....100! 1,
aud
ux>!
590,000: June and Dec June —'
New Haven, N. Loud., A Ston .1001
733,538
i
!
New Haven and
Northampton..100
,

.

.

.

I

—

i

.........

044,000'

,

i 43#
1120

|

,

orthamptou..l00j U010,(K»:^
.. \
New l^naon Northern^
«ew Londou Northern
tnoi 4,Aoo’i22iFcb‘ and AuSAug--5
1(H),
602,152*
j

.

j

I

;

43#

!l85"

j

!
,

,

!T-

July!July,

_

o

j

160
13

13#

!

.

*•■•••••

160

Quarterly. iNov .5 j
Quarterly. [Nov..5 235
Pennsylvania Coal
3,200,000;Feb. and Aug! Aug. .5 { 178
25! 1 000 000Quartz Hill
I
100 10l000’,000 Jan. and July! Jan. .5
Quicksilver
g.\ 48
| j Rutland Marble
25' 1,000,000'Jan. and
July: July.
-a Saginaw Land, Salt and
Min..,. 25 2,500,000:
1

240
238
181

48#

0!r

U0

“j

40

..'105

*

KX); 6,000,0001

135

*150

May and NovjNov....
Feb. and AugjAug. .5

100!
50 j

6S

.

Citizens

(Brooklyn) Gas
; Consolidation Coal, Md...--

50

67# 68

;

|
!

: / 50.
I
West Brai
Inuieli and Susquehanna.KX)
1,000,000 Jan. and July: July. .5
Wyoming Valley.
50*
700,000 Quarterly, I Sept. 4

American Coal
American Telegraph
Ashburton Coal..
Atlantic Mail

12i‘
j' 54

2,050.070;

2.750,000:

'148

July. .5

2.888,805 Feb. and Aug. Aug..3#

Hampshire and Baltimore Coal. 1001 500,000:
International Coal
5o j 1,000,000;
Jersey Citv and Hoboken Gas. 20. 1.000,000;
io
Manhattan Gas.
50j 4.000,000 Jan. and
.....:
Mariposa.-Gold......;
.1(H); 12,000,000
5()#* Metropolitan Gas
•. .100! 2,800,000*
Minnesota
.:
50! 1,000,000'
'■
New Jersey Consolidated
'10, 1,000.000

do
do

Mississippi and Missouri.......




>

g

Sohuylkill Haven.

•

140

Jan. and July

,

i

•

4.282.950

Du

kPrefenet^

New Jersey

i

•

Aug Aug.10

»
!

Milwaukee and St. Paul.
Mine Hill &

do

50

!

ijr>(V,8(V) !!!!!.!.!.!..!!!!!”!/

135
85

J

398,910:
200 (XX)

*

...

Aug. A g. 3

!

j 00

L....I

!

•

j

...

1.109.594; Feb. and Aug Aug. .2
3,527.871. Feb. and Aug Aug. .3#

LouisTille.New Albany A Chic.100
2,800,000

149#

-

.

May and Nov:Nov. .5
-720,8001
;
1(X) 1.025.000'Feb. and Aug Aug. .4
100, 1,175.(XX) Feb. and Aug Aug. .5

:.....! Union

!.....:

.

50 j
501
KX!
50
50
50
1(X)

50
50

Susquehanna an;d Tide-Water..

do
j)referred
Hudson River
;>
i 108# 109 \.
Huntingdon and Broad Top
50!
017,5(X'
i....
;
!
!
do
do
pref. 5ei
190,75( *' Jau. and Julv * Jill v.. 3# \
Illinois Central..-.
T
1(X)|22.s88.9(K |Feb.and Aug1 AimAlOs,.3l 135
Indianapolis and Cincinnati.... 50 1.6S9.tMXi! Quarterlv.* Ulct.. .4
..1112#;.
Indianapolis and Madison
10e
412.(HX!Jan. and Julv Julv..3
do
do
pref.. KM
407.900! Jan. aud Julv July. .4
’
1
Jeffersonville
50 I.OLV.hi;!
*
1
:
Joliet and Chicago
’.'too 1.500.(KX!; Quarterlv. Aug...l#, 91
Kennebec and Pori land
(new).. 10U
“*9
90
!
Lackawanna and Bloomsbnrg.. 5( *
S35,(MXl
do
do
5(H),000;
pref. 50 j
|:

Lehigh Valley
Lexington and Frankfort

..100

preferred

I

40
j 57
.

55
103

,

.

i1 North Branch
50
138.080.
11 Schuylkill Navigation (consol.). 50; 1,908.207

103#'105

April and Oct Oct5..

lUOi

Monongahela Navigation
Morris (consolidated)
do

,
.

50 1.033,350 Feb. and
100 10,(XX).000 Feb. and

Lehigh Navigation

.....

ltXij 3.540,0tX!|Jan. and Jul\ July. .3

A Grand St. F'v.KH
Hannibal and St.
Joseph
r.KXi
do
do
pref. ..100
Hartford and New Haven
KM;

Division
and Hudson
Junetion (Pa.).
and Raritan

Lancastei?and Susquehanna.... 50;

.

Forty-sec'd St.

Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
Delaware

j I Union Trust

j! United.States Telegraph
j United States Trust

!‘ Western Union Telegraph

JJJ0
100,
100:

100!
j j Wilkesbarre (Consolidated)CoallOO:

r;....;144 j j Williamsburg Gas
!
j
11 Wyoming Valley Coal

1,000,000)

k** a

a

: ’

J,000>000 Feb. and Ai# Aug. .4
1,000,000. Feb. ana Aug Aug. .5

i Quarterly. Oct....
Oct....
and
50* 750.000 jJan. and July July. .5
50 1,250,000'

2,175,000'Apr.

Let

65
160

57

100
72
60
80
150

November 18,1865.]

11886635..!

THE CHRONICLE.

Insurance anb

180.

mining Journal.

MARINE MUTUAL INSURANCE SCRIP.

Companies, &cJAmo*nts
Atlantic.

INSURANCE STOCK LIST.

(6 p.

,

c.

Value.

i

Feb.)j

Columbian.
(0 p. c. Feb.)

dividend.

Albany City.....
American*

™0j
50

—

American

Arctic

200,000

50!

500,000
250.000

^tor

Atlantic (Brooklyn)
Baltic

25

Beekmau..

o-J
Z.)

Bowery —

150,000 i
200,000
200,000

Exchange... .100;
,•

50.000,

50j 300,000
200,000

200.000
300.000
150.000

25

*

Brevoort

50
25

.

Broadway
Brooklyn (L. I.).

..

200,000

n
.100
,.100
20
70

Central Park
Citizens’

200,000
150,000
300.0(H)

..

210,000

211.492

*

do

....

187.407

!
“

270,827;Feb. and Aug.iAug
347,723 March and Sep, Sep
192,0311May and Nov.;
233,530 Feb. and Aug.! Aug

204.300 Feb. and
249.704!
do

Gt

4!

