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HUNT’S

MERCHANTS’

MAGAZINE,
Shew* pup e*,'"

%
representing
£====

—■

the industrial and commercial interests

•

,

;

VOL. 37.

of the

united

=============

SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1883.
CONTENTS,

The Financial Situation.
Oar Diminishing Trade
ance

THE

Bal¬

Twelve Mouths Ended May

31,1883

Treasury Statement
Monetary and Commercial

9

English News

News.
THE BANKERS’ GAZETTE.

Railroad

change, U.S. Securities, State

Returns

and

Railroad Bonds and
Stocks
Range in Prices at the N. Y.

11

“

Earnings and Bank

National Bank Returns
General Q mtatious of Stocks
and Bands
Stock Exchange
13 Investments, and State, City
and Corporation Finances..
THE COMMERCIAL TIMES.
Commercial Epitome
24 I Breadstufts
Cotton
25 I Dry Goods

NO. 941.

“

34

15

12

review of

a

of the

questions involved, on Feb¬
17 (page 180) we asserted that “the conclusion from
foregoing facts seemed to be, that instead of a
surplus income of 120 millions, as anticipated by Mr„
Folger, he will have at his command for redeeming debt

“

about 137 millions.”

16

$137,823,253.

22

that

30
31

balance must

.

some

ruary
“
the

9

Commercial and Miscellamooua

Money Market, Foreign Ex¬

In

8

U. 8.

...

m

I six months. As our statements have been more than
once questioned and
quite harshly criticised, we take the
liberty of thus calling attention to their proved accuracy!

CHRONICLE.
Imports and Exports for May,
1883, and, for tlie Eleven and

Cotton < ’onsumption and Over.land Movement to July 1
Financial 1’eview of June, 1883
Tlie Debt Statement for
June,
18^3

states

=====

The actual result

On subsequent occasions

unless further bond calls
run

we

to be

demonstrated

made the

were

above 140 millions

seems now

Treasury

by the 1st of July,

against 119 millions at the close of the last fiscal year,.
The balance has
really reached 142 millions, with dis¬
bursing officers’ balances also increased 7 millions during

%hc dxraurclc.

Thb Commercial and Financial
Chronicle is published in
New York every
the twelve months.
So we see that the
Saturday morning.
Secretary might
\ Entered at the Poet Office, New York, N. Y., as second-class mail
have
called
about 30 millions more bonds than he has the
matter.J
TERMS OF

SUBSCRIPTION-PAYABLE

For One Year (including
postage
For Six Months
do
Annual subscription
Six mos.
do

tf 10.

in London (including postage)
do

past year, had he not deemed it prudent to carry over that
much larger amount of available funds.

IN ADVANCE*
$10 20.
£2 7s.

do

1

The chief interest the

public has in tlrs question is in the
Treasury thus starts this fiscal year with a
surplus about 30 millions larger than it began the last
year with, and hence whatever surplus may accrue
during

8s.

Subscriptions will be continued until ordered stopped
by a written
order, or at the publication office. The Publishers cannot
be responsible
for Remittances unless made by Drafts

or

fact that the

Post-Office Money Orders.

Liverpool Office.

The offioe of the Chronicle iu
Liverpool is at No. 5 Brown’s Build¬
ings. where subscriptions aiid advertisements will
be taken at the
regular rales, and single copies of the paper
supplied at Is. each.
A neat tile cover is furnished
at 50 ceDts: postage on the same is 18
cents. Volumes bound for subscribers at
$1 00.
WILLIAM B. DANA. 1
WILLIAM B. DANA & CO.,
Publishers,
JOHN Q. FLOYD.
5
79 & 81 William
Street, NEW YORK.
Post Office Box 958.

the

next

twelve months,

redemptions and

none

balance.

a

Thi3 is

must all of it go. into- debt
it towards increasing the

of

very important consideration as a
starting point for all who wish to make a correct estimate
On page 15 will be found the detailed
returns, by States, of of bond calls during the coming year.
On another
the National Banks, under the
Comptroller’s call of May 1, occas:on we may pursue that branch of the
subject
kindly furnished us by Mr. Knox. Previous returns were pub¬ further. In this connection
we have
the
prepared
follow¬
lished, those for March 13 in the Chronicle cf May 12,
page
ing gratifying exhibit, showing the annual Government
532, those for Dec. 30 in the issue of March 21,
page 337.
revenue since
1870, the portion of that revenue which
has been left for debt
THE
reduction, and the interest

FINANCIAL

SITUATIONi

The situation has exhibited no marked
feature
the past week.
Whatever of influence the

have exerted has been of
weather has been hot and

during

growing

a

favorable nature,

as

Year ending

the

Railroad earnings
have also made
satisfactory progress for the season, while
the movement of breadstuffs and
provisions to the seabroad and to foreign ports has become
freer, now that the

July J

-

Customs

Receipts.
$

In’envU
Revenue

O tfier

Receipts.

Receipts.

$

187.)

104,538,574:184,899,756

1871....;

1874

206,270,408
216,370,287
188,0S9,523
163.103.a34

1875

157,167,722 110,007,404

1872
1813

143,098,151
130,642,178
113,729,314

last bit of life has been extracted from the
speculation in
those articles.
At the same time all
departments of trade
have exhibited the usual

1370

148,071,985 110,700,732

1817..

130,950,493 118,630,408

1878

130,170,680 110,581,625

having of late

1879
1830

137,250,048:113,561,611
186,522,065,124,003,374

holiday quietness, business circles

the very
and the

given

Public Debt.

-

crops

forcing.

years more and more
ments and recreation the first week in
The chief subject of interest and

charge

at the close of each
year.

up to amuse¬

July.
discussion has been

102,409,785

1881

198,159,076 115,264.3811

1832

220,410,730( 140,497,59'

188:1

213.534,240 144,330,35:

*

Total

Receipts.

Year's
Decrease.

Interest*
Charje.

*
$
$
$
10,521,703 395,959,834 102,643*81 118,734,960
25,002,543 .74,431,105 94.327,765 111,949,331
17,631,705 30 4,394,230 10 \544,491*103,983,463
20,353,837 322,177.674 43.667.63ol 94,049,804
34,427,472 299,94’,09,
4.730,472 98,790,005
10,845,555 284,020,77! 14,399,515 90,855,691
25,293,868 290,006.585 29,249,382 95,104,269
3 i,413,741 281.000,642
S9,281,121 93,160,644
10,694,471 257,4 40,77( 24,371,302 94,654.473
21,510,47 272,322,137
8,579,575 83,773.779
22,995,062 133,523,5)1 85,034,901 78,033,981
27,358,23 $60,782,29!' 101,57 V*84 75,018,696
30,010.924 1-03.525,24 L51,684 351
57.360.110
41,45.3.92; :99,318.511 137,823,253 51,436,709
.

favorable Government debt statement just issued
Computed on tbs a aount of debt outstanding at tho dose of
the fiscal year.
figures of receipts and disbursements for the
Besides the treasury figures for the fiscal
fiscal year.
year, we have
We cannot help congratulating our readers this week
the record of failures for the first six
months of
upon the complete vindication these
reports furnish of the 1883, and this has attracted some
attention.
In
view of
estimates made by us from time to time
during the last the depressed state of many branches of
trade, the low




*

•

THE CHRONICLE.

2

prices everywhere prevailing and the small margin of
profit on all transactions, it was scarcely to be expected
that the showing would be a favorable one, and in point of
fact

we

find

a

decided increase in both number and

The

amount of failures over

either 1882

ber of failures for the

six months reaches 4,j337, against

or

1881.

num.

3,597 in the same period of 1882 and 2,862 in 1881 ;
while the aggregate of liabilities reaches $66,189,034?

[Vol. XXXVII.

diminished profits, the disparity between production
consumption became still more marked. Having
foreign market for our manufactured goods, and the

upon
and
no

domestic markets

being inadequate to their consumption,
glut became inevitable, and it is from the effects of this,
as much as from anything, that we have
been suffering.
Of course, with prices sufficiently low, this glut will soon
be removed, and the increase during May—small though
it be—in the exports of articles other than those of our
chief commodities, suggests one way in which this may
be brought about.
At the same time, it would seem that
there must be some other influence at work tending to re¬
press activity and restrict trade, for (as will appear by our
a

against $50,580,920 and $40,877,150 respectively. Can¬
ada makes even a poorer exhibit. In the first six months of
1882 the failures there reached only 371, while this year
they have increased to 687, with liabilities twice as great,
the aggregate having been $4,116,570 in 1882, and being
this year $8,249,060.
As to the failures in the United London letter on another page) stagnation, dullness, inac¬
States, a more convenient and useful comparison is had by tivity, and want of confidence, are as patent abroad as they
separating the failures into quarterly periods, and we take are here. Is it not the fear of the outcome of the silver
from Messrs. R. G. Dun & Co.’s circular the following question that is inducing caution in conducting business
exhibit of the failures, by quarters, in the first six months operations the world over ? In Europe, having demone'
tized silver, they are living under the dread of a drain
of eight years past.
of gold to this country, and here silver dollars are piling
FIRST QUAKTI- U.
SECOND QUARTER.
up in the Treasury vaults at a rate that can not but excite
Xo.
Averaac
Tears.
Xo.
i
i
A rent(ic
A mount of
Fa i l
Li (tin li¬
Fail- | J
0/ j LiabiU- grave apprehensions as to the future. - Certainly, there
Liabilities.
arcs.
lies.
ures.
are many persons who regard
j J^aLtliUcs. :
ties.
this as about the only
1870... 2,800
$04,044,156 $23,038
1,794 $13,771,273 ! $24,398 drawback to a full recovery of confidence and an active,
1877... 2f80o
23,972
19,010
54,538,074
1,8^0
45,098.097
1878... 3,355
82.078,820
48,753,940 j
2,470
24,404
19.738 healthy business in the early future.
1879... 2,521
17.081 ! 1,534
43, i 12,065
22,600,725 j
14,770
1880... i 1,432
12,777.074
8,922 | 1,065
20,111,689 i
18,88 1
Though the trade figures for May, published on Monday,
1881 ...r !,701
14,031
24,447,250
13,900 1 1.105
10,499,395
showed
1882... 2,127
1,470
33,338,271
17,242,049 ;
15,070
only a balance of 1^ million dollars in our.favor for
11,722
13.000 j 1,810
1883... 2,821
38,372,6 43
27,810,391 !
15.311
that period and there is little reason to expect a better exhibit
In both tile first and the second quarter there is here for the month of June, the market for foreign exchange has
quite an increase over the years immediately preceding. been dull and inclined to heaviness the past week. There
In the first quarter there was a large augmentation in the is a slight pressure of commercial sterling drawn against
number of failures, but a smaller proportionate increase shipments of produce, while the chief demand is for sight
in the aggregate of liabilities, leaving the average of bills and cable transfers.
Bankers note an indisposition
liabilities to each failure only $13,600, against $15,670 in to buy commercial bills at current figures, and any
the same period of 1882, and indicating a larger number urgency in the offerings wouli most likely have an
of failures among small traders.
In the second quarter, unsettling effect upon the market. That there will be a
however, there is a decided increase in the average amount comparatively liberal supply of these drafts very soon
of each failure, the 1,81C failures in that quarter em¬ seems probable from the fact'that the staples bought at
bracing liabilities to amount of $27,81-0,391, or $15,311 the Western centres about a week ago, when prices fell
to each individual failure, against only $11,722 in 1882.
so
as
to place provisions and
breadstuffs within the
This increase is not surprising when we recall the recent reach of purchasers for shipment, will m a few days be
heavy failures of speculators in the grain and provisions delivered, so that the bills against them can be made
trades in the West; and an examination of Messrs. Dun & available.
It is pos^tble that, anticipating this supply,,
Co.’s statement develops the fact that for the six months of buyers of exchange are now holding off.
1883 (the details by States are not given for each quarter
So far as the offerings of speculative bills are concerned,,
separately) Chicago records $7,538,068 liabilities on 125 there seems little probability of large amounts of them
failures, or an average of over $60,000 to each failure—an being drawn, for the reason that money in London will
average larger than that recorded by any State or city in most likely remain at the current rate, or may advance
Messrs. Dun & Co.’s whole list. Notwithstanding its larger rather than decline.
After having drawn to the Bank
average liabilities, however, the second quarter presents ah £758,000 for the six weeks ended June 21st, the 4 per cent
encouraging feature in the fact that it shows a more rate seems to have nearly exhausted its power to draw
marked falling off than usual in the number of failures as much more gold from abroad, and as the reserve is now
compared with the number taking place in the first quar¬ decreasing, and as there is usually a drain upon the
ter, which fact offers room for hope that we have passed Bank from this time on till autumn, it is clear that no
the lowest point of depression, and may expect some im¬ reduction in the rate can be looked for, and speculative
provement in this respect in the future, if no untoward bills must therefore be drawn on the basis of 4 per cent in
circumstance or event interferes.
London.
At the moment it does not seem probable that
There is, however, nothing strange in a record of increas¬
money will rule very high here until the fall, so that
ing failures in times of depression and stagnation in trade. speculation with sterling, based upon cheap money abroad
Nor is the existing depression unnatural or unexplained. and dear rates here, will be light.
Bills drawn against
We are suffering the effects of a reaction from the future shipments of produce and cotton can doubtless be
extreme elation and exhilaration that prevailed a
couple covered at a profit, but, as remarked above, the demand is
of years ago.
We were enjoying marvellous prosperity? so light at the moment that drawers will have to make
and so long as there was no check to this, matters went such liberal concessions as to reduce materially the profits
along smoothly. But when a crop failure of unexam¬ of the operation. It is reported that Europeans are now
pled dimensions, and other unfavorable circumstances, buying some of our leading securities for more or less
combined to change the aspect of affairs, it soon became permanent investment and are also taking a few of our
apparent that we were producing in excess of our means speculative stocks, but as there is very little evidence of
to consume.
And with enforced contraction, consequent this in the exchange market, it may be assumed that the




,

1

.

•

July 7,

THE CHRONICLE.

1883. |

)uyirg is not liberal.

The following shows relative prices

leading bonds and stocks in London and New York
the opening each day.
of

July 2.
Lond’ii

Lond’u

July 4.

118-82

U.S.3%s. 10352
37c6

Erie
2d

%
102344
3734
0«34

118-82

119

103-52

37-14

102*44
313*

90-43

06*4
133%
uo%
58%

con.

96 43

Ill. Cent.

132-65

133

13314

N. Y. C..

11902
29 21+

Ont.W’r

26-43

119%
583,;
26J4

119-43

Readim
St. Paul

104-62

104*4

29"24+

20-55
104-26

July 5.

N.Y.

prices* prices. prices * prices
U.S.4s,c.

deferred

till

much

26
104

Lond'n

July 6.

N.Y.

Lond'n

N.Y.

X
(->

out of the banks for customs has this week to

o

118-82

>«

10352

119

11£94

offset

for 4

o

96-43

13363

p

26-55
104-26

104J4

10585

29-24+

V
r—«

o

w

96-43

13338

11992
C3

96

133*4
11934
58%
26*4

120-17

29-61+

59%

2667

The

96

133%
119%

the

4-8934

Expressed in their New York equivalent,
t Reading on basis of $50, par value.

some

extent

disbursements for interest

by the Treasury.
Clearing House banks, according toreturns collected by us, have received from and
shipped
to the interior gold and
currency as follows the past week.

no%

102*4* 10303 10234*
37-07
37
37 09
37%

26%
105%

New

York

Week Ending July 6, 1883.

Received by

Shipped by

Net Interior

N.Y. Banks.

N.Y. Banks.

Movement.

£987,000

Gold

4-89*4

*

was

season-

is being offered
5v}@G for five and six months, the rate being governed
by the character of the security. The drain of money

prices.* prices. prices.* prices.

4-89J4

The stock market

the

money

Currency
4'89%

in

At present, time loans are obtainable at 5
per cent
months on prime stock collaterals,and

at

Bxch’ge
cables.

later

at

July 3.

N.Y.

be

to

3

$657,000

40,000

Total gold and legal tenders

$1,027,000

■’

J Ex interest.

Gain.

..$330,000

Gain...

£057,000

40,00(T

Gain...$370,000

.

The above shows the actual

dull and almost without feature

this week until after the Fourth of

changes in the bank hold¬
caused by this movement to and

ing of gold and

currency
July holiday. Western
from
the
In addition to that movement the banka
interior.
unfavorably influenced on Monday by the
refusal of Judge Freedman to vacate the injunction
granted have gained $1,44G,718 through the operations of the Subto restrain payment of dividends on the
alleged illegal Treasury. Adding that item, therefore, to the above, we
issue of stock, but it subsequently recovered on the an¬ have the following, which should indicate the total
gain to
nouncement that checks for the
the
N.
Y.
dividends, as they fell
Clearing House banks of gold and currency
due, would be forwarded to holders of stock. On Tues¬ for the week covered by the bank statement to be issued
day Central New Jersey and Reading advanced on a report to-day.
that the injunction
proceedings before Judge Nixon in
Week Ending July 0, 1883.
Into Banks. Out of
Banks| Nct
Change in
the United States Circuit Court at
Bank

Union

was

*

Trenton, N. J., would

be dissolved

on

the

Reading’s giving

Holdings,

!

Movement, as above !
Sub-Treasury operations, net
!
Banks’ Interior

$1,027,000

$657,000

Gain. $370,000

bond as re¬
1,446,718
| Gain. 1,446.718
The business at the Exchange, how¬
Total gold and legal tenders.... 1 $2 473,718
$657,000 | Gain.$1,816,718ever, was almost unprecedentedly small on that day, and
The Bank of
England rate of discount remains un¬
there was very little animation even on
Thursday, until
changed
4
cent.
The Bank lost £172,000 bullion
at
per
the afternoon, when a decision favorable to the Union
Pacific in the suit to prevent the issue of collateral trust during the week, and the proportion of reserve to liabili¬
ties was reduced 6t per cent.
The Bank of France
bonds, started that stock upward, and some manipulation
reports
of
a
decrease
3,250,000 francs gold and 5,000,000'
of Central New
Jersey, Delaware Lackawanna & Western francs
silver,
and
the
Bank of Germany since the last
and the trunk line
shares, induced a covering of short return shows
a loss of
23,173,000 marks, if correctly re-*
contracts,- while commission houses reported good inquiry
The
ported.
following indicates the amount of bullion in
from outsiders for some of the best of the investment
the principal
European banks this week and at the cor¬
properties. The reports of increased earnings of the St.
Paul, Chicago & Northwestern, and some of the responding date last year.
July 5, 1883.
Southwestern roads, for June, stimulated purchases of
j| July 6, 1882.
a proper

quired by the court.'

these stocks, and the tone of the market

was

buoyant for the remainder of the day, as well as all through
Friday, the transactions on the latter day showing a mate¬
rial increase

previous days.

|

Gold.

strong to

£
Bank of

England

Bank of France..

Silver.

1

A

j

Gold.

Silver.

£

A

j

2 4,092.596
22,267,182
40,077,354 41,796,222 33,954,102 16,407,398
7,693,587
j*23,080,763 7,025,750 21,077,250

Those arguing in favor Bank of Germany
of a rise contend that
general trade is improving, that the Total this week
70,038,123 64,876,985 70,072,450 >7,484,648
70.629.646 65,946,351
prospects for the fall business are excellent, that there will Total previous week
70,401,949 >7,812,651
be a large distribution of
The Assay Office paid
goods west-bound for the* re¬
$28,736 through the Submainder of the summer, that confidence is
being gradually Treasury during the week for domestic bullion, and the
restored among non-professional
speculators, and that the Assistant Treasurer received the following from the Cus¬
leaders in the market will take
advantage of these facts tom House.
and unite for the
long-looked for upward movement in
Consisting of—
prices. It remains forJhe future to determine how far
Date.
Duties.
JJ. S.
Gold
Silver Cer¬
Gold.
these expectations are
likely to be realized.
Notes.
Cert if.
tificates.
Money on call continues easy, and this ease is in part June29...
$836,327 GO
$6,000 $41,000 $718,000
$72,000
over

-

due to the liberal disbursements
by banks and corpora¬
tions for July dividends and interest.
Boston rates are

no

longer high enough

to draw funds from here—
in fact have advanced to
par and a small premium—and
the supplies which were sent to
Philadelphia last week
appear to have returned.
It does not seem likely that
money will soon be required from this centre for crop pur¬
poses.
Last year breadstuffs were marketed and hurried
to the seaboard as soon as
harvested, and consequently
the cash in

banks was drawn down from
for the week ended July 15
to $70,069,800
our

$90,9G0,900
by the end of
September, while ..the reserve fell from a surplus of
$10,550,950 on the first-named date, to a deficiency of
$2,271,825 in the week ended September 23. This year
the movement of
money out of this
city is likely




“

30...

505,774 38

8,000

July 2...

1,403,021 07
633,848 60

30,000

“

3...

“

4...

“

5...

689,941 77

Total.

$4,008,913 42

7,000
Iloli
13,000

21,000
388,000
42,000 1,146,000
31,000
527,000

88.000

185,ooa
69,000

day
27,000

599,000

51,000-

$64,000 $162,000 3,378,000

$465,000

OUR DIMINISHING TRADE BALANCE.
The

May statement of our foreign commerce, issued thisby the Bureau of Statistics, shows at what a low ebb
our trade has been
running, and again discloses the basis
for the high rates of
exchange that have prevailed now for
some months.
It is seen that we
narrowly escaped an
adverse balance in May.
In fact, nothing but our reduced
imports—the total imports in the month this year being
12 millions less than in
May a year ago—served to preweek

THE CHRONICLE.
vent such a. result.

[Vol. XXXVII,

As it

is, the merchandise exports are deserving of notice. As between an agricultural year
only a trifle more than a million and a half in excess of of plenty and one of failure, a gain of nine millions
the impprts, and though this of course compares favorably
might be thought of very little account/ but what is par¬
with last year, when there was an excess of imports in the
ticularly noteworthy is that the gain comes only in part
large sum of 19 million dollars, it does not make so good from agricultural products and the like. ’ Thms the breada showing when compared with the balance of
8£ millions stuffs exports exhibit a gain of but a million and a half,
in our favor in May, 18j61.
The balance is so insignifi¬ and provisions a gain of only $110,000. Of cotton, we
cant, chiefly by reason of the small shipments of some of shipped 290,501 bales, against 203,622 bales in
May, 1882,.
our leading
staples, principally breadstuffs and provisions, but the price of that staple was at least 1^: cents per pound
which staples cliques of speculators had run up to such les3 this
year.
Allowing to the cotton exports a gain of
figures as practically to (preclude an outward movement three million dollars in value, and adding on the gain in
of any magnitude.
To show this more clearly, we give a provisions and bread stuffs, we get an aggregate gain on
statement of our merchandise exports, as well' as imports, these three articles of * about 4
J million dollars, to which
by months, for five years past.
should be added an increase of 1£ million dollars in the
petroleum exports, swelling the total to G millions, and
1879.
1680.
1831.
1832.
18S3.
leaving a gain of nearly three millions on other articles.
§
$
Exports MercJvi ndlse.
*
%
$
January
59,409,191 06,997,173 74,078,00-' 64,021,051 80,330,253
This gain on other articles is significant,
for it would
February.....
61,628,737 59,956,673 07,7:33,807 56,006.533 66,855,239
Mar oh
appear to show that at the present depressed prices for
.66,151,745 77,350,547 85,003.791 62,613,872 77,(358,740
April
54,311,802 70,500.538 70,885,015 57,052,376 60,898,159 all
articles, we are finding a wider market for our goods,
52,355,260 65,006.477 64,140.179 4), 178,968 57,001.594
May
Total

soLosor/os 340,531,408 3*31,90 7,357 291,272,800 343,603,985

March

!

45,284,65 - 56,056,224 56,971,198

33,515,040 55,203,488
35,373,419 55,647,-171
41,850.611 70,886,561

47,759,493
60,709,174
59,179,014

58,826,926
68,603,801
66,361,167

April

4.2,130,101

May.

35,873,016 64,870,080 55,503.722 68,350,029

Total
Excess of Exports
*

188,257,817
108,831,981

74,360,455

320,985,655'20S,436,861
19,545,753

03,470,49:

5f3.300.518

60,780.603
57,005,401
56,265.402

310,098,147 287,323,122
‘27,825,347

56,370,863

Deficit.

Excepting last

that

values

Imports Merchandise.
January
February

and

when, for special reasons known to
all, we had nothing to send out, the export movement in
May was thus smaller this year than in any other year
since 1879. On the other hand, our imports too, as already
intimated, have been diminishing, the total irt May having
been not only smaller than in 1882, but smaller also than
1880, and only a little larger than in 1881. For the
five months of the calendar year to the 1st of June, the
exhibit may be termed fairly favorable on both imports
and exports.
The total.'of exports for that period, not¬
withstanding the small movement of late months, aggre¬
gates as much as 343^ .millions, and that total has been
but once exceeded—namely in 1881.
The imports we do
not of course expect to compare with 1879, but
among
the years subsequent only 1881 can show a smaller aggre¬
gate than 1883. It is, however, the relative movements
of both exports and imports that show most clearly our
trade position in the different years-, and here we find an
excess-of exports this year of 50 millions, which was
exceeded in both 1879 and 1881; but is very much better
than in either 1880 or 1882.
Referring now more par¬
ticularly to the movement this year compared with last,
the following gives the exports anl imports at each leading
year,

port.

foreigners

are

disposed to buy of

U3

whenever

low

enough. It is well known that one of the
points in our industrial position is the great pre¬
ponderance of agricultural products in our exports,
making us thus dependent for our prosperity almost
wholly upon the out-turn of the crops. If the crop failure
of 1881 has taught us that we must seek greater diversity
in our export trade, in order to give stability to our
industrial position, it has taught us a much-needed lesson.
The bread stuffs and provisions exports at each port in
May and the five months are set; out in the following table.
The falling off in the breadstuffs exports at San Francisco
explains the falling off above in the total movement from
that port.
It is becoming clear that at $l'12a bushel
(the price this year)’we cannot expect very liberal exports
of wheat from that port.
In May last year the average
price was a little less than a dollar a bushel, and almost
are

weak

four times

as

much wheat went out.

.

EXPORTS OF BREADSTUFFS AND PROVISIONS FROM LEADING TORTS.

1883.
Bread stuffs.

Mag.

Since Jan.

$
4,489,947

New York
New Orleans
Baltimore
Boston

350,896

1,530,973

1882.

j

1.1

May.

$
29,389,310;

$
4,114,919
27,152

5,356,7841

11,748.460

710,089
802.141

Since Jan. 1.

$
23,101,545
670,345
5,185,804
4,349,311

1,501.524

5.997,3621

1,087,970
1,427,092
775,537

5,493,800}

3H7.1G3

1.682,280

12,060,188!

3,546,477,

3,263,200
801,256

15,820.869
4,475,59%

11,075,939

73,592,337}

10,110,925

55,580,737

New York
New Orleans
Baltimore
Boston

4,293,121

30,788,630

1,832

35,377

4 4,151

Philadelphia

670,837
3 4,701

269,128

873,010
6,709,742
3,781,085
171,833
1,478,927

0,265.415

43,833,604

Philadelphia
San Francisco
Other ports
Total

Provisions, tCc.

951,045

San Francisco
O flier ports

Total

j

.

4,(515,396

29,330,970

5,854
57,562

29,017
437,663

483,966

0,823,190
4,524,803

;

716.006
26,263

145,740

139,963

1,653,159

6,155,015

42,956,216

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE AT U. S. PORTS.

In
.

Exports (Domestic
and Foreign.)
-

Mag'.

1833.

Since Jan. 1.:

the

individual

18S2.

|

aside from the
Mag.

Since Jan. 1.

features are, a

items

of

the breadstuffs

small total of the wheat

exports,

shipments, the

continued gain in the shipments of flour, a
$
$
$
$
New York
27,239.723 144.799,748 j 25,335,470 130,309,54 6
very heavy movement of corn, and quite a large move¬
New Orleans
5,249,59 4 47,013, 891
3,573,969 33,537,471
Baltimore
4,218,(354 22,815,80(31
1.855,9v*>8 12,329,537 ment of rye.
The shipments of corn were over five
Boston, &c
(3,232,218 26,9 JO,'36 j
3,742,022 24,519,428
million
bushels
3.878,224
greater than in May, 1882. Indeed,
Philadelphia
16,3(39,039}
2,983,453 13,039,819
Ban Francisco
2,415,566 17,2 J 3,237
4,4 87,'948 21,439.995
AU other ports
8,669,61 » 68.546,002 j
7,201.018 50,097,004 except for this gain in corn, the value of the breadstuffs
Total
57,901,594 313,093,9871 49,178,908 291,272,800 exports—such was the falling off in the wheat movement—
would have been materially less than a year ago, when
-■
!
Imports.
New York
36,630,760 197.653,294! 45,382,223 218.017.917 our
surplus for export was down to the smallest limit for
992.528
1,901,60!
4,159,524;
"5,353,330
Baltimore
1.118,016
5,957,64 o!
1,079.102
5,817,355 years.
The shipment of 565,766 bushels rye appears
7,523.985 32,300,969}
Boston, Ac
7,2 17,25 1 32,982.821
3,007,370
Philadelphia
14,193,580}
4,382,151 17,(61,072 large, not only as compared with the 101,868 bushels sent
Ban Francisco
2,sS 1.993 10,4 18,521
3,896,392 15.718,638
All other ports
4,101,750 16,579,594
5,361,006 23,116.414 out in May a year ago, but also in view of the fact that
Total
56,265.402 287,323,122
the total shipments of that cereal during the whole of
68,350,029 3 i 9,098.147
"While the reduction of 12 millions here shown in the 1881 were'only 9S5,007 bushels—which has already been,
imports is a very gratifying feature, the gain of pretty exceeded thus far in the current year—and during 1882
nearly nine millions in the exports is none the less were 3,420,640. bushels/ The following is our usual table..




/

>

■

7,1883 ]

Jew

THE CHRONICLE.

.

6

EXPORTS OF BRUAD8TUFE8 IN MAY AND 8INCB JANlTAltY 1.

Quantity.
JToy.

1883.

.bush.

Barley

bush.

Corn

Corn-meal...
Oats

.bush.

Rye

.bush.

Wheat
Wheat-hour

.bush.
..

.

bbla.

,1882.

1883.

51,932
6,332,156

3,795
1,235,555

22,748
19,738
565,766
2,972,397
591,554

10,388
1G.851

1892.

f
31,1

Receipts overland at N.Y., Boston.&c.
Shipments between (or South from)

$
u

3,381
1,011,077
79,295
10,897

()

4,186,557
74,817

Corn

101,868

11,631
443,495

5,296,836
427,514

3,470,247
3,458,057

6,151,397
2,725,153

11,075,939

10,110,925

Oats

.bush.
.buah.

Rye

40, U5
9,108,853
90,882

29,163,302

Wheat
.buah.
Wheat-hour.. bbla.
.

108,210
93,223
1.004,783
25,763,182
3,938,905

*

91,923

Sh

5,513

11,613

15,178

ipments inland (not otherwise deductcd) from—

•.

,

Galveston
New Orleans.

„

Mobile

50

14,913

1,051

37

15,442
83,775
1,435

2.253

27,304

Savannah

32,111
6,783,029

10,798,887
369,831

1,480

54,566

61,152

514,878

796,133
29,513,768
22,977,279

488,491
32,939,724
14,956,929

28,463,387
2,447,542

North Carolina porta

-

47,402
1,190

73,592,387

55,586,737

754

2,468

5,413
9,520

10,236

Total to bo deducted

547,468

632,708

542,940

Leaving total not overland!

637,693

464,336

509,799

Virginia ports

325,298

t This total Includes ship incuts to Canada

.

by rail,

1882, amount to 36.076 bales.

5,9.81

wh tch since Sept.

the

provisions exports we find for May a very
decided increase in the shipments of beef, (mostly fresh
beef, not salted) and an equally decided decrease in the
shipments of bacon and hams, the gain in the value of
the one just about counterbalancing the loss in the other.
Subjoined are tho figures.
EXPORTS OF PROVISIONS, AC., IN MAY AND SINCE JANUARY 1.
a

May.
Beef,

Pounds.

1883.

Value.

1882.

1983.

Tallow

1882.

$

fresh and

salted
Bacon and hauis
Lard
Pork

11.863,614
17,777,744
14,912,318
3,978,635
4,767,886

.

Butter
Cheese

$

4,701,933

1,169,616

23,570,109

1,850,457
1,735,933
390,215

13.870,713
5,130,216
4,756,780

977,067
1,681,757

448,814
2,514,*03
1,007,192
474,351
t 89,733
103,389
£;
(\

415.0;;0

515^)34

155,263

5,741,105

549,9^0

Total

.

r*

.

» o

6,265,115

0,155,015

6,715,372

•4,323.244
18,846.226
11,475,716.

Since Jan. 1.
Beef, fresh and
salted

67,751,657
181,501,128
91,000,937
29,874,947
20,426,961

Bacon and hams
Lard
Pork

Tallow
Butter

.

Cheese
Total

40,308,201

186,203,317

19,429,113

100,021,457
35.220,973
2 »,513,092

6,853,016

2,473.477

10,349,690
2,784.097
1,669,814
1,143,983

15; 138,467

25,080,448

1,746,035

2,713,010

43,833.601

42.936.216

-

COTTON

CONSUMPTION
MOVEMENT

Our overland statement

day to the 1st of July,
issue before

lished in

our

wo

are

,939,201
509,270

OVERLAND

the
is

1,273,729 bales greater than in 1881-S2, and 212,935
bales larger than for the same months of 1830-81. Foreign
exports during June are I033 than for the same month of
the two preceding seasons, but tho total up to date is
1,151,770 bales in excess of last year, and 246,441 bales
over the
corresponding period of 1880-81. Stocks at
both the ports and interior towns are in excess of last
year, the former by 81,335 bale3 aad the latter by about
29,000 bales. We give below our usual table of receipts,
exports and stocks.
Movement from

Sept. 1,1882 to
July 1, 1883.
Galveston

able to

bring down to¬

shall
crop report, which is pub¬
we

TO

JULY

shipments by rail in June do not make as
showing compared with previous years as
during the earlier months, yet the total for the ten months
is far in exeess of any preceding season.
The month’s
movement has been 31,720 bales, against 41,028 bales in
June, 1882, and 50,449 bales for the same month of 1881;
and for the season to date the totalis 1,185,1GG bales,
against 1,097,044 bales in the preceding season, and
1,052,739 bales in 1880-31.
The net figures for the
month are also below those fot the two previous
seasons^
but for the ten months show an increase over last year of
173,362 bales and over the previous year of 127,899
•

The details for tho nine months of

these three

:

Sept. 1,

Sept. 1,

Great

1883.

1881.

Brit’in*

Wilmington
Moreh’d C„ &c.
Norfolk

West Point,&c.

New York

83»,171

Since September 1, shipped-—
From St. Louis

Over Illinois Central
Over Cairo & Vincennes
Over the Mississippi River,above St.L..
Over Evansville & Terre Haute
Over Jeffersonville Mud. &Indianapolis
Over Ohio <fc Mississippi Branoh
Over Louisville Cincinnati &

Lexington

Receipts at Cincinnati by Ohio River...
Receipts at Cincinnati by Cin. Southern
Over other routes

Shipped to mills, not included above...
Total gross overland

*This uumui’a movement estimated,




1881-82.

1830-81.

nent.

39,338

831,350

285,355

84,8-10

9,35'J

Total.

517,510

12,653

437,124 1,533,829
1,100
43,290

100.835

f#IMI

10)

100

8.325

283,033

418.998

3,533

130,781

24,775

214,025
2,990
4,590

309,581
3,289
57,763

8,800

299

•

«

•

i

53,173

1,347
•

341,2:30
29,184
498,361
177,670
170,512
94,027'

28,985

••••

197,560
7,080
18,503
5,107

418,385 1,366,107 4,503,834

•81,519

29,096

156,734
443

4,823

63,009
3,386

2,789,342

i

370,221
29,184
684,191
178,113
.238,344
97,413

22,918

Total 1881-82....

4,620,487 2,278,370

850,251

777,443 3,412,004

300,134

Total 1880-81...

5,681,331 8,609,828

540,lyi 1,107,374 4,317,30a

358,543

f
*

■

Great Britain exports include to tlio Channel.

Using the facts disclosed by the foregoing statements,
we shall find that tho
portion of the crop which ha3 reached
a market
through the outports and overland, and tho
Southern consumption since September 1 this year and the
two previous years, is as follows.
1882-93.| 1881-82.

1880-81.

Receipts at the porta to July 1
bales. 5,894,216 4,620,487
Net shipments overland during same timo
461,b36

b.681,281

637,698j

509,799

Total receipts
bales. 6,631,9145,084,823 6,191,080
Southern consumption since September 1.
195,000

3l8,<X)0j 229,000

toales. 6,819,914 5,313,823 6,380,080

The

increase

in the amount of cotton marketed

during the

first ten crop months of 1882-83 is thus seen to be 1,536,
091 bales over 1831-82 and 463,834 bales over 1880-81.

5,350

38,401

196,936

153,593

*113,000
27,799
52,115
60,035
52,229
46,675
72,615
87,000
10,423

101,701
14,929

116,479
139,363
24,418

100,240

82,546

prepared the following.

24,849

41,326
40,172
63,852
76,808
23,037
13,062

Total receipts to July 1, 1883, as above
Stock on baud commencement of your (Sept.

1,185,166 1.097,044 1,052,739

Stocks

July 1.

25,658

376,958

102,080
57,051
130,254
12,579
16,S64

TO-

110,312

411,097
22,207

388,275

109,593

•••••<

‘

-

Conti¬

France.

817,598

Total to Julyl
1882-83.

t, 1382,

.

5,894,216

Brunswick, &c.

Baltimore

.1, 1883.

since

Total 1982-83....

Mobile

aXPORTS StNCi2 SEPT,

since

Philadelphia,Ac.

Now Orleans....

Boston

MOVEMENT

Receipts Receipts

420,245
10,905
13,727
1,649.670 1,181,013
310,612 261,653
27.207
18,423
808,288 725,518
5,503
7,028
505,082 494,630
24,593
24,393
127,197
134,779
19,457
20,555
795,132 009,1-5
226,930 191,860
137,52!
158,892
188,601
225,653
06,424
21,240
107,591
90,876

Indianola, &c..

Port Royal,&c.

The gross
favorable a

follows

receipts have further increased during the month
compared with 18S2, but show a falling off from
figures of 1881; the total for tho ten months however

when

Charleston

JULY 1.

September.

years are as

Port

Florida
Savannah

AND

TO

J

EXPORTS AND SPINNERS' TAKINGS.

RECEIPTS,

3,! 19,489

This is tho last statement

annual cotton

OVERLAND

bales.

463,203

A

96,135

103,153

Total

In

496,667

Charleston

138.102

Corn-meal

1880-81%

500,197

Western interior towns

Since Jan. 1.
.bush.
.bush.

1881-82.

Deduet—

Total

Barley..

!

1832-83.

Value.

To determine the
of Northern

portion which has

spinners

during the

gone
same

into the hands
period, we have
bales.

0,819,914

1, 1882)—
At Northern ports
98,892
At Southern ports
*
21,330—120,722
At Providence, &c., Northern interior markets
8,510—
...

Total supply to July 1,1883
Of this supply there has been exported
to foreign porta since Sept. 1,1382..4,563,334

121,232

0,974,140

THE

6
1x69 foreign cotton included

CHRONICLE

against, May 30, 690,000 pieces, April 30, 600,000 pieces,

4,977—4,558,857
36,076
1,405

Sent to Canada direct from West
Burnt North and South

[VOL. XXX\II.

and June last year,

1,572,000 pieces.
—

hand end of month (July 1, 1883) —
At Northern ports
hales 228,109

■Stock

on

-

18S3.

ports
153,410—331,519
At Providence, &c., Northern interior markets..
7,872—4,985,729

takings by spinners since September 1,1882

318 000

Taken by Northern spinners since September 1,1882
Taken by Northern spinners same time in 1881-82

by Northern spinners this

year,

1,670,417
1,547,874
.bales.

122,543

The above indicates that Northern

spinners had up to
-July 1 taken 1,670,417 bales, an increase over the corres¬
ponding period of 1881-82 of 122,543 bales, and an increase
the

•over

months of 1880-81 jof 49,409

same

AMOUNT

OF

CROP

NOW

IN

bales.

SIGHT.

In the

have

foregoing we have the number of bales which
already been marketed this year and the two previous
An additional fact of interest is the total.of the

seasons.

which was in sight on July 1, compared with a
year ago. We reach that point by adding to the above the
stock remaining at that date at the interior towns, less
stock held by them at the beginning of the season.
In

•crop

this

manner

we

July 1 to be

as

find the result for the three years on

follows.
1882-83.

Total marketed, aa above—bales.
Interior stocks in excess of Sept. 1

Total in sight

bales.

This indicates that

1881-82.

1880-81.

63,024

5,313.823
4,992

6,386,080
40,000

6,912,938

5.318,815

6.426,0-0

6,849.914

the increased

movement

up to

this

date of the present year is 1,594.123 bales as compared
with 1881-82, and 486,858 bales as compared with
1880-81.
WEIGHT

To furnish

OF

BALES.

exact measure of the

receipts up to
JTuly 1, we give below our usual table of the weight
of bales.
We give for comparison the figures for the
same time in the two
previous seasons.
a more

Same

Ten Months

ending July 1,1883.

Same

peri’d in! perVd in
1881-82. 1880-81

Number

-

of

Weight in

'Texas

Average Averagt
Weight. Weight.

Pound 8.

Bales.

Average
Weight.

8 43,071

436,786,651

51809

50116

510 02

1,649,670

795,536,861

482-24

466-78

481-36

Alabama

310,612

49400

508-00

832,219

482-60

47163

480-00

589,G75
1,022,118
146,654
1,455,895

156,237,836
401,628,889
278,615,025
485,986,445
69,025,638
727.583,526

503-00

Georgia*

47254

462-72

471-03

475-47

47003

473-28

470-67

468-70

469-68

499*75

476-67

500-00

6,849,914

3,351,430,874

489-27

474-28

486-69

movement

up to

Louisiana

■South Carolina.

Virginia
-North Carolina.

Tennessee, &c.-.
Total
*

Including Florida.

It will be

noticed that

the

July 1
■shows an increase in the average weight as compared with
the same periods of the last two years, the average this
year being 489-27 lbs. per bale, against 474-28 lbs. per
bale for the

same
THE

There
•cottons

and

was

a

time in 1881-82 and 486-69 in 1880-81,

COTTON

freer

GOODS

TRADE

movement

in

IN

JUNE.

brown and

bleached

during the month in the

cotton

flannels

ored

cottons

were

reduced

more important markets,
continued in good demand; but col¬

remained

quiet.

Fine bleached shirtings

from 12c. to lie. about

CotVn Print- Sheet• CotVn Print- Sheet- CotVn Print- Sheetlow
low
ing inys, miding ings, low
ing ings,
m id- cloths, standcloths, stand- mid- cloths, standdling. 6lrtJ4 ard. dling. 64a:64 ard. dling. 04Z04 ard.

J LTNE.

1,988,417

'Taken by Southern spinners

Increase in takings

1881.

i

At Southern

Total

1S32.

the middle of the

1
2
3
4

10*4
10*4

3-62

8

3-62

8

8...
3-o2
3-62
3-62
3-62
3-62
3-62
S...
3-62
3-62
3 62
3-62
3-62
3-62
S...
3-62
3-63
3-63
3-63
3-63
3-63
8...
3-63
3 "63
3*63

1 1

..

10*4
10*8
10*8
10*8
10*8
10*8

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

8
8
8
8
8
8

-

..

10*8
10*8
10*8
10*8
1 0*i«
10llfi

3
8
8
8
8
8

..

10
10
10

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27

10

10
10
..

10

97b
978

28

OJr

3-63

9l3ie

3-63

9ihs

29
30

1158
11*8

3S1
3-81

*8

111*16

ll3f “
11^

lli.q«
U13I6
11 *316
..

IU316 3-81
u

V

lllSjg
ll,516
12 q 6*
1231(i

3-81
3-81
3-81
3-81
3-81
S...
3-81
3 81
3 31
3-81
3*81
3-81
8...
3-81
3-81
3-8 L
3-83

12316

3-83

1144
11 44
1144

8
S
8
8
8

111316
1178
1 l7s
Hl3lfi

8
8
8
8

3-63

8
-

8

8*4
8*4

8*4
8*4

8*4
8*4

107,

A

8*4
s*4
8*4
8*4
8*4
8*4

8*4
8*4
8*4
8*4
8*4
8*4

..

8*4
8*4
8*4
8*4
8*4

8

8*3
8*^

8*3
S...

..

107,6
107,6
U)7,6
107,6

4

107,«

4
4

8*3
8*3
8*3
8*3

4
4
4

107,0

..

11 \
1144

4
4
4
4

IO’i6
101,6

!071G

..

8
'

3*81
S.
3-31
3-81
3-81
3 81
3-81
3-81
S...

8*4
8*4
8*4

107,6
107,6
107,6

8*3
8...

..

107,rt

Sha

-

4
4
4

8*3
8*3

315,C

8*3

8*3

1 v

107,1 o
r

'A15

107,6

31*16
..

*

8*o

8*3

S...

31*16
31*16
31*16
315,6

*8*3

107,6

3l*i«

8*9

1038
103a
IO-Jq

31*16
31*16
31*16
31*16

8*3
8*3
8*3
8*3

107,6
107,6
«07jg
107,6
! 07,

ft

103Q

8*3
8*3
8*3
8*3

,

Tlie above prices are—For cotton. lo*v middling upland at New York,
for printing cloths, manufacturers’ prices; for
sheetings, agents’prices
which are subject to an average discount of 5 per cent

FINANCIAL REVIEW OF
The month of June closed with

JUNE, 1883.

fair prospect
six months,

in com¬
however,
ending with June, were anything but satisfactory, and the
period has generally been regarded as a prolongation of
the reactionary movement which began at the Stock
Exchange about September, 1882.
Money was very easy in June, and there was little sign,
even on time loans and commercial
paper, of an appre¬
hension of tight money late in the summer ; but this was
merely the feeling of the moment, and is not at all con¬
clusive as to whether the money market will or will not
work closely in August and September.
The stock market was something of a disappointment,
as it showed much
strength at one time and gave promise
of a genuine upward movement, in which parties outside
of professional speculative circles would take an
important
part. Bat this expectation proved to be ill-founded, and
the market soon relapsed into its quiet state.
There was
a
fair demand for investment securities, and railroad
bonds generally gained in prices, particularly as the
interest period approached on many bonds paying semi¬
annual
coupons on July 1.
A comparison of the
prices of leading stocks on July 1 this year with
their
prices a year ago does not make an un¬
favorable
exhibit
in
most
cases,
except
where
there has been a distribution to stockholders, or “ privi¬
leges ” which amount to a large dividend during the year.
The most conspicuous decline is in New York Central &
Hudson, and in this instance the fact that a new parallel
road is under rapid construction is the main cause
alleged
for the large reduction in price ; it is also a matter of
record that in the year ending Sept. 30, 1883, this com¬
pany fell considerably short of earning its 8 per cent
dividends, on account of the reduced rates on trunk line
mercial and financial circles.

The

a

month, as a result of which very liberal sales were effected
by manufacturers’ agents, and the price was subsequently business.
advanced to ll^c.
Some accumulations of fine brown
Foreign exchange in June ruled quite firmly, and there
sheetings were closed out by means of slight price con¬ was some talk of an import of specie later on; but this
cessions, but otherwise the tone of the market was fairly was looked upon as doubtful by most of the bankers.
steady. Print cloths were in good demand, and prices From July 1 the new crops begin to come forward slowly,
ruled firm and steady throughout the month.
The stock and with reduced prices of grain and provisions, exports
of cloths held at the end of June is about 630,000
pieces, will probably increase.
v




THE CHRONICLE

1883.1

Jcly 7,

The

following summary shows the condition of the New
City Clearing-House banks, rate of foreign exchange,
and prices of leading securities and articles of merchan¬
dise, on or about the 1st of July, 1881, 1882 and 1883.

Rulro vds.

York

:es.

STATISTICAL SUMMARY ON OR ABOUT JULY 1.

1881. 1882

1881.
New York

City Banks—

Loans and discounts

1882.

Specie
deposits

Legal tenders
Legal reserve
Reserve held

Surplus reserve
Money, Exchange, Silver—
Call loans
Prime paper, sixty days
Silver in London, per oz
Prime sterling bills, GO days..
..

2® 3
3®4
51 %1.
4 81-4 85

2@5

3s, registered, option U. S
6s, currency, 1898
5s, 1881, (continued at 3%)...
4128, 1S91, coupon
4s of 1907, coupou
Railroad Stocks—
New York Central A Hud. Riv.
Erie (N. Y. L. E. & W.)
Lake Shore & Mich. Southern.

51*5iftd.

Illinois Central

com.

Chicago Milw. A' St. Paul,

com.

Delaware Lack. A Western
Central of New Jersey

114*8

117*8

103%
112%

120

119

146

131
36

119%
37 %

110%

103

...

Merchandise—

130

101%

89

129%
134%

126

123%

112%
127%

101%

76%

132*4
104%

banks in each week of June

were as

June 2.

June'9.

83*4

$77,732,350
86,804.000

Surplus
Range of call lo’ns

$0,071,650
2 @3%
4%(&5

Prime paper

$79,422,550

$9,069,i 75

$8,791,0 jO
2@3

89,213 600

2 © 3
4 (si 4%

June 30.

20,525,700

26,122,900

$80,770,000
89*759,500

$81,072,475
90.312,4 (0

$8,993,900

$9,239,925
223

424%

424%

CLOSING PRICES OP CONSOLS AND U. 8. SECURITIES
AT LONDON IN JUNE.

5s

4%S

ext. at

J une.

4s

|
of\

Jane.

1891. 1907.

3*2.

xOQUio 105 *e 114*2 121% ,20
lCOHie 105*8 114% 121% 21

JOoiiJy

..8...

100*4

100*4

105*8' 115

122*6

29
30

1007,g

105*81115

122
122
122
122
xl2I

100%

1005.6
1005 j(5

--8.J

100%

1009lfi
1009.6

105*8:115
105*8i 115
105*8'115

100*2

x04%|Llo
8.

ioo^G

I

..

.

105*81115

100*4'

121*8

105*8:115

O

s

5s

4 s of
of
1891. 1907.

3%.

105*4 115
105*4 115
105*4 115

121*4
121*4
121*4

105% 115% 121*2
..S...

........

LOO

*4
100*4
10 0 *4

.

105%
105%
105%
1 05%
105%
105%

10051B

IO05j(.
100*8

i*2L%

115%

115% 121*4
115% 121*4
115% 121%

115%
115*4

12114
121%

Opening
x00ll16 105% 114*2 xl21
Highest... l00n1G 105% 115* 122%
..

Lowest

Closing

...

...

100%
100%

x04%

106% 117
1233s
104% 114*4,!

100*8

The

following table will show the lowest, highest and
closing prices of railway and miscellaneous stocks at the
N. Y. Stock
Exchange during the months of May and
June, 1883.
RANGE OF STOCKS IN MAY AND JUNE.

—May.

Railroads.

Albany & Susqueh...
Atch. Top. & San.Fe.

Boat. A N.Y.Air L. pfBurl. Ced. Rap. & No.

Canadian Pacilic

....

Canada Southern
Cedar Falls A Minn
Central of N. Jersey.
Central Pacific
Ches. & Ohio

—CJ it UC.

Apr. 30. Low. Ilifilv.

Low.

132

130

......

132

82%

83%
84%

59%

81
81
60

65%

66%

63*4

67 %

80

*81

'

83

>

82
6L
65

.

Do

Do

Chicago &
Ho

1 at

pref.

2d pref.

Alton

r.

pref.

Chic. & Northwest...
L>o
pref.
Chic. & Rock Tslaud..

Prices bid.

75%

77%

71*4
19%
29%

21%
*31
*23
*133

pref

Chic. Burl. A
Quincy.
Chic. Mil. & St. Paul.
Do

76%

1263s
103%
*119%
135*8
151%
125%

21%
132*2

80%
-77%
21*4
32*4

23%

79%

75*4
*19*4
29

•21*4

135

140
12o 5q

140*8

100%
146 34

105*8 101%
12 1 34 *118*2
13530 130*8
153
14S3q

121*2

126*4

119

128%

126*2

123*4

122*2

N

Hiyh.J'nc 30.
132%

83%

81%
83

81

82%

61%

65

*84%
63%

§6 4

63%

14

§64%

17%

19

S9

85%

77%
20 »4

7534

28%

3 L

29

23%

21%

133%

136

122

126%

101%

10614 104%
121
*119%

119

130*8
148*2

122*2

136% § 13.2,2?
15334 -riso
126*4 125%




J Ex

privilege.

