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NEWSPAPER,!

WEEKLY

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

VOL. I.

SATURDAY, JULY 1, 1865.
The country has braVely
fatal industrial system once
also with crippled powers

CONTENTS.
THE CHRONICLE.

I

NO. 1.
survived the restrictions which

placed

upon

its energies.

a

It

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survived those forms of restri
legislation has at times imposed. Let th
8
Debt......
The President’s Policy
Foreign Intelligence
11 vast
improvements which will be sure to follow the gradual
Commercial
and Miscellaneous
The Detroit Convention..;
11
News
Industrial Rehabilitation of the
removal of the latter, prove to the
partisans of both that
South
the country has hitherto been
THE BANKERS GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL TIMES.
prosperous in spite of them,
19
and not as some think by reason of them.
Bank, Railway and Money Market
12 The Cotton Trade
19
Bankers Price Current
14 Breadstuff's....-.
Mails....
16 Prices Current and Tone of the
To secure this great (end, to attain the
prosperity which
Market
20
Commercial Epitome
19
Imports and Exports..,
24 thus lies within our reach, and to open wide the gates of our
Dry Goods Trade.
66
vast natural resources t<?! the
gTHE RAILWAY MONITOR AND INSURANCE JOURNAL
toiling masses, who now contend
27
Railway and Mining News and
I Railway Share List
29
Markets.........t
25 | Insurance Share List
against oppression and- poverty in less favored lands, it is
"INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.
necessary that the policy of thecouhtry should be based
32
Auction Notices
811 Bank Announcements, etc
wholly upon her industrial and commercial interests. These
have ever pointed the right way, and will yet lead us from
difficulty and doubt to success and certainty.
It is not overstating the plain truth to aver that these
great interests have never yet found a fitting exponent in the
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is issued every Satur¬
newspaper press of this!: country. The pursuits of industry
day morning vnth the latest news by mail and telegraph up to have been looked
upon too exclusively in their money mak¬
midnight of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every rrtorn&g
with all the Commercial and Financial news of the previous day ing aspects—too little in their social and political ones. ./ The
up to the hour of publication..
.
!
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great influence which they have always exercised upon the
The Chronicle and Daily Bulletin are delivered to all
fortunes of our country and which they'must
always con¬
subscribers in New York City per year at V. . .
$12 00 tinue to exercise,, have
bee/t forgotten in the strifes of petty
To all other subscribers The Chronicle is mailed toithout
politicians, and
the beat, of personal discussion. No com
the Daily Bulletin at . . » • • • ... •
10 00
prehensive paper devoted wholly to the great mercantile and
WILLIAM B. DANA & OO, Publishers,
commercial interests, has yet appeared.
Taking the entire
60 William Street, New York.
press of the country together we shall find that these inter¬
ests have to a certain extent obtained
public recognition; but
!
THE CHRONICLE.
in no single journal have
they received undivided attention.
The end of the war, through which the country has just
It' is to fill this place; in the ranks of the
public press, and
passed, inaugurates an era of peace and prosperity which supply this want, that s-The Commercial and Financial
only needs wise legislation to find encouragement; and Chronicle aspires. Nor will it stop with the
advocacy of
with such a stimulus, natural recuperative energies will soon correct
principles; but will be in every essential sense a news¬
be at work, to heal the wounds our civil strife has made, and
All that! the economist, the merchant, the banker,
paper.
to lead us once more into the paths of industry and af¬ the
manufacturer, the agriculturist, the shipper, the insurer,
fluence.
and the
speculator, may need to know in the course of his
At no time in our history has the knowledge and diffusion
daily pursuits, will T^e found duly chronicled in its columns.
of commercial truths, and the advocacy of the well defined
To this great purpose we apply
ourselves. Let the public
principles which govern the economy of wealth, been so in due time answer whether or not we have successfully ac¬
The Chronicle

Political Aspects of

the National

Late-Increase of
tion
Literature

Foreign Immigra¬

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tion which unwise

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During the war we have seen one false the¬ complished it. \
ory after another exploded, and all the wild schemes for pro¬
v THE POLITICAL ASPECTS OF THE NATIONAL DEBT.
ducing wealth, faster than the nieasured action of industrial
is
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laws will permit, come to naught, until all are convinced that
Mr. Jay Cooke, the agent of the national loan, has issued
value only resides in labor and time. Weary, then, of a con¬ a condo ad
populum j on the advantages of a National Debt,
stant succession of dearly bought experiences, do we now
for which he has been called to take divers smart
raps over
turn to the teachings of the great leaders in
political econ¬ the knuckles from the press, f
1 The
omy for wisdom and guidance.
astonishing success which has attended the National
as now.

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[July 1,1865.

THE CHRONICLE

complication of their material interests. We are, no doubt,
“milder-mannered men” than bur ancestors were; but the
cotemporary investments as a providential dispensation of experience of the last few years has shown us that we are still
good to the people ; but it is not surprising that those whose as capable as they were of 6t\ scuttling ships and cutting
‘relations with the Treasury consist in paying out taxes from throats.” But, happily for human progress, the same conditheir own pockets and not in handing over to it the magnifi- tions of national power which make a country formidable
cent results of a well administered system of appeals to the now bind it to forbearance.
To have a giant’s strength in a
pecuniary patriotism of America, should be startled if not ruder, age of human economy, was for a nation to be tempted
made indignant by the propositions, that a National Debt is into using it like a giant.
Now we see that England and
really a National blessing, and that Great Britain owes her France, which have increased enormously in their wealth,
political, financial and commercial preponderance neither to their resources, their general capacity for disturbing the
her mines, her ships, her broad acres, nor her stalwart sons, world and damaging each • other during the last half century,
but simply to King William’s importation of the Dutch have become more and more indisposed to^thc resort of war,
expedient of raising money on the faith of the government, with every year which has made the work of war easier to
We do not propose to enter the lists just now either for or them, speaking materially. During the period of a hundred
against Mr Cooke’s gospel of Debt. His zeal and sincerity and twenty-eight years which elapsed between the accession
are
unquestionable, and the doctrines which he lays down of the king who founded the national debt of England, and
may be a good summary of the average notions on political the Peace of 1815, England was at war for sixty-five years; at
economy which prevail outside the influences of the compar. | peace for only sixty-three.
During the fifty years which have
elapsed since the Peace of Paris, England has involved her¬
atively limited circle of the serious students of that science.
Loan in the hands of Mr. Cooke may naturally enough have
seduced that gentleman into regarding the most popular of

And thus much at
tional

Debt

than
year and a half.
France has been less fortunate in this re¬
spect, but the age in which Frenchmen thought it fine to “ go
self in but

him, that the Na
way or another must be

least must be said for

exists, and in

one

one

serious war,

and that lasted for

no more

a

protected, so that the real interests of the nalikely, on the whole, to suffer from an exaggerated to war for an idea” is visibly slipping away into the^dusW
passion for the National Debt as the palladium of our pros- crypt of forgotten things. The fiscal education of the people
perity, than from a popular reluctance to accept and to tole- of these great^countries, resulting from the pressure of their
rate it.
*
public burdens, has * unquestionably contributed to these
It is not in the genius or traditions of our people easily to happy results; because, in its progress, that, education has
conceive a violent affection for that sort of governmental ma- liberated industry, shed light upon the true limits of comchinery by which alone a National Debt in most of the Euro- mercial and financial legislation, and made men begin to unpean countries has been made possible and protected; and derstand the real laws of private and of public prosperity,
since a National Debt we have, and cannot without infinite We may look, with confidence, for the same effects to follow
damage to our character and our resources escape the bur- the like causes in the United States.
.
•
dens it must impose, it is quite worth while that the popular * If we are determined, as many people seem to think we
mind should be enlightened as to the advantages which may are, to try the merits of governmental interference and cencared for and

tion are less

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tralization, nothing will give us so much sound instruction'
In its financial and commercial consequences the National on the subject as a little practical experience. Meanwhile, in
Debt will certainly compel the education of our people up to making that experience, we shall incidentally be put and
the standard of the times in which we live on the great kept upon our good behavior both to ourselves and to our
questions of taxation and revenue, and the proper relations neighbors.
of governments with national industry, i This will be a posiIt was said by one of the truest foreign friends of America,
tive good of a value now' incalculable, and it is very possible and some years ago, that the one thing needful to the United
that we might have had to wait for it for many long years, States was a “little wholesome national suffering.” That
and at a severe cost to our material development, had not suffering w'e have had and are having. It has no doubt done *
the war bequeathed to us the sharp discipline which awaits us us some good, and will do u§ more, together with the evil
which it has wrought and will work upon us; and if Mr. Jay
im the immediate future.
Cooke will permit us to disagree with him so far as to pro¬
It is as true of nations apparently as of individuals that
flow

or

be made to flow from it.

.

trial, in and of itself, we will gladly
shake hands with him on the proposition that out of the seem
ing evil both reason and history warrant us to hope that we
may end by educing good.
That good may not indeed come, financially and commernounce a

“Other’s wisdom
Nor much their

helps us not;
folly teaches ;

And most of solid worth is what
Our

own

experience preaches.”

national debt

a

I c‘a^y speaking, in precisely the -forms in which Mr. Cooke
may imagine vain things, but the steady necessity of rectify- expects it, nor in any form immediately. We must wait for
ing an annual budget will make itself heard in the New ] 'lt> and be content to take it in the shapes to which the inexIron-masters may rave,

World

as

and manufacturers of wood-screws

it makes itself heard in the Old ;

and noisy, windy

incompetent politicians must give place in the national coun¬
thoughtful and observant statesmen as soon as the peo¬
ple are compelled to understand the direct relation between
the policy of the government and the quality of their own
daily dinners.
*
cils to

Not less certain is it that the existence of the National

orable laws of finance will mould it.

But, politically speak-'
ing, its advent may with reason be looked for at no distant
date, and the words in which Mr. Cooke describes its coming
can
hardly be bettered. It may be hoped that it will indeed
change the politics of the country by introducing into it the
ever leading element of public economy.
Partisanship will
be toned down, administration more closely watched, re-'
“

be made to conduce to our welfare and prosperity I sponsibility and care and integrity more and more demanded
by saving us from costly and damaging foreign conflicts, and
men, and of candidates for office. A great balance
wheel will be introduced into parties and into the life of the
forcing us to observe a wise and liberal policy in our deal¬
ings with other powers. The great security of peace in mo¬ nation, which will check passionate movements and restrain
dern times is less in the development of Christian and frater- disorderly tendencies ”
jx&k sentiments among men than in the multiplication and
Debt may




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THE CHRONICLE.

July 1,1865.]
THE PRESIDENT’S POLICY.

Indeed, on this point, Mr. Johnson expressed him¬
The President’s policy for the reconstruction of the
explicitly as to* leave no room to doubt his intentions.
Should the form of
Southern States has been officially intimated in the various
government adopted by the convention
be not republican, the President retains the
power to reject
proclamations which he has already issued ; but such is its
it and to order new
proceedings.
importance, in a commercial point of view, tha^ a plain an¬
As the electors, in taking the
nouncement of it, unconnected with the special circumstances
prescribed oath, must swear
to which these proclamations are addressed, cannot fail to be to respect the .various Executive proclamations heretofore is¬
sued, including, of course, the Emancipation proclamation of
of deep interest to the business community.
The following article contains the substance of a late conver¬ January 1, 1863, which se|^fr%e all the slaves in the States
sation with the President, and is more explicit, perhaps, than then in rebellion; therefore alUpower to continue the institu¬
tion of slavery would appear tcjbe destroyed. The
the language of the official proclamations :j
States, by ,
As regards the terms of amnesty to be granted to the not expressly abolishing slave^V, may indeed retain the right
Southerners, Mr. Johnson vouchsafed nothing farther than to purchase slaves from such dt|er States—like Kentucky and
what is contained in his proclamation of May 29th, which ex¬ Delaware—as still retain it**! bqt this event is not likely to r
empts all the rank and file on condition of taking the oath of alle¬ ^happen—first, because neither qf these other States have many
giance, and affords an opportunity of forgiveness to such army slaves left, and all of them Vill probably very soon volunofficers above the rank of colonel, and to such men of wealth arily emancipate the few they have; and next, because the
owning over twenty thousand dollars worth of property, as numerous blacks who have lately been freed will acquire,
may apply for special pardon.
In regard to the manner in and undoubtedly exercise, influence enough to prevent such a
which he intends the Southern States shall again shield them¬ measure from being earned into effect.
In regard to
selves under the constitution, the Presfdent was more comconfiscation¥.th4 President was understood to
muni6ative.
In substance he said, that the rebellion continues favor the policy! indicated 1^ Congress in the various acts it
to exist until the last rebel State shall have adopted a loyal has hitherto passed; but at?thd same time to be unwilling to
State government; and all extraordinary powers vested in the carry these acts iinto effect if, in, doing so, he would be obliged
to exercise any doubtful
Executive powers.
government during the continuance of the rebellion remain
In every respect but one, will Mr. Johnson’s policy ob¬
unimpaired so long as the rebellion, so defined, shall continue
tain the popular endorsementand that one is where he ex¬
to exist.
]
A State which has been in rebellion shall be in process of pressly withholds political Amnesty from all southerners pos¬
reconstruction ” when a proclamation shall have been issued sessed of over twenty thousand? dollars worth of property.
It is obvious that any qualification for amnesty based upon
concerning it, appointing to it a provisional governor, and
declaring, like the North Carolina, Mississippi and Georgia the possession of a certain; afoount of property must, in the
proclamations, that a convention shall be convened in it, nature of the thing, be unjust. ! Whatever the amount may
composed of delegates to be chosen only "by its loyal inhabit¬ be, such a qualification mqst unduly favor those who possess
ants, which convention will be empowered to alter and amend something under the amount, and do gross injustice to those
the ex}sting constitution of the State, so that the State may who possess something mdre ; than the amount.
It will also
return to the Union.
Those qualified to vote for such con¬ give rise to all sorts of rascality. A man who has something
vention, and to serve as delegates, shall only be such as were more than the amount determined upon, will strive to mis¬
electors under the constitution of the State as it existed pre¬ represent his wealth, and will* stop at no means of effecting
vious to the rebellion, and who are pardoned by the amnesty his object. And in all dpubtfiil cases the officers of the Gov¬
proclamation of the 29th May, and who shall have taken the ernment, having power on their side, will be more than
States.
self

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of allegiance.

Sjjate shall be considered reconstructed

and restored to
when, by means of the convention and the provi¬
sional government aforesaid, it shall have itself adopted a
permanent constitution, and elected a permanent legislature
and a permanent governor.
It then stands upon an equal
footing! with any of the States, and all interference of the
Federal government, with the exercise of its sovereign func¬
the Union

tions under the constitution of the United States ceases.

The constitution

adopted by the convention, and after¬

wards ratified
come

under

guarantees a

by the people, must be such an one as shall
the clause of the Federal constitution, which
republican form of government to the various

likely to decide empirically, d
Although any property qualification is unjust, one property
qualification may be more unjust than another.
In the South, nnlike the North, there are no middle classes.
The whites are either very poor or very rich; and he who
does not own twenty thousand dollars worth of property does
not own any property at all.
Consequently, the proclama¬
tion practically excludes1 from the benefit of amnesty almost
every capitalist in the South, and places his capital, during
the tedipus^nd wasting processes of confiscation, where repro¬
duction is

impossible; land [afterwards where

benefit will
tpe Southern States from its natural action. In
this, the employment of any sum of capital beyond
no

be derived to
addition to

^natter who

be its owner,
As soon as “ reconstruction ” commences, United States
foreigner, will always be subject to the
fear of seizure—-in brief, it trill always be insecure, and inse¬
courts shall be held, post offices and post routes established,
customhouses put in operation, revenue laws executed, con¬ curity is the death of enterprise.
fiscation laws put in force, and military rule mitigated to a
Beyond this, Mr. Johnson’s policy will obtain the hearty
sufficient degree to enable these functions of the Federal gov¬ acquiescence and support' ofj the industrial and commercial
ernment to be exercised by the government and enjoyed by classes of the entire country, and we are convinced that whenthe practical results cjf placing such a restriction upon thethe people.
'
'
This is Mr. Johnson’s policy. From this it is seen that as employment of capital j begifijito manifest themselves to the
no Federal act,
except the continuance, of military rule until President, he will either ver^ much modify it, or remove it
reconstruction is fully consummated and the enforcement of altogether.
j
1
existing Federal laws during reconstruction and afterwards^
THE DETROIT COMENTION—CANADIAN RECIPROCITY.
is favored, therefore neither the extinction of slavery nor the
States.

twenty thousand dollars, no

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whether' native

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hopeful is it that, immediately after war,

Most timely and
enfranchisement of the blacks are favored as national measures,
but both are to be left to the individual action of the separate the representatives
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THE CHRONICLE.
in convention for

[July 1,1866.

the

promotion of an extended and freer vantage to exchange. The truest and most mutually benefi¬
trading entercourse. The diffusion of enlightened views cial reciprocity is that which results from unrestricted inter¬
The equality and the mutual
upon commercial economy among the mercantile classes is course.
advantage of the
our truest reliance for the
speedy reparation of the damages exchanges ought to be regulated solely by the natural laws of
resulting from the war; and is, with any country, the surest trade, which are as invariably beneficient in their operation
guarantee of prosperity and power. It is the free circulation as the laws of nature. Any scheme of reciprocity aiming to
of advanced views of political economy among the mercan¬ secure
advantages to any specific interest, is almost sure to
tile classes of England that has made Great Britain the
prove abortive. New England demands terms of reciprocity
j
greatest commercial power in history; and it must depend that shall ensure the purchase, by Canadians, of her manufac¬
entirely upon the degree of practical intelligence among our tures. She* would display more judgment in being less
business men whether we early, or only after the lapse of anxious
upon this point.. If she can offer, with her products,
generations, surpass the trading status of the “ Queen of Com¬ advantages superior to those of her competitors, nothing is j
merce.” To thoughtful observers at home, and to the most more certain than that she will command the markets of the
advanced ecomomists of Europe, the average intelligence of Provinces. If she cannot offer better value than other
pro¬
the trading classes of the United States, upon
questions of ducers, then no terms of reciprocity can ensure the purchase -j
commercial and fiscal policy, appears far from assuring. of her
goods by the Canadians. It is altogether false in :
Our predominant ideas, as presented by a majority of the
principle to fix upon a schedule of articles, and say that the (
press and by Congressional legislation, are taken from the ante¬ mutual free exchange thereof shall constitute an equitable re¬
cedents of despotic countries, where they have been contem¬
ciprocity. • So constant are the fluctuations in production and
poraneous with a dwarfish commerce and with class privi prices, that regulations which to-day would ensure a
recipro- j
leges; and the problem of the future appears to be, whether cal exchange, might next year depart very widely from i
these ideas shall conduct us step by step toward
European reciprocity. If, however, all the products of both countries !
institutions, or. be neutralized by those more advanced prin¬ be declared subject to no restriction upon mutual exchange, j
ciples of which Cobden, John Stuart Mill, and Herbert (except such as may arise inevitably out of their respective j
Spencer are the exponents. Nothing affords so much hope revenue systems), then, in the event of an article becoming i
of the ultimate ascendency of liberal ideas in
political econ¬ unprofitable to exchange, another will take its place; and j
omy as the frequent interchange of views between the several thus an equal interchange will be maintained, with the
largest commercial interests,—-as in the
proposed convention, to be possible volume of business, and nothing will be lost through j
held at Detroit, Michigan, on the 11th instant.
inability to exchange commodities comprised in a schedule of |
The convention originated in the Detroit Board of Trade so-called
reciprocity.
-v
j
resolving to address to every board of trade or chamber of
For the sake of the intellectual reputation of American
of. commerce in the loyal States and the British Provinces, merchants, it is to be
hoped that we shall witness at the con- j
an invitation to meet in that
city for the purpose of consid¬ vention no assumption of the false notion that the only ad- =|
ering questions of “commerce, finances, communications of vantage of trade with the Provinces lies in our exports.
transit from the West to Jhe seaboard, and
reciprocal trade Hitherto, the main aim of diplomacy in the construction of
between the United States and the [British Provinces,”, to¬ treaties for
reciprocal commerce, has been to secure terms that !
gether with such other questions as may there be presented, will yield the largest possible export [with the least possible j
not of a local or
political character. It was an enlightened import; as though our wealth accumulated from what we
sentiment which prompted the
inviting of our Provincial part with, rather than from what we receive; or it were un- [
neighbors to share in these proposed important deliberations. profitable to buy in the cheapest market. One of the greatest
No policy that aims at the restriction of our intercourse with
advantages of the existing treaty is that it enabled us, in \
any section of this continent can claim to be the best policy 1863, to purchase from our neighbors $24,000,000 of comj
for the United States.
The recent resolution of Congress, fa¬ modities
cheaper than we could either produce them or buy !
voring the abrogation of the Reciprocity Treaty, is an act of them in any other market, while during the year preceding ?
which the country has reason to be
ashamed; and this step the treaty we could only so purchase $9,000,000. If, during
|
toward nullifying its effect is a becoming token of
repentance. the same period, the treaty enabled the Provinces to inIn the discussion of the treaty by Eastern commercial
bodies, crease their purchases from us only about seven millions, viz., i
and in the report of Congressional committees, the Canadians from
$24,556,860 in 1854, to $31,281,030 in 1863—it then
were most
unjustly charged with disregard of the purpos4s follows that the compact has not given to our neighbors a j
of the, Treaty; and it is satisfactory to learn that some of
cheaper market to the same extent that it has given us one, j
the parties to the anti-treaty agitation are now found
willing and that in that respect, it has favored us.
to meet representatives from
It is of the utmost consequence to the United States and to
beyond the border for the
j
friendly discussion of terms upon which trading relations the Provinces, that the transportation routes of both countries
j
may be perpetuated upon an extended basis. Although the should be mutually free. The great obstacle to our more l
question of promoting an increase offacilities for transportation rapid commercial development is the enormous cost of trans- j
from the interior to the coast cities is likely to receive earnest
portation from the West to the seaboard. The fullest com- j
consideration, yet we perhaps do not misrepresent the au¬ petition between the roads and canals of both countries should
ji
thors! of the convention in assuming that the readjustment of be fostered as the
only means of giving us a mor# complete j ■
trading relations with the British Provinces is the main pur¬ control over the European markets as an outlet for our surji
pose of the gathering.
plus products. The inadequacy of the present railroad and | j
The members of the convention will
greatly mistake their canal system of the Middle States, and the consequent high
business should their deliberations be
inspired by any other prices of produce, make this question of vital practical im¬
spirit than that of merchants aiming to procure the freest and portance and our yearly increasing crops demand its solu¬
largest possible interchange of commodities. With reference tion by the gentlemen who are to represent the nation’s com
to our Provincial
relations, the purpose to be aimed at is not merce at Detroit.
so much a
precisely equivalent interchange-—a scheduled reci¬
procity—as the freedom of both sides to buy from each other
or sell to each other, whatever articles it
may be to their ad
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THE CHRONICLE

INDUSTRIAL REHABILITATION OF THE SOUTH.

4

respective interests, on the one side by an abuse of the
The re-establishment of system and activity, in the indus¬ power acquired by conquest* on the other by a passive in¬
subordination that would confirm their own impoverishment
trial spheres of the South, would be
perhaps the safest guar¬ and
make an inheritance of trouble for their children.
anty of a cheerful political subordination.
A people
Standing in the midst of devastation and ruin and, entirely
thwarted and discouraged in their natural inclination to
pr5“
mote their individual interests
by the sweat of their broiys dependent upon the protection of the constitution and the
laws of the Republic,
and the exercise of their intellectual attributes, are
loyalty to that constitution and obedi
prone to
enc£ to those laws are with the Southern
discontent and turbulence. It is not
people a necessity ;
proposed to rule the it
remains for us to render that
loyalty and obedience a vol¬
South by the iron hand ; their cordial co-operation {is there¬
untary and Cordial offering at the shrine of American repub¬
fore
^ssential in regulating the machinery of government. licanism. r.
This ican be most readily accomplished
j
by affording them
It is to our advantage as much as
theirs, that their lands
every facility for an immediate resumption of the various
shall be tilled, their channels of trade
avocations of peaceful life. There is no
reopened, their villages,
danger now that
towns and Cities redeemed from the
the Southern population will exhibit an
ravages of war, their
open or armed hos¬
railroads, capals and highways repaired and put in working
tility against the Federal authority; but there is danger
that
jthey may be confirmed in listlessness, indolence, and order, and their minds relieved from vague apprehensions of
apathy. Our republicanism appeals to every sentiment of impending chastisement for past misconduct. They have
sinned much, they have suffered
much; but we must not
justicev and expediency, for their immediate elevation,
legally and morally, to the position of working partners in the forget that their misfortune, the desolation of their lands, the
decimation of their virile population, the
mission of self-government.
paralysis that is
|
But it is not a political question that threatens to be the upon their recuperative power, constitute a misfortune to
the whole Republic.
Help them to retrieve their fallen for¬
paramount anxiety of the immediate future. Vital political
tunes, and in! doing so we make them more efficient help¬
issues have been determined, rather than created,
by the ar¬
mates in achieving
the general prosperity. ^
bitrament of arms; but, in the place of the
partisan contro¬
versies of the past, financial issues of incalculable
impor¬
^

s

,

,

—

.

tance have arisen.

Within four years, an incubus has been

THE LATE INCREASE OF FOREIGN IMMIGRATION.

ji
.;|v
proportions than
The caused which determine the
emigration of men, also
any that centuries of misrule and convulsion have generated
determine the emigration of capital. Men are invited to for¬
to the monarchies of Europe.
Our young and vigorous na¬ sake one
country and to take up their residence in another,
tion,Replete with resources and strong in the consciousness through superior security for life and property, or superior
of the indomitable will and unflagging
energy that have car¬
opportunities for industrial pursuits. If they leave a country
ried it triumphantly through the ordeal of civil
strife, has where
doubtless the capacity to Fear the burden without
bending where security isisgreat, and business chances small, for one
security
small, and business chances great, they
beneath its weight, and in good time to throw it off,
emerg must find in
jthe latter not only a recompense for the superior
ing, untrammeled, into the broad fields of progress that
security they leave behind them, but an advantage over and
stretch before it.
But the task of developing those vast re¬
above that compensation, which will leave the net results of
sources must not be
delayed; nor can the Republic spare their labor
and risk greater than the net results they forsook.
any portion of its brain and bone and sinew from the indusThis is precisely the case with the movements of
capital.
trial sphere where its financial regeneration is to be consum¬
The same laws govern both. Therefore wherever we
per¬
mated.
Every where in the great workshop of our nation¬ ceive a stream of
hjiman beings pouring from one country to
ality must be heard the hum of active life, the clink of ham¬
another, we may be sure that unless some temporary causes
mers
upon anvils, the rattle of machinery, the sublime dis¬
or some
legislative restrictions prevail to the contrary, a
cord of the voices of labor in useful competition.
One sec¬ stream of
capital is likewise moving noiselessly in the same
tion of our country, beneath whose fertile soil a boundless
direction.
;wealth waits to be applied to the uses of
recuperation, is one
From 1847 to 1854 the amount of human
emigration to¬
broad desolation.
It must be redeemed. The
people of the wards this
country, was, from 234,968 persons in the first
South,' without capital, without credit, destitute, in part, of
named year, to 427,833 in the last named.
The year 1854
the very implements of labor, are in no condition to as¬
was the
culminating point of this movement. Tranquility
sume their share of the
responsibility, to perform their part and
prosperity in this country cotemporaneously with war
of the Herculean task.
It behooves us, therefore, as a
duty and
political disturbance in EurOpe were the causes of this
to ourselves and to the Republic, as a
duty to coming gener¬
ation^, upon which we have no right to entail any portion of great exodus of population. During the same period the
accretion of Capital in this country from
foreign sources was
debt and taxation that it is in our power to cancel in our
also very great. Enterprises of every conceivable
kind, and
own day, to remove
as far as possible every impediment in
of a nature and an extent entirely beyond our own unassisted
the way of the industrial rehabilitation of the South.
means
were } set
on foot and prosecuted to successful
We can appreciate the difficulties and complications that
besetg the Administration in the adjustment of these ques¬ completion. Rai lroads were opened through every part of
the country;; increasing from 7,000 miles
per year in 1850,
tions.! Under- any other system of government, the solution
to 21,000 miles per year in 1855, as follows :
of the problem would pass from the,
agency of the sword
Increase Over
Miles
to that of the iron
sceptre. But we have faith enough in Year.
Previous Year.
Completed
1850.

born, to the

Republic of

more monstrous

•

•

.„

,

.

the character of

f

*

our

institutions and in the attributes of

our

7,855

1851.
1852.
1858.
1854.
1855.

....'.

.

9,090

20
23

percent
tt J

countrymen, North and South, to be convinced that they will
28
“
11,631
14
“
13,218
accept, on either side, the obligations suggested by inexora¬
88
“ '
18,265
ble facts, and will fulfil them, under the
16
“
21,125
promptings of rea¬
son and
self-interest, in behalf of the Common welfare. The
Canals were dug, turnpikes opened, steamboat lines estab¬
country needs the good offices of the Southern people in the lished, and the means of ocean and lake transit immeasurably
work of recuperation, and there is no reason to fear that the
increased... Most of this was done on -foreign capitals This
people of either section will stand in antagonism with their is provable not oily by direct evidence,
...

lit*’

Mr

■

i




but,

as we

shall pres-

i

■/

THE

6

CHRONICLE.
break of the late

[July 1,1865,
By the

it became plain to
struggle going on
in this country was to be confined to the Southern States.
All fear of Confederate invasion had died away, and the tide
of Secession was clearly seen to have been at least successfully
^
beaten back, and restricted to within well defined and comparativelv narrow limits. Then human immigration ;once
more increased.
In 1863 it rose to 156,000, and last [year!
it amounted to 182,000.
Concomitantly with this influx of
population has occurred a similar influx of capital. £j>ome ;
$500,000,000 of European wealth has been sent to this country •
in exchange for our government securities alone; while en¬
terprises of every nature all over the country are now expe- :
riencing the vivifying effects of additional capital.
j’ ‘ '
And besides the mercantile capital which invaribly flows ■
where population flows, there is another stream of Avealth f
which accompanies emigration—the personal wealth of the|'
emigrant himself. It is a great mistake to suppose that our ini-*
migrants are always poor. Some of them are wealthy farm-T
ers and merchants, who come as cabin
passengers. Many of= :
United States.
them are persons tolerably well off in worldly goods,: and In 1856 the number was 200,436.
Fears of
J
war in
Europe increased the total to 251,306 in 1857. But even the masses bring with them something more thari the 7;
the panic of the latter year again decreased the movement, rags that cover them.
Statistics place the average aidount "
and the number of arrivals in 1858 w as but 123,126, and but of money alone which is brought into the country by ipami121,282 in 1859. The panic once passed, the movement grhnt passengers at about $180 in gold each, while no account y
again increased. It was 153,640 in 1860. Then came the whatever is taken of the value of the property they carry on
Great American War, and writh it, foreign .immigration al¬ their persons, or possess in the way of baggage. The records • ;
most ceased.
The arrivals in 1861 were but 65,000.** In of the Commissioners of Emigration at this port reveal one *
1862, in obedience to the demand" for troops, they again important fact connected with the last mentioned point. They J
slightly increased, the immigration of that year haying show that nearly one piece of baggage to each passenger land¬
been 76,000 (mostly male adults) ; yet the movement bore ed is left with them for a short time on storage.
For the
no sort of
five and a half millions of immigrants who, since the founda¬
comparison with that of the prosperous years
tion of this government, have found their way into the country,
which preceeded the conclusion of the Russian War.
During all this time capital kept almost even pace with the value of this property, added to the $180 brought by each
emigration. The retardation of the influx of foreign capital of them in the shape of money, must form no inconsiderable 0
which followed 1855 is demonstrated by the' embarrass¬ aggregate.
The money alone would amount to over §
ments which culminated in 1857, and into which one
by one $1,000,000,000. And this estimate entirely excludei the j§
all the important business enterprises^ of the country were larger sums brought hither by the wealthier class of immi- f
Started with a superabundance of capital, they grants, who bring it in the form of letters of credit, and doiibt- §
£re all more or less subsequently left to sustain themselves less, much even of that which is brought by the poorer tones
4’
ith limited means, and the consequence was that a
great also, Avho are naturally not over-willing to reveal their little
zoning day came upon them, and in 1857 they all went hoard of ready money to the inquiring eyes of statisticthe board.
hunting commissioners.
The movement of population is thus seen to be an important
The increase of railroads from 1855 to 1859 was by no
means at the same
prodigious rate which it had been before guide to the movement of capital, and such being the case,
the following late item is not only full of interest to the states¬
that date.
i.
Miles
Increase Over
man, but replete with importance to the merchant and finan¬
Tsar.
Previous Year.
Completed.
'

6 81

iently, see by the retardation which occurred in the flow of capi¬
tal towards this country when the peace which followed the
Russian war restored tranquility to Europe; and by the
backward flow which was occasioned by the panic of 1857.
The large transactions which took place on the London Stock
Exchange in American securities is one direct proof that for¬
eign capital was largely invested in this country. The well
known fact that nearly all the Southern railroads were built
with English capital is another. Add to these the facts that
all the ocean steam lines to this country and even the Atlantic
telegraph enterprise were conducted on foreign capital: and the
evidence becomes very strong indeed. But if any more proof
were needed it is readily found in the fact that w hile no Amer¬
ican banking or insurance company can be discovered in Eng¬
land, a large number of English banks and insurance com
panies are established in this country, and were mostly es¬
tablished during the period already mentioned.
By the year 1855 the flow of human emigration, and of
capital, toward the United States, had lost its momentum.
During that year but 200,877 emigrants arrived in the

war.

all the world that the

scene

year 1863
of the great

i

,

.

