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financial;

ommtraai
HUNT’S

xmtlt

MERCHANTS’

MAGAZINE,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES
[Entered, according to act ol Congress, In the year 1882, by W«. E. Dana & Co., In the office ol the Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C.J

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER II, 1882.

VOL. 35.

CONTENT8.
THE
The Week's Elections
Our Foreign Commerce

show

CHRONICLE.
527
529
530

The Financial Situation

Imports and Exports for September, and for the Nine and
Twelve Months Ended Sept.
30, 1882
535
Monetary and
Commercial
English News
536

Report of the Tariff Commis¬
sion

Railroad Earnings in October,
and from Jan. 1 to Oct. 31

Commercial and Miscellaneous
News
537
THE BANKERS’ GAZETTE.
..

SPfraBE

Money Market, Foreign Exchange, U.S. Securities, State
and Railroad
Stocks

Bonds

and

530

I Quotations of Stocks and Bonds 541
New York Local Securities
542
| Railroad Earnings and Bank

j

Returns

543

Range in Prices at the N. Y.
Investments, and State, City
Stock Exchange
510 1
and Corporation Finances.. 544
THE

Commercial Epitome
Cotton

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
517 I Breadstufts
517 | Dry Goods

552
553

£hc (fltrouiclc.
Tun; Commercial

and

Financial

Chronicle is published

in

New YorJc every Saturday morning. .
[ Entered at the Post Office, New York, N. Y., as second-class mail matter, j
TERMS OF

S’JSSORiPTiON—PARABLE

IN ADVANCE:

For One Year (including
postage)
For Six Months
do
Annual subscription
Six mos.
do

,

£2 7s.

do

1

Liverpool Office.
Chronicle m Liverpool is at No. 5 Brown’s

ings. where subscriptions and
advertisements will
regular rates, and single copies of the paper
supplied
WILLIAM B. DANA. )
JOHN (J. FLOYD.
<

THE

be

taken

Year.

Build¬
at the

? •
64,921
56.007

Jan....
Feb

....

62,014

I

56,950
58.^27
6S.604
66,301

*
7.965
+2.220

July....
Aug....

57,952
49.179
51,078
54,013
62,719

62,690
65,801
65,729

+5,990
+8,409
+ 19,171
+11,612
+ 11,188
+3,002

Sept

62,057

63,339

+092

April

.

..

May....
June...

...

Total.

SITUATION.

of Ex¬
ports.

1882.

68,3f>0

(000s Omitted.)

Gold

Excess

E.vp'rLs. Imports.

March

Iml

pnrtjs.
~$r

522,340 576.649 +54,309

1.1&4

Ex¬

ports.

Silver.
Excess

Ex¬

Im¬

ports.

ports.

ports.

$

t

$

of Im¬

1
102

1,032

469

7.231 *6,762
3,229 *2,389
551
2,343 *1.792
204 13,289 *13,085
840

257

162

5.512
4,755

425

1,807

1,13*3

230

*5.315
*4,593
*1,382
006

2,182
1.552
1,527
1,051
1,778
1,327
1.65C
1,488
1,188

5,178 38.558 *33,380 13,752

Exc.'ss

of Ex¬

534

ports.

f
1,048

631

921

621

906

1,053

+1

Oil

1,167

817

510

420

1,230

722

766

512

070

5.923

7,829

■f

It would
no

Merchandize.

8s.

at Is. each.
WILLIAM B. DANA & CO., Publishers,
79 & 81 William
Street, NEW YORK.
Post Office Box 958.

FINANCIAL

FOREIGN TRADE MOVEMENT OF TIII5 UNITED STATES.

6 10.

Subscriptions will be continued until ordered stopped
onicr, or at the publication office. The Publishers cannot beby a written
responsible
lor Remittances unless made
by Drafts or Post-Olliee Money Orders.
A neat tile oover is furnished at
50 cents: postage on the same is 18
eents. Volumes bound for subscribers
at $1 00.
The office of the

large increase, and when all products begin to
move, as they must later on, and the canal is closed and
rates are maintained, the income of the roads cannot fail
to be satisfactory.
It is not wonderful, therefore, that
each decline in the market should
bring in orders, domes¬
tic and foreign, for the
purchase of choice stocks and
bonds, giving assurance of a speedy recovery of values,
except of such properties as are purely speculative.
The condition of the
foreign exchange market, viewed
in the light of the foreign trade
movement, plainly indi¬
cates how considerable must have been the
European
takings of our stocks and bonds during late months. On
another page we give our usual
monthly review of the
trade figures, but that the reader
may be enabled at a
glance to know the real situation, we have prepared the
following summary for 1882, by months, omitting from
all the figures 000s.

$10 20.

in London (including postage)
do

NO. 907.

scarcely be correct to say that there has been
change this week in the aspect of affairs, when such a

We here

that without

allowing anything for interest
Europe or for freights or for undervaluation of
imports—the latter always an important feature under a
due

see

to

political revolution has been effected as the elections have
produced.
And yet as a
disturbing influence these protective tariff,—the simple tradS figures show a balance
changes are of no account. To be sure, a few speculators
against us every month since last January. To be sure,
attempted to use them for a day to further their
plans in in September it had become almost nominal, and since
depressing stock properties, but their efforts met with then the account ha3
undoubtedly turned in our favor.
trifling success, and would have miscarried wholly had But back months left
against us a large debt unpaid, an
not other
circumstances aided them. In fact, this
evidence
of
which
was
seen in
the sterling loans which
sudden,
quiet, but positive substitution of one party for
matured
in
London
in
October.
another,

simply tends

to

strengthen confidence,

as

it gives

such

conditions

Yet, notwithstanding
have imported nearly a

these, we
evidence of the power of the
million
non-office-holding class, by
gold in September and small amounts have been
tiieir votes, to administer
reproof when it is needed. The coming ever since. In fact, the normal condition of
people have not changed masters, but have
simply asserted the exchange market for the pa it few weeks has shown
their

own

^Aside

sovereignty.
from the interruption which

always cause

to mercantile

new

that whatever balance
a

holiday must

affairs, business has continued
favorably. Judged by the traffic returns of
the
railroads, which we publish elsewhere, the outlook is
certainly very encouraging. There is an
unusually large
istribution of merchandise
going on ; for although cot¬
ton is the
only staple that is really moving freely, earnings
to

progress




as

was

due to

the end of the last fiscal year

foreign countries

at

and subsequently, has been
to a very great extent, if not
wholly liquidated. This is
well illustrated now by the circumstance that we are
^weekly receiving small amounts of specie from the West
Indies, Mexico, and Europe. Of course the future bills
on the market have
anticipated exports and to that
extent helped produce this condition; but even
allowing

THE

528

have been a very
considerable move"
in securities to have brought the exchange market

for these, there must
tr

ment

CHRONICLE.

*

[VOL. XXXV.

Receipts at and Shipments from

Received.

Shipped.

$1,016,000
31,000

>680,000

$1,080,000

$‘-,135,000

N. Y.

,

day into its present condition.
Starting, then, with our old balance settled for, with
foreign exchange, dull and heavy, with bankers’ bills for
securities in moderate supply and not unlikely to increase
as our railroad properties by their earnings improve in

of to

Currency
Gold

Treasury Transfer
Total

The Bank of

355,000
100,000

to Philadelphia

America paid out $1,400,000 gold

on ac

associated banks during the week.
Last week’s bank statement was doubtless made up on
value, and with large offerings of cotton bills, the conclusion
This week’s-return will be made up
would seem to be that we may anticipate not long hence a declining averages.
on rising averages, as the
Treasury paid $2,203,400 for
considerable influx of gold. To be sure, imports continue
bonds
called
yesterday.
Considering these facts, the
marvellously large, but these are being paid for in part
count of the

by the movement in securites, while the present indi¬ following will indicate the character of to-day’s exhibit,
cations point to a good if not an increasing inquiry from
Into Banks. Out of Banks
Ret Loss.
abroad for all our food staples.
It appears that early esti¬
$730,037
$
$730,037
Rub-Treasury operations, net
mates of the crops in Western Europe were exaggerated,
2,135,000
1,080,000
1,055,000
Interior movement
and late

reports also reveal the fact that
has been very unpropitious

the harvest,

the weather since
for planting. In

$1,080,000

Total

$2,865,037

$1,785,037

As may be gathered from what has been already said,
England the rains have been almost unprecedented, and
the stock market was again unsettled this week. The
the ground is soaked with water, so that preparations for
influences which have been acting are various. Much
the new crop cannot be made.
All these things tend to enhance prices for food and to speculation has been indulged in, as to the attitude of
ensure a good demand for all our surplus.
The supplies Mr. Gould with regard to the market. He has for a long
time been reported as' operating to depress pries. This
at the Western centres are for the moment somewhat de¬
week some events have transpired apparently adverse to
ficient by reason of the fact that the turnpike roads are
his interests.
For instance, he has been defeated in his
heavy in consequence of the open season and frequen
efforts to secure a majority representation in the board
rains, thus preventing the farmers from marketing their
of directors of the Metropolitan Elevated Railroad Com¬
grain and other produce. But the temperature may soon
This want of success it was argued would indis¬
be expected to change, and as the wagon roads improve, pany.
the supply of grain will become more liberal, and the pose him to take a very active part in the stock market,
export movement be stimulated. Sterling exchange is especially in the direction of higher figures, and therefore
the speculators for a decline were almost certain that he
even now very near the gold-importing point and it will
would not interfere with their plans.
Their most deter¬

require but a comparatively slight change in rates to make
it profitable to move specie.
Then, again, active money here may exert an important
influence upon the foreign exchanges. This week, Wednesday, money ruled at one time as high as 30 percent, falling,
however, in tho afternoon of the next day to 2 per cent.
This was undoubtedly in great part if not wholly due to

mined

opponents were the supporters

properties,

Thursday

steadily

price

Of

who until
supported the

course

the

speculators

for

of the Vanderbilt

morning pretty
their favorites.

of
a

fall could not

hope for entire success in their plans unless they could
succeed in breaking down these barriers; and therefore, not¬
withstanding the manipulation of money on Wednesday,
the market did not become demoralized until Thursday

speculative manipulation. Among the reports current on
Wednesday was the absurd rumor that since the election had
resulted so unfavorably for Mr. Folger, no effort would be morning, when, to the dismay of margin speculators,
Lake Shore suddenly broke binder circumstances which
made by him to relieve the money market in case it should
led to the conviction that the support had been withdrawn.
become stringent.
The suggestion that such a course
The speculators for a decline took advantage of the breach
might be pursued served to alarm the timid, and it had
the desired effect so far as the speculators for a decline they had made, energetically pressed the Vanderbilt and
other stocks, circulated disquieting rumors and apparently
were concerned.
But on Thursday afternoon the an¬
were on the eve of a great
victory when the decline was
made that the Secretary of the
nouncement was
checked by the stubborn resistance shown by the Wabashes
Treasury had instructed the Assistant Treasurer in this
and by a determined rally m the Vanderbilt properties.
city to redeem without rebate of interest bonds embraced
in any call to the amount of $5,000,000 each week until Early in the afternoon the market was turned upward, the
otherwise ordered, and* it is probable that the decline in recovery being aided by the announcement of the continua¬
tion of the recent policy of the Secretary of the Treasury
the rate for money was directly influenced by this order,
as to anticipating the payment of called bonds; speculators
for it indicated a purpose on the part of Mr. Folger to
for a rise took courage and the subsequent advance was
continue the policy he has always pursued of allowing
almost as rapid as had been the decline in the morning.
government operations to interfere as little as possible
with the money market.
The particular call to which Yesterday the market was variable and feverish, with fre¬
this order applies is the one maturing January 18 for quent fluctuations in prices, but for most stocks the
was not materially different from the opening.
SI5,000,000. although by the terms of the order it may
The movements in the market have been, as will be seen
apply to any future calls unless rescinded. Probably the
Treasury Department will issue another call in a few days by the above sketch, in great part the result of
to mature in
February. The domestic exchanges at ive manipulation. Louisville & Nashville was
affected by the announcement that a portion of the new
interior points show a decline at Chicago and St. Louis,stock of the company has been sold- and will be bunaindicating a renewal of the demand upon this centre for
diately delivered. Western Union has been
money, but at New Orleans the rate has advanced, showing
the decision respecting the consolidation of the telegrap
less urgency for funds.
The Treasury operations for the
week, making allowance for such items as do not affect companies, the threatened opposition of the
the banks, have resulted in a gain, which is a loss to the Union, added to the rumor on Thursday that the
more & Ohio was negotiating for a control of the
banks, of $730,037 IS The interior movement Las been
and to the fact that the money necessary for the
as follows.




close

speculat¬
directly

influenced by
Mutua

latth
construG

ngw

cable had already been subscribed. monwealth, the

0Cean

Er^

by the report that the Grand

has been affected
Trunk of Canada was

529

CHRONICLE.

THE

11,1883.]

ovehuek

negotiating with the New York West
Shore & Buffalo for a New York connection, and the
Northern Pacifies were broken down on Wednesday and
Thursday on the theory that the new Congress would take
measures to annul the land grant, speculators apparently

man

who has for

many years

been the

bugbear of her respectability, is more than a nine days’
wonder ; while the majority in this State, closely approach¬
ing 200,000, is something utterly without a parallel in the
history of popular elections and may be called truly phe*
nomenal.
The

causes

which have worked

so

violent

a

revulsion

the country are not distant. It is not too
that at the present rate of progress the throughout
much to say that their result, except in its extent, was
road will most likely be so far completed before the new
discounted and foreseen by the most intelligent observers
Congress can convene, that it will be beyond the power of
that°body, even if it had the disposition, to interfere with weeks ago. And yet, when we examine what the causes
•

the fact

oring

The following table shows relative prices
in London and New York at the opening each day for
leading securities, indicating the profit in cable transac¬
the

grant.

tions.
Nov.

Nov. 7.

Kov. 6.

Nov. 9.

8.

N.Y.

Lond’n

Nov. 10.

N.Y.

119-10

U.S.3%9

101-31
4001

2d con.

00-7:1

119 43

110%
101%

101 19
38-43

40

99 73

cs

mi
14 m

s

149 59

119%
101%
38%
98%
148%
131 %
58%

119%
101%

119 31

101-19
3782

37 H

38-31

V8-27

9"%

99-24

14789

140%

i48-as

148

131-59

130%

131*85

28-40+
2724

131%
50%
27%

109-40

110

U9'43

Ill.Cent. 149-50
N. Y. C.. 131-57

132V;

29-371

19%

28-94 f

27 97t

55%

28-09

28

2773

27 %

27-01

27

110%

110-43

110%

110-43

Reading
Ont.W’n

110-43

f

r

■

*

182*32

K

Eich’ge,

109%

119%
101%

101-19

38%
09%
.

4-80%"

4-86%

4-80%

cables.
*

N.Y.

Lond’n

prices.* prices. prices.* prices. prices.* prices.

U S-4«.C.

St. Paul

Lond’n

Lond’n Ar.r.

prices.* prices.

Expressed lu their New York equivalent.
basis of $50. par value.

+ Reading on

England rate of discount remains
unchanged at 5 per cent. The Bank gained £94,000
bullion during the week, butHhe cable reported a witkdrawal on balance of £17,000 on Thursday.
The propor¬
tion of reserve to liabilities was increased 3 5-1G this
Bank

The

The return of the Bank of Prance shows an in¬

week.
crease

of

of 3.100,000

000 francs silver.

has

francs gold and a decrease of 2,G00,The Bank of Germany since last report

The following indicates the
principal European banks this
corresponding date last year.

gained 6,900,600 marks.

amount of bullion

week and at the

in the

Nov. 9,

Bank of

England

Bank of France

1882.

Gold.

Silver.

St,

St

Nov. 10,
Gold.

•

St

1881.
Silver.
St

20,727,369

20.256,379

Bank of Germany

38,986,564 44,523,420 24.888,050 47,379,090
6,509,750 19.529,250
6,496,750 19.490,250

Total this week

65,739,693 04,013,G76 52,125,175 66.908,310

Total previous week

65.391.289 63,725,005 51,728,541 66,692,107

OP1 The above gold and silver division of the stock of coin of the Bank
oi Germany is
merely popular estimate, as the Bank itself gives no
Information

that point.

on

The

Assay Office paid this week through the Sub-Treas¬
ury $61,541 for domestic bullion, and the Assistant Treas¬
urer received the
following from the Custom House.
Consisting of—
Dak.

Duties.
Gold.

Noy.
“

“
“
“
“

3..
4..
6..

$423,436 84
377,935 96
443,022 20

$42,000
33,000
125,000

JJ. 8.

Gold

Silver Ger-

Notes.

Cert if.

lijicates.

$34,000 $275,000

$71,000
72.000

43.000

253,000
212,000

20,000

63,000

7..

8..
9..

685,834 54

98,000

59,000

413,000

464,495 28

0 4,000

39,000

258,000

114,000
104,000

Total.

$2,391,724 82

$362,000 $195,000 1,411,000

$424,000

THE WEEK'S ELECTIONS.
The one
engrossing topic of the past few days
the result of

has been
Tuesday’s elections, which is surely wonder¬
ful
enough to he engrossing. That the tidal wave of
political reaction, which began in Ohio in October, should
sweep across the country, is not so remarkable, because
this had occurred before

;

but that it should be so em¬

phatic, even parting Massachusetts from her political
iuooring?; and giving as Governor to that staid old Com¬



by unusual conditions. “ When the crib is
low the animals kick,” says a proverb.
In hard times,
with wages low and work hard to find, dissatisfaction with
the powers that be is easily stirred and is not alwaysreasonable.
The discontented man fancies that some good
may come out of a change and feels sure that he will not
be any worse off ; even the far-back Long Island fisher¬
man, when fish won’t bite, unconsciously favors a change
in the government.
Hence, an “ opposition ” sweep was
natural and intelligible in 1874, 1870, or even 1878 ; but
the country is prosperous now—how is it, then, that we
are to explain it ?
Whoever turns his thoughts back over the record of
governmental doings for, say, two or three years, can see
much which should disturb even a busy and a patient people.
What doubt can there be that the country thrives and
grows in spite of the government for which it pays so pro¬
fusely? The number of men in Congress who are really
possessed or actuated by a feeling of official obligation
and responsibility, may, we fear, be counted without taxing
the arithmetic of the finger ends.
Of the subjects which
have really demanded attention from Congress, how many
have had it?
Of the measures which the public interest
required to have passed, how many have been? On the
other hand, is there not a dreary list of things done which
ought not to have been done—things untimely, uncalled
for, stupid, profligate, corrupt, vicious, and pregnant with
the power of perpetuating their own baleful kind?
Is it
not soberly true that Congress, and legislatures generally,
have ceased to adequately and really represent the sub¬
stantial elements which comprise the people? The question
seems absurd at first glance, and yet we must admit that
if this were not true—that is, if the people were not
better than the men who somehow are sent to the Capitals
were, we are met

would breakdown.
long tampering with the subject of cur¬
rency.
Consider the persistent and defiant refusal to re¬
the
lieve
country from suffering further the slow but sure
operation of the silver lunacy ; and, on the contrary,
the attempts to force silver upon the banks.
Consider the
coercive attempt in the Carlisle amendment; the prepos¬
terous bills to prohibit certification of checks ; the uncon¬
cealed desire to punish the banks for adhering to sound
money ; the doctrine that national banks are u creatures
of the government” and become fit subjects for discipline
if they demur to whatever the moralists in Congress see
fit to portion out to them, coupled with the other doctrine
that, as pets of the government, they are monopolists de¬
vouring the people.
Consider, on tho side of sins
of commission, such work as that of the pensions bill,
which simply goes beyond the power in language to fitly
and calmly characterize it.
As a sin of commission and
omission combined, consider the overslaughing of revenue
reform and tax reduction, and the sleeping tariff commis¬
sion ; the remedy for excessive surplus as found in increas¬
ing profligacy, not in diminished revenues.
It is quite true, and only just to admit, that the fault for
these sins is pretty evenly to be distributed. But the party
to

represent them—the order of society

Consider

the

THE CHRONICLE.1

5S0

(Tol. XXXV.

The imports, as will be seen from the foregoing, are not
The form of elections
express, in so many quite as heavy as in August, but there was a similar rela¬
tion between the corresponding months of 1881; still the
words, approval or disapproval of men and measures; they
total for September this year is over
millions above
can thunder displeasure by a vote adverse to the dominant
thatbf September last year, which shows clearly how heavy
party, and let it find those at whom it is aimed. This
in power is the one held responsible.
does not yet permit the people to

election

no

more

means

approval of the non-dominant

of that party in 1884 ; it
expresses displeasure only.
In the lack of a third party
coming forward with apparently clean hands, the people
can only say to the responsible party, "We want no more
of you, at any rate, until discipline has chastened you.”
party than it ensures the success

This is’

an

assertion of the old-fashioned but now

almost

really is. Imports of 63£ millions—or 760
year—will certainly not be considered other¬
wise than large in any month; yet for the last seven
months they have averaged considerably more, and for
the twelve months ended September 30 the aggregate is
$103,899,641 above that of the corresponding period in
the previous year.
This is the more surprising whin we
remember that during these same twelve months our
exports fell off pretty nearly 150 millions—to be exact,
$148,491,458. Thus in the face of a most remarkable
decline in the shipments of domestic products and conse¬
quently in our purchasing power, we have managed
to
spend more money than ever before for foreign
goods.
Such being the condition of things, . one naturally

the movement
millions

a

overslaughed doctrine, that legislation is not merely a
scramble for spoils, but that the public interest should be
thought of sometimes. It is a broad hint, perhaps, that
the party with a positive policy, which is determined to
Stick by that policy and to go on record to stand or fall
on it, is the party which the people will prefer.
-It is an
expression of disgust at the rottenness of platforms and
the insufficiency of names without principles.
It'is a clear
demand for better ends to be pursued than office-keeping expects to see increasing stocks of goods in the warehouses,
but this expectation is not borne out by the facts. There
or office-getting, and a call for something more than spoilsis no excessive accumulation of goods in bond.
In our
parties. It is a blow at the most destructive of all forces
in a popular government, to wit, the deep rooting of a review of August we noted a decrease of four millions in
the stocks remaining in warehouses, from $38,268,715 at
system under which a few professional manipulators,
the end of July to $34,334,523 at the end of August, and
through the polls, the convention, the local convention, the
now we note a further
reduction to $31,050,684 at the
primaries,” and back to “ the slate,” are able, to “fix
end of September.
During these months of last year, our
things,” leaving the people only the mockery of ratifica¬
tion, under the alternative of no alternative. Viewed in imports being smaller, the reduction in stocks was some¬
this way—and in no other way can it be reasonably what larger, so that on the 1st of October this year we had
$2,722,875 more goods in warehouses than at^the same
viewed—the result must work out a healthy lesson.
date in 1881; but the increase is not sufficiently large to
merit particular significance.
OUR FOREIGN COMMERCE.
Thus we see that large exports, exceptional prosperity,
Again we have a trade statement with an unfavorable and may we not add inflated currency, have wonderfully
The figures of our foreign commerce for
balance.
stimulated our consuming power and introduced an en.
September have been issued by the Bureau of Statistics tirely new element in our foreign trade movements and
this week, and they show that in September, as in the
one which must materially modify all previous calculations.
previous months, our merchandise imports exceeded the Were this year’s crops, like those of last year, a failure,
exports. It is to be observed, however, that the excess of there would be no reason to doubt a speedy export of gold
imports is small—only $631,961—and that in this partic¬ in such quantities as to enforce economy. But with crops
ular therefore the exhibit is mere encouraging than its
excellent in quality and more than ordinarily large in quan¬
immediate predecessors.
September is the eighth succes¬ tity, and every prospect of finding a market for them, the
sive month that has recorded a balance against us, but for
danger of gold going out is averted for the time being,
May the excess of imports was over 19 millions, since and therefore although imports may not continue so large
which time it has been gradually growing smaller, having
as they have averaged
during the last seven months, we
been only three millions in August, and having now, as
cannot anticipate a return at present to the smaller figures
stated, been reduced to but little over half a million for of recent years.
September. The adverse balance for the latter month is
But if as regards imports the September statement is
'wholly the result of our extraordinary imports, which are unsatisfactory, it is not without its favorable features. We
maintained on a scale of unprecedented magnitude, the
have above alluded to the smaller balance against us than
exports being fairly large for the season in view of the in the
preceding months. There are two other particulars
heavy contraction in special commodities. The following in which the exhibit is encouraging. We refer to the fact
will show the import and export movement at each of the
that for the first time in thirteen months the merchandise
six leading ports.
exports show an improvement on the preceding year, and
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE AT U. 3. TORTS.
to the further fact that during September, strange as it
1981.
1882.
may seem, we imported more gold than we exported. As
Exports (Domestic
and Foreign.)
September. Si)ice Jan. 1. September. Since Jan. 1.
to the merchandise exports, the increase over the previous
$'
$
$
$
33,466,915 286,450,202 year is only $165,720, but is noteworthy all the same,
32,355,548 253,360.882
New York
2,311,725 6G, 191,872
New Orleans
3,995,376 45,312,754
3,909,757 46.684.985 this for the reason that while the shipments of wheat and
5,842,523 36,876,261
Baltimore
5,046,017 55,281,211
4,937,373 42,526,1 10
Boston, &c
flour were undoubtedly large, the outward movement of
3,266,690 31,499,533
2,955,265 25,716,915
Philadelphia
30,011,684
4,261,561
4,179,297 36,109,16!
Saa Francisco
all other leading staples was very restricted
Of
10,228,714 102,211,861
All other ports
8,391,717 88,437,616
sent
cotton we
only 140,496 bales, against 195,101 bales in
62,491,379 618,397,348
Total
62,657,099 522,339,696
September, 1881 ; of corn only 623,597 bushels (valued
Imports.
33,172.024 338,052,058
41,071,626 394,490,322
Now York
$463,375), against 4,095,111 bushels (valued at
8,875,270
717,598,256.696
New Orleans
921,826
12,311,717
1,422,156
11,133,735
1,388,900
Baltimore
307), and the value of our provisions exports
4,933,592 50,723,971
0,156,777 58,907,917
Boston, Ac
24,223,854
2,308,859
2,888,841 30,819,959
Philadelphia
$9,695,218 to $7,453,734. But the gain in wheat
3,695,296 28,099,559
3,618,689 33,555,672
San Francisco
4,104,277 31,339,015 product, flour, was sufficient to wipe out the loss on
All other ports
3,992,101 39,185,042!
besides.
With such a
63.339,060 576.619.343! 55,713.802 L97,225,uA items, and leave a slight increase
Total
“




and

indeed.

i

at
$2,914,fell from
and its

these

November

THE CHRONICLE.

18S2.]]

11,

such conditions,
exhibits when, as

it is not too much to expect
still better
in October, cotton goes out
freely, and larger exports later on, when in addition to
cotton we will have corn and possibly also increased
amounts of provisions to ship abroad. With the approach
of this period, too, the probability of gold shipments to
this country becomes less problematical, and this brings us
to the other particular in which tho September exhibit is
noteworthy, namely, the excess of gold imports over the
result under

581

EXPORTS OF BREADSTUFFS DURING SEPTEMBER AND SINCE JAN.

Quantity.

September.

1882.

.hush.

Barley
Com
Corn-meal
Oats

.bush.

46,123
118,5«5

6,381
4,095,111
27,561
209,3 49
9,019

bids.

17,159,343
821,010

10,970,393
478,274

bush.

Wheat
Wheat-flour..

.

Total

1882.

1881.

$

$

-

;

3,997

88,897
463,375

2,914,307
94,213

89,937
24.274

18,669,109

91,312
9,297
13,749,542

5,088,634

3,084,765

24,506,067

19,947,433

81,841

|

,

Since Jan. i.
.lmsh.
Coni
.bush.
.bbls.
Corn-meal.
Oats
.bush.
.bush.
Rve
Wheat
.bush.
Wheat-flour.. bbls.

Value.

18S1.

123,190
623,597
21,422

...

Rve

|

1.

211,594

94,459
153,546
50,897
gold exports.
'
11,417,976 61,099,421
8,652,602 35,747,536
175,038
325,503
666,284
969,006
Our gold imports, which began on an important scale in
457,127
207,729
123,763
209,225
880,316
740,579
792,416
775,587
1S79 continued with but little interruption till January,
81,331,429 92,760,138
94.338,429 107,939,345
1882
With that month the movement ceased, and with
4,849,773
5,492,367
29,802.508 31,744,213
Total
134,512,779 177.452,638
February it was reversed. Since that time we have exported
more or less gold each month, as much as 31 millions net
The individual totals of provisions exports are de¬
in the aggregate ; but in September the tide seems to have void of any special features.
Every item shows a de¬
turned. Stated briefly, we shipped only $205,405 domes¬ crease from last year, both for September and the nine
tic and $24,444 foreign gold during September, or $229,- months, in quantity and value alike.- Subjoined are the
849 altogether, and received $1,135,799, leaving the net figures.

Barley

.

The explanation of this change in the
specie currents is to be found net in the trade movements

import $905,950.
for of

merchandise and coin for the three months ended

than we ex¬
bills drawn
against anticipated shipments of merchandise later on, and

September 30, we imported $7,127,704 more
ported but in the large amounts of future
in the movement

of securities to Europe, which would

again appear to be in progress to some extent. Though'
the trade figures do not warrant it, gold arrivals of import¬
ance might even yet be possible before the end of the year
should securities go out in any quantitjL
the merchandise movement at indi¬

A few words as to

vidual ports. As will be seen
New Orleans again has an increase,

from the table above,
and as in August the in¬

augmented breadstuffs movement.
port, which last year lost heavily in its breadstuffs
exports because of the deficient grain production, is again
looming up as an exporting port for this staple. Balti¬
more also is largely
increasing its breadstuffs exports,
which is very natural considering that it is largely depend,
ent upon the production of the Ohio Valley, so excellent
this year and so poor last year.
San Francisco, on the
other hand, has smaller exports than a year ago, the rea¬
sons for which we
gave in our last review.
The following
exhibits the breadstuffs and provisions movement at each
crease

is due to

port.
EXPORT8 OF BREADSTUFFS AND PROVISIONS FROM LEAPING TORTS.

1882.

New York....
New Orleans

Baltimore

....

Boston

Philadelphia

..

San Francisco

Other ports

Total

Provisions,

$
$
9,589,251 57,571,259
4,813.474
1,989,759
4,161,572 18,859,307
8,854,910
l,6&4,938i
1,529,369
6,705,241
3,082,401 25,651.483
2,458,777 12,057,045

24,506,067 134,512,779
<tc.

New York:.
New Orleans

Baltimore
Boston..

Philadelphia
Hau

September.

1881.

Since Jan. 1.

Francisco

Other ports...
Total

5,345,992
10,849
49,066

1,133,571
srq OAO

39,838

534,568

50,707,3311
53,588!

i

September.
$
9,905,498
463,296
2,330,651
1,307,850
1,293.556
3,232,502
1,414,090

Since Jan. 1.

$
7S.2;<7,902
9,581,174
30,513,580
12,373,762
14,176,741
19.983,857
12,525,622

70,265,989
115,719

609,799!
11,812,299;

1,929
60,610

4,263,616

1,587,438

19,250,069

287,163

33,281

278,789

422,840

3,086,100

ri i *31 „!

3,770,171j
73,375,909!

z, e;i o

Si 102.803.051

,

IN SEPTEMBER AND SINCE JAN.

1.

Value.
1881.

1882.

1882.

|

1881.
$

$
Beef, fresh
salted

and

Bacon and hams
Lard

Fork
Tallow
Butter

Cheese

6,846,001
10,912,110
22,088,629

10,862,052

717,350

30,541,074

2,056,345

3,686,361
1,867,405
965,088
9,610,300

24,690,218
5,459,121

2,911,922
507,891

4,194,397
1,994,055

2,727,014
410,686
180,694
180,542

12,790,751

1,181,153

1,488,562

7,453,784

9,695,213

Total

1,005,090
3,052,250
349,848
379,655

Since Jan. 1.

Beef,

fiesh

and

salted
Bacon and hams
Lard

65,004,396
268,671,303
171,297,130

Fork

Tallow
Butter
Cheese

0,203,377

9.710,540

28.723,313
20,249,181
4,459.594

42,397,644

47,855,942
32,016,258

108,468,877
481,553,389
231,577,662
70,007,178
59,323,651

5,693,209

18.052.950

1,136,616

89,559,853

119,328,808

9,901,063

i

Total

2,702,825

24,386,540
5,630,258
4,072.828
3,556,731
12,998,510

73,375,969 102,803,051

probable—nay certain—that September is the last
an excess of merchandise imports
over exports.
The downward movement has run its course,
and a change has already taken place.
This is not so evi¬
dent from the New York figures, but it is to be remem¬
bered that at this period of the year New York does not
hold the same relative prominence in the export trade as at
other periods. The Southern ports do a large export trade
in cotton in the autumn, while some of our neighboring
ports ship freely of breadstuffs. However, the New Y ork
totals are the only figures we have got, and with proper
allowance they may be made to answer our present pur¬
pose.
Hence we give the following table, showing the
imports and exports at the port of New York for four
It is

month that will show

weeks of October this and last year.
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

Imports.

19,947,433 177,452,638
7,021,281

AC

Pounds.

September.

an

That

Breadstuffs.

EXPORTS OF PROVISIONS,

1882.

1881.

$
$
8.181,793 7,958,193
8,940,718 H,411,GG5
20 10,183,767 10,214,552
27 7,657,733 7,530,223

Wk. end'qOctober o
“
13
“
“

Total.. 34,975,011 34.164.633

It

will

be

seen

*

AT NEW

Exports.
Wk.

end'g—

October

10

“

17
24

“
“

31
Total..

YORK.

1882.

1881.

$

$

6,592,524
6,108.988
8,086,939
5,855,520

5,536,912
7,164,162
6,590,674
5,910,615

26,643.971 25,202.363

from this statement that while the

imports still continue in excess of those of last year, the
exports are also beginning to show an increase. But even
we have
already remarked upon the small shipments of wTith this improvement in the exports, if New York should
corn and the
heavy shipments of wheat and floureduring bear the same relation to the entire movement of the
October. The decrease in corn becomes especially marked, United States as in September—namely, 51£
per cent of
however, when we look at the aggregate for the nine the exports and G9.I per cent of the imports—the total
months. During
that period this, year wTe shipped less than exports would be but little above the total imports of the
eleven and a half million
bushels, while in the same time country. As said, however, these percentages offer no
]ast year we
shipped over sixty-one million bushels, a loss guide as to the October ratios. Not only is the export
°f
pretty nearly fifty million bushels. Following is our movement outside of New York heavier, but the imports
usual table
also are heavier, though in the latter the gain in pergiving full particulars.

Concerning




7,453,794

9,695.21

the individual items of breadstuffs exports,

THE CHRONICLE.

532

centage is not so great as in the former.
Last October
New York had less than 41 per cent of the exports

(against 514 above for September this year) and G5J- per
imports (against G9J for September).
Going

cent of the

back to

October, IS,SO,

find that in the imports New
York had almost precisely the same proportion as in
October, 1881, but that in the exports it had about 8 per
cent more, or 4 44 per' cent.
We may safely calculate the
October imports on the basis of G5| per cent.
As to the
exports, we think the percentage this year will be above
41 per cent—this because the cotton movement is so
largely represented in the New York total. The cotton
exports were very heavy in October this year, no less than
510,310 bales going out, against 587,321 bales m October,
1881, an increase of. 128,989 bales. But of this increase
01,097 bales was at New York, the exports from.this
port being 105,249 bales, against 43,552 bales. Thus New
York had

over

we

4tete-fifth

of

[Voi. JCXxv.

Mr. Shaw gives a letter of Mr. James Tliormlv
of Manchester (who visited this country in
1879), in which
is worked out the cost per pound of certain
descriptions of
cotton goods in England and at four centres of
cotton
manufacture in the United States.
Ilis figures we do
not
quite understand, but his result seems to be that the pro¬
portion per pound paid for wages in England is consider¬
ably more than it is here. This conclusion is in accord
with the one reached some time since, we think,
by Mr
Europe.”

Atkinson, and would
ments of

seem

to corroborate recent state

similar nature made

by Mr. Carroll D. Wright.
further investigate this
question of wages, their report might be of no little use.
The inquiry would necessarily take the double form of
(1)
the actual wages paid and (2) the decreased
purchasing
power of the wages, by reason of the tariff.
a

If the Tariff Commission would

the whole cotton movement

RAILROAD EARNINGS IN

OCTOBER, AND

this year,

against only about one-ninth in 1881.
Conse¬
FROM JANUARY 1 TO OCTOBER 31.
quently, we conclude that 41 per cent is too low for New
Railroad earnings continue to show a steady growth as
York’s percentage of the total merchandise exports, and
the autumn season progresses and the crops move in greater
therefore fix it at 43 per cent. On this basis the New York
volume.
The October statement is peculiarly
figures above, enlarged so as to cover the fulbmonth and in the extent and distribution of the increasefavorable,
which it
instead of only four weeks, would give total exports for
records fully confirms the expectation that business and
the whole country of about 68 millions.
The imports at trade will be
large and active during the fall and winter
05^ per cent would give somewhat less than 60'millions months. The
gain on last October is over four million
total imports.
So it would seem that (October will inaug
dollars, having gradually risen month by month since
urate the
change from a monthly balance against us to 'a June
last, when there was a small loss. The following table
balance in our favor, in the substantial sum of about
gives mileage and earnings of individua. roads.
eight million dollars.
GROSS EAKNIKGS AND MILEAGE IN OCTOBER.
e>

REPORT OF THE TARIFF COMMISSION.

Gross Earn in as.

Name of road.

We have received the

To the Editor

of The Chronicle—

The report readies us from all quarters that the Tariff Commission
will recommend no important changes in the rates of
duty as now levied.
We

forced to give some weight to a report so current and so unani¬
mous, and we do so with the greatest reluctance and regret, because
if such shall be the result of the six months’ labor of the Commissioners
are

it will prove

that they are simply the agents of the various rings in
whose interest the. present tariff was made, and by whoso operation the
industry of the country is to-uay hampered.
No honest aid intelligent man can give a single day’s attention to the
tariff as it stands, and be prepared to defend the monstrous tax
upon
iron and steel, the effects of which are felt by every industry and
every
individual in tlie land. Wliat excuse can there be for taxing salt in
bulk a higher ad valorem duly than champagne ? For
collecting nearly
one quarter of the whole customs revenue from an essential article of
food like sugar ?
For levying one hundred per cent duty on rice /
Do these duties protect the wages of laboring men?
Laboring men
want the essential articles of food, such as salt and sugar, as

cheap

as

they are in other countries. Iron and steel, the raw material of all
manufacturing industry, must not be excessively taxed for the benefit
of its few

producers.

If the Commission shall report in

,

favor of continuing these duties

if

they shall endorse this tariff substantially as it now is as the
all possible tariffs, the country will be continued in the
present suspicion that the Commission is simply a ring of the rings, the
agents of interested parlies, a part of the thing to be reformed.
No doubt the large majority of the Commission
will, with a smile, ac¬
cept tins verdict and hud nothing injurious to tlu.-ir established reputations
in the fact that they have accepted a pub ic trust and used it for
special
private benefit. But we have always believed that there was at least
one gentleman of their number whose
previous reputation would be
tarni.-died by such an allegation, and we trust and believe that even if
he should find himself alone, he will publish a
minority report stating
fairly the iniquities and defects of the present tariff, and recommending
such changes as the interest of the country at
large demands.
Yours truly,
D.

'best of

On the

subject of labor referred to above, we have in the
report of Mr. Shaw, our Consul at Manchester, some interest¬
ing suggestions. This report is in a pamphlet issued by the
State Department upon the “Cotton and Woolen Mills of
t




1882.

$

$
A tell. Top. A S. Fe...
Burl. Cert. Rap. A No
Cairo A St. Louis*...
Central Branch U. P
Central Iowa
Central Pacific
Char. Col. A Augusta

Chesapeake A Ohio*
Chicago A Alton

1,402,02:1
300,155

§50,437

§30,912

250,163
812.032

163.706
771,814
156.857
151.233

160,579
212,888

2,251,000
2,502,100

Chic. St. P.Minn. AO
Cin. Inrt. St. L. Sc Ch.
Cleve. Ale. Sc Col
Columbia Sc Greenv.*

516,671
250,000
54,718

Col. Hock. Val. Sc Tol
Denv. Sc Rio Grande.
Des Moines Sc Ft. I).'