10!

132,306!Jan. and July.!

4*

y

Aug. Aug
Aug

aud
474,177 Feb. and

Aug.!Aug

500.000 1,174,929 Jan. and
July..!July
400,000
299,0)381 March and Sep Sep
200,000
227,675! Jau. and July. !
300,000
401,9221 April and Oct. Oct
200,000
246,853'Jan. and

Eagle
Empire City....

40

100;

Excelsior

50;

•

Exchange

200,000
150,000

90.730 00
130.300
80.1)30

44

30,

Ear. Joint St'k(Meridian) 100!
Firemen's
17;
Firemen’s Fund
10:
Firemen's Trust (Bklyn) 10i.
Fulton
25,
Gallatin.
50;
Gebhard
100;
Germania
501
Glenn’s Falls
10j
Globe...
50;
Goodhue*
.1001
Greenwich
25!
Grocers’
50;
Guardian
—:
Hamilton
15!
Hanover
50.

Harmony (F. & 31.)+

50!

Hoffman
Home

100!

50.000

230.229

150.000
200.000

100.000

200,000
200.000

200,000
200,000
200,000
1.50,000

400,000
300,000
200.000

169,340

do
do

10011,000,000

Irving

251

30;
King’s County (Brook'll) 20
Knickerbocker

Lafayette (Brooklyn)

Lamar
Lenox

40 J

50;

...

100
25

Long Island (Brooklyn). 50!

Lincoln Fund
Lorillard*

150.000
200.000

501 1,000,000
.100!
100 j

Mechanics’(Brooklyn).. 50!

Mechanics’ and Traders’ 25!
Mercantile
...100!
Merchants’
50;

500,000
200,000
150,000
200,000

200,000
200.000

.100 1,000,000
Montauk
(Brooklyn)..50; 150,000
Morns (and inland)
100 :
200,000
Nassau (Brooklyn)
50! 150.000
National
37* j 200,000

111,580

300,000
200,000
100,OIK)
210,000

;

| July.

July
July

139)4

...5
..10
...5
.0

j.Tnly
Jifly

156"

5 64b,
Aug. f Feb
1,079,104' April and Oct. April
5
228,0S3|Feb. and Aug. I Aug
5
201,580; March and Sep Sep.
0
113,325 March and Sep1
Jan. and July J July
328,1151
5
157,4S3j
do
! July
5
358,142!
do
July.. ..;5

‘Feb.

and

3)31,793)

169,572;

2)3)3,295|....

•

do
do

July..
July

..10
.5

17 65
40

14

..

..

..10
.

..

..

Emp'c City
Enniskillen

30 00
60

Enterprise

Everett Petroleum
Excelsior
First National
Fountain Petroleum.
Fulton Oil
Germania
G’t Western Consol.

62
10 00

1.)

30 00

20

:jo

i>>

28

Ivanhoc:

Inexhaustible
Island

July.
July

Knickerbocker Pct'111

110,905!....

253,079 j Jan. and July. July
200,000
202,076iFeb. and Aug.1 An
.0
Niagara
50 1,000,000
1,164,291! Jan. and July. July
North American*
5 110
50; 1,000,000
Ynrfh
June and Dec.! June— .6 92
North River
25! 350,000
3SS,919 April and Oct.! Oct
6 91*
Northwestern (Oswego). 50;
150,000
170,982 Jau. and July. July
Pacific
.0
25
200,000
214.289 j
do
Park
July
.7* is”
too
200,000
217,876!
do
Peter Cooper
20'
150,000
163,217! Feb. and Ang.
People's...
97*
20:
150,000
135,496; Jan. and July.!...
Phcenixt
50500,000
661,9871 May and Sept.
May.
50;
200,000
249,750 Jaii. and J uly j July
.5
481.551
300,000
do
Resolute*
July
3*
.100
200,000
232.191
do
i July
.5
Rutgers’
05
200,000
St. Mark’s
208,016 Feb. and Aug August .7
251 150,000
do
St. Nicholast
159,336
Feb... .5
25
150,000 156,70 7
do
Aug... ..4
cecu?tyf1'
501 l,000l000 1,241,874
do
Standard
'Aug.... .7
50.
m ---

Liberty
Lily Run
Monongaliela & Kan.

Bid.

Maple Shade of N. Y.
Maple Shade of Phil.

64
79

*

8

66*
60

N.Y,Ph. &Balt.Cons.

3i
46

New Yrork & Newark
Noble Well of N. Y.
Noble & Del.Rock Oil
North American
Northern Light
Oceanic
Oil City Petroleum..
Oil Creek of N. Y
Pacific
Palmer Petroleum...

47

2 00

1 15

1 25

2 65

People's Petroleum..
Phillips

5 00
4 00
40

1 95

40
13 20
3 05

13 30
3 10

40
60

Southard
Standard Petroleum.

60

80
3 80

Story & McClintock.

Success
Tack Petr’m of N.Y.
Talman
Tarr Farm

30

Asked.

Montana
Mount Vernon
National Oil of N. Y.

Shade River

90
54
61

27

Terragenta

‘J 75*

Titus Oil
Titus Estate.

60
o3
15

July

Companies.

Rynd Farm

)

..

'

President...
Rawson Farm
Revenue

..

..5
.5

1855....

1*11. Hole Creek
Pit Hole Consol

Petrol'm)I

HamiltonMcClintock
Heydrick.:
Ileydriek Brothers
High Gate

...6
.7

July..
July..
'July.
July

Buchanan Farm
California
Cascade
Central
Cherry Run Petrol'm
Clinton
Commercial
i
Commonwealth
j
Consolidated of N. Y. \
Devon Oil
j

1 15
15 00

Guild Farm

..

j1 July..

219,040 Jan. and July
do
249,874
348.407
203,224

4
.10

...

Aug. j Aug.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

185,624;
242,320'
221,815
293,503

17 00
20

1

Brooklyn

.0

..

10,000 65
30,C00! 45
30,0001 30

1864....

44

Asked.

50

Bradley Oil

do

4*

1 20

Brevoort
.0

....

....

Washington

Marine. (7 p. c.)
Scrip of 1863

•

Blood Fann

•

184,916 March audSepiSept
298,778! Jau. and July. j July

Bid.

Bennehoft' Reserve..
Bennehoff Run
Bergen Coal and Oil.
Black Creek

214,373; March and Sep Sep..
I

do
do
do
do
do

...

1

(2.....

Allen Wright........
Beekman

5

261,138 Feb. and Aug. j Aug.

and

,.

24,915

1 805

Alleghany

5

Jan. and July, t
167.778'
! July
do
491,809
do
i July
403,183,
do
July

<2
....<&
.(2.

Adamantine Oil

6

224,667 Jan. and July.! July
221,062
do
July

......!

c)

184>3...
1864....

