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A

WEEKLY

§tatotj ponitM, amt insurance ionrnal.
NEWSPAPER,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

YOL. 2.

SATURDAY, JUNE 23, 1866.
CONTENTS.
TIIE CHRONICLE.

The

Treasury and its Assailants.

The Tax Bill in the Senate
The War in Europe and the
ted States
The Present High Prices
The Strikes

Uni¬

770

771

Commercial

774

Miscellaneous

and

News

77-

773

Analyses of Railroad Reports....
Latest Monetary and Commercial
English News

769

'

776

773

THE BANKERS1 GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL TIMES.

I Commercial Epitome

Money Market, Railway Stocks,
U. S.

Foreign Exchange, New Y'ork

Dry Goods

City Banks, Philadelphia Banks
National Banks, etc
Sale Prices N.Y. Stock

777

Exchange
National, State, etc., Securities.

783

| Cotton
Breadstuffs

Securities, Gold Market,

78-1

785

'.

;

' Exports and Imports

785
787

781 I Prices Current and Tone of the

782 |

Market

789-91

THE RAILWAY MONITOR AND INSURANCE JOURNAL.

Railway News.-.
Railway, Canal, etc., Stock List.
Railroad, Canal, and Miseellane-

792
793

ons Bond List
Insurance and Mining

Advertisements

-...794-95

Journal...

796
797-800

<iil)c CIjronicD.
The Commercial

Financial Chronicle is issued every

Saturday morning by the publishers of Hunt's Merchants' Magazine,
with the latest news by mail and telegraph up to midnight
of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every morning with all
the Commercial and Financial news of the previous day up to
the hour of publication.
and

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Neat

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for holding the Chronicle

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be had at the

frequently exhibited, of learning wisdom from failure, and
of transmuting repulses into victories.
Nothing, for instance, can be more objectionable in-some
of its aspects than our system of internal and customs duties.
Yet, who will venture to doubt that it contains the germ of
a new
system which will be more perfect, more effective,
better adapted to our institutions, and less repressive to the
enterprise and progress of our people, than would have been
any exotic system from Europe, had we taken the most per¬
fect, and tried to acclimate and naturalize it on this great free
Continent of ours? Meanwhile our system is working well.
Already, during the current fiscal year, we have raised by our
customs duties a prodigious sum in gold, probably not less
than one hundred and fifty millions of dollars.
Our newly
fabricated Internal Revenue machinery will collect, during
the year, more than the 300 millions that was anticipated.,
In other words, we have raised, during the year, a revenue of
450 millions of dollars ; or more than is raised either by
Great Britain or France.
If, two years ago, we had predict¬
ed that before the Seven-thirties matured we should not only
have terminated our war successfully, but should have estab¬
lished a fiscal system which, notwithstanding its patent im¬
perfections, would accomplish such results as these, in how
many persons would our words have been met rath^* by the
wish than by the belief that they might prove true ?
Next, as to our National Debt. Again and again it has
been urged that outstanding claims would swell its vast ag¬
gregate to 3,000 millions or more, and the burden of so pro¬
digious a sum on ourselves and our children was very justly
looked upon as appalling.
Here, again, however, we find
that the facts were far outstripped and grievously misrepre¬
sented.
Last August the aggregate debt was larger than it
has

THE TREASURY

AND ITS ASSAILANTS.

NO. 52.

ever

been before

since, and it then fell far short of
We may now be absolutely certain that the
or

2,800 millions.
To hear some of our really able and patriotic financial debt, when all outstanding claims are met, cannot reach
men converse, one would think that the national finances are
3,000 millions, and will probably not much exceed its present

gloomy condition indeed; and that the future, to aggregate of 2,670 millions.
say the least, is not very promising.
Now, we are quite
Again, there has been considerable excitement, not unnat¬
willing to confess that we have never had much sympathy urally produced, by the private sale and purchase of Gov¬
with the croakers, and at present we are unusually disin¬ ernment securities on account of the Treasury.
It is, no
clined to accord with their views.
Their sinister hints and doubt, to be regretted that these transactions were con¬
glogmy prognostications have been so often contradicted by ducted under the veil of secrecy, the public not being informed
the facts, and such is the general confidence in the country, of the facts until they appeared in Mr. McCulloch’s monthly
its riches, its credit, its recuperative forces, its irrepressible statement of the Treasury.
It would have been better, no
energy, its high destiny, its glorious future, that while we do doubt, and more consistent with the traditions, the habits,
not deny our national propensity to make mistakes—finan¬ and the
principles of our popular institutions, as well as more
cial mistakes, political mistakes, fiscal mistakes—still we do in accordance with what is done by other Governments, if
claim that our people have the good habit, which is pretty there Had been no attempt at secrecy.
We are glad, therein




a

very

THE

770

enquiry has elicited the
facts; for the official report has shown how much those
fore, that the recent Congressional

facts have been distorted and

Since the 1st

misconceived.

this respect is to
Compound Notes into Five-twenties

January all that Mr. McCulloch has done in
fund Seven-thirties and
to

the amount of

and to purchase a small
millions—of the 173 millions of outstand.

some

amount—about

23 millions

[June 23,1866.

CHRONICLE.

;

ing association, and such National banking association has assumed the
or banking association, including the re¬
demption of its bills, or by any agreement or understanding whatever
with the representatives of such State bank or banking association, shall
use the bills of such State bank-or banking association, such National
banking association shall be held to make the required return and pay¬
ment on the circulation outstanding, so long as such circulation shall ex¬
ceed five per centum of the capital before such conversion of such State
bank or banking association.
These are the main features of the amendments suggested
liabilities of such State bank

ing Ten-forties. This last transaction, as wc explained at the in the bill since it left the House. There are also a number
time, was altogether exceptional, and we understand it will of subordinate changes. One of these permits gas com¬
not be repeated.
Now, by these several movements a direct panies to charge the public with their taxes. This unpopular
saving to the Government has been effected to the amount and very objectionable arrangement will not, we trust, be
The rate of tax on brokers’ sales
of more than $800,000 ; the credit of the Treasury has been concurred in by the House.
stocks and other things is modified, as are also the already
of
improved, the new Five-twenties have been negotiated at
from two to three per cent, premium, the Ten-forties have complicated provisions applying to transactions in distilled
advanced in the market from 02 to 96, and the way has thus spirits and ale.
been in part prepared for any funding operations which may
Probably, however, no part of the new tax law is destined
to receive a greater amount of public criticism than the
be next entered upon.
It were greatly to be wished that these funding operations provisions relative to seizures of goods for alleged violations
Great abuses are reported to have
had not been checked by the recent Treasury sales of gold ; of the revenue laws.
respecting which the Congressional investigation, to which occurred in this country, and especially in Europe, in conse¬
we referred two weeks ago, is now
in progress. The only quence of the undefined and very large powers confided in
such cases to officers of the revenue.
The Senate Committee
new featuresjn this enquiry are the letters of Mr. McCulloch,
giving an accout of his sales of gold since the ist January, propose to insert a new section into the law on this subject,
which was met by a resolution proposed by Mr. Wilson and and on account of its importance we give it entire :
Sec. 64. Anri be it further enacted, That hereafter in all capes of
adopted by the House unanimously. Both these documents
seizure of any goods, wares, or merchandise which shall, in the opinion
we
print elsewhere. On many accounts, we think, it \\j*s a of the collector or deputy collector, making such seizure, be of the
mistake to sell 50,000,000 of gold in the present condition of appraised value of three hundred dollars or less, and which shall have
been
seized as being subject to forfeiture under any of the provisions
the Treasury. And little, if any, ought to be parted with at
of this act, or of any act to which this is an amendment, excepting in
the time and at the price which were chosen for the heaviest cases otherwise provided, the said collector or deputy collector shall
sales.
When the Congressional enquiry throws further light proceed as follows, that is to say: -He shall cause a list containing a
particular description of the goods, wares, or merchandise so seized to
on the facts, we shall have more to say about them.
he prepared in duplicate, and an appraisemeut-of the same to be made
so

sworn appraisers, to be selected by him for said purpose, who
respectable and disinterested citizens of the United States, re¬
siding within the collection district wherein the seizure was made. The
TIIE TAX BILL IX THE SENATE.
aforesaid list and appraisement shall be properly attested by such col¬
lector or deputy collector and the persons making the appraisement, for
The Finance Committee of the Senate have made some
which service said appraisers shall be allowed the sum of one dollar
important amendments in the new' tax bill. The first of these and fifty cents per day each, to be paid as other necessary charges of
collectors according to law.
If the said goods shall be found by such
which demands notice is the reduction of the tax on cotton to
appraisers to be of the value of three hundred dollars or less, the said
two cents instead of live cents, as was proposed by the House. collector or deputy collector shall publish a notice, for the space of three
In cotton we have a product which, when our facilities for weeks, in some newspaper of the district where the seizure was made,
describing the articles, and stating.the time, place, and cause of their
raising it are restored, will bring a heavy and increasing seizure, and requiring any person or persons claiming them to appear
annual revenue to the Treasury. To impose a heavier tax and make such claim within thirty days from the date of the first pub¬
lication of such notice : Provided, That any p rson or persons claiming
than two cents a pound at present, would, we believe, indefi¬ the goods, wares, or merchandise, so seized, within the time specified in
the notice, may file with such collector or deputy collector a claim,
nitely postpone the resuscitation of the business, and w'ould
stating his or their interest in the articles seized, and may execute a
operate as a premium on the crops of our foreign rivals, es¬ bond to the United States in the penal sum of two hundred and fr ty
pecially the cotton planters of British India, whose facilities dollars, with sureties, to be approved by said collector or deputy col

by three
shall be

for

production and transportation are very far in advance of
what they ever were before.
Another change proposed by the Senate applies to the tax
on

the circulation of such State banks

National

banks,

such

as are

converted into

altogether to do a banking
outstanding notes of these banks an
additional tax of one-fourth per cent, a month, or three per
cent, a year, is to be paid; while on the outstanding circula¬
tion of other State banks the ten per cent, duty imposed by
the Act of June, 1S6T, is to take effect on the 1st of July,
1867, instead of 1st July, 1866. The following clause, rela¬
tive to the taxation of converted banks is also proposed in
place of Section 14 of the Act of 1864 :
business.

or

as cease

On the old

That the capital of any State bank or banking association which has
ceased or shall cease to exist, or which has beeu or shall be converted
into a national bank, for all the purposes of the act to which this is an
amendment, shall be assumed to be the capital as it existed immediately
before such bank ceased to exist, or was converted as aforesaid ; and
whenever the outstanding circulation of any bank, association, corpora¬

tion, company, or person shall be reduced to an amount not exceeding
five per centum of the chartered or declared capital existing at the time
the same was issued, said circulation shall be free from taxation ; and
whenever any bank which has ceased to issue notes for circulation shall
deposit in the Treasury of the United States, in lawful money, the
amount of its outstanding circulation, to be redeemed at par under such
regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe, it shall be
exempt from any tax upon such circulation ; and whenever any State

bank,




or

banking association, has been converted into

a

.National bank¬

lector, conditioned that, in
the

obligors will

case

of condemnation of the articles

so

seized,

all the costs and expenses of the proceedings to
obtain such condemnation ; and upon the delivery of such hood to the
collector or deputy collector, he shall transmit the same, with the dupli¬
cate list and description of the goods seized, to the United States dis¬
trict attorney for the district, who shall proceed thereon in the ordinary
manner
prescribed by law : And provided, also, That if there shall be
no claim
interposed aud no bond given within the time above specified,
the collector or ckiputy collector, as the case m ay be, shall give teu days’
notice of the sale of the goods, wares, or merchandise, by publication ;
and at the time and place specified in said notice, shall sell the articles
so seized at public auction, and, after deducting the expense of
appraise¬
ment and sale, he shall deposit the proceeds to the credit of the Secre¬
tary of the Treasury. And within one year after the sale of any goods,
wares, or merchandise, as aforesaid, any person or persons claiming to
be interested in the goods, wares, or merchandise so sold may apply to
the Secretary of the Treasury for a remission of the forfeiture thereof,
or
any of them, and a restoration of the proceeds of the said sale, which
may be granted by the said Secretary upon satisfactory proof, to fce
furnished in such manner as he shall prescribe : Provided, That it shall
be satisfactorily shown that the applicant, at the time of the seizure and
sale of the goods in question, aud during the intervening time, was
pay

absent out of the United States, or
him from knowing of such seizure,
same

;

in such circumstances as prevented
and that he did not know of the
and also that the said forfeiture was incurred without wilful neg¬

ligence

or any intention of fraud on the part of the owner or oaners of
goods. If no application for such restoration be made within one
year, as hereinbefore prescribed, then, at the expiration of the said time
the Secretary of the Treasury shall cause the ^proceeds of the sale of
the said goods, wares, or merchandise to be distributed according to law,
as in the case of
goods, wares, or merchandise condemned and sold
pursuant to the decree of a competent court.

such

According to Adam Smith and all the great authorities,
one of the fundamental
requisites of tax legislation that

it is

.

June 23, 1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.

771

it should be

simple and so clear that all persons—both those eral Von Gablenz withdrew before them, and the war
may be
and those who have to collect it—shall have said to have begun without the exchange of a shot, the
gener¬
no
difficulty in deciding at once how much is due. ' But it als of the two recently allied and now
antagonistic powers
is one of the chief defects of our tax laws that
they violate behaving to each other as courteously as Lord John Hay and
this cardinal principle.
If any further proof should be want¬ the Colonel of the French Garde Roy ale at the famous fight
ing of this, we may find it in the tax bill now under dis¬ ofFontenoy.
*
cussion.
On the 25th of April this measure was introduced
The receipt of this
intelligence produced, of course, a pro¬
into the House and contained 134
On the 18th of found effect throughout Europe, it
pages.
being everywhere expect¬
June it was reported with amendments from the Finance
ed that the next and more decisive
step must be taken at
Committee ot the Senate and had
grown to 244 pages. once by Austria in the form of an advance of the the Austrian
When it is remembered that this formidable document is
Army of the North” into the splendid Prussian province of
itself only an amendment to
former,laws, to which it.makes Silesia. Flanked on the Northwest
by the small indepen¬
reference in almost every section, the
charge we have ven¬ dent kingdom of Saxony, whose independence, of
course,
tured to bring against our tax laws
is, we think, sufficiently neither of the
great belligerents will be likely at all to respect,
borne out.
As every new fiscal enactment creates a new
the province of Silesia throughout
nearly two-thirds of its
crime, vindicated by pains and penalties, it is of the highest
long frontier line lies directly open to the attacks of Austria.
possible importance that tax laws should be simple and easy It is
protected indeed to a certain extent by the formidable
to be understood by
plain people. What the country needs chain of mountains known as the
Ruseirgebirge, or “ Giant
in this reepect is, that
every new tax enactment should be
Mountains,” the Silesian side of which chain is commanded
complete in itself, and we trust that the committees and by a series of Prussian fortresses aud
'places cTarmes. But
members of Congress will bear this in mind. it is menaced now by
the most powerful army which Austria
The intricacy of our methods of taxation was
not, perhaps, has brought into the field since the time of the first
Napoleon,
in the first instance, to be
easily avoided.
It arose out of under the command of a general, Field-Marshal Von
Benedek,
the peculiarity of our.position as
a great, rich, untaxed Re¬ who won considerable
reputation, both in the Hungarian and
public, called upon suddenly to raise, by whatever means, a the Italian wrars, and it is such a
prize as Austria may well
large immediate revenue to support our Government. Some be justified in
concentrating all her strength to strike for, to
degree of confusion and irregularity w'as therefore at first to win, and, if possible, to
keep. Originally a province of the
be expected. But the problem of
raising a revenue is now Empire, and wrested from Maria ■ Theresa by the great
solved.
During the past three years, we have abundantly Frederic, Silesia is now the wealthiest
manufacturing dis¬
proved that this country is unsurpassed by any in Europe in trict of Prussia and of Germany. It
contains nearly three
its capability of raising a
large annual sum from taxation. millions of inhabitants, and is divided into three circles or
who have to pay

“

What

we

have to do

now

is to find out how the needful

Bezirke, those of Liegnitz, Breslau, and Oppeln, the central
the Government can be raised circle, of which the great City of Breslau is the
capital, being
to the nation, the least
oppres. rich enough of itself, if once seized by an Austrian army, to
sive and vexatious interference with
individuals, and the constitute a permanent base of operations against the North¬
least interruption of the growth of national
prosperity and na¬ ern monarchy. It is a curious fact that now, almost exactly
tional wealth.
at the close of a century from the date of its
conquest by
Prussia, Silesia should thus become the immediate leading
THE WAR IN EUROPE, AND THE UNITED STATES.
object of a war between the two great States wThich now as
Our previsions of last week in
regard to the probable then are contending for supremacy in Germany, and that now
futility of the neutral propositions for a Congress of the as then an Austrian sovereign should find himself supported
Powers of Europe, have been more than
justified, by the in such a war by his Hungarian subjects as no ruler of his
events of which the
race has been
tidings have since reached us.
supported by them in any one ef the many
Under the guidance of statesmen less astute than the Far- conflicts which have stained the history of
Europe and of Ger¬
seeing and energetic Premier of Prussia, or carried away by many with blood in those long intervening years. This fact,
his own impetuous and arrogant
temper, the Emperor Francis to which we have already called attention in these columns,
Joseph committed the grave diplomatic blunder of prevent¬ is of special importance as indicating the deeper causes and
ing altogether the assemblage of a Congress before which it provocations to the existing conflict which lie beneath and
would have been very difficult for either Prussia or
Italy to behind the ambition of Count Bismark, and the impatience
put Austria diplomatically in the wrong.
With more than of the Austrian Kaiser, causes and provocations, the effect of
eight hundred thousand men under arms; supported by a which will soon be seen in the widening sweep of the struggle
strangely harmonious condition of the popular feeling through¬ when once fairly be^un, and which will impart to it a more
out the
Empire; and pressed on to action by the sharp ne¬ serious and significant character than it is commonly admitted
cessities of a desperate financial position, the Kaiser,
perhaps, in the press of western Europe to possess.
The tidings of the failure of the last effort of diplomacy
thought it wisest to stand defiantly upon his diplomatic rights^
and to invite at once that ordeal
by battle, of wrhich the con¬ to avert an appeal to arms were followed on this side of the
ferences at Paris must in any event have proved to be merely water by
a sudden and alarming advance in the premium on
the prologue. He gave orders to the isolated body of Aus- gold.
We do not propose to enter to-day into a full dis¬
strian troops, by which the
Duchy of Holstein has for some cussion of the origin of this phenomenon, or of the probable
time past been occupied, to protect aud
permit the election consequences to ourselves of a wide-spread and destructive
of Federal
But it is eminently desirable that we
deputies by the people of Holstein.
Prussia, in Continental war.
response, regarding this action as a definitive rupture with should be aroused by it to consider how greatly our financial
herself, and being by her geographical position entirely and commercial relations with Continental Europe have
mistress of the situation,” both in Holstein and
Schleswig, been dianged by the events of the last six years; and how
sent General
Manteuffel, commanding the Prussian forces in much more important those relations now are in their bear¬
Schleswig, orders to immediately occupy all posts in Hol¬ ings upon our home interests than they were before the re¬
stein not
actually in the possession of the Austrian contin¬ cent enormous development both of our commerce with the
gent. Upon the advance of the Prussians, the Austrian Gen German States and of our national debt.
The efforts and
for the support of
with the least inconvenience
revenue

“




%

THE CHRONICLE.

772

.

[June 23, 1866.

at any former period.
Besides, the wheat crop which isnowr
for a time hold back the smaller
German States of the South and West, Bavaria, Baden, being gathered, is ample enough to supply the market for the
Wurtemberg and the petty sovereignties immediately de¬ coming year ; and there is no good reason, apparently, why
flour should not be furnished to consumers for six dollars a
pendent upon them, from the vortex of the war. But noth¬

the influence of France may

ing can avert the immediate action of the conflict upon the
commercial and industrial condition of -these States, and

through them upon all communities in any degree connected
with them ; and prudent men will bear it in mind, here in
America as well as beyond the seas, that the coming sum¬
mer and autumn
are certain to witness financial and com¬
mercial disturbances analogous in kind if not equal in de¬

barrel.

goods. They continue to be
high prices.without apparent good reason. The sup¬
ply is large enough to justify the expectation of lower rates;
cotton is far from being scarce, and the coming crop will be
sufficiently abundant to warrant a handsome reduction. But
can perceive no indication of so desirable an event.
The
high prices are maintained almost as if the war still raged,
and gold was at 2S0, and there was neither the supply of raw
material to be depended upon, or the requisite labor for its
So, too, with manufactured

held at

we

those which for the four years of our civil war,
every branch of industry and activity among us,
generated the passions and the perils of speculation, and un¬
manufacture.
settled all the system of our public and private economy.
The addition made to prices by taxation, of course, occa.
Not that we believe this result must of necessity be disas¬
sions somewhat of the increase ; but of this we do not com¬
trous to ourselves, for if we only put our house in order and
plain. We would only require of our legislators, that what¬
prepare for the storm, we may reap decided advantage from
ever burdens they might impose,* they should confine them to
the strife now just begun.
the actual exigency, the maintenance of the Government and
the liquidation ot the public indebtedness.
Beyond this ex¬
THE PRESENT HIGH PRICES.
be oppressive, an incubus on prosperity, and a
tent would
The chief obstacle to the restoration to this country of its
gree to
fevered

discouragement to

industry.

All taxation adds to the cost of

prosperity, the obstacle which must be removed as
soon as practicable, is the
high rate of prices upon all the production, and is reduplicated in the prices to the consumer,
too often built up in this way until increased into a burden
necessaries of life.
It is of comparatively small account
too grievous to bear.
rwhat colossal fortunes are amassed, what apparent exhibition
But the very price at which labor is, as we have seen,
of wealth a people may be able to display. When the nation
is compelled to pay exorbitantly for whatever is eaten and necessarily held, will be said by many to be the cause of the
That is precisely extraordinary cost entailed upon the necessaries of life. It
worn, it is fast becoming impoverished.
is a cause, but evidentlv not the first cause.
The farmer is
the condition of matters in this country at this very moment.
Food of every kind, however abundant, is dear ; and cloths compelled to pay two dollars and more for work which he
was able to obtain a few years ago for one dollar or less ;
are held at rates beyond the ability of the majority of wearers.
We have abundant witness to this on every hand.
Men and all his agricultural implements come to him loaded down
by similar prices exacted by the mechanics. He cannot,
employed in the various avocations of industry find it no
therefore, supply grain at the old prices and be able to carry
easy matter to make the two: ends meet, although wages
on his business.
The cost of transit to market is enhanced
generally are higher than ever.
They find themselves in a similar manner by the increased cost of handling. Our
obliged to pay for rents an amount so exorbitant.as to leave
little behind for other necessaries.
In the City of New York, coal is kept from two to six dollars a ton too high, in part
becaur,? miners’ wages have increased.
That these are facts,
a large
proportion of them have been compelled to give up
we will admit.
High wages are necessarily followed by
their more comfortable homes for little unwholesome apart¬
It is, however, also equally true that high prices
ments in tenement houses, where squalor, dirt and a noxious high prices.
are necessarily followed by high wages, and it will be remem¬
atmosphere speedily brutifies and degrades the inmates.
bered that wages were not the first to rise. It is evident,
Luxuries being out of the question altogether, cheap liquors
therefore, that there is a cause back of this, and operating
become a substitute.
over the whole country, making high wages and high prices
As for the hundred thousands of female operatives, the
burden falls on them most cruelly. They must be neatly equally a necessity ; increasing the cost of transportation, and
former

dressed, and be able to fill up all the hours
remuneration little greater than that received

of labor, at a fostering speculation. In a word, the real difficulty lies in
for similar ser¬ the fact that our paper dollar has been watered until, it is
worth much less than a dollar, and on this flood of currency

Whatever increase of compensation
prices float.
may have bem granted to laborers and other persons em¬
The remedy therefore exists in Congress and the Govern¬
ployed, it has never been equivalent to that of the prices of
the articles of consumption in our markets. Indeed, it is the ment.
Something, we will admit, has already been done;
ultimate natural influence of high prices to depress the rate but the country is beginning to sicken at the slow progress of wages to a point proportionately lower than the prices of made.
Speculation, stimulated by the inflated currency, is
the necessaries of life. Observations at different periods have again rising on its paper wings, and the articles of prime
shown that they naturally have this effect.
The tendency, necessity are being bought up and held by the men that can
In this manner flour and
when the means of subsistence are hard to procure, is for most easily procure the capital.
wheat at the principal points in the West were raised last
all persons employed, and laborers, to increase their exer¬
tions, thus overstocking the market with their labor.
This Fall to a price as high almost as they stood in the City of New
was
prevented during the war by the repeated calls for men York. The banks lent the money to keep up the margin
in the military service.
Now it is different, as is evident and maintain the exorbitant prices, till in many instances
from the unsuccessful termination of the recent strikes, all the grain became injured and heated in the storehouses. We
are liable to have this repeated again this season, and the
of which have resulted disastrously to the laborer.
We cannot account for present prices by pleading a short evil must grow upon us unless efficient measures are soon
supply. The careful observer has noticed that the receipts of taken to bring the currency at as early a day as possible to
wheat and flour at tide-water from the Western States dur¬ a specie basis.
This will reduce labor from its nominal to
its equitable value.
Every other expense will undergo a
ing the present season, are largely in excess of what they
similar transmutation.
We shall no more have prices of war
were a year ago; larger, indeed, than they have ever been

vice ten

♦




years ago.

June

THE

23, 1866.]

CHRONICLE.

773

productive and the nation is at few well chosen points on the employers’ lines; and the
peace.
The men who aredoing business on borrowed capi¬ pressure is consequently protracted and attended with severe
tal, it is very likely, will suffer; but the producing classes injury to the capitalist.
will be placed in better circumstances.
Were the several branches "of trade united in common
They are the ones
and famine when the soil is

whose welfare should be first considered.

The present dis¬

cause, so as

to enable them to meet the workmen with a like

parity is rapidly impoverishing the great majority of the sympathetic opposition, this very ingenious strategy would
people; and a return must be had as soon as practicable to be abolished, because of its fruitless results. But no such
a
sound financial policy in order to obviate the danger general combination exists among employers, and would
of actual calamity.
obviously be very difficult of organization. For this reason,
the firmness wTith which the shipbuilders have withstood the
unreasonable demands of their employees is deserving of all
THE STRIKES.
Individuals among them might have yielded, from
There are apparent symptoms of a disposition among the praise.
narrow and mercenary considerations ; but all have preferred
operatives on strike to return to employment. The difficulty
to incur severe loss in the assertion of a principle in which
among the masons, who struck for a quarter holiday on
not only they, but all employers, are vitally interested, and
Saturday, is in course of adjustment; while ship-carpenters
to ascertain definitely important points respecting the work¬
of New York and Brooklyn, who have been “ on strike ” for
several weeks, to secure the limitation of the daily term of ing relations between employers and operatives. The power
to conquer is unquestionably in the hands of the employers;
labor to eight hours, have unanimously resumed w7ork upon
the old conditions.
The ship calkers, w ho professed the and the result of the well planned and desperately supported
strike of the calkers is an evidence that if the employers are
most resolute determination to enforce their demands to the
united they have the power of enforcing their own settle¬
last extremity have at last relinquished their demands and
ment.

willing to return to work upon late terms.
In Boston,
The calkers must have already suffered to an extent calcu
Portland, and Philadelphia, the calkers co-operated with
For several weeks they
lated to cool their ardor for strikes.
those of New York ; so that it has been impossible for New
have been absolutely idle, their principal reliance being a
York ship-builders to evade their embarrassments by sending
vessels to any of those ports. The calkers of this port have even weekly pittance from the funds of their association, and such
In
taken measures for ensuring the co operation of their trade charity as other organizations chose to bestow upon them.
hundreds of cases the father has eaten the bread earned by
in the ports of England.
Some days ago, three vessels wrere
the sweat of his wife and children, driven to some form
sent from Boston to Liverpool, ballasted with timber, to be
of cheap labor, and to compete with some branch of that
calked at the latter port.
No sooner was this ascertained
common organization of labor which it was supposed the strike
than prompt measures were taken for advising the associa¬
are

was calculated to support.
In the mean time, the place vacated
Liverpool, with a view' to preventing their
working upon the vessels. These instances of co-operation by the idle striker was being filled. The shipbuilders were
among the organizations within the same trade indicate putting raw hands upon their vessels and training them to
one
important source of the strength and endurance of strikes. efficiency ; so that the calkers, on returning to work, find they
have created a large addition to their trade, wbo will be
We, understand that the return of the ship-carpenters to
future competitors for employment, tending to depress wages
work wras a matter of arrangement with the calkers. The
even below the rates at which they refused to work.
Thus
The latter argued that the carpenters would prepare work
will strikes ever result in the ultimate injury of those who
for them, and would consequently only increase the necessity
for the shipbuilders to grant the advance of wages demanded. engage in them They may meet, and have met, with appa¬
This may appear to have been an ingenious device ; but, like rent success for a time, but being against reason, and opposed
to that community of interest which Providence has instituted
all such unnatural expedients, it has proved unavailing.
The
between the workman and the employer, they must in the
shipbuilders wrere determined to make this a test case, and,
end bring the sure penalty that attends every infraction of
at whatever sacrifice, to prove wdiieh side is most capable of
natural law.
They are a suspension of that process which
endurance. They were aware of the extent to wffiich the trades
connects existence and enjoyment with the sources of sustenassociations rely upon their accumulated funds, in the event

tion of calkers at

strike, and wrere intent upon ascertaining to what degree tation; and consequently they result in injury to the
those resources could enable them to enforce their demand. vital interests of society.
The strikers, on the other hand, were resolved upon testing the
ANALYSES OF RAILROAD REPORTS.

of a

power of endurance of
had resolved itself into

the employers. The dispute, indeed,

deliberate strategic trial of strength?
and the result must have a material influence in the settle¬
ment of future

similar

most

a

cases.

CHICAGO

AND

ROCK

ISLAND

RAILROAD.

from Chicago to

The Chicago and Rock Island Railroad extends
Rock Island, a distance of
The Peoria and Bureau Valley Railroad, which is leased
ated by the C
& R. I. Co., extends from Bureau
miles west from Chicago) to Peoria, has a length of

and oper¬

Junction (,114

191.8 miles.

46.6 “
their strikes with no little
The weakness of the operatives lies in their
Total line, owned, leased and operated
adroitness.
228.4 miles.
necessity to wrork as a means of income.
As a protection The doiDgs of this Company for the five years and nine months end¬
against this weak point, each association has its reserve ing March 81, 1866, a period covering the war era, are summed up in
the following statements.
fund, intended for use in the event of a strike; and the suc¬
The extent of new side track, and the replacements by new and recess of any effort to enforce their demands, depends entirely
rolled rail yearly have been as follows :
1864-5. 1865-6.
1862-3. 1863-4.
upon the management of these funds.
Hence, care is taken,
(Year.) (Y'ear.) (Year.) (Y'ear.)
1.20
1.71
2.59
.miles.
through the central union of associations, not to have too New side track iron..
5.30
11.43
19. 6
20.25
Re-laid with new
43. S7
32.80
many strikes at the same time.
By a simultaneous halt of Re-laid with re-rolled iron
57.01
89.30
all branches of labor, the funds of the several organizations
Total miles laid and relaid
999
500
604
1,003
Gross weight of new iron
4,136
814
3,066
would be early exhausted, and the operatives would be com¬ Gross weight of re-rolled iron
2,070
26
Gross weight of Atlas steel rails...
pelled by necessity to yield. A few branches are, therefore,
These additions and repairs are exclusive of rails repaired at Com¬
left to do the brunt of the fighting; and the funds of all the
pany's shops.
associations are made available for their support.
The number of locomotive engines owned by the Company at the
The
The trades associations manage

..

.....

..

.

whole force of the




operatives is thus concentrated upon a

.

.

,

.

close of the fiscal year has been as follows:

1863-4. 1864-5. 1S65-6.

1860-1. 1861-2. 1862-3.

(Year.) (9 mo’s) (Year.) (Year.)
Locomotive

The

engines

..

61

61

..

description andmumber of cars built, purchased and
shown in the following :

(Year.) (Year.)
59
65

re-built in the

two last years are

Built
,Purchased—> r—Re-b'lt—*
’65-6. ’64-5. ’65-6. '04-5. '65-6.

,

1864-5.

3

Passenger, Mail and Baggage.

BUSINES8

173

21

100

193

27

ENGINES

HAULING TRAINS.

1860-1.

1861-2.

1862-3.

264.665
434.649

354,267
579,115

1865-6.

1864-5.
347.582

1863-4.
3-18. SI 8
7 ‘4.008

364,870

92,858

66,6:15

97,502

90,004

783,056
82,014

791,387

do

mileage..

879,657

765,949

1,030,881

1,162,880

1,212,656

1,234,857

Cost of run'geng. $201,529
Average cost per

$152,424

$214,218

$245,949

$401,519

$474,111

19.90

20.78

21.15

33.11

38.39

1864-5.

1S65-6.

Total

mile

run,

cts

22.91

..

Way

“

Avg. rate per pas.
per mile, cts...

45,130
27ft, 114

70,234

61,371

393,632
227,854
236,012
463,866

376,373

3.15

3.41

3.73

223.892
122.566
130.678

160,167

3.05

76.168
72.661
148,829

Pas. carried West
“
“
East
“
“both ways 199.718
“
“
one mile. 11,297,283

1SG3-4.

29,352

car'd
“

204.343

158,077
2:13,401
321,244
437,744
253,244
8,829,401 14,200,292 20,401,500 29,888,967 20,934,519
2.87

2.99

TRAFFIC,

IRF.IGHf

1861-2.
12,330

“

“

1862-3.

1863-4.

1S64-5.

1865-6.

16,395

23,995

31.228

20,811
31,589

24,015

24,318

82.70S

30,618

47,023

i.2,400

56,723

31,099
55,097

285.144
7.79

1S6C-1.

379.879
7.98

441,510
8.42

472.557

Freig’t carried—tons
(2,000 lbs)
301,669
Average load, do do

Averg. rate per ton
per mile, cts

3.50

2.58

2.69

3.15

Business between the Illinois and Iowa shores, illustrated

by state¬
ments of the cars and freight pissing over the Mississippi River Bridge
—navigation of the Mississippi River at Rock Island illustrated by the
number of e'.earners, barges, and rafts, passing the draw of the bridge
yearly:

Tons of

10,116
18.114

10,109
20,022

9,UG7
17.505
59,573

50,741 68,844
62,752 67,019 71,542 89.914 81,157 82,752
Going East
West and East... 109.112 99.446 110,581 140,655 150,001 1LU25
34,815 33,254 40,277 70.962 57.384 50,712
Going West

Freights

Foot passengers

35,254 33,362

Going East

West and East... 70,069 66.616
431
152
Going North

Steamers

43

Going South
North and South.

•

•

•

•

.

Going South

Barges

.

.

.

•

.

•

.

iii

going South
RESULTS

OF

162
167
329
125
110
235

106
20 5
39S
155
129
284
<■76

353
354
707

•

.

North and South.

FINANCIAL

40,166 69,932 58,371 50,963
80,443 140,894 115.755 101.675

154
306

Going North
Rafts

1863-4. 1S64-5. 1865-6.
8.438
7,998
9,913

1860-1. 1861-2. 1862-3.
( Going West
5,866
0,9-5 4,794
•< Going East
8,306
i 7.277 8.460
( West and East... 14,202 13,254 14.172
i Going West
39.039
40,360 3*427

Loaded Cars

245,738
726,661

174,688

187,000

209,830

7,545,220

287

296

473
453
926

238
255
493
576

FOR

T

N

Y’EARS,

and profits of operating the road, <fcc., tfcc.
ending March 31, 1866:

years

Gross

following table will be found deductions from the foregoing,
giving the cost of road, <fcc., per mile, the earnings, <fcc., per mile, and
the rates of expenses to earnings and of profits to cost, with the divi¬
dends, <fec., annually :
1856-57...
1857-58...
1858-59...
1859-60...
1860-61...
1801-62...
1862-63...
1863-64
1864-65
1865-66...

,—Per mile of Road.—. Exp’s to Profits ^Divid’ds-N
Cost of
road, p. m. Earn" s. Exp's. Profits, earnings. to cost. Cash. Stock.
54. m
10.78
10
$4,537
12*
$34,553
$3,721
$8,258
55.32
7.82
2.754
6,164
3,410
35,202
60 47
4.93
3,893
2,354
35,202
1,539
56.97
5.76
2.003
2,726
4,789
60.83
5.53
36.120
3,100
1,996
5,096
50.38
6
6.31
2,326
2,291
30,2S5
4,617
52.38
8.19
6
2.990
3,705
36,488
6,695
48.53
12.70
6
4,556
9,386
4,830
38,067
43.81
20.75
8
39,714
6,426
14,939
8,243
54.25
10
15.51
7,506
6,328
40,790
13,S34

..

...

...

VALUE

MARKET

The

monthly

ranges

of the C. and R. I.
1860-61.

Co.,

OF

STOCK

AT

NEW

YORK.

of prices in the New York market of the stock
are shown in the subjoined statement:
1862-63.
53 *@56*
56 @06
62 *@69*

1861-62.

89

Year. 42*@S4%

60* @68*

.

1864-65.

62*@69*

30*@59*

@95

85%@13L

Cate0l illonetarn aiib (Honuiurtial
RATES OF EXCHANGE AT
AT

following statements exhibit the gross earnings, the operating
expenses, and net earnings or profits yearly :
Passeng. earnings. $338,112
784,023
Freight

$254,071

1863-4.

1862-3.

1864-5.

1S65-6.

(9 inos.)
21 200

Mail*
Other

20,683

...

737,144
21,200
22.289

eargs—profits.

The net

earnings

21.200

21,200

39,794

35,9:45

94,102

110,857

1,529,141
800,987

523,317

728.154

2,143,875 3.359.390
1.040,462 1,167,681

3,154,235

1,711.451

1,103,413 1,891,709

disposed of as follows

were

P. & B. R.R. Lease.
LT. S. Tax on passgr. fares
Illinois Tax on Real Estate.
Loss on Illinois currency...

21,200

531,387

455,964

$643,775 $1,021,779 $1,005,872
3.448,965 2,222,309 2,616.306

21,200

1.054,704

Total gross earngs. 1,164.018
Total operng. exp.
708.054
Net

$433,297
1,034,850

1,442.781

:

$125,000 $125,000 $125,000 $125,000 $125.000I$125,000
5,353
16,415
61,770
93.723
54,318
32,615
11,408
35,001
38,978
63,462
26,557

Legal expenses

53,868

Interest on Funded Debt...
Interest on Bridge Bonds
Dividends (incl. Excise Tax)
Balance Credit Income

97,790

GENERAL

3,908

2.287

Extraordinary repairs, &c..

120,1:44

4,061

5,608

7,362

35.875
45,791
97,790 100,1.35
168,090
82,866

67,754
68,11K)
46,438
102,690 102,532 101,535
40,000
22,934
40,000
338.239 343,4:48 375,041 631,579
71,726 382,142 1,056,250 333,682

ACCOUNT—LEDGER

short.
3 months.
do
Hamburg
short.
Paris
Paris
3 months.
do
Vienna
do
Berlin
do
St. Petersburg
do
Cadiz
do
Lisbon
do
Milan
'
do
Genoa
do
Naples
New York.... 60 day’s
Jamaica
Amsterdam

.

Havana
Rio de Janeiro

I

Capital stock
Mortgage bonds

.

Income bonds
Sundries
Bal. of income...

Total




1863.

1864.

1S65.

1866.

$5,603,000 $5,603,000 $5,603,000 $6,000 000 $6,000,000 $6,500,000
1.397,000 1,397,000 1,397,000 1,397,000 1,397,000 1,397,000
70,000
70,000
53,500
51,000
150

4.796

12,078

421,703

540,444

660,961

7,421,854

977,832

2,034,082 2,367,764

7,545,220 7,743,039 8,444,832 9,484,582

10,315,7641

29.30
29.30
29.30

@

Pernambuco..

@

@
46. 2cL@

Ceylon
Bombay

| is. n*£.@

—

n*£.@—
ll*tf.@ —
—

—

[From

—

—

June 8.
June 5.

—

—

3 mo's.

—

26%@

May 16.
May 17.
May 14.

our own

—

—

—

30

*■

Mav 3.

—

is.
16.

24.77*

do

53*@53%

days.
—

.

—

—

May 30. 60 days.
do
May 17.
May 16. 90 days.
May 9. 60 days.
do
May 13.

—

—

—

11.84
25.12
13. 3
25.16

—

Mav 15.

—

RATE.

short.
do
do
do

—

—

—

j1

June 8.
do
do
do
do

{

—

demand. 46.6* £.@46. 7d.

llong Kong...

@107

81*@118%

—

—

—

TIME.

—

—

—

Singapore

98

104%@118%

<£nglisl) Neros.

—

—

152

2* p. c. prem.
27* @-

25%@25*
52

@—

do
47*@do
27% @27*
6 mo’s. is. 7*tf.@4,s\ 8*tf.
do
is. 7*e/.@—
do
6@8 p.c. dis.
do
26’ 1 %£.
do
26. id.
26. id.
do
'

May 25.
May 24
May 23.
May 15. ,30 days. 1@1* p. c. piem..

Correspondent.]
London, Saturday, June 9,18G6.

There have been
1862.

25.42*@25.47*
13.50 @14.00
6.27 @ 6.29
24 *@25%
46* @47
51
@51%

—

at the close of the fiscal years
ending June 30, 1861 and March 31, 1862-66 is shown in the following
1801.

25.12* @25.20

—

The financial condition of the company

abstract:

@11.16*

—

Valparaiso....

Madras
Calcutta

11:15

—

@113*
104*@109*
105*@108*
96* @109*

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.

DATE.

25.45 @25.55
13. 8*@13. 9

--

Buenos Ayres.

Sydney

BALANCES.

.

Antwerp

108*@113*
105

LONDON, ANJD ON LONDON,

RATE.

TIME.

93 @102
101 *@109*
103 @109

LATEST OATES.

EXCHANGE AT LONDONJUNE 9. '

ON—

81 *@103
91 @105

@i34
@119
@117*
107*@1!4
109*@114*
95 @109*
85>4 @ 97
99 @110
101 *@108%
88*@105%
89* @ 98%
85% @100

88*@ 95
94 @108
93*@104
93 @106
103*@117
103 @113
1U6*@111*
102 @111*

00%@78*
77*@-5*
77% @83*
77*@82*. 100 @123*
8 2* @96* 122* @149%
87%@95
117*@144%

.

1865-06.

110
105
110

88*@149%

53*@96*

.

186:4-64.

119* @127*

April. 03% @67% 34 @,58
May 04% @71% 30+4@39
June. 67)4@70)4 32%@36*
July 7U%@77* 34 @35
Aug.. 79 @84% 37+6@41;%
Sept.. 77*@82% 41 >,(@46
Oct.. 60 @77+8 45%@53
Nov
50 @66
51 @58*
Dec.. 42*@54
44*@54*
Jan.. 52* @62
50 @55%
Feb.. 52*@61* 52*@57
Mar.. 56 @61
55 @59*

LATEST

1861-2.

yearly for the ten

Ordinary Profits Interest Dividend Balanceoperat’g or net on funded paid on after lease
expenses, earn'sjs.
debt.
st«>ek. taxes, &c.
equipment, earn’gs
7*
$139,450
1856-57.. $7,878,273 $1,886,196 $1,0:16,157* $850,439 $137,970 j C447.G10 )
7*
404,314
1857-58.
8.026,119 1,407,846
778,817* 629,029
99,715] *503,600 J
92,685
8S9.300
97,790
1858-59..
537,668
351,632
8,026,119
97.79v)
167,597
44,181
1859-60..
622,661
471,273
8,163,554 1,»i93,934
120,134
97,990
708,054
455,964
1860-61..
8,237.710 1,164,0 IS
168.090
82,866
1861-02..
8,273.936 1,054,704+ 531,387+ 523,317 +97,790
74.726
338,239
728,154 100,i;35
800,987
1862-63.. 8,319,727 1,529,141
343,438
382,142
186:4-64..
8,679,433 2.143-875 1,010,462 1.103,413 102,690
375.041
1,056,250
1864-65..
9,054,9v3 3,359.390 1.467,681 1,891,709 102,532
631,579
3-43,682
1865-66..
9,300,132 3.154.235 1,711,454 1,442,781 101 535
*
Including taxes on real estate.
+ Operations for nine months only.
Cost of
Road and

OPERATION.

The

1860-1.

881,483

7,743,039 8,444,S32 9,4S5,582 10,315,764

REVIEW

expenses

8.35

38,558.462 56,539,150 63.414,831 59.21S,395

Tons carried 1 mile.

116,273
625,700

2,820
239,867

.

following table gives the cost of the road (228.4 miles) estima¬
ting the cost of the P. & B. Val. R. R. at $1,250,000 and the earnings,

459,9.86

8 46

West & East

952,243

In the

1S62-3.

1861-2.

1860-1.
Thro' pasg's

98,594

TRAFFIC.

PASSENGER

500,000

20,000
279,714

257,218

The

Passenger eng's. 349,530
Freight engines. 437,269
Wood <fc gravel

116,250

20,000

GENERAL

following statements show the operations ou the road, viz; the
mileage of engines, the number and mileage of passengers, the tons and
mileage of freight, the number of loaded cars and tons of freight cross¬
ing the Mississippi Bridge, etc., <fcc., yearly :
OF

$8,050,132

7,421,854

Total

OPERATIONS, YEARLY.

(9 Months.)

$6,987,710 $7,023,936 $7,069,727 $7,429,433 $7,804,923
89,957
60,154
156,976
62,268
207,260
101,500
101,500
101,500

100

The

MILEAGE

Accounted for, as follows :
R’d & equipment.
Fuel anu mat’ls..
's stock
Miss". & Mo. R.R.
bonds
Miss. Bridge Co
Assets ana dues.
Cash

6

112

155

Total.

20

109

155

Freight

[June 23,1866,

CHRONICLE.

THE

774

more

favorable indications of

a

return to easier rates

for money during (he present week than at any period since the failure
of Overend, Gurney & Go. The continued large arrivals of bullion from

America, aud the comparatively limited exports to India and other
quarters have had a most salutary effect, and few doubts are now enter¬
tained but that the Directors of the Bank of England will, at their week.

June

23, 1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.

ly meeting, to be held on Thursday next, reduce their minimum to nine
per cent.
By many, indeed.it is wished that, under the circumstances^
and as contributing so
materially to allay the still prevailing distrust,

the Directors would lower
sources

would allow

their terms

of such

as soon as

the state

of their

re¬

movement; but as the custom .here is(
reduction except on court
days, it is probible that we
shall not wituess a nine per cent till
Thursday next. Such a regulation

never

to make

a

a

however, might easily be dispensed with at the present critical time,

especially as the Directors are always ready to advance their rates
<qf discouut when there is pressure, or are symptoms of pressure, on their
•resources.
The tone of the money market
has greatly improved, and
snore

.as

of

the rates out of-doors

quite one per cent below those of the Bank
England, whilst accomodation is much more easily obtainable, busi¬

ness

is withdrawn from the central

carried to its
for

are

regular channels.

caution, and, perhaps, it is

establishment, and is more freely
But there is, nevertheless, great need

satisfactory circumstance to have to re
returning to their normal condition slowly, and not
with a rapidity from which there
might be a possibility of reaction.
Apart from the money market, strictly so called, and which has con¬
tributed in some degree to unsettle
people’s minds, as well as to retard
the favorable tendency of affairs, the
city has witnessed another serious
and important failure, that, viz., of the Agra and Masterman Bank. The
circumstance was not generally known till
Thursday morning ; but as
many rumours were afloat respecting the position of the undertaking,
the public were certainly not taken
by surprise. The “ bears ” in and
outside the Stock Exchange have for a
long time selected this bank as
an
object of attack, and I remarked in a former letter to what extent
they had been able to depreciate the value of its shares. This circum¬
stance, it appears, had reached Iudia, where the bank has numerous
branches, and believing in the truth of the reports circulating here, aud
considering them confirmed by the heavy decline in the value of the
shares, the depositors pressed upon the Bank their claims, and so great
appears to have been the pressure, that most of the branches were com¬
pelled to close their doors, and to telegraph to Londou for assistance
This was the critical time in the history of the Bank, and as the Directors
of the establishment here were not iu a
position to afford the branches
abroad the necessary advances, there was
evidently no alternative but
to dose.
In the balance sheet issued iu March, it
appea-s that the out¬
standing liabilities were £15,582,000. The nomiual capital is £3,000,000
iu £50 shares, of which one-half is paid up. The shares are therefore
of £25 each, and the shareholders are liable to the extent of £25
per
cord that matters

are

a

775

from creditors

holding security, £132,203; deferred assets, viz.: ad¬
allowing for contingencies, £574,349; debt due
from James McHenry, after charging him with £227,000
per contra,
£293,867 ; balance of advances for works being carried on by other
parties, £185,300 ; sundry assets, £153,268 ; interest on freehold and
leasehold properties, £88,000. The firm will be wound up under in¬
spection.
On the other h ind, the statement issued by the accountants having
the affairs of Overend, Gurney & Co. in hand, is not satisfactory, and
states, in effect, that at the time the private concern was purchased by
the Limited Company the business was not worth having, but for the
good-will of which £500,000 was paid. The debts to unsecured creditors
on the
10th of May, the date of the suspension, were £3,318,840; to
creditors holding security, £6,285,662 ; and to liabilities on bills re-discounted, £8,266,048. These are the principal debts, and the chief assets
are as under:
By cash in hand, £63,021 ; by bills receivable in hand,
£1,100,000; by sundry debtors’ balances, £422,000; by overdue bills in
hand, £80,000 ; Overend, Gurney tfe Co., suspense and guarantee ac¬
count, £2,250,000 ; by surplus of securities held by creditors, £266,827.
In respect to bills re-discounted, the accounts state that
it is impossi¬
ble at the present time to form any correct estimate as to the amount
which may ultimately be claimed against the Company iu respect of
vances on

works, after

these bills.”
Messrs.

drawn

on

Simonds, Hunt & Co. have requested all holders of bills
the Agra and Masterman Bank, for their account, by Messrs.