§Ex dividend

67 %

......

47%

....

54*8*

.

.

46

14
42

Minneapolis A St. L..

28

Do
prer.
Mo. Kaus. A Texas

*58

Missouri Pacific

101%

27%

31%

101*4

105*2
15*2

124*4

128

50%
120*4
10*4

125%

12%
27

39
133

180
25

19%
.

.

.

#

.

13

^

45

51%

39%
48%

88%

85

*12%
*34%

Mississippi...
Do
pref.

Ohio Southern

.

r

a.

••

...

85

Panama
Peo. Decat. A E’ville.

28%
108%
68%
13%

•

*20*2

Rensscl. A Saratoga

*42**

4*5

83%

93
99
10

§92%
10.
41 26

121%
10%
*23%

lls%
10%
23%

5 1

83

§S7%

35%

35%
79

33
177

12*4

*10%

27%
89*4
38%
•81*4
36*4

*23%

6%

20%

4130
50

53%

86%

87

10%
32*4

33

90%
li%
36*4
112%

9%
165%
12%

13%
32

80%

85%

8234

86%

*18

22%

5238
130

61*a

*23
.

.

t

.

.

B

83*4
58%

133

39

18%

6*4,
60*2
32*2

21%

19

65

29
85

74*3
93
36*4

5234
59*4
99
96*2
3434
3934
9634
9634
111*2 131%
27
26*2
40
34*2
19

97*2
35
.

36

29%
47*4

25%
40%

29%

26%

473*

42

65%

69*4

30
19

31
21
84

126%

91*4
55%
124

129
94

§93*2
124

25

*3*7%

39%
27*8
2 4%
8
99%

93%

31

80%

*34 >

•

97%
121%

19

98%

59*2
100
38

*

*58
*124

51%

89%
103s

lo%

32

91%

4*1%

145*2

91 *4
30

130

26%.

41
49 34

8234

37%
177

13
43

105

§88

183
28 34
8

28

*2*4%
8

§93%

30

66%
....

.

.

62%

§129

128 *2

94
60
ei%
125% *124

89*2
60

31%
46*2

‘*29**4

69%

67%

43%

20

*19

88*4

§93%

130*2 130
94*4 §t89
63 *2

125

129

29

35

*G2
*126

;i

38*4

New Central Coal.
Ontario Silver Min’g.

13
26

..

Pennsylvania Coal..
Quicksilver Mining..

.....

8%
43%
6%

pref.

Standard Cons. Min’g

109%
79

84
140
42

107*4
36
81
78
138

11034
36
96

15%
*11
*
]_ 2
......

40%
129% §126*2

i Prices asked.

t Ex

......

16
15
....

25

27

280*4

280*4

*8

7%

37%

§6%

8

37%

103

11038

*J4

110
81
139

110
86
150

42

§127

privilege.

41*4
127*4
*4

7%
*35

7

107%

%

If Ex-dividend of 17 per cent in stock.

15

"38

84
140
43
130

30%
'24

Various.

Prices bid.

*56%

§119%

13%

24
16 l4

Sutro Tunnel

59
125

27%

87

20*4
82%

*36
30

16

33%

......

*25%

129*4

734

'

-

*11 %
45

'

12%

Consolidation Coal..
Homestake Mining
Maryland Coal

Oregon Iinprov. Co..
Oreg’u R’y A Nav.Co.
Pacific Mail
Pullman Palace Car.

32

27

Telegraph.

Del. A Hud. Canal...

§93

12

14%
124

1

*
-••••«

34%

98%
_

30

4C%
28*4
58%

51%
28%

Toledo Del. A Burl..
Union Pacific

i

IV

30%

64*2

...

53

49%

10
60

..

s

...

90
50

61 '-2

Rochester A Pittsb..
20%
Rome Wat. A Ogd...
St. L. Alton AT. H
*6*9 *
Do
pref
§93
St. L. A S. Francisco.
32
Do
52*2
pref.
Do
1st pref. *9634
St.Paul A Duluth
38
Do
*95
; pref.
St. Paul Minn. A Man *132 *8
South Carolina
Texas A Pacific
3934
Tex. A St.L in Texas

Do

13%
52

144*2

Rich. A Al. st’k, tr. ct.
Richmond A Danville
Richmond A West Pt.

30%
30%

113% §109%
86%
81%

39*2
43-%
82*2

18
13

16*2
51*2
130

55%

*67%:

32%

54%

19%

105%

-

•

49

21
13
45

35

.

*92

80%

100

Reading

Express.
Adams
American
United States
Wells, Fargo A Co
Coal and Mining.
Ceut. Arizona Miu’g.

95%

32

.

-

72%

25%

10*4

*9

.

.

143

25*4
6%

30 34

.

103*2 §102%

L4

182

51%
89*4
12%

100

Oregon Short Lino
Oregon A Trans-Con.

Amer. Tel. A Cable..
American District...
Mutual Union
Western Uuiou

...

79
29

28%
8%

6%

Oliio A

pref.

.

102*4 §101 *2
*

89*4
37%
79%

30%

Ohio Central

Do.■

10%
•

U 132

56%

78

28%

25%
53%
28%

59

33%

Engl'd.

44

28%,

23
88

88%
37*4

Y. N. 11. A Hart Prd
Y. Ontario AW...
Y. Susq. A West..

Wab. St. L. A Pacific.

107

199

113

47*4

25%

15

*27

83%
93%

53

31

pref.

Y. A New

-

9
18

19%
59'

197
67

48%

42

pref...

Do
pref...
Norfolk A West
Do
pref.
Northern Pacific
Do
pref.

*

I Prices asked.

.

107%

69

95
14

Iron Steamboat Co..
N.Y.ATcx. Laud Co.

124%

.

82
10

92%

*27*4

111%

..

2!%

.

.

•

80

30

Colorado Coal A Iron

81%

79%
74%

.

.

81
30%

107*4
66%

•

123%
42%.

48%

59
107
9

70

91%

Virginia Midland....

Highest... 102913
..

xl21

105% 115 4 1219s

S’ce Jail. 1
Lowest

114^

145*4

80
25
24

......

Pittsb.Ft.W.AC.guar

4%s

ext. at

100*4
100*4
100*4
100*4

22
23

105*2
105*4 114%
124
105*4 115
|25
105*4 115
26
105*4 115
122*8 27
105*41115
122*4 28

1099, „

£

J*
£ O

141%

75

83%

Phi la. A

-2
*86

97%
197

76

N.
N.
N.
N.

2 s)3

43

37

..

follows:

$78,822,725
87.891.900

*.9%
142
95%

%
81%
8%
17%

49
23

Do
yref.
N.Y. Lack. A West
N. Y. Lake Erie A W.

....

Legal' reserve
Reserve held

......

*

93 ‘
195
70

54

Mobile A Ohio
Morris A Essex
*124
Nashv. Cliatt. A St. L.
N. Y. Cent. A Hud. R.
125%
N.Y.Chlc. A St.Louis.
12%

Loans and disc’ts. f317.5 75.800 $321,136,600 $321,748,100
$324,014,400 $328,093,200
Specie
62,251,5 JO
62.26 J.SOO
61.550.900
6.3,233.800
64,189.600
Circulation.'
16,021,300
15,941.800
15.SJ2.400
15.799.200
15.642,000
Net deposits
310,029,400 315.290,900 317.690,200 323.100.400 324,289.900
Legal tenders
24,552,500
26,341,000
25,943.900

n,

......

18*4

80%
9434

Do

June 23.

....

§66 %

..

City Clearing House

June 10.

•

*9

22

9%

130

41

85%
10*4
......

7%
41

123%

47

com.

Do

NEW YORK CITY BANK MOVEMENTS IN JUNE.

New York Cty
Bank Statements.

......

Mil. L. Shore A W

1v 8 %

.

statements of the New York

8%
18

US

Memphis A Cha’stou.
Metropolitan Elev...
Michigan Central....

Cotton, Middl’g Uplands.$ lb.
11*16
12%
If*516
Wool, American XX
lb.
34 5)42
355)4332 5)40
Iron, Amer. pig, No. 1..$ ton. *3 00 5)24 00 25 00^26 00 20 00 5) 22 00
Wheat, No. 2 red win.$ bush. 1 27*4® 1 28 1 35 5)1 35% 1 13%-l 17%
Corn, Western mixed..$ bush.
78 5>s2%
58®.j6%
475)61
Pork, mess
17 09
20 75
.$ bbl.
17 50

The

10

123%

Manhattan Beach Co.
Mir. A Cm., 1st pref.

123
133

131%

51 %

24%

pref.

Do

123%

46
82

*§84%

J

>

*4*4

122

50

Louisiana A Mo. R..
Louisville A Nashv..
Louisv. N. A. A Chic.
Manhattan
Do
1st pret

92%

140%
127*8

.

Chicago & Northwestern,

115

§123*4

..

103%

132

46%

*5

•

85%

133

126
101
142

Michigan Central.
Chicago Rock Island A Pacific

4

13f>%
59*2
4*2

59

Green B. Win. A St. P.
*7
Hannibal & St. Jo
Do
pref.
93%
Harlem
1197
Houst. A Tex. Cent..
*73’
Illinois Central....
144%
Do L’sed Liue4 p.c
Indiana Ill. AW
30%
Lake Erie & West
30
Lake Shore
11 i 34

50%«

.

4 85-4 86%

.

74%

Evaus v. & Terre H...
Flint A P. Mar. pref.

2^3
%®4%

4%®5%

United Slates Bonds—

*106%

Del. Lack. A Westi’ii.
Denver A R. Grande
Dubuque & Sioux C..
East Teun. Va. A Ga.
Do

-

54
49%

1883.

350,491,100 322.884,300 328.083,200
76,415,600
56.124,500
61.189,600
1 8,468,900
19,176,800
15,642,600
346,166,400 305,369.100 324,299,900
17,112,300
25,648,800
26.122,800
$
86,616,600
76,342,275
81,072,475
$ 93,527.900 81,773.300 90,312.400
$
6,91L, 300
5,431,025

Circulation
Net

Do
pref.
Chic. St.P. Minn.AO.
Do
pref.
Cin. San. A Clev
Clev. Col. Cin. A Ind.
Clev. A Pitts!)., guar
Col.& Greenv., pref..
Col. Chic. A Iud.Cent.

AND 1883.

—June.—
Low. High. May 31. Low.
Hiuh.J'ne 30..
18
22
is
18
19%
* 17 %•
54%
57%
55
55*4
57
*54
44
45
50%
48
44*4
102% 103% 103% 104
10 ) % 105%:
38
43
40
45
67*4
69
74%
70*4
77%
75

Anr. 30.
*20

Chic. St L. A Pittsb.

43%
134

109%
*115

84%

I

149

42%
*133

%

§ Ex dividend.

,

THE CHRONICLE

[Voi* XXXV H.
—

BANKERS' STERLING EXCHANGE (POSTED RATES) FOR JUNE,

June.

1.,..
2....
3....

De¬
mand.

60

days.

4 86

6....

4

7....

4

8....
9....
10
11
12

4
4

86
86k)
86k2
88%
86%

...

4

99%

4

8912

16...
17....

4 90
4 90
490
4 90

8.

...

...

13....
14....
15....

8.
4

....

4 86*2
4 86*2

days.

De¬
mand.

4 86k)
4 86k)

4 90
4 90

24....

4 8612
4 86
s.
4 86
4 85i2
4 95%

4 90

26....
27....
28....
29....
30....

June.

4 8912
4 S9%

4 86
4 86

60

18....

4?::::
21....
22....
23....

....

4 90

4
4
4
4
4
4

8512

4

June.
_

4 85k)
4 65 k)

8912
89k)
89
89
89

De¬

days.

mand.

Current Liabilities—
Interest due and unpaid
Debt on which interest has ceased....

4
4
4
4

85i2
85%
83%
851a
851a

89

89

5 8,

89
89

4 89
4 89

■

Hi

1..
2..
3
■

3s,

4#,

6#,

Total

......

19..
20..

xl2%

112% 119%

Character of
Issue.

Off,
Cur.,
1897,
reg.

119%
10378

Central Pacific..
Kansas Pacific
Union Paciflo
Central Br. U. P..
Western Pacific..
Sioux City & Pac.
..

119^0

4

ll 1034

5..
6..
7..
8..
9..
10..

119% 103%

119%
113
113

103k)
120

11..

12..
13..

112%

14..

103%
119% 103%

.

120
120

IMPORTS

High

113

Low.
iClos.

103%

120

When

izingAct.

Payable.

public debt

Below is

as

it

5s of 1881*. ’70 and ’71 May 1, ’81
3s of 1882.. Juy 12/82 At option,
4%sof 1891 '70 and’71 Sept. 1, ’91
4a of 1907.. ’70 and ’71 July 1,1907

rO

^5

Coupon.

$32,082,600

Q.--F.
U.-A.

$

304,201,350

191,829,250
576,869,050

Q.-M

q.-j.

AND

26/79
3ainavyp.fd July 23/68

1883,

given the eleventh monthly statement for the

lows:
Month ended May 31,1883
Five months ended May 31, 1883....
Eleven months ended May 31, 1*84
Twelve monthB ended May 31, 1883

There is a total of over-due debt yet outstanding, which has never
been presented for payment, of $7,831,415 principal,and $306,824
interest. Of this interest, $216,552s,is on the principal of called bonds,
which principalis as follows: 5-20s of 1802, $359,600: do 1864.

t50*400;
do 1865,
1868, $61,150
$118,850;; consols
10-40s of
1865,$251,150;
$342,000:funded
do 1867,
727,050; do
of 1864,
loan
ol 1881, $111,250; 3’s certs., $5,000; 6s of
at
1861, continued

imports and of domestic and foreign
exports for the month of May 1883, and for the eleven and
twelve months ended May 31, 1883, are presented in the fol¬
lowing tables:
MERCHANDISE.

For the
month of

Shaper

1883.—Exports—Domestic

....

Gold certificates
Bilver certificates.... February 28, ’78

1^82.—Exports—Domestic

July 17, ’<»2; Mar. 3, )
*63; June 30. ’64 }

3/63

....

658,378,833

721,068,482

$1,636,192 $110,946,332

$09,334,649

$47,654,432 $683,609,973 $745,586,940

1.524,536
15,854,318
17,327,630
$49,178,968 $699,464/291 $762,914,570
68,350,029 661,949,925 720,870,734
Imports
Excess of exports over imports $
$37,514,366 $42,043,836
Excess of imports over exports 19,171,061
,

AND SILVER—COIN AND BULLION.

do

8,375,934

interest

7,000,690

$538,111,162
4,619

KECAPITULATIO N.

$28,159,419
$7,746,467

1882.—Exports—Dom.—Gold.. $13,259,641
do
Bilver..
1,223,260
29,760
Foreign— Gold

$25,881,463

$26,485,845

11,350,125
1,131,160
4,152.272

12,567,123
1,146,332

$15,062,164

$12,'518,326
$34,119,912

$44,503,021

Imports—Gold
Silver

Total
Excess of exports over imports
Excess of imports over exports

Interest.

Silver..

$232,015

$17,335,903

792,709

549,500

$204,626

Imports—Gold
Silver

Total

$32,082,600

508,863

$2,752,480 $29,306,733

do

Total interest-bearing debt
$1,338,229,150
Debt on which int.has ceas’d since maVriUj
7,831,415
Debt bearing no interest—
Old demand and legal-tender notes
346,740,001
Certificates of deposit
13,375,000
Gold and silver certificates
170,995,471
Fractional currency
7,000,690

Excess of exports over imports
Exoess of imports over exports

7,278,655

611,516
$816,142

$41,398,567

$14,2 16,022

l.H’,759

TOTAL MERCHANDISE AND COIN

$11,937,937

$14,618,922

10,049,693

Silver..

Total

250,000,000
737,586,300
304,204,350
355,900
14,000,000

$9,096,760
11,313,203
2,179.043
6,717.722

$1,024,724 '$27,385,596
$1,727,756
$1,921,137

do
Total

Amount

Outstanding.

$678,455
1,308,5111
256,651

12,039,429
2.2*29,132
7,318,403
$36,205,886
$17,593,045
10,866,374

346,681,016
13,375,000
S2,378,640

$15>37<b624

Silver..

Foreign—Gold

88,616,931

Uuclaimea Pacific Rai Iroad interest

4.303,721

$31,442,067
7,910,013
$42,361,110
2,141,911

AND BULLION.

1883.—Exports—Domestic
Foreign

$57,666,151 $7 71,412,680 $827,290,822

Total

$60,654,074 $798,631,808 $856,609,017

366,824

Imports
Excess of exports over imports
Excess of imports over exports

1882.—Exports—Domestic

2,987,923

27.219,218

24,318,195

57.290,126 685,764,429 749,527,901
$3,363,948 $112,867,469 $107,081,116

$62,137,336 $720,841,361 $784,639,908

22,777.683
2,103/06
21,140,756
$34,241,132 $741,982,617 £807,427,591
69,1116,171 703,348,192 763.231,844
Imports
Excess of exports over imports $
$33,634,125 $44,185,747
4.925,03'
Excess of imports over exports

Foreign

$538,111,162

Total

4.619

Total.
$12,309,38 l
$1,881,171,728
Total debt, principal and interest, to date
$1,890,181,110
Total cash in Treasury
345,38U.902

Debt, less cash in Treasury, July 1, 1883
Debt, less cash in Treasury, June 1, 1883
Decrease of debt during the past month
Decrease of‘debt flince.nine 30. 1882

19,570,660

Total

g,, * 07/j poa

Less amt. est’d lost or clestr’yed, act J’e 21/79

Total debt hearing no interest
Unclaimed Pacific Railroad interest

18,122,453

Foreign

Amount.

.

.

May 31.

$55,679,185 $751,202,712 $800,832,471
56,265.402

Imports
Excess of exports over imports
Excess of imports over exports

$58,985

Feb. 25, ’62; July 11, 62; Mar.
June 8, ’72
March 3, ’63; July 12, ’82

Bonds at 4 per cent
Bonds at 3 per cent

31.

$57,901,594 $769,325,165 $820,403,131

Total

GOLD

Old demand notes.... July 17, ’61; Feb. 12, ’62

Bonds at 5 per cent, continued at 3’a..
Bonds at 4% per cent

May

2,222,409

Foreign

1883.—Exports—Dorn.—Gold..

Interest-bearing debt—

For the 11
For the 12
m’nlhs ended m'nths ended

3% per cent, $460,300; 5s

Authorizing Act.

no

$1,636,192
50,370,863
110,916,332
99,334,649

;

Ma,y.

$1,338,229,150

cent, $821,100; 6s of 1863, continued at
of 1881, continued at 3*ts, $3,001,300.

cur¬

j

58,170,750

Continued at 3 % per cent.
On the foregoing issues there is a total of $1,702,845 interest
over-due and not yet called for. The total current accrued interest to
date is $10,235,092.
'
DEBT ON WHICH INTEREST HAS CEASED SINCE MATURITY.




MAY,

160,716,350

*

*

FOR

fiscal year of the imports and exports of the United States.
The excess of the value of exports of merchandise was as fol¬

$35 5,900
14,00 0,000

Aggregate of microst-boarlng debt—

Refunding certificates
Navy pension fund

all issued under the acts of July 1,

EXPORTS

$1,101,996,150 $218,887,100

Feb.

Aggregate of debt bearing

$16,777,380 $39,850,809

$57,283,388

The total values of

3 £

Registered.

|

1,342,724
1,599,765
1,294,092

rent

AmouJit Outstanding.

sf

A uthor-

Fractional ourreney

1,609,132
1,415,417

15,207,462

[Prepared by the Bureau of Statistics and corrected to June 27,1883.1

INTEREST-BEARING DEBT

Legal-tender notes
Certificates of deposit

8,933,292
152,157
9,367
121,355

1,501,808

104

112% 119% 103%
112% 120
ll>3%!

The following is the official statement of the

Character of Issue.

$4,592,158 $17*435,571
2,969,049
2,971,193

24,140,755

are

by U. 8.

MONTES ENDED MAY 31, 1883.

xl2% 119% 103*©

Open

appears from the books and Treasurer's returns at the close of
business on the last day of June, 1883 :

4a, ref. ctfs.

5,940,243

Balance of
interest paid

AND FOR THE ELEVEN AND TWELVE

THE DEBT STATEMENT FOR JUNE, 1883.

Character
of Issue.

$22,676,001

6,303,000
27,236,512
1,600,000
1,970,560
1,628,320

30..

......

.8.’..

120

$25,885,120

Interest

repaid by
transportat’n

112%
*****

29..

119% 103%
119%

.

by U. 8.

of

112%

15..
16..
17 A
18..

Interest paid

1862, and July 2,1864; they are registered bonds in the denominations
$1,000, $5,009 and $10,000; bear 6 per cent interest in currency,
payable January 1 and July 1, aud mature 30 years from their date.

..8...
120
104
120
101

..

1*03 %

119%

Amount

outstanding.

The Pacific Railroad bonds

120

27
28..

103%

..S..

$345,389,902

$64,623,512

Total

1 Of\

22..
23.
24..
25..
26..

$345,389,902

INTEREST PAYABLE BY THE UNITED BTATE8.

4 89

4 s,

4%#,

.......

4 90

4 8012
4 85k)

Low.

5 8,

13,375,000
151,118,346

1,1883

Available Assets—
Cash in the Treasury

4 90

4%*,

170,995,471

—

Cur., June. eon1801. 1907, opt’n
tin' d
V. 8. 1898,
tin’d 1891, 1907,
coup.
coup.
at 3 k)
013% coup. coup.
reg.
reg.
con-

7,831,415
366,824

4

........

redemption of certificates of deposit.

Cash balance available June

CLAWING.PRICES OP GOVERNMENT SECURITIES IN JUNE. 1883.

Jne

Interest.

Interest theroon
U; 8. notes held for

■

$1,702,845

Gold and silver certificates

8.
8r %

.dSr «k

BONDS ISSUED TO THE PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANIES.

Range
High

89
4 89

60

4
4
4
4
4
4

25...

1883.

$1,552,091,207
1,569,139,403

$18.098,201

!

«?1 'Z’T won*

0*3

The

following is

a

statement showing, by principal customs

districts, the values of merchandise imported into, and exported

from, the United States during the month of May, 1883, and
the values of imported merchandise
houses of the United States May 31,

remaining in the ware¬
1883:

jcly

7,18.3 ]

THE CHRONICLE.

Customs Districts.

Exports.

$
Baltimore, Md
Bangor,

51.743

*

Bath, Me
Beaufort, S. C
Boston & Charb st’n. Maas.
Brazos de Sautiago, Tex...

Cuyahoga, Ohio

6,033,088

51,03"

199,130

98,230

116

220,366
26,562
15,096
120,977

14,6G;>

5

Until, Minn
Galveston, Texas

920
22,010
59,736

382,952

4,315
114,587

53,152

Du

931

3,817

G'enessee, N. Y

Mobile, Ala

'.

A

.

_

33.64"

828

12,831
744

Amsterdam

504,461

Amsterdam

Hamburg...
63,565
1,433

Portsm’tli,Va
Oregon, Oregon

148

4,357

1,123,897

56,557

Oswegatoliic, N. Y
Oswego, N. Y
Paso del Norte, Tcx.&N.M

Pearl River, Miss
Pensacola, Fla
Perth Amboy, N. J
Philadelphia, Pa

Time.

Rate.

20-69

©20-73

20 09

©VO-73

Juno 23 Short.

'

44

12-12 V©T2-15

......

....

Juno 23
June 23
June 23
Juno 23
June 23

Short,

12-12V
20-51
20 51

tt
44

20*31
12-00
12 00
23-32

a

tt

44
41
23
St. Petcrsb’g
©:23V ' Junq 23
Checks 25-27V®25-32L*, June 23 Cheeks
Paris
Paris.
3 mos. 25-^7 V©-5*52 V June 23 3 111 os.
44
Genoa
25-h3%©25-58V June 23 Short.

4,900

71,862

4,006
20

70
49
10,021

103,520
36,262
873,U 9

xMadrid

it

Lisbon
!
Alexandria..

41

New York...
;
'

•

•

»

•

m

m

m

m

60

Bombay

Calcutta•

40*hf, ©40^10

June 23
*■

......

d’ye
IS

Is.

771(-(d.
is.7T1Ld.

■

‘

Hong Kong..
Shanghai....

#

.

;
•

June
June
June
Juno
June
J uue

:

25-29HJ

’
•

“

20 3 mos.
23 Short.
23 tql.trsf.
33.tol.trsf.

23 4
23

■
.

23-30
25-45 :

,

32.228

170,692

5,774

31,797

Passamaquoddy, Me

^

97-00
<4-84 H
'

lp. 71T32d;.
lfJ. 7i7™d,
3a. 838d.
5s. Id.

mos.
<4

-

>

191,307

1,030,46:

Date.

20-69 ©20-73
12* 12 V© 12-15

.

<4 •

Trieste

08,480

5,239,573

186,507

Latest
-

12*5
©12-5 V
12-2V ©12-314

44

44

Vienna

21,509

36,639,760 25,488,069 1,751,654 32,055,372

Norfolk and

Rate.

3 mos.
Short.
3 mos.

.

.

Berlin
Frankfort...

12,909

56,467
519,168
41,990
171,541
524,313
151,256

16,131

Time.

On—

8,659
.

4,097

10‘2,ii7 6
992,528

,

35,108

23,019

Haven, Conn.
London, Conn
Orleans, La
York, N. Y
Niagara, N. Y

New
New
New
Now

700
_

132,302
1,086,778

29,758

595

j

4

—

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.

12,394

176,865

72

Minnesota. Minn

9,197,995

«—

—

23

5,122

199,475

39,673

-

| EXCHANGE AT LON DON-June

•

883,265

51,583
166,066

Huron, Midi
Key West, Florida
Miami, Ohio.

LONDON AND ON LONDON
AT LATEST DATES..

124,261

7.523.985

73.671

1

RATES OF EXCHANGE AT

$

385,419

9i*262

181,26(

Chicago, Ill
Corpus Christi, Texas

|^t0iictavtjl©jaimqevctat^ttotisTx Uteros

9.25S

382,401

Charleston, S. C

Detroit. Mich

4,216,823

1,687

Brunswick, Ga
Buffalo Creole, N. Y
Cape Vincent, N. Y
Champlain, N. Y

$
1,831

$

1,118,016

Me

Rcmain'ng
Foreign in
tcareh'se
Expoi'ts. May 30/83

Domestic

Imports.

9

30,319

68,611

46,768
49,289

1,83(

340,237
3,208

1,546
201.775
715

.

6,381

[From

our own

correspondent.!

;

London, Saturday, June 2$, 1883.; •
position
continues
to improve, but the state of
53,701
3,007,37*
3,874,908
1,316 2,621.0 05
general business is far from satisfactory. Dealing on the Stock
Plymouth, Mass
136,439
Portland & Falmouth, Me.
245,375
Exchange is restrained within most modeiate limits and, with
313.361
li,757
73,405
Portsmouth, N. II
2,251
77,951
an exception, prices are lower than they were a week
scarcely
Richmond, Va
52,292
72,649
Saluria, Texas
5.618
101,219
ago. Trade is also in a very dull condition, and no indications
5,839
San Diego, Cal
32
4,023
45,561
40,542
of improvement present themselves. As the weather is still
Ban Francisco, Cal
2,381,993 2,355,635
59,931 2,440,931
Savannah, Ga
1,224
favorable for the growing crops, the rainfall of the
625,068
13,906
passed week
Vermont, Vt
619,444
107,193
18.352
Willamette, Oregon
37,731
having been productive of great benefit, and as the value of
63,285
15,709
Wilmington, N. C
11,469
234,119
18,955
money tends downwards the present s!ate of business is a cause
York town, Va
220,562
Interior p >rts
for
much disappointment. The reason for*this is undoubtedly
639,162
All other customs districts
96,148
83
175,327
162,664
that, owing to increasing failures, the greatest caution has
Totals
56,265,402 55,679,185 2,222,409 50,244,779 become necessary, and
as six months of the year have now been
nearly completed it is doubtful whether any great or Substan¬
tial recovery will take place.
:
UNITED STATES TREASURY STATEMENT.
For some years past credit has been overstrained and it has
The following statement, from the office of the Treasurer,
now been found
necessary to draw back in order to avoid more
was issued this week.
It is based upon the actual returns serious difficulties than those which
prevail to-day. From the
from Assistant Treasurers, depositaries and
superintendents in East as well as from the West the accounts received regarding
mints and assay offices :
trade are far from encouraging, and it will certainly take some
time
before a sound condition of things can again be said to exist.
LIABILITIES, JULY 2, 1883.
Post-office Department; account
If a moderately easy condition of the money market,
$8,545,814 23
good har¬
Disbursing officers balances
3-1,033,592 30 vest
Fund for redemption of notes of national banks
prospects, and a comparative absence of serious political
“failed,"
“in liquidation,” and
“reducing circulation”
35,900,331 60 trouble, either domestic or
foreign, fail to stimulate business it
Undistributed assets of failed national banks.
170,947 30
Five per cent fund for redemption of nat’l bank-notes.
13,763,499 08 is safe to conclude that there is a deficiency of confidence, and it
Fund for redemption of national bank
gold notes
257,52s* 00 is a well know fact that
to drive away distrust is a slow and
Currency and minor-coin redemption account
7,217 12
Fractional silver-coin redemption account
87,003 25
arduous
For
process.
the
present at all eveuts we can only look
Interest accouut, Pacific Railroads and L.& P. Canal Co
3,690 00
Treasurer U.S., agent for paying interest on D. C. bonds
forward to very quiet business.
203.,S90
58
Treasurer’s transfer checks and drafts
outstanding
3,351,647 78
The Bank;return published this week show’s very
Treasurer’s general accountsatisfactory
interest due and unpaid
$11,235,592 70
results,
the
proportion
of
reserve
to
liabilities
per cent,
being
41
Matured bonds and interest
591,573 90
Called bonds and interest
against
39
7-2
per
cent
last
week
and
46
6,825,703 16
per cent last year. The
Old debt
.

The financial

-*

_

........

*

....

*

'

780,962 94
82,378,640 00

Gold certificates

Silver certificates
Certificates of deposit

increase in the reserve of nctes and coiu is as much as
£803,860,
there being an increase of £697,110 in the supply of bullion and

68,61(^,831 00

Balance, including bullion fund
Total Treasurer’s general account
Less unavailable funds......

13,375,000 00

a

142,280,309 53

supply of bullion is

$346,084,613 23
694,710 31-345,389,902 92

$441,765,115 16
ASSETS, -JULY 2, 1883.
Gold coin
Gold bullion
Standard silver dollars
Fractional silver coin
Silver bullion
Gold certificates
Silver certificates
United States notes
National bank notes
National bank gold notes

$141,824,495 90
.

56,254,071 78
111,914,019 00
28,486,001 05
4,482,216 29
22,571,270 Oo

15,996,145 00
36,498,^39 42
8,217,062 12

Fractional currency

Deposits held by national bauk depositaries

Minor coin
New York and San Francisco exchange
One and two-year notes, &c
Redeemed certificates of deposit. Juno 8,1872
Quarterly interest checks and coin coupons paid
United States bonds and interest
Interest on District of Columbia boud3
Speaker’s certificates
Pacific Railroad interest paid

4,657 64
14,536,550 89
574,170 85
21 00

315,000 00.
89,970 10
174 12
450 GO

$441,765,115 16

—The card of Mr. J. P. Wiutrigham, dealer in gas, insurance,
bank stocks, &c., will be found in another column.
Fifty
ahares of Bleecker Street & Fulton
Ferry stock-are offered this

week for sale,




.

diminution of £106,750 in the note circulation.

The total

£22,093,172 against £24,304,495, while
the total reserve is £12,747,117 against £14,501,885 in 1882.
The demand for money has not materially increased, the total
of “ other securities” having been augmented to the extent of
only £237,US. The revenue has, however, been coming in
freely, the treasury balance being £1,147,650 more than at this
period last week. The total is £8,641,902 against £7,331,543 in
1882.
Should business continue upon its present moderate
scale the effect must be to produce greater ease in the money
market, and, although the Bank of England's position is not so
strong as it was at this period last year, yet unless there
should be an unexpected revival of animation in commercial
affairs it will possess resources adequate to the demands which
may be made-upon it. The following figures show the position
of the Bank of Eegland on Wednesday last, compared with
May 16, on which date the most indifferent return of the year
was

now

made up:
June 20.

Circulation
Other securities
Reserve
Coin and. bullion....
Proportion of reserve to liabilities
Bauk rate
-

The

improvement is therefore

of bullion

.

£25,096,075
22,689.217
12,7 47,117
22,033.172
•
41 p. c.
4 p. c.

May 16.

£25,787,745
24.373,028
9,820.065

*

19,857,810
32 32pc.
4 p. c.

very considerable, the supply
having increased to the extent of £2,235,362 and the

THE CHRONICLE.

10
“Other securities” show

£2,927,052.
-£1,683,811.
reserve

falling off of

a

The demand for money

during the week has been

allowed

by the discount houses to-day and
previous five weeks :

very

Bank Bills.

]] Interest Allowed

j! for Deposits

Trade Bills.

“

25:

ll

June
“

8

lo'
22|

“

“

1

Stock

!

Three ] Four ;
Four | Six
Six ! Three
Months Months Months Months Months Months

3*6@3*4 3>£ ‘l3)i '3%%3% 4 @414
3%@4>4
3^314
3J4@3>6 3403% 3%@ 4
3%%3\i 3'4@ — |81<$@3*g 3&@4
3J$@8J4 3J4® -:3¥@34( 3-K@4
-•

—

Annexed is

4 @4J4|
4 @414

3%@4%4 @414
'4

3H@4

@4J4I

7 to 14

At

Banks.

4‘4@4%
4 @4141j

414® 414
4 @414
4 @414
3%@414

by

Disc't IFses

Joint

London
1

day of the

same

Open Market Rates.

May 18 j

Call.

Days.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

314-314
3! 4-314
314-314
314-314
3-4-314
314-314

3

3

3

3

statement

showing the present position of
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of
consols, the average quotation for English wheat, the price of
middling upland cotton, of No. 40 mule twist, fair second quality,
.and the Bankers’ Clearing House return, compared with the
three previous years:
a

the Bank of

1883.

£

Circulation
25.096,075
Public deposits
8,041,902
Other deposits
22,270,461
Governing securities. 13.31
Other seouHtien
22,689,217
Res’ve of notes & coin. 12,747,117
Coin and bullion in
both departments.. 22,093,172

1880.
£

1881.

1882.

£

£

25,552,610
7,331,543

26,415.725
8,558,928

20,349,460

23,904.464

25.124.079
14,907,127

25,325.658

13.7"4,159
20.836,093
14,501,885

20,086,089
16,369,690

27,035,415

24,304,495

8 933.000

15,804,318
18,371.636

18,032,483

29,581,913

Proportion

01 reserve
to liabilities
Bank rate

40-99

•

4 p.c.

Consols

loo 'a
42s. Oil.

JEug. wheat, av. price.
Mid. Upland cotton...

46
3 i*. c.

•48^
21s p. e.

2a2 p. «

9914

1 O^d.
44 h. 9d.

45s. 4d.

47s. 5d.
67sd.
lo lid.

511^.1.

The Bank rates of discount and open market
chief Continental cities now and for the previous
as

follows.

There is

market at Paris, Berlin,

a

5214

98r>s
6\d.

No. 40 Mule twist
10(1.
10»4(1.
Clear’jc-house return. 133,202,000 100,026,000 103,742.000

have been

11 ltd.

88,562.000

rates at the
three weeks

still further rise in the open

Man 31.

June 7.

June 14.

Rink

I Open

Hunk

Market

Hate.

3

rsr

4

i

:r,«

Frankfort

!

3

Hamburg

j

Paris
•.

01

«>*•O

Brussels

3>4

Madrid

5

Vienna

4

£St. Petersburg..

6

Hate.

,

Open
Ma rket

Rink

Open

Bank

j Open

Rate.

Market

Kate.

Market

3.4

4

24
24
2H
2H
34

3

34

3

34

3

44
34
54

5

44
34
54

3

3
2%

✓

Amsterdam

esti¬

are

is also announced of Messrs. Wilson &

Glynn,
merchants, of Cape Town. T he liabilities amount to £215,000.
Several new companies have been introduced to public notice
during the past, week, but they have no interest in, or connec¬
tion with, the United States.
The Government of Victoria has, however, introduced its
four per cent

redemption loan of £2,000,000, the arrangements
being undertaken by the London and Westminster and London
Joint Stock Banks.
The proceeds are required for redeeming
the six per cent debentures of the Victoria Railway loan of
1857, which will become due

on the 1st of October, 1883.
quantity of rain has fallen during the week, and the
later-sown crops have derived much benefit. The hay harvest
has been impeded, but this is of little consequence if, as seems
probable, we have a return of summer weather at an early
date. If we should have a favorable July and August the
yield of produce in this country this season will be fully an
average. It is said, however, that there are signs of blight
upon the wheat; but/although the rumor has been persistently
circulated, the wheat trade remains in a very dull and inactive
state, but without much change in prices. Millers buy very

A fair

sparingly, but factors and merchants do not press sales.
The following is an estimate of the supplies of wheat, flour
and Indian corn afloat to the United Kingdom—Baltic ship¬
ments are being included :
Wheat
Flour
Indian

3.4
34

3H

j

3

i

4'i

5
4

I

ST*
roH

The silver market

44
3%
5H

6

5
4

6

2%
2%

2H
24
4

34

4
6

during the week has been rather active,
means of remittance to India having been

the demand for the

The price of silver as well as of Council
improved considerably.
refernce to the state of the bullion market, Messrs. Pixley

largely augmented.
■drafts has

*& Abell state:
report in gold, and with the exception of
.£174,000. chiefly in sovereigns, per “Orient” from Australia, wo have
310 arrivals to report.
It is possible that some inquiry may arise for
Idia. but at present it is unimportant. £18,000 was shipped to the
"West Indies, per royal mail steamer “Don.” The Bank of England has
received since our last circular £54,000 m bars and coin.
Gold—We have but little to

price has taken place within the last day or
two, owing partly to the very scarce supply, and partly to the aug¬
mented rate for India Council drafts specified below. The “Magellan,”
from Chili, brought £24,000; this was sold on 15th itisf. at 5041. per
oz. standard.
The quotation this day is 50-V1.; there are buyers for
India at this price. The P. «fe O. steamer “Kaisar-i-Hind” took £70 000
to Bombay, ami £29,000 to Calcutta on the L9ch inst.; £12,000 was
shipped per “Don” to the West Indies.
Mexican Do lars—A large portion of the dollars, per French Mexican
steamer alluded to in our last circular, were sold on 15th inst. at
48 15-1 Fd. per oz.; the price has since advanced to 493ad., our quota¬
tion of this daw The P. & O. steamer “Australia” has left with £65,OOO for Penang, £ 10,000 for Singapore, £20,400 for Hong Kong and
£2,700 for Shanghai.
Silver—A walked rise in

reported

The quotations for bullion are
Price

of Gold.

as

Lest week.

below

:

1881.

1882.

A t pret
qrs. 1,714,000

2.028.500

2,168,000

2,038,000

171,0*0

209,000

365,000

287,OjO

217,600
335,000

135,000
519,000

corn

The extent of the sales of home-grown wheat,

barley and
principal markets of England and Wales since
harvest, together with the average prices realized, are shown
in the following statement:
oats in the 150

■

SALES.

1831-2.

1830-1.

1,722,265
1,630,912
213,008

1 ,177,217
1 ,173,592
162,912

1882-3.

Wheat....

qrs.2,218,203

Barley
265,8 49

Oats

1881-2.

1882-3.
s.
d.
41 8

Wheat

33
21

Barley

hit crest at

The liabilities

AVERAGE PRICES FOR THE SEASON

Rates of

In

The failure

Hamburg and Vienna.

.Tuns 21.

Berlin

speculation in tobacco.

mated at £50,000.

moderate and the quotations have tended downwards.
The following are the quotations for money and the interest

&

to have been

irvoL. xxxvii.

Oats

s.

46
5
31 10
21 4

2

4

(per qr.).
1880-1.

d.

s.

1879-80.

1,191,946
1,377.601
145,773

43
32
24

1879-80.
d.
s.
46 6
35 7
22 11

d.
0
8

0

Converting quarters into cwts. the totals of wheat for the
whole

kingdom for the

follows: 1882-3, 33,449,000

season are as

cwt.; 1881-2, 29,852,600 cwt,; 1880-1, 25,605,100 cwt., and 1S7980, 20,660,500 cwt.
The

following return shows the extent of the imports of cereal
produce into the United Kingdom during the forty-two weeks
of the present season, compared with the corresponding

period in the three previous years

:

imports.

1881-2.

1830-1.

1879-80.

CWt.53,647,423

48,294,828

46.074,820

47.893.199

9,885,757

11.027,910

2,026.271
28,206,395
10.530,437

2.298,116
23,046,111
8,423,504

1882-3.

Wheat

14,204,296

11,351.150

Oats

Barley

.12,165.641

Peas

1,797,635
2,297,864
17,363,953
13,936,754

8,357,534
1,721.677
1,522,438
18,042,270
7,905,164

Beans
Indian
Fiour

com
.

SUPPLIES OF WHEAT AVAILABLE FOR

1380-1.

1879-80.

46,074,820
10,536,437

47,893,199
8,423,504

....38,449.000

29,352,600

25.605,100. 20,660,500

106,033,182

86,052,592

82,216,357

Imports of flour

13,936,754

home-grown

produce
Total

CONSUMPTION—12 WEEKS.

48.294,823
7,905,161

Imports of wheat.cwt.53.017,423
of

11,689,654
1,772,654

1831-2.

1882-3.

Sales

8.128,664
1.961,969

*

Av’ge price of English
wheat for season.qrs.
41s. 8d.
Visible supply of wheat
■*
in t.hell. 8.... hush.20,600,000

76,977,203

-

_

43s. Od.

46s. 6d.

10,000,000

17,200,000

13,000,000

2,270.000

2,108,000

46s. 5d.

Supply of wheat and
flour afloat to U. K.
qrs

2,237,500

—^

mm

...

English Market Reports—Per Cable.

The daily closing quotations for securities, &c., at
and for breadstuffs and provisions at Liverpool, are

London*
reported

by cable as follows for the week ending July 6:

Price of Silver.

!
.

21. June 14.

June

■

s.

Bar gold, fine—oz.
Bar gold, contain’g

77

20 dwts. silver..oz.

77

d.

9

s.

77

1

|1

June

d.

9

d.

d.

!

Bar silver, flne..oz.

50*4

5014

Bar silver, contain-

1014

77

1014

ing 5 grs. gold.oz.

Bpan. doubloons.oz.

73 10

73 10

Cake silver

•S.Am.doubloons.oz.

73

73

Mexican dols...oz

U. 8.

76

gold coi n... oz.

21- June 14.

814
314

76

814
314

oz.

51

5014

54*4
49*4

43H

54

Chilian dollars..oz.

Ger.gold coin...oz.

The failure is announced this week of Messrs.

A. Durant &

€0., commission agents and dry goods shippers to the Colonies
and Havana. The immediate cause of the suspension is stated




London.

Silver, per oz
Consols for money

d.

Sat.

Mon.

507|g
IOOI3

507 j 6
100 is

IOOI4
78-72%
105%
11514
12138
106 34
Erie, common stock... ;. 3838
135^
Illinois Central
N. Y. Ontario & West’n. 27 %
60 $4
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia A Reading. 30ie

Consols for account
Fr’eh rentes (in Paris) fr.
Q. 87 5s ext’u’d into 3*28
U. 8. 433s of 1891...
U. 8. 4s of 1907..
Chic. Mil. &St. Paul....

vnrfc Central

i23

lOO's
78-70

10534
H514
12130
IO078
3838

1354s

Tnes.

50716
10018
1004*2
78.474a
105%
11514
12112
10642
3840
136

27

604^
‘2978
12^

6014
29%
l

>

Wed.

.

Thurs.

Fri.

5012
10018

5014

lOOig
10042

10031(5
1007ie I0Q716

78-40

78-65

105%

105%

73-60
105%

II514
12142

12i 4a

501*2

115*4

150*4

10642
381s
13612

27

27

603ft

60%
2H3q

33

2970
l^i*.

1

115%
121%
107%
38^8
136%
2738
61

3(%
123

Jolt 7,

Liverpool.

Sat.

Flour (ex. State)..100 lb. 12

Wheat, No. 1, wh.

“

Spring, No. 2, n.
Winter, West., n
Cal., No. 1
Cal., No. 2

“

ft.

8.

12 O
8 7k>
0
9 0
0
9 0
2
9 2
10
8 10
lk> 5 1
0
79 0
0
45
6
0
84. 0
0
50 6
0
54 0

12

7h

8
5

Pork, West. mess..$ bbl.
Bacon, long clear, new..
Beef, pr. mess, new,$tc.
Lard, prime West. $ cwt.

8.

Tues.

0

8
9
9
9

“
“
“
“

Mon.

d.

s.

Corn, mix., West.

79
46
85
5‘

Cheese. Am. finest

8
9

Wed.

Thars.

d.

8.

d.

8.

0

12

0

12
8
9
9
9
8
5

8 7*2
0
9 0
0
9 0
o
9 2
11
8 11
11 hi 4 1112
0
79 0
6
45 6
0
84 0
0
50 0
O
54
6

7^2

9
9

S
4
79
45
84
50
54

7a
44
84
50
n2

.held

National Banks.—The

by

d.

8.

following interesting

Description of Bonds.

PublicDeposits

July 1, 1883, to Secure—
Bank

in Banks.

Total Held.

organized:

Spetnagle, Cashier.
Week.—The imports of last
week, compared with those of the preceding week, show a
decrease in both dry goods and in general merchandise. The
total imports were $8,$32.916,
against $10,296,242 the pre¬
ceding week and $10,430,270 two weeks previous. The exports
for the week ended
July 3 amounted to $6,241,130, against
$6,407,662 last week and $7,153,823 two weeks previous. The
following are the imports at New York for the week ending
(for dry goods) June 28 and for the weekending (for
general
merchandise) June 29; also totals since the
beginning
of first
week in January;
Imports

Exports

and

$8,806,000

$200,877,850

$209,633,850

20,000

3,552,000

3,572,000

Currency 6s
5 per cents

15,000
39,40S,5C 0
101,951,650

....

4^ per cents

LOGO,500
6,878,000
255,000
96,500

4 per cents

5s, ext. at 3^
6s, ext. at 3^2

r.

Total

$17.110.000

'CdltfAGE

Denomination.
Pieces.

$373.712.5C0

Fiscal i/ear ended June 30
1883.
Pieces.

eagles

$
1.714,840
657,000

85,742

Eagles

65,700

-

Half eagles
Three dollars

-

!

Quarter eagles

660.379

27.526.120
6,60 *.790

355,072

1,775,360

1,555
4,055

-

Dollars

Total gold

Standard dollars

35,928,927

‘2,350,200

2,350.200

28,111,119

200
200

100

28,111,119

5.519

50

16,319
7,175,119

710,200

j

71,020

3,060,800

2,421,370

1,803,050
1,500
6,102,500

90,152

61,025

Total minor

1 7.907,050

151,222

Total coinage

1

1
i

Five cents....
Three cents
One cent

Changes

1
:...

..j
j

11,119,202

Legal Tenders

in

8,855

2,406,222

j

Total silver

8,855

2,371,840

Half dollars

Dimes

4.665
10,137

151,142

Quarter dollars

45

and

j

859

401,674
?

1,428,307

Bank Notes

-

Amount

on

.

!

Amount reissued A b’nk notes retired in June

i

deposit to redeem national!
1, 1883.
J

bank notes July
*

Circulation

of

$1,069.250
2,614,072

j $38,374,602
—

1,574,822

national gold banks, not included above, *742,229.

months:
Mar. 1.

Apr. 1.

May 1.

Total 26 weeks

June 1.

July 1.

$
$
$
$
$
1,097,794
950,001
887,346
966,426
945,454
Liquid’t’g bks 16,001,633 15,814,829 15,692,130 15,743,519 15,335,347
Redue’g und’r
act of 1874. *23077327 22,889,160 22,504,595 22,135,629
20,998,007

40,776,801 39,053 990 39.084.071 38.374,602 37,299,780
The large decrease in the deposics of lawful
money under tlie Act of
June 20, 1874, and the
corresponding increase in the deposits of liquidafing banks, is occasioned in part by the transfer of $4,001,268 from




$53,287,770
161,239,005

$66,402,929

$61,742,628

187,833.455

168,543,528

192,868,409

$257.218.^90 $214,526,784 $254,236,384 $230,286,156

NEW YORK

FOR THK

1881.

$9,447,246
189,690,761

WEEK.

1882.

$7,059,549

1883.

$4,940,319
153,614,778

185,555,409

$6,241,130
170,706,694

$199,138,007 $192,614,958 $158,555,097 $176,947,824

The following table shows the exports and
imports of specie
the port of New York for the week ending .Tune
30, and
since Jan. 1, 1883, and Tor the
corresponding periods in 1882
and 1881:
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF SPECIE AT NEW YORK.

Exports.

Gold.

Week.

Imports.

Since Jan,. 1.

Week.

SineeJan.l.

$

$9,300

$1,955,779
104,220

West Indies
Mexico
?outk America
All other countries.

20.080

......

18,236

$218,860

$18,976
10,619

590,769

59,680

45,516

28,196,386

$182,878

$6,497,209

$

32,300

373,394

$1,408,698

Total 1881

Total 1883.
Total 1882
Total 1881.

50

87,285

29,S<'4.769
270,033

Total 1882

Silver.
Great Bntain
France
German,
West In i s
Mexico
South America.:...
All other countries.

2,066,007
538,833
75,135
120,221

18,926

102,225
.

Total 1883

$4,878,431

$
31

31

246,230
39,041

16.062
8,606

185,723

5,817

1,540,126
85,198
5*o38

$30,516

$2,062,846

3,220
3,714

$215,178
238,900

$6,916,599

523,070

5.823,268,

9,4 27 j

5,732,425)

1,351,809
1.572.437

33.279!

Of the above imports for the week in 1883,
$2,330 were
American gold coin and $5,577 American silver coin.
Exchange.—Quotations for foreign exchange areas follows,
the highest prices being the posted rates of
leading bankers;
-

Prime bankers’ sterling bills on London.
Prime commercial

Documentary commercial

Paris (francs)
Amsterdam (guilders)
Frankfort or Bremen (reichmarks)

4
4
4
5

Sixty Days.
84^®4
83*4 «4
83x4 ®4
29^3*5

3;'?g^

S5i2
8414
933;
Ibis
4014

94ia

95

a

Demand.
4 88
®4 89
4 87
®4 87k5
4 86^34 87
5 18*8 3>5 15®8

40j8®
95

®

401^
95*2

U. S. Sub-Treasury.—The following table shows the
receipts
and payments at the Sub-Treasury in this
city, as well as the
balances in the same, for each day of the past week:
Balances.
Date.

Receipts.

June30..

July
“

“

the former to the latter account.

$61,350,381

at

Insolvent bkS

Total

$8,932,916

July 6.

_i_ $37,299,780

According to the above the amount of legal tenders on
deposit July 1 with the Treasurer of the United States to redeem
national bank notes was $37,299,780. The portion of this
deposit
made (1) by banks becoming insolvent, \2)
by banks going into
voluntary liquidation, and (3) by banks reducing or retiring their
circulation, was as follows on the first of each of the last five
Deposits by—

For the week...
Prev. reported..

1.332,972

$356,073,281

deposit to redeem national bank;

$8,963,735

,

>

Legal Tender Notes—

Amount deposited during June

$7,676,266

EXPORTS FROM

$357,406,253

$1,305,200
2,633,172

Amount outstanding July 1,1883*
on

$9,188,199

our report of the
dry goods trade will be found the imports
dry goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the
exports (exclusive of
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for the
week ending July 3, and from January 1 to date :

to

National Bank Notes—

notes June 1, 1883

$2,289,337
6,643,579

1883.

of

Germany

1,022,775

July 1:

Amount

$1,912,510
7,051,225

1882.