2

Detroit Luns’g Sc No.
East Teun.Va. Sc Ga.
Evansv. Sc T. Ilaute.
Flint A Pere Marq*
.

Gr. Bay Win. A St. P
Gulf Col. A Santa Fe
Hannibal A St. Jos..
Illinois Central (111.).
Do
(Iowa lines).
Inrt. Bloom. A West..
Intern’l A Gt. North.
Lake Erie A Western
Li tile Rock A Ft. S..
Little Rk. M. R.ATex

Ding Island
Louisville A Nashv..
Marq. Hough. A On.
Milw. L. Sh. A West.
Mo. Kan. A Texas...

Missouri Pacific.p
Mobile A Ohio

...

Metropol. Elevated.
N. Y. Elevated.
N. Y.«A New Engl’ml
Norfolk A Western..
Northern Pacific
Ohio Centra!
Ohio Southern
Peo’ia Dee.AEvansv.
Ricn. A Danv
St. L. A.AT.H. m.line
Do do (branches)
St. L. Iron Mr. A So..
St. Louis A San Fran.
St. Paul A Duluth...
8t. Paul Minn. A Man

Scioto Valley
Texas A Pacific
Tol. Delplios A Burl.
Union Pacific

Virginia Midland*...
Wab. St. Louis A Pac
Total

§60,752
72,570

630,508
22,763
153,062
372,234
73,408
135,325

30,001
227,506
238.142
674,887

190,43.8
260,041
411.407

133.69*
61,592

30,055
108,532
1,212,155
02,001
83,411
687,703,
860,525!

,591,052

[,341.098
379,029
221,3 JO

07.99t>

169,018
228,677
308,322
118,593
60.151
31,455
163.315

"800.301)

360.0031

3,119)

2,7 62
238

517'
847)
240)

430
840
227

337);

335

+40.188
+ 12,722
+ 61,655
+ 659,948
+ 251.002
+ 107,0 12
+ 28,680
+ 16,722

+ 16,036
+ 23,422
-7,834
—0.422
+23,020
+ 50,590

970
87
226
900
144
318
219
323

110.

2261
0021

402)

/

6841

292
919
402
544

+ 103.085

77d

650

+15,105
+ 1,441

16S!

+7,090

225

482}
292
919

385
163
170
3*28

385}
170

328

+ 11,582

90
285

260

562,184
633,839

9-125,519

1,290

1,000

+ 226,680
+ 8.277

079
528

—2,945
+ 58.42 1
4-48,945

246,530

+ 8,748

583.955
81,631

+ 250,505
+ 32,040
+ 8,313
■| 4 44
+ 60,200

32,289
38,753
376,300
131,697
72,041
719,239
308,569

+ 8,865
+ 16,759

+90,155
+ 52.424
+ 72,927

53,656)
1,001)

+ 4,266

419,203

1,595,680

322)
l,160j

1571

+373,349

92,441

144
29 6 i

315

49.390

3,15*.337}
§67,327)

342
144
296
322

303}

+ 22,011
+ 5,066
+ 100,083
+ 6,529
+ 28,697
+ 21.390

979,057}
54

4,383! 3,951
3,300; 2,941
985
1,085 j

+ 10.016

73,689
605,708

146,616

238

71,832

260,313
261,200

80.400}

—98,857
+ 19,525
+ 80,45/

75.692

,002,95b

310,145*

140,562

388
244!

564
116
300
207

+ 35,217
+ 209,205
+ 16,399

223,027

436,500)

140)

-

29,185
1.0,9 42

265,201;

40,602
39.197!

1.790

659

638.432

220.082)
255,278
£34,160
114,271

L820

+1 8,40 /
2.478
+ 34,790
+ 14,422

9,157

315,(544
63.392
113,314
33,935
127.421
23 1,913
6 16,190

j 1881.

+139,600

§14,710
24

256.924

318.737

'

221,748
29.810
78.317

91,042
,507,857

Chic. A Gr. Trunk I..
Chic. Milw. A St. Paul

1882.

$

,263.023

27,332
113,143
108,464
2,400,000

Chic, A Eastern Ill...

Chicago A Northwest

Increase or
Decrease.

1881.

i

following communication from a
leading manufacturer, a typical one in New England.
It expresses the views, not of a theorist, but of a
busy,
practical man—a student of men, things and events—one
of a large class, rapidly increasing.
Congress may for a
time ignore the growing sentiment to which this letter
gives expression, but it is becoming a power too strong to be
resisted, and the party that attempts it will be pushed aside.

Mileage.

74.560

+

122.698

+

17,881

,169,530

[—11.193

§65,521

1,806
+ 197,899

2,025! 1,840
90
796
506
18
14

lb
11
394
428

356
425
972
212
joS
243

1,119
242

128
254

757
195

757
105
121
816
661
175

121

636
643
175

855

1,020

132

132

982
446

1,396
565

3,744

3

353

353

,538.023 + 4.022.630 47.702

42,724

,397,781

+

3,423 3,300

*

Three weeks only of October in each year
t For the four weeks ended October 28.

§ Freight

earnings only.

November

THE

11* 1882.]

CHRONICLE.
We

533
that while

Chicago gained two million
wheat, it lost five millions on corn. Taking all
the ports the gain in wheat is 6,091,056 bushels and the
+}1P table all but six have improved on 1881, and
roads in me
decrease in corn 6,451,522 bushels.
But there were also
the case of every one of these the decrease is
gains in oats and barley, so that the total of all kinds of
scarcely more than nominal. All sections of the country
grain reaches 21,449,157 bushels for' the'four weeks
ar to share in the improvement, though the Southwest
this year, against 20,108,272 bushels in the corresponding
and the Northwest have undoubtedly been especially favweeks of 1881, an increase of
million bushels. In
vored The increase of 16 per cent this year was made
comparing with 1881, however, it must be remembered
on earnings of last year 11 per cent above those of 1880,

——^^^fjncrease is 16, against 14 for September,
10 for August and 9 percent for July. Out of the sixty-two
*1

here

bushels

see

on

,

•

17 per cent above those of 1879, which
in turn were 25 per cent above
those of 1878. Thus
there has been a steady gain from year to year, and the
large growth the present year is the more noteworthy

that

receipts of corn having dwindled to very
small proportions, and the loss on that cereal more than
offsetting the gain in wheat. Corn will probably not come for¬

last three years.

and these

'

were

the

movement

then

was

small—on

increase this

wheat

very

is only natural,
go back to 1SS0 we "will find that
even wheat, which
shows this year such a decided gain
over 1881, was then moving in larger amounts and that
for this reason.
Though the movement of grain was in the aggregate consequently the present figures are not by any means
somewhat heavier than in 1881, it was far from large. In exceptional. To bring out this fact we give below the
totals of flour and grain for four weeks in October for the
fact wheat is the only kind of grain at present moving to

extent, the

any

ward in large

amounts for some time yet, and until it does

small—and

that

If

therefore.

an

year

we

Flour,

Wheal,

Corn,

Oats,

Barley,

bbls.

bush.

bush.

busk.

bush.

1882.... 1,034,645 10,642,810

Rye,
bush.

3,410,599 4,115,008 2,710,340 570,400-

843,357 4,551,754 9,862,121 3,131,630 1,800,233 762,534
unfavorable element to many roads, es¬ 1881....
1880....
814,342 13,303,339 12,972.814 6,199,547 2,244.693 601,613
pecially to such as are not wheat-carriers. Owing to
the very large and active general trade, it is not easy
Thus wheat falls pretty nearly three million bushels
to detect the influence of this drawback.
No doubt, below 1880, while corn is over 9J million less, and oats
the earnings of some of the roads running South
fully 2 millions less ; and the total of 21,449,157 bushels of
from Chicago would have been still heavier except for all kinds of
grain this year compares with 35,322,056 bush¬

will be an

this

exhaustion of the old stock of corn in farmers’ hands. els in that year, a decrease of over one-third, or 14 million
That there should be an improvement on most of the bushels.
It is clear from this that while our grain
corn-carrying roads despite the loss in this cereal, is a movement is a little ahead of last year, it is still far be¬
striking commentary upon the growth of traffic in those hind 1880. The point is deserving of note, because of
sections. Take, for instance, the Illinois Central.
Not the steady
the

*

rise in earnings on leading roads notwith¬
its line in Illinois, but more especially on its line standing this fact. To show how heavily earnings have
in Iowa, is corn a very important item in its traffic move¬
increased, not only over 1881 but also over 1880, we have
ment; yet though it must, with other roads, have suffered selected and give below the figures of eight representative
heavily through the general shrinkage in the volume of roads for October, 1882, 1881 and 1880.
this cereal going to market, the company is able to report
increased earnings on both its lines, though the totals this
1880.
1831.
1882.
Xante.
year fall a trifle below those of 1880. It is only where a line Burlington Cedar
$204,090
$221,743
$300,155
Rap Ac North.
785.190
771,844
812,032
is almost solely dependent upon this one cereal, that the Chicago Ac Alton
130,891
156,857
169,579
Chicago Ac Eastern Illinois
1,493,620
2.251,000
1.591,052
effect upon earnings is easily discernible—as in the case Chicago Milwaukee Si St. l'aul..
2.105,217
2,341,093
2,592,100
Chicago Ac Northwestern
342,052
379,029
of the Des Moines & Fort Dodge in Iowa.
516,671
In Illinois the Chicago St. P. Minn. Ac Omaha..
880,211
815,238
865,325
Illinois Central
345,057
Peoria Decatur & Evansville must also have sustained quite St. Paul Minneapolis Ac Manitoba
605,708
979,057
a loss on this
$3,515,919 $6,882,574 ~$‘V287,237
Total
account, but the road records a small increase
nevertheless.
Peoria and Chicago, but more particularly
These figures demonstrate that the gain this year is not
the latter, are the points that have been most affected by
the diminished corn movement, as the following table, merely a recovery of what was lost last year on 1880,
giving the receipts of flour and grain at the eight principal On the contrary, with two exceptions the roads all had
interior towns of the West, will show.
larger earnings in 1881 than in 1880, and the increase in
1882 is therefore additional to the increase previously
RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN FOR FOUR WEEKS ENDED OCT. 28.
made.
While the eight roads gain $1,633,345, or 24 per
cent, on 1881, they gain $2,228,682, or 35 per cent, on
Flour,
Oats,
Wheaty
Corti,
Farley,
Rye,
b bis.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
1880.
The Illinois Central is the only road that has smaller
Chicago—
earnings this year than in 1880, and its decrease is only
1882
343.094 3,149,997 2,252,402 2,047,053 1,058,203 342,525
1881
239,773 1,180,506 7,402,066 1,600,937
845,946 212,866 nominal and accounted for by the tremendous contraction
Milwkec—
only

on

:

....

....

1882

401,067
1881.... 308,514
....

....

Toledo—
1882
1881

....

....

Thtroit—
It82

....

It 81

....

cit-\

erd—

It 82...
If 81....
Pen: ia—
82

218,360
124,022

2,179,621
765,962

38,35?
5,380

1,926,273
709,653

15,445
53,595

1,343,258
521,379

32,407

147,858
79,346

7,630

269,936

4,765

13,803

21,200

107,2 jO

82,954
141,023

493,315 318,486

191,435
591,775

661,719

51,296

155,159

42,675
332,750

19G.790

230,289

12,854

268,254

415,171

15,64G
10,443

58,636

4,192

18.440

685,800

726,525

7,7(37

27,900

1,384,950

559,100

6.500

9 46.985

1....

85,500

804,770

Dim th—

68,832

180,894

81....

....

It

213,610 1,043,370

47,000
49,190

St. Louis—

1882
1881

808,300
520,384

....

3

74,096

76.814

2,161

41,059

2,693

50,095

36,663

500

120,329 86,890
50,500 113,450

L

Tot a’ of all

1**2

....

*

L-1.... 843,357

*034,645.




10,642,810
4,551,754

3,410,599 4,115,008 2,710,340 570,400
9,862,121 3,131,630 1,800,233 762,534

in the

corn

movement.

Next to the Northwestern

roads, those in the Southwest

conspicuous for their heavy gains. In the case of
these latter, the increase is not quite so large in point of
amount, but almost as large in percentage, since it is
based on smaller total earnings.
The Gould roads have
particularly heavy earnings, and to these the enlarged cotton
movement in Arkansas and Texas must have been an
element of importance.
In fact, a larger cotton movement
was also a factor with many other Southern roads, and as
it is interesting to see what points gained most in this
respect, we subjoin our usual table, showing the receipts
of cotton during October at the Southern outports this
are

and last year.

634

THE

RECEIPTS OF COTTON AT SOUTHERN PORTS IN OCT.,

Galveston
Imlianola, die
New Orleans
Mobile

bales.

Florida
Savannah

142,276

78,779

3,051
199,470

2,061

214,784

72,889

45,019

Port Royal, &c
Wilmington

City, &c

City Point, Ac
Total.

1882 AND 1881.

Difference.
Inc....

C3.497

45,674

3,705
113,850
35,549

Inc..
990
Dec.... 15.314
Inc..
27,870
Dec....
14
Inc..
36,395
Dec....
290
Dec....
1,647
Doc....
7,568
Dec....
881
Dec....
1,752
Inc.... 29,395
rue.... 10,125

952.786

811,483

Inc ....141,303

'

1,098
2.083

125.329
10,378
27,650

While this table makes it evident that

..

..

number of

points
receipts this year than last, it also shows that
Galveston, Mobile, Savannah and Norfolk gained largely.
The increase at the latter point probably served to swell
the earnings of the Norfolk & Western, and also those of
the East Tennessee Virginia k Georgia.
The East Ten¬
nessee lately completed its
extension from Rome to
Macon, giving it, in connection with the Macon k Bruns¬
wick, which forms part of its system, a line all the way
to Brunswick; but the new
mileage does not count
in
the
earnings.
The Mobile k Ohio has a
small
increase
this
time,
due
probably to a
slight gain in its cotton movement. The Louisville k
Nashville records a very large augmentation in
earnings,
also brought about, no doubt, to a great extent,
by the
expansion in the volume of cotton traffic. This is evident
from the receipts of that staple at Mobile. Of the increase
of 27,870 bales at that port, it would appear that a
very
small amount only was contributed by the Mobiie k
Ohio,
almost the whole of it coming either from the Mobile k
Montgomery (Louisville k Nashville line) or from the
Alabama and Bigbee rivers.
We have not the figures for
the month, but for the five weeks ended November 3 the
Mobile k Ohio delivered at Mobile this year 31,8G7 bales,
against 30,691 bales, or scarcely 1,200 bales more, while
the
Mobile k Montgomery delivered
34,413 bales,
against 8,246 bales, an increase of over 26,000 bales.
All the Texas roads—International & Great
Northern,
Texas k Pacific, Gulf Colorado k Santa Fe—have
materially enlarged their earnings, under the heavy cotton
crop in Texas and its free marketing as reflected by the
great gain in the cotton receipts at Galveston. Richmond
& Danville is doing very well, and so are the various lines
embraced in the same system, like the Charlotte Columbia
k Augusta, the Columbia & Greenville, and the
Virginia
Midland. The Chesapeake & Ohio is again conspicuous for
its very decided gain over the previous
year, and every
a

had smaller

other road in the South exhibits

an

increase greater or

less in amount.
As to

IVou XXXY,

large in 1881, so there is only a moderate
gain this October. Central Pacific, like Union Pacific
too, were very

shows

..

150,693

1,793
124,182
2,810
26,766
1,953
143,245

Charleston

Morehead

1831.

1,084
187,593

Brunswick, <fec

Norfolk

1882.

CHRONICLE.

small diminution.

a

For the first 10 months of the
55 roads of almost 32 million

year we

dollars,

have

a

gain

on

about 16 per cent
crop3 of grain and cotton
or

Bearing in mind how short the
last season, this is eminently satisfactory.
There are
but six roads with any diminution in receipts. The
North¬
western roads lead in increase—the Chicago &
Northwestern,
the Milwaukee k St.- Paul, and the St. Paul
Minneapolis &
Manitoba having pretty nearly 8 millions gain
between
them—and the Pacific roads come next, while the Louis¬
ville k Nashville is prominent in this respect
among the
roads in the South. In the extreme East, the New York &
New England has more than half a million
increase, while
on the Pacific slope
the Oregon Railway k Navigation has
a gain
of almost $650,000. The following table gives the
figures of individual roads.
were

_

GROSS EARNINGS FROM JANUARY 1 TO OCTOBER 31.

Name

of Road.

18S2.
$

Atch. Tod. & Santa Fo...
Burl. Cedar Rap. & No...
Cairo &, St. Louis*
Cent. Branch Union Pac.
Central Iowa
Central Pacific

11,314,821
2,276,188

1831.

$
9,822.371

Increase.

Recrease.

S

$

1.992,450
452,144

300.083
747,053
956,596

1,824,044
339,304
801,295
773,918

21,466,176

Chesapeake & Ohio*

19,570,949

2.679,741

1,395,227

6,69G,290
1.475,232

2,194,927
6,238,518

434,811

Chicago & Alton
Chic. & Eastern Illinois.

Chicago <fe Grand Trtmkt
Chicago Milw. & St. Paul
Chicago & Northwest....
Cliic.Sfc.P.Minn.&Omaha.
Cin. Ind. St. L. & Chic.*.
Cleve. Ak. A Col
Col. Hock. Val. &Tol
Denver & Rio Grande....
Des Moines & Ft. Dodge*

Detroit Lansing & No.
Flint A Pere Marquette*.
Gulf Col. & Santa Fe
Hannibal & 8t. Joseph...
Ill. Central {ILL line)
Do
(la. leased lines).
Indiana Bloom. A West..
..

....

lut. & Gt. North
Lake Erie & Western

Long Island
Louisville A Nashville...

Marq. Houghton & Out.*

1,754.122

16,351,000
19,864,107
4,080,067

2,197,797
422,328
2,366,630
5,402,632
277,924

1,327,889
1,681.830

1,142,370

320,106
1,133,565
1,467,123
788,694

194,324
214,707
354,176

1,933,549

317,725'

1,867,288
5,578,330
1,507,375

2.179.465
2.570,341
1,219,255
1,972,377
10.552,731
1,067,706

2,094,496
2,178,942

Metropolitan Elevated..

2,269.527
2,738,403

New York Elevated
New York & N. England.
Norfolk & Western
Northern Pacific
Ohio Central

1,918,205
4,806,703

17,974,694
3,106,425

1,814,125

731,049
5,061,488

6,520,266
1,581,025

2,850,930
1,926,705
5,704,758
859,401

Oregon Railway <& Nav..

4.213,800

Peoria Dec.& Evansville*
Richmond & Danville
St.L.A.&T. H. main line.
Do
do (branches)..
8t. L. Iron Mt. & South’n.
St. Louis & S. Francisco
St. Paul & Duluth
St. Paul Minn. & Man
Scioto Valley
Texas & Pacific
Toledo Delphos & Burl...
Union Pacific

632.153

1,160,085
1,696,511

2,066,027

203,500

230.206
656,008

999,987
300,397
333.277

2,405,126
2,329,115
1,832,594
3,244,888

94,111
2,459,870

540.045

319.356

3,566,61.1
548,966
2,828,193
1,222,362
617,543
5,940,893
2,583,010
578,801
3,312,167
359,352
3,206,833
561,895

647,189
83,187
144.357

22,142.546
*1,014,406

Wabash St. L. & Pac

13,880,691

11,789,664

42,182

53,163

1,427,371
275,282

Virgiuia Midland*

.

54,242

214,026
82,355
84,969
391,399
59,170
275,866

9,125,360
792,424
500,843
4,405,480
5,520,279
1,881,422

2,972,550
1.127.466
715,610
5.956.357
2,911,897
887,134
7,097,921
446,988
3,332,471
777,897
24,269,556
J1.085,336

...

182,678
447,742
125,367
511,341
2,749,410
1,839,413
883,642
209,248
74,603
418,475
595,927

1,349,863
1,242,781
13,601,590

5.792.356
1,539,730

Milw. L. Shore & VVest’n.
Mo. Kansas & Texas
Missouri Pacific
Mobile <fc Ohio

39.216

521,815

94,896
93,067
15,464

323,887
308,333

3,255,754
87,636
675,638
216,002

2,127,010
70,930
2,091,027

trunk-line

traffic, our table does £not embrace
Total
235,130,896 203,266,255 32,443,737 594,096
31.864,6 41
any of the great east-and-west lines, but we have several Net increase
Three weeks only of October in each year.
roads whose earnings are affected by the state of that class
t January 1 to October 28.
1 Includes freight earnings only in Oct.
of business, and these all show somewhat better
Net earnings for September are very much like those for
figures
than a year ago.
Among them may be mentioned the August—very favorable in the main, with one or two
Lake Erie k Western, the Indiana
Bloomington k prominent exceptions. Among the latter may be men¬
Western, the Cincinnati Indianapolis St. Louis k Chicago, tioned the Chicago Burlington k Quincy, which again re¬
and the Chicago k Grand Trunk.
The latter is the cords a decrease, though it is only $13,815 this time,
Chicago line of the Grand Trunk of Canada, and the in¬ bringing its loss for the year, (to the 1st of October.) up to
crease on it is due in some measure to a
greater passenger $54S.298, a part of which it is expected will be wiped
business, which indeed is true of almost all the roads that out before the end of 1SS2. The Pennsylvania again has
*

..

have

under

notice.

But there

.

large gain in a large increase, and the company is now $203,G95 ahead
freight, too. Of the total increase of §61,655 on this line, of last year on the lines east of Pittsburg, though on the
$34,003 was in freight—the remainder in passengers. Western lines it is $1,325,502 behind. The Northern Cen¬
Among Pacific roads, the Northern Pacific has its usual tral added $210,181 in September to its previous increase
amount of increase, while the Union Pacific falls about
in net, making the total gain for the nine months but little
$10,000 'below last October, when, however, the earnings less than half a million dollars.
The Chesapeake
were very
large, having been over half a million above k Ohio is another road that keeps rolling up larger net
those of 18S0.
Atchison Topeka k Santa Fe earnings,
earnings.
For September it had $125,001 this year,
come




our

is a

THE CHRONICLE.

ii, 1882.]

November

^[^Toniy $G5,563 the previous year, while for the cur¬
rent'year to October i it has net earnings of no less than
$740 337) against only $301,337 in 1881, a gain of
$430 000, or over 145 per cent. The excellent showing

535

twelve months ended

lowing tables:

Sept. 30, 1882,
MERCHANDISE.

reports a

1881.— Exports—Domestic

gain of $72,000. We have not the figures

months, but an exhibit for
months to the 1st of November (October
this year being estimated) has been furnished
us1 according to which it appears that the total net for the
period are $2,257,037, against $2,155,767 for the ten
first

nine

months of last year, an increase of
mond & Danville has also begun to

$100,000.

IS32.— Exports—Domestic*...!.
Total

Imports

$81,541,379 $509,340,763 $719,363,351
1,115,720
12,998,936
18,128,127
$82,657,099 $522,339,699 $737,491,478
63,339,060 576,649,343 749.633.347
imports $
$
$
exports
681,961
'54,309,644
12,141,869

$61,307,618 $604,140,363 $867,130,241

1,183,761
14,250,985
18,852,695
$62,491,379 $618,397,348 $885,982,936
55,713,802 497,225.444 645,733,706
Imports
Excess of exports over imports $6,777,577 $121,171,904 $240,249,230
Excess of imports over exports

Foreign

Total

GOLD

AND SILVER—COIN

The Rich¬

1882.—Exports—Dom.—Gold..
do

do

Gross

Operating

Earnings Expenses.

Total

Silver

$
44,802
36,174

-261,439
221,801

158,462

332,219

207,158
181,531
954,562

& VVest.. 18S2

Buffalo Pitts.

loci

do

Do

Rap. k No..1882
do
1881
Chesapeake k Ohio... .1882
Burl. Cedar
Do

247,144
2,186.400

1881

do

Do

Chic. Burl, k

*
01.763
65,362

Quincy. ..1882

2,262,081

do
1881
Gr. k West. .1882
do
Do
1881
Denver k Rio Grande.. 1882
Do

30,014

Donv. Rio

1881

599,191
620,643

& Ft. D.... 1882

31.293

do

Do

Dea Moines

47.510

1881

do

Do

5

Eliz. Lex.& Big Sandy..1882
Do
do
1881

(,3o i

1882 1,112,000

touisv. &Nashv

151.098

1,017,328
14,597

Net

Gross

Net

Earnings

Earnings

Earnings

'

$
049,065
491,177

$
46,961
29.188

1,976,033
660,008
1,602,296
425,943
2,429,578
740.337
2,031,241
65,563
301.337
1,231,838 15,053,879 8,983,629
1,245,653 15,423,831 7.531,927
24,417

208,532:
11.707!

255.161
290,921

25,607;

066,947

445,053;

9,340,576

3,486,851

382,763

8,122,410
1,385,040
1,577.951

2,957,512

1,671,427

724,990

740,139
1,740,825
1,248,465

568,803

169,000
170,979
232,774
221,438
542,435

100,442
102,267

68,5581

112.606

97,530

120.168'
123.908.

322.848

269,587!

1,586,004
4.421,277

429,565

370,159

50,406

4.030,251

4.417,602

2,683.170
2.271,829

-

1882
1881
1882
1881

do

Do

Northern Central
Do
do
.

Penn, (all lines east of
Pitts, k Erie)
1882
Do

do

1881

3,735,006

do

1882
1881

386,455
276,522
2.019.017

Phrla. k Erie
Do

235,883

1881

1,945,874

Phila.& Read. C.k Iron.1882

1881

1,469.315
1,410,537
111,270
102,154

213,262
1,018.334
958.785
1.381,107
1,263,807
59.82S
46,422

1882

105,582

69.979

1881

102.930

83,004

Philadelp’a & Reading. 18S2
Do

do

Do

do

Utah Central

.....1882

Do

West

1881

do

Jersey

Do

do

77,712:

Gross

Do

do

Net

Gross

$

S

$
5,466.152

4,096,567
507,200
464,732

219.000

288,200

4,213,800

233,579

Richmond k Danville..1882

436,500
376,300

206.500
202,300

231,153
230,000
174,000

3.566,611
2,972.550

do

Do

do

1881

Gross

Net

Operating

Do

do

.

$274,127

1881

$170,949

Silver
Total.

Excess of exports over

imports

Foreign
Total

Gross

Net

Earnings Earnings

$103,178' $2,032,317

$703,635

1

IMPORTS

AND EXPORTS FOR SEPTEMBER
AND FOR THE NINE AND TWELVE
MONTHS ENDED SEPT. 30, 1882.

reJ*c fiscal
lows

of Statistics and corrected to Oct. 28,

1882.]

third monthly statement for the curyear of the imports and exports of the United States,

exce9s

i[aPorts or

exports of merchandise was as fol-

Montu ended Sept. 30, 1882
(excess of imports)
$681,961
Month ended
Sept. 30, 1881 (excess of exports)
6,777,577
Vinf mont?18 ended Sept. 30, 1*82 (excess of imports)
54,309,644
Twa!mon^8 emle^ Sept- 30, 1881 (excess of exports)
121,171,904
wjwemontlia ended Sept. 30, 1832 (excess of imports)
12,141,869
weive mouths
ended Sept. 30, 1881 (excess of exports)
240,249,230
excess of
imports or of exports of gold and silver coin
ana

bullion

was as

follows:

eru]ed Sept. 30, 1882

(excess of imports)

Nini leu(]?d
30, 1881 (excess of import*)
Nino mout!18 ended Sept. 30, 1882 (excess of exports)
TWi?onths
,euded sept. 30, 1881 (excess of imports)
months

ended Sept. 30, 1882 (excess of exports)
ene mouths ended
Sept. 30, 1881 (excess ot imports)

total values of imports and of
ports for the month of
Sept., 1882,




..

$230,525
10,199,565
41,208,793
37,629,106
29,508,451
77,320,263

domestic and foreign
and for the nine and

$21,516,120
$88,633,230

6,756,088

$53,071,843

10,203,153
$98,836,333
$
77.320,263

$
37,629,106

AND BULLION.

587,751,232

776,657,658

$

$17,366,582
13,102,851

1,574,548
17,670,100
24,009,265
$63,686,182 $633,810,085 $907,499,056
67,108,170 550,297,287 744,570,089

Imports
Excess of exports over imports
Excess of imports over exports

a

773,139
4,383,131

$62,111,634 $016,169,935 $883,489,791

..

Total

$33,542,798 $162,928,967
3,421,988

statement showing, by principal customs

districts, the values of merchandise imported into, and exported
from, the United States during the mouth of Sept*, 1832:
Customs Districts.

D-ymestic

Imports.

Baltimore, Md
Bangor, lie
Bath, Me

Exports.

$
1,383,900

5,810,397

46,517

36,891

Brunswick, Ga
Buffalo Creek, N. Y
Cape Vincent, N. Y
Champlain, N. Y

Chicago, Ill
DetroitJtficli
Galveston, Texas
Genesee, N. Y
Gloucester. Mass
Huron, Mich
Key West, Florida

6,456,777

4,859,926

44,999

71,074
100,319

458,464
39,274

27,336
23,078
242,533
77,330

$
134,552
232

77,447
44,824

101,629
5,419,013
18,218

1,430

4,004

...

11,337
........

455

623,118
74,195

9,877

7,104
2,419
448.847
373

7,320

51,216

146,977

357,177

10,922

53i976

65,834

612,839
21,414
1,460

975

161,818
10,258
12,581

1,062,369

109,317

58,831
52,997

281,674
35,564

31,113
1,035,733
Miami, Ohio
Minnesota, Minn
142,261 \
967,431
57.831
Mobile, Ala
16,250
New Haven, Conn
72.352
00,632
New London, Conn
5,766
New Orleans, La
921,826 3,977,743
New York, N. Y
44,071,620 31,812,143
312,188
16,378
Niagara, N. Y
Norfolk aud Portsm’th.Va.
34,400
32,463
OrAomn Orp.o-nn
271,249
2,454

58,354

15

.

136,897

Oswegatehie, N. Y
Oswego, N. Y

Tcx.|& N.M
Passamaqnoddy, Me
Paso del Norte,

Pensacola, Fla

Philadelphia, Pa
Plymouth, Mass
Portland & Falmouth, Me.

606,315
19,267
81,038
6,038
2,838,841

165,204
181,822

........

220

17,633

38,174

*
......

.

55,902
3,618,089

Diego, Cal
Francisco, Cal

4,902
618,762

Savaonah, G:L
Vermont, Vt
Willamette, Oregon
Wilmington, N. C

153,601*

56

30,871
76,870

••••••••

1,331,213

99,295

12,986

177,414
74,956

95,545
........

322,384
129,161
41,114

172

.

11.3,495

..

3.314
31.857

.....

6,398

........

281

........

143,604
87,533

........

177,23(.

61,541.379 l.l

5,59.
;

19.551"

1,416,288

80,522

4,098,775
442,181

813

J63.339.060

10,074
........

56

322,526
03,413

7 9,7051

53,752

2,955,209

2,606

10,977

Interior p >rts
All other customs districts

2.017

217

478

2,421
3,075

2,319
39,235
7,418
46,530
601,603

543,405 20,455,484

166

Portsmouth, N. H
Puget’s Sound, Wash

Totals

$
32,126

$

351.916
6.662
82,402
7,612
17,437

Charleston, S. C

San
San

Remaining
Foreign in
ioareh*»e
Exports. Sept.'dO,’82

2,339

Boston <fe CharicsPn. Mass.
Brazos de Sautiago, Tex...

..

{Prepared by the Bureau
Below is given the

733,727

64,987,094
Imports
Excess of exports over imports $
Excess of imports over exports
912,486

following is

$1,997,159
14,362,391

$62,633,134 $556,529,159 $769,625,302
1,441,474
18,119.222
24,393,938
$64,074,608 $574,648,381 $794,02 4,240

1832.— Exports—Domestio

The

$27,024,311
$29,508,451

$46,315,755

10,199,565

exports

1881.—Exports—Domestic
Foreign

1,336,432
4,934,379
$56,532,762
$19,261,244
7,763,067

$15,442,737

$11,394,368

imports $

over

Corpus Christi, Texas...
Cuyahoga. Ohio

Jan. 1 to Aug. 31.

Earnings Expenses. Earnings

Oregon Improve’mt Co.18^2

$

2,257,037
2,155,767
2,094,470
1,727,971

2:828,103

Avgust.
Name.

Net

Earnings Earnings

1882
1881

Do

$1,194,803
$10,660,641

401.27 L

354,923

Jan. 1 to Oct. 31.

1881

Oregon R’y & Nav

629,802

884.955
789.875

35,603
10,926

Operating

%

25,550
365,237

Silver..

55,732

Earnings Expenses. Earnings.
Denver k Rio Grande. .1882

577,741

1,731,426 35 888.778 13,604,501
1,463,177: 32,879 241 13,395,806
149,592; 2,909,154 1,070.500
802,103
68,260
2,595,067
1,000,083 15.552,965 6,760,340
987,089 14,919.075 6,710,156
88.148 10,779,247
032,172
141,730
9,791,680
804,065
51,442
1,122,276
643,285

October.

Name.

8,242
111,315

362,752

951,566

Norfolk k Western

77,715

20,219j

1881

do

Foreign—Gold

10,553,902
745,674
2,067,441

TOTAL MERCHANDISE, COIN

Nash. Chat. & St. Louis 1882
do
1881
Do

Do

$1,475,720

681,400

Total

280,569!

318,622
4:2,111
10.586
21,912
37,132

5,923,510
$11,101,889
$41,206,793

$37,603,193
12,658,758

230,525

Imports—Gold

Excess of

$5,178,379

512,235

$122,616

do

70,703
125,061

$1,417,509

Silver..

do

102,977

$37,241,057

$1,135,799

$

i.—Exports—Dom.—Gold..

*

336,817
163,137

Sept. 30. r.

9,947,339
1,316,419
3,803,867
$52,308,682

$1,648,034

Excess of exports over imports
Excess of imports over exports
188

Sept. 30.

24,444
301,310

Silver..

Total
NAME.

nine For
the
12
m'nths ended m'nths ended

$205,405
886,350

Silver..

Foreign— Gold

GROSS AND NET EARNINGS TO LATEST DATES.

Sept. 30.

For the

Sept.

Imports—Gold

Jan. 1 to

AND BULLION.

For the
month of

roads that will

September.

Sept. 30.

.

earnings; for

exhibits the gross and net earnings of all
furnish monthly exhibits for publication.

Sept. 30.

Foreign

give out reports of net

October its estimate is $230,000, as against
$174,000 in 1881, a gain of $56,000. For September the
gain*was estimated at $11,000. The following table

For Uie 9
For the 12
m'nths ended tn'nlhs ended

Sept.

Excess of exports over
Excess of imports over

for • the
the ten
expenses

|

For the
month of

recent months by Louisville & Nashville,
we discussed in a special article last week and need only
allude to it now. The Denver & Rio Grande has begun
to publish statements of net earnings, and for September

made during

presented in the fol¬

are

1

15.7201 31,050,684

THE CHRONICLE.

536

[VOL. XXXV.

position is regarded as sound
,and whose bills are approved, have, as a rule, to pay one per
RATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON AND ON LONDON cent over Bank rate for accommodation. ' Six per cent, more
AT LATEST DATES.
especially when the open market rate of discount in London is
only 3}£ Per cent,
a veiT burdensome price to pay, and
EXCHANGE ON LONDON.
EXCHANGE AT LONDON-Oct. 28.
especially since profits in business are, owing to keen competi¬
Latest
Rate.
Time.
Rate.
Time.
OnDate.
tion, small. The directors of the Bank of England will probably
12*16*2
Short.
keep their rate of discount at five per cent until the return
Short. 12-3
312-4
| Oct. 28
Amsterdam
3 mos. 12 5 Li 312-6
Amsterdam
movement of coin from Scotland takes place, which will be
25-27
Oct. 28 Short.
the fact that small traders whose

Pfcouetartj s <ttommcxtivcl %uqUsU

.

.

Antwerp....
Brussels

Hamburg...

a

25-52^325-57^'

a

25*521*2 325*57 by [Oct.

28

n

2066
20-66
20-66

320-70
320-70
320-70

28

18-45

318-47

u

Berlin
Frankfort...

4*
44

Copenhagen.
St. Petersb’g

jOct.

*4

25-27

44

20-42

20-42
20-42

Oct,
Oct.

28

44

2»

44

Oct.
Oct.
Oct,

23 Short.
28 Long.
28 Short.

Oct,
Oct.
Oct.
Oct,
Oct,
Oct.
Oct.

28
28 3 mos.
28 Short.
28 4 mos.
4
28
44
28
44
28

44

Paris
3 mos. 25-50 325-55
Paris
4 4
12-10
312-1212
Vienna
44
46 346%
Madrid
44
46 346*8
Cadiz
44
25"80 325-87*2
Genoa
44
51%351%
Lisbon
Alexandria.
New York...
Is. 7*%fid.
Bombay.... 60 days
44
Is. 7*316d.
Calcutta..

Hong Kong..
Shanghai....

•

•

•

....

......

....

....

There has been

i

•

25-23%
25-25*2
119 60

9534
4-81*4
IS. 72332d.
Is. 713lttd.
3s. 9*40
5s. 1V1.

[From our own correspondent.I

London, Saturday, Oct. 28, 1882.

very

little demand either for loans

or

dis¬

during the week. A “ settlement” has been in progress
the Stock Exchange, but the inquiry for loans has not per¬

counts
on

2312323%
Short. 25-22*2 25-30

•

towards the end of November.

ceptibly increased, the rate at the banks and discount houses
on the best security being only 2 to 2% per cent.
Mercantile
paper is still very scarce, and there is no prospect of any in¬
crease in the supply.
The following are the present quota¬
tions for money :
Open-market rates

Per cent.

Open-market rates—
30 and 60 days’
3 months’ bills

'The

bills

following

are

3%3

..

3% 3

..

—

Pee cent.

4 months’ bank bills
3*233%
6 months’ bank bills
3% 33%
4 <fc 6 mouths’ trade bills. 3^34^

5

Bank rate

the rates of interest allowed by the jointdeposits:

stock banks and discount houses for

Per

cent*
conditi on, and Joint-stock banks
3
3
cent; but the Discount houses at call
Do
with 7 or 14 days’ notice
34
Bank of England directors at their weekly meeting on Thurs¬
The above figures show a reduction of
per cent from those
day decided on making no change in their published minimum,
which is, consequently, still 5 per cent. So large a difference previously current, the low rate3 of discount in the open mar¬
is to be regretted, and there are a few who contend that a re¬ ket necessitating a smaller allowance of interest on deposits.
There is no demand for gold for export, and only a few par¬
duction to 4 per cent might have been made this week ; but the
majority seem to consider that the Bank authorities are justified cels of sovereigns have been sent to India. The importations
in the policy they have pursued. Those, however, as far as I have also been upon a small scale. Silver has been less in de¬
know, who support the course which is being adopted by the mand, and the quotation for fine bars is somewhat easier ; bnfc
Bank directors were only a few weeks ago, when the rate was Mexican dollars are unchanged in value. At the sale of India
5 per cent, contending that a 6 per cent rate, though not imme¬ Council bills on Wednesday, only a very small proportion of
diately necessary, should be at once adopted. The probable the £250,000 was disposed of at Is. 77^d. the rupee. The follow¬
withdrawals of coin, in connection with the harvest and with ing prices of bullion are from the circular of Messrs. Pixley &
augmented commercial engagements, together with a threat¬ Abell :
GOLD.
S.
d.
8. it,
ened demand for gold for exportation to the United States,
Bar gold, fine
peroz. standard. 77 9 ®

The money market continues in a very easy
the rate for choice bills is not more than 3% per

were

cited

as causes

justifying such a movement.
proved groundless ; the provincial re¬

But those alarms have

Bar gold, cont. 20 dwts. silver
Spanish doubloons

..per oz.

