View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

HUNTS

MERCHANTS’

%

MAGAZINE,.

^itia

INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.
[Entered, according to act of Congress, in tbc year 1880, by Wm. B. Dana & Co., in the office of tbe Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C.]

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL

SATURDAY, MARCH 27, 1880.

VOL. 30.

THE

CHRONICLE.

Latest Monetary and Commer¬
cial English News
311
307
and Trustees
Mr. Gould as a Railroad King. 308 Commercial and Miscellaneous
News
313
Excessive Corporate Taxation 309
Hartmann
and the United
States
310
THE BANKERS’ GAZETTE.

Sayings Banks Expenditures
.

...

Quotations of Stocks and Bonds 318

Money Market, U. 8. Securi¬
ties, Railway Stocks, Foreign
Exchange, New York City
315

Banks, etc
THE

Commercial Epitome
Cotton

319
Local Securities
Investments, and State, City
and Corporation Finances... 320

COMMERCIAL TIMES.
323

| Dry Goods

conspicuous examples b&
freedom in the use of depositors’ funds” in case of
eighteen banks, all but two of which are in this city or in
Brooklyn. Three-fourths of the expenditures named are
for gratuities to employes and officers, and in some of
the best banks this proportion equals or exceeds ninetenths; tbe rest is for portraits of trustees, entertain¬

schedule of “

CONTENT8.

330

NO. 770.

ments, etc.~
We admit

a

few of the most

freely and commend heartily the present

324 1 Imports, Receipts and Exports 331
329 '

Superintendent’s skill and fidelity, by which, aided by a
good law, he has made State supervision, in one branch
of it, a real service and a sharp contrast to the debauch¬
(£Ixr0ukle.
ery which has overwhelmed it in the other.
And yet
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is issued every Satur¬
we must express very serious doubts whether inquiries
day morning, with the latest news up to midnight of Friday.
of this sort are not, or are not likely or liable to-be,
[Entered at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., as second-class
mail matter.]
•
poshed with an excess of zeal, not wisely directed, and
TERMS OF SUB3CRIPTtON-PAYABLE IN ADVANCE:
possibly productive of more harm than good. Respect¬
For One Year (including postage)
$10 20.
ing entertainments, there will be no dispute anywhere
For Six Months
do
6 10.
Annual subscription iu London (including postage)
£2 7s.
about their impropriety—subject to such explanatory
do
Sixmos.
do
do
.1
1 8s.
Subscriptions will be continued until ordered stopped by a written and justifying circumstances as may exist in particular
order, or at the publication office. The Publishers cannot l>e responsible
for Remittances unless made by Drafts or Post-Office Money Orders.
about their being
cases—or
contrary
to
law.
Loudon Office.
So-called
“gratuities” are another matter. In the
The London office of the Chronicle is at No. 5^Austin Friars, Old Broad
Street, where subscriptions will be taken at the prices above named.
merely legal view, it wculd seem that the nec¬
A dverl IscmenU.
Transient advertisements are published at 25 cents per line for each
essary power to regulate salaries, vested in
trus¬
insertion, but when definite orders are given for five, or more, insertions,
liberal discount is made. Special Notices in Banking and Financial
tees, must cover tbe power to determine time and
column 00 cents per line, each insertion.
manner of such compensation as well as amounts; hence
WILLIAM B. DANA,
)
WILLIAM B. DANA Sc 00., Publishers,
JOHN G. FLOYD, JK. $
79 fie 81 William Street, NEW YORK.
that such payments cannot be contrary to law.
Post Office Box 4592.
We do
not care, however, to discuss that point, because the
tgp A neat file cover is furnished at 50 cents; postage on the same is
IScents. Volumes bound for subscribers at $1 20.
/ purely legal question is not the important one as respects
The word is a misnomer as applied to them.
ISP For a complete set of the Commercial and Financial Chroni¬ these items.
cle—July, 1865, to date—or Hunt's Merchants’ Magazine, 1839 to
The $5,000 given in 1864 to tbe Sanitary Commission
1871. inquire at the office.
^
we regard as a questionable expenditure, and there are
Breadstuffs

a

ISST* The ‘‘General

Quotations of Stocks and Bonds,” occupy¬ doubtless other individual instances that would not

seem

ing six pages, and heretofore published in the Chronicle on the justifiable to business men generally; but as a class
last Saturday in each month, will hereafter be published the
“gratuities” to employes canpot be reasonably con¬
first of each month. These quotations will be published in the demned.
A payment of $550 to a policeman who
same issue of the Chronicle as the “ Financial Review of the
arrested some burglars may have been wise.

and lowest «prices of stocks, &c.,
As for these payments in general, they are not gratuities
and will appear on the fupt Saturday in each month, Pursuant at
all, but rewards of good service and incentives to its
to this arrangement, the “ General Quotations” are not in the continuance, or
temporary additions to salary which, for
Chronicle to-day, but will be published next week, April 3.
good reasons, it is thought best to make in that way,

Month,” giving the highest

SAVINGS BANKS EXPENDITURES AND TRUS¬
TEES.

Superintendent Lamb has just transmitted to the
Assembly, in response to an inquiry by resolution, the
substance of the replies received by him in answer to his
circular of last September, addressed to the savings
banks, relative to alleged illegal expenditures. The total
amount of expenditures found and not considered
authorized is $309,112. The Albany dispatch gives a



particularly when (as during mnch of the time covered)
there has £een a wide change in living expenses. In
fact, there is hardly a corporation or even a private busi¬
ness firm that does not make “ gratuities ” or presentsto
certain employes now and then, there appearing good
reasons for so doing rather than making a permanent
advance of salary. What is thus done, at discretion and
for good business reasdns, in our private affairs, may be
equally wise in savings banks for just the same reasons,
and ought to be within the discretion of trustees. The

THE CHRONICLE.

308

itol. xxx,

Bank, for instance, appears to have paid the direction mentioned or not, we may be sure of one
$4,625 “to deceased veteran officers ” in 1872-79, and thing, and that is that his railroad plans are still unfin¬
$16,080 to employes in 1865-72; its trustees are among ished. The force of this statement will be better under¬
the most substantial and conscientious of onr business stood if we have in mind the incompleteness as well as
men, serving without compensation, and an expendi¬ the completeness of the present system.
Almost anyone who reads the papers is aware that
ture
of $20,000 in course of 14 years, we presume,
may
safely be taken as not having been permit¬ Mr. Gould has been making important acquisitions
ted by them without sufficient reasons. Even the por¬ during the last twelve months, but there are few, even
trait business, although admittedly liable to abuse * and among those well informed on such matters, who have
better let alone, is not wholly without a plea in its ex¬ an adequate idea of the magnitude of the confederation
For the purpose of
cuse, in the fact that the purchase of a portrait may be of roads now controlled by him.
a mode of honoring men who have given valuable time
indicating wha£ routes are under his management, we
and effective use of trained faculties, the “gratuity” in present below a brief but very interesting summary of
the case having been from and not to them. The fact the lines he is now operating, either directly or indi¬
is that it is easy to condemn these things sweepingly off¬ rectly, giving the leading characteristics of each. It has
hand, but that the circumstances and reasons in each been our aim to embrace all the companies under his
case are not on the surface and are hard to communicate,
control; but in cases where the ownership was not
wheras the fact of the expenditure is a matter of record. apparent the lines have been omitted. It is quite pos¬
What we have repeatedly urged about the inexped¬ sible, therefore, that some minor roads should be added
iency pf too closely hampering trustees in investments, to the subjoined exhibit.
1,930 miles.
St. Louis & Pacific
expenditures, and routine details, presents a view that Wabash
By this system control is secured of—
A direct line between Council Bluffs and St. Louis.
ought never to be overlooked. ' Restriction is good, but
A circuitous line between Council Bluffs and Toledo.
An almost direct line between Kansas City and St. Louis.
it can be pushed too far. If trustees are to have no dis¬
A line between Kansas City and Toledo.
cretion left them, their places might as well be filled by
A line between Kansas City and Chicago—Chicago, how¬
ever, would have to be reached via St. Louis, a very
roundabout route, unless the Missouri Kansas & Texas
^dummies; the substantial business men, whom it is a
used between Moberly and Hannibal, and con¬
nection made by way of Springfield and Bement, and
prime point to interest in savings-bank management,
this would still be a very indirect line.
A pretty direct line between St. Joseph and St. Louis.
may naturally conclude that it is not worth while for
A tolerably direct line between St. Louis and Chicago,
them to leave their own affairs for the purpose of taking
and between St. Louis and Toledo.
Toledo Peoria & Warsaw
247
part in it, if the law is to prescribe exactly what invest¬
line from Burlington and Keokuk to Indiana
Affords
State line, connecting with the Wabash at Lafayette
ments they shall make and exactly how they shall con¬
by means of the Cincinnati Lafayette & Chicago.
554
'*
duct every detail. If their judgment is not to have Missouri Pacific
This road gives a second line between St. Louis and
Kansas City, and between St. Louis and St. Joseph,
room to act, their presence and their names may better
and was probably secured to avoid competition.
794
“
\>e absent, for the former will be only a disturbance of Missouri Kansas & Texas
Connects the Wabash system and the Kansas Pacific
and Missouri Pacific with the Texas <fc Pacific.
their time, and the latter will serve to deceive the public
Texas & Pacific
^^4.
**
To be extended so as to.'connect with Southern Pacific
by a profession of service which is not real.
and form a new trans-Continental line.
It is unwise, therefore, in our judgment, to risk dis¬ Union Pacific (Consolidated line)
1,825 “
Roads controlled by consolidated company,
including Central Branch Union Pacific, St. Joseph
gusting this class of men and diverting their interest from
& Western, Utah Southern, Utah & Northern, Col¬
the savings banks. At least, if there is any intention of
orado Central, <fcc
1,597 “
The Union Pacific (original company) gives a direct line
between Ogden and Council Bluffs, there connecting
acting upon the opinion of the Attorney-General—that
with Wabash system for points already mentioned.
restitution of the money unlawfully expended should be
The Kansas Pacific is a direct line between Denver and
Kansas City, connecting at the latter point with the
made by the trustees, and that it is the Superintendent’s
Wabash and Missouri Pacific for 8t. Louis, Chicago and
Toledo.
duty to demand such restitution—we must deem the
The Denver Pacific connects the Kansas Pacific at Dej^
Seamen’s

were

‘

even

a

•

•

......«•••«...........

-•••

*

“

be deprecated, because it could
not be practically successful, and because Stirling up
these old transactions publicly may tend to excite dis¬

attempt especially to

There is no need of interference.
would do wisely to let the savings

trust.
ture

The Legisla¬

banks alone,
disturbing the Superintend¬

altering the law nor
ent
On the other hand, the other field of State super¬
vision—that of insurance—is in crying need of atten¬
tion, and the politician who has brought it to the last
depth of prostitution is as yet holding his place.
neither

MR. QOTJLD AS A

RAILROAD KING.

report was current the early part of the week of
a combination of the Cincinnati Hamilton & Dayton,
Cleveland Columbus Cincinnati & Indianapolis, In¬
The

“

ver with the Union Pacific at Cheyenne.
The Colorado Central is a parallel line to
Pacific.

the Denver

The Central Branch Union Pacific is chiefly important
because if it were not included in the system it would
be a competitor for a portion of the Kansas traffic.
The St. Joseph & Western connects

Union Pacific at Grand Island
The Utah & Northern and the Utah

St. Joseph with the

.

'

Southern are roads

extending north and south, the former northward from
Ogden, uT T., through Idaho, and the latter southward

from Salt Lake City.
Denver & Rio Grande
From Denver southward,

almost entirely through Colo-

329

M

144

‘*

IttUV.

Denver south

Park & Pacific

Road completed from Denver to Buena
tension to Leadville in progress.
Total miles

now

controlled

Roads shortly to be included:
Missouri Iowa & Nebraska
Iowa Central—Alhia to Northwood
Total

Vista, Col. Ex¬

7,864 miles.

113
191

“
*

8,168 miles.

glance at the foregoing synopsis will suffice to
impress the reader, not only with the comprehensivenesi
of the system, and the compactness of the organization,
but also with the fact that vast as the system is, it still
lacks connection with one or two important point®. Th®
number of miles embraced, if we include the Missouri
Iowa & Nebraska and Iowa Central roads, which it i®
Even

a

dianapolis Cincinnati & Lafayette, and Ohio & Mis¬
sissippi, aggregating 1,622 miles, in the interest of
Mr. Jay Gould. That report was subsequently denied,
but it seems to be true in one particular at least,
namely as regards a combination of the Cleveland
Columbus Cincinnati &Indianapolis with the Cin¬
cinnati Hamilton & Dayton, by the purchase of a expected will shortly be brought into the Wabash con¬
controlling interest in the latter by the former, though solidation, is, it will be seen, 8,168, about one-tenth of th®
it does not yet appear that this was made in the interest entire mileage of the United States. It is safe to say
of any one in particular, but rather in the interest of the that, as far as mileage is concerned, this is the largeii
roads concerned. Still, whether*Mr. Gould has obtained combination of roads in the control of any one individuil
or is seeking further expansion of his railroad -system in or corporation in the world.
The Pennsylvania system



March

21. 1880.]

THE CHRONICLE.

309

Ohio & Mississippi, was the most important part of thecomprises about 5,400 miles. If the Vanderbilt roads,
rumor.
The Ohio & Mississippi is very favorably
New York Central, Lake Shore, Michigan Central, and
Canada Southern—which, though not directly controlled located, being the shortest line "between St. Louis and
Cincinnati. It would be a very desirable acquisition to
by Gould, are yet operated in close connection with the
the Wabash, and yet it seems almost indispensable to
same system—are added on, we have a total of 11,549
the Baltimore <fc Ohio, in whose interest it is now oper¬
miles virtually under the same management. This is
ated.
Perhaps we have in these facts an explanation
equivalent to more than one-eighth of our total mileage.
But the Gould system is sufficiently gigantic even for the repeated and violent fluctuations, of late, in the
stock of this road.
1 T
without the Vanderbilt roads. Beginning at Ogden, it
Such, in brief, is a description of the combination of
extends eastward, reaching such important points as
roads now under the control of Mr. Gould, and the
Omaha, Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago, and Toledo,
and a host of minor cities. By means of the Missouri particulars in which the system still seems imperfects
Kansas & Texas and the Texas & Pacific, points as far Any further expansion will probably be eastward, or td
secure connections with the points referred to above.'
south as Dallas in Texas are reached. In some States
It is possible, also, to add one or two feeders in the
almost all the leading lines are under his management.
far Northwest. Indeed, the acquisition of the.Iowa Cen*Take, for instance, Kansas. Here he has a formidable
tral would appear to be a move in that direction. Run¬
competitor in the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe, but all
the other important lines, such as the Kansas Pacific, ning directly north and south, through the - rich State of
Central Branch Union Pacific, and the St. Joseph & Iowa, it should, when the link necessary to connect it'
with the Missouri Iowa & N ebraska has been construc¬
Western, are in his hands. In Missouri, if we omit the
St. Louis & San Francisco, which runs in a southwesterly ted, prove a valuable adjunct to the Wabash system.
direction from St. Louis and therefore does not compete
EXCESSIVE CORPORATE TAXATION.
v
for the same traffic, and the Hannibal & St. Joseph,
during the past week the subject of the recent decision •
which it may be assumed is not inimical to the Gould
of the Supreme Court relative to taxation of national bank1
mtefbst, he controls every east and west line in the
State except the Chicago & Alton. In Colorado he shares has been considerably discussed in financial circles'
absolutely controls every mile of railroad except what is here, the point of inquiry being the immediate effect of <
decision upon the city tax list.
As we reviewed the
owned by the Atchison Company.
Even the Utah the
Southern and the Utah <fc Northern, as far west as whole subject editorially, three weeks ago, and also gave*'
Utah and Idaho, are under his authority, through his in full, last week, the letter addressed to the banking’
interest by Mr. Williams, it is unnecessary to say anything
ownership of Union Pacific.
But with all this extent of road there still appear to be more of the merits of the case or of what the decision!
a
few gaps which need filling up.
And first we are appears to establish.
Since we last wrote on the subject the/ inquiry has been
struck with the fact that1 the system furnishes no
whether the banks contemplated an action to* re*
feasible connection between Omaha and Chicago. .The raised
cover the taxes since 1866^ now declared improperly paid.
Chicago & Strawn, lately completed, supplies the miss¬
Mr. Tappen, chairman of the special committee' of the
ing link between St. Louis and Chicago, and there is a
pretty direct line between Omaha and St. Louis, but no Clearing-House appointed with reference to this decision^is reported as having disclaimed such intention, as far AS
one would ever think of going to Chicago from Omaha
he knew, and as having expressed the opinion that such
by way of St. Louis. Either of the existing roads between
In this
these * points—the Chicago Burlington & Quincy, the an attempt would have no grounds for success.
Chicago Rock Island & Pacific, or the Chicago & J^rth- opinion we should fully concur, because the. taxes already*
western—might be used. But these are all prosperous paid were assented to without protest, in the belief that
there was no escape. - It is a quite well-established legal
roads, a majority interest in either of which could only
be had for a very large sum, and it has not been Mr. principle that money paid in ignorance of fact can b*
Gould’s policy hitherto to purchase prosperous and sol¬ recovered, but as every man is supposed to know the law,,
vent corporati ns.
Besides, there is a much simpler way moneys paid in ignorance of the law cannot be recalled.
of obtaining a connection. As stated above, the Missouri Besides, the banks are doubtless satisfied with deliveranceIowa & Nebraska, completed from Keokuk to Corydon, for the future from inequitable burdens and are willing toWhether any attempt will still be made
lias been acquired, and is to be brought into the Wabash let the past go.
to
continue
those
burdens is uncertain, but an Albany dis¬
consolidation. By extending this road 100 or 150 miles
westward to meet the Omaha division of the Wabash, patch of Wednesday last says that the joint special com¬
and using the Chicago & Strawn and Toledo Peoria & mittee on taxation have prepared a bill—wfcich had
Warsaw, between Chicago and Keokuk, a line would be already passed the Senate unanimously-extending from
obtained between Chicago and Omaha. To be sure, the April 30 to June 30 the time within which the assessment
line would be iar ir«»m direct, but Mr. Gould could rolls must be completed, the object being to give th^
throw a large volume of traffic over it, and it wou’d assessors opportunity to avail themselves of any remedial
answer very well for a time at least.
Besides, this line #ct which may be passed in the interim.
W ithout raising the question whether State banks can
might be used to shorten the distance between Omaha
secure the benefit of this decision, it is enough to know
and Toledo.
It will also be observed that the Gould system of that its effect is to strike off at the least some 60 millions
roads has no connection of its own with Louisville, Cin¬ from the already fragmentary assessment roll of personal
cinnati, and Cleveland. It is this fact that gave unusual property in the city. The farcial results of the attempt to
prominence to the report mentioned at the beginning of tax personal property are notorious ; we have often cited a
this article, and which gained for it general credence at few illustrations of thisv never having had space enough at
the time; for if the roadfc named in the report should disposal to refer to more than one in ten of the glaring in¬
be acquired, the Wabash system would come into pos stances given in the annual reports of the State assessors.
session of direct routes to Cincinnati and Cleveland. In 1879 the banks paid as city taxes nearly 2 millions on
The reference to a connection with Cincinnati, over the some 65 millions of taxable capital. A year ago the as-

,4 for FRASER
Digitized


310

IRE CHRONICLE.
m

—

fJtA: XXX.

:

—.

sessors’ report

said that in Albany the banks pay 58 per
cent, and in this city they pay 36 per cent of all taxes col¬
lected on personal property.
In 1878, the State taxes on
this entire city, on an equalized valuation of 1,293 millions,
were only
3| millions, which was less than three-quarters of
a million more than the banks here alone
paid to the Fed¬
eral government and the Slate, on 1,232 millions less cap¬
ital ; the national banks here paid more taxes than all the
State taxes collected in the whole State, outside of New
York, Kings, Westchester, and Albany counties. The
Bank of Commerce alone paid on $10,048,000 a tax of
$264,205 to the State and city—more than was paid by all
the insurance companies of the city except the life com¬
panies.
All this is in its way illustrative of the inveterate
disposi¬
tion, shown in many instances, to burden corporations with
special taxes, as being always proper objects of statutory dis¬
crimination. The bills proposed at Albany, and discussed in
these columns only a week ago, are recent instances of this
disposition. We have another prominent illustration this

But the “

corporations ” are not plucked in the manner
supposed. There is no pile of capital belonging to nobody.
Surplus and capital stock in banking diminish; undue exactions upon savings banks and insurance are put back on
the community, in obedience to financial laws, and the
whole commonwealth suffers injury. The evils of bad taxa¬
tion only increase with continuance, and they must be reme¬
died. New schemes for corporation taxes will carry us from
rather than towards the right course, unless by the reac¬
tion which follows a very bad error.
HARTMANN AND THE UNITED STATES.
The refusal of the French Government to yield to the

week in the announcement that the Governor of Califor¬
nia has signed, the “ revenue and taxation ” bill,

demand of Russia and deliver up Hartmann, the alleged
Nihilist regicide, has already led to some peculiar com¬
plications. It is a circumstance not without deep signifi¬
cance that Prince Orloff,
the Russian Ambassador, hur¬
riedly left Paris, without first attending to the usual for¬
mality and waiting on the President. It is not wonderful
that conduct so strange3 and so unusual should have occa¬
sioned a certain amount of uneasiness in the public mind
of Europe, and that it should now be rumored that General
Chanzy is about to be recalled from St. Petersburg. An
open rupture between France and Russia would be rather
a curious spectacle in the present divided and
imperfectly*
balanced condition of affairs on the continent of Europe.
The question, as it now stands, between Russia and
France is confessedly a delicate one.
It was natural

providing
savings-bank deposits, mortgages and*
♦capital stock of corporations. Such laws, certain to W
•discriminative and confiscatory, more or less cause the
depression of savings deposits, and check the growth of
banking and other corporations necessary in the develop¬
ment of the industries of the country. However hateful it
the
Russian
may appear to the “ Sand lots ” and satis culottes classes, for
government to
expect that
a
^capital does not take kindly to confiscation ; it will not friendly government would refuse to harbor a mur¬
respond to the stand-and-deliver cry while it has the derer and would-be regicide. On the other hand, it was
resource of running away left it.
Eighteen, months ago. natural for a government founded, as that of France is, on
[Chronicle, August 10, 1878, page 133] we showed that, the will of the people, to show an unwillingness to re¬
in the two and a half years then just passed, there had fuse the rights of asylum to a political offender, until it
been a reduction of sixteen millions in banking capital in was. proved that he had been implicated in crimes which
thi$ city; and within the past four years it is safe to say that excluded him from any claim to such protection. There is
one-fourth of the banking capital of the city has been driven certainly strong presumptive proof that Hartmann was
out. We then said, of the fact that this reduction means, with one of the leading conspirators in connection with the
other things, a large reduction in ability to loan : “Just dynamite affair at the Winter Palace ; and it would appear
“now, with money begging for employment, this fact is that the Russian government are in possession of evidence
“
not appreciated ; but times will not always be as now. which connects him with the railroad explosion of a previ¬
“.Borrowers will be active again, and lenders the object of ous date.
How much evidence was placed in the hands of
earnest quest; meanwhile, there is a
strange incompre- the French government we have no means of knowing. It
hension of, or indifference to, the fact that this process does not appear, however, that that government acted with
of corroding bank capital is really a destruction of our any wilful unfairness, or that their conduct in the matter
“machinery of exchanges. If it is allowed to go to is open to any legal objections. • The question was sub¬
“pieces now, because not needed now, to reconstruct it mitted to the judiciary; and the decision of that body was
“
when it is needed will not be easy and speedy.”
that the evidence against Hartmann was not such as to
This easy prediction may more readily be appreciated justify either detention or surrender.
now that the
At the same time it is difficult to resist the conviction
monetary condition has changed. Kearneyism
is not wanting east of the Ohio, and it is always understood that popular sentiment in France had much to do with the
as settled that
any movement upon corporations is neces¬ course which the government found it convenient to fol¬
sarily popular. To no little extent this idea works in legis¬ low. If the empire had been still in existence, or if the
latures, particularly when the subject of taxation is up and reins of- power had been as yet in the hands of MacMahon,
there seems to be an opportunity to relieve “ the people” by the government might have been less amenable to a popu¬
dumping the burden of governmental support upon cor¬ lar sentiment which is in sympathy with assassins and re¬
porations ; but perhaps the moving cause is the shiftless gicides ; and the judiciary, with the^same evidence before
and lazy habit of dealing with taxation.
That subject iss them, might, with equal ease and unanimity, have come .to-,
intricate and unattractive ; it is a part of disagreeable rou¬ an opposite conclusion. There are, indeed, many persons,
tine and involves some application ; hence the
average well qualified to judge, who are of the opinion that the
member—particularly if he comes from the rural districts, course pursued revealed a weakness on the part of the
where corporations are few and small—catches
eagerly at French government, and that the refusal to detain or
the notion of thrusting a scoop into the “ vast accumula¬ surrender the accused, was a concession to the revolution¬
tions” of city corporations, handy to reach, too clumsy to
ary spirit.
If, in place of finding his way first to Paris,
run and too
he
had
turned
big to hide, belonging to nobody in particular.
up in Berlin or Vienna, or even in London,
Let us “pass a bill,” which anybody can write out in ten there
can, we think, be but little doubt that he would, at
minutes, and the thing is done—the bother is over for this least, have been detained until air doubt had been re¬
year, and we can turn attention to the more congenial wcgrk moved as to the justice of the course to be followed;
of party planning for the next
and it is a significant fact that he had hardly arrived in
campaign.
for the taxation of

;

“
“

“




March

#

THE CHRONICLE.

27, 1880.J

311

also been added to

by £1,694,114, and the total is now £9,926,862,
against £8,898,980 last year/ This increase is perhaps partly
of evidence which would have justified his detention.
due to the Treasury loan for which tenders were received on
It has been rumored that Hartmann meditates a visit to
.Tuesday, but it has also been caused by the efforts which have
this countTy, or rather that he proposes to come hero to been made to collect the taxes now due, so that the Chancellor
claim the' benefits of a secure asylum.
How much of of the Exchequer may be able when he delivers his Budget
truth there may be in the rumor we know not.
It will be speech to present as satisfactory a statement as possible before
difficult for him in any part of Europe, after the infamous the country. This is the more necessary just now, as We are
bound, sooner or later, to have an election, this year, and as
notoriety he has acquired, to escape from the vigilant eyes there is less
political excitement, and a greater desire for do*
of the police; and it would not be wonderful if he should mestic
legislation, to be able to point to an improved financial
conclude to cross the Atlantic and join the happy brother¬ position will be of very considerable importance to the Goverr^
London when the authorities in Paris were in possession
•

hood, presided

by the Swintons, the Schwabs, and
As the case now stands, it might be doubt¬

the others.'
what

ful

Russia’s

-

here in

over

answer' the

demand

the first

for

government' would

Had he

extradition.

his

instance,

make

to

come

and before he turned'up

Paris, unless we greatly mistake, our worthy Sec¬
retary of State would have had but few and slender
scruples, ‘indeed; to ’ hand over such a fellow to the
tender mercies of the Russian government.
Nor do we
think th&jb in so acting Mr. Evarts would have been with¬
out the sympathy and support of the American people.
The truth is we have no place here for jguch men as Hart¬
mann.
Tt is characteristic of all such people—-of the
whole tribe of Nihilists and Communists—that they canriot li^e without a grievance ; and* where there is no griev¬
ance they* must create one.
Here we have no grievances
on which those social vultures can feed.
Here, therefore,
they can only be a disturbing element, and a hindrance to
progress. There is but little danger that our government,
if placed in similar circumstances, would bee tempted to
betray the weakness which that of Prance has revealed in
this Hartmann affair. We care little for kings or em¬
perors a'8 such ; but we concede to others the rights which
Vre claim for ourselves; we honor law, order, good govern¬
ment, however established and maintained; and we have
certainly-no sympathy with incendiaries, assassins, and
wT)uld:be regicides.
Our advice to all such, therefore,
would be—stay on the other side.
in

*

The circulation of notes has increased', but com continues
to return from provincial circulation,.and the supply of bullibh
ment.

augmented. The total supply of bullion is
£28,515,985, against £32,614,558, while the reserve of notes
and coin amounts to £16,561,320, against £18,280,613 last year,

has been further
now

The

proportion of

in the latter,
cent. *

It is

reserve

to liabilities, owing to the increase

has declined from 50*19 per cent to 45*77 pep
•

•

*'

understood that the inland bills which matured oil

Thursday, the “fourth” • of the month, were heavier than for
some time past, and there is consequently substantial confirma¬
tion of the belief that the trade of the

improve.
attached

country continues to:

ago considerable importance was
“fourth” of the month, but since Collie’s

A few years
to the

failure, and the restriction of the home trade, the day has

passed over without any special feature presenting itself.. The
“fourth” of March: and the “fourth” of October, being
respectively at the commencement of the Spring and Autumn,
were special occasions for an extra demand for money, and
there now seems to be some reason for believing that to those
periods more significance will hereafter be attached. It is very
satisfactory to notice that, notwithstanding many adverse cir¬
cumstances, and, prominently, agricultural poverty, the tradfe
of the country continues to improve, and it is fair to claim that
if we show signs of recovery
undgr such conditions we shall
make important progress, if the season should prove, as seems
probable, to be a more fortunate one. One good harvest wil{
only assist in, or be one step towards, recovery, for one good
season can scarcely restore the farmers to their former position
after five bad seasons, any more than one swallow can make a
Summer.
The farmers throughout the country are in a
deplorable state, and it is feared that, notwithstanding the
weather is all that can be desired, the land will be ill-cultivated,
partly from want of capital. There are hopes, however, that
the weather will continue seasonable; that farmers will produce
IPtotijetargi (Coramjerciat %uqUsU
crops which are most likely to pay ; and that the most serious
difficulties have now been overcome. But between the present
RATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON AND ON LONDON
time and next harvest is a long period, and during that period
AT LATEST DATES.
farmers will have only a few#crops to dispose of, and will not
therefore, be able to augment very materially their purchasing
EXCHANGE AT LONDON—
.

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.

March 4.

*

Latest
Date.

On-

Time.

Paris
Paris
Amsterdam.
Amsterdam.
Berlin

Short.

25*20

3mos.

25*421e®25,4712

Hamburg

...

Frankfort...
Vi^nn^

Rate.

5)25*80

5>12*2
Short. 121
3mo8. 12-31* @124
44
20*62 @20*t>5
44
20-62 @20*65
ii
20-62 '5)20*65
ii
1200 '5)12-05

Antwerp....

ii

Genoa

ii

Copenhagen.

ii

18-38 @18*42
473*@48

44

•

•

•

•

Short.

25-2412

Mar.
Mar.

4
4

8hort.
Short.

Mar.

4
4
4

3mos.
Short.
3mo8.

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

1204
20-46

Is. 7 VI.
Is. 77gd.

•

••

[From

our own

Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Man

•

•

117-90
25-26

27-90

•

4 3 mos.
4 Short.
4 4 mos
44
4
44
4
44
4

96i2
4-85
Is. 6 VI.
Is. 8H>d.
3s. 9 VI.
5s. 1VI.

correspondent.!

London, Saturday, March 6, 1880.
The

principal feature in the

money

market during the week

has been an increased scarcity in the supply of floating capital
in the open market, but considerable payments on account of
the

imperial taxes continue to be made, and the facilities of the

Bank of England for transacting a large discount business have
been augmented. This week’s Bank return shows that the

applications for accommodation at the Bank have been upon a
very large scale, the increase under the head of “other securi¬
ties” being as much as £2,920,262.* The
Treasury balance has



to

amount of bills and checks

473*5)48

Bombay.... 60 days

•

Rate.

....

•

the Bankers’ Clearing-House return, the
which^passed through the ClearingHouse on the account of the last Stock Exchange settlement
was £52,767,000, against £54,444,000 at the previous settlement,
and comparing with only £33,288,000 last year.
It is seen,
therefore, that Stock Exchange business is very active, and
there still appears to be confidence in continued activity. The
news from St. Petersburg is certainly a cause for anxiety, but
the German Emperor’s speech and the very friendly act of His
Majesty dining with the French Ambassador at Berlin have
given confidence, great importance being attached to the event.
Th^ German people, situated as their country is, are naturally
desirous of living on terms of peace and friendship with their
neighbors, and the assurance of their sovereign that G^many
desires peace above all things has removed much anxiety from
the minds of all European people. The domestic troubles of
Russia are undoubtedly very serious, and apprehensions have
existed that, as was the case with France nearly a century ago,
domestic troubles would be smothered by foreign wars. The
case is, however, different.
France was then all-powerful in
Europe, but now Germany and Austria form an iron cordon to
Russian aggression which it would he dangerous to attempt to
infringe upon. Germany also has made, it would appear, a
friend of France, and Russia is without means. These facts,
together with cheap money, cheap food and seasonable
weather, promote confidence both on the Stock Exchange and
According

Time.

523*@527s

■

Shanghai....

4

25*47i*©25'52ii2 Mar.
2S-521*®28-571s Mar.

ii
Madrid
44
Cadiz
Lisbon
90 days
Alexandria..
New York...

Calcutta....
Hong Kong..

Mar.

power.

in mercantile circles.
The

railway traffic returns continue very satisfactory,

>

the

THE CHRONICLE.

312

[VOL. XXX.

The following are the current rates of discount at the prinreceipts for last week on the seventeen principal under¬
takings being, on 12,602miles, £1,003,460, against £917,389 cipal foreign centres:
Bank
Bank
Open
last year on 12,390^ miles, showing an increase of 212 miles
Open
rate.
market.
rate.
market.
and of £86,071. These figures, as well as those of the Bankers*
Pr. ct.
Pr. ct.
Pr. ct.
Pr. ct.
Paris
3
4
2*s®2% Vienna
3VS>33*
'Clearing-House, which for the week ended March 3 amounted Brussels../.
3 ®3*4 flt. Petersburg..
3*2
6
5*s®6
3
23*®3
Madrid. Cadiz <Sc
to £156,886,000, against £125,043,000 in 1879, are ample evidence Amsterdam
Berlin
3
.2
Barcelona
4
92M
4 95
of the fact that satisfactory progress is being made. In a few Hamburg
6
3
378®2*8 Lisbon & Oporto
5*a®6
3
2*8 3)238 Copenhagen.... 3*2®4
3*2®4
departments the speculative rise in prices has not been main¬ Frankfort
Genoa
4
4
Calcutta
6

total

-

-

*

tained, but this is not of much importance. In the Autumn,
speculation was wildly conducted, but there is now a steady
increase of legitimate trade.

The moiqey market was decidedly firm in the earlier part of
the week, but a quieter feeling now prevails, and the best three

months* bills

are

taken at 2%@2y6

per

cent.

Now that the

“fourth” of the month has passed

there are fewer bills in the
and
market,
consequently less demand for accommodation.
The following are the present quotations for money:
Per cent.
3

Bank rata

Open-market rates—

•Open-market rates—
30 and 60

days’ bills

23*®27s
23*3>278

3 months’ bills

Per cent.

4 months’ hank bills
278®3
6 mouths* bank bills
3 is a 3%
4 & 6 months’ trade bills. 3*2®4

The rates of interest allowed

discount houses for

deposits

are

by the joint-stock banks and
subjoined:
Per cent.

Joint-stock banks
discount houses at call

2'

'

2

Geneva

4

3*s@4

New York

5

®53«

The weather is very

seasonable, and if old sayings possess
should have a very favorable year. The week
has been boisterous and dry, and though some people assert
that the season is backward, it must be contended that vegeta¬
tion is making slow and healthy progress. It is not
expected
that we shall have a large crop of wheat this year, for the
reason that not much land has been planted with that cereal.
A better crop is naturally hoped for, but it seems to be the
opinion that for several seasons the production of wheat will be
somewhat neglected. The crop, in the first place, does not pay,
and the Winter came upon us with such sudden and early sever¬
ity that some lands destined to grow wheat have now been used
for other purposes. Most of the wheat grown in this country
is sown in the late Autumn or early Winter, and only a few
farmers sow the more tender, or white, sorts in the Spring, and
seldom after the middle of February. The production of barley
any

is

value,

we

attractive occupation.

