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:

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nmmerfta

r0nine

INCLUDING
Bank and (Rotation Section

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(Monthly)

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Entered aocordiiiK to Act of Congress, In the year

A

weeklr nevrspaper entered at Post

VOL.

Office,

by William B. Dana Company, in tlie office of Librarian of Confess, Wasliin-ton '
York, as second-class matter- William B. Dana Compant, Publishers, 7rt}4 Pine St.,
N. Y.

1!)04,

New

SATURDAY, JULY

79.

Week ending July 9

—

Clearings at

1904.

1903.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

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CLEARING MOUSE RETURNS.

O

Bloomington
Ouincy

necatur.
The following table, made up by telegraph, etc., indicates! .Mansfield
.Jacksonville
that the total bank clearings of all the clearing houses of the Jackson
United States for the week ending to-day, July 16, have Ann Arbor
Total Mid. Western
been $2,136,958,243, against $1,822,338,259 last week and
$2,306,046,827 the corresponding week last year.
San Francisco
Seattle
Salt Lake City..
Portland.

1904.

1903.

Baltimore
Chicago
8t. Louis
New Orleans

$1,044,507,896
106,721,302
89,241.547
17,757,523
149,217,352
45,387,282
10,711,928

$1,177,058,754
113,012,670
100,825,093
22,107,240
147,324,652
45,804.982
13.040,463

Seven cities, 5 days
Other cities, 5 days

$1,463,544,880
297,402,118

$1,619,179,854
290.407,621

-90 Omaha

$1,760,949,948
376,011,294

$1,909,587,475
396,459,352

-7-8
-5-2

f2,136.958,242

$2,300,046,827

New York
Boston
Philadelphia

Total

all cities,

5 days.

All cities, 1 clay

Total

The

all cities

for week.

P. Cent

-11-3
—5-6
-11-5
—19-7
+1-3
-0-9
-17-9

Spokane

Tacoma
Helena
Fargo
Sioux Falls
Total Pacific.

Kansas City
Minneapolis

+2-4

St.
St.

Paul
Joseph

Denver
De.s Moines
Sioux City

Topeka
Davenport

week covered by the above will he Wichita
given next Saturday. We cannot furnish them to-day, clear- Cdlorado Springs
I'Yeraont
mgs being made up by the clearing houses at noon on Satur- Cedar Rapids
Total other West'rn
day, and hence in the above the last day of the
week has to
be in all cases estimated, as we go to press Friday night.
St. Louis
Now Orleans
We present below
full details for the

our usual detailed figures for the previous Louisville
Houston
week, covering tlie retui-ns for the period ending with Satur- Galveston
day noon, July 9, and the results for the corresponding Richmond.

week m 1903, 1902 and 1901 are also given. Contrasted with
the week of 1903 the total for the whole country shows
a loss
of 16-9 per cent. Outside of New York the
decrease from 1903
19 15*4

per cent.

2,028,
1,811.
1,857,
788,
550,
554,
685,

133,530,088

161,213,

168.160,218
23,508,800
14.943,978
9,688,146
0.736,509
0,010.358
4,135,800
2,861,617
2.168,816
1,957,209
1,588.944
1,015,809
473.400
751,519
523,105
051.346
090.181
474.200
414.488
352,494
282,604
337.441
247,454
188,501
219,571
145.000

172 792,119
22,475,750
14,738,607
11,533,681

414,51'
S83,02'

100,36'

Clearings

at—
1904.

l,075,437,2,'5fl
U0,D)(<!,(!17

1,. 165,204

190L

1902.

Dec.

1.353,7,S5

1,002,015
719.783

1,243,111

38,:i;i4.120

Buffalo
Washington.....!!!

Albany
Rochester
!!

!!

Breensbur,;
Chester
grle
Franklin, Pa....!!'

Reading

Total Middle.....

-ISO

1,311,052.985
121,399,011
47,423,487
26.609,578
6,912,850
4.621.140
8,977,929
2.744.222
1,725,750
1.599,346

91 12.140

Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Baltimore

Whee.Ing
Blnifhamton

Inc. OT

19.922,260
6,281,635
4,223,773
4,048,682
3,003,545
1.64!l,H13

200

—19-2
—25-1

721,120
619,709

401,477
227,513
261, .333
1,021,805 .Not Include
1,240,691,694

1. .535,108,401

108, 041,077

43 .452.;Wh
'

31

,0:!5,

101,265,303
41,987.515
24,H25,y(Ml

75:1,395

6,857.444

4 ,202.555

2.882,8C.9

3,.662.606

3 357,838

8,,133.787

2,508,817
1,210,154

4.

1

,465,004

—890

1 ,411.686
1 ,176,281

1,39.5.322

-151

701,003
766,131
444.600

851,513
654,422
392,800

— 194

52^1.137

4.'i6

1,866,.068,402 1..5et.l46,455

+6-2
-8-0
+1-8
+9-4
—4-4
-14-6

847.308
416,700

5.58.043
52.J.012

-25

$

-j-47

+55

569.:*20

111

to

180

388,11)0

834,872

-27-2
—22-7
-12-9
I

1,128,764

296,482

13.602,490
11,638,699
6,860,822
5,533,807
8,786.806
3,573,134
2,200.000
1.085.667
815.015
1,024,534
818,600

-32

1

— 15-6
-37

—24
—30-9
—13-7

—17

2

-8-5

—3
+1-4

— 16-0
—13
-301
—15-8
-)-6-4

— 19-3
-5

5

—15-4
-2-6

-300
+24-1
189

—

-I-0-4

+5-5
-21-8
-t-8

-21-2
-17-2

—18 2
-85 3
-2-2
-12-6
—24-8

-42

143,821,523
6,626.600
3.103,221
2,178,040
1,826,256
1,640,126

laoL
148,830,560
8.266,400
3 595.740
1,987.322
l,5y2,.391

1,890..820

1.507,686
1,397,755

805.739
644,770
593,976
514,021
163 044,592

966.144
688,252
461.022
525.589
169,824,861

189.807,197
23,385.600
18.348,202
10,134.506
8,666,079
5,255,849
4,146.400
2.541,159
2,508,857
1,600,844
1,466,026
1,166,437
708,000
560,891
793,709

148,563,848

520 060
667,188
445,71
887,063
889,504
837,625
233,768
830,905
231,330
204,897
182,988
67.682

19,.5y8,250
l(i.25l.878

12,227,138
0,597,439
4,032,887
3,302,600
2,072,870
2,015,633
1,628,341
1,382,794
1,236,632

672,500
508.940
018,064
472,764
523.220
472, 129
455,665
822,168
284,325
252,270
85,000
145,250
130,288
65.050

400,0(10

139,044
393,563

51,478,23b

274,488,732

—4-6
-3-8
-2-5

—12
-12

-2 3

—7-8
+10-9
+0-6
—31-7

224.523.943

28.524.569
5,519,976

22.015.934
3,353,053
2.804,391
5,859,356
2,369.945
1.222,627
1,002,271
581,657

4,221,26'

3,383,253
3.185.279
2,016,616
1,196,054
584.605
540.706
231,253

49,303.578

319 347
208,333
39,827,513

0,782,.507

5.231.052
4.794,606
2,618,724
1,853 671
1.223,540
1,047,52'

512,218
502 105
146,482

Not Include
68,077,479
49.801,434
22,326,438
10.638,413
6,3(38.599

2.682,500
4,804,610
8.910,126
8,351,937
2.784.872
2,756,399
1.471,372
1,591.415
1,828,801
1,090.316
984,548
923,882
793,000
1,098 314

Atlanta
.Nashvill'e

Norfolk

Worth
Birmingham
Fort

Charlestoh

Cha tt anooga

769.95'

53O.000
469.467

Ja(•lc^^oIlTille

On

Southern

Not Include
....

117.482.400

Total all
Outside New York.

2,103,865,740

746,901,003

882,792,755

20,380,207
20,866,013
6,685,440
2,424,211
2,115,179
2,273,162

26,5,50,580

959

—

1.542.641
1,030,549
1,004.081

Canada—
.Montreal

Toronto
Winnipeg
Halifax

Ottawa
(^uol)ec
\ iincoiiver

1,.
374,

llaniUton

1,356,909
981,181

John
London

1,671,878,702 1,784. 155.2CM

-f3-3

—241

1902.

20,869,578
14,547.794
8.447,015

,

St.
tal.

—22-4
-6-2

60,136.62b

Memphis

'I'otal

054,4
606.310
381,201
447,526
841.938
412.448
382.390
192,673
251,367
192,933
104,754

27,905,778
6,268,844
4,303.895
2,840,934
3,380,902
2,354.832
1.736.168
504,270
434,403
407,03

Savannah

Coliimbud,

—17

t>48,576

26,614.654
6.028,239
4,190.726
2.499.730
2,950.607
2,300,580
1,600.705
559,269
436,848
277,985

Beininont

New York

Scrnnton
Syracuse
Wllmlnirton
Wilkes Barre

1903.

Inc. or
Dec.

261,787,819

Augusta
Little Rock
MMCon

0.

7,809,4'20

8,595,789
4,875,500
2,690,038
2,6»8,531
2.072,242
1,878,904
1,043,213
676,200
605.432
645,834

238,628,044

Knoxville

Week ending July

140,619,
6,652,
3,432,
2,233,

47,465,343

Los Angeles

Clearings— Returns uy 'lelegrapli.
Week Ending Julu 16,

116.353,929
5,159,800
3,218,872
2.308,751
1,544,325
1,230,491
1.568,318
759,013
591,051

,

Worcester

|

Terms

,

Springfield

I

C.

NO. 2038.

1904.

16,

D

1,307,5(KI

10,284.042
5,939.042
1.993,946
2,53:1,384

2.085,956

!.

470,195

909,025
644.761

Total Canada....

69,244,022

62 487,607

Victoria

44,006.266

THE CHRONICLE.

176

now bu added Oklahoma.

Probably aumo millions of
bushels of winter wheat have been lost to that crop

THE FINANCIAL SITUATION
In this article

last

week we spoke

of the

Ddmocratic

party as having "apparently been re-created' by

[Vol. Lxxix.

"nom-

from

this cause

in the States

named and elsewhere,
moment of the

leaving a fair average estimate at the

man on a safe platform." That state- country's total production of winder and spring wheat
ment was written under the expectation that the Con- at say not much If any in excess of 600,000,000 bushels,

inating a safe

vention would adopt the platform with the provision
Incloded which had been proposed respecting the
gold

When

money standard.

the platform was passed

with the gold issue ignored, the position of the party

on the most important

became open

against 640,000,000 bushels based on the Agricultural

Department condition, etc., figures for the first of
Corn and other grain crops are making good
progress; low temperature and an excess of moisture

July.

to

are said to be Interfering with the harvesting of oats

has turned out, this ver^ uncertainty
gave Jadge Parker the opportunity of getting an in-

and delaying the development of corn, though a
phenomenal crop of the latter cereal Is still antici-

question.

As

of all Issues

it

terpretation of the platform

Being

a

man

of

from the Convention.
and of outspoken

convictions

honesty, and believing that ignoring the issue left the
intent subject to quibble, he greatly strengthened himself

and

his party in public estimation by sending the

following message to the Convention:

"I regard the gold standard as firmly and irrevocably established, and shall act accordingly If the action
of Convention to-day shall be ratified by the people.
As the platform is silent on the subject, my view
should be made known to the Convention, and. If it
Is proved to be unsatisfactory to the majority, I request you to decline the nomination for me at once,
so that another may be nominated before adjourn*

pated.

do not appear to have had any
on the advance in stock values, except of course progress In that direction would
scarcely have been possible had the negative attitude
on the 16to-l issue of the Damocratlc platform re*
mained unchallenged by Jadge Parkor. That Is trae,
Political

affairs

special iijflaence

by a party convention when facing a
burning issne leaves the matter open to the severe
public Interpretation of being a cowardly dodge. The
money market has continaed favorable to expanding
business on the Exchange. It looks now as If there
was good promise of easy money through the fall
ment."
months.
Crops will be late and large, and free shipThe Convention, after a struggle which showed ments of currency to the West and South will no
most evidently the great necessity that existed for an doubt be needed to move them to market. Bat the
explicit declaration, made the following answer to the bank gross holdings of cash are excessive
very
Above
considerably in excess of last year and the previous
since silence

—

" The platform adopted by this Convention is silent year also. We are not referring to the surplus but to
on the question of the monetary standard because it the gross reserves everyone knows that the sarplua
is not regarded by us as a possible issue in this camcompares favorably with recent previous years; but
paign and only campaign issues were mentioned in
the platform.
Therefore there Is nothing in the that is not the only guaranty against stringency this
;

views expressed by you In the telegram just received
^hlch would preclude a man entertaining them fiom
accepting a nomination on said platform.''

The gross reserves Jaly 9 1904 were $94,571,000 larger than they were Jaly 11 1903 and $77,778,900
At the moment
larger than they were Jaly 12 1902.

This inquiry and response enable us to reaffirm
what we claimed last week and supposed had been done
that the Democratic Party, by
at the time we wrote
nominating a safe man on a lafe platform, had put out
of politics the disturbing issue with reference to a gold
standard for our currency. It will be noticed likewise
that the Convention's favorable response by a vote of
786 to 190 goes even further; It not only commits the
party unequivocally to the gold standard, but is to be
taken as an actual promise by the Convention, and
through it by the party, to join in aiding Jadge
Parker, if elected and the need occurs, to carry out
his expressed determination to use every means to
maintain that standard. Hta exaot words are "I
regard the gold standard ss firmly and irrevocably
established, and shall act accordingly.*' Lawyer-like
he covers every possible present contingency and
every possible future development. This action consequently aid most effectually puts the 16 to-1 issue
out of politics and prevents the political campaign
from being in any degree a menace to business.

the reserve requirement to cover greater deposits

—

—

season.

course, in excess of the previous years

named; but

is,

if

of

onr

money market grows a little harder, loans now being
carried in New York banks will be transferred to
London or Berlin or Paris (or to some other point
where a cheaper market is to be found), deposits will
decline, and cash reqalrements for reserve will decrease, so that a portion of the gross cash holdings will

be freed.
Special transactions in foreign exchange have been
leading features in that market the current week and
are increasing

the foreign capital offering In our

money market.

One of these was the offering by
bankers of sight bills for delivery daring the first half
of October at 4 86f and for the remainder of that
month at 4 86^. There is little doabt that cotton aa
soon ss It matures will be in great demand for Europe
to replenish spinners' reduced stocks, and hence the
early cotton

a

result

export
of

large.

Ag

speculators

in

movement should be

this

condition

exchange believe rates for exchange will
fall heavily during the early months, as was the case
last year, thus enabling such finance bills as may now
be drawn to be covered with sight drafts, bought immediately prior to the maturity of the finance bill, at
a very satisfactory profit, even though the amount realized from Interest on the proceeds of these finance
Inasmuch, however, as
bills may be only moderate.

foreign

Oar Stock Exchaiige market kept strong the first
the week but Thursday yielded in face of
the fact that crop reports during the week had
half of

not teen wholly favorable. Friday the market not
recorded farther advances.
only recovered but
There seems to be no escape from the conclusion noted by us last week, "that winter wheat
in parts of K-ineas, Missouri and Nebraska has
t

een having too

much

rain;" to the foregoing should

there

is

always more or less risk attending speculathis character, It is regarded as de-

tive operations of

'

July

16, 1904.

THE CHRONICLE.

j

177

Blrable to procure, at or about the time

when the finance tendency of prices on the Stock Exchange. The
packdrawn, contracts for the delivery of the sight ers strike, it Is felt, cannot
be prolonged for any great
drafts which will be needed for cover, thus Insuring length of time,
and the reduction in the wages of

bills are

the operator in the finance

ing a

demand

bill

against loss, and creat-

for the above-noted contracts.

If these

speculative of orations in exchange shall be large this
season, as now seems probable, they will have the
throngh the loaning of the proceeds of
effect,
the ficaace bills, of Increasing
the supplies of

cotton- mill operatives is looked upon as the
logical
outcome of the situation In the cotton-goods trade.
The mills simply cannot continue present wa^es and

remain in buslnesp.
It will be recalled that the
manufacturers have bean exceedingly reluctant to

make the cut. The qaestion, it will be remembered,
was under consideration six weeks ago, but the Cotton Manufacturers' Association then decided to defer
action for the time being in the hope that it might be
upon, for six months. Another feature of the week
found possible to avert the step. This, it is now seen,
was the negotiation of sterling loans, bankers drawing cannot
be done. It is not yet clear what course the
nicety-day bills and loaning them on pledge of stock
operatives will take regarding the reduction, but if
collateral to clients who agree to repay the loan
they display wisdom they will yield to the inevitable
with a steiling draft, meanwhile employing the
and acquiesce. Nothing Is to be gained from any
proceeds
time

money
may be

for

the

periods during which such
loans
effected, either for three months, or. In
cases wherejrenewals of the finance bills are agreed

of

to

their

own

the

draft

Individual

in

the

money

market other course.

advantage.

This operation differs from that with other finance bills
In the Iron and steel Industry the situation appears
In
that the banker who draws the draft incurs
no to be becoming clearly defined. The tone ia undoubtrisk of unfavorable changes In the sterling rate by
the edly better than it was, but business is small and the
time the loan matures, he loaning sterling and being demand limited. The action
last week ot the various
repaid in that kind of money, which is procured by the associations of manufacturers
in re affirming existing
borrower of the bill. The latter may obtain Insurance schedules cf 'prices has had a
good effect, even though
against loss resulting from an unexpected adverse It is understood that
these prices are not in all cases
movement of exchange during the life of the loan by being strictly maintained. Semi-official
announcesecuring a contract for the delivery of the sight draft ment this:week that the
United States Steel Corporawhich he will require for the repayment of the loan, tion for the June quarter
would show net earnings
as in the case of the finance bill.
of
about 19i million
dollars,
as against only
13i million dollars for the March quarter. Is
The developments of the week, apart from those looked upon
as an encouraging feature and
has
enumerated above. Include some important events.
played no small part in advancing Steel shares and
The one around which perhaps the most interest cen- stiffening
Stock Exchange prices generally.
In
ters, having regard to the Stock Exchange,
is the the meantime production
is being curtailed so as to
decision banded down yesterday by Judge Bradfcrd
prevent any excessive accumulations of unsold goods.
in the United States District Court for the
District of Evidence that this course is being
pursued is furNew Jersey continuing the temporary injunction nished In the
monthly pig Iron statistics published
granted upon the petition of E. H. Harrlman and
the present:week]by the ''Iron Age" of this city.
It
Winslow S. Pierce to restrain the Northern Securities is really
the only sensible course open to producers,
Company from carrying out its proposed plan for the and
theloperation is facilitated by the fact that prodistribution of its assets.
This decision, if sustained, ductionp8>ow'so"strongly
concentrated In the handg
means that the Harriman people will get back of a
few largo^rconcerns. This Is one of the advanthe precise securities
turned
in by them
at tages whlchfthese large organizations afford.
There
the time of the organfzation of the Northern
Securi- is not such'a multitude of counsels and
fewer Interties Company; that is, will get back
simply Northern ests to consult. According to the
figures prepared by
Pacific stock Instead of part Northern
Pacific and our contemporary, the make of Iron
In June was only
part Great Northern stock.
Moreover, the amount 1,292,030 tons, against
1,633,350 tons in May and
of Northern Pacific stock which they will receive
will 1,667,26?: tonsj'in April.
In other words, the Juno
give them control of that property. As,
however, the output was 241,000 tons less than that for
May. Of
case is likely to be appealed, and does not appear
to this decrease, 184,000 tons

have been decided at all upon its merits (Judge Bradford apparently taking the view that the rights
of the
complainants should be preserved by injunction,
because if there were no injunction Jthey would
lose
their chances of recovery), the final outcome
will not
be known for some time.

was due to curtailment by
the steel companies and 67,000 tons must be
credited
to curtailment by the merchant furnaces.
The latter,

however, added 76,000 tons to their aggregate
of
stocks, sold and unsold, during the month,
from
which It follows that a further restriction of output

is
necessary.
Such further restriction has taken
second event of importance has been the formal place
since the first of July.
It is becoming more and
announcement made at Fall River on Thursday by the more
evident that these merchant furnaces, like the
Cotton Manufacturers' Association of a reduction
of steel companies, are adjusting their output
to the
12i per cent in the wages of operatives to go into requirements of
the situation.
effect July 26.
Notices of the reduction were posted

A

up at the mills on the afternoon of that day. Still
another happening of the week, and one which
is of
direct concern to practically every family
In the land,
has been the general strike of the employees
of all the
large beef-packing plants throughout
the country.
It Is significant that none of
these occurrences has
had any material Infiuenoe in checking the
upward

ThereJwas]no change in official rates of discount by
any of the European banks this week, ai:d compared
with last week unofficial or open market rates were
higher at all the principal centres.

The feature of the statement of the New York
Associated Banks last week was, as was the case In
the prevlousjweek, a wide discrepancy between the

J

THE CHRONICLE.

78

I

estimated and the officially reported Increase In caah,
Depoaits
the latt(r shoeing a net gain of $1,202,800.
increased $6,161,600, and the required reserve was

sympathetically

from

New

been

made

thereby augmented $1,290,376, deducting from which
the gain In cash left $87,6?5 as the decrease in surplus reseiye to $36,017,726. Calculated upon the

ances

at

4i(3i6 per cent.

short

short

sterling.

Orleans
in

4 82

that

market of
October and 4

that
for

large

Vol. Lxxix.

It

Is

reported

offerings

have

cotton

accept-

for

Novem-

81 1

This seems to Indicate that there will be a free
export movement of cotton at the opening of the
basis of deposits less those of $23,282,400 public seaeon and it stimulates the liberal offerings of finance
Loans were In- bills which are now made by New York bankers, for
funds, the surplus is $41,838,326.
creased $3,263,300, carrying this Item to within with large exports of cotton there will presumedly be
$633,800 of the maximum, which was recorded on May low rates for all classes of bankers' drafts, thus enaThe bank statement of this week should reject, bling the ninety-day finance bills to be covered at a sat14.
among other movements, the transfer hither from isfactory profit, even if the covering bill shall not be
San Francisco of $841,198, representing Japanese secured through contracts therefor deliverable in Octyen and of $441,661 domestic bullion deposited at ober or when the finance draft is about to mature.
that point, and also the payment of $833,698 Seattle, Oommercial bills are reported scarce and though
Waeh., Assay Office checks for Klondike gold. It is steiling was heavy the rates for Continental exexpected that about $2,000,000 in Japanese yen will change were fairly steady until the close of the week.
arrive at San Francisco to-day (Saturday), which will Gold received at the Custom House during the week,
be transferred hither next week.
$6,586.
Nominal quotations for sterling exchange are 4 86
Money on call, representing bankers' balances, for sixty day and 4 88 'for sight. Eites for actual
loaned on the Stock Exchange during the week each business on Saturday of last week were, compared
day at 1:^ per cent atd at 1 per cent, averaging 1^ with those on the previous day, 6 points lower for long
per cent, and the bulk of the business was at 1i per and for cables, at 4 8620@4 8630 for the former and
cent.
Banks and trust companies loaned at 1^ per 4 8760@4 8755 for the latter; sight was unchanged at
cent as the minimum. There was a little better de 4 8720@4 8726. On Monday there was a recovery of
mand for time loans maturing after the turn of the 6 points all around, long to 4 8526@4 8535, short to
year, and offerings of ninety- day contracts by foreign 4 8726@4 8730 and cables to 4 8766@4 8760; the tone
bankers were readily accepted. Eates on good mixed was firm. On Tuesday the msrket was easy at a deStock Exchange collateral were quoted at 2 per cent cline of 6 points for long and short to 4 8620@4 8630
for sixty and 2J per cent for ninety days, 3^ per cent for the former and to 4 8720@4 8725 for the latter;
for four to five and 3^ per cent for six to eight cables were unchanged.
Oa Wednesday long fell 5
months. The cfferings of endorsed commercial paper points to 4 8616@4 8526, short 10 points to 4 8710@
of high grade, which caused the rate to decline last 4 8720 and cables 10 points to 4 8746@4 8765. The
week to 3 per cent, have been absorbed, and quota- tone was heavy, and it so continued on the following
tions this week for sixty to ninety- day endorsed bills day, when long fell 15 points, to 4 86@4 8610 (reflectreceivable are 3^ per cent, with some exceptional ing liberal offerings of finance bills), short declined 6
transactions at 3^ per cent.
Prime single names ma points to 4 8710@4 8716, and cables 10 points to
tuting in four months are 3f per cent and those run- 4 874U@4 8745. The market was weak on Friday at
ning six months are 4 per cent, while good paper of a decline of 25 points for long and of 10 points for
these maturities

Is

ber.

and for

cables.

The following shows daily posted rates for exchange
England minimum rate of discount re by some of the leading drawers.
DAILT POBTBD RATES FOB FOBEIQH KXOHAKOE.
mains unchanged at 3 per cent. The cable reports discounts of sixty to ninety-day bank bills in London 2i@
Frl,
MON.,
TUIS., \V»D.. Thctk., FBI..
July 11. Julv 12. July 13. July 14. Julv IB.
July
3f per cent. The open market rate at Paris is If ptr
86
86
80
86
86
60 days 4 83
cent and at Berlin and Frankfort it is 2|@3 per cent. Brown
88
88
88
88
88
JSlKht.. 4 88
Brothers
86
86
86
60 days 486
86
86
BarinK,
According to our special cable from London, the Bank
88
88
88
88
88
MaKOun t Co. (Sijiht.. 4 88
86
86
60 days 4
86
86
86
of England lost £127,312 bullion during the week Baak British
Sight.. 488
88
88
88
88
No. America.
89
00 days 4 86
86
86
86
86
and held £34,148,869 at the close of the week. Our Bank of
488
88
88
88
Montreal
^SlKht..
88
88
86
86
correspondent further advises us that the loss was due Canadian Bank 60 days 4 86
86
8«
86
488
88
88
88
88
of Commerce.. SlKht
88
to the import of £240,000, of which £160,000 from Heldelbaoh.Iok- 60 days 488
86
86
H6
86
86
88
elhelmer& Co. Sight.. 4 88
88
88
88
88
Egypt, £10,000 from Australia and £8O,C00 bought Latard
86
d»yB 486
86
86
86
86
Sight.. 4 88
88
Freres
88
88
88
in the open market, to exports of £50,000 to Java Herobanti' Bk. 60 days 486
86
86
86
86
86
Sight.. 4 88
88
of Canada
88
88
88
and to shipments of £317,000 net to the interior of
Great Britain.
The market closed on Friday at 4 8475^4 8490 for
long, 4 87(^4 8710 for short and 4 8730^4 8740 for
The foreign exchange market, after opening steady cables.
Commercial on banks, 4 84 f (^4 84^ and
to firm, gradually fell off, Influenced by a light de
documents for payment, 4 84^4 84|. Cotton for
mand and by offerings of finance and security bills, payment, 4 84^4 84^
cotton
for
acceptance,
and it was heavy for the remainder of the week. As 4 84|@4 84^, and grain for payment, 4 84^^4
84f
The Bank

of

8.

)

5

j

8fl

(58

1
(

(

}

}

i

j flO

fc8

}
5
)

;

above noted, one feature was the offering of sight
drafts, deliverable in October, at rates sufficiently low
The following gives the week's movement of money
to induce their purchase by bankers who desired to to and from the interior by the New York banks.
protect themselves against possible loss resulting from
Received by
Shipped by
NetlnUrior
Week ending July 16, 1904.
their drawings of finance bills which would mature in
N. r. Banks S. r. Banki.
Movement.
that month.
The ability to procure such sight drafts Currency..
Oain. $3,828,000
$4,819,000
$8,147,000
498,000
004,000
Gain.
411,000
seemed to encourage quite liberal negotiations of Gold
$9,061,000
$4,812,000
Gain. $4,380,000
Total gold and legal tenders.
finance bills, which directly affected long and

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

With the Sab- Treasury

operatlonsi

the result

is

as follows:
Out of
Banks.

Into

15, 1904.

Banks.

Banks Interior movement as above

Net Change in

Hank Holdings

i

Sub-Treasury operations

$9,061,000
29,600,000

$1,812,000
27,400,000

Gain. $4,289,000
Gain. 2,100,000

'

$38.651,000

$32,218,000

Gain. $6,339,000

.

Total gold and legal tenders.

.

following table Indicates the

in the principal

amonnt

of bullion

European banks.

July

Bank

of 785 to
be found in the
''Floanolal Situation." In other words, the only
action taken at any time on the money issue by the
St. Louis Convention was a declaration that it was
willing to adopt and endorse a candidate whose declared purpose was to assert and maintain the gold
standard of currency. We think it perfectly fair to

li, 1904.

July

Silver.

Oold.

Total.

Oold.

£

£

16, 1903,

£

34,148,869

34,148,869

Silver.

Jotal

£

36.696,985

86,598,985

France. .. 109.843,353 45,114,149 154,467,602 100,678,410 44,905,536 146,483,946
Germany..* 32,868,000 11.373,000 43,741.000 32,770,000 11,513,000 44,883,000
93,287,000
8,373,000 101,680,000 79,326.000
BOBSla
9.065,000 88,391.000

n8.-Han.f

47,664,000

18,818.000

60,482,000

45,187,000

Spain.
Italy
Netherl'ds.

14,783,000

20,293,000

35,016,000

22,358,000

3,989,600

5,478,600

6,527,000

26,341,800
12,003,600

14,572,000| 20,500,000
18,fi92,000
2,833,800

Nat. Bele."

3,088,833

1,541,667

4,625,000

3,940.000

2,980.000

13,043,000

6,648,300
1.490,000

which

will

also

say that this resolution expressed the actual voice of
the Convention; because, it must be renaembered, no
vote whatever was taken by the delegates as a whole

of

JIngland-..

The Convention then adopted, by a vote

190, the resolution

Week ending July

The

179

58,830,000
36,072,000

21.025,800
10,48 ^S00
4,470,000

Tot. week.. 362,446,165 110,029,416 478,475,671 384,641,395 109.398,636 444,041,031
Tot, prey.. '36g.ftn9.30P 110.013,678 473.012,987 334,860,941 109.778,740 444,139!a81
.

*»• dlvlBloii (between gold and silver) glTen In oar table of coin
and bullion in the Bantt of Germany and the Bank of Belgium Is made
from the best estimate we are able to obtain In neither oase Is It
elalmed to be aoourate, as those banks make no distinction In their
weekly returns, merely reporting the total gold and silver, but we
;

we make is a close approximation.
The Aiiitro-Hnngarlan Bank statement is now Issued in Kronen and Heoer Instead of Gulden and Kreutier. The reduction of the former
currency to
sterling * was by considering the Gulden to have the value
of 60 oenu. At
believe the division
t

the Krone has really no greater value than 20 cents, our cable
correspondent In
London, In order to reduce Kronen
4, has altered the basis of oonveriion by
dividing the amonnt of Kronen by 24 Instead of 80,

on the question either of adopting or omitting a goldstandard declaration.
The platform submitted by

committee contained no money plank, and the
vote on it was had under the previous question, which
shut off both debate and amendment. This being so,
their action on Judge Parker's message stands as
the
single pronouncement of the delegates on the money
their

question.

It does not leave the agitators of the party
the slightest excuse for reviving their currency notions
on the stump.

We

have thought it necessary to state in brief the
chief facts about last Saturday's episode, because they
seem to us of high Importance to the future, both
our politics and of our finance. Last week we
pointed out why, in our judgment, the silver cause was
practically a dead Issue.
But the fact remained that
of

renewed advocacy, even of a dead financial heresy, at
party gatherings this year could not have failed
to
upset business cofidence and derange business enterJUDGE
THE OOLD
prise.
It was not to be expected that an agitator
who
STANDARD.
had displayed in the Convention such audacity of purThere are many reasons why the remarkable political pose and
fertility of resource in his struggle to keep
incident of last Saturday, whereby the Democratic
alive the one issue which made him a political
personcampaign was squarely placed, by the act of its can- age
would abandon the same endeavor in campaign
didate, in line with sound-money propaganda,
was a time if he had the opportunity.

PARKER AND

matter of historical importance. Its probable effect,
That opportunity he seemed for twenty-four hours
for good or ill, on the fortunes of Judge Parker
in to have secured for himself; but
the events which folthis campaign, and its bearing on the result
of the lowed have irrevocably destroyed
it.
Any demagogue
election, it is not our purpose to discuss;
we shall who undertakes to preach free-silver coinage from
the
leave that particular field of argument to the
political party's stump in this campaign
stamps himself by that
controversialists.
It appears to us, however, that
act as an irregular campaigner who has
refused to
Judge Parker's telegram to the St. Louis Convention,
abide by the decision of his party.
What that means
and the Convention's action on it, have a significance
can best be understood by people who know the attiquite beyond their bearing on the results of
a single tude taken by Western and Southern
votera towards a
canvass.
They have, in our judgment, set at rest formal
pronouncement of their party. It has been
the currency agitation as it could not have
been set at proved on many previous
occasions that a November
rest by any other means short of an
absolute declara- vote would be oast for
policies thus officially declared,
tion by the Convention for the gold standard.
even when the voter did not personally
accept
We stated a week ago, after the Convention had de- them.
cided to omit in its platform any reference
to the
We believe, therefore, that the free-silver issue is
financial issue, our regret at its action,
and also our really burled ; first, because,
for the first time iu our
reasons for believing that the omission did
not neces history both parties are
committed against it; second,
sarlly mean that the silver issue
was alive again. because the voters not of
one party only, but of both,
There were, at the same time, some very
unfortunate will be able to appeal to their
party's action in enfacts about the situation as it then
stood.
The most dorsing the present money standard
; and, third,
beunhappy part, had it been left unaltered,
was that cause the agricultural West
and South, where curBryan and his sympathizers would have been
enabled rency heresies have always
heretofore had their origin
to claim that the matter was purposely
left open, and and their
main support, in times of agricultural
that they had the right to preach
free-silver coinage adversity, are
prosperous, wealthy, and sick of finanon the stump at political meetings in the
campaign cial agitation. To suppose, indeed,
that the wheatag surely as in 1900 and in 1896.
growers of the West, with high prices,
abundant
This was the situation which conservative
men, in crops for half a dozen successive
years, and a vastly
and out of the party. Instantly recognized,
and which increased private wealth, or
the cotton-planters of the
the
party's
candidate fortunately recognized as
South, after the most lucrative season in their
history,
promptly. How completely that situation
was re- are clamoring for a change In the
money standard
versed may be seen by the language
of Judge Parker's under which
these blessings descended on them,
telegram, and of the Convention's formal
action on It
would be to show small knowledge of human
'
intelllwhich we give in full in a previous article.
gence and human
'

nature.

THE CHRONICLE.

180

THE WHEAT OUTLOOK AND OUR
BREADSTUFF8 EXPORTS.
queatlonB present themselvee in
connection with the outlook for the current aeaaon'B
wheat crop in the United Statea. There are always

Some

Intereatlng

cording to the

[Vol. Lxxix.
figures

prepared by the

New York

Produce Exchange, visible stocks of wbeit last 8»*;urday were only 13,638,000 bushels, this comparing
with 14,311,000 bushels July 11 1903; 19,808,000
bushels July 12 1902; 27,978,000 bashels July 13
1901 and 46,081,000 bushels July 14 1900. Furthermore, the Agricultural Department estimates the

size of our wheat crop Is Im
bearing on domestic supplies amount of wheat remaining In farmers' hands on
portant.
and the other has reference to the matter of the for- Jaly 1 1904 as only 36,630,000 bushels, against 42,600,July
eign demand oq us. The latter is dependent upon a 000 bushels July 1 1903 and 62,440,000 bushels
extent of 1 1902. With the promise of rather less than an avervariety of considerations, not merely the
our owu yield, but also the yield in the other leading age crop and with left-over supplies smaller than
usual, it is evident that Earope cannot draw upon ua
producing countries of the world.

two aspects in which the

One

Even

is

in its

we produce more than enough
our own needs and the significance of a large

In poor years

wheat for

crop or a small crop lies mainly in the light It throws
on the point whether we are to have a liberal excess
As wheat is
for export or only a very limited excess.
item in our breadBtafla shipments, the
the largest
same circumstance determines whether our breadstuffs
This last, however,
exports are to be heavy or light.
another consideration, namely the
question of price. We might have a very large scr
plus available for export and yet not be able to dispose of It, European consumers being unwlUlng to
pay the price asked by us. Indeed, that might happen even If our surplus were small, provided adequate
is

qualified by

still

supplies could be procured^elsewhere by the European
consumlnjc countries. The best results are attained

when the United
wheat and there

is

States has a superabundance of
at the same time a shortage in the

rest of the world.

As

to this latter

It is

only necessary to say that no

such conjunction of circumstances at present conThe Department of Agriculture
fronts the world.

to the extent she has In

some other recent

years, even

our price should be satisfactory, and that she will
have to draw more freely upon the other leading producing countries of the world.
Tills, It Is proper to say, Is precisely what she Is doing now, and has. In fact, been doing for some time
past, viz., taking more from other countries while taking less from the United States. The figures on this

if

point are very instructive and significant. From the
June statement of the breadstuffs exports, issued the
it appears that the shipments of wheat
from the United States in that month in

present week,

and

flour

1904 were only 3,618,464 bushels, against 11,822,824
bushels in June 1903 and 12,906,763 bushels In June
In the months immediately preceding a closely
1902.
similar state of things was revealed, the falling off In
May having been more marked than In June. And
yet though our own exports have been so greatly
reduced, Europe has been Importing about the same
amount of wheat as usual at least Great Britain, the

—

largest Importing country, has.

The June statement of the British Imports In dereporting tali will not arrive until next week; but taking the
on Monday issued its monthly statement
the condition of the leading crops on the first of July, May statement and comparing the figures for the five
and this, as expected, shows a further slight im- months ending with May 31 this year with the corre- j
provement In the average of wheat during June, spending figures for the five months of last year and fl
making said average July 1 this year substantially the the year before, an Interesting light Is thrown on the
same

as

on July 1

last year,

viz.,

78*7 against 78-8.

As, however, the area devoted to winter wheat is very
much less than a year ago (over five million acres
planted to wheat last fall having had to be abandoned

existing situation.

The United Kingdom

In these

five months actually Imported considerably more
wheat in its natural form (as distinguished from flour
we mean) than In either 1903 or 1902, the amounts
being 36,261,400 cwts., against 30,465,866 and 28,984,029 cwts., respectively. Bat the portion of this which
came from the United States was only 4,647,600

on account of the severity of the winter and other
causes), the yield of this kind of wheat will necessarily be smaller than in 1903. The condition of spring
wheat is reported even higher than a month ago, and at cwts., as against 12,246,279 cwts. in the five
93*7 compares with only 83*6 on July 1 1903. The area months of 1903 and 17,896,864 cwts. in the five
sown to spring wheat Is substantially the same this months of 1902. On the other hand, the imports from
year as It was last year, and hence these figures hold Russia (we shall mention only the more Important
out the promise (barring subsequent unfavorable de- countries) were 7,304,400 cwts., against 6,838 633 and
velopments) oi » larger spring- wheat yield In 1904 1,421,868 cwts., respectively ; the imports from Routhan in 1903. However, owing to the loss In winter- mania 1,095,500 cwts., against 346,670 and 602,634
wheat acreage, present Indications are taken to point cwts.; the Imports from the Argentine Republic 9,667,the
to a total wheat crop of only about 640,000,000 bushels. 400 cwts., against 6,478,168 and 2,697,699 cwts.;
Australia 2,308,300 cwts., against 26
Indeed, we see that President Hill of the Great Northern Imports from
Eallway has this week been quoted as saying that in cwts. and 1,928,166 cwts., and the Imports from
and 3,227,668
his opinion the United States will not raise more than India 7,404,300 cwts., against 3,370,409
Besides the Imports of wheat the United
best possible conditions cwts.
600,000,000 bushels with the
Last year's crop was reported by the Kingdom imported 7,632,453 cwts. of flour in the five
Agricultural Department at 637,000,000 bushels, that months of 1904, against 7,417,814 cwts. In 1903 and
And here, too, less came
In 1902.
of 1902 at 670,000,000 bushels and that of 1901 7,676,097 cwts.
other
(which was the largest on record) at 748,000,000 bush from the United States and more from

from now on.

els.

It follows that even

If

Mr.

Hill's estimate

should

countries.

These figures indicate very notable changes, and yet
be somewhat exceeded, the crop would have to be rethe changes are only such as knowledge regarding last
garded as rather below than above the average.
Concurrently, both vlalble and Invisible stocks of year's wheat production of the world had prepared
wheat In this country appear to be quite small. Ac- every well-Informed person for. In our Issue of Feb-

.
.

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

ruary 27tli last (page 796) we gave a table prepared by
the Department of Agriculture at Washington show
Ing the production of wheat for a series of years past
in all the different countries and for the world as a
whole. This table brought out the fact that though
the 1903 cr'^p of the United States had been smaller

than that of 1902 and very

much below

that of 1901,

the loss here had been more than compensated by
gains elsewhere, with the result that the world's yield
of wheat proved the largest on record, the total being
3,193,666,000 bushels, against 3,100,181,000 bushels
in 1902, 2,929,274,000 bushels in 1901 and 2,627,971,-

000 bushels in 190O.
With these facts before him, the reader will be prepared for the results disclosed by the breadstuffs exports return for the 12

months

of thefiacal year ending

on June 30. We exported only 120,768,000 bushels
of wheat and flour (fche latter taken at Its equivalent
in wheat) in these 12 months, against 202,906,273
bushels la the preceding fiscal year and 234,772,616
bushels in the

year 1901-2

fiscal

—that

is,

the late

than half those
the years immediately preceding. There have been
of
other periods of small wheat exports, but we would
have to go back to 1891 to find a total as low
The corn exports
that of the late year.
as
in
part
no doubt because
were also small,
Europe had less need for that cereal with the yield of
wheat so abundant, and in still larger part no doubt
because our price was too high. The corn shipments

amounted

to 66,870,000 bushels, against

74,833,237 bushels in 1902-3 ; 26,636,662 bushels in
1901-2 (this being the year of the great disaster to

177,817,966 bushels in 1900 1 ; 209,348,284 bushels in 1899 1900 ; 174,089,094 bushels in
1898-9 and 208,744,939 bushels in 1897-8. In this lastthe corn crop)

;

is

revealed

strikingly

when we

For the late year the
value of our breadstu^s exports was only $149,000,000
against $221,242,286 in 19)2.3; $21-^134,344 In 1901 2;
$275,694,618 la 1900 01 and $333,897,119 in 1897-8.

This

was the

maximum

year in the country's his

and the following
shows In a graphic way the persistent and large

tory for the breadstuffs exports,
table

TAIUBS OF EXPORTS.
Year
ended

Fiscal

Wheat

Wheat.

Flour,

June 30.

874..
875..
.876..

877.

1878..

879..
880..

decline that has occurred in the interval since then.

VALUE OF BREADSTUFFS EXPORTS.
Fiscal year 190 5-1904

$149,000,000

Fiscal year 1902-1903
Fiscal year 1901-1902

213,134,314

Fiscal year 1900-1901

275,594,618

Fiscal year 1899-1900

262,744,078

221,243,285

Fiscal year 1897-1898.

.

.

Tot.WTieat

Com.

883..

119,879,341 54,824,459 174,703,800

884..

333,897,119

Total aU
Br'dstuffa.

33,265,280 126,081,649 131,181.555
41,621,245 110,120,751 117,806,476
48,030,358 169,998,095 181,777,841
40,655,120 200,923,912 210,355,528
53,298,247 279,177,749 288,036,835

130,701,079 29,567,713 160,268,792

882.

Flour.

24,769.951 155,449,504 161,198,864
24,456,937 107,777,240 111,458,266

190,546,305 35,333,197 225,879,502
167.698,4S5 45,047,257 212,745,742
112,129,718 36,375,055 149,304,773

75,026,678 51,139,696 126,166,374

881..

Corn

&

Flour.

$
f
101,421,459 29,258,094 130,679,553
59,607,863 23,712,440 83,320,303
68,382,899 24,433,470 92,816,369
47,135,562 21,663,947 68,799,509
96,872,016 25,095,721 121,967,737

50,702,669 263,448,411 270,332,519
28,845,830 178,150,603 182,670,528
27,756,082 202,459,882 208,040,850
27,648,044 153,814,418 162,544,715

885..

72,933,097 52,146,336 125,079,433

886..

50,262,715 38,442,955

88,705,670

88,003,863 153,083,296 160,370,821
31,730,922 120,436,592 125,846,55

887..

90,716,481

51,950,082 142,666,563

19,347,.361 102,013,924 165,768,662

13,355,950 124,375,128 127,191,687
32,982,277 119,931,463 123,876,661

890..

56,241,468 54,777,710 111,019,178
41,652,701 45,296,485 86,949,186
45,275,906 57,036,168 102,312,071

891..

892..
.893..

42,058,015 144,970,089 154,925,927
17,652,687 123,778,575 128,121.656

51,420,272 54,705,616 106,125,888
161,399,132 75,362.283 236,761,415
93,534,970 75,494,347 169,029,317

41.590,460 278,351,875 299,363,117
24,587,511 193,616,828 200,312.654
80,211,154 158,889,965 166,777,229
14,650,767 110,108,358 114,604,780

69,271,770 128,678,811
43,805,663 51,651,928 95,457,591

894..

69,407,041

95..

896..

39,709,868 52,025,217

897..

59,920,178 55.914,347 116,831,525

898.

145.684,659 69,263,718 214,948,377
104,269,169 73.093,870 177,363.039

900.
901.

73,237,080 67,760,^86 140,997,966

91,735,085

37,836,862 129,571.947 141,356,993
54,087,152 169.921,677 197,857,219

74,196.8£0 289,145,227 333,897.119
68,977,448 246.340,487 373,999.698
86.806,400 226,203,^68 262,744,078

96.771,743 69,459.296 166,231,139
ll?,875,20i 65,661.974 178,537,176

903..

87,793,10

73,756,101 161,561,508

82.527.883 248,759,1 22 275,594618
16,185,673 194,722,^49 213,134,344
40,540.637 202.092.145 221,242,286

,804*.

35,S78,ai0 6:1,95] ,280 104,829,-eO

8J,058,0k0 134,857,920 149,000,000

*

Figures for 1904 subject to alight oorrectiona.

QOANTITIES EXPORTED.
Year ended
June 80.

Av'ge

Wheat.

per

FUywr.

bush.

Bush.

$

BbU.

«

Tot.

Wheat

and

Flour.

Bush.

1-242

877.,
878..

72,404,961

1-388

49,493,572

•678

70,860.983

85,461,098

-587
-562

86,296,252

-471

98,169,877
91.908,175

-543

117.121,106

0-799
0-672

16.859.533

76,102,704

0-576

15.268,892

60,650,080

0-655

14,620,864

79,562,02(1

0-753

11,669,645

148.231,261

0-983

15,349,943

189,432,816

0-748
••718

1-243

881.
882.

160,565,477

1113

95,271,80^

1-185

883.

106,386,828 1-127
70,349.012 1-066

884.
885.
886.

887.

84,663,714 0-862
57.759,209 0-870
101,971,949 0-890
65,789,261 0-853

890..

46.414,129 0-897
64,387,767 0-832

891..
892..

55.131,948 0-933
157.280,.S61 1-026

805..
1890..
887 .
898..
899.
800..
901...

80a..
003..
904*.

101,950,3HP

133,060,667 0-788
164.853.102 0-729
114,181,420 0-769
44,240.001

0-811

•847

72,782,926

e-479 55,372,104
6-358 90.167.959
6,629,714 5-252 147,687,649
6,011,419 5-878 180,304,180
7.945,786 5-669 186,321,514
5,915,686 6149 121,892,389
9,205,664 5-956 147,811,316
9.152,280 5-588 111.534,182
10,648,145 4-897 132,570,368
8,179,241 4-700 94,565,793
11,518,449 4-510 153,804,969
11,963,574 4-579 119.625,344
9,374,803 4-832 88.600.743
12,8.31,711 4-663 109,430,466
11,844,304 4-822 106.181,31«
15,196,769 4-959 225,665,810
16,620.339 4-542 191,912.634

1-068

t

6-208

65.078,122
40,325,611
122,353,936

Bush.

3,935,512

53.047,177

876.

153,252,795

bush

3,973,128

,875.,

879.

Av'e
per

-719

4,094,094

1-124

.880.

Com.

7146 89,463,351 34.434,606
6001 70,926,253 28,858,420

1-428

1169

Av'e
per
bbl.

71 ,039,928

,874.,

273,999,699

Fiscal year 1898-1899

Total

Wheat A

88,415,230

consider the

breadstuffs exports as a whole.

last

been
exceeded In the country's history. la this latter circumstance there is much of encouragement, since it
indicates development in the general export trade.
For reference and study we add the following two
tables, showing the values and quantities of the breadstuffs exports as well as average prices for each year
back to 1874.

;

mentioned year the average price of the corn exports
per bushel was 86*6 cents In the late year it was 538
cents, and generally it may be said that the coro outflow was large when price was low and small when
price was high.
The effect of these smaller shipments of wheat and
corn

181

satisfactory proportions, having only once before

much more

ye&r's exports were hardly

in 1903-4

,

3,343,665
3,947,333

•558

43,184.915

-668

40.586,825

-684

45,247,490

•611

51,834,416

•540

63,655,433
40,307.252

•498
•480

24,278,417
69.592,929

•550
-474
-418

101.973.717
30,768.213
76,451,849

-574

-551

46,037,274

•534

4-100| 164.283,119

65,324,841

-462

3-383 144,711,146
3-558 186,443.968

27,691.137
99,992,835

-629

-308

18,486,690

8-849 145,098,972 176,916,365
4-518 217,806,004 208.744,939
8-964 2i!2,6l8.420 174,089,094

18,609.194
18.650,87k

3-684 186,090,564 809,348,284

-387
•407

3-72

-464

19,716,634

215,990,073} 177.817,965
3-69? 234,772,516 2B,f3.'3.552
3-718 202,906, 73' 74,838,217

17,00«,000

4-056 120,758,000

•538

]7,-69,«03

55,-i7O.0O0

-378
-356

-808
•549

•Figures for 1904 subject to sliKbt corrections.

In view of tbe great shrinkage in the breadstuffti
exports here recorded, the fact mentioned above, viz
IRON
STBEL
that the country is not likely to have any exceptional MR. CHAMBERLAIN'S TARIFF C0MMI83I0N-THE
supplies of wheat available for the foreign market the MANCHESTER COTTON GOODS MARKET*.
ensuing twelve months, obviously possesses much less
Manchester, July 5th 1904.
Eren
significance than would otherwise be the case.
The dulnesB which In recent weeks has been a prein the late year, it is seen, the breadstuffs exports were vailing, though not quite a general, feature in the
British Iron and steel markets is unqnestionably due
the smallest in all recent peri
of small proportions
od« and yet the total merchandise exports, as we in part to the depressing Intelligence of the correshall show next week in our review of the country's sponding markets in the Ualted States.
The enorforeign trade for the twelve months, were of very
* Oommantoated by oar Bpeolal Oorres pendent at ManoHester.
,

—

—

BUBO PSAN

AND

MARKETS-

THE CHRONICLE.

182

prodaction of American pig
Iron since January, together with the shrinking of the
demand for It, have greatly alarmed the mind] of
many people on this side, who are neryoualy afraid of
"dumping" from the West of unprecedented proportions, far exceeding possibly the considerable shipments of 1900-01.
To some extent no 'doubt this
inconsiderate fear may be traced to the "tarifE reform"
discussions and the use which has been made of the

mouB

increase in the

argument that

home industries

a

remedy

is

required in defence of

against the competition of foreign pro-

ductions sent to British ports from protectionist countries at prices

below those maintained at home under

the shelter of the
It

may

tariffs.

be, too, that the speculative bears in the pig

iron warrant markets of Glasgow and London, aa well
as users of the material, are^'.not unwilling to encour-

age this fear in their

own

interests.

It

is

also quite

certain that consumers of Iron, influenced by the pre
Tailing bearish tone, are holding off, and have been doing so for soTeral weeks, in the hope of lower prices

Their attitude, however,

is

not founded upon present

statistics of supplj, for stocks in nearly every direction

are light, notwithstanding that at the end of

number

May

the

bUst was 325,again8t 308 at the
corresponding period of 1903.
In the Mlddlesborough district, which produces about one- fourth of the
whole outturn in the United Kingdom, stocks of
Cleveland iron in the hands of makers have been so
light during the last two or three months, and their
orders for forward delivery so abundant that they
have been able to hold up their prices, for like qualities from one shilling to one shilling sixpence above
those accepted by merchants and holders of warrant
of furnaces in

stocks.

arguments used by those who look for a
is the very low cost of production at
which it is said pig iron can be made In the United
Eight dollars to 8^
States, particularly in Alabama.
dollars per ton are named, and it is assumed
and 8^
that for export even lower rates might be accepted,
producerSibeing recompensed by the higher rates ob
tainable in American markets, it is still an undetermined question whether or not similar iron can be
made under the moat favorable local conditions. In

One

fall of

of the

prices

equally efficient furnaces, at the least cost in the
United States or In Great Britain. But that problem

has really^no essential bearing upon the point under
consideration. The alarmists who are now emphasizing
the supposed irresistible power of the United S :ates to
flood the British markets with iron overlook the fact
that although momentary fluctuations of prices are
governed by the relative proportions of supply and
demand, it is the most costly portion brought to

market, not th^ least costly, which determines the
It is well knowrn that
price over prolonged periods.
in America, as well as in the United Kingdom, there
between the expense of
is the widest difference
making a ton of pig iron in a thoroughly modern fur
nace and in one of older construction.
In every industry the manufacturer whose plant is
markedly in advance of the rest in this respect enjoys
a quasi monopoly so long as the others are kept at
work. He does not reduce his prices incontinently
when competition becomes keen, but keeps the advantage for himself. For the time being he is in the
position of the holder of a valuable patent-right. Id
considering the contingency of a possible extraordinary import of American iron, therefore, the qaestlon

I

Vol. bkxul

how cheaply can

It be made under the most
advantageous conditions, but how much can the most
heavily weighted producer afford to leli below his
high cost of production in order to cover the expense
of transport to the seaboard, and ocean freight, and
lay down the material at a British port?
The theory that the reservation of the home market
for home producers enables them to effectually overcome competition in an open market such as that of
the United Kingdom, whenever the home production
becomes excessive, has been very diligently used by
the tariff reformers.
It has of course bean put forward before in times gone by, but it has gained much
In impressiveness from the exposition of it offered by
Mr. Carnegie about two years ago. It is a question
which has other aspects besides that presented by
him, and without entering into the controversial part
of it, even the plain, common-sense man can see that
there is a limit to the sacrifice upon export business
which is to be covered by the higher home prices. It
has been stated more than once, on good authority,
that German iron and steel producers discovered by
last year's experience that the maintenance of a high
rate of production had been very dearly bought at the
"
cost of the heavy losses involved in their " dumping
export sales.
Kecent experience does not support the fears of
those who look for a deluge of American iron and
steel.
Before the brief revival which took place in
the United States iron markets in the early weeks of
this year, there was a considerable spell of depression.
What happened then ? Large numbers of furnaces
were shut down and the production was enormously
curtailed, the stoppage taking place of course amongst
the least efficient plants, and there was no striking increase of exports to Europe.
Such, it is reasonable to
believe^will be the course of events in present clronmstances.
Indeed, intelligence la already reaching
this side of many furnaces producing merchant
iron being blown out, and there are foreshadow
la

not,

ings

of

still

more

extensive

lessening

of

pro-

duction in the absence of an early improvement of
the demand.
But the memory of the rather abundant imports of
American iron in 1900*1901 still lingers, andthosa whom

most Impresses do not realisa the wide difference between present conditions and those then existing.
At that time the iron and steel Industry of the United
States was still in a very depressed state, and prices
were exceedingly low. In Great Britain and in Garmany the industry was very active and prices were
relatively high. There was justification, consequently,
for a large eastward movement from America in the
much better condition of trade on this side. But no
such inducement now exists, and although American
steel billets are being bought in British markets, and
the import of this and of other forms of the metal
may become larger than they are now, they are not
likely to reach the alarming proportions of which

it

many

A

people are talking.

further bearish alarm which has been especially

prominent in Glasgow arises from the fact that two or
three considerable consignments of Canadian bountyfed pig iron have been received there this spring.
List year it found its way to the United Scates but
now it is being turned eastward. For the moment
the current is checked by the Nova Scotia labor
strike, but the apprehension remains that it may be
renewed at any moment.

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

183

amount

of labor involved in each class.
The loca
branches of the Tariff Reform League Mr. Cham,
propagandist organizations have become
berlaln's
iLfluence tending to depress the British rather more active since his return from Esiypt, but
is not the only
markets. The summer months almost always bring slack they hold few meetings, and their chief method of
to be the
widespread circulation
ness into the iron and steel trade, and this year the bear- working seems
ish tendencies haye accentuated the season's inactiv- through the post of leaflets, handbills and appeals
It is understood that hardly any contracts for for new members.
ity.
The protectionist leader's hold upon the Conservaautumn delivery of iron and steel have yet been made,
and the inference is reasonable that whenever the tive and Liberal Unionist "machines" has probably
buying for next season begins it will, whether large been strengthened by the break-up and reorgan'zation
in itself or not, be all the more energetic because on the lines of his policy of the Liberal Unionist Association, the Duke of Devonshire and those who, with
deferred.
Mr. Chamthe revival in the iron, steel and en- him, remain free traders having left it.
In Germany
gineering industries which set in four or five months berlain, however, notwithstanding the renewed energy
ago is being well maintained, and the consumption of with which he is spurring on his followers, tells them
pig iron continues to be much larger than it was at quite frankly, as he has done all along, that he does
On the contrary, he
the corresponding period last year, although the nu- not expect an early triumph.
been out of blast during repeats that a long time may be needed in order to
merous furnaces which have
the late depression of trade in Germany are not yet all gain the end in view. That is obviously, for him, the
course, in view of the strong popular tide
re-lighted. Attempts to establish an international steel wise
the by-elections to be running
rail syndicate among German, British and Belgian which is seen in

Bat although

buyers, both of pig iron

and

of fia-

—
—

lahed or semi finiahed steel, are undoubtedly postponing purchases in the expectation of lower prices, this

makers, which were abortively made four or five years against a radical change in the fiscal policy of the
At first it was country.
ago, have recently been renewed.
Middling American cotton dropped last week to a
thought that the scope of the arrangement might be
extended so as to include half-manufactured steel. trifle under the old ''standard" price of 6d. per pound,
Then the proposals were again restricted to rails; but at which it used to be said by experienced spinners,
the latest reports are to the effect that the larger "you may always safely store up cotton." The fall of

scheme

On

is

again finding favor, at least In Germany.

3d.

from the recent highest point

Is

certainly calcu-

previous occasions British railmakers have not

lated to put the thought of enlarging their supplies

been able to accept the terms offered by their Continental competitors as to the apportionment of export
orders, and there can be no doubt that the same
difficulty has again arisen. If the obstacles to agreement
with regard to one branch of the proposed combination

into the minds of spinners in view of the considerable

which must elapse before the new crop becomes available in quantity. They continue, however,
to buy with just as much caution as they did when
prices were Id. or 2d. per pound higher.
Short-time
formidable, it is hardly likely is still being continued, although the working week
that of rails are so
that the path of the promoters will be smoothed by has been extended from 40 to 47^ hours.
Never
interval

—

—

trying to include others.

A

further criticism of the

before in the history of the British cotton industry

have spinners and manufacturers acted with so near
an approach to uniformity in the regulation of the
working hours in times of adversity as they have
done during the last twelve months.
There has been
much inducement recently to break away from the
course approved of by the leading representatives, but
It has not been strong enough to seriously weaken the
determination to act unitedly. The fact of the continued scanty buying of cotton by spinners has
strengthened the belief previously entertained by
for finished materials has been steadily increased for some that they hold larger reserves at the mills than
four or five weeks, and manufacturers find their posi- the statistics of deliveries seem to indicate.
tion better fortified by orders and by the current inThe condition and prospects of the Manchester cotquiry than it has been for quite a considerable time ton goods market continue encouraging. There Is
past.
abundant inquiry for most outlets, and the margins
The Chamberlain Tariff Commission is going on of spinners and manufacturers have Improved. Some
with its work of collecting information to form the business of moderate amount has lately been done for
basis of a ''scientific" protectionist system of import China, India and other markets for distant delivery
duties.
No reporti of the evidence or other proceed- on the basis of new^crop cotton future prices, but this
ings are allowed to be published, but the names of is conflned mainly to favorite staple makes, of which
prominent witnesies appear in the newspapers, and shippers like to have an assured prospective supply
one hears ^through various channels of the prog- in ordinary circumstances. Prevailingly, however,
ress of the work.
Several manufacturers and mer- the business for nearly all markets Is of small or quite
chants engaged in the textile trades, some of them on moderate amount, although purchases are frequently
an important scale, have laid their views before the repeated. The outlook in the India markets is disCommission, but no tariff scheme has yet been framed, tinctly good.
The abundant native food crops
or even suggested, for these branches of industry.
It (millet, rice, &c.) of last autumn have laid the founis understood that the evidence collected with referdation ot good times among the masses of the people^
ence to the iron and steel trades is now nearly com and the bountiful yield of wheat and other exportable
pletcd, and that the next step will be the construc- produce in the winter months has greatly strength
tion of a schedule of duties graded according to the ened the buying power of the country.
negotiations

is

that ihey do not contemplate

the par-

American producers in the syndicate.
For this reason and because of the difficulty of bringing coifilcting International interests into harmony,
some experienced English iron and steel manufacturers
who had to do with previous negotiations of this kind
are more than doubtful as to the success of those now
going on. The iron and steel industries in France
are in a fairly active condition, and prices have an
advancing tendency in some directions. The demand
ticipation of

THE CHRONICLE.

184

[Vol. Lxxix.

Even tbe Chineae prospect \b not regarded as nnprom- extensive inoreaaes, we now hare a small decrease.
Ising and in other foreign and colonlai markets there The following shows the half-yearly record back to
The homo harveata 1894.
is hardly a dark oloud to be aeea.
II iy crops are heayy and
likely alao to be good.
80 far have been gathered in excellent condition, whilst
the pasture lands a very important Item in the agrl-

seem

—

Kingdom

caltaral resources of the

— are in excellent

condition. Agricultural wages, which have been stead-

advancing for some years, are now higher than
ever, and labor is almost everywhere well employed.
The manufacturing industries are not In so promising
a condition as in the last three or four years, but on
the whole merchants engaged In the home distribution of manufactures for personal and household consumption ar3 inclined to take a cheerful view of their
prospects for the remainder of the year.
ily

RAILROAD GROSS EARNINGS FOR JUNE
A ND THE HA LF- YEA R.

Orofi ^aminos.

MUetm*.

Ttar

r$ar

Ttar

Bivm.

Prtc4dinD

Given.

r»of
PrMsdine.

MiUi.

MUM.

1804 (104 roads)

148,880

1805(180 roads)
1896 (108 roads)
189T (196 roads
1808(193 roads)

141,';8S

148.813

148.363
111,694
148,008

158,745

1(8,106

806.341 5S4
401.86 1.0U0

152.976

iei.(i86

466,65^.731

(181 roadS;

156.088

186 869

(183 roadsy

ieo.054

166.434

(167 roads)

169.026

164.010

(162 roads)
1003(137 roads)

178.074
166.806

171,803

483,944,626
556,781,160
616,767.274
e57.«96.2^9

1004 (129 roads).

178,670

170,004

Jan.

LBOe
1000
1001
loot

1 to

June

3'

:ei,30!i

t
86B,976,S0D
870.844,181

707,878.028
716,096,169

Znersosi
or

Decreau.

t

440,765 831 Dec 74,780,832
860.870.30S Ine 10.47?l,878
876.651. 6tt7 Inc. ]0.6«0.987

403.760 2 « Die 2.506.115
409,8«e,4i 3 Ine. 65.692 328

457 B99.101 Inc. ac>,e46.425
4>57 270,fi34 Ine. 69.450.885
660,167.846 Inc. 51,; 98,428
ei4.0S2.S18 Inc 48.362.076
e83.«06.57f Inc. 84,«71,468

728,184,802 Dee. 12,038643

Note.— Neither the earnings of tbe Mexican roaaa nor the mining
operatlona of the anthracite ooal roada are Inoladed In thli table.

Oar results for 1904 cover 173,970 miles of road.
The whole railroad system of the United States embraces over 200,000 miles.

returns for

all

Doubtless

if

we conld have

the roads in the country, the decrease

would be raised to, say, 116,000,000 to 130,000,For the first six months of 1903 we computed
that there had been an tVt urease over the first g!x
In
months of 1902 of $116,000,000. Similarly for the
the
first six months of 1902 we estimated the increase at

Conditions were extraordinarily unfavorable for our
000.
railroads during the first half of the current calendar

and very naturally that

year,

fact

is

ri fleeted

diminished earnings for the six months. On
it Is striking testimony to the way in
which the volume of tonnage was maintained that
the loss in revenues in faca of these unfavorable conditions has been relatively quite small.
Obviously it is too early to have full returns for the
six months, since only fifteen days have elapsed since
the close of the half-year. At least four to six weeks
longer will be necessary before we can hope to have
the June statements for some of the larger com
Taking, however, the figures of those roada
panics.
from which we have preliminary reports for the six
months and combining them with the roads which
have as yet furnished figures only for the five months,
a reasonably close approach to the actual results is
At the end of this article two separate
possible.
compilations are given, the one containing the roads
which have reported for the six months and the
other those which have reported for the five months.
In the following we have drawn off the totals of these
compilations acd add them together so as to show
the grand aggregate of the two.
other hand,

MUes

Orot* EarvAngi.

January

1 to

End

Jwm 80.
1904.

1908.

Decrease.

of Road
of Period.

1904.

60 million dollars; for the irat half of 1901 at 70
million dollars ; for the first half of 1900 at 90 million
dollars ; for the first half of 1899 at 42 million dollars
and for the first half of 1898 at 68 million dollars.
Altogether there was an Increase for the six years

from 1898 to 1903, inclusive, of 436 million dollars, of
which there has now been lost in 1904 no more than
16 to 20 million dollars.

Considering the conditions which have prevailed,
marvelous record. The reader knows that
general trade and business have not been active, that
indeed a very quiet state of things has existed, with
this is a

the volume of transactions not

Hjalso knows that the iron and steel industry has
been greatly depressed, both production and consumption being heavily reduced as compared with the
extraordinary output and demand of the first six
months of last year. As a concomitant of this sltnatioD, the demand for and shipments of coal were materially diminished.
Thus the movement of coal ard
coke over the lines of the Pennsylvania Railroad east
of Pittsburgh and Erie aggregated olIj 19,941,181
tons in the half-year ending July 2 1904 as against

21,211,430 tons for

73
97

roads six months.
roads five months

Grand

In

.

tot. (I'i9r'd8).

846.682.33H

6.9r6,6!6

376,400.436

S81,B02,46:^

6,108,087

728,134,838

716,096,169

this way. It will be seen,

we

12,038.648

89,837
84,733
173,970

86,720
83,284
170,004

get an aggregate of

$716,096,169 for 1904, comparing with 1728,134,802
for 1903, indicating a faille g off the present year in

the

sum

of

$12,038,643.

The

loss

amounts

to less

than 2 par cent, beirg in fact only 1-65 per cent.
course in the net earnings the
will be

much

for oparatiog

01

loss, it is safe to say,

larger, both relatively and absolutely,
expenses were heavily increased. Oar

present comparison

is

confined entirely to the gross

revenues, and as showing

how

to that of last year.

1903.

$

t
339.696,723

up

relatively small the con-

traction has been in this regard,

it is only necessary to
point out that the present year's decrease of 112,038,-

643 follows I84,271>452 gain in the first six months of
1903, 142,362,976 gain in the first six months of 1902,
$56,199,4S8 gain in the first half of 1901, $69,460,335
gain in the first half of 1900, 136,946,426 gain in the
first half of 1899 and 155,692,328 gain in the first half
In other words, after a long series of very
of 1898.

the corresponding half year of

These figures include shipments of anthracite
but only a very small portion of the loss in the
Pennsylvania's shipments occurred in that class of ooa^.
On the other hand the anthracite shipments as a
whole to market were quite considerably curtailed.
This followed from the circumstance that the movement of anthracite the first half of 1903 had been
exceptionally heavy, following the strike of the miners
Statistics given out the present week make
in 1902.
the anthracite shipments to market the fi;st six
months of 1904 only 29,267,307 tons, agalcst 31,884,952 tons the first six months of 1903, a falling off of
about 2f million tons. This reduction in tonnage
will explain the heavy losses in earnings reported by
the larger anthracite-carrying companies.
The weather, of course, was a serious adversa inflnThe winter was intensely cold, making railroad
eoce.
operations difficult and costly, while in rorthcra latitudes snow blockades were a further serious obstacle.
1903.

coal

;

The lines of the New Ycrk Central in Northern New
York suffered particularly in the latter regard, there

-

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.

185

being several occaslocs In January and February when In the receipts of flour, as will be seen by the follownot a wheel was turning on some of these lines for one, ing table.
RECEIPTS AT SEABOARD.
1902.
two and three days at a time.
1934.
1903
loot.
Jan. 1 to July 2—
10.166.348
..bbls
9 656.557
10,602,732
11,130,857
Flour
The Canadian lines experienced similar difficulties, Wheat
63,lH2,a54
48.778,447
66.367.009
bush. 21,565,051
30,6fl5,579
10.4S4.918
«2,904,G96
S5,94S,S98
and the Grand Trunk of Canada and the Canadian OatB
4i.ril8.163
21,'; 68.604
21,192.307
27,048.? 97
2,923 379
1.806.6)0
1.489,1?4
2.144.985
Barley
Pacific sustained heavy losses In earnings as a result; Rye
1,981.891
1.806.503
612,652
2,889,220
the Canadian Pacific, however, more than recovered
143,716,846
88,480,560
201.715,74©
75.742.099
Total grain
its loss before the close of the half-year. All the roads
At the Western primary mj^rkets the contraction in
in the Middle States and In New England, as also the grain movement was not so marked, and yet the
those In the Middle Weat, suffered severely from the receipts fell considerably below those for the corextremely cold weather the early part of the year. responding period in 1903. In brief, the deliveries at
Later, excessive rains and floods were quite an adverse these Western porta of wheat, corn, oats, barley and
feature in the Middle Western States. The cold rye were 266,306,216 bushels the present year, against

weather was prolonged much beyond the nsnal time.
Temperatures may be said to have been unseasonably
low for almost the whole of the first five months. On
the other hand, west and south of Omaha, Kansas
City and St. Louis, there appear to have been fewer
retarding influences than usual, with the result that
the Union Pacific Railroad and most of the Southwestern roads are able to show Improved rather than
diminished earnings.
One consequence of the backwardness of the season
was a delay in the opening of navigation. On the
Great Lakes navigation last year was open in April,
the present year not until May. The effect was that the
shipments of iron ore and of coal, to and from the
lake ports, were delayed and reduced, Not only that,
but when navigation did open the strike of the
Masters and Pilots on vessels engaged In Lake transportation proved a further drawback. This strike
lasted for about six wetks up to the middle of June,
and during that period completely paralyzed transportation on these inland bodies of water. Ordinarily
there are large shipments of iron ore from the upper
Lake ports to the lower Lake ports, and, vice versa,

from the lower ports to
the upper ports. Both classes of tonnage were for
the time being cut off, and the railroads running to
the lower ports, as also those to the upper ports, saw
their traf&c and revenues greatly reduced as a consequence. The Hocking Valley Railway lost perhaps more heavily than any other of the bituminous
coal roads in the Middle West, showing gross of only
large

shipments of

12,613,489 in 1904,

months

coal

a(;ainst

13,063,709 for the six

of 1903.

The only distinct advantage which the roads in the
Middle West appear to have had was in the extra
travel arising out of the holding of the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition at St. Louis ; but as the Exposition did not open until May 1 and attendance is never
large at such an affair during the early months, the
gain on that account can not have been very considerable except In the case of one or two of the
minor roads like the Toledo St. Louis & Western.
In Colorado the roads all suffered more or less from
the continuance of the coal miners' strike during the
whole of the six months, and to some extent also
from the ore miners' strike, the effects of which have
not yet entirely passed away.
In addition to all this there was a decided contraction in the grain

movement both

in the East

and

in the

West, and also a large loss In the cotton movement In
the South. At the seaboard the receipts of grain for
the period from Jan. 1 to July 2 amounted to only
75,742,099 bushels in the six months of 1904, against
143,715,645 bushels for the corresponding period In
1903, 88,480,660 bushels in 1902 and 201,715,740
bushels In 1901, besides which there was a falling off

In this case the wheat
277,395,577 bushels in 1903.
deliverirs were larger than in 1903, whereas at the
seaboard

wheat

these

shrinkage.

The

showed

decided
movement in detail at the

receipts

grain

a

Western markets, both for June and from January 1,
indicated in the following table In our usual form.

]&

BBOBIPTB OF VLO0B AND OBAIN FOB FIVE WBEK8 ENDING JITLT 2

AND SINCE JANUARY

Hour,

Wheat,

Corn,

(bbi(.)

(6u»?».)

Ibuih.)

OMeaoo— ^_
732.488
5 wks..Iune, 1904
681,683
6 WkB.June. 1903
Since J an.l, 1904 5.186.569
Since Jan.l, 1903 8.400,878

831,518
963,074
6,^86,164
7,571,718

1.

Barley,

By*.

(buth.)

Oati,
(buih.)

(bu«h.)

92a,13P
14,054,549 4 890.407
13.281,447 8,826,576 1,827,017
44.074,011 34,013,848 10,880,250
46,212.422 45,344.481 0.651.Olic

101,601
222.521
1.220 634
1,783,841

Milviukte—
157,000
5 WkB.June. 1904
343.105
5 wki June, 190S
708,830
Jan.1. 1904
Since
Since Jan.l, 1903 1,622,726
nt. Inuii—
wks June. 1004
6 wk8 June, 190S

5

Since Jan. 1.1904
8lnoe Jan.l, 1908

144,875
118.590
1,136,840
1.016,286

436.480
443.520
3,8?4.0fi0

3.180.730

880,291
5«0,130
8,236.994
6.876,435

739.700
1.453.400
3,770,850
4,727,100

171.00C
139.200
1,859,700
1,390,100

818.85(
672,550
e.l53.«0<

6,698,000

47,000
16.000

1,762.700 1,361,050
1.215.720 1,318945
18 000.72E 8.705,995
14.E61,310 11,083,880

1,748,001
1.306,00(

85.600
92,800
619.800
494.4CO
18,990
12,180
380.016
676,518

Toltito—
6
5

wks June.
wks June,

1904

"

190;^

Since J an.l, 1904
Since Jan.l, 190S

'.".T

Detmit—
5 wks June,

78,950
288,«00
1,484,940
1,714,000

634,100
384,800

86<

1,906.801
1,621,03(

8,08(

10,400
11.522
62,600

9,400

78,7«5.

978.804
1.276.562
4.489.247
7,124,662

50C

177,768
1 19,966

814,766
856.316

345,525

143,650
128,450

741.0'; 7

2.102,36(-

984,65s

1,888.479

2,057,070
1,645,420

55,89f
60,82)

46.837
131,930
364,419
878.508

1,218,36(
839,264
4,838,634
4,748.63^

g 08,38!^

l,18i

811,162
587,624

3.649,807
8.381.788

103,444

88,400
63,400
441.786
472.706

87,000
76,600
338.400
368,800

1,028.200
2.192,00(
18,577.70*
10.876.351

976,000
1.432,300
4,935,600
5.482,100

1,148,100

20.000
16,900
14S.800
168.000

129,800
5 wks. June, 1904
570,600
5 wks June, 1908
608,700
•ilnoeJan.1.1904
?lnoe Jan.l, 1003 1.616,800

949,369

167,560
278.2H9
8.732,402
1.899,700

76.416
7.480
819.452
326.17J

14,414
29,888
179.929
141.68L

4,574,380
6,681,690
33,505,523
83.616.730

843.38( 1.768.720
197.16( 2,089,880
8,491,70f 10,060.100
1,726,85: 7.932,410

876.780
881.380
3,181.840
3,436.680

70.130
788,811
484,680

961,370
131.800
14.483,270
7.611.040

7,866,50(
9,350,14(

1004
6 wks.June, 190?
Since Jan.l, 1904
Since Jan.l, 1903

25.600
25,80(

21-6,230

••••. «V

Olevtiand—
5 wks June, 1904
6 wks. June, 1»03
Since Jan.l. 1904
Since Jan.l, 190S
Peoria
6 wks Jane, 1004
5 wks June. 1908
jtnoe J an.l. 1004
Since Jan. 1,1003

616,051

1,088

"bVe'if

i.ie<

70,200
85,300
1,38«,70(

Dtil«th—
1.099.271
5.480,682
6.808.477

30.281

974

UinneavoUi—
5 wks June, 19f4
5wks June, 1903
^lnoeJan.1,1904
Since Jan.l, lOOS
6
5

'.'.'.".'.':

Santas Oitv—
wks June, 1904
wks June, 1903

Since J an. 1,1904
Since Jan.l, 1908
total nf all6 wki June, 1004 1.284.812
5 wks June, 1908 1,701,998
iHlnce.iau.1,1904 8429,606
Since Jan.l. 1008 H.734.707

8 771,963
9.406 893
78,825,4.<?9

68.494.086

387,800
96.000
8.200.700

l,04'',7a

383,000

'.'.'.'.v..

69,290'

•••••*•«

3.ei8,ti60

800,204
20.880.862 U.g60,415 3,312,67.'
464.306
19,671.68- 16,804,662 3,692.28.
90,072,872 74,822,66^ «4,257.';S<' H.327.607
08.886882 88.881,719 81,585.606 3.797.446

have already stated that the cotton movement
At
in the South fell much below that of a year ago.
the Southern outports the receipts reach only 1,782,828 bales for the six months of 1904, against 2,352,097
bales for the six months of 1903, while the shipments
overland were 661,660 bales against 716,149 bales in
1903 and 800,185 bales in 1902.
Vf e

BECEIPTS OF COTTON AT SOUTHERN PORTS IN JUNE, AND FROM
JANUARY 1 TO JUNK 30, 1904, 1908 AND 1902.
June.

Since

January

1.

1008.

1008.

Ports,
1004.

Qalreiton..

1008.

1008.

1004.

NawOrlaans
Hoblle
Pensacola.&o

0.800
874

11,681

641,079

8.603

47,143

46,518
1.337

87,080

2.68f

52

772

3,64^

689,838
87,285
39,623

18,801

bales.

Sabine Pass &o

4,730

88,088

0,114

68S
SO.OOf'

Brunswick, &o
Otaarleston

329,';

82

66S

12

1.30!?

68

348

46,527
38,308
141

Newport News. &o
Total

668,081
49,768
807.808
88,.<186

100.616
309,98O>
80.987
63.100-

200
64,109

or

lie

8,10^

87.796

67,818

88

60

6.614

6.38P

"8,96'

136,448

185.688

lOS

15,010

l!i,626

15t.e08
84.400

Washington. &o
Horfolk

68,743
83,968
861,873

88,838
18,096

78

Port Boyal. &o

VUmlndton

628

680.780
100,753
85«,«83

1,812

1,015

~9.4fli

70.783

86,8«» 1,782.H2" 9.888.007 8.t08.764

THE CHRONICLE.

186

[Vol. Lxjcix,
Orom BarrUno*.

Mmate.

Notwithstanding all the nnfavorable inflaences here
enumerated, not a few roads are able to record very

Oiven.

sabstantial gains oyer their earnings for the

Mtie4.

high price of cotton was a distinct advantage, and
those in the Southwest, as also roads like the Union
Pacific, none of which suffered from adverse weather

way the

Preceding.

or

Preceding.

Deereaie.

Mile*.

%

I

Oir>en,

firjt alx

months of last year. The loads distinguished in that
way are mainly those located in the South, where the

conditions in the

Tear

Incrtate

Tear

Tear

Tear

lines east of the Mississippi

1803
1894
1896
isee
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904

t
48.860,869

(139 roads)

94.111

92.167

(lieroadB)

91.097
94.192

89,885
94,106

81,5»a.72H

(120 roads)

85.648.164

41.676 898 Ine. 2,184.106
40,726 iiS Dee. 9.136,778
88.811, 648 Ine. 2.886.521

(118 roads)
(lis road!)

89.249

88,761

86.520.966

84.140, 2i')\lne. 2,3sa,7te

90,703
97.221
UH.87&

90.189

36.6o8.E5»

36,851, 840, /nc.

96,813

42.217,558

89,636, 817 fnc. 2,681,741

9i!.2««

48.170,085

40,480,

95.337

93,004

50.104,955

46.061,

97.010

94,048
88.999

61,573,897

47,976,

50,888,873

46,8S2,

roads)
(117 roads)
(107 roads)
(97 roads)
(81 roads)
(71 roads)
(69 roads)
(1)26

86,554

Ine
Ine
Ine
Ine

806,714
6,690,070
4.053.848
8.698,776
3,356,981

Furthermore, Southwestern systems had the
95.018
93.018
61.930.417
64.316. 9S2 Ine. 7,614.485
86,085
83,5f8
55,193, ,097! Oe<
51,682,694
610,983
benefit of the larger grain crops of 1903 as compared
with the smaller crops of 1902. In the following two
Note.— Neither the earnings of the Mexican roads nor the mining
operations of the anthracite coal roads are Included In this table.
tables we show all changes on the septate roads or
In the case of the separate roads, there is for June a
systems, whether increases or decreases, for amounts in
fair number with large-sized Increases, but of course
excess of 130,000, both for the six months and the five
these are overshadowed by the roads with decreases.
months.
In the annexed table we have brought together all inFBIirOIPl.L OHAMOES IH GROSS BABNINOS FOB 6 mONTSS.
creases and decreas?s exceeding $30,000 in amount.
lacreases.
PBIMCIFAI. OHABGBS IH GROSS BABVU08 IN JUNE.
Bemtbern BaUwaj
$932,516 Or. Trunk Sys. (3 r'ds) 9 1,342,428
Decreases.
1,098,604
Increases.
Wabaeh
466,887 Mloh.Cent &Oan. So.
Yaioo Us MlsB. VaUey.
351.579 ftreat Northern Sys. >
$323,383 N.Y.Cent. &Hud. R.. t|354,718
oAn qra Wabash RR
»*/.»04 Ma. Kans. & Texas..
Seaboard Air Line
Montana Central i
312,741 rulnolB Central
260,854
336.5 li
670,729 Mo. P»c. & Iron Mt. >
Mo. Paolflo &Ir. Mt. >
Rio Grande.
206,888
oae nnn LouiBviUe & NashvUle
oqi loo Denver
^»i.i»^
265,000
did.

.

<te

Central Branch... $
Nash. Obat. & St. L. .
Mo. Kana. & Texas...
8t. Lools gonthwest. .
Tol. St. L.

Alabama

Southern.
Hooking Valley
lUlnolB Central
Northern Paolflc

Colorado

259,173
187.355
172,660
165,207 Mlnn.St.P.&S.SteM..
128,359 Toledo & Ohio Central
105.590 Buff.Roch.&Plttsb'gh
101,360 Wisconsin Central
91,814 Duluth So, Sh. & Atl.
79,284 Intemat'l & Gt. Nor..
79,265 Texas* Pacific
75,118 Wheeling Lake & Erie
68,311 Chic. Term'l Transfer

& Western.

Gt. S'tb'n

...

Southern Indiana
Ala.N.O.&T.P.Or'dB)
Oln. N.O.& Tex. Pac
Illinois Southern
St. L. Vand. & T. H...
L Shore &Mioh. So...

Canadian

Paolllo

Mobile Jacks. & K. O.
LooiBvllle & Nashville
Toronto Ham. & Bufi
Pere Marquette

1162,306

57,831
43,744
41,535
38,588

.

Texas Central
Total (representing

24 roads)

$4,051,070

Tk A AW A A aa Aa|

H.T. Central
t

&,

& H.R... t$2,408,515

Ann Arbor
Minn. <k St. Louis

Detroit Southern
Lake Erie & West
Mobile & Ohio

Ohlc.Indplls&Loulsv.
Indiana 111. & Iowa ..
Ga. Southern & Fla...

560,963
550.220
527,357
616,203
362,279
255,072
233,387
215.677
215,485
209,809
157.478
150,974
149.888
132,851
131,489
127,488
122,516
67,807
42,907
38,680
36,653

Total (representing
29 roads)
$11,074,923

PBINCIPAI.

OHANOES IN

GROSS

Great Northern Sys.

Montana Central,
Estimated.

t

In order that the reader may be able to see how the
1904 earnings for June contrast with those of the

June.

&

E. Illinois $
AtlAUtlo Coast Line...
Chesapeake & Ohio. .
Norfolk & Western....
Chlo.

Chicago A Alton
Kan. City Southern...
Pacific Coast

Bangor & Aroostook..
Louisiana

Arkans..
Bloh. Fred. A Pot

Georgia

<&

KR

Total (representing
14 roads)

qqa 799
»34.7.i»

& Reading RR.*.
Baltimore & Ohio
Ohio. & Nor. Western..
Chlo. St. P. M. & Om..
Piiil.

488.392
3 1 3,487 N. Y. Out. & Western.
288,297 N. Y. Susque. &. West..
255,688 Northern Central
145,791 Ohio. Mil. & St. Paul..
107,9)6 Cent, of New Jersey..
98,667 Clev.Cln.Ohlc.&8t.L.
97,598 St Jos. & Grand Isl'd.
70,207 Phil. Bait. & Wash
49,648 Ft. Worth & Denv. C.
Buffalo & Susquehan.
Virginia & 8, Western
$6,979,050 Detroit & Macklnao.
Long Island
.

1,022,840
678.144
604,598
472.592
297,6*1
253,673
181.800
173,369
130,734
127.561
96,724
81,500
70,078
83,508
46,788
41.477
30,809

Deereasea.
Pennayl. RR. (2 r'dB)t $3,209,800
2,087,378
Erie

& South.
Cien.&H.Or.

Col.

B.Gr. W.. J
Iat.*Qt.No..

followins: six-

t Covers the lines directly operated both east and west of Pittsburgh
AErie.

have room for only a few lines with regard to
the earnings for the month of June considered by
The final result shows a small loss $510,983,
itself.
or only about 1 per cent. The cottoa movement,
ment, though never large in June (it being the tailend of the crop season), did n^t come up to that of
last year, while the grain receipts at the Western
market fell much below last year's total, being 44,
055,507 bushels for the five weeks ending Jaly 2 1904,
against 48,928,667 bushels for the corresponding
period of 1903. It is needless to say that comparison
is with previous earnings for June, which had been
steadily increasing year by year for many years yast.
To emphasize that fact we introduce here the following summary of the Jane totals back to 1893.

—

t

553,7 ;7

375.611

3^& 833

989,252
418,52

917.06*

455,361

850,014

1

266,073

716.939
802,481
343,808
770,846

1,459,18;

341,829
1,172.754
2,757.880

1,201,517

891,164

2,6S8,012

494,989
735,808

8.469,558
420,28F

7,400,704

(

1,410.797

52

733,530

778.761

518.076
697,011

8,1«9,477

7,760.3 :J2

7,476,635

aiABHIH&S UF
June.

1,93

1904.

603,188

403.849
684.692

6,401,249

6,661.729

1903.

1902.

1901.

t
4,385,000 4.158,610
592.942
587,069

t
8,179.971

t
2,702.177

1
8,617,760

538.650

607,180

218,745
268,918
3,120,343 8,647,647
196,865
176.671
2S0.4S4
256,flOH
617,862
661,601

Qt. West....

OulnthS.S.&Atl.
iJreat North. Sys.
towa Central...
Mlan.& St. Lonls

U.St.P.&S.S.M.
Norlli. Paolflo.b)

2.811.831

NOBTBWB8TBBN AND NOBTH PAOIFIO OBODF.

258,426
3.196,400
207,333

216946

653.601
233.966

2,685.0S0

8.413.882

177.3»9
SC0,348
430,7SS

186.468
268.049

1

The

1

493,041

634,404

421,068
1,09^,056
2,998.000

S.261,000
561,010

Total

1899.

«

1,370,800

tlo.P.AIr.Mt.
St.L.

19C0.

891,457

4,041,818 4,846,950

at.Panl&Dul.J

We

1901.

1

1,863,600

ifo.K.&Tex.
Bouthw.
Texas A Pao.

1908.

8

1
448,188

Canadian PaolBc.

Total (representing
22 roads)
$12,066,487

1903.

1904.

. . .

1,073,724

we furnish the

years preQe(31ng 1903,

MONTHS.

Inereases.
Decreases.
Book Island Co.
Southern Pad flo Co
$1,6 35.1 1
$1,289,094
Union Pacific System. 1,519,794 Lehigh Valley RB
1,146,379

Atoh.Top. & Santa Fe.
St. L. & SanFran... )

$427,304
s

groups in our customary wav.
BABNINOS OF SOCTHWB8TEBN OBOCF.

2.

EABNIMOS FOB 5

. .

year tables of earnings of leading roads, arranged in

Includes an estimate for the month of June.

H Figures are for period Jan. 1 to July

Northern Pacific
204,108
212,390 Hooking Valley
164.801
Gr.Trunk8y8.(3r'dB).
124,280 Colorado & Southern.
110,594
Tol. St. L. & West
98,457 Wisconsin Central
60.094
Pere Marquette
92,750 Wheeling <k L. Erie
66,809
MobUe&Ohlo
74.076 Mlnn.St.P.&S.Ste.M.
56.248
St. Louis Van. & T. H.
67.773 Duluth So. Sh. & Atl..
56.168
Nash. Ohatt. & St. L..
46,862 Lake Erie & Western..
52 931
45,221
St. Louis & Southwest.
34,080 Texas & Pacific
Tol. & Ohio Central...
39,178
Detroit Southera
Total (represent34,614
ing 14 roads)... $1,651,791
Total (rej
16 roads)
Decreases.
$2,130,030
Central Branoii...i

Canadian Paolflc

840,296
638,760

1800.

1800.

3,603,926 a,e45,277(

808,439
8.686.33

t
2,862.8:8
624.784
813,105

2,077,460
190,249

247,624
416,934

•

8,310,384

621,197

tl02.631
606,463

168.621
600,700

13,868.465 14,459,104 12,414.824 10,686,216

9,056,421

0,006.031

W^liooDsmCent'I.

Total

546,700

608.791

b (nolades proprietary lines Ir
+ Figures for 1900 not reported

661,074

the rears.
takeo same as previous year.

all
;

aABNINQB OF TBCNK LINB8.
1008.

19C4.

June.

1902.

1901.

~
Bal.A 0...
B.4 0.8.W

4,023,127
7c6836^e0

0.836,860

Wabash....
Total.
*

..

1890.

$"

3.794,306

8,656.807
£17,184

408,218

403.626

350,660

,047,649

l,SB3,6ie

862.802
91,816
5,893,870

867,019
76,605

1.703,310
284,469

P.* West
D.G.H.&M
N.Y.C.&H +

1900.

5,088.296

Or. Tr.Can.

Q.Tr.West

I

2.095,031

8.017,688

3,141,906

833,617
j

82.867
»6,870,068

6,724,770

5,907.731

]

4,611,762

89,374
4,377,716

8,018,188

1,694.806

1,515,681

1,427,988

1.310,139

1,268.366

17.866,006

17,878,061

15.082,566

14.144,811

18,103,993

11,167,336

Rough approximation

only.

t The Hall Brook System, the Beeob Creek RR. and the WallklU Yallev BB.
Included for all the ^ears, and Boston & Albany In ImOI, 1903, 1902 and 1901.
k FlKures for 1904 not yet reported; taken same as last year.

.). .
'

July

<

BA.BNIH08

»
849,459

t

Alabama Gt.So.

260,

061,

01iiJJ.O.&Tei.P

573

LouUv.&Nashv..
Mobile

8t.Loul«DI
Tazoo A MisB.yal

•

610,

+631,975

eea.;

407,800
411,676

62,871,180
+481.026
•632,264

+638,

816,033

*7-!6,

8.084.

3,359,40

+463,838
•636,666

687,

8.673,82!

7.483,762

366,634
546,700
587,171

7,044,636

ABNIMOB OF mODLB AND MIDDLB WB8TBBH OBOUP
1904.

1903.

1909.

1901.

Ann Arbor

1
169,606

t
159,063

1
146.124

t
187.48i

143,68.'

Bnff.Booh.A Pitts

f9a,fi7f

707,720

6l2,48i

B82.72)

491.145

Ohlo.Ind.& Lonlsv.

4S4,91(

866,692

353,38:

fel6 1,408

423.946
161,403

391,15

Bvansv.&TerreH

130,89)

119.60.

114,88';

488,9;iV

e 63,7 3.

524,408

488.826

4S7,3Si

891.800

1900.

1899.

t

3,827,20';

4,0S7,661

8,300.8 If-

8,910,43<

8.771,756

2,328,794

•913,282

•839,63)

782.671

687,9tC

198,170

193,862

359,654

268,251

171.175
260,82V

222,197

111,17!-

104.8U

89,B4^

92.037

& West.

278,0SS

178,626

800,36:^

148,236

Wheel.AL.Hrle..

366,6?4

423.443

202,192
330.63i

25i,4eo

242,856

583,970
147,900
164,498
82,288
162,205
202,568

Tol.Bt.L.

168,032

8,182,19»

8,378,731

7,029,178

6,188,82'

6.652,597

4,759,701

Includes Lake Brie A Detroit River Ry. In 1904. In 1903 and In 1902.
k Figures for June. 1904. not yet reported; taken same as last year.
•

QKOBB EASNINQS AND MILEAGE IN JUNE.
Qros8 Earnings.

Same

of Road,
1904.

1903.

s

Alabama Ot.Sonth'n
Ala.N.O.&Tex.PacN.Orl.&No.East.
Ala. & Vlcksb
Vlok8b. 8hr.<ScPao..

Ann ArDor

Atlanta Knoxv.&No
Belief onte Central..
Buff. Rooli.

A Plttsb.

Canadian Paolflo ...
Central of Georgia.
Ohattan. Soathern..