24,876

16 per

26,107
26,979
27,944

7
None.

cent.

cier

’

:

C v

■

.

>

The number of

per cent.

immigrants arrived at this port last week was 6,470,
making a total in five weeks of 27,686, or a weekly average of 6,537,
or
equal to a yearly aggregate of 287,924.

interruption occurred in the prosecution of all
other business enterprises. When the war began, the backward
flow of foreign capital was something enormous. American

First, it shows that immigration is resuming the rate at
which it flowed into the country prior to 1855. And tips is

..1

And the

8

same

stocks and bonds

poured into the country and sold at
any price they would fetch. The precious metals were
shipped to Europe in such great quantities, that in 1862 the
banks were constrained, in apprehension of a direct drain
up¬
on their
specie recources, to suspend payment. All our silver
currency found its way to Canada, and, indeed, has not re¬
turned yet.
Credits were shortened and ultimately cut
down altogether. In fine, a rapid transfer
of capital from
out of this country towards
Europe, occurred, and prevailed
until a keen demand, and
comparatively increased security
for it, began to invite it slowly back.
We now come to the emigration which followed the outwere

tii* 7*** I860 the number given of arrive!* are
only tboge at the port of
N$ n York; bat these generally m over two-third* of the entire number.




•

v

.

»

*

a sure

indication to the statesman that the removal of th!e

strictions which but

re¬

lately were imposed upon intercourse and
already bearing its owrn proper and noble fruit.
Thousands of the world’s outcasts, of the exiled and beggared
of other climes, are seeking the benefits which the New World
holds aloft as tempting prizes to the industrious.
Let those
who hold the destinies of the country in their hands seeFo it
that the restrictions which yet remain shall speedily be re¬
moved, and that in disposing of the now homeless population
of the South, no worse opportunities shall be held out to them
than are afforded to refugees from other lands.
J - I
Finally, and this is where the subject concerns us mostly
and comes more immediately within our purview; it shows that
foreign capital is again finding its way into the United States.
The merchant may now look forward to easy money markets,
traffic is

•

1

THE

July 1,1865.]
low rates of interest,

increased traffic, and

CHRONICLE.

a new lease of com

tnercial

prosperity. And the farmer and manufacturer may
(look for increased facilities for reproduction, for long credits,
and for active markets* And the community at large will see
up about them, as the results
lines of railroad, new canals, new

growing
new

of every sort, the future
wealth and prosperity.

of peace and security,
industrial enterprises

tributaries and reservoirs of national

THE PACIFIC RAILROAD.

We have chosen this form of introduction to the

subject of
the Pacific Railroad, because it presents one of the results
of that undertaking not heretofore sufficiently considered.
The commerce of Asia is about to be developed beyond its
former proportions, and there is no reason why this Republic
should not be made the world’s thoroughfare, through which
the wealth of the East shall roll from coast to coast, paying
tribute, as it passes, into the coffers of our people. The inter¬
nal dissensions that for t,years have disturbed the industrial
system of China are now at an ebd. The spirit of exclusive¬
ness

that has hidden the

greater

portion of the riches of Ja¬

in a sealed casket guarded \by jealousy and prejudice,
is yielding slowly but surely to the'persistent advances of a
higher order of civilization. The unhappy strife in our own
country that for four years has shut out the world from com¬
merce in the
great staple of the South^ has occasioned re¬
search and experiment in regard to the cotton growing facili¬
ties of the East, and the production of that commodity in
India under the energetic and skillful management of Euro¬
peans will greatly enhance the Indian trade. Let us see,
now, whether we cannot compel the merchants of Europe, by
the never failing law of advantage to themselves; to make us
the carriers and our country the viaduct of that immense

The

navigators of the fifteenth century, whose adventurous
spirit first lifted the veil of geographical ignorance, were inj spired to their vast and wonderfully successful explorations
chiefly by the intense desire of the commercial communities
of Europe to discover an ocean channel for the trade of In
dia. The transportation of the rich commodities of the East
across the Isthmus of Suez, or by the tedious and dangerous
journeys of caravans, to the Mediteranean, involved such an
outlay of labor, time and money, that even the limited expe¬
rience of Christendom awakening from the lethargy of Me¬
diaeval darkness, appreciated the benefits to be derived from
the opening of a safer and less expensive route to the great
i
fountain of affluence. To that object was devoted the energy trade.
Let us suppose the Pacific Railroad constructed and in ac¬
of Vasco de Gama and the courage, zeal and perseveranceof
Columbus. When Captain Diaz doubled the extreme point tive operation, with
sufficient rolling stock for the transpor¬
of Africa, and in obedienoe to his instinct of seamanship, tation of Eastern merchandise at remunerative rates.
By
j
■| ' |
*
J
swift steamers from the farthermost ports of Asia the average
named it the Stormy Cape, the sagacious King of Portugal,
forseeing the realization of the hope of the commercial world, voyage would be twenty days. By railroad, from the Pacific
to the Atlantic} coast would be, over a good road,
with pow¬
gave it the more significant appellation of Good Hope. So
erful engines, eight days.
when the Genoese mariner, six years later, anchored his bark
From the Atlantic to the Euro¬
off the wild shores of Guanahani, and beheld the dusky na¬ pean port would be twelve days. Allowing five days tor in¬
tives crowding in awe and wonder to gaze upon his little fleet, cidental delays, breaking bulk, etc., the merchant at Liver¬
he hesitated not to call them Indians, in the belief that he pool could receive his goods in forty-five days from the date
of their dispatch from Hong Kong, Calcutta, or other Asiatic
had accomplished the object of his mission.
Three centuries and a half have passed, and the science of port. The machinery of commercial speculation renders it
navigation has kept pace with the advance of enlightment, impossible for business men to ignore the avenue that is the
perhaps has led the van in the march of progress; but the speediest means of communication with the marts at which
paramount desideratum of the commercial world has not yet they traffic.1! If the American merchant could send a cargo
been attained. Almost every region of the habitable globe of tea from China to Liverpool in forty-five days, the English
has been made a mart for enterprise. Swift steamers glide merchant would be compelled to accept the same facilities or
across the sea where the small
galleys of Gama and Colum¬ to relinquish competition. The inevitable result of the com¬
bus plowed their uncertain way.
The geographical con¬ pletion of the Pacific Railroad would be the Sfcansfer of the
struction of the earth, a' mystery to, the profound students of principal part of the trade of the Indies froffi its present
the middle age, is now familiar to every school boy within channels to the great thoroughfare of nations that would be
the area of civilization.
We know where to go for the established in this Republic.
Do our people appreciate the magnificent future that would
fruits and fabrics that are essential to our luxury or comfort,
but we have not yet opened the nearest, surest and cheapest thus be opened to them ?
Do they realize that opportunity
route to the lands where the ^richest freights and the most to pay the National debt ? ; Venice in her days of glory owed
profitable investments invite us. The straight road"to the her grandeur and prosperity to the circumstance that the com¬
Indies, suggesting itself to every observant mind, is still un¬ merce of India passed by her threshold, paying toll to her on
traveled. A tithe of the enterprise of Columbus, a par¬ its way to market. Let it not be said that American enter¬
ticle of the hopeful nature of, Isabella, assisted by the bound¬ prise hesitated and faltered in the path of such a splendid
less resources of modern skill and science, would have opened destiny.
i - C !
But not only in that respect does this magnificent project
the channel ten years ago, may open it within the next half
decade.
But our heavily laden East Indiamen still follow appeal to the interests and to the national pride of the Amer¬
the track of Gama and his cotemporaries around the storm- ican people.; In the far West millions of acres of fertile land
beaten headlands of Good Hope, or struggle with the baf¬ wait to be redeemed from waste and unproductiveness. The
fling winds that sweep about Cape Horn, or undergo the Pacific Railrqad would drag immigration along its iron course.
costly process of twice breaking bulk, at Panama and Aspin- Wherever the speeding engine would pause in its rapid ca¬
wall, without a corresponding advantage in the shortening ,of reer, to be fed with wood and water, there would a house be
ocean transit.
It is true that the attention of Europe is now built, and then a hamlet, and then a town, and then great, pop¬
earnestly occupied with the completion of the ship canal ulous and busy inland cities, each one the centre of an area
of thriving settlements, each one a link in the quick forged
across the Isthmus of Suez; but the consummation of this
valuable work, illustrating the importance that the master chain of civilization from ocean to ocean, from the teeming
minds of the old world attach to the improvement of the fa¬ marts on the Atlantic border to the golden placers and rich
cilities for intercourse with India, should be a
spur to Amer valleys of Oregon and California. Thus would a wilderness
be made a garden, as if by the touch of a magician’s wand ;
jean enterprize in the same direction.
pan as

■

,

.

:




-

#

and vast tracts of
cause

public lands that

isolated from the arteries of

of boundless

are now f unsalable,

be¬

trade, would become at
to the

Republic.
prevent the present realization of this vis¬
ion?
Are we too poor, despite our boasted affluence, to pay
our way to this mine of gold,
that will repay a hundred fold ?
The capitalist can find no better security, no fairer promise
of large profits than in such an investment.
The road will
pay for itself as the work progresses, by the sale of the ad¬
joining lands. Asa Whitney, the originator of the idea of a
Pacific Railroad, pledged himself to build the road without
pecuniary assistance from the government, in consideration of
a
grant to him of the public territory extending thirty miles
on either side of the track.
A survey of this territory under

'once

a source

revenue

What is there to

his

[July 1,1865.1

THE CHRONICLE.

8

personal supervision satisfied him that

a

it could be made available for remunerative

could be

great portion of
cultivation, and

disposed of at fair rates, mile for mile,

talk

familiarly of renowned persons whom they have never sepn.
family honor the business interests of the
city by making them the subject of their lucubrations, and alter- nately the magnificent piano forte manufactory of Fiddlesticks & Co.,
and the New York Custom House, are illuminated by the rays of
their descriptive talent and narrative genius.
To the latter class evidently belongs our author. Dazzled by the
important nature of the operations daily conducted on the Stock
Exchange, he is seized with the design of imparting his newly de¬
rived experience to the public, and he accordingly rushes into print
in the true Jenkinsey style, without the least preparation which
would tendio fit him for the responsible and arduous duties of an
author.
Even the trifling preliminary of acquiring a respectable
knowledge of the language he is writing in is considered unesential
to his purpose, and Jenkins addresses his readers in much the same
sort of Anglo-Saxon as that to which the readers of English trans¬
lations of Italian opera librettos are treated. For instance, he says,
on
[
p. 133 of the book :
j
These banks are the principaljfeature of Wall street; they art
reservoir of the place into which Jlow~ the spare money of the nation,
Sometimes the Jenkins

“

the work
progressed. Mr. Whitney addressed the legislatures of almost and out of which
flow the monetary streams which set going all the
all the States upon the subject; and
his plan received the most other operations of the place.”
jj'
cordial approbation.
On p. 136 he says :
We are not aware of the motives that
induced him to withdraw from the agitation of this noble enter¬
Money can be obtained by re-discounting the bill—i. e. selling it to
a bank or another
party which deals in that kind of business, &c.”
prise, for the consummation of which his energy and researches
On p. 139, speaking of bills of ^change, he says that they havfe
in the premises qualified him
beyond all others; but "other
Accelerated the progress of
civilisation, by occasioning a much mope
extensive intercourse and intimate /connection between different apd
thoughtful and public spirited men, grasping his idea with a
independent countries that could otherwise have net taken place.” T
proper conception of its promise of splendid results, subse¬
On p. 222, he informs his readers that
quently applied themselves to its practical development.
During the past four years the attention of the government
ned, and the business of the country resumes its wonted channels,
re will be a
great
and people has been concentrated upon
the task oil preserving the railroad lines drain down the valley of the traffic that now feeds
running East!”
•
the integrity of the Union, and the construction of
public
But, errors of this kind are to be found on every page of the
works not connected with the duty of the
time, has necessari¬ work, ancTks for inaccuracies and inelegancies, their name is legiop.
ly languished. But the return of peace is the signal for re¬ The author nas evidently fallen iuto the common error of supposing
doubled energy in the development
of the resources, of the that the Stock Exchange is simply the resort of a pack of ignorant
Republic; and the great burden of debt and taxation that op¬ gamblers, who will read his book without the least suspicion of
The work purports to be a “ Manual pf
presses the country makes the obligation greater to apply its illiterate character.
the Stock Exchange,” yet it starts out (p. 7,) with the announce¬
capital and labor without stint towards the perfection, of the
ment that New York has no public Stock Exchange!
On p U2
instruments of recuperation. Among these, none are so
potent we are informed that neither stock
exchange nor money brokers ajre
as the enhancement of facilities for domestic trade and
foreign required tp take out a license ! This will be welcome news to the
commerce, and the completion of the Pacific Railroad would
tax-payers of Broad and William streets.
An exclusive piece J>f
be a giant stride towards resuscitation from the fearful effects financial information
appears on p. 121, where the reader is confi¬
of civil strife, placing us in the
sphere of traffic beyond the dentially informed that “ this species of speculation (meaning ‘bear¬
competition of the world. The next Congress will be vested ing’) has, no doubt, been recently going on extensively.” The oper¬
with great responsibilities, in
.purifying the political atmos¬ ations of the “ street, or the curb-stone brokers, as the Board calls
phere from the lingering taint of discord and convulsion ; but? them, though often men of probity and honor,” (says the author, bn
p. 129,) “are mostly speculative, often illegal, and, as often, mere
however arduous and complicated their duties
may be, it is
gambling, or betting by parties without capital.”
i
to be hoped that early in the
session, they will find or make
On page 132 we are led to infer that all coupons bonds run to the
an
opportunity to give the impulse of national legislation to
year 1882 ; that all transferable bonds are government bonds ; and
this great enterprise; and no means will
prove so effectual to that all registered bonds are available “ as a basis for banking
communicate this impulse as
throwing open the task, and under the national law.”
j
awarding its advantages to whomsoever will carry it forward
So again we are told (on page 135) that a bank “ first of all in¬
to completion.
vests a portion [of its deposits] in government securities, which is
i
■
|
of all others, the most steady in value, &c.; but the most extensive
kind of advances made by the banks is in the discount of commer¬
as

“

“

-

gWhen the great Southern markets of the Mississippi valley are ^e,

■

.

.

,

Cttcraturc.

cial

bills, &c.”

Jenkins sometimes becomes

New York Stock Exchange Manual

stupified by the magnitude of the
describing, that ordinary expressibns prove too feeble
for his purpose. Yet he is never wholly dismayed, and,
quickly re¬
covering “his presence of mind, he plants himself with admirable
of the ease upon his “ style,” and delivers himself (page 142) in this wise j:

containing; its principles,
rules, and its different modes of speculation, cf-c. I
By Henry
Hamon. New
York

That

:

John F.

:

Trow,’1865.

Jenkinsey weakness which displays itself in the

eyes
groups who daily assemble in front of the brokers’ win¬
dows in Wall street, and
gaze at the

longing

symmetrical

rows

of coin therein

displayed, is not an uncommon one. The Jenkins family is very
large, and while the [poorer members take their fill of empty satis¬
faction in staring at the ostentatious shows which
Wall street
makes, the genteeler Jenkinses wait upon General Grant, and while
paying their adulations to the hero scramble for his cigar stumps, and
preserve them as historical curiosities of the highest value. An¬
other branch of the Jenkins
family are fond of the editorial profes¬
sion, and rush into print as often as some inexperienced publisher
will afford them an
opportunity. They describe with much gusto
the fashionable balls to which
they have heyer been inyited, and




so

matters he is

“

But the question changes when speculations bear on
rious securities which have so much.attraction for
adepts

market, and which
for

those myste¬
in the stock

are the objects of transactions the most astounding ;
instance, the purchase and sale of titles greater than real issues

Jenkins sometimes

indulges* in deep' philosophical cogitations,

i

Thus, on page 143, he says : ;- *v
V-- Z
" !
Speculative operations have become, wild and extravagant It has ■>V
•+,
always been, and always will be, so.”
^
/ 7;i. /
Socrates himself could not have, been more profound.
Agfain (on ^
same page) he says:
’
'
•’ -A/' ' T V'
Speculation may, and often does, lead to fortune, but that is not the 'T,
rule. For one successful speculator there are
many unsuccessful ones.
Men see the
display of the one, and, as the others silently retire into
oblivion, his example becomes popular with youth and inexperience, A
“

.

“

V*S~'

July 1,1886.]

.

leading thousands of noble geniuses to sacrifice themselves in wild
adventures, which terminate in cruel disappointment.”
i Sometimes Jenkins has his
joke. In describing the Free Bank¬
ing system (of what State he does not think it worth while to
mention), he slyly remarks:
This is the Free Banking system as it now stands,
and it takes its
name from the fact that all are
freely permitted to embark in it vho
comply with the rules prescribed / "
| Our author is a patriot also. In describing the effects of a re¬
dundant currency on the price of gold, he does not
appear to think
(page 214) that any other currency besides “ national currency ”
should be taken into account. And in speaking of petroleum (on
jjage 363), he says :
Petroleum has been discovered in
nearly al! the /oya/ States, not
excepting California, and new sources of supply
daily found.”
And again (in page 365)— r
®
Taken from this point of view,
petrolc bm ma; justly be regarded as
one of the
greatest blessings ever bestowed by ivine Providence on
undeserving man.”
j
But enough. We condemn this book—written
evidently in the
expectation that it would prove to be an indispensable and invalu¬
able hand-book to the habitues of Walli street, since a new edition is
*

-

“

announced for next November—as the work of

vain, conceited, and
bombastic ignoramus. And, as if to heighten
the insult which it
conveys to the intelligent classes who make it a' business to deal in
stock securities, it is printed on
dingy paper, and devotes fully half
of its space to the publication of the constitution and
by-laws of the
Stock Boards kand such other matters as, it is to be
presumed,
are
already tiresomely familiar to anybody who may have business
on

’Change.

a

If,

.foreign Netos.

and; the greatest confidence is felt in the success of
unhertaking. J The Great Eastern will probably sail from the
Nore on the 5th !| of
July, and from Valentia about the 10th of
July. The merchants of New York had better prepare their tel¬
egrams.

The value of

DATES TO JUNK

imports of gold into Great Britain in April

April

..

was

period in 1864
given thus :—
£12,071,111
13,770,154
11,376,214
10,489,889

*

March

February.
January

,1.
L.......;
The exports during the month of April for the
past three years

have been

follows

as

r

•

,

now

amount to

assets

312.029/., and that while the nominal

figure for but little more than a third of that sum, the prin¬
cipal item among these consists of 65,000/. due from Egypt, the

realization of which is very doubtful.
The failure of ;T. Woolner and
Brother, spinners and manufac¬
turers, at Bluepits, near Hey wood,! is reported. Their debts are
about 25,000/.
•
Australian advices announce the failure of Messrs.
Howe,
Thompson, and Co., “stock and station agents,” with liabilities for
90,000/., and assets amounting to 65,000/. The partners estimated
their losses in “stations” at 50,000/. Mr. W.
Nicholson, of Mait¬

J

>

1

land, has also stopped

;

the liabilities in this

the assests 25,000/. •_
It is stated that Messrs.

case was

36,000/., and

,

Palmers Brothers’ immense iron and

ship building establishment at Jarrow, on the Tyne, has passed in¬
to the hands ofl.a limited
liability company, with a capital of

£2,000,000. The shares are said to be £5,000. each, and have all
been taken up without having come into the market.
They have
been taken by eight gentlemen, of whom Mr. C. M. Palmer is one.
In addition to their shares in the
company it is reported that Messrs.
Palmer will receive £250,000 for the

property and works. The
purchase has been made by the same company of Manchester gen¬
tlemen who a short time ago bought the
equally large works of
Messrs. Bolckow and Yaughan,at Middlesborough, which has also
been incorporated into a limited liability company;
It is reported that an extradition
treaty will probably be con¬
cluded between Russia and Prince Couza, and that it
applies to
political as well as to other offenders.
The Cape of Good Hope mail reports a commercial crisis at Port

At

has been noticed for. several consecutive months.
The trade and navigation returns in the
exports, continued down
to the 30th of April last, show a
slight decrease on the previous
month, and the returns for the four months ending on the same day
show a similar result when compared with
the same
are

in
cured debts

Simonasaki.

16TH.]

exports for the past four months

.

meeting of the creditors of Charles Joyce & Co., who failed
April for 1,340,000/ has been held. It appears that the unse¬

Advices from Shanghae to May 7th, state that Prince
Kung is
reinstated in the Presidency of the Foreign Board.
In Japan
Prince Nangato is endeavoring to open a port in the Straits of

1,024,6932., against 1,424,6641, in April, 1864, and 1,439,368/. in
April, 1863. The receipts from Australia in April were only 261,332/., as compared with 481,248/. in April, 1864, and 496,7172* in
April, 1863. From France the imports were considerable, amount¬
ing to 104,322/., while in April, 1864, they were 25,964/., and in
April, 1863, 2,746/. The receipts from Mexico, South America
(except Brazil), and the West Indies were 238,856/., agaidst 558,0162. in April, 1864, and 293,183/. in
April, 1863. The arrivals
from the United States were reduced in
April within comparatively
moderate amounts, having reached a total of
only 54,258/-, as com¬
pared with 264,852/. in April, 1864, and 620,322/. in^April, 1863..
The exports of gold from the United
Kingdom amounted in April
to 693,022/., as compared with 1,876,411/. in
April, 1864, and
627,238/. in April, 1863./ The exports to France were 281,370f.,
in April, against 1,187,368/. in
April, 1864, and 290,6272. in April,
1863. The imports of gold into the United
Kingdom in the four
months ending April 30, amounted to 13^675,930/., as
compared
with 5,533,504/. in 1864, and 6,544,183/. in 1863
(corresponding
periods). The exports of gold from the United Kingdom in the
first four months of this year were
2,163,536/.,against 5,688,217/.
in 1864, and 5,234,599/. in 1863
(corresponding periods). There
has been a steady contraction in the movement of gold
during the
last two years. The decline in the imports of gold from Australia

and 1863. The

,

■

A

Elizabeth and Natal.

GREAT bRITAIN,-

[LONDON

appears to be going on satisfactorily with regard to the At

the

**

1

1

All

lantic Cabal,

|
.......I

j |j

.

influential reform meeting held in Manchester last week,
Mr. Forster begged the persons present to make the “ question
of
reform a hustings cry at the next election.”
He warned them not
to ask for too much at first, and then “ one concession would be
followed by another.” Of manhood or rating suffrage, he told them
there was no chance at present. These views were received with
an

favor

by the audience. This is apropos of another reform item.—
Bright has written a letter to a friend at Carlisle upon the
course to be adopted by the
Radicals at the next election. He ex¬
presses a hope that they “ will endeavor to bring their members
up to the point of refusing to support a government not willing to
fulfil the pledges of 1859 and 1860, for,” he observes, i* when it is
a
question of refojm or expulsion from office, the Whig statesmen
will decide in favor of reform.” He further says : “ Lord Palmer¬
ston is the real difficulty. He is not a Liberal, and the failure of
the bill of 1860 was owing entirely to him. When he is out of the
way, no government can exist on our side of the House which will
not deal with the question of reform.” *
A new line of railway, from Manchester to
Liverpool, is just pro¬
jected At the special meeting of the Sheffield Company, Mr. Watkin, in advocating the new line from Manchester to Liverpool, said :
This company held the doctrine not generally
accepted in the
railway world—that the more, within reasonable limits, the facili¬
ties of travelling and transit were increased the more would travel¬
ling and transit increase. That principle had been put in extensive
operation by this company in 1857-8, between London and Man¬
chester and London and Liverpool. And what had been the re¬
sult? Whereas, in 1858, the Great Northern and Sheffield Com¬
panies carried a traffic, between Liverpool and London, under
£25,000 in value, in 1864 the traffic was £38,000, showing an in¬
crease of between 50 and 60
per cent, notwithstanding the obstruc¬
tions connected with passing their traffic over other
peoples’ lines.
Between London and Manchester their traffic was, m 1858, under
£60,000, and in 1864 it was nearly £85,000. These were merely
the pecuniary results to the companies; but what was the result to.
the public ? Whereas, in 1857, the first-class
express fare between
Mr.

“

London and Manchester was 42s. 6d., it was now 33s. The second£12,071.111 class fare had been reduced from 25s. to 24s., and the third-class fare
18,225,089 was the same. Between London and Liverpool the first-class ex11,897,177
The exports for the four months
ending April 30th, 1865, are set ad been reduced from 27s. to 26s.; and the third class was the
down at 47,706,818/., the returns for the same period in the two same. The
system had also been introduced of issuing return tick¬
preceding years respectively having been 49,892,420/., and 39,- ets, by which a man could travel for a fare and a half, with two
1865
1864
1868

Eress fare, which was in 1857 45s., was now 35s.; the second-class

458,381/.

1

days to transact his business in.

-

successful result.
i

fa

I

Negotiations which were in progress for a commercial, treaty
between Great Britain and Austria had been suspended. It was
reported that they had failed; but Mr. Layard, in the House of
Commons on the 15th inst., denied this statement,
alleging that the
negotiations had only been broken off during the hot weather in
Ytehna, and would be resumed in September, with a prospect of a
•

!l




*

.

■■■!-■

'

•.

...

'

Also, in 1857, it

was

considered

unorthodox to carry second-class passengers by express trains. The
Sheffield company abolished that nonsense. It was at that time
considered desirable that when a second-class passenger did travel
he should sit upon a hard board daring the whole of his journey:
What particular connection there was between getting the largest
amount of money out ofthe public, and sending ladies and gentle¬
men to London on hard boards, be did not know, but when the

>1

CHRONICLE.

10
Sheffield company

introduced leather backs and comfortable' cush¬

ions, they wer61ooked upon as making very dangerous innovations.
Then, the ppor third-class passenger, who formerly had to set out
at six
some

or seven

in the

fourteen hours,

abled now to go
1857 there were
vter and London,

morning, dawdling

on

the

way

to London

upon a weary and comfortless journey, was en¬
about six and a half hours. Again, whereas in

in
thirty-one trains only
and between

per

diem between Manches-

Liverpool and London, in 1864/there

seventy-one trains. There haa likewise been a great increase
in the dispatch and regularity of the conveyance of goods, and sim¬
ilar reductions in those charges which previously were excessive.
He claimed for this company that they had to some extent taught
the other companies around them a lesson ; and, guided by the light
of their experience'} the directors asked the proprietors for support
in assisting to make a similar revolution between Manchester and
were

Liverpool.

On the 5th instant the streets of Rochdale bore an interesting
and lively appearance. On its becoming known that the large mill
of Mr. James Pilling, jun., was to be opened that day, and that
there was to be a procession of wagons containing cotton from the
canal yard to Mr. Pilling’s mill, thousands of
persons assembled in
the streets to witness the sight. • The mill, which is a very large

has been in Chancery for three years and a half, and had now
become the property of Mr. James Pilling, jun. The firm will em¬
one,

ploy at least 1,000 workpeople.