A. L. Row it Co., New Yotk ;

Colgate & Co., New York
York ;

Campbell & Shayer, New York; Robert

W. C. Fowler tfc Crampton, New
F. li.
Lee, Crocker &, Co., Boston, and Carruth <fc Sweetzer, Boston, to
;

present them at maturity lor payment, at their offices, 37 Mark Lane.
Endeavors are being made to found a new banking establishment on
the ruins ot the Agra and Masterman’s Bank ; the Bank of London, the
Consolidated, the English Joint Stock Bank, and the European Bank.
A

prospectus will shortly be issued. I have heard that the new under¬
taking is to be called the Phoenix.
This has been the most satisfactory^ day in financial circles since the
10th of May, and were it not that there were unfavorable rumors afloat
respecting the position of several companies, the crisis might be consid¬
ered virtually at au end.
Only one company, however, is looked upon
with suspicion ; but even should that fail, it is probable that very little
regret would be occasioned. I shall be able, however, to speak with
more
certainty respecting it at the proper time. To-day, accommoda-.
share.
In March last a dividend at the rate of 16
tion has been obtained at a comparatively low rate ; the best shortper cent, per annum
was declared, aud on the 1st of
January, 1805, the shares were as high dated commercial paper having been discounted at 8 per cent., or at 2
as SO
premium.
per ceut. below the Bank minimum.
Bankers’ four and six months’ ac¬
Many discussions have been held as to the propriety of endeavoring ceptances have been taken at even a lower rate, or at 7£ per cent. The
Bank return shows many satisfactory
to render nugatory “ bear ” coalitions, and to endeavor, more
changes, and as bullion continues
especially
to flow rapidly into the establishment, the
in such a critical period a3 this, to
prevent if possible speculations by
present position of the Bank
time bargains in stocks and shares.
It is very evident that during the has greatly improved since Wednesday evening. Then the stock of
last few weeks many scandalous proceedings have takeu
place, aud it bullion reached £13,278,961, but now it can hardly be less than
is a certain fact that the two greatest failures of the
present crisis— £14,000,000, whilst it is probable the reserve of notes and coin is ap¬
those,-viz.: of Overend, Gurney & Co, and of the Agra and Masterman
proaching £4,600,000. The imports of specie, chiefly from New York,
have been £2,000,000; and the
Bank—have been hastened by the operations in the Stock
exports, although considerable, have
Exchange of
speculators for a fall. Telegrams from the “ bears” and their agents declined to £560,000.
In the present state of the market, it is difficult to
have been forwarded to all parts of the
country and the Continent, and
give the exact
probably when the affairs of the Agra and Masterman Bank shall have quotations for money out of doors, aud those subjoined must, in conse¬
had more publicity, it will be found that adverse rumors
respecting quence, be considered approximate. The rate at which accommodation
this undertaking had been dispatched to
Bombay, Madras and Calcutta is now obtainable varies in some degree with the extent of one’s influ¬
and had been exaggerated in order to suit the
operations of the specu¬ ence at any particular establishment, and the quotations, even for the
lators here. Telegrams have even been
produced, bearing fictitious best paper, vary considerably. They may be considered as follows :
signatures, forwarded to large holders of the shares of certain influen¬
Per Cent.
PerCent.
30 days’ bills
8 @9
4 months’ bills
9 @10
tial undertakings, warning them of their
solvency, and advising them to 60 do do
s @,9
6 months’ Dills
9 @10
3 months’ bills
9 @93* 6&4 months’ bank paper...
sell out immediately. In such a matter, however,
7%@ 8#
judgment is difficult
of attainment, and, however opportune and
necessary it would be at
Respecting the rates of money on the continent, some little difficulty
the present moment, the Committee of the Stock
Exchange would has been realised iu obtaining those actually current, owing to the great
constantly be compelled to relax and cancel such a regulation. The absorption of interest by the approaching war.
At Paris, the quotation
Committee, however, by a majority of fifteen to twelve, have intimated remains easy, and iu the
open market has declined; but, iu nearly all
their unwillingness to interfere in the present
other quarters, the rates have had au
modes of dealing.
upward tendency.
The Bank of
A satisfactory meeting has been held of the creditors of Messrs. Peto
France has assumed au even
stronger position, the supply of bullion held
and Betts, the railway and
public works’ contractors. The statement by that establishment being £24,000,000. The
following are the rates
submitted by the accountants shows that there is due to unsecured of
money at the leading continental cities :
creditors £258,948, and to creditors bolding
security or partly covered
Bank
Open
Bank
Open
rate,
market,
£16,000. To liabilities from Mr. James McHenry, not covered by any
rate.
market.
c.
^ c.
$ c.
$ c.
security from him, £227,000, less £30,000 of securities deposited by At Paris
Turin
Vienna
5
« '
Messrs. Peto and Betts, and £17,576
Brussels.
surplus from creditors holding Berlin
security, who also hold some of the.-e liabilities, making £179,424 ; lia¬
Madrid
Frankfort
7
7
Hamburg
bilities on account of Mr. James
McHenry, covered by Atlantic and Amsterdam
6>r
St. Petersbure:
gm
6>*
Great Western bonds and debentures,
£104,000 ; liabilities on bills to
Consols were depressed on
Monday by the announcement that hopes
be provided for by other parties, £83,000 ; liabilities on bilks receivable
of assembling a CoDgress to
attempt the settlement of the German dis¬
£68,450, making the total liabilities £438,376 8s. 6d. The total assets
pute had been abandoned. Since then, however, the quotations have
amount to £1,562,064 ISs, 10dMthe
principal of which are: Surplus, steadily improved, and the announcement of the failure of the
Agra and




.

..

il

11

..

776

perceptible effect. The cause to be as¬
signed for the improvement is the nrore satisfactory state of financial
affairs, the rapid influx of bullion, an 1 the declining rates for money.
The highest prices of Consols on the days enumerated were :
Bank had had no

Masterman

ENDING JUNE

THE WEEK

FOR

Thur'dayj

Monday. Tuesday. 1 Wed'day

months shows a falling
the closing months of
last year on account of our own manufacturers, a9 well as during the
early months of this year, must have been of a very extensive charac¬
ter. The following-figures showing the extent of our exports of woolen
manufactures durmg the past four months of this year, fully bear out
this remark, and as compared with last year, the increase is very reBut

Sat’day.

Friday.

|

S5&

week ending

United States

(To

5-20's, 6 per cent

64 J*
5U
41

York
Pennsylvania section, lstra, 1877..
cons'ted mort. b'ds, 1895.
100 dollars, all paid
Convertible bonds, 6 per cent
do

Erie shares.
do
1 i

V-/ O U II

11 LIUi Q

U |IV. X. C L

UI j

$100 shares, all paid..
Cincinnati, 7 per cent...
New7 York Central, 100 dollar shares...
Panama Rail, 7 per cent, 1872, 2d mort.

70
70

41)4
70

70
47
42 ^
70

47

7414
69

07)4

67)4

7!,879,259 9,545,722
7.797.398 11,265.905’
Flannels
'
2,191,691 1,541,169 1,760,454'=
2,483,684 2.417,451 1,233,395*
Blankets
Blanketing and baizes
651,214
472,681
678,436
Carpets and druggets
2,156,293 1.318,441 2,417,799*
Shawls, rugs, coverlets, &c
number.
289,226
174,109
223,253Stuffs of wool only, and of wool mixed with
other materials
yards. 66,351,466 55,874.291 81,7^827The wheat trade throughout the country—owing to the greater cer¬
tainty of approaching war—-has been much firmer, and prices have

Yarn
Cloths of all

41

4-1)4
70

75 >-i

75)4

69

69

67)4

67)4

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
Imports and Exports for the Week.—Th-e imports show a large in¬
this week in general merchandise, making the total imports
$9,055,745 against $2,730,759 last week, and $7,709,323 the previous
week.
The exports are $2,009,003 this week, against $1,943,494
last week, and $1,634,555 the previous week. The exports of cotton

69

67)4

101

101

101

101

101

40

40

40

40

40

40

are

73

73

73

in the

1st mortgage.

73

73

73

J

•3

72 ?4

73

93)4

93)4

73
93

76)4

77

77*4

Frankfort state that the market
steady at 67f.
Messrs. James Baines cfe Co., of Liverpool, and
Co., of London, have issued a circular

73
'95
78

j

9>
78

,

1

73
96

|

week. Included
barrels rye
flour, 1.996 barrels corn meal, 15,363 bushels rye, 1,852 bush
els oats,
10,623 bushels peas, 528,233 bushels corn, 659 pack¬
ages candles, 585 tons coal, 210 bales hay,
52 barrels spirits
turpentine, 3,352 barrels rosin, 222 barrels tar, 100 gallons sperm:"
oil, 1,005 gallons lard oil, 105 gallons linseed oil, 181,101 gallons pe
troleum, 624 barrels pork, 484 barrels and 122 Srerces beef, 87,969'
pounds cutmeats, 34,046 pounds butter, 749,404 pounds cheese, 473,732
pounds lard, S69 bbls. rice, 259,416 pounds tallow, 1,884 hogsheads and
479 other packages crude tobacco, 220,924 pounds manufactured tobac¬
co, as may be seen in a comparative table of exports which we give in
Commercial Epitome. The following are the imports at N*w York
fur week ending (for dry-goods) June 14, and for the week eudrsg, (fb«r

77)4'

for United States 5 *20

Mackay
&
announcing that circumstances
compel them to place their affairs under inspection.
Considering the difficulty of obtaining accomodation, even at a high
of interest, and the many rumors of approaching war, together with
the large quantity brought forward, the decline in the value of wool at
the public sales of Australian and Cape of Good Hope pro uee now in
progress, of Id to 3d. per lb., is not of such important magnitude as
might have been anticipated.
Prices have evidently been, in some
sustained by a decline in the importation, by the circumstance
that the clip in Australia has not shown its annual increase, and by the
Messrs. T. M.

rate

Drv goods
General merchandise

material, in
the
America.

but as the

months have been as
IMPORTS OF

Total for the

Previously

Australia.
other

countries

lbs.

Total

“

1,841,460

3.25 ,532

21,562.695
6,220,970

our

EXPORTS

OF

WOOL

INTO

THE

Al’RIL

/—PRODUCE OF BRIT.

1864.
lbs.
To Hanse

Towns-

Belgium
France

United States.
Other countries

..

Total
.

—

Grand total




.

1865.
lbs.

175,818 1,161,46-4
2,107,276 4.894,751

30.
POS.—,

1866.
lbs.

886,907

1,031,864

4,314,169 8,934.224 8,490,725
1,261,928
337,471
198,011
415,471
111,343
576,110

7,970.534

FROM JANUARY

UNITED KINGDOM
,

t

1864.
lbs.

1,792

FOREIGN

1865
lbs.

96.768

431,609 1,844,717
317,980 849,531

1 TO
1866.
lbs.

,

72,868

290,S61
411,569

$316,458

Liverpool—

360,000

Liverpool—
American gold.
2,497.860
9.800
Silver bars
Calif’nia silver bars
19,758
Gold bars
372,725

13—SS. Persia,

For HavreGold bars
American

41,955,775

exports of

For

London-

300,0: !0

“

15—SS. Hermann,

Foreign silver

15,000

American gold

242,560

Foreign silver

3,250

5u,000»
15—SS. Ville rte Faris, Havre—
Silver coin

11

American gold
American silver....

Spanish gold
Foreign coin

“

10.400

Bremen-

gold

June 15—SS. Allemannia, Hamburg—
American gold ....
327, 500
Gold bars
9,436

179,200

gold
Foreign gold

16—Steamer Etna,

“

1863
1862
1861
I860
1859

15,850
21,700

Liverpool—

$6,056,743

-week
Previously reported

in

30,000'

gold
789,218
16—Steamer Corsica, Nassau—
American gold
1,122

Total for the

Total since Jan. 1,

471,450’

American

13,456

Same time
1865
1864....

the port of New

Southampton—

American

..

21,934,222
4,335,563

wool, there has been a considerable decrease, the
result chiefly of the war movements on the Continent. The quantities
tak6n by the French at the public sales are necessarily not included in
the official statement of exports, because the return is only made up to
the close of April; but from the accompanying table it will be ob¬
served that the failing off is chiefly in the Belgian and German demand :
In

13—Steamer Baltic,

$2,397,972'

72,35^033 100,097,907r
$74,457,06"V$102,495,879'
found * the official bailed.*

commercial department will be
statement of the imports and exports for the week.
The following will show the exports of specie from
York for the week endiug June 16, 1S66 :

7,830,229

43,241,643

$5,231,326 - $2,195,979

In the

Silver bars
13—SS. Marathon,
American gold

1866.

1865.

1864.

85,001,956 72,275.033
$87,551,108 $77,506,359

Since January 1

19,817.182
3,603,630

33,304,318

W#EK.

YORK FOR THE

$2,549,152

week
Previously reported

5,339.209
2,516,552

4,502,380

$1,213,042 $2,009,003:.
1,457,394 7,046,742
$2,670,436 $9,055,74564,736,838 140,63S,721
$67,407,274 $155,694,466

report of the

For the

lbs.

5,515,158
6,686,288

our

1863.

JAN. 1, TO APRIL 30
1866.
1865.

lbs.

4.539.666

1

EXPORTS FROM NEW

June

1864.

week

1866.

1865.

-

under :

From—
Hanse Towns and other parts of Europe.
British Possessions in South Africa
British India

THE WEEK.

AT NEW YORK FOR
1863.
1864.

dry-goods trade will be found the imports of dry
goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of specie) fromthe port of New York to foreign ports, for the week ending June 19 :
In

buy cautiously,

UNITED KINGDOM FROM

wheat flour, 329

$777,708 $1,131,906
M10 210
3,956,946
$2,187,918 $5,088,852
83,366,458 110,054,789
$85,554,376 $115,143,641

....

reported

Since January

supplies of wool held by

WOOL INTO THE

also 12,352 barrels

FOREIGN IMPORTS

and to enter into few fresh
manufacturers are small,
it is anticipated that when the financi al position shall have become more
satisfactory, the recent reduction in prices will, in part, be recovered.
The probability of approaching war on the Continent will necessarily
greatly restrict the German demand; but, on the other hand, French
machinery is in active operation, and French houses are making large
purchases of qualities suited to their consumption. It is even estimated
that out of the large supply brought forward at the present sales, that
French buyers have already taken two-thirds.
They have evidently
taken advantage of the ease prevailing in the money market on their
side, and of the stringency existing here ; and it may without doubt be
asserted that had it not been for these extensive purchases, the decliue
in prices must have been much greater.
Our imports of wool for four
contracts:

exports were

general merchandise) June 16 :

the part of our manufacturers for the 'aw
order to complete their contracts for goods.
The aggregate trade in
goods, so far as exports are cor.cerned, has been very large during
present year, the greatest increase being in our shipments to
At the present time, the high rate of interest and the bank failures, are
on

bales from 474 last

increased this week to 1,-392

our

measure,

causing manufacturers to

quarter.

COMMERCIAL AND

101

cent
cent

demand

..lbg. 9,706.661
yards. 10,353.890

kinds

risen Is. to 2s. per

41)4

70

67)4

wa9

large

1866..

1865.

1864.

70
70
48

70

7 5 >4
69

Advices from

bonds

j

70
70
4S

48)4
42*8

72

by Penn. Railroad Co) —
with option to be paid in
Philadelphia

Canada 6 per
do
5 per

"

crease

$50 shares

Philadelphia and Erie,
do

70

70

50
42

FROM

UNITED KINGDOM

MANUFACTURES FROM THE
JAN.
1 TO APRIL 30.

!

rTr^/
4«>.4

do

3881, (gua.

50
42

70

65)4
50

;

64)4

50
43

U l , XUtU . • . •

Marrietta and

do

64)4

50
43

70

6 per cent

Atlantic and Great Western, New
section. 1st mortgage, 1880

04)4

70
70
46
42

.

Frb i Sat.

;Thur.

Tues. Wed.

Mon.

June 9.

WOOLEN

OF

.EXPORTS

dull in con£e'
quence of the announcement of large sales at New York by an exten
eive holder.
Other American Railway Shares have also been dullThe highest prices on the days mentioned were as follows:
For

remarbable:

86

have been very

Erie Hailway Shares

tuated materially.

although the export demand for the four
lbs., the demaud for wool during

off 6,700,000

| 86j4 86^ex. d
85)4
S5?a
Consols
United States 5-20 bonds have been steady, and prices have not ffuc
1

[June 23, 1866.

CHRONICLE

THE

1866
Same time In

$17,521,047 1858
27.411,833 1857
1856
19,931,040 1855
21,749,363 1854
3.024,822
18,429,776; 1853
31,431,107|1852

:

37,477,535
£43,534,278
$11,870,151
20,056,996
12.236.930

35.696,472
14,364,938

7,918,836

10,518,262

Internal Revenue Report —The Secretary of the Treasury on
1,465,975 1,164,134 891,834
106,826 152,119 273,200 Wednesday June 20 transmitted to the House of Representatives,
15,761,560 11,162,43S 2,324,182 4,107.269 1,940,332 answer to a resolution, a report from the Commissioner of Interna

in

10,294,710 19,S71,*92 13,102,770

June 23,

1866.j

THE CHRONICLE

Revenue, from which it appears that the amount of direct taxes by the
act of 1861 apportioned to Virginia is $937,650, of which $379,491 has
been collected ; appoitioned to North Carolina, $576,194, collected,
$260,283 ; apportioned to South Carolina, $363,570, collected, $205,882 ;
apportioned to Georgia, $584,367, collected $54,421 : apportioned to
Alabama, $529,313, none collected ; apportioned to Mississippi, $413,084,
collected, $25,000 ; apportioned to Louisiana, $385,836, collected,
$301,167; apportioned to Tennessee, $669,498, collected, $82,811 ;

777

' although j'op

have remitted the amount to a bank in New York, where it is sub¬
ject to duty. It is clear that the Mohawk Valley Bank has received the $100,000
on deposit, the whole of which is available
to it, although a portion of it may
have been
i probably placed with you, as a fund against, which it can draw, upon whi^h it
receives interest, although that would not be material to the question.
It is not less clear that you have received $25,000 on
deposit, which you have
transferred to the New York bank with the same view, and that the New York
bank has the $25,000 on deposit, which it may use as it
may use any deposits,
say of individuals.
question would not then be, what use does a bank
j make of its deposits, The what
but
deposits has it on hand?
'
I know that the present duty and taxes on banks are onerous and burden¬
' some ; but yet, so long as the duty, with the collection of which I am intrusted,
them, it does not. seem a sufficient reason why I should authorize
apportioned to Arkansas, $261,866, collections not reported ; appoi tioned is laid upon from what
a
departure
seems to be the spirit, clear intent, and meaning of the
to Florida, $77,522, collected, $5,712 ; apportioned to Texas, $356,106,
law, which might thus be so perverted as to fail to answer the purpose designed.
A bank should not be permitted, for its own benefit, to
collected, $47,423.
go behind its own re¬
cords and books, and to eliminate certain amounts which it
The property held by the Government under sales authorized by
judges not profit¬
able: thus opening a door to fraud and perjury. Of course there would be no
acts relating to direct taxes, was purchased at prices amounting in the
suspicion of evasion by a bank of character and standing like vour own; but
several States as follows : Virginia, $32,268 ; South Carolina, $65,392 ; some banks it is undoubtly best to leave, if possible,
nothing undefined.
A remedy would be for banks to decline to receive
.Florida, $6,168 ; Tennessee, $S,360.
deposits on such terms as
•would not allow a profit, to them above the duty on other
expenses ; but, while
In Arkansas lands were struck off for taxes unpaid to bidders who
competition among them for business is so great, it does not seem probable that
never completed their
the rule would generally prevail.
purchases, to the amount of $18,600. The
The banks in New York and other cities were permitted, upon representations
amounts received from sales in the several States are as follows ;
made by them, to omit from their deposits of the day such checks as were de¬
Virginia, $3,130 ; South Carolinu, $28,433 ; Florida, $34,599 ; Ten¬ posited on that day, but remained uncollected, and against
which no checks
nessee, $122,717.
Arkansas is not reported. The whole amount stand¬ were made, or rather paid. But no claim has been made that any collections
ing to the credit of the Arkansas Commissioners, from taxes collected should be omitted from deposits after the money had been collected.
I notice propositions before Congress to reduce materially the
duty upon
-and the proceeds of sales deposited to the credit of the Uuited Slates,
banks, which, or something similar to it, I shall hope to see become a law. It
is $165,262.
seems necessary, in the event that a burdensome State tax
upon the banks shall
The Secretary of the Treasury in his letter inclosing the above facts, be insisted upou, that Congress should, to a certain extent, remit the duty to
the Government.
says: “ I avail myself of the occasion to express an opinion based upon
F. E. SPINNER,
my observation of the operation of the law that an additional enact¬
Treasurer United States.
Thos. W. Olcott, President National Mechanics' and Farmers’ Bank, Albany,
ment authorizing the assumption by the States, respectively, of the re¬
New York.
mainder of the direct tax due from each, would, in view of the present

impoverished condition of their people, prevent much hardship in indi

vidual cases, and save from practical confiscation the property of many
persons against whom the Government has no grounds of complaint,
while no public interest would be injuriously atfected.
Should this

!

j

Statement
Purchase

of

Secretary

McCulloch Concerning

the

Sale

and

United States Bonds.—It appears

from a letter of the
Secretary of the Treasury, addressed to the House of ^Representatives
policy be adopted, the collection of taxes under the present system in reply to a resolution of that body, that since the first of January,
might and ought to be discontinued until an opportunity for assump¬ fifteen hundred and fiftv thousand
Ten-forty bonds were purchased at
tion be offered. Whether the amount lealized from re-sales of property,
j
bid in for the Government, should or should not be allowed to the ! prices ranging from 90J@92f, or in the aggregate $1,414,537. They
States, respectively, in computing the taxes still due is a question well were purchased because this class of them were being sold in the mar¬
deserving of consideration, which I submit without comment.” The re¬ ket at prices much below their value, and because their depreciation
ceipts on account of internal revenue for the present year up to the 19th was
affecting injuriously the bouds which it was desirable for the govern¬
inst., inclusive, amount to $299,018,436, leaving less than $l,()00,0u0
ment to negotiate, as well as the national credit
to complete $300,000,000, the estimate made at the Bureau of Internal
generally. These
Revenue.
It is now believed that the receipts of the fiscal year, end¬ bonds, which have been cancelled, may be regarded as a purchase on
ing with the 30ch of this month, will amount to $306,Out),000, from account of the sinking fund or as a redemption of so much of the pub¬
taxes for internal revenue alone.
lic debt. The bonds sold since January last were $22,769,900 for
National Bank Deposit Taxes.—The following correspondence is o
$23,461,850. In addition to these, $7,947,700 were exchanged for
seven and three-tenths notes and a small amount of certificates of in¬
interest to the National Banks throughout the country :
debtedness previous to the 1st of January, the ^notes and certificates
National Mechanics’ and Farmers’ Bank,
(
being received by the Department at the time the bonds were delivered,
Albany, June 11, 1866.
f
but for lack of time to make the necessary calculation of interest and
Hon. F. E. Spinner :
the proper entries upon the books, the account of the agent was not
My Dear Sir—The former Commissioner of Internal Revenue decided tha
deposits growing out of collections lor other banks, and remitted for at short settled, and the amount of bonds delivered and notes received in ex¬
cates, were not taxable.
Your decision, though co nprehensive, still leaves the
change was not entered upon the public debt statement until February,
question open for bankers to interpret. You require the taxon “collections
made for other banks, and. in fact, on all descriptions oi deposits w-hicli may be 1 aud did not appear upon the published statement uuti the 1st of March.
It is also proper to remark that $3,747,C00 in
used by the bank.'1 Our interior banks collect for city banks and r< mit by
five-twenty bonds,
check on New

York, weekly, semi-monthly, and monthly, as the arrangement
be, at par. Weekly remittances average three and a half days; semi¬
weekly remitiances average seven and a half days ; monthly remittances aver¬
age fifteen and two-third days.
Deposits which remain in interior banks
through collections in miscellaneous currency only three and a half and seven
and a half days, and are then remitted for by check on city banks, cannot, I
think, be safely used. I am not so clear in regard to an average deposit of fif¬
teen and two-third days, and therefore prefer to know a ad be governed by your
views. As an experienced country bauker, you can readilydecide this ques¬
tion. Our canal tolls are collected on an allowance of twenty days.
I think we may fairly claim that in case of doubt we should have the benefit
of it. This is equitable in all cases, and especially in regard to banks, who are
so over-taxed beyond all other property as to seriously threaten their destruc¬
tion. The yearly taxes of tiiis bank—Government, State and municipal—are
over ten per cent, on our capital.
This will excuse us for past and future con¬
flicts for rights which cannot be yielded without a surrender of our existence.
I am, therefore, induced to bring before you another question for your deci¬
sion. Can a deposit be taxed more than once ? For instance, the Mohawk
Valley Bank has deposits amounting to $100,000, upon which they pay the
Government tax.
They remit to us $25,000 of said deposits ; and can the same
be taxed a second time in our hands ? We remit it, to our credit, to a bank in
New' York, and if this duplicate taxation is claimed there is no limit to its mul¬
tiplication and consequent injustice and oppress on.
I suggested these points, and some others wdiich the Government has since
yielded, to the present Secretary of the Treasury when he was Comptroller of
the Currency, and he wrote me that my suggestions had great weight, and that
he would speak to ihe Commissioner of Internal Revenue on the subject.
The
sacrifices which the condition of our banks then required of us no longer demand
our unyielding acquiescence, and I trust the time has arrived for a
just and
amicable adjustment of these que tions.
I have the honor to be, dear Sir, vours,
THjMAS W. OLCOTT, President.
may

Treasury of the United States,
Division of National Banks,

$3,717,000 of wdiich

were

issued under the act of March 3, 1864, and

which

by the schedule-appears to have been sold in January and Feb¬
ruary, were not entered as a part of the public debt until March, aud
did not appear upon the public statement until April 1, the explanation
of which is, that the sales of the bonds w7ere included
by the agents in

the continuous account, which was not settled and closed until March,
the last sale having been made on the 20th of that month, the agents

in all instances giving proper certificates of deposits to the credit of the
Treasurer of the United States on the bonds, which were from time to
time delivered to them.

d£l)e USaitkers’ (Sa)ctte.
We

give in

Bulletin

from day to day lists of bonds, &c., lost, and
daily, and on Saturday
morning, such as have been published through the week In the Bulletin
will be collected and published in the Chronicle.
Belo^PKvill be found tho»e
published the last week in the Bulletin.
our

dividends declared.

These tables will be continued

DIVIDENDS.

NAME OF

PAYABLE.

RATE

COMPANY.

BOOKS OL08ED.

O’T.

P.

WHEN.

)
>•

Washington, June 18.1866. )
Sir—I have received yours of the 11th inst., the contents of which I note.
You quote the words of the return : “ collections made for other banks, and
in fact all descriptions of deposits which may be used by the bank,’’ and refer
to collections made by conutry banks for city banks, for which payment is made
at stated periods, which collections .on think Would not properly come under
the head of deposits “ u*ed by the bank.”
In the semi-annual return, after enumerating the different classes of deposits,
that have occurred to me as likely to be made with a bank, the words, “and in
fact all descripiions of deposits which may be used by the bank,” have been
inserted to cover any deposits that may not have been enumerated, and not as a
qualification of the preceding classes.
I think deposits arising from collections are as clearly subject to duty as any
class of deposits. The collecting bank has the use of the money from time of
collection until it is paid; it goes into general account with other funds of the
bank, and may be used as well. The fact that a remittance is made at stated
periods does not operate against this view. It may even be an advantage to a
bank to know exactly howlong a collection or deposit may remain with it. If
the collecting bank remits at stated periods at par (as stated) or without charge,
it would seem that it was an acknowledgement that benefit was derived by it
from the collection.
In regard to the question, can a deposit be taxed more than once, instancing
the Monawk Valley Bank as paying duty on $100,000 deposits, $25,000 of which
have been deposited with you by that bank, upon which amount you pay duty,




of

WHERE.
*
-

N. Y. Hanks.
Ninth National
5 p. c. July 2.
5
B’k ofN. Y. Na B’k Assoc.
July 2.
5
Fifth National Bank
Ju y 2.
National Butch's <fc Drovers
5
July 2,
5
Tenth National
July 2.
6
Metropolitan National
July 2.
F urth Nat onal
5
July 2.
Nonh River Bank
5
-...
July 2.
National Broadway
$3p.s July 2.
.

Eighth National

5

July 2.

5
4
4
5

July 2.
June 25.

-

At Bank.
Bank.
Bank.
B tnk,
Bauk.
Bank.
Bank.
Bank.
B ink
Bunk.

At
At
At
At
At
At
At
At
At

June
June
J une
June
June
June
June

20
15
25
15
23
20
23

to

July 2.
July 5.
Juiy 2.
July 2.
to July 2.
to July 7.
to July 2.
to
to
to

June 20 to July 2.
June 25 to July 2.

^Transportation Co’s
Phil. Wil. & Balt. R.R. Co.

Wyoming Valley Canal Co.
Eastern Railroad Company
Boston &

orcester R R..

July 2.

July 2.

Michigan Central Railroad. $5 p.s. J uly 3.
Insurance.
Great Western Marine

3%

....

10

Brooklyn Fire

'

July 2.
J uly 2.

miscellaneous.
Union Trust
4
July 2.
Boston Water Power
($5 p.s 1 July 2.
N.Y. Guaranty Indem’ ty Co
3^ 1 July 2.

1

1

Philadelphia.

Company’s Ofti’e

June 16 to June 25.

Boston.
BostonF. L&T. Co. NY June 22 to July 8.

Company’s Ofli’e June 23 to July 2.
Company’s Otfi’e
73 Broadway.
June 25 to
Far. L&T.Co,NY J une 25 to
Company’sOffi’e June 25 to

July 2.
July 2.
July 2.

778

THE CHRONICLE.
LOST

NAME

Of

BONDS.

PaRT*

BY WHOM ISSUED

NUMB EES.

U. S. 7-3) Bon is

U. S. 7-30 Bonds

AMOUNT FOR.

126,74s

J

June

$500

195,344
1 '5,' 60
236,234

1

Bated.

15, ?6>.

June 15, '65.

$100 e:ich.

.

REFER TO WHOM.

236 554

'

230,857

U, S. 7-30 Bonds

Clapr» & Gordon,
Key West,

$50 each.

-

229,435
23 ,983

June

Florida.

15, ’G5.
1

J

230,473

N.Y. State 6’s,
N. Y. State 7’s
N. Carolina 6’s
Ohio 6’s
Rhode Isl’d 6’s
S. Carolina 6’s
Tenuesee-6's..

[June 23, 1866.
5,000

5,000
7.000

3,000

5,000

Virginia 6's...
City bonds, viz.:
Brooklyn 6’s.
Jersey City6’a
N.Y. City 6’s

55,000

2,000

2,000

10,000

46,000

36,000

7,000
106,000

5,000

58,000

2,000

2,000
.....

.....

.....

I

The

BUSINESS
The
and

AT

THE

STOCK

following is a summary of the amount of Governments, State and City
securities, and railroad bonds sold on each day:

BOARDS.

Mon.

64

Tues.
168

50

Wed.

Thurs. Fri'v.

56

220

40

Week.
393
'

Railroad.shares, viz.:
Catawissa

200

Central of New Jersey....

"lOO
•

Chicago and Great Eastern
Chicago 11 Northwestern.

Tnes.

Railroad Bonds..

6;000

39,500

54,500

$87,500

3,800

4‘606

21*406

3,240

4,858

3,130

2.400

16,378

January
February

3,846,500

85.400

March

3.931.300

22,700

April

May

5,2'.!0

25,500

20,700

2, S00

3.500

4,000

19,200 11,500
5,900
5,200

200

19.152
100
900
900

21.215

13.625

.

13,SCO

22,250

300

509

1,400

500

100
200

’400

3*906

100

600

24,900

RS00

Joseph.

400
2.1U0

100
8'_0

400
400

3,325

...

Sout^rn

1,900

1,900

4,300

4,900
62

....

100

•

••

•

....

1,432
1,984

1.120

100

1,518

1.700

400

3,310

,.

600
90S

50

950

27

32

Mississippi (.$100.)

2,250

200
905
20
300

200

113,002
100
2.800

79

3,950

3,100

1,305

3.325

12.386

10,700

6.000

100

1,313

300

28,513

100

616
100

Toledo & Wabash

....

American Coal
Atlantic Mail
Boston Water Power..
Brunswick City

....

100
300
900

....

700
....

Canton...

200
300
1.200

300

400

1,200

5,300

3,600

90

....

6G0

100
200
9u0

ioo

1,300

1,666

600

Cary Improvement

5O0

80.0

1,000

100

400
2.400
900

TOO
10
200
100

1,100
50
....

100

300

Pacitie Mail

....

Pennsylvania Coal.
Q.uicksilve ■'
Spring Mo intain..

....

1.000

1,000

500

1,536

200

70
700

70
200

1,390
1(H)
70

1,650
100

....

1,500
1,750

2,314

127

21

198

300

200

800
400

....

....

The volume of transactions in sh

790

•

50

900
800

....

400

190

150

50

360

Wyoming Valley Coal

•

....

200

5

....

ioo
•

50

2*900
....

«...

100

Western Dili on Telegraph
W. U. Telegragh—Russian
Wilkesbarre Coal

10

....

....

....

at the

700

....

.

.

.

.

3,310

....

4,300
10,710

two

Boards, comparatively, for
each day of the two last weeks, and the total for the same
weeks, is shown in
the following statement:
*-Reg. Board.Both Boards-Open Boards
Last
week.

Saturday
Monday
Tuesday

Total of week

The transactions in shares
shown in the

following

Week ending

Regular
Board.

Friday.

January

5...

13,334

30,034

61,200

52,842

41,000

44,510

65,yS2

67,762

20.947

54,400
42,380

50,500

00.6 '3

71,447

23,202
24.418

41.800

63,800
31,300

68,180
64,633

87.062

55,718

120,501

238.680

26S,910

380,544

395,501

commencement of the year are

smtement:

Open
Board.

January 26.... 247.743

301.400

February o
February 9.V.
February 16...

.201.107
.209.140
.234 285

239,700
227,800

Februurv23.. .187,913
March
2... .217,961

183,200
221,500
211,300
213,450
335,910

.

82.578

revs

week.

20,500

Both

Week ending

Boards

243.900

9.. .206.819
16... .206,312
23
.261,106
30.. .122,5i.3

La-t
week.
47.274

Prev’s
week.

17,000

;

21.37S
23.252

weekly since the

181,350
January 12... 339,109
January 19... 243^15

March
March
March
March

Last
week.
31.700

week.

30,233
25.800
22,833
150,804

1 ’rev’s

15.574
20,342
24,082

Wednesday.
Thursday
Friday

ires

Friday

425,250 April
328,400 667,509 April
272,300

228,700

516,115 April
549,143! April
440.807 May
436.940 May
462.985 May

371,113 May

,

Regular

Board.
6.. .170.934
13.. ..250,118
20.. ..176,956
27.. ..242.738
4.. -.135.949
.

11.. ..139,127
18..
205,609
25.. ..228,080

439.461 June 1i5 days ). 228,873
8.. ..204,080
41*,149 .June
419.762 June
15.. ..126,594
597.016 June
22..
150,864
..

208,200' 330,763!

Open

Both

Board.

Boards

247,4i'0
214,650

418.334

208.650

464,768
385,606

226,230

468,968*

182,500

318.449
329.597
566.549

190.450

360,940
454.381
380,306
278.850

268,910
238,680

682,461
609,170
472.930

395,501

3i>9,544

The Government and
arc

State, &c., bonds sold at the Regular Board, daily, last
given in the following statement:
Sat.

U. S. 6’s, 1881.
U.S 6’S(5-20’S).
U.S 6's (old)..
U.S 5's (10-40s
U.S 5's (old)..
U.S 7-30 notes

Mon

Tues.

s

$12,500 $24,000

22.500
21.000
500
4.000
4.500

535,000

U.S Certillc’s.

Wed.

Thnr.

$10,000 $20,000
377.500 239,500

38,000

157,000
40.000
30.0iKJ

10,0.10

14.000

2,0 0

19,000

19.000

242,050
15,000

151,500

147,300

57,000

Fri.

....

Week

$5,500

$72,000
178,500 1,560,090

8,000

4,000

2,000

82,500

269,000

55,000
S71,350

15,000

....

bonds, viz.
California 7’s,
Connects 6's.

1,000

Illinois 6’s....
Indiana 6’s...

1.000

$3,035,500
1,692,100

5.798,300

3.006,700
3,739.650

2.903,600
1,679.500

781.240
83S.700

9,822,000
10.622,840
12,056,150

2,258,250

1,236,600

781,900

12,279,450

ending on Friday—,
(5 days).
$1,111,500
$288,0'’0

“
“

1
8
15
22

$085,000

$145,500

1,577.000
1,599,800

$1,830,000

397,000
483,000

93.700

2,789.500

159,000
159.000

2.519,600

Louisiana 6’s.

Michigan 7’s.

1,000
6,000

1,000

-

217,000

3,096,650

Friday, June 22, 1866—P. M.
no materia]
change in tl\e

The Money Market.—There has been

aspect of the money market since our last. The fluctuations in gold
coin produced a general dulness in business, which is
naturally at¬
tended with

incFease of balances

an

on

the bands of bankers and

a

dnliness in the loan markets

The summer cjuiet in stock speculation
in, there is also less demand for call loans. The usual
having set
demand at this season for money for moving the wool crop is begin¬
ning to show itself; but without producing any perceptible effict
upon the rates of interest. At present, the balance of exchanges
between the East and West is in favor of the latter section
; but
there appears to be no consequent movement of funds Westward.
The most geueral rate on demand loans is 5 per cent.; but ou
Government collaterals loans are easily effected at 4 per cent.
Discounts are quiet.
On ordinary prime paper the rate is 6@7
per cent., and on specialties _5@6 per cent. ; lower grades pass at
8@12 per cent. The following are the current rates for loans of

various classes

:

Call loan*
Loans on bonds & raort..
Prime endorsed bills, 2
months

United

Per cent.
4 @ 5
6 © 7

4,000

5,000

3,000
36,000

Per cent.

Good endorsed
4 months

do
5

© 53*

single

bills, 3 &
6

©7

7 ©8
10 @12

names

Lower grades

States

Securities.—Governments have been gener¬
ally firmer during the week. The advance in gold, during the
early part of the week, so far reduced the price of old Fivetwenties here, as, compared with London
quotations, as to
cause
a
partial demand for shipment, under which the price
advanced to 104. The subsequent decline in gold caused a decline
in the price of the bonds, and the price
closes at 103J@103|.
Foreign bankers who have themselves taken bonds sent from their

European correspondents, also sent out

a

fair amount by Wednes¬

day V steamer. Late this afternoon there was a further demand for
export by to-morrow’s mail. The China brought bonds for sale ;
but the amount thrown
upon the market to-day has not been suffi¬
cient to affect prices perceptibly.
Five-twentie3 of 1864 and 1865
have advanced ^@§- per cent., in sympathy with the improvement
in the issue of 1862.
Ten-forties have been quiet, and stationary in
price. Seven-thirties have been more active, and advanced
per cent, in sympathy with the improvement in Five-twenties.
The subjoined closing quotations for
leading Government securi¬
ties, will show the difference in prices as compared with previous
weeks:
U.
U.
U.
U.
U.
U*

S. 6’s, 1881 coup
S.
S.

5-20’s, 1862coupons.
“
5-20’s, 1864
S. 5-20’e, 1865
“
S 10-40’8,

S 7-30’s 1st series

U. S 7-80’s 3rd series
U. S. 1 yr’s certificates

-

May 11. May 18. May 31. June 8. June 15. June 22
109
1093*
1993*
109%
1103*
1103*
102

1023*
1023*
96

1923*
1023*
1023*
100>*

101 &
1(2

1023*
96

1023*
1023*
102%
1013*

10; 3*

1021*
1023*
*
953*
1023*
1023s
1023*
100

1023*
1023*
1023*

1023*
1023*
1023*
903*
1023*
1023*
1023*

1053*
1023*
R’23*
963*
1023*
1023*
1023*

100

100

100

1023*
1023*
1023*
963*

of the $300,000,000 of
payable. On the 1st proximo,
on the
following gold-bearing bonds fall due : Sixes
of 1868; do. of 1880 ; do. of 1881; Fives of 1874 ;
Seven-thirties became

21,000

721,800
277,800
8S6.350

1,834,500

On the 15th the coupons

Kentucky 6’s.

Minnesota 8’s.
Missouri 6’s..
N.Y. State 5's.

$952,000
1,691,500

65.900

State

Georgia 6’s...

$12,155,700

$3.340.100«.
2,591.900

.

'

Cumberland Coal
Del. it llud on Canal..
Manhattan Gas

“

10,125

3,600

50

amount.

62

1,331

06

Total

Bonds.

3.552

4,400

116

Railroad

Bonds.

15,900

1,300

Stonington

$4,827,200

State, <fec.,

600

2,500

Pitt-., Ft. Wayne & Cliic.
Reading
Sr. Lotus, Alton & T. H..

159,000

8,002,700

June

6, ioo

30

,

.

22,500

Week.

and for the weeks

6,725

30
2.025

..

Fri.

21,500

15,009

Governments-—,
Bonds.
Notes.

2,i66

1,300

Milwaukee & FTdu Chien.
Milwaukee it St. Paul....
NewJYork Central
New York <t New Haven.
Ohio &

200

1,200

Long Island.

Panama

LO’O

Thnr.

^994,050 483,000 574,800 453,000 504,500 3.096,850

3.250

3’300

Cleveland it Pittsburg....
Cleveland & Tole to!
Del., Lack. & Western...

Michigan

260

i

....

Wed.

The totals of each class of securities sold in the first four months of the year
are shown in the statement which follows:
,

Cleveland, Col. & Cine

Marietta it Cincinnati
Michigan Central

500

200

700

...

-

100

1*,750

6.500
1,550

Chicago & Rock Island...

Hannibal and St.
Hudson River
Illino s Central

200

”50

Chicago & Alton
Chicago, Bur. & Quincy...




Mon.

Total amount....

Sat.

Bank Shares

week,

Sat.

following shows the description and number of shares sold at the ReguOpen Boards conjointly on each day and for the week ending on ‘.Friday.

second series
the coupons
of 1867 ; do.
do. of 1871 ;

June

THE

23, 1866.]

CHRONICLE.

War Bonds.

On the 15th {July, the interest on the
third series of Seven-thirties, amounting to $8,895,000, becomes

and Oregon

payable; and on the 16th Julv, the interest

on

the bonds of the

Central Pacific Railroad of 1895.
Railroad

exhibits the decline in
of the'Summer

The

following table shows the aggregate transactions at the SubTreasury since April 7 :
W €:eks

Ending
Apr. 7

Miscellaneous Securities.—Stock

and

speculation
at the opening

activity which usually

excursion

occurs
excitement

The

seasou.

at the Gold

also diverted speculation from the Stock Exchauge.
From these causes the Stock Market has been dull during the

May
May

Room has

week, and operations have been very much confined to the brokers.
Some of the larger stock firms are carrying a large amount of rail¬
road shares, which they find it difficult to shift upon other shoulders,
except at a decline ; and, with the present extreme eas$ in money,
and the

satisfactory earnings of the roads, they prefer carrying their

load until the Fall, rather than sacrifice.
The Miscellaneous list is

dull, there having been po sales
days of some of the leading stocks.
Railroad shares are, on the whole, steady.
Erie has fallen about
11, but closes firmer. Hudson River is again active, and closes at
11 advance. Reading is } lower. Cleveland and Pittsburg is the
most active stock on the list, the price, having advanced 2f under
the operations of a clique.
Cleveland aud Toledo is If higher.
Rock Island and Fort Wayne have been run up 1@11 per cent, by
clique manipulation.
The following are the closing quotations for leading stocks, com¬
pared with those of previous wTeeks :
very

for several

May 11. Mav 18. May 25. May 31. June S. June 15. June 22
Cumberland Coal

45

Quicksilver

55%

,

Canton Co

.

Reading

Mich. Southern..

Michigan Central
Clev. and Pittsb.
Clev. and Toledo.

Illinois Central

....

59

xd.94%
99
122

..

The Gold Market.—On

51%
59%
24%
97%

98

63

60%
113%
109%
80%
107

84%

109%
79%
108
82
xd.104

28%
58%

93

59
23

98%
61%
110%
109%
79%

98%
59%
111%
108%

109

108

121

122

drawers themselves

do

bkrs’fo/tg
do short

Jo

'

149%

were a3

5.12%@5.11%

5.12%@5.11%

-

Receipts.
$320,801 81
461,805 47

Loans and
discounts.

$7,975,786
5,496,000
7,811,604
5.692,746
4,580,010

Merchants’
Mechanics’
Union
America
Phenix

-

City
Tradesmen’s

Highest. Lowest
151%

153%
151%

148%

149%

149

June 11
“

“
“

“
“

$2,071,621 00

$9,005,847 70

$2,143,1)07 80
1,873,302 53

901,053 71
600.010 24
907,696 73
463,933 89
1,745,476 01

371,415 85

345,965 00
409,136 21

Treasury morning of June 11

,

Receipts.

Payments.
$4,297,676 22

162,236 56

12
13
14
15
16

Total
Balance in Sub

Sub-Treasury

>

2,178,445 00

1,718,828 41
948,662 67
4,490,947 40

$13,654,093 81

69,613,442 19

,

$103,267,536 00
Deduct payments

during the week

Balance on Saturday evening
Increase during the week

Total amount of
in the

in

$94,261,688 30
4,648,246 11

Included
$283,000 in gold, and $1,788,621

gold certificates issued, $3,719,000.

receipts of customs were
gold certificates.




9,005,847 70

.1

37%® —
42 %®
42%@ 42%
S0%®
74 ®

....

....

June 15.
109 @100%

110%@ 110%
® 5.11%@ —
5.07%® —
5.12%@ —
5.12%© 37 %@ 37%
42%® -

43% @
SO

—

June 22.
106 ©107

107%® 108%
109%@ —
5.15 @5,13%
5.11%@5.10
5-17%© —
5.17%@ —
36%@ 36%
41%@ 42
42 @4\%

© 80%

79%® 80

75% @ 75%

73%@ 74

:

Banks.
New York....
Manhattan

follows:
Custom House.

108%® 109 100%® 100%
110%® 111
5.11%®5.10
5.06%®5.04
5.12%®5.11%
6.12%®5.U%
.37%® 37%
42%® 42%
43 @
80 ® 80%
74 ®

5.11%@5.11%
5.07%@5 06%

1866

a

The transactions for last week at the Custom House and Sub-

Treasury

4,411.120

4,648,246

statement shows the
of New York for the
week ending with the commencement of business on June 16,

98%
120%

This appeared to be the

22.

June 8.

108%® —
109%® 109%
110%® 111

..

154%

04,261,683

7,970,194
25,819,095

were

June 1.

London Comm’l..

speculative movement; and the supply of gold Fulton
Chemical
has since been more generally distributed, and the extreme rates of Merch’ts Exchange
National
interest on borrowed gold have ceased. - There has been but little Butch. & Drovers..
Mech’s & Traders..
demand for gold for export.
The shipments on Wednesday from Greenwich
New York and Boston, combined, amounted to only $220,894 ; and Leather Manufact’s
Seventh Ward
the exports of to-morrow will consist chiefly of bullion in transit State of N. York...
American Exc’ge..
from San Francisco to London, brought by the Aspinwall steamer. Commerce
The export of specie from this port last week amouuted to $6,085,- Broadway
Ocean
621.
On Wednesday the steamer Arizona from Aspinwall brought Mercantile
Pacific
Republic
...:
$911,740 in gold.
Chatham
The following have been the highest and lowest quotations for People’s
North America....
gold, on each of the last six days:
Hanover
6.
18.
19.

dec
inc
inc

asking 109 net. Remitters for Wednesday were almost entirely supplied'by these second bond bills. Yes¬
terday, it was found that this supply was exhausted, and the rates
consequently stiffened. For to-morrow’s steamer, prime 60 days’
sterling has ranged mostly at 108@108L and closes at 107f@108£.
Sight bills on London are. quoted 109L, Frankfort and Paris
letters, by the China, request remittances in sight bills as far as
possible. Bills on Paris close at'5.13} for long, and 5.10 for sight.
The following are the closing quotations for the several classes
foreign bills, compared with those of the three last weeks :

culmination of the

June

13,654,093

inc

New York City Banks.—The following
condition of the Associated Banks of the City

95

of “cornering ” the “ short ” interest, which
then very
large, and the price jumped up to 167£.
At this price, the “ cor¬
nering ” party became large sellers, and the price fell steadily on
the same day to 155f—a fall of 12 points ; since then the price

Highest. Lowest.
'160
154% June 20.
21.
167% 155%

9,005,S47

Balances.
dec
$1,584,856
inc
6,704.395
inc
7,265,664
inc
182,478
dec
4.446, &33
inc
4,991,704
inc
4,732,532

Wednesday’s steamer were
depressed by the large amount of bills offering by parties who had
borrowed exchauge in order to help themselves out of the “ corner”
in gold, in which they had been severely caught. The 60
days’ bills
of the leading drawers on Wall street were sold at 107£, while the

Bremen
Berlin

purpose

148£.

Changes in

Foreign Exchange.—The rates for

Amsterdam
Frankfort

vigorous movement made by parties united for running up the
price. A large amount of gold was held off the market for the

has fluctuated between 154f aud

44

2...
9....
16....

Hamburg

58%

Monday the market opened with

U

2,857,703
2,535,567
2,246,307
2,711,181
2,417,391
2,542,814
2,358,4M
2,182.395
2,141,086
2,071,621

Swiss

106%
29%

97%

June

•

Antwerp

79

105

94

14....
21....
28....
5....
12....
19....
26....

Sub-Treasury
Payments. Receipts. Balances.
$13,324,9S1 $11,790,124 $83,621,790
5,359,749
90,325,685
12,068,189
97,591,349
21,953,904
14,688.239
97,773,823
13,937.517
14,119,991
35,688,713
31,241,874
93,326,985
15,034,333
20.026,038
98,318,690
23,547,689
28.280,222 103,051,222
48,95S.044
56,955.238 111.021,417
45,911,432
20,092,337
85,202,321
89.613.412
11,006,409
15,417,530
/

$2,863,009

do short

84%

30%
59%

Custom
House.

Pavia, long

82

60%
92%'
96%

97%
118%

118

50%
60
24

31%

....

96%
'

46

•

2-1%

58

93%
98%
120%

•

60

86%
104%
28%

29%

•

52%

80
108

86
105

28%
58%

Wayne

-

107%
79%

104%

•

23%
94%
6S%
113%
110%

111%

....

preferred

Rock Island
Fort

22

94%
74%

S3%

Northwestern....

45%
52%
57%

•

54%
61%

•

24%
92%
73%
109%
107%
78%

Mariposa pref....

New York Central
Erie
Hudson River....

“

47

779

Average amount of
*

Circula-

Specie.
$3,016,053

tion.
$S90,049
13,437
662,935
450,079
416,250
2,900
295,000

873,087
806,907

143,271
96.176
8,428.154
1,261,711
4,049,800
82,700
3,480,367
432,540
2,902,305
23,280
2,766,036 4
114,685
5,682,316
406,052
3,104,222
27,055
222.829
2,862,652
2,270,136
17,222
1,745,970
69,123
1,126,651
14,695
3,287,632
174,862
902,138
29.781
5,4:10,7:14
300,208
10,871,601
437,701
22 065,655
857,684
5,176,<42
142,315
3,477,200
38,479
3,254,265
51,591
.
1,968,642
12,181
5,412,114
200,873

21.977

2.552,926
2,700,503

107,169
66,916
48,849

3,520,266
3,824,527

21,803
145,663

2,494,402
1,210,560
1,744,395
1.161,677

39,646
10,692

Imp. & Traders...

4,763,3bl

33,M0

Dry Dock
Bull’s Head
Totals...

1,090,617
1,102,675
1,508,864
931,196
1,519,036
14.154,391
12,194,137

r

26,388

48,478
15,331
.

148,510
9,933
26,174 *
20,614
3.022
7,754
73,052

19,084

1,286,495
5.840,096
2,540,072
3,299,971

24,995
26,836
37,110

648,495
216,901

5,469
10,361

1,187,760

7,148

$247,301,547

.

2,070,720
2,440,321
5,4S6,645
2,121,858
1,009,191
1,910,751
1,506,344
975,236
2,510,215
752.919
4,Ml,482
8,318,472
8,147,870
4,847,263
2,824,134
3,066,728
1,640,981
4,583,267

1,273,534
2,416,983
1,565,809
1,194,000
5,638,957

1,523,732

..