Ohlo.Oreat Western
Chlo. Ind. & Loulsv.
Ohio. Term. Tr. RR.
OlOj N. O. & Tex. Pao.

Colorado & Sonthem
Denv.A Rio Grande
Rio Grande West.
Detroit Southern a...
Dul. So. Shore & Atl.
Qa, South.* Florida
Gr.Trunkof Can...)
Gr. Trunk West.. J

Det.Gr.Hav.&M.;i
No.-S.P.M.&M.
Eastern of Minn.

Gt.

Montana Central..
Gulf

&

Ship Island..
Hocking Valley
Illinois Central
Illinois

Ind.

111.

Southern

Alowa

latemat'lA Gt. No..
Iowa Central

Kanawha & Mloh .

.

Lake Erie & Western.
Loulsv.

& Nashville.

MaooD & BlrmlnR'm
Manlstlque
Mineral Range
Minn. & St. Louis...
Mlnn.St.P.A S.Ste.M

Mo. Kan. & Tex
Mo. Pac.&Iron Mt...
Central Branch
Mobile Jack. &K.0..

Mobile* Ohio
Nash. Chat. & St. L..
Nevada-Cal-Oregon.

S09

309
196
143
189
292
250
27
472

180,277
90,687
98,124
169.606
60,000
4,653
692,976
4,365.000
661,103
9.239
592,942
434,910
126,703
673,886
446.183

183,047
96,93t
88,974

-2,770
-6,243

190

+ 9,150

159, 06f'

+10.538
—1.266
-1,546
-14,744
+ 212.390
-8.053
—1.729
+6,883

189
29^
250

10,968
537,059
4-23,94t

+ 10,964

142,834
593,15C
566.777

- 19,264

-16,131

1,363,500

1,370.800

96,097
212,745
127,297

130.711
268,913
140,468

-110,694
-7,300
—34,614
-56,168
-13,171

3.141.906

3,017,626

+124,280

2,933,517

3,376,188

186.826
148.017
488.929
8,827.207
25,161
130,001
391,457
196,855
126.986
413,095
2.852,100
8,585
8,115
55,321
230,434
561,604
1.410,797
3,142,000
121,000

171,459
149,587
663,730

7,337
60,027
356,608
617,85?
1,098,066
2,905,000
93,000

1142,117

1T33.363

606,060
862,895
19.964

531.976
816.033
16.963

4,087,561
12,754

128,828
421,068
176,671
131,238
466,026
3,058,988
10,13'/

N.Y.Cen.&nud.Rlv.* 16,370,052 16,724,770
Brorthern Pacific 11...

4.041,842

Pere Marquettet
Rio Grande South'n
St. Louis Sonthwes'n
8t. L. Van. & T. H...
Ban Fran. & No. Pao.
Seaboard Air Line...
Southern Indiana....
Southern Railway....
T.Hante A Indlanap.

1,005,98'2

38.646
561.010
265.943
124,570

1,068,924
103,805
3.886.523
170,984
T. Haute* Peoria...
61,337
Texas Central
87,084
Texas* Paolflo
733,580
Tex. Sab.Val. * N.W.
9,000
Tol. * Ohio Central..
820,476
Tol. Peoria * West'n
110,047
Tol.St. L. AWeet....
278,083

4,246,960
913,235
46,452
526,930
198,171
126.591
1,067.269
95,609
3,369.402
172.896
62,768
86,477
778,761
10,000
859,654
111.178
179,626

1903.

$
+11,427

249,459

669,15fc

—442,671
+15,367
-1,570
—164,801
-260,354
+12,407
+1,173
—29,611
+21,184
-5,252
-62,931
—206,888
—1,552

+778

+ 5,294

-26,174
-56,248
+312,741
+237,000
+28.000
+8,764
+74,076
+46,862

+ 8,001
f-364,718

-204,108
+92,750
—7,806
+34,080
+67,773
—2,021
-8,346
+7,696
+27.121
-1.962
—11,431

+ 1.667
-45,281
-1,000
-39,178
-1,181
+98.467

1,677

1,876

only.

GROSS EARNINGS PROM JANUARY
tfame of Road.

1904
$

Alabama Gt. Southern.

* Tex.PacN. O. & Northeast'n...
Alabama & Vioksb'g.
Vlcksburg Shr. A Pac.

1

1908.

TO JUNE 30.
Increaie.

Decreate.

$

$

1,535,244

1.406.885

1,163.432

613.042
699,740
914,247
343,879
29.455
3.491.346
21.510,779
4,466,654
55,445
3,724,777
2,460,867
718,142
3,388,814
2,424,681

1,180,484
583,949
640,421
1,047,098
351.024
37.126
3.726,733
21,443,468
4,495,885
62,126
3.745,415
2,503,774
868,030
3,247,000
2,985.644

7.421,688

7,992,417

648,465

128,359

Ala. N. O.

Ann Arbor

AU. Knoxv. & North'n.
Belief onte Central
Rooh, A Pittsburg.
Canadian Pacific
Central of Georgia
Chattanooga Southern.
Ohio. Great Western...
Chic. Ind. * Loulsv
Chlo. Term'l Transfer..
Otn. NewOrl.ATex.Pao.
Colorado & Southern...
Oenv. & Rio Grande..
Rio Grande Western s

•

17.053

..» -.**

59.093
89.819

-

--• •-•«

182.851
7.145
7.671
235,387
68,311
• •««««•.•

• •»•

>••

29,231
6.681
20.638
42,907
149,888

91,814

14?

27
60C
8.328
1,877

556
108
836

7,590
1,845
105
929
647
108
336

1,121

1,121

2,398

2,398

432
574
395

401
574
395

4,085

4,082

106
92£

5,62S

8.628

36C

347

260
251
347

4,343

4,301

137
253

96
263

1,169

1.007

858
177

558
177
880

261

880
3,578
97
64
127
642
1.469
2,991
6,722

3.439

97
64
127
642

Detroit Southern,*
Oul. 8o. Shore & Atl....
Ga. Southern A Florida.

1,121.545
828,623

776,953
1,337,030
865,276

560,963
570,729
127,488
215,485
36,653

Grand Trunk
)
Gr. Trunk Western.. >

Mileage.

Increase or
1904.
Decrease.

260.886

61,266
6,199
707,72(
4.152,610

880
321
263

11

Bafif.

Total

736
321
263

Includes Lake Erie & Detroit River Railway.
Includes proprietary roads in both years.
If Figures are for five weeks ending July 2.
X Figures here given are for four weeks to June 25.
y Figures here given are for three weeks only of the month In both
years, the fourth week not yet reported.
2 Includes earnings of Iron Railway Oo. in both years.

t
130,746

Fere Marquette... •1,008.98
2ee,94£
St. li. Van. & T. H.
380,47t
irol.& Ohio Cent.
110,047
Tol. Peo. 4We8t.

Illinois Central....

942.007

+39,300
+8,580
-50,207

t

253,6fi5

Hooking Valley.

+ 110440

2/55.682

Rough approximation

469
977
1,162

Boston and Albany included In both years,

283,618
329,664
180,762

June.

05403,160

X402,400

t

1900.

on material carried for company's own use Is no longer credited to
•amines, the Item having been eliminated from both earnings and expenses.
The figures for 1904, 1903, 1902 and 1901 are given on this basis.

3.484

-510,983 86,085 33,568

a;441.700
i/64.262

*

* Freight

+323,383 2,486
—56,809
469
—60,094
977
+20.391 1.171

2518,600

Mexican Southern..
Nat'l RB. of Mexico..

& Memphis Division In these years.
MontRomery Division for 1904, 1903, 1908, 1901 and

1.694,805
428.443
606,794
566.780

Mexican Beads- Not Inolad ed in totals
Interoceanlo (Mex.)..
Mexican Railway...

147.847

Inoindes Padnoah

+ Includes

2,018,188

Total (69 roads).... 54,682,684 55,193.687

317,161

\

362,842

1903

$

Wabash

Wheel. A Lake Erie..
Wisconsin Central..
Tazoo A Miss. Val...

2,177,311

2,698,626

446,

S 69,780

Mileage.

Inereate or
Decreaie. 1904

1903.

1904.

2,430,167
3.886,

oj Bead.

1809.

t
164,070

477,100
440,57«

195,

teo6,

19C0.

t
170,146

63,058,688 62,662,

9.790,614 9,844,948

Total

S

JSarmngt.

Cfrofs

1901.

658,

669,166
698,150

62,892,

& Ohio...

lfaiti.Chat.& St.L
r...|
Southern Ry..

1902.

1903.

1904.

137

OF BODTHBRM QBODP.

Mam*

Cent, of Oeorgia.

.

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

June.

).
.
).

15,510,074

16.752,502

1,242,428

15,692,141
1.236,671
885,198
2,513.489
22,601,735
147,828
826.463
3,342,149
1,158.523
760.397
2.325,228
17,096,000
18,019,014
57.563
35,962
10,156,000
299,707
1,244,891
2,868,458
8,126,068
19,600,654
805,000;

16,793.123

........

1,084,653
861,177
3,063,709
23,129,092
68,544

152,019
24,021

Det. Gr. H. AMUw..)
Great No. St.P.M. A M. >
East'n of Minnesota

Montana Central
Gulf

&

Ship Island

Hooking Valley........
Illinois Central.,
Illinois Southern
Ind'a Illinois
Iowa...
Int.
Great Northern..

&

*

Iowa Central
Kanawha & Michigan.
Lake Erie A Western...
Lake Shore A Mloh. So.
.

& Nashville..
A Birmingham..
Manlstlque ..............
Mich. Cent. A Can. So..
Louisville

«aoon

Mineral Range
Minneapolis * St. LouU
Minn. St. P.A S. Ste. M.

Mo. Kan. A Texas
Mo. Paolflo A Iron Mt...
Central Branch

Mobile Jack. A K.Clty.
Mobile* Ohio
Nashv. Cliat. & St. L...
Nev.-Cal.-Oregon
N. Y. Cent.* Hud. Rlv.*.
Northern PacltlcU
Pere Marquettet
Rio Grande Southern...
8t. Louis Southwestern.
St. Louis Vand. * T. H.
San Fran. * No. Paoiflc
Seaboard Air Line
Southern Indiana
Southern Railway
r. Haute * Indlanap. ..
Terre Haute & Peoria..
Texas Central
Texas APaolttc

1,462
2,693
6,305

Texas Sab. Val. * N. W.
Toledo * Ohio Central.
toledo Peoria* West'n.

388
137
912

388

Western....
Toronto Ham. A Buft...

1,201

1,196
144
3,320
8.884
2,oeo
180
1.293
158

144
3,422
6,610
2,108
18(

1,808
168

96
874

16.-^

166

2,611
166
7,198
8C

2,607

174
227
1.767
58
436
248
451

174
227

167
7,189
80
1,707

88
486
248
451

*

Tol. St. L.

Wabash

A Lake Erie..
*Flsoon8ln Central
A Miss. Valley..

Wheeling
Yazoo

11218,373;

...... .^

.......••

550,220
537,357
79,284

865.143
2,551.958
1,155.253
745.860
2,447,744
17.020,882
17,961,183
68.662
29,680
11,253,604
2,m.652
1,376,380
3,230,735
7,933,713
19,523,362

1,099,982

38,680
209,309
3,270
14,637

--••••«
-•>•••>»«•

132,516
75,118
57.831

......••

11,099
6,282
1,098,604

18.055

131,489
362,279

601,000

187,355
77.192
204.000

11156,067

1162,306

3,792,666

3,859,973
5,192,3791
4,933.206
81.534
84.418
36,291.481 38.699.996
20,923.078 21,439,281
5,332,563
5,291,028
219,424
247,421
3,587,744
3,418,084
1,290,955
1,211,690
580,682
592.272
6,839,287
6,602,773
511,891
617,481
21,987,364 21,064.848
982.836
959,954
803,058
295,377
265,629
304,217
5,428,048
8,585,521
66,400
70,200
1,574.456
1,829,628
623.269
651.978
1.665.327
1.500,120
&252,514
2)296.258
10,747.022 10.280,136
1,973.176
2,124.149
3.234.910
3.019,233
3.610,446
3,862,024

67,307

289,173
2,884

3408615
516,303
41,535

27,997

172,680
79,265
11,590
336,514
105,590
932,516
22,882

••••>«••

7,68*1

38.588

157,478
3.800

28.709
165.207
43.744
466,887
-••• ---

381,579

255,072
.._,„_
...•*•»•
......••

160,974
218,677

-

Total (72 roads).... 839.695.728 346.632,339 4,428.404 11365020
6,936,616
Net decrease (2 00 p. o.)

Mexican Roads— Not Inolnded in
Interoceanlo (Mex.)....

Mexican Railway
Mexican Southern
National RR. of Mex...

x3.102,700
z2,963,200
V588,050
5.984,707

totals.

a-2.632.630

x2.699.400
y487,189
6.624.116

t

......M

........

A Albany Included in both years.
Inoludes Lake Brie * Detroit River Railway.

y

470,070
268,800
100,881
230.682

Includes proprietary roads In both yean.

*

Boston

II Figures are for period to July 2.
b Figures are for period to June 14.
X Figures are for period to June 25.
y These flgures are down to the end of the third week of
tinoladea earnings of iron Railway Oo. in both years.

Jane only.

THE CHRONICLE.

188
ROADS REPORTIKfG FOR

FIVJi

MONTHS.

the Section.

Vol.

LXX.1X.

I

A total

membership

of 810

is

now

reported, an

Increase of 62 during the year.
Jan.

1 to

May

1901.

31.

1908.

Deer'ie.

Tnereaie.

9
Atch.Top, & 8. Fe..
Atlantic Coant Line.
Bait. <3K An. 8h. Line.
Baltlm're A Obto Co.
BaiiKord: ArooHl'k..
Brldgion Ai Saco Rlv
Buflalo & HiisQUpli
Cent, of New Jersey
Ohes. <b Ohio
.

Chicago
Ohio. M.

&.

Alton....

&

St.

Paul.

Ohlc&NortliW.'st..
01ilo.8t.P.
Ul.

M.&Oiu.

Om.Clilc.&8t.L.

Peoria A Eastern.
Colamb Newb. &L.
Copper Range

Cornwall
Cornwall & Lebanon
Detroit A Mackinac
Erie

EvanBv. AT. H
Falrohlld& No. E..
Farmv. & Powhat.
Ft. W. & Denv. City
Georgia

Kansas '"Ity South..
Lehigh Valley RR..
Lexington & East..
Long Island
Louis.

& Arkansas..

MaclBtee & Or. Rap.
Manistee <&No.EaBt.
Maryland & Penn.
Millen & South w. .
.

Nevada Central

N. Y. Ont. & West'n
N. Y. Susq. & West..

Norfolk & Western.
Northern Central...
Ohio Riv. & West'n.
Paoilio Coast Co
Penn. RR. —Lines di

reoily operatedEast P. & Erie..
West P. & Erie..
PhUa. Bait. & Waeh.

27.241,462
9.103,676

26,167,738
8,616,284
040,047
25,961,775
773.704
18,481
415,652
8.788,800
7,696,767
4,136,280
18,433,847
20,881,886
4,600,982
8,088,639
1,247,447
86,982
al31.6e2
37,218
100,088
446,427
19.349,134

(157.946

25,278,681
872,871
18,492
368,044
8,056.066
7,910,244
4.391,968
18,260,478
19,726,787
4.128,340
7,961,078
l..£39,104

96,011
al41,66«
26,322
00,587
403,950
17,261,756
a537,82»
17,038
36,288
883,421

1,073,724
488.392
17,9011

678,144
08,667i

11
68,508
1130.734
818,4871
265,6881
173,369
604,"'98

1472,592
1127,561
8,343

10,029
10,002

10,896
10,386
41.477
2,067.878

10,236

a548,065
16,883
80,493
903,499
959,617
2,553,344
12,976,326
283,484
62,299,714
233,391
a49.693

1,009,265
2,699,185
11,829,047
210,116
62,268.905
830,989

ai8.390

a 146,462

al30,242
115,932
18,914
all,705

118,791
27,602
a6,056
2,643,476
1,129,610
9,141,748
3,985,692
a61,788
2,213,268

2.841,117
1,883,292
9,153,451
4.167,492
a59,031
2,105,362

166
5,795

70,078
49,648
145,791
1,146 879

28,368
80,809

97,69 J

2i^a03
'16,226

2,141

"8,688
5,640
297.641
263,673

288,897

181,806
2,767
107.916

South'n PaclfloSye..
Union Pac. System.
Virginia & Southw.
W. Jersey & 8. Shore
W'msp't & No. Br'ch
Wrightsv.&Tennille

46,918,117
626,699,50J
5,366,294
14,236,105
688,673
al63,869
16,607,949
a42i,67X
14.032,411
36.203,985
20,670,475
215.865
1,368,828
a48,167
a60,923

49,327,417
627,500,000
5,447,794
15,258.945
618,466
al74,229
17,867,043
a321,395
13,197,688
34,668,817
19,150,681
268,653

a57,651
a59,706

9,484

Total (57 roads)..

876,400,436

331,502,463

7,076,626 12178,653

Phlla.&Read. RR...
Richm. Fred. & Pot.
Rio Orande Junok'n

Rock Island Co
tit.

Jos.

& Or. Island

& San Fran.
Incl.Ch.&E 111.^

St. L.

1,343,928

2,400.300

SOO.500
81.600
1,023,840

70,207

10860
1,259,094

90,724

834,723
1,635,118
1,519,794

46,788

24,900

Decrease (1-34 p.c).

8,102,027

Mexican roads — Not included In table.
Mexican Central..
a9.044,418
a8,327,285
Mexican Internat'l.
2,989,147
3,166,117
.

717,133
176,970

TEMS ABOUT BANKS. BANKERS AND TRUST

GO'S.

—The

public sales of bank stocks this week aggregate
90 shares, of which 110 shares were sold at auction aad the
remainder at the Stock Exchange. The dealings were con.
fined to the stocks of two banks— the National City, of which

Bank of Commerce, of
which 180 shares were dealt In. The table below, given in
our usual form, shows the actual sales of New York City
bank stocks made during the week at auction and at the
Stock Exchange. Bid and asked quotations for all city bank
and trust company stocks are published weekly in another
department of the paper and will be found to-day on page 1(8
Latt previous tale,
Sharet.
Banxs— J^few Fork.
Price.
210 shares were sold, and the National

'Sold at the Stock Exchange.
at the Stock Exchange.

265
207-209
§

Of

this

demands for banking facilities in this growing district
win be very largely Increased. We are informed that the
following gentlemen will make up the new bank's board of
directors: W. D. Baldwin, President 0„is Elevator Company;
E. A. De Lima of Messrs. D, A. De Lima & Company;
George S. Hart of National Park Bank; Egbert A. Chesethe

brough, President Cheeebrough Mfg. Co.; C. T. Barney,
President Knickerbocker Trust Company; Calvin Tumklns;
C. R. Runyon, President Commanipaw Coal Co.; H. T.
Co.; John N,
Alexander, President H. T, Alexander
Halght;
Robins; H, Gt. Cortls of Messrs. Wheeler, Cortls
J. R. Livermore; Alfred H, Post; Oaklelgh Tnorne, President North American Trust Co,, and N. W. Anthony, President North American Coal Co.

&

&

—The New York State Bankers' Association met in annual
convention this week on Thursday and Friday at the Hotel
Champlain, Bluff Point, N. Y. Chief interest in the program centered in the address of Mr. Frederick D. Kilburn,
State Superintendent of Banking, dealing with "Interest on
Deposits." Mr. Kilburn argued against the payment of interest on Individual deposits by banks of discount, CDUtending that this practice is the greatest msnace to banking in
the State to-day. Addresses were also presented by Mr. R.
Rass Appleton, President of the Fourteenth Street Bank of
this city, whose topic was "Financial Legislation;"' Mr.Hirtman Biker, Cashier of the Merchants' National Bank of
Philadelphia, who spoke on the subject of "New York and
Pennsylvania;" Mr. John L. Hamilton, Chairman of the Executive CouQcil of the American Bankers' Association and
Cunningham of
Vice-President and Cashier of Hamilton
Hoopeston, 111., who gave his views on the "Practical Work
of Banking Associations," and Mr. M. J. A. Prendergast, General Manager LaBanque D'H3chelaga of Montreal, Canada,
the subject of whose discourse was "Note Issues Under tha
Canadian Banking Law." Mr. Liwis E. Pieraon, President
of the New York National Exchange Bank of this city, made
some interesting remarks as President of the Association.
The social end of the program Included trips to An Sable
Chasm, Montreal, Lake Placid, etc.
The following are the officers of the association for the
ensuing year President, Mr. Charles H. Sabin, Vice-President of the National Commercial Bank of Albany; VicePresident, Alfred H. Curtis, Cashier of the National Bank
of North America, this city; Secretary (re-elected), E. O.
Eldredge, Cishler of the Osvego National Bink of Osvego;
Treasurer, David Cromwell (re-elested), President of the
First National Bank of White Plains.

&

a Figures are for months to April 30.
approximation only.

6 B,ongb

'210 City Bank, National
^180 Oommeroe, Nat. Bank of

—Another new institution, to be called The Battery Park
National Bank, will make its advent this fall on the corner
of Battery Park and Bridge St., facing the new Custom House.
Mr. E. A. De Lima of the well-known exporting house of
Messrs. D. A. DeLlma&Co., 17 State St., will be its President.
In addition to a capital of $200,000 the bank will have a
paid-in cash surplus of $103,000. The organization committee plans to distribute the stock among the important
representative firms and corporations who oocupy quarters
in the immediate vicinity.
Its projectors believe that with
the completion of the new Custom House and the establishment of a large branch post office in It, besides the opening
of the subway extension to Brooklyn and the erection of
many modern office structures now building in the locality,

July
July

1904— 265
1904— 206

amount 70 shares were

sold

:

—The
Trust

large Increase In the business of the Fifth

Company

Avenue

of this city necessitates the enlarging of its

meeting of the Savings Bank Section of the American Bankers' Association will take place on Tuesday, September 13, the day preceding the opening of the general convention, which, as heretofore noted, will be held September
The meeting place of this section
14, 15 and 16 in this city.
win be In the Myrtle Room of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel.
The Savings Bank Section was established in 1902 and held
To the untiring efforts of
its first annual meeting last year.
Mr. William Hanhart, the S3cretary of the Section, and his
colleagues composing the executive committee, is due the
success already attained by the Section.
No additional
fee or expense is involved in joining the Savings Bank Section, and all banking institutions members of the American

present quarters at 5th Avenue and 43d Street. To accomplish this the new building adjoining on 5th Avenue is being
utilized the whole Is to be converted into a handsome banking room, which, when completed, will have a frontage of
50 feet on 5th Avenue and 200 feet on 48d Street. Special
attention is being devoted to the ladles' department, elegant

Bankers' Association .doing a savings bank business, or hav2 ng a savings department, are urged to become members of

:na National Bank of this city,
organization of the
approved by the Comptroller on the 1st inst., is assuming

—The

;

White marble and verde
parlors, etc., being provided.
antique brocze will be extensively used In fitting up the new
room. The Fifth Avenue Trust Company during the past
six months has made a noteworthy advance, deposits having
risen from $12,655,715 to $15,235,656; surplus and undivided
profits from $1,300,703 to $1,348,286, and aggregate resources
from $14,956,417

—The

to $17,583,941.

^

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

definite shape. The bank will locate in the center of the
batter, cheese, egg, fruit, produce and provision district, in
the new Mattlage Building, corner of Warren and Greenwich
It will have a capital of $200,000 and surplus of
streets.

Mr. Jamr s Dennieon, formerly Cashier of the Irving National Bank, with which he was connected for thirtytwo years, will be the new bank's cashier. The temporary
organization committee consists of Mr. J. M. Coward, of the
1100,000.

189

liquidating and organizing a trust company to take overjits
business, has decided to re-extend for twenty years its

charter expiring November next. This decision, it is stated,
the result of the passage of the general trust company
bill, under the provisions of which the bank fears too many
trust companies will be organized.

is

—

The fifty-third annual .statement of the Deep River
Savings Bank of Deep River, Conn., of date July 1 is issued
Coward Shoe Company William Gamble, C> Henry Matt. in comprehensive form. The bank has deposits of $1,768,469,
lage, J. B. Knapp, President of the Maryland Coal Company; Its assets show railroad bonds with a book value of
$658,140;
C. E. Finlay, President of the New Jersey Steel Company, municipal bonds of a par and book value of
$250,000, State
and James Dennison.
bonds of $15,000 and bank stocks of $48,131. The various
—The Hamilton Trust Company, located at 191 Montage e is-ues in these totals are all separately given, as well as the
Street, Borough of Brooklyn, in its statement for June 30 dates of maturity and the rates of interest. The institution
1904 reports a deposit of $6,455,380, as against $6,166,246 on is managed by Mr. Milon Pratt President, Washington F
Aggregate assets are $7,976,050, as against Willcox Vice-President and Harvey J. Brooks Sacretary and
Dec. 31 1908.
$7,605,417 six months ago. Mr. Silas B. Dutcher is President; Treasurer.
Mr. William Berri and Mr. Walter C. Humstone, ViceA merger by which all of the present banking instituPresidents; Mr. George Hadden, Vice-President and Secre- tions of Warren, R. I,—
five— will lose their identity is about
tary, and Mr. Robert S. Girling, Assistant Secretary.
to take place. An offar for their absorption has been made
—Sir William Van Home and George H. Macy, it is an- by the Industrial Trust Company of Providence, and meetnounced, have become members of the board of directors of ings to consider the matter will be held August 24 by the
the laternational Banking Corporation, replacing Mr. James shareholders of three of the institutions—the First National,
the National Hope and the National Warren banks. The
H. Hyde and Mr. W. H. Mclntyre.
—Group VI, of the New York State Bankers' Associatior. Warren Trust Company and the Warren Institution for
held its summer meeting on Friday and Saturday, July 8 and Savings will also be embraced in the consolidation. If
approved. It Is proposed to transfer the business of the sev9, at Stamford, N. Y., at the invitation of the National Bank
of Stamford. The headquarters were at the Bezmere, at eral Institutions to the Warren branch of the Industrial
which hotel a banquet was served on Friday evening, this Trust Company. The Warren Trust Company (capital $148,being followed by after-dinner speaking and a reception in 000) is offered the payment in cash of an amount equal to
the hotel parlors. On Saturday morning the formal business the stock actually paid in and all that the assets yield in admeeting of the Group was held In the opera house. After dition on liquidation. No charge will be made by the Inthe transaction of the regular routine work, a short discus- dustrial Trust for liquidating the Warren Trust and the
sion on banking subjects was engaged in. Mr. John J. three national banks. The stockholders of the First National
Crawford, the author of the Negotiable Instruments Law, (capital $150,000) and the National Hope Bank (capital $130,addressed the Group on the subject of the " Banker in Poli- 000) are to receive $100 a share In cash and In addition all
His address was thoroughly appreciated by all pres- that the assets yield above par; the stockholders of the
tics."
ent.
Both Mr. Merchant, the President, and Mr. Kendall, N ational Warren Bank (capital $200,000) will receive $50 a
the Cashier, of the National Bank of Stamford, did all that share cash and in addition all that the assets yield over par.
could be done to provide for the comfort of the delegates and In the case of the Warren Institution for Savings a division
the ladies. On Saturday there was a choica of several drives. of the whole property of the Institution will ba made among
the depositors In proportion to their respective Interests
—The People's Trust Company, with offices at 172 Montatherein. A modern banking building will be erected In the
gue Street and at corner Bedford Avenue and Halsey Street,
near future on the site of the Warren National Bank. In
Brooklyn, shows a marked increase in its business during the
the meantime the Industrial Trust C jmpany's branch will
past six months. The deposits for June 30 are reported at
occupy the rooms of the First National. Mr. Edwin A.
$14,526,104, as against $11,677,168 on Dec. 31 1908. Total reCady, Assistant Cashier of the First National^ and Assistant
sources have advanced from $14,324,859 to $17,214,528. As
Treasurer of the Warren Institution for Savings, has been
previously mentioned in these columns, this institution is
appointed Manager of the Warren branch of the Industrial
now constructing a handsome new home directly opposite its
;

—

Montague Street.
—The Savings Bank Commissioners

Trust.

present quarters on

of Massachusetts, un-

der the provisions of the new general trust company law,
granted a certificate of incorporation to the Harvard Trust
Company of Cambridge, Mass., on Monday, the 11th inst.
The petition was presented by the officials of the First
National Bank of Cambridge. The bank will be liquidated
and the trust company, which will have a capital of $200,000
and surplus of $100,000, will succeed to its business. This is
the first company to receive permission to organize under
the new law. Stockholders of the bank have been notified
that they have the privilege of exchanging their stock for
stock in the trust company on the basis of share for share,
or accepting by a surrender of their share a first dividend of
150 per cent, the book value being 165. The officers of the
company will be Mr. W. A. Bullard, President; Henry Endicott, Vice-President, and W. F. Earle, Treasurer.
An unsuccessful effort was made to bring: together the
organizers of the Harvard Trust Company and the Central
Trust Company, another projected Cambridge institution,
for the purpose of uniting the two and forming one institution.
The officers of the Cambridgeport National Bank are
back of the movement to establish the Central Trust, which,
after several hearings before the Bank Commissioners, was
granted a charter on Wednesday, being the second company
to receive permission to organize under the new law.
In
this case, also, the Cambridgeport National will liquidate
and the new Central Trust will take over its affairs.

—It is announced that the People's National Bank of Roxbury, Boston, Mass., which last year entertained the Idea of

—In the United States District Court at Trenton, on Wednesday, the Indictment against George F. Kroehl, Albert C.
Twining and David C. Cornell, charging them with embezzling the funds of the First National Bank of Asbury
Park, N. J., was quaehed by Judge Lannlng.
The
"Newark News" of the 13th Inst, states that the quashiag of this Indictment leaves Kroehl (who was acquitted
on the 7th Inst, from the charge of making false entries
in the books of the bank) free from all pending crimiwith his management of the bank's
another indictment, it is stated, against
Twining and Cornell, but which has been attacked by their
counsel. Judge Lannlng has announced that he will hear
testimony to-da7 to determine whether this Indictment shall
nal charges In connection

affairs.

There

is

stand.

—The stockholders of
N.

J., at

the Passalo National Bank of Passaic,
a special meeting on the 7th lust., authorized an in-

crease of $100,000 in the capital. The Issuance of the new
stock win give the bank a capital of $200,000, and at the selling price of $200 per share (par $100) will advance the surplus $100,000, making the amount about $219,000, Subscriptions are payable in two instalments, the first on August 15
and the final one on October 15.

—June 80 marked the completion of the fortieth year of
the First National Bank of SomervlUe, N. J. Since it began,
In dividends $659,500 and has
earnings a surplus fund and undivided
profits of $134,929.
It has a capital of $100,000 and deposits
of $671,862. The management consists of Mr. Peter Dewitt,
In 1864, the

bank has paid

accumulated from

Its

THE CHRONICLE.

190
President;

John G. Gaeton, Vioe-President and William H.

—The

Highland Trust Company, referred to in onr issue of
opened for business on Thursday, June 30, at 149
Summit Avenue, West Hoboken, N. J.
18,

—The
pany

bonds are the direct obligation of the trust comlien on all of its assets.
The bonds are dated
July 1 1904 and are due July 1 1934. They are redeemable,
however, upon any interest date on or after July 1 1909 at
the option of the obligor. The bonds are in denominations
of $100, $500 and $1,000, and bear 4 per cent interest, payable
quarterly on the first days of October, January, April and
July. It is understood that the real estate mortgages deposited as collateral bear a higher interest rate, running up
to 6 per cent, the difference accruing to the Trust Company.
A large amount of the bonds has already been disposed of at
par and accrued interest.
trustee, the

pany and a

Taylor, Cashier.

June

[Vol. lxxix.

Philadelphia Trust, Safe Deposit

&

Insurance Coman In-

of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia has obtained

junction in the United States District Court in Wilmington
against the Philadelphia Trust, Safe Deposit & Insurance
Company of Delaware, restraining the latter from the use of
The Delaware institution, it is stated, is a
that title.
recent organization.

—In view

&

—At a recent meeting of

the directors of the Land Title
Trust Company of Philadelphia |600,000 was added to the
With a fullsurplus, increasing the amount to |1, 600,000.

paid capital of $3,000,000 and undivided profits of $303,506,
the combined capital, surplus and profits now aggregate
18,803,606.

—The Farmers' Deposit National Bank of Pittsburgh
opened on Monday the Wood Street addition to its banking
rooms. The requirements of business and the convenience
of customers rendered necessary this addition, which covers
a space 60 by 80 feet, making the total of floor space occupied
by the bank 6,000 square feet.

of the fact that the State

Banking Department

of Illinois does neither prescribe nor proscribe the exact

character of investments which must be made by the savings
banks of the State (as is required throughout New England
and the East generally), the Merchants' Loan
Trust Company of Chic&go voluntarily publishes for the benefit of its
depositors a comfjlete list of the bonds and mortgages in
which their savings funds are Invested. This list embraces
$1,679,000 standard railroad bonds, $614,000 municipal bonds,
$220,000 selected corporation bonds and $1,367,800 real estate
first mortgages.
The publicity Inspires oonfidence among
depositors, aside from the fact that the list of securities is In
itself good.

&

—

—Official notice of the pending liquidation of the Tradesmen's National Bank of Pittsburgh appears in the papers of
that city. The Tradesmen's was to have gone into the general consolidation planned over a year ago, but which was
declared abandoned in December,

An interesting little book is being distributed by the
Wleconein Trust & Security Company of Milwaukee. In his
Introductory remarks President Oliver C. Fuller states that
the book "is written not for the purpose of telling its readers
what a trust company is, for that is no longer necessary, but
—Mr. Charles E, Smith has become Assistant Cashier of to point out, and perhaps to impress upon them, some of the
the Commercial and Farmers' National Bank of Baltimore, advantages of trust companies in general, and of the Wisconsucceeding Mr. Wilson Keyser.
sin Trust & Security Company In particular, that may not
—The Merchants' National Bank of Baltimore has awarded have occurred to all who may read it." The book is well
the contract for the reconstruction of its building at South and attractively bound in heavy olive green card board, and
and Water Streets, which suffered in the Baltimore fire of printed on heavy white paper. A portion of the remarks
of the building will be reduced made by President Lyman J. Gage of the United States
upper stories which had been used as Trust Company in his address on "The Problem of Wealth
This will leave but one story above the banking and the Trust Company as Trustee" presented at the annual,
offices.
The convention of the American Bankers' Association last year
floor, which latter is equal to two stories in height.

February last.
by cutting off

The height

five

The

rebuilding is expected to be finished by January next,
bank's quarters at present are at 309 Cathedral Street.

In

—

As a consequence of the addition of a trust department,
the name of the Pearl Street Savings & Loan Company of
Cleveland has been changed to the Pearl Street Savings &
Trust Company, the change taking effect on the 1st inet.
The company has increased its capital from $100,000 to $200,The new stock,
000 since adding the trust department.
which bears a par value of $100, was sold at $300 per share.

—The First National Bank of
in its

Cincinnati

new home on Third and Walnut

is

streets.

Incorporated in the book. Some of the various capacities
which the company is qualified to act are enumerated, and
other information of general interest is given concerning it.
The Institution, as is known, is closely affiliated with the
Wisconsin National Bank, and In addition to President Fuller is under the management of Frederick Kasten Vice-

is

now domiciled
Work on the

which is twelve stories high, has been in progress
some time past. The new quarters are most attractive,
the safety deposit vaults being especially spacious and
equipped with all modern appliances.
—The Western German Bank of Cinoinnati is about to
start work on a new building which It will erect on the
southeast corner of Twelfth and Vine Streets, The bank
came into possession of the property about two months ago.
The new structure will cover a plot of 78 by 100 feet, and
will be exclusively for banking purposes. About $150,000

President
Secretary.

and

Treasurer,

and

Gardner

P.

Stickney

—The capital of the State Savings Bank of Butte, Mont.,
has been increased from $100,000 to $800,000. The surplus
also now stands at the latter figure. The par value of the
shares is $300 each, instead of $100, as formerly.

building,
for

will be

expended in the construction.

—Preparations to organize a new Fort Wayne, Ind. bank
are in progress, the Comptroller having approved the application of the organizers on the 8th inst. The name is to be
,

the German-American National and the capital $200,000.
Those interested are Samuel M. Foster, Charles F. Pfeiffer,
Robert W. T. De Wald, Henry Beadell and Theodore F.

—Mr. R.

B,

Burmlster has succeeded Mr.

Assistant Cashier of the Phoenix National

W.

Bank

F.

Dodge as

of Phoenix,

Ariz.

—The Columbia Savings Bank of Los Angeles, Cal., has
been taken over by the Union Bank of Savings of Los
Angeles. The consolidation was effected on the 1st inst., the
buainess of the Columbia being moved on that day to the
quarters of the Union Bank of Savings at 223 South Spring
The Columbia had a paid-in capital of $50,000. It
Street.
was organized in 1893.
—The application to convert the West Virginia Savings
Bank and Trust Company cf Huntington, W. Va., Into the
West Virginia National Bank of Huntington, was approved
on the 2nd inst. The capital will be not less than before the
conversion, namely $185,000.

—The consolidation

of the Metropolitan

Bank

of Virginia

and the Richmond Trust & Safe Deposit Company, both of
An innovation recently made by the Union Trust Com- Richmond, referred to as a possibility in these columns
pany of Detroit, Mich., Is the issuance by it of first mortgage June 25, appears to be nearlng consummation. The stocktrust gold bonds amounting to $260,000. These bonds are holders of the two Institutions have been called to take
secured by deposit with the Collateral Deposit Company, action In the matter at meetings on Thursday next, the 21st
Limited, Trustee, of an equal amount of first mortgages on Inst.
improved city real estate valued at not less than twice the
Plans have been accepted by the Memphis Trust Comamount of the loan. The trustee of the bonds, the Collat- pany of Memphis, Tenn., for Its contemplated building on
eral Deposit Company, Limited, was recently organized, and Main Street. The structure will be fifteen stories Instead of
is composed of interests Identified with the Union Trust.
In twelve, as originally planned. Work will be started on It In
addition to the security of mortgages deposited with the the early fall, and by September of next year the building Is

Thieme.

—

—

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.1

-1903-04-

expected to be completed. Ttie entire ground floor and basement will be devoted to the bank's own use.

—The Georgia Bankers' Association held its annual
convention on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week at
Lookout; Inn, Lookout Mountain, Tenn. The proceedings
contained three addresses of more or less import— "State
Supervision of State and Private Banks," by Mr. Charles O.
Austin, Vice-President of the National Bank of North Amer-

191

Exvorta.
%

-1902-03.-

Imports.
$

Bxportt.

Excttt.

Imv<yrt».

1

Bxceai.

1

%

+6.670

+20,087

Sliver and Sliver 1 n Ore.

3.883
5,008
4.431

49.618

May
Total

13.063
13.692
11.109
2.698
2.148
1,566

6.488
7,699
4.660
1,668
1.618
2.060

+21.784

44 250

24,168

27,734

15.727
13.086

June

+788
+8.353
+6,202
+1.618
+3,115
+1.718

6,680
7,874
6.884
2,215
1.983
2,718

7.403

Jnly-Sept..
Oot.-Deo...
Jan.-Mob...
April

+ 5.898
+6.419
+1.034
+536
-494

— Bzoeis of importB.
+ Bxoeiior exports.
ica, Chicago;
We subjoin the totals for merchandise, gold and
Bonds as Security," by Mr. Clark Williams, Vice-President
silver for the twelve months since July 1 for six
of the United States Mortgage & Trust Company, this city, and
by Mr. A. Kavanagh, Assistant years.
"Safe and Unsafe Banhing,"
GOLD.
SILYSH.
MUBOHANDISI.
Cashier of the National City Bank of this city. Mr. Williams

"An Element

of

Danger to Banks

in Municipal

urged that "municipal bonds should be carefully engraved
by a responsible bank-note company, producing the best
workmanship and giving absolute security during the differ-

Tw'Ave
Hot. Bxvorti. Imvortg.

ent stages of preparation, as well as exercising a careful
guardianship over the engravings afterward, to prevent
A
either.'piates or impressions falling into improper hande.
certificate signed by a responsible trust company should appear on each bond, evidencing the genuineness of execution

03-04 1.460,829
02-03 1,420,141
01-02 1.381,719
OO-Ol 1.487,766
99-00 1,894,433
98-99 1,227,028

and as a guaranty against over-issue through carelessness or
fraud." It is his opinion, furthermore, that "a certificate of
legality should appear on each bond, or a reference to the
fact that such legal examination has been made, and that the
legal papers relating to the issue are filed with the trust company, which would be responsible for the genuineness of the

Similar totals for the six months since
for six yflars make the lollowinj? exhibit.

way avoiding the constantly recurring
expense and delay of examination of the legality of the security by counsel for each new purchaser. The trust company, however, certifying the bond as to its genuineness
should be particular to assume no responsibility as to Its
validity." At the conclusion of the meeting on Wednesday
a trip to the St. Louis Fair was taken by the delegates.
certificates, in

F. Albertsen began the

payment on

of a forty- per-cent dividend to the depositors of the

First National Bank of Macon, da., for which institution he
has been acting as receiver since its suspension, May 16. It
is expected that the depositors will ultimately be paid in full.
A sum aggregating $736,459 was received a few weeks ago
from life Insurance policies on the life of the former President, the late Robert H. Plant.

—The Merchants and Planters Farley National Bank of
Montgomery, Ala., after the payment of the usual semiannual dividend of 4 per cent out of its earnings for the six
months ending J une 30 has carried to its undivided profits
account the sum of $30,000.

—Mr.

R. Lee Kempner has been elected Assistant Cashier
Texas Bank & Trust Company of Galveston, Tex., to
succeed F. P. Evans, who disappeared on the 2nd inst., and
in whose accounts an alleged $15,000 discrepancy was disof the

President Kempner states that the bank
protected against the shortage.

covered.

is

amply

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FOR JUNE.
The Bureau of Statistics at Washington has issued
the statement of the country's foreign trade for

of

Bx-

Im-^

vorti.

I

I

I

I

portt.

r

BXCUB
or

Ex-

Im-

Exports ports.

ports.

I

990,715 470084 81,616 99,050 •17.535 49.613 27.734
1.085,710 394482 47,091 44,982
903321 478398 48,689 52,081

2.109 44,260 24,163
*3,452 49,733 28,232
823.172 6ti469:!^53,I8e 66,051 •12,889 04 286 36.S8^
3,694 36,718 35.866
849,941 54464248.267 44.5:3
«»7,148 529875137,622 88,«65 •31 ,433 ."iO 319 306-5

Bzeeii of Imports.

•

UEKOHANDIIB.

January

1

aiLVBB.

dOLli

Six
Sxports. Imports.

Bxcsss

Im-

of

Exports ports.

this

—Bank Examiner W.
Monday

BXCtBi

BxvorU

t

t

t

i

t

1904 673,728 447.936 125733 68.504
1903. tt97,662 512.746 184807 31.336
1902. 638,196 456 342 181854 20,277
1901. 721,853 433.441 288412 29,491
i900. 712 034 439,419 272616 30,441
1899 .3U3.019 388.445 204574 27 653
*

ports.

47,75«
13,976
13,187
15.927
16,625
23.SH8

Bxcsts

an-

Im- Bxetts
0/ JFa.

Exports ports. ports.
%

I

20,748 26.3^8
17,860 17,505
7,0w0 22.628
13,564 28,434
13.816 30,370
4.ie5 27,120

t

ports.
t

13,741 12,647
9,981 7,624
12.821 10,807
15,135 13.809

18 849 11521
14 487 12,683

Hzoess of Imports.

In these tables of totals, gold and silver in ore for
the years are given under the heads respectively of
gold and silver.
The following shows the merahandise balance for
aach year back to 1876.
BX0BS8 OF MBB0HANDI8B IMPORTS OB BXPOSTS.
12 montht ending June 30—
6 months ending June 30—

all

1876
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904

Imports. il9,562,726
ExportB. 79,648,481
Export8,151.152,094
Export8.267,814,234
Export8.264,66V,666
Export8.167,683,912
Export8.259,712,718
Export8. 25.902,683
Export8.100,658,488
Export8. 72.815,916
Export8.16«,662,426
ExportB. 44,088.694
ExportB. 23,863,443
ImportB. 28,002.607
ImportB. 2,730,a77
ExportB. 68,518,275
Exports. 39,664,614
Kxport8.202,675,686
ImportB. 12,605,798
Export8.244, 132,692
Exports. 76.568,200
Exportfl.102,882,264
Export8.286,263,144
Exporte.615,432,676
Export8.529,874,813
Export8.844,841,898
Export8.664,692,826
Export8,478,898,463
Export8.394,422,442
Exports.470,084,465

1875
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
L889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1909
1904

Import8.|21.795,212
ExportB. 50,063,783
ExportB. 37,896.413
ExportB.155,864,538
Export8.115,036,61l
ExportB 31,163,494
Exports. 97,999,966
ImportB. 39,437,030
ExportB. 46,083,019
Exports. 10,786,835
Exports. 55,313,693
ImportB.
978,738
ImportB. 27,090,127
Imports. 61,575,300
ImportB. 30,655,356
Imports. 18,721,363
ImportB. 13,261,671
Exports. 47,425,412
Imports. 68,800,021
ExportB. 68,486,072
Importa. 4,786,035
ExportB. 74,956,440
ExportB, 36,961,882
Export8.295,280,759
Export8.204,573,754
Export8.272,615,091
ExportB.288,411,618
Export8.181,854,021
ExportB.l 84,907,400
Exports. 125,7 33,099

—

Failures for Second Quarter and Since Jan. 1. The following figures, prepared from Messrs. R. G. Dun & Co.'s
Jane, and from it and from previous statements statement, show the number of failures in the United States
ve have prepared the following interesting sum- and Canada during the quarter ending June 30, 1904, and
for the six months ending volth the same date. For purposes
maries.
of comparison like figures for the corresponding periods of
the preceding year are given:
FOBBION XBADB UOVBM BHT OV THB TTMITBD STA.TBS.
1903.
1904.
Amount of
No. of
Amount of No. of
[InttaafoUowlnirtablef three elphari (OOOi) are In alloatei omltted.1
.

.

Ill III
1903-04.

.

B«9ortt.

niereh'dUe.
July-SepU..

OoU-Dec..
Jan..Moh...

AprU
June
Total-

..

Import$.

+43.671
336,696+258.781

304.969
417,681
391,673
109.827
100.R29

245,803 +59,161
267,167 +15t>,364

246,0fS4

3<J0,7«4

1.460,829

Second Quarter.

.

Mxvort$.

262.T60 +118.004
83.582 +26.858
80,698
+9.183
81.015 +12,182

93,197

1902 03.

.

Exe$$$,

Importt.

291,025
495.477

109,880
89.883

May

.

990,745

95.923

Bxtttt

264,087+127.046
87.682 +22.145
79.036
82.000

+21.894
+13.823

+470081 1,420,141 1,023,719+3941422

Geld and Uold In Ore.
JnJy-Sept...
Oot.-Deo....

10,201
2,810

Jan.-Moh...
^VTi\

4.888

May

Jnw
Total

19,470
43.069

17.685
33,637
22,116
10.290
10.471

-7,464
-30.S17
-17.728
+9,180
+32.698

1.677

4,881

-3,304

81.516

99,060

-17,636

10,780
5,085
2,686
1.705

11,719
19.287
8,8B«

-999
-14,262
-5,761
+866

14,488
12.508

1.819
1.463
2.768

+13,085
+9.740

47.091

44,988

^+2,100

NewEnKland

Failurei.

Liabililies. Failures.

Liabilitiea.

379
639
460
256
499
365
282

$4,666,658
10,999,093
4,611,472
1,821,007
6,413,687
1,978,969
1.433,342

307
523
408
214
4R4
301
191

$3,866,140
8,438,856
3,711,875
1.594,446
10.833.289
1,016,784

Aggregate United States... 2,870

$31,424,183

2,428

$32,462,827

$3,370,115

205

$1,643,464

723

$12,920,671
24,737,102 1,182
14,134,118 1,135
5fO
3,807.092
16,766,192 1,0 ^4
651
4,l77,^87
888
3,347,852

$10,309,069
20,779,806
7,665,178

$79,490,909

6,628

$86,797,260

$6,074,738

498

$3,457,137

States.

Middle States
Southern States.
Southwestern States
Central Western States
Far Western States
Paoiflc States

Dominion of Canada
Six Months.
Knfrland States
Middle States
Southern States
Southwestern States
Central Western States
Far Western States
raolflo States

New

274

796
1,363
1,060

608
1,064

789
544

Aggregate United States... 6,214

Dominion of Canada

585

2,9i)l,437

3,Hti{;,627

17,337,029
^-,962,974

3,976,682

THE CHRONICLE.

192

The record of fsilnres in the United States by quarters for
first six moDths of the last nioeteen years is as follows

the

:

,

—

1886
1887
18S8
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
ia03
1904

Fatluret.

3,203
».007
2.948
3,311
8,223
3,545
3,384
3,202
4,304
3,802
4,031
3.932
3,687
2,772
2.894
3,335
8,418
3,200
8,344

I

I

The week

Second Quarter.

—

Number

Amount

of

liiabiUtiea.

Failures.

Liabilities.

$29,681,726
32,161,762
38,884.789

1,953
1,905
2,241
2,292
2,162
2,529
2,119
3,199
2,735
2,856
2,995
2,889
3,031
2,081
2,438
2,424
2.747
2.428
2,870

Pint Quarter.

N7imber

Failubes.
^eara

Amount

,

of

4'.',972,516

37,852,968
42,16'/, 631
39,284,349
47,338,300
64,137,333
47,813.683
57,425,135
48,007,911
32.946.565
27.152,031
33,022,573
31,703,486
33,781,768
34,344,433
48,066,721

.

$20,752,734
22,976,330
29,229.370
22,856,337
27,466,416
50,248,636
22,989,331
121,541,239
37,601,973
41,028,261
40,444,547
43,684,876
34,498,074
14,910,902
41,724,879
24,101,204
26,643.098
32,462,8^7

From oar own oorTMpoiiaent.J
London, Saturday, July

81424.188

2, 1904,

ending better than it began, for during the
past few days an improved feeling has sprung up, and there
has been a decided recovery in important departments; for
instance, in the market for consols and also in the South
African department. One of the causes of the dulness that
has prevailed in London for some time past has been the fear
that a dissolution of Parliament would take place soon. Now
it is coming to be understood that there will be no dissolution this year. Furthermore, there is complete confidence
that whatever may happen in the Far East there will be no
serious troubles on the Paris Bourse. Indeed, it is predicted
by high authorities in Paris that if Port Arthur falls and
General Kuropatkin has to surrender, there will be active
buying of Russian bonds, not only by the Russian Finance
Ministry but also by the great French banks. One reason
for this expectation is that it is hoped in France that if there
is a complete disaster the Russian Government will make
peace. Another reason is the strong desire to reassure
French holders of Russian bonds and so prevent trouble in
the market.
is

The strong tone at Paris has, of course, had its influence
upon London. Moreover, there has been all through the
week continued buying of international securities of all
kinds— Argentine, Chilian, Brazilian, Spanish, Portuguese,
Rufsian, and so on. Everybody foresees that very soon now
buyers will recognize that the return on international securities is

becoming

less

and

less attractive

and therefore that

[Vol. Lxxix.

In some directiono, indeed, signs of imAltogether, therefore, the feeling is more hopeful than It was, and though it is hardly
probable that there will be much increase in activity while
the war goes on, yet the utter stagnation that has prevailed
80 long seems to be coming to a close.
The end of the half-year passed off very quietly in the money
market. The outside market borrowed an immense sum
from the Bank of England, but that was not because the
supplies were really insufficient, but because the joint-stock
banks are in the habit at the end of each half-year of calling
in large amounts of money from the outside market so as to
make it appear that their each reserves are much larger than
they really are. As these moneys are called in, the bill
brokers, of course, have to borrow from the Bank of England.
But once the new half-year begins, the banks let out the
money that they have just called in, and there is for some
time an actual plethora. To-day, for example, and yesterday, it was difficult to employ all the money that was on
hand, and this state of things is likely to continue for a week,
when these payments to the Bank of England will be so nearly
completed that a normal state of the market will be arrlvecl
The general impression is that when this temporary disat.
turbance is over, money will be found to be both plentiful
and cheap, and that it will continue so, until September at
all events.
There is little demand here now on the part of
the Continent for gold, and therefore it is hcped that all
the gold arriving in London, or at all events the greater part
of it, will go into the Bank of England.
In Parip, the accumulation of unemployed money is extraordinarily large. The French banks are renewing all the
sterling bills that fall due, and though they are not increasing the balances they are employing in London, they are not
reducing them. Furthermore, the French banks are remitting very large amounts of money to Berlin for employment
there. And at the same time the Russian Government is
transferring seme of the proceeds of the loan lately raised in
Paris to Berlin to replenish its balances in that city. And
yet the impression among the well-informed is that the
Imperial Bank will not put down its rate because the German
Government, instead of raising a public loan this year, is
issuing Treasury bills, which it sells to the Imperial Bank,
and the Imperial Bank has to keep funds in hand to meet all
the requirements of the Government. Owing to the transfer
of so much money from Paris to Berlin, it is not expected
that any gold will be taken by Germany from London.
The Indian Council on Wednesday offered for tender 50
lacs of its drafts and the applications exceeded 300 lacs, at
prices ranging from Is. 3 81-32d. to Is, 4d. per rupee. Applicants for bills at Is. 8 31-32d. and for telegraphic transfers at
Is, 4d. per rupee were allotted about 1 5 per cent of the amounts
applied for.
The following return shows the position of the Bank cf
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols, &c,
compared with the last three years:
decline in trade.

provement are noticeable.

they will tarn to British Government securities. In consequence operators who look ahead are buying beforehand,
1008.
IMK
1904.
1908.
July S.
July 3.
Jun* 29.
Jul]/ 1.
^Moreover, money is expected to be exceedingly cheap in a
M
*
»
M
80.SC7.860
80,929.6^:0
30.898,015
week or so now. Tree, the outside market has borrowed an JlrOSlatlOD
88,868,790
10.0M,8ll
ll,49e,689
11.089.416
Pnblle dapotit*
9,016,643
40.e6«,i4O
immense sum from the Bank of England, which will have to 3tk«r depofltl
48.8»'4.97<
46.684.008
60,i!6H,n?
i4.eoi.(>43
14.7B0,£15
U,(>78.1<4
l&,987,806
SOTernmentiMiirltiei
be repaid. Nevertheless, it seems certain that money will 3t)l«r«««arltlet
85.407.334
{0.821,298
80,246.418
37,614.486
26,04e,P9S
24,4S6,b»7
:^5,278.8S8
)!4,9t0.49Z
KM«rT«Of notes and aoln
be very plentiful and cheap for the next two or three months,
87.59u,677
87.670,0(8
37,811.180
XllnAballlon.bOthdepartlli'tB 86.SSW.2b2
4816-16
43
43 1-id
Frop.r«terT«to Uabliitlet.p.o. 4116-10
Over and above all this, the arrival of Chinese laborers on lank rata
8
3
8
8
paraant.
98 6.16
90 6-16
9!^^
86^
lonaoli.aMparoant
the Rand is making itself felt. A little over a thousand have S'lrar
i'Hi.
«6d
24^d.
84 S-lod.
218,098.000 9e3,297.uuo ISMBT.OOO 267.693.000
already reached the Rand and been allotted to certain mines. Cltartnff-Hoaiaratarni
Ihe rates for money have been as follows:
Two thousand more are on the wayj and another two thousand are about to start; so that five thousand altogether
Inttfft aJlot***
09*n Mark$t Bmt$i
forit90»it%ht
will have been gotten together and embarked in about five
M«4on.
Irai* BUU. Joint
Bank Billt.
weeks. To be sure, the Chinese Inspector of Emigration is
e
Stock
Montht a Mot. *Mo$. Batikt Call D«»i
»Month$. tMonthi.
raising some difficulties, but these are really questions of
"iji
91.10
2 1.16
SH&3 3-16
IM
money and admit of being amicably settled. The important June 8 8
IM
"
a
S
2H@iH
IM
10 3
thing is, that the mine owners find Chinese laborers very eager
2 1-16
IH IH IM
89«d2M
8
to enlist, and consequently they are now hoping that the sup84 3
2 8-16®2!4 2 3-16®iM
IH IV
2H
i5*aa
9H
2M
IM IM
1M<3>Z
ply of labor from China will be larger than they nad ven- July 1 3
tured to anticipate heretofore. Consequently, it is expected
The Bank rate of discount and open marketrates at the
that the outDut from the Transvaal mines will begin to in- chief Gjatinentaloitles have been as follows:
crease materially from this onwards.
Jtin«18.
June 11.
June 25.
July 8.
On the Paris Bourse business continues to be more active
Rattiot
than on any other European stock exchange. But investors
Inttrtitat
Bank Open Bank 09*n Bank 0p<n Bank 09*n
and operators are buying more largely in London than at
Bat*. Marku Bat$. Marki Bate. Mark*> Batt. Marktt
home. In Germany bueineBS upon the Stock Exchange is Parli
19-18
8
8
IM
IH
3
8
4
4
8
1
4
iH
SH
quiet, but trade is improving steadily, and there is a hopeful Berlin. .....
4
4
4
SH
4
SH
8H
»H
feeling everywhere. Apart from the improvement at home SamborK..
4
s»
4
4
8«
3H
4
SH
Prankfort..
in the markets for British Government securities and for imiterdam
8^
S)<
SM
SM
an
9H
3H
8
8
8«
8
8K
3
2«
gold shares, there are likewise more signs of life in the Amer- Braiielt....
SM
854
SX
SM
3H
3H
71enna
8K
Particularly, there is an exceedingly
ican department.
non.
non.
nom
6%
SM
5X
5« nom.
St. PatercbnrK..
strong demand for good American railroad bonds. There is Madrid
S}i
iH
4M
3X
SM
4»
4«
*H
<
4
4
4
4»
4M
iH
a feeling, furthermore, that we are nearly at the end of the CooenhaKen
'.

.

..

m

m

m
m

m

m

—
:

July

:

.
.

.

:

)

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 19U1.]

193

&

Abell write as follows under date of
Messrs. Plxley
80, 1904
Gold— The Continental demand having fallen off to some extent, the
Bank was able to buy a good portion of the arrivals. During the
week *544 000 has reaohetl the Bank, and of this £438.000 Is in bare
and £100 000 in 80verel»<na from Egypt. £8,000 for Gibraltar Is the

Jane

only withdrawal. ArrlvalB: South Afrloa. £584.000; Aaatralla, £61,
000- China $6,00o; Straits, £1,000; River Plate. £11,000; West
Shlpmente: Bombay, £49,630;
Africa, £12,000; total, £ov7,o00.
Colombo, £1,500; total. £51,150.
^ .»,,..
^ , ,
,
Silver— The market hardened at the end of last and the beginning
of this week, until 26»ed. was touched. The rise was caaaed In the
Far East was also a buyer. A
first Instance by special orders, bat the
reaction to 26d. then took place, but the fall has baen fully recovered.
with small off jrlngs, at 2rjifll, for cash, with i^^d
We close steady,
less for forward. The Indian rate is Rj. 66^ per luOTolahs. The
averace price of stiver for the halt-year is 25 908d..8*y 25i6,8d.
New York, £238,000; Australia, £:J,000; total, £247,OuO.
ArrivalsShipments: Bombay, £41,500; Hang Kong, £33.864; China, £52,000; total, £127,364.
Itfeilcan Dollars— These have followed the price of spot silver and
are quoted 26i8d., with but small business.
..

f he qj notations for bullion are reported as follows:

GOLD.
iiondon Mlandard

d.

I.

f.

d.

9Js 77 9%
4i« 76 488
U.S. gold ooin...OE
Oerm'ngold ooin.os, *76 5i4 '76 5»4

Bar gold

,

77
76

fine.... OE.

Vrenoh gold ooln.oi *76 6
ob '76 408
Japanese yen

76
76

5
408

1908, see

EBCBIPTS AND DI8BUESBMHNT8 (000
»

—

r-f 0«

mat

-^

"
>a

|^O(J0»
eio«e
«:«T»

2?

d.

26i«

»

a>s«

1901-2.

1900-1.

Total
Av«r.prleewheat,week.26r. 6d.
Average price. Beason. 87b. 2d.

e
CB

CO Mao)

ooeec•MrHtO

*ao»
a> —
.<»oa
t-r-o
C>«IO

-tf

00
10
,H
t»

8

g^aooti^

C-

C|

aBO«

M
<*

«oo»

09

fe!

ocor•toon
«^ato«M
».<•*

oooe*
00-*«i
WOOOJ
0»«0«

a
«
*

to-^m

a<ooe

c««

esoeo

esokot
OtiH

09

a*0'«
e>ao'«

|»^S««

9

loao
fOlO

00
<a

»

TliCOO

(Cl^*

<3>

ot

«-:«

...

of wheat, flour and
m

•

•

•

acD« ^c4co

r.* i?1 C<)

voaacoc-

o
o
a
CD
^

F<e-cc^oa

00-<CD'».-fH

i-l

IO(Ow-IIO.-IIO

QOCDC-

.

•

•

aeoc0'-<09gi

1901-2.
2,675,000
395,000
820,000

cr.

0»rtlQr-aO
00OlO04«04

cc

190

an

CO OOt-

tn

— ri'^

.«...

.

r^lO

t-iH

on

f^

00

.4.'

eeo t-a

ee

an ««
O05 at-

V
,H
OO
CD
lO

miQ MCC
.-r- Mr-

-

•
:

.

»

-

•

t>

:

fc

-

:
•

1

1

e

04O

:

:

:

:

.

.

190

P<oo
mlscellane

revenne...

reaalDta

Internalrevenue..,.

'^'he daily closing quotations for seouritiea etc, <•& uondon
are reported by cable aa follows for the week eodinpr July 15;
,

LOMDOn.

8aU

Hon.

Tuet.

261I16 2613,6 26%
89%
89 >«
89*.
89»8
891516 SB's
98-40
98 05
VT'fl1irenteB(lnFarl8)fr. 98-06
85ifi
851a
Spanish 48 ....
.....
S%
3'9
3%
Aiiaoouda Mining

Wed.

For aocount .... ......

A Banta JTe.. 77
Preferred.............. 97 »«
Baltimore A Ohio
84%

4toh.Xop.

96

Preferred

128%
Oanadlan Paoiflo
Ohesapeake & Ohio.... 33%
14
Ohloa. Great Western
.

Ohio, Mil.

4

A Bio

Den.

St. Paul... 149
Gr.,oom.... 2214

Do
do Preferred. 72
25 'b
rie.oommon
iBt preferred ......... 62
Sd preferred.... ...... 37 >«
13714
lUlnolB Oentral
.
LoalBTllle A NashyiUe.. 11538

Mexican Oentral
:Xo. Kan. A Tex., com..

8>fl

18

Preferred. ............. 39%
Rat.BR.of Mex-.tst prf 38
T. Oent'lA Budson.. 120
m, T. Ontario <h West'c 28%

.

A Western

Xorfolk

Do

60 >«
91

do

pref.
northern Securities.... 104>«

97»«
8408

95

Phlla.ABead.,lBtpref.
Phila.ARead..8dpref.

34 la

34%

14%

141a
16II4

22ifl

72

28%

2ft>a

88

62
38

137»«

137ifl

116«>9

115i«

8%

8%

62>fl

>4

23

76

25%
62%

34%
14%
i5l

23
75
26

Civil

a

War

Indians

War...^

Navy,

Q

(4

Navy

O

Treasury Currency Holdings.—The following compilabased on official Government statements, indicates the

currency holdings of the Treasury on the 1st of April, May.
Juae and July, 1904. Statement for corresponding dates in
previous year ivill be found in Chronicle of July 4, 1908,

page

18.

TRBASnST MET HOLDINGS.

39

4pr .1.1904

Holdinottn iSub-Trea«uries34S,B29,691
netKold ootn and bullion
Net silver coin and bullion
18.613.628
67,88«
Netn. 8. Treasury notes
5,278.146
Net leKal-tendernoteB
10,lle,^96
bank notes
Netnattonal
11,646,9112
'•••
Net rrnctlonal silver

8%

13
891a

U8%
9%

19

6II2

30%
61%

91

91

91

38

30

40%
88»*

122%

91
105
6038
26

I06»a
6II4

4314

481a

87

37

87

87

43%
36%

80ie

SOifl

5II4
241a

5l''8

2B%
91%

»eo8
961a
12i«

JMai/ 1,1904 J'fl«l,1904

rulvl.te04
n6.88fl.7S8
28.331,070

60,713
18,ie»,0S9
16,689.807
11,661,880

ess.ioi.ooa

Cash n Snb-Treasnrles
Cash In national banks
Cash in Philippine Islands
I

62

24 >a
91

QP

ia

tion,

138

tiewi

O9 «m

* Totals of various Items of reoslpts ana expenditures In 1902-08
have been revised to agree with the oBiolal flf^nres issued in the
annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury.
Note —Total disbarsements under "Civil and Miscellaneous" In
1903-04 includes $S4 600,000 paid on aoeonnt of Panama Canal and
loan to Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company.

39

8%

•B
U
I3P
t^

XJJD

Civlland

Indians

IS8

2938
611a

60 >«

Cnstoms
KCEIPT8

OS

Pensloni

Pensions

39

28%

61
91
105

Total

Cnstoms Internal
KOBIPT8

M °'^

I8BUR8KMENT8

and

Mlsoellaneons

Total

138
1161a

122>4

28»8

Mlsoellaneons

6208

38

U3,6HH.ei8
7,38ft,843

96^8

24%

96ifl

90>«
94>8
96>«
Ills
6OI4

9438

pref..

69''8

111*
6038

^.

17
3519
59>«

17 le

16%

36
59 >a

86
60

Prloe per share.

128BB

I21I4

23%

*

62%

96%
^2333

38

90ifl

preferred
Deb. "B".

74
2«

8538

961a

121k

18
39'a

23 ]«

Do
Do

151
22 >•

S'b

78
98

19
401a
381a
122

18
S9>a

88>«
9414
96'«
11>4

WabaBh

88%

14
149>«
22i«
721a

Preferred..............
Union Paclflo

do

86%

34

49''8

Do

78
98

14

Jouthem Paoiflo
oath'n Railway, com..
Preferred
U. 8. Steel Oorp., com..

3%

77 «8
98

127 '8

26>4
43I4

86%

8S

3%
95i«

60<>8

43

86

890g
>»8-37is 98-»7% 98 30
89i»ie

128'^8

149%

26«,«

89ihe 891a

95 1«

25%

*Read

76 '8

Fri

8908
8i)%

127i«
34I4

60>«

'ennsylvanla

PhUa.

77I4
97i«
84O9

Thurt.
265))

MlT«r, per ounce.... .d.

ConBOlB.,new,2ifl p.ots.

,

i
9
9
3

<V«7

s oa

n;

Financial narkets— Per €aMe.

'

SScDoSi

1902.08—

I8B17B8BMKNTB

Ensltflli

•

*or

oo
MOO aa
oaa

mlscellane

1903-04-

receipts..

-.w C»l>
fCD ore))0 *<•
*a n.-

a
*
f
03

,

P

,Ha3

03

..

1908-8.
2,000,000
305,000
1,070,000

•»
an
aa
««

0103

<•

K9CD«10O5t»

or

•

CD ID

coa
oie a<9

CDIOOOOCDOJ

•^

F- 05

•

-'09

a a

OB
03 00
CD
00 1- 00 (NX) 04

oo

......

03

ri lO

r-OOr-ilOCDO

O)

1

1

,-4

«o«ioaaoe4

O!

•^ t- 1-

aot
c-a

03
•»

aoo 00.-^ 09 .—

a

o
«
o

a'-co-

o

•w

<oo ooo

oo,<

.-t»-H0rjcOa

«
OD
*

*

OIO

a 09 O 00 CD
03
aO

00
00
lO

t-^

•Oiinc«T(ic.o

to

e;

.

00 on

Tli

«'«o»

•

03

rH .- CD

•*a»»'*0'*
aoot^ of

•*-H09

.

miH

.H

ID

00

...
...

oe
oa

9^

a

a-vaot-a
eaiat-f c-cD
c-aiooao

.

I- 00

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CD

me*

••«>

lo

aoDcCfMO

et
«#

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^

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.HOOtCOtHlO

o»e»

a
04

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IO.-C0»C0C-

09
fM

i».4a>o

3
s

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otoooooom
fOOWWCOCO
««09.4aa4

t-

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ooo
<•« 03M

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9

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aoo

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04C-C-

91

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to

mo*

0900

09

^o »
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«

looio
OQao
«e>ia
10 10 00
00 09»

l>-

osar-

OCDXr.<CDO

eo"*

vast

c»

acDt»T<i.-a9

C4'«coxc-r>

«

et.'

otiocDoaiao
a<OlO.-03rt

00 to
MB lorn
• w am

OD

00 r> 04 cot- 10
e« t- ." r- 10 CD

c<
10
(D

aot

« A

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0*09

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•

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ao

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CO

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n
01

a
09

CH'V

04 00

03 04

CD

—

!••*.<

«.ooo

09OCD'*

.-.<

oat- 04

?
»
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r-ia

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03

oaa,-««04

03

OOO

•*
•^

i-'

00

0»

•

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oo

oc-t-ioaoo

t»

««-c-

••

^

c-atooc oio

•

atovogooc•Hc-e-o4oio
OD'Vcofaei
oo«c>

*
a>
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0»0«

t»
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fH

o« 00
^

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04 04 aa

04

^a

loaoo

aa
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<SI

Ot-I0f<0 —
not IOC- 04 04

a>
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o

.H

CO OQ 04

—

00

'S"

-^lo^ioeaai

lO

ot»t- — oort
.-H

t-*

.-ID

ODW

o

OOOfOOCtOO

r•*

•OOC-COf —
C-C-t-.-Of

OS

03 04

THO UCD
a CO ose
*f
ooa
esa

t00
to

o<»a9'a>c-r-

o

09IOIOVCD

09

<z>

e«

OCD

CD'W
OiCM

,-<

o
fH

'WmvcDcDa

WW aa

00

a>

ooooaowae4
ctt-O.HX»»

OC» t>«
-co ».-

1

«t>00 VOO
OCDCDO«9Cb
coooa^ot>a
ar-t- — C9.<

CD

,-1

a
a«o o
X
a
o
O
«M N
—lO
mOQ » do 00 30 o
a.-a:>r- .^la
a
««0Da<OM o
^
t^ooca
eu j.^..« 04
OD
00 r- 03 tv

1

-

mo4

•>»

rf

o-va

aoa
0^

r-IOOO
i-HCDO

IB

I^ODOOOt

lo
1

CD 04

».--.

,.^

con
»H0»O

,

805,000

1,015.000

fvXO

10
*
OflOO 00
SOBS n
»"*•

^

TMMtoeek. Laitweek,
Wheat
ars... 3.635,000 3.935.000
160,000
195.000
near, eqaal tears.,.
qrB..,

et^

ooot-

'

at
00

1

..-^

^

aoavvft <o
CD lO i>
04 n
o
r->ae<oaoo> »^
FHODOf)
^
«

e»ao»

..(Bee

21,798,191

maize afloat to the United Kingdom

f

—

•MM

CD
to

1

»
toooaoDW a
et
ODi.' 3D
•M
a
-v f aO -^ CD lO
00
t-C-OOW — *
•lO'waa-'

«
«
•

asoDoi

— 0»

«

aa

'^•»a«^QO

10

,H0l)O

m-'

ira

CW-.

...

0«rH

S

m

oooof 'Vioco
<C 1004009 •*

vooa aoo

«
*
^ODA 10
aeeo »
«»c^oo CO

§

03

Jurie,

jmltted.

^•> t-ocoas
aDoo.-o3»o

tj1

(CM
MW *

<o

CQ

97,940,491
27s. 6d.
87b. Id.

The following shows the quantities

"•Of

oaooei

21,920,188

109,106,942 104,668,643

CD
04
00
00

04

V l»t>««

97,681,966
30B. 6d.
27b. 6d.
86b. lOd.
27b. 9a.

21.697.981

tales Of home-growii.16,161.763

•
•«

(Cf

00

r-iHOl

h.

r^

e«.<
xiiooo

«

^«ao

j^

<•

•"••I'*

9.*

«»iS«n

1902-3.

oa>-9

•

ihOOO

ee
10

,

1903-4.

00

C^tDOO

-f"0»

OIW

«,»

Wheatlmported.owt. 75,962,138 67,005,871 59.090,560 87,140,000
16,983,043 15,864,791 16.671,268 19,002,300
Imports Of floor

,1010
0K»

i-Cta

Supplies available for consumption (exclusive of stock
on September 1):

««a

<n
09

•*

i^o^a
i.

04 CO -v

a-oojo
Ol.-C-

<sioa>

^

1

K ,H n '«

,-i

(^JD«lr<

IMPOSTS.
1900-01.
1903-4.
1901-2.
1902-3.
Imp'tB of Wheat, owt.75,962,136 67.005,871 59,090,560 57,140,000
darlny
27.636,726 22,056,661 19,928.091 17.908,200
12.624,494 12,208,916 14.508,624 18.608,100
Oata..~
2,122,030
1,789,540
2,024,010
1.638,937
Feas
« 1,791,718 1,295.109 1,673,853 1,465,240
Beana
38,975.467 32,214,850 87,717,637 45,695,700
Indian oorn ......
......„16,988,043 15,864,791 16,671,258 19,002,800
»l0Ur

0901

«
»

on
ID
(D

.-l^o
laoao

r^

1

ooeOTii

CD
•*

e«1»

^

tX}.^0

tjj.ii«-a«)

<o
wt
at

OdOGR
«»IO-IO
0<->«

26V

The following shows the Imports of oereal produce Into
the Jnited Kingdom during the forty-three weeks of the
aoaaon oampared with previous seasons:

Iffaiifl

1

e

Bar silver, One.. .01. 26 1« 25 \
Do 2 mo. delivery|26iia 25lli«
B»r BllTer.oontaln'g
do 5grs.gold.OB.;26H 26i«
uo 4 grs.gold.oBc 267,e 86I1A
25 '«
do Sgre.gold.OK.
ot. 283,e 27%
Oake silver

1

t*
(S
00

« »10rt
OIOIO

«3

—•

r-l

g

oot~

IS
-H

0D-* J-

1

.

23

30

,

Blexloan dollars. .os.

*liromln»l.

and 1902-08. For statement of
Cheoniolk Ju'y 4, 1903, page 18.

the fiscal years 1903 04

June June

London Standard

23.

30.

and disbursements for the month of Jane.
From previous returns we obtain the figures for previous
months, and in that manner complete the statement for

receipts

•^

BILVHB.

June

June

(JOVEENMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURES.—Through the
courtesy of the Secretary of the Treasury, we are enabled to
place before our readers to-day the details of Government

26%

91
9558
96 %
12

107»a
6l»«
2608
431a

106%
61

26%

621*

62%

96%
12%
62%

17
36>c

171a
871a

37

61

61

61

17

Cash In banks, sub-trea8.,eto.
0«daot current liabilities.*...
(Sold

82,049,ttS!<

874,e«0,BPe 570.919,188 818,2H7,Bie <I19.C2 7,848
160.000,000 160,000.000 150,000,00C 160,000,000

reserve fnnd..

Z24.fl9l).99e>280.91P.lS8 163,887.81 e 169.087.84

Available oasb balanoe.
*

104.1^6 463
84.880,004 86.0e8,^81

468,961,81(1 1B7.B0'<,0a(

;

"Chiefly dlsburslns offloers' balanoei."

Stock op

Money

in

Country.—The following

table

ihows the general stock of money in the conntry, as well as
the holdings by the Treasury, and the amount in circulation
on the dates given. The statement for June 1, 1904, will be
found in the Chronicle of June 18, 1904, page 2422.

THE CHRONICLE.

194
i-Stoehof

Statee.

r-Monevin Circulation.-Held <n
Ireatury,

July

JtUyl,
1V04.

•
t
aoldooln(lDO.bal'nliiTreaB.)l.S2e.7>!2,70l 815,829,7&3
Gold oertlfloates
6eO,088.&i4 26,813,149
Standard silver dollar!

046,1

86 31»

60.718
12,189.089

464,808,629
71,B«1,«84
469.S78.7i5
94,603,028
ia,927,287
884,491,977

5,639.207

483.595,883

oertlfloates

11.5ei,M0

lC6.)H4,e48
Subsidiary illrer
12,978,000
Treasury note* of 1890
84«,B81,0ie
Dnlted States notes
Cnrr'oy cert.. Act J nne 8, '72.
449,285,096
National bank notes

ToUl

]

1.

1908,
t
eai, 616,146
879.048,889
72,84U,b0a
465,079.538
9V!,195,600
19,10*',670

{36,591,378

4C0.408.189

8.801.886.8C4 280,718,677 8.621.151,927 8.376,823.210

Population of the United States July
latton per capita, |M 80.

1,

1904, estimated at 81,867,000; otrou-

For redemption of outstandlnR oertlfloates an exact equivalent In amount
of the appropriate kinds of money Is held In the Treasury, and Is not Included
Id the account of money held as assets of the Government.
t This statement of money held In the Treasury as assets of the Government does not Include deposits of public money In national bank depositaries to the credit of the Treasmrer of the United States, and amountlns to
•

1108,078,822 73.

Bank Notes— Changes

Total

and

in Deposited
give below tables which show all the
in

op,

Bonds, Etc.— We
monthly changes in Bank Notes and in Bonds and Legal
Tenders on Deposit. The statement for June, 1903, will be
found in the Cheoniole of July 4, 1908, page 18.
Bonds and

Legal-

Total.

ten urs.

SO.,

SI. 410,672,640 38,709,531 407,279,€34 38,709.581 445,988,565

416,016,690 36,476,646 412,759,449 36,475,616 449,235,095
39,277.792
39,309,708
89,971,819
39,199,896
37,889,395
38,088,496
38,959,862
40,910,711
38,511,653
39,739,661

397,802,781
395,600.234
390.852,49
387,657,731
387,273,623
388,018,484
380,650,821
379,515,824
380,076,322
377,606,826

39,277,792
89,309,708
39,971,819
39,199,896
37,889,895
38,088,495
38,959,862
40,910,711
38,511,653
39,789,661

437,080,573
484,909,942
430,824,310
426,857,627
425,163,018
421,106,979
419,610.683
420,426,635
418,687,976
417,346,487

full explanation of the above table see Chronicle
page 1282, first item in Financial Situation.

14, 1901,

The following shows the amount of each class of bonds
held against national bank circulation and to secure public
moneys in national bank depositories on June 30.
U. 8.

Bonds Held June

Bonds on Deposit
June

Public Deposit*
in Banks.

30, 1904.

6 p. ots., 1894, due 1904
4 per ots., funded 1907.
4 p. ots., 1895, dae 1925
3 p. ot8..'98, due 1908-1^
5 p. ots., 1900 due 1930

Btate&Clty
Philippine Isl'd Certlf s
Hawaiian Island bonds.
Railroad bonds
Philipinne Loan

30, 1904, to Seeurt-

Bank

total Belc

Oireulation.

9100.000
8,105,060
10,058,050
6,513,500
83,256,450
1,934,000
3,675,600
3,368.000
1,072,000

8-668 Dist. Col., 1924...

$4,215,500
1,822,100
1,815,440
408,163,660

$100,000
12,820,550
11,880,150
8,327,940
491,420,100
1,934,000
3,675,600
3,368,000
1,072,000

1,902,000

1,902,000

$119,988,5.'S0

Total

8416,016.690 »538,000,240

The foregoing does not include the bonds held

in the

New fork

Sub-Treasury against deposits in banks. Theie
were so held on June 30 $7,081,000 bonds, making the
whole amount at that date in possession of the Government
as security for deposits |127,064,650.

The following shows the amount of national bank notes
and the amount of the legal-tender deposits June 1
and July 1, and their increase or decrease during the
month of June.

afloat

Ifational Bank Notes— Total afloat—
Amount afloat Jane 1. 1904
Amoant issued daring Jane
Amoant retired daring Jane

Amoant bank notes

afloat July 1

,

$445,988,566
$7,887,327
4,140,697

1904

3,246,630

$449,235,095

Legal Tender Notes—

Amoant on deposit

to redeem national
1904
Amoant deposited daring Jane
Amt. of bank notes redeemed in June

bank notes June

banknotes July

The portion of

$38,709,631

1,

Amount on deposit
1,

$851,360
8,088,245

redeem national
1904

2,233,886

to

$36,475,646

legal tenders deposited (1)

by banks becom-

ing insolvent, (2) by banks going into voluntary liquidation,
(3) by banks reducing or retiring their circulation,
as follows on the first of each of the last five months.

and
was

Legal Tend's.

Meh.

1.

Ohio,

com

3

<&

'Sep

II

a

Sep
Oct
Sep

1

1»«
3

a
2

"a

AprU

1.

Afay

1.

June

1.

Aug
—
Aug

a^aJ'ly

Aug

2

2>aJ'ly
a>2J'ly

1

1

Aug 16
Aug 16

July

1,

Depositsby—

9
Inaolv'ntbks.
428,710
566,880
873,690
814,795
254,765
Llqald'g bks. 12,356,853 11,762,975 11,956,687 11,866,131 11,993,496
aed'o'gund.*
act of 1874 27,049,137 27.118,023 26,947,415 26,529,605 24,227,396
Total.... 39,971.819 89,309.708 39,277,792 88,709,681186,475,646
*Aot of Jane 20, 1874. and July 12. 1882.

to
to

Holders of
Holders of

J'ly 17
10 J'ly 26
2U J'ly 1
1 J'ly 23
1

l^
16 J'ly

a J^' J'ly
Cai. eas
Kl. Corp., San Fran.(mtlily) 25c. J'ly
1^4 Aug
Columbus (O.) By., pref. (quar.)
Federal St. & Pleasant Val., Pltteb....
2»!» J'ly
Grand Rapids (Mich ) By., pref. (qxi.).
l"* Aug
Jacksonville (Fla ) Eleo. Co., pref
$3 Aug
Milw. Elec. By.
IV2 Aug
Lt.,pf. (No. 19) (qa.)
Monongahela 8t. Ry., Pittsburgh
2
.........
Twin City Rap. Tr.Mlnneap ,com.(qa.) 1 >« Aug 1
United Traction, Albany (quar.)
IVAug 1
Worcester Rys
$2 25 Aug
Investment
1

&

&

&

Holders
Holders
Holders
J'ly 23
J'ly 21
J'ly 31
J'ly 22

„

Aug 81
Aug 31
Sep

1

Aug IS
J'ly »1

to

Aug

to
to

J'ly 20
Aug 1

9

to

J'ly 16

to
to
of rec.
of rec.
of rec.
to
to

J'ly 16

1

J'ly 8
J'ly 12

reo.
rec.

to
to

Holders of

J'iy '15
J'ly 16
J'ly 18

Aug 31
Aug 1
Aug
Aug

reo. J'ly

IS
1

20

Banka.
Merchants* Brooklyn
Fire Inaarance.

J'ly

IB J'ly 10

to

J'ly 16

Ondem
3
Aug
an Aug
3
J'ly
1^ Aug

Pittsburgh Coal, pref. (qnar.)

13* J'ly

Holders

1^ Aug

J'ly 16
J'ly 18

Bogera Cocomotlve Works, com

June

For

&

do
pref
Maine, oom. (qoar.)
do
do
pref
Central RE. of N. J. (qnar.)
Xjoulsvllle <fe Nashville
Missouri Pacific (dividend No. 61)
Nash. Chatt. <S> St. Louis
Southern Indiana, pref
White Pass & Yukon
Street Uailwaya.
Brooklyn City (quar.)

Boston

111., Boston (quar.)
Electric Co. of America
Internal. Steam Pump, pref. (quar.)...

Legal-

Bonds.

Books Closed..
(Days IncluHve.)

aallr«a4a (8t«aai).
Baltimore
do

Consolidated Gas, Pittsburgh, pref

May

Dec.

Per
WTun
Cent PayabUl

Company.

Bdison Klec.

tenders.

SO., 899,795,140
Mar. 31. 398,034,650
Feb. 29.. 392,671,650
Jan. 31.. 390,231,600
Deo. 81.. 889,335,680
Nov. 80.. 384,625,930
Oet 31.. 382,726,830
Sept 30.. 381,484,830
b«. 81.. 381,486,480
July 31.. 380,173,030

of

niaevllanwoMB.

Oireulation Afloat Under

1903-04 for Bank Oireulation.

Apr.

Name

Home

Legal Tenden on Deposit

Bonds.

OITIDBNDS.

Monev July 1.-.
1904.

In the Dmted

SUyer

[Vol. Lxxix.

l** Aug
do
do
do pref. (qnar.)
Spring Valley Water (quar.)
63c. J'ly
2
Standard Underground Cable (qnar.)..
J'ly
do
do
do (extra)..
2 [J'ly
Torrlngton Co., com
4 Aug
I

Holders
Holders
Holders
J'ly 21

J'ly 4
J'ly 4
J'ly 17

of reo.
of reo.
of rec.
to
of rec.
to
to

to
to
to

J'ly 90
J'ly 16
J'ly 21
Aug 1
J'ly 16
Aug 1
Aug 1

J'ly 9
J'ly 9
J'ly 31

National Banks. —The following information regarding
aational banks is from the Treasury Department.

MATIOMAL BANKS OROAHIZBD.
Certificates Issued April IS to July 8, 1904.

7,208—The First National Bank of Gate City. Virginia. Oapltal.
$28,600. I. P. Kane, President; N. M. Horion, Cashier, Conversion of the Bank of Gate City.
7,209— The First National Bank of Berwyn, Indian Territory. Capital, $25,000. 6. W. Young, President; F. W'. Fisher and O.
W. Henderson, VlcePreslaents; Ohas. Bohnke, Cashier.
7.210— The First National Bank of Ventura, California. Capital,
$50,000. John Came, President; Felix W. Ewlng, VicePresident; Edgar W. Came, Cashier.
7,211—The First National Bank of Delmar, Delaware. Oapltal, $30,000. J. P. Morris, President; Peter 8. Sohookley, Vice-President; 8. Ker Slemons, Cachier; Arthur W. Ellis, Aeslstant
Cashier.
7,212—The Adams National Bank of Devine, Texas. Capital, $50,000. W. B. Adams, President;
, Cashier.
7.213 -The First National Bank of Graoeyllle, Minnesota. Capital,
$26,000. John MoBae, President; C. J. McRae and B. J.
MoBae, Vice Presidents; J. A. UcRae, Cashier; G. A. Bruce,
Assistant Cashier.
7,214—The First National Bank of Alpine, Texas. Capital, $26,000.
C. A. Brown, President; J. H. Derrick, Cashier.
7.215—The Bell National Bank of Pinevllle, Kentaoky. Capital,
$29,000.
Preeideni; E. Q. Conant, Cashier.
7,216-The First National Bank of Greenwood. Mississippi. Capital,
E. R. McShane, President; W. T. Loggins, Cash$260,000.
ier; A. MoO. Ktmbrongh, Vice President, A. R, Bern, Assistant Cashier.
7,217— The First National Bank of Stigler, Indian Territory. Capital,
$25,000. Sam. Rose, President; John C. Foster, Vice-President; Chas. O. Sloan. Cashier.
7,218—The Fredonla National Bank, Fredonla, Kansas. Oapltal, $25.000. O. F. Clark, President; E. H. Russell, Vice-President;
A. A, Clark, Cashier.
7,219—The First NaUonal Bank of Alturas, Oalifomla. Oapltal, $40.000. O. A, Bates, President; D. O. Berry, Vice- President;
B. F. Lynlp. Cashier.
7,220—The First National Bank of Tallapoosa, Georgia. Oapltal.
$25,000.
Wm. 8. Wltham. President; Geo. W. Bheppard,
Vice-Preeident; Rowe Price. Cashier; F. D. Kirven. Assistant
Cashier.
7,321— The First National Bank of Lamberton, Minnesota. Capital,
$25,000. Wilson C. Brown, President; Charles Chester, VloePrestdent; Geo. J. Grimm, Cashier; H. M. England, Assistant
Oashter. Oonrerelon of The Citizens' State Bank of Lamberton.
7,222—The First National Bank of Lyndon, Kansas. Capital, $25,000.
£. Olcott, President; Thos. Williams, Vice-President; A. L.
Wilson. Oaihler; E. C. Wilson, Assistant Cashier. Conyerston
of The People's State Bank, Lyndon.
7,223—The First National Bank of Englishtown, New Jersey. Oapltal,
$26,000. T. W. Bartt, President, John A. Stolts, VlcePresident; F. D. Clayton, Cashier.
7,224— The First National Bank of BrllUon, Wisconsin. Oapltal. $25,000. Cbas. Brass, President; Frank F. Becker, Vice-President; Geo. E. Dawson, Cashier.
7,226—The National Bank of La Follette, Tenneseeee. Oapltal, $60.000. R. B. Balrd, President; Robt. Mnllins, Vice-President;
W. 8. McKamey, Cashier.
7,826—The Flrot National Bank of La Harpe, Kansas. Oapltal, $S5,000. W. O. Lenhart, President; O. H. Hackney, First VloePresldent; J. A, Brown, Second Vice-President; D. Rnnyon,
Cashier; O. E. Lenhart, Assistant Cashier.
7,227—The First National Bank of Browervllle, Minnesota. Capital,
$25,000. Wm. E, Lee, President; John D Jones, Vlce-Preeidenl; Harry Lee, Cashier, and J. G. Mock, Assistant Oashler.
7,228- The First National Bank of Monte Vista. Colorado. Oapltal,
$25,000. H. H. Abbott, President; Q. W. Gates, VloePresident; Wesley Staley. Oashler.
7,229—The First National Bank of Saxton. Pennsylyanla Capital,
$30,000. Michael B. Breneman, President; W. H, Sweet,
Vice-President; G. W. Derrick, Oashler.
7,280—The Commercial National Bank of Saint Anthony, Idaho.
John D. O.
Capital, $25,000. J. E. Cosgrlff, President;
Kruger, Oashler.
7,231— The First l\"dtlonal Bank of Ooolldge. Texas. Capital, $25,000.
J. R. Wallace, President; W. L. Murphy, Vice-President; J.
E. Jenson, Oashler,
7,232—The First National Bank of Mansfield, Louisiana, Capital,
$25,000. Bollng Williams, President; W. A. Kabors, VloePresident; B. F. Dudley, Oashler.
,

.

.

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.J

7,233— The Flrnt National B»nk of Phllmont, New York. Capital,
850,000, JoslaU W. Place. President; J. G. OartiB, VlcePreeident; C. Traoy. Cashier.
7 234— The First National Bank of Oenabrook, North Dakota. Capital, $25,000. John Trotter, Preeiaent; F. B. Sargent, VioePreeident; T. L. TlUisoh, Cashier.
7,286—The First National Bank of Amesvllle, Ohio. Capital, $25,000.
J. J. Beasley, President; O. M. Lovell, Vloe-PreBldent; W. P.
Smith, Cashier.
7,236—The Union National Bank of Elgin, Illinois. Capital, $100,000. Richard N. Botsford, President; Alexander L. Metzel,
Vtce-Preeldent; William W, Sherwin, Vice-President; Jno. E,

Whitham, Cashier
7,237—The First National Bank of Someraet, Ohio. Capital, $25,000.
D. S. Thomas, President; L. L. Dlttoe, Vice-President; E. A.
Montgomery, Cashier.
7,238—The German National Bank of Weatherford, Oklahoma Territory. Capital, $25,000.
President; O. A. Gal,

loway, Cashier.

7,239— National Bank of Commerce of Lincoln, Nebraska. Capital,
$100,000. M. Well, President; 8. A. Fosoer. Vice-President;
M. I. Altken, Cashier; Carl Well, Assistant Cashier. Conversion of the

Bank

of

Commerce

'

Sebree, Kentucky.)
7,248— The Stockmen's National Bank of OotuHa, Texas.

Capital
$60,t)00. L. A. Kerr, President; T. O. Frost, Vice-President;
G.W. Henri chson, Cashier; B. Wlldenthal, Assistant Cashier
7,244— The First National Bank of Lakevlew, Oregon. Capital
$60,000. W. H. Shirk, President; H. A. Brattaln, Vice-President; 8. O. Cressler, Cashier; Lee Beall, Assistant Cashier
7,246—The First National Bank of Clifton, Texas. Capital $tO,000
J. W. Budaslll, President; G. J. Qibbs, Vice-President and
Acting Cashier.
7,246—The Citizens' National Bank of Pennsboro, West Virginia
Capital. $25,000. E. J. Taylor, President, C. H. Broadwater'
Cashier; C. R. Cunningham. Assistant Cashier. (Conversion
of the Citizens' Bank of Pennsboro.)
7,247~The First National Bank of La Fayette, Georgia. Capital
$26,000. A. R. Steele, President; R. N. Dickerson, VicePresident; 8. A. Hunt Jr., Cashier.
7,248—The Farmers' & Merchants' National Bank of Mt. Vernon, Ohio
Capital, $100,000. F. V. Owen, President; Leander Hays,
Vice-President; F,W, Severns. Cashier; A. L. Byrns, Assistant

7,249—The Farmers' National Bank of Center, Texas.
$25,000.

J. T. Norris, President;

.

—

,

President; Oscar C. Wilt, Cashier.'
Conversion of the Salem Bank.
7,261—The First National Bank of Ramona, Indian Territory. Capital
$25,000. A. S. Burrows, President; A. D. Morton, Vice Presi'
dent; Charles P. Davis, Cashier.
7,262—The First National Bank of Egan, South Dakota. Oanltal
$25,000. W. H. Pratt Jr., President; T. E. Spanlding, Vice*
President; A. B. Larson, Cashier.
7,268— The First National Bank of Qulncy. Florida. Capital. $50,000
John H. Carter, President; W. H. Davidson, Vice President;
W. H. Ide, Cashier.
7,254— The First National Bank of Prestonsburg, Kentucky. Capital
$25,000. B. E^ Stanley. President; James Goble, Vice President; J. M. Weddlngton, Cashier; L. P. Mayo. Assistant
,

Cashier.