The church bells rang merry peals,

and about 11 o’clock the wagons,

with flying colors, left the canal
yard, preceded by the Rifle Corps {band, playing lively airs. Mr.
Pilling was on the balcony of the Wellington Hotel, and as the
procession passed him he was lustily cheered. The workpeople
were treated during the day to refreshments, and the rejoicings were
kept up with spirit.
A letter from Calcutta, dated May 7th, says that the political and
commercial stagnation of the past few weeks has been suddenly and
rudely disturbed by the news from America. Telegrams startle the
Anglo-Indian public even more than that of England, for the former
are in exile, and receive the budget of
newspapers and letters that
explain the telegrams only once in the ten days. The horror excited
by the intelligence of Lincoln’s assassination is still fresh, and every¬
where men are speculating on the future. Will there, be a coup
d’ltat to get rid of Johnson, the late Vice-President?
Will the
army act the part of the Praetorians of the Empire ? Is this assas¬
sination to be accepted as a sign of a time^of anarchy and a reign
of terror in the South, as the introduction of a
change the whole course of American history ?

new era

which will

[July 1,1860.

such as those for stocking arsenals, improving fcirts,
completing roads, &c., which manifestly belong to the ordinary bud¬
get, are put down in the extraordinary one; but he forgot tbit if
that were not done, the ordinary budget would appear very large,
apd that consequently the object for which the division is made
would not be attained. He also maintained that items which! are
put down in the corrected budget really belong to the extraordinary
one : for example, the expenses of the occupation of Rome and of
the expedition to Mexico figure in the corrected budget of 1865,
though it was perfectly easy to foresee them when the extraordinary
budget of that year was presented. But here again he does not
show due consideration for the necessity under which the Minister
is placed of “ making things pleasant ” by presenting, in the first
instance, as moderate a budget as possible. Though complaining
of the large expenditure of the Government, M. Thiers declared
that it is not possible to reduce the army, albeit it is nearly doiible
what it was forty years ago.
The evacuaiion of Mexico would, he
said, enable a large saving to be made ; but he expressed the opin¬
ion that ,the Government would not consent to any such measure.
As to the slackening of public works, which is also recommerided
as a means of economy, he entertained only faint hopes of seeing it.
rious expenses,

Thus,

on

*the whole, he

comes

to the conclusion that, vast as the

outlay is, it is not likely to be diminished. As to the receipts, he
showed that they are constantly below the expenses, and for 1865
he calculated the deficit at 182,000,OOOf. To make up this Sum,
the Minister of Finance, he said, proposed to suspend the operations
of the sinking fund, whereby he would get 127,000,OOOf.; to take
18,000,000f., the amount of an anticipated increase in the receipts ;
27,400,OOOf. from Mexico, and various small items ^from other
sources.
M. Thiers, however, condemned very decidedly any med¬
dling with the sinking fund as a violation of good faith to the public
creditors ; he expressed grave doubts that the improvement in the
revenue would be realized; and he maintained that Mexico could
not pay the sum put down*
He concluded an effective and brilliant
speech, of which it is impossible to give a fair idea in a few lines of
analysis, by the startling declaration that if France persists inker;
financial policy, she will either arrive at bankruptcy, or be com¬
pelled to adopt “ deplorable and detestable imposts v—such as the
income tax—which will impoverish the country and produce divi¬
sion among citizens.
After representing the position of the finances to be so’ lamentable,
it was to be expected that M. Thiers would tell how it could be
avoided. But, as I have said, he proposed nothing. He stated, to
be sure, that the reduction of the army, the withdrawal of the
troops from Mexico, the slackening of public works, and the revival
of the sinking fund, were remedies, but he at the same time declared
that those measures could not, or would not, be adopted; and of
course the presentation of impracticable or unacceptable schemes is
equivalent to presenting none at all. M. Thiers’ omission to throw
light otf this important point has surprised the public. Equally
surprised apk they that he should have pronounced against a reduc¬
tion of thy army, which is certainly desirable, and could certainly
be effected without danger; that he should have condemned an! in¬

The news, follow¬
ing closely as it did on the announcement of the surrender of Lee’s
army and the evacuation of Raleigh, has, however, given some com¬
mercial relief here. Suspense is at an end. It is well understood
that when Dhollera touched 9d. a lb. it reached its lowest point,
and that for at least some years to come the abolition of slavery,
the disorganization of the South, and the necessity for imposing a
serious export duty oh its cottOD, will enable India to maintain a
firm hold of the Liverpool market Asiatics are so timid that I fear
the news of the end of the American struggle will induce the Indian
peasantry and middlemen to limit the area sown with cotton. It come;^, which the example of Peel
in^England and of Wilson in
has certainly happened at the very time—just before the breaking
India proves to be an admirable instrument in embarrassed situa¬
up of the soil at the beginning of the rains—for doing this * but, on tions, aud even as a permanent
branch of income; and that he
#the other hand, English piece goods will still continue so dear, and
should have repeated the stale arguments about the sinking fund.
the millions of our native subjects have gone on so long
wearing out
In a second speech, the honorable gentleman, in order to present
their old clothes, that the ryots
may be induced to at least keep up the situation of affairs as
concisely and as strikingly as possible,
the cotton cultivation of last season, for the
purpose of having said that in 18d3 the total
budget was 2,292,000,000f, in 1864
abundant material to weave their own cloth.
more than 2,16Mb0,000f, and in 1865 will be 2,200,000,OOOf; and
that the veritable receipts,—that is, those coming from taxes,—
were in each of those years only from 1,930,000,OOOf to 1,940,000,1.
OOOf. The difference, he said, has to be made up by the manipula¬
THE CONTINENT.
tion of the resources of the sinking fund, or by “equivocal resour¬
[PARIS DATES TO JUNE 16tH.]
ces, whichfrequently are only loans in disguise.” M. Yuitry, in
,.]
•
i
Mr. Thiers has delivered in the
Corps Legislatif his great annual the name of the Government, replied to M. Thiere: he displayed
speech on the finances. It is certainly a striking exposure of the great talent, but of course failed to prove that the situation of the
financial situation} and it has
produced a profound impression on finances is satisfactory. He, however, showed that they were im¬
the
9'
country; but practically it is of no value, for it suggests no proving, and that is something.
plan by which the situation can be made better. It is even marked
The Corps Legislatif yesterday rejected a demand for 6,000,000f
with a certain degree of injustice, inasmuch ds it seems to throw on made
by the Government for the erection of a new General Postthe Minister of Finance the
responsibility of a state of things which Office. Ybis vote has created considerable sensation, the Legisla¬
is the direct and inevitable
consequence of the C»3arism France ture having scarcely ever before refused applications for money,
has seen fit to adopt, or at least to tolerate, as her form of Govern¬ however unreasonable
they might be. .Hopes are entertained that
ment.
The Budget of France was
formerly, said Mr. Thiers, about it will henceforth exeeute more rigidly its duty of guardian of the
1,500,000,OOOf. (£60,000,000), all expenses, ordinary and extraordi- public
purse.
nary, foreseen and unforeseen, duly counted ; and now it is from
The Emperoir’s visit to Algeria will not be sterile in a commer¬
2,200,000,OOOf. to 2,300,000,OOOf (£88,000,000 to £92,000,000). cial point of view. A convention has been concluded between the
And the reason is, that the
Government, not allowing the French Government and Mr. Fremy, Governor of the Credit Fancier, and
people any part in the management of their own political affairs, is M. Paulin Talabot, Director General of the Mediterranean Rail¬
obliged to occupy their intellectual activity in wars abroad, which way, acting for other persons as well as for themselves, by which
are costly things, and
by great undertakings at home, which are not they undertake to form in three months a company with a capital of,
less so. M. Thiers next
presented some severe and telling criticism 100,000,OOOf, in 200,000, shares, for “procuring capital and
on the numerous divisions
of the budget, which the present Minister
granting bredits for all industrial, agricultural, and commercial op¬
of Finance makes;
namely :—Ordinary budget, Extraordinary bud- erations in Algeria* and tf undertake sue!/operations itself.” The
get, corrected bndget, special (or departmental) budget, and defini¬ company
is to place at the dispositiomef the Government 100,000 -,
tive budget; and he affirmed that this is
only done in order not to OOOf, in instalments payable kKstbe/coorse of 9ix years, to be era.
alarm the public by
presenting the “ total of the whole ” in one ployed in making roads, ports, railways, canals, irrigations, &&T
lump. Herein, no doQbt, he was right; but M. Fould’s expedient the said sum to be reduced to 62,000,OOOf, if, in the course of ihie<,
1
,e iQdulgence, seeing that it is always well to gild years, the Government should think fit. Five and one-fourm pet
pills which are large and bitter. M. Thiers not only objected to cent, is to be paid by the Government as interest andsinking fum
iw multifarious di?igionsof the
budget, but he maintained that va¬ of the debt, which is to be paid off in fifty years; and the company




.

,

Julyl, 1866.],

THE CHRONICLE.

is to have 100,000 hectares of land at a rent of If lhe hectare, and
all the mines it may discover in the course of ten
years. The com¬
pany is to issue debutants.
j
Some eminent capitalists of Paris sent
representatives to Madrid
to make
biddings for the new Spanish loan. This fact proves that
the French have ceased to think that the non-fulfilment
by Spain
of her
past engagemants, is a reason for refusing to enter into new
ones with her.
'
A royal decree of the Queen of Spain has
just suppressed the toll
of seventy-five reals hitherto paid to the governor of the fort of San
Lorenzo del Puntal, in the Bay of Cadiz,
by all^ foreign vessels
which anchored in or crossed that
bay.
A letter from
Mogador, in Morocco, states that a large walled
enclosure is about to be made there, intended to serve as an
entrepot

for European merchandize. For additional
security to merchants,
the Emperor has decided that
twenty-four dwelling-houses, with
numerous warehouses, shall be erected within the enclosure.
It is certain that the Mexican agent who arrived in Paris was

185469—SMWL.
.

sent

by Maximilian for the express purpose of explaining the criti¬
cal state of affairs in Mexico, the
menacing attitude of the Amer¬
icans, and the fear of his Majesty that war would be declared by
the United States, now that the war with the South is over. The

French government has, therefore, given the
Washington cabinet to
understand very plainly that Mexico is under the
protection of
France. That France will not allow any power to attack it.
That fillibusters and adventurers entering Mexican
territory with
hostile designs will, if taken in arms, be
hanged or shot without
loss of time or mercy; and that the United States
government
whose good faith France of course does not
doubt, will act wisely
as well as
humanely by doing all in its power to keep heysubjects
from injuring her protege.
The Washington Cabinet
probably has no desire at this time to
be on bad terms with this country, and will, no doubt, act
prudently
in this affair. The language and tone of France» is what
may be
called decidedly energetic.
It may not be literally correct as
mentioned, but it is substantially so.
On the 8th instant, in the Corps
Legislatif, M. Jules Favre made

a

speech, strongly condemning the Mexican expedition.

He main¬

tained that the position of Maximilian was
precarious, and appre¬
hended a conflict with America.
1
,
M. Chaix D’Este Ange demonstrated, in
reply, that the position
of Maximilian was in no
way precarious, and pointed out the prog¬
ress which had been made in Mexico.
The effective force of the ex¬
peditionary corps, he said, did not exceed twenty-six thousand men.
Relative to the apprehensions of a conflict with America the

^

Year.

11

.!

j

i

1
,

1860—Wm.
1861—
1862—
1863—
1864—

186.!

o.

!
\

i

r

Barnes, SupePnt

do
do
do
do

do
do
„

■i'

do

of

Co’b.
96
95

Ain’t of

Premum
Income.

Capital.

20,482,860
‘

7,261,595 62
6,827,736 46

96
101

20,432,860
23,632,860

7,712,190 88
10,181,030 52

107

,

do

20,282,860

28,807,070

15,618,603 82

it

It must be borne in

mind, however, that the average rate of fire pre¬
mium was not increased at all during the
year, but actually declined,
and that the augmented
premiums consequently resulted entirely from
an increased amount of business.
The fire premiums of the New York
joint stock companies increased, as stated above, from $10,181,030 62
in 1863, ito $15,618,603 82, in 1864—the ratio
being 53,4088, which is
the highest sver known in the
history of these corporations. The num¬
ber of policies issued by New York life insurance
companies .increased
from 20,757 in 1868, to 28,782, in 1864, and the amount insured from
$140,628,427 10 to $194,819,824 46. The gross assets of all the New
York companies, fire, marine, and life, increased
during the year frsm
$82,488,066 07 to $103,463,772 76. ,
The grand average per (fcntage of losses
to-premiums «n all the New
York joint stock fire insurance companies has
ranged, during the last
five
years, from 41.16, in 1868, to 60.44, in 1862. For every $100 of
premium received in 1862, over $60 was paid for losses. Wheu the
individual companies are taken, and the losses to
premiums averaged
for the five years combined, the range of
per centage oscillates from
18.64, in the case of the American, to 95.99, in the case of the North¬
western, and when these five years are separated, the swing of the pen¬
dulum extends from 0.80
per cent, in the case of the Commerce Fire, in
1868, to 259.81 per cent in the case of the Beekman, in 1862. Aver¬
aging ail the companies, for the five years combined, 1860 to 1864 in¬
clusive, fifty have lost less than fifty per cent of premiums, and fifty-one
more than
fifty per cent of premiums; again, separating the years, the
number of compnmes losing more and less than fifty per
cent of premi¬
um
was as

follows:

j

Year.

No. of Co’s.

1860.......*.........
1861.................
1862.........fe......

76
96
96
101
180

1864....

Average

99.20

No. of Co’s losing No. of Co’s losing
over 60 V c’t.
less than 60 V c’t..
61
45
46
49
65
81
21
80
62
46

47

52.20

It is thus demonstrated

beyond any cavil or contradiction, by the ex¬
perience of the last five years, that a very large number of companies
actually lose heavily beyond the fifty per cent of premiums received on
outstanding unexpired risks, and that therefore this small reserve is, as
speaker quoted the expressions of President Lincoln just before his a matter of fact,
entirely inadeqaate to meet and provide for even the
melancholy death, to show that they i need hot be entertained. He average oscillations of loss, much less for the annual variations which
said that those expressions had become a
political testament, that must be[ considered as certain to occur during a series of years. Shall
will be carried out in good faith by those whom President Lincoln these losses be
paid out of capital, or from an accumulation of surplus
no
longer governs, but whom hi3 memory still inspires. The profits mid a reinsurance fund expressly provided for such contingen¬
United States, continued the speaker, now only thinks of
consoling cies I
The
the widows and orphans of their civil war, and do not
contemplate should Superintendent h&e but one opinion on this point. Capital
the shedding of more blood on their frontiers.
ordinarily remain intact, to be impared only by such super-ex¬
The debate on the American question was further continued
traordinary fires as those in New York City in 1835 and 1845.
by
The Superintendent feels that
is his duty, as well to the
the legislature on the 9th instant, but nothing new was
developed. as to the public, to reiterate theitrecommendation of last companies
The Empress Eugenie had received a letter written
year on this
by the Presi¬ subject, that a sum at least equal to the
dent of the United States to the Emperor, in reply to the
fu^L amount of premiums re¬
imperial ceived on unexppred risks should be
ion by diviletter recalling Count Mercier from Washington.
reserved from
dends and maintained as a surplus fund fpr reinsurance
d other conThe text of a despatch dated May 22, addressed to Mr.
Bigelow, tingenciea, and that u all our companies should volun
adopt this
American minister, by the State Department at
Washington, is principle as a golden rule in declaring dividends eithey wr or without
published. It expresses the grateful memory preserved by the gov¬ further cumpulsory or restrictive legislation on the subject.” This
ernment and people of the United States of the sentiments ex¬
regulating principle embodied in legislation would also operate bene¬
pressed by the Emperor, Senate and Corps Legislatif of France on ficially in discouraging the organization of an unnecessary and embar¬
the assassination of President Lincoln. It reverts also to the old rassing nnmber of new corporations.
It is only simple justice to officers and directors to
friendship existing between the two nations—a friendship, says the
say that the 'ten¬
dencies of our companies in this direction have already been marked mid
mimister, which is cordially reciprocated on our side.
decided during the last five years, and have not failed to attr;
attention and commendation of European economists and statist:
The following average dividends only, have been
paid for'
COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
five
years:

We hgve received from the New York Insurance
Department ad¬
vance sheets of the DepArtment’a
Report, from which it appears that

the amount of capital invested in joiat stock insurance
companies, has
been increased over five million dollars during the
year. The following
table exhibits the increase in the number, capital, and
premium income
for a pesiod of seventeen years: .
i

Year ending
Dec. 81. j

Total capitat
; Dec. 31.

96

$20,482,860

1861...4

95

1862....
1863.••.
1864...,

96

101

80,282,860
20.432.860
23.682.860

107

28,807,070

1860....

;

Per centage
of dividends.

12,054
10,461

10,003
8,567
8,621

.

Amount df

dividends.

$2,469,090 05
2,121,788 76
2,048,898 01
2,024,742 51

2,483,870 94

TABLE.

The dividends paid in 1864 only about equal the dividends of 1860,
Showing the progressive net increase in the numbei^of New York State
although the amount of capital has increased over eight million dollars.
Joint Stock Fire Insurance Companies, with their
Aggregate Capital The general impression prevailing that fire insurance stocks
and Premium Income, from the
ordinarily
year 1848 to 1864 inclusive:
pay excessive dividends, is thus shown by the above table to be a popu¬
No. of i
Ain’t of
lar delusion. Whenever heavy dividends are paid, the foundations for
Premium
Year.
Co’s. 1
Income.
Capital.
such
payment must be laid on many years of experience and accumula¬
Fillmore, Company, ...24..!.. $5,421,700. •Not returned
tion, guided by superior qualifications and acquirements in the officers,
24 1
do
Hunt,
do
6,611,010
managers, and agents.
I860—
do
do
81
|
do
7,006,010
.

1851—Philo O. Fuller
1862—John C. Wright
1868—
do
1854—Jas. M. Cook
1866—
do

Burrows

1857—
1869—




do

E Church
do

do

do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

36
48
64

67
69

73
88
86
98

7,156;010
8,606,010
; 18,066,010
j 13,658,010
V 18,852,010
14,902,010
16,781,010
17,131,010
'

20,007,010

do
.

do

4,622,270 69
4,622,270 59
6,018,446 68

6,570,440 90
6,961,404 87
6,046,486 76
6,699,360 96

Of the Coal Trade of last week, the Pottsville Minert? Journal
says
The quantity sent by railroad this week is 24,609 11; by canal,

“

6,848; for the week, 31,457 11 tons, against 99,307 for the correspond-

ing week last year.

Loss for the week, 67,849 tons.

There is a little increased demand for steamboat coal, but
prepared
continues dull, notwithstanding the decreased quantities sent to market.
Several collieries are preparing to start again, the men agreeing to
go
to work at the reduced rates proposed on the 1st of
May last
The trade sums up this week as follows, compared with last
year :

[July lj 1866.
-a;

Total.

1,410,841

24,610

1,127,807

d282,684

816,682

6,848
12,760
17,488

189,467
698,192
106,860
841,481
85,268

dl 26,076
d 77,689
d 41,227
d 75,681
d 80,805

102^801

l0,S65

101,867

7,096

209,358
! 16,288

269,480

P. and R. R. R..68,041
Schuyl Canal... .81,266
L. Valley R. R. .81,477

82/562

676,831
192,077
417,112
129,068

Lehigh Canal... .22,169

Scranton, South
Scranton, North
Penn. Coal Co..’

i

By Railroad.. 6,488
By Canal «... 20,088
.

-

Pel abdHud.. ..80,710
Shmnokin
1,226

TfeyoHtoo•••*•«•

1

Lykena 'Valley.. ....
RroadTop.
9,614

-

*.

•

•

197.057
d 86,684
d 9,985

125;786

1,936

9,660

d 16,708

'

'

19,478

>...

186,866

3,051

26,845
4,276

.

114,153

'8>10,723 116;489

i

.

16

16.^02

116,479
:

28,868

; 26,361

....

Tbtal... .219,898

1,216
L...

129;852

••••

South Mountain..

decrease.

Week.

Totat.

.

Income A

-1865-

1864-

d 64,218

8/184,198

speculative movement before the period
of summer recreation. The public refuse to be drawn into
speculative adventures, although freely tempted by offers of
ten per cent margins; a fact to be attributed partially to un¬
fortunate experiences in speculation during the last two years,
and perhaps equally to the prevailing disposition to put sur¬
plus means into government securities. A large portion of
the transactions are speculative operations between the
brokers, who determine prices just as they are able to con¬
trol the supply of the stock under manipulation.
At present,1 the “bear” party are reposing, quite willing to
allow the “bulls” to toss prices as high as they please, so
dealers to create

a

summer lull comes, operations for a fall may
have the better chance for success; the “bulls,” however,

that, when the

8,184,198

72^*630

Difference,168,409 “

hope to keep the market firm through the summer by hold¬
ing a large amount of the leading stocks off the street; which
they think can be easily accomplished with the money
market as easy as it appears likely to prove. Soi^e of the
According to the la test, steamer’s advices, the rates of discount in the
larger speculators have made proposals for protracted loans,,
chief European cities are as’follows :

Hie falling riff in the trade cdhtimies large,'hhd hnlesa Some efforts are
made to start the trade at * bottotri prices,the falling off will reach a
million tons before there is much reaction.

,

'

*

Open Market.

B*uk Rat»i

Per cent.

London
Parb

Berlin

••••••

\

do
do
do
do
.do
do

••••••

•................

Frankfort..
Amsterdam.
•••••••

Brussels................
Madrid

6

81
J

do

St.

8

81
4*
31

H
9

—

do

Peteftburg.

Exchange, for the last six days

21
81

—

for that purpose.
Erie common stock has become

Cumberland Co.....'
Atlantic Mail 8. 8. CoE§e*oy
New York Central Railroad

®l)c Bankers’ i&afctte.

Erie Railroad

w

Hudson River

Friday, June 30, P. M.
•

,

The

^

Money

:

J

Market.—The loan market, exhibits ex
r
j
■
1
r
"

.

^

The fall in

prices, following the decline in gold
from upwards Qf 200 to below 150, unacompanied with any
diminution in the large volume of currency, has produced an
extraordinary redundancy of money ; while, at the same time,
the inactivity of speculation, and the general dullness of trade,
treme

ease.

26th.

2Tth.

2Sth.

29th.

80th.

38

588f

88*

88

87*

87*

12*

14

14

June 24th.

Comply

51* > 52

Mariposa Mining Co

^

scarce, as

:

Quicksilver Mining Company.

°/vvvvvvv^vsj

quite

.

u

^

\

the re¬
sult of a steady outflow to Europe, the shipments for last
ten weeks having exceeded 15,000 shares.
Illinois Central
continues very firm from a like cause. The following are the
closiitg prices of the leading shares, at the New York Stock

8

61
81

4
4

do

Hamburg

S
5

do

.,

Vienna

8f

8*

has reduced the demand for loans to the 'lowest rtiinimum.

41

x.

.98*

1.

\

,

Railroad.3.

75*

98*

93*

76*.\ 76*

109

95*
64*
103* 104
124*' '127 (
•, 68* ^ 68*
25* 26

128

Chicago and North Western Railroad...
Chicago and North Western preferred..
Rock Island Railroad
Fort Wayne

68
24*
54

100

95*

■iUt
98*

150* ‘ 151 '

94*
63*
108*

Railroad

ia*

42

109

Reading Railroad...
Michigan Southern Railroad
Michigan Central Railroad.,
Illinois Central Railroad
Cleveland and Pittsburgh

150*

d.

42

58

53*

101*

96*

108

It

-

94*
68

55*

104*
127* '
68*
25*
55*

96*

1WA

,

55

76*

101

.

98*
77*

18*
41*
153*
94*
78*

98*

97*

158
:

62
104
128

67*
25

54*
100
96

109
63
106

128*
68*
25

55*
101*
95*

United States SECtiRiTiES.—-Thb home demand for gov¬
ernments has been quiet.
Holders generally show great

confidence in their securities, and no class of bonds are
tendency, in such a! condition jof things, for pressed for sale. " The Ahticipation that the second series of
money to take the place of bills of exchange; but, as yet, Seven Thirties would be freely thrown on the market to
that process has been only partially developed, and does not
be realized upon, has not thus far been fulfilled. There is,
appear likely to prevent a continuance of extreme monetary however, some possibility that they may be offered for
It is the natural

-I

/

ease.

‘ /*

Considerable amounts of currency are going West, for the
^purchase of the wool crop • Cotton traders'J also1 ate taking
^

greenbacks to the South ; and, within the last fourteen
days, the Sub-treasury has received from the National Batiks
of this city about' $10,000,000, on temporary deposit; but
these movements, which in' ordinary times wobld havC pro¬
duced a sharp stringency in the market, have been attended
with A growing abundance of money'and a steady decline* in
out

the
*

'

rate of interest.

The demand from stbek brokers is

vr

quite limited

freely during the next few weeks. The Secretary
Treasury paid out to contractors $80,000,000 of the
notes, within about ten weeks proceeding the commencement
of the third issue. The receivers Were bound to keep them
out of the market for four months ; so that after the middle
of July the parties who are" now issuing them as collaterals
may be expected t6 offer a certain portion of them for sale.
This movement is, however" anticipated, and probably the
price will hot be materially affected by such sales.
Certificates of indebtedness are a fiavoiite security for the
employment of surplus Funds, and the demand from Milks
and private bankers is quite active. ’ The old issue is firm
at 99 3-4 to 99 7-8; the new' at 98 1-4 to 98 3-8 cash, and
sale

more

of the

produce
j The rate on
call loans was generally 5 per cent, at the beginning of the
week, with exceptions at 4'per bent. • at*the close, the ruling 98 to 98 1-8 “to Arrive.” The Western (quartermasters are
rate is 4 per cent., with'exceptions at 5; per cent.
Large paying them out freelyf atid the supply on this market is
amounts are offered on' loan from Saturday to ‘ WCdnessteadily improving^though it is not yet up to the demand.
day, pending the vacation, at 2 1-2 to 3 per cent., without
Advices per steamer of the advance of Five Twenties to
691-4 to 69 3-4 afd^oncfofi, and the arrival of orders during
I
'• “ '
r»
t
Discounts are extremely dull. Strictly prime short date
the week for upwaftjgbf $1,000,000 worth, has improved
paper is in demand, apd would be taken at 51-2 to 6 per cent; of the old issue,'
the ' quotation having toiidied 1041-4 7 and
but there is no supply of that grade. For other g*rades there
the new issue has advanced *n sympathy.
is very little inquiry, and transactions'aredone at 7 to 10 per
An effort has beeff made to introduce the second issue of
■[
cent.
Seven Thirties into the European market; which appears
(w4.
i-;
i *J
Railroad and Misc&ttXNEOtTe STOCKS.—The stock market dttitep likely to’ pVbve successful.
A small ^cofisrgnmetit
lib
qS'
'C-;
bi x
his' been persistently dull/' n A '#v
f1 lias1 heed sent out by one3
the efforts ol
Jay' Cooke’s agents, as
;

dealers also ask for very moderate advances,

-

j .

•

'

-

i




s w

it

j -

.

.

v •

■»

1

■

/. -•

■

■ ■ •

*

.

.<•

Jnlji,
An

13

^peripae^t. There is$ 3tei4y d^aw4/9r bonds from

Foreign Exchange.—-The demand for

exchange
newlyl organized Rational banks, wlnc^ ere required by
is chequed by a growing expectation that the exports of
rqp<f
law tp invest their, capital in national securities
j the prefer¬ ~w>n and an increase in the
sbipinents of western; produce
ence
being shown for Ten-forties, which has produced a
ill early
augment the supply of commercial bills.
•
rise in tharn during the week from 96 1-4, to 97 3-4.
At the same time, the
supply of bills has been increased
On the 1st July about
$19?50<)?(>0fL qf interest upon gold through the export of a considerable amount of
Five-Twenty
beaftng bonds become due and payable. The following are bonds and Erie railroad stock.
the bonds and the amount of annual interest thereon

bonds of January 28, 1847
March 81, 1848
Five per cent bonds, June 22, I860
“

tt

Six

14

M

“

$564,915

/....

June 14, 1858

684,600
851,100

.J

1,000,000
1,104,900
3,000,000

bonds, Feb. 8,1861
:
“
"
July 17 find August 5, 1861
July \ } 7 and August; 5j.1861, ex¬
changed for seven-thirty notes.
Five per cent bonds, Texas
indemnity, Sept. 9, 185 0....
Six per cent Oregon war bonds, March 2,1861.........
bonds,March 8, 1863..............
per cent
*
“

“

w

“

i

.

The

'.

duce remitters to

clined

•

.

following have been the closing quotations for the

lead¬

T

do
Merchants

....

110

isa..

....

ifis..

103§

....

8. 10.40’s coup
8. 7.80 Treasury Notes
do
Second series
ru. 8. 6's certificates....;.

V 110* '

1 1T0I

110*

108V"’ 103*1 1084" ■’•108**"

1031
96*

*97

99*

99*

99*

i 99*
i • 98*

991

-

99*
98*

•98*

29th.

110*

■'

M

goth.

no*

103*
108*
97*

1044
104

m

'

99*

99*

m

991'

99*

98*

98*

99*
98*

•

a

llOfa

sterling.:.....

..

;

109

a

5.13*

a

4.11

a

j

6.18*

•••••••

June 30.—\

t

110*

IOSf
1Q9*
109f 108*
6.12* 5.171
6.10
4,13*

a

a

6.12

Hamburg

6.121

a

40*

a

41*
41*

5.15

5.12* *
6.10*

5.17*

Amsterdam..................

86

109*
108*

6.20

a

1094

a
a
a.
a

....

5.15
36

““

28th.

8. 6’s, 1861 cpup
8. 5.20’s coup., o.
8. 5.20's coup., n.

*—June 23.——»

109*

8 do

ing governmental securities at the Stock Exchange each of Francs, 60 days...
do
8 do
the, last six days :
j
Antwerp
26th.
June 24th.
27th.
7J.
7J.
TJ.
U.
iU.

of cotton,

amount

expected to produce about $1,000,000 of bills on
London; beside which It is known that several
cargoes will
early leave Southern ports for Liverpool, to be drawn
against
at New York; these
facts and the supposition that further
orders may come from
Europe for Five-Twenties, ib^u to in¬

$19,607,814 Bankers sterling, 60 day*

i

*■

Eu-

defer their purchases. The rates have de¬
materially during the week, as will be seen from the.
60,960
following comparison of quotations :
4,600,600
8,849,889
42,100

“

Total.

considerable

a

which is

Int. per annum.

Six per cent
*

Freight^is.engaged for

:

on

Swiss....;

;W.

Frankfort

41

Bremen

Prussian Thalers.......

a

78*

71*

• ••••••

a

a

79*
72*

a

5.15

a
35* a

86
41

40*
40*
-

'

$.
a

78*

a

71

78*

a

nt

41

In

consequence of Independence Day falling on
subscriptions to the third issue of Seven-thirties have
Tuesday,
the Stock Board, Gold
Room, and Petroleum Exchange, ad¬
shown a gratifying increase within the last fortnight.. In this
city,; however, the subscriptions are extremely light, owing journ from to-morow until Wednesday, July 5th.
probably to the competition of the second issue, which sell
New York Qrrr Banks.—The
at 99J to 99 J,
following statement shows
being more direct in this city than in the in¬ the condition of the
Associated Banks of New York city, for
terior.
The following have been the
subscriptions to the third fhe week ending at the commencement
of business on June
issue of Seven-thirty
Treasury notes throughout the country 24th, 1865:’
each of the last five
days, as reported to Jay Gooke & Co.:
Average amount of
The

June 24

•

•••••••••••

•

•

•

•

•

$2,815,0QQ

1

June 20
June 27

•

•••••••••

••••••

June 28

^ • w• •

w

•

2,258,550
«,80r,700

■

2,451,800
2,631,100

June 2J

Total..

Daily

$11,867,660

average,

$2,871,580

Gold Market.—The diminished transactions in

foreign

exchange have had a depressing effect upon the gold premium
throughout the week, and speculation has generally been in
favor of a decline. About
$5,0p0,0()0 was bought up a few

days

;

by “bull” operators, which has been kept out of the
market; during the week. This has rendered it difficult to bor¬
row
gold for making deliveries under “short” transactions,
as much as 1-8 to 3-8
p. c. per day haying been paid on loans,
—and has checked the downward
tendency. The sales for
export have been very limited, compared with late weeks,
the shipments from
Saturday last to torday, inclusive, having
been $150,250.
j
The market is largely oversold, in
anticipation that pay
ment of the
July interest by the Government, and the ten¬
dency toward ease in foreign exchange, ywill put down the
premium. To-day, a resolution was passed at the Gold Room
to the effect that all
gold contracts maturing before Wednes¬
day next shall be settled to-morrow. This will have the
effect of compelling the “ shorts ”1 either to
buy largely or
borrow heavily
to-morrow, and may temporarily advance the
premium. The following h^ye beep, tl*e highest and lowest
quotations for gold on each of the last six days:
ago

Jwm24...

\

;

Highest Lowest

__

li£*
J
••••••••••••• .
......a»«..«• ......a.
14 If
JUD0 27............
.....«.142
•

J141
June 29
Jh0*80..




141*
140

•»* t * ft

ffjf

Naw

■

l8f

in

W

Discount#,

York*.

>

Manhattan..

...

M82.760 f

716,762
287,707
198,066

1.

Tradesmen’s.
Fulton..::..
Chemical

2,959,620

Leather Manfi

2,846,688

State of N Y.'
Amer. Exchange...
.

...

Commeroe
Ocean...

Mercantile...

Pacific.............

Republic

People’s

Hanover.. u;.Lv..

Citizens’

Nassau.::.*.........
8t Nicholas
Shoe and Leather..
Com Exohfcnge..*.

Continental......:.

Commonwealth....
*

Lthkntto..
#•*,.«

Bgk. As

North River
East River.........
Man. aha Mer

Seooid HatloMl...
Dry Dook
Ball’s Head....,.,
N. Y. County

Mann/aptur*^--^

8,676,136
1^80,064
4,880,513

1,978,468
8,950,380
3,048,507
8,841,893
2,643,099
1,029^97

1,556,817
1,091,808

e'er «§•••••••

Imp. Sad Traders..
Meo.

!

v

4,141,846
11,222,191
1.621.870
r 936,603
1,698,964
427,146
2,263,437
18,600,593

106,874
10,699

781.689

,

180,629*
68,627 p
104,668

18,167
43,368

189,321
•3,999
26,468
266,628
57,261
184,868

m-

111,946

29,657

2,807,285

2,267,000

2^75,245
675,209

,

449,861'

•

-

•

•

•

888:881

i,iBgm
428,992

;068>18

1,119,691

2,671,776
1,626,968
1.262.786
6,288,524

799,516
481,064

389,724
2,978,000

1.247.787
2,062,186
2,128,484
1,284,772

410,465
88^620

;62d!o54
629,519

•

2,188,401

855:000

782,000 '
900,000

•

,

’
-

47,*868

28,369
274,615

■

"3,894
15,095
9^776
1,488
1,171,843
869,045

I4**87
224,113
929,078

41,618

11,169

120,668

2^575

24,974

•t 968,801

18,042

49,881

At the

*213,890.840

270,000

15,90*314

-

887,164
942447
223,992 1,666,415
624,106 v
26&06T ’
.-968,064
-3^510,640
672,868
-11^5K882
8,588,014
1,720,112
716A2T
172,933
1,454,027
287,757
489,842
17&245
1,884,548 : 1,096,084
10,868,959
8,304636
14,420.724
14,581,674
.

•

•

236,888

1,017,453

0,T89,07o

1

35,000
-

12,267
—

.....