In

20,455,488 i
28,619 |
40,467,400

98,665.824 i 66,192 70

j

Total 26 weeks

35,303,076 i' 28,835,170

National

Amount outstanding Junel, 1883
Amount issued during June
Amount retired during June

Drygoods
GenT mer’dise..

Great Britain
France

July 1.—The Comptroller of the Currency has furnished us the
following, showing the amounts of national bank notes out¬
standing June 1, together with the amounts outstanding July 1,
and the increase or decrease during the month;
also the
changes in legal tenders held for the redemption of bank notes
up to

Since Jan. 1.

2,759
4,080
717,512

|

60,951,526

4,944,432

6,280,364

1880.

$

1,376,306

-

.

$1,395,902

Value.

■

Double

Total

40,469,000

$350,596,500

Value.

$1,837,968
7,350,231

Dry goods

7,402,800
385,700

of June.

1881.

Gen’l mer’dise..

111,832.650
7,657.800
482,200

United States Mints.—The following statement,
kindly furnished us by the Director of the Mint, shows t he
coinage executed at the Mints of the United States during the
month of June, and for the fiscal year ended June 30, 18S3 :
Month

1880.

15,000

by

for the

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK.

Circulation. '
For Week.

3 s, Act July 12, 1832

following national banks have lately

First National Bank of Vassar, Mich.
Capital, $50,000.
Townsend North, President; Frank North, Cashier.
Marsh National Bank of Lincoln, Neb.
Capital, $100,000.
Charles W. Mosher. President; Richard C. Outealt.
Cashier.
Bea Me County National Bank of Huron, D «kota Ter.
Capital,
$50,000. Everell F. Dutton, President: Frank E.
Stevens,
Cashier.
Citizens’ National Bank of [Sabetha, Kan.
Capital, $#0,000.
J. T. Brady, President; A C. Moorhead, Cashier.
2391—The First National Bank of
Wilber, Neb. Capital, $50,000.
Oliver II. Patch, President; John S. Edwards, Cashier.
Second National Bank of Greenville, Ohio.
Capital, $100,000.
Wi liam K. Kerlin,
President; Robert A. ShuOhdon, Cashier.
Central National Bank of Chillieotlie, O.
Capital, $100,000.
Thomas G. McKell, President; Theodore

12 O
8 6
9 0
9 O
9 2
8 1L
012 5 li2
0
79 0
6
44 6
0
84 0
6
50 6
6
52 O

statement, furnished by the Comptroller of the Currency, shows
the amount of each class of bonds held against national bank
circulation and to secure public moneys in national bank
depositories on July 1. We gave the statement for June 1
in Chronicle of June 2,
page 616, and by referring to that the
changes made during the month can be seen.
TJ. *S. Bonds Held

229930——TThhee
been

d.
O
6
0
0
2
11

II

National Banks.—The

Fri.

Commercial and iXXtscetlaticcrus iXcius
Bonds

2299887——TThhee

THE CHRONICLE.

1883.]

“
“

2..
3..
4..
5..
6..
....

Coin.

Currency.

$
$
$
778,073 09 115,773,012 23 8.377.153 34
1,307.847 14 116,986,549 18 .8,1:^3,841 32
3,562.952 43 114.812,205 48 8,203 326 58
Holi day
2,721,934 63 115,548,703 79
1,074,921 96 115,928,528 69
...

<

Total

$
3,062,369 93
2,278,070 57
1,463,094 99

Payments.

*3,326,554 37
1,515,922 65
*9,646,012 51

9.445^29 25
eejBCTticates put into cash.

Includes $2,000,000 gold

3,076,443 01
8,137,622 80

1 HE CHRONICLE,

12

In London the expectation now is that the movement of
specie to that centre lias culminated, arnd that there will be

3JIxe flankers' (gazette.

no more

Per
Cent.

Name of Company.

When

East

3
1
li)

Mahanoy

East Pennsylvania
Housatonio pref. (quar.)
Little Schuylkill

Navigation

Long Island (quar.)

I

Manhattan 1st pref. (quar.)
Mine Hill & Schuylkill Haven....

1%

Philadelphia & Trenton (quar;

$1

AUg.
July
75 July

‘2 In

.

Pittsfield & North Adams
Port Saco & Portsmouth
Providence A: Worcester
St. Louis &, San Fr’isco 1st pref..

2%

July

10
5
10
17
10 duly
0 to July 15
13 July
4 to July 15
1 July 21 to Aug. 1
2
13 July
3 to July t 13
10

July

July

15

3

July

2

3%

1

5

5

Shore Line

4

Ware River

31-2

July

July 17 to Aug.

1

3%

July

5
5
5

On dem.
On dein.
J u iy
v

2

Insurance.

People’s Fire
United States’ Fire
ITtiscclIaaeoiiK,
Union Trust Co. (quar )
YORK,

1833.
June 30.
Loans ana dis.
Soecie
Circulation...
Net deposits

3

July

7
5
5

On dem

On dem.

2

July

On

FRIDAY,

previous

1882.

IPSli

.

July 1.

iveck.

July 2.

$32^,083,200 Inc..>2,038,300 $322,884,300 $350,491,100
64,180.000 Lie.

955,800

15^612.000

15(3.600

Dec.
3241239.900 Lie.

56,124,500
18,468.900
305,360.100

76.415.600
•

L^gal tenders.

26; 122,800 Deo.

402.900

25.64S.800

Legal reserve.

$31,072.475 Inc.
90,312.400 Inc.

$205,875

$76,342,275
81,773,300

$86,616,600
93,527,900

$9,239,925! Inc.

$257,025

$5A31.025

$6,911,300

S urplus

6

1,133,500

552,900

,

Exchange.—The past week has l>een exceedingly dull in the

dem.

10 July

JULY

Differ’nets fr'm

19,176,800
346.166,400
17,112,300

Reserve held.

Globe Fire
Hanover Fire
Firemen’s
Met cant ile Fire
Pacific Fire

NEW

gold and 5,000,000 francs ip silver. The cable also
reports the large decrease of 33,173,000 marks in the Bank of
Germany in addition to 5,500,000 marks last week.
The following tabie shows the changes, from the previous
week and a comparison with the two preceding years in the
averages of the New York Clearing House banks.

.

,

Metropolis

The Bank of France lost in the last week 3,350,000

francs in

"

Hank.
JBank of the

England lost £173,000 bullion during the week,
mainly, it is understood, because of the semi-annual settle¬

2

3

A uir.
Julv

The Bank of

ments.

Jipy

July
July
$1 50 July
3
July
$2
July
4 %
July

Apierican houses have been

American markets.

•

(Days inclusive:)

*

Railroad*.
Atlanta & West Point
Cheshire pref
Detroit Hillsdale
.Southwest

Mention is also made in the latest

discounting their sixty day bills rather freely, thus showing
their belief that future rates of exchange will be lower in

Books Closed.

Payable.

imports of gold.

London mail ad vices that several

DIVIDENDS.
The following dividends have recently been announced:
;

[vouxxiut.

6,

8 to Julv 11

1SS3-5 P. M.

market for sterling. - Rates have been nominally unchanged,
but weak, in anticipation of larger supplies of commercial
bills soon to come upon the market. The posted rates have
remained at 4 85% and 4 89. Actual rates have been quoted as

follows, viz.: Sixty days 4 84%, demand 4 88 and 4 883^, cables

4 88%(g>4 88%, and commercial bills 4 83%@4 83%.
Money Market and Financial Situation.—The record
United
States Bonds.—Government bonds still
tend
of failures for the half year, as compared with previous periods,
towards higher prices on the long-dato issues. Both the 4s
attracts general attention on account of the increase over tlie and the
4%s have advanced a fraction during the week. The
preceding three years. Messrs. Dun & Co.’s agency report 3s, on the other hand, are weak and lower, very likely because
the total for the six months at 4,637, with aggregate liabilities of the report of an early resumption of bond calls.
The closing prices at the N. Y. Board have been as follows:
of $66,000,000, against 3,597 with liabilities of
$50;000,000 in

The

the

corresponding time in 188.3,
$40,000,000 in the same time in
$66,000,000 of liabilities for the
$11,000,000 were in New York

and 3,863 with liabilities of
1881. Of the aggregate of
six months to July 1, 1888,

City, $7,500,000 in Chicago,

$1,780,000 in Boston, $1,398,000 in St. Louis, $1,153,000 in
Philadelphia and $1,044,000 in San Francisco.
The increased number and amount of liabilities in the last
six months has unquestionably been to a considerable extent
due to the speculative failures in the grain and provision trades;
but aside from this there has been an almost continuous
decline in the prices of all the great staples, and also
all
the
principal manufactured articles, for /over a

Intei'est June
30.

Pet'iods.

July
2

'

5a, continued at 3%.. Q.-Feb. *103%; *10338
4%s, 1891
..reg. Q.-Mar. *112% *112%
4%s, 1891
coup. Q.-Mar. *112% *112%
Is, 1907
reg. Q.-Jan. *118*8‘US7*
4s, 1907
coup. Q.-Jan. *1 197h x187b
3g, option U. S—reg. Q.-Feb. 103*8 *10u78
*127
6s,our’cy, 1395.. reg. .1. & J. *12 7
*1.23
6s,our’ey, 3 896..reg. J. & J. *128

July

3.

Juy

4.

5

*x02%

•

‘112%
112 %

j
j

•

119
no

*10311
*127
*123
*129
*130
*131

6s,our’cy, 1397.. reg. J. & J. *129 *129
*130
6s, our’ey, 1398..reg. J. <fc J. *130
*131
3s, cur’oy. 1899..ieg. J. & J. *131
This is the price bid at the morning board;
*

July

no

3
id
o

hi

w

sale,

was

July
6.

*102% *102%
*112% *112%
*112% 11273
119% 119%
119
119%
*103% 1033q
*127
*123
*129
*130
*131

*127
*128 ’
*129
*130
*J 31

made.

which has entailed heavy losses on many legiti¬
State and Railroad Bonds.—The railroad bond market
traders, and compelled general liquidation and
a readjustment
of credits.
If we carry the comparison has been very dull, and though prices have as a rule been well
no further back than 18S0, when there were
only 3,497 failures maintained for the high priced bonds, there is no appearance
altogether in the first six months, with liabilities less than 33 of the liberal demand for this form of investment noted a few
millions, we are apt to get an erroneous idea as to the extent months ago. In the speculative bonds there isr of course, the
of the present figures, because in that year failures were same speculative interest as in speculative stocks, and partic¬
unusually few and liabilities very small. Looking at the first ular issues are influenced by the special circumstances con¬
year,
mate

»Lx months of 1879, we find that the number of failures then

nected with the.

4,000, and the aggregate of liabilities $65,000,000,

principal business

was

over

and in the first six months of 1878 the number

was

5,800,

with aggregate liabilities over $130,000,000.
The failures for the next year, it is expected by many, will
show a decrease from the figures of this year, because there
is reason to believe that the general decline (luring the last

two years

has run its course ; that prices are now near their
minimum—many of the raw materials being down to the cost
of production; and that a new basis of credits has been
established on these low prices. »Some lines of trade are still
very much depressed, but in general the future is at the
moment regarded with greater hope and confidence than for

some

time past.

'

The money

market has this week received liberal accessions
of funds through the interest and dividend disbursements inci¬
dent to the 1st of July.
The payments by the New York SubTreasury have been $1,446,718 in excess of the receipts; and be¬
sides, large sums that had been held by the banks temporarily
out of the market for the payment of dividends and interest will
now be again available.
The increase of funds is not expected
to make much difference

in the rates for call loans—those

extremely low before; but it seems probable that three
and four months’ money, both for loans on collaterals and for
discount of mercantile* paper, may be a little cheaper. The
latter class of loans should also be influenced somewhat by
the fact, that the general status of mercantile credit has been
greatly improved by the decline of prices and by the numerous
failures, which have eliminated the weakest elements from the
general mercantile community.
The rates for. money on
Friday were as follows, viz.: call loans on collateral of-divi¬
dend'paying stocks 2@3 per cent; discounts of first-class
double name mercantile paper, 4 to 5 per cent; single names
5 to 6 per cent.
The domestic exchanges have this week been in favor of
New York at all points.
The statement of the New York banks last Saturday showed
an expansion of $3,038,800 in loans, and the
deposits an increase
of $1,183,500; but there .was also an increase of $955,800 in
specie, though legal tenders decreased. $403,900. The increase
in surplus reserve was $357,035.
*
were




properties represented by the bonds. The
m

th6 week has been in West Shore bonds,

which close at 78 ex interest. Texas & Pacific' Rio Grande Divi¬

sion) sold at 83%@83%@84% and closed at 84%. After these
there has been quite a little business in Atlantic & Pacific
incomes at 34%@35(o>34%@34%, closing at 34%. The business
in all others than these lias been very small, though there
have been some considerable changes in prices on sales of verysmall amounts as follows, viz: Memphis & Charleston (State
lien bonds) sold lower at 110 early in the week, but are up to
111 at the close; Louisville & Nashville (New Orleans &
Mobile) first 6s are 1% higher at 96; Kansas & Texas consols
1 per cent higher at 110; < Northwestern consols 1 per cent
higher at 133; Texas & Pacific incomes % per cent higher
at 64}<; Denver & Rio Grande Western firsts 2% higher
at
other changes were only fractional.
In State bonds there has been but little done, though there
have been Some wide fluctuations in prices of the Arkansas
railroad aid bonds. The Red River issues, as compared with a
week ago, are 2 per cent lower at 48; the Little Rock Pine Bluff
& New Orleans declined from 53 to 41, and afterwards sold
at 42, though subsequently 45 was bid;1 Little Rock and Fort
Smith issues declined 12 per cent, from 60 to 48.
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.—The early part of
the past week presented the dullest market for stocks experi¬
enced for some years, though there was no considerable de¬
cline of prices as usual in an extremely dull market. On Tues¬
day afternoon—before theNational holiday—the market,though
still extremely dull, began to show signs of more strength,
and on Thursday there was a, moderate upward movement,
which has continued with only slight fluctuations and re-ac¬
tions, the result of the week’s business being a general advance
of % to 2 per cent on the active stocks. The largest advances
were on Delaware Lackawanna & Western, Chicago & North¬
western, Chicago Burlington & Quincy, Missouri Pacific,
Central Pacific, find Louisville & Nashville.
Long Island
lias fluctuated oyer a wide range from 83% to 86%, but
is only % higher for the week.
Ohio & Mississippi has also
fluctuated considerably, selling down to 32%* and uptto 34%,
with 34
the closing price, on the possibility of the road’s
being taken out-of the hands of the receiver.

JuiiT 7, *863. J

THE

CHRONICLE.

NEW TORE SHOCK EXCiUNGE PRICES FOR
DAILY

HIGHEST AND

WfcEK ENDING JULY 6, AND SINCE

LOWEST

PRICES.

STOCKS.

Saturday,
J une 80.

Monday,
July 2,

03%

(3 4

04

03*4

04 %

04

83 %

80 %
7(3

85*8
75*4

RAILROADS.
Burl. Cedar Rap. <&. Northern.
Canadian Pacific
Canada Southern
Central of New J ersey
Central Facitic

Jstpref
2d. pref—

•

Wednesday,
July 4.

75%

04%
85%

75%

*18

’ * 20

20

63%

20

82%
63%
<04%
85*3 80%
75% 76%
19
20*a
'28*3 30

81

22
24
*134
135
124% 124*3 124% 124% 124 *2 125
10430 104
103% 101*3 103% 104 >s
'11912 120*i 119% 120
119*2 119%
132^ 13200 132% 132*4 132 132%
150
-160
152
152
161% 151*3
125% 125% 123 123*3 123% 123%

21% 21%

21
130

Chicago
Alton
Chicago Burlington A Quincy.
Chicago Milwaukee A St. Paul
Do
pref.
Chicago A Northwestern
Do
pref.
Chicago Rock Island A Paoitlc
19% 19*4
Chicago St. Louis A Pittsburg *17% 1834
54
64
64
65
54
Do
64*3
pref.
40
40
47*8 47 %|
Chicago St. Paul Minn. A Om.
105*3
105
Do
14)1%
105
105%
104%
pref.

Cincinnati Sand. A Cleveland.
Cleveland Col. Cinn. A Ind
Cleveland A Pittsburg, gnar..
Columbia A Greenville, prof..
Delaware Lacka wanha A w ee t.
Denver A Rio Grande....I
..

Dnbuquo A Sioux City
East Tennessee Va. A Ga
’
Do
pref.

Green Bav Winona A SL Paul
0

Hannibal A fit; Joseph
Do

*07 *a

128% 128% 1*28%
42% 43%
43*4 43%

*93

94

133
79

..

Long Island

Louisville A Nashville
Louisville New

133%
79

48

*47

Do
1st pref..
Do
common
Manhattan Beach Co

*47*’ **4*8*
29*3

Memphis A Charleston
Metropolitan Elevated
Michigan Central

30

303a

*89
92

92 %

Milwaukee L. 8h. A Western
Do
prof.
.

Minneapolis A St. Louis

Do
prof.
Missouri Kansas A Texas
Missouri Pacific
Mobile A Ohio
Morris A Essex
Nashville Chattanooga A St.L.
New York Central A Hudson.
New York Chic. A St. Louis..
Do
*
pref.
New York Elevated
New York r>ack. & Western
New York Lake Erie A West.
Do
j
pref.
New York A New England....
New York New Haven AIIart.
Now York Ontario A Western.
New York Susq. A Western...
Do
rref.
Norfolk A Western, pref
Northern Pacific
Do
pref
Ohio Central
Ohio A Mississippi
Do
pref..
Ohio Southern
r

..

Oregon A Trans-Continental..
Peoria Decatur A Evansville..

Philadelphia A Reading

Pittsburg Ft. Wayne A Chic..
Rich. A Allegh.,8t'ck trust ctfs.

93*0
*11*3--..
45

30%

* *9*2"

*44

*50
30

*75% "*76%

'*450
100
100

151,400
31,910
000

*8*3

10

*8*3

198

i*3 3 *’ i*3*3%

*51

55

*45
*85
*45

48

9*2

*9*2** *9*4*

*92*’ *94*

■**68*’ ’ 72

*68

80

80

78 *a

31*2
29*3

31*3
29%

32

10

48*3 48%
29% 30

30

*80*' **92**

92

92%

92%

92%

26 %

‘26*4

68

303a
29% 30*8
29% 30%
10230 102 % 102% 102*2 102*3 102%

60

*45

30
43%
*89

93%

93%

30%

44%
26%

*56*3 57*.j
119*4 11934
*10*2 11
*23*2 25*4

*10*2
24

**88*' *88
37 ;,8

37%

11%

24
108

83%
37%

88%
37*2

48
90
48
30
43*
93

400

4,960
1,400

7,80*6

94

*300

45 %

27

500

*56

6*76*6

30%

30%

14 %

"56*2

119*4 120

*10 *3 11%
*24
25
*05
108

11

11

119% 120%
11% 11%

24%

24%

*24%

*J5

108

88
37

*37*'* *37%

88%
37%

*95
88

i* 6*0*3

37%

17,700

*

177

177

20%

2(3 \

20

20

41%

*33

83%

41%
5134
89%

41*4
51%
89*8

10*2

10

41%
61%
89%
10%

83%

*5*8% *59%

5 %
0 *4
Richmond A Danville
00*3 61
Richmond A West Point
32% 32%
Rochester A Pittsburg
19
19
St. Louis Alton A Terre Haute *79
81
Do
^95
98
.pref.
Bt. Louis A San Francisco
Do
pref.
Do
1st pref.
Bt. Paul A Duluth
*34 30
Do
93*2 93*2
pref
Bt. Paul Mmneap. A Manitoba 124
124*4
South Carolina
Texas A Pacific
**37*4 * 3*7%
Texas A St. Louis in Texas
Do
in Mo. and Ark. '2*1% ‘24%

83

83%

*57% ‘*6*8%

83%
*19*2
58*0

60%

•

*34*
67

99*3
124

26*3
37*4

25%

26 *2

S
20
*41

79
*94

*30*a
*55
*98

33%

32%

83*4
20*3

83%
19%
58%

68%

51%
80%
10%
34
84
19%
59*3

79
98
3*4
67

99*q
36%

*93

95

123% 124%

*60%
32%
18*3
79
*

*3*:i" ”33
55*2
*93

124

24*3

37*2

32%
18%
79%

37%

55*2
99

38*2

94%
29%
44%

93
29

29

28%

43%

43%

43*8

67% 67%
30% 3034
109*3 109*3
*19
19%

69

09 *,

93*4

29

43%

New York A Texas Land Co.. *116

Oregon Improvement Co

Oregon Railway A Nav. Co

Pacific Mail...'..
Pullman Palace Car

Adams.
American
United States

149

42%

Do
pref
Western Union Telegraph
EXPRESS.

*7%

Wdlls, Fargo A Co
COAL AND MINING.

123

*19
116

29%
43*2

19%
115

35

93% 95%

29*2

29%
43% 44%
68*3

68*3

31

31

'115
86

20
120

86

42*3

41*3

133% 132

41%
132

8%
38*s

9
39

82*3

130 *129
90
*89

*89
*62
*12(1

128

*24

26

64

41%
132

83*q
131
90
61

82%

*41%

41%
132%

133

8%

*7

38%

*35

83%!

M30

135
90
*89
•62
*62
64
126*3 126*3 *xl22 124

83%

39

81%

130

135

*80

90

*62
*122

61

124

22% Feb. 20
52

33% May 18
75
169

96
10

7,117

79

**6*66
400

84%

69%

133

3,560

100

....

33% 33

5 3,650
300

1,000
1,000
1,100

*76
*90
*32

31

’*2*0*6

*55% 57
99*3 99

205

35*3

35

*93%

...

*3*8 % *3*3%
95% 95%
29% 30%
44% 45%

115
87

*7*2
*36

83%

100% Jan. 19
18

Jan.

4

48% Jan. 20

Little

Pittsburg Mining
Mariposa Land and Mining....
Maryland Coal

*24

15*3

*24

15*3

*2 4

15*3

32

110%
20
122

87%

9
39

81%

*131
135
89 % 89%
*62
61
124
122
”24

15*3

Now Central Coal
Ontario Silver Mining
Pennsylvania Coal
Cameron Coal
Central Arizona Mining
Dead wood Mining

Jan. 10

18

June

2

37% Feb.
44% Feb.
79% Feb.
9% Feb.

26

29

20
20
16

Feb. 11
Feb. 16
Fob. 2
Feb. 20

16% May 22
49% Feb. 20

These

are




the

prices,bid and.asked:

3*6” **49%

98

45

120%

49%

65
46% 100%
57
78
40
82

60%

SI*

40
15

37

42%
77
77
13

82%
93

105
21

*1%
19

*’**5*6
200

Jan.

5

27
100

•

58%
36%

77

67

i',450
57,670
4.815

15,620

22%
91%
25%
40%

May 8 27% J uue 141
June 28 24% June 29l
Feb. 7 104% Jan. 18|
May 21 36% Jan. 18
May 17 57% Jau.

261
600

26

64% Feb.
28% Feb.
1,315 105% Feb. :

*64 j

250
263
36%
50

94%
46%
66%
106%
42 34
99%
168%

55

Mar. ]

78

100

131

May!

1,400
1,750
200

300

30,085

39
117
7%
37 %

18j
09% June 15!

33
55
31

98% 11934
23% 39%

45%

71%

65
25

74

37

55

39% Apr. 16!
53%
112% Apr. 14| 102% 11934
25
Jan. 17
19% 30%

17% Mar. 1

000

122

July

91% Mar.

6i
5

Feb. !
Jan. !

150

Feb.:
June:
Jau. I

134
June 13
9% Mar. 3
46% Mar. 6
85 % J uue14

June 14

44% Apr.

79% Feb.

9

126% May

128** *1*6*3%
32%

117

8

40

76%

5 135 Jan. 5 133
Mar. 161 94% Tune 9
90
55% May 17! 65% Jan. 6! 62
35 122
Feb. 19 128 Juno21'. 125
88

May 18

27%.Tan. IP

Mar.

6

19

15
Apr. 13
12% Mar. 27

17

Jan. 15

14

Jun.

......

120

88%

139
40

8,360 tll4%Mav31 169% Apr. 16
800
22% Mar. 15 27%Anr. 5;
11,200 34% May 21 43 Jan. 18!
18

37%
109%

*33% *43%

.

Jan. 19

4|

Fob. lOi 35%Jan.
8i
Feb. 2.280% Junel3j
Feb. 27
18
Jan. 8

% Mai'. 26

5% Feb. 17

t Ex-privilege.

29

.23%

May 31 138 Jan. 16
June27 15% Apr. 16
47
Jan. 13 67% May 9
21
Feb. 16 39
June 2
16% Feb. 16 23
Apr. 4
48
Jan.
3 85
Juno 19
Tab
87
3
May 14
Apr. 11
29% Feb. 28 30% May 31
48
Feb. 23 59%June 2
89
Feb. 28 100% Jau. 11
35
Feb. 15 40% Jan.
9
91
Feb. 20 97%June 16

14

no sale was made at the Board.

41%

*

59

% Jau. 12

Excelsior Mining
Robinson Mining

*

27

21

5

270

Stormont Mining

97%

45
52%.Tan. 9
60%
183
186
May 28 168
29% Apr. 14
20% 81%
8% May 10
2134 May 10!
4934 Jan. 20i 44%I 80
53% June 14
28%} 54%
90% June 141 6634i1O0%
14% Apr. 13
11%' 25%
36% Apr. 13 27 * 42
112% June 13
90%'112
23%
14% Apr. 24
89
Jan. 19
98%
28
Jan. 18
39%
61%Juuolu
67%

2434 Mar. 2
6% May 18

18

Bilver Clil!
Mining
Standard Consol. Mining

97%

30% Jan. 18

,

Consolidation Coal
llomestake Mining Co

*7*3*

63%
82%
19%
27%

68% Jan. 18

83

130

3,300

19
79
97

*19*q

93

Jan.
8
Juno 21

40% Jan. IS

Feb. 19

30% May 17

**7*0*6

31%

Feb. 20

55

Feb. 7 35
4
Jan.
Jan. 13 105
Feb.16
85% Mar. 1 89% Mar. 5

1,500

19*2

Jan. 22

23
101

*12** *1*2%

41% *4*2*’ *42%
133% 133*a 134
8%

Feb. *0
June 11
Mar. 6

34%

109% 109% lit)
*J 0

May 17

90
10
42

34

69%

Feb. 19

76

16,088
4,079

14 9

x83% 85%
129*3

..

115

93% 93%

84% 84%
*133

Quicksilver Mining

....

93*2

36

90
10%

133

81

May 17

35% Apr. 9
33% Jan. 18
106% Feb. 16 114% Jan. 18
60
Jan.
2 86% June 30
47 % May 21
58% Jau. 20
39% Jnuo20 68 J an. 5
40
Mar. 21
53% Feb. 9
Jan. 18
81% Apr. 6 90
53
Fob. 10
44% May 2
15
Feb. 21
30% June 30

89%
10%

2,115

...

Union Pacific
Wabash Bt. Louis A Pacific...
Do
pref.
MISCELL A NEOUS.
American Tel. A Cable Co
Colorado Coal A Iron
Delaware A Hudson Canal....
Mutual Union Telegraph

Feb. 16

62

124*2 121*3124%
25

Feb. 17

26

8
20
42
52

*69*’ *61

61

77
25

27

84%

35 % J an. 20
27
Jan. 22
Feb. 20 137% Jau. 22

*44’

227% 145%
115% Feb. 20 129% Apr. 13 120% 141
97% Feb. 20 108% Jan. 20
96% 128%
116% Feb. 7 122 Jan. 9 114% 144%
128% Feb. 2 140% Apr. 13 124
150%
143
Feb. 20 157
175
Apr. 13 136
118
Feb. 21 127% Jan.
5 122
140%
18
May 31 22 Apr. 21
54
Apr. 26 5734 Mav 16
44
May 21 55 Jan. 18
29% 58%
102% May 21 113% Jan. 6
07% 117
38
49
% Mar. 9
44
May 22
62
67% May 17 84
J an.
5
65% 92 34
129%June 2 142 Jan. 26 133
140
31
Feu. 26 68% May 9
50
104
118% Feb. 16 131% Apr. 13 116% 150%
39% Jail. 2 51% May 3
38% 74%
81%Jnuo 5 92
Mar. 12
82
96%
8% Feb. 21 11 % Apr. 13
8
16
14 a4 Fob. 20 23
15% 28%
Apr. 14
6
Feb. 9
6
10% Apr. 12
16
38
Mar. 6 46% Jan. 17
45
110
72
Jan. * 3
72
97% May 5
111%
194
Apr. 13 200 Jan. 29 196
208
67
61
June£8 82% Apr. 5
92%
4132 June26 148 June 14 127% 150%

*7
20

*20*3

23% Jan. 20

28% May 22
July 5

21
130

26%
*40*3

7*
60%

*35

37*4

27 *0
42

51*3
89%
9%

88% 89%
9% 10

”7

80

64

"51% *r»i%
*33

33%

**1*66

177

25%
‘7
*19

5l*u
89%
10*4

34*’ * 3*4**

177

.7 une 20

Juno 15
5
Jau.

85%

27% May 18 31% Jan. 18
26% 42%
97»4 Feb. 26 106% Apr. 9
86% 112%
12
14% J une 28 19% Jan. 5
3534
**29*6 120 Feb. 15 129% June 11 119% 128
50% May 17 64% Jan. 22
47
87%
19,9*9*9 118% June 26 129% Mar. 10 123% 138
260
10
Feb. 2 15 % J an.
5
10% 1734
200

1*0*8*
88

37%

89
88

8

07

7,610

126

iio" 11*9% ii*9*8 ii*ii’%
'

100

103% 104*2 101%

125 %

352

1,121
2,150

*

*

* rii*2 i‘24 *4

60

*85
*45

2,187

20,705
16.733
33,625

18*2

'

*50

29*2

781
32
30i

109% 100% 109% 110J
86
83% 85
86*3
53*2 54 t
52% 53%

*47*’ * 48 *3

100

* ’*7*2*

133% 133% 133% 134

*85

26*3

123

1.610

1,700

**7*0*6

45*2

58

48

18*3

13

45

27

6,137

130% 128% 129%
44% 45*3
43% 44%

'

*25*a 27

800

1,821

’ ’*9*2

*85

92%

16,485

*9

31*u 31*2 *30
30*2
30%
30*4
29% 29 7i
29% 29%
10878 109% 108% 109
109% 109%
85*e 80*3
8334 863,
85*3 86*3
62*4 63*4
62% 63
62% 52%

Manhattan Elevated

3,688
57,430
1,215

18*3

9

19

Low. High

81
July 5
65% May 3
71% Jan. 19

71% May 22

*2*00
112
13

Mar. 23

68% Jan.

*

105*3 106

18*2

80

Highest.

58% heb. 23
63% May 21

4,750
34,610
7,375

*17%
*8*3

30*a
30*4

Albany A Chic

.

196

120*3
134%
152
124%
17*3
64%

xl28

*9*3*’ '*9*3*

94

70*

•

u

>

67

*’*8% *"9 %

*193

Illinois Central
Do
leased lino—
Indiana Bloom’n A Western
Lake Erie A Western
Lake Shore

04

10

*02**

pref

Harlem
Houston A Texas Central

48

75

18=0

*9

48

*104*3 105%

133*2133*2

*’*9 “ "*9%
18

55

*17
54
48

126*3

Lowest

10,966

23
131

125% 126
105*2 105%
120% 120*3
133% 133%
151% 151%
124*4 124% 124*4

"75 * *75*
128*4 123%
42*3 41

*21
13 4

21
136

64*4

(Shares)

82

125%
101*4
120%
132%
151%

£

04
128

Friday,

July 6.

84
63 \

63*3
64%
83%

04

For Full
Year 1882.

the Week

82%
63% 61%
64%
64% 647)
87% 88%
87%
75% 76*a| 76*3 77%
*J 8
20
*19
20*3
*28*3 30%
29%' 20%

03%

JAN. 1, 1883.

Range Since Jan. 1,1883.

Sales of

Thursday,
July 5.

82*3

Chesapeake & Ohio
l)o
Do

Tuesday,
July 3.

13

7

Apr. 10

t Ex-dividend of 17 per coat in stock.

48%

145
14%

62%
93%

149%
97%
80%
132

14

THE CHRONICLE.
RAILROAD
Latest

EARNINGS.

Earnings Reported.

Jan. 1 to Latest Date.

Roads.
Week or Mo

1883.

1882.

1883.

1882.

$

$

$

[Vol. XXXVIL

New York City Banks.—The t olio wing statement shows the
condition of the Associated Banks of New York City for the
week endinfir at the commencement of business on June 30:
Average amount of—

77.781

▲la.Gt.Southeri) May

Atcb.Top.A 8.Fe May
Bur.Ced.R.&No. 3d wk J’ne
Can ad’n Pacific 4tb wkJ’nc
CeF.tral of Ga... May
Central Iowa.... May
Central Pacific. May

Cbeeap. & Ohio.
Chicago A Alton
Chic. Bur. & Q..
Chic. & East. III.
ii,
It,

pi;

|H|.

Chic.A Gr.Tnin n
Chic. Mil.ASt. P.
Chic. A Norlliw.
Ch.Bt.P.Min.iVO.
Ohio. & W.Micli.

Cln.Ind.St.Ti.cVC.
Cincinnati South
Cin. Wash.&Balt
Oev.Akromfe Got
CoLHock.V.&T

1,180,808
48,299
191.000
155,700
110,394

54.S53
1,183,761
51,358
92,000
144,164

84,417
2,099,000 2,342,298
337,922

May

4tli wkJ ’ne

May
4th wkJ’ne
wk J’ne *23
4th wkJ’ne
4th wkJ’nc
4th wkJ’uei
3d wk
2 wks J’ne

J’nej

May
2d wk May
3d wk J’m
1 st wkMay

257,040

160,199
147,905
1,888,077 1,505,261
30.898
55.386
062,000

721,562
137,076
30,056
90.362
208,208
26.779
11.107
62,239

402,127
5,527,934

308,050
5,683.869
1,232,658
893,546
1,163.781

1.220,074

2,206,450
1,272,000
484,290
9,387,479
1,460,793
3,774,978
9,345.192

445.522

9,926,866
1.127,737
3,434,115
7,718,451
812,358

-

24,968
89,372
208,210

1,058,381

632,390
1,088,455

947,248

991,532

24,323
10,066

640,26235,359

529,347
221,237

58.584

****---*

Capital. Loans

ana

discounts.
t
New York
Manhattan Co...

Merchants
Mechanics’
Onion
America
Phoenix

‘

787.071
29,547
38,169 1.329,581
973.275
457,308 10,690.000 9,209,929
626,832 10,805,232 10,615,205
112,792 2,327,433 2,228,553
711 344

Banks.

City

218.

Tradesmen’s.....
Fulton

Chemical
Merch’nts’ Exch.
GlaUatin Nation’l
Butchers’&D-ov.
Mechanics’ & Tr.
Greenwich..
heather Man’f’rs
...

10.087.000

1.000.000
1,000,000
300,000

3.229.300

000.000
300.000
800,000

Seventh Ward.
State of N. York.'
American Exch
Commerce

5,000.00<

.

*

2,000,000
2.050,000
2,000,000
2,OOO.OQ0
1,200,000
3.000,000
1.000,000
1.000,000
1,000,000
000,000
300,000

2i0,0ilf
200,000-

Specie.

7,803.000
7.723.400
7,527.000

,4,252.500
10,061.210
3,305.000
7,284,200
3.157.900
1,670.000

f

1,485.000
Hal,000
1.040.700

743.000
395,000
5s2.80O

023.000
517. LOU
1,220.! 00
0U0.000

905.000
'312,500
63s,, ,00

6,769,000
369.200
220.000

12,*49,0'XJ 3,129,700
4,5-^5.700
l,l 43,300
1,018,000
1,069,300
3.104.300
1.1<;0.2J0
3.7 1,600

11,' 16,000
15,921.800

Legal

Tenders.

236.3 X*
4;8.3.)0
420.000
lbO.OCKi
1S,4j:i
240 000

227.500
374,601
3,20 ».0()(

182.500
473.900
145.000
130.300
508.300
39 7,0(>0
181.700
4tt,4:)0
94,000
193.900
398.0,M)

137.199
lo5.7jf.
1,5 t'i.0/)(,

I.;

Net dep'ts
other
than U. S.

Circtdation.

S

f
e 555.000

0.395.030
0 038.3 )0
6.240.900

495,Of 0
359.300

3.260,100

7.504.800
3.013.900
12.)03 700

1,103
267,eoo

2,040.5)0

786.300

1.254 600
12 0n0.*00

281,700
765.600

2.('00,80b
2.489.409

1,792,4X1
I.096,000
1,055,200

249.3'jO

2.430.200

529 100

1,200.000

18,000

45,000
2.000

3.394.20b
10,91-4 000

970 300
5.U00.()0(
2,701.0:)'. l,538.8.Xi lf.4tl.300
15,329
16,561
8, v19.600
8.f.,0,ji
889.7CO
1.000.00C
2h-',-8o9
4.742,0)0
166.400
Denv. <fe Rio Gr. 4 th wkj’ue
152,300 3,044,200 3,11*2,199 Broad wav
6.429.600 1,010.10,
600.9;mi
6,31-.030
Mercantile
l,000,001
701,000
304.400
Denv.& R.Gr.W. 4th wkJ’nc
27,500
5 ‘8.4).
2.510.400
Pacific
422.700
204,7.X
2.843030
Des Mo.& Ft. D. 3d wk J’ne
5,33*6
6,074
130,543
166,2*74 Republic
4.3 ">7.800
255,80'
360,-'00
412,4)
2.727.800
I,500,00(
Det. Lan.
»fc No.. 3d
wk J’ne
28,062 .
27-> 8.1 ■
1
)
3
29,490 15
6
8.622.900
3.815.0.x;
450.000
45,(XO
Chatham
95
Dub. A Sioux (’ 3d w k J’ne
508 581
1.515.100
3f)(
23,360
200.001
1.K244C0
5,400
22,811
148,109
489,35s
People’s
2
2.857.500
700.00b
2(4
Ox
North America..
863.190
3wks June
318,(00
Eastern
206,2i»l
196,019 1,513,290 1,414,978
S.Ki
0.473,
10.314
eo.ooo
Ho*Hanover
1,515
1,000,00(
2)1
970,JOc
E.Tenn.Va.&Gn 3wksJune
141.965
178,531
1,705,604 1,340,863
408 800
3.813.700
405.4 )(
3.180.70500.00:
33'5, 00
57.714
Eliz. Lex. A 15.8 May
162,069 Irving
268,430
38,951
2 090 ( 00
95.0.X
3,000.000 13,838 000 3,( 00.00
5)0,00(1
Metropolitan
Evansv. A T. JI. 3d wk J’ne
14,482
15,903
323,455
353,273 Citizens’
( 00,0 K
22 -.300
2 (-5
2.573.8 0
008 0 h
266,500
Flint A PJVIom. 3d wk J’ne
4S,039
36,187 1,200,909 1,002,696
2,271 8)0
.72.00'
Nassau
231.000
2,409.5)0
500,00C
2.90
172.962
(.400
Flor. Cent. A W. May
2.42
552.10'
).2(K
171,773
Market
90,.
00
428,*500
31,528
500,000
39,58 6
2.439.100
48 400
1.879.49!,
SOO.OOf
3t. Nicholas
15SI ,x
Flor. Tr. & Pen 3d wk J’ne
9,BOS
201,919
210,508
7,190
550 00:
107.000
45*0,006
2,4s3,000
500,000
2,)-78.000
3hoe
&
Leather..
Ft.W. A Denver 3d wk J’ue
7,200
5 001.100
4 000
4 0 -1.8 ji,
67a.4iJ!
163,1 00
Corn Exchange..
I'OOO.OC'C
March
148,041
350,155
114,257
425,73 s
Georgia
0,4! o,600 1,319.4')!
6.937.800
450,000
Continental
1.000.000
225.40.
316.L02 8,105,312 7,425,541
Grand Trunk... WkJ’ne *23
356,470
2.040
2.142.700
t
105.9
300.00(
209.100
700
Oriental
182.51s
570.0V 0
7,917
172,528
3.551,000
612»*0(
3.927.000
400,000
21*vU00
7,837
Gr.Bay W.&St.l*. 3d wk J’ne
Marine
; 272 500
19.359,0)0
1 wks Jam102.611
()
GulfCol&8a«.Fe
3
.
0
8
.
4
629.900 21.498.30
800,15.:
467,128
60,089 6
Importers’ &
Tr.. 1 .§00.000
19,000,900
1.574.09b 23.557,4 0
Park
45,000
)
4
.7
4
.
4
mi wkJ’nc
Hannibal&St.Ji
| 2.000.000
46,3115
94‘2,56o
47.281
1,166,882
!.«09,lO(
500.00C
no. ioo
1,409.5.))
206,40,
Wall St. Nation’l:
Hous.lv A W .Te x May
123.8193.979
25,775
23,057
1,54
i
,0j(
210.000
17,00197.00 i
1.438000
North River
i
768,10;
575,815
iJous.A 4
Tex.Cen March
120 9 o
l,17l.7'K
i)
.5
2
1
9n8,2)(>
River
250,000
a7,400
if 7,295 3,056,146 3,186,999 East
Illinois Cen.( III.) 4tli wkJ’ne
123,300
10,.27.lot 4.438.00,
Fourth National.1 3.200.00b
177.100 17.590.400
53a,b00
30.836
Do
297.U00
938,14!
7.997,001
908,713
(Iowa) 4tli wkJ’ne
8.7;3.000
37.700
1,061.1-0'
1,293.000
Central Nat
! 2,000.000
651.0 it
40.000
3,377,001 i
3.999.0 JO
370.000
300.00C
Do So. Div. 4tli wkJ’ne
51,632 1.957,047
52.700
1,556,353 Second Nation’!.
69 \2()0
5,7)3.l0b I 1.445.8 y
566.500
0,338, l JO
750.000
Ind.Blooin.tV W. 3d wk .I’m
55,909
48,049 1,337,731
1,108,009 Ninth National..
)
5,059,000
i
44,900
747.5J9
10.'
90.000
500.0)0
.8,3-3
2
».
First National..
K.C.Ft.S.&Gtill 2d wkJ’nf
23,711
26,407
5,084.400! 1,117 0 i
82i),9.)0
6,017 0 )o
Third National.. l.OOO.OOC
K. C. Law. A
So. May
73,367
579,973
367,910
131,101
200*6'6
),426.1(0
)
4
.
7
1
140.9bC
1.1x3,300
N. Y. Nat. Exch.. 2
300.000
580.716
Li. Erie A West’n 2d wk J’ne
26,357
596,602
21,651
1.875.500
‘.71,0 K1.81^.000
190,091
221.500
250.000
8owery National
2
wksJune
L. R. & Ft.Smith
180.329
2.10*. I i*o
1.657.100
£09.700
13,100
231,34*2
180,000
13,093
200.000
2:,90
N. York County..
2
2.IUU
2,443
800
76.600
9(J0
168.595
75X000
6,700
L.Rk.M.Riv.<VT. 2wksJune
9,346
Jerrn’n Amerie’n
11,210
107,669
5
4.505,800
724.1-19
400.80'
45,660
1,190.7
(Chase National..
3)0,000
978.552
71.9)5
68,679 1,079,960
Long Island.... 4 th wkJ’ne
58.2, i(
2 u76,8.K
2,1-0.000
373,9oi
100.000
Fifth Avenue....
Louisa. & Mo. R. March
111,213
59,842
37,539
156,810
2 029.900
1,774.3,)C
54,0)(
304,0 f.
200,000
German Exch.
Louis v.A Nash v 1th wkJ’ne
307,579 6,337,129 5,808.128
369,390
1,6^3,000
152.20(
289.900
2/-04,?00
200.000
Germania
178,223
283,803
81,845
156,898
Mar.Hongh.A. (). May
5,909,000
237.500
500,000
6,23i'.3j0
441,603
U. S. Nat
1,10 ,90(56.589
541,559
479,416
1.466.500
300.000
3.3 .4,700
201,9. if
52,527
171,70b
44,000
Hemp. & Chari. 3wks June
Lincoln Nat
824,700
24,90!
660,000
179,500
Mexican Cent.. 2d wk J’ue
141.200
32,953
Gartfeld Nat
790,058
200,000
Do
No. Div 3d wk 1 ’ue
5,443
114,497
Total
61.102,700 328,083,200 64,189.600 20.122.80f 3?4 2S9.9 0 5.642,600
Mexican Nat’l.. 3d wk J’ne
358,943
15.589
Mil.L.Sh.& West 4tli wkJ’ne
465,315
29.590
407,543
21,153
I* WS
Minn.&St. Louii* Apiil
100.619
.415.632
496,026
135,868
...Inc. $1 183.5 0
Net deposits
Loans
Inc.
and
discounts
$2,038,800
Missouri Pacitie. 4th wkJ’ne
204,612
3,215.580
172,167 4.172,865
...Dec.
156,6.0
955,800
Specie
1*'C.
Central Br’eh. 4 th wkj’ue
35.126
672,396
18,817
382,311 Legal tenders
402.900
Dec.
95.282
Int. A Gt. No.. 4th wkJ’ne
1,767,087 1,490.903
93,141
The following are the totals for three weeks:
Mo. Kan. A T.. 4th wkj’ue
152,962 3,317,432 2.047,326
186,957
Bt.L.Ir.Mt.iV S 4th wkj’m
179,319 3,478,400 3,231,303
188,721
H
•it ion. At
Loans.
Clear
Specie. L. Tenders. Deposits.
.Tex. A Pacific. 4th wkj’ue
t
*
*
161,169
134,941 2,836.554 2,133.188
1883
S'
*
;^l!
t1
50.020.400
15.923.700
260.98
0)0
608
>.400
13.*
2
r>7.900
Whole System 4th wkJ’ne
872,175
751,648 10,244,728 13,100,617 Apr. 7....311.039.400
11
310.2^2,000 53.062.800 17.085.100 281.1)9,000 10,49 >.8 •:> 78: -i 13,446
Mobile A Ohio.. June
124,640
965,379
878,918
136,183
.310,807,0010 53.809.800 18,4:3,550 2-6,070,10.) 10,49 (. »(W 82-.7 70,284
Nft6h.Cb.cV St. L May
841.619
931,328
1 171,079 154.163
312,895.000 53,736,8 )0 19,039,000 280,922,4 )> 10.312.1». 048. i 1.931
N.Y.L.E.& West. April
1,548,474 1,670,743 6,053,928 5,862,131 May 5 ...315,507,400 55.709.100 20,077.000 296.970.100 l.).-2s;ln'i» 77:*."87,780
N. Y.&N. Jingl’d May
290,951
289,722 1,334,679 1,247,09 L
12....315.45..000
60,022.000-- 20,fc81.;00 353,97,100
7-3 >.59!,791
N. Y. Susq. & W. May
87,054
57,835
19....317,828.000 60.558.900 21.9.5,100 307/93.500 18,151,(00 103 023.713
377,343
216,985
20.... 316.281,500 02.826,800 23,75-.SOO 3O0.'-3O.8OO 15.194.400
087,1.7,850
N.Y. Pa. A Ohio April
463.678 450,555
Norfolk A West. 3 wks June
968*1*39 June 2....817,575.800 62,251.n00* 24,552.500 310.929.400 16.021.800 550.836/24
128,818
118,073 1,13 4*642
9....321.136,600 61.550.900 20,341,000 315,290.900 15.911.800 ?4S >51.640
Northern Cent.. May
499.133
465.694 2,468.450 2,121.892
“
10
321,74s.100 62.269.800 25,943.8 )0 317.6 0.2)0 15 8 2 4 k) 710.1)3.872
Northern Pacific 4tli wkj’ue
215,300
211,385 3,475,758 2,659,316
23....320.041.400 63.2 )3.^00 20.523.700 323.100.400 15.799, -'00 724 n93.940
Ohio Central.... 4tli wkj’ue
24.625
486,793
3).... 328,083,200 04,189,600 23,122,800 324,289,900 15.642,0 30 594 509,188
7.283
1*6 i*, 14*6
Ohio Southern.. 3d wk J’ne
6,966
187,056
Boston
Banks. —Following are the totals of the Boston banfct :
67,069
i
277,359
Oregon A Cal... Anril
Loans.
374,686
Specie. L. Tenders, deposits.* Circulation, tgo. Clear
267,339 1,459.402 1,2*29.80*6
Oregon Imp. Co. May
%
*
*
*
*
*
1883.
427,600
412,213 1,882,200 1,894,70 4
Oregon R.&N.Co May
151.00s.000
7,425,800
5,263.900
94 680.700
29,76*500
e8.958,173
Pennsylvania
May
4,303,006 4,108,877 20,195.708 18,557.091 Feb. 5.
0,61),800
150.821.200
4,8-3.000
93,699,200
29,911,300
70.(84,277
Peo. Dec. & Eve.'3d wk J’ne,
11,711
11,296
319,100
349,090
5.952.300
151,811.000
3.943,700
92,41;,900
29.S07.20O
77.!42.274
341,415 1,598,467 1.383,550
Philadelp.AErie May
:
363,359
150.151.200
4,814,900
88.0 i9.-00
3,919,200
29.98t.s00
60.721.965
Phila. A Read.. May
1,696,877 1,703,469 8,155,371| 7,816,766 Mch.
1)7,75-.: 00
4,sb9.S00
8 ,417,800
3,771,200
3'J.153.300
'70.043,068
Do C. A Iron May
145.072.100
4.591.300
3.841,800
84,141,900
30.L4i,2OO
65.578,107
1,395,053 1,174,540; 5,623,076, 4,969,140
•;i:: r
4.9U3.600
145.300.200
3,563.000
82,845,700
30,154,900
70.677.842
Richm.A Danv.. 4th wkJ’ne 1158,000 US1,000, 1,789,615 1,684,536
143.940.100
5,068,000
3,531,000
80.733.300
30.248,300
60.007,217
Cb’lCoi.&Aug. 3d wk J’ne
14,231
tl,97l! 366,341
310,740
3.752.200
3.(33.500
91,001.000
30.47s.700
55,3
0.704
144,779.900
Apr.
Coluwb. A Gr. 3d wk J’ne
t2,849
4.5621
347,923
316,206
145.520.800
4,6)5,800
3,333.900
83.79'.400
80,10 ‘,100
To.SO-.lTO
Va. Midland.. 4thwkJ’ne
t65,466
715,121
t56,850|
617,835
143.295,700
4,554,100
3,250,100
82,170.300
30,079.500
70.918,241
West No. Car. 3d wk J’ne
133.587
t3,l46
85,541
12,187
4,083,000
82.487.100
30.103.300
142,7-9.300
S.lO-t.lOO
73.3'8,935
142,925,600
5,046.900
3.555.300
30.ISO,200
83,481.400
04.r90,013
17,681
Bt.Johnsb.&L.C.j March
18,147
47,110
49,487
4.947.000
3.728.300
141.500.800
85,183.000
81.082,500
30,245,'00
M*y
8t. L.Alt. A T.H. 3d wk J’ne
22,865
631,108
20,441
5**0,611
144.962.800
4.685,000
3.872,400
85.998.100
30.'88.^00
70 455.314
Do
14,090
372.903
(brclis.) 3d wk J’ue
367,881
10,688!
4,010,800
1)4,022.300
3,^65,000
85,897,500
29,87 ',200
08,032,857
St.Louis A Cairo 3d wk J’ne
7,316
163.931
174.145
5,577
m
114.410.100
4,7(9,900
4.179/00
S5.235.5t0
29,^95 900
65.396,715
Bt.L.&San Fran. 4th wkJ’nc
76.338 1,696,972
83,755
1,513.819
144,5 i 8,300
4.891.300
61.390.906
4,245,900
86.730.000
29.595,500
41,618
8t. Paul A Dul.. 4tli wkJ’ne
4*20,504
27,5711
525,221
144.890,400
4,070,000
4,351,900
29,4.-8,000
8 7,134,500
70.088.338
8t. P. Minn.A M. 4th wkJ’ne
144.7:0,800
4,585,000 4,415,300
87,509,700
28.84^,200
67.935,835
165,900
217,477: 3,912,511 3,631,034
14J.H82.800
4,842.400
4,400,000
88.2))-',700
29,074.800
03,5^2.1)0
Bo. Pac.Cal. N.D February..
72,045
142.140
68,258i
159,034
4,9.9,200
4,(82,960
141.3.7.800
87,073,700
28,910,4.0
02.285.93C
Do So.
579.659
666.485
Div.I-jFebruary.. 279,926 345,925
Including the item “ due to other banks.”
Do ArizonaFebruary..
161,782
341.783
457,392
241,318;
Do N. MexFebruary..J
105.920
49,346
22,601i
89.070
Philadelphia Banks.--The totals of the Philadelphia banks
Bcioto Valley... May
44,006
198.627
43,386
195,985
South Carolina. May
75,089
74,248
570,012
517,746 are as follows:
Loans.
Circulation. Ago. Clear.
Lawful Money. Deposits:
Tol. Cin. A St. L May
83,0. 0
%
*
*
*
1883.
S
Union Pacific... June
2,072.000 2,202,000
6-8.125.702
Feb. 5
20,199.710
9,719,541
54.89®,'’69
74,728,573
Utah Central... May....
97,671! 152,324
643 306
494,651
12...
0H.49l.944
19.417.440
9.7 57.010
75,342.721
50,091 150
30.832
19
35,690!
51.392 20
205,100
188,044
75.505,199
Vick8b’rg<V Mer. May
la,100,381
'60,^05,037
9,781,891
kO
60.949.0 4)
75.442.C-55
18.574.1:9
9.7-7.850
47,581,855
Wab.St-L.4xP... 4tli wkJ’ne
311,654; 323.396
02.299.719
17,312,4-5
76,028.694
60,270,230
8.778,558
West Jersey
92,412
73,892
369,158
3*20,321 Mch. 125...
May
53,1^4.710
17,202,227
9,7s ,2- 2
75,891,403
04,9.5,001
26.285
Wisconsin Cent. 3d wk J’ne
19
9.8J7.374
75.473.591
04.410.10 t
16,71*0.025
55.087.444
20
9.774.0-70
74.7l3.3i7
03.130.185
48.234.123
16.222.910
t Freight earnings.
i Included in Central Pacific earnings above.
2
02.488.577
15.320.927
9.81)
.351
74,620,434
49.064,219
Apr.
Coins.—The following are quotations in gold for various coirs:
9
15.552.778
9.814.468
02.970.557
74.33S.580
57.456*449
10
64.984.3S5
9.827.083
10,733.783
50,792.166
90
Silver %s and
75.323,449
— 99%®
$4 85
par.
Sovereigns...
57.-“ 97.579
9.828.541
23
17.170.705
65,899.784
75.740,207
Five francs
— 92
® — 95
Napoleons
3 85 # 3 89
17.406.815
4fi.055.795
30
60.130.013
9.701.1«1
75.f3l.61*
Mexican dollars.. — 85% d — S6?a
X X Reicbmarks. 4 73 ® 4 78
55.760 5 53
18.334.970
60.s21.372
9.751,5^*1
75,292.485
M*y 7
Do uncoinmerc’l. — 8412® — 86'
X Guilders
3 95 ® 3 99
67.2) \>34.
14
18.753.345
9.705.950
75.053,722
40.938,183
®15 65
— 80
Peruvian soles.... — 79
21
9.75 '.8)0
50.392.858
08.269.898
75.5t0.7e0
19.154, ** 80
Bpan’h Doubloons. 15 50 ®15 60
52.185.304
25
9.785,941
Mex. Doubloons.. 15 45
70,118,351
10.H9t.213
69.514,188
English silver
4 78 ® 4 84
9.751.394
49,241.889
June 4
20,598,0 J 9
71,<127.644
1 llhs Prus. silv. thalers. — 68 ® — 70*$
76.054,159
Fine silver bars
1 10
71.192.525
9.734.158
57,754.904
11
76.961,127
20.065.H42
F ne gold bars..
par® *4 prern. U. S.trade dollars—*85 ®
18
20.777.920
58,5303-8
73.315,281
9.0SK.S91
77.301.958
Dimes A
dimes. — 99^»® par
U. S. silver dollars — 99%® par.
21.109.941
59.998,948

III

Danbury & Nor. May

i

.