South American doubloons

standard. 77 10*23
peroz. 73 9*25>
per oz. 73 3 *2 3
peroz. 76 3*2®

United States gold coin
quirements for coin for harvest purposes have been scarcely Gentian
per oz
gold coin
3
d.
silver.
d.
perceptible. The improvement in our autumn trade, to the ex¬
tent, certainly, that had been anticipated, has not taken place, Bar silver, fine
per oz. standard. 50% ®
Bar silver, contain’g 5 grs. gold
3
peroz. standard. 52
and there have been no exports of gold to the United States. Cake
.per oz. 55**ie'3
silver
peroz. 50*2 ®
The 6 per cent rate of discount has not only, therefore, become Mexican dollars
Chilian dollars
peroz. ...
a)
entirely unnecessary, but the open market has been rapidly
Quicksilver, £5 17s. 6d. Discount, 3 per cent.
falling away from the official rate, until, as stated, a difference
A feature on the Stock Exchange during the week has
of as much as 1v/2 Per cent is observed. It is now said that a
been that all securities of acknowledged soundness have been
reduction in the Bank rate to 4 per cent is impracticable, as it
in demand, and their value has had an upward tendency.
would lead to an adverse movement in the exchanges, and gold
Consols have reached the high price of 102%, and the markets
would be speedily sent to New York, at least in sufficient quan¬
for Indian Government, Indian railway, Colonial Government
tities to create anxiety ; and it is also contended that the trans¬
and municipal government securities have been rising in value.
mission of a moderate quantity of coin to Scotland ^for a brief
An Indian railway loan, receiving the moral support of, but not
period is a sufficient reason for allowing so great a discrepancy
to exist between the official and the open market rates of dis¬ guaranteed by, the Indian Government, introduced by Messrs,
Baring and Messrs. Rothschilds, has been rapidly subscribed.
count. It is very clear, from present indications, that there is
The undertaking is called the Bengal & Northwestern Railway
only little prospect of the value of money in the open market
Company, Limited, and the present issue is £1,000,000, being
improving, and consequently, if the present abnormal con¬
the unsubscribed portion of £2,200,000, the capital of the com¬
dition of things is to be terminated, the Bank rate must be re¬
pany. Interest at the rate of 4 per cent is to be paid out of
duced.
If the existing Bank minimum of 5 per cent had any influence capital; but the works are in an advanced state, and it is
expected that, as the line runs through a fertile district, the
ron the exchanges, the retention of the rate at that point
company
will soon become a dividend-paying concern.
could be justified; but exchange operations are not based uptfn
Annexed is a statement showing the present position of the
theories but upon facts; and they are at the present time being
Bank of England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of con¬
calculated by comparison with the open market rate of dis¬
sols, the average quotation for’English wheat, the price of mid¬
count, and not by the fictitious minimum of 5 per cent.
If
America was in the position to take gold from us, she could dling upland cotton, of 40 mule twist, fair second quality,
the Bankers’ Clearing House return, compared with the three
take it now, as money is very cheap in this country, but it is
evident that our indebtedness to foreign countries is by no previous years:
1379.
1880.
1881.
18S2.
£
£
£
£
means great, and that the balance of trade is iu our favor.
On
26.626,360 28,265.290
sb

and

^

the other hand, the continuance of the Bank rate at 5 per cent
is undesirable for the reason that, as money in the open market
is at so very moderate a point, many merchants are disposed

England view the
future, if not with apprehension, at least not very favorably;
and this is obviously calculated to exercise an adverse influence
upon our trade—a result by no means to be wished for.
It also
gives the capitalists, that is to say the banks, an undue
advantage in the very numerous small operations which are
daily being arranged throughout the country. This is due to
to

assume




that the directors of the Bank of

Circulation
Public deposits.
Other deposits
Governm’t seeurities.
Other securities
Res’vc of notes & coin.
Coin and bullion in

26,322,425 26,194,845
3,30 1.480
3,028,9 15
24,425,285 24,927,210

Eug. wheat, av. price.
Mid. Upland cotton...
No. 40 Mule twist

4,398,500
31,932.439

19,070,528

12,731,057 14,320,260

16,865.070

23,100,655 20,900,743
10,419,954 1C,801,319

16,671,039 17,832,143

both departments.. 20,992,379
Proportion of reserve
to liabilities
Bank rate
Consols

4,544,363
28.177,105

36-40

5 p. c.
1021a
39s. 2d.

6"isd.
10 4d.

Clear’g-house return. 91,588,000

18,057,666 17,363,355

21,24G,164 28,297,399
38
5 p. c.
09%
47s. Id.
6 k>d.

10*4<L

93,476,000

50*2
2% P- C.
99*3
42s. 8d.

6%d.
i

as. a

3l,0u7,433s
13
2 p. c.

9i7d

49s. 10A
7yl
lOd.

6<j’

80,782,000

THE

11.1882. J

November

The following are
centres:

pal foreign

the current rates of discount at the princi-

Bank
Pr. ct.
*,* lo

Market.
Pr. ct.
344
4

;>

ilttullUU

Bank

Open

rale.

5S

4^8

Frankfort—
n* • * *

'

Amsterdam.
Brussels

CHRONICLE.

r>

4*4

4'1g
4*2

414
4^8

rate.
l’r. ct.

Madrid
Vienna
St. Petersburg..

Open
4io

Geneva
Genoa

Copenhagen....

6
4

4

5
5

5
4

the spot

quarter

:

afloat is

The London stocks of wheat and flour show
over last year, the totals
being as under :
Wheat, quarters
Flour, bushels

Lj

Flour, sacks

of failures in England and Wales gazetted dur

The number

corn

only 15,500 quarters. American mixed
has been sold this week at 35s. and 37s. per
quarter, but the price for February-March delivery is 27s. per

Market.
Pr. ct.
5
6

Indian

corn on

537

large increase

a

1882

1881.

491.694
25,000

235,249
5,868

183,725

93,752

The fall of rain

during the past week has been exceedingly
week ending Saturday, Oct. 21, was 227, against 220 in
corresponding week of last year, showing an increase of 7* heavy—heavier, in fact, than for some years past. We have
or a net decrease in 1S82 to date of
732. The number of bills had some heavy gales, and the land throughout the country is
of sale published in England and Wales was 835, against 1,097, so greatly saturated with water that farmers are unable to
showing a decrease of 202, and a net decrease to date of 2,761* make any progress with ploughing and the sowing of grain.
The number published in Ireland was 26, against 26, being a ne^. We have not, indeed, had so unfavorable an autumn season as
the present, and it may therefore be concluded that the
decrease, in 1SS2 to date of 343.
pros¬
The following return shows the extent of the exports of pect at the present time is not very
encouraging. With the
British and Irish produce and manufactures, as well as of average price of English wheat under 40s. per quarter, and
colonial and foreign wool, from the United Kingdom to the with but a small hope of permanent improvement, the farmers*
United States during the month of September, and during the position cannot be regarded otherwise than as a serious one.
nine months ended September 30, compared with the corre¬ The improvement which seemed to? be
taking place has been
checked, and from what quarter relief is_to come is a very diffi¬
sponding periods in the previous year:
ing the
the

—Tn

September.—

1881.
275.961
8.143

1882.

358,707
4,378
107,263
2,070

2,239,122
49,122
751,505

5,513,900
Earthenw.& pored:tin. £
60,515
Haberdashery and mil¬
46,828
linery
£
Hardware & cutlery.. &
44,872
43,046
tons.
Iron-Pig

4,151,100

54,077,400

75,300

649.186

44,256

342,498
365,827

tons.

1,000

1,390

Railroad
tons.
Hoops, sheets,boiler &

26,321

7,006

5,522
16,074

4,670
15,578

323

416

Alkali

cwt.

Apparel and slops
Bags and sacks

£
doz.

57,585
2.1S1

Beer and ale..-,— bids.
Cotton piece goods.. yds.

Bar. &c

armor

plates.. .tons.

Tin plates
tons.
Cast or wrought..tons.

'

50,109
42,935

308,933
9,454
242,446
29,304

Old for remannft.tons.

6,602

6,864

Steel—Unwrought. tens.

.12,632

129,586
4,543
66,153

5,316

...lbs.

87,446

594,000

4,973
71,415
118,141

750,500

goods. ..yds. 8,723,200
Lead—Pig, Ac
Linen niece goods. -yds. 7,812,400
Machinery—Steam en-

8,763,600

3,092,200
74,490,700

61

6,493,100
61,458,200

347

486

6,936,900

63,910,500

74,122,500

Jute yarn
Jute piece

....

£
£

gines
Other kinds

2.3 42

31,901

49,545
284,730

390,298

281

640

3,992

6,391

95

219

2,787

23,310

16,207

41,065

38,752

189,493
251,799

6,219
158,038
360,862

13,093

5,155

72,213

70,219

18,990
25,643

21,691

113,691
71,653

193,355
69,830

..cwt.

mg

Other kinds except paper hangings....cwt.
Salt
Silk broadstuffs... .yds.
Other articles of silk
Oil! v
....£
Mixed with other 111a“terials
£
.

Spirits—British... galls.
Stationery, other than
paper

£

8,533

.cwt.

61

....

Tin—Unwrought

.

..

15,818
14,582
4,063
693,100

Wool—British
-lbs.
464,000
Colonial & foreig n.lbs. 2,681,153 2,251,594
Woolen fabrics
..yds.
266,900
436,000
Worsted fabrics... yds. 2,406,600 3,130,900
Carpets, not being
rugs
120,300
111,500
•

The

following figures relate to British North

embrace the

same

:
In

September.

188
1881.

Apparel and slops
£
Cotton niece goods, vds.

Eartlienw.&porcelain. £
linery.......

1882.

29,660
,251,000

22,778

10,787

3,095,000
12,294

125,518
19,066
5,993

120,603
23,429

and mil¬
....

£

Hardware & cutlerv..«£

Iron-pig

tons.
tons.
tons.

Par, &c

Railroad

Hoops,

sheets
and
boiler plates...tons.
Tin plates
tons.
Cast or wrought.tons.
Cotton piece
goods.yds.

fait
Silk

broadstuffs
Ribbons....

1,0G9,600

America and

periods
/

Haberdashery

79.278

62,584
71,683
5,900
13,628
3,984,800
3.651,500
13,530,542 15,879,301
3,332,600
5,414,000
21,285,300 26,315,400
977,300

yds.
£

16,632
7,244
7.424

5,657

20,319

,

1881.

61,259

68,014

8,615

7,626

51,255

43,405

1.767

1.832

5,811,900
318,343
77,701
368,642
26,303

26,357

111,881

150.174

6,127
11,205
5,360,700
496,986

85,484
406,435
23,558

10,194

30,408

43,000

1.600

1,054

33,454

39,015

514,600

OsS,3uO

854,800
590,100

5,146,300
8,623,100

6,888,000
7,426,200

200,000

233,100

1,450,000

1,738,200

fabrics’.’’.’.. vds*

worsted fabrics...

Carpets,

not

Vds.

being
yds.

The trade fer wheat in the
early part of the week, though
quiet, was tolerably film iu tone. Bad weather was cited as a
reason for this
partial firmness ; but notwithstanding that the
weather has become still more
unpropitous, the trade closes
with

a

very unsatisfactory appearance for producers. Our
imports continued on a
large scale, but as the exports from
J2£jican ports have declined considerably, the supply esti¬
mated to be afloat to the
United Kingdom is now only 1,630,000
quarters of wheat and




150,000 quarters of flour. The supply of

1881.

1880.

1879.

5,880,850

2,667,200

23,395,200

18,427,696

19,008,017

15,729,225

41s. 8d.

49s. Sd.

41s. 3*1.

47s. 5d.

in the IT. 8.... bush. 14,500,000
Afloat to United King¬

20,250.000

14,400,000

20,787,000

Total

Av’ge price of English

wheat for season, qr.
Visible supply of wheat

dom, estimated

qi...

1,803,000

2,173,000

English Market Reports—Per Cable.

The daily closing quotations for securities; &c., at London,
and for broadstuffs and provisions at Liverpool, are reported
by cable as follows for the week ending November 10:
London.

Sat.

10,654

11.946

3,865,125
1,691,261

6,481,320

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia & Reading.

2,889

7,108,756
1,691,596

0.874,000

produce

common stock
Illinois Central

451.100

5,013,223
1,742,225

1,691,596

33,083
81,277

1,559
468,900

426,898

2,557,899

11,370,764
1,691,261

33.169

9,325
8,458

103.932

222.265

2,194,820

11,435,001

57,674

509

294,635

2.009,501

11,370,764
2,463,500

10,204,151
1,712,225

166,765

2,261

167,051
318.282

1882.

29,179

1,200

1879.

11,435,601

Imports of wheat.cwt.14,200,872
Imports of Hour
2,320,328
Bales of home-grown

140,616

92,657

1880.

10.204,151
1,849,968
1,997,990

SUPPLIES AVAILABLE TOR CONSUMPTION.

931,533

cwt.

Woolen

corn

816,011

6,901

candj

Barley
Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian
Flour

1881.

cwt.14,200,872
1,916,983
1,125,086
104,741
185,278
2,596,089
2,320,328

164,268
47,944,000
95,800

£

paper

1882.

Wheat

151,880
43,280,100
73,057

20,114

Sugar-Re tilled,"aiul

IMPORTS.

1882.

1,427

„

The

/—In Nine Months.—.

Spirits—British... ga 11s.
Stationery, other'than
-■

,

164,249

3,853
34,632

Paper—Writing or print-

'

16,400

cult

problem to solve.
following return shows the extent] of the imports of
2,514,664
38,939 cereal produce into the United Kingdom
during the first eight
594,419
20,536 weeks of the season, compared with the corresponding period
60,232,900 in the three
previous years ; it also shows the quantities of
646,665
wheat and flour placed upon the British markets
during the
407,500
and three previous seasons, the average price of
396,111 current
’
384,715
English wheat for the season, the visible supply of wheat in
16,113
162,504 the United States and the quantity of wheat afloat to the
United Kingdom.
28,735

In Nine ITon ths.
1881.
1882.

Silver,

per oz
d.
Consols for money
Consols for account
Fr’ch rentes (in Paris) fr,
U. S. Ssext’n’d into3^
U. S. 4 igs of 1891
U. S. 4s of 1907

Erie,

New York Central

51iiic
10178

51 \

102*16
1027i6
8115
10410

51*2

115

115

122*3

122*2

122*4

154
65

153*4
61*2
3 U*s
13612

3()i0

7
Corn, mix., West.
“
Pork, West.mes8..$ bbi. 96
Racnit, long cleerj new
Beef, pr. mess, new.^tc. 8*9
Lard, prime West. $ cwt. 62

59

10
0

6

41*0

Mon.
d.

8.

12
3
8 7
8
4
8
5
8 11
7 10
96 0

0

89
62

0

59

0
0
0

10

40

30

136*4
Tues.

51»ie

Wed.

51*8
102ig
102*8
80-40
104

11478

11470

122*4

122*4
39*8
15212
6II2
2914

152

6412
29*4
136*2

Fri.

104

3«70

152*4

6150

Thurs.

10210
10210
102*8
102*8
80-8712 80-65

122*2
4118

136

new

1

L1478

Sat.

Am. choice,

»0

Wed.

Tuts.

104
114 70

d.
s.
Flour (ex. SI ate.. 100 lb. 12 3
8
7
Wheat, No. 1, wh.
“
8 4
Spring, No. 2, u.
“
8
5
Winter, West., u
“
Cal. white
“
8 11

iee.se.

51

jl023ie

1021a
1027i6
80-5212 8» 15
1041s
10418

Liverpool.

C

Mon.

64U

2«70
1 35

Thurs.

Fri.

s.
d.
S.
d.
ft.
3
12 3
12 3
8 7
7
8 8
8 4
8 4
8 4
8 4
8 5
8 5
8 5
8 5 ■
8 11
8 11
8 11
8 11
7 10*2
7 IOI2 7 1012
8 0
96 0
96 0
96 0
96 0

12
8

d.
3
7

12
8

89
62
59

0
0
0

-9
62
59

8.

s.

0

0
0

89
62

0
0

89
62

59

0

59

0
0
0

©ommerctal and IlXlscjcUauc0tts^lcms.
National Banks.—The
been organized:

following national bank has lately

2,809—The First National Bank of Frankfort, Kansas. Capital, $50,000.
Wm.

Imports

Hetlierington, Pres’t; James 8. Warden, Cashier.

and

Exports

for the

Week.—The imports of last

week, compared with those of the preceding
increase in both

week, show an
The

dry goods and general merchandise.

638

THE CHRONICLE

.

imports were $8,873,958, against $7,657,733 the preced¬
ing week and $19,188,767 two weeks previous. The exports
for the week ended Nov. 7 amounted to $8,027,765 against
$5,855,520 last week and $8,036,939 two weeks previous. The
following are the imports at New York for the week ending
(for dry goods) Nov. 2, and for the week ending (for general
merchandise) Nov. 3; also totals since the beginning of lirst

(instalment No. 7) has been duly called by the board of direct
and is now payable at the company’s office, No. 15 Broad

total

ors,

Street.

Rome Watertown & Ogdensbnrg.—The following is a state¬
of the financial condition of the Rome Watertown &
Ogdensburg Railroad Company, September 30, 1882 :
Balance Sept. 30,1881.
$2,551 Expenses
$1,385,426
ment

week in January:
FOREIGN IMPORTS AT

1879.

For Week.

fVoL. XXXV.

Interest

Earnings to September
30, 1882

1881.

Balance to credit

$1,822,316

Total

7,251,375

$2,020,433
6,853,525

$8,478,350

$7,817,024

$8,873,958

$1,275,153
5,222,388

$1,226,975

Total
Since Jan. 1.

$6,497,511

Dry goods

Gen’l mer’dise..
Total 44 weeks

$80,203,611 $109,157,729
196,817,855

304,829,704

151,041

'1882.

$1,382,726
5,931,298

Dry goods
Gen’l mer’dise..

10.000
32,750

Rental

NEW YORK.

1880.

243,009

1,819,705 Sinking l'uiul

$93,052,333 $116,192,188
275,085,485 310.424,538

$277,026,466 $113,986,433 $373,137,818 $426,616,776

Total

$1,822,316

Tehuantepec (Mexico).—The. Mexican Financier reports

that “the Minister of Public Works has just signed a contract
with Mr. Delfin Sanchez, Superintendent of the Morelos R. R.
for completing the
The road kasbeen
was
our

railroad across the isthmus of
partly built by an American

Tehuantepec!

company, but
referred to in

declared forfeited last August, as more fully
editorial columns. The Government has determined to

com¬

plete the road, and Mr. Delfin Sanchez will at once proceed to
the United States to purchase materials. The contractors bind
(exclusive of themselves to adhere strictly to the plaus already adopted; if
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for the modifications are deemed necessary, these must have Govern¬
mental approval. The work is to begin next November, and the
week ending November 7, and from January 1 to date :
entire road is to be completed on or before the last day of Feb¬
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.
1882.
ruary, 1885.”
In commenting upon the subject editorially the
1831.
1830.
1879.
Financier says: “The contract just closed by the Mexican
$8,027,765 Government for the completion of the Tehuantepec Railroad, as
$6,029,302
$6,055,705
$6,819,600
Fortlie week...
290,799,262 316,236,178 317,482,357 232,203,789
Prev. reported..
given in our railroad column, promises to be the end of a com¬
plicated and vexatious question, whose late issues have caused
Total 44 weeks $297,618,862 $352,291,883 $323,511,659 $290,231,554
The subject was deemed
much comment in the United States.
The following table shows the exports and imports of specie
important enough to form an item in the last Presidential Mes¬
at the port of New York for the week ending Nov. 4, and sage to Congress, and severe criticism had been passed on the
since Jan. 1,1382 :
action of the Government declaring the concession to that road
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OP SPECIE AT NEW YORK.
forfeited. We hold that these criticisms, while very natural to
Imports.
Exports.
the‘injured’ party, were not well-founded.” * * * * “So
Gold.
far, however, from showing an unyielding demand, the Mexican
Since Jan. 1.
Week.
Since Jan. 1.
Week.
Government did grant repeated extensions for the work. In his
$
$106,498 message President Gonzalez says : ‘ Four different times did the
$
$29,652,192
Great Britain
401
2,526,150
France
Executive extend the terms of the contract. But seeing that in
232
85,660
2,500
Germany
spite
of such extensions the work on the road did not advance
1,809,500
403,031
6,088
West Indies
in the least, and after duly notifying the company that no far¬
206,109
Mexico
316,698
257,650
9,582
ther extension of time would be granted, and the company de¬
South America
499
91,0 16
1,299,314
All other countries
cidedly failing to fulfill their engagements, the Executive was
This is
$413,112 $2,530,544 finally compelled to declare the concession forfeited.’
$2,500 $33,827,354
Total 1882.
671,970 50,712,439 the other, and equally important side of the question.”
432.441
Total 1881
10,000
095,956 40,252,380
2.105,723
Total 1880
Toledo Cincinnati k St. Louis--The principal subscribers
Silver.
to the Toledo & Delphos Trust met at the office of the Toledo
$20,279
$
Great Entain
$61,833 $7,521,033
Cincinnati & St. Louis Railroad Company in Boston, November
1,208
50,000
1,176,350
France
128,094
216,500
9, to hear a report from the managers of the trust. The report
German/
1,024,358 stated that, by •permission of the subscribers to the trust, some
2,924
17,154
West In lu s 7.
883.308
40,467
Mexico
814
115,077 of the funds subscribed for the completion of the road had been
South America
27,2 45 used for other purposes, to pay floating indebtedness, furnish
817,167
3,512
All other countries
much-needed equipment, improve the property, etc. There was
$53,205 $2,205,479 now needed to
Total 1882
$115,315 $9,748,204
complete the construction and secure all the
187,831
2,496.141
497.500
9,381,738
Total 1881
4,212,139 property belonging to the trust, $360,000.
58,616
This it was recom¬
4,857,693
26,500
T'otal 1880
mended the trust subscribers pay by assessing themselves 25
Of the above imports for the week in 1882, $231,350 were per cent, or $375,000.
For this the company would turn over
American gold coin and $3,334 American silver coin. Of the to the trust $400,900 iu branch lines, scrip, first mortgage
bonds and equipment bonds, as follows :
exports for the same time, $3,512 were American nickel coin.
T. O. & S. L. 6 per cent car trust bonds
$126,000
California Southern.—This company issues the following T. D. <fe B. 7 per cent equipments
18.000
circular:
Avondale branch 6 per cent lirst mortgage bonds
66,000

found the imports

In our report of the dry goods trade will be
of dry goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports

CIRCULAR NO.

3.

Boston, Nov. 6. 1382.
The road of this company is now completed to Colton, a small station
on the Southern Pacific Rk., 127*4 miles from National City. The boaid
have recently decided fro extend the
about five miles north from Colton.

road at this time to San Bernardino,
For the purpose of making this ex¬
to extend its wharf to deep water,

tension, and to enable the company
and to erect suitable sheds and other buildings for the storage and

150,000

Coupons
In two

40,000
$400,000

branch roads 634 miles

Total

This recommendation was unanimously adopted. The report
stated that the securities in the trust would be divided upon

the

completion of the road, if the Lew moaey was promptly paid
livery of cargoes, and to complete its machine 6hops and erect freight in.
The following-named were appointed a committee to con¬
and passenger stations, it has been determined to raise the sum of
sider the needs of the
de¬

This subscription is now offered to the stockholders under
each holder of fifty shares of stock being entitled to
ftufe&cribe for one block under this circular. All subscriptions must be
made in sums of $800 or multiples thereof, and must be received at the
offioe of the company, No. 70 Kilby Street, Boston, on or before Nov.-

$417,600.

circulars 1 and 2,

16, 1882.

Any amount untaken by the stockholders on that day will
the President may consider for the best interests of

he disposed or as
the company.

PROPOSAL.

For $800 in cash, payable one fourth on allotment, one fourth Dec.
15. 1882, one fourth Jan. 15, 1833, and one fourth Feb. 15, 1883, the
California Southern Railroad Company will deliver to subscribers eight
shares of the full paid capital stock of the company, and one thousand
doilars in its first mortgage bonds.
Thomas Nickerson, President.

terminal
On the
part of the railroad company—R. M. Pomeroy, E. B. Phillips,
Oliver Ames, W. D. Hobbs, C. W. Pierce, S. C. Blanchard.
On
the part of the syndicate—Ransom B. Fuller, John Felt O.-goou,
Theodore Adams, C. W. Freeland, G, T. W. Braman, G. 0,
company as

regards elevators,

payment of the January coupons.

facilities and the

Whitcomb, Arthur Sewall. *
—Attention is called to the card of Mr. Fred. H. Smith, of this
city. Mr. Smith has had an experience of over fifteen years
in railroad and other securities, and has recently added tohi8
now extensive business the dealing in, and carrying on margins
of, all stocks dealt in at the N. Y. Stock Exchange. :

Moses, G. Henry

Danville Olney & Ohio River.—This company has com¬
pleted about 98 miles of road and is operating about 130 miles
Auction Sales.—The following, seldom or never sold at the
between the cities of Olney and Danville, entering Danville
Stock
Exchange, Were sold at auction this week by Messrs.
over tracks leased from the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad.
Adrian H. Muller & Son:
There are outstanding upon the road aboutr$775,000 of first
Bonds.
Shares.
10.000 N. Y. Co. AccumulM
mortgage bonds, and the company has a floating unsecured
80 Nat. Bk. State of N. Y....129V
Debt 7s, Nov., ’88.. 1
debt of about $100,poo. The company has been obliged to
35 Georges Ctk. C
Iron
.0,000 Consol. Coal Co. or
,
Co. of Balt
91
extend some of the floating debt by reason of the failure of
Md.. consol, conv. os. 97.1oU^
300 Citizens’ G.-L. Co., Bklyn (>t)
the townships to pay the bonds which had been subscribed as
3,009 Chic. Ciu. & Louis v. no
(5 Met. Gas-L. Co. of Bklyn. 72 34
RR. 1st guar. 7s, due 87-ieo
local aid. In this condition of affairs the trustees under the
63 N. Y. & Va. 8.8. Co
$>
>7,005 Col.A ludiamip.Cem.
<&
Dos
M.,
13
18
Keokuk
com..
mortgage, George Whitney, Darwin E. Ware and Charles R.
UR. 1st sm!c. 1U
63
Do
pref..30tf,321<2
Codman, of Boston, have deemed it best to place the road tem¬ 600
L,5U0 Keokuk A. I>es M. LBGreov.wich Bk......
110 4
1st 5s, due. 1925
y-y101
porarily in the hands of a receiver, to be appointed by the
15 Mercantile Fire Ins. Co.. TO
LOGO Town of Lake. Cook
United Srates Circuit Court. The company asked for the
15 Fifth Avenue Bk
-150
Co., 11!., 7s, Water, 1894.-.llo«
0 Imp. & Traders’ Nat. Bk.267
appointment of Mr. Maxwell, the General Manager, but there
1,005 Clark Co.. Mo., 7s, due
1 Fulton Nat. Bk
1; O
was opposition to this from Western creditors.
Aug. 10. 1888
J ^
156 Johnston Harvester Co.. 1 !
>,409 Nassau Gas-L. Co. oi
40 Nassau O.-L. Co
Bklyn. 50
North River Construction Co.—The stockholders of the
Bkln., 7s, reg. c-ert ...... ^
46
2 Clinton Hall Assoc’n
North River Construction Company are notified that a further
Bonds.
5,000 Jeffersonville Mad. A
rnriin.miTvi&t.7s. due 190o.ll* .
instalment of
ten
on
their respective shares $3,000 Toledo Water 3s,-’<94.. 124
per cent
.

.

c




.,

November

THE CHRONICLE.

11. J88J.J

The Bank of

England on Thursday showed a gain of £94,000
specie for the week, and the percentage of reserve to liabil¬
ities was 37%> against 33 15-16 last week; the discount rate
remains at 5 per cent. The Bank of France gained 3,100,000
francs gold and lost 2,600,000 francs silver.

jlte flankers’ ©alette.

in

DIVIDEND;
The following

dividend has recently been announced:
Per
cent.

Name of Company.

Railroad.
Cleveland A Fitts., guar.

(quar.).

13*

When

Books Closed.

Payable.
Dec.

(Days inclusive.)

1 Nov.

11

to Dec.

1

—

NEW

YORK, FRIDAY, NOV.

10, 1882-5

P. I»I.

Market and Financial Situation.—Since Tues¬
day there has been an impression creeping over Wall Street
that Mr. Folger acted very wisely in not resigning his
position as Secretary of the Treasury. As if to show his good
The Money

539

Exchange.—There lias been little variation in exchange this,
week, and to-day the actual rates for bankers’ prime 60 days?
sterling were 4 80^to>4 81 and for demand 4 84%@4 85, with
cable transfers 4 85%@4 86. The actual rates for Continen¬
tal bills are as follows: Francs, 5 23% and 5 19% ; marks.
94% and 95%@95%, and guilders, 39% and 40.
Quotations for foreign exchange are as follows, the highest
prices being the posted rates of leading bankers:
Nov. 10.

Prime bankers’ sterling
Prime commercial

bills

Sixty Days.
on

London.

Demand.

80*2 04 1*1*3
79*204 80
79 04 79qj
233*05 21*4

4
4
4
5

4 81*204 85%
4 83*2 04 84

4 83
04 83%
purposes, and that his policy will not be changed by the elec¬ Documentary commercial
Paris (francs)
5 20 05 16%
tions, he sent an order on Thursday to the Assistant Treasurer Amsterdam
40 0 40%
(guilders)
39500 40
in New York to redeem, without rebate of interest, any of the Frankfort or Bremen (reiclimarks)
91*4 0 943*
95*00 93%
called bonds yet outstanding, to the amount of not over
Coins.—The following are quotations in gold for various coiner
$5,000,000 per week, thus bringing the $15,000,000 called bonds Sovereigns
Silver *48 and *as.
$4 82 0$4 86
993*0 par.
due Jan. 18 within the limits of those which may be thus Napoleons
Five francs
93 0—95
3 83 0 3 87
X X Reiclimarks. 4 73 0 4 77
Mexican dollars..
8&
87*a0
redeemed on presentation.
X Guilders
3 96 0 4 OO
Do uneoraraerc’l.
85 0
87
The great topic of the week, of course, has been the result Span’ll Doubloons.15 55 015 70
English silver
4 75 0 4 83
Mex. Doubloons.. 15 45
015 65
Prus. silv. thalers.
68 0
7C %
of the general elections, which give a majority in the next Fine silver bars
1 113*0 1 12*2 U. S. trade dollars
99*4 0
99 ^
U. S. silver dollars
par 0 *0 prein.
gold bars
993*0 pujc
Congress to the Democrats. There can be no change in the Fine
Dimes & *2 (limes.
99 % $ par
Executive of the Federal Government, before March, 1885, and
United States Bonds.;—The result of the elections has nof.
the Democrats in Congress will, in the meantime, be placed on
had much effect upon the prices of government bonds, and
their good behavior to an extent hardly known before, so that this fact tends to
prove that the decline in railroad and mis¬
any depression in stocks at this time based -on the idea of cellaneous stocks was manipulated.
It is reported on what
extravagant action to be taken in the National Legislature, is seems to be good authority that Mr. W. H. Vanderbilt has
founded on the most shadowy of future possibilities. A com¬ recently sold $10,000,000 of liis 4 per cent bonds at private sale.
The closing prices at the N. Y. Board have been as follows:
mon-sense view of the situation leads one to conclude that the
weakness in stocks has been engineered by parties who were
Interest Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov*
Periods.
4.
<72
8.
9.
10
working for it; or that prices might have declined this week
*10130 *101*4 *101 %
without any election, and that the latter was merely used as a 5s, continued at 3 *2.. Q.-Feb. *101.1-3 101 *3
*112
*112
*112
"112
4*as, 1891
reg. Q.-Mar. *112
convenient handle to effect the result. Most assuredly, the 4*as, 1891
*113
*113*8 113
coup. Q.-Mar. *113*8 *113*8
*119*8 *11930 119**
reg. Q.-Jan. *11930 *11930
railroad earnings for October, which have been compiled so Is, 1907
*11930 ‘11930 *119%
4s, 1907
coup. Q.-Jan. *11930 *119*8
10230 *10230 *102%
reg. Q.-Feb. ‘102*4 *102*0
fully and comprehensively in the tables given on another page, 3s, option U. S
0
*129
*129
*129
*129
.1. <fc J. *129
6s,
our’ey,
1835..reg.
do not show any cause for dissatisfaction, but give an indication
X
*130
*130
*130
*130
6s, cur’oy, 1896.. reg. J. & J. *130
*130
-ISO
*130
of the large traffic in the season of 1882-3 upon which we are 6s, cur’oy, 1397..reg. J. & J. -130 *130
*130
*130
>130
*130
6s, our’ey, 1898.. reg. J. & J. *150
now just entering.
*130
*130
*130
The N. Y. State canals will be closed on 6s, our’ey. 1899.. reg. J. & J. "130 *130
—
—

—

—

—

—

....

..

—

—

—

—

—

—

/

*

.

;

*

CZ

the 7th of December.
Aside from

the

political

•Tliisis the prioe bid at the morning board; no sale was made.

outlook,

the Western Union
State and Railroad Bonds.—As to Southern State bonds,
decision has attracted more attention than any other event of the result of the elections had a more direct
bearing than 011
the week. The opinion of the Court says very squarely that any other class of securities. The bonds of other States than
Tennessee appear to be well sustained, but Tennessee com¬
the issue of the stock dividend was void; but with the pros¬
promise
bonds sold off to-day to 52. It is true that the lowpect of an appeal to the Court of Appeals, and the delay and tax
party has been victorious, but there are many who be¬
uncertainty incident thereto, it is impossible now to foretell lieve that the recent adjustment of the State debt on such a
what the final result will be. But the unfavorable outcome
low interest basis will not be disturbed, and it would be great
of Mr. Gould’s recent litigations or negotiations excites a good folly and bad policy for the party in power to undertake any
new adjustment.
deal of comment—first came the' Story decision against the
Railroad bonds have been variable and sympathetic with
elevated roads, giving property holders a right to recover stocks, and it is well worth while for cash buyers to look
damages; then came the Mutual Union difficulty, entailing about now for satisfactory purchases.
new law suits; after these, the great Western Union decision
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.—Since the opening of
was rendered; then the Caro decision was affirmed in
the
market on Wednesday morning after the elections, there
plaintiff’s
has
a good deal of activity with prices irregular and gen¬
been
faver and a re-settlement refused; and finally the Kneeland
As noted in our remarks above, there is every
erally
weak.
party was completely victorious in the Metropolitan Com¬ reason to
suppose that the elections have been made use of to
pany’s election.
work the market down ; and then there are always some par¬
The money market has been unsettled and high rates have ties who are ready to take the gloomiest views of a situation
ruled at times, as might have been expected from the shaking (quite sincerely), and acting on such views they will sell stocks
to their own detriment.
There is strong suspicion, also, that
up in the stock market. Borrowers on stock collaterals paid as
the money market has been manipulated for the purpose of
high as 20 to 25 per cent at times in the past three days, but causing stringenc3r, and shaking out holders who are carrying
6@7 per cent has been the rate for most of the business of stocks on slender margins.
On the other hand, Mr. Vanderbilt is reported as wanting
good houses. Government bond dealers have generally been
$10,000,000 for use in some direction, and it is naturally con¬
supplied at 4(3)5 per cent. Prime commercial paper is quoted cluded that he is a buyer of stocks. With the new railroad
at 6@7 per cent.
lines that are opening and the new charges for obligations on
The New York City Clearing-House banks in their statement interest account, there must be sharp discrimination between
different stocks, and it must be remembered that a certain
of Nov. 4 showed a
deficiency in their legal reserve of $14,325,
in the country does not benefit all railroads alike.
prosperity
against a surplus of $1,597,900 on Oct. 28, being a decrease for For instance, large
a
cotton crop can do no good to the North¬
the week of $1,612,225.
western roads, and, similarly, a large grain crop can not help
The following table shows the changes from the previous much the roads in the Southern Atlantic States, while such a road
as the Denver & Rio Grande is peculiarly situated and relies
week and a
comparison with the two preceding years:
for its heavy freights neither upon grain nor cotton. These are
mere generalizations, it is true, but when we talk of the pros¬
1880.
1881.
1882.
Differ’nces fr’m
pects
of the stock market they must not be lost sight of, as
Nov. 6.
Nov. 5.
Nov. 4.
previous week.
nothing is less rational than to put all stocks on a dead level,
Loansand dis. $317,588,200 Tnc .$5,732,800 $313,350,900 $324,370,200 and look for a rise or fall in all of them as about equally prob¬
Specie
60.913.500
6b,691,700
58,900
52,026.900 Dee.
able.
The fruits of that sort Of boom have been seen in the
Circulation..."
20,008 400
18.630.390 Dec.
18.691.800
117.900
Net deposits. 288.4 48.500 Inc. 4,757.700 292.082.500 307,796,700 past in such stocks as Wabash, Louisville, Denver, Richmond
Legal tenders.
15,211.800
20.070.900 Dec.
11,939,6)0 & Alleghany, and many others.
'
363,900
The Western Union litigation and the Metropolitan elect ion
begalreserve. $72,112,125 rne .$1,189,425 $73,020,625 $76,945,175
Reserve held.
have been the principal events bearing directly upon particu¬
78 681,300
422.800
76,125,300
72.097,800 Dec.
lar stocks. Towards the close to-day the tone was irregular,
Surplus..
def. $14,325 Dec.$1,612,225
$1,732,125 and
$3,101,675
easily vacillating between strength and weakness.




.

#

540

THEJ CHRONICLE
—

KA NGM
—~****

—

^

’

-*■

W

[Vol. XXXV.

-L4JLJC

PRICES AT THE N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE FOR THE WEEK, AND
SINCE

IN
i.

——

■■

■

—

■

■

—

■

■

DAILY

HIGHEST

AND

LOWEST

PRICES.

Sales of

STOCKS.
'atm

day,

M ouday,
Nov. 6.

Nov. 1.
»c A

Tuesday,

Wednesday.

Thursday,

Friday,

Nov. 7.

Nov. 8.

Nov. 9.

Nov. 10.

i^®Week'
;

fekarea.

Allegany Central
Topeka A Santa Fe..

79 kj
*80
09 4

pref.
No..

Boston «te N. Y. Air 1 me,
Burlington cedar Ri p. A

Canada Southern
Cedar Falls «C Minm sota
Central Iowa
Central or New Jeney
Central I'acifio

Chesapeake A Oh

1st

Do

2d

Chicago A Alton
Chicago Burlington A Quincy.
Chicago Milwaukee A St. Paul

pref

SO

814

81 kj

70

71
33 4
72 <8
90 =4
25
37 4

25

*30
2 5

‘265a

1414 141 4
1314 132
110 4 111
120

127
144 4 1453a

163=4 10334
1324 1324
107 4 108
58 4 58 4
*84
85
‘139
142

9

'89 Hi
10 4
18
30 =g

91
10 •‘'a
18 7a

37 hi

8_7s

8

-a

135=4 13G=4
517a 53

l()(5g
19

*3*7*\*384

i
!
!

j

pref.!

,

*80" * 83

New Y'ork A New England....
New Y Oik Now Haven A Hart. *184
27 4
New York Ontario A Western, j

78 k.

79

Northern Pacific
Do

53 4
45
92 4
15
30 4

-

—

pref

Ohio Central
Ohio A Mississippi

^

pret

Do
Ohio Southern

Oregon A Trans-Conliuontal...
Panama, Trust Co. certificates

EvansviRe..
Philadelphia A Reading
j
Pittsburg Ft. Wayne A Chic...!
Peoria Decatur A

15
85

79
80

79
80

08

G934

148=& 1493b
40

40

32 kj

32 kj

61

61

51 Hj

o2;4
52
90
50
18 4

*48
*85
50

184

35 4 35 4
2 5 =4 20
141
111
131
1314

1094 1104

1094 HO

125 4 126 4 124 4 125
143
143 4
1444' 141
-1 (53 4 103 34 101
101
131
1314 130
131

**4*8 4 *4*94

1314
154

*184
27 4

54 4

54 4

45 4

454
924
15 4
35 4

93 k>

15

k*

30 4

**8*2" *8*3**

431
200

47,055

*7*0*6

«io 4

70 4
89 4|
24 4!

8334
24 4
34 34
*25 4

57.800

12,338
2,595
1,100
1,175

35=4j
27

1404 1104!
130 4 130 =41

839

1,879
60,900
7,415
12,040
1,440
3,173

109 4 110 4
125 4 120
143 4 144 4
102 4
102

13034 1314

53 4
132 4

153,

4

87

*28 4
59 4

kj

71

84
84
130 4 134

10 4
18 4
82 4
37

9=4
17'4
824

364

504

5134

91
10

91
10
18

17
......