If the land is suitable to
growth
of
fine
54s. per quarter can be
malting
qualities,
Annexed is a statement showing the present position of the
obtained with facility, and even 56s. and 58s. per quarter has
Bank of England; the Bank rate of discount, the price of Con-'
been realized.
All
soils# are not, however, adapted to the
sols, the average quotation for English wheat, the price of
growth
of
choice
barley,
and only in a few districts abroad—
Middling Upland cotton, and the Bankers* Clearing-House
chiefly
in
the
Saale
district
in Germany—is it possible to raise
return, compared with the three previous years :
produce which shall meet with the approbation of our leading
1880.
1879.
1878.
1877.
Burton brewers. Only about twelve years ago, 42s. per quarter
•Circulation, including
£
£
£
£
was considered to be a good price for malting barley, but 54s.
Bank post bills.... 27,236,251 29,629,286 27,209,420 27,649,832
Public deposits
9,926,862
8,898,980 10,140,493
8,290,675 is now currently obtained. The wheat trade, however, notwith¬
Other deposiis
25,971,140 29,355,754 21,412,480 22,235,172
Goverom’t securities. 16.532,024 14,963,606 15,575.688 15,988,176 standing the small deliveries of the British farmers, is still
very
Other securities.
21,344,230 23,719,030 22,174,533 19,049,118
quiet. Stocks are being reduced in this country, though they
Kes’veofnotes* coin 16,561,320 18,280,613 12,476,657 14,086,465
•Coin and bullion in
are said to be increasing in France.
Our importations have of
both departments.. 28,515,935 32,614,553 24,386,777 26,434,255
late
been
Proportion of reserve
very moderate, and as the consumption in progress is
to liabilities
45 77
47*42
39*17
45*68
very
great—never
greater than it is now—foreign produce is
Bank rate
'
3 p. c.
3 p. c.
2 p. o.
2 p. c.
Consols
9778
96*s
‘ 95**
96*a very rapidly absorbed.
The severity of the Winter has pro¬
Eng. wheat, av. price
43s. Od.
38s. Od.
50s. lid.
50s. 3 Od.
duced
Mid. Upland cotton..
scarcity
quite
a
in
the vegetable world. Many crops
75ied.
6%!.
56lcd.
6*sd.
Clearing-House ret’n. 156,886,000 125,043,000 133,291,000 102,235,000 which would be
coming forward in abundance just now have
Some of the leading firms on the Stock Exchange interested been killed by the frost, and the retail tradesman charges
in the bonds of the Atlantic Mississippi & Ohio Bailroad Co., almost what he pleases. The result is that, in consequence of the
being dissatisfied with recent proceedings, have forwarded the dearness of vegetable food, and of potatoes, more bread is con¬
sumed throughout the country. The demand for seed potatoes
following communication to the bondholders* committee :
To the Committee of the Consolidated Bondholders of the Atlantic Mis¬ ; just now, not only for this country but also on a large scale for
sissippi <t Ohio Railroad Co. :
Ireland, has forced up prices, and it must be some weeks before
Gentlemen—We, the undersigned, holders of, and representing hold¬
market
ers of, $1,500,000 consolidated bonds of the Atlantic
gardeners will be able to forward any considerable
Mississippi & Ohio
Bailroad Company, at present represented by certificates of
your com¬ supply of vegetables to market.
As far as wheat is concerned,
mittee appointed in 1876 by the the* bondholders, and
presided over
by Sir H. W. Tyler, desire to point out that in holding these certificates however, millers buy very cautiously. We are fairly out of the
we do not wish to be understood to
acquiesce either In the scheme pro¬
posed by your committee or iu your subsequent proceedings, but that, Winter, and the area whence we can draw supplies will now be
on the contrary, we shall liobl ourselves at
liberty to represent our views steadily extending. Wheat, of the new crop, is arriving from
before the Court if, and whenever, necessary.
Stock Exchange, Feb. 28.
Australia, and we shall soon be receiving considerable supplies
of excellent quality. India and Egypt, and Algeria, will soon
Tenders were received at the Bank of England on
Tuesday be discussing their harvest prospects, and the
crops of those
for £1,670,000 in Treasury bills of three and six months’ date.
countries have either a direct or an indirect influence upon our
The allotments were—in bills at three months, £1,219,000; in
markets. Egyptian or Algerian wheat may find a market at
bills at six months, £451,000. Tenders for bills at three months
Marseilles or some Mediterranean port, but its purchase by
at £99 6s. 4d. received about 45 per cent; all above that price
France diminishes French competition in the United States,
in full; while tenders for bills at six months at £98 12s. 7d. and
and leaves the field more open to us. Some time must, how¬
above were entertained in full. These prices are
equivalent to ever,
elapse before’supplies in Europe can be largely re-enforced
a discount of about 2%
per cent per annum.
from any other source than from America; but buyers in this
There has been very little movement in the market for
gold country believe that
present prices are sufficiently attractive,
during the week. The export demand has been trifling,^and and that
during the next six weeks or two months we shall
only ^few sovereigns have been sent abroad. A small quantity
obtain all that we require without being compelled to pay
of bar gold has been purchased by the Bank of
England. The
silver market has been dull, and prices have had a downward higher terms than those now current. Should the weather in
tendency. The Indian demand is very moderate. The follow¬ Europe be favorable for the growing crops, less desire will be
shown to hold, and there may be some indications of weakness.
ing prices of bullion are from Messrs. Pixley & Abell’s circular :
It must,, however, be borne in mind that the crop in this
gold
b. d.
b.
d.
country is so poor that a large proportion of it finds its way to
Bar gold, fine—
per oz. standard. 77 9 9
the poultry-yard or to the piggeries, and that the quantity
Bar gold, contain’g 20 dwts. silver
per oz. standard.77 3.0**®
Spanish doubloons
per oz. 74 3 « 74 6 sent to market is very limited.
According to the usual calcula¬
South American doubloons
per oz. 73 8*s®
United States gold ooin
tions
of
the
trade, farmers have only delivered since harvest
peroz
76 3*2®
V.
German gold coin
peroz. 76 3
! *
3,370,700 quarters, against 5,888,200 quarters last year, being a
decrease ef 2,517,500 quarters, or about 40 per cent. The crop
silver.
<l
Bar silver, fine...
per oz. standard, last price. 53.3* 9
of. 1879 was not a good one, either in quantity or quality, the
Bar silver, contain’g 5 grs. gold.per oz. standard
“
52*8 9
Oake silver
rather considerable deliveries being <^ue to the fact that finan¬
9
per oz. 5578
Mexican doliars
per oz, last price. 507* 9
cial necessity compelled the fanners to clear out all old stocks.
•Ghilian dollars
9
per oz
But last year’s crop was worse, and hence the falling off of 4G
Quicksilver, £7 12s. 6d.
Disoount, 3 per sent.
Do

with 7

or

14

days’ notice.

2*4

now a more

the

.

-




..

.

MABCfl

per cent is still more significant,
farinaceous property.

Liverpool Breadstuff* Market

the prodace is so devoid of

as

Mon.
d.
«.
15 6
Flour (ex. State)flcent’1.15 6
10 11
Wheat,sprig,No.2,1001b.l0 11
10 6
Spring, No. 3...
“
10 6
11 6
Winter,West.,n.
“ 11 6
11 8
Southern, new.
“118
10 11
Av. Cal. white..
“
1011
11 5
11 5
California club.
“
6 1
Corn, mix.,W.old# cent’l 6 1
do
new.
6 0% 6 0%
do
“
Sat.
d.

8.

Daring the week ended February 28, the sales of home-grown
in the 150 principal markets of England and Wales
amounted to 31,030 quarters, against 45,574 quarters last year ;
and it is estimated that in the whole kingdom they were 124,120

wheat

quarters, against 182,300 quarters in 1879. Since harvest the
sales in the 150 principal markets have been 842,672 quarters,
against 1,472,049 quarters; while it is computed that they
have been in the whole kingdom 3,370,700 quarters, against
5,888,200 quarters in the corresponding period of last season.
Without reckoning the supplies furnished ex-granary at the
commencement of the season, it is estimated that the following
quantities of wheat and flour have been placed upon the British
Imports of wheat.cwt.33,349,129
Imports of flour
5,804,397
Sales of home-grown
produce
14,606,500

1877-8.

1876-7.

24,841,047
4,085,490

30,350.572
4,452,657

18,861,527
3,039,916

25,514,000

Sat.
d.

1,039,972

616,539

Result......

53,133,975 53,395,735 54,635,257

43,702,604

53s. 4d.

49s. Od.

Av’ge price of English

40s. 5d.

47s. Od.

wheat for the season.

following figures show the imports

The

Pork, West, mess.. fibbl.57

0

clear, cwt.. 35

6.

Bacon, long

6

36

“

Short clear
Beef, pr. mess,

0
0

$ tierce.76
Lard, prime West. #cwt.39
Cheese. Am. ohoice “ 71

0

6
6

1
0

Wed.
d.

8.

58
35
36
76

0

6
6
0

38

6

71

0

Fri.

d.
15 3
1011
10 6
11 6
8
11
10 10
5
11
6 0
5 11

;

8.

£
'd

C

15
q
•

'

Fri.

Thurs.
d.
8.
59 0
35 0
36 6
76 0
38 6
71 0

£

s

S
w

Pet’leum, spirits “

a

..

..

..

a

d.
-

9

.

•

m

••

a
a

m

'ft

..

.

i
.

Fri.

Thurs.

Wed.
d.

Tues.

Mon.
Sat.
d.
d.
Pefleum. ref. » gal... ® .. 5 7a'S> 6
-

20,872.000 22,417,700

1,044,802

686,051

wheat and flour

5

Tues.
d.
8.
57 0
35 6
36 6
76 0
38 6
71 0

Mon.
d.
8.
57 0
35 6
36 6
76 0
39 0
71 0

12129076098——SSABttlarri.c.ke 18745.
s.

54,440,537 55,675,229 44,319,143

53,820,026
or

exports

11

Thurs.

London Petroleum Market.—

1878-9.

1879-80.

Total

Wed.
8.
d.
15 3
10 11
10 6
11 6
11 8
10 10

Tues.
d.
8.
15 6
10 11
30 6
11 6
8
11
10 10
11 5
6 1
6 0

Liverpool Provision* Market.-

markets since harvest: '

Deduct

313

THE CHRONICLE.

27, 1880. J

d.
..

7%®7%

a

..

.

a

..

Good

.

Friday

••

©mtxwercial and mis ccllau eaus foetus.
Imports and Exports for the

Week.—The imports of last

week, compared with those of the preceding week, show
increase in both dry goods and general merchandise..
The total imports were $11,724,181, against $9,910,917 the pre¬

an

and exports of cereal

produce into and from the United Kingdom since harvest, viz., ceding week and $13,878,046 two weeks previous. The exports
from the first of September to the close of last week, compared
for the week ended Mar. 23 amounted to $8,146,413, against
with the corresponding period in the three previous seasons:
$6*932,979 last week and $7,775,954 the previous week. The
IMPORTS.

1878-9.

1877-8.

1876-7.

24,841,047
6,445,201
5,852,574
846,024

30,350.572

18,861,527
7,352,267

1879-80.

..:.cwt.33,349,129
9,064,151

Wheat

Barley
Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian
Hour

1,234,391

657,501
corn...

11,513,042

...-

5,864,397

14,957,045
4,085,490

7,730,571
5,887,792
952,861

5,217,082
740,820

2,136,729
15,325.303

2,304,795
16,000,720

4,452,657

3,039,916

*

c

EXPORTS.

Wheat

...

.cwt.

Barley
Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian
Flour

1879-80.

1878-9.

1877-8.

1876-7.

619,364
13,638
56,533

997,542
78,423
53,070
10,264
6,691
269,107
47.260

1,005,220
32,107
64,798
14,348
10,959

596,308

80.146

22,015
523,833

com...

'

66,687

18,257

70,129
16,192
16,228
265,438

64,028
34,752

20,231

YORK FOR THE WEEK.
5 1879.
1878.

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW

1877.

$1,946,801

Dry Goods
General mdse

5,691,470

4,016,975

4,950,956

1880.

$3,580,506
8,143,075

$6,893,801

63,308,271

*5,803,558 $11,724,181
34.880,116 101,272,758

$76,487,995 $70,202,072

$70,683,674 $112,996,030

$7,638,271

Total week
Prev. reported..

Total s’ce Jan. 1.

$1,786,583

$1,942,845

68,849,724

our report of the dry goods trade will be found the imports
dry goods for one week later. The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for the
week ending Mar. 23:

In

of

Secretary has introduced a bill for the purchase
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THB WEEK.
1877.
1878.
1879.
1880.
Metropolitan Water Companies, and the value of the
$6,948,985
$6,098,015
$8,146,413
For the week....
$3,952,107
shares of those undertakings has, in consequence, risen to an Prev.
75,187,785 65,994,392 68,360,716
reported.. 56,700.002
important extent. The shareholders are to receive in exchange Total s’ce Jan. 1. $60,652,109 $82,136,770 $72,092,407 $76,507,120
for their shares 3/£ per cent Metropolitan stock to an extent
The following will show the exports of specie from the port
which will yield them the same income that they derived of New York for the week ending Mar. 20, and also a com¬
from their shares. An issue of stock to the extent of £31,000,- parison of the total since Jan. 1, 1880, with the corresponding
000 will be necessary. Opposition to the scheme is assuming an totals for several previous years:
The Home

of the

.

following are the imports at New York for the week ending
(for dry goods) Mar. 18 and for the week ending (for general
merchandise) Mar. 19:

organized shape, and it is expected that Mr. Cross will find it
difficult to pass the measure.
If a telegram which appeared in yesterday’s Standard,
described as “authentic,” be correct, the crisis in Europe last
year was of a very serious and alarming n ature. The corres¬
pondent of that journal at Berlin says that when Austria
decided upon occupying Novi Bazar, the Czar proposed an alli¬
ance to France and Italy, and immediate war upon Germany
and Austria. A few impetuous members of the French Cabinet
entertained the proposal, but Messieurs Grevy and Waddington
were opposed to it, and happily the matter fell through.*
Those advanced liberal politicians in this country who have so
persistently opposed and vilified the Government during the
last few years need be, as they are, quiet, for undoubtedly the
erisis

was a

crisis indeed.

^

March.

C. of Austin
C. of Chester

?

Liverpool

20—Str. Canima

Mayaguez, P. R

20—Str. Neckar

London

St. John

daily closing quotations in the markets of London and
Liverpool for the past week, as reported by cable, are shown in
the following summary:
London Honey and Stock Market.—The bullion in the Bank
•f England has increased £31,000 daring the week.
The

Sat.

Har.
20.

Silver,

per or

...d. 52*4
.

Console for money
Consols for account....

8. 5s of 1881
JJ.
U.

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia^ Reading.

52*9

971618
981 is

.105

8. 413s of 1891
U.S. 4s of 1907
Erie, common stock
Illinois Central

Mon.
Mar.
22.

105%

iio*4

110%

108*4
45%

108%

105

106%

•

•

•

•

35%

46%

53*4
36

Wed.
Mar.
24.

Thurs.
Mar.
25.

52»i6

52%

52*4

98* is

99*16
98*,«

98*16
98*16

Tues.
Mar.
23.

97^16

105*4
110*4
108*4
46%
107%
•

•

•

»

•

•

•

•

105%
110%
108%
44% *
106%
52%

35%

105%
110

108

45%

107%
53
•

• •

Liverpool Cotton Market.—gee special report on cotton.




Fii.
Mar.
26.
*

•

SB

I
§
q
t

99,500

Am. silv. dola.

1,000

Mex. silv. dola.

13,650
24,435
6,500

Mex. silv. dols.

Mex. silv. dols.

Hamburg

3,204
7,817

15,850

100,800
Total for the week ($52,085 silver, and $227,171 gold)........ $279,258
Previously reported ($1,398,295 silv., and $1,252,200 gold) .. 2,650,405
Tot.since Jan. 1, ’80 ($1,450,380 silv., and $1,479,371 gold) ..$2,929,751
Same time in8ame time inSpan, doubl’ns.

20—Str. C. of Alexandria. Havana

Same time in-

1879
1878
1877
1876

$4,686,935

2,6> *7,527

3,343.606

11,530,959

The imports of
been as follows:
Santiago

Cable*

$6,500

Mex.goldbull’n
Am. gold bars.
Am. gold bars.

1875
1874
1873
1872...i.

$16,286,346
7,979,048
14.352,316
5,222,581

Crescent

1871

1870
I860.....
1868

specie at this port for the same

March.

EnKliKh market Reports—Per

-

...

—Mex. silv. dels.
Venezuela
gold
bullion

Nassau

$14,131,847
6,582,314
-

periods hav#

.

Cuba
City—South America

Germany

Traveler

Wieland

gold com..
Gold bars...*..

coin..
Am. silv. coin..

..Bolivia

Gold
bars
Silver bullion..

France

For. gold coin..

Hayti
Am.
.Cent. Amer’n States. Am.

Arran

$1,851-"
2,247
000

Am. silv. coin..
silv. coin..
Am.
Am.

British West Indies. Am. silv.

17—Str. C. of Austin
Rhein

8,797,027
14,724,300

silv. coin..
silv. com..

2,850

.

1,045
^
147,171
78
106,000
8,584
1,000

$271,684
2,183,900
Tot. since Jan. 1, ’80 ($1,325,496 silv., and $1,130,178 gold)..$2,455,$74
Same time in—
Same time in—
silver, and $256.9:21 gold)
($1,310,733 silv., and $873,257 gold)

Total for the week '$14,763

Previously reported
Same time in-

1870
1878
1877
1876

$2,710,517
4,428,837
4,705,253
1,171,723

1873
1872

$3,995,857 1871
1,062,838 1870
666,909 1869
561,214 1868

5,818,054
4,372,05$
1,790,02$

following table shows the receipts and payments at the
Sub-Treasury in this city, as well as the balances in the same,,
for each day of the past week:
The

314

THE CHRONICLE.

[VOL. XXX.

1

Balances.

Receipts.
Mar. 20...
“

22

“

23...

«

04

«

25!*;

“

2G...

Payments.

$
1,089,453
1,899,582
1,518,454
906,854
1,041,210
1,160,578

41
18
79
90
00
52

7,616,133 80

Gold.

—The New York, New

Currency.

$
$
931,961 62 103,705,385 50
971,867 20 104,819,637 29
1,767,863 47 104,498,371 39

849,255 84 104,620,157 51

1,510,971 87 104,lit!,544 86
2,158,490 70 103,086,943 73

-

to

$

5,626,159
5,439,622
5,511,479
5,447,292
5,478,139

30
62
76
70
48

5.512.832 43

8,190,410 70

England & Western Investment Com¬
by order of the Auditor of the city of Toledo, Ohio, offers
exchange for certain bonds of that city, connected with the

pany,

issue of which there

certain informalities, new consolidated
so prefers, to pay par and ac¬
crued interest in cash.
With commendable promptness, the
Common Council of Toledo voted to issue the new bonds as soon
as attention was called to the informalities referred to.
This
action of the Council will go far to
strengthen the credit of the

funding bonds,

were

if the holder

or,

city of Toledo, which is already very high. These bonds have
thirty years to run, but are redeemable at the option of the
city after twenty jrears, bearing interest at six per cent per an¬
net earnings of the year ended December 31,1879,
upon its num, payable semi-annually, in the citv of New York, to cover
registered income bonds, payable on the first day of April, in the several issues above referred to and to be used in exchange
Boston.
for the
Kansas City St. Joseph & Council Bluffs.—The directors
have voted an interest payment of two per cent from the

said old bonds.

Philadelphia & Reading.—The following is the monthly
comparative statement of gross receipts, tonnage and passen¬
gers of this company for the month of February, 1880 ana 1879 :
1880.

,

Fiscal Year
Month.

;lt*ilroad traffic
Oanal traffic

to date.

1879
Fiscal Year
Month.
to date.

$l,OIG,377 $3,581,335
617

$825,154

28,609

$2,536,527

45,273
2,275

189,972

1,223
51,487

156,849

Loss.

ment, State, municipal and miscellaneous securities, and makes

specialty of all classes of stocks and bonds, whether interest¬
paying or in default. His business is strictly on commission,
and he refers, as will be seen, to several of the best-known
a

GROSS RECEIPTS.
,.

—Attention is called to the card of Mr. Charles B Greene
in this issue of the Chronicle. Mr. Greene deals in Govern¬

firms and institutions.

9,000

—Messrs. Coleman Benedict & Co., the well-known stock¬
will remove on or about May 1 to the large offices, 24
brokers,
barges..
22,068
14,359
Broad street, as the building they now occupy, 92
Broadway,
Total Railroad Co
$1,063,309 $3,821,985 $877,865 $2,716,736 will be tom down to be replaced by a more extensive one.
Reading Coal <k Iron Co.
530,472
1,926,806
551.396
1,558,092
Boston Banks.—The
following are the totals of the Boston
Total of all
.....$1,593,781 $5,748,791 $1,429,201 $4,274,828 banks for a series of weeks past:
Steam colliers
Richmond coal

,

TONNAGE AND PASSENGER8.

Tons of coal on Railroad
Tons of merchandise.
..

Passengers carried
Ooal

transported

steam colliers

369,211
449,305
617,611

by

1,506,517
1,376,312
2,107,527

221,869
418,656

f,722,378

127,399

44,086

122,350

37,307

519,COI

Quicksilver.—In the suit of George L. Kent,

one

1,343.863
4,427,118

of the pre¬

ferred stockholders of the Quicksilver
Mining Company, against
the company, for interest claimed to be due on his
stock, Mr.
James H. Gilbert, of 37 Wall street,
referee, has rendered a
decision in favor of the plaintiff, in which he holds that the net

earnings are what remains after deducting from the gross
earnings all the current expenses incurred in producing earn¬
ings. The total amount of the net earnings made by the com¬
pany from May 1, 1870, until May 1, 1879, is $2,900,000.
Of
that amount the preferred stockholders are entitled to
$1,988,263, with interest added, making

total of $2,683,284. The
$62 52.
While the litigation was In progress the trustees invested all
the surplus cash in retiring the bonded indebtedness. There
now remains in the
treasury only about $300,000 cash to pay
the award. Should the decree be confirmed
by the court, a
meeting of the trustees will be called to consider the propriety
of re-issuing the bonds as a dividend to the
preferred stockhold¬
a

amount due each share of preferred stock is

ers on

account of the award.

1879.
Oct. 13..
“
20..
“
27..
Nov. 3..
“
10..
“
17..
“
24..
Dec. 1..
“
8..
“
15..
“
22..

Loans.
*

Specie.

126,903,ISO
128,015,000
130,491,300

3,251,100
3,254,200
3,246,300
3,215,000
3,245,400
3,300,800
3347,200

132,056,100
133.491,100

132,427,100
131,932,200
131,484,000

3,572,800

131,646,900
130,931,700
130,656,100
132,221,900

3,682,600
4,329,000
4,265,400
- 4.125,400

133,827,200
12.. 134,991,300
“
19.. 137,133,900
20.. 139,105,600
Feb. 2.. 139,816,800
“
9..
141,215,600
16..
142,101,000
“
24.. 140,028,500
Mar. 2.. 139,927,300
“
9..
139,679,400
15..
14L,040,200
“
22.. 140,975,000

3,941,400
3,822,800
3,813,300
3,857,100
3,970,300

“

29..

1880.
Jan. 5..
“

“

The leased property embraces the recently consolidated
City & Pembina railways, and will
be operated as the Sioux City & Dakota Division of the Chi¬
cago Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. Bv this lease the Chicago
Milwaukee & St. Paul Company is enabled to run its own trains
from Chicago and Milwaukee to Sioux
City, Yankton and Sioux
Falls, and most important points in northwestern Iowa and
pany.

Dakota Southern and Sioux

06,267,539
71,705,752
74,242,072
68,069,822

55,010,200
53,728,400

31,081,500
31,072,300

70,281,469

53,605,200
52,793,300

31,003,400
^31,052,000
30,875,200
31,019,400
31,092,500

53,217,400

53,038,800
51,871,300

69,237,794
72,091301
47,305,866
50,566,135
68,452,000
63,289,012
....

.

Nov.

Lawful Money. Deposits.
$
*
64,706,995
17,235,309
54,709,355

27
3

10
17
24
Dec. 1
“
8
“
15
“
22
“
29

..

19
26

2
9
16
23

“

f‘
“

$

54,812,858
54,580,094
54,187,213

14,851.359

53,501.853

14,616,42?

65.302,071
64,581.278
64,650.163

52,696,026
52 342.702
52.653.503

64,724 368

14.491,491
14.958.053
15,049.003
14,977,274
14,754.053

64,775,731

14,447,092

51,203,835

64.331,710
64,696,423
65,161,061
64,655,160
64,972.032
65,670,329

15,663,259
15,802,394
16,417,981
16,931,434

52.606.250

12,050.841

52,898,593
54,360,797
54,306,766

12.072,760
12,082,360

66.H88.134

17.197,950

44,106,759
52,253,037
54,006,178
5L,527,260
54,961,998
55,027,309

11,871,878
11,890.480
11.932,035
11,992,523
11.985.600
12.011,733
12,021,266

52,113,471
52,197,358
51.582,397

*

12,073.093

17,213.347

54,563.582

12.068,233

17,120,173

54,072,059
50,166,186

12,070,263
12,050.483

55,627,182

12,058,555
12,093,000

10,220,959
15,773,938
16,250,179
16.731.502
16,018.387

*

11,814,680
11,853,039
11,878,284
11,885,099
11,875,666

10,240,119
15,039,404
15,185,160

67,265,688
67,318,205
67,130,447
67,404,233
68,467,563

1
8
15
22

Circulation. Agg.Clear.

65,942,232
66,274,801
60.337,415
66,680,258
65,977,180

64,386,503

1880.
Jan.
5
12

Feb.

Philadelphia banks

Loans.
*

1879.
Oct. 13

55,122,311
55,397,217

53.941,988
56,258,526

12,085,136
12,073.945
12,092,147

40,780.676
43,148,041
64.548.184
-

50.885,477
50,800,337
42,399.082
45.951.614
50.218.107

50,508,285
50,955.546
42,963.541
48,058,960
46,890,069
53,151,054
39.982.846
53,624.758
42.li9.011
45.910.829

BiNKUiG AND FINANCIAL.
FISK

from the date thereof, issued under the act dated
May 1,1875, will be paid at the National Bank of Commerce, in
the city and State of New York, on and after the 1st
day of
May, 1880, and that the interest on said bonds will cease on
said last-mentioned day : Bonds for $1,000
each, No. 1 to No.
79, both inclusive, and bonds No. 100 to No. 269, both inclusive.
[ Bonds No. 80 to No. 99, both inclusive, are now owned by the
years

A

HATCH,

BANKERS,
AND

DEALERS

IN

GOVERNMENT

and other desirable Investment

BONDS,

Securities,

NO. 5 NASSAU STREET, N. Y.

'

Texas State Bonds.—The Governor gives notice that he
will receive sealed proposals for the
purchase, from the lowest
■

bidder, of the following outstanding bonds of the State of Texas,
or any of them, viz.:—-Six
per cent currency, due March 1, 1892;
7 per cent gold, due September 1, 1890; 7
per cent gold, due
April 1, 1892; 7 per cent gold, due January 1, 1904; 6 per cent
gold, due 1906. The bids will be opened and passed upon on
the last day of each month
during the present year, at tne Ex¬
ecutive office, Austin, Texas. The Governor is authorized
by
law. to exchange the thirty years’ 5
per cent gold bonds, due
July 1, 1909, for any of the outstanding bonds named above upon

fair terms.

—Messrs. Jas. A. Roosevelt and Wm. R
Fosdick, trustees.and
receivers of the Columbus Chicago & Indiana Central

Company, give notice that

Railway

coupons due October 1, 1879, on 7
per cent bonds of the Union & Logansport Railroad
Company
will be paid on presentation at the office of
Messrs. A. Iselen &

Co., 48 Wall street, New York.




31,101,800
31,280,300
31,336,000
31,385,900
31,240,200

follows:

paying the maturing State indebtedness,” notice is given by
the sinking fund commissioners that the
following bonds .re¬
deemable at the pleasure of the State at
any time after five

]

50379,600
50,866,800
51,382,200
52,651,000
52,742,200

Philadelphia Banks.—The totals of the
are as

Mar.

State

Deposits* Circulation. Agg.Clear.
9
$
f
47,210,000
27,973,600
55,617,716
48,063,400
28,146,300
64,281,244
48,907,100 28,372,700 66,499,862
49,152,400
28,557,300
65,241,372
51,108,100 29,041,000 69360,177
51,724,400
29,311,100
71,780,588
50,769,100
29,554300
76,365,582
50,085,200
29,805,300
56,107,558
50,802,500
30,289,000 69,674,935
50,137300
30,607,100
65,753381
49342,700
30,867,500
62,129,120
49,048,100
31,096,300
51,019306

Other than Government and banks, less Clearing-House checks.

southern Dakota.”

State of Missouri.—By virtue of the
authority contained in
the act of the Legislature of the State of
Missouri, approved
March 29, 1875, entitled “An act to authorize the issue and
sale of renewal funding bonds for the
purpose of meeting and

4,488,400
4,393,600
5,224,000
5,321,500
4,845,100

“

*

3,856,300
4,693,400
5,418,900
5 362,900
5,435,700
5,329,300
4,826,300
4,040,300
3,637,900
3,511,300
3,527,600
3 335,700
3,016,600

4,374,800
4,576,500

“

20

Sioux City & Dakota.—A despatch from Sioux
City, Iowa,
March 20, said that the board of directors of the Sioux
City &
Dakota Railroad Company in Yankton had leased the entire
property to the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Com¬

*

L. Tenders.
$
4,931,500
4,582,900
4,528,800
4,480,500
4,370.200
3,892,800
3,546,700
3,594,900
3,474,900
3,014,800
3,865,300

Buy and sell all issues of Government Bonds, in large or small
amounts, at current market prices, and will be pleased to furnish infor¬
mation in reference to all matters connected with investments in Gov¬

ernment Bonds.
We

\

prepared to give information in regard to first-class Railway
Securities and to execute orders for the same.
Buy and sell all marketable Stocks and Bonds on commission, at the
Stock Exchange or in the open market.
Receive accounts of Banks, Bankers, Merchants, and others, and allow
interest on daily balances; and for those keeping accounts with us we
collect U. S. coupons and registered interest, and other coupons, divi¬
dends, &c., and credit without charge.
Wo give special attention to orders from Banks, Bankers, Institu¬
tions and investors out of the city, by MAIL or TELEGRAPH, to buy or
sell GOVERNMENT BONDS, STATE and RAILROAD BONDS, BANK
STOCKS, RAILROAD STOCKS, and other securities.
are

-We have issued the Seventh Edition of “ Memoranda Concerning Gov¬
ernment Bonds,” copies of which can he had on application, .
FISK & HATCH
'

IIMarch

315

THE CHRONICLE,

27, Jt80]

Dec. 12, 1879.

Lesources.

glue Stokers* (Saaelte.
NATIONAL BANKS ORGANIZED.

The United States Comptroller of the Currency furnishes the
following statement of National Banks organized :
2,467—First National Bank of Maysville, Kentucky. Authorized capi¬
tal, $210,000; paid-in capital, $105,750. James M. Mitchell,
President; Thomas Wells, Cashier. Authorized to commence
business March 18,1880.

DIVIDENDS.
The following dividends have
Name of

recently been announced:
Per
Cent.

Company f

Railroads.
Chio. Mil. & St. Paul com. <fc pref.

Books Closed.

Payable.

(Days inclusive.)

April 18
May 1
May
1
April 10 April 1 to April 12
April 10
April 10

$3 50 April 15
*$2

Chicago ft. I. & Pacific (quay.) ...
Cincinnati Hamilton & Dayton...

3*2
2 lo

Philadelphia & Trenton (quar.)...

United Cos. of N. J. (quar.)
miscellaneous.
American Dist. Telegraph (quar.)
*
Also 50 cents per share on the

When

2*2

Mar. 30 to
Mar. 28 to

-

1*2 April 15 April 2 to April 15
Iowa South. & Missouri Northern.

FRIDAY, MARCH 26, 1880—5 P.
The

Money Market and

Loans and discounts
Overdrafts
United States bonds to secure circulation
United States bonds to secure deposits..
United States bonds on band
Other stocks, bonds and
Amount outstanding

102,742,452
55,352,459
14,425,072
47,992,332
7.474,082
4,150,836
10,377,272

3,694,726
361,501,700
14,417,000
36.798.600
41,060,341
319,948,584
300,290
117,680,900
53,219,269
14,353,806
47,830,616
6,388,708
3,925,749
10,320,050

112,172,677

166,736403

16.392,998

15,362,757
397,288

Bills of other national banks
Fractional currency

Gold coin
Silver coin
Gold certificates
Silver certificates

387,447
:

1

( 67,841,515
5,041,516

78,568,041

15.269.600

54,725,096

55,183,527

11,295,000
16,147,686
907,129

16,003,430
967,352

295,340

;

Legal tender notes
United States certificates of deposit for

legal-tender notes

Five per cent redemption fund.
Due from United States Treasurer

1,148,500

$1,925,229,617 $2,035,339,048

Total

M.

Financial Situation.—In mone¬

3,962,119
364,272,700
14,789,000
40,690,050

38,823,619

Exchanges for Clearing House

21, 1880.

$969,557,855

mortgages

State bank notes outstanding
Due from approved reserve agents
Due from other national banks
Due from State banks and bankers
Real estate, furniture and fixtures
Current expenses and taxes paid
Premiums paid
Cheeks and other cash items]

Feb.

$929,581,542

Liabilities.

Capital stock paid in

Surplus fund

Other undivided

$454,498,515
115,429,031

.

47,573,820

profits

$45*,148,5$5
116,964,043
42,546,277

tary affairs there is very little change, and rates for call loans National bank notes outstanding...
*321,949,154 ‘324.016,592
4,068,008
remain stringent. There is a great difference, however, between Amount on hand
1,306,180
1,368,164
Dividends unpaid
the different sorts of collateral, and one borrower pays 5@6 per Individual deposits
755,459,966
847379,741
6,923,323
7,639,969
cent, while another, offering only inferior stock collaterals, has United States deposits
3,893,217
2302,484
Deposits of U. 8. disbursing officers
152,484379 ' 170,233,619
to pay 6 per cent and a commission of 1-32 to 1-16 per cent a Due to other national banks
59,232,391
65,405,224
Due to State hanks and bankers....
day. Government bond dealers report a fair supply of money Notes and bills rediscounted
2,116,484
1,918,789
4,041,649
4,181,282
Bills payable
offered to them at 4@5 per cent
The stock market closed for our week on Thursday afternoon,
Total
$1,925,229,617 $2,035,339,048
r.
Number of banks
2,059
as to-day (Good Friday) is observed as a semi-holiday, and all
*Tke amount of circulation outstanding February 21,1880, as shown
the Exchanges adjourned over.
The market has been quite
by the hooks of this office, was $343,778,206, and the ambunt outstand¬
irregular, and the heavy decline that has recently occurred in ing December 12,1879, was $342,202,598, which amounts inolude the
of insolvent hanks, of those involuntary liquidation, and of those
several of the prominent speculative stocks has occasioned some notes
which have deposited legal tender notes under the act of June 20,1874,
discouragement to those who had overlooked the possibilities of for the purpose of retiring their circulation.
United States Bonds.—The week has been dull in Govern¬
speculative manipulation in a market such as we have had for
the past six months. Pacific Mail declined from 62 on March 8 ment securities, and prices of fives and sixes rather easier. The
of bonds at the weekly purchase by the Treasury Depart¬
to 36% on March 24.
Manhattan Elevated declined from 57% offers
ment amounted to $5,120,650.
Bids were accepted to the
March 16 to 31% March 24. In regard to the iatter stock, it is amount of $2,000,000, at prices ranging from 105T1 to 105*37
commonly believed that some of the New York State Senators for 6s of 1881, from 103*05 to 103*10 for 5s of 1881, and at 103*74
have been sadly deceived as to its probable course and have met and 103% for 6s of 1880.
with serious losses on it, or, ih the vulgar phrase of the Street,
Closing prices at the N. Y. Board have been as follows:
have been “ cleaned out.” Many times in the history of this
Interest March March March March March March
25.
26.
23.
21.
22.
20.
and other States has it been suspected that railroad influence
Periods.
had a connection, more or less direct, with legislative action.
0s, 1880
reg. J. & J. *103% *1035s *1035s *103% *103*a
*103*3
But never has the communication] between Wall street and Al¬ 6s, 1880
coup. J. & J. *103% *10358 *1035e *103*2
*105
105*8
6s, 1881
reg. J. & J. *105*8 *105*8 105*4
*105
*105
bany been so direct and palpable as in this instance. The noble 6s, 1881
coup. J. & J.J *105*8 *105*8 105*4
*103
'103
*103*8 -103
<8
reg. Q.-Feb. *103
Senators were informed by influential parties in the Street that 5s, 1881
*103
103*8 *103*8 *103
5s, 1881
coup. (,>.-Feb. *103
‘107*2
*10758
should the §ve cent fare bill be defeated in the Senate Manhat¬ 4*23, 1891
.reg. Q.-Mar. *10758 *1075s *1075s
Ui
coup. Q.-Mar. *10758 *10758 lOTSg *107*2 107%
tan stock would go up to certain very high figures ; then came 4*28,1891
105%
105%
*10558
*10558
*10558
Q.-Jan.
4s, 1907
reg.
§
coup. C».-Jan. 106% 106% 106% 1065b *106%
wonderful activity in telegrams from Albany to Wall street, and 4s, 1907
-122
*125
*120
*122
0
6s, cur’cy, 1895..reg. J. & J. *122
*122
'125
Manhattan was in great demand, advancing to 57%. The bill 6s, cur’cy, 1896..reg. J. & J. *122 *122 *122
*122
*122
'125
was killed in the Senate, and then the stock (as if sympathizing
6s, cur’cy, 1897..reg. J. & J. *122 *122
'122
*122
*125*2 *124
6s, cur’cy, 1898..reg. J. & J. *122
more with the passenger than the Senator) became depressed
*122
*122
*125*2 *124
6s, cur’cy, 1899..reg. J. & J. *122
and fell off gradually to 31%. This was quite an ordinary re¬
This is the price bid; no sale was made at the Boara.
sult after the giving out of a good “ point” for speculation, and
The
range in prices since Jan. 1, 1880, and the amount of each
it turns out that the New York Loan and Improvement Com¬
class of bonds outstanding March 1, 1880, were as follows:
pany has managed to work off the entire block of 65,000 shares
of Manhattan stock awarded as a bonus to the Metropolitan
Amount March 1, 1880.
Range since Jan. 1, 1880.
Elevated Company—or the Loan and Improvement Company,
Coupon.
Lowest.
Registered.
Highest.
which is the same thing. The prices obtained ranged from 45
Feb. 16 $14,722,00<
$3,507,000
to 50, and the proceeds are said to have been invested in United 6s, 1880
ep. 102% Jan. 13 104
63,552,650
7 1057a Mar. 2 181,379,051
States 4 per cent bonds.
6s, 1881
cp. 104*8 Jan.
Jan.‘ 29 290,703,050 210,715,850
Feb.
2 104
cp. 103
The Bank of England statement on Thursday showed an 58,1881
81,337,200
4*23,1891..cp. 10638 Jan. 2 109*4 Feb. 17 168,662,800
increase of £31,000 in specie, and the percentage of reserve to 4s, 1907
Jan.
2 107*4 Feb. 16 513,417,350 225,544,650“
cp. 103
64,623,512
liabilities was 46, against 45 15-16 the previous week. The dis¬ 6s.cur’ney.reg. 125*2 Feb. 13 126*2 Feb. 17
count rate remains at 3 per cent. The Bank of France showed
Closing prices of securities in London for three weeks past and
an increase of 16,975,000 francs.
the range since January 1, 1880, were as follows:
*
•
The last statement of the New York City Clearing-House
Range since Jan. 1,1880.
banks, issued March 20, showed a decrease of $1,124,400. in
Mar. Mar. Mar.
the excess above their 25 per cent legal reserve, the whole of such
Lowest.
19.
25.
Highest.
12.
excess being $860,650, against $1,935,050 the previous week.
Mar. 19 106% Jan. 12
105*8 105
105*8 105
The following table shows the changes from the previous week U. 8. 5s of 1381
110*4 110
110
109% Jan. 2 111*2 Feb* 10
U. 8. 4*28 of 1891
and a comparison with the two Drecedinar vears.
106*4 Jan. 2 109% Feb. 19
109*8 x08!4 108
U. S. 4s of 1907
.

.

■

i

•

•

•
t

r

•

•

*

•

t

*

-

1880.
Mar. 20.

1879.
March 22.

Differ’nces fr’m

previous week.

Loans and dis. $294,407,400 Dec $2,849,500 $243,839,800

Specie
Circulation

55.440.100 Dec. 2,487,800
20.975,800 Inc.
8,700
264,539,200 Dec. 5,842.800
97,300
11.555.100 Dec.

>

18,803,700
19,290,900
206,591.400
36,972,600

1878.
March 23.

$241,566,700
39,687.500
19,906,300
211,933,500
29,605,700

State and

Railroad Bonds.—In

been only moderate transactions.
ginia, Messrs. Hambleton & Co.

circular:

State bonds there have

As to the situation in Vir¬
of Baltimore say in their

the late Senate of Virginia
resolution to submit to
Legal tenders.
disapproval the RiddleLegal reserve. $66,134,550 Dec.$l,460,700 $51,647,850 $52,984,625 berger and Ross Hamilton bill, did not even come ui> in the House;
69,293,200 consequently it is inoperative. The Legislature has adjourned without
55,776,300
Reserve held.
66,995,200 Dec. 2,5o5,100
doing anything with the debt question, and the bouds remain as they
$4,128,450 $16,308,575 were before the Legislature met. In order to force an extra session, the
$360,650 Dec.$l,124,400
Surplus
Legislature adjourned without passing appropriation bills. The present
The following is an abstract of reports made to the Comp¬ appropriations extend to next October, and it is thought that by making
troller of the Currency, showing the condition of the national temporary loans the State will be able to get along until the next regu¬
lar session—two years hence.”
•

..