........

-I

►

......

........

........

.

-

“
“

“

“

“

..

....

..

.

...

....

....

ii

..

.

44

....

.

.

...

.

D

...

.

44

....

.

..

11

44

...

.

ii
•

i

....

44

44

....

....

,

..

...

4%

—

ii

....

4i

x

Unsettled—this is bullion value.




July

25
2

1
A i
Wgl

t

•

...

S..3

77,074,224

78,437,321

20,915,607

'

72,470.902

9,775,573

74,392,555

9,087,433

47,020,999

$

h

s'*!

%\
Its.
is

$

TO THE COMPTROLLER, MAY 1, 18S3.

ABSTRACT FROM REPORTS OF THE NATIONAL BANKS MADE
Deposits.
Other.

$

$

$
Maine
New

Hampshire.

7.880,000
50,7 50,000
45,402,500
20,550,050
25,700,820

Vermont

166,112,591

1,321,523

302 104,589

50,350,000! 23,342,502
1,800.000
l,400,0u0
34.194,160! 8,548,060
3,716,665
12,000,350
8,697,303
17,558,000;
3,278,924
10,050, GO
8,768,079
31,168,288

2 51,819.2.) 2

613.896

8,360,6*27
80,833,663
27,640,917

91.936

928,079
266,180

62,327,713

232.02*2

21,558,666

61,741,228

221,153
532,365

236,668,416 29,845,454 16,094,4iu
9,861,715
113,000
396,569!
90,909,502 2,329,965'
223,770
31.898.891
678,231'
50,940
60.129.892 5,43 S,362
101,220
26,416,271 1,346,702;
181,930
■ 99,730
67,995,227 2,932,772*!

157,120.798! 57,751,533

517,282,06u

2,886,281

523.874.914 42.968,055 16,807,800!

1,743.9 sol

557,01?*

11,490,330!

2,665,939

3,648,904
19,112,229

49,620
159,520
35,108

other

Delaware
Baltimore

2,4 si,700

736,372

Washington
Dist.of Col.,other

1,125,000
252,000

2 17,73/

5,375,74»'
2.57*2,791

00,00!

632,467

Virginia
Virginia.

3.321,300

1,097,524
480,79?

10,728,851
2,359,019

63

1,836,000

! 22,250,315

5,845,380

44,430,031

2,551,000
1,885,000
2,331,000

421,558
700,038

3,460,328
3,273.868

100.000

606.400 |

3,353,926

1,408,000

11,742
290,000

117,200

2,500

268,164

1,055,000

10,574,602

595
891,950
05,000
736,973

8,043,184
865,184
2,911,505

1,506,1741
699,004

8,310,116
9,489,795

Maryland, other

..

99

Total Div. No. 3.

2,6.73,485, 2,177,720;
1,369,973
37 9101
1,590
309,985!
914,431
62,860

41,465,860

45.153,791

,

30,112,530

6,075,680

4,064,359
26,132,534
5,572,264
2,053.344

119,474
308,335
210,111

7

66,169

240

$
234,297
130,074
196,433
3,403,331
1,527,960
420,382

153,248

2,690

874,877

883,844

53,142,375

1,237,023

194,6*5

4,456,271
3,415,939
4,353,<69
449,903
1,803,917

155,327
186,38S
282,958

3,580
17,000

3,437
79,341

122,413
9,280,210

37,463
122,503
252,067

270

20

100,630
4,140

713,322!

109,360 ,6.787.354

401.16.

97 9,WiO

479,2991
212,017!
.439,4 85

10,407,899
768,130
3,712,715
6,u10 1,652,200
91,720 5,738,720

784,162i

42,810

8,77o
12,480

5,710

141.667!

47,800

178,307
2,202,900

70,510

710

443,408

13,485,

27,250

3,30.4,

3,olO

286,925
35?,000

73,715 j

11.390

682,537

37,3201

225,878

39,358

179,g07

411,320;

379,376

~~U
13
13
2
9
2
7
1
29

..

—

Mississippi
Now Orleans

Louisiana, other.
Texas
Arkansas

2,875,000 !
100,000
2,724,000
455,000
3,551,500
8,095,900

5
9
51
30

Louisville

Kentucky, other.
Tennessee

.%.

Total Div. No. 4

185

Cincinnati
Cleveland.....

Wisconsin, other.

13
6
175.
96
11
144
5
80
3
41

Total Div. No. 5.

..

Ohio, other
Indiana

Chicago
Illinois, other

3,865,300
3

>,518,900

-

8,850,00 >
4,200.000
20,^97,930

13,173,500
0,950 000

205,095
108,119

540,986
1,968,708

42,400

100,610

6,987,000

53.172,976

1,024,000
770,000
4,114,527
3,620,4 40
2,365,000

13,0389*6

289,542
82,501
880,558
197,030
287,115

ini

2,287,0

735.000!

*

8,155,343
35,927,58n

416,997
538,937

25,40s, 118

814,618
76,997

42,577.774
33,790,613

3,190,009

3,709,639
140,000
1,‘•01,623
285,000
085,204

574

83,548.030

18,581,438

Iowa

98

7,974,050

1,804,888

17,493,7 1

♦

134.01 2

Minnesota
St. Louis

35

6,270.000

0
25
26
32

3,150,000

1,245,110
703,47 5
455,750

433,313
277,182
70,630
333,049

371,750

14,213,370,112,133
5,243,-99
5,177,768
7,168,092

222

23,794,650

4,909,742

55,409,584

Detroit

Michigan, other.
Milwaimee

Missouri, other..
Kansas
Nebraska
Total Div. No. 6.

Colorado
Nevada
San Francisco

8,240,000
650 000

2,350.000
1,725,000
2,325,010

35

5,300

14,0951

11,260

305,825

290,340

153,665 ;
2,960

520,020

50

51,090

189.651

520
59,860

9,450

7,243

15,640

7,210,531
13,693,905
9,166,449

32,000
7,250
27,400

36,450

480.966

159,885

47,000
1,760
30,280

63,039,49b

2,244,801

500,050

1,081,087

756,200

5,067,228

354,692
294,083
155,732
270,379
42,330

38,230
29,3 .'0

2,692,718
1,238,500
2,891,849
2,010,664
5,587,153
2,078,191

8,730
10,500
2,250

727,491

2&6.502

19,813,225

iO, 182,858

222,612

44,702,85?
29,803,762
43,096,729
33,861,610
8,471,296
23,18 *,941
3,539,646

2,131,946

7,730

84,559

226.440.227 13,224,499

655,670

1,528.761

1,010,332
841,989

1,650

678,030

355,133

19,595,016
19,086.689
9,117,968
4,916,065
4,3*20,907
7,637,830

253,720
231,528
478,706

217,000
5,950
5,750
6,920

200,109
113,953
39,471
55,591
48.640
62,277

1,603.979

64,680,535

3,494,305

237,510

7,504, SOI
187,8s0

352,645

6,040
20

3.859
22,270

9,778,305

1,224,106

350,000

2,136,975

479,298

5,170,000

1,349,976!

20,162.399

806.880

17,485,362

2,963,714

2o9,704

1.853,344

70,691

81,158

277,021
20,000
14 1,500
135,318

6,418,714
336,147
3,835,415
1,288,648

211,241

3,029,048

182,6:3
222,021

3,741,742

157,500

1,529,328

90,123

425,000

42,750
98,000

893,625
1,480,755

922,727
1,233,063

76,957

4,085.000

873,409

12,922,91 6

854,240

Total Div. No. 8.

55

45,000

135,252

5,060

1,092,801

4,999,0" 8

Wyoming

40,310
387,500
14,690
109,000

4,539,255

1,320|

52,794
49,4011

-

27.880
‘

2,034,424
581,650

2,596,628

•

-

27,500

1,351,509
4,589,195

27,506
579,010

100,000

•

59,144

6 46,476

198,471,673

330.539
274,034
247,633
68,000
193.670
15,368
1,072,580
11,998

1,910

287,384

9,912,911

37,105
488,375
125,909

|

304,282
13,060
167,086
304,896
423,071

149,585
8,259,816

5,922,310
2,625,211

1,425,000
100,000
1,175,000
550,000
435,OuO
475,000

Washington Ter.

22,120

16,220

376,391
55,000

1,800,0(0

24
1
9
6
4
6
4

Utah

10,843
48,755 i

197,013
26,878

18,182,083
4,49 >,559

328,769

56,500

48,000
859,605

“T

Arizona
Dakota
Idaho
Montana
New Mexico

6,983,600

174,646

9,557,95 (
203,580

75,000
1,500,000

Total Div. No. 7.

789,777
4 s 5,480

110

9,780
37,850

694,000
18,618
205,467

1,445,000

1

1
11
3

,

2,050,0o0

19

California, other.
Oregon
:

...

12,440,000

93,951
129,796
■

4,054,955

90,160

_

North Carolina..
South Caroling
Georgia ....:
Florida
Alabama.

2,491,530
3,385,461

2,481.270,1,147,420 34,216,961

2,970

310,190

1.370

137,854!

75,850
35,000
1,000

11,497,501
3,433,432

$

44,522
37,345

27,2871

1326.500

58)225
50,881

388.941

.V,59 6

2,287.800

Leg. tenders

d- U. S.

ctfs.
cerfific'tes of deposit.

$

,

1,200!
3,130!|

176,836

41,615,609

Philadelphia
Pittsburg

West

3,360

268,039

New York City ..
Albany
New York, other.
New Jersey

642

309,923
32,989

506,232
124,738

18.524,672
8,108,120
12,393,300
108,210,106
83, L 10.252

.

11,419.6137

503 166.835.3701

Total Div. No. 2.

128.273

9,422,532
4,262,302
5,372,<*11
67,959,240

Ti'easury

I *
*

!

22,523,048

Connecticut
Total Div. No. 1.

$

108.030
316,3*8
158,001

Boston

Massachus’ts.otli
Rhode Island ...

Peuna.,

2,591,198
1,121,463
1,795,764
11,590,572
13,494,541
3,990,880
6,881,442

10.485,000
6,U‘5,00O

.....

certificates.

overdrafts.)

Silver

Silver.

(Incl’g gold C. II. | Treasury

counts.

Individual.

Gold

Gold and

Loans <£• dis¬

Surplus.

Capital.

1883.

May 1,

15

THE CHRONICLE.

7,1883.1

rcLY

240

........

17.000

26,220]

130,850'

i,040

4,250
136,100

1,189,647;

1,253,839;

520.041

224,550

5,678,370

72,318

1 2,020
810

754,864
1,874
8,069
93,916
7,220

*

19,660

5,330

157,728

18,160

865,943

1,2011
26,0621

2,200

21,300
399,917

2.206]

....
‘

.

2,090

260

5.680

102.147]

6.530

863,708!'

_

490,277

8 270

170,000
13,020

7.682;

490

691.878
856,929
468,811

1,388,575
871,438
2,123,800
360,957
459,609
473,991

12,630
970

10,73.0
4,322'

1,560

839,486

205.88 0 19,036,970

1,6'0
1,000
1,420

120,211

505,856

6,400

28,837!
21,1041

500

227,451
130,333
114,885

11,582.981

12,450

41,434!
17,347

11,600

104;25S;

98.000

890,828
131,270

38,761
305,229
58,318,
41,833
34,073
69,256

968,687-

76,676.408
493.973.0*,91137,765,004; 1,067,964,238 15,243.009 1,262,400,4821 73,071,785 21.013,490] 6,963,73«i! 2, .558,2(n
STATEMENT OF THE NATIONAL BANKS OF THE RESERVE CITIES, AND TOTALS.

Total for U. 8.... 2.375

I

J

»

)

V

9

Totals

Reserve
Cities, &c.
for

Resources.

Loans

....

!Bostn.

*

3
h

Albany.

%

12*94
20*59

3*15

10*70

*33

8*51
1610

*40
•11

Legal tender notes

National bank notes....

Clearing House exeli’s..
U. S. certitic’s of deposit
Due from U.S. Tr’surer.
Other resources

Totals
Liabilities.

Capital stoclc
Surplus fund
Undivided profits
Circulation
Due to depositors
Due to hanks
Other liabilities

Totals..




;

Clev ’d.

o
■

B
u

Detroi.

g b

5s
I

Louis. Fran- ciso. Total Resrve Cites. Total Other Cites. Total United Staes.
SI.

J

!

S.

|

Mils.

4940
137*8
60* 7
313*7

2*72
19*6s

Silver certificates

\

\vile.
Louis¬

315, 1*50 173*50 314-47
79‘26
•21
58’53
•7o
37 95
TO
22*81
•32
•387-26 226-47
%‘2
6-40 1*86 535-26 547*94
3627
6T0 *5> 222*72
3 74
s-oi
01

Stocks, bonds, &c

1*52
TO
*11
2*56

Gold coin
Gold Treasury certific’s
Gold Clear. House ctfs.
Silver coin

£

Wash- inIgton.

§

Si

2,360-2

9*86

3*99

:.

•<s>

o

*

4-31 18 66 13*41 36*63 17*62 78*04 13 78 7-62 17-40 4*56 1,109*3 1.250*4

Mil’s

19*12

Real estate

/b
«c

L

.

*fO
1

S 3

191*92 4s2*75 1623 115-64 46*33 44 37

mrs.

•28

Due from banks

^

o

*05
1*27
*47
2-07
•94
•34
•3»

Mil’s.

103*21 *236*66
31*30

circulation..:]

|

Mil’s.
Mil’s mi’s. Mil’s. I [it’s. Mil's Mil’s. Mil’s. Ml’s Mil’s. Ml’s Mil’s*
205 9-28 7*21 19*81 10T8 4310 8*47 354 9-12 2 60 582*76 67962
98*97 25550
*60
•81
•50
•93
•93
1-90
2-88 6-54
•73 2-48
1L-81
20-95
•55
•35
1-90
*54
•56
•23
•20
•90 106
42*69
•34
25-66
•09 •26
1 24
•65
•54
•13
•40
•03
•26
83-21 113-96
7*28 1*67 1T4 1*53
3*70
1-60
1-95
*9*
•55
21 33
25*81
•22
•41
•os T2
•27
•33
•12
•44
•33
25’03
22*58
•63, *86
*58 •29
*29
•22 4*59
•17
•31
•06
•84
20-17
TO
•22
•39
•05
03
•03
•07
•29
2-5 50
*02
1*86
5* 10
•04
•03
*04
•16
•05
•05
•04
•01
*15
*45
2T3
TO
*01
•01
T7
*52
•05
•03
3037
•47 2-02 •01
37-88
•69
1*69, 1*22 4-76
*4*
•25
1-07
14‘65
8*45
•40
T8 •06
1*67
•30
•36
•09
•19
04
1-84
T8 14416
1*17
•20 •51
•43
•221 10*40
1-23
•04
\>8
7-84
To
*83
•01
1-00
•0 4
11-78
5-7 >
03
*05 •02
•12
*06
•09
•15
•29
•ii
•03
21*20
•01
9-80
T8
T6
T9 •01
•26
*55
•24
T5
T5

Other U. S. bonds

Bonds for

f

2*58
2*18
i i\

*12
*10
2*89
1*69

O 1

JL

*98
14*95
1*63

10*70 10G-87
*51
1*61
1*10

1*52
1*73
4*73

50*75 50*35
11*59 23*3i
3*32
11*35
3'>*69 16*57
68'97 2 52*43
26*8 l 128*27
*77
*41

Mil’s.
60*13 -26-41 26*13
7*51
10*88 7-31
•30
*40
•45
•06
*81
5*34
3*34
13*30 3*08
*74
2*59 1*45
•31
1*38 1*35
*3 2
*18
•10
*£

OO

*40

Mil’s. Mil’s

*03
*01
•26
•09
*19
*51
*07
*13

1*80
1*40
*28
1*36
8-45
2*98
*01

•O I

uu

*44
*09
3*36
*70

*14

*14

8*74

*01
2*49
*58
1-21

2 33
•63
1*07

*33
*53

-

17*56 10*05 11*49
8*70 328 2*67
1*58
*72
1*66
9 65 6*46 6-6 •
62*56 21*78 19*27
15*06 3*8- 2*64
07
*22
*45

191*921482*75 16*2Slll5*64

46*33 44*3

....

....

....

....

m

m

m

m

m

m

....

••••••

......

.....

....

....

.

1 12
*25
•12

•63
2-61
*03
....

2-88

106
•4b.
2-16
10 57
•1-48
*02
'

3 55
•74
•2<>
2*59
3 79
2*27
•27

8-85
102
•63
5*75
13‘7'
6 09
•52

8*95
2-37
IT 8
*75
8*60 42-65
1-02 2214
•96 ......

4*20
•77
•37
1-70

2 65
T4
•33
•84

•65
•29
•16

•45

7*47 4-98
2*35 1*09
....

1,262*4
354*5
32*8

68S
197-2

47*1
47-6
21-0

25-5
70
2*6

68*2
23*1
1460
8*4
17*5
310

1,083-2
2590
11-8

*

481 18T»6 13*41 3663 17-62 T8-04 13-78 7*62 17-40 4 -56 1,109-3 1.250-4

2.360-2

THE CHRONICLE

16
GENERAL

QUOTATIONS

[Vol. XXXVII.

OF STOCKS AND

BONDS.

v

Quotations in New York represent tUo per cent value, whatever the par may be; other quotations are frequently male per share.
The following abbreviations are often used, viz •
for mortgage; “ g.,” for gold; “ g’d,” for guaranteed; “ond.,” for endorsed; “cons.9
for consolidated; “conv.,” for convertible; “s. f.,” for sinking fund; “1. g., for land grant.
Quotations in New York are to Thursday; from other cities, to late mail dates.
Bid.

United States Bonds.

Ask.

City Securities.

UNITED STATES BONDS.
Virginia—(Continued)—
10—4 Os, new
58.1881,continuedat 3^.reg.. -Q—E 102*2
'
113
112%
Tax-receivable coupons
4**8, 1891
reg.. Q—M
4*98.1891
coup.. Q—M 112% 113
l i9*e
CITY SECURITIES.
4b, 1907
reg...Q—.1 119
119*8 Albany, N. Y.—6s, long—Various!
4b, 1907
coup.. .Q—J 119
7s long
r
3s, option U. 8
reg..Q—F 103*4 103*2
Allegheny, Pa.—5s,cp., ’83-97. .Var.
08, Currency, 1895
reg—J&J 127 '
4*26, ooup.. 1883-1901
Var.
6b, Currency, 1896
J&J 128
reg
4s, coup., 1901
Var.
08, Currency, 1897
reg—J&J 129
Allegheny Co., 5s, cp., 1913. .J&J
6s, Currency, 1898
reg
J&J !l30
4s, riot loan, 5-1 Os.
68,. Currency, 1899
reg—J&J 131
do
48,
10-20s
STATE SECURITIES.
£b,
do
5-10s
5s j
83*2
Alabama—Class “A,” 3 to 5,1906... 82
do
10-20s
......

......

do

83

small

Atlanta, Ga.—7s

109

Claes “B,” 5s, 1906

Do.

Claes “C,” 4s, 1906

107
11
41

Arkansas—68, funded, 1899 ..J & J

40
40
19
1

J &J

7e, Levee of 1871,1900

California— 6s, civil bonds, ’93-95.
Delaware—6s

......

109
J&J-* 107
cp.F&A 1093a 110*4
.

Market stock, 7s, 1*92
Water stcck, 7s, 1901
do

7e, 1903
Florida—Consol, gold 6s
Georgia—6s, 1886
7s, new bonds, 1886
78, endorsed, 1886
7s, gold bonds, 1890
8s, *76, ’86

121*2
117*4
121*2

116
120
120
129
129
102

J & .1

133

F & A 105
......

107
113

A & O

......

......

-

117
65
57 *4

Kansas—7s, long

J&J

Maine—4s, 1888

FA A 102

Louisiana—New con. 7s, 1914..J&J
Ex matured coupon

113

War debts assumed, 6s,’89.A& O

1880-’90
Q—J 98
M iseaclmsctts—5s, gold, 1890. A&O 103
5s, gold, 1891.1895
Var.i l LI
5s. g., sterling, 1891
do
do
1894
do
do
1888

J&J I

66
59
103
102
110
110
; 10
101
110

J&J lo7
J&J 103
Q—J K» 5

Hospital, 1882-87
1890

.....

113*4

Maryland—6e, defense, 1S83.. J&J id*e
exempt, 1887

Michigan—7s, 1890

i

.....

....

:

0

!

113

i

J & J 100

Missouri—6s, 1886
1
Funding bonds. 1894-95 ....J
Long bonds, ’89-90
J
Asylum or University, 1892. J

& J 106
& J 117
& J 110

1

_

.....

112

& J

Hannibal & St. Jo., 1886
J & .1 109
do
do
1887....J&J ICO

N. Hampshire—5s, 1892
J&J
War loan, 6s, 1892-1894
J&J I
War loan, 6s, 1901-1905
J & .1
War loan, 6s 1884
MAS
Now Jersey—6s, 1897-1902... .J&J
6s, exempt, 1896
I&J
New York—6s, gold, reg., ’87.. .J&J
6e, gold, coup., 1887
1 & J
6b gold, 1891
:J & J
6s, gold, 1892
A
08. gold, 1893
A ix
'.Carolina— 6s, old, 1886-’98..J&J

107*2 109
115
126
102

117
128

6s

6s,
6s,
6s,
6b

118

122
122
.

j

.

.

_

os,

A & O

Chatham RR

30

33
32*«

30

4s, new, cons., 1910
49. new, small
Ohio 6s, 1886

J & J

12
12
*

"

*

'

6
4 *
4\

■

4*-.
77%

6s,

new

7
6 *v

78*2

v

J & J

39

1 & I>
Vermont—6s, 1890
Virginia—6s, old, 1880-9)5
J &
6b, new bonds, 1886-1805... J & J

6s, consol., 1905

J

J

6s, consols, 1905. ex-coup... .J&J
J&J

68, consol., 2d series..
•

Price

nominal;




O

...

uo kite

.

39*c

38*2
£8*2

1 4
Compromise bonds, 3-4 5 6s, 1912
Texas—Os, 1892
MAS! 112
7e, gold, 1892-1910
MAS' 120
7e, gold, 1904
J&J! i:;o

0s. deferred boons

...

99

series, 1914

106
112
120

Lynn, Mass.—6s, 1887
Water loan, 6s, 1894-96
58,1905
Macon, Ga.—7s

102

J & J 100
J & J 120
F&AI 105
J&J 119

104

100

10&
102

i 07* *
122

M&Nl 116% 117

10478
113%
113%
113%

11.)
30

.....

125
115

36
60
37

......

48
8 ,*2

trausactioua.

.

120
123
104

70
72

59

115
121
125

Ioi

130*2
115

ioa
83

95
116
114

140

105

130

i’16'

106*2
103
106

8s
8s, special tax

Cincinnati, O.— 6s, long..
fis, short
..

Var.i
Var.i

1 130
102
130

1

107
121

7s, water reg.&cp./93-’98-..A&0.
I
7s, street imp., reg, ‘83-80
Var.
1 Portland, Me.—Gs, Man., 1895. Var.i
130*2'
6s, railroad aid, 1907
M&S
105
Portsmouth, N. H.—6s, ’93, RR. J&J 1 ]

130*2: Poughkeepsie. N. Y.—7s, water

1
i Providence, R.T.—5s,g.,T900-5.J&J i|
6s, gold, 1900, water ioau...J & J;
b», 1885
M & 81;
Richmond, Va.—6s
J&J!
8s.......
J & Jj

120
110*2 III

fis, long

Var.
Va’*.
Var.
1 102
1 1«)5

7-308,

short"

Dallas, Texas—Ss, 1904
10s, 1883-96....
Water, 6s. 1900
Detroit, Mich.—7s, long
7s, water, long
Elizabeth, N. J.—7s, short
7s, funded, 1880-1905
7s, consol., 1885-98

132

5s

96
107
117

116
122
102
117
120

....

106
119
122

115%'110
118
115

j

117

126%; L27
102*2 103*2
L 16

135
106

Var. 105
138
J & Jtj 135
100
Rockland, Me.—6s, ’63-99,RR..F&A 99
iio
st. Joseph, Mo.—C'omp’unse 4s. 19011
78*2
116
114
St. Louis, Mo.—7s, 1385
F&A 103*21101*2
104
107
6s, short
Var. 105% 100*2
105
no
6s, long
Var. 111 1120
97 *2 102*2
108
5s, long
Var. 107

Var.i
Var.i

......

42 *2

Var
A&O

7s, 1905

Mass.—6s, 1904...FA Al
5s, 1894, gold
F&A 1
5s, 1909
F&At
j Fitclibn rg, Mass.—6s. ’91, W. L.. J&J t
Galveston, Tox.-Ss. 1893-1909 M&S
5s, 1920
J&D
Galvest’n Comity, 6s, 1902..MteN
Hartford, Ct.—City 6s, var. dates..*
j Capitol, untax. Os
1
Hartford Town i*2S, untax
1
Fall River,

......

J30

!

119

Var.

Columbus, Ga.—7s
Covington. Ky.—7-3Os, long

new,
new

122
116
107

4s,
1
103*2 Pittsburg,Pa.—4s, coup.,1913.. J&J. 94
106*2
5s, reg. and coup., 1913
J&J. 106

119*4 120

7s. shoit

long

J&J
reg.,due 1895 & over. J&J

6s, old, reg

6sj

120

J&J! 104
J&J 120
120

Petersburg. Va.—6s

112

105
118

120
135

j

106% 107*4

Water Works

t>

..

8s

100 ! 101
|
118
118*4
LOS *2 103*2

4s

•

4b, reg , 1912
F&A i is
Rhode JsPd—Os, 1893-9, coup..J &J 116
South Carolina—6s, Act of March
Q
23,1869. Non-fimdable, 18~8.. )
Brown consois

Lynchburg, Va.—6s

*

4b, leg., 1892-1904

Tennessee—6s, old, 1890-98 ..J & .1
6b, new bonds, 1892-1900 J
.1

115

3-65s, 1902
Cook Co. 7s, 1892
Cook Co. 5s, 1899...
Cook Co. 1*28, 1900
West Chicago 5s, 1890
Lincoln Park 7s, 1895

4s
J&J
'
Southern RR. 7-309, 1906.. .J&J
do
68, g., 1902
M&N 1
Cur. 6h, 1909....F&A t
do
do
Skg. fd. 5s, 1910M&S t

16

77
J & J LOG
Fenca.—5s, new, reg... ’92-1902. F&A 116
6s, 15-25, reg., 18S2-’92
V & A

109
112

Var.i 100*2 105%i
100**
M&N 106
114*4
Lowell, Mass —6s, 1890, W. L.M&Ni 114

4*28, 1900

7-308, 1902

A&O

6a, special tax, class 1,1808-9A&O
6b,
do
class 2
A&O
6s,
do
W’n N. C. RR.A&O

123

6s, short
5s, 1890-1900

118
110

West Park 7s. 1890
South Park 6s, 1899

117

J &. J 7 j J 55
A&Oil |155
7 coupons off
do
J&J ;i30
do
7 coupons off ....A&O 130
Funding act of 1806 1900 J&J 10
‘
do
1868. L893A&0 10
new bonds, 1892-8
J&J I G
-do

99
99
101
102
112

......

6s, 1895

6s, N C. HR., 1883-5
6s,. do
Ce

105
......

....

Chicago, III.—7s, 1892-99

102*2

117
107
107
112
115

|

105

......

..!

M&N

Minnesota—Now 4*29

'

111*4 j

M&Nj
A&O*

106
107
110
120

_

J & J 107

Q—J

112

108
107

7s.M&Saud'J&D
Bayonne City, 7s, long
J&J
Lawrence, Mass.—6s, 1894... A& OI
6s, 1900...
A&O
Long Island City, N.Y—Water,7s,*95
Louisville. Ky.—7s, longdates. Var.i 117
7s, short dates
Var.i 106
6s, long
Var.i 110
do

106*2 107
97
98
100
101
10S
110
108
105

106

105
110
104
106
105
106
105
119

Jersey City—6s, water, long, 1895..
". ..J & J
78, water, 1899-1902
7s, improvement, 1891-’u4.,..Var.
7s, Bergen, long...
J & J
Hudson County, 6s
A&O

....

115
117

J&Jt 120

Perm. imp. 7s, 1891

Wash.—Fund.loan(Cong.)6s,g.,'921
Fund, loan (Leg.)6s, g., 1902 Vari

6s,
6e,
6b,
5b,

•

103% 110*4

Funding 5s, 1899
J&J l 113
Perm. imp. 6s, guar., 1891...J&JI 116*2

109
120
160
100
100

Ask*

Bid.

City Securities.

105*4 Manchester, N.H.—5s, 1885
J&J l 10134
114*4
6s, 1894
J&JI 119
,
114*4
6s, 1902
J&J 121*2
103
115
4s, 1911
117
115
Memphis, Tenu.—6s, C.
J&J 35
119
117
6s, A & B
.J&J; -35
115
113
68, gold, fund., 1900
.M & N 35
.67
127
125
6s, end.,M. & C. RR
130
126
J&J .68
6s, consols
10)
100
Milwaukee, Wis.—5s, 1891...J & Dl 98
10478 105%
Os, 1896-1901
:
Var.i
1 7s, water, 1902
J&Jt
5s, 1916
M&N 123*2 127
114
Mobile, Ala.—3-4-Ss, funded..M&N 56
48, 1920
J&J 111
Bangor, Mo.—6s. RR..l890-’94;Var.1 112*2 114*2 : Montgomery, Ala. —New 3s .. J & J
75
122
5s, new
6s, water, 1905
J&J1 120
1< 4
111*4 Nashville, Tenh.—6s, old
6s, E.& N.A. Railroad, 1894..J&Jt 114
It 4
117
68. B. & Piscataquis RR./99.A&01 115
6s, new
102*i Newark—6s, long
Bath, Me.—6s,railroad aid
Vari 102
Var.1 113
1 897. munieinnl
102
7s, long
Var.i 118
101*4
7s, water, long
Belfast, Me.—6s,railroad aid, ’98..tjl04
Var.! 121
129*1 New Bedford,Mass.— 6s, 1909. A&O’ 129*2
Boston,Mass.—6s,cur,long,1905Var1 129
120 *i i
5s, 1900, Water Loan
A.&O 113
6s, currency, 1894
Var. 120
N. Brunswick, N. J—7s, various.. J 106
5s, gold, long
'.
Var.i 118% 119
112
6s.
1 93
4*28,1908
A&O 110
SI
New Orleans, La.—Premium bonds
107
4s, currency, long
J&J 106
105
Consolidated 6s, 1892;..
Var. 93
Brooklyn, N. Y.—7s, short
J&J 109
114*2
Newport—Water bonds 7-30s
J&J 144
7s, Park, long
100
...,*.
New York City— 7s, short
7s, Water, long
J&J 140
135
145
7s, long
7s, Bridge, long
J&J 140
110
Os. short
fis, Water, long
.T&.I 110
!
129
os, long
6s, Park, long
J&J 124
126
! Cs, gold (consolidated), 1896-1901 130*
130
6s, Bridge, long
118
112
117
! 5s, long
5s, Bridge, long
100
114
Kings Co. 7s, 1882-’89
j 4 s, long
M&N 102
110
1 Newton—6s, 1905, water loan. .J&Jj 129%
do
6s, 1882-’80
M&N 101
5s, 1905, water loan
I&Ji
Buffalo, N. Y.—78, 1895
Var. 112
Norfolk, V a.—6s,reg. s tk, ’78-85.. J&J ioi
7s, water, long
...Var.t LI 7
8s, coup., 1890-93
}
Var.j 115
6s, Park, 1926
M& S* 109
8s, water, 1901
M&N; 128
■auibridge, Mass.—5s, 1889...A&01 107 10s
122
J&J! 120
6s, 1894-90. water loan
j Norwich, Ct—5s, 1907
A&O!;
/
J&J 127*2 128
6s, 1904, city bonds
,’harlestou, 8.C.—Os,st’k,’76-98..Q-J 76 1 80
Orange, N. J.—7s, long
< j 115
Oswego, N. Y.—78, 1837-8-9
Iii02
7s, tire loan bonds, 1890
J & J 30 1
106 j
Paterson, N. J.—7s, long
Vai j 120,
7s, non-tax bonds
6s. long
75*2
4s. non-taxable
114
122
5s, loug
Chelsea. Maes.—6s, ’97,water!.F&A1 120
105

6s, Pitts. & Con’v. RR.,1886.. J&J
,u,
Os, consol,, 1890
Q—J
6s, Balt. & O. loan, 1890
Q—J
6s, Park, 1890
Q-M
6s, bounty, 1893
M& 8
6s,
do
exempt, 1893... M & 8
5s, water, 1894
J&J
6s, 1900
J&J
6s, West. Md. RR., 1902
J&J
Q—J
5s, consol, 1885
6s, Valley RR., 1886
A&O

20
8

...

Diet. Col.—Cons. 3-65s,1924,
Consol. 3-05s, 1924, reg

42

34
45

110
Austin, Texas—1 Os
Baltimore—6s, City Hall, 1884 Q—J 101

46

......

Ask.

Augusta,Me.—6s, 1887, mun..F&A!
Augusta, (3a—7s
Various 108

15
60

42**

npli
7s,L. R .P.

Connecticut—de, 1884-5

8s

82

Bid.

42*2
42*2

......

1

107
124
101
35
Houston, Tex.—10s
35
i 6s, funded
Haverhill, Mass.—6s.’85-8;).. A&O! 100
Indionan *!is. f ml.—T-UOx.’oa-op.r.y 1 i

t Purchaser also pays aocruod interest.

Var.j 104% 106

5s. 10-20
St. L. Co.—6s,

118
107
109
112
115
124
114

120

| 80
1895..A&GL 113

85
115
10 >
105
129

gold. 1905
A&O
46
Currency, 7s. 1887-’88,... Var..
46
it. Paul, Minn.—‘Cs, long
46
7s, long
46
8s. 1889-90
Var1 Salem, Mass.—6s, long, W. L.A&OI.
125
103*2!
5s, 1904, W. L
r&'t
115*2' i. Francisco—7s, g., 1888-95-.. Var. 'I
......

42*o
121
103
115
tit
113
106
105
98
102
......

Rochester, N.Y.—6s
7s, water. 1903

Gs, gold, long

.Savannah funded 5s. consols

<omcrvilie, Mass.—5s,

.....

108
128
too
45
45

109

6s, 1835
6**.s, 1831

J&Jt 103
A&O I 104

Springfield, Mass.— Os, 1905..A&Oo 127
7s, 1903, water loan
A&O I] 133
Toledo, 0.-7-303, RR., 1900.M & N »j
8s

Var. fj

63, 1893 to ’99

Var.i!

126

11$

137

Washington. D.C.—Stui Dist. «»t Col. 1

t lu London.

U Coupons on since 1369.

jr™

17

THE CHRONICLE.

7,1863.]

GENERAL QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND BONDS—Continued.
Explanations See Notes at Head of First Page of Quotations.

For

j Ask.

Bid.

Railroad Bonds.

Bid.

Railroad Bonds.

Central Pacific—(Coutiuued)—
95
Wilmington, N.C.—Gs ..
104 1103
1
Land grant M.,' 6s. g., 1890.AAO
8s, gold, con. on
Worcester, Mass.—G3, 1802...AAO IllGTj ! 116^ ri West. Pacir., 1st. Gs, g., ’99. .JAJ
Charl’le CoLAA.—Cons.,7s,’93.JAJ
5s, 1905...
A,tO 113 1113
2d mort., 7s, 1910
4 s. 1905
TAJ
A,tO 101 HOG

Yonkers. N. Y.—Wall

1909

r.

ml AIJL lit O A. JL? £&0[VD»Ss
Ala.Cent.—1st M.,(js, 1918
JAJ iI
Income Gs, 1918
JAJ
Ala. Gt. Southern— 1st mort., 190S j;

Alb’y A Susq.— 1st M., 7s, ’88.. JAJ
2d mortgage, 7s, 1885......-AAO
Consol, mort., 7s, 190t‘,giur. A AO I
Consol, mort., 68.1900* guar AAO !

1

dies. A Ohio—Pur. money
Series A, 1903

95

AAO.

Cheshire-Gs, 1396-98

103

Chic. A Alton—1st M., 7s, ’93..JAJ

Gs. 1911

i

TAJ

Sterling mort., Gs, g., 1903..JAJ

1

This Ran C line Gs
1903 MAN
Miss. Riv. Bridge, 1st.,s.f., 6s, 1912
Louia’a A Mo.R., lst,7s,1900FAA
40
do:
2d. 7s, 1900 MAN
120
MAS 1 i 1 ;>
St.L.,Tacks’v.A C., 1st,7s,’94.AAO
Afcch’n A Neb.—1st.7s. 1907
do 1 s t gu; u\ (564),7s,’ 9 4 A A 0
Ateh.Ton.&S.F.—lst,7s ,g„’99.JAJ f 119*4 120
do 2d M. (3G0), 7s, ’93.. JAJ
Land grant, 7s. g., 1902
A AO tiisio 114
do 2d-guai’.( 1S3) 7s,’’93. JAJ
102*2
Sinking fund, Os, 19LI...
TAD 102
'Chicago A Atlantic -1st mort
Guaranteed 7s, 190.)
JAJ&AAO 1112% 113
97
I9G
•iChic.B.A Q.-^-Conaol., 7s, 1903 JAJ

Allegh. Val.—Gen. M.,7310s. .JAJ ini
•East, exten. M., 7s, 191.0
AAO
1
Income, 7s, end., 1891
A AO

120

<

-

7s, guar., L.b.A M.S., 1901.. AAO
iClev. Col. C. A r.—1st, 7s, ’99.MAN 121*6
Consol, mort., 7s, 1914
111*4
.TAD 121
91 h
Belief. A Ind. M., 7s, 1899...JA.T 110
50
51
Clev. A Pittst.—4th M., Gs, 1892.JAJ 107*3
\
Consol. S. F., 7s, 1900
MAN 123
1110
110*15 IClev.AM. Val.—1st, 7s,g.,’93.FAA
115
[Columbia A Greenv.—1st, Gs. 191G 104
j 2d mort., Gs, 192G
.{
1 11 *2
83
Col. & 110 c k. V •—1 s t M., 7 s, ’ 9 7. A A O f 115
do
2d M., 7s, 1892. JAJ 1107
1115
Col. 'A Toledo—1st mort. bonds
117
1109
do •
2d mort

..A AO

413 s, 1920
Florence A El Dor’do,

ISlSj

85

1

131*8

85
101
11.3

1

lMt.7s.AA0d l*>3%

K.C.Topcka&W., 1st M.,7s,g.JAJ;t 11734
income 7s.

...

..

......

......

......

......

•

..

{Col. A.Xenia—1st M., 7s.1390.MA8 tiio
-Conn. A Passuinp.—M., 7s, ’93. A AO t
[• Massawippi, g., Gs, gold, ’89 JAJ t

......

......

......

.

......

.....

33

10G
114

121

Rfta, m,,,*

•

V

JLKWI.I9IUIUO6 r

1o6 \r
l?Jt

fij

.

.

N l

.u ivu

TGI

OTjtj vVtl

•1st mort... 7s. truar
Boston A Lowell—7s. *92

\J A

X.V*

•

)

U Of J.

V Lr

.

U Ot-G

122*2*

P. du C.

120
!
101 *2

P 1) , 2d M., 7 3-1 Os, 1898 .FAA
St P A Chic , 7s,
1902
JAJ
Mil. A St. P.. 2d M., 7s, 188 4. A AO
La. C., 1st M., 7s, 1893
TAJ
T. A M., 1st M., 7s, 1897
JAJ
Fa. A Dak., 1st M„ 7s, 1899. JAJ
Hast. A Dak., IstM.,7s, 1910. JAJ
Chic. A Mil., 1st M.,7s, 1903.JAJ
1st mort., consol.. 7s, 1905.. JAJ
1st M.. I. A D. Ext., 7s, 1908JAJ
1st M.,Gs, S’thwest Div.1909.TAJ
1st Mm 5s. La C. A Daw 1919.TAJ
So. Minn. 1st Gs. 1910
JAJ

“1

115

108*2
123
102
98
106
lit
33

JA.T

.

,

...

117*2!

AAOif 117

11

1110%

.TAJ

L

Chic. A Pac. Div. Gs, 1910
do
West. Div., os,1921. JAJ
Mineral Pt. Div., 5s, 1910...JAJ
Chic. A L. Sup. Div., js, 1921
Wis. AMimi. Div., 5s. 1921 ...JAJ
Ohio. AN. W.—Sink.t.,lst,7s,’85FAA

!

12 4

Bost. A Providence—7s, 1893.JAJ 1 123
Best, A Revere B’h—1st, 6 s.’97. J AJ 1112
Bradford Bold. A K. — 1 sf, Gs, 1 932

112*3
1

I

Bradf.Eld.A Cuba—1st.Gs, 19 rJJAJ

1

Bklyn Bat li&C. I. -1 sr.Gs, 1912. FA A
Brooklyn Elevated—Bon Js

Div., 1st, 8s, 1838. FAA

Interest mort.. 7s, 18S3
31 AN
Consol, mort., 7s, 1915
Q— F
Ex ten.- mort., 7s, 1385
FAA
1st mort., 7s, 1885
FAA
Consol., gold, 7s, cp., 1902..JAD
do ’ ~do
reg

|

1st ino..

.

......

113

12D
121
123 *^»

......

|

..

94*2
LOO *2

...

......

.

1

...

.

.

......

..

.

Equipment. 7s, 1890
.

5 s,

.

•

.

.

.

......

......

......

J

......

*

Price nominal; no late transactions.




Consol., gold. Gs, 1912
Cin. Ham. ADayt.- 2d, 7s, '85 JAJ 102
Consol, mort., 7s, 1905
AAO, * 12 2
do
Gs, 1905
AAO!H10%
Cin. II. A I., 1st 31., 7s. 1903.JA I t LOS
Cin. I. St. L. A Chic.—Con. Gs, 19203 10)
Cin.A Indiana, 1st 3I.,7s,’92.JAD 1109
do
2d M.. 7s.’82-87.JA,LI 197
....

I
I

105*2
110*2
112*1!
.J
!

j

ito 1

•

117

116
118
7j3

:

......

......

......

105
106

113*2

......

75*a
34**2
92*4

33

......

......

’

rndl inapolis C. A L., 7s of ’97.. -1 1 111
Ind’apolis A Cin., 1st,7s.’83.AAO! 107

Ci11.Laf.ACI1— l3t,7s,g.,1901.MAS| 110
40
Cm. Northern. — lsL Gs. gold, 19 :0.l

f Tlie purchaser also pays accrued interest.

90
103
12 i
ILL
101

112
109
LOS
112
60

*

1

106

101*9

2 ‘

ii i

t 111
1117
AAO 1123

112

Holly W. A M.—1st, 8s, 1901.JAJ 120
Ft. Madison A N. W., 1st 7s. g., 1905 1
72
Ft. W. A Donv. City—1st, Gs, 1921.
73*6
Frankfort A Kokomo—1st. 7s. 1908
Gal. Har. A S. A.—1 s f, Gs, g. 1910. F A A 105*e 106
2d mort.. 7s, 1905
J.teD
75
77
Gal.lIous.A lien.—1st, 5s, gold. JAJ
110
/I’oorgia—7s, 1883-90
JAJ 106
124
127
63, 1897 A 1910
......

......

......

85
as

Georgia Pacific-1st mort
ir.Rap. A Ind.—lat, l.g., g’d, 7a, g.i 1116
-

.

1st.

•

•

•

M.,7s, l.g., gold,not guar. AAO 1110
100

i4'v\v ASt I*
1st Gs 1911 F A A
2d, incomes, 19LI
Julf Col. A 8. Fe—1st, 7s,1909 JAJ

105

4|.

iaunibal A Nap —1st, 7s, ’83.MAN
dan. A St. Jo.— Conv. 8s, 1885.MAS
Con. 6s, 1911
MAS
Kalis. C. vt (tmi.. 1st, 10s.’92. JAJ
flousatome—1st ivl., 7s. 1885.FAA

doVt.E.AW. Tex.—1st,7s,’98.MAN
2d, Gs. 1913
.JA-1
doust.A Tex. C.—1st., 7s, guar.,’91
West. Div., 1st, 7s, g., 1891.. TAJ
Waco A N. W.. 1 st, 7s, g., 1903.JAJ
Cons, mort., 8s, 1912
AAO
Waco AN., 8s, 1915
Gen. mort. Os, 1921
AAO
dunt. A Br. Top —1 st, 7s, ’90..AAO
2d mort., 7s, g., 1895
FAA
Cons 3d Mi 5s. 1895 .,
AAO
ill. Cent.—1 st M.Chic.A Sprj’93JAJ

•

....

......

2d mort.. -4-5-0.1909. ...AA.

l fn umUim

•

•

•mm

1125*4 125
...»

105
73

I07k> 108

L05*4
112*5
122*3 125
...

.

.

98

115*e
115*4
85*5
110
•

>1

30
111

106 *4 107
110
111*9

5s, 1921
Sterling, S. F.,.5s. g., 1903..AAO 110(>
sterling, gen. M.,Gs, g., 1895.AAO jll3
Sterling. 5s, 1905
TADi ;106
j Ind. GI. A VV .— 1st, pf.,7s, L900JAJI
87
;! 1st mort., 4-5-0, 190.)
AAO
Middle Div. reg.

1

......

AAO
AAO

.

103*2

1»0

103

......

......

89
85

•

•

117*9
123*9
7s. 189 4
Flint A P. Marq.—M. Gs, 1920.AAO 1109 *e
107
Flint A Ilolly, 1st. 108, ’88.MAN

Gs, 1893

.

,

l< 0

190)01-02

......

.

Income bonds, 1903
MAN
Am. Dk.A Imp. Co.. 5s, 1921. JAJ]
Leh.A Wilkesb. Coal,ino.,’83, MAN j
Consol, ,7s, gold, 1900,ass’d.Q-.\l 10 4 %
Cent. Ohio—1st M.. Gs, 1890..MAS 110*4'
!
Cent. Pacific—1st,Gs, g.,’95.-93.JAJ
1
State Aid, 7s, g., 1881
JAJ
S. Joaquin, 1st M.,Gs, g. 1900. AAO ho
Cal. A Oregon, 1st, Gs, g.,’83.JAJ
Cal. A Or. C.P.bonds. 6s,g.f’92 JAJ fins

•

......

Evansv.T.H.ACiii.— 1st, 7s, g.MAN 101 %>
Fitchburg—5s, 1899
AAO 1110^

......

104%|

AAO

Evansv. A Crawf.—1st 7.', ’87. JAJ
Evans.A T.II.,lst con.,Gs,1921,JAJ

.

.

101
93

•

115

.«•••»

...

114*3

73

•

......

.

Iljsb

100

*•••••

......

assented.Q—J
Adjustment bonds, 1903

«.*.«•

.

1

Consol. M. ,7s, 1899,

77 *4

95

109*2 109 Sb Eastern, Mass.—Gs, g.,1-906. .MAW *110*4 110%
109
03*8 9l-r>s ; Sterling debs., Gs, g.. 1900..MAS flOO
9 i *2* Eliz. City A Nor.—3.F. dcl).,Gs.AAO
90
1st mort., Gs, 1920....
..MAS
95
90*4' E izab. 1 ox.A Big 8.—Cs. 1902.MAS
*
106
EimiraA W’mspt—18“ ,6s,1910.JA 1 118
93
100
101
5s, perpetual
.•
AAO
1 Erie A Pittsb.—‘2d, now 1st
III
TAJ 109
132*2
i
;
(Tons, mort,, 7s, 1398
-.JAJ 112

....

......

_

...

91

77

Os, 1905

Divisional. 5s, 1930
JAJ
E. Tonn. A Ga., 1 st, Cs,’83-86.JAJ
E.Tenn.A Va.,ond.,Os, 188G.MAN

10G
......

j*

|

.

...

9*6 7e

......

......

.

......

127*a

112
127

|

......

.

100 ‘
101
103
i(*8
108

......

Income, 1921
117
jDub. A Dale.—1st xM., os, 1919. JAJ
119
124
iDub.A S. City—1st,2d Div..’94.JAJ
113
iDunk.A.V.A P—1st,7s,g.. 1900JAD
iEast Penn.—1st M„7a, 1883..MAS
115*2 117
118
E.Tenn. Va.A Ga.—1st, 7s,1900..1AJ
12 1 *2
120
1st mart., consol., 5s, 1930 ..JAJ
121
Income, Gs, 1931
104

......

......

.