......

83

57 4

33=4
004

50 34

4

1,305
121.700

52

94,370
14

.....

......

80 4
80

1464 147 4
08

38 *8
31 >8 32
1114 114 4
5934 60 J4
464 49 4

ii

10 4
18
80 4
34
-8 4

4,405
0,100

18=8
80 4

500

2,800

8 4

400

......

83
70
147-4 148
39
39
314 33
*80
70

H334 1104
GL'
48

01

200
100

5,805

1,700
1,850

103,950
500

494

92,5-5
200

50
*82
......

50
90
......

18
18
48
45
*SL
92
101
103
51
*4 9
30 ■4 30 34
094 70
35

334
103
*18

50
90

*45
*85
......

*10
48

17

77
77
101 4
99
47
48
2 8 34 30
6834 69 4
32 4 3 3 4

1014 103-4
18

18
......

524 53 4
1307e 132
154 15 4
314 3134

48 4

5 L

1294 1314
14 4
31

15

52
90
.

......

*16

4

105 34
19

*45
*85

1,350

2*9*66

....

18
48

700
800
10

101
1014
*48
50
30 4 30 4
09 4
09
3 3 34

30,000
500

2,300
1.900
49,000
51,800

35

103 4 1014
*18
19
120
120
52 4 53=8
1314 132
1 O '-j
15

314

314

100
100

7.900
20,145
4,931

32-8

4,020

117] 51*6
2,010

1,190
97

.....

11,371

—

54 4
45 4
934
15 =4
37 4

54
43 4
90

144
34 4

544

5334

45 4
92 34
15 4
35 4

43
89 4
14 4
35

*824 *85*4

*29 4
594

......

27
55 4

66

3434
284

**42*’

4(3

*81
37
57

804

97 34

8

1314 133

0534
8 4

80

147 4 148 4
384 08 Hj
3L34 32 4
1 14 78 115 4
61
61
50
514

84

......

34 4
8 4

......

.

28

'14
23

300
905

81

105
105
*100
*100
105
37 4 384
38 4 38-4
374 38 7fe
82 4 83
8134 82
51
51
50
50 4
*181
184 4 185
184
184
27 4 27 4
27
27 4
i ‘O

87

3434

8L

<3,845

*100

.

54 4
14 4

•tv 0,

\

22 4

37
57

9734

*96

.

16 4
65
29
•21 3.

71

234

394
80
37
58
98

91 4

15=8
30

*8*3*4 *824 *8*4**

25 4 27
54 4 56 4
136
136
....

15
35 4

54 4
44 4

*

28 kj

......

4J34
90 4

35 ;4

......

584

54

914
14 34

.....

......

4080
37
*56

......

16 4
60 4
'

20 4
55 4

.

Ronre Since Jan.
1, 1882.

Lowest.

ls^].

Highest.

07
34

194

39

-4

40 34
*81
*35
55
*95

*96

98

0 1

50

33
58

3334

4

004

149
89

1504
414

105 4 107 4
314 33 4
56 34 59;>6

1*47*4

147 4

0b
i
23 4

O

414
83
37
55 4
95 4

i *4*8 4 i-i’.r*

38 4 40
10 4 10 4
105
100 4
5 14
—.**4
bu
■'

_

39-4

OO
07
44
15
27

094

5934
112-4

70

ro

70

394!

II34!

1134 1134

25 4 27
! 20
20
■ l.>3
Oregon Railway A Nav. Co
1534'
Pacific Mail
39 4 39 4
Pullman Palace Car
! 120 120 i 127 127
West.Uniou Teh. ex-certific’s..
88 4 85 4;
82 4 85 4
Butro Tunnel
j

**3*9*4 *4*6*4

j

68
70
38 l4 29 4
112 4 112 4
24 4 26
......

*39
*125
to

......

'40 k>

127
82 hi

68
39

1114 112
24
24
148 4 ]j()
•58
39
122
12 4
78 4 80 4

40 4

4 100 =8
O ‘J
33 4
584 594

10 4

09
09
oS
39 4
112-A 1124
24
24

152
152
38 4 334
12334 124

79=8

1
1

Wells, Fargo A Co
COAL AND MINING,
Consolidation Coal

i

*28

i

I

35
—

19 4

20 4

*19
37 4

*200

*84
414

pref

10
414

21
Mar.
127 4 Mar.

1127 July
104 4 Jan.

1184 Apr.
124
Jan.
136
Apr.
125 4 Apr.
68
afar.

*414

*138
93
*65
128

139
*135
93 4
93
70
07
130
129

*28
17 4

80-4

*■

21

20 4

37 4

21

94
44 4

......

9

7

8
15 4
(38
34
8
47
75 4
61

41

8 4

414

*.

.

.

8 34
42

*84
41

5,09*3
77,125
31.120

141,925

June

**

4

*.
*
.*

••••••

*19

20

*18

4
.....

......

.....

21

94
41

.....

.....

was

made at the Board.

23

.....

1024
334
484
364

127
156
133 4 1824

1014 1294

H64

140
117
136
131 4 1474
129
148*4
40
33 k,

241

4134 Mar. 11

584 Aug. 15
3<i34 Sept. 7
77
Sept.ll

Mar. 6
Feb. 25

19
59

26:hi Mar. 11
42 4 Aug. 2
804 Apr. 21)12 4 Sept.12

12
June 0i 35=4
119 34 M ar. 13 128
48 4 Nov. 9 87 4
1234 May 1 138
10 4 May 25
1734
27
May 27 37 =a
100
May 15 109 4
33 4 J tine 7
4334
67
Mar. 8
8734
50
Nov. 9
60 4
168
Feb. 17 185

204June

9

88
51

Mar.

10lr,a Oct.
234 J une
457g J une
Jan.

1464
574
654

1354
63

1104
1174
594
594
93
126

131

Jam 27

96
1304
394 524
Sept. 15 80 4 964
Sept. 8 60
844
Nov. 9 164 4 190

Oet. 10

Sept. 12

9j 55 July 28
9; 19 July 21
5j 1194 Jan. 10
10 3978 Aug. 2

281

106

Aug. 30

8

9

350
121

102
63
Aug. 4 130 4 155
Oet. 27

66 ‘-2 Jau. 26
Feb 21 106 4 J an. 1 7
Fell. 15
39
July IS
Jan. 19
96
Sept.21

34;4 .Mar.
104 Nov.

64

Jail. 14

24
Feb. 27
60
Sept.12
54 3« Sept. 13

26
68108 4 J an. 20:100 4

21
33

844 1264
42
644
23
304
62 k 704
347f 54
85
1144
18 4 394

.laii. 21
14 118

A ug.

314 July 28

16
Oct. 31
44 4 Mar: 8

8

134

555

90

1*4*9

(i5
125

loo
1,606
300

800

300

28

4

254
23 4
53

434

264
70
51

884

374
60

126

374
83
200

574
744
142

146
80
171

1744
50

504
774

1434

55
8.14
55
Ua 4
90
424
26
894
70
88 4 1134

414

734

38
15
105 '‘j 1314
33 h 60

71-'a Jan. 14

044

964

00

31

744

35

*6*7*“

134

190*

Feb. 14

894 1154

39

1

Mar. 14

36 78 Jan.
1934 Feb.

h Aug. 12
Nov.

8

4 Jail. 17
13 k* May 20
J une 24
Mar. 2

14 Feb.

6

16
4

24 Mar. 27
24 Jan. 25

26
33
Jan. 16 40
240
Jan. 17 245
8
Oct.
3
14 4
40
Oct. 17
624
4 hi Oct. 12
19 34
18
Oct.
2 374

2

3

'•

624
151
94
24
153

Feb. 18
974 Feb. 25| 62^ 98
Oct. 25
804 Jan. 26! 514 79
142
Feb. 24 132
Sept. 6 112

4 ^ an. 17
lVJune 8
14June 6
13
May 2

4

Jau.

May 19 1494 Jan. 10ll20

15

1

•

t Ex-privilege

204
324

1,477 117 Juno 5 145
Jau. 1^1120
391,580 76 4 Mar. 111 933sSept. 15 77

"loo

......

......

:::::

45

■

c

20

404

821. 112
80 k,

7

67
Nov. 9j 74
Sept.29
374 Nov. 91 53 78 Mar. 30
3.9 1 7 11024 Mar. 13 II934 Aug. 15
3,095 ! 20
Oct. 12 30 4 Aug. 17
1,734 i 128
Jan. 31 j 103 4 Sept.25!
37
7,070
Apr. 21! 48:4 Jiuy 11

”

'*

90
90

June 12

3,060
1,500

.....

"*

714

69
50
16
31

16
Jail. 14
13
26 4 Jan. 18 23
Mav 12
86 4 Oct. 18
64
Nov. 10
42 s8 Oct. 16
Feb. 15
16
Jan. 18
Sept. 4 110
Feb. 8 444
Oct. 16 1.11 4-Tan. 9 94
Mar. 11
924 July 25 63
1274 Jail. 4 150 4 Oct. 18 124
36
Mar. 8 49 4 Sent. 15 38
4
23 4 June 12
45
July 26 32
98
June 6 1204 Mar. 30
1124
49 4 Feb.
65 Sept. 15 44
46 4 Nov. 9j 100=4 Jan.
3 79
57
Juno 51 78
Sopt.20 50
40
Oct. 191 604 Feb. 11 15 ■4
8?
Oct. 24 98 4 Jan. 28
40
Oct. 191 58
Aug. 11
17
Oct.
3 37
Mar. 30 18
4434 June 7 82\ Jan. 18 41
77
Nov. 9; 93
Oct.
4
774
77
Apr. 18:105
Sept.23

794

25

.....

45

91 “
62
Oct. 19 414 1094
684
924 July 24 81
IOI4
133
Jan.
7 140
July 27 127 4 142
50
Oct. 13 104
Feb. 2 82
954
(5
June 7
21 4 .Tan.
7 184
324
116 4 Apr. 24 150 4 Sept.12 107
131
50
Oct. 16
74 4 .Tan. 20 66
1134
82
Apr. 15 96 4 Aug. 3 76 4 88
Mar.

219

’

......

2*634

July 22
414 Sept. 15
9
29
Sept. 15
11 145 4 Aug. 16
5 141
Aug. 9
4 1284 Sept. 9
14 1444 Sept 8
4115()34 Sept.12
10] 175 Aug. 10
18 1404 Aug. 11

654June

44

43

86,631

140
94
67
129

35

174

27

8 84
Feb'. 1
294 Feb. 23 55 4 Aug. 30
97 4 Feb. 24 lH^ Aug. 19

800

....

*8 4

These are the prices bid and asked—no sale




140
92 4 94
*67
70
*128
131

J

Mariposa Land A Mining
Maryland Coal
Ontario Silver Mining
Pennsylvania Coal
Quicksilver Mining

Mining

Ul33

138
93
70
131

]

Homestake Mining
Little Pittsburg M ining

Robinson Mining
Silver Cliff Mining

140
! 138
"03
94 4
92
*08 4 71
:*xGS
129
131
|*129

13S

21

374 Jan. 4
97 kj Feb. 20
97 4 July 28

274 Apr. 18

4 Oct.

Adams
American
United States

Standard Consol. Mining
Cameron Coal
Central Arizona Mining
Deadwood Mining
Excelsior Mining
New Central Coal

Juno 10
Feb. 23
Fob. 1 8

80
Feb. 23
19 4 Mar. 9

31

67
37 4

34 4 Sept. 15

95 4 Sent 4
wili.o.L:
80
4 Sept. ^
9
85 4 Feu.
2
72
Oct. 27
30
July

»ti
0i

July 19
0434June 5

EX I'ilES*.

Do

T an.
n 11

284 Mar. 9
324
10 5, J 4 0
66:*4 Fob. 231100 % Sept.14 64 >e
6,443
ll;*8June 7 25-4 Jan. 14 21
3,400
27
Feb. 23
42
July 18 35
90:4 Mar. 9,112 Aug. 4 974
300
12
Juno 31 23 4.Jail. lt>
18
22,416
60
Jan. 30! 9334 Sept.25 64
165
July 28 204
May 9 190
2,5*7*6 25 June 9 3934 July
26 27 4
42,730
514Mar.lll 67 4 Jan. 7 50
10 130
June27 139
Sept. 9 127
131 4 J uly 20 143
Nov. 2 130
*2*0*0 16 May 25 40 4 Jan.
5 35
3,860
57
Oct. 13,250
Feb. 7 991
1,000 29
Nov. 9,263
Feb. 15 122
8,710
194 Nov. 10 36 ’a Mar. 22 22
100
20
Jan.
40
July 25 22
600
20 4 Mar. S
50
Sept.14 SB300
55
Jau. 16 85
Apr. 20 92
300
334 June 13 404 Jan. 25 39

400

,*

24
844 -1pctuuo 10

.

Colorado Coal A iron
Delaware A Hudson Canal
Mutual Union Telegraph

*

For Full
»©nr

’

«»^ «*,

4

80

50=8

......

33
22

80
*35
56

27

4,650
21,198

200

US4 U94
40 4 41 3;
11
114
100 4107 4 107 4 108
314

met.

84

134 4 13(3 4
514 52 4

......

pref...!

Wabash St. Louis A Pacific

80 4
29 4
58 4

52.4*0*6

484 48 4
100 4 107-4

30
8

'•

58 4

.j

40 4 48 4
105 4 107
58
58
80
80

100 4 1074

......

58

274

28
23 k,
30
Rome Watertown A Ogdensb.
30 '
42
Bt. Louis Alton A 'let re Haute
43 4
Do
prof, i *81
85
St. Louis A San Francisco
j 37 4 37 4
Do
*50
58 4
1st pref. j
Do
98 4 98 4
Bt. Paul A Duluth
; *3-4 4 30
Do
pref
j *94
95
Bt. Paul Minueap. A Manitoba! 147 4 148
Texas A Pacific.
40
4
414
|

MlSsUKLLA N EOl's.
American District, Telegraph
American Tel. A Cable Co

.*5 4
09 4

70 4

87
89
24
24
34 4 35
25 4 254
140
140
129 4 1304

90 4'
24 4

24

15

28

Rensselaer A Saratoga
j
Rich.A AUegli.,sL’cK u not cits.
Richmond A Danville
i
Richmond A West Point
I
Pittsburg
Rochester A

Toledo Delphos A Burlington

89 4

084

*

j

Do

07 ‘4

......

l
pret

Do

05 4

72 4

*80

31
3234
314 32
1 *100 105
105
*100
40
oil
West.:
38 34 40
83
85
’4
83
pref.
4 84

Norfolk A Western

704

......

*80
83
79 4 79 4
1 19
3 49 4
40
40
33 k>
1 15
115^4
*60
61
51 >4 52 4
73
7 3 ;tB
50
50
89
*87
4934 50
18
18

Mobile A Ohio
125
Morris A Essex
i 125
514
Nashville Chattanooga A St. E.j *
New York Central A Hudson .| 1314 132 4
15 l4
15 4
New York Chic. A St. Louis...

„

!
704;

8 *y

Memphis A Charleston
92
*81
92
Metropolitan Elevated
I *82
* 101 =e 103
jMLioliigan Central
10134 102 7e
49 4 49 4
Milwaukee L. Sli. A West., pref
51
*49
.50 4 31
Minneapolis A St. Louis
3034 31
71
71
Do
pref..
71
714
34 7g 354
Missouri Kansas A Texas
35 4 35\
105 'a 1004 105 4 1004
Missouri Pacific

Do

60

!
1

......

lU kj
19

8 *s

..!

Manhattan Beach Co

717a
90=8

135-'4 13G5g
5134 53

Lake Shore

common

004
254

9

IllinoisCentral
Indiana Bloom'n A West., newi
Lake Erie A Western —

Chic

33 4

73

90

107 4 10S
58
58
*
86

Green bay Win. A St. Paul...
Hannibal & St. Joseph
Do
pref....
Houston A Texas Central

Y’ork Elevated
York Lake Erie A

804:

*

4*3 4 4*9 -\ *49** '*49*7,

East TenneHi-ee Va. A Ga
Do
PrefEvansville & Torre Haute ....
Fort Worth A Denver City....

Do

79

"

Dubuque & Sioux City

Long Island

3*3 kj

163 Si 1 (53 hi
131 hi 132 >4

Cleveland Col. tin. A I ml
Cleveland A Piltsburg guar...
Columbia & Gieenville.mef...
Columbus Chic. <& Ind. Central
Delaware Lackawanna A West
Denver A Rio Grande

Do

SO

71=8

1444 145

Chicago <fc Nortli v ©stern
Do
pref..
Chicago Rock Isl. A Pacific—
Chicago St. L. ANew Orle«.ns.
Chicago St. Faui Minn. A Ora.
Do
pref
Cincinnati Sandusky A Clov...

Louisville A Nashville...
Loui.sville New Albany A
Manhattan
Dc
1st pref

71

25 34
37
37
27
27 4
141
142
132
132
101) "a 1 10k,
126
126^

pref....
pref

Do

79 Hj

*

o

Do

8 ormont

*

11.ROADS.

Atchison

New
New

JAnTT^T

Jan. 20

14
14

34
1734
324

Aug. 14
Jan. 16 240
Jan. 14 12
Jan. 19 53
Apr. 5 173,

July 13
4
3
4
Sept. 15

15s Jan.
634 Feb.
27e Apr.
23
4

30

Jan. 28

234 Jan.

5

14 Feb.

6

25
1
4

43
294
84
8
35
384
254
214
754
27
454
7
14

4
18
2

2%
14

7
354

T
4

541

CHRONICLE,

THE

1*8n2.J

November

"quotations
op state and railroad
bonds and miscellaneous securities.
^
STATE BONDS.

N. Carolina—Gs,

Michigan—

a:

Class
3 to
Class B, 6s,
Class C. 4s;
6s, 10-20a,

85

5.1906.

to

5, small ..<

1906
1906

1900

A2ftK. 1899-1900..
7a L.

ROCK &

Ft. S. iss.

30

ijSf-VSRB
Miss. O. & R-178,

Arkansas

7s,

P i?

t>

o

7s,

’87

do

Do

15

11

Cent. BK.

Funding acL 1866-1900

Georgia-bs.lHob
7s, new, 1886-----7s, endorsed, 4886
7b, gold, 1890

10(5
106
113

116

65

70
70

61 V

63

(59

i

v.Y-niatured coupon

On,
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,
68,

Del. it II.—ContinuedAll). it Susq.—1st, 7s..

xchunge-

r >',►.)(c

2d, 7s, 1885

Pricey)

Ala.Central—1st. 6s, 1 Jig
a

llosr’v

Do
Do
Consol. 4s,
Small
Ohio—

*92

fund Os, 1911rat*.—1st, 6s, 1910

Balt. &
liost.

98

().—lst.Oa.Prk.Br.

;

Bin“uHap. & No'.-ist.'ris!

Minu.ltSt,L.-lst,7s,gu |*120
Iowa C. & West.—1st,7sj

1st, 6s, 1920
108p>'Eliz. Lex.it Bigtt.—Os...
!.
ijErie—1st, extended, 7s...

La.it ivio.

101
54

53 P

*

|

ill]

*2!

i ib'(i

gold, 7s, 1920.
id. coup., 7s..

116

7s, 1398
!
'98
Miss.U.Br’ge—lst.s.f.Gs
C. B.&Q.-Hj). cM 1st,’83 102V 103 V
—2d,.guar. (138),7s,

Os!

new,
now,

.

44 P3
50

35
35
35
81
59
50
12

1866

1807
6s, consol, bonds
6sj ex-matured coupon.
6s, consol., 2d series
6s, deferred
District of Columbia—
.

I
|

'103

Ail.it eh*—1st,

Tf-

13*2

...

62 Pa

p.,7s,’97

7s. *

cons.,

.

IliV

114

134

133

133

'

108
|
93 pa

So.—lst.int.g’ar.ogl

130pj'

94

130

115p
46

oo

j!

55
! 125
i

'94^1'95**

1

118
110
109

Rellev.it S. Ill.—1st,8s.
SLP.Minn.it Man.—1st,7s

2d, (is, 1909
Dakota Ext.—6s, 1910..

loop*

!::::::!

,

.

2d, 6s, 11)31
Tex.Cen.—1st, s.f. ,7s, 1909
‘103
1st molt., 7s, 1911

Tol. Del. & Bur.—Main,6s
1st, Dayt. Div.,(is, 1910j

,

.

.

.

76
II6P2
110 *2
100 Pa
124
111
110

65

__

1st, Ter’l trust, 6s, 1910(

Va. Mid.—M.inc.,6s,1927
Wab. St.L.it P.—Gen’l, 6s

55
83
83
90

82
81

Chic. I)iv.—5s, 1910
Hav. Div.—6s, 1910
Tol.P.itW.—lst,7s,1917

109
91

108

Iowa

I)iv.—6s, 1921
Ind’polis Div.—6s, 1921

...

(I

.

HO

104

”82”
89
108
103

101*4

.

,

104 V
108
107 Pa

106*4 107.

....

„

102

Min’s Uu.—1st,6s,1922.1 108
100
St. P. it Dul.—1st,5s, 1931
*98
So. Car. Rv.—1st, 6s,1920

Detroit Div.—6s, 1921..
82 p ■'85" N. Pae.—G. l.g.,1 st, cp. 6h io3 v iosv
128*4 130 (iCtr’n Bay W.&S.P.—lst.Os
Consol. 7s, 1903
Cairo Div.—5s, 1931
Registered Gs, 1921
;102Hi’ Gulf Col.it S.Fe—7s, 1909 107 1107 V
5s, sinking fund, 1901..
Wabash—M., 7s, 1909..
N.O.Pac.—1st,(is,g., 1020.1 85Vl
iillau.it St.Jos.—8s, conv.. 104Pa 105
Ia. Div.—8. F., 5s, 1919. *102
Tol. it\V.—1st, ext., 7s
104*2 Norf. & W.—G’l., (is, 1931! 100*4*10084!
84 Pi
S.F. 4s, 1919
!j Gtmsol., (is, 1911
Ohio
&
112
Miss.—Consol,
s.f.
*116
1st, St. L. Div., 7s, ’89
Pa 118 j
JIous.it T.C.—1st,M.L.,7s 109
83 I 84
Denver Div.—4s, 1922..
Consolidated 7s, 1898..|
2d, ext., 7s, 1893
*106
;118
4s, 1921
2d consolidated 7s,1911!
Equip, b’ds, 7s, 1883. .
jl20Pa
il29
1st, Waco & N., 7s......j no
C. R. I.ifeP.-6s,cp., 1917
|
Consol, conv.. 7s, 1907
1st, Springfield Div.. 7s! 114 |115
2d consol., main line, 8s *119
*127 1129
6s, reg., 1917
Gt. West.—1st, 7s, ’88
Ohio Central—1st,(is, 1920
95 ! 95 p>
.= ioi v
2d, Waco it No.,Hs,19151
Keo. it Des M.—1st, 5s.
!
2d, 7s, 1893
f 97V 1st, Ter’l Tr., 6s, 1920.. *
j 94 |
General, 6s, 1921.....
!
Central of N. J.—1st, ’90. 110*2
Q. it T.—1st. 7s. 1390.1
102*2.
1st, Miu’l Div., 6s, 1921 ....
IIous.I0.it W. Tex.—lst.Vsj
1st consol, assented. ’99 j
jl09
!
j
'!
Han.itNaples—1st,
7s!
Ohio
So.—1st, 6s, 1921 ...i
1 85
Conv., assented,7s.1902' 108 llOOp; 111.Cent.—Sp.Div.—Cp. 6s|
St. L. K.C.itN.—lt.e.7si
Oreg’n<tCal.—1st,(5s, 1921 j
lOGPj
.<! Middle Div.—Reg., 5s..
Adjustment, 7s, 1903... *105
()m. Div.—1st, 7s
104
I
*i
Vi
Panama—S.f.,sub.6s,1910
*
! 102 Pi
Lch.it W.B.—Con. g’d, as 101
*
Glar'd a Br.—6s,1919!
10 4
i
Peoria Dee.it Ev.—1st, (is!
111
1st consol., 7s, 1897
89 V 00
Am. D’kit I nip.—os, 1921
1
k
st. Chas. Br.—lst.Os
98 !
120
1 Evans.Div.,1st. 6s, 1920 *
2d. 7s, 1907
C. M. it 8t.P.—lst,8s,P.D. 133 .135 Pi
No. Missouri—1st, 7s.
10 4 V 105*2' Pac. RRs.—Cen. 1\—G.,6s 114
gold, 5s, 1951
2d,7 3-10, P. D.. 1898... 124 I
j
West.
U11. Tel —1900, cp.
|
San Joaquin Branch.. j*l08
Dub. it S. C.—1st, 7s,’83 *100
1st, 7s, $ g., R. D., 1902. 128 j
1900, reg.
.'106
Cal. it Oregon—1st, (is
j
2d I)iv., 7s, 1894
| 115 !
1st, LaC. Div., 7s, 1893.
1
!
State Aid bds., 7s, ’84,*101 P> 105
j N.W.Telegrapli—17s, 1904
Ceil. F. it Mum.—1st, 7s 114
iHt, I. & M., 7s, 1897... -124 j
!
119
Land grant bonds, Gs. 103p> 104p> Mut.Un. T.—s.IL,6s,1911
124
i
' Ind. Bl. it W.—1st prf. 7s' *.
1st, I. A I)., 7s, 1899
West
90
(Vest,
112P»:114*4
jSpriug Val.W.W,—1st, 6sj
Par.—Bonds,6s
126
1
1st, 4-5-Gs, 1909
1
1st, C. <fe M., 7s, 1903
So Pac. of Cal.—1st, (is.I 103
79
1103 Vi Oregon UR. & N.—1st, 6s;
126
Consol. 7s, 1905
I
i 2d, 4-5-Gs, 1909
I
Union
lion Pacific—1st, G...| 115*8H534 i
96 Pj 9 < *2
East’n Div.—(5s, 1921
101
I
2d, 7s, 1884
i
INCOME BONDS.
Land grants, 7s,’87-91 lloV
1st,7s, Lift D. Ext.. 1908 124 1127 Pi Indiana}). D.it Spr.—1st,7s! 101V
(Interest )nu,(ible if earned)
Sinking funds, 8s, ’93 117 V1
8. W.
2d, 5s, 1911..
!
1st, (is, 1909. 108 |110
_

45*«
45 V
55
40

Incomes, 1900

1112pjHSciotoV.il.— 1st,

109

(is, 1887
(is, real estate, 1883
6s, subscription, 1883..
N.Y.C.itH.—1st, cp.,7s.
1st. reg., 1903
Hulls. R.—7s, 2d, s.f.,’85
Can.

2d, 7s, 1905.

6s,

6s,

2d, 6s, 1901.

1126 *•»'

•

2d (3(50),

new senes,

10()P»! 1st. L. it Iron ML—1st, 7sj U5Pa
2d, 7s, 1897
, 104 Pa
Arkansas Br.—1st, 7s.. 107 V
83p> 87
Cairo
it Fulton—1st, 7s- 107
105 p. 106 P>
Cairo Ark. it T.—1st. 7s!
(50
Gen. r’Vit 3. gr., 5s, 1931
*4
104
St. L. Alton it T. IT.—1st.' 114
109
2d, pref., 7s. 1894....
j
2d, income, 7s, 1894

Nash.Chat.it St.L.—1st,7h|

I

j

new,

6s.

100

Harlem—1st, 7s, coup..
1st, 7s, reg., 1900.,...!
J.ong Lock b’ds, 7s, ’93. *i'i(j'
j
X.Y. Elev’d—1st. 7s, 190(i!
Bul.N.Y.itE.—1st, 1916
i' 99Vm
N. Y.L.E.itW.-Ne w2d 6
>
:
2d, consol., fd. cp., 5s...
1
Trust Co. Receipts
Buf.itS.W.—M. 6s, 1908
r.Y. & New Eng.—1st,7s
I;Ev. it T. H.—1st, cons., 6s ’bo” 1
i
12PFl’t <t P.M’rq.—M.6s,1920
i 1st, 6s, 1905....
1IN. Y.C. it S t.L.-l st, 6s 1921
107
petal, llar.it S.Ant.—1st,6s
1

1131-,
117

Riv.—1st, 7s.,*114

1st cons.,
1st cons.,

j

100

1901

2d, 7s, 1900
..!
8t. L. Jack. & Chic.—Inti
1st, guar. (564), 7s,’94 J

j

122

..

•125

......

6s,

3-65s, 192 4
Small bonds
Registered
Funding 5s, 1899
“ small
Do
Do
registered

1
S’thw.Ext.—lst.7s.1910 112

Morgan’s La.itT.—1st,

i

......

1909! 113 '111

-

1"95'"
I
! 9i*..l

1892-8-1900.
1914
C’mp,misol3-4-5-6s,1912
Virginiar—6s, old

116

Pac. Ext.—lst.Os, 1921.1
Missouri Kail, it Tex.— '
j Gen. con., (is, 1920
1
(’oils. 7s, 1904-5-0
..;
j 97 *<2 9734
Cons. 2d, income, 1911 .1
.! 92*8
t
• { *
H. it Cent. Mo.—1st, ’90
|
rnr». j ii-i’Ci Mobile it Ohio—New, (5s.
1
1
1
7*>
Collat. Trust, (5s, 1892.. j
i

! 101P
3d, 7s, 1883....
4tli, extended, 5s, 1920. i
5th, 7s, 1883

V

37*2

-1st,7s,
2d, 7s, 1891

1

i

103*8 104*2
44 Vj 45*4

Tennessee—6s, old, 1892-8
15
15

CPi

fr*a

Brown consol’n 6s, 1893

BONDS.

Iowa Ext.

j

193

6s, Act Mar. 23, 1369 )
non-fundable, 1888.)

109

■

!!

Clies.A Ohio—Pur. m’vfd.!
(Is, gold, scries A, 1908.

Income 7s, 1833
Sinking fund, 6s,

grant, 3P>s, S. A

1st eons., 5s, 1930
Divisional 5s, 1930
PBiz.C.it N.—S.f., deb.c.Os

•

1st, 5s, 1921
j
Central Iowa—1st, 7s, ’99 108
Char. Co!, it 'Aug.—1st, 7s!*102
(is, gold, seiios B, 1 08.
6s, currency, 1918
Mori gage (is, 1911..
Chicago & Alton—1st, 7s.

Land

E.T.Va. it(L-lst.7s,19(

101 V 102 V

C.Bap.Ia.F.ifeN.—lst.Osi 106

KHJV !
i

1

Ask.

South Carolina—

Mil.L.S.itW.—lst.Os,192L| 93V 99*4' ltiidi. it Dan v.—Cont’d—,
Debenture (is, 1927
!
Minu.itSt.L.—1 st,7s, 1927 117
120 j

I

niOPi1

32
32

79

Rhode Island—
6s, eouiiou, 1893-99

i

49

nartf. & E.—1st, <s

1910

6s, 1886

.

...

6
(i

class 2
class 3

Bid.

SECURITIES.

8
8
8
85

6*4

Special tax,class 1, *98-9

......

'*136 ~i
1*133
j
1st, reg., 1921
1109
Jcnv.it Kio Gr.—1 st,190( ! 108
I
93
p> 93 V
lsi consol., 7s, 1910

100

C'eu.—1st, 6s, 1922

Sinking
Atl. &

!

A.&O

Chatham RR

RAILROAD

Railroad Ronds.

bonds, J.itJ., ’92-8
Do

......

108
108
102 Pj
118
119
121

gold, rog., 1887
gold, coup., 1887
loan, 1883
loan, 1891
loan, 1892
loan, 1893

1868-1898

Do
New

New York-

Connecticut—6s,^1883 4..

Louisiana—
7s, consol., lOi
7«, small..--

102 .
108
108 Pa
1 IOPj
112
116
119
108
108

due 1882 or 1883 ....
due 1886
due 1887
due 1888
due 1889 or 1890....!
•Asyl’m or Univ., due ’92,
Funding, 1894-’95
>
Hannibal *fc St. Jo., ’86
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,

30 pj
15(5
150
130
130
10
10
15
15
5

No. Carolina RR..J.&J.
A.itO
Do
Do
coup, oft’, J.&J.
Do
coup. Off. A.itO.

Missouri—

Ask.

30Pa

old, J.<tJ

6s, old, A.&O

102
117

6s, 1883
7s, 1890

Bid.

SECURITIES.

Ask.

Bid.

SECURITIES.

! Ask.

Bid.

securities.

.

.

.

«

^

50
96 Pj
107 Pj
99 Pj

^

.

96
105
98

99*2 103*2
10 0 *4
107

ib'i ”

"85”

bo”

118*2

*

iib”

.

"75”

,

...

..

.

..,

..

Div.,
1st, 58,LaC.ifeDav.,1919
1st,8. Minn. Div.,(is, 1910
1st, H. ift D., 7s, 1910
Oh. it Pac. l)iv.,6s,1910
1st, Chic.ifcP.W.,5s, 1921
Miu’l Pt. Div., 5s, 1910.
C.&L.Sup.Div., 5s, 1921
C. <fe N’west—S.td., 7s, ’85
..

92\

Kent’kyCen.—M. 6s,

91

100
.....'135
100
108
106
126
128 Pi
1127
112

?

^

°*

P.itM.1st,Gs,1918

Vas.—1 st, 6s, 1930.

St.P.&S.C.—1st,08,1919

Clnc.&E. Ill.-i st,s.f.,ear.
Col. & c

95

-

1st, 6s,

•ho

Louisv.C.it L.—6s,

1931;

JL. Erie & W.— 1st, 6s, 1919
i

;

1

123

129
124 Pj’

119 Pi I

114*2 115pj
105
90
95

|

100
105

!

1

P>!
j

Consol., (is, 1905
IncomeitLd.gr., reg.
1st, BioG.Div.,6H,1930'

90

ioo"
*40

I

4pjs.lst c.;
Registered, 1921
PitLC.it St.L.—lst,e. 7s
1st, reg., 7s, 1900
2d, 7s, 1913....
..!
Pa.Co’s guar.

......

100

Sandu.skv Div.—(is, 1919

' 100
) 98
!

j

jLouisv.N.Alb.itC.—1st,6s!
Manhat.B’chCo.—7s,1909

90:5.j

2d, 7s, 1*91
Bonds, 7s, 1900

‘

*122
*134
115

7s Oi 1871,
Dfi

1901*.*”””
(‘oi,so1m guar., 7s .

1st, ext., 7s, 1891
toup., 7s, 1894..

W*
pU*£?Civ.,cp.,7s,1917
Div.,
feg., 7s, 1894

r

87
, 'Mex. Ceil.—1st, 7s, 1911...!
!
121 Pi, Midi. Ceil.—Con., 7s, 1902 123pj 124

105*2 107
115 >2 116
.

.

115

)
!

*

•

128

Consolidated 5s, 1902.,|

j

!

102

Equipm’t bds.j-Ss, 1883.

I (is, 1909

115

115*2

ioo"

Coupon, 5s, 1931
Registered, 5s, 1931

j
j

J acK. Lau.it Sag-.—6s,’911
Mil. & No. 1st, 6s, 1910. J

|

No price




Fridaj— thesy are 1 ateat qu tations made

'

98 V

9734; 98
91

;

reg., 7s, 1917.

*

i

i

this week.

98

50

*90p>!

92

5(5pj 58
80 | 80 P>

•••••«

24

G. BavW.it St.P.—2d.ine.
Tinl. Bl. it W.—Inc,, 1919

"

4*8*2 ”4*9**

Consol. Inc., (is, 1921...
Iud’s Dec.itSpr’d—2d|inc
Trust Co. certiticates...
Int. & Gt. North.—2d inc.
2d assented, 6s, 1909...
Leh.it Wilkesb. Coal—’88

”8*6”

W.—Inc.7s.’99|

Laf.Bl.it Mnn.—111c.7s,’99i
Mil. Ji. S. it W.— Incomes
Mob.it O.—1st prf. deben.;
2d pref. debentures
’

it Al.—1st, 7s, 1920
:Rich.it Danv.—Cons.g.,Os'

50
50
52

......

40
49
78

80*8

......

48
39

.

90

56*2

N.Y.P.itO.—1st inc.ac.7s.'

;....

2d, guar., 7s, 1898
J
I 'itts.B.it B.—1st,6s,1911!
1 tome W’.it Og.—Con., 1st

J I

”74'"
'40 V

118

H 10
,

65

60pj

40

Ohio Cent.—Income, 1920
Min’l Div.—Inc.7s,1921
1 Ohio So.—2d inc,, 6s, 1921

j

ogdciis.it L.C.—Inc,, 1920
small

I

'

I Pt-m ia D.it Ev.—Inc.,1920
Evans. Div.—Inc., 1920

1921.1 46
32
j ltomc \\'. A Og.—Inc., 7s.
So. car. Ky.—Iuc.,6s, 1931
• sr. J.ouisl. Mt. (t So.—
97
i 1st, 7s, pref., int.a-dim.
i '2d, 6s, ini. accum’l dive
St g{,-S: Ry.-Scr. 11..in •. 94
.....
Plain iuVqmcs, 6s, 1 •>'. 6. *
(Sterling Mt.iiy. - ,ic..'i).>
Roch.it 14 Its.—Inc,,

lst.Tr't Co.ctfs.suppl.
St.L. Y.iftT. I i.—lst.g.,7s

2d, 7s. 1898

’bo”

Central of N. J.—1903

C. it I. C.—Inc. 7s,’90
jCol.
1

Sand’kyDiv.—Inc., 1920

ll()i..
121

4th, sink, fd., (is, 1892
Col. C. it r.C.—1 st,consol.
2d consol., 7s, 1909.
1 st .Tr’st Co.etfs. ,ass’d
2d,Tr’st Co. ctfs.,ass’d

85

Alleg’y Cent.—Inc., 1912.

Lake E. it

2d. 7s, 1912
128
3(i. 7s. 1912
i
Clev. it Pitts.—Cons. s.f. '123*a 124

100
104
90

87
70

(110

125

<.

!

103 P>

187*2 139 *
136
J 135

N.Y.itM.B’li—lst,7s,’97
.‘Marietta it Ciu.—1st, 7s. j
1st, sterling

|

■

Pitts. Ft. W. it Ch.—1st

I

130

92

i

114*2 118

99

Jill

lOOV*107

So. Pac. of Mo.—1st.. *103 V
Tex.ift Pac.—lst,6s,1905| 102 i

.

100

88*2

1896.........! HO

St. L.it S.

98V!

*98*s

Jill -VlAtl. it Pac.—Inc., 1910.

2d, 7s, 1891
...4*110
F.—2d,6s,cl. A
95
3-us, class C, 1906.... I 90
class
B,
3-6s,
1906
90
1st, 6s. Peirce C. <t O..f
Equipment, 7s, 1895.1*

124V!

*

'108

111

1109
3d. 7s, 1906
Pacific of Mo.—1st, 6s *105 P> 100

125*2

iLaf.Bl. it M.—1st, 6«, 1 i)li>j

81

1.22

,

st,6s,’95;

108*2

117^!! Ala. Cent.—Inc. 6s, 1918.

107

Reorga’11 Tr’st (.’o. Cert.
100t2101
Cent. I a.—(’oun.deht rtfs.
C.Br.U.P.—F.c., 7s,’95 100
iCh.St.P.itM.—L.g.iuc.,
6s
At.C.&P.—1st,6s,1905!
95
lChic.it E. Ill.—Iuc., 1907
At. J.C’o.ife W.—1st, Os
93
Oreg. Short L.—1st,6s *100 j 101P2 DesM.it Ft. D.—lst,ine.,6s
jDet.Mac.it Marq.—Inc..
Ut. So,—Gen.,7s, 1909 106*4!
Extern, 1st, 7s, 1909 100V;101P» iE.T.V.it Ga.-Inc.,6s,1931
Mo. I’ac.—1st cons., 6s.
99 V
El. C.& No.—2d iuc., 1970

1

124

(is...j

Den. Div..6s,as’(l,’99|
1st consol., 6s, 1919

105

Leban’n-Knox—(is, 1931 j 100

111

*i()9 *2

Kans. Pac.—1

108

w

Registered 8s,1893 .J*

Collateral trust,

82

...