■

669.615

2,678^68
2,342,611
8,918,866

•

11.T03
81,427
110,846

511,966
m£&'

1,612,277

-1,670,780 -

*17,915

62,175

W189

'

1,661^58
8,867,889

AW

1

2^,318
M.S4S

c

2,977,064

68,661
22,876

175,920 1
190,917
106,488

96A09

5,098,618
1.846,818

"•

472,662
818,317

7,078,684

87,144

30,708
108,906 ’

492,098

1,495,964

5,582,147
7,061,664

14.766

77,810

*31,877'

•

6.79,069

18,868
268,000
821,180
12,805
4,465
68,161
57,600
6,411
10,161 •
84,478

'

96,677
60,841
61,626
229,866
26,727

'

2,864,531
813,021
22,954

115.716

-

1,296,755

'

92816

M80,7168

••••*•••••••

•«•••••♦•*

>

1,206,070

4,202,145
1,074.894
472.88T"
523JJ6T

1,668,245 H
1,057,770
1,780314

4&169

457,677
864,240

9,678,098

1,280,883
8,254,686
2,838,102
1,460,120
8,706,069
4,877,984
2,066,526

Irving. :
Metropolitan

a*

6.860.869

1,715,758

........

North Jimer

Pack....

892:284

1^92,145

•

2,4l8,8T7
5,795,209

28*920
9,09614,835

m
83,266

Wo
1,783,624

Broadway

•

697,764

.

2,896,383

1,950^16

84,887
96,040

1,786,058

Seventh Ward.

8,987,297

12,261
848,043

2,197,624
2,269,586

2,558.260

6,088,750
6,255,406
4,184,663
9,482,366
8,821,107

4,080

1,061,821

2,279,831

Meek’s A Trad’S. :..
Greenwich.........

$10,074,861
7i5T8^5»

881,978

4,603,746

Legal
Tender*.
$2,074,566

DeposRs.

41,048

2i2TW8

Mercht Exchange..
National
Butch. 4 Drovers..

Net

-

119,804
198.716

...

City...i

!$•

$46,113
15,770
27,283
26,404
15,099

907,405

7,161,641
5,319:508

1^69,878

Phenix

Chatham...

Ulrculation.

Specie.
$4^71,985

$7,277,634

"

Merchants
Meohanitt*
Union J
American

141f

139*

Loans and

Bank*

’

187,908,986

Vx'

08,600,689'.

^

pcrio4 of the th^ee last years, the correspond" ?:
ug ite^s yrm as Mows:
s»m.e

.

THE CHRONICLE.

14
Loans and
Discounts.

Legal

Circula-

[July 1,1865.

000 of that amount shall be

apportioned among the State*
and Territories according to representative population, and
$148,346,401
1863
175,682,421
38,271,702
1864.
Ihe remainder distributed by the Secretary of the
197,077,002
22,000,893
4,809,192
Treasury
1865
218,590,230
)6,3l4^rs5,':
15,906^1^^5,789,070; 187,508,936 $58,560,589 among associations formed in the several States, in the Dis¬
The following comparison shows rthe totals of the Banks’
trict of Columbia, and in the Territories, having due
regard
Statements for each week of the current year:
to the existing banking capital resources and
business of such
Circula¬
al
Loans.
tion.
Specie.
The following statement
Deposits. Tenders. Clearings. State, District and Territory.
Jan.
1.... 195,044,687 20,152,892 3,183,526 147,821,891
535,055,671 shows the
apportionment of currency to each State, the
Jan. 14....
189,686,750 21,357,608 3.074,029 148,931,299
1 5:18,780,682
1862

tion.
j
$8,910,844;
6,004,1771

Spocia.
$80,882,626

.

--

_

'

Tenders.

Deposits.
$127,860,708
158,589,308
158,772,982
187,508,936

era.

Jan. 21....
Jan. 28....
Feb.
4....
Feb. 11....

187,060,586
186,117,375
185,689,790
185,515,904

20,211,569
18.896,985
19,682,808
20,297,346
Feb. 18.... 186,365,126 20,682,819
Feb. 25
183.534,735 20,092,378
Mch. 4
186,569,665 19,880,183
McV 11.... 188,120,890 20,737,838
Mch. 18..;.
211,486,651 22,256,596
Mch. 25.... 207,677,503 22,066,524
Apl. 1.... 204,458,855 20,584,668
204,158,889 20,045.906
Apl. 8
Apl. 15.... 206,508,095 19,533,784
Apl. 22.... 204,72^,196 19,122,288
204,277,578 19,049,913
Apl. 29
May 6.... 212,172,277 20.088,399
May 18.... 218,502,980 28,553,231
May 20.... 219,810,780 23,194,402
May 27.... 212,445,121 22,068.929
June 3.... 210,416,548 21,346,493
June 10....
208,392,635 18,480,620
June 17.... 208,944,311 16,680,877
Jnne20.... 218,590,280 15,906,318
...

2.979,851

156,068,355

2,957,899

149,247,991
152,703,816

2,868,646
2,821,996 156,711,166
2,855,982 156,150,684
2,739,388 158,948,481
2,720,666 158,009,588
2,741,684 152,134,448 26,713,408
4,662,505 174,479,837 33,645,014
4,457,162 166,956,508 85,295,153
4,888,980 173,3^), 491 42,989,382
4,773,528 174,850,185 46,424,957
4,757,862 177,815,945 51,061,462
4,700,210 184,244.399 59,954.987
4,660,659 193,188,783 66,096.274
4,886,937 200,466,785 66,258,849
4,889,562 208,369,886 61,052 537
5,082,944 208,854,725 55,625,517
5,066,693 197.081,017 54,524,078
5,323,082 186,935,680 51,065,440
5,402,758 185,509,953 56,201.836
5,647,944 189,947,334 62,567,844
5,789,070 187,508,936 50,510,589

The deviations from the returns of the

follows:

as

611,194,907

........

i

625.739,233

272.740.215

859,950,814
505.599.215
511,914,441
510,767,845
429,221,798
889,049,879
420,542,766

542,070,189
519,448,415

j...:

.....

j.

L

Dec.

Dec.

h

•

_

*.

•

•'

The increase of

$4,645,919 in the loans is owing to the
deposits of the banks in the Sub-TreasuVy on temporary loan.
The amount so deposited during last week, was nearly ten
millions; the fact that the increase in loans, shown above, is
only about half that amount, implies that the banks have
contracted their regular loans to a considerable extent.
The
decrease of four millions in legal tenders is owing to the de¬
posits in the Sub-Treasury alluded to. The decrease of
$774,563 in the specie line, though important, is yet in a
lower ratio than during late weeks, owing to the limitation
of the exports of specie. The circulation continues to increase
steadily ; but, notwithstanding that the number of banks has
been increased by the creation of national institutions, the
circulation is now $3,121,274 less than at the same period of
1862—a fact easily accounted for by the
displacement of
bank notes by greenbacks.

and the week

previous, with the fluctuations in the respective

items:
Capital Stock

I

Loans.

i

Specie

.

v

Legal Tender
Deposits..

Circulation

The

$14,292,850
50,449,649
1,216,293
19,570,094
39,127,801
6,688,483

$14,442,350

50,369,800
1308,852
19,445,055
89,607,041
6,790,444

.

Inc.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Inc.
Inc.

$150,000
80,849
7,441
124,939
479,240

101,956

following comparison shews the condition of the Phil

adelphia banks at monthly periods since 1863
Date.

Loans.

Specie.

January 5,1863.
July 6,1868....
January 4,1864,
July 4,1864....
January 3, 1865
February 6, “

$37,679,675
35,936,811

$4,510,750
4,860,745
4,158,585
8,9a5,866
1,808,583
1,702,776
1389,264.

March 6,
April 3,
May 1,
JuneS,
June 26,

**
44
44
-

85,693.808
40,918,009
48,059,403

50,269,478
49,228,540
50,522,080
51,726,389
53, 95,688

,

44
“

,

50,369,800

,

Deposits.

j $4,504,115
| 2,564,558

1,843.223

1,262,258
1,258,782
1,208.852

:

Circulation,

I

$28,429,188
28,504,544
29,878,920
87,945,305
89,845,963
38,496,837
38391,622

2,055,810
2,154,528
2,793,468
4,898,178
5,346,021
5,893,626
6,441,407

6,717,758

38,816,847
44,794,824
41,518,576

6,790.444

39,607,041

Boston Banks.—A

'

of Boston

‘

*

.

.

’

National Banks.—The National Bank Act of June
3,
1863, limits the circulation of the currency issued by the
national banks to
$300,000,000; and a

ment,

bearing




subsequent enact¬
date March 3, 1865, requires that $150,000,-

.

Amount
authorized
to June 10.

Amount
delivered
to June 10.

$6,281,500

8,312,000

3,348,000
3,626,991

1.895.500

$8,490,770
1.719.500
2,405,200
86,965,780
1,716,450
7.550.500
22,140,440
8,0S8,55O
26,628,070
1.567.500
298.750
874.900

13.519.500

1,086,260

528,250

17.623.500
9,615,000
11,888,000
5.200.500

17,983,500
8,990,700
9,086,900

6.211.500

2,056,500
2,858,000
1,019,000
90,000
1,857,750
1.759.500

12,167,140
5,804,930
6,198,990
1,821,100
1,267,000
1,884,900
960.750
49,000

.

2.989.500
21,795,000

Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey..

7,222,600
58.478.500

10,411.688
58,747,186
6.196.500
39,249,458

6,690,000

Pennsylvania
Maryland

26.527.500
7,137,000
1,090,500
658.500

Delaware
District of Columbia.

Virginia
\
West Virginia., f •**

Ohio.....
Indiana
Illinois

Minnesota...
Kansas
Missouri.
-...

60,797,300
8,271,300

8,794,000

2.844.500
499,500

2,264,400

4.408.500
1,050.000

.'...

646.500
9,411,000
10,500,000

...

Kentucky
Tennessee
Louisiana
Nebraska Territory..
Colorado Territory...

6,766,000

585,000
450,000

10,581,000
181.500
198.500
'

Mississippi
Georgia

5,266,000
9,420,000
7.546.500

North Carolina
South Carolina

58,500
180,000
45,000
90,000

860.880

880.900
860,640

180,000
27,000
20,000

7,556,000
2,724,000
2,425,000
287,000

Utah

Territory
Washington Territory.*.
Oregon

82,500

870.500

California
Nevada Territory.......
New Mexico
Texas
Florida
Dakota

8,008,000
48,000

486,000
8,961,000
955.500
■*
27,000

'

Grand total

$299,968,500

$252,079,888

$187,487,840

The whole amount of national bank circulation issued

June 17, 1865, was $143,064,875; of which $2,267,120
was authorized during
the week ending at that date.
The following named national banks were authorized during
to

the week

ending June, 24, 1865:
Locations

Auburn City
National.
First.
Mercantile
National Commercial
Providence
Com’l A Farmers..
Farmers’ A Drovers

First.

Capitol.

Newark, N. J.
Phillipsburg, N. J
Auburn, N. Y
.Schuylersville, N. Y

$850,000
..

.

;

UticaCity
Farmers’...,

100,000
66,000
600,000
600,000
600,000
612,660
111,150
200,000
250,000

Albany, N. Y
.Providence, R. I.
Baltimore, Md
Somers, N. Y
Pougbkeapaie, N. Y
Poughkeepsie, N. Y
Amsterdam, N. Y.
.Utica, N. Y...
Richmond, Ky

126,000

200,000
160,000
120,000
100,000
400,000
50,000:

Indian Head
....Nashua N. H................
National Union
.Owego, N. Y
Farmers’ A Manufact’s... .Poughkeepsie, N. Y
First.
La Crosse, Wis
Clinton
Clinton, Ct.
„...

Pejepscott
Union........
Commercial
Falmouth
Farm. A Mechanics’

Delaware! City

75,000

Brunswick, Me

N. Newark B’k Co

60,000
600,000
100,000

Newark, N. J
Massillon, Ohio.
Providence, R. I
Falmouth, Mass
Hartford, Ct
Delhi, N. Y

1,000,000
i...

100,000

1,105,000
150,000

.New York......

1,500,000

Baltimore, Md.
Providence, R. I

Newmarket, N. H....

•

•

•

• •

•

600,000
600,000
80,000
80,000
156,000

•

Delaware City, Del.

First N. Bank Nevada... .Austin, Nevada
National Hamilton.......Hamilton, N. Y..

Agregate capital
The

new banks,

following comparison shows the

200,000
200,000

Bloomfield, Iowa.
.Hartford, Ct.

City... p.
Poughkeepsie

large majority of the banks
having organized under the National Bank Act, the bank re¬ Delaware.
turns for that
city are so incomplete that it can be of no inte¬ Gallatin
Western........
rest to publish the
weekly statement until all the banks Blackstone Canal
become associated, and complete returns are issued.
Newmarket.... ..
’

-

$5,415,000

Name.

following comparison shows Newark
City
Philadelphia banks jon the 26th June, Phillipsburg
Thl» week.

*
Circulation
each State is
entitled to.

Names.

Last week.

V

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont

Philadelphia Banks.—The
the condition of the

•

Michigan

774,563
141,126
2,438,38
4,006,755

Inci

Deposits.
Legal Tenders

10th, and the amount of notes
the respective States and

date to

same

$4,645,919 ?Wisconsin
Iowa

Dec.

Circulation....

are

the

to

Territories.:

604,796,728
509,148,691
483,658,634
427,761,675

IncJ

Specie

delivered

584,179,409
518,305,222
481,028,121
511,361,887
412,802,453

previous week
|

Loans...

amount authorized to June

655,828,878
66:1,814,434

110,000

$10,628,710
progress

of the

July 1,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE

national banks, in respect to number, capital and circulation,
from October, 1863, to latest dates : 1
January, 1864.•••«»■•
April,
“
Thlv

u

137"

•••«•••

857
469
524
681

j 7, “

“

21,
Feb.-. 4,
;

“
“

“
“

jl48,641,400

855
908

76,809,890
78,724,520
88,068,200
87,288,800

186,041,786
192,949,786
202,944,486
225,246,800
232,064,150
246,054,170
264,954,170
276,167,470
281,868,820

78,566,880

slightly increased general activity of the present time will be
On the

sustained.

contrary, while the produce market continues

dull,
and so long as the advices from India
refer
only to a state of commer¬
cial aflairs as unsettled as that now
described, little probability appears
that trade operations will be entered
intoon anexended scale.
Money
s now
quoted at 3 per cent in the two chief
capitals of Europe ; and
t is remarkable as evidence
of the altered direction of the bullion cur¬
rent that the reductions in the
rate of discount have been in London

rapid than in Paris.
The returns of the Bank of
June 14, are as follows
more

•

■

ISSUE

Notes

99,826,600

England, for the week ending

DEPARTMENT.

issued........ £29,741,280

Government Debt. .£11,015,100

Other Securities...
3,634,900
104,760,640
Gold Coin and Bul¬
978
111,684,670
Apr.; 1, “
lion
1 fi
“
993
15,091,280
114,524,000
i22
“
1,041
119,961,800
£29,741,280
MftV
6
“
£29,741,280
1,117
126.860,880
BANKING DEPARTMENT.
1,180
128,769,020
18, u ..•••»».»•••»«•«
1 9.0
a
1,172
180,680,170 Proprietor’s Capital... .£18,658,000 Gov. Securities.,. .£10,480,025
9>7
«
I
284,409,120
1,186
182,472,690 Rest
i*1,
*.••••••
•
8,210,646 Other Securities... 19,516,637
Public Deposits.......
298,971,020
1,212
186,607,060
8,802,198 Notes
9,011,885
1.261
299,843,620
187,772,705 Other Deposits
10, “
12,895,881 Gold A Silver Coin.
954,388
1,297
810,295,891
140,797,765 Seven day <k other bills.
17, " ................
461,711
1,834
320,924,601
148,064,876
24, M
•••»•••
£89,962,986
£39,962,936
Foreign Banking.—The amiexed statement shows the con¬
The preceeding accounts,
compared with those of the predition of the Bank of England for the weeking ending June
«

18

«

«

■

$29,165

95,312,945

782
815

#••«••••

12144,660
25,825,696
61,894,160

1179,121,296

18

Mar

•

145,524,660
169,099,296

4

s

*»

Circulation.

j 99,839,400

685
736

*

tMlualjr» l ow ••••
“

Capital,

i $7,184,715
14,628,712
42,204,474

94

•••••••

M

wuiy,

1

Banks.

Date.

October, 1863........ •

that the

15

4

it

«

“

“

'

|

,

ceeding week, exhibit:

j

7th:

ISSUE DEPARTMENT.

Notes issued..............

£;••:•*•••

Government Debt
Other Securities,
Gold Coin and Bullion

^29,640,625

No

8,634,900

14,890,625
29,640,625

j'

BANKING DEPARTMENT.

£1 A,558,000

Proprietors’ Capital
Rest
Public

Deposts (including Exchequer, Sav¬

ings Banks, Commissioners of National
Debis, and Dividend Accounts)
Other deposits.
Seveh Days’ and other Bills
*

jjhio

j

619,664

i

•/
INCREASE.

jL/iBcuuurcu..

Advances
Bank Notes

■

.

the

^

..

Current accounts

\

\...

^
''

*
.

gives the following result when compared with
£3,203,412

Increase

i

Other Securities

.

v

-

j
£10,480,026... .Decrease.
19,712,530.... Decrease

—

:.....

increase of

£253,410

;

and the stock of bullion in both de¬

'■

680,000

\

EXCHANGE.

Friday, June 30Fort W

1100

Cumberland
1,000,000, 100
110,710 Mar. Mn. Co

'282,160
8,876,620
Decrease
of notes in circulation is; £21,164,005, being

[

*

-

FINANCIAL NEWS.

EVENING

1 00 a............

unemployed....

The amount
an

752,667
562,348

j

■

Government Securities
Notes

£18,133

..

7.954,181
Decrease
18,357,088... .Decrease

On the other side of the account:

•

LATEST

previous week:

Rest 1
Public Deposits
Other Deposits.

|.

20,000
1,580,000

DECREASE.

""

The return

1

\

■

•

£89,539,165

:

7,234

,n......

Cash

969,990

’

195,898
185,054

Treasury Ballance.

Gold and Silver Coin
«

previous week:

.19,712,580
8,376,620

vrotes

;

ending June 15,
changes, compared with the statement of

10,480,025

Other Securities

421^702

Change in Government Securities.

.

Securities

(including Dead
Weight Annuity)......

848,017

A Decrease of othe r Securities of
An Increase of Bullion of
An Increase of Rest of
An Increase of Reserve of

the

7,754,181
13,357,083
471,489
39,539,165

Government

£444 888

The Bank of France returns, for the week
shows the
following

8,203,412

I

►

A Decrease of Circulation of
An Increase of Public
Deposits of.
A Decrease of Other
Deposits of..

....

•

•••

•

•

200

blO

j 200

Pittsburgh.

•«

100

100

Erie

.......

95} Mich* Southern.

Northwest.

Railway.
.85

800
ICO

...

...

.b3
blO

600

partments

Gold and stocks very dull, but firm. No
is £15,860,615, showing an increase of £22,124,
gold sold on
compared with the preceding return.
call; but after call sold at 141 A, and stood at that at close of
The returns of the Bank of -France, for the week ending
report. *
ending June 8, shows the following changes, compared with
The price of gold would seem to
depend largely upon the
the previous week’s statement:
•
market price of Five-twenties in
Europe. Thus : in order to
when

The amount of notes in circulation is

£21,164,005, being an increase keep up the present subscription to the
Seven-thirty loan, it
£253,410; and the stock of bullion in both departments is £15,860,is desirable to keep the Five-twenties above
612, showing an increase of £22,124, when compared with the preceding;
par in currency.
returns.
In order to keep the Five-twenties above
]
»
par the currency
\'
»
j
must be kept sufficiently
redundant, and the measure of this
Foreign Financial Intelligence.—The latest
European

of

•

.

redundancy is always to be found in the gold price of Fivetwenties in Europe And this is doubtless the
policy now
pursued by the Treasury. But another, and a still more po¬
tent reason exists why Five-twenties should be
nois Central railroad shares were quoted 82 1-2, f*vid Erie R.
kept above
R. 52 a 53. U. S. Five-Twenties advanced to 69 1-4 a 69 par, and that is the obligation which the law imposes upon
the National banks to make the
aggregate value of their secu¬
3-4, and were repotted scarce. The London Economist of
rities equal to par.
Thus, if gold were permitted to fall
June 17th, reports on monetary affairs :
to par to-day, Five-twenties woulctf fall to
The amount of mercantile paper afloat is small but, as
somethipg^near
usual, there their
has been more activity in the demand for
European price or 69|. This, of course, would neces¬
money in the open market at
3 per cent, and a larger share of business has been carried
tq the bank. sitate the immediate putting up of «0^J>er cent more securi¬
There is a diminution in the supply,
partly owing to the withdrawals by ties
by the National banks. To be obliged to do this would
country bankers in connection with the anticipated expenses of the
coming election. Beyond these circumstances there is no indication at once imperil their
solvency.
advpes

are to

the 17th inst.

The Bank of England,

on the
15th inst., reduced its rate of interest from 3 1-2 to 3
per¬
cent.
On the 17th June Consols closed 90 1-4 a 9 5-8. Illi¬




<

16

THE CHRONICLE

[July 1,1886.

AMERICAN RAILROAD BOND LIST.
This Table is corrected

especially for The ^Chronicle

(*) Signifies that the road is in the hands of
receivers;

at different

a

Description.
Atlantic and G't West’n

1st Mortgage (S. F.)
2d Mortgage
Atlantic andG’t West’n
1st Mortgage (S.
F.)
2d

Where
payable.

J...

!...

u oaf

Mortgage

Atlantic ana St. Lawrence. .U.
Dollar Bonds (Coupon)...1...

$ 980,000
693,500

4

Baltimore and Ohio:

| do

do

'

do
do
do

do
Jan. & July

2d

Mortgage
Special, (Sunbnry and Erie).

1881

do
do
do
do
do

400,000

988,000
484,000
1,000,000

|.

Maryland, SterrgB'dsofl838 3,000,000
Mortgage Coupon do
1863 2,500,000

do
do
do
Balt.

do
do

do
do

do.

do

»1850
1855
1834

City Loan of 1855..;

Bellefontaine and Indiana :
1st Mortgage convertible.
1st Mortgage extended....

1877/

Dividend Mortgage
Cleveland and

79

Pittsburg:

1882

876
1883

y

X

76
98

A.)j..

1,000,000

do
do
Boston Concord and Montreal:
1st Mortgage
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage Coupons
2d Mortgage Coupons

500,000
589,500

200,000
300,000

100,000
250,000
200,000

Sinking Fund

Boston and Lowell:

Mortgage
Buffalo, New York

and Erie

1st
1st

(S. F.).
(S. F.).

Mort. S. F. convert..

do do
inconv...
Plain B’ds, dated Sep.
20,1860
2d Mort. incovertible*
Chicago and Aurora 1st Mort
Central Military Traot, 2 Mort.
do
do
Plain.
|
Chicago and Alton :
1st Mortgage
:
1st Mort. pref. S. F.

do

1,100,000

(C. & M.)

(M. & C.)

1st

Mortgage

con

Income Imnds
Chicago and Northwestern:

Preferred Sinking Fund......
General 1st Mortgage

Bonds issued for
coup, of do.
2d

.

Mortgage

Appleton Extension bonds..
Green Bay Extension bonds.
Flagg Trust bonds.
Cm. Hamilton and
Dayton :
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

1st

Mortgage

Cleveland

ana

Mahoning:
........

■

84




do

July

Ap’l & Oct.
May & Nov.

do

2,000,000

|

Ap’l & Oct.
!

1,397.000
1
53,500

Jan. &

1,250,000

Feb. & Aug

3,600,000
756,000
2,000,000
184,000
300,000
245,000

384,000
1,250,000

Cin. Zanesville:

do
do

May &Nov.
Jan. & July

con

:

July

Jan. &

1,300,000
850,000
344,200

048,300

July

May & Nov.
do

May & Nov.
do

|

Feb. & Aug
1.
do
Jan. & July
do

89|

99f
100

1872

Boston.

var.

New York 1883
do
do

j

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
>

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do

1092
1877
1882

do

East:

do

Land Security
Convertible Bonds
Harrisburg and Lancaster:
New Dollar Bonds
914 Hartford and New Haven:

112

Mortgage

:

Honsatonic:
1st

994

Mortgage

1894

1893

nsS

1875
1866
1868

M’ch& Sep

do

8

Mortgage—,

Boston.
London.
Boston.

Ap Ju Oc

’63-’64 103
1872
95
1874
994

do

’65-’71

-

1st Mortgage..
2d Mortgage...
La Crosse, Vlroqua
let Mortgage..

99
95
....

) 6 Jan. & July
) 7 April & Oct
) 7 Jan.
&July

do
do
do

1881
1883

100

July Phil’delphia 1883

100

6

Feb. &

6 Jan. &

106

102*

’73-’87 78

Ang New York.

91

1883

99

July Bridgeport. 1877

1886
1875

1867

7 Jan. & July
do
7 April & Oct London.
6
do
New York.
6
do
do

....

1866

1868
1875
1875
1890

7 Jan. & July
>10
do

do'

’69-’70 102|
105
104
95
....

•

•

•

....

1866
118

do
do

.

1866
1862
1868

200,000 '7
do
do

106
100
68

1870

i

640,000 7 May & Nov.

dO

;/•

Mch & Sept

.

1881

100

1861

75
70

7
7

April & Oct

do.
do

1873

7

June & Dec

do

1888

6

May & Nov. Phil’delphia 1873

& Min’l Pt:

•

•••

-

Mortgage..

107
110 La OroBse and Milwaukee:

UtJfaHgage OEufcn.JHY.).

•

mow 4

•

•

•

-•

•

*#• •

—
f Milwaukee.

98

•••«••

MW*,

•

115

V

600,000 7 Jan. & July
do
400,000> T

Madison:

Mortgage...

—

1868
1865

7 Jan. & July
7 ?
do

—

....

7

...

Mortgage
Indianapolis and

60
....

do
do

.

Indianapolis and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

1st

do
do
do

105
10C
106

Aug

:

(convertible)...

....

1875
1881

7 Feb. & Ang New York.
7 June & Dec
do
7 May & Nov.
do
7
do
do

Income

Lehigh Valley:

1875
1876

do
do

)10 April & Oct

F.)

Jeffersonville:

do

* 100
105

do
do

do

) 6 Jan. &

924
Real Estate
Mortgage —...
794 Ind., Pittsburg and Cleveland :

116

50
40

.

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

iio

1882

Ap’l & Oct. New York. 1871

) 7 Feb. &

Indiana Central:

79

114
103

) 7 Feb. & Aug New York. 1882
) 7 May & Nov.
do
1875
)... Jan. & July
do
1879

Redemption bonds...........

904

...

5 Ja

...

Construction

1st

....

Philadelp ’ a 1875

6 J’ne & Dec.
5 Jan. & July
) 6 Feb. &
Aug

Illinois Central:

2d

do
do

)
)

Optional Right bonds

84
95

8
7

)
344;tf()0

Convertible

18..

1885
1885
1883
1890
1885
1885

1904

7

97

var.

do

)
300,000 7 Jan. & July New York. 1863

Mortgage..,,.

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage (S.
3d

103

do

Ap’l & Oct. Philadelp’a 1904

)10

Mortgage.

Construction

1870

95

)

Hudson River:

85

.....

1876

) 7 Jan. & July
) 8
do

Houston and/rexas Central:
State (1st Lien) Loan
!

var.

do

)
600,000

Mortgage West. Division,

1898
1874
18..

do

do

"

do

85
50

1868
1876

1867
1880

Feb. & Aug

(convertible)..

(G. W. R. R.)..

do

1st

98

1034

)
)
)

*....

1004 Hannibal and-St. Joseph:
94*
Missouri State Loan (1st lien)
101

1890
1867

,do»

M’db& Sep
do I

......

1st Mortgage Coupon
2d Mortgage (S. F.)

1883
1890

May & Nov

j.

do

do
do

after ’64....
Galena and Chicago-Union:

1st

....

1878

) 6 Jan. & July
) 6
do *
3 6
do

Mortgage (convertible)..

IstMfg. (State) $75,OOOVyear

110

,

Boston.

9 7 M’ch & Sep
9 7 J’ne & Dec.

do

Coupon..
Elgin and State Line..
’65-’70 1004 Great
Western, Illinois:
1875

do
do

70

do

.

Sep

75
75

'

Mortgage.

3d

July New York. 1865

Jan. & July

Chicago and Great Eastern:

1st Mortgage
Chicago and Rock Island

|

99

1004
1004

J’ne & Dec.

lOlf
1014

1863
1863
1864
1864

9 8 Jan. & July New York.
1867
9 8
do
do
1881

do

Dubuque and Sioux City:
1st Mortgage
Coupon...
Dubuque Western:
1st mortgage
Eastern (Mass):
Income (due 75,000 annually).
2d Mortgage
(convertible)...

1882

781,000 “ M’ch& Sep
940,500
July.
F’kforto. M
199,000
Jan. & July New York
68,000
May & Nov
do
65,000
M’ch& Sep
do

2,400,000
554,000

Income Bonds
Chicago and Milwaukee:
1st General Mort
do

,

1st
2d
3d
4th

.

1867
1872

York. 1865
do
1870
do
1886

New

& Sep
Jan. & July

....

f

2d-do
Detroit and Milwaukee:

•

do
Zanesville, 1861
Feb. & Aug
do
1864
J’ne & Dec. New York, 1865
do
do
1885
do
do
1876

470,000 8
3,163,000 8

”

do

1880
do I
1863
New York, 1864
do !
1867
do
1870
do
1875
do
ms
do j1889
do

do

Delaware, Lackawana & W’n:
1st Mortgage
(Lack. & W’m)
do
(E. Extension).

101

Ap’l & Oct.

...

97
95
71

9 8
9 8

Mortgage

Delaware:
97 J'
1st Mort. guar, by [P. W. &
Baltimore
95
Guaranteed.
103
State Loan.

London.

Feb. & Aug
May & Nov.

6 Jan. &

1st
2d

do
do
do
do

M^ch

:

Dayton and Western:

100

I'

do

600,000

106‘

1860
1873
1876
1892
1887

July New York. ’64-’90

Ap’l & Oct
J’ne & Dec
Feb. & Aup
M’ch & Sep
Jan. & July
do

0 6 M’ch &

valley,:

2d

’61-’70

May & Nov
Jan. &

1st
2d

var.

Philadelp'a.

800,000

Chicago, Burling'n & Quincy:
Trust

-

do

0
208,000

7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7

72

121

0 6 J’ne & Dec.

Mortgage
Cumberland

106

1866

Feb. & Aug

800,000
960,000
1,365,800

Cheshire:
Bonds of ’75, ’77, 80

1st
1st
2d

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

450,000

E. Div

do

Dayton and Michigan:
1st Mortgage.
102*

York, 1877
do
1872
do,
do
do j

Aug

Semi-annu'l

600,000

Mortgage W. Div

2d
3d
4th

Feb. &

1,400,000

do

1st

95
95
101

1873

141,000

Mortgage..
do
do
do
do

Boston.

1,037,375

♦Central Ohio:

(convertible)

Mortgage
Conn, ana Passump rivers

do
Boston.
1865
do
New York. 1865
Jan. & July
1870
Boston.
do
New York. 1870
do
Boston.
1889

do

300,000

do

.

Feb. & Aup New York. 1862
do
do
1878
1880

l

0
0
0
0
I
0
0
0
0

2d Div..

Connecticut River:

J’ne & Dec. New York. 1867
M’ch & Sep Princeton 1885
Feb. & Aug
do
1877

1,700,000
867,000

Cayuga and Susquehanna:
1st Mortgage
Central of New Jersey :
1st Mortgage
1

99
100

do
do
do
do
do

100*

1870
1866

500,000
790,600
675,000

Coupon

Mortgage Coupon.

jePric .

Due.

0 7 Feb. & Aup New York.
0 7 M’ch &^Sep
do
0 7
do
do
Jan. & July
8; 6
do

Tol., Nor. and Clev. 1st Mort
C. and T. Income
Mortgage

100
100

Where

payable.

0
509,000 7 Jan. &

Cleveland ana Toledo :
Junction 1st Mort. 1st Div..
do

When

Oj 7

Dividend
do
July
Income
do
(S. F.
do
New York, 1866
101* Columbus and Xenia
do
do
'70-’09
Div. (due 1860, ’61, ’62,”66)
do
do
1870

798,200
762,000

1,700,000

1st

do

1867
1890

Ap’l & Oct.
Jan. & July

3,192,923

2.500,000
Consold. Mt. Loan $5,000,000
Camden and Atlantic:

2d

do
do

May & Nov.