129,000

1863....! 224,000
1864....1 195,000

t?2

86,020.
101,3-10 39

Companies.

5

[

Mutual, i
(6 p. c. Nov.)!

PETROLEUM STOCK LIST.

5

[July

159,602

.

New Amsterdam.
2>t
New World
50j
N. Y. Cent. (Union
Sp.) .100;
N. Y. Equitable
35;
N. Y. Fire and Mar
100 :

44

.July

225,241 Feb. and Aug.

25,1,000,000

Manhattan
Market*

Metropolitan* +.

200,000
200,000
150,000
230,000
150,000
300,000

44

7

Aug
590,147 Jau. aud July, j July

100; 2,000,000 2,929,028!
Hope
50'
200,000
214,017!
Howard
50; 300,000 433,998
Humboldt
>.
100; 200,000
234.925!
Importers’and Traders’. 50' 200,000
213,413;
Indemnity
100! 150,000
159,054 Feb.
International
Jefferson

4

1865....

Sun

102,44o!

09,470

Scrip of 1862...

50

162,744 May and Nov. May

500,000

Butfalo.(7p.

255,112:
do
j July.... .5 102
146.0241 Feb. aud Aug.!
57),
72,880!
;!
102
262,121 j Jan. and July. July
5
141,396;
‘ 1
do

204,000
150,000
150,000
200,000

<2>.

.!

<& -g
44
I860. ..;
© t:* Union. (6 p. c.); 549,000)....
Scrip of 1859.... j
98
@ g§
44
I860....! 180,650, 90
44
1861.... 177,330i 87
44
<&
184)2....! 130,180! 83
“
1863.... i 153,420: 99
|.s
44
@ » !1
1864.... i 125,670 75
!'
44
1865.... i 185,540 71

42,7(H)

mutual of

7
0

July. July

•

44

(0p. c. Feb.)
Scrip oflSSS...

.

50

1863...

Scrip of 1862

41

1001

..

....

44

10

53.610!..,

1864....) 180,790;.

44

41

100'

<g

184)5...!
mercantile, j

..

Com Exchange
Croton

1864....j
Pacific Mutu¬
al. (6 p. c.)
j
Scrip of 1S61,.*,'
1862....

(fr

44

44

Continental*

44

(ft
(2)
(2-

“

1864.. .i

1859...
300,6521Feb. and Aug. Aug4 p. sh.
44
250,000 289,454;Jan. and July.. July
1860...
};j®| 500,000 495,400'
5 80*
100
...1681
do
Commerce
1862...
1001 200,000 229,835!
do
July
4
Commerce (Albany)..
1001 200,000
1863...
239,144!....
1
44
Commercial
50
1S64...
j 200, IKK) 209,319 Jan. and July. July
5
Commonwealth
100,
250,000
1865
282,2431
do
" July
5

Simon
Columbia*

..

©■

...

,

“

186)3...| 435,40-1

44

0
10

jAug

86i:..i

1865...!
Western.'
(6 p. c. Feb.);
Scrip of 1861...!
44
1862. J

5
5

319,027 June aud Dee.! J line

180)3...)

44

.,

i

1802:..!

44

121,460!

Scrip of 1859....! 138,570
“
I860....; 131,270;...
1801.... 105,770i...
186)3.... 100,830;...

‘|
(2
<&.....

95
90
85
80
78,700 75
120.540 72
103,850 70

1860...!

200,045;
;...
j
440,0S4;Jan. and July. Jan ...12*
203,303;April and Oct. Apr...
.5
529.107 Jan. and July J Jan
5;

')

83.120
81.120
4S.600
84.120

44

Orient Mutu-!
(I al. (0 p. c. Mar.);

July.)!

Scrip of 1859... j

i

■

1803...
1 804...!
1S65...

44

,

..1

...

1802... |

“

Commercial.;
(Op.c.

..

Jan. ..3*

122.248'

159,079:Feb.

153,000

..

Capital City (Albany)

11

..

30

@
256.000
@
1864...4.350.000 27*<£
1865... I
w.....
@

; Last paid

293,142 Jan. and July.

1800.
1 801

—@...

!

Agricultural, (Watert n). ^5;
Albany

Periods,

....(2....

44

Scrip of 1862...

Net
Assets.

joint Stock Fire s ,
Adriatic
&>: $300,000:
£11111*
501 200.000;

jo,705,000

Per cent.

Scrip of 1S59...

j

Dec. 31. 180-1.

COMPANIES.

Marked thus (*) are partici-:
patinsj, and tlms (t) write Capital.
Marine Risks..
'

N, Y. Mutual.
(6 p. c.)

Per cent.

$

Scrip of 1804..! 2.699.520

10

20
70
1 40

30
1 05

Union
United Pe’tl’m F’ms.
United States
United States Pe-1
trolenm Candle.. f

20
27 So

40 00
60
27 60

Venango

Vesta
Watson Petroleu

n

Webster

McClintockville

W.Virg. Oil

McElhenny

McKinley.

2 50

Manhattan

Maple Grove

and Coal

Woods &
Oil Creek

15

Wright)
f
Working People's (
Petroleum

f

..

MINING STOCK LIST.

.

..

..

..

.

.

*w

'

.

gVv
®erllng¥

100!

otnyvesant
I radesmen’s
United States.

Washington*

Western (Buffalo)
Williamsburg City

100;
25
25
20

50
.100

Yonkers and New York, 50
loo

200,000
200.000
200,000
150,000

250,000
400,000
200,000
150.000

500,000

263,035 Jan. and July. July
200,559
205,070

Feb. and
Jan. and
do
343,605
000.527 Feb. and

.5

Aug.
July, July
July.
Aug. Aug.

30)3,213

159,220 Jan. and July. July.
do
566,543
Jan
.

Joint Stock
marine;

•

j

LLUU

*

J




,1(K1

57
....5

lij”
....4

...

.5
.5

C4U,UUU
287 490

081,689.;

Aztec
!,
Boston
Caledonia
Canada
Central
j
Columbia & Sheldon. 1
Flint Steel River
Ililton
Huron i.
Indiana

July.

Jan

.

..

.12

July. ...3*

40

July

July

....

3

3 00
—

S 00
■

SO
45 00

•

•

•

•

*

85*

Companies.
Benton

Consolidated Gregorv

Corvdon
Gold M in. of Colorado
Gunnell.

75

j
!

!

0U

1 50

i

Kansas-Colorado
Kip «fc Buell

Mnnhiittnii

1 50

3 00

Quartz Hill
Smith & Parmelee...

.Standard

Quincy

Clute

Rockland

l

2 00
2 00

Missouri and Penn...

Ontonagon

Superior

25

i

!

.

j Mount Alpine
'New Y'ork
IN. Y. & Nova Scotia.