Net deposits

.

banks of the United

States at the close of business on Dec.
The reports of one bank in Ore¬

12, 1879, and Feb. 21, 1880.
gon

and

one




in Washington Territory Were not received in 1880:

“The joint resolution that was
by
does not seem to be generally understood. The
the people of Virginia for tbeir approval or

passed

Railroad bonds continue very strong
issues.

for all the investment

1

THE CHRONICLE.

316

Messrs. A. H. Mailer & Son sold at auction the

securities, seldom sold at public sale:
Bond*.

Nat. Park Bank
Nat. Trust Co

120*«

Twenty-third St. RR

112

$50

Am. Exchl Nat. Bank
121
Merchants’ Nat. Bank
131
N. Y. Gaslight Co
100*4
United States Fire Ins... 126*4
60 Spring Mt. Coal Co., 7 per
cent, guar
64
239 Nat. Butchers’tfe Drovers’
Bank
...1123112*2
113 N. Y. Bowery Fire Ins... 196
60 Manhat. Life Ins....3713369
5 Clinton Fire Ins
140
5 Jefferson Ins.
143
15 Knickerbocker Fire Ins.. 58
12 Firemen’s Ins
102
6 Manhat. Fire Ins., old co.;
10 Etna Fire Ins., old co.;
3 Indemnity Fire In4, for $26
22 Columbia Fire Ins
56
25 American Land Co. for...
$7
Bond*.

S3,000 Broadway & Seventh
7s, due 1884....*102*2
10,000 South Ferry RR. 1st
mort. 7s, due 1894
*65
Av. RR.

3,000 Bleecker St. & Fulton
Ferry RR. 7s, due 1900..*99*2
2,000 City of St. Louis 6s,
Water Bonds, due 1887.*105

*

$152 Amer. Fire Ins. scrip... 43
1,000 Paducah & Elizabeth¬
town
RR. 2d mort. 7s,
due 1897; $200 2d mort.
scrip; 15 shares pref.,

flOO ea.; 15 shares com.,
100 each, for

$1,180
3,000 CoL & Ind. Cent. RR.
1st mort. 7s.
112*2
6,000 Scioto Valley RR. 1st
mort. 7s, due 1896
102
3,000 St. Louis City 6s, due
1886
105%
15,000 Town of Westchester
7s, reg. bonds
...*102*4
3,000 N. Y. City 6s, Croton
Water stock, due 1883...*105
2,000 N. Y. City 7s, Croton
Water stock, due 1900 ..*123*9
1,000 N. Y. City 7s, City
,

Park

impr.

stock,

1903

due
*127

1,000 Col. & Ind. Cent. 2d
mort. 7s. due 1904, Nov.,

and

1879. coupon on

104

25,000 Sixth Av. RR. 7s, due
1890
111*9
52,000 Selma Rome & .ualton
RR. 2d mort. 7s, due July
1, 1900, coupons from

January, 1876, attached,
$1,000 each
73s®6*2

miscellaneous

Stocks.—The stock market
has shown much irregularity, and while in some stocks there
has been an extreme decline (amounting to 26 per cent from the

highest point on Manhattan), the general market has been toler¬
ably strong, and in some cases shows a considerable advance.
We have already noticed the proposed increase in stock of the
Chicago Burlington & Quincy, the Louisville & Nashville and
the Chicago & Alton companies, and now Chicago Rock Island
& Pacific comes to the front with the most astonishing proposi¬
tion of all. This, as adopted by the Executive Committee, and
to be submitted to the stockholders at the next annual

meeting

in June, is a plan for the consolidation under a new corporation
of all the roaas of the company. It is proposed to create a new

company, with a capital stock of $50,000,000. The stock of the
new company will be exchanged at the rate of two shares of
new for one of old stock.
The present capital is $20,980,000,
and it is said that the amount of new stock not needed for the
exchange will be held by the company for the future acquisi¬
tion of other property, or, in other words, held where it may at
any

time be damped

on

the market.

The general market

closed with a stronger feeling on Thursday, notwithstanding
the ti^ht money market, ana in some quarters it was thought
that higher figures would probably be seen next week. Rail¬
road earnings are well kept up, and

roads show a

many

very

large percentage of increase in gross eammgs, but also a large
increase in operating expenses.
The daily highest ana lowest prices have been as follows;
Saturday
Monday. Tuesday, Wednesd. Thursday,
Friday,
March 20 March 22. March 23. March 24. March 25. March 20.
Am. Diftt. Tel.
Atl.APac.Tei.
Canada South.
Cent, of N. J..
Cent. Pacific..
Ches. A Ohio..
Do 1st prf.
Do 2dprf..
Chic. A Alton.
Chic Bur.A Q.
Chic.M.ASt.P.
Do
pref.
Chic. AN. W..
Do
pref.
Chic.R. I.AP.
Ch.St.L.AN.O.
Chic.St.P.AM.
dev. C. C. AI.
Col.Chic.AI.C.
Del.AH.Canal
Del.Lack.AW.
Han. A St. Jo..
Do
pref.

Houa.ATex.C.

75
x44
07

75
44

*25
107
142

20
107
143

75

75

74

*26

05*
107*
103*
“9*

ior

05!
107:
172*
40*

83

80

108

156*
43* 46* 35* 43
11
11*
25

45*

93”

90* 99
32
82*

33

94
34

43*

107
90

107

31

33

32*

St.L.LM. A So.
St. L. A 8. Fran.
Do
pref.
Do 1st prf.

St.P.ASiouxC.
Do
pref.
Sutro Tunnel.
Union Pacific.
Wab.St.L. A P.
Do

pref.

59* 60*

*42* 42*

65* 56*

78

75

42* 42*

'2* ,2*
91* 92
44* 44%
69

163

37*
~

«S
•O

m

7*
92%

•a
o
o

107* 109
90
91*
82* 33

-’SI*

36

75% 76

60
60
*42
56
*78
43

43*
78* 80
89* 91

ml

67

70%
67

63

59* 60* 56% 59
42

56

56

43

J*
89
43W

February.
Chicago & Alton .3d wk Mar.

43

198,683

165,569

83,371

1,105,098

Chic. & East. Ill..2d wk Mar.

1,476,114
893,105
1,200,238 1,105,098

10,545

19,030

14,999

197,458

162,131

Chic. Mil. & St. P.3d wk Mar. 204,000
Chic. & Northw..February .1,153,800
Chic. St. P. <fc Min. 3d wk Mar.
28,526
Chic.&W. Mich.. 1st wk War
14,584
Cin. & Spring!. ..3d wk Mar.
14,287
Clev. Col. Cin. & 1.3d wk Mar.
65,411
Clev. Mt.V. & Del.2d wk Mar.
7,992

142,862

2,090,000

1,485,174

889,623

2,308.432

19,780
11,962

231,430

1,897.944
196,388

9,444

186,671
816,089

127,730
645,705

83,885
112,163

65,967

Del.&H.Can., Pa,Div..Jan..
Denv.S.P’k& Pac.February
Det. Lane.&No..2d wkMar.

112,163
135,430
22,791

Dubuque&S.City.2d wk Mar.

22,014

Eastern
February.
Flint &PereMar.2d wkMar.
Gal. Har.& San A.January...
Grand Trunk.Wk.end. Mh.l3
Gr’t Western. Wk. end. Mh.12
Hannibal & St. Jo.2d wkMar.
Houst.& Texas C. January...

175,345
32,838

.

IllinoisCen. (Ill.).February

.

103,139
190.106

91,734
47,711

319,041
462,673
120,138

.

,55,516
6,906
88,063

88,063

279,730

........

17,694

19,716
153,371

....

179,930
377,659
290,788
103,139

155,630
316,610
199,238

179,752
85,358
47,486

1,875,795

870,977
432,290

1,734,621
830,619
369,056

200,746
368.568

319,041
879,909
239,559

260,746
844,459
202,654
204,155

23,578

114,930

Do
(Iowa).February.
98,353
Indiana Bl.&W..2d wkMar.
17,225
23,792
Int.&Gt. North.. 2d wkMar.
27,950
27,305
Iowa Central
January...
78,019
58,001
K. C. Ft. S.&Gulf. 1st wkMar
23,529
13,471
Kans.C.Law.&So.4th wk Feb
8,226
6,964
K. C. St. J. & C. B.4th wk Feb
35,369
30,053
Little Rk.& Ft. S.2wks Mar.
18,810
10,975
Louisv. & Nashv. 2d wkMar. 132,700
100,800
Minn. & St. Louis. 1st wkMar
9,250
6,607
Mo. Kan.&Texas. 3d wkMar.
69,692
50,530
Mobile &Montg..January...
78,154
80,869
Mobile&Ohio.... 3d wkMar.
35,155
37,533
Nashv. Ch.&St.L.February .
191,154 158,034
N. Y. & Canada..January...
49,810
25,587
N. Y. Cent. & Hud.February .2,317,231 2,210,304
N. Y. L. Erie & W. January... 1,296,3811,147,173
N.Y.&N. Engl’d. 3d wkMar.
38,980
33,662
Northern Central. January... 334,494
265,002
Northern Pacific .February .
56,419
44,658

Ogd. &L. Champ.3d wk Mur.

114,930

216,849
355,649

78,019

365,694
58,061

1,523,774
100,400
922,283

1,084,489
62,235
546,958

...

78,154

80,869

482;720

573,534

396,788
315,313
49,810
25,587
4,910,844 4,235,116
1,296,381 1,147,173

’349,957

426,650*

265,002

334,494

81,672

138,262

6,504
5,049
5,402
68,087
4,970
52,062
Pad. & Memphis.. 2d wkMar.
4,032
2,984
43,909
34,828
Pennsylvania
February .2,944,576 2,538,039 6,028,127 5,081,463
Peoria Dec. & Ev.2 wks Mar.
11,832
4,954
469f679
449*748
Pbiladel.<feErie..February
245,372 237,000
Phila. & Reading.Febr»ary .1,063,309
877,865 2,379,398 1,835,080
Rensselaer & Bar.January... 114,451
114,451
79,549
79,549
St.L.Alt.&T.H. ..2dwkMar.
243,686
22,741
14,414
155,313
Do
(brchs).2d wkMar.
13,520
130,990
114,076
10,723
St. L. Iron Mt.&S.2d wkMar. 111,100
86,486 1,284,363
856,241
St. L. & San Fran.3d wk Mar.
22,300
40,100
523,444
231,674
8t.Paui& Duluth.February
71,405
46,078
33,214
22,646
317,884
St.P.Minn.&.Man.February
137,645
140*521
195,893
St.Paul&S.City..February
*94,024
66,976
Scioto Valley
3d wkMar.
6,664
5,411
Southern Minn...January...
*50,128
50,128
37,151
37,151
Tol. Peoria& War. 2d wk Mar.
22,004
27,712
252,615
216,869
Union Pacific....ILdysMar 585,165
425,325
Wab. St. L. & Pac.2d wk Mar. 203,520
151,908 1,944,911 1,455,418
Wisconsin Cent...February
177,827
111,449
85,171
54,806
Wisconsin Valley.2d wkMar.
6,255
3,733
Pad.&Elizabetht. 1st wkMar

4 88%, demand bills being weak.
4 89.
Lower prices of grain are
certain extent.

Cable transfers

are

4 88%@

stimulating shipments to

a

Quotations for foreign exchange are as follows :
March 26.

24
67

Prime hankers’ sterling hills on London.
Good bankers’ and prime commercial...
Good commercial

_

107

..V

4 85*4®4
4 84%®4
4 84
@4
4 83*'S)4
5 20 ®5
5 21**5
5 20 @5

40

®

84*2
84
18*8
193s
18*8

Bremen (reichmarks)

9400®

68

Berlin (reichmarks)

9408®
94®8®

95
95
95

43*
68*
108

made at the Board.

are

40*
95°8

40*®
95*89
95*8®
95*8®
95*8®

95^8
9508

950§

quotations in gold for various coins;

Sovereigns

$4 84

®$4 88

Napoleons

3 84

X X Reichmarks.
X Guilders

4 72
3 92

@ 3 88
9 4 78
9 4 00

Dimes & *2 dimes.
Silver
and J^s.
Five francs
Mexican dollars..

Span’ll Doubloons.15 90

^16 lp

English silver

Mex. Doui»loons..l5 45 ®15 65
Fine silver oars
1 14*e® 1 15
..

Fine gold bare

5 18%®5 16*8
5 171«'®515a8

40*

24

following

89
88*#
®4 87**
4 86V©4 87
5 17*a®5 15^g
4 88
4 87

85*

95

The

4 88*2®4

86

94°8®

a*

Demand.

Sixty Days.

Hamburg (reichmarks)
Frankfort (reichmarks)

00* 70*

90*
44%

was

44,733
2,261,000
102,077 s 401,018

Chic. Burl. & Q.. .January.. .1,200,238
Chio.Cl. Dub.& M. 1st wk Mar
13,663

Swiss (francs).
Amsterdam (guilders)

55* 55*
79* 70*
42* 43*

78* 80

298,646
109,894
265,509
44,116
37,908
2,145,857
190,744

•

Pails (francs)

g* g*
63

940,618

389,486
156,870
434,990
62,389

Carolina Central.January...
37,908
44,733
Central Pacific...February .1,038,0001,056,691
,056,691

Antwerp (francs)

25*
87*

*M*
70

25,541
4,927

6,065

Documentary commercial
54

69%
69*
West. Un.Tel. +108% 09* 107% 108*q
1079i
•These are the prices bid aud asked; no sale
+ Sale* were alto made ex-div. at 107*@108*.




93*

4
0!
26

32*
54% 55*

298,646
109,894

©

129* 129% 129* 1

44% 45%

1424324 1,241,000

prices for prime bankers’ sterling are about 4 85@4 85^6 and

107*106%

157
33

.

23

pr6f. 63* 64

81

!»
91%

92* 93*

77,362

Exchange.—1The market for foreign exchange has not shown
much animation.
There is no chauge in the posted rates
of the leading drawers of sterling bills. On actual transactions
the

105* 108%
35* 36

157

Cairo & St. Louis.2d wk Mar.

99,962

.

87

81

155

.

Do

17*
85r

70* 72

104* 1
35%
107% 1

77,362
8,594

,

56
80

86

61

99,962
15,834
Atch.Top. & S. Fe. 2d wk Mar. 175,500
Atl.&Gt.West.... January... 389,486
Atl. Miss. & Ohio.January... 156,870
Bur.C.Rap.<feNo..2dwkMar.
43.359
Atchison & Neb ..1st wk Mar

.

93% 94

85

.

Albany & Susq ..January...

.

40* 41%

H

/—Latest earnings reported.—% ^-Jan. 1 to latest date.—.
Week or Mo.
1879.
1880.
1879.
188Q.
Ala.Gt. Southern. February
$33,094
$51,227
$106,628
$67,035

.

110
188

*55
79
17
85

93*

22

..

109
185

84^

mentioned in the second column.

.

110* Ill 113
149* 146% 149
85
84* 85*
105% 106 106%
95* 90

82* 84;

Illinois Cent.. 102* 103
Lake Brie AW.
Lake Shore....
Louisv.ANash 155
15
Manhattan
42* 45*
Mar. AC.lst pf. 10*
Da 2d prf.
Mich. Central,.
MobileA Ohio.
Mo.Kans. AT.
Mor.A Essex..
Nash.Ch.A8tL
VewCent.Coal
N.Y.C.AH. K.
N.Y.L.E. A W.
Do
pref.
M.Y.Ont.AW.
Northern Pac.
Do
pref.
Ohio Central
Ohio A Miss...
Do
pref.
Pacific Mail...
Panama..
Phil. A Read’s 60* 71*

St.L.A.AT.H.

74

44

42;
44* 43* 43* 42
42%
67* 67* 07* 00* 67* W*
66
85* 80* 85* 80* 84* 85% 83* 85* 85" 85*
80
80
78
76
77
79* 70* 78
24 ‘ 24* 24*
24* 24* 23* 24
23% 23
♦31
84
*31
*30
83
33
30% 30%

105

earnings and the totals from Jan. 1 to
below.
The statement includes the gross
given
earnings of all railroads from which returns can be obtained.
The columns under the heading “ Jan. 1 to latest date” famish
the gross earnings from Jan. 1 to, and including, the period
are

Ches. & Ohio

And interest.

Railroad

The latest railroad

latest dates

Share*.
40
20
100
36
33
48
72

following

IVOL. XXX.

**prem.'3>38prem.

....

—
—
—
—

99 %®
99%®
92
90

4 75

Prus. silv. thalers.

—

Trade dollars
New silver dollars

—

—

par.
par.

® — 95
® —‘.91

9 4

85

68 ® — 70
99*® —99**
99%® par.

M abch

THE CHRONICLE.

27, 1880. J

Average amount of
Banks.

Capital. Loans

and

Specie.

discounts.

$
2,110.000
441.800
1331.700

S

2,000,000 10,-200.000
Manhattan Co... 2,050,000
6,810,100
7.125.700
Merchants.
2,000,000
7.617.800 1.243,800
Mechanics’
2,000,000
4.593.600 1,000,500
1,200,000
Upion
9.129.900 1.292.700
America
3,000,000
569.000
Phoenix
3,284,000
1,000,000
6,779,000 1.528.400
City
1,000,000
2.978.100
Tradesmen’s
366,000
1,000,000
355.400
Fulton
1.670.400
600,000
Chemical
800,000 12.465,300 2.809.100
Merchants’ Exch. 1,000,000
3,684,000
591.800
414.500
Gallatin Nation’1 1,000,000
4,071.000
1,417.000
281.900
Butchers’ADrov.
300,000
105.000
Mechanics' A Tr.
878,000
200,000
909.700
20,700
Greenwich
200,000
346.800
Leather Man’f’rs
2.931.800
600,000
Seventh Ward...
976.700
129.800
300,000
3.502.200
State of N. York.
653.600
800,000
American Exch.. 5,000,000 13,928.000 2,1s 5.000
Commerce..
5,000,000 13,734.500 4338.100
5.418.700
803.600
1,000,000
Broadway
672.600
Mercantile
3.949.800
1,000,000
230.500
Pacific
2.283.500
422,700
505.300
Republic
5.626.900
1,500,000
Chatham
709.600
3.580.200
450,000
108.100
1.379.000
412,500
People’s
North America..
223,000
2.343.400
700,000
Hanover
7.763.600 1.878.700
1,000,000
484.100
2.707.10U
Irvin*
500,000
Metropolitan.... 3,000.000 13,047.000 2.798.000
CltisenS*.
1.805.700
243.900
600,000
184.400
Nassau
2.281.900
1,000,000
386.300
Market
2.474.700
500,000
St. Nicholas
272300
1,975,300
500,000
649.000
3.478,000
Shoe A Leather..
500,000
247.300
Corn'Exchange.. 1,000,000 3.495.500
Continental
5.465.100 1334.400
1,000,000
New York

Oriental
Marine

1.555.900
2.913.000
18,995,100
16,073,800

300,000

Importers’ A Tr..
Park
Mech. Bkg. Ass’n
North River.
Bast River
Fourth National.
Central Nat.
Second Nation’1.
....

Ninth National..
First National..
Third-National..
N. Y. Nat. Exch..

Bowery National

Ni York County..
Germ’n Amerio’n
Chase National..

400,000
1,500.000

%000,000

^500,000

824.200

838,100
1,031,200
16.638,200
8,650,000
2,595.000

240,000
250,000
3,200,000
2,000,000
300,000
750,000
500,000
1,000,000
300,000
250,000
200,000
750.000
800,000

30.900
727.000

5,197.000
3387.700
142.500
39.600
143.400

3.353,600
1,230,000
860.(*00

4.599.500

830,000

14.113.00U

2.966.000

9,172,000 £.424,400
1.353.500
165.400
24.000

1.427,000
1.836.800
2.111.000

16;500
199.400
584.600

3,022,100

Net dept’s
Circula¬
Legal
other
tion.
Tenders. than U. S.

9
68.000

112,000
54.500
69.800
230.400
140.800

125.100
44.300
154,000
215.100
198.400
100.200

110,600
307.000
852.900
265.100
202.200

173.400
312300
134.500

113.700

85,000
246.100

The deviations from
Legal tenders

The following

“

Sept.
K

returns of

are

Loans.
$

9. ..272,936,000

16 ...274,311,000
23. ...263,570,100
80. ...256,160,300

6. ...257,380,800

“

..

29.

Dec.

..

1,433,100

3,493,000
1.896.300

33.000

474.900

900.000

180,000

1,125,066
800,000
437,000
45.U00

260.500
3.900

434.400
450,000
450.000

4,600
742,600

284.500
187.000
360.60C

21,161,500 fi.105,53

285.800

18.016.900

30,000

617,700

95.700

789 400

180,666

8,288.000

535.700
358.400

225.666

804.800
87,400
855.000 16,122,200
478.000
7,815,000
8.062,oOO
420.000
304.000
4.482.700
106,309 14.103.000
10.122,700
343,800'
1,020.300
87.500
1.097.000
281,000
1,285,400
831.200
1.781.100
99.600
3.115.900
211.200

810,000

1,477,000
45,000
450,000
450,000
798 400
269.900
225,0 JO

180,000

266,966

previous week

.273.439,900

“

6. ...273,101,100
18. ...275,750,100

,*

20.

.278,098,100
27. ...277,584,200
..

the totals lor

a

are as follows :
..Dec. $5,842,800
Inc.
8,700

series of weeks past:

Specie. L. Tenders.
S
$
19.624.100 50.435.500
43,974,000
19.553.200
19.681.100 41,838,600
19.684.700 41,279,300
19.753.800 40,088,000
19.876.900 39.481.100
19,942,000 42,029,400
20,017.400 40,047.700
20.149.100 38,003.500
22.566.300 36.438.500
26.383.600 33,097,700
27.682.600 30.151.700
29.675.300 28.615.900
33.823.800 23.486.900
42.992.800 22,595,800
50,006,700 18.985.200
52.310.700 16.771.700
54,771,000 14,073,200
54.069,400 13.403.900
50.842.900 12.543.400
48.638.200 12,089,700

1880.
Jan.
3. ...276,706.200 48.282.100 12.723.500
“
10. ...276,116,100 51.473.500 14,097,800
“
17. ...276,990,900 53.558.600 15.914.200
“
24. *>.280,068,000 51.882.200 17.143.500
“
31. ...283.194.500 50.312.800 18,586,000
Feb.
7. ...290,381.600 52.994.600 16.437.900
“
14. ...290.445,200 54.746.500 10,686.000
“
21. ...290,091,200 59,©87,200 15.505.500
28. ...293,545.600 57.418.300 14,168,000
Mar.
6. ...297.135,500 58,055,000 12.130.400
“
18. ...297,256,900 57.927.900 11,052,400
“
20. ...294,407,400 55.440.100 11.555.100

Deposits. Circulation Agg.Clear
253.230.200 20,682,100 660.036,583
248.474.600 20.719.500 605,012.052
235.958.900 20.827.500 482,688.369
228317.400 20.942.500 476,563.861
226.635.600 21,372,300 452,345,265
225.572.900 21.603.500 507.109,348
228,271.000 21384,000 530.921366
229,983,000 21.531.900 591,859,560
231.920.700 21.932.400 747,278.535
232.780.500 22,060,100 741,448,440
232.805.300 22,286,800 798.960,746
231.668.000

234,412,000
231.927.700
239.201.200
250.297.300
247.195.500
247,030, tOO
247359.200

22.448.700 701.277,728

22.600.500

865,862357
772,150,134
870,092,059
942.922,768
779.955.847
850.846.848
722,603389
666,418,518
586,014,073

22.341.500

22.475.700

22.550.400
23,024,800
23355.100
23.463.800
246.118.600 23.651.900
242,062,200 23.732.900

242.087,100 23,748,600 604,197,943
246,995,000 23.812.900 657,095,260
253.731.900 21.635.900 787,728,198
257.483.700 21.662.900 743,125,031
259,675,000 21.529.900 772.270,895
264.404.200 21.683.200 720,978,130
267,128,100 21,599,000 683.453,357
271,601,000 21.282.200 795,314.114
271,012,800 21,174,000 725,419.855
271.483.400 21,002.100 895,014,025
270,381.000 20.967.100 827,801,84 >
264.538.200 20.975.800 748,481,804
Not* —With December 27 the Grocers’ Bank disappeared from the list.

„

QUOTATIONS IN BOSTON. PHILADELPHIA AND OTHBB CITIES.
Bid. Ask.

SUOUBITIXS.

Bid. Ask.

SXCTJBITIXS.

Old Colony,7a...
old Colony, 6a
109*
Omaha A S. Western, 8a ....
Pueblo A Ark. Valley, 7s
109* 10**
95
Rutland 6s,lat mort.
Vermont a Canada, new 8s..
Vermont A Mass. RB.,6s

115

land grants 1 113* 114
2d 7s
133*
do
land Inc. 8&
Boston A Maine 7s
r 121*
Boston a Albany 7s
do
6s
112
Boston A Lowell 7s
do
6s
*
Boston A Providence 7s
122
Burl. A Mo., land grant 7s... 114
do
Kebr.68 Ex.....
loo*
do
102
Nebr. 6s
Conn. A Passumpslc, 7s, 189; 109*
94
Eastern, Mass., 4 *8, new. ..
-

>

do
do

115*

...

*

#

*

1

*

t

-

TTt

Fitchburg BR., 6s!..

...

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

• •

•

STOCKS.

Atchlf on A Topeka
At hi 0 1 A Nebraska
Boston A Albany.
Boston A Lowel1
Boston A Mame
Boston A Providence

185*

x
....

143
*0
x

<8

143*
93*

158* 129

135
135*
iBurllngton A Mo. In Neb. .x 144*
"55
{Cheshirepreferred.
.x
Chic. Clinton Dub. A Min.... 70* 70*
Cm. Sandusky A Clev
15* 15*

do
7s.,Concord.
Fort Scott A Gulf 7s
107* Connecticut River
Hartford A Erie 7s
Conn. A Passumpslc.... ,..x
56* 57
Ran. City Top. A vv„7s, 1st
Eastern (Mass.)
115
do
f
do
Eastern 4*few Hampshire)...
7s, inc.
K- City Lawrence A 80.4*.,
«7
Fitchburg
x
Kaiw City. St. Jo. A C. B. «, 106* 108* Fort Scott A Gulf, pr ierrc
Kan* Clrr St. Jo. A 1. B. In
00
common.
r 62
Little B’k A Ft. Smith, 7s,la t 100*101
K. C. Law. A Souther*)
KeY York A New Eng. is. .
K.
C.
Pt.
Jo.
A
Council
luffs
111*
1
Little Fock A Fart Smith
Cgdfthsbnrg A Eak« i;n.8s..

.

.

.

.

01
41

62

....

r

r

r

....

....

..

• •

•

....

89

1*3*
80
53
81

07*
60

60*

6s,n.,rg.,l395A over

do
do
do

121
lu3

Williamsport.......
do
do
pref..
Har.P. Mt. Joy A Lancaster.
Huntingdon A Broad Top...
do pref.

tgailSfei::::-:::.::::liinehlll
Nesquehonlng valley

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia A Erie
Pnlladeiphla A Reading
Philadelphia A Trenton
Phila.Wflmlng. A Baltimore.
PittsburgiTltusv. A Buff.....

Chesapeake A Delaware
Delaware Division

do m. couv. g., n-g./94
do mort. gold,*97....

51*
50

50*

*000

•

•

•

•

•

•#

•
%

•

00 a

0

000
• as

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•0

p •

•

• •

0 0

Ml

• •

•

•

iff

UH

UH

water, 8s
71* Norfolk
BAILKOAD 8TOOK8.
la*

0 00

88

79
62

do
2d m. 6a. reg., 1907
do 6«, boatAcar.rg.,1918
do 7a, boatAcar.vg.,l9i5

J8f

88
«

•••

•

••

103
111
107
100
106
111

110

109
no
115

114
120
125
121

113
no
105

111

111*
U3* 114

117
119

121

112*. 112*

110

m

Par.

157
....100 156* 120
117
tstpr^f
103*
108*
2d prtf
do
Wash. Branch.100 150
do
do
Parkersb*gBr..50 6* 83
Northern Central.
50’ 82* 8
Western Maryland.
5u 8* 80
Central Ohio
....50 8»

Balt. A Ohio
*>o

07

37

SI*

pref...

railroad bonds.

Allegheny Val., 7frlOe, 1896...
do
7s, E. ext., 1910
do
Inc. 7s, end., *94.
Belvldere Dels. 1st m.,68,1902.
do
2d m. 6s.’8.)..
~

6s, ’87..

Camden AAmboy 6s,coup'S3 104*
do
6s, coup., ’89 107
do
mort. 6s, ’89— 114*
Cam. A Atl. 1st m 7s. g., 1*98
2d m. cur. 7s, lr79..
do
Cam. A Burlington Co. 68/91. 112*
Catawlssa 1st, 7s, conv., ’s2...
do
chat, m., 10s, ’88 ..
113
114
new 7s 1900
do
103
Connecting 6s, 1900-1904...
Chartiers Val., 1st m. 7s,C.,190.
Delaware mort.,6s, various..
117
Del. A Bound Br., 1st, 7s. 1905
East Penn. 1st mort. 7s, TO ..
El.A W’msport, ibt m., 7s, ’oO.
85
do
5s,perp
Harrisburg 1st mor* 6a. ’83-j.l
H. A B. T. 1st m. 7s, gold, 90.
do
1ft m. 7s, fd. g.’e9
do
2d m. 7s, gold, 95. 100
do
2dm.f .*crlp g.,»e 63
do
3d m. cons. 1». ’95*.
IthacaA Athens 1st g d, ?s., 90
Junction 1st mort. 6s ’82
2d mort. 6s. 1900^.
do
Lehigh Valley, lstjls.cp., 1898
do
do reg., 1898...
do 21 m. 7s, reg., 1910..

6s,rg.,1928

6s,< p.,19.S

Little 8chuylklU, 1st m. 7s>2
North. Penn. 1st m.6s, cp.,’85. 107
do
2dm. 7s, cp., *96.
do gen. m. 7s, cp., 1903.
do gen. m. 7s, reg., 190J
Oil Creek 1st m. 7s, coup.,’8i.

000

RAILBuAD bonds.

Balt. A Ohio 6s, 1880, J.AJ....
do
6s, 1885, A..AO* .
N. W. Va. 8d m.Auar.,’85JAJ
Plttsb. A Conneilsv.ls.TO^JAJ
Northern Central 6a. *85, «>AJ
do
6s, 1900. A.AO.
do 6#,gld, 1900, J.AJ.
Cen. Ohio 6s, lstm.,’90,M.A8.
W. Md. 6s, 1st mygr.,’90J.AJ.
do
1st m., .890, J. A J *...
do 2dm.,guar., J.A J—
2d
do
m., prei............
do 2d m.gr. by W.C0.JAJ
do 6s. 3d in., guar.. J.A J.
Mar. A Cm. 7s, *92, F. A A ...
do
2d,M.AN
do
8s, 8d, J.AJ
Union BR. 1st, guar., J. A J..
do
Camon endorsed.

CINCINNATI.
7s
«*30s....... ....<

do
do

do
Scrip
Pa.AN.Y.C. A BK.7S, 896....
do
1906
Pennsylv., 1st m., 6s, cp., *80t. 102*
....

gen.m.6s,cp..l9»Q:
gen. m. 6s, rg., 1910.
6-, rg., 1905
6s. cp., 1905.

lfStf

112

—

do
South. BR. 7*30s.
do
do
6s, goldHamllton Co., O., 6s. long...

7s, lto5yrs..
7 A7*30a,fong.t
Cln.A Cot- Bridge st’k, pref.
Cln. Ham. A D. 1st m. 7s, ’80 +
do
2dm. 7s, 851
Cln. Ham. A Ind.,7s,guar....
cm. A Indiana istm.7a.;u..+
do
2d m.7s, *27*.+
Colum. A Xenia, 1st m. 7s.’90
Dayton A Mich. 1st m. 7s. '8l+
do
2d m. 7«, B4.+
3d m. 7s, *8St
do
ao

do

4*

Loulsv.C.A Lex. 1st m.7s,*97t

no
118
no
119

114*
108
111

109* 110*
103
no

108
no

no
190
115
120

.90* 96*

108
no
109

....

120

100*

70* b0*

40
no
110

117*

118
106
106
104
no
130

100*

108
100
1U5

48

.000

•

•as

108
108

iis*
106*
000

•

0 000

♦•••
■*••#

101

105*

102

101* iff

103
102

HO*

0 0

0 0

0 00 0
•

.

SIS
#••

0 0 00

72

'55
128

104* 105
104* 105

104* 105
104* 105
104* 105
104* 105

104* 105
107* 108*

100
no

101

?}$“
us* lift

Louis.A FtTl,Lou1sv. Ul6s»^1
Loolsv. A Nashville—
Leb. Br. 6s,*86......•••• • • .T 104*
1st m. Leb. Br. Kx.,7a/8£S6.t 104
Lou.In.
do
6s,’9S-.T 104
Jefferson Mad. A Ind stock. 103
f 4ii4
....

102

.

%

112

105

do
1st m., 1905.f
do
1st m.fs, 190> mi
Ind; cm. A Laf. 1st m. 7s#i...
do
(I.AC.) 1st m.7s,’884 105
Uttie Miami 6a, *83
.t 102
cm. Ham. A Dayton stock... 71
Columbus A Xenia stock..... 125
54
Dayton A Michigan stock.... 120
do
8.

.

•In default, £ Per share.
i COu. to Jan.. *77. funded.

101* lot

Dayton A West. 1stm.,

LOUISVILLE.

Ml#

110

107

Louisville 7a....... .....,*.,..7
do
6a, *82 to *87........ T
do
6a, *97 to ’92
t
do
water 6a,*87 to
water stock 6a/97.4
do
118*
wharf 6s;
do
..t
11**
do
*89.t
spec’ltax6sof
114*
Louisville Water 6#. Co. l9071
106* Jeff. MALlst m. ClAM) 7s,^lt
2dm#,7s ••«
do
t
do
1st m., 7s, 1906....t
104
113

5

105

Cincinnati 6s, long

p.C. st’k, guar
Little Miami stock

plttsb. Tltusv. A B., 7s, cp.,’% 78*

Navy Yard 6s, rg/81
Penn. Co ,6s. reg
...
Perkiomen 1st m. 8s.coup.,’9
Phil a. A Erie 1st m.6s, cp./8 •
do
2d vi 7«,<p..TO,
Phi a. ' ewt’n A N.Y.. 1st m.
Phils. A Rend. 1st m. t a, *<£-’44
do
48-.49
do
do
2d m., 7a, cp^9J.

K

••00

• •

rg.,191! 104

Susquehanna 6s, coup.. :9i8 .*
BALTI9EORE*
Maryland 6a, defense, J.A J..
do
6s, exempt, 1887....
10
do
6s, >890, quarterly..
do
5a, quarterly
51*
Baltimore 6a, >S8i. quart
do
6s,
l8S6, J.A J.
58
58*
do
6s, 1890, quarterly...
54
do
6e, park, 1890, (j.—M.
102
do 6s, 1898, M. A 8
50*
do
6s,exempt,’4S.M. AS.
52
do
6s, 1900, Q —J
do
6s.
1904, J. A J
34*
do
5', 19 6, new

Susquehanna

_

io»

Morris, boat loan, reg., iS85..
79* 88
33* Pennsylvania 6s, coup., 1910.. 102
103
16
Bchuylit. Nav.lat rn.6s.rg.,*97.

Pennsylvania.

eons. m.

•

:•

Schuylkill Navigation......

do
do

•

*•••

.

122
105

••••••••••••.«•

cons. m.

cons.

Pittsburg A Connellsvllle..50

L^tllgh NftYlj[WlOD«.»*s*#aa«

do

00 •

at

Lehigh Navlga. m.^sa, reg.,*84 105*
ill
do
mort. BR., rg .9. no

Paul A Duluth R.R. Com
do
do pref.
United N. J. Companies...... 157*
West Chester consol, pref....
West Jersey
CANAL STOCKS.

do
do

•••

•

0000

Chesap. A Dela. 1st 6s, rg./86
Delaware Division 6s, cp.,T8.

8t.

do

•

m.,6»,g.t1905
98
do
lnc.Al.gr ,7a 19(5
Union A Tltusv. 1st m. 7s. *9C
United N. J. cons. m. 6s,’94.
101
Warren A F. 1st m.7s,’96.... ioo
118* 128
West Chester cons. 7s, ’91
West Jersey 6s, deb., coup.,’8S
112
do
tat m. 68, cp., *96 in
do

pref.

con. m.,

•

»• •

Z*

Norristown
North Pennsylvania

do
do

•

•

0

Elmira A

m.

•

CANAL BONDS.

33

do
pref.....
do
new pref...........
Delaware A Bound Brook....
East Pennsylvania.

3d

•

«#

Suab.

do cons. m.7s,

Caiawltsa.....

do

•

do
1stm.7s,*1« .... 116
cons. 0a, 1903 ...
do
Western Penn. RB. tfa,cp.,.899 105*
do
6a P.6.,’96.

RAILROAD

do

a

*68

.

Harrisburg City os, coupon..

Momi
do pref....

•

Stony Creek 1st m.Is i907....

7s, ur.imp.. reg.,*88-86.

do

•

•

ijaz. A W.,lst m.,58/2*.
Snnbury A Erie 1st m. 7a, W..
*yra.Gen.A ( omV,let, ;s, 1905
Texas A Pac. 1st m ,6a, g.,1905

88

87*
•

•

N. Jersey 6s, reg. and coup...
exempt, rg. A coup.
do
Camden County 6s, coup
Camden City 6s, coupon
do
7s, reg. A coup.
Delaware 6s,coupon
«...

do

106

...

•

6s,gold.reg... ...
7s, wH’r In.rg. Acn.

STOCKS.7
Camden A Atlantic.
do
do
pref

.

m.6s, 905
do imp. m.6*g., 1897...
do conv. 7s, 1898*
do
7s, coup, off, *93

Phll.A K.CealA Iron deb.7s.92
do
deb. 7s. cpa.oft
do mort., 7s, 1892-3
Phils. Wflm. A Balt. 68. ’84 ...
Pltta.Cln.ASt. L. 7s, con., 1901- 115*
do
do
7s, reg., 19 *
Shamokln V.A Pottav. 7s, 1901 111
Stenbenv. A Ind. 1st, 6a. 1884.

65

1882-92q

4s, various
Allegheny Countj 5s, coup...
Allegheny City 7s, reg..
Pittsburg 4s,coup., 1913.....
do
5s, reg. A cp., 1918.

......

*




.

82

118*

5s, cur.,reg ...
113
5s, reg., 1S8 -1892
5s, new, reg., UM7M06s, 1045, reg., li77-’82. 101*
107*
6s, 15-25,reg.,
6s. In. Plane, reg.,1879
Philadelphia, 5s reg
do
6s. ola, reg....
do 6s,n., rg., prior to *95
do
do

do cons. m.fie.g.1.1911.
ro ven.

do
do

do
do
do
do

....

BOSTON.
Atch. A Tcpoka 1st m.7s....

m

STATS AND OITT

896,000
5,400

5.624.200
1.482.200

111.100

2,487.800 Circulation
97,300 ]

Dec.