560,026
20.830
10,230
450,906
497,479
223,953
105,000
6,533
145.214
102,156
11,361
780,130
3,2S4,130
900,000
784,739
307,503
110,7*29
556.450

1,929,683

Citizens’
Nassau
Market
St. Nicholas
Shoe and Leather.
Corn Exchange...
Continental
Commonwealth.
Oriental
Marine...
Atlantic

16,030,631

3,116,880

’ 3.056,775

7,307
294,915
247,935

1,383,000
9,420,SS8

Park
Mech. Bank’g As’n
Grocers’
North River
East River
Manuf. & Merch’ts
Fourth National...
Central
Second National...
Ninth National....
First National.....
Third National....
N. Y. Exchange...

8,452,751

131,050

Irving
Metropolitan

.

5,146,947
3.053,766

67,719
'

2,447,157
2,398,061

2,826,067
4,885,500

5,322,084
5,995,928

37,347
62,821
42.250
liJJOO
23,584

1,880,632
1,271,208

Net

deposits.
$7,940,537

189,980
901,700
133,611
4,581
504,800
735.805
859,087
26,2:15
475,596
214,927
112,587
221,850
92,500

512,974
1,000,009
307,893
67,667
'12,427
225,000
1,200
2,662,755

1,498,020
270,000

890.491
448.579
797.C26

1,420,056

1,997,295
2,151,666
1,388,294
3,663,300
»

,

2.615,251
2,347,556
2,984,733
1,134,669
1,480,336
1,153,893

3,803,857
16,910,179

1,429,330

1,355,135
1,183,580
708,340
1,175,446
11,349,801
12,267,752

1,029,278
6,212,614
2,745,312
2,798,801

Legal

Tenders.

$3,923,919
1,793,782
3,653,750
2,357,512
1,202,787
3,596,306
977,469
1,203,329
710,758
2.117,798
2,723,836

603,764
294,928
488,152

423,559
190,540
1,296,218
675,602
2,393,063
4,758,034
4,763.800
2,077,852
1,039,808
1,067,730
628,760
1,331,003
602,129
315,278
985,144
510,128

551,0 0
2,243,500
531,684
723,201
1,029,433
617,377
1,600,000
565,000
849,000
794,766
386,142
468,450
401,009

1,276,391
3,901,604
560,800
610,332

170,869
249,526
372,645

4,287,493
3,393,694
323,114

1,915,205

1,153,669

279,253

1,202,665
289,497
25,000

11,217,305 25,887,876 202,415,676

79,179,804

268.216
13,455
99,680

692,332

1,269,551

The deviations from the returns of the

1

previous week

are as

CREDITOR.

fol

f.

ows :

Loans

Dec. 12,237,412

Specie.

Dec.

Circulation

Dec.

4,004,358
79,877

The several items compare as

weeks

[June 23,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

780

Deposits
Legal Tenders

$88,273

Dec.
Inc.

4,560,030

follows with the returns of previous

:

Circula¬

Legal

Loans.

tion.
Specie.
Deposits.
Apr. 7.., .$242,643,753 $11,480,295 $24,187,001 $189,094,901
11,035.129 24.533,931 193,153.409
244,009.839
Apr.14..
Apr.21.., 242.067,003 9.195.403 24.045.857 196,*08,578
8.243.937 25,377.280 202,718.574
Ajpr. 28.. 245,017,092
May 5.. 253,974.134 10.914,997 25.415.077 210,373.303
257 021,317 13,970.402 24,093.259 217.552.S53
May 12..
May 19.. 255,090.403 13.595,405 25.189,804 217.427,729
May 26.. 257,909,593 19,730,929 26,223.867 208,977.905
June 2..
250,959,022 21,858,093 2 6.244. v 25 198,127.289
June 9..
219,538,959 15,821,003 25,947.253 202.503,949
June 16.
247,301.547 11,217,305 25,887,876 202,415,076

Aggregate

Tenders.

Clearines.

$71,445, 65 $602,315,743

81.2C4.447

578,537.855
535.834,774
545,339.663
003,556,177

85,040.059

523,098,538

.

85.710,107

.

73,8-9,947

57:‘,:-42,48S
713.575.444

73,910,370

.

77.602,688

.

80.5S9.022

.

,

09.178.992

.

713.575.444

74,028,074
79,179,304

June 9.

June 16.

Loans

Specie
Legal Tenders.
Deposits

859. d33

Increase
Increase.
Decrease..
Decrease..
Decrease..

48 010,145

$497,248
37,748

..

897,381
20,508.591

21,508.085
38.326,936
9,007,515

Circulation....

$14,642,150
...

36,972,474
9,219,553

999,494
1,354.462

c.

563,095,201

0

224,447 98
364,928.231 47

426,049 98
416,6:39,600 81

338,684,643
7,147.400
13,984.940
14,276,500
7,357.300
34,470,700
22.382,200

0

345,816.310
8.539,200
13,067.340
13,974,500

711,000

0
0

—

7,313.500

564,500

692,400

8,310.534

& branches

60.000,000
12,980,750 14
36.171,987 91
100,000,000 0
8,416,146 0
1,S83,009 9
16,718,582 82

0

1,912.326 22
16,864,322 73
.

Sundries —:

0
0
0

502,300

60,000,000 0
12.980,750 14
36,171,987 91
100,000.000 0

Expenses of management

0

34,315,700
21,746,800

securities in the Credit Foncier

1,643,30M07~95

613,698.301

following comparative statement
shows the average condition of the leading items of the Philadel¬
phia Banks for the past and previous week :
$14,042,150
48,118.897

on

in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto to the State
Government stock reserve
Ditto other securities
Securities held
Hotel and property of the bank

033,056,381

Philadelphia Banks.—The

Capital

Difto

f.

c.

602,328.224 50

Cash and bullion
Commercial bills overdue
Ditto discounted in Paris
Ditto in the branches
Advances on bullion in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on public securities in Paris
.
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on obligations and railway shares
Ditto in the provinces

1,002,958,377 75

point of view. Com
pared with that of the previous week, it shows a decline of 58,842,OOOf. in discounts, of 41,42L,000f. in the circulation of notes, and
an increase of 30,233,000f. in coin and
bullion, of 5,444,000f. in
deposits. The increase in cash is 39£ million francs, and a decrease
The return is not favorable in

a

commercial

in commercial bills of 58 4-5 millions francs.

212,038

The

following comparison shows the condition of the Philadel¬
phia Bauks at stated periods :
Date.

June 2
June 9
June 16

Loans.
Legal Tenders
$18,949,719 $46,832,734
19,144,600
48,000,654

Specie.
$690,244

48.2 ’6,2.56

Apr. 28
May 5
May 12
May 19
May 20

896,741

....

.

48,330,507

897,913

$8,779,160
8,794,348
8,930,420
8,918,938

21,154,9 9

..

48,030.984
47.504,996

807,994
890,121

1,988,742
9,022.553

48,118,897
48,610,145

859 633

20,568,591
Banks.—No

.,.

Government

912.023

897.381

38, ISO. 500
38,320.9:34

last report:
National Bank of Bellows Falls, Yt.
our

;

the Colorado National

Bank at Denver

City, and the Rocky Mountain National Bank at
Central City. The last two have no circulation, and the first has
been a year reducing its State circulation to the required standard.
The total number of National Banks is 1,653.
The national currency

Previously issued
Total

issued during the week amounted to.

$1,358,215

r

278,905,075

to date

$280,203,890

The

following comparison shows the jtrogress of the banks since
May 5th, in respect to number, capital, and circulation :
Date

May

Banks.
5.
12.
19.
26.
2.

May

May
May
June
June

1,650

$271,202,105

1,050

272.878,895

1,050

274.053.195
270.540.510

1,050

414,921,479

1,050
1,050
1,053

9.

June

Circulation.

Capital.

16.

277,379,600
27S,905,075
280,203,890

Foreign Banking.—The

following is the statement of the Bank
Eugland for the week ending June 7, 1866 :

of

ISSUE

Notes issued

DEPARTMENT.

Government debt

£27,620,325

£11,015,100

Other securities.
Gold coin and bullion

....

£27,620,325

3.98-1,900
12,620,325

£27,020,325

BANKING DEPARTMENT.

Proprietors’ capital

£14.553,000

Government securities

£10.813,403

3,434,385

Other securities
Notes
Gold and silver coin...

3i.771,815

Rest
Public deposits..
Other

6.049.516

deposits

20,200,083
507,100

Seven day and other bills

£45,411,239

The

preceding

accounts,

2,167,405
65S,030
£45

,411,fs9

compared with those of the previous

week, exhibit:
Increase. Decrease.
Circulation
Public Deposits..
Other Deposits
Gov. Securities

£

£541,899

461,003
260,397
51,235

Increase. Decrease.
Other Securities...
£
£1,675,618
Bullion
1,400,186
best
14,026
Reserve
1,960,061

The

June

following is the return of the Bank of France, made
7. The return for the previous week is added :
DEBTOR.

Capital of the bank
Profits, in addition to capital

Reserve of the bank and branches
New reserve
Notes in circulation and at the branches..
Drafts drawn by the bank on the branches
of the bank

payable in Paris

or

provinces

Treasury account
Accounts current at Paris
Ditto in the provinces

Dividends pajable
Various discounts
Re-discounts

Surplus of receipts not distributed
Sundries




June
f.

7,1866.
c.

182,500,000 9
7,044,770 2
22,105,750 14

i

(Marked thus *
not

up to

are o

National.)

f.

c.

182,500,000 0
7,044,776 2
22.105,750 14

4,000,000

0

4,000,000

0

878,458,125

0

919,879,775

0

21,535.429 13
116,566,749 29
342.464,517 S5
41,524,138 0

16,714.614 85
10ti,412.588 00
332,534,087 39
40,011.025 0

584,112 75
16.093,820 25

002,771 75
14,458,377 74

9,353,596 60

1,643,306,007 95

2,074,992 92

8,619,6i8

28
1,662,958,377 75

•

Friday.

|

Bid.!Ask.

Last Paid.

Periods.

|

i

3,000.000|Jan. and July. ..IJan.
lUO.OOu'Jan. and July .,|Jan.

America*
lOOj
America (Jer. City)
25!
American
100
American Exchange.! 100
Atlantic
I 100
Atlantic (Brooklyn).
50

Bowery.
Broadway

LIST.

Dividend.

.

£ |
«s! Amount.

fc®

’66.
’06.

500,000;April and Oct. ..jOct. ’65..
5,000,000 May and Nov. May. ’00.
Jan. ’00.
300,000 Jan. and July.
Jan. ’66.
500,000 Jan. and July.
25<»,000
25! 1,000,000Jan. and July. JJnly ’66.
50;
300,000 Jan. and July. .iJan. ’06.
200,0001 .Quarterly...
Apr. ’66.
50|
25;
800,000'Jan. and July
’00...
100 3,000,000'May and Nov
’00...
200,000 Jan. and July
50
’06...
25
450,000 Jan. and July
’60...
100;
300,000;.. Quarterly...
’60...
400,0001Jan. and July.
’05...
100! 1,000,000 May and Nov.
50
’00....
300,000/Tan. and July,
’00....
10010,000,000 Jan. and July.
•66....
100
750,000 Jan. and July.
..

..

..

.

Brooklyn
Bull’s ilead*
...
Butchers & Drovers
Central
j
Central (Brooklyn). !
Chatham
!
Chemical
Citizens’

City
City (Brooklyn)...
Commonwealth

•

Continental
Corn Exchange*
Croton

.

..

2,000,0G0jJan. and July.

; 100
.

..

100 1,000,000 Feb. and Aug.

!

East River

50'

Eighth

100!

Fifth
First
First (Brooklyn). ...
Fourth
Fulton
Far. & Cit.(Wm’bg).
Gallatin
Greenwich*
Grocers’
Hanover

100|

lOOj

io6|

100,000 Quarterly
200,000 Jan. and July..
350,0U0;Jan. and July..
250,000!Jan. and July..
150,000 Jan. and July..
500,000 May and Nov..
..

30!
‘

Jan. and July..
5,000,000 Jan. and July..
600,000 May and Nov...
160,000 Jan. and July..

30
20;
100 1,500,000 Apr.

and Oct...
25
200,000 Apr and Oct...
50
300,000iJan. and July...
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July...

100
50
50
50
50
30
100

Importers & Trad...

Irving

LeatherManufact’rs.

1,500,OOOjJan. and J lily...
500.000 Jan. and

July...

600,000)Feb. and Aug...

400,000;Feb. and Aug...
2.050,000!Feb. and Aug...
Manufacturers’...
252,000!Apr. and Oct.
Manufac. & Merch.*.
500,000 Jan. and July..
100
Marine
400,000 Jan. and July..
Market
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July..
25 2,000,000 Jan. and July..
Mechanics’
Mechanics’ (Brook.).
50; 500.0(H)! Jan. and July..
Long Isl (Brook.)

Manhattan*

Mech. Bank. Asso...
Meehan. & Traders’.

Mercantile
Merchants’

50

25;
100!
•

Merchants’ Exch....

50j

50|

Metropolitan

100!

Nassau*
Nassau (Brooklyn)
National
New York
New York County..
Ne wYorkExchange.
Ninth

lOOj

.

Oriental*
Pacific
Park

Peoples’*
Phoenix

St. Nicholas’
Seventh Wa rd

Secoud
Shoe & Lea .her
Sixth
State of New York..
Tenth
Third
t
Tradesmen’s

....

.

Union

Williamsburg City*.

...(
.7
....6
....6
.

...

•

100;
50|
100
100
100
100
100;
50
50
50
50
100
25
20
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
4(
60

•

•

•

•

•

....

•100
...

.5

■

•

.

m

'114
...5 100
’00.... ....5
’GO.... ....5

114
102
100

....

....

200,000!

100’
100!

Currency
Dry Dock*

North America
North River*
Ocean ;

105* 106

....(

.

.

Commerce

Republic.

in the

2,074,992 92

~

—

May 31. 1S66.

STOCK

Capital

Companies.

36,972,476

depositories were designated by the
during last week. Fhe following National Banks have

been authorized since

BANK

Deposits.
$36,032,807
30.987,008
38,414,585
37,290,048
37,078.417

9,007,515
9,219,553

.

National

Circulation.

19.648,232

....

’00.... ..15
•66.... My
’06....
..4
’00
....5
’60.... ....5
’00.... ...10 207
"00
...10!

....

.

....

....

99*

..

•

..

•

•

•
■

...

210

...

’00

,'00

,.5i
..5 y
’GO
....5 107
’06
..6
’00.... ....5
’GO....
..6
*00....
..4
’60.... ...5
’00.... ....5
’GO.... ....5
’60
....5 <32
’06.... ....5 100
’66.... ....5
’66....
..6
...

06

....

103*

....

..

..

104

.

....

1

....

....

....

...

....

.

..

.

•

....

.

..

.

•

•

....

114

.

•

..

•

•

•

112

....

«...

^..

•

•

....

•

•

...

..

’60....

115
’6 >.... ....5 120
•60....
150
6
no
’00.... ....5
500.000|May and Nov,.
*66... ....5
600,000|May and Nov..
’60.... ....5
l,000,000!May and Nov..
'66
..5
3,000.000;June and Dec .,
’66
..5 106
1,235,000 Jan. and July..,
’00.... ...6 122
4.000,000 Jan. and July...
’65....
1,000,000 Jan. and July ..
’06....
..5
300J>00 Jan. and Jnly...
’66
...5 107
1,500,000; April and Oct...
’66....
..5 110
3,000,000!Jan. and July...
’66.
...9 151
200,000 April and Oct...
’66..., ...6
300,000;Jan. and July...
’66
..5 136* 109
1,000,000, Jan. and July...
.5 110
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
.6 124
400,000 Jan. and July... Jan. ’66..
1,000,000'Feb. and Aug... Feb. ’66..
.4|101 102
.5125
300,000;Feb. and Aug... IFeb. ’66..
.5
422,700!Feb. and Aug.. iFeb. ’66
155
..7
2,000,000; J an. and Jn ly... ;Jan. ’66..
..5 118*
412,500!Jan. and July... 'Jan. ’66..
....

_

*

...

•

.

....

...

|

*

-

•

.

♦.

*

....

.

.

...

....

.

.

....

....

.

.

....

.

..

1,800,OOOiJan. and July... I Jan. ’66..
2,000,000;Feb. and Aug... !Feb. ’60

..4
..5

.

1,000,000 Feb. and Aug... IFeb.
500,000;April and Oct.. 'Jan.
Nov.
300,000;May and Nov
1,500,000!Jan. and July.. iJan.
200,000iMay and Nov... Nov.
2,000,000;May and Nov... Nov.
1,000,000; Jan. and July... July
1,000,000! Jan. and Jnly... ‘Jan.
1,000,000; Jan. and July... Jan.
l,600,000|May and Nov... May.
60
500 000;Jan. and July. Jan.
..

,

’60
’66..
’65
’66...
’65
’66

..G 105

.

..

.,

..

’66
’66
’66

’66
’66

. .
..

..

.
..

...5
...5
...6
...5
...5
...5

105*

105*
109

7X 140
...5 115
•

.3*

•

• • •

*

•

•

781

CHRONICLE.

THE

1866.]

June 23,

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.

AND

STOCKS

[ Satur

SECURITIES.

| 155%

•

National.
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

—

•r

coupon.

j

j

i

jl02%

jl03% '103%
203

110%'

j

104%

103%
1103

Chicago and Northwestern,

|

6s, Certificates,

i

i

j~

96%

j

|

do

r

—

100
100
100
100
100 78%
.100
100
100
100
100
100 71%
100
100
100
100 99%
100 109%
100
100
—

do

do

1

Michigan Central..

do
do

do
do
auk'
do

guaranteed.
do
do

2d

pref

do

[

Morris and Essex.
New Jersey
New York and New Haven.

100
79

79%

—

—

—

7S%

f8

JL

95%

ioo
100

84

85%

r

—

102%
84%

ft

100

Stonington

.

'95% 95%

—

Third

95

67

—

|

I

—

—

60

44%'

1155

Delaware and Hudson.

60

45

155

—

—

—
—

—

——

4%

j

55
40

4%
54%

j

4%
|

‘

i

|

Citizens
—

i

■

145

! 48%
100 i 60%

46%

41

42

42

41

60% 60

100;

100
100
100

—

52%
57% 57% 57% 54
106% 127% lf 6% 106%
127% 1-5% 125
127%

i

Farmers’ Loan find Trust
New York Life and Tru-t
Union Trust
United States Trust

.

Conake Iron
Benton Gold
Consolidated
Gunnell Gold

97%

Saginaw L. S. & M
Smi th and Farm elee

25

23

5'

.-.

5

Copper.., 15
100
25

10' *

—

50

—

25

25

10

—

50%

27

27

27%

98
98% 98%
109% 108% 108%
82

62

111

.

95

95

97

92

96%

85%

3d mortgage, conv
4th mortgage

75

do

102

2d mort.

do

Erie, 1st mortgage, 1868.
do 2d mortgage, 1864
do 2d mortgage, 1879
do 3d mortgage, 1883
do 4th mortgage, 1880
do 5th mortgage, 1888
Galena and Chicago, extended
do
do
2d mortgage
Hannibal and St. Joseph, 1st Mortgage

Michigan Central 8s, 1869-72.
do

do

8s,

new,

91
96
91

95

100
97

103

102%

101
97

103%

109

18S2

do
do
Goshen Line, 1868
Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien, 1st mort...
Milwaukee and St. Paul, 1st mortgage.
do
do
Income
New York Central 6s, 1883.
do
do
6s, 1887.
do
.do
6s, Real Estate
do
do
6s, subscription
do
do
7s, 1876
do
do
7s, convertible, 1876
do
do
7s, 1865-76.. .
.

Mississippi, 1st mortgage
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago, 1st mort..
do
do
do
2d mort...
do
do
do
3d mort...
St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute, 1st mort...
do
do
do
2d, pref—
do
do
2d, income.
do
Toledo and Wabash, 1st mortgage
Ohio and

—

100 23% 23%

Montana Gold
New Jersey Consolidated
New Jersey Zinc

Rutland Marble

—

100

Mariposa Gold
Mariposa preferred
Minnesota Copper.

Quartz Hill
Quicksilver

I

100
v

97%
109
30

95%
92
90

60

59

56
5

Gregory Gold

’j

—

.v

*

9S%
no

50

Michigan Southern, Sinking Fund
do
do
2d mortgage, 7s

25
100
100
100

Mining.—Canada Copper

j

—

100

99

—

27%

Lackawanna and Western Bonds
Marietta and Cincinnati, 1st mortgage

210

100

Nicaragua

98
110
—

—

—

100

—

98%

50

Harlem, 1st mortgage, 1869-72
do
Consolidated and Sinking Fund
do
2d mortgage, 1868
Hudson River, 1st mortgage, 1869...
2d mortgage, (S. F.), 1885
do
|
1
do
3d mortgage, 1875
do
convertible, 1867

100|

United Srotes
100
Western Union
100 j
Western Union, Russian Extension. 100;i

New York
Pacific Mail
Pacific Mail Scrip
Union Navigation
Transit.—Central American

—

—

90%

j
..

Williamsburg.

58

—

Toledo, Sinking Fund
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 1st mort.

146

Gas.-

—

—

57%

Interest
Extension
1st mortgage...
consolidated...

do
do

do
55

58
72

Income

do
do
do
do

do
do
Cleveland and

36

32%

4%

.'

58

—

Chicago and Rock Island, 1st mortgage
Cleveland and Pittsburg, 2d mortgage

45%
155

—

Spruce Hill..,

do

do
do
do
do

60

—

Pennsylvania.

96%

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, 8 per cent...
Chicago and Milwaukee, 1st mortgage
Chicago and Northwestern, Sinking Fund....

i

Miscellaneous Shares.

79

260

ButFalo, New York and Erie, 1st mort, 1877
Chicago and Alton, Sinking Fund
1st mortgage
do
do
do

79

:

Atlantic and Great Western, 1st mort—
do
2d mort
do
*"“l

107% 108

100

avenue

Toledo, Wabash and Western
do
do
do
preferred.

100
—

40%

100
100

Second avenue
Sixth avenue

1

""

Telegraph.—American

82%

70

Reading...
50 109# 109j$
St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute
100
do
do
do
preferred. 100 61

do

do

42
—

—

84%

79

79%

—

—

27%

Mississippi Certificates,

42
10
109

—

Ohio and
do

Railroad Ronds

Cary

79%

—

79

80%

8.Uk\

—

—

—

—

i

—

—

—

do

do

New York 7s
6s
do
do
5s

Canton

—

—

j

~T

—

_

1

6s, Water Loan
6s, Public Park Loan
6s, Improvement Stock




—

„

Jersey Citv6s, Water Loan

Trust

—

——

.

|

Virginia 6s, coupon
municipal.
Brooklyn 6s

New York

—

—

—

I

79

—

—

—

96%

—

Michigan 6s

do
do
do

do

do

L

do
7s, War Loan, 1878
Minnesota 8s
Missouri 6s
do
6s, (Hannibal and St. Joseph RR.).
do
6s, (Pacific RR.)
New York 7s, 1870
do
63,1867-77
do
5s, 1868-76
do
7s, State Bounty Bonds
North Carolina 6s
Ohio 6s, 1870-75
do 6s,1881-86
Rhode Island 6s
Tennessee 6s 1868
6s 1890
do
.>
,....'

'

—

I

Louisiana 6s.

147

—

—

i

r..

—

100
100 59% 59% 59% 58% 58% 59%
72
74
72
100 74
100 32
100
50
50
100
111%
■12% 112
no% 111
124
121
100 122
120% 120%
50
100

Erie

i

'.

—

50

i

...

120%

.

!

•105

i

1860-62-05-70

98%

—

—

—

1CUMA

i

Georgia 6s

Illinois Canal Bonds, 1S60

—

99

.

|

• ■

Connecticut 6s

—

—

—

—

Cleveland and Pittsburg.

|

Kentucky 6s, 1868-72

r

102% 1102%
102% )102% 102% 102% 102%;
103% 102% 102% <102%!

State.

do Registered, 1S60
do 6s, coupon, ‘79, after
do
do 1877
do
do
do 1879
do
War Loan
do
Indiana bs, War Loan
do
5s.

do

do

1

96%

Thurs

100
.100 30% SO
30% 30
29% 29%
59
59
.100 53% 59
53% 58%
94
.100 94
94% 95
95%
.100
50 j
83% 86% 66% 85% 84%
107
106. 106% 107
50 105
.06%

j 102% •02% >102%

7-30s Treas. Notes
ls/tferi*
do
....2d serif.
do
do
.do
do
do
3 cl seri<

California 7s

Chicago and Ureat Eastern.

11

j

j

do

1108% j 102% ! 102%
(V-i

—

96%

96%

—

do

1

|103

Wed.

—

j

5s, 10-40s.;....

1

1

,103

1

registered.T

I

110% T10%

—■“

•

5s, 1871
5s, 1874....

il03%

|

L

j

:

.100
.100
.100 102
.100

|

1

126
1 o%

Tues.

Railroad Stocks.

i

102% 102% ,102% 102% 102%
102%
102% 103%
1

r|102%

l\
6s, 5.20s,
do
—regii
6s, Oregon War, 1881
6s,
ao.
do.
(i yearly).

do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

1104

I

f

do

"

Mou.

Saiur

STOCKS AND SECURITIES.

I

!
j

129

130

if 102% ■103

do
do
do

do

•

i'r*- i

i

i

’106% 196%

coupon. 102%

6s, 5-20s

Tliurs

Wed

!

;110%

j

6s, 5.20s

1

.1130
*

do
do
do
do
do

Tues.

(Mon.
]

.130

doited States 6s, 1867

REPORTED OFFICIALLY ON EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, JUNE 22.)

■

(REPRESENTED BY THE CLOSING SALE

23

do
do
do

do
do
do

1st mortgage, extended.
2d mortgage

InterestBond*

92

93

101%
97

95%

74

75

782

THE CHRONICLE.

[June 23, 1866.

NATIONAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL SECURITIES LIST.
!Outsta.u(iiug

do
Bonds

do

(t yearly)

(5-20*0 of 1862
do

do .registered.

do
do

1804— coupon.
do .registered.
865 ...coupon.
do .registered,

do
do

f

j-

100,000,000

Asked

125

do
do
do

1130

1273* 130
1223* 125
104% l

July

.

Jan. &

6

j

do
do
do

1881

j i{102% j •
.

iMay & Nov.

’

I Jan. &

,

820.000

York&Cum.R.

B.&O.R.coup |

Water Loan
Water Loan

j
Stg.

j

740,000
583,205
6,580,416
1,265,610
1,949,711
993,000
634,200
1,281,000121,540;
5,550,e00
216,000
299,000
571,000
360,000

,

Jan. &

|l870

-Jau. &

July 1886
J.,A.,J.&0.

....

95'

100
101

99% 100%
....

....

! 82

jlSTO

July 1873

{May & Nov 1875

83
97
98

95

96%

1

; 98
; 98%

98%
•9
99
99

99

1890-j |
M.J.S&&D. 1S90 ’

98%

’65’82| 90%

6
4
5
6

4%
5
6

do

;

554,000 6
197,700 6

..j

Aug. 1867

--

6

5,000,000 6

Railroad Debt

City Bouds
City Bonds

I J.,A.,J.&0.

1,500,000 6
3,500,000 6
1,000,009 6

Water Loan...

do

do
do
do
do

July 1895

,7.30 Feb. &

Miscellaneous.!

102%! Boston, Mass.—City Bonds

{ Mar. & Sept. 1904 si j 063* 06%
96
96

4,63 i 000

Z

4,963,000

N.W.Virg.RR.

do
do
do
do

!

.

1885-j

do
>65 '691
do
- >70 ’821
do
;iS79 ;
Jan. & July! var. 1
;
do
11913

6
6

600.000
?!

RR. Bds.;

B. &O. RR.. S
1033* 1033*1
I’ark
102% 103 i
102% 1023*! Bangor, Me.—City Debt

1882-j

May & Nov. 1SS4

225,000; 6

Baltimore, Md.—Improvement.. I

July 1881

May & Nov.

IJan. & Julvj’70 ’74!

850.000
300.000

Alb. Nor. RR..
do

Payable.

$90,000' 5

City Scrip
Walter Loan....

do

.

FRIDAY.

pul

Alleghany City, Pa.—City Bds

...

Priuci-

1—

Municipal Securities
Albany, N. Y.— City Scrip

Jan.&July'lSSlf^liojj

oiq iruj

..

July,1867

1868-j
Jan. & July 1871
-j
I Jan. & July 1874
j

71,003,500

f

1864
.coupOn. I
do
do registered, f
Union Pacific lilt. Bonds of 1866
Treasury Notes (1st series)
(
do
do
(2d series)..... -<
do
do
(3d series)
(
Debt Certificates
State Securities.
Alabama—State Bonds

(10-403)

,

interest.

Outstanding.
Rate.

143%

Jan. & July

514,780,500 6

I

Bid

!
Jan. &

,

coupon

Amount

DENOMINATIONS.

Due.

Payable.

•

J

1,010,000 6

\coupon-

FRIDAY.

pal
Rate

American Gold Coin
j
National Securities.
Bonds of 18-17
registered.: 9,415,250
1S48
,
coupon.
8,908,342
do
do
registered. J
do
1860
coupon. )
7,022,000 5
do
do
registered, f
do
1853
,
coupon. I
20,000,000 5
do
do
registered, f
i
do
1861
coupon. [
282,728,150 6
do
do
registered, j
i

OregonWar Bds (yearly) (. Munnn

Princi¬

INTEREST.

Amount

j

DENOMINATIONS.

91
’74
’79’801
I0t!%
’77,
116
’73
’78:
Jan. & Julv ’65 ’71
*65 ’95 j
do
-1869 - 99"
do
>61 ’97) 95
do
*65 *79i
'65
’78
'65
'67
’72
’70

....

....

...

102% 102%! Brooklyn, N.Y.—City Bonds
810,512,650 7.30 Jun. &Dec. 1868 102% 102%
do
6
Improve’t St’k:
do
7.30 Jan. & July 1868 102% 102%!
Pub. Park L’n.
6
' 62,620,000
6 j Maturity' 1 year 100% *100%'
do
Water Loan... 1
6
Buffalo, N.Y.—Municipal Bonds;
6
2.100,000
do
May & Nov 1877 !
j
7
>65 "82i
Municipal Bonds!
cio
do
co
Jan. & July 1S76
648,000,
(Sterling),
ji
Chicago, Ill.—City Bonus
Apr. & Oct.; 1881
f4
j
do
do
do
do
688.000
do
1S76
!
do
!Jau. & July ISTti
City Bonds
!
California-S tite Bonds
i :
do
j j do
;'72 ’80 1*20
913.000
do
Sewerage Bonds
1
>79’87
2,472,000
do
State Bonds large f
-...j 95
do
;’*
do
Water Bonds
j
1888
do
j 1,030,000
94%; 95
Connecticut—War Bondsj 8,000,000
-Jan. & Julyi’72’92i 973*!
i Cincinnati, O.—Municipal
!
Apr. & Oct. 1895
Georgia—State Bonds
Jan. & Julv 1880
{ 2,073,750
do
Water Bonds
1053*
Jau. & July
do
do
do
!
1 525,000
do
,1872
Cleveland, O—City Bonds
do
var.
•
Illinois—Canal Bonds
’ 1,2S8,S87
do
Water Bonds.,...!
1S79
do
do
do Registered
1,758,406
do
du
do
1890
Sewerage Bonds .'I
do
do
'60 '65
Coupon Bonds
1,386,570
Detroit, Mich.—City Bonds...-..
do
1871
20,000 8
do
do
do
2,371,725
do
'69 '70
do
June &Dec. >69 ’79
City Bonds
256,368 7
|
do
93
do
do
!i
i
do
1,773.677
do
>76’77 ....j
City Bouds
1
50,000 6 Apr. & Oct. I860
do
do
do
!
241,000
do
do
]1S79 |
Water Bonds
Jan. & July {1871
650,000 7
do
War Loan Bonds
! 1,157,700
do
!is79 i
Dubuque, Io.—City Bonds
!
Various. ! ‘65 ’72
319,457 S
Indiana—State Bonds
i
236,000
Jan. & July 1866
do
Railroad
400.000 7
Jan. & July''75 ’77
j 87 !
j
do
do
do
do
j 2,058.173
11866
!
Hartford, Ct.—City Bonds
125,000 6
Various. >65’80
!
do
War Loan Bonds
do
May & Nov |lSGS '
j 1,225,500
Park Bonds
I
Feb. & Aug ,1882
130,000 6
Iowa—State Certificates
Jail. & July 1886 j
200,000
do
Railroad Bonds..*
!
Jau. & July 1876
500,000 6
do
War Loan Bonds
96
do
300,000
‘1877 !
do
Water Bonds
of
I
June&Dec. 1883
375,000 6
Kansas—State Bonds
200.000
Jan. & July ’76 '78 95
Jersey City, N. J.—City Bonds.;
>
j
Various. >65’SI
122,000 6
Kentucky—State Bonds
447.000
Jan. & July '66 '73
do
do
do
1’65’75
j
118,000’ 7
City Bonds.)
do
State Bonds
3.201.000
do
* '68 "72 95 j*..” 1
do
do
Water Bds .!
Jan. & July >77’83
650,000 7
Louisiana—State Bonds (RR)
516,000
—'.
i detn. \
Louisville, Ky.—City Bonds
7
Various, j var.
j
do
State Bonds
j
i 67 .69!
do
(RR).... 3,942,000;
....j 05
6
do
City Bonds....
j var.
do
State Bonds for B’ks,
5,398,000
do
Water Bonds
May &Nov. 18S7
Maine—State Bon ds
532,000
{Mar. &Sept.>66 '67
97' Marysville, Cal.—City Bonds
Jan. & July!
do
War Loan
Jau. & July ’80 '89!
4,800.000
I
-do
;
City Bonds...
do
Maryland—State Bonds
8,171,91*2.
Quarterly { var.
86
[Milwaukee, Wis.—City7, re-adj'd
June &Dec. 1894
911,500
do
State Bds .cowpo/t. i
Feb. & Aug>70 ’83
j Quarterly 18901 101 101 Newark, N. J.—City Bonds
219,000
6
do
StatbBds inset ibed (
do
Jan. & July:1873
101
City- Bonds
1013* |
100,000
do
State Bonds.coupon.
New Bedford,
1,727.000 6
Quarterly *1870 100 101
425.000
Mass.—City Bds.
Apr. & Oct. ’65 ’84Massachusetts—State Scrip
672,0''0 5
New London. Ct.—City
|
Various. ;'68 '74 97
Bonds...
Jan. & July '67 ’S7
60,000
do
do
do
220,000 ' 5
May & Nov. 1880 |
Newport, R. I.—City Bonds
i
Apr. & Oct.! ‘73 ’841
do
War Loans
6,429.000i 5
do
•New Haven,
1894
! 95 I
J ».& July ’70 '81
Ct.—City Bonds
200,000 6
do
State Scrip
Jan. & July %i '74
1.150,004 (}
-New York City—Water Stock..
1093* i
3.000,200 5
do
P.M. A.&N 1870
do
do
do
2,450,000, 6
,'75’78 108 !
Water Stock..
1880 *
2,147,000 5
ao
do
War Loan
do
1,088,000 i 6
1883 !
!
CrotonW’rS’ki
18! 10
900.000 5
do
Mich igan—$2,000,00'' Loan
Jan. & July 1868 i
250,000! 7
I
Croton W'r S’ki
1890 .
do
100,000 6
do
do
do
do
1,750,000 6
>73’83
W’r S’k of ’49!
>75 '79
do
do
Renewal Loan
483,900 5
do
216.000; 6
11878 •
W'r S'k of ’54!
1875
do
do
War Loan
1*878,900 5
do
1,122,000! 7
11886 i 95
Bu. S'k No. 3.!
do
do
War Bounty Loan
190,000 5
>70'73
345,000' 7 : May A: Nov. 1890 !
Fire Indem. S. |
j
Feb. & Aug. 1868
402,768 5
Minnesota—State Bonds
250,000) 8 ; Jau. & July 1867
100
""
Central P'kS.
399.300 5
Missouri—State Bonds
f.m.a.&n 1898
&4
602,000 - 6
do
11883 ! 78%: 79
Central P'k S.
do
ilS87
do
State Bonds for ItR... 13,701,000)
3,066,071 6
Jan.'& July;’71’89'
6
i
Central P'k S.J
do
275.000 6
1898 State Bonds (Pac. RR)
do
do
7,000,000 6
>72 '87C.P.Imp.F. S.1 2,083,200 6 "
j
do
do
1887
State Bonds i,II,&St.J)
do
3,000. OIK) 6
jT72’85, 80% 1 81
C.P.Imp. F. S.! 1,966,000 6
do
do
1876
Revenue Bonds
431,0001 9 !
do
Real Estate B. j
1866
New Hampshire—State Bonds..
'600.000 6
do
1873
Jau. & Julv! I874 i
535,100 ! 6
I
Croton W’r S.
do
,1883
do
War Fund Bds
1,800,000 6
'• 1S69 ! 95 !
1,650,000! 6
Fl.D't. F'd. S.
New Jersey—State Scrip
953*
do
118782,748,000 6
95,000! 6 IJan. & July) rar. I
Pb.B.Sk. No. 3!
do
*..)
War Loan Bonds.. j
150,000 5
do
rlS66
731,000; 6
Jan. & Juiy '71 ’70
!
_

•

....

..

..

..

....

....

'

•

P

•

..

...

...

-..,

..

|i8w

....I;;;

■

...

...

.

...

.

.

..

..

.

...

96%t

..

..

,

3,192,7631

,

-

....

....

....

....

■

„

....

...

-

....

..

.

:

.

New York )

1,189,7801

{J.Ap.J.&O.

6

900.000! 5
800,000! 5

25,566,000!

do
Jan. &

7

:

192,5S5 5
1,103,000 5
167,000

Ohio—Foreign Loan
do
Foreign Loan....

.!

Foreign Loan

do

do

.

(War) Bds.
South Carolina—State Stock...!
do
do

Bonds!

Improvement Bonds i

Railroad Bonds. ...j

Vermont—State Certificates
do

do
do




5

b

3.691.000

2,347,340i
2,115,4(H);
'175

Si

- 1<5,UUU;
1,650.000-' 6

Coupon Bonds

i

Sterling Bonds

21,888,398| 6
lo’qlro'nnn

j i’soOJXK)

6
6

1.200 000

6

War Fund Bonds...

War Fund Certii....

300,000 ! 6

605,000 ; 6

!

do

rar.

do

July,’84 ’951
>S6 *95

11872
I Jan. & July ’67 ’68
do
’77 ’88
:
Apr. & Oct. 93- «8

Railroad Bonds.

do

Railroad

Bonds,

do
do

Railroad B’ds

City Loan....;

Rochester, N. Y.—City Bonds...(
do
"
City Bonds...!
do

|
!
{

do

....

St.

....!

67

100

Louis,
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

j

95%

Railroad

{Sacramento, Cal.—City Bonds...

....

j 97

&

,

CityBds.newCity Bds,old

Providence, R. I.—City Bonds...

87
i 84)*

j var. j
Jnn. & Dec. ’71 ’78!
do

Riot Dam.H.B

Portland, Me.—City Bonds.....

1868 i 80
do
i1868 I ....I 96
Jan. & July,
long

! Jan.

895,570
490,000

6
6

1,000,000

6

2.500.000

5
6
6
6
6
6
5
5

1,400.000
2,000,000
949,700

1,442,100
652,700
739,222

Apr. & Oct.

13011 oivy

102.000

6

4,996,000

1 var. ; S9 I
do
var. ; 89)* |
Feb. & Aug. 1871
102 )102%
•Tan. & July! 71 ’94933*’
Jan. & July;’68 ’90

«

Sol.S.&Rf.R.B

5
5

Sol.B'ntyFd.Bl

J

Various.

„

do
do
do

CityBds,new
Pittsburg, Pa.—City Bonds

-

1

Wisconsin—State Bonds
do
d

3,889 000

do
do
do

192%

....

do
do
do

May & Nov.|'68-’71j

War Loan Bonds..

Virginia—Registered Bonds
.

!

095,309
2,400,000 i
679,000

2$209^000;
3 pop ppn

Vol.Fam.AidL
Vol.Fam.AidL

1873
1874
4 1875
-1877
11866
1868
1871
1

183 539

6.168.000
,„,w<wv

Union Def. L.
Vol. B'nty L’n

154,000

500,000

Philadelphia, Pa.—City Bds,old;

Jan. & July'i860
do
11865
do
'1868
do
1870
do
,1875
do
{1881
do
{1886

| 4
Im'.m
;

!

111874

i^gooi
^

Domestic Loan Bonds
Pennsylvania—State Bonds..
do
State Stock..... I
do
Military L n BdsRhode IsLAND^State

Tennessee—Improvement

5

4,500.000 5
9,749,500 6
562,26'*! 6

379,866

Foreign Lord
Foreign Loan
Foreign Loan
Foreign Loan

do
do

----!

NewYorkC’nty.—C’t House S'k
do
do
Sol.Sub.B.R-;B!

Julyj 1S77 1

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

,

North Carolina—State Bonds

'l’bmp.M’ket S

'

..

1878

Ja.&Ju N
J AJ&O
I860
do
1872

6
3,050(000 6
6,000,000 6
2,250,000 6
500,000 6
900.000; 6

-Canal Bonds.

Pub. Edu. S’k.

j

May & Nov. ;i868
Jan. & Julv,iS75

702.666

do

Docks&SlipsS

~i 100

!;1868

909,607 5
442,961 j 5

Bounty Bonds....

1870

Jan. & July
pleas.1
do
i
do
;i878
do
!
pleas

500,000 ! 6
800,000; o

General Fund

do

....

...

700,000! 7

Mo.—Municipal.

Improvement..
Water.
Harbor
Wharves
Pacific RR

do
do

....

Iron Mt. RR

.

150.000' 7

260.000! 6
1,496,100; 6
446,800 j 6

6

239.000; 6
163.000 6
457,000! 6

429,900! 6
....

C.&Co’tyB.
C.&Cb’tyB.
C.&Co’tyB.

C.&Co’tvB.
Wilmington, Del.—City Bonds..

V

300,000 5

200.000,' 5

254,000

O. & M. RR

do

600,000 ! 6
500.000 ! 6

4?4,000 6

Francisco, Cal.—City Bonds,
do
City Fire B.
do
City Bonds.
d«>

1,500,000! 6

523,000! 6
425.000 ; 6

Sewerage.

.

7,898,717
1,009,700
1,800,000
985,326- 6

1,464,000' 6

..

Real Estate

do

San

County B’ds.

2,232,800

285,000 6
1,352,600 10
178,500 10
329,000 6

1,133.500 6
300,000 7
960,000. 7
1.000.000 7

338,075'^

do
do
do

’67 '76
11873
!’65’ 69

May & Nov. Il864
do
do
do

11867
1865

>66’73

May & Nov. i’75-’89
do
|’73-’76
I’SO-’Sl
do
;’83'90
do
do
1 77-'82
Jan. & July >65 ’81
do
j'65 S2
do
>65 ’93
do
Jan. & July var.
do
'1913
70
Various. >66’83 95%

95

|’65’99

Apr. & Oct.I’68 ’71
Mar. & Sept. ;1S85
Jan. & Julv'1876
do
" {1893

Various.
*65’S2
do
>65 ’82
Jan. & July >65 ’76

96

95% { 96

.

Jan. & Julyi’88- 9S
do
!1S$4
Jan. & July ,’65 ’S3
do
>65 ’90
do
>79 ’88
do
I’71 ’87
do
>71*83
do
>65 ’86

>67 ’81
do
do
do

’71 ’73r
’72 ’74!
’74 ’77
May & Nov. 1871
Jan. & July 1866
1875
do
1888
do
do
’77 ’78
April & Oct. 1883
Jan. & July 1884

various

'

95%

I

.

,

+ 4

4.

June

THE

23,1866.]

CHRONICLE.

following table shows the foreign imports of certain leading
commerce at this port for the week ending June 15, since Jan1, 1S66, and for the corresponding period in 1865 :
The

&l)£ Commercial ©inus.
COMMERCIAL

articles of

[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.]

EPITOME.

For
the
Week.

Friday Night, Jane 22.

Trade

is

783

again in

Same
time
1865.

Since
Jan. 1,
1866.

For
the

Since
Jan. 1,
week.
1866.

,

Same
time
1865.

u very unsatisfactory state.
Goods will not sell. Buttons
225
2,121
49
7,U04
1,080 Hardware...
3,280
80,681
113,148
Iron, RRb’rs 7,038
6,334
253,001
73,663
market, they are firmly held. But never have Coal, tons
254
1.687
78,526
Lead, pigs.. 7,327 214.047
Cocoa, hags...
7,695
buyers acted with greater caution and reserve. A decline of 20 per Coffee, bags
37,061
426,377 251,003 Spelter, lbs.446,246 6,103.083
24
:..
6,768
3,4:18
88.750
19,512 Steel
1,590
cent, in the gold premium from the highest point of the week, together Cotton, bales.
223,823
379.379
15,517
Tin, bxs
Drugs, Ac.
Tin slabs,lbsl03.299 3,901.229 1 692,943
109
with a failure of the utmost efforts to produce another advance, has
1,290
Bark, Pertiv
3,269
416
Blea p’wd'rs 1.592
10.552 Bags.
16,809
22,870
11,528
weakened confidence in present currency quotations ; hence, the ex¬
hhds.
2,03SSugar,
11,128
Brimst, tns. 1,353
128.756
85:1
tes A bbls.. 39.860
177.166
231
Cochineal...
treme difficulty of selling goods.
There is one sort of trade, however,
234.818
152,223
3 To Sugar,bxsAbg 37.792
Cr Tartar
20
698
345,216
Tea
which is somewhat stimulated ; that is, goods which are generally sold
Gambier..., 1,200
81,668 524,611
11,989
11.871
7.905
7.083
519
1,279 Tobacco
Gums, crude
for a certain price in gold, at short time, sell more readily, owing to the
558
028 Waste
4,210
2.018
7,954
4
Gum, Arabic
51
1.161
2.81(j|Wines, Ac.
Indigo.. .*...
the premium on gold will further decline. But even
general belief that
16.697
67.820
23
7,117
Madder.
1,873 Champ, bkts 7. OSS
16.303
26,209
in this direction business is so moderate that it would be scarcely no
224.519
923
Wines
212
2.607
Oils, ess
27,971
10.078 Wool, bales...
2,913
41,895
584
74,450
Oil, Olive...
ticed, except for the stagnation that otherwise prevails.
398'Articles reported by value.
2 4
430
Opium
27,185 Cigars
67,379
£78.647 £795,632 £219.677
Cotton has been depressed by the return of fine weather at the
Soda, bi-carb 2.100
00,316
2.753
75,064
5,547 Corks
16,000
1,224
Soda, sal
823,2-2
22,226
892
15,206 Fancy goods.. 62,393 2,012,835
Soda. ash...
South, the decliue in gold, and the difficulty of negotiating bills.
2.252 F sh
578,047
287,554
S
Flax
7,304
Breadstuff's have been unsettled, owing to the interruption of supplies Furs
1.698.Fruits, Ac.
1.892
63,141
22.873
253.206
Lemons
10.223
1,515
Gunny cloth
by a break in the Erie Canal.
22.075
2-5,2s9
257,577
4
1,522
2,621
Oranges
Hair
Provisions meet with a steady demand. Prices are much better sup¬ Hemp, bales.. 5, SI 9
26,451
576.817 598 570
17,21"* Nuts
63,S67
215,527
14,112
473.104
Raisins
Hides, Ac.
42G Hides,undrsd.S189.366 3,456,615 1,752,531
ported than in any other line of Domestic Products.* There is much
68
1.248
Bristles
5.074
168
1,456 Rice
51,294 313,215 695, S06
Hides, dres’d.
speculative confidence in Perk. Prices are somewhat more than a dol¬ India rubber.. 1.175 13,121
15,316 Spices, Ac.
40.017
201
Cassia...... 4,715
lar below the highest point of the week, but every decline brings out Ivorv
256
39
125,873
9.S29
32,157
Ginger
Jewelry, Ac.
1.H3
large orders to buy. Other hog products are very firm, especially cured
236
370
76,906
13
9,1 IS
Pepper
Jewelry
58.C72
295 Saltpetre
99,340
574
10
Watches....
hams and shoulders, which are much wanted, causing a brisk demand
147,315
7.862
15,961 Woods.
Linseed
29,695
17.S63
for the liberal supplies of live hogs.
Fustic."...... 1,4 <0
83,270
5,974
56,678
Lard is dull. Beef of all kinds is Moiasses
59,56
696
99,339
Logwood
Metals. Ac.
630
116,24
quiet and unchanged. Putter and Cheese have not come to market as
73,575
77
2,970
1,049 Mahogany..
Cutlery......
freely as was expected ; and the latter, with good export demand
EXPORTS OK LEADING ARTICLES.
brings very full prices.
The following table shows the exports from this port of some leading
Groceries have been without animation, and close flat. Stocks are
articles of commerce for the .week ending June 18, siuce January 1,
generally large, and, with unimportant exceptions, accumulating. To¬
day trade was very flat: the only fact worth mentioning being some 1866, and for the corresponding period in 1865 :
For
Since Same
Same
Since
For
demand for really choice qualities of Rio Coffee. There was also some
time
Jan.
the
time
Jan.
the
’65.
week. 1. ’66.
'65.
business in Molasses at about steady prices.
week
1,’66.
1,260
44
2.027
5,340 Pitch, bbls.
Ashes, pts, bills
Metals have been fairly active. Foreign metals show full gold prices, Ashes. Prls.bls
437 Oil cake,10u lb
44
5
10,691 295.309 179,467
Beeswax, lbs.
15,789 135,242 124,760 Oils.
and currency quotations are rather better than l ist given.
Petrol., gals 194,72011,963.588 3,642,561
Breadstuff's.
11.151
9,693
Naval Stores have been without animation, although in liberal sup¬
12.312 463.287 598,221
Whale, gals
Flour, bbls.
100
34,740
68.827
69,817
C. meal, bbls
63,197
Sperm, gals
1,975
25,-. 56
ply. Oils have been more active for Crude Whale aud Linseed, at bet¬
10,205
Lard, gals..
1,005
131,494 406,146
Wheat, bus.
Provisions.
15,363 199.200
Rve, bush
ter currency prices, but not corresponding to the advance iu gold.
67.807
629
48.386
Pork, bbls..
Coru, bush. 528.23-3 3,661.327 344,531
600 726,073
606
38.374 55,928
Beef.bblsAtcs.
Hides have been quiet, latterly, but for strictly American dry, gold
Oats,bush..
385 226.782 286.094
94.130
Bacon,100 lb
11.968
Peas, bush..
59.187
371
9,-758
85.919
659
prices have beeu better maintained.
Leather has been active and Candles, b\s.
Butter, 100 lb

With

an

easy money

...

..

...

?

...

...

♦

....

.

....

....

...

=

..

«...

.

.

’

•

Cotton, bales.

Tallow has been active, the

demand being partly speculative.
Wool has been less active, and prices are drooping.
Petroleum has been

steadily declining.
been firm, but quiet.

Fruits and Fish have

1,392

Hav, bales
Hops, bales..

firmer.

210

259.571
18.992

1

665

IS
43

121.141

C.Turp.bbls
S.Turp.bbls
Rosin* bbls.

