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§»nte’ tedfc, (tatwmat limas, §aiJwag P^nitov, and Insurance journal
,

,

‘

-

‘

A

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'

.

,

WEEKLY

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,' •

NEWSPAPER,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

VOL. L

SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1865.
*

CONTENT8.

Detroit Convention

65

6b

specie

.

The Market Yaluo of Capital
Literature

68 Foreign Intelligence
70 Commercial and Miscellaneous
News
70

67
39
39
41

THE BANKERS GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL TIMES.

Imports and Exports

Money Market, Railway Stocks, U.
S. Securities, Gold Market, For¬
eign Exchange,

New York City

Banks, Philadelphia Banks, Na¬
tional Banks, etc
American Railroad Bond List.
Commercial Epitome.

8ft

Cotton Trade
Breadstuff*.
Cattle Market

76
78

81

Dry Goods Trade

.

82
88
84

NO. 3.

•

government because

THE CHRONICLE.

Bpecie Payments.................
TKe United States and Mexico...
Baez Canal—Europe and the East.
▲ Consul-General for Panama....

!

no

attempt has yet been made to

resume

payments in this country. Do the taxes not come

forward fast

plough? Then let the collectors bestir them¬

selves, and phe on the load. We have it from one of these
officials himself, that a large tax-payer, who, a short time
ago, through a mistake of his book-keeper, had paid $10,000
more taxes than he was called
upon to pay, actually insisted
upon its being retained by the collector, rather than that the
trouble should be incurred of

sending the return to Wash¬
ington for correction. With such a spirit as this, the people
THE RAILWAY MONITOR AND INSURANCE JOURNAL
of this countrjf cannot be accused of a want of willingness to
92
89 I Mining Stocks.
Eprtome of Railway News
98
Monthly Earnings
90 Insurance Stock List
furnish the government all the means it can. But while the
94
Railway Skate List
91 | Postages to Foreign Countries....
INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.
people are thus considerate for the government, the latter
Ocean Steamships
64 should in turn bestow some
95 {.Bank Announcements, etc
thoughts on the people. It
should think of the vast inconvenience and loss which daily
results from the continuance of a high premium on gold, and
endeavor to p\it an end to it at once. We have every con¬
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is issued every Satur¬
fidence both ic .the President and the Secretary of the Trea¬
day morning with the latest news by mail and telegraph up to
midnight of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every morning sury, and belie Ve that if the currency is not reduced, some
79

Prices Current and Tone of the
Market

85

$I)C (ftljrottui*.

with all the Commercial and Financial

up to

news

the hour of publication.

of the previous day excellent

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
For Thi Commercial and Financial Chronicle, with The Daily
Bulletin, delivered by carriers to city subscribers, and mailed to all
<

others
$1 00
For The Commercial and Financial Chronicle, without The Daily
Bulletin ...;
0 00
For The Daily Bulletin, without The Commercial and Financial
Chroniole...
4 00

WILLIAM B. DANA &
.

~

~^

The circulation of the country in 1860 was, taking
bank notes together, about $250,000,000,

coin and
increasing and de¬
creasing in obedience to the constantly varying demands of
trade. It is now not less than $1,000,000,000, and it neither
increases nor diminishes, but remains
always the same
whether trade is brisk or slack. If there exists
any good
reason
why this unnatural state of the currency should be
maintained, we are at a loss to perceive it. Surely the gov¬
ernment bonds require no “
floating.” Subscriptions amount¬
ing to four millions per day in seven-thirties must be grati¬
fying enough to the officers of the government. Bonds of

this kind cannot

surely go a-begging in fair currency, when
the tall of interest in Wall street is but from three to four
Over one hundred millions in five-twenties are
acknowledged by the London papers to be held by capitalists
1? England, while Frankfort sends interest-coupons for over
ninety millions p£ bonds. Our credit stands well with all
the world, and
only stands less than the credit of any other
per cent.




why it should not be. But may, they not be mistaken?
May it not, after • all, be the very best policy for all con¬
cerned to

retu|n immediately to specie payments ? Let us
Object dispassionately.
’
First, is ft possible to return to specie payments? To do

examine this

(■**:

•

this would necessitate the

OO, Publishers,

(Chronicle Buildings,)
60 William Street, Nsw York.

SPECIE PAYMENTS.

exists to the minds of these functionaries

reason

...

funding of some $250,000,000 or
$300,000,000 of the currency—in other words, the with¬
drawal of two-thirds of the non-interest bearing greenbacks
in circulation.^ At the rate at which money is now being
loaned to th^i
government, this would take two or three
months time, provided the money could be devoted by the
government tS that purpose, and not expended in other ways.
Mr. McCulloch may have some arrearages to pay, he may be
temporarily snort of funds, but certainly the income which
the government has derived from the internal revenue, from
loans, and other sources, has not been so far behind the daily
demands of government that he cannot wait for two or
three months before he pays off the last contractor or the last
bureau budget. Then, when enough greenbacks for the
seven-thirty or other bonds are received and cancelled, to
bring the currency to par, he can resume the payments he is
making now, and pay up outstanding accounts as fast as he
pleases, for money will come in much faster than it ever has
yet. Such a proceeding will jeopardize the interests
of certain heavy operators who are in high favor at
Washington, say the enemies of the Administration.
Such insinuations we repel with honest indignation. It will
.

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[July 15, 1865!

THE CHRONICLE.

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i:

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it

compel the National banks to put up more securities, and
thus endanger the pet system of the treasury, say others.
This is absurd. .The national banks have now a circulation
of $146,9*27,975 loaned upon securities amounting to $340,938,000, which is equal to $2.32 for every dollar of bills is¬
sued.
Even should we come to specie payments this very
day, with Five-twenties in London at 71 in gold, which would
of course become their price here, the National banks would
still hold securities, the par value of which would be $242,025,880 in gold, which is equal to $1.64 for every note is¬
sued.
With assets amounting to sixty-four per cent over
and above their liabilities, aiid which can be immediately
converted into gold at pleasure, the National Banks are thus
seen to be quite able to meet any reduction of the currency,
however rapid, which the government can possibly inaugu¬
rate.
Does the Secretary of the Treasury entertain the
opinion that should he allow the currency to approximate to
par, he may fail to secure any further loans, because the quan¬
tity of circulation being reduced, what remained of it would
find constant and active employment, and would consequently
not flow into Mr. J. Cooke’s net ?
We can assure the Sec¬

these fears are not well founded. True the cur¬
rency would be actively employed in effecting the exchanges
of commerce, true it would not flow in response to Mr. Jay
Cooke’s polite invitation; but is it not apiece of finan¬
cial ' blindness, to regard as the only source of supply
for government loans the currency of this country % The
time has gone by when financial problems of every sort
were checked by the quantity and activity of the local cur¬
rency.
Finance ministers have now a much larger field for
their operations.
It is not the currency of their own country
but the currency of the entire world which they must study,
it is not a little country stream that they are fishing in tor
loans, but the vast ocean which belongs to all mankind. The
flow of emigration and capital which has gone on uninter¬
ruptedly for the last half century from almost every country
on the glebe towards those most inviting to laborer and capi¬
talist, a flow which is evidenced by the equalization of the
rates of interest for money, has brought all nations into com¬
munion.
To-day the rates for call loans in New York,
London, Paris, Vienna, and indeed all the great banking cen¬
tres of the world, only vary but one to two per cent.
This
is positive proof that money is free to flow almost uninter¬
ruptedly between all these places, and that the offer of a
higher rate for loans, if due allowance is made for whatever
of risk or labor may attend the transaction at any one of
these places, will be sure to attract capital for investment
The'Atlantic telegraph soon to be laid,
from all the others.
will, by^plaeing the hemispheres in instant communication,
convey intelligence to and fro of any change either in supply
demand, and equalization will go on until the rates of in¬
terest at all the great banking centres of the civilized world
will be the same.
With these proofs that he is dealing not
with the currency of this country but with the currency of the
entire world, does it not seem strange that the Secretary
should still have reason to delay specie payments ?
i The
people of Europe are not so stupid as not to perceive
the immense advantages offered to them by the seven-thirty
loan.
They know full well that the rate of interest it offers
is far above the market value of money.
The risk they run
is scarcely worth mentioning.
The loan must soon be all
filled, and as the treasury lias no authority to offer any more,
their chances of an extremely favorable investment will be
gone. They know all this.
They also know that in two or
three years at farthest this government will be able to bor¬
row all the money it wants at three per cent, and that it will
do so, and call in all its present obligations, and replace them
with bonds bearing a lower rate of interest just as fast as it can.
retary that

.

X




f

>

knowing all this, they are sending their surplus funds
herFasThst as they can, and will send it faster and faster all
e time.
We venture to say that if England had not pos¬
And

sessed the shrewdness to pass

the late Limited Liabilities

large portion of the entire savings of her people would
long ago to our shores. IJy passing this
act, however, they threw open a wide door to profitable in¬
vestments, and United States government bonds have now to
take their chance with the rest of the numerous profitable in¬
vestments which this act opened to British capitalists, in
competing for loanable funds. All that our government has
to do to get money is to offer enough for it, and it can have
all the riches of the earth at its feet.
We are at a loss, therefore, to perceive any good reason
for not returning to specie payments.
On bonds which are

Act,

a

have found its way

6 per cent, gold interest on
per cent, per annum.
fast will this rate sink
to six per cent., and. subscriptions to the loan concomitantly
cease.
To keep up the subscriptions, all the treasury has to
do is to offer a little higher rate, and this it has the power to
do under act of Congress.
It will only be for a short time on
a
comparatively small amount of bonds ; it will be no more
than We have been paying hitherto—indeed not so much, for
within the year we have paid as high as 18 per cent, in gold
(6 per cent, on par value of bonds rated at 33 in gold)—and
above all it will enable us to return to a condition that will
restore strength to our wounded commerce, bring fresh hopes
to our heavily burdened people, impart faith to our creditors,
and confer honor upon the promises of our republican gov¬
worth 71 in

gold,

we now pay

their par value.
This is equal to 8£
As fast as the bonds go to par, just so

ernment—we mean

specie payments.

THE UNITED STATES AND

MEXICO.

equivocal nature of the political relations between the
later, result in
open antagonism or a definite understanding. This govern¬
ment cannot ignore the essence of a nationality bordering up¬
on our own territory and acknowledged by the great powers
of the world.. Pending the struggle between the revolted
States and the Federal authority, the privilege of reticence
on the part
of the Administration upon the subject of Mexi¬
can affairs was conceded as due to international expediency;
but the struggle ended, it becomes a matter of national dig¬
nity as well as duty to define' frankly and explicitly the po¬
sition of this Government in regard to the imperial claim of
Maximilian. Interests of magnitude, not only political, but
industrial and commercial, are involved in the settlement of
this question; and in the disposition of an issue so important,
it behooves the American people to act with calmness and
discretion, holding the impulses of popular prejudices subject
to the promptings of reason, j and submitting with the best
possible grace to the uncompromising absolutism of facts,
and to every honorable argument of safety and self-interest.
It is not to be concealed that popular opinion, founded sim¬
ply upon sentiment and traditional doctrine, is averse to the
introduction of imperialism upon this continent; and if, to¬
day, the voice of the American people could pass judgment
without appeal to arms, the republicanism of Mexico, weak
as it was and fraught with the
elements of corruption and
revolution, would be restored. But that is not, exclusively,
the question.
It is for us to determine whether the immedi¬
ate restoration of Mexican republicanism would be worth the
peril and burdens of a foreign war, in which our exhausted
country would have to confront at least one of the most pow¬
erful of the potentates of Europe ; and if the self-reliance
and indomitable spirit of our countrymen is willing to invite
such an arbitration, it is further to be considered whether the
Mexican problem cannot be solved to our satisfaction withThe

United States and Mexico must, sooner or

July 15,

1\HE CHRONICLE.

1865.]

the enterprises that offer to foreign capitalists in the Mexican
armed intervention of this government.
It must be admitted that the Mexicans have not approved Empire, and which we have translated for the information of
our readers.
j
themselves well qualified for the mission of self-governmentPurchase
Land.—Land can be obtained in all the various degrees
From the hour when they cast off their allegiance to 'the of
climate, and consequently adapted to the cultivation of all kinds of
mother country, their land has been the arena of incessant produce.
U pon the coast, and, in general, in the warm regions south of Mexico
strife and periodical revolution. Our own republic made its
apd Morelia, cotton, coffee, rice, sugar-cane, tobacco, etc., can be culti¬
independence the instrument of its prosperity, and under the vated.
j
The elevated lands, such as Guanajuato, San Luis,Zacatecas, produce
influences of freedom it has advanced to the front rank of
all th£ cereals, besides the vine, the olive and flax, and all kinds of cat¬
nations; but there is some attribute, apparently inherent in tle
raised.
In Morelia and Oajaca, the silkworm could be raised with much suc¬
the Mexican race, that has paralyzed the hand of progress
cess, as the'Ohinese mulberry grows admirably, and the silkworms are
and thwarted the intention of self-government. It cannot be of
surpassing beauty.
The natives, accustomed to the care of the
denied that this evil quality, half lethargy, half turbulence, cochineal, could attend to all the necessary details.
Industry.—The industrial sphere offers a vast field for development
is a characteristic of thp people and not of climate, soil or in Mexico. Thert? Are as
yet only great factories of cotton and woollen
lack of opportunity; for California and Texas have been re¬ stuffs, and glass and common earthenware apd flour mills; everything
else can therefore be established, and a factory of linen stuffs would be
deemed by the infusion of life and energy from our own
very profitable, on accoufit of the great number of water falls that can
populations. The illustration is opportune, and suggests the be utilised as motive po\Ter> iu the vicinity of which flax grows with
*
:
method by which the whole pf Mexico can be republicanized vigor.
Mines.—By the laws of the Empire, aliens can hold possession of the
in substance as well as in name.
Their populations must be mines as well as Mexicans, whether by furnishing capital for their work¬
innoculated with Americanism, and tutored to political inde¬ ing to the proprietors, or by right discovery. In this category, nature
has been so prodigal to Mexico that occupation will not be lacking for
pendence and industrial progress by immediate contact with capital as well as for strangers who rpay immigrate.
out recourse

to the

of

-

are

.

our

people.

•

.

At the south *of Morelia, district of Coalcoman, there are abundant
mines of iron, copper, and of a natural bfonze that comes from the mine
with the convenient alloy of zinc.
At Oajaca there are mines of gold, silvef and iron, in the neighbor¬
hood of forests and of rivers of considerable size. Subsistence is so

from the area of our own
territory, where boundless resources wait to be developed, a
sufficient number to constitute a numerical superiority in
cheaply earned that it is a pretext for the indolence of the natives, who
Mexico; but we can spare enough to act efficiently as the have in reality no wants.
■As to the rich silver deposits of Guanajuato, Zapatecas, Catorca, Tasmissionaries of enlightenment and republicanism. The Mexi¬ co, and so
many others, it can be said that they are imperfectly known,
cans. require
leaders, instructors, examples of industry, aud that they possess immense riches destined to be brought to light
when they are well worked. ‘ Already a great number of mines are
enterprise and political action at their own threshold. They being profitably worked, and inot long ago, one of those of Guanajuato
must be educated to the work of their own redemption.
If produced one of the richest yields of the world.
In the neighborhood of Jalapa there are deposits of gold, iron aud
our fleets and armies could give them republicanism to-mor¬
coal, as well as a fabulous abundance of copper.
Near Tuxpam, Tlaxcala, south of Morelia and of Matamoras, coal is
row, they would abuse it; teach them to earn it by their
found, and, in general, all the mountains abound in mineral products
own energy and devotion, and when it is theirs, they will
that have been neglected on account of the civil wars and limited pop
better understand its mechanism and appreciate its blessings. ulation.
j'
'
At Zinapan, there are mines of opal; in the neighborhood of Atareja
Maximilian is certainly not jealous of the introduction of
and Iturbide, of quicksilver, marble, salt, sulphur, saltpetre, etc., etc.,
the American element in his Empire.
On the contrary, he
generally found at a great number of localities.
It is true that we cannot spare

are

has thus far evinced a most

laudable anxiety to encourage

immigration from this Republic, and his efforts to secure the
co-operation of American capital, enterprise and labor for the
development of the natural resources of Mexico, entitle him
to consideration as a sagacious and well meaning prince,
devoted to the regeneration of the neglected and disordered
territory over which -he has assumed a difficult, if not a
dangerous sceptre. Maximilian, doubtless, appreciates the
instability of his throne, and has concluded, wisely, that by
giving an impetus to the commerce and industryj of the
country he can at least secure a respite from revolution. We
too can afford to wait a little, while the Mexican people are
being indoctrinated with the true principle of republicanism ;
and we can abide the period of probation with the; better
grace from the circumstance that meanwhile a vast field for
profitable adventure will be open to ourselves. A very few
years will suffice ,to place-the industrial system of Mexico
under the direction of capitalists and business men from this
Republic; and then, in good time, the political question will
resolve itself without precipitating an international wTar.
Let us examine, therefore, the immediate inducements
presented to our capitalists, and to those adventurous spirits
that are looking about for new fields in which to exercise
their talents.
Maximilian has issued an imperial decree
authorising a “ Company of Mexican-American Immigra¬
tion,” and to that company he extends the most liberal con¬
ditions, and opens the most inviting prospects. The director
of this society, Mr. Canfield, is at
present in the United
States for the purpose of promoting the success of the enter¬
prise. It will not be uninteresting to exhibit the resources
that Mexico has in store for those who
purpose immigration
or investment.
They are embraced in an official document,
signed by the Mexican u Minister of the Interior n detailing




Public Works.—Thus far, a single line of railroad is in construction
from Vera Cruz to Mexico; another has been granted to the Pacific, to
follow closely the direction of the great valley, through which runs the

and the departments of Mexico,
and Jalisco, and to terminate at San Bias. But
others are to be constructed, and the govet nment is well disposed to
issue the grants to private companies; the lateral lines to connect with
this principal artery are as follows:
1. Fiom the river Acambara to Guanajuato and Queretaro.
2. From
Guanajuato to Guadalajara via Leon and Lagos. 3. From Queretero
to Matamoras, via San Luis Potosi and Saltillo.
4. From Lagos to
Zacatecas and Durango, via Aguascalientes. 5. From the port of Mazatlan to Durango and Chihuahua.
Lerma, that is to say, by way of Toluco
Morelia, Guanajuato

•

5

The four first of these lines

traverse

localities that will

ensure

them

difficulties of construction ; there are,
however, other routes that may offer good speculation to the company
undertaking them.
*
There are, also, several rivers that can be made navigable, such as
the Panuco, that empties into Tampico Bay ; the Zacatula or de las
Balsas, that flows into the Pacific, and is open to boats as far as Puebla;
the river Santiago, from San Bias through the departments of Jalisco
and Morelia; the Coatzacoalcos, as far as the middle of the Isthmus of
Tehuantepec, and other rivers of less importance.

great activity, and that present no

accompanies the cordial invita
Maximilian, and. it is worthy of remark that his policy

Such is the bill of fare that
tion of

exhibits

a

marked favoritism for the bone and sinew and

For civil engineers, for artiof mechanical industry, for
practical and theoretical miners, for shipbuilders, architects,

monied power of our country.
zans in
almost every branch
and

manufacturers, for farmers and all who have experience

agricultural pursuits, and especially for capitalists, a field
of enterprise is open where they will be sure to meet with
welcome and encouragement.
But; while fulfilling the mis¬
sion of industry to their own profit, the energy, self-reliance,
and habit of free thought; that distinguishes those nurtured
under the influence of our republican institutions will not fail
to strengthen and ennoble the Mexican character, and prepare
them for the responsibilities of self-government.
If our Re¬
public had been spared the ordeal of civil strife, the intrigue
by which imperialism was thrust upon the Mexican people
in




THE CHRONICLE.

6§V

[Jaly 15,1$65

But it is now an ac¬ energy 'with which M. De Lesseps has devoted himself to this
colossal enterprise, were demonstrated in the presence of a
complished fact, and as such it must be accepted. The tacit
acquiescence of our Government thus far in the sway of Max- gre#t company of strangers, representing the chief commercial
jnilian renders it impossible to dispute his position without cities of the, Mediterranean.' The New World, also, wit¬
nessed this interesting ceremony in the person of a citizen of
throwing down the gauntlet to France, and perhaps to Austria
and other powers of Europe.
We have let go by theoppoiy' San Francisco, and of our fellow-townsman, Mr. Cyrus W.
tunity for diplomatic action; but there still remains, without Field, now on his way across the Atlantic in the ship which
recourse to arms, a channel for the vindication of the spirit of bears the submarine telegraph and its fortunes.
But it is asserted that the canal can never be kept filled
the Monroe doctrine. Americanize Mexico, and republi¬
with water to such a depth as to permit the passage of large
canism will re-assert itself.
/
=5
vessels; that the harbor of Port Said will be constantly ren¬
/
would not have been

consummated.

.

THE SUEZ CANAL—EUROPE AND

The

most

THE/feAST.

striking chapter in the first volume of the Em¬

Napoleon’s “ Life of Csesar,” is that in which the
nephew of the great conqueror, who deigned to “ make the
Mediterranean a French lake,” sums up the commercial and
political history of the states which rose and flourished about
the shores of that great water before Rome had reached the
peror

term

of her

republican

progress.

One after another the

splendid cities—Egyptian, Phoeni¬
cian, Greek, Carthageniam—which lit up their beacon lights
of civilization from the Isthmus of Suez to the Pillars of Her¬

evoked by the imperial writer from the “ ignorance
and silence” of the Past. We see them once again in the
glory of their enterprise and their opuleiice; we trace the fer¬
tilizing stream of Oriental traffic as it flows from point to
point, bringing life and kindling life on its way. And, then,
one after another we behold these glittering marts decay, the
country around them sink back from prosperity and enlight¬
enment into a barbaric desolation; and moved by so eloquent
a
spectacle of human progress and of human instability, we
are led
easily and naturally up to the “ conclusion of the
whole matter,” as the Emperor puts it in these more than
significant words : “ The remembrance of such greatness in¬
spires a very natural wish, namely, that henceforth the jeal¬
ousy of the Great Powers may no longer prevent the East
from shaking off the dust of twenty centuries, and from being
born again to life and civilization.”
Uttered by an ordinary historian, this sentiment might
pass for what Mr. Choate described the Declaration of Inde¬
pendence to be—“ a tissue of glittering generalities.” Uttered
by the most powerful and the most politic of cotemporary
sovereigns, it will be recognized, especially when read with
the commentary supplied by events now actually occurring
as a
programme of action proposed to himself by a monarch
who has never yet suffered “I dare not” to wait upon “I
cules,

are

would.”

The

organization of the Kingdom of Italy, and the success¬
ful prosecution of the canal across the Isthmus of Suez—both
of them sedulously favored and really made practicable by
the influence of the Emperor of the French—have now reached
such a point that no man interested in the future direction of
the great

world-commerce between the East and the West,
any longer afford to be ignorant either of the mighty
changes which are preparing in that world-commerce, or of
the policy of France in regard to those changes.
Correspondents of some of the English journals who were
present at the recent opening, under the auspices of M. De
Lesseps, of the communication by the canal of Suez between
the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, have represented that
great work as a practical failure.
No one, indeed, ventures to deny that the Isthmus has real¬
ly been pierced; that the waters of the Mediterranean have
really, and in no metaphysical sense, been mingled with that
of the Red Sea; and that a small steamer, presented to the'
Suez Company by Prince Napoleon, has actually passed
through the existing canal. These results of the indefatigable
can

impracticable by the shifting sands; and that the fresh
water canal, constructed to supply the trans-isthmian route
with water, will prove inadequate to that object.
To all of these criticisms the trans-isthmian company reply
that the entire success of their undertaking is a mere question
now of time and money, and that what they have already ac¬
complished was pronounced utterly impracticable by the same
English writers five years ago.
•The preponderating testimony of the French, Italian, Ger¬
man and Levantine merchants, who made the trip with M. De
Lesseps from the one sea to the other, - is decidedly in favor
of the company ; and the general aspect of the Suez question

dered

in the East at this moment is

such

as

to warrant

the belief

Eu¬
rope and the East will be peremptorily and effectually
changed, in such a manner and to such an extent as to bring

that, at

no

distant day, the whole course of trade between

commercial revolution throughout the world.
A convention has just been signed between the French

about

a

of the Messagerie Imperiale and the Suez company, by which Port Said is to be made the terminus of the
Mediteranean steam-line connecting with the east. At Cantara, the frontier station of the great Syrian caravans, M. De
Lesseps has made extensive purchases of land, and laid out
the plan of a considerable town; the works on Lake Timseh
are
pushing forward energetically, and a strategic position has
been selected by him on the heights about half way between
the Red Sea and the Mediteranean, to be fortified, which will
company

command the entire Isthmus from

sea

to sea.

Both at Con¬

stantinople and at Cairo the progress made and making by
enterprise, which was thrown by the opposition and the
incredulity of England entirely into French hands, has at last
excited very serious alarm in the one city for the integrity of
the Ottoman Empire—in the other for the practical indepen¬
dence of the Egyptian Vice-royalty.
The British minister at
Constantinople, Sir Henry Bulwer, is actively fermenting the
anxieties both of the Ottoman Porte, and of Osman Pasha;
and it is now proposed that a joint commission to be named
by the Turkish and Egyptian governments and the Suez com¬
pany, shall revise the concessions of land originally made to
the latter, and decide how much is really needed by them for
the commercial purposes of the enterprise.
Meanwhile the extraordinary activity with which the new
Italian government is pushing forward its system of railway
connections between the eastern and western parts of the
peninsula bears witness to the clearness with which the com¬
mercial mind of Italy appreciates the impending change in
the conditions of the Mediteranean commerce, and to the de¬
termination with which Italy proposes to appropriate her
natural shajre of the advantages attendant upon that change.
At the end of May the Italian Minister of Finance and the
two sons of the King hastened from Turin to Bari on the
Adriatic to join in the celebration at the latter city of the
opening of railway communication from Piedmont, Lorn
bardy, and the Romagna, to the shores of the Southern Adri¬

this

atic.

A
a

glance at the map of Italy will show the reader that by
railway stretching from Genoa and Florence through

line of

■'M

4

THE CHKONICLE.

July 15, 1865.]

central Italy to Bologna, and from Bologna to Brindisi
Otranto, the mail and passenger traffie from America

'

69

and and travel to and from California, the necessity becomes ur¬
and gent for adequate diplomatic representation in that quarter.

England to Egypt and the East must be necessarily diverted In view of the magnitude of the material interests involved,
from its present course, by way of Marseilles and Malta, so it is hardly fair to abide by the relative positions of the two
as to passthrough the Italian Peninsula.
governments, in the political scale; and under the circum¬
Before the tent in which the Italian

n

'^4,

princes and the Italian stances the present consular representation is not a sufficient
minister were entertained at a banquet in Brindisi by the diplomatic influence. An American consul, selected from
Railway Company, three gonfalons were displayed bearing in among the residents* of a given locality, and usually engaged
white letters upon a crimson ground the significant names of in some business pursuit that naturally engrosses his atten¬
“Suez,” “ Brindisi,” and “London.” Were the canal of M. tion, may be all that is requisite to follow the routine of
De Lesseps to remain forever the shallow and futile ditch it is such an office; but4where questions of importance may
declared by sundry English journals to be, the completion of arise, and prompt, decisive and f intelligent action may be re¬
the South Italian railways would of itself effect a very marked quired, to meet an emergency or pronounce upon an interna¬
and important modification in the course of Oriental com¬ tional issue, the national representative should be one ^ap¬
merce.
Nearly one-half of the whole system of their rail¬ pointed in view of his personal qualification for the respond
ways is already open to traffic; and as within three years sibility, and should be invested with higher dignity and fuller
the whole system is expected to be completed, embracing power than a mere commercial agent.
We urge upon the
total length of more than 1,300 miles, and forming an un¬ consideration of our government the propriety of establish¬
a
broken chain of railway communication by the Mount Cenis ing a Consul-generalship at Panama.
;
The English and French Governments and trading com¬
tunnel and the North Italian lines, from Paris to Naples, and
from Naples to Brindisi, Tarento, and Otranto; it is evident munities appreciate the importance of the Isthmus as a com¬
that the question put as a matter of historical speculation by mercial depot and passage way. They are developing their
Napoleon the author, whether “ the jealousy of the Great resources and extending their influence in that direction with
Powers” shall longer “ prevent the East from shaking off the an energy that our people will do well to emulate. Six lines
dust of twenty centuries, and being born again to life and of steamers are now in operation, forming a nucleus at Pana¬
civilization,” is rapidly rising into a question of practical ma, and extending their ramifications to various points. ’ A

politics under the manipulation of Napoleon the Emperor.

line between

England and New Zealand via Panama, has
established, that contemplates an ultimate connection
with Australia. A French line, comprising four steamers,
has arranged with the Pacific Mail Navigation Company, the
Pacific Mail Steamship Company and the Panama Railroad
Company for the transportation of merchandise between
Europe and the ports of the Pacific, by way of the Isthmus,
touching at Martinique. The Pacific Steam Navigation Com¬
pany at Callao proposes to run a third line of mail steamers
between Panama, Callao and Valparaiso, to connect with the
steamers of the “ Compagnie Generale Transatlantic ”v be¬
tween St. Nazaire and Colon.
The great and valuable
increase of trade and travel by way of the Isthmus fully
justifies and rewards the enterprise of foreign capitalists in
that quarter, and exhibits conclusive evidence of the necessity
of strengthening our diplomatic machinery at Panama. The
complications arising from such an intermingling of interna¬
tional interests at one point, and the great importance to this
Republic of securing its coin of vantage in the competition,
demand the immediate supervi$ion of a Consul-general.
been

A CONSUL GENERAL FOR PANAMA.

The State of Panama, insignificant in every respect except
that it affords a convenience for inter-oceanic transit, is not
free from the elements of discord and revolution that con¬
:

vulse

to-day almost all the political systems of this hemis¬

phere south of our own Republic. We single out for especial
comment this inconsiderable nationality from the chaos of
South and Central American turbulence and anarchy, because
certain interests of importance to our commercial communi¬
ties are connected with that locality. The circumstance that
millions of treasure belonging to citizens of the United States,
and thousands of those citizens in person- monthly cross and
recross the Isthmus, suggests the inconvenience, if not the
peril involved in a condition of petty warfare and lawlessness
along the line of that valuable thoroughfare. Recent intel¬
ligence informs us that the contagion of revolution has spread
to Panama, and that pronunciamentos and counter-pronunciamentos, and insurgent demonstrations threaten to culminate
The leader of this insurrectionary move¬
ment is Buenaventura Correoso, a turbulent spirit that has
in armed collision.

But there

are

other considerations that invite attention to

subject. The commercial world ;is just now much inter ¬
working out the problem of cheap and convenient
already been identified with similar acts of insubordination.
Correoso does not confine himself to partisan antagonism, intercourse with India. It is not without jealousy that foreign
but assumes, to a certain extent, the control of the inter powers view our superior advantages in that respect, em¬
the

ested in

Sovereign State of braced in the construction of the Pacific Railroad. The Em¬
Panama” he has addressed himself officially to the Superin¬ peror of Mexico will spare no pains to render the isthmus of
dent of the Railroad, assuming the supervision of all official Tehuantepec available for a similar enterprise, and it is pos¬
matters connected with the transit, and forbidding the con¬ sible that the old projects of a ship canal through the Isthmus
veyance of the “ present usurpers, their officers or soldiers ” of Panama may be revived. With the prospect of interna¬
upon the line. Between the cross-fire of the two factions, tional competition before our eyes, it is not/immaterial that
the Company is in a fair way to collide with one or the other. our government should be represented by an experienced
We do not design to exaggerate the importance of these and sagacious diplomat, upon the spot that is likely to prove
domestic brawls, or to imply that the Transit Company are an arena for intrigue and conflict of international interests.
not fully capable of protecting the interests confided to their The energy and statesmanship ;of Maximilian will in time ex¬
oceanic route.

m

care.

As “ President of the

But where those interests

are so

vast, and include the ert its influence to the southward of his territory, and it is

preclude the supposition that his imperial palm
may itch to extend its sceptre over the weak and disordered
United States should make ample provision for security political systems of Central America. .In view of such a con¬
against the contingencies of anarchy and riot. It is true that tingency, the wisdom of securing a firm diplomatic foothold
as a
political power the State of Panama is almost a nonen¬ in that region is apparent.
%
, '
%
One other consideration we wish to urge, and that is, the
tity ; but in regard to its being the principal channel of trade

no less than property of1 so great a number
of American citizens it is but just that the
government of the

personal safety

i'




not

safe to




[July 15,1865.

THE CHRONICLE.

70

are also county debts incurred to provide soldiers for the war,
importance of having a proper person to fill the position.
He should be able to command the respect of all who have amounting to more than double that amount. The interest
ahd redemption of the bonds will require a burden of taxa¬
intercourse with him.
Our country has suffered terribly by
tion so heavy as to preclude the sanctioning by the Legisla¬
reason of the men sent to represent it in the southern petty

Weakness of character as well as of mind seem
to have been pre-requisites for an appointee.
Can we not,
however, have at Panama an office and an officer of. the
republics.

highest grade ?
DETROIT CONVENTION—SEABOARD

TRANSPORTATION.

of any new expenditure,
•
will add to the amount.
ture

There
of either

not absolutely

required, that

is, however, no apparent necessity for the adoption
measure.
The navigation of the Mississippi has

begun to divert commerce from the Atlantic seaboard. The
canals of New York already exhibit the effects. Their reve¬

pledged by the Constitution of the State to pay the
at Detroit will be regarded with interest.
It has assembled expenses of superintendence and repairs, and to contribute
So great
within a brief period after the holding of a similar gathering $1,700,000 for the redemption of the canal debt.
ds the falling off of these revenues, that that amount will not
at Boston, showing the earnest feeling entertained in the mat¬
be
ter by our leading men of business.
The large attendance is theobtained, and a direct tax will be required to make up
deficiency.
■
'
■ •
also gratifying. The question of representation threatened
The capacity of these canals for transportation has not been
the harmony of the Convention, but was equitably adjusted
overtaxed. They have been able to carry twenty-five per
so as to permit
the transaction of business.
cent more of merchandise, etc., than has in any one year
The subjects set forth in the call for the Convention are
been transported upon them.
An enlargement would in¬
Commerce, Finance, Transit Communication between the
crease the difficulties already experienced in a measure of
West and the Atlantic seaboard, Reciprocal Trade between
the-United States and the British Provinces. The first action obtaining water sufficient to float boats, but it could not for
after organization and the preliminary ceremonies, was the many years, add to the volume of the commerce.
Tln> Niagara Ship Canal which has become a favorite pro¬
appointment of two committees, the one on Transit having
for Chairman Hon. Dewitt C. Littlejohn, of Oswego, former ject of the merchants and forwarders of Oswego, would
Speaker of the Assembly of this State, and the other on Re therefore, it will be perceived, if it should be constructed, ac¬
ciprocity of Trade, with J. F. Jay of Detroit for Chairman. complish the policy of diminishing the tolls, and overthrow the
The Canadian and other provincial delegations with becom¬ canal policy of the state, which is already beginning to totter.
This apprehension, added to the certainty of onerous taxation,
ing delicacy declined taking part in the organization, but con-,
tented themselves with the appointment of conferees to meet! will be sufficient to prevent any State legislation on the
and hold communication with those committees.
The ques¬ subject. Congress, however, may be induced to take steps
It will, in such an event, be worth while to
tion of voting having been determined on Wednesday all in the matter.
was readv for business.
.
inquire whether the transit? over Lake Ontario w ill not result
Mr. Littlejohn was ready in the afternoon of that day with in transferring the emporium of commerce to some point
outside of this country.
a
report on his favorite measure, the Ship Canal around
One fact seems to have been overlooked in the debates of
Niagara Falls. He declared that the construction of this
the Convention by those who are urging the increase of the
great work would quadruple the amount of produce sent from
the West to New York and Boston, by diminishing the .tolls facilities of transportation between the wrest and the seaboard.
which now are required by way of the canals of the State of Production alone, it should be remembered, is not enough to
Demand is the inexorable condition of
New York, and by reducing the other expenses of transporta¬ create markets.
tion.
He also affirmed, what would seem to be a paradox, trade. It is the duty of the men w ho are clamorous for
that this would be the shortest avenue between the coal mines more avenues of commerce to show' that there are not enough
The action of the

■

«/

Commercial Convention now in session

nues are

•

already to meet the requirements. Up to the present time
since Mr. Littlejohn apparently held different sentiments.
In the canals and railroads of New' York and Pennsylvania have
been able to do the entire carrying trade of the country, and
a caucus of the republican members of the Legislature of this
State in 1S59, when the subject of completing the enlarge our statesmen w'ant to know what prospects exist of an in¬
*
ment of the canals was under consideration, Mr. Shepard of creased demand at the seaboard.
St. Lawrence remarked that Lake Ontario afforded a natural
Upon the matter of reciprocal trade with the British Pro¬
channel for commerce far cheaper and surpassing the advan¬ vinces, w'e are pleased to notice that a large majority of the
of Pennsylvania and

the Northwest.

It is not

many years

-

1

Convention take enlightened views. The action of Congress
of the canals; to which Speaker Littlejohn answered
with great vehemence that the sails which whitened the waters in directing the termination of the Reciprocity Treaty, we
The advantages to the com¬
of Lake Ontario carried the commerce to Europe by other are convinced, was ill-advised.
routes than the city of New' York.
But Ihose times have merce of this country were equal, if not superior, to those
changed; and there is a commercial rivalry between the cities derived by Canada and the other provinces. The river St.
of Oswego and Buffalo, which found utterance in a minority Lawrence, and the canals of the provinces were secured to
the people of the United States, w'hile the inhabitants of
report by Hon. Erastus S. Prosser of the latter city, in favor
of enlarging the locks of the Erie Canal. This was a favorite the provinces acquired no corresponding privileges on the
canals of this country. .
project of Mr. Prosser w hen he belonged to the Senate of
The carrying trade, therefore, has for the last ten years
New-York. His report pronounced it cheap and practical,
and declares that it would enable the canal to forward several been placed principally in the hands of the* forwarders
of the United States. But this is only a single advantage to
hundred millions of bushels more of grain than were moved
the citizens of this country. The extensive commerce itself
^
in 1862.
The prospect that the Legislature of Newr York will adopt is the reason why the relations to the Provinces should re¬
main undisturbed.
A glance at the statistics ought to be sat¬
either of these projects is very dubious. The rivalry exist¬
ing between the two cities will be a constant impediment. isfactory to the most incredulous. $
The aggregate amount of goods imported into Canada
Each will aid to defeat the other.. The argument of State
from the United States for ten years ending June 30th,1864,
finance, too, will recur to prevent their success. The indebted¬
is valued at $105,114,774, of which the aggregate of $85,ness of New York is about forty million dollars^ and there

tages

"Wf!!

•IF

~ ■.

--

v*

f V-w 'j,v, --^

the treaty. The dutiable goods

816,826 was made free under

purchased in the markets

of the United States and carried

the same time, amounted to $94,503,385.
TheseJ amounts would have been larger, but for the enhance:
ment of prices made necessary by the war.
The other British provinces have not been considered in
these calculations.
Between them and the United States there
has been an extensive commerce.
The exports from the
United States since 1850, to those provinces, amount to
$101 ,405,218; the imports from these into this country
to only
$48,508,934. In breadstuff's alone we furnished
them a total value of $39,493,410.
The footings show that the trade between this country and
British America since 1850 has resulted in an over-importa¬
tion on the part of Canada to the amount of $63,038,638 ;
and on the part of the other provinces of $52,896,294—a to¬
into

Canada during
^

.,

t

.

«.

_

^

71

THE CHRONICLE.

July 15,1865.]

f

f ■ - sj....

couraged, by the laws of another capital is restricted in its
employment, by the law s or want of laws in a third both
person and property are endangered. And not alone laws,
but sometimes ignorance, and sometimes poverty prevents
a free flow of labor and capital from one country to another.
If the poorer classes in China knewr how much more secure

.

would be, and, the richer, hoW much safer their
capital would remain in this country than in their own, it
would not be long Before the United States wrould be densely
populated by the sons of Fu-hi, provided the poorer ones
had the means to come; and it is just so with capital.
Ignorant sometimes of the advantages of employing their
labor, and sometimes of the advantages of employing their
capital in other lands, and at other industries, powerless to
change their sphere of life at will for wrant of the necessary
means, and often restricted by arbitrary laws from doing either,
it is, therefore, not surprising that the greatest inequality
tal of $115,934,932.
should exist between the w ages of labor and the earnings of
A commercial treaty yielding such advantages cannot fail
to add to our material wealth.
The policy which would an¬ capital in various countries, and even between the relative
value of both in the same country.
nul it must be short-sighted indeed. We argue from the
In China capital is scarce and labor is plentiful.
The for¬
deliberations and views maintained by the delegates at De¬
mer is, therefore very expensive, the latter very cheap.
troit, that it cannot prevail. The free trade sentiment, we
In this State capital is plentiful, and labor, comparatively,
trust, will be maintained by the President, and that Congress
will awake to the true interests of the nation, and sanction scarce- The former is, therefore, cheap, and the latter expen¬
sive.
negotiations for a renewal of amicable as well as equitable
In England both are plentiful and both are cheap. In Cali¬
relations with our northern neighbors.
fornia both are scarce and both are expensive.
In fine, the poorer a country is in capital, or saved up
THE MARKET VALUE OF CAPITAL.
When California was first opened to emigration, the w-ealth, the higher are the ; wages which capital earns, in other
scarcity of laborers compared with the immense demand wrords, the higher is the rate of interest; and the richer it is *
in capital, or saved up wealth, the lowrer are the wages which
which existed for their services, caused the price of labor to
rate very high.
Besides digging for gold, men had other capital earns, in other w ords, the lower is the rate of interest.
And so it is with labor.
It would therefore be highly in¬
wants to supply.
Food had to be provided, clothing made,
shelter erected, poker packs imported, beards to be shorn, structive, if it w ere possible, to trace the gradual progress of
a country towards a state of extreme wealth from one of ex¬
and even occasionally a little clothes -washing to be done.
treme poverty; but, unfortunately, history, too much occu¬
All these desiderata had to be compensated for at an immense
cost, compared to what was demanded for them in better pied with the petty events of war and intrigue, has forgotten
their persons

.