Coupon, gold, 7s, 1902..
Reg., gold, 7s, 1902
Sinking fund, 6s, 1929.
Consol., coup., 2d, 7s. j
C’onflol., reg., 2d, 7s...
Sinking fund, reg
99 V 99 Pi
Sinking fund, 5s, 1929.
Sinking fund, reg
j *99 !.
Escan’a <t L.S.—1st, 6s.j*lOS illl
iLouisv.it N.—Cons.7s,’98,
Des M. ift Min’s—1st,7s.
2d, 7s, gold, 1883
I 'wa
Ceeilian Broh—7s, 1907'
120
I
Midland—1st, 8s.
120
N.O.itMou.—1st,
6s 1930
Peninsula—1st,conv. 7s
j
E. H. it N.—1st,6s, 19191
Chicago ift Mil.—1st, 7s 122 Pj. 126
Vin.it St. P.—1st,7s,’87 107 V HO
General, 6s, 1930
Peusac’la Div.—6s, 1920
2d, 7s, 1907
*129
Mil.ifeM. d.-lst,6s,1905
St, L. Div.—1st, 6s, 1921'
; 114
2d, 3s, 1980
C.C.C.&Ind’s—1st, 7s, s. f. 120 i
Consol. 7s, 1914
121
Nashv. & Dec.—1st, 7s.
123
S.&N.
107
Ala.—S.f.,(is,1910!
C.St.P.M.ifto.—Consol.,6s
407*2
C. St,

si

j
1911 j

Lake Shore it Mich So.— i
Mich.S. it N.I.—S.fd.,7s 10434
Clove. & Tol.—Sink, fd.! 106*2
New' bonds, 7s, 1886..; 105'*4
111
Clove. P. it Ash.—7s
121*2
Butt', it Firie—New' bda.
Kal. it W. Pigeon—1st. *102
*120
Det.M.&T.—1st,7 s,1900 i
Lake Shore—Div. bonds 120
12(5

106

Interest bonds. 7s, 1883
Consol, bonds, 7s, 1915.
Extens'n bonds, 7s, ’85.
1st, 7s, 1885

.

Coupon, 6s, 1909

92 7q

.!

104*

Int.it Gt.No.— 1st,6s,gold!

93
! 95
108 V 109
119
1120
109
111

-----

108

117
110
115

(i8 pj 70
104 *2 104 :t4 St.L. A.it’l'.H.— i1 ivT b is.
82
81
lToi.Iicl.it Ji.--4nr.JJs.19IO
iiavton Div.— (is, 1910
95
;I
94

jTex.it St. L.-L.g.,inc.il'2 >

46

j

**8*6”

1

70
50

1

GO

!
1
37

20*4

THE CHRONICLE]

542

Quotations in Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore.

New York Local Securities.
Insurance Stock List.
[Quotations by E. S. Bailet, Broker,
No. 7 Pine Street.]

Bank Stock List*

Marked thus (*) are
not National.

Par.

LOO
100
100

America*
A Ed. Exchange.
Bowery.
Icrteheirs’ ft Drov’rs’
Central....
Chase

Chatham
Chemical
Citizens’

City
Commerce
Continental

Corn Exchange*
Bast River
Eleventh Ward*
Fifth
Fifth Avenue*
First
Fourth
Fulton
Gallatin.
German American*.
German Exchange*.
Germania*

Greenwich*
Hanover

Imp. and Traders'...
Irving
Island City*
Leather Manul’trs’.
Manhattan*
Marine
Market

Mechanics’
Mechanics’ A Tr’drs’
Mercantile
Merchants’.
Merchants' Exch’ge

Metropolis*
Metropolitan

25
25
100
100
25
100
25
100
100
100
100
25
25
100
100
100
100
80
50
75
100

100
25
100
100

50
50
100
50
100
100
25
25
100
50
50
100

Bid.] Ask.
155

|ieo

129%!

..

Bowery
Broadway.
Brooklyn
Citizens’

125

City
Clinton
Columbia

2001

Commercial....
Continental

211* *
149% 151

Eagle
Empire City

i?5

Exchange
Far rag ut
Firemen’s
Firemen’s Trust
Franklin & Emp....
German-American..
Germania

110

..

125
100

Globe

Greenwich
Guardian
Hamilton
Hanover
Hoffman
Home
Howard

133
200

135

136

Importers’ & Tr’d’rs
Irving
Jefferson

Kings County (Bkn.)
Knickerbocker

Lafayette (Br’kJyn).

152
120

132

Lamar
Lenox
Long Island

122%

.

Murray Hill*
Nassau*
New York
New York County...
N. Y. Nat’l ExctPge.
Ninth
North America*....
North River*
Oriental*
Pacific*
Park

100
100
100
100
100
100
70

People’s*
Phenix
Produce*

Nassau

0t. Nicholas
Seventh Ward
Seoond
Shoe and Leather..
Sixth
State of New York.

National
York Equitable
Y'ork Fife ...
York A Boston.
York City...
Niagara
North River

30
25
50
100
25
20

Third

Tradesmen’s
Union—
United States
Wall Street

West Side*

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
40
50
ieo
50
100

(Brooklyn)..

New
New
New
New

Pacific
Park
Peter Cooper

ioo

50

Republic

(B’klyn)

Lorillard
Manufac’rs’ A Build.
Manhattan
Mech. A Traders’...
Mechanics’ (B’klyn).
Mercantile
Merchants’
Montauk (Brooklyn)

*95

100

Mount Morris*..

50
100
25

American
American Exchange

130
1J0

People’s
Phenix

105

Relief

Republic
Rutgers’
Standard
130

Star

Sterling
Stuyvesant

no
150
155

Tradesmen’s
United States
Westchester

Williamsburg City.

25
17
20
70
100
30
50
100
40
100
30
50
17
10
100
100
50
50
!25
100
15
50
50
100
50
50
100
30
20
40
50
100
25
50
25
100

140
105
I HO
100
no
140
118
115
90
216
200
75
90
117

80
100
117
180
no
no
250
00
118
135
83
143
80
60
50
140
18C

100
25
50
50
50
50
50

37*

35
100
100
100
50
25
25
100
20
50
50
50
100
25
50
100
100
25
25
25
10
50

76
103
70
75
100
53
107
50
130
130
65
105
105
140
130
140
90
5
00
170
100
175
117
150
114
140
05
75
;so
100
70
50
115
70
125
120
223

Brooklyn Gas Light Co
Citizens’ Gaa Co (Bklvn)
do
bonds

25
20

Jersey City A Hoboken
Metropolitan
bonds

Matual.N. Y
Nassau. Brooklyn
do

scrip

100
10

People's (Brooklyn)

Bonds
Bonds
Central of New York

Williamsburg
do

1,000
Var.
50
50

...

bonds

1,000

Metropolitan, Brooklyn
Municipal
do

100
100

bonds

4,000,000
1,000,000
375,000
125,000
400,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

ioo

Fulton Municipal

3

150
112
210
180
195
150
125
130
40
100
230
22)
85
100
125
90
100
120
193
150
120
283
03
120
143
85
150
85
75
55
150
210
80
107
75
80

M. AN.
J. A J.
M.AN.
Var.
F.A A.

Quar,
••«••••

750,000 M.AN.

0

1888

Connott m
do
CaB'ornia

100

094,000 J. A J.
100 2,100,000 Q-J.
_lat mortgage
1,000 1,500,000 J. AD.
10 2,000,000 Q-F.
Brooklyn City—Stock
1st mortgage.
1,000
300,000 M.AN.
100
Broadway (Brobklyn)—Stock
200,000 Q-J.
100
Brooklyn Crosstown.—St’k....
400,000 C—J.
1st mortgage bonds
1,000
300,000 Q-J.
Buahwick Av. (B’klyn)—Stock.
100
500,000 J. A J.
Central Pk. N. A E. itiv.—Stock
100 1,800,000 Q-J.
Consolidated mort. bonds
1,000 1,200,000 J. AD.
Christopher ft Tenth St.—Stock
100
650,000 F.AA.
Bonds
i,eoo
250,000 J. A J.
..

Dry Dock E.B.A Batt’ry—Stock
1st mortgage, consolidated

..

Eighth Avenue—Stock

Lsfr mortgage
42d St. ft Grand St. Ferry—St’k
1st mortgage
Central Cross Town—Stock
lat mortgage
Houat.West St.& Pav.F’y—St’k
1st mortgage
Second Avenue—Stock
3d mortgage
Consol, convertible
Extension

Sixth Avenue—Stock
1st mortgage
Third Avenue—Stock
1st mortgjige
Twenty-third Street—Stock.
1st mortgage
*

100
•300&C
100
100

1,000
100

1,000
100
500
100

1,000
1.000
•".oOite
100

1,000
100

1,000
..

100

1.000

column shows last dividend




oa

1,200,000

Q-F.

900,000 J. AD.

1,000,000 Q-J.
203,000 J. A J.
748,000 M.AN.
230,000 A.AO.

’

6
7

000,000

ioo
100
220

215

Pueblo A Ark. Valley,
Rutland 6s,1st mort
do

100

Boiton C;ln.
Boston A
Boston A
Boston A

110
80
103
8)

750,000
500,000
2,< 100,000
2,000,000
000,001
250,000

M.AN.

J.AJ.
Q-F.
J.AJ.

7
5

F. AA.
M.A N.

4

4

7

175*
57

99%

Lowell

Maine.

Providence...... x

100

itji*

28%

29

Eastern

Eastern

(Mass.)
(New Hampshire)...

Fitchburg
Flint A Pere

do

Fort Scott A

Marq

...... • ••••••

Mar.

135
21

pref.... .x

Hough. A

.

Lawrence....

0S>4

69
117

144
50

Nov., ’88’107
Sept..’83) 115
Mar., ’82 245
July. NO 110

20
50

53%

••

51%

Williamsport.......

40

75

17%

04%! 65%
50

Paul A
do

53%
....

United N. J.

'

35%

53
65

59% 59%

Duluth R.It. Com .
do pref.

Companies......

West Chester
West Jersey

03

62%

Philadelphia A Erie...
Phtla. Germ. A Norristown.
Pnua. Newtown A N. x ......
Pnlladelphla A Reading
Philadelphia A Trenton
Phlla.Wllmlng. A Baltimore.
Pittsb. Cln. A St. Louis, com.
al

34

...

Schuylkill....

Central
Pennsylvania

....

!

1(9

s

27%

189

‘27%

ISO

consol, pref—

West Jersey A

Atlantic

CANAL STOCKS.

Lehigh Navigation
Pennsylvania
Schuylkill Navigation.... ..
do
pref...

12

railroad bonds.

123
Allegheny V ai.. 7 3- lCs. 1396... 122
do
7s, E. ext..1916 118
do Inc. 78, end..c.’94. 48
50
Belvldere Dela. 1st m.,63,i'j02.
122
do
2dm.6s. ’85.. 104
do
3d m. 6s, *37.. 104
Camden AAra'-C'* os.toup.’st 101%
do
6s, coup., ’39

115
80
110

....

94

95
121

121
06

94%

lnc.AL gr.,78 1915
m
Union A Titusv. 1st m. 7s ’90. 90
United N. J. cons. m.6s,*94..
Warren A F. 1st m.7s,’96
tVd%
West Chester cons. 7s, ’91
West Jersey 6s, deb.,coup.,*8S
do

do

lstm.6a,cp.,’%.

do

1st m. 7s,’90.

do

cons.

119

0s, 1909 — 113
W. Jersey A Atl. 1st in. Ss, cp.
Western Penn. RR. 6s,cp. 93.
do
6s P. B.,*96

no

108

89

103%

U4%

90
107

m.6s.rg.,’97.

....

95%

10S%

do
mort. 6e. sJ
Cara. & Atl. 1st m. 7s, g.. 139£
co
2d in. 6s, 1904..., 102
do
cons., ti p. c
Cam. A Burlington Co. 6a,*97.
Catawlssa 1st,7s, coav., cp.’s2

260
115

11*2%

Baltimore 6s. 1S84, quarterly.
do
6s, 1866, J.ft J
do
6s, 1890, quarterly... 115
do
8b, park, 1890, Q.—M.
do
6s, 1893, M. AS......
do
68,exempt,’93.M.AS.
do
08,1900, Q.-J.
do
68,1902, J. AJ

118

do
5s, 1916, new
Norfolk water, 8s
railroad STOCKS.
Balt. A Ohio
do
1st pref
do
2d pref

197

• • • •

Par.’
100

108

115%

127
130

122%
120%
--135

129

do
Wash. Branch.100
Parkersb’g Br. .50
do
Northern Central
SO

10
56
17

Western Maryland
•••S
Central Ohio, common. ...50
Pittsbu g A Connelisville...

RAlLltOAD BONDS.
Atlanta A Char. Ists
100% 107%
<:o
Inc
....
80
Balt. A Ohio 6s, 1885,A.AO. .. 104%’l91«
Columbia A Gree^v. Ists.... ....
101
80
73
do
21s. ..
do
106
N. W. Va. 3d m.,guar.,’S5,JAJ
121
Pittsb.A Conaellsv.7s,’98 J AJ
it 6
Northern Central 6s,’85, JAJ
do
6a. 1900, A.AO. i'10%
do 6s,gld,l900, J.AJ. 110
108%
Cen. Ohio 6s. 1st in..’9C.M.A S.
W. Md. 6s,lst m.,gr.,’90,J.AJ.
do
1st m.,1890,J.AJ...
do 2dm.,guar.,J.&J....
110
do
2d m.,pref ........... ICO
do 2d m.,gr. by W.Co.JA-) 110
do 6e, 3d in., guar., J.A J.
....

....

150
115

do

*

chat. m.f

* Iu default.

10s,’88

..

f Per share.

i°o%
do
2d, M. A N ..
C0
do
8a. 3d, J.AJ
Richmond A Danv., gold, 6i.;
110
Umon RR. 1st. guar., J. A
do
<:-nion endorsed. j!03

Vhginia & Tenn. is

...

iis

....

60

...

....

Hto:ks% out the date of maturity of bonds

Pitts.Gin. ASt. L. 7s, reg.,190t
1
do
do
7s, cp., 1900
i irllinllluoV#®
pittsb. Titusv. A B..
JO.* 7a,
16,ep.t
cp..*96
sru
inf
1G1K
Rich.A Danv.cons.lnt.6a,1915
1901
Bharaokln V.A Pottsv.7a,

BALTIMORE.

5»

Bro^Top...
LeWghWley^.....; •••;•
pref....

99

*75

,

do
do 4%s,reg.,1921
do
do
coup., 19il
Phil.A R.Coal A Ir *n deo.7s.92*
do
deb. 7s. cps»ofi
do mort., 7s, 1892-4

P.Mt.Joy* Lancaster.
Huutn*don*

do

00

do
2d m. 6s, reg., 1907 57
MISCELLANEOUS BONDS.
107
Penn. Co., 6s. reg
- •

Har

Nov., '--'2 2TO

July, ’90 110
Aug.,'82 151
May, ’93.110

pref

Nesquehonlng Valley
Norfolk A Western, com

,Phll.Wilm.ABalt.,4s,Tr.cert8

im 3chuylk. Nav.lst

Atlantic..

Delaware a Bound Brook....
East Pennsylvania.....
Elmira A
do
uo
prer..

Little

7s, R. C., 1893*
7s, coup, off, ’9S

94%

Morris, boat loan, reg., 1885..
Pennsylvania 6s, coup-, 1910..

7

19%

do

....

120

59 i
16 Mi Lehigh Naviga.m.,68, reg.,’84 103
do mort. RR., rg .’97— 114
do con8.m.7s,rg.,191!... 117
do Gr’nw’d Tr.7a, rg.,’92

im

PHILADELPHIA.
railroad STOCKS.+

do

118

do
gen.rn.7s, cp., 190i
CANAL BONDS.
Ches. A Del.. 1st m.. 6s, 1836

4&

Wisconsin Central...........
pref
do

Catawlssa.....
do
lat pref
do
21 pref....

102% 103

Texas A Pac. 1st m.,6s,g..l905 101
Rio Gr. Div.,1830
do
do
cons. m.,6e,g.,1905 94

160
Norwich A Worcester.......
Ogdensb. A L. Champlain ... 137% 138
Portland Saco A Portsmouth 112%
125%
Pullman Palace Car
x
20

Camden A

111

21%
97% Sunbury A Erie 1st m.7s, ’97..
,8unb. Haz. A W.,lst m.jSa,^.
\
do
2d m. 6a, 1938..
Syra.Gen.A Corn’g,lst,7s,190&
90

47

Smith....

England...
Hampshire...

102% 103

121

Gulf, pref

Nashua* Lowell...............
New York A New
Northern of N.

132 «
120

tL

do
common.
Iowa Falls A Sioux City.....
Llttie Rock A Fort

Maine Central
Manchester A

lift
124
123
133

do conv.

do
92
5

Pasaumpslc
Conuotton Valley

UO

110

Pa.A N.Y.C. A RR. 7s,1896 .
do
1906....
Perklomen 1st m. is,coup.,’87
Phlla. A Erie 2d m. 7s,cp.,’S8
do
cons. mort. 6s.i920
po
do
5s,1920
Phlla. Newt’n A N.Y.. 1st, *9.
Phil. A R. 1st m. 6s, ex. due 1910
do
2dm.,7s,cp.,93.
do cons. m..7s,rg., 1911
do
do
cp.,1911
do cons.m.63,g.lR0191l
do lmp.IR.,63,g„ C. 1897
do gen. m. 6i, g.. C.180do J.n. m., 7s,coup.,1896.
do deb. coup., IS93*—
do do coup, off, 1893.
do scrip, 1882

84%

Conn. A

140
119
112
112
2)5
119

185

7
7
7
5

84
174

Concord
Connecticut River.

112

July, ‘82 175
Apr.. ’85 103

150,000 A.AO.

110-4

A Fitch

Pennsylvania.

July. ’94 lu5

l ,050,000 M.AN.
2<> »,000 M.A S.

x

asSWSB&::::
Cln.Bandusky A Clev

20
112
147
IdL
2J5
110
205
200

Nov.itkji

1,100,500 J.AJ.

113

Income,

A Albany

Boston

North

7
4

*

71%
105%

<s

Topeka

...

con. m.,6s,rg.,1923
132^
do
6s,cp.,1928
Schuylkill, 1st m.7s,’82
jN. O. Pac., 1st m.. 6s, 1920 ..
North. Pena. 1st m. 8s, cp.,*85
IO0J4
I
do
2dm.7s,cp.,’96. 119
do gen. m. 7s. reg., 190^
do gen. m.78, cp., 1903.
j
do debenturefis,reg... iofl%
;Norf*k&West.,gen. m. ,6s. 1931 100% 101
lOU Creek, 1st 6s, coup., 19r3.. 102
Pennsylv.,gen. in. 6s, rg., 1910 125
do
gen.ra. 6s,cp..l9ll)
124%
do
con8.rn.6s, rg.,1905.
122
do
cons.m.6s,cp., 1903.
132
do
do
5s,reg.,191y 108^

STOCKS.

Atchison A

110
80

7-

*

111
107
33

...

00

Little

Day’n I),
Main L..

do
Northern

Ocr.. ’82 250
Jan., ’81 100
May, ’82 24)

2d mort. 6s. 1900
reg., ’li¬ 122
do
1st, 6a. cp.,189fc 102
do 2d m. 7s, reg., 1910..

{Lehigh Valley, 1st,6s.

Ut 6s.......

do
do

!

500,000 J.AJ.

*

bt. L.,

T. Clan. A

do

1

Old Colony, 7s
Old Colony,0S ........V*

175

200,00) M.AN.
250,000
-

71

100

..

1093*

102

Revere Beach A Lynn
Tol. Cin. A St. Louis
Vermont A Massachusetts..
Worcester A Nashua

97
155

June, ’93il!5

Apr.,’93

W’msport, istin..63,19l0 i‘1'5
do
Ss.perp
Harrisburg 1st mort. 6s, ’83...
H. A B. T. 1st m. 7s, gold, ’90.
i
co
codb. m. 5s, 1345....
IthacaA Athens 1st g d, 7s.,’95
'Junction 1st mort. 6s, ’82

L. Ch.con.oj.
inc.

do

70
140
140
75
110
118
153
100
150
95
10
05
180
100
180
125
175
120
145
75
85
150
110
75
30
125
75
135
125
200

110
70
no

Oct., ’82 144
June *84 103
3% Nov.. 82 208
7
102
6
Oct., *82 19J
0
Oct., ’82 180
7
1888
105
6
Oct., ’82 150
6
Oct.. ’82 144
7
Dec. 1902 117%
2% Aug.. ’82 108
7
isy0
1C8
4
Nov., '82 255
7
3
7

<s

A So. PaC. 7s...

Ogdensburg A

105
00
112

!05
08
!05

2
7

*-

-

no

100

El.A

110%

Central, <s—
York A New Eng. 6s....

New Mexico

*

1
*
% July. ’82
7
J’ly,1900 107

1,000

... 109*4

Central. 6s...

..

...

do
do

Mexican
New

{Easton & Amboy, 5a, 1920

..

Kaa.City. St. Jo.AC. B. »s. .
Little B’k A Ft. Smith, <8,1st

Bid. Ask.

70

900,000 J. A J.

.

5a
Southern, 6s

Hartford A Erie 7s ...........
K City Lawrence A So. 5s...

Mass

.East Penn. 1st mort.Is, ’88

D.Ex

Kastorn,Mass.,4^8,new.
Fort Scott A Gulf «s

[Quotations by H. L. Grant, Broker, 143 Broadway.]
Bleeeker 8t. ft Fult. Ferry—St’k
1st mortgage
Broadway ft Seventh at.—St’k

..

Rutland, pref erred.

105

1,500.000

Passumpslc, <s
Valley. 6s...

Conn, a

1% Oc., *82 103% 105
3
55
Sept.,’81 CO
3% Nov.,’32 90
95
5
113
115
Nov., ’82
3% Jan., ’70 42
45
3% Nov., ’82 100 108
3
90
Oct., ’82 85
3
85
Aug., ’82 75
1% Feb.. ’82 UU
55
3
102
Oct., ’32 100
2% July. ’32 70,
75
7
181
Nov., ’82 177

A.A O.
1,000.000 M.AN.

3,000,000

*

5
Nov., *82
2% July. ’82
i% Oct., 82
3
Aug., ’32
'5% July. ’32
5
Aug., *82
8
Aug..'32

Var.
Var.

315,000 A. A O.
50 1,850.000 F.AA.
20
750,000 J.AJ.
50 4,000,000 J.AJ.
100 2,500,000 M.AS.
500
750,000 F.A A.
100 5,000,000 Quar.
25 l,000,000i Var.
Va
700,000 M.AN.

-Manhattan

New York

2,000,000
1,200,000

«

1,C00

Harlem

do

Date.

Amount. Period

income

new 7s, 1900,r.A cp
118
Val.,lstm.7a.C..l90;
.Connecting 6s, ep. 1900-1904. ifo
Delaware m.. 6s.reg.Acp.,var
Del. A Bound Br., 1st,7s. 1900
125V4

Chartlers

'

«i%

Boston A Maine 7s
boston as Albany 7s
do
6s
Boston A Lowell 7s
do
68
Boston A Providence 7s
Burl. A Mo., land grant 7s.... 115
do
Nebr.6s
Ex 112%
102
103
Nebr. «s
do
82
do
Nebr.48....83
Chicago Burl. AQuincv

Oai and City Railroad Stocks and Bonds*

Par.

119%

Pacific, 6s

, ©

As*

[Gaa Quotations by Prentiss A Staples, Brokers, 11 Wall street.]
Ga« Companies.

land grant7s

no<-

SECURITIES.

Catawlssa

T#pckalstm.7s..... ns

Atlantic A
Bid.

Ask.

BOSTON*
Aten. A

Par.

Companies.

Bid

SECURITIES.

Price.

Price.

Companies.

[Vol. XXXV,

11’?
...

do
8i
Wl’. A Weldon, gold.
Wll. C. A Aag.-Oi

,22

7s.

108

.126%
101

j 125

THE CHRONICLE.

11,1882.]

November

RAILROAD

EARNINGS.

New York City Banks.—The
following
statement shows the
condition of the Associated Banks
of New York City for the
week endimr at the commencement of business on
Nov. 4:

Jan. 1 to Latest Date.

Roads.

Uo
Week or2Io

1882.

1881.

1882.

$

$

543

1881.
Average amount of

’r.

$
77,79 3

$
513,343

Banks.

70,326
575,17
1,402,62 3 1,263,023
9,822,371
AtchTop.&S.Fe
T*. 1,759,29 1 1,642,634
Halt, k Ohio....
3
’r.
91,76
65,362
649,0G5
491.177
Buff. Plttab.&Jl.
ct
105,09 6
71,981 2.276,188 1.8 24,014
Bur.Ced.R-A No.
•t.
1
9,04
9,709
300,088
Cairo & St. Louis
339,304
ct
42,43 1
21,696
747,053
801.295
Cent.Br.Un.Pac.
2,409,00 > 2,507,857 21,400,176 19,570,949
Central Pacino.
•t.
tl7,99l3
111,058
Cbarl-Col.AAug-;
347,88vZ
236,396 2.777,400 2,267,617
Cliesap. A Ohio.
et
204,73;i
202,016 6,686,290 6.238.548
Chicago & Alton
r. 2,186,40( ) 2,262,981 15,053,87
Chic. Bur. A Q- 1
15,423,831
ct
43,12()
42,423 1,475,23
Chic. & East. Ill
1,349,86
28
l
59,10:
Chie.AGr.TmnK
37,532 1,754,12
1,242,78
)
ct
707,00(
CUio. Mil.ASt. P.
508,166 16,351.000 13,601,590
4th
wk
O.
.4
881,66*)
Chic. A Northw.
757,227 19,864.10 17,974,694
)v
135,1311
85.373 4,215,200 3,281,798
Cb.St.P.MIn.AO
t.
62,56; )
Chic. A W. Midi
59,518
250,001 )
Cin.Ind.St.L.AC October
221,320 2,197,79
1.988.549
r.
243,255
Cincinnati South
239,934
1,851,226 1,662,127
ct
17,67^
12,358
Clev. Akron & Col
422,328
347,725
t.
t20,77
Columb.AGreen.
tI6,367
ct
Col. Hock. V. AT.
70,52(
67,445 2,366,630 1,948*205
t.
Connottou Val..
4,07*
)V
Denv. <fe Rio Or.
128,16f
131,694 5,522,058 4,9*41,399
Denv.A RGr.W.
37,865
t.
Dos M. & Ft. I).
8,56q
8,60*9
277,921
3*20,106
Bet. Lan. A No..
153,965
130.942 1,327,839 1,133,565
Pub. A Sioux C.
ct
36,44i
27,896
956,97
912,019
Eastern
r.
3 45,OOC
323.353
E.Tenn.Va AGa
372,23^
315,614
Eliz. Lex. A B.S
r.
57,351
362,752
Europ’n A N. A
47,023
38,8*0*9
306,93
263,055
Evansv. A T. H.
73,408
63,392
Flint A P. Marq
t.
45,403
38,773 1,681,830 1,467,1.23
Ft. W. A Denver.!
1
28,287
Gal.Har.ASan A
>t
340,581
247,972
Ala

Gt.Southero

Capital.

..

New York
Manhattan Co...
Merchants
Union
America
Phoenix

..

City
Tradesmen’s.
Fulton

Broadway

Mercantile
Pacific

Republic
Chatham

People’s
North America..

..

368,155

..

1th wk 0< it

GulfColASan.Ft October.

..

Hannibal A St. Jo

it

Hous.E.AW.Tex

r.

Illinois Ceil.(Ill.)
Do

..

(Iowa)

.

Ind.Blooni.A VV.
Int. A Gt. North.
Iowa Central...
K.C.Ft. S. A Gull
L. Erie A West’ll
L. R. AFt.8mith

il

77,410

;t

125,176
103,464

.

;.

35,855

A

50,248
61,592

t

t.

dya
r

t

Northern Cent..
Northern Pacific
Ohio Central....
Ohio Southern..

T

;

Oregon Imp.Co. August...
Oregon R.AN.Co
Oregon A Cal...

290.981

f265,201
65,766
95,816
169,000
82,210
493,893
255,278
592,43c
204,90C
38,353

11,260
274,127
507,200
125,730

Pennsvi vania
Peoria Dec. AEv.

2,570,341

956,596

773,918

1,2*19,' 255

1,160,035

391,200
143,800
32,063
28,855
7,855
18,610
27,607
238,792

r

N. Y.AN.
Engl’d
N. Y. Pa. A
Ohio August.,
Norfolk A West.

96,015

94,042

1,972,377

312,800 l
98,000

1,067,706

21,785

12,897
386,455

Philadelp. A Erie
Phila.A Reading
Do

792,424

728,133

155,775
205,646
256,921
67,150
75,037
179,979
70,052

850,930

462,523

t

246.530

:

429,565

'

115,6761
30,148
9,301

;

|

464,732

659,401
310,030

13,317

276,522 2
2,019,017 1,945,674 15
14,919,675
Coal A Ir. Sep tern b’r. 1.469,315 1.410,537
1C
9,791,689
Richm.A Danv..
f 436,500 t376,300
2
2,828,193
St. L.Alt. A T.H.
42,885
40,522 ]
1,222,362
Do (brclis.)
25.632
29,660
715,610
617,543
St. L. Ft. S. A W.

Bt.L.Iron.Mt.AS.

St.L.ASan Fran.

St. Paul A
Did:. 4th wk Oct
St. P. Minn.AM. 4th
wk Oct
Scioto Valley... 4th wk
Oct

&So.Pac. Cal.... July

Do So.

Div.

So. Pac. of Ar... July
July
So. Pac.
„

of N. M.

July...

5,094
276,232
116,553
46,619
334,828

17,461
130,570
11287,358
11284,426
1113,906
121,360

127,784

....

223,252
97,423

5
2

22,673|

5,940,893
2,588,010
837,134

578,801

181.676

7 ,097,921

3,842,167

14,426

446,988

359,352

664,478

II2 270,641
Ill

South Carolina.
Sep"temb’r.
115,700
817,967
845,623
Texas A Pacific. 4th
wk Oct
194,055
180,779 3 ,382,471 3,206.833
Tol. Del. A
Burl. ith wk Oct
30,374
777,897
21,687
561,895
Union Pacific...
22,142,546
Utah Central. 1 October... 3,15S,337 l1,169,530 24
Septerab’r.
111,270
102,154 1
Vicksb’rgA
Mer.
31,805
43,300 - 307,024
\a. Midland... Septemb’r.
3 wka Oct.
tG7,327
165,521 1
1,014,406
Wab.St.L.A Pae. 4th wk Oct 450,411 366,457
13
11,789,664
West Jersey
105,582
102,930
884,955
789,875
Wisconsin Cent. Septerub’r.
3 wks Oct.
58,477
39.433
includes Great Western Road since October& Northern Division.
II luclnded in Centroi

paeific^arniiigs above.
i ae

U. S.
Sub-Treasury.—The Mlovnug table shows the -points
and payments
at the Sub-Treasury iiftais city, as wen
balances in the same, ter
each clay of the pas

recess

Balances.

Dale.

Nov,
“

“
“
“

“

4

6.
7.
8.
9.
10

Receipts,

Payments.

$

1,579.1.33 95
1,592,152 85

i.666,336 *0*4

Coin.

$
$
967.481 31 100,072,067 25
1,003.124 (54 100.518,586 94
Election Holiday

1.856,52 7 42
1,974,543 00

1,232.003 29 101.030,612 01
1,833,157 80 101.000,160 63
1,719,033 31 101,131,972 65

8,563.703

6,869,809 41




26

Currency.
4,422,738 47
4,509,240 99
4,416,-551 67
4,366;009 61
4,447,073 28

238.700

4,026.500

642.000

13.314,000
10,030.900

2,174.000
1.750,200
687.000!
058.900
311.200
323.200
420,230

5.3-15,700
5.941.700
2.022,400
5.393.0OC

3,5-2.200
1.482.600

2.177.250

4.969.60C

1,000,000

6,6'6.50C
2.129.100

300.000

3.825.000

400,000;

1,500,000
2.000,000
500,000
240,000
250,000
3,200,000
2,000,000
300,000
750, OOC
500,000
1,000,000
300,000
250,000
200,000
750,000
300,000,
100.00C
200,000
200,000

.

18.792.000
16.520.500
1.496.100
1.4 43.300

1,486.100

f40,400
28.000

920,000
1.021,700

2.0CO
518400

2.320.000
1,155.390
3.502.000
9.710.000
9 175,700

720.8i)O
137.9i)0
619.300
275.000
378.500
335,000
135,000
133 Ooo

9l3,3jo

23300
45,000
1.008.000

3,940.000

894.000

5.712.700
2.307.10C
2.733.400
3.010.500
1.752.9<X
2.338.600
8.358.300
3,041.10(
9.539,000

797,600
1,118.400
45,000
5,400

791^66

394.300
224,0()0
240.900
169,2;X)

511,100

143.200

800.500
409,000

99.5(K,
235,000

391.900
1.2i3,000
42,200
886.000

2-20.000
427,2
116.000

4.213 500

4.834.300

409,3\K)

270.000

4.393.5 )0
168.600

011.300
156.800
149.100
93.8oO

985.800
20,166.200
1.399.200

1,837,400
45,000

222.000

19

817,400

1,075.8, X)

3.610.000
5,314,1*0#
13 909.000
5.668 500

500,000

4.493,400

53.400
1,044,800

121.900

300,000

1,429,100

331.100

1.085,000
1.679.900
2,030.200

218.100

498.700
75.40J
243.5;J0

2.838.000
4.020.300
1.852.0)0
1,783,000

149.10C,
114,600
161,100
120,000

131,100

450.600
4.000

600,600

1,333,100

1,195.0oo

52 100

450,900
440.000

3.835.100!

6S3.000
906.200
2.645.390
383,8 >0
119.810
214.500
82.0.X
318 600
9 >7.500
302.50C

266,500

0.789.700
2.051.600

18 348.900
7 902.000

320.000
432.2)0
367.000

422,000
*.250.000

2.238.600
2,049.000
2.484.71X
2.139.400
2.900,000

2,899.400; 1.073.000

1.863.000
1.820.100
2,085.700
4,046 500
1,846 600f
1.599.500

1,*42,400

281.700
701,500

333.7(H)
3.192,000
277.700
278.200

475,000

14,002.000
5.505.500
1.444.100

2,851 200
2.159.400

72.000
151.800
362,000

117.5)0

7.842.000
3.274.000
5.651.9 X

795,100

1.252.300

97.000

17.9,10

1.028.200
17.193.70C

1.100

267,600

14,360.500

182,000
201,50(

198.500
231,000

360,006

5.484,900,
2.849,000|
0,094,200,
1.476.1001

131.300
109.800

1.110.500!

2,884,200
2.651.50C
3.082.000

1,000,000

Bowery National

l,9B3,7n0
4,703.800
1,093,8 X)

229,300
540,000
297.000
90,000
598,000

433,0)0
M».169
923.760

180,000
•#•••*

91.800

448,500
45,000

60.962,700 31T.53S.200 52.028.900 20,070,&00 288,41S.500 18.630300

The deviations from

returns of previous week are as follows:
Inc. |5,732,800 I Net deposits ...
Inc. 14,757,700
Dec.
5(.900 Circulation
Doe.
147,900
Dec.
363,900 1

Legal tenders

The

following

Boston
1882.
Oct. 30..
Nov. 6..
•

the totals for two weeks:

are

Loans.

1332.
S
Oct. 28,...311,355,400
Nov. 4 ...317,588,200

Specie.

L. lenders.

*

Deposits.

*

S

52,035,800 20,431,800
52,026.900 20,070,900

Banks.—Following

are

283,690,800
288,448,500

*

S

18.778,200

857,810.086

18,630,300

991,296,926

the totals of the Bo3ton banks:

Loans.
*

Specie.

146.423.300

6,2'3.300

$
3.508.700

148,848,100

6,229,500

3,861,100

L. Tenders.

t

Circulation. Aw. Clear

Deposits.* Circulation. Ago, Cleai
9*1.076.300

30.054.500

93.210,000

•

68.657.565

30,235,500

82,653.554

Including the Item “ due to other banks.”

Philadelphia Banks.—The totals of the Philadelphia banks
are as

follows:

1882
Oct. 30

Nov.

0

Unlisted

Loans.
$
75.729.024
75,195.393

L. Tenders.

Deposits.

Circulation.

S

*

10.392.627
17.597,287

03.720,743

60,340,829

Securities.—Following

are

Am.

Railw’y Imp.Co—

ex

bonds and stock..

Atchison Col. A Pac

12'a

..

18

....

Atl. A Pac.—6s, 1st
90
Incomes
Cent. Branch
85
Incomes
30
Boat. H. & E.—New st’k- 1
Old
%

25
95

l*e
1
18

B’klyn Kiev.—Scrip stk *3
1st mort
*35
Buff. N. Y. A Phila
23
Pref
48
1st mort
90
Cal.AC. C’nal A Dock.. 30
Pref
78
Chic. & Atl.—1st
100
Chic. & Can. South
3

Istmort

12

.

00*2
25

68*4

8
100

49

...

13

•

mm.

*2*2
22
96

Subs. 100 p. c

6*2
40

20

•

3
91*2

ered when issued..

52*3
•

109

20

Or.Trans-C.-Sub.40p.c 90*2

30
•

1st mort

Istmort.

105
" 4

Mexican. Nat
Prof
Istmort
Mich. AO.- Subs.30 p.c
Newb.D. A Corm.--Pf..
J. A N, Y.—Com...
Pref
1st mort

95

Oreg. Short L.—Deliv¬

.

S

N.Y.C.A St.L.—Equip.

N.Y.L.AW.—5p.c.g,atk 81

Oregon Improvem’t... 71*2

Mo.Kan.ATex.,g.m. 83
Lehigh A Wilkesb. Co

Memp.A Chari.—Com.

Bid.
No. RIv. Const.—70p.o 81
NY. W.Sh.ABuff.—St’k 23
5s ex-Jan. ’83 coup. G43#
Subs. O. A W.. 45 p.c cm*
N.Y. Sus. A West.—1st 72*3
Com. stock
5*a
Debentures
46

Pref

35

..

46,516450
61,832.953

quoted at 33 New Street:

Atl. AGt.We8t., com..

Tol. Can. So. A Dot.. 15
Den.A R.G.R’y—Cous. 88*2
Denver A Rio. Gr.West 22 *s
Istmort
GO1*
Ind. Dec. A Springf...
4
Istmort. fund
Intern at. Imn.—80 p.c 41

L. Rk. A Fort Smith*
Istmort
Massachusetts Ceut
1st mort

Agg. Clear..

9,796,750
9.775.391

Bid. Asked.

....

■

426.830

1,088,000

Continental

8pecie

518,966
2,595,067

3.068.200

Corn Exchange..

5,520,279
1,881,422
2,133,177
2,480.763
1,577,951

32,879,214
632,153

I9.4ioo

500,000
500,000

N. York County
Germ’n Amerie’n
Chase National..
Fifth Avenue...
German Kxch.
Germania
IT. S. Nat
Lincoln Nat

3,566,611

4

9^.000

St. Nicholas
Shoe A Leather..

Park
Wall St. Nation’l
North River
East River
Fourth National.
Central Nat
Second Natlon’l
Ninth National..
First National..
Third National..
N. Y. Nat. Kxch..

3l7.5aol
3.387.300

1,002,700

Market

Importers’ A Tr..

275.10C

4iSs>oa

5,701,0001

9O0.OOU

1,8)5.500

4*8.000
386.200
104.800
131.000

2,121.800

Loans and discounts

C

570.300
40,000
354.000
62.000
108.200
05(1,300
356,1(00

600.000
500,000
500,000

4.405,48*6

3,360,564
510,045

2 29,000

702.200
699.000

’.2,045.000

513,913

2,329,115
3.623,303
1.832,594
4,030.251

826,600

3,000.000

....

Total.

749,659

13,070
25,365

4,417.602 3,735,006 3c

..

1,696.511
9,125,360

4.703,000
8,5*2.300

5.351.400
6.180.006
3.885.200

500.000

Oriental
Marine

1,507,375

493.30C

3,276,300
4.221.700
1/32,300

700,000

Citizens’
Nassau

783* 6*9* i

8,263,000

2,463.5,7C
8.598.100
3.262.10c

Irving
Metropolitan

1,867,288

2.094,496
2,178.942

t

Z

1,142,870
1,814,125
191,289
5,792,3

1,589,730
63,5651 2,179,465

36.491

O.
Mexican Cent..
Do
So.Div

Elevated..