7.255—The Washington County National Bank of Granville
York.

Capital, $50,000.

James

E.

New

Goodman, PresidentC. Thomson. Cashier,

Arthur H. Morrow, Vice- President; John

7,866—The First National Bank of Versailles, Missouri.
Capital
$30,000. Joel D. Hubbard. President; G. W. Petty. VicePresident; W. W. Moore. Cashier; W. T. Petty, Assistant
Cashier. Conversion of the Bank of Morgan Oountv at Versailles,

Capital
$25,000. R. Smith. President; F. S. Stanley, Vice President:
B. O. Bianchar, Cashier.
7,273— The First National Bank of Belle Plaine. Minnesota. Capital
$26,000. J. G. Lund, President; H. B. Kamp, Cashier.
7,274- The First National Bank of Lewistown, Montana. Capital
Herman Otten. President: David Hilger, Vice$100,000.
President; Geo. J. Bach. Cashier; W. B. Miner. Assistant
Cashier. Conversion of the Judith Basin Bank, Lewistown.

Montana.
7,275—The First National Bank

of Clendenin, West Virginia. Capital.
$25,000. L. V. Koontze. President;
Cashier.
First National Bank of CatUn, Illinois
Capital. $25,000
C. V. MoClenathan, President; W. S. Douglas, Cashier.
7,277—The First National Bank of Loup City, Nebraska. Capital.
$25,000.
President; W. F. Mason, Cashier.
.
.

7,276— The

Conversion of The First Bank of Loup City.
First National Bank of Thomas, Ottlahom<* Territory. Capital, $26,000, J. 8. Houston, President; F. D. Curphey. VicePresident; T. 8. Garvin, Cashier.
7,279--The First National B»nk of San Mateo County at Redwood

7,278—The

City. California. Capital, $102,800. J. L. Ross. President;
P. P. Chamberlain, Vice-President; L. P. Behrens. Cashier;
F. K. Towne, Assistant Cashier. Conversion of the Bank of

Missonri.

7,257— The First National Bank of Annona, Tex.

Capital, $26,000
R. N. Boswell, President; R. F. Scott, Vice-President; Ira
o'
Bryant, Cashier.
7,268-The Farmers' & Merchants' National Bank of Onlev. Virginia
Capital, $80,000.
Ben T. Gunter, President: JJJi"'^^^-'
Cashier.
7,259-The Redlands National Bank, Redlands. California. Capital
$50,000. K. C. WeUs, President; M. M. Phlnney, Vice-President; H. H. Ford, Cashier; O. C. Wells, Assistant Cashier.
Conversion of The Union Bank of Redlands.
7,260— The First National Bank of Odon, Indiana. Capita), $85 000
Lpwry Cooper, President; Harry H. Crooke, Vice-President;
W. C. Garten, Cashier.
7,261—The First National Bank of Lineville, Iowa Capital, $25 000
J. P. Jordan, President; Geo. Rockhold, Vice-President; P
a'
Bockhold. Cashier; H. S. Petty, Assistant Cashier.
„ „«„
7,262 -The First National Bank of Scenery Hill, Pennsylvania. Capital, $25,000.
George E. Renshaw, President; F. I. Patterson
Vice-President; O. M. Mitchell, Cashier; C. E. Hill, Assistant
Cashier.
7,263- The Old National Bank of Washington, Pennsylvania. Oanital
$150,000. O. S. Ritchie. President; S. M. Teipleton andyohn
Seaman, Vice-Presidents; Robert L. MoOarrell. Cashier
,. «o.
rr^J*7,264— The First National Bank of Falrchlld, Wisconsin. Canital
$25,000. N. C. Foster, President; W. K. Coffin, Vice President; Wm. F. Hood, Cashier; Hattie M. Foss, Assistant
Cashier.
7,266— The First National Bank of Wllliamstown, New Jersey. Canital, $26,000.
W. H. Bodlne, President; Luther M. Halsey.
„ o«- ^Vice-President; Jan van Herwerden, Cashier.
7,266—The Citizens' National Bank of Meridian, Mississippi. Canital
$160,000. W. A. Brown, President; H. M. Street^ First VicePresident; J. E. Reed, Second Vice President; W. Q.Simnson. Cashier; Paul Brown, Assistant Cashier.
_ „„„
'

San Mateo County.
7,280—The First National Bank of Galeton. Pennsylvania. Capital.
$50,000. W. O. Park, President: W. B. Layton, Cashier.
7,281— The Olive Hill National Bank, Olive Hill, Kentucky. Capital.
$26,000. W, J. Rice, President; Claude Wilson, CashlerT
7,282—The First National Bank of Mountain Grove, Missouri. Capital, $26,00O.
J. M. Hubbard, President; T. I. Pitts, VicePresident; E. J. Green. Cashier.

7,283- The First National Bank of Waterville. Minnesota. Capital
$25,000. F. H. Wellcome, President; Geo. E. Greene, VicePresident; James M. Knudson, Cashier
7,284—The National Bank of John A. Black of Barboursville Kentucky. Capital, $30,000. JohQ A. Black, President; Joseph
Miller, Vice-President;

Edward England,

Cashier;

Black. Assistant Cashier.

7,285—The National Bank

Henry C

Commerce

of Dodge City. Kansas. Capital, $25,000.
C Q Chandler, President; J. W. Berryman
Vice-President; H. A. Burnett. Cashier.
of

7,286— The Tamaqua National Bank, Tamaqua, Pennsylvania,

Cap-

$100,000. P. P. Spiese, President; O. B. Dreher, VicePresident; A. L. Leopold, Cashier.
7,287— First National Bank of Norway, Iowa. Capital, $25,000. O
P. Chrlstlanson, President; Geo. A. Doebel, Vice-President:
John T. Smith Cashier.
7,288—The Montrose National Bank, Montrose, Colorado. Capital
$36,000. J. W. Tripler, President; John O. Bell, Vloe-President; Geo. O. Gilbert, Cashier.
7,289— The Duncan National Bank, Duncan, Indian Territory. Capital, $30,000. J. M. Armstrong, President; W. W. Payne and
J. M. Robberson, Vice-Presidents; J.
Wade, Uashier; F. W.
Jarboe, Assistant Cashier.
7,290—The Richmond Borough National Bank of Stapleton, New
York. Capital, $100,000. Josiah W. Place. President; Chas.
F. Wlgand and Fred'k A. Verdon, Vice-Presidents; T. P.
Brlnsmaid. Cashier.
7,291—The People's National of Lakewood, New Jersey. Capital
'
$60,000. W. J. Harrison. President;
Cashier
7,292—The First National Bank of Mora, Minnesota. Capital, $25 <)0O
Chas. Keith, President; J. C Pope, Vice-President; Geo. h!
Newbert. Cashier; Ganda M. Anderson, Assistant Cashier
7,293—The National Bank of Norman, Oklahoma Territory. Canital
$25,000.
. President;
S. N. Brees, Cashier.
7,294— The First National Bank of Havelock, Iowa, Capital, $25,000
J. P. Farmer, President; 8. H. Gill, Vice-President; W.
Harris, Cashier; A. F. Clarke, Assistant Cashier; T. G. Demaray, Assistant Cashier.
7,296— The First National Bank of Flngal, North Dakota. Capital,
$25,000. Thomas Casey, President; L, A, Batoheller. VicePresident; C. E. Batoheller, Cashier
7,296— The Plngree National Bank of Ogden. Utah. Capital, $175,000.
Job Plngree, President; W. Abbott. Joseph Scoworoft, and
James Mack, Vice-Presidents; James Plngree, Cashier.
7,297-The Wellesley National Bank, Wellesley, Massachusetts. Capital, $50,000.
Isaac Sprague, President;
Cashier
7,298—The Farmers' National Bank of Oberlin. Kansas. Capital
$50,000. M. E. Mix, President; C. M. Sawyer and 8. A. Fish!
Vice Presidents; John P. O'Grady, Cashier; S. O. Stowell,
Assistant Cashier.
7,299—The National Bank of Commerce of Guthrie, Oklahoma. Capital, $100,000. J. W. McNeal. President; A. L. Cockrum. VicePresident; Wm. S. Stiles, Caehier,
7,300— First National Bank of Madison, Georgia. Capital, $50,000.
W. P. Wallace. President;
.Cashier.
7,301—The Commercial National Bank of Pendleton, Oregon. Capital, $60,000.
R. Clyde Beach, President; T. G. Halley, VicePresident, W. L. Thompson, Cashier.
7,302—The Jewell County National Bank of Burr Oak, Kansas. Capital, $50,000.
M. C. Berkeley, President; F. E. Burke, VicePresident; L. Monbeck. Cashier.
7,303—The Home National Bank of Eureka. Kansas. Capital $26,000.
G. 8. Saliyards, President; Sam'l Holmes, Vice-President; Elwood Marshall. Cashier.
7,304 -The First National Bank of In wood, Iowa. Capital, $26,000.
E. Renshaw, President; Herbert Renshaw, Vice-President;
Chris Eriokson Jr., Cashier.
Conversion of the Peoples' Savings Bank.
ital,

D

Capital
Cashier

7,250—The First National Bank of Salem, West Virginia. Capital
$60,000.

7,272— The First National Bank of Hood River, Oregon

of Lincoln.

7,240—The Merchants' National Bank of Fort Smith. Arkansas. Capital, $400,000. W. J. Echols, President; J. B. Williams. VI cePresident; C. 8. Smart, Cashier. Conversion of Merchants'
Bank,
7,241- The First National Bank of Loogootee, Indiana. Capital,
$25,000. John N. Breen, President; J. M. Twitty, Cashier.
7,242— The First National Bank of Sebree, Kentucky.
Capital
$25,000. J. B. Ramsey, President; Joel Bailey, Cashier. W. I
Smith, Vice-President. (Conversion of the People's Bank,

195

'

H

,

7,308—The Cooperstown National Bank, Cooperstown,

New

York.

Capital, $50,000.
Andrew K. Smith, President: Datus E.
SIver, Vice President; John R. Klrby. Cashier.
7,806—The First National Bank of Shamrock. Texas. Capital, $25,000. J. M. Shelton, President; Thomas B. Lee, Vice-President; O, P. Jones. Cashier.
7,307- The Goodhue County National Bank of Red Wing, Minnesota.
(Capital, $180,000. F. Busoh. President; John H. Bloh, VicePresident; C. F. Hjermstad, Cashier; Emll L. Lee, Assistant
Cashier. Conversion of the Goodhne County Bank of Red

Wing.

7,308—The American National Band

of

Lynchburg, Virginia. Capital.

$100,000. R. F. Ropes, President; P. A. Krise, Vice-President; W. K. Smiley, Cashier. Conversion of the Krlse Banking Company, Lynchburg, Virginia.

7,267-The Bradford National Bank, Bradford, Vermont. Capital
$26,000. Wm.H. Gil more, President; Warren L, Crafts, Vice'
President; G. M. Marshall, Cashier.
7,2e8-The First National Bank of Deer Creek, Minnesota. Capital
$25,000. E. J. Webber. President; L^vorette
Baboock
Vice President; A. D. Baker, Cashier; H. J. Baker, Assistant

Auotlon Sales. Among other seoarlties the following
not regaiarly dealt In at the Board, were recently sold at

7,269-The Farmers'

anction.

—

W

Cashier,

& Merchants' National Bank of Grandvlew
Capital, $30,000. O. L. Wilkirson, President; J. B
".«•«.
Harrell, Vice-President; R. E. Pitts, Cashier.
7,270—The National Citizens' Bank of Charles Town, West Vlrirlnla
Capital. $50,000. Braxton D. Gibson, President;
John O
Burns. Vice-President; H. C. Getzendannor, Cashier;
J Frank
Turner, Assistant Cashier.
7,27 1-The First National Bank of Bolivar. Missonri.
Capital, $25,000. Richard B. Vlles, President; Leslie M. Fame Cashier*^ " ""• '^•^ne. uashier,
Ohai, W. Vlles. Assistant
Texas.

By Messrs. Adrian H. Mnller
stocks
800 Iron Silver Mln ng Co .
$20 each.. $2 per eh.
10 Central Crosstown By.
Co., guar. 15 p. fl
325
<

'

Cashier

200Cln.Uam.
.

.

<fi)D. RR.,com. SSH
110 Nat. Bank of Commerce.
808^-209

A

Son:
Slockt.

40 Federal Sugar Co., pref 70
10 Intern. Meroan'e Agency 10
Bonds.
$15,000 Consol. Rubber Tire
deb.48, 1951
$5,000 Princeton Lighting
Co. iBt 5s

9<te

80

Vol. Lixix.

THE CHRONICLE.

196

New York City Clearing House Banks.—Statement of
oondition for the week ending July 9, 1904, based on average of daily results.
We omit two cipher$ (00) in all ea»e».
BANKS.

Surplu*.

Capital.

LoanM.

Specie.

Legale.

\DeposiU Res'

New York

City, Boston and Philadelphia Banks.— Below
of the weekly returns of the Clearing Hou&g
Banks of New York City, Boston and Philadelphia. The New
York figures do not include results for nou-member banks.

a

is

summary

We omit two ciphers (OO) in
BAKK« Capital .1
BANKS tiUrplAlS.

Loans.

all these flyurei.
J)e-

Circu-

pggiu.t

lalion.

Clearings.

11220125
11433141
11629888
11681503

38.762,8
38,970,1
39,209,6
39,108,4

1,046,673,0

216,870,0
7,163,0 21H,514,0
6,879,0 218,280,0

7,370,0
7,367,0
7,381,0

122,827,1
136,001,^

231,785,0 11,638,0
,232,119,0 11,568,0
233,984.0 11,548,0

103,818,3
iii.ioa.B

,

Legals.

Specie.

ve.

N. Y.

y

Bk. of N.

2,000,0
2,050,0
2,000,0
3.000,0
1,500,0
1,000,0
25,000,0
300,0
600,0
1,000,0
300,0

Mauliat. Co
Merc)innt8'

Mechanics'.

America

Phoomx

...

City

Chemical

..

Mercli. Ex
Gallatin

.

But. & Drov
Mecb.&Tra.
Greenwich
Amer.Exch.
Commerce..

700,0
500,0

Mercantile
Pacittc

Chatham
Peojple'8

...
...

N. America

Hanover

...

Irving
Citizens'

..

Nassau
Mar.& Fult.
SIioecfeLtlir.

CornExch
Oriental

.

...

Imp. <fe Trail

Park
East Kiver
Fourth
Second
First

N.y.Nt.Ei.

Bowery

...

N. Y. Co...

German Am
Chase
Fifth Ave..

German Ex.
Germania

..

Lincoln
Garfield
Fifth

Bk. ofMet..

West

Side..

Seaboard ..
IstN.Bklyn
Liberty
N. Y.Pr.Ex

New

Ainst.

Astor
Total

...

$

$

$

5,000,0
25,000,0
3,000,0
422,7
450,0
200,0
2,000,0
3,000,0
1,000,0
2,550,0
500,0
1,000,0
1,000,0
2,000,0
750,0
1,500,0
3,000,0
250,0
3,000,0
300,0
10,000,0
1,000,0
250,0
200,0
750,0
1,000,0
100,0
200,0
200,0
300,0
1,000,0
250,0
1,000,0
200,0
500,0
300,0
1,000,0
1,000,0
500.0
350,0

2,586,7
2,492,3
1,458,4
3,381,8
3,6i'3,3

284,8
16,885,2
7,564,2
362,0
2,210,4
120,4
355,8
530,9
4,075,6
11,786,9
4,513,6
618,6
1,095,1
400,5
2,106,8
6,705,8
l,085,i!

648,2
313,1
1,322.2

360,2
3,397,
1,076,0
6,794,3

7,090,2
133,3
3,041,2
1,402,9
13,743,9
873.7
767,7
663,0
524.3
4,0116,6

1,738,0
676,2
874,9
1,346,2
1,287,4
379,6
1,429,0

548.6
1,428,1
593,9
1,935,9

495,0
549,4
559,4

$

$

19,326,0
20,690,0
16,818,1
21,924,0
25,359,0
3,351,0
175,655,1
23,500,0
6,718,6
8,953,7
1,916,6
4,038,0
2,666,6
30,796,0
165,282,8
23.849.2
3,216,8
6,072,5
2,000,9
16,064,6
48,060,2
6,815.0
15,493,2
2,540,3
6.176.5
6.982,7
29,885,0
7,805,0
23,851,0
70.165,0
1.111,5
22,672,8
9.112,0
96,097,6
7,662,5
3,010,0
4,482,2
3,534.8
43,977,1
9.187,2

3,313,0
13,833,0
4,303,4
3,510,0
6,026,6

598,0
39,976,0
6,621,6
1,048,5
1,345,7
506,5
1,250,0
467,5
3,759,0
25,068,6
4,262,9
391,9
1,047,7
615,6
2,816,6
16,084,6

978.0
2,652,6
485,6
1,301,8
1,681,0
5,814,0
1,155,1
3,776,0
16,237,0
192,8
4,050,6
1,112.0
33,146,9
1,265,9

431,0
991,4
654,4
15,753,0

2.712,1
2,743,3

12,116,0
7,534,4
2,497,0
7,289,0
3,425,0
13,497,0
4,331,0
10,900,1
4,951,0
5,812,9
4,736,0

2,508,5
200,0
420,2
950,6
1,539,3
429,2
1,759,3
639,0
2,009,0
646,0
2,332,2
810,6
926,4
996,0

$

F.C.

1,617,0 18,808,0 256
2,218,0 33,295,0 48-2
1,314,0 20,616,3 27 2
2,062,0 22,676,0 24-6
2,182,7 28,384,1 26-3
2,911,0 28-3
226.0
8,820.4 179,906,5 27-1
1.898,0 24,608,8 34-6
601,8
6.347,6 25-9
499.9
7,032.5 .6-2
45.1
2.351,0 23-5
441,0
4,874,0 34-6
340,3
2.531.2 31-9
2,298,0 24,772,0 24-4
16,486,6 158,417,1 26-2
1,351,2 21,510,6 260
430,8
3,816,1 21-5
942,0
6,440,0 30-8
2,692,2 33-5
253,0
1,711,8 18,340,3 26-2
3,568,3 63,243,8 31-0
578,4
6,394,0 24-3
2,155.7 18,733,5 25-6
234,7
2,97^,5 24-1
575,2
6.297.2 29 8
387,4
8,298,6 24-8
3,609,0 36,775,0 25-6
361,6
7,513,6 201,316,0 20,991,0 24-2
5,213,0 80,090,0 2o-5
184,6
1,267,4 29-7
2.864,2 26.032,0 26-5
1,193,0
9,805,0 23-5
1,932,0 103,724,0 33-8
507,4
6,974.3 20-4
343,0
3,500,0 22-1
495,7
5,840,2 25-4
214, i)
3,395,4 25-6
1,896,1 66,551,2 31-2
318,6 10,218,4 27-6
630,0
3,453,5 24-0
809,1
5,102,0 24-0
2,176,1 12,895,4 24-2
291,3
7,517,3 24-3
130,2
2,411,8 23-1
922,7 10,418,3 26-V
324,0
3,888,0 24-7
1.531,0 16,035,0 27-6
677,0
4,712,0 28-0
24H,0
9,539,9 27-0
429,5
5,173.4 23-9
528,3
6,563,1 221
176,0
4,689,0 24-9

115,972,7 134,323,4 10782948 243,093,9 82,461,4 11581503 28-1
t

t

Total United States deposits included $23,282,400.

Reports of Non-Member Banks.—The following Is the
statement of condition of the non-member banks for the
week ending July 9, 1904, based on average of daily results.
We omit two ciphers (00) in all cases.

$
J'nelS 250.296.1 10496898 236,366,3 83,006,7
J'ne25 250.296,1 10668132 240.368,3 83.912,9
J'ly 2 250.296,1 10750316 239,371,8 84,980,7
J'ly 9 250,296,1 10782948 243,003,9 82,461,4
Bus.
J'ue25 52,6.<J5,4 172,653.0 17,071,0 7,455,0
J'ly
J'iy

2

9

Fbila.
J'ne26
J'ly
J'ly

2
9

62,636,4 174,526.0
52,635,4 176,414,0

Capi-

Sur-

OOs omitted.

tal.

plus.

Invest-

Specie.

&Bank
NoUs.

ments.

Net

Leg. T.

Other Deposits
Agent. Bks.Jcc

Clear'g

N. Y. CiTT.
Sorouyhs ol
Columbia

..

14th Street.
Gansevoort.

Hamilton

..

Mt. Morris

Mutual
19th Ward
Plaza
Biverslde ..

.

State
12th Ward

23d

Ward

.

..

Yorkville ..
Fidelity ....
Jellersou ..

Century ...
Wash. Hgts
United Nat.

$
100,0
300,0
100,0
200,0
200,0
250,0
200,0
200,0
100,0
100,0
100,0
200,0
100,0
100,0
200,0
400,0
100,0
100,0
1.000,0

236,3
295,6
107,6
80,0
129,6
116,3
180,0
188,7
257,2
106,7
655,8
113.2
102,9
283,8
118,2
295,7
68,2
133,3
123,9

Cousol. Nat. 1,000,0 1,127,6
Union Exch 750,0 471,6

Borough

$

if!

2,266,0
3,740,0
1,652,9
2,024,6
3,032,7
2,204,2
2,583,6
1,727,9
2,980,0
1,139,6
7,244,0
1,696,0
1,382,2
1,970,1

783,5
2,128,8
728,3
614,4
2,002,9
3,589,8
3,807,0

64,1

207,0
81,6
11,9

188,8
117,4
23,7
21,1

138,0
11,3

444,0
46,0
46,5
40.0
11,0
13,3
'27,7

12,7

231,7
260,3
127,9

$
220,4
125,0
68.8
17 '2,
116,2
124,9
183,1
131,4
127,0
104,8
277,0
243,0
154,7
178,4
50,3
109,5
33,6
26.3
66,5
62,0
184,0

$

$
390,4
369,1
238,0
3,5
269,6 290,0
149,3
71,3
71,0
250,0
462,7
65,2
163,6
5,4
467,8
307,1
629,0
110,2
245,0
130,0 1,064,0
88,0
15,0
213,6
93,2
408,6
227,0
64,0
172,7
47,7
170,2
69,6
626,6
365,5

6,3

96,3

425,0
460,0

3,081,2
3,810,0
•2,132,0

2,288,5
3,454,8
3,125,8
2,596,1
2,362,3
3,412,0
1,434,7
8,707,0
2,128,0
1,781,1
2,510,0
773,0
2,047,9
802,2
579,9
1,166,2
2,579,4
4,077,9

ol

Brooklyn

.

..

Mfis.'Nat..
Mechanics'
Merchants'.

Nassau Nat
Nat. City

North

..

Side.

Seoples
17th Ward

.

SpragueNat
union
Wallabout
Borough ...
Borough oj
Richmond.
.

l8tNat.,S.I.

150,0
300,0
252,0
500,0
100,0
300,0
300,0
100,0
100,0
100,0
200,0

334,6
167,6
552,0
396,5

2,127,2
1,616,6
3,292,8
6,91.''i,'-

14,2
121,0
354,0
218,6

63,5

1,065,1

8,3

756,8
604,2
174,1
180,2
86,9
249.8
116,6

6,377,ti

185,0
118,0

3,197.0
1,079,5
1,386,4

67 1

,9

1,131.0
1,096,3

12,3
64,4
14,6

120,0

187,8

274,6
06,9
321,4
101,2
639,7
782,4 1,100,7
59,2
144,2
349,0 1,009,0
323,0
823.0
79,2
50,3
163,6
134,2
61,8
76,7
20,0
267,0
104,3
10.),5
30,9
49,5
104,0
136,2

100,0
200,0

83.1

80.-. .2

62,1
63,1

88,1'

1,363,9

42,7

100,0

111,6

701,3

65,1

400,0 1,063,5

3,959,8

158,5

250,0
250,0
200,0

654,9
278,6
288,1

2,13o,C.

89,1

76,1

1,155.0
1,413,4

72,7
60,6

110,0
125,0

539,7
153,8

2,331,6
1,227,5

152,5
37,2

200,1'

10,0

22.2
50,9
70,0

25,0
261,0
212,6
146,(1

86, li

30,0
612,6
148,5
55,4

147,1

2,270,9
1.867,6
4,073.4
9,018.4
1,200.6
5,912,0
4,182,0
1,200,8
1,679,9

729,0
1,293,0
1,659,7
912.4
1,713,8

New York

National

.

JTor week.

1904.

Dry Goods
General Merchandise

405,0
232,5
513,9

144,5

2,090,1
1,106,2
1.917,9

33,1

196.1

269,1

60,9

71,l'

85,1

14,1
4,9

>

following are
for dry goods

1902.

l'J03.

$2,132,117
7,718,971

Total

$1,959,320
7,944,364

1901.

$2,033,645
6,511,325

$1,480,867
8.645.437

$9,851,088

Since Jan.

$9,903,684

$8,544,970

$10,126,304

$63,148,748
249.589.500

$70,700,256
242,912,566

$64,488,579
222.946,472

$54,691,179
241,303,790

1.

General Merchandise
Total 27 weeks

$312,738,248 $313,612,82-.' .$287,435,051 $295,994,969

of dry goods for one week later wiU be found
our report of the dry goods trade.
The foUowing is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
specie) from the port of New York to foreign x>orts for the
week ending July 11, and from January 1 to date.

The imports

in

EXPORTS FROM

NEW YORK

FOR THE WEEK.

1904.

For the week.
Previously reported..
Total 27 weeks

1903.

1902.

1901.

$7,907,932
244,763.340

$7,377,646
259,723,278

$8,890,725
244,912,508

$9,450,833
271,869.367

$252,671,272 $267,100,924 $253,803,233 $281,320,190

Note.— As the figures of exports as reported by the New York Custom
House from week to week frequently show divergence from the monthly
totals, also compiled by the Custom House, we shall from time to time adjust
the totals by adding to or deducting from the amount "previously reported."
The following table shows the exports and imports of
specie at the port of New York for the week ending July 9
and since Jan. 1, 1904, and for the corresponding periods in
1903

and 1903.
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF SPECIE AT

NEW YORK

EXPOETS.

Gold.

Imports.

SinceJaiu

Week.

Great Britain
France

Week.

1.

637,476
41,305,126

Since Jan. 1.

6,045

$2,047,346
1,439,882
1 633 787
461,852
49,220
647,763
54,347

$45,059
21,351
19,628

$6,334,197
3,605.861
1,295,165

.tl9,

Germany . ............
West Indies.............

*'$506

1,3831 604

$7
3,210

78,735
2,041,126
2,000

All other countries

35;79'7

$500 $64,448,06)

Total 1904
Total 1903
Total 1902

7,142,318

32,462,651
16,930,961

SUver.
Great Britain
Prance

$535

$448,365 $19,824,278
277,550
763,109

Germany
West Indies

•26,800
149,63';
48,601

1,905
8.746

*"$967

100 813
281,038

1,356,100
9,653

'iojii

86,690
2,447

^730,915 $22,177,177
779,315
17,708,442
545,537
17.917,412

$20,678
42,046
66.899

$482,074
936,405
734,330

"6,00(3

Mexico
South America
All other countries

Total 1904
Total 1903
Total 1902

Of the above imports for the week in 1904, $2,765 were
American gold coin and $92 American silver coin. Of the
exports during the same time. $500 were American gold
com and $5,000 were American silver coin.
Auction Sales.

—See page preceding.

Spencer Trask

&

Co.,

Bankers,
WILLLA.M

& PINE

NEW

STREETS,

YORK.

Special circular carefully describing
the property covered by an Electric
Illuminating Company First Mortgage
Gold Bond, paying the investor 5Vo,

6,132,0

25,5
104,0

week ending

;

Members N.

INVESTMENT SECURITIES.
Branch

2,484,4
1.335,3

Otfice. 05

Y. Stock E.vch.inge.

Moffat

HOBOKEN.
First Nat...
Second Nat.

for the

July 7 and for the week ending for general merchandise
July 8 also totals since beginning first week January.
FOBEIGN IMPORTS.

Hudson Co
Second Nat
Third Nat..

—The

Imports and Exports for the Week.
the imports at

807,3

358,3 1,502,4 1,514,0

90,5e2,t}

;

JkusbyCity
First Nat...

116,353,9,

Including for Boston and Philadelphia the item "due toother banks,"
and also Government deposits. For Boston these Government deposits
amounted on July to $3,763,000 on July 2 to $3,753,000.

Brooklyn.

Broadway

1,233,921,1
1.075,437,3

t

Mexico
South America

Man&Br'nx
Colonial

04,291,0
62,611,0
63,762,0

48.167,1 192,754,0
48,167,1 194,594,0
48,167,1 196,256.0

Deposit with

BANKS.

16,911,0
16,841,0

1.05e,904,:i I

&

State

St.,

Albany

White,

Members Nov York Stock ExchaoKe,
1 NASSAU STREET, CORNER WALL,
jDealers In Investment Securities.

Tot.J'ly 9 101370 121318 93.538.1 4,125,0 5.S40,5 13407',! 7.726,0 UI84367
Tot. J'ly 2 101370 12131.^ 93,643,0 4,032,' 5,45S.O 146022 H.614,8 1098507
Tot.J^ne25 9,387,0 116603189,369,5 3,983,5 5,503.7 122184 7,234,8 1021774

TeL

583C-582L Cortl&DdU

Telephone S:ooka a 8pectaltr«

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

For Dixidtndt tet

The market for railway bonds has, unlike the stock marbeen more quiet and steadier than last week. Not only
has the volume of business been smaller but it was not as
A few issues have been conspicuously
well distributed.
active, including Union Pacific convertible 48 to-day, on the
decision already referred to, during which they advanced

®a^jettje»

tanfejers^

19"

ket,

page. iq4~

WALL. STREET. FRIDAY JULY 15, 1904.-5 P. M.
The Money Market and Financial Sitnation.— There has nearly 2 points.
been a continuation of the activity noted last week in Wall
United States Bonds.— Sales of Government bonds at
Street, but the movement of prices has been less regular.
Reports of serious floods in the Southwest and of damaging the Board include $3,000 38, coup., 1908-18, at 106!^; $1,000
rains in the Northwest cast a shadow over the brilliant 4s, coup., 1907, at 106%, and $17,000 4s, reg., 1907, at 108%.
prospect for an abundant harvest of wheat in the sections The following are the daily closing quotations; tor yearly
These reports are doubtless exaggerated, as range see third page following:
mentioned.
usual, but there is known to have been considerable damage
InUr*8t July July July July July July
done in certain parts of Kansas, Nebraska and Missouri.
Pgriods
14
16
13
9
11
19
other hand, injury to wheat m the Red River Valley
On the
reglatered
-Jan '104>4 104»4 104^ '104'4 104*4 '104^
rain at this season of the year is so rare an 2a, 1980
by excessive
oonpon
-Jan 104»4 '104'4 '104»« *104^ '104*4 104*4.
Ss, 1980

occurrence as to be scarcely worth considering in the present instance, and if followed by favorable weather for a few
weeks, the crop may easily prove to be better than an average one. An important event of the week has been the decision handed down to-day in the Northern Securities case.
This decision continues the temporary injunction, preventing
the retirement of Northern Securities stock as planned and
further developments are awaited with interest.
Not much attention has been paid here to the labor strike
that has closed nearly all the large packing-houses in the
country, as negotiaiions are in progress looking to an adjustment of the matter. It is only one more illustration of an
evil that menaces all our industries and prevents the development of new enterprises that might be of great benefit
to the community at large.
The open market rates for call loans on the Stock Exchange
during the week on atook and bond collaterals have ranged
from 1 to \yi per cent. To-day's rates on call were 1 to
\\i per cent. Prime commercial paper quoted at 3@3J^ per
cent for endorsements and 33^@3^ p. c. for best single names.
The Bank of England weekly statement on Thursday
showed a decrease in bullion of £127,312 and the percentage of reserve to liabilities was 49*73, against 46*45 last week,
the discount rate remaining unchanged at 8 per cent. The
Bank of France shows a decrease of 22,575,000 francs in
gold and 3,300,000 francs in silver.

3a, 1980,ama.J.regiatered

coupon
Sa,1930, amall
registered
8a, 1918
Ss,

-Feb
-Feb
-Feb
-Feb
-Jan
-Jan
-Feb
-Feb

oonpon

1918

(s,1918, small.reglstered
oonpon
Ss, 1918, small
registered
48, 1907
48,
48,
48,

1907
1936
1935

coupon

registered

coupon

*Tiil8i8 the prloe bid at the

*106
*106

*105
*106

•105
*106

106
106

*104»4*104»4.
*106>4 106>«

'106
*i05" *i06" -ios" •106" '106
*106>« loei* -106>« 'IPB"* '106i« 106*8
»106>4 •106>« 106»8 106 >< 'IO6J4 '106>4
*182'« *132i« *182i4 '183 >4 183 1* 181>«
*183>9*133i»
*182««i *182»8 *182»» '132'>g

morning board; no smu waa made.

Bailroad and Miscellaneons Stocks.- The stock market
has been more active than last week, but irregular in tone.
Prevailing itfiaences have been somewhat conflicting, as
Loted above, and in many cases the best prices of the week
have not been maintained. Notwithstanding this fact, a
long list of active shares closes from 1 to 3 points higher than
last week.
No adverse rumors affected the coal stocks, and they have
continued to be strong features of the market, but reports
of crop damage gave a reactionary tendency to some of the
granger and trunk line issues. Rumors early in the week
that a decision in the Northern Securities case was pending
stimulated an advance of 3 points in Union Pacific and
Southern Pacific shares, from which there has been some
recession. This decision rendered to-day created an urgent
demand for these issues and an advance of over 4 points in
the former, which closes 5J^ points higher than last week.
BANKS.
HEW TOKK OITT 0I.BABIN0-HOU8B
Naturally the whole market was active and strong in symMetropolitan Street Railway and Brooklyn Rapid'
pathy
JHff*r*neti
1909
1903
/row
Transit are exceptional in that they close fractionally lower
July 12
July 11
July 9
pmXotts wMk
than last week.
Generally speaking, industrial stocks have been strong.
109.832,701
98,872,700 Steel preferred. General Electric and Amalgamated Copper
Oftpltai
115.972,700
134.S23.400
139,069.300 118.074 600
aorplTU
advanced 2 points or more. Phenix Mining fluctuated over
Loftna A <liaooTUita 1,078,294.800 Ino S,2e 3,300 909,639,000 906.776 300
43.910,300
OlroolAtlon
89,168.400 Deo
41,200
81,777,200 a range of 8 points, closing with a net gain of 1.
Consoli•1,168.150,300 Ino 6,161.600 893.143,330 943,198.000
Met deposits
3peole
343.093,900 Ino 3.723,100 166,673,100 170.607,200 dated Gas, on the other hand, is lower.
Legal temdera

Seserre beld
16 p. o. ot depoalta

82,461,400

Deo 2,619,300

825,665,300 Imo
289,637,675 Imo

1,103,800
1,290,376

74,871,200

77,369,200

331,044,300
223.036,836

247,776,400
336,649.600

87,676
36,017.726 Dec
8,008,476
13,336,900
gnrplna reaerre
* $38,382,400 United atatea deposits Inoiaded, against $23,249,600 last
week and $37,374,600 the corresponding week of 1903. With these
United Stateadepoalts eliminated, the sarplasreaerTewcvidba $41,888,326
on July 9 and $41,916,960 on Jnly 2
NOTB.— Betnmaot separate banka appear on the preoedlng page.

Foreign Exchange.— The foreign exchange market was
quiet and steady to firm at the opening, gradually growing
easier and closing weak.
To-day's (Friday's nominal rates for sterling exchange
were 4 86 for sixty day and 4 88 for sight. To-day's (Friday's) actual rates for sterling exchange were 4 8475@4 8490
for long, 4 87@4 8710 for short and 4 8730@4 8740 for
cables.
Commercial on banks, 4 84%@4 84)^, and documents for acceptance, 4 84@4 84^. Cotton for payment,
4 84@4 8434^; cotton for acceptance, 4 84%@4 84)^, and grain
for payment, 4 84>^@4 84^^.
To-day's (Friday's) actual rates for Paris bankers' francs
were 5 18%(a5 1S%* for long and 5
for short.
Germany bankers' marks were 95@95 1-16 for long and
95 7-16@95i/^t for short. Amsterdam bankers' guilders were
40i^"[I@40 a-16* for long and 40 5-16@40%t for short.
Exchange at Paris on London to-day, 25 f. 20J^ c; week's
range, 25 f. 22 c. high and 25 f. 20J^ c. low.
The week's range for exchange rates follows
-Lonf.
-Bhort.-OdbUt
SUrling Actual—

For aaily volume of btunneaa see page 206,
The following sales have occurred this week of shares not^
represented in our detailed list on the pa^es whioh follow.

WUk

lllaOhalmera

I

4

®
W

I

I

»
»

I

I

.

I

H

4 8760

'it

I

4 8740

,.

Smnt$ Hnc4 Jam.

i.

300 44 J' ly 9 45 J' lyl5 SOifiMar e4'8Feb
SijI'tte
4 J' lyl3
5 J' ly 15
800
6 Jan
300 30 J' lyl4 304J' lyl5 26 J'ly 88>aJan
50 140 J' lyl3 140 J' ly ,2 l.S0>«Feb 140 Apr
10 103 »« J' ly '3 108'<jJ' lyl3 10 i Mb; 104 J'ne
100 180 J' lyll 180 J' lyll 163>«Jan 190 Feb

Much more interest has been evinced
for unlisted securities this week and aggregate transactions have been of greater magnitude than in
any previous week of late. During the early trading values
moved upward, but on Thursday and to-day prices displayed
a reactionary tendency. Northern Securities and Interborough Rapid Transit stocks continued to attract considerable
attention. The former advanced from 102 to 105^^^, then
react- d to 103 and to-day broke sharply to 101 on the announcement that Judge Bradford in the United States District Court at Trenton had banded down a decision in the
Northern Securities case favorable to the Harriman interests; between 19,000 and 20,000 shares of this stock changed
hands during the week. Interborough stock rose 53^^ points
to 1343^ in the early part of the week, but on Tuesday it
dropped abruptly to 130, recovering on the same day. however, to 133 during the rest of the week the price moved
irregularly between 130 and 133}^, and closed to-day at 131 J^.
Seaboard Air Line preferred shares advanced from IB^^ to
17^, but subsequently fell back to 16; the common stock
rose from 8% to 9)4 and ended the week at 9. Southern Pacific "rights" "when issued" fhictuated between l^'aand
2Jq, and closed to-day at the low figure the new preferred
stock "when issued " changed hands at 11514, a gain of }^
from the last previous reported sale. After a rise of 4 points
to 630, Standard Oil dropped back again to 626 and then
reacted to t28. On Thursday Electric Boat preferred sold at
75J^, a loss of 61^ points, but recovered tli same day to 78
the common shares r^n uo a point to 45. After declining a
point to 40)^, American Can preferred stock advanced to
Greene Consolidated Copper moved up from 14^8 to
42}^.
15H to-day the stock sold ex-dividend at 15';^.
Outside quotations will be found on page 206.
market

;

96»iaf
96»ut

40Ht
40^1

Smng* for Wttk
wttk

Outside Market.-

in the

16V

I

I

8710

Sal4s

Cent A So Amer Teleg..
Commercial Cable
General Electric nghtg.. 7,841
6»4J' ly 9
4''8J'ne
6>aJ' lyU
ewiy
Nat Enam & HXAmv, pref 160 78 J' ly 9 78 J' ly 9 78 Jan 88 Jan
N Y <fc PJ J Telephone ...
16 147»«J' lyl3 147VjJ' lyl3 140 Feb 16U Jan
Phoenix Gold Mining... 42,900 22 J' ly K •30 J' lyll •18 Mar 8" J'ly
t'tisb Ft Wayne & Ohio
10 179W lyl2 17919 J' lyl3 179Wljr 180 Jan
St L <b San Fran stock tr
otfs (or C <6 E lU pref .
200 124 J'lyU 126 J'lyl6l 123 Feb 136 J'ly

6
6 17>i

I

[

4 8755
4 8730

4 8730

|

I

Co, pref.

Am Steel Foundnea
Preferred
mer Tobacco Co. pref..

n^tm ^H

High... 14 8625
^Zj 4 8535
4 8725
ie 4 8490
Low ... 4 8475
4 87
ParU Bankers' Wro not—
'f)
High... |6 18»8
6 16«a«
6 171a*
"> 6 18>«*
Low... 1618*4
6 IT'S*
Oermany Banktrt' Markt—^
High...
96iie'* 'i 96»«
96Vi
Low
It 96iie
96
P5'l8
AtMUrdarm Banktri' Ouilder,
High...
40»ie* ® 408ie
40»i«1]
Low...
« 40»ie*
40H.1,
40»i9
lioaa: »»i«ofl%. r»8»ofl''* t««iofl<:

STOCKS

Ending July IS

I
I

PIna: TI>uof 1%.

,

•luof

1<K.

:

The following were the rates for domestic exchange on
Nt^w fork at the under-mentioned cities to-day: Savannah,
12)^0. per $1,000 premium; Charleston, 25o. per $1,000 pre-

mium; New

Orleans, bank, 20c. per $1,000 discount;
per $1,000 discount; Chicago, 25c. per
$1,000 premium; at. Louts, 30c. per $1,000 premium; San
Francisco, 55c. per $1,000 premium.
State and Railroad Bondx.- Sales of State bonds at the
Board include $3,000 North Carolina con. 4s at 101 and
$2,000 Tennessee settlement 3s at 96.

oommeroial,

50o.

;

;

1

New York

Stock

Exchange— Stock

Record, Daily,

Weekly and Yearly

OCCUPYING TWO PAGES
STOCKS—MISIIKST
Saturday
July y
• 22

27

'SO

I

66

74»4

I

7538

94 'e 95
8238

.sa°8

"92

'

4 9 'a

,

:

333b
39',

8II2

'•180

•122
13 4 1334
•811a 84
6IH1 62>4

t

*20
23
14538 146

[

*n8^nd
,

172
,J217
r

172
217

}

••133 140
•1701a 180
';

638

638

^•15

16

•41a.

72
•101
16
•49
ai-^

723,

110
16
50
2108

159i2l59'6
•26914 271

«21k

2134

693*

70 Hi
20

•15
2I2

21^
4I2

•3>r2

•6134

03
*6
7
•Ills I2I2
2538
25
801* 60'b
37 1<
37
•60
55
•70
78
•40
51
•175
»
74
1238 13i«
67
67
821a 823,
1331^133=8

•18

19

*115
*130

8084

124

135
....

33
•38
•80
•180
•122

82

1338
•81 la

333»
3918
....
....

•170
6

16
4

94

3234

39
•80
•180

1653,.

331a

39
82

122

13^2

133
170

1414

84
54
23
1463,

180
17434

220
140
180

6

5=8

6ie

151a

151a

•4

41a

5

122
135

178

82^8

134
18^8
6834
?2134

I318
67>a

82 '8
1341ft
18''8

36
*26ia 28
6834
2134

42% «43

4934

126

1251a
•65 'e
16534
33=8
3914

•135
861a
125
-6578
166^1
33 14
40

125=14
661,

81
•180
•122
1378
801a
*50ia
•20'a
14678

1661a
3379
3914
81

8014

•170

5018

•126
•140

130
150
86=6

130

125

Ann

1«

-6578

166^2 •163

1438
801a

56
2414

14778

140
180

'133
'170
•6
634

140
180

180

133
'170

6I4

•178
•12
67

8U4

185
74
13
6718

83

133=8 I34I4
18^4

1834

36
36
•26
28
68 "a 6834
2178 217e
4218 4234
•121a 14

43
*12>3 14
•121a 14
47 52 •47 52 •47 52
•25
•25
26
26
26
26
•85
•85
•83
95
95
95
•245
•245
•245
•45
•45
•46
50
50
60
II2I4II3I4
112 11238 11236113
150=8 15m, ISOialSlia 15014 15178
t
87
88
88»4
89
861a 8914
lieiall?!. 11434 11634 1143811638
,
'

176

434

1-2

1878

1534

•50

5038

1

I

Bvittalo Itoch.

614

4I4

434

75
*105
1534
15

73
20

•17
•2

3
434

&

Do

634

12

?12i«

25=8
61 la
38I4

2434
60=6
3734
'60
'70

55
78

1878

36
•26=8 28
6834

6834

22

22

421a 43I4

•12 la 13
'47
62
26
26
86
95

245

•45
50
113iall4
1511a I52I4
8814 89
115 la 11638

Susque, pref.

pref

•40
•175

22=8

73
20

&

,

&

Delaware* Hudson

& West'n.

elaw. Lack.

Denver & Bio Grande

Do

pref

&

Des Moines

Ft. Dodge.
3 Detroit South. vot. tr. ctfs
41a
Do pref. vot. tr. ctfs

•2
•313

41a
641a
7
1218

,

Union Traction.

pref
7514 Cleve. Cln. Chic.
St. L
Do pref
151a Colorado
So., rot. trust
5036
Do Istpf. vot. tr. cfs.
211a
Do 2d pf. vot. tr. ctts

73
•18

•634

64 14 Detroit United
7
DtUuth So. Shore

Ilia

12

25

253,

Urie

6II4

617g

-CiDo

x6i

253fe

61 14
3812
55

38
54
•70
*40

78

54

Do

pref

& Terre Haute..

pref

Wortli&Den. C.stmp
Great Northern, pref
Green Bay&W.,deb. ctf.A
Ft.

Do
Hocking

deb. ctL
Valley...
pref

Do

838

•120
45
•76
67I4

124

8-'4

140
46
90
68I4

124

17»8 17''8
3334 3334
911a 92

•113
•37
•18
f"
117
•261a

115
38
1815
11738
271-2

•107 115
•60
65
•188 "a
2734

69
•86
•

2818
bV^j

90
159
5714 58
•85 100
•661a 70
11734 II8I2

16
»76
'69
•CO
•92
50I4

83
7134
2134
66I4

•25

20
80
72
621a

98

5m.
8314
72'^

22
66I4

32

838

83,

81a

'120
•120 140
48 7g 48'8 •40
•76
•76
90

Do

Keoktii

&

6734

073.

1231s 1231a
171a 171a
383, 3878
91 14 92
II214 113
*36'2 38
18 181a
11634 11736
•261a 271a

•108

110

S63>-4

631,

188'a
2 7 =8

28',

5834

•86

673,i

123

17 Hi
17
381a 3834
9216
91
113 114^2
*36ia 38
18
18

II7I4IIH
27^2

108
•60

69 1<
90

59

60
100
70
11738118^^
•16
20
•76
80

85

2778
581a

62 "i

COia

98

96

bl\

50=8
8334
713»

833^

7134 72
2178 22 14
661a 60 "a
•25
32

28=8
6978

60
6O34
•87 102
68
681a
117 14 119
•16
20
•76
80

•92

83

27 >a
110
66

•86
90
il6038l603b

60

62
96

2H4

621a
8334
7178
221*

66

671.

'25

814

32

1818
39^8
9218

8=8

140
46

838

*120

92
701a

127
18^^
39=8
93^2

114
•36»a

181-2

39 14

381a
18'a
1191a

•37
*17ia

S90

90

61
61
•90 102
?69ia 69 Hj
118 la 11938

•16
•76
«69
•01

96
5178
8334

•71
2134
661a

25

20
80
69
62
99
52=8
8334

72

22 7e
6734

35

2834
69=8

•86

2938
OOis

90

*57ia

14 J'ne 4
Feb 25
22 la May 9
64 Is J'ne 1

7,405
1,355
2,845

61

"88 102
•67
69
IISI4II9
•17
20
•76
80

Jan 2
Apr 1
Jan 23
Jan 2

13 Aug
831a Sep

29=8

Oct
Sep

Jan2

182
176

J'lyl. 168
J'ly 13 153

I33I4

2278 Jan

8

Jan 14
Jan 21

42
29

721a J'ly 15

Jan
467eFeb

Sep 2241a Jau

Aug 250

224 J'ly 15 190
5137 May 7 132
145

Mexican Central

61,010

5119

& St. Louis.
Do pref
Minn. S. P. & S. S. Marie.
Do pref
Mo. Kansas & Texas

1834

Minneapolis

"a

40
90
7,740 55
6,150 116

5165 Nov
8
15

Aug

3

112

May
May
Aug
Dec

10

J'ly

441a
17

Aug
Aug
Aug

Sep

30
66

149
230
18
62
12

J'ly

Oct

Not
Sep

734

14
56

Aug
Nov
Oct

Aug
10 Nov
23 Aug
-62 Is Apr
44 J 'ly
391a J'ly

Aug

78

31 Sep
160 Oct
73 Dec
10 Aug 27 la Jau'
63 Sep 1061a Feb
77 Oct 99i4Mar
125i8J'ly 151 Jau
16 J'ly 48 Jau
301a Oct 77\ Jau'
25i4 0ct
62i4 0ct

47 la Jau
8234
36I4
6II4

16 "a Oct
29 Oct
10 Oct

2 127i4J'lyl4 109 la J'ne
19 Jan 21
151a Oct

42 Is Jan 22
95 78 Jan 22

10HaFeb21 124i4Janll
3434 Feb 25 41
Jan 11
25

60
19

J'nel4
'8

Jau2t3

09

May 19 196 Jan 23
Mar 14 31i8J'lyl5

53'aMarl2

May

88
150
51

33 Oct
85 34 Aug
85 Oct

Jau
Jau
Jan

Mar

Jau
Jan
Feb
791a Feb
132 14 Feb
3018 Jan
"a Feb
11578 Feb
133 la Deo

m

341a Mai
Feb 25 2 178 Jan 8 17 Nov
Marl2 122 Jan 8 112=8 J'liMaylO 32I4 Jan23 19i3Sep

10l'-,,Mayl2 109 "a J'ly 6
5185 14

14278

29
135
110
118

1 138
6734

Feb
Jau
Jau

40 Mar
555 Apr
53 Jau
118 Feb
33413 Jaa
83 Jau
130 "a Jan
155 "a Jau
128 7e Jan

8»aNov
Feb 26 102 May
Jan 18 41 Oct
Jan 6 9434 Jau 21 83 Nov
Jan 4 701a J'ly 13 42 Aug

Feb

May

15^8
112^8

Jau
194 Jau
1976 Jan
36 Jan
1713 Jan
5934 Jau
9938 Jan
119 Jan
311a Jan
72 Jan
48 Jan
1831a Feb
2761a Jan
43 Feb
901a Feb
4714 Jau
2038 Jau
3934 Jan
90 Jau
19 la Feb
2938 Feb
42=8 Jau
74 Feb
6478 Feb
72 "a Jan
91 Jan
7434 Feb
209 Jau
85 Jau

J'ly 162

38
88

Mar 9 53 J'ly 12
Apr 23 14iaJanH

5

Micliigan Central

Jan

Oct 2001s Jan

117

17 Dec
51 la Dec

Jan 15 171s Jan 4

16

100 45

Jan

90 7^ Jan

Aug 183 14 Jan
Aug 194i4Jau

pref

(Chic.)

Jan

851a

63
24

I48I4

16iaFeh24 22 J'ly 13
31 Feb 29 43iaJ'ue22
lOiaJanll 1938Aprl2

Des Moines...

3714

Eriecfe Western...

N. Y. Central <fc Hudson.. 12,325
•28
200
30 N. Y. Chic. & St. Louis...
108 110
Do Istpref
•60
65
50
Do 2d pref
1891a
N. Y. N. Haven & Hartt.
29 14 3118 N. Y. Ont^irio <& Western. 101,900
5978 (513^ Norfolk&Westeru
16,810
"6>i
10
90
Do adjustment pref.
105 165 Nortliern Central
110
60
60
2,130
Pacitio Coast Co
*90 102
Do Istpref
•67
320
Do 2d pref
681a
118iall9i, Pennsylvania
191,060
*17
20 reoria<fc Eastern
•76
80 Pore Marquette
12
Do pref

•1891a

la

May24 77 Is Jan 22
837
Marl2 85 Jan 7
5,450 12534 Feb24 135 J'ly 14

118>aH9

05

1734

86
71
31

60
77

14=8 Feb 24
32 14 J'ne 1
87 Feb 27

127

18=8
3934
921a

110

28=8 29 1*
591a 60

100

6,435
40=6
7,770
Do i)ref
112,795
Missouri Pacific
931a
114 116
Nash. Chatt. <& St. Louis 1,100
1,400
at. of Mex, non-cum.pf
381a 3938
18
1,120
19
Do 2d pref

70I4

6934

38'-i
181-^

•60

820 48

Sep

J'ne 3

•77

18'a
3934

105

140
48
95

18'a

15'4Ai)r 6

13 la J'ne 1
J'ne
1,000 17 79 J'ne
7,630 149 Mar 12
2501a Feb 23
3,150 18 Marl4
2,610 64^2 Feb 24
19 la Jan
li8J'ne27
450
234 J'ue27
i',406 eoisJ'nelO
518 J'ne 3
300
575
934 J'ne 4
64,295 211a May 16
13,350 55 =8 May 31
5,570 33 Majl6
200 54 J'lyl5
72 Feb 23
40 May 12
170 Marl 7
1,400

150

126

II8I2II9I4
•27 la 30

291,

110
65

1034

91a

120
-42

9238 93 14
11438 1143y

114

•16
118
29 14
•108
*0O
190

936

140

•42
48
•77
92
70 14
69
1201212714

Feb

Mar24

May24
2.950 68iaMayl8
100 Feb
29

Feb

8514 Jan2
60 Sep 75 la Deo
}182 Janl. 5170 J'ly 5184 Mar
{135 Mar24 105 J'ly 138 W Jau

45 la Apr 7 62 Apr 12 48 J'ly
200 26 Marll 30 la Jan 25 23 la Nov
Lake
85 J'nel7 }95iaMay24 89 Nov
Do pref
5250 J'ly 1 527134 Feb 24 275 Dec
Li. Shore <& Mich. South'n
46 Mayl7 55 "a Jan 2 49 Dec
Long Island
Feb23 1161a J'ly 15 96 Sep
Louisville & Nashville. .. 39,237 101
Manhattan Elevated... 8,849 13934 Marl2 152i4J'lyl3 126i4Sep
Jan 21 70 la J'ly
etrop. Secur., sub. rec. 18,897 72I4 Marl4 92
87,149 10434 Marl 4 124 Jan 2 99 78 Sep
Metropolitan Street

Do

West Side El.
Do pref

•120
-42
•77
6934
70
125 He 126

'19034 ....

*66ia

50I4

8=8

36
40

J'ne 1

J'lyll

4

400 32

C.Ft.S.<feM.,tr. cts. ptd
So. vot. tr.
Do pief. vot. tr. ctfs.

115=8 Oct 13834

57 "a Sep 781a Jan
153 Oct 190 Jan
Jan 28 2714N0V 53 "a Jaa
1..

11

1,400

Fub
Feb

150

Sep 100

140

72

5165 Apr28
5iaMay24
870
410 13i4May27

Michigan..

Kansas City

68 14 Jan
166 la J'ly

Nov

,121

867bJ'iie2
l257eJ'ly

Jan 21
176 Jan
1234 Jan 13
261a Jau 15
738 Jan 4
3334 Jan 18
8O34 Jan 22
110iaMarl4
10 Jan 12
681a Jan 25
2838 Jan 22
1681a Jan 2
27534 Apr
2338 Jan 22
7478Jau22
24=8 Jan 22
1434 Jan 23
29 la Jan 25
67 la Jan 22
IOI4 Jan22
I634 Jan23
29i4Jan 2
6934 Jan 27
50 "a Jan 2
66 la Jan 27
72 Feb 23
54 Feb 3
186 Mar23
7973 Jan 7

1,400

pref

Kanawha &

'

1,855

owa Central

53

140
50
90

B

illinois Central

Met.

53

Atl..

Istpref

Evansv.

78

<fc

pref

Do 2d

381-.

51
175 185
185
*
74 *
74
I314 I3I4 •121a 13
67i.i
67
671a 6734
82=8 82=6
82
82
13438 136
135 135
1834 1334
18
191a
*384 37
•351a 36i2
•26
•2638 23
28
7034 721a
681a 72
22
22
22
22
43I4 43ia
43
43
•121a 13
•121a 13
'47
•47
52
52
•25
'26
27
28
•85
•85
96
95
•245
'245
•47
•47
49
49
I13I4 11638 115 1161a
151181521, 161 1511a
87 14 87 '8
87
8S3,
1153811738 116 11634
51

Do

J'ly
51.i5'aJ'ue2

1,100 86'8J'ne
10,275 109 "a Marl
64 Apr 29
800 1541a Feb 20
20,285 28i4Marl4
1,000 33 Jan 15
300 75 Jan _
5181 Jan 18
124 Febi:
9,360 12^8 J'ne 8
100 80iaJ'lyl3
950 47iaJ'ne 6
100 20 J'ne 6
146,097 137i8Feb24
735 173 Mar 4
11,661 161i8Marl4
1,146 207 Feb
5130 J'ne .
135 Mar22

pref

Do

130

51351a J'ne2

Chicago Term '1 Transfer

110

22=8

73
20
3

•31a
6378
7

64

22=8

llH'4Mar

Pittsb'g.

pref

4I4 Chicago

*49ia
21
I59I4 15973

6()=L

22=8
7234

221a

36

&

Book Isl'd & Pacific
St P. Minn. & Om

Chic.
Chic.

15

22
211a 21 Hi
1593b 159 15914
*268ia270
'270 271
271

I34I4I3412

I

,

....
....

15

741a 76
'105 110

7413

110
16

6618 671a
8234 8278

I

'J

125 la / mnadlan Pacific
66 14 vvanada Southern
166 Central of New Jersey...

140
180

Highest

Lowest

,

80=8 BufiCalo

i&H

16

'

434

51
190

&

3334 34=8 Chesapeake <& Ohio.
•3878 4011 Cliicago A Alton
84
Do pref

33=8

Highest

Jjovoett

200 26 J'lyl
27 Jan 22 25 Dec 41 Jan
386 {4934 J'ue
67 J'ly 13 .'i4iaDec 69 Jan
Uauta Fe. 120,1'J3 64 Feb
761a J'ly 13 64 Aug 89 7^ Jan
_
8,107 87 =8 .Ian
96'4 J^iieJ'.t
8438 Auk 103 la Jan
900 104 Feb 1 ll3iaJ'ly '•'' 106 ]»tc 126 May
AtlantlcCoast Lino BR,
56,716 72'eMarl
85'6 Jau27 7 1=8 Sep 104 Jau
HallunoroA OUio
405 87=8 Feb 1_ 94 J'lyl
Do prof
8234 J'ly 96 \ Feb
Urooklyu Rapid Transit
77,045 38 Feb 24 52 >4 Jan
2'JiaSep 71 •sFeb

Do

861a

125
66 14

40
80 14

84>4
941a
5034

83>4

•93

Hfiares

Knilroads.
Arbur

Do pref
76i« Atch. Topelca
95
Do pref

HHHallSia

Hange jor Year 1U(J4
Hange tor Prevxovt*
On basis 0/ lUO-share lots
Year (iy03)

01

the

Week

Chicago Burl* Qumcy..
•122
Chicago & East. ID., pref.
14i« 141a Chicago lireat "Western.
14
141a
•80
*80
8411;
84
Do 4 p. c. debentures
•62
•49
63
63
Do 6 p. c. pref. "A"..
•21
24
Do 4 p. c. pref. "B"..
221a 221a
146i4l477e Chicago Milw. & St. Paul,
14614 1473,
180 182 *179 182
Do pref
175 17534 17518176 Chicago & North Western
•220 225
224 224
Do pref

•6
-151a 16
418

30
59

9434

607,

•180
•122

....
....

§180 180
174i«176
222 222

133

70'«
9536
112^2
8338
9414

Sales

STOCK

EXCHANGE

Do

•

I318

•64

95 14
112 >a
83
•93

8O34

73
110

185

75V4

130
150

•25
•65
76

30
60

•65

5934

8634

74
731a 74
•106 110
'105
•16
-1534
161.
16
16
501,
5038
60
50
50
*21ia 22
22
22
22
159 15934 159 15934 169
270 271 *270 271 '270
2134 1\\
21=8 22
22
70'8 71
7134
70>a 701a
•17
*17
•17
20
20
2i8
2i«
•2
2ie
21a
43.
•3 la
*3ia
33.
•31a
eaia 63
621a 62 Is
631a
*6
*6
634
7
7
•11
12
12
12
12
24S8 251a
2434 2538
25h
6OI4 61
6018 61
6O34
37 14 38
3734
3714 371a
'50
•50
•50
55
55
'70
•70
•70
78
78
•40
•40
•40
51
51
72^4

105

•67

69

83=8

94
50

16

•36

•201a 21«8

8234

94

12438 12578
*657e 60

1334

140
180

1124

831,

25

761a
9538

STOCKS

NEW YORK

friday
July 15

Thursday
July 14

30
67

7538
95 14
1121a

130
160
868b 86 \

-80
84
•50
49
50
•20
•20
23
14518146 14 145
179 17934 5180
172 17238 172
217 220
220

133

•24
53

75'8

•122
•135

165

W»dneaday
July 13

27
53

4918 60',

C6
166

-On^B

351a 3576
•261a 28

•42

82
•92

8S34
12434

165

I'i

94^8 95 14

60^8

(•130
86 la 80->4
12434 laoH(
•65-4 06
;*164 166
3234

743(,

93

•115

*80

•24
•50

•llOis...
82 Hj 82»4

60^8

l •SS

July

25
25
•50
63
74>a 753^
95
90 H)

93

AND LOWUST SALE PRIUEH

T'ut.Bday

July 11

94

50\i

t

Monday

6

02

'1

90

J'nel4 109
Feb 24 61

Jan

2!5

47«feMay
28i2J'ne
156 Jan
45 Jau
100 Oct 118 Jau
60 Sep 87 Jau
nS7iaMay 225 14 Jan
19 Sep 3514 Feb
5334

Apr 12 85
J'ne22 190
J'ly 13

61i4Janl2 08 J'ly 12
llliaMarl2 123 „ Jan 27
17 MaclO 23 14 Jan 22
74i8J'=e 9 8138 Jan 23

Nov
Aug
Aug

7614

Feb

93 "a Feb
190 Aug

3934 Sep
72
80 J'ly 100
50 14 Aug 76
.1034

Jau
Feb
Jan
Nov .57'^ Jan
J'ly 39
Jan

15
74 Jlj- 91 la May
568 May 31 509 J'ly 13 574 Dec '76 Sep
•eiia 621a Pittsb. Cin. Chic. & SU L.
470 55 Apr 20 O634 Jau 22 55 Sep 94 Jau
J 62 '4 62',
'95
•95
-_
98
100 90 April 98 Jau22 90 Oct .15 Jan
98
Do pref
51 >a 6234
37 "a Nov 69 14 Jan
5134 62\ Reading, vot'g tr. ctfs.. 389,270 3834 Mar 14 6234 J 'ly 1
605 76 M:u 1 8334 J'ly 12 73 Sep 89^6 Feb
8J^ 83=8 •8314 8334
1st pref. vot. tr. ctfs...
57134 7134 «72'2 72^
1,015 55I4 Feb 25 72 "4 J'ly 8 5534 Nov 81 Jan
2d pref. vot'g tr. ctfs.
22 14 23 18 Bock Island Company
22 >< 22 '8
103,737 19 V Marll 2718 Jan 22 19 la Aug 53=8 Jan
66^8 0738 3:6534 06=8
pref
9,460 5734 Jan 6 6878 Jan 22 5534 Sep 86 Jau
Do
-25
•25
30 Apr 22 3812 Feb 9 30 Aug 72 Jau
85
35 Rutland, pref

BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES—BROKERS' (QUOTATIONS
Banks
NEW YORK

Mid

American... 476

AmerExch.. 215
Astor
Boweryll

775
325

Butch's&Dr 140

Ask
500
225
825

Banks

Bid

Ask

City ... .
t265
Coal & Iron. 160
180
Colonial 11 ... 450

£id

Fourth

210
380

Gallatin

Columbian .. 350 400
Gansevoortll 140
Commerce.. t207 t209 Garfield
500
GonsoUduted 150 165
German Am1| 155

C'ruExchgell 350
Century 11
Discouiitli ... 145
155
180
Chase
East River.. 150
600
165
Chatham
326 340
Fidelityll.... 180
200
ChelseaExcH 175
Fifth Avell.. 3500 4000
Chemical
4100 4300, Fifth
300
Citizens' Ctrl 140
First
160
'iOO
• Bid and asked prices; no sales were made ou this
1 Sale at StookExchange or at auction this week,
155

Banks

Ask

14thStreet1I. 300

German

400
165

Exi; 375

Germauiall

..

Greenwich

Moch

..

170
Hanover
500
Imp & Trad. 540
Irving
218

Ask

JSid

140
500
Liberty
950
Lincoln
Maiden Lauo 105
Manhattanll. 310
Market cfcFul 240
Mechanics'
250

530
1050
325
255
260

.

600

1|

Hamiltouli

Banks
JeffersonlJ...

270
525
555
i25

& Trail

Mercantile ..
Morcli Exch.
Merchants'..
Metropll
MtMorrisll..

(lay.
^ Loas thau LOO suaros.
s Trust Co. certificates.
h

;

Ex

130
245
170

12,->

237
160
175

ISO
426
230

376
215

rnjiiD.s.

Assessment

:i

Banks

NY

State banJts.

paid.

Hid

Ask

290
180 183
New Amster 400 410
New York Co 1500
Nat Ex. 195 210
Now York... 275 290
19th Wardll. 150
North Amer. 00 205
115
Northern
220 230
Orientalll
260
Pacilicli
170
Park (new).. 465
People'sli
270 .'90
Mntuallj
Nassaull

•J

—

a

Baiilu
Phenix
Plazivll

Hid
105
525

Ask
112
550
176
280

Prod Exchll 165
Riversidell .. 250
Seaboard
600
Second
600
Slioe& Leth. 130 145
1000
StateD
34th Street.. 195 205
12th Wardll. 120
23d Wardll. 125

Union Exchl; 165
United

Ex dividend and rights.

90
6

175
100

New stoclL.

t

—CoBcluded—Page

Stock Record

frpTULYlG, 1904.J

STOCSS—HIGHEST AND LOWEST SALE PRICES

-36
*]6
*60

July 11

38
20

72
47 i2 48
•iGo lea
12 •« 12%
3034 31
48^4
221^

48^4
23>4

8t)'8

88

25
122
-17>a 20
*24
25'i
38 1,
38
24'8

»121

*94i4

05h

in^j 91'8
93^4
•914

9334

47^4

4814
16^4

16^4

3412

•15

41

23
•17 '4
39 >Q
J

51

•iei4
73^4
Hj

•88

12'a

31
23 »8
88i«
2434

163
1214 12

481a

S6\
24 '(

20

H,

27'!/

90

•22
28
{19612 1951^
6
•5>s
•4
4's
21
21

2514

48^4
1634

22
1734

3938

230
5118 52

•518

}21i«

•6^

634

•6I9

•2634
•8

2714
9

•26''8

«28
20
•83

28
20
84

26

225
5U«8
1634

1713
75
2712

54>4

6414

63<

•61a
26^8
•838

5458

*72
*210

12
7534

75
220

•5
*48'4

•210

49
32 V*
64

9

9

7434

220

5

7

81='4

»

128»8 12912
•lOia 12
16^ 761a
7434

64
91a

114'2ll4'2
11
11
*68
70
*20>^ 22»4
158>alS834
•12
13
69
69

•84 Wi 3534
•30
33
{76S»
•7
46I4

31
76

10

7
46I4

46I4

99^

28
73
225
•16«8 18
•72
78

28
•71
•220
7

31
76

107

12

»16'12

\1\

•76 hi 78
•34'a 'il^
•8234 86
•34

38
21 h

46iii

95
129 H;
88

271a 271a
99 le
99
281a 291a

73
225
l»ia

75

•6«8

42

•76
•34

7

42
17
78

16
hi

•8234

36I4

86

II2

3734

7
10734
2412

23
95
129
88

73
•220
18
?75

7
4134

41

II412
1112
68I4 69
2118 2ll8
16814 15878
13
13
•68
701a
344 34>2

11

76iu

{lOT'slO^'e
2134 23 14
94
94
»125 130
88
88
28 ig
27
99^8

114

•25 Vj

^\
•107

8I4

8I4

6'8
8034

6'8

6

6^8
8034

7i»

6I4

•4
O^a
26I4
712
•261a
2OI4
831a
•3

6^8
26'4

•16
6438
9714

118

89

24

•991-1100

•210
•37

158
•180

215
88
158
195

4
18
5434
9738

120
95

1281a 12938

•127ial29
*10
*72

210

220

76

210
•5

•5
7
•48'a 4912
3134 3176

•484
3178

64

•

914

195
114

1141a 114»2
1118 III4
69 14 6914
2034

78

9478
8734
2734

70

75

7

75
10

4638

10

4618 4638
10734 107»4

23

12

36I4 361a
321a 32 la

301a 33

125

114

70

69

69
3534

-74
•7

9
19534

2II4
21
1587816014
1378
13

I314

3512

7
4912
3314

Ilia

2034

69

741a

220

70

157ial58i2

12'a

12
77

64
§9

93,

194 la 195

461a

IO8I4IO8I4
23"^ 24 14

24
95
130

9414 94I4
12934 12934
•87
88
271a 29

8842
27 3<.

9918IOOI8
9912100
29 14 30 >2
30ia 34
74
7434
74
741a
220 223 •220 222
1878 20 12
20
20 la
75 78
79
78
634
7«4
7
7
4234 43
421a 4278
16
16
161a 1738
•76
•76
78
78
37
36
361a 36
•8234 84
•8234 85
•114

II4

1^4
3734

3834

27

27

39
•2608

I'a
3934
27»2

Sia

109
718

49
49
109 12 JllOia llOia
738

71a
8238
6

58

J58

17

163*

17

08

683^
liij

68

68

1034
5838
2434

2434

534

82
6
68

68

43

•23

20I2
8312

73

17
lO^a

9

31

12834 12834

81

58 Sj 59 18
2334 25
•9912100
201 215
871a 87 12
157 la 160
180 195

5I4
434

2012

12

57

58

•leva 1714
•671a 68
lO's IIH
6818 58'8

6I34

2OI2

4

81
6

5-'8

40
230

18
76
•27I4 28
«88
88
•23
27
200 201

6'a

481a 4812
J108 109

110

*6«8
803,

•57

3734 38I4
•25'a 2713

15

•10
•76
73

*48ia 49
3214 3214
938

I718
36»8

12834 12334

7

I90MI9512 1941a 195

51 >4
18

63.

120
95
129
129

48

75

267g
9
*26
31
2018 2OI4
831a 8312

19
641a
971*

943,
337,

1818

3934

18

•3

2114
2538

44
24

225

51»8

•171a
5438

25
121

1734

17^8
3938

3

2714
9

513?
2378
8812

24

•518
6
4
?20i2 201a

6

2m,

97
97
97
120 120 *117
•89
•89
95
I28I4 12834 1281812876 12734
•127 4 129 12 129
•I0»a
47534

•14
•42

44
24

230

39

9I4 10

*47ia
16»4
351a

28
90
27
194^4 198

96 'e 97
120 120
89 95

J129'iil29><!

9208
9379

708

8318
OV,

68
45

•99 la 100

1718 1736
681a 6988
ll-a ll'e
6018 614
2434 251a
•9934 100

215
88
J88
157 la 157 12
180 195

201 215
87 «^ 8778
15334 159
180 195

llSg

60

201

Priday
July 15

40
•60

48I4

163
13
32

13
31
5018 507,
231a 243,
88 14 89

21

900
6,930

O.&E.T.comstocktrctfs
131a St. Louis Southwestern..

10(1
3,35(1

la

254 251.. Tol. St. L. & W. V. tr. ctfs
3714 3734
Do pref. vot. tr. ctfs.
{964 95 4 Twin City Rapid Transit
Do pref

3714

961a 9534

93 14

2(lpref
St. L.&S.Fr., Istpref....
4938
Do 2d pref

94%

97 7l

9309

94
914 10
•47
4H

94

161a
3579
?15l8

16»N
3618

17

42

44

•23
18

24

S9334

620
442,490

Pacific.

Do
Do

2,435

pref

Do pref
15
Wheeling <fe Lake Erie...
41 14
Do Istpref
24
Do 2d pref
18 Wisconsin Cent. v. tr. cfs

4118

•22
18

404

•3934

40

225

Do

pref. vot. tr. ctfs.
iVIiscell

Industrial

tor Year 1904
of 100-share lots\

&

Lowest

Range

for Previous
Year (1903)

Highest

Lowest

32

B'eb24

874 Feb 23
71

3979
9534

Apr 25
Jan 21

Marl4 97 '8 J'ly 15

x864Feb25 94 4 Apr
9 Feb 17
42 4 Apr 19
15 May 16

6

12

Jan 15
J'ly

6

Jan
3234 Feb24 41
Jan
14^4 J'ne i 19 4 Jan
400 414J'lyl5 5234 Jan
251 214J'ne29 2934 Jan
1,325 16 J'ne 6 2179 Jan
1,700 37 J'ne 6 47 79 Jan

27
25
22
22
27

1,825
10,710
115

Highest

Marl 5 14
Mayl7 45

Jan 23
Oct
7
35
Jan 19 32 Oct
16 Jfin 8 204 Jan 1
13 Oct
§61 Mar 1 570 Jan 28 68 Aug
-- ,
39i4Jan
49%J'lyl
39 Dec
150 J,-in 9 167 Jan 23 143 4 Sep
94.T'ne 1 I6I4 Jan 2
12 Aug
25%J'n6 1 3634 Jan 2„ 24 Aug
414Marl4 5214 Jan27 3309 Sep
18i4Feb24 24'>8J'lyl
164 Oct
77 4 Jan 6 8934 j'ly 1
69 4 Oct
90 Feb 25 92 Jan 26 85 J'ne
204J'ne 7 2734 Jan 2„ 20 14 Aug
115 Marl4 124 4 Jan 13 loo Oct
17i4 0ct
174J'ne21 22 Jan 2
214May27 29 4 Jan 2_ 15 Sep
9

48

loo

pref

Wabash.

I7ie
3638

36
{16

18i«

3934

Union

941*

1,245

1,400

UnltRysInv'tof SanFran

15'fl

?224 12 2241a

Istpref

32 7g
11,600
Do pref
5038 62
346,.t59
Southern Pacific Co
24>'6 Southern v.tr. of s. stmped 84,490
24
8834 8934
9,116
do
Do pref.
50
M. <fe O. stock tr. ctfs .
2538 2534 'Pexas & Pacific
8,750
97(!
120 121
i hlrd Avenue (N. Y.).
•2018 21 Toledo Railways & Light
800

25 Wj

25
87

50
1,000

31

93
S93
25 12
25
120>a I2OI2
•2018

Shares

St. Joseph <fcQr'd Island

Do
Do

Range
On basis

Week

1278

75

4778

the

47=8

40

IGO

Sales 01

STOCK

EXCHANGE

10
810
40 la 42
1812 20
•62
70

SO

38
95 Is 9534

28
•88
•23

90
27
195

•3
4
*17ia 19

54>4

2538
•3714

94I4

7334 75

30
20
83

20
83

21 14

2538

41

38^8 3934

192

25

120

9II4 9338
9378 94
•91a 10
4734 473^
161a 161a
35 »,
35
*14ia 16

94
10

17

23

88I4

21

94I4

35 1^
16

17
•721a
271a
•88

23 la

3714 38

38
94 14

225

16'6
73^4

4934

2412 2514
12134 121*4

44
25

•23
}17

4934
2334

23 Is
88
88 V

23 12

9mj 92 14

15

313,

Thursday
July 14

III2

60 72
471a 4734
•160 163
1234 13
3134 32 4,

12

3134

20
19
25 14 25 14

9334
*9i2
•4734
161a

39

17

155

121i8l2m
•37>4
9414

\\h

40
20
•60
72
48
471a

3134
49H,

4834

10

17

13

42

39 "f.

•10
•38

38
•16
•60

35

35
16
48
23
18

230

•225
51
27

10

38
20
70
4734 48
•160 163

Wednesday
July 13

Tuesday
July 12

Monday

Saturday
July 9

STOCKS

NEW YORK

199

2

2134

20
27

24
79
155
6534

I514

58
2479
"'

78
170

Jan
Jan
Jan
Feb
Feb
J'ly

Jan
Jan

30
66
68 14

Mar

3676

Jan
Feb

96

964 Mar
Feb
Jan
37% Jan
3178 Jan
48 Jan

430a
12379

Sep
Oct I2214 Jan
J'ne

51-5914

Aug

10409

Deo
Jan

83 4 Aug

95 14 Feb

9

Dec

35

J'ly

22% Jan
644 Jan
3234 Feb
55 14 Feb
274 FeU

lOOgOct
27 4 Sep
12

J'ly

Ma^
384 Feb
Feb
Nov 554 Feb

40 14 Not
20 Sep
144 Oct
33

62

291-4

64 {220 Feb
226 May] 2 {204 Jan 235 Feb
Express
5118 5334
524 533^
5334 J'ly 14
malgamated Copper... 223,910 434 Feb
3309Oct 75% Mat
17 '8 18
1778 183r
4,100 1434 J'ly
American Car & Foundry
21% Jan 27 1714N0V 4134 Jan
77
78 H
784 79
2,020 67 Jan
79 J'ly 15 60 4 Not 93 Jan
Do pref
27
27
(!28
28 American Cotton OU
410 24i4J'nel4 3278 Jan 26 25 14 Aug 46 14 Feb
•88
884 90
90
60 8834 J'ne 6 90 Feb 9 82 J'ly 98 Feb
Do pref
•23
23 27 American Dlst-Telegraph
27
23 Mar21 25 Jan 15 24 Nov 414 Jan
S20158 203 {200 200 American Express
86b 180 J'ne 2 5203 J'ly 14 171 Aug 235 Feb
514
514
534
5i4J'lyl3
6 American Grass Twine ..
84Febl5
1,660
6 J'ly 29% Jan
•4
*4
2i4 0ct
434
514 Jan 27
250
208 Jan
114 Jan
40t. Amer Hide & Leather
2II4 2II4
21
21
21i4J'lyl5 10 Oct 37% Jan
546 11 4 Jan
De pref
6O3
9i4Jau 2
64 64 American Ice
(3%
445
6 4Mar24
4 Oct 1134 Jan
•25
26
26 »8 26«8
717 2414 Mar24 364 Jan 4 164 Oct 4214 Jan
Do pref
912
11 American Linseed
840
91a
7 J'ne 2 12 Jan 22
5 J'ly 1934 Jan
26
26
30 Mar21 234 Not 484 Jan
50 22 4 J'ne
Do pref
2034 21', American Locomotive...
201a 2078
7,410 16 4 Jan 6 23% Feb 16 104 Oct 3109 Feb
84
85
87
2,265 76 4 Jan 6 87 J'ly 15 674 Oct 9534 Feb
841a
Do pref
•3
4
4 American Malting
24J'nel6
434 Jan 22
2 4 Mar
5 4 Feb
"600 16 J'ne 3 22 Jan 14 144 Sep 244 Jan
*16ia 19
17
1734
Do pref
56 "4 56 Amer. Smelt'gifc Refln'g. 15,943 46 Feb25 56 J'ly 15 3634 Oct 5279 Feb
541a 5534
9838 984
9714 98%
5,822 8834 Jan 6 9878j'nel3 30i4Oct 99 4 Feb
Do pref
•118 130
11978 119''6 American Snuff
300 110 Jan 21 120 Feb29 90 Aug 126 Mar
•89
•89
95
95
93 J'uel4 80 Sep 98% Jan
85 Jan
Do pref
12334 12908 129 13034 Ajnerlcan Sugar Refining 47,995 122i4Mar 7 13109 Jan 25 1074 Oct 134% Jan
128 130
12841284
pref
420 123 Jan 4 130 J'ne23 116 Aug 123 DeoDo
5129 12914 129 13018 Amer. Teleph. & Teleg...
1,130 121 Feb 16 131i4J'ne29 117i4 0ct 169 Feb
11
11
li
12
12 4 Jan 11
100 10 Jan
American Woolen
74 Oct I408 Feb
77
76
77
77
415 69 Jan 25 77 J'ly 14 65 Oct -SO Jan
Do pref
76
73 la 76
76 V Anaconda Copper
61
Feb 20 80 4 Apr 12 58 Oct 1264 Feb
3,200
•210 220 • 210 220
185 Mario 227 Mayll 170 Sep 225 Jan
r)rooklyn_Union Gas
•5
*5
7
7
508May24
7 Jan 26
5 Oct
uns w. Dock <fe C. Imp'
154 Jan
4779 Feb 19 49 79 Mar 7 40 Aug 55 Jan
481a 49 X; 4834 494 Butterick Co
32
31
33
327,
25 4 Marl2 344 Jan 27 24 Not 824 Jan
Colorado Fuel<fe Iron...
6,800
64
64 CJ Do pref
63 Apr 6 65 Jan 27 65 Dec 122 Jan
9'4
978
914
914 Col. & Hock. Coal <fe Iron.
8 J'ne28 I634 Jan 26
9 4 Not 22 4 Feb
1,285
19334 L9614 I93419414 Consolidated Gas (N. Y.).
5,302 185 Feb 8 2104Apr2U 164 Aug 222 Jan
*113'2ll4
114 114 Continental Tobacco, prel
930 1014Jan 4 1144J'ly 9 9434 Aug 119 Jan
lHa 117« *114 12 Corn Products
934 May 9 22% Jan 25
154 Not 35 Mat
1,870
70
7014 «71
71
Do pref
1,952 65 Mar 9 74 4 J an 23 60 Not 85 4 Jan
22 Distillers Securit's Corp.
211a 214 21
960 19 4 J'ne 9 26 4 Jan 21 20 J'ly 3434 Jan
160 L6O34 I6O34 163 General Electric
6,670 cl51 J'ne20 I7OI4 Jan23 136 Sep 204 Feb
13
1334
I314 13 7«
nternatlonal Paper
9 J'ly 1978 Jan
6,90G 10i4May26 14% Jan 25
69
69
69
69
820 64 4 Feb 9 70% J'ly 7 67 4 Not 744 Feb
Do pref
*36
3634
364 364 International Power
800 26 Mar ] 36 4 J'ly 13 23 Not 73 Jan
•31
324 Internat'l Steam Pump..
451) 29
J'ne 7 40 Apr 7 28 Dec 46i4May
321a •31
*75
•76
80
80
Do pref
410 714Feb 9 78 Apr 7 70 Oct 89 4 Jan
•6I2 10
10 Manhattan Beach
64Mar21 8 Apr 19
13 May
170
6 4 Sep
4638 464 National Biscuit.
{4634 4534
2,335 36 Jan 4 46 4J'ne25 32 Oct 47% Feb
10734 LO8I4 10734 IO8I4
Do pref.
253 lOOViJauie IO8I4 J'lyl3 94 Oct 10678 May
23
24 National Lead
27,140 14 4l!'eb25 24 4 J'ly 11 104 Not 294 Feb
231a 24
•93
93
95
93
Do pref
670 804Jan26 96 J'ly 11 75 Oct 95 Feb
125 L30 I25I4I25I4 New York Air Brake
40U 120 Feb25 13934 Jan 22 105 Oct 177 Jan
3514 8-34
87 4 88 North American Co., new
1,550 30 Marl2 90 Jan 26 68 Sep 1244 Jan
28I4 28 14
28
284 Pacitlc Mail
4,110 24 Feb27 3314 Janl8 17 Aug 4234 Jan
99 14 LOII4 10041014
3734 Sep 108% Feb
eop. Gas-L.cfe 0. (Chic.) 23,880 9234 Marl2 10209 Jan 23
32 14 321. Pressed Steel Car
321a 3312
8,015 24 14 May 16 34 J'ly 13 22 4 Nov 6534 Jan
76
Do pref
741a 7512, {76
1,773 67 Maylb 754 J'ly 14 62 4 Not 95 Feb
2211422114 222 222
Pullman Company
325 209 Marl4 222 J'ly 15 196 J'ly 23534 Jan
1934 20
20
20ifl
all way Steel Spring...
3,300 16 MaylS 244 Mar 2 16 Sep 37 Feb
•75
t>
78
78
78
V/Do pref
610 7134 Marl 6 79 J'ly 13 67 Not 90 Feb
7^4
714
714
5% Not 22% Feb
74 Republic Iron & Steel ... 2,400 6 May 16 334 Jan 25
4234 4234
4218 43 14
Do pref
5,185 37 Mayl3 49 4 Jan 23 3634 Nov 80% Feb
1738 1734
1779 18
12 J'ly 30 Feb
Rubber Goods Mf g
1,660 1434 Apr 16 22 14 Jan 27
•76
7714 78
78
Do pref
200 7434 Jan 15 7934 Apr 4 60 J'ly 844 Feb
*364 37
loss-Sheffield St. & Iron
•361a 37
1,300 31 4 Jan 7 4134 Aprl2 22i4 0ct 72 Feb
844 84 4
3434 85
Do pref
300 77 Jan 5 85 J'ly 14 67 Not 97 4 Feb
•lis
{1»8
34 Mar 4
34 Sep
64 Feb
17eFeb24
14 Standard Rope <fe Twine..
124
1«R
38 '8 39
3808 39
Tenn. Coal, Iron &
7,270 SlOgMayie 41 4 Apr 7 25 '8 Not 68% Mat
26 274 Texas Pacific Land RR...
27
27
200 25 MaylO 29 Jan 22 22 Aug 40*4 Jan
Trust
5I4 Jan2u
6
4 Mar22
4 4 J'ly 15 Jan
«4
35
Union Bag<& Paper
45 Feb 24 53i4Jan 4 5734 Dec 7934 Jan
Do pref
64Mayl6 84 Jan 21
6 Sep 16 Feb
834
{74
U. S. Cast I. Pipe & Foun.
435
«83t
Do pref
700 40 Mar24 50 J'ly 6 33 Not 55 Feb
109 112 United States Express...
110 110
530 100 Feb 24 1104 J'ly 13 95 Aug 50 14 Feb
7*2
738
64May27 8I4 Jau25
6 Sep 15 '4 Feb
74 708 United States Leather
12.040
"
84I4
83 14
82*4
834
Do pref
6,695 7509Jan 4 84i4J'ly 16 71 4 Oct 9634 Maj
714
608
714
714 U S Really cfeConstructlon
4 Dec 284 Jan
9% Jan 21
6 4 Jan 15
6,641
6II4 614
59 'g 61
Do pref
2,638 40 Jan 14 63%May23 3014 Not 73 Jan
49
50 U S Realty <fc Improve'nt
3,954 43 J'ly 13 50 J'ly 15
451a 49
1739 17% United States Rubber
1738 1738
7 J'ly 19 4 Feb
1,320 104 Feb 6 ISI4 May 4
69 14 69 Hi
69 '8 7034
Do pref
3,667 41 Jan 4 7034 J'ly 15 3014 J'ly 58 Feb
1134 12
1139 12
8%Mayl;i 12% .Tan 2 10 Not 3979 Feb
United States Steel
88,332
60 14 61ie
60 4 60 7e
Do pref
221,800 51i4Mayl3 62 4 Apr 7 4934 Not 8934 Jan
25 18
25
25 4 25 4 Vlrginla-CaroUna Chem..
5,130 2234 J'ne29 34i4Jau25 17 4 Sep 66% Feb
9934 100
•99341004
Do pref
97»8Aprl6 106 14 Jan 26 80 Aug 1284 Feb
•201
205 •201 '210
200 J'nelO {212 Jan 6 {191 J'ly 249 4 Feb
Wells, Par^o <fe Co
8734 88
3734 33
est'u Union Tele'gpli
2,008 85 May 19 3934 May 9 80i4Sep 93 Jan
158-'4 I5914
I5914I63 West'gh'seEl&Mfgassen
4,160 153 May 2 17379 Jan 21 130 Oct 221 Jan
180 195
Do Istpref
180 195
5180 Apr 21 194 Jan 19 160 Sep 224 Jan

230

Adams

84

.

3

ti

64

S

"

BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES— BROKERS' QUOTATIONS
Bid

BanlcH

Wash.H'htsIl 200
WestSidell.. 500
Yorkvlllell

..

BROOKLYN

375

Ask

Bid

Banks

Ask

BIIOOKLYN
Maiiufaclrs'.
Mtichanicsll
Mercliants'..
Niussau
Nat City
.

North

Sidell.
I'cople'sll

355
275
130
400
300
225
290

Trust Cos.

Bid

CITY
Bankers' Tr. 280
Howl'gGroeii 200
Broad wayTr. 145

Ask

310

C'lH'lyB&Tr 4S0
Central Tr'sl 19 10

Trust Co'h

ParmLoATr
Kitth AveTr

N. Y.

Bid

Ask

1300 1375
525 550

(iiiaranty 'rr 575

150

GuanUan Tr 165

500
1980

Kiiick'rb'k'r 900

175

Lincoln Tr... 335

Manhattan

Trust Co's

Bid

Ask

N Y Ltfe&Tr
N YSecfcTr

1000
010
242
325
325
440
1350
365
1425

Ask

1030

North Amer.
Real Eat Tr't
StandardTr'l

Tr Co o( Am.
Union Trust

Trust Co's

Bid

BROOKLYN
252

nrookyn Tr 390

420

200
320
290
Ilaniillon
400
Kings Co
1, I.sl l.ATr. 280
250
Nassau

340
300
435

Fl;itl)usli

450
1400

franklin

470 500
USMtg<fcTr
.>90
BoronghD
135
17th Wardll. 155
(Jolouial
MiTcantllo .. 975
150
290
H75
1025 Unit States
265
Broadwayll.. 300
Spragiio
.Morcbauts'.. 200
('(inimonw'tl;
22(1
190 210
Van N'denTr 196 200
Brooklyn!) .. 110
325 .i5(*
Venule's
vih" Sluyvcsant" 190 210
Ka.stern Tr.. isV)"' 1S.>
Motropolit.an 590
Washington. 390
610
Con'ylifcUB' 140
Willlamsb'g. 210 22&
Unionl]
Kiii|nro
MortonTrusI 875 890
160 175
Wiiulsor
225 275
160
First
360
Wallaboiitll
.Mut.Alliancc 200
155
H(|UitableTi 650
700
220
Bid and asked prices; no sales on tliis day. i l.cis tliau loo .snare:*, t li\ rights, c Kx dividend and rights,
1 Sale at Stock Exchange or at auction this week,
u Kx stock dividend, « Trust Co. certifio-ites.
U.inlcs in^krkod with :i p.^ragraph (H) are State banks
(.'ity

Trust... 265

275
300
70

..

.

.

',1

New York

Exchange— Bond

Stock

V.

>;.

BO MIS
STOCK EXCHANGE

WiiKK Enliimi July 15

J^tce

«

Ask Low

Bid
11

t>

V

S

U S

V
US
VS
U
i>

.S

S
S

'U

U

U. S. (aOVCrilllll'llt
28 consul registered. rflOSO
(0930
2s Coiisol coupou
28 coiisol res .siimll..ril9;!0
28 coiisolcoui) small. ((IDliO
lcH)iH
38 registered
fcl918
38 coupon
3s rei; small bonds. .tl9lH
38 cou small bonds. ./tTJl^
/tl907
48 registered

U S*8 coupou

U 8 48

U

105 107>4
105 "4 106 '4

105%

105"
106% Sale

106^4
10534 108

105:'4

May'lM

ii),'5-'','ii)7'^

106''(,

loG'V

106 '4 108 '4

lOO'* 106''4 106% 106%
131 "i 132
132%May'04
132 Hi 133 "a 133 J'uo'04
110 ...
11134 Mai'04

192r)

192
Pliilippiue Islands 48.1914-34

106% 108
132%132'e
132'-il34
11134 11134

(jiovei'iiiiiciit

Fraukiort-on-J^Iain SHzs ser 1. .VI. S f95
t these are price s on (he ba
93 '4
Japanese Go^'t Gs ctfs full paid Oct
100^4
Hepub of Cuba Hs ctfs lull paid
99^4
2ft mslal paid for 5s of 191)4. Sep
*96^2
a ot Mexico s t k 5s of 1899

H

t1

IStnte Securities
Alabama class 4 to 5

A

190U
190U
190U
Currency fuudiug 4s
1920
Blstof Columbia 3-65s
1924
Louisiana new oousol 4s.. 1914
Small
Missouri funding
1894-1995
Korth Carolina consol 48.1910
1919
68
SoCaroUua4i28 20-40
1933
Tenn new settlement 3s. .1913
Small
VUginia fund debt 2-3s... 1991
68 deferred Brown Bros ctfs.
Class
Class

10508 Muy'04
106"<
106^4
107 J'ne'02

'.'.'.'.'.'.

B5s
C 4s

tiese

t95>.2Feb'02

,

sis ol

are pr

J-J 102
J-J
J-J '100
J-J
F-A 120
J.J 102 14

foxcr

marks

to o

93
101
lot

128

ne do liar.
9234 93%

59

98Hil01

Sale
93%
Sale lOOSj
IO0I4 99 Si

"-.2

130

M»y04

1:99
Lces

n

102^4

t/ie

1
'isi-s

May'04

.

98% 101
98% 100 Hi

0/

$5

to

a.

10234 10234

109 14 Oct '00
102><2Mar'O2
111 War'02
121 Mar'03
102i4J'ly'O4

.

102>4l05

109»a*eu'99

J-J
J-J
A-0

102

J-J
J-J
J-J
J-J

101
101
136HaJ'ly'01
120 Mar'Ot'

95I2.

94

96
93HiNov'03
92 14 Mar'04

,

97

3514

97

91 ii "9214

J'ly'04

7

102 Hi

lOl

96

.

9434
7

6H2

7

ICailroad

Alabama Cent

Hee So

Ry

laba ilitU See At Coast Line
Albany & Susq aee Del & H ud

Allegheny Valley AeePennKK

AUeg & West See Butt R P
Am Dock & Im See Cen t of N J
Ann Arbor 1st g 4s
/i.l995
<fe

Q-J

AtchTtfe SFegeng4s...l995 A.-0
Registered
1995 A-O
Adjustment g 4s
7il995 N^ov

;il995 Xov
Stamped
/il995 M-N
East Okla Div 1st g 4s.. 1928
Clue & St Louis 1st 68. .1915 iVI-S
Atl Knox
Nor Ist g5s..l946 J-D
AtUintic Coast Ist g4s.?il952 M-S
Ctiaxles& Sav 1st g 7s..l93b J-J
^
fiav F <fe
1st gold 63.. 1934 A-0

95 Sale
102 "a Sale

94

9434

94

95

8v!