13. ...256,960,400
“
20. ...259,391,000
“
27. ...260,763,700
4. ...266,364,300
Oct.
“
11. ...268,701,800
“
18. ...267,505,500
“
25 ...269,433,800
Nov. 1.,...271,238.600
8. ...270.076,800
*•
15. ...268.538.800
“
22. .-276,194,400
“

180,000
2,700

10,212.400

242.000

Dec.

“

710,700*

87.700
626.500
450.000

1.751.500
2,049.800
1.933.000
1.481.600

Dec. 12,849,5001 Net deposits

r

795,206

BONDS.
Penna. 5s, g’d, int.,reg. or cp.

Bid. Ask.

SKCUBITIX8.

....

Pullma

PHILADELPHIA.

859.500
2.212.200
917.500
2.836.300
10.005,000

222,600
94.700
99.500
64,000

• Palace Car
Pueolo A Ark nsas

Wte,-ilsnt1nued,

Phi). A Bead, deben., cp./UF
do
do
»*
cps. ofc.
do
87* 89
scrip, 1882.
In. m. 7a, cp,1896
do
do eons. m. 7a, cp.,1911.. 113
118
do eons. m. 7s, rg.,19U.. 117

OgdensD. A L.Champlain ... 31*
do
pref..
111
Old Colony
Portland 8»co A Portsmouth 105

l.lOO

264.2001

4.191.200
3.750.100
2.032.000
3304.600
3.504.300
1.274,000
2.151.900
7.693.900

Manchester A Lawrence.... 145
113*
Nashua A Lowell
Ne w York A New England... 53
Northern of New Hampshire
Norwich A Worcester. .... .x 137*

613,000

662.700

1.209.300
937.000

2.515.500
11.094,000

Loans and discounts

Aug.

6.458.500
2,643,000
6.397.700
1,818,000
1.214.700
12,016.900
2,845 800
2.233.900

Bid. Ask

sxcvsmss.

Rutland, preferred
%....
Vermont A Massachusetts..
Worcester A Nashua

8.863.600

204.900
160.000

Specie.

1879.

400

563,900
44,500

60,375,200 294.407,400 55,440,100 11,555,100 964,538,200 20,975,800

Total.

,

9.716.600
4.016.200
5.871.500
6,338,000

252300
195.000
372,000
67.600
218,200
75.000

$
495,000

Ptllh iilHiliP III.

iFMfjH,

B«nk».^-The following statement shows

New York city

the condition of the Associated Banks of New York City for the
week ending at the commencement of business on March 20, 1380:

317

•

•#9

105
105
105
105

1 HE CHKON1CL&

318

STOCKS

QUOTATIONS OF
U. 8. Bonds and active Railroad Stocks

are

quoted

AND

previous

on a

Bid.

SECURITIES.

•

7s,
7s,
7s,
7s,
7s,

L. Rock A Ft. Scott iss.
Memp. & L. Rock RR
L. RP.B.A N. 0. RR.
Miss. O. A R. V RR...
Arkansas Central RR.

^Georgia—6s
7s, new
7s, endorsed.
7s, gold

Kentucky—6s
Louisiana—7s, consolidated

64

93% 95

7s. small

.74
20

Michigan—6s, 1883

7s, 1890
Missouri—6s, due 1882 or ’83
6s, due 1886
6s, due 1887
6s, due 1888
6s, due 1889 or ’90
Asylum or Uniy., due ’92.
Funding, 1894-95
Hannibal & St. Jo., 1886..

f1

.

Connecticut—6s...

63

62%

4

106
101
111

113

110#

..

York—6s, gold, reg.,’87
6s, gold, coup., 1887
6s,loan,1883
6s, do 1891

Illinois—6s,coupon, 1679...
War loan.....

RAILROAD

3.-west div., 1st 6s, 1909..
1st

(Active previously quoted.)
Albany A Susquehanna
8108

Frankfort A Kokomo
Harlem
Ind. Bloom. St, Western
Intern’l St Gt. Northern
Keokuk St Des Moines
do
do
pref.

550

58, LaC. & Dav., 1910.

N. Alb. St Chicago..
Metropolitan Elevated

N. Y. Elevated
N. Y. New Haven St Hartf.
N. Y. Ontario St West.,pref.
Peoria Decatur & Evansv..
Pitts. Ft. W. St Chic., guar,
do
do
spec’l.
Rensselaer St Saratoga
Rome Watertown & Ogd...
St. Paul St Duluth
do
do
pref.

127
110

111

Terre Haute St Indianapolis
Texas St Pacific
Tbledo Peoria St Warsaw..
United N. J. RR. St Canal.

Sinking fund

§ 15*'
535

Mariposa L’d St Mining Co..
do *’
do
pref.
Maryland Coal

117

108%

158% 158%

527"
117

119"

53i"

Morris A Essex, 1st m ....
do
2d mort..
do
do
do
do

Pullman Palace Car

111

58

do

48%
105

534
9

2%
2%

122
110

,

fs, i917.

18
73

56%

107%

75

532%

Stock Exchange Prices.
Balt. St O—1st 6s.Prk.b.l919
Bost. H. St Erie—1st m
1st mort., guar
Bur. Ced.R.A North.—1st,5s
Minn.A St. L., 1st. 7s, guar

110
57

.

89%

eo

•

•

....

Iowa

City St West’n.lst 7s
Chesap.A O.—Pur. m’y fund *106
6s, gold, series B, int. def.
6s, currency, int. deferred
Chicago St Alton—1st mort.

70

44%

Income

Sinking fund
Joliet St Chicago, 1st m...
Louis’s St Mo., 1st m., guar 108%
da
2d 7s, 1900.
102
St. L. Jack. St Chic.. 1st m. *113% 115
.

Miss.Riv.Bridge,lst,s.f,6s

Chic. Bur. St Q.—8 p.c., 1st m
Consol, mort., 7s

5s, sinking fund
Chic. Rk. I.& P.—6s, cp.,1917
6s, 1917, registered
Keok.A Des M., 1st, g., 5s.
Central of N. J.—1st m., ’90.
1st consolidated
do
assented.
Convertible
do
assented

Adjustment, 1903
Lehigh AW. B.,con.,g’d..

109%
120% 122%
100

117*'

lie"

118
100

98

116%
105% 106

107" 108'
106

108

97'

do
assent’d
Am. Dock St Impr. bonds, *1
do
assented *110

Chlc.Mil.A St.P.—1st,8s,P.D
2d mort., 7 3-10, P. D......
1st m., 7s, $ gold, R. D
1st m.,LaC. Div
tst m., I. St M
ist m., I. St D
1st m., H. St D
*

1st m., C. St M
Con. sinking fund
2d mortgage

113
112
112
112
110
110

114

115% 116
1(9% 110%
Frt.

10Q

bonds.

Cleve. P’ville St Ash., 7s
Buffalo St Erie,new bds...
Buffalo A State Line, 7s..
Kal’zoo A W. Pigeon. 1st.
Det.Mon.A T., 1st, 7s.h906
Lake 8hore Div. bonds...
do
do
do
do

coup.,

1st

cons, reg.,
cons, coup.,

2d.

cons,

1st.,

cons.

•

.

.

.

102%
117

127%; 132
....1116

104% 106
1G4%
*.... 115

110%

’

104
108

105

112'
m% 112%
111%*113

....;ii6

122

125

105

106

104%

111%
118% 118>a

reg..

2d

..

i
I

...
....

102
110

iii"
63"

110
116

Ip
302
318
122

121

"

,

Equipment bonds

N. Y. Elevated—1st, 7s, 1906
N. Wisconsin—1st.

+ And accrued interest.

-

.

t

t

*

r

^

t

d

it

#

r

do f
do

do

m..

Cleve.A Pitts., consol., s.f.
do
*4th mort...
Col. Chic. A I. C., 1st con..
2d con...
do
do IstTr’tCo.ctfs.ass.
do
do
suppl.
do 2d
do
ass.
Phil.A Read.—
Cons. coup. 6s

Registered 6s, 1911.
Coupon 7s, 1911
Registered 7s, 1911
Improvem’t, coup., 6s, ’99
General, coup., 6s, 1908...

114% 116
114% 110

115
8C

St.L.I.M.AS.—1st 7s.prf.int
2d int., 6s. accum’lative ..

319
83
90
97

96
112
104
105

ttt.

r

•

*

109%
100%

«

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

H2% 112%

133
115
114

114

116
110

108%
95

105%
109%

75

—

70
~* *

*

*

*102"
103

99

4-

Indianapolis St St.L.—1st, 7s

Indianap.A Vine.—lst,7s, gr
International (Tex.)—1st, 6s
Int.H. & Gt. No.—Conv., 8s.
Kansas St Nebraska—1st m.

119

119%
108%

•

•

«

2d mort

•

82

85"

*82*

83*

N.Y. & Oswego

4..

*80
*80
*80
r

•

•

f

fff

s

*

*

,

«

-

JU
•

•

2d...

do

Mid.—Stock

Sfonvertible bonds

82% 85

*

N. J. Midland—1st, 7s, gold.
2d mort..........;
New Jersey So.—1st, 7s. new
St. Joseph St Pacific—1st m.
2d mortgage
St. Jo. A Western stock

St.L.A S.E.—Cons., 7s, g.,’94
St.L.VandaliaA T.H.—1st m

-

90

2d mortgage, guar
8outh Side (L. 1.)—1st mort

South Minn.—1st m..7s, ’88.
70
114

103
105
108

1st mortgage, 7s (pink)....
Extension
Tol. Can. S.& Det.—1st. 7s, g
Union St Logansport—7s....
U. Pac.—South Branch
....

62
98
90

-

305%
99
307
102
105
108
90
100

!06%
90
103
100
87

20
90

32
66
102
92
107

ioo
110
104

106%
110
100

105

96"
ldi"
89
24
95

108% 110%

104
75
100
75
105

,05*

80*’
107

100

V

46
43

80
49

107

110

62* 65

22
7
7
90
82
83
88
55
25
85
*108

+92
97
105
100
95

25
92
33

91
60
28
100

112
95
00
110

104
70

97% 103
97

100

N. Carolina—New4s

74

76
102
105

98
So.Carolina—Con., 6s (good)
M.A S. + 103
96% Texas-08,1892
7s, gold, 1892-1910.. J.& J. + LH
7s, gold, 1904
J.AJ. + 112
38
Virginiar-New 10-40s
Past-due Coupons.—

111

Tennesssee 8tate coupons.
South Carolina consol
Virginia coupons
do
consol, coupons...

%
40
10
80

1112

113
39

25
• •

•

20
84

RAILROADS.

87
80

55'

48;

Ala. £Chat.—Rec’rs ctf s.var
Atlantic A Gulf—Consol—
Cent. Georgia—Cons, m., 7s
Stock
Chari*te Col.A A.—Cons., 7s
2d mortgage, 7s
East Tenn. A Georgia—6s..
E.Tenn.A Va.—6s,end.Tenn
E. Tenn. Va. A Ga.—1st, 7s.
Stock

36%
70

54
58

80
106

100 ’
108

111
95
106
95

113
100
107
100
102
102
112
75
119

98
98
110
70

Georgia RR.—7s

116
104

Greenville A Col.—7s, 1st m.

105
100
85

6s
Stock

78,

guar
Macon A Aug.—2d, endors.
Mem phis A Cna’Bton—1st,7s
2d. 7s

Stock**. «*?»
Mississippi Cent —1st m., 7s
2d mort., 8s
:
Miss. A Tenn.—1st m., 8s, A
1st mortgage, 8s, B
N. O. A Jacks.—1st m., 8s...
Certificate, 2d mort., 8s...
Norfolk A Peter8b.—1st, 8s.
1st mortgage, 7s
2d mortgage, 8s
Northeast., 8. C.—1st m., 8s.
2d mortgage. 8s
Rich.A Dan.—1st consol., 6s
Southw. Ga.—Conv., 7s, ’86.
*

••••*»••••••»«•«

Stdck
S. Carolina RR.—1st
Stock

m.,

7s.

^

Ar

28

STATES.
104

99%
108%

* No pnee to-cay; these are latest quotations made this week.;

59^ 61

(Brokers' Quotations.)

65

.......

105

Southern Securities.

63"

N.Y.LakeE.&W.Inc. 6s. 1977
Ohio Central—Inc., 1920....
PpoHh OpC

,

Long Island—1st mortgage.
N.Y.&Greenw. L.—1st,7s, n.

*80
*80

90% 91
82% 84

115«Jj 17

•

74%

74

do
do

94%

Cent.of la.—1stm.,7s, gold

Consolidated 8s
Stock
t.
Galv. Hous.A H.—7s. gld.’Tl
Gr’nd R.AInd.—lst,7s,l.g.gu
1st, 7s. Id. gr., not guar...
Gr’nd R.A I.—1st, exl.gr.,7d
Hous.A Gt.N.—Ist,7s,g.l900

95% 100

2d-pref. debentures

Sd
4th

m

93
93
93

100
106

Evansv. A Crawfordsv. -7s.
Flint A Pere M.—8s, I’d gr’t

pref. deben

91%
126%

25

ex cp.
Bost. St N. Y. Air-L—1st m.

115% Chic. St.P.A M’polls—1st. 6s
Landgrant Income, 6s....
Chic.A Southwest.—7s, guar
Cin. Lafayette A Ch.—1st m
Cin. A Spr.—1st, C.C.C.AI.j7s
1st m.,g’d L. S. A MtS., 7s.
Denver Pac.—1st,7s,Id. gr.jz
109
Erie
A Pittsburg—1st m., 7s
96%
Con. mortgage, 7s
100
7s, equipment

ee
71

c

54

23

Atch.AP.P’k—6s,gld,

2d...
Stock
Chic.ACan.So.—1st m.,g.,7s
Chic. A E. Ill.—S.F.c’y,1907.
Income bonds

107

Burlington Div
2d mortgage. 1886
Consol. 7s, 1910
Pur. Com. rec’pts, lst.E.D *131
do
1st, W. D. *130% 131

MobileA O.—1st

53%

RAILROADS.

112%

Leh. A Wilkes B.Coal—1888
Lake Erie St W’n—Inc.7s,’99
Laf. Bl.A Mun.-Inc. 7.1899

126%

30
80
22
22
22
75

{Brokers' Quotations.)

*92

Mortg. 7s of ’79
T.AWab., 1st ext.Ts,.
1st St. L. div.7s,ex mat.cp.
2d mortgage ext., ex coup

4%
36%

Miscellaneous List.

106

do
do
7s. 1908...
Inc. mort., coup., 7s, 1896.
Deb. mort., coup., 0s, 1893
Deb. mort., conv., 7s, 1893
Rome Wat. A Og.—Con. 1st.
68%
St. L. A Iron Mount’n—1st m *113%
2d mortgage
102%
Arkansas Br., 1st mort...
Cairo A Fulton, 1st mort. 107"
Cairo Ark. A T..l8t mort. *101
St. L. Alton St T. H.—1st m. 11
2d mortgage, pref
do
income
Belleville St So. Ill., 1st m. *115
St. P.& Sioux G.—1st 08.1919 103%
St. P. M. A Manit’a—1st, 7s. *110
2d mort., 6s, 1969
.95%
Tol. Peo. A W.—1st m., E.D.
1st mortgage, W. D..\—

do
Bur. Div.
1st pref. inc. for 2d mort.
1st inc, for consol
Wabash RR.—

Ask.

BONDS.

72
74

126
112

Small

2dm.. *125

3d

114

Registered

Consol. 6s. 1905

do

Rhode Island—6s,coup.’93-9
South Carolina-

4

00
Income and land gr’t, reg
~69
Pennsylvania RR—
Pitts.Ft.W.A Chic., 1st m *129%
*

Bid.

....

104%

Kansas Pac.-1st m., 6s, ’95, with cp.ctfs
1st m., 6s, ’96,
do
Den. Div. 6s ass. cp.ctf...
do
*
1st consol. 6s
Pacific RR. of Mo.—1st m.
2d mortgage
Income. 7s
1st m., Carondelet Br...
St.L. A S.F., 2d 6s.class A.
do
3-6s, class C
do
3-6s. class B.
do 1st 6s, Peirce, CAO
South Pac. cf Mo.—1st m.
Texas A Pac.—1st, 6s, 1905..

,

305
106%
104%
40
44*'
Equipment bonds, 7s, 1883
Consol, conv., 7s..
99% j 100%
Gt. Western, 1st in., ex cp 107
108%
118
do 2d m.,7s.’93,ex cp
104%
*105
107’
Q. St Tol., 1st, 78, w,ex cp.
Ill.A So. la., 1st m.7s,ex cp
133
Hannibal St Naples, 1st 7s
99%
St.L. K.C A N.R. E.A R.,7s *106%
102
Omaha Div., 1st mort., 7s 113
113%
Clarinda b., 6s, 1919
St.Chas.B’dge,lst, 7s, 1908
108%
North Missouri. 1st m., 7s
102%
116%
122
West. Un. Tel.—1900, coup.
120
1900, registered
Spring-V^y W.Works—1st 6s
Oregon R. A Nat.—1st, 6s..
03%
124
124

be

may

Securities.

68, Act Mar. 23,1869.)
Non-fundable
J* “
Tennessee—6s, old
6s, new
6s, new series
Virgina—6s, old
11%’ 6s, new, 1866
H%l
6s, new, 1867
19 1
68, consol, bonds
20
6s, ex matured coupon....
\
6s, consol., 2d series
4%
6s, deferred
4
D. of Columbia—3'65s, 1924.

107%
102% 103
INCOME BONUS.
63
68% Central of N. J.—1908
109
108%
j Chic.St.L.AN.O.—2d m. 1907
101% Col.Chic.AInd.C.,inc.7s,1890
114 ' 115
Ind’s Bl. A W’n—Inc., 1919..
105
107
ind’s Dec. A Sp’d, 2d Inc...
lut.A Gt. Northern—2d Inc
108%

126
cp.
do
1st m., reg.
126
Huds. R., 7s, 2d m., s.f.,’85 *110
Canada South., 1st, int. g.
90%
Harlem, 1st m., 7s, coup., 126

1st m., 7s, reg....

119
122

115%

102*

do

64

11*6*

Metropolit’n Elev—1st,1908

Central—6s, 1883
6s, 1887.;
6s, real estate
6s, subscription
N. Y. C. A Hud., 1st m.,

75"

110%
108%

Mich. Cent.—Cons., 7s, 1902
1st mort.,. 8s, 1882, s. f.....

6s 1909...
Mo.K.A T.^Cons.ass..1904^6
2d mortgage, inc., 1911
H. A Cent. Mo., 1st., 1896.
Mobile A Ohio—New m., 6s.
Nash. Chat. A St. L.—1st 7s.

303

102% 103%
100% 101%

118
117

Registered, 8s
Collateral Trust, 6s

„

...

ill3%

112

Louisv.A Nash.—Cons.m.,7s 116%
105
2d mort., 7s, gold
110
Cecilian Branch, 7s
Nashv. A Decatur, 1st, 7s. HO
L. Erie St West.-lst 6s, 1919
99%
Laf. B1. A Mun.- 1st 6s. 1919 101
Marietta A Cin.—1st mort.. *109
1st mort., sterling

N. Y.

126% 127

ioo

new

Sinking fund

113"

105% 106%

do

Western Pacific bonds..
South. Pac. of Cal.—1st m.
Union Pacific—1st mort..
Land grants, 7s

•

2d mortg., ext’n 5s, 1919..
3d mortgage, 7s, 1883... ..
4th mortgage, 7s, 1880 —
5th mortgage, 7s. 1888....
1st cons, gold 7s, 1920

Cleve. St Tol., sink. fund..

San Joaquin Branch....
Cal. A Oregon, 1st
State Aid bonds
Land grant bonds

108

103% 104%

Dub. A Sioux C., 2d div...
Cedar F. A Minn., 1st m..
Ind. Bl’m A W.—1st, pref. 7s
1st mort., 7s, 1900
2d mort., 1909
Ind’s Decatur A Sp’d 1st 7s
Int. A Gt. North. 1st 6s,gld.
Lake Shore—
Mich S. A N. Ind., s. f., 7s.

1st m., Springfield div —
Ohio Cent., 1st m., 6s, 1920.
Peoria Dec. A E’ville, 1st 6s
Pacific Railroads—
Central Pacific—Gold bds.

*116% 117

Denv.A R. Grande—1st, 1900
Erie—
1st mort., extended

Iil.Cent.—Dub. ASioux C.lst

AND

Consolidated
2d consolidated

,

115
Long Dock bonds
125"
Buff. N.Y.A E, 1st m., 1916 124
HI
N.Y.L.E.AW.,n.2d,con.,6s
*116
do l8t,con.,f, cp.,7s
3%
do 2d,con.,f.cp.,08,6s
85% 86%
4
Han. St St. Jos.—8s, conv... 106%
IIous.ATex. C.—1st, m.l.,7s 109%
1st mort., West. Div., 7s.. 307
107%
1st mort., Waco St N., 7s* 107
2d C., Main line, 8s
114%
2d Waco AN., 8s
Inc. and ind’y, 7s
97%
,

Railroad Bonds.




reg.,

STOCKS

Ohio A Miss.—Consol, s. f’d

110%

r

102
109

6s. 1886

100% 102%

Ask.

30
30

3%
3%
3%

class 2
class 3

Ohio—6s, 1881

do
2d mort.. *110
do
3d mort.. 104
do
1st con., guar 112% 113
130
Rens.A Saratoga, 1st,coup
do
1st, reg.

6 i'

pref

Silver Cliff Mining
8pring Mountain Coal
Standard Cons. Gold Mining

^

do

Albany St Susqueh., 1st m.

12*
516

Reg. 7s, ’94.

1st Pa. div., coup., 7s, 1917

107

114%

Prices nominal.

do
do

.

113
119
29
29
115
115
95
95
11
11
18
18
4

Special tax, class 1

'

Quicksilver

7«. T. A T»

bonds, 1900
constructs
7s of 1871.
1st con.,g’d..

Del.AHud.Canal—
1st mortgage, ’84
1st mortgage, 1891
i
do
extended.
do
Coup., 7s,’94

156

Oregon Railway St Nav. Co. 8111
200
Pennsylvania. Coal

*

105%

116%
Mortgage 7s, 1907
8yr. Bli vh. A N. Y., 1st, 7s 116%

119%

A.& Q
coup,
coup,

do
1868
New bonds, J. & J
do
A.&O

107
107
107
117

..

113%

Montauk Gas Coal
Ontario Silver Mining

m..

loo
109

’

592%
x....

\

off, J. A J.
off, A.A O.
Funding act, 1866

108%
115%iH7
..

.

.

old,JAJ

Chatham RR

Iowa Midland, 1st m., 8s., *120
Galena A Chicago, exten. 1(8
Peninsula, 1st m., conv... 110
115
Chic. A Mil., 1st
Winona A St. P., 1st m. ..
do
2dm
C. C. C. St Ind’s—1st, 7s, s. f. 120
Consol, mortgage
...i 110%
C. St.L.A N. O.- Ten.lien7s *107%
1st con. 7s
*107%
Del. Lack. A West.—
2d m
;
*108
7s, convertible...

§30%

Miscellaneous St’ks.
Adams Express
American Express
United States Express
Wells. Fargo St Co
American Coal..
Boston Land Company
Boston Water Power
Canton Co., Baltimore
Caribou Consol. Mining
Central Arizona Mining....
Central N. J.Land Imp
Climax Mining
Colorado Coal St Iron
Consolidation Coal of Md..
Cumberland Coal St Iron....
Deadwood Mining
Excelsior Mining
Gold St Stock Telegraph....
Homestake Mining
La Platta Mining
Leadvilie Mining
Little Pittsburg Mining ...

do
do
do

109
110

,

Coupon gold bonds
Registered gold bonds.

8tonington

1st

107%
108%

103
120

Int. bonds
Consol, bonds
Extension bonds
1st mortgage

67%
§22%

York—6s, loan, 1892

6s, loan, 1893
North Carolina—6s,

6s, old, A.A O
No. Car. RR., J. AJ

103%

•

Loufsv.

do

51%
50
103
115
102
105

Bid.

SECURITIES.

New

Chic. A Northw.—
Sink, f’d

—

Long Island

Ask.

MISCELLANEOUS

AND

NEW YORK.

BONOS.

Chic. M.ASt.P.—Continued.

Railroad Stocks.

Cedar Falls A Minnesota...
Chicago A Alton, pref
Clev. A Pittsburg, guar—
Dubuque A Sioux City

1887..

do

do

New

112%

Boston A N. Y. Air L., pref.
Burl. Cedar Rapids A No...

Bid.

SECURITIES.

Ajf.

IN

>01.. AX A.

Prices represent the per cent value, whatever the par

page.

STATE

Alabama—Class A, 2 to 5...
Class A, 2 to 5; small
Class B, 5s.
Class C, 2 to 5
Arkansas—6s, funded

BONDS

[

7s, 1902, non-enjoined
Non-mortg. bonds.;

—

West Ala.—1st mort., 8s—
2d mort... 8s. mwr

98
102
97
40
102
107
119
100
111
113
115
103
115
120
110

107**
95*’
105
103
99

40
105

122**
104
113

115%

106"

126*’
•

•

• •

102% 104
107

107
106
17
65
40
114
1U

110
106
no
21
70
46
116

-

116

f No quotation to-day; latest sale tkis week

319

THE CHRONICLE.

I860. \

March 27;

JiOCAL SECURITIES.

NEW YORK

Insurance

•

Stock List.

Ban fee

at latest

lark’d thus (*)
arc

not-

[Quotations by K. S. Bailey,

Prior.

Dividends.

Surplus

Capital.

Companies.

dates. §

Amount

Kiv'i.

Net

Bid. Ask.

Last Fold.

Period 1878. 1879.

Capital.

7)4 Jan., *80.
6
Nov, ’79.
10
Jan., ’80.
16
Jan., W.

8
6
11
10

*

0
Jan.. ’80. 3
7
Jan.. “80. 3^ 118
7
100 2,000,000
3
Sept.
’79. 8 128
69.200
'
100
300,000
chase..........
6
110
Jan., ’80. 3
0
135.600 r. a J.
25
450,000
Chatham
Ja
’80.25
ieo
1700
100
Chemical....... 100 300,000 3,270 700 61-m’ly
6
Ja
0
’80. 3
159,900 J.& J.
25
600,000
Citizens’
10
210*
Nov., *79. 5
10
100 1,000,000 1,475 800 M.AN.
City.....
8
142
8
Ja i., ’80. 4
2 777.400 1. A J.
Commerce .... 100 5,000,000
110
3)4
jar.,
’80.
3)4
109,000 J. A J.
Continental.... 100 1,000,000
10
Feb , V0. 5
830,100 F.A A. 10
t»
Corn Exch’ge*. 100 1,000,000
1
64.100 I. A J.
8)4
J*n., K0. 8)4
250,000
25
Kast River ...
July 78. 3
14,000 1.A J
100,000
11th Ward*.... 25
6
0
Jan., 80. 3
35,600 r. A J.
100
150,000
Fifth
275
100,000 201 000
Fifth Avenue*. 100
L20
12
Jan., *80 5
100
500,000 1.197,900 Q—J.
First0
6
863.400 r. A J.
Jao., '80 3)4 115
100 3,ZOO,000
Fourth
7
Nov,
3>tt
30
600,000 387.100 M.AN. 10
Fulton
133
7
7H Oct., *0. 4
5oJ 1,000,000 753,2Jt \.A O
Gallatin....
57
10(7 «r. & a.
2)4 Feb., 80. 2)4
75
750,000
German Am.'
5
5
May,
60,10;
5
May.
200,000
German Exch.* 100
3
Nov., <9. 3
57,230
100
200,000
Germania*
0
0
15.20j
Nov.,
M.AN.
Greenwich*.... 25 200,000
Jan.,
3
23,600 r. A J.
30
225,000
Grocer**
7
7
206.2 Hi r. A J.
80. 3)4 120
Hanover....v... 100 1,000,000
14
14
’80.
7 233
J>.n.,
r. a J.
Imp.* Traders’ 100 1,500,000 1.801,600
8
120
8
Jan., 80. 4
50
500,000 uo-ioo J. A J.
Irving.;..
3
4,400 J. A J.
Jan., ’78. 3
100,000
Island City*... CO
a
Jan., ’80. 4
600.000 420.600 J. A J. 11
Leather Manuf. 100
7
8
Feb., 80. 3)4
Manhattan*..
50 2,050,000 1,027.7-10 F.A A
2H July.
10,500 J. A J.
Manuf. A Mer.* 20
100,000
3
Jan., 80. *J>4 115
Marine
400,000 100,300 J. A J.
100
7
7)4 Jaa., 80. 4
Market
500,000 271,000 J. A J.
100
140
8
8
Jan., 80. 4
918 S00 J. A J.
Mechanics*
25 2,000,000
4
75
2
Nov, *70. 2
73,400 M.AN.
M&ch. Assoc’n. 50
500,000
2)t Jmy,
14,000
Mech’ics * Tr. 25
200,000
01
6
3
May,
171.300 M AN.
Mercantile
100 1,000,000
7
8)4
Jan.,.c0 3)^ 120)4
050,800 J A J.
Merchants’.
50
Jan.. 8b. 3
112.000 J. A J.
Merchants' Ex. 50 1,000,000
7
Jan„ ’80. 3)4
50 700 J. A J.
Metropolis*. . 100 300,000
0
UO
10
153
J >n., V0. 5
Metropolitan.. 100 3,000,000 1,111.800 .f. A J
12
12
Jan.. 80. 0
77.9 0 J. A J.
Munay HUl*.. 100 100,000
5
89
90
5
Nov.
45 400 M.AN.
Nassau*
100 1,000,000
8
7
Jan., VO- 4
786.100 J. A J.
New York
100
8
8
Jan., 80. 4
N. Y.County.. 100
48,000 J. A J.
8
7)4 Feb..
73.000 F.A A.
N. Y. N. Exch. 100
5
•
Jan., 80. 2>® 105
105,700 J. A J.
Ninth
100
•
July,
123.600 j. A J.
No. America*.. 70
7
Tan., 80. 8*
70.6C0 J. A J.
North River*.
30
8
»an., 80. 4
173,000 .1. A J. 10
25
Oriental*
10
10
1
Feb., 80. 2)4
211,500 Q-F.
Pacific*
50
0
121
0
jan., [80.
332.500 jTa J.
.
Park
100
8
7
1
Jan., ’80.
129,000 J. A J.
25
People’s*
6
3
4
Jan.,
172,000 J. A J.
Phentx....
20
July, ^4. 3)®
53.600
Produce*
50
*0*
130
140
Feb., *80. 4
637.500 F.A* A.
10Q
Republic
108
3
Jan.,
119.900
St. Nicholas..>. 100
3
‘
Jan., *83. 3
52300 j. AJ.
Seventh »Vard. 100
9
8
Jan., ’80. 5
92,400 J. A J.
Second....
100
10
iso
8
Ian. ’80. 4
170.100 J. A J.
Shoe A Leather 100
0
0
Jao., [80
45 200 J. A J.
Sixth
100
120
7'
7
Nov,
State of N. Y.. 100
267.300 M.A.N.
3
Jan., 80. 3)4
94.900 J. A J.
Third
100jl,C00,000 256
125
108
7
Jan., ’80. 3)4
7)4
500 J. A J.
Tradesmen’s...
8
Nov. ’79. 4
Union
695,300 M.AN. 10
50
8
J an.. ’80. 0 1
12
117,800 J. A J.
^estSide*.
100
....

„

’

• *t

•

*...

.

^

•

•

r

r

-

-

•

•

*

-

,

T

_

*

^

,79. 3

•

.

T».

....

.

jan^

•

—

•

•

•

•

f

©

^

.

•

•

•

#

•

•

•

•

.***

|79. 3

e ©

•

.

...

•••

•

•

• ••

t

*

-

>

•

*

•

.

•

•

2®. 2)4

.

....

[80- 3)4
[77. 3

*

♦ • • •

.

•

e •

....

...

•

....

•

• • •

•

• • «

s

t

..

sst

,,,,

[79. 3

'm

-•«

r -

• •

T

•

.

3
f4

■

•

“

1

[80. 3

«•••

^ ^ *

^

....

.

.

-rr

.

.

.

•

....

3
[79. 3)*

*

-

®

-

....

...

...

...

this column are of date "Feb, 27,1880, for the National
13,1879 (latest return made), for the State banks.
Gas and City Railroad Stocks and Bonds*

S The figures in
and of date Dec.

'

Gas Companies.

Amoant. Period.

Par.

|

25

Brooklyn Gas Light Co..

20

Citizens’Gas Co (Bklvn)
•Sh)
bonds
Harlem

1,C00
50
20
50
100
V r.
100

Jersey City & Hoboken
Manhattan

Metropolitan.,
Mutual, N. Y

do
bonds.
Nassau, Brooklyn
do
scrip.....
New York

People’s (Brooklyn)..
bonds.
do
do

do

3)4
1*

2)4
3)4

.

.....

certificates.
do
do
Central of New York

Williamsburg

7
3
7
5
5

Va
700,000 M.AN.
100 4,000,000 M, AN.
10 1,000,000 /. A .7.

.

scrip

Metropoll tan, Brooklyn.........

Municipal

300,000
Var.
300,000
50
466,000
50 1,000,000
Var. 1,000,000

1,000

100
100

1,000,000
■1,500,000

4

3)4
7

M.AN.
J. A J.
F.A A

3)4
3

•

68
!00
1808
Feb. ’78 55
Jao., ’60 140
Jure, ’79 170
Feb , ’80 130
Feb ..’80 100
Ju y, ’79 68
10J
1882
Feb., V0 50
Nov, ’79 90
May, ’79 100
Jan.. '70 V5
90
1397
Jar., ’80 75
Aug., ’79 50

J. A J.
M.AN.

*

Fulton*«r*y—stk.

1st mortgage

Brotdway

<£Seventh Ave—stk..

100

1,000
100

900,000 J.
694,000 J.

1,000 1,500,000
10 2,000,000
300,000
1,000
100
200,000
Broadway (Brooklyn)—stock..
100
400,000
Brooklyn Jk Hunter's Pt—stock.
300.000
1,000
1st mortgage bonds
100
500,000
Buthwick Av. (B'klyn)—stock..
100 1,800,000
Ce Ural Pk., y.dk A. River—stk.
Consolidated rnortga^ebon- s 1,000 1,200,000
100
650,000
Christopher dk Tenth St.— Stock
250,000
1,000
Bends
100 1,200,000
D 'v Lock, E. B. dkBatiery—sik
Brooklyn fJiiy—stock
1st mortgage

1st

500&c

mortgage,-conB’d

Big hih Avenue—stock....:
1st mortgage
4Ud 8i.dk (Brand St terry—stock
1st mortgage
Central Cross Uown-

stock.

..

Ufc morfgige...
Houst m, West st.dkPavJ'y—slk
utm rtgige.....
Second Avenue—stock.
3d m^rt^age

Fong. Cjmverti Jlc
Extens on
Sixth Avenue—stock..

*t

i.

*.

.

jiu»




100
500
100

1,000

3
2

A. A O.
.1. *
.

J. & J.
J. SB J.
J. AD.
F.A A
J. A J.

..

st

250,000)
500.000IJ. A -I
L.199,500 J. AJ

¥

i.fiU.

5
7

100

NovVl90i

July, *94
2H Jan., ’80
7
Apr , *85

2,000,000 Q-F.
1,000 2,000,000 7. A.7.

.

750,000 M.&>.
415,000 7. A J.

600,000 F.jAA.

250.000 M.A N.

7

4

7

May, ’88

■; -1' -

300,000
200,000
1,000,000
800,000
200,000

170
190
117
130

125
140

f.O

125 *
115
181
175
1250 13 40 13-05 Jan., '80.6-85
180
190Oct., '79. 5
15
20
544,412 20
•
Jan., *80. 3)4 95
10
10
73,858 14
107
Feb., *80. 5 100
10
10
15
99,155
Exchange
200,010
Jan., 80. 7)4 120
15
15
ioa
08
200,000 13S.833 15
Farragut
10
8)4 Jan., *80. 3)4 105
68,936 12
Firemen’s
204,000
Jan.,
5
*80.
11
11
12
76,147
130
Firemen’s Tr
150,000
Jan., *80. 8
7’
136,442
FranklinAKmp 100
200,000
Jan., *fo. 5 138
10
10*'
10
875,406
100
14Q
German-Ainer.
135
1,000,000
Jan., *S0. 7
14'
22
30
115
Germania. ..... 50
110
500,000 752,754 20
Jan.. *80. 5
10
10
50
250
Globe
200,000 118,251
Jan.,
*?o.
7k
30
40
30
343,749
25
200.000
Greenwich
70
Jan.. *80. 3k 05
! 7
7
22,908 10
LOO
Guardian
200,000 120
Jaa., *80. 7)4 125
12)4
806
20
17)4
15
Hamilton
150,000
Jan., *80. 5 10J 105* *
20
10
50
91
Hanover
500,000 685,945 10
lan.. 'so. 5
10
10
10
51,536
50
Hoffman
129
200,000
Jan.,
-80. 5
10
10
100
Home
3,000,000 1,320.785 10
10
3)4 Jan., *79. 3* 55
4,089 10
25
If 0.000
100
Hope
Jan., *80. 5
5
10
116,815
12
50
102
Howard
97
500,000
Jan., *80. 5
10
10
12
78,922
50
70
60
200,000
I.nporters’A T..
10
8)4 Jan., *80. S
13
0,486
100,
200,000
140
.
Irving
Mar., -go 5
10
10
200,010 290,776 10
Jefferson
* 30
170
Jan., *80.10
20
20
193,014 20
50
150,000
Kings Co.(Bin) 20
5
- Jau., *80; 5
5
4,938 10
280,000
117
Knickerbocker 40
Jan.,
*80. 5
10
14
134,907
20
150,000
Lalayette(Bkn) 50
Jan., *80. 5
10
104*
10
97,080 10
100
85*
200,000
Lamar.. *
Jan., *80. 5
10
10
31,104
10
25
150,000
Lenox...
125, 1B>
lan., *80. 5
13
16
8>
200,000 253,533 20
75
Longlsl.'Bkn,-] 50
Jan., >0. 4
5
10
34,202 10
25
300,000
135
140
LoriHard
JaD., ’go. 0
12
12
162,909
12
200,000
Manuf.A Build. 100
10
J Jan., ’so. 5 105
10
140,928 20
100
100
250,000
Manhattan
Jan., ’80. 0' 150
20
20
30
238,160
25
200,000
150
Mecb.ATrad’rs’
Jan., go. 7
20
20
150,000 MMJtfegO
75
Mech’lcs’(Bkn) 50
Jao., *80. 5
10
10
30,8321 io
130
50
200,000
120
Mercantile.. .
jan., *85
13
16
159,762
20
200,000
115
Merchants’.... 50
J»n-. »b0. 5
10
12
18
109,954
200,000
165
Montauk (Bkn) 50
Jau.. go, 7
20
20
200,000 147,011 20
109
100
Jan., -8o. 5
Nassau (Bklyn) 50
10
10
101.513 14‘
200,000
165
Jan,,
National
3714
15
»80
5
20
20
120
210,000 316,895
110
N. Y. Equitable 35
Fej.f *80. b
12
14
130,185 17
70
200,000
60
New York Fire 100
N’ae
20.068
05
200,000
N. Y. A Boston 100
Jan., ”79. 5
N’ne 5
10
1,065
800,000
ire
140
New York City 100
Jan., ’80. 0
12
11
12
5’?,
458
11Q
50
500,000
100
Oct., *79. 4
Niagara
8
10
350,000 108,148 11
200
Jan.. »80.10
North River.... 25
20
30
25
200,000 399,052 20
108
Pacific
Jan., *80. 6
12
12
20
89,737
200 000
100
lt-0
Jan., vo.10
Park
20
20
20
190,043
150,000
110
Peter Cooper... 20
Jan., ’go. 0
12
12
103,739 18
50
150,000
130
Jan., ’80. 5 125
10
15
People’s
20
407,0*6
1.000,000
90
..r
Phenix .....
10
Jan., *80. 5
10
10
43,577
50
200,000
11
Relief
Jan., *30. 3)4 08
5
8)4
10
26,725
100
300,000
105
155
20
20
J»n., *80«10
200,000 175,334 20
25
TO
55
Rutgers'.
9
Feb , ’80 3
10
10
10,811
200,000
25
130
St. Nicholas....
S-’IS Jan., ’80.6-23 125.
109.090 1235 6-23
200,000
50
105
102
Standard
12
Jan., *60. 5
100
500,000 121,591 17* 12)4
80
70
8tar
10
8)4 Feb., ’80. 3)4 112 116
28,519 10
100
200,000
Sterling
14
10
Jan., ’80 5
10
187,084
25
200,000
105
100
Stuyvesant
10
10
Jan., ’80- 5
300,000 102,389 20
130
127
Tradesmen’s.... 25
12
11
Ja-’., ’80. 5
215,455 10
250,000
25
no
United States..
10
Jan , VO. 5
10
300,000 121,502 10
Westchester... 10
Jan
’80.10 203 V....
‘20
20
20
443.695
250.000
Williamsb’g C. 50

Commercial...
Continental., t
Eagle
Empire City....