106,538
5,578,330

45,225

.

Nasiir.Ch.ASt.L

15,078
646,4 90
169,048

t

Mar.Hough.A

N. Y.

'8,296,940 ’8,097*8*37

39,055

Long Island....

Louisv.ANashv.
Louis.N.A.ACh.

337,812
13,006
127,421
69,739

34,165
39,821
00,151
31,455

L-Rk.M.Riv.AT.

Mil.L.Sli.A Wesi
Minn.A St. Louis
Mo. Kan. A Tex.
Missouri Pad tie.
Mobile A Ohio..
Metropol. Elev.

14,661
227,506
74,715
22,141
674,687
190,438

533,000
863.000

’.1,453.700

1,000,000!

Hanover

..

1.012.000
1.0L7,i<OO
0v.fl.IOO
530.000

2.H0 7.900
l,'<56.700

300,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
300,000
200,000
200,000
600,000
300,000.
800,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
422,700
1,500,000
450,000
200,000

Seventh Ward.
State of N. York.
American Kxch
Commerce

.*

9,072.000
6,767.000
6,^711,500
7.519.000

3.22S.000
6,268.800

600,OIK)

Chemical
Merch’nts’ Kxch.
Gallatin Nation’l
Butchers’ADrov
Mechanics’ A Tr
Greenwich
Leather Man’f’rs

Circula¬
tion,

other

than U. S,
*

2,000,000
2,050,000
2,000,00(1
2,000,000
1,200,000
3,000,000
1.000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

Mechanics’

..

Sept. 16

Net dep'ts

Specie.

$

*

grand
Trunk....
r.BayW.ASt.P.

Loans and
discounts.

35
5 1

Ohio C -Ex bd. A stk.
River Div. 1st mort.
Incomes
Pitts. A Western
Pensac. A Atlan.—1st.
St. Jo. A West
Kans. A Neb., 1st...*
2d mort
St. Jo. A Pacific 1st.
2(Is
St. Paul rights
Tex. ACol.Iinp.—GOp.c
Texas A St. Louis
1st mort., M.AA. div
Incomes
do
Tol. Cin. A St. Louis.I"
istmort...
Incomes

Vick. A Merid. 2d M

100
6
5
-

,

Assessment

20
76
10

15

Go
20
GO

23
6%
7
97

101

77**
17*12
9
49
10

12
55
13

65
32

Incomes.
*

.

903t
4*2
62^8
177e

paid-

THE CHRONICLE.

544

INCOME ACCOUNT.

Juucstmjcuts

1880-81.

lieceipts—
Net earnings

AND

complete exhibit of the
Funded Debt of States and Cities and of the Stocks and Bonds
of Railroads and other Companies, It is published on the last
Saturday of every ether month—viz., February, April, June,
August, October and December, and is furnished loithout extra
charge to all regular subscribers of the Chronicle. Single copies
are sold at $2 per copy,

ANNUAL

a

REPORTS.

(For the year ending Sept. 30, 1882.)
The report states that the increase of business made it imper¬
ative to largely increase the equipment, and extensive purchases

of cars and locomotives were made in addition to what could
be built in the shops. Six powerful locomotives have been
built or purchased. Twenty of the old passenger cars in use

the opening of the road in 1846, and in recent years used
chiefly for excursion business, have been sold, and in their
place twenty-two new cars of the best modern style and of

upon

large capacity have been purchased or built.

Eighty box

freight

cars and two-handled coal cars have been purchased.
The amount paid for new equipment, after deducing all sums
received for equipment sold, has been $273,659, a much larger
amount than has ever before been expended in a single year.
The whole of this has been charged to the expense and improve¬

and while the equipment account

the books

on

has not been increased the value of the locomotives and

is

cars

greater than at the beginning of the year. To provide for the
growing business of the company a further increase will be
necessary in the next year, and contracts have already been
made for new cars and engines. The cost, however, will not
probably exceed one half of that expended the nast year. The
company has now about twenty-three miles of aouble track out
of fifty miles between Boston and Fall River, and the directors
contemplate the necessity within a few years of completing the

double track for the whole distance. It can probably be done
out of income without interfering with reasonable dividends.

61,175

1,305,449
"7,498

Total income

1,308,021

Disbursements—

$

1,382^)47

Rentals paid
Interest on debt
Deficit Union Freight
Dividends

the Fall River line to New York has been prosperous during
the year, and a dividend of eight per cent on the shares of the
steamboat coinpanjq owned by this corporation, has been

received. The new' steamship Pilgrim is nearly completed, and
will be placed on the line next year. A new freight steam¬
boat has also been built, and will be ready for business by
January 1, 1883. It now seems that the investment of the

in the stock of the Steamboat Company will prove
satisfactory.
Notes havmg more than one year to run have been issued
during the year to nearly the extent authorized the last year,
and it may be necessary during the coming year for the conve¬
nient transaction of the business of the company to issue such
notes; and the directors ask for authority to issue notes or
bonds to an amount not exceeding $500,000. The attention of
company

stockholders is called to the fact that the balance of interest

paid has been reduced the past year by the sum of $41,457.
Of all the expenditures made in the past year, nothing has
been charged to construction except for the purchase of land
and for the cost of the railroad from Raynham to Taunton,
including freight yard at Taunton. These charges amount to
$287,364. The dividend was increased in July to 3^2 per cent,
which can probably be maintained in future at the same rate,
unless unforeseen accidents prevent.
Operations and income

•..

.

303
167

456

470

110
267

115
268

1,595
1,000

1,664

Locomotives

Passenger, mail and express
Freiglit cars
Coal and all other

cars

cars.

1,102

OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.

Operations—
Passengers carried
Passenger mileage
Freight (tons) moved

Freight (tons) mileage
Total gross earnings

Operating

expenses

Taxes
Total

Net

earnings.'




Ono

434,028
90.000

489,097
05,000

1,208,186

1,370,695

0,835

3,252

Balance, surplus

Boston & Providence Railroad.

the Union Freight Railway and the preferred stock of the
Providence Warren & Bristol Railroad have been credited to
interest account. The increase in expenditures has been
chiefly
due to the increase of mileage, higher taxation, renewals, re¬

pairs and additions to property. Taking advantage of the larger
receipts, many improvements heretofore delayed have been for¬
warded. Small parcels of land have been purchased in Provi¬
dence, Pawtucket, Readville, lloxbury and Boston. At Pawtucket
a freight house, greatly needed, and at Dedham a new
passen¬
ger station and locomotive house, have been finished and occu¬
pied. An iron highway bridge has been built at Canterbury
Street in Roxbury, rendered necessary by the extension of the
third track. The heavy ledge of rocks near by has been re¬
moved. Next year the third track will be completed from Mt.
Hcpe to Readville, and put in operation as soon as practicable.
All the improvements and additions to rolling stock and
prop¬
erty have been charged directly to expense account. The main
line is now entirely equipped with steel, and there are 12
miles of steel rails in the branches.
The earnings and expenses, and the

disposition of income,
together with the general balance, were as follows in 1880-81 and
1881-82

:

OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.

Total miles

operated

.

1880-81.

1881-32.

$
5,024,030
80,ls7,583
1.441,618
53,704,401

$
6,503,471

$
3,746,448

100,460,413
1,552,616
53,340,470
^

4,126,258

18SC-81.

1381-82.

68

68

•

.

Operations—
Passengers carried
Passenger mileage
Freight (tons) moved
Earnings—

.

.

3,802.405-

-42,191,736

4,128,299
46,344,791

660,290

718.000

,
$
822.752
593,956

62,605

$
910,763
605,221
68,855

1,410,313
934,273
8b.. 6,> 7

1,584,839
1,138,491
94,018

1,023.910

1,232.509
652,330

305.403
-

INCOME ACCOtTX T.

188C-S1.

IteceijUs—
Net earnings

1881-82.
$

$
395,403

.

Disbursements—
Interest on debt
Dividends
Kate of dividend

352,330
22,816
320,(00
(8)

28,712
1......

320.000

(8)

.'

Total disbursements

342,810

348,712
46,691

Balance, surplus

9,514

GENERAL BALANCE AT CLOSE OF EACH FISCAL YEAR.

'

1SS1-S2.
$

1880-81.
A ssets—

$

.

Railroad, buildings, equipment, &c
Real estate
Stocks owned, cost....
Bills and accounts receivable
Materials fuel, &c
*
Cash and cash funds
Total
Liabilities—

Stock,

common
Bonds and notes (see Bci element)
All other dues and accounts
Dividends
Profit and loss

Total liabilities

4,698,174

4,608,174
108,000

198,000

231,260

231,269

143,136
144,843

250,863

111,463

129,513
36,305

5,526,834

5,544,154

4,000,000

4,000.000

164,484
430,552

860,000
80,982
163,106
410,066

5,520,384

5,544,154

800,000
71,848

New Haven & Derby.
(For the year ended Sept. 30, 1852.)

1881-82.

301
155

Total operated

345,208

627

Total disbursements

EQUIPMENT.

1880-81.

Miles owned
Miles leased and controlled

$

419,588

370,341

Railroad.

Improvement account

:

ROAD AND

‘

403,100

During the year a lease for ninety-nine years has been taken Passenger
of the Fall River Railroad, between Fall River and New Bed¬ Freight...ford, under the provisions of chapter 62 of the acts of 1882. Mail, express, &c
The Boston Clinton Fitchburg & New Bedford Railroad has
Total gross earnings
exercised its option to share in this lease. The rental is to be Operating expenses
thirty per cent of the gross earnings. Nearly all the steck and Taxes
a major part of the bonds of the Fall River Railroad
Company
Total
are held by or in the interest of this
company. The business of Net earnings

for two years were as follows

$

„

(For the year ending Sept, 30,18S2.)
The report for the late fiscal year has just been made, and it
states that two dividends of 4 per cent each, clear of taxes, have
been earned and declared. The dividends on investments in

Old Colony Railroad.

ment accounts,

1S81-82.

$
1,216,846

Interest and dividends

STATE, CITY AND CORPORATION FINANCES.
The Investors’ Supplement contains

LVol. xxxv,

From the report

just issued w’e extract the following:
earnings and expenses.

Earnings—

1882.

18S1.
$58,931
e 3,457
5,176

Passengers

Freight../.
Mails, express, &c
Total earnings
Opcrating Expeuse*—
Maintenance of roadway
Maintenance of ro ling sloes

$70,277
j.

0,349

5,775

$147,564

$160,402

$ 12,277
1 6,0 l 4

$23,178
*>0

3 1,326

5,746

38,490
5,772

Total operating expenses

$: 0,296
$48,267

$78,389

.

Income above operating expenses

made iron1

Some of the leading expenditures which have been
this excess of income were: For taxes, $3,989 ; ior

2,301,443
108,154

2,630 " 2

2,400,602
1,24,846

2,820 809

$23,325 ; for embankments, bridges and building, $13,y-- 5
steel rails, $11,060; for new cars, $5,399 ; for machinery

1,305,140

shops, $6,237

140 737

572

Wages, salaries, &e.
Rents, damages and Sundries

;

makiDg

a

total of $63,324 of income

hjteres^

thus

t0

tfOVBMBER
j

,1

THE CHRONICLE.

It, 1882.]

During the year

197.749 passengers

were

carried,

against* 157,783 in 1881, and 127,192 tons of freight, against

^Irfaddition to

the improvements, the property of the road
has been kept in irood repair and is believed to be in as service¬
able condition as at any previous time.
It is the policy of the
directors to continue the improvements now being prosecuted,
as

rapidly as the income

of the road will permit."

CONDENSED It A LANCE

to Mr. Kneeland were deprived of voting
power. What
the result of the change of control is not yet known.
—On November 6 an injunction suit
in

was’begun

will be

the Supreme

Court in which the Manhattan Company appears as the plain¬
tiff and the Metropolitan Company and the New York
Company
are the defendants.
The tripartite agreement of 1880 provided
for the payment by the Manhattan
Company of 10 per cent
dividends on the stock of the Metropolitan and New York Com¬

panies.

SHEET SEPT. oO, 1S8:

545

Under the agreement mad

*

in October, 1881, this

was

reduced to 6 per cent. A temporary injunction was granted by
Justice Donohue, restraining the defendant companies from

issuing certificates of their stock having thereon a memorandum
providing for the payment of interest or dividends at the rate
of 10 per cent per annum on the capital stock of the companies.
$1,150,953
$1,150,958
—The General Term of the Superior Court has handed down
a decision in
the Caro suit against the Metropolitan Elevated
Railway
Company
to restrain it from maintaining or operating
general investment news.
its road in front of his premises. The Court holdsffhat the
ap¬
plication made in behalf of the company to resettle the judg¬
Denver & Rio Ora tide.—The following exhibit for ten ment of the General Term
must be denied.
The company de¬
months has been issued by the company:
murred to Mr. Caro’s complaint, and the General Term over¬
Tlit* "ro.s.s earnings of the Denver & Rio Grande Railway for
ruled the demurrer.
Mr. Caro’s attorney then entered a judg¬
the teii months from January 1 to October SI, 1882, are.. $5,400,151
ment based upon the opinion of the Court,
according to which
The operating expenses for same period (October being esti¬
mated) are
3,209,114 the company was absolutely enjoined forever from running its
earnings for ten months
earnings same period of 1881 of $4,990,500
Expenses same period of 1881 of
2,840,800
Net

a

$2,257,037

injunction absolutely, but only in the alternative

o-.iji.ot irross

Net

earnings same period of 1881 of
for ten mouths in 1882 of..-

The

101,270

proportion of charges against income for ten

months of 1SS2 is as follows :
Interest on bonds

January. There remains subject to call 65

225,102
175,000

34,525—

Sinking fund
Profit for ten months

1,503,098
$093,339

The months of November and December are good traffic
months in Colorado, and may be expected to add largely to the
above net earnings and profit.

Dorclies'er & Delaware.—Under

the injunc¬

Mexican Central.—The two last bonds on the second block
of Mexican Central will not be issued until soon after the 1st of

$1,129,070

equipment trusts
Taxe&and insurance
Interest on

;

tion to take effect if the company did not indemnify Mr. Caro
for the damages sustained by him. They applied, therefore,
to have the judgment entered by Mr. Caro vacated or resettled.
The Court holds that it has no power to grant the application.

$2,155,700

Being a gain

trains in front of Mr. Caro’s house. The counsel for the com¬
pany declared that the General Term had no power to grant an

decree of the Circuit
Court for Dorchester County, Maryland, this road will be sold
the 28th day of November, 1882, at public auction. The road
a

Cambridge to the Delaware line, 27 miles, where
by branch road (6 miles) with the Delaware lload at
Seaford, Delaware.

extends from
it connects

Louisville New Albany &

Chicago.—.Below are given the
gross and net earnings of this railway company for the months
of August, September and October, *1882, compared with the

per ^ent of the third
block, which, in connection with the funds now in hand, will
supply the management with funds until another block is put
out, now a question of a few -weeks. When the bonds belong¬
ing to the three now- subscribed for are issued, there will be
from #21,000,000 to £22,000,000 of the 7’s upon the market.—

Boston Advertiser.

Mutual Union Telegraph.—In the New York Superior Court,
Wm. H. Cameron, as plaintiff (supposed to represent the Gould

interest), has begun a suit, on the equity side, against John G.
Moore, Thomas C. Purdy, George F. Baker, George William
Ballou, Charles F. Peck. H.C. Fahnestock and other individuals,
and the Mutual Union Telegraph company, as defendants. The
complaint sets forth that the plaintiff brings the action on his
own behalf and on behalf of all others in like
situation share¬
holders of the Mutual Union Telegraph company; that he

seventy-five shares of Mutual Union Telegraph stock ; that
the Mutual Union Telegraph Company
same months of 1881 :
wras £600,000, divided into 6,000 shares of £100 each, and ihafc
1882.
1881.
Inc. ’82.
Total gross earnings for three months.. $442,480
$295,57(5 $140,90 4 the certificate providing for the increase of the capital of said
Net earnings for three months
182,109
104,082
78,080 company to £10,000,000, divided into 100,000 shares of £100 each,
Manhattan Elevated.—The following named gentlemen were wras not tiled, as by statute required, until on or about the 16th
elected directors of the Manhattan Elevated Railway Company: day of February, 1882.
And the allegations are made, in sub¬
Messrs. Jay Crould, Cyrus W. Field, Russell Sage, R. M. Galla- stance, that the agreement for construction and extension of
lines made with John G. Moore & Co. were modified, to the
way, Edward M. Field, George J. Gould, Sidney Dillon, Samuel
Sloan, Jose F. Navarro, W. E Connor, George S. Scott, John H. great detriment of the company. “ Wherefore the plaintiff de¬
Ilalland H. F. Dimock. Inspectors of election: G. P. Morosini, mands that the said modifications be decreed to be null and void
and a fraud upon the rights of the corporation of this plaintiff
J. J. Slocum and P. P. Harris.
and of shareholders and of the rights of creditors. That .said
Memphis & Little Rock.—A dispatch to the Globe- defendants pay over to the telegraph company the amount of
Democrat from Little Rock, Ark., Nov. 4, said that the case of the
of said firm in the performance of said contract.
R. K, Dow, Matthews and Moran against the Memphis & Little Thatprofits
the said firm be required to perform every of the obliga¬
Rock Railroad Company, as reorganized, was that day sub¬ tions of said firm not
yet performed under the said contract.
mitted to Judge II. C. Caldwell in the United States Court. It That the said
firm, as the first takers of capital shares of the
will be remembered that iu March last the State recovered a
said telegraph company, be required to account with and to the
judgment against the company, and the railway was advertised said the Mutual Union Telegraph Company for and as to the
for .‘■ale. Before the
day of sale Dan Matthews and Moran, as actual values by them paid for or upon account of such shares.
trustees of a mortgage executed by the present Memphis & And that the Mutual Union
Telegraph Company be decreed to
Little Rock Railroad Company on May 2, 1877, paid the amount,
do whatsoever aud to take such action and institute such pro¬
it being over £233,000, into the State.
Treasury. Afterward ceedings whatsoever as shall
requisite or proper to ascertain
these gentlemen, by tlieir counsel, filed a bill in the Federal the rights and enforce the be
remedies in the premises of the
Court against the railroad company, praying to have judgment
plaintiff, and of all others for whose benefit this action is
against the company for the sum so paid, and to have the road
brought.”
sold subject to the lien of their mortgage. The
company, by
Now York Central & Hudson.—In the great suit
against
counsel, answered, claiming that the mortgage and bonds were
this company by the U. S. Government, through J. M. Bailey,
void; that consequently the plaintiffs had no interest in the
to recover the tax on the famous scrip dividend of
property and no right to pay the debt. The company also filed Collector,
Dec. J9, 1868, the U. S. Supreme Court has just rendered a
across bill making
the same allegations, and praying that the decision in favor of the
company. To a World reporter Mr.
mortgage and bonds be canceled. Judge Caldwell’s decision Wm. M
Evarts, of the firm of Evarts Southmayd & Choate,
will be looked for with interest.

Metropolitan Elevated.—At the annual meeting for the
election of directors, Mr. Sage voted only 600 shares, Mr. Cyrus
W. Field only 100, Mr. Gould for himself
only 100, and for the
Manhattan Elevated 3,200 shares. The total vote of the Gould
party was 5,246 shares and of the Kneeland party 27,174

shares, although the latter

appear

to

own

52,000 shares.

The

following are the directors elected : Joseph S. Stout, Jacob
Berry, Elijah Smith, Thomas T. Buckley, Rufus H. Gilbert,
Sidney Shepard, Joseph N. Burnham, Morillo H. Gillett, Charles

Duggin, Sylvester H..Kneeland and Benjamin W. Gillett. At a
meting of the new board Mr. Kneeland was elected President
and Morillo H. Gillett Vice-President.
John.E. Body continues
as

Secretary and Treasurer. None of the stock converted into
Manhattan second preferred could be voted on, but in addition
amount of stock was disfranchised, on account
°tpj{jlsalarge
the
inability of the owners to transfer it on the books of the

company recently.




In this

way

nearly 10,030 shares belonging

owns

the original capital of

counsel for the railroad company, related the history of the
suit as follows: “This is an intricate and interesting case, but
I can give you the points in a few words, though Mr. Choate
had the case in charge. The United States Government levied
its internal revenue taxes under the act of 1864 on the scrip
issued by the New York Central Railroad several years ago, and
which doubled the capital stock of the company. The Govern¬
ment levied this tax as if the scrip was a dividend on the profits
of the railroad.
Suit was brought, and on trial in the

Appeal

was

United

taxable.
taken of the United States Supreme Court, which

States Circuit Court it

was

held that the scrip was not

reversed the decision and held that it was taxable, bat sent the
case back for retrial.
Mr. Choate then appeared and on ;trial
of the case in the Northern District he showed that a great

part at least of this scrip did not represent

ments of the funds of the company.

pany

profits, but invest¬

On this trial the com¬

recovered $498,432 68 of the accumulated taxes. The
appealed to the Supreme Court. At the heari g

United States

CHRONICLE.

THE

546

there the Attorney-General appeared for the Government and
Mr. Choate for the company. Judgment was rendered sustain¬

[Vol. XXXV.

io giving the opinion
statement of the facts:

man

of the Court makes the following

This action is brought by the plaintiff as a stockholder of the
ing the decision of the lower court. This about covers the his¬ Western
Union Telegraph Company against the said company
tory of the.suit. The principle involved in the case was that its directors and the Union Trust Company, to obtain an adjudi¬
stated by Mr. Choate, that the taxes to the amount of the judg¬ cation determining that a certain agreement* made by the West¬
ment were levied on actual property and not on profits or ern Union Telearaph Company with the American Union and the
dividends.” The decision in the Supreme Court was rendered Atlantic & Pacific telegiaph companies is void, and for relief not only
against the agreement and its execution as being beyond the powers of
the telegraph companies, but to the extent of reaching the personal
by Judge Matthews. Justice HaiJan dissented.
liability of the directors of the Western Union Telegraph Company
New York Chicago & St. Louis.—This company (the Nickle The Union Trust Company was made a party defendant because it had
Plate) has about completed arrangements for terminal facilities been selected as a trustee for carrying out tlie agreement. The agree¬
at Buffalo by connecting with the Lake Shore Railroad. The ment is dated January 19, 1881, and it provides for the purchase by the
Western Union Telegraph Company of the property, lights and fran¬
large switch, about half a mile in length, extending from Big chises (except the franchise to be a corporation) of the American and
Tree .station to the Lake Shore tracks, is nearly completed, and Atlantic &
Pacific
companies
at
the price of $15,000,000
the Nickle Plate trains will run into and from the Lake Shore for the property, Ac., of the American Union and $8,400,000

Kailroad Construction (New).—The
the completion of track on new railroads

latest information of
is as follows :

Atchison Top. A Santa Fe.—'The San Fedro Branch is completed from
Ban Antonio, N. M., cast to Carthage, 0 miles.
Chicago & Atlantic.—Track laid between Lima, O., and Huntington,

Ind., 37 miles, and between North Judson, Ind., and Rochester, 23
miles.

Corning Cowanesqne A Antrim.—The Cowanesque Valley Branch is
extended from Elkluud, Pa., west to Knoxville, 7 miles.
Indiana Illinois A Iowa.—Extended from Momence, Ill., east 5 miles.
Jacksonville St. Augustine A Halifax.—Track laid from the St. Johns
River, opposite Jacksonville, Fla., south by eaBt G miles. Gauge 3 feet.
Kansas City Springfield & Memphis.—Extended from Loveland, Mo.,
cast by south to Norwood. 16 miles.
Marquette Houghton & Ontonagon.—Branches have been completed
to Wet more Mine. Mich., 1 mile; to Beaufort Mine, 2]4 miles, and to
Eric Mine, 54* miles.
Norfolk A Western.—The New River Division is extended northwest
to Glenlyn, Va., 20 miles.
Northern Pacific.—Extended from Park

City, Mon., west to Merrill,23

Sheldon, 40 miles.

Pittsburg A Western.— Extended from Chcwton, Fa., nort h to New
Castle, 10 miles. On the Parker Division (gauge, 3 ft.) extensions have
been completed from Parker north to Foxburg, 4 miles, and from Bald¬
ridge south to Gallery Junction, 7 miles.
St. Louis A San Francisco.—I he> Arkansas Division is

Mountaiuluirg, Arlt., south to Van Buren, 21 miles.

extended from

The Springfield
Ozark, Mo.,

Southern Branch is extended from the James River south to
10 miles.

Trinity & Sabine.—Extended from Moscow, Tex., east 5 miles.
Union Pacific.—Track on the Oregon Short Line is extended westward
to Pontneuf, Idaho, 55 miles; also from American Falls westward 16
miles. Ihe Greeley Salt Lake & Pacific Branch is completed from Gree¬
ley, Col., west to Stout, 30 miles.
This is a total of 419 miles of new railroad, making 8,731 miles thus
far this year, against 6,003 miles reported at the corresponding time
4,946 miles in 1880. 2,987 miles in 1879, 1.717 miles in 1878,
1,867 miles in 1877, 1,931 miles m 1876. 1,128 miles in 1875, 1,594 miles
in 1874* 3,283 miles in 1873 and 6,106 miles in 1872.—Kailroad.
in 1881,

Oazctlt

Rochester & Pitlsbnrg.—At the meeting of stockholders of
the Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad Company, the President
submitted his report for the fiscal year ending September 30,

showing that the earniDgs were $305,988; expenses, $204,408 ;
net earniDgs, $101,580.
Interest charges, including September,
on first mortgage bonds, $78,000 ; on car trust bonds, $12,504 ;
total interest charges, $90,504. On the main line $130,810 were
spent in improvements and $144,405 in the purchase of rolling
stock. The lease of the following roads was approved : Brockwaysville & Punxutawney Railroad,
Perry
Railroad
and
Rochester & Ontario line.
Also the
exchange of
$4,000,000 of Rochester & Pittsburg stock for $4,000,000 stock
of the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company. The fol¬
lowing directors were elected ; Augustus Kountze, Frederick
D. Tappan, Andrew Pierce, F. O. French, Henry K. Southwick,
Walston H. Brown, A. L. Hopkins, Fred, A. Brown, James Gal¬
lery, Henry Day, Frank R. Lawrence, Wheeler II. Peekliam,
William M. Shaffner.

Union Pacific.—At the time of

the

organization of the
Union Pacific Railway Ccmpany, in January, 1880 (the consoli¬
dated company), the names of but 1,126 stockholders appeared
upon the books of the company. To-day there are 3,454 stock¬
holders. The following table, showing the number of stock¬
holders each year since the consolidation and at the present
time, is interesting:
Boslcn
Stockholders.

New York
Stockholders.

Total.

506
847
1.358

620
1,085

1,325

1,932
2,683

1,927

1,527

3,4'.4

1,126
'

This shows not

only a considerable increase in investment
holdings, but that this year, for the first time since the consoli¬
dation, Boston stockholders outnumber those of New York.—
JBoston Advertiser.

Western Union

Telegraph.—The General Term of the
Superior Court of New York City has rendered decisions in the

two suits of William S. Williams and Rufus Hatch agaiDst the
Western Union Telegraph Company and others, which came up

appeal from judgments of Judge Truax, dismissing the com¬
plaint in each case. The suits were brought by the"plaintiffs,
as Western Union stockholders, to
prevent the consummation of
the famous consolidation agreement between the Western
Union, American Union and Atlantic & Pacific telegraph com¬
panies, to have the same declared invalid, and also to invalidate
the issue of $15,526,590 of Western Union stock issued as a
dividend. In the Williams suit two opinions are written, the
opinion of the Court being by Judge Freedman. Judge Arnoux
■writes a concurring opinion, and Judge Russell also concurs in
the result in both cases. The Court reverses the judgments of
•Judge Truax and orders new trials in both suits. Judge Freed¬




be advised to cause its capital stock to
to its present outstanding stock of
$38,926,590, represented by shares of $100 each, and shall issue and
deliver the same to the said Union Trust Company for distribution as
follows: $15,526,590 to holders of its present shares, the same being to
represent its investment of earnings in the purchase, construction and
equipment of additional lines, wires and general plant since the 1st day
of July, 1866, and the lemainingsumof $23,400,000 for the acquisition
of new lines, property and connections in the manner above provided.
take such proceedings as it may
be increased by an addition

In addition to
the new stock above provided to be delivered to
Western Union Company shareholders, the amount of $58,850 50, par¬
cel of the present capital stock of said company, owned by it and now
in its treasury, shall bo distributed in like manlier to its shareholders.”

As to the power to declare stock dividends by this
corporations, the opinion says :

or

other

,

miles, and 30 miles beyond. The Fergus Falls branch is extended from
Fergus Falls, Minn., west to Breckenridge, 27 miles. The Fargo A
Southwestern Branch is completed from Fargo, Dak., west by south to

on

the property, Ac.,
of the Atlantic A Pacific Telegraph
Company, payable in the capital stock of the Western Union com¬
As no stock of that company was on hand to make payment
pany.
with, it was provided in the agreement that the capital stock should lie
increased as follows, viz.: The Western Union Telegraph Company shall
for

depot Nov. 11.

January, 18S0
January 1, 1881
January 1, 1882
October 1,1S82

“

“Ordinarily tlie law requires that additional stock to bo issued by a
corporation shall be paid for. This power of disposition the directors
*
to use in trust.
*
*
“The terms.of the agreement of
contemplate, nor was provision
are

January 19, 1881, do not provide or
made in any other way, that the dis¬
shares among the company’s own shareholders

tribution of the new
should be. made upon equivalent value being returned or promised to be
returned by the shareholders, nor, indeed, upon any new value to the
company. The agreement is sought to
the shares to be distributed represent

be upheld upon the theory that
the company’s, investments of
earnings in the purchase, construction and equipment of additional
lines, wires and general plant since the 1st of July, 1866, and that as
these earnings are or were due to, or should have been divided among,
the shareholders, an acceptance of a stock that represents them will be
a release by the shareholders of the earnings, and is the; same in effect
as if there had been a severance of the earnings from the other property
of the corporation and a delivery of tlie shareholders and a return to the
company in the shape of capital. This theory would, upon the facts of this
case, be open to no objection.so long as the scheme involved in ithus the
requisite sanction of a certain proportion of shareholders if there were no
statutory obstacle to it.
But in its advocacy the /respondents are con¬
fronted with the following statute : “It shall not he lawful for the direc¬
tors or managers of any incorporated company in this State to make
dividends excepting frqpi the surplus profits arising from the business of
such corporation; and it shall not be lawful for the directors of any such
company to divide, withdraw or in any way pay to the shareholders, or
any of them, any part of the capital stock of such company, or to reduce
the said capital stock without the consent of the Legislature.”
“It seems too clear for argument that in the face of 11»at statute the
issue of the stock to the shareholders of the Western Union Company
cannot be upheld as a dividend from surplus profits, because the profits
were no longer on hand.
They were converted into oilier property.
Even if such other property remained and still is of equal value it never¬
theless took the place of profits. It became capital.'

are as follows :
the Western Union Company' to create and issue, under
the provisions of chapter 566 of the laws of 1870, to the American
Union ami Atlantic A Pacific companies stock in payment for their
lines, cannot be well disputed. But that does not touch tbe question
whether the agreement of .Tan. 19, 1881. as a whole, and when all the
objects and purposes to be accomplished by it are considered, is not in
other essential particulars in excess of the authority conferred by the
..statute, nor the question coucerning the legality or illegality of the
proposed division of shares among the shareholders of the Western
UnionCompany.” * * * V “ Consequently, when the Western Union
Company attempted to distribute ihat part of its capital stock amoDg
its own stockholders, without any new consideration, the attempt
The

“

general conclusions of the court

The power of

involved a division, withdrawal, and payment of part of the capital
st ick without the consent of the Legislature, and within the prohibition
*
*
of the statute.”
*
*
From the foregoing it will he seen that, notwithstanding the most
liberal interpretation of the facts, and the most liberal construction of
the statutes in relation to the incorporation and regulation of telegraph
“

companies, and the many assumptions made in favor of the Western
Union Company', and the most rigid restriction of the standing of utc
plaintiff in court, enough is left of plaintiff’s case to call for the interpo¬
sition of the court on grounds affecting public interests.” * *. *maintiff has demonstrated that the proposed gratuitous division oi
$15,526,590 of stock among the shareholders of the Western Union Com¬
pany is wholly illegal. No action on the part ot directors or stockholders
or both combined, could overcome this difficulty, and as the illegality
complained of entered into and permeatedthe agreement of January
1881—inasmuch as by its terms the capital stock of the Western Union
Company was to be first diluted to the extent of the proposed gratuitous
issue, and payment for the properly rights and franchises of the veiiUtH
companies to be made in the stock thus depreciated—the agreement
itself cannot be sustained. The action was properly brought by tne
plaintiff as a shareholder in the Western Union Company', on beliau jn
himself and till other shareholders of that
situated,
aud
though
iu
the
matters

company

similar'}

complained of j*insignificant minority, no

may represent only a
comparatively
has
nevertheless a sufficient interest' and
standing to
it is the duty of the court, for reasons affecting public interests,
tertain his complaint, and upon the proofs given iu support

to en¬
thcreoi i

grant appropriate relief.

The dismissal of the

complaint, thercion,

least entitled to a
adjudication declaring the illegality'of the agreement of Januai w* •
18sl, and enjoining the distribution of the $15,526,590 of stock, no
much further relief should have been granted, if any, especially' in ^ a
of the far-reaching provi-ious of the statute that has been violated, n
not necessary to express an opinion upon.
That is a quest ton W"
may be best left to be determined on a new trial. Of course, the m
that at the time of the commencement of the action tlie agreement *
been partially executed, and that since the erroneous dismissal or
r
couip'aint it may' have been wholly executed so far as lay iu the pu
constituted

error.

As tne case stood, plaintiff was at

of the directors and shareholders of the

Western Union

Company. ‘

not affect the legal questions involved, though it may have an
bearing upon the nature of the relief to be grauted.
should bo reversed ami a new trial ordered, w ith costs to the
to abide the event.”

h111,, N,t
^'iViTdlan*
appt

November

THE

11, 1888.1

CHRONICLE.

547
COTTON.

g\xc (Commercial jinxes.
~

Commercial

Friday, P. M., November 10, 1882.

epitome.

Friday Night, Nov. 10, 1882.
There has

been another severe twinge in the money market,

the Treasury at Washington to
Leading staples of agriculture
have farther declined, and the disposition to meet the export
demand seems to increase. The general elections this week have
resulted in the success of the opposition to the present Admin¬
which caused the Secretary of
take measures for its relief.

House of Representatives for the Congress which
meets in December, 1883, will have a large Democratic majority,
supposed to be pledged to the reduction of import duties and
the abolition of internal imposts.
The speculation in provisions has been fairly liberal, and in
sympathy with the rise in corn prices have been advanced,
particularly for lard. To-day pork was sold on the spot at
$22 25 for mess; the options were neglected and entirely nomi¬
nal. Lard opened firm, but a realizing movement brought
about a slight weakness at the close; Western contract sold on
the spot at 12,40@12,65c. and to arrive at 1210c.; refined for

The Movement of the Crop, as indicated by our telegrams
from the South to-night, is given below. For the week ending
this evening (Nov. 10) the total receipts have reached 262,251

bales, against 256,623 bales last week, 241,738 bales the previous
week and 242,329 bales three weeks since; making the total
receipts since the 1st of September, 1882,1,685,917 bales, against
1,657,366 bales for the same period of 1881, showing an increase
since September 1,1882, of 28,551 bales.
Receipts at—
Galveston

istration. The

South American 12 75c.; Western for
future delivery sold at 12@12 05c. for November, ll*27^@11.35c.
for December and year, lV22^£@ll’32?£c. for January, 11*30@
1135c. for February, ll*30@ll*37^c. for March and 11*3726®
ll'42^c. for May; the feeling at the close was weaker. Bacon quiet
at 12/4@12?2C. for long clear.
Beef hams dull at $17 50@$18.
Beef steady at $2S@$30 for city extra India mess. Butter was
steady for fine grades. Cheese firm at 72£@12%c. for State
and 5@12/£c. for Ohio factory. Tallow quiet at 8 5-16@8%c,
Uterine dull at 12^@12%c. for Western and 12%@13c. for city
prime.
Rio coffee has been dull on the spot at a decline to 8\i@
for fair cargoes, while there has again been a large busi¬
ness in options, though at steadily falling prices;
to-day there
were sales of 4,750 bags at 5’85@5‘90c. for November and De¬
cember, 5’90@5*95e. for March and 5 95c. for April, with fair
grade for March 7'90c.; mild grades have been very quiet as
a rule, and the supply being very large some
depression has at
the Continent 1210c.;

times been noticeable; a fair business has been done in Mara¬
caibo and washed 4Caraceas, but aside from this very little.
Rice has been quiet but firm. New Orleans molasses has been
more ative at a decline to GOc. as the outside
price; foreign has
been dull and nominal. Foreign dried fruits have been rather
quiet and raisins have declined. Spices have been dull and

unchanged. Raw sugar has been dull and nearly nominal at
7^c. for fair refining.
277ids.

Receipts since Nov. 1

Sales since Nov. 1
Stock Nov. 8,1882
Stock Nov. 9, 1881

Boxes.

4,718
5.897
32,448

75
8,034

51,536

6 814

Baqs.
3,005

Mclado.

Refined sugar has sold fairly of late at some decline; crushed
closed at OS/sc., powdered at 9M@9^c., granulated at
9#9^c.
and standard soft white “A”
8^@8%c.

Kentucky tobacco has been

New Orleans...

m

•

Tues.

••

Wed.

2,911

....

Thurs.

4,437

....

m

11,018 14,262 15,322

m

3,999

Fri.

Total.

4,939

32,123

482

482

9,510 11.511
1,029
2,426

69,817
14,235

7,428

m ,

....

2,215

3,291

3,918

8,164
1,353

6,441

7,950

5,836

6,405

Mobile

Florida
8avannah

Brunsw’k, &c.
Charleston

....

5,204

Pt. Royal, &e.
Wilmington
Moreli’d C.,<fcc

1,066

Norfolk

6,408

•

City Point,&c.

....

•

•

•

.

.

.

.

1,417

•

....

4,013
.

5,429

...

1,106

....

295

295

7,079

384

384

7,827

43,618
14,113
3,413
5,095

....

....

....

14,113

315

COl

965

621

885

713

1,080

C85

779

868

....

....

-

•

....

....

80

Pliiladelp’a, Ac.

.

482

.

.

7,172

7,414

.

1,02 4

....

....

27,380

532

20

-

....

Totals this week

.

1,576

....

•

....

5,544

....

1,332

469

40,407

7,843

•

Baltimore

•

....

3,730

4G9

6,297

6,921

New York

Boston

•

....

3,460

....

....

910

1,189

'548

1,189
2,152

9

38,904 49,216 42,475 37.582 36,297 57,777 262,251

For comparison, we give the following table showing the week’s

total receipts, the total since Sept.l, 1S82, and the stocks to-night,
and the same items for the corresponding periods of last year:
1881;

1882.

Receipts to
Nod. 10.
Galveston

Since Sep.

This

Since Sef).

Week.

1, 1882.

Week.

1,1881.

32,123
482

New Orleans...

69,817

Mobile

14,235

Florida

469

Savannah

40,407

Brunsw’k, &e

259,957
8,861

19,605

180,212

CO 3

7.209

336,670
116,987
2,295
329,594

64,324
13,181
37,401

407,090
90,462
2,777
312,326

3,337

209

3.937

227,647
11,107
53,267
4,857
209,196
70,904
10,286

785

Charleston
Pt. Royal, &c.

27,380

219,262

29,607

295

591

Wilmington....

7,070

M’head C., &c
Norfolk

3,899
46,258
3,219

43,018

City Point, «fei

14,113

New York

331

Baltimore

3,413
5,095
1,189

Pliiladelp’a,&c.

2,152

Boston

Slock.

This

Indianola,&c.

Total

52

Mon.

5,670 10,117

Indianola, &c.

1,330

400,624
377,525

Sat.

8,681
860

231,022
70,282
10,550

30,080

28,OCT

7,802
1,562
3,010

11,999

2,387

1882.

1831.

76,010

85,930

131,329 225,572
14,734 27,281

112,340

90,155

90,026 108,991
471

415

15,361

19,796

63,752

45,389

•

•

•

.