9214
96^4 Sale

MS

&

W

latgold 5s

A-O

W

Al-N

1934
Ala Mid Ist gu gold 58 1928
Brims &
1st gu g 4s 1938
SU Sp Oca & G gu g 48 1918
Atlantic & Danv /See South By
Atlantic & Yadk See South Ry
Austin <fe N
See Sou Pacific

J-J
J-J

3P

Jun &

PLE&

?i.l925 l^-J

?il948

A-O

?i,1948

y-j

1911

iVI-S
iVI-N

M DiT Ist g 3 11281925

W Va Sys3ref 4sl941

SoutUw Dlv

g

Ist

"28...

Registered

M-N

94 7g
94 Ha
95 14 May'04
103 « Sale 103
I0314
103
103
98
98 J'ne'04
goHi
91 J'Iy'04
98 14
98
98^4 98
91

14

Monon Riv 1st gu g 58.. 1919 F-A 108 14

CenOhio R 1st cg4'2S.. 1930 ,U-S
Pitts Clev cfcTol 1st g 63 1922 A-O
Pitts & West 1st g4s... 1917 J-J

X7I4

Hi

94I4

82 Hi 82 Hi
87 Hi 92%
92 >4 97 H=

105 Hi Mar'04
108 J'ne'04
119Hi Mar'04
98 J'ue'04
100^4 Feb '03

.

108

.
.

95
94 Hi.
.

Wall 1st gug 58. ...1943
Roch<fe Pitts 1st g Us. ..1921
Consul 1st g 6s
1922
JBuUalo <Si Southwest See Kvw
Bull & Susy 1st ret g 4.s.(il951
-Bui- Cedar R & No 1st 5s. 1906
Con 1st <& col trust g 53.. 1934
Registered
193-1

'ORIEciiN Wl8tgu5s.l921

u-s

A-O
J-D
J-D
A-0
A-O

.

119

.\-o

Balti

Imp gu 6s..l9'21
Hud li gengugSs 1920

99UJ'ly'04

01 '8 104 Hi 101H2J'ly'04
119 J'ue'04
II6I4
120Hi Mar'03
110
110 Hi J'ue'04
1

103% Sale
109
105

Sale

I0314
10734

107

107

103%
109
107

92 Hi

92 Hi

Registered
1939
General gold 4H28
1992
Registered
1992
Craig Valley Ist g 58
1940
A Div let con g 4s. .1989
2d consol g 48
1989
Warm Spr Val Ist g 58. .1941
Greenbrier Ky lstgug4s '40
Cliicfc Alt RR ref g 38... 1949
Railway 1st lien SHjs... 1950
Registered
1950
Chic B & Q— Ch<fe laD 58 1905
Denver Div 48
1922
Illinois Div 3H28
1949
1949
Registered
Iowa Div sink fund os.. 1919
Sinking fund 48
1919
Nebraska Extension 4s. 1927
1927
Registered
Southwestern Div 4s
1921
Joint bonds See Great North
1913
Debenture 58
Han & St Jos consol 6s. .1911
Chiccfe E lUlsts 1 cur 68. 1907
1934
1st consol g 63
General cousol 1st 58
1937
1937
Registeretl
Chic & Ind U Ry Ist 58.1936
Chicago & Erie -S'ee Erie
Clue In & Louisv ret 6s. ..1947
1947
Refunding gold OS
Louisv N A & Chlsl6s.l910
Ghic Mil & St Paul cou 7s 1905
1914
Terminal gold 5s
General g4s series A..el989
Registered
el989
General g 3 His series B.cl989

&

Chic<fe
Chic<fe

P Wl8tg58

Dak & Gt So g 58
Far & Sou assu g 6s
Hast<fe DDivlst78

112
93

96Hi

92 14 95 14
10014 103 Hi
100 103
98
97
87Ha 91
92 Hi 98 14
87I4

92I4

105H2lOoHi
108 108
119Hil22
98
98

Ist 5s

1910
Mineral Point Div 58
1910
So Minn Div Ist 68
Southwest Div 1 St 6s. ... 1909
Wis& Minn Div g5s.... 1921
Mil & No 1st
L 6s.. ..1910
1913
Ist consol 68
1915
Chic & North w cons 7s
1886-1926
Extension 48
1886-1926
Registered
1987
General gold 3 HiS
«1987
Registered
Sinking fund Gs... 1879-1929
1879-1929
Registered
Sinking fuud 5s.. .1879-1929
1879-1929
Registered
1909
Debenture 5s
1909
Registered
Debenture 5s
1921
Registered
1921
1933
Sinking fund deb 5s
Registered
1933

108

108
,

110^4 Sale

78
79
40 Hi Sale

116Hi Mar'04
IIOS 111 '4
107 J'ue'04

70

^1

79

38H2

42

Hi

••Slfcel

I

100

<fe

M4s
N4s
P4s
Chic R

1915
1916
1918
I <fc Pac RR 43. .2002
Registered
2002
Coll trust gohi 5s
1913
Choc Ok & G gen g 5s .01919
1952
Consol gold 5s
DesM<fc FtD l8t48....1906
1905
lst2H28
Extension 4s
1905
Keok & DesM l.st58
1923

A-O 105% Sale 105% 106%
J-J
78% Sale 78
78%
109 J'ne'04
J-J 106%
M-N '100% 107 100 Mar'04
F-.^
107% Sale 107% 108
b'-A
90 % Sale
90%
90%
J-J

82% Sale

82%

82%

J-1)

J-J
V-O
J-J
J-J

J-J

ID

96%

96%
J'ne'OO

115
116

*.Xo price Friday; latest price this week,

103

Nov'Ol

109

100

I-

A

96%
95

J-J

Bway<fc7thAvlstcg5s 1943 1-D

963,

on

.Nttxt

Hi

105%

Sale

103
112
10034

Hi

96
,

10J%

Mig/l

04

28
104

28

11%
12

J'ly'04

03

78%

8334
10434

02

,

93% Sale

102

102 Hi

1

0434

104%

10434

02

105

13

Apr'Ol
May'03

99%
94%

100>4
J'ly '04

79

2

110

Apr '02
Apr '00
102

91

90%
0934

00%
03%

1043,

Dec '03
Feb '04

10034

05%

105%J'ne'04

1414 11434 114

00
05
14

J'ne'04'

J-D
X-O

06 Hi 107

105%J'ne'04

33

129

Apr '04

.\I-N

.M-N

17'4
15Hi

J-J

15

J-J
J-J
J-J
J-J
J-J
J-J

11 634

130

14%

J'ne'04

09%.

29

Dec '02

28>4.
12

05%

J'ly'04

120
113

109
175

116

111%

.

J«n'04

12%
26%
11%

111%

J'ly'04
Ai)r'04
10934
10934

08
69

09 4
07 14 10914 10934 .7'ne'04

n

0734

09

07%
09%
97%

109%J'ne'04
98% May'04
116% Apr'03
116 Apr'04
110% Feb '04

98
1334
I6I4
10 -.i 112

14%

15%
09%

11434 J'ly'04
11134 J'ue'04

09'8
27I4

1434
0934

137%J'lv'99

1434

11734

04%

May04

16%

Mar'04
Mar'04
113% Oct 'Ob
107 May'04
110% 110%

06

112
114

0934

106
69

69

1

12

06
1034
0934
1334

Hi

0634

10%

May04
114
112

11%

112

Al-N
C^-F

9834
9834

14

115% J'ne'04

F-A

16
29 130
03 Hi
03

FA
A-O
A-O

14%
27%

104%J'ne"04

0234

102%.'Vlay'04
9834
9^3^

02%
96%

103
118

Nov'9S
lis

11%

lll%Dec'03
10

A-O
M-N
M-N
A-O

05
03

110
107
104

09

J'ne'04

08%

Mar'04

06
04
04

104% J'ne'04

107

09%.
08%.
16%.
14%.

Mar'04

07%

108% J'ue'04
10834 Jan '04
118

0834

15%
14%

118

114%J'ne04

.

02%,

106

06'4.
0534
10

105% May'04
105% Nov'03

05%

10934 J'ne'04
127% J'ne'04
11734 Mar'04

09%
26%
17%

.

.

28

.

19%.
29%.
03%.

F-A

M-N
J-J
J-J

103
109
125

''2

21%:::::: 120
Oii4Sale 104
107

J-J
J-J

M-N
M-N
M-N
M-N
M-N
M-N
.M N
M-S

97
96
93

97

90

92
71

Sale

7034
7034

7934 Sale

81%

81

103%,

M-N 104%

Nov'02

142% Feb '02
13134 Dec '03

3214.

J-J

J-J

1034

J'ue'04

128

118

.A-O

81%
74%
99

102

96 H,
.VI-

1434

00%

9334
93%
90% Apr '04
10934 Apr '04

10
02

,VI-K

09%

100%

106% Oct '02
90% Dec '03
85%
85%

78 H2 Salt"

g 6s. .1925 M-S

".J

108

87 Hi

fit

Ashland Div 1st
IOU4 103%
Mich Div 1st g 6s
1924
Convertible deb 6s
1907
115Hill9
Incomes
1911
llUHillOHi Chic Rock l.sl di Pac 68. ..1917
Registered
1917
General gold 48
1988
102
106
Registered
1988
104% 109
Coll trust Senes C 48 .. 1905
105 107
1910
H4s

10334 112
105 Hi 107
126 6534 79 Hi
239 28
42

111%

11834 118
11834
11834 11434 J'ue'04

97
105

A-0
M-N
M-N
7s. .1907 F-A

97 Igloo's

106% 108
IIOHIIS

102I4

llOHi
10034

Mo Minn Isl
Milw& Madison 1st 6s.. 1905 .M-S
1910 M-S
North Illinois 1st 5s
Ott C F & St Paul 1st 5s 1909 M-S
Winona & St Pet 2d78..1907 M-N
Mil LS& West 1
g 6s 1921 M-K
Ext & Imp s fund g 5s 1929 F-A

I2IH2I2IH2
121 1« 124

93

18

92% 92%

J'nc'04

110% May'04
118

M

ll3Hill7%

90

13(J

Low

Hj

107Hi.

D Exten l8t78
D Ist 5s.. ..1919
Lacrosse
9278

Jiiuh JVo
28 155
24
92 % May'04
104 Fcb'u4
102 J'ne'99
103 J'ly'03
13^i4J'ly'04

103i4J'ly'04

Hi

101

1921
1916
1924
1910
1910
1908

life

20

Low

111%

loviHiSalc

LSuDivg58....1921 J-J
Mo Riv Div 5s. ..1926 J-J
Pac Div 68
1910

MISCKLLANEOUS BONUS—C^ontiniicil
UiiiUvay
Brooklyn Rap Tr g 5s
1945
2002
Ist refund conv g 4s
Bk City 1st con 5s. 191 6, 1941
Bky Co <fe S con gug 53.1941
Bklyn Uu El Ist g 4-5s.l950
Kings Co El 1st g 43.. ..1949
Nassau Elec gu g 43
1951
City & S Ry Bait Ist g 5s. 1922
Conn Ry<k Llst<fe relg4%.s '51
JDcn Con Tr Co 1st g 5s. ..193:)
Den Tram Co con g 63. .1910
MetRyCo 1st gu g 6S..191
Uet Cit SlKy lilt con g 03.1 90."i
Gr Rapids Hy 1st g 5s...al916
Louis Ry Co Isl con g6s..l9:ii
JMarketStORy Isl g 63.. 191.
.ilet St Ry gen col tr g 53.1997

103

R&

112%112«
109
93

Range

100

Chesifc Ohio g Gseer A../I.1908
Gold 6s
al911
Ist consol g 58
1939

99

91

<fe

107
118

Jaiiiuiry 1

.S'ee

'

94H2

Since

Last Sale

lUHillS

>),;

Le&
Leh & Wilks B Coal 58. .1912
Con ext guar4Hi8
f/1910
N Y<fc LougBrgeng48 1941
Cent Pacific
So Pacific Co
Chas & Sav See Atl Coast Line

Chic

80

BCR<fe>;

Ohio
Cen RR & B of Ua col g 5s 1937
Ceutof Ga RR 1st g 53..;)1945 F-A
Coueol gold 53
1940
Kegistered
1 945 .M-N
Islprel income g 6s
2)1945 Vict
2d pref income g 5s
501945 Oct
<Vee

.

97

Cen Branch U P Ist g48... 194b J-D
Cen Branch Uy See Mo Pac
Central Ohio

103 Apr '97
121 Hi Mar'04
124 May'04

122 Hi.

J-J

1927 J-D
190b J-J
v^2a 6s
1913 ,V1-S
Registered
1913 .VICarb & Shawn See 111 Cent
Carolina Cent See Scab Air L
Carthage <fc Ail See X V C <fc H
-See

115 Hi 117 "i 117'8J'ne'04

F-A

ilifc St List gu g78
''anada South Ist us

CedRIaF&N

Am Dock

Des

ilO
122

J-J

Week's

Range or

S.\

ol Qa,—( Continued
Bid
Ask
3d pref income g 58
27 Rale
pl945 Oct
*
Chall Div iiurmon g4H.1951
«2>4
Mac & Nor Div Ist g 58.1946
103
MkI Ga& AU Div 58. ...1947
100 Hj
Mobile Dlv l8tg58
107
1946
Cent of N J gen'l gold 68. 1987
13JH2
Registered
1313^
/tl987

Chictfe

<S'ee

Cl&

.-f

9934
91^2
90^4 J'ly'02

Sale

1'20

J P M & Co cerlfs
Bal Creek & S iSee Mich Cent
Beech Creek >See N Y C & H
Bellev & Car See Illinois Cent

,

101

99

9214
97H?

91 Hi 9434

1925 J-J

& Montauk
Long 1
& West See Atl Coast L
Butlalo N Y & Erie See Erie
Butlalo R & P gen g 5s.. .1937
AU & West Ist g 4s gu..l998

96Hi

109
114H2 0ct '02
9834 Sale
98 Hi
99
132
126 Hi 129 Is 125'6Nov'03
11314
11288 Jan '04
112 II311 112 Apr '04
94
93
93
97
91HiOct'03

?il925

Bklyn
Brims

91^9 951,
98'8 lots

94 14
Hi*an '04

92

ENDINO JCLY 15

<fe

W
Balt&OIiiopriorlg3i2S.1925 J-J
Registered
Gold 4s
Registered
Conv deb 48

95

102 Hi 103
101 HiJ'n6'04

Registered

JVice

July 15

STOCK EXCHANGE Zt

VV'EKK

No Low Jiigh Central

104^, 106
106 "i Sale

S 4s coupon
ForciK'i

Jiiffh

1

104^4 105I4 105 May'04
104\ I05I4 lU6i4 Mar'04

/il907

re;?istered

N. Y.

Since

January

Weekly and Yearly

i'a<;es

UONliS

Range

Week's
Jtange or
Last Sale

Fridav
July 15

Record, Friday,
folk

ot;cui*viN<;

81

Apr'04
Sep '03

21%

Feb '04
104% 31
Jan '03

01

20

97

97

96

97

Mav'04
May'04
May'04

96
93
90

93

90

71%

66%

7034
8I34
Jan '04

7034

7434
70»4

73

85

104%
103% Jan
95% Oct

,

03

J'ne'04

104% 104%
103% 103%

'04
'03
"03
'04

J-J
J-J
J-J

96
94

A-O

106%

A-O
M-S
M-S

92%
91 Sale
90%
91% 47 69
117% 118% 118% 118% 1 115%119
114 116%
116
115% May'04
9434 190 93% 96
94% Sale 9334
121 J'ne'04
116 121
117%

.

90
98

,

9434

,

Oct

Jan

93 »4 98
104% 10634

10634 J'ly'04

i'aae.

Streot Uailway
99% 106% Met St Ky—ft'oiuUef g 4s2002
C0I& 9lh Av Ist gu g 08.1993
72% 80
Lex A V <fc P F 1st gu g 53 1993
107% 109
Third Ave KK con gu 4s 2000
100
100
Third Ave Ky Isl gos.. 1937
100 108
82
90% MolWS ElCChic) Istg4s.l938
Alil El Ky & L 30-yr g 53.1926
79% 85
Minn St Ky Ist con g 5s. .1919
90
97% St Jo Uy Dt llitP 1st g 5s. 1937
.St Paul City Cab con g 5s. 1937
Union Kl (Clue) Isl g 6s. .1945
United KRs Sau Frsf 48.1927
United Kys St L l.st g 48.1934
\V Cliic Si 40-yr cons g 58.1936

J-J
J-J

FA

94

J'ue'04

J-J

104%.

106
110

J'ue'02

J-J

110

110

J'ly'04

F-A

MN
A-O
A-O
J-J
M-N

1

80%
79%

Sale

Oct

94

95

110

110

'99

09% Dec '99
80%
80%
8034 J'ue'04

266

75% SO^e
80% 81

Mar'98

Uns and Electric Light
110
116%
112% 116% .\tlanta G L Co Ist g 5s...l947 J-D
Uklyu U Gas 1st con 58.194.")
115% 116
112% 116
Duo Aug
a Due Jan d Duo Apr e Duo .\lay j/Duei'ne /t Due J'ly
l'

A:

,

99

..

11534

Due Oct

Dec '97

115% J'ly'04

p Due Nov

112% 115%
« Option

sale

1

July

Bond Record—Continued—Page

1G, 1904.J

BOND?*

l^xce

Choc

W
0& Gull'

Siiice

Last Sale

BiO,

jls/c.

J-D
J.D

1S3

1321a

M-N

130^4

131

93

JJ

129

1293,
I23I4

,

A-0

12Sh

J-J

73
112

Q-M

6eeCKI&P

73

Sale
1

,

St

Low High
130%

133»4

Doc '03
Feb '04

Maro4

12934 12934
120 1231a
721* H234
110 IIII4

123 V
74

Hip Apr '04

II314

II3I4

101

113

<fe

J-J
J-J

M-N
M-N
M-S

Istg
1940 J-J
W W ValDlvconsol48....19*20 M-N
6s.
C St L C
I

<fe

l8tgold4s

fcl936 Q-T
7^:1936

Q-F

con Istg 5s.. 1928
1914
I consol 78
1914
Consol sink iund 7s
General consol gold 6s. 1934
Registered
1934
Ind Bl &
l8t pref 48.1940
Ind<fe
I8tpt5s...dl938
Peo & East Ist con 48. ..1940
1990
Income 48
CI Lor & Wli con Isl g 58.1933
Olev <fe Marietta See Penn RR
Clev <fe Mahon Val g 58... 1938
Olev <fc Pitta See Penn Co
1947
Col Midland Ist g 4s
Colorado <fe Sou 1st g 48... 1929

J-J

Registered

Cln

S<fe CI

CCC&

W
W

Coluui

&

Greenv See So Ry

J-D
J-D
J.J
J-J

^

lOlia

100 h; 100
100
100
98 Feb '04
100^8 102
100^4
10034
99 Jan '04
95
102 Dec '02
94iaAug'03
91
105
105 Jan '04
102 "2 Sale 1021a 1021.^
101 Hi
111 114 II514 J'ne'04
120 J'ly'03
127

128

Del Lack

Waco

&

AC
Q-J
AG

99

J.J

114>a

104iaNov'0I
99

Apr 61
A-O 112

Sale

116

60

Sale
8438 Sale

J-J
F-A

993fc

17

61159
112>aPeb'04

Feb '04

SSVz

78... 1907

M-S

Morris<fe Essex 1st 78. ..1914 M-N
1915 J-D
Ist consol guar 7s

1915 J-D
2000 J-D
1st ret gug 3'28
N Y Lack & Ist 6s. ..1921 J-J
Construction 5a
1923
Term & improve48
1923 M-N
Syr Blng & N Y let 78. .1906 A-O
Warren 1st ret gug 3 Hjs. 2000
Del & Had 1st Pa Div 78.1917 M-S
Registered
1017
Alh& Sus l8t con gu 78.1906 A-O
1906 A-O
Registered
Guar gold Bs
1906 A-O
Registered
1906 A-O
Rensife Saratoga let 78.1921 M-N
Registered
1921 M-N
Del Riv KR Bridge See Pa RR
Denvife R Grl8tcoug4a.l936 J-J
Consol gold 4i«2S
1936 J-J
Improvement gold 5s. ..1928 J-D
Rio Gr West Ist g 48. ...1939 J-J
Consol and col trust 4s 1949 A-O
Utah Cent Istgu g4s al917 A-O
Rio Gr So gu See Rio Gr So
Deu & S West geu s t g 5s 1929 J-D
Des Moi & Ft U See C R <fc 1 P
Registered

W

FA

FA
MS

W

Des M & Minn See Ch <& N
Des Moi Un Ry 1st g 5s. .1917
Det M & Tol See L S & M So
Det & Mack Ist lien g 4s. 1995
Gold 48
1995
Det Sou 1st g 48
1951
Ohio Sou l)iv 1st g 48. ..1941

Dul&

Iron Range 1st 5s.. 1937
Registered
1937
2d 68
1916
Dul So Shore <fc Atl g 58. .1937

8434

Minn SeeStPM&M
Ten Va & Qa See So Ry

11208 Jan'04
128iaJ'ne'04
128^8 J'he'04

lll^a.
12834
.

1

29

>2

126»4

.

140

.

12814
11434

101

12934 J'ne'04

114i2J'ly'04
103iaJ'ly'04
109^8 Feb'04
102 Feb '03

103

107^8

135S8

13334 Mar'04

.

134 "4.

1391a.
9959 Sale

105
1041a
IOOI4 Sale

97%

89

88^8

Jau '02

24

Elgin Jol & East 1st g 58.1941
Elm Cort <fe No See Loh & N Y
Erie Ist ext gold 4s
1947
2dextgolir68
1919
8d ext gold 4>2S
1923
4th ext gold 58
1920
5th ext gold 4s
192»
Ist consol gold7s
1920
1 St consol g fund 7s
1920
Erie 1st con g 4s prior.. 1996
Registered
1996
ist consol gen lien g 4s.. 1996
Registered
1996
Penn coll tr g 4s
1951
ButlN Y<fc Erie lst7s.. 1916
Butl& S
gold 6s
1908
Chic & Erie Ist gold 6s.. 198
Jen RR Isc gu g 5s... .01909
Long Dock consol g 68. .1935
Coal<feRR 1st cur gu 68.1922
Dock & Imp Ist cur 6s. .1913
N Y & Green L gu g 5s. 1946
K Y Sus <fc Ist ret 5a. 1937
2d gold 4'2S
1937
General gold os
1940
Terminal Ist gold 5s... 1943
Regis §5,000 eacli...l943
MidKRotN J lstg(is.l910
Wllk<fc Ea Ist gug 5s. 1942

99 14

111

W

41

W

36

921a

114

45
661a 84
10934 1121..

110

130

1311.2

OS's

J-J
J-J
J-J

85

F-A
J-D

94
125

J-J

1133,

J'no'04
Ma5'(t4

M-N
A-O

llO^eSale
103
133^2
116 11818
IIOI4II5
110 ....
IIOI2II5
99 101
102 "a 106

J-J

M-N
J-J

F-A

96'al00i4

11

Sale

86 14

Sale

la

8534
9334

i-j

85

Feb

981a

84

8714

8534

io'i

'04

981.^

853,
951.

95 1< 151 H834
125i4J'uo'04
1251412514
119»8

106
132

119\

116

120

Aug'02

Apr '04

132

130

11714 J'ne'04

1131a 11834

113i-,Nov'03

108 la Jau '04
111

'108

J'ly'04

la

1081a

09

la

11

1

9934 J'iie'04

9934 10138

11334 ....

102 la J'ne'04
113iiiJan'04

101 la 104
113iall3ia

AO

IIOI4

11084 May'04

J-D

108

FA

M-N
M-N

2d gold 58

1941 J-J

North Ohio Isl gu g 6s. .1945 A-O
L Sho & Mich S See N Y Cent
Lehigh Val (Pa) coll g 58.1997 M-N
Leh Val N Y 1st gu g 4ias.l940 J-J
1 940

111

UOialll^B

107iaJ'ne'01

il06ial09

Ist consol gold 4s

General gold 4s
Ferry gold4i2S
Gold 4s
Unitied gold 4s

Debenture gold 5s

N
N

l8t58

KdEUUBku SeeKCoEL<fep
Ko E lU Se« N Y G cfc E L H & r
Kg G L N Y 1st con g os. 1 932 M-S
Kq G & Fuel See P G <fc C Co
Uu8<& Elec BorgCoc g5s.l949 J-D
.

5534

54

96 14 Sale

9534

106
112

64

J'ne'04

65

17334 102 171>8 17334

96 14
J'ne'03

Nov'03

8

9534

1938
1922
1932
1949
1934
1949

J'ue'04

107

107

105 Mar'Ofi
103ial04ia 104 la 1041a
78
83
78 J'ue'04

10234 108

71

10214 J'ne'04

1021a....

971a Sale
9739

103

9634
9534

103

Sale

10734 Sale

105

*

la

10912
'

78

101341031a

9S3e 1212
153
98

103

901^.

90
102

98^
98

106%

1031a 110»8
1051a 1071a

10734
IO714
1051a 1051a
10014 Apr'04

L00i4l00'«

115 Apr'04
ll3iaMar'00

115

IOII4 Apr'04

116
100 14 102

ioi'iiioi'i^

115

94 Mar'03
Oyi^Oct'Oo

98
10134

1031a
9438 Sale

106
Oct '01
May'04
101 Apr'04
1061a Mar'03
943,
94

110

1

105
102

.

102 la 106

10234

,

103 14
100

102
101

7934.

94I2

9314

9314

23 May'99
85 la Mar'04

80
"93"

9414 J'ly'04

101% Oct

100 Nov'OO
107 14 10714

I'il

1'24 la

9934

.

101
95«8

851a
"o'iia

106-% I0714

Apr'04
Nov'98
Nov'03
11934 Mar'04
93=8 May'04

.

1031a

'99

10618.

1241312412

90
119

1201a.
II9I4
,

93
103 14,

118
87

11934

98%

102 14 Dec '03
101 Mar'02

106 Mar'04
1061a
106 106
10438.
107 la Dec '02
98I4I
la
.-01
98
98
98 101
120 S-- 120
Sale
120
llS5pi2l
9934 Sale
9914
993. 104
97 100
<

70 Nov'03
110 J'ly'04
87 la J'ue'04

66
73
110
87 la

1911

NorShB Istcon ggu58ol93'2
Louisiana <fc Ark Ist g 53.19'
Louisv ifc Xaahv geu g 68.1930
193^
Gold 5s
UuUied gold 4s
1940
Registered
1940
Coll trust gold 5s
1931
5-20-yr col tr deed g 48.1923
E H <fc Nash 1st g 6s
19111

io9 % 112"
89
85

MUwaukee Gas L

112

108

107% 108 la
14

no

.

,

107 14
961a

llliall2
10434

107%
108%

105

105

107
92

107
93

107

Jau '04
May'04

nek J'ne'04

119

100»8 lOO's

116

II6I4

100

99I2

99
101
10134 100

109
103

Q-J

991a

98

10034

Feb '04

101

101%

Oct '00

101% J'ly'04
110

96'6lU134
110 no
10134

J'ue'04

100%

101 la J'ly'04

1081a.
1071a.
10034

.

05 14 Mar'03
112 Mar'02
112 la Jan '02
112 la Apr '02
103% 103 "a
118
118
1

.

.

M-S
J-D

117iall8

M-N

114
100i4Sale

M-N
A-O
J-D

11012 1121a

100«8 J'ne'04

MS
MS

J-J
J-J

711a

115iall9%

Feb'04

107i4Miiy'04
1081a 1081a
105 Jan '04
ll3'8J'ne'03
109 Hi Oct '99

107
93

99

105
lOX

no

31

119% J'ne'04
11 21a Apr '04

1191a
110 116
llOia

102
114

71 14
71
63 Oct '00

711a

U Ola Dec '03

2;i
1

1001410,!%

II514II8

98 102
lOl'sK'l^s
109 113
113411434 113 J'ue'U4
9s %
199 96 14 99%
99 Sale
99
la J'ne'04
111%1H%
111
112
IOOI4
100
I01%j'ne'04

I'ase.
liiulit

Ist 4s.. 1927

M-N

Mm Fuel Gas Co See Peop Gas
NYGELllAPg 6s. ..1948 J-D

Purchase money g 48... 1949
Ed El 111 1st conv g us. .1910
Ist consol gold 5s
1995
N Y&Q Kl L& P 1 St con g 5«1930
N Y di Rich Gas Ist g 58.1921
Poo Gas & C 1st gu g 68. .1904
2d guar gold 6s
1904
Ist con gold 6s
1943
Rofunding gold 5s
1947
90%
98

J-D

71

M-b
J-D 101
M-S
J-D
M-S lOlia.

y B<S;MBl8toong58l936 A-O
Y& R B Ist g5s 1927 .M-S

(•nn and Klectric

173% Sale 172%

/il931 Q-J

Guar ref gold 4s
Bklyndi Mont Istg 63. .1911

»llSt;EL.l.AMiOUS BONU!»—Contiiiuetl on Next
<»aM niid Electric Li((ht
Buffalo Gas let gos
1947 A-O
Ch G L & C Co See P G & C Co
Consol Gas conv deb 6s
1909 J-J
Con tias Co See P G & C Co
DetroltCity Ga8g58
1923 J-J
Det Gas Co con Ist g 68...191S FA

J-J

Long Isl'd— Ist con g5s./il931 Q-J

Aug'03

99
981a
981a Jau '04

101*8

M-N

City Sou Ist gold 3s.. 1950 A-O
Registered
1950 A-O

Leh VTer Ry Istgu g 58.1941 A-O
Registered
1941 A-O
Leh V Coal Co 1st gu g 53.1933 J-J
Leh&N Y Ist guar g 4s.. 1945 -M-S
113 116
Registered
1945 M-S
El C & N 1st g Ist pf 6S.1914 A-O
114 114
Gold guar 68
1914 A-O
11238 1133.
I0«l4lll
Leh & Hud R See Cent of N J
111 11412 Leh & Wilkes b See Cent of N J
Leroy & Caney Val See Mo P
13116 I3518 Long Dock See Erie

111
100
1017eJ'ne'03
13434 13534 134 J'ue'04

JJ

107

.

K.

Kan

lllSs

Ill

J'ne'04

11334

10234

TalH<feH of 1882 1st 58.1913 A-O

94I4

37

J'ly'04

113H.
10878
112^2

10534

SeeSoPacCo

Kentucky Cent See L <& N
Keok & Des Mo See C R I <fe P
KnoxvUle <fe Ohio See So Ry
991a 991a Lake Eri6& Wlstg5s..l937 J-J

Jan '04

M-N
M-S
M-S
A-O

1211

lOi

P
Mar

Fla C <fe Penin See Sea Air Line
Fort St U D Co 1st g 4ia8.1941 J-J
& Den C Ist g 6s. ...1921 J-D
Ft
RioGr 1st g 4s.. .1928 J-J
Ft

Registered

Ul'8114'2 111

116

KC&MR&B SeeStL&SF
Kan & PacUio See M & T

24

75I4
701a
lllSg J'ne'04

7514 Sale
lllKi

Low HiuH

J'ne'04
1053,
J'ne'02

10534 10534

St

<fc

See Pere

W
W&
/>alHar<fcSA

High

112

103
106

M

Feb '01

116

AO

M

120

1171,

Since
Janiiari/ 1

M

99 13 May'04
92'aJ'ly'04
4034
41

116

J-D

So See Ch

Georgia & Ala See Sea A Line
Ga Car & Nor See Sea A Line
Georgia Pacitlc See So Ry
Gila V G & Nor See So Pao Co
OSShIOI's Gouv & Oswegat See N Y Cent
9934IOII4 Grand Rap & Ind See Penn RR
98
98
Gray's Pt Term See St L S
9934 10234 Gt Nor— C B & Q coll tr 48 1921 J-J
1921 Q-J
Registered, h
99
99
Greenbrier Ry See Ches & O
Gult&SIl8tref<fctg5s &1952 J-J
105 105
Han&StJo SeeCB<feQ
ousatonio See N Y N H & H
100 la 1021a
Hock Val Ist consol g 4 las. 1999 J-J
1999 J-J
110iall5>4
Registered
Col& H V Ist ext g 48.. 1948 A-O
Tex See So Pac
Houst E <fc
Houst cfe Tex Cen SeeSoPacCo
128 128
Illinois Central let g 48. .1951
1 Registered
1951
1951
Ist gold 3ia8
09T(
Registered
1951
95
1951
Extended 1st g 3ia8
58
65
1961
112'all2ia
Ist gold 38 sterling
1952
CoU Trust gold 48
Registered
1952
116 116
gold 4s.... 1953
1953
Registered
56
63
1950
Cairo Bridge gold 4s
82
891a
Louisville Div gold 3 las. 1953
1953
Registered
Middle Divreg58
1921
1951
St Louis Div gold 3s
Registered
1961
1951
Gold 3ia8
1951
Registered
11238 11258
Spring Div 1st g 3ias...l951
1271a 1291a
Lines Istg 4s. .1951
western
128'8l33
Bellev&Car 1st 6s
1923
Carb & Shaw Ist g 48. ..1932
Chic St L <fc N O g 5s.. .1951
127 12934
1961
Registered
111141151a
GoldSias
1951
100141031a
109 '8 109 '8
Registered
1951
Memph Div Ist g4s...l951
13334 1 37 14
St L Sou Ist gu g 4s. ...1931
Ind Bl & West See C C C & St L
1935
105 ig 108
IndDecfc
Ist g 58
1935
Ist guar gold 5s
1960
Indlll& la Istg 4s
104 106
Int<fe Great Nor Istg 6s.. 1919
103 103
2d gold 5s
1909
3d gold 48
1921
Iowa Central 1st gold 5s. .1938
Refunding g4s
9634 IOII4
1951
IO414IO4I4 Jefferson RR See Erie
S
103 1061a Kal A & G R See L S &
an & Mich See Tol & O
94 101
See St L <fc S F
83
891a K C Ft S &

May'04

M-N

M-S
M-S

&

linttfePereM

C

24

98
09
92"a

J-J
J-J

36

"i
101 128
88 's
6

97

J-D
J-D
J-D

A-O
A-O

Apr '04

May'04

99=8
{'S^f
I0414 J'ly'04
lOeVa 1061a

|i"argo
I

Ask Low

Bid

Penn Co

W

14334 Nov'02
1471a J'ne'02

M-N

MS

J'ne'04
J'ne'99

103

.

.

88
90

Aug'Ol

149
106
122
104

107'8.
10618.
10458
10468.

140

Oct '98

li'^ast of

XLiast

See

LNO&Tex

60

84

M
See M K & T

Western

Pitts

W

Mar'04

W

<fe

&

<fe T H 1st cons 68.1921 J-J
1942 A-O
Istgeneral gold 5s
Mt Vernon 1st gold 6s. .1923 A-O
Sull Co Branch 1st g 5s. 1930 A-O
liv cfe Ind Isicon gu g 63. .1926 J-J

Range

Range or
Last Sale

W

95

Col & Hock Val See Hock Val
Ool Conn <fe Term See K &
Conn <& Pas Rivs 1st g 48.1943 A-O
& Gt So See C <fe St P

Dak
alias

Fi'iday

July 15

1111411314

<fe

1939
Cairo Ulv Ist gold 4s
Cln W<fe MDiv Istg 4s. 1991
col trg 4s. .1990
StLDiv 1st
1990
Registered
Spr&ColDiv Istg 48. .1940

Krle

I

<fe

<fe

13334

I3014I31

104 la Deo '03
113 Oct '00

IOII3.

L C 6ee G C C St I,
Cln S & C See C C C St 1j
Mali See B R & P
Cleartleld
St L gen g 4s 1993 J-D lOHiSale
Clev Uin C
I

High

1

Week's

iYice

STOCK EXCHANGE
WEEK ENDING JULY 16

N. Y.

Evans

Oin H & D consol s t 7a...l90o A-O
19;" J-J
2d gold 4112S
CinD<fe 1 1st gug 68. ..1941 IVI-N

C

Low

January

201

2

JJO.NDS

Range

Kange or

July 15

6VeAtcUT<fcSaFe

ChiCifeStL,

Chic St L <fe N O Sec 111 Cent
Chic St L & Pitts See Peuu Co
Chic St P M c& O coil 0s...l9;S()
Cons 68 reduced to 3 vs.lit^ii
ChStP& Minn IstgOs I'.llH
Nor Wisconsin Ist Gs-.-lDSO
StP& SCity Istg 6s. ..1919
Chicago Ter Trans k 4s. ..1947
Chic<fe West Ind gens (3s <?1932
Mich See Pere Marq
Chic &

WeeK's

f'ridav

STOCK EXCHANGE
Week Ending Jcly 15

N. Y.

H

1

F

M

A
K

8G34

00% 90

108% 109
96

104%

90%

108^8

95 '8

Sale

lOS'e

96

90

10534 104'8J'U"'04

J J

118

120%J'ne04

F A

I0514

101 May(i4
100 Mar'oi
lol%J'uo'(M

MN
M N
J D

98
101«9
1013(,....

.

101%

101

87% 90%
lonf-^

"h

109
96

102% 105%
'4 120%
1
100% 102
1 r.

100

100

101% 101%
101
103
11834 124

124
r24
61 % Oct '01
A
124
104
deb g 3%8..1942 F-A
103
103 Apr'04
90
M S lO.-i
90% J'ly'04
88
Ist g 68. ..1915 FA
109%J'iu>'04
106% 109%
10734 Dec '00
ChG-L<fcCkel«tgug58 1931 J J 10.)%
Hudson Co (ias Ist g 5s. .1949 M N '105'
lO.'">%May'u4
104 106%
Coil G Coot Ch Islgu g68.'3( J B 105% 108
105 J'uo'04
i 03 'si 05%
Kings Co El L& Pg 5a. ..1937 A O
Mar'04
101
101^4
101
Eq Gcfc FChl8tgug(ls.l905 J J 101%
Purchase money 68
1'2(>
105 Apr'04
106 105
1 997
122
Mu Fuel Gas Istgu g 58.1947 M N
120%J'ne'04
117% 120%
Ed EUlBkn Istcon K 48 1939 J-J
9418 J'ne'04
92% 96
93^ 94 -V .Syracuse Lighting Istg 5s. '6 J D
pacG MLotStLlatg63.el919 Q-F lOH Sale 108
109 Feb '01
106 10H14 rreuu>u G & El Ist g 5s. .1949 M &
108
'MeprloeFriday; lat«8tbidanda8kedUilsweelK. sDaeJan b Due Feb dDaeApr eDaeMoy /iDueJ'ljr /tDueAug oDueUct gOueDeo fOijtIonsale

Oi'u Electric

Ur

RapG LCo

AO

Bond Record

202
KONDS

Price

<fe

1931 M-N
J-J

6s....lfi:i()

2il stoltl

I'.Wt) J -J

Peusacola Div gol<168...1020
1921
St LDlv l8tgold68
1080
'idgoltl 3s
Homier B(tKPlHt8fK68. 1031
KciituckrCcnt pold 4»..1087

M-S
M-S
M-

M
J-J

L<feN&M&Ml8tg4Vj8l946 M-S
Lit N-South

M Joint 48.1052

J-J
1052 J-J

HogiHtereil
Flaifc H Istgii K 58. ..1937
Pens
Atl l8t Kii g 6s. .1921

N

F-A
K-A
&
S & S Ala con jni g 5s. .1036 F-A
1010 A-0
Sink tuiKlgoldGs

L& Jell BdgeCogug4s..l045 M-S
L N A & Cli See C I A L
Mahon Coal i>e« L S & M 3

AC

anhnttan Ryconsol48.1990
1990 «, S
Registered
Metrqpol El 1st g 6s. ...1008 J-J
Coloniz g 58.. ..1034 J-D
Man S

W

McK'pt&BV

See

N

J-J
J'ly
J'ly

High No Low

Ask Low

108i<Jan'03
126 "u 123»4 J'ly'04
12234 Auk'03
116 ...
11638 Mur'02
122 Apr'04
1211a...
74>2 75 J'no'02
106
113 Nov'OO
9939
99
09
107
107>-iJ'ne'03
94 Sale
92
94
107
126

117

4 Sale

11712

1167g 115
114'4..112

106
98

...
...

1

Jligfi

122

110

FA

M-S
M-S
J-D

110
9SiaJ'ne'04

62
14

92 Hi 95
88

West Shore

94

Lake

1171a

115
116

911a

984

10 101 Hi 106 12

I0714IIOI8

105

MS

Minn Un See St P M &M
Mo Kan & Tex Ist g 4s.. .1990 J-D

Wa

K&

MK&TofTlstgug5s.l942

Sher Sh & So 1st gu g 58. 1943
1906
Missouri Paoillc 3d78
1920
1st consol gold 6s
Trust gold 5s stamped. al917
Registered
al917
1920
Ist coU gold 5s
Cent Br Ry let gu g 48.1919

F-A
M-N
A-0
M-N
F-A
A-0
M-S
J-D
M-N
M-N
M-S
M-S
F-A

FA

Leroy&CVALlstg58l926 J-J
B of Mo l8t ex g 48.1938 F-A

Pac

2d extended gold 53... 1938 J-J
St L Ir M<fc Sgen con g 5sl931 A-0
Gen con stamp gtd g 5s 193 A-0
Unified & ref gold 4s. .1029 J-J
Eiv & & Div Ist g 48.. 1033 M-N
1933 M-N
Registered
1st g 5s. 1926 M-S
Verdi V I <fe
Mob <fe Birm prior lien g 5s 1946 J-J
1045 J-J
Mortgage gold 4s
MobJ&K Cist cons g 5s. 1953 J-J
Mob <fe Ohio new gold 6s.. 1927 J-D
Ist extension gold6s..A1027 Q-J
1038 M-S
General gold 48
Montgom Div l8t g 5s.. 1947 F-A
St L <& Cairo coU g 4s..el030
1931 ?:!
Guaranteed g4s
& O coll 48 See Southern

W

M

Mohawk & Mai SeeNYC&H
Monongahela Biv See B & O
Mont Cent See St P M & M
Morgan's La & T See S P Co
Morris <& Essex See Del L & W
Nash Chat <& St L 1st 78.1913

1928
1st consol gold 58
Jasper Branch 1st g 6s. .1923
& Alls! 68.. 1917
McM
T & P Branch Ist 6s.... 1917
Nash Flor & Shef See L <& N

MW

J-J

A-0
J-J
J-J
J-J

1951 A-O

Se«NYNH<fcH

NJJuncRR See NY Cent
New & Cin Bdge See PennCo
N O N E prior lien g 6s pl915 A-0
N Y Bkln & Man Bch See L I
N YCent<ft H Rivg 3^28.1997 J-J
<fe

Registered
Debenture 68
Registered

9614. ..

91,

230

60
12
6

711a

96

1634
93,

142
11238

99 H2 Sale
80^2 Sale

103 Sale
83
84 "2
102
89 Vi 93
110

120i2Peb'04
121
Jan '02
116 J'ne'04
96I4

96I4

98

80
102
821a

108

Sale

108
92
100

109

10834

06
100

I03I4

108
lOSTg
J'ly '04

May'Ol

11334 May'04
11634 lieVj II634
10934 Oct '03
8934 Sale
80
90

96

96

754

95 12

.

81

08410438

83I2

103i8J'ne'04

05

116
98

834

80
102

102
90

3

1064111

1940 ?:^
1940 J-J

1051
let g 3 48
1952
Bat C <fe Sturl8tgug38. 1989
Y <fe Harlem g 348. ..2000
Registered
2000
North Ist g 58.. .1927
R
O con I8text58./il922
Oswe<fe R2dgug58...el915
R W<fe O T R l8t gu g 5s. 1918

N

NY&
W&

8713.

125 I2712 12334 J'ne'04
121 Apr'04
1181a
9412 J'ly '04
95
Ill
II312 May'04
O212
92 12
921a Sale
06
98iaNov'03

12979
1131311514
113
112
II314 11534

FA

F-A
J-J
J-J
J-J

91

la

Sale

90
10519 108
10339
10712

1014

1044
1204
1174

114
121
139

9.-J

98

10034

98

9841014

Feb'02

Nov'03

127
125
113

IOII4 160

Jan '03

IIII4

109'% Apr'04

1214

122 Jan '04
127 J'ne'02
106 14 J'ne'04
106 4 Nov'OO

121
10334

104 14 Apr'04

1044

.

101

1044
Mar'04

109'%112i4
122 122

10541064
"964 974

113 1154
^1541174
11634 11634

104

104 14

10234 10434

101

101

1234.

101 Tg

Id's

13134 Apr'03

IOII4.
10034

iOl^g Apr'04

101

.

103i4Sale

W

1114 1124Apr'04
M-N *
130 Aug'03
M-N 1274...

A-O
J-D

9934 J'ne'04

9334 Sale

J-J

1084

M-N

101

Q-J
Q-J

103

W

Q-F
Q-F
J-D
J-D
F-A
Q-F
P-A

10418 Sale
74^8 76
7134

1124 J'ly '03
1054Apr'04

90 Si
9119
91 Jan '03
105 ig J'ly '04
102 Mar'04

10041004
10038

86
86
80I4

934
914
914

104

1064

102

102

964 Nov'03

10541084

95
84

J-J

11034

90
1134 May'04

110
109

110 J'ly '04
108 4 J'ly '02

110

110

See

1084 J'ly '04

105

110

Sale

102 4 J'ne'04
102 Apr'02
108
108

108

108

10534 J'ne'04

105»4l084

100
90

.

Mo Pao

Sink fund subsidy g 68.. 1910 M-N
Ist g 44s. 1921 J-J
Registered
1921 J-J

Penn Co— Guar

Guar 348 coll trust reg.1937 M-S
Guar 3 4s coll tr ser B...1041
Tr Co certif'8 gu g 34s. 1916 M-N
C St L & P 1st con g 58.1932 A-O
Registered
1932 A-O
CI <fe Pgengug44sserA.'42 J-J
Series B
1942 A-O
Series C 348
1048 M-N
Series D348
1050 F-A

gug343 B.1040
1040
C
N&C Edge gen gug 44s 1945
P C C <fe St L gu 4 48 A. 1940
Erie<fe Pitts

Series

.

J-J
J-J
J-J

A-O

1042 A-0
Series B guar
1942 M-a
Series C guar
Series D 4s guar
104r> M-W
Series E 3 4 guar g.
1940 F-A
Pitts Ft W<fc C I8t73...19i2 J-J
. . .

2d78

1»12
/a912
3d 78
Penn RR Ist real est g4«.1923
1005
Consol sterling g 6s
Con currency 6s reg...<7l905

BONUS—Continiiecl

12241224

J'ly '99

00

85" "96"
1134

111

Un Pao
Un Pao

.

99410118

7238
97=8

J-D
Q-M

113

100

994101!%

6834

132

A-O 106

9934

874 94

97»8

1224 MaT'04

11341134 Panama Ist s fund g44s.. 1917 A-O 1024.

953410134
OOTg
98
100 10238
10034 lOO'g

9934

7238 J'ne'04

11034

113i2J'ne'U4

31

1124

90 1014105
1044 105
104 4 J'ly '04
101 104 4
75I4 i26 704 764
744

125
119

113

103 4
78

94 i27
934
107 4 J'ly '01
101 J'ly '04

97»8Jan'04

964

W

ac of Missouri

111

127 Nov'03
F-A 1234.-1314 132 4 J'ne'04
12541324
A-0
lOlV 129 9641014
A-O 101 14 Sale 101

Oawego & Rome See N Y
120 1244 O C F <fe St P See C & N
1104115
Pao Coast Co 1st g 5s. ...1946 J-D 109

100
73

1034 17 10041034
Dec '03

<fe

W

113

IO314

100

'03

<fe

hio River RR 1st g 58.1936 J-D
General gold 6s
1037 A-O
Ore <fe Cal See So Pac Co

J'ly '04

Sep

J-J

108
105

014

102

92
9718 Sale

10241024
1104

Nov'98

924 Dec '03
97!%
974

117

1184J'ne"04

11138
11289

9578

97»8

118

1184

96

96

1034 Aug'03

94^4
9334
9214
O214

96
102

Jan '04
Nov'OO

9834 Apr'04

9834 '983i

102

1104
1104

110

108

1024

102

108

110

10934

1114

1164Feb'01

108

904

924
117
116
IIOI4I23

A-O
M-N 1044108

Apr'04
Mar'04
J'ly '04
J'ne'04

12708Oct'02
121
Mar'04
119 Apr'04
107 4 Mar'04

1014102
90

92

121 121
110 119
104 41074

J-J

Q-M

on Next Vage

TclcRmpli and Telephone

Istg5s.l926 J-D
1926 J-D
Kan&ilC&Cl8t8fg5s.l951 J-J
Pleas ValCoal 1st gst 58.1928 J-J
Roch& PltC& Ipurm 53.1946 M-N
Tenn Coal gen 58
1951 J-J
Tenn Div Ist g 68
ol917 A-0
Birm Div Ist consol 68. .1917 J-J
Cah C M Co Ist gu g 68.1922 J-D
DeBarCA I Co gu g 6s. 1910 F-A
Va Iron Coal <fe C Ist g 58.1949 M-S
I

latest bid

Apr'04

101 14 Sale

O6I4 May'04
954.
J-D
100 Sep '03
M-N 100
M-N
113 Apr'04
A-O 1134
117
A-O 117 Sale 117
11334 Jan '02
F-A
M-N

1134114
Nor Wis See C St P M & O
884 924 Nor & Mont See N Y Cent
See C C C & St L
OInd &

A-O

65
105
100
73

70

7134

C l8tg68..1919 A-0

PGColstg5s.l010

08

10641094
4 1083,

12,105
35,

<fe

—

1071a

FA

F&

N Y Put See N Y C & H
N Y & R B See Long Island
N Y S W See Erie
N Y Tex M See So Pac Co
Nor & South Ist g 5s
1941
Norf & West gen g 68
1931

NW

Dec '00

90 '8
991a
00 12 J'ne'04
10134 j'ne'04
lOO's Apr'04

1

JiigK

W

AT

1021a 104 12 IO312 J'ne'04
77
7712
78
77«8

9934 Sale

10734 J'ly '01
10734 107
107 4
9934
1004

M-N

NY&NE Ist 78
1005 J-J
l8t68
lOOi J-J
N Y & North See N Y C & H
N Y O W ref 1st g 4a..ffl092 M-S
Regis $5,000 only
gl992 M-S

N

I24I2 J'ne'04
II312 II312

113

Since

No,' Low

4108 4

1004 Sale

MS

NY&LongBr
of N J
NY&NENew See CentHart—
SeeNYNH&H
New York
Hav
Housatonic R con g 58.. 1937 M-N
N H & Derby con g 58. .1918 M-K

.

llliaMar'04
91 Feb'04

J-J

MS

1931 M-S
1931

Improvem'tife ext g 6s.. 1934
99 10434
New River 1st g 6s
1932
100 103
& Ry 1st con g 4s. 1996
10634 1094
Registered
1996
11838 12238
PocahC& C Joint 4s. .1941
104 108
1st gug 53
CC
1922
Soio V A N E l8t gu g 4s 1989
11 10334 lOS^e North Illmols See Chi <fe
91'8 96
North Ohio See L Erie <fe
Nor Pac Prior lien g 48. .1997
Registered
101 IO318
1997
10941144
General lien gold Ss
o2047
11139 11634
Registered
a2047
St Paul-DtU Div g 48.... 1996
91i«
78 84
1096
Registered
OI!&Qcoiltr4s SeeGtNor
91
954
St P <fe N P gen g 6s. ...1923
Registered certific's. 1923
StPaul&Dul Ist 5s.... 1931
11141114
91
2d 58
1917
91
1st consol gold 4s
1968
12334 1264
Wash Cent 1st g 4s
1948
121 130
Nor PacTer Co 1st g 68.. 1933
90
944 Nor Ry Cal See So Pac

Coal and Iron

*No price Friday;

Ist consol 68.1909

58
Registered
48
Registered

<fe

81
103

113
116

101
109 14.

951a

96410034

OO's

I20I2

High

lianf/e

January

<fe

10

Nov'Ol

981q

12038
107»8

1201,1

120121204
113

Apr '01

102 Jan '04
00
90
110 J'ne'04
10434 Sale 1031a 10434
103 May'04
108 1083e 108
108

.

Col
& I Dev Co gu g 68.1909 J-J
Col Fuel Co gen gold 68. ..1919 M-N
Col
1 Co gen 8lg6s..l043
Convertible deb g 58
1911 F-A
Trust Coctfs

Wh LEA

Mich Cent

W
W

Dec '03
Deo '03

»IlSCEia..ANEUU!!i

Jeff& ClearC<&
2d gold 5s

...1934 J-J

107
107

Utica& BlkRivgug4s.l922 J-J 102 "a
N Y Chic & St L 1st g 4s. 1937 A-O 104 14
Registered
1937 A-0
N Y & Qreenw Lake See Erie
N Y <fe Har See N Y C & Hud
N Y Lack
See D L &
N Y L E <fc
See Erie

May'OO

103

100

98

1997 J-J

Mlch~'entcollg3>28....ie98
Registered
^1098
3eecli Creek Ist gug 48.1936
Registered
103G
2d gu goldSs
103G
Beech Cr Ext Ist g 3 Hjs 61961

Coalifc

KaAAGRlBtgiic5B.103H J-J
Mahon C'l RR Ist 58. .1934 J-J
PittsMcKA Ylstgu68.1932 J-J

JL& Slstg 348

91

ISWj 106

of. ..1884-1904 M-8 101=8.
1884-1004 M-S 101
100i2Mar'04
Eegistdeb 58 of.. .1889-1004 MS
pebenlure g 48. ...1890-1905 J-D 100 14.
1003eMar'04
1890-1005 J-D
Registered
09 Dec '02
1 905 M-N
Debt certs ext g 48
100 >4
9934 Hay04
Registered
1005 M-N 100 14
99i2Nov'0ii
Lake Shore coUg 3 Hj8... 1998 FA
9234 Sale
9234
93 'b
91 12 J'ly '04
RcQstored
1998 FA
92
901a

Qr Riv

J-D
RegiHtcred
1997 J-D
Debenture g 4s
1928 M-8
Det Mon <fe Tol 1st 78.1906 F-A

Ore RR & Nav See
Ore Short Line See

Natof Mex prior lien 4'as.l926 J-J
l8t consol 4s

2361 J-J

Sliore gold 3 48.... 1997

<fe

J-D 138 ...
J-D 108 14..
A-0 118»8...
J-D 112%...
M-N 115 117V!

M<fePlst5s8tpd48intgu 1936 J-J
M 8 S M <fe A Ist g 4 int gu 1926 J-J
4rl990
1944
Ist ext gold 5s
St L Div Ist ret g 4s. ...2001
Dal &
l8t gu g 58... 1940
Kan C <fe Pao 1st g 4s... 1090
K 1st gu g 58. ..1942
Mo

91

02«4 J'ly '04
OOSaJ'ly'Ol

63 Vz

T^

W
M

2d gold 48

Ist 48 gu... 2361 J-J

9912

Beglatered

Jan '04
Apr'04
Mar'03

63 Hi Sale
15 Sale
9 Sale

=Q>:

Apr '02

95

gu lHt48...1980 F-A

McKees* BVl8tg68l918
107 "4,

g'^i
j

107 4 J'ly '00
105 Oct '02
106 4 Nov'Ol"

NY&Pul8tcongug48 1993 A-O
Nor& Mont Ist gug 58.1916 A-O

89

115
115
112

86

MS

N J Juno R

9714

II712

1051a IO512
10378 Deo '02
11019 T'ne'04

Atk Low

Bid

Ad Istgu g 48. ..1981 J-D
Clearf Hit Coal Istsf 48.1940! J-J
Oswo Istgu g 58 1942 J-D
Moh <fe Mai Ist gu g 4s. .1901

Gouvife

2d guar 6s

105'al06

Ifeefc"*

Jiange or
Latt Sale

Cart<fc

I23V4I26

A-0
A-O

MSlPcfeSSMcoug4intgu'38 J-J

NewH&D

January

!"=-

Price

Fridav
July 15

STOCK EXCHANGE
Wkkk E.s'DrNO July 16
N Y Cent & H li—(Continued)
N. Y.

NY Cent

Metropolitan El See Man Ry
Mex Cent consol gold 48.. 1011
l8t consol income g 38.al039
2d consol inc«nie g ds..al939
1917
Equip* coll gold 5s
1910
2rt series gold Ss
Coll trg4i28 1st Ser....l907
Mexinternatlstcon g 48.1977
1077
Stamped guaranteed
Mex North 1st gold 6s.... 1010
Mich Cent See
Y Cent
Mid of N J -See Erie
See Chic <fe N "W
MU L S <fe
MU & Mad See Chic <fe N
Mil <fe North See Ch
& St P
Minn <fc St L 1st gold Vs. .1927
Iowa Ex let gold 7s
1909
Pacific Ex Istgold 6s. ..1921
South West Ex 1st g 78.1910
1st consol gold 58
1934
Island refund gold 4s. .1949
Minn & St L gu See B C R & N

W

Since

Last Sale

[Vol. lxxix.

8

BONDS

Hanye

Range or

Bid

Na«hv (CoiUlnued)

JiCinA
NOAMLex K0l<14V>s...
Istgold
NO&M
6«

Weefc**

priday
July 15

STOCK EXCHANOE
Wkkk e.nuinq July 15

N. Y.

LKiiilaT

—Continued— Page

J-J

9934

73
7134

115
107
102

Nov'OO
Mar'04
0934

May'04
7134

J'ne'02

Am Telep & Tel coll tr 4s 1020 J-J
Comm Cable Co let g 4s.. 2397 Q-J
106 105
2397
Registered
954100
69
794 Erie T & T col tr g 8 f 5s. .1926 f.i
1018 M-N
694 73 4 MetT&Tlstsf g5s
X Y & N J Tel gen g 5s. .1020 M-N
No Westn Teleg

May'97
4 Oct '03
1064 Feb'02
105 Oct '00

104
103

See

96

92

92
106

02

10034 110

Aiir'Ol
106''8J'ly'04

10")

102
105

69

Sale

72

664
32

and asked this week,

Deo '03
105

714
Jan

'0(J

a Uuo Jan

02
106

>Ianutacturing <& Iiulu>iitrial
1915
Am Cot Oil ext 44s
1014108
Am Hide A L 1st 3 t gOs..l919
10041054 .A.m Spirits Mfg Ist g0s..l015
Am Thread Ist col tr 4s. ..1919
664 73
Bar A S Car Co Ist g Os. ..1942
102

&

Duo Feb

«DaeMay

90

94

109

Oct '90

i"o9"7e !!."!;

10034 J'ne'04

108

1084

10434 Sale

104
107

10934 10934

1054 J'ly '03

West Un

West Union col tr cur 5s. 1038 J-J
Fd and real est g443... 1050 M-N
Mut UnTel s fund 6s. ..1011 M-N
Northw Tel gu f 4 4s g. 1934 J-J
0134

J'ne'04

105

1074
103

.

90
102

94

964 1004Apr'02
1004 Oct '00

j/Dae.i'ue

/i

Due

Q-F
M-S
M-S
J-J
J-J
J'ly

824 84
83
80

87
82

1014105

J'ly '04

84
S4
85 4 J'ly '04

784

105

p Due Nov

105

105

10334 Apr'04

98

97

«

10834

108!%
J'ne'04

804

Jan

Option

'00
sale.

107
100

95
70
82
74

107
103»i
DO'S

83

804

I

—

1

July

Bond Record— Concluded—Page 4

16, 1904.]

BON l).s
STOCK EXCHANGE
Week Endi ng July 15
^enn RH—{ Continued)

Kange

9734 Sale
10214

.

Aug'03
Nov'97

108 Is
100 14

GrBcfe Iexl8tgug4'-2Sl'.t41
Sun* Lewis 1st g 4s. ..1980

10834

108i2Apr'O4

93

Waco

100

Marlst gu

g4'i2S..19,i5

1944
N J EB & Can gen 4s.Nasli
L

XJ

Pensacola & Atl See
Pee & East iSee C C C
PeocS;

PekUn

g

1st

2dgold4i28

PereMarq-Clidc
Flint* PMgOs

&
&

St

WM

IIOI4

121
97I4
61921 M-N
58 1921 J-D '105

121

1920 A-O

SeeB&O

1997
Registered.
1997
Jersey Cent coll g 48. ..1951
Eensselaer & Sar See Tl> & H.

Dan

& Meek

'

Nov'97

137

120 Oct '01
112i2Dec'02

115'2Mar'04
98 J'ly'97

llSWjlloH

11234
98'8 Sale
9818

1 14 ig

May'04

114i«n4i8

98%
99

99 H, 216
J'ne'04

9534

96

'30

94»gl01
98
99
913b 96

See South By
See Southern
See Den <fe Bio Gr

Pitts

BB

See

Boine Wat <fe Og See K
Rutland Ist con g 4i-2S

<fe

IO9112IIOB8 11078J'ne'04
68 J'ne'04

2d gold 6s

llOiallO^g
631-2 68

Mar'03

92

P

Y Cent
10334 May'04
101i4Nov'01

1941

Eut-Canadlstgug48...1949
Sag Tu8 <fe H See Pere Mara
t Jo&Gr Isl I8tg4a...l947
St Law & Adiion 1st g 5s. 1996

10334 104

84 12 J'ne'04

81

84

841a

1996

<fe

<fc

St Life

1906
1931
1931

104 "4
125
11034 Sale

SFRBcon3g4s..'96

Southw Div Istg

5s. .1947

9834 102 14
8178 Sale

Belunding g 48
1951
K C Ft S & M con g 68.. 1928
K C Ft S cfe M By ret g 48 1936

Consol gold 4s

96 Vi May'04
100 Jan '04
8138
82 232
8434 310

8434 Sale
101

1932

Gray'sPtTerlstgugSs 1947
& Dul See Nor Pacific
etPaulMcfe Man 2d 6s... 1909

%2H

96^4
74»8
7034 Sale

ctla. ..j>1989

103 1« 105
1031a 103158
12234 127

119i2Feb'04

I2OI4I25

KC&MB&Blstgu5s.l929
St Louis So See Illinois Cent
St L S W 1st g 4s bd ctf8.1989
2d g 4s inc bond

IOSI4 J'ne'04
103«8 J'ne'04
127 J'ne'04
11034 l]03<

10454

<fe

2d gold 6s Class C
General gold 68
General gold us

96^4

963e

73

73

7934

71

11212

110
96
100

96'i2

100
791a 84

1191a II912

78

1933
1933
Reduced to gold 4 ^s.. 1933
Registered
1933
Dakota ext gold 6s
1910
Mont ext Ist gold 48
1937
Registered
1937
E Minn 1st div lstg53..190a
Nor Div Ist gold 48
1948
Muin Union Ist g 6s.. ..1922
Mont C 1st gu g 6s
1937
Registered
1937
1st guar gold 58
1937
Wiil& S F 1st gold 5s.. 1938
St P <fe Nor Pao See Nor Pac
St P <fa S'x City Ae« C St P
&0
Salt LakeC Ist g st 6s... 1913
SFe Preset Ph Istg5s...l942
S A & A P See So Pac Co
S F c& N P 1st sink t g 5s. 1919
Sav F & West See Atl Coast L
Scioto Val & N E See Nor <fe
Seaboard Air Liue g 48 ...1950
CoUtr letundgSs
1911
Cai' Cent 1st con g 4s... 1949
Ifla Cen & Pen 1st g 5s. 1918
Ist land gr ext g os ...1930
Consol gold 58
1943
Ga & Ala By 1st con 58ol945
Ga Car & No 1st gu g 58 1929
Seab & Boa 1st 5s
1926
Sher Shr <fe So See
K&T
Sil Sp Oca & G See Atl Coast L
Sod Bay & So Ist g 58
1924
So Car & Ga See Southern
SoPaoCo— CoUtrg4>i2S..1905
Gold4s(CeutPaccoU)./i;1949
Registered
/cl949
Istgu g 5s
1941
Cent Pac Ist ref gu g 4s 1949
Registered
1949
MorLguargold3^8../(;1929
Registered
yi;1929
Galllar& S AlstgGs..l910
2d gold 78
1905
Mex<& Pac Istg 58
1931

107»8ll0l2
130 I3214

110"4 110^4
132i4J'ly'04

10934
13238.

.

May'02

140
108'4.

10838 J'ly '04

103^3.

llG^sApr'Ol
109 la May'04
103
103
106 May'Ol
104 Aug'03

13138.

1071a 110

Apr '02
Apr '04

110
103

128
135
115

109iallli2
100 103

116^.

135»8

133

Apr'97

1141a Mar'04
117 Jan '04

11434.

Il4iall4ia
117 117

110
9934.

11334

Dec '01

68 "a 70

98

69
69
97 14 J'ly '04
93 J'ne'04
100 Sep '00

103»2

J-J

Jau

106»uPeb'02

'04

110

110

99
"dOH 92
*101»2
*100
105

Hi

107

'•2

M

102

100 "2 Sale
94 Sale

lOO^e
931a

D
D

J

J

9912

D

D
F A
J D
MN
Gila VG€S!Nlstgug58.1924 M N
Hens E & W T Ist g 58.1933 M N'
Ist guar us red
1933 M N

88

94^

100

'04
Apr '04

88

9779 10134
871a 941a
8534 H734

97 102
97I4IOI78

101
101 »s
99 14 Mar'03

Sale

88

.

106

.

103»4
10334

100 la 10334
10638 1081a

107 J'ne'04
105 J'ne'04
105 Dec'03
103>aJ'ly'04

.
.

108

105

103

la

1031a

J>1ISC!EL,L.ANE«US

'

U

.

S Steel Corpcollr2d6».rf'63
Registered
April 1963

*Mo price Friday;

latest bid

Western Div

Ist g 5s. ..1935

A-O

1935 J-D
1990 A-O
TolP&Wlst gold 4s. ...1917 J-J
TolStL<feWprlieng3ias.l92u J-J
50-year gold 4s
1950
Tor Ham <fe Bull 1st g 4s./i.l946 J-D
Ulster & Del 1st con g 5s 1928 J-D
1952 A-O
1st refund g 4s
UnPacBEcfe 1 gr g4s ...1947 J-J
Begistered
1947 J-J
Ist lien convert 4s
1911 M-N
Registered
1911 M-N
Ore Ry & Nav con g 4s. 1946 J-D
Ore Short Line Istg 6s.. 1922 F-A
Ist consol g 5s
1946 J-J
1927
4s & participating
tJtah & Nor 1st 7s
1908 J-J
Gold 5s
1926 J-J
Uni N J RR & C Co See Pa RB
Utah Central See Bio Gr Wes
Utah & North See Un Pacthc
Utica <fe Black B See N Y Cent
See Mo P
Ver Val Ind <fe See South By
irginia Mid
Va <fc Southw't Ist gu 58.2003 J.J
1939 M-N
Wabash ist gold 5s
2d gold 5s
1939 FA
Debenture series A
1939 J-J
Series B
1939 J-J
1st Uen equip s fdg 58.. 1921 M-S
Det&Ch Ext Istg 53. .1941 J-J
DesMoin Div Istg 4s. .1939 J-J
Om Div 1st g3ias
1941 A-O
Tol & Ch Div 1st g 48. ..1941
St Chas Bridge 1st g 68.1908 A-O
Warren See Del Lac <fc West

M Ist gu g 4s.

. . .

AO

FA

MS

Y& Pa Istg 58.. 1937 J-J
gold 3-4s
1943 A-O
Income 5s
dl943 Nov
West No Car See South By
WestN
Gen

W VaCeut& P
Wheel'g&
LE

Istg

63. .1911

J-J

Ist g 5s... 1926 A-O
1st gold 5s.. 1928 J-J
ExteUifc Imp gold 5s... 1930 F-A

Wheel Div

88

84

110i4Feb'03
10334 Apr'04

.

J'ne'04

10638 107

Jan
Jan

841-2

85

134

May'04

108

10538
10134
102 14
104 ig

10534 J'ly '04

102
102
102
1 15 14

1301a
121

'01

'04

1001-.S

100

100
76
105

87 14

108

10534 10818

May'04
Oct '03
Apr'04

101

la

102

105

108

Mar'04

102 102
II5I4II5I4
1141011413
lilt
119
107 110
108 IO834

IO518.

101

Feb '04

101

101

103
111
108

103
118
110

116
116
109

Feb '04

119

10914 J'ly '04

llliaOct
103 Jan

991a
11533 Sale

'0-2

'04

115
115»i,
110 Peb'04
9512
951s
113 Dec'03

113
95 "a Sale
113 116
961a Sale
'

J'ne'04

114iaApr'04
.109

961a

9234

11434
118 May'04
II314
113iaApr'04
II8I4II912 II8I4 118
112
112
1091a....
123 J'ne'04
122 May'04
1201a....

85

109

1091a....
11038....
11234 ....

123
116«8
11238

110

110 11334
110iall2i3

110 la May'04
93 Dec'03
115 J'ne'04

120

II3I2
11919
112

I03ial06
110

11334 J'ne'04

112 ....
92 ....
11313115

118

11834 122

120
114
112

92 Sep '02
105 la J'ne'04
123 Feb '02
110 J'ne'04
115 Jan '03

....
....
....

106
114

118
113
117

116^8 J'ne'04
1123g J'ne'04

114»8....
11218....

951a

9313 98
115 II713
9II4 9638

963,

117 la Apr '04
9638 J'ne'04

113
93
90

117 J'ly '00
104 la Sep '02

....

110

112iall6i4

May'04

110 110
II214II6I4

II6I4 J'ne'04

II718

102

102 J'ly '04
119
119
80 j'ue'04
109 May'04
.1091a
1061a 1061a ]«ar'04
11478 May'04
1121a
lllia
111 May'04
1041a
1031a 1031a

Mar "si'

NW

W

J

108
102

8434 Sale

130
121

.119
85

9334

931a

88

102
20 115
80
108

102
119
93

111

86
81
68

92
8u»a

73

Apr '03
J'ly'04

9134
IO4I4

6

91^4
5
10434 187

106 14 113
1

9134 913*
00^4 106

May'04

104

10038 104
1031-2 2996 941a 10313
101
98 la J'ne'04
9634 98 13
102i4J'ly'04
981a 10278
l'20i4 I2413
124 la J'ne'04
5 111
117
1141a 114»g
97 14
98 308 90=8 98

103 14 Sale

102
123^8

115iall6
9778 Sale
1081a

111

1031a 106
9389
91

90

98
1121a 113

8I34 Sale
10434 Sale

noi*

101 IO6I2
11214 115

85
"73" Sale14 8478 J'ly '04
73
711a
91
111

981*

110

93=8

90

92

981b

110

,

112 Dec'03
114 la Apr '02

108
118
10934

60
100
109

1001310414
1021a J'ly'04
1141311314
1171a 118
109 's 10934
101)^4 110
94
94
1001* 94 J'ne'04
5838
Sale
68
601a 400 56
Jan '04
102
102
1031,, 102
IIOI2 J'ne'04
1051411013
Sale

Feb '04

95

90

831c

821a

821a

83 14

90
22

90

7978 83 14

Mar'02
1091a Mar'03
98

Wash Cent See Nor Pac
Wash O & W See Southern

10034 183

Jau

87
102

F A 101 ig Sale
F A
J

10534

102

IO6I2IOS

Jan '03

100

J O
J

701a

96
991a
92 14 93

10534 J'ne'04
108 J'ne'04

J.J

J

65

llli4May'03

102*2...

1061a
98^2

Feb '02

W

W

Kulckor Ice (Chic) Istg 58. '28
Lackaw Steel lat g fis
1923
N at Starch Mfg Co Istg 68 1920
Nat Starcli Co s f deb 58.. 1926
Stan Rope & T lat g 6s... 1946
Income gold 5a
194(i
V 8 LeathCo8fdebg68..1913
US Healty<fcIconvdebg6s'24

(?2000

La Div BL Istg 5s
1931 J.J
Min Wife
Istgu 5s '30 F-A
T0I& O l8lg53
1935 J-J

Kan &

M

Rlanulnctui-ing &. Industrial
Consol Tobacco50-yrg 43.1951
Registered
1951
Distil Sec Cor conv Ist g 58. '27
Distill of Anier coll tr g Ss. 1 9 1
111 Steel Co deb Ss
1910
Non-conv deben 58
1913
Int Paper Co Ist con g 68.1918
lut St Pump lO-yr conv. 68 '13

2000 J-D

l8t gold 5s

General gold 5s

Registered

A&N W

Tex & Pao E Div Istg 68.. 1905 M-S
2d gold inc 58

911a 96^6
701a 781a
651a 7434

F-A

112
113
93 la

Apr'04
May'04

Gen refund st g4s
1953 J-J
OS's
9814
981s Sale
110 Mar'04
St L M Bge Ter gu g 5s. 1930 A-O 112
Tex & N O See So Pac Co

8434

St Paul

1st consol gold 6s

104 14 105

SyraBing&NY i&'eeDL&W
n^er A o£ St L Ist g 4i2S..1939 A-O UOTg

X 1st con gold 5s.... 1894-1944

901a

107
113
100

117

C&
E&

W

110
112

112

127 la

1291a.

A&

MS

High.

Apr '04

^ January 1
Low High,

130
121

125

A-0

1920 J-J
N YT&Mex gTil8tg4s.l912 A-O
Noof Callst gug6s....l907 J-J
1938 A-O
Guaranteed gold 5s
Ore <fe Cal 1st guar g 58.1927 J-J
APassl8tgug4s.l943 J-J
S
SoPol Argulstg68...cl909 J-J
clOlO J-J
1st guar g 6s
1905 A-0
SPot Cal Istg 6s
1905 A-O
1st g 6s series B
D...190C A-O
Istg 68 series
F...191'J A-O
Ist g 6s series
1912 A-0
1st gold 6s
1937 M-N
1st con guar g 58
1905-.. 1937 M-N
Stamped
S Pac of NMex Istg 6s.. 1911 J-J
8P Coast Istgu g 48 1937 J-J
1905
Tex & N O 1st 78
1912 M-S
Sabine Div lstg68
1943 J-J
Con gold 58
1994 J-J
Southern— Ist con g 5s
Begistered
1994 J-J
Mob & Ohio coll tr g 4s. .1938 M-S
Mem Div 1st g 4ia-58... 1996 J-J
St Louis div Istg 48.. ..1951 J-J
1918 J-J
Ala Cen R 1st g 6s
1948 J-J
Atl& Danvlstg48
Atl & Yad Ist g guar 48.1949 A-O
1916 J-J
C0I& Greenvlst6s
E T Va <fe Ga Div g 58.. 1930 J-J
1956 M-N
Con Ist gold 5s
E Ten reor lien g 5s
1938 M-S
192 J-J
GaPao Ry Istg 6s
Knox & Ohio Ist g 63. .. 1925 J-J
1915 J-J
Rich<fc Dan con g 6s
1927 A-O
Deb 5s stamped
Rich <fe Meek Ist g 4s.. .1948 M-N
So Car& Ga 1st g 5s. ...1919 M-N
Virginia Mid ser C 68.. .1916 M-S
Serie8 D 4-58
1921 M-S
Series E 58
1926
General 5s
1936 M-N
Guar stamped
1936 M-N
1st cy gu 4s. .1924 F-A
O <fe
WestNC 1st cone 6s. .1914 J-J
S <fc N Ala -See L <fc N
Spok FaUs & Nor 1st g 68.1939 J-J
Stat Isl Ry 1st gu g 412s.. 1943 J-D

W

L Cairo See Mob & Ohio
L & Iron Mount See M P
L K C N See Wabash
StLMBr AVeTRBAof StL
St L S Fran 2d g 68 CI B 1906

& T 1st 7s. 1918

FA

.

Q5^ 96

Rio Gr West
Bio Gr Juno Ist gug58...1939
Biogr So l8tgold48
1940
Guaranteed
1940

Eoch &

11914 1191-2

11314.
111"*.

Reading Co gen g 48

<fe

120^4
10734 1101-2
109141101-2

II914 Apr'04

iiesg.

ao9

&

&
y&

Bioli

118

'Iv '04

&

&

Bioh

Apr '02

109 May'04
110 hi Feb '04

,

Tol See B <fe O
Pitts Cleve
& Cli See Peuu Co
Pitts Ft
1922
Pitts June 1st gold Os
Pitts & L Erie 2d g 5s...al928
Y SeeN Y Cen
Pitts McKees
L E Ist g 5s. ..1940
Pitts SU
1943
Ist consol gold 58
West
Pitts
Asli lat con 58.1927
Pitts

W

120ial23v,
98 101

J'ly'04

12134 12034 J

M-N 110 li2
A-0 lis
SagTuscfc H Istgu g 48.1931 F-A
-_„_
PliUa& Beading cons 7s.l911^ j.d inn.
Pine Creek reg guar 68. ..1932
D
Pitts Ctn €& St 1/ See Penn Co
.

May'04

121
101
109

Q-F

ibaiiibsi^

May'OO

117

L

6s. ...1921

N W div 1st g 6s '30 M-N

<fe

Morgan's La

Low
112
112

Sale

Since

•^

9278Mav'04

1st gold 6s

1939
1st consol gold5s
Pt Huron Div 1st g 5s. 1939

St
St
St

941a

jisk

112

Mange

Range or

llOia

J-J

A-O
Consol g 6s int guar.
Gen gold 48 int guar.. 1921 A-0

112*4 Mar'OO

DBRB<feBgel8tgu4sg. 3b

.

H & TC 1st g58intgu.. 1937
..1912

Week's

Last Sale

Bid

Low High Southern Pac Co (Continued)

Hi(jh

Dec '03

114
106
97
102

IO6I12

Price

Friday
July 15

STOCK EXCHANGE
Week Endino July 15

N. Y.

January 1

Last Sale

Ask Low

Bid

1919
Consol gold 5s
15)4.1
Consol gold 4s
1912
Convertil)leg3'2S
Alleg Val gen gu g 4s. .1942

Since

or

203

BONUS

Mange

Week's

Prtc«

Friday
July 15

N. T.

Clcfc

1

20-year equip s f us
1922 J-J
Ist consol 4s
1949 M-S
<fc East
See Erie
& Sioux F See St P &
Winona <fc St P See G <fe
Wis Cent 50-yr Ist gen 4s. 1949 J-J

WUkes

116

117

Apr'04

116

115
93

93% May'04

9312

SO
IO6I4
II214
1081a

40

112 Dec'03
112 Apr'04
1 10 1* May'04
109 Apr'04
91

91-2

90

9:'

93^

109 14 114
II0I4IIOI4
109 109

110
99 la 100 1« 10014 J'ly'04
911*

116

Mar'Ol

90

40

IOUI4I.03
86
911a

M M

WU

NW

891a.

S8I3 91»9

BONDS— Conclmlea.
nLisceilancoiiH

63ie
641a 632
0134 J'ly'04
63
651a 193

641a Sale

03
96 la
93
95

64
,

10334

,

100 la Sale

99
88

Sale

2

la

Sale

110
bale
7878 Sale
la

1081a

108''8

100 la 1011-2
93 Feb '03
983g
99
87 J'nc'04

641a
6I34
681a

92

92

Adams Ex

col tr g48
1948 M-S
AmDk<fcIiup53 See Cent N J

AmSSCoof W Vag

58....

40

IJ'kl'n FerryCo Isi cons g 5s '48
Chic Jo <fc St Yard col g 58.1915
DetM&Mldgr incomes.. 191

10518108^ Hoboken L& I gold 58. ..1910
Mad Sq Garden Ist g 58. .1919
97 103
Man Uch H <fc L gen g 4a. 1940
Newj) Ne Ship & I) D Cs dV.VM)
82 9238 99
90 4, N Y Dock 60.yr Ist g 4a.. 195]
87

and asked, a Due Jan

6

v,

Due Feb

Sale

0513

17

c

66

St

35

47

1021a

103

23 100

103

10034 J'nc'02

60
100
80

901a.
9834

62
111

61

J'ly '04

82

J'ly'04

60

621-j

85

.

May'04
41

103

1920

Joaeph Stk Y<l8 1 at 4 las. 1 930
L Ter Cupplos Stal'n * rron
II3
4
Co Istg 4I28 5-20 year. .1917
5
21a
21a
109 "a J'ne'04
107'4 1121a S Yuba Wat Co con g 68..1923
8O34
Sp Val Wat Works 1st 63. 1906
83 iiii 80 34 83
77«»
79 3200 6834 79 "8 U S Red^ife ReX lat a t g 6a. 1931
79
2 6834 79
777h
0534

641a

40 14 Sale
81

Sep '03
Jau '99
Feb '04

99
99
92

5334
5734
611a

66»4

Feb '02

Mar'Ol

90 14

90 13

761a 83

14

89«3 91

St

Due Mar d Due Apr A Due J'ly

J^

Due Aug

o

.

lOlia.

108 Nov'03
113 la J'ly '00
79 Aug'03

Due Got p Due Nov

g

Dae Deo

«

Option aalt

.

BOSTON STOCK EXOHANaE -Stock
Sibnre Price*

Monday

Saturday
July 9
74''g

July It

95 '4
246>a247
151»al5134
235 '^34
167 170
170
300
143ial45

240

246

16134 16134

235

»167

170

•

•300
143 "oHS

*181
•160
•281
•136

282
137

181
160
281

80

80

172

172
20

»

73
•HI4

192

SO
•95
*62i2
91=4

•93

•91
•112

•140

30

30

65
91^8

94

90^2

9l>-j

112

65
92
941.

91I2

7638

78

96

95

•62Hj 65
91Hj 93
•94
94H2

91Hi 9II2

75»9

245

13\
751a
4^8
1934

128 '8

128 Hi
128 H2 12834
1281a 129
11
76>4

III4
7612

II214II314
'7''8

8Hi
*5ia
6
'244 245

•1314
•73Hj

4

91Hi

111

9lHi

111

•m
121 121

122

121

220
•8

821'ii221>i

8
102

•11
76Ha

11314
8 Hz
*5Hj

245

121

220

220

8h

10134 102
•221a....

•22>2

•2 '4
2*4
102^4 103
4934 4934
2934 30

9IH2

111

91Hi
111

'-*4

•8

6

•19

11
76Hj

•214

11
7634

9138

111

249Hi249Hi
I58I4I6O
39 14 39 Hi
39 Hi
80 14 30 Hi
80H2
175 •173 Hi 175
121 Hi

138

121H»121Hj

221

223

222

-214

23*

103i4l05Hj
•4934 51
30
30

129
129

11
76I4

West End St

50
Do pref
50
Feb'04 Wisconsin Central ... 1 00
J'ne'04
Do pref
100

es'a

68I4 5834
••60
-75
•9V2

68

10 'e 111^
58'8 59

11

•60

•75

68^8
1034

234

105 Hj 107
50
60
30
30

6878
Ills

I29I4
128H»

129
11 '4
7634

llHi

77

9IH2

Jan

'04

Lowest

249
160

250

175

8O34

175

Ih
121

Hi

3914

81
175
li8

IHi

122

122

Last Sale 2
Last Sale 17
222

•8
8H1
1011410114

2934

222
*a

Mar 14

76''<8J'lyl3|

Jan

88

9638J'ne'2Hl

7

2934

12
61

11
6038
••'8

Last Sale 50
*8l
•78

95

9Hi

9Hj

106
252
608
Zb-A

11,682

353
4,390
1.185
1,005

lis

123

M exican Telephone.. JO
100
N E Telephone

222

PuUmanCo

100

8Hj Reeoe Button-Hole.. 10

.....

80

LastSale 95

10
85
80

J'ly '04
11

85
80
J'ly '04

West End Land
'Zb
West Telep & Teleg.lOO

Do

pref

K1&

Westing

Do

pref

100
Mtfc'... 50
50

Lowest
64 '4
85

161
170

J'ne 195

Jan

290

J'ly

Marll 240

Apr23 230

230

J'lyl3| 134

J'uelo 169 Hi J'ly 13
Apr 10 171 Jan 13
295 Feb 24 301 Apr23
136 J'nelS 116 Jan26
rue Hi J'uel5 124 Hi Jan 19
180 J'neU 184 Hi -May 10
160 Apr 6 lO^^HjJau 4
276 Jan 25 85 J'uelO
133 J'ne 6 141 Apr 7
24I4 Jan 'Z 40 Hi J'ly 9
73 Jan 27 80 May 2
161
168

lia

l>a

S\

83.

51

5188

•9

10

5118

Ih

1\

37,

52

834
5934

10 14

IOHj

11

l\

IH2

87l

IH2
83*

83^

61 ''a

51 14

51 7j

2
878

IHj
83,

170 J'ne 7 175
16 '4 Feb 25 24 Jau21
68HiJ'ne 6 8OI4 Jan 27
5
Apr 25 14 Jan 11
186HiMayJ5 190 Jan 2
160 J'ly 5 163 Hi Apr 7
222 Jan 29 232 Apr21
198 J'nel3 207 Apr 21
75 Feb 16 80 Hi Feb 1
68 Marl7 75 Jan 1
30 Mayll 39 Jan -20
'.4

Jan 15 42 Feb
May25 95 Hi J'ly
65 Jan

65 Jan 6
7138Slarl4

86i4Mar 1
Mayl6
Jan 4
Jan 4
17 Hi Feb 26
J'ne28

Jan

7

12HjAprl4
Jan 5
3 Hi Feb 4

51

533.

'4

Last Sale
••56'

75
•35

•7S2

8

24 Sj 2434

934

•50'"

•'50

'-'ib

-oS

'

71a
24''8

••35

....

469

465

8

21

21 14
•9^8 10

••25

*43'4

^26

4438

23
42
104

23 ^
42
104

*2
•7

2'.

33l6
•I's

•8
4

465

211a

10

10

••23

-25

23
42
1U4

3''u
1'4

•2
71a
313a
"I's

8»2

•734

4

•4

41a

4

•50
414
413.

7\

•50

•334

41 »«

31a
••40

••50

•12 '4
62
24 14
•1

4'.

41^4
3
•SO
7
123^

02
24'1'4

82 >a 83 Hi
••75
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1

41

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31a

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214

7^
8I3S
1^4

1318

3H

50

Hi

13'-V

02 '4 02'4
21^2 24',
*1
1'4

84

•50

25

465

84

•06"

Laitsale
9

9

25

•2
"7
313a
1'4

414

•4"

13
62
24 H>
114

•75

470

4I4
•50

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13'l6,

10

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io

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22

iil

'-'IH

43''^

44 14

•20 -li
Last Sale

Hi

4I4
f

414
•50

4H
"4HJ
43 >4 4334
4
4
••60
•75
1339 li-Ss

62 \

03

243.
1I4

2479

87

85

1
134

ale
470
-'5

^^ lis

^^

257l

i,

24 14

'104
106
2*4
•2 Is
2 Hi
7H
7H
7H»
3135
3^32
3

413, 431,
379
3'i
"•40
•50

•60

42

25-«8

533.

2134
•

9

24'^8

-24

51

45
22 Hi 23
42
42
104 104

Hi

470

•24

^25

10 H

Last Salt
•80 OO

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2438
•9H2

49 '8

85

•75
134
534
5»b

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465

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•62 la -02

••35
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t23i8 2478
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466

213.

23
42
1U4

8
251*

'•5u

2434
••36
....

•35

•465

8
25

•75'
^35

•10 Hi 11

9758

-J'ly

3

8

15

Nov 3734 Feb
Dec 96 Jan
285eApr
tl88HiMa> 225 Jan
161i4Dec 173 Mar
220 Sep •232 Mar
196 Aug 212 Hj Feb
17

75

8"e J^'ov

1-2

38
145
I514

J'ly

6634

Aug 104 Hj Jan

10
223 208

04

IHi
Hi

••75

24',
i"e

80

H.

1
134
6'

•3Hj

3

3

1^

IHi

llHi
4Hj
4Hi
4434
4

*10

4Hj
4Hj

44 14
*3Hj

L4

[^

IHi

89 H,

IHi

11
4Hi
•45
4Hi

44 14
4
J'ly'O^

May '03

•75

03 H
24Hi 26
IHj

100

26
Granby Consoluliited. 10
Guanajuato Consol..
Isle Royale (Copper). 26
Mass Consol
25
Mayflower
26
Michigan
25
25
Mohawk
MontanaCoalife Coko 25
Montreal »fc Boston..
National
Old Colony
Old Dominion
Osceola
Parrott(Silv& Coi)p) 10
25
Phcenix Consol
25
yuincy

50

86

pref

Elm River

8
3

Last Sale 40
Lait Sale 75
14
03

1)0

2i8

•45

4Hj

44

104

213

8

14
62 Hj
26 Hj
IHj

89
1
134

1

14
03 14
2 5 Hi
IHi

89
IH-

12

Franklin

Rhode Island

25

."VI

ay

Jan
Jan
25 Jau
7
75 Jan 8434 Jan
91HjOct 104 Hj Jan

Jan
Feb
Feb
Feb
Jan
26%
J'ne2» 3818 J'ly 52 Jan
Jan 7 144 Sep 150 Jan

Janl3

9

96
178
97
116

Nov 26

76

Feb

80 14 Feb
7

-Mar

24 Mar
134 14 Jan
123 Hj Dec
169 Hj Feb
14 '8

Feb

7914

Jan
Jan
Jan

534

127

Mar2!r

17

J'ly

1

Marl 5 223 J'ly 13 197 J'ly 237
878Aprl4
6HiJanl9
61a Dec 10
99 J'ly 132
.19934 Mar21 102 14 J'ly 8
433
-

50

50

475
239
•.,;94

Aprl2

•75

6Hj J'ne S

11

Jan 14
Jan

Marl4 85

J'ly 15

7534 J'ne28 85
9334 J 'ne2 100

Jan 21
Jan 15

76

'2

ale

Sep

J'ly
J'ly

7^4 J'nel3

13,

8

91
85
71

74
68
30

94i4Apr
83 Hi Oct
Apr21 zl02 Sep
Mario ^7HjAug
113i8Apr20 108 Sep
17H2Feb20 15 Hi Nov

108
93

Apr,

177 Apr
iOo Mar
167 Jan
126 Jan
196 Hj Mai
170 Mac
286 Feb
143 Hi Feb
39 Hi Jan
83 Hi Jau
42 Mar
180 Feb

6HjNov' 62i4Jan
12 May "
oHjOct
834 Jan
63g Aprl4
5 Hi Jan 23
"rio 230 Feb26 250 Jly 12 223 Dec 310 Feb
Sep 204 Feb
J'ne2'/ 178H2 Jan2-2 133
1,005 al61
1,148 3738 Maris 43 '8 Jan 5 30 J'ly 48»4 Feb
677 7734 Marl4 82i4Jan 5 74i4J'iy 8878 Feb
VZ 173 J'ne 2 180 Marl 2 164^4 Aug 190 Feb^
li«Apr30
lis Oct
2 Hi Jan
2 Jan 25
125
•205 118
Feb23 127 Apr 10 121 Nov 139 Jan
9 Apr 20 Jan
1
Marl4
Jan 28
4

605

'2

104
2'e
7Hj
3
•II4
lOHj
414

J'ui-

Jan 23 66 Hi Nov
3 Sep
6 Mar31
Marai 12 Sep
17 Feb 27 21
Feb -24 131 Hi Jan 25 10738 Oct
122 Hj
122 Hi Jan 5 l'29HjJ'ne23 116 Aug
119i4Febl9 131'vJ'ne:i9 lI4H2 0ct
634 Oct
9 Feb 19 1238 Jan b
68HjJanl9 78 J'ne25 65 Oct
SHjJ'ly
37gFebl6
3HjMar28
112H2Janl5 II5I4 Aprl5 115 Oct
71

lis J'ne22
25
AdventureCon
935
8I4
25 2,861 (i38i6 aiar b
8H. AUouez
Feb 8
63=8 Amalgamated Copperloo 28,789 43
52 Hj
•75
Mar21
75
Mar'04 Amer Gold Dredging 5
8 Feb 2a
934
10 Am Zinc Lead & Sm.
1,615
15% Feb 24
25
J'ly '04 Auacouda
I8H1
•85
-85
Arcadian
25 "iio •25 Feb
•26
Jan 13
•25
26
Apr'OJ Arnold
•834
7-20
7 Feb 11
Atlantic
25
9
19 Mar
25 14
'2534 Bingham Con Miu<& S 50 7,565
39 May 14
30
J'ne'04 Bonanza (Dev Co)... 10
Jan 4
26
470
b'i 435
470 Calumet & Hecliv
09
-09
Catalpa (Silver)
10
100 •05 Apr 2 b
tll4H2 Feb
2434 Centennial
24
25 8,082
7 Jan
•913
155
25
10 Central Oil
•20
^22
Cons Merour Gold...
1,733 •20 J'ly 15
26
7Hi Apr
2i34
Apr '04 Continental Zinc
52 Hj
53 Copper Range Con ColOO 44,758 38 Keb23
Daly. West
20 3,717 18 J'ly 16
18
4434 Dominion Coal
100
010 40 J'ne2y
44Hj
134

AuE 164
Auk 50

133 Sep
110 Not
184 Nov
160 Jau
270 Aug
131 J'ly
26 Oct
75 Dec
42 Mai
Apr 26 73 Hi May

25
28
134

91

ii63

176

442
3,5'20

790
6,094

436
200
450
3,368

480
1.370
2,520
1,549
3,507

J'ly

Jan

2634
2934
5

Aug 111

Feb.

Jan
Jan
Jan
Apr

27

Jan.