Lead

Denbow

WaJIklU

75
9 00
95
1 00
5 00

Montana'
—

Asked

80

Isaac's Harbor

\

New Jersey Central.
Norwich

Pewabic

30
8 00

Hone

[ 17
I

i

Bid.

Gold:

•

Knowlton

Ogima
do«
do

1 Asked.

Copper:

Mendota
...

Bid.

Evergreen Bluff'.

i

Jan. and

wZfiuZr

Companies.

.

1 50

54

80

4 00

6 00

90
5 62

s

12

25
25

l 10

1 50

[November 18,1865.

THE CHRONICLE.

670

Countries.

(*) indicates that in oases whera
prefixed, unless the letter be registered, prepay¬

ESrTha Asterisk
ment is

luired.

optional; in all other cases

prepayment is reNot Not

Exc. Exc.

Acapulco..

10
83

...

Southampton
ill (if
Alexandria, Prussian closed mail r
prepaid 86c)

Aden, British Mail, via

by Bremen or Hamburg

'io

mail
French

Ceylon, open mail, via London,
American packet
do

4 o. cts.
40.
ota.

[Countries.

mail

...

*38

*80
*80 *60

-21

do

6

do
do

*15 *80
...

do
do
Marseilles....
Argentine Republic, via England
do
via France, in French

89

Bordeaux

30

83

46

Marseilles and Suez

'45

Aspinwall...
Australia, British mail via Sth’mpt’n
Marseilles

do

do

do

New

by private ship from

>

Y ork

or

Fch. mail

do
do

(S’th Austr’a Co.) *80 *60

mail

50 102

Marseillesaud Suez...

via

45

by Bremen and
mail via Trieste

Austria and its States,

Hamb’g

55

Prussian closed

mail

*80

....

Prussian closed
ml. when prp’d
do by Brem. or Hamb’g

do

...

28
*15

mail

in Italy)Fch.mail.... *21 *47
Azores Island, British mail via Por..
29 82
Baden, Prussian closed mail (if prep’d
do (except

do

prov.

*30

2Scts)

Bremen or Hamburg mail
Freuch mail
Bahamas, by direct st’r from N.

Y.

Batavia, British mail via Southamt’n
do
do
Marseilles,
do
do French mail
Bavaria, Prussian closed mail
do
do
when prepaid
do
by Bremen or Hamb'g mail
French mail.............

do

Belgium, French mail

England,

closed mail, via

do
do

open mail,
American

...
...
...

30

*30
...

28

...

*15

*21 *42

*21 *42
*27

via London, by

21

packet

mail, via London, by
British packet

do

open

5

Belgrade, open mail, via London, by
American

London, by
...

by French mail,

do

Prussian

Beyrout

mail, (if

closed

*80 *60

French mail....

Bogota, New

*21 *42

84

Brazils, via England,
do
France, in Fch
,

mail from

Bordeaux
Bremen, Prussian closed mail,
do
do
do
when
do
Bremen mail

Hamburg

do
do

45

*

*33 *66
. .

prep’d

...

*30

28
*10,

*15

maii

French mail
*21 *42
Brit. A. Am. Prov., except Canada and
New Bruns w’k not over 3,000 m. ... *10
do
exceeding 3,000 m. .... *15
do
do

Brunswick, Prussian mail
*30
do
when prep’d ... 28
do
by Brem. or Hamb’g ml. ... *16
*21 *42
do
French mail
Buenos

Ayres, via England
via France by French

45

French mail

*

Br’n

by

80

*10

Connda

Canary Islands,

via England

Cape of Good Hope,
do

do
"

ape de
do




60

Brit mail, via

33 46

Southampton.....
Brit, mail via
Marseilles,..

45
53

Verde Islands, via England 29 37
do

in Fch, mail, via
Bord’x and Lisbon

30

30

Hamb’g mail, via

or

Marseilles and Suez....

Falkland Islands, via

England

France

Frankfort, French mail
uo
Prussian closed mail
do
do
when
do

*20

68
86

40

72

60
84

prepaid

Bremen

or

Hamburg mail

Madeira, Island of, via England....

Majorca and Minorca,
do

Malta, Island

-

by American pkt..
mail, via Brit, pkt

French mail

*

(if

French mail

do
do
do

Bremen mail

(except Luxemburgh)
Hamburg mail
Gibraltar, French mail.
do

open
Amn.

*15
21 42

mail, via London, by *
pkt
mail by British pkt.....

do
open
Great Britain and

Ireland

Greece,. Prussian closed

mail, (if pre¬

paid. 40c)

by Bremen

*42

or

Hamburg

*35

mail

do

open

mail, via London, by

21

American

pkt
mail, via London, by
British pkt
Hamburg, by Hamburg’ mail, direct
do

*24

do
do
do

28

prepaid
do

*21 *42

Frenchmail

Hanover, Prussian closed mail
do
do

do

by Bremeu or
mail

do

Frenchmail..*,.

Hayti, via England
Holland, Frenchmail
do

open

prepaid
Hamburg

when

i. *30
...

*15
*21*42

45
*21 *42

mail, via London, by
pkt.....,» «•$

American

23

21

88

89
80

45
60
84

10

Prussian closed mail

*80

do when p’paid

do

(Strelitz and Schwerin,)
oy Bremen or
mail

do

Hamburg

' (Strelitz and Schwerin,)

28

...

*15

*21 *42

45

by Frn’h mail
80

60

...

28

by Bremen and
Hamburg mail.
Nassau, N. Prov., by direct steamer

...

22

Netherlands, The, French mail.

*21 *42

from Bordeaux

Naples, Kingdom of, Prus. clos’d maii

Frenchmail.... *21 *42

do
do

do

do

5

from N. York

mail, via Lon.,
by Amer. pkt
open mail, via Lorn,
by British pkt...,.

do

open

do

21
...

New Brunswick

...

Newfoundland....

v

....

Granada, (except Aspinwall and
Panama,)
New South Wales, British mail, via
Southampton...
British mail, via
do
do

6
*10
10

New

do
do

do
do

18
...

New

83

Marseilles ..... 89 45
French mail.... *80 *60

by maii to San
Francisco

*10

*15
*30

45
...

Yucatan, Matamoras

do

5

Bremen mail
Prussian closed mail
do when
do

21
5

*80 *60

above
Mecklenburg, (Strelitz aud Schwerin,)

open

from New York

8$

and Pacific coast
to places excepted

do

24
1

*80 *60

French mail

do
do

*21 *42
*15

...

do
via Marseilles
French mail

45

*30

42

...

Martinique, via England
Mauritius, British mail, via South’pt’n
do
do

87

21

op.

French mail.
*15
Montevideo, via England
: 38
do
via France,

10

29

British mail

do
French mail..
of, open mail, via Lond.

do
do

*28

...

prepaid, 28c)

*22

mail

...

...