104

j Did. Mi ok. A M.—1st. Gs, 1921. AAO

30
35
Buff. Brad.A l\-(ien.M.7s,’96..TAJ, 102
1
125
Buff. N.Y.AFrie—1st. 7s. 1910. JAD
123*4'
Buff N Y A Phil — 1st, 6s,g ,’9G.JAJ
1
1
i
2d mortgage, 7s, g
i
12
100
1
9
9
*2
fund,
Os,
1929
AAO
Sinking
Cons. G>l 1921 .*.T.
TAJ
103
1
do
5s, 1929
AAO 102
Buff. Pit tab. A West.—Gs, 1921A AO
i
Escan.&L Sup., 1st, Os. 1991.JAJ
95
i
Pitts. Titusv.A B.—7s, 1896.. FAA
1
Dos 31.A Minn’s, 1st.7s.1907.FAA
Oil Creek, l st M., Gs, 7 912... A A( > 105^!
loo
Iowa Mid., 1st M., 8s, 1900. AAO 125
Union A’fitusv., 1st,7s. 1890.JAJ
1
Peninsula, 1st, conv., 7s,’98.MAS 120
Warren A Fr’kln, 1st, 7s,*9G.FAA 115 I
1
i Chic. A Mil., 1st 31., 7s, ’93..JAJ
Huff. A Southwest.—Gs,1908..J.AJ
111
Mil. A Mad., 1st, Gs, 1995..M.AS.
100*6'
Bur. C. R.AN.—Ist.Ss.uewJOG.J A»> 100
j 105
Chic.R. T.APac.— Os, 1917,coup. JAJ 123*8 12 4
C. Rap.I.F.A N.,1st,(is. 1920.AAO
...JAJ < 122 *2!
Cairo A St. Louis—1st mort
Gs, 1917, reg
10G
Ciiie. A S. \V.. 1 st,7s,guar.,’99. .MAN
Oalifor. Pae.—1st M.,7s, g.,’8'0. JAJ f 104
105
Chic. St. L.AN.O.-lstcon. 1897,7.- iiG
2d M.. 6s, g.,end C. Pae., ’89..TAJ tioo
107
2(1 mort Gs, 1907
TAD 116
3d M. (guar. C. P.), Gs, 1 >05. JAJ i 105
120
Ten. lieu, 7s, 1897
62
MAN 110
do
do
3s, 1905.JAJ
104
103
5s, 1951, gold
California So.—1st, 6s, 1922
JAJ
120
Miss. Ceil., 1st M.,73,’7 4-8 4.MAN 1100
<?amden A Atl.—1st,7s, g.,*93..JAJ i 19
107
do
2d mort., 8s
2d mort., Gs, 1904
AAO
N.O. Jack. A Gt. N.,lst„8s.’8G. JAJ 106*2 108 1
Cam. A Bur. Co—1st M., 0s.’97. FAA
!
do
2d M., 8 s, 90, c t f s. A AO 11 1
90
96*4
Canada So.—1st M.,guar., 1998,JAJ
1 1 n
(ID
-£(.1 IllOL L. u(n)U.
•./ViVv/
J
)
GitrOliua Cuii t#—1 st)
0*j0« J
<V1
at- r
1
1 cm
A.i-n
do
incomes
160
122 *
Chic- A (it. East., 1st, 7s, 93-’95
120
Col.A Ind. C., 1st M., 7s, 1904.JAJ *1 L5
Gedar F. A Min.—1st, 7s, 1907. JAJ 110
do
2d 31.7s, 1901.31 AN, *110
Cedar R. A Mo.—1 st, 7s, *91... FAA 1103*4 l<»8%
117
!
121
Un.A Logansp.?lst. 7s, 1905.AAO *1 L4
1st mort., 7s, 1910
MAN i 120
103
T. Logansp. A B., 7s, 1884..FAA *100
(
99*2 100*2
Cent. Br. U. Pac., lets, Gs, ’95. MAN
*100
Fill. A Chic. A. L., 1886-’9()
9G
99*2 10()*2 Chic.St.P.Min.AOm.—Con. Gs, 1930 107*2
Atch.A Pike’s P’k, 1st. Gs, g; .MAN
Ill
Ch.St.P.A Minn. lsLGs,l913MA‘:
j
Cent, of Ga.—1st. cons., 7s, *93. JAJ 103 ^l 11 !
95
!
Land grant, ine., Gs, 1893M«cN
93
Certificates of indebted jess, Gs..
Ill
North Wise., 1st Gs, 1930 ...JAJ
Cent. Iowa—New 1st., 7s , *99. JAJ no
55
St. PaulAS.Citv, 1st Gs, 1919. A AO 113*2 114 !
Inc. bonds," debt certs.’’, 7s,AAO
!
112
Chis. A Tomali.—Scrip, lo05
1L10
SwLj 81
Idas tern I)iv., 1st, Gs, 1912..AAO
90*o
Cin. A Eastern—1st, 7s, 18JG
Central of N. J.—1st M.,7s,’90.Faa 117
ICO
1 i 6
2d mort., 7s. 1909
11 4

|

us-

Detroit A Bay G—1st,8s,1902.MAN 105
1
1st M., 8a, end. M. 0., 1902. MAN 1113
i)ot.G.Haven AMil.—Equip.Ga,19l8 til 5
i Con. M., 5% till’8 4, after G*,. 1918 J114
iDet. 1,. A North—1st, 7s, 1907.JvtJ tll7%

99

..«■« m

85

i 95
flOO
1102
f 107
1107
1118

122*0 j Del. A Bound B’k—1st, 7s,1905FAA
!
113
Del.Lack.A W.—Conv.7s, 1892 JAD
111
) Mort. 7s. 1907
51 AS
ln<vn
1
7<i o- 1 QOfk \f.SrN
125
ILL
1st
!
consol.mort.,7s, 1910
JAI
26
!Denv.All. G.W. -1st, Cs, 1011.MAS

Chic.A Mich.L.Sh.—1st, 8s,’89.MAS 1112

Us!
105*2'
N6w 5s, 1899
JAJ j 105
1
Boston A Maine—7s. 1893 91. JAJ U22%!l23
1.80G

Gs

V.V/

-

*

Quincy A Wars’w, 1st, 8s, ’90. JAJ 1113
20
Ohio. A Can. So.—1st, 7s, 1902 A AC
Chio.C. Dub A. Minn.—7s, 1910 JAJ 110 1*4 101% jDenv.S.P.A Pac.—1st,7s,1905 MAN
97
1 Dos M. A Ft. D.-lst, Gs, 1905. JAJ
Chic.. A East ill.—1st mort. 6s, 1907

LOGV Chic. Mil. A St. Paul—

TAJ
TAJ
TAJ
Equiimient, Gs, .1885
FA A
too
Framigham A Lowell—1 s!. 5s, ’91
Boat. Cone.A Mon. —S.F., (>.$,’39. JAJ 1 105:14
Consol, mort., 7s, 1893
AAO K 13%
32
Dost. Hart. A E.—1st, 7s, 1900. J AJ
1st M.,7s, 1889-90
B. C. F. A N. B., 5s, 1910
N. Bedford RIL, 7a. 1891

«

113

32

100

.....

Income

115

1119
i 100
%
1112 4j
103 H
1122
MOL

T,t- T

1 son

V*/ O D

109

......

.CumberLVal.—1st M.,8s,1904. AAO

i 122*4
112
1 110*4
i 123

bonds, 1907
'
Chic. A Gr. Trunk—1st mort., 1900
Chic. Pa A Neb.—2d M., 5s, 1883.. 1

117

.

fia

VX lit

1

119

1902..MAS 1L 17
do
1910. MAN 1119
ParkerRbnro- t*iv, Gs, 1910
aao 1 131-2
Balt. A Pot’o—1st, Gs, g., 191L.JAJ ; 115
1st, tunnel, Gs, g., g’d, 1911 .AAO 1113
Belvidere Del.—1st,Gs,c., 1902. JAI)
2d mort., Gs, 1885
MAS 103
3d mort., Gs, 1887
..FAA
Eoston A Albany—7s, 1892... FA A 1 122
g.,
Gs. g.,

Om.AS. W., 1st,8s,JAD
III. Grand Tr.. let. 8s. ’90... A AO
Dixon Poo.A II., 1st,8s,1889.JAJ
do

j

105

8G
80

118

.

75
30
117

......

80

122

[Col. Spri ngf. & C.—1 st. 7s, 1901. MAS

......

Dakota Southern—7s, gold,’94,FAA
4s, plain bonds, 1921
JAJ
Bur. A Mo. R., I’d M., 7s,’93. A AO t L1G*8 110:‘o Davton A Mic-h.—Consol. 5s
2d mort., 7s, 188 4, now lst.MAS
do
Conv. 8s.’91 ser.JAJ \
3d mort., 7.8, 1883, now 2d.AAO
Bur.A Mo.(Nob.), lst,Gs,191S.JAJ K 11 -h 112
do
103*4 Dayt.A West.—IstM.,Gs, 1905.JAJ
Cons, 6s, non-ex.. JAJ no3
80s,
1st mort., 7s, 1905
TAJ
do
4s, (Neb.), 1910..JAJ ISO
115
iDolawiiro— Mort., Ga.guar.,^. JAJ
do
Neb. R R, lst,7s, A AO HI 4

9734 \

‘1(U

do

4s[ Denver Div., 1922

......

JAD
MAS 1112

VOj i. U O kJ

4s, 1919,

1

illia

..

■e

5s, 1919, Iowa I>iv

104 I
114W
103 Li

Pleas’t Hill & Do Soto. 1 st,7s,1907*1 103%
Pueblo & Ark. V.. 1st. 7s. g.,1903. 1 L11
Sonora. 1st, 7s. 1910, guar.. JA.T 102%
WichitaAS. W., 1 st,7s, g., gu.i.. 1902 KOI
11 g *2
Atlanta A Charlotte Alt L.—1st,7s
79
Income, Gs
97
Atlantic A Pac. — 1st Gs, 1910
JAJ
31
Incomes, 1910
JAJ
Baltimore A Ohio -Os. 1 835.. AAO 101

Sterling, 5s, 1927
Sterling, Gs, 1895
Sterling mort., Gs,

5s. 1901

i*23*

.

126*4 127*2 Conn. Val.—1st M.. 7s, 1901...JAJ
JAD ! 10 L*a 102
[Conn. West.—1st M„ 7s, 1900. JAJ
106
...AAO
.Conneeting (Phila.)—1st, Gs ..MAS
10
Cumberland A Penn.—1st mort
1*4
AAO
87
2d mort
86*4
AAO

Bonds, 5s, 1895

105%

AAOjt 105
N.Mcx.ASo.Pac.,1 sl,7s, 1909 AAOji 114
do

.

-

.

5s, plain bonds, 1920

110
110

Cin.ASp,—7s, C.C.C.A l., 1901. AAO
.

KUOs
121

t

Alleghany Cent.—istM., (i-, 1922

I'd.,1898

6s, gold, series B, int. def. 1903..
6s, currency, int. deferred. 1918.

i111

103

Too

Cin. Rich. A Chic.—1st, 7s, ’95 JAJ 1107
’’Cin. Rich. A F. W.—1st, 7s, g... JAIlil 107
Cm. Sand’lty A CL—Gs, 1900..FAA{f
7s. 1887 extended
MAS f
Consol, mort., 7s, 1890
JAD f

Ask.

JLU J

—

10D

LOG
109

109
109
99
106

Bid.

Railroad Bonds.
.

Clieraw A Dari.—1st M.,8s,’88.AAO

[125

r

Ask.

*

....

70

......

*

87
«••••»

«•••*•

107
115
108
>•••<•

80

72

THE CHRONICLE.

18
GEN'EliAL
For

QUOTATIONS, OF STOCKS AND BONDS—Continued.

Bxplanatlon*

6s, 1921

Tnd’polis & St.L.—1st ,7s, 1919.Var.

M.AClarksvt’g,6.190

2d mort.. 6s, g., guar., 1900.MAN
Int. & Gt.North.—1st,6s,1919. MAN

J.-lst,6s,l910,AAOj 91
MAn!

MAS

2d mort., income, 8s, 1909
Ionia & Lansing—1st 8s,’89.

..JAJ it 110
lowaCityA West.—lst,7s,1909MA8]

I’a Falls & Sioux C.—1st, 7s,’99 A AO 1U19k

Jefferson—Hawl’y

Br. 7s, ’87.. JAJj 100
l8tmort.,7s, 1889
JAJ
Jefl. Mad.ATmi.—1st, 7s,1906. A AO

‘

•

‘

2d mort., 7s, 1910
JAJ
Junction /Phil.)—1st,4ks,1907 JAJ
2d mort., 6s, 1900
A AO
K.C.Ft.ScottA G.—1 st,7s,l 908 J AD! f 112 k
Kansas C. Lawr. A So. 1st, 6s. 1909 1103
K.C.St.Jos.&C.B.-M.7s,I907..JAJ i 11178
Kansas A Nebraska—1st mort

2jd mort

'

;

....

Ketatucky Central—6s, 1911.. .JAJ
Keokuk ADesM.—lst.5s.guar. A AO
L. Erie A West.—1st, 6s, 1919. FAA

Income, 7s, 1899
Sandusky Div., 6s, 1919

~

:

FA A
do
income, 1920
L»p. Bl.A IIun.,lst, 6s,1919.MAN
do
income, 7s, 1899.
Lake Shore A Mich. So.—
M. So.A N.I., S.F.,lst, 7s,’85.MAN
Cleve. A Tol., 1st M.,7s, ’85.. JAJ
do
2d M., 7s, 1886.AAO
Cl. P. A Ash., new 7s, 1892.. A AO
Bufl.AE.,

new

32

tj

98k
39

104k
106 k
113 k

lids, M.,7s,’98.AAO

Buff. A State L.. 7s, 1886
TAJ
Det. Mon. A Tol., 1st, 7s, 1906...

Jamest.A Frankl..lst, 7s, ’97.JAJ j

—

2dM.,7s,’94.JALj

....

do

Kalamazoo \l.AGr.K.,lst,8s.JAJ| 114
Kai.A Schoolcraft, lst,8s.’87.JAJ!

*

Kal.A Wh. Pigeon, 1st. 7s,’90..JAJ
Dividend bonds, 7s. 1899...AAO
L.S.A ?I. S.,cons.,cp., 1st.7s. JAJ
do cons.,reg.,lst,7s,1900.Q—J
do cons., cp., 2d,7s, 1903..JAI)
do cons.,reg.,2d, 7s,1903. J AD
Lawrence—1st mort., 7s,1895.FAA
'

North’11 Cent.—2d mort.,68, 85.JAJ 102 [104
3d mort., 6s, 1900
'120
AAO 118
102“ | Con. mort., Os, g., coup., 1900.JAJ 117 [119
MAS! 101
'
MAS'
6s, g., reg., 1900
AAO 115
98
!l00
j 113
j; More. bds., 5s, 192(5, series A JAJ
J. L. A Sag. lst,8s’85f“ wh.hds”JAJ' 1105V106
do
series B
95k 97k
J|
J.L. A Sag. North Ext.,8s,’90. MANj 107
Con. mort, stg. 6s, g., 1904.. .JAJj
do
Cons. M.,8s, ’91. .MAS!i 113
102
113k Northern, N.J.—1st M., 6s,’S8.JAJ 1100
do
6s, 1891
107 ! Norvv’hAWorc’r-lst M.. 6s.’97.JAJ 1116
MAS 106
118
125
99 k lOOks
Joliet A N.Ind.,lst,7s (gnar.M.C.)ji 120
North. Pac., P. D’O Div.—6s, MAS.
Mo. Div. 6s, 1919
MAN 100k 101 k?
ij Michigan A Ohio— 1st mort
I —
95 k! I Gen’l 1. g., 1st, 6s. 1921
JAJ 105 y 1053a
j Midland of N.
Gen’l 1. g.. 1st, 6s, reg
4-5-Os, 1910
AAO
JAJ 105 k 105k
80k; Mil.L.S.AW.—1stM.,6s,1921
... ...j 101 k
Ogd’usb’gAL.Ch.—istM.6s,’98,JAJ 1103 103 k
1st, incomes
j
77
82 i! 3. F.. 8s. 1890
MAS1* 102 103
Mil. A No.—1st, 6s, 1910..
JAD
! 91 j Consol, ,6s, 1920
I -*S9k? 90
Minn. A St. L.—1st M.. 1927..JADi 114k!
23
ji Income, 1920.
!
25
1st M., Iowa City A W., 1909.JAD
75
Ohio Cent.—1st,mort.,6s,1920, JAJ
80
i
2d mort., 7s. 1891
ii
30
JAJ
Incomes, 1920
Southwest. Ext., 1st, 7s, 1910
l097e; 1104 : 1st Ter’l Trust. 6s, 1920
JAJ
101
Pacific Ext., 1st, 6s,, 1921
1101 a4
Mineral Div., inc. 7s, 1921
Miss.A Tenn1 st M., 8s,series “A” 120 1125
55
j, River Div., 1st
88, series “ B”
JAJ 101_ 1107 j[
10
do
income
Mo.K. AT. —Cons. ass.. 1901-6. FA A 109
110 : Ohio AMiss.—Cons. S. F. 7s, ’98. JAJ
116k
112 k
Consolidated 6s, 1920..
116 k
JAD] 82k 82k;. 'Cons, mort., 7s, ’93
JAJ
2d mort., 7s, 1911,
1st, 6s, g., 1899. (U. P. S. Br.)J AJ
116k
AAO
2d mort., income, 1911
58 k|121
AAO
!| 1stmort,.Spring!.Div., 1905 MAN,
General moivgage
81
i;Ohio Southern—1st 6s, 1921...JAD
Boonev’e B’ge,7s,guar,1906.MAN
28
I
’! 2d income, 6s. 1921
1106 k Ohio A W.Va.—lst,s.f.,7s,1910MAN
Han. A C. Mo., 1st 7s, g.,’90.MAN
;
107
Mo.Pac.—1st mort.,6s,gid,’88, FAA 107k 108
* Old Colony—6s, 1897
FAA'i ll"1! iifk
10lk
6s, 1895
i Consol. 6s, 1920
MAN
JAD H16
116k
'
113
2d mort., 7s, 1891
JAJ
jj
73,1895
MAS
3123 123k
!
Car. B., 1st mort., 6s, g. ’93..AAO
93
I[Oreg. A Cal.—1st 6s, 1921,
JAJ JJ6
3d mortgage, 7s, 1906
MAN 116
117 j;Oregon Short Line—1st mort
! 160 100:la
Income, 7s, 1892
MAS
'
Oregon A Trim scout.—6s, 10*22
j
96 5g 97
Moh. A Ala, Gr. Tr.—1st, 7s,g’ld,’95j'
'
l Osw.ARoliic— 1st M., 7s, 1915.MAN7^2
70
Mobile A O.—1st pref. debentures..
lli"
.j Panama—Stevl’g M.. 7s. g. ’97.AAOi{ 112
40
105 )! 2d pref. debentures
•[ Sinking fund sub.; (5s, 1910.MANi
.3d pref. debentures
]I 37 j] Subsidy bonds. Eng. issue, 6s....!
6s... J1105
107
1105
31
4th pref. debentures
Paris A Doc’ t’r—- 1st M.,7s,g.,’92. JAJ I
.....
I15k>
New mortgage, 6s, 1927
...1 100k,T07k Penna.—Gen. M., Os.'cp., 1910Q—J i 1-3k
130
Cairo Extension 6s, 1892
JAJ:
Geu’l movt., 6s, reg., 1910.. AAO' 123 j 124*4
Morg’n’s La. A Tex.,l.st,6s, 1920JAJ!
Cons, mort., 6s, reg., 1905..Q—M!
119
Morris A Essex— 1st, 7s, 1911 MAN;
6 s. coup., 1905. .JAI),
j 136
do
,118
2d mort, 7s, 1891
FAA; 1U:,4
Penn. Co., 6s, reg., 1907
0 —1 107 ■;
do
1st M., Iks. 1921.JAJi
JAJ
Bonds, 7s, 1900..
95
1111
121
General mort., 7s, 1901
j Penn. A N. Y.— 1st .7s,’9tJ A1906. J A1)
AAOj 120
;127
Consol, mort.,7s, 1915
TADif 123 ] 123 k 1 Pensacola A Atlantic - 1st m..MAS
71 ! 75
11 Ik Peoria Dec.A
[Nashua A Low.—6s, g., 1893.FAA! HI
Ev.-lst.6s, 1920,JAJ
97
! 5s, 1900
106
'
Incomes, 1920
50
j 105
Nashv.Ch.A St.L.—1 st, 7s, 1913 JAJ
115 i
ilOl
;
Evansville Div.,1st 6s,1920.MAS
10J
2d mort., 6s, 1901
JAJ 100
; 50
j
do
income. 1920 ...

1st, Tenn. A Pac., 6s, 1917...JAJ

..i;
.

103
1

jNewburg D. A Conn.—Income
N’burgliAN.Y.—1st M. 7s,1888.JAJ

i
90

!

Leb.:Knoxv. 6s, 1931

!
11(5

109

101

:

10134
105

—1

f

106

100

Louis. Cin. A hex.. 6s. 1931.MAN 100
Mem.A 0.,fitl., M..7s, g., 1901 JAD :ii?

FAA

.

___,

(

119

bo'

...

; 107

92

91

123k

S6k

109

112

j

ill!

JAJ] 127k: 128k
1903... JAJ J122 ! 121

!,l95=k

105

1

j 107

;io5

104
JAJ| 127k 129
TAI)

j 95

o ->3
Class B.
!
73k
! Philu. A Erie—2d M-, 7s,1888. JAJ! 1U
111k
Gen. M.. guar., 6s, g.. 1920. .JAJ;{H9
;121
SunburvAErie, 1st M.,7s.’97. A AO: 125 {126k
Pliila. A Reading—2d, 7s,’93. AAOj 117 !.
Debenture. 1893
IA.J
1

Gen’l mort., (Is, 1908

JAJ

96 k

Convertible, 7s, 1893

JAJ1

84

! 97 k
8134

you

103

Deferred income;

1

Income mort., eons. 7s, ’9(5, JAI'.
Coal A L, guar. M., 7s, ’92.., MAS?
hi la. Wil. A Balt.—6s, 1892.. A AO;

] 95

25

f

M09" ,111

6s, 1900.
VAO 111
ink
1105
N.Y.CityA No.—Gen’l,6s,1910MAN| 50
51
,107
i
Trust Co. receipts
Pittsb.Bradf.A F.—lst.dsldl 1 AAO
92
! 497s oO
122 |122k
N. Y. Elevated—1st M., 1906. J AJ j 117 ,
N. Y. A Greenw'd L.—1st M. inc. 6s]
2d mort., 7s, 1913
28 j•.....
AAO
2d mortgage income
Steuhenv.A Ind., 1st.. Os,’81. Var.
1
7 ; 1L
i9934k'c0*k
N. Y.AIIarlem—7s,coup., 1900.MAN I 127k; 128
122
Pittsb.ACon’llsv.—lstM.7s,’93.J AJ 120
124
7s.reg.,1900
MAN1
,1 Sterling cons. M., 6s, g., guar.JAJ 1122
136
| Pittsh.Ft.W. A C.—1st,7s,1912 Var
T
.

......

N. O. A Mobile. 1st 6s, 1930. JAJ
Pensacola Div., 1st,6s, 1920..MAS

Sterling mort., 6s, g.,
N. Y. C., 6s, 1887

j 101
! 101
' 95

>1

100

Hud. R.. 2d M.. 7s., 1835
TADj 101k 105
iN.Y.Chic.A St.L.-1st,3s,1921.JAI)J TOiy 101 =k
2d 6s, 1923....
MAS] 75 ;

117

JOS

!

Mort., 7s, coup., 1903
Mort., 7s, reg., 1903

U11.—lst,0s,1921.Q—Fj
Perkiomcn—1st M., 6s, 1887..AAOj 103
i
Cons. mort. 6s. 1'.) 1,3, sterling
J92
'- .....I Petersburg-Class A
90
!

10.

New .ierse}' A N. Y.—1st mort
N. J.Southern—1st M.,ncw 6s.JAJ
N. O. Fae,—1st, 6s. gold, 1920.JAJ
N.Y. A C;m.-£M.,0s,g„ 1904. MANiJ
SN.Y.GAIL—Debt cert ext ,5s,MAN

10 5 k

; Peo.A Pekin

j

j

-Natchez .Tack. A Col.—1st, 7s. 1910]
iNevada Cen.—1st (Is, 1901. ..A AO
Newark A N. Y.—1st, 7s, 1887.JAJ 106
New’kS’setAS.—1st. 7s, g.,’89.MAN 101

•

Incomes

1

•

1st, McM. M. W.AA.,0.3,1917.JAJ

Nashv.ADecat’r.—lst,7s,1900.JAJ;t

..

75
I 80
116
■119
98 k

JUI.City A Flushing—1st, 6s,1911

,

:

L. Miami—Renewal 5s,1912..MAN

2d mort., 7s, 1918
South Side, bt, 7s, 1887
MAr
Newtown A FI., 1st, 7s, 1891

.

.

Lehigh A Lack.—J st M.,7s, ’97.FAA
Lehigh Val.—1st,6s,coup., ’98.JAD 120
1st 'mort., 6s, reg., 1598
JAI)] 122
2d mort,, 7s, 1910
MAS| 131 1135
Gen. M., s. L, 6s, g., 1923
IAJ> 120=141
Delano Ld Co. bds, end.,7s,’92 JAJ

do

....

>!

Ind’apolisA Vin.—lst,7s,1908.FAA

,

Bid. j Ask.

Railroad Bonds.

KalamazoGAS.H.,lst,8s,’90.MANltil2

Trust Co. cert
New 1st mort. 6s, funded

Coup. 6s, 1909

Ask.

Bid.

MAS

6s. 1909
5s, coup., 1931
5s, reg., 1931

Income, 1919
In’polis I). A Sp’cl—1st ,7s,1906 A&3. 100
2d mort., 5s~, 1911
J AJ
2d mort., income, 1906
JAJ
-

First Pase of Quotations.

! Michigan Central—(Continued'—

W.—(Continued)—

East. Div., 1st mort.
East Div., income

See .Votes at Head of
Railroad Bonds.

Railroad Bonds.

Ind. Bl. A

fV0L. XXXVII.

......

N. Y.L.E.A W.—1st, 7s,’97,e xt. M A N | 123
>,
2d mort., 7s, 1912
JAJ 130
*94 1 2d mort. exten., 5s, 1919 ...MAS: 107
] 3d mort., 7s, 1912
AAO 130
101 k
St. Louis Div.. 1st, 6s, 1921. .MAS
4tli mort.. ext., 5s, 1920.. ..AAOj 106
108k
106
Equipment, 8s, 1834
MAS 1103
do
51k
5th mort 7s, 1888
2d., 3s ,1980.MAS
TADj 100k!
iPittsb. A West.—1st mort
Nash. A Dee., 1st 7s, 1900...JAJ
129
! Portl’ndAOgb’g—1 st6s,g.,1900J AJ 10b
118
1st cons. M., 7s, g.,1920
lbs
MAS 128
E. II. A N., 1st 6s, 1919
100
'
20
New 2d cons. 6s, 19(59
30
JAD
JADI
95:U 96k j Vt. div., 1st M., 6s, g.,1891..MAN
89 :U
Gen’l mort., 6s, 1930
90 r1!
106
JAJ
130
1st coni, fund coup.,7s, 1920 MAS 1125
Port Royal A Aug.— 1st, 6s, ’99.JA.Ij 100
100 [106
100
So. ANo. Ala., S. F„ 6s, 1910 AAO
35
j
Income mort., 6s, 1899
2d cor i. f’d cp.,5s,1909
TAD +97 ] 99
JAJj 35
] 50
50
107
1st mort.. sinking fund, 8s
1;r Reorganizat’n 1st lien, 6s, 1908 i
!
Rcn.AS’loga—1st 7s,1921 con.MAN; 135
135
99 k i co
i- Gold income bonds, 6s, 1977
L’av.N.A.AChic.—1st,( 8,1910. JAJ
75 j 82
1st. 7s, 1921, reg....
MAN,
Maine Cent.—Mort. 7s, 1898. ..JAJ 1121
123. ;!
<1: c.
72**
Riehm’d A Alleghany—1st, 7s, 1920!
Long Dock mort., 7s, 1893..JAD
! 118
1111
113
N.Y.A N.Eug.—1st M., 7s, 1905JAJ 1 111 ^ 112
2d molt., (is, 1916
1121
123
1st mort., 6s, 1905
IAJ i I0234]l03k Rich’d A Danv.—Con.,6s,’90..MAN ioi" 105*
3 107
109
N. Y. N. II. A II. 1st r.48,1903 JAD! 103k U‘5
96k 96 34
!: General mort., (Is, 1915
.JAJ
1
67 k
112
43
68
N.Y.Pa. 5c O.—1st inc. a<%, 7s, 1905,
jiiio
43 j|
!j DebenimwOs. 1927
AAO
1100
101
!
1 10
107
do
105
112
do
Cons. M., 6s, ’95J
1 111
113
13
Rich. Fred. A Potomac—6s.ext.JAJ: 107
ij 2d mort. inc
j :i2
85
•
!j 3d mort. inc..
Man.Beaehlmp Jim.,7s, 1909,MAS
Ok
Mort, 7s. 1881-90
JAJ" 130
:5 34!
N.Y.A Man. Beach, 1st 7s.’97,JAJ
125 u
20
L’sed L.rental tr’st’73,Trus.cer.7s' :io
108
Rich. A Pctersb., 8s,’80-’86...AAO]
Marietta A Cin —1st M..7s. ’91 FAA 131
135
New mort., 7s, 1915
MAN:
;<i8 j 72
135
do
70
do
■65
Richmond York Riv. A Cites., 8s...I 107
:i3o
105 k 106
93
130 1
Rocli. A Pitts., 1st, 6s. 1921.. .FAA j
3d mort., 8s, 1890
45 k
82
82 k
do
income. 1921
JAJj 535s] 537e N.Y. Susq. A W.- 1st. (Is, 191 i .,TA I
1100 j 103
65 !
Debentures 6s 1897
RomoWat’nAO.—S.F.,7s,l891. JAD! 109
FAA| 65
lo9
Balt. Short L., 1st, 7s, 1900..JAJ] 105
105
1104
11
I
Mex.-lst.6s, 1912AAO‘
j.N.Y.Tex.A
]....
1116
118
72
72 k
Consol , 1st ex. 5s, 1922
77k
Marq’tte Ho. A O.—Mar. A 0.,8s, ’9211116
! 118.
'N.Y. West S. A Buf.-5s, 1931. JAJ
AAO
’
39
40
105
99k
Mass. Central—1st, 6s, 1S93.
2d mort", 7s, 1896
■ Rtitlanu— 1st M., 6s, 1902....MAN
US
1
193k'
k
t93k] 94
91k
Mem.AL.R’ek—1st inert.,8s, 1907.
63 k
124
!
163
75
80
105 k
Memphis A Charleston—1st consol. 105
\\
112 k' i
25
28
1st,cons..Tenn. lien.7s, 1915 JAJ 109
!
2d mort.
112kbNorf’k
AW—Geu’l M.,6s, 1931 MAN, 101k
101 k
115
98 k 99 ;
New River 1st 6s, 1932
Metrop’11 Elev.—1st, 6s, 1908. JAJ
AAOI
2d 6s, 1899
!i Norf’k A Petersb.,2d, 8s, ’93.JAJj 110
112
MAN
86
105
Mexican Cent.—1st. 7s, 1911..JAJ
69k 70 11
1J South Side, Va.,1st, 8s,^’84-’i)0.JAJ 101
Mexican National—1st mort
77 j 80
48
do
2d M., 6s,’81-’90.JAJ 100
is 34 :
122
54
do
3d M.. 6s.’86-’90.JAJ 109
Subsidy bonds
115
101
123k 125
Virginia A Tenn., M.,6s, 1884. JAJ 100
107 34!
104
105
j| Va. A Tenn., 4tli M., 8s. 1900.JAJ, 120
1st M. on Air Line. 8s, 1890. JAJ 1113 jl 13145 North Carolina—M.. 6s
121
95
Air Line, 1st M., 8s, guar. ..MAN;f
118
125
ll2k iNortheast.,S.C.—1st M.,8s,’99,MAS] 123
Gd. Rlv. V.. 1st «s. <ruMv..’86..TA.rn08
10 SV 109
109
J 2d mort.. 8s. 1899
WAX 119

1

,

{

4^:

...

,.

1

]

......

!

j-

.

.

.

.

j

!j

9934!

77k|

jj

.

:

......

..

......

jj

j!

!

111k!

*

Prue nominal;




no

late transactions.

t The purchaser also pays acorued interest.

; In Lo idou.

THE CHRONICLE.

July 7, 1683. J

GENERAL

QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND

Explanations See Notes at Head

For

19
BONDS—Coxtisued.

of First Page of Quotations.
1

Bid. i Ask.

Railroad Bonds.

Bid. ! Ask.

Railroad Stocks.

Bid.

Railroad Stocks.

103
Wabash—(Continued) —
j Cincinnati A Milford
1 102
1st. St. L. div., 78, 1889. ex.FAA; 100V 103
1 Cincinnati N. O. A Tex. Pac
72 V
100; 70
Gt. West., III.,1st,78, ’88,ex.FAA! 105 V
39
43
Cairo A Ful., lst,l.g.,7s,g.,’91.JAJi 106 V107%
50
;Cin. Sandusky A Cleveland
77
do
48
49
do
Gen. con. r’y & 1. g.. 5s. 1931 AAO ,76 V
2d, 7s, ’93,ex.MAN! 99 V
Pref., 6.50
Clev. Col. Cin. A Indianapolis.. 100
75*4
et.L.&SanF— 2dM.,elassA,’06MAN
Q’ncy A Tol., 1st, 7s,’90, ex.MAN; 101
111. A S. Ia., 1st, 7a, ’82,, ex.FAA :
Clev. A Pittsburgh, guar., 7
2d M., class B, 1900...
50 133 V 133V
MAN
St.L.K.C. A N. (r.est.A U.),7s.MASi
107 V Col. Chic. A Indiana Central...100
4V
do
class C, 1900
3%
MAN
do Om.Div.,lst7s,1919.AAO ioiiv
Columbus A Xenia, guar., 8
South Pacific.—1st M. 18S8 .JAJ
50 150
9*0
85
do Clar. Br., Os, 1919.. FAA!
52*o
Pierre C. A O. 1st, Os
Col. Hock. Val. A Tol
101
FA A
119
do No. Mo., 1st, 1895...JAJ j 117
Columbia A Greenville...
;
TOO
JAP
Equipment 7s. 1895
do St. Clia’s Bridge Os, 1908;
64
80V 85
do
64
Pref
looi
General more, Cs, 1931
JAJ!
Wab. Fund. 1907-Var. 7s. FAA ;
Concord
50 $ 100 V;
81. L. Valid. AT. H.—1 stM.,7s,’97.J A.)
1
do
Various Os
Concord A Portsmouth,guar.,7 100!xll2 j 115
2d inort., 7s, 1 898....
MAN
FAAj
; Connecticut A
Warren (N.J.)—2d M.,7s, 1900. ..!
2d. 7s,fiiiav., ’98
MAN 110
IOO: 85V 86V
Passumpsic
i’o* 7 1 Connecticut River
W. Jersey A At. 1st M.,0sl910MAS;
165
St. P. A Duluth—1st, 5s,1931.FAA
100 xl03
W. Jersey—Debont. Os, 1883..MAS! ioo"
Connotton Valley
St.P.Minn.A Man.—1st 7s,1909 JAJ iVo'
0*4
50i $3
1st mort., Os, 1890
110V Danlmry A Norwalk
73
2d 0s, 1909
JAJ I
AAO 109
50j 70
122
107V
1-08
1st
58
Dak. Ext,. 0s. 1910
MAN
AAO
mort., 7s, 1899
Dayton A Michigan, guar., 3V-.50; 56
Consol, mort., Os, 1909
141
do
1st consol. 0-t. 1933
JAJ 103V 104
AAO 114
Pref., guar., 8.501 140
Minn’s U’n, 1st. Os. 1922 ...JAJi
West’n Ala.—1st M., 8s, ’88... A AO i 108V
Delaware A Bound Brook
100$134
2d mort., 8s, guar., ’90
Delaware Lack. A Western
AAO! 109
50; 128*2 129%
Sandusky Mansf. A N.—1st, 7s,1902 I i’is’T’.l!
115
West. Mil.—End., 1st, Os, 90...JAJ: 110
Denver A New Orleans
Savannah Florida A West.—
!
3
St. L. A Tron Mt—(Continued)—
Cairo Ark. A T.,lst,7s,g.,’97.JAD

,106 V

*

*

1

1897....JAJjt

fundjl

125

Ala. N. O. A Pac., Ac., pref
do
do

I

Tex. Cent. —1 st ,s*.fd.,7s,l 909M AN: 107V
1st mort,, 7s. 1911
MAN 10. V
^ Tex
109
1
as A New Oilcans-1st, 7s
Texas A Pac.—1st, Os, g. 1905 MAS
L‘.0V!
91
Consol, mort.,Os, gold, 1905. JAI>
l>2 V 03 V
Inc, and land gr., rog., 1915.July
83% 84 :
1st (RioGr. l)iv.), Os, 1930.. FAAj
01
102*o
Texas a St. Louis—lsf,0s,1910 JAD
•J8V
Land grant, incomes, 1920
70*4 7 0 V
Mo. A Ark. Diw, 1st. Os
j
44
40 .
Tol. Cin. A ST. Louis—1st mort.. ..!
12 V*
Income
j 12
52
Tol.Del’s A B.—1st main, Os, 191o|
43
1st Dayton div.,0s, J910i
do
do
1st Per l trust, Os.

j

Tonawanda V.-.I.A ('.—1st, «*s, 1931
United Co’s N.J.—Cons.,0s,’91.AAO
Sterling mort., Os, 1994
MAS
do
Os. 1901
MAS I
Cam. A A mb., mort.. Os. ’89.MAN j
Union Pac. -1st,Os,g.. 1 890-’99 JAJ j
Land Grant 7s, 1887-9
AAOj
Sink. F., 8s, 1893
M AS
Om. Bridge, sterl. Ss,g., ’90. AAO i
.

L 13

121

TAJ!
JAD ”94'

[!

95

-

1

109
10 7

!

—.

:

12
4

do

Ill
108

...

1
1

"

91
50
95%:
50

100! 105

$14 it

do

Cairo A Vincennes, pref
California Pacific

Prof

50

Canada Soutlieni

100,

Canadian Pacific

100,

Catawissa
do
1st pref
2d pref
do
Cedar Falls A Minnesota
Cedar Rapids A Mo
do
Pref., 7
Central of Georgia
Central Iowa
1st nref
do
do
2d pref
Central of Now Jersey

50
50

113
1 11
94
54

Cheshire, pref

Chicago A Alton
do

$
15

100

15
35

100,

25

100j
50!

,

t Purchaser also pays accrued interest.

!

•27

110

105)4

(> 1

|

<

50 $

Little Rock A Fort Smith
Little Miami, leased, 8 guar..

81%

42
94

68

72

16

29% 30*4
1C9% 109V

501 $71
lOOj
50; 148

...

..

52% 53
51

Albany A Chic.100
Macon A Augusta

j| Mauhatti.il
Railway
do
1st
do
! Marietta A
;

100

100

pref

87V

55

*95**

100

100!

30

100 >

47
85
47

i
;

common

Cincinnati, 1st pref.. 50 j
2d pref..50!

163

30*4
48V
90

48V

do
! .Warn.

100:

U

100

Houghton A Out
'
do
pref
Massachusetts Central

-

80% Mexican Central

55

54
58

7 5 *2

75%

;

Mexican National

!

Michigan Central
Michigan A Ohio

do*

1001
..10b

100

100

Minneapolis A St. Louis
do

Pref.... 100

xl48
x148

150
104 V 104%
119 V 120

'Morris A Essex, guar., 7
Nashville. Chat. A St. Louis

50

25

3..100

132% 132% Newburg Dutchess A Conn
do
do
L51V

Pref.

17V

18%

54

55
47 V

104 V! 105*4
51 V 52
86 V 87 V
70
73

17%

44
92

7

17%
8V

92%

92V

15

13V
44%

$64
25 V

56

*2*7“
58

30*4

Nashua A Lowell
Nashua A Rochester, guar.,

123 '4 124

42
89

30%
102% 103

125 V 125V
2V
4V
75
25

‘

pref

Pref
do
Midland of New Jersey
Mil. Lake Shore A West.
100
do
do
Pref. ...100
Mine Hill A S. Haven, leased
50
do

40*2 47
100V 101
1
IV

j

25j

Memphis A Charleston
Metropolitan Elevated

52

46%

71%

,

Louisville New

80%

15

!

Little Schuylkill, leased, 7
Long Island
50
Louisiana A Mo. Riv., Com
100
do
Pref., guar..
Louisville A Nashville
100

J Maine Central

20
18
28*o
30 V
20
22 V
xG2
03
134
135
145
155
20
27

”

92

100

Keokuk A Des Moines
109
do
Pref.... 1001
Lake Erie A Western
100j
100
L ike Shore A Mieh. So

Lehigh Valley
14%

17

9V

8*2

100

Kentucky Central

111

29
57
57

41

35
110

do
do
Pref... 50 $29 V
Illinois Central
100j 143
80
80
do
leased line, 4 p. e. 100:
30
Indiana Bloomington A West’1111)0
30*4
Indian. Decatur A Si>., com
1
do
do
Pref... 100
Town Falls A Sioux City
80V 81V
100
90
Jett’v. Mad. A Im'Fp’s, leased.. 100
Joliet A Chicago, guar., 7
100
72
75
Kansas City Ft. Scott A Gulf...1001
122
do
do
'
pref.. 100 120

9V
185 V

30

100
100

......

i
100!

100J

Huntingdon A Broad Top..

10(>j 102*2 10 3
100 119*21120
98
100; 96

......

i 101*2 102

Pref., 7. 100!

Houston A Texas Central

•

100,

Joseph

130

•

27V

27

;

•

124

j

Pref

1-7V

42

$26)4!

100i

•

A Bank’g Co. 100

03% 64*4f Manchester A Lawrence
03 L>i 63%: Manhattan Beach Co

do
50 j
Pref
Central Pacific
100!
Charlotte Col. A Aug
100
Chesapeake A Ohio, common ..100
do
1st i>re,f.. .100
do
2d pref.... 100

132
;oj

......

$

IOil

104

199“ Harrisburg P. Mt. J.A L., guar., 7.50

,

50

43
91
62

50j $60%
80*2

S4%

50,1

......




do
Hannibal A St.
do

i

.

Prices noiniual; no late transactions.

84
08

26

pref... §

82
9H
18V

River Wiley, guar., 5.. 100
"»"!jlGranil
Green Bay Winona A St. Paul..lOoj

%

j

pref

.....

*

Georgia Railroad
j 'Grand

!

L

......

...

5*4
0*4
2*4

98 VI00
500!
100. 159 1IOO

Pref., 7
100
90
5th series, 5s
Chicago A Atlantic
59
...
Incomes, cumulative
Chicago Burlington A Quincy..100
108
Wabash—1st, ext., 7s. ’90, ex .FAA 107
Chicago A Canada Southern
:
96
AAO'
Mort., 7s, 1879-1909
Chicago A East Illinois
—
2d mort., 7s. ext. 1893, ex. MAN
99
Chicago A Grand Trunk
so
MAN
100
Chicago Iowa A Nebraska
Equipment, 7s, 1883
General mort.. Os, 1920
.JAD
76
77*4 Chicago Milwaukee A St. Paul. 100
1
do
Chic. Div., 5s, 1910
78*4. 79
Pref., 7.100
Havana Div., Os, 1910
..JAJ
Chicago A North Western
109;
100
;*
do
Pref., 7.100
Tol. P. A West,, 1st 7s, 1917. .Q 105
!
do
1st pref. inc., couv.
Chicago Rock Island A Pac.... 100
do
J
2d pref. inc...
Chic. St. Louis A Pitts
10 >
87
Iowa Div., Os, 1921
.MAS
do
pref
100
.JAD
Chic. St. P. Minn. AOm.,com..lOO
ludianap. Div., Os, 1921
do
Detroit Div.. Os. 1921
..JAJ!
pref.. 100
95
Chicago A West Michigan
100
Quincy Mo.A P.,1st,Os, guar .1909 ! 90
Cairo Div.. 5s, 1931
..JAJ
! 82
i Cin. Hamilton A Dayton
100
Cons, mort., 7s, 1907.con.,oxQ—F
Cin. Itidianap. St. Louis A Chic.100
90
.

10

Buffalo A Southwest..
100
do
Pref....100

Central Ohio

05

;

1

BuffaloN. Y. A Philadelphia

do

i

TAJ

10
Vermont Cen.—1st M., 7s,’80.MAN
2d mort., 7s, 1891
TAD
Income extension 8s
MAN
Stans tend 8. A
7s, 1887.. JAJ
Verm’tAMass.—1st M.,Os, ’83.JAJ
Couv. 7s, 1885
JAJ t 130
97
Vicksb. A Mer.—New 1st mort

2d series, Os
3d scries, 5-Os
4tli series, 3-4-5s

i

old

i;Camden A Atlantic

,

Gs...

new

Flint A Pere Marquette
do
do
Pref
Fort Wayne A Jackson
do
do
Pref
Fort Worth A Denver C
Galv. Harris!). A San Antonio

1107 V Cairo A St. Louis

3 08
do
Deny. Div. 0:
ilOSV
993, lot)
do
1st cons. M ,0s.3 919 MAN
90
A tell. Col.APac.,lst,0s,1905Q.—F;
!
91
A tell. J. Co. AW.. 1st, Gs, 1905.Q,—-F?
92
V
98
Utali Cen.—1st M., Os, g.,1890. JAJ
Utali So.—Gen. M. 7s, 1909
TAJ 101 Cl
99
Extension, lsi, 7s, lviOO
JAJ')
j
Utica A J-U’k It— Mort., 7s, ’91. JAJ; 115 1
Valley, of Ohio—1st mort
1 103 ; 100
50
Verni’t A Can.—M.,8s

Virginia Midland—1st scries,

new...

.

..

2d mort
3d moi t., income

100'

j Burlington C. Rapids A North. 100

,

Mississqlioi, 7s, 1891

*

198
127
120
209
8

Lynn.. 1001xlOd
5
Ill
Brooklyn Elevated, a,ssessm’t paid.
118in LI914
25
100
Brooklyn A Moutaulc
118
00.
122
100
j
* do
Pref
117
i
Buff. N. Y. A Erie, leased
100:

MAS|

DenverPae.,1st M.,7S,g.,’99.MAN
Kan s. Pac., 1st, Os. 1895
FA A
JAD
1st M., Os, 181 Mi
do
do lst,K.A L.G .1)’ d,’99.MAN
do
Inc., No. 11, 7s, 1910. MAS
do
Inc.,No.10 ,7s ,1910. MAS

00 v

100 f 185
*\5
100
Pref., 6.. .100; 109%

Albany
Montreal.,

Boston Hartford A Erie
do
do
Boston A Lowell
Boston A Maine
Boston A New York Air
do
do
Boston A Providence
Boston Revere Beach A

112L2 11;;

Reg. 8s, 1893
,

Boston A

Bust. Con. A
do

109 V

Collateral trust, (!s, 1909

do
5s, 1907
Colorado Ccnt.,1 st, 8s, g.,’90. J A1

j *8*3 %

81
113

100x123

Rapids A Indiana

50|

Parkersburg Branch

•mm

131

100

Atchison Col. A Pacific
Atchison Topeka A Santa Fe..l00;
Atlanta A Charlotte Air Line
i
Augusta A Savannah,leased... 100!
Baltimore A Ohio
100|
do
1st pref.,6
100•
Balt. A Ohio, 2d, pref
Washington Brandi
100.

12 V

111
119

def...

Vliegaiiy Central
Allegheny Valley

12%
12

J5%
11%

j

22

100

Fitchburg
19%
Ii%

*43%

43%

East Tennessee Virginia A Ga.100
do
do
Pref.
Eastern (Mass.)
100
Eastern in N. H
100
Eel Iiiver
100
Elmira A Williamsport, 5
501
do
Pref., 7..50
Erie A Pittsburg, guar., 7
50;
Evansville A Terre Haute
50j

i'll *

•

Chany A Susqueh., Guar., 7... 100. 128

j

Income, Os. 1910, main 1 no
Dayton Div. inc., Os, 1910

108V

;

com

Dubuque A Sioux City

.

120
125
105 V
121
125
80
82
tsi
4y% 50

1st series, new
2d series, new
Wis. Valley—1st, 7s, 1909
JAJ
WorcT A Nashua—5s, ’93-’95.. Var.
Nasi). A Roch., guar.. 5s.’94.AAO
KAILItOAD STOCKS. Par.
Via. Gt. South.—Lim., A., 6s,pref..

Lim., B,

Denver A Rio Grande
100 j
Denver A Rio Grande Western
Des Moines A Fort Doclge
1
do
do
Pref.. 1
Det. Lansing A Northern, com .100!
do
do
Pref. 100!

110
109

Wheeling A L.Erie— 1st, Os, g., 1910
Wilm. Columbia A Augusta, 6s
Wil.A Weldon—S. F., 7s, g., ’96.JAJ
Winona ASt.Pet.—lstM.,7s,’87. JAJ
2d mort., 7s, 1907
MAN
Wis. Cent.—1st, 7s, coups, unfund.

JAJ!
8unb.Haz.AW-B.—1st, 5s, 1928MAN
2d mort,, Os. 1938
MAN!

1910|

115
112
120
125

vVest’nPeun.—1st M.. Gs, ’93..AAO:
Pitts. Br., 1st M.. Os, ’96
JAJ

Summit Br.—1st, 7s, 1903

.

1.5

JAJi 110
2d mort., pref., Os, 1895
JAJi 107
112
2d, end. Wash. Co., Os, 1890 JAJ; 112
3d, end., Gs, 1900
JAJ 122
End., 2d mort., Os, 1890

.

Susp.B.AErieJunc.—1st M.,7s
I
B yr. 3 i n g. A N. Y. —c o n s o l. 7 s. ’ 0 0 A A O j

JAJi 110

1st mort., Os, 1890

At. A Gulf, cons, 7s,
1st mortgage, 7s
JAJ
S.Ga.A Fla., 1st M. 7s, 1899, MANjt
8cioto Val.—1st M., 7s, sink’g
2d mort.
I
Consol. 7s, 1910
JAJ
Selma Rome A Dalton—1st mort..I
2d mort..
„•
j
Incomes
i
Shenandoah Val. 1st.7s, 1909. JAJ
General mort., Os, 1921
AAO
92
Sioux C. A Pac., 1st M., Os,’98.JAJ
So. Carolina—1st M.,0s,1920..A AO
2d mort.. Os, 1931
JAJ
Iucomc 0-!, 1931
So. Cen. (N.Y.)—1st mort., 5s
8o.Pac,Cal.— 1 st ,Gs,g.,l 905-12. J AJ 105
SouthwestcnuOa.)—('on v. ,7s, 1880! lo5

New

109

Jersey A New York
do
pref

16
123
55

N.Y. Chic. A St. Louis, com
100
do ...Pref.. 100
do

J Eu Loudou.

$ Qu >tation per share.

57*4

149% 150
59

61

2V

IV

New Jersey Southern,
N. O. Mobile A Tex is
100
N.Y. Central A Hudson River..100

16

125V

119*6 119%
loV 11
24

25

I

THE CHRONICLE,

20
GENERAL
For
Bid.

Canal Bonds.

95

N.Y. Elevated.... 100
N. Y. & Harlem —50
do
Pref..50
N.Y.Lack.AW.,c;.5.100
N.Y.L.ErieA West 100
do
Pref.100

Ask.

Del. Div.—6s, '98.JAJ
Del. A H.-7s, ’91 JAJ
1st ext., 1891..MAN

193
......

N.Y. A N.EngIand.100

88

37

37 k

32%

*3 3 k

177
26
81

N.Y.Nj II.& Ilartf.lCO
N.Y. Out. & West.. 100
do
Pref.

N. Y. Penn. & Ohio
do
Pref.
N.Y. Prov. & Best. 100
N.Y. Susq. A Western

152
7
19
30
6
11
67 k

N.Y. West Shore & B.

Norf.&West,, com 10(>
do
pref. lo(i
No. Pennsylvania. .50
Northern Central.. .5(
North’u N. Uamp.lOt
North’h Pac., com. 100

109

51 %
89 %

|I

.N. Y. Guar. A Tnd..l00
N. Y. Life A Trust.100
‘
1<>0
121k Union
United States
10i

......

87 k
-

•

.

90
70

......

......

94

......

80
80
72
70

......

......