East India Goods

Tar. bbls...

are

dull.
Freights have nearly come to a standstill, owing to the non-arrival of
grain, A few steamers for Liverpool, whose sailing day had been
fixed, took corn on Tuesday and Wednesday as low as; ld.@Ud. per
bushel; but there has been nothing of moment done in two days. Pe¬
troleum vessels find employment more easily and considerable Tobacco
is being shipped to Great Britain and the Continent.
The receipts of domestic produce for the week ending June 22, since

4,381

19,095

RECEIPTS OP DOMESTIC PRODUCE FOR

have 1

[Of the items left blank iu 1865
This
week.

een as

no

189,965
37,011

66,139
42,465;Peanuts ‘bags.
218,082
....j Provisions—
121,435 *438,895
Butter, pkgs. 8,583
15.66S
Cheese
99, $83
114
Cut meats...
4,214

7,008

2,802

118

.

9,490

Breadstuff's—

Rye

:

Malt

2,012

Barley
Grass seed

Flaxseed....
Beaus

90

36.223
105.089

1,765

Peas
10,490
C. meal,bbls. 4,0ll
C. meal.bags. 3,699

56,995 +178,870

171

bags
Cotton, bales

..

Copper, bbls...
Copper, plates
Dnedfruit.pkgs
Grease, pkgs...
Hemp, bales
Hides, dried...

11,073

6*776

1S6

2,817

172,970

*

3,655

185,291
7-,166
90,932

416
381
....

77.089

....

78,530
90,330

52,829

166
221

5.267
1,101

Stearine

Spelter, slabs..
Sugar, hhds &

144,025
73,625
78,480

1.460

2,355

21
26

5.4 7
348

3,400

4,395

229,312

..

.

....

.

..

75.115

2.224

bbls

2.607

....

....

Including malt,

t Including bags reduced to barrels.

....

8.985

21,117
38,991

38,502

15,792

74.214

108,S42

1,647

47,375

75,795

Tobacco,mf,lbs. 230.9241,693,360l,S94j 96
5,370: Whalebone, lbs 14,959 361,993 118,535
4,9971
611

Circular reports.

sold at

of at
silver ranged
Mexican from 3s ld@3s 2d.
75s@.93s 6d, ancl 342 bags Grenada

Cake £80, best Selected £89, Sheathing £91,

28,385
28,630
....

....

Y M

'hemp.-For

500 bales fair Sunn there were no bids, and they were taken in at
£18 10s. 40 bales Bombay found buyers from £23 5s.Q £23 10s. for fair
Of 700 bales Manilla only 40 bales were sold from £35@£42 5s. for ord current
to

quality.

good Sorsocran quality.

Jute.—10.000 bales sold early in the .week at an

advance of I0s.@20s. per ton.

Of 2.100 ha'es offered at public sale nearly the whole realized from
£24 15s. for low common to good. 34 bales cuttings brought £G.

Iron.—Welsh quiet.

Rails and bars £6 f. o. b. iu Wales. Scotch

£14 15s.®

pigs 5Cs. 9d.

Clyde.
5
Linseed.—Arrival this week 4,748 qrs. The smallness of available supplies
has further advanced the pretensions of holders ; Calcutta has made C7s., and
Bombay is held at 69s. For June-July shipments of Calcutta G4s. paid, and
Azov (of which 25,000 qrs. were last week reported at fils. 6d.(&62s.) for summer
shipment otters less freely at fi2s.@62s. 6(1.
Linseed Cakes is without change, aud consumption limited.
Cotton Seed is more difficult to buy at a slight advance, coast cargoes being
held at £7. 10s.££7. 12s. fid.
Naval Stores.—French Spirits Turpentine on the spot obtainable at 4fis.,
and to arrive 41s.
Petroleum £17 Crude and Refined 2s. 2j£d Pennsylvanian,
and Spirits Is.
Oils.—Linseed inactive at 36s.@36s. fid. for present delivery.
Rape firmer.
Olive : more disposition to sell, ancl Gallipoli just arrived is obtainable at £59,
aud Spanish at £57: Mogadore £51@£51. 10s.
Palm sells at -His finest Lagos.
Fish: Sperm at last public sale sold at £123; Southern nominally £48; Cod
cash for mixed Nos. on

,

£4fi.

Rice.—10,000 bags soft grain sold at 10s.

proof.
Spelter

quiet at £20@£20.10s.

Saltpeter.—S00 bags Bengal
4}£d. per cent, refraction ; also
lowances.

^

3d. for Necranzie, 9s. 10><d.@10s.

lvd for Rassein, and 500 bags white Bengal at 15s.
Rum.—210 puns Penang sold at Is. 4b-;!., and 700 puns Berbice
the former at Is. 6>*d., the latter at Is. fid.@ls. O^d.', with some
'

81,769

2,304

Tallow. 100 lb
Tobacco, pkgs

.

....

1-19.107
0.388

Chili Slab sold at £83.
Drugs, Ac.—Shellac—Of 350 chests at public sale about one-third sold at a
further decline of about 2s 6d per cwt, viz, 82s 6d for fair European orange, 70s
for e-ood native orange, and 31s 6d for mid garnet. Cutch—320 bags fair l’enang
taken in at 29s. Plumbago —170 bbls mostly sold from 13s 6d(a;18s fid for mid to
fair lump, and from 9s.@,9s. fid. for dust. Red S nders Wood—ICO tons were
disposed of at £4 5s. for sound, and at £4 2s. fid. for slightly damaged, being a
decline of 5s. per ton. Logwood—320 tons Laguna taken in at £8 10s. (£7 only

264,900

5,067

.




...

191,255

45,884

158
Tallow, pkgs..
Tobacco, pkgs. 3,024
3,406
12,935 Tobacco, hhds. 1,830
Hons, bales
596
Leather, sides
50,65!) 1,023,2521,100,600; Whisky, bbls..
Wool, bales...
2,905
4,558
Lead, pigs
Dressed nogs,
Molasses, hhds
No
* bbls
724
7,358
Rice,
rough.
Naval Stores—
Crude trp.bbl
1,058 hush
899 23,374
Spirits tur-;
18,632
3,809
pentine..;. 1,626
*

....

2,952

S9,S3ti

..

Lard, kegs...
Rice, pkgs
Starch

26,749
4,730

98,851

Lard, pkgs...

363.210
3,860

.

437,572

24

208,844

B. W. Flour,

50,014

4,123

Eggs
Pork..
Beef. pkgs.

1 222

60,423

Sheathing 8d.

Same
Since
Jan.1. time’65

Rosin
7,878
302
Tar
52
Flour, bbls .. 62,382 953,4401,291,055 Pitch
2.S56
Wheat, bush 33,3'4 392,893 467,665 Oil cake, pkgs
35
Oats
175,4601,539,9143,129.845 Oil, lard
Corn
474,850 3,729,0201,855,150; Oil, Petroleum. 21,550

Ashes, pkgs..

112,133

11,637 Staves M,

Cocoa—-Of 1,339 bags Trinidad part

at 67s 0d@79s.
Coffee steady.
Copper quiet.—Tough

SINCE JAN. 1.

This
week.

48.091

145.366

Cochineal. —Of 650 bags at auction only about 300 baas were disoosed
a decline of ld@,2d on silver, and 3d@4d per lb on black : Honduras
from 2s 4d@3s 8d, Tenenffe s Over from 3s@3s5d, and

record was made.]

Since
Same
Jan. 1. time’65

7.484
4.737
234

Cheese, 100 lb

Lard, 100 t)

Lontov, June 9.-—Baring’s

;

follows;

THE WEEK, AND

.

18,324

Naval Stores,

very

Jan. 1, aud for the same time in 1865,

.

11.883

3.352
222

•

andDemerara,
good at la. 7d.

sold at 23s. 3d. for fi*vd. per cent., and 24s. for
100 tons for arrival at 24s. with customary al¬

Lead firm.—Common Pig £21© £21.10s.
Sugar.—The market has been quiet, and on

very

moderate.

Tallow.—The market is steady at 42s. for
and lor this month, and 40s. fid. for October to

amount

St. Petersburg Y. C. on the spot
December.

COTTON.

Friday, P. M., June 22.

receipts at all the ports, the past week, have reached about
18,500 bales, and the exports about 11,251 bales. Since September
1st the amount of receipts is 1,938,561 bales, at.d the total exports
1,448.81 1 bales. The receipts at all the ports, since the close of the
war, now amount to 2,851,053 bales, and the present stock on hand is
846,609 bales. In making up this statement of stock we have estima¬
ted the amount held at Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore at 35*000
bales. It may be more than that.
Below we give our table of the movement of cotton at all the ports
since September 1st, showing at a glance the total receipts, exports,
The

AT

(BALES) SINCE SEPT.

PATES

MENTIONED.

EXPORTED since

1 TO—

sept

SHIP-

rec'd

PORTS.

“

“

“

1,810

460

5,926

unsettled
32©—

1,358

702 2,023

5,261

35©36

Great

1.

j France Other

Britain.

0

654,774

235,272

Texas, June S

163.346

Newr

135,445
146,196
62,114,

401,343

,

1 STOCK.

PORTS.

|

Receiprs. Sales. Exp's. Stock*

Date.

York, June 22*
Florida, June 2....

N. Carolina, June 22

7,600 6.746
7,270 2.200 18,628
6,841 10.4(H) 2.243
5,159 7.500 10,2 3

80,788

37©38

63,430

36

48.697

44,702

87.534

141.102

6,057

86,042
1.492
1.739 3,214
58,005
381,040 35,488 41,160
34.703:
21 i

437.088

..

107.673

34.703

....

,

,

,

62,141

21

,

5,261

11,706
64,037
6,534
...128,000

03,559

....

4.588

74,228
63,124
58,493

3!©-

t.

20

2.181

8

1,903

15

1,505

9,019

3.700
4.250

2,598

1

3,950

3.01(5
1.973
2.(530
4.«i74
3,096

1
1
1

%
X

350—'

✓

33© 34

/4

4

\\/

32033
33©—

42,407

X
•S'

>4

300—

41,958
39,188

-@•34
33@34

%
X
X
37,596 nominal. X

126© 128
12501260

0 1
© 1
0 1

126© 127,
12501260
126©. 127#

0 1

12801290
1290130)

X
X
X
X
X
%

59,342 1nominal. %
49,782 31© 32
43.808
41.782

000X 0/ 1

1
1

12501260
©-

© 1

1400552:

© 1

138© 1381
140©—
©—

@©0 0-

703,635 346,609

The market closed on the 15th instant unsettled.
The Scotia’s news
under date of the 2d instant was not interpreted favorable, and buyers

1

....

|

18,049;

...

290

....

....

t Estimated.

with

Upland.

Middling

Good Middling

$

29
33
35
37
40

It.

-s.

Florida.
29
33
35
37

Mobile.
,

2.180[Norlolk. Baltimore, &c
461 Per Railroad

874|

11.073

*

93G, 129

.

947,202

Total since July 1

have been as follows :
May 80.

476

bales

Rcce'ts. Sales. Exp. Stock.

2,6(52

16,663

2,4(56

5,479

13,458

30031

1,379

182

4.493

10.344

2.626
3.277

650

3,437

9,538

1,777

618
915

12,192

29© 30
28029
28© 29
nominal
nominal

..

ii

13,..

ii

20’..
27

ii

751

2.274

..

1,197
1,532

..

4

May
; i

11
18
25

tt
it

June

1

J

b

une

..

1,261

..

506
1.176
925

..

..

..

477

..

757
100
191

’247

2.319

10,657 nominal

2,806

219
64

2,992
1,181

8,357 nominal
9,305 nominal
7,238 nominal

ii

25
384

776

’65.

435

452,610

Total for the week

Previously reported

453,416

453,851

1,392
454,325

453,416

453,851

454,3*25

455,717

1200128
126012$
124@126
12 .©127
125© 127
126©128
127@129

—

6,5.84 nominal

—

1290132

131©

—

1390140#

The
Ex¬

nominal, nothing being offered. Sight on New York
premium. The total receipts at Galvest n since
reach 141,752 bales, and the total at all the ports of Texas

change sterling wras

firm at £ to lc.

;

16.—The mail returns for the week

ending June

receipts to be only 3,842*bales, against 5,258 bales last week,
decrease of 1,416 bales.
The shipments for the week were 10,650

15 show the

bales: of which 2.691 bales were

shipped to Liverpool, - 373 tales to

Bremen, 739 bales to Barcelona, 2,541 bales to New York, 8,961 bales
to Boston, and 317 bales to Philadelphia.
Stock on hand June lf»th
had been reduced to 121,791 bales. " The receipts, sales, and exports
for a scries of weeks and the stock, price of middli* g, rates of freight
to

Liverpool and New York, and price of gold at the
April 7, were as follows;

close of each

week since

Freights

,

Rec'ps. Sales. Exp.
April 7... 18.133 14,300 22,456
14...
12,849 18,100 22.338
10.801 11,000 19.779
21...
28..., 10,303 5,300
10.888 5,900 8,862
May 5
12....
5.799 9,500 8,266
18..
5,460 9,700 3,512
25....
5,207 13,000 15,303
June 2
4,112 8.200 13,088
9.... 5,258 5,000 21,723
15....
3,842 9,750 10,650
.

“

.

“

.

.

.

...

“

474

125@126

t Per steamer.
Specie, ex-revenue tax.
There was no life in the market—no one wanting to operate.
few bales sold were at 25c. specie, ex revenue tax, for Middling.

“

71

gold.
126©127

lc.@—
9- 6© 2s
%© I
1 ©9-16©%
1
©9-16©%
1
©9-16© %
1 ©9-16©%
1
©9-16©%
©—
9-16©,%
©—
0 ©9-16
%(&0 ©9-16
X@ 1
0 ©9-16
1 00 ©

*

“

300

.28

Stock.

176,220

♦By steam.
The market

To Liver-To New

Price
Mid.

156,497

154,369
157.087
147,496

139,769

1 24,133

121,791

,

Price

York.*
gold.
—@38 9-160% d. #0—c. 125%© 126
39© 10 9-16©%
0@— 1*25# @126
pool.

167,748
160,336 40©-

“

80

.

12.474
11,715

174
155

Date*

-Week endingJune 12. June 19
June a.
912
449
37
23

2,291

Price

York.t

#d.@#d.

29030

1,252

..

.

To New

Price To Livermid.*
pool.

162,869 bales.

1.S42 Foreign

Total from N. York since July 1,

Date.
March 23
ii
30
April 6

JSept. 1st now

Bales.
848
1,022
1,340

advancing rapidly, in¬

Freights.

,

a

Bales. |
From
2,967 North Carolina

exports of cotton from this port

market. Gold was excited and

—

by the advices of the advance in New York. Exchange ster¬
ling ruled dull and nominal throughout the week; New York sight f
premium. The total receipts at Mobile since Sept, 1 now amounU to401,343 bales, and the exports 388,037 bales.
Galveston, June 9.— We have received one week later statement by
mail from Galveston.
The receipts were 477 bales, against 925
last week, and the shipments were 1,181 bales, against 2,992 last week.
T'he following were the shipments for the week ending June 9th : To*
Liverpool 1.166, and to New Ociean6 15 bales. Below we give the re¬
ceipts, sales, and shipments for a seres of weeks, and the stock, priceof middling, rates of freight to Liverpool and New York, and pric^ o<s
gold at the close of each week :

fluenced

was

week ending this even¬

Previously reported

To Liverpool
To other British ports
To Havre
To other French ports
To Bremen
To Hamburg
To other German ports
To various Continental ports

kept out of the

2,205
1,770
2,000

New' Orleans June

ing (Friday) were as follows :
From
New Orleans
Texas
Mobile
Savannah
South Carolina
Total tor the week

& Texas
30
34
36
3S
42

30
.‘43
36
37
41

41

receipts of Cotton at this market for the




3.114
3,045
2,274

37

1,933,501 1,168,037 (211,977 68,797 1,448,811

....

Ordinary
Good Ordinary
Loav Middling

The

3.4(H) 10.021
0.500 3.835
5,000 12,074

5.393
4.684

i

....

regard to the next crop are at length improv¬
ing—the rivers have fallen and the rains have ceased, so that a
better feeling prevails.
To what extent the freshets, frosts, <fce.,
have injured the prospects for the year, it is. of course, as yet
impossible to say. That the season has been thus far unusually severe
aDd unfavorable is very certain, and that a portion of the land which
had been put under cotton cultivation lias been necessarily abandoned
or turned into corn is equally true, while other portions are suffering
from the growth of grass, which the planters have not been able to
keep clown during the rains. Still every effort is now being and will
be made to recover as much as possible of the loss ; and, with a favor¬
able season for the future, much may be accomplished. The favorite
estimate now for the coming crop is about 2,000,(M'0 bales ; of course,
however, no great reliance can be made on estimates made at this time.
The sharp reaction in gold during the week, together with the im¬
proved wreather reports from the South, have weakened the confidence
of holders of cotton and prices have experienced a somewhat irregular
decline, the market closing very unsettled and with a downward ten
dt-ncy. The export inquiry is trifling, owing in a great part to the diffi¬
culty of negotiating exchange. The spinners are buying very little
here, receiving large supplies direct from the Southern markets.
The
receipts hero are liberal and the stock increasing, although at Southern
ports, and in the aggregate there is a considerable falling off.
The
sales in this market the past week are about 8,00+) bales, and the fol¬
lowing are the closing quotations :
N. Orleans

The

.

10 @1
©-

X
X

18,339

34,115

By Railroad, Canal and River,

Our advices

'

578

42.062

8.503

c.

134@136*
130© 1325
1290131

June

p’ts, June 19.

Total
*

100,719 37,596

%

38039

5,585

gold'.

~

'

10c©-

'34,115!
1+35.000

Virginia, June 22...
Other

258 11*

‘

77.153
79.031

11.175

ro
17
“
24
31
April 7
14
k
2t
2S
5..k>
Mav
4.
12
it
19...

Freight
,
To New Price of

Xd

42
40

76,455

4*

209,143 117,924

To

mid. L’pool. York.
-<

8.778
3,700 30,477
5,700 3.707

2,300

12,034

March 3

450,153

100.926

—

102,898 bales, and the exports

Price of

331,160 127,017 21,976
216,354' 40.184 1,579

June 15.
Mobile, June 15....
Charleston, June 15
Savannah., June 15.

—
—

receipts at Charleston since

The total

tt

N. Orleans,

nominal

:

NORTH.

Total.

for'gn.'

|

Is©- 137©
0©— 144©
0©— 143©

@—

0

281

4 505
2 099

6.915

1,110

Junel..
“
8..
“
15..

M NTS TO:

SINCE
SEPT.

York, sight, £ premium. The receipts, sales, and exports for a
of
weeks, and the stock, price of middling, rates of freight to Liverpool
and New York, and price of gold at the close of each week since May
5th, were as follows :
Freight for Upl’d—,
Price of
To Liver- To New
Price
mid.
pool.
York.
gold.
Date. Rcce'ts. Sales. Exp. Stock.
Mav 5..
940 2,470 10,650 unsettled 0d.@9-16d. lc.@— 1280129'
2,301
0 ©9-16
29030
%@— 128© —
12..
2,863 1,200 1,901 11,112
9,322
0@% 130© —
32©—
0 ©9-16
19..
1,403 1,250 3,193
9.610
36©0 @9-16
0@— 140© —
26..
1,318 1,070 1.030

September 1st, now retfceh
97,637 bales.
Mobile. June 15.—By mail we have received one week’s later dateB
from Mobile.
The receipts for the week ending iu* e 15th were 1,505*
bales against 1,903 bales last week, and the shipments were 3,096*
{ bales against 4.674 bales last week ; leaving the stock on hand and on1
shipboard not cleared at 37,596 bales. Shipments during the week
were—to Liverpool 1,371, to New York 559 bales, and to Boston 1,166
1, AND STOCKS bales. The following are the weekly receipts sales, and exports, for a
series of weeks, and the stock, price of middling, rates of freight to
Liverpool and New York, and price of gold at the close of each week :

stocks, <tc.:
OF COTTON

New
series

tendency. Exchange

quiet.—Bars 80s., Blocks 85s., Refined 87s. Straits 75s.@76s.
Tea.—12,600 pkgs soid at public sale this week at about previous market
The business by private contract has been very limited. Good Common
rates.
Congou Is. ©Is. O0d. per lb.

AND EXPORTS

June loth
for

Charleston, June 15.—The receipts for the week ending
to 1.858 bales against 1,110 bales last week.
Shipments
this week amount to 2,023 bales against 2,099 bales last week. The
market closed quiet with a downward
on

the spot transactions have been

Tin

RECEIPTS

[June 23, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

784

9-1 G©%
9-16©%
9-16© %
0®%
009-16
39040
0@9-16
40©—
%@0
38®39
0@—
Unset’d. 0©~
—©—
35©36
—©35
36©37

‘

*

during the first half of the

'

*

0@— . 12500126
0@— 128 ©—
0@— 1280©—
0@— ISO @1300
0©— 1300©—

1480©,1440
1390 @1440
1 ©10 137 @141
1 @1# 14000147

,1

0©1

.

week was active, with an ad**

June

THE CHRONICLE.

28,1866.]

Tuesday of about
cents ; the latter half this advance was
mostly lost. The market closed unsettled. Exchange sterling l60@
162.
Sight on New York
premium.

785

European

Indian Cotton Markets.—Our

correspondent in Lon¬
don, writing under the date of June 9, gives the following full renew of the
European and other cotton markets ;
and

America indicate

hales.
From
From

own

Liverpool, JuDe 9.—Arising chiefly from the fact, that our latest advices from

falling off in the receipts of cotton, the market here in the
early part of the week was very buoyant, and the upward tendency in prices
continued. The trade, however, was subsequently very inactive, and on the
announcement that the Bank of Agra and Masterman had been compelled to
stop payment, there were many symptoms of heaviness apparent. Above all,
the abundance of supplies has induced more caution on the pait of buyers ; but,
at the same time, the aggregate sales, although by no means equal to last week,
are tolerably large.
They amount to 71,490 Dales; of which speculators have
taken 6,710 bales ; exporters, 9,580 bales, and the trade, 55,200 bales, Prices on

Total
bales.
333
527

Britain, Continent.

vance on

May 11 to May 16
May 18 to May 25

bales.
&34

i45

Total

382

145

716

861

Previously from November 1.

124.145

25,818

149,963

Total
Same period last season

124,290
189,976

26,534

150,824

84,754

294,780

a

BREADSTUFF,S.

,

Friday, P. M., June 22, 1866
The break in the Erie Canal, which occurred on the date of our last

repaired. We have
consequently been for some days without regular supplies of grain, and
the receipts of flour have been diminished. From this circumstance,
extreme prices have been obtained for grain ; out current quotations
may be regarded as for the most part nominal.
For arrival, figures are
^re as under:
1866.
scarcely more settled. Amber Clab Wheat sold early in the week at
Good and
Fair and
1865.Ordinary
$2 50 to arrive, but now can be had lower. Corn may be quoted at
fine.
Mid.
Fair. Good
and middling.
good fair.
3S
52
33
70
34
42
21
27
54
Sea Island.
88(«)90c. for Prime Mixed to arrive. Oats 55@58c. for Western to arrive.
21
22
24
20
16
18
stained
J5
is
13
10
We have 6ome further crop accounts. There is danger of another
16#
Upland
Mobile
16#
10#
13#
15#
entire failure in Kentucky ; and in Pennsylvania, where the promise was
17
16
New Orleans
is#
10#
13#
17
18
16
Texas
10#
13#
so good, the weevil is doing much mischief.
Sou hern Ohio and In¬
Annexed is a comparison of the prices of middling cotton for the la t four
diana send unfavorable reports ; but Southern Illiuois and the whole of
years :
COMPARATIVE PRICES OF COTTON.
Missouri promise well.
Western New York promises an increased
1863 1864. 1865. P66
1863. 1864. 1865. 1866.
yield of fine wheat. The Spring Wheat districts promise well.
d.
d.
d.
d.
d.
Middling—
d.
d. Middling—
d.
Upland
Egyptian
19# 27# 15
18
The following are the nominal closing quotations;
21# 28# 16# 13
17
Broach
16
Mobile........ 22

-

report, was very extensive, and has not yet been

Monday showed an advance varying from #d. to Id. per lb. This improvement
has not only been lost, but the quotations even exhibit a decline, in some
instances, from last week. It is chiefly conlined, however, to American descrip¬
tions, which show a fall in price of #d. to #d. per lb. A very limited business
has been done in produce to arrive. The prices current for'American cotton
,

N

...

-

.

.

_

3

..

•

28#

The

16#

17

27#

15#

8#

13#
13#

7

8#

6#

13#

28#

Orleans.
22#
Pernambuco.. 20#

Dhollerah

15#

17

Flour, Superfine State and
Western
$ bbl $6 75® 7 60

1865.
bales.

Stock in Liverpool
“
in London
East Indian cotton afloat
American
“
“

406,490

998,770
96,7!3

20,000

701,800
127,000

Total, Great Britain.

1,011,166

1,924,283

60-5U0
30,000

126,000

Shipping R. hoop Ohio. 8 85@10 00

1866.
bales.

84,676

500,000

Stock in Havre
“
rest of Continent
Total for

20,000

1,101,666

Europe

2,070,283

Extra

purchases, and to this circumstance must be attributed the fact that, although
prices have fallen materially during the last two months, the decline has not
been so rapid as the magnitude of our immediate and prospective supplies might
have led one to anticipate. The real tendency of prices at the present moment,
notwithstanding the recent fall of about 8d. per lb., is towards increased ease,
but the market is now strongly influenced by the accounts from America re¬
specting the receipts at Southern ports and the accounts relating to the growing
crops. The latter vary in character considerably; but with an excess of supply
immediate and immediately prospective—of one million bales, as compared
with last year, no circumstance but a heavy failure of the American or Indian
crop could possibly contribute to any important advance in prices from those

to

com¬

8 5C®12 60

good

Double Extra Western
and St. Louis
12
Southern supers
10
Southern, fancy and ex. 11
Canada,
to
common
choice extra
9

Rye Flour, fin.' and super¬
fine
Corn

This simple calculation is perhaps the most important, in a commercial point
ot view, that has been made for some time, and it semis impossible to imagine
how, in the face of such figures, the cotton trade in this country can have an
upward movement. So far as manufactures of cotton goods are concerned, our
trade, although of diminished extent as compared with the last six months, is

undoubtedly in a healthy state, and the business doing for export, as well as for
home use, is large.
Spinuers, therefore, are compelled to make considerable

Western,

mon

00®13 75

1 70® 2 25
00® 2 40

2

2 30® 2 60
2 75® 8 00
2 50® 3 35

6 75@ 7 25

97

85®

Western Yellow

1 15® 1 40

Rye
Oats, Western
Jersey and State....
Barley

55®
65®
85®.
1 00®
1 15®
1 60®
_

Malt

Peas, Canada
White beans

and

Jersey
Brandywine
meal,

Spring

Corn, Western Mixed

75®16 50

50®11 50
60®16 75

Chicago

per bushel
Milwaukee Club
Red Winter
Amber Stale and Mich.
White

7 60® 9 .75

Extra State

supplies of cotton,-available and prospective, are now as follows:

Wheat,

75

80
1 20
1 20
1 25
2 50
.

_

4 80® 5 25

The movement in Breadstuffs at this market has

been

as

follows

:

RECEIPTS.

-1865.-1866.For the w'k. Since Jan. 1. For the w’k. S’e Jan. 1.
928.600
1,291,055
99,485
67,815

Flour, bbls
Corn meal, bbls.

Rye, bush
Barley, Ac., bush

.

FOREIGN

178,870

2,850
209,105
276,235
11,225

3,742,110
65,990
397,480

1,543,605

467,665
1,865,150
42,465

33,245
367,765

153,875
445,545

3,440
103,855
738,615
11,825
2,250
259,055

3,129,845

438,895

EXPORTS.

—

current.
The subjoined figures show the sales of
and the year; the imports for the week and the year; and
hand at the period at which the latest statement of supplies
now

the leading description for the week
also the stocks
was made uf> :

SALES, ETC., OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS.
Total Total
Same
this
Ex- Specula this
period
week
1865.
tion.
Trade. port.
year.
.

.bales. 19.850 ■1,480

3,450

240
330

470
30
350

9,820
2,930

Brazilian.
Ac
m

..

..

rmm

9,902

Egyptian........
India

6,710

9,580

286

To this To this
date
date
1865.
1866.

784,078 124,924
264,642 119,647
125,194 210,190

3,158
52,257

41,560

18,230
5,510
3,670
1,470

574,570

13,880
20

129,360
141,740
206.810

48.533

53,236
692,945 299,703

This

1865.

day.

459,369

401,730
334,068 125,740
54,880
411,328
27,750
113,328

r

6,420
1,490

14,300
3,910

41,530
56.490
70,930

386,460

168,850

S7,877

125,871

2,210

56,220

2,539,708

40

Japan

at Lake Ports.—The following shows the receipts
following lake ports for the week ending June 19 ;
'

Milwaukee
Toledo
Detroit

America

'.

-

May 7

Vicilpc

TiQlpfl

160,31)8

102,860

186,771

1865.
Bales.

1866.
Bales.

13,812

383,955

17,991
586,342

3,515

;;;; 7.7.

19,791

2,438

800

59,908
5,084

814
162

631,855
711,331

1,838,354
2,169,997

623,021

11,247
28,791

103,535 1,009,464

619.914

14,450

4,194

“Cleveland
Totals
Previous week
Cor. week, 1865 —
*

82,041
86,396

804,732
383,936

93,473

88,187
14,443

7,655

No report.

and Grain from Upper Lake
Eastward movement of Flour and
lake ports for the week ending June 16 :

Barley.

Rve

Flour.

Corn.

Oats.

1,111,450

906,228

99,205

30.378

133,230

364,287

40,928

1,542

52,756
47,514

Oswego

Wheat.

241,895
166,777

533,902
700,099

1,576,162

947,156
304,608

114,630

100.425

1,417,226

12,942*

Comparative Receipts at five Western Lake Ports.—The fol¬
lowing will show the comparative receipts of Flour and Grain at the
ports of Milwaukee, Chicago, Toledo, Detroit and Cleveland, from Jan.
1st to June 16, for 1866 and 1865:
1866.

1865.

1866.

Flour, bbls...
1,433,368
Wheat, bush.. 8,225,196
Com, hush.. . 13,951,081

961,803
7,244,604
6,236,380

Totals, grain
Increase 1866 over 1865:

Oats, bush ....
Rye, bush
Barley, bush ..

5,529,941
323,046
683,232

1865.

4,549,297
440,933
5H6,764

28,703,496

18,717,978
Flour, 471,565 barrels, and grain 9,985,578

bushels.

.

402,082

Total

limited scale.

626,562

business is passing in cotton, and ship¬
They stand thus:

Alexandria, June 3.—Scarcely any
ments are on a very




30,481
125,223
51,646

113,493

29,894
10,564

298,757

13,054

.

123,345
127,929
127.250
84,676
82,521
96,713
Bombay, May 25.—The cotton trade is still very inactive, but the week’s ship¬
ments are large, or 25,000 bales.
DholleTah is quoted at 275 rupees per candy.
Freight to Liverpool, 25s. per ton. The following is the latest statement of

London..,

Rye.
64,932
20,464
3,883

Barley.
8,310
1,961

Oats.

444,544

22.378

Stock, June 7

Liverpool
Clyde....
Continent

Corn.

1,631,004

39,411
15,126

Chicago

406,490

LqI^q

shipments, viz., from Jan. 1 to

Wheat.
292,640

Flour.

The imports and

Import from Jan 1 to June 7
Delivery do
do

70,250
129,380

Weekly Receipts
at the

Grain from upper

London, June 6.—The trade closes heavily at the rates of last week, the ad¬
vance in prices in the early part of the week having been lost.
deliveries of East India, China, and Japan cotton at this port since January 1,
have been as follows :
1864.
1S65.
1866.
.

196,95^
679,165

1,255

"1

To

998,770

3,632.825

17,365

Jan. 1.
598,220
69,425
406,145
314,534

Eastward Movement of Flour
Ports.—The following will sh w the

12,170

1,095,744

88,748 1,920,135 920,874

East India
China and

3,760

528,235
...<>.

3,460

-Stocks—
Same
Dec. 31,
date
1865.
1S65.

^

Total

1865.

42,780 33,340

71,490 1,417.9501,242,050

Imports

—

This
week.
23.145

American
Brazilian
West

'

1,840

....

....

55,200

Total...

3,370

30,420

1866.

457,060

1,185

Corn, hush

Rye, bush
Oats, bush

Average

28,855
3,830
19.265
41,700

10,005

Flour, bbls
Corn meal, bbls
Wheat, bush

weekly sales.

148,010

180.760
104,210
41.090
472.160

3,290

150
2,S70
29,630 7,380 2,410

Japan

617,890

23,880.
10,530

on

-1865.-1866.
For the w’k. Since Jan. 1. For the w’k. S’e

Eastward Movement by
ward movement of flour and

Saturday

on

Canal.—The following will show the east¬
grain, and about what there was afloat last

canals destined tor tide water :

Buffalo,
weekending

Flour.

June 18
June 11

82,020

1,129,21)0
949,121

310,156

3,480

F'm Buffalo, 14 days.
F’m Oswego, 9 days.

3,480

269,755

1,510

71,835

Total afloat
Previous week

5.3!K)
8,930

341,590
197,266

From

Wheat.

187,735

Oats.

468,671

25,897

2,078.321

778,827

13.690

25,e97

158,827
2,230,348
1,770,839

792,517
770,685

Bye.

Bariev.

Corn.

69,113

....

15,600

&4.713

14,980

....

99,693

25,897
25,897

23.924

Amoskeag
32 inch 51,
14, American 20, Glen Allea 3-4 13$, Chattanooga 3-4 15,
A 8-4 13, Passaic 7-8 20, Sacondale 13, Windsor 22, Chatta¬

field 14, Pacific Extra
A C A 62$, A 50, B

Albany
Ontario

$ 32$, do 4-4 42$ Henry Clay 3-4 19,
45 C 40 and D 35, York 80 inch 41,

Farmer’s and Miner’s 50.
generally firm at last week’s prices.
Burlington Brown Denims sell at 14$, Homestead Brown 20$. Pea¬
body Blue 19, Arkwright Blue 26$, do Brown 26$, Madison Brown

nooga

16, WillowBrook 45,

Denims

and

Cottonades

are

358.821 32,720
19,204 j 20, Providence Blue 20.
Liverpool, June 9th.
Print Cloths are firmef but not very active. The quotation is 15
The increased probabilities of war on the Continent, consequent on the aban¬
cents for 64x64 square.
donment of the Conference, caused our market on Tuesday to open with more
Prints are unsettled, and a large proportion ofmake3 are withdrawn
firmness, and holders of Wheat demanded an advance < f l>d. to 3d. per cental,
from market, especially of dark goods.
Others are held lc. higher than
which was, however, reluctantly paid by millers. French Flour was in better
our
1st quotations. The last sales of Sprague’s were as quoted, but
request, and Is. per sack dearer. With a liberal supply of Indian Corn prices
gave way 3d. per qr. Oats me' a slow sale at a decline of Id. per bu-bel.
they &re now held out of market. Merrimacks are also out of market.
Since Tuesday the improved tone of the market has gained strung h, many |
Arnolds are 17c, American Print Works madder 20, Sprague’s National
holders of Wheat and Flour have withdrawn their stocks from the market, and j
prices are decidedly against buyers. Indian Com is again rather easier, with j 19, Madder Rubies 21, Indigos 21, Mournings 18, Canaries 20, «olid
Corres^ding time,'65.

-

[June 23,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

786

32.409

793.259

589.572

colors 21, shirtings 22, Garners. 23, Amoskeag pink22, do purple 21, do
the country, warm j
already present a j shirting 20. do dark 20, do light 20, do mourning 19$, Swiss Ruby 21$,
Lowell dark 19, do light 19 Spring Valley 15, Wamsutta 16$, Dusters
At to-day's market there was a good attendance of buyers who, however, j 164, Merrimac D 20, do W 21.
Manchester 19 for fancy and 20 for*
showed considerable reluctance to pay the advanced prices demanded for Wheat j
frocks, Dunnels 19 net, Ellen’s 19 net for fancy, 20 for purple, and 20$
and Flour, but eventually a fair amount of business was done at an improve¬
ment of 3d per cental on Wheat, and Is. to Is. 6d. per sack on Flour.
Indian : for pinks. Pacific 20 net, Hamilton 20 for fancy, 21$ for pinks and pur¬
sellers at 29s. to 29s. 3d. for mixed.
The weather during the week has been more favorable for
with frequent showers, and the appearance of the crops
marked improvement.

Corn was also in better request,
Flour—Extra State, per bbl.,

and 3d. per qr. dearer.
25s. 6d.(&20s. 6d.; Canadian, 26s.@28s.

Wheat
—Chicago and Milwaukee, per 100 lbs., 9s. 6d.@10s. 4d.; do. Amber Iowa, 10s.
4d.@10s. 7d. Indian Corn—Yellow, per 480 lbsT, 29s. 6d.; White, 3is.@,31s. 6d.;
Mixed, 29s.@,29s. 6d. Peas—Canadian, per 504 lbs., 38s.@39s. Oatmeal—Ca¬
nadian, per 240 lbs..

26s.(gj29s.

farmers’

Week ending June 2d, 1866
Same time 1865

deliveries.

49,911 qrs., at 47s.

—

4d.

41s. lid.

70,443
IMPORTS.

Wheat,
qrs.

United States and Canada
Total for week
Total since 1st January
Same time 1865

v

I. Corn,

Flour
sacks.

,

,

bbls.

qrs.

253.061

306
5S.870

240,160

15,672
15,672
384,569

145,267

61,333

150,343

35,816

306

....

9,612

THE DRY

.

6,006

GOODS TRADE.
Friday, June 21, 1866, P. M.

The
led to

high price of gold and the anticipated advance in the tariff has
greater firmnes in all branches of the Drygoods market. Manu¬

Glen Cove full madders 14$, Wauregan fancies 19$, do Rubies 2o$
are quiet and unchanged.
Lonsdale 20, White Rock 22 for
high colors, and 21 for plaiu.
GiNGAMsai e firm and rather more active. Lancaster 27$, Glasgow 26.
Lawns are pressed to some extent and prices are lower.
Dutinell
Manufacturing Co.’s 1,400 quality sell at 26 regular; Lodi fancy, mourn¬
ing and plaiu solid colors 20, Pacific Co.’s fine printed Cambrics 82$.
Silf.si xs are active for leading makes and rather firmer.
'Iudian Or¬
chard 23, Social Mills 27$, do extra fine twilled 32$.
Cambrics are in steady request and prices are firmer.
Manville 14
for black, 15 for plain and 16 for pink.
Clinton 13, Federal 12$, Srnitfield Mfg Co. 14-15, Fox Hill Bank 12, Naragansett 15, Wauregan 16.
Hoop Skirts are steady at uniform rates, Thomj: son woven Train 65c
do Zephyr 55c, Bradly’s Duplex Elliptic, and Empress Trail prices un¬
changed" S T & A T Meyers’s IXL in fair demand, J C Kelley’s Gotham
No. 60, 35@52c, do do No. 70, 47 to 68c..
Canton Flannels are in better request at higher rates. Columbia

a

say they have made little or nothing during
months, aud that they cannot afford to place goods upon
facturers

the past six
the market at

figures. They are further confident that the tariff will be in¬
aud, with comparatively light stocks, they are either holding
their goods out of market or asking higher prices. The market for
domestic goods is very firm for both cotton and woolens. Foreign
goods are unsettled and held above the market from the rise in gold,
with the exception of such goods as are now past the season. Dress
goods and fancy styles are pressed for sale at lower figures.

the low

creased

;

Brown Sheetings

and

Shirtings have been

more

in demand from

jobbers, and prices are generally higher, with a prospect of a still fur¬
ther

Standards

advance.

are

now

held at 25 cents.

This is the

price of Indian Head A, Appleton A, Stark A, Nashua X X, and Law¬
C.
Atlantic heavy A 37 inch 26, do P A 37 inch 25, do A
H 37 inch 25, do P H 37 inch 25, do heavy shirt A V 30 inch 21, do
fine sheet A L 36$ inch 23$, do do P L 361 inch 23$, do shirt P E 33 inch
22$, Indian Head B 3U inch 20, do E 48 inch 374, Nashua extra A 36 incli
22, do fine D 36 inch 21, Waltham F 40 inch 26, Massachusetts A 4-4
22, do B B 4-4 21$, Medford 24, Newmarket Manuf. Do. 33 inch 20, do
do 36 inch 21, do do heavy D 36 inch 24, Auburn 36 inch 14, Indian
Queen 36 inch 17, New England 36 inch 17, Pittsfield A 36 inch 18,
Iiocky Point sheetings 36 inch 17, Wawawanda 36 inch 17, Appletou
B 40 inch 30, do C 17, do D 19, do W 48 inch 33, do shirting N 19,
Ethan Allen D 14$, Manhattan K 174, Pocassett Canoe 39 inch 26, do
K 36 inch 21, do family cot 36 inch 18, do H 28 inch 15, Western
States 18, Grafton 2S inch 15, do 30 inch 16 do 33 inch 17, Indian Or¬
chard W 33 inch 18$, do B B 19$, N 23, do 0 21$, and A 25, Bristol
19, G. Washington heavy 19, Griswold £ 12, Warren 36 inch 18. Ex¬
celsior light 4 4 11$, O. J. Rathburu $ 19, Edward Harris 40 inch 30
do | 19, Wochusetts 23, Tigers 15.

rence

Bleached

Sheetings

and

Shirtings have

advanced

less

than

goods, but a few makes are higher, and there is a fair busi¬
doing. New York Mills are held at 48$ cents, Wamsutta
37$ and Lonsdale 32, Rockdale B 26, Uxbridge imperial 4 4 25,
Kent River 12, Grafton 3-4 14 and 7 8 15, Auburnville 4 4 29,
Aquiduecks 4-4 21, do 7-8 18, White Rock 36 34. O J Rathbufi
7*8
19, Social Mill Co. water twist 284, do, C7-8 18, Manville
R 21, do XX 26, Attawaugan XX 254, Bedford O 16, Indian River
.XX 23, Warrenton B 15, Bartlett Steam Mills 33 inch 24, do 5-4 33, do
7-8 21$, do 4-4 29$, Newmarket 33 inch 22, do 36 inch 25, Waltham L
72 inch 65, do X 33 incli 22$, do W 42 inch 31$, do M 81 inch 85, do
brown
ness

N 90 inch 97$.
are

in

colored 17, Nashua and Frankliu each 15.

prices are not as firm,
do 3x3 22, Louisiana
plaids 24, Ringgold fast plaids 20, Simpson’s Charabrays 25, Concord
15, Madison check 18, Roanoke 20, Penobscot 22$, and Uplands 22.
Ticks are quite steady, but the request is limited. Some makes are
higher. West Branch are held at 18 for No. 3, and 20 for No. 2. Spring-

Stripes and Checks are only moderate, and
but nominally unchanged. Arkwright 6x2 22$.




Jacconets

26, Nashua A 27.
Mouslin de Laines are inactive and quotations are as
Pacific and Manchester 23, Pacific armures 24, do Robes

yet nominal.
de Chambre

Challies 23$.
demand, and quotations are nomi¬
nal.
Gilberts black and white $33 per doz, do dark fancy colors
$39, and Park Mills black and white $30.
Linskys are in good demand.
Rob Roys sell at 26 cents for 3-4,
Wool filling 3-4 84, $ 87$, White Rock 35.
Cloths are fairly active and the tendencey of prices is upward.
Cot¬
ton warps $2 15 for No. 1, $2 05 for No. 2, aud $1 95 for No. 8;
6-4 Conshohockeu do $2 25@$2 75 ; 64 all wool black doeskins $3 25
@$8 75; Leicester ladies’cloths $1 50.
Cassimeres and Satinets adapted to fall trade are in better demand,
but light colors are dull.
Millville 3-4 fancy, cassimeres $1 50@$2,
silk mixed do $1 50,
Evans, Seagrave & Co.’s 3-4 fancy $1 37$@$2,
F. M. Ballou & Co.’s do$l 25@$2, S.' <fc H. Sayles,do $1 25@$1 50~ Bab¬
cock tfe Moss, $1 50@$2, Campbell & Co.’s do $1 37$@$2, Mechanicsville
Co.’s do $1 374@$2, plough, loom and anvil 50c, Dighton’s silk mixtures
$1 60@$2 12$, Farmer’s A Union cassimeres 47$ cents. Carolina mills
fancy do$l 00@$1 25,tan mixture $1 62$@$2, Peacedale fancy do $1 37$
do black and white check 85c, American mills fancy $1 62$ for £, and
$3 50@$4 for 6-4, East Windsor Woolen Co.’s £ $1 50@$1 75, Gran¬
32$, Pacific and Manchester
Balmoral Skirts

are

in very light

ville mills £ fancy $1 50.
Kentucky Jeans are unchanged.
50 cents.

Richmond 47$, Ermiue

Washington and Union each sell for
Cloth 65, aud E and H Babcock’s Alpine

cloth 47$.

unchanged. Lowell
for extra super, and $2
Hartford Co.’s $1 60 for medium superfine, $1 75 for
superfine, $2 074 for Imperial three-ply and $2 25 for extra three-ply,
Caupets

are

somewhat irregular, but prices are

Co.’8 Ingrain sell
15 for three-ply,

at $1 60 for superfine, $1 75

for 4 fr. and $2 65 for 5 fr.
good request. Plain scarlet and orange 32$@60, plain
white do 84@75, scarlet, bine and mixed twilled do 374@65, 4-4 Shaker
65@95, Lucas Mills white domets 35@16, Gilbert’s opera flannels 70,
Peck and Kilburu’s fine domets 57$, Franklin Mills colored opera flan¬
nels 65, Bay State do. 57$.
American Linen is firm but unchanged.
Crash 12@16, and Huca-

Brussels $2 45 for 3 fr. $2 55
Flannels

are

in

buck 20(5)21.
Manchester

the date of

Market.—Our

own

correspondent in London, writing under

June 9, gives the following

review of the Manchester cotton yarn

goods market:
In the early part of the week, the market for yarns was tolerably active, and
displayed a fair degree of firmness. Since the announcement, however, that the
negotiations for a meeting of the Great Powe.s had failed, and that the pros¬
pects of war were more certain and more immediate, business has become much
less active, and, in several instances, prices have given way. The check to the
upward movement at Liverpool has also produced some inactivity in the de¬
and cotton

mand.

Lighter
request at firmer rates for heavy goods.
weights are quiet. India 25, Globe Steam Mills 20, Union drill 12$,
Pepperell 25, Boott 25, Stark Standard 24, Park Mills 20.
Corset Jeans are sold up, and prices are generally firm.
Indian
Orchard 16£, Silver Lake brown are sold ahead at 21 $@22, Newmarket
Drills

ples

Yarns are generally in less active request, with the tendency of prices slightly
against spinners. For India mules the demand has slackened, and full prices can
no longer he obtained.
The continued absence of the German demand tells
against water twist yarns, and, both in bundle and warps, they are weaker by
about >£d. per lb. Warp cops aud pin cops, Although in litile request for export,
remain tolerably steady, especially the better qualities from 30's to 60’s, which
appear to be still under contract to some extent.

The rather extensive business which was done in various kinds of cloth last
week, and which was mainly for the East, necessarily had a strengthening effect
on prices, manufacturers
adding to their quotations to a considerable extent.
The advance in prices, combined with the quieter tone of the Liverpool market,
has to-day arrested the demand, which is much tamer than of late, and .while
very little actual business is reported, the full prices lately paid can now hardly
he realized.
Fabrics suitable for India and China show as much steadiness as
anything else, and printers jaconets, and the better class of domestics and T
cloths, although not so easy to sell, maintain their value with considerable
firmness. Annexed are some of the leading prices:

-

WATER

TWIST FOR

7
9
15

16
17
19

TWIST

MULE

7
9
13
GOLD

56

Weights

8

10

-Subjoined is

a statement

874

72

0

25
27
29

8

8

27

29
31

100
d.
31
33
35

12

lb. oz.
16s. Od.

Liveil

PRINCIPAL FABRICS FOR MAY’

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPORTS OF TUE

Blankets Wool-

.

Cotton
Yarn.
lbs.

& Printed.
Yards.

Linen.
Yards.

37,755

Dyed. Col'd
I860
1861
1862
1S63
1864
18 :-5.
1866

1,396,584

£152,014

Silk
Mixt’s.
Value.
£18.667

101.948

51.086

1,827

2.903,850
2.990,346
4,540,135
4,196.593

110,796
95,312
368,074
193,628
290,471

2,743,127
117,760
818,9S3

4,667,370
143, S93

1,205,009
2,459,487

1.040,703
2,491,902

6,205
19.619
3.000
10.400

699,236
3.041,550

2.037.517

9,329

Annexed is

a

Silk &

1.070.417

lens and
Worsted.

Value.

2,737

..

MANUFACTURES

Cottons
Colored
Prints

..

..

..

Silks

..

5,294
4,316
866

..

.

723

15,753

Cape of Good Hope
Port Philip
Sydney

’

.

3,991

15,618

1,917

33.596
10.215

13,908

66,106

7,995
3.475

New Zealand
Van Dienuin's Land.
Swan River

7,091

Adelaide
Total

superior description is selling at a decline of ?d.@3d., as coni'
pared with March sales ; fleece and handwashed l>£d.@2d. per lb.
We cannot look for better prices until the money market becomes easier.
In consequence of the disturbed state of Germany, there is iittle or nothing
doing for that quarter; French buyers are still operating freely, and they have
Scoured wool of

taken about two-thirds of the entire quantity brought forward ; the home trade
is good, but the price of money prevents our buyers from operating so freely as

they otherwise would.

importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending June
21, 1866, and the corresponding weeks of 1864 and 1865, have been ns
ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION FOR THE WEEK

1864.

<

Pkgs.
Manufactures of worn...
do
cotton..
do
silk
do
flax....
Miscellaneous dry gooas.
...

160
62
173

60

....

$1,421,840
INTO

THROWN

AND

THE

307
169

$7,025

5
3

2.321
4,534

37

8,721

34
194

1

225

2,881

6

1026
3926

46.857

$22,829
296,794

3638

$282,962
1,421,840

Total th’wn upon mak’t

579

$319,623

4348

*1.704,802

710

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING !DURING THE

Manufactures of wool... 1659
363
do
cotton..
328
silk
do
1094
do
flax
Miscellaneous dry goods. 226
3670
517

Total entered at the port. 4187

15,406

1095
382
133
649
47

$418,352
1,421,840

2306
3926

370,069
208.034

66,343

296,794

8,703
158,355
49,146

4432 $1,840,192

$1,795,034

$102,009
72,435
51.744

4,871

$281,284
1,102,870

$457,626
121.943

176,549
188.541

26,753
$971,412
1,102,870

6232 $2,074,282

STATEMENT.

following is a detailed statement of the movement the past
ending June 21, 1866 :
ENTERED

week

Pkgs. Value.
Woolens.... .435 $218,801
51
Cloths
26,707
50,170
Carpeting... .183
4
Shawls
2,686
Total.
.

CONSUMPTION.

FOR

Value.

Pkgs.

:193

5,258
98,163

14

4,363

Worsted v’rn 37
Braids & bds. 20
Cot. <fe worst. 79

Pkgs.
21

Gloves
Worsteds
Hose

..

—■

Value.
8110

6,976
32,386
—

.

.1027

$453,620

27
..206
..227

59,408

MANUFACTURES OF COTTON

Cottons.... ..118 $40,620
Colored
23
6,907
6
Prints
1,414
1.066
3
Muslihs
Total.
..