»

•

•

....

....

.

•

...

-•••••

.

•

•

-

.

Over all liabilities,
includes scrip.

-

City
LQuotations by Daniel

52)4

Secaritiea*

A. Moran,

20
95
45
100

92)*

ytw York:

-

••••If4*'*}-

Croton

85
61

do
lo

110

21
100

82*
106
155
110
150
100
102
95

72
110
85
95
115
115
175
110
180
115
30
101
33
100

£8
95
95

il5
165

105
110
105

maturity ot bond s

Months

Bate.

95

)100

Broker, 27 Pine Street.]
Price.

27

102

—

-

Interest.

Water stock.....
Croton water stock.. 1845-51.
do
do
..1352-60.

95

t Surplua

capital and scrip,

Including re-lnsarance,

72
104

99

Sept..’83 90
May. ’77 125
July. ’90 105
Fen., *80 150
luly, WI10J
Feb.,’80 If5
W«y. ’03 103

but the date of

210.000
250,000

102

85
70
Dec.1902 U 6
Feb.. ’80 60
85
13&)
Feb., ’80 110
June, ’93 110
Jan , ’80 16J
»ar.. ’81 100
Feb., ’80 170
Apr., *93 110
25

7

200,000 M.AS.

dividend on stoat*,

ctvldend.

¥
7

153.000

300,000

lr5
135

•July.*’84 104)i
Feb.. 80 150
Nov., ’8 »102
Jan. ,’80 140
Oct., ’79 95
100
1883

r

900,000 J. AO

150,000

Columbia

200,000

;20~

Jan.,’°0i 79

Jan., ’80
Jan., ’80

4

Q-*.

1,050,000 M.AN

Clinton.

72
105
65
152

I

7

7
7
5

1.000
500b&C.

1.000

AH'Mi'A

t This u an extra

¥

Q-J.

M.AN.

100

Twenty Mira street—stock
i*t

Q-F.

8
1,000,000 Q-J. 7
203,000 J. A J.
1,000
100
748,000 M.AN. t5
296,000 A.AO. i
1,000
100
600,000
200,000 m!an.
1,000

1,000

Third Ave me—stock
1ssw nrtgage
|

7. AD.

100

J00

let mortg .ge

7
2
7

J.

2,100,000 Q-J.

1st mortgage

•-

®

City

200,000
300,000

125
96
165 : 200
195

.

H Jan., V0 18
J’ly.1900 95)4

& J.

...1

Citizens*.

Broadway.]
I

Beecker St.dk

105
95

1888

0

/l,503,000|
H. L. Grant. Broker. )45.
100

twuotatlons i»y

Broadway
Brooklyn

IH Jar.. ’80 72* 77
100
3H Jan., ’80 95
60
2H Jan., ’80 55
202
5
Jan., '80 1C5

Quar,

750 000 M. AN.

do
bonis
Fulton Municipal

’79 117

Bid.

Last Paid.

10H Jan.. ’80. 6
14
475,871 15
Jan., '80. 5
10
10
62,545 10
Dec., ’79.10
20
386,940 \20 ‘ 20
Feb,,
’80. 8
18
20
300,404 20
Jan., ’80.10
20
20
196,417 20
Ja-’., '80.10
20
20
41-0,579 20
Feb., *80. 5
163,429 17)4 10-72 10
Jan.. '80. 5
11
12
130,255 18
July, '77.. 5
N’ne
2,725 5
Jan., '80. 6
10
18
112,401 25

400,000

100
25
25
17
20
70
100
30
50
100
40
100
30
50
17
10

Bowery

Bid. Ask.

2)4 Feb;, ’80

Var.
315,000 A. AO.
1,850 000 F.& A.
750,000 f. AJ.
4,000,000 J. AJ,
2,500,000 ■M.&S.

1,000,000 |S. AS.
5,000,000 Quar.
«
1,000 1,000,000 F.A A.
Var
25 1,000,000

certificates

ao

NOV.

banks

50

•

Date.
*

5

Var.

2,000,000
1,200,000

Rate.

+
American Excb

American

Central

•

1876.

a

125

5
8

Pkioe.

Dividends.

1880.*

Amount

rar.

120

.

Jan. 1,

3)4
3

Broker,7 Pine street.]

Surplus,

Companies.

100 3,000,000 L412,100 i. A J.
America4
M.&N.
Am.Exchange. 100 5,000,000 1,370,400 f. & J.
100
250,000 188,400
Bowery
I. A J.
1.184.900
25 1,000,000
Broadway
82 200
Butchers'* Dr. 25 300,000 231
90
1. A J.

Stock List.

Aqued’ct stock. 1865.
pipes and mains...
reservoir bonds
Central Paik bonds.. 1853-57.
do
..1853-65.
no

1870.
1-75.
Market stock
1865-68.
Improvement stock.... 1869
Dock bonds
do

do

t.o

Consolidated bonds
Street imp. stock

....I8t9.
var.
var.
var.

do
do
New Consolidated

Westchester County...

....

Consolidate!
Assei

5
5
0
6
7
6
5
6
7
6
7
6
7
6
6
7

*

meat

[Quotations by N.

Bonds

Bid. Ask.

due.

Payable.

1880
Feb., May Ang.A Nov.
1890
do
do
1883-1990
do
do
1884-1911
do
do
1884-1900
May A November.
Feb.,May, Ang.A Nov. 1907-1911
1888
do
(*©
1895
do
do
1901
May A November.

?*•
%

3

.

1898

May A
do
do
do
do
do

November,
do
do

do
do
do

January A

July,
do

do

Qua-terly.

May A November.

T. Beers, Jr., Broker,

100
104

101

104
106
no
109
108
108
120
107

10 T
119
124
XVA
109
100
129
100
1IK '
10» T
116

1894-1897 117

107
1889
1879-1890 102
113
1901
102*
1888
1879-1882 102
-113
1896
118
1804
105
1920
102
1884

105

,

J15
J05
105

115
119-

.

105

109

1

1 New stj
—7—

Brooklyn—Local iin I’em’i
City bonds
■■••••
do
••
Park bonds
Water loan bonds

Jamary A
do

•••

do
do
do

Bridge bonds
Water loan.

ac

do

...

City Donas
Kings Co. bonds

July,
4o
do
do
do
do
do

May A November,
do

no

do
Park bonds
do

January a
do

:

July,
do

1819-1880 101
16oi-lb35 J02
1915-1924 124
1900-1924 134

1904 1912 12*
1899-1905 109

1881-1895 103
1880-1883 i«e

1880-1885

114

1924

,114

1907-1910 113

108
111
120

126
124
113
115
111
115
116
115

•AU^Jrookiyn bonds flat.
[Quotations by C. Zabrisei*.

47 Montgomery St.. Jersey City.]
*

Jersey City—
Water loan,long..
40

•••••« ••••

•-—••

tlww

1

Improvement bonds........

Bergen bonds..

1863-69.

January A July.
January A Jmy.
J. A J. and J A D.
January and July.

1395

1899-1902
189V04
1900

ifl
107
107

100,

108
106

lOf.

^

320

THE CHRONICLE.

Jmueslwjettts

made to

J^TATE, liTY AND CORPORATION FINANCES.
THE

panied
that it

INVESTORS'

a price fair alike to producer and

“

consumer.

simple compliance with the law

a

of

To

supply

agreed upon ; and as this
plan is not accom¬
by any entangling conditions, it is
just to assume
will be fairly earned out.

While the coal business (from the causes
above stated) has
been unremunerative and
railroad interests
unsatisfactory,
our
have been

SUPPLEMENT

The next number of the Investors*
Supplement will be issued

steadily

and the results they show for
the year is a full improving,
endorsement of the reasonable
anticipa¬
tions we have indulged in in
regard to them. The Boston Hoosac
Tunnel & Western Railroad has been

Saturday, April 24.

£iF“ The “ General Quotations of Stocks
and

yield

attach this result
and demand was

AND

rvoL. aax

Bonds,”

occupy¬
completed, and the
published in the Chronicle on & Susquehanna Railroad has now become a part of aAlbany
great
trunk line between the
the last Saturday in each
West., Southwest and New England, and
month, will hereafter be published a large increase of
earnings is assured upon that portion of our
the first of each month. These
*
*
*
quotations will be published in property.”
“It is a profitless task to
the same issue of the
indulge in predictions, but the
the “ Financial Review of
Chronicle
managers feel that it is due to the stockholders to
the Month/’ giving the
say that the
highest and lowest prices of stocks, &c., prospects for the year upon which we have entered
are
promising than for any period since the suspension of more
and will appear on the first
divi¬
in
Saturday
each month. Pursu¬ dends, and they indulge the
ant to this arrangement,
hope
that
the
time
has
arrived
when
a
the “ General Quotations” are not in
gradual return to our old prosperity may be
reasonably
anticipated.”
the Chronicle
to-day, but will be published next week,

ing six

pages, and heretofore

.

„

April 3.

Comparative statistics

INDEX SINCE MARCH
SUPPLEMENT.
The following is an index to all reports and items
published in the Investment Department of the heretofore
Chronicle,
since the last issue of the Investor’s
Supplement;
annual
reports are indexed in black-faced type :
372
272
297

293

Central of New Jersey
272
Charlotte Columbia & Au gusta .271

Ohioago Burlington & Quincy. 272
Chic.

Clin. Dubuque & Minn...296
Chicago & Pacific
298

Missouri Kansas & Texas
Missouri Pacific
Montpelier* Well’s River

Nashville Chatt. & St. L
New Jersey Midland
N. Y. Lake Erie &
Western
New Orleans & Mobile

295
273
272

....

Ohio & Mississippi
298
Chicago St. Paul & Minneapolis 264 Oregon Railway & Nav. Co
289
West
Ohioago &
Michigan
270
Cin. Indianap. St. L. <k Chic... 298 Pennsylvania Railroad...274, 298
Peoria

Oleve. Mt. Vernon & Del
Oieve. Tuscarawas Valley

Wheeling

271

&

272, 297

Col. Chic. * Ind. Central
‘Columbus Chic. & Ind. Cen

Cumberland Valley
Detroit

289
274

296

Lansing & Northern.. .271

East Bound Freight Tariff
264
Evansv. Terre Haute & Chio.. 298
Grand Rapids & Indiana
272
....

Hannibal A St. Joseph
Hartford &Conn. Valley
Housatonic.. .x

296

Decatur & Evansville.. 264
Pittsburg Cin. & St. Louis
298

Quincy Missouri * Pacific

274

Richmond <fe Allegheny
Richmond * Petersburg

—

...

„

Valley

ANNUAL

Balance

270
264
264

289
289
264
289

272

REPORTS.

Total

43,445
381,048
698,758
306,911

338,932
8,264,522
$
737,628

Disbursements—
Coal on hand Jan. 1
Coal purchased

120,599

Mining coai

follows:

•

4,638,872
44,313

1878.

1879.

$
5,229,266

5,764,477

39,100

28,900
341,036
248,275
294,312
1,147,322

80,146
672,785
398,219
341,781
59,591

6,743,040
$
698,758

6,818,887

41,025

91,408
535,264

595,663

326,635

630,643

7,985,118
$
673,651

$

341,036

2,754,778 2,077,370 2,264,228
542,156
488,073
618,252
1,032,431
759,349
820.438
Railroad freight, &e
428,840
422,746
528,532
Interest
1,187,886
1,157,352 1,340,956
Taxes and miscellaneous.
596,780
534,025
406,883
Loss on leased railroads...
555,404
605,367
498,562
Balance
308,020
Coal

3,003,893
641,951
933,768

transportation, &c...

Can al freight and expenses

Total

274

272
273
Houston & Texas Central...... 273
Indianap. Cin. & Lafayette
273
Indiana Southern
298 Union Paoittc
Little Pittsburg Mining Co— 273
Virginia State Debt
Louisville & Nashville
273
Wabash St. Louis & Pacific
Louisville <& Nashville—N. O.
* Mobile
273 Warwick Valley (N. Y.)
Wash. City Va. Midi. & G.
8....
marietta Pittsburg & Cleve... 273
Western Union Telegraph
Milwaukee & Northern
273 Western * Atlantic.
Missouri Iowa & Neb
298 Wisconsin

6,495,428

Coal on hand (Dec. 31)
Railroad earnings in Penn.
Interest on investments...

.

1877.
$

$

Miscellaneous profits

271

St. Louis Iron Mountain & So..
298
St. Louis & San
Francisco.289, 298
St. Louis & Southeastern
299
St. Paul & Duluth
264
St. Paul <fe Sioux City
264
8t. P. Stillw. &
Taylor’s Falls.. 299
8elma Rome & Dalton
299
Southern Pacific
289
Texas & Pacific
274
U. S. Transportation on
LandGrant Roads
264

1876.

Receipts—

Sales or coal
Canal tolls

298
273
273
273

,

as

INCOME ACCOUNT.

,

Atchison <fc Nebraska
Atlanta & Charlotte Air-Line..
Atlantic & Great Western
Atlantic Miss. & Ohio
272,

for four years are

8,264,522

•

830,427
1,234,449
350,916

316,059

6,743,040 6,818,887 7,985,118

GENERAL BALANCE AT CLOSE OF
EACH FISCAL YEAR.
A fsftpAft—

$

Canal, &c

6,339,210

Railroad and equipment..
6,195,511
Real estate
8,532,873
Mines and fixtures
2,666,849

Coal-yard, barges, &o....

.

Lack. & Susquehanna RR.
New York & Canada RR
Cherry Val. & Sharon RR.
Coal on hand Dec. 31
Advances to leased lines..
Advances on coal royalties

917,573
1,021,153
320,118
698,758

427,500
521,179
Miscellaneous assets
8,088,714
Telegraph, and Car Co....
54,675
Supplies on hand
1,319,604

Cash on hand and bills re¬
ceivable
2,687,821
Profit and loss
^....

6,339,210
6,209,981
8,622,913
2,679,961

897,287
1,021,153
3,597,087
314,871

6,339,210
6,190,766
8,643,783
2,679,677

877.784
1,022,293
3,597,074
305,991
672.785
439,020
617,246

6,339,210
6,220,669
8,795,657
2,699,590
720,487
1,022,293
3,597,074
300,000
535,264
368,773

341,036
385,374
581,289
605,326
4,438,512 4,295,445 *4,480,701
69,410
69,410
69,410
1,089,853
958,667
878,000
1,926,694
199,660

2,314,268
587,185

3,140,116
1,208,726

Total assets.

39,285,099 38,714,292 39,610,006 40,981,301
$
'
$
$
$
Stock
20,000,000 20,000,000 20,000,000 20,000,000
Bonds (see Supplement)..
15,116,000 17,010,500 18,333,000 19,837*>00
Sinking fund
274,545
Miscellaneous accounts... 2,846,230
1,703,792 1,277,006 1,144,301
Profit and loss
1,048,323
*r

Liabilities—

Delaware & Hudson Canal
Company.
(For the year ending December 31,
lt7*M
The report of Mr. Thomas
Total liabilities..
Dickson, President, has the follow¬
39,285,099 38,714,292 39,610,006 40,981,301
ing : There were mined and sold for account of the
company,
These miscellaneous assets include the
3,054,390 tons of coal; transported for other
following: Boston Hartford *
parties, 357,673 Erie, 1,420 bonds, $1,254,268, less sinking
tons of coal; total,
fund, $435,738—$818,530;
3,412,063 tons of coal.
Jefferson RR. bonds (108),
"
*

The close of the year 1878 was
marked by one of the
ever experienced in our
canal region, which was
accompanied by an unprecedented freshet that caused
great
destruction ana seriously
injured the canal and its appurtenan¬
ces.
Repairs were made during the early months of
1879, and
their entire cost, about
$150,000, was charged to the current
expenses of the year. The year 1879 will be
remembered as
marking the lowest prices ever known in the
history of the coal
trade. These were caused
by over-production, a necessary
result of the fatuous desire of
managers to obtain large ton¬
and consequent prominence in the trade.”
nage
*
*
*
**
The forcing process that was the
severest storms

$86,660; Albany <fc. Susquehanna consols
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co., 1,891 bonds
(746),
$746,000; sundry assets, $402,022. Stocks as follows:
shares
Albany & Susquehanna, $900,000; 8,241 shares Rensselaer9,000
& Saratoga
$822,137; sundry stocks, $100,012.
(610), $605,338;

The
year

LEASED RAILROADS.

reports of the railroads leased by this

ending

September 30,1879,

as

company for the
made to the N. Y. State

engineer, were published in Yol. 29, p. 518. The
following
condensed statement for the
year 1879 is now made, showing
the profit and loss of their leased
railroad lines, being Albany
& Susquehanna, Rensselear &
Saratoga,
New York & Canada,
and their branches.
-

Expenses.
year’s business produced an enormousgoverning principle of the Operating railroads
Earnings.
$946,769 Passenger
tonnage, largely in excess
of any previous season. ‘
$1,056,052
Maintaining
railroads....
519,602 Freight
Rose-colored’ statements as to the
1,994,703*
current demand, and
Maintaining equipment.. 295,388 Miscellaneous
glowing predictions as to the future,
56,010
Mails
together with the issue of paper
46,072
$1,761,760
prices
that
were
never
real¬
ized, combined to stimulate the trade
unnaturally. Consumers, Interest, rentalRental.
$3,152,830
and div¬
too, were induced, by published intentions
Loss.
of farther increase
idends on leased lines. 1,707,138 Balance
in prices, to lay in stocks of coal in
oharged to prof¬
advance of their require¬
it. and loss account.
ments ; so that business
which, under ordinary circumstances,
Del. & Hud. CanaACo.
316,050
shoald have been spread over the
months of October,
November,
December and January was
$3,468,898
$3,468,895
all done in the first two
months. The natural result ofnearly
this was that a
St. Louis & Iron Mountain.
surplus
of
not
lees than three millions of tons
of coal was left to be carried
(For the year ending Decenib r 31,1879.)
forward as a burden upon the new
year. The sluggish demand
The annual report just issued
for coal and the general
supplies the following informa¬
in prices which marked the tion :
month of. January and weakening*
the early part of February,
1880, con¬ The gross earnings of the transportation department for the
firmed this view, and the trade
was again threatened
year were
with a The
$5,292,611
repetition of the ruinous competition that
operating and general expenses.../
2,992,050
characterized,the
early months of 1879. At this juncture wiser
counsels preThe net earnings.
♦ tiled, and, with singular
$2,300,555
The increase in gross
0jal should no longer beunanimity, producers determined that
earnings
was
$778,290,
or
17*24
per cent
given away, but that it should be over those of 1878.
The gross earnings per mile of road
(684



March 27,

.

THE

1880.]

earnings was $354,599,
earnings per mile
for 1878, or 18*22 per
wholly .in the
transportation of freight, the total being $4,103,664, showing
increase of $820,767, or 25 per cent over 1878. The number
of tons carried was 981,139, an increase over 1878 of 286,537
tons, or 41*25 per cent. Tons carried one mile were 226,573,979,
against 170,988,859 in 1878. Revenue per ton per mile 1*81 cents
in 1879, against 1*92 cents in 1878. The passenger earnings
$981,151, a decrease from previous year of $$46,733, or
4*55 per cent. The total number of passengers carried was
652,757, against 600,556 in 1878. The total number of passen¬
gers carried one mile was 31,348,280, against 32,696/103 in 1878.
The average rate per passenger was $1 50, against $1 71 in 1878;
and the average rate per mile 3*13 cents, against 3*14 cents the
previous year. The operating and general expenses of the
road also show an increase. The operating expenses, simply,
$2,701,434, an increase of $367,359, or 15*74 per cent aver
those of 1878. But the percentage of these expenses to earn¬
ings was 51*04,. against 51*70 the previous year. And the
general expenses were $290,621, an increase of $56,331, or 24*04
per cent over those of 1878, being 5*50 per cent to earnings.
The Board of Directors in May, 1879, resolved that the gauge
of the road should be changed from 5 feet to 4 feet 8% inches.
This was promptly done in June, at a cost of $195,169.
The income account shows the following :
Operating and general expenses
$2,992,056
Interest and eichange
24,318

miles) were $7,732. The increase in net
or 18*22 per cent over those of 1878.
The net
ef >oad (684%) were $3,361, against $2,843
cent increase. The increase of earnings has been

were

were

interest certificates

on funded
on divisional

mortgage bonds,

including part of the

16,120

1870.

1877.

1878.

$

$

$

137,570

Miscellaneous

earnings

8,100
33,684

$
1,740,207
390,199
607.800
32,825

580,496

416,950

$
1,762,095

Disbursements—
Interest on bonds....
Other interest
Disc’t on con. m. bds.
Miscellaneous

260,263

Balance, deficit..

AT CLOSE OF

GENERAL BALANCE
Assets—
Road and

786,228
3,839,579

receiv’le

264,694
35,798

416,951
15,000

Miscellaneous items.

84,660

*379,257

120,331

341,334

$!!#**

2,222,194
40,438

EACH FISCAL YEAR.

1056,677

604,826

5,000

50,114,055 51,028,147 52,335,184 53,219,959
$
21,458,961
21,510,253 21,471,151 21,469,101
25,909,000 25,909,000 30,068,657

Total assets

Liabilities—
Stock

Bds.(see Supplement)
Certfs. A unfund, cou
Bills payable A other

24,797,000
2,263,565

2,440,125

1,375,576

430,415

114,300

777,*456

accounts
Funded interest

Interest accrued, &c.

489,019
108,210

539,029

2,438,165
1,979,889

Jl,095,Ill

53,360

Equipm’t renewal fd.

1,742,839
195,169
105,138
50.400
10,000
18,550
579,174

2,300,555

$
$
44,960,735 45,237,715 45,694,907
753,581
656,977
598,313
3,742,908 3,648,008 3,556,472
320,564
506,629
. 241,382
198,310
242,312
* 208,458
432,365
386,892
1,116,081 1,236,415 1,577,753

equipm’t.. 44,755,805

Materials, fuel, Ac...
Cash on hand
Income account

1,945,956
$
1,814,600
167,027

$

$

Real estate
Lands
Bills & acc’ts

$

$

$

2,131,902

1,483,646

50 54

50*86

ACCOUNT.

$

Receipts—
Net

2.992,056
2,30 0,555

1,945,956

52*63

62*92

INCOME

$

2,568,365

2,368,520
2,131,902

1,483,646

Net earnings
Per ct. of oper. exp..

1879.

••••••

j*

2,518,399

Total

an

Interest
Interest

321

CHRONICLE.

52,335,184 53,219,959
1874-5-6-7-8,
$105,139; judg¬
1878
ment by Rogers’ Locomo’e Works, $50,400; change of gauge, $195,169.
Rogers Locomotive Works judgment
t This includes $569,846 of Arkansas land trust notes,
Discount on 50 I. M. 2d mortgage bonds sold at 80
j This includes—On sundry coupons due but not presented, $26,390;
Equipment (cars destroyed in 1879)
Cairo A Fulton first mort., payable Jan. 1,1880, $279 930; St. Louis A
Interest on preferred income bonds, 1st and 2d
Iron M. first mort., payable Feb. 1,1880, $116,666; do. second mort.,
May 1,1880, $69,731; Cairo Arkansas A Texas first mort., pay¬
Total
$5,733,769 payable
able June, 1880, $8,458; Arkansas Branch first mort., payable June 1,
Less gross earnings
$5,292,611
$579,174.
Interest on consolidated mort. bonds canceled
99,820— 5,392,431 1880, $14,583; on income bonds,
Maine Central.
previous year

Change of gauge
Taxes Arkansas trust lands, 1874 to

50,114,055 51,028,147

Total liabilities...

*

Includes taxes on

Ark. trust lands for

.

$341,337

Balance

provided for in the agreement
bondholders, November 27,
1878, was carried into effect, the consolidated bonds and unpaid
coupons placed in the Union Trust Company, and the first and
second preferred income bonds were issued. The total amount
of these income bonds issued to December 31,1879, was $7,992,657, leaving $71,000 consolidated bonds, $80,000 of Cairo &
“The funding arrangement
made between stockholders ana

{For the year ending

December 31, 1879.)

j

has the following remarks:
steel rails laid, and have pur¬
chased 2,000 tons more to be laid during 1880. As this purchase
was made prior to the recent large advances in prices, our
expenditures in this department for 1880 ought not to be much
in excess of those for 1879.” * * * “The Sandy River RR., of two
The annual report just issued
“
We have now 53 miles of

may prove

to be a

valuable feeder to the Maine Central, and we
its promoters every facility in

have accordingly extended to
our power to enable them to

and has been continued, and the coupons paid in full
complete their line and put it in
presented. The amount of work done and payments made successful operation.” * * * “In
the year 1879 we hardly made
out of earnings during the year, in addition to ordinary expenses
up
the
deficiency
arising
from
the
business of 1878,
we
and interest, have been very large. Grouped together, for the
besides to pay the large sum of $49,284 to the State for taxes
purpose of showing the extraordinary burden thrown upon the of
previous years. Unjust and oppressive as these taxes were,
earnings of the road during the year, they are stated as fol¬
they have now been entirely settled, but our profit and
lows
Arrears of taxes
$105,138 account bears witness to the fact that this corporation cannot
in full,
as

and

had

loss

Extraordinary legal expenses
Judgment on contract
Change of gauge
Construction and equipment
Red River bridge

character.”
history of the Maine
of its bonded
Supplement), which
relating to the

04.409
50,400
195,109
365,816
74,471
$855,406

*

Total

exist and continue pay exactions of this
There is appended to the report a brief
Central Railroad Company, with a synopsis
indebtedness (as given in the Investors’
exhibits in a condensed form the material facts

history and

“Arrangements have been made for the purchase of the 450
leased cars mentioned in our last annual report, and also for
400 new box cars, on easy terms of payment, running through
^several years. We also added 50 new fiat cars, 50 new car

ROAD OWNED AND

Miles owned
Miles leased and controlled

postal cars and 11

already mentioned.”
Comparative statistics for four years are as

dition to that

ROAD AND

1876.

.Miles owned A oper*d
Locomotives
Pass., mail & ex. cars

^Freight cars

685
120
66

2,580
55

All other cars

EQUIPMENT
1877.

70
49

OPERATIONS AND FISCAL

72
2,507

-

RESULTS.

49

Rate per

1879.

Freight
Mail, express,

685
121
72
2,591
53

355

355

355

w*

,006

$33,304

FISCAL RESULTS.

$

*

769,657
836,028
120,812

Ac.

688,056

833,541
126,578

623,718
702,668
108,302

1,434,688
earnings .. 1,726,497 1,648,175
$
$
$
Operating Expenses—
247,703
274,163
305,478
Maintenance of way, Ac..
104,238
150,217
125,856
Maintenance of equipm’nti
470,969
531,906
Total gross

.




47

ton per

Earnings—

570,763
615,492
600,556
652,757
29,158,441 33,403,029 32,696,103 31,348,280
Rate per pass. p. mile
3*32 cts.
3*21 cts.
3*13 cts.
3*34 cts.
Freight (tons) moved
611,841 - 674,652
694,601
981,139
Freight (tons) mil’ge. 138,134,513 162,298,859 170,988,859 226,573,979
1*81 cts. I
Av. rate p. ton p. mile
2*05 cts.
1*98 cts.
1*92 cts.
Earnings—
$
$
$
981,151
Passenger
974,062 1,108,668 1,027,884 4,103,605
Freight
2,842,761 3,208,749 3,282.898
207,795
Mail, express, Ac....
185,222
183,005
203,539
4,500,422
4,514,321 5,292,611
Total gross eara’gs 4,002,045
Operating Expenses—
$
684,896
603,760
553,718
Mamt. of way, Ac.*..
691,245
942,692
805,420
736,464
M&int. of equipment.
749,876
1,073.846
924,895
839,909
Transport’n expenses
781,978
218,585
168,372
147,976
General expenses....
110,009
72,037
65,918
90,453

Ac.

47

693,199 611,345
25,208,476 22,740,125 20,449,197 20,441,291
3*05 cts. 3*02 cts. 3*05 cts. 2*98 ete.
Freight (tons) moved .....
382,942 384,830 329,811 396,107
Freight (tons) mileage
25,029,850 25,028,148
*2*87fct«.
3*33 cts. 21,193,655
3*32 cts. 27,052.047

Passengers carried..
Passenger mileage...

47,721
Including extraordinary disbursement on road,

237
118

18 70
30$

Passengers carried
Passenger mileage
Rate per pass, per mile

Operations—

Taxes

operated

Passenger

685
118

237
118

308

OPERATIONS AND

4.

1878.

1878.

Operations—

follows :

685
118

2,594

Total

OPERATED. \
1877.

1876.

locomotives to our
equipment. Fortunately, we purchased 8,000 tons of steel rails
at such low prices that, as they arrive in the first half of the
year 1880, the increased value of the old rails for which they
will be substituted will very nearly pay for them. There are
now 203 miles of steel track on the line, and we hope to lay
over 100 miles more during the year 1880.
Considerable new
rolling stock will be required during the ensuing year in ad¬
bodies for old trucks, 5

financial condition of the company.

Comparative statistics for four years are as follows:

Transportation expenses.
Taxes, insurance, etc
Miscellaneous

per cent

of oper. exp.

549,045
29,688
32,014

20,457

1,042,081

1,003,538

684,416

644,637

60*36
INCOME

fet earnings..
Other receipts.

13,576
4,219

840,705
593,983

809,979
638,398

58*60

57*67

f

593,983
5,974

638,398

689,852

650,699

648,557

54,000
523,410

599,957
$
54,000
569,381

26,109

3,845

3,726

47,180 def.27,269

21,052

etc...

Balance, surplus

38,487

Other interest,

...

255*601

644,637
0,062

54,000
502,996
29,814
64,555

Rentals paid
Interest on bonds
Dividends

1 >508,377

109,547
486,087
11,702
7,042

$

$

793,699
104,253

684,416
5,436
$

Disbursements—

60*88

ACCOUNT.

*$

Receipts—

26,795

$
610,425

$

•

10,159
6
54,000

569,179

322

THE CHRONICLE.
GENERAL BALANCE AT CLOSE OF EACH FISCAL
YEAR.

Assets—

$

*

$

$

9

-Railroad, buildings, &o. ..10,006,657 10,006,432 10,019,932 10,018,152
Androscoggin RR. lease...
768,333
768,333768,333
768,333
Equipment
1,658,541 1,658,541 1,658,541 1,658,541
Stocks

'

Owned, cost

)

Bonds owned, cost
Bills & acc’uts receivable

Materials, fuel, &c.

Cash

on

Total
'Liabilities—

Stock,

-«<ve

4-1 rmo

on

10^5
-U,uo

41,J02

207,684
244,489
136,777

hand

.Miscellaneous items
•

nr

5

158,786
112,661
129,591

151,353
37,427
95,785

20 195
zv,lvo

'

94,262
106,547
20,821

.13,048,676 12,876,246 12,751,566 12,686,851
$
$
$
$
3,602,200 3,620,100 3,620,100 3,620,100

common

Stock of P. & K. RR
63,600
Bonds (seeSupplement).. 7,703,584
Bills payable
928,920
All other dues & accounts.
122,754

Miscellaneous
Profit and loss

13,700

8,706,011

18,861
608,757

Total

‘

51,201
6,104

8,708,942
12,959

8,704,219

40,500

34,223

369,065

328,309

479,130

13,048,676 12,876,246 12,751,566 12,686,851

GENERAL INVESTMENT
■

■■■■■

NEWS.
4

Brooklyn & Montank.—Judge Gilbert, in Brooklyn, has
.given permission to Receiver Sharp, of the Long Island Railroad
Company, to lease the Brooklyn & Montauk Railroad (formerly
the Southern Railroad of
Long Island) for fifty years, at a
.rental of 25 per cent of the total net
earnings of the
Island
(Railroad Company and its leased lines ; and also Long
to lease the
New York & Flushing Railroad for the same time at an
annual
rental of $18,000.
Chicago & Grand Trunk.—Of this road, which is a consoli¬
dation of the several lines
forming the new Chicago route of
the Grand Trunk of Canada, a
despatch from Detroit, March
25, savs, the stockholders of the Northwestern Grand
Trunk,
the Chicago & Northeastern and the
Michigan Railroad Com¬
pany have adopted resolutions affirming the articles of consoli¬

[Voi. XXX.

Denver & Rio Grande.—In the
litigation between the Denver
& Rio Grande and the Pueblo & Arkansas

Valley railway com¬
panies, Commissioner Rogers has filed his report, fixing
the
cost of the railroad through the Grand
Canyon of the Arkan¬
sas to

the mouth of the couth Arkansas at
$685,819. The Rio
xrande Company is to deposit this sum as
security, and have
die road delivered to it under decree of the court.
Elizabeth Citv Debt.—The Elizabeth bond cases
were
wrought before the U. S. Circuit Gourt at Trenton, N. J.,
on
a
writ
of
mandamus, and rule to show
cause
why the Common Council should not be attached for con¬
tempt of court* in not obeying an order of the court to
include in.thetax levy the amount of
$4,602, a judgment ren¬
dered in favor of Robert and Peter Goelet’s Executors.
The
writ had been served on Feb. 24, and on March 11 the
Mayor
of
Elizabeth recommended to the Council to include the
amount
of the judgment as ordered
by the court, but the Council
unanimously struck out the item. A meeting was held last
Monday night, when a resolution, not an ordinance, was adopted
that the amount should be included in the tax
levy, and a return
appending that resolution was the return made to the writ to¬
day. Mr. Gerry insisted that the return was a sham and.a
fraud, and the court held that no compliance with the order of
the court or writ has been made, and
gave the Councilmen one
week more to show cause
why thev should not be held to be in

contempt of court and punished therefor.
Greenville & Colnmbia.—This railroad, jn South
Carolina,
is to be sold at auction at Columbia, S.
C., on the 15th of April
next, under a decree of foreclosure issued
by the Court of
Common Pleas for Richland county. The sale will include
all
the corporate rights, franchises and
privileges of the company,
and all the right, title and interest of the Greenville & Colum¬
bia Company in the Blue Ridge Railroad,
together with all
claims and demands against the Blue
Ridge Railroad Company.
Long Island,—In addition to the lease of the Brooklyn &
dation with the Indiana Railroad. The new road is to
be Montauk (South Side) Railroad, Receiver Sharp, of the Long
known as the
Chicago & Grand Trunk. The stockholders of Island Railroad, has petitioned Judge Gilbert, in the Supreme
the old companies will surrender their
stock and receive new Court, Brooklyn, to ratify the new contract with the New York
in exchange.
Woodhaven & Rockaway Beach Railroad
Company. The latter
Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul.—The directors of this com¬ company is to be allowed to use the former’s track and terminal
pany have declared a dividend of 3% per cent on both common facilities between Rockaway and Long Island City and Woodhaven for 33% per cent of the
And preferred stock.
gross earnings, and between
Following is the statement for 1879 :
By gross earnings
Rpckaway and Flatbush avenue for 45 per cent of the gross
$10,012,819
Ju.t*s operating expenses,
earnings. The Rockaway company is also to furnish the
including taxes
5,473,794
Island Company money to build a second track from Loiig
Balance
Long
Island City to Fresh Pond. The contract is for
$4,539,024
Interest received on
money loaned on account
fifty years.

in 1879
To 3*2 per cent dividend

on

October, 1879

T-i 2^ per cent dividend

on

October, 1879

common

385,106-

•

*

Total

per cent dividend on

April, 1880

*

2,357,407

v

April. 18S0.
3^2‘ pw cent dividend

on

$1,435,795

preferred stock iu

-

common

stock in

814,888

$3,793,203

sinking
.

meeting of the stock¬
holders has approved of the lease of the
road to the Boston &
Lowell Railroad. The lease
provides that the line shall be
completed by the Massachusetts Central Company from the
Arlington branch of the Lowell to West Deerfield, with a
branch from Amherst to
Northampton, by November 1,1881;
that it be equipped with steel rails
; that the Lowell Road fur¬
nish all the rolling stock ; that the contract
be for twenty-five
years, and the rent twenty-five per cent of the gross

429,781

stock in

To Interest on bonds and
payment on
fund in 1879

Massachusetts Central.—A special

69,066—$4,608,091

preferred stock in

$429,781
539,149—

Missouri Pacific.—The United States

rendered

968,931

of

"Balance

$466,864

*

an

—A Chicago report states that the fact
wras made known there
March 20tli that the Chic. Mil. & St.
Paul Railroad
Company
had bought sufficient stock of the
& Pacific Railway
Chicago
Company to enable it to redeem the latter road from the hands
of John I. Blair, who
recently purchased it for the bondholders
At a foreclosure sale for
$916,000. Of this, a dispatch-in the
Chicago Times says : “ The fact that the
Chicago Milwau¬
kee & St. Paul
Company has

a

ually.