590,000

Americah Loan
Loan for $500,000
do
800,000
do
675,000

1st Mortgage
C’atawieea :
1st Mortgage

JaApJuOc

Jan. &

J’ne & Dec. New

500,000
200,000
149,000

K

1st Mort. on 1st Division... 1
Camden and Amboy:
English debt (S. F.) £453,093
Converted Sterling Loan...

.

do

do

2,000,000
426,714

Special Erie and North-East.

do
do

do

o
228,000

River Line bonds
Clev. Columbns and Cin.:

92
96

1838
1885
1880
1875

:

Burlington and Missouri:
#

JaApJuOci London.
Ap’l & Oct.: Baltimore.
Jan. & July
do

440,000

1st Mortgage coupon
2d Mortgage
coupon
Buffalo ana State lme:
1st Mortgage
Income ft in ’69,4 in ’72....

\

Portland.

47,550

(guar. C. and

var,” that the bonds fall due

payable.

10
500,000 7
0
900,000 7

1st Mortgage (Main Line)...
2d Mort. (M. L.) or 1st Ex’n
3d Mort. (M. L.) or 2d Ex’n
4th Mort. (M. L.) or 3d Ex’n

1882

Nov. & May
London
1878
Various NYP&Bos ’68-’70

87,000

Belvidere Delaware:
1st Mort.
2d Mort.
3d Mort.

700,000

1,128,500
1,000,000
5,000,000

Ap’l & Oct.

268,000
422,000
116,000

2d Mortgage
Income oonds
Real Estate bonds

1

Interest.

[inter st.

i

Clev., Painesville & Ashtabula:

Ap’l & Oct: New York. 1879

2,500,000
956,000
717,000

jL

Q

*

SterlingBonds (Coupon).;..
City ofPortland Loan (Coup)

day of publication.

M S. F.,” Sinking Fund;

Description.

<u

-i.

•

•

(Pa.).

Fields Branch—
Atlantic and G’t West’n (O.)...
1st Mortgage (S. F.)—.....
2d

When

payable.

Mortgage

Eastern

B

(N.Y.)

j...

interest;

to the

periods.

o

-

its

Interest.

d
t.

Friday evening previous

every

(t) that the company is in default in

•

••*

July 1,1866.]

THE CHRONICLE.
AMERICAN RAILROAD BOND

17

LIST.—(Cootintisd.)

*) Signifies that the road is in the hands of
receivers; (t) that the company is in deflwlt in
its interest; “ S. F,”
I
Sinking Fund; “ var.,” that the bond* (Ul due
‘at different periods.
r

i

Amount.

Description.
La Crosse and Milwaukee:

2d Mortgage (Eastern
Div.)..
1st Lana Grant (West’n
Div.)
3d

Mortgage (whole road)....

Unsecured Bonds
Lexington and Frankfort:
Mortgage, due 1864, ’69 i
Little Miami:

Bonds

Co.:

Mortgage Bonds
Marietta and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage Bonds

6

609,978

Mortgage sterling....

Loan

.

Goshen

Air Line
Detroit and Toledo
1st General
Mortgage (S. F.).
2d General
Mortgage
Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien:
1st Mortgage
...

:
~

Mississippi
1st

2d

(Coupon)

..

and Missouri:

Mortgage (convertible)...

Mortgage (S. F.)

Income bonds
N. Hav., N. Lond. &

v

Mortgage
Mortgage

% Company’s (various).....
'New
1st

j ’.

6

Mortgage

New York Central:
Premium (S. F.) Bonds...
D’ts of form’r Co’s
outst’ding
do

B&NF

Heal Estate (S. F.) Bonds
do
Bonds & Mort...

‘

do

Bonds of Aug. 1859, convert,
do’- of Oct. 1863, (S.
F.)...

New York and Erie:
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
3d Mortgage
4th Mortgage
5th Mortgage

Mortgage

...

Consolidated

Jan. & July

1891

95

607,000

7

1,000,000

7
8
7
7

York, Providence

Mortgage—

Jan. & July
\

4

1875

Jan. &

7

July

224,920

and Bos

do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

3,000,000 7 May & Nov.
1,000,000 7 Feb & Aug.
980,300 7 Jan. & July
V
7

912,000
1,088,000

6

Feb. &

do
do

June & Dec

var.

Aug

1879

1891

1873

99

Bonds for Dividend Scrip....
Steamboat Bonds
Ohio and Miss. (O.
andlnd.:)
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

Construction
Income.
Pacifld (Mo.:)
State (Mo.) Loan
State Loan (S. W.

GeutrottoB




400,000

6

6

100,000 7

200,000
2,060,000

7
7

258,000 t

April & Oct

Boston.

....

7,000,000

6

Jan. &
do

>

<

do

/
•

do (seriesD)..

•

1st

1880
1886
1886

•

•

•

»

*

•

r

ll..

1912

101
101
101
101
101
95
95
95
95
95
95
83

1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1912
1876
1865

....

York.
1875

35

1863
1863

Boston.
do
do

-

,

.*.

.

60
14
8

1863

............

....

1866

....

;.T

_

1878

July New York. 1866

April & Oct
Mch & Sept

do
do

--

30

1868
1856

....

do

7 April & Oct
5 Jan. & July

90

0
)
0
0
5

do
do

’71-’87 70*
’87-’8»
65

96

do
do
do
do

,

-

dq

....

1894
1894
1894

92
92

80
80
70

1894

1894

-

Feb. * Aug
>
do
May & Nov.
do

do
do
do
do

«•••■

1865
1865
1878
1878

90
90

74*
74
88

.

•••«••

Nov.

July

1st

(Va.) Loan

Mortgage

Warwick Valley, N. Y.
1st

3
3
3
3

Western, (Mass.:)
Sterling (£899,900)...
Dollar Bonds

Albany City Bonds........

Hudson & Boston R. R. Loan
Elmira:

Williamsport and
1st

Mortgage

Wilmington and Manchester:
1st Mortgage
,

fid Mortgage ••••••?•«?•••••«

6

6
6
6

3
568,500

Mortgage
Mortgage

Watertown, and Rome:
Mortgage (new bonds)..;..

17

-

do
do
do

*

Warren, (N. J.:)

....

....

7
7
7
7
7

3 6
3 5
3 6

1st Mortgage.
2d or enlarged
Mortgage...
Salt Works Br. M. due ’58-’61

85*

....

111

’75-’78

.

3 7 May &
3 .7 Jan. &

Mortgage (coupons)... i-.\..
Mortgage (coupons).......

108

....

1877

0
94,000 |7 Mch & Sept New York. 1866

Mort., guarant’d by S. of Va.

’72-’87 95

’64-’74 92

do

April & Oct New York. 1876

7

i

;

Phil’delphia

Boston.
do

1861
1867

do
do
do
do

7 Feb. &

Richmond. 1880
| Richm’d 1872

t&NYork 1884

68*
16*

Richmond. 1887
New York. 1872
do

Lynchburg,

1884

do

Chester.

1880
1871

3
800,000 7 Mch & Sept New York. 1880
) 5 April & Oct
) 6
do
) 6 Jan. .& July
) 6 June & Dec

London.
Boston.
do
do

7

V*-

80
20

....

87*
70

107*
;

’68-’71
1875
ioi
’66-’76 100

dem.

)
1,000,000 7 Jan. & July Phil’delphia 1880
)

•

....

var.

Aug New York. 4875

3 7 April & Oct
3 7 Jan. & July

83
•

May & Nov. New York. 1866
) 7
do
do
11872

•-

101*

1912

,

State

•

74*

1890
,

,

7 Jan. &

0
814,000

2d

Virginia and Tennessee:

••■

93
96
96
96
96
96
100

1871
1880
1880
1880

do

■

,

1st

23

1872
1880
1876
1881

do

•

Vermont Central

95

do
do
do
do

July

1867
1880
1870

New

7 Jan. & July
) 7 April & Oct
3 7 Feb. & Aug
3 7 May & Nov.
3 7
do

Western)
Sinking Fund Bonds.
Equipment, bonds

891

;

Branch)... 1,268,000 6
M8M00 ll

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

>.i.

Mortgage Coupon..., *.
Mortgage Coupon........
95* Virginia Central:
..I

-

119

3 6

.

and Wabash;

....

1861

105

1886

do

3 7t
3 7t

1st M. (Toledo &
Wabash)
1st M. (L. E., Wab, & St
Lo.)
2d M.
(Toledo and Wabash)..
2d M. (Wabash and

102

do
1877
do
New York. ’64-’74
Feb. & lAug
do
’63-’70

4,242,000 +
3,320,000 t May & Nov.

.;..

Mortgage (convertible)...
Toledo
.

....

Jan. & July

Jan. & July
April & Oct
M*ch & Sept

do
do

State (Tenn.) Loan.
Terre Haute and Richmond

107*

1870
1871
1877
1885

2,500,000 6 April & Oct Phil’delphia 1875
860,000 10
do
dq ,
1887

Mortgage
Mortgage (R.

.Income(series E)..
Tennessee and Alabama i

100
97

’73-’78

do

3
1,290,000

Mortgage, pref,(series C)..

.

♦

do

Chicago.

7
7
7
6

& N’wark:

(series Ift..

2d

102

.

Mortgage
Chattel Mortgage
Northern (N. H.:)

k

>

3
3
3
3

-.

1866
1875

do

Cincin.:

1st
and W. Br.)
St. Louis andiron Mountain:
State (Mp.) Aid
St. Louis City
Subscription,
i
St. Louis Co.

92*
94*

•

Phil’delphia 1865

400,( 310 Jan. & July New York. 1875
329,( 310 Feb. & Aug S Francisco 1881

Subscription...

Baltimore. 1866

do

•

..

do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do

•

New York. 1889

Aug

3 7 Feb. & Aug
3 7
do
3 7
do

Sunbury and Erie.:
1st Mort. (Sun’y to
0
W’msp’t)
Mortgage (half to State).
0
93
Syracuse, Binghamton & N. Y:
1st Mortgage
Coupon
3
1001 St. Louis,Alton &.Terre Haute: 1,400,000
1021
1st Mortgage
3
(series A)
100
do

1883
1880
1888

-

6 Feb. &

3 8
3 8

iii

1867
-

Jan. &

220,700

90

do

.

6 Ja Ap Ju Oc
6
do
6 May & Nov.
6 Jan. & July
6
do
6
do

July

....

1867

April & Oct

6

•do
do
do
do
do
do

91*

1883
1876
1887

6

Bonds due 1864 and 1874

1st

105

Harrisburg.

,

.Saratoga and Whitehall:.

102

1876
1883
1883
1883

4,350,000

Norwich and Worcester:
Mass. State Loan —:

Sand’sky,Mansfield
1st Mortgage

1875
1894

•

Six per cents

t

April & Oct New York. 1859

North Pennsylvania:

105

var.

104
98

>

Mississippi:
Mortgage (Eastern Div.).
Mortgage (Western Div.).

Mortgage
2d Mortgage
Sandusky,. Dayton and
1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage
3d Mortgage...

1869

1875

do '
London.

.

(series L)....
(series M)....

1st

96

-

(series H)....

(series D....
(series K)....

Sacramento Valley:

100

7 May & Nov.
7' Men & Sept
7
do
7 April & Oct
7 June' & Dec
7 Jan. & July

F)....

G)

Rutland and Burlington:

96

N. London. 1871

7 Feb. & Aug
6 May & Nov.
78,000 6
Ido
165,000 6
do
190,273 7
var.
do
45,550 6
604,006 7 Feb.i & Aug
2,925,000 6 June & Dec

E)

Mortgage
2d Mortgage
3d Mortgage

May & Nov. New York. 1883

6,917,598 6

C>....
D)

1st

7
7+

;

1st
1st

38

Semi an’ally New York.

51,000 7 Jan. & July

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Phil’delphia 1880

) 7 Jan. & July
do
J 7 Feb. &
do
Aug
) 7 Mch & Sept
do
D 7
do
April & Oct
) 7 May & Nov.
do
1 7 Jun. & Dec.
do
) 7. Jan. & July
do
) 7 Feb. &
do
Aug
D 7 Mch &
do
Sept
) 7
do
April & Oct
3 7 May & Nov.
do
) 7 June & Dec
do
3 7
April.
do
3 7 May & Nov.
Phil’delphia
3 6
do

Bridge Bonds
Chicago Depot Bonds.

181

*

(Ogdensburg:)

.

98
964
90

(series
(series
(series
(series
(series

109

5
;; do
5
i\
do
6 April & Oct
6 Jan. & July
i
6
do
6 v
do
6
do
6 ■;s
do
6
i
do
7 ;
do

)
400,000

Racine and

do
do
do
r)o

1,500,000
3,077,000

,

2d

do

1st Mortgage.:
2d Mortgage—
North Missouri
fitate Loan
(30 years).

i

«...

....

450,000 7 Mch & Sept New Haven 1861
200,000 6 Jan. & July
do
1868
116,000 6 May & Nov.
do
1878

Northern Central:
Balt, and Susq. H. H.
(Coup.)
150,000
1
Md. State Loan
(irred’mable).
York & Cumberl’d, 1st Mort. 1,500,000
175,000
York &
Cumberl’df. 2d Mort.
25,000
Y. & C. guar by Balt. 3d Mort
500,000
Construction, 2d Mortgage...
Debt to city of Baltimore.... 2,500,000
;
850,000
Northern

•

1861
1862
1863
1865

3d

do

.j

^

1860

1

232,000

Mortgage Bonds, Coupon..
*N.
1st

ill
in

1865
1872

do

)
812,000 6 Jan. & July Phil’delphia 18&4

Div.)...
Pittsb’g, Ft. Wayne & Chicago:
1st Mortgage (series A)....
do
(series B),...
do

iii

London.

:

1st Mort. (Turtle Cr.

ioo

4,000,000
6,000,000
3,634,000
1,002,500
186,400

8d Mortgage.
New York and New Haven:
Plain Bonds, Coupon

1

Mortgage Loan
Pittsburg and Connellsville:

1872

1868
1876
1885
1877

.

3,000,000

...

Buffalo Branch
New York and Harlem:
1st

London.

do
1869
do
N. Y & Bos. 1869
April & Oct
1882
do
do
1882

Funding (S. F.) Bonds....... 1,398^000
Exchanged St’ks' (S. F.) B’ds
663,000
do

July
Sept

„

500,000
103,000

.

Phila., Wilmington and Balt.

Jan. &
Mch &

6
8
8
8
8

642,500

London Northern:

do

'

Ston’gton:

Extension:
iNew Haven and Northampton :
M 1st Mortgage
m 1st Mortgage (H and
Hamp.).
rffew Jersey:

)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)

..

,

..

511 000

2d

do
do
do

do ”
do
1843,1!» do
do
1844,
do
do
1848,
do
do
1849,
do J
do
1857, (convertible)..
do
1856,
do
Bonds and mort. on Real Est.

....

7 Hay & Nov New York.
6,000 7 Feb. & Aug
do
38,000 7 Mch & Sept
do
7,000 7 Feb. & Aug
do
do
77,000 7
do
682,000 7
do
do
!•
do
734,000 7
do
4,822,000 7 May & Nov
do
do
2,194,500 7
do

400,000
590,000
2,740,000
650,000

Oskaloosa Division
1st Land Grant...
2d Land Grant

84

1836,
1849,
1861,

i

> 6 Jan.
&’July
) 6
do

Convertible Loan

1880

1,000

.

Northern Indiana, Plain..
Jackson Branch.......

1

1891
1891

& Norrist’n:

Philadelphia and Reading:
Bonds of 1836,
(unconvert.).,
do

110

i

i...

Consolidated Loan

86

110

Q

6 Jan. & July
6 April & Oct
6
do
5 Jan. & July

,.

:

N. Indiana:

1st.
Northern Indiana, 1st—-.
Erie and Kalamazoo

......

Phila., Germant’n

6

1,340,000

Michigan Southern,

Mortgage

Where

payable.

7 April & Oct
.7 Feb. & Aug

Mortgage Sterling
State Works Bonds...........
Mortgage and ground rents..

*

When

payable.

M

.

Mortage Sterling.........

do

do
do

do

2d
2d

100

1882

6
7

Mortgage Sterling
467,489
Mortgage St’g (convert.)
500,000
Mortgage (convert.) dollai 2,230,500
Mortgage (convert.) dollai
215,000
Mortgage (S. F.) convert. 4,328,000

Mich., Southern &

1883

do

Feb. & Aug

.

Mortgage Sterling......1.

1st Mortgage.....

'

Interest.

i

Pennsylvania:

May & Nov. New York.

7
7

910,000

Michigan Central:

•

1st
2d

Lexington. ’64-’74

2,007,000 7 June & Dec

Memphis and Ohio:
State [Tenn.} Loan.

,

|Due. Price.
Panama:

6

1,000,000
Memphis and Charleston:
Stare [Tenn.] Loan
1,100,000
1st Mortgage
Memphis, Clarkesv. & Louisv: 1,600,000

1st
1st
1st
1st
1st

payable.

100,000 5 Jan. & July New York. 1876
do
500,000 6
do
1870
175,000 7 May & Nov.
do
1890

Mortgage.
Extension

[Tenn.]

payable.

£
2

Description.

t

1,300,000

2d

State

Where

4,000,000 + Jan. & July New York.
1,700,000 +
1,785,000

106,000

State Loan (S. F.)

1st

When

I

$1,000,000

:

Interest.

1!

.

Mortgage (Coupon)
Long Island;

Long Dock

•4-)
OD

f

—

95*

69*

THE CHRONICLE.

<&1)t Commercial ©imcB.

[July 1, 1865From Jan. 1
1865.

Out meats

pkg.

Lard..
Cheese
Butter
Rosin. <
Crude Turpentine

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.
Friday

Trade leaves off for the week, in a state of
feeling but poorly
calculated to promote activity. While holders prophecy and seem to

feel

if if

Spirits-

Tar
Rice.
Ashes.

of well

supported prices fog some months to come, and
buyers express little expectation of a material decline ; yet it is
found impossible to induce anything more than “ hand-to-mouth ”
.1 transactions; and where a liberal buyer appears, it is
astonishing
;i’ how many sellers are called out.
'*
This unsatisfactory state of affairs arises from two causes. The
first is the unsettled state of the currency.
This fact needs no elabo¬
ration. The second is the uncertainty that prevails as to the re¬
turn of trade and as to the finances at the South, the
quantity of her
great staples to come forward, and the rapidity with which they
can be marketed.
It may almost be said that the solution of the
first depends in a great measure upon the second. But some weeks
must elapse before there can be any such accumulation of data as
will permit accurate deductions to be made. ! The
spirit of the
Southern people seems to be excellent, and to meet with a cordial
response at Washington. But it will require some time to ad*
just affairs, under the most favorable auspices; In*the meantime,
the situation is such as to discourage imports and stimulate
exports,
and this influence is increasing. At a slight decline from
present
gold prices (which is likely to follow increased supplies, now on
he way,) a considerable export will take place.
The following
tables exhibit the various movements of produce for the week.
sure

FOB THE WEEK ENDING

Coastwise.

.

3,414
2,342

.bbls.
.brs.

.bbls.

"Whiskey"."

"Wheat....
Corn
Oats

.

North
Riv.

50,509

516
482

bush.

....

10,892
....

Rye

•••••«

.....

Malt

....

....

.....

.

....

....

r; i

237
93

29

*439

bales.

,

Spirits Turpen...
Crude

Turp.„....
Copper
Copper Plates....

Lead ........pies.
Spelter. .<•. ..slabs
Sugar
bbls.
Sugar
hhds.
Starch...... pkgs.
Butter
Cheese
Petroleum... bbls.
Molasses.... hhds

*152
63

6,212

.

.

•

•,

•

675
,

....

.

.

.

.

,

.

....;

....

>

|L...
| 605

11,040
1,098
4,644
1,028

3,904
766

•i

485
84
289

1,062
370
15

8^515

10*872
94

645

718

224
223
20

1,169
7,684

12,130

1,360

1,189
! 45

438
8

j

269

8,973

7,144

9! 8

162
110

1,100

1,082

426
425

-

286
152

631
121
41

8,196
1,492

397
7

219
121

80

38,238
2,215
I

4,750
85
834
305
100

335

623

200
280
167

1,800
1,485

1,061
186

706

3,043

7,872

1,856

980

14

11,200

7,769

891

26,922
460,952

•

4,742
L2.527

173,580
264,162

1,952

9.807

829

.bales

20,931

31,220

82,180

follows

as

leading articles of do-

Cotton
Flour.
Corn Meal
Wheat
Corn.

bales
.bbls.

bush.
tcs. and bbls

Pork
Bacon.

..bbls.
.100

lbs.

Lard........
Cheese...

Ashes, Pearls

•

lbs.

• • •....................

*•

•

•

bbls.

348,629
57,269

•

•

T ar

'

100 lbs.

Tobacco...................... pkgs.
Tobacco............
lbs.

Oil, Sperm....
Oil, Whale
Oil, Petroleum.
Oil, Lard......
Seed, Clover.
Staves, M..

..........

..

•

t

4,124
.

-

5,027
110,417

840

284,693
16,075
780

621

300
v

689

206,289
76,819
60,838
1,869,805 2,056,006
84,740
634,171

1,054
•

67,549

184,224
11,637
6,748

109,311
•

816,660

180,040

437

1,575

.galls.

764,006

152,373
120,216
69,474
5,371

•

30

,.v

145,610
57,543
80,236

69,898
241,162

378
10

Spirits Turp.......................

Tallow

73,844
66,607
489,879 6,807,183

*

9,464

bales.

Same
time 1864.

19,486
24,618
681,163 1,096,077

287
25.

.casks.

Beeswax

Since
Jan. 1.

1,094
32,982
8,922
33,239
8,995
1,341
1,991
5,068
3,206
8,082

;

Ashes, Pots

Hops .

\

:
Tut
Week.

Butter

72,429
132,843
149,236
453,665

Cr

produce have been

Beef.

1864.

•

663

11,804
117,731
184,108 3,826,669 6,877,948
25,256
304,983
10,996
18,639
202
6,690
7,100
41,276
220,742
299,888
81,801
149,836
849,154
•

bags.

Oil Cake
Whalebone

100 lbs.
;

.'.

I.. .lbs.

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

London advices to the 16th report:

Cocoa.—298 Dage Trindad

brought 70s a 73s 6J for mid red,
good fine red, and 105s for superior. Some Guay¬
aquil is reported sold at 82s 6d.
1,974
Saltpetre very flat.
4,750
85
For Coffee the demand continues
good at full prices. Of Plan¬
*834 tation Ceylon the sales have been 131 casks 21 barrels 27 bags at
82s a 84s for mid, 85s a 89s for
305
good to fine mid, 91s 6d a 95d for
441
fine.
363 casks 865 bags Native at 65s 6<2 a 66s for
small, 66s 6d a
68s Cd for good ord, 70s for fine ord, and 73s
a 75s for
superior.
628
162 barrels 42 bags Jamaca at 67s a 67s 6J for
good ord, 70 6d
200
for fine ord, and 76s a 80s for low mid to mid. 476
280
bags Guate¬
1.800
mala at
588

•1*974

84,060
292,178
88,920
175,026

647

of the

4,486

8,824

70,490

>6,493
4,403
15,285

do
.......

mestic

400

....

84,276

bags
pkgs.

Wool

8,289

....

—

Same time

bales

Tobacco.-*

138,412
7,665
16,100

965
250

,

Since
Jau. 1st.

8,849

tons

Sugar..........hdds., bbls. and tcs.
do
bxs. and bags
Jeas..........
.pkgs.

1,633
399,815
324,212

201

....

24,430

201,950
1,261,600

Week.

Coal
Cotton
Coffee
Molasses

8,620

'

13,404
16,818
8,288

We

.

77s

a

88s 6d for

74s a 79s 6d, aDd one lot at 81s 6d. Of the first
cargo
Costa Rica, 2,400 bags, the greater
portion was realized at 75s 6d
a 77s 6d for fine to fine ord, 78s ’6d for low mid
mixed with pale,
and 79s 6d a 82s for low mid to mid even.

give, as a comparative statement, the receipts of a few leadCopper.—Tough Cake & Tile 90Z a 92Z, Best Selected 94Za 96Z,
ing items per all domestic routes since Jan. lst, and for the same Sheathing 98Z a 100Z, Y. M. Sheathing 8±d a 8\d. Foreign : Chili
Slab 80Z a 82Z.
?
period last year.
Lead dull. Common Pig 20Z.
From Jan. 1
Same time
Hemp.—Of 1,300 bales ^Manila' at auction
1865.
1864.
only about 100 bales
good quality found buyers at 31/; the remainder was taken in at
.bales
177,546
166,260

Flour
Corn Meal.

.bbls.

Wheat....

.bush.

Oom

Bye
Barley, Ac.

Oats

1,723,740

50,180

68,495

679,080

2,256,950
bbls.

.bbls.




1,872,720
175,920
5.020,970

453,185

8,220,600

.

.....

u

1,879,645
185,925
910,210
2,110,765

74,285
161,535

,

68,735

229,110

B

FOREIGN.

For the

3,867

...!

•

17,360
58,470

.185,800

.

•

98,835

29,876
13,165
29,490

sides

•

8,105

Imports of a few important articles for the week, together with
comparative statement.

a

S4.045

2,720

.

....

•

f •

.

bbls.

.

Total.

....

....

2,899
8,240

Wool
Hiaes
.No.
Leather
sides.
Tobacco
hhds.
Tobacco pkgs. &c.
Rice., tcs. & bbls.
Rice
bgs.
Rosin
j.. .bbls.
Tar
i
Pitch...

463
353
164

7,357

bbls.

Hemp.. I
Hops

.

....

400

577
286

....

Lard Oil
Cotton

fc

4,746
.

.

bales.

Hops.

Exp’s

613
245

•

875

! I

-.

467

4,435

8,284

11,040

'Lard.. .bbls. & te.
Lard
kgs.
Ashes
pkg.
Tallow....
Grease
Oil Cake
fitearine
Dried Fruits.....

Eggs

152

J

...

84

....

313,244
132,991
6,700
15.850

2,311

pkg.

Rosio.

Beans
Peas
Beef. .bbls. & ter.
Pork
bbls.

Cutrneata—pkgs.
It

27,198
i 860

400
200
662
395.308

Per

.'

Leather

4,721
13,421

4,890
6,170
9,826
37,655
9,070

tcs.

Whiskey

6,265

4,187

...

Wool

TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 1865

Camd. & Hud. Cent’l
Erie Ainboy Eiv’r R.R. of
R.R.
R.R.
R.R. N. Y.

.

*

*,...

286,785
146,540
148,500
174,860
9,781

280,060
29,127
1,661

bbls.

Tobacco.
Tallow.

i

VBIOIIPTS or DOMESTIC FRODUCE

do

1864.

90,876
80,640
104,240

...

Nioht, Jane 30.

Same time

30Z for mid to fair current. '"Of 370 bales Kurrachee about
onethird sold at 22Z 15s for good
quality. 60 bales Sunn sold from 17Z
15s a 19Z 15s for mid to fair.-—JuTE : the

public sales comprised

30,000 bales, for which there was a steady demand at
previous
rates; prices ranged from 11Z 10s a 217 15s for common to to
from 9Z 15s

cuttings. '

a

10Z

a

10s for

rejections and inferior, and

good,

a

6Z 5s for

:

Iron.—WJesh very firm ; Rails and Bars 7115s f.
Scotch Pigs 54s 4id cash for mixed Nos. on
-

o.

Clyde;v

b. in Wales.
-^

>

!

'■V* i'

July 1,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

19

'

Linseed.—Import for the week 16,495 qrs. from the East In¬
dies. For a little Calcutta on the
spot 56s has been paid, but the
market has since become
decidedly easier; Mirzapore and Patna
are worth 56s
6d; and Bombay would command 57s. For arrival
about 2,000 tons Calcutta
; for shipment up to
ehanged hands at 56s 3d up to 56s 9d, closing with August, athave
sellers
the
latter figure; 400 tons
Bombay, June July shipment, sold at 69s
3d sound
bags. Imports since 1st January 257,659 qrs.,
against
285,502 qrs. last year.
v
’
j

Molasses.—120 puns sold at 16s a 16s 6d for
Dominica, and 170 oasks new Cuba MuscovadoAntigua, 15s 3d
at 15s 6d.
Oils.—Fish; of Sperm there are few sellers under
92/; pale
Southern 46/; new pale Seal has
declined to 42/; Cod 51/ to 51/
10s; East India 30/ a 30/«l0s. Linseed is
scarce, on the spot there
are no sellers under 33s 6d
a 33s 9d, for
delivery last four months
this year 34s is the value.
Rape active : Foreign Refined is worth
45/ 10s, and Brown 42/ a 42/ 10s.
Olive tend upwards ;
Gallipoli
would command 51/ 10s a
52/, Malaga is held for 51/; Seville 50/,
and Mogadore 48/. Cocoa Nut in
demand at 42s 6d a 42s 9d for
Ceylon, and 44ss ,6d for Cochin. Palm firm ; fine
Lagos is worth
36s 6d a 36s 9d, and Palm Nut
32s.
i
Spelter firm.—On the
spot 22/15s has been paid. >
Oil Cakes.—Linseed Cakes
barely maintain their price ; Cotton
Cakes are firm and prices well
supported.
41

COTTON.
The market has been
very

active, and a rise of fully six cents per
Wednesday. Since then the market has
been rather quiet, and closed
weak and slightly lower. A moderate
export movement has set in under the favorable
intelligence from
Liverpool. Sales of the week, 12,000 bales.
Receipts 8,196 bales.
Exported; last week, 1,074 bales. Stock on hand,
(estimated)
45,000 bales. We quote:
*
pound

on

,

for

* i

realized

was

-

new

YORK

CLASSIFICATION.

>

•land.
29

Ordinary, per lb....
Good Ordinary
Middling
Good Middling
Middling fair

34
44

Fla.