.

.

Emh’d mus’u 1
16
Velvets.
Laces
23
Braids & bds. 29
.

..

$39,451

Velvets
Ribbons....
Laces
....

.

.

.

2,005
20,375
35.043

13,861

Laces

.649 $175,495
2
1,659
.

Total.

Gloves

Spool

7,906

Hose

,

S.551

—

6,232
59,290
—

455
427
311

9
2

Sewings
Hdkfs
Thread

SILK.

1
1
1

Gloves
Cravats
Hose
Raw
MANUFACTURES

Linens

130

8,787

..679 $200,311
MANUFACTURES OF

Crapes

1,159

Hemp yamn. 15

1,187

Sue. & elast..

907

1

$4,871

WAREHOUSING.

FOR

a

Pkgs
272
46
86
93
19

.138
Cottons...
60
Colored
12
Gilliams
5
Emb muslin.

$44,105

Carpeting
Blankets
Shawls

.

19.458

.

3,158
3,052

...

.

171,787

30,571
1,013

8.053

Worsted yarn 10
Braids &hds. 24
Cot. & worst. 78

5,160

.

..

MANUFACTURES

*

2,575

8
Gloves
Worsteds... .376
Delaines....
Hose
'-2
Merinos..

$119,652
20,024
25,650
11,830
26,018

Woolens
Cloths

Pkgs. Value

Pkgs. Value.

Value.

.

54

$97,218

Crapes

o

4,199

Plushes
Total..

2

2,714

8,671

31,623
—

—

1095 $457,626

Total

OF COTTON.

16
Velvets
3
Laces
Braids & bds. 11
15
Gloves

7,215

..

9S0
3.392

..

4,738

.

28

8,680

94

Spool
ifose

27,165

—

382

$121,943

Silk & worst. 1
Silk & cot... 19

14,323

Total

Braids & bds. 3
Silk & worst. 16
Silk & cotton 4

11,822

OF

17
40

1,312

—

Total

..m

2,275
13,237

3,566
—

$144,170

t

FLAX.

14.855

Linen & cot

15,695

Hemp yam

4
.1084
..

1,263
9,835

1796 $218,802

Velvets

19,394
36.270

17
34
4

.

Ribbons....
Laces

.

.

2,302

12ft

—

133

$176 549

4

200

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

510 $143,736
Linens
Linen & cot.'. 8
3,454
Total..

Hdkfs
Thread..

15,294

19
.108

.

..

Hemp yarn..

25,857

—

649

$188,541

MISCELLANEOUS.

Leath.

gloves
Matting
CR thing

9

$4,898

3
1

434
393

Embroideries 20

14,243

10
2

3,513
1,756

Corsets
Straw goods

.

.

Susp & elas.

1,516

2
—

$26,753

47

Total

EXPORTS

(EXCLUSIVE OF SPECIE) FROM THE PORT OF NEW YORK TO FOREIGN
PORTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING JUNE 19, 1866.
AMSTERDAM.

Quercitron,
200

4,000

Rosin, bbls.. .613

1,592

bxs

Mahogany,
logs.
228
Lamps, bxs.... .1
Coffee, bgs... .534
112
Segars, cs
Sew mach, ce..98

12,340
57
10,973

33,61S

3,866

Seneca root,
bales
...23

1,268

.150

750

Ice, tons

$65,964
BREMEN.

2,311

Tobacco, bhdsl72
Tobacco,bales 174
Tobacco, cs
47
Tobacco stems, ;
375
hhds
Sh’e pegs,bbls739

37,169
3,480
-

2,693

1,200
bxs 50
Beef, bbls
125
Potashes, bbls.25
Rosin, bbls.. .619
Beeswax,
lbs
13,789
Whalefoots,

Oars
Ext fustic,

$541,630

6,266
314

lbs
2,862
Tallow, lbsl64,241
Ess oils, cs
2

20,497
165

Hardware, cs. 41
Segars, cs
3
4
Hats, cs

625
420

Tobacco, hhds.84
Cotton, bales. .25
Staves, No..5,000

10,550
3,915
1,026

Mfd iron,pkgs..6
Miscellaneous

112

155

38

...

$52,367

19,835

2,320

Quan. Value
Logwood, tons 100 2,075
110
1,400 Dry goods, cs.. 4
562 Ext logwood,
bx200
1,042
3,150
12
4,100
999 Books, cs
2,500
2,173 Sew mach, cs. .29

Quan. Value.

Quan. Value.
HAMBURG.

Paper, cs
4
Seneca root,bgs.2
Ivory nuts,bgsl75

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

2
22
42
22

46 $51,744

Total

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.
'

Logwood, tns.115

The




ENTERED

50,225

SAME PERIOD.

$186,742

121.379

DETAILED

..

—

**•

Total.

DURING

4952 $1,384,154

794
3638

$1,498,240

consumpt’n

„

458
36
101
171
30

$732,415

....

85,967

223
225
46
273
259

62
517

Silks

606

2

Silk & cotton

—

$1,102,870

200,311
144,170
218,802

MARKET

$136,477
57,439
39,308

Total
Add ent’d for consumpt’n

.

997

6

2,350

$453,620

SAME PERIOD.

16

....

,

3926

214,523
58,152

3638

$296,794
THE

...

8S2
999
593

Clothing:. ..V 1

$427

Leath.gloves. 1
..256
Matting

Value.

1037
679
151
1796
263

231,247
484.395

555

1S66.

,

Pkgs.

$433,523

775
497
730

14,219
6,660

WAREHOUSE

Manufactures of wool...
do
cotton..
do
silk....
do
flax
Miscellaneous dry goods.

1031

207,288

61

v

Value.

Pkgs.

19,053

21, 1866.

ENDING JUNE

1865.

,

.

Value.
$48,974

517

Total

Total
Add ent’d for

$72,435

225

Total

OF SILK.

‘.....273 $50,225

;

FROM

—

MISCELLANEOUS.

Silks

The

WITHDRAWN

5
—

MANUFACTURES OF SILK,

IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK.

follows

Hose

1,807
1,956

44,832
1,194

138

Spool

1,398

1

Thread

$48,069

..252

Linens

o^

100,721

11,731
46,077

$102,009

Total.

To be
sold.
8.940
2.229
44

Solid
bales.

To be
sold.

1,146
16,521

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

May:
Up to the present the following quantity of wool has been catalogued, andwith lew exceptions, sold since the commencement of the present series of sales
Solid
bales.

641

2
Cot&wos’d. 32

3,642

3
2

Laces
Braids & bds.
Silk & worst.

$32,188

14
1
23

.

Crapes
Ribbons....

14,808
13,0-0
9,027

6,485,19-1
64,624
report of the wool sales in progress at LondoD, dated the 9th
2,562,293

1

COTTON.

OF

Emb. mnsli’s 12
Velvets
3
Laces
10
Braids & bds 6

$7,130

17
17
15
2

.... ..

.

Gingams...

4,491

'

1,680
31,683

Lasting?
Braids & bds.

Total

11,073
«

Pkgs. Value.

223

2,122

.

81

Blankets
1
Shawls
2
Worsteds.... 72

$45,398

Woolens... ..100
Cloths
3
10
Carpeting..

MANUFACTURES

I860, to 1866.
Plain.
Yards.

OF WOOL.

Pkgs. Value.

Pkirs. Value.

,

WAREHOUSE.

FROM

MANUFACTURES

.

of the exporrs of the principal fabrics from

Cottons

263 $85,967

.-

WITHDRAWN

pool during the month of May in each of the last seven years :

'

18,715 Susp.&elas. 18

45

2,648 Corsets

1,700
365
7,104

4,826 Straw goods. 7
11,066 Feath.&flow 2

95
63 $19,710 Mattting
19,833 Embroideries 12

14
7

Total

50 Inches
*
04
66
72
10 4
11 0
11 8
lb. oz.
lb. oz.
lb. oz.
18s. 9d. 19s. 9d. 22s. Od

56

10

Leath gloves.
Kid gloves...

YARD8.

,

„

lb. oz. lb. oz.
18s. Od. 20s. Od.

lb. oz. lb. oz.
14s. 6d. 16s. Od.

Prices

26

SHIRTINGS,

GRAY

0

9

4

25
27

90
d.
29
31
33

80
d.

70
d.

60
d.
23

21

17
19
21

45 Inches
64
66

/

Reeds

END

19
21

50
d.
22

40
d.

14
15
17

12
13
15

Clothing

38 to 4
d.
21
23
25

EXPORT,

FOR

6 to 12 16 to 24 30
d.
d.
d.

Common quality..
Second quality;
Best quality

23 to 32
d.
17

16 to 24
d.

Common quality
Second quality...
Best quality

MISCELLANEOUS.

,

EXPORT.

6 to 12
d.

Numbers

Numbers

787

THE CHRONICLE.

[June 23,1866.

ROTTERDAM.

65 Honey, pkgs.414
253
LIVERPOOL.
1.050

4,296

LONDON.

Beef, tes
122
Furs, bales....95
Oil cake,

4,825
23,137

lbs
509,290
Rosin, bbls.. .421

13,582
4,400

Pre'd

fruit, cs.. 20
1
1
Pistols, bxs
1
100
Pork, tes

200

Books, cs
Leather, cs

150
456

100
4,800

Cheese, lbs287,369
Tea, pkgs
49
Tin. slabs...3,503

56,947

97

1,480

Cocoa, bgs
Skins, bales

8

1,029

56,800

3,046

Whalebone,

lbs
5,197
4,158
165
Com.bush.317,625 264,433 Perfumery, cs. 5
pkgs
3
100 Tobacco, hhds.35 66,456 Corn, bush. 15.480 12,950
3,500
Tobacco, tes... 20
3,600 Bacon, lbs.20,850
6
Ivory, hales
2,000
$69,276 Mfd tobacco,
lbs
.43,395
3,303
$194,764
DUTCH WEST INDUES.
Segars, cs
6
458
BRISTOL.
.2
200
Flour, bbls. 1,200 14,450 Muskets, cs
Wine, cs....... .19
334 Tobacco, hhds.39 11,700
Rye Flour,
Staves
1,700
10,000
..189
bbls
1,330 Exp goods,
Corn meal,
438 Corn, bush 45,034 12,779
pkgs.
10
650 Tallow, lbs.18,849
.130
2,161
bbls
$26,179
370 Machinery, cs.16
3,190
Beef, bbls...
FALMOUTH.
7
105
90 Cond milk
Pork, bbls. ....5
270 Rosin, bbls.. .525
5,540 Corn, bush.15,111 12,844
Lard, lbs.'.. ..850
144 Peas, bush. .3,532
4,415
Furniture. cs...4
GLASGOW.
475 Cotton, bale8.912 78,096
Candles, bxs ..125
Cheese, lbs391,694 70,824 Corn, bush.61,200 53,562
Petroleum,
8,401
100 Beeswax,lbs 2,000
860 Peas, bush. .7,001
..245
galls
6,000
550
SfO Staves, No. 13,200
2,040 Staves.:
Butter, lbs.. 2,100
144 Mud, csk;
25
560 Hogs’ hair,
....1
Cow
bales
147
8,700
Tallow, hhds..74
9,500
Mfd tobacco
Cheese, lbs 57,948
6,394
'lbs
2,377
1,142
3,078 Rags, bales .... 20
66 Effects, cs
6
436 W’halefoots,
Miscellaneous...
Wood ware,

.

$20,007

Oil Cake,
lbs
559,777

csks

13,b42

6

800

Tobacco, hhds..2

750

Quan. Value
Oxide zinc, eke.5
200
Mfd tobacco,
' .124

174

Machinery, ce..l

370

lbs

Quan. Value
AUST BALIA.

BRITISH

Petroleum,

25,119
13,151
S.817

galls
42.800
Drugs, pkgs..627
28
Segars, cs

$79,901

Tobacco, hlids.16

2,969

28,483

Mf tobacco,
lbs
168,123

93,883

CORK.

Corn, bush.34,756
Petroleum.

42.500

100,800

gals

$70,983
SLIGO.

4,412

Corn. bush. .5,225
BELFAST.

Corn.

19,717

bush.23,870

13.128

DUBLIN.

15,022

Com, bush. 17,637
Tobacco, hhds424
Tobacco, ce... 172
Mfd tobacco,

95.463

1,223

343

BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN
COLONIES.

Flour, bbls .4,074
Mfd tobacco,
24,901
lbs
Iron ore, tons..90
Corn meal,
b bbls
395

35,792

Pork, bbls.... 100
Beef, bbls
...10
Peae, bbls
30
Rice, bbls
5
Butter, lbs..9,024

2,790
217
218
148
3,350

4.500
1,998

.

clothing, cs.2

Molasses, nhds20
Rum, pch
5
Coal, tons
394
Matches, cs
25
Tar, bbls
-00
Rosin, bbls.... 15
....

264
380
60

125

83

Petroleum,

286

2,068

galls

6,500
1,636

Carriage ware,
7

735

Pres

apples, cslOO

20

60

Sugar, csk
6
Mfd iron, pkgs.51

409

73
61

Miscellaneous...

$195,225
HAVRE.

375
17025

Pearlashes. bbls 5
Potashes, bbls.19
Cotton, bales..71

9.301

Diygoods, cs..27
Cocoa, bags
52

23,010
J ,200

.

Candle-1, bxs..239
Soap, bxs
15
15
Shoes, bxs
Lumber, ft. .9,690
Shingles,.. 130,000
Hay, bales. ...210
Rice, bags ....10
Paint, pkgs.... 20
Domestics, cs.. .4
Books, cs
1
Matches, cs... .70
Hardware, cs.. 14
Furniture, CS..12
Tobacco, cs ....1

Corn, bush..1,930
Corn meal,
bbls
1,290
Oil meal,
bbls ....133,300
Shooks...
512
Live stock, hd. 12

Oars, No

48

Drugs, pkgs.. .11
Vinegar, bols... 5
Oats, bush.. 1,252
Rope, coils
4
Lard oil, galls.132
Clothing, cs ... .4
Tobacco, cs

2

Tea, pkgs

9

Matting, roll... .3

13,728

Cocoa, bgs...314
5,000
Staves

8,600

1,250

$60,308
TARRAGONA.

Confectionery,
Miscellaneous

$13,715

21,862
53.891
.599
2,869

Rosin, bbls

petroleum,
galls
12,061

Refd
Sew

Paint, pkgs

12

11,848
3,2S9

Vinegar, bbls..10
Petroleum,
440

Paper, reams.600
Furniture, cs..l2
Bread, pkgs...40
Perfumer, bxslOO
Flonr, bbls....75
J

$3,254

404
420

1.770
5,877
5,652
913

3,653

Stationery, cs.29

524
1,350
422

2
Enmld cloth, cs.l
Felt, cs.
1
cs

Fancy goods, cs.l
Exp. pkgs
3
Glassware, cs.. 23
Shoes, cs
11
Paper, cs
1
Fans, cs
8
Rosin oil, bbls.20
Phot mtl, pkgs.13
Blacking, cks... 2
Paper, bdls ...17
Rope, pkgs ... .4
Pork, bbls.. ..20
Leather, rolls... 2
R. R.

car*

538
250

100
400
1,162
992
180
120
236
961
204
146
443
600
?00

56
.

.

pnehs

20

75

1.725

6M0
26 7

266
1.263
136

6

47

bbls.6

156
300

Cot waste,

3,268

.12

11,000

50s
82

baies4

175

1

Piano

Agl implts,
pkgs

Bread, pkgs..211

2,292
75
5.179
1,501

Mfd iron, pkgs.14
Sew mach, cs. .46

3,692

157
10
Drugs, pkgs..363
Tea, "pkgs

765

1

113

20
Hardware, cs.135

4,909

Cutlery, CS....61

2,717

Wicks, cs
Wine,

Iron,

140

cs

c"s

561
695
943
625

47

91
3,161
1,827
1,94)
32,250
' 349

Flour, bbls. .2,502

1,350

...191

Turp'tine.bbls.lO
Blacking, cks... 2
Pepper, bgs
27
I R goods, cs.. .3
Combs, cs
2
Lager bier,bbls 20
Paper, rms. .2,000
2,6:34 Perfumery, 8xs275

166
280
- 291
802
320
1,125

8,234
Paint, pkgs... .35
513
W’dware, pkgs.53
1,640
Lamps, pkgs. .30
1,059
Cot gins,pkgs,270
18,113
Spts turp, cj. .50
420
14,8:35

gals

.

Glassware, cs. .88
Furniture, cs.112

1,960

2,603

14
Shoes, cs
Tobacco, cs.... .1
Dry goods, cs..4

910

350

1,168
170

Lumber, pcs. .435
Shooks* H... .922

110

758

Nails, kegs... 120

757

Miscellaneous

313

...

405

206 Brandy, pkgs.. .6

122

Oars

60

Iron

safe

$118,451)
ICELAND.

338 Linseed oil,
gals
105
258
112 Cor*’, bush... .794
192 Butter, His..3,084
791 Cement, bbls. 100

83

828
1,215

Rye, bush.. 15,363
Rye flour, bblslOO

175
200

1

16,900
625

Total
$17,525
Grand total.... $2,897,972

738
109

IMPORTS

737
855
520
545

(OTHER THAN DRY GOODS

Drugs, pkgs...33
Paint, pkgs .34
Hardware, cs...3

973

[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.]
Pkgs. Value.|
i Pkgs. Value
Pkgs. Value.
China, Glass * E. ware—
Figs
299: Pepper
9,118
Lemons.
5,493
22,S73 Stationery, *c.—
Bo-ties.

Miscellaneous

226

1,850
560

650

Lumber, ft .20,000

88

174

...

China..... .1,005
Earth’nw’e. 1,591
Glass ......4,443
Glassware... .355
Glass plate...137

14,935

I R

Ammonia, sal.13
Arrow Root

670

Alum...

Aspphaltum ....
Bark, Peruv.109
Barytes
225

422

Boots&shoes,cs.2

158

Metal

180
100
293
900

goods, cs.l
Fancy goods, cs.l
Clothing, CS....2

Photo intis, cs. .1
Billiard mtls, cs.7
Wine, cs
50

...

816

132
856
420
809
"

127

13,050
150

II,034

$03,223
NEW

GRANADA.

Dry goods, cs..21
Clothing, cs.,.20
Boots* eh’s,es.17
Photo mtls, cs..8

6,457
8,000

Books, cs.. ....12
Sew mach, cs. .26

4,800
5,082

5J00
16(H)

Expkgs.cs. ...1
125
Fancy goods, cslo
3,950
Lard,“lbs...96.9! 9 25,966
Hams, 11)8.-5,665
1,475
Bacon, lbs. .3.980
1.016
Beef, bbls.... 120
2,897
Flour, bbls...379

4,307

Matches, bxs..52

728

Rope, pkgs....29
Drugs, pkgs..218

593

goeds, cs.. .9
Furniture, cs:\23
Machinery, cs.42
I R

5,535
527

818

5,102

Oranges
Pine apples

,

-

15,263;
15,566;

1,287

35,482
530
1,312
21,fc94
791
564

..

Oils

Oils,

207
3.726

8,616
368
1,015
708

Stmtonine
Soda, bi car¬

7.685
8,302

bonate. .2,100
Mo sal... 1.224
do ash
892
do caustic.310
.

29.494
7,346

183 10,897

Smraroflead ..'3

*217

Sulph copper...

2,033

2,053
16.773
2,335

...

900

Perfumery bxsl71
Soap, bxs ...730
Gunny bags,bls90
22
Tar, bbls
Sugar, bbls
25
Tin plate, bxs.25
W’dware,pkgs.27

1,581

Whiting

Mfd iron,

pkgs.10

Trunks, pkgs.B34

Agl im’ts,pkgs.46

1,3>>4
3,979
90

797
258
91
772

681
1,851

363

Cocoa, d>gs .254
4,741
Coffee, No. 37,061 576,G21
Emery
390
Fancy goods.... 62,393
Fire crackers....
5,236

5.137
2,902

...10

699

283

Yellow ochre
Other

...

c

967

8,379
57

Hattersgpods...
Fruits, &c.
Bananas
Citron
Currants

Dried fruit

Ale

Porter
Rum

..354

Whiskey
29
3,178
Wines ....16,303 139,900
Champagne,
bask
7,088 65,013
Metals, Ac.—

121

‘

chors

Copper
Cutlery

.137

3,605

80.215

17 37,599

38
Hardware... .225

Guns

•

6.051

26,276

Iron, hoop,
tus

.

33,225

39,84
73

Metal goods.. .54
Nails
...,26
4
Needles
Nickel
13
Old metal
Plated ware. ...1
Per. caps
3

3
3,438

77,146
33,063
8,282

Marble* man..
Maccaroni.
Oil

paintings. .8

Paper hang
Perfumery,
Pipes
Potatoes...*

Rags
Rice
Salt
Starch
Seeds
Linseed

398
569
512

59,078

Spelter,
lbs....446.246 19,976
Tin, bxs... 15.517 115,804
Tin, 1227 slabs,

16,750

4

1,332

Mustard

995

374

3,021
2>70

61,648
2.104
5,375

12,238
1,224
1,714
2,772

13,726
417
451

416

10.502
51,294
9,136
3,075

•

7,862

5,434
36.334
996
7,144

Sago.. .........
Soap
1,906
Sugar, hhds. bbls
and tcs. 39,860 1,870,958
Sugar, boxes &
bgs.'
32.292 409,005
Tea, bxs.81,668 1,051,101
Toys
790 35,676
Tomatoes
Waste

2,150
558

18,750

Wool,bis ..2,913 216,595
Other
1,490

655

Nutmegs

..

.35
.26

Provisions

1,817
1,909

3,116
1,477

3,761
Molasses.. .5,974 131,026

1,252

7,368

803

1,407

5819 112,552
159
6,133
114
9,1S2

24,996

112| Zinc. lbs.467,535 25,416
^Spices—
104; Cassia
4,715
8,748; Cloves
633
19,588
892

Hemp
Honey
Hops

415

tons
1,647
Lead, pigs. .7,327

Wire

Feathers
Flax
8
Flour
500
Furniture
6
Grindstones
Hair
4
Haircloth.,. ..6

37,590

Iron, other,

Steel

.

2,066

bars
7,038
Iron tubes ...47

Saddlery*

4

Ivory
..39
Machinery ...70

Iron, R. R.

15,241

2,753

lml. lubber. 1175

Iron, sheet,
tons

orks

3,857

65

Iron, pig,
tons

'

...

126

Brass goods... .1
Bronzes
2
Chains and an-

103,299 lbs....

Furs, *c—
Furs

S25
3,5^2
78,6 »7

2,742

45.328
701
1,953

Quinine
1
Reg antimon. .91
Rhubaro —40

Butter, lbs.. 1,576
safe
1

11,512
1,552

670

2.-71
12.913

3.478
Vermillion.... .9

Iron

,357

1,179

Clocks,

24 13,440

do

20,G84
1,025

1,065

32,SOI

Potash, hyd
Potash, cltlo....
Potash, bi cho..
Potash, nitrate..

Vitrol
Sumac

11,217

Cottou, bales..24

18.56S

.212

Sponges

660

3,366

Gin

5,675

.167

"Shellac
Safflower

12,421

3,031

696

630

443
5,887

5,104

.

Paints

160

Mahogany

26
856
150
70

.89

Opium

1,021

Cordials

25

Oils,

lbs

13.365

1,410

Cigars
Coal, tous.. 6,334

6,261
427

50

ess....

Fustic, M lbs. 180
Logwood, M.

23,506

870
5,332
6U3
4,341

linseed.342
Oiit, > dve.. .58*1
o,'

4,725

3,835
7,860

857

117

j-

.

Cork

9,131
9,812

..140

...

Other
78
731 Woods—
14.112
Camphor wood..

1,617

copavi.. 25
51
.
5

Madder

4,232
21.60S
4,866

Rattan
Willow
Other..
Watches
10 19,034
Miscellaneous—
Leather, Hides, Ac.—
Baskets
398
Bristles.?.. ...68 14,690
Boots & Shoes.2
869
Bags
Bricks
Hides, dress¬
ed
’...168 78,357 Boxes
49
Hides, undres’d. 289,366 Buttons
Jlorns
269
Building stones.
1
605 Clay.....
Leather
Cheese
,...53
Liquors, Wines. &c.—

10.555

Indigo
Iodine, pot
Lie root

12,137

12
302

...

Brandy

4,?<9S

Tartar.20
Chickory..... .569
Cudbear
20
Gambier.. 1200
Gums,crude. .516
Gum Arabic...4
Cream

Lie paste

73

Books

Engravings
Paper

2,899

9,557 =-Sauces and pre9,994;
serves
1,049 Instruments—
140
168 Musical..«
5
10,392 Optical
3,641 Jewelrv. &c.—
13
968 Jewelry

717
1

Ipicac

26,451

22.075
3,18S

!.

Prunes
Plums
Raisins

16,193;

Chalk

Gum,

15TH, 1866.

Nuts

1353

tons

Bomiue
Blue vitrol
Castor
Carmine

AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK FOR THE

JUNE

55,033'

Blea
Brimstone,

460
30!)
650
505
240

SPECIE)

ENDING

48,297

1,481
powderl592 25,848

1,908

293
2,120
232

248

Algols

1,000
I,595
4,700

46 »

332
118

Alkali
Acids

5,617

Saddlery, cs
1
Machinery, es.16
Silverware, es..l

Paint, pkgs — 28
Tel mtls, pkgs. .9
Petro, gals. .1,310
Tinware, bx... .1
Live stock, lid.27
Harness, cs . .1
Miscellaneous

ic.-

Drugs,

Plated ware,pkg6
Mfd iron, pkgs 7

AND

WEEK

$13,702

1,194

Butter, lbs 10,062

Bone black,
hhds

520

Salt, bbls
Pkld c fish,

goods, cs.. .5

70,322
400
620

Machinery, c -. .58
6,341 Feed, bags.... UK)
Mf iron, pkgs.. 66
2.212 Bear s, bbls ...ill
569 Wick, pkgs —16
2,000 Woodware,
84
pkgs
674
2,973
50
750
442 Ale, bblc
88 Bacon, lbs. 13,669 2,824
329 Fish, cs
30
425
600
89 Waste, bales....6
786
179 Empty hhds..413
813 Firecrackers,
102
pkgs
810
130
67 Dry goods, cs. .35 11,195

267
370
228
142
356
750

490

bbls
Corn meal,

1,250

602
6.570
9,270
ISO
354
983
550

lot)

100

.50
Pork, bbis
Ale, bbls ......8

89

BRAZIL.

Coal, tons

298
103

Cinnamon, rolls.6
Cloves, bales..10
Cot’n seecl,bbls50

475

Soap, bxs.... 100
Combs, cs
1

250

724

310
100

RICO.

.

Stationery, cs. 7
Perfumery, bxs25
Corn meal,

2.0sti

28

Tobacco, cs.,.30

Matches, cs —10
Pork, bbls
10

233

W’dware, pkgs 16

1,437 Spts turp, bbls. 13
1.60S Hams, lbs..37.851

Books,

Whisky, bbls. .4

4.166

bur,

100

198

$221,135
PORTO

...

529 Kerosene,

Candles bxs...45

1,531 Mfd lob, ibs.1,500
3,403 Drugs, pkgs...34
351 Trunks, pkg— 1
3,872 Lamps, pkgs...7

12,505

cases

Tomatoes, bxs.84

2.043

12,463

Lard, lbs..303.496

lbs
Metallic

1,133

.

978

5,837
240
150

Starch, bxs.... 50
Pumps, csk
T

Machinery, cs.. .5
Matches, cs.... 84
Lager bier, ca.250
385 Hams, lbs.... 352
Lumber, ft.96,276
$10,061 Soap, bxs.. ..7X)
Rosin, bbls... 486

274

....20

es

OoO

Cider
200
Miscellaneous

18,474

H.4,303

galls

Gin,

Miscellaneous

223

Dry goods, cs. 107
7.593 Sew mach,-cs. 122
360 Stationery, cs..4
Hoop skirts, . .c3
26S Furniture, cs. .26
1.834 Cocoa, bgs... 215

246,250

&

125
2.709

25

cs....

Cond milk, cs 15
Shooks, cks...34

Hardware, cs. .48

$86,881

284 Plated ware, bx.4
289 Matches, cs ....7
5
760 Pork, bxs
431 Oats, bush.... 600
93 Paper. rms..3,200
49 Rice, bags
755

406
175

195
l,0o7

Mexico.

CUBA.

150

Trunks, pkgs..70
Candles, bxs.. .50

Turpentine, bbl 3
Soap, bxs
200

Cordials,

Pre’d ineats.cs200

LISBON.

Corn, bush. 3.801
Nails, kegs...252
Gas tixt, "cs
2

790

400
240

.

1,825 Staves, No.65,900
° 50

....100
1

pkgs
Soap, cs

172
900
ISO

Stone, tons... 150
Oakum, bis .. 40
Match sticks.. 12
Grindstones .200

100

Furniture, cs.. .2
Perfumery,

712
585
130
55

BRITISH HONDURAS.




5.339
945

mach, cs.. 14

1
...

38

Shooks & H

'BARCELONA.
Staves... .107,3 !0
Cotton, bales 332

Opium, pkgs.. .7

$101,608

galls

4,017

...

1

bxs

Toys

9,668

Cotton, bales..52
Staves
21,500

141

200

Wheels, bdls

200
180
250

...10, SOI

lbs

435

Lumber, ft. .9.000

Nails, kegs5...30
Bread, pkgs
50
Paper, rms...500
Lard, lbs ...7,500
Butter, lbs.. 1,875
Cheese, lbs. 1,152
Hams, lbs' .3,280
Beans, bush ..54
Candles, bxs.. 200
Rice, bags. . .100
Coal oil, gal. 1,000
lloops, No.11.000

41

.3

Glassware, cs.
Whalebone.

1.679 Shooks
424 Hoops

3,200
2,881
1,060

Biass

Quan. Value
Lard, lbs...23,996

.

Tin, pigs
3
Trucks, pkgs.. 12
Tallow, lbs.2,326
Sperm oil
100
Ziue, csk
.1
Lamps, cks
3
Yellow metal,cs.4
Cider, cs
12

Mfd tobacco,

galls....-.6,080
Bread, pkgs. 1,265
Peas, bags... .425
Peas, bbls
225

200
350
3,900
190

938

108

2,S60 Drugs, pkgs.. 107
693 Bread, pkgs...51

2.290

8

Pork, bbls
30
Beef, bbls—
3

140

1

Petroleum.

Mfd tobacco,
lbs
14,808
Coal oil,

Eggs bbls....

Oakum, bales .50

1

11,477
pkgs
22
221 Furniture, CS..45
1,611

888

515
63

Segars, cs

37,673 Hardware, cs.112
10,330 Lamps, pkgs...6
4,380 Provisions,

...

4

Flour, bbls... 50
Plaster, bbls. ..25

Effects, cs
Books, cs......

INDIES.

Flour, bbls..3,827
Pork, bbls....309
Beef, bbls
.159
Lard, lbs...38.471
Hams, lbs?...955
Cheese, lbs. 7,158
Butter, lbs. .8,600

Palm oil. cks

...

750
750

563
1

$62,691
BRITISH WEST

183

521

133

1,376
509
2,561

300

Rye flour, bbls.40
Plaster, bbls.. .50
Hops, bales
1
Ext logwood,
bxs

319

apples, bbls55

Oars

6,498

Cheese, lbs. 1,830

goods. csl2
Agl implts, cs. 1

1.711

43

I

940
3(0

.

Perfumery, cs 100

1,700
977
3,44S
9.840

Glassware, cs.. .2
Lumber, pcl3,919
Dd

Sew mach, cs. 16
Moss, bales.... 19

Quan. Value
Quan. Value.
1,063
3,589 Miscellaneous
Cutlery, pkgs. .25
1,688
$121,833
Glassware, cs.. .1
190
VENEZUELA.
192
Hoop s-irts, cs.2
Rifles, cs.
320 Drugs, pkgs...33 • 907
2
1,075
Tobacco, cs.... 9
446 Print mtls,pkgsl9
66
645 Matting, rolls.. 3
Stationery, cs..9
30
Beef, bbls
600
Keroseue,
1.230
gals
70S Flour, bbls... 145 2,040
Tobacco, bis.. 44
876 Flour, bgs
80
480
479 Domestics, cs.14
1,564
Lumber, ft. 15.982
110 Books,,cs
1
Boat
....1
112
Bread, pkgs
76
.94
565 Paper, reams..50
86
Brandy, pUgs.. .2
145 Hams, lbs....364
Butter, lbs.. >09
312
Wine, pkgs... .46
768
2,500
652
Cheese, lbs...253
48 Lard, lbs
Mfd tob,lbs.1,179
1,281
353 Hardware, cs.. 13
4
150
Powder, kegs..59
565 Nails, bxs
Lard oil, gals.873
275
1,611 Perfumery, cs.20
Hardware, cs.l 14

..

1.510

Cutlery, cs.,.175
Hardware, cs.257
pkgs

Quan. Value
1,125
Salt, sacks....500
Lumber, pcs 654
ISO
1,360
Matting, pkgs.5S
Paper hang,
22
pkgs
1.964
Cutlery, es...
659
9
Harness, bx.... 1.
132

10,349

Nails, kegs.. .245
Books, cs
S
Rosin, bbls... 74

7.500

$103,306

Oil

2.592
480

Maizenn. bxs 650
Tin cans.... 1.0 0
Pr<s. lish, csl,524

cs

GIBRALTAR.

lbs

5,334

Wood ware,

LONDONDERRY.*

Com, bush .15770

3.329

Agl implts, pkg07
Mf wood, pkgsl 17

[June 23, 1866.

CHRONICLE.

THE

788

Total

$7,046,742

June 23,

Native Ceylon

20

©

22

Maracaibo

CURRENT.

PRICES

789

THE CHRONICLE.

1866.]

17
17

©

20
19

©
Laguayra
17 ©
17}
Domingo
t'o^per—Duty, pig, bar, and Ingot, 2}; old copper,
2 cents
2); manufactured. 30 18 cent ad val.; sheath¬
ing copper and yellow metal, in sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches wide, weighing 14 © 34 oz. IP square
foot, 3} cents IP 2).- All cash.
Ingot is in fair demand and firmer. Other kinds
are
steady.
.
Sheathing, new
@45
^9 2>
24 @
Sheathing, &c„ old
25
Sheathing, yellow
..
@
83
Bolts
©
45
St.

WHOLESALE.
All goods deposited in public stores or bonded
warehoases must be withdrawn therefrom, or the
duties thereon paid within one year from the date of
the original importation, but may be withdrawn by
the owner for exportation to Foreign Countries, or
may be transhipped to any port of the Pacific, or West¬
ern Coast of the United States, at any time before the

expiration of three years from the date of the original
importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be subject to the same rules and
regulations as if originally imported there; any goods
remaining in public store or bonded warehouse be¬
yond three years shall be regarded as abandoned to
the Government, and sold under such regulations as
tne Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe.
Mer¬
chandise upon which duties have been paid nlay re¬
main in warehouse in custody of the oflicers of the
customs at the expense and risk of the owners of said
merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three years, shall be
entitled to return duties, proper evidence of such
merchandise having been lauded abroad to be furnish¬
ed to the collector by the importer, one per centum
of said duties to be retained by the Government.
In addition to the duties noted below, a

discrim¬

..

Braziers’
Baltimore
Detroit

with the United States.
On all goods, wares,

and merchandise, of the

growth or produce of Countries East of the Cape of
Good Hope, when imported from places this side of the
Cape of Good Hope, a duty of 10 por ceut. ad val. is
levied in addition to the duties imposed on any such
articles when imported directly from the place or places
of their growth
production ; Haw Cotton and Haw
Silk

excep*ed.

The

tor in

ail

cases

to be

2,240 lb.

Aslies—Duty: 15 $ cent ad val.
Pot, 1st sort.
Pearl, 1st sort

'.

....$ 100 ft

. •

Anchor*—Duty: 2} cents $ lb.
Of 209 2) and upward
$ lb

Bones—Duty: on invoice 10 $ cent.
Rio Grande shin
IP ton 85 00

val.
$ 15

Bread—Duty, 30 $ cent ad

white... IP 2)

American, gray and

Welch tubs,strictly fine,
do
fair to good
Firkins,
} dr. tubs, strictly

do

Western,

fine

good to choice

hair, 1 $ 2).
70 © 2 50
cents.

common

to

medium

Canada, uniform and

fine

ordinary, mixed
Mich ,Ill.,Ind. & Wjs., g. to f. yel.
do
do com.tomed.
do

85

35

©
©

30
30
2S

Vermont

,

©
©

33
87

30

33

@

85

80

©
©
©

.

.

23

_

dairy

•

©
©
©
©
©

.

*

'

,

37
80
22
20

15
•

.

•

.

Candles—Duty, tallow, 2}; spermaceti and wax
and adamantine, 5 cents $ 2)

8; stearine

Sperm
1

do

IP

*
,

patent,

«

•

•

•

Refined sperm, oity

■

30

Stearic

22

Adamantine

$ bbl

Cement—Rosendale

Chains—Duty, 2} cents $ 2).
One inch and

•

$ 2)

upward

«♦

©
©
©
©
©

©

,

,

50
40
81

23
1 75

,

Corks—Duty, 50 IP cent ad val.
Regular, quarts
gross
Short

Tapers..

8}

Coal—Duty,bituminous, $1 25 $ ton of 28 bushels
the bushel; other than bituminous,40 cents
18 28 bushels of 80 2) $ bushel.
Liverpool Orrel..IP ton of 2,240 ft
..
© 10 00
Liverpool House Cannel
..
© 14 d0
Anthracite
8 00 © 9 00

80 lb to

.

Cocoa—Duty, 3 cents $ 2).
..(gold).(ln bond).. 18 2)

Caracas

.

Maracaibo .(gold).,
Guayaquil .(gold)

do

22 ©
..

do

......

Coffee—Duty: When imported

@

15 @

23
••

lot

direct in Ameri¬

equalized vessels from the place of its growth
or production; also, the growth of countiies this side
the Cape of Good Hope when imported indirectly in
American or equalized vessels, 5 cents $ 2); all other
10 Ip cent ad valorem in addition.
Coffc'O has been unsettled during the week and the
can or

market closes dull.

Rio, prime, duty

paid

do good
do fair..'
do ordinary
do fair to goo<l cargoes

Java, mats and




...gold
gold

gold
*

:

gold
gold

bags.*.»*~*^gold

191 ©

18 @
16 ©

H} (81
16 ©
24} @

20

If}
16,

15
17$

25}

©
©

.

.

45
12

Mineral
Phial.

i6
2d

©

70

©
©

.

,

50
40

©

Cotton—See special report.

Orugrs and Byes—Duty, Alcohol, 40 cents Ip
gallon ; Aloes, 6 cents Ip ft; Alum, 6t) cents IP 100 ft ;
Algols, 6 cents IP ft; Arsenic and Assafietida, 20;
Antimony, Crude and Regulus, 10; Arrowroot,80 Ip
cent ad val.; Balsam Capivi, 20; Balsam Tolu, 30;
Balsam Peru, 50 cents Ip ft ; Calisaya Bark, 30 IP cent
ad val.; Bi Curb.Soda, 1}; Bichromate Potash,3cents
IP ft; Bleaching Powder, 30 cents 18 100 ft ; Refined
Borax, 10 cents Ip ft; Crude Brimstone, $6; Roll
Brimstone, $10 Ip ton; Flor Sulphur, $20 ip ton, and
15 Ip cent ad val.; Crude t amphor, 30; Refined Cam¬
phor, 40 cents Ip ft.; Carb. Ammonia, 20 Ip cent ad
val.; Cardamoms and Cantharides, 50 cents 19 ft ;
Castor Oil, $1 Ip gallon; Chlorate Potash, 6; Caustic
Soda, I}; Citric Acid, 10; Copperas,}; Cream Tartar,
10; Cubebs, 10 cents IP ft; Cutch, 10; chamomile
Flowers, 20 Ip cent ad val.; Epsom Salts, 1 cent !p
ft; Extract Logwood, Flowers Benzola and Gam¬
boge, 10 IP cent.; Ginseng, 20; Gum Arabic, 2o 19
cent ad val.; Gum Benzoin, Gum Kowrie, and Gum
Damar, 10 cents per ft; Gum Myrrh, Gum Senegal,
Gum Geeda and Gum Tragacanth, 20 ip cent ad val.;
Hyd. Potash and Resubliined Iodine, 75; Ipecac and
Jalap, 50; Lie. Paste, 10; Manna, 25; Oil Anis, Oil
Lemon, and Oil Orange, 50 cents; Oil Cassia and Oil
Bergamot, $1 Ip 1b ; Oil Peppermint, 50 Ip cent ad
val.; Opium, $2 50; Oxalic Acid, 4 cents 19 ft; Phos¬
phorus, 20 Ip cent ad val.; Pruss. Potash, Yellow, 5;
Red do, 10; Rhubarb, 50 cents !p ft: Quicksilver, 15
Ip cent ad val.; Sal xEratus, 1} cents ip ft ; Sal Soda,
} cent IP ft ; Sarsaparilla and Senna, 20 IP cent ad
val.; Shell Lac, 10; c*oda Ash, }; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
IP ft ; Sulph. Quinine, 45 Ip cent ad val.; Sulph. Mor¬
phine, $2 50 Ip oz.; Tartaric Acid, 20; Verdigris, 6
cents IP 2>; Sal Ammoniac, 20; Blue Vitriol, 25 Ip
cent ad val.; Etherial Preparations and Extracts, $1
Ip ft; all others quoted below, free. Mo.-t of the
Id
cash.
articles under this head are now sold for cash, (All
nominal.)
Acid, Citric

(gold)

62} ©

68

Ip gall.

©
©
©
•'$ @
55 @
©
24 ©
26} ©
3 ©
25 ©
S7} ©
S5 ©
©
©
40 ©
©
©

4 42

>.

Alcohol

% lb

Aloes,Cape
Alum

Annato, fair to prime
Antimony, Regulus of

(gold)

Arsenic, Powdered

Assafoetida
Balsam Capivi
Balsam Tolu
Balsam Peru

C.

(gold)
(gold)

Bark, Calisaya
Berries, Persian
Bi Carb. Soda, Newcastle
Bi Chromate Potash

Peppers
Leon, bags

Bird

—

(gold)

Peppers—Zanzibar.,

Ip lb

Brimstone, Am. Roll
Brimstone, Flor Sulphur

Camphor, Crude, (in bond).(gold)
Camphor, Refined
Cantharides

Ammonia,in bulk....
Cardamoms, Malabar
Castor Oil, Cases
IP gallon
Ip ft
Chamomile Flowers
Chlorate Potash
(gold)
Soda

Cochineal, Honduras
Cochineal, Mexican..

112 fts
(gold)
(gold)

Copperas, American
Cream Tartar, prime

(gold)

Cobalt, Crystals. ..in kegs.

Logwood

...IPoz,

Flowers, Benzoin
Flowers, Arnica
Folia, Buchu
Gnmbier

bales
IP ft

Ginger^”Jamaica, bl’d, in bbls

50
10
23

’

4} @
5

@
.©
07} ©
©
•

32
34

321
50
4}
5}

•

16
8 00
2 85
50

in
75

@
3 25
2 90
60

©
©
Ip
34 ©
9} ©
©
1 15 @
©

34}
10

..

1 20
1 30

..

•

2}

©

80} ©
©
13; ©
•

*
..

'

46
14

.....

and Western..
Arabic, Picked..
(gold)
.

©

H @
60 @
55
7

@
@

<m

80
25
75

7}

.(gold)

38
SO @ 100
..

@

57 @
42 ©
©
83 ©
..
©
..

©

©

75
44
55
85
2>
84

50

4

2

.

.

25
36
28

8

do

7}
1 75
46

Nutgalls Blue Aleppo

4 00’
4 75

...

8 50
8 (.0
8 75
3 87}

(gold)

.Opium, Turkey... (uold in bond)
Oxalic Acid

,

.

-Phosphorus.

9

Quicksilver
Rhubarb, China.....

(gold)

Rose Leaves
Salaratns
Sal Ammoniac, Refined
Sal Soda, Newcastle

f

Canary

t

,

,

101

(gold)
(gold)

ft
Ip bush.

Seed, Anise

.

40
f0
5 50

50
30
24

Sarsaparilla, Hond
Sarsaparilla, Mex
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

85
85
80
50
75
20

38
30

Madder, French, E. X. F. F.
Manna, large flake
Oil Anise
'
Oil Cassia
Oil Bergamot
Oil Lemon
Oil Peppermint, pure

,

(gold)

4 25

Hemp

16}

Ip 2>

Caraway... i
Coriander

Mustard, brown, Trieste
do
do

,

English, white

,

,

...

,

24
85
80
80

Senna, Alexandria.
Senna, East India
Seneca Root.

,

%

...

California, brown,

.

Shell Lac
Soda Ash (80 19 cent)
Sugar Lead, White
Sulphate Quinine, Am
Sulphate Morphine

2}

(gold)

..

IP oz.

2 60

Ip ft

55

..

Tartaric Acid
(gold)
Valerian, English..
do
Dutch

..

..

.......

56

Verdigris, dry and extra dry
Vitriol, Blue*.

©
©
©
©
©
©

60
24
40
1 00
3 50
,

Duck—Duty, 30 $ cent ad val.
Ravens, Light
IP pee
13 00
Ravens, Heavy
22 00
Scotch, Gourock, No. 1 per yard.
Cotton, No. I...
89
18 yard

,

@ 5 00
© 2 25
5
©
55
©
87}
©
24
©
39
©
©
©
8
©
© 1 90
50
©
,

Gb.

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
@
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

.

.

.

4 50
5 00
....

3 25
4 00
....

44

1 10

40}
1

00

6 50
20
11

2}
55
26

4 75
2 50
18
J6

17}
12
15
-c-*-

85
45
3
44
65
50
56
54

©
@
18

©

..

©
©

72

©
©

Dye Woods—Duty free.
Camwood/

(gold). ,.$ton
Fustic, Cuba
Fustic, Tampico
Fustic, Savanilia
(gold)
Fustic, Maracaibo
do
Logwood, Cam peachy
(gold)
Logwood, Hond

(gold)

Logwood, Tabasco
Logwood, St. Domingo
Logwood, Jamaica

29 50
25
25
20
26
23
20

66
00
00

00
00
00

2» 00
110 00

Limawood
Barwood

(gold;

Feathers—Duty: 30 ip cent ad val.
IP 1b
90
80

Prime Western
do Tennessee

© 80 00
©
©
© 26 00
©
© 27 00
©
©
©
©
©
..
.

-

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

85 00

Sapan Wood, Manila

.

© 90 00

100

@
@

85

Fisli—Duty, Mackerel, $2; Herrings, $1; Salmon
$3; other pickled, $1 50 IP bbl.; on other Fish,
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller pkgs. than bar¬
rels, 50 cents 19 100 Tb.
Drv Cod is scarce and firm. Mackerel is in only
light demand.
6 00 © 7 75
$ cwt.
Dry Cod
©
Dry Scale
19 bbl.
4 50
© 5 00
Pickled Scale
IP bbl.
,

<jp bbl.

Mackerel, No. 1, Mass, shore
Mackerel, No. 1, Halifax

.

...

.

...

© 7 50
© 28 60
©
©
©
©
©
©

.

.

-

9

*

13

66

-

«

.

..

Salmon, Pickled, No. 1

.

*

*

©

© 40 66’
© 15 00
© 14 00
65
62} ©
55
52} ©
4 00 ©
6 00
m.

Shad, Connecticut,No. 1. Ip hf. bbl.

Herring,pickled

.

.

7 00
23 00

.

Herring, Scaled
Herring, No. 1

.

19 00

Mackerel, No. 2, Mass. shore.
Mackerel, No. 2, Bay
Mackerel, No. 2, Halifax...,..
Mackerel, No. 3, Mass, large
Mackerel, No. 3, Halifax

IP box
IP bbl.

Flax—Duty: $15 IP ton.
Jersey
IP

,

14 50
13 fO

17

©

23

Fruit—Duty: Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and.
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds, 10; Almonds, 6; other
nuts, 2; Dates, 2 ; Pea Nuts, 1; Shelled do, 1}, Filbers
and Walnuts, 3 cents ip ft; Sardines, 50; Preserved

Ginger. 50 ; Green Fruits, 25

4}

8
5

Solid

7$

1 75 @ 2 00

Ginseng, Southern

India

87}

,

Liccorice, Paste, Sicily
Licorice Paste, Spanish
Licorice Paste, Greek
Madder, Dutch

Pickled Cod

..

Gamboge

Gum Myrrh) East

,

90

1

©
©
7} ©
SI) ©
40 00 @ 42

..

Gam Damar

#

85
90

2)

’

Arabic, Sorts
Benzoin
Kowrie.
Gedda

25
28

2S

•

Epsom Salts

Gum
Gum
Gum
Gum
Gem

12}

•

•

Cubebs, East India—

Extract

4
70

•

•

Sierra

9

•

•

African,

Cutch
Cuttlefish Bone

9

..

•

Bleaching Powder
Borax, Refined
Brimstone, Crude.. IP ton.(^old)

Caustic

26

..

Argols, Crude
Argols, Refined

Bird

..

25
85

50

Licorice Paste, Calabria

Prussiate Potash
55
.

Carbonate

$ ©

8?
33

©

Tarred Russia.
Tarred American
Bolt Rope, Russia

Aloes, Socotrine

,

©
©
©

15
17
12

English dairy

4J

©

.

-

Factory made dairies
Farm dairies
do
do
common

8-5
85
40

80 ©
30 J©

,

do firkiDs, finer kinds, yellow .
West. Re erve, good to fine, yel.
do
com. to medium
Southern Ohio

Cheese—

J*

@
©
" ©

*•

Batter and Cheese.—Duty: 4
The market is again dail and nominal.

Pa.,

@

special report.

Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs

.

41

©

• •

Breadstuff s—See

Butter—
N. Y.,
do
do

10

©

lleeswax—Duty, 20 $ cent ad val.
American yellow
IP 2>
40

Pilot
Navy
Crackers

©
©

45

Portage Lake.
32 © ' £2j
Corilag’c—Duty, tarred, 8; untarred Manila, 2}
other untarred, 3} cents $ 2>.
©
Manila,
ip 2>

,

inating duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no reciprocal treaties

@

81} @
3j* @

..

Gum, Myrrh, Turkey
Senegal
(geld)
Tragacanth, Sorts
Tragacanth, white liakey...
Hyd. Potash, Pr. and Eng.. .(gold)
Iodine, Resublimed
Ipecacuanna, Brazil
Jalap
."n riper Berries
Lao Dye
Gum
Gum
Gum

Ti

p

Market has been effected

drain:: nominal.
Raisins, Seedless
'do
do

Layer

cent ad val.

by the gold fluctuations

IP } cask

IP box

Bunch
Currants

IP ft

Citron, Leghorn
Prunes, Turkish
Dates

Almonds, Languedoo

Sardines
do.
do

Provence

Sicily, Soft Shell
Shelled

..

.»

©
©

8 50

©
14} ©

4 40

28

19
i..

r.

do
do
do

8 GO
4 40
4 05

$ box
$ hf. box
IP qr.box

18
86
82
2S

46
85
33
22

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

15}
29
20

20
83
34
8(5
43
90
40

2*

Filberts, Sicily
Walnuts, French
Dried Fruit—
N. State Apples
Blackberries
Black Raspberries
Pared Peaches

@
©

.

...

13

©

21

13

@
©
@
©
@

.

25

18

Unpealed do
Cherries, pitted, new...

15f

©

13
40

26

..