1.

-

to observe the important indications which serve to note the
populated lands. In addition to ready labor of various kinds
something else was needed. • The first lump of gold in Cali¬ gradual steps of its prosperous growth, and we are left
fornia was picked up by a child near Sutter’s mill, and for a partly to conjecture and partly to induction for the solution
wre seek.
Nevertheless, enough remains of the history of
long time after this the gold was eliminated by the rude
some countries to furnish us with a rough guide to its mate¬
process of handwashing. But when it was known that a
much greater yield could be realized from the employment rial progress, and this wre will now proceed to avail ourselves
of machinery, a demand sprung up for capital wherewith to of, in the case of Great Britain.
We give below the lowest rates of interest which at the
buy picks, shovels, pans, rockers, crushers, amalgamators,
present time prevail in Great Britain. • ;
quicksilver, and a variety of other labor-saving adjuncts.
The follow ing are the current terms for paper of various
Now capital is the product of somebody’s labor which has
been saved up, and the saver as the reward of his original dates:
6 month8-*-b’k bills.. 4 per cent
labor requires for its use as much as his labor is worth. If 30 to 60 days........ 3£ percent
3 months.
3J per cent 6 mo’s—trade bills... 4$ 5 do
to do a certain piece of work requires another man’s labor for 4 months..
4 percent
a day, which
is worth two dollars, then the use of enough of
The allowance for deposits at the joint stock banks and dis
his capital to perform the same quantity of work without his
count houses has been as follows :
labor is evidently worth an equal amount.
Capital, there¬
*2$ per cent.
Joint Stock Bauks.....c.......
2$ per cent.
Discount houses at call
fore, stands upon precisely the same ground that labor does.
2f per cent.
do
with seven days’ notice,
When it is plentiful it is cheap ; wrhen it is scarce it is dear.
3 per cent
do
fourteen days
And being scarce in California at that time, nay, even more
At the London and Westminister H per cent only on sums below £500.
scarce than labor, it earned proportionately large rewards.
The following are the rates of discount current in the chief
These rewards w ere paid in the shape of interest, and interest
continental cities :
'
Bank Open
Bank Open
is, therefore, seen to be the wages of capital, just as capital
Rate. Mkt.
Rate. M’rk’t.
i
itself is the wages of labor.
p. c.
p. c.
p. c. p. c.
6
8
Turin
4f
Paris
3
It is sometimes the case that labor is plentiful, and capital
Brussels
31
3$
Vienna
5
scarce in the same country, or vice versa.
This would not be Berlin
3} Madrid.
9
4
8
Hamburg
2$
the case if all countries were free to emigration, and person Frankfort
4
5$
3* St. Petersburg
3£
Amsterdam./
and capital. securely protected from violence or danger,
The earliest account which w^e now possess of the
because then both emigration and capital would flow where
they found the most profitable employment, and the price of rate of interest in England is from, the Chronicle of Joceline
de Brakclondy and relates to about the year a.d. 1173. From
both would find the same level all over the world.
By the laws of one country emigration is forbidden of dis¬ that time forward we have here and there isolated accounts




*

A

v

.

...-

„

h• r

V"

■ \

•

v

THE CHRONICLE.

72

[July 15,1866.

prevailing rates of interest at various times. Some¬ pointed there, as well as in Spain, to important civil offices.
If an historian of Philip Augustus may be believed, they
times the legal rate, which, by the way, is no indication what¬
ever of the market rate, because the market rate of interest possessed (a. d. 1180) almost one-half of Paris.” •- (Ibid. i. p*
includes insurance for Varying degrees of risk assumed by the 157.) And all from the enjoyment of an almost priceless
lender—sometimes the rate at which the State borrowed— monopoly. I
The statute of a. d. 1197 (reign of Richard I.) is the ear¬
sometimes that at which the sovereign borrowed—either on
his own responsibility, or endorsed by the faith of a city, or liest enactment upon the subject mentioned in English his¬
the security of a pledge—sometimes the rate at which mer¬ tory, though the labors of a learned association have given
chants borrowed, and sometimes that at which land was to the world some curious and precise information on the
subject. This is contained in the Chronicle of Joceline de
mortgaged.
From the year a.d. 533, when the law of interest was reg¬ Brakclond, mentioned above, from which it appears that in
ulated by the code of Justinian to the ninth century, nothing 1173 William, the sacristan of the monastery of St. Edmundsbury, borrowed from Benedict, a Jew of Norwich, certain
occurs in history to indicate what was the rate of interest in
sums of money, for which he paid interest at rates varying
Europe. By that law persons of illustrious birth were con¬
fined to the moderate rate of 4 per cent, while 6 wras pro¬ from 16 to 19 per cent per annum, giving Benedict his bond
nounced to be the ordinary and legal standard.
For the con¬ therefor, sealed with the convent seal. Subsequently, Bene¬
venience of manufacturers and merchants 8 per cent was dict had to go to "law for the recovery of his loan, and it
In Magna Charta, granted 15th
allotted ; to loans on shipping 12 per cent was granted, but seems he wron the case.
except in such “ perilous ” business no higher rate than 8 per June, 1215, the clause relating to interest, as interpreted by
cent was permitted (Gibbon's Hist. Dec. & Fall, chap, xliv.) Blackstone, Hallam and Hume, clearly recognizes the law as
These rates can, however, be no possible indication of the enacted in 1197.
After the death of Henry II. the Jew’s fell into disfavor,
true value of loans of money at that time, and could only
have been enacted by the crafty and unscrupulous emperor, and wrere made the subject of frequent persecutions under
In the succeeding reign of Henry III. open war
in order that he might take advantage of them for his own King John.
was declared against them, and in a. d. 1253 seven hundred
benefit. Rome had long since been reduced by repeated in¬
vasions from the North, and the reign of Justinian" a Byzan¬ of them were slain in London (Stoic's Survey of London, p.
tine emperor of vulgar origin, was filled with wars, conducted 106). An immediate rise in the rate of interest occurred.
Hume says it was 50 per cent. (History of Eng., chap. xii),
by his general, the able Belisarius. It is only relieved by one
white mark—the great code of civil law called the Pandects, and Mathew Paris asserts that at the same period the debtor
framed by Tribonian and other lawyers, which now passes paid 10 per cent, every twro months.
In the year 1248 the rate of 43 1-3 per cent, was given for
by the emperor’s name, and which contains the law of in¬
a loan of-money, as is evidenced by a close-roll
of that pe¬
terest just quoted.
‘
riod.
In the year 1272 a bond granted Bonami, a Jew of
Nevertheless, this law appears to have remained unim¬
paired until the Christian Church began to assume temporal York, by Sir Hugo de Nevill, a Lincolnshire knight, bore
power, when, in a. d. 800, during the reign of Charlemagne, precisely the same rate of interest. As by ordering that all
Jews who lent money on interest should first procure a royal
Emperor of the West, the taking of interest was entirely for¬
bidden by the canon law. (Macpherson's History of Com¬ license to do so, and from the evidence adduced by Mr. Bond
merce; i. 250.)
The same influence next extending to the (Archccologia xxvii. 225) and the author of Anglia Judaica,
Eastern Empire, the Basilics, a partial and mutilated version there is reason to believe that the English monarchs partici¬
of the Pandects were published by the Emperor Constantine pated in the gains derived by the Jews from this business—
Porphyrogenitus, and contained a similar prohibition. This a portion, perhaps a large portion, of this 43 1-3 per cent,
was about a. d. 950.
(History Decline and Fall, chap, liv.) went to the crown, while another large portion served to
Next, at a great council held at Westminster on the 8th or cover the risk or insurance, so that it is impossible to ascer¬
9th September, 1126, for the purpose of regulating the disci¬ tain what portion of it represented the actual value of loan¬
pline of the Church and the lives of the priesthood, all clergy¬ able money. Taking the St. Edmundsbury transaction for a
men were ordered to abstain from interest and “ base lucre”—
guide, it was probably not much over 15 per cent. All this
usuram et turpe lucrum.
(History of Commerce, i. p. 318.) time the rate of interest in the Republic of Venice was but
From this time to the year 1197 there is no reason to doubt 4 per cent. (Macpherson's Hist. Com., i. 341), though in
that the taking of interest was interdicted by law, but in that the instance given the loan was a forced one, and was proba¬
This was in a. d.
year, again through the influence of the Church, Christians bly below the rate current in the Rialto.
1171. In Flanders, a. d. 1201, it was from 20 to 30 per
were forbidden to take interest.
This was in the reign of
Richard I. * Of course, this threw the entire business into the cent. (Robertson's View of State of Europe, note xxx). In
hands of the Jews, and this monopoly partly laid the founda¬ Verona, A. d. 1228, it w as 121-2 per cent. (Mid. Ages, ii, 400),
tion of that extraordinary wealth which they subsequently though as this w as the legal rate it affords us no definite in¬
possessed; though often and dear were the penalties they dication of the state of the market. In Aragon, a. d. 1270,
the legal rate was 18 per cent. ( View of State, dec., note xxx).
were made to pay for the privilege thus conferred upon them
In Modena, a. d. 1270, the legal rate was 20 per cent. (Mid.
unasked.
The reluctance of the early Christians to take interest, aris¬ Ages, ii, 400). In France, about the year a. d. 1272, an edict
ing partly from ignorance of the true nature of capital and of Philip Augustus, limited the Jews in France to 48 per
partly from canonical prohibitions, seems to have thrown the cent. (Hume, Hist. Eng., chap. xii). Taking a general view
business of money lending into the hands of the Jews in of the state of maritime Europe up to the persecution of the
other countries besides England. ■ “The Jew’s,” says Mr. Jewish money lenders by Henry III. ot England, a. d. 1272,
Hallam (Middle Ages, ii. p. 400), “ were noted for usury it would seem that the rate of interest for mercantile transin France as early as the sixth century.
For several subse¬ actions, varied from 4 to 8 per cent, in yenice, to about 15
quent ages they continued so to employ their capital, with per cent, in England, and probably not much over that
little molestation from the clergy,” and “ often with some en¬ in France. As to the interior of Europe we have no ac¬
couragement from princes.” In the twelfth century they counts. But this indicates that capital was much more plen¬
possessed landed property in, Languedoc, and were even ap¬ tiful in Venice than elsewhere, and that her republican govof the




“

•

L

.

r:

THE

July 15, 1865.]

both security and freedom for his person and for the employment* of his capital,
the cause of its flow thither from less favored coun¬

emment in
•

affording to the capitalist

was

~V?'

ir

tries.

With the
a new era

beginning of the

in the history

cordingly leave this

for

a

fourteenth century commences

of the rate of interest, and we ac¬

future article.

v<WWWVA^WW\,^>

8

-

read about, are apt to b$ regarded some¬
myths. It is difficult to think of them as
men and women, eating, drinking and sleeping in the same common
place way that we do, and when we enter their houses, and hold con¬
versation with these old people, to whom Mr. Merivale introduces
us, we clear away, in a most interesting and instructive manner,
those cloudy mists, which partially hid the centuries of long ago,
and the whole picture stands out in bold relief from the canvass of
the past. In walking about through the streets of Rome, we stum¬
ble over several characters with whom our school boy days have
made us familiar.
The Augustan age was eminently the palmy
days of Roman literature. Then flourished Livy, Virgil, Horace,
and Ovid, and many others whose names may be less familiar, and,
in reading of them, and of the times in which they flourished, we
are strongly reminded of the days when, with dictionary and gram¬
mar, we sadly murdered the beauties of the JBnead, and stumbled
through the poetry of the Odes, the Satires, and Epistles.
The American Annual Cyclopaedia and Register of Important
Events of the Year 1864.
New York, lD. Appleton & Co.,

the very old heroes we
what in the character of

45681
Citcraturc.

History of the Romans under the Empire. B.D. Vol. IV. D. Appleton & Co.

By Charles Merivale,

gladly welcome the fourth volume of Mr. Merivale’s valu«
The previous volumes have carried us step by step
through the great civil wars, and have shown us the imperial edifice
gradually reared upon the ruins of the falling republic. We have
now reached that point when the empire is permanently established.
Old things have passed away ; all things have become new.” By
the death of Brutus and Cassius the murder of the great Julius
was avenged, and then “all public grounds of civil contention ceased;
with the overthrow of Sextus the Pompeian faction was extinguish¬
ed ; and, finally, on the deprivation of Lepidus and the death of
We

able history.

•

*

Broadway, 1865.

443 and 445

*

-

l*

i

73

CHRONICLE

-

*

This valuable volume,-

•

j1

.

the fourth of the series,

contains as nearly

be, not only a complete history of thp United States for the
year 1864, but also furnishes a pretty full record of the material
and intellectual progress of the year the world over. The past twelve
months will, however, ever be most memorable, by reason of the vast
Antonius, even the victorious party acknowledged no divided inter¬
military and naval operations in this country, and their results. Of
ests, and Octavius maintained his place without a rival at its head.” these matters the publishers appear to have presented a truthful
The shout of the soldiers at the battle of Actium was the funeral
picture, giving, entire, all important documents, messages, orders,
knell of the republic, and the cry of the new born empire; and the
despatches and letters from official persons; with full statistics of
Eternal City, so long harassed by anarchy and civil war, was glad, the condition of the nation, the state of its commerce, finance, liter¬
by placing the power in the hands of the youthful hero, to close the ature, science, agriculture and mechanical industry during this last
temple of Janus, as a sign of the return of peace. The extended epoch of the great contest.
domain to which the young Octavius aspired, while it was ready to
welcome with joy a tranquility under any form of government, still
remembered the traditional tyranny of Tarquin the Proud, and
haughtily rejected the hated title of king. It is curious that a peo¬
GREAT BRITAIN.
ple, of such deep penetration and subtle reasoning ability as the
Romans, should have been so jealous of a mere title, while they sub¬
LONDOHAND LIVERPOOL DATES TO JULY 1.
mitted, almost without a murmur, to the reality. “ That the name
The Bank of England continues to experience an influx of specie,
as

may

jForngtt Netos.

republic should be suffered to remain, while the yok6 of royal though not to the extent of the Bank of France. Of the million
really fixed upon them, was beyond their power to con¬ of sterling that reached England from America, Australia* and
ceive. Accordingly, while Octavius assupied the title of Imperator, other places, the bulk went to India, which will probably attract
specie for some time to come.* Rumors of financial disasters in
a name with which the Roman people were familiar, and to which
India raised a painful distrust. Accounts from that quarter were
he, as commander of the legions, had a just and lawful claim, we no unsatisfactory. Considerable anxiety was entertained respecting"
where find him mentioned as Rex. It is true he did search the Lat¬ the safety of an old East India firm of good standing, whose liabili¬
in language for a fitting name, by which he might be known, and ties were known to be heavy, but assistance was obtained, and it is
believed that the danger has passed. The failure of this firm would
fixed, at last, upon that of Augustus ; but this, so far from being have
produced a crisis in the trade.
an index of tyranny, was an epithet applied solely to the gods.
The The Board of Trade accounts for the month and five months ended
assumption of it by the youthful hero was a master stroke of policy. May 31, 1865, have been published. There is a decrease in the ex¬
with the corresponding periods
It pointed out to the people his own divinity.
It reminded them ports for both periods as comparedthe previous year, as shown by
of last year, but an increase upon
that in his veins flowed the blood of the now deified Julius, the de¬
the following figures:
j
Month, i
Five months.
scendant of the pious ’jEneas, the heaven-born child of a goddess
£11,281,289
1863
£50,742670
Could such a being disgrace the Roman name, or enslave the Roman
14,176,640
64,069.060
18,194,758
60,901,576
people ? The idea was absurd. Did not the gods, who guided the
Trojan fleet, and saved it from the “ ever-mindful wrath of angry
The exports in each month of; the present year have been
Juno,” still watch over the Roman people, and rule them in the as follows : January, £10,489,339 ; February, £11,376,214 ;

of the

rule

'

m

was

of the young Augustus ? And was not
divine; and could the gods do wrong ?

person
.

their hero himself

principal events which marked the reign of Augustus, were
pacification of the provinces, and the wars with the German
tribes. The history of these is related by Mr. Merivale in his
usual graphic language and interesting style. The latter chapters
are devoted to a general survey of the Empire : the vast extent of
country, the different classes, languages and religions, which ac¬
knowledged the government of one man. The great cities of anti¬
The

the

quity, and the important place they occupied in the ancient com¬
monwealth, are discussed in this volume at some length. The author
iepdeavore also to ascertain the population of the Eternal City, in
the days of its splendors, from its area, the number of - its houses,
and the number of recipients of grain. Lord Macaulay, in his his¬
tory of England, pauses in the record of events, to give us some
insight into the daily life, the habits and customs of the English

n

—

.

March, £13,770,154; April, £12,071,111; and May (as above,)
£13,194,756.
The value of cotton manufactures exported in the month was
£3,707,981, as compared with £4,247,705 in 1864; the figures for
the five months being—1864, £18,411,451; and 1865, £18,116,05$.
The amount of raw cotton imported in the month aod five months
was 611,653 cwt. and 2,637,022 cwt. respectively, as compared with
997,244 cwt. and 2,756,664 cwt. in the corresponding periods of
1864.
Sir Charles
.

finances in the

Wood has presented the following exhibit of Indian
House of Commons : For the year 1863-64, the sur¬

plus was £78,000.

The difference between the surplus of that year
and this arose

and 1862-63 was as between £78,000 and £1,827,000,
from a falling off in the receipts on opium.
revenue,
had improved, for whereas the

however,
The
estimate had been £46,163,000, the
receipts had been £46,284,000, but there had been an increase in
the charge of £1,562,000, the increase for the army being nearly
£694,000, though the numbers had been reduced ; and this was ow¬
ing to the increased price of provisions and theBhootan war, which
cost about £160,000.
Comparing the revenue of last year with
people. So doee Mr.^MERtVALE, before entering upon the reign of that of the previous year there ;Was an increase of more than
Tiberius, pause in bfchistoric narrative, to lay before us the every £1,600,000, but the increase of charge in the latter year compared
with the former was £2,260,0001 ;j The charges were, however, al
daylife ofthe old inhabitants of Rome. It has always seemed as if attributable to thejunjfcoted administration of the country. The
tfc£%e-gone ages of antiquity, and
~7r"'
wlT




'

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[July 16,1865.
■■■■■■

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THE CHRONICLE.

u

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the pre’ general trade which has not yet terminated. Manufacturers, how¬
also estimated ever, are full of orders, with special activity in the worsted trade.
At Bradford the upward tendency in wool has been arrested, but
it was an¬
ticipated that there would be a surplus of about £800,000 ; but a prices continue steady and unchanged. Yarns are quiet, with no
revised estimate showed that there would be a deficit of above £260,- demand for export. Pieces: at this branch the manufacturers con¬
000; it was nevertheless supposed that it would be reduced to tinue fully occupied, but get no fresh orders. The entire market
£90,000. He had heard with surprise that the income tax had being evidently influenced by the quietness of the cotton trade.
The demand for metals during the week continues restricted;
been discontinued in India, and that step was taken in opposition
to the opinion of Sir J. Lawrence, but in spite of the loss by this prices, howevever, have been maintained. From present appear¬
item, the estimate of the revenue for next year would be increased ances, no note-worthy change is likely to take place until the general
by above £400,000. There would, however, be an increase of charge elections are over and the harvest is safely got in.
The accounts from the manufacturing districts are on the whole
of about £3,000,000.
In the Indian budget it was proposed to add
to the duty on salt, which had been prevented by Sir J. Lawrence, highly satisfactory, considering the half-year settlements. At this
and a proposed duty on exports, which would have produced about period merchants and manufacturers are unwilling to enter upon
£300,000, had been prohibited by him (Sir C. Wood.) The right any speculations, preferring to wait and take advantage of the turn
honorable gentleman entered into detailed statements showing the of the market. In this view, it will be seen that the reports exhibit
remarkable wealth and prosperity of Bombay. With regard to a degree of steadiness that is favorable.
The traffic returns of railways for the United Kingdom, for the
raising any loan in this country, he did not propose to do anything
in that way until he had received the matured opinion of the new week ending June 17, amounted to £682,915, and for the corres.
Finance Minister of India. In the last six years there had been ex¬ ponding week of last year to £662,577, showing an increase of
pended on public works and railroads in India £73,000,000 ; aDd in £20,338. V
The report of the Law Life Assurance Company, submitted at
the last two years, on public works, exclusive of railroads,
the quinquennial meeting for the division of profits, stated the sum
£13,000,000. The state of the revenue showed the improvement
in the condition of India, and it was the fact that in cotton culti- to be 518,811Z., of which 103,762/. belongs to the proprietors and
vation, as well as in all agricultural products, there had been a great 415,049/. to the assured., The invested assets amount to more than
increase. Referring to the policy pursued towards Oude, he denied 5£ millions, and the annual income is half a million. The insuran¬
that there had been any change in the course adopted by Lord Can¬ ces in force on the 31st of December last were 8,913,569/., with
■
} ning. In regard to Bhootan, he justified the hostilities which had bonuses of 1,747,962/.
A bill supposed to be highly important in relation to landed
been carried on against the half-savage tribes in that country, who
had inflicted many injuries on the population of the frontier, but no property has passed both houses of Parliament and received the
permanent occupation of the country was intended, beyond that of royal assent. The powers it confers are limited to companies making
certain strongholds and passes, for the purpose of preventing further advances on real estate, and rates and. rent-charges on real estates
only. Such companies must possess at least £1,000,000 capital, of
outrages.
^ ‘
The Cotton market exhibited considerable fluctuations and excite¬ which not less than one tenth is to be paid up, nor more than onement during the week.
On Monday sales of 20,000 bales were half. The securities that are to be the basis of the issue of the
effected at an advance of |d per pound. This advance was fully mortgage debentures are to be deposited with the Registrar of the
maintained on the following day, but with reduced sales amounting Office of Land Registry, who will endorse the debentures as proof
to 15,000 bales.
On Wednesday the reception of American news that the conditions of the Act have been complied with. The
with the intelligence of President Johnson’s proclamation removing gross amount of debentures afloat is not to excceed the aggregate
all restrictions on trade with the exception of the tax of two cents of securities deposited with the Registrar, and they may be for sums
per lb., produced a reaction, and prices and sales receded. For of £50 ajftnipward, transferable by endorsement under hand.
the remainder of the week the sales averaged five or six thousand
Reports of the failure of the Bank of Bombay occasioned con¬
bales per day. The advance on American Cotton at the beginning siderable anxiety during the week in London, although later tele¬
of the week was lost, and on other kinds the reduction was greater, grams have not confirmed the rumor. The knowledge that the
in some cases as much as 2d per lb. The total stock on hand at Government will have to give to the bank whatever support may
the close of the week was 308,030 bales, an excess of 31,000 bales be necessary, since they are actual partners and shareholders not
over the estimated quantity, 39,000 being in East India and 2000
only in the Bank of Bombay, but in those of Bengal and Madras,
in China and Japan, whilst there is a decrease of about 10,000 in tended somewhat to re-assure parties. Nevertheless, uneasiness
was felt as to the extent of the excitement in India consequent up¬
American and the long-stapled descriptions.
American was in great request in the early part of the week, and on the decline of prices of cotton, and the probable effect upon
continues in good demand at about id. to id. advance. In Brazil credit.
No new commercial enterprises of importance were announced
very large transactions took place up to Wednesday at an advance
of lid. per lb., the whole of the rise has since been lost, the market during the week, although there is a large aggregate of fresh enter¬
*being freely supplied. An active demand for Egyptian occurred prises, chiefly upon the joint stock principle, which seem to gain in
early in the week, and prices advanced considerably; but since, favor. Respecting the London Merchants’ Company, which recent¬
Cotton has been pressed lor sale, and quotations are reduced Id. to ly organized with a capital of £2,000,000, the shares have fallen
lid. from those of last week. Smyrna, after an advance of fully from three per cent premium to one per cent discount, in conse¬
Id. per lb., has relapsed to last week’s quotations. East India has quence of doubts as to whether the profits of the last three years,
been in good demand and advanced id., but closes with very little upon which the amount paid for the good will of the old concerns
variation from last week. In China and Japan a large business was^ based, were not exceptional. The experiment of amalgamating
has been done, and prices improved with the general tone of the the old firms is regarded with some jealousy by other merchants,
market, but close only about l£d. per lb. above former quotations. perhaps, because they had not adopted the idea themselves.
A prospectus has been issued of the Liverpool and Dublin Steam
To arrive, purchases to a considerable extent have been made on
terms following the currency of the market.
The latest quotations Navigation Company, with a capital of £400,000, (half to be first
being on Wednesday, Pernarn, fair average, ex quay, 19id.; first subscribed) in shares of £25, to establish a daily line of paddle
quality, in the river, 19d. Maceio, fair average at sea, 17id.— steamers between the two ports in connection with the Midland, the
Egyptian, open, fair, ship named, 18$d. to 18id.—Comptain, guar¬ Great Northern, and the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire
anteed fair, ex quay, 13id.—Oomrawuttee, fair new native, May. Railways, and the Bridgewater Canal.
In the colonial and foreign produce markets transactions have
tailing, 13^d., and yesterday Egyptian, open, fair, ship named, 18|d
The Manchester market was marked by great firmness during the again been upon a moderate scale, but supplies keeping very light,
rates are fully maintained.
There has been a more active demand
beginning and middle of the week. Last weeks quotations of yarn for
sugar, and slightly stiffer rates have been paid. The coffee mar¬
and cloth were sustained, at slightly increased rates, but with more
limited demand, buyers exhibiting much caution, and only purchas¬ ket, in the absence of public sales, has been quiet, but in what busU
ness has taken
ing to suit immediate wants. This caution depressed the market tinues without place full rates have prevailed. The tea trade con¬
activity. Rice is firmly held, with few transactions.
towards the close of the week, and caused prices to recede.
In the oil and tallow market no quotable change has occurred.
At Leeds there was a better demand for fancy goods; plain
The arrival of grain and seed-laden vessels during the week have
cloths of good quality, and tweeds. The enquiry for the American
been forty-three, including twelve of wheat, eleven of maize, and
and Continental markets caused an activity in business. Prices for
fifteen of barley. There has been only one of linseed, and two of
all descriptions of goods were higher.
At Nottingham there Has not been the average amount of busi¬ cottonseed. The wheat was chiefly from Odessa, the maize and bar¬
The floating grain
ness, the German buyers not coming in as had been anticipated. ley from Sulina, Kustendje, Ibrail, and Galatz.
The cotton branch was dull. The home trade generally is quiet, cargo trade is steady in tone. Prices of the leading articles have
Black silk laces for trimmings are in tolerable request, and there is been firm. The reported, transactions daring the last eight days
still more doiDg in narrow edgings. The hosiery trade continues embrace twenty four cargoes and 6,000 qrs.
very active. All classes of goods are in request, and manufacturers
have orders on hand for some time to come. Yarns are making
THE CONTINENT.
\
very high prices, and the market is very firm.
Trade in Rochdale has not been animated during the week.
[FROM OURjOWK CORR18FONDXRT,]
Still, a large amount of flannels has changed hands. In Yorkshire
Paris, July 1,1865. t
goods there was more business for the better kinds, but lower des¬
Wool was firm, with prices in favor of the
The accumulation of bullion in the vaults of the Bank of France
criptions were dull.
seller, except in the case of the lower kinds; which were dull.
indicates very forcibly the general dulness of trade. The unusual
l^The annual midsummer fair at Salifaxinduced a quietness in the sum of 512,000,000 francs is now In the vaults, Veing an increase
estimated

revenue

for 1865-6 would be better than that of

sent year by £2.640,000 ; the charge, however, was
to increase by about £376,000. In the estimate of 1864




,

r

<

,

:vT“'

■ft
Wi
§

in the corresponding period last
yCThe market exhibits features of great distrust, and transactions
were limited, holders being cautious of investment.
The market
Tallied previous to the monthly settlement, and better prices were
obtained through it; it is supposed that this confidence will be only
temporary. The general trade of France is in an unsettled condi¬
tion, partly from the agitation among the workmen, and also from
political causes. The principal securities were the most neglected,
and prices receded in almost every case. Speculators seem to labor
under vague fears of a financial disaster which had probably been
induced by the heavy sugar failures. On Wednesday Credit
Mobilier shares experienced a reduction of 6f. 25c., closing at 700.
Mexican stock experienced a remarkable and sudden collapse under
the influence of supposed unfavorable advices from America.* On
nearly four times the amount

Thursday the market rallied, and an improvement was manifested
the rates showing an augmentation on the closing prices of the
was

fr.,25c.

company with a capital of 100,000,000f., is to be revised. It has
been ascertained that the capital is not sufficient to accomplish all
that is required. It is proposed consequently to convert the Alger¬
ian Company into a great financial institution, at the head of
is to be placed M. de Germiny, senator, ancient Governor of tha
Bank of France, and at present president of the Mexican Finance

The 4^ per cents closed at 95i

fr. 45c.

The

maintained until the close of the week, which
terminated more favorably than had been anticipated.
The Budget of the Minister of Foreign Affairs just adopted,
amounts to 12,783,200f. The staff of the Ministry, with the salary
of the Minister and 130,000f. for his expenses of representation,
amount to 600,000fr.; furniture, stationery, etc., 250,000 fr. The
salaries of the political and consular agents amount to 6,757,300fr.
The name of the firm at Marseilles whose failure exercised such
an unfavorable influence upon the Bourse, was that of M. Rosland
& Co. The failure is said to affect the entire population of Mar¬
seilles. Two days previous to the stoppage the large number of
the shares offered for sale at the Stock-Exchange brought the price
down from 560f. to 60f., and finally to 25f. The last quotation is
from lOf. to 15f. The loss, which is enormous, is confined to
Marseilles, but as the shares are divided among a great number of
individuals the financial catastrophe will be less severe than was at
first supposed. The suspension is attributed to the fall in the
price of sugar, and, should a recovery take place before the affairs
of the house are wound up, they may yet meet all their engage¬

i£&.

§?■
m
W?

which

Committee.
The liabilities of the great sugar refinery at Marseilles which
recently failed are ascertained to amount to 31,000,000 sterling.
The failure has jeopardized several smaller firms in that city, and

induced a general distrust in the trade. At Nantes the sugar
trade is in a bad way, owing to the low price of the article ; and
the Minister of Finance has suddenly caused perturbation in the
trade by requiring that import duties shall be paid in two
instead of four as formerly. It is apprehended that other branches
of commerce will be affected after sugar. As regards the cotton
trade in particular, unfavorable reports are current,

ments.
The market at

Frankfort has undergone a marked change in the
renewed demand for American stocks, and the dulness of Austrian
securities. The news of the restoration of peace, and the reduction
of the army and navy of the United States has given a stimulus to

the investors.
On the other hand, the policy of the Austrian
Minister of Finances has greatly weakened the demand for the

securities of that nation. The demand for the new loan 116,000,000
fl. indicates that the Minister either cannot sell the domains at the

expected price, or that he is unwilling to do so, and prefers bor¬
rowing and keeping them. The deficit for 1865-66 had been reduced
to 10,000,000 fl., and it was expected that the pledges for the sale
of the lands would be carried out. The avowal of the misappro¬
priation of large sums which had been voted for different purposes,
and the admission that the bad harvests of 1863 had caused a
diminution of income to the amount of 20,000,000 fl., though sus¬
pected, had produced an unfavorable impression. The declaration,
therefore, that this would be the last sacrifice required to pay off
the debt to the Bank and to restore the currencv, and that hence¬
forth the taxes being paid in cash the deficit would totally disappear,
could, it is said, make no impression. Hence the 5 per cents, keep
down at 68, although the interest has now been paid without inter¬
ruption for the last 50 years. Money is at present so abundant at
Frankfort that discount is at 2£ per cent.
The annual wool fair at Berlin was a success. Prices were
moderate, showing a decline from two to four thalers per cwt., as

months

albeit prices

run

high.
COMMERCIAL AND

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.

State, will be

The following, written by the Comptroller of this
read with interest, giving, as it does, a very unexpected reading
the laws which govern the taxation of shareholders of Banks
within this State:
fi
; .

to

located

State

of

New York, Comptroller’s Office, )
Albany, June 28, 1865.
)

Dear Sir: Your letter making inquiries in relation to asssessing
shareholders in national banks is duly received. I had previously read
the circular published by the Hon. E. G. Spaulding, to
you

which

refer.

printed circular issued by me states the duty of assessors in this
respect as I understand it. Congress expressly authorized the taxing
of the shareholders in national banks. The Legislature, at its last ses¬
sion, passed a law,“ The Enabling Act,” so called, which directs them
to be taxed in pursuance of that authority. I do not see how any
assessor can disregard that law.
The act of Congress requires that they shall not be taxed at any
higher rate than State banks. Mr. Spaulding’s circular assumes that
they will be taxed at & higher rate, because they have no deduction on
account of United States stocks held by them, whilst the State banks
have such deduction to the extent that their capital is invested in those
stocks. The error of this assumption is manifest. The rate of taxation
is one thing; the amount of assessment is quite another and different
thiDg. If a State bank has invested any portion of its capital in gov¬
ernment securities, it can only be assessed for the residue, but it is
taxed at the same rates as if it had no such investment; but not for the
Its government stocks are exempt by act of Congress.
same amount.
But Congress made no such exemption in the case of national banks.
On the contrary, in the very same act in which it requires them to
invest in government stocks, it authorizes them to be taxed, and makes
no exemption in their favor.
The decision of the Supreme Court does
not affect the question, for it does not and cannot override the express
act of Congress upon which the authority is based.
If Congress has in this particular inadvertently given an advantage
to State banks, the assessors have not, for that reason, any right to dis¬
regard the law. Congress alone has power to remedy the defect. Too
much property is already exempt from taxation by reason of its being
invested in privileged securities, leaving the great burthen of taxation
to fall upon the less fortunate.
The lines of exemption should not be
extended beyond the strict requirements of law.
i .
The

compared with the preceding year. The foreign buyers, who were
consisted chiefly of French and Swedes with but few
English.
e
The crops in several governments of the South of Russia have
been much injured by the continued drought. In some districts no
Yours, very respectfully,
rain had fallen since the middle of April. Grain of all kinds is
L. Robinson, Comptroller.
rising in price.
The quantity of flour, wheat, corn, and barley, left at tide-water
Two English Government agents, it is stated, recently paid a
for the fourth week of June, in the years 1864 and 1865, was as folflying Visit to Dortmund and the Westphalia ironworks, ordering a
lows:
considerable quantity of steel plates lor the arming of ships.
Corn.
Wheat.
Barley.
Flour.
The jealousy of the petty German governments has prevented
bu.
j bu.
bu.
bbls.
100
the completion of the commercial treaty with Italy as the act 1864
505,800
706,400
42,700
8,800
would involve the recognition of Victor Emmanuel as king of a 1865
424,800
614,400 *
80,800
legitimate realm, This short-sighted policy, which shuts out Ger¬
Inc. 8,200
man goods from Italian markets, is in deference to the scruples of
Dec
Deo/19,900 Dec. 81,500
Austria, which has not yet recovered from the bitterness engendered
The aggregate quantity
articles left at
by the campaign in Italy. Another cause for this course is the from the commencement ofof the same to the 30th ult. tide-water
.navigation
inclusive;
hostility of Southern Germany to M. Bismark, who favors the
during the years 1864 and 1865, was as follows:
proposition. It is believed, however, that the measure will be car¬
Corn.
Barley.
Wheat.
not numerous,

.

fcj

75

Norway, shall be, like the imports from the Hanse Towns,
except from the certificates of origin and invoices previously re¬
quired.
The usual monthly auctions for the Sinking Fuad of the Passive
debt took place at Madrid on the 30th of June. The prices fixed
by the government were :—For the first-class interior, 39 f.; second
ditto, 25f. 75c.; second class exterior, 32f. Tenders were sent in
at from 37f. 95c. to 43f.for the first interior ; from 21f. 40c. to 23f.
for the second interior; and from 3If. 85c. to 32f. for the exterior.
The convention concluded between the French Minister of War
and MM. Freury and Talabot, for the formation of an Algerian

advantages were

'

•,

and

lexican day.
quoted at 45; shares advanced to rated at
Sreceding loan Credit Mobilier while Mexican bonds720. The
321

k?>

THE CHRONICLE.

July 15,1866.]
of

'v

.

ried at

no

distant date.

According to the terms of the treaty concluded between France
and the Hanse Towns in March last, the necessity for producing
certificates of origin and invoices indicating the price of merchan¬
dise imported into France will cease as soon as the
conventions come into operation. As the French

Flour.
bbls.

1864
1865

Franco-Prussian

treaties with the
Zollverein take effect on the 1st July, orders have been given to
the different custom-houses that, from that date, all goods imported

.........

Dec.

224,100
189,200

bu.

5,628,300
1,465,800

31,400 Dec. 4,188,000

bu.

bu.

1,787,100
1,700,600

167,000

160,700

Dec. 86,500 { Inc. 16,300

quantity of the latter left
the corresponding period
last year, shows a deficiency of 867,500 bbls. flour.
from England, Belgium, Italy, the Zollverein, Switzerland, Sweden,




at

By reducing the wheat to flour, the
tide-water this year, compared with

76

THE CHRONICLE.

[Juy §15, 1865.

The\following comparative table shows the quantity of some of July 6—Steamer Columbia, Havana—
.Spanish gold
principal articles of produce left at tide water from the commenjjffnent of navigation to and including the 30th of June, ult., July 7—Steamer Boruasia, Hamburg—
the

in the years

indicated

:

-

,

1863.

Canal

opened— '

Flour
Wheat.
Corn..

.bbls
bush.

1864.

May 1.
402,100

Oats

5,636,800
6,814,100
56,700
2,889,600

Rye.

91,200

Barley.
Malt
Beef
Pork
Bacon
Butter.

•

bbls.
lbs.

Lard..
Cheese,
Wool.

•

•

1865.

April 80.

May 1.

224,100
5,628,300
1,737,100
167,000
2,616,900
64,600

189,200

•

%

•

•

•

7,712

£,000

219,000
8,002,800
38,400

559,300
32,600

46,200

16,270,400

664,800
'

840*400

41,200
23,200

10,900

Agricultural

Prospects.—Mr.

William

Pruellen,

1,465,800
1,700,600
150,700
2,670,600
90,500
167,700
4,690
18,750
1,090,900

Foreign silver
American gold
July 8—Steamer City of Boston, Liverpool—
American gold..
.

Total for the week.

“
.

f

immense yield is promised

on

“

.........

1861

“

1860.^.

“

1859
1858..

“

1857
1856....

“

Special

:

1855
“
“
.

.....

.

1854...
.1868

$26,858
17,988,916

.$18,015,774

1862

88,599

hundreds of plan¬

.

1863

“

29,765,185
21,044,601
80,628,411
8,251,688
28,199,882
86,315,496
18,067,976
28,260,518
16,236,260
17,014,160
17,014,160

9,717,663

1852...:

of ab.udoned

an

16,408

I

Total since Jan 1, 1865..
Same time in 1864..........

Agent of the Treasury Department for the West, has arrived at
Washington, an i reports the prospects for crops in the lower Mis¬
sissippi Valley much better than heretofore supposed. The leasing

exclusively, and

1,200
8,550

Previously reported

40,000
1,428,200
190,400

plantations by Northern men proved a losing specu¬
lation in 18f3 and 1864, but is likely to be very remunerative the
present season.
A much greater breadth of cotton was planted this spring, and
the region between the Arkansas and Red Rivers is beginning to
assume its former agricultural
importance. Wherever the cultiva¬
tion of cotton could not be resumed, corn has been planted almost

$1,700

..

v

13,202,088

The

imports for the week show a falling off in general merchan¬
are well supported in dry goods.
The following is our
comparative summary :

dise, but
usual

FOREIGN IMPORTS

AT

NEW

YORK.

1863.

General merchandise....

1864.

1805.

$973,670
8,121,273

Dry Goods

$1,702,741

$1,298,443

1,864,694

1,466,849
)
Nearly all the planters between the mouth of the Red River and
Total for the week..
$4,094,943
$3,567,485
$2,764,792
the Gulf had devoted themselves to sugar-growiDg for years before
90,107,715
Previously reported
129,811,035
79,542,220
the war. The stoppage of all extended operations in this region
the first two years of the war reduced the amount of cane to such
Since Jan. 1.
$94,202,658 $132,878,470. $82,307,012
an extent that but half the land has been
planted in any season
The following will show the exports (exclusive of
specie from
sipce. Last year it was estimated that more than half the cane New York to
foreign ports, for the week ending July 10, an since
grown was saved for seed consequently very little sugar was made. the
beginning of the year:
It is not known what proportion of this year’s cane will be saved
for seed ; but the probabilities are that the amount of sugar manu¬
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK.
factured will still be insignificant with a continuation of the present
1863.
1864.
1866.
favorable season. The planters can all be well supplied with cane For the week
$4,142,775
$4,894,698
$4,068,638
seed for next year’s crop, and the usual amount of sugar is expected Previously reported......
95,177,505
92,747,942
80,698,722
tations.

....

•

•

•

•

•

$

,

to be thereafter made.

.