States, Prue. closed mail

*15

Grand Duchy, Hamburg

'. *30

Guatemala....
German

*21 *42

Bremeu

mail

83
*15 *80
*21 *42

Gambia, via England
Gaudaloupe, via England
.

28

Grand Duchy,

Mexico, (except
64

*30

Duchy, French

Grand

'

do

*15

*21 *42

mail

5

33
#42

paid
do

do

21

80

Frenchmail

...

53
60

Grand Duchy, Prussian
closed mail, when pre¬

do

*27 *54

via Trieste

do
Ecuador

80

Frenchmail

do

*35
...

by Br'n or Hamb’g mail,

do

do

mail from Bordeaux..

Hmb’g mail

or

closed mail, via Trieste..

18

Granada

Bolivia

by Brem.

>

,c

mail

do

45

England

East Indies, open mail, via London, by
American pack’t
do
open mail, via London, by
British packet
do
Prussir ^ closed mail, via
Tri^.te
do
(Lng. possessions,) Prus.

5

*40

prepaid, 38cts)

do

21

packet

open mail, via
British packet

do

Islands

Denmark, Prus. closed mail (if pre¬
paid, 33cts)
do
do

49

45

Grand Duchy, Prussian
5 Luxumburg, closed mail

packet

*33

...

Lombardy, Prussian closed mail, (if
prepaid, 40c)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg

Corsica, British mail by Am. packet ... 21
do
Brit, packet .. .
do
5
do
French mail,. .. .*
*15 *30
Costa Rica
...
10
...
Cuba
10
Curacoa via

French mail........

Liberia, British mail

21

mail, via London, by

open

Corfu—see Ionoan

5
46

53
60

packet

Brit,

*15
*21 *42

do
do

open

via Marseilles

do

do
do

*32

...

...

85

Japan, British mail, via Southampton

*40

45

French mail........ *30 *60
British mail, via Eng¬
land

*20 *60

or

30 60
39

closed mail,
(if prepaid, 36c)... i.

7

72
60

35

...

mail....

Ionian Islands, Prussian
do
do

8

..

Hmb’g mail.
mail, via London, by

by Br’n

do

do

do

40

80

Am.

*

83

5

Boston

by Beern. or Hamb’g

do

89

mail, via

*25

*27*54

Marseilles

55

prepaid, 38c)...,;

10

...

ml.

Frenchmail

#35

British mail, via

do

45

63

by mail to San Fran., thence
by private ship
Constantinople, Prue. closed mail, (if

60

Abcension, via England

45
34

...

Frenchmail

do
do
do

mail.
do
Frenchmail
Honduras
Indian Archipelago, French

83

via Trieste

45

6

60

89

Southampton

by Br’n or Hmb’g

5

,

...

£

cts!

London, by

pkt
Holstein, Prussian closed mail, (if prepaid, 83c)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg

21
80

do
Marseilles
do Br’n or Hmb’g

Holland, open mail, via
British

by

Brit, mail, via Southampton
Marseilles
do

do
do

mail, via England,
byAm.pkt
de
open mail, via England,
by British pkt
Algeria, French mail
Arabia, British mail, via Southampton

..

British packet
French mail

China, Brit mail via

’

cts.

10

...

...

mail, via London, by

open

do
do
do
Chili

open

mail from

Sloop, via Panama

C. Am. Pac.

Countries.

Exc. Err
* 0. 4

cts.

cts.

K is

Wot Not

Not Not
Exc. Exc.
4o. 4 o.

TO FOREIGN

TABLE OF LETTER P0STAGE8
COUNTRIES.

...

Zealand, British mail, via South¬

hampton

Corporations.

THE MEXICAN

EXPftESS.

(ESTABLISHED JUNE, 1805.)

CARRINGTON & CO.,
80

BROADWAY,

By elicit steamer of American
lean
It I. Co*

A

1

November 18, 1865.]

THE

CHRONICLE.
Insurance.

UNION TRUST COMPANY
of New

York,

cash CAP1TAI,

....

interest allowed o.\ deposits,

CASH

f
CAPITAL,
SURPLUS, JANUARY 1st, 1865

TRUSTEES.

.

Henry E. Davies, 43 Wall Street.
Henry K. Bogert, 49 William Street.
Jonathan W. Freeman, Troy, “
W. F. Aldrich, Secretary.

CRUSHERS "AJND

PULVERIZERS,

FOR WET OR DRY

The Best and

MANUFAC1URED

Boston

WORKING,

Cheapest in the World.
BY

Losses

COMPANY.
(INSURANCE BUILDING8,)

Dividends paid in 15 years,

253 per cent.

49 WALL STREET.
ASSETS,0ft. 4, 1864
$2,383,437 45

JONATHAN D. STEELE, President.
P.

-

NOTMAN, Secretary.

-

X

ance company.

156

158 BROADWAY, N. Y.
Capital
Cash Capital and Accumu¬ $2,500,000
NOS.

AND

lation
Losses Paid
Dividends Paid to Policyholders
From the great success of this

2,550,000
1,000,000

750,000

Company, they are
enabled to oner superior
advantages to policy-holders.
Life-policies are issued, payable in annual, or in
one, five, or ten annual, installments; also, non-for-

feiture endowment policies, payable in ten annual
payments, which are paid at death, or on arriving
at
any particular age. Life insurance, as an investment,
has no superior, as it has saved millions of
dollars to
the insured, and thousands of families from ruin.
Dividends are paid to
policy-holders, thus enabling
them to continue their
policies, if otherwise unable
do so.
to
This favorable feature has been the means of
saving
many policies that would have been forfeited for
want of means to continue
them, and, in several in¬
stances, families, once wealthy, have thus been saved
from utter ruin.
Henry

HTHE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE
X

COMPANY OF NEW YORK.
CASH ASSETS, Sept. 1st, 1865, over
$13,500,000 00
j

FREDERICK S. WINSTON, President.
McCURDY, Vice-President.

R. A.

Stores Nos. 87 and 89 LEONARD Street,

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22,

At 10 o'clock, at the
salesrooms, '
LARGE AND ATTRACTIVE SALE
OF

ST. ETIENNE AND BASLE
On

twenty-four hours.
The Pulverizer weighs two tons, and pulverizes to
dust infinitely finer than stamp work, thirty-four
hundred lbs per hour, or thirty six tons per diem, equal
to the yield of forty stamps; and the first cost and
wear, as compared to tnis number of stamps, is about
one-tenth—tho entire yield being fit for amalgamation
j

without further reduction.
The fine dust is not ob¬
tained by screening, but by tho immediate action of the
Pulverizer.
Fifteen horse-power, net, is the maximum
power re¬

one machine.
The cost of wear per ton is less than by
any other
machine. All wearing parts are now made of Franklinito iron.
Let miners and their friends carefully study the
prac¬
tical working of all other machines and
processes offer¬

Susimnur
31

All

machines
Contract Work.
our

aro n<m

made in

our own

shop. No

Addres*—

JACOB J. STOKER,
General Agent and Treasurer,
1105 State Sheet, Boston.