50
35

Buenos

5

50

do

Bear, Black

.

1 00 @ 1 25

..$ skin 5 00 @15 00

..

5 00 @10 00

4 00 @ 8 OH

brown

do

90 @ 1 50
90 @ 1 50

Badger
Cat, Wild

JO 00 @75 00
3 U0 @10 00
l 00 ® 2 25
60 @ 1 25

Silver

do Cross

do Red
do Grey

-

1 25 @ 3
5 50 @10
1 50 @ 3
3 00 @ 6
10 @

Lynx
Marten, Dark
do pal*

Mink, dark
Muskrat,
Otter

.

50
50
00
00
85

5 00 @ 8 00

80

20 @

Opossum...
Raccoon

70 @ 1 00

Skunk, Black

75 @ 1 00
40 @ 50

Striped

do
do

..
..

12

10 @

White

..
..

..

..

..
..

..
..

..
..

..
..

20
00

..

14

do

..

19
14

dead green..

black, dry

..

..

9

buflalo

25
15

of 1864

do

Horns—Duty, 10 $ cent ad

10

Para, Fine

India Rubber— -Duty, 10

Window—1st,2d, 3d, and 4th qualities.

(Subject to a discount

6x 8 to
8x
to
1 lx. to
12x19 to
18x22 to

or

10x15 inches, 2f cents

American

8x10

of 80 @ 85 $ cent.)
$ 50 feet

10x15
12x18
16x24
20x30.
20x31 to 24x30
24x31 to 24x36

•...

.

50
00

50
00

7 50
9 00
10 00
11 00
12 00
13 00
15 00

25x36 to 30x44
80x46 to 32x18
32x50 to 82x56
Above
cr’ish &nd French

E

5
6
6
7

@ 7
@ 7
@ 9
@ 9
@ 11
@ 14
@ 16
@17
@ 13
@ 20
@ 24

18 00

@
15 00 @
16 00 @
18 00 @

24x31 to 24x36
24x36 to 30x44.
80x45 to
82x50 to

25
75
25
50
75
50

32x43
32x56

16
IS
20
24

18 00
13 00

00
00
00
00
00

..

65

East India

.

Carthagena, etc
Guayaquil

..

..

..

•

S4

@

1 20
95

$ ft

Bengal
Oude

77f

©
@
@
@
@
@

70
60
.

@
@

Madras
Manila
Guatemala
Caraccas

70
85
85

....(gold)
-(gold)

70

••

•

2 00
1 25
1 25
1 35
1 65

85

gold.

Bar

Swedes, assorted sizes

75
25

American,Refined
Common

do

Scroll,
Ovals and Half Round
Band

75

50
50
50
00
50
00

less
3i

Horse

Shoe

Rods, 5-8 @ 3-16 inch
lloop

$ lb

Rod

Nail

Sheet,Single.Double and Treble..
Rails, English.. .(gold)
$ ton
American

do

Store Prices—,
00 © ...
00
@ ...
00 ® ...
00
@200 00
00 @155 60

16C
120
110
150
145

,

145 00
122 50
1-5 00
10
27
6
55 00
SO 00

@10
@150
@180
@220
(81
©
©
@
© 85

#

,

-

Sheet, Russia.

@ 48 00
@ 47 60
@105 00

m

00
00
00
00
11
23
8

...

00

Ivory—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.
East India, Prime..*.
East India, Billiard Ball

8 00

$ ft

3 50

3 00

African,-West Coast, Prime
African, Scrivellos, West Coast..

2 00

@

3 50
4 50

@
©

3 95
2 50

@

Lead—Duty, Pig, $2 $ 100 lb ; Old Lead, If
$ lb; Pipe and Sheet, 2f cents $ lb.
©
$ 100 ft
Galena...
6 62f @
Spanish .
6
62; @
6 75 a

German..

gold

Bar

Pipe and Sheet

(ft
(81

$ ft

:

84
13f

Oak and Hemlock are

cents
6 i-0
f, h0

7 00
11

Leatlier—Duty: sole 35,upper 30 $ cent

65

$ ton 310 00

(gdd)

(gold)

do

do

Dry Hides—
Buenos

Ayres

Montevideo
Rio Grande
Orinoco
California
California, Mexican
Porto Cabello
Vera Cruz

Pamplco
Matamoraa
8an Juan and Cent.
Maracaibo

Bogota




.

’.
,

.

.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Amer/.. do
,

.

,

do

do

17f@
17i®
16 @
15 ®
I6f©
15
12
14
14

@
@
@
©

13*©
(81
@
..

..

-

B

do

,

.

ii
,.

• •

.....

.....

heavy, do

Orinoco, etc. l’t. do
do
middle do
do
heavy., do ..'...
do & B. A, dam’gd all

@

27
21

poor all
do
Slaughter in rough, .cash.
Slau*rhter in rough, light... do
do

o[o

<3>

34
31
30
32
50

middle do

do
do

weights

Oak,

16
13

heavy .do
California,light. do

do
do

20

ii

......

middle, do

do

do
do
do
do
do

quotations are nominal.

$ ft gold

do

do
do

Hides—Duty, all kinds, Dry or Salted, and Skins,
10 $ cent ad val.
Th' Market is dull an 1

middle... do
8o
heavy.... do
do
light Cropped
do
middle do
do
bellies
do

do
do

10

32
37
42
43
48
16
32
35
31
31

cash.$ ft

Slauehter,light

Hemlock, B. Ayres,«fec..l’t do

@250 00

9f ©

ad val.
both ia gooI demand and

do

do
do
do

8 5 00 @ <40 00
120 00 @140 00
@
8$
$ ft
..

Russia, Clean
Jute
Manila
Sisal

@325 00

13

firmer.

Oak,

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $25; Jute,
$15; Italian, $40; Sunn and Sisal, $15 $ tor; and
Undressed

..
.
.

.

@ 70 00

~

@110 00
@100 00

...

@150 00

w

Rosewood—Duty
25 @

12 @

Port-au-Platt, logs

16

12
12
10

Nuevitas
Mansanilla
Mexican.....
Honduras (American

.*

30
16
16

@
@
@

15

20
16

14 @
12 @~

3u

@

10

@

14
14

$ cubic ft.

50 @

1 60

$ Bt»

5 @

Mansanilla
Mexican
Florida

8

@

6 00

@
@

4 00

Bahia...

do

20

@

20

wood)
Cedar, Nuevitas,
do
do
do

£0

17 @

.

Port-au-Platt, crotches.

Rosewood, Rio Janeiro

been somewhat unsettled by the

35

do

..

80
65

••

@
@
@
@

@
@

Tampico, 1 cent $ lb.
American, Dfeased

..
..

logs

.

,

nominal.

Kurpah

English..

@

..

Domingo, ordinary

St.

do
do
do
do
do
do

@ 15 00

34

60

..

5

do

@

Hair—Duty free.
Rio Grande, mixed..(cash)..$
Buenos Ayres,mixed

Hay—North River, in bales $
100 fts, for shipping

..

ITIolasses—Duty : 8 cents $ gallon.

Bar, English and
do
do
do

@

.Ilf @

..

,

Mahogany? Cedar?

free.

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
60
@110 00

@800
@250
@200
@120
@250
@200
@125
@100
@175
@150

..

•

hhd., light

40

1 10

Hog, Western, unwashed

$ M.

hhd., heavy

do

70

40 @

33

Red oak,

@120 00

100 00

bbl., culls

do

@ 65 00

60 00

.

STAVES—
White oak, pipe, extia
do
pipe, heavy
do
pipe, light...
do
pipe, culls.. ..
do
hhd., extra
do
hhd., heavy
do
hhd., light..
do
hhd., culls
do
bbl., extra
do
bbl.,heavy
do
bbl., light

•

@

Sporting, in 1 ft canisters... $ ft

ft

35 00 @ 40 00

.

..

Indigo—Duty free.

Pig, Scotch, Best,No l(cash) $ ton 46 50
46 00
Pig, American, No. 1
Bar, Swedes, assorted sizes, (in gold) ■r 95 00

Gunpowder-Duty, valued at 20 centsorlcss
$ lb, 6 cents $ lb, and 20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
cents $ ft, JO cents $ lb and 20 $ cent ad val.
Blasting (A)
$kegof25ft
..
@5 00
Shipping and Mining
..
@5 50
7 50

55

Para, Coarse

fluctuations in

valued at 10 cents or less,
cents $ ft
Calcutta, light and heavy . .$ pee
23f@
24J

Rifle

2116

$ cent ad val.

$ ft

The Market has

Gunny Rags—Duty,
$ square yard, 3 ; over 10, 4

Gunny Cloth—Duty, valued at 10 cents or
square yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ lb.
alcutta, standard
yard
29 @

@
@
@
@

Iron—Duty, Bars, 1 to If cents $ lb; Railroad,
70 cents $ 100 lb ; Boiler and Plate, If cents $ lb;
Sheet, Band, Hoop, and Scroll, If to If cents $ lb;
Pig, $9 $ ton; Polished Sheet, 3 cents $ ft.

Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th

tjnalit es.
(Single Thick)—Discount25 @ 30 per cent.
6x8 to 8x10
$50 feet
6 00 @ 7
8x11 to 10x15
6 50 @ S
7 00 @ 9
11x14 to 12x18
12x19 to 16x24
7 50 @ 10
20x31 to 24x30
12 00 @15

Maple and Birch

val.

$ c

Ox, Rio Grande
Ox, Buenos Ayres

Window Polished Plate
$ square foot; larger
and not over 16x24 inches, 4 cents $ square foot;
arger and not over 24x39 inches 6 cents $ square
oot; above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
cents $ square foot; all above that, 40 cents $ square
oot; on unpolished Cylinder, Crown, and Common
Window, not exceeding 10x15 inches square, If; over
hat, and not over 16x24,2; over that, and not over
21x30, 2i; all over that, 8 cents $ lb.
(xlass—Duty,Cylinder

23
25
16

@

4 00

55 00 @ 65 OJ
80 00 @ 90 00

Mahogany, St. Domingo, crotches,
$ foot

Para, Medium
not over

@
@
@

S3 @

Hops—Duty: 5 cents $ ft.
$ ft
Crop of 1865

90

S @

20
24

.$ $ cash.

.

•

,

@100 00

80 00

$ M
Poplar and W. wood B’ds & Pl’k.
Cherry Boards and Plank
Black Walnut

Sf
H
Si

@ 33 00

29 00

...

-

@ 80 00

25 00

.

Boards

Oak and Ash

.

..

Honey—Duty, 20 cents $ gallon.
Cuba..(duty paid).(gold).$ gall.

80

20 ©

..

Kip

White Pine Box Boards
White Pine Merchant. Box
Clear Pine
Laths, Eastern
.7

HEADING—white oak, hhd

6 00 @ 50 00
3 00 @ 0 00
1 00 @ 2 00
50 @ 1 00
1 00 @ 2 50
4 50 @ 8 00
1 00 @ 2 50
3 00 @ 4 00
10 @ 25
3 00 @ 5 00
65 @

•

Ilf

..

.

75 @ 1 00
35 @ 50

..

A. & Rio Gr.

do
do
do

11

..

*

.

40 @ 1 00
40 @ 1 00

-

..

Calcutta, city sl’ter... $ ft cash.

4 00 @ 7 00

10 @
20..
10 @
5 00 @10 00 .. 3 00 @ 5

do House
isber
ox,

..

do

Sierra Leone
Gambia and Bissau
East India Stock—

1 25 @ 1 50

.

10
11

@
sf©
@
@
@
©

Coutry sl’ter trim. & cured. do
do
do
City
do

L.

..

Pale

Rio Grande
California
Western

•

8

$ ft gold.

.

•

@
@
@
10*@
10 @
11 @

do

Ayres

@

9
10
10

$ ft gold.

.

Upper Leather Stock—

Western.
No. 1.

$ lb 1 '0 © 2 00
1 25 @ 1 50

Beaver, Dark

Maracaibo
Maranham
Pernambuco

Bahia.;
Chili
Wet Salted Hides—

10 $ cent.
Prices—Add premium on gold for currency
North, and East.
No l.

Dry Salted Hides—

Tampico and Metamoras... do

Furs— Diuy,

prices.

..

31

23
36

do mid. & h’vy do

@
@
@
@

@
@
@
@
@
@
©

35
40
43
46
52
19
34
36
3 i

321
85
35
31

3
31

©
©

}

©
©
©
©
©

3L
2i
31
82
43

©
©

Lumber? Woods? Staves?

Spruce, Eastern
Southern Pine

.

..$Mfeet

4'i

1 60
2 10

Etc.—Duty

10 $ cent ad val.;

70

*

Nails—Duty: cut If; wrought 2f; horse shoe 2
cents $ lb
Cut, 4d. @ 60d..
Clinch
Horse shoe,

$ 100 ft

8 50

@

..

34

82 @
50 @

$ fl>

forged (Sd)

@ 7 00

6 75

Copper

".
Yellow metal
Zinc
f

33

35
20

@
@

..

spirits of turpentine 30
$ gallon; crude turpentine, rosin, pitch, and
tar, 20 $ cent ad val.
The Market has been somewhat irregular closing
Naval Stores—Duty :

cents

quiet.

Turpentine, N. C...... ..,$ 280 lb
$ bbl.
Tar, American
do foreign

..
@ 5 25
2 25 © 3 00

@

..

@

Pitch

Rosin, common
do
strained and No. 2

3 00 @

r

8 25

4 00

6 00
7 50

6 50

No. 1
Pale and Extra

do

..

@
@

8 00

do
(2S0 lbs.)
Spirits turpentine, Am
$ gall.

@ 10 00

@

83

9 @

11

S7

$ lb.

Oakum—Duty free

20 $ cent ad val.

Oil Cake—Duty:

City thin oblong, in bbls—$ ton
do
in bags
Western thin oblong, in bags

...

54 £0

@ 57 fO
@ 55 00

1.. @ 53 00

Oils- Duty: linseed, flaxseed, and rape seed, 28
cents; olive and salad oil, in bottles or flasks, $1:

burning fluid, 50 cents $ gallon; palm, seal, and cocoa
nut, 10 $ cent ad val.; sperm and whale or other fish
foreign fisheries,) 20 $ cent ad valorem.
5 15 © 5 ■20
Olive, 13 bottle^baskets..
1 95
@ 2 00
do in casks
.$ gall.
11
Ilf
©
Palm
$ ft
1 65 © 1 66
•••$ gall
Linseed, city
.

1 23
1 45

Whale
do refined winter

Sperm, crude

.

winter, bleached,
unbleached
do
Lard oil
Red oil, city distilled
do
do

.

Parafline, 28

—

.

2 77
1 95
1 00

©
©
©
©
©
©
©

1 10

30 gr....

•

•

. .

•

.

1 50
o

50

2 75
2 00
1 15

©
@

£9

©

•

.(free)...

Kerosene

.

©

saponified

do
Straits

53
61

Paints—-Duty; on white lead, red lead 1 and
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents $ ft; Paris
white'and whiting, 1 cent $ lb; dry ochres, 56 cents
$ 100 lb: oxides of zinc, 1$ cents $ ft ; ochre, ground
150 $ 100 ft ; Spanish brown 25 $ cent ad val.;
China clay, $5 $ ton; Venetian red and vermilion,
5 $ cent ad val.; white chalk, $10 $ ton.
12
©
$ ft
Lithrage, American...
-12
©
Lead, red, American...
17
©
do white, American, pure, in oil
17
16* @
do white, American, puie, dry.
11
10 ©
Zinc, white, American, dry, No. 1.
12
10 ©
do white, American, No. 1, in oil

in oil, $

,

,

,

2 50
9
1 50
8
4 50

Oo^re,yellow,French,dry $ 200 ft
do

gronn i

in oil..

dry...

$ ft

100 ft

ground in oil.$ ft
Paris white, No. 1
..$ 166 fts
do

do

Am

Whiting, American....

Vermilion, Chinese...
*

21 00 @ 25 00
55 00 @ 65 00

@

50

@

65

do

,

Lumber, 20 $ cent ad val.; Staves,
Rosewood and Cedar, free.

65
45

English Islands

Spanish brow

10 $ cent ad val.
$ bbl.
Rockland, common
do
heavy
Lime-—Duty;

1

Porto Rico
Cuba Muscovado
do Clayed

■

Brazil Nuts

Western

©

23
15
12
11

...$ ft

Figs, Smyrna

Gold.

[June 23,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

790

do
do
do

Venetian

..$100 fts

.

N C.).,

,

3 50
10

©

9

©
©
2$ ©
1 60 ©
1 05
©
1 35 ©
30 ©
.

$ ft

Trieste....
California & English..
American.,

©
©
©

.

3 00

©

.

.

5 00
-

.

-

3
1 70
1 10
1 40
40

8 SO

June

16 00
33 00
5 00

ft
China

$ *on
39 bbL
39 ton

clay.

mace, 40 cents; nutmegs, 50
cloves, 20; pepper and pimento, 15; and
ginger root, 5 cents 38 ft.
Spices are very quiet with only a light jobbing
business.
Cassia, in mats

Totroleum—Duty: crude, 20 cents; refined, 40
$ gallon.
f6
25* ©
Crude, 40 @ 47 gravity
$ gall.
55
©
Refined, free
do
in bond
41* ©
38
©
Naptha, refined
5 50 1 ©
6 00
Residuum
$ bbl.
..

.

Paris—Duty: lump, free; calcined,
39 cent ad val.
Blue Nova Scotia
.39 ton.
@
..
Plaster

20

©

..

$ bbl.

@
@

..

Calcined, city mills

.

2 40
2 50

1

cent;

Provisions—Duty: beef and pork,
hams, bason,

higl

are

and^.lard, 2 cents $ ft.

has been unsettled but prices
Beef is steady at last week's quota¬

Pork Market

The

er.

tions.

39 bbl.

Beef, plain mess

..

16 00

do new do
do extra mess
do
do
new
do India mess
Pork, mess, new
do prime mess
do mess, Old
do mime, do

..

21 50
..

82 00
....

30 00
26 50

kettle rendered

do

19*

39 ft

Lard, in bbls

..

17*

Hams, pickled
do
dry salted
Shoulders, pickled....
do
dry salted

17*
13f
..

$ bbl.

Beef hams

..

15

Bacon.

©
(<h
©
©
©
@
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

..

21 00
..

24 50
.

32 50
....

31 00
27 00
22*

10

17

10*
5*

©

4* ©
! ©
11 ©
4* ©

Seconds

City colored
Canvas

Country mixed

l

H*
5*

Rice—Duty: cleaned 2* cents $ lb.; paddy 10
cents, and uncleaned 2 cents $ ft.

$ 100 ft.

Carolina
East India, dressed

Salt— Duty: sack, 24 cent3
cents

12 (0 © 13 00
10 00 © 10 50

$ 100 ft ; bulk, 18

39 100 lb.
©
©

50

1 52* ©
2 75 ©

1 55

©

2 80
2 SO

Turks Islands
Cadiz

Liverpool .ground
do
do
do
do

hn

e

Ashton’s

.

..(:old)

fine, -Vorthington’s....
fine, Jeffreys & Darcy’s
fine, Marshall’s

Onondaga,

com.

fine.

do
do
do
do
Solar coarse.Fine screened
do
F. F

bbls.
..210 ft

bgs.

73
2 75

2

.

.

2 25
1 65
38
.

.

45
.

..240 ft bgs.

.

2 75

©
©
@
©
©
©
©

©
©

.

.

.

.

2 50
1 75
40
.

.

46

8 00
3 u0

Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 2* cents; refined and
partially refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent 39 ft.
Refined, pure
39 ft
..
©
18

j

Crude
Nitrate soda

10 ©
3! ©

gold

4

Seeds—Duty; linseed, 16 cents; hemp, * cent 39
ft; canary, .$! $ bushel of 60 ft ; and grass seeds,
30

cent

ad val.

39 ft

Clover

Timothy, reaped
39 bush.
Linseed, American, clean... 39 tee

American,rough.39 bush

do
do

Calcutta
Bombay

do

10
5 5o
.

2 90
•

•

•

•

....

12
©.
© 6 50

@ 26 ()’»
© 8 20
©
©
•

•

•

•

Shot—Duty: 2* cents $ ft.

Drop and Buck
Silk—Duty: free".
Tsatlees, No. 1 © 5

All thrown silk. 35 39 cent.

f ft

Taysaams, superior, No. 1 © 2

...

do
medium, No. 3 © 4....
Canton, re-reeled, No. 1 © 2
Japan, superior
do
No. 1©3

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Bolivar
Honduras
Sisal
Para
VeraCruz

9 00

©

9 50

S 75

©

9 00

10 50
8

0

..

Skins—Duty: 1U $ cent ad val.
Goat, Curacoa
$ 1b (cash)
do Buenos Ayres
god ...
do VeraCruz
gold

Deer, San Juan

10 00 © 11 25
9 50* © 10 50

14 50

China thrown
Italian thrown

do. Tamj^co
do Matamoras
do Payta..,
do Madras,.,...
do Cape

12

11 @

$ ft

gold....
gold...

gold—.
to'd

.....gold....
gold39 ft
gold
gold....
gold

gold
gold....

...-.gold....
Chagres
Puerto Cabello....gold,...

•

©13 00

© 10 00

© 16 50
©

40 ©
40
..

45

©
©

42*
55

57* ©

59

55

©

42*

40 ©
..

©

82* ©
55 @

.

40 ©
6:* ©
57* ©
57* ©
©
..

Spcl ter—Duty: in pigs, bars, and plates,
6f
Plates, foreign
gold..39 ft




65
60
60

11

Nutmegs, No. 1.
Pepper,
Pimento, Jamaica

87* ©
22* ©
20* ©

90

Cloves

27* ©

Ginger, race and African
Mace

...(gold)

.

21

centad val.
Tt e market is dull and nominal from the
tuations.
50
Brandy—J. & F. Martell.. .(gold)
50
(sold)
Hennessy
40
Otard,Dupuy & Co
(gold)
30
Pinet, Castillion & Co.
.(gold)
Renanlt & Co
45
(geld)
J. Va ail & Co
00
Jules Robin
(geld)
Marrette & Co
(geld)
United Vineyard Propr.. .(gold)
5 80
Vine Growers Co
(geld)
5 50
Lgerfreres
(gold)
5 0)
Otiier brands Cognac
(geld)
Pellevolsin freres
4 90
(geld)
A. Seignette ...
4 85
(gold)
Hi vert Pellevoisen
4 SO
(gold)
Alex. Seignette
4 85

..

..

ed,8*; above ISandnot over 20,4; on refined,5; and
on Molado, 2* cents 39 ft.
There ba9 been much irregularity in raw Sugars and
prices are nominal. Refined are quiet but steady.
Porto Rico
11*
10* ©
39 ft
10 ©
Cuba, inf to common refining
10*
It
do fair to good
101 ©
do
do
do

fair to

do
do

....

prime to choice do

....

Meladp

Havana, Boxes D. S Nos.

7 to
do 10 to
do 13 to
do 16 to
do 19 to
white

do

do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do

do

Arzac

.(gold)

(gold)

Seignette

J Romioux
Other brands Rochelle.... (gold)
Rum—Jamaica
(geld)
St. Croix
(gold)
Gin —Different brands
(geld)

9
12
15

18
20

.

Loaf
Granulated
Crushed and powdered
White coffee, A
Yellow coffee

11*.©
12* ©
10 ©
«! ©
10* ©
11* ©
12
©
13; @

12*
18*

14* ©

15

Whisky—Scotch and Irish .(gold)
Domestic—N. E. Rum
(cur.)
Bourbon Whisky
(cur.)
Corn Whisky
(cur.)

I4f ©
©
©
©

centrifugal

good grocery

15*

Wines—Port

181
8*

H*
1

1'*
H*

Sherry

Sumac—Duty: 10 $ cent ad val.
Sicily........
39 ton 100 00
Tallow—Duty: 1 cent $ ft.
American, prime, country and city
39 B)
Tea—Duty: 25 cents per ft.
Hyson, Common to tair
do
Superior to fine
...

d>

Malaga, sweet
do"

©195 00

(gold)
(gold)
(gold)
(geld)

00

(go d)

incases

(geld)
..(god)

No. 19 to 26
No. 27 to 36

1 10

©

1 40

©

Gunpow. & Imper., Com. to fair
do ''
do Sup. to fine.

1 80

©

do Ex. f. to finest

150

©

Skin&Twankay,Com, to fair.
do
do
Sup'rtofine.,

55

@

Ex f. to finest.

75

©

80

Uncolored Japan, Com. to fair ...
do
do
Sup’rtofine..
do
do
Ex f. to finest

85
95

©
©

90
05

1 10

@

15
85
10
65

.

$5 @

90

1 20

Ex tine to finest

Souchong & Congou, Com. to fair.
do
do
Sup’rtofine.

60

Ex f. to finest

1 00

do

do

©

SO

Wools

©

©

do
do

^

70
90
50

©
©
©

Tin--Duty: pig,bars,and block,15 $ centad val.
Plate and sheets and tome plates, 2* cents 39 1b.
20
Banca
©
(gold)... 39 ft
©
Straits
(gold)

English.
(gold)
Plates, charcoal I. C
$ box
do
do
do

I. C. Coke
Terue Charcoal
Terne Coke

19
..

16 0o
13 50
14 75
11 0!)

Tobacco—Duty: leaf 38 cents $ ft; and manu¬
factured, 50 cents
ft. Cigars valued at $15 or^less
per M , 75 cents per lb., and 2o per cent ad valorem;
over $ 15 and not over $3u, $1.25 per lb. and 30 per
cent ad valorem; over $ 10, and not over $45, $i per
cent ad valorem; over $45, $3 per
pound and 60 per cent ad valorem.
The ma-ket is dull from the gold fluctuation0.
lb. and 50 per

Lugs (light and heavy) 39
Common leaf do
Medium do do
Good
do do
Fine
do do

do
do
do
do
do

Selections do do
Conn, selected wrappers
do prime wrappers
do fair wrappers
do fillers ?
New York running lots
Ohio
do
New York and Ohio fillers
Yara
Havana, fillers

16

©
©
©
©
©
©

©

4*
6*
8*
1H

40 ©
30 @
10
7
5
..

28
26
30

26
...

(Western.)—Ex. fine, bright..
Fine

—

(Virginia)—Ex. fine, bright..

do

do

Fine

do
do

do
do

Medium

& N.Y..

Cigars (domestic).

$150 39 ft
©
;*

New-York Seed, Conn.
Penn.
do
do
Common Cigars

©
©

75
60
40

®
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

32* ©

Common
Medium
Common

©

63* ©

X fts—(dark) Best Virginia
do
Medium
do
do
do
Common
do

@

8 @

Manufactured (in bond)—
10s and 12s—Best Virginia & N.Y
do
Medium ..."

fts
do
fts

4

45

39 (gol<l)

.....

82* @

28
25

©
©

6*
9

18*

©105
© 45
20 00 @ 80
18 00 © 25

8 00

90

©
©

25
10
3 00
2 40
12 00

Wrapper.
do

©

65

50

©
©
©
©
©

57
50
€0
51
45
38
25
45
25
83
80
87
23

45
55
47
88

S3

Peruvian, unwashed

Valparaiso, unwashed

27

©

S. American Mestiza, unwashed..

82
18

©
©
©
©

-

common,unwashed..
Entre Rios, washed

22
43
42
25
15
35

do
unwashed
S. American Cordova.

Donskoi, washed
Persian

African, unwashed
do

washed

.

do

39 100 ft; sheet
2* cents $ ft.

$ ft

Sheet
.

14

To Liverpool :

14*

Petroleum

$ ton

©
©
’5 ©
10 0 ©

*.

$ ton

,

,

••

12 6
..

3

2
1

0
6

©
6
0
5

5

©
©
©
©

..

..

•*

32 bbl.
32 bush.

.,

,.

Petroleum

32 bbl.

Heavy goods

f

32 ton

##

Oil
*

39 tee.

Cotton

.

32 bbl.

8

0
4

2

8*

.

.,

32 ft

..

1

Hops

39 bbl.
38 ton
Wheat, in shipper’s bags.. 32 bush.
Beef and pork
Measurement goods

1
10

$ bbl.

Petroleum

Lard, tallow, out meats, etc 39 ton
Aabea, pot and pearl.

..

..

.

5

6
,

.

8

6

© 1
©
©
© 5
© 20
@ 30
© 5
© 8

$c.

To Havee:

Flour

2*.

:

Corn, bulk and bags

Beef
Pork

.

6

©
$ tee.
$ bbl.
39 bush.

.

© 20
© l

-..-I

$ bbl.

.

©
@
©
©

,,

$ tee.
<j9 bbl,

Heavy goods

Corn
To Glasgow
Flour
Wheat

$ bush.

3
6

1
5

© 17

,.

Beef
Pork
To London:

27

d.

8.

$ ft
Ip bbl.

Cotton
Flour

Wheat

CO

©

I’reights-

30

13 00 © 25 00

.

43
45
80
25
45
25
25
45

@
©
©
©
©
©

22
35

washed

,

24

©
©

20

Mexican, unwashed
Smyrna, unwashed

Oil
Flour
Petroleum
Beef
Pork

00

1 75
1 50

60

$ ft

pulled

10
6

00
00

1 45
8 00

©
©
©
©
©

Corn, bulk and bags
Wheat, bulk and bags

55 00 © 80 0ft

80 00
25 00

3 00

©
©

1 20
1 25

common

20
60
45
35
1*2
15

26

2 60
6 00

20
80
15
32

do
do
Texas

Heavy goods

35
35
30

©
©
©

©

Oil

85
70
.‘0

4 85
6 00
3 75
3 50
4 90

©

full blood Merino

15

32
28

©
©
©
©

settled.

17*

105

© 10 00
00
00
95
©
90
©
95
©
95
©
©

©
©

85

do

19

©
00 ©
00 ©
14 50 ©
10 75 ©

are u;

American, Saxony fleece

70

80 ©

Oolong, Common to fair
do
Superior to fine
do

1 10

..

..

4 00

~
Superfine
No. 1, pulled
California, unwashed...

do

do

©

70 @

..

©
© 10 00

2ft

* and * Merino
Extra, pulled

do

H.

1 35

©
©

$ ct. off list.
$ ct. off list*
Telegraph, No. 7 to 11 Plain.$ ft
S ©
9
Wool—Duty: costing 12 cents or less $ ft, 8
cents $ ft J over 12 and not more than 24, 6 cents;
over 24 and not over 32,10, and 10 $ centad valorem!;
over 82,12 cents $ ft, and 10 $ centad valorem; on
the skin, 20 $ cent ad val.
There is a steady demand for fine fleece. Foreign

...

do

...

GA 10 50

20
25

Ex fine to finest...

Ex fine to finest

do

© 10 00

@ 10 50

90
1 25

(gold)

25
50
90
SO
70
20
1 45
1 80
60

Young Hyson, Common to fair
"do
Superior to fine

@ 10 50
© 10 50
@ 10 50

@150 00
@ 30 00
© 25 00
Champagne..
Wire—Duty: No. 0 to 18, uncovered, $2 to $3 5C
$ 100 ft, and 15 $ cent ad val.
No. Oto
5 $ cfc off list.

13

90 ©
1 10 ©

dry

gold fluc¬

2 00

.(gold)

Claret, in bhds
do

12? ©

o

(gold)

Madeira
do
Marseilles

15*

4 85
4 75
4 ( 5
4 00
3 60
o
90
4 00
2 45
2 50

(gold)

Burgundy Port
Sherry

is*
17*
17*
17

Seed and Havana, per M
Clear Havana.
do
d » Codnecticut Seed

12

.

Sue»-T—Duty: on raw or brown sugar, not above
No. 12 Dutch standard, 8; on white or clayed, above
No. 12 and not above No. 15 Dutch standard, not refin¬

IS*

©

23

.

© 1 35
1 35

and

Wines

Steel—Duty: bars and ingots, valued at 7 cents $
ft or under, 2*cents; over 7 cents and not above 11,
3 cents $ ft; over 11 cents, 3* cents $ ft and 10 ^
cent ad val.
(Store prices.)
24
English, cast, 39 ft
18* ©
German
17*
15* ©
12*
American, spring,
11 ©
13
English, spring
11* ©

do
do

val.

43
20
90

1 82* © 1 35

© 1 87*
Liquors— Liquors — Duty:
Brandy, first proof, $8 per gallon, other liquors, $2.50
Wines—Duty: value set over 50 cents $ gallon 20
cents $ gallon and 25 $ cent ad valorem; over 50
and not over 100, 50 cents $ gallon and 25 $ cent
ad valorem; over $1 39 gallon, $1 $ gallon and 25 39

44

gold 39 ft

Navy fts—Best Virginia

©

Soap—Duty: 1 cent $ 1b, and 25 $ cent ad
$ ft.
18 ©

domestic,...

42*

©

Castile

do

85
62*

..

..

©
©
©

20
SO
15

Rags—(Domestic).
White, city

South Sea
North west coast
Ochotsk
Polar

cassia and

cents

.

Whalebone—Duty: foreign fishery, Op.c ad val39 ft
1 22* © l 25

Spices—Duty:

© 20 00
© ....
@ 5 50
© 20 00
©
49

15

White Nova Scotia
Calcined, eastern

791

THE CHRONICLE.

23, 1866.]

$
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

©

5

4!
0
0
0
0

6
c.
•

•-

.

*

,

,

#

6

m

0

10

[June 23, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

792

iilonitor.

<£l)e Ratltuajj
Railroad

which make

$322,227

108.973

736,082

227.260
215.784

30,798
1.425,120

264,605
198,082
30,276
1.101,668

460.573

507.830

Eastern
Chicago and Northwestern
Chicago and Rock Island
Cleveland and Pittsburg
Detroit and Milwaukee

Erie
Illinois Central
Marietta and Cincinnati

73,842

365,196

353.194

426,493
167,488
245,511

146,943
203,018

1,107,000
283,130
672,628

1,265,000
290,914
637,186

Five

193,919

196,154

173,732

203,514

215,784
$988,046

$859,551

169,299

167,301

Dec.

138,738
63,862

316,433
86,913

Inc.
Inc.

$7,213,705

Inc.

a

Illinois Central

65,404

12,270

22,422

17,702

$77,463 $128,493

Railroad.—The project of

direct road from Indianapolh

and Decatur, Ill., has beeu

commenced at an early day.
Jeffersonville Railroad.—This company have purchased the
Peru and Indianapolis Railroad, and the two roads are to be con¬
solidated. A connection with the Chicago and Great Eastern is to
be made at Kokomo, forming a line between Chicago artd Louis¬
ville 34 miles shorter than any other route, to be run without
change of cars. Total distance, 301 miles, viz., C. and G. JjJ. 139,

revived, and the work is to be

1,998
177,695
23,051

$7,077,513

building

51,532

198,082

$910,583

months....:
and

Dec.

2,235

167,007

222,411

202,857

Indiana

37.345

Dec.
17,702
522
Dec.
Dec. 323.451
Inc.
47,257
Inc.
21,822
36.260
Dec.
73.299
Lie.
Inc.
20,545
Inc.
42,493
Dec.
85,000
Dec.
7,786
Inc.
35,442

95,664

401,456

Michigan Central
Michigan Southern
..
Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien
Milwaukee and St. Paul
hjew York Central
Ohio and Mississippi
Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Chicago....
St. Louie, Alton & Terre Haute (Apr.)
Toledo, Wabash and Western
Western Union

$34,143
9,739

May....:

$333,432

76,074
585,623

Chicago and Alton

Chicago and Great

$168,799
151.931

March

$11,205
32,299
150,459

Inc.
Inc.
Inc.
Inc.

$4,758
28,209

$173,557
180,140

j April

1866.

1865.

1865-6.

Increase.

$139,414
170,879

January
February

May.

1864-5.

1866

1865.

1864.

principal'railroads

the year,) of the

(aud the first five months of
regular reports :

months, 1864, ’65, and ’66, have been

for May,

Earnings.—The following are the returns

five

Pittsburg for the first
monthly as follows :

earnings of the Cleveland and

The

136,192

and the Jeffersonville 162.

Railroad.—This road has
been open to Ottumwa for several years.
It is now being carried
follows :
1S66.
1865.
beyond, the bridge over the Des Moiuss having been completed,
Dec. $28,315
$1,427,290
$1,455,605
Chicago and Alton
Inc. 100,152
and the way graded as far as Albia. So far, it is evpected to open
490,911
Chicago and Great Eastern
390,759
Inc. 130,316
2,706,762
2.576,446
Chicago and Northwestern
the line by the 1st of August.
Dee. 154,258
By June 1st, 1867, it i3 to be com¬
1,100,461
Chicago and Rock Island
1.254,719
Dec. 128,495
859,551
and Pittsburg
Cleveland
988,016
Dec. 500,196
pleted to Chariton, 60 miles west from Ottumwa. To build the
5,496,440
Erie
5,996,636
Dee. 168,074
2,526,280
remaining sections to Plattsmouth will be the work of several years.
Illinois Central
2,694,354
Inc.
1,416
435,685
Marietta and Cincinnati
434,269
Dec.
74,061
Miscellaneous.—Two railroads are projected in Maine ; one ot'
1,594.324
Michigan Central
1,668,385
1,250,314 - Inc. 117,551
these will extend from Wiscasset to a junction with the Portland
Michigan Southern
1,132,7(53
Inc.
57,540
554,378
Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien.
496,838
Lie. 162,336
and Kennebec Railroad, and the other from Wiscasset to Rock
752,236
Milwaukee an t St. Paul
589,900
Inc.
25,720
1,4> 0,439
laud. The latter will connect the Kennebec with Penobscot Bay.
Ohio and Mississippi
1,374,719
Dec. 633,961
2,963.322
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago.
3,597,283
Inc. 541,619
—The line of a canal from the Potomac at Bladensburg to the
1,263,366
Toledo, Wabash and Western
721,747
Inc.
39,460
250,653
Western Union
211,193
Chesapeake Bay at Annapolis has been surveyed. Construction
will be commeueed in a short time, and the work opened within two
Total (16 lines
$25,483,662 $25,072,412 Dec. 411,250
years.
Length, 23 miles ; summit, 156 feet; 18 locks; estimated
The length of the T., W. and W. in 1865 was 242 miles, and in
cost, $2,500,000.
It is designed to facilitate the distribution of
1866, 484 miles ; and hence it results that a relative decrease has
Alleghany County coal to the seaports. been made, instead of the absolute increase shown above.
Total

The

COMPARATIVE
1864.

(322 m.)

(466 m.)

1864.

1865.

$289,400

$1G0,000

327,269
399,870
343,408
460,422

179,011
154,575

18l'034

314^679

521.174

314,521

695,523
738,527

332^098
406.076
446.044

677,625

381,>10

719.911
731,270

357,556

599,752

3,709,970

$504,992. .Jan.

..

408.864...Feb...

388,48 •...Mar...
394.533... April..

..May

—

.

..

...June..

—

...July...
Aug...
—Sep

—

1864.

—

—

Year..

2,770,484

3,840,091

..

’

1864.

(708 m.)

(797 in.)
(657 in.)
$984,837 $1,001,007 $1,187,188.. Jan ..
983.855...Feb...
947,146
H 934,133

11,072,293

1.041.975
994,317

1,105,364
1.301,005

1,222,568
1,224,909
1,334,217

1,256,567
1.458.45

1,333,46

1,177,37s’

1,202,181
1,331,04*1
1,336,610
1,43 S 6
1,522,472
1,429,765

459,762
423,797

..

406.373

460,573

510.100

...luly...
...Aug ..
..Sep—

423,578

—

—

—

—

—

—

...NOV...

657.141

...Dec....

603,402

6,329,447

1866.

(524 in.)
$256,600
304, W5

$363,996
366,361

$314,598.

338,454

413,322

330.651

366.245

267,126
815,258

411,806

353,194
402422
309,083
424,206
484,173
621,636
498421
36G,192

4,110,154

4,868,951

fan.

.

283,177. .Feb...
412,393. .Mar...
409,427.. April..
426,493... May...
—

—

—

—

—

1865.

*(468 m.)

(468 m.)

$290,676
588.066

532,911

506,640

584,523

625.547

712 495

075,330

795,938

701,3)

691,55
914,03

858,500
712,362
580,963

7,120^45

8,489,062

525,751




146,943

178,526
149,099
117,013

74.409

89,901
72,389
88,993
78,697
91,809

..June..

...July..

—

—

94,375

...Aug...

—

—

—

...Dec...
wYear

..

—

—

—

—

1,711,281 1,985,571
H3t. L.. Alton &
1864.

(210 m.)
$100,872
147.485

160,497
157,786
149,855

1865.

—

July-

162,570

...

144,942
218,236
234,194
203,785
202,966
204,726

..Year..

2,084,074

2,290,696

.

..Ang- .
-Sept*..
..Oct....

—

.

Nov.
.Dec

..

218.236
269.459

222,924
208,098
162,694

-

—

c

—

—

46.474

(234 m.)
$98,181
86,523

64,993

95.905

83,702

106,269
203,018

(234 in.)
$51,965

251,9 6

86,4 2

241.370

164,710

300,841

...Aug...
....Sep...
..Oct...
...Nov. ...Dee.-

*.,Y ear

...

....Oct..,
..Nov..

—

324,865

►

336,617
321,037

....Dec..

—

..Year

—

3,095,470

..

1864.

1866.

—

—

—

....Oct..
...Nov,.
...Dec..

(285 m.)
$252,435
278,S48
348.802

338,276
271,553
265,780
263,244
346,7S1

..

221,638
198,135

129,227

1,402,106

237,562

395,579
346,717
171,125

2,535,00!

—

—

—

1864.

...June..

...July..
..Aug...
sept...

..Oct
..NOV;...
..Dec....

*»Year„

(242 m.)

$79,735
95.843

132,896
123,987

1865.

(242 m.'S

194,524

220.209

265,154

2,060,323

309,261
269,443

f 271,725

4374.534
*379,981
375,534

f 361,610

(247,023

2,926,078

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

3,223,088

—

1866.
(2&5 m .)
$282,438
265,796
344.228
337,158
343.736
337,240
305,196
401,456
365,663
1865.

(285 m.)
$306,324
279,137

—

329.105

413,501

—

—

—

—

•

—

—

—

1865.

»

1866.

(340 m.) (310 m.)
$259,223 $267,541
246,109
239,139
326,236
313,914
271,527

277,423

■283,130

..June

223,242

...July

268,176

304,463
349.2S5

302,596

344.700

332,400

350,348
372,618

...Aug..

....Sep.,

278.006

....Oct..
...Nov..
...Dec

..Year.

346,243
275,950

412.553

3,311,070

.

3,793,005

1864.

(140 m.)

$30,840
37.488
42 038
41.450

..June
*

July

..Aug..

.

y

48,359
68,118
50,308
49,903

.Sept..

60,565

..Oct...
..Nov..
..Dec...

54,942

..Year.

3$L319

-Western1865.
Union

<

(484 m.)

-

—

290,916

i860.

—

—

224,957

250,407.. Mar..
270,300. April.
316,433.. May.

156,338
139, e? 5
375,534
221,570

260,460

April

144,001
138 738

244.1x4

(340 m.)
$210,329

$226,059...Jan.,
194,167...Feb.,

127.010

—

Ohio <& Mississippi

,.

$144,084

139,171
155,753

—

4,504,546

1 Sb4.
..

—

190,227

3,966,946

.

245,511...May.

—

300.707
261,141

—

490,693
447,669
328,869

,

121,904..

—

311,180
232,728
288,095
384,290

460,66i

124.175...Mar.

—

264,605

405,510
376,470

.

$131,707... Jan.
122,621.. .Feb.

—

197,8S6

227,260

410,802

1866.
(234 m.)

—

186,172
*

408.445

..Year.

—

^-Toledo, Wab. Sc Western.-)

.

—

1865.

99,662

—

—

1,222,017

...July...

—

—

104,587

131.648
126.970

1866.

173.722

—

—

.

..June

(210 m.) (210 in.)
$170,078 $178,119... Jan...
155,893... Feb...
153,903
192.138...Mar...
202,771
167,301.. April..
169,299
...May...
177,625

155,730

.

1804.

T. Haute.-^

..June..

—

^Milwaukee & St. :Paul-)

108,082.. April..
167,488... May...
—

224,980
271,140,
331,494

—

114.512

72,135...Mar...

—

243,178

...July
4.. Aug...
Sep..

—

96,908
95,453

$121,776... Jail-..
84.897.. .Feb...

-

198,679

..June..

—

—

I860.

(182 in.)
$305,554 $237,555
174.104
246,331
289.403
226,251
(182 vi.)

185,013

735,082... May.

—

117,604

l,03Sr165

243.150

.

90.576

..Year..

.

(251 in.) (251 m.)
$90,125.. Jan..,
$98,112
84,264... Feb..,
86,626
82,910... Mar..,
93,503
82,722.. April.,
82,1SG
95,664...May...
73,$42
..June.,
110,186
...July.
108,652
...Aug..
112,156
..Sep..
120,051

....Oct...
...Nov...
...Dec...

(234 in.)

110,664

1865.

93,078

—

-

923,886

..Sep...

—

310.594
226,840

....Oct....
...Nov...

—

—

—

170.555
228.020

672,628...May..

—

140,418
186,747

106,689

113.399
168,218

...Aug...Sep...

(468 in.)

—

(251 m.)
$77,010

507,330... May

177,159

1866.

—

88.221

139,547

—

—

115,1:35

(234 m.)
$98,183
74,283
70,740

...July...

—

—

1804.

406,773..April..

224,838

$555,488.. .Jan...
678,504
474,7:38... Feb...
654,890... Mar...
857,583
606.078.. April..
733,866
637.186
646.995

(234 m.)
$102,749

212.209

$690,114

457,227
611,297

^

516.822...Mar...

641.589

..June..

■t—Pittsb.. Ft.W.«& Chicago.—*
1864.

7,960,981

r-Mil. and Prairie du Chien.-^
1866.
1865.
1864.

(524 m.)

—

6,114,566

•»

7,181,208

1865.

448,934

..Year..

1866.
(708 m.)
$582,823...Jan. :.
512,027... Feb.

518,088

Year..

563,401

—

643,887

(524 in.)

404,568

......Dec...

749,191
546,609

—

747,469
739,736

...Oct—

586,964
799,236
661,391

669,605
729,759
716,378

916,707

...Oct—
'.. Nov...

—

617.682
578.403

1864.

402.219

528,972
616,665
516,608

..June...

—

13,429,643 15,434,775
Mich. So. & N. Indiana.-)

358,862

(708 in.)
$571,5:36

$327,900
416,588

1,070,434... Mar...
1,153,295.. April..
1.101,668...May

—

278,891

1865.

767,508

...Aug...
....Sep...

—

mmois vcmraii

1866.

519.306

..July..

—

—

$523,566... Jan..
405,634... Feb..
523,744... Mar.,
518,730. .April.

747,942
702.692

—

(182 m.)
$158,735
175,482

(679 in.)

5S5.623

565,145
480,710

..June..

—

307,919
236,824

..

421,363
466,830

370,889.. April..
333,432... May...

355,270
335,985
409,250
401,280

307,803
252,015

—

(657 in.)

1,114,508
1,099,507

322,277

390,355

482,164
499,296
468,358

1865.

1864.

lbbo.

(609 in.)
$541,005

$273,875
317,839

304,885... Mar...

357,956

..

Aauwav.

1865.

258,480

...Nov...
Dec...

—

„

a

299,063

312,165
354,554
320,879

..

1864.

(609 m.)

(28P m.) (280 m.)
$280,503 $210,171.. Jan...
207,913 ..Feb...
275.282

...Oct...

—

6,568,068

396,847

(257 in.)
$100,991
154,418
195,803
162,723
178,786
206,090
224,257

(507 m.)

i—Chicago & Northwestern
1866.

»

1S66.

1865.

RAILROADS. and Rock Island.-)
-—Chicago

OF PRINCIPAL

MONTHLY EARNINGS

——Chicago and Alton.

—Atlantic & Great Western.-^
ISM}.

River

Burlington and Missouri

five months of the year compare as

earnings for the first

56,871

42,196

587,078

(157 in.)
$43,716
37,265
32,378

33,972
63,862
82,147
68,180
59,862

75,677
92,715
61,770
37,830

689,383

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—\

1866.

(177m.)
45102
6 006
3 299
43.333

86,913
—

—

—

—

—

—

—

June 23,

RAILROAD, CANAL,

and have

10jl
•

Periods.

standing.

fixed incomes.

Atlantic & Great Western
nreferred.
Atlantic & St Lawrence*
Baltimore and

FRIDAY.

out¬

leased roads,

aud^fLou

Alton

AND MISCELLANEOUS

Dividend.

Stock

Companies.

Marked thns (*) are

Last

p’d

Bid. Askd

153,000 Quarterly. Apr..l*

o0; 1^Jl«^0Uu!

55
108

100 2,494,900)
j .......
Ohio.,,...........10013 188,902) April and Oct Apr... 5
1,650,000 April and Oct; Apr...4

Washington
Bellefontaine Line

Branch*.. .100

128*

Feb. and Aug Feb.. 3

100 4,434,250
Belvidere, Delaware
100 997,112 Quarterly. Apr...l*
Berkshire*.
100 600,000 June & Dec. Dec. .2*
250.000
Blossburg and Corning*
50 8,500,000
Boston, Hartford and Erie
100 1,830,000 Jan. and July Jan .4
500 4,076,974 Jan. and July Jan .4
Boston and Lowell.
Boston and Maine
100 3,160,000 Jan. and July Jan .5
Boston and Providence
100j 4,500,000 Jan. and July Jan .5*
Boston and Worcester
100j 492.150
Brooklyn Central
100: 1.000,000 Feb. and Aug Feb.. 3)4
I" 366,000
Brooklyn City..
Brooklyn City and Newtown.. .100|
850.000 Jan. and July Jan...3*
Buffalo, New York, and Erie*..100 2,200,000 Feb. A Aug. Ee ..5
Buffalo and State Line
1001 4.988,1.80 Feb. and Aug Feb .10
Uamden and Amboy
1°0' 378,455
Camden and Atlantic
50 682,600

Companies.
Marked thus (*) are leased
and have fixed incomes.

preferred.. 50

do

00

Cape Cod

37
115

Mar. .5
Mar. .5

May .5

117
51
9

99

j*

162*
119*

100 4,390,000
.100 1,000,000
100 2,250,000
100 13,160,927 June A Dec June.. 3)4
do
do
pref. .100 12,994,719 April and Oct Apr.. .5
Chicago and Rock Island.......1()0 6,500.000
Cincinnati and Chicago Air LinelOO 1,106.125
Apr and Oct. Apr .4
Cincinnati, Hamilton A Dayton.100 3,000,000
Cincinnati and Zanesville
100 2,000,000 Feb. and Aug Feb..5
Cleveland, Columbus, ACincin.100 6,000,000 May & Nov. May.. 4
Cleveland & Mahoning*
50 1,036,000 Jan. and July Jan .5
Cleveland, Painesville & Ashta.100 5,000,000 Jan. and July Apr '66 4
Cleveland and Pittsburg
50 5,403,910 April and Oct Apr. ..8
Cleveland and Toledo
50 4,654,800 Quarterly. Mar..2)4
Columbus A Indianapolis Cent.100
Jan. and
Jan.. .5
Columbus and Xenia*.
50 1.490,800 May and July May.. 4
Nov
50 1.500,000 Jan. and July Jan... 3%
Concord
Concord and Portsmouth.
100 350,000
Coney Island and Brooklyn
100 500.000
Connecticut and Passumpsic.. 100
392,900 Jan. and
Jan.. .3
do
do
pref.100 1.255,200 Jan. and July Jan...4
July
Connecticut River
..j
100 1,591,100
Covington and Lexington..... .100 1,582,169
Lay'ton and Michigan
100 2,316.705 Jan. and July Jan.. .3
Delaware*
50 406,132 Jan. and July Jan.. .5
Delaware, Lacka., & Western .. 50 10,247,050
Des Moines Valley
100 1,550,050
Detroit and Milwaukee
100 952,350

Chicago and Great Eastern
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska*..
Chicago and Milwaukee*
Chicago and Northwestern

30

29*
5S*
95*

58*
95*

.