■

Some losses by inundation have occurred in the vicinity of Lake. Since Jan. 1
Providence and other localities where the levees were destroyed
by
the Federal armies, but these have been fewer and less disastrous
than was generally apprehended.

correspondent of the Richmond Republic, who has ju3t re¬
turned from a tour in Southern Virginia, says that except
just
visible traces of

the crops are
good ; there has not been such an oat crop for many years, and the
corn proaiises well; the
people are quiet and industrious. The re¬
turned soldiers are going manfully to work, facing existing difficub
ties like good and brave men. The servants are, as a general
thing,
are no

war

;

*$97,142,440

$84,757,260

®l)t Bankers’ ©alette.

A

around Burkesville there

$99,820,280

\

.

-

-

Friday

July 14, 1865i—P. M.

The Money Market.—We have to report a

continuance
monetary ease. * Funds are flowing steadily to¬
ward the West, in payment for produce and especially for
well behaved and at work.
With regard to the grain-growing States we have very cheerful the large wool crop, and some considerable amounts are go¬
accounts, with rare exceptions; from every direction. Harvest is ing to the Southwest and South, for the
purchase of cotton
of extreme

;

progressing rapidly. Some of the farmers have already finished the
work of cutting their grain, and are “ hauling in ” the crop,
while
others are in the midst of harvest, busily engaged in
reaping.
Specie Movement, 1864-65.—The following table exhibits the
monthly receipts of Treasure from California, and the imports and
exports of specie from and to foreign countries for the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1865:

and naval storesbut the

supply at this centre shows no
diminution, but rather a steady increase, and a corresponding
decline in the rate of discount.
The demand from specula¬
tors is more active.
The transactions at the stock exchange
have largely increased since the Fourth, but the consequent
Total from
Receipts
Imports from
Exports to increased demand for loans, instead of being attended with
from
California and.
foreign
foreign
Months.
California.
Countries.
a
Countries.
Foreign ports.
partial stringency, has been accompanied with a decline of
1864....
$711,645
July,
$128,052
$839,697
$3,309,887
nearly one per cent, on call loans. This increased ease is
1,241,165
Aug. do
1,487,013
245,858
1,000,014
1,189,159
Sept. do
58,220
1,247,87 9»
2,835,898 partially attributable to the payment of several millions of
Oct.
do
853,378
129,775
985,153
2,496,221 dollars in semi-annual
dividends, and partially to the liquida¬
Nov. do
882,276
161,627
1,043,903
7,267,662
Dec. do
114,976
2,205,619
2,820,595
6,103,877 tion of large amounts of 1 year certificates of indebtedness,
Jan. ]1865
2,048,457
52,268
2,095,725
3,184,853 now falling due.
The receipts of money from the latter
Feb. do
914,785
106,704
1,021,439
1,023,201
source are, however,
Mar. do
243.242
1,668,975
rapidly used for the purchase of the
1,912,217
881,913
2,807,025
April do
236,492
2,543,517
871,249 new issue of certificates, which are being paid out in very
1,257,651
May do
177,085
1,484,736
7,245,070
June do
750,469
249,732
1,000,201
5,199,472 large amounts to government contractors.
The current subscriptions to the 7.30 loan, though large,
Total
$16,027,544
$1,904,031 $17,931,576 $40,919,318
have no appreciable effect upon the money market here, for
Total from California and foreign porta
17,981,575
the reason that the orders are chiefly from the interior cities,
Excess of exports over receipts
.$22,987,748 and are
mostly balanced by demands upon the Treasury
Specie in Banks and Sub-Treas., July 1/64. .$31,057,650
do
do
do
June 80/65.% 44,099,101
from the same or adjoining sections.
$18,041,661
The banks are employing their funds mostly at 5 a 6 per
Amount supplied from other sources than California and
cent.
The unusually large amount of imemployed funds in
imports, to account for excess of exports and in¬
the hands of brokers and private bankers has been employed
crease in Banks and
Sub-Treasury....... $36,029,294
on call loans at 4
The following will show the
per cent, with exceptions at both 3 and 5 per
exports of specie from the port of
New York for the week ending July 8th, 1865 :
*
cent.; but to-day the market has shown less ease, and the




....

•

•

•

■:

•

•. •

•

•

....

•

•

•

•

....

....

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

...,

-

4-

‘hf.

15, 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

77

02

major part of the call loans have been negotiated at 5 per in active demand at 98f. The first and second series of
7-30’s are selling actively at 99 7-8 to 100, and interest.
cent., with exceptions at 6 per cent.
...
Discounts are dull. There is^a larger supply of bills, es¬
The following are the closing quotations for the
leading
pecially of grocers, but the demand is quiet, the rates rang¬ government securities at the Stock Exchange for the last six
ing from 6 a 10 per cent. Wle quote the best grades of the days:
•
’ ■"/ "
f >

lUi,

.

several classes of paper as

follows

:

Per Cent.

Dry Goods
Grocers..
m

Railroad

4r.

Per Cent

lkers.
’roduce Commission...

6$ a ~

9

7
10

a

a

■

Miscellaneous

and

6

Stocks.—The

improve¬

U.
U.
U.
U.
U.
U.
U.
U.

S.
8.
S.
S.
S.
S.

.

J uly

6’b, 1881 coup.

llth.

106#
106#
105#
97# •:

99#

107#
105#
105#
97#

100

99#

99#
98#

f

13th.

107#
105#

100

106#
105#
97#
i

12th.

107#
105#
105#
97#

8th. 10th.

107

5.20'8 C., O. 188
5.20,s c., n. iss
10.40’b coup
7.30 Treas. Note
7.30 2d Series
S. 6’b certificates
8. 6’b certif. n. iss

99# !

-

.

105

97#

99#
98#

98

-

99#

•

99#

14th.
108

106#
105#
97#
100

99#

99#

98#
98#
98#
railroad stocks inaugurated last week, has been con¬
The subscriptions to the third series of 7-30 notes,
during
tinued with much animation during the present. The trans¬
the week, have been larger than at any
period since the loan
actions for an advance in prices have been quite large, and
was
opened. The daily subscriptions reported to Jay Cooke

ment in

prices, with slight fluctuations, well

sustained^fThe brokers,

however, continue to have the market very much to them¬
selves, the public being indisposed to enter into speculations,
though tempted by free offers of 10 per cent margins. Erie
common stock has been unsettled by rumors as to the
pros¬
pect of the dividend. The Directors have met during the
week, but without coming to any decision as to j the disposal

ta¬

of the

large .surplus earnings of the company; the prevailing
expectation that a 4 per cent semi-annual dividend will be
declared before the close of the month; and this
morning
rumors to that effect resulted in the
purchase of 6,000 shares,
and an advance of 1J.
Quicksilver has been’ very active
during the week, and on Wednesday touched 64—a rise of
11 since July, 1864. The advance is attributable
partially
to the purchases of a large “ short ” interest to cover their
contracts, and perhaps more to the fact of the company hav¬
ing received an offer from the house of Rothschilds to become
agents for the sale of 25,000 flasks of silver per annum ; a
tender which is almost certain of being
accepted, as it will
largely improve the facilities of the company for marketing
their product.
The following have been the closing prices of
leading shares
on each Of the last six days :
July 8th. 10th.

Canton Company*.

42#

Suickeilver Coal
aiipoea
Cumberland

60
13#
44

Atlantic M. S. S..

156#
96#
81#
Ill#
99#
.63#

New York Central.
Erie
Hudson River.. .j

Reading
i
Michigan Southern
Michigan Central

108

Illinois Central.
Cleveland and Pittsburgh

136

.....

Chicago and N. W....

Chicago and N. W. pref

Rock

Fort

island.....1..'.

Wayne......

<

70#
28#
63#
107#
99

42#
60#
13#
43
157

96#
79#
112

98#
65#
109
138

69#
29#
64

107#
99#

llth.

12th.

13th.

41
64

42

41#.

41#

63#
12#

62

61#
12#

13#
44#
158
96

80#
111
100

66#
108#
136#
70#
29#
64#
109#

99#

44
159
96

78#
no#
101#
67
.

,

138#
70#
29#
64#
109#
100#

14th.

13#
43#

43
159

158

95#
78#

94#
80#

no#

111

100#
65#

101#
65#

109

138#
68#
28#
62#
107#
98

138#
69#

& Co. have been
July 7.

’

Total for week.

H
f||
M

|||
%

has advanced under this demand from 107 to

108.

Tuesday last the Secretary of the Treasury commenced
ing

-

.

|

‘
•

On
pay¬

all audited claims 75 per cent in certificates of indebtedness, and 25 per cent in currency. This course is rendered
necessary by the maturing of very large amounts of the old
certificates, and the large requirements of quartermasters for
currency for paying off the troops.\ This is causing a mate¬
rial increase in the
supply of thfe hew certificates, which are
on




$96,132,450

Total sold to date..

126,436,250
103,563,750

Remaining unsold..

gold premium is at present chiefly
controlled by speculative movements.
Although, within the
last ten days, about six millions of gold interest has passed
from the Sub-Treasuvy into the* market, and the
export de¬
mand has almost entirely ceased, yet the price of gold shows
extraordinary firmness, and has advanced from 139$ on Fri¬
day last, to 143* to-day. The decline of Five-Twenties in
London, reported by the Persia, has encouraged the “ bulls ”
to hold their stock, of five or six millions off the
market;
while at the same time they have made new alliances and are
still buying up considerable* amounts.
By this means they '
have been enabled to steadily force up the premium.
They
are understood to aim at
putting up the price to about 145,
and then attempt to sell out.
The shipments of specie from this port since our last re¬
port, have been as follows: On Saturday, July 8, by City of
Boston, $15,408; on Wednesday,- 12th, by the Cuba, $239,OOO—total $254,408.
The following have been the highest and lowest quotations
of gold during the week :
Highest. Lowest.

July 8...:
July 10
July 11.. <

140$
140$
140$

Highest. Lowest.

139$ j July 12
189
July 13
139$ j July 14

for the week

ending July 8th, 1865,

142

148$

142$

131,842
309,347
288,769
871,156

76
4088
08

492,386 44

Total..
Balance in Sub

r

,

Receipts.

$6,681,478 08
3.265,804 64
2,594,229 68
6,192,435 81
8,068,255 85

"

$4,740,717
1,762,588
4,852,851
8,662,735
8,384,311

55
16

89
44
29

$23,403,204 33
42,822,099 30

$66,225,303 63
26,801,905 46

during the week

Balance on Saturday
Decrease during the

:

-Sub-Treasury.-

Payments.

$1,493,592 51 $26,804,905 46
treasury on morning of July 3..

Deduct payments

Treasury

follows

were as

Custom House.

Receipts.

140$

142
142$

The transactions at the Custom House and Sub

and for orders, exceeded $1,000,000 ; and judging from the

large foreign purchases made yesterday and to-day, to-mor¬
row’s shipments of the same class of bonds are not
likely to
be less than $1,000,000 more; so that, within the week, over
$4,000,000 Of 5-20’s and 7-30’s will have been sent abroad.
Since Saturday last, the old issue of 5-20’s have advanced
from 105$ to 106$.
Sixes of 1881 have been in
activejdemand from newly organized banks, who now give them a preference, as a basis
of capital and circulation, over the 10-40 bonds: the
price

Previously

Gold Market.—The

July
sactions in government securities is the large
demand from July
the European markets. On Saturday last about $1,000,000 July
of 7-30’s were shipped for Germany, and over $1,000,000 of July
July
5-20’s. On Wednesday the export of 5-20’s, on
speculation

|1

:

$30,303,800

United States Securities.- -The chief feature of the tran¬
$

follows

$4,261,200
5,251,600
5,471,300
5,106,400
6,110,200
4,103,100

do
8.
do 10.
do 11
do 12.
do 13.

29

62#
107#
97#

as

evening
week.

$39,420,398 17
3,401,701 13

Foreign Exchange.—The transactions in

foreign exchange
of
port, to upwards of four millions of dollars, the appear¬

have been limited.
this
ance

of

a

This week’s increase in the exports

fair amount of cotton bills

on

the

market, and the

large shipmenis of Government securities to Europe, have
unitedly produced a large amount of bills on London and
Paris; and remitters have been to a certain extent induced
by this tendency of the exchanges to defer their purchases of
bills, in expectation of lower rates. Drawers have with¬
stood the downward tendency-as strongly as possible, but
the rates have tended steadily to lower quotations. We
quote
as

follows:

1

,

i.

.

it*

78

THE CHRONICLE.

Bankers’

Sterling, 60 days.
S

-

Merchants’

109

days*

a

109*

109$
107$a 108$
5.16*

..

Francs, long date....
Francs, short date

5.13$

Antwerp

5.21$

Swiss

5.20

Hamburg

a
a

5.17*
5.17*

85*

36

40*

a

.40$

a

40$
40$

78

Amsterdam
Franfort
Bremen
Prussian Thalers

a

a

71

Foreign Banking.—The following
Bank of England for the week
ending

78$
71*

a

Notes issued

New York
Manhattan
Merchants..
Mechanics..
Union
America.
Phenix

8,559,872

165,951

4,085,712

19,723

267,585

2,957,174

City

Tradesmen’s
Pulton
Chemical
Mercht. Exchange.

.44,624

193,273

2,275,884

27.809

12,471
825,838
68,252
96,045
69,418
136,594
80,925
416,030
828,242

28,920
8,894
j 14,677
42,950

2.867.701
868,474

Broadway..
Ocean
Mercantile
Pacific

DEPARTMENT.

4,597,745

8,281,009

deposits, includ¬
ing exchequer, sav¬
ings banks, commis¬

sioners

of

including deadweight
annuity .......... .£10,480,025

Other Securities/....
Notes
Gold and Silver Coin,

national

debt, and

1,820,724
8,469,908
2,249,402
1,886,903
9.850.881
1,888,588
2,101,846

dividend

22,036,075
,

8,947,140
v 984,681

Citizens’
Nassau..
Market
St. Nicholas
Shoe and Leather.,
Corn Exchange....

Oriental
Marine

accounts

10,487,984
Other Deposits
13,724,188
Seven day <fc other bills
451,740

2,058,807
3,852,830

£42,447,921

Park
Mec. Bk. As
Grocers
North River......
East River
Man. and Mer.....
Fourth National...
Central
Second National...

vious

preceding account*, compared with those of the
week, exhibit:
'
'
,

An Increase of Circulation of
An Increase of Public Deposits of
An Increase of Other Deposits of

No

£424,083
906,691

of
of
of
of

Other Securities of
Bullion of
Rest of
Reserve of

The Monileur

France, made

1,285,730
112,756
10,140
308,634

A-

Surplus

oi

June

182,500,000

0

7,044.776

2

182,500,000 0
7,044,776 2
22.105,750 14

22,105,750 14
4,000,000 0
802,508,125 0
8,113,266 57
170,506,294 26
187,151,770 3
81,275,975 0

Treasury account
Accounts current at Paris.
Ditto in the provinces
Dividends payable
Various discounts
Re-discpunts i

14,818.509 75
522,887 12
1,427,623 17
752,993 36
9,886.943 15

receipt; "izi distributed.;

Sundries...

1.442,614,913 57

,

in Paris

Government stock reserve
Ditto other securities
Securities held
Hotel and property of the bank

m

286,180,355

0

44,041,485 15
12,154,286 0

0
0

15.568.800
9,947,250
30,894.900 0
20.135.800 0
615,800

939,577

253,802
807,769

12,827,951

269,414

4.155,180
[470,747

1,189,866
958,783
1,552.950
478,668

985,586

259,435

876,982

158,276
1,271,514
8,905,866
4,397,006
866,877

2,414,474

11,576,874

17.487

119,551

827,507

266,251

22,144

55,001

819,213

$218,541,975

19,100,594

6,001,774

198,199,005

269,918

25,000
21,375

^

At the
same

corresponding period of the last three
items'eompared as follows :
Loans anjl
Discounts.

1862
1868
1864..
1865.

0
0

0

12,980,750 14
36.557,487 91
100,000,000 0
8,413,185 0
4,777 5

-...

$147,997,486
175,022,768
199,699,742
218,541,975

..

Specie.
$82,098,174

years,

Circulation.
$9,212,897

88,566,895
20,084,987

5,922,000
4,696,107

19,100,594

the

Deposit#.
$127,588,055
160,975,771
158,225,977
198,199,005

6,001,774

>

62,519,708

following comparison shows the totals of the Banks’
Circula¬
Loans.

Jan.
Jan.

4,000.000

0

Jan.

797,822,975

0

Jan.
Feb.

7,689,816
131,499,115
171,816,002
28,234,759
597,106
13.336,333
2,789,444

10,642^460

10
0
89
0
76
60

5
92

3.380,078,539 47

497,626,559 43
544,857
238,262,938
280,197,705
43,299,285
11.755.486
15,329,000
9,904,350
30,436,600
19,637,350
606,100
435,600
60,000,000
12,980,750
36.657.487
100,000,000
8,383,912
2.226,202
11,894,355

62
14
0

15
0
0
0

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Mch.
Mch.
Mch.
Mch.

Apl. 1.,
Apl. 8..
Apl. 15.,
Apl. 22.,
Apl. 29..
May 6..
May 18..
May 20..
May 27..

June 3..
June 10..
June 17..
June 24..

July 1..
July 8...

0
0
0
0
0
14
91
0

7.
14.
21.
28.
4.
11.
18.
25.
4..
11..
18.,
25..

tion.

Specie.

Legal

Deposits.

195,044,687 20,152,892 8,183,526 147,821,891

.

21,357,608 3,074,029
20,211,569 2 979,851
18.896,985 2,957,899
19,682,808 2,868,646
20,297,346 2,821,996
20,682,819 2,855.982
'20,092,378 2,739,388
186,569,665 19,880,183 2,720,666
188,120,890 20,787,888 2,741,684
211,486,651 22,256,596 4,662,505
207,677,503 22,066,524 4,457,162
204.458,855 20.584,668 4,888,980
204,158,839 20,045.906 4,773,528
206,508,095 19,588,784 4,757,862
204,723,196 19,122,288 4,700,210
204,277,578 19,049,913 4,660,659
212,172,277 20.088,399 4,886,987
218,502,980 28,553,281 4,889,562
219,810,780 28,194,402 5,032,944
212,445,121 22,063.929 5,066,693
210,416,548 21,346.493 5,323,082
208,392,635 18,480,620 5,402,758
208,944,311 16,680,877 5,647,944
213,590,280 15.906,818 5,789,070
216,585,421 15,854,990 5,818,445

.

.

.

,

,,
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

189,686,750
187,060,586
186,117,375
185,639,790
1S5,515,904
186,365,126
183.584,735

218,541,975

19,100,594

148,931,299
156,068,355
149,247,991
152,703,816
156,711,166
156,150,684
158,948,481
158,009,588
152,134,448 26,713,408
174,479,837 33.645,014
166,956,508 85,295,153
173,8T0,491 42,989,362
174,850,185 46,424,957
177,815,945 51,061,462
184,244,399 59,954,987
193,188,788 66,096.274
200,466,785 66,258,849
208,369,886 61,052 537
208,854,725 55,625,517
197.081,017 54,524,078
186,935,680 51,065,440
185,509,953 56,201.886
189,947,334 62,567,844
187,508,936 58,560,589
191,656,773 60.904 445

6,001,774 198,199,005 62,519,708

The deviations from the returns of the
as

Tenders.

follows

:

655,828,878

663,814,484
584,179,409
.518,805,222
481,028,121
511,361,887
412,802,453
625,739.288

60^796,728
509,148,601
488,658,684
427,761,675
272.740.215
859,050,814
508.899.215
511.914,441
510,767,845
429,221,798
889,049,879
420,542,766

542,070,189
619,448,415

478,720,318
875,504,141

previous week

are

-:

Inc.

Loans

Specie..
Legal Tenders

Clearings.
585,055,671
538,780,682
611,194,907

!

$1,956,554
8,245,604
1,615,254

Circulation...
Net

Deposits

Inc.

$188,329
6,542,282

1

i The large increase

of specie is the result of the payment of
0
Expenses of management
85
interest upon July coupons at the Sub-Treasury.
Sundries
17.499.148 60
The aug¬
33
mentation of the deposits is partially due to the same cause,
1,442,614,913 57
1,380,078,539 47
all the gold receipts of the banks, except so much as they
New York City Banks.—Tiie following statement shows have received
upon, the coupons of their own bonds being in¬
the condition of the Associated Banks of the city of New cluded in the deposits. Probably it may
approximate accu¬
York, for the week ending at the commencement of business racy to estimate the increase in net deposits, exclusive of
on
July 8th, 1865 :
specie, at $4,000^,000, of which $1,615,254 is in legal tenders*& branches
—

nil

512,901,803 34
267,475 1
274,008,610 37

448.000
60.000,000

Ditto in the provinces
Ditto to the State

1,427,450

4.881,991'

3,837
14,773
98,340
1,488
1,487,589

.......

22,1865

CREDITOR.

Cash and bullion.
Commercial bills overdue
Ditto discounted in Paris
I
Ditto in the branches
Advances on bullion in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on public securities in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on obligations and railway shares
Ditto in the provinces
.
Ditto on securities in the Credit Foncier

847,000
779,000
940,000

Statements for each week of the current year:

June 29, 1865.
f.
c.

provinces

681,857

229,895
480,600

41,621
11,168

1.420,751

Manufacturers’.,;..

The

to capital
Reserve of the bank and branches
New reserve
Notes in circulation and at the branches..
Drafts drawn by the bank on the branches
of the bank payable in Paris or in the

58,593
26,740

50,890

811,862
787,835

1,538,080

206,300
1864.267

Totals.

DEBTOR.

Profits, in addition

16,978
455,181
41,729

470,192
906,688
508,240
209,971
636,865
585,664
542,545

8,584,000

15,951,921
1,181,198
229,896

Bull’s Head

:

Capital of the bank

'

60,864
; 21,737
*5,127

29,832
08,245

14.338,749

*

1,572,698
1,350,887

982,092

10,768

14,136.859

‘

67,622

publishes the following return of the Bank
up to the 29th ult.; the return for the pre¬

vious week is added

1,628,088

32,200

34,027
18.857

474,074
789,447

8,998,699
1,591,901
1,148,967
2,828,845

116,544

38,112

1,552,418
418,822
2.288.701

Dry Dock

Change in Government Securities.

An Increase
An Increase
An Increase
A Decrease

of

pre¬

1,629,689

11,886

55,458
60,841
68,660
248,446
16,648
26,565

958,193

.

The

2,887,822

57,854
74,600
6,884
9,958
,

761,758"
411,989
1,795,705
1,951,598
2,678,600
2,019,558

5,019,926

12.178
4.433

20,827

99,455

169,255
303,920

1,086,558
4,799,105
11,868,718
1,626,864

878,095
140,208

5,469,042

64.678

■

-

283,188
815,016

7,246,948

68,552

27,148

'

759,087
1,841,649
497,347

7,018,228
1,110,056
2,131,969
2,167,447
1,434,589
2,555,922
2,456,567
2,433,993
4,917,808

41,642

201,465

8,268,827

Imp. and Traders..

£42,447,921

85,680
68,099
27,965
177,878

2.691.882
1,044,634
1,628,203

Atlantic

454,885
724,451

7,790,089

820,786

44,861

3,010,641

...

1,802,111

318,457

2,517,487

Continental........
Commonwealth....

874,100
4,010,994
-

2,594,612
110,185
22,476
18,287
264,000

118,460
20,957
120,205
25,289

1,674457

Metropolitan

10,855

77,760
185,852

1,258,155

People’s

105,882

977.589

8,278,989

Irving

Government Securities,

*

1,977,275.*

North Amer
Hanover

1,977,949

1,666,488

s

6,831,137
1,720.54S
1,075,820
1,982,514
1,428.107
.664,998

702.216

..

$1,625,186
J,. 116,202

2,587,348

988,105

2,471,520
2,250,874
2,280,640

National....,

829,085

Chatham..-

£80,072,985

Proprietors’ Capital. .£14,553,000

252,129

4,815,984

Republic

£80,072,985

Rest
Public

260,625

5,922,991
10,625,966
17,179,240
5,485,976

Silver bullion.

$45,721
15,761
26,584
25,190

*8,975

State of N. Y.
Amer. Exchange..
Commerce
.

Legal
Tenders.

Deposits.
$18,947,816

1453,972

7,589,660
5,840,318
4,174,649
8,486,594

1,718,941

Government Debt.. .£11,015,100
Other Securities
8,634,900
Gold Coin and Bullion 15,422,985

Net

tion.

7,218,088
6,185,648
4,754,211
2,674,760
9,499,895
3,246,634
8,756,284
2,090,827

is the statement of the
Leatherf Manf....;.
June 28, 1865 :
Seventh Ward

.....

BANKING

Specie.
$7,975,719
909,786
772,772

$7,668,186
5,979.218

Butch. <fe Drovers.
Mech’s <fc Trad’s...
Greenwich

DEPARTMENT.

£30,072,985

srage
Circula¬

Loans and
Discounts.

Banks.

.

ISSUE

[July 15,1865.




THE CHRONICLE.

July 15,1865.]

The increase in loans falls much below that of deposits,

show¬

tendency toward. mone¬

ing an inactivity of business, and a
tary ease.

The

79

of the
banks, in respect to number, capital and circulation,
from October, 1863, to latest dates:

Date.
weekly statement of the Phil¬ October,
1863
adelphia Banks, made up to the 10th inst., present the fol¬ January, 1864
April,
“
lowing aggregates as compared with those of the previous July*

Philadelphia Banks.—The

Banks.

This week.

$14,442,350
50,054,700
1,184,631

Capital Stock

Loans.

Specie
Poe from other Banks

October,

Last week.

$14,442,350
50.188,778
1,187,700
5,158,164

8,718.878

7,S47,90i

Due to other Banks.

7,827,457
41,844,059
6,758,585

40,9f 0,990

Deposits

Circulation
United States Legal Tender and
Demand Notes

6,771,226

3,069

Inc.

Inc.
Deo.
Inc.
Dec.

“

“

1,489,294
20,534
868,062

12,641

20,801,492

19,664,918

Dec.

1,186,580

following comparison shows the condition of the Phil*
adelphia banks at monthly periods since 1863 :
Date.

Loans.

January 5,1863
July 6,1868
January 4,1864
July 4,1864
January 3, 1865
February 6, “
March 6,
“

$37,679,675
35,936,811

April 3,
May 1,

“

49,228,540
60,522,080 '

June 5,

M

51,726,389
53, 95,688

Specie.
$4,510,750
4,860,745
4,158,585
8,955,866
1,808,683
1,702,776
1,889,264
1,843.223
1,262,258
1,258,782

July 10,

«

50,188,778

1,187,700

85,693-808
40,918,009
48,059,403
50,269,478

National Banks

-

Circulation.
$4,504,115
2,564,558
2,055,810
2,154,528
2,793,468
4,893,178
5,346,021
5,893,626
6,441,407
6,717,758

Deposits.
$28,429,188
28,504,544
29.878,920
87,945,305
89,845,963
38,496,837
38,391,622
38,810,847
44,794,824
41,518,579

6,758.585

41,344,056

Individual

First

Disconnts.

$1,000,000

Second.../

100,000
750,000
200,000
600,000
250,000
200,000
450,000
500,000
500,000
250,000
234,780
120,000

Third

Fourth,
ICS

Commercial....
Merchants
Union—
Northwestern..
Mannlhctnrers.

City

Traders—...

Total

$5,054,780

'

$1,199,289
213,458
818,882
188,714
495,943
290,693
170,772

05
09
05
98
80
22
03

240,675 79
667,036 61
297,285 30
162,852 12

*

177,106 59
168,846 50

$4,986,856 04

Deposits.
$1,230,409 77
806,869 10
1,824,475 68
473,723 87
581,644
431,396
114,394
469,571
2,319,875
260,910
178,108
219,063

98
88
80
94
92
24
09
80

471,519 29

$9,331,993 36

National Banks Authorized.—The
were

authorized

Locations.

Names.

Shetucket..Norwich, Ct

StLouis. Mo—
Union
Merchants’. Pokeepsie, N. Y.
Meriden
Meriden, Ct
N. Bl’k Riv.Proctorville, Vt.
Citizens’... .Baltimore, Md..
Tolland
Tolland, Ct....

Abington... Abington, Mass.

Tint.
Wellsb’rg,W.V.
Atlantic
New York.
ContinentaLNew York—..
Union
Wilmington,Del
N. Bank of

Chemnng.Elmira, N. Y...

Oneida
Utica, N. Y
BankofN.Y
Nat.Bank.
Associa’n.New York
American

Exchange.New York

New Capital
Previously authorized
'

Total

Capital authorized

following National
during the, week ending July 8,
Names.
Locations.
First
Utica, N. Y
Traders’.... Providence.R.I.
The Clark ..Rochester, N.Y.
The Nation¬
al Bank.. .Coxsackie, N.Y.
Nat. Bank of

Capital.

OrangeCo.Goshen, N.‘Y..
Riv.,N. J.
100,000 Mechanics’.Syracuse, N. Y.
800,000 First
Woonsocket,RI

110,000

Capital.
$35,000
500,000
150,000
800,000
50,000
500,000
' 75,000
50,000

600,000
200,000
200,000

112,000

Ocean Co.. .Tom’s

75,000
140,000
107,000

2,000,000 The Nation¬

203,175
100,000
400,000

3,000,000

al Bank... Winterset,

Iowa
CumberlandCumberland, R.I

125.000

Ft. StanwixRome, N. Y

75,000
75,000
250,000
110,000
150,000
150,000

Greenwich .E. Gr’nwich,R.I
National BkNewbury, Vt...
Merchants’ .Memphis, Tenn.
Goshen
Goshen, N. Y...
Nat. Union.Woonsocket,RI

5,000,000

50,000

'

,y

$15,292,175
340,938,811

«.

$356,230,986

Papers have been filed and banks reported for organiza¬
tion; but deposits of bonds not completed as yet, with capi¬
tals to the following amounts, in different States as follows:
Maine.
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Connecticut
Rhode Island
West Virginia

Virginia
Indiana
Illinois

si

%

;...$

1

Wisconsin

i

Michigan

#

Total

685
736

“
18, “
Mar. 4, “
“
18, “
Apr. 1, “
8. “
“
22, “
May 6, “
“
18, “
4,

782
815

.

“

20,
“
27,
June 8,

993

1,041
1,117

L

1,172

“

10,

“
“

94

.

17, “

July
“

1,180

“

“

1,185
1,212

973.

“

“

179,121,296
186,041,785
192,949,786
202,944,486
225,246,800
232,064,150
246,054,170
264,954,170
276,167,470
281,868,820
284,409,120
298,971,020

855
908

*

“

1.251

“

•••••••«

299,348,520

;

1,297

810,295,891

•••••••

1 QQ4
A

820,924,601
340,938,000
856,280,986

1, u

jt)UT

1,378
1,410

8, “

’

$29,166
12.144,650
25,825,695
51,894,150

76,809,890
78,724,620
88,058,200

87,288,800

73,556,880
99,825,600
104,750,540
111,684,670
114,524,000
119,961,800
126,860,880

128,759,020
130,680,170
182,472,690
185,607,060

187,772,706
140,797,755
148,064,876
146,927,975
149,098,605

Capital.

(Marked thus *
National.)

are

America
American*

American Exchange*
Atlantic*
Atlantic (Brooklyn).
.

Bowery*
Broadway*
Brooklyn

Bull’s Head*
Butchers & Drovers’
Central*
Central (Brooklyn)..
Chatham*
Chemical
Citizens’

100,000 Minnesota
;

$15,839,085

The total amount of circulation issued to national banks

during the week ending July 8th, was $2,165,630; which,
added to the $146,927,975 previously issued, makes the
aggregate of national bank circulation, issued to that el ite,
$149,093,605.
■

Dividend.

Market.

Amount

Last Paid.

Periods.

100 3,000,000 Jan. and July..
100
600,000
100 5,000,000 May and Nov..
100
800,000 Jan. and July..
50
500,000 Jan. and July..
26
50
60
25

Bid. Ask.

180

July
May
July
July

5 lisx 114
...*•

6
6

.12
1,000,000 Jan. and July... July
300,000 Jan. and July... July
July
!
200,000 ..Quarterly
July
.....I 120
800,000 Jan. and July
100 2,000,000 May and Nov
....' 108
May
50
200,000 Jan. and July.. July
25
1 125
450,000 Jan„ and July : July
100
July
<
300,000 .Quarterly
25
400,000 Jan. and July... July ...5 & 5 ex.
100 1,000,000 May and Nov... May
6 175
50
—
300,000 Jan. and Jnly... July
100 10,000,000 Jan. and July... July
...5
100
750,000 Jan. and July... July
5 99
100 3,000,000 Jan. and July... July
4 95
100 1,000,000 Feb. and Aug... February
5 110
100
100,000 Jan. and July... July
—
30
3
200,000 ..Quarterly
July
50
4
259,150 Jan. and July... July
100
250,000 Jan. and July... July
5
100
150,000 Jan. and July... July ...5 & 3 ex.
100
500,000 May and Nov... May
10
Jan. and July... July ...7 & 5 ex.
100 6,000,000 March and Sept March
5 99
80
600,000 May and Nov... May
6
>20
160,000 March and Sept. March
100 1,500,000 April and Oct... April
6
25
200,000 May and Nov... May
6
50
Jan. and July... July
300,000
,6
100 1,000,000 Jan. and Jnly... July
5 105
100 1,500,000 Jan. and July... July
4 105
50
500,000 Jan. and Jnly. July
4 105
60
600,000 Feb. and Aug.. i February
6
60
4
400,000 Feb. and Aug... February
60 2,050,000 Feb. and Aug... February
6
30
210,000 Jan. and Jnly... July
100
600,000 Jan. and Jnly... July
.....5
30
400,000 Feb. and Aug... February ......6
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July... July
4 100
25 2,000,000 Jan. and July... July ...5 & 5 ex
50
500,000 Jan. and July... July
25
500,000 May and Nov,.. May
5 101
25
600,000 May and Nov... May ...5 & 5 ex.
100 1,000,000 Jan. and July... July
6 125*
..

..

103

.

.

City
City (Brooklyn)

Commerce*
Commonwealth*....
Continental*
Com

Exchange
Currency*
Dry Dock

.....

East River*

Eighth*...

Fifth*
First*
First (Brooklyn)* ...
Fourth*
Fulton
Far. & Cit.(Wm’sbg)
Gallatin
;
Greenwich....
Grocers’*
Hanover*

Importers ^Traders’

Irving*

110
105

99

106*

...

LeatherManufact’rs*

Long Island (Brook.)

Manhattan
Manufact’ rers’ (Wbg)
Manufac. &Mecn’nics

Marine;..;

Nassau
Nassau (Brooklyn)..
National
New York*
"New York County*.

1,223,350
780,000
110,000

LIST.

.

100,000
150,000
150,000
170,000
100,000
50,000

$2,870,240

STOCK

Companies.

3,463,495

$450,000 New York
225,000 New Jersey...
725,000 Pennsylvania
1,400,000 Delaware
230,000 Maryland..
1,777,000 Ohio
200,000 Iowa
800,000 Missouri
265,000 Kansas
300,000 Nebraska
200,000

BANK

Market*
Mechanics’
Mechanics’ (Brook.)
Mech. Bank. Assa*.
Mechanics ATraders’
Mercantile*
Merchants’*
Merchants’ Exch.*.

Papers have been filed for banks with an aggregate capi¬
tal of $5,962,667 that have been authorized to
proceed, but
have not completed their
organization, making together an
additional national bank capital of about twenty-two mil¬
lions already authorized.




681

s

7, M
21, “

Feb.

95,312,945
99,889,400
143,641,400
145,524,560
169,099,296

524

Circulation.

Chicago.—The

of

Capital.

Banks
1865:

..«.»••

“

following is a state¬
ment^ the capital, discounts, and deposits of the National
Chicago, Ill., on the 1st July, 1865 :

Fifth.
Me

857
469

'

The

“

137

y

January, 1865
$184,018

Inc.

Capital.

$7,184,716
14,528,712
42,204,474

94

.

••••••••

week:

the progress

following comparison shows

national

....

Metropolitan*

NewYorkExchange*

Ninth*
I
North America*
North River
Ocean
Oriental
Pacific
Park*

..

50
50
100
100
100
60

100
100
100
100

100

Sixth*.....

60
50
50
50
100
25
20
100
100
100
100
100
100

State of New York..

100

Tenth*

100
100
40
50

..........

Peoples’

Phoenix*

Republic*

St. Nicholas’*
Seventh Ward* :..
Second *
Shoe & Leather

....

Third* ....:
Tradesmen’s*
Union....

Williamsburg City..

50

3,000,000 June and Dec
1,235,000 Jan. and July...
4,000,000 Jan. and July...
1,000,000 Jan. and Jnly...
300,000 Jan. and Jnly...
1,500,000 April and Oct...
3,000,000 Jan. and July...
200,000 Jan. and July...
150,000 Quarterly.....
1,000,000 Jan. and Jnly...
1,000,000 Jan. and July...
400,000 Jan. and Jnly...
..

June

106

5 107

July
6 102
July ...5 & 5 ex.
July
4
July
5
April
July
5
July
...9
July
..3
July
...5
July ...5 & 5 ex. 106 106
July
6
1,000,000 Feb. and Aug... February
4 80* 92X
300,000 Feb. and Ang... February
5
422,700 May and Nov... May
.6
2,000,000 Jan. and Jnly... July ..6 & 10 ex.
412,500 Jan. and July... July
5 110
100
1,800,000 Jan. and July... July
110
2,000,000 Feb. and Aug... February
5
1,000,000 Feb. and Ang... February
6 loo* 103
600,000 Jan. and July... July
800,000 May and Nov
May
1,600,000 April and Oct- April......... .4 100
t•#*’*
200,000 May and Nov...
2,000,000 May and Nov... May
5
1,000,000 Jan. and Jnly... July
6
1,000,000 Feb. and Ang... February
1,000,000 Jan. and July... July ...6 & 4 ex. 125
1,500,000 May and Nov... May
500, 000 Jau. and July... July
4
..

..

•••

• •••

o~

15,1865.

THE CHRONICLE.

80

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE:
(REPRESENTED BY THE CLOSING SALE

Satur

SECURITIES.

,

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

r

6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,

Wed.

r

Tliur

do

jl06%

...registered. 106%:
small coupon.
.registered.

105%!l(

...

5-20s (new)
5-20s (new)..:...

107%!
105% 105%
—

—

105%105%;1(
105%;1(

—

1106

104% 1105
105
‘105%

Cleveland and Toledo

—

Oregon War, 1881
do.
do.
(* yearly).

5s, 1871

coupon.

\

1871.!

endorsed coupon.
.registered.

1871
1874
1874

|Hudson Rtver

coupon.
endorsed coupon.

....registered.

1874
10-40s
10-40s

J.

coupon
endorsed coupon.

97%! 97% S7% 97%;

7-30s Treas. Notes
do
do
do
do
do
do

1st series.
2d series.
oil series.

10^)

90% I
98

100

99%

i

—

|

99

95

:

..

;

ii*f

_

i

do
do

.;.

4

78

73% 73%

Joseph RR.)...

74

)

100'

do

96% 96

96

95% 95%

26%; 26%
HZ; 250

26%

25% 26%
60

99%
99%: 99% 100% 98
100
101% 100% 101%

50 99% 98%
85

30

100 34

preferred. 100
100

100

100

do

do

50

preferred.... 50
99

do

1st

do

’

mortgage...

99

93
97

98

Income

do
do
do
do

•

do

do

-

.

Cleveland and

«.

86

Interest
Extension

84

1st mortgage..
2d mortgage

84

90

3d mortgage, conv..

4th mortgage...

Toledo, Sinking Fund

Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 1st mort.
do
do
do
2d mort,
Erie, 1st mortgage, 1868
do 2d mortgage, 1864
do 2d mortgage, 1879
do 3d mortgage, 1883
do 4th mortgage, 1880
do 5th mortgage, 1888
;
.

...

-

75%

77

103

101%

99%

100

94

103

Galena and Chicago, extended
do
do
2d mortgage
:
Hannibal and Sr. Joseph, Land Grants

-

72% i

95%
64

Harlem, 1st mortgage, 1869-72.

■

••

’

V

99

Chicago and Rock Island, 1st mortgage
Pittsburg, 2d mortgage

.

93%

do
do

95

Consolidated and Sinking Fund

2d

mortgage, 1868....

:

Hudson River, 1st mortgage, 1869.
do
2d mortgage, (8. F.), 1885
do
3d mortgage, 1875....
do
convertible, 1867
Illinois Central 7s, 1875
Lackawanna and Western Bonds
Marietta and Cincinnati, 1st mortgage

.02

102%

.

73%

71%

72

; 72

72

114

Michigan Central 8s, 1869-72

69%;

60

do

1

do

8s, new, 1382

97

Michigan Southern, Sinking Fund.
do

97
80

do
•
do
Income..
Mississippi and Missouri, Land Grants.
.

Stock,

New York Central 6s, 1883
do
do
6s, 1887....
do
do
6s, Real Estate
do
do *
6s, subscription....‘
do
do
7s, 1876

Wiater Loan..
.

!

!

|

53,1867
5s, 1868.-.,
5s, 1870......

do
do

2d mortgage, 7s
do
Goshen Line, 1868
Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien, 1st mort
Milwaukee and St. Paul, 1st mortgage

,...;

Municipal.
Brooklyn 6s.....
do
6s, Water Loan
do
6s, Public Park Loan

99%

99%
,...

j
.;.

‘06

I • do
do
7s, convertible, 1876
Ohio and Mississippi, 1st mortgage.

.......

Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago, 1st mort..
do
do

.•

i

f

5s. 1875,

5s, 1876,.,,,...
5s, 1S00
os, 1898...,,

5s,F; Loan. 1868..
Railroad. Stocks.
Central of New Jersey.*
•

69

100

Cleveland and
do
do
.

.

-•

40%

100,

.

do
do
do
do

74

..

•

65% 66

on and Quincy, 8 per cent...
waukee, 1st mortgage
Chicago afid Northwestern, Sinking Fund.

.

i

.

•

—

100!

Bufialo, Npw York and Erie, 1st mort, 1877...