Dayton road,

not less than $200,000

an

They

board of directors for the latter
company
in their own interest. These directors
leased the Pacific Rail¬
road Company of Missouri to the Atlantic &
Pacific
a

practically in perpetuity.
aforesaid) issued bonds

Company
Subsequently, they (the directors

to the amount of

$4,000,000 in the name

of the Pacific Railroad
Company of Missouri, secured by a
third mortgage upon its
property. This is the mortgage whose
foreclosure in the court below gave rise to the
present litiga¬
tion. It is alleged
by stockholders of the

Pacific Railroad
the real appellants in this case)
that the board of directors elected
by the Atlantic & Pacific peo¬
ple while the latter had temporary control of the road
corruptly

Company of Missouri (who

are

and fraudulently permitted a default in the
payment of inter¬
est to cause the
subsequent foreclosure. This court now holds:
That it has jurisdiction of the
appeal, even although the decree
below was rendered
by consent. That it distinctly appears in
the record that the Pacific Railroad
Company or Missouri
assented, through its solicitor, to the decree of foreclosure and
sale. This is equivalent to a direct
finding by that court as a
fact that the solicitor had
authority
to do what he did, and
binds this court on an appeal so far as the
question is one
of fact. That while it
may be true that, under the
-

Cincinnati Hamilton &
Dayton.—A
Cleveland, March 24, says:—“The repoit press despatch from
telegraphed by Asso¬
ciated Pres^ from Cincinnati on
Sunday, that the Clev. Columbus
Cincinnati &

^

Missouri, appellant, ts. George E. Ketchum et al. This is
appeal from a decree of foreclosure and sale entered in the

thereupon elected

City & Dakota.

annual meeting of the directors
of the Columbus
the matter of this
road,
punmase was decided upon, and brokers
were
soon after set to work
buying
enough
stock
of
the
Cincinnati
Hamilton & Dayton road to
get the controlling interest.
-all of the amount
required was purchased at less than Nearly
as the stock *f the
70, and
Dayton road is
about $3,000,000, a con
trolling interest has been purchasedonly
for about $1,000,000.”
The report states that this is in the interest
of no combina¬
tion but for the C. C. C. & I.
only,
which will ultimately save, by
tfie acquisition of the

Supreme Court has
Company

decision in the suit of tho Pacific Railroad

Circuit Court of the United States for the Eastern
District of
Missouri on the 6th of
January, 1876. As stated in the appel¬
lant’s case, certain stockholders of the Atlantic &
Pacific Rail¬
road Company in 1872 obtained a
controlling
interest
in the
stock of the Pacific Railroad
Company of Missouri.

purchased the Chicago & Pacific
and Southern Minnesota railroads was
practically a fact nearly
«, year
ago, so far as the Southern Minnesota is
concerned; as
an actual fact, over two
weeks ago, so far as
the
Chicago Paci% The inside history, as it refers toconcerns
the
Chicago
& Pacific, ana that has not
yet been published, is that some
time ago the Chicago Milwaukee
& St. Paul
Company went
quietly at work and bought up all the
Chicago & Pacific stock,
^xcept that owned by Joy, of Detroit, and secured a
controlling
interest. The more recent movement
of the
Chicago
Milwau
kee & St, Paul
Company has been the purchase of Mr.
Joy’~
interest. The Chicago &
Pacific, when completed, will have
a
cut-off for
Milwaukee, and will, of course, injure this
city
while it will benefit
Chicago.”
The Chicago Milwaukee & St.
Paul has also leased the Sioux

Indianapolis road had.
Hamilton & Dayton road, seemed to purchased the Cincinnati
be confirmed
by the facts
that have been known in a
quiet
way
here for several days. At
the last

a

earnings.

peculiar
provisions of the company’s charter, the stockholders have a
sort of supervisory power over the
doings of the directors,
they cannot on appeal correct errors arising from the latter’s
acts.
If they have been defrauded,
they must apply for relief

in the first instance to the court in which
the fraud was perpe¬
trated. The court fails to discover in the record
any errors
which can be corrected on
appeal, and the. decree is therefore

affirmed.
The Chief Justice delivered the
This
decision shuts out the old stockholders of the opinion.
Pacific Railroad
of Missouri, and confirms the title of
Jay Gould and others, the
present holders of that property.
■

New

Jersey Midland.—The

recent

purchasers of the New

Jersey Midland Railway have reorganized under
i

the

name

of

MaROH

3i3

THE CHRONICLE.

27, 1880.]

“Midland Railroad of New Jersey.” The following directors
elected: Jacob S. Rogers, Robert S. Hughes, John J.
Brown: and Garret A. ' Hobart of Paterson; Henry Marks,
Gharies H. Burtis, Charles Parsons and Simon Borg of New
York; Henry Whalen of Philadelphia ; Frederick A.
Hunterdon, N. J.; John W. Taylor of Newark; J. F. Hull of

Site Commercial jinxes.

were

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.

Potts of
Poughkeepsie, and E. S. Francis of Pittsfield, Mass. The

Friday Night, March 26, 1880.

past week has been nearly a repetition of the previous
circles. The weather has been quite cold
and blustering; trade comparatively dull, and the decline in
speculative staples even more general and decided. The money
market has also continued unsettled. In fact, the condition of
money is probably the secret of the general decline in specula¬
tive values. Large stocks of very many descriptions of mer¬
chandise were everywhere being carried by our financial insti¬
tutions, and under the money pressure and fears of an export
of gold they have been let go, resulting in larger exports.
This decline, therefore, and the decline in Wall street securi¬
The

elected Garret A. Hobart, President; Charles
Parsons, Jr., Secretary, and Charles Parsons, treasurer.
The
maximum capital stock was fixed at 38,000,000.
board of directors

one

N.- Y. Housatonic & Northern.—The referee’s sale of this
Railroad, which was advertised to take place at White^ Plains,
did not come off, as just before the hour designated*for the
sale Mr. John H. Clapp, the referee, was served with an order
from Judge Donohue staying the sale until April 3. The order
was made at the instance of Mr. Harrison Hall, a bondholder

representing $45,000 out of $2,000,000 of bonds, upon an affi¬
Hinds, a railroad contractor, who said he
would bid more tham $130,250—the amount of the bid which
davit of Mr. William

in commercial

corrective influences of benefit rather than of harm to
New York & Oswego Midland.—The New York Times says legitimate business and to the material interests of the country.
that the committee appointed at the recent meeting of repre¬
Provisions closed a trifle firmer, under increased demands
sentatives of the cities, towns and villages along- the line of the from
refiners of lard and exporters. During the week the mar¬
old New York & Oswego Midland Railroad owning stock in that
read, to arrange either for a sale of the stock, aggregating ket has been fairly active at generally easy prices. Pork sold
$5,800,000 par value, or for a loan sufficient to redeem the on the spot to-day at $11 for old and $11 50 for new mess; new
road, have been in consultation with certain New York capi¬ mess for April at $11 25, closing at $11 30@$11 45 for April
talists, whose names they decline at present to disclose. They and
May, and $11 55@$11 65 bid and a&ked for June. Lard sold
have returned home, and were “ unable to effect a satis¬
on the spot at 7*60@7*62%c. for prime new Western; and for April
factory sale of the stock; but an agreement was reached and a
contract drafted; which they have taken with them, to be at 7*50@7 60c., closing at 7*52%@7*55c.; May 7*57%@7*67%c.,
signed by their several constituents, under whose terms the closing 7*60@7*62%c.; June 7*62%@7*70c., closing 7*65c.; seller
latter are to turn over their entire holdings to the New York
the year 7*47%@7*o0c.; refined to the continent 7*90c. Bacon
capitalists, who on their part agree to furnish the $4,600,000
was a trifle firmer in Chicago at 6*60c. for long and short clear,
necessary to redeem the road. This money is to be secured
and
quoted here at 6*90@7c. Cut meats, beef and beef hams
by the .issuance of $4,600,000 of first mortgage bonds, and
as a bonus for the advance the lenders are to receive in
are quiet but firm.
Butter and cheese and eggs are in good
addition $4,600,000 of income bonds. * The original owners of
sale at steady rates. Tallow quoted at 6%c. for prime.
the stock are to be given in exchange for their old shares,
Rio coffee has been quiet most of the time, and prices have
which are to be canceled, new stock in the reorganized combeen more or less depressed at 14@14%c. for fair cargoes; mild
?any,
ork Ontario &any
Western stock are to be admitted into the
benefits of the arrangement by being permitted to exchange grades have
very
their holdings into stock of the reorganized company on pay¬ as last week. The supply of coffee is ample, and the slowness
*
ment of an assessment of 20 per cent in cash.”
' *
* of trade has a weakening effect on prices. Rice has sold freely
The New York capitalists propose, as soon as the contract at firm prices, or 6%@7%c'. for Carolina and 6@6%c. for Ran¬
shall have been duly signed and the old stock placed in their
goon. New Orleans molasses has been in good
hands, to make a formal tender to President Conrad N. Jordan
of the New York Ontario & Western Company, of the sum firm, while grocery grades of foreign have sold but moderately,
which he paid for the old New York & Oswego Midland Road though prices have remained steady ; refining grades early in
—$4,600,000—and claim possession. If it be refused, suit is to the week were active for cargoes to arrive, and the marke
be begun at once.”
advanced to 41c. for 50 deg’s test, but since these have come in the
The statute under which this proceeding is to be taken has
been quoted in the Chronicle (March 6, p. 241), and its scope demand has slackened, and the close is quiet at a reaction to
was

made at

a

sale February 28.

ties,

assessment. The present holders of New

without

I

are

remained

quiet at nominally the same prices

“

demand and

brought would 40c. Raw sugar has been quiet, the sale of the refined product
which would take several having fallen off, and refiners not feeling inclined, after their
cash will hardly be believed recent large" purchases, to proceed until the market improves;
felt; and the upshot of
informed by a broker who consequently raw has of late been slow, and to a great extent
$££
at 7M@7%c. for fair to good refining
ably be that all the old stock and convertible bonds will be nominal,
degrees test centrifugal
Melado.
Boxes.
Ba*rs.
Hilda.
admitted to the present company on payment of 20 per cent
2,947
740
202,373

and meaning- are

utterly uncertain. A suit

have to go to the Court of Appeals,
years. The offer of $4,600,000
until the money is actually seen and
this whole operation (as we are

cash instead of 30.

Receipts since Marcli

Ogdensbnrg & Lake Champlain.—At Albany, N. Y., March
signed the bill to authorize the Ogdensburg &

23, the Governor
Lake Champlain

and 8?4c. for 96

1,1880 — 53,407

Sales since March 1,1880
Stock March *:4, 1880
Stock March 26,1879.'

48,137
39,700
22,417

1,564

448

150,701
653,470

2,803

8,770

522,985

2,915

858

latterly at 95/8@9Mc. for

Refined sugar has been quiet,
bonds.
Pennsylvania Railroad.—The statement of the business of I
powdered and granulated,
all lines of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company east of Pitts- *
^
Ocean’ freight
room has shown a marked improvement daring
buTg and Erie for February, 1880, as compared with the same the past week both in business and the rates realized. The
month in 1879, shows
increase in gross earnings of
$106,537 tonnage in port has been considerably reduced, and a firm tone
An increase in expenses of.
347,341 prevails at the close. The business to-day embraced grain to
Liverpool, by sail, at 5M<*. 60 lbs ; do., by steam, quoted at 7
$59,196 73£d.;
An increase in net earnings
bacon taken at 30@32s. 6d., butter and cheese 35s.; flour
The two months of 1880, as compared with the same period quoted
3s. per bbl. and 20@22s. 6d. per ton ; grain to London,
in 1879, show
by steam, 7/4<L standard bushel; grain to Glasgow, by sail,
An increase in gross earnings of
$946,664 5%d. 60 lbs., sack flour 18s. 9d; gram to Hull, by steam, 7%d.
:
An increase in expenses of
540,702 60 lbs.; do. to Bordeaux or Antwerp, excluding Rouen, 4s. 7%d.
*
An increase in net earnings of.*
$405,9G2 per qr.; do. to Genoa, Leghorn or Naples. 4s. 7%d.; do. to
cork for orders quoted at 4s. 10%d.@5s.; refined petroleum to
All lines west of Pittsburg and Erie for the two months of
_
Antwerp quoted at 2s. 7%d.
. ,
1880 show a surplus over liabilities of $422,014, being a gain
The market has been very dull for Kentucky tobacco, the
the same period in 1879 of $296,117. .
sales for the week amounting to only 350 hhds. Prices are
Selma Rome & Dalton.—At Montgomery, March 23, the Su¬ nominally as last quoted. Seed leaf meets with a moderate
preme Court of Alabama rendered an opinion, deciding that the jobbing trade, and sales for the week are 1,080 cases,
as follows
56 cases
crop of:
trust deed of 1852 had a first lien on the whole main line of road „
„ „
.
. ft/5aOA
cases crop of
in Alabama, on the Government land grant and also to> corres- 650 cases crop of 1878, PeIinsy}jagia>9@20c.; 51
ponding portion of rolling stock, the other portion of the roll- 1879,*
1878, Ohio,
70 cases
of 1878,
State,terms;
and and
200 100 cases crop
crop seed,
Wisconsin,
Havana
private
mg stock belonging to the road in Georgia.
A decree will be of 1878,
Wia™aiT'
WWana
rnivata
Wisconsin,
7@14c. There
has been a fair inquiry for
rendered for the sale of all property ana franchises, including Spanish tobacco, and sales are 800 bales Havana at 80c.@$l 10.
There has latterly been a dull and uilinteresting market for
grants of lands, of the road in Alabama, which is 170 miles long.
A despatch received by the officials of the Selma Rome & Dad- naval stores.
Spirits turpentine closed at 48%@49c. and
ton road in N. Y. says, in reference to the* Alabama Supreme common to good strained rosins at $1 45@$1 52%.
Petroleum
Court decision, that it confirms to the company all the road, closed weak under the prolonged inactivity; refined in bbte*
subject only to the prior lien of the Alabama & Tennessee River here quoted at 7%c. United certificates have been variable,
Railroad first and second mortgages, amounting altogether to and close at 88 %c. bid.
Metals of all descriptions, wool and,
$600,000. The certificates of the receiver held by the Selma in fact, general merchandise, has been dull, and prices more or
Rome & Dalton Railroad bondholders are ratified, and the land less on the decline. Ingot copper has remained quiet at 22%®
grant of 450,000 acres is confirmed to the Selma Rome & Dalton 22%c. for lake.

Railroad Company to issue

An

*

over

-

-—

-

terms: and

bondholders free from lien.




324

|THE CHRONICLE,
COTTON.

[Tol. XXX

The speculation in futures
opened the week
with an appearance of firmness, but an

Saturday last
Friday, P. M., March 26, 1880.
early advance on that dayThb Movement op the
Crop, as indicated by our telegrams was not sustained, and in the course of Monday and Wednesday
from the South to-night, is
given below. For the week ending there was a decided decline in values. The reduction was
great¬
this evening tMar. 26), the total
receipts have reached . 53,419 est in the Summer months and least in November and
bales, against 49,611 bales last week, 64,368 bales the previous
December.
This depression was caused almost
week, and 78,451 bales three weeks since,
entirely
by
the
stocks
large
making the total
receipts since the 1st of September, 1879, 4,447,669 bales, against at the ports and at interior towns, showing an excess last
Friday
4,119,220 bales for the same period of 1878-9, showing an increase of 378,479 bales over the
corresponding date of last March.
since September 1, 1879, of 328,449 bides. The
details of the This exhibit,
supplemented by the fact that spinners are carry¬
receipts for this week (as per telegraph) and for the
corresponding
weeks of four previous years are as follows:
ing much larger stocks than last season at this date, and by dull
Liverpool accounts, encouraged the bears to make a strong attack
Receipts this w’k at
1880.
1879.
1878.
1877.
1876.
upon values, while the bulls did not exhibit the
courage of some

HeW Orleans
Mobile

27,057
2,341
3,805

16,667
2,808
2,888

22,016
5,246

14,290
2,026

2,761

1,287

weeks since.

The

narrowing of the range between this and the
has continued to make progress, and on Wednesday
4,569 August and
September were only l*55c. apart instead of l*75e.
378
two weeks before.
Yesterday the opening was firmer, but free
3,219
notices for April delivery caused a decline.
The close, however,
5,997

25,461
5,466

0000836148435..210468121
Charleston

Fort Royal, Ac
Savannah

191

•

-

•

•

693

£69

8,222
4,136

2,779
1,770

Galveston'.

3,500
4,654

Indianola, Ac
Tennessee, Ac

36

104

15

23

4,694

10,543

12,541

3,794

8,194
5,527

145

5,481

Florida.....

113

793

225

North Carolina
Norfolk

35

61

788

1,895
6,876

766

5,579

1,821
9,414

2,932

661

1,538
7,266

1,939

843

426

331

53,419

60,698

65,470

30,397

59,912

City Point, Ac

Total this week

...

Total since Sept. 1. 4,447,669 4,119,220 3,893,458
3,731,049 3,757,676

The exports for the week
ending this evening reach a total of
67,973 bales, of which 43,767 were to Great Britain,
11,562 to
France, and 12,644 to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as
made up this evening are now 784,575 bales.
Below are the
exports for the week and stocks to-night, and a comparison with
the corresponding period of last season.
Week

EXPORTED TO—

ending

Great
Mar. 26. Britain.

N. Orl'ns

France.

11,935
3,953
5,469

Mobile..
Charl’t’n

8a van’h.

11,562
«...

Gaiv’t’n-

N. York.

Norfolk-

Other*..

2,562
2,625

26,059
6,578
5,469
5,574
8,372
5,000
6,213
4,708

5,574
1,883

....

....

....

....

....

....

STOCK.

Same
Week
1879.

Week.

nent.

....

....

6,489
5,000
6,213
4,708

•

Conti¬

....

....

Total
this

1880.

1879.

40,886

25,740
3,322 283,055 188,086
1,240 26,593 13,988
4,004 50,000 26,000

Tot. this

week..

43,767

11,562

12,644

67,973

next crop

rather better.

Cotton on the spot has been
dull, and on
Tuesday the quotations were reduced l-16c., and closed
yesterdayquiet at 13£c. for middling uplands. The Cotton
Exchange last
evening adjourned to Monday.
The total sales for forward delivery for the
week are 641,900'
bales, including
free on board. For immediate delivery the*
total sales foot up this week
2,540 bales, including 703 for export,
1,706 for consumption, 131 for speculation, and
in transit. Of
the above,
bales were to arrive. The
following
tables show
the official quotations and sales for each
day of the past week:
was

UPLANDS.
NEW ORLEANS.
TEXAS.
Mar. 20 to [.
Mar. 26.
Sat. Mon Tues Sat. Mon Tues
Sat. Mon. Tues

Ordin’y.$}tt> 1171S 11716

Strict Ord..
Good Ord..
Str. G’d Ord
Low Midd’g
Str. L’w Mid

58,949 784,575 548,046

12 V-

12%

12ic

119J6 11916 11016 H910 ll9ie
1115.6 1115,0 1115,0 1115.6
1238
123s

12%

125s

111316 111316

12*4
121c

HI® 16

1258

12%

12%

12%

125a

12%

12%

U&J.
is?. A A

Wed

Ordin’y.jpib

8trictOrd.

113s
11%

Til.

Frl.

113s
11%

Middling..: 13is

Tot. since

Bept. 1.. 1853,669 303,015 630,158 2836,842 2879,172

Pair

Midd’g Fair 14*8
14%

Wed

Th.

11%

Good Ord.. 1-316 12316
Str. G’d Ord 12716 12716
Low Midd’g 12%
12%
Str.L’wMid 12i516 121516

Stood Mid.. 13%
Str. G’d Mid 13%

8?

g

1318
1338
13^8
1418
1478

%

s

Frl.

11%

i

13%

13%
14%

13%'
14%

From the foregoing statement It will be seen
that, compared
with the corresponding week of last
season, there is an increase
in the exports this week of 9,024
bales, while the stocks to-night
are 236,529 bales more than
they were at this time a year ago.
In addition to above exports, our
telegrams to-night also give
ns the
following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not cleared, at
the ports named.
We add also similar figures for New
York,
which are prepared for our
special use by Messrs. Carey, Yale &
Lambert, 60 Beaver street:

STAINED.

Good Ordinary

•

Bfcrtnt, Oond OrdinaryLow Middling

12%

o

o

5

Mar. 26, at—

Liver¬

pool.

New Orleans
Mobile
Charleston
Savannah

35,553

7.900

2,200
12,000
7,175

Galveston
New York

The

N.York

165,951
19,484

N. Car.

Norfk*

Other..

98.963

643,432
231,729

Thisyr. 4394,250

Last year
•

wise.

8,841

7,616
2,000
1,050
7,800

2,800
1,500

900
563

53,241

217,410

150

14,604

20,546

2,231

our usual table

Stock.

1,231

70,828

2,080

Leaving

Total.

None.

None.

1.

1878.

M.Orlns 1321,066 1086,140
Mobile. 331,990 340,121
Char’n* 449.376 497,102
fJavTi~ 698,473 659,154
Galv.*. 433,786 523,058

Florida

Foreign

*

.

12,700
4,900
21,000
9,868
6,500

108,299

showing the

33,492
24^674
16,624
31,018

283,055
70,093

676,366

movement

of

131,134

51,155
127,314
490,338
153,006

7

Great
Britain.

*

l

France.

653,548 208,016
54,393
6,791
133,481 16,914
169,191 17,767
175,773 20,964
215,995 19,522
•

•

•

•

22,668

186,800
168,053

•

•

•

•

Other

Foreign

*

Total.

e

Stock.

12%

10,830

146,005
196,727
43,536
40,309
....

72,014

54.220

296,400 31,531
383,685 41,559
240,273 47,686
305,826 282,441
....

....

10,447

33,115

4,583

1,479

4.577

192,856
185,623

33,634

....

17,570

4058,5221638,669369,315 812,2392820,223 579.279

Under the head of CharUiton is inoluded
Port Royal, Ac.: under the head
ol
vaitttfem 1b Included Indianola, Ac.:
under the head of Norfolk i*
included City
Point. Ac.




11%

12

12

12%

v

Th.

113X,

lllo,6
12%

12%

1

15

Frl*.

lliJJe s*
|s

12H

°s

1211,6 12Ui,

FUTURES.

Ex¬

Con- 8pec- Tran¬
port. sump. ul’t’n sit. Total.

Sat.. Quiet, butsteady.
Mon Quiet
Tues. Ertsy
Wed Easier, at 1,6 dec.
Thurs Dull, nominal....
Fri.

200
253
250

Total

703

.

120
709
449
205
222

....

....

•

•

•

•

....

•

•

•

•

....

131
....

d Fri

1,706

.

.

.

Deliv¬
eries.

320 68,000
962 112,600
699 141,000
336 149,800
223 170,500

400

2,540 641,900

2,600

.

....

day..

131

Sales.

The daily deliveries given above are
actually delivered the
vious to that on which they are reported.

400
500
800
500

day pre¬

For forward delivery the sales have reached
during the week
641,90) bales (all middling or on the basis'of
middling),
and the
following is a statement of the sales and prices :
For March.
Bales.
Cts.
800
12 02
12 93
600
600

1,000
200

1,900

100

.

12- 4
12*95
12-96
12-97
12 99
18 00
.13-01

1,800

13-05

100 S.n.i4lhl8- 7

l/iOO

13-10

100
4 0

1811
1313

Cts.
1304
13-05
13 06
1307
13 08
13-0-4
13-10
1311
13-12
13 13
13*14

7,400
3,800.
e00

2,000

200

1,6- 0
600

13 15

1316
1317
13*18
13-19

000
600

2,900
8,100....

13-20
13-21

100.

137,000

13,100

For April.
1,500
12-92
12,400
12*93
1295
12*98

.

Bales.

1302

18 03
lOOe.n.231.13 04
200
13 04

47.500

1809,902 291,453 667,514 2768,869
817,261

o

SALES OF 8POT AND TRANSIT.

SPOT MARKET,
CLOSED.

1,000

197,513 1059,077 274,057

13%
13%
14%

MARKET AND SALES.

mO

EXPORTED SINCE BEPT. 1 TO—

13%
13%
14%

Mon Toes Wed

.

ports from Sept. 1 to Mar. 19, the latest mail dates:

SEPT.

1879.

Coast¬

None.

RECEIPTS SINCE

Forts.

Other

6,000

following is

eottom at all the

France.

300
50
ceived.
500

Other ports
Total

Shipboard, not cleared—for

13%

Sat.

12516 125,6 125,6

.

On

131.6 131.6

S

13%

15

11%

«

12%

15

12

Middling....

11%

15

V B>. 11%

Frl,.

129.6 129.6

g

13116 131.6
13%
13%

Th.

11%' 11%
125.6 125.6

•a

1278

13%

1SS

11%

1178 1178
12516 125.6
12918 129.6

1278

A

Wed

♦

The exports this week under the head of “other
ports” include, from Balxnore, 8.768 bales to Liverpool; from
Boston, 904 bales to Liverpool : from
Philadelphia, 46 bales to Liverpool.

12%

12%
121316 121316 121316 121516 1215.6 1215.6 1315.6
1315.6 1315,8
13
13
13
13%
13%
13%
13%
13%
Middling... 13316 133,0 133,8 135ie 135.6 135.6 13%
135.6 JgSiO 135m
Good Mid
13716 13916 13*16 13*16 139.6
139,0
Str. G’d Mid
131116 13l*ie 13l3i6 1313.6 1313.6
1313,6.
Midd’g Fair
14516
145.6
145.6 145.6
145,6
Fair
*
15116 15lio 151.6 151.6
15
..

27,173 270,651 221,707
9,168 46,192 27,038
3,848 29,574 18,798
5,345 37,624 26,689
4,849

on

........12-97
12*98
12-99
13* 0
1301
13*08

1303

Fdr
700

4,000.

7,100

18,800

May.

1311
13*12
1313

.

Ill
13 16
131#
1318

1310
J8"‘ 0

11,600
.13-21
9,600.... .....13-22

6,200

6,900
1,200

5.000
400
700

2,400
2,500

2,500
5, 00
2,500
1,000

Cts.
13-24
13-*5
13-26
13-27
13-28
13-29
13-30
13 31
13-3*2
13 »3
13-34
13-35
13-38
13m7
13-38
13-39
13 40
..13-41

186,500

1,600
5,200

19,500
16,400..
2,8'*0

Bales.

10,400
4,000

13-23

For Jun*».
800
13-28
13*2 *
7, 00
13-- 0

7,800
12,800..
17.100

...

13* 2
13 33

900

3,200

3300
100

2,500
400

l.too
MOO
3, 00
4,40.)
1, 00
900

900

155,800
For
200

1,200.

18-41
13*48

2300

13*44

03-45

5,60'

.13-47

7,000
5,600

18-40

14,000

10,600
7,400

!3-39

4,500

13-40

2,400

17.200

July.

9,800

13-34
13*35
13-36
13-37
13 38

4,200.
8,700.

18-4
18-4
18-4
18-4
.13-4
18-4
18-4
13-4
18-4
.,.13-a
13*6
18-6
18-6
18-6
18-5
JL8*5
13-5
18*51
13-6

18-40

13-48
: 18-60*

18*51
18-68

27, 1880.]

March

Cts.

Bales.

1,800

13-54

2,700

13-50

13*59
13*00

13T5

300

‘

Ct*.

2,500
1,000

1 400

18*00

13*02
.....13*63

400
000
900

...13-09
13*70
13*71

13*12

.

100
100.
100

...

1

13*03
13*04

1H-58
..13*54
13*60
13*61

’700.

13*04

1 900

13-65

1,400

900

18-00

1,700

13*07

200
500

000

1,800

132-94 132-94
13*74

13-75

13*70

1,400

13*77
13*78

8,000

13*53

1000
1.700

3,000

13*55
13*56

200

3,600

13*53 | 1,000

0,000
7,100
6,500

...

13*54

13*18
13*19
13-20
13*21

700

13-!V7 1

«3ftn

13*80

For September.
100
13 10
400
13*.7

13*51
13-58

700
500.

1,900

54,500

14*50

1,700

For

800
500

800
100
100
200

mo

*

13*29 l

.

13*23 |

300
900
600
900
200
000
200.1
500
100
200
500

1,400

11*99

Continental stocks
American afloat for Europe....
United States stock

12-14

East Indian, Brazil, d\c.—
Liverpool stdbk

December.

400
400.

12-38

12*39
12*40
12*41
12-42
12*43
12*44
12*45
12-46
.12-47
12549

11-95

,...

ll-9fr
11 "0i

.11-99

12*00
12 02

200..
100

12*03
12*09

40»

200

2,600
For January.
200.
11-98
12-04
100

12**51

300

12*56

Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe

Egypt, Brazil, Ac.,
Total East India,
Total Amerioan

Total visible
Price Mid. Upl.,

154,000

135,000

25,078

16,000

59.750
43,000
113,000

39.025
8,148
149,464

London stock

4,000

700
200

follows:

American-

afloat

375.715 366.750
2,017.619 2,030,964
2,393,334 2,397,714

&c

supply

1877.

737.000
356,000
345,000
719,468
88,742
10,000
2,256,210

128,000 267,000 351,000
536,098 708,000 639,000
784,575 548,046 631,970
.12*00
81,918
77,253
12*02 United States interior stocks.. 148,946
12*03 United States exports to-day..
1,000
17,000
12,000
32*04
12 00
Total Amerioan
2,017,619 2,030,964 2,272,223
12-07

1,8 0

F<\r

totals of Amerioan and other descriptions are as
1880.
1879.
1878.
Liverpool stock.....
419,000 414,000 556,000

Of the above, the

November.

203

October.
12-34
sou........ ;r-i*85
J00
12-80
12-87
700

13 79

400
500

For August.
13-49
200....

'

For
500

.

13-70

800

65,200

10,000

13*73 11,400

1,000

13*71

500.

18*05

!3-08

13*04

900

.

..

500

13*21
13*29
13*80
13*37
13*39
13*40
13*43
13*44
18*45
1340

300
300
700
300.
200
400
100
100
200
300

13*02

1000

OOO
•700
600
100

13-01

500

1,100

13-57

200

13-24

3.300

Cts.
12*50

Bales.
200

Cts.

I Bales.

Bales.

325

CHRONICLE.

THE

180,000 336,000
12,750 33,750
47,000 85,500
161,000 1180,000
53,000 1*6,000
453,750 671,250
2,272,223 2,256,210
2,725.973 2,927,460

57sd.
T^d.
57sd.
The above figures indicate a decrease in the cotton in sight to¬
night of 4,380 bales as compared with the same date of 1879,
a decrease of 332,639 bales as compared with the corresponding
Liverpool....

date of 1878, and a

decrease of 534,128 bales as

compared with 1877.

supply table we have heretofore only
the 7 original interior towns.
the new interior towns for the
four years, we could not make a comparison in any other way.
Sept.
That difficulty no* longer exists, and we therefore make the fol¬
June.
for July.
lowing comparison, which includes the stocks at the 19 towns
The following will show the range of prices paid for futures* given weekly in our table of interior stocks instead of only the
and the closing bid and asked at 3 o'clock, P. M., on each day in old 7 towns. We shall continue this double statement for a
the past week.
time but finally shall simply substitute the 19 towns for the 7
The

May.
for May.
May.
May*.
June.

*19
*20
*13
*12
*39
*39
*40

Saturday.

Futures8
.

For

exch.
April for July.
exch. 100 April for May.
exch. 500 April for May.
exch. 1,000 June for July.
exch. 100 June for July.
exch. 300 May for August.
exch. 800 April for June.
exch. 100 April for June.

Tuesday.

Lower.

Weak.

For Day.

Closing.

Day.

pd. to
pd. to
pd. to
pd. to
pd. to
pd. to
pd. to
pd. to

ITIonday.

Unchanged.

Market.

the week:

have been
made during
*49
100

following exchanges

*20 pd. to exch. 100 April for
*25 pd. to exch. 500 March
*20 pd. to exch. 500 March for
*22 pd. to exch. 400 April for
*30 pd. to exch. 100 April for
*65 pd. to exch. 300 Oct. for
*35 pd. to exch. 900 April for June.
*30 pd. to exch. 100 April for
*48 pd. to exch. 100 April

Closing.

—

For

Day.

Closing.

—

Futures

Wednesday.

Friday.

Market.

Lower.

Variable.

Holiday.

March

.

April...
May
...

June...

July...

August.
Sept...
October
Nov....

Deo’ber
Tr. ord.

For

Closing.

Day.

Closing.

Day.

For

Low.

Bid. Ask Wnh
High. Low. Bid. Ask High. Low. 12-91 93
13 00-12 94 12-92 — 12-93-12 92
95
— 12-9812-92
1302-12 94
12 1318-1313 1315 16
13*21-13*11
33
13 39-13*28 13-28 29 13-35-13-31
13-44*45
13*51-13*41 13*40 41
13-52 54
13-59-13*49 13-48 49
1318 19
13-21-13*16 1313 15
12-34 36
12*38-12-34 12-30 32
11-99 t
1202-12*00 11-97 i
11-95 97
11-98-11-95 11-93 95 1
12-95
12-9 5

„

Closing
Bid. Ask

bales

Stock at Liverpool
Stock at London

-

Total Great
-

Britain stook

.

Stook at Havre

Stock at

Marseilles

-

736,000
12,750

33,750

612,025
48,930
2,130

608,750

748.750

,106,750

172,500

265,000
6,000
30.000

194,250

7,000
30.000

14.500

35,500

73.500
10.000

Stook at Hamburg
St&ok at Bremen
-

Stook at Rotterdam
Stock at other

420

3,750

22,340
26,900

Stook at Antwerp
‘

1,410

3.000

conti’ntal ports.

Total continental

ports....

3,890

136,148

stocks....

748,173

Europe.
Amer’n cotton afloat for Eur’pe

149.4=64

Egypt,Brazil,<fcc.,aflt forE’r’pe

25,078

Total European

India cotton afloat for




310,000

10.250

6,500
7,750
398.000

918.750 1.,146,750 :
161.000
113.000

3,500
66.000

6,750
puv*
14 500

ia

aa\ *500
441

180,000

345,000

631,970

719.468

77,253

17,000

88.742
10,000

..2,393,334 2,397,714 2,725,973

2,927.460

536,093
784,575
148#46
1,000

708,000
16,000
548,046
81.918
12,006

39,025
8,148

we

call these bales of

follows.

36,000

takings in pounds
takings in bales of 400

lbs

24,067,338
60,168

week
according"

Consequently, if we call the Continental consumption this
50,000 bales of 400 lbs. each (it averaged 49,000
to
Mr. Ellison last month\ spinners’ stocks must have increased this
week about 10,000 bales of 400 lbs each.
At the Interior Ports the movement—that is the receipts
and shipments for the week, and stocks to-night, and for ths
corresponding week of 1879—is set out in detail in the following
statement:

Augusta, Ga

Columbus, Ga
Macon, Ga
Montgomery, Ala
Selma, Ala

Memphis, Tenn..

Week ending Mar.

26, ’80.

Receipts Shipm’ts

Stock.

950

2,100

197
25

1,274

304
115

5,965

Nashville, Tenn..

590

Total, old porta.

8,146

Dallas,Texas..
Jefferson, Tex.*..

287
180
900
909
63
180
76
316
428
250

58.500

639,000
53,000

'Stock in United States ports ..
-Stock in U. B. interior ports...
-United Sts tea exports to-day..

Total visible supply

5,500

2,318,667

135,000 180,000 336,000
59,75<r* 12,750 33,750
43,000
47,000 85,500.
149,464 113,000 161,000 180,000
Egypt, Brazil, &o., afloat
25,078 16,000 53,000 36,000
Total East India, &c
375,715 366,750 453,750 671,250
2,134,793 2,050,509 2,326,765 2,318,667
Total American
Total visible supply .......2^510,508 2,447,259 2,780,515 2,989,917
These figures indicate an increase in the cotton in sight to-night
of 63,249 bales as compared with the same date of 1879, &
decrease of 270,007 bales as compared with the corresponding date
of 1878, and a decrease of 479,409 bales as compared with 1877.
Imports into the Continent this week have been
bales. 54,563
Takings of Continental spinners this week have been “ 55,074

1877.

549,000
59,750

Stook at Amsterdam
*

1878.

1880.

27,128

2,134,793 2,030,509 2,326,765

154,000

London stock
Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe

Continental spinners’
Continental spinners’

573,000
39,025

Stook at Barcelona

17,000

708,000

548,046

would be

1879.

2,000
42,750
4,250
25,250
45,250
8,750

Brazil, &c.—
Liverpool stock

as

at 11-98-a 12-04.
Visible {Supply op Cotton, as made up

Friday only.

12,000

737,000
356,000
345,000
719,468
151,199
10,000

414,000
267,000

the same average weight (437 lbs.),
as the Continental takings last month, the spinners’ takings in
pounds and bales of 400 lbs. (during the past week)

by cable and
telegraph, is as follows. The Continental stocks are the figures
of last Saturday, but the totals for Great Britain ar.d the afloat
for the Continent are this week’s returns, and consequently
brought down to Thursday evening; hence, to make the totals
the complete figures for to-night (Mar. 26), we add the item of
exports from the United States, including in it the exports of
The

Total American

If

Steady.

Weafc
Closed
k
12‘02.
11200.
January sold on Wednesday

131.463

556,000
351,000
639,000
631,970
131,795

bales 419,000
128,000
American afloat to Europe
536,098
784,575
United States stock
United States interior stocks.. 266.120
1,000
United States exports to-day..
East Indian,

1877

1878.

1879.

1880.

Continental stocks

Steady.

Day.

preceding table.

Liverpool stock

Thursday.

For

the

American—

Barely siteady.

1

preceding visible

included the interior stocks at
As we did not have the record of

towns in

Bid. Asl
Bid. Ask High. Low.
High. Lo*o. Bid. Ask High. Low. 13 04 - 1302-1301 13-02 03
13
11-1303
13 13-1310 13 08 09
1318-13*04 1306 — 1306-1301 1305 —
April.. 13-21-13-14 1314 — 13-37-13-23 13-24 25 13-25-1318 13-23 24
May .. 13-41-13-34 13-34 — 13-54-13-41 13*42 43 13-41-13*35 13-40 41
June.. 13-59-13-52 13-52 53
13*67-13-59 13-54 56 13-52-13-48 13-52 53
July... 13-71-13-65 13-64 - 13-7413-62 13-62 63 13-61-13-55 13-60 61
13-72
73
13*80-13-74
13*28 30 13 25-13-20 13-23 25
13-46-13-39 13-36 38 13-37-13-30
12*41 42 12-40,12-36 12-39 41
12-48-12*40
50
12-56-12-51 12-47
-1204 12 04 06
12
05 07
12*07-1206
13
-1219 1211
11-99 '*
1200-11-98
1203-12*02|1201
03
-12-09 12 06 08
Deo’ber
13-05
13
05
13 •10
Tr. ord.
Steady.
—

In the

Shreveport, La *.

1 Vicksburg, Miss..

* Columbus, Miss..

Eufauia, Ala*....
Griffin, Ga*
Atlanta, Ga*
Rome, Ga*
Charlotte, N. C*.
Bt. Louis, Mo....

12,431

11,861

Week ending Mar 28, ’79.
.

Receipts Shipm’ts Stock.

1,208

1,726

559
67

553

1,511

2,882

12,362
6,567

542

850

8,723

13,574

1,832
4,332
2,137
48,325

915

1,743

6,363

17,617 148,946

13,525

22,134

81,918

719
230

2,074

92
285

703

389

350

1,796

1,024
1,065

10,500

1,771

194
412
408

11,775
1,454

627
265
97
634

1,102
383

2,541
6,784
3,156
97,625
14,548

3,844
1,436
2,250
1,220
10,239
5,163
1,400

1,909
109
194
127

1,028
546
382

806

896

1,276
3,417

2,172

2,538

60

647

221
404
189
730
676

1,705

4,713
22,255

732

1,255
953

5,605
9,113

7,744

7,110

9,663
49,543

Cincinnati, O....

2,462

6,040 .68,592
2,453 10,106

Total, new p’rts

9,183

14,639 117,174

21,161

22.701

17.329

32,256 266.120

34,686

44,835 131,463

Total, all
,

* This year’s

3,138

flgures estimated.