Or, CHARLES H. GARDNER,

16 COBTLANDT STREET, N. Y.
OFFICE OF

WELLS, FARGO & CO.,

NEW YORK AND CALIFORNIA EXPRESS AND
EXCHANGE COMPANY,
NO. 84
BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
SHIPPERS OF FREIGHT TO THE PACIFIC
COAST will please take notice that,
having been ap¬
pointed Freight Agents of tho Pacific Mail Steam¬
ship Company, we are now prepared to receive

Freights for California, Oregon, Nevada, Washing¬
ton Territory, Sandwich
Islands, Central America,
and Western Coast of

South America.
For rates apply at our office, No. 84
Broadway, or
Freight Office on dock, foot of Canal street.
Steamers will sail on the 1st, 11th and 21st of each
month; those dates falling on Sunday, on
preceding

Saturday.

No slow

Freight

freight received

on

muBt be delivered

day of sailing.
on

dock foot of Canal

atreet.
Bills of Lading will be issued at
No. 84 Broadway.
Our usual Package
Express will be sent by each
■tsamer, and will close at 10 a. m., on sailingdays.
Our Letter
Bags will close at 11% a. m. Tor con¬
venience of our np-town
customers, a letter bag will
be kept at the
Metropolitan Hotel, and on the dock
root of Canal street.
Our franked
envelopes will be on sale at the office
of the hotel, and at
our offices, No. 84
Broadway and
Oinal street dock. '
All letters sent
us must be in Government
through

envelopes.
Sight

Exchange

San Francisco for sale.
transfers of money made to all
points
retched by the wires on
West Coast.
California Coupons
bought at best rates.
Exchange on Dublin and London, £l and upward*,
un
Paris,la sums to suit. For sale by
on

•




WELLS, FARGO

& CO.

At 10 o’clock at the auction room.

FRENCH GOODS—250 packages

FRENCH, SWISS,
GERMAN, and ENGLISH STAPLE and FANCY
GOODS, of recent importation.

DRY

$5,000,000.00
CAPITAL, paid in, & Surplus, 885,040,57
Policies of
-

-

CASH

issued

Insurance against loss

on

or

the most favorabl#

GUITERMAN

damage by Fire

B. C.

MORRIS, Pres't.
Whitney Sec’y.

Wm. M.

,

BROTHERS,

IMPORTERS
63 LEONARD

Broadway, New York.

Cash Capital..'
Assets July 1,1S65

Banks and Bankers,

$1,000,000

L. P. Morton &

1,400,000

This Company insures, at customary rates of
pre¬
mium against all Marine and Inland
Navigation
Risks on Cargo or Freight; also against loss or dam¬
age bv Fire.

If Pf'emiums

are

paid in Gold, Losses will be paid

twenty-five per cent of the net
profits, without incurring any liability, or in lieu
thereof, at their option, a liberal discount upon the
premium.
All losses equitably adjusted and
promptly paid.
Scrip Dividend declared Jan. 10,1855,
FIFTY PER CENT.
JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, President.
ROBERT M. C. GRAHAM, Vice President.
EDWARD A. STANSBURY, 2d Vice Pres.
John O. Goodiudge, Secretary.

against Accidents
•

l jti iij

AND

TRAVELERS’ INSURANCE CO.
243
BROADWAY, NEW YORK,

OPPOSITE CITY HALL PARK.
EDWARD A. JONES, President.
-

-

-

case

week COMPENSATION for

NEW YORK.
Are

prepared to draw Sterling Bills of
Exchange, at sight, or sixty days, on the

Union Bank of

day —25c.

“

2

“

“

8
6

“

«

50c.
75c.

$500,000

of DEATH, or $25

Interest allowed

for $5,000.
ASHER S. MILLS,
W, E, PRINCE, Yioe-President,

executed abroad.

Deposits, subject to
Cheques at sight.
Prompt attention given to the Co ec«
tTfan of Dividends, Drafts, See
on

_

T.

per

$2

“

.

8
4
5

“
“ .$1 25c.
“
Insurance on above tickets commences at 6 o’clock
A. M., 12 o’clock noon, 6 o’clock P- M.
REMEMBER THAT 25 GENTS per day insures

you

to

Cisco &

Son,

BANKERS,
No. 38 WALL STREET, NEW YORK.

Tickets for 8 days
“
12
20
30

sums

Orders for Securities

disabling accidents.

«t

London,

suit purchasers; and also to
*ssue Circular Letters of
Credit, on this
Bank, for Travellers* use.
&
|
n

TARIFF OF RATES.
Tickets for 1

WALL STREET,

,

Is now prepared to issue GENERAL ACCIDENT
INSURANCE TICKETS from one to twenty days.
These tickets Insure against ACCIDENTS o*
every

description for $5,000 in

35

;

Government Securities, Stocks and
Bonds bought and sold on Commission.

NATIONAL LIFE

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL,

Co.,

Bankers,

in Gold.
The Assured receive

Insure

ST.,
NEW YORK.

METROPOLITAN INSURANCE CO.,
108

OF

Shawls, Dress Goods, & Scarfs,

MARINE AND FIRE INSURANCE.
No.

$100.

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC
WOOLENS, TAILOR*
ING and GENTS’ FURNISHING
GOODS, etc.
FRIDAY, November 24,

York, July 1st, 1S65.
-

sums over

THURSDAY, Nov. 2?,
10 o’clock, at the salesroom,

At

Street.

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL

RIBBONS, MILLINE¬

RY, GOODS GENERALLY.

credit of four months, for approved
endorsed
notes, for all

Cuntjiaiu},

Pine
New

quired tor

ed, and then see ours working in East Boston, .Maes.
We ask only this.

a

FIRE AND INLAND

Crusher, weighs less

tons in

CORLIES, Auctioneer.

By Kobbe & Corlies,

C. Y. Wemple, Secretary
S. N. Stebbins, Actuary.
Abram DuBois, Medical Examiner.

OFFICE OF THE

inzof this series of machinery.

than two tons, and crushes from ten to twelve tons of
ere per hour to fine gravel, or two hundred and
fifty

w MORRIS.

Dry Goods.
EDWARD L.

purchase machinery before seing, or
•ending their friends to examine, the practical workor

j-THE0

Actuary, SHEPPARD HOMANS

Miners should not

jgj^The Whirling Table,

(ISAAC ABBATT,

Secretaries
aeoretanes,

Stokes, Pres.
Halsey, Ass. Sec.

Company,
Sreet, Boston, Mass.

.

DIVIDEND THIRTY PER CENT.
This Company insures
against Marine Risk* <m
Vessels, Freight, and Cargo; also, against Inland
Navigation Risks.
Premiums paid in gold will be entitled to a
return
premium in gold.
MOSES H. GRINNELL, Pres't.
EDWARD P. ANTHONY, Vice-PreJt
Isaac H. Walker, Sec'y.