.1.

•

55.1873..;,..,..
5s. 1874.*.

—

!

Chicago and Alton, Sinking Fund

..

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

' 50

100:

Atlantic and Great Western, 1st mort...,
do
j
do ,
2d mort....

...

Jersey City 6s,
Kings County 6s
New York 7s, 1875
dd
6s, 1676,,^.-.
do
6s, 1878.
J
do
6s, 1887

i

1st pref.. .100
2d pref.. .100;

Toledo, Wabash and Western

.

6s, Improvement
imp

81%

50

Railroad Bonds:

...

Jr

45

1001
1001

avenue

do

78%

,..;

...

•

78%

88

:

.100

.•

preferred
preferred.

Louis, Alton and Terre Haute

Third

62%

do
6s, 1878
do
6s, 1883.
do
7s, 1868..
do
7s, 1878
do
7s, War Loan
Minnesota 8s.
do
7s, Indian War
Missouri 6s
do
.6s, (Hannibal and St.
..do
.6s, (Pacific RR).
New York 7s, 1870
do
6s, 1865
do
6s, 1866.
do
6s, 1867...
do
6s, 1868.
do
6s, 1872.
do
6s, 1873.
do
6s, 1874.
do
6s, 1875.
do
6s, 1877.
5 s, 1866,
do
do
5s, 1863.
do
5s, 1871.
do
5s,
1875-.
do
do
5s, 1876...
North Carolina 6s
Ohio 6s, 1868...f
do 6s, 1870
do 6e, 1875
do ' 6s, 1886
do 5s, 1865
Rhode Island 6s
South Carolina 6s
Tennessee 6s, 1868
:
v
do
6s, Long Loans
do ‘- 5s
Vermont 6s
Virginia 6s, coupon
do
6s, inscribed
Wisconsin 6s
do
6s, War Loan
-

88

100;

:Stonington

;.

-

60

'.

do
do
: Second avenue
! Sixth avenue

75

133
70

..100 111% 112—111— 110% 110% in
100136 133 136% 138% 138% 139
50

....

...

•

81% | 79% 80%

New York Central
1001 96%
New Haven and Hartford.
100:
Norwich aDd Worcester
100
26
Ohio and Mississippi Certificates
do
do
do
preferred....
Panama
100
Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago
.100 99

St.

Michigan 6s, 1873

■Vl

"

do
do
preferred
Mississippi and Missouri

'

.

.

70% 68%
104
103%

100

do
Milwaukee
do
do
do
do
do
do
Milwaukee and St. Paul

:Reading

...

Louisiana 6s
Massachusetts 5s
do
j.
6s

131

50;

|New Jersey.

-

Kentucky 6s, 186S^72.
do
6s, large, 1868-73

|103

29% 28% 29
64% 62% 64
109% 107% 108%

100 j 108 ,108 '108%! —
100 63% : 63% 66% 67
do
guaranteed...100
40
100
and Prairie du Chien
39%!

Morris and Essex

Georgia 6s

hi

110%

Michigan Central
Michigan So. and N. Indiana

98%, 98%

Illinois Canal Bonds, 1860
do Registered, 1S60
;
do 6s, coupon,’79, after 1860
do
'.do
do
1862
do
do
1865
do
do
do
do
1870
.do
do
do 1877
do
do 1879...
do
..do
j War Loan..
—1
Indiana. 6s, War. Loan.
do 5s'
...do ..,2*3
.;
Iowa 7s,,..
Iowa 7s, War Loan.
..

100;
100 j
100:

Long Island

Marietta and Cincinnati
do
do
1st
do
do
2d

97%

•

_

100;

Indianapolis and Cincinnati
Joliet and Chicago.

1

100

6s, Certificates, (old)
6s,
do
(new)

State.
California 7s, large
do
7s
Connecticut 6s, 1872
do
6s, 1882
do
6s, 10-40s

97%

97% |

registered.

5s, 10-40s

100;

Hlinois Central

,

FrL

50

Erie.
:
do preferred
Hannibal and St. Joseph
do
do
preferred
Harlem
do
preferred

small.

110% 111

50 102

Delaware, Lackawanna and Western..
Eighth Avenue

1105

Thun

100

—

j
100:
1
...100 28%: 29%; 29%
100 63% 64 I 64%
100,107% 107% 109%
100!
1
50j 70%; 68% 70%

Chicago and Northwestern
do
do
preferred
Chicago and Rock Island
:
Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati..
Cleveland and Pittsburg

107% 107%. 107% 10S

Turi. Wed.

—

100! —
100:111

preferred...:

| Chicago and Milwaukee

coupon. 107
endorsed coupon.
smaU coupon.
coupon.

10 j
100;

| Chicago, Burlington and Quincy

114

113

do

Mon,

Satur

SECURITIES.

Kri.

.

Brooklyn City
Chicago and Alton

coupon. 113

5-20s
5-20s

5s,
5s,
5s,
50,
5s,
5s,
5s,

rT^isn.

registered.

1881
18S1
1881
1881
5-20s

6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,

Mon.

115

registered

.United States 6s, 1867
do
do
6s, 1868
do
do
6s, 1868
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

REPORTED OFFICIALLY ON EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING FRIDAY, JULY 14.)

139%

American Gold
United States.

-

!

.

!
100

do
do

■

do
do
do
do

95

2d mort...
3d mort...

St. Louis, Alton and Terre Haute, 1st mort...
do
do
do
2d, pref....
do
'
do
do
2d, income.
Toledo and

—

do
do

84

86%

Wabash, 1st mortgage
do
1st mortgage, extended.
do
2d mortgage
do

Interest Bonds

do

Equipment

—1

H



■

'/*

v?

8L

THE CHRONICLE.

July 15,1865.]
/y\

Commercial

Sinee Jan. 1
1865.

.bales
.bbls.

•

July 14.

past week has been active and buoyant,—favored
Monday, by a slight but pretty steady advance in gold. The

Trade the
since

increased deliveries of Western and Southern staples,
and stronger and more general confidence in the stability of prices,
is still exhibited in the stimulated demand for consumption which
is felt in all directions. The wants of the great manufacturing and
commercial populations of the New England and Middle States in
all those great Staples, have proved to be so great, from having
been long held in abeyance, that export orders are still difficult to
execute in Cotton, Breadstuff and Provisions, although the prices
bid on foreign orders have materially advanced. The most notable
movements and advance, have taken place in Shipping Flour and
Wheat, Pork, Lard, Cotton, Sugar, Coffee and Teas. In many
other staples, howler, there has been considerable activity.
At to-day’s matffet, the feeling, in sympathy with the advance in
effect of the

gold,

quite

was

b^yaut, checked, however, towards the close by

Cotton, (for

‘the reaction.

an

exception.)

dull throughout the

was

The advance in flour called out free sellers.

day, under large receipts.

receipts are increasing. Coarse grains
closed drooping. .Pork advanced a dollar a barrel, with large
sales; other Provisions remaining without essential change. Sugar
was very active, and
higher, but other groceries barely firm.
Southern markets, where

Metals
It is

were

firmer in

"

some cases.

noticeable feature

a

weeks, that

some

of coddling and nursing.
figures. Breadstuffs, for
instance, have seldom seen lower gold prices than in the past month,
and aU the favorable ciicumstunces which surrounded the market
to-day, could not prevent a decline in an important branch of the

a rise require a great deal
If left to themselves, prices fall to very low

a very

dull closing.
THE WEEK ENDING

FRIDAY, JULY

Camd. &
Coast¬
wise.

Erie
R.R.

2,444

26,410
; §51,

204
872

-.887
332 547

2,999

3G&.117

Riv’r R.R. of
K.R. NY.

98
1.817

5,322
8,526

Cosn Meal. ...bgs.
Corn Meal. .bbls.

"Whiskey...

« •

•

407.665

•

R.R.

144

2,197

....

657

.

Wheat
Corn
Oats

Hud.J CentT

Amboy

26,683

65

..bbls.

Flour

North
Kiv.

....

•
*

Malt

....

657
....

....

.....

1,1*8

....

Beans
Pear

....

60

772

—

1.163
143

a,

4,623
8

50

268

2,599

2,086

389

30

Hops

..

..

10
20

...

676

896

17,920

840

244

8,529

847

274

730
49

>

.

Tar

i

2.953
815

,

,

,

■

90

55
66

....

40

2,308
44,810

....

;2,0(50

1,500

4,SOI

....

964
83

....

....

....

•

•

.

•

....

2.958
815

....

....

205
823
320

79

223

:—

Copper Plates....

..pigs.

Lead

Spelter....
Sugar....

.

-'

2000

M

•

....

.bbls.

.

Sugar

Molasses
Peaches...

....

pkgs.

.

400
7

.

Peanuts...

.

hhds
.bbls

i

.

,

4

.....

.

....

•

....

•

«

•

•

64

.bbls.

.

f

.

....

....

/

-

£
194^
68
621

j

^

.

....

2,526

921
2,673

1,546

13,882

1,750

s;o

•

•

.

.

.

2*666

•

.

.

«

400
7
12.390

.

12,390

2,449
81,800
....

9,623

16,706
87,063

....

last year :




9,921

2,237

6,265
6,061

6,063

16,084

6,370
7,505

tea.

.....<

10,540

9,075

.pkgs.

46,860
11,305

116,100
22,610

bales.;

Tobacco, domestic
Tobacco, foreign

82,405

62,090

17,856

9,385

Tallow

Wool, domestic.
Wool, for, city

.*.

..

Leather

13,380
82,555
1,195,900

bbls.
sides
.bbls.

f......

Oil, sperm.....
Oil, whale

71,410
25,075
219,680
1,331,600
37,985
48,652
81o,710

30,120

..

Hops
Whiskey

^.....

18,186
64,380

216,955

7,960

4,495

Oil,lard..-

lbs.

Whalebone

500,000

458,500

Imports of a few important foreign articles for the week,
a comparative statement,

together

with

Since
Jan. 1st

7,192

Coal
Cotton
Coffee
Molasses

'

54

Same time
1864.

104,429
84,816

For the
Week.

80,023
28,919
481,587

310.362
93,633

7,841
1,314

191,874
184,85$
285,144
12,056

141,235
153,963
608,292
22,495

869

do
Teas
Tobacco
Wool

32,401

84,767

6,612

<

‘The
mestic

exports from this port of some of the leading
produce have been as follows :

Cottou
Flour

8,121

Meal

200,446

Wheat
Corn
•••••»••»*

447,245
60,621
74,210

75,886
2,648

........tcs. and bbls

2,876
8,951

Bacon

^

25,051
705,272
80,171
697,380

3,401
51,830

bbls.

articles of do-

Since
Jan.l.

Last

Corn

75,875

5,468
4,785
1,302

hdde., bble. and tcs.
...| .bxs. and bags

Sugar

253,766

••••••••••••••ft

Ashes, Pots....

•

•

159,801

Same
time 1864.

21,880

1,177.282
69,267
7,946,385
169,230
59,108

83,198
767,459
337,685

61,696

100

•

5,211
16,663
756

Lard
Cheese
Butter

5,587

168,029
60,895
4,843

149,627

135,855

11,717
7,708

259,578
15,518

m

•

•

•

•

•••••••••!lbs.

Hops

-

bbls.

Rosin

Spirits Turp....

871

85

Ashes, Pearls...
Beeswax

437

729

**

*••••••••

•

m

•

1,586
•

•

•

•

•

Oil Cake
Whalebone

•••••••••

1,095

117,415

7,435
205,824
22,242

85,020

lbs.
•

5,127

100 lbs.

Oil, Sperm
Oil, Wh^e
Oil, Petroleum..
Oil, Lard.......
Seed, Clover....
Staves,

\

•

•

•

•

154,702
1

•

.

485

.

»

•

•

«

M
..........

820
304
643

631

30

Tar
Tallow
Tobacco
Tobacco

523

..100 lbs.

27,385
•

•

•

•

223,536
56,464

2,107,877 2,877,188
720,629
66,982
,

187,985
11,804
4.009,534 7,172,822
826,427
26,066
18,864
10,995
8,341
7,252
252,842
830,897

879,298

152,341

following are detailed, statements of the exports and imports

for the week

EXPORTS

:

(EXCLUSIVE OF SPECIE) FROM THE PORT OF NEW YORK
FOR THE WEEK ENDING JULY 11, 1865,

TO FOREIGN PORTS

CBONSTADT.

Quan.
Quau. Value.
Petrm,gls.l02,113 $57,425 Agl. imp. pkgs. .8
Tree nails... 3,000
366 Ex. lgW’d,bx2,000

15,584
194
68

....

196,350

34,671

,

....

121

give, as a comparative statement, the receipts of a few lead¬
ing articles per all routes since Jan. 1st, and for the same period
We

Tar
Rice
Ashes

157,880

804,275!

do

Spirits

J 194,800

81,575

...bbls.

.,

The

t

Spirits Turpon. ...
Crude Turp......
Copper

5,824
14,800
1,942

ISO

....

,

3,185

....

....

....

400

....

....

7,480

-

•

Pitch.

?

786
1,060
398
244
63

Hides.... ....No.
Leather... .sides.
hhds.
Tobacco..
Tobacco.. .cs. &c.
Rice. .tea. & bbls.
Rice......
Rosin

920

126

649

...

201

....

,

,

9,847

Hemp....

2,806

s...

473
60

Wool

398
48
141

49

37S

_

822

1,200

451

268
45

^

99

236
445

,

A

Pork

403

458

...

Lard
Cheese
Butter
Rosin
Crude Turpentine

287,810

140,825

pkg.

14,500

1,526

,

.

m

4

91,970

blls

^6(^4

1,174

245
98

28

.

Starch....
Butter.....
Cheese....
Petroleum

884,286
314,438
417,179

1,307

229

156,625

Pork

3,404,800
59,980
237,750

2,873,285
75,760

I. .tcs. and bbls.

.

Bacon,Ac

7,060

....

1,078

•

58.805

456

352
147

Oats
Beef

64,315

'702,560

Week.

1,190

Barley

Beef. ;bbls. & ter.
Pork
bbls.
Catraeats
pkgs.
Lard... bbls. & te.
Lard.:
kgs.
Ashes
pkg.
Tallow....
Grease..."
Oil Cake.
Stearino
Dried Fruits
.bbls.
Eggs
Lard Oil.
Cotton

65,180

493,180

Total.

3,024

501

Grass Seed

Flaxseed

2,805,570

Exp’s.

•

•

•

427

14, 1865

Per

2,3S5

1451$
;,860

Rye

5,571,160
1,962,940

Itye.
Barley, Ac

*

RECEIPTS OF DOMESTIC PRODUCE FOR

188,800

1,798,240

*

heretofore for

now, as

speculations for

trade, and

192,470

Winter, caused by the course of Oil, petroleum

Wheat closed flat under a decliue in

175,620
2,072,290

Corn Meal
Wheat.
Corn

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.
^
■ •»
Friday night,

200,850
1,509,375

bush.

©tmeo.

Same time
1864.

$619
7,713

Value.

Quan.

Value.

$85

Barometers... .100
Total

....$66,208

HAMBURG.

40
Gin, pkgs
Guts, bills..... 32
I R combs, cs..2
Itosin, bbls.. .994
Camphor, bbls..4

14
100 Skins, bis.
2,000 Preserves,cs...10
250 Furs, bis........ 2. 1,000 Clocks, bxs.... 21
Mf Tob,lbs.23,053

25
5
Tobacco, cs... .28

403 Beef, bbls.'
0,000 Effects, cs

1,100
Sarsapa’la,ble. 219. 10,500 Piano
Candles, bxs... 10
181 Segars,

1
cs....... 7

cs...l.. 1,200. .Sew.mach, .cs.374
Silverware, cs... 1
4,200 Tobccco ble-280
Ostrich fea.,

1,200
2,500 Agl imps, pkgs..5
1
S40 Books, cs
300

3,292

17,381
7,7

.

Staves
6,000
Palm oil,pkg8.363

Total.

9,356
429
4,662
195
100
650

14,520

.$90,19

[July 15, 1865.

THE CHRONICLE.

82

MALAGA.

BREMEN^

Tobacco, hhds. (554 158,833
Tobacco, bis..455 10,139
Furniture, cs... .2
80
950
Peas, bbls
200
Tob stms.h’ds.324 23,634
Pulse, bbls. ..200
907
Shoe peg8,bbls256
Ex logd, bxs.. 500

938
5,089

Wheat, bu.154,091 212,175
Corn, bu... 13,614 10,777

Tobacco,cr... .287
4,187
700
Mahogany, pcs.68
Beeswax, Ids .618
126
Tobacco, cs.4,280 242,167
24
Beef, tcs.
1,200

541

Seneca root.pk.10
Pot ashes,bbl. 100

:i

2,654

1

500

Furs, bales
7p- 28,682
Sew mach, cs. .16
1,343
Books, cs
18
,700

2
5,000 Jewelry, cs
4
8,612 Ess oils, cs
1
10,000 Guns, cs
250 Flour, bbls..2,522
Mahogany,Igs. 263 9,800 Cotton, bis..3,401
Rags, bales.... 16
706 Tallow,lbs.345,292
Steel, pkgs
4
325 Hams, lbs.. .4,480
Ore. tons. ...,100
800 Pork, bbls.... 150
Mftob,lbs..53,348 21,047 Tobacco,hhds. 522
Ag imps, pkgs. .2
1,100 Beef, tcs.... 1,026
Veneering, bxs. .2
200 Che’ee,lbl,614,679

Staves
CUBA.

399

LIVERPOOL.

Fustic, tons.... 15
Clocks, bxs. 1,167

Quan. Value.

Rope, pkgs

Spm oii,gls. 16,140 28,645
685 Empty cans.. .105 1,050

1,956

1,984
100
933

160 Coarse meat,tcs48
16,031 Machinery, cs... 3
537,776 Ag imp,pkgs.... 2
_.17
35,707 Drugs, cs
1
719 Effects, cs
2,800 Dent mat, cs.... 2
139,121 Hardware, cs... .3

23,950
246,957

425

130
1,117

200
2,080
947
836

Miscellaneous....

Total

Nails, kegs
Shoes, cs

$1,521,242

LONDON.

48,658 Brandy, pkgs T. 40
24,013 Mouldings, cs.. .9
61,368 Muskets, cs.... 35
Flour, bbls..4,371 30,857 Pigs’ hair, bis. .13
Staves
4,000
700 Shoe pegB,bbl.322
Spm ofl.gals.6,102 11,136 Wheat, bu.. 19,960
3,800 T grease,lb.64,423
Pork, bbls....200
Beef, tcs
84
4,095

7
2,391 Wine, cs
200
443 Beef, bbls
8,500 Rosin, bbls.. .260
1,100 Starch, bxs..1,400

Tobacco,hhds .141

Sew mach,cs. .601
Oil cl,lbs.2,619,692

1,065
29,940

310
3,100
4,735
4,780

Total

750

640

—

240

....5

2,612
920

$113,920

GLOUCESTER.

52,274 70,967

Wheat, bushels
GLASGOW.

.48
Corn, bu...29,178 23,421 Beef, tcs
300 Coarse m’l,pkg.21
Beef, hhds!
2
Butter, lbs.21,737
2,900 Chinaware, cs.. .1
Beef, pkgs
50 1,600 Cheese,lbs 128,564
Tobacco, hhds. 10
4,000 Flour, bbls..2,517
Staves
9,600
Lobster, bxs.. .18
• 175

2,191 Tapioca, bis... .50 1,100
230 Miad’s,lbs.l06,200 16,992

250
19,135
15,472
1,400

51,400

Mf tob,lbs.113,400
Com etch,bxs.300

1,560

Total........ $142,126

LOUGH FOYLE.

7,141

1,173

Flour bbls.
LONDONDERRY.

Com, bu.. .17,350

Flour, bbls. .4,670

16,388
32,690

1,900
Wheat,bu.. 14,180 24,815
Pork, bbls.... 100

1

Drugs, cs
132
Hardware, cs..85
Cornm’l, bbl.1,342
Butter, lbs .8,724
Peas, bags
45
Oil meal,lb.83,000
Hams, lbs.. 11,839
Codfish, qtls.,135
Bread, pkgs...330
Tobacco, bis.. 108
Beef, bbls
116
Rope, pkgs.. ..15
Com, bu... .7,050
Lumber, pcs... 15
Matches, cs.... 20
"Whisky, bbls...l
Portrait, bxs
1
Bacon, bbls. 1,225

Total........ $761,930
»

3,968 Bread,

Mf iron, pkg.1,815
Cora, bush.. 7,994
Beef, bbls
307
340 Mf tob, lbs.. 3,284
336 Clocks, bxs... .16
2,034 Lard, lbs
,600

Pork,5bble.. ..918 18,674
2,572
Butter, lbs. 14,665
Flour, bbls.22,111 140,154
Beans, bbls....57
Cod oil, cks...52
Rosin, bbls.. ..10

'

AMERICAN COLONIES.

BRITISH NORTH

Organ

400

Starch, bxs....90

’?,b^l..

5,431

Total

117

290
176

$185,217

88

Flour, bbls.. 1,375

Codfish, qtls..212
Lard, lbs.. ..3,200

3,093
2,845
6,726
3,037

76

Bran, bags... ,.53

822
Lumber, ft.25,000
134
Lard oil, bbls...2
85
Starch, boxes. .21
200
179 Hose, ft
.250
231
833 Tinware, bxs.. .4
135
2,633 Mt tobacco,lbs240
432
685 Wine, pkgs... .12
98
1,632 Oil, galls.......78
2,426
1,822 Furniture, cs.. .57
3,024 Flour, bbls..7,395 50,325
524 Pork, bbls....426 11,294
3,371
7,207 Lard, lbs... 17,460
127 Tobacco, hhd.. .1
260
320 Candles, bxs.. 860
3,815
Pkd fish, bbls. 100
121
800
100
120 Shooks
130
316 Cheese, lbs..8,477
1,383

155
525
1,962
895
1,058

Nails, cks.... .22
Rye flour,bbls. 190
Hay, bales.... 172
100
Peas, bbls

Kerosene,gls 2,100
Tea. pkgs
2

98

.1
Confection'ry,cs.2

1,197
650
90
896

26

190

Oats, bn
1,900
Tobacco, cs
1

1,383

Crockery, crate.. 1

102

12

Shoes, cs

Live stock,h’d..65
Sew mach, cs..

Soap, bxs

Melodeons

100

2

116
2,060

Miscellaneous....

$121,828

Shooks

186

Peas, bbls ....175
102
Beef, bbls
Candles, bxs..872
Tobacco, hhds ..2
Staves, pcsl28,000

104

Lard oil,

2,150

Miscellaneous....

159

Total......

i.

$56,761

AUSJJEaLIA.

Hardware, CS..145 $7,078
2,870
Axles, cs
35
1,1«
Preserves, cs. .249

Nails, keg# .195
Agl implt% pkgs4

Books, cs.......6

$1,419#

Tobacco, cs
4
Mf tob’co,lbl2,027

4,211

Wood’w’e,pkgs37
Pumps, bxs
17

Ke’ sene,gal

..

Clocks, bxs...154

604

30,480 21,240
Cordials, cs....!#
Drags, CS.....683
7,442
1,745
Carriages, ncg.. 35 12,333 Mf wood, pkgs .62
Glassware, cs..i5 1,000
440
500

galls.405

Tobacco, CS....11
80
12,025 Hay, bales
2,160 Carriage mat.. .20
2
2,150 Books, cs
102

7,320
BRITISH

600
590
699
400
350
100
79

$600
4,810
2,443
978
194

...

Miscellaneous
Total

$71,052

MARSEILLES.

aIcoIk0I,. bbls
1

.500 $10,255

Drags, cs ...*!. .27

3,281

Logw’d, lb.375,000 $10,000
Tallow, lbs. 11,067 1,217

Staves, pcs. 11,800
Total

$997
$25,750

CETTE.

78,960 $9,360

...:

Staves

Hoops, bdls. ..300
Beef bbls.......5
Butter, lbs.... 300
Stationery, cs...1
Hams. lbs.. .3,996
Corn, bush... .400
Petrol’m, gall,605
Tobacco, hhds..4

Carriages..
6 $2,300
Drugs, cs
112 1.561
218
Mfirop, pkgs.. 13
160 Shooks
2,500
1,000
900
840 Glassware, cs..l7

80
100

390
992

Miscellaneous....

Total..

2,000

473

$25,598

3*1,000

Staves

4,890

♦*..<.87,720

7,218

CADIZ.

Staves




110

2,878

$121,264

Total

780

2,425
185

484
125

58

Butter, lbs

400

142

270
Pkld fish, bbls.70
Dry fish, bxs.. 700
Beans, bbls
31

3,383

Feed, bbls...,.22
Bread, pkgs.... 38
Lumber, ft 10,000

'

252
2.860
1,305

••

710

140
294
2,865

78 Tobacco, bales.73

Kerosene, galls.80
i

cs..

95 Rice, bbls

Pork, bbls
110
Tobacco, hhds..2

500
184
163

6

Drugs, cs..
Beef bbls
Hams, lbs

7
698

846

Shooks .......106
Iron, bdls
50
Miscellaneous....

338
266

$27,273

Total

MEXICO.

.

13
929
Machinery, cs. .94 $15,003 Books, cs
Saw dust, cords28
112 Pumps, bxs
5
286
80
1,976
Flour; bbls.. 1,553 13,634 Soap, bxs
Butter, lbs..4,880
1,705- Paper,bdls....400 ’ 240
360
Furniture, cs.. .82
6,085 Cora, bush.... 300
259
642
350 Hay, bis
Tobacco, bales.lO
558
Blacking, bbl... .1
60 Axle grse,lbe5,533
2
260
Brandy, cs
60
220 Oil cloth, cs
3,334
340 Harness, cs.. 19
Cinnamon, rollB. 6
1,500
.428
Cocoa, bags
2,239 Ice, tons
53
187 Lumber, ft.81,000 2,022
Perfumery, cs.. 50
Paper, reamel,000
500 Coal oil, galls7,400 4,845
Mf iron, pkgs... 6
113
381 Cheese, lbs... .942
1,416
Buttons, cs......2
275 Glassware, cs..46
2,318
Stationery; cs... 2
400 Hardware, cs..117
275
Tobacco, cs
20
239 Cotton gins, bxs.4
100
220
Agl implt, pkgs38
225 Wines, cs
50
700
4,716 Ale, bbls
Drugs, pkgs.. .252
Boots and S, cs.l
265 Alcohol, ce.....10
134
..6.000
300
Telegr mat, pkgs8
228 Bricks
s.

175
8,000

40

Cider, cs

Domestic, bis.. 12

900

Lamps, pkgs.. .18
Preserves,cs..124
Copper, pkgs.., .4
Sew mach, cs.. 64
Metal goods, cs.l

891

211

8,522

280
500

Clothing, cs...... 2
12
Iron, bars.
Beans, bbls...821
Tacks, bxs
11
Wagons
21
Lard, lbs...27,070
Potatoes, bbls.617

203

1,121

380

9,775

5,077
1,234

Hams, lbs...3,071
Miscellaneous....
Total..

.....

754
2,254

$99314

NEW GRANADA.

Drugs, pkgs...75
Wine, pkgs.. ..15
Candles, bxs. .164
Kerosene,gals.480
Lard, fts... .9,117
Paint, pkgs... .51

2.053
376
666
278

.3
Shoes, cs.
Cider, bkts..... 12
Bread, pkgs
9
Machinery, bxs.8

1,905

Clothing, cs.... .6
Dry goods, cs.. .4

Lamps, cks

6

Tar, bbls
.20
Den’l mat’le cs.l
Muskets, cs ...10

Fancy goods, cs.2
Butter, Tbs.. ..340

...

685
118
171
180
2,592
.

1,600
1,239 Books, cs
4
98T
281 Sugar, bbls.... 71
2,451
132 Cutlery, cs
49
3,498
130 Flour,"bbls... J£18—LS90
155

Ag’l imp’s, pks.15

.

Hardware, cs..99
Furniture, cs ..17
,Cart..»
1
117 Cinnamon,bales.3

136
920
234

j'-

1,293
956
85
221

Pitch, bbls
26
Hoop skirts, cb 1
Powder, kegs. 100
Gunny bags, bis. 5
Mf tob’co, fts.475
Soap, bxs
470
Syrup, bxs
6
Drid fish, bxs. 120
Preserves, cs .86
Sew mach’s, cs.l

*77
62
795

..

879

185

808
64
101
277

.

Miscellaneous

800
2,567

...

$31,115

Total

VENEZUELA.

.517
Beef, bbs
.2
Sugar mills.
...

.

...

Print mat’ls .cs.l
..727
Hams, fts
Butter, fts.. ..718
Soap, bxs.:. ..103
Resin, bbls ...12
Butter, fts. 2,297
..3
Pitch, bbls..
..

.

Revolvers, cs...2

Rope, pkgs
32
822 Bread, pkgs.. ..2
Perfum’y, pks. 203
661 Lamps, pkgs.. .36
130 Carriage
10
1 * ' 382 Tar, bbls
169 Drags, pkgs . 353
7,977 IR goods, cs.. .1
465 Brandy, kegs...10
283 Manf d iron... .26
353 Phot mat’ls, cs.,8
530 Furniture, cs.. .16
114 Lard, fts...21,650
1
5,044 Blocks, hhd
2
268 Combs, cs
1
879 Books
62 Flour, bbls.... 770
5,915 Kerosene, gls.300
589 Hardware, cs .41
705 Miscellaneous
1.189 Paper, reams. .200
352

2,623
1,759

.

...

.

Total...

'91
_

693
69
118
-417

•

571
456

"121

168

1,724

$35,699

BRAZIL.

Flour, bbls. 1,882
.131
Spars
Lard, Tbs.. .19,000
.

12.958

7,000
1,189

Cassia, bxs....48
Resin, bbls.. .210
Lumber, ft.52,785

805
1,126 Paper, rms. .1,000
1,416
Total.....
$25,763
1,724
..

CI8PLATINE REPUBLIC.

t

Lumber, feet
Plaster, bbls

.>

1-7I'JI,768 * 9,*29
.55
188
$9,867

Total.....
PERU.

2

Trucks...

Drugs, pkgs.. 306
Sew mach, cs.. 77
Boot jacks, ce... 3
Oak, pcs
100
Wax, fte....3,079
Woodware, cs..66
Rum, bbls.... .77
Furniture, cs .42
.

860 Petrol’m, gls. 5,000
3,200
9,553 Tali’w, ft s. 105,980 12,000
540
2,965 Tranks, pkgs. .52
250 Paper, rms. .3.500 1,750
4,500
\ 140 Lumber,ft. 128! 187
1,373 Agl impls,pks.l96 5,159

387

995
1,010

Pork, bbls
Hardware, cs

74
.61
Perfum’y,pkgs.23
Blacking, bbls. 18
.

Provi8’ns,pkB.175

1,789
2,47*
’ 630
980

2,700

Shooks &H..439

1,040

Lard, fts.. 109,288 23,718 Preserves,cs.. .90
Mf iron, pkgs. .16
8
300 Blocks, cks
Stationery, cs.. 84
685

1,200

Naphtha, gs.l. 000
Cil cloth, cs.... 11

480 Rope, pkgs.... 18
1,090 Lamps, pkgs... 12

Drugs, cs
236
Beef, bbls.. ..250
Books, cs
4
Beef, tcs
10
Blocks, pkgs .. .5
Fancy goods, cs.2
Coal, tons....788
Lamps, cks
2

3,440 Cartridges,

1,079
1,160

1,260

Total........ $85,216

.,. .

..

♦

3,511
1,293
240
972
150
6,012
118

cs..

.7
12

Clocks, cs
Effects, cs

..9

Lead,pkgs..!.791
Billiard

table,ps .4
Pork, bbls....297
Milk, cs
Hardware,

202
cs.. 26

1,018 Pistols, cs.—j

1,200 Preserves, cs..lt
379 Firearms, cs...-;
5,200 Clothing, cs —
750 Percu’n capB, cs
6,311 Mf wood, pkgs.
2,520, Flour,bbls.. ..2!
2,709 Plank, pcs..-...!

7,306
2,239
1,200
250
218
150

2,742
218

1,718
67 ' 663 Miscellaneous
Paper, cs..
.5
578 Ginseng,pkgs.557 203,990
Total........ $272,766
Butter, fts..2,G00
970 Machinery, cs.. .6 1,230
Mf iron, pkgs..40
591
Muskets, cs
.28
8,612
.$4,068,538
Grand total.....
87

Tobacco.cs

TARRAGONA.
.

500

CHINA.

$750
.

144

5,999

8
3

FRENCH WEST INDIES

Pork, bbls.... 100 $2,490
Lard, lbs....2,000
400
Flour, bbls
.420 3,340
Lumber, ft...2,C50
85
Tobacco, cs... .40
2,209
Dent mat, ce.,..2
249
Pump
1
270
Furniture, ce..ll4
3,600

1,570
8,678
265
2,931
800
816
1,092

.14

$240

$144 Matches, cs... .20
250 Vinegar, bbls..50

Oats, bush.... 160
Toys, cs
18
Starch, bxs .... 20
Blocks, hhd..... 1
200 Pork, bbls....551
1,500 Corameal, bbls421
2,150 Lard, lbs... 11,250
1,231 Woodwarepkg382
1,061 Peas, bags
50

stock,hd. 128 $7,355
Flour, bbls.. 1,451 10,319
Cheese, lbs .11,064 -1,504
1,819
Bread, pkgs... 491
Live

Opium, bxs
6
Cutlery, cs—.18
Bread, pkgs
5
Lumber, ft.142,810
132 Live stock, head. 1
150 Stationery, cs...2
200
275 Soap, bxs
3,200 Cheese, lbs.. 1,100
326 Miscellaneous....

550
260
' 180
300

Shoes, cs
Sugar, bbls

Sew mach, bxs. 19

BRITISH GUIANA.

2,961
1,681
850
906

165

Furniture,

..

Total

4*4
801

Oars, No
40
Metal’c coff No.10

110

$10,368
1,422
710

Tobacco, bales. 85

BRITISH WEST INDIES.

165

1,066 Rice, bags—200
400 Hay, bales.... 980
4,372 Oats, bags.... 200

Onions, bbls.. 100
Dry goods, cs. ..25
Jewelry, case...l

975

1,158
6,400 Coram
3,150 Teles inst, bxs. .7
1,098 Miscellaneous....
204

897

HAYTI.

BRISTOL.

'.

2

Wick, bales

210

(

.

Total

Potatoes, bbls.212
Glassware, cs.. .3

Mf wood,

..

.23,300^.32,000
..75,623 108,415
.241,168
5,505

cs....... 3

3,021
8,454 Confectionery,cs2
21,000
240 Bricks
3
2,948 Tinware, cs
24,217 Oakum, bales. .20
5,037 Brass goods, cs. .1"
8,246 Tallow, lbs.... 900
4,099 Lamps, pkgs. ..10
Eggs,, bbls
45
940 Exp pkgs. case.. 1
Agl implts pkgs67
3,754 Drugs, pkgs .99
.2
1
236 Bionzes, cs
Books, cs
Bark, hhds.....10
1
162 Soap, box
Machinery, cs.. 71 6,459 Hams, lbs.. 29,138
Com meal,bbls200
1,000 Fancy goods, cs.2
Woodw’e, pkgs32
580 Paper, reams6,000

CARDIFF.

Wheat, bushels.
Oil Cake, lbs...

1,234

1,688

Furniture, cs... 47

200 Vinegar,bbls ..20

200

pkgs.. 2
100 Pumps, No
9

..40

Hardware, ce... 50
Bacon, lbs. .46,850
Ptg mat, pkgs.. 11
Butter, lbs..9,647
Lard, lbs.. 125,834
Salt, sacks ..2,750
Shooks & H.3,785
Coal oil, galls6.144

$241,897

Wheat, bushels

Bran, bags

Quan. Value.

1,140
504

..

132 Books,

Sew mach cs.. .65
Iron tubes
119

156

Miscellaneous

580

1

..

Quan. Value.
Stone, tons
.380
Beans, bbls....65

$528

Perfumery, cs.,16
Mf iron, pkgs.. 56
Cotton cards, csl6

450
26,489

54 Oars.... ....2,044
1,603 Rosin, bbls... 100
400 Furniture, cs.... 2

8,1*0

MARSALA.

8,500

v! $468,671

7,908

106,120

i

Staves
4,800 '
Cedar, logs. .1,100
Miscellaneous....

Total.....

..52,400

Staves

102
Tallow, ibs.46,225 »i 8,480

■

Steari’e,bbl.26,880
Oil ca’e,lbs378,616
Cedar, logs.... 867
Fustic, pcs. .1,227

2,352

Cotton, gin

3,545

Bacon, lbs.687,592 108,844
Lard, lbs..143,175 22,307 Ptg mat, pkgs.23
Butter, lbs.15,000
3,150 Beeswax, lbs. 109

Hope, bales.... 85

Extract, bxs.. 500

4,273

Bread, pkgs

.

Spirits Turpentine offer at 53s’on th«
spot, future shipments 52s. Refined Petroleum 2s 6d.
Oils.—Fish dull; Sperm offers at 90Z; Pale Southern 45Z; Pale 1
Seal 42Z; Cod 50Z a 51Z; and some sales of East India have been
Quan. Value. made at 30Z. Linseed continues
plentiful on the spot at 33s 3d a 33s
Boxes
173
fid. Rape very firm; English Brown 42Z, and Foreign 42Z10# ;
Buttons
64 16,067
121
Burr stones
.24
English Refined 45Z, and Foreign 46/ a 46Z 10s ; a good business in
Cigars
18,718
Coal, tons...7,192 17,408 Brown for first four months next year at 42Z10d a 42Z 15d ; Re¬
Corks
74
1,037 fined Cotton has also advanced, on the spot we quote 32Z a 34Z as
Cotton, bales..64 4,885 to
quality, for the last six months delivery a good business in Ord
Clocks
3
1,113
Cocoa, bags... 100
2,158 at 32Z10d, of Crude, from new seed, there are buyers on the spot
Coffee, bags.7,841 140,666 and last six months delivery, at 26Z 10s ; sales of Madras Ground
Effects
838
Fancy goods
46,127 Nut at 40Z; Niger is held for 36Z, Poppy at 37. Olive ; the ad¬
Grain
168
vance of last week is fully supported ; Mogadore 49Z a 49Z10* ; Se¬
Hair
15
2,913
ville 51Z; Malaga 52 ; and Gallipoli 54Z; for Corfu 49Z 10s to TJ.
Hair cloth...... 6
2,926
Hemp
226 6,869 K. or Continent is demanded, but a shade less might be accepted.
Honey...
87 2,112 Cocoa Nut.
Cochin 44* 6d a 45s, Ceylon 43#.
Palm. Stocks
India rubber..224 10,923
Ivory
8 1,876 chiefly in second bands, and 37# fid asked for fine Lagos ; Palm Nut

THAN DRY GOODS AND SPECIE) AT THE PORT
NEW TORE, FOR THE WEEK ENDING JULY 6,18S5.
[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.]

IMPORTS (OTHER
...

Quan. Value.
Chins,-.Glass, & E’ware—*
.7 18,812
Quan. Value. Jewelry
China
..2 $814 Watches ......25 86,600
Earthenware..700 17,884 Leather, Hides, Ac.—
844

Acids

2
Ammonia, sul.88

Homs
Leather

1,119

Drugs, &c.—
Bl.

Hides, undressedl26,100

6,254

Leathenpatent.5

9

2,957
2,806

1,067 Liquors. Wines, Ac.—
Brandy

1

powder—100 1,095
26,896

Porter

SO

Vinegar
Wines

25

601

Brlms'ne, tnl,076

922

Chiccorv.
..87
Ohio potash....20

17

338

327

494

448

4,282 Champ’ne bkt 165 1,799
.5
509 Metals, Ac.—
1
210
Gum crude
9
266 Bronzes
1
117
Iodine...
12 3,062 Copper
Cutlery
...13 5,070
Lie. paste .... 490 12,981
5
676
OilsT
42 5,070 Guns
Cochineal .....32

Cudbear

-

23 7,778
Iron, pig, tons4C0 4,987
Iron,KR. brs4,606 24,189
Iron, sheet, tns.7
550

7,864
128
Potash, hhd...23 2,747

Paints
Paris white

...26

Furs, &c.—
Purs

8,606
2,778

Rags

492
2,847

goods.. .41

6,723

2,622
1,020

13

8
247
28 2,933

Other

.....2

681

8,665 Woods—
10,983 Logw’dlbsMl,2S0 6,611

Pineapples
Raisins

1,888

1,255

Mahogany

621

Fustic, M lbs.. 63

Sauces and pre...

Instruments—
Musical

Optical

80

.........

Jewelry, Ac.—

11,629
4,967

Other

4,105 Miscellaneous—

120

1

*

European dates are to

Alabaster om’s21
Baskets
6

941

.1 "

246

Seeds

Engravings
Paper

,8,912

3,482
1,324

Statuary

Books

18,255

Oranges

222

4,454
1,266
899

90

Rice
Salt

291

3

Wire

11 18,526 Cassia....
7,554 Stationery, Ac.—

Bananas
Lemons
Nuts

4,410

Potatoes

5

Spices—

Hatters' goods.21
Fruits, Ac.—

1,769
24,814
1,616

Pipes

2,193
Old metal
50 2,308
Saddlery
132
1
Steel
273 7,886
Tin, bxs. ...7,888 49,550
Tin, slbs 300.1,000 2,339

|1,185

!

Other

248

6,877

Needles.,

11,142

Ultramarine

7

Metal

2,888
j8,285

11

..

Lead, pigs.... 807

168

,

....

Molaeses
.1,314
Onions
Oil paintings.... 9
Plaster

Iron.other, tnsl02

Iron tubes

.10 1,264
Soda, bi carb. .250 ! 635
Soda, ash ....653, 22,166

Potash, prus..