.

12,461

51,180 133,562
1,435
3,420
8,397 22,234
25,993 14,294

262.251 1.035,917 23.3.3-0 1,6 57.366

6 41,031 777,039

2.313
1 2,S54

43.352

10,226

In order that comparison
may be made with other years,
give below the totals at leading ports tor six seasons:

Receij)ts at—
Galvest’n,«fec.

1882.

1881.

32,605

20,203

1380.

1879.

22,374

1878.

21,113

21,639

we

1877.

20,654

69,847
48,683
61,324
61,272
active; sales for the week New Orleans.
33,871
56,307
200 hhds. for export and 100 hhds. for
14,235
13,181
17,216
11,459
19,723
consumption—total, 300 Mobile
15,374
hhds. Prices are firm ; lugs 6@7c. and leaf 7/4@12c. Seed Savannah....
37,401
40,407
35,814
42,532
26,379
31,793
leaf. remains comparatively quiet. Sales for the week are Charl’st’n,<fec 27,675 30,201 26,190 18,229 22,468 21,591
1,715 cases, as follows : 150 cases 1881 crop
7,463
9,5 41
8,lS6
5,991
Pennsylvania private Wilm’gt’n, &c
8,959
7,620
terms ; 300 cases 1880 crop do. 9@14c.; 450 cases 1881
Norfolk, &c..
57,731
42,793
42,679
46,757
crop New
22,444
31,503
England 12@30c.; 100 cases 1881 crop State private terms ; 560 All others.... 12,318 15,735 14,2 46 12,863 15,471
6,628
cases 1881
crop Ohio 3%@Qc.; 55 cases 1881 crop do. Little
Tot.
this
w’k.
262,251 233,320 215,842 220,21G 176,004 194,571
Dutch private terms ; and 100 cases 1881 crop Wisconsin Havana
seed 10c. Also, 350 bales Havana at
Since
8Sc.@$l 20.
Sept. 1. 1685,917 1657,366 1857.906 1667,438 1364,233 1125,721
Naval stores have been quiet; rosins rule
Galveston includes Indiauoia; Charleston includes Port
irregular
iu price
Royal, Ac.
and spirits turpentine has declined to
53/£c. in yard, in sym¬ Wilmington includes Morehead City, Ac.; Norfolk includes City. Point, <&o
pathy with Wilmington advices; common to good strained rosin
The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total
Tooted 8;4@9c. for export as to test; crude certificates have of 154,887 balas, of which
85,416 were to Great Britain, 15,622 to
had an active
speculation and
to-day fully 25,000,000 France and 53,843 to the rest of the Continent, while the stocks
bbls. were sold here,
opening at $1 33, dropping to $1 25, as made up this evening are now 644,034 bales. Below are the
recovering to $1 29 and closing at $1 24%. Hops exports for the week and since September 1, 1882.
very strong but more quiet, owing to the reserved offerings and
Week Ending Nov. 10.
From Sept. 1.18S2, tc Nov. 10,1882.
quieter advices from London; new State quoted here at $1 05
Exported to—
Exported to—
@^115, although sales of a speculative nature have been made
Exports
*n the
Great
Total
Conti¬
Great
Conti¬
country at $1 25@$1 30. Ingot copper steady with 200,from—
Total.
000 lbs. Lake sold at
Brit’n. France nent.
Week. Britain. France
nent.
18018
Ocean freight room has been
5.117
) ,025 12,394
5,031
04,110 15,48 ■
20,195 105,800
moderately active; at least, so Galveston
more

^asJ'ke °^erinGs of

tonnage would permit. Rates are firm
aud the general
position is quite satisfactory. To-day grain
was taken to
Liverpool by steam at 5d. and from Baltimore for

iJecember 7/£d. and for

January at 8c.; cotton hence
2s. 6d. per bbl. and 15s. per ton; bacon 25@30s.;

^Od.;
llour
cheese 35@40s

grain to London by steam, 7d.; do.
by
steam
7j4@7/£d.;
do.
to
Plymouth
hy steam, 7}£d.; do. to
Antwerp
by
steam,
7d.;
do. to
Havre by steam, 13c.; do.
by
sail
to
Cork
for
orders
(December),
hs. 3d.
per qr. and reported 5s. 7^d. prompt; refined petro¬
leum to
Rotterdam, 3s. 7/£d.; do. in cases to the Levant, 24%e.;
Go. in bbls.
from Philadelphia to Plymouth, 3s. 7/£d.; residuum
thence to
Marseilles, 3s, 9d.; crude oil thence to Cette or Mar¬
seilles, 3s. 7^d.
to

Cardiff




;

New Orleans..

26,583

0,471

17,970

52,721

111,829

2,r.o

13,441

15,891
11,012

26,539

50,877

02,072

231,37 5

10.178, 11,618
6,595

52,530
27,533

74,326
00,007
9.084

150,331

10,019

50,659

35,949
40,40e
19,215

300

17,033

217,008
35,949
57,739

Mobile

Florid?.
Savannah

,

....

Charleston *...

2.710

WilminRton..

l, <331
17,697

Norfolkt
New Yor*
Boston

...

Baltimore

?hiladelp’a,&c
Total
Total 1831..
*

19,037
4.213

8,932

1,030

5,020
J ,500
83,413

U,S:0

1,*'34
17,89:
31,9 37
4,218
5,020

1,500s
13,022

53.849 154,887

"50 531 "12,338| To 315 104.2041

Includes exports from Port Royal, &«.
+ Includes exports from West Point, &c.

3,934
70,950

7*3,930

750

19,905

539,567 100,927

237,372

883,863

~78*.9.J8

182.707

747.135

465,440

THE EHRONICLE.

548

IVOL. XXXV

Th* Sales and Prices of Futures are Hhown by the follow¬
ing comprehensive table. In this statement will be found tie
the City Point, «fco., movement. Consequently we have now
daily market, the prices of sales for each month each day, and
the closing bids, in addition to the dailv and total sales.
our weekly and monthly tables of receipts from Sept. 1, 1881,

lyr* In January and February, 1882, large additions to eur port
eoeipts were made, for om bsIous during previous weeks of a por¬
of

tion

revised

o Fob. 1, 1882, and incorporated the omissions in the weeks to which
they belong instead of inserting them in bulk in December and January.

> •?<

In addition to above exports, our telegrams to-night also irive
us the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not cleared, at
the ports named. We add similar figures for New York, which
are prepared for our special use by Messrs. Carey, Yale &

10, AT—

-

Great
Britain.

France.

Coast¬
wise.

Other

Foreign
24,056

3,405

80.053

None.

None.

None.

Charleston

4,000
0,100
23,707
35,849
9.500
5,000

None.
1,300
None.

6,870

1,050

23,000

5,400

13,280
3 4,500

1,488

334

None.
550
None.

1,838
4,000
1,000

1,287
2,3‘J5

28,066

110,820

Total 1881
Total 1880

“•(-D

x

B ®

—

3.5*

85 r+ ©

B*

2 S'

None.
None.

13,527

61,698

a

53,083

23,185

42,556

101,107

23,503

40.504

14,814
16,432

134,238
187,546

'K

-w

®

E®5*S
ft*

P
P*
A

!—•

Nov. 4 to
Nov. 10.

71516

Ordin’/.tflb
Strict Ord..
Good Ord..

Btr.G’dOrd

NEW ORLEANS.

Mou Toes

Sat.

83,6

83,6

8:j16

83i6

«3g

8%

85s

S5g

93l«
9^8

oy,G

83?

95s
IO83
10%

Good Mid.. 10^
Btr.G’d Mid 10151(i 1015lc

Holiday

Midd’g Fair IDig H716
123,6

12316

Wed

7^8

Strict Ord..
8&i6
Good Ord..
9*8
Str. G’dOrd 9916
Low Midd’g 10
Btr.L’wMia 1014
Good Mid..

mou. Tae*

93 lB

Middling... 101*3

Middling...

TEXAS.

Sat.

71516

101i6
10°16

Ordin’y.$tt>

MonTae*

838

.Low Midd’g lOfio
Str.L’w Mid lO^ifl

Fair

Sat.

Th,

Frl.

97s
105,6

9'16
978
10516

10*3

978
I05lfj

101*3

101*3

1041,h
1015,6

1118
llSg
1238

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123s

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1238

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were to arrive.
The following are the official quotations
sales for sach day of the past week.

•

ft* —

The

4,671 bales, incduding 1,200 for export, 3,271 for consumption,
200 for speculation and
in transit. Of the above, 500 bales

.

H-p >>

I

►rcr3

642,801
585,074

The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 462,200
Dales. For immediate delivery the total sales foot up this week

p rrf- *

:

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(JO

•

£

5
2
®

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—-® ®
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—1

40.130
45.657

yielded, for the want of support. December and January were
notably weak under large sales for Southern account. On
Thursday prices again gave way, but there was a slight
Tecovery at the close and a steadier feeling.
To-day there was
an early advance on a better Liverpool report, stimulating a
demand t# cover contracts, but as the inquiry on this account
subsided prices partially receded. Spots declined l-10c. on
Wednesday without leading to any marked revival of demand,
whether for export or home consumption.
To-day the market
was
quiet and unchanged, middling unlands closing at

Q*oap®
o 3.2*2*

“ftftH

23,740

well as a demand to cover contracts, but there was a furtlrer
decline on Monday. Tuesday was a holiday. Wednesday opened
firmer on the better accounts from Liverpool but values soon

o8-Ҥ*

o

99

as

— —
X O ® X

® •

49.194

speculation in cotton for future delivery lias been only
moderately active the past week and there is some further
decline from the low prices already made. There was, on
Saturday evening, an effort towards a reaction, based on the
statistical position as presented in the last Chronicle. The
fact that the out-turn of the crop for the first two months of
the season was about 70,000 bales less than for correspond¬
ing, period last season, and that at the same time the visible
supply of American cotton was about 307,500 bales smaller
than at the end of Oct., 1881, caused some buying for the rise,

O

:

§

®

429,323

211,711

1—

21 ©

101,276
14,731
7 6,7 46
77,846

26,816
40,012
1 4,050
6,000

X^
*

O*og?
S’
—*11 P —

9

—

Slock.

Total.

25,323

Total 1882

— — M

Leaving

!

None.

New York
Other ports

O

Shipboard, not cleared'—for

26,004

Galveston
Norfolk

►-•i-i P Du

® ®

New Orleans....
Mobil©
Savannah

7

o

00
to

Nov.

v

p

n

Lambert, 60 Beaver Street.
On

0^x2

>

®

1 1

©

ftj

Good Ordinary
Strict Good Ordinary.
Low Middling
Middling

....$ ft

7°io
83s

7916 !
83s

xo'16

7ifl

j Iloli-

9 he
10
i

day.

8sia

8516

9

9

9

915lfi

915in

9!5|e

MARKET AND SALES

I

I

! S

713

1
*
includes sales in September, 1882,
ber-October for October, 815,000.

i!

for September, 500,200;

Septem-

Orders—Saturday, lO'-lOc.; Monday, 10 30c.; Tuesday,
Wednesday, 10 30c.; Thursday, 10-25c.; Friday, 10’25e.

Transferable
SALES OP SPOT AND TRANSIT.

SPOT MARKET
CLOSED.

Ex¬

Bat.. Quiet
Mon

.

....

Dull and easier..

Tues.
Wed Steady at Lq dec
Thurs Easy
Fri.. Quiet
.

Total

------

Con-

Spec-

port. sump. ul'Vn

....

45 i
548
201

1.200

Tran¬
Total.
sit.

392
5S8

392

Hoiid
693
3.271

200
....

200

Sales.

Deliv
eries.

„

„

^

9

....

....




Short notices for November—Saturday, 10

35 c.

E5P* We have included in the above table, and shall continue

588

to give, the average price of futures each day for
be found under each day following the abreviation

i,33:i

age

93,000

300

1,459 110,000
899 105,100

200

3u0

4,671 462.200

1,200
pr-

for each month for the week is also given
The following exchanges have been made

•33 pd. to exch. 100 Nov. for April.
•34 pd. to exch. 200 Feb. for May.
•19
•11

pd. to exch. 500 June for A ag.
pd. to excli. 500 Mav for June.
•45 *vl. ;u cauG. -J0J i\iJ. L* J .Ri-\

each week

each month. It wil
“ Aver.” The aver¬
at bottom of table.

200
200

deliveries given above are actually delivered the day
^he tj
dally
Uuit ou vliLli
.uvy cuv repjr.ed.

;

62,400
9L.700

av...

882
711

FUTURES.

during the

week:

*11 pd. to exch. 400 Jan. for Feb*
*12 pd. to exch. 100 Feb. for m *
*47 pd. to exch. 100 Jan. for 1 <. •
*47 pd. to exch. 300 Jan. for 1,1. - *?>
12 p-1. to ux.-k. JJJ
*0*

THE

11, 1882 J

November

CHRONICLE.

THb Visible Supply op Cotton, as made up by cable and
f^levrapb, Is as follows. The Continental stocks are the figures

bales less than at the same period last year. The
receipts at
the same towns have been 8,479 bales more than the same
week
last year, and since September 1 the
receipts at all the towns
are 9,925 bales less than for the same time in
1881.
Receipts from the Plantations.—The

the totals for Great Britain and the afloat
this week’s returns, and consequently
brought down to Thursday evening; hence, to make the totals the
complete figures for to-night (Nov. 10), we add the item of exports prepared for the

f last Saturday, but
for the Continent are

1882.
.

Britain stock

rf.»tal Great
Stock at

Havre..

77,000
533,000

,

.

112.000
2.500

-*

gtortk at Marseilles..-.
Stock at Barcelona
Scook at Hamour^
Stock at Bremen
Stock at Amsterdam
Stock at Rotterdam
Stock at Antwerp..

1981.

461,000

bales,

Liverpool
London

Stock at
Stock at

........

1880.

1879.

505,000
42,500

424.000
42,200

288.000

547.500
151,000
3.590

463,200

340.831

58,100
7,640
32.800

86,820

27,000
3,500
29,300
7.600

56.800

52,831

809

4,000
1,800
20,403
17,300
3,230

24,000
8,930

900
300

13,000
38,200
16,400
1,360
2.300

.

Stock at other conti’ntal ports.

14,000

12,900

12,500

6,000

continental ports....

197,100

295,550

149,651

140,362

735,100

813.050
56.000
315,000
28.000

491,193
74,575
503,434
39,656
578.768
187,126
34,000

_

Total

.

Total European stocks..

..
,

Amer’n cotton afloat for

Efcypt,Brazil,&c..atlt for E’r’pe>
United States ports
SUMkinU. 8.interior towns..
Uniied States exports to-day..
«t{ ck in

..

2.200
981

644.034
173.157

285.408

615,851
55,000
454,000
33.000
771.957
227,135

18,220

30,800

11,000

134,000
439,000
16,000

afloat for Europe
Eur’po>

ladla ootton

2,500

777.039

2,159,511 2,335.297 2,167,913 1,898,752

Total visible supply

■loan and other

descriptions

follows:

are as

American—

439.000
644.034

173,157
18,220

United States interior stocks..
United States exports to-day..

395,000
129,000
315,000
777,039
285,408
30,800

301,000
66,000
451,000
771,957
227,135
11,000

171,000
46,000

31,000

East Indian,Brazil, dc.i

Egypt,Brazil, &c.,afloat..
.

270.000
77,000

110,000

126,100
134,000
16,000

166,550
56,000
28,000

623,100

403,050

123,000
42,200
83,651
55,000

42.500

117,000
52.831

94,362

33,000

74,575
39,656

336.851

378.424

1,536,411 1,932,247 1,831,092 1,520,328

Price Mid. Upl.,

The

Week

2,159.511 2,335.297 2,167,943 1.398.752
6 led.
6Tlf>d.
07i6d.
678’1

Liverpool

imports into Continental ports this week have been

Beceipts at the Ports.

ending—

SVk atlnterior Towns.

18S0.

1881.

1882.

1880.

1881.

Aujf.25

21,123

12.352

33,471

40.492

Sopt,. 1

42 0S2

35,078
46,722
72.612
91,052

23,032
28.088

32 712

46 422

39,302

57.410

16,519

49,512

51,674

75,452

136.413 112,293 77,223 77,868
29...... 172,221 131,756 136.479 96,331
Oct.
6
190,094 174,810 179,883 123,509
4
13
210,367 191,056 206,136 147.913
**
20
236,341 192.531 242,329 179,792

"

8

61,117

“

15

102,695

“

22

“

21

“

10

1882.

1880.

1881.

14.327

20,920

30,199

10,144

15,586

4] tR8ft

5 > gjig

94 9H1

67,707

83,000

29,081
52,108

103.779

19,115 115,067 112.094
29.985 162,007 140,020

124,526

46 022 190,084 155,503 153,116

78,862 229,272 205.843 210,123
95.875 231.771 232,058 224,949
228.7.S5 125.039 208.220 224,755 271.693
193.501

...

The above statement shows—1. That the total

plantations since September 1, in 1882
1881
2.

corresponding
period of 1881—is set out in detail in the following statement:

©

§ 3 Sc®£2

V

®

I—•

B

*

:

S

;

iP

® ® an i-j

were 1,934,102 bales; in 1880 were
That, although the receipts at the out-ports the past week
were 262,251 bales, the actual movement from
plantations was
298,899 bales, the balance going to increase the stocks at
the interior towns.
Last year the receipts from the planta¬
tions for the same week were 265,341 bales and for 1880 they
were 23S,533 bales.

Amount
we

of

Cotton

in sight

November 10.—In the table below

give the receipts from plantations in another form, and

add to them the net overland movement to November 1, and
also the takings by Southern spinners to the same date, so as to

give substantially the amount of cotton

now

y*-

;: &•

un
©m3 ?!
®

c+

80

®
•-J

©
i—i

e*

80

S'gfQF
/-F
®

ert**

go

H

©

Oo

“

m
2/©,.?<*

CSg

o

P
r, Q
od rS 2

c+

i
r; 9

SJ

CD ®

g®> £3
^

|j

^;

in sight.

CO

.

*»

o

H

cc

to

MtO

45, 15

CO M CC *-*►—* to M

CD

-lVo-JCH-1 *M

©jom*kcotojoto£»xP>.

Cl

©

O<JC0 0iQ0h-O

CD

pi-CCClCD-Cl®

Cl

-

o

erg
P ?
Q

MOB

So
.

»

CO
'3

13
CDi-*M
O ® M

01

*4

p:

o

00

wek. This

100 m"© ©M M © CC
P] CD MCI to P- ©on
CDM CD ~<1M to ©(£.--•©©- J ©©Ot©OtO
MMlOCC©M©CDCrt^J©i"*0&CDM0Jt|^^4 0H

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10

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mi^©C0i^.<4

01 O CO
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CD 00 © C O' Cl CO
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-1 © — CD © Cl It- ©'t to M © 00 © to CD M M C
a.© © C© CO M © 03 Cl ©
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CO

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to

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M 03 to M M to b'l © bo
cc © CO CD © to CO © © M Ot to CD O' ® © O'
© 03 tv CD X © to |fc» O X © 03 if^ © © O’ X cc cc
r-

—1 CO CC O’1 CD cn X ©

■S'
a

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b««

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CO

CO

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w

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— <-

to M

—I

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> © © m © a >-*
If- CD © CD c M ©

to

M

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d co

m

03 -* <1 to M to ©t

©

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©i © to cc c: cc to

bo

to m © © © x co to

13

M

to

MM

p

>-t:Mto

©

©i ® M © <J m to M <1 CO

C

M

© © -1 x © CD

to

M V ® ©1 © bo to M - J p
Cl to X ® © © CD ©
© - i — ® C X © © -* A- © 0‘ © C> © ©
- - C’l
© X © — C: © 1
1 C m !-* O’ ll M © © ©■ - i C3 ©i

'

—-

a

o—■

w

•

-

/.
-

i^*
-■

t-1

CD

F

'M
MtO
© tO MrD»-CO©
CtO © M M Ct *0

Cl

°

v*

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ommwwj:
**>3 O’ X

MM

MCOXi^-OiCO-l©

►—A

f? >
**•

The

by the above that the decrease in
to-night, as compared with last year, is 71,156 bales.

® 03 —• *— m ^1 to © CD io to ©T x to O’ M Ci io
— © 10 ©I 03 ^1 -4 —1 M tO tO
© X © © © -4 ©
© »I ©i 03 — 03 -1 ^4 M ©i © -4 X -4 M © 10 tO CC

Ci

M

©i

CD
©

M -J

to to M ct ©i to to

© M

M

03C0Mt0£*<J

io

M

c:

X to

-l

CCCC©©»-4©©tOO©itO-4XMtOM©TX©

to © to a

Ct

©I

OC to

m l C ©i Cl
to to tv -4 -1

V

Si'if.cM -.1

QO

o

m

m ©l © © © O’
X © M X CD to to
^4 03 if- © to © X © X to © 03 to M ©t tfx

Hto

M-MMMHIO

Mtc.ifktOCiCDO O’ tv M © © © CD M
io *® -VPl ©Pj M *©'<1 ©i -1C 00 05 to ‘-'P-© CC
C5iC--l-MtC»-tO‘)0^l5rt-'lOiOi(-tO
I-* M

c CO CO

I—

Cc

M
^

S'

seen

by

Telegraph.—The

amount

in sight

favorable condi¬

still prevail in the greater
and cotton is being gathered and

Cs

r1
:-.l

I

F

?r

vs

a

^

^

cT

>3

?

©
r»

M

on

past week, the rainfall reaching one inch.

four days of

The election

excitement liaa partially interfered with picking.
mometer has ranged from 63 to 80, averaging 71.

•

x»

2?

-1

to
X

the

W

©t M -4 M © *— OO M I-1 ‘JO m <1 —'‘

above. totals show that the old interior stocks have in¬
during the week 27,652 bales, and are to-night 112,251




2,105,185

sight November 10

Huntsville, Texas.—Wo have had showers

g

Tliis year’s figures estimated.

creased

2,034,020

Total in

It will bo

and lowest 02.

2c

v—4

XiO
03 © M to H if4’ tO
M M o; |U ©l 03 lb. ©
-c; © ® -4 CO © 03 to --1 © CC ©1X © M M © X ©

O
CD

-—

O’
ci

126,083
45,000

Palestine, Texas.—It lias rained on four days of the past
The rainfall reached one inch and
thirty-five hundredths. Average thermometer 71, highest 79

.

1C

cc
tc

50,000

week, doing no harm.

13

It-

Southern consumption to November 1.

to 86.

5-

MW
©

® ©1 © -4 M M ^3 rf- © Ifa- © CO X © CD CD 10 03 ©

CM

w~

<s

Pj 03 3-4 io
©-l©i-‘^|CC03Cl©lt0lOM®®M©©®M
to 00 to to Cl CO O’

o

a—

1,034,102

03,857

276.736

Brenham, Texas.—We have had no rain all of the past
week. The thermometer lias averaged 79, ranging from 61

cc

13

GO

1,881,172

10

days of the past week, the rainfall reaching forty hundredths
of an inch.
The thermometer has ranged from 69 to 84, aver¬
aging 77.
Dallas, Texas.—We have had no rain during the past week.
Prospects are unchanged. The thermometer has averaged 75,
the highest being 84 and the lowest 59.

&

iS

M

— Cl

Total receipts from plantations....
Net overland to November 1

of Sept. 1 on Nov.

of the

gj

^

•3

1,657,366

excess

Galveston, Texas.—The weather has been warm and dry all
past week. Picking has been interfered with to some
extent by the election excitement but not as much as expected.
Average thermometer 74, highest 79 and lowest 68.
Indianola, Texas.—We have had harmless showers on three

co

qs°

I-*

o

1,085,017
105,255

Interior stocks in

portion of the South,
marketed very freely.

H

i—

h

1881.

tions noted for several weeks past

§3S

v* :

Si *§ i £
: : g»

•

Receipts at the ports to November 10.. .bales.

Weather Reports

QD ^

o

o'

s gpc fa

b

®

.

i

receipts from the

1,881,172 bales; in
2,082,326 bales.
were

1882.

At the Interior Towns the movement—that is the
receipts
for the week and since Sept. 1, the shipments for the week, and
the stocks to-night, and the same items for the

£

88,093

The above

figures indicate a decrease in the cotton in sight
to-night of 175,780 bales as compared with the same date of 1881,
a decrease
of 8,432 bales as compared with the corres¬
ponding date of 1880 and an increase of 260,759 bales as com¬
pared with 1879.

t#

1832.

155.559

36,000 bales.

<—

Rec'pts from Plant'n*

254,830 210,587 241,738 209,575 251,532 139,317 284,013 233,334 258.010
251,708 225,285 256,023 240.562 290,140 175.092 282,755 203,893 292,398
215,842 233.320 262,251 203 258 322,161 211,740 238,538 205.341 298,899

3

Nov.

578,763

187,126

purpose

RECEIPTS from plantations.

503,434

1,536,411 1,932,247 1,831,092 1,520,328

Lonrton

following table is
of indicating the actual movement each
week from the plantations. Receipts at the
outports are some¬
times misleading, as they are made up
more largely one year
than another at the expense of the interior stocks. We reach
therefore, a safer conclusion through a comparative statement
like the following. In reply to frequent
inquiries we will add
that these figures, of course, do not include overland
receipts or
Southern consumption; they are
simply a statement or the
weekly movement from the plantations of that part of the crop
which finally reaches the market through the out-ports.

“

191,000
71,000

Liverpool stook
Continental stocks....

549

The ther¬

Weatherford, Texas.—We have had no rain during the past
Prospects good." The thermometer lias averaged 74,
the highest being 33 and the lowest 58.
Belton, Texas.—There lias been no rain during the past
week.
The thermometer lias ranged from 58 to 83, averaging
week.

75.

LutingTexas.—We had no rain all of the past week.
Picking has been interfered with to some extent by the elec¬
tion.
Average thermometer 75, highest 84 and lowest 58.
New Orleans, Louisiana.—We have had no rain during the
past week. The thermometer has averaged 71.
Shreveport, Lousiana.—Telegram not received,

fHE

550

|>.r:

Vicksburg, Mississippi.—It has rained on one day of the
past week and the remainder of the week has been pleasant.
Columbus,Mississippi—We have had no rain during the
past week. About three-fourths of the crop has been picked,
and is being marketed freely. The thermometer has averaged
64, ranging from 47 to 81.
Little Rock, Arkansas.—It has been cloudy with rain on
two days of the past week, and the remainder of the week lias
The rainfall reached sixty-four hundredths
been fair to clear.
of an inch. Average thermometer G2, highest 73 and lowest 51.
Memphis, Tennessee.—We have had rain on five days of the
past week. It has been cloudy the entire week. Planters are
marketing their crop freely. The thermometer has ranged
from 51 to 75, averagingJ63, and the rainfall reached eighty-nine
hundredths of an inch.
Nashville, Tennessee.—It has

past week, the rainfall

reaching

dredths. The thermometer has
72 and the lowest 43.

ri_.

CHRONICLE.

rained
one

three days of the

on

inch and forty-four hun¬

averaged 57, the highest being

Mobile, Alabama.—We have had no rain the past week.
Picking is making good progress.
The thermometer has
averaged G4, ranging from 51 to 81.
Montgomery, Alabama.—The weather has been warm and
dry all of the past week. Picking is progressing finely and
planters are marketing their crop freely. The thermometer
has ranged from 46 to 74, averaging 61.

[Vol. XXXT.
Shipments since Januaru

Shipments for the week.
Conti¬
nent.

Great

Britain.

Conti¬

Greatr

Total.
,

Britain.

i

nent.

Total.

Calcutta-

400

109,100

200

113,600

38,500
37,900

147,600
151,500

2,800

2,800

56,500

5,000

300

3U0

22,000

600

61,500

54,100
25,500

19,100
6,100

73,200

219,700
161,100

62.600
44,900

282,300

400
100

1882
1881
Madras—
1882
1881.....
All others1882
1881

100

22,600
31,900

Total all-

1882

3,200

1881

400

3,200
500

100

206,000

The above totals for the week show that the movement from
the ports other than Bombay Is 2,700 bales more than same
week last year. For the whole of India, therefore, the total ship¬
ments since January 1, 1882, and for the corresponding periods
of the twro previous years, are as follows:
EXPORTS TO EUROPE FROM ALL INDIA.

all Europe
from—

Since
Jan. 1.

This
week.

Bombay
All other

1881.

1882.*

Shivments
to

p’rts.

4,000 1,395,000
3,200
282,300

1880.

This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

12,000

889,000

2,000

500

206,000

2,600

This

Siilce

week.

Jan. 1.
'

865,000
227,400

had no rain during the past
4,600 1,092.400
Total
week.
We are having the finest weather ever known.
7,200 1,677,300 12,500 1.095,000
Average thermometer 56, highest 67 and lowest 45.
This last statement affords a very interesting comparison of the
Madison. Florida.—The weather has been cold and dry dur¬
total movement for the three years at all India ports.
ing all of the past week. We have had a frost, but not a killing
Alexandria Receipts and Shipments.—Through arrangements
frost.
Picking has been interfered with by the election ex¬
we
have made with Messrs. Davies, Benachi & Co., of Liverpool
citement.
The thermometer has ranged from 52 to 70, aver¬
Selma, Alabama.—We have

'

It.v

aging 61.

weather has been cold and dry dur¬
ing all of the past week. We have had a frost, but not a kill¬
ing frost. About two-thirds of the crop has been picked, and
about one-half has been marketed.
Average thermometer 54,
highest 79 and lowest 39.
Columbus, Georgia.—It has rained on one day of the past
week. The thermometer has ranged from 53 to 70, averaging
Macon, Georgia.—The

and Alexandria, we now receive a weekly cable of the movements
of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt. The following are the receipts
and shipments for the past week and for the coiresponding week
of the previous two years.
Alexandria., Egypt,
November 9.

Receipts (cantars*)—

Savannah, Georgia.—The weather

has been pleasant during

week, with no rain. The thermometer has averaged
56, the highest being G8 and the lowest 43.
Augusta, Georgia.—The weather has-been clear and pleas¬
ant during the past week with light rain on one day.
The
rainfall reached but four hundredths of an inch.
Planters are
marketing their crop freely. The thermometer has averaged
55, ranging from 40 to 71.
Atlanta, Georgia.—There has boon no rain during the past
week. The weather has been very dry and favorable for cot¬
No killing frost yet. The thermometer has ranged from
ton.
36 to 70, averaging 54.
Charleston, South Carolina.—Wo have had no rain during
the past week.
The thermometer has ranged from 45 to 70,
averaging 51.
The following statement we hare also received by telegraph,
showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3 o’clock
November 9, 1SS3, and November 10, 1831.

This
week.

the past

Nov. 1, ’82.

New Orleans

Below high-water mark
Above low-water mark
Above low-water mark
Above low-water mark
Above low-water mark

.

Memphis
Nashville

Shreveport...
Vicksburg

Feed.
13
0

Inch.

2

15
.

8

o

O

9
•J

4
8

Nov. 10,
Feet:
10
18
9
lb
22

Exports (bales)—

G
O
11

This
week.

5,000
7,101

190,000
635,500

Since

This
week.

Sept. 1.
35,500

Since

Sept. 1.

3,000
522

31,000
5,501

3,522

36,501

This statement shows that the receipts for the week
Nov. 9 were 120,039 cantars and the shipments to all

ending
Europe

12,000

To Liverpool
To Continent

1,000
13,000

Total Europe.
*

A cantar is 98 lbs.

were

23,000
1,000

27.000*

12,101

1-1,68L

i

50.184'i

-

13,000 bales.

Manchester Market.—Our report received from Manchester
to-night states that the market is quiet. We give the prices of
to-day below, and leave previous weeks’ prices for comparison:
1881.

1882.

’81.

Inch.
4
8

Since

Sept. 1.

1880.

135,000
757,550

120,000
35 G,01)0

This week....
Since Sept. 1

63.

1881.

1882.

32s Cop.

8*4 lbs.

Twist.

Shirtings.

ColVn
Mid.

Upl is

6. R. Vd.
s.
d
d.
Sept. 8 9% 0 97s 6 4hj07 10*2
15 9;is 0 97«;6 4l^2u)7 ion.
“
22 9^8 0 978 6 4*2 07 10
“
'a>7 9
29 933 0 934 G 3
6
1*2-07 8
Oct. 6
cv 7
9
13 U3s 0 P34 6 1
“
1 *2 07
9
20 933 0 9h <>
a
27 9l4 0 9h) G 0*207 7*2
6
Nov. 3 9 316® 9-'*3 5 11*207
10 9:*
9% 5 11*2^7 6
**

“

d.
n
1

d.

Shir ling 8.
R.

■'He

B78® 9*2 6
S78 0 9)3 0

7

9

678
6 53
6%

9*8
9*8
9
9

6
0 9\ 6
0 9:h 6
0 9^ G
0 9 *2 6
0 934 6
0 978 G
6
010
0

GotPn
Mid.

8*4 lbs.

32s Cop.
Iwist.

(1.

-

d.
a.
5*2 07

5*2 07
6 08
G 08
G
G
G
G
6
6

08
08
'03

Upldt
d.

d.

8*2
8*2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

73ia
7*4

7hs
678

67ia
6

;<8
reported below high-water mark of 1S71 until
6716
08
636
9*3
638
@3
Sept. 9,1874,"when the zero of gauge was changed to high-water
9*8
0-16
08 1 *2 a'1 is
mark of April 15 and 16,1874, which is 6-10ths of a foot above
oq
618
1871* or 16 feet above low-water mark at that point.
European ^Cotton Consumption for October .—We have
India Cotton Movement from all Ports.—We have during
the past year been endeavoring to rearrange our India service received to-day (Friday), by cable Mr. Ellison’s figures for
so as to make our reports more detailed and at the same time
October, the first month of the new cotton season. We have
more accurate.
Hitherto we have found it impossible to keep also received the revised totals for last year, and give them for
out of our figures, as cabled to us for the ports other than
comparison. The spinners takings in actual bales and pounds
Bombay, cargoes which proved only to be shipments from one
India port to another. The plan we have now adopted, as we have been as follows:
have reason to believe, will relieve us from the danger of th^s
Total.
Continent.
Great Britain.
Jn October.
inaccuracy and keep the totals correct.
We first give the
Bombay statement for the week and year, bringing the figures
For 1882.

New Orleans

69ic

“

down to November 9.

BOMBAY RECEIPTS AND

Shipments this u ctlc.
Year Great
BriVn.
1882
1881
1880
1879

6,000

Conti¬
nent.

0510 bo b o 5Io o

SHIPMENTS FOR FOUR YEARS.

Shipments since Jan. 1.
Great

Total.

Britain

Conti¬
nent.

Total.

Receipts.
This

Since

Week.

Jan. L.

4,000 776,000 619,000 1,395,000

9,000 1,600,000

865,000

6,000 1,112,000

612,000

6,000

12,000 323.000 566.000
2,000 300,000 505,000
3,000 252,090 360,000

889,000 12,000 1,224.000

Takings by spinners...bales
Average weight of bales....
Takings in pounds

221,520

152,360

373,850

421

391

409

93,259,920

59,572,760

152,832,GS0

309,950

120,720

439,670

434

411'

427

53,314,920

187,833,220

For 1881.

Takings by spinners., .bales
Average weight of bales....'
Takings in pounds

134,518,300

According to the above, the average weight of the deliveries
pounds per bale in October this season,
According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show a \ against 434 pounds during the same time last season.
decrease compared with last year in the week’s receipts of 3,000
bales, and a decrease in shipments of 8,000 bales, and the •^Continental deliveries average 391 pounds, against 411 pounds
shipments since January 1 show an increase of 530,000 bales. last year, and for the whole of Europe the deliveries average
The movement at Calcutta, Madras and other India ports for the 409 pounds per bale, against 427 pounds last season. Our
last reported week and since the 1st of January, for two years,
has been as follows. “ Other ports” cover Ceylon, Tuticorin, patch also gives the full movement for this year and last year,
in bales of 400 pounds each.'
Kurrachee and Coconada.
W

838,000

in Great Britain is 421

The

dis¬

.


'•v


November 11,

THE

1883.]
Great Britain.

In October.

Continent.

CHRONICLE
This statement shows that the

Total.

For 1882.

Spinners’ stock October 1
Takings in October

..

Total smpply

Consumption.......

••

56,000
233,000

149,000

195,000
382,000

289,000
284,000

288,000
244,000

577,000
528,000

5,000

44,000

49,000

Spinners’stock Nov. 1..

139.000

receipts since Sept. 1
to*
to-night are now 75,620 bales more than they were to the up
same
day of the month in 1881 and 94,072 bales less than
they were
to the same day of the month in
1880. We add to the table
the percentages of total
port receipts which had been received to

November 10 in each of the

are

Takings in October

240,000
133,000

Total supply
Consumption

361,000
280,000

373,000
232,000

81,000

141,000

Spinners’ stock October 1

..

Spinners’ stock Nov. 1.

512,000
222,000

Bremen, per steamers Elbe, 1,677
Main, 1,770
To Hamburg, per steamers
Polynesian, 4,597
Vandalia,
400
Westphalia, (additional) 500

To

To
To

Catalan, 2,800

Charleston—To Liverpool,

Liverpool gives

since

16th inst.: “The

January.

Monthly
Receipts.

Year
1882.

Beginning September

1.

1801.

1880.

1879.

1878.'

429,777
853,197

458,478
968,318

333,643
888,492

283,348
639,264

Totalyeai 1,307,24' 1,282,972 1,426,796
1,222,135
Perc’tage of tot. port

583,637

978,112

678,959

8eyt’mb.’j
October..

326,656
930,584

receipts Oct. 31.

27-18

2 4 29

24-43

21 99

1877.

95,272

15 62

This statement shows that
up to Oct. 31 the receipts at the
this year were
bales more than in 1831 and
24,263
119,5ob bales less than at
the same time

l°

in 18S0.

?,k°ve
to
totals
we shad
be able
to
lor the

different

exact

years.

1832,

1831.

comparison of the

36,792

U

it

e

5....
6....
n
7....

M

Q

«(

A

o.„.

“

9....
1 A

10....

-

38,060

29,104
27,151

41,574
33,904

35,933
4S,836

1880.

1879.

46,514J
37,89'!
33,533

30,704

1877.

978,112

678,959
31,773
29,165
33.775

8.

27,243
21,848

46,140

8.

38,310

8.

31,603;

49,216
42,475
37,582
36,297
57,777

8.

29,924

29,682

46,365

8.

31301
40,389
33,590

40,193

49,319
23,562

30,961
27,896
23,330
31, SOS
43,978

8.

27,231

35,842
31,9G6

Total.... 1,635,917
1*610,297 1,779,939
r«oentag 6 of




34-11

30-30

30,902

46,381

8.

1,522,36- 1,215.510
30-44

27-33

8.

To

steamers

per

Antwerp,

per steamer

6,232

518

,

513

1,305 (additional)

3,689

Kansas, 5,328

per steamer Lord

Iowa,

Switzerland, 750

2,834
750

163,212

The particulars of these
form, are as follows:

<C 11am- <£• Ant-

vool.

Havre,

NewYork.. 19,037

N. Orleans.

1,050

10,800 11,190

Charleston.
4,926
Savannah
Texas
13,11.8
Wilmington 2,350
.

shipments, arranged in

1,520
4,256
6,000

Norfolk.... 33,678
West Point.
0,232
Baltimore..
518
Boston
9,683
Philadelp’a • 2,831

burg.
8,911

werp.

Barcc-

Koval.

Iona.

Genoa.
1.274

1,662
8,191

2,402

7,100

Tolal.

31,967
32.583
6,446
11.356
26,121
2,350
33.678

7,003

6,232

3,689

4.207
9,688

750

Total... 103,181 24,01619,636

Below

usual

our

Bremen Avis'dam

Liver-

2,112

3,584
7,100

8.191

3,676 168,212

give all news received to elite of disasters
carrying cotton from United States ports, &a.:
Ana

9.688

Clive, 2,834....