63 Jan
Aug 31HjFeb

7 Sep
7134 Oct
9 Oct

15i«Feb
95HjMay
18HjFeb-

Jly
Nov

57 Hi J an
3978 Feb
4934 Nov 8988 Jau
Jan Si) -Uar
•b*)

33
10

7HjNov '28
Oct 102
Oct 108

71
67

8034 Oct 110

Dec

Jan
Feb
Feb
Jan

t8'gJ'lyll

3i4Jan

5334 J'ly 13

3334 Oct
t'el)
•50

Jan
8HjMar
75S8Mar
II4 Feb

6 Jan
15=sJ'ly

31 14 Feb

3

1

Jan IS

Mario

113gApr
19 '8 -Jan
1

25

1-2

2

Jan 23 75
Jan la 25

9

7

60
470

Mar23 40
400
Apr

J'ly 13
25'6J'ly 14

09

f25
10
76

20

,

J'ly 15
J'ly 14

May20

Jan 5
l2i4Apr 9
5334 J'ly 13

Sep
Apt
Oct

18

1234

OH)
•96

Mar
Feb

Mar

Feb
Dec 39 Hj Feb
Dec 90 Mar
141*

J'ly 551

Mar

OS

Feb 10

12

J'ly

31 '8 Feb

Sep

9HjJ'ly

534
•35

Nov

1*732

Feb
Jan

lOHiSep 10 Mar
37 J'ly 75 Feb
30 Jau '2 31 Nov 48 Hi May
7"2
Jan 2 59 Hi Oct 131 's Jan
103 J'ly
113 Jau 2-2 106 Oct 118HjFeb
5 Mar
2 Oct
134 J'ne2'i
2 Hi Jau 5
9i4Jan 9
7 Jly 14 Feb
J'ne '2
7
6I9 Apr
4 14 Apr 29
334 J'ly
2«8 Marlb
3 Jau
•62 Hj Feb 16
2
Apr S •50 Dec
6i4J'ly 17HjFeb
May2J llHiJ'lylS
6H1
3 Jly 18 Feb
4'8 Jau lb
3 Feb 25
2 Hi Jau
45 J'ly 15 •87 Hj Jau '22 50 Dec
434 Dec
llHjFeb
3^ J'nelU 6 la Jan
34 « l''eb 8 4434 J'ly 14 31 J'ly 68 Feb
•2I4 Jan li
2 Nov
8 Mar
Maylb
6

40

J'ly

50

J'ne 9

I

82

13^
1434

Apr lb
Apr
Apr

yi4Feb 9
53 Feb 8 64 J'ly 13
2U34 Keb 1 291a Feb
li4J'Jy 5
3 Jan
500
363 60 Feu 26 100 Jan
'200

J'nt

Jan

38HiOct

iVIining

•IJ*
8 "8

Aug 897gJaii
Aug 103i4Jan
Feb
Jan

Apr '.251 244

40
87

Highest

J'ne 262 Hj

51
2137 Feb 6 152

101 Swift & Co
100
Aug'03 Toirington Class A.. 25
Sep '03
Do pref
25
2 Jan 10
2HjMar29
J'ne'04 Onion Cop L'd & Mg. 25
105
107 United Fruit
100 7,725 95 Feb 8 113 J'nela
60
50 United Shoe Mach... 25
416 46 14 Feb20 51 Mayl3
2934
297,
25
302 •IS Jan 28 30 J'nel5
Do pref
8 Jan 23
634
J'ne'04 U S Leather
100
6H1 Mayl'z
77 Jan 10 7934 Apr 22
7938
J'ne'04
Do pref
100
1034 Feb
17 Hi May 5
May'04 U S Rubber
100
/7Hj
100
Do pref
60 40Hi Jan b 0934 J'ly 13
&38 May 13 12»8>Iau 2
1134
11', U S Steel Corp
100 5,157
6038
603.
Do pref
100 8,420 51^ May 13 62 la Apr 8

83
79
•94

•94

Ellison Elec Ilium. ..100
General Electric
100
39Hi Mass'chusettsGasCoslOO
Do pref
100
81Hi
175 Mergentnaler Lino.. 100

1623.

101

60 14 01

•94

250

J'ly'04 Plant Com t' st stk com 1 00
J'ly'04
Do pref
100

-75
•60
•9Hi....

83
79
95

7534

Last Sale 25 14
Last Sale 28
Last Sale aH)
106 1067,
•49 Hj 60

6934
1134

5Hj
a;248

39%

391s
80^4

Amer Agricul Chem.lOO
Do pref
100
414 Amer Pnou Serv
60
20
Do pret
50
i30Hi Amer Sugar Relln
100
1291.
Do pref
100
130% Amer Telep & Teleg.lt)0
III4 Amer Woolen
100
70
Do pref
100
14

\

1

23934 J'ne 7

38
145

J'ne'04 Boston

160\ 160 Hj

lor /Yeciou<
Year (1903)

Uiyhest

160
172 89
20 108

Wore Nash* Roch..lOU

Land
10
May'04 Cumberl Telep & Tel 100
8Hj
8H1 Dominion Iron & St..
J'ly'04 East Boston Land

-75

*9Hj
•81
•77
80

95

7534
414
•1834

58 Hj 60

60

9
9
821a S2ia
•77
80

80
95

6934
1138

*13H»

9

222

*8
8H2
101 IOII4
•22 Hj...

8Hi

4
19
12934

9

158H:

138

13'f
7534

Last Sale

250

•lis

13 7g
75
4
19
129
128
128

Last Sale 3H2
Last Sale 114

•11314....
•8I4
9
6
•5Hj

10134
•22H2...

23.

43s,

20

128Hj129

101

1021a 103
50
60
30
30

75

12334 12938
128 128Hi

III4
76H!

83,

1334

4%

4>4

Last Sale
Last Sale
Last Sale

*81
•77
•84

95
24014

Last Sale 77Ha
Last Sale 38
Last Sale 145

13
75

14
75

1'28
12834
12834 129

157H2
3983 3939 •3938
80i« 8018
8038
'174
174 175
•lis

1^8

11

Shares

"

19
19
1281812834

I58I4I5914

168'^4l68'2
3938 39 Vi
80^4
80
174 17434

I

EXGHANGB

Uuilrondn
76i« Atch Top <fe Santa FelOO 2,124 64

76»e

•95 M 96 Hi
240Hi240»8
102 162
237 237
168 I68I4
168 168

Bange

1904

tut

Week

YN

•140

140

TKursday
July 14

Kange /or Year

Sales
0/

95
100
Do nref
613
240 V Boston <& Albany
100
112
151
151
Boston Elevated
100
253
24
Boston & Lowell
100
ios" 168 Boston & JIaine
100
26
170
Do pret
100
5
Last Salt 306'" J'ly'04 Boston & Providence 100
144 Hi Chic June Kycfc USYIOO
145
143
116
122
10
122
Do pref
100
J'ne'04 Con* Mont Class 4.. 100
Last Sale 181
181
Last Salt 160^ Apr '04 Conn & Pass Riv pref 100
•281 282 H2 282 Hi 282 H. 282 Hj 282 Hi Connecticut River... 100
6
137
137 Fitchburg pref
220
137 137
137 137
100
39 Ga Ry.<fe Electric
39
100
100
•39 Hi 40 Hi •39 4 40H»
•78'2
•79 Hi 80 Hi •7834 80
80
13
Do pref
100
Last Sale 42
Mar'03 Houston El'tric com. 100
172 1^ 172 k
Maine Central
11
100
20
213^
21
2018 20»8
Mass ElectncCos
100 1,575
74
75
75
Do pref
408
74
74 Hi
loo
•8I4
•834
914
934
10
10 Mexican Central
215
100
192 192
192
193 N
192 192
H & Hart.. ..100 629
100 100
Northern N H
100
Last Sale 2^6
J'ly'U4 Norwich & Wor preflOO
225
202 14 202 14 Old Colony
202
202
21
100
""
•77
Last Salt ?S
78
J'ly'04 Peie Marquette
100
70
70
70
71
71
Do pref
100
30 Rutland pref
30
30
30
100
Last Sale 7514 Oct '03 Savannah Elec com.. 100
Last Sale 42
Feb'04 Seattle Electric
100
•94
•94
95
95
95
95
Do pref
75
100
Last Sale 65
Jan '04 Terre Haute Elec
100
•62Hj 05
9334
9279 9434
9338 941,
97«(. Union Pacific
100 11,181
•9334 94
Last Sale 95 14 J'ly'04
Do pref
100
Last Sale 165
J'ly'04 Vermont <fe Mass
100

110Hj112

112

I312
75>a
4
19

Ha

41,

•112^4 il3>4
iih
"7»a
*6»3
6

8
102

95'2

75!^

STOCRS
BOSTON STOCK

Friday
July IS

Weekly and Yearly

iUi8ceilaneou.s

19 '8 IS'i
128'al287g
129 129
128=*4 129
•loa* 11
76I4 76 H.

•

226

30

140

....

9Hi

71

'

30

96'a
*62ia
9134
•9334

95V!

75

226
201
•77

71

*13^ 14
•74-\
.41^

1934

74 14

191-el92

226
202
78

71

•

19Hj

73

19134 192

•225
201
•77

282 Hi
137

•39H> 40Hj
*79Hi 8OH1

•8H1

192

226
201
78

246

181

...
...

•19 "a 20
73
73

73I4
914

*225
201
*77

'

•39W, 40'u
•79'a SOHj

4013 40>u

Wetlneiday
July 13

96 1» 95"8
•246Hi247
I6I34 15134 I5II4I62
235
236 ....
167 167Hj 169 169 Hi
170
170
300
300 ....
145
145
95 1«

96

246

282 >2 •281
13634 137
137

Si

Centum Prices

I'er

75^8

74»4

7C»,

96

•

—Not

Tuesday
July 12

Record, Daily,

'2

bO

Miiy2o

lUApr

S

•55
•75
•60

N'ov

Mav
J'ui.

Oct
43 Hj J'ly
16 J'ly
27b

Dec

2«8Jau
I's

2 Hj

Jau
Feb

23 Hi Feb
79 Feb

34
7 Hi

Feb
Feb

Oct 120 Hi Feb

Nov

4

Feb

J'ly
3 Jan
1 ig J 'ne24
2 Hi J'ly 15
Santa Fe(Gold& Cop) 10 14,095
De.
14'8Apr
6i4J'ne 1
914 Jaulb
5Hj
10 4,3iHl
5'b
Shj
6»e Shannon
J'ly 190
Feb
•90
*91
95
9a Hi
91
91
93
93 Hi 94
93
137 85 JIay3l 120 Jam
25
92
93 Tamarack
Nov l»ie Feb
•60
•oO
100 •25 J'ne'2U 50 J'ly 13
Tecuraseh
25
3334 .Mar
1734 Jau
LastSale 3^
25
J'ly '03 Tennessee
14 Feb
6I4
414 J'ly
334 M!ir26 "0 '8 J'ly 15
4''8
4'8
534
5 Hi
26 lOj'ii
6 Hi
4''t
6H.
6> Trinity
4 Dec 3134 Jan
6 Marly
6 Marl
Last Sale
100
Mar'04 United Copper
10 14 J'ly 27 Hi Feb
'21^2 2134
21 '8 2L1h
21 'p 2 IN
2108
21 Hi 213<
21
2138
217^ UnitedStates Mining 25 8,341 18 Jan 4 2-Z Jau 2
8 Dec 17 Mar
8 Is an 4 ll'gJ'lyU
•10
10 4 •10 Is 10 14
IOI9 103,
1034 1114
llHj ll't
1134
1134 Unit States Coal Jtoil 25 2,360
22 Jan 33SB."Vlay
37I4
Jau
3934 J'ne2i
3714 37
373.
8634 37 14
37
30 Hj 37 Hi
37
5 19,474 30
3734 Utah Con (Gold)
373h
9
Feb
IHjUet
2^-'4
3I9
3I4 Victoria
2i8J'nell
'^34
4 Apr
23^
234
3
3
316
25 '2,610
2'b
23i
8I4
8ig
5 Hi J'ly 11434 Mar
Feb 23
8 Hj J'ly 14
73,
734
738
738
738
25 5.118 5
7H!
8
8H
8Hi Winoira
J"* 75
Mar
J'ly 77
576 69 Jan 6 77 J'ly 13 61
74
V4
77
77
73 H» 74
76
76
25
74
76
76 Wolverine
li4Jau 4 •75 Oct
•60 85
2'e Mar
•50
85 ••60 •85
75 75
50
•75
•75
•60
710 50 Feb 23
Wyandot
25
Bx-nghts. aEx-dir. & rights
tBeforepay'tofas8e8s't8 0aUedinl903. d Before pay't of assess'ts called in 1904. 'Bid and asked. H New stock. fAss'tpaid.
*6-'4

1%

-138

•IHj
534

134

534

21-^

534

-I

'fc

:t

-

—

5

July

Boston Bond Becord.

1904]

16,

BONDS

Price

'

Week's

Friday
July 15

BOSTON STOCK EXCH'QE
Week Ending July 16

Last Sale

98»4 99
9534 Sale

<fe

M.S

110 Feb '04
104 >2 Apr '00
117 Feb '04

F-A

M-N

101 Mar'03
112>2 Jan '03
112'8 Apr '04
101 Apr'04

FA

J-J
J-J
J-J

'

112'a,

9934

A-0

M-N
J-D

Iowa Div

>

Debenture 5s
Denver Exten 48
Nebraska Exten 4s

100
107

AG

M-N

19l:i

1922
1927
1921
B<fe SWst4s
3 I2S
1949
/ lUinois Div
Joint bonds See Gt Northern
Chic Jc Ry <fe Stic Yds 5s 1915
Coll trust refunding g 4sl940
Ch MU cS; St P Dub D 6s.. 1920
Ch
& St P Wis V div 6sl920
Chic & No Mich 1st gu 58.1931
Chicifc WMich gen 58. ...1921
Concord & Mont cons 48.. 1920
Conn<fc Pass R Ist g 48. ..1943
1927
Current River Ist 5s
1st 48... 1946
DetGr Rap<fe
Dominion Coal Ist 6s
1913
1906
Eastern Ist gold 6s
Fltchburg4s
1915
1927
48
,

105 J'ne'04
100 J'ne'o4
106 14 Dec '02
9SH1 Mar'04

F-A

M-N
M-S

'

128

Apr'04
Jan '04
10014 Feb '04

extend 4s. 1905
1919 A-O
1919

99

J-J

9339

9334 Sale

9334

9934

128

78

81

991a 100
IOOI4 100^4

104 105
99 14 100

58

NY

98'a 98^
90ie 9334

J-J

107

125^2.

12512 J'ly '04
1231a Apr'04

A-O
A-O

W

MS
M-S
MS

98

98
125

M-N
J-D
J-D
A-O

J'ly '04

106 Hj.

A-O
J-J
J-J

M

Hi.

May'04

10(1

10634

10634 10734 10634

10538 107
97
981a

125%

12434

123>al24i2
100 101 14
1061a 107

109 14 Mar'02
11214 Jan '03
101 Apr'04
9534 J'ly '04

96
108

108

108
104

Sale

J'ne'04

lOOialOlia
96
97
1051a 109
104 104»8
102 la 103

1024 Apr'04
111>4 May'02
M-S
FremtElkcfcMoVlst68..1933 A-O 137>g
137
1371a May'04
Unstamped 1st 6s
1933 A-O ]37Hi
137 Feb '04
137
9634
Gt Nor C B & Q coU tr 4s 1921 J-J
97^8 Sale
98S 79 90
951a J'ly '04

1921 Q-J

Registered 4s

N'Eng

<fc

1371a

137

98%
95 %

9038

Philadelphia and Baltimore Stock

—Not

731a 75
79

July 11
•7378

79

791a

83,

7415

9

I6I4

4534

61a

6I2

4534

4534

4534

20

20

741a 75
80 14 3034
9
9
1634 17

741a

9

16

7%

20 14 20 14

7

80

80

9%

7''8

9%

I714
714

9
I6I4

I714
714

739

7%

45%

4534

2038
*3l4

20%

914

9%

101

Sale

J-J

62

Sale

J'ly
J'ly

1434 Sale

No

J-J
J-J

2^8

*9i8

3

314

93i6

913

914

*80i2 81
38»8 38»e
3^16

ii

3

20
9I18

80»8
'SO
38 "a 3808

S'^ie

59
59%
39 14 39 14
6i«
•6

•8O34
3808

1134

251a
411a 4134
361a

•36
53

811a

39%

338
5834 593j6

59
59%
•39
39%
*6
6%
•11^8 12 14
25I4 2534
•4lia 42

1134

9%

33j,

S'le

25%

4534
2038
314

S9
6I16

39%

6I16

*11'8 12 14
253l8 26I4
4178 41^8

4534 4534
2038 2038
ta^ie 3610
tula
b^j

9%

'

9%

9313.

101'4
10414

J-D
F-A

J-J

FA

J'ly '04
Oct '02

Mar'02
Apr'04
10314

M-S

107

Feb '03

J-J

102=8 Apr'04

100=8 103

94 'e Mar'04
107
108
72 14 May'04
102
102
105i8May'04

94''8
94
100iall3

108

Sale

MS

M-N

11 20s

Range

80%

3834

3%

36

36%
531a
8534

8538

6%
12%

12

397e

2534 263e
4178 4178
36ii8 36lie

54%

85 14

63 '8

85

631a
8434

59%

6%

6I16
6%
1178 12
26Ji6 26Bi8
41*8 42
*35S8 36

531a

3«16

693i„
3878

38 '8 39

35'4

8578

54% 54%
85%

3%
5938
3934

11

Bid

PHILAU£I,PUIA

Ask

Inactive Stocks

American Cement

41

'35

'8

Diamond State

50
47

51

48

86

87
23

Range

tor Year

tor Previous
Year (1903)

Highest

71

75
92

534 J'ne

1

J'ly 14

1034
2134
838

5

J'ne 2

7 J'ue21
1334 J'ne21

Jan 2
Jan 2
Jan 26

Apr 12

Preferred

15

15%

3-3 %.48

10

50

MinehiU& Schuyl H..60

60
sieel.5

North Pennsylvania. .50
Penu Gas Coal
50
Pennsylvania Salt
50
Pennsylvania Steel.. 100
Preferred
100
Phlla Co ( Pitta) pref. 60
Phil Gorman & Norrls.50
Phila Traction
5t)
.

Railways General
Susqueli Iron

<te

Tidewater Steel
Preferred

.

152
983f.

152%
Si

Steel..

Id

Westmoreland
*

3ii

Coal... 60

Bid and asked prices

80
i

DQ sales on this day.

MS

II

Lowest

is

6sgl911....J-D
Imp M 48 g '47. A-O

Con

P

M

of '82 48 '37.J-J

R E Side

os 1930
43 interim ctfs

10S%

U Trac Ind gen 58'19. J-J
U Trac Pit gen 5s '97 J-J

1071.

Welsbach

9934 100

105
82

82%

51% 53
106%
102
10734

110
110
11734
1213,

US^B

107%

s f

5s 1930. J-D

llAl,TIi11<)RK
Inactive Stocks
Atlanta <fc Charlotte. 100
Atlau Coast Line RR.IOO
Atlan CoastL (Couu)lOO
Canton Co
100
Georgia Sou* Fla...lOO
Ist pref
100
2(1 pref
100
G-B-S Brewing
100
Mt Vcruou Cot Duck
Unit Elec L <fe P pref. 60
.

AnacoBtia
Atlcfc

104
92

i'r378 11438

Ch

Atlau C

cfc

28
45»4

2638 J'ly

81
22

42

K

J'ly 13

Marl4 36% J'ly 12
Jan 2 54% J'ly 15
May 16 8934 Jan 22
22

J'nel8

65%

Charl C

6538

Jan.

J'nel8

Deo
Nov 36 J'ly
64 Aug 7934 Feb
34% Nov 457g Jau

% Sep

1

Nov

35

Oct

5

Cttsof lndebt4s....J.J
HiiltCPasslstSs'll M-N
Bait Fundg 68.1916 M.N
Exchange 3 %s 1930 J-J
Hef undin g 3 %8 1 952J -J

Halt&PlstOsnil'll A-O
Halt Trac 1st 5h..'29 M-N
No Bait Div 5s 1942 J-D
Couverliblo 58. '06

Dec

Jan
Jan
Jan
Sep 44iiiB Feb
Nov 40% Jan

Nov

110

ox-dlyldend.

H Ex-rights.

t$15l>aid.

|

9
177b

341 lie

2734
4078 Sep

4734 Feb-

Oct 116% Jan

76
20

Aue 31

228
95

93%
""534

235
100
45
96
67

MS

A ext 5s. '09 J-J

Ask

80
114
110

115

112% 113
98
114

no

121
113

102
114
117
68
12

100

92

106%

11*7

117

118

lO.i'v

1071

3

15

1

i

%i

109
112
11234 114

115
112
105

io'j"

'J

E

1

Lcfc

P 1 8t 4 'as' 29

M

-

N

Un Uvcfc Kl 1st 4s '49 M-S
J-D
In(onio is 1949
VaMid 1st 6s 1906.. M-S
series Os 1911. ..M-S
scries Os 1916. .JI-S
4th ser 3-4 58 1921 .M-S
5th series 5s 192(i.M-S
Va (StJito) 38 new '32. J -J
Fund debt 2-38 1991. J -J
West N C eon 6a 1914 JJ
2(1
3(1

Wes Va CA P
107

5S1
15

100
90

112%
1 5 %

SecAvT(Pitt8)5s'31 J-D
Sav Fla ifc West 5s '34 A-O
Seaboard A L 4s 1950 A-U
::^rtli^ A Koan 5a J026.J-J
South Bound Ist 5s. .AO

99
120
95

983,

105

105
110

A

106% 107

114

52% 52 %
22% 2234

J-,1
68 1904
Series
5s 1926.... J -J
Series B 58 1926. ...J-J
Pitt Un Trac 58 ]9l»7.JJ
PotoViil Ist 58 1941.. J-J

Norfolk St Ist 5s'44..J..l

2%
29% 31

il9

115

110%
112% 112%
102% 10234
107
107%

North Cent 4 %8 1925 A.O

6

Mar

Bid

113% 114% Npt NcfeO P Ist 58'38 M-N
General os
1941 M-S

M.N 100%
M.N 113

Ry con5sl032
Ext& Imp 58.1032 MS
ChaaCityRy 1816h'23 J-J

7834 Jan
4734 Feb.

Aug

734
1834

36

Jan

4

5538

MetSt(Wash)l8t5s'25FA
Mt Ver Cot Duck Ist 58.
Incomes

155

09

Atl Coast L(Ct)ctfs 5s J-I)

<fe

11

i;>

2d 78

116

Pot 63

1st 7... 1907 J .J

L RR481952M.S

Cent'l

104
109

518

Bonds

1919. ..Var

Pcnii Steel lat 58 '17 M-N
People's Trtr certs 48 '43
P Co 1 stife col tr 58'49

M
M

Terminal 58 g 1941. Q-F

Penu A Md Steel con 6s. iii'
Pa cfe N Y Can 78 '06. J-D 105
Con 58 1939
A-O 114
993
Con 4s 1939
A-O

50

Warwick I ronife Steel. 10
West Jersey & 8eaSh.50

. . .

8

Jan

10%

1910 A-O
City cfc Sub 1st 5s.. '22 J-D
103%
Cltycfe Sub(Wa8)lst5.s'48
127
Col<feGrnvlst6s.l916J-J
119 120
Consol Gas 6s... 1910 J-D
113%
1939 J-D
105
08
104
Ga cfc Ala Ist con 5s '45 J -J
125
G a Car & N 1 st 5s g '29 J101% 102% Georgia P lst68...'22 J-J
GaSOcfe Fla 1st 58 1945 J-J
100
111
G-B-S Brew 3-4s 1951M-S
2d income 58 1951 M-N
97%
KnoxvTraclst58'28A-0
114
LakeK El l.st gu5s'42M-S
54
57

106%

102

r

Jan 22
May26 6*16 Jan 13
Jan 6 tl5% Jan21

37'8M»yl7 43
5

4034

Chas Ry G <fe El 5s '99

5

S

Var

5s

62% Jan 14 81%J'ne21
Feb 26 39% May 6
27eMar 3 4ii6Jau25
5578Marl2 61% Jan 27
3334

19%Marl4
226 38 Mar 1

3,538
6,289

'J

y«ioJan

Dec

38

^00%

M

10734

91

38% Feb

6

%Nov

7iioOct
10 Dec

100

P & E gen

111%

102

J'ly

14% Jan

Dec 52 % Jan
17% Nov 2634 Jan

g '20. A.O
Gen
48 g 1920. .A&O
Ph & Read 2d 5s '33. A-O
Con
J-D
78 1911

PHILADELPUIA

W A B col tr 4s '21. J-J
Rochester By con

l42

5% J'ly 15

106,256

ConM

110

Coii.sol

672

yi4J'ne25
13% Feb 8

Jaa

45

4034

J'ly 15

4:614

Oct
Oct

20
8

BALTI.HOKE

Ex

10534

138Mayl3
Feb 8

58% Dec 72%Jaa
84% Oct 118 Jan
1034 Dec 28% Jan

A$K

109

Inconif) 4s 1939... M-N

Consol 68 o 1905

10

1,710
2,778
16,589
1,935

117

Ist 48 '36. .M-N
Deben 6s 1905
M-S
Penu gen Os r 1910.. Var

8% No Penu

10

United N J Rll <* C. 100 266
Unit Pow <fe Trans.... 25
United Trac Pitts
50
Preferred

F-A

1943

Lehigh Nav 4%s '14. Q-J
RRs 4s g
1914. Q-F
GenM 4%8 g.l924.Q-K
59% 60% Leh V C 1st 58 g '33. .J-J
62% Leh V ext 4s Ist 1948. J-D
2d 78 1910
M.S
Consol 6s 1923
J-D
2% 3
Annuity Os
102
103
J-D
Leh V Trac 1st 4s '29. J-I)
Nat Asphalt 5s recta.
91
New (;ou Gas 58 1948 J.D
New,irk Pass con 5m 1930
45
45% NY i'li&Nol8t48'39J.J

60

KeystoneWatch Case. 100

<fc

WU

H

Keystone Telephone ..50

Iron

53 1920 M.N
Elec
Peo Tr stk tr ctfs
Elm <fe
1st 6s '10. J-J
Eq II Gas-L 1st g 5s 1928
& B Top con 5s '25 A-O
Indianapolis Ry 48.1933
Interstate Rys

&

.

N Haven

Me Ist 5s 1949 J-J

E & A 1st M

Elec Storage Batt
100
Preferred
100
Germanlown Pass
50
Harrison Bros pref . .100
Indianapolis St
100
Inter Sin Pow & Cheni.60

Nesquehoning

94

D Can Ist 6s '16 J-J

Che<fc
Chocife

Eastou Con Electric. .. 60

Lit Brothers
Little Schuylkill

101%

110%

Bethle Steel 6s 1998. Q-F

J'ne 3 40%Jne21
18%May25 21% Jan 23
%Mayl3 t3=8J'lyl5

43

734

Highest

Lowest

Phil Elec gold trust ctfs.
Trust certits 48

IUO34 101

ctfs.

Weekly, Yearly

Bid

Ask

Bid
1163,

Ch Ok <fe G gen 5s '19 J-J
Col St Ry Ist con 5s 1932
ConTracoIN J Ist 68. '33

265
839

50
100
RR
50
PUiiadelp'a Co (Pittsb) 50
Philadelphia Electric. 25
Phlla Rapid Transit... 50
Beading
50
Do 1st pref
50
Do 2d pref
50
Union Tract on
50
United Gas Impt
50
Wi-lsbachCo
100

Bonils

AmRy8Conv58

Steel

Preferred

E

36

54%

ext 78 1910 A.O
1911. J-D
Atl City l8t 58 g '19. M.N
BaUs Ter 1st 5a 1926. J-D

Al Val

7=(

41"8

5334

Berg&EBrwl8t6s'21J-J

10
60
50
Cambria iron
50
Central Coal & Coke. 100
Preferred
100
Consol Trac Pitts
50
Preferred
50
Danville Bessemer... 1%

Amer Iron & Steel
BeU Telephone

40=8

U258 112

Trust Co.

1904

26

3834 Lehigh Valley
3"8 MarsdenCo
593e Pennsylvania

til*
6%
12% 12%
26
26%

'20

PH11..ADELPHIA

120
424
50

80% 80%L«Mghaoal& Nav.... 50

39

531a

84^8 84^8

9% aieotric Co of America 10
6% Gen Asphalt interim ctfs..
Do pref interim ctfs

4,677
3,555

oi^Consol Lake Superior.. 100
634
Do pref
100

3834

98 "a 100 la

16

Apr'04

and asked.

Daily,

the

10134 1021a

100
100 la
87 14 J'ly '01

10038 Sale

>4

7138 72I4
102 10234
IO5I8IO518

10234 Apr '03
1021a J'ly '04

F-A
J-J
J-J
J-J

459

4534 .vmerioan Railways.... 50
20«8|Cambria Steel
50

80

02
103

92
100

....10334 103

57% Jan

39%

101 3f,
101
104 14104^4
lOlia 1011-2
1201a 121

J'ne04

121
105

103

100
47
607
50
100 1,073
681
100
16% I6I4
Do pref
•738
7«8 United Ry& Electric. 50 1,965

8O34

3%
31a
693i9 599l8

10118102 la

1011,

102
92

J-J
J-J
J-J

Lowest

38 '8

7l8

93 42 9712
102 102
102 102
10218104 14

IOII12 J'ue'04

Shares

9%
5%

16 14

678

102 Apr '04
103 Apr'04
106 19 Mar'03
10134 lOl^f

FA

Baltimore
74% 75 Consolidated Gas
81% 84% Northern Central
8 7e Seaboard Air Dine
83,

8034

3534

53

338

701a

13

Week

Stocks see below)

4534
2038
*338
*634

118

oSH

Mar'02
9334
94
102 Jan '04

Philadelphia
4534

851a

104
106 '8

118
10

1434

J-J

Sales
of

100
110
121
95

104

F-A
A-O
A-O
A-O

.

legig

10134
101
I2OI4 122

6 '8 May'04
75 J'ne'O

price Friday ; latest bid

(For Bonds and Inactive

IViday
July 15

1434

97
97

9334

128
97
103
117
92
81
103
107

94 Is J'ne'04
83
8:J
103 J'ly '04
107 May'04
101
101
120 14 Apr'04
102 J'ue'03
118 May'04
62
62

85

A-O
A-O
A-O

Gold4ias
1914
1916
Gold debenture 4s
Gold 4s
1917
Western Teleph & Tel 5s. 1932
Wisconsin Cent 1st gen 481949
Wisconsin Valley 1st 7s.. 1909

ACTIVE STOCKS

Thursday
July 14

Wednesday
July 13

78% 79

79

834
1534
634

83<

1&\

16

Tuesday
July 12

83

J-J
J-J

Exchanges— Stock Record,

Per Centum Prices

Sslmre Prices

Monday

Saturday
July 9

MS
AO

M-N
M-S
M-N
West End Street Ry 4s... .1915 F-A

"

96

97

109 J'ly '04
120 '4 121

10918

......1915 A-O
let 7s !!!".!!! 1 906 J-J

Bonds.

Low Jiigh

Hicih
J'ly '04

J-D

M-N 121
M-S
941a

1905
1924
Old Colony gold 4s
Oreg Ky <fe Nav con g 4s 1946
Line Ist g 68
1922
Oreg Sh
Repub Valley Ist s t 6s... 1919
Rutland 1st con gen 412S-I94I
Rutland-Canadian Ist 431949
Savannah Elec Ist cons 5s.] 952
1930
Seattle Elec 1st g 03
Torrington Ist g 5s
1918
Union Pac RR cfc 1 grg 48.1947
1911
1st lien cony 48
U nited J'^uit conv gen 58. 1911
US Steel Corp 10-60 yr 5s. 1963

Note— Buyer pays accrued interest in addition to the purchase price for all Boston

97
97

12818 J'ne04
971* J'ly '04

Ist 68

.

'

.

Ask Low

97

Since
Ja/nuary 1

A-O I27ia
A-O

. .

113
102

112
101

9934
J'ne'Ol

117'4
8OI4 J'ly'(l4

80 »4

110

110

il7'"il7'

Feb '04
Feb '03

100
128

Cent Vermt lstg48..Mayl920
Ist 5s
Ist 4s

M

99^8 Jan '02

J-I)

.

97»8 10134
9334
87

AO

Range

Range or

J-J

Illinois Steel

.

10

Week's
Last Sale

Sid
deben 5s
1910
Non-convert deben 5s. ..1913
la Falls <fc Sioux C Ist 78. 1917
Kan O Clin& Spr Ist 5s... 1925
Kan G Ft S & Gulf 1st 78. .1908
1928
KanC FtScottcfe 68
1934
KanCMcfe Bgen 4s
1934
Assented income 58
Kau C & M Ry ik Br l.st 5sl929
KanCStJo&O B 1st 78.. 1907
D R cfc Ft Sni Id gr Ist 7s. 1905
Maine Cent cons 1st 78... 1912
1912
Cons 1st 4s
Mara Hough <feOnt 1st 6s. 1925
Mexican Central cons 4s. .1911
Jan 1939
Ist cons Inc 3s
Jan 1939
•Jd cons inc 3s
Mich Telep cons 63 tr rec.1929
Minne Gen Blec con g 5s 1929
1929
NewEngCot Yarn 6s
1906
New EngTelephGs
1007
6s
1908
6s

99
96

9734
88I4

J-J

1924
1907
1944
1906
Improvement 48
B08t <fe Mon 8(1 issue 7s . 1904
Boston Terminal Ist 3 '28. 1947
1918
Bnr <fe Mo BIT ex 6s
1918
Non-exempt 6s
1910
Sinking fund 4s
1917
Bntte & Boston 1st 63
Cedar Kap<Si MoR Ist 7s. 1916
1909
2(178
Cousol 58
Boston <S> LoweU 48
Boston <ft Malne4'<j8

&Q

99
96

95 V2

ITice

Friday
July is

Low High

Jiigh

9834

205

BOSTON STOCK EXCH'GE
Wkbk Ending July 15

January 1

aqcc

lOl'fllOl'4 loivi
10134
93'2
9334 J'ne'04

.'.

lowaDiv

Jiange
Since

or

113»2Feb'03

Atch & Nebraska
AtchTop<fcSFeKeng48..1995 A-O
Adlnstment g 4s.. J 'ly 1995 Nov
Boston Elect Laght Ist 68. 1908 M-S

.

Ranye

Ask Low

Bid
J-J
Am Bell Telephone 48.. ..1908 J-J
48.1929
Am Telep Tel coU tr7s.. 1908 M-S
Ist

Chic Burl

J
J

Wll

&

Weld

Ist r.g- 1 1 J .J
58.. 1935. J.

116
lU!
1

113

113
69

10H%

69%

106

79%
W)\

!•()

4734

4-<

%

104
112
116
110

112%
94

95

9434

95

112
109
11414

Reorganization certiticates $3 assrssnieut paid.

%

THE CHRONICLE.

206

[Vol. Lxxix.

(lan t^ecuritien

Yolume

TBANSAOTIONS AT THE

NEW YORK

Stocks

Week xniUng
July 15
iyu4

238,528
458,101

V S

$20,364,300
41,631,600
46,935,000
76,274.400
63,754,250
81,490,350

$1,111,500
2,770,500
3,108,500
4,372,500
2,746.600
4,312.000

$14,000
24.500
159.500
28.500
61,000
38,000

$18,421,500

$325,500

...

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday.

5.3S,-<4U

831,209
GSH/JIO
848,004

Thursday...
Friday
Total.

Week ending July 15

Sales at
Stock

January

$1,000
20,000

$21,000

July 15

1 to

New York

Exchange

1903

1904

Gas—
F.A

1915

68 g 1949
Indiana Nat &
l8t 68 1908

Bonds

S:c

Bondt

Par valxn

Shares

State

Sonds

Railroad

Rapiils

lllst 58

Hudson Co Gas

3,598,658 $330,449,800

Sattirday

Grand

STOCK KXCUANQK

WEEKLY AND YEARLY

DAILY.

93
65
28

noi

100
71
See Stock Exch
111

Gas—
M-N

Indianapolis Gas stock 50
Ist 68 1920
M.N
Jackson Gas Co
50
58 g 1937
A.O
Kansas City Gas
100

42
58

n04'2
81

97

liiduHtrinI

Ask

and

niiscel

Bid

60

Compressed Air Co... 100
Consolld Car Heating 100

60

66

30

IjCons Firew'ks

com .100

14

100

60

18
67

"Preferred
103
72
liat

46
63

4

Cons Ry Ltg<fe Ref ng. 1 00
414
4
Consol Rubber Tire.. 100
I'll
Debenture 4s
9
11
Cons Storage BatlerylOO
10
Cont Tobac deb 7»'0D A-O noiia 1021a
1.

Cotton Oil<feKibre,pref.25
Cramps' Sh <feEu BldglOO
1;Crucible St<;el
100
100
II Preferred..
Cuban Os of 18^6

3

5

18

I

25

5%

100
37
9512
16
94
1158 1922
A-O
97
98 "s Diamond .Match Co. 100 12934 1301*
lILaclede Gas
100
Dominion Securities. 100
5
15
95
UPreferred
100
95
Electric Boat
100
44
47
Lafay'eGasl8t6s'24.M.N
58
63
Preferred
100
74
82
Log<feWabVl8t6s'25.J-D
50
34
Electric Lead Reduc'n.60
54
Madison Gas 68 1926. A-O no6 109
Preferred
50
l"*
Newark Gas 6s 1944. QJ nSoHi 136 Electric Vehicle
100
9^ 934
Newark Consol Gas.. 100 73
Preferred
14
I412
74
100
TICongSs 1948
S-D n07's 108
Electro-Pneum'icTranlO t
^
512
No Hudson L & Pow
Empire Steel
100
61a
08 1938
33
Preferred
100
42
A-O noo 102
47
62
flO&IndCNat&IU.lOO
3
8
H General Chemical ..100
40
Ist 6s 1926
93
45
100
97
J-D
H Preferred
la
52'2 Gold HiU Copper
Pat <fe Pas Gas<fc Elec 100
51
1 f
"td
U Cong 58 1949. ...M-S no2 10312 Greene Consol Copper. 10 t 1514 15%
St Joseph Gas 58 1937. J-J
93
HackensackMeadowslOO
13
95
16
StPaulGas Gen 58'44M.S
92
95
Knick'b'ker Tr Co rects
10
15
Syracuse Gas 5s 1946. J-J i 99 101
Hackensack Water CoRet g 48 52 op 12. ..J-J {9112 92
HaU Signal Co
70
90
100
Telegrr
Telephone
Havana Commercial. 100
8
15
15
87
95
Preferred
HAmerTelegcfc Cable 100
100
35
BeUTeleph of Buttalo 100
98 100
Havana Tobacco Co. .100 26
28
104
36
IJCentral & So Amer .100 102
Preferred
33
100
Che3& PotoTeleph..lOO 30
Hecker-Jones-Jew'l MiU
5s 1909-29
JJ IO3I4 105
l8t68 1922
M-S 102 105
'4
1
TlCommercial Cable ..100 178 200
Herring.HaU-MarvinlOO
30
40
Commer Un Tel (N Y). 26 115
Ist preferred
100
2
Emp & Bay State Tel 100 78
82
2d preferred
100
Franklin
47
52
Hoboken Land <fc ImplOO 200
100
UGoldcfe Stock
100 118 121
M.N il02 105
1158 1910
1
114 128. 1905
Houston OU
3
100
13
90
16
Hudson RiverTelephlOO 85
Preferred
100
90 lOU
149
Hudson Realty
J Teleph...lOO 147
UN
58 1920 See Stock Ex Chang e Ust Internat'lBankingColOO 14112
414
419
Int'n'l Merc Marine. 100
UNorthwestern Teleg. 50 120 123
16'2 18
78
82
Pacific <fe Atlantic
Preferred
25
100
50
75
Col tr deb 4'2l922op'07
1[Southern & Atlantic 25 100 103
10
11
International Salt
100
Electric Coinpaniea
43
45
Istg 581951
5
Chicago Edison Co... 100 142 145
International SUver.lOO
30
33
HKingsCo El LcfeP Co 100 190 193
Preferred
100
92 '2
90
Narragan (Prov) El Co 50
Ist 6s 1948
J-D 5 991a 101
NY&QElL&PowColOO 46 48 John B Stetson com. .100 150
79
Preferred
81
Preferred
100
100 130 150
20
812
Lanston Monotype
UnitedElectricot N JlOO
20 t
91a
66% 66% Lawyers Mort insur.lOO 170 180
48 1949
J-D
Lawyers' Title Ins... 100 275 285
Ferry Companies
IfLonUard (P) pref ...100 115
512
612 Mackay Companies ..100
24
Brooklyn Ferry stocklOO
241a
67
70
Preferred
B<&NYlst6s 1911. J-J 105
100
10
20
Con 5s 1948 See Stock Exch Ust
Madison So Garden.. 100
2d 68 1919
N Y & E R Ferry stk. 100 75 80
M-N 60
90
Manhattan Transit
1st 5s 1922
1% 1%
M-N i 89
20 t
8
10
Hob con 5s '46. J-D 105 107 Mes Nat Construe. pflOO
S^
Hob Fy 1st 5s 1946 M-N no8 110 Monongahela R Coal. .50 f
Preferred
N Y <fe N J 1st 5s 1946. J-J no2 104
50 t 19% 19-8
40
60
Mosler Safe Co
10th <fe 23d Sts Ferry 100
1021a
100
I5I4
95
14
Ist raort 6s 1919. ..J-D i 91
UNat Enam & Stamp 100
70
80
28
30
HPref erred
ITUniou Ferry stock .100
100
110 116
89
National Surety
Hist 5s 1920
100
M-N 88
42
45
HNew Central Coal
20
Railroad
N Y Biscuit 6s 1911. M.S 105
Chic Peo & St L pref.lOO
NYMtge&Security.lOO 115 125
16
20
Deposited stocK....
HNew York Dock
100
40
45
10
Undeposited stock
llPreferred
100
5
109
Prior Uen g4'2S'30M<feS no6
N Y Transportation. ..20
51a
1
91
88
Con mtg g 58 1930. J&J
Nor
Lum'r <fc Pulp 100
2'a
3I2
4*4
24
28
Income 58 1930
HOntario SUver
100
93'2
29
31
ChR I& Pac4s (wi)
Otis Elevator com
100
86
88
82
87
Erie conv4sAprl'53A&0
Preferred
100
Y Central deb 4s (w i). 98 '8 98% Pittsburg Brewing 50 t 2512 2534
Northern Pacific
Preferred
100
50 t 45'2 46
143*
When released
132 139
Pittsburg Coal
100
101 '2
5818
53
Northern Securities.. 100 loo's
Preferred
1 00
2 '8
212 Pratt & Whitn pref.. 100
99
Reduced
37
Pitts Bess <fc L E
Realty Assoc (Bklyn)lOO 120
50 t 34
Preferred
77
Royal Bak Powd pref. 100 103 104
50 t 75
63
Seaboard Air Line
RusseU & Erwin
25 f 61
85 '2 86
190 I
Colltr 5s '07 op (wi)M-S
Safety Car Heat& LtlOO 183
'8
South Pacific rights (w 1)
3
Seminole Mining
2
•a
5 t
H
25
30
Preierred {,w i)
100 115 lloi-. Smipson Crawford Co 100
80
35
Va & South western.. 100 28
Deb s i 68 '24 op '05. .J
Singer Mfg Co
100 400
Industrial uud Miscel
6
Standard MUUng Co. 100
7'a
26
29
AUiance Realty
90 100
Preferred
100
100
8'2
75
76
llAUis-Chalmers
100
5s
9's
44
45
llPreferred
Standard Oil of N J. .100 624 627
100
28
32
67
HAmer Bank Note Co. 50 t 64
Standard Coupler comlOO
4 '4
4 '2
American Can com. ..100
Preferred
100 110 126
42 'a 43
Preferred
'*
Storage Power
loo
50 t
American Chicle Co. .100
88
92
Swift c& Co See Boston St k Exc h'ge
102
Preferred
82
78
1st 5s 1910-191*-.. ..J-J ilOl
loo
1
31
American Elevated
Tennessee Copper
25 t 28
75
90
MaUingOs 19 1 4. J-D 100 102 llTexas <fc Pacific Coal 1 00
90
Amer Press Assoc'n.lOO 80
1st 6s 1908
A-O n«5 110
435 450
Amer Shipbuilding... 100 14 "s
Title Guar <fe Trust ...100
Preferred
80 Is 8412 Title Ins Co of N Y..100 130 140
100
2
Soda Fouu com. .100
4
Touapah Min ( Nevada).! t 734
Shi
11
8
65
1st preferred
70
Trenton Potteries com 100
100
82
78
11
14
2d preferred
Preferred new
100
100
76
American Surety
165
50 160
Trow Directory new.. 100 05
3^
1
Amer Tobacco com... 50 250 600 Union Copper
10 t
llPreferred
100 135 140
Union Switch & Signal 50 t 65
i()5**
24
28
Am Typefo'rs com. ..100
Preferred
50 t.
r9
82
84
88
Preferred
Union Tj'pewr com. .100
loo
3 '4
Amer Writing Paper. 100
Ist preferred
100 108 111
10 la 11 'i
Preferred
2d preferred
100
100 108 1091a
3
1'4
72
73
58 1919
J-J
UnltBoxboardcfc Pap.lOO
9
11
21
Preferred
IIBarney&SmCar ...100 17
100
110 120
2
llPreferred
U S Cotton Duck
2'a
100
100
20
Bliss Company com
50 130 150
U S Envelope com... 100
67
63
Preferred
llPreferred
100
50 140 160
Bond& Mtg Guar. ...100 345 360 U S ReaUy<fc Imp See St'k Exch list
Borden's Cond Milk.. 100 115 120
58 g 1924 opt See Stock Exch list
7
109 111
Preferred
1 00
U S Shipbuilitiug (w i).
40
'4
Preferred (w i)
Camden Land
3
18
25
Celluloid Co
6 certifs
lOo ^12 113
13
18
Cent Fireworks com. 100
U S Steel Corp new 58 See Stk E X Ust
66
Preferred
60
Coltr sI6s '51 opt '11 .. no7's 1081a
..100
1
Coltrsf 6s '51 not opt.. n07i2 1081a
Central Foundry
100
6
7
Universal Fire Ext'r. 100
Preferred
7
100
8
60
53
Universal Tobacco. ..100
Deb 6s 1919 op 'OlM-N
a I'a
2
100
4
125
Preferred
Century Realty
100 100
Westchester & Bronx
Chosebrough Mfg Co 100 410 430
150
1]Clartiu(li B) 1st prof 100
88
92
Title & Mort Guar Co. 130
90
95
Westingh Air Brake.. 50 tl32i2 136
112d preferred
100
90
White Knob Mining. 10
98
100
11 Common
4'a
65
80
Col & Hock Coal* 1 pf 100
Worthing Pump pref. 100 116 119
90
1st g 5s 1917
J-J i 85
i

12

II

H

1903

1904

Bid

Essex & Uudsou Gas 100
Fort Wayne 68 1925.. J J
Ga8<& El Bergen Co. .100

Exchanges

of Business at Stock

.

89,563,267
3,598,658
4,777,217
56,909,153
StockST-N o. shares
$330,449,800 $437,775,050 $5,287,604,175 $8,877,834,350
Par value
$387,650
$28,000
$8,200
Bank shares, par..
,$391,800

BONDS
Qovernment bonds

21,000
325,500

15,128,200

$457,400
2,316,700
342,178,100

$9,142,750
353.600
362,072,300

$18,768,0001 $15,341,200

$344,951,200

$371,568,650

State bonds

BB. and nil a. bonds
Total bonds

18,421,5001

$113,000

DAILY TBAJ^SAGTIONS AT THE BOSTON AND rHILADELPUIA

EXCHANGES

Philadelphia

Boston

Week ending
July 15
iy04

Listed
shares

Unlisttd
shares

Bond

Listed
shares

tales

Unlisted
shares

Bond

."

sales

7,946
20.232
39,052
51,866
39,067
47,303

3.442
6,189
5,134
9.893
21.693
14,226

$13,000
21,000
42.500
103,600
59,500
66,000

14,986
14,743
28,490
31,458
34.U21
22,247

3,777
3,575
7,193
10.015
9,366
7,772

$56,000
118,000
109,700
89,800
107,400
130,400

205,466

59,577

$305,600

145,945

41,698

$611,300

Saturday

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday

.

Friday
Total

Outside Securities
A

Street Railways

NEW YORK

Ask

Bid

CITY

<i

Dry

D E B <& S—

iflst gold 58 1932. ..J-D 10884
99 4;
llScrip 68 1914 ....F-A
U Eighth Avenue st...lOO 390
F-A 105
HScrip 68 1914
H 42d & Gr St F'y stk. . 100 390
& St Av. . 100 60
42d St
lllstmort 6s 1910 .M-S 104^2
80
il2d income 63 1915 J-J
Interborough Rap Tr. 100 131
Lex Av <fc Pav F 5s See St k Exc
Metropol Securities See Stk E
Metropol Street Ry See Stk E
Ninth Avenue stock. 100 185
Second Avenue stocklOO 204
lllstmort OS 1909 M-N H02H2
Consol5s 1948.... F-A ill2
TISixth Avenue stock 100 172
Sou Boulev 58 1945. .J-J no2
So Fer 1st 5s 1919. ..A-0 no5
Third Avenue See Stock Exch
P & 5s 1928 100
Tarry
YkersStRB 5a 1946A.O 104
28th <fe 29th St8 Ist 5s '96 1110
liTwenty-Th'd St stk 100 390
J-J
Deb 58 1906
96
Union Ry IstSs 1942 F-A 108
Weatchest Ist 58 '43 J-J 102

M

I

;

I

i

W

N

M

BROOKLYN
Atlan

Ave

5s 1909. .A-0

110
100 "2

405
106
405
75
107
85
132
Ust

W E 08 1933. .A-O
Brooklyn City slock... 10

Con 6s See Stock Exoh
Bkln Crosstn 68 1908.J-J
Bkn Hgts Ist 58 1941 A-O
Bkln y Co & Sub See Stk
Bklyn Rap Tran See Stk
TJConey Is. & Bklyu ..100
Isl cons g 48 1948. .J-J

.

Bys Co

N

N

No Hud Co By 6s'14J-J ni2

i

71
67
108 '4
113
102
102
260
110
19

70 '4
87
101

106

llMutual Gas

EquitGascou58l932 See Stk E X Ust

101
105
Excli

Exch

list
list

350
loo's

114

100

New Amsterdam Gas1st consol 68 1948.. J-J
NY G EL HifcP See Stock Exch
N Y & East River Gas—
Ist 58 1944
J-J nil
Consol 58 1945
J-I no7
N Y Richmond Gas. 100 36
Nor Un 1st 5s 1927. M-N no4

112
h list
102
116

OTHER CITIES

no5

310
108 12
Ust

113
109

OTHER

Amer

Liglit

M-N

mow

107
140
170
112

Tract. 100

llStandard Gaa
llPreferred
let 58 1930

4912
91

93

00m

1131-.;

..100

loo

130
155

'•J

51

»2

CITIES

&

Preferred

nil's

290

<fe

Ust

Am

N

Am

Cent Union Gas Ist 58. no7 110
Con Gas (N Y) stk. See St k Exc h list
Conv deb 68 ctfs SeeStk Exch Ust

list

100

Bay State Gas
50
h
Uingliaiutou Gas 5s 1938 i 95
98
Brooklyn Union Gas deh
6s 1909 conv '07. ..M-S 184
186
Bull'alo City Gas stocklOO
2 "2

Am

107
I08
1st 5s 1947 See Stock Exch list
Chic UuiouTraoA'eeSt'ck Exch Ust
Cliicago Gas .See N Y Stk Kxcl: list
Cleveland Elecir Ry.lOO
70'* 72'v Cincinnati Gas & EloclOO 101 12 102
Columbus (O) St Ry..lOO 90
92
Cousol Gas of
J
100
Preferred
lOO 106^4
1st 53 1936
J-J
Colum Ry con os See Ph ila list
Consumers' L
^ Pow
Crosst' \vn IstSs '33.J-D }105'-j 106'a
63 1938
J-I) noi
103
Grand Rapids Ry
100
57
60
llDetroit City Gas
50 t
Preferred
loo
85
88
Elizabeth Gas Lt Co.. 100 200
Buyer pays accrued intereat. 1 Price per share.
Sale price, a Ki rights.

165

N

H

".J

ii

,

NY&

232

100
230

100
Stelnway Ist 68 1922.J-J illi

I

10
30
76
76
100
49

Gas Securities
NEW YORK

N Wb'g&Flatl8lex4'23

I

9 '4

'•J

noi

330
100
Brk C & N 5s 1939.J-J 111
Gr StifeNew 1st 5s '06 F-A 100
Gr'pt cfeLorimer St 1st 6s 102
Kings Co. Elevated
l8t 48 1949 See Stock Exch
Nassau Elec pret
100
76
A-O llOi^
58 1944
l8t48 1951
See St k Exc

Buffalo Street Ry—
Ist cousol 58 1931.. F-A
Deb 6s 1917
A.O
Chicago City Ry stk. 100

100

Preferred
29
100
4128 1952
J-J
74
North Chic Str stock. 100
72
Pub Serv Corp of J 100 95
Tr otfs 2% to 6% perpet 48
North J ersey St Ry 100
20
1st 48 1948
M-N 70
66I2
Cons Trac of
J... 100
1st 58 1933
J-D ilOT->
New'k Pas By 5s '30J.J 5112
Or & New Ist 63 '05A-O noo
Essex Pas 68 1905 M-N HOI'S
Rapid Tran St By.. 100 250
Ist 58 1921
A-O S109
17
J C Hob* PatersonlOO
48 g 1949
M-N 693.
So J Gas El & Trac 100
85
Gug5s 1953
M-S noo

J-J nio
X list
58 1928
Ext 5s 1924
X list
M-N no4 105
Pat City con 6s '31.J-D n22
192
2d 6s.. ..1914 opt A-O noo
208
99 Si 1011^;
100
103 "2 Bochester Ry
98 '2 loo's
PrelerrJVl
100
II212
Con 5s 1930 See Phila list
176
2d 5s 1933
J-D 102 104
106
So Side El (Chic) stk.lOO
108
91
92
Syracuse Rap Tr 5s 1946 noi
list
U nit Ry 8 ( S t L Trans) 100 1012 12
106
Preferred
63 '2 65
100
106
Gen 4s 1934....6eeStk Exch list
113
UnitRysSanFran SeeHtk Exch List
400
Wash Ry <fc El Co.... 100 12
99
15
67 '2 5U
Preferred
100
111
78
4s 1951
J-D
106
7Sh
HWest Chicago St
100
46
47
HCong 58 1936.. ..M-N i 72
75 '4

A-O 108
Con 58 g 1931
Impt 58 See Stock Exc U list

BB&

Sti'cet llailvrays
Bid Ask
3'4
3%
1st 6s 1928
J-J i....
IJLouisv St58l930..J<feJ 113
114
Lynn<fe Bos 1st 68 '24. J-D m2'5 II412

Lake St (Chic) El stk.lOO

New on

Y&N

I

Weekly Review of Outside Market will be found on a preceding page.

3H4 33 Vj
Bleeck St& Ful F stk 100
93
96
1Il8tmort4s 1950 ..J-J
& 7th Ave stk ..100 239 244
T[B'y
U2dmort 58 1914 ...J-J 104 107
Con 5s 1943 See Stock Exch Ust
110
B' way Surf 1st Ss gu 1924 no8
99^2 101
2d 5s int as rental 1905
llCent'l Crosst'n stk.. 100 300
340
UlstM 6s 1922 ...M-N ni7 121
UCenPkN <fe EK stk.lOO 204 209
185
ilChr't'r& loth St stk 100 177
Col& 9th Ave 5s See Stock Exch list

&

I

a;ExdlVj

11

Sells

on Stock Exchiinge, but not a very aoUve

seouritT^

a

u

July

1

.

.

.
.
.
.

1

.

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

207

and l^ailtoad |utjelligtnx;e.
RaTlRoXd G R OSS^EXRlTlNGa

Itttr^sttttjettt

^^^

'

The following table shows the gross earnings of every Steam railroad from which regular weekly or monthly returns
can be obtained. The first two columns of figures give the gross earnings for the latest week or month, and the last two
columns the earnings for the period from July 1 to and including such latest week or month.
The returns of tJie street railways are brought together separately on a subsequent page.
Latest Brosi Earnings

ROADS
or

Week
Month

Current
Year

July 1

to Latest

Latest Gross Earnings

Date

ROADS

Week

Inly 1

Current
Year

Previous
Year

or

Current
Year

Month

Previous
Year

%

Previous
Year

Latest

to

Date

$

$

Current
Year

Previous
Year

27,714
343,745
291,602
34,327
<& No East April
76,262
8,115
82,983
7,33
June
Manistlque
183.047 2,416,966 2,289,577 Maryl'd A Penn. May
283,419
180,277
272,503
25,735
27,750
N O <fe No East. June
90,687
96,930 i.285,092 1,150,546 JMexloanCent'l.t April
2,347,081 2,213,447 17,256,092 15,158.429
June
Ala<fe Vlcksb'g
98,124
88,974 1,426,750 1,268,520 {Mexican latern. May.
557,364 599,723 6,360,419 6,598,563
Vioksb Sli&P. June
Dec. 54,240
Inc. 247,866
98,00U 5,631.500 5,259,800
vVkJune 25 101,200
Allegheny Valley May
J Mexican Ry
10,422
40.422
960.524.
38,885
38,885 jMexicanSouth'u 3dwk June
20,802
16,787 1,115,398
IstwkJuly
Ann Arbor
54,904
43,587
5,338,483 5,215,138 63,053.732 57,862,791 Millen A So'w'n. May
5,170
3,519
Atoh Top & S Fe May
9,810
270,300 267,465 2,976,849 2,672,490 Mineral Range.. IstwkJuly
9,889
9,889
9,810
Atlanta & Char. April
52,9S4
60,000
721,022
52.984
54,631
61,266
703,559 Minneap A St L. IstwkJuly
54.631
Knoxv <fe No June
Atl
55,419
Atlantic & Btr. a April
MStP A S St M. IstwkJuly 132,378 131,438 132.378 131,438
19,4le
285,472
250,001
Brunsw.&Birm April
Mo Kan <te Texas- IstwkJuly 285,472 250,001
1,822,735 1,720,109 18,780.785 17,877,043 Mo Pac A Iron Mt Istwk July 569,000 600,000
569,000
600.000
Atl Coast Lilne..( May
18,00U
14,970
138,944
11,379
99,835
25,000
18,000
25,000
Bait A Anns L.. April
Central Branch IstwkJuly
5.242,960 5.721.869 59,689,182 57,633,340
587,000
625,000
IstwkJuly 587,000 625,000
Balt&Ohio
May
Total
150,332 155.390 1,858,991 1,639,010 Mob Jack A K C. WkJuly 2
419,298
273,599
7,268
8,357
Bangor <fe Aroosi May
4,653
66.401
6,199
115,165
117,942
67,038 Mobile A Oliio... IstwkJuly 115,165 117,942
Bellefonte Cent') une
5,050
3,156
42,341
158,679
170,296
44,285 NashCh AStL.. IstwkJuly
158,679 170,296
Bridgt & Saco R May
115,085
194,016
161,989 tNat'lRRof Mex IstwkJuly 194,016 236,363
236,363
Bu«Rooh&PUtK IstwkJuly 115,085 161.989
84,332
83.194
881.737
920,936 Nev-Oal-Oregon. June
194,016
195,642
19,964
16,963
Buflalo (feSusq... May
60,300
51,200
60,300
25,658
33,295
51,200 Nevada Central.. April
1,901
3,484
Canadian North.. IstwkJuly
914,000 N Y C & Hud Riv June
6370052 6,724,770 77,500,900 77,605,777
Canadian PaoUic IstwkJuly 1,012,000 914,000 1,012,000
171,900 158,200
171,000
158,200 N Y Ont & West. May
570,497 621,952 6,010,110 5,533,813
Uent'l of Georgia IstwkJuly
1,924,915 1,839,276 19.795,680 17,344,188 N Y Susq A West May
249,674 283.447 2,398,280 2,377,930
Cent'lotN Jersey May
1,460,659 1.349,578 13,775,430 12,847,305 Norfolk A West'ii May
2,013,603 1,902,558 20.825,079 19,192,117
Central Pacltio.. January
'2,123
2,123
2,094
2,094 Northern Central May
901,865 861,165 9,255,746 8,531,746
Chattan South'n. IstwkJuly
1,617,942 1,502,160 17,559,808 15,186,551 North'n PaclBc. June
4,041,842 4,245,950 47,456,926 47,258,340
Ohesap & Ohio... May
842,928 837,703 10,469.685 9,323,135 Nor Shore iCal).. February..
389,649
345,070
30,321
33,284
Chic & Alton By. May
172,899
159,815
116,899 141,782
116,899
141.782 Ohio Riv& West. April
16,414
16,692
Ohio Gt Western. IstwkJuly
106,189
102,310 Pacific Coast Co. May
522,226 467,864 5,310,992 5,028,151
ChlcInd&Li'v..- IstwkJuly 106,189 102,310
3,531,435 3,702,382 44,464.137 43,611,815 ePenn— EastPAE May
10106138 10624538 109389235 108570835
Chio Milw & 8t P May
171C. 1,1
a,700
3,835,909 4,336,855 48,954,075 45,842,411
Dec. 53 9,100
May
Chio& North
eWestP AE... May
227.64U
222,075
795.037 890,422 10,586,591 11,103.253 Pere Marquette w IstwkJuly 227,640 222,075
Ohio St P M & O. May
26,232
26,232
31,730
31,730 PhilaBalt&W'sh May
1,235,55b 1,231,253 12,392.232 11,993,232
Ohio Term Tr RR IstwkJuly
652,461 673,214 6,929,481 6,332,883
Cln N O & T Pac. J^thwkJ'ne 214,581 230,572 6,768,744 6,155,455 Phlla A Erie..
May
1,775,884 1,806,680 19.031,211 18,351,749 Pittsb C C A St L May
CI Cin Ch & 8t L. May
1,962,251 2,041,546 22,316,187 21,461,624
250,120 273,974 2,785,120 2.666,827 Raleigh & O Fear May
46,202
Peoria (feEaat'D May
3,874
126,312 128,563
128,563 Reading Railway May
Colorado & South IstwkJuly
126,312
2,956,970 3,295,110 31,000.073 29,104 891
14,266
ColNewb <fe Lau. May
14,683
210,303
179,583
3,317,691 2,952,838 32,225,018 20,098 906
Coal Air Co.... May
43,463
421,474
314,045
Copper Range.... AprU....
37,014
6,304,661 6,247,948 64,125,091 49,203 797
Total Both Cos May
6,612
Cornwall
9,394
68,422
May
85,375 Rioli Fr'ksb A P May
187,552 1.53,6u0 1,364,308 1,192 ,248
21,121
492,956
482 ,174
Cornwall ALeb.. May
222,828
26,296
228,553 Rio Grande Jet.. April....
42,460
46,575
11 349
Cumberl'd Valley January.
149,750 125,193 1,291,195
11,349
8,477
842,194 Rio Grande So... IstwKjuly
8,477
Denv.&RloGr. t IstwkJuly 281,800 308,300
3,025,225 3,196,735 41,575,876 41,473. 541
May
Rooklel'dCo
281,800
308,300
Klo Gr. West. J
1,115,968 1,187. 148
93,955 122,20
St Jos AGrl
April....
85,303
Det & Mackinac. May
83,160
894,353
871.187 St
2,642,320 2,595.818 32,874,767 29,392 290
San Fran 9 May
123 733
Detroit Southern. 4thwk J'ne
28,710
42,309 1,493,775 1,531,797 St L Southwest.. IstwkJuly 143,710 123.733
143,710
49,212
DulSoSh&Atl.. IstwkJuly
51,696
49,212
51.696 StLVan&TH.. June ....
265,943 198,170 2,567,480 2,393 300
Brie
May
3,869,030 4.264,190 41,108.530 41,436.484 San Fran
124,570 126,591 1,356.531 1,299 •278
P.. June ....
EvansvA TH... •Ithwk Api
44,936
47,139 1,485,129 1,445,527 Seaboard Air L.. 4thwk J'ne 284,857 293,359 13.280,226 12,706 ,528
F'rchild&N'r'e'n May
2,857
3,295
900 ,495
32,983
37,006 Southern Ind
103,305
95,609 1,290,045
June
Farmv & Powhat May
9,298
7,204
76,735
69,884 So PaoiflcCoft... May
7,608,720 7,459,844 85,965,497 80,552 3-28
Ft
& Denv City May
152,566 180,766 2,321,564 2,273.997
Central Pacific. January... 1,460,659 1,349,578 13,775,430 12,84 7 305
Georgia RR
169.484 166,690 2,'259,655 2,143,441
May
Gal Har ASA. January... 580,584 593,810 4,221,191 4,014 019
Qa South A Fla.. June
127,297 140,468 1,686,690 1,635,191
696 201
807.199
77,226
99,724
Gal Hous A No January...
GUaValG<ii N.. January ..
96,57U
106 ,623
29,078
30,920
235,533
179,385
10,300
12,547
GulfWT AP.. January...
Gr Trunk System IstwkJuly 712,581 697,973
712,582
697,973
161,517 161,821 1.144.280 1,16 165
Louis'a West... January.
GrTr. West'n 4thwk J'ne 119,628 149,338 5,284,143 5,075,245
Morgan's L A T January .. 417,904 473,036 2,990,794 3,013 301
Det Gr HAM.. 4th wk J'ne
288, 262
40,226
32,620 1,254,613 1,188,319
292,660
36,645
N Y T A Mex January ..
30,084
Great Northern.. June ....
2,933,517 3,376.188 38,643,428 39,567,322
Oregon & Calif. January... 312,659 288,974 2,576,550 2,344 219
Montana Oent'J June
565 161
186,826 171,459 2,318,769 2,111,779
681,749
65,523
70,159
So Pac Coast.... January...
Total system. June
3.120,343 3,547,647 40,962,197 41,679.101
SoPaoRRCo.. January .. 2,619,233 2,503,802 19.658,844 17,93'. ,714
Qulf&SlilpIslaud 4thwkJ'ne
41,293
39,890 1,831.455 1,705,047
3,405,692
So PaoSS.Llnes January... 453,189
Hooking Valley.. IstwkJuly 142,246 153.296
153,296
142,246
Tex A NOrl
302,477 287,550 2,253,290 1,917,719
January...
Hous A Tex Cent January .. 418,'280 460,339 3,461,608 3,358,251 Southern Rallw'y IstwkJuly 802,334 761,408
761,408
802,334
W.Texas jEinuary ..
69,903
81,363
555,001 TerreH AInd... June
519,274
170,934 172,896 2,080,932 1.906,438
Hous A Shrevep't January ..
16,514
19,041
144,551 Terre H A Peor.. June
626,816
607,620
124,142
62,768
51,337
Illinois Central.. June
601,614
735,417
3,827,207 4,087,561 46,634,117 45,186,077 Texas Central ... 4tiiwk J'ne
11,862
11.726
Illinois Southern June
156,342
25,161
12.754
148,823 Texas A Pacihc. IstwkJuly 156.140 156,342
156,140
254,066
* 130,001
Ind 111 «& Iowa... June
149,500
128,828 1,576,489 1,716,716 TexS V
153,684
10,000
June
9,000
..
Int A Gt North'ii Isiwk July
77.252
77,252 Tol <fc Ohio Cent IstwkJuly
77,140
64,845
77,612
77,612
77,140
64,845
25,20.x
llnteroo (Mex)
Wk June '25 112,100 105,610 5,907,910 5,183,020 TolP A West.... IstwkJuly
23,690
25,208
23,690
Iowa Central
IstwkJuly
44,232
41,266
41,266 TolStLAW
60,101
47,577
44,232
IstwkJuly
60,102
47,577
Kanawha A Midi IstwkJuly
486,554
25,460
25.888
25,888 Tor Ham &Buflf. 2d wkjune
-10,776
605,453
25,460
12.083
Kan City South' May
537,852 505.068 5,985,446 5,621,067 Un Pac System
May
4,551,769 4.069.449 50,661,862 45,715,402
LakeErieAWestn June
657.3.55
556,726
413,095 466,026 5,086,729 4,908,317 Virginia & So W'n May
58.321
46,250
Lehigh Val RR.. May
426,8'25
469.370
2,514.006 2,624,098 •27,086,112 23,953.356 Wabash
IstwkJuly 469,370 426.825
Lexlng A East'u. May
43.884
55,740
510,016
Jersey A Sea'e May
560,892
342,850 325,050 3,904,534 3,660,034
Long Island
May
81.019
Dec. 7,877
Inc. 296 227
Wheel A
71,976
81.019
IstwkJuly
71,976
Loulslaua A Ark. May
153,222
70,073
56,583
476,379 Wm'sport&N.Br. April
138,776
643,876
12,3.57
13.692
Loulsv Hen&St L March
133,233
608,436 Wisconsin Cent.. IstwkJuly 134,500 133.233
134,500
672,340
Loulsv A Nashv IstwkJuly 588,835 649,123
154,457
151,302
588,835
649,123 Wrightsv AT'n.. April....
10,657
10,466
Macon & Birm.. June
10,137
148,856 Yazoo & Miss. V. June
8,585
131,005
587,171 566.780 7,890,735 7,330,085
Man'teeA Gr. Ua. AprU
10,514
118,560
7,393
71,901
87,344

Ala Qt Southern 4thwkJ'ne
Ala N O & Texa* Pacilic.

87,497

3,099,446

2,749,819

Manis

WH

.

.

LA

&N

W

.

.

H&E

AN W

. .

.

W

VARIOUS
ROADS

Orots Earnings

MaiLisli(iue

Maryland

&

Jan.

1

Pennsylvania Mar.

1

Missouri Pacific
Central Branch
Total
IBIexicau Central
Mexican International
1

'

1
1
1
I

...

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

1
1
1
1
1

to Jan.
to July
to June
to Apr.
to June
to May
to July
to July
to July
to Apr.
to May

FISCAL. YEAKS.

ROADS

Current Tear Previous Tear

Allegheny Valley
Jan. 1 to May 31
Atlanta & Charl Air Line. Mar. 1 to Apr. 30
Atlantic* Birmingham. Deo. 1 to Apr. 30
Bellefonte Central
Jan. 1 to June 30
Chicago & North West.H... Juno 1 to May 31
Chic St P Minn & Omaha. Jan. 1 to May 31

Cumberland Valley
Jan.
International & Gt North'n Jan.
Lake Erie & Western
Jan.
Manistee & North Eastern Jiin.

LE

3

7
30
30
30
31
7

7
7i

30|

31

Decrease.

602,446
288,1*27

29,455
63,750,804
4,128,340
149,750
2,419,761
2,325,228
146,462
35,962
76,680
20,169,5.54

823.000
20.992,554
9,044,418
2,989,147

$130,417
565,359

JMexican Railwivy
JMexican Southern
tNatioual

Current Year Previous Yeat

Gross Earnings

RRof

Mexico...
37,126 Northern Central
49,842.779 North Shore
4,600,932 ePennsy., East of P & E...
125,193
cWestotP&E
2,029,210 Pore Manjuette
tc
2,447,744 I'lillii Baltimore &Wash..
130,242 Pliiliidclphia & Erie
29,680 Pitts Cin Chic & St Louis..
78,832 Kio Grando Junction
20,123,362 St L Vaudalia & Torre H ..
62(i,000 Torre Haute <fo Indianap ..
20,749,362 Tcrro Haute & Peoria
8,327,285 Texas & Pacific
3,166,117 West Jersey & Scasliorc...

«

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Mar.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
JanJan.
Jan.
Doc.

1 to

1 to
1 to
1 to
1 to
1 to
1 to
1 to
1 U)
1 to
1 to
1 to
Nov. 1 to
Nov. 1 to
Nov. 1 to
Jan. 1 to
Jan. 1 to

\

Juno 25
June 21
July

May

7

31

Feb. 29

May

31
Blay 3
July 7

May 31
May 31
May 31

$2,963,200
588,050
6,048,813
3,985,692
632,652
46,918,117
Decrease.

5,560,203

$2,699,400
487,189
5,860,478
4,167.492
538,435
49,327,417
800,500
5,51.1.103

5.366. 2',M
2,756,298;

5.447.794
2.!»28,H0

Apr. 30

9,597,211
216,2641

9.7ll.28'.4

Jime

.30

l,717.(i62i

30
June 30

1,326.719;

1.602.588
1.267,379

7
31

5,587,038,
1,368,828'

Jiuio

July

May

400,013

217.540
402,548
5,741.864
1,343,928

t Results
on Monterey
Mexican Gulf aro lucluded for both periods,
currency.
J Mexican
V Includes traus-Mlssourl linos
Blnoe Fob. 16, 1903.
ft Includes the Hous. A Tex. Cent, and its
e Covers linos directly opersubsid. lines In both years aud for botu periods.
ated.
7 Includes the Chicago A Eastern Illinois in both years.
I Including Sav. Flor.
West, and also Florida Southern and Saiiford
A 8t. Petersburg Rys. in both years.
w Includes Lake Erie & Det. Riv. Ky. from Jiin. 1 i>i)tli voars.
a These figures are for the oousolidatea company, including Tifton ThoBV.
Gulf and Tlfton A Northeaatorn. *Approxlmiite Hguree.

*

&

THE CHRONICLE

208

Latest iiross Earnlngra bj Weeks.— In the table whloh
follows we Biuu up separately the earnings for the first
The table covers 40 roads and ihows
wenk of Jaly.
9-84 per centlnorease In the aggregate over the same week
last year.

1904.

week of July.

1«(

2.123
116,899
106.189
26,232
126.812
281.800
49,212

712,582

........
Arbor....
Buffalo Rooh. A PIttsbV.

Canadian Northern
Canadian Paoltlo.....
Central ofGeoriria
Ohio. iDd'pUs

&

.

Loolsv..

Cbloago Tenn. Transfer.
Colorado <fe Boathem
Denver & Rio Grande *..
Oolatb 8o. BhorA A At...

Grand Trunk of Can... J
Grand Trank West.. >

S
38,886
161,989
51,200
914.000
168.200
2,094
141.782
102,310
31.730
128,563
308.300
61.696
697,973

442,246
77,612
44,282
25,460
C88.835
9,810
52,984
132,378
285,473
569,000
18,000
115,165
158.679
194.016
227,640

Ann

OhattanooKa sonthern.
Chlo. Great Western

190S.

9
40,422
116.0H6
60.300
1,012.000
171,90J

153,296
77,252
41,266
25,888
649.123

Det.Gd Hav. Jb MUw. 5

HooMag

Valley
International & Gt.No..

Iowa

(Central ...•••...•.

&anawb» &

Michigan...

Louisville & Nashville..
Mineral Range...........

Minn,
8t. Lonls
Minn. 8t. P. & S. Ste. M.
Ho. Kansas <b Texas
Mo. Paolflo A Iron Mt...
Central Branch
Mobile <teOhlo
Nashv. Chat. & St. Lionls.
National RR. of Mexico..
Pere Maraaettet
Rio Grande Sonthera. ..
S t. liO 3 8 Honth western
Sonthem Railway
Texas <& Paotflc
Taledo & Ohio CentralToledo Peoria A West'ii
Toledo St. L. (b West
li!

Wabash

Wheeling A Lake Erie...
WlBoonBin Central.......
Total (40 roads)

7,410,024

Net inoreaee (0-34

46,904
9.100
98.000
13.700

29
24.883
8,879
5.498
2,251
26,500
2,484

11,050

860
2,966

428

••*•••••

60,288

79

uxek of June.

1904.

$

5,56"8

2,872

19,977
40,926

202
12,295

tric CJo....
July 1 to

11101,200
18,357
10,854

284,857

315,691
25,303

Increase.

Total(49 roads)

495.871

May

Jan. 1 to May 31.
Rich. Fred. A Pot. May
July 1, to May 31

11.870,705 11,818,121

o.

p.

H Ptgnres aie for
ing July 2.

week ending Jane 25.

I

290.388

<Sc

Detroit

a Net earuingsheregiven are after deducting taxes.
b Ketearnings hereglvenarebeforededaotingtaxes.
interest Charges and 8vrpln8«—The following roads, la
aidition to their gross and net earnings given in the foregoing, also report charges for interest, ftc, with the surplus

below those charges.

a'lQve or deficit

— Int., Rentals,

6,490
3,200
1.089

May

July 1 to

Cornwall

9
425,439
163
15,991

May

3i...
of
Brockton, ft(aBS..May
Jan. 1 to May 31.

454,869

Roads.

Allegheny Valley... May
Jan. 1 to

May

31

BellefonteCentr'lbJuue
Jan. 1 to June 30....

Bridgt.&Baoo R.b.May

July 1 to May 31....
Chic. Ind.dcLonis.a May
July 1 to May 31....

Cornwall ALeban. May
July 1 to

May

3i....

Edison Eleo. Ilium. Co. of
Brockton, Mass.. May
Jan. 1 to
Fall Blver

May

»1....

Dec. 64.240
Deo. 130,417
6,199
4.653
87,126
29,456
3,156
8,050
44,286
42,341
454,773
439,524
4,865.978 4,629,724
21.121
26,296
228,553
222,828

Net Earnings.
Previous

Year
$

Tear.

$

Deo. 91,433
Deo. 825,054
1.396
2.015
7,655
13,790
1,964
271
13,646
14.179
156,562
169,486
1,742,798 1,793,798
9,631
14,426
100,661
100.826

May

Co

tric

July 1 to May 31
Nev.-Cal.-Oregnn...May
July 1 to May 3i....
Tol. Peo.A West... June
July 1 to June 30....

7,967
48,293

7,079
43,607

3.412
22,388

1,643
10,102

25,346
22,179
8,594
May
39.346
128,724
134,551
Jan. 1 to May 3i
893,976
Qr. Trunk of Can.. .May 2,4.3;».P48 2,348,086
July 1 to May 3i... 26, llO.OOt 24,717,332 6.845,689

—

Gr Trunk West.

May

107,063
486,163
699,379
July 1 to May 3 ... 4,*13,U0 4,654.624
12,166
97,816
78,837
Det.Gr. H. & Mil. May
230,356
July 1 to May 3i... 1,134,784 1,036,567
876.820
3,794,663 4,043,794
Illinois Central... a.May
July 1 to May 31... 42,806,910 41,098,616 10,870,980
Lowell Electric Light
6,656
18,233
17,166
May
Corporation
86,806
310.903
215,979
July 1 to May 31....
def.683
8,116
7,837
June
Uanlstique.b
3,891
86,962
29,680
Jan. 1 to June 80....
. .

1

44I,S#5

,

7,293
48,372
795,186
7,331,172
109,983
642,374
1,460
262,908
1.176,854
12,397,906
5,488
68.765
1,340

707

6,778
3,994
43,456

$
def.S49
8.401
10,483
67,371

2,459
17.176

6,098

983

801

8,212

4,004

95
464

524

8,499
83.882

7,292
i7.848

1,827
15,177

1,115
10.933

5,329
70,629

4,368
57,882

8.842
98,738
2,192
22,273
22.494
270,304

14.727
161,820
6,156
41,269
1,793
1,181

10,847
119,196
8,620
67,087
del. 7,648
2,844

106,621
2.104
28,904
23,003
277.188

1

842

4TREET RAILWAYS AND TBACTION C0MFANIE8.
Latest Orott JSamings

May
May

Worcester.. May
Burllngt'n (Vt.) Trac. June

Boston

<fe

Gas & Electric.. May
Out. Penn. Tract.... Jane
Ohlcaco & Mil. Elec. June
Oak Park...c June
Chic
Cin. Darton & Tol.Tr. May
Cdn. Newp. <& Coving.
Light & Traction... AprU
Cal.

&

Jur'nt
Tear.

Vee/corilo

Albany & Hudson... May
American R'ys. Co.D. June

Gas Department...
Dart.&W'port8t.Ry.
Detroit United Ry..n
Duluth Street Ry
East 8t. Louis & Sub.
Elgin Aurora <& Sou.
Havana Eleo. Ry. Co.
Honolnlu Rapid Tr.
-

9
93,843
604,872
86,410

33,869

92,945

3»3,460

863,249

8.126
41,132
14,961

6,822
40,542
14.900

31.838
204,752
83,344

23,662
196,846
52,939

354,981 282,968
77,554
116,231
104,896
23,353
21,118
99,848
97,723
12.374' 12.681
44.^60
May
43735
letwkJuly 103.420 101,2^0 2,147,860 2,0»B,713
14.677
308,079 308.631
IstwkJuly 15,701
478.109 SS5,948
«ay
105.134 87,30^
173,894
1*)8,544
Hay
3s. 101 39,148
WkJulylO 33,546 128,144 ]863,366 J742,478

Traction Co.. April

Intemaf 1 Tract. Co.
May
System (Buffalo)
Jacksonville Eleo.C^. AprU
Kansas City Ry .& U. May
.

.

Lake Shore Eleo. Ry

May

April
;yehlgh Traction
Lehigh Val. Trac. Co.
April
Street Ry. Dep
Electric Light Dep. April

Ry

LindonSt. By.(Oan.)
Mad. (Wis.) Traction.
^nXu West Side Eiev..
Mil. Elec Ry.&Lt.Oo
Mil.Lt.Heat&Tr.Co.
Houtreal street Ky..
Mnncle Hartford A

May
June

May
June

May
May
May

Ft. Wayne
Maek.l-r.ife Light. Co.

May

Street Ry. Depart..

May
May
May
May
May

Eieotno Light Dep.

Gas Department...
New London St. Ky..
Nor. OhloTr. & Lt. Co
Northern Texas Trac.

June
Northwestern Kiev.. June
Oakland Trans. Cons May
Railway...

94,763
25,872
21,274

!

May
By. May

Indlanap.&Ea8t.Ry. May

St.

Tear.

99,459

April
April

Houghton Co. St.
Houston Eleo. St. Ry. April

Jlean

Tear.

Light

Electric Depait

Illinois

Ourrent Prevums

237.036
93,720
3^4.841
186,825

Conn.Ry.&Ltg.Co.—
Railway Depart... April.

Land Co

Tear.

'an. 1 to Latest Dale

-

Oleve.* Bo.W.Tr.Oo.. June
Oleve. Palnsv. <& E... April

A.

iVev'tii

9
9
9
22.529 22.299
97,616
131.308 118,738 654,774
41,778 •••. ...
137,202
21,217 20,311
88,938
37,700 .••• ~7,960
6 840
35,479
J29,077 222,h36 1,631,2 7ii
48,823 45,476 346,372
40,838 22,483
168,250
6i.830 63,24S 389,290
44,463 46.174
176,0i6

(Muscatine, Iowa).. April

(jexinglon

Gas Works

Co

.

v

8,707
4,175
45,291

Tear.

1,421
7,939
6,866
65,360

8,991

FaU River Gas Works
Co
May

<fe

Oiirrent

620

EdisonElecIUnm. Co.

Blnghamton Ry

Net £arniiis8 Monthly to Latest Dates.—The table f oUowiag shows the gross and net earnings of Stbah railroads
r jporced this week. A full detailed statement, including alj
roads from which monthly returns can be obtained, is given
once a month in these columns, and the latest statement of
this kind will be found In the Chboniclb of June 18,
1904.
Th 3 a ezt will appear In the issue of July 23, 1904,
Tear.

$

81...

Aur. Elgin & Chlo. Ry

"4.784

Tear.

843

& Leban.May

July 1 to

of Net Eam'gs.—.
Current
Previous

/— Bai.

Tear.

& Saoo Rlv.May

Cdtirens' Ry.

Tea?'.

—

Previous

Hoads.
Brldgt.

GB088

8,502

607,458
52.584

etc.

Current

Decrease.

Flgares are for week end-

— Gross Earnings. —
Previous
Current

Ife7,5.'i2

23,718
19.089
368,441
213,984
R,2n9
10,712
65,172
79,860
250,306
229,406
662.835
810,361
74,452
64,634
455,364
861.708
200,547
270.382
2,936,577 3,039,005
39.802
40,827
512,745
445,021
24,796
14,851
278,369
273,148

1,364,308 1,192,248
Seaboard Air LI ne aMay 1,103.827 1,059,668
July 1 to May 31
18,221,301 11,639.257
Southern Indlana.bMay
99,848
83,494
July 1 to May 31
8B4,»86
1,186,740
110,'^47
Tol.Peorla & West.bJune
111,178
July 1 to June 30.... 1,308,719 1,239,974

Corporation
May
July 1 to May 31....
Minneapolis Gen. Elec-

"i'.ios

15,638
293,359

Net increase (044

41,236
490.S11
20,241
178,678
673.214
2,928,110
153,600

3i

9,043

S

1198,000
17,268

45.768
550.621
18.454
174,052
662,461
2.756,298

May

May

Eabhihob.

Mexican Railway
Mob. Jackson & K. City.
Bio Grande Boathem...
Beaboard Air I^lne

V

Jan. 1 to May 31....
Lowell Electric Light

....

Inolades Lake Erie

9

4>

Sev.-Cal. -Oregon. a May
July 1 to May 31

1,518

1,2(?7

Previously rep'd (ilfds) 11,010,119 10,940,287
87,344
87.497
Alabama Gt. ooathern
214,581
230,572
<3in. N. O. & Texas Pao.
Gulf & Ship Island
41,293
39.890
Inieroceanlo (Mex.)
11112,100 IT 105,610

V

.

Tear.

Tear.

81,000
7.000
2.777
11,617
42,347

12,525
42,545

1908.

Tear.

Minneapolis Gen. Elec-

S5.471

For the foarth week of Jane onr final statement covers
49 roads, and shows 0*44 per cent increase in the aggregate
over the same week last year.
Atfi

Xel Earnings.
Current
Previous

Tear.

94*6

81,019
133,233
7,384,721

,

Tear.

14,609

42 5,826

t

— Gross Earnings. —
Current
Previous

1,647

p. o.)

* Inolndes Rio Grande Western.
Blv. RR. in both vears.

,

Phila.&Erle.b....

9

1.637

54.631
181,438
250,001
600.000
25.000
117,942
170.296
236.363
222.075
11,349
123,733
761,408
156,342
64,845
25.208
47,577

148,710
802.334
156,140
77.140
23.690
60,102
469,370
71.976
134,500

.

9

9.ci89

8.477

.

1

Deereaie.

Increase.

(Vol. Lxxix.

4.prll

Orange Co. Traction. April
PeekB.L't'g*BB.Oo. March

80,178
16.440
32.049
75.438
17.566

22.253
16,11.

32,539
5a,527
11,312

135,338
72,976
116,0«0
309,386
75,675

103.071
73,863
125,075
242,033
45,366

385.691 327,126 1.644,789 1,481,931
89,991
75,843
23.8 L9 19,361

U8.165
53,799
10,488

v8.878.867

51.488
9,911

211,406
40,648

203.079
38,165

204,414 226,616
86.820 61.771
13,»-4 12,397
57,972
53,392
116,231 105,668
26,148 26963
75.569
78.491
19.236 16,224
8,242
36,985
38.028
9,354
166.384 167.419 1,063.828 1,087,812
260.815 t«5,13i 1,267,258 1,181,764
164,482 140,839
86,488 31,630
943,877 830,918
220,154 172,987
18,505

6,860
6,819
2,507
2,790
2.934
3,137
5.861
6,343
74.917 74 2547.213 40,889
102,333 9J,856
112,897 10i,370
6.270
7,876
7,152
7,610
8.222
7.794

64,613

28,047
14,250
18,502
22,639
316,581
258,935
651,147

29,601
16,339
19,462
21,382
311,011
206,939
826,164

^8,866
26,267
24,192

23,818
86,246
22,888

. .
.

July

.

.

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

209
— Int., Rentals, etc. —

ian. 1 to Latest Date
Latest Gross Sarning*
_.-i.„Mn Ovr'ni Prev'vs Current Prenou

OBOU
CABMIMOB.

Year.

-Hal. of Net Earn'gs.—,

Current

Current

Previous

Tear.

Year.

Previous
Tear.

Year.

Fear.

Roads.

S
23,211

Peoria APekln Term March.
PblladeipIUa Co. and

Jane

AfflUated Corpor'8.
Pottsv. Union Tract.

7,949,120 7,763.810
66.341
70,110
76,959
80.114
1.80*1,927
7,811
7.907
122.795 101.947
578,683 497.506
17.798
21.998

Light Cto'e
May
Boobester Railway
Rookford Belolt *
Jane.
JaneBvlUe
St Joseph (Mo.) Ry.

A

Sao

Paulo

May..

16,26i
22,849

11,878

April
April

Pow. Co
Lt. Heat
St. Lonls Transit..-

$
26,915

1.187.218 l.ai0,88»

May

Rys Co.Ghen.— RoadB

7,982

s
71.055

13,201)

54,271 45,582
925.387 645,590 4,247',436 3,467,464

Jane

$

Syracuse Bapid Tr.May
July 1 to May 81

119,000 109,92t
487.354 422,650
45,481 42.V40
204,184 193,301
78,094 74,148
825,998 308,990
197,848 181.797
931,115 813,941
Jane
122,107 127.8»7
798,744 786,714
WkJalylo
1,716
1.416
26,640
26,814
May
841,918 316,431
71,677 65.643
May
32,573 26,21A
144,557
120,^38
212,201
May
46.637 88,970
169,328
May
100,780
23,096 24,778
108,072
677,222
May
142.581 135,4ie
630,633
19,60' 15,994
Jane
97.933
Wk. July 9 48,255 44,13F 1.186,542 1,047,570
IstwkJuly 89.237 87,893 2.144.254 2,004.820
May
30.720 32,109
132,903
133.592
May
5741969 544,156 2,687,936 2.478,557
May
22,702 21,718
101,328
91,181
May
38.693
186,925

Seattle Eleotrlo Co.

South Side Elevated
BpriBgfl'd <k Xenla Tr
8yraotiBeRap.Tr.Ry

Tampa Bleotrlo

Co.

Terre Haate Eleo.Oo
Tol. BowLGr.A So. Tr

Toledo Rys. <& Light.
Toledo * Western.. .
Toronto Railway ....
l^lrln City Bap. Tran.
Union (M. Bedford).
United of San Fran.

Wash. Alex.AMt.V
TonngBtown- Sharon
t

I

SpanlBh BUver.
These are results for properties owned.

c Resnlts for main line.
n These earnings Include the Detroit United Ry., Detroit

A

Port

— Gross Earnings. — ^ Current
Net Earnings.
Current
Previous
.

Previous

Tear,

Central Pennsylvania
Traction Oo
June
Jan. 1 to Jane 30

Ohio. A Mllw. Eleo June
Jan. 1 to Jane 30....
Cincinnati Dayton & Toledo Traction, b... May

June 1 to May 31....
Cleveland Soathwest'n—
Traction Oo
June
Jan. 1 to June 30
Houghton County St. Ry.
(Hancock, Mich.)
Jan. 1 to

May

May
3i....

Lond. St.Ry (Can.)a June
Jan. 1 to June 30....

North. Tex. Tract, fc June
Jan. 1 to June 30

...

Oakl'd Trans. Con. bApr.

Month

of

May

Bookford Belolt & JanesvUle
June

Savannah Electric May

Jan. 1 to May 3i....
Scran ton Ry. Co
May
Jan. 1 to May 3i....
Seattle Electric Oo.May
Jan. 1 to May 3 1 ....

Byracuae Rap Tr.fcMay
July 1 to

May

3i
Tampa Eleot. Co... May
Jan. 1 to May 3i

Terre HauteEleot..May
Jan. 1 to

May

31....

Tear.

Tear.

Tear.

$

$

$

80,711
309,153

76,917
292,837

*114.165
*293,727

*38,526
*248,321

$

48.823
246,372
40,838
163,250

45.476
237,036
22.483
98.720

8.529
35.118
26,702

16.664
80,025
14,740

90,t>63

53,87.*

44,463
502,990

46.174
489,493

18,429
201,203

21.152
217,681

44,182
204,762

40.642
196.845

19,528
60,277

17.707
75,966

16,440
72,976
19,235
78,491
47,213
258,935
107,832
112,897

16,111
73,862
16,2?4
75,869
40,889
206.939
96.797
106,370

4.909
12,642
7,458
18,668
21,184
110.961
56,729
60,477

6.026
21,360
6,740
24,333
21,586
94,5lO
51,087
65,831

11,878
46,481
204,134
78,094
325,998
197.848
931,115
71,677
687,633
82,573
144,557
46,637
212,201

13,200
42.940
193,301
74,148
308,990
181.797
813.944
65,643
767,288
26,216
120,838
36,970
169,328

6,427
19,686
79,083
37.281
122,962
64,255
277.509
28.858
303,683
12.696
59,267
15.410
57,732

6,420
19,324
66,053
35,216
122,065
58,944
211,349
27,633
318.671
11.895
66,422
15,106
48.934

429,949
1,690,357

194.671
685,762

8.573
16.284

1903-4.

1901-2.

1902-3.

1900-1.

Disbursements—
$
$
$
$
36.895,146 35,449.378 30.712.252 28.022.207
Gross earnings
Operating expenses.. 26.173.934 23.970.813 20,902,438 18,233.034

Net earniigs

11,721,211

11,478,565

(68-23)
P. c. of exp. to earns.
Inc. from invests. <fec. 1,619.121

1.122,493

1.001.022

9.789.17S
(6607)
704,688

Total net income. 13,340,332

12,601,058

10,810,841

10,493,861

9,809.819

(67-62)

(68-06)

6,347,297
265,931

4,918,145
4,708,345
4,871,593
265,931
278.672
Bents
280,143
928,.525
844,474
Taxes
832,074
813,538
144,400
141,100
Sinking fund
146,600
128,900
127,155
Unfunded discount
53,464
53,464
45,639
89,905
71,877
65,110
S. AN. A. BR
Dividends
(5)3,000,000(3)3,000,000(5)2.875,000(6)2,695,000
Tot. dlsbursem'te. 9,733,992
Snrp. over dividends. 3,606,340
-V. 79, p. 152.