326

THE CHRONICLE.
—

The above totals show that the old interior
creased
more

during the week 9,471 bales, and

than at the

towns have been
„

same

cT

;

stocks have de¬

period last year.

to-night 67,028 bales
The receipts at the same

of

an

:

—

The rainfall is

:

seven

hundredths

inch.

Memphis, Tennessee.—It has rained here on
reaching three hundredths of an inch.

day, the rain¬

one

fall

week last year.

same

—

being 70, and the lowest 36.

are

5,379 bales less than the

tvoL. xxx.
:

The thermometer

Receipts prom the Plantations.—The following table is has ranged from 43 to 72, averaging 56. The river is at a
stadd,
prepared for the purpose of indicating the actual movement each thirty-four feet four inches above low-water mark. The
damage
week from the plantations.
Receipts at the outports are some is not as great as was anticipated. Ploughing, vigorous; in
times misleading, as they are made
up more largely one year uplands and on high bottoms.
than another, at the expense of the interior stocks.
Mobile, Alabama.—Two days in the earlier portion of the week
We reach,
therefore, a safer conclusion through a comparative statement were showery, but the latter part has been clear and
pleasant,1
like the following
VN The tributary rivers are lower, and no serious damage ha^ been
done. The thermometer has
/ ; RECEIPTS FROM PLANTATIONS.
averaged 61, the highest being 75
.

...

-

,

.

Week

ending—

Receipts at the Ports. Stock
1878.

1879.

1880.

and the lowest 47.-

at Inter’r Ports

1878.

1879.

Rec’ptsfrom Plant’ns

1880.

.1878.

1S79V

1880.

Jan., 9...... 142.099 121,091 149.480 236.293 253,64? 849;869 125,153 93,104 143,402
.

16

.....

153.727 113,613 129.480 237,380 233,236

352,383 154,814 93,202

132.033
23...... 164.059 148,648 168,280 242,013 218,585 358,074
168,692 133,997 173.971
•*
SO
159,186 107,097 137,191 244,494 220,935 361,880 161,667 169,447 140,997
F«b. O...... 137,138 17L608 112,363 240,708 214,117 357,916
133,352 164,790 108,399
*•
13....:. 120,090 150,841 119,854 233,103 190,765 345,975
112,485 127,489 107,913
**.
20
109,736 134,828 115,307 226.685 182,246 327,084 103,318 125.809 96.4U
M
27
94,349 110,047 102,995 210,935 170,438 31 d,972 78,599 98,299 92,883
Mar. 5.J.... 90,947 83,266 78,451 192,465 165,619
303,279 72,477 78,447 64,758
••

'

44

12

•*

19

M

82,264
75,723

78,490
60,202
66.470 60,698

26

64,368 169,636 159,418 289,996
49,611 146,653 141,612 281,647
53,419 131,796 131,463 966,120

59,435

72,289

52,740
50,612

42,896 40,662
50,549

51.085
38.492

The above statement shows— *
1. That the total receipts from the

plantations since Sept 1 iD
4,706,488 bales; in 1878-79 were 4,245,031 bales; in
were 4,008,771 bales.
2. That although the receipts at the out
ports the past Week
were 53,419 bales, the
actual movement from plantations was
only 88,492 bales, the balance being drawn from stocks at the
interior ports. Last year the
receipts from the plantations for the
stme week were 50,549 bales, and for 1878
they were 50,612 bales.
1879-80
1877-78

were

Weather Reports

Telegraph.—The past week has been
very favorable fpr planting and for preparation work almost
everywhere. The rivers in Alabama, which were so high last
week, are subsiding rapidly ; but the Mississippi is still high at
Memphis, though lower at New Orleans. Galveston has had line
showers again, and all over Texas
good progress is being made
by

in

•

The rainfall is

one

inch and five

Montgomery, Alabama.—We

hundredth^;

had rain on two days the earlier
part of the past week, hut the latter portion has been clear
and.

pleasant. Floods are subsiding. Average thermometer
59^
highest 72 and^fowest 44.- The rainfall for the. week is
.

hundredths of

an

inch.

•

■

forty

<

-

\
Selma, Atcibama.-^-^Nehave had no rainfall during the
week,.
The weather lias been fine.
...
Madison, Florida.—At has rain-.d during the past week on one
day. The thermometer has averaged 62, the highest being
.85,
and the lowest 40,
Planting is progresing finely. ...
••
Macon, Georgia.—We have had no rainfall during the past
week. The thermometer has
averaged 53, ihe highest being
73 and the lowest 44.
/
;
.

.

.

..

-

-

.

•

-

.

.

Columbus, Georgia.—There has been no rainfall at this point
during, the week. Average thermometer 64, highest 70 and.

lowest 52.

-

.

•••

:

•

Savannah, Georgia.—It has rained on one day, the rainfall’
reaching tw.nty-tWo hundredths of an iDch; but the weather the
rest of the week has been

pleasant*

The thermometer has

aver¬

aged 61, the extreme range having been.44 to 77.
Augusta, Georgia.—The weather has been warm and dry
throughout the week, the thermometer averaging 57, and rang¬
ing from 42 to 73. Planters are giving increased land to cottoik
this year. - Planting is
making fine progress.
-•?
Charleston^. South Caroline^--There has been no rainfall- at
this point during the past week/ The thermometer has
ranged*'
from 44 to 76; averaging 59.
*
The tY Rowing statement we have also received
by telegraph*.* •
Showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3 o'clock
Mar. 25, 1880, and Mar. 28, 1879.
;
...

,....

-

repairing the damage the cold did last week.
Galveston, Texas.-^lt has rained splendidly on four days the past
week, the rainfall reaching three inches and twenty hundredths.
Planting is making good progress. Some replanting required.
Mar. 25, ’80. Mar. 28, 79.Average thermometer 63, highest 73 and lowest 53.
Feet. Inch.
Feet. InchNew
Orleans
Below
Indianola, Texas.—We have had showers on five days of the
high-watermark..
1
7
5.4
Memphis
Above low-water mark... 34
4
24
8
past week, the rainfall aggregating one inch and nine hun- Nashville
Above low-water mark... 21
O
20
O ?'
Above low-water mark... 22
dreths. Planting is
4
6
3
progressing finely. The thermometer has Shreveport
Vicksburg
Above low-water mark... 42
10
32
10
ranged from 54 to 80, averaging 67.
New Orleans reported below
high-water mark of 1871 until
Corsicana, Texas.—We have had a shower on one day, with a
Sept.
9, 1874, when the zero of gauge was changed to high-water
rainfall of fourteen hundredths of an inch.
Average thermom¬ mark of April 15 and 16, 1874, which is 6-10ths of a foot above
eter 64, highest 80 and lowest 43. Both corn and
cotton planting
1871, or i6 feet above low-water mark at that point.
is making satisfactory
progress.
Ellison & Co.'s Cotton Report for February.—We are in
Dallas, Texas.—There has been no rainfall at Dallas during the
receipt
of Messrs. Ellison & Co.'s cotton report dated March
past week. We have had a frost, but not a killing frost. Plant¬
ing is progressing. Wheat and oats were unhurt by the recent 10, and make the following extracts from it:
COURSE OF THE LIVERPOOL
cold weather. Average thermometer
MARKET, FEB. 11 TO MARCH 10. during the week 64, highest
Our last report was issued on the 11th
.

.

-

.•

ultimo.

80 and lowest 43.

Brenham, Texas.—We have had no rain during the past week.
Planting is making good progress; also replanting where re¬
cently killed. Fruit not as badly hurt as was supposed. Aver¬
age thermometer 67, highest 80 and lowest 50.
New Orleans, Louisiana.—It has rained on three
days the
past week, the rainfall reaching one inch and forty-eight
hun¬
dredths. The thermometer has
averagqd 62.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—The weather here has been fair and
dry, no rain having fallen. Roads have been improving all the
week and are now in good condi ion.
Cotton coming in slowly.
Average thermometer 6fi, highest 76 and lowest 46.
Vicksburg, Mississippi.—The weather during the week has
®

.

been favorable.

Columbus, Mississippi. — '\ here has been no rainfall
during the
past week. The thermometer has averaged 60, the highest be¬
ing 68 and the lowest 52.
Last week

had rain

The market

buoyant to an advance of about %d. per lb. since the
5th ultimo, and there was every
prospect of a still further rise*
Confidence in the future was especially
strong in Manchester,
and 8d. per lb. for middling upland was
regarded as certain to
be seen at some not very distant date. The next
day, however,
there was a distinctly
tamer"feeling, and prices commenced togive way. The declining tendency was arrested on the 13th by
the active appearance imparted to the
market, owing to an>
unprecedentedly large business in Egyptians, the relative
cheapness of which had attracted the attention of speculators;
but the fall re-commenced on the 14th, and, with
slight interrup¬
tions, continued until the 23rd, ending in a decline of
3-16d# on
the spot and %d. in futures from the rates current on the 11th*
There was a slight recovery during the next two
days ; but in
was

very

the absence of any assistance from either America or Manchester
the improvement was soon lost, and on the 1st instant the
prices
ruling were %d. on the spot and 9-32d. to ll-32d. for futures
lower than on the 11th
February. The weakness was due to a
distinct pause in Manchester and to weaker markets at the
American ports. It was felt that Manchester had done her best
for the present, and that in the
neighborhood of 7^d. the sup¬
ply of cotton would be equal to the demand, if not more than
the world would take off at that figure. The American
receipts
did not indicate the
rapid exhaustion anticipated in some quar¬

on five
days, the rainfall reaching five
fifty-two hundredths. The thermometer ranged from
40 to 68, averaging 54.
Little Bock, Arkansas.—The weather the
past week has been
pleasant, three days having been clear and the balance fair.
Average thermometer 56, highest 74 and lowest 42.
ters, and faith in an
Nashville, Tennessee.—Rain has fallen on two days
advance in prices was propor¬
during the tionately diminished. important
Few people anticipated any serious fall;
past week.' The thermometer has averaged 52, the highest there
was, therefore, no pressure to sen, but it was thought

inches and




we

March 27,

that

a

327

THE CHEONICLE

1980 ]

decline to not far from 7d. would be necessary to re-in-

Continent.

Great Britain.

vigorate business in Manchester.
On the 2nd March there
1878-79.
1879-80.
1879-80.
1878-79.
a somewhat unexpected improvement in the demand for
Lbs.
Lbs.
Lbs.
Lbs.
futures,” chiefly on New York account; this imparted a better
6,012,000 13,800,000 18,720,000 30,550,000
tone to the spot market in the expectation that Manchester Surplus stock Oct. 1
would follow. A change for the better led to the suspicion Deliveries to Feb. 28. 610,006,500 478,970,950 485,541,120 428,921,370
that March deliveries had been oversold. This developed a
616,018,500 492,770,950 504;261,120 459,471,370
Supply
considerable demand to cover, and gave a hardening tendency Consumption in 29
weeks
528,900,810 456,400,000 419,200,000 381,600,000
to the spot prices of the medium grades of upland and Mobile,
in spite of the fact that Manchester regarded the movement
Surplus stock Feb. 28 87,117,690 36,370,950 85,061,120 77,871,370
with the utmost indifference, and that spinners continued to Surplus stock in bales
212,000
of400 pounds
91,000
195,000
217,000
buy very sparingly; the result was an advance of fully
per lb. between the 1st and 5th‘ instant.
On the 6th the
These figures shoV an excess of 126,000 bales in the stock
upward movement was encouraged by the smaller receipts at held
by English spinners and one of 17,000 bales in those held
the American ports and interior towns, and a further advance
of l-16d. was established—all positions partaking of the rise. by Continental spinners, or a total of 143,000 bales. The excess
in the “visible supply” is 67,000 bales.
The two together
Meanwhile, however, the spot market remained inactive, the
make a total excess of 210,000 bales.
sales of the day being only 6,000 bales. On the 8th (Monday)
the business in futures was again active, owing to higher prices
prospects.
•
at the American ports, and a continued demand to cover near
Nothing has transpired during the past month to cause
contracts. More was doing too on the spot. The result was an • us to make
any change in the opinions expressed by us in
advance of l-16d. for all positions. But the improvement was i our last
report as to the prospects of supply and demand. We
lost on the 9th (yesterday), owing to $he absence of any response ’ stated in our annual
report that the stock of cotton.in Europe
from Manchester, and, in some measure, to the anticipation of at the close of the season would
probably be about 200,000
a dull time during the forthcoming elections.
To-day the tone bales larger than at the end of the last season, and we see no
is weak at 1-16d. to %d. below the best rates of the 8th.
reason for thinking differently now.
With regard to supply,
Compared with the rateacurrent a month since, the spot quo¬ we expect that the out-turn of the American crop will be fully up
tations for American show a decline of %d. to 5-16d. for good
to, if not over, our estimate of 5,560,000 bales. We think, too,
ordinary, and %d. for low middling, l-16d. for good mid¬ that our estimated import of Egyptian will be exceeded by
dling uplands and Mobile, %d. for good middling Texas, and 20,000 to 30,000 bales. It may be that India will furnish a little
no change for good middling Orleans; Brazils are %d. to %d.
less than our computation, but there is no certainty on this
lower. Brown Egyptians are 34d. and white %d. to %d. higher
poiut. We do not think that the rate of consumption will
than the opening rates; but %d. to j£d. for brown and %d. for
materially, if at all, exceed our estimate of 115,000 bales of 400
white lower th^a-the rates touched oh the 14th ult. In Surats
lbs. per week for all Europe. No doubt, the stocks in Liver¬
there is an advance of 1-16. to %d., except Oomras, which are
pool
and the principal Continental ports will be very moderate
%d. to 3-16d. easier.
in compass throughout the season; but this need not trouble
The following are the principal fluctuations in the prices of
consumers, as, with judicious buying, there will be quite suffi¬
middling uplands on the spot and for forward delivery since cient cotton to meet all probable requirements at the present
the 11th ult.:
scale of values. The enormous business done during the past
three or four months hah taken the rough edge off the world's
Feb.- Mar.- April- May- June- July- Aug.- Sept.appetite for cotton goods ; and it is not unlikely that in the
Spot. Mar. April. May. June. July. Auej. Sept. Oct.
future, as in the past, buyers will act very conservatively when
middling American is at 7^d. At that figure the tendency will
7k
72i32
7k
7»16
Feb. 11
7k
71*32
was
44

.

—

_

%

.

Feb. 23
1
8
Mar. 10

7*ie

Mar.
Mar.

....

7k

£32

7k
7k

Z?32
/‘32

71132

7k
73s

71*32

£ie
7*8

7k«

73i6

COURSE OF THE MANCHESTER MARKET

7k

£"

be to tall back upon

T&t

happen
to the new American crop, in which ease th<* outlook
would have to be

7»m
71*32

£32

7H32

7k «

71°32

'1632 7716

FEB.

10 TO MARCH 10.

For about a week after the issue of our last report the Man¬
chester market continued active and buoyant at a further
advance in prices, but during the past three weeks there has

been a decided pause in the demand; and although there has
been no pressure to sell, prices have given way
to %d. per
lb. in yam and l%d. to 4}£d. per piece in 8%d lbs. shirtings
from the previous highest point. The tone at the close is dull,
the disinclination for business being rather increased by the

anticipation of inactive markets during the forthcoming
general election. The following are the present quotations for
specific qualities of yarns and piece goods compared with those
of

a

month since:

Mule Twist.

8k

71b.

16.

40’s.

30’s.

Water Twist.

30’s.

50’s 20’s.
!

Mar. 10.. 6s.©7s. 4kd- 6s. 9d.@8s. 7kd. 11 kd. 12kd. 14d.
11 kd. 12 kd. 14d.
Feb. 10. 6s.©7s. 4kd. 6s 9d.©8s. 9d.

*-•© ra# *d

„

These figures show
since

MOVEMENT DURING THE SEASON

OCTOBER

there is an excep¬

1 TO FEBRUARY 28.

The deliveries to English and Continental
the first five months of the season compare as

figures for the corresponding
1879-80.

1,355,570

Number of bales

Av’ge weight (lbs.)..

weight (lbs.)

..

-

450

spinners during

follows with the

months of last season

:

Continent.

Great Britain.
--

12kd.
12 kd.

that the advance gained after the 10th

been lost. In 32’s cop twist
to %d. per lb.
tional net advance of

Total

disaster should

some

regarded from an altered standpoint.
Gunny Bags, Bagg no, &c.—Bagging is being taken rather
more freely, though the orders continue small, but the inquiry is
increasing from the South, and a better demand is looked for
shortly. The firm price quoted for butts has the effect of stiffen¬
ing prices, and dealers are quotiug lO^c. for If lbs., 11c. for 2
lbs. and ll|c. for standard qualities. Butts are quiet and we do
not hear of any transactions except in a jobbing way. The recent
large sales have supplied the market and no fresh arrivals are
reported. Quotations are steady, and 3£(&3 9-16c. are the figures
at the close as to quality.
Comparative Port Receipts and Daily Crop Movement.—

comparison of the port movement by weeks is not accurate,
the weeks in different years do not end on the same day of the
month.
We have consequently added to our other standing
tables a daily and monthly statement, that the reader may con¬
A

as

Shirtings.

ult. has

reserved stocks, unless

•

stantly have before him the data for seeing the exapt relative
movement for the years named.
First we give the recei >ts at
each port each day of the week ending to-night.
PORT RECEIPTS FROM

D'ye New

Or¬
of
we’k leans.

1879-80.

1,091,050
439

1,115,920
436

1878-79.

1,005,960
426

610,006,500 478,970,950 485,541,12Q 428.921,370

Gal-

Char¬ Savan¬
leston.

vest’n.

nah.

Nor¬
folk.

Wil¬

All

ming¬ others.

Total.

ton.

"

866

206
15

418

285

871

239

427

385

423

5

899

7,410

356

1,106

1,187

91

963

698

143

775

781

50

2,304

7,433
7,699

3,805

3,500

4,654

5,579

606

5,877

53,419

59

637

595

Mon

6,667

943

460

818

1,264

Tues

121

837

959

295

520

629

Thur

4,360
4,254
2,721

356

653

Fri..

2,381

567

Tot.

27,057

2,341

The movement each month since Sept. 1 has been as

consumption in Great Britain has again increased
during the past month, and we now estimate it at 65,000 bales
of 400 lbs. pet week (or about 58,000 bales of 450 lbs.)- This

26, *80*

1,265
1,052

839

6,674

Bat.

Wed

1878-79.

Mo¬
bile.

SATURDAY, MAR. 20, '80, TO FRIDAY, MAR.

11,141
11,637
8,099

follows:

The rate of

equal to 260,000 bales, or 104,000,000 lbs.,
which, added to the 425,800,810 lbs. consumed to the end of Jan¬
uary, gives a total of 529,800,810 lbs;, as the consumption for the
first five months of the season, against 456,400,000 lbs. last sea¬
son, or an increase of 16 per cent.
The weight of goods and
yams exported in the five months was about 443,000,000 lbs.,
against 385,000,000 lbs., or an increase of 15 per cent, ^o that
our estimate of the consumption cannot be far astray.
The
rate of consumption on the Continent is perhaps a little larger
than it was last month, say 49,000 bales of 400 lbs., against
48,000 per week, or a total of 196,000 bales, equal to 78,400,000
lbs., which, added to the 340,000,000 lbs. consumed up to the
end of January, gives a total of 419,200,000 lbs. as the consump¬
tion for the five months, against 381,600,000 lbs. last season.
On the basis of the foregoing estimates, the movements for
the twenty-two weeks were as follows :
for four weeks is




.

Year

Receipts.

1877.

1878.

1879.

Bept’mb’r

333,643

28fe,848

October..
Decemb’r

888,492
942,272
956,464

January
February.

647,140
447,918

689,264
779,237
893,664
618,727
566,824

Novemb’r

Beginning September 1.
1876.

This statement

8626

sho#s

169,0W

98,491
578,533
822,493

236,868
675,260
901,392

900,119

787,769

610,316
740,116
821,177

689,610
472,054

500,680
449,686

479,801

Tot. year. 4,215,929 3,836,564 3,561,300 3,551,655

Pero’tage of tot. port
receipts Feb. 29. \

1875.

91-95

that up

87-95

637,067

1874.

134,376
536,968
676,295759,036
444,052
383,324

3,457,554 2,934,051
.

82-50

83-90

to^Feb. 29 the receipts at the

ports this year were 379,365 bales more than in 1878-79 and
654,629 bales more tb&n at the same time in 1877-78. By adding
to the totals to

February 29 the daily receipts since that time.

fHE CHRONICLE.

328
shall be able to reach
ment for the different years.
we

comparison of the move”

exact

an

[Vol. XXX.

Alexandria, Egypt,

Receipts (cantars*)—
1879-80.

1878-79.

1876-77.

1877-78.

Tot.Fb.29 4,215,9 29 3,836,564 3,561,300 3,551,655 3,457,554 >,934,051
44

2....

12.171

8.

44

3....

12.432

19,628

44

4....

19.653

44

3....

10,056
13,404

44

6....

7....

S.

44

8....
9....

16,415
6,724

“

10....

6,711

44

11....

44

12..*.

“

13....

-

13,767

8.

44

15....

13,435

44

16....

7,411

17....

6,660
4,150
10,248
11,141

44

18....

44

19....

44

20....

44

21..-.1

44

22..

S.

12,019

8.

7,531

7,453

18,579

8,718
13,897

16,441
10,397
11,024

6,427

8,072

10.584

S.

4‘23....

8,094

8.

44

24....

7,410

44

25....

7,433

13,707
8,851

13,681

44

26

7,699

11,185J

15.793

...

8,531
6,678
8,722
6,561

16,2^8

•

8,473
8.

19,179
11.487
14.234
13,992
14,644
11,210

11,637

8.

8.

8.298

10NL4

14....

44

8.

13,745
7,707

“

32,985
17,175
9,746
8,873
12,300
8,728

18,764
14,887

10,944

4,567

8.

7,947
9,860
15,631
12,430

9,829

44

6,325
9,782

17,754
9,868

10,547

16,279

8,903
10,947
14,779
10,928
10,617
8,240

7,842
12,518
12,817
10,411
8.

19,134
15,922
15,674
6,387
10,364
8,451

‘

13,681
12.118

9,247
12,365

•

•

8,391

8.

8,017

17.597

6,758
7,692

11,286
11,015
6,572
9,628
10,121

6,341
4,227
8.

7,229

8.

5,378

12,539

7,584
4,982
5,943

9,800

5,836

8.

8.

7,913
13,096
10,312
9,375
10,479

9,263
7,845
8.

14,581
5,923
7,439
7,989
8,265
5,279
8.

11,312
8,224

7,436
7,896
8,884

8.

7,428

Exports (bales)—
To Liverpool.........
To Continent
Total Europe
*

that the receipts since Sept. 1 up to

This statement shows

to-night are now 348,977 bales more than they were to the same
day of the month in 1879, and 5S0,407 bales more than they
were to the same day of the month in 1878.
We add to the last
table the percentages of total port receipts which had been
received to Mar. 26 in each of the years named.

which

are

now

collected for

us,

down to March 25.
BOMBAY RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOR FOUR TEARS.

Great
Conti¬
Brit’n. nent. Total. Britain.

Year Great

Conti¬

Total.

nent.

1880 14,000 8,000 22,000 86.000 120,000
1879
1.000 54,000 70,000
1,000
1878 17,000 7,000 24,000 115,000 154.000
1877 31,000 '20,000 51,000 151,000 117,000

This

8ince

Week.

Jan. 1.

206,000 48,000

359,000

124,000 37.000
269,000 40,000
268,000 62,000

240,000

406,000
394,000

According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show an increase
compared with last year in the week’s receipts of 11,000 bales, and
an increase in shipments of 21,000 bales, and the shipments »-ince
January 1 show an thcrease of 82,000 bales. The movement at
Calcutta, Madras, Tuticorin, Carwar, &c., for the same week and
years has been as follows.
Shipments this week.
Conti¬

Great
Britain.

nent.

Great
Britain.

Total.

Conti¬

1,000

i'ooo

53,000
63,000

4,000

4.000

40,000

6,000

46.000

15,000

36,000

The above totals for this week show that the movement from
tbe ports other than Bombay is 15,000 bales more than same week
of last year.
For the whole of India, therefore, the total

shipments this week and since January 1, 1880, and for the
corresponding weeks and periods of the two previous years, are
S£

follows.

to all Europe
from—

£L
Bombay
All. other ports.
Total

1880,

1879.

This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

22,000
15,000

206,000

37,000

259.000

This
week.

1,000

53,000

Since

This

Jap. 1.

week.

124,000

63,000
1,000

1878.

187.000

Since
Jan. 1.

24,000

269,000

1,000

36,000

25.000

305.000

This last statement affords a very interesting comparison of the
total movement for the week ending March 25, and for the three

jte&rs up to date, at all India ports.
Alexandria Receipts and
ments

we

Shipments.—Through arrange¬
Davjps, Benachi & Co., of

have made with Messrs.

Liverpool and Alexandria,

shall hereafter receive a weekly
Alexandria, Egypt. The
following are the receipts and shipments the past week and for
4,he corresponding weeks of the previous two years.
we

cable of the movements of cotton at




8,000 360,000

4,049 bales.
report received from Manchester
to-day (Mar. 26) states that prices of twists and shirtings are
steady, but the market is inactive.
We give to-day’s pricea
below, and leave previous weeks’ for comparison.
Manchester Market.—Our

1878-79.

1879-80.

Shirtings.

Twist.
d.

d.

8.

Jany.23 10%®1078
44

30 10%®11

6 11 ®11%
44
13 11%® 11-%
44
20 11%®12%
44
27 11%® 12
Mar.
5 113a® 12
Febv.

44

Cott’n
32s Cop.
Mid.
Twist.

8% lbs.

Cop.

32s

12 11%®11^
19 11
®11%
26 11 ®ll%

7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

d.
3
3
3
6
9
9
9
6

s.

®8
®8
®8
®S
®8

®8
®8

®8
41e@8
4%®8

'

Uplds

d.

d.

d.

d.

Cott*n
Mid.

Shirtings.

upia*

s.

d.

s.

7

778®8% 5

7.%® 7

7ii«

7%®8% 5

6

6

7%
7%
730

5
5

6

6
9
9
9
3
3
3

7^®8%
76s®81e
7%®83B
7%®814

7Bi6
73b
738
7%
738

'

8% lbs.

6
6

®7
®7
®7

6

d.

d.

7%
6

5^165%

7% 5%
7% .538

5
5
738®8% 5
73s®8% 5
758®8% 5

4%®7

7%

5&i«.

3

6

538

1%®7

4%

®7

3
4%

5Jie
5%-

778®838 15

4%®7

The Exports op Cotton from New

®7

0
3

®7

:

6

York this week‘ snow

a

compared with last week,, the total reaching
oaies against 10,590 bales last week.
Below we give our usual
table showing the exports of cotton from New York,- and theiT
direction, for #>ach of the last four weeks; also the total exports
and direction since Sept. 1, 1879, and in the last columo-the total
for the same period of the previous year.
,

as

New York since Sept. 1,1879.

Week

Exported to—

Mch.
3.

Mch.

Mch.
10.

17.

7,135

Total to Great Britain 12,378

7,135

•

\

9,353

834

Hamburg
Other ports

500

.......

663

1,334

239,289 187,274
6,706
4,812

»

|

245,995 192,086
19,522

lo-fa

19,522

10,551

0

21,742
13,037

to

2.324

13,325
2,202
635

37,103

16,162

<u

o

8.
537

535
39

100

Total to North. Europe

year.

•

i

period.
previous

0)

*

Bremen and Hanover....

Total to
date.

663

1,103
1,103

Mch.
24.

9,353

ports

Havre
;
Other French ports

Same

ending—

12,378

Liverpool.

Othp.r British

637

574

o

i
5.

Spain, Op’rto, GibraJt’r,&c

5,610
3,206

All other

•

Total

3,206

Spain, &c

5,610

•

Grand Total

14,815

305,826 224,400

7,772 10,590

The Following are the Receipts of Cotton at New York,.
Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore for the past week, andsiaceSeptember 1, 1879:
New York.

Receipts
from—

N. Orl’ans
Texas....
Savannah
Mobile...
Florida.
S.Car’lina
N Car’lina

This

Since

This

Sept. 1.

week.

2,087 140,658
89,510

'398 174,075

Virginia..

North, pts
Tenn.. &c.

Foreign..
This year.

"31-2

“358

5,500

.

| Philadelphia.

Boston.'

week.

103,397

| Since

jSept. 1.
23,545
2,869
35,953

This *
week.

8ince

Sept.l.

38,836
2,526 191,263
46
5,968
1,954 167,905
.

130

Baltimore.

This
week.

Since

Sept. 1-

5,279
2,575
161

14,896

3*056 52,960
■

1,290
......

65

31

134

ibi 44,479
1,886 126,133

......

700
134

9,651
9,603

703

69,499
.462.

1.981 132,107

759 56,050

15,000

4,376 366,407

920 78,865

4,592 157,184

9,327:256.631

3,022 68,930

2,538 132,680

2.855

7,587 919,967

Last year. 16,571

EXPORTS TO EUROPE FROM ALL INDIA.

Shipments

5,000 203,000

Total.

nent.

9,000
22,000
21,000

1,000

1879
1878.
1877

Shipments since January 1.

44,000
41,000
15,000

14,000

1880

4,049 416,297

This statement shows that the receipts for the week ending
Mar. 25 were 6,000 cantars, and the shipmehts to all Europe

CALCUTTA, MADRA8, TUTICORIN, CARWAR. RANGOON AND KURRACHKE.

Year.

4,000 218,000
4,000 142,000*

Total French

Receipts.

Shipments siuce Jan. 1.

Shipments this week

Since
This
week. Sept. 1.

2,000 141,000
3,000 62,000

all

Friday, of the shipments from Calcutta, Madras, Tuticorin, Carwar, &c., enable ns, in connection with our previously-received
leport from Bombay, to furnish our readers with a full and
•omplete India movement for each week. We first give the
Bombay statement for the week and year, bringing the figures

Since

Sept. 1.

2,000 269,750
2,049 146,547

Exports of Cotton (bales) from

Ports.—The figures
and forwarded by cable each

India Cotton Movement from

This
week.

•

Sept. 1.

A cantar is 98 lbs.

44

Total
4,447,669 4,098,692 3,867,262 3,713,328 3,707,007 3,156,212
Percentage of total
90 25
88-99
92-16
91-96
88-45
p*rt rBo’Dts Mar. 26

Since

This
week.

2,522,000"

.

Mar. 1

17,0OO~

11,000
1,535,000

6,000
3,196,000

This week....
Since Sept. 1

1874-75.

1875-76.

1878.

1879.

1880.

March 25.

741,794i

Shipping News.—The exports of cotton from the United
States the past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached
87,702 bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, theser
are the same exports reported by telegraph, and published in
the Chronicle last Friday.
With regard to New York, we
include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Wednesday

night of this week.

*"

Total bales.
New York—We are unable to obtain our New York figures in conse¬
quence of to-day, (Friday) being a holiday in the cotton market.
New Orleans—To Liverpool, per steamers Juana, 2,522
*t.

L<ouis, 3,220....Yrurae, 4,318
Chilian. 3,147....8yria,
5,034—Plantain, 4,675
Mediator, 4,100
Navigation,
3,040
MacGregor, 4,613
per ship Asiana, 4,431 ......
To Havre, per ship John Watt, 4.343.
To Bremen, per steamer Camellia, 1,289
per bark Schelde,
^
3,553
To Reval, per bark Triade Tarabochia, 3,490
To Helsingfors,per brig Tri Brata, 1,540
To Barcelona, per bark America, 300
.

To Genoa, per ship Ida Lilly, 1,462

,

39,100
4,343
4,842

3,490
1>510
300

1,462

Total Bales.

Charleston—To Liverpool, per barks Eleanor, 2,493 Upland—
v Minnie Gordon, 2,062 Upland
To Bremen, per bark Ida, 2,300 Upland
To Reval, per bark Kong Oscar, 1,380 Upland
Savannah—To Liverpool, per bark Lady Bussell, 2,564 Upland
and 20 Sea Island

Tq Bremen, per bark E. V. Alinquist, 1,850 Upland
To Amsterdam, per bark Florence Treat, 2,775 Upland
To Riga, per ship C. B. Hazeltine, 3,275 Upland
To Barcelona, per brig Maria Rosa, 630 Upland
,.
Texas—To Liverpool, per bark Jupiter, 2,134..
To Cork, for orders, per bark Reform, 1,464
To Genoa, per barks Edward Cushing, 1,900... .Pallais, 1,102
Baltimore—To Liverpool, per steamers Moravian, (additional)
570 and 218 bags
Nova Scotian, 538 and 470 bags Sea
ship Abercarne, 3,321
Liverpool, per steamers Marathon,

Island
Boston—To

per

Bulgarian, 1,087
Philadelphia—To Liverpool, per steamer

4,560
2,300
1,380
2,584

Saturday.

1,464

3,002
5,117
1,428
126

87,702

particulars of these shipments,
form, are as follows*
The

Cork. Havre.
4,343

N.Orleans...39,100
Charleston
4,560
Savannah... 2,594
Texas
...
2,134
Baltimore
5,117
Boston..
1,428
..

1,464

Total.

4,812
2,300

...» 5,030

1,850

2,775 3,275

1,462

1,380

....

55.077
8,240

7ll32®38
7**32

Mar.-Apr

7932

Apr.-May

7®32

Aug.-Sept..

'5>5ie'®ll32

June-July

761§

7932®m

Mar.-Apr

free her
Maria Louise, steamer, from Shreveport for New
board 1,537 bales cotton, sunk near the mouth of
18. She will probably be a total loss.
and cargo
at $100,000.

were valued

7

.....

6i5i»
.....7»32

Oct.-Nov
Mar

.738

Oct.-Nov

7

May-June

793#

Mar.-Apr

a.75»

June-July
July-Aug

71*32

Mar

71I32

Aug.-Sept

71332 Aug.-Sept..

7&i«

7%
.

/

Delivery.

'v

7113*

Aug.-Sept

May-June
7*4
June-July.. ..75is®932

79s2

Mar

Oct.-Nov

7&16

Delivery..
June-July
7&1®
July-Aug
7ii 32
Aug.-Sept
.7&i$
Mar.-Apr
June-July
7932
Oct.-Nov
6" 32

Delivery.

Delivery.
Mar.-Apr
Apr.-May
May-June
June-July
July-Aug

Orleans, having on
Red River, March

7113*

Thursday.

1,428

8,992 2,775 9,685 4,464 87.702
Included in the above totals are from New Orleans, 300 bales to Bar¬
celona, and from Savaunah, 630 bales to the same port.
Below we give all news received to date of disasters to vessels
carrying cotton from United States ports, etc.:
At TON, steamer (Br,), Robertson, from New Orleans, before reported,
entering a dock at Havre, March 2, the check rope broke and the
vessel collided with the quay wall, and sustained serious damage
to her bows and made considerable water. She was placed along¬
side the quay and the donkey engine was kept going continually to

7%
7*4#
7&i*

Delivery.

7*4®732 July-Aug

Apr.-May

Mar.

1,464 4,343

...

I Oct.-Nov

Delivery.

Mar

5,117
126

Boat

1

! July-Aug. 738®1132®38

16
May June... .7932 ®6ii
71132
June-July

6.600

3,002

126

Total...,55,049

.

Delivery.

I

Delivery.
Mar

11,114

....

7

Tuesday.

Delivery.

...

Philadelphia

.

Delivery.
Mar
Mar.-Apr
| Apr.-May
I

Wednesday.

Riera. Genoa.

dam.

men.

Oct.-Nov

d.

7i3j*

Monday.

Delivery.
Mar
71832
738'@i332/27i6 Aug.-Sept
738
71*32 Sept.-Oct
Mar.-Apr
73s
Apr.-May ..7&i6®1132 May-June
.71*32
June-July.... 738@1332 Mar
7H32
July-Aug
7i332 May-June
Delivery.

Reval,
Aras- Helsingter- fors <fc

Bre-

Liver¬

arranged in our usual

Delivery.
Sept.-Oot

Delivery.
d.
May-June
viisa^ss
738®i*32
Mar.-Apr... .7516®n82 June-July
738d>i332
Apr.-May
7&i®® D32 July-Aug
738® 13s*

Mar

2,134

Indiana, 126..’.

Liverpool for the same week are riven
basis of Uplands, Low Middling ofause,

d.

Delivery.

630

300.,..Iowa,

Total

'

The aotual sales of futures at
below. These sales are on the
unless otherwise stated.

1,850
2,775
3,275

41

pool.

329

THE CHRONICLE.

27, 1880.]

March

'u32

-""32
731C
7732®14
7!4®932
7932

7&\6
74

Aug.-Sept
Sept.-Oct

7*4

Mar.-Apr
July-Aug

7516
714
7932

Apr.-May
May-June
Friday.

Good

Friday—Holiday

BREADSTUFFS.
Friday, P. M.,

There has been a further

grades of flour.

March 26, 1880.

and material decline in prices

of all

The demand has been limited, and holders
the necessity of making repeated reductions

Boston, had have been under
in prices to effect sales. Many buyers withdrew till the market
Bkn Lomond, ship (Br.), at Liverpool, March 6, from New Orleans,
reported: On Feb. 12, lat. 40, N., Ion. 42, W., blowing a hurricane, should become more settled. The depression was caused mainly
the foretopmast was cut away to save the ship, which carried away
jibboom, maintopgallantmast and nearly all attached, and portions
by the decline in wheat, but supplies increased, and there was
of bulwarks on both sides.
Eurydice, ship (Br.), at Liverpool, March 8, from Norfolk, lost rudder much
anxiety to reduce stocks in store. Yesterday the market
on Feb. 18.
John Murphy, ship, at Havre, from New Orleans, before reported, also
was dull and weak.
grounded while entering Havre harbor, and would be docked to
have her bottom sighted.
The wheat market shows a material decline, under pressure
Themis, bark (Br.), Jordan, from Savannah for Bremen, before reported
spoken 80 miles west of Cape St. Vincent, with rudder broken and to sell. The lower prices have had but little influence in stimu¬
short of provisions, arrived at Cadiz, March 21.
Maroh 1, lat. 45, N., Ion. 32, W., there was passed a bale of cotton,
lating the export demand, because there has been a nearly
apparently not long in water.
Cotton freights the past week have been as follows:
equal advance in rates of ocean freights. The large stocks
and favorable prospects of the Autumn-sown crop have en¬
FrL
Wednes. Thurs.
Tues.
Mon.
Satur.

Palestine, steamer (Br.), at Liverpool, Maroh 18, from
heavy weather, and had her deck-houses damaged.

r

Do
sail...if.
c.
Havre, steam

sail

Do

sail
sail

sail

Do

a

0

*2

O

%

*8

recovery, but it was only partially
was a steadier but rather quiet

sustained. Yesterday

market, the latest call
being omitted, except that No. 1 white was active at a sBght
Indian

d. 716® l632 716®1532 716®1532 716®1532 7ig®1532
d.

some

decline.

®

...®

couraged large sales for future delivery at the decline. On
Tuesday No. 1 white closed at $1 37@$1 37% for April
and $1 34%(a)$l 34% for May, and No. 2 red Winter $1 42%
for April and $1 39% for May.
On Wednesday there was
there

50®...*

*2-

^8
...-®

...ft

>.