Sponges
2
Snlph copper..80
Sumac
700
2
Vermillion
Verdigris........

Machinery

Hardware

892
5
60 1,226

Oil, ess
Oil, olive

Naval Stores.—French

OF

..

Hides, dressed.75 34,179

188
7,227

Glass
83
Glassware
265
Glass plate....87

$1,466,849

Total

including

Continent.
Rum steady—320 puns
Demerara.

sold at Is 6±d for Leewards, and Is 7<Z for

Spices.—Black Pepper : 1,400

bags Penang partly sold at 3d;

of 540

bag# Bengal mostly sold at 25s a 26s 6d for brown Date. Privately
bags Mauritius sold at 29s 6<Z a 30s 6d for brown and yellow
syrups, 36s 9d a 37s for crystallised, and 15o bags Gurpattah Data
Bengal at 33s 9d. Of Foreign no public sales have been held, and
the only private transactions are 220 hhds Cuba Muscovado at 30#
3d a 31s 6d, 19,000 bags unclayed Manila at 26s 6d, and 700 bag«
Guatemala at 28s 6d. Afloat eleven cargoes have been sold afloat,
viz. one Havana, 1906 boxes No. 13 at 25s 6d fully insured for
U. K.; eight Cuba Muscovado, together 3,500 hhds aud 400 tierces
and barrels at 21s 9cZ a 22s 3c; two Brazil, 2,400 bags brown
Pernams at 20s 6d, and 285 cases 31 barrels 827 bags brown Bahia
at 20s 6d, both with landing weights and for U. K.
Tallow—-The market continues firm; St. Petersburg Y. C. on
the spot is worth 41s 9d, and about 2000 tons for delivery last three

4000

314
145

Cocoa rather dearer.—1,330 bags Trinidad sold at 59* 6d a
for low to good grey, 66# a 70# for mid to mid red, 71s a 87s

] good to fine red. and 106s for superior ; 104 bags Grenada

65*

for
52# a

48#; 35 bags Surinam were

bought in at 75# a 77s.
i

.

...

2d July. A London circular of the lit

64s; 32 bags Dominica 47# 6d a

^
worth 32«.
Rice quiet, but prices are sustained—7,500 bags sold,
Necranzie Arracan at 9s 4^d, Bahia at 9s 14d, and Rangoon at
9s 9d; also a floating cargo Rangoon, 800 tons, at 10s 9d for the

bags Penang White only a small portion sold from 5d a
Soap..
3
192
Sugar, hhds, bbls
5£d for ord. 200 bags Pimento brought from 2|d a 2id. Gmger :
and tcs... .6,613 808,707
160 barrels Jamaica realized from 62s for good ord to 92s 6d for
Sugar, boxes and
5.488 100,346 good bold ; 200 bags African were bought in at 38s, with 100
bags.
Tea
4,786 61,205 bags Bengal at 25s.
Toys.
118 6,529
Sugar.—The market is steady at fully last week’s prices. Of
Tobacco
1,302 80,780
Tomatoes
103 British West India 3,500 hhds sold, including at public sale part of
Waste
...104
3,969 349 hhds 3 tierces 260 barrels Barbadoes from 30s a 35s 6d, 76
Wax.
612
6
Wool, bales ..869 68,847 hhds 38 tierces 47 barrels Tobago at 27s 6d, and 44 hhds 28 tierces
Other
1,014 with 632
bags crystallised Berbice from 32s 6d a 36s 6d. 2886

reports:
|

83

THE CHRONICLE.

July 15,1865.]

Coffee.—The fdemand continues good at full prices. The
landed supplies of Plantation Ceylon are much reduced, and only 25
casks have been oflered, which sold at 84# a 85# for mid. Of Na¬
tive 220 casks 3 barrels 899 bags brought 67# 6da 70# 6d for good
to fine ord ; 80 bales Alexandrian Mocha were sold at 92# 6d a 93#

30 barrels 28 bags Jamaica realised
74s a 84s Tor fine ord to mid. In
Foreign 81 bags Guatemala realised 75# 6d a 76s 6d ; 3,457 bags
Costa Rica, 71s a 72s 6d for ord, 74s a 77# 6d for fine to fine ord,
and 78# 6rf a 84# for low mid to mid. Of 925 bags Rio 400 sold at
62s a 65s for good to fine ord colory. A cargo of St. Domingo
sold, 1,700 bags Aux Cayes at 63# 6d insured free of 10 per cent for
| r a near port.
6d for good greenish ; 22 casks
67* a 73s for good ordinary,

neglected.
'*
Copper—Tough Cake and Tile 90Z a 92Z, BestvSelected 94Z a
961, Sheathing 98Z a 100Z, Y. M. Sheathing reduced to 84d.—
Foreign: Chili Slab 181 a 80Z.
Saltpetre

months sold at 43s.

Molasses—225 puns

Trinidad sold at 15s, and 100

Antigua,

at 16s.

Tea market quiet, and prices
Common Congou Is a Is Id.

without material changes.

Good

Tin—English without change; Blocks 97s, Bars 98s, Refined
Foreign : Straits sold at 92# cash, and 93s to arrive. The
Dutch Trading Company’s sarle of Banca took place yesterday,
when 169,900 Slabs sold at fl 56, equal to about 96Z here.
A Havana circular of the 8th reports:
100s.

been very little variation in the
of the offers have been on a range
for No. 12^00 which basis a few trifling lots have been

Sugar (clayed).—There has
market during the week. Most
of

74

rs

and 164 P®r

found. No. 12 at 7$ rials per arrobe—60s. freigh£
cent, prem. of Exchange=25s. Id. stg. per cwt.
on
tcs 28.11 ems per 50kilos (without freight), exchange on

board; and
Paris at
Corn.—The market is firm with short supplies of English
4 per cent. P.
Last year at this date No. 12 being at 94 rs-freight
Wheat, and prices generally are 1# per qr higher. Average price 62s. 6d. and exch. 11
per cent.-stood iu at 31s. per cwt. f. o. b.
of English Wheat for the week ending 24th inst was 41s 3d on
The higher grades of Derosne3 no. 18 19. are still in favor for
61,039 qrs returned. White American Wheat 43# a 46s; Winter
Lead dull.

Common Pig 20Z.

Red 41# a 44s; spring 41# a 43# per qr ; American Flour 22s
24s per barrel.
Cotton was very firm early in the week, and prices further
vanced Id a l^d per lb, but in the last day or two there has

a

free

United States at 9 a 94 rs. The sugar coming to town still
ceeds that received at the same period last year.
Molasses.—In Matauzas a better demand has sprung up for

ex¬

Eu¬
ad¬ rope, and holders being more tractable, some parcels of good body
beeft a layed molasses for boiling purposes have
taken at 24 a 3 rs.
complete change, and the above advance has been lost, the market Muscovado is scarce and firm at 44 a 4f r beenkeg.
per
closing very flat. At Liverpool the sales for the week are 66,900 bis ,
Honey—Buyers would willingly pay now 44 a 44 rials per gal¬

Mid. Orleans 204d per lb.
,
1
Hemp.—Russian quiet; St. Petersburgh Clean 28Z 10s.
bales Manila, fair to good current, sold at 30Z
Jute.—No public sales, and nothing to report privately.
Spelter steady at 22Z 10s.

cjish.

IRON.-Welsh steady ; rails and bars 7Z 5s
Scotch pigs 55s cash for mixed Nos. on Clyde.
Linseed.—The market has further improved

f.

o.

1,000

b. in Wales.

both

on

the spot

Calcutta arrived commands 57s, at which a little
business has been done. Patna and Mirzapore are worth 58s, and
Bombay 58s 6d a 59s.
A cargo Black Sea on the Coast sold at
57s. About 1,000 tons Calcutta, for shipment up to end of August,
sold at 57s 6d a 58s, sound bags, 600 tons Bombay at 59s 6d,
10,000 qrs. Odessa for shipment up to end of July at 57s 104d to
Hull direct, and a cargo on passage at 58s. Imports since 1st Jan.
278,595 qrS., against 293,249 qrs. last year.
and for arrival.

Linseed Cakes are 6s per

5#

a




10Z10*.

ton dearer

;

New York, in bbls. 10Z
-

lon.

,

'.I

COTTON.

This market has been active and buoyant throughout
and prices have been further advanced.
reached, however, on Tuesday, under the stimulus of a

the week,

The highest point was
public sale.of
government cotton, at whicb good ordinary brought 49c. and strict
middling Orleans 534c. - Since then, although the extreme prices of
that day have not been fully supported, the market has ruled strong
and active. The Liverpool accounts are hardly so favorable to
pricees as were anticipated, and the receipts have materially in¬
creased. Rut the advance in cotton goods, and the large demand
from spinners, an advance in gold, with considerable speculative
feeling, have neutralized these influences, and yet the market closes
weak at quotations,—spinners generally retiring from the mar¬
ket. Sales for the week, 15,000 bales. Receipts, 15,025 bales.
Exports last week, 3,400 bales. Making about 8,000 bales in tho
past four weeks, and mostly to Liverpool. We quote:

""

■

N.O.

89
46

88
45

Ordinary, per lb........
Good Ordinary
Middling
Good Middling.
Middling fair
At to-day’s market, Sea
Advices from the South
pretty gradual, though not

52

54

56

53

52

54

52
54

51
53
55

46

56

i,

Islands gold by auction, at 71c a 73c.
are still meagre.
There appears to be a
large, increase of deliveries at the ports.
From a careful comparison of accounts that reach us, we estimate
the quantity of cotton marketed at about 4,000 bales per week day,
It may not, how¬
or, in round numbers, 24,000 bales per week.
ever, exceed 20,000 bales per week.
The latter figure will give
over 10,000 bales per week for export, as difficulties arising out of

LIVERPOOL

171
Ordinary
Good ordinary.... 18
Low Middling.... 19
19*
Middling
Good Middling.... 20
20*
Middling Fair
Fair

17£
18*
—

—

—

—

—

18*

'

—

19*.
19£

—

20*

—

34

—

—

r

—

SALES.

Total
this Year.

Total
this week.

42

0910

158320

2S290

717020

3060

8760

176030

Other Sorts. 4890

669210
118980
197140
285840

Total.... 26510

14360

6740

7390

14350

4050

10590

261840
242820

28030

68900

1556030

•

1

This Year

1864.

136109

111667

27345
7598

333108
160350

123012

7707

231642

9207

153323

220376
231239

59276

Brazilian

Egyptian
Other Sorts

,

1014532

1151034

-STOCKS

1

This Day.

American
East Indian
Brazilian.

Egyptian
Other Sorts

Total

1864.

28480

10’ibO

134090

131610

32830

57900

54730

808030

•

23750 )
733S0 V
90440

•••••

Piculs.

8770nO
Piculs.

42000

BREADSTUFFS.

by the advance in gold and a considerable export de¬
mand, with favorable intelligence from Europe, and very moderate
Stimulated

’

a

•

•

Nominal.
90
00

a

•

a

•

a
a
a

...

July 4,

•

i

•

80

a

1

60

a

1 25

SEPTEMBER
Bushels.
Corn.

277,779
•

•

•

•

26,233
40,276

-

....

“

•

•

1

■

•

•

•

•

•

21,630

34,517

•

•

-

a

58,390

17

•

-

60

.*..

8,534

From New York, to July 7,1865....
From other ports, to latest dates...

•

•

•

"■

344,288
240,220
8,880,166

2,167,358
13,411,808
20,467.495

19,498,91G 12,360,583,
Bushels.
Wheat.

Bushels
Corn.

19.603

.

97,430

11,485

1,823

•

•

•

•

•

21,426

To about same

69,037
136,472
595,202

•

•'

11,485
12,535
68,957
319,562

97,430
256,319

1,494,633
7,328,703

period 1864,

•

.

Total

period 1862
breadstulfs at the West have been as follows :

To about same

The movements of

■

i

FLOUR AND GRAIN AT

OF

CHICAGO DURING THE WEEK

Total Receipts
Cor. week last

■

ENDING

8.

Flour, bi Is. Wheat, bu.

33,593 *280,020
y’r 24,131 S22:257

Rye. Barley.

Oats.

Corn.

861,376 341,432 15,224 7,038
500,744 210,020 13,265 601

GRAIN AT CHICAGO DURING THE PAST WEEK.
Rye. BarleyFlour, brls. Wheat, bu.
Corn.
Oats.
27,328 105,835 541,853
....

SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR AND

Total shipped
Cor. week last

y'r. 40,616

851,116

RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND

1864.

.

.

4,318,670
8,310 000

8,195,885
276,349

150,088

631,049

AT£€fcHic

SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN

150,073

AGO FOR FOUR SEASONS.

.......

Wheat

Coin
Oats

Rye
Barley

361,682
2,513,291
7,529,395
4,128,697
162,843
1,112,874

1862.

1863.

1865.

FJoifr

1862.

360,091

276,473

Rye
Barley

....

709,143
5,471,350
12,615,106
1,163,419
497,384
437,974

700,061
3,775,094
6,007,370
2,864,005

243,107

....

7,860

1863.

461,945
3,610,449

4,936,241

........

Wheat

Corn
Oats

819,585

GRAIN AT CHICAGO FOR FOUR SEASONS.

1865.

y

271,825 16,251

679,451

8,071,187

FJour

)

335440

•

BblsFlour.

140000

451000

•

85

a

,

2,087,838

72,660
1,710
15,484

987,385
period, 1864
period, 1863..... 1,308,209
period, 1862..... 2,132,234

464740

V—COTTON AT SEA—
This Year.
1864.

,

a

1 60
1 70
83

TO THE CONTINENT.

.

Total

a

Bushels.
Wheat.

Bbls.
Fleur.

127,922

1382040

7419

American.... j
East Indian

a

IRELAND FROM

GREAT BRITAIN AND

July 7, 1865
July 1, 1865
July 4, 1865
July 4, 1865

To about same
To about same
To about same

RECEIPTS

JM FORTS.

This Week.

a

66

50
1 00
1 50
1 00

JULY

1

50

55

Total

1600S7

...

1

58

.1865,

Same time
1
1S64.

2550
10980

Egyptian

1 44
1 46

..

Baltimore.....
Boston
California and other ports

—

830
8020
2640
1220
1650

..

42

a

1

—

tion

American.
3530
East Indian. 9290
Brazilian.... 3060

1

bushel

a

—

Export.

Trade.

6 25

a

75

To Date.

Philadelphia..

i

Specula-

a

1 40

...

—

—

75

4

85

North River
Western
State.
Canada.

New York,...
New Orleans..

—

—

a

8 00
11 50
9 00
5 50

1

—
-i.

a

extra

-

—

_

a

8 10
6 75
5 00.

Western

From

'

a

10..

,

•

-

20*

—

—

30

50

7

<fcc....

EXPORT OF BREADSTUFF8 TO

declared

—

20

—

20*

20

8

7 10
8 40
11 00

White Beans

Sea
Islandg.

18

17*
18*
19*

—

a

Barley.....
Barley Malt.

lb. On

Orleans.

18

17*

6 75

•

Texas.

Uplands.

a

to good........

Mixed
Western White
Western Yellow
Southern Yellow
Southern White

do

Monday

QUOTATIONS.

90

Western

do

estimated quantity.,

be 31,100 bales in excess of the

6 90

6

85

Red Winter.
Amber Michigan,

Oats,

l

proves to

The actual stock in this port,

2d per lb.

a

and St. Louis.....

Southern, supers .
.
Southern, fancy and extra
Canada, common to choice

do

in

as

Double Extra Western

Rye,

bales but the
President’s
proclamation, abolishing all restrictions on trade in, and taxes on cotton
the Southern States, except 2c per lb, caused quite a reaction, and
the" daily sales have since dwindled down to 5.0UO and 6,u00 bales.
The advance in American obtained early in the week has been entirely
lost, and on other descriptions the decline has been much greater, in
much

$6 00

70

Ohio

Extra Western, common

do
do
do
do

Charleston, July 7, 31c ; Shreveport, June 29, 18c. ,
Liverpool circulars of the 1st July notice a dull heavy closing in
that market, with quotations slightly lower for the week.
A circu¬

some cases as

Shipping Roundhoop

Corn,

;

a

6

/.

do
do

increasing
exceeding 1,500 bales
per day. Much of the cotton coming forward is in a damaged
condition. The accounts from the growing crops are pretty uni¬
formly favorable. The following are quotations for middling at
various points to latest mail dates : New Orleans, July 2, 45c ; Mo¬
bile, July 1, 31c, buoyant; Memphis, July 3, 34c ; ‘St. Louis, July
lar says :
“
The market early in the week continued very strong.. On
the sales amounted to 20,000 bales at an advance of *d per
Tuesday this advance was fully maintained, sales 15,000
;
arrival of the City of Washington, on Wednesday, with the

Extra State

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

$5 75

bbl.

per

..

Rye Flour, fine and superfine
Corn meal, Jersey and Brandywine
;..per
Wheat, Chicago Spring.
Milwaukee Club
do

the scarcity of labor will prevent our manufacturers
their consumption at present to a quantity

10, 44c

quotations in this market

Superfine State and Western.

Flour,

39

89
46

The following are'closing

j:

& Tex.

Upland. ^{Florida.' [Mobile.

to-day,

[July 15, 1865.

THE CHRONICLE.

84

636,97?
4,859,062
5,914,260
4,695,185
141,146
73,395

662,824
5,545,268
10,125,004
899,641

761,960
3,142,040

15,381,874
2,960,997
267,877

369,272

39,336

144,614

The following wiil show the weqkly receipts of flour and grain at
receipts, there has been a large advance in extra State Flour and
prime Spring Wheat, with which the whole market^has more 'or the places indicated for the week ending July 8 :
less sympathized, except the coarse grains ; in fact, in Oats we have
Rye,
Barley,
Flour,
Wheat,
Corn,
Oats,
bu.
bu.
More speculative feeling has.devel¬
bbls.
bu.
bu.
r
bu.
to notice a material decline.
15,224
861,376 341,-133 7,098
38,593 280,470
oped itself, based on letters from the West, giving crop accounts Chicago
658
1,820
9,025
1,350
5,712 232,022
that are not so favorable as were first reported. It is asserted that, Milwaukee
SOO
1,624
85,099
21,839
with a great growth of straw, the yield is less than was anticipated, Toledo.......
172
5,293
5,953
18,346 - 12,599
Detroit.......
although still large. The crop in Pennsylvania and West Virginia
23
330
6,000
31,619
3,372
has been very good, and as it begins to reach the market the de¬ Cleveland
mand for the finer sorts of reds in this market has been materially
o*2,551
7,931 16,544
870,693
Totals
81,862 611,809
curtailed. In Corn the movement has been very large.
Prev. week.
97,201 926.583 1,114,940 5 v 1,2 IS 5,009 22,076
At to-day’s market Flour was fairly active, at a slight improve^
ment.
Wheat was two or threi cents better for Spring, but with
Tim following will show the shipments of flour and grain from
a
arge and irregular decline in Winter Wheats at.thc c!o>e; the the
ports of Chicago und Milwaukee) atld Toledo; for the week
whole market closed flat and unsettled. Corn was active f ir ex
ending July 8< and destination :
port. Oats were lower, and all coarse grains dull.




...

*.••••

....

•

o

e

™

..'St;c
:v '? V

■'{.

Flour,

100

Cleveland
Pt Huron

Saginaw

50,000

13,983

408

100
800

....

points

t

10,749

15,600

•

•

1,800

Crapes

9,354

....

639,191
906,983

274,125
886,252

2,535

Prev.week....

65,176

699,855

761

Pkgs.

78

market

Pkgs.

Extra State

21

Flour.
do
do
Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Ohio
-.
do
Canadian.
do
do
Sour and Heated
do
Wheat Chicago and Milwaukie.... .(per 100 lbs.)
Amber Iowa
do
do
Red and Amber Winter ....
do
White—Western
do
.do
do
Southern.,..
do
..(per 480 lba.)
Indian Corn. Yellow
Mixed
do
j

..

21

..

.

..

s.

d.

a

6

a

a

24 0
24 6

18 0
8 2.
8 8
8 4

a

8 6
8 9

8 9
9 0

a

8 10
9 3

a

8

14,807
3,109
9,640

2

a
a

0 0

Coatings—
T‘

PkLs.

Silks
Velvets

..

-\
Pkgs.

Woolens..;.. 178
Cloths....... .‘.’48

Carpetings. ..124

Blankets...8

"
Value.

$96,891
25,937
29,591

•

•

•••

175




442

$180,734

OF COTTON.

Pkgs. Value
7

362
491

1,109

120

Hose.

1,572

$32,261

4,515

MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

1
1
1

Pkgs. Value.

551
454

-

Silk&wo’d.. 8
do. & cott.. 10

1,766
7,154

57

$60,043

1,275

Pkgs. Value.
2,374 Hemp yarn..
$37,345 Thread..... 5
1,088-

Pkgs.TValue.
Linens
Handkfs

171
1

.

9

•

667

$41,024

186

MISCELLANEOUS.

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs. Value.
Kid gloves..
1
Oilcloth,... 22

$5,057 Clothing..... 8

467

$7,095

36

WAREHOUSING.

FOR

ENTERED

Woolens.
Cloths...
Blankets.

Value.
1,813

PkF

1,507

Embroideries

42

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

Pkgs. Value.
ll
8,843
Worsted.. ..186
74,503
Delaines.... 33
14,979

Pkgs. Value
$60,997
24
11,471
8
1,101

Shawls

,.121
..

,..

Pkgs. Value.

Merinos
48
Cott. & wore. 108

80,252
37,477

539

$231,693

MANUFACTURES OF COTTON.

Pkgs. Value.
..

..

1

41

v

PY

11,955
;

MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Pkgs. Value.
97 $117,092 Velvets
5
2,693 Ribbons

-•

Pkgs. Value.

:

Value.

54

Pkgs. Value.
\
2,023 Hose.

Laces

$357

$15,673

1,338

,

Pkgs. Value.

Laces

..

....

1,605

14,166

1,649

1
Silk & worst. 15

11,031

134

3

13

..

$148,229

MANUFACTURE3sOF FLAX.

Linens.

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs. Value.
58 $11,111

1,038 Threads

Handkerch,s 1

..

1,340

5

.

64

$13,489

'

MISCELLANEOUS.

Pkgs. Value.
*'
Straw goods 6o
1,823 Fea.

Pkgs. Value.

Kid Gloves..

3

$3,418

Clothing.....

1

25

71

*

Dry Goods entered for consumption at
ending July 14:
-1864.-1863.Pkgs.

Value.

"478

$168,898

g203

50,160
191,192

Pkgs.

1* 97

24,892
18,616

496
487
109
922
73

.1069

$453,758

2087

Withdrawn from
the same period ;

•194

1127

-1856.Value

Value.

Pkgs.

$214,148

632

$276,747

142,813
64,016
174,110
23,671

498
278
392
1814

121,881
269,591
113,897
44,180

$618,758

3614

$823,296

warehouse'and thrown intojjthe market daring

j

Manufactures of wool....
do
cotton..
do
silk
do
flax
Miscellaneous dry goods.

Total
Add ent’d for consumt’n.

Entered for

$8,549

the port for the

week

Manufactures of wool...
do
cotton
do
silk...'
do
flax—

3,283

& flow. 2

.

RECAPITULATION.

mrkt

5110
97
f 21

•

39,278
24.398

144
55
296
96
12

415,124
20,008
8,006

442
120
57
186
36

180,734
82,251
60,043
41,024
7,095

823,296

42,725

.

*

17,960

115(

24,883
23,980
3,413

*352f

$115,952

^099
lk21

453,758

12087

$498,823
618,758

841
3614

$569,710

2690

$1,117,-581

4455

^

603,

warehousing and total entered at

'}>

period:

184
12a

$70
q55
Miscellaneous dry goods. % 20

*’

the port daring the

•

73,307
27,640
89,997

,

539

*31,593

54

15,973
148,2*9
13,489

1003
144
136
495
324

456,601
48,716
137,846
144,722
56,752

2102
2087

$844,639
618,758

3614

8*3,998

4189

$1,463,394

4476

$1,245,829

,

i 134

64
71

862'

8,549

$417,538

.

„

.

i

■

6,69*
11,253

2,541

........

4,594
91,520
4,313

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.
16,735
6,911
Pkgs. Value.
Pkgs Value.
6,446 Worstedy’n. 5
740
Shawls...... 10
Total
§154' $211,590
4,181 Braids &bds 25
12,014
Gloves...... 15
458,758 34,476 Add ent *d for consumpt’n 1069
Worsteds •.: ,110 63,200 Cot. & wor’d 100.
Hose.;:;;;;. 9
-3,514
..—
$665,348
632 $276,747
/
..
..

y

Hose
7
Braids & bda. 2
Cott A.wos’d. 35

Pkgs.. Value.

Manufactures of wool....
do
cotton..
silk
do
do
flax

..

Fkgs. Value.

_

931

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

same

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION.

Value.

8

Laces
Cravats......
BrdB & bds.

5,229
14,004

Total th’wn upon

THE WEEK ENDING JULY 5, 1865.

$44,180

Pkgs. Value.

Value.

Pkgs. Value.
19 $29,621
5

1,814

WAREHOUSE.

1
$10,082 Velvets
1
11,028 Laces
,372 Braids Abds 2
2,700 Spool
20
.

,

j

Delaines....

2,181

OF WOOL.

Pkgs.

763

1

,9,542

8

Susp. elast....

328

2

MANUFACTURES

Silks...
Plushes.

YORK FOR

$113,897

Pkgs. Value.

3,523
2,499

$501 Carpeting... 3
57,206 Blankets.... 44
5,370 Worsteds.. .217

Cloths...... 10

disorganized state of labor they are not in a position to supply the
market to the extent of the orders which are being sent forward.
It is also (pleaded that, the stocks of the raw material are insuffi¬
cient for the requirements of the trade. At the first blush there
would seem to be some force in these reasons, for the short stock
of goods.! But we believe the actual cause is not so much a posi¬
tive want of" material or labor, as a desire upon the part of the
manvfacturers to supply their productions sparingly, so as to re¬
alize better rates than the actual cost of production would warrant.
Such a course, pernicious in its tendency, will sooner or later work
its own cure. In support of these views, we would merely refer
to the daily receipts of cotton at this port, which are much in
excess of the manufacturing capacity of the country.
Woolen Goods.—Of domestic productions the market is barely
supplied just now. The value of the raw material still keeps up,
so that nrarly all descriptions of Cloths are held for extreme prices.
At present the demand is mainly confined to woolens suitable for
Clothiers and the jobbing trade. Broadcloths, Fancy Cassimcres,
and Satinetts, are on the rise, whilst Flannels of all- kinds are in
*•
request at better prices.
We give a table of prices in our Daily Bulletin and need Dot
repeat them here.
:g '
The importation of dry goods at this port for the week ending
July 12,1865, and the corresponding weeks of 1863 and 1864
IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW

10,368

Feath. A'flow. 16

777

FROM

Pkgs. Value.

Wool..
1
Woolens.. ..114

•

:

Value.

Threads.

9,208

6
10

MANUFACTURES

Throughout the past week the Dry Goods market has been
moderately active at higher rates. The supplies brought forward
have been somewhat limited. Producers allege that owing to the

j

Corsets
Straw goods.

0 0

a

THE DRY GOODS TRADE,
V
Friday Evening, July 14.

follows

Embroideries

10 0

28 6
28 6

a

15

Pkgs. Value.

20 0

a

$266,691

flax.

of

Clothing.... 12

WITHDRAWN

22 6

a

.

Value.

$2,824

Matting... .1750

Cotton..
Colored.

as

Hdkfs

22 0

22 6
21 6

2,018

65,435
5,802

392

5

Gloves
Le’th’r glo’s.
Kid
do

Ribbons.... 14

d.
0

s.

1„579
5,244

MISCELLANEOUS

QUOTATIONS.

have been

.....

183

Cottons
32
Coloreds.... 43
Prints
1
Emb’d mus .JJlO

-

Pkgs. Value.

Silk & wors’d 3
do. & cotton 8

Value.

$94,138

‘ 1

SILK.

Pkgs. Value.
.45
13,769
1
728

Value.

340

16,251
13,184

....

Liverpool circular of the 1st July thus reviews that

„

450

2,607 Vestings.... 3
108
169 RaW
41.604 Braids & bda 8

Linens

particularly for the Amber Spring, which is getting scarce, and readily
brought an advance of Id. per cental; other descriptions were more
saleable at prices rather in favor of sellers. Flour was 6d. per sack
dearer, and there was more inquiry for barrels. Indian Corn: several
lots of Bulgarian were pressed from the quay at 27s. 6d. per qr., which
made other descriptions difficult of sale.” i

i

4,692

Laces..

week :
“Yesterday we had steady rain, which has been general throughout
the country; the want of it wa9 beginning to’ be severely felt for spring
corn, roots and pastures; but the Wheat plant, except, on light soils, is
generally well reported of. The trade since our last report has shown
increased firmness, though without much activity. At Tuesday’s mar¬
ket there was a better inquiry for Wheat, at an advance of Id. per cen¬
tal, Flour wa9 more saleable, at 6d. to Is. per 6ack dearer; good bar¬
rels are scarce. Indian Corn, with several lot9 offering ex-quay, was
rather easier. At to-day’B market there was a good demand for Wheat,

'

Laces
Cravats

manufactures

3,200
11,076

for the

i

Gloves...... 20

$122,944

1
44

Ribbons

......

2,600
2,378

860

.

2,950

Handkerc’fs. 14

2,251

77
8
2

$121,881

1,070

6So

Pkgs. Value.

Plushes
Velvets

•’•••••

«

15,193

MANUFACTURES OF

Silks

43,863

5,566 Hose.

26
Braids & b'ds 3

..

Value.

Value.

7^

Laces

1,163

5

1
4

Emb'dnms..

..

Velvets

Cottons.,...... 70 $18,228
Colored...,;, 73
21,517
uslins
Smts,,

.,

' Pkgs.

Value.

72,889
,161

66,261' 616,507

A

Pkgs,

-

..

29,676
11,888

Totals.
•

bu.

bu.

258,060

1,000

...

Kingston....

By railroad

445,600
16 000
14,700
13,600
1,750

MANUFACTURES OF COTTON.

Bye,

Barley,

bu.

bu.

21,100

...

Goderioh....
Sarnia
other

79,096
123,600
166,119

4,703

....

To
To
To
To
To
To
To

bu.

25,308

Oats,

Cora,

Wheat,

bbls.

To Buffalo,
To Oswego
To Pt. Cblb’e.. ;
To Ogdensburgh
To Dunkirk

85

THE CHRONICLE.

July 15, 1865.]

n-

PRICES

Sheathing, yellow

CURRENT.

.

WHOLESALE.
pf All goods deposited in public stores or bonded
warehouses must be withdrawn therefrom, or the
duties thereon paid within one year from the date of
the originnl importation, but may be withdrawn by
the owner for exportation to Foreign Countries, or
may be transhipped to any port of the Pacific, or West¬
ern Coast of the United estates, at any time before the
expiration of three years from the date of the original
importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be subject to the same rules and
regulations as if originally imported there; any goods
remaining in public store or bonded warehouse be¬
yond three years shall be regarded as abandoned to
the Government, and sold under such regulations as
the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe. Mer¬
chandise upon which duties have oeen paid may re¬
main in warehouse in custody of the officers of the
customs at the expense and risk of the owners of said
merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three years, shall be
entitled to return duties, proper evidence of such
merchandise having been landed abroad to be furnish¬
ed to the collector by the importer, one per centum
of said duties to be retained by tae Government.
$3BT" In addition to the duties noted beloto, a discrim¬
inating duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no reciprocal treaties
1

with the United States.

goods, wares, and merchandise, of the
produce of Countries East of the Cape of
Good Hope, when imported from places this side of the
Cape of Good Hope, a duty of 10 por cent, ad val. is
On all

or

levied in addition to the duties imposed on any such
articles when imported directly from the place or places
of their growth or production ; Raw Cotton and Raw
Silk excepted.
The ton in all cases to be 2,240 lb.

Ashes—Duty: 15 $ cent ad val. Produoe of
the British North American Provinces, free.
Market steady.

$100 lb

Pot, 1st sort
Pearl, 1st sort

....

a T60
© 8 00

Anchor%—Duty: 2| cents $ lb,
Of J209

18

124 ©

lb and upward

Barilla—Duty free.
Teneriffe

$ ton.
Beeswax—Duty, 20 $ cent ad val.
52

50 ©
Tallow, Western and South..$ lb
Bones—Duty, on invoice 10 $ cent.
$ ton 35
Bread—Duty, 30 $ cent ad val.

Bio Grande shin

...

©

Breadstuf fs—See special report.

Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs hair, 1 $ lb.

$ lb

50 © 1 621

Candies—Duty, tallow, 21; spermaceti.and wax,
8; stearine and adamantine, 5 cents $ lb.
Sperm, plain
$ lb
83 ©
Sperm, patent,
45 ©
50
Stearic
SO ©
81
Adamantine (boxes) flight weights)
20 ©
22
..
Cement—Rosendale
$ bbl
160

$ R>

,

..

Cocoa—Duty, 3 cents $ lb.

(in bond).. $ lb

Caracas
Maracaibo

91

©

©

do

55 ©

......

do

Para

..

©

do

Guayaquil

20

60

©

do
©
..
..
Coffee—Duty: When imported direct in Ameri¬
can or equalized vessels from the place of its growth
or production; also, the growth of countries this side
the Cape of Good
Hope when imported indirectly in
American or equalized vessels, 5 ceuts $ lb; all other
10 $ cent ad valorem in addition.
The market has been aotive, including sales 12,000
Bio yesterday.
33 © .1344
Java
curroney. $ lb
224
©
Bio, prime
gold, (

St. Domingo

..

do good
do lair

cash, |
duty^

do ordinary.
do lair to good cargoes
do &ir to good cargoes,

paid |
(
(gold, in

bond)

Laguayra

currency

Maracaibo
Jamaica

St*

214 ©
20

©
184 ©
194 ©

Hi ©
314 ©
29 ©
284 ©
184 ©
134 ©

.

22

.

204

.

18

.

204

.

.

.

.

.

154
324
814
294
19
14

gold
gold
Copper—Duty, pig, bar, and ingot, 24; old copper,
9 cents $ lb; manufactured, 30 $ cent ad val.; sheath¬
ing copper and yellow metal, In sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches wide, weighing 14 © 34 oz. $ square
foot, 34 cents $ lb. All cash.
Quiet, and a shade firmer.
Sheathing, new
4.$ S>
Q
4B
Sheathing, 4a, old*Domingo




do

t

(In bond)

..

.

.

©

..

Oxalic Acid

Phosphorus
Prussiate Potash...

Quicksilver
Rhubarb, China

~

19

27

Sarsaparilla, Mex
Seneka Root

Senna, Alexandria
Senna, East India
Shell Lac
Soda Ash (80

Cotton—See special report.

40 ednts $

Brag’s and Byes—Duty, Alcohol,

gallon; Aloes, 6 cents $ lb ; Alum, 60centa $ 100 fl>;
Argols, 6 cents $ lb; Arsenic^aud"Assafcetida, 20;
Antimony, Crude and Eegulus, Tv; Arrowroot, 80 $
cent ad val.; Balsam Capivi, 20; Balsam Tolu, 30;
Balsam Peru, 50ncents $ lb; Calisaya Bark, 80 $ cent
ad val.; Bi Carb. Soda, *4; B1 Chromate Potash, 3 cents
$ lb; Bleaching Powder, 80 cents $ 100 lb ; Refined
Borax, 10 cents $ lb; Crude Brimstone, $6; Roll
Brimstone, $10 $ ton; Flor Sulphur, $20 $ ton, and
15 $ cent ad val.; Crude Camphor, 30; Refined Cam¬
phor, 40 cents $ lb.; Carb. Ammonia, 20 $ cent ad
val.; Cardamoms and Cantharides, 50 cents $ lb;
Castor Oil, $1 $ gallon; Chlorate Potash, 6; Caustic
Soda, 14; Citric Acid, 10; Copperas. 4; Cream Tartar,
10; Cubeba, 10 cents $ lb; Cutch, 10; Chamomile
Flowers, 20 $ cent ad val.; Epsom Salts, 1 cent $
lb; Extract Logwood, Flowers Benzola and Gam¬
boge, 10 $ cent.; Ginseng, 20; Gum Arabic, 20 $
cent ad val.; Gum Benzoin, Gum Kowrie, and Gum
Damar, 10 cents per lb; Gum Myrrh, Gum Senegal,
Gum Goeda and Gum Tragacanth, 20 $ cent ad val.;
Hyd. Potash and Resublimed Iodine, 75; Ipecac and
Jalap, 50; Lio. Paste, 10; Manna, 25; Oil Anis, Oil
Lemon, and Oil Orauge, 50 cents; Oil Cassia and Oil
Bergamot, $1 $ fl>; Oil Peppermint, 50 $ cent ad
val.; Opium,,$2 50; Oxalic Acid,4 cents $ lb; Phos¬
phorus, 20 $ cent ad val.; Pruss. Potash, Yellow, 5;
Red do, 10 ; Rhubarb, 50 cents $ fi>: Quicksilver, 15
$ cent ad val; Sal JSratus, 14 cents $ lb; Sal Soda.
4 cent $ lb; Sarsaparilla and Senna, 20 $ cent ad
val.; Shell Lac, 10; soda Ash, 4; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
$ Id ; Sulph. Quinine, 45 $ cent ad val.; Sulph. Mor¬
phine, $2 50 $ ox.; Tartaric Aoid, 20; Verdigris, 6
cants $ lb; Sal Ammoniao, 20; Blue Vitriol, 25 $
cent ad val.; Etherial Preparations and Extracts, $1
$ lb; all others quoted below, frex Most of the
articles under this head are now sold for cash. (All
nominal.)
'
Quiet.
Aloes, Cape
$ fl>
..
©
25
Aloes, Socotrlne.
V
85 ©
..

j.»

35 ©
29 ©
4 ©

(gold)

25 ©

L

L...

©

..

50 ©
144 ©

t

(gold)

*

~

©

..

©

..

22
34
30
62 50

Bleaching Powder

Borax, Refined
I
Brimstone, Crude
Brimstone, Am. Roll.
Brimstone, Elor Sulphur.

© 1 75

..

$ ton

"

lb

55

4|

©

©
©
31
© 65 00
64
85
1 00
1 70
19
3 40

95

Cantnarides
:
Carbonate Ammonia, in bulk....
Cardamoms, Malabar.
*.....
Castor Oil (cases).
gallon
Chamomile Flowers
$ lb
Chlorate Potash
L.
(gold)
Caustic Soda

50
60

774

Copperas, American
Cream Tartar, prime

(gold)

384

Cubeba, East India.

134
184

Cutch

Epsom Salts

.14

Extract

$ oz.
$ B>

1
Southern and Western..

Gamboge.:

Gum Arabic, Picked
Gum Arabic,
Gum Benzoin
Gum Kowrie, good to prime
Gum Gedda
;..
Gum Damar...
Gum Myrrh, East India

©

Sorts..j......

Gum, Myrrh, Turkey
Gum Senegal

80
S
1 00
90
85
86

©

20
40

70

*

55
45
1 00

Tragacanth, Sorts
Tragacanth, white flakey...
Hyd. Potash, French and English.

(gold)
J
Iodine, Resublimed..
Ipecacuanna, Brazil. ^
Jalap.
|
Lac Dye, good and fine
Licorice Paste, Calabria
Liccorice, Paste, Sicily...
Licorice Paste, Spanish Solid.....
Licorice Paste, Greek
Madder, Dutch
L
(gold)
Madder* French, E. X F. F. do
Manna,large flake... j....

Light stock, prices nominal.
(gold)
$ ton

Camwood

150 00
45 00

—

Fustic, Cuba
Fustic, Tampico
Fustic, Tabasco
Fustic, Savanilla
Fustic, Maracaibo

48 00
•» •

. .

32

(gold)
do

Logwood, Laguna
Logwood, Campeachy
Logwood, Houd
Logwood, Tabasco
Logwood, St. Domingo
Logwood, Jamaica

(gold)
(gold)
(gold)

(gold)

19
26
24
15

(gold)

00

30 00

66

27 00

00

25 00

00
00

60 00

65

66

..
Sapan Wood, Manila
Feathers—Duty: 30 $ cent ad val.

55

66

0

674

Lima Wood....

Barwood

Fire

:...(gold)

....$ fl>

Prime Western
do Tennessee*.

Crackers—Duty: $1 $ box of 40 paoks.

Canton, 40 packs, No. 1, (cash)

box
8 90 ©
4 00Fish—Duty, Mackerel, $2; Herrings, $1; Salmon,
$3; other pickled, $1 50 $bbL; on other Fish,
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller pkgs. than bar¬
rels, 50 cents $ 100 fl>. Produce of the British North
Americon Colonies, free.

Market

dull; drooping.
6
5
6
22
13
15

$ owt

Dry Cod
Dry Scale

$ bbl.
Mackerel, No. 1,Mass. Shore ...
Mackerel, No. 1, Bay
.. •*
Mackerel, No. 2, Mass. Shore ...
Mackerel, No. 2 Bay
Mackerel, No. 2, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 3, Halifax
Mackerel, No. 3, Small....
Salmon, Pickled,Nd-1
Salmon, Pickled
$ ton.
Shad, Connecticut,No. 1. $ hf. bbl.
Herring, Sealed
$ box
Herring, No. 1
Herring
$ bbl.
Flax—Duty: $15 $ ton. $ B>

3 00
40
45

©
©

©
28 ©
38 ©

30

©

H ©
9

©

1 00

Sorts

75
00
50
50

7 00

50
25

13 75
© 10 75
© 13 75

12 50
10 25

7

66
00

_

33 00

11 50

35 00

Hi ©

do Layer
do Bunch
Currants (new)

80

©

#7$ ©

(new).
(new)

$ hf. cask
$ box

6 75
5 ?5

$ B>

Citron, Leghorn
Turkish Prunes
Dates

Almonds, Languedoc
Provence

do
do

Sicily, Soft Shell
Shelled

do

$ box
$ htbox
$ qr. box

Sardines
do
.....