80
35
45

47

Intelligence from 4he

N. O.
A Tax.

80
85
45
48

35
45

48

50

*

Mob.
80

51

48
51

51

South

respecting the deliveries of cotton at
is very defective and
unsatisfactory. The government
monopolizes the telegraph, and the mails from all
parts arrive irreg¬
ularly and at long intervals. The latest authentic
intelligence from
New Orleans speaks of increased
receipts, and middlings quoted at
36a37c. No large quantities of cotton are
reported to be passing
Cairo. From Mobile, we cannot learn that
In Rice business has been small.—A
cargo of 1,800 tons Ran¬
any cotton is arriving
goon has been sold for arrival at 11s
14</ for United Kingdom; or there. A cargo of Government Cotton has arrived thence aVthis
10s 74d for the Continent.
"• *
market.
At Savannah and
T
j
Wilmington small quantities are
Rum in fair demand.—240
puns Jamaica sold, chiefly at 3s 4d a coming forward. At Charleston
3s 6d.
' \
preparations are being made
to bring to
!
market, the cotton in the interior. It would be a
Spices.—-Black Pepper: market dull;
high
1,200 bags Singapore estimate to
were
put the receipts of cotton at the Southern
only partly disposed of from 34</ a 3Jd; 5,000 bags
ports for
Penang June at 75,000
were sold at 2id
(a few lots at 3d), Ginger : 1,000 bags
bales„a quantity that would not leave over
■
Bengal
25,000
were held for 24s
; 60 barrels Jamaica went from 68s a
75s for bales for export.
.■■■’**
good ordinary to middling. 1,000 bags Pimento
New Orleans advices to the 16th
chiefly
report as follows :
buyers from 2d\ a 2fcZ. 100 bales Cinnamon sold sold from found
Arrived since 8th instant of Louisiana and
Is 7d
a Is 9d for thirds to seconds.
Missssippi, 11,125 bales
Lake 82 bales,
Montgomery 154, Mobile 854, Texas 104, together
Turpentine.—French Spirits have declined to 54s.
11,819. Cleared since the 8th instant for
Liverpool 782, New York
1,857, Boston 579, together 2,718 bales. Stock in
Sugar.—The quantity offering at
warehouses and on
public sale has been small, and shipboard
the sales have been effected at moderate
notyeleared on the 15th instant, 17,259 bales.
rates.
Of British West
At the date of our last
India 2,500 hhds sold. 4,295
report, the market closed dull and
bags Mauritius were realized at 31s 27 to 36c for
drooping at
6d for middling soft
Ordinary^ 32 to 34 for Good Ordinary, 85 to 37 for Low
grey syrups, and 34s Qd to 3.6s 6d for low mid¬ Middling, and 40 for
Middling, since which, under the influence of
dling to good yellow semi-crystalized. 1,035 bags
Bengal were receipts from the Red Rivej* and discouraging accounts from New heavy
York,
mostly bought ina few lots sold at 28s a 28s 6d for low
yellow prices have further declined fully 6c per pound, as will be seen from
Date. Foreign : 238 hhds 216 barrels
the following details. On
Porto Rico were
disposed
Friday, the first day of the commercial week,
of at 30s 6d a 31s for good
J?rown to low greyish yellow, 32s a 34s the previous depression was increased by the extent of the
6d for low middling to good ditto, and 33s a
receipts, and
300 bales changed hands at
35s 6d for
prices
middling to
good bright yellow. 164 hhds 24 tierces 20 barrels Cuba Musco¬ lb. There was no improvement on indicating a decline of 1 to 2c per
1 vado partly sold at 31s 6d to 32« for low
Saturday, but, holders meeting the
demand freely, buyers
again came forward and took about 400 bales,
middling to middling grey¬
ish yellow. Afloat the
mostly on the basis of 854c for Low Middling. On
following cargoes have been sold,
Monday, there
Havana, 3,090 boxes No. 12 at 25s, 3,701 boxes No. 10 viz., three having been some accumulation of stock from the
to 104 at
increasing receipts,
23s 6d, both fully insured for United
prices ruled still more in favor of buyers, but the business was of
Kingdom, 1,672 boxes No. limited extent
quite
134 at 26s 6d, foreign insirance for Copenhagen;; two Cuba
hardly reaching 200 bales, Low Middling selling at the
Mus reduced rates of 82 to
covado for United
34c, showing a further falling off of about 2c
Kingdom, 729 hhds 73 tierces at 21s 6d, and lb. On
per
842 hhds 21s 6d and 400 boxes No. 10 at
Tuesday priees exhibited a further decline of 3 to 4c, but the
23s.
supply being copious and the demand fair at the reduction, the business
Tallow dull.—St. Petersburg Y. C. 40s
6d on the spot, and 42s summed up fully 1,000, Good Ordinary
ruling at 26 to 274c, Low Mid¬
for the last three month.
j
dling at 29 to 30, and Middling at 32 to 84. There was no material
Tea.—3,000 pkgs Assam sold at public sale this week at
4d a 6<Z change on Wednesday, when 800 bales changed hands at more irregular
per lb advance for fine qualities. Not much business
prices, the general
doing in material advance'in tendency to a further decline being increased by a
China Teas, but holders are firm. Common
Freights, but checked by a decrease in the
Congou Is a Is Id per
lb.
pressing on the market Yesterday the market again opened quantity
with an
Tin.—English without change; Blocks 97s, Bars 98s, Refined apparent tendency in favor of buyers, but as the demand became more
active, holders evinced renewed stringency in their
100s. Foreign : Straits, 91s, Banca 95s.
pretensions, and the
sales, which comprised fully 800 bales, were at
Whalebone.—A small parcel of inferior Polar has
prices indicating a slight
been sold at. recovery from the previous decline. j
490/a 491/.
This makes a total for the week of
3,500 bales against 1,400 last
week and 2,100 the week before.
I A private Bombay telegram of June 12
•!, '
reports an upward ten¬
We now reduce our
quotations—Ordinary, 20 to 28c; Good Ordinary,
dency both for cotton and for goods and yarns. Exchange lower— 25 to 28c• Low
Middling, 29 to 31c; Middling, 88 to 84c; Strict Mid¬
Is ll|d.
Money tight, and a monetary crisis imminent.
dling, 35 to 36c.
Groceries have been dull and
STATEMENT OF COTTON.
drooping, and towards the close Stock on hand,
September 1,1864
sugars have slightly declined. A Havana circular of the 24th re¬
bales.
4,5 75
Arrrived past week
ports that market quiet for sugar, but very firm; the demand
11,819
Arrived previously
...#
mostly directed to low grades for the American market; No. 12 8
67,192—79,011
•ireals per arrobe—50s
freight, and 17 per cent premium of ex¬
change—25s 7d sterling per cwt free on board ; and 28f 82c
83,586
per 50 Exported past week...........
kilos (without freight),
2,718
exchange on Paris at 4 per cent premium. Exported previously
Last year at this date No.
63,609—66,827
12—being at 9$ reals, freight 55s, and
exchange 9 per cent—stood in at 31s 9d per cwt, free on board. Stock on hand and on shipboard
.bales.
The total export of sugar from the whole
17,259
island iq the year 1864
The very latest from New Orleans is to the 24th.
The New
(including hhds) amounted to the equivalent of 2,656,549 boxes. Orleans Della, of that date
From the 1st January to
reports :
the 3lst May last it was 1,637,304 boxes
The daily
receipts of our products, from Saturday last to the close of
against 1,336,853 do in 1864, ip to same time,
shewing an excess business yesterday, were, according to our marine
of 300,452 boxes. The
list, as follows:
weekly supply is now beginning to fall off*
somewhat, though still exceeding that of the previous
4
1
Bis. Cot in
year.
Cot’n. Seed.
A private telegram from Rio,
June 17
May 24, says : Total sales of coffee
between steamers, 85,000
bags; sales for U. S. same time, 25,000 do ; June 18
stock at date, 100,000 do
'
June 19
j I
; price, $6,600 a
$6,800; shipments to June 20 ;
the United States between
.

the ports

\

>

.

...

,

w

.

1

•

-

»

/.

.

.

steamers, 16,000 bags ; exchange, 244d
24|d ; freight, 45s. *• '
The speculation in
pork has subsided, and the whole market for
provisions closes flat. The provision markets,
at home and abroad,
ao pot favor a brisk
export*
a




■

June 21
June 22

..

-

.

\j

.

-

!

6,527

4

r

to

'*

.

|

a

1 30

27

a

36
45

a

1 30
1 40

a

1 60

70

a

^78

Western White.......

80

a

85

Western Yellow
Southern Yellow
Southern White......
Western
North River
Western.
State
v
Canada

80
80

a

83

Milwaukee Club....,
Red Winter
Amber Michigan, Ac.
Western Mixed

do

67,805.

The following circular was
for transmission by the mails

25

Wheat, Chicago Spring

brings the total receipts, from the 1st of January last to date

This

[July 1,1866.

THE , CHRONICLE.

20:

do

issued at the close of business yesterday,
do
this morning:
Corn;

COTTON

MARKET

do
do
do
do

REPORT.

New Orleans June 24.
26

a

27

80

a

81

88

a

84

86

Ordinary......
Good Ordinary,
Low Middling..

a

Middling

ar

..

Oats,
do
do

Heavy orders beiDg on the market, the week’s sales reached near
7,000 bales at prices showing an improvement.
No freight room and

anticipated receipts have restricted the demand to-day; but with
offering, prices are well sustained.

little

a

Nominal.
85
90

a

78

a

a

68

a

00

Barley
Barley Malt.

76
70

a

60
00
40

.

.

a

White Beans

a

1 80

a

1 60
1 50

Liverpool to the 16th June, report: “The market
The receipts and exports of breadstuffb at this market have been
opened quietly, being affected by the decline reported iu New York, as follows:
but the large demand for the Continent, and an active and improv¬
receipts.
Sams time
Since
ing business in Manchester, soon renewed the confidence of holders,
1864.
Jan. 1.
and, with an active demand, prices rapidly advanced *d. to Id. per Flour, bbls
1,872,720
1,379,545
175,920
185,925
pound.; and, although to-day there is less doing, prices are main¬ Corn Meal, bbls..
6,020,970
910,210
Wheat, bush.....
tained at the highest point of the week, and in some cases exceeds
1,723,740
2,110,765
Corn, bush
for the better grades of East Indian
68,495
60,130
Rye, bush.. ^....
Advices from

"

QUOTATIONS.

Ordinary..,

164

16

17*
16*

-

H

-

-

18*
1

—

9

Since
Jan.1.

Same time
1864.

Flour, bbls
Cor. Meal, bbls..
Wheat, bush

681,163
78,344
439,879

1,096,077

Corn, bush....

—
—

19

—

—

348,629

16*

18*
18*

—

-

J

—

—

18

-

18*
18*

10*

exports.

—

18

—

17*

-

18

Fair.

164
164
16*

30,

16

16*
16*
1174

Oats, bush

Iiland*.

Orleans.

Taxas.

Upland*.
16* 16*

Cotton.

•

Sea

42

—

—

—

The

'

■

:

8ALE6.

at the

*

Same time
1864.

Total
this wee;k.

Total
this Year

10170
48820

Specula-

189630

134910

623390
164020

678760

Trad*.

Export

tion.

American... 4100
East Indian.21860
Brazilian.... 6400

2420
19060

3050

4400

2680

8610

1110

4610

12280
14130

9390

3990

6470

19860

220940
209420

171420
197860

Total.... 49160

30970

26120

106260

1347800

Other

...

Sorts.

Flour.
bbls.'

Wheat.

bush.,

Chicago....

38,692

305,741

Milwaukee..
Toledo
Detroit
Cleveland

6,768

279,811
208,090

Totals....
Prev. week.

”

L

IMPORTS.

4

American...
East Indian.
Brazilian

1944

12686*

6068
2605

306761

Egyptian...

7681
7673

217871

Other Sorts.

*

This Year.

Week.

152262
1440851

1864.

105692
418081

Total.

86360
134980
49680
68480
64620

American...

Indian,

East

Day.

Brasilian...

Egyptian...

Other Sorts.

Total

...

COTTON

!

AT

20460
180660

Egyp

an.
BREADSTUFFS.

Under the combined influence of

)

J)

.

J
a

decline in

Dunkirk...

Goderich..
Sarnia.....
.

Whitby
Kingston...
Montreal...

supplies, seems to be generally abandoned.
The following are closing quotations in this market:
Flour, Superfine State and Western.. ...per bbl.
$5 00




do

•

3,207

10,334

7,655

654,969

14,443

,

383,936

Rye,
bu.

672,626

420,226

17,660

•

•

•

•

•

243,144
180,746
47,860
7,000
1,800

•

m

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

3,026
20,000

•

•

■•••«

,

•

•

••

81,616
16,000
18,660

..

86,918

638,919

81,711

696,727

..

17,760
21,660
876
200

•

9,600

1,162
17,967

29,826

10,610

•

«

•

•

•

•••••

■

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

17,376
6,976
694,861
771,982

•

•

*

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

• •

800

600

3,200
6,000
11,475

•

•

**••••

*

8,000

•

m

•

•

•••••

•

13,000
•

•

•••••

*•••••

<■

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

••••••

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

«

600

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

19,694

60

392

446,619

17,600

18,392

860,063

2,000

17,862

following tables show the receipts and shipments of flour
grain at Chicago from January 1 to Juno 24, forfbur years :
RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN AT CHICAGO FOR FOUR SEASONS.

1865.

Flour

388,608
3,012,212
6,129,678

••••

'

1804.

676,661

'4,652,162

4,136,736
206,807

7,160,822
2,800,172
,266,676

265,255

148,510

SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN FOR

1865.

Flour
Wheat
Corn
Oats..

....

1864.

803,833
2,166,025
6,103,005

648,971
4,208,971
4,679,146

8,611,844

4,077,062

1863.

664,787
3,374,116
14,527,220
2,661,800

340,768
148,018

1862.

717,889
4,693,134
10,142,475
986,318
449,618
428,694

FOUR 8EA80N8.

1863.

696,505
2,620,394

13,147,095
2,480,707

1862.

667,166

4,216,795
7,96$,527
740,466
317,647
144,614

a

$5 85

183,036
267,640
73,030
38,876
The latest advices from Europe are to the 17th June. There
11 00
7 40 are rumors that the crops in Germany promise badly. The British
11 60 crop promises well. Considerable orders have come out for Flour,

Extra State

6 70

a

Shipping Roundhoop Ohio

6 26
6 00

a

Rye Flour, fine and superfine
Com pieal, Jersey and Brandywine* •, ♦,,

•

bu.

attempt to support prices, through a general holding back of

Southern, fancy and extra
Canada, common to choice extra

•

Barley,

1,047
'407
11,824

Oth. Pte

sympathy with New York.

Extra Western,common to good........
Double Extra Western and St. Louis..;..
Southern, supers.
i..

•

bu.

Coll’gw’d..

• •

do
do
do
do
do
do

‘

•

Oat«,

dependent of those influences, have remained comparatively steady Wheat
Coro«•
Crop accounts continue very favorable, and the weather through-* Oats
out the country is generally good for the maturing wheat crops?
Rye
the gathering of which is now about to commence.
Barley...*...

do
do

•

•

bu.

St Clair..'.

and

gold and sterling exchange, and advanced rates of freight to British
porta, there has been a very heavy decline in flour, wheat and corn
the past week, while oats and coarser stuffs, being in a measure in”

The

•

•

The

increased receipts,

The western markets have declined in

18,317

•

•

392

Corn,

8,632
19,740

By railroad

160000

66000

•

•

20

bu.

Prev. week.

370000
Piculs.

Piculs.

•

•

Wheat

Totals...,..

18(54.
Bales.

| ) 439000

11,379

bbls.

26,249

To
To
To
To
To
To
To
To
To

380000

[ ‘ This Year.

!
-j

758,819
619,914

ToOgden’b’h..

1864.

Bales.

East Indian
Brazti

917,445
1,009,464

To Buffalo....
To Oswego....
To Pt. Golb’e..

j
•'

18,114

Flour,

1047771

72210
’78270

677

14^71
6,304
6,925

14,792
1,160

2,610

80,958

following will show the shipments of flour and grain from
the ports of Chicago and Milwaukee and Toledo, for the week endiug June 24, and destination :

111662
211058
201648

28400

i 363820

8EA.

‘

,

681,201

The

8TOCKS.

This

bush.

79,729
44,074

101,043
108,635

‘

940835>

Rye.

bush.

919

1,703

*

26961

Barley.

731,330

83,498
.20,892

....

..

v

Oats.
bush.

Corn.

\ bush.

.

96980

66,607
6,807,183
145,610

following will show the weekly receipts of Flour and Grain
places indicated for the week ending June 24 :

1261110

Egyptian

7910

679,030
3,220,600

458,185
2,266,950

Barley, Ac., bush.

'

a

8 00

a

6 60
7 60

a
a

6 90

a

6 00

a

6 00

Rye
Barley.

6 60
7 85

8 26

6 60

4 66 a 5 16

Wheat and Corn.

[

tions:

146,668
99,646

The following are

fbe latest Liverpool quota*

,

•Jittyl, i&5.]

THE
V.

Flour.
do
do
do
do

Wheat.

Extra State

»

Philadelphia and Baltimore...

do
do
do
do

Ohio
o -9 1
Sour and Heated..

Chicago and Milwaukie

do
do
.

(per 196 lb.)

Amber -Iowa.'.. •■»...........
Red and Ambsr Winter

do

j

•

(per 100 lb.)
do
!

White-Western

do
do
Southern
Indian’ Corn, i Yellow
do
••••%••••••••••••••••

|

*

do
dj
do

*

(per 480 lb.)
do

21
21
22
21
18
8
8

! ,s- 4.

4.
0
6
6
6
0

CiffiONKTLE

0

a

6

a

22 6
22 6
24 0
24 6
20 0
8 4
8 8

a 4

a

8

8
9
28
23

a

a‘
a
a
a

6

a

0
6
6

a

a.
a>

10
9 0
9 6

0 0
a 0

i

THE DRY 800DS TRADE.

quantity of cotton known to be on the Southern plantations shall,
under the stimulous of high but
declioing prices, be precipitated
the market faster than it can well receive it, cause a panic and
decline in price much below what the
general aspect of the market
upon

would warrant.

This

danger will have to be guarded against—per¬

haps to point it

out will be sufficient to ward it off.
Standard Brown Sheetings have advanced

materially, anddose
weights—lighter goods in proportion.
The stock was very much reduced
early in the week, andit was with
the greatest difficulty that a Bmall order could be
filled. Hie arri¬
vals, however, are closed quickly by the commission houses, who, as
we have said, are
very averse to any accumulation. They do not
mind a reduction of one or two cents
per yard to avoid it.
Bleached Goods are without improvement as to
price, but have
been more active. Several marks have been closed out at
full prices,
and the prices of standard
goods are well-supported. They are
generally gold
Prints are in light supply, but there is Borne
irregularity as to
prices. The best makes on good styles, on dark ground, bring 2T
a 27ic.,
among which are Cocheco, Merrimac, and Spragues. Some
first class goods on light grounds have been closed ont for
the sea¬
very firm at 31 a 32|c. for full

Friday, June 30.
spring and summer season is drawing to a close with the wholesale houses. The auction sales have, for the present, ceased to have any
significance. The catalogues embrace goods suited to the wants of
the local and near-by dealers, who are about the
only buyers at the
moment, and it is probable that very little will be done for a month
to come. The season, on the
whole, has been a prosperous one.
The country was quite bare of
goods, and attracted by the relative
cheapness, (as compared with a year ago,) people have bought
freely. Very little has been done with that part of the South which
son at 25c.
has been; more recently reclaimed to the federal dominion
j
; but with
Printing Cloths are firm ; 64x64 for immediate
New Orleans a better business has been done than
delivery are
during the war. worth 19c. For
August delivery prices are firm at 17c.
Confidence as respects the coming fall season is
strong;. But
Delaines are closed Out from first hands—are
grave doubts cling to the prospect. The past week has shown how
jobbing at 23c.;
challies, 25c. There is the greatest aversion to carrying these
a
very moderate revival of exports will effect the gold market
Shipments of bullion have nearly ceased ; the premium has declined; goods over.
Ticks are in very light
this has in turn carried down the
Bupply, and firm ; Amoskeag, A 57|;
price of breadstuffs and provi¬
Hamilton, regular, 60c.
sions, so that the export demand, instead of having the effect to
Denims.—Commission houses keep these goods in
steady prices, (as would be the case were our currency in a normal
light stock, and
condition,) produces the contrary result; the greater the export, the although the demand is small^, prices are supported. Amoskeag,
65c.; York, 60c.; Union, 50c.
lower the premium on gold, and the lower
prices of the great staples
Corset Jeans are firm—the better
will decline. This simple statement of the case will show how un¬
grades 31^ a 32c.
fortunate is the position in which is
Drills.—Regular Cbiua drills are scarce and firm at 30c.
placed the. trade in the great
Woolen Goods are‘firm,
staples of the West. If any considerable quantity of cotton should
especially for fine heavy fabrics, of
which the production has been
be procured for export it would only
hardly equal to the demand. Good
add to the difficulties of the
; Western farmers. They will be strongly tempted to withhold their. styles of Union goods are also wanted at full prices, and the prime
makes of satinets bring more
money. The whole of the old regular
crops from market, in hopes of obtaining higher prices. This has,
trade shows great confidence;
undoubtedly, been already done to a considerable extent; but it has
apprehensions that prices would be
broken down through a decline in the raw material
failed of its object; prices of breadstuffs are
and prices of
mainly down to an
labor, are not row generally entertained. Army flannels and
export basis ; and the attempt to retard supplies threatens to have
its usual termination—to precipitate the
decline it was designed to packages are of course very quiet. Carpets are dull, and scarcely
so firm.
'(
prevent, and cause a temporary fall in prices that will be exceed¬
Foreign Goods are in very light
ingly discouraging, and in many cases ruinous.
stock, either in bond or in the
hands of jobbers, and trade,
9 How far disproportionately low prices
except for a local demand, is very quiet.
for breadstuffs and provi¬
All indications, however,
sions are likely to effect the demand for
point to a large importation for the com¬
goods, the intelligent mer¬
ing season, aud a brisk trade. The goods ordered, to judge from
chant will judge with
accuracy. Probably experience will show
views entertained by importers, are of a
that the influence of the great
higher cost than before the
struggle through which we have
i
passed, will be found to be on the side of substantial fabrics, whether war.
The importation of dry goods at
of high or low cost.
this port, for the past week,
Tawdry and flashy imitations are, from the
and the corresponding week of 1864, have been as follows
very nature of the case, not likely to hold the large space they have
:
heretofore done in a. stock of goods. The feeble efforts of the
entered for consumption.
Biddies ” to rival the fashionable appearance of their
1894.
1865.
mistresses, as Manufactures of Wool
|
27,890
seen in the
291,123
past two years, will best illustrate this point.
do
Cotton
24,714
185,481
Domestic cotton goods while
do.
Silk ...••••.»!.....
presenting an aspect of firmness, are
191,281
288,446
do
Flax
t still unsettled.
* leading styles fluctuate almost daily. • There is the
11,899
217,217
do
Miscellaneous
3,022
28,725
greatest timidity among manufacturers and commission houses. This
is owing to the margin for decline, which, under
Total Entered for Consumption.
very favorable cir¬
2,85808
960,971
The

,

.

:

•

i

“

..

•

cumstances to the increase of

production, may take place. The
consumption of cotton by the mills in the Northern States is now
about one thousand bales
daily—perhaps a few more—a quantity
not likely to result, even at
present prices, in an overstock of goods.
And yet manufacturers
carefully guard against any accumulation
} of goods. We have to notice this week an
improvement in a few
goods ; but it is due wholly to the fact that at the moment the
sup¬
ply on the market is reduced almost to barrenness; very slight
; arrivals
might put down prices.
this circum¬
printing cloths, causing
some
irregularity. The probable supply of cotton to be obtained
from the’Southern States
is; earnestly, not to say anxiously, dis¬
cussed. The prevailing* impression is,
that through the disorgani¬
sation of labor, and the unsettled status of landed
property, • there
little

seasons ;

hope that ihe.formjer grbwtb of cotton will be reached lor
Botoe'yeai's to cOtae.' "TOT XBere "ii 'ton^'ineaSInesi^lest * the' letfga

is




&

•

WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE.

Manufactures of Wool
do
do
do
do

14,885
7,780

47,445
27,898

Total Marketed.

960,971

257,106

Miscellaneous.;.

8,029

98,800
258,806

Silk

Flax.

128,092
26,279
74,884
82,885

2,848

.Cotton

Total Withdrawals.
Add Entered for Consumption.

1

The trade is now, as it
were; between two
stance has some-influence upon
prints and

•••••#

1,275,580

814,619

entered for consumption.

Manufactures of Wool...»
do
do
do

do
.....

Cotton..........«.
Silk....*
Flax...
Miscellaneous.

........

4

202,822
86,061
48,466
..-r

.............

Total Warehoused
Add Entered for Consumption .

808,075
17,152
88,818
26,860
5,118

7,864
67,405

862,108
485,018
•258,806 ? "966,971
■

IV*.y....

Total Entered at Port. ^......... \.




22

\

THE CHRONICLE.

PRICES

Sheathing, yellow
Pig, Chile—.
:

CURRENT.

Boltz
Braziers’
American

WHOLESALE.
All goods deposited in public stores or bonded
warehouses must be withdrawn therefrom, or the
duties thereon paid within one year from the date of
the originnl importation, but may be withdrawn by
the owner for exportation to Foreign Countries, or

may be transhipped to any port of the Pacific, or West¬
ern Coast of the United States, at
any time before the
expiration of three years from the date of the original
Importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be subject to the same rules add
regulations as if originally imported there; any good$
remaining in public store or bonded warehouse beyond three years shall be regarded as abandoned to
the Government, and sold under such regulations as

.35

..

.

..

45
45

„

ingot..
291
Cordage—Duty, tarred, 8; untarred Manila, 21;

.

other untarred, 3* cents $ R.
Market more active.

Manila...j

21

©
•©

22

©
©

..

Tarred American
Bolt Rope, Russia

19
27

..

..

Corks—Duty, 50 $1 cent ad val.
1st regular, quarts
1st regular, pints
Mineral .L

4'S @

$ gross

39
50

Phial.........

©
@

10

:

50
40
52
50

©

Cotton—See special report.
_

-

i

*

.

Drugs and Byes—Duty, Alcohol, 40 cents $1
gallon; Aloes, 6 cents $ R ; Alum, 60 cents ^ 100 R ;

....

'

►.

..

....

.

„

..

..

..
..

..

..

..

....

..

Chlorate Potash
Caustic Soda
Citric Acid

@

Liverpool House Oannel
Nova Scotia

©

8 50

Anthracite, by dealers $ ton of
2000 R

8 50

© 10 00

Cocoa—Duty, 3 cents $ R.
Very quiet.
Caracas
Maracaibo

(in bond).. $ R

©
©
55 ©
60
Guayaquil
do
Para
do
20 @
St. Domingo
do
......
©
Coffee—Duty: When imported direct in Ameri¬
do

......

equalized vessels from the place of its growth
or production; also, the growth of countries this side
the Cape of Good Hope when imported indirectly in
American or equalized vessels, 5 cents $ R J all other
can or

10 39 cent ad valorem in addition.
There has been a fair business in

ing a fi action.
Java

do
do
do
do

Rio, sellers yieid38
••

.

..

cash,

fair

ordinary...
fair to good cargoes.
1
fair to good cargoes, (gold, in
bond)
Laguayra
......
Maracaibo
Jamaica
St, Domingo
do
(in

.

.

©
©
21* ©

.

Rio, prime
do good

58

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

20

@
18* ©
19 ©
14

©
31* ©
29 @
28* ©
18 ©

.

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

34*
22*
22

20*
18
20

15

32*
81

29*
18*
13*

bond)...
12*®
Copper—Duty, pig, bar, and ingot, 21; old copper,
2 cents ^ R: jnanufactured, 30 $ cent ad val.: sheath¬
ing copper aA yellow metal, in sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches wide, weighing 14 @ 34 oz. $ square
foot, 3* cents $ R. All cash. ]
Ye?y dull, but none inquiring for ingot at the close.
Sheathing, new
$ R
©
45
Sheathing, <fcc., old
©
.

.

'

.»

—

—

5

(gold)
do

Cochineal, Honduras

60
85
75

do J

Cochineal. Mexican

..

do

Copperas, American
Cream Tartar, prime
Cubebs, East India.
Cutch

...

(gold)

|

Epsom Salts

Extract Logwood
Flowers, Benzoin
Gambier

60

H
62
88

©
771
.2
n ©
34
38* ©
45 ©
12* ©
13*
©
3i
14
©
60 ©
80
8
7* ©
95 © 1 00
80 ©
90
65 ©
85
34 ©
86
1 00 ©
28 ©
30
19 ©
20
36 ©
40
©
70 ©
55
©
40 ©
45
..

^ oz.
fp R

Gamboge..|

Arabic, Sorts
Benzoin

Kowrie, good to prime rough
Gedda
Damar.

*

Myrrh, East India
Gum, Myrrh, Turkey
Gum Senegal
Gum Tragacanth, Sorts
Gum Tragacanth, white flakev...
Hyd. Potash, French and English.
(gold)
Iodine, Resublimed
Ipecacuanna, Brazil
Jalap.
J
Lac Dye, good and fine
Licorice Paste, Calabria
Liccorice, Paste, Sicily
Licorice Paste, Spanish Solid.....
Licorice Paste, Greek

85

1 00

Oil Cassia
Oil Bergamot
Oil Lemon
Oil Peppermint, pure, in tin

3 20

©
©
©
3 00 ©

3 35

Opium, Turkey

40
45

©

©
23 @
38 ©

5 50
3 50
70

48
24

38

..

8* ©
9 ©
1 00 ©
©
©
80 ©
2 75 ©

8*
1 25

..

..

90

©
©
©
©
5 87* ©

..(gold)

Oxalic Acid

j

100
89

Quicksilver
Rhubarb, China
Sal ASratns...
Sal Ammoniac, Refined
Sal Soda, N ewcastle
Sarsaparilla, Hond
Sarsaparilla, Mex

(gold)

8 50
ft 00
5 75
65

©
©
©
©
©
©
©

..

Phosphorus

58
3 00
’

14

41
20

2*
40

@

25
60
24
18
60

©
©
©
©

*

Seneka Root

Senna, Alexandria..
Senna, East India
Shell Lac

(goidj

(80jp cent)

Ravens, Light
Ravens, Heavy

•

•

22

65

@
2* ©

Sugar Lead, White
Sugar Lead, Brown
Sulphate Quinine
p oz.
Sulphate Morphine
Tartaric Acid.
(gold)
p R
Verdigris, dry and extra dry (gold)
Vitriol, Blue
Duck-Duty, 30 $ cent ad val.

■

..

40

40

©
@

2 25

©

2 20

60

8 10

58
.30

©
©

14
^

.

$ pee

16 00
22 00

26 00
Scotch, Goureck, No. 1
Cotton, Phenix, No. 1
$ yard > 0 95
Dye woods—Duty free.
Most kinds scarce, demand moderate.
Camwood
(gold)
p ton
45 00
Fustic, Cuba

Fustic,
Fustic,
Fustic,
Fustic,

Tampico

24

Tabasco

..

4

Savanilla
Maracaibo..*

(gold)
do

Logwood, Laguna
Logwood, Campeachy......(gold)
Logwood, Hond
:..
35 00
g
Logwood, Tabasco
(gold)
24 00
Logwood, St. Domingo
25 00
:...
Logwood, Jamaica
Lima Wood
60 00
(gold)
Barwood
(gold)
30 00
Sapan Wood, Manila
Feathers—Duty: 30 p cent ad val.
Prime Western
do Tennessee

Fire

p R

© 40 00
© 25 00
©
©
© 60 00
©
© 55 00
..

..

65

..

© 0 67*
© 5 00

5 80

Crackers—Duty: $1

box of 40

packs.

Canton, 40 packs, No. 1, (cash)
5 80 © 6 00
P box
Fisk—Duty, Mackerel, $2; Herrings, $1; Salmon,
$3; other pickled, $1 50 pbbl.; on other Fish,
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller pkgs. than bar¬
rels, 50 cents $ 100 R. Produce of the British North
Americon Colonies,

frkk.

Quiet. Unchanged.
Dry Cod.....

$ cwt.

6 75

Pickled Cod

©

6 25

Dry Scale

©

6 75

©

7 00

A

....pbbl.

Mackerel, No. 1, Mass. Shore
Mackerel, No. 1, Bay.
Mackerel, No. 2, Mass. Shore
Mackeral, No. 2 Bay
Mackerel, No. 2, Halifax....
Mackerel, No. 3, Halifax..........
Mackerel, No. 3, Small
Salmon, Fickled, No. 1
Salmon, Pickled
..pton.
Shad, Connecticut,No. 1. p hf. bbl.
Herring, Sealed
p box
Herring, No. 1..
Herring
p bbl.
Flax—Duty: $15 $ ton.p R

..

©
13 50 @
16 00 ©
12 50 ©
10 25 ©
10 25 ©
©
33 00 ©

7 00

..

....

..

14
16
13
11
16

00
5§
00
50

75
..

35 00

©

..

© 16 00
35 ©
4fl$
25 ©
Sr
5 00 © 6 50
11* ©
IT
..

Fruit—Duty : Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds, 10; Almonds, 6; othsr
nuts, 2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts, 1; Shelled do, 1*, Filbers
and Walnuts, 3 cents $ R; Sardines, 60; Preserved
Ginger, 50; Green Fruits, 25 $ cent ad val.
Raisins, Seedless....
do Layer (new)
do Bunch (new).
Currants (new)
Citron, Leghorn

hf. cask

©

p box
-...

5 40
12* ©
24 ©

p R
!...

Turkish Prunes
Dates

18
18

do
do
do*
Sardines.
do
do '

<

Shelled

$ box
p ht box
$ 0r- b°x
$ R

Brazil Nuts

©

,25

Sicily, Soft Shell

Figs, Smyrna.

22

26

Provence

.*

©
©
©
©
©

41

Almonds, Languedoc

88

©

©

..

24* ©
25 ©
J

Filberts, Sicily
Walnuts, French

©
©
©

17
13

6 20
5 50
13
25

19
20

26*
26
24
43
90
45

25
30
10

17*
14

Furs and Skins—Duty, 10
cent ad val.
Product of the British North American Provinces*
free.