‘3

5s®...*

hi

%

%

5g® ...*
hi
V

*2

38®-..*

hi

...e.

3ie
58®...*
V

58®...*

®8®...*

316

hi

*2

sail.-.c.

Baltic, steam

•*

5q*

V

A rust'd’m, steam, c.

Do

-.

*2

c.

Hamburg, steam c.
Do

®8®

*2

c.

Bremen, steam, .c.
Do

»16
*8® —*

S16
®8®..."

732®14

732®14

732® *4
316

Liverpool, steam d. 7^2® *4

corn

also shows a

No. 2 sail-mixed

material decline, and on Wednesday

sold at 56@56%c. on

the spot, 52%c. for April

and 50%c. for May; steamer No. 2, on the spot, sold at 54%c.
following Yesterday there was very little change, but the close was weak.
Rye has been dull, and is nominally lower. For barley, prices
are pretty well sustained, and recent sales aggregate about
Mar.
25.
Mar. 19.
42,000 100,000 bush., mostly Canada, at 94c. for No. 1 and $1 05 for
31,000
35,000 No. 1 bright.
22,000
Oats quite broke down early in the week, No. 2
14,000
25,000
2,000 graded touching 42c. for both mixed and white, and No. 2 mixed
3,000
3,000 sold at 41 %c. for April and 39%c. for May. Yesterday the
1,000
578,000 573,000

Liverpool.—By cable from Liverpool, we Lave the
statement of the week’s sales, stocks, &c., at that port:
Mar. 5

...hales.
Sales of the week
Forwarded
Sales American
Of whioh exporters took....
Of whioh speculators took.:
Total stock—Estimated
Of whioh American—Estim’d
Total import of the week
Of which Afherioan
Actual export
Amount afloat
Of which American

42,000
18,000
32,000
7,000
4,000
521,000
386,000
65,000
45,000
6,000

334,000
284,000

Mar. 12.

45,000
14,000
33,000
4,000
5,000
576,000
429,000
109,000
87,000
5,000
313,000
230,000

.

421.000

419,000

55,000
31,000
4,000
345,000

i

264,000

256,000

50,000

44,000
4,000
3o0,000

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and futures each day of the
week ending March 25, and the daily closing prices of spot eotton, have
been as follows:

Saturday Monday. Tuesday. Wednes. Thursd’y

Spot.
MsrVst
12:30 p.m.

)

J

Mid. Upl’ds
Mid. Orl’ns.

Market,
5

p.m..

{
5

Active
and
firmer.

Mod. inq.

freely
supplied.

Easier.

Steady.

738

77is

77is

7*8

73s

77is

7*2

7*2

77l61.

77iq

Firmer &

fr’ction’ly
dearer.

Sales

8,000

Spec.& exp.

1,000

—

—

—

15,000
2,000

,

—

8,000

8,000

8,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

Friday.
t

♦H

f

-I£

Market,
P.M.




l

5

Firm.

Flat.
1

Quiet
.

DUt

Steady.

Quiet.

steady.

1

•

4

and No. 2 graded

both mixed and white.
The Produce Exchange was

day.
The

following are closing

$ bbl. $3 30®
Superfine State and

No. 2

4 50®

Western

Spring wheat extras..

5 10®

Winter shipp’g extras.
do XX and XXX...
Minnesota patents...

5 85®

XXX...

City shipping extras.
Southern,

bakers’ and

5 50®

5 20®

quoted at 42%@42%c. for

closed to-day, it being Good FrU

quotations:

FLOUR.

do XX and

•a

Futures.

market was weak,

410

/
GRAIN.

Wheat—

# bu.$l 30
1 34
4 90
Amber winter... 136
5 40 Red winter, No. 2 1 43
6 75
White
136
5 70
No. 1 white
6 85 Com—West, mixed 139
54

6 50® 7 50

5 20® 5 75

No. 3 spring,
No. 2 spring

West’n No. 2, new
Western Yellow..
Western White...

6 00® 7 00 Rye
5 40® 5 85 Oats—Mixed
4 70® 5 00
White
W.
2 65® 3 00 Barley—Canada
State, 4-rowed...
Brandywine,Ac..., 5 20® 3 25
State, 2-rowed...

family brands
South’n ship’g extras.
Rye flour, superfine..
Com meal—
Western, <fee

_

•Af»

®132
®1 36
®1 43
®1 43*a
®1 40
®1 39i*
®

55 %®
56 ®
®
®
®

56ift
56
58
59

94
4a

® 46
®l 05

80

®
9

70

®

95

330

THE CHRONICLE,
(From the “ yew York Produce Exchange Weekly.”)

Receipts of floui>and grain at Western lake and river ports
or the week ending Mar. 20, 1880 :
Flour,
At—

bbls.
(196 lbs.)

Chicago

44,619

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit

45,915

Wheat,

Corn,

bush.

Oats,

bush.

bush.

24,057
4,375

(60 lbs.)
(56 lbs.)
183,428 1,436,398
144,974
69,700
205,317
174,812
107,353
11,712
6,750
23,350
91,817
632,065
6,850
524,250

Total
125,720
Same time *79. 113,869

746,489 2,872,287
921,091 1,126,077

4,879

Cleveland
8t. Louis
Peoria
Duluth

1,875

Total receipts at same ports from
for four years:
1880.

.

Barley,

Rye,

bush.

bush.

(32 lbs.) (48 lbs.) (56 lbs.)
326,604 28,259 11,590
42,418 22,800
9,227
5,902
202
1,693 10,451
112
6,400
1,450
1,000
43,377 28,023
5,076
105.200 19,000 15,300

531,594 109,983
626,269 92,946

42,507

45,493

Jan, 1 to Mar. 22, inclusive,

1879.

1878.

1877.

Flour

bbls.

1,203,524

1,381,346

1,329,075

970,469

Wheat
Corn
Oats

bush.

9,162,647
28,449,793
4,493,985
1,545,107
536,029

13,631,397
16,114,652
4,749,650
1,551,815
668,966

11,980,409
12,871,665
4,199,982
1,903,021
690,803

3,671,869
13,317,843
2,947,470
1,355,375
471,911

Barley
Rye

44,187,561

Total grain....

36,716,480

Tojal receipts (crop movement) at the

31,646,889

21,764,468

same ports

from Ang. 1

to Mar. 22, inclusive, for four years:
1879-80.

1878-79.

1877-78.

1876-77.

bbls.

3,530,349

4,232.702

4,101,469

3,564,161

bush.

71,547,077
72.951,423
18,907,419
9,411,986
3,488,017

69,720,261
56,182,047
21,610,632
8,593,591
1,625,309

55,466,700
47,961,281
8,381,881

33,064,854
52,067,744
13,993,260
7,421,025

2,667,620

2,329,395

176,305,922

157,731,840

131,089,021

108,876,278

Flour
Wheat
Cora
Oats

Barley
Rye
Total grain

....

16,611,539

Comparative shipments of flour and grain from the
ports from Jan. 1 to Mar. 20, inclusive, for four years:
1879.

1880.

Flour....

.

..bbls.

Wheat...
Com
Oats

1878.

same
1877.

968,610

1,482.144

1,340,571

818,357

3,317,008
15,405,861
2,865,351
807,425
395,316

6,408,527
8,394,724
3,183,857
1,102,149
315,604

10,393,662
9,103,160
2,532,088
1,083,866
415,805

1,653.094
6,671,775
1,713,169

[Vol. XXX.
Wheat,

In Store at—

Corn,

bush.

Toledo
Detroit

1,241,852
1,613,747

522,421
3,625

Oswego

260,000
709,855

125,000

St. Louie
Boston
Toronto
Montreal (15th)..

106,722

333,377
123,215
494.048
7,703
188,981

Philadelphia
Peoria

Indianapolis
Kansas City

46,283
520,054
932,678

Baltimore
Rail shipments...
Lake shipments..
Total
Mar. 13, ’80
Mar. 6, ’80
Feb. 28. ’SO
Feb. 21, ’80
Mar. 22, ’79

Oats,

bush.

1,454,344
354,054
88,595
389,758
344,460
161,015
164,361
460,414

2,294,687

bush.
91,869
18,289

2,000
197,251
50.533
22.350

•

131,721
.

98,506
160,442
143,895

Barley,

■bush.

29,000
2,855

5,818

410,000

4,0*)0

32,809

42,468
4^318

13,980

%

124,771
8,971

37,678

827

52,565

.

726

5,272

3,848

354,439

73,614

15,599,088 2,914,671
14,979,402 2,847,509
14,970,644 2,804,575
15,621,190 2,909,694
28,179.959 15,524,733 3,009,925
20,090,441 13,15.0,646 2,271,434

2,638,464

25,864,237
27,046,506
27,259,552
28,034,716

Rve,

bush.

39,132

775,281
3,470,690 820 612
3,509,077
831,162
3,687.191
900.050
3,768.721
915,945
3,139,438 1,238,595

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
Friday, Pi M., March 26, 1880.

The

past week has witnessed

a

lull-in the demand for

most

descriptions of dry goods at first hands, and operations were
more nearly of a hand-to-mouth character than at
any time
since the opening of the Spring trade. There was, however, a

steady moyement in

many kinds of seasonable goods on account
orders, and the tone of the market, if less buoyant
than of late, was at least firm, and stocks of manufactured
goods are so light that the stability of prices seems to be
assured for some time to come. The jobbing trade has shown
less animation than for weeks past,* and while department
goods were fairly active there was less inquiry for domestics
and prints, most of the larger retailers having supplied their
of former

immediate wants.
Domestic Cotton Goods.—The exports of cotton

goods hence
(to markets abroad) during the week ending March 23 aggre¬
819,967
Barley..
gated 1,517 packages, of which 679 were shipped to Great
Rye
217,211
Britain, 254 to Chili, 205 to U. S. of Colombia, 153 to Mexico,
Total grain
22,790,961
19,404,861
23,528,581
11,075,219 57 to Dutch West
Indies, 52 to Venezuela, 45 to Brazil, &c.
Rail shipments from same ports for the last four weeks:
The market for cotton goods ruled steady, but (as indicated in
Week
Oats,
Flour,
Corn,
Wheat,
Barley,
Rye,
last report) the upward tendency of prices has been checked by
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
ending—
bbls.
Mar. 20
932,678 2,294,687
354,439
99,392
73,614 39,132 the lessened demand and the decline
tendency in the staple.
Mar. 13
356.836
114,784
383,194 1,741,181
84,496 27,345
Mai*. 6
220,380 1,729,023
102,472
242,196
73,306 20,311 Brown cottons were in moderate request by jobbers ancLcon203.506 1,818,360
Feb. 28
198,423
105,301
65,660 34,205
verters, but bleached cottons were a trifle sluggish, and trans*
actions
in colored cottons were mainly restricted to small pur¬
Total, 4 w’ks.421,949 1.739.758 7,583,251 1.151.894
297,076 120,993
4 weeks ’79..559,897 2,684,992 3,293,831 1,397,370
364,169 110,550 chases of the various makes. Print cloths were 'quiet and easier
Receipts of flour and grain at seaboard ports for the week on the basis of 5%@5%c. for 64x64 spots, 5/£c. for 64x64s. for
ended Mar. 20:
July to October delivery, and 5@5 l-16c. for 56x60s—“ futures,r
Corn,
Wheat,
Oats, Barley, Rye,
Flour,
and “spots.” Prints moved slowly, and selections were mostly
bush.
bush.
bbls.
hush.
bush.
At—
busb.
New York
514,786 1,239,841 317,916 19,736
74,161
6,189 confined to small
parcels of the newest work; but prices remained
1 L,525
2.700
Boston
36,708
287,817 55,900
1.500
55,000
Portland
4,200
31,500
2,500
steady and unchanged. Wide printed cottons, lawns and
7,800
Montreal
6,666 *1,000
440
4,427
77,000
596,600 43,600 16,000 10,400 piques were in steady demand, and ginghams and cotton dress
10,200
Philadelphia...
—

..

..

..

..

..

Baltimore
New Orleans...

19.003

..

16,618

..

228,200
47,566

667,400

442,316

35,200
6,478

3.800

Total week...
165.317
941,877 3,205.504 467,260 41.936
Cor. week ’79.... 216,194 1,637,450 *2,218,572 568,783 106,192
..

20.829

93,477

And from Jan. 1 to Mar. 20, inclusive, for four years:
1879.

1880.

1878.

1877.

bbls.

1,962,728

2,284,508

1,939,418

1,492,211

Wheat...... bush.
Corn
Oats

8,090,205
24,243,473
3,821,432
1,133.212

17,096.859
20,649,282
3,645,377
1,054,769

15,042,817
21,178,327

,223,858

532,862

627,804

1,378,049
16,519,566
2,958,068
772,658
246,716

37,512,180

42,979,149

41,559,021

21,875,057

Flour

Barley

Kye..
Total grain....

3,028,057
1,682,016

Exports from United States seaboard ports and from Montreal
Mar. 20:

for week ending

Flour,
From—
New York*....

bbls.

Wheat,

Corn,

bush.

bush.

bush.

Oats,

Rye,
hush.

586,755
<222,413

1,236

4,116

Total for w’k
Jam© time ’79.
*

bush.

60,470

1,256,992

18,079

3,321

156,641
54,491

2,928
11,033

57,265

467,274

474,220

965,234

1,999,609
1,820,029

2,271,676

2,454

4.116

18,421

1,867,748

4,345

«915

26,436

95,831

116,817

9,235 bush, barley.

12,500 bush, barley.

10,421

Domestic Cotton Goods.—The condition of the market for
woolen goods has not materially changed. Prices continued
very firm on all desirable makes of clothing woolens, blankets,
flannels, carpets, &c., and stocks in first hands are exceedingly
light, many makes being heavily sold in advance of production. •
The business of the week in woolen goods was comparatively
quiet, owing to the fact that so many makes of goods are sold
ahead, but there was a large movement on account of former

orders.

Cotton-warp cassimeres

were

sought for in considerable

quantities, but transactions were checked by the light supply
offering, and there was a moderate demand for all-wool fancy
cassimeres and cheviot

suitings.

Worsted coatings were

a

trifle

less

active, but the full products of the leading mills have
already been disposed’ of, and prices are very fftm. Overcoat¬

8,odd ings ruled quiet, and cloths and doeskins were lightly dealt in.
For Kentucky jeans and satinets there was only a moderate

30,000

Montreal

Philadelphia.

Peas,

goods continued active in both first and second hands.

1,218

inquiry, and transactions in flannels, blankets and carpets were
mostly confined to making deliveries in execution of back
orders. Worsted dress goods were in fair request, but shawls
remained very quiet.

Foreign Dry Goods.—There was an irregular demand for
the stocks in granary
gr^tin, com
of accumu ion at lake and seaboard imported goods at first hands, but prices ruled steady. Dress
ports, and in transit by lake and rail, Mar. 20, was as follows:
goods were in fair request, and fine black and colored silks met
Wheat,
Corn,
Oats,
Barley,
Rye,
with considerable sales; but low grade silks and Pekin's were
bush.
bush.
bush.
In Store at—
bush.
bush.
New York
273,232
3,550,349
216,403 348,919
114,246
Do. afloat (est.)
651,000
511,000 272,000 150,000
26,000 quiet, owing to the fact that retailers have lately been enabled
78,000
46L806F to supply their immediate wants through the medium of the
1,000
12.000
190,000
Albany
Buffalo
12,760. 168,440
519,019
259,516
38,830
Chicago
8,885,689 5,417,685 939,746 563,366 229,776 auction rooms. Linen and white goods and laces and embroid¬
Do
afloat,-,.
1202,329 2,382,533
77,368
eries, were in moderate request, and there was a fair movement
Milwaukee
5,206,336
205,388
47,099 520,912 123,804
in hosiery and gloves.
Duluth
270,000
175,000
t
■ -1-*

The visible supply of
at the principal points




.

.

Receipts of Leading Articles of Domestic Produce.

Importalloufl of Dry Goods.

importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending
corresponding weeks of 1879 anc
1878, have been as follows:
The

March 25, 1880, and for the

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK ENDING MARCH

Value.

Pkgs.

$

Manufactures of—
•

Value.

Pkgs.

530
956
588
867
386

Wool
Cotton
Silk
Flax

Miscellaneous

3,327 1,252,613

Total

WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE AND

799

Pkgs.

322>932
454,259
559,220
327,426
168,516

1,567
864

1,503
4,592

Value.

$

$

^

222,444
295,450
403,275
198,732
132,712

25, 1880.

1880.

1879.

1878.

1,128
1,800
1,115
1,897
992

9,325 1,832,353
THROWN INTO

459,686
546,951
738,463
406,372
269,596

6,932 2,421,068

THE

MARKET

The

following table, based upon daily reports made to the
Exchange, shows the receipts of leading
articles of domestic produce in New York for the week ending
with Tuesday last (corresponding with the week for exports)
also the receipts from January 1,1880, to that day, and for the
corresponding period in 1879:
New York Produce

Week ending
March 23.

449
283
118
592

Flax

111,413

129,474
60,615

6,316

Miscellaneous

559,614
7,782
3,327 1,252,613

Total
Ent’d for consnmpt.

369
184
08
411

183,973
83,137

314
153
98
483

151,031
54,062
83,489
86,399
83,052

4,200

2,209

458,033
5,262
9,325 1,832,353

3,257 385,060
6,932 2,421,068

946

1,714

2,354

14,637

20,106

Flour, wheat.

bbls.

78,280

899,382

Corn meal

bbls.

1,481

21.099

1,220,824
44,590*

Wheat

bush.

687,202

3,145,853

Rye

bush.

25,462
1,512,321
260,780
115,770
24,390
10,385

109,795
6,794,799
2,184,591
1,1U6,788
127,817

5,823,192'
1,827,768.
1,051,543
124,952:

315,214

274,916-

1,605

9,457
2,820

bv.sh.
bush.

Corn
Oats

bush.

Barley and malt

bush.
bales.
bbls.

Peas

Cotton
Cotton seed oil
Flax seed
Grass seed

on

market... 11,115 1,812,227 14,587 2,290;386 10,189 2,806,128

Hides

538
195
149

408
251

Flax

Miscellaneous

395
172
133
317
152

211,294
54,482
125,173
86,523

35,066

165,930
40;482
123,501
69,049

-

‘255

°113
110
413

•

2,115

36,245

101,903
29,061
93,340
100,968
60,036

Total
Ent’d for conaumpt.

1,511
512,538
3,327 1,252,613

1.169
435,207
9,325 1,832,353

3,006
385,30S
6,932 2,421,068

Total at the port...

4,868 1,765,151 10,494 2,267,560

9,938 2,806,376

Imports of Leading Articles.

The following table, compiled from Custom House returns,
shows the foreign imports of leading articles at this port since

China, Ac.—
China
Earthenw

Class
Glassware.
Glass plate.
Buttons

7,577

Coal, tons...
Cocoa, bags.
Coffee, bags.
CottoUjbales
Drugs, Ac—
Bark, Peru.
Blea. iKiwd.

9.333

1,543
3,533

12,160
552,931
1,579

Rosin
Tar

Oil, lard
Oil, whale

.

.

.

Gum, Arab.

Indigo
Madder, Ac

Flax

2.795

Gunny cloth

1,414
4,263

Hair

Hemp, bales
Hides, Ac.—

Ivory
Jewelry,Ac.

Hardware...

13,227

25,822

20,669

37,625

7,936

Nuts........
Raisins

147,767
600,547
247,578
300,916

266 Hides, undr.
1,090 Rice

159,704
586,004
208,073
305,812

7,464,210
51,734

2,733,570

57,481

76,364
41,546
131,112
70,489

Oranges

.

...

io;3u

17,176

12,325 Spices, Ac.—
198

15,958
130,065
93,695

•651
Pepper....
146 Saltpetre

...

146,716 Woods—

7,024

1,871

1,250

401

159

t.

Cork
Fustic

Logwood

..

Mahogany.

131,095
11,376
208,777
40,194

100,638
31,306

217,658
34,912

Exports of Provisions.
following are the exports of provisions from New York,
Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Montreal, Portland and New
.

rhe

Fork,

To—

Beef,

bbls.

bbls.

London

824

Liverpool....

926

522

764

Glasgow

410

1,274

Cardiff

360
200

Bristol

Newcastle
Hull

...

*

Hamburg..,.

Rotterdam...
Bremen
Denmark....
Havre
Marseilles.
French ports.
Spain

788
150

.

*

16

Mexico
S. Am. ports.

Hayti

ouba
;;;
W.I. ports...

B. N. A. Ool..
Oth’r countr’s

Total week..




Bacon,

lbs.

lbs.

1,291,035
1,326,815
194,880
74,900

25
53
375

340

“i 00

'

374,700
178,310

605,625
507,775

42%400

953,375
522,700
295,925
1,289,233

141,283
1,429

123,793
6,429

bush.

2,08*7

29,570

33,035-

pkgs.

3,7*23
42,406

22,999
10,003
470,476

78,955*

pkgs.
pkgs.

Cutnieats
Butter
Cheese

13,335
6,000
24,801
12,105
2,651
1,445
1,874

pkgs.

pk^s.
bbls.

tea. & bbls.

kegs.

No.
pkgs.
slabs.
r...pkgs.

Rice

Stearine.

Sugar
Tallow..
Tobacco
Tobacco

682

:

...bbls.

boxes &

Whiskey

135,911
134,149
25,490
39,765
21,264 '

.

bhds.

2,480
3,139
1,628

bbls.

7,104

242,677
8.876

49,610
10,412
33,351
8,822

11,359
4,095
71

814

6,381
24,865
39,114
12,162
76,169
5,113

23,980
30,256
28,743
7,630
88,87 L
11,058

......

pkgs.

bales.

Wool.

105,296

586
197
4

cases.

226.488

’

blids.

13,075

540,127.
273,698
273,566
79,474

89

Exports ot Leading Articles of Domestic Produce.

following table, based upon Customhouse returns, shows
exports from New York of all leading articles of domestic
produce for the week ending witji Tuesday last; also the exports,
from the 1st of January, 1S39, to the same day, and for the cor¬
responding period in 1379:
.

The

the

Week ending Since Jan. 1,
March 23.
1880.v

Ashes, pots
Ashes, pearls
Beeswax

Same time
last year.

bbls.
bbls.

308
67

lbs.

21,983

12,700

72,927

816,214

30

692,506
2.502
38,186
8,690,018

.

463

.

42

532.500

i 2*2

****54

1,577

13,435
222,903

4,881

61

33,600

1,700

572
135
314

409,800
9-,66 4
17,847
129,838

2,709
25,087
9,356
47,951
71,034

bbls.
.bbls.

Corn meal
Wheat

bbls.
bush.

Rye

bush.

Oats

bush.

Barley

....bush.

Peas
Corn
Candles
Coal
Cotton
Domestics

bush.
bush.

pkgs.
tons.
bales.

pkgs.
bales.
bales.

Hay..
Naval Stores—
Crude turpentine

7,440,732

4,216
1,334
10,649
14,019
490,344
2,294

414,481
34,463
198,109
77,817

704,542

5,660,393

6,705,273

41,103
21,712
127,287

13,604

1,994

15,422

11,591
1,787
2,159

74,946
22,265
21,050
1,785

i

16,430
19,100
69,006
27,950
9,716

2,332

10 0
2,420

580,000

Rosin

bbls.

9,962

46,950

34,677

262,300

Tar
Pitch

bbls.
.....bbls.
cwt.

229
313

1,289
1,213

1,820

18,087

378,805

155,424

Oil cake
Oils—
Whale

.gals.
gals.
-..’.gals.
gals.
gals.

Sperm

93,500
124,000

Lard....
Linseed
Petroleum

^Provisions—
*
8,000
45,449

100,361

4,707

Pork
Beef.
Beef
Cutmeats
Butter
Cheese
Lard
Riee

14,673

1,782

bbls.
bbls.

....tierces,
lbs.
lbs.

288

288

61,058
111,744
7,152
66,157,608

260,873
1,900
30,829,023

51,544

59,565-

7,623
970

4,109,727
5,147
1,042
2,862

14,344,950

lbs.

295,740
188,064
6,759,564

bbls.

148

lbs.
.lbs.

3,334,003
328

Tobacco.:.. .hales and case#.

781

Tobacco,Manufactured, lbs.

204,136

Tobacco, leaf.
Whalebone

675,011 2,756,227

.

lbs.

1,241

419,616

19,661

.hhds-

Tallow

35,725

1,292,670

159

14,640

2.817
1,922
1,008

6,970

1,061
35,374

bbls.
bbls.

200

15.600

Flour, wheat
Flour, rye

Spirits turpentine

142.500

47,240

5,692|

lbs.

30,875

151,983

7,912

Tallow,

^37,300
148,779

836,125

32,000
204,103
307,280
223,680

99

794

496

18,122

Beef...*

Hops

43,980
16,020

768,075
*

200

747

lbs.

1,438,171

190,500

237,260

.Cheese,

7,633,159
723,900
706,550

70,250

123,714

*102 1,985,037

..

Cent*! Amer..

-

Lard,

796

pkgs.

5,916

bbls.

Spelter

332.

9,917
61,213
6,479

370

..galls.

Hogs, dressed

69,506*

bbls.

.

Lard
Lard

20,740
968,488
375,691
4,941

.

Breadstuff's—

OnAAia.

Ginger....

51,640
10,693

Cutlery

23,123

91,395

215

Molasses....
Metals, Ac—

151

119,331

799

.

315

153,693

..

645

Jewelry...

261,927
17,531

16,620
214,822

1,161
39,779

2,942
19,061

500,950

374,637
23,794

$
328,880

....

Hides,dr'sd

750,363

$

544 Fish..
1,497 Fruits, &e.—
100
Lemons

663

.

106,384

422,636

value.

5,815 Cigars
13,249 Corks
15,055 Fancy gqpds

55,806

India rubber

Watches
Linseed

205

3.352

Fii^s

..

0,729 Reported by

179

..

9,973
18,0 L6
2,040

Bristles

13,631
Champ’gne
1,253
baskets..
1,325 Wines
1,200 Wool, bales.

10,813

Opium
Soda, bi-cb.
Soda, sal...
Soda, ash..
..

6,088
a,550
13,549
2,333
2,107
483

Oil, Olive..

109,591

1,025
15,937
67,439

79,380
55,878
40,318

7,265
1,286

Peanuts
Provisions—
Pork

2,186
253,723
15,112

10
592

8,841,044
243,212

•

*..bbls.

Pitch.:
Oil cake

1879.

253,736
3,231,481
28,347

bbls.
ibis.

*.

Sugar

Tea
9,036 Tobacco....
3,057 Waste
700 Wines, Ac.—

8,425

Cochineal..
Gambier

16,123
1,786,417
106,276
389,772
8,579,394
63,483

36,132

Turpentine, spirits... bbls.

Eggs

Metals, Ac2,216 Lead, pigs.
7,365 Spelter, lbs
43,812 Steel
7,725 Tin, boxes.
1,007 Tin sibs.Jbs
2,757 Paper Stock.
7,019 Sugar, hhds,
7,725 tcs., A bbls.
516,796 Sugar, boxes
3,870 and bags...

2,988
10,749
122,120

.

1880.

396

...pigs.
hhds.

Turpentine, crude

same period in 1879:
|Tke quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified. |
1879.

bbls.

sides.

Lead
Molasses
Molasses
Naval Stores—

January 1, 1880, and for the
1880.

783,427
22,228

1,881
3,724
1,376

bales.

^

Leather

Manufactures of—
Wool
Cotton
Silk..

572

67,554
6,324

7

No.
bales.

Hops

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSE DURING 8ASIE PERIOD.

9,729
3,550
53,537
36,522
13,591
: 4,670

bags.
bags.

Hides

Total

75'

Same time
last year.

1,

Breadstuff's—

DUR-

121,453
37,161
85,198
102,713
38,535

Since Jan.
1880.

bbls.
bbls.

Ashes
Beaus

ING THE 8AME PERIOD.

Manufactures of—
Wool
Cotton
Silk

331

CHRONICLE.

THE

Makch 27, It 80.

8,312

14,24924,341
.

11,174

1O,40L

17,261
136,090,949
■. 4,886,140
11,501,028
58,002,274

10,615*

",

200,610,056

24*,596877

2,783

68,817,933
4,181

16,173,856

18,923,297

"V

15,670
11,553
1,816,539
36,499

11,72*

—

1.502
15,895

Financial.

Financial.

jfamesM. Drake & Co.

John F. Zebley, Jr.,

Financial.

CO.

UNION TRUST
Wo. 73

HAS SPECIAL

Transfer

rT..

-

-

$1,000,000.

-

FACILITIES FOR ACTING AS

Agent and
Registrar of Stocks.

Authorized by law to act as Executor,
tor, Guardian, Receiver, or Trustee, and

11

Vice-President.

3. H. Ogilvie, 2d

Augustus Schell,
E. B. WE8LKY,

G. Gn Williams,

A. O.

TIATION OF

Coleman Benedict & Co.

RONALDSON, Secretary.

Brooklyn Trust Co.
& Clinton sts., Brooklyn,

Cor. of Montague

N. Y.

special charter to

This Company is authorized by
act as receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, or ad¬
ministrator.
It can act as agent in the sale or management of
real estate, collect interest or dividends, receive

AND

•

;

CHAS. R. MARVIN,

PINE

7

Thomas Sullivan, Abm.

Alex. McCue,
A A. Low,

Dodge, Potter & Co.,

r

Cash paid at once

they will.be sold on
JA8. L. Anthony,
Henry W. Poor.

York.

10

BONUS

All classes of negotiable securities bought
sold at the 8tock Exchange on Commission.
vances made on same.

and
Ad¬

B. Hinckley,
L. M. Jones,
Member N. Y.
Member N. Y.

Exchange.

Geo. A. Mercer.
J.

C.

RANKERS
COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS,
7 Exchange Court and 52 Broadway.
Interest allowed on deposits, to be drawn at will
Also, Contracts made and carried in New York
Cotton and Produce Exchanges. We issue a Daily
Latter which will be sent on application.

Buttrick & Elliman,
BROKERS,
No. 2 Nassau Street, Now York.
BONDS, STOCKS and INVESTMENT SECURITIES
BANKERS AND

No.

given to Mining Stocks.

Frank F. Dickinson.

and Mining Exchanges.

Kimball, Howell & Co.,
C. H. Kimball,

J. P. Howell, N. P. Henderson,

y

Members N. Y. Stock

68

Exchange,

BROADWAY AND 17 NEW ST.,
Bur, Sell and Carry on

Exch’ge.

Exch’ge.

Banking Business, buy and sell

Jos. C. Walcott,
Members N. Y. Stoek

All Securities

Margins

dealt in at the Exchange

J. H. Latham & Co.,
BROKERS IN
EXCHANGE,

FOREIGN

United States. Chicago, Cincinnati, St.
District of Columbia Bonds,
AND

52 WILLIAM
J. H. LATHAM.

OF* WALL 8TREET AND BROADWAY,

Louis,

OTHER

INVESTMENT

of STOCKS and BONDS for

iluy and Sell Investment Securities.
P. O. BOX 2,647.
'
r

~>r-

Wavland Trask.

in every event the full
NO SURRENDER of

H, J. MORSE.

value of his Reserve.
the Policy is required; only

notice from the policy-holder, on blanks fur¬
nished by the Company.
AFTER THREE YEARS, ALL RESTRICTIONS

a

CONDITIONS in regard to travel, residence,
occupation and cause of death are removed, thus
making the Policies, after three years, INCON¬
TESTABLE FOR
ANY CAUSE, EXCEPTING
FRAUD.

application, send Circu¬

The Company will, upon
lars giving full particulars.
Office of Middle Department, Boreel Building
No. 117 Broadway, N. Y., Henry W. Baldwin, Sup*!.

HOME
Insurance
NEW

OF

.

OFFICE,

119

Company
YORK,

BROADWAY.

Fifty-Third Semi-annual Statement,
SHOWING THE

CONDITION OF THE

COMPANY ON THE FIRST

STOCK
,

_

AND BOND

BROKERS,

No. 52 EXCHANGE PLACE, NEW YORK.
Stocks, Railroad Bonds, Governments, and

Miscellaneous Securities, bought and

Sold.

1880.

$3,000,000 00
1,841,438 00
248,764 81

CASH CAPITAL
Reserve for Re-insurance
Reserve for Unpaid Losses

1,320,785 30
$6,410,988 11

Surplus

Cash Assets

SUMMARY OF ASSETS

PAY¬

Held In the United States, available for the
MENT of LOSSES by FIRE and for the protec¬
tion of Policy-Holders of FIRE INSURANCE:
Cash in Banks
i
Bonds and mortgages, being first lien on
„

real estate (worth $4.171,400)
United States stocks (market value)....
Bank stocks (market value)
State and municipal h’ds (market value)

on stocks, payable on demand
(market value of securities $543,592).
Interest due on 1st January, 1880
Balance in hands of agents

Loans

Real estate
Premiums due and
cies issued at this

Total

uncollected on poli¬

$233,299
1.866,053
3,184,125
200,702

29
06
00
50

237,859 50
418,670 00
55
154.114 m
54,125 01

0,507 38
$6,410,988 11
CHAS. J. MARTIN, President.
J. H. WASHBURN, Secretary*
office.....,

T II

E

UTUAL LIF J
INMMM

STREET.
F. W. PERRY.

J. D. Probst & Co.,

Business, including

~

default.
The new form of Endowment Policy provides
That if the ENTIRE RESERVE is a greater sum
than the single premium required to carry the full
amount of insurance to the end of the endowment
term, the excess shall be used as a single premium
to purchase a pure endowment, payable at the end
of the term, thus guaranteeing to the policy-holder

SECURITIES,

York.

Transact a General Banking

>

premiums, excepting in the event of the death
occurring within three years after the original

Net

le
commission all securities
dealt in at the New
York, Philadelphia and Boston Stock Exchanges,
either for cash or on margin.
Special attention

BANKERS,

ArAL Kidder.

CO.,

on

ON COMMISSION.

Co.

the purchase and sale
Gash or on margin.

Sc

29 Broad Street,

Transact a General

ciLcJlIWfCiXlei.
New

Stock Exchange.
(Special.)
Mining Stock Exchange. <

BANKERS,

AND

C. A- Buttriok, Member of the N. Y. Stock
Wm. Elliman, Member of the N.Y. Mining

COMMISSION.

WALCOTT

from

take place during

DAY OF JANUARY,

Owens & Mercer,

BOUGHT AND SOLD

r

GIVEN TO
STOCKS.
Wm; M. Lent,
fcan Francisco.

MINING

Wm. B. Wadsworth.

Wm. 0- Sheldon.

Member N. Y. Stock

BOUGHT AND SOLD ON
SPECIAL ATTENTION

for three or more years have

been paid, upon receiving the required notice
the assured the Company will continue
in force without further payments, for its
FACE, for such a period as the ENTIRE
will carry it.

Hinckley & Jones,

STOCKS.

form of Policy issued by the
Insurance Company before in¬

suring elsewhere.
After the premiums

No. 19 William

DEALERS IN

AND

Wm. F. Owens,

Approved Collateral.

Street, New York.
GOVERNMENT BONDS. STOCKS
AND INVESTMENT SECURITIES

STREET,

AND

HANKERS

on

Examine the new
United States Life

and

Street, New York,
And 83 Devonshire Street, Boston.
Buy and Sell on Commission all Securities
Current at the New York Stock Exchange.
Allow Interest on Deposits. Make Advances

Wadsworth,

WALL

Member N. Y. Mining Exch’ge

No. 19 Broad

COTTON COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
34 PINE STREET,

Sheldon &

for the above Securities; or
commission, at seller’s option.

BANKERS AND BROKERS,

AND

New

Stocks

ANTHONY, POOR & OLIPHANT,

BANKERS

LIBERAL AND IMPORTANT CONCESSIONS IN
LIFE INSURANCE CONTRACTS.
::

Should the d ath of the insured

Member N. Y. Stock Exchange.

Jas. H. Oliphant,

-

the continued term of insurance as provided for
above, the full face of the Policy will be paid—no
deduction being made for foreborne or unpaid

SPECIALTY.

A

B.Baylis, Henry K. Sheldon

H*E.Plerrepont, Dan’l Chauncey, John T. Martin,
Atex. M. Wnite, Josiah O. Low, Ripley Ropes,
Austin Corbin. Edmund W. Conies.
WM. R. BUNKER, Secretary.

,

STREET.

Insurance

$4,983,226 81
872,484 06

-

Surplus,

the Policy
FULL
RESERVE

Dealings in

Vice-Pres’t.

Counsel.

Wm. B. Kendall, Henry Sanger,
John P. Rolfe,
Chas. B. Marvin.




Bailey

S.

E.

TRUSTEES:

-

an<^all

bought and sold for

“1

Assets,

JAMES BUELL, President.

Bonds, Governments,
Se¬
the New York Stock Exchange
Investment or carried on mar¬
gin. strictly on commission.
*
Coleman Benedict,
Jas. McGovern, Jr.
Tdember N. Y. Stock and Mining Exchanges.
Stocks, Railroad

curities dealt in at

RIPLEY ROPES, President.

Edgar M. Cullen,

Stock and Mining Exchanges.

The United States
Life Insurance Comp’y,
261—264 Broadway, N. Y.1

BROKERS,

BOND

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

92

registry and transfer books, or make purchase and
sale of Government and other securities.
Religious and charitable institutions, and persons
unaccustomed to the transaction of business, will
find this Company a safe and convenient depository
tor money.

SECURITIES.

RAILROAD

STOCK

The

GIVEN TO THE NEGO¬

SPECIAL ATTENTION

8amttel Willets,
Wm. Whitewbight,
Geo. Cabot Ward
G. D. Wood.

’«

Street, New York,

Pine

COMMITTEE.

EXECUTIVE
4. M. McLean,

Orders executed at the

,

Securities.

Investment

In

Insurance.

through the

McLean, 18t Vice-President.

<J. M.

(Drexbl Building)
Dealer

BANKERS,

EDWARD KLNG, President.

Clearing-House.

YORK,

NEW

Walston H. Brown & Bro.

FHBD. A. BROWN.

WALSTON H. BROWN.

DEPOSITORY FOR HONEY.
allowed on Deposits, which may be made

ST.,

Special attention given to Defaulted Railroad and
Municipal Securities of Illinois, Kansas, Missouri,
Iowa and Nebraska.
Correspondence solicited and full information
given on all classes of bonds and stocks,

Administra¬

Is a

Interest
and withdrawn at any time.
N. B.—Checks on this Institution pass

BROAD

5

St., New York.
BUY and SELL RAILROAD STOCKS and BONDS,
U. 8. GOVERNMENT, STATE. CITY, and all other
Negotiable Securities, ON COMMISSION.
Mr. J. M. Drake has been a member of the New
York Stock Exchange since 1862, and will give per¬
sonal attention to all business entrusted to the firm.
Wall

BROKER,

AND

BANKER

BUILDING,

22 DREXEL

AND

21

Broadway, Cor. Rector St.

CAPITAL,

LEGAL

BANKERS,

YORK,

NEW

OF

[Vol. XIX-

CHRONICLE.

THE

SSUES EVERY

APPROVED

DESCRIPTION®

1IFE AND ENDOWMENT MU0E

MffiMWOOftOOC


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102