70

Union—1st 6s.’83M AN

'Out.

......

•

58%!

Mort. 6s, g.,1904 JAJ
Uii. RR.,lst, end.,6s.
1
do 2d,end. Cs.g.MAN
! Col.Coal A Iron—1st,6s
! Cov. A Ciun.
Br., 6s...
i Gold A Stock Tel

I

......

62
......

20

10
15

s

Pltts.Ft.W.A C.,guar.7

•

f

do

Special,7.100
Pittsburg & Western..

......

17
1

95
106

j

|

Rutland

100
Pref., 7.. 100

20
11
78 k
91

do
St. Joseph A Western.
81.Louis Alt. A T. I f. 100
do

4
20

'8

Pref.100

Bellev.AS.Ill.,pf.lOO
Si.L. Jack. A Cbie. 100

......

Pref.100
St. Louis A San Fr. 100
do
Pref.. ..100
do
1st pref.100
Sti L. Van. A l. H
tit. Paul A Duluth. 100
do
Pref. 100
fit. P.Miun. A Man. 100
Scioto Valley
Beab’d A Roanoke lOo
do
Guar.. 100
8outh Carolina.... 100
do

7s, r.Ac., 1900.MAN
StciTg 6s, 1900.MAS
MISCELLANEOUS
STOCKS.
Amor. Bell Teleph. 109
Amor. Bank Note Co..

j
...

1

Aspiinvall Land.... 10
Boston Baud
10
Boston Water Power..

......

32
55 k

34
57
99

Brookline (Mass.)L’d5
Brush Elec. Light Co..
Canton Co. (Balt.). 100
36 k Cov. A Cin. Bridge, pf.
95 k Edison Electric Ilium.
121k ’Edison Electric Light

98
35
93
124
7
100
110

.

.

.,

Tex.A

92

Brookline, Mass... 100
Cambridge, Mass.. 100
(Chelsea, Mass
100
Dorchester, Mass. .100

......

103
114
105

Jamaica ITn.MasslOO

Lawrence, Mass... 100

,

:
-

<

.

......

6 k

8

105
110
37% 37 S
20

Laud serin
Oregon Ry.AN.Co.100

’

.

.

...

.

......

.....

‘

Central of N. Y
Harlem, N. Y

310

......

«k

ik

L

82
1
k
120
115
37
40
148
148

x

80

‘I

<

50

V

§37 *‘2

10

13

15
95

Wil. Columbia A Aug..

83
85

Wil.AWeld..lsd., 7.100
Wisconsin Central
do
Pref.
Worc’terANashuu. loo
CANAL BONDS,

95

2

x

Ik
21 k
60 k

61

Chesap. A Delaware-

1st mort., 6s, ’86 JAJ

Ches.AO.—6s, ’70. Q.-J

To

.......

'Western Union....100

Price nominal; no late transactions.




.

.

105
86
......

50

Middlesex (Mass.). 100 x*23/

Narragans’tt(F.R,)100

*69 j
......

......

......

Newmarket...

101

Pacific

8an Francisco

Barnard Mfg. (F. II.)..
Bates (Me.)
100
Boott Cor. (Mass.) 1.000
Border City Mfar. (F. R.)

....

41k

42k

j

70
80
|Dwight (Mass.). ..500
83 k ,8.3 k ’Everett (Mass.)... 100

|Stark

820

30
100
x 93
133
90

117
122
82

60

Mills (N.IT.i 1000

/

h' ft

Xffl

)

59^
37 k

>70
LOO

1610
690
240
950

103%
126

1330
115

133
1315
90
239
...

Marip’sa L.AM.Cal 100
do
pref.100
Maryland Coal..., 100
Ne w Central Coal
Ontario Sil. Miu’g.1'00
I?e nnsj Ivan ia Coa 1.50

Quicksiiver M iii’g. 100

.

127 k

do
prof
GOLD A SJLV13U
DINING STOCKS;

182 k
31
1G3
80
115
90
105
235
189
LV2

33*0
52

1340
115
1050
157
875
160

48k

......

85

......

......

900

.

31
24
15 k
......

31

15%
......

......

......

t

...

......

......

......

......

.....

.

'

....

10
100

120

100

124

Bodic

100

50

Bnldomingo

83k

100
.100
1
lOo

Bullion
Bulwor
Calaveras
Caledonia B. II

62
255

7
35

8%
39

2-75
•04
•1G
9’75 10*37

•92

•04
......

.

•90

5o

Climax

100
10

•1G

•18

Consol.

Imperial ..100
•43

•45

Clierokee

10

593b 1 Chrysolite
37 5& Ohollar

875

=

t

....

......

4-70

...

•09

......

•02
*0?

*09

......

•62
•7b
•10

.

120
x080
106

Ilk | [ndepeii'L'nce

t Purchaser also pays accrued int. { In London. $ Quotation per siiaro.

i

Iron Silver

i Luerosse

Lcadville C»nsol
Little Chief

10o
2c
1<
It
5<

•05
•15
•04
•53
2*85
*08
•40

y

-GO

•00

Mexican G. A Silv.100

V Premium.

T

•60

Littlii Pitts.
Moose..

•

•50

*84
•11
•03
1-05

100

..

x

.

.....

10

Amie
Bassick
Bechtel
Bello IMo

so
90
93
80
122
700
mo

.

.

'

100

Alta Montana

American Flag

Pneilie.
100
Consol. Virginia...100
125 k 'Crown Point
100
2050 ibumlerberg
10
■' Dunkin
127
1235 ! Eureka Consol
100
x 110
i Father DcySmet
145
100
iFindiev
1
90
113
'Gold Placer
20
x 180
Gold Stripe
185
1915
1925 iGuodshaw.
109
139
Could A Curry S..100
1090 IluO Croat Eastern
1
149 k 1.50
Green Mountain.... 16
1000
itlale A Noivross. 100
115
Hibe.ru i \
xt ro
175
16
Hortons:..
530
520
Llukili
5
79

...

Alpha Consol GAS. 109

36

1 l

m

......

-

-

.

973

(N. Y. A 8.AN. FRAN.)
AllCP

m

......

48 k

Mahuniug 0 >al A RR.
107
89
82
GO
50

m

500
125
rO
180
1300
1150

212%

Wampanoag( F.R.) 100
\Vashingt’n( Mass.) 100
Weed Sew. M’o (Ct.)25
Weetamoe. (F. R.)100
Willim’ti e Li non (Ct) 2 5

California

2*0

120
>50

90
120
1320

Union C.Mf. (F.R.) 100

.

85

1180

50 k

Tecumsch (F. R.). 100
Thorndikef Mass.) 1000 1000
Trein on t A S. (M a ss) 10( • 155
A- ’.V

.

85

31
101
ICO
136
90 k York Co. (Me.)
750
100
98
CO A1* A, MISCEIi,
122
125
!WINING STOCKS.
132
133
Caribou (Am. Miu’g.lo
161
165
Cent.Arizona Min. 1()0
x SO
81
Colorado Coal A 1.100
96
98
Con.sold 'oat of Md. 100
125 k 126
Home.llako Mln’g.100
99
100
LeJiigh A Wilkes

[Cros’t

j Dougl’s Axe (Mass) 100

......

Slade (Fall Riv.).. 100
Stafford (Fall Riv.) 100

......

13 k

Riv.)
Vmorv (N. £1.)
125
100
•Vimi; keag (N. El.) 1000 2040
ViKlroscog’ii (Me.). 100 xl25
Appleton (Mass.). 1000 xl22o
Burnaby (Fall Itiv.)...

LI 40

Sagamore (F. Riv.) 100 ioo
Salmon Falls(N.H.)300 x320

x

Wash’ton City G. L.20
.Georgetown G. L...25
MANUFACTMNG

Atlantic (Mass.)... 100

86

85
975
235
92
235

Rich. Bord’n(F.R.) 106
Robeson (F. Riv.) 1006

10*7

Ilk

815

1
G. L....

STOCKS.
Am. Linen (Fall

<475
L290

(Mass.)... 1000

Pcpperoll (Me.)
506
Poeassct (F. R.)...10<

48

,

101

.

0^0
Naumkeag (Mass.) 102 <123
79
N. E. Glass (Mass.)375

Nashua (N. HJ)....50(

Tww r1

Carondelct, St. Louis 50

Boston Co.(Mass.)1000
Boston Belting
100
Bost. Duck (Mass.)7(>0

......

.

......

......

.....

50

68 k O^k Chaco (Fall Riv.) .100
52
53
Chicopee (Mass.) .. 100
100
105 j Cochoco (N. II.)
50o
23
(CollinsCo. (Conn.).. 16
93
iContinental (Me.). 100
9*2
99
Mills (F. R.) 100
175
i Crystal Spr. Bl.fF.R.)
155
19
20
iilavol Mills (F. R.) 100
.

......

Sandw.Glass(Mass.)80

Laclede, St. Louis. 100

.

......

45 k

50 §

St. Louis G. L

.

STOCKS.
American District. 100
American Dist (Phila.)
Amur. Tel. A Cable
Atlantic A Pacific..25
Cent. A So. Am. Cable.
100
Franklin
Gold A Stock
25
Internation’i Oc’n. 100
Mexican
100
Mutual Union
100
50
Northwestern
Southern A Atlantic 25

Mass. Cotton
1000. 1325
Mechanics’ (F. R.) 100
Merchants’ (Lk R ) 100
Merri mack (Mass) 1000 x 131(
Metueomet (F.It.) .100

......

Washington, Phila..20
Portland, Me., G. L.50

......

......

J Lyman M. (Mass.). 100 103
Manchester (N.IL) 100 xl25

47

Mutual of N. Y.. ..100
Now York,N.Y.,.. 100
N. Orleans G. L. ..100
N. Liberties, Phila..25

'

Warr’n(N.J.),lVd,7.50
Westch. A Phila.,pf.50
West Jersey
50
West Jersey A Atlantic
Western Maryland

99

50 102
Manhattan, N. Y... 50 230
Metropolitan, N.Y.100 187
Municipal
100 130

....

...

......

.

Texas A Pacific
100
i
i
Texas A SJ.L. in Texas
| Pacific Mail SB. Co. 100 4L%
do
in Mo. A Ark.
21k Pullm’n Palace Car 100 133
13*3%
12
Tol. (’an. So. A Det
95
i St. I/Ou is B’d gc, 1 s t pre f 192
3%
4
44
Tol. Cln. A St. Louis..
j 2d pref. certificates. *40
U. N.J. RR AC. Co. 100 5192 k
103
:8t. I/OldS Tumie] R.R
uoo
Union Pacific
100
95:h 91
St. Louis Transfer Co.
Stand. Water Meter
Utah Central
100
19
Vt. A Can., leased. 100
21
ISutro Tunnel
10 §
Yt,A Mass.,l’sed.6.100 131k 13 lk U. S. Electric Light... 128
150
26
155
Virginia Midland, com.
,Union RR. St’k Yards. 110
do
60
1st pref.
EXPIt ESS ST’CKS
do
69
2d pref
; Adams
135
LOO 130
6
99
Viekeo. A Meridian
American
100
39
'L'k
it
do
61
United States
62
100
pref...
12 4
Wab.St. L. A Pac. 100
29k 29 k Wells, Fargo A Co. 100 122
do
Pref. 100
43k
j TEL EG II API!
...

......

......

.

N.Y.ATex.Ld.,Lim. 50

61

37

Fuller Electric Light
Pref.
do
Iron Stcamboat-Co

1 Maverick I,and— 10
N.E.Mtg.Secur.fBost.)
N. Hampshire Land 25

120

Lynn, Mass.,G. L..100
Maid. A Melrose.. .100
Newton A. Wat’n ..100
Salem. Mass
100
Fall Kivcr
...100

.

So, & No. Alabama

Terre H. A Ind'nap.50

127

...

Lo w cl l. B Ic a c her y. 200 x‘235
Lowell iMac.h.Shop.500 960

i

Brooklyn, L. 1
25 105
77
Oili/.eus’, Brooklyn.20
80
114k LL4k Metropolitan, B’klyn.
50
Nassau, Brooklyn ..25
45
People’s, Brooklyn. 10
70
Williamsb’g, B’klyn 50
270
272
19
C harlost’n ,S.C. ,G as. 2 5
§3 7k 40 .Chicago G.A Coke. 100 120
4k
5
{Cincinnati G. A Coko. 189
6k
28
Hartford, CL, G. L..25
2k
3
Jersey. C.A Ilobok’u 20 155
2k
2 k ! People’s, Jersey C
Louisville G. L
142

iKeelcy Motor

B’west.,Ga., g’d, 7.100
fiyr. Bing. A N. Y.100
Summit Branch,Pa.50

100

Lowell

......

185

......

.....

Col.Imp.,...60%

do
exbd
GAS STOCKS*
Balt. Cons ji. Gas
Boston Gaslight...500
Bast Boston
25
South Boston
100

83

.

44

.....

......

kj

16
89
93

1391.

110

North Riv. Cons., 100%

......

......

......

Am.R’vtmp.,ex b.Astk
Cent. N. J. Land Imp
;Continental Cons., 85%
; Hud. Ri v. Contract.. 40%
I Internal.Imp. Ex., 80%
N. Y. Loan A Imp’mnt

103
102

......

,

.....

.

112

......

|Oregon Improvement.
80% 'Oriental C0113

-

110

_

_

.

t

100

x

......

......

.

60

m

......

'N. Y. A Scranton Cons.

109
117

•

1G ra ni te (F. R.) 1
1060
iGreat Fails (N. II.) 100 84 k
'Hamilton (Mass.) 1000 950
| ITartf. Carpet -(Ct.) 100 230
90
(Hill (Me)
....100
Holyoke W.Power. 100 220
Jackson (N. II.)..1000 1 ICO
King Philip (F. R.) 100 no
1 Laconia (Me)
400 540
L19U Lancaster IM.(N.1I)400 650
97
L’rel Lake Mills (F. R.)
1G0
Lawrence (Mass.)lOOO 15 91
690 685
Lowell‘(Mass)
■

St. Paul rights
Tex. ASt. Louis,sub.90%
IMPKOVRM’T &
coivvrtthv cus.

......

106

(Gl’l)q Y.Mills(F.R.)100

105

do

......

m

75

(F. R.) 100

[Franklin (Me.)

......

......

......

j

......

....

I
Port.8aco APorts,lsd (3 X109
5
Port Royal & Augusta
1st, 6s 19LO, J.AD..
30
33
Ports. Gt.F.& Con 10v
JOrcg.R.AN. 1st, Os, JAJ 106 k
123
ProvT. & Worc’ster.100 xl25
| Pullm’n Palace Car—
Reus. A Sa ratoga.. 100
......j 1 3d series, 8s,’87FAA 1107
5i.v
5
l4
J 4tb. do
Rich. A Alieg., stock..
8s,’92 FA A J 113k
60 h
61
Richmond A Danv.100
Deb’nt’re,7s,’88AAO 1103
06% 63
Rich. F. A P., com. 100
Stlg, 7s, g..1885 A AO
do
Guar. 7.100
St. L. Bridge A Tan—
!
do
do
G
1st, 7d, g.. 1929.AAO 1125
81
77 k
Richmond A P’b’g.100
Sp. Val. W.W. —1st, 6s.
33
32
Rich. A West Point
Sterling Iron A Ry.—
1
Richmond York R. A 0.
Series B., inc.,
1 ~ 11
Rochester A P111 s. 100
1 Plain income 6s, ’96.
31
26
Rome W. A Ogd... 100
} Western Union Te.l.—
.

......

! Rich. A

......

m

......

$10,000 blka, ex bds
(Or. A Trans.,8Uba. 100

......

87

Mutual TJuion Tel. Os.
North w. Tei.—7s, 1901
Or. Imp. Company—

19
LU

......

ICO

80%
Al.,8ubs.. 100%
!R ch. A D., exsubs.70%
45 k
Dcben., subs. $2,250
Rocli. A Pittsb., subs..

-

103
104
115
105
80
102 k
100

Mariposa—7s,’86

|

.

260
160
325

r
......

s

;

.

•

......

A West., subs 95%

|0re. Short L. subs.,90%

.

58%

....

Oregon liyA N.,rights

......

j Flint Mills

......

405

Bu.N. Y. AP. ,subs.6 Op.e
C II.A D.'.pool cert.,gu.
Den. A R.G.W.,subs.,ex
Mex. G. blks..N«>.2.
Mich. A Ohio, subs 75%
N. Y. W.S. A B. .subs. .8 0%
Ohio C. ex bd. A stock.

103

.

.

.

§ 3z%

......

(Atl. A Pac.,biles.35 p.c

M.,6s, 1897.Q-M
2d M., Os, 1907.. JAJ
Mort. 6s, cp.i’95 JAJ
6s, imp., cp., ’80 MAN

......

do
Pref. ...50
Phila. ATren., 10, 100
Phila, Wiim.A Balt.50
Pitts. Cin. & St. L. .50
Pitts. & Con., l’sed.50
do
Pref—

......

Hiftms, Ac,

......

100
Norw. A Worcester. 10( xl58
1 CANAL
30
STOCKS,
Ogd. A L. Champ.lot
10
Ok
Ohio Central
Cal. A Chi.Can. A Dock
100
32 k 33 k
do
Ohio & Miss
100
pref.
j Del. A Hudson
do
Pref. 10i
100 109
139
x38k
Ohio Southern
100
j Del. Div. leased,8..50
Old Colony
10< X138U 139 ! Lohigh Navigation.. 50 §45 k
16 ! Morris, guar., 4
|L1
Ore/ion& Calif....l(h
100 §
43
do pf.,guar.l0..100
do
Prof... 100
!ll
|1
30
50
Pennsylvania
Oregon Short L no—
88 H 8 3 k: 3ehuylkill Nav
50;§
Oregon Trans-Cont —
125
Osweiro & Syr., guar..
do
do pref.50
§16
1
Panama,
1O0
Siisnupr1iu.nn«i
50
Paris & Decatur.
Pennsylvania RR. .50 § 58% 58k! MISCELLANEOUS
23 I
BONDS.
Pensacola & Atlantic..
90
19*3 20 k Balt. Gas Light Os
Peoria Dec. A Ev..l00

Phila. A Reading... 50

170

Ask.

.

|F. R. Merino Co... 100

250

iODSfiKIPlI'^S,

......

1st

89 k

5 29

2'
100

......

ILL

6s,btAcar,1913MAN
58 k!
7s, bt Acar, 1915 M A N
iSusq.—6s,cp., 1918 JAJ
51 k
7s, coup., 1902..JAJ

110

105

......

New mort

1

......

Prof. 100

)

i

13
12

Fall Riv. Iron W. .10(

i F. It. Machine Co.. 160

Equitable
100
Farmers’ Loan A Tr.25
Pa.D.cp.,7fi,MAS< 127102
100
k Mercantile
Leh.N.—6s, rg.,’84Q-J 100%
116
RR. 6s, re<rM ’97.Q-F
(Metropolitan./
Conv 6s,g.rg.*94MASI
68, g. ,cp. Arg. .’97 J AD
Cons. M., 1911 7sJAD
Morris—Boat loan, ’85

Bid.

BIISGELLANEOU9.

MOCKS.
Am. Loan A Trust.100
Central

.....

Ask.

I BU^T <’<*.’ i

Brooklyn irust

......

117k
117 k

Penn.—Os, coup., 1910
! Schuylkill Nav.—

......

......

102

i

8
20

......

.......

Bid.

Miscellaneous.

1st

i

......

Pref.

do

177
26 k
S'J
.

...

do

|

87%

il4

7s, 1881
JAJ
Conn. 7s. 1891. A AO
Re it. 7s, 1694 ..A AO

.....

fload of First Page of Quotation*.

Ask

Bid.

Miscellaneous.

108
193

BONDS—Oo.TriN'uuiD.

QUOTATION'S OE STOCKS AND

Explanations See Notes at

lilt. STOCKS.
Continued.

fvou xxxvn.

..10

2 50
......

THE CHRONICLE

?, 1883. 1
GENERAL
For

Moose Silver

.

Mono

100

Navajo.

100

Northern Belle

•

•

•

•

Bank Stocks.

10

Potosi

100

Rappahanook

i

Robinson Consol..
50
Sierra Grande
Sierra Nevada
100
Oliver Liitr

ow

South Hite, new
South Pacific

2D

...

Webster.

100

•08) j Atlantic

*05
•03
•51
3*10

5

Rising Sim

100

^

•

-1

3*75

Fulton

130

City National

260

280

New York

no

1 Z\)

N. Y. -Ni^XCll

XU
•

]()j

Long Island

110
200
195

170

100

Tip Top

100

Brooklyn Trust

100
t.75

STOCKS.§
25

Atlantic

25

Brunsw’k Antimony.5
Calumet A Heeia.. .25

Catalpa Silver

10

Central

25

Copper Falls

5C

Dana

25

o

Duncan Silver
Franklin

11

5c.

Minnesota

25

National
Osceola

25
25

1%
20 '

Pewabic

25

3%

Phenix

25

Quincy

25

Silver Islet

25

BANK STOCKS.
BALTIMORE.
Bank of Baltimore 100
Bank of Commerce. 15
Citizens’
10
Coni. A Farmers’.. 100
Farmers’ B’k of Md.30
Farmers’ A Merch. .40
Farmers’ A.Plauters’25
First Nat. of Balt..lO(
Franklin
00
German American
Howard
1
Murine

3u

Mechanics’

10

Merchants’
TOO
National Excb’ge. 100

25

People’s

Second National .UK;
Third National....100
Union
75
Western
20
.

.

Un.Stock Y’ds Nat,100

20*i
4

j

155

225

250

Nat. Lat. A Bk. of Com.
j Second National
3
Third National
4
1*4
1% Union Nat
Western German Bant
i
HARTFORD.
/Etna Nat
10f
110
American Nat
5C
145
'.Charter Oak Nat..10(
17*2 18
18
19
City Nat
1()(
121 - 123
(ConnecticutRiver 5(
37
39
j Far. A Mecli. Nat. 1<)(
53
First Nat
10(
55
43
Hartford Nat,
10(
45
1 Mercantile Nat
134
10(
137
105
National Exchange.5<
107
! Phoenix Nut
10(
no

10*4

12*2

39
13
140

137
121
124
18
20
155
100
110
112
81
80
31 Vi 33

10<

State

i

126
115

I Bank of KentuckylOf
Bank of LouisvillelOt

Citizens’ National. 10<

ICity Nat

101
FaflR Cily TohaccolOl

;

Farmers’of Ky ...10(
Farmers’ A Drov..l0(

First Nat
10(
German Ins. Co.’s. 10(

BOSTON.
100
100
TOO

151b?
127*2
100*4
120*2
120*2

-

140

,

•

130
75
145
91
52
140
120
179

125
72
S3
50
136
118
176
120
74
175
108

126
77
180
111
150
80
128
132
100
109
110
165

US
76
127

131
99
107
108
104
107
114
135
151
220
130
142
111
105
158
-

^

..

‘

115
......

152
225
131

114

130
......

.




j Last

price this

50

40

RICHMOND, VA.
City Bank
20

3

2%
29%

.

!

..

117

116

Home

39% 41
102% 105%
60
55
117
117%
123% 126

...

..

70

40
65

36
63

30%

People’s
Sun Mutual
Teutonia
NEW YORK.
American
50
American Excli... 100

..

26

Hibernia

Merchants* Mutual
Mechanics’ A’Traders’
New Orleans Ins. Aps’ii
New Orleans Ins. Co

112

6%
59

118% 119%
124
125%
79%
119
120%

130

.

-

.

-w

135

130%

'

......

.....

.

*

......

......

150
lit
170
175

[165,
150
120
125
96
250
250
80
95
125
80
80

120
200
145
115
270
63
118
135
82
145
70
90
70
133

200
80
92
70
115
60

413
....

......

First Nat. Gold
100
Nat.Gold BankA Tr. Co
Pacific
'.
INSUK’CE
Flit 1C
STOCKS.
BALTIMORE.
Associate F i rcm <; n ’ s. 5
Haitiinnrn Fin*. Tns 10
Firemen’s Insur’ce .18

1

50
Mercantile
Merchants’
50
1 .Montauk (B’klyn).. 50

117

Nassau

5

10

8
on

19
7*8
4*2

19'Qu!|N\ Y.

53

G*3

I

“1 ?\f\

1

.....

$ Quotation per share;

or*

(B’klyn)

[National..

6
op

-

......

L*

Royal Insurance

2*4
28%

Lafayette..!

—

4*4
...

6%

50

37%

Equitable

73*uNcw York Firo

BOSTON.
j
American F. A M. .100 xl30 1135
Boston
100 X12 5 •135
1 13
Boylston
100 112
Commonwealth. ..100
Dwelling Hoiiso...lOO 109*4 HO
15 0
Eliot
100 125
1
150
Firemen’s
100 145
50
9 9 *2 [Franklin
100
[IManufacturers’. .. 100 95*4 96
IjMass. Mutual
100 x 116 118
Mercantile F. A M.100 131*4 135
116
Neptune F. A M... * 00 115
North American ..100 110

>vei

1

■

...

_

Queen Fire A Life

....

....

.

20
63
147

143
106
25 160
'Bowery
103*4 {Broadway
25 170
17 160
(Brooklyn
115
LIS
(Citizens’
20 140
•10 ICity
*05
70 113
68
[Clinton
100 120
90
93
! Commercial
50
120
Continental
100 245
Eagle
40 240
75
55'
56
Empire City .
100
90
168
169
Exchange. T
30
164
Farm gut
165
50 118
75
160
Firemen’s
17
161
70
116
117
Firemen's Trust
10
112
153
Fran k. A Emp’i urn
159
German-American 100 190
25
Germania
50 140
27
50 110
135
Globe
25 250
110
Greenwich
60
Guardian
100
92
Hamilton
15 113
120
105
Hanover
50 130
75
Hoffman
50
1
Homo
450
100 140
63
Howard
!’
50
320
85
200
Importers’ A Trad. .50
60
153
Irving
100
30 J 26
95
Jefferson
111*2
Kings Co. (B’klyn) .20 190
75
119
1 Knickerbocker... ..30
85
117
| Lafayette (B’klyn) .50
98
j Lamar
100 65
102
[Long Isl’d (B’klyn).50 110
55
J Lori Hard
25
.Manuf. A Builders’100 108
166*4 168
100
(Manhattan
122
127 %i [Mecli. A Traders’. .125 115
j Mechanics’ (B’klyn)50 130

Canal Nat
100
Casco Nat
100
First Nat
100
Merchants’ Nat
75
National Traders’. 100

Maryland Fire

19
GO

47

Hope....’

....

85

21%

Firemen’s

120
110
115
125

190

20%

!Germania

.

12»
292
133
93

45
24

86

....

229*

Li v. A lend- AGlolm 2
North’ll Fire A Life .5
North Brit. A Mer. 8%

F».e.t,m*«’ anil ’Traders’

28%

128
150

Ass.Corp,! 2lo

25

NEW ORLEANS.
Crescent Mutual

_

115
100

144
6
57

75
28

!Merchants’ Mutual.50
National Fire
10

.

4

.

100

.

226*2 .’30

PORTLAND, ME.
Otimheriand Nat

.

......

West Philadelphia.100

Howard Fire

.

.Price nominal; no late tmi}Bactlou3.

.

35
40

......

50

Western Not,

100
IOO
100

London

146
120

50
50
100

"

TO 4

100
100

22d Ward
Third Nat
Underground
Union Nat

Hartford
National
Orient
Pliomix

227
124
285
131
91
185
80

LONDON.
Commercial Union.£5
50
Guardian

127
54
120

People’s
100
Philadelphia Nat.. 100
Second.Nat
100

100

100
IOO

125

Mechanics’ Nat. ...100
Merchants’ Nat
Nat. B’k Commerce.50
Nat. B’k Geriuant.’n.50
! Nat. B’k N. Liberties 50
Nat. B’k Republic.. 100
National Security. 100
50
Penn National

[Clay Street

“

*

M an ufaeturers’ Nat.25

...

.

-

Kensington Nat. ...50

Spring Garden

.Etna Fire
(ton nnp.fi nut.

Lancashire F. A L. .25

65
64
205
225
141

First Nat
100
Merchants’ Nat
100
Nat, Bk of VirginlalOO
Planters’ Nat
100
State Bank of Va.100
iia
ST. LOUIS.
B’k of Commerce.. 10e
133
Commercial
100
100
122*2 Continental
1 10*2 Fourth National ..100
140
International
TOO
150
Mechanics’
100
112
Merchants’ Nat... 100
130
St. Ijouis National.100
Third National
100
63
{Valiev National.. IOC1
SAN FRANCISCO.
152*2 Bank of California

...

.

....

100

{Southwark Nat

25

Imperial Fire

50

.Seventh Nat
Sixth Nat

99
150
113

20 126

..

•—**

160

20

...

105

300
260
112

106
160
120

.

j

104

100
Farmors’AMech N ioo
Girard National
40

128"

111

HARTFORD, CONN.

163*2

First Nat

J05
140

170

116

40

Tradf^men’s

Eighth Nat

132

•

»

1110

ioe.
100 |
125
100
100 125%
100 131

City National

1*38

152
; German
10(:
German National. 100
128
100*2 Kentucky Nat
100
Louisv. Banking Co.40
121
121
Masonic
100
Boylston
100
Merchants’ Nat. ..100
100 100
Broadway
Northern of Ky ...100
100 174
177
Bunker Hill
Central
100
”
Second Nat
100
100
...100 11 Mh L20 'Security
City
Third National
100
120
Columbian
100 129
■'
Western
100 iio
Commerce
100 1244*i 125
Commonwealth
West.Finan.Corp. .100 114
.100 11134 112
1 12 *4 i
NEW ORLEANS.
100 112
Continental
110
Canal A Banking.. IOO 132
100 100
Eagle
Eliot
100 126
12(5*4 j Citizens’
100 121*4
100 138 >*4
Exchange
lOO 128*2 129*2 1 Germania Nat
113
100 130
Everett/
100
113*2 Hibernia Nat
131
Faneuil Hall
100 130
|l Louisiana Nat.. .. 100 128%
100
200
'.Metropolitan
First National
100 195
115
First Ward
100 112
j Mutual Nat
100 126
Fourth National.. 100 108% 100
j Vow Orleans Nat.. 100 202
61
Freemans’
100 110*2 117
People’s
50
107
100 130
State Nat
Globe
100 uio
120
Hamilton
100 119
Union Nat
100 150
NEW YORK.
110 *u
Hide A Leather ..100 110
Howard
100 125
127
America
100 154
to l
American Exeh’gclOO 128
Lincoln
105 103
93
Broadway
25 250
Manufacturers’.. .100
Market
100 100
100*.} 1 Butchers’A Drovcrs25 130
:Central National.. 100 125
Market (Brighton). 100 140 ! M5
100 180
Massachusetts
.250 no |llu% i Chase Nation al
100 222
Maverick
i‘225
i Chatham
25 134
132
'T:-:3
2001
1 A
J
4)j^ lr,
99
Merchandise
100
(City
100 250
13d
Merchants’
100
Citizens’
25
|I40
Metropolitan ...... H>0 1 1 5 *4 lib.**! j Commerce
100 155
°08
(Continental
100 \ 125
Monument
100 200
1128
160
hit,. Vernon
(Com Exchange ...100
100 1 2 ’J
120
New England
100 13 i 1134*4 [East River
....25
25
North
100 132
132*2 Eleventh Ward
; 112*2 First National
100 800
North America.., .100 1 12
0
1
125
National... 10<
OM Boston:
50
1 01*2 Fourth
Fulton
30
1 20
l OO ICO !: n-2
People.’«
'■ Fifth Avenue
i 31 *« [132
100 350
Redemption
lOu
130
131
‘Gallatin National .51 +1164
Republic.10‘
112
G trtic’.d
..10
Revere
100 ‘17*1 118
Rockland
10: j 13 1
j 130 : German American. .75
i ZK)
155
Germania
100
Second Nat
100 153
Security
100 18 ) ! 183
Greenwich
25
Grocers’
30
Sliawmut
100 118
10( •147
8'uoe A Leather
100 107
107*2 Hanover
,’50
State
....
100 124-h 1:25
Importers’ A TV... 1 OK
!r* v;no*
5n
...
Rufloik
pv* t 1 >i 1

100

Atlantic
Atlas
Blackstono
Boston Nat

"National
Seventh Ward
Shoe A Leather....
St. Nicholas

Commercial Nat.... 50
Commonwealtli Nat 50
Consolidation Nat 30
Corn Exchange Nat.50

LOUISVILLE.

;

133

Central National..100

113
210
171
122
137
130
200
137
143
126
115

50

10
ST

1*0*5

Uuion
50
United States Nat
50
Wall Street Nat
PHILADELPHIA §
B’k of N. America 10G

150

Metropolitan Nat
40

102

100 J133

.

First National
Fourth National
Jerman National
Merchants’ National..

i ->h

Western

60

50

100

Washington

Republic

105
104

347%

130

"

90
150

130

20

.....

80
150

190

Firemen’s

Union

Ask.

128

Germania
Globe

Security

......

(Stateof N. Y

145

120

20

100
20

20
20
.20
Merehants’A Manuf 20
Miami Valley
50
'
100
National

135

25

99
80

.

Eureka

50
25 1135
50 160
100 168

Phenix

......

60

Exchange Nat. Bank..
......

155

People’s

360

CINCINNATI.
Citizens’ National
Commercial Bank.

1710

25

25

10c
10*4

%

Mesnard

Winthrop

i

100
geioo

North River
Oriental

125
260
170
135

....IOC

Union National. ...100

*

10

Harsluiw Silver ....20
Huron
25

Sullivan (McdSilver 10

Chicago Nat

1 99!

79
3 45

IOO

Eagle
Enterprise

....

Northwestern Nat. 100

25

25

CHICAGO.

1 %

95c.

20

Ridge”

People’s National. 101

i

100

Now York County. 100
Ninth National./..100 j
North America
70

101

i Commercial Nat.. .101
12
10(
First National
15
212
Hide and Leather
244
50c.
Homo National ...10(
55c
9 5}
20
Merchants’Nat.. .10(
•75
Nat, B’k of Illinois.1.00
1

10

5

Douglas (Me.)

i

100
173
140

165

....

Pacific
Park

155
129

...

128

Exch’geSO
Metropolitan
/ lOO
Nassau

Wnshimrtnn

CINCINNATI.
Amazon (new Rtne.lri 20
Aurora
Cincinnati
25
Citizens’
2fl
C 'ommereial
25

Merchants’

115
100
*210
200
175

96

CHARLESTON.
B’k of Chas.(NBA) IOC
First Nat. Chas.. .100

0.3j

Unadllla
Union Consol
100
BOSTON MINING

Shoe A Leather. ..100
155

j 115

100
50

Merchants*

Bid.

Insurance Stocks.

155

Leather Mauufts.-lOO
50

Mercantile

•S3 i
1
1 •°l>i

Ask.

M anhat tan

86

Brookljm

;

Standard

Allouez

97

Bid.

Bank Stocks.

180
130
270
135

1

Tuscarora

96
85

1

275
125
255

(State)

Manufacturers’
Mechanics’
Nassau

Spring Valley

Ask.

BROOKLYN.

1
10

Red "Elephant

Washington

Bid.

153
lUUh 118
(Marine
100 ’150
144 *2! 145 i Market
100 135
132*-i! 133
Mechanics’
25 148
109
109*2 Mechanics’& Tr.. .25 j 100

100
100

lTemont
| Onion

1

Ophir

100
100

Third Nat
Traders’

•

4-00

285

STOCKS AND BONDS—Co.vci.ujjed.

OF

Ecpltinationi Sfco Votes at Meat! of First Pa;e of Quotations.

Ask.

Bid.

Mining Stocks.

QUOTATIONS

21

!

JrLY

Niagara
North River
Pacific
Park
Peter Cooper

People’s

35

100

50
25
25
100

20
no

[Phenix (B’lclyn) —50
Relief

50

Republic

100

Rutgers’
Standard
Star

100

Sterling...'.

100

Stuy vesant

25

ITradcsuien’s

2.>
25

(United States
j Westchester
lnT'"i,»rn<lt)ll>,lY C’tF

50
100

10

60

103
105
140
83

145
70
145
100
160
110
155
108
140
58
80
120
ioo
C7
55
120
65
125
120
215

120
145
65

108
108
450
92
150
76
155

108

.

170

118
465
115

445
62
85

126
105

70
60
125
70

130
It 25

225

.

THE CHRONICLE,

22

[Vol. XXXVIL

rights pertaining to all Common Stock of the A. & P. Co. At
the last annual meeting of the A. & P. R. R. Co. it was resolved
convert all of the Missouri Division Preferred Stock into
“New” Common Stock, and the St. Louis & San Francisco

to

AND

Railway Co. and the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Co.
have decided to so convert that held by them, and the few out¬
'
r —
standing shares may also be so converted upon presentation.”
The Investors’ Supplement contains a complete exhibit of the
Boston Interest and Dividend Payments.—Mr. Joseph G.
Funded Debt of States and Cities and of the Stocks and Bonds
Martin publishes a statement of the amounts payable in Boston
of Railroads and other Companies. It is published on the last
this month for interest and dividends as follows :
Saturday of every other month—viz., February, April, June,
Interest on bonds
$8,407.755
August, October and December, and is furnished ioith</ut extra Railroad dividends
2,029,102
charge to all regular subscribers of the Chronicle. Single copies Manufacturing dividends
080,040
STATE, CITY AND CORPORATION

FINANCES.

f

.

are

sold at $2 per copy.

1,103,403

Miscellaneous.

ANNUAL

$12,286,900
12,803,018
10,056,982
10,283,399

Total—July 1, 1883

REPORTS.

Jan. 1, 18r>3

July 1,1882
Jan. 1, 1882.....

Mobile & Girard Railroad.

%

this rail¬
(For the year ending May 31, 1883.)
road for the year 1882 were as below.
The mileage increased
The annual report says : “ The gross earnings for the past fiscal from 5^9 miles on Jan. 1,
1882, to 1,150 Dec. 31:
year have been $255,756, and the expenses for the same period Kerri pis from—
$178,300, leaving a net of $77,455. Of this net, $59,649 has
Fi u lit
$2,287,678
*
Passengers
955,270
been paid out for interest, and the balance, $17,806, has been
Express
30,641
used in reducing indebtedness.” * * *
Mail
37,296
“Desiring to secure the largest possible margin of safety in,
Miscellaneous
1
33,967
providing for onr fixed charges, your board have deemed it
Total
$3,344,852
advisable to use the surplus funds of this year’s earnings, as
Expenses
(732s
per cent)
2,402,223
above stated, and a portion of the reserves of former years, in
Net
reducing the debt of the company. About a year ago the
$882,029
board carefully considered the advisability of extending the
Central of New Jersey.—In the United States Circuit Court
road to Eiba, in Coffee County, a distance of thirty miles, but at Trenton, N. J.,
an order was granted that the Reading and
in March, 3883, after a very careful review of the situation, it j
Jersey Central shall show cause on July 9 why an injunction
was reluctantly concluded to defer, for the present, any attempt
should not issue prohibiting the lease. This order was obtained
to construct the extension.
Before this conclusion had been
by Win. B. Dinsmore, who holds 1,000 shares of Jersey Central,
reached, however, the efforts had resulted in securing the and who is opposed to the lease on the ground that it fails to
authority of the stockholders, by resolution at a special meet¬ provide compensation for dissenting stockholders, as is said to
ing held at Girard, Ala., on the 26th of September, for the be required under the laws of the State. Mr. Dinsmore is
issue of $250,000 of bonds, to be a first mortgage upon the ex¬
represented by Edward T. Green, one of the Pennsylvania Rail¬
tension and a third upon your present property.
It is still the road lawyers/ Till the hearing, the receipts of the Jersey Cen¬
deliberate conviction of your board that the interests of our tral’s business are to be kept
separate from those of the Read¬
company will be served by this extension, and when the neces¬
ing’s other properties. A temporary injunction was first issued,
sary funds can be provided and the proper co-operation of the but this was dissolved by Mr. Gowen’s furnishing security in a
people living along the proposed line be secured to the enter- j bond for $250,000.
prise, it should be undertaken by our company.”
Cincinnati A Eastern.—At the annual meeting in Cincin¬
RECEIPTS AND DISllUHSEMENTS EOR YEAIt ENDING MAY 31, 1883.
nati Secretary Mansfield, in his report for the fiscal year
Disbursements.
Kerripis.
$101,758 ending June 30 was compelled to approximate the figures for
$197,601 Transportation
Freight earnings
70,54>
54,003 Repairs road
Passage earnings
the closing weeks, but they will come very near the actual, as
MAil service
59,049
4,090 Interest
Canadian Paciflc.-rThe receipts and expenses of

.

t.

t

t

‘

-

Reserved fund
Chattahoocliie Nat. Bank.
Construction

40.907

4,398
199
339
845

Capital stock
Cash on hand

May 31, ’82

$302,500

Tot.il

Heeoud. mortgage bonds,
8 per cent
Third mortgage bonds, 0

follows

34,000

272

300

Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe.—The official statement of the
earnings and expenses of this company for May, and for the
live months ended May 31, is as follows:
May.
,
r-.Taa. to May, 5 mos -s
.

3 383.

Miles of road operated
Gross earnings
Op. exptis. (exclusive
of taxes)

1,820

$1,180,808

489,430

1S82

1882.

1883.

1,820
$1,183,701

693,655

1,820
1,808
$5,527,935 $5,o83,870

2,799,722

Missouri Division Preferred
$10,000,000
all but 1,037 shares of which is owned by, and de¬

posited in trust for. the St. Louis A San Francisco Rail¬
Company and the Atchison Topeka A3anta Fe
Railroad Company, share and share alike.
Central Division Preferred
way

^

deposited in trust

4‘01d” Common

as

1,400,000

above.

all but 450 shares of which is owned and deposited in
trust, as above.
“New ” Common
all of which is owued and deposited in trust, as above.

-

8,360,300
31,750,000

“When the Missouri Division Preferred and the Central
Division Preferred Stocks were originally issued they were

given preference for dividends up to 7
of the net earnings of those Divisions
Common Stock received any dividends.
of stock should receive dividends up

per cent per annum out
respectively, before the

After the three classes
to the rate of 7 per cent
per annum they were to share equally in any excess of earnings
more than sufficient to pav that rate on all.
The Missouri
Division of the A. & P. R R. Co. now constitutes part of the
main line of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway Company,
and any

and all preference formerly attaching to the Missour

Division Preferred Stock of the A. & P. R. R. Co. has ceased

and^ become null and void.




$498,100
259.510

190,000

bonds

30.800

| to Richmond. The 19 miles additional to complete the road to
j! Portsmouth are graded and nearly ready for tlie steel. Of the
$3,000,000 capital of the new

5

syndicate,

one

million is for the

Gallipolis extension.
—A Times dispatch from Cincinnati, June 30, says : “The
fifteen local capitalists who
took hold of the Cincinnati
& Eastern have not been able to market their bonds as
readily as they had supposed. They expected to sell enough
to provide for $8,000,000 of maturing bonds, and to put the
road into Portsmouth.
This they have not been able to do. but
by taking $300,000 of these bonds themselves at 7i) cents,which
they have done this week, they expect to put tlie read through
and biiug the bonds up to par.”
Chicago & AUanlic.—The application to the Stock Ex¬
change for listing this company’s stock and bonds contained
the following: The Chicago & Atlantic Railway company was
formed by consolidation of three organizations, as follows:
1. The Chicago Continental & Baltimore Railway Company*
organized under the laws of Indiana, the name of which was
subsequently changed to the Chicago & Atlantic Railway Com¬
pany.

& Continental Railroad Com¬
organized under the laws of Ohio.
3. The Chicago & Atlantic Extension Railway Company, or¬
ganized under the laws of Illinois.
The company’s railroad extends from Marion, Ohio, to Ham¬
mond, Indiana, a distance of 249 1-10 miles, and thence to
Chicago, Illinois, over the Chicago & Western Indiana Railroad
under a perpetual lease.
The entire line, 268 6 miles in.
length, with 40 miles of sidings, is completed and has just
been opened for operation.
Rails 60 lbs. steel.
The company has acquired adequate terinal facilities in
Chicago under contracts with the Chicago & Western Indiana
Railroad Company. This line- secures an independent, outlet
for the system of/he New York Lake Erie & Western Railroad
2.

$51,510,300

82,002

| Total
$1,013,509
On which interest is now guaranteed by the new syndicate.
The miles of road operated are 98 2-10, including main stem
87 miles to Ottawa, in Scioto County, and the Ohio River branch

3,757,401

Net earnings
$691,372
$490,106 $2,728,213 $1,926,409
Atlantic & Pacific.—In the application of this company
to the Stock Exchange the following was stated in regard to
the issues of stock :
Capital Stock.—Total amount authorized by the charter.$100,000,000
Amount issued (apportioned as follows).
51,510,300

all of which is owned and

First mortgage
Second mortgage
Six per cent mortgage
Ohio River brunch

$302,506

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.

$45,590

include some extraordinary expen¬
the flood. An additionalA?xpense
was $18,096 paid to the Cincinnati Northern as rental.
The mortgage bonds outstanding are as follows :

1,277

Total

-

The operating expenses
ditures made necessary by

93
450

31, ’83

$128,253

Balance

2,253

Agents’ ledger
Public land sale
Cash on hand May

1882, to July 1, 1883

Operating expenses

14,000
11,844

per cent
Central R. R. Bank
Merchants A M. Bank
Preferred capital stock..'
Pike County stock

:

Total earnings from July 1,

The Baltimore Pittsburgh

pany,

It still, however, retains all the Company.

W
July

THE

7, 18S3.

CHRONICLE.

Tlic authorized

capital (divided into 100,000 shares of $100
each) is
$10,000,000
30,000 shares voting stock
$1,000,000
SO,000 shares trust stock, non-voting
9,0o0,000
.

Total stock

$10,000,000

The voting power on the

90,000 shares of trust stock has
Trustee.
of bonds authorized and issued is $6,500,-

been vested in H. J. Jewett,
The total amount

is

€00, secured by a first and only mortgage covering the railway,
its equipment/franchises, contracts ana property of every de¬

scription.

The bonds

dated June 13, 1881, and are payable Novem¬
ber 1, 1920, ar d bear interest at the rate of 6 per cent per
are

payable semi-annually, May 1 and November 1; both
principal and interest payable in New York in gold of the
annum,

reseat standard
of in
weight
fineness,at or,
the ofoption
E olders,
andmoney
of the
the
in London,
sterling
theatrate
$5 to
£. The bonds
bered from 1

coupon bonds for $1,000 or £200 each, num¬
to 6.500.
Trustees: Farmers’ Loan and Trust

are

Company of New York and Conrad Baker, of Indianapolis, Ind.
The interest is further secured by a pledge to the trustees of

the gross earnings of both the New York Lake Erie and
Western Railroad and the New York Pennsylvania & Ohio Rail¬
road on all the traffic going to and coming from the Chicago &
Atlantic Railway. A printed copy of the pledge certified
by
the Farmers’ Loan & Trust Company, trustee, is attached to
each bond. Hugh J. Jewett is the President.

Delaware
Hudson Canal Co.—Notice is given that the
bonds of this company falling due July 1, 1884, will be re¬
deemed on their presentation at the company’s office in New
Y'ork and assignment to the company. The funds for their

redmption have been provided by the issue of new stock.
Kansas City Lawrence & Southern Kansas.—This company’s
statement for May, and the five months ended May 31, is as

tion of the real estate in the various wards, as
last year, and the valuation of personal estate.

1883.

Miles of road operated
Gross earnings

Op.

expos,
of taxes)

Net

1882.

May, 5

Ward.
I
ir
in
IV

18s2.
384

$73,366

$579,973

$367,909

62,552

46,387

289,645

206.320

$71,552

$26,979

$290,323

$161,589

.384

Assessment for 1882.

i

29,236,640
35,265,560
11,753,163

30,199,197

35,680,351

962,537
420,791
354,943
1,872,402

16,210,608

36,025,160
27,423,523

x

17,310,105
16,050,163

XI
xn

9,953,400
22,964,155
52,782.240
34,793,862

-

XVII

*

71.875,252
176.556,298
39,701.820
79,471,130

286,419
7,137,250

42,693,422
87,080,448

2.991,602
7,609,318

85,083,164

5,538,129

9,756,565

178,740

$1,079,130,669

$14,286,825

4

546,'*35

PERSONAL ESTATE.

Total
Net decrease.

Assessment for 1883.

$129,162,101
1

1,575,971

57,534,510

-

$198,272,582

$127,678,542
10,715,533
59,152,420

Decrease

$1,483*559
860,438
Ine.

$197,546,495

1.617,900

$2,343,997
726,087

Total real and

personal estate for 1882
Total real and personal estate for 1SM3
Increase in 1883

.

$1,233 476,398

.

1,276,677,164
$43,200,765

These tables show

$43,926,853, and

a

net increase In the real estate valuation

net decrease in the valuation of personal
net increase on the grand total of real
estate of $43,200,765. In three wards there is a

$726,087,

personal

1,553,201

9,577,825

Assessment for 1882.

and

33.595.8 42
73,428.453

14.846.410

Decrease.

estate of

35,146,468

14,299,475

$1,035,203,816

Residents
Non-residents...
SIiarehT’sof bks

of

549,441
*306,121
202,130
6,047.535
*11,885
398,387
1,608,200
352,606

183,693,548

79,545,035

*

1,352,614

54,390,440

33,309,423

Total
Net increase.

74,108
*41,966

17,003,984
16,252.293
103.430,854
9,941,515
23,362,542

97,383,(299

xur

-

12,108,106
42,712,202
22,437,828
16.168,642
37,377.774
27.972,964

22,363,660

XVIII
XIX
XX
xxr
XXII
XXIII
XXLV

Increase.

$4,249,437

40,839.800

*

Assessment for 1883.

$64,761,657

v

XIV
XV
XVI

compared with
These figures

$60,512,220

vr
VII
VIII
IX

mos.s

398
$134,104

(exclusive

earnings

—Jan. to
1883.
398

follows:

are as

follows:

-May.