Gold Prices—Add

premium

on

gold for

currency

prices.
Beaver, Dark

p R

Pale

2,00
1 50

Bear, Black
do

5 50

5 00

8 25
4 75
ft 25

.

do

30

Madder, Dutch
(gold)
Madder, French, E. X. F. F. do
Manna, large flake
Manna, small flake
Manna, Sorts
Nntgalls, Bine Aleppo............
Oil Anls....

©
@
©

..

Ginseng, Southern and Western..
Gum Arabic, Picked
Gum
Gum
Gum
Gum
Gum
Gum

[July 1,-1865.

Soda Ash

Argols, 6 cents ^ R ; Arsenic and Assfifcetida, 20;
Antimony, Crude and Regulus, 10; Arrowroot, 80 $
cent ad val.; Balsam Capivi, 20; Balsam Tolu, 30;
Balsam Peru, 50 cents $ R; Calisaya Bark, 80 $ cent
ad val.; Bi Carb. Soda, i*; Bi Chromate Potash, 3 cents
$ R; Bleaching^ Powder, 80 cents $ 100 R ; Refined
Borax, 10 cents ^ R; Crude Brimstone, $6; Roll
Brimstone, $10 $ ton; Flor Sulphur, $20 f} ton, and
15 $ cent ad vaL; Crude Camphor, 30; Refined Cam¬
phor, 40 cents
R.; Carb. Ammonia, 20 $ cent ad
with the United States.
|3ir“ On all goods, wares, and merchandise, of the val.; Cardamoms and Cantharides, 50 cents $ R;
Castor Oil, $1 $ gallon; Chlorate Potash, 6; Caustic
growth or produce of Countries East of the Cape of Soda, 11; Citric
Acid, 10; Copperas, *; Cream Tartar,
Oood Hope, when imported from places this side of the
10; Cubebs, 10 cents $ R; Cutch, 10; Chamomile
Cape of Oood Hope, a duty of 10 por cent, ad val. is
Flowers, 20 $ cent ad val.; Epsom Salts, 1 cent $
levied in addition to the duties imposed on any such
R; Extract Logwood, Flowers Benzola and Gam¬
articles when imported directly from the place or places
boge, 10
of their growth or production ; Raw Cotton and Raw cent ad $ cent.; Ginseng, 20; Gum Arabic, 20 $
val.; Gum Benzoin, Gum Kowrie, and Gum
Silk excepted.
\
j Damar, 10 cents per R; Gum
The ton in all eases to be 2,240 R.
Myrrh, Gum Senegal,
Gum Geeda and Gum Tragacanth, 20 $ cent ad vaL:
Ashes—Duty: 15 $ cent ad val. Produce of Hyd. Potash and Reeublimed Iodine, 75; Ipecac and
the British North American Provinces, free.
Jalap, 50; Lie. Paste, 10; Manna, 25; Oil Anls, Oil
Receipts less liberal. Market firm.
Lemon, and Oil Orange, 50 cents; Oil Cassia and Oil
Pot, 1st sort
$ 100 R
@7 50
Bergamot, $1 jg_R; Oil Peppermint, 50 $ cent ad
Pearl, 1st sort
7/
D; Oxalic Acid, 4 cents $1 R; Phos¬
-.j....
7 50 @ 8 00
phorus,^ $ cenAad val.; Pruss. Potash, Yellow, 5;
Anchor*—Duty: 2* cents $ R.
Red do, 10; Rhubarb, 50 cents $ R: Quicksilver, 15
Of 209 R and upward
$ cent ad vaL; Sal Bratus, 1* cents $ JR ; Sal Soda,
13 @
13
$ R
* cent $ R; Sarsaparilla and Senna, 20 $ cent ftd
Barilla—Duty free.
val.; Shell Lac, 10; e*oda Ash, I; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
$ R; Sulph. Quinine, 45
cent ad val.; Sulph. Mor¬
Teneriffe
$ ton.
©
phine, $2 50
oz.; Tartaric Acid, 20; Verdigris, 6
cents $ R; Sal Ammoniac, 20; Blue Vitriol, 25 $
Beeswax—Duty, 20 $ cent ad val.
Small sales.
cent ad val.; Etherial Preparations and Extracts, $i
50
Yellow, Western and South..R
48 ©
$ R; all others quoted below, free. Most of the
articles under this head are now sold for cash. (All
Bones—Duty, on invoice 10 $ cent.
nominal.)
Rio Grande shin
There is only a more retail demand
$ ton 35
©
85
Aloes, Cap^
@
cent ad val.
Bread—Duty, 30
$ R
85 ©
Aloes, Socotrine
Alum
1
Pilot
R
©
‘41
5*
©
50 ©
70
Navy....
41 Annato, fair to prime
©
15
Antimony, Regulus of
Crackers.
14* ©
14
©
35 @
40
Argola, Crude, Oporto.:
Breadstuf fs—See special report
Argola, Refined
291
(gold)
29 @
Arsenic, Powdered
4 ©
Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs hair, 1 $ R.
Assafcetida
25 ©
40
Balsam Capivi
(gold)
41
American, gray and white... $ R
50 @ 1 62* Balsam Tolu
70
@
Candles—Duty, tallow, 2*; spermacetijand wax, Balsam Peru..'.
@ 2 60
8; stearine and adamantine, 5 cents $ R.
Bark, Calisaya
„
@ 1 75
55
Very moderate jobbing trade.
Berries, Parisian
©
Bi Carb. Soda, Newcastle
Sperm, plain
Q R
7
35 ©
6$ @
Bi Chromate Potash
22 @
Sperm, patent,
45 @
50
Stearic
L...
80 @
81
Bleaching Powder
3 ©
*3*
Adamantine (boxes) (light weights)
31
21 ©
24
Borax, Refined
30 ©
Brimstone, Crude
$ ton
62 50 © 65 00
Cement—Rosendale
....^bbl
160
Brimstone, Am. Roll.
$ R
5 ®
Brimstone, Elor Sulphur
6* @
6*
Chains- Duty, 21 cents $ R.
•
35
Camphor, Crude, (in bond)
©
One inch and upward
\$ R
’
©
95 © 1 00
9* Camphor, Refined..;....
Cantnarides
© 1 70
Coal—Duty, bituminous, $1 25 $ ton of 28 bushels, Carbonate Ammonia, in bulk....
18 ©
19
80 R to the bushel; other than bituminous, 40 cents
3 15
3 40
Cardamoms, Malabar.
$ 28 bushels of 80 R $ bushel.
Castor Oil (cases)
3 40 ©
\ $ gallon
The auction sales Wednesday showed a slight imChamomile Flowers
30
50
$ R

ErovementOrrel..$ ton of 2,240 R
iverpool in anthracite,

V

Prussiate Potash

$ R

Tarred Russia

the

Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe. Mer¬
chandise upon which duties have been paid may re¬
main in warehouse in custody of the officers of the
customs at the expense and risk of the owners of said
merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three years, shall be
entitled to return duties, proper evidence of such
merchandise having been landed abroad to be furnish¬
ed to the collector by the importer, one per centum
of said duties to be retained by tae Government.
In i.ddition to the duties noted
below, a discrim¬
inating duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no reciprocal treaties

@
©
@
©
28* @

..i

< 7

4 00

Cubs...

2 00

Badger
Cat, Wild

10
10

do House

Fisher, Dark
Fox, Silver..
do Cross .!
do Red
do Grey

;....

10
4

4 00
*

i

.c.........

3 00
150

25

Lynx

1 50

Marten, Dark
Mink, Dark....

800
2 00

do Pale
Muskrat

200
20

Otto?

■

tr*»••••*8 0

© 2 50
© 2 00
© 10 00
© 6 00
70
75
20
6
20 00
5 00
© 2 00
70
©
© 2 00
© 4 00
© 4 00
© 3 00
25
©

©
%
&

©

6 0

July 1,1865.]
Opossum

THE CHRONICLE.
8
80

...

Racoon..

Skunk, Black
do
Striped

...

80

..

15

do
White
Gold Prices.

$ lb

321 ©

do

421 ©
40
©
821 ©
@
©
321 ©

Payta.

Madras..

Cawnpore
Cape

.

Honduras

ib

per

Cuba

42* ©

471
©
321
471 (§1
50
42* @
45
421 ©
45
©
|
©
©
©
Window Polished Plato
....

Siam
Para

Missouri
Texas

..

..

Glass—Duty,

8x10

$

India

is

5 50
6
6
7
7
9
10
11
12
18
15

subject to
...

•

....

a

50
00
00
00
00
00
00

$ 50 feet

..

..

@
©
@
@

©
©

©
@
@

7
8
9
10
12
15
16
18
20
24
26

Guatemala
Caraecas

.*.

yard

©

..

$ keg of 25 lb

free.

75
25
75
50
50
50
50
00
50
00
00

do

27
less

East

0 95

a

155 00

Russia, Clean
180 00

Manila..7.(10 © gold)

..

ft>

13.
1 00

British

San

Juan,’ etc.
Savanlla; • etc.
Maracaibo, Salted
do ** Dry

131
10*
-10*
12*
9*
10*

Maranham,Dry Salted Ox and Cow
Pernambuco,Dry Salted

12
10
14

*

.>

Dry Salted
.

Vera Cruz
Porto Cabello
Minoz
Rio Hache

Truxillo

and Port-au-PlattDry

California, Dry.,,,,




9*
12*
13
vl2

Bogota

Curacao,..

India, Prime

©
©

©

..

dulL

-

•

crop

Ayres
middle, California
middle, Orinoco, etc.
light R«. Grande & B. Ayres
light, California
g
light, Orinoco, etc
heavy,v R. Grande & B.
Ayres
do
heavy, California,
..

18

Dull and nominal.

common
$ bbl.
© 122
lump
.7 7.
@ 1 60
j Lumber* Woods* Staves, Etc,—Duty,
-Lumber,.20 $ cent ad vaL; Staves, 10 $ cent ad val.;
...

.

.

.

.Rosewood and Cedar,
all

..

free.

Lumber and Timber of

kinds, unmanufactured, product of the British

North American Provinces, free.

Spruce, Eastern.. 7.

$ M feet

15*

White Oak, Logs........ ^ M feet
White Oak, Plank
White Pine

Shipping Boards

STAVES—
White oak,pipe, extra..

’The arrivals

do

pipe, heavy....

are

>

^

soft &
8 25

do

Wilmington, etc..
Tar, Washington and New Berne.
f

and

.

roduct

liberal, and prices drooping.

2a0 lb

7 do N. B..Prov

4 00
5 00

foreign
Pitch, city, No. 1
Rosin, common...

,.$ 280 fl>

do

strained and No. 2, (in
yd

do

No. 1
Pale and Extra.

$ 280

6 00
10 00
18 00

,

©
©
©
©

4
5
6
9

©

.bbls.

do

© 10 00
©
...

$ bbl

6 00

50
50
50
00

S9 00

12 00

Rosin,
© 16 65
Spirits turpentine, Am.... $ gall.
1 35 © 1 40
Oil
Cake—Duty: 20 $ cent ad val.
Sales 100 tons Western.

City thin oblong, in bbls.... $ ton 49 00
@ 50 00
do
in bags
47 00 @ 48 00
Western thin oblong, in
bags
%.
© 4 50
Oils—Duty: linseed, flaxseed, and rape seed, 28

cents; olive and salad oil, in bottles or flasks,
$1:
burning fluid, 50 cents $ gallon; palm, seal,
] *ut, 10 $ cent ad val.; sperm and whale or and cocoa
other fish
(foreign fisheries,) 20 $ cent ad valorem.
i

j

■

Olive, Marseilles, (gold). 7. $
-do

in casks

case

© 4 00
©
©
8
118 © 120
1 00 © 1 05
1 10 @
1 80 © 1 85
@ 2 20
..

$ gall.

Palm,
(gold)
Linseed, city....

..

..

$ gall

Whale
do

bleached winter
Sperm, crude
do
winter, unbleached
Lard oil, prime, winter...

..

1 60
1 00
..

..

—

80 gr. deodorized..

..

........(free)...

Lithrage, American.
$ fl>
Lead, red, American
do white, American,
pare, in oil
da white, American, pure,
dry.
Zinc, white, American, dry, No. 1.
do white, American, No. 1, in oil
Ochre, yellow,French,dry $ 100 lb
do
ground in oil
$ fl>
Spanish brown, dry
$ 100 lb
do
ground in oil.$ lb
Paris white, English, No. 1
Whiting, American.
Vermilion, Chinese
do
do
do

'

Trieste
American

American,

Venetian red, (N. O.)

Carmine, city made
China clay

70 00
60 00

*

..

@
©
@
©
@

165

@

72

..

1 25
55

Chalk.,...

$ ®>

13 ©
13* ©
..

8

2 50
9
..

2
1
1
1

common...

$ cwt.
$ lb
$ ton

©

13* ©
8 ©

3
19
38

8
3
00
25
20
25
35
00
00
..

13*
14
15
00

©
10
@ 8 95
©
10
© 1 50
©
9
©
’ 3*
© 2 25
© 1 30
© 1 25
© 1 30
©
40
© 8 50
© 80 00
@ 40 00
© 4 50

©
© 70 00
© 30 00

3? bbl.
|cents
Petroleum—Duty: crude, 20 cents; refined,40
^gallon.

©160 00
©180 00

the

The

$ M.

tine 30

Province^ free. (A1I

•. ■

Turpentine, North County,
1

© 18 00

Bird’s-Eye Maple, Logs $ sup. feet

Black Walnut, Logs...7.......'
Black Walnut, Crotches!
Blk Walnut,Figured and Blistered
Yellow Pine Timber7.7.

10*
18*
12*
10*
10*

©

white lead, red lead, and
Paints—Duty:
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents $ lb; Paris
white and whiting, 1 cent
$ Ib ; dry ochres,
$ 100 lb: oxides of zinc, 1* cents $ lb; ochre,56 cents
ground
in oil, $150 $ 100 lb ;
Spanish brown 25
China clay, $5 $ ton; Venetian red $ cent ad vaL;
and vermilion,
25 $ cent ad val.; white
chalk, $10 $ ton.

heavy, Orinoco, etc
good damaged
poor damaged.
upper, in rough, slaughter.

do

©

..

.i-o.

on

*

©

cash.)

Paraffine, 28

....

Rockland,

•

•* •
-• •

y......

5 25
6 50
80
50
35
20

©

©
©
©

^ gallon; crude turpentine, rosi
tar, 20 ^1 cent ad val. Tar and
turpen_
of the British North
American

Kerosene

j do
■Oak, upper, in rough, slaughter...
Ume—Duty; 10 ^ cent ad val.
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

•

-7

Straits

do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do

^

Red oil, city distilled
Bank and shore .'.

Hemlock, middle, R. Grande & B.

-Gold—i
v

*

heavy..

5 00
6 00

iJ
Naval Stores—Duty: spirits of
cents

2 25

8 75
8 75

$ 100 lb

forged (8d)..-lb

.,..

Zinc",..

:

.

$ 100 ft>.

©
©
©
@
©

..

65
40
35

.

'-ft-**

Copper

8 75
2 75

$ M

,>

*

i

(Cash.)

Yellow metal

4 00

middle..

North

17
15

St. Domingo

.

©
©

do
do

©270 00
©165 00
©
©190 00

-Cash17

Orinoco

Tampico

.

$ ton

..

free.

B. A., 20 © 26 Ib selected-.
;•.$ lb
Rio Grande, 20 © 23 Ib, selected.
R. G. «fc B. A. Green Salted Cow.
Rio Nunez.
Gambia and Bissau.

Bahia, Dry
do
Dry Salted..

do

©
Spanish....
@
German, Refined..
8 75 © 9 00
English
8 75 © 9 00Bar
$ ft>
©
12
Pipe and Sheet.....,...,
©16
I^eatlxer—Duty: sole 35, upper 80 $ cent ad val.
A good business doing.
Oak, (slaughter,)light...... :.$} ft
30 ©
do

(Nominal.)
steady but not active demand, with a firm market

Matamoras

do

American

Market very
Galena

14

Product of the

Provinces,

do

$ galL

.

Clinch
Horse shoe,

7

Lieud—Duty, Pig, $2 $ 100 fi>; Old Lead, 1* cents
$ Ib; Pipe and Sheet, 2* cents $ lb.

©
14 ©
15
all kinds, Dry or Salted, and Skins,
..

>. r'

IcidUfi

s-

,

8 cents $1 jgalldh.

Cut 4d. © 60d

.7* ©
10*
7* ©
10*
58 00. ©
85 00 © 90 00

Eastern..

21*

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $45; Jute,
$15; Italian, $40; Sunn and Sisal, $15 $ ton; and
Tampico, 1 cent $ lb.
$ ton 260 00

$1 ft.

©.;; io*

..

100 Jt>

Jute.

9*

..$ Ib
8 00
India, Billiard Ball
4 50
African, West Coast I*rime
2 75
African, Scrivellos, West Coast..1 75
LiUtlis—Duty, 20 $ cent ad val.

27

©

..

,i. 7 8B

(American

Mansanilla

•

25

,

10

,

© 45 00
© 36 00
© 92 50

35 00

Mexican

Honduras

70
50
38
English Islands............55
65
Nails—Duty: cut 1*; wrought 2*; horse shoe 5
cents

Ivory—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.

Hay—North River,Shipping $

Undressed

Am.

Rails, English... (gold)

80

.„

40 00

,

00^

Nuevitas.

do Claved

...

....

© 6 50
© 6 50
8 50 ©
48 © 1 15

$ lb

85

*

© 40 00
©120

...

Mansanilla

Molasses—Duty:

—

„

Sales, Manilla 10c. gold.
American, Dressed

sizes

©70*0^
...

Port-au-Platt, crotches,
Port-au-Platt, logs.....

Now Orleans
Porto Rico
Cuba Muscovado

© 2 40
© 160
© 1 70
© 1 40
© 1 40
© 1 70
©
90

*

Nail Rod
$ lb
Sheet Russia
Sheet English, Single,Double and
Treble...,.

..

Rio Grande, mixed..
(cash)..
Buenos A yres, mixed.
Hog, Western, unwashed.

•.

Swedes, aborted

00

,-

48

..

1 65

Iqo>

00

Mexican.
Florida...
$1 cubic ft.
Rosewood, Rio Janeiro
$ fc %
do
Bahia
,Ki.idv ^

/-—Store Pkioks—>
160 00 @170 00
Bar, English and American,Refined 105 00 @110 00
do
ao
do
do
Common
95 00 @100 00
Scroll, English
140 00 @200 00
Ovals and Half Round, English... 130 00
@140 00
Band, English.
135 00 © •-:-.C
HorseShoe
135 00 ©145,Otf
Rods, English, 5-8 © 3-16 inch... 105 00 @185 00
Hoop, English
140 00 @220 00

...

canisters.. .$ Ib

do
do
do

to 1* cents $ lb; Railroad,
70 cfjnts $ 100
B>; Boiler and Plate, 1* cents $ !b;
Sheet, Band, Hoop, and Scroll, 1* to If cents
$ lb;
Pig, $9 $ ton; Polished Sheet 3 cents § Ib.

Car

at 20 cents or less
$ lb, 6 cents $ 15, and 20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
cents $ lb, 10 cents $ fl> and 20
$ cent ad val.

Shaping and Alining

70

Iron—Duty, Bars, 1

Pig, Scotch, Beat,No l(cash $ ton
Pig, American, No. 1
Bar, Swedes,assorted sizes (in gold)

Gunpowder—Duty, valued

Blasting (A)

..’• ©
©
©
*..
©
47
©
©

(gold)

..

00
00

Domingo, ordinary

logs

wood)..
Cedar, Nuevitas

free.

Madras
Manila

East

Calcutta, standard

©18 00
© 15 00

St

,

do
do
di
do
do
do

Market very quiet.

Good demand.

do

do

•

..

Kurpan

60 00

_

,

35,
20
Produce of

130
1 10
75
90
1 80

aiif

mahogany* Cedar, Rosewood—Duty

..

$ lb

'

110 00
70 00

free.
..

cent ad val.

-

70 00

©125
© 90
© 55
© 85

market has been inactive throughout ths week,
to be more liberal, and there is
disposition to realize,- * The only feature of mo«

receipts^ begin
more

gM***9*

flJS%

H80 OO

‘

©
©

..

.$ lb

pipe, culls...
hh<L,
hhd., extra..
hhd., heavy
hhd., light
hhd., culls
bbl,lextra
bbl., heavy
bbl.* light

Mahogany, St. Domingo, crotches,
$ foot

13 00

Bengal....

do-

or

$ C

Oude

*

6 00
6 90
7 00
-7 50
8 00
12 00
13 00
15 00
16 00
18 00
21 00

do

$1 cent ad val.

5

10 $ cent ad val.

Rubber—Duty, 10 $

Indigo—Duty

© 7 25
© 7 75
© 9 25
© 9 50
© 11 75
© 14 50
© 16 00
© 17 00

00
50
00

Calcutta, light and heavy .. $ pee
26 ©
Gunny Cloth—Duty, valued at 10 cents
$ square yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ lb.

A

10

Guayaquil

.......

do
do

Hides-?Duty,

$ tt>

©110 00

do
hhd., light
HEADING—white oak, hhd..

..

..<©
©

East India..?
Oarthagena, etc

©
(Subject to a discount of 85 © 40 $ cent) v
Gunny Rags—Duty, valued at 10 cents or less,
square yard, 3; over 10, 4 cents ^ 3 B>

10

©

1

Para, Coarse

@ 18 00
© 20 00
© 24 00
discount of 40 $ 45

Above

American

©

..

j,

oak, pipe, light..,

bbl., culls
Red oak, hhd., heavy

$ lb.

Para, Medium...,.

(Single Thick.)

6x 8 to 8x10
8x11 to 10x15
11x14 to 12x18
12x19 to 16x24
18x22 to 20x30
20x31 to 24x30
24x31 to 24x36
25x36 to 30x44
80x46 to 32x48
32x50 to 82x56

Sisal

..

..

..

Para, Fine

French Window-- 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th
qualities.

do

..

Ox, American, selected

foot; larger
cents $ square foot;

1

12x19 to 16x24
18x22 to 20x30
20x31 to 24x30
24x31 to 24x36
25x36 to 30x44
30x46 to 32x48
32x50 to 82*56

Sporting, in 1 lb
Hair—Duty

..

Ox, Rio Grande

..

square

$ 50 feet

8xlltol0xi5
11x14 to 12x18...

’

1

©
©'
©

the British North American
Provinces fuse.

larger and not over 24x39 inches 6 cents
$ square
foot; above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
‘sents $ square
foot; all above that, 40 cents $ square
foot; on unpolished Cylinder, Crown, and Common
Window, not exceeding 10x15 inches square,
1$; over
that, and not over 16x24,2; over that, and not over
24x30, 2J; all over that, 3 cents $ Ib.
American Window—1st,
2d,'8d, and 4th qualities. 5

Above...
(The above
cent)

.!

of 1863

Horns—Duty,

..

©

(g^

..

Cylinder or
not over 10x15
inches, 21 cents
and not over 16x24
inches, 4

6x 8 to

8

..

..

Arkansas
Florida.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

'

Crop of 1864
do

kdo

8
8
9

©

....

$ gall.

Hops-Duty: 5 cents
Dull and unsettled.

30

....

(duty paid)
(in bond).

do

10*

White
do

©
7* ©

Singapore...'.
.c.
Honey--Duty, 20 cents $ gallon.

35

11

10
7

-

Country and West’rn

Manila Buffalo
Calcutta Buffalo
Calcutta Kips, Slaughter
Calcutta Kips, Dead Green

45
41
35

10* ©
©

-

v.

(currency)

Penang Cow

..

Shins, in merchantable order.

Salted

City Slaughter
City Slaughter, Association.

..

Deer, San Juan and Chagres
do Bolivar City
do
do
do
do
do
do

Green Salted

©

..

Matamoras..

Deer

Dry Western

35
35

821 ©

Tampico

do
do
do
do

California%Green

i

.

Vera Cruz

do
do

California, Dry Salted

60
59
35
8
•

Goat, Curacoa, No. 1
do Buenos
Ayres
do

10

@
©
©
©

$ slJ

i

THE CHRONICLE

24
ment is the sale of several hundred brls. Reflned

In

bond, buyers option for the fall months at 86 a 86c.
If
j
Crude, 40 @ 47 gravity . ..ft galL
85
841 ©
Beflned, free
72 @
78
I

|.

in .bond

do

1

Naptha, refined

Besidnum.

48
10 00

$ bbl.

..

50
@
@ 10 50

$ eent ad val.

Blue Nora-Scotia..
White Nova Scotia

Calcined, eastern
Calcined, city mills

,.V@

...ft ton.
ft bbl.

,

..

..
,.

'@

&
@

.Wbalebon©—Duty: foreign fishery, ^ eent ad

Liquors.—Cash.

95 ft cent
Brandy, gin, and pure spirits.....
Bnm, pure

4-10

Whisky

2 05

ana

....in bbls.

••

••

..

..

..

..

..

..

Provision*—Duty: cheese and batter, 4 cents

Steel—Duty: bars and ingots, valued at 7 cents ft
cents and not above 11,
01 centt ft lb and 10 $

19
12

a
a

24
14

blister..(2d A 1st qlty)...
machinery
Osman.., .(2d & 1st qlty)

13
14
15

American blister

12

20
16
17
14
22

do
do

do
do
do

Free.

The speculation, in Pork has
partially broken down,
and the market closes very weak at 24 a 24.25 for new
mess.
In other products, business has not been im¬

portant, and the fluctuations light, prices ruling very

firm. Beef has been fairly active.
Batter steady.
Cheeae is in active export demand with a large export

demand, with sales of prime fkotory made at 16o.

'

10 00 @ 14 00
12 00 © 16 00
nominal,
nominal,
nominal.
19 00 @ 19 50
nominal.

$ bbl.

do India
do India mess

Pork,

prime mess, (new)

do mess,
do
Pdo

West’ll, (l year old and
new).
prime,West’n, (old and new).
thin

23 50 @24 75
18 00 @18 50
nominal.

mess

Lard,in bbls.....^

ft fl>

Hams, pickled
do
dry salted
Shoulders, pickled
do
ary salted

Beef hams

19J
.19

15* @
..IT @
..

J 50

ft bbl...
Batter, Western
lb.
Itldo N..York State dairies, new.
do
Orange County,
Cheese, opjnmon to choice, (new).
..

20

.

.22
.84
10
,

.

@ 27 50
@
28
@ .28
@ .85
@ .16
.

i.

.

lb.; paddy 10

Rice-^Duty: cleaned 24 cents

cents, and uncleaned 2 cents ft lb.
Carolina
Bast India, dressed
Patna, cargo styles..;

9 75
9 00

ft 100 lb
’.

..

100

Salt—'Duty: sack, 24 cents $
$ 100 lb.

10 00
<a 10 00

@

lb; bulk, 18

cents
.

£

Turks Islands

ft bush.

ft sack
Ashton’s
fine, Worthington’s....
fine, Jeffreys A Darcy’s
,.
fine, Marshall’s

1 55

Cadiz

Liverpool, ground
do
do
do
do

nne,
.

52

51

.

&
&

-

&

1
8
2
2
2

60
25
80
80
80

Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 21 cents; refined and
partially refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent ft lb.
Keflned,

(cash)
$ lb
(cash)....,

pure

Crude

Nitrate soda

..

..

@
@

24
141

(cash)
1..
5f @
6
Seed*—Duty: linseed, 16 cents; hemp, 1 cent $
B>; canary, $1 $ bushel of 60 lb; and grass seeds,
30 $ cent ad val.
Clover

$ fl> '
ft bush.
Canary .;
$ bush.
Linseed, American, clean... $ tee
do
American,rough. $ bnshi
do
Calcutta (at Boston)

18
3 00

do

!

Calcutta

,

*-

a
a

2 50

8 20

a

...

3 22

a

3 25

...

a

.

..

(at New York).

Drop
Buck

.

a

141
4 00
6 00

2 00

Bombay (at N«w York).
Shot—Duty: 21 cents ft lb.
do

a
a

5 00

Timothy, reaped

...

..

,

$ ft

Silk—Duty

free.

:

..

a

14

..

a

15

All thrown silk, 35 ft cent.

•

13
12
10
13

...

medium, No. 3 @ 4....

do

Canton, re-reeled, No. 1 @ 2
do

usual reel
#

!; Japan,superior
do
No. 1@8
1 China thrown..
«,

a
a

14

Sicily madeira
Bed, 8paniah and Sicily

$ lb

-

..

11

"

,

Cuba, Muscovado ,

-

..

Molado
Stuarts'loaf
do
best crushed
do
granulated

,

..

ground

..

white—A

...

yellow/—C

..

Tallow—Duty : 1
British North American

Teas—Duty i 25 oents

per

10

,

Hyson
Young Hyson
Gunpowder and Imp

1 00
SO
1 10
50
85
70
55

-

Hyson Skin and T wank ay....

Japan (uncolored)
Oolong
Souchong and Congou

ft lb.

:

do

•’

in

domestic

Spies*—Duty:

mace, 4(1
20; pepper

doves,
ginger root, 5 cents $

; Cassia, gold

(in bend).
Ginger, race and African

.

Cloves

.

'

u.

821 @
261 @
1 10

1 15

@
@
@

30 @
61 @

**,<*<> (ta bond)
Pimento, Jamaica
do

a

91
81

f*

20

Mace

.

a

.9a

(All cash}

Nntmegs,No. I..
V Pepper, gold

i

13 00
19 00

cents; nutmegs, 50:
and pimento, 15; and

....$ lb

do

l:

..

8

cassia and

.

a

17
pigs, bars, and plates, $1 50 $

Plates,foreign....(cash).....# lb

;’ *»

a

23

(inbond)

..

35

@
@
@

85
28
24
1 15
1171
81

7

24

,

...(gold), ...ft fo
(gold)
English
(gold)
Plates, charcoal I. C
$ box
do

Croix..

-i

••••••*•»

hlskey, Scotch.




do
do

do

a
a

...

3 25

•••

2 60

a
a

...

9 00

a

..

12 50

I. C. coke

do:

9 00
4 60
..

8 10
4 00

271
26
24
18 00

9 75,

a

11 50

9 50

a

10 00

13 25

charcoal

a

18 50

Tobacco—Duty: leaf ,38 cents ft tt>; and
factured, 50 cents $1 lb.
Kentucky—
Lags and low leaf
Medium to good

manu¬

....

@ 115

..

@ 110
@ 60 00
@ 8 00

..

Claret, low grades.. (gold). f) cask
do
low grades .(gold)fl dozen

85 00
2 75

^ ■»

»

Wire—Duty: No. 0 to 18, uncovered. $2 to $3 50
$ 100 ®>, and 16 ft cent ad val.'
^ &
^

-

No. 0 to 18

30 W ot. off list.
40 W ct off list.

over
over

7i @

'

Wool—Duty: costing 12 cents

less

or

ft lb;

8

fl lb, 8

over 12 ana not more than 24, 6 cents;
24 and not over 82,10, and 10 ft cent ad valorem;

the

.

The market is quiet firm at the Tednced'flgnres, and
has shown more activity for -consumption. Specula¬

tion, however, is quite inactive.

American, Saxony fleece ...; ft fi>
do
full blood Merino.....
do
landMerino
do
native and £ Merino...
Extra, pulled
*
Superfine, pulled
No. 1, pulled
'
California, fine, unwashed
7...

@
@
65 @
60 @
70 @
64 @
60 @

unwashed...

@.
@

common,

Peruvian, ianwashed
Chilian Merino, unwashed
do
Mestlza, unwashed

70
68

42
20
85
85
80
30
85
82
25

.......

Valparaiso, unwashed
S. American
do
do
do
do

Merino, nnwashed
Mestiza, nnwashed
common, washed..
Entre Bios, washed
Creole, nnwashed.
Cordova, washed
Cape Good Hope, unwashed.
East India, washed
African, unwashed
..

45
40

73
70
* 68
66
.
72
70
63

@

25
87
40
33
32
87
85
27
47
45

@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@

washed

do

Mexican, unwashed
Texas

nominal.
25
42
27

Smyrna, unwashed
do

washed

Syrian, unwashed

@
@
@

32
45
82

wrappers

do

running lois

.(duty paid)
.(duty paid)

(duty

(duty paid).

80

6

(in bond)

@

6

5^ and Vb—best
do
medium
do
common
10’s and 12’sr—Best
do
medium

@

20

20

..

@
@
@
87$ @

»....

do

..