$ lb

Figs, Smyrna
Brazil Nuts

Filberts, Sicily...
Walnuts, French...
Furs and Skins—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.
Product of the British North American Provinces1
free.

Gold Prises—Add

0 50
3 50
70

premium on gold for currency

prices.
Beaver, Dark

48

do

B)

Pale

Bear, Black
do

.-

Cubs..

Badger

24
38

Cat, Wild....

*84

Fisher, Dark
Fox, Silver

•

e

1 25
a-

*

Raisins, Seedless

3 25

Manna,small flake..*

|
Bias Aleppo

16 00
22 00
26 00
90

$ pee
Ravens, Light
Ravens, Heavy
Scotch, Goureck, No. 1
Cotton, Phenix, No. 1
$ yard
Dy© Woods—Duty free.

do
30

rough

Gum
Gum

“

$ lb
Verdigris, dry and extra dry (gold)
Vitriol, Blue
Duck—Duty, 30 $ eent ad val.

Supply of foreign dry very light, and prices ad¬

do
do

Gambier

.-

vanced.

Cochineal, Honduras
Cochineal, Mexican..,

....j.
Logwood .... j,
Flowers, Benzoin.... i

$ ot.

Sulphate Quinine
Sulphate Morphine
Tartaric Acid
(gold)

Fruit—Duty: Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds, 10; Almonds, 6; other
nuts, 2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts, 1; Snelled do, 14, Filbers
aud Walnuts, 3 cents $ 9>; Sardines, 50; Preserved
Ginger, 50; Green Fruits, 25 $ cent ad val.

do

Citric Acid

(gold)

$ cent)
Sugar Lead, White
Sugar Lead, Brown

Pickled Cod.

40

©
70
© 2 60

..

Bi Carb.Soda, Newcastle...(gold)
Bi Chromate Potash. .j.

44
70
15
40
294

41 ©
..

Bark, Calisaya
Berries, Parisian

Ginseng,

(gold)
(gold)

Sarsaparilla, Bond

Phial

Assafcetida
Balsam Capivi
Balsam Tolu.
Balsam Peru/

(gold)

Sal J&ratus
Sal Ammoniac, Refined
Sal Soda, Newcastle

$ gross

1st regular, quarts
1st regular, pints.
Mineral ....!

in tin.
(gold)

Opium, Turkey

294
24;

Corks—Duty, 50 $ cent ad val.

Camphor, Refined.

Coal—Duty, bituminous, $1 25 $ ton of 28 bushels,
80 lb to the bushel; other than bituminous, 40 ceuts
$ 28 bushels of 80 lb $ bushel.
Liverpool Orrel..$ ton of 2,240 lb
..
©
Liverpool House Caunel
T60 © 8 00
Nova Scotia
8 50 © 9 00
Anthracite, by dealers $ ton of
2000 lb
8 50 © 10 00

©
©

..

Camphor, Crude, (in bond)

Chains—Duty, 21 cents $ ft.
One inch and upward

Tarred Russia.
Tarred American
Bolt Rope, Russia

Antimony, Eegulus of
Argola, Crude, Oporto
Argola, Refined....
Arsenic, Powdered

Crackers

American, gray and white...

ingot
99 ©
Cordage—Duty, tarred, 8; untarred Manila,
other untarred, 34 oents $ B>.
Manila....
$ lb
32 ©

Annato, fair to prime..

Navy

45

45

©

;

Alum....

..$ fi>

Pilot

„.

Braziers’
American

Oil Cassia
.
Oil Bergamot
Oil Lemon
Oil Peppermint, pure,

35

©
©
©

...

Pig, Chile
Bpltz

growth

86

The chronicle.

July 15,1865.]

90

do House

do Cross
do Red
do Grey

Lynx
Marten, Dark,

-

/
f
...................

*

4

July 15, 1866J

THE CHRONICLE.

Opossum

8 @

•....

Racooon...

80

80

1,5

Sknnk, Black

,

do
Striped
do
White
Gold Prices.
-

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
w

Buenos

@

2

Goat, Curacoa, No. i

# ft

60
36
8

@

35
35

82$ @
32$ @

Ayres

Vera Croat,

10
60

@
@

..

@

45

...L.

Tampico .3L..;

@

47$

42$- @
82$ @
@

Payta..../.

Madras..

35

82$ @

Matamora/

85

45

..

Cape!??..

.*.*.**....*

in merchantable order.
Deer, San Juan and Chagres per ft
do Bolivar City
Deer Skins,

do
do
do
do
do
do

Honduras
Siam *
Para
Missouri-.
Texas.
Arkansas

do

Florida

.....

.

42$ @

47$
@
32$
50
47$ @
45
42$ @
45
42$ @
@
@
@
@
Window Polished Plato
30

..

..

....

Glass—Duty, Cylinder

or

not over 10x15 inches, 2$ cents $ square foot; larger
and not over 16x24 inches, 4 cents $ equate foot;
larger and not over 24x39 inches 6 cents $ square

foot; above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
cents $ square foot; all above that, 40 cents $ square
foot; on unpolished Cylinder, Crown, and Common
Window, not exceeding 10x15 inches square, 1$; over
that, and not o^er 16x24, 2; over that, and not over
24x30, 2$; all over that, 8 cents $ ft.
American Window—1st, 2d,c8d, and 4th qualities.
6x8 to 8x10
8x11 to 10x1$
11x14 to 12x18
12x19 to 16x24
18x22 to 20x30
20x31 to 24x30
24x31 to 24x36
25x36 to 30x44..
80x46to 32x48
32x50 to 82x56./.

$ 60 feet

Above
,

5 50
6
6
7
7

(The above is subject to

cent)

a

00
50
00
50
00
00
00
00
00

@
<a
@

7
T
9
9

25
75
25

50

@ 11 75
9
@ 14 50
/10
@ 16 00
11
@ 17 00
12
@ 18 00
18
@ 20 00
15 00 @ 24 00
discount of 40 $ 45 $

French

Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th qualities.
(Subject to a discount of 85 @ 40 $2 cent)
Gunny Bag's—Duty, valued at 10 cents or less,
$2 square yard, 3; over 10, 4 cents $ lb
Market steady.
Calcutta, light and heavy .. ^9 pco
26 @
27
Gnnny Cloth—Duty, valued at 10 cents or less
tfi square yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ lb.
Calcutta, standard
Market

yard

..

@

21$

Gunpowder—Duty, valued at 20 cents or less
lb, 6 cents $ lb, and 20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
tents $ lb, 10 cents $2 lb and 20 $ cent ad val.
Blasting (A)....... ^ keg of 25 lb
@ 6 50;.
..
4

Shipping and Mining
Sporting, in

1 lb canisters... $2 lb

Hair—Duty
Buenos

(cash).. $ ft

Ayres, mixed... 1

Hog, Western, unwashed
Hay—North River,Shipping $
looib
Market firm.

60

a

..
8 50
48

@ 6 50
@

1 15

fbbb.

Rio Grande, mixed..

80
27
10
90

New arriving sparingly;

@
@
@

81
28
12

a

95

selling at

75o.

Tampico, 1

$ lb.

cent

Scarce and firm.

American, Dressed
do

Undressed

Sjj2 ton

255 00
165 00

Russia, Clean

..

Jute.
Manila
Sisal

175 00

$ lb

16
14

@265 00
@175 00
@
@190 00
@
@
15
and Skins,

Hides—Duty, all kinds, Dry or Salted,
10 ft cent ad val.
Product of the British North
American Provinces, fbbb. (Nominal.)
The market has been fairly active, and very firm.
-GoldB. A., 20 @ 26 ft selected... $ ft
Rio Grande, 20 @ 23 lb, selected.
R. G. «fc B. A. Green Salted Cow.
Rio Nunez
Gambia and Bissau

Orinoco

;

San

Juan, etc
Savanila, etc

Maracaibo, Salted
do

Dry

Maranham,Dry Salted Ox and Cow

do

22$

I

lb.
and prices tend upwards.
$ ft
15 @
40
do of 1863...;
10 @
25
Horns—Duty, 10 $2 cent ad val. Produce of

!

(duty paid)....$
(in bond)
Hops—Duty: 5 cents $
There is rather more doing
Crop of 1864

gall.

.1 20

1

*

Vera Crux
Porto Cebello....

Y

Minoz ......i

the British North American Provinces

Rio Haohe

India

...$C

..

13 00

Curacao....

California, Dry

California, Dry Salted...........
California,Green Salted (ourrenoy)
Dry Western....
Green Salted Country and West’rn
City Slaughter.
City Slaughter, Association......
Penang C o w.....................
Manila Buffalo.:.

Buffalo,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

15$

do
do

i

Red oak,
;
do

..

•

...

...

..

...

..

00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00

§ 55 00

’bbl., culls.

85 00
70 00

hhd., heavy
hhd., light

HEADING—white oak, hhd..

..

@ 40 00
@120 00

iMahogany, Cedar, Rosewood—Duty

@18 00
@ 15 00

Mahogany, St. Domingo, crotches,
!

b

j

Para, Fine...;
Para, Medium
Para, Coarse

ft

65

70

$ foot

do
v

do

St. Domingo, ordinary
logs
k, do
Port-an-Platt, crotches.

Rubber—Duty, 10 $2 cent ad val.
..

East India

Port-au-Platt, logs.....
Nuevitas

do

;

Mansanilla

%

Carthagena, etc.
Guayaquil
Indigo—Duty
Very quiet.
Bengal....

48

■

]

50

Honduras
..

Oude

Mansanilla
Mexican

do

!

...

(American

;

do
do

fb

...

Mexican

wood).
Cedar, Nuevitas

fbee.

Florida

Kurpan

Rosewood, Rio Janeiro

Madras
Manila ,r

j

(gold)
Iron—Duty, Ba
)uty, Bars, 1 to 1$ cents $ ft; Railroad,
70 cents $ 100 lb; Boiler and Plate, 1$ cents
lb;
Sheet, Band, Hoop, and Scroll, 1$ to 1$ cents
lb;
Pig, $9 ^ ton; Polished Sheet, 3 cents |2 lb.
There is a better demand, but prices are without
improvement.
Pig, Scotch, Best,No l(caah $ ton • 40 00 @ 45 00
Pig, American, No. 1
35 00 @ 36 00
Bar, Swedes,assorted sizes (in gold)
@ 92 50
..

/•"•Store I^biobs"^
Far

Swedes, assorted sizes
160 00
Bar, English and Americau,Refined 105 00
do

do

do

do

@170 00
@110 00

Common

95 00

@100 00

Scroll, English...

140 00

Ovals and Half

Round, English...

130 00

t200 00
@

•

Band, English

135 00

...

Horae Shoe

:..

@145 00
@185 00
@220 00
9$ @
10$
24 @
25

Nail Rod

:
f} lb
Sheet, Russia
Sheet, English, Single,Double and

do

..

105 00
140 00

Hoop, English

Treble
do Am.

140 00

135 00

t

Rods, English, 5-8 @ 3-16 inch...

do

do

do

..

00
00

9*
9*
@ 58 00
@ 90 00

cent ad vaL

Ivory—Duty, 10

Molasses—Duty: 8 cents $ gallon,

&ev¥

Orleans...

4 00
India, Prime
8 00
.'...$ lb
India, Billiard Ball
* 4 50
African, West Coast, Prime
2 75 @ 8 75
2 75
African, S.crivellos, West Coast..
1 75
Laths—Duty, 20 ^2 centred val.
Better supplied and lower.
Eastern
....$ M
20 00 @ 2 10
Lead—Duty, Pig, $2 $ 100 lb ; Old Lead, 1$ cents
$ lb; Pipe and Sheet, 2$ cents $2 ft.
Sales 400 tons for the week at full prices.
Galena..
$ 100 lb
9 25 @
Spanish
8 75 @ 9 00

German, Refined

8 75

@ 9 00
@ 9 00
Bar
12
.......$ ft
<2>
16
Pipe and Sheet
@
Leather—Duty: sole 35, upper 80 $ cent ad val.
Active market and prices firm.
37
Oak, (slaughter,) light
$ft]
85 @
do middle
41 @
42
do heavy
42
V.
41 @
do crop
50
38 O
Hemlock, middle, R. Grande <fc B.
30 @
31
Ayres
middle, CalifoNiia
29$ @
81$
28 @
29
middle, Orinoco, etc.
29
light, R. Grande * 3. Ayres j~
27$ @
27 ©
28
-light, California
g
26 @
27
light, Orinoco, eto
heavy, R. Graado & B
&
Ayres
29$ @
31$
29 @
31
,do
heavy, California
do
26
heavy, Orinoco, etc
25 @
do
good damaged
23 @
26$
do
20
poor damaged
18 @
do
26
upper, in rough, slaughter.
24 @
35
Oak, upper, in rough, slaughter...
80 <a
Lime—Duty; 10
cent ad vaJ.
8 75

.-

Porto Rico
i

@
@

1 20
1 60

Rosewood and Cedar, fubb. Lumber and Timber of
all kinds, unmanufactured, product of the British
North American Provinces, fbbb.

16 00
8
8

Black

18

Blk
Yellow Pine Timber

22

Walnut, Crotches
Walnut,Figured and Blistered

@19 00
@
10
@
10
@
@
@

25
1 25
94

70 00 @
60 00 @ 70 00
@ 30 00

M feet

..

Boards

\

ft M.

heavy,,,,

re 9••t •« %

70
45
35

do

Claved

!English Islands

,

160
@160 00

$180

00

75
55

@
@

42

65

55 @

Nalls—Duty: cut 1$; wrought 2$; horse shoe 6
ents $ ft
(Cash.)

Cut, 4d. @ 60d..^ 100 ft
Clinch
Horse shoe, forged (8d)...... ^ ft
Copper

5 00
6 00

5 25
6 50
80
50
30
20

Yellow metal
Zinc

Naval Stores—Duty: spirits of turpentine 30
$ gallon; crude turpentine, rosin, pitch, and
tar, 20 $ cent ad val. Tar and turpentine, product
:

cents

of the British North American

Cash.)

Provinces, free. (All

; The market is
quite unsettled.
Turpentine, North County, soft W

9 50

10 25

do

Wilmington, etc
Tar, Washington and New Berne.

f bbl

do

4 60 @

foreign
Pitch, city, No. 1
!

@

*

common
strained and No.

do

$ 280 1b

5 25

0 50
6 00
8 00
6 25

2, (in yd

'

$280ft

! do

No. 1

6 00
10 00

Rosin, Pale and Extra.
Spirits turpentine, Am....$ galL

14 00

1 75

9
12
15
<a 1

00
00
00
80

j Oil Cake—Duty: 20 $ cent ad val.

Market quiet and firm.
City thin oblong, in bbls.... $ ton
@ 50 00
do
in bags
47 00 @ 48 00
Western thin oblong, in bags
@ 45 75
; Oils—Duty: linseed, flaxseed, and rape seed, 2$
..

....

..

cents; olive and salad oil, in bottles or flasks, $1:
burning fluid, 50 cents $2 gallon; palm, seal, and cocoa
pkt, 10 $ cent ad val.; sperm ana whale or other fish
/breign fisheries,) 20 $ cent ad valorem.
KMarket very firm, but inactive,

f/live, Marseilles, (gold).... $
C do

in casks

/inseed, city.
•Whale
do

s

case

gall.
# ft
W gall

ii'alm, ....(gold)...
bleached winter..

Sperm, crude

!

do

winter, unbleached

Lard oil, prime, winter
Red oil, city distilled

Bank and shore

....

White oak, pipe, extra
do
pipe,

Closes firmer.

fl gall.

Cuba Muscovado

East
East

White Oak,Logs..,
White Oak, Plank
White Pine Shipping

38 fi)

Bahia

i The market has been aotive.

Rosin,

English

^ cubic ft.

280 ft

6$
'0*

$ ton

American

STAVES—

v do

j

Guatemala
Caraccas

fl M feet
Bird’s-Eye Maple, Log3 $ sup. feet
Black Walnut, Logs

BtDomlngo and Port-au-PlattDry

•

hhd., extra.
hhd., heavy
hhd., light
hhd., culls
bbl., extra
bbl., heavy
bbl., light.

@110
@70
@180
@110
@ 70
@ 60
@125
@ 90

free.

Ox, Rio Grande
Ox, American, selected

Spruce, Eastern

Truxillo

do

.

I

fbbb.

More plenty, but prices steady.

Bogota

do
do

....

Lumber, Woods, Staves, Etc.—Duty,
Lumber, 20 $2 cent ad val.; Staves, 10 $ cent ad val.;

Dry Salted

do

;

Cuba
do

_

pipe, culls...

;do

a.pjight. decline.
Rockland, coopnon,/......^ bbl.
do
lumps'/

Matamoras




do

Active at

Pernambuco,Dry Baited
Bahia, Dry...
do
Dry Baited
Tampico

White oak, pipe, light.
..

.

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $?5; Jute,
$15; Italian, $40; Sunn and Sisal, $15 $ ton; and

do

Kips, Slaughter
Kips, Dead Green
1
Singapore
Honey—Duty, 20 centsI^|gallon.

Rails, English.. .(gold)

active.

more

Calcutta
Calcutta

87

Straits.

Paraffine, 28
Kerosene

—

80 gr.

deodorized..
(free)...

_

Paints—Duty: on white lead, red lead, and
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents $ ft; Paris
whiting, 1 cent $ ft ; dry ochres, 56 cents
$ 100 ft: oxides of zinc, 1$ cents $ ft ; ochre, ground
in oil, $150 $ 100 ft ; Spanish brown 25 $ cent ad vah;
China clay, $5 $ ton; Venetian red and vermilion,
white and

25

$2 cent ad val.; white chalk, $10 $2 ton.

Lithrage, American

$ ft

Lead, red, American.

i do white, American, pure, in oil
do white, American,puio, dry.

Zinc, white, American, dry, No. 1.
do white, American, No. 1, in oil
Ochre, yellow,French,dry $1 100 ft
i do
ground in oil
...."gift
Spanish brown, dry. .....$ luo ft
do
ground in oil $ ft
Paris white, English, No. 1hi ting, American
ermilion, Chinese
$2 ft

ff
*

j

do
do

Trieste

13 &
13$ @

15

13$ @

00

,

b
8
2 50
9

8
3
2 00
2 00
1 25
1 20

1 25
35
3 00

American

14

@

.

@
@
@

@
@

10
8 25
10

1 50
9

@

@
@
@
@

225
1 30
1 25
1 30

@
40
American, common...
@
$2 cwt
19 00 @ 20 00
$ ft
35
@ 40 00
38 ton
Chalk.
@ 4 50
v bbL
Petroleum—Duty: crude,20 cents; refined, 40
cents $ gallon.
Large receipts and cancelled foreign orders hare de¬

■5*

do

Venetian red, (N. C.)
Carmine, city made
China clay

...

• •

—

■

pressed the market.

Crude, 40 @ 47 gravity

*

$ gall,

89 @

$8f

:”>V

"v"'

.

THE CHRONICLE.

•88
do

In bond

.j...

Naptha, refined

••

© 10 50

39 bbl.

Residuum..

54

lump, free; calcined,

Planter Paris—Duty:
20 32 cent ad val.
Blue Nova Scotia.
White NoVa Scotia

Calcined, eastern

©
©
©
©

$ ton.

$ bbl.

L..

Calcined, City mills

3 75
2 40
2 50

Provisions—Duty: cheese and butter, 4 cents ;
bacon, and lard, 2 cents

beef and pork, 1 cent; hams,

Produce of the British North American Pro¬

$ ft.

vinces.

hog products ” has largely advanc¬
ed, the demand being mainiy speculative; other ar¬
ticles steady.
12 00
Beef, plain mess
$ bbl.
9 00
15 00
do mess, extra, (new)
^
12 00
do Drime mess.*.......
nominal.
nominal.
nominal.

mess

Pork, prime mess, (new)
do clear, (new)
do mess, West’n, (l year old and

prime, West’n, (old and new).
thin

© 29 00

.

.

lb.; paddy 10

Wice—Daty: cleaned 2* cents
3leai
cents, and uncleaned 2 cents 33 ftThe market has been active at very

$ 100 lb

Carolina
East India, dressed
Patna, cargo styles

full prices.
9 75 © 10 75
9 25 @ 9 75
..

Salt-Duty: sack, 24 cents 33 1°6
$ loo lb.

cents

32 bush.

51
51

32 sac^

1 55

fine, Ashton’s
fine, Worthington’s..
fine, Jeffreys & Darcy’s
fine, Marshall’s

2 75
2 75
2 75

Turks Islands
Cadiz

Liverpool, ground

52

©

....

Clover...

32 ®

,

32 hush.
Canary
32 bush.
Linseed, American, clean... 39 tee
j do
American,rough.32 bush
Calentta
Calcutta

6

5*®

(at Boston)

(at-New York),

5 50

4^513
2 30
3 10
3 12

Silk—Duty: free.

do

re-reeled, No. 1 © 2

a

13 50
12 00

10 50

13 50
11 00

Sales 800 bxs.
Castile (gold)

$ 5).

refining

.

j.

good refining

box, Nos. 13 @ 15,.

13

11$

,

Manila

Brazil, brown
Melado
:
Stuarts’ loaf
do
best crushed
do
granulated..
do
ground

a
a

•

14 00

[..

.'

$ ft

$ ton

^ lb

gold

African

Mace

*

Nutmegs, No. 1

PeSo*rgold (in'bond)!.*.*. !.!. !!!.*

Pimento, Jamaica..
do

(in bond)

Qovas

75
26
20
1 10
1 15
29

stocks.

Gin, Holland,
Whiskey, Scotch
Domestic

gold.
do
do

do

..
..

..

do

1....J..

61 ©
23 ©
©
35 ©




bbls.

* and * Merino
native and

-

common,

unwashed...

Peruvian, unwashed
Chilian Merino, unwashed
do
Mestiza, unwashed

Valparaiso, unwashed..!

S.‘ American Merino, unwashed

ad val.

©

23*

26*
©
24*
12 25 © 13 00
10 25 ® 11 75
9 25 @ 9 62*
13 25 © 18 25

32 box

active; 6ales for the week

32 ft

a

9

©

16

©

20

7
15
12
6
10
9

©
©
©
©
©

10
30
15
7
15
11

Leaf—

wrappers

running lois

Foreign—
Havana, wrappers, .(duty paid)
do
assorted .(duty paid
do
fillers
.(duty paid
Yara, assorted...‘. .'.(duty paid
Cuba, assorted
(duty paid
St. Domingo, assorted (in bond,
Ambeleriia, Giron, and Carmen
(in bond)
;.....

77*

6
10
18

.

...

©

1 20
1 00
90
80

©
©
©

70
6

©
©

20

6

©

20

©

2 00
1 50
1 10
1 00
80

Manufactured—Tax paid.

87*

5’s and 7’s—best
L
do
medium..!
do
common. J.....
10’s and 12’s—Best
medium

.....

do

common.,

Half pounds, bright—best...
do
medium...
do
common
L
82’s
.

Negrohead twist, (Western).
do

(city made

bright

•

©
©
©

'.

washed ..!!.!!!

82
45
32

Zinc—Duty; pig or block, $1 50 32 160 lb; sheet,
2* cents 32 ft..
Sheet........'.
$ ft
12*
12 ©

Freig-fitsShipments have been less active and rates have not
been supported; the close, however, is towards some
recovery.
To Liverpool:
Cotton
Flour
Petroleum..,.

d.

s.

^ ft

32 bush.

Corn, bulk and bags

Wheat, bulk and bags
Beef
Pork
To London:

32 tee.

Heavy goods

32 ton

Wheat, in ship’s bags.
Corn, bulk and bags
To Glasgow :
Flour
Wheat

.32 bbl.

.

.

8*

@ 17
© 20
© 2
®

6
..

0

©36
..©29
®
6
@
5*

•

..

..

.-..32 bbl.
.32 bush.

Com,bulk and bags.
;
Petroleum.;<32 bbl.
Heavy goods
ton

•

..

15
1 9
5 00
..

....32 tee.
.32 bbl,
.-.32 bush.

1

%

bbl.

Oil
Flour
Petroleum
Beef
Pork

d.

s.

* ©

©
7 6 @ 10 00
10 00 ® 15 00
4 @
4*
4* ©
4*

32 ton

Heavy goods

0

1

...32 bbl.

Oil

Oil
Beef
Pork

,

©
®
©

25
42
27

.

.

Syrian, unwashed
...

..

.!,

do
do

86
48
85
nominal.

Smyrna, unwashed’.
do

2,500 hhds.

do
do

28*
20
35
30

washed

Texas

40
83
32
37
35
27
47
45
65

37

!.

African, unwashed

1. C. coke

charcoal

washed*.

common,

44

©
©
©
©
©
©

..

Mestiza, unwashed

East India, washed

ft

(gold).

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

* Merino...

Creole, unwashed.

Pennsylvania and Ohio, fillers..

24
15

20
80
7
24

sales Jor the

77
72
70
67
75
72
65

32

full blood Merino

Cordova, washed..
Cape Good Hope, unwashed

Connecticut and N. York, fillers
do
do wrappers,
do
do rnn’g lots

27

©
©

11^

©

active, and prices ad¬
pound.

pulled.
Superfine, pulled
No. 1, pulled.
California, fine, unwashed

do

Lugs and low leaf....
Medium to good

8*

00
15
10
00

85 00
2 75 © 3 00

Entre Rios, washed

Fine to select

©

11

do
do
do
Extra,

do

Hyson
]..
Young Hyson
J.,
Gunpowder and Imp ...!..
Hyson Skin aud Twankay.
Japan (uncolored)
.j

Pounds (Western)—extra f

Liquors.—Cash.

Alcohol, 80 ana 65 $ cent
Brandy, gin, and pure spires...
Bum, pure

WbUky

of the

Kentucky—

Spirit#—Duty: Brandy, first proof, $3 per gallon,
other liquors, $2.50.
Domestic whisky is slightly firmer, with reduced

do
Rochelle,
Rum. 8t Croix.

American, Saxony fleece

.

?

Brandy, Cognac

The market has been very

110 00 a 185 00

Teas—Duty : 25 cents per 5).
The market has been very active;
week reaching 20,000 pkg9.

Seed

© 2
© 1
© 1
© 50

North American Provinces, free.

•

Sumac—Duty: 10 $ cent ad val. *

about

1

Wool—Duty: costing 12 cents or less $ ft, 3
32 ft? over 12 and not more than 24, 6 cents;
over 24 and not over 32,10, and 10 32 cent ad valorem;
over 32,12 cents <p ft, and 10 $ cent ad valorem; on
the skin, 20 32 cent ad val. Produce of the British

vanced for fleece 3®5 cents per

The market has been very

12 50
21 (JO

90
t2 90
00
© 1

..

.

(in bond)
Ginger, race and

19*

Tobacco—Duty: leaf 38 cents 32 fi>; and manu¬
factured, 50 cents 32 ft.

• a

a

1 85

1 75

cents

..

a1400
a 12 50
a 11 00
a 13 50
a

1 60

.

..

..

do J white—A
do
yellow/— C..

do

Inactive.
do

@

16* ©
10* @
10* ©
7 @
©
©
©
©
©

1 80

Sicily
maderia

© 13 00
© 11 00
© 2 40
@ 2 60

Wire—Duty: No. 0 to 18, uncovered, $2 to $3 50
32 100 ft, and 15 ^ cent ad val.
No. 0 to 18
30 32 ct. off list.
:
No. 19 to 36
40 32 ct. off list.
8
Telegraph, No. 7 to 11 Plata. $ ft
7* ©

©

box, Nos. 19 © 20...

2 00

(gold)
sweet
do
(gold)...
Claret, low grades.. (gold). 32 cask
do
low grades .<gold>32 dozen

14* ©

Terne, coke

Spice#—Duty: mace, 40 cents; nutmegs, 50*
cassia and clove?, 20; pepper and pimento, 15; and
ginger root, 5 cents $ ft. (All cash.)
Cassia,

do

©

16

175

•

Malaga, dry.;

12* ©

box, Nos. 16 © 18.;..

'

port

Marseilles

12* @
II

3 00

Sicily madeira/.
Red, Spanish and

©
©
©
H
©
10 ©
Ilf ©
12 ®

fair to good grocery,
box, >os. 7 @ 10;i.
box, N03. 11 © 12..

4 (>0

...1

Burgundy port

..

White

do

Spelter—Duty: in pigs, bars, and plates, $1 50 $
loo lb.
;
9*
Plates,foreign....(cash)
32 ft
.
a
domestic

fair

15

17 50
Soap—Duty: lcent.$ Tb, and 25 32 cent ad val.

do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

English..

14

a

none.

Japan, superior
do
No. 1 © 3
China thrown—.

$ fl>

Market shade firmer—more doing.

3 15

..

Port

Refined

5 50 © 15 00

$ gall.
;

Lisbon

Banca.
Straits

13 25

usual reel

9,000 hhds. and 5,500 boxes.

Madeira...........

Sherry

Sales

Mexican, unwashed.

All thrown silk. 35 $ oent

Tsatlee9, No. 1©3
32®*
Taysaams, superior, No. 1 © 2 ...
medium. No. 3 © 4....
do

advance.

T1 »- -Duty; pm, bars, and block, 15 32 cent
Plate and sheets and terne plates, 2* cents ^ ft.

2 40

•.

Buck

cents

and not over 100,
ad valorem; over
cent ad val.

higher. J*

■

32 lb

Drop

an

Oolong
Souchong and Congou

••

Bombay (at New York).
Shot—Duty: 2* cents $ lb.

Canton,

for the week

at

©

..

Wine—Duty: value set oyer 50 cents 32 gallon 20
32 gallon and 25 32 cent &d valorem j over 50
50 cents
gallon and 25 32 cent
$1 32 gallon, $1 32 gallen and 25 32

j

The market has been active

1 25

1 20

32 ft

Ochotsk
Arctic.

©
©

The market has been active and advancing.

Timothy, reaped

do
do
do

..

®
©
©

North we=t coast

13 @
13

common...

South Sea

5

American, prime, country and city

Seeds—Duty: linseed, 16 cents; hemp, £ cent 33
lb; canary, $1 *32 bushel of 60 ft; and grass seeds,
30 32 cent ad val.
Market quiet.

65
60
50

medium.......

Whalebone—Duty: foreign fishery, 32 cent ad

@

Product
: 1 cent 32 ft.
British North American Provinces, free.

15’

fine.....
medium

val.

©

Tallow—Duty

141©

(cash)

'

ed, 3* ; above 15 and not over 20,4 ; on refined, 5; and
on INlolado, 2* cents 32 ft*
’

Sicily.

Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 2| cents; refined and
partially refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent $ lb.
Refined, pure
(cash)
32 lb
..
©
24

..(cash)

12

20

;..;
t

„

©
bulk, 18

©
©

on raw or brown sugar, not above
No. 12 Dutch standard, 8; on white or clayed, above
No. 12 and not above No. 13 Dutch standard, not refin¬

.

Orange County
Cheese, common to choice, (new).

do
do

24
14

-

Stififar—Duty:

.

do

Crude
Nitrate soda

Milan, (in bond)

.

©
21]
©
211
181 ©
21
13 ©
.15
12 ©
.14
50 © 27 5U
20
28
©
22 ©
23
34 ©
35
10 ©
.16

do

15 ©

j.'

.

19

Beef hams
$1 bbl.
Butter, Western
^ ft
tdo N. York State dairies, new.

13
14

Cuba, Muscovado

nominal.

17

$ ft

fine,

.......

do
do

do

and 10 $9

19 ©
12 ©

American blister
do
cast, hammered..
do
cast, rolled
do
spring
:

New Orleans....
j.
do
clarified.....
St. Croix.
Porto Rico
i.

19 50 © 20 00

mess

Lard, iu bbls
Hams, pickled
do
dry salted
Shoulders, pickled
do
dry salted

do
do
do
do

English, cast.(2d & 1st qlty). $ ft
do
spring. .(2d & 1st qlty.)..
do
blister. .(2d & 1st qlty)...
do
machinery...,..!
German
(2d & 1st qlty) ....*.

cent

21 50 © 22 50
nominal.
27 00

new).,
do
do

,

(Virginia)—extra
bright

Navy pounds—best........

[

Free.

The market for “

do India
do India

lb or under, 2* cents; over 7 cents ami not
3 cents 32 ft ; over 11 cents, 3* centt $ ft
•cent ad val, (Store prices.)

.

..

..

Pounds

Steel—Duty: bars and ingots, valued at 7 cents $
above 1 J,

73

©
©
®

Refined, free

[July 8,1865.

::..
.

32 tce3? bbl.

2

_

©
®
••••-..

©
©

t

6
5*

© 20 00
20

® 25 00
©
©

4

..

3

ToHavke;
55
50

©
©

©
37* ©
©
©
©
©

Cotton

62*
55s
45

..

,

,

..

#

,

..

•

..

Hops

32
,....■

1
Beef and pork
bbl.
Measurement goods.
.3a ton 10
W heat, in shipper’s bags.. 32 bnsh.
Flour......’
32 bbl.’" "
Petroleum
'..‘.'/.'.’.V*./....;'
5

^

Lard, tallow, cut meats, etc 32 ton

..
.

©

'' ©

..

..

©

y

6

..

©

Ashes,pot and pearl
8 00 © 10 00
To Melbourne (Br. tea.).32 foot "
35 ' @
....
To Sydney, N. S. W. (Br. ves.).. 37* © • ..
To San FranoibGo, by clippers: * *"
Measuremeht goods’
$1 foot

Heavy goods.....
Cool..

"ft

«’3B tbh

Vl

July 15,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

89

—all which exhibits

I)e Ratltbat) Jttonitor.

very satisfactory condition of railroad finance,
when &any of the companies here represented have
cleared off overwhelming liabilities from the
proceeds of business
EPITOME OF RAILWAY NEWS,
during the period of th4 rebellion.
That the earnings
With the approach of the Erie dividend period, the question of
o%ailroads have not been diminished by the
cessation of hostilities,! is
the ability or policy of the company to pay or pass the August
fully evidenced by comparing those for
dividend, is again the subject of a wild canvass, That the earnings June 1864 and 1865 j
|Nor is it probable that they will be de¬
from operations, all other matters being quiet, have been ample
is creased, at least daring the forthcoming season. Everything, in¬
conceded ; but there are large floating liabilities existing and con¬ deed, is in favor of infreased
earnings. Never before have the
tinued extraordinary expenditures demanded, which for the welfare crops promised so large Returns ; and the
foreign demand is exof the company ought to be satisfied/ It becomes, therefore, a : pected to be extensive. { For a short time the
high prices of pro¬
matter of policy, and as such it ought alone to be considered when duce and provisions forbade
export, but with the present prospects
the question is argued.
Many of the best friends of the company prices are approaching the gold standard, and trade will be re¬
maintain the impolicy of a present dividend, and
certainly we can¬ sumed. This will create an active internal movement, and require
not but agreg with such, if it be wisdom to maintain the
integrity the utmost capacity of pur railroads.: The vast increase of popula¬
of the company’s capital. The uncertainty of the result of the tion in the Atlantic citfes will
help the movement; they must be
question in the Directory, however, has been the cause of erratic fed from the interior,
their wares and manufactures must find
fluctuations in the price of Bhares, and the chief
point of interest there their place of consumption. Thus the railways will reap a
in the market for the past week. No decision was come to at the double benefit—loads bpth
way, and never out of cargo. For the
meeting on Wednesday. The Directors of the company meet results on our principal foads we refer tojthe Chronicle’s table of
again on the 25th, and will probably then have made up their monthly earnings on the! next page.
minds what to do. The interim of
The Ohio, Indiana and Illinois consolidation is now a matter of
uncertainty will undoubtedly
be prolific in schemes and jobs.
We do not, however, anticipate fact. All are agreed, aril the following lines now compose the To¬
any such fall and rise in the stock as that which signalized the last ledo, Wabash and Western Railway :
dividend occasion. Holders are now better
acquainted with its Toledo and
Wabaeh, in Ohio and Indiana
242
real value than they were at that time ; nor is the * short’
interest, Great Western of Illinois/
175
which suffered so severely on the occasion referred to, of much Meredosia Branch of the same.
*7
account. The prospects are, therefore, not quite so
Quincy and Toledo, in Illinois
34
inviting to the Iowa and Southern Illino?!
26
manipulators ; but that every effort will be made to depreciate this
stock, is a conclusion warranted by the course of events during the -—making a total of 484) miles. This consolidation forms one of
week. In reality, however, it is of little
importance whether a the largest and most important trunk roads in the country, and is
dividend be paid or not. If' it be paid,
there is so much in hand the only line between Lake Erie and the Mississippi under one orfor the shareholders. If not paid, the future value of the shares ganization and of uni orm
gauge. Trains have commenced running
will be increased in like proportion, and the
through from^ToIedo to Quincy and Keokuk. The Hon. A. Boody
company be cleared
from the bulk of the difficulties now
surrounding its financial is President of the consolidated company.
status.
Iu the meanwhile the holders of shares
ought not to give
Concerning the Minnesota Central Railroad, the Minneapolis
way to despondency. The company is undoubtedly in a healthy Atlas of the 5th says : “ The track
laying still continues with una¬
position, and daily developing resources the future of which is im¬ bated vigor. The track is already completed as far as FarriDgton,
and

especially

a

so

ai-jjl

measurable.

,

‘

within twelve miles

Northfield.

There is but little doubt that
road will be finished from this town
and to Faribault, fifty miles, by the

o

,

by the 1st of September the
Company has declared a c.'sh dividend of 5 to Northfield,
forty miles,
per cent, for the first half of the current year. The shareholders month of October.”
have also been complimented by another distribution in the
shape
The railroad ordinance of the Missouri Convention,
of stock to the amount of 10 per cent, on their
levying a
holdings, out of tax upon the business of the roads to
pay the railroad debt lor
the proceeds of,the land, department.
The latter represents an which the State is liable, has beeu adopted by the people by 18,167
equal sum of cancelled land mortgage bonds paid off with the majority.
cash proceeds of land sales since the previous scrip dividend. Ten
A letter from Great Salt Lake
City says : “ We are perfectly
years ago the country traversed by the Illinois Central road was sure that the Pacific
Railway, so far as engineering difficulties and
unpeopled and a waste. It is now almost as thickly settled as the expensive grading are concerned, can reach Great Salt Lake City
agricultural districts of any other of the Western States. So with not a tenth part of the expense it cost the Erie or the Penn¬
much for the influence of avenues of communication. The results sylvania Central roads to cross the mountains lying in their way.
The country for hundreds of miles east aud west of the mountains
to the stockholders who, at the outset, were deemed visionaries,
is destitute of timber, and herein is the
are highly satisfactory,
and their reward ample. The future will come ; but Providence seems to have great obstacle to be over¬
smoothed
The Illinois Central

double

down these vast

the amount of their shares and give

them a permanent mountains on
purpose to afford a highway for the commerce of the
value, which rfo circumstances likely to occur can invalidate. We world.
As to fuel, there is an abundance of coal
have seen these shares quoted very low and also very
high. They ered on both sides of the mountains to run the already discov¬
road, and for all
are now valued at 138Ial40, and the last
quotation in the London other
market was 84 (gold.)
The following are among

purposes

the railroad dividends payable in July

Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago..
Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg.
Hartford and New Haven

Panama
Terre Haute and Richmond

Northern Central
Boston and Providence

Fitchburg
New York, Providence and Boston
New York and New Haven
Norwich and Nashua
Delaware
Worcester and Western

Cape Cod

Concord and Portsmouth
Providence and Worcester.
Camden and Amboy
Central of New Jersey

Cleveland, Painesville and Ashtabula
Detroit and Milwaukee........
Little Miami

Michigan Central.........
“

Western (Mass.)............




*

:

Pcrct.

'

Quarterly
Semi-annually
Quarterly
Quartet ly

.Semi-annually
Quarterly
Semi-annually
Semi-annnally
Quarterly
Semi annually
“

21
5
8
6
6
2
5
3
8
4
4
3

“

“

8

“

31
81

**

u

4

“

.Semi-annually
“
“

.And in

scrip

.Semi-annually

Railroad communication from Atlanta to Columbus, Ga., is now
open via Opelika. Trains are also running between Opelika and

Cheraw, Ala., forming connection with stages to Montgomery.
Chattanooga will be completed the coming

The railroad from

I

week.

■;

It is a moderate estimate to
put the various railway works now
in hand, or shortly to be commenced, in and around London, at an

aggregate length of 120 miles, and involving an outlay of about
£30,000,000. This vast network of railways is designed for the

convenience of

a

population already exceeding 3,000,000.

In England, as appears from the
following extract from a Lon¬
don paper, the custom of insuring
against railroad accidents has
become very general: “ No less than 200 excursionists* insurance
tickets were issued by the Railway Passengers’ Insurance
Company
for the train that ran off the line at Rednal, and claims have al¬

ready been made by the holders of nineteen of these for injuries
more or less severe, and in one instance
likely to prove fatal. Two
2$ of the
injured iu the collision near Keyusham were also insured, and
5
it is already known that two of the sufferers
by the disaster at Sta10
B
plehurst had taken the same‘precaution. One of these is a really
remarkable incident of the advantages of accidental assurance. Mr.
4
James Dunn was killed, and as he had paid 4d. for a return
6
journey
insurance ticket, his family became entitled to £500.”
5
5

Quarterly
Quarterly

lor all coming time.”

90

THE

CHRONICLE.

RAILROAD

EARNINGS—MONTHLY.

ATLANTIC
Tear.
1864
1865
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

Jan.
....207.298

Feb.
229,041
384,147

56,734

55,123

74,690

81,531
73,169

....100.991

75.621
93.591
101.355
154.418

78.361
130.935
104.372
195.803

.261,903

162,723

232,583

288,159

263.149

66,703

.<.140.024

63.975
90.607
130,225

77.408
77,007
75.076

....