23

a

or a

fallibg off in the value of real estate as compared with last
year.
The Seventh Ward shows a decrease of $41,966, the
Tenth Ward a decrease of $306,121, and the Thirteenth Ward
a decrease of $11,885.
The heaviest increase is in the Twentyfirst Ward, where the gain is $7,609,318.
This is closely
followed bv the Nineteenth Ward, with a gain of $7,137,250.
The Twelfth Ward shows an increase of $6,047,555, the Twentysecond Ward a gain of $5,538,129 and the first Ward a gain
of $4,249,437.
In each of five other wards the gain is oyer
$1,000,000.
The total amount appropriated by the Board of Estimate
and Apportionment for the expenses of the City Government
for 1883 was $30,593,535, and the estimated amount of revenue
from the general fund not specially appropriated
by law was
$2,000,000, leaving a total of $28,593,535. The Legislature
added to this sum $23,550 for preserving records in the Reg* •
ister’s, County Clerk’s and Surrogate’s offices, $57,700 for free,
floating baths, and $2,000 for additional compensation for the

Kentucky Central.—A dispatch to the Times on June 30,
from Cincinnati, says : “ The Kentucky Central extension from
Paris to Richmond, Ky., has just been completed. This gives
the Kentucky Central a through and direct route over the
Louisville & Nashville, Virginia and Tennessee and Georgia, con¬
necting practically with all points in the South. The Cincinnati
Southern has beer; paralleled—a thing which a few years ago
it was not supposed would ever be done. All the Kentucky
Central now lacks is a bridge across the Ohio, which will
bring
it into Cincinnati.
When that is secured, it will be one of the
important lines terminating here. The extension passes through
•coal and mining regions.”
Manhattan (Klevatedb—The Mercantile Trust Company
gives notice that it will purchase from the first preferred stock¬
holders of the Manhattan Railway
Company, in whose favor a
dividend was declared payable on July 2, their claims to said Commissioner of Jurors. This makes the total
amount to be
dividends, and receive an assignment of such claims, accom- raised by taxation this year $28,676,785. It is
expected that
the tax rate will be about 2*27. Last year the rate was 2’25/
to like
a amount,from
ew York an
Elevated Railroad Company for
in case
NewYork Susquehanna & Western—Middletown Unionthe merger agreement between the three elevated railway com¬
ville <& Water Gap.—The Philadelphia Press states that it is
panies should be adjudered invalid.
officially announced that the Mid. U, & W. G. RR. has been sold
N. Y. Chicago & St. Louis.—This company, commonlyknown to the N. Y.
Susquehanna & Western Railroad. Several years
as the “Nickel-Plate,” recently made
application to the Stock ago, when the New Jersey Midland was in the hands of a receiver*
Exchange for the listing of $10,000,000 second mortgage the directors of the Middletown Unionville & Water Gap Rail¬
bonds.
The statement submitted did not say what this new road executed a lease with them.
The lease rental being too
issue was for, except that $3,092,182 of floating debt was to be
heavy, the authorities of the N. Y. S. & W. road began nego¬
paid with it,, leaving the conclusion to be drawn that the tiations for a controlling interest in the M. U. <£ W. G. road.
$10,000,000 was to be put out at such a price as would, at The transaction is now completed and the stock transferred*
least, pay this amount.
the price being fifty-five cents.
The New York Susquehanna
There was also a remarkable balance sheet submitted as of & Western has made
arrangements with the holders of the
March 31, 18S3, iu which, under the head of “assets,” the second
mortgage bonds by which the interest on these bonds
Road and Equipment” are put down at $64,963,800. This is will be scaled from 7 to 5
per cent.
All but one bondholder
a pure fiction, so far as it
purports to give any information of has agreed to the arrangement, and as soon as he gives his
the real cost of the property, and is a mere forced balance consent a
permanent lease of the road will be made.
sheet to match the issues of stock and bonds on the other side.
Ohio & Mississippi.—The Cincinnati Commercial-Gazette
The question naturally arises in a case like this, whether the
•Stock Exchange ought not to exercise a sound discretion and says that the efforts of the Baltimore & Ohio party to secure
the Ohio & Mississippi Road, taking it out of the court.s, seems
require that the figures submitted to them as a basis for listing from
present indications to be in reasonably close proximity to
securities should be substantially true.
For instance, in the success. At a meeting in Cincinnati last
Saturday, Mr. Gar¬
present case, the item of $64,963,800 in the balance sheet might rett
presiding,
resolutions
were adopted authorizing the imme¬
properly be divided thus :
diate execution of a new issue of bonds and a mortgage to $0
<’ost of road and equipment
$19,166,250 secure them. The new issue is for $16,000,000 of which
discount on stocks and bonds issued
$13,45,797,550
000,000 will be used to retire outstanding bonds, and the re¬
Total nominal cost
$64,963,800 mainder to pay off the floating debt and past due interest and
The balance sheet referred to, contained in the
application for the purchase of new equipment. English bondholders in
1o the Stock Exchange Committee, was as follows :
control are to take a large part of new bonds at a fixed price,
Assets.
provided
American parties take the rest.
Liabilities,
Road and equip.io ne’1.$64,963,300 Common stock
$28,000,000
Pennsylvania Railroad.—The entire new issue of $5,000,•Car t’st equip receiv’d
4,249,504 Preferred stock
22,000,000 000
of 4x/2 per cent bonds of the Pennsylvania Railroad has
Tins.cart'st (to pay for
First mortgage bonds. 15,000,000
fnrther equipment)..
1,750,495 Car trust certificates..
4,000,o00 been placed by Drexel, Morgan & Co., of this city, and J. S.
Floating assets
1,128,382 Floating liabilit’s (to be
Morgan & Co., of London.
extinguished by the
Richmond & Alleghany.—The second mortgage bond¬
bonds now offered)
3,092,182
holders of the Richmond & Alleghany Railroad Company have
Total
$72,192,182 I
Total
$72,092,182 appointed a permanent committee,
consisting of H. C. Parsons,
New York City.—The Board of Aldermen received from the James Miller, J. W.
Johnston, J. A. Coke, T. C. Potts, J. T.
■Commissioners of

Sanied by

assignment of their claims

dividend

the

4‘

..

Taxes and Assessments this week the tax and
and personal estate of this city.

assessment rolls of the real

Accompanying these documents




was a

Hubbard and

R.

M. Manley, and directed it to open corres¬

pondence with non-resident bondholders to secure their
table giving the valua¬ operation in the pending proceedings against the railroad.

co¬

THE CHRONICLE.

24*
St. Panl & Northern

Pacific.—1The St. Paul & Northern

Co. was incorporated in 1874 (as the Western
Railroad Company of Minnesota', and has been in operation
aince 1877 from Brainerd, on the line of the Northern Pacific
Railroad Company, 60% miles, to Sauk Rapids, paying divi¬
dends equal to over 6 per cent per annum during the past five

&
3? he (fonmevcial jinxes.

Pacific Railway

-

COMMERCIAL

EPITOME.

Friday Night, July 6,1883.
adjournment of the commercial exchanges two or three
days for the National holiday interrupted business very much
Sears.
auk Rapids to the city of Minneapolis, including a bridge
during the past week. The intensely hot weather has also con¬
across the Mississippi river at Anoka, and a double track from
tributed to the dullness in trade. "Crop accounts are of the
St. Paul to the extensive property of the company about mid¬ most favorable character, and
general confidence is felt that
way between St. Paul and Minneapolis. The terminal improve¬ autumn trade will open earlyand prove large and remunera^
ments will comprise such facilities as are necessary to accommo- tive.
date the business perlaining to the 3,000 miles of the trans¬
The following is a statement of the stocks of leading articles
continental system of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. of domestic and
foreign merchandise at dates given :
The terminal property comprises twenty acres at Minneapolis
1833.
1882.
1883.
and 380 acres at St. Paul. The land grant of the company,
June 1.
July 1.
July 1,
amounting to about 244,000 acres, is located along the line of

This railroad is now beiDg extended about 1)2 miles from

.

fVoL. XXXTH.

road between Brainerd & Sauk Rapids
The St. Paul & Northern Pacific Railway
its teiminal property, is leased for 999 years

Company, with
to the Northern

Pacific Railroad Company, and constitutes the only indepen¬
dent entrance of that system of railroads into the cities of

■Minneapolis and St. Paul. The contract and lease provide
that the Northern Pacific Railroad Company shall equip,
operate and maintain the road and its terminal property, pay¬
ing taxes and a net rental quarterly equal to 40 per cent of
the gross earnings and receipts, which it guarantees shall never
be less than the interest upon the entire issue of bonds.
There are now offered by Drexel, Morgan & Co. and Winslow,
Ijanier & Co., at 102, an issue of $5,000,003, six per cent 40-year

gold mortgage bonds. These bonds are part of an

authorized

and with the exception of $673,000 bonds,
(provision for which has been made by the reservation of an
rqnal amount of bonds by the trustee), constitute a first mort¬
gage lien upon this terminal railroad, its land grant and its
improved real estate. The remainder of the authorized issue is
reserved for the future uses of the company, in conformity with
issue

of $10,000,000,

hiifc terms of the mortgage.
Texas & Si. Louis Railway Company in Missouri and
Arkansas.—This company’s statement to the Stock Exchange,

filay 31, furnished the following information:
The Texas & St. Louis RsvIwmV Company in Missouri amt Arkansas

v

by the eimsolnlntmn ( i'
Texas & St. L >uis Railway (tom
of Arkansas and the Lit Mo River Valley
Arkansas Railroad
Company, from End's Point, Missouri, opposite Cairo, Illinois, to-Tcx■rtifcaun, Texas, where it comic ts with flm Texas & St. Louis Railway in
Texas, from Texarkana to Louie Hass and Laredo, by way of Gatesviile,
iriik a branch road from Mt. Pleasant to Dallas.
The lexasASt. Lanin Railway Company, in AfisPotoi and Arkansas,
km authority to purchase the stock of connecting linos, and has ar¬
ranged to purchase the majority of the stock-of the Texas & 8t. Louis
Jt’jutway Company in Texas from the holders thereof, aiut proposes to
ac-cure the exchange of the balance of the stock of the Texas & St. Louis
Vtadvray Company in Texas for the stuck of the Texas &. St. Louis Rail¬
way Company in Missouri and Arkansas, that there shall ultimately be
tailouo cbtss of certificates of stuck outstanding, to be known as the
of the Texas & St. Louis Railway Company in Missouri and
nan y

Artansas.
llie two companies

leave

now

about completed their main stem of rail-

read from Bird’s I'oinr, Missouri, opposite Cairo, Illinois, in a yen oral
•euthwcsterly direction to Catesville, Texas, a distance of 722-6 miles
*i main line, with blanches as follows: Raw Raw Junction to New
Madrid, 5-9 miles; McNeil to Magnolia, (ih3 miles; and side tracks, 36

Fora;

bids.

23,373

20,735

Beef
Lard

tcs. and bbls.
tcs.

923

22,920

lilide.
bales.

44,092

1,118
23.902
17,596
47,033
58,065

Tobacco, domestic
Tobacco, foreign
Coffee, Rio

bags.
bags.
mats.

Coffee, other
Coffee, Java, &c
Sugar

Sugar
Sugar
Molasses, foreign

Molasses, domestic

bales.
bbls

197,500
17,425
1,563
1,454
31.600

No.

Rosin

Rico, E. r
Rice, domestic
Linseed

bbls.

bbls.
bags.
bbls. and tcs.

Saltpetre
Jute...,
Jute butts
Manila hemp
Sisal hemp

bags.

bags.
—balesbales.
bales.

bales.

34,400
20,900

122,20 L
92,049
5,007
597.000

Cotton

Tar

110,475
74,000

lilids.
boxes.
bags, &e.
lihds.
bbls.

Hides

Spirits turpcutino

17,926

60,810
111

515,000
11,783

17,410
3,000

31,045
493

21,053
32,233

41,797
72,515
69,000

122,225
66,186
5,343
438,655
9 717
2.500

3,000

112,900

145,200
214,906
26,074
1,313
1,406

243,400

33,800

185,116

22,433
091
880

1,340

1,725

32.000
13,550
2,500
88,000
41.705
29,701

35,000
10,400

17,600
1,672
121.500
10.500

2,500
80,000

2,200
40,700

40,600

43.829

33,580

7,398

market, lias continued variable, with the tendency
prices downward. Affairs are unsettled, and the advices
from Chicago add to the confusion.
The. speculative interest
has fallen off, and the support from exporters is slight.
Pork
has declined and shows much irregularity. To-day the feeling
iu lard was slightly bette**, although the speculation was not
large; a good feature-is the improved export interest; Western
contract sold to-day at 9'45@3 02%c.; August contracts realized
9 58(39'67c ; September, 9 70c.; October, 9 70c.*, December,
9*35e.; seller year, 9 25<S9'35c.; closing v»i-ak: July, 9 40c.;
August, 9 oSc.; September, 9 Ole.; October, 9 02c.; December,
9 30c.; seller year, 9*25c.
pork was easy at $ 1.7 50 for mess; a
few small lots sold at $18/ Bacon quiet at 9c. for long clear.
Beef quiet at $19@$20 for city extra India mess. Tallowwas
quiet and unchanged, with sales at 7%@7 15-16c. for prime.
Stearirie was almost nominal at 11 %c. for prims. Butter has
declined under large arrivals and very-small sales. Cheese is
Tiio lard

of

export at I0(cbl0}/i<i. for the best 85ta.te factory.
Rio coffee has been only fairly active on the basis of 9%c. for
fair cargoes; options have been moderately active at

in demand for

prices

marked change; No. 7 sold to-day at 7‘45e. for July,
The Land Grant and Income bonds of the company in Texas cover the
7T»5@6'60c.
for September, 7‘65(g7*75c. for October, 7'85c. for
arcds to which the eompan\ in Texas is entitled, by virtue of the road
fcsastructed in that State, at the rate of 10,210 acres per mile. The November, 7'90@7'95c. for December, S’05e. for January and
Land Grant in Texas is about as follows:
8 15c. for February; August was quoted at 7 50.(@7’60c.
Mild
Xtampletcd track
315 6 miles. has been fairly active and steady. Tea was steady until to-day,
Company entitled to
3,231,SCO acres. when easier
prices were accepted at auction. Rice has been
Talents to issue«.n located certificates
“
93^,880
8'atvuts now held for
N me.
steady but only moderately active. Spices have been firm but
Equal tv acres. quiet. Foreign fruits
have been- quiet as a rule, and raisins
201,800
#VTtiiieates issued and received, but land not located
tfifes; aggregate 771 miles.

-

The

showing

Certificates issued, hut not received
Additional certificates due on Governor's certificate of com¬

pleted road
Certificates claimed

as

due

on

Gatesviile Extension and

shortage on milmgo to Waco
tissod disposed of by old Tyler Tap Railway Company
Total to which company would have been cntiTcd under
law if all had been received and were now held

the

438,100

513,3G0
000,480
445,1 iO
3,231.3(10

$3,915,000 General First Mortgage Eouda, $3,015,0 )0 General First
Kortgage Land Grant and Income Honda, and $3,0To,000 stock of the
Texas & 8t. Louis Railway Company in Texas were i.-sued. but.au
•quui amount to the outstanding old First Mortgage Ronds and First,
Mortgage Land G-rant &. Income Bonds have been issued under t he new
&«»eru,l First Mortgage and General First Mortgage Land Grant and
Income Mortgage .of the Company in Texas, and deposited with the
Central Trust Company.of New York to cover the two million ono hun¬
dred and twenty-eight thousand dollars bonds of each class heretofore
fcsvaed and now on the free list. In June, 1S82. a I raffle arrangement
was concluded with the Illinois Central and St. Louis Aiton <fc Terre
Haute Railroad Companies for a polio i of ftty years, by'which the
eaiHre system of the Texas A St. Louis Railway in Missouri and Arkansas
in Texas will ho operated in harmony with the said Illinois Central
'lerre Haute railroad companies, thus making
practical termini, both in St. Louis ami Chicago.

xod 8t. Louis Alton A
ido

1911; $3,945,000 general 1st moil. (5 p. c. goid bonds of the Texas
A St. Louis Ea lway Company iu Texas, due 1920, $2,123,090 being re*v<?v4'd to redeem the outstanding 1st mortgage bonds; $3,915,000 gen•s-al 1st luovtuago land grant and incomo 6 p. ct. gold bonds, same cunisany. due 1939, $1,972,000 being reserved to redeem the outstanding
land grant and income bonds.
These amounts of bonds cover and include tho onti»’0 amount of
Tends issued by tlie Texas Company heretofore, as horoin before stated,
ifcere are also ear trust ccriifmates amountRig to $797,750, payal-L-

Durtug the next 00 months; $2“,G20 Inis already been paid iu matuiiug

antes.

Tho fttock is $9,532,500 of the Texas & St. Louis R illway Company in
3hssonri and Arkansas, including tho amount necessary to cover the
stock of tlieCompany in Texas into the treasury of tho Company in Misand Arkansas. $3,945,000 of Ibis amount v.U bo deposited with
Central Trust Company of New York for tho purpose of exchange.
T!ic earnings for the year 1832 on 275 miles of road iu Texas were
jpSM/717. The operating expenses were not reported.




no

rather weak. Oranges have been scarce, and lemons have sold
briskly at higher prices. Molasses has been quiet but steady.

at 7%@7%c.
nomi¬
firmer;
powdered, 9%@9%c.; granulated, S 13-I6c.;
centrifugal

Raw sugar has been quiet and
easier
for 96-degrees test; Muscovado hasten to a great extent
nal at 6Me. for fair refining. Refined sugar closes

crushed, 9!4@9%c.;

standard “A,” 3)4@8%c,

Kentucky tobacco has remained

<*

.

firm at r>%@6%c. for lugs

0At@lic. fori eaf. Sales 200 hhds. for consumption and
dn seed leaf has been
well sustained.
cases, including
Pennsylvania, private terms; 300
eases
1881-80 crops, do., 8014c.; 200 cases 18S2 crop, New
England, ll@13c ; 200 ca*es 1881 crop, do., 10@l8c.; 400 cases

and

65 hhds. for export.
The business
of smaller proportions, but all prices are
The sales
for the week
embrace 1,800
cases
1882 crop,
500

1882 crop, Wiseonsiu. 9(^12c.; 200
also 400 bales Havana, 8C@$1 20, and
Rosins have been very quiet, and

cases

sundries, 4@18c.;

200.Sumatra, $1 10@1 50,
prices at the close were
almost nominal at $1 GQ®$1-65 for common to good strained.
Spirits turpentine has been weak and lower until to-daj”, when
prices improved to 36%(<?37c. in yard. Refined petroleum has
declined under the continued dulness; 110-degrees tc3t is now
quoted at 7%e. here and 70-degrees test 7%e. The stocks
abroad are very large. Crude certificates have been on the
decline; several new wells have brought out a pronounced
“short” interest, and the feeling of late has been very unsettled.
To-day the speculation on the two exchanges aggregated
9,155,000 bbls.; opening, $1 13; highest, $114%; lowest, $1 10%;
closing, $1 14%. iDgot copper steady, with 100,000 lbs. Lake
sold at 15/4@15%o.
Linseed oil sells in a fair way at 55(tt56c.;

and old whale at 46c.;

crude sperm sold at New Bedford at $1
crude menhaden here realized 35@33c.; lard oil
Americau pig iron is more active, and the
very
on

much improvedi

the berth.

quoted 80@o5c,

general market is

Ocean freight room was

higher to-day

JOT.Y 7,
■".i

THE CHRONICLE.

1883]

1

f ■

1

—1 ■■

-

1

■—

11 -

r*~—

"

'■

COTTON
Friday, P. M., July 6, 1883.

bales, against 11,497 bales last week, 12,395 bales the previous
week and 21,573 bales three weeks since ; making the total
receipts since the 1st of September, 1882, 5,904,962 bales, against
4,630,073 bales for the same period of 1S81-82, showing an
increase since September 1,1882, of 1,274,876 bales.
Mon.

Sat.

Galveston

711

Indianola, Ac.
New Orleans...

217

980

319

....

....

....

Brunsw’k, Ac.

G

«...

....

....

Pt.

Royal, &c.
Wilmington

.

110

158

19

Charleston

.

.

1,230

4,280;

7

92-

18

643

....

....

25

13f

....

151

.

2,938
18

18

....

59

Tote l

35

2

....

77

Fri.

71

12

....

328

7

Savannah

440

1,155

47

13

■

Thar 8.

....

18

Florida

Wed.

G70

1,175

183

Mobile

Tues.

17

•

"

■'

In addition to above exports, our telegrams to-night also give
the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not cleared, at
the ports named. We add similar figures for New York, which
ns

The Movement op the Crop, as indicated bv our telegrams
from the South to-night, is given below. For the week ending
this evening (July 6) the total receipts have reached 11,914

Receipts at—

25
--—

---

•

•

•

prepared for

are

special

our

by Messrs. Carey, Yale &

use

Lambert. 89 Broad Street.
On
July

6, at—

Great
Britain.

New Orleans....
M >bil© .’.1.
Giant ston
S wane ah
Galveston

.....

Norfolk
Naw York..
CRher ports

....

Total 1883
Total 1882
Total 1881

Shipboard, not cleared—for
France.

|'Fore
Other
£<7 w

Coast¬

696
None.
2)0
100
703

10.558

1,213

-87

None.
None.
None.

2,124
1,850
3,400
2,500

None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.

None.
None
None.
None.
None.

20,432
4,550
31,391

Leaving
Stock.

Total.

wise.

12,551
None.
25D
luO

87.333
7,000
3,200
3,400

2,050

2,827
3.900

18.412

400"

None.
None.

2.900

192,274
28.522

1,213

8S7

3,799.

20,331

349.552

7.989

6,137
.4,016

2.206

20 882

234.441

2,417

41,770

290,31^3

400

3,310

8,685

3.800

350.

27

The Cotton

7

7

Exchange

closed

Tuesday, Wednesday
On Saturday
Moreh’dC.,Aclast there was a slight decline in futures, and on Honda
78
29 D
389
40
112
57
975
Norfolk
271
prices gave way 4@G points, under very favorable weather for
271
West Point, Ac
70
82
New York
152' the growing crop
and dull foreign advices, causing some
1 82
SO
3)
13 i
134
Boston
5 OS'
selling to close accounts preparatory to the adjournment over
490
Baltimore
490.
the holidays.
To-day the market opened under a feeling of
32G
180
5 SJ
1,039
Philadelp’a, Ac.
great depression. The weather at the South had in the inter¬
3.185
2.287
GOO
1.719
2.949 11.914
Totals this week
1,168
val been hot and forcing, and foreign advices had not
For comparison, we give the following table showing the week’s improved, so there was a further decline of 14@21
points.
total receipts, the total since Sept.l. 1882, and the stocks to-night Cotton
on the spot was moderately active for home consump¬
and the same items for the corresponding periods of last yeais.
tion, but the export business was quite limited. To-day quo¬
1881-82.
1882-83
Slock.
tations were reduced 1-lGc., middling uplands closing nominal
Receipts to
....

....

G

....

....

....

3

....

»

....

.

•

3

.

....

....

....

•

•

-

-

.....

,

.

.

,

4

was

on

16; and Thursday—half of the week uuder review.

.....

....

'

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

....

.

.

.

.

....

This

Jtiltf 0.
Galveston

Sep.
1, 1882.

4,280 1,653,767
02
310,030

922

1,181,935

99,837

45,612

419

202,072

7,060

1,903

3,500

3,853

Florida

Bavannah

13

18.423

G43

808,921

356

5,508
563,419
21,000

Bruusw’k, Ac
Pt. Royal, Ac.

7

Wilmington....

1,399

Norfolk
West Point. A(
New York

Boston

21,514

68

134.347

10

26,571

1,919

611,134
192,433

623

152

137,073

.

......

122

....

993

1,039

103,680

690

22,241

6,480
17,948

12,020

91,572

5,767

5,442

6,580

9,580 4,630.073 375.883

255.323

made with other years,
give below the totals at leading ports tor six seasons.
Receipts art—

1S83

Galvest’u.&c.

.

New Orleans.

1881.

1880.'■

1879.

2 514

1,13)

720

549

4,280

922

4,369

2.305

65 C

1,175

92

419

501

740

119

313

613

1,309

1.219

54 1

350

903

303

740

1,073

707

CG

194

16

81

170

60

39

439.

2,572

3.425

2.214

48G

679

A.11 others....

1,246
2,318

3,225

5,392

0,300

k)0

Tot. this w’k.

11,911

9.58G

19,103

14,070

i

3,032

Exports
from—

Great
Rrit'n. France

Galveston

Conti¬

Total

nent.

Week.

Great
Britain. Franc (

New Orleans..

712

80

1,216

2,058

Mobile

......

7%

Middling...

39,:'2832,Of 2 286,021
34,840
9,35)

Midd’g Fair 11-16
Fair
12*1*

r—4

H-L

j

lA

Fair

Florida
....

,

Charleston *...

......

,,

Wilmington..
Norfolk*
New York

470

6,U03
1,409

...

Boston
Hultimore

,

.

......

,

....

......

.

......

......

1,031
......

......

53.172
370.879

7,097

502,703

1.4 '9

179 169

272

170 512

27.

3.711

110,312
131.OSO

•450

......

......

PhUadelp?a;&c

.

3,711

25/V8
24,775
......

4,823

07,42:

127,6

Wed

Ft).

Frl.

8

tA

iA

cc

cc

r3

lOlio
10*4
105a
10''a

K

11 Ja

t

12*8

•

•

0

0

te

11 l8

•

115*8

•

•
■

in on Tnes Wed

6i3,e

013,6
75a

Til.

Frl.

6^

85ir,
97io

Holi-

Holi-

Holi-

73,3

day.

day.

day.

SH
93a

*■

day during the

are

Sat.. Qtiet
Mon
Dull and nominal
Piles

Wed

217,0 i 5
4,590

372870

Th

100,813

107ft

glance how the market closed on same days.

10-

238.016

103l6
10 Lj

indicated in the following statement. For tho con¬
venience of the reader we also add a column which shows at a

418 993

8,380

91*3
lo

im
1158
123a

•

The total sales and future deliveries each
week

100

03 2 4

33
r—d

107a

75a
8 516

8

MARKET AND SALES.

283.0:8

57,762
359,8'5
154.609
688.0: a
41: i 179.012

a

H

123q

9710

A,

!S

10*2

1

Frl.

813,*

tA
rt

105,6

0

0

w

I27i.q

j

•

«

9*3

a

Sat.

1

Wedj Til.

10

•27

'o

0i

11H16

16

8*3,6

4

.......

103s

>A
rs

109]6 109,6

79ig

.$ lb.

1030

111

:

•

10*®ift 10is16
Hh6 113»€

734

.......

81,6
8^8
99.6
101.6

12*16

g

517.519

28,985

29,0*6

0

7^8

81,6
87a
99lfl
101,6

12*16

H

i

r—i

75q

SALES OP SPOT AND TRANSIT.

45,29 /

200,000

non. Taos

Sat.

1111,6

Jlpie

32

Midd’g Fair

CC

101,6
103fl
10»ifl

7r>,«
DM
9%

o

o

Good Mid..
Btr. G’d Mid

81,6
878
9^16

89l6

<t

CC

.

Savannah

Frl.

Til.

SPOT MARKET

437.204 I 555 887.

are

TEXAS.

75-a

113j6
>

12316

Total.

1,100

rtton Tues

ioie16 101olfi

•

*

Middling...

100a
109,6

o

.

Strict Ord..
Good Ord..
Str. G’d Ord
Low Midd’g
Btr. L’wMid

lOijo

a

liZie

Wed

nenc.

160,593

9° 16
C3

rz

lO^ie

.......

•

7*8
8lio
S 78

Good Mid.. 104 1
1011 jo
Btr. G’d Mid 101516 IOI&k

CLOSED.

317.59S

.

Conti-1

73a

Strict Ord..
7)3ir,
Good Ord..
8^8
SSg
Btr. G’d Ord
95 !0
9*»1 (5
Low Midd’g
91316 913l6
Btr.L’w Mid 10 Is
1010

Good Ordinary....
Strict Good Ordinary
Low Middling

Sept. 1.1882, tc July 0, 1863.
Exported to —,

Sat.

1

5,257

The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total
of 15,987 bales,of which 13,338 were to Great Britain, 1,266 to
France and 1,333 to the rest of the Continent, while the stock*
as made
up this evening are now 37.5,833 bales.
Below are the'
exports for the week and since September 1. 1882.

NEW ORLEANS.

HI on Tue«

STAINED.

Galveston includes India: 101a; Charleston includes Port Royal, Ac.;
Wilmington includes Morelioad City, Ac.; Norfolk includes Cily Point. Ac.

From

Sat.

1,035

Since Sent. 1. 5901.902 4630,073 5703.840 4850.204 4427.572 1218.551

Exported to—

hf 0.

Qrdin’y.$lb

1878.

315

Week Ending July 0

a

we

2,956

Mobile

Bavannab....
CharPst’n, Ac
Wilm’gt’n, Ac
Norfolk, Ac..

may be

1882.

J

Ordln’/.^Mb

.....

169,807

496

UPLANDS.

Jane 30 to

770

1,227

158,892 190 074
227.184

In order that comparison

•

4.893

1,531

11.914 5,904,962

•

the week

sales foot up this week
736 bales, including 175 for export, 379 for consumption.
182 for speculation and
in transit. Of the above, 182 bales
were to arrive.
The following are the official quotations for
each day of the past week.

2,097'

3,510

22,312

189.090
66.920

....

Total

495,248

122

227,257

.

508

Philadelp’a,Ac.

618

271

•

•

7.026

975

•

.

2,324

••••••

726.857

103.4c.

The total sales for forward delivery for
bales. For immediate delivery the total

27,207

127,207
19,457
790,029

10
•

11,512

13,727

-

Charleston

Baltimore

at

1882.

426.560

18

M’liead C., Ac

1883

1,1881.

315

Indianola,Ac.
Mobile

Since Sep.

Week.-

828,398
10.918

2,938

New Orleans...

This

Since

Week.

Ex-

j
port.\
ioo;

....j
....

Coil- | Spec-', Transump. ] ui’t'n\ sit.
tg! 1S2h
611 ....j

.

....

*ta

dec..

7o

242

175|

379:

*

Total

1

\ Iloli diva.
|

I

Easy at

358
Gl

....

nra

Fri.

Total.

•*"!

382!

FUTURB8.

Sales.

Deliv¬
eries.

40,090

200
200

3L7 132,800

20 )

730 200,000

600

27,200

....

j
***•
....

The daily deliveries given above are actually
vious to that on whirl* t.inw are FeDoried

s

delivered the day pre¬

,

Total

13.333

1,266

15,987 2,799,750 419 051 1,356,534 4,575 935

1 ,.*> >3

•

—

—

-

—

—

—_

...

—

-

,

Total 18H1-S2
*

.

21.031

7.2n«

15.4

;o|

-'•0 4 ’ 5

induces exports irom Port Koyal, &c.

t Includes exports from West Point, &c.




O O iO

om

807.210

“Si MS’ a

9«sn

—

•

The 8ale3 and Prices of Futures

are

shown by the follow¬

comprehensive table. In this statement will be found the
daily market, the prices ofr sales for each month each day, and
the closing bids, in addition to the daily and total sales.
ing

26

THE CHRONICLE

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59.100

4,820

4,600

17,000

7,200

7,800

379,000

218,700

385,510

223,390

375.883

492,000
8<>,000
140,000
255,323

65.201

36,161

7,000

640.000
21 1,000

501,000
138,000
22 4,000

338,083

237.220

64.212

71.950

5,000

0,000

260.000

'

5,000

258.000
56.900

350.000
63.800

137,000
268,000
42,000

13L700
•'360.U00
23,000

198.000

254,000
55,1 OO
85,390
237,000
19,000

4 4.400

123,510
292.000
37.000

Jt^“The imports into Continental ports this wreek have been

The above figures indicate an increase in the cotton in sight
to-night of 370,000 bales as compared with the same date of 1882,
an
increase of 107,779 bales as compared with the corres¬
ponding date of 1881 and an increase of 494,321 bales as com¬
pared with 1880.
At the Interior Towns the movement—that is the
receipts
for the week and since Sept. 1, the shipments for the week, and
the stocks to-night, and the same items for thj.

corresponding

period of 1881-82—is set out in detail in the following statement:
O

^5

a

b

a

r-t

0

r-t

1'

X

O

©

:
j

1

C

M

a

»—*

g/£z

£

0

—

5’£

O

£
5“ -i

Ci

b

^

m*

3

1

a

5*?

<r»-

£ ®:

O
•

-r

sj

©

3

*—

bo©
§b**-5 3

r-t

^
.-1

.

O

ft-

©

K-1

2,322.934 1.943,98 k 2,215,205 1,823.000
6 VI.
5»i«a.
0r>ic.i.
0i3i6d
'

....

38,009 bai^s.

©

^

Total visible eupply
Mid. Upl., Liverpool

—

O

OX.

80.100

3,500
54,900

701,900
935,500
696,910
650,490
1,561,084 1,008, IS 4 1,518,295 1,178,170

ce

X X

©0©
k-M

«T

11

•

1

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;

CO

©

M

1

•

a«

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6 1 ©0
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1

01

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6 '

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2

9

x

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5

6

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**

M

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^

03

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CO

Pr

0Q

M

10

205.600

1,300
27,000

1.561.084 1,008,184 1,518,293 1,178.170

Total East India, <fec
Total American

2

o

7

—J Cl

1

CO

5,080
3,330

5,300

122,000

Indian,Brazil, efic.—

tiast

CQ

b

c©

|

<
©

:

©

co

600
127.000

11,700

749,000

Liverpool stock

b

2

-J

©

2,900

30,100
17,100
3,150
1,320

19,000
12,OoO

242,000

London stock
Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe

b

■

<

141.000
9.900
96.000

American afloat for Europe....
United States stock.
United States interior stocks..
United States exports to-day..

T

^

i ©

Vj

ex- 00

Havre

2,400
8,100

0*-

9

01 at

Antwerp

at

26,500

n>

M

obx

i
0-

1

^x

coco

h

Oi

99

7,80

x a>

CO

sc

M

^

0
ci

E

0
■

ccco

2

Of

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0

cox

CO CO C CO

■

%

^1-1
00

•

XX

OCX
<•01

00
co

%

«

er-

O’

<1

1 ©9:

14,600
1,200

5,600
57.200
39,700

M

K(

99

t

B
b
b

<
©

•

ZU

at

Total American

>

99

36,000

Continental stocks

^

1 ©

(X

©09

I

c

810,100

at Bremen
at Amotordam
at liottordam

Liverpool stock

ST
O

co CO
-tot

1 ©to:

882,400

American—

*

•

©

905.800
3.O00

follows?

10 M

c c

cc 0

1,063.900
3,900
50.700

Total visible supply
2.322.934 1.943.9S 4 2,215,205 1.828,660
Of the above,the totals of American and other descriptions are as

<-}

I-*

•

2
^

8*

©

10 to
to M

1 to:

M ©

55,100

..

—

00

l—'cc

44,400

..

© 9:
^ bo1
OO^:

©90©

63,800

Total European stocks..
1,442.900 1,124,500 1,207,910 1,033.490
India cotton afloat for Europe. 268,000
360,000
292.000
237,000
Amor’n cotton afloat for Eur’pe
122,000
211.000
140,000
224.000
42.000
Egypt,Brazil,&c.,aflt for E’r’pe
23.000
37.000
19.000
Stock in United States ports
255.323
338.083
375,883
237,220
Stock In U. 8. interior towns..
36.: 61
65,201
64.212
71.950
United States exports to-day..
7,000
5,0u0
5,000
6,000

I

1

M

—

56,900

755,000

Total centinental stocks...

its

%

1880.

838,000

Stock at Trieste

Of

CO
®
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O

o

if^ob

ciliOw

m

CO

Ot

«-

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I ca~\
M—--C M
o o o o

c©9

1

“:-

I ©W
—

1881.

842,000

at Marseilles
8rnok at. Barcelona
Stock at Genoa

1-0

■©.

«r:

—

CM
e m

r»
l ti' ci;

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o

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w w

mm*, m

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2g.~

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d-P

Stock
Sxxjk
8took
8toch
8'ouuh
S:ock

t>.

?
®

99

1382.

bales.1,007,000

Total Great Britain etock

=r
®

S.a

*

Ot yi

®

Stock at London
a

to

m*~*

£
®

>-* 1—

1883.

S-^U
9c

©§71

Thursday evening.

Stock at Liverpool..

S1?

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wot

M

■

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^
I «*v

.

.

§-5*tC
5-a> "i

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CO

n

to

figures are brought down
But to make the totals the complete
figures for to-night (July 6), we add the item of exports from
the United States, including in it the
exports of Friday only.
to

o

M

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p ®
v;

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S © tO ®

—

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c-t
ti

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w

The Visible 3upply oe Cotton to-night, as made
up by cable
and telegraph, is as follows. The Continental
stocks, as well as
those for Great Britain and the afloat, are this week’s
returns,
and consequently all the European

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rvoi, XXXVII

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© M © © H- M O' *• - 1 © M -1 © X
m

© x 10 -1 f~ -1 © m to a x -1 to © © tf* -1 ©
C4 C m M to © © © © M M M — X © C O' © -©
>—1 -i m c « 0: x c © m © t- © m © © at

a

^ >3

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to
.

H>0*^
c~o

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©

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;

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to
CO

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to

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cc

©

Cft

a»

c£o

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l ©:

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to
0

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| & ' co:
1

©
►-*

K*

^oc

X

1: to

at

to

© © >a

c ©

M

m © a» c

to

“CO

to

a»

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© © x at -i to to

^

©

m a«

->c

Cb

•s-

^

ft

r* %
•

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5*

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f

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v,

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*

Includes Sitlea in September. 1882, for September. 500,200;
Scptember-Gctober lor October, 845.000 ; September-November for Noven ber,

731,000; September-December for December, 1,007,400; September,
January for January, 2,070,200; Septeumer-Febi nary for February,
1,300,200; Sept^mber-Marcli for March, 1,960,400; Septembor-April

for May, 2,726,800; September-

C5

•

©

X
X

c.;

Short Notices for
1027c

Monday, 10'30e.: Tuesday,
c ;

Friday, 10-lOc.

M

July—Saturday, 10*23®10-29e.; Monday. 10:28-®

following exchanges have been made during the week.

pd. to exch. 100 July for Aug.
I *65 pd. to exeh.
pd. to exch. 100 s.n. 6th for log. | -32 pd. to exch.
pd. to exch. 200 s.n. 7lh for leg. 1 *10 pd. to exch.
•64 pd. to exch. 200 Nov. for Sept. J -43 pd. to excli.

•10
•10
•01




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w
© 10 to © to © M

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©

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X
at

10u Nov. for Sept.
500 Nov. for Sept.
300 July for
500 Nov lor Amr.

Aug.*

X

•

m m

at

cat

MOtMw-i

m

.

cc

ft??
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m©

w © w © to © at
© to © © © © M
x w at © if* m ©

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-} 01 0" © © c to«—

O' O' M x x to x -i a* — a; © x o' ©.-"©—• at
© X © >— © © © at © © t — 1— to x 0: — © m
cc -1 cc © © to X at M at © M © a. x © -1 © ©

o’

X3
x

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X

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00

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ym

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M© tO
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m
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h-

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to -I

M—1

©

X © to •a» ©
to ©
to
m -1 © © © to ©
© to O' to © to © X C © |0> 18 - 1 © to © © X m
Cm CC O CM©©©© © to M M 0: at i i to x ©

-1

mm MM

M 0*

x -) m :: © © ©
/ X © -J C M

jv

lO

W -Jt X
© -1 © at © -1 -i
© a © x — © ©

f—*

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too;

ft

0-..

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M

l^gT’ AVe ha^e included in the above table, and shall continue each
week to give, the average price of futures each
day for each month.
It
will be found under each day following the abbreviation “ Aver.*'
The
average for each month for the week is also given at bottom of table.

The

W-.ltOMtOWO’

xE©a.EM©b

©

X © O' © M ©

©

■

Orders—Saturday, 10*35c.;
Weduesday,
c.; Thursday,

CO

cc
X
©

•

©

a>

Transferable

M©

■

Cw

for April, 1,713,300; Scptember-May
June for June, 2,032,700.

M©

X M 10 c©
at
tote
M OC O' M -1 © © X © 0; M O' K- © - 11~ © to ©
X 0© ©M©M O' 10 tO © »— © © © CO © -) ©

© O' X O't © M

Ir-

>—*

to.
©

©

b

Cc
>

•© O

182.

-1

•

This year’s tigures estimated.
The above totals show that the old interior stocks have de¬
creased during the week 4,845 bales, and are to-night 29,040

bales

more

than at the

same

period last

year.

The receipts

at

CHRONICLE.

THE

7, 1863.]

July

27

the same towns have been 2,642 bales less than the same week
last year, and since September 1 the receipts at all the towns
are 744,373 bales more than for the same time in 1881-2.

the month of June the rainfall reached four inches and

Quotations for Middling* Cotton at Other Markets.—-In
the table below we give the closing quotations of middling
cotton at Southern and other principal cotton markets for each
day of the past week.

four days of the week and the indications are that
they
extended over a wide surface.
The rainfall reached one inch
and forty-one hundredths.
Crops of all sorts are very fine.
The thermometer has averaged 81,
ranging from 09 to 93.
Rainfall for month of June two inches and ninety-nine hun¬
dredths.

CLOSING

Week

ending
July 6.

Satin'.

913i(j
9%

9%

Charleston...

10

9%

Wilmington..
Norfolk
Boston
Baltimore

JIon.

915io

Galveston....
New Orleans.
Mobile
Savannah....

..

9%

978

10%

....

St. Louis

9*2
9%
9%
10

10
9%

Louisville

9%
9%
10

10%
Pkj
9%
9%

Cincinnati...

9i»w

10%

i <?

10 Lj

Tnes.

91513
913i6

9%
9%
10%
io%

9 7a a i °

Philadelphia.
Augusta
Memphis

QUOTATIONS FOR MIDDLING COTTON
Wedncs.

j

j

:

|

:

1
!

91%6
9%
9%

91 Ji6

9%

9%

i

9%

9%

i

io%
10%

!

3

10%

f—l
•

9%
9*8
9%

•
'

:
:
J

t

!

10%
lo%

9%
9%
9%

1

9%
9%
9%

!

9%
9%

Plantations.—The

following table is
of indicating the actual movement each
week from the plantations. Receipts at the outports are some¬
times misleading, as they are made up more largely one year
than another at the expense of the interior stocks. We reach
Receipts

from

prepared for the

therefore,

a

the

purpose

safer conclusion through

a

comparative statement

like the following. In reply to frequent inquiries we will ado
that these figures, of course^ do not include overland receipts or
Southern consumption; they are simply a statement of tht-

weekiy movement from the plantations of that part of the
finally reaches the market through the out-ports.

crop

which

RECEIPT8 FROM PLANTATIONS.
Week

Receipts at the Ports.

endino—

|

1882.

1881.

18

St'k at Interior Towns.
1881.

1882.

Rec'pts from Plant ’nt

1883

i

1881.

1882.

13-3.

Apr. 20
44
27

(50.7! 8

2 '.800

(56 527 241 .198

189,281 213 029

40.317

8.331

40 095

47,729

33.(506

32 351

11,161

4

59 211 225 820 157 8 1(5 189,8 6
48 7(51 215 253 113.327 164,38 (

£4.968, 19,911

30.021
23.338

28,553. 10,184

34.134

May

j

11

45,555
49,150

31 1 ?3

44

25,881

50 r> ■ 5 19; ('62 127.633 147,5(4

>44

IS

42,415

20,8(54

43 976 174 8 9 115,435

133,871

22,502

8,669

5.9.905

3 5.85

13,981

3s 539 LIT 173 104,018 125 505

9,515

2.564

30.233

44

4

June

f)

■

i

32.(542

15.95C; 30 426 13(5 470

14

8

29,132

15.621

“

15

28.21-8

13.65-;

2' 5 3

14

“

July

j

25

21

93 5~»5 114.679, 2!,639

5517

19,540

96 917

85.334 105,92(5
72.408 98.763

15.785

5,433
2,07 >

14,410

1 7.7d9

4561 109 380

23.47(5

13.8(591

12 395

91 230

59/53

88.210

20

20.(5(52

9.288

11 497

7^ 617

79.509)

(5

19.1(53

P.5s6

11 91-1

72 39!

50,417
42,813

22:.

...

74.647

2,342

1(5.703

1,011

1,872

8,049.

K5

2.76(5

12,9.57'

2.012

7,052

The above statement shows—1. That the totai receipts from th*-

plantations since September 1, 1882,

were f>,903,124 bales; iD
1831-82 were 4,027,491 bales; in 1880-81 were 5,737,699 bales.
2. That, although the receipts at the out-ports the past week

one

the

fine shower

during

week, the rainfall reaching ninety hundredths of an inch.
Prospects are first class. Average thermometer 82, highest 95

H>3&

10%

pa

Huntsville, Texas.—We have had

9 % a) 7q

10*2
10%

10

978

hundredths.

10

9%

>>

on

Palestine, Texas.—We have had showers on two days of the
week, the rainfall reaching eighteen hundredths of an inch.
More rain would be beneficial but crops are good. The ther¬
mometer has ranged from 70 to 93, averaging 82.
During the
month of June the rainfall reached six inches and
thirty three

Fri.

|

forty-

Brenham, Texas.—We have had delightful showers

ON—

10

10

10

95*

Thin'S.

four hundredths.

and lowest 68.

Rainfall for the month of June six inches and

eight hundredths.
Weatherford, Texas.—It lias been showery on ore day of
the week, the rainfall reaching nineteen-hundredths of an
inch.
More rain is desired, but prospects are good.
The
thermometer has averaged 77, ranging from 60 to 94.
The
rainfall during the month of June reached
ninety-nine hun¬
dredths of

an

inch.

Belton, Texas.—The weather has been warm and dr}r dur¬
ing all of the week, and crops are good. The thermometer
has averaged 81, the highest being 93 and the lowest 68.
Rainfall during the month of June eighty hundredths of an
inch.

Luting, Texas.—It has rained very hard on one day of the
week, but not near enough yet, though very beneficial. The
rainfall reached four inches.
Planters are encouraged some¬
what, but more rain, is needed badly, as the ground is very
dry. In many sections the streams have completely dried up,
and cattle are watered from wells, or else have to be driven
far away, or perish.
The thermometer has ranged from 68 to
95, averaging 82. During the month of June rainfall fifty-six
hundredths of

an

inch.

New Orleans, Louisiana.^lt has rained

on five days of the
week, the rainfall reaching sixty-three hundredths of an inch.

The thermometer lias

averaged 81.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—We have had clear to fair weather
during the week, with high and steady temperature. The
rainfall reached two hundredths of
has ranged from 69 to 10b.

an

inch. '1 he thermometer

Vicksburg, Mississippi.—Telegram not received.
Meridian, Mississippi,—Wo have had too much rain
dining the week. Land is too wet-for cultivation, cotton is
grassy, and the prospects are less favorable.
The corn crop is
0

tiie

best

ever

made

in

this section.

The

thermometer has

! 85, ranging from 70 to 100.
Columbus, Mississippi.—It lias been showery on two days
of the week, the rainfall reaching sixty-three hundredths of
were 11,914
bales, the actual movement from plantations was
an inch.
Average thermometer 82, highest 101 and lowest 61.
only 4,802 bales, the balance being taken from the stocks at
During the month of June the rainfall reached two inches
the interior towns.
Last, year the receipts from the planta¬
and sixty hundredths.
tions for the same week were 2,012 bales and for 1881 the)
Little Rock, Arkansas.—We have had fair to clear weather
were 12.937 bales.
during
the week with rain on live days, the rainfall reaching
Amount of Cotton in Sight July 0 —In the table belou
two inches and -forty-three hundredths; corn and cotton in
we give the receipts from
plantations in another form, and goad condition and much benefit ted by
late rains. The ther¬
add to them the
net overland movement to July 1, and
mometer has averaged 80, ranging from 05 to 98.
For the
also the takings by Southern spinners to the same, date, so as to
week ending June 28 the weather was fair to clear and hot,
give substantially the amount of cotton now in sight.
and the thermometer ranged from 64 to 95,
averaging 78.
During
the
week
the
previous
weather
was fair to clear and
i 1882-33.
1881-82.
1880-81.
1879-80.
very hot, with rain on two days.
The rainfall reached two
Receipts at the ports to July (>.. 0'1)04,302 1,03 j.073 5,703,316 4,356,201 hundredths of an inch and the thermometer averaged 84. For
Interior stocks on July 0 in
the week ended June 14 we had rain on three days and the
excess of September 1
58,162
*2,582,'
33,553
02,038 rainfall reached
seventy hundredths of an inch. Tiie ther¬
mometer ranged from 61 to 93 and averaged 77.
Tot. receipts from plantat’us!5,903.124 4,627,491 5,737,399
4,91 *<,24 2
During the
Net overland to July 1.
j
464.336 509,799 568,250 month of June we had rain on ten days and the rainfall
( 37,698
Southern eonsumpt’n to July 1
318,036
229,00'
195,000
107,Ouo
reached three inches.
The thermometer ranged from 61 to 97
and averaged 77.
Total in sight July <>..
6,913,822 5,320.827 6,442,19.8 5,653,498
Memphis, Tennessee.—It lias rained on one day of the
Decrease from September 1.
week. ~ The thermometer lias averaged 88, the highest
It will be seen by the above that the increase in amount in sight
being 95 and the lowest 69. It rained on fifteen days during
to-night, as compared with last year, is 1,597.095 hales,
average

''

as-compared

with 1880-81 is 170,024 bales and with 1879-80, 1,205,321 bales.

Weather Reports by Telegraph.—The weather still con¬
tinues quite favorable for the crop in the greater
portion of
the South. Rains have visited the dry sections of Texas.
In
some portions of Alabama and
Mississippi there are com¬
plaints of too much rain and weeds.
Galveston, Texas.—We have had tine showers on three days
of the week, the rainfall
reaching one inch and thirty-nine
hundredtns.
The dry region of Western Texas had good
rains this week, but not enough. The thermometer lias
ranged
from 74 to 90, averaging 82. During the month of June the
rainfall reached one inch and seventy-nine hundredths.
Indianola, Texas.—We have had line showers on two days
of the week, but need more.
The rainfall reached one inch
and five hundredths
Average thermometer 80, highest 87

and lowest 09.

Rainfall for tlie month of June

one

inch and

seventy-five hundredths,
Dallas, Texas.—It has been showery on three days of the
week, the rainfall reaching sixty-seven hundredths of an
inch.
Corn and cotton are. promising.
Small grains are
resulting better than expected.' The thermometer has aver¬
aged 85; the highest being 101 and the lowest 08. During




the month of June, and the rainfall reached four inches
and ninety-two hundredths.
The thermometer ranged from
57 to 95 and averaged 78-2.

Nashville, Tennessee.—We have had rain on five days of
the week, the rainfall reaching one inch and sixty-live'hun¬
dredths. The thermometer lias ranged from 66 to 92, aver¬

79.
Mobile, Alabama.—It lias been showery on two days and
lias rained severely on one day of the xveek, the rainfall reach¬
ing one inch and sixty-four hundredths. Accounts from the
interior are conflicting; it is reported that weeds are
growing
so fast that
they are becoming troublesome; that the crop is
late and the general condition unsatisfactory;And that cater¬
pillars have certainly appeared, though the injury done is as
yet limited. Average thermometer 81, highest 99, lowest 70.
During the month of June the rainfall readied nine inches
and forty-three hundredths.
Montgomery, Alabama.—It has rained slightly on two
days of the week. Weeds are growing so fast that they are
becoming troublesome. Hot, dry weather is needed to insure
a good, clean
crop and to prevent caterpillars from spreading.
The thermometer has averaged 80 4.
Rainfall for the month
of June five inches and two hundredths,
aging

28

THE CHRONICLE,

| [Selma, Alabama,—-The weather has Been

warm, dry, and
rain on one day.

“
The cotton crop in this Reef ion is later than last year, but in good
condition. Rains have been plentiful, weather warm, and tlie plant is
growing and maturing rapidly. It is too early j-et to pi edict the out¬
come of the crop, hut at present all indications are favorable.”

very favorable during the week, with light
The rainfall reached thirteen hundredths <?f an inch. The
crop is developing promisingly. The thermometer hks aver¬

Greenville, Washington County, Jane 25.—The New Orleans
correspondent writes :

aged 77, ihe highest being 91 and th^e lowest 63.

Madison, Florida,—We have 'had warm, sultry, wet
weather during the week, with rain on three days. We are

[Vox.. XXXVII.

Times-Democrat
“

i

The cotton is well in hand too, and was never more promising, notmore than usually

withstanding the heavy local rains, which have been
prevalent of late.”

having too much rain. The cotton plant looks strong and
healthy, and the fields are clear of;weeds. The thermometer
Tennessee.—The Somerville Reporter says that:
has ranged from 75 to 98, averaging 86.
Macon, Georgiy.—It has been showery on one day of the
“Crop reports from all sections of Fayette County are of the most
Coru and cotton are both promising, the only
week. Rain is nebded. The thermometer has ranged from 66 promising character.
complaint being iu regard to grass. A few days of dry weather and
to 91, averaging 79.
this will be killed. The indications are that wo will have a full crop,
Columbus, Georgia.—It has rained on one day of the week. and business wall be lively this fall.”
Weeds are growing so fast that they are becoming trouble¬
The Memphis Avalanche of Sunday, July 1, gave the follow¬
some.
The thermometer has averaged 84, ranging from 70 to
ing :•
96. Rainfall for June five inches and fifty-six hundredths.
I.a
Fayette Co.—'41 Cotton generally is very grassy. There is
Savannah, Georgia.—We have had rain on three days of no Grange,
damage to cotton from insects. Labor is very satisfactory, working
the week, the rainfall reaching two inches and ninety-six hun¬ hard. Tne genera' appearance is good. Cotton rather small but
stocky
dredths. The weather is hot. The thermometer has ranged and showing signs of early and prolific fruilage.” '
Collierville, Shelby Co., June 29.—“ Cotton on some farms looks feeble,
from 73 to 92, averaging 83.
but generally is looking well. The plant is small bat healthy.
Cotton
Augusta, Georgia.—The weather lias been warm and dry is greatly impeded by grass. The heavy rains of the last
few weeks kept
during the week, with one light rain, the rainfall reaching labor out of tlie fields, and the grass lias had a go d start. Vigorous
but nine hundredths of an inch, Accounts are good, and the efforts are being made now to subdue ir. One more week of dry weather
will make wonderful changes in cotton.. Lice, wlinli infested cotton
crop is developing very satisfactorily. . The thermometer has early in the season, disappeared as soon as hot weather came.”
ranged from 69 to 94. During the month of June the rainfall
Jackson, Madison Co., June 30.—” Coiton is not receiving that atten¬
tion ijnliis county that it has heretofore. Many of our largest cotton
reached five inches and eighty-five hundredths.
Atlanta, Georgia.—The weather has been very hot and planters of former years liavo discontinued it-* cultivation altogether,
finding mote piofitin stock, clover, gi asses and grain. Cotton
to this
dry all the week. Average thermofnetor 79*5, highest; 91 and time presents a discouraging prospect. Tne cool weather of up
May and
■

•

lowest 66.