118

152"

.

84*
107

S4*
1 7*

67

70
104

.

v

do
do
Dubuque and Sioux
do
do
Eastern, (Mass)

pref.

City

pref.

147

Elmira, Jefferson, A CanandagualOO
50
Elmira and Williamsport*

100 1,900,000

Hannibal and St. Joseph

pref...100 5,253,836
Hartford and New Haven. ,.. .100 3,000,000
do

do

Kennebec and Portland (new). .100
Lackawanna and Bloomsburg.. 50

Lexington and

pref. 50

do

do

Lehigh Valley

50

Frankfort

Little Miami
oirtle Schuylkill*
Long Island

Louisville and Frankfort
Louisville and Nashville
Louisville, New Albany &
Macon and Western

50

50
50

50

do

do

500,000

Quarterly.
516,573 Feb. and Aug
Jan. and July
3,572,436
2,646,100 Jan. and July
1,852.715 Quarterly.
1,109,594 Feb. and Aug

New Haven, N. Loud., A Ston .100
New Haven and Northampton. .100
New Jersey
50
New London Northern
.
100
New York and Boston AirLine.100
New York Central
f.. .100

100'

35‘

111
16

112

1,447,060
2,022,484
6,205,404
3,819,771

1,000,000
6.491,336

61*
112

37*
60

4,395,800

5,000,000!

Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
Lancaster

Feb. and Aug Feb. .5

SO

71*

126

Morris"tconsolidated)
do
preferred

Feb..3
May.. 5

99

58*
72
59
87
110

Union
West Branch and

1,141.050

Jan. and

125

Jan.. .5)
Jan.. .2

July

317,050 January.

....

JnneandDec. June. 3

50

Miscellaneous.
Coal.—American

Quarterly.

Manhattan...

Metropolitan
New York

50

....-

2,000,000

Jan. and July

lo
100

July 20

Merchants’ Union.
United States

Wells, Fargo A Co...
Transit.—Central American

37

43**
45*

38*’
55*

145

58*
40*

59
41

100 3,000,000 Feb. and Aug
100 22,000,000 Quarterly.

.100'10,000,000

Feb.
53

Quarterly.

116

120

HI*
111*

115

220

100 4,000,000

100
100

#

Steamship.—Atlantic Mail

1,000.000
4,000,000

100 2,500,000
100 7,000,000
100 2, (XX), (XX)

New York
Pacific Mail
Union Navigation

123

Quarterly.

Quarterly.

June.

Trust.—Farmers’ Loan A Trust. 25 1,000,000 Jan. and July) Trm.. .4
New York Life A Trust.... 100 1,000,000 Feb. and AnejFeb. 15.
Union Trust
*..
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July ; July .4
United States Trust
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July Jan. 5
100 5,097.600
Mining.—Mariposa Gold

Saginaw L. S. A N. Y

41
45

60

600,000

2.500,000

500 3,000,000
100
100 6,000,000
100 2,000,000

.

67*

...

100 10.000,000

Express.— Adams

25

Jan...5

750.000 Jan. and Julv

2,000,000
25 1,000,000
100 1,000.0(X)

United States...,, /
Western Union
;
Western Union, Russ. Ex.

16

60

1.500. (XX) Feb.and Ang

10"

Cary (Boston)
.Telegraph.—American

33*

July..4

.

Jersey City A Hoboken

27*

Augl Feb.. 6-m

Aug!Feb. .6

100 2,175,000 Apr. and Oct Feb.
Feb. and Aug
loo 1.9M» one Feb. arid Aug Feb....
25 2,000,000
20 1,000.000 Jan. and July Jan.. .4
644, (XX)
50
20 1,000,000 Jan. and
July Jan...5
50 4,000.000
2,800,000
100
May....
50 1.000.000 May and Nov Jan... 5

(Brooklyn)

117*

Jan. and J uly' Jan... 5

loo
lo 1,000,000

Mariposa Gold Preferred
Quartz llill Gold

52*

Fel>. .5

r

Gas.—Brooklyn

American

153

iFeb. .5

50j
Jan.. .5
loot 2.000.000 Jan. and July
5,0<X).000
100|
Quarterly. Apr. .5
DO 3,200,000

Pennsylvania
Spring Mountain
Spruce Hill

Nicaragua

Feb. and
Feb. and

750,000

25

Cumberland

Williamsburg

53*
153

2.7S7.000

50

Feb. and Au<

Susquehanna.100 1,100,000

Rutland Marble

110

60

Quarterly."

750,000

100 1,175,000
13S.086
Pennsylvania and New York... 50
Schuylkill Navigation (consol.). 50 1,908,207
do
preferred. 50 2,888,805
Susquehanna and Tide-Water.. 50j 2,051,000

Quicksilver

...4

Irregular.

108*
79*
96

Feb. and Aug Feb..5

Feb.and Aug

109"

80*
57*

Feb. and Aug Aug. 3*
Jan. and July Jan.. .4
Feb. and Ang Aug. 3s.

41

•ii
108* 108*
54* 55*

Jan. and July Jnu.
050.000 Apr. and Get
869,450 Feb. and Aug Feb. .2

796,800
50
50 1,025.000 Feb. and Am

Brunswick City

38
Aug Feb .3*?
Aug Feb .3s
18
May and Nov May. .4
108
Jan. and July July. .5
Feb. and Aug Ang. .3* 79

54*

50 5,101.050 May and Nov! May..5

Lehigh Navigation...
Monongahela Navigation

Boston Water Power

27

259

Feb. .3
Division
50 1,633.350 Feb. and Aug Feb.10
and Hudson
100 10,000,01 W) Feb. and Aug
and Raritan
100 2,528,240iFeb.and Aug Feb. 10
200,000
and Susquehanna.... 50

Improvement.— Canton....

Feb. and
Feb. and

700,000

788,047
24,386,000

70

108*

862,571
576,050

25 1,550,363
25 8,228,595

Wyoming Valley
91

10

Feb. and Aug
Feb. and Aug

75

Wilkesbarre

Feb. and Aug Feb..3*

Feb. .4
Feb. .3*

Ill.)

Central

738,538

1,010,000

Western Uriion (Wis. A
Worcester and Nashua.

Ashburton

120* 120*

27*

i
South Carolina
100 5,819,275 ............
Syracuse, Binghamton A N. Y.100 1,200,130
Jan.. .6
Terre Haute A Indianapolis.... 50 1,929,150) Jan. and July
Third Avenue (N. Y.)
100 1,170,000; Quarterly.'
Toledo, Peoria, and Warsaw.. .100 1,700.000)
do
do
1st pref.100 1,700.000!
2d pref. 1001 1,000,000
do
do
35
j 36*
Toledo, Wabash and Western.. 50| 2,442,350 J tine and Dec i J une. 3
984,700! June and Dec; Dec. 3*
do
do
preferred. 50
am and J u 1
Tioga.*.
100; 125.000) J............v;! Jan,.. 3*
100 607,111!
Troy and Boston
Troy and Greenbush*
100 274,400) June and Dec! Dec ..3*
Utica and Black River
1001 811,560 Jab. and J uly j Jan . .4
98* 1U0
Vermont and Canada*
100; 2,860,000i June and Dec Dec ..4
50
2.860.OOo!Jan. and July Jan...2
Vermont and Massachusetts... .100:
1.408.300: Jan. and J uly j Jan.. .3
50!
Warren*
135
Western (Mass)... 1
.100 5,627,700 Jan. and July; Jan.. .6

Wyoming Valley

Apr.. 2)4
Feb...2
Jan.. .5
Jan...3
Feb. .2
Feb. .2

100 2,400.000
Mine Hill & SGhuylkill Haven.. 50 3,708,200
Morris and Essex
50 3,000,000
May. .4
600,009 May and Nov Feb..7
Nashua and Lowell
100
Feb. and Aug
Naugatuck
100 1,100,000 June and Dec Dec..4
New Bedford and Taunton
100
500,000




32

100 1,500,000 Apr and Oct April.3

2d pref.100 1.014,000
100 1,000,000

New York and New Haven

11C

77

354.866

do*
do
pref.100
Sandusky, Mansfield A NewarklOO
Schuylkill Valley*
50
Second Avenue (N. Y.)
100
Shamokin Valley A Pottsville*. 50
Sixth Avenue (N. Y.)
100

Citizens
Harlem

6,632,250

Michigan Southern and N. Ind..l00 SL381,800
do
guaran.100 1,089,700
do
Milwaukee and Prairie Du ChienlOO 3,014,000
do
1st pref.100 3,082,000
do
.

-

58*
73*

835,000

50
100 5,527,871
Chic.100 2.800,000

McGregor Western*
100
100
Maine Ceutral
Marietta and Cincinnati
50
1st pref. 50
do
do
2d pref.. 50
do
do
Manchester and Lawrence
100
Michig ta Central
100

Milwaukee and St. Panl
do
preferred

45

April. 3

Jan..
Jan. and July Apr.. .4
5
100 6,563,250 April and Oct
494,380
Huntingdon and Broad Top *... 50
Jan.. .3)4
do
pref. 50
do
190,750 Jan. and July Feb. .5
Illinois Central
100 23,374,400 Feb.and Aug Mar. .4
Indianapolis and Cincinnati
50 1,689,900 Mar. A Sep. Jan.. .3
Indianapolis and Madison
100 412,000 Jan. and July Jan.. .4
do
do
pref..100
407,900 Jan. and July
Jefiersonville
50 1,997,309
Joliet and Chicago*
100 1,500,000 Quarterly. Apr...i*
do
preferred
Hudson River

29

65

Quarterly.

100
820,000
.100 1,180,000

Housatonic

105

73

26*

ChicagolOO

Canal.

58*

38*;
103

i

50 1,774,623!

Chesapeake and Delaware
Chesapeake and Ohio

Quarterly. Apr.
Feb. and Aug Feb.. 2)4
Jan. and July

.

2,333,000® Jan. and July j July. .5

Wrightsville,YorkA Gettysb'g* 50

Mar 7#..
Alarch
Jan. and July Jan.. 4

100 1,000,000
500,000
500,000 Jan. and July Jan.. .3)4
do
500,000 Feb. & Aug. Feb.. 4
do
pref... 50
Erie
-.
100 16,570,1 Feb. A Aug. Feb. .3)4
do preferred...
100 8.535.71 Feb. A Aug. Feb..5
Erie and Northeast*
60 600,000 Jan. and
Jan.. .4
*
Fitchburg
100 3.540,000 April andJuly Apr .5
Oct
St. A Grand St. F’y.100
750,000
Forty-sec’d

Eighth Avenue, N. Y*

150

100 1,500,000

100 1,751,577
100 1,982,180
100 3,155,000

94
45

98*
9,312,442 Quarterly. )Apr..2* 98* 1UU
1,500,000 June and Dec) June. 3
Portland, Saco, A Portsmouth .100
124
Providence and Worcester..... .100 1,700,000 Jan. and July) Jan.. .4
2,360,700
100
Raritan and Delaware Bay
800,000 A p ri 1 an d Oct! A pr.. .4* \
Rensselaer A Saratoga consol . .100
Apri
3
and Whitehall
100 500,000 April1 and Oct! Apr....3
Saratoga
and Oct!
Troy, Salem A Rutland
100 800,000 Jan.and July Apr..
July..5
Rome, Watertown A Ogdeush'glOO 1,774,175
Rutland and Burlington
.100 2,2:33,376
32
30
St. Louis, Alton, A Terre IlauteloO 2.300,000
61* 63
Annually. jMay. .7
do
do
pref.100 1,700,000
St. Louis, Jacksonville A Chic*100
Sandusky, Dayton, and Cincin. .100 2,939,090 Feb.and Aug Feb.. 3

Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne &

27*

Apr.. .2*
July. .2)4

.*.

3.008,400 May and Nov

.100) 3,077,000
100 19,822,85'

Pittsburg andCounellsville

1115

70

1,508,000) Quarterly. |Apr...3

May3A1.i
4.518,900; Quarterly. -Apr. .2
50{ 3,150,150!
)..

: 29

631,605 Jan. and July July.. 3*

50 1,150.000 Feb. A Aug.
do
preferred
50 2,200,000 Quarterly."
100 10,685,940
New Jersey
Ceutral of Nt
Jan. and July
Cheshire (preferred)
100 2,085,925
Chester Valley*
50 871,900 Mar and Sep.
Chicago and Alton
100 1,783,200 Mar and Sep.
do
preferred
100 2,425,400 May & Nov.
Chicago Burliugton and Quincy.100 8,376,510

Catawissa*

5,085,050
1,500,000 Jan. and 3 uly Jan... 4
795,360

Ask.

Last p'd. Bid.

Periods.

Mississippi
Jan.. 7
do
preferred. .100 2,950,500 January.
Old Colony and Newport.. .., .100 3,009,000 dan.and July: Jan...4
482.400 Feb. and Aug j Feb. .4
Oswego and Syracuse
50
Panama (and Steamship).
100 7,000.000 Quarterly.' (Apr..6
50 20,Ov0.UOt>iMay and Nov) May. .5
Pennsylvania
(
218,100
Philadelphia and BaltimoreCentlOO
Philadelphia and Erie*
50 5,069,451) Jan. and July) Jan...3
Philadelphia and Reading ...... 50 20,240,673 J; n and July; July..5
Phila., Germant’n, & Norrist’n* 50 1,476,300 Apr. and Oct;Apr. .4
Phila., Wilmington & Baltimore 50 3,973,300i Quarterly. (July..5

.

129

outstanding,

New York and Harlem
50;
do
nreferred
50 i
New York Proviuence&BostonlOU
Ninth Avenue
100;
Northern of New Hampshire.. .100;
Northern Central
50!
North Pennsylvania
Norwich and' Worcester...?
100

101
122
135
141

.

FRIDAY.

Dividend.

j Stock

roads,)

Ohio and

.

'

STOCK LIST.

Ogdensburg A L. Champlain..

.

do

793

THE CHRONICLE.

1866.]

.

.100 5,774,400
25 1,000,000

10,000,000 Jan. and July
25 1,000,000 Jan. and July
25 2,500,000

100

Smith & Parmelee Gold..... 20

2,500,000

Jan.. .5

124

205

225

125

10*

U*
23

50*

5i‘‘

[June 23, 1866,

CHRONICLE.

THE

794

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST.
INTEREST.

DESCRIPTION.

N. B.—The sums placed aft r
name of Company shews the
Funded Debt.

butstand-j
ing. !

the
total

^

:|

|

j
j

Baltimore and Ohio ($10.112,5S4):

do

do

• • •

1855.,
1850
1853

do
do
do

do

!
!

do

uo

do
(I. P. AC.)
2d
do
do
Belvidere he raw are ($2,103,000':
1st Mort. (guar. C. and A
do
2d Mort.
'3d Mort.
do
1st

Blossburg and Corning ($150,000':
Mortgage Bonds
Boston, Cone. A Montreal ($1.050,000k
1st Mortgage
do

1st

do

($100,000):

Mortgage Bonds

Buffalo. N. Y. and Erie
1st Mortgage

($2,395,000):

2d Mortgage

Buffalo and State Line ($1.200,000):
Mortgage

Camden and Amboy ($10,204,403):
Dollar Loans
Dollar Loan
Consoldated ($5,000,000) Loan
Camden and Atkin tic ($983,000):

Mortgage

Central of New Jersey

($1,509,000):

E. Div

Mortgage (Skg Fund), prof
do
do

income

Chic.. Burl, and

Quincy ($5,924,969):
(S. F.) convert....

Trust Mortgage
do
‘

do

ineouvert..

Bonds, (dated Sept. 20. I860)

Chicago and Gt. Eastern ($5,000,000):
1st Mortgage
Chicago and Milwaukee ($2.000,1)00):

Mortgage (consolidated)
Chicago A Northwest. ($12,020,483):
Preferred Sinking Fund
1st

1st

Mortgage

Interest Bonds

Consol. S. F. Bonds, couv. till 1870
Extension Bonds
Chicago A Rock Island ($1.44S.00O):
1st

650,000
6

1,000.000

1807

J’ne A Dec.

589,500) 0

do

1st

|

7

300.000

do

I

400,000 6

Mortgage
Cleveland. Col. and Cine. ($491,500):
1st Mortgage
Cleveland A Mahoning ($1,752,400):
1st
2d

* l

J’ne &

2,000,01 H) 7
380,000 7

! May A

do
do

3d

400,000 j 7

Sunbury and Erie Bonds
Cleveland A Pittsburg ($3,880,S4S):
2d Mortgage.

convertible
do
do
Cleveland and Toledo ($2,014,400):
Sinking Fund Mortgage
Connecticut River ($250.000):
3d
4th

;

.

490.000 7 jJan. & Julv

j

909.(HM)i
909.O00; 7
,!
000,000 7

Feb. A Aug

Feb. A Aug

1890
1890

!•-

...

102

1870

90

j

jM'cllA Sep 1865

0 Jan. A

j

I

!

i

96%
S7>; j

1

3d

D io ware < $50*3,000):
l«t Mortgage, guaranteed
De:a.. Jjacka. A Western ($3.491,500)
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
do
24
.

Lackawanna and Western




April A Oct lSSl
Jan. & JulyjlSS3

94

7

G

jJan. A July 1883

90

927,000!

6

!Feb. A Aug 1S83

1,037,500
1,000,000

7
6

I

1,250.000 7 i Feb. A Aug 1885
do
188.5
3,600,0(H) 7 1
756.000 7 (May A Nov. 1863
2.0(H).(HH) 7

48-1,000 7

9114
80

1S77

;Feb. A Aug

1.907,000)

7
0
7

I

192.000:

„

7

1870
1809
1885
1875
1807

Feb. A Aug 1885

-Tan. A Julv 1870

379.000

7

I

7

104

102

! May A Nov. 1880

do

1,300,000

;

May A

1867

1st

1,108,124
2,205,0(H)

7

1,619,500

109,500

8

1st

102,5(H)

8 ;
7
7 !

500,000

0

642 (Hh

87%
75

I

70

1

May A Nov.

1SS1

July 1S82

800,000

Jan. A

July

1574

800,000
230,000
250,000

April A Oct
do
do

1870
1801
1802

903,000

1,000,000

May A Nov.
Jan. A July

1872
1869

1,465,000

May A Nov.

1873

May A Nov

1883

900,000

April A Oct

1877

500,000
225,000

Jan. A

...

do

....

Mortgage

s

300,560

...

300,000

93

*72

Feb. A Aug 1892
May A Nov. 1888

1,000,000

1885

2,091,293
.

Mortgage

92%

Feb. A Aug 18S3
1883
do

1,804,000

Memphis Branch Mortgage

98

July 1870
May A Nov. 1890

($3,297,000):

$1.1-0,000 Loan Bonds
$ 100.000 Loan Bonds
1st Mortgage (P.& K.RR.) Bonds..
2d
.do
(
do
) Bonds..

91^

Milwaukee A: Prairie du Chien
1st

Mortgage,

1st

2d

100

1G2

99*

102

Apr. A Oct. 74-‘75

399,000

Feb. A Aug.

80

1874

Ang 69-72

Feb. A

4,328,gp0

April A Oct

4

May A Nov.

1882

1885
1877
do
Feb. A Aug 1868

402,000

Jan. A

855,000

110

95% 97
91

loo’

:

sinking fund.

July 1891

:

4,600,000
1,500,000

Mortgage
do

1st
do
Oskaloosa
1st Land Grant Mortgage
2d
do
do
do

Morrhs and Essex :
1st Mortgage, sin king

081,000

2.253.500

Mississippi and Missouri River:
1st Mortgage, convertible
2d
do
sinking fund

July 1875

314,100

671,000

do
2d
Goshen Air Line Bonds

Milwaukee and St. Paul

Feb. A Aug. ’90-'90 75
June A Dec; *70-’71

1,092,900

2.230.500

Sinking F’nd do
.
Michigan South, cb North. Indiana:
1st Mortgage, sinking fund

Jan. A July 1807
do
1881
do*
18—
do
18—

7 Jan. A July 1875
000,000 7 (M’ch A Sep; 1881
900.000 7 'Jan. A July 1871

1,500,000

104

|Jan. A July 1806

Jan. A

500,000-

($1,280,000):

Michigan Central:
Dollar, convertible
I103X

-J

Jan. A

103*

Marne Central:

| Jan.

283.000 S

2,655.500-

640,000) 7

80

'

($3,011,293):
Mortgage,
Scioto and Hocking Valley mort
McGregor Western :

Feb. A Aug) 1880
1874
do

M’cli A Sep 1873
do
1875
Jan. A July 1892

7

100

1875
1890

1,300,000

.

97*

187,000- 7 April A Oct 1573

1st

i

7
7
0

^

ioi"

Jan. A July 1866
1870
do

7

Marietta A Cincinnati

Feb. A Aug 1873‘
M’ch A Sep 1804
do
1875

1,129,000

500,000

1S75

do
do

3ti4,OOOio

.

Extension Bonds
Louisville arid Nashville
1st Mortgage

July, 1890

900,000) 7
500,000 ! 7

600,000,

Mortgage

Nov)1893

April A Oct

2,503,000j 0

,

.

103

iMay A Nov 1870
-Feb. A Aug 1875

7
0

2,890,500)

($960,000):
sinking fund
Long Island ($932,000):

-

Jan. A

491,500

1st

do

0

Little Schuylkill
1st Mortgage,

t

do
J’ne A Dec

May A Nov.

500,000 0

0,837,000)

Lehigh Valley ($1,477,000):
1st Mortgage
Little Miami ($1,400,000):

j Quarterly. 1915

7

do

1876
1870

523,000,

.

($1,903,000):
Mortgage, Eastern Division....

2d

do

!

5(H),000)

mortgage

1st

|

-Jan. A July

.-

Kennebec and Portland
1st Mortgage
2d
do
3d
do
La Crosse A Milwaukee

5,000,000) 7 j Ap'l A Oct. 1895
I
!
!
2,000,000! 7 jJan. A July 189S

-Jan. A July

G

110,000

Joliet and X. Indiana
1st

•

Ap’l A Oct. 1904
j
do
) 1904

Toledo Depot Bonds

7

3,890,000;

Mortgage, sinking fund........
($800,000):

1st

July|lS70

7

,

sinking fund......

97

April A Oct ISOS
Jan. A July:lS65

191,000)

id Mortgage
\ Joliet and Chicago ($500,000):

161,000 8

do
do

-,,,

100
90

700,000!

\jeffe rsom'ille\ $621,000):
'

90

.

633,000(

~

do

.

3,437,750;

Indianapolis and Cine. ($1,362,284):
1st Mortgage
Indian aixAis A Madison ($040,000):
1st Mortgage

!

May A Nov.-1877
2.400.0(H), 7 Jan. A July 1893 ‘
1,100,000 7 i Ap'l A Oct. 1883
!
i
407.000 S 1 Jan. A July 1883
do
3.167.0(H)! 8 !
1883
680,000 7 M'ch A Sep 1890
519.0(H) 7

92

Julv|'75-'80

Mortgage Bonds

2d

Jan. A

Mortgage

2d

\

....
....

91&

90

1,350,000;

1st
1st

J’ne A Dec. 1876

do

G

1,000,000

($13.231.000):
Mortgage, convertible..
do
Sterling.
97%
Redemption bonds
Indiana Central ($11.254.500):
1st Mortgage, convertible

^

800,000

do

927,000

do
2d
Illinois Central

May A Nov 1S75
M

| 95

Aug!lSS2

.

250,000

Dayton and Michigan ($3,782,430):
1st Mortgage.

1st

,

100

jl09%!

May A Nov. 4875

Huntington A Broad Top($1,436,082):

Cumberland Valley ($270,500):
1st
2d

Feb. A

7

.

Mortgage

Convertible.

1879
Aug11882

A Oct.

A July 1885, 101
M’ch A Sep! 1878

Mortgage

do
do
do

2d
3d

1873

Conn, and
1st,

7

1,963,000;
1,086,000'

1st Mortgage
Hudson River ($17,7*7.680):
1st Mortgage
1st

97

July.1870

\lIousatonic’($191,000):

Aug 1883
May A Nov. 1889
J'lfe A Dec. 1893

6

Jan. A

149,000; 7

IF.)

,

Feb. &

96

3,816,582) 6 M’ch A Sep 1875

Hartford A New Haven ($927,000):
1st Mortgage
I Ilartf. Lvov. A Fishldll ($1,936,940):
1st Mortgage
; 2d
do " sinking fund

Pdssurnpsic R. ($250,000):
Mortgage
'

let

do
1883
0.000.000 7 i
4.441,000: 7 April A Oct 1880
926,500! 7 IJuue A Dec 1888

New Dollar Bonds... .*

Dec.11877
Nov 1872,

!

1.700.000 6

Cte.’\, Pain. A Ashtabula ($1.500,000):
Dividend Bonds

3,000,0091 7 , May A Nov. 1876
4,000,000' 7 M’ch A Sep;1879

Harrisburg A Lancaster ($700,000):

95

Jan. A July:"09-'72
do
-1870

7

598,000; 7 Ap’l & Oct.ilSSS

Convertible Bonds.

98%

1879

Ap’l A Oct. 1866

500,000! 7

867.0(H)!
4,269,400

!

96

1,000,000, 7 Jan. A July 1873

Mortgage West. Division

Land Grant

1889

'

850,000 7
244.200 7
648.200 8

Mortgage

j

do
East.
do
Hannibal A St. .Joseph ($7,177.000):

1870
1870

Jan. & Julv

!

1st

Cincinnati <f* Zanesville ($1,300,000) :
1st

|

420.000 5

Mortgage, sinking fund
do
do

Mortgage
Great Western, lit. ($2,350,000):

" 1865

do

do
11894
'
'Jan. A July 1872
739,200 6 ,Feb. A Aug,lS74
1
i
i

600,000 7

j Grand .Junction ($927,000):

I8d>

Feb. & Aug

200,(HH) 6 i

2d

!

150,000) 0 ^ May & Nov. 1871
j
!

1,249,(HH)

Cine., Ham. <0 Dayton ($1,629.000):
1st Mortgage

-

....

Feb. & Aug 1877

|

■

1

■

Sterling convertible
Erie and Nor theast ($149,600):
Mortgage
\Gal. A Chic. U. (incl. in C. AN.

'500,000) 0 M’eli A Sep 1885

03

7 Jan. A Julv 1803

300.000

Mortgage, convertible
do
do

!■'

do

347,000

<

7:44,000 7 Feb. A Augjl876

..

116.000

1,397,000

Mortgage

2d

368.000
422.000

000,000!

Mortgage Bonds

Chicago and Alton ($3,619,000):
2d

2,500,000 6

S00,000| 7

Cheshire ($600,000):

1st
1st

700.900; )i

800.000, 7 !MaV A Nov

Mortgage W. Div

2d

($734,000):
1st Mortgage
Dubuque and Sioux City ($900,000):
I 1st Mortgage, 1st section.'
do
j 1st
2d section.
'.Eastern, Mass. ($1,798,600):

j

JO

£

\ 2,500.000 7 May A Nov.:lS75
j 1,000,000) 8 j
|1864
do

j East Pennsylvania ($598,000):
97%) 98
t
Sinking Fund Bonds
JaApJuOc 1807
92>; 94 VElmira A Williamsjrort ($1,000,000)
,Jail. A Julv 1875
92% I 94 jj 1st Mortgage
do
* 1880
.
I Ap'l A Oct. 1885
92% j 94 j Erie Railway ($22,370.982):
!! 1st Mortgage..............
do
2d
convertible
Jan. A July I860
.
A
3d
do
do
V70--79!
4 tli
do
convertible
1870
.
do
5th
do
do
do
1870 !.

450,000! 7

Central Ohio ($3.673.000):

($3.500,000):

Mortgage, convertible

|

|

H3

Ap'l & Oct.4887
348,000! 7 J'ne & Dec.,1874

do
2d
Detroit. Monroe A Toledo

!

~

do

do
do

1st

9SS,00d! 6 j Ap’l & Oct. 18)>6 j .. J
484,000j 0 ) May A Nov. 1878 . :.. . J
1.128,500; 6

II

Payable.

!$1,740.000

\

Mortgage Bonds

Income Bonds
Detroit and Milwaukee

1881

141,000 7 'Feb. A

Mortgage

1st.
1st

7

493,000 7 | Ap’l

do

Catawissa ($141,000):
1st Mortgage
1st
2d

7

200.000

Income
Erie and Northeast

1st
2d

<

1876
do
Jan. A July 1883

200,000 6 !

Sinking Fund Bonds
Boston and Lowell

1st

7

250.000 7 Jau. A Julv
100.000 6 1
do
‘

‘do

2d
2d

5

na

187*

do
do

7

j 1.000.000; 6

Beliefon tairte Line ($2,037,550):
1st Mortgage <B. A 1.) convertible.
1st
do
do
extended...
2d

B.—The sums placed after the outstande of Company shows the total;
ing.
Funded Debt.

Ctl

7 Ap'l * Oct. 18-4
7 i
do
1884
| 13,858,000 7 i
do
1895

Sterling Bonds

Mortgage (S. F.) of 1S04

'C

FRIDAY.

■S.2

.

Amount

N.

•si1

' Payable.

7 Ap'l & Oct. 1877
1882
-do
7
1882
do
7

Mortgage, sinking fund, (Ha.) $2,500,000!
do
do
; 1,000.000Franklin Branch
do
528.000)
,
1st Mortgage, sinking fund, („V. FI)
1.014,000)
800,000
2d
do
do
1st Mortgage, sinking fund, (Ohio)| 4,000,000!
2d
do
do )s 4.000.000 !
1st Mortgage S’k’g Fund (Buff, exjj 2,000,000)
1st
do
300.000j
S’k'g FundiSilv.Creek j
1st

2d

INTEREST.

|

Railroad :
Des Moines Valley ($2,088,000):

Rati road :
Atlantic A Gt. Western ($30.000.000):!

Consolidated Bonds
AtUmtic A St. Lawrenee($ 1,472,000)
Hollar Bonds

DESCRIPTION.

2 *2

I
£

FRIDAY.

*->

Amount

fund.^.^

Jan. A
7

July! 1893
April A Oct:1893

1,000,000! 7 Jan.

\
400,000, 8
590,000! 7
3,612,000 7 May
695,000! 7

92

92

&July'l875

do
do

1876

do

1883

JS76
A Nov. 1877

3.500,000' 7 May & Nov. 1915

60

92%

June

795

THE CHRONICLE.

23,1866]

LIST (continued).

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS BOND
Amount

.placed after the name o outstand: a;
ing.
Company show the total Fundee
3
Ps

The sums

Princpa payble.

Payable.

Debt.

Railroad:

$500,001

Mortgage

1st

New Jersey: “
Fpi ry "Ri^iid« of 1R53
New London Northern:

Feb. &

1,500,000 6

Jau. A

July !

2.500.000

jJan. &AJulv
April
Oct

j

220,7(X

1,000,000 6
500.U00

•

7

7
6

Jan. &

•

•

•

.

,

;

. . . .

....

2d

i

I

92
96

.

Troy Union

....

....

1st

93

93*

April A Oct

1870

do
Feb A Aug.

1875
1872

119 8(H)

292,500
408,000
182 4(H)

2,856,600
106 000
1 521 (XX)

....

April it Oct

%

98

I

1

Guaranteed (Baltimore) Bonds

Jan. &

April A Oct
April A Oct
April it Oct

1877
18S1
1901

....

5
5
6
6
6
6

Jan. A

do

7

do
do
do
do

6

May A Nov.

692,000

6

Jan. «t

6

Feb. it

Aug 1889

5 200 000 7
5 160 000 7
2 000 000 7
’200’000 •7

2d
do
ft
3d
do
Akron Branch: 1st mortgage

Pittsburg and Steubenville:

1 000 OX)

1 st. Morti'nw

500’(X)0

2d
do
Racine and

....

7
7

Semi

an

Ally

do

April it Oct,

! Jan.

! Feb.

!

A Julv

1,438,000

8

Raritan and Delaware Bay :

1912
1912
1912
1884

it An"
do
«t Julv

1S75

1879

400.000 7 I May & Nov.
d >
340.000 7
do
*
500,000 7 I

o

Reading and Columbia:
1st Mortgage
RiV.sselaer <& Saratoga consolidated :
ltd Mort. Rensselaer A Saratoga .
1st Mort. Saratoga A Whitehall....
1st. Mort Troy S A, Rut (cninr)
Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg:
1st Mortgage (Potsdam A Watert.)
2d
do
(
do
do )
1st
do
(Watertown & Rome)
2d
do
do )
(
do

800,000

1

!

800,000 7 Jun. & Dec.
do
200,000 7

•

•

i

.

«

.

1

uo int- haid lS6o j

Sacramento Valley:
1st Mortgage

2d
do
St. Louis, Alton and Terre
1st Mortgage
do ° preferred

!

j

1,800.000
937,500

7
7

1863

2,200,00(J
2,800,000)

7
7

1,700,000!

7

Feb. &

8emi

....

j

•

....

96

....

33*

1861

& Doe

|Jan. & July ! 1883
1876

j

iFeb. & Aug

....

93*

93
»oo

1

'

1S75

.....

1873
1878

•

V

*

4

fr

•

»

»

•

•

April & Oct '68-'71
do
1875
Jan. & Julv ’66-’76
June & Dec D'm'd

*

....

76

80

96*

1890
1890

Jan. & .uly
do

2.000,000 6 -Ja Ap Ju Ot
do
4,375.000 5

96*
...»

1870
1890
1885

6

1,699,500

•

•

•

.

800,000

Jan. A

July 1878

7

Mch A

Sept

....

^

.

»

1S70

752.000 7 Jan. A Jirtv
do
161,000 6

....

6

641,000

1865
1868

6

Jan. A

July

1876

April & Oct

1876

b

May & Nov.

1876

o

750,000
,

590,000

94

80

1870
1884

6

182,000

■->

Mch & Sept
do

6

414.158

2,667,276

.-

....

...»

91

90

—

0 Mch A
Sept 1872
6 Jail. A Julv 1882
980,670
586,500 6 May A Nov. 1870

1,764,330
3

^

1,160.000
325,000
.

t)

2,500,000

.

_

Jan. A Jnlj | 1865
do
187S
do
1864

6
6

SS

82

•

i

•

o

1.000,000

Union (Pa.):
1st Mortgage

May & Nov.
'

|

•

« A

100

60*

60
90

1883

95

24

j

25

*

!

West Branch and
1st

*

-

.

....

Susquehanna:

Mortgage

6

450,000

;

Wyoming Valley:

Jan. &

£

750,000

Mortgage

1878

f

tf.

:

1

Jan. A

July: 1S78

Jan. A

Julyi

1

*

Julyj

85

SO

Miscellaneous:

....

'

j

1st Mortgage Bone's
ila nposa Min ing:

....

....

....

.

lsVMortgage
2d
1st

88

86

i
...

.

.1
-!

90
81

1894

74

8

600.000
-

600 006

Jan. &

Jan. & July

j

•

>

•

•

let
2d

1

84
•

•

•

•

Mortgage

Feb. A

7

Aug; 1871

|

V

do

Western Union
1st Mortgage

1881

i

Quicksilver Mining ;
^

Telegraph:

_..

500,000
500,000

2,000,000

•

*

»

»•

*

#

|

1

•

•

-j

•

j

....

j

1894

•

Mortgage

»

•

•

•

July! 18— 1
April A Oci; -.8-1

7
7

1,500,000
2,000,000

.T

do

1884

I

”

Pennsylvania Coal:
1st Mortgage

40"

7

....

Mississippi (Roch I.) Bridge:

Aug 1.881

an’ally 1894
do
d>

•

....

1886

Maryland Loan.?
Coupon Bonds
Priority Bonds,

1862
1871

& Ang 1863
do

«...

jJan. & Julv i 1867

July

Cincinnati and Covington Bridge :
1874

186-3
1867

Jan. A

2,3S2,109

Improvement

....

j1

6

500,000

....

do

87>-

...

....

....

1871
1877

Mortgage (North Branch)

2d

1st

1
400,000:10 Jan. A July 1875
329,000 10

Haute:

! Feb.

1 st

97

.

t

....

lSS'7
1885
;Mav & Nov. ! 1875
1
!Mar. & Sep. 1882

-Jan. A Julv
do

1st Mortgage

100

....

76

74

1

Apr. A Oct.

6
6

Schuylkill Navigation :

...

....

175, (HX1 6 Mav A Nov. 1870
25.000

Mortgage Bonds
Pennsylvania d; New York:

123,(HH) 7 ! Mch A Sept
do
1880
800,(HM) 7 i

Rutland and Burlington:

6

200,(HX)

Mono)>gahela Navigation:
Mortgage Bonds

1890
1890
1880

7
7
7

6

596,(XX)

.•

Loaii of 1871
1 o in of 1SS4

1881
1881

i Mch & Sept

110 000

....

• o

1 Mob

.

Susquehanna and Tide-Water:

1888
1888
1876

7

5
6
6
6

Morris'.

A Sept
do
do

1,000,000
250,000

Mortgage, sinking fund

...

! Jan.

7

1,(HX).(XX)
150,000

Lehigh Navigation : ($3,081,434).

!

Mississippi:
Mortgage

S

4,319,520
850,000

Mortgage, sinking fund

1868

.

1875
1865
1874

7 jJan. & July
654,908 J 8 April & Oct

do

Erie of’Penhsylrania:
1st Mortgage Bonds
Interest Bonds
7

July 1884

400,000

....

399,300

...

Cent.):

Preferred BoiulsV
Delaware Division :
1st Mortgage
Delaware and Hudson:

1867
1880
1870
93>4 95
1871
1880
91
90
1880
10S
1.886 107
1886

April & Oct
Jan. A July

90*

Canal

90* 91*

1865
1885

....

^

Chesapeake and Delaware:
1st Mortgage Bonds
Chesajyeake and Ohio :
Maryland Loan
Sterling Bonds, guaranteed

96

Jan. & July
do

.

.

'

v

Mortgage

....

6
6

July

6

600,000

...

1st
2d

7
o
6

7

550,600

Mortgage
A' Verm. & Can. Bonds

I

1876

.

H-*

»

.

103
....

t

•

....

7 'June

1

1,135,000

102

July

17

2,(HH).(XX

Mortgage..

,

«...

.

I

1st
do
guaranteed
York if’ Cumberland (North.

....

.

'

500.000: 6 IJan. A Julv
do
180. (XX 6

1880
1875
1875

258,000

Mortgage

:

Jan. A Julv

oo’ooo

Pittsburg and Connellsrille:
1st Mort. (Turtle Cr. Div.)
P'b'g, Ft. W. and Chic.: ($573,500)

200,000

75

do

!7

650,(XK)i 7

1S84

976.8(H)
564 (XX) 6

Mortmain* T.oan

300.0(H)

7

000,000
5,000,000
4,000,000

Philadelphia and Trenton:
1st Mortgage
Philadel., T\ liming. & Baltimore:

152.355

3(H) (HH)

6
0

1

Valley Bonds, convertible

1,500.000|

Albany and W. Stockbridge Bonds.
Hudson and Boston Mortgage ...
Western Maryland:
1st Mortgage

....

.

.

....

do
7
7
do
7 IJau. & Julv

600,(XX)

Sterling (£899.9(H)) Bonds...
.

1876

1,(XX),0(H) 7 May A Nov.

2d
do
,
registered....
Western (Mass.):

i

1871
*

900.0(H): 7 Feb. & Aug 1865
18S4
do
2.500.0(H): 7

!

Mortgage (guaranteed)
Westchester and Philadelphia:
1st Mortgage (convert.) Coupon

.

1

June & Deci 1894

7

Verm. XVn
Warren :

1916

.

....

July! 1870

7 !Jan. &

’

do
(no interest)
2d
Vermont and Massachusetts /

•*

•

iMch & Sept 1866
1

j 7

1,391.OCX

Mortgage Bonds
do ^
do
Vermont Central:

_

„

•

t

!

2d
do
3d
do
Convertible

97

|

j

1,180,000

Equipment bonds
Troy and Boston:

90.J*

93
•,

do

•

.

1-

Sinkin" Fund Bonds.

90

j 96

94,(HX

(Toledo and Wabash!
(Wabash and Western)..

do

•

•

.

•

•

•

i

j
1,400, (XX !I 7 April & Oct

1st Mort mure

2d

Aug 1S72

200,000 7 Jan. & Julv

York.

Toledo, Peoria and Warsa w :

»1>4 | 86

T

:

Mortgage

1st Mortgage
Toledo and TT abash : ff
1st Mort. (Toledo & Wabash)
1st do
(extended)

-

Dollar Bonds of 1849
dr»
do
1861
do
do
1313-4-3-9
Sterlin" Bonds of 1843
Dollar Brands convertible




•

•

1867

Feb. &

1

6

575,000

do

income

|
....

.

July *72-'87

Mch A

4

2,621, (XX)
2/283,840

Sterling Bonds of 1836

do

.

•

....

....

2,0(H),(XX)! 5 jJan. & Julv 1866
1,070,000) 5 ! Various. * ! 68-74

Sept

1,029,000

Philadelphia and Reading:

I

.

•

1875

,

—

Dollar Bonds.

rv

Philg.de!Ceruiant. <f: Norristown:
Consolidated Loan
Convertible Loan

d(T

....

Jan. & July '70-’S0

1,150.0(H)

(general)
(general)

July

June & Dec

7

|'7
700,000 7

gVftfi jjatje and Indianapolis ■
1st Mort mure, convertible
*1 Third Avenue (N. Y.):

|
.

1872
1874

May & Nov.

416. (HX) 4
( 346.1XM) 7

sterling
Philadelphia and Baltimore Central:
1st Mortgage
Philadelphia and Erie:
1st Mart<we (Sunbury A Erie)....

5rif

Jan. & July
do

1,139,000

,

__

April & Oct 1869

225,(XX)

Mo

Jan. &

j

1st

4,980,000

Mortgage \

July 1874
Aug 1870

350,000

do^ °

1st
2d

„

1873
1873
1885
1885

7

O.)

Mortgage

1bt

_

750,000

Mortgage

2d
do
Convertible Bonds

|

•

.

-

75

1900
1875

500,000

,

Syracuse, Binghamton and New
i
1st Mortgage

....

1st

2,900.000

Pennsylvania:

do

Jan. A July
do
do
do

7
7

rv

rlo

.

1S74
1880
1887

do

-Tan. A
Feb. A

7

1,494,000

Mortgage, sterling
do
do
2d
do
do
Peninsula (Chic. & N. W.):

1st

6

300,000

1st
1st

1st.

6

500,000

Panama:

do

)■

;
6

100,000 7

;

1885

i

{if. IF. Branch):

do

1st

..

10,2

irred. j

April & Oct I

10

1,500,000

Mortgage

do

.

|

6

3(H) (HH

OAvego and Syracuse:

Lebanon

6

i

2,500,(XX

Oswego & Rome ($350,000).
1st Mortgage (guar byR. W. A

1st
2d

6

i

Champlain

May & Nov

1,290,(XX)

:

•

Aug, 73- 78

2132,000 6

Ohio and Mississippi:
1«t Mnrt.fjiorfi ■--2d
do ~ ( W.D.)

2d
2d

.

.

....

:Feb. & Aug

Domestic Bonds
Staten Island:

.

.

.

1,088,000 6 April & Oct | 1875

Steamboat Mortgage

1st

»

•

1876

1

I

Norwich and Worcester:
"General Mortgage

1st

86
86

j

Rorth- Western Virginia:
1st Mortgage (guar, bv Baltimore).
2d
do
(guar, by B. A 0. RR.)
do
3d
( do
do
do )
3d
< not guaranteed)
do

guar, by

do
Feb. A Aug
!
do
do
|

lstMortsiaue
South Carolina

May A Nov. 11 1872
1,(XX),IHX) 7 Feb. A Aug 1893
1868
do
1,000,000 7

Northern "New Hampshire ;
pifiin Ronds
North Pennsylvania;
Mortgage Bonds

Mnrto-n"c

May A Nov

6

|

1

Sinking Fund

•

7

i 1st Mortgage..
iSharnokin Valley and Pottsville:

94

91*
92*

•

.

May & Nov. iS94

.

1S83
1887
1883
1883
1876
1876

.1 uue & Dec

....

.'
Mortgage Bonds
York, Providence and Boston :
1st Mortgage
Northern Central:

1st

18S5

Jan. A Juh

<

• •

•

7

ji Sandusky, Mansfield and Neuvark:
1st Moriffl re

604.000 7
7

New

Pacific,

1873

1,398,000 7

3d Mortgage
New York and New Haven:

i

201.5(H)

Aug

165.(MX) 6

Mortgage

(extended)

Feb. A

6

08

•H

April & Oct.

i

•

Second Avenue:

663. (XX)

stocks)

•

1,000,000

Sandusky, Dayton and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage
2d
do

•

1,700,000

Income

do

1

2,925.(1)0 6

Consolidated Mortgage

Mortgage

1

7
rf
•

1869

6,917,598 6 May A No\

Sink. Fund B'ds (assumed debts).
Bonds of August, 1859, convert...
Bonds of 1895
".
New York and Harlem :

1st

|

»

i

Subscrip. Bonds (assumed

Ogdensburg and L.

»

■

Premium Sinking Fund Bonds ...
Bonds of October, 1803 (renewal).
Real Estate Bonds

State Loans
M Mort^ao-e

2d

T3

M

T3

I

July

6

a

& Chicago:

Jan. &

I.

140.000

New York Central:

1<t Goncr.-il

92

.lau. A July 1X08

7

1

Payable.

Railroad:
St. Louis, Jacksonville
1st Mortgage
2d
do" '*

1

485, (XX i

General Mortgage

1st

U

200,'00C

°

do

New Haven and Northampton:

AO

Debt.

1

300,(XX 1 7 Jan. A July |1876
j
i
>j 7 M’ch & Sep 1861
450,(XX

Mortgage (convertible) ...
N. Haven, N London ife Slotting ton ;
1st Mortgage
1st

2d

w

Princpal payble

•

placed after the name oi 'outstand¬
ing.
Company shows the total Fundee

<

«

Amount

sums

;

i

Naugatuck:

|

1

Description.
The

T3

FRIDAY

INTEREST.

FRIDAY

INTEREST.

Description.

7
7

June A Dec 1873
. Jan. A July j 1879

-

Tan. &

...

|
l

j

j

JiUyi^67 ’5b|

..

....

Marked thus

Dec.

(.*) are

participating, and (+>
25
50
50

Adriatic

Broadway
Central Park
Citizens'

250,000i
200,000
200.000
300. O'K)
SUO.tkKH
150.000
300.000

29
70
100

City
Cliufon

210 000

10U

Columbia*

250.000
500,000

‘

Commerce fN.Y.L 100

200,000

50
loo
100
50
100
40
loo

200 (MM)
250.00"

Commercial
Commonwealth...
Continental *

...

a

Exchange..

Corn

Eagle
Empire City
Excelsior
Exchange

.

36 ,970 March

200.000
200.000
150.00(1
201,000
150.000

Firemen's Fund..
Firemen s Trust.
Fulton
Gallatin
109
Gebhard
50
Germania
50
Globe

Cascade
Central

Jnlv’64

1111v

....

...,

.

209.000

6
149,755 May and Nov. May
Jail, and duly. Jan. ’66 .6
Jau. ‘66 .5
do
592.394
195,875 Jan. and July. July *65 . .5
Great Western*!. 100 1,000,00013,177,437 Jan. and July. July ’66.3%
95
228.12 Feb. and Aug. Feb. .*66. .5
200,000
Greenwich
50
186.17" April and Oct. Apr. ’65.. 5
200.000
Grocers'
17°. 318 J;> i) a nd ,1 u 1 v. Julv ’66 3%
20O.0tMi
Guardian
Jan. '66 .4
do
15
150,000
Hamilton
163,860
Jan. ’66 .5
do
50
Hanover
400,000 4 50,295
Jan. *66 .5
do
300,000
253.214
Harmony (F.&M.1+ 50
Jau. ’66 .5
do
50
•20 7.345
200.000
Hoffman
do
Jan, '66'. .5
100 2.000,000 2,485,017
Home
Jan. ’65 .5
do
50
200.000
152,057
Hope
150, (MX)

22 *.30 i

....

Devon

.

....

.c.

,

.

Equitable
..

.

.

.

.

1

1

135

Metropolitan *

Security *!
Standard
Star

100

Sterling *

100

Stnvvesant

Tradesmen's

...

j

1835]

I860'

:

90

87

81.1201..
48,660'

.1862
do
...1021.48
do

.1863

7V\7(M)

do
do
do

.1861
1865
.1866

126,540!

....

103,851!...,

do

1862

.1863

1804
1865
1866
do
Mercau’leMu .I860
.181)1
do
.1862
do
.1869
do
186
do
186
do
.1SC
do
N. Y. Mutual -186'.
1861
do
do
.1862
.1803
do
.1864
do
1865
do

435,101'




.1868

'66..5

85

.

Jan. '66
Feb. '66
Jan. '66

....

.5
.4
.5

.

.

.

Jill}7 ’65

S5

•

Copper:
Adventure..

Feb. '66. .5

•

.

•

80

75

c
*

SO

70

....

90

.....

....

..

42.7(H)

.

69,470
111.580
84. (.24

101,340

.i
i

—

••••

.

•••

;
.....

i’

Washington
121,460

.1862

do
do
do
do
do

do
do

1863

.

1861
1865
1866
.

.1S63
.1864;
1865
.

-.1866

....

....

....

....

57

100,830
53,610

v

eo u

13%

17%
2%

Boston

-

13
....

....

.

•

•

•

....

66

4

25
7 25

20
7 20

10

.10
.10
6
5
.10
100

Vesta
Watson Petroleum

....

•

.

i6

25

-

•

•

•

•

Ask>

cd.

-

-

-

2
2

180,650
177,330

New York.

130.180
153.420
125.670

ool14

5%
5
6%

-

-

18

Superior

10

10
25
—

—

•

.

60
....

....

35
3 70
2 65
9 00
•

•

4 10

•

42

—

3 00
9 20
30
50

—

...

5

,

....

...

....

10

—

Manhan
Phenix
Redwood
Waltkill

20

.

....

—

-

.

.

...

—

65

—

1 00

Iron :

Adams

10

Rockland

5

par 50

100
50

American, pref...

r.

..

.

....

....

....

....

—

....

10

5 00

.

.

.

....

.

.

‘

United States
Wells, Fargo & Co
Miscellaneous*
Rutland Marble

Saginaw, L. S. & M

.

.

7 00

...

Express:

-

Columbian

•

—

Schuylkill

—

Sheldon and

10

Denbo

British

3%

Portage Lake

1 85
•

Columbian....

-

Princeton
Providence

32

Coal:

11

Pewabic

90
5 <0
88
8 50
1 40
25
1 00
2 00
95
45

2 00

—

Mount Pleasant

lit

85

—

Copake
Lake Superior

-

Ogima

Qnincy

oc

761

-

Norwich

—

.

Lead and Zinc:
Bucks County
par

1
2

.

25

Waddingham

-

-

•

•

'

—

Virginia City

1%

..