....

...

April

May.

June.
314.521

226.733-

197.267

214,679

448.815

406.680

460.422

63.995
65,858

72,196
122.084

..

....305.554

75,482

122,512
243,150

246,331

289.403

386.172

•

202.321

1864
1865

.273,876
.535,675

...

...

221,709

317,839

141,174

73.751
104.254
115.201
156,809

107.758
122,487
119.409

132,639

64,937

938,641

80.296

: 1.098.464

170,044

110,910
320,879

.

?KA KKA

111,955

163,294
252,015

307,803

1
;

1,225,001

1.673,706
2,770,484

1
....

...

*

138.374

119.947

.170,937

139,142

205.865

160,806
307,874

227*260

224,980

311.180

299.607
519.806

473.186

651,122

665.364

435,945

708.714

AND

88,410

65.907
65.302
(9.716
103.407

359.888
565.145

275.506
182.054

*

AND

92,873

75,457

152.537

1,181,003

123.339

118.753

146,268

161,503*

138,795

210.729

216.030

135,595

1,261,050
1,423,439

196.435

201.134

1,959.267

375,860

324,805

336,617

321,037

3,095,470

705,496

404.183
545.943

5,858,297

203,829

158,077

125,000

319,593

379.590

345.000
391,932

433,311

£80.843
457.161
547.174

349,953
393.409

506,610

430,063

372,705

55,652

76,304
82,467

82,220
82,400

88.401

105.253
164.8%
185.920

'

3.975.935

TOLEDO.

176,105

85.663

145.839

154.084

727.192

....154,058

86,200

134.500

NORTHWESTERN

466.830
568.904

75.709

82,895
•

....145,916

..106,263

..

Total.
3.709.970

ISLAND

103.175
365,780

78.170
85.239

94,928

136.697
128.191
157.948
312.165

102,353
144,995
198.679

371.461
467.710

32,778
55.085

61.79160.573

72,68&>

79,673

84,603

63.137
64,910
99.569

44.781
50.380
52.269
71.716
90.882

60,285
78,538
95,134

84.640

94,406
98.52,8

102,176
130,551

100,000

113,515

154,245

1S2.110

33,657

361.819

393.409

319,955

359,114
477,642
419,010
615,962

112.507

750.397
183,049

117.284
143,836
184,614

780,236
889,499

955,959
1.167.544

1.579,509
1.942,993

208,291

ERIE.

....404.507

1865

....908,341

115.713
161.047
367.560

121.123

....212,714

190,589
209,422

308.f1'3

202.346
210.616
278.540
311.540

.699,097

...

458,560
638,006

601.595
889,949

1.134.508

1,210,620

•

•

.

•

e

„

..

.458.953
501,231
....525,936
..

....

281,60*8
425.047
412,210

595,024
731.243

687.092

816,801

965,294

1.941,975

994.317

1,105,364

1.225,528

1,301,005

1 .222,568

1.224,909

418,111

'

185.926

....321,844

219,268

....190.130

236.037
271.085

327.900

416,588

546,410

522.555

33,004

209.994
229,334
181.084
275.643
459.762
592,216

26,25*2

....

....

53,i

1864
1865

56.540
98.112

156,973

170.157

367.220

157,443

180.000

193,951

169.549

192,442

151,427

135,299

146,424‘
212,118

173,261

202.392
253.049

159,769
190,364
273,726

193.442

244.771

219,561

268,100

239,911
302.174

484,550

3.726,440

306,595

197,162
210,083
295,750

361,600

340,900

340,738

507,552

4.274,556

321,059
284.020

410,336
496,433

243.163
243,219
372,593
487.679

661.391

647,141

€03,402

46,452
77,112

81,329

55,257

83.059

76.764

96,662

90.576

97,047

48,544
68,863
92,772

1.017.868

44.895
67/190
61,S35

799,841
1.153,407
1,163,734

112,913

1.247,258
1,711,281

281.759
£51.159

219.890

192.05*1
391.648

193.931

199,488

248,971

189,280

268.983

206.246

259.643
289,862

261.079

eg*!

269,282

334,687

352,786

414.543

407,992
510.100
590.060

343,929

511.305

406.373
454.604

423.578

418,576

640,179

799,236

491.297

its

38.579

64,306
73,215
'

AND

32.668
£5.526
86.964
73.842

82.186

37,520
54,246
83,903
67,130
102,749
98.183

32.301
44 021
62.907
76.132
115.135
74.263

1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

.1(14,345

106.828

131.467
..140.925
163.152
248.7.84
256.600

119.833
116,938
153.728

39.501
43.637

45.811
49.102
61.7 £9
88.177
340.418
106.089

47.0*10

44.925
88,221
70.740

MICHIGAN

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

110,712

107,749

142.334

119.164
159,658

230,159
242.073
252,435
306.324

1859

899,478

311.717

186.039
236.453
211,553

478,503
585,141

409.628
551.100

027,051
710, S14

689.688

677.073

867,590

1.059,028

146,722

I860
1861
1862

1863

155,327

163.551

188,609

171,841
160.538
217,161

361,834

..161,106

.....436,742

1864

,

90.900

205.055
178.526

130,184
122,272
138.342
149,099

218,465

196,495

109,661
155,417

154,369

168.218

238.012
358,862

i..

-

'*'•* ;

•

233.851

213,722
325,818
375,5(57

402,219

407.107

.......

193.540

417,813

216.624
215,449
346.781

300,474

1,001.435

1.029,736

322,369

408,445
.

•

*

307,474

129,022
260,134
258,634

*

375,488

339,794

306.186

408.866

405.510

376,470

591,920

743,599

709,671

637.792

520.396

092,382

6.303,703

868,985

811.458

730,736

562.016

696.175

752,841

1,055,793

952,960
968,228
1,0*15,401

7,996,783

840,450

892,744
1,079,551

927,036
1.018.375

523.047
S72.985
1.002.798

1,273,117

1.450,07(5

1.041,522
1,196,435

1.157,818

READING.

429,029

505,517

270.051
25*1.285
464.809

669,384

757.178

936,188

265.735
295.778

270.675

282,695

216.501
277,009
427.094
525.751

230,377

248.862
314,806
289.987
388.725

278,270

611.297

462.987
5S8.066
738.107

241.695

WAYNE

AND

165.795
201.778

1,110.241

245,938

286,814

270.086
397.525

.‘552,071
401.299

463,509
675,360

505,814
701,352

95,969
153,470
234,134

118.887
144,73(5

203,441

202,966

204,776

106,100
142,537

125,027

77,599
137,086

92.574

203,853
248,031
277.380

250,753
506,041

532.911

463,873
915,902
754,551

288,619.
321,208
291,763

245.977

2*19,032
278.219
454,826

746.955

526,009

2.905,839
4,088,837
6,324,083

231.253
%2,790
264,334

191,138

2,335,354

301,958

3,021,787

370,983

466.3(H)

691,550

487,642
914,082

3,745,310
5,123,934
7,120,466

129,166

135,610

143,748

162.921

1,032,149

407,077

625,547

•

684,260

696,738

886,511

1862

75,252

1863
1864
1865

08,748

71.S54

109,808

63,881
110.603

112,384

120,310

113.798

100,872
170,078

147,485
153,903

160.495

123.115
157,785

202,111

169,2%

177.625

42.064
47.043

6*1.414

67,946

67,428

84,879

122,785

74.278

333.722

56.006
103.056

SO,074

93.404

47,142

73,4 79
70,274
83,5) 2
132,111
123,987

101,815

113.578

108,219

170.380

172.870

131.272

152,583
156,338

115,214
105,554
139,626

147.5*18

116.379

139,528

120,595
243,840

151,052
221,570

134,568
220,208

266,154

LOUIS, ALTON AND TERRE HAUTE.
119,855
TOLEDO

1860
1861
1862

1868
1864
1866




59,639
82,285

62,551

61,971
95,843

189, m '

'

‘

132,896
155,753

-

2,715,396
3,315,501

466,557

1865

ST.

9,693,244
11,069,853
13,230,417

CHICAGO.

180.429
249.419

395,845

448,994
714,302
1,125.635

205,358

414,707
574,486

154,022

261.210

3(58,956
276,209

283,646

7,154,622

V

264.622
339,911
234,456

327,495

451,834
711,457

601.238

401,965

1.657*818
1.039,902
■

263,917

3.168,066^
3,969,010

2,660.702

818,512

AND

283,996

2,305,142
2,124.314

•

'

258,671

1.754,819
2,068,896
2.189,077
2.647,833
3.302,541
4,120,153

749,571

1.201.435

214,423

710,225

1

1,1051064
1,300,000

274,258
360,598

117.013

411,806

196.182
242.089

307,333

295/156

308,168

.

...

610,417

215.475
248.110
252.154

512*218

.

251,423
236,846

144,982

193.328
263.244

841.165

188,331

‘

152.172
134.912
189.077
279.589
348,048

203,492
231.265
305,284
332.360
448.934

276.181

308,106

i"

128.393
123.377

839.126

182.566

3.445,827
4,571,028
6.329,447

.

770,223

192.779

359.463
424,531

.

177,879

235,69
276,109

736.114

457,227

337.350

.

163.615

226.819

504.217
544,494
523,138

PITTSBURG, FORT
217,262
293,420

*

134.126

178.773

485,943
558.743

£25.404
265.011

.

2.664,848
2.899,612

CENTRAL.

396,771
617.021

152.574
202,071

.

139,161

173,870

^

257.410
191.260

532,786

^ •

-*-v*

151,170
130,821

911,397

915.6(H)

£

225.196

224,401

INDIANA.

172,189

'

£65,780

phi LA DELPHI.A
.......

•

174.002
206.221

401,456
NEW YORK

•

189.145
2781891

241,236

123.085

509.211
561.078

•

180,915

133,620

£37.240'

•

101.710
127.273
126.558

161,391
181,983

149.650

344,228

402.530

NORTHERN

123.196
134.688

158.510

279,137

£38.276

94,375

402.122
852,194
MICHIGAN CENTRAL.

238,495

420.793
631.956
790,167
936,587
58!.372

920.272

.

AND

138.C84
115.481
170.362
SCO. 826
26*1.935
267.126

230,432
348.802

489,065
921,831

165.741
112.(4 1
175.096

151,617
151.902

370,544

749,163

£00,245

160,311

245,858

186.747
146.934

218.848

3S0.239
387,128
.

392.120
208.(43
£30.(51

413,322

230.508
304,445
366.361

89.533

PRAIRIE DU CniEN.
48,797
37.429
60,229
141.171
107.117
90,463
144,915
108.721
16,163
111.260
71,587
69.353
139.547
212,209
113,399

106.967

145.258
110.842
186.951

58,704

«■

56,687
52,864
•

59.082
112.266
130.218

403.571

1,933,434
2,075,822
2,023,53^
2.922,970

l

37.271

75,055

S OUTHERN

143.626
166.454
153.170
157.500
557.227
338,454

CINCINNATI.

29,384
40.700

MILWAUKIE AND

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

252,053
220,370
246.283

CENTRAL.
188.060
177.629

423,797

25,891
00.5*10
90.855
93.503

77.874
86.626

RIVER.

155,164

MARIETTA
1862

13,429,643

125.305
140,860
114.804

183,758

.

1,035.321
1,334,217

4,651,049
5,335,424
6,214,183
8,400,334
10,469,481

115.444
129.996
122.683

ILLINOIS
....185.257

756,421

414.164
412.123
714.211
963.859

141.269
156.281
150. SOS

134,606
139.751

£•(‘6.81 2
356.626
424.810

719.354
885,136

528.842
.770.148

1,339.279

1.099,507
1,472,120

205.343

515.948

587,416

HUDSON
•

465.959

587,242

530,60S
561,448
734,108
902,906
1,024,649

*

948.059

880,039

455,285
600,104

848,783
1.072:593

626,070

956,445

984,133

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864

ROCK

62.294
76.032
90.824
87.9 J 5
121.278

....

.......

103,635

73.474
95,096
149.137
224.257

139.049
130,542
117,086

280,209

1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

81,453

56.779
67.210
76.913
88.4138
146.829

....

Dec.

357,556

in

CLEVELAND

......

Nov.

381,810

100,403
90,621

240,051.

if

1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

Oct.
396.847

ALTON.

76,426
63,761
90.625
145.542
206,090

AND

390.335
506.290

481.165

Sept.

44&044

104.272
102.163

CHICAGO

1863

Augr.
406,076

'

89.170
76.009
76*459
126.198
185.013

3

July.
332,098

.

86,211

CHICAGO
....

1865

WESTERN.

312,316

72,834

GREAT

75.250
81.994
132.301
178.786

March.

CHICAGO AND
....

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864

1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

AND

...354,755

.........

[July 15,1865.

144,001

127,010
133,738

93,766
123,949
155,730
AND

67.721

85,359

118.077

130,378

144,942

218,235

1,117,697
1,554,913
2,080,717

WABASH.

*

.......

.

244,114

«

r

v

<

162,858

•»

51,296
111,339

926,735
1,172,100
1,403,147
1.439,798
2,050,322
*>

.

.

•

•

•

'M



91

CHRONICLE.

THE

July 15, 1865.]

LIST,

THE CHRONICLE’S RAILROAD SHARE
FRIDAY’S'

CONTAINING

CSaphi¬are inpa.id dLiva’s.t

CSahpai-re div ’d.

Market Price.

j

Companies,

tal

P.

$877,953

;

c.

i

P.

■

Alauama.
Alabama and Florida \
Alabama andMissis&ijojn
A la. and Tennessee Fivers

i,

,

■

’

335,010

1,067,006

J

....

$151,S33

i

793, S50
307,010
1,936,740

.

..

9

«

1,010,000
602,152
3,000,000
2,122,600

....

191,485
....

j

•

•

1

|
I

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

669,950

2,921,900
built and

4,205,939
5,738,640
3,731,316
5,603,000
6,02S,400
1,64S,561
19,015,970
1,780,295

.

!

109#
2S*
107$

Chicago and Northwestern
Chicago and Rock Island

5

j

—

3,900,000

35'

•

•

(|

1

Cincinnati and Chicago

986,061

1

Evansville and Crawfordsville..
Indiana Central

5

Western

Indianapolis and Cincinnati...
Ind., Pittsburg aud Cleveland.

|

.T

.

.

3#
_____

5

New

•

.

516.072!...

2,998,253
....

2,700,000

....

j

514,573

....

1,104,587

3,242,31S
,

,

......

1,283,05

;

l

‘

1

108-

6
Michigan Central
!
9,016,200 3# Mich., S’th’n <fc N’th’n Indiana
Minnesota.
Minnesota and Pacific
Southern Minnesota .:

Go*

j

i
1

!

7,153,S36
2,459,207
500,000
3,486,916
71,513
1,971,127

•

.

.

•

•

•

•

•

•

«

•

•

*

r

•

•

■

....

1

Mississippi Central
Mississippi and Ten nessee
Southern Mississippi

.

•

.

’

South Western Branch
St. Louis and Iron Mountain

.

PREFERRED
Divid’ds,
Railroads.

oi standig

Ain’ t shares

out¬

a

CU

G

6

•

•

•

....

.

.

.

.

,,,,

Tennessee.
Central Southern (Turn.)
East Tennessee and Giorgia....
Blast Tennessee and; Virginia...

....

.

/.

.

Memphis and Charleston
Memphis aud Ohio
Memphis, Clarkesv. & LouLv..
Mississippi aud Tennessee ....
Mississippi Central and Tenn..

....

....

•

•

•

•

McMinnville and Manchester...
Nashville and Chattanooga
Nashville and Northwestern....
Tennessee aud Alabama..
Winchester and Alabama
Texas (all aided by State).

....

....

•

•

•

t

•

Buffalo, Baycu, Braz. & Ccl’r’do
Galveet., Houst. & Henderson...

.

275,000
455,000
•

.

,

.

.

5
5
4

^

1,280,400

2.233,376
1,097,000

5,000,000

....

1,378,500
516,164
332,000

....

Carolina

...

.

,

.

Manassas

,

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

Orange and Alexandria
Petersburg and Lynchburg
Petersburg and Roanoke

•

•

•

....

....

133

Wisconsin.

800,000
‘4,940,000
4,826,800

130
.

...

•

2,705,720
t

•

....

....

68*

103*
■

11,750,000
1,631,130
15,123,430

•

•

•

•

....

.

16,S02,745

.

.

.

....

....

4,G5S,706

GUARANTEED

20

....

1,380,000
4,273,281

43

5,000,000

RAILROAD

Kenosha and Rockford
Milwaukee and Minnesota....
Milw'kee and Praitne du Chien
Racine and Mississippi

,

4

Mississippi
Pittsburg, Columbus and Cin..,
Sandusky, Dayton and Cine....'
Sandusky, Mansfield & Newark.^

Virginia Central

Virginia and Tennessee

14

.

5

Canada.
Buffalo and Lake Huron (#
Montreal aud Champlain
Grand Trunk
Great Western
Northern (O. S. & H.)
New Brunswick.

y.j

European and North American.

New Brunswick and Canada
Nova Scotia.
Nova Scotia
New Granada.
Panama

...

2501

STOCKS.

jDivid’ds
-Pi
.•

Divid’ds

O*
,

a

Railroads.

Railroads.

r\

Riclim., Frederick & Potomac.
Richmond and Petersburg....
Richmond and York River....
Seaboard aud Roanoke.........

.

•

....

Richmond and Danville

....

,

Hampshire..

Gap

Norfold and Petersburg
Northwestern Virginia

....

•

3,452,S13

Ghio and

AND

Western Vermont
Alex., Loudoun &

1,981,197
1.041,880
835,750
657,812
844,200
3.162,754

Marietta & Cincinnati, reorg...

3#

Vermont Central
Vermont and Canada.
Vermont Valley

....

1,365,300
883,200

.

Little Miami

....

....

1,403,018
2,969,861
1,500,124
! 468,605
2,063,655

r

Dayton and Michigan
....

....

Virginia.

Cleveland and Pittsburg..... .,
Cleveland and Toledo
Clev., Zanesville and Cincin...
Columbus and Indianapolis....
Columbus and Xenia

....

Houston and Brazoria
Houston and "Texas Central....
San Antonio & Mexican Gulf...
Vermont.
Connect. <fc Pnssurnpic Rivers...
Rutland end Builington
Rutland and Washington

.

....

80

Cleveland, Columbus and Cine.
Cleveland and Mahoning...»..
Clev., Painesville
Ashtabuni.

7

Boston.

Providence, Warren &. Bristol..
Soctii Carolina.
Charleston and Savannah
Charlotte and South Carolina..
Greenville and Columbia
North-Eastern
South Carolina

•

216,962

«

.

Raleigh and Gactoii
Wilmington and Manchester..
Wilmington and Weldon

IT

Market price.

-d
5

o
-4~>

.

.2,981,267
10,379,554
6,246,950
1
1,906,736
!
2,697,090
!
84S,770
3,314,775

Pacific
.

1

Cine., Hamilton and Davtou...
Cine., Wilmington and Zanesv.

1,490,800
2,452,217

|

North Missouri
Platte County

Rhode Island.
N. Y., Providence, and

61

<Gentr‘il Ohio

"

5

369,673
750,000

j

Missouri.
Hannibal and St. Joseph

1

95$

Atlantic and Great Western
Beliefontaine and Indiana

3,832,712
3,526,800

}

•

•

1

78*
110#

(Ogdensburg)

Western North

1,086,065

Mississippi.
•

....

3,300,000

Minnesota Transit

•

.

_____

2,441,176
5,000,000

!
Minneapolis find, Cedar Talley, i

2,000,961
798,285
1,000,000

.

2,155,800

|

•

•

595,922

•

North Carolina.
Atlantic and North Carolina...
North Carolina

....

1,859,813
1,628,556

!

•

•

S 317,447
t 144.894
i e,056,544

Troy and Boston

866,939

!

*/2
•

p 298,721
£ 798,285

OuiO.
,

6

....

Syracuse, Binghamton & N. Y..

....

1,130,470
1.340,213
280,212

*

•

*■

.......

Staten Island

973.300

•■j

Chic.,Detroit (fe Can. G.T. June.!
Detroit and Milwaukee
|

....

....

1,545,225
4,000,000

Michigan.

2,950,000
0,057,436

....

j

.

.

....

B -570,000

Oswego and Syracuse.
Rensselaer and Saratoga
Rome, Watertown & Ogdensb’g
Saratoga and Schenectady
Saratoga and Whitehall

606,911

Vicsburgh, Sr eve port <£• Texas.!

...

Northern

1.200.130

Louisville and Nashville
!
Louisiana.
N.O. Opelousas and Gr. West'n \
N. O. Jackson
Gr. Northern.;

5,802,199

....

63,102

Covington and Lexington
•
J Lexington aud Frankfort.... j
(Louisville and Frankfort
|

1,5S2,1G9

Norrist’n..
(Sunbury) Erie
Philadelphia and Reading
100$
145
Philadelphia aud Trenton
I'hila., Wilmington, and Balt,. (128
Pittsburg and Connellsville....
Pittsb’g, Ft. Wayne <fc Chicago
Shamokin Valley & PotUville..
Tioga

....

103

Pennsylvania..:.

Phila. and

$,809,949

New York Central
New York and Harlem

3

540,000

Kentucky.

•

•

505,214

r
?

lie

Pliila., Germant'n &

....

....

1,201,000
1,429,008
965,743

:

..

Pennsylvania

&t,2S9.673

129
0
136
75
120

Bloomsburg

Lehigh Valley
Little Schuylkill
Mine Hill and Schuylk. Haven
North

75

1,85°, 716
24,209,000
5.717,100
|
4,571,900
I
596,340
i
610,000
1,499,100
)
l
300,000

.

..

-

V 536,651

Buffalo, New York and Erie....

4

.

437,917

a

Buffalo and State Line
Erie
Hudson River

5

.

58

New York.
Atlantic and Great Western

•

.

.

105

Bay

West Jersey

•

•

.

1,508,000

62$

Northern Now .tersev

.

*

706,365

'.

Raritan and Delaware
Warren

♦

! 6,164,532

42
128

(incl. Alb. & W.S. etc.)

Jersey,;

•

110

New Jersey.
Belvidere Delaware
Camden and Amboy
Camden and Atlantic.../
Central of New Jersey .
Morris and Essex

5

•

1,767,373

Sullivan
....

•

•

13.211,228
999,200
7,460,000

i

•

•

Lackawanna and

500,000
367,300

j

Burlinyton and Missouri
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska.. .
Dubuque and Sioux City. ... j
Keok., Ft., Desmoines
Minn
Mississippi and Missouri
:

752,733!

921,449

|

Indianapolis and Madison
Lou is v., N. Albany <fc Chicago.
Terre Haute and Richmond
Iowa.

104

Concord (par $59)
Manchester and Lawrence
Merrimac and Conn. Rivers....
Northern New Hampshire

3,75^466

1

JelTer.-onville

-

105

10$

•

145

Harrisburg and Lancaster
$112
Hempfield
Huntingdon and Broad Top....

....

R267,200
5,010,944

115#

Boston, Concord and Montreal
Cheshire

....

1,977,950
j 20,105,200

io

108$

Vermont and Massachusetts....

....

850,000 3#

1,106,679

8

lOo
ss

Troy and Greenfield

....

687,872

Indiana.

611,050
1,689,900
835,971
1,015,907
772,812
2,800,000
1,517,450

60*

Lowell and Laurence
Nashua and Lowell
New Bedford and Taunton
N. York and Bo-ton Air Line...
Old Colony and Fall River....
Providence, aud Worcester
Salem and Low-ell
Taunton Branch

....

1,307,750
531,893

138#;

Ohio and-Mississippi
‘St. Louis, Alton
Terre Haute

....

2,G46,100
4,132,935
3,147,750
13,430,250

Fitchburg

1.203 553

i Illinois Central

5

120
120

Eastern

....

1,157,800
4,i597,Si.'0
150,850

j Galena aud Chicago Union

....

•

1,000.553
3.630,000

98

Chicago and Alton
Chic., Burlington and Quincy.

5
6

2,297,250

Cape Cod Branch

4

997,362
5,009,200

Bank).

Muscogee
!.
Savannah, Albany and Gulf

110$

New Hampshire.

Macon and Western..

1,275^901

622,345
710,(>00

..

Georgia (and Bank) ..l

•

109

.

•

•

•

1,809,565

•

South Western
i
Western and Atlantic,.........
Illinois.

4,366,800
4,156,000
1,500,000

45

Boston and Providence
Boston aud Worcester

•

4

243,305
250,000
923,942
2,214,225
5,150,000
1,141,000

*

.

Brunswick and Florida!
Central of Georgia (aud

Pennsylvania.
Atlantic and Great Western....
Beaver Meadow.
Catawissa
Cumberland Valley
Del., Lackawanna and Weet’n.
East Pennsylvania,
Elmira and Williamsport......
Erie and Northeast
1.

.

5

1,000,000
600,000
1,182,550

Connecticut River

1,650,000

Augusta and Savannah

151,887

,

•

1,890,000
2,035,925
1,500,000
1,000,000
595,5S8
3,068,400
500,000

733,700

,

•

3,015.100

.!

1

Georgia.

Atlanta aud West Point
Atlantic and Gulf—M. Trunk

1,250.000

109

*r

•

•

604,190

V,

Washington Branch

357,155

....

T

Northern Central

■

600,000
500,000

Newcastle and Frenchtown
Florida.
1
Florida
.j.
Florida and Alabama \
Flo. Atlantic and Gulf Central
Pensacola and Georgia-

•

Boston and Lowell
Boston and Maine

4
5

200,000

Delaware.

744,520

•

3,500,000
£56,900
5,698,250

1(H)

Somerset aud Kennebec
Maryland.
Baltimore and Ohio

3^000,000 ;;;;

Norwich and Worce.-ter

1,983,900

Portland, Saco and Portsmonh

3,540,000

85
120
93

406,13°

f

....

3,160,000
4,500,000
0S1,6G6
1,591,100

i

New London Northern
New York and Newr Haven

c.

•

Atlantic and St. Lawrence
Kennebec and Portland
*
Maine Central

....

4,076,914

i

Naugatuck
|N. Haven, N. London and 8ton.
New Haven and Northampton.

•

Massachusetts.

]

150

*

$1,362,218

Androscoggin

•

1,S30,000

Housatonie
•>

•

....

2,260,000

J

Hartford and New Haven

3

2,350,000
2,000,000
1,031,800
738,538

|

P.

c.

.28

Companies.

Last

tal

;

-

{•
| Danbury and Norwalk
Hartford, Piovid. and Fishkill.

•

-

-

•

■3,1 IS, 902
1,650,000

Memphis and Little Rock
California.
Sacramento Valley
Connecticut.

•

2,494,600
! 1,2S7,779
s 1,050,860
1,500,000
169,200

i

[

351,524

CSahpat-re inpa.d div ’d.

v-‘

Market Price.

Maine.

I

| Montgomery aud West Point
Arkansas.

YORK

NEW

IN

Companies.

i

j

1,419,7(>3

PRICE

Last

j

.

MARKET

rd
’3

<D

S

*

°.g

Oh

price.

l

2,4(11,900
Vgl
Balt, and Ohio, (pref.).
3,000,000
Boston, Con’d & Mont, (pref.) 1,354,000

Buffalo,. N. Y. & Erie (pref.)..
Cheshire (preferred)
.
Chicago and Alton (pref.).....
Chicago and Northw’n (pref.).
Detroit and Milwan. (pref.)...
Dubu’e and Sioux City (pref.)
Elmira & Wm/gport (pref.)., .

850,000
2,017,825

2,425,200
2,400,000
1,500,000
1,987,014
500,000

6
7
7
7

—

7

70$

•

44

7 100
5$ 64

Harrisburg and Lan’r (guar.).

1.182,100

Mich. S. & N. Indiana (guar.) 2,183,600
Mil. & Pr. du Chien (1st pref.) 2,T73,500

.

3$

3.535, TOO

(pref.)... 5,253,856

Housa tonic (preferred)
,. 1,180,000
Marietta and Cinn. (1st pref.). 5,105,384
do
(2d pref.)... 3,424.169

.

7
.

Erie (preferred)
Hannibal aud St. Jo.

^

do

,

Milwaukee & St.

(2d prof.. 1,014,000
Paul (pref.)*. 2,255,(XX)'

861
45

i64‘

6
7
10
7

Peoria & Bureau Val.

(guar.). 1,200.000
Philadelphia & Read. (pref.).. 1,551,800
Philadelphia & Trenton (guar) 1,000,000

Pitts. F’t W’ne & Chic, (pref.) 2,000,000
Pittsfield & N. Adams (guar.) 450,000
Port. Saco Portsmouth (guar.) 1,500,000

St. L., Alton & Ter. He (pref) 1,700,000
Toledo & Wabash (pref.)
| 984,700

Troy and Qreeubush (guar.).. i 274,400
White Mountains (guar.)..... 200,000
■

7
....

7
6
6
6
7
6
5

6
6
•

7
6
5

100

92

THE CHRONICLE.
MINING

STOCKS—GOLD, SILVER, COPPER, IRON, LEAD, ETC.

Copper Stocks.

Copper Stocks.
-

*->

¥

Companies.

Iron, Coal, etc., Stocks.

a....—

.i

IFsi

■f 1:3®

© ©

a|

:£

*

u

Companies.

©

p.

Ch

©I

Gold, Silver, etc., Stocks*

Number shares. Parvalue share. Market ppsriche.

Companies.

[3 ©

«$<-:!$ ’C
o!

[July 15,1866.

of

ft

of

1

Copper:

Acton
Acton Fale

Ca. 200,000
Ca.i 60,000
Adventure
L. S. 20,000
Albany and Boston do 20,000
Algomah
do
20.000

Alliance

18

19

Amygdaloid.
Annapolis

2*..

...

Bay State

Ca.

L. Si 20,000

20,000

Hare wood
Kahtadin—
Me.
ILake Superior —L. S.

.

20.000;.

200,000p

Teal Lake

Tyson

Mass
Massachusetts

5 I.... iMendota
2*'
'Merrimac
j 1J 'Meteor
5 *
'Mesnard

do
do
do
do

20,0001.

20,000'.

20,000;.

20.000

20,000| 25
25,000' T
10,000; 50

Am. Pioneer
A. T.
Arizona (silver)... do
Atlantic (G.)
N. S. 100,000 2
At. & Pac. (G. & S.)Nev 50,000 10
Bay State (G.)
Col. 200,000 5
Beacon (G.) ......N. S. 200,000
2
Benton (G.).. *
CoL 100,000 5
Black HaWk (G.)... do 50,000 100
Boston (G.)...
do 10,000 50
Brigge (G.)
do 10,000 100
Bullion (G.).
do 200,000* 25
Burroughs (G.)
do 100,000 10
Canadian (G.)
Ca. 200,000 2
la ;Central (G.)
Col.' 50,000 20
! Chaudiere (G.)
Ca. 100,000 5
IChebucto
N. S. 100,000
5

50,000 10
j Lead and Zinc:
i
L
Amenia..*
N. Y.
| 5
Bucks Counts..
Pa.!...
j...
: Canada
Ca. 100,000; 5

20.000!.
do 20,000;.
Md
L. S.i 20,000
do i 20.000'

Marquette
Maryland

5

:

.•

<CIute..

■

100,000

Gay's River

...

100,000

.1 'Hampton

2
5

100,000.

.!: Keystone

Gold, Silver, and
Quicksilver:
A2tna (G.)
Col.
Acadia (G.)
N. 8.
Albion (G.).
do
Alpine (G.)
Col.
Alps (G.)
do

50,000 10
100,000 8
100,000 3
150,000 10
100,000 5
American
do 200,000 2
Am. & Mex. (S.).N. M.

3,000100

L. S.

I •£

[

50 r 5
50 '....

20,000!

Massachusetts
Mount Pleasant.... Pa.

do 100,000;
do .200,000

L. S
do
do
do

Mandan
Manhattan
10

CaJl‘25,000

,

Madison
Malden

N. Y. 50,000
6,000

East River

do ;200,000;
L. S. ; 20,000 .
*.. .Ca. 100,000!

Lyster

do ! 20,000..-..!....

Copake

j 20.000.

,

do i

Lafayette

Logan

Ariz. T. 10,000il00
Ascot
Ca. 20,000 20
Astor
L. S. 20,000
Atlas
’.... do
20.000
Aztec
do
20,000
Bolt, andN.C....N. C. 20,000
Bare Hill
do

Beaver
Bedford
Black River

do
do

Lawrence
LenWixville

L. S. 20,000
Md. 50,000; 10

Arizona

Kickapoo.
King Phillip
Lake

2*j

Iron:

L. S.! 20,000
do i 20,000j.

Knowlton

Ca. 200.000
L. S. 20,000
Ca. 200,000

Allouez
American

Copper :

Jefferson
Keweenaw

1

Companies.

Pa* 80,000
Lancaster
do 200,000
Macomb
.N. Y.' 12.000
5
Bolton
20,000
[Mineral Point
100,000 5
Boston
J.... Michigan
do 20.000..
Mount Hope
N. Y. 100,000 5
B. and Corinth
Vt.i 20,000 10 '
Middlesex
do
20,000
i National
..!
! 1
! Colonial (G)
Ca. 100,000 2*
Brooklyn
.L. S.I 20,000
i Mineral Hill
j'New Jersey
N. J.( 20,000100
iColorado (G.)
Brome
Ca. 100,000
Col. 50,000 10
5
Minnesota.
...L. S.i 20,000 ....j 12 |N. Y. & Boston..N.
Y.'100,000 5
Consol.
Cahot
—L. S.i 20.000!
C'a
nnni
Grejr’y (G.) do 50,000 100
do
J — j!Missisquoi
.C’a. H
150,000! 2 !
Oswegatchie
.Ca. 100,000 5
Caledonia
Copalinshe
do ! 20,000
200,000 20
—;—jiMontezuma...N. Mex. 300,000!
Placentia Bay
N. F.j
Corisannie
do 100,000 10
Cambridge
do ! 20,000
1,
Morrison
L. S. 20,000!
iRamsay
Ca.! 20,000 25
Canada
IC’orydon (G.)...*
Vt. 100.000! 4
do 100,000 25
00c 'Nashua
do J 20,000;.
Bossie
do 100,000: 5
Day & Bnshnell (G.).C. 300,000 10
Carp Lake
L. S.i 20,000
I
iNational
do 1 20.000*.
19
Shawangunk
N. Y. 100,000; 5
Denver (G.)
Cascade
do i 20,000;
Ca. 50,000 20
INative
do ! 20,000'.
Sussex
N. J.
Dorset (G.). .t
Central
do 170,000 5
do
20,000 ....i 50
iNaumkeag ...
do | 20,000;.
'Union
ioo.ooo
El Dorado (G.)....Nev. 100,000
..100,000 5
5
Champlain
Ca. 200,000 2*!.
Nelson
Ca. 200,000
i
1
Wallkill
N. Y.
Chatham
do 200,000
2 j.
Nequaket
L. S.i 20,000'.
I Coal and Anthracite:
Chaudiere
!
do 100,000
^ress (S.)
do
1 :.
Nevada (silver)
American
—Pa.! 37,500 25 57*:- Eureka
do/ft),000 .
Chester
do 200,000
1 1.
(G.)
Cal.
New England
doA 2ty,000;.
Ashburton
do 50,000 50
Excelsior (G.)
Cheticamp
: 30,000
5 !.
Col. 30,000 10
Newton
,Ca. 200,000:
Atlantic & G. C
Md.
Frankfort (G.)
Chippewa
L. S.j 20,000
100,000 2
New York
L. S.:j 20,000'.
Baltimore
do i
IOC
i5c Garrison’s (G.)
Cleveland
Ca. 100.000
.Col. 100,000 5
5 i.
N. Y. and Passaic.N. «f.L00,000i
Bear Valley
do 40,000 12*
Cliff
Gilbert River (G.).. Ca. 100,000 5
L. S. -w,wu
j;
ui'tu
20,0001.
Beaver Meadow
Pa. 100,000 50
Clifton
Gilpin (G.)
Col. 100,000 5
20,000;— —; INorth Silver Lake, do
20,000;.
■Belmont
do j 10,000 50
Collin
4| Gold.:
do 100,000
5
20,000; —1
I North State
do
20,000
'Big Mountain
do
Gold Field
Columbian
do
50,000 10
20,000
|North Sutton
Ca. ]
',000
Blackball....
N. S.I
Consolidated
do
50,000 10
20,000;.
North Western...L. S.i
j
i,000
Boston & Pictou.. do
Copper Falls
do
191 iNorwich
100,000 3
20,000.
do
',000
i Gunnell
Bridgeport
Pa.:
Copper Harbor... do 20,000.
(G.)
Col. 300,000 10
!Ogima
do 20>
Broad Mountain.... do
Halifax (G
.N. S. 200,000
Copper Hill
2
! Ontonagon
do 20,
Butler
do
1 Harmon (G. & S.).Nev
Copperas Hill.... do 50,000; 10
Ottawa
C'a. 200,
1
'Cape Briton
N. S. 200,000 2*
Holman (G.)...
Cornwall
..Vt. 100,000! 2
Col. 150,000 2
'Pacific
L. S. 20,
Carbondale
Pa.
Dacotah
L. S. 20,000;....
[Hope (G)
do 80,000 25
do 20,000
.!'Pennsylvania
i Central
do
J.
Isaac’s Harbor (G.)N.S. 100,000
Dana
5
20,000
i'Petherick
do
1
!
Clinton
20,000
do
Isabella (G.)
Deep River
N. C.
Col.
UPewabic
do
■Coal Brook.
20,000
do
4,000 50
Delaware
L. S. 20,000,
100,000
.! Phila and Boston, do 20,000!....
'Continental
.1 10,000 50
■Kent (G.)
N. S. 200,000
Derby
20,000:.
.j Phoenix
do 20.000;
Cumberland (pref.) Md. 50,000100
Devon
do
f..Col.
20.000'.
|!Lake(G.)
iPittsburg *fc Bost. do 20,000'...
tniel Webster
Dorchester
6,000100 .....
.N. S. 12,000 60
20.000
!Pontiac
do
st Mahanoy
:
20,000'....
Pa.
Douglas
do
Libertad~(G. & S.)Mex.
20,000
lPrince of Wales.. ..Ca. 200,000
'erhart—.
Dover
20,000 25
Manhattan (G.)
..Ca. 200,000
Col. 100,000 10
Providence
L. S.! 20,000
Franklin....... —Pa.
6,000 100 ••••j Mariposa (G.)
L. S. 20,000
Dudley
Cal. 100,000 100 13
! Quincy
56
do | 20,000
Fulton
do! 60,000
6
Dunham
Massachusetts (G.).Ca. 500,000 5
..Ca. 200,000
.i!Keid Hill...-.
Cn. 200,000
Gilbertson
5,000100
Durham
Mex.Pac.(G. & S.)Mex. 100,000100
200,000
Reliance
L. S.j 20,000
George’s Creek
Pa.'
.L. S. 20,000
Montague (G.)
N. S. 60,000 10
Eagle River
Richford
60,000
Grand Tunnel
El Dorado (silver) do
Montana (G.)
j 4,000 100
Col. 100,000 5
20,000,
Ridge
L. S. 20,000
Green Mountain—Pa.
Escot
Montezuma (G. & S.)N. 100,000 5
..Ca. 25,000, 20
\....
Rockland
do
20,000
Si Hampton & Balt...Md.j
92 Mt. Alpine (G.)....Col. 250,000
Essex
Roscoe.
Ca. 200,000
Hazleton
Etna
^.Pa.j 32.300 50
Mt. Vista (G. & S.)Nev 50,000
L. S. 20,000'.
Rudisell
Henry Clay
New England (G.).Col. 50,000 5
Eureka
j 3,000100
do
20,000
St. Clair
L.-S.I 20,000
Si International.... .N. S. 20,000 50
Bverett
New Gregory (G.).. do 60,000 10
do
20,000.
St. Flavien
Ca. 100,000
Lawrence
Pa.
2,000100
New York (S.)..... do 100,000 10
Evergreen Bluff... do 20,000
St. Francis
do ;100,000
Locust Mountain... do
Flint Steel
N. Y. & N. S. (G.)N. S. 100,000 5
do
20,000
St. Mary’s (L. & M)L S. 20,000
Lorberry.
do
Nova Scotia (S.)... do 100,000
4,000100
Forest City
2
do 20,000
Salem
do
Macan
20,000
do
Fewest Shepherd., do 20,000
2,000100
Oldham (G.)
do 100,000 2
Sharon Consol..
do
20,000
Mahanoy
do
Franklin
1,000 20
Otate (S.)
do
Mex.r
20,000
35* ! Sheldon
do
20,000
Metropolitan
do, ......100
Palma (8.)
French Creek
Pa. 100,000
do
50c Silver Creek
do
Middle Coal Fields .do
20,000
Peck (G.)
Gardner City
N.S. 100,000
L. S. 20,000
Silver Hill
do
20,000
Milford.....
2,500 50
Gardner Hill
Peninsular (8.). .L. Cal.
do
75c Silver Lake
20,000
do
Mill Creek
20,000
PaJ
Girard
Picacho (S.)
do
A. T. 50,000 50
20,000
Silver Valley...'.. do
10c Mulgrave
20,000
I 2,000
Glade..
Pontiac (G.)
do
Col. 50,000 20
20.000
Southampton
Ca 100,000 5
Narragansett..... .R. I. 8;000 10
Glencoe
Prince Albert (G.). .Ca. 100,000
Ca. 200,000
2
South Bedford
do 200,000
2
New Creek
1
Pa.!
Globe..j
L. S. 20,000
Quartz Hill (G.).. .Col. 40,000 25
South Side
L. S.j 20,000
North and Luzerne, do'
1
Grand Portage .... do
Quicksilver
Cal. 40,000 25 61*
20,000
Springfield
Md
5
Penn
do 100,000 50
Grand Trunk.
Renfrew (G.)
Ca. 100,000
Ca. 120,000 2*
Stadecona
Ca. il00,000
5
Penn. Cannel
do
Great Western
6,000 50
Riviere du Loup (G.)do 20,000 10
L. S. 20,000
50c Star
L. S.I 20,000
2f Picton
do
Green Mountain
4,000 100
Vt. 20,000 10
Rocky Mt. (G.).... Col
Stark
Vt. 100,000
2
Pine Knot,
dor 4,000 50
Guilford
Sacramento (Si).. .Nev.
L. S. 20,000
Strafford
! 30,000 10
Port Hood
Hamilton
San Antonio (S.).A. T. 60,000 50
do
.....j 4,000 100
20,000
L. S.j 20,000
Superior
Potomac...
3i
Hancock
Santa Clara (Q.).. .Cal.
do
Md.j 40,000 10
20.000
Sussex
do
Powell
20,000
Par
‘
Hanover
Santa Rita
do
Ariz. T.
20,000
Sutton
Ca. 100,000
Preston
do'
Hartford
Scottie (S.)
do
do
Toltec
20,000; 25
L. S. 20,000
Princess Alex—N.
Hazzard
Sherbrooke (G.)..N. S. 100,000 10
do
S.| 5,000100
20,000*....
Tremont
do
20,000
Ridgeway
'
Sierra Nevada (G.).Col.
do 20,000....
Highland
Union (L. and M.). do
St.Clair
20,000
Pa. j 5,009100
Hilton
Silver Hill (S.)....Nev.
do
20.000!
Vernon
do
25,000 10
Schuylkill Valley... do: 20,000 10
Sonora (S.)
Hope
do
Ariz. T.
20,000!
Victoria
do
20,000
Shawmut
Hudson...
Southam (G.)
do
\ 6,000 50
N. S. 100,000 5
20,000
Vulcan
do
20,000
Short Mountain—Par 16,000 50
Hulbert...
Stafford (G.)
do
Ca. 100,000 5
20,000!....
Washington...... do 20,000
Stafford
.!
Humboldt
Star (G.)
do
....Col. 100,000 25
20,000:
Waterloo....
Ca. 100,000
Suffolk
Stewart (Q.)
4,000100
Hungarian
do 20,000
Ca. 100,000 5
Waukegan
L. S. 20,000
Huron
Ta seller
Sugar Loaf
Par
do
20,000
(G.)
do 50,000 10
381 West Minnesota
do
20,000
Summit
.do' 40,000 20
Indiana
Victoria (G.)
do
do 100, OnO
2
20,000.!
Wickham.. ;
Ca. 200.000
Susq. Coal & C. Mt. do *
Inverness
do 200,000,' 2*
Waverly (G.)
do 50,000 10
do 100,000
Wickopee
Isle Haute
Tamaqua
do ;
Windsor (G.)
40.000'
Col. 100,000 10
Winthrop
L. S.i 20.000
li Vandermark
i
i 20,000 50
United States (G.). do 75,000 20
IsleRoyale
L. 20,000!
12
Wyandotte
do j 20,000;
Wyoming Valley.. .Pa. 22,760 50
do. 200,000
L. S.i 20,000
Ca. 200,000
L. S.i 20,000

Bohemian

.