'

;

*

:

94.

The following statement we have also received by telegraph,
showing the height of the rivers at the points named at'3 o’clock
jQly 5. 1883, and July 6, 1882.
July 5, '83.
New Orleans

Below high-water mark
...Above low-water mark.

Memphis
Nashville'

Above low-water mark.

Bhreveport

Above low-water mark.

Feet.
2
30
5
17

July 6, ’82.

Inch.
8
8

39

Feet.
o

29

(»

9

2

12
40

0

Inch.
30
3
8
li
9

New Orleans

reported below high-;water mark of 1871 until
8ept. 9, 1874, when the zero of gauge was changed to high-water
mark of April 15 and 16,1874, which is 6-10ths of a fqot above
16 feet above low-water mark at that point.
Cotton Consumption and Overland Movement to

1871,

In

or

our

editorial columns

Movement

to-day will be found
brought down to July 1.

Cotton Bloom

from

Mississippi.—We

are

our

?

^uly

1.—

usual Overland

indebted to Messrs.

Hancock states that this is two weeks earlier than last year on

his plantation.
'The Growing Crop.—We give below items from

corres¬

pondents and exchanges showing the progress that cotton is
making in various sections of the different ^-ates :
South Carolina—Spartanburg, Spartanburg Co., July 1.—
Oar own correspondent at this point saj's :
“Rains generally light during June, but very gcrod in the country

Prospect for crops good.”

Georgia—Forsyth, Monroe Cl, July 1.—Our
pondent wiites us that—

own

corres¬

seem to

remains

Louisiana.—Correspondents of the N, 0. Times-Democrat
write

as

follows

:

Arcadia, Bienville Parish, June 29.—“ The cotton erno in this section
is promising and looks line.
Worms are reported, hut no damage hae
been done j’et.
If no accident happens to the crop a large yield is ex •
peeted.” w * * ‘‘We have had a good season during the last two weeks.”

Troyville, Catahoula Parish, June *2*.—“Crop reports from all sections
very promising. The Black River at this point fell two inches in
the past 24 hours.”

are

1

Arkansas.—The Memphis Avalanche of Jane 29 and July
supplies the following items

Conway, Franklin. Howard, Phillip and 'Saline counties, crops pro ining; Benton, Lincoln, Logan, Madison, Marion, Pope, Washington and
counties, reported backward; Jefferson and Pulaski counties
report in fail* condition; White County, prospects good; Ouachita
County reports crop late, but the present hot weather is bringing it for¬
ward with wonderful

rapidity.

Helena, Phillips Co., June c9.—“ Crops, especial’y cotton, are behind
fiom one to two weeks. Cotton is small.
v
*
*
Crops are grassy, but
it is thought they will be all right should ibis week remain clear.”

Texas.—Galveston ATews correspondents write as follows:
Pastrop, Bastrop Co., June 28 —“ We had a light rain at this place
evening. Good rains are also reported
The farmers now say that the cotton

last night and a good shower tins
in different parts of the county.
ci on will be good.”

Bremoud, Robertson Co., June 23.--“ We had yesterday good rains,
could be desired.
lias fruited well ”
yesterday, which
was beginning to be need* d.
T his revives our abundant crops.”
Groesbeek, Limestone Co., June 29.—'“ We have had uico rains, and

alter two weeks dioutli. thus making corn all that
Cotton lias grown off finely during the dry tenn, and
Calvert Robertson Co., Juue 28.—“A good rain 1 ell

prospects are good. The corn crop will be the best made in years.”
Navasota, Grimes Co.. June 29.—“Rain began yesterday before dark

crop

and there

were

frequent showers rill 7 oVl ck A. M. to-day, attended
atid lightning. It has done much good, as

with light wind, thunder
crops were needing ir.”

Rockdale, Milan Co.. June 29.—“We have every assurance of line
and <o ton crops.”
Wuxahachie, Ell s Co., June 29.—"A flue rain fell yesterday. Weather

corn

“Crop prospects‘arc still flattering. Colton commenced blooming
about June 22<l, and the crop is generally in flue eomlirion.”
•

had, and what

Yell

Fielding & Gwynne, of this city, for. a cotton!bIooin, which was
received by them Jane 30, from Mr. Rosw-11 Hancock, of
Coahoma County, Mississippi, uuder date of June 26. Mr.

around.

have conspired against ir. Stands are verv
has been cheeked in growth by grass, which the
wet weather rendered it impossible to clear.
A great many farmers
who still cling to cotton are being rapidly convinced, by the
uncertaiuty
of the seasons, that this is not a cotton country, and freely express
their determination to plant less and give more attention to stock and
tlie cereals. The warm weather has pretty well destroyed the insects
on the cotton, which d.d material injury during the cool weather.”
the incessant rains

Charleston, South Carolina.—It. has rained on two days of
the week, the rainfall reaching fifty-three hundredths of an
inch. The thermometer has averaged 83, ranging from 74 to

hot autl crops

line.”

First Bale of New Cotton—A special dispatch to the Telegraph and Messenger at Macon, Georgia, dated July 5, says
“Since our last report—two weeks age—we have had lint and forcing that the first bale of the new crop of cotton was sold at Albany.
■weather with no rain. Farmers have taken advantage of ti.i favorable
Ga., to day for 25}£c. per pound; weighed 335 pounds; class
and now

Rome, Floyd Co., June 29.—Mr. T.

contains the

following

F. Llowel’s circular

:

>

weather,

report tin it* Holds uuusally free from grass for this

Btage in the growth of the

plant.”

Alabama.—Correspondents of the Selma Morning Times
report to that journal, under date of June 28, as follows :

middiii g; was

raised by Primus W. Jones, of Baker CuulDty;

bought by A. B. Weslovv, and shipped by express to Woods &

Murphy, of New York.
Jute Butts, Bagging, &c.—Bagging has not shown any
Eulnula, Harbour Co.—‘ A cold, heavy rain fell here one In ur to dayCrops arc backward, and in many cases verv gf assy. Labor is hard to change since our last report, and the demand is of a small
get. Corn is vety good. Cotton is email and unpromising as compared
description, few inquiries being reported for large parcels.
with the same date last year.”
Prices are steady, however, holders showing no desire to make
l)< mopoiis Mar. ngo Co.—“ We had a fine rain this morning. Weather
is cloudy and cool. The crop report is satisfactory. Roth cotton ami
any concessions on the parcels moving, and we do not hear of
corn are in good condi ion.”
anything to be had below 9%c.~for l?£lbs., 9‘Mc. for l%lbs.,
Grcensboio’, Hale Co —“ It rained about four hours to-day. Cotton is
10}oO. for 2.bs., and ll%c. for standard grades. Batts have
ten days late, and in grass. The corn is generally good. The rain was
spotted and needed in many neighborhoods. To sum up, ciop prospects been quiet, but a steady trade is doing in moderate parcels.
are not diseourair ng.”
There is some inquiry for futures, and the tian.-actions for the
Huntsville, Madison Co.—“No rain to-day. Crops are generally fair
past month foot up* about 16,000 bales spot aucl to arrive at
ill this section. Cotton is backward, but doing well. Coin is good.
l%@2%c. as to quality, and the market closes quiet at
Crops have been well worked iu this count'..”
Marion, Perry Co.—“ We had a tine rain this morning. Corn and cot¬ 2c. tor paper grades and 2%@2%c. for bagging qualities.
The
ton promise w ell. There is a general complaint of grass.”
s'oek on hand is 87,000 bales, and on the way from Calcutta
Randolph, Bibb « o.—' Good rains lure Sunday, Monday and to-day.
122,458 bales, giving an available supply of 209,458 bales.
No dam ge. crops all flourishing ”
Talladega. Talladega Co.—“ We had rai l to-day. Corn and cotton are
India Cotton Movement from alt. Ports.—We have during
l>oth good, above h average at this season.”
the past year been endeavoring to rearrange our India service
Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa Co.—” 3.ight rain here this morning; not
enough t<* do any good. Crops are looking well, hut rot sufficient rain. so as to make our reports more detailed and at the same time
The dry weather lias been taken advantage of by the farmers, and crops
more accurate.
Hitherto we have found it impossible to keep
uro clear of weeds.”
out of our figures, as cabled to us for the ports other than
Uniuntown. Perry Co.-” We had a moderate rain to-day. It was
very general. Con is excellent, cotton small and grassy, but in a fair
Bombay, cargoes which proved only to be shipments from one
growing condition and fi lming well. Few reports of the caterpillars.”
India port to another. The plan we have now adopted, as we
Mississippi, —M - ridhn, Lauderdale Co., June 28.—Messrs. have reason to believe, will relieve us from the danger of thisCarter & Co., in their uicn’ar, speak as follows :
inaccuracy and keep the totals correct.
We first give the-




Jew 7,

THE CHRONICLE.

i883j

Bombay statement for the week and
July 5.

year,

down to

bringing the iigures

BOMBAY RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOR FOUR YEARS.

Shipments this week.

V

Year Great

Conti¬
nent.

Brit’n.

Shipment*
Great
Britain

Total.

since

Jan. 1.

Conti¬
nent.

This

October..

Svice
Jan. 1.

Week.

1883 25,n00 11,000 36,000 413,000 743,000 1,161,000 9,000 1,511,000
1882 9,000 6,000 17,000 637,000 554.000 1.238,000 19.000 1,533,000
1881 8,000 18,000 26,000 251,000 483.000
731,000 •20,000 1.087.000
1830 5,000 7,000 12.000 340.000 441.000
781.000 iO.OOo 1.016,000

According to the

foregoing, Bombay appears to show a
in the week’s receipts of 10,000
bales, and an increase in shipments of 19,000 bales, and the
shipments since January 1 show a decrease of 77,000 bales.
The movement at Calcutta, Madras and other India ports for the
last reported week and since the 1st of January, for two
years
has been as follows.
“ Other ports” cover Ceylon, Tuticorin,
decrease compared with last year

Kurrachee and Coconada.

Shipments for the week.
Great

Conti¬

Britain.

nent.

Shipments since January 1.
Great

Total.

Continent.

Britain.

1882

Sept’inb’r

Receipts.

Total.

Tear

Monthly
Receipts.

Total.

Novemb’r

Deoemb’r

January
February.
.

Maroh...

April....

May
Juno

1S81.

326,656
930,531
1,094,6 J7
1,112,536
752,927
595,59S
492,772
231,519
185,523
78,501

Beginning September 1.
1880.

,

429,777
453,479
853,195
953,313
974,013 1,003,501
996,807 L,020,802
437,727
571,701
L
291,992
572,723
257,099
476,532
147,595
294,216
113,573
190,054
69,679
131,371

1879.

333,613
888,492
942,272
956,46 4
647,140
447,919
264,913
158,025
110,001

1873.

1377.

288,84."
639,264
779,237

893,664
613,727
566,324
303,955
167,459
84,299
29,472

88,155

93,491
578,533
822,493
900,119

689,610
472,054
340,525
197,965
96,314
42,143

Total year 5,894,216 4,620,437 5,031,231 4,837,32* 4,421,749 4,233,246
Pero'tage of tot. port
receipts Juno 30..

97 88

93*72

96 71

99*42

97-52

This statement shows that up to June 39 the receipts at the
ports this year were 1,273,729 bales more than in 1881-S2 and
212,935 bales more than at the same time in 1830-81. By adding
te the above totals to June 39 the daily receipts since that time
we shall b* able to reach an exact
comparison of the movement
for the different years.
1

Calcutta—
1883
1832

800

1,200

2.000
200

73,000
99,500

10,800
31,500

83,800
131,000

200

4.700

5,700

3,700

29,700

1,000
2,000

2.503

2U0

Madras—
1883

200

1882
All others—
1&63
1382

......

3,700

Total all1883
.1882

31,700

2,500
3,800

9,500

7,300

7,500
29,300

2,000

3,500

15,500

44.SUO

3,900
7,700

800

4,700
11,200

85,200
158,500

13,800

3,500

90,009

49,000

207,500

The above totals for the week show that the movement from
the ports other than Bombay is 6,500 bales less than same
week last year. For the whole of India, therefore, the total
ship¬
ments since

of the two

January 1, 1SS3, and for the corresponding periods
previous years, are as follows.
EXPORTS TO EUROPE FROM ARE INDIA.

1883.

Shipments
Europe

to all
■

from—

Bombay

This
week.

1882.

Sine#
tJCh)v% I

This
week.

•

36,000 1,161,000

AH other ports.
Total

4,700

1881-

-

Since
Jan. 1.

17,00 J 1,238,000
11,200
207,51)0

90,000

40.700 1,260,000

This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

26,000!

731,009

2,300;

2*i,200 1,145,500

19S2-S3

171,500

28.300

Alexandria Receipts and Shipments. Through arrangements
have made with Messrs. Davies, Benachi & Co., of Liverpot 1

receive

weekly cable of the movements
Alexandria, Egypt. The following are the receip s
and shipments for the past week and for the corresponding week
of the previous two years.
M
1882-83.

July 5.
Receipts (eautars*)—
This week....

BjB<?e Sept. 1

2.254.000
This
week.

Exports (bales)—
To Liverpool

“

.-

"

20....

1,71!-

4,223

4.594

“

21....

1,333

3.790

4,002

2,097
369

**

22

3,43 (i

“

23....

1,336

1,51 1
•1,3.33
2,808

3,793
4,001

3,141
3,719

1,126

“

24....

S.

4,539

2,117
6,089
2,9 47

Sept. 1.

!

|iI;

:
|

2,631,720

;

This

i

week.

Total Europe

1,000
2,769,000
i

Since

This

Since

**.25....

2,133

26....

2,20.5

“

27....
28....

1,730
815

50^

29

3,202
1,168

1,032

215,900

422,1 71 ■ 116,176 395,308

A eantar is 98 lbs.

This statement shows that the receipts for the week
ending
-July 5 were
cantars and the shipments to all Europe
were 1,000 bales.
Manchester Market.—Our report received from Manchester
to-night states that holders are less willing to sell, and the
market is quiet, with limited business.
We give the prices of

to-day below, and leave previous weeks’ prices for comparison.
1883.

32# Cop.
Twist.
d.

<L

8H lbs.

Shirtings.
d.

Irffty 4. S*,60 9*3 5 10
«t

ll

®

18

SUi6—9t>i„

2 r>
Junto i
15
•JO

8*4

0

8l'ib-

‘»L> 5 10

5 10
9*2 5 10
914 •> 9

6®8 ® 9*8 5
6*8 0 9*8 5
338 0 9q a

29 8 4
July o
1*2
-

0
'ft

9q 5
9 l4 5

9
9
9
9
9

Vpl la

32# Cop.
1 wist.

30-...

—v’.t*

Shirtings.

8.

4,37v3,056
2,519
21,239

8.

3.975
3,101
2,228

1,102
8.

515

1.543

986

1,431

191

719

2,603

537

LSS

1,542

8.

931

058

8.

5,894,216 4,620,4S7 5,631.231 4,837,328 4,421,749 4,238,246
S.

2....

“

3....

3,185
2,237

“

4....

1,719

"

2,732

3,3 0 3

3.

1,210
2,786

5....

2,40'
8.

2,949

1,904

313

948

2,902

271

970

8.

1,521

1,518

1,176

1, / 3o
1,236

1,763

464

2,85'-

1,395

4,003

60:

6....

3.402

.2,701

1

S.

2,62*
1,530

629

761

111

1,163

8.

840

Total
1 5,90 4,9 c 2 4,627,720 5,696.005 4,817,809 4,421,954 4,214,104
Percentage of tot»-l
93 01
96-96
port rec’otp July 6
96 92
99-50
97*66
This statement snows that the receipts since
oept. i ap co
to-night are now 1,277.212 bales more than they were to the same

day of the month in L882 and 208.957 bales more than they were
same day of the month in 1331.
We add to the table
the percentages of total port receipts which had been received to
July 6 in each of the years named.
to the

Shipping JSews.—The exports of cotton from the United
States the past week, as per Latest mail returns, have reached

39,680 bales.

So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these
the same exports reported by telegraph, and published in
the Chronicle iast Friday.
With regard to New York, we
include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Thursday
night of this week:

CotV

8*4 lbs.

Total bales.

•

TJplc 8

New York—To

Liverpool, per steamers Adriatic, 1,097
Ari¬
1,334. ..Bothnia, 836
Furnessia, 399....oorroanio, 641
Spain. I,^;8 8
To Hull, per steamer Sorrent o. 1,0 u
zona,

s.

@7
07
07
-07
07
@7
07
07
07
07-

d

d.

44

5*4

4 lo
44

51

44
3

d.

:{I6

5t3l6
578
5*4

14
14

5*1

O

51*10
5»ie

0

3
3

16

9*8
9*8
3*8
9*8
9*8
94
94
9*8

d.
010
010
010
010

s.

6
6
6
6
010
6
0104 6
0104 6
01OJ4 6
9O|601OM 6
9i),o0loq 6

d.

s.

d.

d.

4407 9
44 07 9
4407 104
4407 10 4
4407 lu4
608O
6 08 0

6*1
6*4

6

679

08

0

4407 104
4 4 07 1(>4

6 Sr
ti

6*8

6*8
6*8

(T4

678

Comparative Port Receipts and Daily Crop Movement.—
A comparison of the port movement
by weeks is not accurate
as the weeks in different
5rears do not end on the same day of
the month. We have
consequently added to our other standing
tables a daily and monthly statement,
that the reader may
constantly have before him the data for seeing the exact relative
movement for the years named.
The movement each month
since September 1, 1882, has been as follows.




“

...

8.

1,611
2,116

*

8.

are

1882.
CoU" n
Mid

“

“

3,500 243,000
176.2711 12,676 152,308

1,000 320.000

“

Sept. 1. 1I week. Sept. 1
.

956

"

“

ll

-

“

July 1....

1880-81.

.

1,000 234.000
86,000

To Continent

*

Since

1881-82.

1877-78.

'

Tot. Ju.SO

l

j
M....

1878-79.

Tot.My 31 5,815,712 4,551,808 5,549,410 4,748,373 1,392,277 4,196,104
5.376
8.
8,474
2,361
2,691
2,269
“
2...
1,499
2,720
9.
3,905
2,002
3,731
“
S.
3...
2.044
2,101
3,249
6,351
2,359
“
s.
4....
4,127
4,56’.
1,386
5,842
2,396
**
5....
1 04 4
4,920
8.
2,656
2,316
1,243
M
0....
3.327
4,100
S.
4,700
1,557
1,704
“
7...
3,539
2,245
5,019
333
2,409
*0,129
"
8...
5,163
2,002
3,306
a.
2,691
1,10
**
9... ;
3,236
2,993
3.
-2,913
4,381
1,718
S.
10....
95 1
1,865
4,931
2,013
2,686
11....
8.
2,439
3.793
3,59 8
W2
1,862
*1
JO
S.
5,563
3,105
875
3,13i
1,920
“
13....
2,903
8.
2,19l
6,754
1,060
1,170
“
14....
1,642
1,88.
5,719
1.021
4,037
2,192
“
15....
5,735
1,86'
2.356
3,741
8.
1,505
“
16....
1*533
2,753
2,9 L 4
662
3,26l>
8..
“
8.
17...
4.9 >1
2,587
13,29.
1,773
2,279
“
J 8
8.
1,913
4,462
2,709
1,186
1,360
“
19....
8.
2,3 3)
1,820 *
3,573
449
1,581

a

of cotton at

Alexandria. Egypt,

1879-80.

J’no 1...

we

now

1830-81.

*

905,500
This last statement affords a very interesting comparison of the
total movement for the three years at all India ports.

And Alexandria, we

1881-82.

To Bremen, per steamers Donau. 100. ...Nookar, loO
To Hamburg, nor steamers Frisia, 400
Rugia, 250....

Westphalia (id lltl >• al). 109
To Antwerp, per steamer Noderl ind, 8.
New Orleans—To Liverpool, per steamers Historian, 2,398...
Jamaican, 2,356
To Bremen, per baric Maitland, 221
To Vera Cruz, per steam schooner E. L>.
Biilbury, 797
Charleston— I o Norrkoplng, per bark Eva. i,000
Texas—To

Liverpool,

Baltimore—'To

per steamor

Liverpool,

Scotian, 1,532

Australian, 5,l5.l...Fedorioo, 516

per steamers

To Bremen, per steamer Hermann, 373
Boston—To Liverpool, per steamers Batavia,
garian, l,Oo3
Istrian, 254....Missouri,
tori a, 413

5,965
1,0 JO
200
750
81

5.231
2 *1

797
1,0 JO

5,453
Nova

2,048
...

376

1,170 ...Bul¬

2,226....Vn>

Philadelphia.—To Liverpool, per steamer British Princess,
2,150
Ban Francisco—Tc Liverpool, por ship Pinmoro, 311 (foreign)..

5,071
2,150
311

Total.......s.oo.ooO

these shipments, arranged in our

The particulars of
form, are as follows:

Hull.

burg.

Antv:erp.

New York

5,066

1,1)00

950

81

N. Orleans

5 ,‘254

221

Charleston
Texas
Baltimore
Boston

5.453
2,048
5,071

373

d: Ham-

Total.

d.

d.

d.

d.

7,997

5 33

5 33

5 32

5 33

5 33

5 31

5,32

5 34

Aug.-Sept.. 5 38
Sept.-Oct... 5 37
Oct.-Nov.... 5 31

5 39

5 37

5 39

5 34

5 37

5 3

1

5 30

5 31

5 30

531

5 35

5 31

5 35

......

......

5,071
2,150

1,000

81

1,540

1,000

26.2 33

Total

Nov.-Dec..

311

311

Francisco

July
July-Auk..

1,000
5,453
2,426

1,000

707

Thurs., July 5.

Fri., July ($.

Open High Low. Clos.

Open High Low. Clos.

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

id.

d.

'

6.272

797

2,150

Philadelp’a

IjOw. Clos.

Open] High

Vera
Cruz.

l:oping.

fVoL. XXXVII,

.

Wednes., July 4.

usual

Xorr-

Bremen

Livcrp >ol.

San

CHRONICLE

THE

30

.

■

....

30.680

....

....

Jan.-Feb.r..

5 35

d

3*J

5 35

5 35

Feb.-March

53?

5 37

5 37

5 37

Below we add the clearances this week of vessels carrying
cotton from United States ports, bringing our data down to the
latest mail dates:

,

|

.

.

•

•

•

....

....

•

5 30

531

5 30

5 83

5 35

5 30

5 35

5 35

530

5 35

5 36

5 35

5 30

5 34

5 33

5 31

5 33

531

5 83

5 33

5 33

5 33

5 33

5 33

5 34

5 33

5 33'

5 30

5 33

5 30

5 39

5 39

5 35

5 3.)

5 39

5 80

5 35

5‘35

5 31

5 31

5 3l

5 33

5 35

5 35

5 33

533

5 30

5 30

5 31

5 34

5 37

5 37

5 37

5 37

5 33

-

Dec.-Jan...

•

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

531

•

•

•••

!

1

|

Liverpool June 29—Steamer Partliia, 797
July 3 —
Steamer Norsemau,
Philadelphia—For Liverpool- June 30—Steamer British Crown, 2,400

Boston—For

.

BREADSTUFFS.

July 3—Steamer Indiana, 1,000.

give all news received to date of disasters to vessels
carrying cotton from United States ports, &c.:
Polynesia, steamer (CJer.), Kuhne, for Hamburg, while proceeding to
sea from New York. June 28, it was discovered that her propeller
was loose.
She returned to the dock and discharged about 150
tons of cargo from the after hold, and a coffer dam was placed
under her stern. Her wheel and shaft were being removed July
Below

Friday, P. M., July

we

2 for examination.

Cotton

freights the past week have been as follows:

\

Liverpool, steam d. 9t>4'®7a3 964®732
Do
sail...d.
964®13e4
V
'V.
Havre, steam
c.
Do

sail

c.

Bremen, steam,

-

c.

•

a
....

J

•

•

•

rr-

2

2
r—<

3

....

t

Do

ki

*
....

....

....

;

d. 932®516* 932®516*

sail

....

W

sail.-.d.

Baltic, steam

3ie'® V

3

o

Amst’d’m, steam.c.
Do

....

CS

sail... cf.

1532*

,

....

Hamburg, steam, d. 316®l4
Do

V

t

1532*

....

9e4®732
964®13(4

«*

....

-

1532*

.c.

sail

Do

-

-

Tri.

Thurp.

Wednes.

Tues.

Mon.

Salur.

c.

n10*

Barcelona,steam.c.
Genoa, steam
d.
*
Compressed.

V

...

932 25ie*

;

....

....

.

.

.

.

J

ll16*

;

®8*

'

Liverpool.—By cable from Liverpool, we have the following
stocks, &c., at that port. We
add previous weeks for comparison.

statement of the week’s sales,

June 22

June 15.

39,500

33,500

53,000
34, <00

260,000

261,000

239,000

207,000

107,000

111,000

100,000

54,000

1,(540
1.840
29,500

4,500
13,000
983,000
742,000
59,000

Saturday Monday.

12:30 p.m

£
j

Flat anti

irregular.

Easier.

5«8

Mid Upl’ds

Wednes.

Dull
anti
easier.

Fal r
dem ind

freely met

5->8

«2916

4,000

8,000

6,000

Oni6
10,000

250

1,090

500

500

Spec.& exp.

13'

29,500

3^600
6,400
991,000
738,000

the daily closing prices

Tuesday.

534

Mia.Orl’ns

Bales

1,890

43.500

day of the week ending July 6, and
of spot cotton, have been as follows.
Spot.

40 00

Thursday.
.

Dull
and
easier.

Friday.
Mod.

inq.

freely
supplied

59i«
5nifi

5916

8,000
1,000

10,000
2,000

51*16

futures.

Market,
12:30 p.m.

Market,
4.

P. M.

^
(

Steady.

Easy.

Quiet.,

Weak.

Weak.

Weak.

Weak.

Dull.

J
\

FLOUR.

Liverpool market for spots and futures each

The tone of the

Market,

July 6
47JOOO
2,6(0
1,050
35,000
3,200
16,000
1,007,000
749,000
79,000
54.000

38,000
2,400
1,100
29,000
3,700
11,000
982,000
739,000

41,000

bales.
8ales of the week
Of which exporters took
Of which speculators took..
Pales American
Actual export
Forwarded
Total stock -Estimated
Of which American—Estim’d
Total import of the week
Of whicn American
Amount afloat
Of which ATnerion.il

June 29

Weak.

Steady.

Barely
steady

opening, highest, lowest and closing prices of futures at
Liverpool for each day of the week are given below. These
prices are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause, unless
The

otherwise stated.
fy
prices are given in pence and GitAs, thus: 5
and 6 03 means 6 3-64d.
I>Iou., July *2.

Sat., June 30.

62 means 5 62-64rf.

No. 2 spring...#
No. 2 winter

8upertiue
3 35®
Spring wheat extras.. 4 00®
do bakers’
4 75®
Wis. & Mien, rye mix. 4 75 ®

Open High

d.

d.

j Low.j Clos.
j

d.

d.

d.

d.

5 39

5 39

5 39

5 29

5 40

5 33

5 39

5S8

5 37 |
5 38

5 30

5 40

5 45

5 43

5 43

5 43

5 43

5 41

d.

Juiy-Aug...
Aug.-Sept.. 5 45
Sept.-Oct... 5 43
Oct.-Nov....

Open High

!

5 39

!

5 37

j

Spring, per bush
Spring No. 2
Red winter, No. 2

5 30 ‘ 5 30

5 35

5 35

531

5 35

1

5 38

5 30

5 3K

,5 30

5 30

Dec.-Jan....

5 37

5 37

’531

5 30 ; 5 36

!

5 37 i 5 37

Feb,-March




....

...

....

1

1114S117
95 ®1 16

White

100

White No. 1
Corn—West, mixed
West. mix. No. 2.
White Southern..

I

5 30

i 5 37
t

....

5 30

538

....

5 36

5 38

....

5 35
5 38

....

5 35

5 38

i

3 00® 3 40
3 40® 3 50

Western, &c
Brandywine,
Corn—
Yellow Southern.
White Western...

66
67

®
®

Rye—Western

63

®

State & Canada..
Oats—Mixed
White
No. 2 mixed
!
No. 2 white
< Barley nominal.
.

®1 17
103is®l 09
49 ® 60
58 ® 59
69 ® 70

The movement of breadstuffs to market
statements below, prepared by us from the

r

70 ®
39*2®
42 ®
40*2®
44^®

67
67^

66

73

43
52
40\
45

is indicated in the

figures of the New

Exchange. We first give the receipts at Western
Lake and River ports, arranged so as to present the comparative
movement for the week ending June 30 and since Aug. 1 for
each of the last three years:
York Produce

Detroit

Cleveland....
St. Louis

—

Peoria.
Duluth

Flour.

IVheat.

j

218,740

2,291

1,231
1,617

51,575

3,335

14 310

12,500

9,500

17,700

52.146

180.52.J

20,100
75,909
121,025

1,985
10,000

2,300|

120,000

799,035

30,179

82.6X6

94,805

24,600

9,115

0,242
*

4.400

6,500

6,000
.

1,712.099
838,300

1,130,001

67,021

740,808

4LS91

1,421,375 ( 4,951,311
172,004
1
.8,776,523 72,545.020 89,353,101
7,283,7 74 40,818,190 102,849,702

1,183,271

72,926

591,880;

8.150.'85

:

35,779,
677.628

18S0

.

Bye.

Barley.

Bush.32 lbs Bush AS lbs Bush. 56 lbs

112 967

149,038

1881

Oats.

2 215

61,712

101,435

1882

■

Bush.56lhs
987,818
Ib0;ib0

Tot. wk. ’83
Same wk. ’81

Com.

186,336
135,277„

53,088

Same wk. ’82

SinceAug.l—

I
•

5 38
5 30

5 38

«...

5 38
5 30

i 5 38

•

5 40
5 30

5 38

•

5 40
5 30

5 33

•

5 34

5 38

5 39

«

5 34

5 34

5 3s

| 5 41

5 37

.

5 34

5 35

5 38

5 41

5 37

•

5 34

5 35

5 40

541

5 37

•

541

5 31

5 40

542

5 37
•

j

d.

Corn meal—

®
..®1 10

Red winter

Chicago
Milwaukee..

d.

5 30® 6 50
4 20® 5 10
3 30 ® 3 75

GRAIN.

Open High Low. Cl08.
d.

bakers' and

5 25® 6 00

family brands
South’ll siiip’g extras
Rye flour, supertine..

Wheat

Receipts at—

d.

8outheru

6 00
5 50
Minn, clear and stra’t 4 00® 6 00
Winter sliipp’g extras. 3 90® 4 25
Patents, spring
5 75® 7 25

Tues., July 3.

j 5 41

5 42

Nov.-Dec...
Jan.-Feb....

d.

| 5 30
5 30 ; 5 30

5 43

5 37

1

City shipping extras.

4 00
4 25

7 25

$5 50®

Patents, winter

bbl. $2 40® 3 00
2 90® 3 50

Bbls.imbs Bush.60 lbs
Low. Clos.

6, 1883.

quiet and more or lees weak. .It. is stated
that the production at the West has been reduced somewhat
since the recent failures at Chicago, but the fact that the
supply already on hand here is quite large tends to neutralize
the effect of any decrease in the manufacture as far as this
market is concerned. To-day the market was about steady
but quiet; among fancy patents winter wheat grades were
the best sustained.
The export demand was slow.
Wheat has been fairly active both for export and on specula¬
tion.
Prices have been weak, owing to favorable crop advices
and large sales to realize both here and at the West. The
English demand is not very brisk, and the export trade is
largely with the Continent. The prospects for the crops in
Europe are reported to be very good. To-day the market was
steady on the spot, but less active for export, while options
were fairly active at a decline of % to lc.; No. 2 red sold at
$1 10%@1 11 for July, $1 12%@1 13% for August, $1 15(g)
1 15% for Sept., $1 16%(gl 17% for Oct. and $1 18J£@119 for
Nov., showing a decline of 2 to 3 cents during the week.
Indian corn has been declining under the some influences that
have caused no little weakness in the market for some weeks
past, namely, the steady decline in wheat, the fine weather
and promising crop prospects at the West, and a general dis¬
position to sell. At times a brisk export demand has prevailed,
however, and the transactions in options have reached a fair
aggregate. To-day the market was steady on the spot with a
good export demand and a fair amount of activity in options,
which advanced % to %c.; No, 2 mixed sold at 57}£c. for July,
5914@59%c. for. August, 60%c. for Septemoer and 61%c. for
October, showing a decline however of 3 cents for the week.
Rye has been quiet and lower. Oats hive been fairly active
at some decline at one time, but latterly at higher prices.
To-day the market was %@l%c. higher, despite rather large
receipts, an advance in Chicago stimulating the market here ;
No.'2 mixed sold at 40%@40%c. for July and 38@38%c. for
August.
The following are closing quotations :
Flour has been

77.531.018s

118.110.950

102,694
11,920
-

20,088

49,891,783 15,470,310
35,183,385 12,064,597

4,781,053

44.417.4-1

3.300.145

11.811.025*

3,783,557-

July

THE CHRONICLE.

7, 1888.]

The comparative

shipments of tiour and grain from the
from Dec. 25, 1882, to June 30,1883, inclusive, for
show as follows:

same

ports
four years,

1882-83.

1881-82.

1880-81.

1,499,452

3,619,832

4,441,504

2,702,418

14.866,549

52,226,572

12.489,573
38,541,509

25.325,992
47,819,213

22,409297

15,125,810

17,362,423

27,087,485
62.256,235
12,093,989

4.549,676
1.960,526

2,090,586

2,008,387

1,612 704

1,357,846

1,060.641

1,002,864

90,012,620

69.605,314

93,576,657

104.053.277

bbls.

Flour
Wheat..
Com
Cats

busb.

Barley..;
Rye

Totalgrain

....

The exports

from the several seaboard ports for week ending
are shown in the annexed statement:

June 30, 1883,
Exports
from —

Flour

Wheat.

*

Bush.

Bbls.
New York
Boston.
Portland.
Montreal.

Corn.

Oats.

Rye.

Peas.

Bush.

Bush.

Bush.

Bush

66,257
39,618

482,225

779,469
114,099

18,673
6,714

182,180

122,849

Philadel..
Baltim’re
N.Orl’ns

3,453
466

403,636

..

Total w’k.
8’me tiim

1882.

.

2,580

44,650

1,473

35,186

93,946

137,000

1,424

98,152

109,416

The destination of these exports is as below.

We add the

for comparison:
Corn.

Wheat.

Exports

'

1883.

1862.

1883.

1882.

to—

Week,

Week,

Week.

Week,
July 1.

June 30.

June 30.

July 1.

Bbls.
Uu. Kin^.
Contiu’nt
8.& C.Ain
W. Indies
Brit. Col’s
Otli.c’nt’s

90,303
2,172
14,923
18,378
8,IK 5

Total...

135,181

Bush.
656.723

Bush.
711.311

3,130

547,943

282,980

37.

500

have the
season

Bush.

61,506
4,089

19,944
6,644

750

7,040
10,118

1,533
1 100

105,001 1,205.041 1,025,047 1,212,575

92,853

previous totals

r.o our

we

following statement of exports since September 1, this

and last,

season.
Flour.

Exports sinci
Sept. 1, to—

Wheat.

Corn.

18S2-H3.

1881-82.

1882-83.

1881-82.

1882-83.

1881-82.

Sept. 1 to

Sept. 1 to
Jut 1/ 1.

Sept. 1 to

Sept. 1 to

Sept. 1 to

June 30.

July 1.

June 30.

Sept. 1 to
July 1.

Bbls.

Bush.

Bush.

Bash.

33.905,480
25.940,968

27,017,359
11,852,300

30,708,029

19.503,218

7/07

72,064

35,079

0,409,192
392,034
850,042
89,5(82

4,380.967

120,500

140,500

79,483

39,210,259 88,090,445

25,225,642

June 30.

Bbls.

2,050.200

Un. Kingdom
Continent

5,317,43?
406,730

198.03*1

S. & C. Am...

577,033
702.KK

011,877
589.303

...

West Indies.

Brit. Col’nies

519,710

10,113

Oth. eountr’s

30.74S

401,311
29,120

00

227,400

242,934

7,020.508

4.542,907

00,349,191

Total.

July 1.

Bush.
790,244
39 i ,210

19,796
8.015
1,051

By adding this week’s movement,

*

1883.
Week.
30.

Bbls.
55.600
17.409

...

Bush.

123,043

of grain, comprising the stocks in granaiy
principal points of accumulation at, lake and seaboard
ports, and in transit, by rail find water, June 30, 1883, was as
follows:
bush

4,-230.096

Do. ailoat <est.)

Albany
Buffalo

Chicago

Milwaukee
Duluth

381,0'»0
1,814

rndianapelis
Kansas City
Baltimore
Down Mississippi.
On rail
On lake
....

......

On

canal,...

ft

270,237
305,620

39,902

616,721
50,552

75 393

10.660

62.578

29,647

4,254

68,6s2

162.475

2.144
68.432

1,009

162,500

101.000

87.985
857.338

113.818

29,300
6,024

457,997

813,803
357,325

2,452.973

DRY

38,610
„

m

m m

2,872
210

1.633,070

request,

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74,039
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99.784
14.000

17,449

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180.996
478.045

GOODS

47.398

53.373

24,400

133,507
164,432

486.922 1,837.911
4749 01 1 878,492
198.568
725.670

198,972

136.071

235,772

211,334

M..

July 6, 1883.

dry goods has been of strictly moderate pro.
portions the past week, both Independence Day and the follow¬
ing day having been observed as holidays by most of the prin¬
cipal wholesale houses in the trade. There was a freer
movement in dark prints and some other descriptions of
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Friday, P

The business in

'

561,231
52,500

107,219

—

IS

325.000

19.413.915 13,035.984 4,005.007
Tot. June 23. ’89. 20,2 4 9.434 14.631.577 4.345.492
Tot. Jnlv
1, ’82. 10,107.430 6,965.867 1.848.210
Tot. July
2. '81. 15.970.746 14,511.3 »7 8.332,493
Tot, July
3,’80. 12,264,920 16,733.213 2,823,762

THE

17,562
60,000

67.749
200 865
130.055

done in Matelasse

was

are

in better

ft

o

33*

r-r

h-

1,100

167.295
237.258
80.212

205.830
3 299

„

were

1-3

2*

o

219,4 86
80.000

.

28.035
198,092

Tor, June 30.’S3.




H

•n

.

fair business

importations of dry goods at, this port for the we* k
ending July 5, 1883. and since January 1, and the same facts
for the corresponding periods of 1882. are as follows:

bush.

-

a

Importation*! of Dry Ooodw.

bush.

510
6.275

46.101
91.090

4.3^8

3%c. and 3%c., for the

The

9

53.646

1,691.863
47.236
181.324

Print cloths

largely sold to arrive.
some large ship¬
ments having been made to interior markets by
cheap trans¬
portation routes. Repellents were in pretty good demand, and
there was a light movement in Kentucky jeans and doeskins,
but satinets ruled quiet.
All-wool and worsted dress goods
were in moderate request, but transactions were almost whollv
restricted to fabrics adapted to the coming season. Hosiery and
knit underwear were in irregular demand, but large deliveries
were made by agents in execution of
early orders.
Foreign Dry Goods.—Business has been very quiet with im¬
porters—as is usually the case between seasons—and the
jobbing trade was comparatively light; but there is likely to bea
freer movement in the near future, as importers hold liberal
orders for certain fabrics that have been affected by the new
tariff that has just gone into operation.

Ryt,

•

active, and

Flannels and blankets

Barley,

l 1.121
51.723

27.370

48.000
512,583
86,533

Peoria

163,000
7.537

713,544
37,834

Oswego

Philadelphia

932,693

447,830

7-6.652

....

1,070.687

2,631.390
195,566
88,795
475.021

Detroit

Boston...
Toronto (23).
Montreal

bush.

hush.

761.431

Toledo..

Cincinnati

Oats,

6.079,101
1,925.128

415,050
996,178

Louis

Corn,

more

sackings, leading makes of which

—f

hi store at—
New York

St

little

430,112

the

Wheal,

hands.

048.219

The visible supply

at

from first

in moderate demand and firm at

a

92.853

for week

in cotton flannels

movement

Week,

95,419

j

unchanged.' There was a fair business in
leading makes of fine brown cottons, and some considerable
sales of light browns (adapted for conversion purposes) were
made by agents, but the export demand was very light.
Bleached goods ruled quiet, and outside makes are a trifle
easier in price ; but the best fine and medium-fine qualities are
steadily held. Wide sheetings were only in moderate request,
and colored cottons continued quiet; but there was a liberal
are

1882.

79,836

Flour.

goods market

Dark fancy prints were more active, as
were such staple calicoes as indigo-blues,
pinks, purples, &c.,
but light prints were generally quiet in the hands of both
agents and jobbers.
Domestic Woolen Goods —There was a continued light
and unsatisfactory demand for men’s-wear woolens, but fair
deliveries of fancy cassimeres, worsteds and
overcoatings were
made by agents on account of former orders.
Cloakings were

2,580

year

coming fall trade.
Domestic Cotton Goods.—The main features of the cotton

respective grades.

....

135,181 1,205,041 1,212,575

corresponding period of last

jobbing trade presented the quiet appearance usually witnessed
at this stage of the season, but jobbers in this city and at most
of the leading distributing points in the inteiior are
seemingly
in very good spirits, because of the fairly satisfactory outcome
of the spring business, and the encouraging aspect of the

were

116,267
49,895

105,001 1,025 047

.

1879-80.

31

t.

X

(O

<1M*1X ©

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•

THE OHRONIOLE1

32

Honesty Guaranteed
NEW

Companies, Institutions and Commercial
firms, can obtain suretyship from this Company at
moderate charges.
ha b^nds of this Company are
courts of the State of New York.

accepted by the

*

ACCIDENT INSURANCE.
Policies issued against accidents causing death or

totally disabling injuries.

Fun iniormatiou a* to details, rates, Ac., can be
obtained on application to head office, 179 Broad*
way. N. F.
wm. M. Richards, Prest. John M. Crank, Sec’j.

uiRKCTOKS—George T. Hope.G. G. Williams, Geo.
8. Coe, Charles Dennis, J. 8. T. Stranahan, A. B.
Hull, A. 8. Barnes, 8. B. Chittenden, II. A. Hurlbut
W. G. Low, David Dows. J. D. Vermilye,
Alex.
Mitchell, wm. M. Richards.

Honds ot

SuretyNhip

OTHER

NO

We give special
accessible points.

Directors.—Benjamin A. Botts, Pres’t; F. A.Rlce,

Thos. P. Miller & Co.,
Special attention paid to collections, with

No.

YORK

Correspondents.—Bank of the State of New York,

New York; Louisiana National Bank. New Orleans:
Bank of Liverpool, Limited. Liverpool.

A. K. Walker, Cashier

Pres’t.

First National

$800.Ono
400,000
214.000

Secretary.
Nbw York Directors.—Joseph w. Drexel, A. L
I’opkins. H. Victor Newcomb. John Paton, Dan:*|
Torrance. Edw. F. Winslow. Krast.ns Wiman.

on

'SSlestcrn

Hauliers.

The First National Bank, of Grand Rapids,
at Grand Ilaplds, in the State of Michigan, is

Middendorf,Oliver & Co.
BANKERS AND BROKERS,

8. W. Corner German 6c South St*.,
P.O. Box 897.
BALTIMORE. Md.
Special attention given to the negotiation of For
eign Bills of Exchange, Collateral Loans and Com¬
mercial Paper.
INDICATORS AND TELEPHONE IN OFFICE.

Robert Garrett & Sons,
BANKERS,

its affairs, its corporate existence, having expired
February 24, 1883.
All note holders and other
creditors oi said association are therefore hereby
notified to present the notes and other claims agutnst

As substantially the same management will con¬
tinue in the new organization, with equal capita

(which

N. W. Harris &

AN

No. 176

BROKERS,
BALTIMORE.

DEARBORN

STREET,

CHICAGO, ILL.

INVESTMENT and SOUTHERN SECURITIES

and

Co.,

INVESTMENT BANKERS

AND

nished.
N. Y. Correspondents—McKim

doubled) it is hoped the
long bestowed
to the present

be speedily

will

generous confidence and patronage so
upon its predecessor, will be continued

Wilson, Colston & Co.,
specialty.
Correspondence solicited

400,000

Referring to the foregoing the officers and directors
NATIONAL BANK OF GRAND
Of the OLD
RAPIDS, beg leave to announce that on Monday,
February 26 inst., they will continue the business of
banking in all its branches, at the same place of busi¬
ness. as suc essor of
the First National Bank of
Grand Rapids.

S. L. WITHEY. President.
H. J. HOLLISTER. Cashier.

FOREIGN BANKING BUSINESS.

BANKERS

information

a

fui

Brothers A Co.

BONDS,

Fisher & Sons,

BANKERS,
And Dealer* In Government*, Stock*
and Inve*tment

Securities,

32 SOUTH STREET,
BALTIMORE,
MD.,

Opposite Second St

The funding of entire issues receives special atten¬
tion. Write us if you wish to buy or sell.

Have Western Union wires in their offices, by
means of which immediate communication cun be
had with all commercial points in the country.
Es¬
pecial attention given to purchase and sale of Vir¬

ginia Consols, Ten-forties, Deferred and all issues

of the State, and to ail classes of Southern 8tate.
City and Railway Securities. Correspondence so¬
licited.

COMPANY

(OF
Transact

a

LONDON),

general Financial and Agency Business in
the State of Texas and Europe.
C. E. WELLESLEY,
Correspondents:
Bros. & Co
General Manager,

New York
Blake
Wall Street.

,

Dallas, Texas.

Eustis 6c Co.,

George

Southern Hauliers.
BANK.

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.
Coll actions made
terms;

on

all Southern points on best

prompt returns.

JOHN P. BRANCH, President.

John F. Glenn.Cash.

THOMAS
BANKERS

AND

Fred. R. Scott. Vice-I’res’t.

BRANCH
COMMISSION

Sc

CO.,

MERCHANTS

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.
Virginia Bends funded under the Funding Aot

passed by the last Legislature, for Hi per cent commis¬
sion. New North Carolina 6 percent bonds, secure ;
by lien on the State's stock in the North Carol.na
Railroad, for sale.

BANK

OF

CHARLESTON,

National Banking Association,

CHARLESTON, S. C.
OoLLBOTKiNR.

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVSN TO




E K S

AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS IN

RICE,
96 Wall

Street, New York,
10, 12 6c 14 East Ray, Charleston,
108 Bay Street, Savannah,
41 A 43 North Peter* St., New Orleans

Thos. M. Thornton.

W.

Wm. W. Thornton, Casn

THORNTON

F.

SAMUEL
Pine Custom

BUDD.

Shirts

Specialty.
Twenty Years’ experience war¬

Over

the

rants

Shirts

aie

ance

and

antee

in

assertion

our

that

Dress

our

unequalled for style, appear¬
workmanship. We guar¬
all cases a perfect fit. >

SAMUEL

BUDD,
Broadway & 24th Street, New York.

Brinckerhoft, Turner
&

Co.,

Manufacturers and Dealers in

COTTON SAIL DUCK
COTTON

CANVAS,

FELTING

DUCJC.

CAR

COVERING, BAGGING, RAVENS DUCK, SAIL
TWINES, AC., “ONTARIO” SEAMLESS
BAGS, “AWNING STRIPES
-

'

Also, Agents

UNITED STATES BUNTING CO.
A full

supply, all Widths and Colons, alwayB in stock
No. 109 Duane Street.

OF F I C E

CARPETS.

CINCINNATI. OHIO.

Sc

SON,

(Established 1859,)
BANKERS AND BROKERS,

HOUSEKEEPERS AND OCCUPANTS OF OF,
F1CES take notice.
Before buying your Carpets
Linoleum, Oilcloths, or Mattings, call at BENDALL’S
Misfit Carpet Store, 114 Fulton St., basement floor.

Cheapest place in New York.

ire

R

o

pe.

8HELBYVILLE, tLLINOI8.
Collections made in Shelby and adjoining Counties

8TEEL AND CHARCOAL

and Proceeds remitted on Day of Payment.
REFERENCES—National Hank of Commerce.New

suitable for MINING AND

York. Union National Bank,
Cincinnati. Third
National Bank, St. Louis. Traders’ Bank. Chicago.
Indiana Banking Company. Indianapolis.

P.

F.

KELG1IER
OLIVE STREET,

Dealer*

In

ST.

Western

IRON of

superior quality

HOISTING
PURPOSES.
Inclined Planes, Transmis¬
sion of Power,

&c.

Also,

[Galvanized Charcoal and BB

1871.

ESTABLISHED

305

Wm. C. Courtney. Pres. Ernest H. Pringle, Cash

Mortgage

LIMITED,

B K () K

NATIONAL

FACTORS

MILLERS,

And all kinds of

Texas Land &

,

MERCHANTS’

DanTalmage’s Sons & Co

State, County, City, Town. Schoo
and Car Trust Bought and Sold.

T HE

Wm.

Commercial (Cards.

$1,500,000

Capital Limit, ----Capital Paid in,
- - - -

Institution.

DOMESTIC

- -- -- -- -- - 25,000
Prompt attention given to all business in our line.
N. Y. Correspondents.—Donnell, l^awson & Co
and the Metropolitan National Bank..

OF GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

STREET,

GENERAL

Surplus,

The Old National Bank

BALTIMORE,
A

ROCK, ARKANSAS.
Capital (Paid in) ----- $75,000

up

HARVEY J. HOLLISTER, Cashier.

J. W. MIDDENDORF, W. B. OLIVER, C. A. ALBERTI
Members Baltimore Stock Exchange.

TRANSACT

Bank,

German

located
closing

on

Baltimore Hauliers.

SOUTH

( STATE BANK. (C. T. WALKER
Cashier.
(Incorporated 1875. J

all parts of the United States

the association for payment.

7

C. F. FENZEL,
President.

Grand Rapids, Mich., Feb. 24,1683.

D. J. TOMPKINS,

No.

$250,000

•.

Bank,

The First National Bank.

OFFICE:

-

WILMINGTON, N. C.

BROADWAY.

178

rompt
ay of

of Mobile Bonds.

E. B. BURRU8S,

Managing Director: Edward Rawlings.
NEW

.

Buy and sell State of Alabama and City

payment.

Vice-President:
IIon. Jas. Ferrikr.

President:
Sir. Alkx. T. Galt.

.

-

LITTLE

remittances at current rates of exchange on

Collections made

Cash Capital
Cash Assets
Deposit with Insurance Department

Capital,

C. A. Broadwater. Pres’t. A. G. Clarke, V.-Pres’t.
E. Sharpe. Cashier.

BANKERS,

MOBILE, ALABAMA.

BUSINESS.

NORTH AMERICA.

BENJ. A. BOTTS.Pres’t

B. F. WEEMS. Cashier.

The Guarantee Co.
OF

UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.

C. C. Baldwin, W. B. Botts, Rob’t Brewster. S. K.

Mcllhenny, B. F. Weems.

Bank,

HELENA, M. T.

collections on ali

attention to

fBatifcers.

Montana National

Texas.

Houston,

YORK.

Public

HOUSTON,

OF

CAPITAL, $500,000,

Bunks, Railroads and Transportation

Companies, Managers, Secretaries and Clerks of

BANK

CITY

THE

PftUELITY Sc CASUALTY CO.
OF

<®8testeru

jibutfteru fJmrtters.

financial Companies.

Officials of

ITol. nivn

Sc

CO.,

LOUIS,

Securities.

Defaulted Bonds of Missouri Kansas and Illinois

Specialty. Good Investment Securities, paying
4to 10 per cent, for sale.
References in New York, by permission, Clark
Dodge At Co., 01 Wall St.; Hatch A Foote, 12 wall St.
» References in St. Louis. Banks generally.

for

Ships’ Rigging, Suspen¬

sion Bridges, Derrick Guys,
Ferry Ropes, Ac. A large
stock

constantly on hand
which
any
desired
lengths are cut.
FLAT

from

STEEL AND IRON ROPE8
for Mining purposes manu¬
factured to order.

JOHN W*'MASON 6c CO*.

49 Broadway, now T©rlu^

/


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102