9,390,010
3,211,048

113,869
607,187

8,960,532
1,860,307

8,907,748
1,586.113

West Jersey & Seashore Railroad.
(Report for the year ending Dec, 31, 190S,J
President A. J. Cassatt says in substance
The gross earnings show an Inoreaae of $366,661, but this was more
:

than oSset by an Increase of $423,577 in expensee. the greater part
of which was In conducting traBsnortation, and due to the higher
cost of material and labor. Ihe total amount of oonstruoilon and
equipment expenditures during the year was $481, 4fO. Substitution
of 100-pound rails on Cape May Division representing $163,806;
stone ballasting of 20 miles of track south of Millvllle, $jO,000; overhead bridges on Atlantic City Division, $58,574; improvements In
Atlantic City, $129.27? remainder eoatterlng. Of the above amount
$318,871 was paid through the extraordinary expenditure fund set
aside last year and the balance charged against income.
In addition to the constructton and equipment expenditures noted
above, there appears on the balance theet as dae to the Pennsylvania
RR. Co. the sum of $1,355,063 on account of your one-half ihe cost of
the CamdfU Terminal improvements mentioned in your last annual
report. The total cost ol your share of this improvement to date is
$1,685,339. but the balance has been paid oat of cash in the treasury.
The elevation of the tracks of the Amboy Division from the Camden
Station to Haddon Ave., in coiinectlon with the Camden terminal
Improvements, and the elimination of grade crossings on yonr Atlantic City and Cape May divisions in Camden, will be proceeded with as
goon as practicable. Both of these projects will require large expenditurep, and with this end In view the balance of Income for the
year has been transferred to the extraordinary expenditure fund.
;

Statistica.—HhQ earnings, expenses and charges, and the
balance sheets, have been
EABNINOS, EXPENSES, CHABOBS, ETC.
:

1903.

444.331
1.687.639

46.-^98

LoalSTille & Nashville Railroad.
^Preliminary Statement for the year ending June SO, 1904. J
The operations for the year 1903-4, compared with previous
years, are shown below, June, 1904, being estimated:

831
$

Miles operated

Earnings—
PassengerB
Freight
Miscellaneous

2,738.593
..1,162,238

1902.
332.

1901.
332.

1900.
332.

$

359,629

2,321,380
1,032,122
325,191

2,227,592
951.027
311,838

4,260,460

Total

2,537,607
1.025,956
330.235
3,893.798

3.678,693

3.490,457

676,312
470,201
1,557,884
55,354

45e.068
1,415.036
61.463

2,759,751

2,566,181

918,942
24.010

934,276
23,396

ExpensesMaint.of way&stractures 722,705
677.084
Mainten'ce of equipment. 595,376
522,027
Conducting transportat'n.1,930,962 1,624,419
General

65,942

67,878

3,314,985

2,891,408
945.475 1,002,390
5.649
23,190

Total

Net earnings

Add

United Tr. (Alb'y)b.—
Apr. 1 to June 30
July 1 to June 30

7,416
95.453
9.752

. .

Street Railway Net Earningrs.—The following table gives
the returns of Street railway gross and net earnings reoelved
this week. The last general summary which we furnish once
a month, and in which we bring together all the roads from
which monthly returns can be procured, was given June
25, the next will be given July 80.

Roads.

8,615
92,998
10,584
48,803
5,160
10.129

ANNU AL RE PORTS.

Interest

Huron Shore Line and the Sandwich Windsor <jk Amherstbnrg By.
V These figures are for period from Jane 1 to May 31.

20.217
223,218
2,143
10,124
6,533
32,650

After allowing for other Income reoelved.

Tram. L't & Po. Oo April....
Savannah Eleot. Oo May

May
May

2.112
10,464
10,250
47,e03

Eleot. co. May
Jan. 1 to May 31
Terre Haute Elect. .May
Jan, 1 to May 31....
United Trao. ( Alb'y )—
Apr. 1 to June 30
July 1 to June 30

Tampa

(Brazil)

Soranton Railwav.

20.243
210,685

miscellaneous

Total

638,614

951,124

1,025.680

942.952

957,672

a Net earnings here given are after deduotlng taxes.

fnierest

30,5.286

bNetearnlngB here given are before deducting taxes.

Rental
Taxes, miscel. <fe extraor'y
Dividend on com. (5 p. o.)
Do. opec. guar. (6 p. c.)
Extraord'y expendltureB.

12,341
64,154
247,603
6,240
162.589
152,310
601

227.C44
13.156
68.402
247.608
6.240
144.266
318.871

225.366
12.467
68.373
247,603
6,240

223,932
15,816
336,866
247,603
6,240

1.026.580

942,952

Interest Charges and Surplus.

— Int., lientats,

etc.

— ^Bal. of Net Eam'gs
.

Current

June

1 to

May

Houghton County
Jan. 1 to

May

May

St.

31

Jan. 1 to Juno 30
Bockford Beloit & Janesville
June
Savannah Electric May

Jan. 1 to

May

$

$

to extr'y exp. fund.

17,336
195,181

16,050
193,673

3,454
16,571
10,028
60,547

2,929
14,645
9,018
54,125

def.3,g07

6.022

Mlecellaneons

6,102
24,008

3i

May

Jan. 1 to May 31
Seattle Electric Oo. May
Jan. 1 to May 3i....

2,697
10,878
51,968
18,411
91.861
23.485
118.652

2,600
9,631
48,163
19.786
98,929
26,648
125,968

1,465
def.8,929

3,097

11,166
60,414

12.578
40,383

2,730
8,708
27.116
18,870
31,101
40,770
168,867

6,71ft

3,920
9,693
17,890
15.430
23.136
32.296
85.391

951,124

Total
Surplus

382,904

OGNERAL BALANCE 8HBET DEO.
Road and
Stocks

1802.
%
equlp't. 11.822,366 10, ,476.182

of

other

companies
from other

173,216

r,

2,846

Due

compauleB. eic.
ot her tban traffic
halunces
Due from BKcntH..

1003.

Uabmties—

25,P45

80.120
ISO, -^27

10.7S6

07,6W7
71,062
683,601

20.S.8S4

Cash

348,630

Pay rolls A vouch.
One other roads ..
Dnecontnl'd co's.
Int. arcr'd

on

-V.78.

p. 14«9.

13.726,298 \\.rA\.fZt

lids.

4 ,958.(150

4.886.600

T

l,85.'-..0fl2

803.64H
llf.1171
7P.,5eB
1<3,3'*6

MIscel nneous
Bxtra'y oxp. turd.
Hal. to prof.

Total

Total

,V

104 000

01.000
4.968,050
4.9.'6,800

Coramou stock ...
Bonds (pee Sci*I'MCMKNT).

14it.ie2

1902.

*

Special K<iar. stk..

I'ennsvl. Ktt Co..
Cnraden Terni'l.

MIscellun'B assets.
MatorlulB on hand

830,421
127,261

31.

1903.

Ry.

May

North. Texas Tract June

Scranton Ry. Co

.$

Added

Tear.

To-

31....

(Hancock, Mich.)

Tear.

.

Previous

Tear.

$

A

Current

Tear,

Roads.
Olnoinnatl Dayton
ledo Traction

Previous

Deduct—

loss

679 379

364.441
78.000
72,?82
98,886
4,868
318.871
670,670

18,7«e,«98 11 .941.384

THE CHRONICLE.

210

Chicai?o Union Traction Co.
f Receivers' Report for 9 months ending May 31, 190 Jf)
The receivers make the following report for May and the
three months, alec the nine months ending May 31, 1904:

MAY AND THE XnaBE MONTHS— (I). WEST CHICAGO AND
,

May, 1904.
W. Ohie.
$
481,486
344,244

" ""
No. Ohic.

Net
Other Income
Total Income
Deduct—
Tdxes

NO. CHICAGO-

8 months.

,

.

>

on funded debt
Other Interest
Rental accrued

]

1,^51,876
1,074,686

767,128
600,406

75,580
1,551

277,190
11.812

166,722
5.549

77,081

289,002

172,271

61,007

41,543
151,205
21.565
130,491

40.554
57,795

9

hkirq
"*>'i»a

I

(
J

51,867

184,173

deMl,902
52,955
85,410

16,567
57,067

9,420
28,470

93,646
171,172

47,093
71'91

Total deflolt
Per cent expenses

83,9.S7

61,007
344,804
16,074 def.55,802

115,168
26,531

Total dedaotlon
SarpluB,
,
Other deductions'—
Ch. ConRO). Tract, deflolt..
Depreciation reserve

(2).

274,707
199,177

141,689

Int.

No. Ohic.

137,241
4,448

OrORB eamliiKS
Operating expenses

Ohie.

TT.

21,816
73-32

320,624

800

CHICAGO CONSOLIDATED T«ACTIOK

CO.

Period Qross.
Net.
Other inc. Ohargfs. Hal., def.
$25,987
May, 1904
$136,161
$6,651
$59,633
$26,995
3 months
19,956
340,0)6
37.937
178,725 al20,832
a Increased to $146,602 by charge of $25,770 to correct Item of
taxes accrued for six months ending Feb. 29.

NINE MONTHS ENDING MAY 31, 1904.
West
Ohicago.

Ohicago

Total

Oonsol. Trae. all lines.

3,960,806 2,233,729
17,447
6,564
25,597
27,038

Advertising, etc

978,143 7,172678
26,252
3,241
4,369
57,004

4,003,850
247,874
375,254
1,813,860
545.563

2,266,331
166,040
237,003
1,034,417
253,396

986,753
101,516
97,134
565,494
100,398

7,255,934
515,4S0
709,391
3,413,771
899,352

2,982,551
1,021,298

Passenger earnings a
Mall

1,690,856
575,475
17,014

864,537
121,216
60,204

5,'i37.944

Gross earnings

Maintenance ot way
Maintenance of eqalpm't.
Transportation
General
Total

Net
Otherlnoome

31,25.'>

1,717.690
108,473

Knowlbs Intkbebts.— In order to eonsolidate these inter& Knowles Steam Pump Works of New Jersey was In-

it acquired all these properties
and issued in exchange securities of like character and amount to
those then outstanding of the previous Eoglish (or holding) company.
The International Company received as its share ia the new company
the whole common stock.
In purchasing the interests of the Blake & Knowles Steam Pump
Works of London and the Geo. F.Blake MinnfactarlnK Co., both of
which companies have been dissolved, the surplus of the latter, $ I,
116,399 (incluilng $524,977 accumulated during the existence of the
International Company) remains upon the balance sheet of the new
company under the heading of "surplus capital." The surplus and
reservcB of the English company have, after deducting the debt due by
It to the GHorge F. Blaks Manufacturlne Co, etc. -being a net balkuce
of $1,021,631— been applied to write down the value of the Warren
plant, now disposed of, and la reduction of the good-will and patents
aoconnt. With these exceptions the capital assets were taken over as
they appeared in the balance sheet of the George F. Blake Manufacturing Co. at 1st April, the transfer being treated as of that date.
Balance Sheet.—The amount of 6 per cent debentures of the International Steam Pump Co. now outstanding Is $2,494,000 [against
$1,S9Z,667 on March 31. 1903]
The more important improvements and additions included In the
balance sheet the past year are the farther larite exoendltures upon
the new plant at Harrison, N. J., which is now far advanced, and the
greater part of the balance of extensions at theSaowand Laidlaw
plants, etc, [The additions to property accoant inolule: New plant
at Harrison, additional cost, $787,402; improvements and additions at
other pUnts, $338,033; expeadllures on account of pattern? and
drawings, $305,154; small tools, $42,404; modernizing and replacing
machine tools, etc., including machinery repairs, $-{7,966; patents
(exclusive of most of legal charges), $8,929.] The depreciation charge
[$294,056] has been fixed upon the same basis as In prevloas years.
Current assets and liabilities compare as follows:

Mar. 31,
Inventories of finished
progress

work and work

$2,481,007
1,611,749
3,563,909
184,631

$2,625,534
1,580,600
3.132,789
*106,231

$7 841 296
l!89l!043

$7,445,154
963,631

$5,960,253

Materials, supplies, etc

Accounts and bills receivable, etc
Cash In banks and o a hand

*$6,481,523

Less current liabilities

*In addition $489,238 cash from proceeds of debentures was held
by Colonial Trust Co. in special account. [The assets and liabilities
of March 31, 1903, have been supplied from last year's report —Ed.]
This dlflerence is accounted for by the large additional expenditures
on capital account, already referred to. The Inventories have been
valued as nearly as possible at cost price. Accounts receivable are,
as usual, stated after making due provision for possible losses on
account of bad or doubtful accounts.

Results for three years have been as follows:
1902-3.

1903-4.

592,490

181,420

1,826,463

125,494
453,615
6,900
61,162
891,474

123,814
173,385
675
104,330
155.602

30,457
439,372

279,765
1,06«,372
7.575
161,686
608,701

Total
Interest and discount
Depreciation plant, tools, etc,

Bent.leaeed lines accrued.
Total

1,028,645
28,908

"6,193
59,625

557,806
535,647 2,122,098
34.684def.854,227def295,635

-

Ohio. Coniol. Tract, deficit

Reserve depreciation
Total
Deflolt
. .

127,895
248,418

758,804

736,718
712,810
74-97

376,313
341,629

354,227

758,804
1,064,439

75-51

8800

a Including chartered oars.
"Interest on funded debt," here consists of interest on bonds of the
West Chicago Street RR. Oo. and the North Chicago Street RR. Co.
Rental of leased lines accrued consists of interest on bonds of Chicago
West Division Ry., Chicago Paseenger Ry., North Chicago City Ry.
and of the guaranteed dividends on outstanding stocks of those oompanlee.— V. 78, p. 2441.

International Steam

Pamp

(Report for year ended March 31, 1904 J
President John W. Dann says in part:
Opebations.— The manufacturing plants have bsen in continuous
operation and have increased their production over the previous year
by about $300,000. The orders taknn amount to $9,500,000 and the
unfilled orders at the end of the year amount to over $1,600,000.
The new Worthlngton disc meter has been successfully introduced
and many valuable improvements have been made in the centrifugal
and turbine pumps.
New Plant, Etc.— The construction of the new works of Henry R.
Worthlngton at Harrison la now far advanced and It is expected the
foundries will be In operation In September, and that the entire plant
wUl be available for manufacturing during the current year. These
works will be eqaipped with the most improved and modern machinery, and will have have more than double the capacity of the present
plants of Henry R. Worthlngton at Brooklyn and Ellzabethport.
Ac the other plants the Improvements in the way of buildings have
been completed and many new tools have been Installed with special
reference to standardizing the work. Increasing the output and reducing the cost of production.

Tieasnrer Max Nathan says in part:
Associated companies —The associated companies now eonslst of:
(1) International Steam Pump Co., (2) Henry R. Worthlngton. (3)
Blake & Knowlea Steam Pump Works (of New Jersey), (4) Holly Man
ufacturlng Co. The only changes in the form of the accounts arlne
from the omission of the Wortblni^ton Pumping Engine Co. Irom the
list of associated companies and from the substitution of the Blake &
Knowles Steam Pump Works (of New Jersey) for the George F. Blake
Manufacturing Co.
FoKEiGS BusiNES8.—The Worthlngton Pump Co., Ltd was incorporated early In 1903, under the laws of Great Britain, and acquired
all the European and part of the remaining foreign business heretofore
controlled by the WorthiUKton Pumping Engine Co., Henry R Worthlngton and the George F. Biako M»uufactarlng Co., those companies
receiving In payment certain debentures and capital stock Issued by
the new company, constituting in all about 90 per cent of the debentures and 80 per cent of the stock of the new company. The balk of
the remaining stock was paid for the control of the English business
of James Simpson <& Co., Limited, which is now operated for the
manufacture of our merchandise for the European markets.
.

$

1,936,738
36,068

2,113,365
14,9i2
258.517

1,795,158
46,817

294,056
1,606,617

1,839,906

1,510,487

35,000
141,273
12,8?9
Discount on bonds, etc., written off
Dlv'ds— Int. Steam Pump Jo.,pref (6) 531,000
Int. Steam Pump Co.. common. (4) 490,500
H. R. Worthlngton preferred.. (7) 140,000
(6) 161
H. R. WorthiUKton common
Blake companies charges & dlvs... 1154,639

35,000
22,889
9 493
(6) 531,000
(4) 490,500
(7) 140,000
(6) 18
* 104,725

531,000
490.500
(7) 140,000
(3) 184
*105.050

1,504,972
101,646

1,338,750
606,156

Net

profits

1,740,202
64,951

237,849

Deduct—
Interest on Holly bonds

Steam Pump deb.

Total
Balance, surplus

Includes sinking fund for debentures,
bentures.
t

*

•^

(6)
(4)

1,266,734

243,763

Less sinking fond for de-

OONSOLIDATED BALANOB SHEET MABCH
1904.

Co.

1901-2.

$
2,036,101
27,264

Int.

226,382
510,386

Mar. 31, '03

'04.

In

Profits from manufacturing and
$
trading, all companies
1,827.430
Mlscel., dividends. Interest, etc...
109,308

Deduct—
Taxes acorned
Interest on funded debt ..
In terest on mortgages
Interest on floating flebt..

Per cent operating exp.

&.

Blake

corporated in April, 1903. and In June

1,052,553

Total income

Borplns
Also deduct

North
Ohicago.

Blake
ests the

[Vol. Lxxix.

31.

1903.

1902.

25,912,084
199,802

24,960,542
170,626

Assets—
Real est., bldgs. maoh'y, plants, &
equip., patterns, iiatents, good-

&

Invest, in stacks & bonds
will
of ass'd and other cos., etc., of
24
1,983.471
properties held directly

Discounts on bonds issued
Inventories of manuf'd material,

ls7,403

supplies, etc., on h-kud
4,092,757
accts. and bills receivable,
reserved for bad debts. 3
3,385,461

4,206,134

3,635,996

147.831
30,613
184,631

2,917,599
201,717
13,472
595,469

2.606,382
190,791
26,096
175,226

.....33,012,170

34,046,277

31,765,658

12,287,300
10,860,000
2,592,667

12,349,700
10,850.000
579,900

2.000,000
1,500,000

2,000,000
1,500,000

Trade

etc., less

Miscellaneous debtors
Associated co. bals. In transit, etc.

Cash

In

bank and on hand

Total assets

Liahilities—
Cap. stock and bds. aath., less In
treas., etc.:

In hands of public-

Common

12,287,300
11,335,000
4,033,050

stocks
Preferred stocks
Bonds and debentures

Owned by Blake

Co.,

London

Common stock
Mortgage

Surplus capital B.

& K. 8.

Sink. I'd reserve
Sundry creditors -

"

P. Oo...

"

...

Loans
Trade accounts

649,875
635,131
205,461
256,536

Miscellaneous

Shareholders for dividends
Res. for completion of contracts
Surplus account, balance
Total llablUtles

1,116,899
64,384

..

156,690
478,744
103,656
132,750

145, 'S41
*3,284,993

604,705
149,962
132,888
76,076
3,652,680

3,614,417

33,012,170

34,046,277

31,766,658

* Includes total surplus aoonmulated since Mar. 24, 1899, viz., $1,710,500; also $57 1,493 " undivided profits of Henry R. Worthlngton
and the Holly Mc»nnfaoturing Co., which accrued prior to their
association with the International Company, and which are therefore
not considered to be available as undivided profits of this company."

:

.

July

The capital stock and bonds authorized, less In treasary, etc., also
the notes payable and loans are more fnlly shown below:
"
Blake &
Holly
Con»oUH. R.
Int. Steam
Pump Oo. Wonh'i'n. Knowlea. Mfg. Co. dated.
UabiUties*
485,000
830,050

700,000

12,287.300
11,335,000
4,038,050

27,655,350

2,002,300

1,3?4,050

722,500

°'^C°o'^^5n*rocki.".i"!'.''r6.237,500
3,650,000
Preferred stocks

5,497,700

970.000

767,000

33,494.000

7,500,000
24.375

2,294,r50

1,489,500

23,606,500
'•

p. 2598.

In hands Of public, „ ..„o Knn
9 -tna
>!,dOU
13,'<J63,60u
rommon stocks
8.850.000 ?,000.000
P?S"rred stocks
debentures.. 3,494.000
Bond 8 &

82,CS00

Notes payable and loans.

-V.

378,C00

.

27,655,850
649,375

77, p. 2393.

American Thread Company.
^Statement for year ended March 31, 1904).
results for the year ending March 31 compare with
The
those reported for previous years as follows
190203.
1900-01.
190304.
lSOl-03,
*1,497,457

Deduct —

nenreolatlon

BondlBtereet

$1,147,245

$754,080

$1,273,375

$300,000
236,900

Profits

$300,000
242.740

244,.'i24

244,.524

$300,000
264,748
244.524

672,000

168,000

Nil.

$310,000
267,750
252.675
434,000

Preferred dividend...

Common

dividend,...

Balance, surplus

$44,033

.

The balance sheets

of

March

$191,981 det.$55,192
31 follow:

BALANCE SHEET
1903.
1904.
8
i
Atiett
12,642,173 12,565,063
Plant, etc
Stocks in trade, net
4,178,358 3,934,738
cost

—

receiv-

Accounts

796,694

able, net

Cash!

.121,017

Sundry Investm'ts

Advance

paym'ts.,

ARCH

1803.

up

4,200.0(V)

6,000,OL.O

Bng Sewing Cotton

4.8t 0.4

304,3«4
249,363

60 000
accrued.
Depreciation fund 1,675,000
Div. on com. stock
672,000
pay. July. IbCS...
Balance forward.
333,426

Total

78

604,93«
41.1.418

60.0(0
1,275,00
I

168,000
305,703

18,284,627 17,817,565

79. p. 153.

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS
BAILBOA^S. INCLUDING STBEET ROADS.
Baltimore & Belair Electric Rj.— Bonds Authorized.—
27 authorized the making of a
the International Trust Co. of Baltimore, as
trustee, to secure $500,000 of 5 per cent 30-year gold bonds.

The shareholders on June

mortgage

to-

is about completed from Hamilton to Carney, Md,,
a distance of 3J^ miles; it is to be extended to Belair, 15^^
miles additional. The United Railways & Electric Co. or
Baltimore will operate the system under traffic contract, but
without guaranty of the bonds or ownership of the stock.
The authorized stock Is $500,000, all of one class; outstanding,
$51,000; par of shares, $50. Bonds are to be dated July 1, 1904, and
due July l, 1934, but subject to call on any Interest day; denominations, $1,000 and ^500; interest payable Jan, 1, and July 1 at office of
trustee; no bonds Issued as yet. Balls. 60-lb. T- President, S. A.
Williams; Secretary and Treasurer, John D. Wortblngton; Manager,
J, Alexis Shrlver, all of Belair, Md.
Baltimore & Ohio B.R.- Listed.— The New York Stock
Exchange has listed $1,000,000 additional 50- year 4 per cent
mortgage bonds of 1948, making the total amount listed
$70,963,000. The additional bonds were part of the amount
reserved to be issued for improvements, additions, etc., at
Eot exceeding $1,000,000 per annum. The total amount expecded for said purposes from July 1, 1898 to Mar, 31, 1904,
was }27,549,779, against which $11,000,000 of bonds (|3,000,
000 prior lien and $8,000,000 first mortgage 48) have been
issued, leaving $16,549,779 against which the company is entitled under terms of mortgage to issue bonds.
IDuring the
year ending March 81, 1904. said expenditures aggregated
$7,201,226, of which $2,035,051 on the main line, $2,339,087 on
the Pittsburgh & Connelleville, $573,580 on Point Pleasant,
Buckhannon & Tygarts Valley RR. and $375,448 on Akron
Chicago Junction RR. Compare V. 77, p. 2097, V. 78,
p. 1906.— V. 79, p. IRQ.
Bangor & Aroostook RB..—Dividend.—The company has
declared a second semi<annual dividend of 1^ p. c, placing
the stock on a 3 p. c. basis.— V. 78, p. 47.
BoBtOB & Maine R-R.-Deatruction of Blevator.— The company's large grain elevator with three freight houses on piers
Nos. 1 and 3, Mystic Wharf, Charleston, Mass., were destroyed
by fire on July 5, occasioning a loss of $500,000 or more, fully
or mostly covered by insurance. V. 78, p. 819.
Brooklyn Rapid Transit BE.— iVb Recent Sale of Bonds.—
President Winter is quoted as saying that the company has
not sold any bonds recently and that the directors do not
Intend to sell any at present.- V. 79, p. 151, 102.
Brnnswick & Birmingham BR.— Da^e of Sale Avg. i,—
The official advertisement states the date for the sale as
Aug. 2 at Brunswick, Qa., and the minimum price that will
be accepted as $1,000,000.— V. 79, p. 151.
Cedar Rapids- Iowa City Railway & Light Co.— Bonds
Offered,— N. W. Harris & Co. are offering at 98 and Interest
$250,000 of the $688,000 first mortgage gold 5s outstanding on
April 27, 1904. See further particulars in Stbeet Railway
Section and V. 77, p. 2279.
Chesapeake & Ohio Rj.— Consolidation of Conti oiled
Lines.— The Lexington & Big Sandy RR., 185 miles; MaysvUle & Big Sandy RR., 144 miles, and the Covington Short

The road

&

—

$5,000,000

To acquire 1,590 shares of the capital stock of the Qnlncy
RR. Bridge Co
$318,000
For facilitating and promoting a discharge of the prior liens 1.000,000
Sold for oonstruotion purposes and paid for
8,517,000
ILLINOIS DIVISION BONDS— $85,000,000 ADTHOBIZBD,
$50,835,000
5,992,000
of

prior bonds

4.200.000

int.

made, undertaken or

Chicago Burlington & Qaincy RR.— Listed.—The New
York Stock Exchange has listed $9,835,000 additional Illinois
Division 3)| p. c. bonds recently sold, making the total
amount on the list §50,835,000. The proceeds of these additional bonds were used for the following purposes

24,024.000

Bonds available

p.c. prf. fully pd. 4,890,475
4 p.c. 1st M. bonds. 6,000,000

Co., Ltd
Accounts payable.

for betterments

contracted for

For purchase of the Quincy GarroUton & St. Louis Ry. Oo.
350,000
Said meeting Is also called to authorize the purchase of the
railroad last aforesaid upon the terms and conditions agreed
upon.— V. 79, p. 151.

c bonds issued and listed
p. c, bonds sold and shortly to be listed (see below)
Bonds issuable only on retirement of a like amount

s

5

Bond

To provide funds

2.

4
1904.

paid

ize the issue of $5,350,000 of 8 per cent refunding 50-year
gold bonds under the mortgage of Oct. 1, 1899, as follows:

313 p.

31.

LiabilitiesCorn, stock. $3 50

18.284.628 17.817,665

Total

-V.

3U,7ii0
32,588

905,121
f9.488
317,451
25,710

If

$8,950

&

Alton Railway.— To Authorize Bonds— Merger,
Chicago &
Alton Railroad, will vote Aug. 31 on a proposition to authorChicago

—The shareholders of the controlled company, the
1,

250,000

211

Route Transfer Ry., 1 mile, all subsidiaries of the Chesapeake & Ohio Ry, Co., were consolidated on July 1 under the
title of the Chesapeake & Ohio RR. of Kentucky.— V. 78,

t

*

9

1.

:

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

additions, improvements, betterments, etc.. when 95 p. o. of said prior bonds shall have
been paid (Sections, Article 2)
for

4,149,000

Bonds Ready July 18.— Claris, Dodge & Co., New York,
and Lee, Higginson & Co., Boston, announce that holders of
negotiable interim certificates of the Illinois Division 4 p. c.
bonds can exchange them for definitive bonds on and after
July 18, 1904 (V. 78, p. 1981.)—V. 78, p, 2593.

Chicago Cincinnati & Lonisville BR.— See Cincinnati
Hamilton & Dayton Ry. below.— V. 78, p. 2598.
Chicago City Rj.— Tentative Agreement.— The proposed
it is understood, will be drawn, as
stated by Chairman Milton J. Foreman of the transportation
committee of the City Council
•'tentative ordinance,"

This committee Is willing to consider the completion of the "tentative ordinance" for the Chicago City Railway Oo. on the basis of a
fixed term in commutation of all the rights of the company in the
streets under Its unexpired grants, including its claims under the
ninety-nine year act. The commuted or average term on this basts
would be, say, about 12 years. The ordinance should give to the city
the right, upon the expiration of the commuted term or of any subsequent year up to 20 years, to deal freely with the tangible property
of the company on the basis of Its fair value— that is (a), to purchase
it, or (b), to require its sale to another corporation.
The grant, if on
this basis, is to carry less compensation for the commuted term, with
greater compensation after its expiration for such time as the company may thereafter operate under it up to twenty years from the
date of the ordinance.— V. 78, p. 1167.

Chicago Union Traction Co.—Negotiations Respecting
Franchises. The negotiations with the city respecting franchise matters, which were recently broken off, have been
renewed. The Transportation Committee of the City Council desires a settlement with the company on the basis of a
fixed term In commutation of all the franchise rights, similar
(See that comto that suggested for the Chicago City Ry.
pany above.) The committee has also recommended to
the Council that the Mayor be directed to advertise for bids
for the equipment and operation of a street railway over the
routes covered by the grants to the Chicago Passenger Ry.,
which recently expired, as follows:
Michigan Ave., from Washington
Harrison St, from Desplalnes to
W"8tern Ave.
to Adams St.
Adams St., from Michigan Ave.
Western Ave,, from Harrison

—

to Desplalnes St.

Desplalne
Harrison,

St.,

St. to

from Adams to

Twelfth.

Twelfth

St.,

from Western Ave.

to Fortieth St.

These lines are said to aggregate about 10 miles of the 34
miles of track of the Chicago Passenger Ry. Co., the rights
on the remaining 24 miles mostly expiring In 1905 and 1906.
Earnings.— See page 210, under "Annual Reports.''
Litigation.— Henry S. Robbins, representing the North and
West Chicago Street railroad companies, recently filed
cross petitions to the petition of Receiver Henry A. Blair,
claiming that notes to the amount of $1,090,000, issued by the
West Chicago, and notes to the amount of $2,318,000 in the
name of the North Chicago, were made by "dummy" officers
at the bidding of the Chicago Union Traction Co. to provide
for the iatter's debts and are not valid obligations of the
issuing companies. See "Assets" in balance sheet on page
2382 of Chronicle of June 11, 1904.
The suit of J. J. Townsend, filed la«t August, to annul the
amended leases of the North and West Chicago roads, has
recently been up for hearing before Jnage Mack at Chicago.
New Oars. Equipment Obligationa.— Judge Qrosscnp on
June 28 authorized the purchase of one hundred new cars,
sixty- five for the West Chicago and thirty-five for the North
Chicago, the same to be paid for by notes of those companies
due in one, two, three, four and five years. Judge Qroascup
says that the rehabilitation of the system will cost probably
some millions of dollars, a sum that could not be raised upon
car trust agreements and receivers' certificates, considering
the uncertain franchise relationship •with the city. He adds:
But the court has already, out of the current resources of the com-

—

number of lines- the BowmanvlUe lines, the
Division Street lines, the Grand Avenue Lines and the Ogden Avenue
and, to the extent that the means can be commanded, other lines
should be re-eqnipped and improved.- V. 78, p. 2441.

pany, equipped a
lines,

THE CHRONICLE.

212

Cbico & Northern liEL.— Increase of Stock.— The Bhareholders will vote Aug. 24 on increasing the capital stock from
$1,000 000 to $3,000,000; par value of shares, $100.— V. 78,
p. 819.

Cincinnati Dayton k Toledo Traction Co.— R-iport.—lae
resnlts for the year ending Miy 31, 1901, were:
(pi95,180
Gross earnings
f50/,990 Fixed oharffes, eto
6,022
201,202 Balance, snrplas
Netearnlngs
HAY 31, 1901.
BALANCE 8HEBT
Liabilities—
As$* .'«—
Road and equipment.. 97,I'79,108 Stock issued
f 3,500,000
3,500,000
50,223 Bonds Issued
Oaeh & onrrent asiets.
Uolund. & onrrent debt
199,30
Sarplns
30,030
I

|

$7,229,331

Total

Total

$7,229,831

Taere was expended for improvements and betterments
daring the year $72,147.— V. 78, p. 1961.
Cincinnati IlAmilton & Dayton Rj.— Control.— Acquiaition of Large Interest in Pere Marquette RK. The syndicate
which recently parchis^d a majority of the stocks of th'?
Dayton Ry. and the Chicago CincinCincinnati Hamilton
Louisville Ry. Co. has deposited the same, pending
nati
the completion of its fioancial plans, with the Uaited States
Mortgage
Trust Ca. of this city, as trustee. Common stock
of the Pere Marquette RR. Co.. amounting to $11,010,000 (its
outstanding capital being $14,145,500 common and $10,512,300
preferred) has been transferred to the Cincinnati Hamilton
Dayton R/., which has dsposited the same with the aforesaid trust company as trustee under the new mortgage below
The stock of the Pere Marquette so pledged,
described.
along with $1,854,600 of treabury common and $1,487,800 of
treasury preferred, possession of which also passes and which
will be lodged with the trust company, afford control of that
property, its authorized share capital being $16,030,000 common and $12,00 ',000 preferred. L »ter on the majority stock
Louisv. may also be deposited as
of the Chicago Cincinnati
part security under the new mortgage. In this or in some other
manner the permanent amalgamation of the several companies will be effected. In the meantime their control by the
Trust Co. representing the purUnited States Mortgage
chasers ensures harmonious operation and management.
The syndicate managers are: G. W. Young, President of
Trust Co.; V. P. Snyder, President of
the U. S. Mortgage
the National Bank of Commerce; Damont Clark, President
of the A.merican Exchange National Bank; L. B. Pierce,
Vice-President of the Commonwealth Trust Co. of St. Louis,
and Q-. H. Norman, Chairman of the Pere Marquette boird
of directors.
New Mortgage.— The oomoany has made a mortgage to the
United States Mortgage & Trust Co. of New York, as trustee,
to secure not exceeding $25,000,000 of 4 p. c. gold bonds,
dated July 1, 1904, and due July 1, 1954, without option of
earlier redemption; denomination of coupon bonds $1,000, of
registered bonds $1,000 and multiples; interest payable Jan,
The mortgage covers all the
1 and July 1 in New York.
railroad lines and appurtenances owned directly by the
D., its leases of the Dayton &; Michigan and Flndlay
C. H.
Western roads and $11,000,000 common stock
Fort Wayne
of the Pere Marquette RR,; $7,115,800 stock of the Cincinnati Indianapolis
Western RR. (a consolidation of the
Indianapolis Ddcatur
Western and the Cincinnati Indianapolis
Western subsidiaries of the C H. & D) will be assigned to the trustee as part security as soon as practicable.
The authorized issue has been or will be applied as follows:
Reserved to refund the underlying bonds below mentioned
$15,023,000
leaned In exchange for $11,000,000 Pere Marquette RR.
common stock at or about $75 per $100 share, etc
8,500,000

—

&

&

&

&

&
&

&

&

&

&

—

&
&

[Vol. Lxxix.

Announcement.—The United States Mortgage
on July 8 made the foUowlni^ stnitement:
Common Interests oonslstltig of tlnincters of New

& Trust Co.

late

York, Boston.

Phlladelplila, St. Louis, Toledo and D'^trott haveacqulred a ontroUlng
interest in the Cincinnati Hamilton & Dayton, the Pere Mdrquette
and the Chicago Cincinnati <b Louisville, and propose to bring aiioat a
merger of these three properties. Id order to provide a connection

& Daytoa and the Pere Marqiecte
tralli ) rlghtn and the use of terminal
perpetuity over the tracks of the Toledo Terminal <fe Railway Co., which U the principal pliyHioil ciinneotlon between the two
prooerties. The I'ero Marquette will on the l»<th inst. enter upon Us
tralHo agreement, which will give It a throntjh line from Chicago to
Buffalo. Through the m«rger, the ClnolQuatl Hamilton
Dayton will
also get a through line into Buffalo from Jmolanatl.
rtie merged
properties will serve the following Important points: Chicago, Milwaukee. Cincinnati, Buffalo. Detroit, Toledo, Indianapolis, Grand
Rapids, Dayton and Saginaw.
The plans for the unification of these railroads have not yet been
between the Cincinnati Hamilton
at To'edo, they have also secured
faoilltles Id

&

definitely determined
The most experienced railroad men and financiers of the conniry are beln;; consulted in respect to the plan, with a
view of agreeing on a method of merger that will bring about the most
economical method of operation with the lowest possible capitalization. It is expected that when the merger shall have been completed
and the properties united, it will be with a mortgage obligation of not
exceeding «^.^,000 a mile and with acapltai stock, preferred and common, outstanding of not more thaa $ l.oeo^per mile.
As the system will own and operate about four thousand miles, the
capitalization will be approximately $4.1,000,000 in stocks and $100,i

000,000

The

in

bonds.

company

No, 66 BroadPare Marquette are now located.
No holding company is proposed,— V. 79, p, 151.
New Control
New
Cincinnati Inter-Terminal RB.
President.— A\l the real estate required for the company's
terminals having been acq aired, Col. J. H, Woodard on
June 20 retired from the Presidency and was succeeded by
George W. Stevens, President of the Chesapeake & Ohio Ry.
Co. The control of the later-Terminal has passed to the
Covington & Cincinnati Elevated RR. & Transfer & Bridge
office of

the

way, where the

will be located at

offices of the

—

—

&

O. bridg-i across the river at CinCo., which owns the C
cinnati and whose stock ($1,500,000) is owned by the Chesapeake
Ohio Ry. Co. The dividends on the 4 per cent
preferred stock of the Inter-Terminal ara guaranteed by
Nashville
rentals to be paid by the C.
O , the Louisville

&

&

&

The preferred
and the Cinoinnati Hamilton & Ddyton.
stock dividends are secured by a deed of trust not only on the
property but also on the rentals. The preferred stock has no
vote except in case any payment of dividends should be in

The rentals are paid to a trustee who first pays the
dividends and then pays the surplus into the treasury of the
company. The company's present authorized issue of $400,000 preferred stock will, we are informed, bs canceled, and
another, with the same security upon the same plan, for
about $890,000 will be issued. Col. J. H, Woodard, who was
instrumental in carrying through the plans of the InterTerminal, is one of the directors of the new Union Terminal
RR, Co. of Cincinnati; see below. For further facts regarding the Inter-Terminal, see V, 77, p. 198, 400, 450, 510,
CincianatI Toledo A; Detroit Shore Line (Electric) By.—
Mortgage. This company, organized last February under
the laws of Ohio with $6,000,090 of authorized capital sto3k,
is filing its $6,0J0,000 mortgage made to the Trust Company
of America as trustee. The company is successor of the
People's Rapid Transit Ry and its road is projected to run
from Cincinnati through the counties of Himllton, Batler,
Preble, Dirke, Meroer, Van Wert, Paulding, Djfianoe,
Williams, Henry, Fulton and Lucas to Toledo. President,
J. M, Morgan; Secretary, L. J. Weadock; Treasurer, A.
Burger. J. Morgan & Co., Spitzer Building, Toledo, are
default.

—

,

interested.

Citizens'
tion.

Rapid Transit

Co.,

Richmond, Ya. -Co nstruc-

—The "Richmond D.spatch" understands that this com-

pany, of which John C. Robertson is President, has let contracts for the construction of part of its proposed system,
"which will cover a large portion of this city and suburbs
gage
1,477,000 not covered by trolley lines."
Colorado & Northwestern VLR.-In r*osse«non.—This comThe underlying bonds [aggregating $15,023,003] to be retired with the new issue are as follows, the company coven- pany, successor of the Railway Company, recently foreclosed,
anting to pay them all at maturity, except the Dayton & took over the oroperty on June 28. The company is building
an extension of the road from Sunshine to Eldora, 22 miles,
Michigan bonds, without extension of time of payment:
to have it finished by December, opening up a
Oonsol. M. 5 p. c, 6 p. c. and 7 p, c. bonds due Oot. 1, 1905. $1,595,000 and expects
Second mortgage i^ p. c. bonds due Jan 1, 1937
2,000,000 rich mineral country. The officers are: Col. S. B, Dick,
General morts-age 5 p. o. bindsdue June 1, 1942
3,000,000 President; Robert Law, Vice-President and Qan'l Manager;
Oln. Dayton & Ohio, ist M., 4. p. c. bonds, due Apr. 1, 1942. 1,200,000
W. B. Hays, Secretary,— V. 78, p. 1961.
Cin. Day. & Ironton Ist M. 5 p. c. bonds, due May 1, 1941. 3,500,000
Eastern Trank l,\neB.—Redtiction in Buffalo Grain Rates.
Day. & Michigan oonsol. M. 5 p. o. bonds, due Jan. 1, 1911. 2,728,000
New Stock,— The C. H. & D, will also, we are informed, — Oa July 1 a reduction was effective on export grain from
increase its common stock by $5,500,000 in connection with Buffalo and east thereof to seaboard points as follows: Wheat
and flax, from 4 cents per bushel to 8 cents; corn, 8% cents
its purchase of the control of the Pere Marquette,
oats, no change.
It is pointed out that at the present rate of dividends to 8 cents; barley, 9% cents to 3 cents;
This change, it is supposed, was made to strengthen the posi(4 p. c.) paid by the Pere Marquette, the income from the
stock acquired will be largely in excess of the interest on the tion of the trunk lines in their competition with the Canadian
routes.- V. 78, p. 47.
bonds issued in payment for the control.
Erie RR.— Listed.—The New York Stock Exchange hag
Offlcers,—The following changes are announced:
trust 4
New Directors— 6. M. Cnmmlng (Vice-President of United States listed $1,000,000 additional Pennsylvania collateral listed
Mortgage & Trast Go.), New Vork; J^mesJ. Roblson, Toledo; Eben per cent bonds of 1951, making the total amount
Richards, New York (Vice-President Mexican Central Ry.); Rudolph $33,000,000. The issue is limited to $36,000,000, of which $38,Kleybolte, Cincinnati; Alex. B. Pleroe, 8t. Louis; B W. Palmer, Bos
000,000 was put out in connection with the acquisition of the
ton; ThomaH H. Tra^y, Toledo, and James Philllpi Jr., New York.
Remain— Eugene Zimmerman, H. F. Shoemaker, Lawrence Max stock of the Pennsylvania Coal Co., Erie & Wyoming Valley
well and J. B. Foraker.
RR. Co. and Delaware Valley & Kingston Railway Co., and
New OflBsers— Eugene Zimmerman, President; G. M. Cnmmlng, Vloe- $4,000,000, Including the bonds just listed, was reserved for
Preatdent; E.R Wilson (formery with the Pere Marquette), Beoretary.
additions and improvements to the properties of those
F. H. Short remains as Treasurer.
Exeontlve Committee— Eugeae Zimmerman, H. F. Shoemaker, companies.
George M. Cnmmlng, Eben Richards and Thomas H. Tracy.
Earnings,— For the 11 months end ng May 31:
Bal., sur.
0th. inc.
Charges.
Orots.
Net.
11 mo«.
"There will probably be a few changes in the personnel of
1903-4.. ..$41, 108,630 $10,627,199 $360,3^3 99,68^013 $1,303,579
the board at or prior to the coming stockholders' meeting, 1902-3.... 41.436,484 13.981,100
which is to be held Oot. 1."
-V. 78, p. 1906.
Balance, available for additions, extensions, 'betterments,
rolling Btook and equipment (but not exceeding, at par.
the cost thereof) for railroads covered by this mort-

.

July

16, 1904.

—

THE CHRONICLE.

|

Great Northern Ry. Distribution EJnfoined.—See Northern SecnritieB Co. below.—V. 78, p. 1781.
Uoosac Yalley Street Railway, North Adams, Mass.—
Bonds.— The Massachusetts Railroad Commission has ap
proved the proposition to issne $400,000 5 p. c. aO-year bor>ds
and $100,OOJ additional stock to fund floating debt and for
refunding. The new stock will be Issued to stockholders at
$105 a share.— V. 78, p. 1416.
Massaobasetts Electric Companies. - Sie
River S;reet Ry. below.— V. 79, p. 103.

Newport

Mexican Central RR.— Funding Plans.—The
Evening Post" said yesterday:

&

Fall

"New York

"It was learned from an Inside souroe of information to-day that
plana are being made by direotora of the Mexioan Central for taking
np the company's floating debt, which amonnta to between $8,000,000
and $10,000,000. No official annoancement could be had as to the

nature of the transaction, but it i-i understood that Ladenburg, ThaiOo. have negotiated for the sale abroad of Mexioan Central

mann &

three-year notes."

Recent advices received by the Chronicle from sources
believed to be well informed, indicated a floating debt of
about $7,000,000 —V. 79, p. 103.

MohusTllle

& Adamstown RR.—Sale

Aug. 6.— This com-

pany's road, extending from Mohnsville to Adamstown, Pa,,
8 miles, is advertised to be sold at trustee's sale under mortgage of April 1, 1896 (Reading Trust Co., trustee,) on Aug. 6,
The funded debt at last accounts was
1904. at Reading, Pa.
164,668; capital stock $23,992.

Newport & Fall Biver Street Rj.—Neto Mortgage.— The
shareholders on June 38 authorized the cancellation of the
mortgage to the American Loan & Trust Co. dated 0;t. 1,
1908, and the making of a new mortgage to secure $1,000,000
bonds. The new bonds will provide for the payment of the
floating debt, the refunding of outstanding bonds and for
extensions and improvements. The road belongs to the system of the Massachusetts Electric Companies (see V. 79, p.
108; V. 78, p. 3599, 1907).— V. 76, p. 1849.
Norfolk & Western Rj.— Listed.—The New York Stock
Exchange has listed $1,000,000 additional first consolidated
mortgage 4 per cent bonds of 1996, making the total amount
listed $39,710,500.
Under the mortgage $9,690,511 bonds were
reserved for new construction and acquieitions, and for betterments and improvements, such bonds to be issued at a rate
not exceeding $1(100,000 per annum, With the present listing $9,000,000 of the bonds so reserved are outstanding.
STATEMENT OF ISSUANCE OF $39,734,136 FIB8T OONSODIDATED
MOBTOAQE 4 PER CENT BONDS.
Purposes of Incorporation. .123,328,600
Prior issnes
3,888.000
7I8,lf9
Old car trusts

Equipment
Real estate

Second track
Yards sidings A terminals.

—V. 78, p. 2143.
Nortliera

3.716.881
14,729
2.7S0.e6S
2,«8l,509

—

Improvem'ts and additions
to roadwar and tracks

(472,033

Replacing and strengtneniDgbrldges

578,826

station
buildlDga

Office,

and

shop

Branches and extensions...

499.1Pfi

I,60d,3i3

—

213

Panama RR.— New

Directors.— Admiral J. G. Walker,
William H. Burr and C. E. Grnmsky, all of the Isthmian Canal Commisjion, have been elected directors of the
Prof.

Railroad Company in place of Charles Einsiedler,
G. Buchanan, and Charles Paine, resigned. A majority of
the stock of the road was acquired by the U. S. Government
through its purchase of the Panama Canal —V. 78, p. 1788.
Pere Karquette RR.— See Cincinnati Hamilton & Dayton
Ry. above.— V. 78, p. 2600.
QaiBcy CarroUton & St. Loais Ry.— Jlf r^er.—See Chicago
& Alton Ry. above.— V. 77, p. 401.
Rochester (N. Y.) Rj.— Option to Subseribi.— la accordance with the plan published in the CnaoNiCLE of May 7,
p. 1783, the preferred stockholders of the Rochester Railway
Co. are offered the right to subscribe pro rata for $500,000
first consolidated mortgage 5 p. o. gold bonds of the Rochester
Railway & Light Co. at 9D and interest and $350,000 of the
common stock of that company, 70 p. c paid, at the price of
$20 per share. Toe stock is liable for a further assessment
of |10 a share, payable July 1, 1906, "but no additional
assessments are anticipated." The preferred shareholders
can subscribe for the bonds to the extent of 80 p. c. of their
holdings and to the common stock to the extent; of 10 p. c,
but no subscriptions will be received for the stock without a
snbsjription for the aforesaid proportion of bonds. This
offer is equivalent to bonds at par and interest with a bonus
of 50 p. c. in stock.
E. W. Clark & Co of Philadelphia will
buy or sell fractional amounts of the stock at the rate of |38
per share, the present market price. Subscriptions will be
payable at the office of said firm on or before July 20th, on
which date, subscriptions will close. The bankers say: "We
are confident that the Rochester Ry. & Light Go. will earn its
fixed charges, the dividend on its preferrid stock, and a
handsome and increasing surplus available for dividends on
its common stock."— V. 79, p. 153.
Rflchester (N. T.) Railway & Light Co.—Right to Subscribe.— See Rochester Railway above.—V. 79, p. 153.
St. Louis St. Charles & Western ( Electric) RR.— Receivership.— At St. Louis on July 8 Rufus W. Bailey was appointed receiver of the company by Judge A M. Thayer.
Friends of the company claim that proper notice of this
action was not received by the management. On June 15
last the company's bonds were sold from the Court House
steps in St. Louis.— V. 78, p. 704.
St. Louis & San Francisco RR.— AppUeatio i to List.
The New York Stock Exchange has been requested to list
(a) $1,368,000 additional refunding mortgaee 4 p. c. bonds,

Panama

J.

—

making the total $57,853,000; (b) $84S,000 K'insas City Ft.
Scott & Memphis Ry. Co. refunding mortgage bonds, making
the total $15,977,000.
Extension. Passenger service on the St. Louis extension
of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois line, it is said, will begin
Aug. l.-V. 79, p. 153, 104

—

Preliminary Injunction.
Faeiflc Ry.
See
Northern Securities Co. below,— V. 78, p. 1963.
San Pedro Los Angeles & Salt Lake RR.— Completion to
Northern Seonritles Co.— P/a7i Enfoinei,— Judge Brad- San Bernardino. This road was to be formally opened from
ford in the United States District Court at Trenton, N. J ., Los Angeles to San Bernardino on July 3.—V. 78, p. 2385.
SpriDgfleld & Xenia Traction Co.— Sa^e Ordered.- The
yesterday granted a preliminary injunction restraining the
pro rata distribution of the assets of the Northern Securities Common Pleas Court at Springfield, O., on July 11, ordered
Co. The injunction was applied for by E. H. Harriman and the foreclosure sale of the property as sought in the suit of
others for the purpose of recovering for the Union Pacific the Cincinnati Trust Co., the trustee.- V. 78, p. 2443.
RR. Go. its controlling interest in the Northern Pacific Ry.
Tennessee Central RR.— Reorganization Effected,—The
Co. Judge Bradford, however, does not go into the merits of holders of all the outstanding 5 per cents of 190;i (about $8,the case. la an opinion 60 typewritten pages in length be 000,000) having agreed to the issue of new prior lien 5 per
takes the position that if there is any question as to the pro- cent bonds at $12,500 per mile (total issue not to exceed
priety of granting tbe injunction, the complainants are enti- $4,200,000) for improvements and payment of floating
tled to it, for otherwise the distribution of the stock would debt and the exchange of tha old bonds for an equal amount
deprive them of the relief to whic h they would be entitled of the new general mortgage bonds, the plan referred to in
should the case be decided in their favor on final hearing. V. 78, p. 1788, has been carried out. All of the old bonds,
The distributio a among the shareholders of the Northern viz., the Tennessee Central Railway, Nashville & Enoxville
Securities Co. of the dividends accumulating on the stocks first mortgage bonds and Tennessee Central Railroad 5 per
owned by it in the Great Northern and Northern Pacific cents of 1902 have been canceled, leaving the new prior lien
companies must apparently await the settlement of this liti- bonds a first lien on the road. The new bonds are described

—

Compare V. 78, p. 2443.
Oklahoma City Rj.~Mortgage.—ThiB company has made

gation.

a mortgage to the Iron City Trust Co. of Pittsburgh as
trustee to secure not exceeding |1, 000,000 of 5 p. c. gold
bonds. These bonds are in $1,000 pieces and are dated July 1,
1904, and due July 1, 1934, but are subject to call at the
company's option [on and af tei?] July 1, 1914, in any amount
at 110 Int^rpflt payable Jan. 1 and July 1 at office of trustee.
The Chronicle has been favored with the following authoritative statement:
Out of the total authorized issue of $1,000,000 bonds, $350,000 have
been issued to acquire tbe rights, franchises and properties of the
Metropolitan Railway Co. of Oklahoma City. The road has under
oonstruotion 4 miles of additional tracb, which, when completed, will
give it about 15 miles of track within the city of Oklahoma and its
suburbs. The remaining $e50,000 bonds are held In the treasury for
future extensions and improvements under very strict conditions.
They can be l«sned only for 90 per cent of the valne of such extensions and improvements, and before any part of tbe same may be
issued the road must have earned in the previous twelve months net
sntUolent to fay double the Interest apon all or its bonds, including
the bonds then to be lesued. There is no provision in the present
issue, nor is anyoontemplated,for anexti^nsion of the road to Guthrie.
The road earned net fur twelve months ending May 31st, 1904,
$38,606 41.
The capital stock is $1,000,000, all of one class and all outstanding, par of shares $100. The President is Charles W.
Ford; Secretary, H. M. Brauer, and Treasurer, George
H. Brauer, Oklahoma City.
No prior Hens, we are informed, remain outstanding.

as follows

:

Prior Hen bonds authorlzad, $1,100,000; dated Jan, 1,1904. due
Jan. 1, 1934, but sub) ot to oall on Jan. 1, 190!?, or any Interest day
thereafter at 110; Interest January and July at Mlsslesippl Valley
l-rnst Oo,, St. Louie, trustee; outstanding, $4,014,000.
General mortgage bonds authorized, $zo,000,000, issuable at $37,500
per mile on present mileage (320 miles), Inolndlng $4,200,000 reserved to retire the prior lien bonds and 925,000 per mile on new
mileage constructed or aoqulred. Dated Jan. 1, 1904, due Jan, 1,
1954, interest January and July at Mercantile Trust Oo. of 8t. Louis,
trustee. Issued, $12,014,000. of which $4,014,000 are reserved to
retire the prior Hens as above stated.

Ciark»vilh Subsidy fieceiued.— Clarksville, Tenn,, has turned
over to the company $100,000 of the city's 4 p. c. bonds in
payment of subsidy voted in August, 1901.— V. 79, p. 152.
Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis.- Lt^ted.The New York Stock Exchange has listed the $18,000,000
general mortgage refunding 4 per cent slaking fund bonds of

1953.— V. 78, p. 2300.
Toledo Urban & Interarban Co.— Lease.— See Toledo
Bowling Green & Southern Traction Co., above.— V. 78, p. 583.
Toledo A Western (Electric) Rj.— Earnings, Ete.—Thin
company's operations are reported as follows for the month
of June, 1904 and 1908, and for the half-years ending June 80:
June
6 nws.
6 moi.
June
1903.

Gross earnings
$15,094
Standard freight oars handled...
139
Increase

-V,

75, p. 1255.

19U4.

1903.

$19,608

....

228
60 p. o

670

1904.

$97,938
1,0S2

S2

p, o.

THE CHRONICLE.

214

Triolt7& Brazos Tulley Kj.— Mortgage.— Th\B company
made a mortgage to the Old Colony Trnet Co. of Boston

hae

as trnetee to secure an issue of 5 p. c. gold bonds of $1,000
each. These bonds are limited to |20,000 per mile, dated
March 1, 1904, and due March 1, 1934, but subject to call at
any time in any amounts at 110; Interest payable Sept. 1 and
March 1 at cffice of trustee. The capital stock is |300,000,
Some 80 miles of the line
all outstanding par of shares $100.
has been In operation for some months, extending from
Cleburne to Mexia, Texas, and an extension is proposed
southeasterly from Mexla to the coast. President, J. H. B.
;

Vice-President and General Manager, R. H. Baker
Treasurer, E. Sammons. Office, Austin, Texas.— V. 79, p. 105.
Union Pacific RK.—Preliminarjf Injunction Oranted.—See
Northern Securities Co. above.— V. 78, p. 2601.
Union Terminal RE., Cincinnati.— Proposed Union ler
mtnoi.— This company was incorporated in Columbus, Ohio,
on July 1, with nominal ($100,000) capital stock to construct
a new union passenger station In Cincinnati, it Is said,
between Court Street and the canal, and extending from
Plum Street east to Elm or Race Street also to construct
a railroad from Jeptha and Badd streets to Court Street
The depot building and train-shed,
and Eggleston Ave.
according to the Cincinnati papers, will be about 1,200 feet
in length and contains 12 tracks.
The incorporators are
J. H. Woodard, Byron M. Clendenning, Otway J, Cosgrave,

House

;

;

;

Edward Wisnewski and Theodore Mayer. Col. Woodard,
who was the leading spirit in the establishment of the Cincinnati Inter-Terminal Ry., has favored us with the following:
The Union Terminal RR. Co. has been organlzert. and haa a paid-up
oap/tal of $100,000 In oonamon stock. This amount of common stock
wUl never be Increased. The next step will be the hearing by the 8apreme Court of Ohio in quo warranto proceedings to determine all of
the rights of a railroad company so organized for the purposes eet forth
in the articles of Incorporation. Should the court sustain our Incorporation as constitutional and strictly within the statutes, we will
then authorize an Issue of preferred stock sufficient to acquire the real
estate and build the road and station buildings. This preferred stock
will be secured by a deed of trust on all of the property as well as all
of the rentals paid by the various railroads, and all rentals (which will
be equal to the interest or dividends on the stock) will be paid to a
trustee, who will first pay the dividends promised and pay the surplus
into the treasury of the company. The preferred stock cannot vote
except In case of default, in which caee it oan take possession of the entire property. There is now no double liability on stock in this State.

The enterprise is therefore to be financed on the same gen
eral plan as the allied Cincinnati Inter-Terminal RR., which
see above.

Bearer

[Vol. lxxix.

Dam

Coal Co.^New Trustee,— The Guardian Trust

Co. of Cleveland has been appointed trustee under the mortgage of July 1, 1908 (recorded in Tuscarawas County, Ohio),
to succeed the Federal Trust Co., resigned.
F. M. Osborne
is President and C. A. Lowry.Secretary of the coal company,
which was incorporated in December, 1901. with |150,000 of
authorized capital stock. Office, Cleveland.

ClafHn(H.

Co.— Statement for Half Year.— The earnmonths enning June 30, 1904, compare as fol-

B.)

ings for the
lows:

6 mot. to Net
Total
DividendH
Balance,
Dividends
surplut.
JuneSO. earns.
on pref.
turplui.
on com.
1904.. $310,760
$1,276,794
$lo,470
$1*2, X28
(4) $153,164
1903.. 303,994
1,240,761
142,125
153,164
8,705
(4)
1902.. 317,377
1.215,160
142,125
22,088
(4)
153,164
1901.. 303,097
7,808
1,140,905
142,125
(4) 163,164
President Claflin says
The season opened with a good demand for merchandise, but
adverse weather conditions and extraordinary flnotnations In the
price of cotton soon unsettled trade and rendered tranaactions difficult. Normal conditions are now re-established, and a slowly improv:

ing business Is In progress. We note the fact that the aggregate of
dividends on our common stock passes the 100 p. o. mark at the end of
the fourteenth year of our corporate bnsinees, the July distribution
raising the total to 101 H p.
V. 78, p. 228.

c—

Colambns & Hocking Coal & Iron Co.— iVete President.—

&

Circwiar.— Lathrop
Smith, 37 Broad St., who recently
acquired control, issued a circular under date of July 11
announcing the resignation of Arthur A. Brownlee, President, because of the necessity of going to Europe and the
election as his Euccessor of N. L. C. Kachelmacher, "who
really was elected President two years ago, but that election,
by the parties in control of the company, was thrown into
Court on technical points." The circular further says
Mr. Kachelmacher is untiring as to labor and eminently fitted to 1111
the position. He will live in Oolumbna, and serve both as President
and General Manager, thus doing away with the salary of the latt«r.
We have made thorough Investigations as to the actual firfanclal
condition of the company, which we have never before been able to
do. We give the following facts as we find them. The annual statement of the previous Board of March 3l8t, giving the surplus as
$83,351, included 88 an asset, item "Creola Oil Well, No. 1," $5,961.
This was the money spent in drilling on the Vinson County land, with
no result—is not an asset, and should have been charged to expense
:

We find item of royalties to be received, $14,103 instead of
$19,204 as per their statement— a dlflerence of $4,801. The Item of
accounts receivable, $78,266, should be $65,043. a difference of
$13,222. Thns the surplus of March 81st (date of report) was
$fi9,387 Instead of $83,351.
The long strike on the Lakes shut off all shipments of coal from the
Hooking Valley to that section, and demorallzUion of prices of coal
followed throughout the Valley. It was most unfortunate for the
account.

Unite A Railways & Electric Co., Baltimore.— .ZVeic Cars.— new management to meet this serioua condition. During the strike
high. The
making the
Car Trust Bonds, —The company has arranged to purchase the tonnage was light, 10,000 tons of cost of miningsame as whenfixed
procharges In getting out
coal are the
152 new closed cars, the cost, over |400,000, being met chit fly ducing 40,000 tons— therefore coal operations up to June resulted in
by the sale of some |350,000 car trust gold bonds to Sutton, a loss of $18,238. Now. however, that traffic has been resumed on
Strother & Co. of Baltimore. These bonds, issue date not
yet fixed, will be payable in ten equal annual instalments.
The trustee will be the Fidelity Trust & Deposit Co. of Balti-

more.—V.

79, p. 105.

Tirginia Passenger

The coupons due July

& Power Co.— Payment of Coupon.—
on the bonds of the Richmond Trac-

1

tion Co. are

now

Baltimore.

Compare V.

period

1,

being paid at the Maryland Trust Co. in

the Liakes, normal conditions will prevail,
and sold and the prices should be higher.

more

coal will be

mined

"The interest due July Ist on the full amount of $1,000,000 bonds was paid, though only $806,000 of these bonds is
outstanding, $24,000 having been bought in since Jan. 1,
The company is entirely free from floating debt. The
1904.
small surplus, however, calls for the greatest care in the

management."— V. 78, p. 2887.
The
Commonwealth Electric Co., Chicago.— 5o»cfs.
West End Street Ry,, BoBton.— New StocJc.—The company Angle -American Debenture Corporation recently oflEered in
has petitioned the Massachusetts Railroad Commission for
London .|490,000 5 p. c. first mortgage gold bonds, part of the
authority to issue |150,000 additional stock to cover the cost
present outstanding issue of $5, SCO, 000, at 103>^ and interest,
of improvements, alterations and permanent additions made
in exchange at 49i^d. per $1, viz,, £215 per $1,000
on the property by the Boston Elevated Ry. Co, during the payable
bond. The bonds are dated June 1, 1898, and are due June 1.
April
March
1902, to

79, p. 153.

31,

1904.— V.

—

79, p, 105.

INDUSTRIAL. SAS AND MISCELLAMSOUS.
Alma (Beet) Sngar Co. —See Bay City Sugar Co. below.
Amalgamated Copper Co.— Reported Negotiations.— A director of the ocmpany is quoted as saying that negotiations
touching a possible purchase of the Heicze interests (United
Copper Co.) have been carried on, but that the price talked
of in the papers is absurdly high, considering the market
value of the shares.
special correspondent of the "Engineering and Mining Journal," writing from Butte, Mont.,

A

on June

25, said:

There are persistent rumors here that the Amalgamated Copper Co.,
or interests favorable thereto, are at work on some kind of a deal with
F. A. Helnze and hia people whereby the latter's properties will be
absorbed. Anyway, hOBtllltiea between these copper concerns seem
to have been called off, for the time being at least. It Is known that
during bis late visit to this camp. Ben. B. Thayer, as the representative of H. H. Rogers, with certain offlola'.s of the Amalgamated Company, inspected certain of the Helnze properties.
The Heinze properties are being operated with about the usual force,
and are running full blast.— V. 79, p. 149.

American Sugar Refining Co.— See Bay City (Mich.)
Sugar Co. below.— V. 78, p. 767.
Bay City (nicb.) Sngar Co.— Central Board of ControlMichigan papers state that the following companies in which
H. O. Havemeyer of the American Sugar Refining Co. is said
to own the controlling interest have organized a central
board of control with Charles B. Warren of Detroit as
Chairman, to insure the economical operation of the plants:
Alma Sugar Co., oapltal $650,000; Saginaw Sngar Co.. capital $750,000; Valley Sugar Co., capital $650,000 (V. 77. p. 358); Bay City
(Mich.) Sugar Co., capital stock, $1,000,000; Tawas Sugar Co., capital
$750,000; Sebewalng Sugar Co., capital $650,000; Sanilac Sugar Co.,
oapltal $800,000; Peninsula Sagar Co., capital $1,000,000 (V. 77. p
102); total capitalization, $6,250,000.

Under the agreement each of these companies elects one
representative on the central board which will control all the
plants.- V.

76, p. 1251.

with interest payable Mar. 1 and Sept. 1 at office of
Northern Trust Co., Chicago, the mortgage trustee. Additional bonds can be sold under the mortgage but only to the
extent of 75 p. c. of the coat of extensions and improvements.
(Compare V. 67, p. 482, 319.) The underlying Issues have
been paid, but there are still outstanding $180,000 of real
estate mortgages, also $500,000 of debentures of 1903 (V. 74,
Regarding the recent offering, the " Chicago Interp. 990).
Ocean" said:
These bonds are not a new issue, but are a part of the $1,500,000
1943,

bonds sold abroad by President Samuel Insull about a year and a-half
ago. No Immediate Issue of new bonds is thought to be contemplated, as the needs for extension work have been pretty well provided for. The next new capital raised will probably be by an issue of

new stock.
bonds above described, the Commonwealth
The Chicago
$6,250,000 stock.
Edison Co. has issued $5,000,000 first mortgage bonds and
$1,483,000 debentures; also $9,865,880 stock on which dividends are paid at the rate of 8 p. c. per annum.
New PZant.— Touching the new power plant, the same
Besides

its

company has outstanding

journal says:
Extremely satisfactory progress on the new power station, located
on the south branch of the Chicago River, is reported. The company
now has about $2,000,000 invested In the plant. Three of the large
electric generating units are set up and in operation. Each of them is
rated at 5,000 kilowatts capacity, but they oan each deliver as high as
7,600 kilowatts for an indefinite time. This is over 10,000 horse power
apiece. The plant is the largest turblne-englne power-generating plant
in the world. The turbines are of the new Curtis steam turbine type
made by the General Electric Co. The installation has proved a oonspicuons success. A large part of the current from the plant is sold
to the Chicago Edleon Co.
Report.— The comparative tables of earnings, etc., were
published in the Chronicle in V. 78, p. 1546. The Commonwealth's pamphlet report affords also the following:
Under the company's ordinance from the city of Chicago. 3 p. c. of
gross Income derived from the sale of current is payable annually to
the city, commencing with June 1, 1903. Your directors have made
provision for this obligation by creating a " municipal compensation
reserve" account. The amount of business connected at the close of
the year, expressed in the equivalent of 16-oandle-power lamps, compares as follows:

I

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

215

Issue is limited to $500,000; New York Security & Trust Co. of
York, trustee; $325,000 bonds are now issued or about to be
issued, $75,000 are reserved to retire an equal amount of Seneca Falls
& Waterloo Oas Light Co. 5 per cent bonds, $20,000 are reserved to
retire $20,000 Geneva Gas Co. bonds and $80,000 are reserved for
future extensions and betterments. The iesue is a first lien on all
the property of both companies now owned or hereafter acquired,
Mitchell.— V. 78, p. 1646.
excepting only the stock of the Auburn Gas Co., should that be acundoubtedly
more than
Copper Baogre Consolidated (Copper) Co.—Advertisement. quired. These properties are The Empire worthCo. owns all twice the
$420,000 outstanding bonds.
the stock
"New York San" and other papers contained on of the Interurban Gas Co. and a new by Coke
The
product, 8emet-8olvay gas
the form of an advertisement an announcement and coke plant, consisting of 30 ovens, capable of orodaclng over 140
Monday in
of coke and over 600,000 cubic feet of good illuminating
from Thomas W. Lawson that the 43,000 shares of stoc^^ tons together with 2,000 gallons of tar and over 4,')00 pounds gas per
day,
of sulbonght by him some two years ago had|been sold in order to phate of ammonia.
relieve the company from possible attack by the interests
The Interurban Gas Co. has perpetual franchises for li;s new highwhich he is combating. At the same time he gives his reasons pressure pipe line just completed from Geneva through Seneca Falls
and Waterloo to Auburn. It owns all the stock and $80,000 of the
for believing that the prospects of the property are good.—
$100,000 bonds of the Geneva Gas Oo. and all of the stock of the
629.
V. 77. p.
Seneca Falls & Waterloo Gas Light Oo. The Gene a Gas Co has perpetual franchises in Geneva. The Seneca Falls & Waterloo Gas Light
Cramp Steel Co,— Reorganization Pton.— Stockholders Co. has a franchise in Seneca Falls expiring in 1950, and a franchise
Duncan Donald, J, A. Carrie, William SIddington, W. J. in Waterloo which, I am advised by counsel, is practically perpetual.
Lindsay and J. T. Dnguid, "realizing that it is impossible to Each company has its generating plant, gas holder, mains, etc. Tne
Geneva Gas Oo. and Seneca Falls & Waterloo Gas Light Co. have been
avoid a foreclosure of the mortgage on the plant held by the in operation for about fifty years and their business is growing more
North American Trust Co. of New York, have constituted rapidly than ever. Kor the year 1903 their net earnings were largely
themselves a committee for the purpose of organizing a new in excess of interest on all the present bonds of the company. A contract has been entered lato to supply the Auburn Gas Oo. with gas.
company." Their circular dated July 4, 1904, says In part:
I estimate the combined net earnings for the first year after starting
Several plans of re-organlzatlon have been suggested. The oiron- coke-oven plant as follows: Sales of gas, $65,000; sales to Auburn Gas
lars of the President of the 10th ult. dlaoloeed thit a plan of re-organCo., $15,000; sales of coke over cost of ooal, $25,000; total, $105,000.
izatlon wag contemplated by parties In England, who have been
negotiating for the bonds of the company. Some parties In New
Houston Oil Co.— Overdue Cowpon.—Th? interest due Fob,
York, who had no.lnterest In the company, have also "clrcnlarlzed" the 1 last on the Timber Certifi -ates will shortly be paid at
stockholders with a similar purpose In view. These proposals are all
the National City Bank of N. Y. from the proceeds of the reindeflnlte and uncertain. The present committee are local shareholders, and can secure proper management and carry out the reorganiThe funds have been deposited with
ceivers' certificates.
with promptness and economy. S a fllcient proxies have been the bank, and as soon as the necessary formalities are arzation
secured to insure the co-operation of a majority of the stock
The majority of the committee are interested in an associated Indus- ranged, which will be b ^fore Aug. 1, the distribution with
interest to date will be made. See V. 79, p. 151, 106.
try in CoUlngwood, the Imperial Steel & Wire Oo., Ltd. This company
[Seebelow.— Ed.], organized a little over a year ago, has invested in
a wire plant over $l50,0OO, and will be a large consumer of the prod(The) Imperial Steel & Wire Co., Collingwcod.Ont.—iVew
uct of the »teel company. As such feel that they can enlist further
Plant.— Th\a company, incorporated in April, 1903, under the
capital In the steel company should It be necessary. All plans oontemplating an Issue of bonds and loans from stockholders have failed, laws of Ontario, with $700,000 authorized capital stock, exthrough the dlQionlty at the present time of interesting capital in pects to have its new continuous wire rod mill, with
Indnstrlal enterprises. Your plant Is complete and In excellent condicapacity of 50 to 100 tons daily, in operation within a few
tion, and can be put in operation In a few weeks time, and with the
weeks. The capitalization, officers, etc., follows:
protection afi' )rded by Customs duties and bounty paid on the outpat.
It should earn substantial dividends.
The committee feel satisfied
Of the stock, $200,000 is 7 p. o. cumulative preferred, par shares
that there will be no difficulty in transferrin? to the new company the
$10 each; outstanding $500,000 common and $164,000 preferred. No
bonus of $60,000 granted by the town of Co!lingwood. The plan probonds outstanding. A bonus of $25,000 cash was received from the
posed will enable the new company to start off with a clean sheet and
town of Oolltngwood. The company will obtain its supply of steel
with enthslent working capital to carry on Its business in a satisfac- billets from the Cramp Steel Co., whose works are adjoining. (See
tory manner.
above and V. 77. p. 300.) The output, according to the prospectus, is to be 100 tons wire rods, 50 tons of wire, 25 tons of
The plan of reorganization provides:
wire nails and 25 tons of wire fencing. In September, 1903, the
A new company "The Northern Iron & Steel Co., Ltd.," Is to be North American Securities Co. of Toronto oflfered $40, ^00 of the preformed to take over the property. Its authorized capital stock will ferred stock at par, a bonus of one share of fall-paid common stock
be $2,500,000, of which $1,250,000 will be ordinary stock and $1,- being given with each preferred share.
250,000 will be 6 per cent preferred stock, preferred both as to prinDirectors: J. A. Carrie. Toronto; W. J. Lindsay. St. Thomas; John
cipal and dividends, which will be payable quarterly. The shares will
Charlton, Lyndook; N. H. Stevens, Chatham: W. H. Schneider, Hamilbe of a par value of $100. The present shareholders are oflfared the ton; Major B. »haw Wood, London, Ont
Duncan Donald, Toronto;
new stock on the following basis: (1) For each share of preferred A. H. Notman, Toronto; Dr. D McKay, J. T. Duguid. W. D. MoLeod,
stock surrendered there will be allotted to applicants two shares of
KIrkhill.
the new preferred stock, with $85 per share paid up, the balPresident and General Manager, J. A. Oarrie; First Vice President,
ance of $15 per share to be payable $5 fortliwich and the balance In
B. Shaw Wood; Second Vice-President, W. J. Lindsay; Third Vicethirty and sixty days after allotment; (2) for every five shares of the
President, W. Saddlngton; Secretary-Treasurer, Duncan Donald.
common stock surrendered there win be allotted to applicants one
share of preferred stock, with $85 per share paid up, the balance of
Kings Connty Gas & Illnminatlng Co Merged.— See
$15 per sbare to be payable $5 forthwith and the balance in thirty Kings County Lighting Co. below.— V. 74, p. 1255.
and s'xiy days after allotment. The Imperial Securities Co., Ltd.,
has off -ired to place any stock not taken up and also to secure subKings Conuty (N. T.) Lighting Co.— Jfergfer.— This comBcriptlans for additional working capital should it be necessary.
pany, recently incorporated with $2,000,COJ of authorized
Sufflcient stock will be left in the treasury for this purpose. The
stock (par of shares $100), filed on July 1 a certificate mergshares allotted and paid up wUl be deposited with a trust or securities
company to be held in pool for a period of six months or one year as ing the Kings County Gas
Illuminating Co. , all of whose
the directors of the new company may deem It advisable. To allow
$1,000,003 stock it owned. Charles H. Werner is President;
the company to show soma earnings before the shares are traded in
W. G. Phillips, Treasurer, and Ashley T. Cole, Secretary of
pooled receipts will be issued to eaeh shareholdjer.
"The capital of the new company is just half that of the tbe new company. The property absorbed supplies gas in the
Cramp Steel Co., Ltd., and share per share will be twice as 80th Ward of Brooklyn. For two years past it has been conN. Brady and associates. Its bonded debt invaluable. Immediate action is imperative." Deposits and trolled by
the first cash payment may be made on or before Julv 18 at cludes $750,000 5 p. c. first mortgage gold bonds, coupons
the Imperial Securities Co., Ltd., Toronto. F. A. Hall is payable April 1 and 0.;t. 1, and $25J,000 5 p. o. debentures,
both issues due Oct, 1, 1940.
Secretary of the committee, 705 Temple Building, Toronto.
Mortgage, —The new company has made a mortgage to the
—V. 78, p. 105.
Central Trust Co. of New York as trustee to secure an issue
Edisnu Electric Illnminating Co. of Boston.~New Stock of $5,000,000 Ist refunding mortgage gold bonds due July 1,
issue Probably Next December.
President C. L. Edgar is 1954; interest, 5 p. c. per annum, payable Jan. 1 and July 1;
quoted as saying:
denomination, $1,000. Oaly a portion of these bonds will be
The statement that we shall Issue additional stock in the Immediate issued at present, $1,000,000 of them being reserved to retire
future Is somewhat misleading.
In December, however, we shall
at or before maturity the existing mortgage bonds and
probably oflar stockholders the right to subscribe for approximately
10 per cent in new stock. The Gas & Electric Light Commission last debantures. The new bonds are subject to call at 105 and
year authorized us to Issue 20,000 shares at $200 per share, and of iuterest on or after Jan. 1, 1940.— V. 78, p. 2337.
this we have Issued only 9,500 shares, which would leave 10,500 still
Lake Superior Corporation.— Operaftows.—Vice-President
unissued. The exact details of this otter have not yet been considered
by the directors and they probably will not be until the late tall.— V. Drummond is quoted as saying:
78. p. 2387.
As we have already received large orders for Helen Oline ore, we
EdiBoa Electric Illuminating Co. of Brockton.— Acquiai- shall put the mines in operation at once, and the ore will be shipped as
rapidly as possible to Clftveland and Hamilton, Ont. The lime at
tUm.—The company, having arranged to purchase the Whitwhich the
will depend on
other plants will be
man Light Power Co., recently applied to the Massachu- the reportssteel rail andManager Shield. We started the opinion that
of General
are of
Electric Light Commission to approve the we have now a sulllolent amount of capital to make the works go.
setts Gas
transaction and to authorize the issue of $150,000 new stock
President Warren is given as authority for the statement
to cover the purchase and provide tor improvements, etc. that the Helsn Mine is turning out from 800 to 1,000 tons of
This wonld increase the sbare capital to $300,000; par of ore per day; that the puip mills are working at full capacity,
shares $100. Dabt includes $100,000 first mortgage gold 58.— producing about 100 tons daily, and that the saw mills are
V. 71, p. 1169.
running at their fu.ll capacity. V. 78, p. 2445.
Empire Coke Co. and Interarban Gas Co., Geneva, Etc.,
Lehigh Coal & Navig ition Co.— Bonds Listed in PhiladelN. Y.— Joint Bonds Offered.— Fr&vola Ralston Welsh, 828
and improveChestnut Street, Philadelphia, has purchased and is offering phia.— An additional $285,000 of 4 p. c. funding
ment bonds of 1898 has been listed on the Philadelphia Stock
for sale at 101 and interest a block of the joint first mortgage
Exchange, making the total amount on the list $2,036,000.
6 per cent gold bonds. Authorized iesue, $600,000; due, Aug.
The additional amount was in the treasury bonds and it was
1, 1923; interest payable Aug. 1 and Feb. 1, tax free.
These
bondi) are the j nnt and several obligations and only issue of issued for improvements. V. 79, p. 107.
the Empire Coke Co. and Interurban Gas Co., which operate
Mllwaakee Gas Light Co.— Bonds 0/r<'»*ed.— Kountze Bros,
in Geneva, Seneca Falls and Waterloo. N. Y., and adjacent and Farson, Leach
Co. offer $1,000,000 of the outstanding
territory.
E. H. Pdlmer, President of both companies, says
$7,000,000 first mortgage gold 4s at 90 and interest. The net
in part, under date of July 5:
interest charges (now $284,000) were
t arnlngs available for

BUSINESS CONNECTED ON MAB. 31 BY COMMONWEALTH COMPANY
(EODIVTAIiKNT OF 16 CANDLB POWER LAMPS )
1902.
1901.
1900.
1903,
1904
341.365
236,102
178,950
447.507
«04;i94
Ohloago EdlBon)— Edward L. Brewster,
Directors (all directors of
Bamnel Insull, Kreklne M. Phelps, Robert T. Lincoln and John J.

The

New

;

—

,

&

A

—

&
&

—

—

&

THE CHRONICLE.

•il6

in 1908 1620,879. Regular dividends have been paid for the
last 45 years of not less than 6 p. c. per annum,— V. 78,
p. 2603.

Monopfirabela River Consolidated Coal & Coke Co.—
Dividend Passed.— The directors on Tuesday indefinitely
postponed action on the preferred dividend. The motion
unanimously adopted follows:
"Whereas, the nnprecedented weather conditions of theetx moiths
ending May 1 , 1904, were Buch as to praotloally arrest the baBlneBs of this
oonapany tor a period of nearly four months, and In addition thereto
to oanse losseB by flood and fee, which, aocurAtely stated, amount to
$457,900, and. Whereas, conditions are now reversed, therefore. Resolved, that while the net earnings of the company ha^e been more
than suHlotent to cover all fixed charxes and these losses, as stated,
bat do not warrant the declaration of a dividend at this time, therefore be It resolved that It is the sense of this board that the question of dividing the net earnings of the oompany to the preierred
shareholders be deferred antU they be aoonrately aaoertained at the
oloae of the fleoal y«ar, viz., Oct. 31, 1904."
of the company passed late In 1903 to the Pittsburgh Coal Co., which now owns about $15,000,(00 of the
$80,000,000 common stock and $3,500,000 of the $10,000,000 7
The preferred dividend was
p. c. non-cumulative preferred.
paid regularly from July, 1900, to January, 1904, inclusive.

The control

Purenase.

—The

oompany

recently purchased the Southern

Railway Company's steamboat and barge coal carrying line
between Greenville, Mies., and New Orleans on the Mississippi River, including two large towboats, about 100 coal
barges, rights of way, etc.— V. 78, p. 1378.
National Lead €o.— Merger Probable.— Fresiient L. A.
Cole, referring to the reports of a pending merger with the
United Lead Co., is quoted as saying: "Mr. Guggenheim
and I have agreed to submit to our respective boards of directors at the next meeting a plan looking to the union of
the two companies." The directors of the National Lead
Co. will meet July 31. The "New York News Bureau" says:
It is understood that the National Lead Co
for the pnrpoae of abcorblnK the United Lead Co., will Increase Its capital stock by about
$20,000,000, of which half will be preferred and half common. The
present capital stock of the National Is $30,000,000, so that the new
concern will be capitalized, If present plans matare, at $50,000,000,
and will bear the name of the National Lead Co. The United Lead
Co. has between $9,000,000 and $10,000,000 bonds outstanding.
These, It is learned, will be exchanged for new preferred stock of
the National Lead Co.
,

Compare V.

78, p.

771.— 7.

78, p. 3388.

National Salt Co.— Sale Confirmed.—Supreme Court Juetice Giegerich on July 8 confirmed the foreclosure sale of
this company's property.
At the auction in 1908 $337,500
was bid; at the recent sale only $193,3''6; and Justice Giegerich expresses the opinion that a third sale would give no
better result. He recommends that the salt, coal and other
supplies on hand be sold as soon as possible and the company
wound up.— V. 78, p. 3015.

New York &

Westchester Lighting: Co.— New Company,—

This company was Incorporated at Albany on July 11 with

nominal ($360,000) capital stock. The new company is intended to acquire from the United Gas Improvement Co.
of Philadelphia for the Consolidated Gas Co. the control by
purchase or lease of the Westchester Lighting Co., in which
the Improvement Co. owns a majority of

the $13,500,000

Compare V. 79, p. 160.
Northwestern Telegraph Co.— Guaranteed Bonds.—The
statement made to the New York Stock Exchange some time
capital stock.

4i^ p. c. bonds of 1934,
guaranteed by the Western Union Telegraph Co., affords the
since regarding the $1,500,000 of

[Vol. Lxxii.

& Electric Co.— De«cr*pf <on.—MacDonald,
.and Everfz, FoUanshee & Co., both of Chicago,
offered at par and interest by advertisement in the Chromiglb
of Feb. 30 $2,000,000 first mortgage 6 p. c. gold bonds of
$1,000 each; semi annual interest from Jan. 1, 1904; principal
due Jan. 1. 1923, optional .Ian. 1, 1908, at 105 and interest.
Equitable Trust Co., Chicago, trustee
There are no underlying bonds. Officers: Sumner R. Clarke, President: F. W.
Little, Vice-President; Lyman A. Walton, Treasurer: Theo4ore J. Miller, Secretary.
President Clarke, writing to the bankers from Peoria on
Jan. 16, says:
Thecompany was organized under the laws of Illinois and nowowna
the plants, franchises and business of the following companies, viz.:
Peoria Gas
Electric Co.. Peoria Gas Light A Coke Co., Peoria General Electric Co.
Through this consolidation it owns and controls the entire gas and eleotric-llghtlng and steam heating business
of Peoria; a perpetual gas franchise granted under B[>eclal Act of the
Peoria Gas

McCoy & Co

ifc

State Legislature; a perpetual steam-heating rranobise; a gas franchise granted for 99 years, and an eleotrle-llghtlng franchise granted

20 years.

for

The company has a capital stock of $2,500,000 [In $100 shares] and
a total authorized Issue of $2,500,000 first mortgage 20-year 5 per
cent gold bonds, of which the $2,000,000 purchased by you are oni•tanding and the $500,000 bonds held by the trustee are reserved
for future acquisitions, extenfions, equipment and betterments at not
to exceed 90 per cent of the actual cost thereof. A sinking fund of 5
per cent of the grots earnings is provided after 1908 for the purchase
of the bonds in the open market or for additions, betterments and extensions.

The business for the year 1 903 was as follows Gross earnings, $477,896; expenses. Including taxes and depreciation, $276,235; net earnings, $201,661, or more than double the Interest on the bonds outstanding. The property and business of the Peoria Gas Light & Coke
Co. was purchased by and consolidated with that of the Peoria Gas
Electric Co. Deo. 31. 1903, so that the above statement is made up
of the business of these two companies, operated Independently, The
steam heating system was not in operation long enough to materially
affect the earnings for the past year; the company now has $i7,000
in steam-beating contracts, which will practically augment the net
earnings for the current year to that extent. It is expected that
larger earnings will result from the consolidation just effected, there
being a saving in salaries and wages alone of $8,OoO per annum.
The two gas plants are located on adjoining property, admitting of
their operation as one plant for the maun faoture of both water and
coal gas, the combined dally capacity being 2.300,000 cubic feet. Both
plants are llioroughly modern and in first-class physical condition.
The gas distribution system consists of 108 miles of mains, with
7,537 metres. The eleotrlo-llght plant has been practically re-buUt
since 1900, with large units, direct connected machinery, storage batteries, etc. Its dIstrlbntlDg system consists of over 5,000 poles, carrying 456 miles or 467,228 pounds of copper wires, and 8,066 metres.
The company's plants are located on ample and valuable real estate,
with railroad and river frontage. The tract upon which the electric
plant is located, comprising an entire block, and that upon which the
two gas plants are located, is a tract 300 feet x 1,080 feet In size. The
books show the total value of the property to be more than $4,000,000,
The directors are: Sumner R. Clarke, President Clarke Bros.' Distilling Co., Peoria. 111.; Berj. Warren Jr., Grain Commission, Peoria,
:

&

111

;

Theo. J. Miller, President Peoria

&

Pekln Terminal Railway,

Peoria, 111.; F. W. Little, Vice-President and Manager Peoria Gas Ss
Electric Co., Peoria, 111.; John R Walsh, President Chicago National
Bank, Chicago; F. M. Blount, Vloe-Pres, Chlcaeo National Bank,
Chicago; Lyman A. vvalton, VloePres. Equitable Trust Co., Chicago.
The company serves theCoity of Peoria, North Peoria, East Peoria,
South Peoria, Avery vlUe and Peoria Heights, comprising a 1900
Census population of about 63,000, and also reaches a large district
outside of these limits. The present estimated population of territory served Is 80.000.

of an expert says: "The manufacturing capaciof both plants are far in advance of present requirements and able to meet fully the assured large increase of
business for several years to come. The company sells its
product at such low prices that competition is very remote.
Over 19 miles of gas mains were laid late last fall, from
which a large increase of business will be obtained this

The report

ties

year."—V. 78, p. 824.
Pittsburgh Coal Co.— Dividends.-The directors on July
13 declared the usual quarterly dividend of 1^ p, c, oa the
preferred stock. As stated below, action on the preferred
dividend of the controlled company, the Monongahela River
Consolidated Coal & Coke Co., was indefinitely postponed,
V. 78, p. 1965.
lows:
Saginaw (Beet) Sngar Co.—See Bay City Sngar Co. above.
For value received, the Western Union Telegraph Co. hereby guarantees the payment of principal and interest of the within bond.
Sanilac Beet Sugar Co.— See Bay City Sugar Co. above.
Western Union Telegraph Co.,
Sebewaiog Beet Sugar Co.—See Bay City Sngar Co. above.
By
Secretary.
The bonds are secured by a mortgage to the Bowling Green Trust
Senaca Falls & Waterloo (N. Y.) Gas Light Co. -See
Co., trustee, dated Aug. 1, 1903, covering all the lines of telegraph
and appurtenances owned or to be owned In Wisconsin, Mlohi(?»n, Empire Coke Co. above.
Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana and In ManiSterling (111.) Gas & Electrle Light Co.— Bonds Offered.—
toba. Since the date of the lease the property has been much enlarged and Improved. By the terms of the lease, which Is for 99 years A block of $50,000 5 p. c. 1st mortgage gold bondd of this
from July 1, 1881, the Western Union Telegraph Co, agreed to pay in- company is offered at par and accrued interest by Wm. H.
terest at a graduated rate rising to 6 percent per year In 1897, and Colvin & Co., 182 La Salle St., Chicago.
The Federal Trust
continuing at that rate thereafter, upon $^,500,000 of stock of the
We quote from a cirNorthwestern Telegraph Co. and Interest upon the outstanding bonds & Savings Bank, Chicago, is trustee.

following:
These bonds were Issued to redeem $1,180,000 7 per cent first mortgage bonds which matured Jan. 1, 1804, and to provide working capital.
They are for $500 each; dated Jan. 1, 1904; maturing Jan. 1,
1934; interest, A^ p, o. per annum; payable Jan. 1 and July 1, beginning July 1, 1904.
The principal and interest are guaranteed by endorsement as fol-

,

of the Northwestern Telegraph

Co.— V. 78.

p.

705.

cular as follows

:

Capital stock. $250,000; bonds authorized, $250,000 bonds Issued.
$243,000, due June 1, 1927, without option of earlier redemption; coupons payable June and Deo. Company is owned and operated by the
National Gas & Water Co., suooasafnl builders of such plants In various
parts of the country. Serves Hterlng and Rock Falls [108 miles from
Chicago]; total present population about 11,000. Has a perpetual electric franchise and a 30 year gas franchise for Sterling and a 50-year gas
franclitse for R"ck Falls. Theeleotrlc-Ught and power plant is operated
by developed water power of 600 H. P. and etiulpped with auxiliary
steam power plant. The electric station was entirely rebuilt and new
switchboard and generator installed in 1903. An entirely new and
complete gas plant was constructed on a new site In 1902, with present manufacturing capacity of l'.20,000 cubic feet dally, and 23 miles
of gas mains reach every section of these cities. Over 1,100 meters
are set and 1,000 gas ranges are in use. The net earnings are more
than twice the interest requirements.
;

Peninsular Beet Sngar Refining Co.— See Bay City Sugar
Co. above.— V. 77, p. 3103.
Peninsular Telephone Co., Tampa, Fla.— Bonds Offered.—
John J. Cushing & Co., of Cincinnati, were recently cfifering
for the underwriters $200,000 of this company's $400,000 first
mortgage 5 p. c. gold bonds on a basis to net about 5^ p. c.
on the investment. These bonds are due in 30 years, but
redeemable after 15 years at 5 p. c. premium; denomination
$500 each.

A circular says in part

of the best constructed we have. Undergound con10 milee; overhead lines cable oontruotlon, about 18 miles; all
suitable for abont three times the present subscribers. At present
about 1,500 Hubeorlbers In Tampa, Increase about 100 a month; seven
outside towns 700, increase 30 a month. Present Income monthly
about $.'>,000. Balance sheet shows abont $680,000 assets. Author
Ized capital stock $500,000; authorized bond Issue $400,000. With
these bonds we clve a liberal bonus of the stock of the ootDpany. Last
year's business, after Interest on bonds, depreciation and extraordinary constructior, showed a net surplus equal to about II4 p. c. on the

The plant is one

duits,

stock.

Compare

also V. 75, p. 1358.

Slilwell-Bieroe & Smlth-Yaile Co., CincinDatl.— iVbWceto
Bondholders. In view of the bankru tcy sale which was
ordered on July 3 by the United States District Court for the
Soul hern District of Ohio, a bondholders' committee consisting of L, P. Claweon. James H. Gates and J. M. Button of

—

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

Cincinnati, nrges the bondholders to deposit their holdings
with the CincinnatilTrust Co. on or before July 31, with a
view to united action at the sale and in any negotiations for
reorganization.
The agreement provides that the committee shall have full power to
deal wlh the bonds In the best Interest ol the bondholders, and that
the expenses of the oommlttee, Including oompensatlon, disbursements and counsel fees, shall not exceed 2 p. o. of the par value of the
bonds so deposited. See V. 79, p. 156. 107.
Tawas (Beet) Sagrar Co.— See Bay City Sugar Co. above.

Tennessee Coal, Iron & RR. Co.— Strike— O a July 1 over
7 000 union miners in the Blrminecham district struck, the
ooal operators having declined to make a contract with
th^m on last year's basis. The soale was signed temporarily
by most of the prodacers for public consumption, but the
furnace interests insist on a reduction. In consequence of
RR. Co. "has stopped
the strike the Tennessee Coal, Iron
all of Its furnaces that were making foundry iron."— V. 78,

&

p. 2446.

United Illaminatlngr
dend,

Co.,

New Haven, Etc.— Extra Divi1% p. c. on the

— With the usual quarterly dividend of

$1,000,000 stock, there was paid this month an extra dividend of 1 p. c— V. 70, p. 283.
United Lead Co.— See National Lead Co. above.—V. 78, p.
1449.