HTHE MANHATTAN LIFE INSUR-

milling and manufacturing

105 State

$1,000,000
270,358

equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
Cash

Chartered 1850.

J. S.

THE

ffitthutl Snsttranre

No. 12 Wall Street.

ffhICH MAY BE MADE AND WITHDRAWN AT
ANY TIME.

Qam’i G. Wheeler, Jr., 54 Wall Street.
Edward B. Wesley, 22 William StreetWilliam R. Travers, 19 William Street.
Andrew Carrigan, 51 Chambers Street.
Horace F. Clark, 65 Wall Street.
J. Boorman Johnson, 91 Broadway.
James K. Waterbury, Brooklyn, E. D.
Freeman Clark, Rochester, N. Y.
Amasa J. Parker, Albany,
“
Francis Skiddy, 101 Wall Street.
David Dows, 20 South Street.
Daniel Devlin, 237 Broadway.

SUN

Fire Insurance Company.

$1,000,000

Isaac H. Frothingham, President.
John V. L
) yjce
presj^en^s#
Andrew V. Stout, \
A. A. Low, 31 Burling Slip.

Insurance.

NIAGARA

BROADWAY, cor. of Rector St.

13

671

Secretary;

Negotiate Loans and Business Paper, make Collso*
tions, purchase and sell Government and other Securi¬
ties on Commission, receive money on
deposit and
allow inte’est at the rate of four percent per
annum,
on
or

daily balances which may bo drawn at any time;
will issue Certificates of Deposit beariug interest

payable en demand.

JOHN J. CISCO, of the U. S. Treasury in N. Y,
JOHN ASHFIELD CISCO.

THE CHRONICLE.

672

[November 11, 1865.

I

Banks and Bankers.

fBanks and Bankers.

BABCOCK

BROTHERS

Have removed

the New York

to

&

c o.,

A

bankers,
No. 91 BROAD WAY. AND No. 6 WALL ST.

f

Guaranty and Indemnity Company’s ,
New Building, No. 14 Broad St.
I
They will continue to deal in
Sterling Exchange, and to issue
Mercantile Credits available in Eu¬

Sii;

w o o D

r o c k

&C0.

Fire Insurance.

Dealers* in Government and other Se¬
curities.

and bankers upon

deposits of gold and currency,
Cold loaned to imrchanis
favorable terms.

INSURANCE CO.

B il (J TC HTn"GS 1LA iYGElk
OFFICE,

No. 4 WALL

BANKING AND EXCHANGE

•

rope.
Also, to make advances on
Government Bonds and Stocks to be j
sold abroad, and upon shipments to j
their Liverpool firm.

FIRE

Interest allowed upon

subject to check at sight.

DEARBORN St.,

CASH

CHICAGO, ILL.

Collections made on all parts of the Northwest.
Stocks. Bonds, Gold, and Government Securities
bought and sold on commission, either in New York
or

CAPITAL,

Chicago., and carried on margins when desired.
York correspondent and reference.

Now

•

Messrs. L. S. LAWRENCE & CO.

FIRE, ON FAVORABLE TERMS.

Government Agency, and Designated Deposi¬
243 BROADWAY,
'
tory of the United States.
Interest allowed on call deposits at the rate of four j
IOSEPII U. OR VIS, Pres’t.
JOHN T. HILL, Cash'r
per cent; on deposits of three months and over, five •
per cent, and six per cent on deposits of six months !
THE
ard over. Any deposit may be drawn on ten days' ;
notice, and interest allowed' the same as deposits on
NINTH NATIONAL HANK
call. Collections promptly made and returned with
of the City of New York,
quick dispatch. Government and other securities
bought and sold. Possessing every facility, will ex¬
m BROADWAY, CORNER OF FRANKLIN ST.
ecute all orders and commissions at the* very best
market rates. Refer by permission to S. C. Thomp¬
J. U. ORVIS, President.
son, Pres. 1st Nat. Bk., N. Y., A. N. Stout, Pres. Nat.
J. T. HILL, Cashier.
Shoe & Leath B'k, N. Y., W. II. Johnson, Pres. Han.
New York. July 22 1S05.
Bk., N. Y., James Buell. Pres. Imp. & Trad. Nat. Bk.,
N. Y., S. K. Green, Pres. 3d-av. Savings Bk., N. Y.,
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
N. L. Buxton, Irving Savings Bk., N. Y., lion. Geo.*
Opdyke, Ex-Mayor, N. Y., lLou. James Harper, ExOF PHILADELPHIA.
Mnyor, N. Y.
(Tho First National

J. NELSCN LUCKEY,

MAURICE IIILGER, President.
RUDOLPH GARRIGUE, Vice-Pres
JOHN E. KAHL, Secretary.

Etna Insurance
Hartford, Conn.

Bankers,
COR. OF PINE and NASSAU

This Bank invites the accounts of Country Banks
and Bankers: will allow four per cent interest on
daily balances, and make collections at most favor-

STS«,

able' rates.

ISSUE

Circular Notes

Circular Letters

and

One Million Dollars,

of

CHARTER
TnOMAS A.

„

For the

Credit,

'

States, available in all the principal cities of the
world; also,
For

Commercial Credits,
use

in

Europe, east of the Cape of Good Hope.

We9t Indies, South America, and the United States,

Agency, bank of British xortii
AMERICA.
No. 24 PINE STREET.
CLARENCE M. MY.LREA,
and JAMES GOLDIE, Agents.
Exchange bought and sold on London and collec¬
tions made, in Great Britain and the colonies. Drafts
issued on Canada, Nova Scotia, New-Brunswick.
British Columbia and San Francisco.
Drafts for
small sums issued on Ireland and Scotland.

Assets, Jan. 1,1863,..

{

GOLD, STOCK, AND BOND BROKERS.

of

WALTER WATSON.

DU PEE, BECK & SAYLES,
BROKERS,
STOCK

No. 22 STATE
DUPEE,

The trades me ns
CAPITAL

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
*1.000.000
RICHARD BERRY. President.
ANTHONY HALSEY, Cashier.

The nationaiTpark"bank

HENRY SAYLES.

H

OITMAN &
commission

*2,000,000 | SURPLUS

*1,200,000

This Bank will issue Certificates of

ing interest

on

Deposit bear¬

favorable terms.
J. L.

WORTH, Cashier.

New York, August, 21,1S63.

H.

J.

MESSENGER,
BANKER,
No.
139
BROADWAY,

CO.,

Seven-thirty Loan Agent

Gold Bonds and Stocks of all descriptions
bought
lend sold on commission.
Accounts of Banks, Bankers, and individuals re¬
ceived on favorable terms.

consignments of Cotton.
Wool, Hides and Naval Stores, by our friends in New
Orleans, Mobile and Galveston,
Mechanics' National Bank, N. Y.