Total

we

to vessels

Sala, steamer (Span ), Ojinasra, which sailed from New Orleans.
Nov. 3, for Barcelona, put iuto
Havana, Nov. 6, with her maehiuory
out of order.
Clapeyron, steamer (Fr.), Ganello, from New Orleans for
Havre, took
fire at the latter port Nov. 2.
The lire was extinguished with
damage to cargo contained in the main hold.
Flachat. steamer (Fr.), Prado, from New
Orleans, took Are at Havre,
Nov. 3. The tiro was afterwards
extinguished
with slight damage
to vessel and
cargo.
Hesper, steamer (Bi\), Watson, from Galveston via Newport
News, Va.,
Oct. 19, where she put in for
coal, having on board 4,617 bales
cotton and 55 saoks cotton seed oil
cake, arrived at Liverpool.
A. M. Nov. 6, witli the cargo in the
forepeak on Are. The Are was
extinguished P. M. of the same day. Part of the
cargo was dam¬
aged by Are and water.
Mount Lebanon, steamer, from Baltimore for
Havre, before reported,
which arrived at Halifax, N. S., Oct.
6, with propeller gone, had a
new one put on and sailed Nov.
8 for destination.
Prinz Georg, steamer (Ger.), Felde, from New
O.leaus for Havre, put
into Now York, Nov. 8, short of coal and with
machinery damaged .
Virginian, steamer (Hr.), which sailed from New York
for Liverpool on
de

Sunday', broke

off Nantucket
for repairs.

Do

sail.-.d.

Havre, steam
Do

sail

Bremen, steam,

c.

pipe and otherwise deranged her machinery
to this port yesterday

Tuesday', and returned

e.

aail..:tf.

Compressed.

Satur.

Mon.

14'S’516

*4® *16

....

Tues.
•

916*

as

follows:

Wednes.

Thurs.

14®516

14®516

Fri.

a4a>5ia

•

....

....

916*

j

....

916*

,

....

®ie*

»
....

....

.c.

Do
sail
c.
Barcel na, etcam.c.
*

a steam

on

freights the past week have been

Liverpool, steam d.

Do

2219

2,402

Pohona, 2,600 Upland

per steamer
per steamers America,

Philadelphia—To Liverpool,

Do
sail
e.
44,31 r
31,771 Hamburg, steam.d.
Do
sail...d.
35,213
22,037 Amst’d’m, steam, c.
Do
sail...d.
31,522
22,876 Baltic, steam—d.

964,495

per barks

2,78G....l9trian, 1,574

that time

1878.

1,274

Buenaventura, 3,650

Liverpool,

Salier, 2,334
Boston—To Liverpool,

movement

41,655
55,664

total
J’ort rec’ntp Nov
10

To Bremen,

Cotton

Tot.0c.31 1,307,240
1,282,972 1,126,796 1,222,135
Nov. l....
2....
3....
4...,

By adding

Oct. 31 the daily receipts since
reach an

l

897

West Point, Va.—To
Liverpool, per steamer Mareca, 6,232
Baltimore—To

The movement each month

September 1, 1882, has been as follows.
[oP1 In January and
February, 1882, large additions to our port
receipts were made for omissions
during previous weeks of a portion of
tne City Point, Ac.,
movement.
weekly anil monthly tables of Consequently we have now revised our
receipts from Sepc. 1, 1881, to Feb. 1,
l»8L, and incorporated the
omissions in the weeks to which
instead of inserting them in
they belong
bulk in December and

765

To Havre, per bark Anna, 1,520
Upland
1,520
Savannah—To Havre, per steamer Regidus, 4,256
Upland
4,256
To Reval, per steamer
Castello, 7,100 Upland
7,100
Texas—To Liverpool, per steamers
Andean, 4,055
Sapphire,
5.785....Tunis, 3,278
13,118
Tc Havre, per steamer
Empress, 6,000
6,000
To Bremen, per steamer
Hannover, 4,368....per bark Isabel
Craggs, 2,635
7,003
Wilmington—To Liverpool, per bark Erna, 2,350
2,350
Norfolk—To Liverpool, per steamers
Alsatia, 7,251
Ben-

crop:
Liverpool, Oct. 25, 1S82.

years named.

5,497

Counsellor, 4,350
10.800
To Havre, per steamers Priuz
Georg,
To Barcelona, per steamers Anade 7,895..Provincia, 3,295 11,190
Sala, 4,200
CastilJia,
1,701
per barks Valparaiso, 1,000
Voladora, 1,290..
8,191
To Genoa, per steamer Castillia,
2,402

bales in September.

coming in during the last week at the rate
of 500 to 2,000 cantars per day. Some lots contain more dead
than last year, but generally speaking the
quality so far is
satisfactory, particularly Mansurat. Cotton from Zagazig is
rather disappointing. All the leading firms
agree that the
plant has suffered from insufficient irrigation and by worms,
and there is hardly any putting forward estimates of more than
2% million cantars as the result ofthis year’s crop.”
Jute Butts, Bagging, &c.—There are no
special features to
note in the bagging market, and business shows no
increase;
orders continue to be for small lots
only, as under present con¬
ditions buyers are not disposed to take more than
required for
present wants. Prices under the. competition of makers con¬
tinue to rule in buyers’ favor, and at the close the
asking rates
are 7/|c. for
lbs., 7/£e. for 1% 1 bs., 8Mc. for 2 lbs. and
9%c. for standard grades, but an offer of a shade less for a
quantity would probably be accepted. Butts are in about the
same position as when we last wrote.
Prices are about steady,
with a moderate demand for small
parcels, and holders are ask¬
ing 2 7-16@2 9-lGc. for paper grades and
2y£@2%c. for bag¬
ging qualities. '
Comparative Port Receipts and Daily Crop
Movement.—
A comparison of the
port movement by weeks is not accurate
as the weeks in
different years do not end on the same
day of
the month. We have
consequently added to our other standing
tables a daily and
monthly statement, that the reader may
constantly have before him the data for seeing the exact relative
movement for the

3,447

Antwerp, per steamer Vaderland, 765
Amsterdam, per steamer Surrey, 897

Genoa, per steamer Scotia, 1,274
New Orleans—To
Liverpool, per steamers

ber. Hence it appears that the total for the whole of
Europe
is 1,000 bales more than it was last month, or 132,000 bales in

cotton has been

1,050

To

September), and that the Continental consumption was
61,000 bales per week, against 60,000 bales reported for Septem¬

My Alexandria firm writes by mail dated

Tolalbales.

—

for

new

same

Liverpool, per steamers Abyssinia, 2,730
Adriatic, (additional) 119
Arcliimede, 1.774*...City of
Berlin, 1,360...City of Richmond, 1,986...England.
2,625
Horrox, 1,839—Servia, 660—Virginian, 5,935.
19,037
To Havre, per steamers
France, 600
Heimdal, 450

foregoing indicates that spinners* stocks are now 49,000
bales, against 222,000 bales a year ago.
The cable also adds that the consumption of Great Britain
was in October 71,000 bales per week (which is the same as
given

The Egyptian Crop.—Mr. Fritz Andres of
the following respecting the Egyptian cotton

the

New York—To

The

October, against 131,000

years named.

Shipping News.—The exports of cotton
from the United
States the past week, as per latest mail
returns, have reached
16S,212 bales. So far as the Southern

ports are concerned, these
exports reported by telegraph, and published in
265,000 the Chronicle last
Friday. With regard to New York, we
469,000 include the manifests of all vessels
cleared up to Thursday
734,000 night of this week:

For 1881.

25,000
336,000

551

•

....

....

V

v

....

•

mmm

....

•

910*

•

•

...r

9i«*

*16*

m

...»

m

m m

C3

2

V

*2*

V

v—«
•••

932*

932*

....

....

O

H

j
•

....

....

,

932*

•

•

••

®32*

....

V

•

....

38*

V

a
a

V

....

....

•

•

•

•

a

v

V
•

•

•

•

•

....

....

THE CHRONICLE.

652
Liverpool.—By cable from Liverpool, we have
Statement of the* week’s sales, stocks. &c., at that

Bales of the week
bales.
Of which exporters took ....
Of which speculators took..
8ales American

Actual export
Forwarded
Total stock -Estimated
Of which American—Estim’d

62,000

6,100

10,000

703

530

31.500
5,000

33,500
7,400
8,500
448,000
161,000
61,000
52,000

860
41.000
4,900

5,500

Saturday Monday.

140,000

Tuesday.

6%g
G916

Salos

8,000
1,000

Mia.Orl’ns

Spec.&exp.

1.650

42,500
7.600
14,000

•161,000
191,000

80,000

76.000

68,000
260,000
172,000

63,000
284,000
197 000

Wedncs.

Thursday.

Friday.

Firm.

Easier.

demand
freely met

f>:%6

63m

6%j

OLj

Fair

inq. Mod. inq. Mod. inq.
freely
freely
freely
supplied.
supplied. supplied

Mid.Upl’ds

65,000
7,400

9,600
462,000
183,000

221,000

Mod.

?
$

Market,
12:30 p.m

53,000

6,50!

market for spots and futures each day of the
the daily closing prioes of spot cotton, have

The tone of the Liverpool
week ending Nov. 10, and
been as follows:

Spot.

48 00.

449,000
150,000
61,000
38.500
228,000
1 10.000

Total import of the week
Of which American
Amount afloat
Of which American

Nov. 10.

Nov. 3.

Oct. 27.

Oct. 20.

the following
port:

Gia

G3is
6°i0
10,000
1,000

12,000
2,000

12,000

12,000

2,000

2,000

Steady.

Dull.

Steady.

6«ig
10,000
1,000

6%a

futures.

Market, ')
12:30p.m. j

{

Market,
5 P. M.

Flat.

Steady.

Barely

Dull.

Weak.

Firm.

Steady.

steady.

The actual sales of futures at Liverpool for the same week are given
below. These sales are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause,
unless otherwise stated.
Saturday.

Nov
Nov.-Dee..
Dec.-Jau...

Apr.-May

...6464®%4

62(J4
6°t34
-2 ff54'® 3 34

.

d.

Delivery.

d.

Delivery.

d.

Delivery.

53904
5°9G4
5<;%34

Doc -Jan..

Jan.-Feb...

.5<U64®«3G4 May-June.
j Mar.-Apr..
.5<51fl4'®60,.4
..6%34®,5(54 1 June-July.
Jan.-Feb... 56164®60g4 June-July
Feb.-Mar.. .5 ^04^'° ^4 July-Aug.. ..O^ ®P64 July-Aug..
.

6»fi4

.

.

Nov.-Dee

6

Mar.-Apr..

6764

55964

..

Monday.

164

Dec.-Jan...

557G4

Nov
Nov.-Dee

6

55864

June-July..

5^04
Mar.-Apr..
Apr.-May
May-June -'-.6304®-G4
June-July..
July-Aug.. ...6%;4®0 4

Jan.-Feb...
Feb.-Mar...
Mar.-Apr..

Nov
Nov.-Doo

63e4
.

Dec.-Jan

Jan.-Feb..
Feb.-Mar..
.

.

May-June

®ohG4®Bi,64

June-July

.

5°%54
5«ofi4
C164

.

Mar.-Apr..

"25804 3> a (G4
Apr.-May.. .50-04 ®oaG4
June-July
.

May-June..

...

..(>1(34 ^261

560G4

Nov.-Dee..

Dec.-Jau... 500fl4 @oiR4
Jan.-Feb...
Feb.-Mar...
.

5«3tf4

®G364®6®50*164
Mar.-Apr...
May-June..

G

•

June-July..
July-Aug..

-63G4 @^64
60G4

69g4

Wednesday.
NO V

50304

G-* 34 ® 3G4® 264

Feb.-Mar
Mar.-Anr

6^4

'S/^^04'S>6104

Jan.-Feb
Mar.-Apr

50i64
6

May-June
June-July
July-Aug

6L14
6064
6s64

Nov.-Dec... 5®%4 ®6!264
Dec.-Jan
..5®304

Jan.-Feb
Feb.-Mar

5®304@O2G4

Mar.-A pr

03g4 «■ 2C4

6ie4®6

'®D(.4-g)10(,4
56ic4 Jan.-Fcb

Mar.-Apr
April-May
June-July

56364
Gig4
65«4

Nov
Nov.-Dee

56364
55964

.-55904

Dec.-Jau
Jan.-Feb
Feb.-Mar.

559o4

.50ie4@60g4
50264
Mar.-Apr
Apr.-May i
G

Cbu
50064 ® G164
6
50064
o(5064
50064

Nov
.1 an .-Feb
Nov
Nov.-Dee
Dec.-Jan

Apr.-May
63g4
MayJmie.. ..67fi4'g>664
June-July.. '..69G4@8G4
July-Aug...
Gi2g4
Nov.-Dee

.

May-June'

6%4
^.G^

June-July

Thursday.

56264 June-July
5^~64 July-Aug.
557c4 Nov
55764
■S'D864®“'64 t Dec.-Jan
5'*Br4 Jan.-Feb

Nov

Nov.-Dee
Dec.-Jan
Jan.-Feb
Feb.-Mar

Mar.-Apr .c.5<50.
Apr.-May

May-June

4

Nov.-Dee.... ...5o864
u964 @ &8C4 ; July-Aug.

| Jan.-Feb

_....55"^

a.

Jan.-I eb
•

Feb.-Mar..

«

Nov

59,

537G4

I

Feb -Mar

3iY.4a3"(U

I

July-Aug

.501G4@go(

4

5C2G4
5®%;4® 6

Mar.-April
Apr.-May

GI04

May-June
June-July

<:

.'.G-'ci

-

1

B R

Dec.-Jan

...

Fob-Mar

G264

May-Juuo

6-\4
6^4

G4u4
G"r4

June-July
July-Aug

50:*e4®6

«6i64 | Feb.-Mar
563C4 1 Apr.-May
6^4
Friday.

Nov.........5c-64^G3G4 j June-July
Dec.-Jan

common

were

and even the transactions then
bushels—would not have been considered
especially important during the height of the speculative
fever some months ago. The foreign markets are in a more
encouraging state, however, and the increased export move¬
ment here of late may perhaps be accepted as the precursor
of the active foreign trade which has been so long deferred.
To-day the market was irregular, opening %c. higher, but be¬
coming weaker later in the day ; No.' 2 red sold at $1 07%@
1 07/6 for Nov., $1 09%@1 09% for Dec.,- $1 073^@1 07%
seller’s option the year, $1 11%@1 11% for Jan. and $113%

speculative trading took place,
—some

2,200,000

February.
has advanced four cents on the spot, owing to
scarcity, while options have declined several cents. There has
been a better demand for cash corn, and the fact that there has
been very little available has given holders a decided advantage,
though options, by reason of the increased movement of the crop
during the last fortnight, have been depressed. The predictions
of speculators that the receipts at Chicago during the first fort¬
night of this month would be small have not thus far been
realized. The weather at the West, however, has for some
days been less favorable than could be wished, and complaint
is made at Chicago that the quality of the late receipts has not
met expectations.
To-day the market was %@2%c. higher,
with only a small trade in cash corn, owing to its scarcity,
though options were fairly active; No. 2 mixed sr»ldat84%@
85c. for November, 76%c. for December, 76%@76%c seller the
@1 13% for

557G4
557G4

Dec-Jan
Jau.-Feb

oB864
53864

56364
-GL-i

Apr-May
May-June
June-July

55964
6

65%@65%e. for January and 64c. for February.
quiet at some decline. Barley has been de-.
pressed. Oats have declined slightly on the spot and have fallen
several cents for options, while there has, in each case, been a
fair business. To-day the market was fairly aetive at some re¬
covery from the late decline ; No. 2 mixed sold at 43@43%c. for

year,

Rye has been

December and 43%@44c. for January.
The following are closing quotations:
FLOUR.

G364

No. 2 spring...$
No. 2 winter ...1

bbl. $2 40®

3 00®

3 15®

Superfine
Spring wheat extras..

4 10®

5 25®
5 50®
5 00®

do bakers’,
Wis. & Minn, rye mix.
Minn, clear and stra’t
Winter sliipp’g extras.

3 90®
6 00®
5 50®

Patents, spring
Patents, winter

I

May-June..,
Nov.-Dee

4 I
G7g4 I Jan.-Feb
Feb.-Mar
5o9G4 |I Nov
G
>ee.-J:m
5«ln i I1 1Feb.-Mat1? , 1 Mar.-Apr

'n°e 1

5^9G4-@60G.j
oO-Vi

Mar.-Apr

G

0i64

6%4
56og4
560G4®6i(;4

563G4

GL-,4

5<>iG4,®goG4
5’Vi
GCi4

Apr-May
May-June
June-July..."

6%4
6^4
G7G4

M., November 10, 1882.

quiet for the better grades,

Corn meal-

Westem, &c

Brandywine, &o....
Buckw’t flour.lOOlbs.

which have

5 60
7 00
5 25
3 90

4 15® 4 25
4 30® 4 50
3 30® 3 6d

Rye—Car lots

Wheat—

Spring.per bush.
Spring No. 2

®

....

®1 09
®1 13

....

87

Red winter
Red winter, No. 2

Boat loads
Oats—

....

®109i4
®1 10
1 08q®l 08^8
80% ® 89
107
76

White....

White No. 1
Corn—West, mixed
West. mix. No. 2.

91
87
92
85

White

Yellow
Buckwheat

®

40
42
40

Canada No. 1....
Canada bright...
Canada No. 2—
State, 4-rowed...
State, 2-rowed...

York Produce Exchange

Receipts of flour and grain at Western
for the week ending Nov. 4, 18S2 :
Flour,
Wheat,
Corn,
At—

(19G tbs.)

Chicago

96,422

....

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit

(56 lbs.)
(60 lbs.)
945,235 1,057,547

100.GG8
29,312

218,447
414,145

3,922

294.378

1,428
51.191

Cleveland
St. Lour:
Peom

1,7L)0

bush.

bush.

15.750

154,833
16,678
1,500

41,500

28,480
180,-100

1

597.157
9,6 SO

43

®
i>
@

53%
42%
46%

t>

93

42^3)

Barley—

921s

@ -88
93
®
87
®

(From the “ New

Mixed
White
No. 2 mixed
No. 2 white

@1 02

Weekly.”)

lake and river
Oats,

90

®
®
®

Barley,

bush.

bush.

(32 lbs.)

(48 lbs.)

95
83
p

>r: s

Rye,
bush.

(56 lbs.

280,537 116,901
13,750
66,800 209,147
107,091
5,281 3,890
!87
87.376 16,513
7,000. 2,751 10*241
3 50,633 114.922

680,764

157',225

I6.20U 15,500

Duiutn

Total..
Same time

.

2.34,79 9 2,520,842

’81. 178,364

1,-55 5,188

1881-82.
Flour

bbls.

Wheat
Corn
Oats

bush.

1,257,389 645,401

6,957,990

1879-80.

1880-81.

7,003,930

178,309

484,19 3 93,301
to Nov. 4f

738,594 1,8 74,103 7 1 7,918
from Dec. 26, 1881,

Total receipts at same ports
18S2, inclusive, for four years :

EADSTUFFS.
Friday, P.

City shipping extras. $5 25®
Southern bakers' and
family brands
5 75®
South’n sLip’g extras. 4 50®
Rye flour, superfine.. 3 60®

3 25
3 GO
3 85
5 00
G 25
G 00
7 00
4 40
8 50
7 25

GRAIN.

bbls.

Apr.-May

Flour has been very

corn

...5026464

-

.

..

6364 @2(34

..

Nov

55yH4
539G4
559ti4
Feb.-Mar... ...501fl4
®6O04 ®61g4

..63g4®4< 4
6d04®7G4

.

July-Aug..

6

Nov

Nov
Nov.-Dee...
Dec.-Jau...
Jan.-Fcb...

Mar.-Apr... 56164®62g4
.

563»,

Jan.-Feb...

Nov
6%U
Nov.-Dee...
560(34
Dec.-Jan... 559(34 ®60g4
Feb.-Mar.. .500G4®6i64

...5^,4 3 6

Dec.-Jan... 5^%:4 a &Sr;4
Jau.-Feb... .53V,4 <2 oH(34
Feb.-Mar... 55PC43By64

May-Jurie

Jan.-Feb...

Tuesday.

<r-

Apr.-May..

62rt4
55G„4

June-July.
Apr.-May
July-Aug..

Nov

5«V,i

Nov
Nov.-Dec...

grades of winter alone selling at all freely. Prices
steady for these, and barely so for the other descriptions.
Wheat has latterly been in good damand for export, and
though in the fore part of the week there was a steady de¬
cline there has been a recovery of confidence with increasing
activity, and prices have advanced to about the figures of a
week ago. The supply has been gradually increasing at Chi¬
cago of late, however, and speculators on the bull side have
shown considerable caution, though operators on the opposite
tack have been equally cautious about taking large risks. The
result has been that until yesterday comparatively little

the

Indian

Flat.

$

Dull.

[Vol. XXXV

1878-79.

5,534,605

5,803,280

72,211,512

"88.379,511

_

40,355,825
63,323,297 119,614.332
137,715,596
66,770.937
31,957,448
36,840,397
39,870,141
7,620.314
8.189,353
9.476,255
3,316,400
3,222,321

86,126,223
27,964,384
8.317,12?
4 329,64o

accordingly been, to a great extent, nominal in value. The
grades of winter wdieat brands below $5, liowrever, have latterly Barley
2,815,797
been in good demand for export, and, as a rule, not being plen¬ Rye
215,116,892
Total grain
182,286,727 217,222,273 255,881,270 ports from
tiful, have been quite firm in most instances. There is a large
Comparative receipts (crop movement) at same _
supply both of spring and winter, with the exception of the
July
31, 1882, to Nov. 4, 1SS2, as
lowei grades of the latter, and the tone of the market is unsat¬
vioas three years *.
..
isfactory to holders. To-day the market was generally quiet,



....

compared] with the V™'*

1

1882.J

NiJtEMCER 11.

1881.

1880.

.bbla.

2,683,398

2,547,835

2,265,243

2,058,341

....bush.

37.978.643

1,632,093

19.932,402
49.711,268
11.336,783
4.193,065
2,222,934

39.261,788
47,064.348
16,930,036
5,014.578
1,954,046

48,385,636
30.267,006
10,902,317
5,877.392

79,669,905

86,451,452

110,224,79^

97,849.455

Jylta

17,579.861

"

17,820.556

Rye

Total ffrain...

1879.

Flour...

-

Wheat...
Corn
Cats

1891-82.

1880-91.

..bhls.

6,932,103

7,593.853

bush.

48.159.351
53.316,675

141,800,311 181.G01.2o0

215.831.238

•

Total train

....

Rail shipments
weeks

ended:

Flour

Barley
Rye

from Western lake

Week
Flour,
ending—
oots.
Nov. 4. ..276.603
Oct. 23...292.306
Oct. 21...258.M5
Oct. 14...261,330

155,526

155,146

133,116

604,288

271,101
1,002,152

3*9,755
523 906

499,300
135,66 %
82.104

3 43.421
345,023

9v;9,661
78,84 4
69,019

291,918
53.927

2.030.92 5

1,271,215

1.255.164

Tot., 4 vy. 1.088.75 4
iw’ka 81..773,261

Corn,
bush.

1,298.226
1,365,6 05
1.28 1,100
1.9 10,06 L

p ►res

188<X
Week

Barley.

Bye.

bush.

859.789
890.573

DM,142
729.598
7*90.29 1

1,107.006

731.839

Boston
Portland

Montreal

81,609
1,100
21,305
28,393
27,951

,

Philadelphia...
Baltimore
New Orleans..

Wheal,

ills.
bush.
152.714 1,409.900

.

,

,

23,839

.

76,500
242,437
146,750
430,500
211,390

Corn,

264.897

98.351

262.533 135,720
298,553 75.971

153,384
86,575
4,200

49,300
21,800
17,450

431.780 401,814

434,831 326,899

Exports from United States seaboard ports for

Nov. 4,1882:

Wheat,

Com,

34,263

110,579

1,382

250

199,124

250

491

26,411

9,222

2,050
1,000
2,955

bush.
80.721

bush.

4,363

ending

1.146

205.226
80,258

7,816

88,035

5

3

Total for w’k 191,546
Same time ’81. 88,812

1,537.93 4
883,454

82.3 >8
773,933

5,107

Pea*,

bush.

bush.

46,956

10,717

Importations

H
P

In store at—
New York
Do. afloat (est.)

Albany

Buffalo

Chicago

Corn,

bush.

Duluth

Toledo.;
Detroit

Oswego

650.000
10,600
913,391

24,000

.548,774

Boston

Toronto
Montreal

Philadelphia

Peoria

Indianapolis
Kansas City
.

^.....

Down Mississippi.

On rail
On lake
On canal

115,709
112,219
257,259

2,176,834

Tot. Nov.
4,’82.17,742,853
Tot. Oct.
28,
Tot. Oct. 21, *82.16,07s,303
’82.14,925,811
Tot. Oct.
14, '82.14,498,914
Tot. Oct.
7,
’82.13,9
16.219
Tot. Nov.
5, ’81.21,155,954

919,301
7,728

182.759

12,200
43,230
71,044
16.000
41,136
3,734
1,866
636,129

1,096,657
45,174
757.117
767,513

77.500
88,121

6,624

176.526
2.696
213.600
343,954

42,000

11,500
25,835

79,095
6,215
135.000
98.645

134,000

Bt. Louis

Oats,

bush.
bush.
285,814 1 ,918.451

4,290,412

3,367,770
202,979
030,000
654,434
255,005

Milwaukee

Baltimore

Wheat,

1,520.190
57,758
‘

4,246
88,790
85.061

2,000
80,877
11,824

Barley,

2

21,380

120,158

61,000
109,000
265,939
156,458
164,940

56.000

5,000
2,973
595.000
167,965
10,627

50

215.483

12,216

229 3t 9

17,089

-

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16.609

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41,670

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25,000

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28,315
501

17,837
1,783

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92.491
20,500

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to Cl cc too
** co-i-i co

to^i
CO m

7^1

■

X

©CO

©*©

12,585
mm'm

generally expected, the dry goods trade was
the early
very quiet in
part of the past
week, owing to the elections. Since
t en some
improvement has been
developed in the jobbing
ranches of the
trade, more seasonable weather
having enabled
^tuners to
p.ace



©

®

fc

■

COM
HHH

O' M
M <1
Ot to fO cn —

to

Friday, P. M., November 10, 1882.

coaoiddabie quantities of

CO

249,788

_

3,837.443 4.313.500 2,068.133
4,491.938 4,659.788 1,654,865
5.676.554 5,067.04 2 1,213,038

4,’170,585

0

;

p :
1

5;

<1^1
J^-©

4,003.361 4,175.772 2.572,329
1,084,018
3,669,1 45 4,186,410 2.139,919 948,793

24,958,991

Ml •

•

44,500
37,348

the dry goods
trade.
As

0

'

0

©.

p.

E:

27,570

815,933
195,236

•

pr

-

19,230
-

~
o;
Q

CD *

5

0

£ SToSc 2
S
5 p

®

r

c

0

,

0

Rye,

bush.

p

£• 'n ® o <

h

S

Sr
o

as

bush.

14,075
200,177
92,500

was

ft

S

46,956 80.423
72,462 148,984

water, Nov. 4, 1882,

Dry Goods.

importations of dry goods at this port for the
ending Nov. 9, 1882, and since January 1, and the same week
facts
for the corresponding periods of 1881, are as
follows:

69,706

37,356

of

The

The visible
supply of grain, comprising the stocks in
at the
granary
principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard
ports, and in transit by rail and

follows:

so were

and
only a moderate business was effected by jobbers. hands,
Silks ruled
quiet, but small parcels of plushes and velvets were in
request. Dress goods were inactive, and linen and white steady
gooefs
lacked animation.
Laces, handkerchiefs and fancy
holiday
goods were severally distributed in moderate
quantities.

61,861
60,822

Rye,

bush.
854.7 L2

Philadelphia..

week

Oats,

bbls.
112,638
50

900

49,905

.

Flour,

24.956

43,544
27,000

4,250
39,411

quiet with

satinets, but a moderate trade in iliese
fab¬
rics was done by jobbers.
White, scarlet and blue flannels were
taken in small parcels to a fair
amount, and agents continued
to make liberal deliveries of dress
flannels, suitings and sack¬
ings on account of back orders. B'ankets were
in light
demand,
aside from the better grades, for which
there was some
inquiry.
Worsted dress goods, shawls and skirts
were slow of
sale, as
were carpets, knit underwear
and hosiery.
Foreign Dry Goods have been dull in
importers’

busA.

2,000
964

agents, and

Rye,

bush.

215,250 321,300
120,200 10,000

buyers having
clothing woolens have been

pretty well cleaned up, and desirable makes are
fairly steady in
price. Spring cassimeres, suitings and worsteds are sold
ahead
in nearly all the most
popular makes, but indifferent.styles are in
some stock.
Kentucky jeans and doeskins have been

week

Barley,

bush.

.

Baltimore
New Orleans..

ness was

317,759 191,777

Oats,

bush.

Total week.. 337,113 2,569.527
332,709
Oor. week’81.. 279.450 1,433,370
1.653,512

From—
New York
Boston
Portland
Montreal

restricted in volume,
comparatively few
appeared in the market. Heavy

bash.

5.987,992
4. 369,25 I 3,156 072 1.142.712
501.819
3,129.579 10, 011,8 >7 2.299,535
753.548 316.862

Flour,
,

Domestic Woolen Goods.—There was a
fair movement in
men’s-wear woolens, in execution of back
orders, but new busi¬

for last four weeks:

Oats,
bush.

1,510.79 7

nor converters

“near futures” and
3j|@3 5-16 for 56x60s. Prints continued dull
and unsettled and there was a
very light call for ginghams
and cotton dress goods.

315,975

Receipts of flour and grain at seaboard ports for the
At-

jobbers

1879.

ended iNov. 4:
New York

seemingly gauged by actual requirement—neither
having shown any disposition to antici¬
pate future wants—and transactions were
light in the aggregate.
The best makes of
plain and colored cottons are
unchanged in
price and mostly steady, because of the moderate
y-ipply, but
outside brands are less firm and
plentiful enough. Print cloths
ruled quiet and
steady at 3Yq@3 ll-16c. for 64x0s “spots” and
was

and river ports for the

.bush.

bush.

520 to Argentine Republic, 240 to
Hayti, 137 to
to Chili, 104 to Sandwich
Islands,
103 to British
West Indies, 65 to Santo
&c.
The
Domingo,
demand at first
hands

180.038 «30

Week
Nov. 8.

Wheat,

Britain,

4,791.953

Nov. 6.

2.211.837

of

satisfactorily.

Hamburg, 113

3.843,578

179,020

shipments from sam-;

of

Domesmic Cotton Goods.—The
exports of cotton goods for the
were 3,587
packages, including 1,275 to China, 578 to
Great

19,826,860

..bbla.

Total...,

the sales resulted

78,650,486

1891.
Week
Nov. 5.

479.375
815,933
236.464
78.777

rooms were

poorly attended—none
having been of special importance—and few

72,975.753

1882.
Week
Noe. 4.

.......

Rlit and lake

64.157,477

3.745,907
1,993,755

...

auction

week

117,727,410
27,397,083
3,441.817
2,660.381

on

present.
The
the offerings

1878-79
6,302 254

4,517,666

44.567.159
100,363,557
30.930,872

31,659.935
3.991.794
2.703.5S9

made

^

1879-80.

r

transacted by importers. Prices
change, but the market cannot •
strong, and it is probable that concessions would be
certain fabrics if
buyers were less apathetic than at

have not uudergons
any material
be reported

JZVt ITr

Dee. 20, 1881. to Mov.

553

goods in the channels of consumption. The
demand for dom¬
estic cotton and woolen
goods at first hands con'inued
light
and a very limited business was

2,417,104

Comparative shipments of flour and er»in f™™

Barley
Bye

CHRONICLE.

1882.
Flour
Wheat

THE

-

•.

r -1 <-*
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— -•

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O'.

c'

►

s

re»

V,

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*

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,

THE CHRONICLE.

554

[Vol. XXXV.
Insurance.

Commercial Cards

Financial.

Henry Bros. & Warfield,
BROKERS

OFFICE OF THE

IN

STOCKS AND BONDS, UNLISTED SE¬
CURITIES AND MINING STOCKS,
52 BROADWAY.
Douglas Henry.
Charles Setcn Henry.
member N.Y. Stock Ex. Vn'sber N. Y. Min. Stock ExDaniel 'WARFIELD.

Dan T almage’s Sons 8c Co
AND COMMISSION

John S. J ames & Co.,
Commission Stock
No.

BROAD

10

STREBT,

NEW

NEW

10, 12 & 14 East Bay, Charleston,
108 Bay Street, Savannah,

Stocks, Bonds, Ac., bought and sold for cash or on

Farmer,

Solicitor and Attorney.

Pr&riioea in the District Circuit and Supreme
Coarts of the United States aiid of the State, in
all classes of cases. Has no other business, and de¬
votes his personal attention vnd all his time exclu¬

sively to his profession.

Refers to Bank of Monroe.

Joy, Lincoln 8c Motley,
MUDGE, SAYVYER & CO.,

43 A 45 White Street,

15 Chauncey Street

NEW YORK,

BOSTON

Ocean Mills

John B. Manning,
G Wall

No.

AND

SOUTHERN
A

EUerton New

SECURITIES

New York,

Barrett,

IS6 Middle

BLEACHED SHIRTINGS
AND SHEETINGS,

AND

PRINTS, DENIMS, TICKS, DUCKS, &c.

BROKERS,

Towels, Quilts, White Goods and Hosiery

Street,

PORTLAND,

Boston, Philadelphia,

SELLING AGENTS FOR LEADING BRANDS

BROWN

AND

White Mig. Co.,

Bliss, Fabyan 8c Co.,

State, Municipal and Railway Bonds and Coupons
bought and sold at best market rates. Investors oi
dealers wishing to buy or sell are invited to communlcata wllli ub.
Member of the New York Stock Exchange.

BANKERS

Clilcopee Mlg. Co.,

Mills,

Saratoga Victory Mig. Co.,
Hosiery and Yarn Mills.

York City,

SPECIALTY.

Swan &

Co., Atlantic Cotton Mills,

Peabody Mills.

BROKER.

Street, New

Drills, Sheetings, dc., tor Export Trade.

MAINE.

Dealers In Government, State, County, City and
Rail rr ad Bonds, Bunk Stocky, &c.
Desirable Investment Securities constantly on

Brinckerhoff, Turner

band.

8c

George Eustis 8c Co.,

Manufacturers and Dealers in

COTTON

CANVAS, FELTING
DUCK,
CAR
COVERING, BAGGING. RAVENS DUCK, SAIL
TWINES, &C., “ ONTARIO ” SEAMLESS
BAGS, “AWNING STRIPES.”

CINCINNATI, OHIO.

Sons,

Also, Agents

BANKERS,
And Dealers in Governments, Stocks
and Investment Securities,
Opposite Second St
32 SOUTH STREET,

UNITED
A

'Hare Western

Union wires in their offices, by
of which immediate communication can be
had with nil commercial points in the country.
Es¬

incarw

BUNTING

No.

109

Duane

Columbia

Street.

Bicycles.

lawyers, ministers, editors, iner* hunts,
&c., Ac. Send 3-cent stamp
for elegantly illustrated SG-puge
catalogue to

cited.

The Pope
042

SPECULATION ANJ> INVESTMENT
IN STOCKS AND SHARES
a

nmisitm

EXPLANATORY
ruiiid

post free

upon

BOOK, just
application.

published, gratis

realised, and the possibility of losses reduced

to

• Minimum.

OPINIONS OP THE PRESS.
Civil Sert'ice Gazette—'The system rccommendc

January, 1881, to 31st Decem¬
ber, 1881
$4,110,176 72
Losses paid during the same

period.
Returns of Premiums and Ex¬

$024,227 02

penses*

The

Company has the following Assets, via.:

United States and State of New
York Stock, City,
other Stocks

Herring’s Safes.
TI1E

IN

CHAMPION

RECORD

ALL GREAT

FIRES.

STATIONERS AND

ceivable

1,631,294 23

Cash in Bank

347,765 99

$13,165,466 40

SIX PER CENT INTEREST




the outstand-

or their legal representatives, on and
Tuesday, the Seventh of February noxt.

thereof,

TIIE

CERTIFICATES of

OUTSTANDING

the issue of 1877 will be redeemed and

paid to

thereof, or their legal representa¬
tives, on and after Tuesday, the Seventh of Feb¬
ruary next, from which date all interest thereon
the holders

will

cease.

A

produced at
canceled.

The certificates to bo

tbe time of payment and

OF FORTY PER CENT

DIVIDEND
on

the net earned premiums

of tbe

Company, for the year ending 31st December,
1831, for which certificates will be issued on
ind after Tuesday, the Second of May next
By order of the Board,
H.

J.

CHAPMAN,

Secretary

T R U S T E E S:3

J. D. Jones,

Horace Gray,

Charles Dennis,
W. H. H. Moore,

Edmund W. Corlies,

Lewis Curtis,
Charles H. Russell,

Adolph Lemoyne

John Elliott,

William E. Dodge,

Royal Phelps,
Youngs,

C. A. Hand,
John D. Hewlett,

Cole,

J. D. JONES,

STREET.

SQUARE.)

HERRING
251 & 252

&

CO.,

Broadway, New York,

W. H. H.
A. A.

Degroot,

Henry Collins,
JohnL. Riker.

President.

CHARLES DENNIS,

or¬

Marshall,

George W. Lane,
Edwin D. Morgan,
Robert L. Stuart,
James G. De Forest,
Samuel Willotts,
Charles D. Levericb,
William Bryce,
William H. Fogg,
Thomas B. Coddington,
Horace K. Thurber,
William

William H. Webb,
Charles P. Burdett,

PRINTERS.

Bobt. B. Mintura,

Charles H.

Josiah O. Low

1SS5.

XXT New concerns organizing will have their
ders promptly executed.

(JIANOVER

on

eertificates of profits will be paid to the holders

Benjamin H. Field,

CO.,

Stationery.

WILLIAM

491,148 18

Notes and Bills Re¬

Wm. Sturgis,

Supply Banks, Bankers, Stock Brokers and Corpo¬
rations with complete outfits of Account Books ana

So. 1

1,729,500 00

Company, estimated at.
Premium

Thomas F.

&

and

Real Estate and Claims due the

Gordon W. Burnham,
A. A. Raven,

This system com

London E.O., England.

Sears

$8,965,758 00

Loans secured by Stocks
otherwise

James Low,
David Lane,

SWORN BROKERS, No. 7 DRAPERS GARDENS

ESTABLISHED

Bank and

St„ Near Third Aye

sneads itself i\s being a very safe one.” News ot th
VForld—" This book is well worth reading. One can
ootdo better than retuln their services.”

&

80

New York Riding School,
214 E. 34th

easy to comprehen
John Hull—'An easy and apparently saf
system,
of
worthy
public
confidence.”
Court Joitmal■**
An excellent way of speculating, ably set forth

GUTTERIDGE

$1,775,882

Mfg. Co.,

Uy Messrs. Guttertdge & Col, is

W.

57

Washington St., Boston, Mass

uad safe.”

Civilian—"An .'nforesting book.

$5,627,021

....

risk.

OPERATORS IN STOCK EXCHANGE SECURI¬
TIES should test this -system, by which large profits
are

10

Premiums marked off from 1st

declared

Thousands in daily use by doctors,

pecial attention given to purchase and sale of Viri4,isra Consols, Ten-forties, Deferred ancl all issues
<of the State, and to all classes of Southern State,
•City and Railway Securities. Correspondence so-

with

COMPANY.

full.snpply, all Widths and Colors, always In stock.

,

MD,,

STATES

$4,039,487

1,587,534 47

Total Marine Premiums

And all kinds of

:

December, 1881 :

off 1st January, 1881

after

BALTIMORE,

the 31st

Amount.

o K K R s

Win, Fisher 6c

on

Premiums

Co.,

COTTON SAILDUCK
b

of its affairs

SUCCESSORS TO

E. R.

AGENTS FOR

BANKER

YORK, January 25, 1882.

The Trustees, in conformity to the Charter of
the Company, submit the following
on Marine Risks from
1st January, 1881, to 31st De¬
cember, 1881
Premiums on Policies not marked

MONROE, LOUISIANA.

Counselor,

Co.,
Statement

41 & 13 North Peters St., N. Orleans.

margin.

W. W.

Mutual Insurance

96 Wall Street, New York,

YORK.

Warren T. James.

John s. James,
Member N. Y. Stock Exch.

MERCHANTS IN

R I C E,

Brokers,

ATLANTIC

FACTORS,

MILLERS,

Vice-President

MOORE, 2d Vice-Presidect.

RAVEN, 3d

Vice-President


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102