United States Gas Improvement Co.— Probable Sale or
Westchester
Lease of Controlled Company,— Sse New York
Lighting Co. above.—V. 78, p. 2602.
United States Realty & Improvement Co.— Listed.—
The New York Stock Exchange has listed $11,869,000 of the
authorized iseue of $13,506,000 convertible 5 p. c. 25-year debenture bonds of 1924 and $13,632,600 of the now-issuable
$16,494,000 stock, the remainder of the $80,000/00 authorized being reserved for the conversion of the debentures.
The remaining $1,647,000 debenture bonds and $2 881,400
capital stock will be add«^d to the list when issued in exchange for stock of the United States Realty & Construction
Co. There have been deposited for exchange into the securities just listed $23,719,000 of the $27,011,100 preferred
stock and $23,680,400 of the $33,198,000 of the common stock,
of the last-named company, See plan in V. 78, p. 2019;
also report for the eleven months ending May 31, 1904, with
detailed statement of assets, etc., in V. 78, p. 2596.— V. 78,

&

217

COMMERCIAL EPITOME,
Friday Night, July

15,

1904.

usual at this period, the volume of business passing is
Many merchants and bankers are
is of small proportions.
absent, taking their customary mid-summer vacations from
the stress of bnsinesp. Although reports from the interior
state that there will be some curtailment from the expected
large yield of the wheat crop, the general outlook for the
crops of the country continues to foreshadow good yields.
The issues of the Presidential campaign are not likely to be
of a character to disturb general confidence, the views of the
leaders of both the great parties on the moi;e:ary question
being clearly defined, and they are of reassuring nature.
An unfavorable development the past week has been the
beef-packers' strike, but it is expected that an early se ttlement will be reached. With the opening of the fall trade
the prospects are considered promising for an active season.
Prices in many lines have gradually settled until they are on
a fairly attractive basis, and surplus stocks in consumers'
hands have been well worked oflf.
Lird on the spot was firmer early in the week, the packers'
strike being a factor. Subsequently, however, there was a
reaction. The close was quiet at 7'15c. for prime Western
and 6'60c. for prime City. Refined lard prices advanced
early in the week but the Improvement was not maintained,
closing at 7'20c. for refined for the Continent. Speculation
in lard for future delivery has been fairly active. Daring
the first half of the week the strike was a bullish factor.
Subsequently, however, under the belief that an early settlement would be reached, prices reacted. The close was quiet

As

and

is

easier.

DAILT OLOSIKO PRIOIS OW LABD IDTOBBS IN OHIOAOO.
Thurt.

Wed.

Jolydel'y

690

6-87IS

ttui.
6-95

6-92i«

Sept. del'y
Oct. del'y

7*02Ja

702»«]

707i«

7071s

8at.

tfoH.

682^
695

Pri.

6 80
6-92i«
6-97is

707»3
705
710
7 00
7-12>a
Pork has had only a limited sale, but prices have held
steady, closing at $14 25@14 75 for mess, $14 50@15 50 for
short clear and $14 50@15 00 for family. Cut meats have had
a fair sale, but the close was quiet at 6>^@6^o. for pickled
shoulders, 9^@10o. for pickled hams and 6}4®^^i<i- for
p. 2606.
United States Stf el Co., Ererett, Mass.— Circular— Plan, pickled bellies, 14(3110 lbs. average. Canned beet has ceen in
The International Trust Co. of Boston, under date of June fair jobbing demand and firm at $8 00@8 50 for mess, $9 00@
9 50 for packet, $10 00@10 50 for family and $14 00@15 00 for
21, eent a circular to the bondholders saying in substance
mess in tcs. Tallow has been quiet but steady
At the sale made under the mortgage the property was bought by extra India
the International Trust Co. (the mortgage trustee) for the benefit of at 4J^<?. Steaiines have been in full supply but well held,
the bondholders at $50,000. The holders of a majority of the mort- closing at 'li^^Se. for lard stearine and 6^@7e. for oleo
gage bonds have deposited the same with the trust company for the stearine. Cotton-aeed oil has declined but the close was
purpose of carrying out a plan for reorganization, on the basis of a
new corporation to be formed under the laws of MassachnsettR, with steady at 30c. for prime yellow. Butter has been easier but
a capitaflziktlon of $500,003, In fthares of the par value of $100 each, the close was firm for choice grades at 13@18c. for creamery.
$250,000 to be 6 per cent preferred stock; the bondholders to receive Cheese has been in full supply and easier at 6J^@9i^ ;. for
for each $100 bond $100 In preferred stock and $100 in c immon
State factory, full cream. Fresh eggs have advanced, owing
stock; the stockholders of the old corporation to be given the privilege

—

:

of subsorlblng, within thirty days from May 31, 1904, $7ft,000 oasn,
for which they are to receive $ 100,000 in preferred stock and $ 100,000
In common stock. As it is poseible that the cath capital may not be
nbscribed for by the stockholders of the old corporation, it is desired that you should authorize the trust company to agree to suoh
other form of reorganization as shall be, in its judgmen*", for the
interest of the bondholders, with the aaderstanding that the bondholders are to share alike In the benefits of the reorganization. As all
the bonds may not be deposited, the trust company reserves the right
to sell the properly, accounting to the holders of the bonds for their
several proportions of the net proceeds.

—

1

Re-Sale To-Day. The property will be re-sold at auction at
o'clock this afternoon.— V. 78, p. 2890.

Talley (Beet) Sugar Co.— See Bay City Sugar Co. above.

—V.

77, p. 355.

Westchester Lighting Co.— See
Lighting Co. above.— V.

New York &

Westchester

79, p. 160.

Westinghonse Air Brake Co.— Favorable Deeiaion.— Judge
United States District Court, in this city on
Thursday confirmed the report of Special Master John A.
Shields in the suit against the New York Air Brake Co. and
others. The Master found that there'was due the Westinghouse Company from the defendants for an infringement of
the patent covering the emergency valve of its air-brake
$128,397. An appeal will probably be taken to the United
States Circuit Court of Appeal?.— V. 78, p. 1121.
Wyandotte Gas Co., EaMsas City, Kan.— iVet» Franchise,
Etc.— This company, which was recently granted a 20-year
renewal of its francnise, is building a large gas plant, which
it is expected will be ready for use by Jan. 1, its estimated
Piatt, in tue

capacity bsing 2.500,000 feet every twenty-four hours. The
company Is controlled by the United Gas Improvement Co.,
of Philadelphia, and its capitalization, at last accounts, was
$120,000 stock and $60,000 bonds.

—Edward Dickinson, lately Assistant Cashier of the First
National Bank, Chicago, has formed a corporation under the
name of Eiward Dicalnson & Co., which will make a
specialty of commercial paper and collateral loans.
Mr.
Dickinson is the head of the new concern. Offices have been
opened at 177 La Salle Street.
The Aetna Indemnity Co. has furnished a bond to the
amount of $100,000 to the Pennsylvania RR. Co. to insure
completion of the North River section of the tunnel within
three years by the O'Rourke Construction Co. The premium
paid is understood to be in the neighborhood of $10,000.

—

to the packers' strike, closing at 20c. for best Western.
Brazil grades of coffee have hid only a limited sale, many
of the trade pursuing a waiting policy, holding back for an
expected freer movement to market of the new Brazil crop.
Prices have held steady, closing at 7,^c. for Rio No. 7 and
8c. for Sintos No. 4. West India growths have been ia fairly
brisk demand, the larger roasters being freer buyers, closing
at 9c. for good Cucuta and lOJ^calOil^ i. for good average
Bogota. Speculation in the marRet for contracts has been
quiet, neither buyers nor at Hers being aggressive, and changes
in prices have been slight. The close was quiet but steady.
The following are the closing asked prices:
July
6'95c. Oot........^..^ 6 SCO. March ........... 6'65o.

Aug

Sept

6'OOo.
S-lOo.

Deo
Jan

,

6'35c.
6*48o.

AprU

May

675c.

.„

6-8Se.

Raw

sugars have been quiet, refiners holding off as buyers.
There has been no pressure to sell, and prices have held
steady at 3 15-168. for centrifugals, 96-deg. test, and 33^c. for
muscovado, 89-deg. test. Refined sugar has continued in
good demand and firm at 4 90@4'95c. for granulated. Teas
have been quiet. Pepper has been unsettled.
Kentucky tobacco has had a moderate sale and at steady
prices.
A more active market has been experienced for seedleaf tobacco.
The business transacted during the week includes Zimmers Spanish, 1900 and 1901 crop Pennsylvania
broad leaf, 1902 crop Wisconsin binders and 1903 crop Connecticut broad leaf. Sumatra tobacco has continued to meet
wi:h a fair sale at full values. Havana tobacco has been quiet.
The demand for Straits tin has been improving and prices
have advanced. The close was at a slight reaction from top
prices at 26'25@2650c. Ingot copper has bean in limited demand only but prices have been well maintained, closing at

12M@12;^c. for Lake and 12%@12^c. for

electrolytic.

Lead

has been steady at 4'20@4*25c. Spelter has been unchanged
at 4'95@5c.
An unsettled market has been experienced for
pig iron, closing quiet at $14 25 for No. 2 Northern and
tl3 00@18 25 for No. 2 Southern.
Refined petroleum for export has been easier, closing at
7'70c. In bbls., 10'40o. in oases

and

4'80c. In

bulk,

Naphtha

has been steady at llj^c. for 71 degrees and 12c. for 76 degrees.
Credit balances have declined, oloaing at I'SOo.
Spirits turpentine has been in better demand and steadier,
closing at 563^@57c. Bosins have been quiet and easier at
$2 {15 for common and good strained. Ilops have been in
limited demand and steady, Wool has been in good demand
and firm for new clips.

THE CHRONICLE.

218

COTTON.
Friday NiaHT, Jaly

15, 1904.

The Movement op the Crop

as Indicated by our telegramt
from the South to-night, la given below. For the week ending
this evening the total receipts have reached 9,903 bales,
against 10,483 bales last wees and 17.374 bales the previous
week, making the total reoelpta since the Ist of Sept., 1903,
7,074,373 bales, against 7,681,689 bales for the same period of
1002-8 showing a decrease since Sept, 1, 1903, of 547,266 bales.
ReeeipU at—

Tut.

3ton.

Bat.

Wed.

in.

Thura.

Total.

7

109

448
313

509

OalTestoD
Pt.ArthuT,&o

New

Orleans.

Mobile
Pensaoola,

5

24
1,075
161

26

745
102

2,037

166
5,921

1,111

581

&o

Bavannah

464

lie

342

193

194

130

1,433

Brnnsw'k, &c

12

'

Oliarleston ...
Pt. Royal, <fco.
Wilmington. .
Wa8h'ton,&c.
Norfolk

2

3

N'p't

248

62

63

York.

222

75

73
149

74
38

11

985

1,446

Boston

210

25

Baltimore
Phlladelp'a,
Tot.

&o

30

week

tills

748
215
219
375
123
30

4
215
145
96
123

News, &c,

New

17

2

.

2,321

1.828

l,914l

1,109

9,903

The following shows the week's total receipts, the total since
Septi 1, 1903, and the stocks to-night, compared with last year.
1903-04.

BeceipU to
July 15

1902-03.

Since Sep.
1, 1903.

This
week.

1661 2,335,014

Galveston...
Pt.AT.,&C.

New OrleanB

5,921

MobUe

581

P'eaoola, Ac.

Savannah..

1,433

Br'wlck, AcCharleston..
P. Royal, <fco.

17
75

Wilmington.
Wasli'n, &o.
Norfolk
N'portN.,&o
New York..
Boston
Baltimore.
PUladel,&o.

104,029
1,978,122
198,980
132,479
1,139,161
120,760
155,294
1,282
321,258

472,987
21,700
18,030
30,527
30,087
14,327

9,903 7,074.3731

Totals

1904.

1,1902.

1903.

2,253

1,93;^

62,446

540

53,830
862

16,232

47 2,091,566
154,105
4,344 2,296,810
47 214,107
155,938
18 1,297.096

4,494

146

123

130,622
209,657

924

95

287

256

6,276

328

36,374
98,458
46,503
26,631

51,938
2,562

158,487
6,300

710
916

l,lf8

6,004 7,621,6391

144,0841

227,619

30

337
329,566
387
508,987

95

336
748
215
219
375
123
30

Stock,

Since Sep.

Thit
week.

214
398
160
161
102
242

24 495

779

In order that a comparison may be made with other years,
give below the totals at leading ports for six seasons.

we

Receipts

at—

166

Galves'n, &o.

New

Orleans

193

5,921

4,344

581

47
18
30
95
214
398
665

MobUe
Savannab

1,433

. .

17
75
748
215
747

Cbas'ton, Ac.
Wllm'ton, Ac

Norfolk
N. News, *o.
All otbers...
Tot. tklB wk.

9,903

1901.

1902.

1903.

1904.

6.004

1,048
5,955
4
1,568

102
18

1900.

15,180
10,470
105
5,787
Z24

1,094
12,806
3,798
4,943
2,600

47
3,843

1899.

8,228

8,087

845
1,119

763

384

463

253
54
390
73

3,713

13,535

6,127

7,548

14,416

49,576

We

Lambert

ft

40,879

Barrowa. Produce Exohanae Buildlna.
OM SHIPBOARD, HOT OLIABBD VOB—

July 15 at-

lAa9in§
ertai
Britain fr'nee

Wew Orleans.
Oalveston.. ..

5,203

Obarleston...
Mobile
Norfolk

15,5 If.

Eiworted to-

Sxiports

from—

Great
1

^

Oreat
Conti- lotal
France
Week. Britain.
nent.
\

Ualveston....
PUArthur, 4c.

2,656

8,556

793,d9S 816,619

NewOrleani.

1.743

1,718

68

68

801,7b9 26?.86i
87,680 16,308
62,018 18,691
181,037 66,29K
84.901

17,11b|

Mobile
Penisoola

SavaQnab

Bmniwlok

—
.

73.299
2,tU3

WUmlngton...
Norfolk

Boston
Baltimore ....
PhUadelphla..

2,158

8.126

Total.

11)03-03.

B.284

610

510
901

100

1904

TofaJ.

720.959 1,830.871
78.317
90.432
639,017 1.708,068
6a.876
119,808
66.79i

&90.2U8

131,503
827,629

607

256,097
103,083
66,633
3U,90d
87

7.824

92.125

48.066

284,45f-

6,408

8,497

Total 1903..
Total 1902.

3,099

328
2,330

4,791
3.U49

28,C00

174,516
6.101

UPLANDS.

4.071

8.100

11.9,184

96.0J1
44.C6?
4',9e6

11.778 2.602,682 704,883 2,717.(j88 5,9a3,8«EI

6,578

8«,0i6

8,1-

125,673

180

17.958
16,510

209.661
243.498

3,118 13,388i

435

7.571!

8,0751

Mon Taes

Sat.

Tired Tli.

Frl.

9-95 10 15 10-15 10-25 1008
1067 10-77 10-77 1087 10-67
10-95 10-95 1116 11-16 11-25 1105
ii-39 11-39 1159 1159 11-69 11-49
|ll-91 11-91 1211 12-11 12-21 12-01

Good Ordinary

9*95
10-57

Low Middling
Middling
Good Middling
Middling Fair

1

GOLF.

Low Middling..
Middling
Good Middling.
Middling Fair..

1120 1120

26,789 781.611 8,0i8,307 6.C86.707

11-40

11-64

li

1164

1216 12 16
Sat.

Middling

Low Middling

Tinged..

Good Middling Tinged

The

Tb. Frl.

10-20 10-40 10 40 10-60 1030
10 82 10-82 11-02 1102 11-12 10-t»2

1020

Good Ordinary.

Strict

Men Tnes: W^ed

Sat.

(juot&tloni for

1140 1150 1130
84 11-84 11-94 11-74

1236 12-46 12-26

12-36

Mon Tues

VfeO.

Tb. Frl.

9-45
9-45
9-65
9-65
9-76 956
10-45 10-45 10-63 10-65 110 75 10-55
10 61 10-61 1081 10-Sl 10 91 10-71
10-95 10-95 11 15 11 15 |ll-25 11 06

middling upland at New York on
year! have been a! follows.

July 15 for each of the past

!

1904....0 11-06
13-20
1903
95,g
1902

1898....0. 7iia

1888. ...0

lOifl

1896 .. 7
1894.
7H

1887

10^

1901
1900
1899
1898

1893...
1892...
1891...

1880....o.ll'^8
I2I16
1879

1886...... 9^
1886...... 10>4

1878
H7i«
12i«
1877
1876
11%
10
.]5»*
1876
8%
lOiie
63ia
I2I16
17ifl
1874
1890.
12''e
63,
111*
20%
1897
71616 1889
ll»ia 1878
NoTS.—On Oct. 1, 1874, grades of cotton as quoted were changed.
According to the new olasslfloatlon Middling was on that day quoted
*8C lower than Middling of the old classlllcation.
MARKET AND SALES.
8ifl

.
.

SSia
7Vt

.

6,520
458,622

4S,98W

18,411

Speculation in cotton for future delivery has been fairly
active but the tone has been unsettled. Daring the greater
part of the week prices have shown an advancing tendency.
English cable advices have been of a more bullish character.
Spinners have been reported better buyers of spot supplies of
cotton, and bull interests in the Liverpool market have been
aggressive in the near-by positions. Following the lead of
the Liverpool market, prices locally also have advanced.
The outlook for the crop has continued highly favorable.
Many of the trade, however, argue that it is still early in
the season, and that there is ptill plenty of time for the present exceptionally favorable crop outlook to have a setback. It
has been contended that a considerable short interest existed in the market, created by the favorable crop prospects,
and some of the trade, figuring on the possibility of a less
favorable turn to the crop prospects, took the bull side of
the market for a turn during the fore part of the week, and
this, with some buying to cover shorts, carried prices to a
higher basis. To-day the market opened at a slight advance
in response to stronger Liverpool advices than expected. Aa,
however, the day progressed a distinctly weaker undertone
dtveloped. Crop ntws continued practically all one way,
being exceptionally favorable. Selling for the account of
recent buyers developed, under which prices rapidly crumbled.
The close was steady at a net decline for the day of
11@29 points. Cotton on the spot has been unsettled, closing
at ll'OSc. for middling uplands.
The rate! on and oil middling, aa established Nov. 18, 1908,
oy the Revision Committee, at which grades other than
nlddling may be delivered on contract, are as follows.
r»ir.
^...M^o. 1-80 on Good Middling Tinged ..e.
Kven
Ulddllng Fair ........ ..
. 0-96 on
Strict Middling Tinged
006 oil
"
0-68 on Middling ~
:)trlot Good Middling
Tinged....
012 off
0-44 on Strict Low Mid. Tlnced.
0-34 Ofl
3ood Middling
0-14 ofl Low Middling Tinged
itrlct Low Middling
050 Ofl
0-38 off Strict Good Ord. Tinged. 0-84 ofl
Low Middling
Strict Good Ordinary ...^ 0'78 off MiddUng Stained
50 ofl
9ood Ordinary
.,....«. 1"00 oS Strict Low Mid. Stained... 1-06 ofl
Strict Good Mid. Tinged.. 0-30 on Low Middling Stained
1-60 ofl
On this basit the offloia) orloen for a few of the grades for
the past week- July 9 to July 15— would be aa follows,

7,387

89,3^1

8,376
50.138
4.075

4,281

4.230

314.607

200

7.23S

4,510|

17.884

l.COl

eo7

San Fran.. &o_
Total

6,86t

2,t-71

N'port N., &0..

New York

Continent.

15,

43.055

Charleston
Port Royal...
.

July
to—

to

924
400

1,900
1,800

400

Total 1904..

944

"146

49.278
1,850
15,632

1,900

"*506

Low Middling

Sept. 1, 1908,
Bxporteil

403
600

"56

"96
"500

.

for the week ending this evening reach a tota'
of 11,772 bales, of which 4,540 were to Great Britain.
Below
to France and 7,232 to the rest of the Continent.
are the exports for the week and since Sept. 1, 1903.

The exports

from

13,168

402
600

"loo
400

New York
Other ports

itoek.

Total.

1,329

1

STAINED.

Endim July 15 .1904.

3,780

2,906

..

Since Sept. 1 7074,373 7821,639 7407,848 7466,162 6487,855 8374,453

Week

Otktr Ooaitfor'gn wife.

many

206

921

1,245

In addition to above export!, oar telegrami to-night also
give tai the following amount! of ootton on •hlpboard, not
cleared at the port! named.
add !fm11ar figuret for
Hew York, whlob are prepared for our special use by Messra.

Bavannah..

1

[Vol. Lxxix.

SPOT Mabkit
Olobbo.

1884
1883
1888
1881

FUTUBBI
IfABKBT
OLOSBD

11

SaLBB or SPOT
Oon-

Oon-

port.

Mitnp.

tract-

Saturday
Quiet, 30 pts. do. Steady
Very Dieauy.
Monday... Wolet
Tnesday
Quiet. 20 pts. ad Very steady

610
800
800

125
460

Wednesday ynlet.
Thursday Bt'dy. 10

B'rly steady.

....

Firm

400

261
708

rriday

Steady

.

...

Total.

pts. ad
Quiet. 20 pts. do.

A OOHTBAOt

Mm-

....

2,610

1.554

*otai.

785
1,000

2,260

800
100

1,908

1,900

6.064

800
261
lOO

111
1
1

«

1 I

July

[

o

.

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

FUTUEHB.—Highest, lowest and

New York.

closing prices at

219

At the Interior Towns

the movement— that is the
since Sept. 1, the shipments for the
week and tbe stocks to-night, and the same items for the
corresponding period of 1902-03— is set out in detail below.
receipts for the

to.

19

|«

I

I

9

19

19

(0(0

(0(0

Ci^.

OOP

coco

COCO

coco

os>-

i^o

oo ^O

<l

19

I

9

9

9

I

Id

I

I

I

I

I

CO

CO CO

I

co^

9

I

I

9

I

I

9

I

I

coco

9

I

03 00

I

9

I

9

coco

9

,

CO

I

•

I

I

pp
WW to to
WW
to to

I

I

19

•

I

9

I

o

I

I

9

'

9

coco
I

I

ccco
1

ODW

19

19

19

1

II

II

II

1

II

19

19

19

1

I

19

p
w

ifkco

19

19

pp pp
^ob
WW CiCi

,

0>
<i

pp p
WW W
•40)
i^
19

19
II

11

19
II

19
II

'

co«
C^w
coo

l9

19

9

coco
Wll^

o>)

19

coco

coco

coco

coco

<iw

ow
19

cop

OOM
i

9

pco
OiCi

fl»^

coco

«DO

WM
wo WW
»^il^

coco

19

9

ts^

coco
obab

99

wo wc»
i^o mw

>4N

MW

1

I

I
'

19
I

I

I

t

9

i

•

CO
oo

9

|9

I

O
9

CO
6)

o

I

*
O
9

oo oo
Q0»
WM
pco 99 •:'®
oob CDob oco
00 CO
(BW OM
o
» Id
MM MM
t-'f
MO
oo oo oco
«O0D
oo OOCD

o
to

I

I

M*^

361,000
39,000

I

a

>

«

'

W
03

19

19

900d
6illd.

CO

la

CO

owto

K^WKktOCDOhOOlCBCcSM'

It
V,

f?'^i''i^pp

i*^

w

y

M
bo
qdmm; w
OOMtOOMOJ. O

too;
iMO,
COOQD.

*>.

CO

y>;

*>.

w*

•

.-"

MOM

toco

tO'

W

09

CI.

<>.

aj

)f^

,

too;
mo; o o;
CO
05;

•

COCO'

;

CO
t-'t-'
m
mkom' i^.»
fcai^rf».Moooo5MO
Mtf>.M'
COWW< |I^C0aDC0OC0t0t305WM||^OO 5: m»
»•

I

9

I

'T
o
O

9

CO

CO

1902.

1901.
591,000
7,000

581,000

462,000

7''8d.

7d.
4"ifld.

6Bi«d.

7d
4l4d.
4>4d.

00
-

tOMW W
oocoMCo

tOMi
oco;

'CO
I

6iii8d.
4%d.
6Biad.
Continental imports past week have been 76,000 bales.
above figures for 1904 show a decrease froni last week
05 182,190 bales, a decline of 105,733 bales from 1903, a decrease
of 807,253 bales from 1902 and a loss of 560,833 bales from 1901.

f^
The

:
.

oto

Ifc.

to

,

10-5ud.
6i3,ed

to;
CO-

QOO»05t005COOMCOt005(»OCOCOO(f-.05W005lf'QOl(>.OOOWCOWoSoO

tMk

rern r. Rough Good, Liverpool
Broach Fine, Liverpool,. ...«
TlBBiivelly Good. LJverpooL..

•

S^i;:Jt:;ft;2r:''^'^^'^®*'**-''^"''-'cooi^cotcanooiuoi(i.ootototo^

,

9'7i«d.

1^:

w.

cow;
'

.

713,8d.

!

OS
to
,to
to
M
M to looo to MOooota M O wcDcno^.^-jc-'M »owScoouki»cdo-5m
to
p 00 X) w CO o MM oo w ^ CO o o 05 35 o CO S M J: M a o S S §
w

Continental stocks. ...... a,._ 261,000 276,000 269.000 212.000
4merlcan afloat for Sarope...
96.000
71,000
93.000 124.000
United States stock
144 084 227.619 260,008 417,112
,
United Stateslnterlor stocks.
89.129
25.961
91,146 198,597
Unltedstatesexportsto-day.
3,996
6.362
9,308
2,133
TotalAmerloan
910,209 1,006,942 1,303,462 1,445,842
Matt Indian, BrMil,*e.~
^
Liverpool stook..«.„ .... ....^ 121 .000
92,000
112,000
129,000
I^adon stock
16,000
.
14,000
^..
19,000
7,000
Manchester stock
9,000
6,000
,....,
Continental stocks.... ...^...
132000
81,000
63,000
76,200
India afloat for Borope . .....
97.000 140,000
65,000
66,000
nrpt. BraxU.Ao., afloat
18.000
17.000
15,000
27,000
neek in Alexandria, Ksypt.
96,000
23,000
60,000 100,000
In Bombay, Indla..!L454,000 679,000 433,000 573,000
lotal Bast India, Jm ,„..
943,000 952,000 757,000 968,200
Total American.
910,209 1,006,942 1,308,462 1,445.8 42
1,863.209 1,958.942 2,060.4UZ 2,414.012
fiddling Upland, Liverpool..
6'72d.
6'44d,
53,39d.
41031(1.
Middling Upland, New York..
12-500.
nose.
9^80.
8i,e0.

fTpt Qood Brown, Liverpool

w:

•"CO

AmtruaH —

292.000
24,000

owl

ooi-Mto
ooioowcDo'toai'cO' 'MCooowcoi^-'kico^ccio
**S?!::?5J"^
OK)COif>.|(i.O©OtOOif'05MWO- toocowwowoooaoS

^"05

1^1^

.

bales.

:
.

COO)

Block »t Liverpool
bales.
453.000 693,000
Btoak »t LonrtOB
^t., ,..
14.000
19,000
Bto«k »t Uanoheater.^..^.....
45,000
Iot»l Ore»t fitrltain stock, 462,000 512,000 712.000 688,000
look »t Hamburg. ..^ .__ ..«, 41,000
28,000
22 000
22,000
took at Bremen ..^ . ....^ 144,000 166,000 105,000
95 000
took at Antwerp
4,000
4,090
4,000
3,000
took at Havre..... ^.. ..^ ...^ 118,000 113,000 122,000 127,000
took at UarsellleB
..
4,000
8.000
3.000
4.000
took at Barcelona . ...... ...., 35,000
20,000
43,000
30,000
took at Genoa.....
29,000
22,000
18,000
20,000
took at Trieste . ...... .... .~ 18,000
11,000
6.000
17,000
Total Continental stooka .
893,000 357,000 322,000 318,200
Total Snropean tonkw,,.," 855.000 869.000 1,034,000 916,200
India cotton afloat for Burope
97.000 140,000
65,000
56,000
Amer. cotton Afloat for K'rope.
96,000
71,000
93,000 124,000
Egypt, BrazU.Ae., %flt.for E'pe
18,000
17,000
15,000
27,000
Stock In Alexandria, Bgypt...
96.000
23,000
60,000 100.000
Stock In Bombay, India....... 454,000 679,000 433,000 573,000
Stock In United <«tateB ports.. 144,084 227,619
260,008 417,112
Stock In U. 8. interior towns..
89,129
25.961
91,146
198,597
United States oiportsto-day..
3,996
6.362
9,808
2,138
Total visible svpply ......1.863,209 1,958,942 2,060,462 2,414,042
Of tke abeve, totals of Amerloan and otner desorlptiona are as toUowe:
Liverpool stock

tO'

:

^oo(f>.ooif».co'

l^tOW K^lC-tOWQDtOM (31 to
OMMMOtJka
S££:^IS:3S"^®^<=«'0'«' WMwSowowooco
oooif^ooooMCooDHi>wcotf>oootoooooooDoowoo

w

CO
ro

oo oo
00 en

ots

is ai follows.
Foreign stocke, as well
are this week's returns, and oonseqnentiy all
foreign figures are brought down to Thursday evening,
But to make the toBal the complete figures Cor to-night
July 15„ SV6 add the item of exports from the United States,
Including in it the exports of Friday only.

anokeater stock

•

wif».wMK)

((X.

s-

00
CO

and telegraph,

1903.

K.,'
to.

MO'
oo
oo

M the afloat,

1904.
418,000
16,000
38.000

m

tf>.;

.

wcooooit'.oooocoooi-OMtOMcocoo&tiowMwiSagc'SooaogI

^CO
OOO

Tbb Visiblb supply op oottow to-nignt, as made up by
oable

00 oD

M*

coco

*?

I
'

1^- if^

!<>•

^1

coco

<0
1

CO

:

ao(b.ftM©;

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to to

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po 99
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OM
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.

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too

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#''00

9

WW aco
wa
MCO

:

•

i ® t" ^ S? to o w boV in ojw od"5d olc'ik <i M o w CO 03 o w M o'co CO o
OOM|f^(t^OWO*»COlOaDO!|f.COMOOmooa)COQOCOWWoSiC*ISSSSl

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ciiw
WW
I

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OOMOMMM*-MtOMMO)OWCi<IWtP-CO

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9

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cop

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»JM

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I

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vco

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19

to 00

9

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toco

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0009

coco

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I

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19

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(BCD

I

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en

VXD
II

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II

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week and

i*

COtOOtObSM

tSiU

OMWocooocosJM

^
Vm
oo

5?

:

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w
WtOtOQOOOMCOOOQOJCjOWOMWtOOOJCJDoS
fo

*

If'

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I*-. :

Oif..

Ci3

toocoS

ObOMMh

I-?

o*

The above totals show that the interior stocks have decreased during the week 8,031 bales, and are to night 63,168
bales more than same period last year. The receipts at all the
towns have been 1,658 bales more than same week last year.

Overland Movement for the Week and Since Sept. 1.—
give below a statement showing the overland movement
for the week and since Sept. 1, as made up from telegraphic
reports Friday night.
The results for the week ending

We

July 16 and since Sept.

1 in

the last two years are as follows.
1903-04.

July 15.
Week.

1902-03.

Since
Sept. 1.

Since

Week.

Sept. 1.

—

Shipped
Via St. Louis
Via Cairo
Via Rook Island
Via Louisville
Via Cincinnati
Via other routes, &o...

2.476
1,524

273
133
10 i

Total lepross overland
Deduct shipments —
Overland to N. Y., Boston, &c.

Between

Interior

507.955
252,837
13.731
120,426
31.865
195,152

4.508 1,121.966

747
31
52

towns

Inland, &o., from Soutli

765
104
259
76
527

742,950
208,244
29,605
161,863
38,677
269,049

1,731 1,440,388

92 971
80,991

665

97,636

11

207,966
49,947
66,061

Total to be deducted.

830 221,601
676 323,974
Leaving total net overland'..
3.678 900,365
1,055 1,116,414
* Including movement by rail
to Canada.
The foregoing shows that the week's net overland movement
this year has been 3,678 bales, against 1,05^ bales for
the
week
1903, and that for the season to date the aggregate net
overland exhibits a decrease from a year ago of 21tf,04a bales.

m

1903-04.

In Sight and Spinyiers'
Takings.

Week.
Receipts at ports to July 15....
15.

Total marketed
Interior stocks in excess
Into sight during week.

Total In Bight July 15

Movement
1902- July 18
1901-July 19
1900- July 20
1899- July 21

Sinet

Week.

Sept. 1.

9,903 7,074,373
3,678 900,365
38,000 1,875,000

6,004 7,621,639
1,055 1,116,414
38,000 1.816.000

45,059 10584053
*2,002
137,117

48,550

43,067
9,927,265

North, spinners' tak'gs to July 15
* Decrease during week.

Week—

Since
Sept. 1.

51,581 9,849,738
* 8,031
77,627

Net overland to July 16
Southern consumption July

Came

1902-03.

\

3 81 2,075.7 93
Less than SeptTT

10546936
2,067.510

into sight in previous years.
Balei.

40.763

59365
61 242
37,473

Since Sept.

1—

1901 02-- July
lPOO-01— July
1899-00-July
1898-99— July

18
19

Bale*.

10,163,201
10,176.034

20

8,9.')1,788

21

11,022,466

THE CHRONICLE.

220

Quotations for Middling Cottin at Other Markets.—
Below are closing quotations of middling cotton at Southern
and other principal cotton markets for each day of the week.
CLOBINO QUOTATIONS FOB MIDDLING COTTON ON —

Week ending
July

16.

Sat'day

Monday. Tueaday. Wed'day. Thurtd'y Friday,
lOifi

New Orleans lOK,,
MobUe

...

1038

..

10 'a

SaTBnnih

lOia

IOH16

1013.6
1038
lO'e

lOi^

Galveston...

101 B,e

lli.«

lOV

101-2

ICs

11

1011,6
llie
1013
11

11

ll»e

iii^'

1095

1115

11 25
11-40
lO'a
101 he

11-40
11-40
11

11-15
11-40
11-50
11
11
1015,6

10i3ia

llV

10%
llifl

Oharlenton

WUmlugton.
Norfolk

^

Boston
Baltimore...
Pbliadflph'a

ll-UO

10\

Louis

...
...

Houston
Little Rook

The

25
00

11
11

10%

10i3,a

Augusta

Memphis
8t.

11
10-95
11-00
11-2J

io'-'s

10

10%

103l
1012
1014

101-2
10ii>

3,6

lOiSia
1015,6
1012
10>4

10%

IOI2

lOM

im
11-25
11-25
11 30

11
11
11

10%

1013,8

IOI2

lOifi

closing quotations to-day (Friday) at other important

Southern markets were as follows.

New Orleans

Natchez

lO'^s

Montgomery..

.

III4
lO^'g

Raleigh..

11

Nashville

Columbus, Ga. 10
Columbus, Miss ...

10 "a

Shreveport

107,

Option Market.—The highest, lowest and

closing quotations for leading options in the New Orleans
cotton market the past week have been as follows.
Sat'day,

JtJLT

Monday, Tuesday, Wed 'day, Thur§d'y\ Friday,

July

July 11.

9.

July

July 13.

July 12.

July 15.

14.

-

10-63-02 10-63--74 10-90--00 10-90-05 1105 '18 10-85-00
,10-92--00 10-90-00 11-15
11-00

Range

Closing.. 10-65--66, 10-70

August—

I
i
I

1

i

10-25--50 10-35--50 10-49--e7 10-58--75 10-69--92 10-51--88

Range

Closing.. 10-35--3d 10-37--39 10-63--64 10-59--60 10-91--92 10-55--57

Bept.

Range

..

Closing..

Octob'e —
Range
.

Closing..

Dec'her—
Range ..
Closing..

9-79-96 9-70-

9-4S--56
9-52--53

9-52--60

9-18--25
9-21--22

9-22--30! 9'30--47
9-27--28 9-42--43

9-38--49
9-38--39

9-42--54
9-53--54

9-36--52
9-39

9-16--24
9-18--19

9-18--28
9-26--27

9-28--44

9-35-'46
9-35--36

9-38- •50
9-49- •50

9-32--43
9-34--35

Steady.

Steady.

Steady.
Steady.

Steady.

Quiet.

Firoi.

Steady

9-58--59J

9-66--76!

9-72--84

9-73--74

9-73--74| 9-94--95, 9-74-

9-40-41

ToneSpot.

--

Options.

Firm.
Quiet.

Vy

st'dyi Steady.

during the week, the rainfall reaching two inches ani sixtyThe thermometer h«is averaged 81.
Leland, Mississippi. — Bnt little work has been done in the
field the past ten days.
Tuere has been rain on three days
duriui^ the week, the precipitation reaching one inch and
seventy-two hundredths. The thermometer has averaged
766, the highest being 87 and the lowest 68.
Vtckfburg, ilfM«t««ippi.— Continued rains have retarded all
farm work. There has been rain on six days of the week,
the precipitation being two icches and thirty two hundredtbp. The thermometer has averaged 78, ranging from
six hnndredrhs.

68 to 90.

Columbus, Mississippi,— There has been rain on three days
during the week, to tne extent of one inch and fifty-nine
hundredths,
Average thermometer 75, highest 94, lowest 66.

Qreenville, Mississippi.— We&ther fair.

Oreenwood, Mississippi.-The weather has been more favorable the past week.

We

Arkansas,—
are having too much moisture.
rains and oveifijws the crops are very grassy.
have had rain on two days of the past week, the precipitation reaching fifty-one hundredths of an inch. Average therLittle Rock,

We

From

LoulsvUle

11

Atlanta.

[YOL. LXXII.

Weather Beports by Telegraph.— Telegraphic

reports

mometer

79, highest 93, lowest 65.
Helena, Arkan»xs.— Cotton looks fine but is too rank, too
much rain havicg fallen to allow of proper cultivation. No
complaints of insects. We have bad rain on two days during
the week, the rainfall being one inch and sixty hnndredtbs.
The thermometer has averaged 80, the highest being 93 and
the lowest 68
Memphis, Tennessee. There is some complaint of grassy
fields owing to too much rain, but the crop generally continues to improve. It has rained on three days of thd week,
the precipitation reaching one inch and twenty-three hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 78*7, ranging from

—

66 8 to 90.
Nashville, Tennessee.

— Rain

has fallen during the week, the

and ninety-six hundredths. The
thermometer has range! from 64 to 92, averaging 78.
Mobile, Alabamu.— There have been beneficial rains in the
interior but on the coast they have been heavy and continuous.
Crop reports continue very favorable. Cotton is growing and fruiting finely. There has been rain on each day of
the past week, the rainfall bsing three inches and eighty
hundredths. Average thermometer 78, highest 88, lowrainfall being one inch

est 65.

evening indicate that the weather
has continued favorable on the whole during the week.
Oyer the greater part of Texas little or no moisture has
fallen, bnt elsewhere, as a rule, there has been rain, benefical
at many points. From portions of Arkansas and Mississippi,
however, there are complaints of too much moistare, hindering work of cultivation. Advices from Alabama and some
Atlantic districts denote that the crop is doing very well.
Oalveaton, Texas, There have been showers on two days
of the week, the precipitation reaching seven hundredths of
an inch. The thermometer has averaged 83, ranging from

Montgomery, Alabama.— Cotton and corn are doing splenPresent prospects are the best in years. We have
had rain on three days during the week, to the extent of
ninety hundredths of an inch. The thermometer has averaged 79, the highest being 92 and the lowest 67.
Selma, Alabama. —Crops are all that could be asked for.
There has been rain on five days during the week, the precipitation being one inch and twenty hundredths
The
thermometer has averaged 83, ranging from 60 to 94,
Madison, Florida.— R&in has fallen on three days of the
week, the rainfall reaching two Inches. The thermometer
has ranged from 66 to 90, averaging 77.
Augusta, Georgia.— The week's rainfall has been thirty-one
hundredths of an inch, on three days. Average thermom-

79 to 87.
Abilene, Texas.— Dry weather has prevailed all the week.
The thermometer has ranged from 72 to ICO, averaging 86.
Brenham, ieoxM.— Rain has fallen on one day of the week,
to an inappreciable extent. Average thermometer 84, highest
95 and lowest 72.
have had no rain the past
Corpus Chrtsti, Texas.—
week. The thermometer has averaged 79, the highest being
86 and the lowest 78.
Cuero, Texas.— There has been rain on one day during the
week, the rainfall reaching five hundredths of an inch. The
thermometer has averaged 85, ranging from 73 to 97.
Dallas, Texas.— There has been a trace of rain on one day
of the past week. The thermometer has ranged from 71 to

eter 81, highest 94, lowest 68.

to ns

from the Sonth

this

—

We

averaging 87.
LMngview, Texas.— We have had showers on one day of the
past wet- k, the precipitation reaching seven hundredths of an
inch. Average thermometer 86, highest 101, lowest 71.
Henrietta, Texas.— There has been no rain during the
week. Average thermometer 88, highest 105, lowest 70,
Huntaville, Texas— There has been no rain during the week.
The thermometer has averaged 86, the highest being 98 and
the lowest 7*^.
Kerrville, Texas.
There has been no rain the past week.
The thermometer has averaged 80, ranging from 63 to 97.
Lampasas, Texas. We have had no rain during the week.
The thermometer has range! from 67 to 99, averaging 83.
Palestine, Ttxas.— There has been no rain during the week.
The thermometer has averaged 82, ranging from 72 to 93,
Paris, Texas,— Dry weather has prevailed all the week.
The thermometer has ranged from 68 to 100, averaging 84,
ISan Antonio, Texas, —There has been no rain during the
week. Average thermometer 83, highest 94 and lowest 73.
Weatherford, Texas. We have had rain on one day of the
week, the rainfall being six hundredths of an inch. The
thermometer has averaged 89, the highest being 105 and the
lowest 73.
Shreveport, Louisiana.— There has been rain on two days
of the past week, the precipitation reaching twenty-four
hundredths of an inch. The thermometer has ranged from
70 to 94, averaging 82.
New Orleans, Louisiana.— There has been rain on five day
103,

—

—

—

didly.

,

8mi,rna, Qeorgia,— Crop prospects continue very fioe.
Rain hac fallen on two days of the week, the precipitation
reaching forty-two hundredths of an inch. The thermometer has averaged 76, and ranged from 65 to 91.
Savannah, Georgia. We have had rain on four days of
the week, the precipitation being one inch and seventy -two
hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 80, the highest
being 92 and the lowest 63.
Stateburg, South CaroHTia.— Everything is suffering for
moisture, but cotton is still holding up well. Rain has fallen
lightly on two days of the week, the rainfall being thirtynine hundredths of an Inch. Average thermometer 83, high-

—

est 98, lowest 63.

Oreemcood, South Carolina.— B,&in has fallen during the

week to the extent of fifty hundredths of an inch, The thermometer has averaged 80, the highest being 92 and the lowest 69.

—

Charleston, South Carolina. There has been rain on six
days of the week, the rainfall being one inch and thirty -three
hundredths. Cloudy and threatening to-day. The thermometer has ranged from 70 to 90, averaging 80,
Charlotte, North Carolina —Conditions could hardly be
more favorable. There has been rain during the week, the
rainfall being one Inch and fifteen hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 78, ranging from 66 to 92.
The following statement we have also received by telegraph,
showing the height of the rivers at the points named, at
8 A, M. July 15, 1904, and July 17, 1903,
July 15.

'04.

July 17,

'03.

Feel.

New

Above zero of gauge.
Above zero of gauge.
Above zero of gauge.
Above zero of gauge
Above ze ro of gauge.

Orleans

Memphis
Nashville

Shreveport
Vloksbiirg.

FeeU

12-1
20-7
3-9
11-4

11-2
13-7

30-2

259

4
14-7

Movement from all Ports.—The receipts
Bombay and the shipments from all India ports

India Cotton
of cotton at

14 and for the season from Sept.
to July 14 for three years have been as follows.

for the

week ending July

1

July

THE CHEONICLE.

16, 1904.]

Beeeipts

at—

Since

Week.

Oontir
nenl.

Great
Britain.

from—

11,000 2,097,000

Since September

Total.

Great
Britain.

500

000s

lbs.

1903-04.

1
each,

iymitted.

Sept. 1.

Spinners' stock Oct.

Takings

For the Week.
Xxportt

Bale* of

Since

Week.

Sept. 1.

16.000 2,440,000

7,000l2,086,000

Bombay

Since

Week.

Sept. 1.

Oet.Ho July

1901-02.

1902-08.

1903-04.

'221

Continent.

to

1

Jaly 1

4,000
6,000
2,000
1,000
3,000
2,000

190304..
1902 03..
1901-02
Calcutta -

.

1903 04..
1902-03..
1901-02..

i'ooo

4t.OOO

]

it.OOO

t,000

Total.

949,000
937.000
494 000

4,000
5.000
3,000

43.000
40,000
44,000

47.000
45,000
47,000

5,000

i",oo6

2',6o6

Jr,oo6

10,000
8,000
2,000

34.000
17.000
10,000

44,000
25,000
12,000

2.000
4,000
4,000

8,000
i.OOO
4L,000
{

19,000
23,000
3,000

347,000
145,000
100,000

266,000

i'.ooo

1903 04..

Total all—
1903-04..
1902-03 .
1901-02..

855,000
861,000
488,000

4L.OOD

MadTHS1902-03..
1901- 02..
All others 1903-04..
1902 03..
1901-02..

94,000
76,000
9,000

,000

1902-03.

Oonti

Great

446

Oonti

Britain.

Total

ntnt.

nent.

318

436,

65.

4.266,

6,619.

2,734

4.417,

Z702,

7,106,
6,078,

2,789,
2,515,

4,735

3,S61,

841,

40,
2,363,

Total

1^027,

274,

874

99,
99,
99,
99,
99,
99,
99,
99,
99.

149,

66,
65,
65,
65,

373,
7,151,

1.

2,403.
Supply
Oonanmpt'n.SO weeks 2,217,

Spinners' stock July

Bombay—

Great
Britain

1(^8

000

103,000

1

186

7,624,
6,376,

3,361,

l7l48,

Weekly Consumption

OOOs omitted.
In October
In November
In December
In January ........
In February .......
In March...
In April
In May

50,
63,
63,

60,
55,

55,
65,
65.
55.

In June

162
162,

169.
154,
154,
ISi.
154,
164.

65,
65,
65,
65,
60,

99,
99,
99,
99,
99,

164.
164,
164.
164,
164,
164,
164.
164.
159.

99.

99,
99,

99

that the weekly consumption is now
154,000 bales of 500 pounds each, against 159,000 bales of
The total
like weights at the corresponding time last year.
spinners' stocks in Great Britain and on the Continent have
decreased 139,000 bales during the month and are now
131,000 bales less than at the same date last season.

The foregoing shows

7,000
15,000
8.000

3,000

7.000
18,000
8,000

127.000 1,179,000 1.306,000
112,000 1.063.000 1.175.000
639,000
656,000
17,000
1

Aoocrding to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show a
decrease compared with last year in the week's teoeipts
of 9,000 bales. Exports from all India ports record a loss
of 11,000 bales during the week and alnoe Sept. 1 show
an increase of 131,000 bales.

Alexandria Receipts and Shipments of Cotton.-—
Through arrangements we made with Messrs. Choremi,
Benachi & Co., of Alexandria, we now receive a weekly
cable of the movements of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt.
The following are the receipts and shipments for the past
week and for the corresponding week of the previous
two years.
Alexandi ia, Egypt,
July 13.

1902-03.

1903-04.

1901-02.

200

356

6,459,695

.......

5,740,005

6,467.379

Since
This
week. Sept. 1.

To Liverpool
To Manchester
To Continent
To America..........

Since
This
week. Sept. 1.

Since
This
week. Sept. 1.

3.000 231,591
135,176
s.odo 344,008
800 52,239

202,541
145,086
2,008 319,154
81,243

196.231
2,031 123.244
3,801 414.393
102,260

8,800 763,014

Exports (bales)—

New England

2,008 748,024

— Mr.

James

Cotton Mill Situation.— IFagre Reduction

—

Receipts (cantars*)—

This week.
Since Sept. 1

Government Weekly Cotton Report.

Berry, Chief of the Climate and Crop Division of the United
Stat' 8 Weather Bnrean, made public on Tuesday the telegraphic reports on the crop in the Southern States for
the week ending July 11, summarizing them as follows:
Cotton has grown rapidly throughout the cotton belt, complaints of
too rapid growth being received from portions of the central districts
where the crop 1b suffdiiug for cultivation. In portijus of the western
districts cotton Is also in need of cultivation and some shedding is
reported from portions of Texas and South Carolina. Over the greater
part of Texas, however, and In the eastern districts the crop Is In a
good state of cultivation, and comparatively llltle damage from
insects is reported, except in Texas, where boll weevils are Increasing
and becoming more destructive in the southwestern counties.
at Fall River. Tue Cotton Manu' aciurers' Aasociation of
Fall River made formal announcement July 14 of a reduction
in wages of 12J^ per cent to go Into effect July 25, and
notices were immediately posted in the cotton mills. The
association includes all the cotton mills at Fall River except
those operated by the Fall River Iron Works Co. It is not
known what action Mr. Borden will take in those mills.

5.832 836,128

—Messrs. Lord & Nagle, Boston, publishers of the "Textile
World Record," have furnished us a copy of the Annual
Official Directory of the Textile Industries and Yarn Trade
* A cantar is 98 lbs.
for 1904, just issued. The work comprises 628 pages and
This statement shows that the receipts for the week ending about 20 textile maps showing the location of cities and
July 13 were 200 cantars and the foreign shipments towns, railroad connections and population, arranged so that
8,800 bales.
any town can be easily found and its distances from centers
Total exports

Full information

ascertained.

is

given in regard to the mills

Market.— Our report received by cable reported— names of officers, machinery capacity, class of
to-night from Manchester states that the market is quiet for goods
made, whether they dye or not, kind of power used,
yarns and steady for shirtings. The demand for both India who the selling agents are, etc. The book is compiled
from
and China is sood. We give the prices for to-day below and offi3ial returns from the mills, in most instances obtained by
leave those for previous weeks of this and last year for personal visit and canvass, and should be
a valuable book of
comparison.
reference to those interested in textile matters. The book is
published in two editions; the Office Edition, printed on
1904.
1903.
heavier paper and bonnd in stiff cloth covers, costs |2 50;
Sk^fts Shirt- Oott'n Traveler's Edition, of smaller size, printed on thinner paper,
SM lbs. Shirt- Ootfn
32« Oop. ings, common Mid. 32s Oop. ings, common Hid.
and bonnd in flaxible covers, costs |2.
Twist.
Twist.
Uplds
to finest.
to finest.
lipids
SHiPPma News. As shown on a previous page, the
d.
s. d.
s.
d.
d.
d.
d.
d.
d.
8.
d.
8.
d.
exports of cotton from the United States the past week have
6-68 8s^ '©914 5 10»fl'Si8 9
6*82
J'elO 9««®10i4 6 l»a®9 3
" 17 938@10ie 6 1 ®9 3
reached 11,772 bales. The shipments in detail, as made up
6-38 9
6-78
'&9^ 5 11 -©8 10
" 24 9i«® 9^* 6
'3>9
lia 614 9
®9is 5 lOia-aS 9
696 from mail and telegraphic returns, are as follows:
5-98 8^8 ®938 5 QH'ci)^ 8
6-64
J'ly 1 8's'8> 9 Be 5 10>a®8 10
Total bales.
" 8 8%® 9>« 5 10 ®3 9
6-36 8U,en9i« 5 8i2®8 6
650 Nbw York— To Liverpool, per steamers Baltic, 2,579
Oar" 15 9 ® 934 5 11 »8 10i2 6-72 8\ ®93,6 5 9 '38 6
6-44
pathla. 31=) .. Celtic. 162
3.056
Manchester

—

European Cotton Consumption to July 1.— By cable
to-day we have Mr. Ellison's cotton figures brought down to
July 1.
We give also revised totals for last year that
comparison may be made. The spinners' takings in actual
bales and pounds have been as follows:
Oct. 1 to

July

1.

Great Britain

Continent.

Total.

For 190S-04.
Takings by spinners... bales
2,339,000
6,809,000
4,470,000
verage weight of bales.lbs
485-9
506
476
Takings Inpoonds
1,181.195,000 2,127,720,000 3,808,915.000

For 1902-03.
Takings by spinners... bales
2,760.000
4,650,000
7,400,000
Average weight of bales.lbs
483*1
497
475
Takings In pounds
1.366,750,000 3,20g,750,0OO 3,576.600,000

AccordinK to the above, the average weight of the deliverie.'in Great Britain is 505 pounds per bale this season, against
497 pounds during the same time last seaeon. The Continental
deliveries average 470 pounds, against 475 pounds last year,
and for the whole of Europe the deliveries average 4(f5'9
pounds per bale, against 483"1 pounds last season.
Our
dispatch also gives the full movement for this year and last
fear in bales of 600 pounds.

To Manchester, per steamer Strabo. 70
To Bremen, per steamer Prineess Alice 1,842
To Antwerp, per steamer at. Andrews, 100
To St. Petersburg, per steamers Hekla, 72... United

70
1.842

100
States,

46

To

1

Trieste, per

New OKLBA.N8

steamer Qertv. 98

To Hamburg -July l3-8teamer Montauk, 293
To Rotterdam— July 13— Steamer Monomoy, 529
To Barcelona July 8— Steamer Miguel Gallart, 916
»ALVE8TON-To Bremen— July 11 Steamer Frankfurt, 2,556..
Mobile— To Rotterdam -June 13— ateamer Erneeto, 68
Bi^wiom To Manchester -July 8— Steamer Oaledonlan, 510
Baj-timorb— fo Liverpool -July 1— Steamer Templemore. 904
To Bremen- July 13— Steamer Chemnlz, loo
SAM Fbahoisoo— To Japan—July 12 Steamer Korea, 671
lAOOMA—To Japan— July la-Steamer Oalchas, 36
Total

18

98
299
529
916
2,556

68

510
904
100
571
86
11.772

The particulars of the foregoing shipments for the week
arranged in our usual form, are as follows.
Great
Bril'n.

New Yorli.
N Orleans.
Galveston.
Mobile ....

Boston
Baltimore.
San Fran..

French Ger-

<— Oth.E' rope—^ Mexico,
die. Japan
ports, matiy. North. South,

3,126

1.842

298

bS

218
529

916

2,566
......

610
904

......

....•

68

68

610
100

1,004

Taooma...
Total....

4,540

Total.

5,284
1,743
2,556

4,796

S16

The exports to Japan since Sapt.
from the Pacific Coast.

1,014
1

have

671
571
36
36
607 11,772
been 43,4S9 bales

THE CHRONICLE.

222

—

Liverpool. By cable from Liverpool we have the following
statement of the week's sales, stocks, &c., at that port.
June
Sales of the

Of whlob

week

.....

Forwarded

Of which American

9,000
69,000
38.000

afloat

Of wklob American

July

17.

61,000

44,000
1,000

1,000

1,000
88,000
4,000

28,000
6,000
42,000
436,000
363.000
34 00O
26 000
68,000
35,000

376000
16000

Of whloh Anierloan— Est'd.
Total Import of the week.....

Julyi

I

82,000
1,000

28.000
6 000
60.000
498,000

Total Btook— Estimated

Amount

July

1,000

Of whtoh speoalators took.
Sales American

otaal export

24.

S8.000

bales.
exporters took. ..

1,000
45.000
3 000
62 000

46 000

413,000

462,000
388,000
17.000
9 000
73,000
40,000

%9i 000
16,000
6.000

67 000
89 000

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and fntnree
each day of the week ending Jaly 16 and the daily closing
prices of spot cotton, have been as follows.
Spot.

Sai'day.

Monday

Tuesday. Wed' day

Market, \
12:30 p. M.^

Fair
bQslness
dolnK.

Fair
business
dotug.

Moderate

Good

demand,

Good

demand.

demand.

6 36

& exp.

10,000

500

654

6-24

6.000

500

Mid. Upl'ds.
Sales
Spec.

Tkursd'y Friday.

Good
demand,

6 68

6 64

6 72

8,000

10,000

12 000

300

500

600

10.000
1,000

Futurei.

i&6

opened.

i>ta.

decline,

I

5^10

ptB.

406

1 pt. dec.

adyanoe i

I

decline.

Firm at

Steadv,
unoh. to

Irreg. at iBr'lyst'dy

Market

pts.

Steady, Steady at
nnch. to 11®I3 pts.
pts. dec adyance
j

Basy at Verr st'dy Steady at Qnle', Veryst'dy E'sytost'y'
9 .417 pts. 2 pis. dec. 3ai4 pts. nnch. to S'Se pts, ,7 ptt.de. to
decline, to Spts.ad adyanoe 7 pts. ady, adyanoe. 8 pts. acly

Market,

4 p. M.

The

prices of futures at Liverpool for each day are given
Prices are on the baals of Uplands, Good Ordinary
clause, unless otherwise stated.
17* T^e price* are given in pence and lOOtA. ThH$ : 6'S4 means
6 24-lOOd.

below.

Sat.
July 9,

Mon.
July 11,

Thars.

T««s.
July

13,

July 13. July 14.

1 12ifl 4 12)« 4 12)a 4 12i« 4 12)«{ 4
P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M, P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M, P.M. P.M.
d.

d.

8 21 6
July- Aug..., 6 18 6
Aug. -Sept.. 5 94 5
Sept. -Oct.... 5 44 6
Oot.-Nov.... 5 21 6
Nov.-Dee.... 5 20 5

July

d.

d.

d.

14 6 03 6 17 6
05 5 94 6 08 6
83 5 72 5 85 5
42 5 35 5 40 5
235 18 5 22 5

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

31 6 31 6 43 6 37 6 39 6 43 6 48 6 36
31 6 21 S34 6 28 6 30 6 34 6 40 6 29

91 5
46 5
28 5
195 146 18 6 24 5
Deo.-lan.... 5 18 5 17!5 12|6 16 5 215
618 6 165 11 5 16 5 20 5
Jan. -Feb
Feb.-Mcb. .. 5 18 5 165 1115 15 5 20,5
Mob. -April, 6 18 5 165 11!8 16 6 20 5
Aprll-Oday

d.

d.

90
44
26
22
20
19
19
1»

pott on the prospects of the growiag crop and foreshadowed
a yield of about 2.500,000,000 bushels. Weather conditions
for the crop have continued favorable during the week.
Despite the present promising outlook for a good yield from
the growing crop, prices have held to a steady basis. The
sustaining factor has been the advance In prices for wheat,
and with which values for corn have shown a sympathetic
tendency. Owing to the wet weather in the Southwest, the
movement of old-crop corn to primary markets has been limited, and this has had its Inflnence in favor of the market.
The spot market has been quiet but steady. To-day there
was a steady market. The close was quiet aod unchanged.
DAILY 0LO8INO PBI0E8 OF HO, 2 MIXED GORH IK NE^¥ YORK.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fn.
Tues.
8at.
Mon
Oasb corn f. 0. b
541^
5414
5414
64%
54%
54%
53i«
July delivery In elev
68"8
53>4
6388
54
63
Bept. delivery In elev.... 63%
641*
63'8
53»8
64
63%
DAILT CLOSWQ PBIOEB OF NO. 2 MIXED COKN IN CHICAGO.
8at.
Wed. Thurs.
Fri.
Tues.
Mon.
49i«
Jnly delivery in elev
4838
4988
48
48Vt
4Sk
49i«
48"'8
Hept. delivery In elev
49
4808
48%
48%
Deo. delivery In eley
4514
4l''8
45
44%
45
44%
May deUvery In elev
44>8
44SIb
4414
44
44^
44%
Oats for future delivery at the Western market have been
moderately active. Prices for the near-by deliveries have made
a fractional advance in sympathy with the strength of the
market for other grains. The more distant deliveriee have
felt the favorable outlook for a good yield from the new
crop, and have failed to follow the advance. Locally the
spot market has been firm but quiet. To-day there was a
quiet market.
DAILT CL08IH0 PBI0B8 OF OATS IK NEW^ YORK.
Wed. Thura.
Sat.
Mon.
Tues.
Fri,
So. 2 mixed In elev.
Nom. Nom. Nom. Nom. Nom. Nom.
No. 2 wblte In elev.
Nom. Nom. Nom. Nom. Nom. Nom,
DAILT OLOBINO PBIOEB OF MO. 2 MIXED OATB Uf CHICAGO^
Sat.
Mon. Tues.
Wed.
TKurs.
Fri.

96
5 60
5 33
29
5 27
6 26

5 93 6 95 5 98 6 08 5
5 44 5 47 5 50 5 60 5
5 28 5 29 531 6 40 6
f>
5 24 5 26 5 27 5 86 5
5 22 5 23 5 25 5 33 5
5 21 5 22 5 24 5 32 5
5 26,5 21 5 22 5 24 5 32 5
5 26 5 21 5 23 6 21 5 33 5
5

99
.S2

33
29
27
26
26
26

8938
3214

32%

32%

33

S^H

34

SS's

8414

39ie
32^8
8378
31I4

39>fl

3338

S3
3438

FLOUB.
Nominal.
$3 25 ®3
3 40 ®3
3 80 «3
3 90 ®4
4 70 ®5
5 20 96

Fine..

Superfine
Extra, No, 2
Extra, No. 1
(Jleare

Straights
Patent, spring

Patent, winter
NominaL
City mills, patent. 6 40 95 90
Rye flour, superfine 4 10 94 75

86
50
70
70

Buckwheat

Com meal—

fiour..

15

00

Nomimal.

©3
93

3 00
3 05

Western, etc

Brandy wine

05
10

OBAIH.

^beat, per bush—

0.

N. DuL.No.l
N. Dul., No. 2
Bed winter, No. 3..
Hard winter. No. 2.
Oats—Mixed, p. bush.

White
No. 2mixed...
No. 2 white

15, 1904.

3878
81''8

Following are the closing quotations:

..

Friday, July

38»8

32

33

Sept. delivery In elev,...
Dec. delivery In elev
May delivery in elev

May- June...

BREADSTUFFS.

38I3
S214

July delivery In elev

Vrl.
July 16

12ifl

[Vol, UX.21X.

c

Com, per bush-

f.o.b.l0738
f,o,b.l03»i

f.o.b.108%
f.o.b.lOO's

43 945
44 951
Nominal.
Nominal.

0.

964%

O.
f. o.
0.

b.64%

t

No. 2 mixed
No. 2 yellow
No. 2 white
Bye, per bush-

Western
State and Jersey..

Barley— West
Feeding

0,

51
f.

b.56
b.55

Western mixed...

72 975
Nominal.
Nominal.
47 951

Exportg of G^rain and Floar from Pacifle P«rts.— The
exports of grain and flour from Pacific ports for the week
ending July 15, as received by telegraph have been as follows:
From San Francisco to Japan and China, 28,000 bbls, flour.
Combining these figures with those for previous weeks, we
tiave the following, which covers the exports to foreign
countries for the period since July 1, 1904, comparison being
made with the corresponding period of 1903.

Following the advance in values for the grain, higher
prices have been asked for wheat flour. The volume of business transacted has been limited. At prices recently ruling
buyers have shown more willingness to trade, but they have
been reluctant to follow an advance. At the higher figures
ruling they have continued to pursue strictly a hand-tomonth policy in placing orders. City mills have been quiet.
Corn,
Flour,
Wtuat,
Oats,
Barley,
Mxports
bbls.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
fromr—
Rye flour has been held at higher prices, but only a jobbing
dan Fran.
32,311
80.000
business has been transacted. Corn meal has been held at PugetS'd
higher values, but business has been quiet.
Portland
Speculation in wheat for future delivery has been active,
32,311
TotaL...
80,000
and the tendency of prices has continued towards a higher rot.
47,000
1903.
basis.
The monthly Bureau report, issued on the afternoon
Exports of Breadstuffs, Provisions, Cotton and
of the eleventh, indicated that the outturn of the winter and
spring-wheat crops, according to the average condition on Petroleum.— The exports of these articles during the month
July Ist, would largely exceed last season's yield. This re- of June, and the twelve months, for the past three years
port, however, had little eflEect upon the market. Since the bave Deen as follows:
opening of the month weather conditions in some sections of
1903-1904.
1902-1908.
1901-1908.
Exports
the winter-wheat belt have been decidedly unfavorable.
Heavy rains in Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri and Okla- from V. B.
June.
l21donths.
June.
li Months.
June.
UMonth*.

roma, and floods, now that the harvesting season is
at hand, have done extensive damage and considerably
reduced the indicated yield of the crop in those States. The
"Cincinnati Price Current" says the loss to winter wheat
since July Ist in the West is presumably 30,000,000 to 25,000,-

000 bushels; elsewhere little change. The crop prospects in
the spring-wheat belt hare been of a favorable character,
and during the latter part of the week had the effect of
holding the upward tendency to prices in check, Foreign markets have been firm and higher. The spot market has been
quiet. To-day there was an unsettled market, closing about
unchanged for the day. The spot market was quiet.
DAILT OLOUNO PBIOBBOF WHIAT FUTCBB8 HI
Sat.
Wed.
Thurt.
fri.
Mon.
Tues.
108i«
112
No.2 red winter, f.o.b... 112
112
112
10S>9

NEW YORK

Jaly delivery in elev

94»fl

97

Sept. delivery In elev....
Deo. delivery In elev....

87%

SB^g
88'4

87J4

98
80

89%

DAILT CLOSntO PKIOBS OF WHEAT FnTUBBS
8al.
Mon.
Tues.
July delivery In elev
Sept deUT. in elev
Deo. deUv. in el««v
May deUvery In elev

88%

90^

84

8478
84i«
867e

83ifl

85H

9238
86»«
8538
86''8

99%

99^

100^

9338
S'dH

9038
8i)3B

CHICAGO.

Wed.
94»8
86''t

86
871*

IKurs,
96>4
8668
8698

86%

riour,..bbls.

44.168,744

6,083,365 113,454,468

16,789,650

458,500
679,998

1,510,991

19,442,930

3.518.464 119,441,719
1.730,904 53.608,35»

11,82».824 100,017.687
5,899.217 74.860,870

12,906.753 282,fl81.i40

Tot. bush..

6,249.338 175,048.073

17.718.041 876,808,007

13.5C2.168 869.003,6«6

Values.

Wh'tA flour.
Corn & meal.

«

*

*

S,89S,4S3 103,657,192
1,030.736 31,691,700

RyQ
Oats & meal.
Barley

<

9,691,490 160,066,419
8,488,772 41,5S9,869

66,497

347,116

8,143,876

281,460

1,681,478

189,101

8.640.810

641,178

6,6-5,408

168,383

4,602.322

667

8.847,687

18,798,888 813.043.898

Provisions*.

ie.8«6.189 200,181.664
8.900,441 370,490,683

17,142,369 190,491.076

Petrol'm.ic.

95
86"«
8668

86%

Indian corn futures have baen moderately active. The
Agricultural Bureau on Mondiy afternoon issued its first re-

$
t
10,379,808 176,876,071
498.683 17.03S,078

440,977

4,514,859 143.709,481

Cotton

606,899 96.324,868

921,918
6,107.697

81.093

Br'dstuffs....

Tot. value.
fri,

7,986.89} 168,898,723
1.248,857 17,509.826

Wheat.... bu.
Corn. ..bush.

,

90i>8

8978
IN

Quantities.

Wheat.bush.

76.806,189

7,027,264

38,fl87.766 790.13rt,87O

7,160,173 :U6,907,68S

11.801,091 905,02 a,66»
14,776.818 810,187.630

65.893,303

8,294,338 290,141,851
6,770,891 70,948,609

4S,480.07t< 784.731.143

40 648.338 778.260,860

6,888.634

months and years.
Q0VE3NMENT WEEKLY (Jrain REPORT.— Mr. James Berry,
Chief of the Climate and Crop Division of the U. S. Weather
Bureau, made public on Tuesday the telegraphic reports on
the grain crops in the various States for the week ending
July 11 as follows
*

InoladlDgoattle and hogs in

:

all

:

July

.

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

the greater part of the corn belt corn has made vigorbut continuous rains have prevented ouUivatloui and
muobof the crop Is weedy. In the more northerly districts corn Is
aenerally baohward, but has advanced decidedly during the past
week In tbe Middle Atlantic States the crop has made exoellent
progreas and Is In very promising condition.
Winter Wheat.— Winter wheat has sustained great damage from
continuous heavy rains In Nebraska. Kansas. Oklahoma, and Missouri,
where the unharvested grain was seriously damaged by rust and
lodKlng and that In shook by molding and sprouting. Harvesting
was also greatly hindered bv unfavorable weather In the districts east
of the Mlsf leslppl River, where, however, the conditions were much
less serious than in the States of the Lower Missouri Valley. Har
vesting 'as continued nntHer favorable conditions on the Paolflc coast.
Spring Wheat.— While sprlnir wheat has snff^'red slightly from rust
over the southern portions of the spring-wheat region and Is thin and
weedy on lowlands in Northern Minnesota, the crop, as a whole, has

Corn —Over

ous Jtrowth

advanced saflsfaetorlly. It Is now heading In North Dakota and
Northern Minnesota. On the North Paoltlo coast spring wheat, especially the late sown, has suffered seriously from dry weather. In
Oregon much will be out for hay.
Oats.- In common with other grains, oats have suflfered from exceselve moisture In the Lower Missouri Valley, but elsewhere this
crop has made satisfactory progress, although rank growth is reported
from portions of Minnesota and Ohio.

i>23
19Ui.

94
95
97
92
88

Minnesota
North Dakota
South Dakota

Iowa
Washington

Preliminary returns to the Chief of the Bureau of Statistics of the
Department of Agriculture show the acreage of corn planted to be
about 91,930,000 acres, an increase of about 2,130.000 acres, or 2*4

per cent, on the area planted last year, as revised in Dfloember.
The average condition of the growing crop on July I was 86*4, as
compared with 79-4 on July 1, 1903, 87*6 at the corresponding date In
1902, and a ten year average of 88'4.
The acreage and condition of corn for a series of years
is as follows:

ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CORN ON JOLT
1902.

1903.

1904.

1.

1901.

§
«

^
Illinois

8T

Missonrl
Indiana

78

Ohio
Kansas
Nebraska
Wisconsin
Michigan
Minnesota
Texas
Tennessee
Kentucky
Pennsylvania

88
8S
76
86
88

7a
79
98
94
89

85

Oth. States &Ter's.

Total

Per cent of

86-4

8.695
9.42?
3,803
4,853
3.085
6.841
7,956
1.B19
1,294
1,551
B.049
3,286
3,227
1.428

9.S03
9,624
6,775
4,621
3,200
7,451
7,818
l,60t
1,333
1,483

8.186
9,335
5,963
4,295
3,976
6,707
r,505
1.489
1,320
1,439
5.816
3,204
3,103
1,467

'i7,383

86

27,008

^
U

^

3.337
3.337
1.48e

27.333

86
89
93
95
95
95
96
89
95
83

87
90
98
93
92
93
93
89
90
90

76
88
90
87
90
87
91
73
84
92

89-8

89-2

84-3

Ullnoie

Iowa

dec. In acreage

H-2-4

94,044 gl-3 91,360

-f3-0

91

1902.

85
92
82
77
94
84
79
87
71
85
85

88
77
98
97
69
93
93
75
93
99
68

Georgia

101

88

Alabama

99
102
97
98

88

North Carolina
Arkansas

f>l

Kansas
Missouri.....
California

Nebraska
Illinois.

Pennsylvania
Ohio.

Indiana
Oklahoma....,

Texas

1,

June

1,

Jxily I,

July

1.

1904.

1903.

1902.

83
83
70
89
83
79
60
68
69
72

84
86
80
85
81
76
55
58
67
72

88
60
73

56
99
84
98
89
78
78
82
80
52

90
67
90
82
69
90
80

Com
Winter wheat
Spring wheat

of the various crops
1904. 1903. 1902.
86-4
79-4
87'6
78-7
78*8
77-0
93-7
82*5
92-4
69-8
84-3
92-1
90*2
91-2
880
88-5
86-8
93*7
93-9
92-9
88'1
88-0
77-1
84-7

on July
1901.
81-3
88-3
95'6
83-7
93'6

1 is

given below.

1900.
89-5
80-8
56-2
85-5
89'8
76*3

913
87-4
31-1

1899.

865
65-6
91-7
90-0
83*3
92-0

1898.
HO-5
86'7
95-0
92-8

938

....

75-8

85'7
95'5

87-8

91

912

for each of the last three years

1,

Whtat.

jriour.

Corn.

have been:

Barley,

Oat$.

Rv*.

Bbl«.l»6»>t BtUliAO Ibt filMh.BA lbs Biuh.a2 lb BushABlb* Bv.se 16.,
CliioaKO
170,728
93.710
1.626,830
1,100,S5(
126,612
7,000
41,300
54,660
7,600
108,70<
Mllwankee
83,600
6,600
62,000
153.818
Dnlath
86.42
88,?36
18,417
1,147.250
Minneapolis.
10.680
836,79
46,060
9.100
ee.ooo
Toledo
11,000
83,6(0
1,700
Detroit
12.000
20,000
8,700
62 830
•
•
93,469
Cleveland ...
4.780
63,27t^
9.802

Lonli....
Peoria

33.445

115.839

93,700

872,651

10,000

9.800

6.400

9;j.000

112.40(

152,100

145,800

316i7'75

1.750,867

3.067.089

2,357,4.>

Same wk. '03.
Same wk. '02.

449,665

2,643,895

4,014,4t)l

4,836.382

435,331

3971.129

2,018,908

2,614,9 1

average.

Ten-year
average.

74
76
77
78
68
85
73
69
84
79

In certain States since that date.

The average oondition of sprlng^wheat on Jnly 1 was 93*7, as compared with 93-4 last month, 82-6 July 1 1903, 92-4 at tke oorrespondIhk date in 1902 and a ten year average of 86-8.
The following table shows for each of the five principal springwheat States the condition on July In each of the last three years,
and that on June 1, 1904, with the ten-year July averages.

..

48.000

Tot. wk. 190*

.

5,400

St.

Kansas Clt7.

Binct AuQ.l.
1903-1904

<

78-8
78-3
77-7
United States
78-7
770
It should be borne in mind that this report relates to conditions on
July 1, and takes no note of the effects of storms that have occurred

,

a ten-year averatte of 89-7.
The average condition of spring rye on July 1 was 90-8, as compared
with 88-3 on July 1, 1903, 89-3 at the oorrespondlng date in 1902, and
a ten-year average of 87"4.

1902-1903.....

1.

85
88
91
88
86
90
85
88
84

1904.

87'3

. .

July averages

July

92-1

The average condition of barley on July 1 was 88*5, against 90 5 one
month ajjo, 868 on July 1, 1903, 937 at the corresponding date In
1902, and a ten-year average of 87-1.
The average oondition of winter rye on July 1 was 880, as compared
with 90-2 on July 1, 1903, 91-2 at the corresponding date in 1902, and

.

88-4

90
Mississippi
91
Virginia
lol
93
South Carolina
91
99
South Dakota
87
102
Indian Territory
Ill
96
Oklahoma
»6
90
116
Louisiana
101
90
86
The average condition of winter wheat on July 1 was 78'7, as comgared with 77'7 last month, 78-8 on July 1. 1903,77 at the correspondig date in 1903 and a ten-year average of 78-3.
The following table shows for each of the States having one million
acres or upward In winter wheat, the condition on July 1 In each
of the la^t three years, and that on June 1, 1904, with the ten year
Slates—

88
90
89
90
89
77

86

92
92
90

RecHvU at—

89
90
86

Ten-year

1903.

United States

.

90
97
100
95
95
98
90
95
88
95

and since Aug.

-flO-2

1904.

98

87
81

The acreage and condition percentages for all other States
having a million acr-s or more are as tollowe:
last year.

87
85
86
92

88

the figures for the earlier years also.

States—

average.

91
90
89

87

Three ciphers omitted (,000) from acreage figures.
* Acreage figures tor 1901 are the revised results of the Agrionltural Department based on the Census returns for the previous year.
Owing to this revision, there Is an increase of 1 0*2 per cent over 1900
(as against the Department's estimate at that time of a decrease of ^
of 1 per cent) but of course this is an apparent increase only. To
make the comparison correct, the Department would have to revise

Oondition July

Ten-year

The movement of breadstnSs to market as indicated in the
itatements below is prepared by as from fignres collected
by the New York Produce Exchange. The receipts at
Western lake and river ports for the week ending July 9

'

Acreage compared with

Kansas

Potatoes
Cotton

inc. or

—4-5

Pennsylvania
Indiana
Ohio

Oats
Winter rye
Barley

91
69
89

26,040

,3,&3S

87-6

91,930 79-4 89,802

9,211
9,254
6,578
4,432
3,077
7,885
7,741
1,461
1,320
1,361
3,177
3,178
3,178
1,457

90
96
94
92
93

93-4
82-6
92-4
United States
868
-The average condition on Ju'y I of spring and winter wheat combined was 84-5, ae compared with 80 on July 1, 1903, and 829 at the
corresponding date In 1902.
The amount of wheat remaining In the hands of farmers on July 1 la
estimated at about 36,630,000 bushels, eqalvalent to about 5-7 per
cent of the erop of last year.
The average condition of the oats crop on July 1 was 898, as compared with 89-2 lant month, 84-3 on July 1, 1903, 92 1 at the corieapondlng date in 1902, and a ten-year average of 87-3.
The following table shows for the ten principal oats States the condition on July 1 in each of the last three years, and that on June 1,
1904, with the ten-year July averages
July 1, June 1,
July 1,
July 1, Ten-year
1904.
1904.
1903.
19o2.
Slates—
average.

The condition
Ten-year
Avtrage
Condition.

States.

July 1,
1902.

84
73
86
87
80

92
94
96
95
92

93-7

—

June, as follows:

July 1,
1903.

Ju7ie I,
1904.

J^lty 1,

States—

Agricultural Department's Report on Cereal Crops, Wisooneln.
Minnesota
&c.,toJulyl. The Agriculture Department issued on the Nebra<4ka.
11th inst., its report on the cereal crops for the month of New York

Iowa

3

4

:

.

1901-1903

8,600

298.99S
492.178
109,950

40.417
142,123
34,049

64,583.868

7,661,893
0,182,716
6,047,738

*

18,317,687 81X,187,2^6 164.734.240 163,020.86c
39.478,668 238,5 19.180|158.718,404 182,1?4,51(
80.298.540 243.985,442121.900,617 136,126,997

55,047.884
80.474,438

The rec<^ipts of flour and grain at the seaboard ports
week ended July 9, 1904, follow:

for

the

/(•tir,

wi%*t.t,

osm.

Oat*,

Bansn,

129.455
88.660

^

NtwYoTk....
Bolton
MOBtraal

904.850
66,712
156,648
222,3H9
47,060
t3,874

7I1..S00

13,200

fen*'.

Pkiladelpkia.

62,9f6

131.800
14,083
286.510
S.918

Baltimore

S!4,»98

113.P.S7

1,660
9.^51

14.738
l.OOO

..^

25,JX)7

KItkmond
7ew OrlesDF
Kewport Naw*...»^.

81,0(^0

607

73,7H8
«3,87'i
92,i>85
S9,)i7d

'

23.699
4,000

17,143

»«lT«itOB
Portland, Mt

87,200
81.(00

Total week..

278.487
446,183

'e;::

673,130
1,466,060

763.470 1.024.956
1,837,319 1.207.093

Week 1003
.^.
Total receipts at porta frcm Jan..
follows for f onr years:
jDl$tH9t»$f—
rionr

bbll.

"967

l»,SHi
84,b00

1904.
9,8t8,994

1

1903.
10.948,915

9B7

40,799
25,730

SS.CO^

to July 9 compare as
1902.
10.661,393

igoi
11,649,996

ffkeat.

...bosk. 22.288.181

60,i'R4,6I3

70.632,759

3orn...,
aati....

3l,434,r4»
82,817.163

64,732,016
88,255,890
2,170,738
8,872.917

H7,2H0,7.S4

3arler

1.847,40k»

518,000

tye.....

Total sraln.......

"

18.250.4ll

148,896.670

4B,rt0'<,i»l
i;,ii4»,379

2,04(1,880

98,560,608

208,613,048

The exports from the several seaboard ports for the week
ending July 9, 1904, are shown in the annexed statement:
Mmftrtt from- hmX.

Hew York
Boston

Portland, Me.
fklladelphla
taltlmore

1,094

News

Montreal
aaiveiton

jrZour.
bbll.

29,9i2
8,172

81,000

fswOrleani
iiewi*'rt

0$rn,
huth
140.054
60,714

309,017

Total week .71)98.011
Same time '08.. 747.401

Oat$.
bulk.
49,860

Rue,
tUBh.

P«i.»,
t'n>i
8,216

BarUv,
»"
4,100
8,647

663

'3,"876
1.600
13.041
17,143
162,738
11.020

4C6,808
1,840,810
,840,810

1,110
4,881

80
76

5C7
48,149
84,685
£06,244

,,

89.171

8,671

89.806
e 0,043

70,847

8,910
6,171

81.498

THE CHRONICLE.

224

—

.

mx90rt$ for
TFttk Bine* July
mttk *ni iint$
JulyO, 1,1004.
bbi't.
bbli.
July 1 te—
Onitad KinEdOK 62.038
il.O^O
11,040
Oontlntnt

* 0. AmarlM.
Wtit Indlai
r.H.AmOoio'i

i.fVi
ll.OUl

eco
«.74B

>

Wtek

l,.Wi

huth.
343.031
48.977

231.807
1S7.4S1

231.317
13T.451

11X14

21.»0fl

T1.B86

8.

Corn,
Bint* Jnll

Julu 9.
buth.
11.314

843,084
4U.B77

1,

si.ooe
lis
1.812

1004.

4.716

84.525
TotBl
roUllOOS-08.,.. 208,211

.

Bint* July

500

Otkar •onatriai

W*»k
July ».
buih.

4.fi0l

11,021

bu*h

116

l.SU

.

892,011
747,101

437.6»d

for four-yard sheetings. There has been some demand for
all the heavier grades of drills and sheetings for export and
sales of three-yard sheetings and 334^-yard drills have been reported. Bleached goods have been taken in small quantities
for immediate delivery, bat in several inetanoes buyers have

week and since

Tt)6 destination of theio exports for the
1, 1908, Is as below:
Wh$at.
flour.

July

892.0T1
2,53l,C82

~106,308

discovered smaller stocks than they had expected. There
have been no instances of heavy individuHl purchases. Ducks
are in limited request and eaey to buy. Business in dt-nims
and other coarse, colored cottons, such as plaids, tickings,
etc., is very limited, and prices are without quotable change.
Buyers have made unsuccessful efforts to secure roduotions
on wide sheetings and the sale haa consequently been slow,
while sheets and pillow cases have been quiet at previous
figures,
(ilnghams are in moderate demand and unchanged.
Canton flannels and cotton blankets are dull and without
special feature. Kid-finished cambrics are steady.
Print
cloths are down to 3o. for regulars, and odd goods are quoted
on a lower basis than this price for regulars. There is a
firmer feeling in wide 643, owing to the decision of certain
Southern manufacturers not to sell thf se below 4i^c.

lOfl.SO'i

l,'^10.810

2,275,672

The visible enpply of grain, comprising the stocks in
granary at the principal points of accnmnlation at lake and
•aboard ports, July 9, 1904, was as follows'
Wk$mt,

lm$frtmt—
New York
DO •flO«»...
BoitoD

kuik.
668,000
.*.
.««.

.^

Pkllsdalphia
Baltimore.

ew

OriMnf..^..««.
oaiTaiton
.^...^
Montraal
Voronto

nSalo
Do

'83.00'o

06.000
140,000

165.001

io2,'(>de

170,000
80,000
94.000

Bttrltx

Jl»«.

149,000

"1.000
18,000

189,000
I9d.ono
88,000
870,000

'is.ooo

381,000

660,000

551,000

142,000

3,000

387,000

858.dob

887,00«

Vo.^;,/.

86.000

50,000

8,000

1,197,000

8,761,000

460,600

4S2.000

73,000

121,000

897i6oU

1,000

iia,o«o

5,000

166.000

88.606

'i'oVoot

874.000
34,000

17.000

498.000
11,000

"ia.boo

"laVooo

816,000
816,000
693,000
26S,0no
637.000

1,386,000
1,223.000
478,000
120,000
391,000

—

ii-/v„v
874.000

«float

Woolen Goods,— The new lines of men's wear woolen and
worsted fabrics that have been opened during the past week
have been for the most part of medium gradei and prices
equal to those of last season have been quoted. On the
whole sales have k>een satisfactory. Most of the lines that
have been so far shown are under a dollar and the higher
grades will not be opened before next week or the week
after.
The situation in the raw material market is causing
some delay in this matter, for manufacturers feel that under
present circumstances higher prices should be realized. A
feature of the week has been the raising of the price on cer-

77.boc

fl.OOO

16,000

•A-.v

L'^O.MO

Fort WUlIam
Port Arthur

918,000
1,106.000

Dulnth
afloat

5.830.eao
71.000

Klnaaapolli
Bt.Lonii

Do

698.000

63,000

Do afloat
Dairoit
Do afloat
OUaago
Do afloat
MUwankaa

Do

3.000
107.00V

Oatt,
k«*h.

168,000

afloat

Tolado

DO

..••i-j
4.000

0*r«,
bulk.

afloat. ••.«.•

'44,0(>6

837,000

KaniaiOity

".OOO

133.000
24,000

^g.OOO

lines of crashes and homespuos by the American
Woolen Company, indicating that they have been freely
purchased by ih? trade. The demand for these go wis, however, is causing some complaint in other directions where
goods have been neglected. The demand for heavy-weights
continues, and some fairly large orders for these have been

tain

880op

Paoria
Indlanagolli

145.000
406,000

*.<W0

OiaanalandrlTer.
Total Jul y
Total July
Total July
ToUl July
Total July

. •

4,437,000

18.538,000
11.055,000
14,811,000
12. 1902.. 19,808,000
13. 1901.. .87.978,000
0,

1904

. . .

1.31ff,000

1904.
11, 1908.
2,

1,316.000
i.azo.ooo
7,121.000

placed quite recently, although the aggregate for the season
below that of last year. Overcoatings are in moderate demand, staples being favored rather than fancies.
Cloakings are quiet. In woolen and worsted dress goods
smooth-finished woolers are strong, but the demand is not
very heavy. Breparations for spring lines are well under
still falls

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
New

Yoek, Friday, P. M., July

[Vol. LXJix.

way.

15, 1904.

Foreign Dry Goods.— The demand for imported woolen
and worsted dress goods is moderate and principally confined
to the better grades, while there is a distinct tendency
towards plain goods in every department. Silks and ribbons
are quiet. Linens are firm but the demand is small, Burlaps
are featureless and without change in prloe.
Importations and Warebo use TV^ltbdravralsof Dry Goo4a
Thelmportationsand warehouse withdrawals of dry goods
at this port for the week ending July 14, 1904, and since
January 1, 1904, and for the corresponding periods of last

While' the cotton-goods market remains quiet and orders
are comparatively scarce, there are some indications that an
improvement may occur in the near future. Sellers have
assumed a much more confident position and have shown
less disposition during the past week to grant concessions, a
fact that has impressed itself upon the minds of buyers.
This has been due to a great extent to the fact that the recent shadiDg of prices has resulted in mtU stocks being
cleared up, and that, while orders have not been of large volume, yet they continue to come forward fairly regularly for

Again the export inquiry continues on a fair vear are as follows:
lots.
and is having an effect on the attitude of sellerp.
Buyers, on the other hand, while continuing their hand-tomouth purchases, are so far making no preparations for the
future and are watching the raw cotton market closely for
»r «
g:
2:
possible developments. The labor situation in New England
*•
2'
6
good deal of attention in the trade, reports
is attracting a
s:
2
g:
<B
manufacturers have practically
from Fall River stating that
^:
B
agreed upon a wage reduction of 12^^ per cent. According
small
scale

2^
"'^

:

:

:

:

;

;

»:
b:

:

ts

S:

:

»
b

:

eg

o;

.

gs>

:

:

:
•

.

•

r

!

!

A

;

1^
•O

b: a
.
C

:

•

:

!

I

to the union leaders, the men will not consent to this. Much
satisfaction has been expressed over the semi annual report
of the H. B. Claflin Company; showing an increase in net
number cf
earnings for the six months of nearly $7,0OQ.
new lines has been opened during the week in the men's
wear, woolen and worsted division, and generally speaking
prices have averaged the same as last year.

A

V

'•3

'

to

;

I-.

I
!

00
«3
»3

cnco

Nbw Yobk. to July 11.

Week. Since Jan.

1,

Week.

1^
CO
'to

Since Jan. 1.

M M h3 M
i(>'-4ao-4«

AtOMMtO

>-•

V«M
-jw

5
9,076

66
11

Afrlea
WeBt Indies

Mexico
Central Amerloa.

Boath Amerloa...
Other Ooantrles..

251
18
879
890
21

M'S)

cxao'oVo^

(6.00

46,649
4,626
13.302
5,969
10,417
1,216
7,984
29.278
8,596

21
14

1.247

<0

790

>-

8,391
21,833
5,819
16,798
1,643
6,492

539
35
203
875
43

33 022
6,0*2

127,970

209,695

1,767

I

I

ao«^
OO

^

w

(Jl^

lobo

•4
OQ
OD

\

I

tOACO[»«

oca

03
-I
to

!

I

I

of these

New York

exports since Jan.

17,811.864 in 1904, against $9,129,186 in 1903.
Practically no changes have occurred in prices

1

has been

during the
past week, and is does not seem probable that there will be
any alterations of importance for some little time unless
some unforeseen occurrence should take place in the raw-ootton market. For staple lines there have been a number of
small orders, but the aggregate is not large. The domestic
demand for drills has been somewhat better than for sheetings and the former have been therefore rather firmer; but
there has been an improvement in the number of inquiries

-4 N) )-• 09 (C
Ol WO)
00

O
O A oVj>.oD"bi
Cd VOOoa
COCJ

oopo

i(kcoaoi-<o

-401

J'

A
OS

00 00

WOD

iF^cioa^'CO

I

I

e»^

I

"• to

j

00

a

-4<0

i

00

w'to
cxta

',

'« CO CO ao ^
toojOi^ao

o
bO

tO'4
cxoa
<QC»

1^
to
I

CO
to

',

M

0«
00
CIt

»jq<<0»aoo

to -J ...^00

I

!

VH^^^Ol

»aOC»C3CO

M^ CO l^tO
tao^-ooM

coosVaT-'co

OslfkCOOtO

^^

WtOKOiao

«a to ^1

oo'coaooo

"btVco'aw

AODMCOtO

C0 09CS|^C3

,-,
I

T-»9«0

A

,

—

H'tO'-'
OB *^ CO GO 0)
**

eco
to'Vi

o

-4 CO

at

eoto

to

«0

ODM

oajviwoaoo

(O

<c»
«ao

o

I

OtM

<1

o

q«

«C0
I

I

004^

OCX

'to

2.049 2,295 1,752 2,061 1,112

c;i

«

^
?

A

CD at

M

CKOCOtStO
I- Oi-'y a«

to
CO

<i

toooaao

oa

!

<jt

M

coS^
128.378 312.193 790.671 528,082 292.051

to
-J

t3-fl»_tO;J

rr

COCO

c^ CO en so at

ooc^toacit

MOICOOOO

O A^^il^
C^COmCOCX

tOCOMCCCO

Vi'cobo'-jot

kSM

OSM

-J

COOr'W

MMCOOoV

b

OtODOOOtl-'

MtO
CO to
ODA
COM

*^Vc^«w

MM_tOj|kfcO
"coV'c^'mos

MVlfltbsV

o<<i

—

totO-.i:j<

Mco Akao
CJ<®l»kM»J

<]t3tOCOi»

CO
»0

oiMM^eo
ovtaeto
<0OX«C0

10
I

cor.>Mxao
r'tOOCOCX
acxksoicx

too

OS

I

wo

I

i

I

CO...

AMO0«0

V ow
o coa
O)

cb

wAta

p*k_vj

wVooVi

i"'

!

-cji

t-

00

o>J

00

Ol

^OOC^ W<l

I

»!-'

't^

r*

M
I
I

M"*k
«4C0

iy«co»j3i>ccao^9Cl•co

<©
">-'

-^

a

00 M 00 7 00

QO«U1COCO

tOl->
'

^
laloww'uj

OOtO

if^

CO

The value

«•

-jAM^jto

COCO

taM
I

O

107,528

27

I*

tooi^to

aiQCIt3<St9

uta

V|

10,706

Total.

439
497

ka

lt>'t0aA-4

A«'5)>*'pt«;

OB

Great Britain
Otber .European.
Cblna .......•..>
India ....• ...•••.
Arabia

CDAtOOD^

vluOA A

O^Ototooi

CrCO

MWOOOOO

1

1904.

.

r^

1

1903.

•

C6tO
"(0

li^^l

0<<0

Domestic Cotton (iooDs. —The exports of cotton goods <0
m
from this port for the week ending July 11 were 10,706 w
packages, valued at |580,797, their destination being to the
points specified in the tables below

'•

t0

pr

1^00 MOO Ok

L^
a

«D^Ol«^M

OtO«»'AI-'«B!2-

OOM

Ot »*.(-• to

^ 1^ QD CO A

M

MOO WMOJ

co

i

I

eoa

ooTooeo-'

I

ot

to'-j

S

teVi

tSMAtOtO
coMOifce

'

—

—
:

July

THE CHRONICLE.

1G, 1904.J

News

—

D£

ITY

Items.

Colambis, Mo.— -Bands Ordered Registered.— ThQ State
Supreme Court on July 1 issued a peremptory writ of mandamus against the State Auditor compelliog him to register the $100,000 5^ water and light bonds voted last
rea'iODS for th« State Auditor's refasal to
register these bonds were set forth at length io V. 78, p.
2453. The suit resulting was a friendly one to remove all
doubts as to the validity of the issue.
Colnmbns, Gt\^.— Injunction Dissolved. Judge W. T. New-

The

February.

—

United States Court recently dissolved the
temporary in j auction granted about a year ago restraining the city from issuing the $250,000 4?! water-plant bonds
awarded on Aug. 8, 1903, to Sperry & Co. of Baltimore.
Pending the result of this litigation, the bonds were no*, deWe understand that Sperry & Co. have signified
livered.
their willingness to take the bonds now that the restraining
order has been dismissed. See V. 77. p. 362, 811 and 263.
Denver, Colo.— Bond Decinon, If the decision handed
down early in the month by Judge John I. Mullins of the
District Court is sustained by the Supreme Court, to which
an appeal has been taken, from $150,000 to $500,000 Capitol
Hill eewer district bonds will become a direct obligation of
the city and county of Denver, and not a charge upon the
property owners made payable by assessments. The suit was
one brought several years ago by David Rubridge and others
to prevent the sale of their property to meet non-payment of
asssesmentp. It was contended by the plaintiffs, among
other things, that the improvement made by the storm-sewer
did not enhance the value of their property to an amount
equal to the cost of the aeeeesment, and that for this reason
the improvement was not a local one but a general one, for
which the city as a whole should pay. The decision of Judge
Mullins was brief, and, according to the Denver "Republi-

man

of

the

—

was

as follows
claim that the 8torm-Bewer In oontroverpy was not a
local unprovement, and that by reaion of failure to comply with the
jurUdlotloDal provlgione of the law the rity Jacked authority and

can,"

The

plalntlffa

power

to 888688 ItB coBt

upcn

their properties.