Messrs.,Gilman. Son «fc Co., Bankers. N. Y.
Ives, Providence, R. I.

Messrs. Brown &

MUNROE

AMERICAN

&

Co.,
BANKERS,

No. 5 RUE DE LA

&

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

Refkrencks — Union

PAIX, PARIS,

AND

No. 8 WALL STREET, NEW YORK,
Issue Circular Letters of Crod l tor Travelers in all
parts of Europe, etc., etc. Also Ccmn ercial Credits.

Bank,Liverpool; II B. Chitlin

& Co, New- York; J. II. Brower, Esq., New York ;
II. Roberts Esq., Sauannah; C.M. Furman, Esq., Pres’t
Bank of State of 3. C., Charleston ; E. J. Hart & Co.,
New Orleans.

Alexander Whilldin &
COMMISSION

19 & 21 Nassau

,And allow interest

on

sent per annum.

A. a. OATTELL. Pres’t.
)
A. WHILLDIN, V. Pres’t. f

j

Capital,

$500,000

BA N K

,

PHILADELPHIA, PA.,
on

liberal terras.


http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
Hv
rtiiriT^Wi
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis r^'Trr ***«*••:**•••-

Woo], Woolen & Cotton Yarns-

rJpi 1E AMERICAN LAND COMPA-

NY AND AGENCY, ORGANIZED UNDER THE
LAWS OF T1IE STATE OF NEW YORK.

in all

Attends to business of Banks Sc Bankers

J. W. TOUREY, Cashier.

For the Sale of

Office, No. 57 Broadway, New York.
Will buy and sell Real Estate as tho
Agent of others

THE CORN EXCHANGE
NATIONAL

NTS,

PHILADELPHIA,

Street, New York.

balances at the rate of Four per

MERCIIA

parts of the United States, especially in the South.
*Will facilitate
Emigration, and will transact all business in which a
responsible Agent, known and trusted by all interests,
may be usefully employed.
JOHN A. ANDREW, President.
Frank E, How*, Yic© President and General
Agent
North,
c
Will negotiate loans on Real securities.

Safes,

AND POWDER AND
The

BURGLAR-PROOF LOCKS.

reputation that the Alum Patent

Safes have

enjoyed lor many years of perfect
impenetrability bv
fire, entire freedom from dampness (the great evil o'f
every other safe) commends them to the attention
of

all persons requiring protection from fire
and burg¬
lars. These safes are the
only ones constructed of
heavy angle iron and corner braces, which
cannot be

through. Bankers

and jewelers requiring fire or
or both combined, are

VALENTINE &
Patentees and Sole
Street. N. Y.

B ANKERS,

BUTLER,
Manufacturers, 79 & 80 Walker

MERCHANTS, AND

others, should send by the

HARNDEN

EXPRESS, 65 Broadway,

they have unsurpassed facilities for the rapid and
safe forwarding of GOLD,
SILVER, JEWELRY.
-AND MERCHANDISE of
every description. Also
for the collection of notes,
drafts, and bills, bills ac¬

companying goods, &c.
Their Express runs on lightning
passenger trains In
charge of competent messengers.
SOUTHERN * LAND,
EMIGRATION,
AND PRODUCT CO.
No. 71

BROADWAY,

near

Wall St., N. Y.,

Offers for sale 4,000,000 acres of the finest and most
valuable Land in the Southern States,
at exceedingly
low prices.
Tracts from 1,010 to 500,000 acres.
T

Cotton Plantations, Farms, Mineral and Timber
Lands, etc. Iron Works and Furnaces, Coal Lands,
Silver Mines, etc.
Titles guaranteed.
W. H. QUINCY,

Secretary.

Sons,

Nos. 20 & 22 SOUTH FRONT ST.,
and 21 & 23 LETITIA ST.,

CULVER PENN & CO.,
BANKERS,
CXCEIVE DEPOSITS FROM BANKS, BANKERS
AND OTHERS,

Commission

Merchants,
No. 42

JOHN

Marshall, Beach & Oo,
Charleston, S C.

SALOMON, ROOT & CO.,
Bankers

Fire, Burglar, and Damp-proof

as

REFER TO

Liverpool, Eng.

Street.

ALEXANDER, Agent.

superiority* *

merchants,

on

Beach, Root & Co.,

AGENCY,

No. 62 Wall

invited to examine the specimens at our
factorv,
where they can readily
satisfy themselves of their

NO. 24 WHITEHALL ST..
NEW YORK.
Cash advances made

YORK

burglar proof depositories,

OF NEW YORK.

CAPITAL....

NEW

cut

Miscellaneous.

NATIONAL BANK.

201

STREET, BOSTON.

JAMES BECK,

$3,800,439
123,077

j. Liabilities,

JAMES A.

Personal attention given to the purchase and sale
Stocks and Bonds at the Boston Brokers’ Board.

A.

i

JosKPn Church
Drayton Hillykr,
Robert Buklk,
Tnos. A.
Aucxandkr,
Ebknkzicp. Flowkr,
Walter
Kenet, ■
Elipualet A. Bulkf.ley,
Cuas. II.
Brainard,
Roland Mather,
William F.
Tuttle,
Samuel S. Ward,
George
Roberts,
Austin Dunham,
Thomas K.
Brace,
,,
XT'
Gustayu-* F. Davij,„
Erastus Collins,
Edwin D. Morgan, of New York.
^

BOSTON.

JAMES

j

A C O., I

B URNETT, DR A K E
BANKERS,

Secy.

DIRECTORS.

i

.

C. II. CLARK, President.
MORTON McMICHAEL, Jr.. Cashier.
GEO. PHELLER, Manager Loan Dept.

of Travelers abroad and in the United

use

92,250,000

PERPETUAL.
ALEXANDER, President

LUCIUS J. HENDEE, Secretary.
JONATHAN GOODWIN, Jr., Asst.

,

GOVERNMENT SECURITIES
of all classes dealt in.
•

Co,,

INCORPORATED 1819.
Capital
-----

Bank Organized.)

Capital

$500,000,

WETK A LARGE SURPLUS
THIS COMPANY INSURES PROPERTY OF ALL
KINDS AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE BY

Hanking: and Collecting- Office of

DUNCAN, SHERMAN & CO.,

STREET, N. Y

North American

Lloyd,

THE NEW STEAMSHIP LINE BETWEEN
NEW YORK AND BREMEN.

Working Capital
IN

-

-

$1,000,000

10,000 SHARES OF $100 EACH.

SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR SHARES,
in

SINGLY OR

lots, received, and prospectuses furnished at

office of the

undersigned

every

the
day, between the

hours of 10 A. M. and 4 P. M.

.

RUGER BROTHERS,
46

BEAVER STREET.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102