•

~

Texas

19
10

Lake Superior
Manhattan
Mendota
Merrirnac
Minnesota
New Jersey Consol

.

5
25

Rocky Mountain
Smith & Parmelee

25
2%

,8

\

Manhattan
Montana-.
New York
Quartz Hill

8%

1 25
54

■

—

Liebig

9%

1 00
50

—

Liberty

-

.

5

25

Hope.
Kip & Buell

5%

Knowlton

3 25
2 04
1 45
3 00

—

Holman

3%

33

,

1 5*i
1 40

—

Gunnell
Gunnell Central

1
2%

Hudson
Huron
Indiana.
Isle Rovale

,

,

—

Eagle

-

Franklin

,

2 25

—

Corydon

-.24%

City

3 25

—

—

—

Downieville
Gold Hill

Excelsior
Flint Steel River
Forest

par

Bullion, Consolidated...
Consolidated Gregory... 100 14 60 14 90

i oo

-

Copper Creek
Copper Falls
CV err Harbor

Bid. Ask.

Companies.

.

5

Lafayette

*7,230
30,000

«...

2

American Flag
Atlantic & Pacific
Bates & Baxter
Benton
Bob Tail

4%

Hope

10,590

•

5

.

—

French Creek.Great Western
Hamilton
Hartford
Hilton

105.7701

185,540

•

.

W.Virg. Oil and Coal.

....

26
3

Eagle III n er
Bluff

131.270’

587,930
549,000

•

•

....

3
.10

Venango (N. Y.)
Venango & Pit Hol(

Gold:
Ada Elmore
Altona

Evergreen

]

129.000
224,0:, 0

•

•

25
60
55

Titus Estate

Union
United Pe’tl’m F’ms

paid 3

Caledonia

standing Bid.

.

1

Canada
Central

180,790

•

45

.10
.10
5
.10

Bid. Ask.

Dac,; ih
Dover

1866
do
Sun Mutual 1862
.1863
do
1861
do
1865
do
1866
do
Union Mutu. 1660
.1861
do

2 30

Bay State

-

.1860
.1861
1863
1864
1865
1866
Pacific Mut. .1860
.1861
do
1862
do
1863
do
.1861
do
1865
do

•

.

...

.

.”5

Bohemian
76

Mut, .1859

....

.

22

.10

5

T

Aztec...

Jan ’66 .5
Jau. '66 ..5

do
do
do
do
do
do

.

Second National...
Shade River
5
Sherman & Barnsdale. .2%
Sherman Oil
.10
5
Standard Petroleum.
.10
.10
5

Tygart’s Creek...

""

Albany & Boston
Annita..

.

Out-

.

.10
10

!io
.10

Algomah

July *63 .4
Feb.'66.3%

Companies.

15
....

Companies.

....

..

.

MINING STOCK LIST—Friday.

Jan. '60.3%

Feb. '05.. 5

.

.

1

.

...

.

„

.

20

5

Jan.’66.3%

3
5

.

....

....

July '64 .5

66

....

Knickerbocker
Lamb's Farms
Lafonia & Sage R..Liberty
Lily Run

.

do

do

J.in

2

Is

.20

.

....

2 -p0
1 40

2 30

.

.10
.10
5
.

Island
Ivaniioe
Ken. Nat. Pet & Min.

90

.

Gt. Western. .1861
do
do

104

.

...

....

.

Ilomowack
Inexhaustible

July *65 .5

do
do
do

..

Home

.

Orient

98%.

Atlantic Mut. 1804j

1861

100

INSURANCE SCRIP.—Friday.

Ask¬
danding Bid. ed.
Ollt-

do

92

.

500. (M Ml!

MARINE

.1869;

.

Jan. ‘66
4
Jan. ’66.3%
Julv ’65.10

"ii

10

....

....

"io

.

Heydrick
Heydrick Brothers
Hickory Farm
High Gate

.

287.400
'

do
Commer'l Mu

July *65 .6

93

.

...

208,049 Feb. and Aug. Feb. '66. .4
142.830 Jan. and Julv. Julv *65 .5
Jan. ‘66 .5
do
350.412
569,623 Feb. and Aug. Feb. ’66. .6
581.689 F"b. and Aug. Feb. ’66...2
Jan. ‘66.. .5
do
550,301

250, ()()()!
400,0001

-

do

.

177.915

150.000

Washington *!... .10'
Yo'lkers and N. Y ,10u

Companies.

Jan. ‘6b .5
Jan. ’66 .10
Jan.'66 3%

....

2%

Hammond
Hard Pan

86

.

194,317

20l)’000j

25
20
50

iw*

Washington

90

...

"75

HamiltonMcClintock

5

.5

385,489 1April and Oct. Apr. '66..4

200,000!

on

United States....

..
.

July *65 .4

173.691
150,000 154,206 Feb. and Aug.
1,000.900 998,687 3an. and July.
200.000’
18S. 170
do
do
457.252
300.000
do
200.0(H)
208,969
206.909 Feb. and Aug.
200.000
do
150,580
150,000
150,000 138,902 Jan. and July.
1 OtMLOOO 1 277.564 Feb. and Aug.
230.903 Jan. and Julv.
200,000
do
217.813
200.000

25
25
50
50

....

lily '65

Jau. *66

200.000
150.000

100
25

St. Mark’s
St. Nicholas!

J

235,518

229.729

Consol.

G’t Western

.....

.

350,000
2( Ml, 0(H)

100

Resolute*
Rutgers’

Aug. ‘65. .5
Alar. '66 .6

■

.10
100
10

40

....

.

Rynd Farm

10

....

nr

t

.

50

Republic*

Feb.’66.3%

.

.

20
50

...

Fulton Oil
•

.

.

1
.10
5

SO

.5

300,000

.

Phoriiix !.....
Rebel

.6
.

50

.

.

Jan. *66 .8
do
do
311.976
July *65 . 5
210,000 244.066 Jan. and July. Jan. '66 .4
200,000 222.199 Feb. and Aug. Feb.'66.3%
1,000,000 1,175,505 Jan. and July. Jan. *66 .6
Jan.'66 .5
do
601.701
500,000

200,000!

National
7%
25
New Amsterdam.
N. Y. Equitable 3 35
N.Y.Fire and Mar 100
50
Niagara
North American* 50
25
North River
Pacific
100
Park
20
Peter Cooper

People’s

July *65

40
8

.6
.5

.

......

2

.

First National
Forest Citv...,

.

Feb.'65

.

....

...

2 00

5
5

.

il

6
...

...

.5
.10

.

Everett
Eureka....
Excelsior.,

.

.

10'

12

“4 "io

.10
10
100
100
.10
.20
5
.10

Petroleum Consol..
Pit Hole C. No. 2...
Pit Hole Creek..
Pithole Farms
Plumer
President
Raw son Farm
Revenue.

.10

.

Jan. 60
J ulv '65

30

2

.

•

.

do
319.521
300.000
do
100
201.216
200.000
Humboldt
do
1 8,82200, (KM)
Import* & Trade’. 50
138.166 Feb. and Aug.
too
150.04X1
Indemnity
do
100 1.000.000; 1,024.762
International
do
25
195.571
200.000
Irving
*
30
200,010
245.9S4 March and Sep
Jefferson
to
2S0,00( i
279,864 .[.-in and July.
Knickerbocker...
do
100
300,000
340J 26
Lamar
do
25
150,000 129,644
Lenox
do
*>5 1,000,000 1,162,779
Lorillard*
do
100
Manhattan
500,000 704.303
do
282.35 4
200,000
100
Market*
do
197.633
200.000
Meehan'
Trade' 25
do
.too
Mercantile
200,000 211.178
do
640,000 1.322.469
Mercantile Mtit’i*!l00
2->8.644
2(H) 000
do
50
Merchants’
do
t.. 100 l,000,000; 1,192,303

20

5!

-

*

*“7

Pennsylvania Oil ....
Pepper Well Petroleum...

|

Emp’e City Petrol'm
Empire and Pit Hole

450

4 15

..10

Northern Light
Oak Shade
Oceanic
Oil City Petroleum.
Oil Creek of N. Y
Pacific
Palmer Petroleum...

00

1|

.

Eclectic

.

Howard

40

.10!

.....10!

30

N.Y,Ph. &Balt.Cons
1
Noble & Delancter
8
Noble Well of N. Y.....25
North American
10

"20

Columbia (Pbg).
50;
Commercial
100
Commonwealth
...10;
Consolidated of N. Y—\10
De Kalb
|

.

200.000
500,0(M)
200.000

2 65

.100

Clifton
Clinton

...

.

150,000

63

'... .10'
Cherry Run Oil
Cherry Run Petrol’m
21
Cherry Run special
51

60

5

i 66

5j

California

10

'

Montana
5
Mount Vernon
3
National
5
New England
10
New York
5
N. Y. & Alleghany
5
New York& KenCy Oil. 100
Newr York& Kent’yPet.. 5
New York & Newark.... 5
5
N. Y. & Philadel

12

10,
5!
100 j
5;

Buchanan Farm
Bunker Hill

300,000

.

.

Monongahela & Kan

5;
10;

Brooklyn

16S.02-]

Mercantile
Mineral Point

Mingo

15

10
5

Marietta

11 80
3 00

20

Brevoort

80

361,705 A]»ril and Oct. Apr. '66..5
212,14) Jan. and July. Jan. *66 .5
July *66.. .5
do
258,054
140.321 Feb. and Aug.
230.3 2 Jan. and July Jan. '66 .5
Jan '66..3%
do
149.02 i
J illy '65 . .5
do
156.063
Jau. '66 .5 100
do
215.079

2 75

10

Bradley Oil

78

Maple Grove
Maple Shade of N. Y

Bliven

....

and Sep! .Mar. '64.. 5

.Tun

and Oil

Blood Farm

200 out)

17
10
10
‘25

Bergen Coal
Black Creek

.

.

400.000!

30

Firemen’s

.

90

.

500.00(1

*

.10
5
2[
5
10'

Manhattan
2 35

10

par

McKinley

10
10
5
BenneholV & Pithole
2
Bennehoff Run.
....10
Bcnuehoff Run Oil
5
Anderson
Beekman
Bt mis Height-*

....

.

100
10

Alleghany.
Allen Wright

-io.") 076

4109)03 Jan. and July. Jan. '66..-.
213.590 Jan. and Julv. -Ian. '663%
501.543 Jan. and July. Jau. 65.. .5
253,2321 Feb. and Aug. Feb. '66...5
200.362 Mavand Nov.
1 si,052 Feb. and Aug. Aug. '65..4
320, ill June and Dec. Dec. '65.. .5
249,392 Feb. and Aug. Feb. 66..5
123,577 Jan. and July July '64 . .4
Jan. ’66.10
do
378.440
aud Aim F 3 5z p. sh.
314,787
231.793 Jan. and July. July’65
5
do
July‘64.3%
391,913
Jan. V>6 .5
do
212,594
214,296 Jfin >)nd July Jan. '66 ..5
26S.S93 April and Oct. Oct. ’65.. .5
1.199.978 Jan. and Julv. Jan. *66 .7

200,000
500.000

McClintockville
McElhenny..

Adamantine Oil..... par 10
—

'

200.000

Bid. Askd

Companies.

Bid. Ask.

Companies.

.

223.775 Jan. and July.

‘20U ()■!{>

25
10U

Bid. Ask.
ed.

paid.

Last

Periods.

Assets.

$300,000

American *
American Exch'e. 100
Arctic
25
Astor
25
Baltic
25
Beekman....
25
Bowerv

dividend.

31, 1865.

Capital.

write Marine Risks.

PETROLEUM STOCK LIST—Friday.

LIST.—Friday.

INSURANCE STOCK

[June 23,1866.

CHRONICLE.

THE

796

—

120% 122

—

•

—

25
25

•

.

210

....

125
220

....

June

==

.

=

=====

*======

COMMISSION MERCHANT

Goodman & Merrill,

CHINA SICKS,

and Manufacturers of

IN

GENERAL COMMISSION MERCH ANT
36 NEW STREET & 38 BROAD STREET,
NEW YORK CITY.
Advances made op consignments
bacco. and other produce.

HANDKERCHIEFS,

Cotton, Produce

Imitation Oiled Silk.

of Cotton, To¬

t

costs hut half as

much as real silk, which it

equals in

and durability.

appearance

collar

ever

Y'ELLOW,

York.

to trade in Pecora Paint

UMBER

Tracy, Irwin & Co.,

BLACK.

and

150 N. 4th

St., Phil.

»►.

Nos.

Messrs. Crane, B eed & Co . Cincinnati.
a. E. Addison, Esq., Virginia.
Geo S. Cameron, Esq., South Carolina.
Hon. W. B Ogden, Chicago.

invented.

unless the name of the
agent is on the package.
S. Bowen, Agent,

Co., N. Y.

New Orleans.

George S. Mandeville, Esq.,

Reversible Paper Collars,

the most economical

All persons are forbidden

DARK,

R. BROWN,

Messrs. Duncan, Sherman & Co., New
U. A. Murdock, Esq., New Y'ork.
W. R. Dixon, Esq , Pres. Hoff an Ins.
Dr. W. N. Mercer, New Orleans.

Agents for the sale of the
Patent

Caution, :

Colors,
PECORA

mission.

superior finish, and

53 NEW ST., N. Y»

Reference,
Tilford & Bodley, Bankers, N. Y.

REFERENCES:
Our “ Imitation” has a very

and Provisions,

40 aud 42 BROADWAY' and

Machinery and Agricultural Implements of every
description supplied.
Southern Real Estate Bought and Sold on Com¬

Silk,

Oiled

J. A. BOSTWICK,

SUCCESSOR TO

Importers of

SILK AND COTTON

Jr.,

Formerly of Mississippi.

BROADWAY,

EUROPEAN AND

Merrill,

P.

A.

Pearce & Co.,

No. 353

Miscellaneous.

Commercial Cards.

Commercial Cards.

S. H.

797

THE CHRONICLE.

23, 1866.]

i

&

Furniture

2

Varnish.

Ogden, Fleetwood & C ., Chicago.
D. B. Molloy, Esq., Memphis.
Messr-. Porter, Fairfax & Co., Louisville, Ivy.
Francis Surget, Esq. Nutcliez, Miss.
H. B. Plant, E q., Augusta, Ga.

Best Green and

Yellow.

Carriage Varnish.

5'>n. Milton Brown, Mobile.
W. Mead Addison, Esq., Baltimore.
A. P. MERRILL, Jr„
36 New Street, New York City.

Poco Metallic Paint.

Foreign and Domestic

Carleton, Foute & Co.,

Drying Japan.

including a

COMMISSION MERCHANTS

NO. 400

BROADWAY,

JOBBERS

IMPORTERS AND
or

Dry Goods,
superb stock ol

Pecora White Lead.

AND

GOODS,

DRESS

General Commercial Agents.

AND

HOSIERY and WHITE

GOODS.

E.R.Mudge,Sawyer&Co.
No. 35 Sc

37 PARK PLACE, N.
AGENTS

Y.,

FOR

WASHINGTON miLLS,

Manufacturing Co.,

Chicopee
SARATOGA

Victory Manufacturing Co.,

and

NOS. 38 BROAD AND 36

Consignments and orders solicited.
carleton, foute & co.
New York, Feb. 1, 1866.
References—Duncan, Sherman & Co., Bankers,
New York; I. B. Kirtlaud, Hill A Co., Bankers, New
Y'ork; Third National Bank, St. Louis, Mo.; Hon.
Thos. II. Yeatman,

Cincinnati, Ohio; lion. James

U. S., Washington; J.

Speed, Attorney General
Smith Speed, Louisville.

BURLINGTON WOOLEN CO.

NEW

Jeremiah M. Wardwell,
Wardwell & Co.)

1866.

SKIRT,

(of the late firm of Neilson

J. W. Bradley’s

Importer and Dealer in

DUPLEX ELLIPTIC.

45 CLIFF

Manufactured solely bv

CARY, 97 Chambers Street.
81 Reade Street, N. V.

79 Sc

E. S. Thackston,
*

Tobacco, Note and
No. 12 OLD

Exchange Broker.

SLIP, cor. WATER ST.
NEW YORK.

tention.

solicited.

him will receive prompt at-i

Consignments of Cotton, Wool, Hides,
Best of references given if

And others

HARNDEN

Also for the collection of notes
accompanying goods, etc.

hnd Blank Book Manufacturers.
26 EXCHANGE PLACE,
Corner of

The Old

“ White’s” Type

Foundry,

PROPRIETORS,

Co.,

V,
is prepared to fill, at

Beekman Street, N.

established concern
short notice, orders for

BOOK,
’

NEWSPAPER AND
TYPE

Or

EVERT VARIETY,

JOBBING

INCLUDING

Type from other Foundries, Scripts, Borders, Cuts,
Brass Rules, Labor Saving Rules, Wood Type,
Printing Inks, and Furniture of every kind.

Hand, Power,




and Job Presses,

Varnishes &
COMPANY.

&c.,

WHITEHALL ST., NEW YORK.

Mechanics’ National Bank, N. Y.
Messrs. Gilman, Son <fe
Messrs. Brown & Ives,

Co., Baukcis, N. Y.
Providence, E. I.

150 North Fourth St.,
PHILADELPHIA.

STORAGE,
No Cotton

*-

IN FIRST-CLASS
Nos,

115, 117,

WAREHOUSES,

119, 121, Sc 123,

R. P. GETTY

ORLKAN3.)
BROKER,

(FORMERLY OF NEW

Taken,

Greenwich Street.

Davis,

R. M.

Japans.

BOWEN, Secretary,
PECORA WHITE LEAD, ZINC, AND COLOR

Sc SON,

115 GREENWICH STREET.

EXCHANGE AND STOCK
and-

COMMISSION
NOS. 38 BROAD

MERCHANTS.

STREET AND 36 NEW STREET
Office, No. 29.

Orders promptly and carefully attended
Consignments of Cotton, Tobacco, and

to.
other pro¬

J. M. Wardwell,
REMOVED FROM 83 JOHN STREET
TO 45 CLIFF STREET.

duce solicited.

Glenn,

-Marsh
ATTORNEY AND

Catlin
LATE

Texas,
collect promptly, all
to his charge in

Middle, or Southern

AND

Wardwell,
Burtis, French &
J. H. Brower

)

Woodward, VNew York City.

& Co.,

Campbell & Strong,
Hon. J. H.

W.

STUTVESANT CATLIN.

JA9. 8. SATTERTHWAITE.

Texas.

REFERENCES:

J. M.

Satterthwaite,

SAVTERTHWAITE BROTHERS,

Insurance Brokers,
No. 61 WILLIAM ST

Sfraud Street, Galveston,
Is prepared to attend to, and
Claims or other business committed

&

ADJUSTERS OF AVERAGES

COUNSELLOR AT

LAW.

Farmer, Little &
This old

Best

consignments of Cotton,
Wool, Hides and Naval Stores, by our friends in New
Orleans, Mobile and Galveston,

William St.

1810.

ESTABLISHED IN

63 Sc 65

Also—

Cash advances made on

EXPRESS, 65 Broadway,

Cooper & Sheridan,
Stationers

Company’s WHITE LE VD is the whitest

should send by the

they have unsurpassed facilities for the rapid and
afe forwarding of
GOLD .SILVER, JEWELRY', & MERCHANDISE

•

The

and most durable Lead known.

COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
NO. 24

as

of every description.
drafts and bills, bills

PAINT KNOWN for HOUSES,
FRONTS, TIN ROOFS, and DAMP
WALLS. PEPOIIA DARK costs one-third
that of Lead and wears longer than Lead.
BEST

IKON

required.

REFER TO

Bankers, Merchants,

Philadelphia.

& Co.,

Hoffman

COMPANY,

COLOR

SMITH

STREET, NEW YORK.

All orders entrusted to

WESTS, BRADLEY Jfc

Hardware,

AND

Merchant,

Commission

and

PECORA LEAD

NEW STREETS.

G. N. CARLETON, A. M. FOUTE, New York.
R. B. SPEED, A. M. SUMMERS, New Orleans.
J. H. SPEED, W. B. DONOIIO, Memphis.
W. M. COZART, J. J. STOCKARD, Mobile.

^

j

1 New Orleans, La.
Texas.

Reagan, Palestine,

Judge G. F. More, Austin, Texas.
T. H. McMahan & Gilbert, 'I Galveston, Texaa.
J. S. Sellers
Co.,
J. W. & T. P. Gillian, Houston, Texas,

SAM’L

B. C. MORRIS, JR.

B. CALDWELL.

Caldwell & Morris,
Successors to Brewer & Caldwell,/'
COTTON FACTOR^
AND

~X

General Commission Merchants,1
->
20 OLD SLIP, NEW YORK.
All orders for the purchase of Goods will receive

prompt attention.

[June 23, 1866.

CHRONICLE

THE

798
Steamship and Express Co’s.
PACIFIC MAIL STEAM8HIP COMPANY’S
THROUGH LINE

THE

Insurance.
OFFICE OF

To

C

A L I F O R N I A
And Carrying the

21st of every month (except

when those dates fall on
Sunday, and then on the preceding Saturday), for
ASPINWALL, connecting, via Panama Railroad,
with one of the Company’s steamships from Panama
for SAN FRANCISCO, touching at ACAPULCO.
JUNE:

1st—Arizona, connecting with Golden City.
10th—Henry Chauncey, connecting with St. Louis
21st—New York, connecting with Sacramento.
Departures of 1st and 21st connect at Panama with
steamers for South Pacific ports; 1st and 11th for
Those of 1st touch at Man¬

Central American Ports.

zanillo.

Baggage thecked through.

allowed eich adult.
An

One hundred pounds

experienced Surgeon on board.

attendance free.

The Atlantic Mutual

United

Slates Hail,
LEAVE PIER NO. 42 NORTH RIV¬
ER, FOOT of Canal street, at 12
o’clock noon, on the 1st, 11th, and

Medicines and

For passage tickets or
at the Company’s ticket

further information, apply
office, on the wharf, foot of
Canal street, North River, New York.
F. W. G. BELLOWS, Agent.

INSURANCE COMPANY.

Trustees, in Conformity to the Charter of the
Company, submit the following Statement of its
affairs on the 31st December, 1865.

FOR

$6,933,140 SO

cember, 1S65
1st

Policies not marked oft’

on

2,019,324 73

January. 18C5

Total amouut of Marine Premiums..

$8,952,471 53

Life
Fire Risks discon¬

No Polices have been issued upon

Risks; nor upon
nected with Marine Risks.

Premiums marked off from 1st Janu¬
ary,

$6,764,146 33

1865 to 31st December, 1865

Losses

paid during the
period.,
$3,659,178 45

SALVADOR,

Commander, Joshua Atkins, and
SAN JACINTO,
Commander, Winslow Loveland,
1,500 Tons Burthen each.

Expenses
The

Company has the following As¬

Stock, City, Bank and other Stocks, $4,828,585 00
secured by Stocks, and other¬
3,330,350 f0
wise

Loans

nave been placed on the route to Savannah by
he Atlantic Mail Steamship Company of New York,
nnd are intended to be run by them in a manner to
meet the first-class requirements of the trade.
The Cabin accommodations of these ships are not
excelled by any Steamers on the coast, and although
their carrying capacity is large, their draught of wa¬
ter enables them to insure a passage without deten¬
tion in the riverSan Salvador,Sat. June 2 I San Jacinto, Sat.June 23

Jacinto,
“
“
9 j San Salvador, ”
30
Salvador, “
“ 16 | San Jacinto, “ July 7
Returning, Leave Savannah, every Saturday, at 3
o’clock, P. M.
Bills of Lading furnished and signed on the Pier.
For further particulars, engagement of Freight or
Passage, apply to
GARRISON & ALLEN, Agents.
5 Bowling Green, N. Y.
Agent, at Savannah. B. H. Hardee.
San
San

221,260 00

Real Estate and Bonds and
Dividends

Bonds

Stocks,

on

,

Mortgages and other
re-insurance

and

Loans, sundry notes,

and other claims due the

144,964 43
3,283,801 96

80,462 00

.

U. S. Treasury Note Cur¬

do

do
rency

310,551 78

.

$12,199,975 17

Total Amouut of Assets

cancelled to the extent paid.

FIRST MORTGAGE BONUS

declared on

AND ROME RAILROAD
COMPANY.

guaranteed and payable by the

for the year ending
Decembers 1865,

of the Company,

RAIL¬

J. H.

Drake Kleinwort&Cohen

strictly

representative and Attorne ,
prepared to make advances
on shipments to Messrs. Drake, Kleinwort & Cohen
London and Liverpool, and to grant mercantile
credits upon them for use in China, the East and
West Indies, South America, &c. Marginal credits
The subscriber, their

52

cheap and

W. II. H.
DESIRABLE INVESTMENT.

Moore,

Wm. C.

CO.,

70 Reaver Street.

ESTATE
AND

Bureau.

HASTINGS GRANT,
70 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.
S.

Agdntforthe sale of Landed Estates, Mines, Tobacco
and Cotton Lands in Virginia, Tennessee, North and
South Carolina, Georgia, &c.. now offers properties
of great value, many of which cover Gold, Copper,
Lead. Plumbago, Iron, and Coal Mines, Water¬
power, and Mineral Springs. The fullest informa¬
tion with regard to the above may be obtained
through this office.
References; Messrs. Gilman, Son & Co., M. K.

Jesup & Co., Phelps, Dodge & Co., A. R. Wetmore
& Co
Satterlee & Co., Lathrop, Ludington & Co.,
Wilson G. Hunt, Esq., John Torrey, M. D., U. S.
Assay Office,

Pickersgill,

Curtis,
Charles II. Russell,
Lewis

Lowell Holbrook,

Weston,
Royal Phelps,
R. Warren

Caleb Bars tow
A. P. Pillot

William E.
Geo.

Dodge
G. Hobson,

MERCHANTS,

James

Sturgis,

Joseph Gaillard, Jr.
J. Henry Burgy,
Cornelius Grinned,
C. A. Hand,
B. J. Howland*
Benj. Babcock,
Fletcher Westray,
Robt. B. Mintnrn, Jr.
Gordon W, Burnham,
Frederick Chauncey,

George S. Stephenson,

Bryce,

William II. Webb.

Leroy M. Wiley,
Daniel S. Miller.

JOHN D.

Stocks, Bonds and Governments bought and sold

j. d.

Columbus Powell,

S

W

.

on

.

Commission.

I. F. Green, Chs. M. McBhee

.

Da

n a

,

AND EXCHANGE BROKER,

STOCK

No. 30 PINE

STREET, ROOM 4.

Exchange on London and Paris bought and sold on
Commission—also Gold Stocks, Bonds, and Gold.
'

references and securities.

Wm. & John O. Brien, Weston
Gray, Mcllvaine Bro’e, Washington Murray, Esq

Messrs. Ward & Co.,
&

New York.

J. C. Morris,

NO. 5 WILLIAM STREET,
Broker in
PETROLEUM AND MINING STOCKS,

JONES, President,

CHARGES
W. H. H.

STREET, NEW YORK.

exclusively

James Low,

David Dane,

& Commission

Bankers

■<

Henry K. Bogert
Joshua J. Hentry,
Dennis Perkins,

Henry Coit,

Further information on application to
S. W. HOPKINS A

POYVELL, GREEN Sc CO.

C.

CHAPMAN,

Wm.

Joues,

issued for the same purposes.
SIMON DE VISSER,
Exchan e Place, New York.

of the London House

trustees:

John D.

LIVERPOOL.

in the United States, is

31st

Secretary.

and will be sold on terms that render them a very




Banks and Bankers.

By order of the Board,

Charles Dennis,

,

13th. THE INSURANCE AND MINING
JOURNAL.

38 BROAD

November.

FIRST-CLASS SECURITY,

Mining

New York Market.
10th. THE RAILWAY' MONITOR.
11th. A TABLE OE RAIl U AY, CA¬
NAL AND MISCELLANEOUS liONDS.
12th. A TABLE OE RAlLYVAY, CA¬
NAL AND MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS.

issued on and after

Tuesday the Third of April next.

in the

REAL

in the United States.
A special Report on Breadstuff's
A Dry Goods Report.
9th. WHOLESALE
PRICES CUR¬

Thirty-five Per Cent is
the net earned premiums

for which certificates will he

ROME, WATERTOWN & OGDENSBURG
ROAD COMPANY,

These Bonds are a

Report on Cotton, acknowl¬
edged to be the best and most complete published

A dividend of

THE

City of New York, on the
[First Days of May and

vious year.
A special

LONDON AND

1864, will be redeemed and
paid to the holders thereof, or their legal repre¬
sentatives, on and after Tuesday tlie Sixth
of February next, from which date interest on
the amouut, so redeemable, will cease. The certifi¬
cates to be produced at the time of payment, and

SEVEN PER CENT.

Interest

taining an epitome ol'the movements of trade for
the week; complete tables of the Total Receipts
of Domestic Produce for the week and since
Jan. 1.
Also, of Exports and Imports lo¬
th e w eek anil > ear of all leading articles of
commerce, with a comparative statement of the pre¬

interest on the outstand¬

ing certificates of profits will be paid
to the holders thereof, or their legal representatives,
on
anil af.er
Tuesday tlie Sixth of

of tlie issue of

Attention is called to the

OSWEGO

tive statements; progress and condition of Na¬
tional lianks, Foreign Banking, and a
Rank Stock List.
6th. A TAULE OF SALE PRICES, on
each day of the week, at the New York Stock Ex¬

£

Six percent

Fifty per cent of the outstanding certificates

To Capitalists.

OF

GAZETTE-Givlist of ail Dividends Declared and
Itonds losi or stolen for the week ; a review
of the Money Market, Stock, Gold* and
l oreign Exchange Markets for the week ;
Bank Statements for the week, with compara¬

February next.

Miscellaneous.

MISCELLANE¬

on

estimated at
Cash in Bank, Coin

and financial affairs.
4th. COMMERCIAL 4:
OUS NEWS.
5th. THE RANKERS

RENT, containing lull quotations of the prices,
Friday, of all leading articles of Commerce in the

Company,

Premium Notes and Bills Receivable..

ing London journal—7 he Economist—who will, in a
weekly letter, report the foreign markets specially
for THE CHRONICLE, furnishing the freshest and
most reliable information with regard to commercia

7th. A TABLE OF NATIONAL,STATE
AND CITY SECURITIES.
8th. THE COMMERCIAL TIMES—Con¬

sets, viz. :
United States and State of New York

Mortgages,
Interest on

2d. LITERATURE—Notices of new books.
3d. FOREIGN NEWS—It is with great plea
sure we are able to announce that
we have se¬
cured the services of one of the editors of the lead¬

change of Stocks and Securities sold.

$992,341 44

".....

n£s& i)icn«

ng a

Returns of Premiums and

SAVANNAH, GA,,
Every Saturday.
The Elegant Side-Wheel Steamships
SAN

on Marine Risks,
January, 1S65, to 31st De¬

Premiums received

Premiums

Saturday morning. Each num¬

jects relating to Finance, Commerce, and
other questions of general interest to busi-

The

from 1st

Chronicle
Is published every
ber contains :

1st. EDITORIAL ARTICLES—prepare
with great care by competent writers, upon sub¬

JANUARY 27tii, 1866,

NEW YORK,

same

Empire Line

Commercial & Financial

DENNIS, Vice-President

MOORE, 2d Vice-Pres’t,

hewgett; 3d vice-Pres’t.

RAILWAY SHARES, GOVERNMENTS,
At all the Stock Boards.
REFERENCES

B. C. Morris,
Harbeckt & Co.,

&

f

Galwey, Casado & Teller,
Caldwell & Morris.

.

June

23,1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Banks and Bankers.

799

Bankers and Brokers.
COOKE,
1
MOORHEAD, V
D COOKE,
)

(H.

JAY

C.

Bankers and Brokers.

FAHNESTOCK,

Fourth National Bank.

WM. G.

Capital

W. H.

Jay Cooke Sc Co.,

$5,000,000

H.

-< EDWARD DODGE,
( PITT COOKE.

No. 8 Broad Street.

COMMERCIAL

BANKERS.

NASSAU STREET, N. E. COR. PINE STREET.

In connection with

Washington

our

houses in

Philadelphia and

we

Mr. Edward Dodge, late of Clark,

Collections made for Dealers

on

New York, Mr. H. C.

best terms.

ton

Tenth National

Bank,

No. 240 BROADWAY.

D. L.
J. H.

STOUT, Cashier.

Bank,

318 BROADWAY.

Capital

We shall

and

issues

give particular attention to the purchase,
of

exchange
;

government securities

and gold, and to all business of National

bonds

JAY COOKE & CO.

March 1,1866.

City and Country accounts received
favorable to

our

on terms mos

Correspondents.

United State

WILLIAM A. WHEELOCK, President.

WILLIAM H. SANFORD, Cashier.

The Tradesmens
201

Keep constantly

on

Street.

New

UNITED

John Munroe & Co.,
BANKERS,

STOCKS

6 Per Cent Bonds of 1881,
6 Per Cent 5-20 Bonds of 1862,
“
6
“
1864,
6
“
k;
1865,
5 Per Cent 10-10 Bonds,
7 3-10 Per Cent Treasury Notes, 1st,
6 PerCent Currency Certificates.

SCRIBE, PARIS

GOLD, STOCK, AND BOND BROKERS.

2d, & 3d scries,

Bounty Loan.

Compound

>

Interest Notes of 1864 Sc
CO.

&

Co.,

Dealers in Government and. other Se¬
curities.
Interest allowed upon deposits of gold and currency

Gold loaned to merchants
favorable terms.

subject to check at sight,

Culver, Penn Sc Co.,
BANKERS,

aaiid others.

Orders for the Purchase and
Sale oiGoverniuent Securities receive partic¬
ular attention.
Special attention is given to the trans¬

Treasury

Department.

to

6um9

Lawrence

Bank, for Travellers* use.
Government Securities,
Bonds

bought aud sold

Co.,

BANKERS,

on Commission for Cash Only.
Deposits received subject to check at sight, as
with Banks.
DEWITT C. LAWRENCE,
Memoer New York Stock Exchange.
CYRUS J. LAWRENCE,
JOHN R. CECIL,

tion of

late

Stocks

ana

executed abroad

Butler, Cecil, Rawson & Co.

WM. A. HALSTED.

Depew Sc Potter,
BANKERS,

on

Dividends, Drafts, &c

Duncan, Sherman Sc Co.,
BANKERS,

bought and sold

FOUR PER CENT PER ANNUM ON

DEPOSITS,

which may

be checked for at sight.
Special attention given to the purchase and sale

of

GOVERNMENT SECURITIES.
Miscellaneous stocks and bonds bought and sold
commission.

Collections made promptly on all points.
HENRY W. POTTER.
CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW,

(Late Secretary of State.)

r

j Capital,

$500,000

j

BANK,

PHILADELPHIA.,
Attends to business of Banks Sc Bankers
on liberal terms.
J. AY. TOKKEY,

1

National

First

Cashier.

Bank,

RICHMOND, VA.,

Designated Dejwsitory and Financial Agent of the
(Government.
city and all accessible

Collections made in this

points in the South.
S. A.

H. G.

FANT, President.

Glover, Cashier.

Western Bankers.

Gilmore, Dunlap Sc Co.,
108

110

A

West

Fourth

Street,

CINCINNATI, OHIO.

CORNER OF PINE AND NASSAU STS.,
ISSUE

Dealers in

CIRCULAR NOTES

AND CIRCULAR LETTERS

OF CREDIT,

For the

use

GOLD, SILVER, UNCURRENT BANK

NOTES, and all kinds of GOVERNMENT BONDS,

of Travelers abroad and in the United

States, available in all the principal cities of the
world; also,
COMMERCIAL CREDITS,
For use in Europe, east of the Cape of Good Hope,
West Indies, South America, and the United States.

STREET, NEW YORK,

Allow interest at the rate of




Securities

HENEV 8AYLES

Exchange

NATIONAL

OF

Deposits, subject tc
Cheques at sight.
Prompt attention given to the Co ec

NO. 16 WALL STREET, N. Y.
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES,
AND OTHER STOCKS, BONDS, &c.,

on

for

this

on

Commission.

on

STREET, BOSTON.

.TAMES BECK,

A. G. CATTELL, Pres’t.
|
A. WHILLDIN, V. Pres’t f

London,
Credit,

Sc Sayles,

BROKERS,

The Corn

purchasers; and also to

Interest allowed

Brothers

NO. 11 BROAD

suit

Circular Letters of

Orders

&

Commercial Credits for *he purchase of Merchan¬
dise in England and the Continent.
Travellers’ Credits for the use of Travellers
abroad.

Southern Bankers.

prepared to draw Sterling Bills of
Exchange, at sight, or sixty days, on the

.ssue

CO., PARIS.

AL80 1SSUK

Are

n

19- & 21 N ASSAU STREET, NEW YORK,
Receive Deposits from Banks, Batik

action of all business connected with the

JOHN MUNROE Sc

JAMES A. DIIPEE,

NEW YORK.

Union Bank of

ON LONDON

AND

STOCK

WALL STREET,

35

BANKERS,

ers

,

STREET, BOSTON,

Co., Dup ee, Beck

Bankers,

No. 94 BROAD vVAY AND No. 6 WALL ST.

and bankers upon

Page, Richardson Sc Co

No. 22 STATE
a

Ccmrreioiai Credits

Lockwood &

of

BILLS OF EXCHANGE

1865 Boiigrin and Sold.

AND

No. 8 WALL STREET, NEW YORK,
Issue Circular Letters of Cred l tor Travelers in

Als

BOSTON.
Personal attention given to the purchase and sale
Stocks and Bonds at the Boston Brokers’ Board.

Li. P. Morton

AMERICAN

partsof Europe, etc., etc.

Burnett, Drake Sc Co.,
BANKERS,

STATES

VERMILYE Sc

7 RUE

Eastern Bankers.

issues of

LIBERAL ADVANCES MADE ON GOVERN¬
MENT STOCKS TO BANKS AND BANKERS.

$1,000,001
RICHARD BERRY, President.
ANTHONY HALSEY, Cashier.

NO.

York*

hand for immediate delivery a

New YOrk State 7 per cent.

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

CAPITAL

Co.,

J. L. Kirkland, W. B. Dinsmore, Jr

114 STATE

BANK.

PLACE,

AND BROKERS.

Railway Shares, Bonds, and Govern¬
ment Securities bonght and sold.

INCLUDING

Collections made in all parts of the
and Canadas.

NATIONAL

BANKERS

BANKERS.
No. 44 Wall

descriptions of Government Bonds-

Sc

Commission.

49 EXCHANGE

,

W. T. Galwey,

Vermilye

on

Galwey, Kirkland Sc Co.„

oi

to orders for purchase and ale of stocks,

$3,000,000.

n« for sale all

GOVERNMENT SECURITIES

Bought and Sold

Banks.

Central National

GOLD, AND

Washing¬

will be resident partners.

all

ROSS, Presiden t

BONDS,

House, aud Mr. Pitt Cooke, of Sandusky, Ohio,

sale,

Designated Depository of the Government.

our

«

STOCKS,

Dodge & Co.,

Fahnestock, of

PAPER

Bought, Sold and Collected.

have this day opened an office at No.
Nassau, corner of Wall Street, in this city.

All the Government Loans for sale.

Whittingham,

COLLECTIONS MADE at all
aud remitted for

Checks

on

on

accessible points

day of payment.

UNION BANK OF LONDON for sale

Corn, Tweedie Sc Co.,
BANKERS Sc
No. 30 BROAD

BROKERS,

STREET, NEW YORK.

locks,Bonds,Gold, Foreign Exchange
and Government

OUGHT

and

SOLD

Securities,

on

COMMISSION.

ADOLPHUS M. CORN,
DAVID TWEEDIE,
Members of the New York Gold Exchange.
EDWIN D.

FOSTER,

Member of the New York Stock Exchange,

B.

Hutchings Badger,

BANKING

Sc

EXCHANGE

OFFICE,

CHICAGO, ILL.
Collections made on all parts of the Northwest.
Stocks, Bonds, Gold, and Government Securities
bDught and sold on commission, either in New York
of Chicago, and carried on margins when desired.
New York correspondent and reference,
Messrs. L. S. LAWRENCE & CO.
36 DEARBORN St.,

[June 23, 1866.

THE CHRONICLE.

800

Insurance.

Insurance.

Insurance.

Marine & Fire Insurance.

Mutual Insurance

Sun

t

NO. 175

METROPOLITAN INSURANCE CO.,
NO. 10S
Cash

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

COMPANY.

1, 18G5, over

(insurance buildings,)

Company insures at customary rates of pre¬
all Marine and Inland Navigation Risks
Cargo or Freight; also against loss or damage by

This

49 WALL

Fire.

If Premiums are paid in

Gold, Losses icillbepaid

STREET.

ASSETS, Dee, 31, 1865

in Gold.
The Assured receive

twenty-live percent ofthe net
profits, without incurring any liability, or, in lieu
thereof, at their option, a liberal discount upon the
premium.
All losses equitably adjusted and promptly paid.
Scrip Dividend declared Jan. 10, 1855,
_

FIFTY PER CENT.

JAMES LOR1MER GRAHAM, President,
ROBERT M. C. GRAHAM, Vice President,
JAMES LORIMFR GRAHAM, Jr., ad V. P.
Henry II. Porter, Secretary.

Navigation Risks.
premium in gold.

Isaac H. Walker,

Sec'y.

to the

OFFICE, NO. 92

present time, Losses amounting to over
EIGHTEEN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS.

For the past nine years the cash dividends paid to
Stockholders, made from ONE-TIIIRD of the net

Capital-

Coupons of First Mortgage Preferred
DETROIT AND MILWAUKEE
Coupons, and

-----

This Company Inmires against Loss or
Fire on as favorable terms' as any othar

Damage by
responsible

Company.

SOLICITED.

HARTS1IORNE, Secretary.

Niagara Fire Insurance
COMPANY.

John'S. Williams,

paid.

INCORPORATED

1819.

$3,000,000

Capital

LUCIUS J. HENDEE, President.
J.

Drayton Hillyer,
Thus. A. Alexander,
Walter Kkney,
Chas. II. Krainard,
Roland Mather,
William F. Tuttle,
Samuel S. Ward,
George Roberts,
Austin Dunham,
Thomas K. Brace,
Gustavu* F. Davis,
Erastus Collins,
Edwin D. Morgan, of New York.
•

Bukle,
Ebenkzkr Flower,
Eliphalet A. Bulkeley,

$1,164,380

DIVIDEND TWENTY PER

CENT.

insures against MARINE

and IN

Risks, on cargo and freight.

risks upon hulls of

$4,067,455 80

Assets, Jan. 1,1S66,

244,391 48

Liabilities,

vessels ar

NEW YORK

taken.

profits of the Company ascertained
10, 1855, to January 1,
18G5, for which certificates were issued

The

JAMES .A. ALEXANDER,

$1,707,310

Agent.

profit for eleven year?
previous to 1803 have
redeemed in cash

Total

$1,107,24

President.

Vice-President.

<*.i

Benj. S. Walcott,

.-.

$556,303 98

24,550 00

DORAS L, STONE,

President,

Secretary.

Cotton

American

The

Planting & Loan Co.
SHARES, $25.

..$2,500,000

BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

War.
of New

Hampshire.

Hon.

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW, date Secretary
St^tc
York

of

h’. WALTON, late Treasurer U. S. Mint,
Philadelphia.
Hon. N. B. BRYANT, Boston, Mass.
GEO. L. TRASK, Esq., firm ol Bigelow & Trask,
N. Y.

TH0S. COREY, Esq., firm

of Corey, Wilson & Co.,

Boston.

ELIJAH F. DEWING, Esq., New Orleans.
Major H. O. BRIGHAM, late Paymaster, U.
Washington, D. C.

S. A.,

This Company offers greater inducements for in¬
vestments than any Stock Company now in exist¬
ence.

object of the Company is to

afford facilities to

Planters of the

market, always
taking good and satisfactory security, by mortgage
ou their plantation and crops, for money advanced
in procuring supplies, paying labor, and other neces¬
sary expenses incidental to the development of the
soil.

CAPITAL AND LABOR
the universal requirements of the
tion of
'
THE SOUTHERN

$400,000 00
156,303 98

capital

Surplus.:

;-

ALlSTS^~

SPLENDID INVESTMENT.

••

January 1st 1866.

Cash

Gross Assets
Total Liabilities -

ALFRED EDWARD,

ALDRICH, Secretary.

are

No. 45 WALL STREET.

$1,S9G,334

Feb. 20,1S66.

WM. LECONEY,
THOMAS HALE, Secretary.

COMPANY,

189,024

The certificates

.

Hanover Fire Insurance

January 1,1SG5,

January 1, 18GG

W. F.

the impoverished Cotton and Sugar
South to grow and get their crop to

from January
amount to

of Four Per Cent., free of
second day of July
be closed from the

Government tax, payable on the
next.
The Transfer Books will
25th inst. until that date.

The

AGENCY,

No. 62 Wan Street.

[

New York,

declared a Dividend on the Capital

Hon. JAS.

GOODNOW, Secretary.
DIRECTORS.

Joseph CnuRnn

Assets, Jan. 1st, 1SGG

been

of Trustees have

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Ex-Secretary of
Hon. JOS. A GILMORE, Ex-Governor

Robert

to

TRUST COii PA NY Ol? NEW
York, No. 73 Broadway, June 16, 1866.
The Board

Co.,

Hartford, Conn.

BROADWAY.

Additional profits from

inst., to re-open ou the 2d July next.
By order of the Board.

CAPITAL STOCK

Insurance

iETNA

(TRINITY BUILDING,)

No time risks or

payable on and after July 2, 1866.
The Transfer Books will be Closed on the 20th

JONATHAN D. STEELE, President.
P. NOTMAN, Secretary.

COMPANY,

LAND NAVIGATION

A DIVIDEND OF FIVE PER CENT.
(free of Government tax) has this day been declared,

270,353

Losses equitably adjusted and promptly
Chartered 1850.
Cash Di
Dividends paid in 15 years.
253 per cent.

William Nelson, Jr.,

Pacific Mutual Insurance

This company

Bank,
\
Broadway, New York, June, 12,18G6. J

No. 363

$1,000,000

SURPLUS, JANUARY 1st, 1865

Secretary.

111

J. II. STOUT, Cashier.

IMPORTANT TO CAPl i

STREET.

CASH CAPITAL

L. Edgerton,

Henry R. Kunhardt.

Francis Hat ha wav, Paul N. Spofford.
ELLWOOD WALTER, President,
C1IAS. NEWCOMB, Vicc-Prest.

C. JjDespard,

A DIVIDEND OF FIVE PER CENT.
(free of Government tax) has this day been declared,
payable on and after July 2, 1866. Transfer hook
will be closed from the 23d instant to July 2.

Stock of this Company

NO. 12 WALL

COMPANY.

JOHN T. HILL, Cashier.

TRUSTEES.

Aaron L. Reid,
Ellwood Walter,
D. Cokleu Murray, *
E. llaydock White,
N. L. Met .'ready,
Daniel T. Willets,

the 2d of July, less

M. K. JESUP &

U NI • *.%

JACOB REE*»E, President.

,

Charles Dimon,
Jas. D. Fish,
A. William Heye,
Geo. W. Hennings, Harold Dollner,




lAMO* ROBBINS,

HENRY S. LEVERICH.
CHAS. D.

RAILROAD—Cou¬

The Ninth National

WILLIAM REM SEN,

Risks

Merchandise of all kinds, Hulls, and Freight.
Policies issued making loss payable in Gold or
Currency, at the Office in New York, or in Sterling,
at the Office of Kathbone, Bros. & Co., in Liver¬

RAILROAD—

TENTH NATIONAL BANK,
No. 240 Br< adway,
f
New York, June 19, 18G6. f

of Directors:

on

Henry Eyre,
Cornelius Grinnell,
E. E. Morgan,
Her. A. Schleicher,
Joseph Siagg,

Government Tax.

.

Hoard

the stockholders.
This Company continues to make Insurance on
Marine and luland Navigation and Transportation
Risks, on the most favorable terms, including

Joseph Walker,

AND PONTIAC

Bonds.

will be paid at our office,

THOS.-P. CUMMINGS,
HENRY M. TABER,
ROBERT SCHELL,
JOSEPH FOULKE,
STEP. CAMBRELENG. WILLIAM H. TEURY,
THEODORE W. RILEY, FRED. SCHUCIIARDT.
JOSEPH GRAFTON,
JACOB REESE,
JNO. W. MERSEREAUJL. B VARD,
D. LYDIG SUV DAM,
JOSEPH BRITTON,

James Freeland,
Samuel Willets,
RobertL. Taylor,
William T. Frost,
William Watt,

DETROIT

pons due July 1st, 1866,
No. 84 Broadway, New York, on

BROADWAY..

ONLY FIRST CLASS RISKS

SIOUX CITY RAILROAD—

Mortgage Bonds.
DUBUQUE SOUTH WESTERN RAILROAD—

Coupons of First

«

profits, have amounted in the aggregate toj
One Hundred and Twenty-one and a
Half per cent.
\
Instead of issuing a scrip dividend to dealers, based
on the principle that all classes of risks are equally
profitable, this Company will hereafter make such
cash abatement or discount from the current rates,
when premiums are paid, as the general experience
of underwriters will warrant, and the nett profits re¬
maining at.the close of the year, will be divided to

MORRIS.

SHEPPARD HOMANS.

CHICAGO AND ALTON RAILROAD—
Coupons of First Mortgage Bonds.
JOLIET AND CHICAGO RAILROAD—Coupons
of First Mortgage Bonds.

t

$200,000 00
Assets, March 9, 18G6 - - 252,55” 82
Total i,i •bilitii s - - - 26,850 00
18 65 - - - 201,588 14
Losses Paid i

Cash

ABBATT,

THE0. W.
Actuary,

Miscellaneous.

ANTHONY", Vice-Pres't

Fire Insurance Company,

ORGANIZED APRIL, 1S4L

pool.

r

Preset.

Hope

$1,366,699

has paid fo its Customers, vp

McCURDY, Vice-President.

\ ISAAC

DUBUQUE AND

STREET, NEW YORK.

Assets, Jan. 1st, 18Gb.

.

Secretaries,
'

EDWARD P.

NEW YORK.

CASH ASSETS, Sept. 1st, 1865, over $13,500,000 00
FREDERICK S. WINSTON. President.

COMPANY.

INSURANCE

The Company

RANCE COMPANY OF

entitled to a return,

MOSES H. GRINNELL,

President.

RUDOLPH GARRIGUE,
JOHN E. KAHL, Secretary.

R. A.

paid in gold will be

Premiums

$705,989 83

The Mutual Life Insu-

Marine Risks on
Freight, and Cargo; also, against Inland
insures against

This Company

Vessels,

CENT.

205,989 83

......

TOTAJL ASSETS

$2,716,424 32

-

DIVIDEND THIRTY PER

The Mercantile Mutual
OFFICE No. 35 WALL

-

$500,000 O

SURPLUS, Jan. 1st, 1866

mium against
on

BROADWAY, N.

CAPITAL,..

CASH

$1,000,000
1,600.000

Capital

Assets Nov.

Co.,

Germania Fire Ins.

and when

largesUpoi’\

STATES,

judiciously applied, no matter by whom

unfortu¬
and make the

furnished, will restore that portion of our
nate country to its former prosperity,
South all that nature designed it,

THE GARDEN OF THE WORLD.
Books opened for the sale of the Stock
office of the Company ; also at the office of

TON, BRYANT &
York.

at the
WAL¬

CO., No. 17 Broad street, New

Send for Circular, j


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102