The

payment July

22, 1904:

8BWEB BONDS.
Capitol Hill Storm Sewer Dist. No.

Bond Calls and Redemptions.
Cincinnati (Oliio) School District.— -Bond OaH.— This dishas called for payment Octoter 1, at the American Exchange National Bank, New York City, or at the Third
National Bank of Cincinnati, i% bonds Nos. 1 to 70, inclusive,
each for |500, dated Oct 1, 1891. These bonds mature Oct.
1, 1911, but have been subject to call since Ojt. 1, 1901.
Cole Connty, Mo. Bond Call, Call was made for payment July 1 of
bonds Nos. 6 to 18, inclusive, for $500 each.
Date of bonds, Jan. 1, 1897.
ConnergTille, Fayetle Connty. Ind.— JBond Call.— TLos.
M. Little, City Treasurer, called for payment July 1 at the
Farmers' & Merchants' Trust Co. of Connersville the following bonds

trict

H

—

:

BoDdg No9. 18 to 30. Inoluslve. Iraucd under Ordinance No. 855.
BoDd» N 8. 1» to 19, lucliisive. Issued under Ordlnimce No. 368,
Bonds Nos. 7 to l*". Inclusive, Isiiued under Ordinance No. 308,
Boud No. 1 for tlRa2l Issued under Ordinance No. M»!8.
Bond No. 2 (Brldeesc ntract), Issued under Ordinance No. 363.
B jndg Nob. l to a, lacluelTe (Willi tins contract). Issued under Ordinance No.
39i.

Nog.
Nos.
Nos.
Nos.

to 11, Inclusive. Iasue<l undor Ordinance No. 861,
1 to 11, IncluKtvo. iBsned undpr Ordiuance No 371.
1 to 8, inclusive. Issued undtr Ordinance No. 377.
1 to 8, Incluglve, Issued under Ordluacce No. 888.
1

1— Bonds Nob.

167 to 184, inclusive,

Nos. 301 to 807, Inclusive.

Upon request from the holders

of

and

any of the above bonds

ten days before the expiration of calls, the City Treasurer will arrange for their payment at the Mercantile Trust
Co,. New York City; but not otherwise.
Freeport, III.- Bond* Redecniea. This city on June 18
redeemed $12,900 special assessment bonds.
Hamilton County, Ohio.— Bond CaH.— Notice has been
given that Interest will cease on Dec. 16, 1904, on $150,000 6%
20 30-year (optional) current-expense bonds issued in 1884.
Payment will be made at the office of the County Treasurer.
Lexington Township, Lafayette County, Mo.— Bond Call,
—Interest will cease August 1 on S^i bonds Nos. 1 to 9, inclusive, each for |1 ,000, dated Aug. 1, 1899.
Mnltnomah Connty (P. 0. Portland), Ore.— Warrant
Call.— John M. Lewis, County Treasurer, has called for payment all Class "36" and "87" warrants drawn on the general fund up to and Including May 1, 1904; also Class "C"
warrants drawn ofl the road fund up to May 1, 1904.
Sniabar Township, Lafayette Connty, Mo.— Bond Call,
Call is madi for payment August 1 of bonds Nos. 1 to 7, inclusive, each for |1,000, dated Aug. 1, 1899, Interest, S%<(.
Warren Connty, Miss.— Bond Call,— 3. D. Laughlin,
County Clerh, calls for payment the following bonds
$3,000 Mississippi Valley & Ship Island Railroad bonds, Nos. 106 to 186, inclus-

—

—

:

ive, dated Feb. 1. 189».
8,900 Virginia Bayon bridge bondg, Nos. 1 to 6, inclusive, of t^OO each, and
Nos. 1 to 4, inclusive, of $100 eacb.
2,700 Clear Creek bridge bouda, Nos. 1 to 6 for $500 each and Nos. 1 and 2 for

$100 each.

Havnes

Bluff bridge bonds, Nob. 1 and 8 tor $500 each and Nos. 1 to
inclusive, for $iOo each.
200 Cliy Cemetery bridge bonds, Nos. 1 and 2 for $100 each.

1,100

4,

Washington Tuwn&bip, Lafayette Connty, Mo.— Bond
will be made August 1 on 8}4% bond No. 1

CaW.— Payment

for $1,000, dated

Aug.

1,

1899.

Worth Connty, Mo.— Bond CaZZ.— Interest
on bonds Nos. 18
dated Dae.

19, inclusive,

to

ceased June 1
carrying 5% interest and

1897.

^^____
Bond Proposals and Negotiations
1,

week have been
Adjourns. —The General Assem-

'LoViUlAHA.— Legislature
bly of this State adjourned July 7.
Ma»mcbnf etts.— Bounty Act Foid.— The State Legislature on June 9, jast before it was prorogued, passed over the
Governor's veto a bill providing for the payment of bounties
to veterans of the Civil War under certain contingenciep,
and also authorizing the State Treasurer to issue bonds to
meet these payments. The State Treasurer having some
doubts as to whether the bill was passed over the Governor's
veto in the manner prescribed by the Constitution, referred
the question to the Attorney General for an opinion. On July
12 the Attorney-General gave an opinion holding that the Act
was void for the reason that the Constitution requires a
two thirds of the total mcmbersh'p of the originating branch
of the Legislature and a two-thirds vote of the members
present of the other branch in order that an Act may be
passed over a Governor's veto. In the case of the bill under
discussion, while both branches of the Legislature gave a
two thirds vote of the members present in acting on the
veto, yet the vote in the House of Representatives, in which
the bill originated, was not two-thirds of the total membership of that body, and for this reason, the Attorney- General holds, the bill failed,
New York City.— .Prtce of Bonds Advanced.— Fiek & Robinson, who are at the head of the syndicate which last May
was awarded the greater portion of the |37,000,000 33^^ corporate stook of New York City, have successively advan ced
the price this week for the same from 1023^ to 103, to
103^ and 104 and interest. These bonds wero originally
offered to the public by the syndicate at 102.

Bonds
Bondg
Bonos
Bonds

Dade County, Mo. Bond Calls. This county called for
payment June 1 5^ bonds Nos. 201 to 250, inclusive, each for
11,000, dated June 1, 1894; also for payment July 1 of bonds
NoH. 251 to 300, inclusive, of the same issue.
Denver, Colo.— Bond Call.—C S. Elder, Treasurer, of the
City and County of Denver, calls the following bonds for

allegations of the

oomplatnt are fully eupported by the evidence. * * • The munloipallty must strictly comply with its charter In order to asBess the cost
of Improvements upon the property of the citizen, and It cannot i>y
merely declaring it so transform an improvement which is not in fact
local In its character and doesnot In fact specially benefit the property
assesBed and thereby conclude the courts from InveBtlgacing the
facts.

225

this

as follows:

—

Akron, Ohio»— Injunction Dismissed, Jujge Pardee of the
Probate Court on July 8, at the instance of Gaorge C. Kohler, who claimed eeveral irregularities, issued a temporary
restraining order preventing the city officials from delivering
the $145,000 A^% bonds recently awarded to P. S. Briggs <%
Co, of Cincinnati, as stated in V. 79, p. 169. Oa the following day, however, the injunction was dismissed at the plaintiff's own motion, he stating that the suit had been brought
under a misapprehension of the facts.
Aliqnippa, Beaver Connty, Pa.— Bonds Not Sold— Bond
Offering.— The $15,000 i}4% bonds offered on July 5 were not
Proposals are again asked for these bonds, this time
sold.
until July 25. For details of issue and terms of sale see V.
78, p. 2618.

AndOTer, MasB.— Bond Safe. -On July 8 the $39,000 i%
school-house bonds described in V. 79, p. 115, were awarded
to the Andover Savings Bank at 102*50. Following are the
bids :
Farson. Leach 4Co., New York. 101-8?0
Sav. Bank. Andover.. lOS'OO
101 816
H. Rollins & Sons. Boston. ..108-2P6 EslHbroolt & Co., Boiton
lOrSO
Blake Bros. & Co., Boston
101-788
102-21
H. W. Poor & Co., Boston
Aoams & Co.. Boston
102-169 Blodget, Merrltt&Co., Boston .101'67
N. W. Harris & Co.. Boston
102'125 Denlson, Prior & Co., Clevelana
Jackson & Cnrtls, Boston
101-60
and Boston
Geo. A. Fernald A Co.. Boston.. 102'048
101-«6
101-93
C.S.Butler
Moore & Cabot, Boston
lOl'lO
Harvey Fiek & Sons, Boston.... 101-983 8 A Kean, Cbicaeo
Merrill, Oldham
Co., Bo»ton..l01-8B» Lawrence Bamum &, Co., N. Y.. 100-680
101 837
R. li. Day & Co., Boston

Andover

I

H.

Lawrence Sav. Bank, Lawrence.lOiJ'^S

'

i

1

I

I

<fe

|

|

Anne Arnndel Connty (Md.) School District.— Bond

Offering. The Board of School Commissioners of this county will
offer for sale at 11 a. m. August 2 an issue of $15,000 5% cou-

—

pon school bonds.
AntiffO, Wis.— Band Sjlc-Oa June 30 the $25,000 ii
coupon Bchcol-lDuilding bonds described in V. 78, p. 2618,
were awarded to Rudolph Kleybolte & Co,, Cincinnati, at
100-04.

Ashland Connty (P. 0. Ashland), Ohio.— Bond Sale.— On
July 6 the $35,0U0 5% bridge bonds described in V. 78, p.
2613, were awarded to Rogers & Son, Chagrin Falls, at
107'698.
Following are the bids
Rogers & Sons, Chag. Falls.. $87,694 40 Feder, Holzman & Co., Cln... $37,183 CO
N. W. Harris & Co., Chicago. 87,641 CO Well, Roth ACo.. Cincinnati. 37.117 50
87,561 Oo Prov. Shv. B'k A Tr. Co.. (In 87,( 91 60
SeasongoodA Mayer, Cin
,076 00
New lit Nat. Bk. Columbus
Denlson, Prior * Co., CleveS7,n4460 Fuller, Parsons & Snyder,
land and Boston
36.925 00
Cleveland
Havden, Miller * Co., Clove. .S7,476 00
87,i50 00 P. S. BriKBS & Co., ('lucln ... 3R.906 00
A. Kleybolte & Co.. Cincln.
W Hayes* Sons, Cleve... S7.40SOO W. R. To'ld A Co., ('IncinnntI 86 HV6 CO
Cincinnati Trust Co., Clnclu. 87,350 00 Sec Sav. B'k & Tr.Co.,Toledo SH,?" b 00
}'6.*17 50
87.280 85 8. A. Konn. (^hiTKU
Noble, Mobs * Co Detroit.
36.S25 00
.•}7,X80
J. M. Holmes, Chicago
S. Kuhn & Sons. Cincinnati.
:

;t

.

.

,1.

.

.

.

Lamprecbt BroB.A Co. .Cleve.

1

37,276 00

G. W. Miller (for $lo.O00).... 16,88<»60

Asotin Connty (Wa$h.)»4chool District No. 5.— Bond Sale.

—This

district has sold $14,500

4-'i^'<

l("-2L'-year

(optional)

funding bonds to the State Board of Land Commissioners at
par,

Avoyelles Parish, ha.- Details of Loan.— The $10,000 loan
mentioned in V. 79, p. 115, was discounted at 6^ and will
mature Feb, 1, 1905.

THE CHRONICLE.

226

Bwd Sale.— Oa Jaly 9 the $30,000 i%
coopon watnr bonds described in V. 79, p. 169. were
awarded to N. W. Halaey & Co., of Ciiicago, at 100-45 and
Belie Plalne, Iowa.—

10 year

interest,

Benson, Minn.— Bond Sale.— This village has sold $16,000
tunding bonds to U. M. Stoddard & Co., Minreapolis, at
par. Dite, Jaly 1, 1904. Interest, semi-annaal. Denomina^14"^

tion, fl.OOO.

Brandon, Wis.— Bonds Foied.—This place recently voted
to issue |6,000 gas-plant iKjnds.

Bristol, Tenn.—i^ond Sa/e.— This city has sold at private
sale to W. R, Todd
Co., of Cincinnati, at par, an issue of
$10,000 5^ 30 year school-building bonds, dated May 1, 19C4,
Denomination, $500. Interest, semi-annual.
Baffdio, N. Y.— Bonds Authorized.-The issuance of $100,000 4% 1-10-year (serial) refunding water bonds, dated Sept. 1,
1904, has been authorizad.

&

[Vol. Lxxix.

district awarded $25,000 5% bonds, issued to rebuild and repair levees, to the Bank of EdwardsviUe for $25,418 33.
Danomination, $500. Date, June 15, 1904. Interest, annual.
Maturity, $8,000 in one year, $S,000 in two ye.»rs and $9,000
in three years.
Cluciauatl, Ohio.— Bond Sate.—Oa July 11 the $300,000
30-year coupon viaduct bonds described in V. 78, p. 2454,

U

were awarded to N. W. Harris & Co., Chicago, at 110*179
and interest. Following are the bids
V. w. Harris A Co.. Chlc....»»80,eS8 oo p. J. Good heart & Co.. Cin. .$327,989 00
N. W. Halsey *<;o., N, V... 33;,240 00 Lamprecht Bros. Co..r;ieve 826.bl0 00
DomlDick & Oomlnlck.N.y.,
German Nat. Bk.and Union
:

and BlodKet.Merntt ACo.,
Boston
32«,743 00

W. .J. Hayes & Sons. Cleve..
W. K. Todd &Co., Clncln...
SeasoUKOOd

Sav Bk. 4Tr. Co., Clncln.
FeOer. HoUonuti *Co.. Cm,
Prov Sav. Bk. & Tr. Co Cin.
Atlas Nat. Bk., Cincinnati..

00
8i'8,060 Ou
Mayer, Cln... 88f,016 86

&

8i!8,oi'l

.

325,625
824.720
8.4,720
82»,000

00
00
00
00

Bond Offering.— PropoB&\B will be received until 12 m., August 15, by W. T. Perkins, City Auditor, for the $325,000 i%

A $608 62 judgment bond has been author- coupon fire-department bonds authorized by the City Counsame to be taken by the Hertel Avenue Oatlet Sewer cil on June 13, Denomination, $500. Date, Sept. 1,1934.
Sinking Fund as an investment. Bond is dated July 1, 1904, Interest semi-annually at the American Exchange National
Bank, New York City. Maturity, Sept. 1, 1934. A certified
and matures July 1, 1905.
Bondu Authwized.— The issuance of i!83,485 86 d}4% grade- check, payable to the order of the City Auditor, for 5% of
crossing bonds has been authorized. Date of bonda, Aug. 1, ihe gross amount of bonds is required.
1904.
Interest semi-annual. Maturity, Aug. 1, 1924.
Clark, S. Dak. Borui Election. A special election will be
Bonds Authorized, —The issuance of $25,000 4% 1-10-year held July 19 to vote on the question of issuing $18,000 5%
5-20 year (optional) water-works bonds. Thomas Dean is
(serial) bonds has been authorized to pay for an electric
engine at the pumping station. Bonds are dated Aug. 1, City Auditor.
1904, and the interest will be payable semi-annually at the
Clark8Tllle, Tenn.— Bond Issue. The Board of Mayor
ofiSce of the City Comptroller or at the Gallatin National and Aldermen of this city has ordered the issuance of $1C0 Bank, New York City.
000
20-year bonds dated July 1, 1904, to the Tennessee
Cambridge Springs, Pa. -Bond 0#eringr.— Farther details Central Railroad in payment of the subscription to that road
are at hand relative to the offering on July 18 of $25,000 4^ voted at the election held in August, 1901.
coupon improvement bonds. Proposals for these bonds will
Clearwiter County (P. 0. Bagley), Minn.— Bonds Debe received until 4 p. m. on that day by A. H. Drake, Borough feated.— At an election held in this county June 14 369 votes
Clerk, asd will be opened at 7:30 p. m. by the Borough Coun- were cast in favor of and 845 against a proposition to isene
Bond

If sue.—

ized, the

—

—

a

Authority, vote of 204 to 25 at election held May 31,
Denomination, $^00. Date, Aug. 1, 1904. Interest
semiannually at the office of the Borough Treasurer. Maturity, $1,500 yearly on August 1 from 1919 to 1933, inclusive, and $2,000 on August 1 of the years 1933 and 1934. Bonds
are free from all taxes. Securiies are issued for the purpose
of refunding and paying oS certain notes and orders and to
make permanent sewer and paving improvements. Certified
check for 2% required with bids. Bonded debt, including
this issue, $41,000. Assessed valuation, $701,000.
Canandaigna, N. Y. Bond O^eringf.— Proposals will be received until 12 M July 26, by George A. Voorhees, Village
Treasurer, for $100,000 gold street-improvement bonds, Denomination, $1,000. Date, Sept. 1, 1904. Interest (rate to be
cil.

$85,000 court-house bonds,

1904.

Coldwater, Mich. Bond Sale.— Ihia city has sold to local
par an issue of $50,000 ii sewer bonds, Denominations, $100 and $500. Date, June 1, 1904. Interest,
March 1 and September 1. Maturity, part yearly on September 1 from 1911 to 1917, inclusive, bonds unpaid being sub-

,

named

in bids)

March

1

and September

1

in

New York

City.

capitalists at

ject to call after 1913.
Collf ge Township School DlBtrict, Knox County, Ohio.—
Bond Sale. This district sold last month to Denison, Prior
Co. of Cleveland and Bjston an issue of $20,000 5% school
bonds at 105-91. Denomination, $5C0. Date, June 1, 1904.
Interest, semi-annual.
Maturity, one bond each six months.
Colnuibas, Ga.— Bonds Voted, At the election held in this
city July 8 the proposition to issue $40,COJ funding and firedepartment i% 1-20-year (serial) bonds was carried by a vote
of 779 to 44. D^te of sale and other details not yet deter-

—

&

—

mined,
Maturity, $10,000 yearly on September I from 1918 to 1927,
Concord, N. R.—Bond Sale,— Oa July 12 $55,000 SJ^i oityinclusive. Bids are to be made on blank forms furnished by hall bonds were awarded to E. H. Rollins & S^ns and Geo,
the Village Treasurer. Certified check for 2% of the bonds A. Fcrnald & Co., Boston, at their joint bid of 101-579. Folbid for, payable to the Village Treasurer, required. Accrued lowing are the bids
100-639
R. L, Day * Co.. Boston
E. e. Rollins & Sons and Geo.
interest to be paid by purchaser, who will also be required
10r579 Denison, Prior & Co., Cleveland
A. Fernald 4 Co., Boston
100-27
lOfO*
and Boston
Vermilye & Co., Boston
to furnish blank bonda free of charge.
100-127
lOO'Ol
N. W. Harris 4 Co., Boston
Jackson & Curtis Boston
lOO'eS
The offloial notice of this bond offering willbe found among Farson, Leach & Co., Boston...
Denominations, $500 and $1,000. Dite, July 1, 1904. Inthe advertisements elsewhere in this Department.
Maturity, from 1924 to 1929, inclusive.
terest, semi-annaal.
Canon City, Colo.— Bond 8ale.—On July 5 $2,000 6^ sideCook County (111.) School District ]No. 99. -Bond Saie.—
walk bonds were sold at par to Mrs, Agnes B. Stewart. Dd- This district, which includes the villages of Morton Park,
nominatioDS, $250 and $500. Date, July 1, 1904. Interest, Hawthorne and Grant Works, recently sold to N. W. Harris
June 30 and December 81. Maturity, July 1, 1925, subject & Co., Chicago, $19,000 i^4<i bonds. Denomination, $1,000.
to call after July 1, 1909.
Date, June 1, 1904. Interest, eemi-annual. Maturity, $2,000
Centerville (Iowa) Independent School District.— Bond yearly on June 1 from 1908 to 1916, inclusive, and $l,0u0 on
Sale.— Oa July 11 the $10,000 4^ 5-lOyear (optional) refund- Janel, 1917.
ing bonds described in V. 79, p. 169, were awarded to N. W.
Crawford County (P. 0. Bacjrns), Ohio.— Bond Sale.—
Hilsey & Co. of Chicago at par, accrued interest and blank This county has awarded to the Bacvrus City Bank $80,000
bonds free of charge. Following are the bids
5% bridge boads for $30,43i) and to Weil, Roth & Co., CinoinN. W. Halsey ft Co., Chicago... lOO'OO
DenlBon, Prior & Co., Clevenati, the $80,000 5^ pike bonds for $31,291, this latter issue
land and Boston
W. J. Hares & Sons. Cleve
+ 98'40
t 99-00
being described in V. 78, p. 2614. The following bids were
Koyal Trust Co., Chicae'K
.+ 98 oo
• Ana blank bonds. + The difference between par and price oflored Is to meet
received
I

|

|

j

:

.

.

attoruei's lees, blank bonds, etc.

Cheviot, Ohio.— Bond Sate.— On July 7 the $5,C.OO 5% 25
year water-pupply bonds described in V. 78, p. 2454, were
awarded to S. Kahn & Sons, Cincinnati, at 110*75 and interest.
Following are the bids
B. £uhn & Sons, Cincinnati. .$5.e»7 £0 Cosmopolitan B'U'k & Sav. Co.l5,455 00
i^etutouKOoa & Mayer, Cluoin.. 6,519 SO German Nat. Bank. Cincm
6,45:3 50
Well. Roth & Co.. ClDCln
6,504 SSI W. K. 'I'odd *Co., Clncmuatl.. 6..S7.i 00
:

I

|

Union 8av. Bk. & Tr. Co.. Cin..
Prov. Sav. Bk. &Tr. Co.,Clu..

6.477 00
6,459 01

I

Atlas Nat. Bank. Cincinnati... 5 SCO 00
8. A, Eeun, Cblcago
5,105 00

Chicago, lil.— Bond Offering.

— Proposals will

be received
until 2 p. M,, August 1, by L. E. McGann, City Comptroller,
for $5,000,000
gold general corporate bonds. Date, July 1,
Denomination, $1,000. Interest semi annually at the
1904.
office of the City Treasurer or at the fi3cal agency of the city
of Chicago in New York City. Maturity, $280,000 yearly on
January 1 from 1907 to 1923, inclusive, and $240,000 on Jan. 1,
1924.
Certified check on a Chicago bank for $100,000, payable to the city of Chicago, required with each bid. These
bonds may be registered, if desired, in the office of the City
Comptroller.
The offlcial notice of this bond offering will be found among
the advertisements elsewhere in this Department,
Chotean, Mameuke and Yenice Drain ige and Levee District, Madison County, III.- Bond Hale.— Oi Jane 22 this

H

$30.00

t '0,000
Bridfie Bds.

Ptki Bondt.

Well, Roth & Co., Cincinnati
Bucyras City Bank. Bucvrus
Fuller, Parsons & 8uyder, Cleveland
Seasoniiood & Maver. Cincinnati.
S A. Kean. Chlcngo
A. Klevb. lie & Co Cincinnati

00
00
81,126C0
31,10126

lSl,2fll
3ii,851

,

Lamprecht Bros

A.

Co,. Cleveland

(Unclnnatl Trust Co
Denison. Prior A Co., Cleveland and Boston
Citizens' Saving's & Loan Co., Mansfield
New First National Bank, Columbus

Hayden, Miller &

W

R.

Co.. Cleveland
Co.. Cincinnati

Todd &

W. J,Hayes&

|30,43O0O
80,<;68

00

.S0,9i600
3i',900uO
30.h82 00
30,8«0 66

80,399 00
30,126 00

S0.85OOO

30,3u7 00

30,23760

»0,7, 001
3i).e76 00
.10,675 00

80,S06 00
30.237 00
80,276 00

30.60000

SJ,87600

Sons, Cleveland

An

offer of $31,110 for the pike bonds was
Trust Co. of Cincinnati,
Union Savings Bank

made by the

but too late
&
be considered.
Detroit, Mich.— Bids.— Following are the bids received
July 6 for the $100,000 4« 15-year refunding water bonds
awarded, as stated last week, to the Detroit Sinking Fund
to

Commission at 107-05

:

N. W, Halsey A Co., Chlo
Noble. Moss* Co., Detroit
Kstabrook « Co., Boston.

107*05
SInkinc Fund Commission
107'Oafi
.Matthew Finn, Detroit
1P6-893
Khoades & Riihraoud. N. T
idlev S. ll*rde. New York.... 109 877
D
106-71
Termllje&Co,, New Vork
Blodgei. Merrilt* CO., Boston.. 106"68

N.

W. Harris

B.

I

H. Rolllus & Sons, Chicago. .106-277

Ueutson. Prior

and Boston

Co.. Chicago.... K'tveiS

i,

&Co„

I

Frank P. Holran, New York ...106-048
106-95
Albert C. Case. New York
J. Uayet « Sons.Cleveland.106-925

W

Merrill,

Oldham 4

Co., Boston 105-649

Well, Both * Co- Cincinnati... U)6-2»6
106-81
Moors ,& Cabot, Boston.

Cleveland

106191

10e-18«
loa-066
106-06

1

Hayden, Miller*

Co., Cleve.... 106-1.5

Dak.) School District.—.miction on Bond
Isiue Postponed.- We are advised by O. W. Matson, Clerk of

Deadwood

(S.

—

—
July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

227

the School Board, that the Board has deferred action in the
matter of iasning $35,000 high-school- building bonds for

Beck, County Auditor, for the following coupon bonds, ag
gregating $53,000

sixty days.

$1,500 4H!t Kldgeville Township Road bonds, maturing $500 on March 1, 1007
on Sept. 1, 1H07 and on March 1, 190H.
10,000 4Vfe,'S Freedom Township Houd bonds, maturing $500 each six months
from March 1 19'7, to Sept.l, 19i2, inclusive, and §1,000 on Marcli 1
and Sept. 1 of ihe years 1913 and 1914.
Napoleon Township Koad bonds, maturing tSOO March 1, 1907, and
3,600
$].ot0. n Sept 1. 1107, and on March 1 and Sept, 1, 190S.
8,500 4^'/J Monroe Township Road bonds, maturing $600 each six months from
March 1. 1907 lo March 1. 1914, inclusive, and $1,000 Sept. •, iy'4.
6,000 4>^;J Harrl.-<on Townehip Road bonds, maturing $600 each six months
from March 1. 1910, to Sept. 1, 1914, inclusive.
18,000 *iH Liberty Township Road bonds, maturing $500 each six months from
to Sept. I, 190!^, Inclusive; $i,000 each six months from
March 1,
March 1. 1909, to Sept.l, 191U, inclusive; §1,600 each six months from
March 1, 1911, to Sept. ), 1914, inclusive.
6,000 <!^A IJamascus Township Road bonds, maturing $500 each six months
from March 1, 1910 to Sept. I. 1914, inclusive.
1,600 i^% Richfield Township Road bonds, maturing $500 on March 1, 1007, on
Sept. 1, It 07, and on March 1, 1908.

Dillon (S. C.) Graded School District No. 8.— Bond Offfring.— Proposals will be received until July 20 by E. L.
Moore, District Clerk, for |1 2,000 ^% 20 year coupon school
bonds. Denomination optional with purchaser. Interest.
annual. The district is at present in e of debt. Assessed
valuation. |593,0(:0.

Eagle Bend Ikdepenaent School District No. 73, Todd
Conuly, TIL\nn.—Bond Sale.—The $8,000 5^ 10-15-year (optional) school bonds offered but not sold on May 25 have
been placed at par with Elizabeth Y. McHigh.
Elmira, N. Y.—Bond Differing. —This city offers at public
eubecription to-day (July 16) |28,500 refunding bonds at not
exceeding 4;? interest. Denomination, $500. Maturity, part
yearly from 1905 to 1915, inclusive.
Elyria. Ohio.— .Bond* Authorized.~By an ordinance passed
June 7 this city is authorized to is8u« $65,000 5% coupon Mid
Dadie Avenue improvement bonds. Date, March 1, 1904.
nomination, $600. Interest semi-annually at the office of the
United States Mortgage «fe Trust Co., New York City. Ma
turity, 16,500 yearly on March 1 from 1905 to 1914, inclusive
Emmett School District No. 36, GanTOn Coauty, Idtiho.
—Bond bale.— We are informed by the Clerk that the State
Land Board has purchased at par an issue of $1,500 5% 10-20year (optional) gcbool-house bonds dated April 1, 1904.
Denomination, $300. Interest, January and July.
Eageue, Ore. Bonds Voted.— A special election was held
July 5 at which the question of issuing |10,000 sewer bonds
was submitted to the people and carried by a vote of 87 to 14,
Eart^ka (Kan.) School District.— Bond Election.— An
election will bs held July 19 to vote on the question of issuing $30,000 high-8chool-bnilding bonds.
EustistNeb.) School District —Bond iTZeci on.— An election will be held in this district July 20 to vote on the question of issuing |6,C00 brick school-house bonds.
Eveletti, Min».— Bond Sale.— The $50 000 5% gold water
bonds olfered on June 20 and described in V. 78, p. 2399, have
been awarded to John Nuveen
Co., Chicago, at par and

&

interest.

&

Evergreen Park, 111.— Bond SaZe.— N. W. Harris
Co., of
Chicago, recently purchased two issues of 5% refunding
bonds, one for $3,500 and the other for $4,000. These bonds
were issued in exchange for the old securities, which were
handled by the Chicago fiim.
FarmingtOD, 111.— Bond O^ermflf.— Proposals will be received until 8 p. M,, August 1. by the City Council, for $9,500
refunding water bonds. C. M. Routson is City Clerk.

Franklin County (P. 0. Colambas), Ohio.— Bond -SaZe.—
July 12 the $75,0u0 i% emergency-bridge bonds described
in V. 78, p. 2454, were awarded to the Columbus Savings &
Trust Co. at IOU'523 and interest. Following are the bids

On

:

Columbus Sav. & Trust Co...$75,?92 51 R. Kleybolte & Co.. Cincin...|76,2*<2 50
SeasouKooa (k Mayer, Olnom. 75,309 00 New Ist Nat. B'k, Columbus. 76,115 00
I

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School District.— Bond Saie.— This district has gold $6,300 5% bends to the Belleville Savings B*nk
at 103-17, Maturity, $600 yearly on July 1 from 19l6 to
1915, inclusive, and $300 Jnly 1, 1916.
Fulton Connty (P. 0. Wauseon), Ohio.- Bond Sale.- On
July 9 the $90,000 i}4% road-improvement bonds described in
V. 78, p. 2614, were awarded to Denison, Prior & Co. of
Cleveland and Boston at 102*028 and interest.
Gloacester, Mass.— Bond Sale— On. July 12 the $50,000 4«
1-10 year (serial) bonds desurioed in V. 79, p. 170, were
awarded to the Worcester County Institution for Savings of
Worcester at 102-51. Following are the bids
Worcester Co. Inst, for Savings. 102-61
Geo. A. Fernald & Co., Boston.. 101'88
Moore, Baker & Co.. Boston
102-339 N. W. Harris 4 Co., Boston
101-079
Lawrence S^ivings Bank
102-Ma
Lawrence Barnum & Co., N. Y. 101-866
Moors A Cabot, Boston
102 29
Jackson & Curtis, Boston
101621
E. H. Rollins & Sons, Boston... los-l'S Blake Bros. & Co.. Boston.
10f66
R. 1,. l>»y & Co., Boston
10i:-09
Merrill, Oldtiam
Co Boston. .101-539
Adams * Co.. Boston
102-07
Blodget. Merrlit & Co^. Boston. 101-586
Harvey Fl»k & Sons. Boston..., 108-035 Denison, Prior & Co., Cleveland
Cape Ann National Bank
101-91
and Boston
10151
Grand Rapids, Mich.— Bid*.— Following are the bids re
ceived July 2 for the $90,000 4<l 30-year water bonds awarded, as stated last week, to Kountze Bros, of New York City,
the price paid being 107-411
Eonntze Bros.. New York...$9R,e69 00 Denison, Prior 4 Co., CleveN. W. Halsey 4 Co., ChIc
98,670 00
land 4 Boston
195,643 00
B. L, Dav & Co., New York., U6.3t6 90 B H. Rollins & Sons, Chic... 95,200 00
N.W. Harris 4 ('o, ChlcBgo.. 95,927 00 Merrill, Oldham & Co.. Best.. 94.H96 10
Albert C. Cane. New York
96,860 00 Seasonsood & Mayer, Clncin. i<4,817 5o
Khoades & Richmond, N. Y. 95,784 30 W. K.Todd A Co.. Clncin... 91,h(,0 00
W. J. Hayes 4 Sons. Cleve... W5,774 00 Prov. Sav. B'k4 Tr. Co.. CIn. 01,350 00

Freeburg

(III.)

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Bstabrook &
„

Co.,

Boston

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95,640 SO .8. A. Kean, ChioaKo
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90,900 00

Sale. -Oa July 9 $5,000 6%
water bonds were awarded to the First National Bank of
Hanley Falls at 104. Denomination, $1,000. Date, April 1,

llanley Falls,

1804.

Minn.— Bond

Interest, annual.

Maturity, April

1,

1919.

Uarrlgonbnrg, Ya.— Bond Ojfertnflr.— Proposals will be received until Aufiust 8 by Dr. T. O. Jones, Chairman Finance
Committee, for $60,000 4^ coupon electric-plant bonds. De
nomination, $1,000. Date, Aug, 15, 1904. Interest, semi-annuaf.

Maturity, 30 years, subject to call after 15 years.

Purchaser will be required to pay accrued interest. Bonds
will be delivered from time to time in lots of $5,000 or more,
as the

work

progresses.

:

iW

W,

All the above issues are in denominations of $600, dated
Interest semi-annually. Separate bids to be
1, 1904.
made tor each issue. Check or draft for $1,000, certified by
the First National Bank or the Citizens' Bank of Napoleon,
required.
Hlllsborongh County (P. 0. Tampa), Fla.— Bond -SaZe.We are advised that the $309,000 i% gold road bonds described in V. 78, p. 2400, and offered tor sale on June 10,
have been awarded to Farson, Leach
Co., New York, at
95 and interest. Bonds mature Julv 1, 1933.
Hills School District No. 66, Rock County, Minn.—
Bond Sale, — Oa July 1 the $3,500 5% school bonds described
in V. 78, p. 3455. were awarded to Browne-Ellinwood Co. of
Chicago at 101 057. Following are the bids
Browne-BIIlnwoodCo., Chlc..t3,537 00| Kane & Co., Minneapolis
$3,500 00
Duke VI. KarsonA Co.,Chlc... .'4.511 00 S. A. Kean, Cbicago
3,*M5 00
U. M. Stoddard & Co., Minn.... 3,500 00 J M. Holmes & Co., Chicago.. 3.326 00
HoUjwood Union High School District, Los Angeles
Connty, Cal.— Bonds Befuied.—lt is stated that tbe AdamsPhillips Co, of Los Angeles tiave refused the $65,(00 5% bonds
lecently awarded to them, claiming that the election authorizing the issue was not held in all the districts foiming
the Union High School District.
Houston, Texas.— Bonds iVoposed.— An ordinance is before the City Council providing for the issuance of $350,000
bonds for school and sewer purposes.
Hantington Township, Ind.— Bonds Fo^ed.— At the election held June 14 the $78,500 Cincinnati Bluffton & Chicago
railway- aid bonds were authorized by a vote of 1479 in favor
of to 613 against.
are advised that it will be a year or
more before any part of these bonds will be issued.
Bond Question Not Submitted. The proposition to issue
$50,000 bonds in aid of the Fort Wayne
Southwestern
Railroad, which it was proposed to submit to the voters on
June 14, was withdrawn prior to that date, and no vote was
taken in the matter.
Ithaca, Mich.— Bonds Fofed.—This village recently voted
to Issue $13,000 electric light plant bonds.
Jackson Connly, Ind. Bond Sale.— Oa July 9 two issues
of 43^^ road bondi?, aggregating $32,800, were awarded to the
People's State Bank of Brownstown at par. Denominations,
sixty of $475 and twenty of $315 each. Date, July 5, 1904.
Sept.

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May 15 and Nov. 15.
Jackson Township, Ohio. Bond Sale.— This township on
July 12 awarded $^,000 6% road improvement bonds to Seasongood & Mayer, Cincinnati, at 116-666. Denomination,
Date, Aug. 1, 1904. Interest, semi-annual. Matur$500.
Interest,

—

ity, 1926.

Jenkintown (Pa.) School District.- Bond O/erir gr— Proposals will be received until 13 m July 20, by J. Fred.Tiefenbach, Secretary, for $24,000 i}4i bonds. Denomination, $500.
Date, July 1, 1904. Maturity, July 1, 1934, subject to call
after July 1, 1909. Certified check for 10^ of the amount of
bonds bid for, payable to J. G. Trank, Treasurer, required.
,

Janlata (Pa.) School District.— Bond Election.— Aa election will be held in this district to vote on the question of
issuing $12,000 school-building bonds.
Kansas City, Mo.—Bond Sale.— Oa July 11 the $600,000
20-year coupon water- works bonds described in V. 78, p. 2615,
were awarded to N. W. Harris
Co,, Chicago, at 105 656
and interest". Following are the bids

H

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W.

4 Co., Bo«.|633,504 00
4 Mayer, Cin... K83,408 00
633,913 00 W. R. Todd 4 Co., Clncin... 607,60000
& Co., Boston
To Guard Against Floods. The City Council has passed a
resolution providing that a joint conference of the otiicials
of the cities of Kansas City, Mo., of Kansas City, Kan,, and
of the States ot Missouri and,Kansas, be held at onoe^with the
view of arranging for euch laws as will provide for the protection of this district from ravages of floods, and if need be
to permit the issuance of bonds for the purpose.
This section, it will be remembered, has on several occasions suffered
severely from floods, the latest occurrence being within the
present month.
KnoxTllle. Tenn.— Bonds Foied.- This city on July 9, by a
vote of 1 821 to 239, authorized the issuance of $750,000
water-works bonds.
Koochiching, Minn.- Bond 0.;^erir!gr. — Proposals will be
received until July SO Dy Matt Donahue, Town Clerk (P. O.
International Falls), for $6,C00 Qi bonds to run for a period
of twenty years. Denomination, $500. A deposit of 1% reN.

Harris

Vermilye

4

4 Co.. Chlc.

Co.

. .

$633,937 00

i

and Blake

Blodget, Merritt

Heasongood

Bros.

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Hastings (Neb.) School District.— Bond Offering.— Pro- quired.
posals will be received until July 30 by E. W. Hamen, SecLakeland, Fla.— Bond Sale.— This city some weeks ago
retary Board of Education, for the $40,000 i}4% 10-20-year sold to John Nuvetn & Co. of Chicago at 101 an issue of
(optional) high-sohool-luildlng bonds authorized at the elec- $35,000 Q% 5-20 year (optional) water bonds dated Fet>. 1, 1904.
tion held July 6 by a vote of 467 to 50.
Lawton, Okla.— Bonds Authorized.— The City Council, it
Henry Connty (P. 0. Napoleon), Ohio.— Bond Offering.— is stated, has authorized the issuance of $18,000 citj -hall,
Proposals will be received until 1 p. m Aug. 2, by F. J. $4,000 fire-department and $3,000 water-worka bonds.
,

THE CHRONICLE.

228

Leesbarsr, Va. -Bonds Voted.— This place on July 9, by a
vote of 126 to 63, anthorized the ieauance of $30,000 water-

work?

bonrts.

Bond Offering,— PiopoB&la will be received
until 12 M., Angnst 1, by Lodge Riddle, Village Clerk, for
$3,833 40 %i llO-yt'ar (seirial) Lincoln Avenue paviD£ bonds.
Denomination, $333 31, Intereet, anDtite, August 1, 1904.
nually at the cfiSoe of the Village Treasurer. Purchaser
certified check for 10^ of
must pay accrued interest.
amount of bid, payable to the Village Treasurer, required.
Lnverne, Ala.— Bond Q^ertngr. Proposals will be received
until 8 P. M,, August 1, by A. B. Brooks, Town Clerk and
Treasurer, for $10,000 5f gold coupon water- works and elecDenomination, $100. Date, July 1, 1904.
tric-light bonds.
Interest, semi-annual. Maturity, July 1, 1924, subject to
Certified check for $100, payable to
call after July 1, 1914.
Lisbon, Ohio.

A

—

the Town Treasurer, required. The town has no bonded
debt at present. Assessed valuation, $211,437; real value

about $423,000.
McKresport, Pa.— Bond Election. An election has been
ordered to vote on the question of issuing $125,030 electric-

—

light-plant toads.
Manchester, N. H.—Bonda Authorized. The issuance of
$9,000 bridge and $B,000 school bonds has been authorized.
Marlon (III.) Srhool Dlstriet.- Bond Sale.— On July 5 an
issue of |10,00(i i% school bonds was awarded to Geo. M.
Bechtel
Co., Divenport, as four per cents. Denomination,
|l,000.
Date, July, 1904. Interest, semi-annual. Maturity,
July, 1916, subject to call $1,000 yearly after 1907.
Marlborough, Mass.— Bond O^ertngf. -Proposals will be
received until 2 p. m July IS, by Charles F. Robinscn, City
Treasurer, for $12,000 4% coupon sewer bonds. Denomination $1,000. Date, July 1, 1904. Interest, semi-annually at
the Winthrop National Bank of Boston. Maturity, July 1,
Authority for issue Ciiapter 443, Laws of 1903.
1929.
MarysTille, Ohio.— Bond Sale.— On July 12 the four issues
of 5% paving bonds, aggregating $78,250, were awarded to
W. J. Hayes Sons, Cleveland, at $84,660 and interest. Fol-

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lowing are the bids
w. J. Harei * Sons. CleTe...»84.660 00 Weil. Roth ft Co., Clnclnnati.$83.633 87
80,750 00
PrOT Sav. B'k * Tr. Co.. Cln. 83.061 25 P. 8. BHrkb & Co.. Clnoln..
Massachneetts.- Bond O^ertng.— Proposals will be received
1

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by Edward S. Bradford, State Treasurer
and Receiver General, for $1,812,000 dj4% gold registered
bonds as foUcws:
until 12 M., July 21.

[Vol. LxxiY.

Monticello, Wis.— Bond Sale.— Thia town has sold to N.
Harris & Co., of Chicago, an if sue of $8,000 5% electriclight bonds.
Denomination, $500. Date, July 1, 1904. Interest, annually on July 1 at Monticello.
Maturity, $500
yearly on July 1 from 1905 to 1920, inclusive.
MoQBt Uilead, Ohio.— Bonds Defeated.— The proposition
to issue $45,000 sewer bonds failed to carry at the election
held June 80. The vote was 75 for to 156 agairst.
Napoleon, Ohio.- Bonda Authorized.—The Village Council
on June 22 authorized the issuance of $20,000 4%% 25-year
refunding water and light bonds.
Denomination, $1,000.
Date, July 1, 1904. Interest, March 1 and Sept. 1.
Newark, N. J.— Bond 8ale.—0a July 13 the $800,000 d%i
50-year track- elevation and the $100,000 3J^^ 30-year water
bonds were awarded to John D. Everitt & Co., N. Y. City,
at 102*517 and 102-087, respectively. Following are the bids

W.

:

$800,000

Bonds.

John D. Everitt &

Co., New York
New York
* Oo., New Yord
Blodsret. Merritt & Co Boston
Dudley S Uarde
Herrlck. Hitks & Colby
K-tabrook 4 Co., New York
Rboades & Richmond. New York
Kountz- Bros., New York
ProDst, Wetzler & Co., New York
Donitnick A Domnick. New York
Denlson, Prior & Co., Cleveland and Boston
Karson Leach 4 Co., New York
N. W.Hal-ey 4Co., New York
Ladeuburg, Thalmann &Co., New York

N W.

Harris &ro..

Blake Bros

.

$100,000
Bond*.

102-617
1C2-087
All or none, 102-187-^
101-78
101-68
101-417
lOi-O^S
102-i5
101 S«
•

—

lOZdl
10208

101921
101-837
101-801
101-683
101-49
101-477
101-879
101-317
101-210
101-80

101401

lOlM?
101-141
loi-132

lOrOU
101-277
101-2E9

10r037
100-89

100-661
Newark
Securities are dated Aug. 1, 1904, and the interest will be
payable semi-ant ually at the office of the Commigsioners of
the Sinking Fund.
Fidelity Trust Co..

Newark, Ohio.— Bond Saie.— The Sinking Fund Trustees
have purchased $3,000 smallpox and $1,538 Pine Street improvement bonds of this city as an investment.
Bonds Authorized.— The issuance of $300,000 water bonds
has been autborized.
New Bedford, Mass.— Bid«,— The following are the bids
received on July 7 for the $1CO,OOD 4% 1-20- year school bonds
awarded, as stated last week, to E. H. Rollins & Sons, Boston, at 104-596
B. H. Rollins 4 Sons. Boston. ...104-696 R. L. Day * Co.. Boston
104396
Merrill. Oldham 4Co.. Boston.. 104589 Blake Bros. 4 Co.. Boston.
104-312
N. W. Harris 4 Co.. Boston
104-6K9 Estabrook 4 Co.. Boston
104189
Vermilye 4 Co., Boston
lOi-49
Moore, Baker & Co.. Boston.... 104 -09
104-44
H. W. Poor & Co., Boston
Geo. A. Kemald 4 Co., Boston.. 104 08
104-413 BlodKet,Merrltt4 Co.. Boston. lOS'fS
Adams 4 Co., Boston
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New

Britain, Conn.— Bond Ojfertnfli.— Proposals will be
Btate-Hongeloan, due Oct. 1. 1918
f230,000 received until 1^ M
Aug. 1, by the Board of Water CommisArmory loan, due Sept. 1, 1831
16,000
sioners of the City of New Britain, for $75,000 4% water
Armory loan, due Sept. 1, 1934
60,000
108.000
Medfleld Insnne Asylum loan, due Apr. I, 1934
bonds. Denomination, $1,000. Date, July 1, 1903. Interest,
Prisons and Hospitals loan, due May 1. 1984
507,000
Feb. 1 and Aug. 1 at the New Britain National Bank. MaMetropolitan Sewer loan, due July 1, 1944
3i«2,000
turity, July 1, 1933.
Total
$1,312,000
New London (Ohio) School District— Bond Offering.—
No bid will be considered except for the entire cfifering. Proposals will be received until 1 p. M,, July 18, by Geo. W.
Certified check for $26,240 payable to the Treasurer of the Runyan, Clerk Board of Edccation, for $10,000 5^ coupon
school bonds. Date, Sept. 1, 1904. Interest, semi-annual.
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, required,
$500 from 1905
The offldal notice of this bond offering will be found among Maturity, part yearly on Sept. 1 as follows
to 1908, inclusive; $750 from 1909 to 1918, inclusive, and $500
the advertisements elsewhere in this Department.
in the year 1919.
Authority, Sections 8991, 3992 and 3993,
Massillon, Ohio.— Bond Election Postponed.— At a special Revised Statutes of Ohio. Certified check for lOjJ of amount
meeting of the City Council on JuoelSit was decided to of bid required. Bocds will be delivered Sept. 1, 1904, at
postpone for sixty days the special election which had been New London. Present bonded debt of district, $11,000. Ascalled for June 21 for the purpose of voting on the question sessed valuation, $475,000.
of issuing |200,000 water- works bonds. During this time
New Philadelphia, Ohio.— Bond O^eringr.—Proposals will
the officials of the water company will submit a proposition be received until 12 m,, July 19, by John M, Schell, City Auditor, for the following assessment bonds, authorized by ordifor the sale of the present water plant to the city.
Medina County (P. 0. Medina), Ohio.— Bond 0#eringr.— nances passed by the City Council on June 3
Proposals will be received until 12 M. to-day (July 16) by W. $16,000 S!( 1 10-year (serial) Broadway Street improvement bonds. Denomination, «800.
H. Hobart, County Auditor, for $1,800 6^ coupon ditch bonds 12,000 b% 1-10-year (serial) East Avenue Improvement bonds. Denomln*tlon, $1,200.
to be issued in accordance with the provisions of Sections
12,000 5% 1-io-yeai (serial) High Street Improvement bonds. Denomination,
4480, 4481, 4482, 22b, Revised Statutes of Ohio.
Interest,
$1,200.
payable semi-annually beginning Feb. 15, 1905. Maturity,
2,000 6t 1-lU-year (serial) Salmon Alley Improvement bonds. Denomination, $200.
$800 each six months from Feb. 15, 1905, to August 15, 1907,
All the above issues are dated Sept. 1, 1904. Interest semiinclusive.
certified check for 5% of amount of bid, payable
to the County Treasurer, required, and the purchaser must annually on March 1 and September 1 at the office of the City
Treasurer. Accrued interest to be paid by purchaser. Cerpay accrued interest and furnish blank bonds.
Mercer County, N. J.— Loan Authorized.— The Board of tified check for 1% of the bonds bid for, payable to the City
Freeholders, at a meeting held July 12, anthorized a loan of Treasurer, reqciired.
Sons, Cincinnati,
Norwood, Ohio.— Bond Sale.—B. Kuhn
$40,000 in anticipation of the collection of taxes,
MlddletowD, Ohio. Bonds Authorized.— On June 10 the were the highest bidders on July 11 for the $6,000 4^« 25City Council passed an ordinance providing for the issuance year electric-light bonds described in V. 78, p. 2456, offering
of $4,000 4.% coupon repaving bonds. Denomination, $500. 108" 15 for the same.
Oakland School District, Alameda Connty, Cal.— Bond
Interest semi-annually on February 1 and August 1 at the
National Park Bank, New York. Maturity, $500 yearly on Sale.—On July 6 $860,000 4% 1-40 year (serial) gold school
bonds were awarded, $500,000 to the Oakland Bank for SavAugust 1 frcm 1905 to 1912, inclusive.
Midland, iial.— Debenture SaZe.-On July 11 the $8,000 i}4i ings at par and the remaining $460,000 to the Central Bank
80-year debentures described in V. 79, p. 118, were awarded of Oakland, also at par. Denomination, $1,000. Interest
A. Stimson
to
Co. of Toronto at 103 075 and interest. semi-annually on March 1 and September 1.
Ocean Park School District, Los Angeles County, Cal.—
Follow! Dg are the bids :
G. A. Stimson & Co., Toronto. 18,846 00 Wm. C, Brent, Toronto
$8,16100 Bond Election.— The Trustees of this district have decided to
Dominion Securities Corp
8.186 00
hold an election to vote on the question of issuing bonds for a
Minnesota. Bond Sale. According to local papers the new school house.
State Board of Investment on July 5 purchased $200,000
Oneoota, N. l.—Bond O^erinflf.— Proposals will be received
woith of Capitol Commission certificates at 3!iS. The certifi- until 8 P. M., July 26, by the Board of Village Trustees
refunding bonds,
cates were purchased out of the Permanent School Fund. Henry D. McLaury, Clerk for $14,0!
The Capitol Commission paid the State $100, COO for certifi- Date, Sept. 1, 1904. Denomination. $500. Interest, to be
named in bid, payable annually on September 1. Maturity,
cates issued in 1899 and falling due July 1, 1904.
MissiSblppi.— Bond Saie.— On July 9 the $500,000 8}4% 10- $500 yearly on September 1 from 1906 to 1933. inclusive. A
80-year (optional) bonds described in V. 78, p. 1923, were certified check or New York draft for $500, payable to the
awarded to N, W. Harris & Co., Chicago, at 100'185 and in- Village Treasurer, required, and the purchaser must pay acterest.
Followino: are the bids
crued interest. Bonds are exempt from taxation for town,
N. W. narrls&Co.,CiiloaKO.. 1600,928 A C.Jones (for $4,000)
$4,000 county, municipal or State purposes.
Proposals mu<t be
l-t.OOl Capt. Trank Burkett (for $1,000). 1.000
S. li. Mor.anrin (fo^$l^,000)...
made on and subject to the conditions of the form of propoAlice Ililiim (for tS.OOO)
6,000
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THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.J

which may be obtained npon application to the Village

Clerk.
OjferiTJgr. —Proposals

Ottawa, Ont.— Debenture

will be re-

ceived until 12 M., Angust 11, by W. R. Stroud, Chairman
Finance Committee, for |829,972 84 debentures, as follows
161.000 00 i% 40- year debentures.
6«.801 67 3H« 10 year debentures.
126,628 06 3^% 20-year debeotures.

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the advertisements elsewhere in this

found
Devartment.

OTid Union Free School District No. 1, N. Y.—Bond Sale.
—The Rochester Savings Bank of Rochester some time since
purchased at 10250 an issue of $20,000 4:% 1-20-year (serial)
bonds of this district.
Oxford, N. C —Bond Offering.— We are advised that the
$46,000 5% 80 year refunding bonds described in V. 78, p.
2080, for which all bids received on June 15 were rejected,

now

being offered at private sale.
Pasadena (Cal.) Sch'Ol Bisttiet.— Bonds Defeated. At an
election held in this district June 30 a proposition to issue
$25,000 i}4i school-building bonds failed to carry.
Fatebogae, N. Y.— Temporary Loan. This village has negotiated a $1,200 6% 60-day loan with the Citizens National
Bank of Patcbogue.
Patergon, N. J.— Bond Sale.— The $500,000
35-year coupon funding bonds offered but not sold on June 20 have been
awarded at 100*50 and accrued interest to Spitzer
Co. of
New York City. Bonds were described in V. 78, p. 2402.
Penn Yan, N. Y.—Bond O^ering.— Proposals will be received until 8 P. M,, July 19, by Norris S. Da iley. Village
Clerk, for the following bonds at not exceeding 5% interest
are

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$81,816 rectistered sewer brnds, dated April 1, IPOJ, and maturing two bonds of
11,772 each yearly, beginning Oct. 1, 1923.
SS.OOO registered eleotrio ligbt bonds, dated Aug. 1, 1901, and maturing five
bonds of $800 each yearly, beginLing Aug. 1, lfc09.

Interest on both the above issues will be payable semi-annually at the oflSce of the Village Treasurer. Accrued itttrest to be paid by purchaser.
Proposals for each iesue must
be accompanied by a certified check for $1,000, payable to H.

Clark Andrews, Village Treasurer.

NEW

&

NEW

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J.

& W. Seligman
& Co.'s syndic'e

New

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North American Co.

100 787

{

Co.... 20.000.. Kit -85
20,000. 101-83
60,000. 101626
600.. 101-50
Sidney Ellerman

3. 000.

Bloren&Co

.

2.600. .101-60
160.000.. 101 26
1

10.000.. 10 -00
8,000. .101-00

Fidelity Mut.LifeIn.Co.250,0i'0. 100 94
.

Harde

8, 600.

2.610. 10100

H»rry C.Chambers....

2,000,000.. 10087

GirwdNat Bank
L J. Morris
W. T. Homrtehauser.

C

Dudley

S.

Finance Co. of Petn.

Northern Trust Co....
Jesse nendrlcks

^

John Roth well

600.000. 100 -80
500,000.. liO-BB
(600,0^0.. 10 J'SO

.100-626

61,,710. 100-50
20.,000. .100-125
69,,400. .I'flO
88, 000. 100-06

.

Mllion A. Ellerman....

.lOlTO

8,,0C0. .100-85
2S,,4 0. .10II-76

James Martin

James Jones
Lawrence Beylard

IfO ,300. .10126
10 ,000. .101-19
180,,900.

100-77
2,ono. .102-00

All....

locoe Conklln

.1(12-00

.101-80
.101-76
.101-75
.101-50

1 ,000. • KJlJS
700. .101-27

American Trust

R

77 ,000.
23,,' 00.
6. ,000.
7:<.,400.
146,,701'.

and

Bank

Speyer&Co
Joseph Howard

$10, 300. .102-50

100. 102-25
I

2,0<0,000. 100-456
2,000,000.. 100-4 16
2.000,000.. 100-306

& Co. syndicate. All

Nat. City

f

8.00",tK)0. 100 576
2.000,000. .100*6Srt

I.

&

&

2,000,000.. 101086
2,000,000 100 966

I

Drexel

&

$16,000,000
all or none. 101-033
2,000,01)0.. 10 1-3 115

f

Interest will be payable semi-annually.
The official notice of this debenture offering will be

among

Ptailedelphis, Pa.—Bond SaZe.— On July 11 the twelve
issues of d]4% bonds, aegregating $16,000,000, described in V.
78, p. 2402, were awarded to a syndicate compoeed of J.
W. Seligman Co. of New York, William Salom >n
Co.,
New York; Edward Sweet Co.,
Yorn; N, W. Halsey
Co., New York, and Lpo, Higginson
Co. of Boron at
101 036 -a basis of about 8-443^<g. Following are the bids :

&

:

§76,533 38 it 10-year debentures.
19.109 73 i% 20-yeftr debentures.
176,000 00 i% 30- year debentures.

2-29

.100-04

79,,U00 100-01
5.,fOO. .100-75

100-38
100-28

250,,000
850, 0<IO
2<'0,,000.

.10000

22.,700. .100-00

,000.
5,

.100-00

Pittsburgh, Pa.—Bond* Voted and Defeated.— The election held July 12 resulted in favor of the proposition to issue
$5,000,000 filtration-plant bonds by a vote of 14,784 to 11,987,
and in the defeat of the proposition to issue $2,000,000 Fifth
Avenue grading bonds by a vote of 12,754 for to 14,855
against.
Fort Dover, Ontsrio.- Dt&enfttre Sale.—Oa July 5 this
village sold $8,000 43^* town-hall debentures to the Crown
Bank of Canada at par. Date, July 15, 1904. Interest, annual. Maturity, part yearly for 20 years.

—

Pueblo County, Colo —Bonds Authorized. The County
Commissioners have decided to issue $198,000 bonds to pay
off all

outstanding floating indebtedness.

Fremont County, Idaho.
Uexborg School Ulgtrict No.
—Bond Sale.— On June 1 $7,0001,5% school- house bonds were
awarded to the State Land Board at par. Denomination,

NEW

LOANS.

LOANS.
COMMONWEALTH OF

^^,000,000

^100,000

MASSACHUSETTS.

CHIGACIO BONDS FOR SALE.

Village of Canandaigua, N.T.

Proposals for the Sale of Hoik's, Department of FInaro -.

Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of
Trnstees of the Village of Canandaigua, N. Y., until
12 M.. JULY 86TH 1904. for the purchase of 1100,000
bonds of the Village of Canandaigua, N. Y., being a
portion of the bonds to be used for street improvement purposes, pursuant to a resolution adopted at
a spedal tax meeting of the qualified electors of the
Village of Canandaigua. held on the 8th day of May,
1903, to authorize said Board of Trustees to borrow
on the credit of said Village of Canandaigua a sum
cot exceeding $200,000, and to Issue the bonds of
said Village therefor from time to time as the same
might be needed for the purpose of grading and paving the streets of said Village, which reeoluMon and
all the proceedings relating thereto, iacludlng said
special tax meeting, have been ratified and legullzed
by an Act of the Legislature of this State, which became a law on January arth, 1904.
Bonds to be of the denomination of $1,000 each, to
be dated Septemoer 1st, 1901, and to mature as

LOANS.

street ImproTement Bond^.

TREASURY,

PROPOSALS FOR BONDS.
Sealed proposals for the purchase of the following
Bonds of the Commonwealth of
Massachusetts will be received by me up to twelve

,

CITY CF CHICAGO.

issues of Registered
o'clock, noon,

DAY OF JULY,

on the 21ST

which time they will be opened, read and recorded.
The bonds oflered for sale will all bear Interest at
SH% per annum, both principal and interest being
payable in gold coin or its equivalent, and are for
account of the following loans, viz.

STATE HOUSE LOAN,
Due October

1,

1918

.

$230,000

.

ARMORY

LOAN,
Due Se^ember
ARMORY LOAN,
Due September

1,

1931

.

15,000

1,

1934

.

60,000

MEDFIELD INSANE ASYLUM
LOAN, Due

April

1,

1934

.

.

.

108,000

.

507,000

PRISONS AND HOSPITALS
LOAN, Due May

1,

1934

,

,

METROPOLITAN SEWER LOAN,
Due July

1,

1944

.

.

392,000

.

Office of the Comptroller,

Chicaso, July

1004, at

1'^,

1904.

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the
City Comptroller until 2 o'clock P. M., MONDAY.
AUGUST 1, 1U04, for t5,000,0u0 of Municipal "Im
provement Bonds" for the purpose of providiUK
funds for the general corporate purposes of the
City of ChlcaKO, Ills. Bonds will be In denomination of |1,000 each, and be dated July 1, 1904, and
shall bear interest at the rate of 4% per annum,
payable semi-annually. Both principal and interest
are payable In gold of the present standard of
weieht and fineness at the fiscal agency of the City
of Chicago in N. Y., and at the office of the City
Treasurer in the City of Chicago. Bonds will be
issued in eighteen series, the first series ($'^83,O0O)
maturing Jan 1, 1907, series In equal amounts maturing annually until Jan 1, lii'dS, and the last
series, amounting to $2tO,O0O, on Jan. 1, 1924.
Bids will be received for the
LE OH.
of said Issue, and each bid shall be accompanied by a certified check on a Chicago Bank, payable to the City of Chicago or order, for the sum of

WHO

PART

ANY

$100,000.

$1,312,000

No

bid will be considered except for
OfferluK.

the total

Each proposal must be accompanied by a

drawn to the order ot the
Treasurer or the Commonwealth of maasachnaetta for twenty-six Ihonaand two
hundred and forty dollara (*-i6,'i40), and
most be enclosed in a ncaled envelope addressed to mr, and endorsed "Proposal for
the Parchase of Bonds."
oertifled check

Therlkht

Is

reserved to reject any and

EDWARD

Each bid shall state whether the price offered
(not less than par) includes accrued Interest from
July 1 to date of sale. Other things being equal
that bidder shall be deemed the highest and best
bidder who shall offer to pay the highest price,
Bonds will be delivered to the successful bidder SO
days after acceptance of the bid by the City Comptroller. These bonds may be regis tered. If desired,
in the office of the City Comptroller,
All information pertaining to these bonds, including copies of the ordinance authorizing the Issue,
may be had on application to the City Ccmptroller.

all bids.
L,.

BRADFORD,

E.

McGANN,

follows:
$10,000 September 1. 1918. and $10,000 annually
thereafter on eacQ first dav ot September, until aU
of said bonds are paid. Interest payable semiannually on March lirt and September Isi In each
year. Both interest and prlnclptl to be payable at
such place in New York City as shsil be agreed upon
with the purchaser
A certified check for two per cent of the amount of
the bouds bid for, payable to the Treasurer of said
Vll age, must accompHny earh bid. Bids will be received for the whole or any portion of said bonds,
the bonds to be sold to the person O' persons who
will take them at the lowest ra e jf interest. Proposals should be sealed and marked "Proposal for
Bonds," and may be mailed or delivered to George
A. Voorhef 8. Village Treasurer. CaDandaluna, N. Y.
Any bidder wbo»e proposal is accepted must notify
the Treasurer of said Villatie in writing by or before
August 6th. 190J that he is satisfied as to the lecality
of the bonds so bid for, and in default of such notification such bid may be rejected.
At the time of the delivery of the bonds, the purchaser will be required to pay the accrued interest
in addition to the amount of the bid.
Bonds to be printed by the purchaser at his own
expense.
Blank forms for proposals may bo obtained oa
application to the Village Treasuior.
The right Is reserved to reject any and all bids.
Canandaigua, N. IT.. July 1, 1904.
By .order ot the Board of Trustees of the Village
of Canandaigua.
C. J.

WILL

B.

MARTIN,

ANDKUSS.
President.

Clerk.

City Comptroller.

9.
Treasurer and Receiver General.

E.

T. B. POTTER,
MacDonald, McCoy & Oo.,
MUNICIPAL BONDS.
MUNICIPAL and BONDS,
C. STANWOOD Sb Co. HUMICIPAL AND CORPORATIOH CORPORATION
95

BANKEKH.
Milk Street,

BOSTON.

BONDS.
Z7I

La

Salle Street, Chicago.

172 Washington Street,

CHICAOO,
L1»T ON APPLICATIOM.

ILLS.

THE CHRONICLE.

230

& Orient Railway. The city of Wichita— the
county seat of Sedgwick County— also votedlto issue $30,000
bonds for the same purpose on the same date.
Shepard Special School District, Franklin Coanty, Ohio.

Date, Jane 1, 1904. Interest, January and Jaly.
Matnrlty, 20 years, tn\ ject to call after 15 years.
Kldgefleld Park, N. J.— Bona aaie.-Oa Jnly 11 the |25,000 6% road- improvement bonds described in V. 79, p. 172,
•were awarded to Dick & Robinson, New York, at about 1C3^.
Rochester, N. ¥. Bond Offering, Proposals will be received until 11 A. M., July 20, for the following ^^% registered bonds

City Mexico

$1,009.

—Bond

—

one brnd each elx months, as follows

DenominaMaturity,

March 16,
15, 1906, Inclusive; $500 from March 15, 1907,
1911, Inclusive; $600 from March 15. 1912, to
:

$400 from

1905, to Sept.
to Sept. 16,
March 15, 1916, Inclusive.

Certified check for 1% of the par
value of bonds bid for, drawn on a national bank or trust
company, payable to E A, Ogden, Clerk, required.
Slippery Bock, Bntler County, Pa.— .Bonct Election.— An
election will be held Aug, 9 to vote on the question of issuing bonds for a water supply system.

,

All of said bonds are dated Jaly 1, 1904, and are In denomination of |5,000 each. Interest at the rate of SJ^i^, payable semi-annually. A certified check en a national bank

South Sharon, Pa.— Bond Qfl'crinfl'.— Proposals, it is stated,
win be received until 6 p, M., July 22, by M, A, Tozler, Bur-

for 2% of amount of bid, payaole to the city of Rochester, required. Bonds will be certified to as to genuineness by the
United States Mortgage
Trust Co. of New York City.
St. Paal, M.inn.~£onds Proposed.— The issuance of $100,000 bi^h-gchool bonds Is being considered.
San Antonio, Texas.— fionda Defeated.— A proposition to
iesue |35,lO0 5% bonds for the purchase of land for cemetery
purposes was defeated at an election held June 14.

gess, for

&

the $100,000

mentioned in V.

Saudaskf, Ohio.— fionds Authorized.— The City Council
on June 20 authorized the Issuance of |22,000 i% 10-year
street Improvement bonds.
Denomination, $1,000,
Date,
Aug. 1, 1904, Interest, semi-annual. These bonds are for
the purpose of paying the cltv's proportion of the cost of

Improving First Street, Camp Street and Washington Row.
Santa Monica, CaU— Bond Election Proposed.— An ordinance is before the City Trustees providing lor an election to
vote on the question of issuing $315,000 bonds for various
improvements, including $150,000 for municipal water works.
Schenectady, N. Y.— Bonds to be Taken by the Sinking
Fund.— This city will have for sale on July 23 an issue of
$110,000 83^2 water bonds. These bonds, we are advised by
the City Comptroller, will be taken by the city as an investment for the Water Debt Sinking Fund.
Sedgiritk Coanly, K&n.— Bonds footed,— This county on
June 31) voted to iseue $80,000 Ai bonds In aid of the Kansas

NEW

OjTertngr,— Proposals will be received until 12 m., July

28, t.y E, A. Ogden, Clerk, for $12,000 5% bonds.
tions, $400, $510 and $6C0.
Interest, semi-annual.

91,000,000 locAl-lmproTcroent bODds, luaturltiK f 200,000 J11I7 1, 1009: $300,000
JuIt 1, lUH.and (buo.C'Ou July 1. Ifo:^4. Bids tu be addressed to
Samuel H. Williams, City Comptroller.
170,C00 WHter shed bonds, maiurlnv July 1, 19S4. Bids to [be addressed to
l,j umri M. Otis, City Treasurer.
100,OCO Kjisi Side truiiR-sewer bonds, maturlnK $25,000 yearly on July 1 from
li»:iMo 1941, Inclusive; optional alter July 1, lull. Bids to be addressed to Lyman M. Otis, City Treasurer.

N^VAMLOANS.

[Vol. lxxix.

43^5t
79, p. 119.

30-year street and sewer bonds

Springfield, Mass.— Bond 8ale.—An iseue of $40,000 1-20year (serial) gold sewer bonds has been awarded to the FiveCent Savings Bank of Springfield at 100*125,
Standish (Jlicb.) School District.— Bonds Defeated.— This
district recently voted against a proposition to Issue $10,000
bonds for the erection of a new school building and to retire
outstanding bonds.
Stanley, Wis.- Bond Sate.— On July 2, the $25,0C0 5% 1-10year (serial) school-building bonds mentioned in V. 79, p.
119, were awarded to the Royal Trust Co. of Chicago at
102"688.
Date, July 2, 1904. Denomination, 5500. Interest,
annua).
Stlllmore, GtB.—Bond Election.— An election, it is stated,
will be held shortly to vote on the question of Issuing bonds
for water works and for school Improvements.
Sumter County, Ala. Bond Sale.— Oa June 28 this county
sold to Otto Marx
Co. of Birmingham an Issue of $50,000
5% road bonds at 101 "60. These are the same bonds awarded
last April to Spitzer
Co. of Toledo, which firm, we are advised, afterwards refused the Issue for the reason that the
transcript furnished was not satisfactory. The bonds have
since been approved by Judge Dillon. Dtinomination, $1,000.

&

&

NEW

LOANS.

LOANS.

J^90,000
CITY OF NEW IBERIA, LA.

CITY OF

DRAINAGE BONDS.

BONDS FOR SALE.

Sealed bids will be received by the President of
the Board of Commissioners of "The Hew Iberia
Southern Drainage District," at the City Hall, New
Iberia, La, until MUNDAV, AUGUST 1ST, 1904, at
12 o'clock, noon, for the purchase of ninety ($90,00o)
dollars of bonds to be issued by " The New Iberia
Southern Drainage District" under the provisions
of the city charter of the City of New Iberia, La., as
amended by Act No. I4i of the Aces of the General
Assembly of the State of Louisiana of i902, and
Art. 2«1 of the Constitution of the State of Louisiana
of l»»«and Act No. 3i9or the Acts of the General
Assembly of the State of Louisiana of 1903. The
bonds to be Issued will be of the denomination of
one hundred ($100) dollars, and will be sold for not
less than par and accrued interest, and will bear
interest at the rute of five (536) per centum per
annum, payable annually on the ist of July of each
year and draw interest from the lat of July, lyoi.
Said bonds shall be redeemable aflerten (10) years
from the date of their issuance, four thousand dollars ($4,ii00l annually, to be lelected by lot or chance;
and, after tllteen (161 years, ttie Board of Drainage
Commissioners shall have the right to pay and
retire annually a greater amount tban four thousand
dollars of said bonds, but to be compelled to pay
and retire at least that amoant. And, commencing
with the year beginning ih« 1st of July. iao4, said
Board of Dralnoge Commissioners shall set aside
eacb year sufficient funds for that purpose.
Proposals must be accompanied by a certified
check payable to the order of the Pre.'tident of the
Board of Commissioners of " The New Iberia Southern Drainage District" for two (2*) per cent of the
par value of the bonds bid for.
Bids to be marked " Proposals for bonds," and
addressed to Leon M. Lemaire, President of the
Board of Commissioners of The New Iberia Southern Drainage iJIsirict " City Hall, New Iberla, I,
The Board of Commiasiouers reserve the right to
reject any and all olds If it deems it to the best
interest of said Board so to do.
•

Dated June

SCHOOL BONDS.

Tenders addressed to the undersigned and marked
"Tenders for Debentures" will be received by the
Corporation of the City of Ottawa at the office of
tbeCity Clerk until THURSDAY, THE llTH DAY
OF AUGUST, at noon, for tne purchase of debentures to the amount of $829,972 84.

ISSUED TO THE BOARD OF EDUCATION,

4%

Per

Annum Payable

10-year Debentures to the
"
"
20 year
"
"
30-year
"
"
40-year

Half Yearly.

amount of $76,533 38
"

319,109 73
175,000 00
61,000 00

"
"

$631,643 11

3^2% Per Annum Payable Half Yearly.
1 0-j ear Debentures to the amount of $69,801 67
"
"
"
20-7ear
128,528 06
$198,329 73
be received for either the whole or
part of the above. Delivery will be made from th«
Bank of Ottawa, and In all cases accrued interest
will be added to the rate tendered.
For particulars of the above, application to be
made at the office of the City Treasurer.
The highest or any tender not necessarily ac-

Tenders

will

LEON

M.

LEMAIRB,

&

NEW YORK

CITY

The necessary papers to establish the legality of
this issue will be furnished Immediately to the
successful bidder, who will be expected to take up
the bonds on August 1, 1904, which must be paid for
by certitied check to the order of the Treasurer of
the Board of Education, Yonkers, N, T.
Proposals must be accompanied by a certified
check for live per cent or the amount bid for, to the
order of the Treasurer, as above, and endorsed
"Proposals for School Bonds" and addressed to
J. H. Claxton, Secretary of the Board of Education,
Yonkers, N. Y.
The right is reserved to reject any or all bids,
which will be opened In the Board Room, Hlgb
School Building, FRIDAY, J ULiY 22, ie04, at 8
o'clock P.

CHARLKS H, FANCHKR.
KUDOLF KICKEMEYBR JR.,
PETER U. FOWLER,

Committee on Finance.

R.

L.

DAY &

40 Water Street,
BOSTON.

T.W.STEPHENS & CO.,
New

York.

J
^

^1

CO.,

3 Nassau Street,
NEW YORK.

MSMBERS
AlfD BOSTON"

STOCK EXCHANGES.
8TATE, niUNlClPAL. AND HIGH GRADE
RAILROAD SECURITIES.

STATE. CITY A RAILROAD BONDJv
Established 188S.

H. C. Speer

F.

& Company

159 La Salle

CITY COUNTY
AND .TOWNSHIP

St.,

Chicago.

BONDS.
^

-^^^^

R.FULTON & CO., INVESTMENT

Municipal Bonds,
SEND
171 LA SALLE STREET,
OENISON,

CHICAGO.

'

M.

NEW YORK

2 Wall Street,

1950.
1960.

1,
1,

BANKERS,

Z^% GOLD

TAX-EXEMPT BONDS.

Boston.
NAHBAD HTRKET, NSW TUKK,

$1,100 April
6,900 April

W. R. STROUD,
Chairman Finance Committee.

Co.,

16 Conorress Street,

mature as follows

(Signed)

New

BANKERS

will

Ottawa, 12th July, 1901.

Iberia Southern iirainage District," City
Hull, New Iberia, Loalslana,

Blodgct, Merritt

Sealed proposals are invited for $8,000 Four Per
Cent Registered Bonds, Interest payable April and
October 1.
These bonds are Issued in conformity with the
provisions of Chapter 543 of the Laws of 1899, and
of resolutions passed by the Common Council June
27, 1901. The bonds will be dated July 1, i904, and

cepted.

30, 19U4.

President Board of Commissioners "The

3tf

OTTAWA CITY OF YONKERS

CLEVELAND.

FOR

BONDS.
LIST.

PRIOR & CO.
BOSTON.

,

July

THE CHRONICLE.

16, 1904.]

Date, Jan.

7, 1904.

lottrest, semi-annual.

1934.

Maturity, Jan.

7,

—

Tamaqna, Pa.— Bond Sale. We are advised by the
Borough Secretary that $30,000 8U% 5-30-year (aptional)
sewer bonds have been awarded to the First National Bank
of Tamaqua, at par, this being $20,000 in addition to the
$10,000 bonds the sale of which was mentioned in the
Chronicle last week. Denominations, |500 and $1,000. Date,
Jane 1, 1904. Interest, semi-annual.
Tampa, Fla.— Bond Election.— At a joint meeting of the
City Council and the Board of Public Works, held recently,
it was agreed to call an election to vote on the issuance of
$500,000 bonds for sewers, paving, city hall, city hospital and

231

Trenton, N. i.—Bonaa Authorize !.— The issuance of $50,000 4^ school and $23,500 registered State Street improvement bonds has been authoriz'^.d by the City Council. The
Mayor has signed both ordinances. The State Street improvement bonds are to be issued in denominations of $100
or multiples thereof, and will carry interest at a rate not exceeding i.%, payable semi annually. Maturifcv, 10 years.
Co. of New York City have
Bcmd Sale.—R M, Grant
been awarded at 108'859 an issue of $50,00l) i% 80 year water

&

bonds of this

city.

Y.—Bond Sale.-Oa Jnly

year

(serial)
p. 174, were

12 the $40,000 3}ii 1-20public improvement bonds described iu V. 79,
awarded to the Savings Bank of Utioa at par

other improvements.

and accrued

interest.

Tillamook, Ore.— Bond OjTertngr.— Proposals will be received until 12m., Aug. 15, by Thos. Coates, City Recorder, for
the |58,O0O 30-year gold water-works bonds voted at the election held March 1, 1904. Interest, not to exceed Q%, will be
payable semi-annually in New York City. Denomination,
Certified check for 2% of the par value of bonds bid for
$500.

Utica Special School District, Licking County, Ohio.—
Bond Sale.— On June 27 the $7,000 Q% 1-7 year (seria') bonds
described in V. 78, p. 2618, were awirded to Lampreoht
Bros. & Co. of Cleveland at 105.
Tienna Township, Pottawatomie County, Ean.-B>nd«
Voted. This township recently voted in favor of issaing
bonds to the Topeka Frankfort & Northwestern Railroad.

required.

ToMna School District No. 7, Dawbod County, Mont.—
Bonds Not Sold. We are advised that no bids were received
for the $1,000 Q% school-honse bonds offered on Jane 15.
Toledo, Ohio.— Bonds fVopo«ed.— The issuance of $100,000

—

i% refunding natural-gas bonds

is

being considered.

Topeba, Kt^n.— Bond Sale.— The City Council on Jnly 5
awarded $43,985 45 5« paving bonds to H, C. Speer
Co,
Chicago, at 101' 10. Following are the bids

&

:

Premium.
H.

&

C. Speei-

Bank

Co..

Chicago

Fremium.

I

Trowbridge & Nlver

1483 62

Co., Chio...»Zli 06

21182 8. A. Kean.Chloairo
100 80
Topeka
Other bids were received, but were not considered because
not accompanied by check. Denomination, $1,000, except
one bond for $965 45. Date, Aug. 1, 1904. Interest semiannually in New York City. Maturity, yearly on August 1
as follows : $4,965 45 in 1905, $4,000 in the years 1906, 1908,
1910, 1912, 1913 and 1914, and $5,000 in the years 1907, 1909
of Topeka,

|

and 1911.
Traverse City, Mich.—Bonds Fofed.— This city on July 5,
by a vote of 132 to 15, authorized the issuance of $20,000 i%
water- works-extension bonds. Full details and date of issue
not yet determined.

Ctica, N.

—

The vote was 60 for to 27 against the
Vigo Township, Enox Coanty,

issue.

lud— Bond

Offering,—
Proposals will be received until 9am., July 18, by S, T.
Cullison, Township Trustee (P, O. Sandoorn). for $33,500 5^
1-5-year (serial) coupon school bonds. Denomination, $500.
Date, Aug. 1, 1904. Interest semi-annually at thi^ Hinover
National Bank, New Yorfe City. Certified check for $300,
payable to S. T. Callisoa, Township Trustee, required. The
township has no debt at present. Assessed valuation, $2,136.060.

C—

Temporary Loan.—This county has
Wake County, N.
negotiated a 90-dav loan of $10,000 with the Commercial
Farmers' Bank of Raleigh.
Warren County (P. 0. Williamsport), Ind.— Bond Offering,
Proposals will be received until 1pm., August e, by
RjbertL, Winks, County Auditor, for $27,000 A% 1-3-year
Denomination, $1,000. D^te, Aug. 1,
(serial) bridge bonds.
The county has no debt at present. Assessed valua1904.

&

—

tion, $10,913,370.

—

Washington, Pa.— Bid.s, The following bids were received on July 5 for the $20,000 park and $150,000 road i%

INVESTMENTS,

INSURANCE.

MUNICIPAL
AND
Public

Service

office: of

OorporatioD

BONDS.

E.H.ROLLINS & SONS,
Chieago.

ATLANTIC MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY,
New York, January 20th, 1904.
The Trustees, in Oonformity with the Charter of the Oompany, submit the following statement of
its affairs on the 31st of December, iqoj ;
PremiumB on Marine Rlslis from let January, 1903, to 3l8t December, 1903.
Fremiums on PoUoies not marked offlst January, 1903

BOSTON.
DeBTer.

the

San Franeisco.

$3,174,147 73
800,368 56

Total Marine Premiums

$3,974.516 29

Premiums marked

FAESON. LEAOH & 00„

from Ist January, 1903, to 3l8t December, 1903
$3,250,364 45
"
Interest received during the year
$336,185 20
"
"
"
Rent
less Taxes
111,923 77
$448,108 97
ofi

Losses paid during the year which were estimated
In 1902 and previous years
$322,490 79
Losses ocoorred, estimated and paid In 1903
1,065,141 83

$1,387,632 62

Less Salvages
Re-insnrances

Public Securities,

$146,587 55
64,028 75

,.

Returns of Premiums and Expenses, $467,841 97

CHIVA6U.

MEW YORK.

BOSTOH

of All

Company

S«ri»

Years Bensht and Sold.

Premium Notes and

Bill

Receivable

NEW YOBW

ENGINEERS.

H. M. Byllesby

& Co.,

INCORPORATED.

ENGINEERS.
CONSTRUCT AND OPERATE
RAILWAY LIGHT, POWER AND
HYDRAULIC PLANTS.

DESIGN,

Examinations and Reports.

New York

Life Buildinor,

CHICACO,

ILL.

policies

payable In
182,001 68
89,461 72

foreign countries
ash In Bank

Amount
No. 518 Atlantic Buildlmgr.

49-61 Wall Street,

1,107,221 88

Cash In the bands of European Bankers to pay losses under

JOHN M. GILLESPIE,
Koom

$1,177,016 32

The Company has the following Assets, viz.:
United States and State of New York Stock; City, Bank and other Securities
$5,170,084 00
Special deposits In Banks and Trust Companies
1,612,252 53
Real Estate corner Wall and William Streets and Exchange Place... $3,789,000
Other Real Estate and Claims due the Company
75,000 3,864,000 00
.

FHIIiADELPHIA.
Atlantic niatnal Insarano*

210,616 30

o

$12,025,021 81

Interest on the ontstandlng certificates of profits will be paid to the holders
or their legal ropresentatlves, on and after Tuesday ,"the second of February next.
certificates of the issue of 1 898 will be redeemed and paid to ihe holders
thereof, or their lega. representatives, on and after Tuesday, the second of February next, from
which date all interest thereon will cease. The certificates to be produced at the time of
payment, and canceled.
A dividend of Forty per cent Is declared on the net earned premiums of the Company
for the year ending 31st December, 1903, for which, upon application, certificates will be Issued
on and after Tuesday, the thlid of May next.
Hv or.ier of the Hoard,

SlT per cent

ixereof,

The outstanding

aSTAV AMSINCK,
K-RANOIS M. IJACUN,
JOHN N. BKACU.
WILLIAM B. BOULTON
7KRNON H. BROWN,
WALDRON V. BROWN.
J09KPH H. CHAl'.MAN,
aBORGK 0. CLARK,
JORNELIUe KLDWRT,
^WALU FLBITMANN.

G. STAINTON FLOYD- JONES, Secretary.
TRUSTEES.
HERRKRT L. GRIGGS.
LEVI P. MORTON.
CLEMENT A. GIU8C0M,
HENRY PARISH,

ANSON W. UARn.
FREDEIUO A. PARSONS
MORRIS K. .JKSUP.
DALLAS B. PRATT,
LEWI8 CASS LKOYARD,
GEORGE W. QUINTARD,
FRANCIS 11. LRCKiKTT,
A. A. RAVEN.
CHARLES I). LKVERICH,
JOHN L. RIKER,
LEANDKR N. LOVELL,
DOUGLAS ROBINSOR.
GBOUGE U. MACY,
GlISTAV H. SCHWAB,
CUARLKS H. MARSHALL.
WILLIAM C. STUBGJBS.
W.U.U. MOORE,
A. A. RAVEN, President.
F. A PARSONS, Viee-Rres't.
CORNELIUS ELDERT, art Yiee-Pre^t,
THEO. P. JOHNSON, jd Vice-Pres't.

THE CHRONICLE.

232
bonds awarded, as stated last week, to
Co., Cleveland, for $17.'),074 45

Hayden, Miller

&

:

$173,129 70
nick A Rob'.DBOn. Phllii
171.K000O
N. Uolmes A Son. PlttubV.. 174,oi>7 0u \V. tt. Todd ACo.. Clncln.
B. Kleybolte ACo.. Clunln.. l7.S,H10 00l W.J. Ilaren A Hnns. OISTe I'lO.OiS 00
W. W.narrlsACo., N. Y.... 173,660 00 Municipal Seoul itlci A Corp.

navden. Miller A CcCleve Jl'5.n74 46

1

nTO.OCOOO

Co.. I'ittsburKh
•

Flat.

Vfatettoifn,

a water

Mass.— Bond Sale.- Oa July

bonds described in V.

79, p. 174,

Oldham & Co., Boston, at 108'199.
WanseonCOhio) School District— Bond

Merril

15

the $150,000

were awarded to

,

.9aZe.— On July 9

the $3 000 5^ bonds described in V. 78, p. 2618, were awarded
to the First National Bahk of Wauseon at 102 90. Following
are the bids
:

Lamprecht Bros. ACo., CIeve.t3.044

First Nat. nank. Wauseon.... $8,087 00
Beasongood J( Mayer. CInoin.. S,('6i50
Hayden. MlUer ACo.. Cleve... 3.0«i0 60
Well. Rotb A Co.. Cincinnati. 8,016 00

10
3,030 Oj
.S.OOOOO
3,000 00

Kean, Chicago
BriBBB*Co..Clncln
People's Bank. Wauseon
8. A.
P. 8.

.

Wajnesbnrg, Ohio.— Bond Sate.— Oa July 12 the |10,0C0 5^
coupon water-works bonds described in V. 78, p. 2405, were
awarded to D:?nison Prior & Co. of Cleveland and Boston at
107-177 and Interest. Following are the bids
:

W.R.Todd A Co..Clnclnnatl.»|10.6ll 00
Denlson. Prior A Co.. Clere*$10.717 75 Feder, Holiman ACo., CIn.. 10 500(0
land and Boston
W.J. Hares* 8ons,CleTe... 10.639 OC Lamprecht Bros.ACo., Cleve. *1J,2S7 00
New Ist Nat. B'k, Columbus.. 10,606 00 Hayden, Miller A Co.. Cleve. 10.100 00
I

I

|

|

•

And

coupon town-hall bonds, described in V. 78,
were awarded to the Ridgeway Banking Co., at

2-6-year (serial)
2405,

100 20.

White Coanty (P. 0. Monticello, Ind.) -Bond Sale.-Oa
July 9 an issue of $5,218 80 &% ditch bonds was awarded to
the State Bank of Monticello at par.
Wichita, Kan.— Bunds Fofed.— This city on June 30 authorized the iesuance of $80,000 4% 10 SOyear (optional)
bonds in aid of the Kansas City Mexico & Orient Railway.
Sedgwick County, of which Wichita is the county seat,
voted to issue $80,000 bonds on the same day for the eame
pnrpo?e.
Wiafleld, Kan.— Bond* Voted.— On Jane 28 this city anthorizid the issuance of $184,000 water-works, electric- light
and natural-gas bonds.

BOND DEPARTMENT.

THE AMERICAN TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK,
Chicago,

Illinois.

Municipal and Cor-

Railroad,

poration Bonds, conservatively issued,
yielding investors 4^ to 5%%,

Printed

Cook Coanty. lll.-Bond

District,

— Propoaals will be received until 8pm, July 21,

Offer-

by M.
Busscher, Secretary, for $9,000 coupon Linden Park purchase
and improvement bonds at not exceeding 5« interest. Dinomlnation, $500. Interest, January 1 and Jaly 1. Maturity, $l,OtO yearly on January 1 from 1910 to 1918, inclusive.
Certified check for 5^ of bid, payable to the Winnetka Park
District, required,

Wyandatie(Mlcb.) School District.— Bond* Voted— Bondt
Offered.— This district on July 2, by a vote of 140 to 81, authorized the Issuance of $13,600 5% Lincoln school-improvement bonds, maturing Aug. 1, 1914. Bids for these bonds
were asked for until 8 P. M, yesterday (July 15), but with
what result was not known at the time the Chbonicle went
to press,

Yale (Mich.) School District— Bond* Voted.— This dison July 5 voted in favor of the issuance of $17,000 high-

trict

The vote was 154 for to 28 against.
Takima Coanty (Wash) School District No. 25 -Bond
Sale—Oa July 2 $2,000 i%i 1-15-year (optional) refunding

school-addition bonds.

bonds of this district w«re sold to the State of Washington
Denomination, $1,000. Date, July 2, 1904. Interest,

at par.

lists

and prices npon

application.

Takima Conntj (Wash.) School District No. H.—Bond
Sale.-Oa July 2 $1,C00 5^ 1 20 year (optional) school bonds
of this district were sold to the State of Washington at par,
Denomiaation, $500.

Yonkers, (N. T.) School District.- Bond O/enngr.- Proby J. H. Claxton, Secretary Board of Education, for |8,CO0 i% registered
bonds. Authority, Ctiapter 543, Laws of 1899. Date, July 1,
1904.
Interest, April 1 and October 1. Maturity, $1,100
April 1, 1969, and $6,9D0 April 1, 1960. Certified check for
5^ of the amount bid for, payable to the Treasurer Board of
Education, required.
The official notice of this bond call will be found among
the advertisements elsewhere in this Department.
posals will be received until 8 p, m. Jaly 22,

J.

43-4:9

and Reports on Electric
Railway, Gas, Electric Light, and
Power Transmission Properties
for Financial Institutions

Investigations

and

Investors,

ElMtrie Bailways, Eltotrie Light aad Eleetrls
Power Plants Financed, Designed and Bmilt

LONDON CORRESPONDENTS:
J.

G.

26

Exchange Fla«e, New York.

WHITE

dc

Limited,
Cannon St.

CO.,

Capital, $2,600,000 Surpla8,$2,500,000

OFFICERS:

EDWIN OOUL.D
Prealdont
WILLIAM H.TArL.OB....l*t Vlce-Pres.
2d Vice-Pre*.
CHAS. P. ARMSTRONG
JOHN A. HILTON, 3d Vlce-Pres. &, Troaa.
WILLIAM M. LAWS
Secretary
DIRECTORS:
Myron T. Herrlok,
Edward T. Jeflery,
Edward R. Ladew,

Charles P. Armstrong.
Frank Brainard,
Robert C. Clowry,
Edmund C. Converse,
Wm.Nelson Cromwell.

William M. Laws,
J. W.Mlddendorf,
William WUlis Merrill

Wlnslow

Edwin Goold,
Frank Jay Gould,

The American Mfg. Co.

CO.,

BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

QrenvUle M. Dodge.
A. Go6,el,

Rudolph Kleybolte&Co.
DEALBRS IN

TRUST

Engineers, Contractors,

itSa College Hill.

BANKERS,

Interest, annual,

MISCELLANECUS.
TRUST COMPANIES.
G. WHITE & CO., BOWLING GREEN

MISCELLANEOUS.

Offers

Wlnnelka Park
ing,

annual.

interest.

West Kidfceway (P. 0. Ridgeway), flardin and Logan
Connliep, Ohio.— Bond Sale,-Oa June 28 the $2,500 H
p.

Winfleld (Kan.) School District.- Bond fi-a/e.— We are
advised that this district has sold $15,000 bonds.

I

.

iVOL. LXXIX.

Qeorge

J.

8. Pleroe,

Frederick B. Sohenok,

WlUiam H. Taylor.
Edward R. Thomas,

Qoold.

John A. Hilton,

John P. Tmesdell,
B. F. C. Young.

MUNICIPAL, RAILROAD and

MANILA SISAL AND JUTE

STREET RAILWAY

CORDAGE.

1

BONDS.
NASSAU STREET, NEW

Interest Paid on Dailv

YORK.

65

Wall

Street,

New

York.

No. 6«

34TH

and Time Deposits.
No.

HTHITING'S PAPERS.

TRUST DEPARTMENT:

Ilandsomelr eiiKraved, or In cheaper style
(not cheap looking) partly printed from
Send for samples and estimates.
type.
100 Certificates »3 to $25. Seal Press »1 50. Quick TTork.

Albert B. Kins: & Co.,
Engravers
106 William Street

and

Whether for letter written with your own hand, or
bTlthe typewriter, are UNBQUALEI). Their quality
Is assured and they have won highest honors at all
the ureat World's Fairs. For hlRh Krade writing
papers of all kinds, for bond papers, and for ledger
papers, Insist on havlnt;

HOL.\OHE, HiASS.

liithugraphers,

New Tork City

them made by the

WHITING PAPER COMPANY,
New

York.

Philadelphia.

Chicao'O.

B.

RANDALL, Trust Officer.

HARLEM BRANCH:

For BnBlne»a Correapondeuoe.

EUTII ICATES

FIFTH AVE.
I'JSTH STREET.

MoLEAN WALTON, Assu Secretary.
HARRIS A. DDNN, Asst. Treaanrer

WILLIAM

BOSTON.

(

WEST

T. BARNEY. President.
FRBD'K L. BI.DRIDQB,lst Vioe-Preaident.
JOSEPH T. BROWN. ad Vic&-Pre»ldent.
JULIAN M. GERARD. 3d Vice-President.
B. L. ALLEN, 4th Vice-President.
FRBD'K QORB KINO, Sec. and Treas.
J.

fDr^ivrnrici and stock
i^

BROADWAY,

ST. Si

THIRD AVENUE & 148TH STREET.

60 State Street,

U

100

"^

CO.

CHARLES

& Burr,
INVESTMENT BONDS
Perry, Coffin

JL> VJ r\

TRUST

"^

W.

K.

LEWIS, Manager.

BRONX BRANCH:
JOHN BAM BEY

Manager.

A. G. Becker
{

&

Co.,

INOOKPOaATED.)

COMMERCIAL PAPER,
S.

W. Cor, Uonroe & La

Salle Sts., Chicago.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102