20.000'.

...

...

20,000!

.

...

.

6

—

..

.

—

■

....

.

.

.

•

•

.

...

.15i

—

—

.

.....

..

.

.

...

.

.

illl

.

.

t

...

....

.

..

....

•

.

....

.

.

.

.

.

•

.

.

.

iS

.

—

..

...

;

»—

......

—

...

..

....

....

—

....

..

CANAL
XT

o

•

OQ

•

%

m

NAVIGATION

•

Companies.

pa

-

CheMpoake and Delaware.
Chesapeake and Ohio

Delaware Division.*
Delaware and H udson




.

L
100

$

1,343,563

pc

STOCKS.

o CP

MS.

Companies.

AND

$
66* Lehigh Navigation...
jMonongahela Navigation

8,226,595
1,683,350 — 82 ‘jMorris (consolidated)
10,000,900! 1014# Schuylkill Navigation (con.)..
...

Par shares. Am’t Stock. Div d’s. Market price.
of ol

OJ4

Companies.

!0

•

$
50
50
100
50

1,025,000 5
1.902.467

.

4

.

86
21

.

'a!

a

<

$
pc $
$
4,282,950 6 59* Susquehanna and Tidewater. 50
726,800 3

tS8

Union (preferred)

West Branch

ana

Wyoming Valley

50

Susqueh’a.. 100/
I /
.

.

.

$

pc

2,048* 860—
2,750,000

i,ooowg

ivH

v^’

',’-y

THE CHRONICLE

July, 15, 1866.]

93

Fire Insurance

®I)C Insurance lonrnaL

Par

Home

Hope

i.

Howard

We are preparing for this department of The Commercial and
Financial Chronicle new and valuable tables of the Insurance

Last Semi-annual

Dividend.
Capital.
Val.
2,000,000 100 January
200,000 50 January
800,000 50 July
200,000 100 January

Companies.

Humboldt

Indemnity
Irving

106

May.............8

....

105

80
50
40

March. ..........8

....

156

July
January

20

50
800,000 100
150,000 25

LoDg Island........

200,000

Lorillard

r

Manhattan

600,000
600,000
200,000

Market
Mechanics’ A Traders’
Mechanics’

200,000
160,000
200,000
200,000

60
50
60

“
“

John
“

New

York, July 8, 1865.

D$ker, Esq.., Chairman Board of Engineers and Foremen :

Sir—I

150,000

60

87* January

200,000

26

200,000
210,000

Mar.

60

500,000
150,000
200,000

35

New

directed

M

“

INSURANCE STOCKS.
Fir* Insurance

Companies.
Adriatic
./Etna........
American
Arctic
Astor

Atlantic
American
Baltic
Beekman

Par

Capital.

200,000 50
200,000 60
600,000 50
150,000 25
300,000 60
200,000 100

:

^Exchange.

200,000
200,000

Broadway

800,000
160,000
200,000

Brooklyn, L. I

163,000

Brevoort

Central Park..
Citizens’

150,000
800,000
210,000
250,000
500,000
200,000
250,000
600,000

City
Clinton
Columbia
Commercial
Commonwealth
Continental
Corn Exchange
Commerce
Croton
....

Eagle
Empire City........

Excelsior

Exchange
Firemen’s..........
Firemen’s Fund.....

=

Firemen’s Trust.....
Fulton
Gebhard ..........
Globe
Goodhue.
Greenwich
Grocers**
Gallatin
Germania
Guardian

Hoffman
1




25
25
60
25
17

100
20

70
100
60
60

100
100

150,000
.*

25

200,000 100

200,000

60

200,000
.

Last
Bid. Sales.

January
“

5

34 A 80 Sc’p

May
May.....;
May

85

..6 ‘J25 185
.6
101
,.5
98
5

....

ft

....

February

25

200,000
150,000
600,000

60

200,000
150,000
*°®,ooo
800-000

50
60
....

140

87*

February
January

January

Feb/uary

200,000
200,000
150,000

July...
April

6
6

January

..7

185

119*

105 113*
120 180*
80
....

88*

171*
100

5

....

;

100*

April

7*
.

105

....

.7
5

....
....
....

140
90

90*
100

January
February
April..
January

5
5
5
4

....

90
....

....

April
May
July...

MISCELLANEOUS

112*
90*
116

iftii

6

....

94*

6

....

85

....

............

...

15

.’a::::

...5

....

ioi"
las
180
100

7*

.5

5

Scrip.

Jan. July

TELEGRAPH

American Telegraph
U. States Telegraph
Western Union
“

Co
Co ..

N. S

Jan.July
“

...

GAS

Citizens* Gas Co., Brooklyn
Harlem Gas Co
Manhattan Gas Co.......

Metropolitan Gas Co.....
New York Gas Co

Williamsburgh
J’y City A Hoboken Gas Co

Last dividend.

$25
100

July.......4
February...5

Last
Sales.

...

...

...

198
102

6

170

90

100

February...5

100
100

10

April 25 th.. 2

STOCKS.

2,000,000
1,000,000
400,000
4,000,000
2,500,000
1,000,000

-

Bid.

••••

116
120
180
100

...

100

100

....

Brooklyn Gas Co

val

STOCKS.

3,000,000

Last
Sales*

jof-f[

STOCKS.

Farmers’ Loan A Trust Co. $1,000,000
New York L. I. A TrustCo. 1,000.000
Union Trust Co
United States Trust Co...
1,000,000

V-ms

Bid.

COMPANIES.

Capital.

70

77*
119

20
50
60
100
60

4

117

*

140
185

...

107
*••••#•••*••»

•••

set

...

Light Co...

1,000,000
110,000

Atlantic Mail Steamship Co
Pacific
“
“

2,000,000
4,000,000

100

127i

set

ess

"5

Paterson Gas

114

....6

....

Par.

Companies.

175

125*
102*
61*

....

6

March.......j®

TRUST

90

....

....

Payable.

20 esh, 40 scp.

106
100

....

January

600,000 July 3*.
800,000 Jan., 10 and 50 scp.
200,000 July 3* 6

210
76 76
219 280

»..

January

8,600,000

117*

....

8*

Feb., 10 A 60

Laat dividend.

$1,000,000 Jan.,

....

7

January
January
July

160,000 60
500,000 100

125
110

....

8*
3*

New

60

Capital.

....

....

....

MARINE COMPANIES.
Companies.

....

....

February
February

60
26
25

400,000

Yonkers A N. York..

G. West..

....

....10

January
January
January

...

260,000

T

Washington
Williamsburgh City.

Metropolis
72$ Washingt’n

95 112

January

Stuyveaant.
Sterling

Standard
Tradesmen’s
United States

....

...,

6

25
25
25

St Nicholas

....

....

3

March

60

160,000
150,000
200,000

Mercantile..

10
$3 60
6

January

200,000 60 New

1,000,000

St.Mark’s..

160 162

....V.

jo July
50

Resolute.

..10

....

Scrp

..

60
50
50
300,000 100
200,000 100
200,000 25

Relief

104 107

,6
10

June 6 A 60
October 10.

January
6
January..
5
20 January
......5

160,000
600,000
150,000
200,000

Republic

Columbian.

.......

6
6

26
200,000 100

Park
Peter Cooper
Phoenix

100

70

7
8

60

160,000
200,000

Pacific

6

December

January
January

Nor*-West’n (Oswego)

....

....

March.....
May.....
New ...:

February
January

85

934 94*

10

200,000

200,000 100

Hamilton.
Hanover ..».,»• ...«••

Harmony.. t.

....

400,000 50
200,000 50
200,000 100
800,000 40
200,000 100
200,000 50
150,000 c30
204,000 17
150,000 10

.........

■i

■

$300,000 $25
...

Bowery

•

Val.

Laat Semi.annual
Dividend.

North River

Rutgers
Security

....

....

100

January

200,000 100
50
500,000 50
850,000 25

People’s

by the Board to acknowledge the receipt of
your communication dated July 1, enclosing copy of a resolution adopt¬
ed at a meeting of your Board, held on the
evening of June 80th, 1865,
and in reply, to inform you that the Board is not
prepared to Comply
with the proposition contained in said resolution.
Very respectfully, Ac.,
Chas. E. Gilder8lekve,
Secretary.”
am

....

....

Niagara
Engineers North American.... 1,000,000

following

O.S

January .........6
January ««.«•««..6
60 July10
25 February
4
100 January
10
60 January
3*
25 January
6

118

.....

July
...6
January
10 200
800,000 100 January 10 A 50 Sep

.

.....

communication from the new Board of Commissioners. On the
30th of June a resolution was adopted by the Board of

The

6
5

150,000

on a

cease to perform duty after the 10th inst.
was the reply of the new Commissioners :

76

100

25

Lamar
Lenox.

.

Department would

....

New

160,000

Knickerbocker

Kings County
Lafayette

July, from which date the whole stock stands on the same footing.
The following semi-annual insurance dividends have,
among Mercantile
s..
others, been declared since our last:
Merchants’
Etna Insurance Company, of Hartford, five per cent; Mechanics
Fire Insurance Company, five per cent; Tradesmen’s Fire Insu¬ Metropolitan
Montauk
rance Company, five per cent; the Market Fire Insurance Com¬
Morris (paid in $200,pany, ten per cent; Niagara Insurance Company five per cent; La¬
000)
mar Fire Insurance
Company, five per cent; Excelsior Fire In¬ Nassau, L. I
surance
Company, five per cent; Fulton Fire Insurance Company, National
-4— per cent.
New Amsterdam....
The Board of Engineers and Foremen of the old Fire
New World
Department New York
held a meeting, a few days since, for the purpose of
Equitable
taking action New York Fire A
and Foremen, setting forth that unless the new Commissioners would
agree to grant honorable discharges to all members of companies
entitled to receive them, by the 1st of August next, the Volunteer

....
....

146*
106
185
100

200,000
150,000
280,000

Jersey City

.

....

....

200,000

........... ..

Jefferson

ital to one million dollars, and declared a dividend on the old stock
of five per cent. They also pay interest on the new stock to 1st

8
5
10
6
5

February

150,000 100
International..
1,000,000 100
Importers’ A Traders* 200,000 60

Companies of our city, which we expect to be able to give in our
next number.
Among other interesting features will be a table of
Marine Insurance scrip, showing in each case the amount outstand¬
ing, with the date and market price of each issue. Very little is
generally known with regard to the value, extent, &c., of these is¬
sues, although the Mutual Marine Insurance interest is an extremely
important one, and an extensive business is done in buying and sell¬
ing the scrip.
In giving the value of the stock of the Hanover Insurance Com¬
pany last-week, we were made to quote it at 25 instead of 125, as
ft should'have been. The error and the cause of it was apparent.
The Metropolitan Insurance Company have increased their
cap¬

Last
Bid. Sales.

20

•

••***•«**••*

100

.V. 168*....

EXPRESS stocks.

Adams.....
American

National.....
United States..........

Wells, Fargo A Co.

3,000,000
8,000,000
250,000
2,000,000

100
600
100
100

2,000,000

100

290

...

y

V.I.’ 296!!!."
•

•

•

•

•••••••••

*••••••••••

see

# » •#

800

• • • •

'r:'

94

THE” CHRONICLE.

TABLE OF LETTER POSTAGES TO FOREIGN
COUNTRIES.
l3&~The Asterisk (*) indicates that in cases where
It is prefixed, unless the letter he registered,
prepay¬
ment is optional; in all other cases prepayment is re¬

quired.

Countries.

4 o.
cts.

C. Am. Pac.

Ceylon,
do

'

33

prepaid 86c)
by Bremen or Hamburg

*38

mail

do

* French

do

*30
*30 *60

...

mail, via England,
by Am. pkt.
21
de
open mail, via England,
by British pkt
6
Algeria, French mail
*16 *30
Arabia, British mail, via Southampton ... ‘83
do

Uo

Marseilles....

39

do

cts.

10

5
30

60

...

33

39

45
34

*

.

Indian

do

Ionian

do
do
do

French mail

Bordeaux

30

via Marseilles and Suez...

do

60

45

72

hy. Bremen and Hamb’g
mail via Trieste

...

55

do

mail
Prussian closed
ml. when prp’d

do

do

do

do

by Brem.

or

*30
...

do

28

do

by Brin

or Hamb’g
via Trieste
French mail

...

do

French mail

30

Bavaria, Prussian closed mail..
do
do
do

when

do

by Bremen

or
French mail

prepaid
HamVg mail

>..

*;.
*21

Belgium, French mail.

60

*30 !
28;

*15;

*21 *42

via London,
packet
do
open mail, via London,
British packet.,
Belgrade', open mail, via Loudon,
American packet
do
open mail, via London,
British packet
do
by French mail
Beyrout * Prussian closed mail,
prepaid, 38cts)
open mail,
American

5

by

(if
...

*40

*30 *60

Bogota, New Granada

18

Bolivia

84

Brazils, via England,

45

France, in Fell mail from
*33 *66
*30

Bremen, Prussian closed mail,

do
do
do
when prep’d ...
28
do
Bremen mail
*10
do
*15
Hamburg mail
'do
French mail..
*21 *42
Brit. A. Am. Prov., except Canada and
New Brunsw’k not over 3,000 m.
*10
do
do
do
exceeding 3,000 m. ... *15
..

'

...

Brunswick, Prussian mail
do

do

when

prep’d
Hamb’g ml.

...

*30
28

by Brem. or
...
*16
do
French mail
*21 *42
Buenos Ayres, via England
45
do
via France by French
*
.f
mail from Bordeaux..
30
60
Canada
*10
■

Canary Islands, via England
*33
Cape of Good Hope, Brit, mail, via
Southampton

45

o

do

do

Guatemala
German States,

by

Bordeaux

do
do
do

r

•

do
do

83

do

opeu mail,
British pkt

29

37

30

60

,

24
1

open mail, via London,
American pkt....

i
15

45
30

60

...

by Bremen and
Hamburg mail
Nassau, N. Prov., by direct steamer

22

from N. York..

...

*42

.

*10

Newfoundland....
New
New

10

Granada, (except Aspinwall and

Panama,)...
South Wales, British

...

do

do
do

do
do>

...

*30

...

28

18

...

33

British mail, via
Marseilles
89
45
French mail.... *30 *60

by mail to San

Francisco

New Zealand, British mail, via South¬

hampton
British mail,.via Mars’ls

do
28

...

mail, via

Southampton...

-

do

*10
* 15
*30

do

Nicaragu,
do

33
39

45
French mail
*30 *60
Pacific slope, via Panama ... 10
Gulf Coast of.

84

Norway, Prus. closed mail, (if p’paid,
42c)

*15
*21*42

45
*21 *42
...

by
21

6

Netherlands, The, French mail...... *21 *42
do
open mail, via Lon.,
by Amer. pkt.... ... 21
do
open mail, via Lon.,
by British pkti
5

New Brunswick

*21 *42

Holland, French mail.

28

*

*

*15
2 L 42

prepaid

€?ape de Verde Islands, via England

*30

...

28
French mail.... *21 *42

5

Hayti, via England..
do

from Bordeaux

via London, by

53

.
...

(Strelitz and Schwerin,)

21

mail
French mail.

34

.

T10

Montevideo, via England
do
via France, by Frn’h mail

London, by

French mail

.'*■=.

.

French mail.......... *21 *42

Hamburg

Hanover, Prussian closed mail......
do
do when prepaid
do by Bremen or Hamburg
do

do

do

from New York

do

60

do

*25

Bremen mail
Prussian closed mail
do
do when

45

(Strelitz and Schwerin.)
by Bremen or Hamburg

do

Hamburg, by Hamburg' mail, direct,
do
do
do

Prussian closed mail...
do when p’paid

do
do

*35

open mail, via
American pkt

39

to

do

mail..
do

„..

places excepted above
Mecklenburg, (Strelitz and Schwerin,)

*30 *60
or

45
33

...

*30

and Pacific coast

do

*30

..

...

by Bremen

21

...

via Marseilles

Naples, Kingdom of, Prus. clos’d mail

...

French mail

83

Mexico, (except Yucatan, Matamoras

*28
*15

...

pkt

paid. 40c)

42

mail

Greece, Prussian closed mail, (if pre'

do

*30

'

Amu. pkt
do
open mail by British
Great Britain and Ireland

*22
87

21

mail..

French mail.

*21 *42
*15

(except Luxemburgh)
Hamburg mail
Gibraltar, French mail
do
open mail, via London, by

45

Brit, mail via

in Fch, mail, via
Bord’x and Lisbon

34

33

'10

...

do

60

45

French mail
Bremen mail..

29

op. mail, via Brit, pkt
5
French mail../.... *30 *60

do
do

.

...

Prus. closed mail (if
prepaid, 28c)......

French

*
Martinique, via England
Mauritius, British mail,Via South’pt’n

*21 *42

Hamburg mail

*15

by American pkt.:

72

40

...

Marseilles,....
do

36

closed mail
do
when

or

do

do
do

68

...

Gambia, via England
Gaudaloupe, via England...'

5t
*21 *42

do

*15 *30

Bremen

*21 *42

mail

•

.

-21

French mail

do

do

28

Malla, Island of, open mail, via Lond.

...

Prussian
do

*30

Duchy, French

Madeira, Islarid of, via England....
Majorca and Minorca, British mail.

6

6l

prepaid.

by

.

do

do
do

by
21

21

30

islands, via England

...

paid..

...

mail,

*42; Frankfort, French mail

closed mail, via England,.<.

do
do

|

do
Ecuador.
Falkland
France

closed mail
Grand Duchy, Prussian
closed mail, when pre¬

do

Duchy, Hamburg

closed mail, via Trieste..

...

Luxumburg, Grand Duchy, Prussian

Grand

..

Br’n or Hamb’g mail, via
Marseilles and Suez....

*15

...

*21 *42

do

(Lng. possessions.) Prus

by

*42

:

*35
*20

*27 *54

16............

83

Duchy, Bremen

i

Ill*

mail.
Freuch mail

mail
Grand
mail

do

...

'

do

53

60

...

Lombardy, Prussian closed mail,- (if
prepaid-, 40c).
do
by Bremen or Hamburg

do

do

(except prov.
in
Italy)Fell.mail.... *21 *47
Azores Island, British mail via Por..
29 32
Baden, Prussian closed mail (if prep’d
28cts)
*30
do Bremen or Hamburg mail
*16
do French mail, j
*21 *42
Bahamas, by direct st’r from N. Y. ...
5 |
Batavia, British mail via Southamt’n
45 |
do
do
do
Marseilles,
53 j

45

...

30

45

mail, via London, by
pack’t
open mail, via London, by
British packet
Prussiclosed mail,! via '.

do

do

do

] 49

...

/do French mail
Liberia, British mail

...

American

*15

35

Grand

East Indies, opeu

Hamb’g

mail

French mail

Eng¬

do

...

Denmark, Prus. closed mail (if pre¬
paid, 83cts)
do
by Brem. or Hmb’g mail

Austria and its States. Prussian closed

45

;. *38
*30 *60

via Marseilles...

.

60

39

10
10

...

^

do

30

i

via

Japan, British mail, via Southampton

*30 *60

England

French mail
British mail, via
land

60

open

Costa Rica
Cuba
Curacoa via

50 102

British mail,
Marseilles

do
do

by Br’n or Hmb’g mail. ... *32
mail, via London, by
Am. packet
As pi q w all...
21
10
do
open mail, via London, by
Australia, British mail via Sth’mpt’n ... 33
Brit, packet ..
do
Marseilles 39
45
5
by private ship from New
j Corfu—see Ionoan Islands
Y ork or Boston
5
Corsica, British mail by Am. packet ... 21
Fch. mail (<S7/i Austria Co) *30 *60 j
Brit, packet .,.
do
do
5
do’ Freuch mail,.
I
*15 *30
by Beem. or Hamb’g mail
mail from

Ascension, via England

*25
*27*54

.'

Islands, Prussian closed mail,
(if prepaid* 36c)

55

by mail to San Fran., thence ^
by private ship
..
3
Conslantinople, Prus. closed mail, (if
prepaid, 38c)
...-*40

45

*35

85

53

30

...

Archipelago, French mail....

45

40

5

Honduras.

Hmb’g mail, via

or

mail
French mail

do

cts.

...

Holland, open mail, via London, by
British pkt
Holstein, Prussian closed mail, (if pre¬
paid, 33c)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg

21

Marseilles and Suez
French mail

do
do

45

Argentine Republic, via England
.do
via France, in French

by Br’n

Countries.

1 o.

by

open mail, via London, by
British packet
French mail
Brit, mail, via Southampton
do 6 Afarseilles

Not Not
Exc. Exc.
1 o. ' * o.

cts.

...

...

Brit, mail via Southampton
do
Marseilles..,.
do Br’n or Hmb’g ml.
via Trieste

open

mail..*

Sloop, via Panama

open mail, via London,
American packet
c

10
...

io.
cts..

eta.

Aden, British Mail, via Southampton
Alexandria, Prussian closed mail (if
do

.

Countries.

|o.

Acapulco
,

Not Not
Exc. Exc.

Not Not
Exc. Exc.

■».;

[July 15,1865.

do
do

by Bremen
French

or
mail

Hamb’g mail,

...

*46
*38

*33 *66

Nova Scotia—see Brit tf. American
Provs

Oldenburg, Prus. ctoaed mail, (if
paid, 28c)

pre¬

*30

y
!




THE CHRONICLE

July 15,1865]
Not Not

95

Not

Not

£

•

£

Exc. Exc.

4 o.

Countries.
cts,

Oldenburg, by Bremen or
mail

*21 *42
••••■• •

British maityvia England.

Peru

• • •

10

...

45

22

*

o.

herein mentioned:

as

By Freuch mail, via Austria....

•

21 *42

Turk’s Island

19

Tuscany, Pr. cl’d mail (if prepaid, 40c.)
do

French mail

*42

..

do
by Bremen or Hamburg mail
Uruguay, via France, by French mail

*23

Southampton

....

British mail, via

do

do

Marseilles

63

French

do

do

45

80

Poland, Prussian closed mail (if pre-

60

British mail, via Havana.

34

83
30
21

Prussia, Prussian closed mail
do
do
do when prep.

60

42
42

*30
28
Hamburg mail..... *16
...

do
by Bremen or
do
French mail
.-.
*21 *42
Rom. or Pap. States Prus. closed mail ... .44
do
do
French mail.... *27 *54
do
-do
Bremen or Ham¬

burg mail

...

...

do

prepaid, 40c.)

*21 *42
•

do
when pre.
do Brem. or Ham-

•

•

•

•

*30
28

*16
burg mail. •
do French mail.. *21 *42
*30
Saxony, King, of, Prus. cl’d m
do
28
do
do
.when pre.
do by Brem. or Ham. m.
*15
do
do French mail
*21 *42
do
*26
Schleswig, by Brem. or Ham. mail..
‘French mail.
*27 *64
do
Prussian closed mail (if
do
•

•

•

do

do

•

•

•

•

French mail

m’l via Lon. by
Amer. packet..
open m’l via Lon. by
Brit, packet... *
by Bremen or Ham-

1 •>

do

do

•

•

r/Z

•

•

•

•

•

•

do
do

a|

do

...

via Marseilles

||:French mail
Spain, Bri| mail, by Arner.

80

packet

do
do
by British packet....
do French mail
21
do by Bremen or Hamburg mail.
80
St Thomas, by U.S.
pkt., to Kingston,
Jamaica
do
‘. via Havana.
...

,

Sweden, Pru9. cl’d mail (if prep’d, 36c.)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg mail
<

do

Freuch mail

•Smyrna, Prus. cl’d mail (if prep’d,38c.)
do

French mail

Switzerrd,Pr. cl’d mail (if prep’d, 33c.)
French mail

do
do
“do

CALIFORNIA.

..

French mail........

Turkey
Islands

cept as




By the steamers of the ATLANTIC MAIL
STEAMSHIP COMPANY

do
do

in

liquids,

per gross
or currency,

specie
kind,) in

specie

1 60
08

gallon....
(payable in

of $5,000 and

sums

per ct.

over

do

40
01

or currency,

kind,)

in

(payable in

less than
f per ct
Freight will be taken by measurement or by
weight, at the company’s option, except by
special agreement.
sums

$6,000

business hours.
One of the

company’s steamships will sail
Orleans, direct, every Saturday, at 3
P. M., from pier No. 46 North River.

o’clock

JAMES A.

RAYNOR, President

to

Aspinwall, by Railroad of the PANAMA
Aspinwall to
Panama, and by Steamers of the PACIFIC

RAILROAD COMPANY from

HAVANA, SISAL AND
VERACRUZ.

MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY from Pan
ama

ELEGANT SIDE-WHEEL

The NEW and

to San Francisco.

STEAMERS of the

COMMENCING JULY 1, 1865.

American and Mexican

Passage Rates Reduced to
$350 in Deck Stale Room.

Mail

325 in First Cabin Saloon.

Steamship Co.

Built

250 in Second Ctibin.
125 in

Steerage.
transportation by the three
several parties above named over their respec¬
tive routes, and including provisions on board

expressly for the Trade, will be regu«
larly dispatched from NEW YORK to SISAL
arid VERA CRUZ, via HAVANA, on
FIRST ami FIFTEENTH of each Month.

the

THE MAGNIFICENT SIDE-WHEEL STEAMSHIP

...
....

18

34

*40
*38

*38 *66
...

*40

*30 *60
...

...

*36
*19
*19

83

45

80

60

...

...

...

No

-

Europe, and Turkish
in the Mediterranean, ex¬
herein mentioned:
'

By Bremen or Hamburg mail
Open mail, via Lon., by Am. pkt
do
do'
by Brit, pkt

Rates of Freight.
Freight, by measurement, per cubic ft
do
by weight, per pound
do
in dry barrels, (equal to flour
barrels, per bbl............

from New York

delay whatever at the Ithmus, being con¬
veyed from Aspinwall to Panama in first-class
53 railway carriages in Four Hours !
60
Children under 2 years free.
21
Children under 6 years of age, one-quarter
6
42 price.
Between 6 and 12 years, one-half price.
42
Bankable Funds or Greenbacks only taken

in

Prussian closed mail

60 00

for New

22
46

*21 *42

by Bremen mail
by Hamburg mail....
Syria, British mail, via Marseilles, by
French packet.
do

5

$80 00

the steamers.

burgmt }..;

SingaporiJBrit. m’l, via Southampton.

21

eteamer

Passage in Second Cabin, (with board
included)
40 00
Passage in First Cabin, on screw steam¬

Freight for thi9 company’s steamships will
company’s warehouse, upon
their pier, No. 46 North River, (third pier above
the foot of Canal street,) at all times during

Which includes

open

do
•

47
*21 *42
•

Rates of Passage.
Passage in First Cabin, on side-wheel

be received at the

TO

•

prepaid

,

21

U S. Mail Line

*35

do
do

...

•

•

do
do

28

OCEAN STEAMSHIPS.

•

•

Sicilies, The Two, Prus. closed mail.

...

*37
*29

...

do
do

*30

open mail, via Lou.,
in British packet
5
French mail
*21 *.4 2
Bremen or Hamb’g mail ... *15

do
do

Savoy, District of
*16 *30
Saxe- Altenburg, Prussian closed mail ... *30
do ‘
do when pre. ... 28
do
by Bre. or Ham. mail ... *16

do
do

34

...

by

*42

Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Meiningen and
Weimar, Pr. cl’d m.

*15

10

when pre..
do
open mail, via I on.,
in American packet.

The following are the rates charged for the
transportation of Passengers and Freight from
New York to New Orleans, upon this Compa¬
ny’s line of Steamships, viz.:

by

do

French mail
*21 *42
Brem. or Ham. mail
*23

*5

er...

45

not British

do
do

Sardinian States, Prus. cl’d mail (if

French mail

*80
*27 *54

(except Cuba)
Wurtemburg, Pr. cl’d mail

3

■

60

ampton
West Indies, British.

*30 *60

Francisco

do

45

by Bremen or Ham¬
burg mail
Venezuela, British mail, via South¬

*42

do
do

39
80

(if

French mail

do
do

Sandwich Islands, by mail to San

do
do

33

...

,

prepaid, 40c.)

French mail.

60

45

prepaid, 28c.)

*28

Russia, Prussian closed mail (if pre¬
paid, 35c.)................
do
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail

...

Venetian States, Prus. closed mail

closed mail (if

Romagna, Prussian

British mail, via
Marseilles
French mail

do

45

30

do via Bord’x <fe Lis.

do

Southampton.
do

...

Portugal, British mail, via England ..
do
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail
do
by French mail, via Behobia
do

from Bordeaux........
SO
British mail, via England.....
Van Diemen’s Land, British mail, via

do

.

paid, 85c.)
,*37
Bremen or Hamb’g mail. ... *29
*80 *60
French mail

do
by
do
by
Porto Rico,

...

10 BARCLAY STREET.

No.

*21 *42

•

Philippine Islands, British mail, via

i

i

c.
ets.

cis,

Turkey in Europe, cities of, except
•

•

V

Paraguay,

"13

Hamburg

French mail..,

do
Panama

•:

Countries.

eta.

28

*32
21
.6

in

•

1500 TONS
CAPTAIN

BURTHEN,

ED. W.

A

payment.

One hundred pounds baggage allowed te each
adult cabin passenger, and fifty pounds to each
adult steerage passenger, without charge; on
all over this quantity twenty cents per pound,
to be paid to the clerk on board the ship, but
do merchandise nor bedding will be taken as

baggage.
Baggage masters accompany the baggage
through the entire trip.
For further information, or passage, apply
to

D B. ALLEN,
General Agent of the Line,
No. 5 Bowling Green, N. Y.
Or to C. L. Bartlett <& Co.,
No. 16 Broad st., Boston, Mass.
Or to R. J. Kimbals & Co.,
No. 12 Toronto st., Toronto, C. W.
New York, June 8,1866.

TURNER,

Will leave Pier No. 3, North River, for

Havana, Sisal anti

Oera €rnj,

SATURDAY, JULY IS, S P. M.
To be followed

by the Steamship
Aug. 1.

VERA CRUZ,

RATES
Payable in Gold,

OFPASSAGE
or

States

its equivalent in United
Currency.

NEW YORK to

First Cabin....

$50

HAVANA,

S teerage

$30

NEW YORK to SISAL.
First Cabin....

$90

Steerage

$46

NEW YORK to VERA CRUZ.

$ 100

$50
Steerage
Experienced Surgeons attached to the steam*
ships of this Company.
Superior accommodation for Passengers.
UglF* For Freight or Passage, apply at 20
Broadway, New York.
CHAS. A. WHITNEY, Agent.
First Cabin....

96

THE CHRONICLE.
Government Agency, and Designated Depoeitory of the United States.

United States

7.30 LOAN.
THIRD

JOSEPH C. OR VIS, Preset

of the

Agent for the sale of United States Securities,
pubtic the third series of Treasury
Notes, bearing seven and three-tenths per cent.'
offers to the

the

These notes

15, 1865, and

are

are

issued under date of

July

payable three ye^rs from that
convertible at the op-

date in currency, or are

option of the holder into

U. S. 5-20 Six percent.
GOLD
BEARING
BONDS.
These bonds

mium, and

are now

worth

a

No. 4 WALL

Capital Paid In

-

-

-

*1,000,000

Accounts of Banks, Bankers, and Business
Men solicited. Government bonds for sale; 7
8-10th U.S. Notes on hand, for immediate deliv¬
ery. U. S. Certificates of indebtedness bought
and sold.

7.30 LOAN.

exempt, as

The Notes of this Third Series

precisely

similar in form and privileges to the SevenThirties already sold, except that the Govern¬
ment reserves to itself the option of paying
interest in gold coin at 6 per cent., instead of 7
3-lOths in currency. Subscribers will deduct
the interest in currency up to July 15th, at the
time when they subscribe.
.
The delivery of the notes of this Third Se¬
ries of Seven-Thirties will commence on the 1st
of June, and will be made

promptly and

~

con¬

FOE

REEb,
BANKERS,

T. L. TAYLOR &

And Government Loan Agents,
No 6 WALL STREET,
Boy and Sell Government Securities and Specie,
AT BEST

RATES, AT THE COUNTER.
PER

ON ALL DEPOSITS,

CENT

ALLOWED

Subject to Check at

The return to specie payments, in
of which only will the option to pay

the event
lewis & cox,
interest in
CHA&LTON T. LEWIS.
s. s. cox.
gold be availed of, would so reduce and equal¬
ize prices that purchases made with 6 per cent,
COUNSELLORS AT LAW,
in gold would be fnlly equal to those made
Noc. 132 BROADWAY, P. O. Box No. 5,660.
with seven and three-tenths per cent, in* cur¬
NEW YORK CITY,
rency. This is
Now offered

by the Government, and its
perior advantages make it the

Great

Attend to all business in the courts of the Uni¬
su¬

Popular Loan of the
People.

RUDOLPH GARRIGUE,
Vice-President.
JOHN E. KAHL, Secretary.

Francis & Loutrel,

ted States and in the
ton.
enue

departments at Washing¬
Especial attention given to Internal Rev¬
business and to claims against foreign gov¬

ernments, as well as our own.

perience

Mr. Lewis's

ex¬

Mi|DEN

45

LANE,
•
STATIONERS, STEAM PRINTERS,
‘

LITHOGRAPHERS AND

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS.
*

'

All kinds of
Books for

Stationery, Paper and Account

Business, Professional and Brivate

U9e.

Orders solicited.

THE COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL

CHRONICLE,
Issued from the office of

HUNT’S MERCHANTS’
A

MAGAZINE,

WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF
THIRTY-TWO FOLIO PAGES,
Modelled after the
Celebrated London ECONOMIST.
"

o

*

.

-

_

is

published

every

•

t

-

*

•

Saturday morning, and

tains the latest Commercial and Financial
from all

OUR

higher rate.

Only Loan in Market

'

SALE, EEADV FOE DELIVEBT,

tinuously after that date.
The slight change made in the condition of Sight.
RAILWAY STOCKS, BONDS, and other
this THIltD SERIES affects only the matter
of interest.
The payment in gold, if made, will Securities bought and sold at Brokers' Board, at
be equivalent to the currency interest of the the
usual Commission.

The

MAURICE HILGER,
President.

:

City of New York,
27 and 29 Pine Street.
DEPOSITARY AND FINANCIAL AGENT OF
THE UNITED STATES,

U-S-7 3-ioTreasuryNotes

are

$500,000,

THIS COMPANY INSURES PROPERTY OF ALL
KINDS AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE BY

of the

HAVE

CAPITAL,

WITH A LARGE SURPLUS.

FOURTH NATIONAL BANK

handsome pre¬

are

CASH

STREET, N. Y.

FIRE, ON FAVORABLE TERMS.

all the Govems ment Bonds, from
State, County, and Munici
pal taxation, which adds from one to three per
cent, per annum to their value, according to the
Convertible, at Maturity, into
rate levied upon other property. The interest
is paid semi-annually by coupons attached to 6
PER CENT. GOLD-BEARING BONDS
each note, which may be cut off and sold to
any bank or banker.
Also,United States 10-40 Bonds.
The interest at 7 3-10 per cent amounts to
Do.
5-20 Bonds.
One cent per day on a $50 note.
Do.
1 Year Certificates.
Two cents per day on a $100 note.
We also collect Government Vouchers and
Ten cents per day on a $500 note.
Drafts and attend to other business with Gov¬
Twenty Cents per day on a $1000 note
One dollar per day on a $5000 note.
ernment.
P. C. CALHOUN, President.
Notes of all the denominations named will
be promptly furnished upon receipt of sub¬
B. Seaman. Cashier.
scription.
are

INSURANCE CO.

City of New York,

363 BEOADWAI.

By authority of the Secretary of the Treas¬
ury, the undersigned, the General Subscription

as

FIRE

NINTH NATIONAL BANK

SERIES,

known

GMMAUIA

JOHN T. HILL, Cash’r.

THE

$230,000,000.

interest per annum,

[July 15,1865.

graph,

con¬

news

parts of the world, by mail and tele¬

to midnight on Friday.

up

A

very,large and efficient corps of reporters
are engaged on each
department;
so that the most mature
opinions, as well a9
the freshest intelligence, will always be com¬
bined in the columns of this journal.
and editors

The Chronicle i9

accompanied by

Daily

a

Bulletin, published every morning, containing
all the Commercial and Financial

new9

of each

day

up to the hour of publication. it
The commercial classes, bankers,

writers,

under¬

shareholders,

manufacturers, mer¬
and shippers, will
in The Chronicle and its Daily Bul¬

chants, jobbers, brokers

possess
the best and most reliable

letin

information needed in their
The Chronicle will in

sources

of the

daily pursuits.

no manner

enter up¬

Deputy Commissioner of Internal on the domain of
partisian politics, nor admit
Less than $230,000,000 of the Loan author¬ Revenue will be a
guaranty of thorough ac
ized by Congress are now on the market: This
anything in its columns having a partisan bias
amount, at the rate which it is being absorbed, quaintance with the Revenue Laws.
but will, nevertheless, endeavor carefully to
Mr. Cox’s connection of four years with the
will all be subscribed for within sixty
elucidate the effects of political events and
days,
when the notes will undoubtedly command a Committee of Foreign Affairs in Congress, and
premium, as has uniformly been the case on his long membership of the National Legisla¬ legislation upon commercial and financial af¬
ture, ensure a thorough knowledge of legisla¬ fairs.
closing the subscription to other Loans.
In order that citizens of every town and sec¬ tion and practice in both departments.
tion of the country may be afforded facilities
for taking the Loan, the National Banks, State
TWENTY-SIXTH DIVIDEND.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
Banks, and Private Bankers throughout the
country have generally agreed to receive sub¬
scriptions at par. Subscribers will select
their own agents, in whom they have confi¬
dence, aBd who only are to be responsible for
the delivery of the notes for which they re«
ceive orders.

JAY
'

Subscription Agent,

No. ll^ South
Mat 15,1865.




COOKE,

Third Street,
PHILADELPHIA.

as

HANOVER

To

FIBEINSURANCECO.,
J^-THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
of this Company have declared a semi-an¬
nual dividend of SIX (6) PER CENT.,
free from government tax, payable on de¬

mand, at their office, No. 45 Wall street.
B. S.

WALCOTT, Sec’y.
Niw-York, July 1, 1865.

* mm

*

city subscribers for The Commercial
and Financial Chronicle,
(weekly,
of thirty-two folio pages), with The
Daily Bulletin, (daily, of two quarto
leaves), delivered by carriers
$12.00

To all others without The Daily Bul¬

10.00

letin.

WHL B. DANA & Co.,
Publishers,
60,

WILLIAM. STREET, IT. V.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102