,k

|

..

(city made)..

Pounds (Western)—extra fine,

bright..;

!
do
do

do
do

do

.

•

90
80

Fine
medium

65

common

do-

•

medium

..

r

..

....

.

j-do

.

medium
common.,.

.

'

Flour
Petroleum
Beef
Pork....

$ bbl.

..

1

..

5 00

:...,

ft tee.

@

..@36
@29
6
@
@
51

-.v.fr bbl.
Wheat, in ship’s bags.,... ft bush.
Corn, bnlk and bags

To Glasgow
Flour
Wheat

@ 17 6
@ 20
9 @1101

..

15

..

..

:

$ bbl.
...ft bush.

2„..

...ft bbl.
ft ton

15 5

Corn, bulk and bags
Petroleum.

Heavy goods...

Oil

.

ft tee.
ft bbl.

4

.

.

w

@ 20 00
@ 25 00

.,

3

.......ft lb

Hops

*

..

20

Beef

@

..

@

1

Beef and pork.
.....ft bbl.
Measurement goods.... . ... IW ton
W beat, in shipper's baga.. ^ bush.
Flour
bbl.
Petrolenm

1
10

..
..

5

Lard, tallow, cat meats, etc ft ton
Ashes, pot and pearl
To Melbournb (Br. ves.).^ foot
To Sydney, N. S. W. (Br. vea.)..

-

..

..

8 00
35

371 @

To San Francisco, by clippers:
Measurement goods ....... ft foot

@

There havo been large shipmento of Floor,
and Corn to Great'Britolif,'beth direct, and to

..

@
@

65

'■

ft ton

Oil

Heavy goods.....

75 @
@

55

@

d.

.

1 05
@100
@
85
@
751

(Yirginia)—extra fine, ~

Navy pounds—best
do..

@

1 00 @

bright......77.
do--^flne.
••

..

@
@

..

s.

|@
*
@
9
1 8 @
1 3
7 6 @ 10 00
10 00 @15 00
5 @
51
4 @
41
@
..
@
..

—

.,

..

:

Negrohead twist, (Western)
do

@

62*
55
45

@

..

*

common

32’s

.

12*

:

To Havre :
Cotton

..

55
60

To London

Pork.............

@
@

..

Half pounds, bright—best
do
medium
i

ft ton

7
15
11

@ •
@
@

Manufactured—Tax paid.

.

Heavy goods

30
15

70 @

paid)

common

Flour....
Petroleum..*

@

d.

s.

ftfl>
$ bbl.

Heavy goods

00
50
10
00

Domingo, assorted (in bond).
Ambelema, Giron, and Carmen

j do

Freights-To Literpool:

Cotton

10

120 @ 2
1 00 @ 1
90 @ 1
80 @ 1

(duty paid)

BtJ

12

# lb

@

a

Foreign—

Yara, assorted
Cuba, assorted.!

Sheet....

6
*10
9

do wrappers.
|
do rnn’g lots
Pennsylvania and Ohio, fillers..

do

block, $1 50 ft 100 lb; sheet,

@

@

7

j

wrappers,
assorted.,
fillers

or

Corn, bnlk and bags,..... ft bush.
Wheat, bulk and bags
Beef
ft tee.
Pork
.......ft bbl.

Connecticut and N. York, fillers

Havana,

ft lb.

15 @
12 @

ft lb

do
do

cento

9
16
20

6
10
18

do
do

Zinc—Duty: pig

Oil

Leaf—

JJSpIri ta—Dutf: Brandy, first proof, $8 per gallon,
4 50

..

Terne, coke.... j

do
do
do

4 25

1 60
1 85
80
1 15
1 50
1 50

a
a
&
a

..

Straits

do

...

1 60

a
a
a
a
a
a

Tin—Duty: pig, bars, and block, 15 $ oent ad vah
plates, 21 cents
lb.

871

Brandy,Cognac, —.....gold...
do
Bochelle,
do

a
-

@ 1 90
2 00

Plate and sheets and terne

none.

12 75
17 00

Ilf

@

lb.

;

do
do

00
50

• •

H
81
191
191
191
191
181
171

cent ft fi>.
Product of the
Provinces, free.

American, prime, country and city
•I
$ fo

1 75-;

82,12 cents ft lb, and 10 ft cent ad valorem; on
skin, 20 ft cent ad val. Produce of the British
North American Provinces, free.

185 00

a

1 60- @ 1 90
•

1 85 :@

..(gold)
(gold)

sweet

do

110 00

# ton

Malaga, dry

'

cents

Sumac—Duty: 10 ft cent ad val.
Sieily

1 80

Marseilles maderia..-.
do
port *

Telegraph, No. 7 to 11 Plata.ft lb

121
14
151
'161
17

@
@
@
@
@
@

..

1 75
2 00

Hi

.

....««...«.••««..•••••.....

3 00

Burgundy port

do

@ 15 00
@ 13 00
@1100
@ 2 40
@ 2 60
@ 2 00

4 00

Port...........

111
121

.,-16 @
161 @
101 @
101 @
7~@

,

Sherry

151
141
H

141 @

i

5 00

^ gaU.

No. 19 to 86

12 @
12 f @

Brazil, brown

I

•

Castile....

r

121

t.

91 @
101 @
llj @
Ill @
101 @

refining

good refining.,
fair to good grocery
box, Nos, 7 @ 10....
box, NdS! 11 @ 12
box, Nos. 18 @ 10
box, Nos. 16 @ 18
box, Nos. 19 @ 20

Madeira.

•r.xT- V

@
@
@
@

..

Fine to select

50

.

..

St. Croix....

Se«p—Duty: 1 cent $ lb, and 25 $ cent ad val.

•

•

*

00
a 13
00
a 12
50
a 11
a 18
00
none.

f

Lisbon...

ed, 81:'above 15 and not over 20,4; on refined, 5; and
on Molado, 21 cents ft fl).
There has been a very large business, equal to
10,000 hhds.

Seed

Tsatlees, No. l'@ 3
Taysaams, superior, No* 1 @ 2

(

16

Banca
'

ad valorem; over
centadvah

a

on raw or brown sugar, not above
No. 12 Dntcb standard, 8; on white or clayed, above
No. 12 and not above No. 15 Dutch standard, not refin¬

do
do
do

..

1 45

over 50 cents
gallon 20
cent ad valorem ; over 50
^ gallon and 2o ft cent
$1 $ gallon, fl
gallen and 25 ft

13
..

Porto Kico

188

.

Wine—Duty: value set

20
18

New Orleausi.
clarified
do

1 25

@

1 40
187

,

Arctic..
■

@
@
@

.120

..,

.

.

Smear—Duty:

White
Manila

Ochotok

...

cast, hammered...
cast, rolled

fair

^ lb

Northlwe8t coast.,

a
a
a
a
&

spring
Milan, (In bond).;

do
do
do
do
do'
do
do
do

South 8ea

cents $ gallon and 25 $
and not over 100, 50 cents

English, cast. (2d 4c 1st qlty). $ lb
ao
spring..(2d A 1st-qlty.)..

pork, 1 cent; hams, bacon, and lard, 2 cents
Prodace of the British North American Pro¬

Beef; plain mess....
do mesa, extra, (new)
do prime mess

a

lb or under, 21 cents; over 7
3 cento $ fl>; over 11 cents,
cent ad vaL (Store prices.)

beef and
vinces.

2 25
2 85
2 06

a
a

.

$ fi>.

a

584

@

Puria—Duty: lamp, free; calcined,

Piaster
20

52

Domestic

Alcohol, 80

EJ$y 1,1866.

80
75
60

Coal

lb
....ft ton

65
'
..

@
@
@

'

70
11

Wheat,
Penarth
Boads, for orders, and rates doss firm at qhotationa,
with an upward tendency.' The shipme&to of Cotton
and Provisions

we

IWa KctiYei,

-

^

3R

July 1, I860.]

THE CHRONICLE.
After the

payment of the July dividends an active. speculative market
isv expected, which may continue through August.

®l)c HailtDatj Jfloniior.
EPITOME OF
he line of travel is
elers can go from

RAILWAY NEWS.

open

Fortress Monroe.

j

j

Wednesday, June 28.
strong at the morning board, but afterwards
gradually fell off, and prices were irregular at the close.- Atlantic Mail
was sold at 162 to
163, and at the close was held firmly at 163. Mich¬
igan Southern was weak at the close, under rumors of complications in
the company’s affairs. - The market closed
unsettled, and with few
The stock market

from Weldon to Petersburg. Trav¬
Raleigh to Petersburg in twenty-four hours, and from
Raleigh to Baltimore in forty-eight hours, by the way of Petersburg and
now

25

stocks

.

The

Virginia Central Railroad bridges, over Ravenna, Moor’s Creek,
and Mechanic’s River, are
progressing, and hopes are entertained that
the whole road will be in
operation in four weeks.
The Orange and Alexandria Railroad is being repaired from Char¬
lottesville to Lynchburg. Cars are now running from the latter place to
Dye River, thirty miles.
*
The Cincinnati and Indianapolis Junction Railroad has just been com¬
pleted and its formal opening celebrated. It extends from Connersville to
Cambridge City, and traverses some of the finest agricultural

offering.

Thursday, June 29.
dull, and prices, remain about the same*
The occurrence of two
holidays next week in succession makes specula¬
tors reluctant to
operate in transactions which must extend till
Wednesday or further. •
^
The stock-market continues

CITY

PASSENGER RAILROAD

N. B.—A dash

[

new

Berlin will be

Earnings.

lishman may
hours.

New

York, and shorten the distance to New York from Berkshire
County, Mass., by thirty miles;.and, moreover, Salisbury could theu
move the twenty thousand tons of iron ore
(which is now conveyed by
horse power), by rail.
Another
to

Massachusetts.
Boston and Chelsea.

project is said to be on foot to build a railroad from Holly
Monroe, Michigan, forty miles—thus connecting Saginaw and Toledo

and Cincinnati.

j

There appears to be but little doubt that the
contemplated air-line
railroad -from Indianapolis to Chicago will be
commenced before the
.

110,000

X

c.

.

Dedham and West Roxbury..
Dorchester and Roxbury 4...
Lowell (Horse)
•
Lynn and Boston......
Malden and Melrose
L...
Medford and Charlestown....

...

;46

,

Metropoliton (Boston).
Middleeax (Boston)
Quincy

Salem and South Danvers....
Somerville
Stoneham Street (Boston)
Suburban
Suffolk (Boston)
Union (Transportation)
West Cambridge .1

Winnisimmet
Worcester

,

close of the present season.

Cambridge

$
$
p.c
110,000 8,800 7,409
250,000 129,615! 15,895
256,257
727,800* (Unio n Co)
734,671
41,00ft
12,000 (Metro poilt'n
18,742
40,129 11T062|
43,894
766
200,000 129.927! 12,197
254,611
60,246
200,000 20,807'
23,000 (Middl esex)
35,000
1,420,141
176,075 580,043 49,981
488,945
400,000 170,235
71.600 28.510 1,369
135,243
173,980
150,000 37,017
50,000 (Middl esex)
50,000
35,300
32,90ft 7,4W
95,500
5,00ft (Middl esex)
34,198! 1,261
(Sold to Metro.
160,00ft 278,428
241,441
13.600
(Lea sed)
13,600
60,000 21,389
62,154
75,800 25,453
86,657

;..

Broadway, Boston

railroad

project started in Salisbury is to link Millerton Sta
flon, on the Harlem road, with the Houstanic at Sheffield, Mass., a dis¬
tance of fifteen miles.
This it is said, would give an unbroken air-line
route from from a
point near the southern boundary of Vermont to
new

1

Companies.

Europe. By this line
brought within forty-eight hours ofj Odessa, and an Eng
travel from London to the Black Sea in eighty-four

LIST.

“ not ascertained.*’

railway, the “Alexander,” is about to be constructed in Rus¬

sia, which will bring the fertile corn districts, on the borders of the
Black Sea, into communication with all parts of

A

SHARE

] signifies “ nil,” and leaders

counties of Ohio and Indiana.
A

was

Connecticut.
Fairhaven and Westville..!
Hartford and Weathersfield..,

50

32|

47*

.

100,000
300,000

100,000
300,000

*

New York.

Broadway (Brooklyn)

RAILROAD AND MINING SHARE

216,918
200,000 55,780 15,491;
Brooklyn, Bath, & Coney Island.
106,125i
61,625
Brooklyn, Central and Jamaica..
804,870! 492,150 146,218 7,216
Brooklyn City
.1... .\ 1,331,357! 1.000,000 542,641 132,836!
Brooklyn City and, Newtown...
284,765
346.000 61,453 7,881
Brooklyn City and Ridgewood..
51,328,
53.500
Buffalo

MARKETS, NEW YORK.

Saturday, June 24.
Street
The 6tock market has fluctuated
considerably during the week, but Central City (Syracuse)
prices have advanced under the influence of a strong bull movement. Central P’k, N. & E. Rrv. (N. Y.) 994,655 446,073 19.794 7,008
Coney Island and Brooklyn.....
543,687
494,800 63,286
Many of the stocks are engineered by cliques, and their efforts to ad¬ East and North River (N. Y.)...
650
.650
vance prices are favored
Y.)
by the extraordinary ease /in the money mar¬ Eighth Avenue (N. street Ferry 978,534 800.000 388.598 124,445
42a street & Grand
600,000
726,361
ket, and an increased demaud from outside
f
operators. The clique in Fourteenth Street (N. Y) (W’g)
Grand street & Newtown
Rock Island is
working its price upward. Thy Michigan Southern Harlem Br., Morisania & Fortfm
party does not progress, and Fort Wayne is heavy to move. Atlantic Main and Ohio Street (Buffalo).
Niagara street (Buffalo)
Mail was sold at 150$ ex.
j
dividend, and at the close was held at 152. Ninth Avenue (N. Y.)
447,598
795,360 97,24ij 23,479!
N. Riv. & Wall St Ferry (N. Y.)
Cary Improvement is firm at 26*. Mariposa- is hard to move, notwith¬ Port Morris and Westchester...
1,200
1,200
81,500 7,636! 3,977
standing the flourishing statements made by its manipulators. Cum¬ Rochester pity and Brighton...
Second Avenue (N. Y.)
1,135^848 650,000 280,354! 51,127
berland Coal is dull., New York Central and Erie
Sixth Avenue (N. Y.)
1,161,893 750,000412,6001 99,227
qre both strong, and Tenth
Avenue and 32d St. (N. Y.)
closed with a
tendency to advance.
Third Avenue (N. Y.)
j ~
1,819; 308 1,170,000 682,131 233,079
Troy and Lansinghurg.
.L... .•
Monday, June 26.
Utica
,

6 100
100

9

ioo"

3

.

69

12

100

’"*

"

The stock market

Cleveland

and

was

firm and advanced at the first

City

regular board.

Pittsburg, Reading, Rock Island, and Erie

most active stocks

on

the list.

150$, and at the close it

was

Sales of Atlantic

held

Mail

were

were

the

made at

firmly at 162.

Quicksilver was firm
at 62. Cary Improvement declined
$ per cent, selling at 26$, and at
the close 25£ to 26 was bid. Fort
Wayne is firm, and it is stated that
a clique intends to advance the
price. Hudson River is steady. The
market closed quiet but firm.
5
!
Tuesday, June 27.
was active and
buoyant at the morning board, and
a
heavy business was transacted, 'f'here was a general advance
throughout the whole list, ranging from one half to three and a half per
cent. There was a slight reaction after the first
board, owing to sales
by parties to realize profits; but the market readily took all that was
offered, and at the close was strong Stocks are difficult to borrow.
Sales of Quicksilver were made at 52$ to 53f;
Cary Improvement at
25$; Mariposa at 14 to 13$, and Atlantic Mail at 151. Illinois
Central
advanced from 126 to 129 at the
mojrbing board, and at the second
board reacted to 127. Cleveland afid
Pittsburg is active and strong;
also Michigan Southern and Rock Island. Erie was weak
during the
latter part of the day. The bulls have the market
completely under
their control, and the number of outside buyers is
decidedly increased.
The stock market




i

V. Brunt St. & Erie Bas. (B'kl’n)
New .Jersey.
Hoboken and Hudson City
Hoboken and Weehawken

Jersey City and Bergen Point...
Orange and Newark

West Hoboken and Hoboken....

Pennsylvania.
Chestnut and Walnut (Phila.)

CitLzens’( Pittsburg)

Delaware County
Fainnount and Arch St. (Phila.).
Frankford and Southw’k (Phila.)
Germantown
;
Girardi College (Phila.)
I...
Green and Coates St. (Phila.)....

Hestonv., Mantua & Fairrriount.

Lombard and South St. (Phila.)..
North Philadelphia
Oakland (Pittsburg & E. L.).

Philadelphia & Darby.
Pittsbg. Alleghany and Manch’r.
Pittsburg ana Birmingham
Race and Vine (Fairmount)
Richmond & Scnuylkill (Phila.)
Ridge Avenue and Manyunk

....

.

Second and Third St. (Phila.)
17th and 19th St. (Phila)

Spruce and Pine (Phil. & Gr's F)

10th and 11th Sts.
13th and 15th Sts.

West

(Citizens)..i

(Phila.)

Philadelphia
Maryland.

Baltimore City,»•«•«••••

12

100
100

100 240

"

7,080

2460
62,000

1,693
4,582

310
752

30,000
70,000 17,228

9,986

•

500,000

32,000
134,400

411*666

21*1,666

100,000

40,000

235,421
185,913
30,729
194,618
759,261
377,824
81,612
232,954
100,000

127,217

71,050 19,1.83

100, 0001 28,761
100,000 100,381
23,780 6,876
200,000 77,533
490,530 251.897

10

50,439
20,036
1,473

‘'

112.245

50

“5,901

81,029
176,540 41,534

7*
50

160,000 102,862 24,703 m
150,000 166,776 51,494 20
60,000 59,473 -.3,929
90,000 54,041 0,320
’

29,500
86,447
93,921
65,355
305,000
130,000
179,635
478,202
114,368
175,610
176,049

102,000
....;

10

337,879,

29,500 37;605 !b49i
100,000 .32,449 6,29
75,00ft 67,930 6,096
48,000 58,060 15,984
180,000 95,336 1,418
100,00ft120,000 39,334 8,ii3
203,757 355,774 98,863
120,000 41,269 9,-418
159,312 79,670 21,297
‘

192,750,162,367

20

51.179

20

100,000116,912 24,831
249,100220,672 16,233

yj

700,0001 670,000 239,059 faW-

49*

I

'

26

'

|,

354 755

March.

GREAT WESTERN.
July. , Aug.
406,076
332,098
314,521

226,733

197,267

! 214,679

448 815

406 680

74,690
78.361
110.935

63,995

86,211

76,426

75,621
93,591

65,358

75,250

63,761

72,196

81.994

90,625

81,453
73,474
95,0%

101,355
154,418

104.372
195.803
2S8 159

122.084

132,301

145,542

.'.....100,991
261,903

162,723

178,786

206,090

232,583

|

-

Total.

Dec,

446,044

381,810

357,556

3,709,970

94,928

73,751
104,254
115,201
156,869
307,803

64,937
80,2%
111,955

938,641
1,098,464
1,225,001
1,673,706
2,770,484

ALTON.

AND

103.635
136.897

141.174'

149.137

128,191
157,948

132,639
170,044

107,758
122,487
119,409
170,910

224,257

312,165

354*554

320,879

153.294

252,015
m

1 319 316

96.3 140

CHICAGO

ISLAND

ROCK

AND

*

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

77.408
77.007

89,170
76.609

83,030
120,776
140,024
158,735

63.975

175,482

243,150

185,013

246,331

289,403

IftR 17*>

202.321

(■ 240,051

273,876

317,8:39

221,709
390,355

371.461

280,209
466,a30

535,675

481,165

506 290

467 710

551,122
708,714 i

435,945
705,4%

404, las
545,943

3,975,936
5,858,297

79,673

76,304
82.467
88,401

117,284

82,220
82,400
105,253
164,8%

780,236

94,406
98,528

143,a36

185,920

184,614

208,291

134,500

88,410

130.542

154,084

145,839
152,537

119.947

117,086

146,268

161,503

1:39,142

160,306

210,729

216,030

138,795
1%,435

224,9S0

307,874

375,860

324,865

299,607
519,306

473,186
655,364

72.389
84,603

K6S 004

90,607

75,676
122.512

102.353
144.995

76,459

130.225

126.798

56,779

85,239
106,263

76,918
88,468
146,839

176,105

67.210

145,916
154,058

275,506
4$2,054

359,,888
521,059
-

-

TOLEDO.

AND

v

59,856
78,170

123,319

NORTHWESTERN.

AND

CLEVELAND
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

1,181,003
1,261,050
1,423,439
1,969,267
3,095,470

139,049

! 997 960

J

!

CHICAGO

1863
1864
1865

336,617

75,457
118,753
135,595
201,134
321,037

82,895

90,621
138,374
170,937
243,178

198,679

305 554

232,208

.

66,703

92,873

100.403

104,272
102,163

72.834

75,709
86,260

62,29-1

55,652

52,778

44,781

61,791

76,032
90,324
87,915

165.780

121,278

69,716
103,407

55,085
63.137
64,910

50,386

85,663
103,175

65,907
65.302

99.569

52.269
71.710
90.882

66.573
60.285
78,538
95.134

102.176
130.551

203,329

158,077

125,000

100,000

113,515

154,245

182,110

84,640

112,507

-

150,397
183,649

889,499
955,959
1,167,544
1,579,509
1,942,993

.

-

ERIE.

1

*

55.123

55,734
81,531

Nov..

Oct.

396,847

460 499.

CHICAGO
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

Sept.

June.

Mav.

April

;

EARRINGS—MONTHLY.

ATLANTIC AND
Feb.
229.041
384 147

Jan.

-

.

[July 1,1866.

THE CHRONICLE.
RAILROAD

Year.
1864
1866

*

•

;

•

.

1859

319,593
315,000

‘33,657

361,819

393.409

393.409

458,560

547,174

430,063

638.006
956.445

626.070
948.059

606,610
587,416
i 848,783

319,955
372.705

528,842

595,024

770,148

731,243

1,114,508

1,099.507

1,072,293

1,041,975

994,317

886,039

845,695
.....984,837
908,341

380.343
457,161

349,953

433.311

601.595
839.949
934.133

354.000
404,507

372,296

391,932

304,708

I860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

1,240,626

1,472,120

1

192,161
212.714
223.157

-

307,330
458.953
501.231

525,936

190.589
209,422

205,343

175.773
161.047
167.560

192.442

472.240

356.626

270.676
278,540

244,771
281,759

424,870

311,540

253,049

219,890

236,637

191,648

271,085

275,643

289.224

416,5S8
522,555

459.762

423,797

206,246
334,687
406,373

592,276

401 997

1-16.424

173,261

212,118

295,750

300,595

239,911
302,174
340,900

321,059
284,020
410,336

243,249

4%,433
661,391

437,679
647,141

268,100

219,561

361,600

■'

6,214,183
8,400,334
10,469,481
13,429,643
'

270,083
340,738

261,079
343,929
423,578

407,992
510,100

232,033

1,933,434

220,370
246,283
403,571
484,550
507,552

2,075,822

225,1%
224,401
359,463
424,531
603,402

2,664,848
2,899,612
3,445,827
4,571,028

2,023,53*
2,922,970
3,726,440
4,274,556

•

'

•

248.971

259.643

268,983
352,786

289,862

511.305

478,576

640,179

799,236

414.543

243.163

372,593

6,329,447

J

AND

CINCINNATI.

29.384
40,706

37.271

56.687

46,452

58,704

52,804

77,112

75,055

89,533

94,375

96,062

33.904
38,203

26.252

25.891

38,579

32,668

53,778

56,540

77,874

(50.540
90.a55

64,306
73,215

35.326
86.964

98,112

86,626

93,503

37,520

32.301

54,246

44.027

45,811
49,102
61,759

59.082
112.266

130,218

141.771
144,915

108,721

60,229
90.463
76.163

106,967

111,260

71,587

69,353

109,661
155,417

186,747

212,209

139,547

113,399

168,218

'512,218
710,225
1,017,868

55,257

48,544

76,764

68,863

97,047

92,772

90.900

81,329^
ai,059
90,576

44.895

799,841

67,990
61,835
112,913

1,153,407

146 034

,

MILWAUKIE

as,903

62,907

39.501
43.637
47.010

67.130

76,132

44,925

102,749

115,1:35

88.221

88,177
"140,418

98,183

74,283

70 740

106 6SQ

119.a33

163,152
248.784

363,996

366,361

413,322

'I860

110.7i 2

160,311

r

1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

142.334

107,749
119,764

151,617

•

230,159
242,073
.'.....252,435

159.658
278.848

151.902
236,432
348,802

306,324

279,137

3-14,228

1859
1860

380,239
387,128

509,211
561.078

1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

489,065
749,163
920,272

370.544
402,530
420,793
631.956

256,600

AND

PRAIRIE DU

AND

SO LJTHERN

170.362

200,826

181,9as

230,508
304,445

557.227
338.454 I

268,613

264,935

330,651

267,126

138,084

122.272
138.342

149,099

•

1,163,734
1,247,258
1,711,281

117,013

315,258

369 104

366,245

151,170
136,821

173,870
233,851

178,773

235.690

276,109
308,106
402,219

128,393
123,377

193,540

251,423
236,846
295,956
308,168
408,445

189,145

278,891

129,022
200,134
258,634
306,486
376,470

2,305,142
2,124,314
2,650,702
3,168.065

520,3%
523,047
872,985
1,002,798
1J57,818
1,039,902

6,303,703
7,154,622

279,539
348,048
411,806

2,068,896
2,189,077
2,647,833
3,302,541
4,120,153

1.

CENTRAL.

165.741

158,510

123,085

172,614
175,6%

149,550
186,039
236,463

133.620

172,189
193.328

216,624

206.221

271,553

265,780

263,244

346,781

337,240

CENTRAL.
504,217

591,920

743,599

692,382
562,076

868.985
6%, 175

752,841

892,744
1,079,551
1,450,076

300,474

d01 466

NEW

174,002

YORK

478,563

j

407,107

189,077

>

-

,338.276

I

1,754,819

637,792
730,736
952,960

325,818
375,567

273,722

152,172
184,972

1%,182
242,089
307,474
339,794
405,510

276,181

226,819
238,012
358,862

■

1%,495'
203,492
231,265
305,284
332,360
448,934

218,465

238,495

627,051 j
710,814
867,590

/'

180,915

-

241,236
'

MICHIGAN

899,478

130,184

205,055178,526

126.558

161,391

153,728

921, asi

163.615
177,879
154.369

101,710
127,273

123,7%
134.688

145,258
170,842
186,951
192,120

790,167
936,587

139.761

134,726

NORTHERN INDIANA.

175,481

143.626
166,454
153.170
157,500

245,858

CHEEN.

37,429
107,117

48,797

■

106,828
116,9:38

*

73 R49

89 186

131,467
140,925




135,2%
193.442

464 604

327,900

104,345

409,628

447,813

585,141
689.688

551,700
677,073
736,114

495.943
558,743

544,494

610,41T

J 839,126
1.004,435

841.165

749,571
818,512
1.055,793

770,223
911,397

|

523.138

144,982
215,449

840,450

r

.307.333

322,369
375,488
408,866

3,%9,010

-

709,671
811,458

927,036
1,018,375
1,041,522
1,196,435

968,228

1,045,401
1,157,818

7,996,783

9,693,244
11,069,863
13,230,417

581,372

1859

163,551
161,106
192,216
345.685

436,742

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

139,951

1862

75,252
109,808
100,872
170,078

293,420
337,350

290,676
684,260 '

1 029,736
1,273,117
1,059.028 ! 1,105.664
904 436
915,600 1 300 DOO
PHILADELPHIA AND READING.
j
248,862
241,695
215,475
230,377
155,327
las,609 |
225,464
257,410
327,495
314,806
171,841
265,011
-278,270
248,110
265.358
289,987
191,266
252,154
270,051
160,538
263,917
414,707
244.423
283,9%
254,285
388,725
217,161
258,674
574,486
451,884
396,771
505,517
429,929
361,a34
-461,809
QSR 1SS
767 17ft
KRQ 3ft4
711 457
1 170 241
532,786
617,021
PITTSBURG, FORT WAYNE AND CHICAGO.
154,022
203, S53
192,779 • 182,566
188,331
165,795
152,574
248,031
180,429
270,675
265,735
204,778
202,071
216,501
277,380
261,210
282,695
249,419
274,258
295,77s1:
277,009
407,077
461,965
395,845
250,753
427,094
366,598
462,987
625,547
506,641
457,227
611,297!
588,066
525,751
532,911
738 107
601 93ft
696,738
886,511
ST. LOUIS, ALTON ANTf TERRE HAUTE.
85,359
93,766
67,721
112,384
68,748
71,854
63,881
130,378
118,077
123,949
110,603
123,115
113,798
120,310
157.785
160.496
218,235
149,855
144,942
155,730
147,4a5
177,625
202,771
169,299
153,903
1’OLEDO

.

1860
1861
1882

*8«

170.157
193,951

193.931
189,280

177.829
269,282

1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

1868
1864

180.000

CENTRAL.

199.4as

MICHIGAN

1863
1864
1865

156,973

167.220

t

192.054

*

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864

157,443
169,549
197,762

155,164

273,726

*

209,994
229,334
181,084

279.268

MARIETTA

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

1,334,217

140,860
114,804
159,769
190,364

188,060-

190.1,30
299,944

1862
1863
1864
1865

1,224,909

816,801

1,301,005

125,305

183,758

185,926

546,410

719,354
885,136
965,294
1,222,568

RIVER.

202.392

ILLINOIS
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865

4,651,049

412,723
714,211
963,869
1,035,321

5,335,424

515,948
756,421

361 760

418,711

414,764

561,448
734,108
1)02,906
1,024,649

.

115,444
129,996
122,683
151,427

156,281
150,808

308,963

366,802

536,608

587,242

455,2&5

••••••••

141,269

121,123
134,606
139.751
202.346

281,568
425.047

185,257
321,844

1860

1 ,105.301

465,959

600,104

359,114\

477,642 )
419.010 \
615, %2
687,092

330 970

HUDSON
1859
1860
1861
1862
“1863
1864
1865

l

86,321

64,414
62,551
56,006

73,679

42,064
47,043
47,142
91,971
95,843

103.056

76,274 ’
as,582
132,111

132,890

128,987

139,171-

W5VT53

'144,001

l

67,946
79,278
106,845
134,272
127*010

138,788

AND

WABASH.

67,428
80,074
113,578
152,585
156,338

84,879
93,464
115,214
105,654

139,628

"by*

264,622

339,911
234,456
448,994
714,302 *

1,125,635

288,619
283,646
321,208
368,956
291,763
276,209
466,557
463,873
746,955
915,902
754,651' 1,032,149

454,826

526,009

2,715,395
3,315.501
2,905,839
4,088,837
6,824,083
-

245,1)38
270,086
397,525
463,509
675,360

95, %9

2,335,354
3,021,787

466,300
691,566

191,138
301,968
370,983
487,642
914,082

129,166
143,748
202,966

135,610
162,921
204,776

1,117,597
1,554,913

77,599
137,086

51,296
92,574
189,528'

231,253
302,790

286,844
352,071
401,299
505,814
701,352

118,887
144,736
203,441

153,470
234,134

245,977
249,032
278,219

264,334

3,745,310
5,123,934
7,120,466

2,060,717

-

122,785
133,722
168,219

116,379
244,114

170,380
120,595

125,027
162,868
172,870
151,052

243,8401;

221,570

106,100
142,537

,

147.548

111.339

134,563
220,208

266,154

•♦»»•••

miimi

926,785
1,172,100

1,408,147

1,439,798

2,060,822

/

/

i

July 1,1865.]

THE

CHRONICLE.

27

THE CHRONICLE’S RAILROAD-SiJARE

THURSDAY’S

CONTAINING-

MARKET

PRICE

LIST,

I\N

YORK

JE W

•
•

;

-

o.fl
ci—'
©

5*

P.

Q

Markei Price.

Companies.

*3

©

...

...

1,419,768

j

13,118,902
1,050,000
2,260,000

•

California.

1

.

.

217

!

•

.

.

Naugatuck

.

’

•

400,132

Hartford and New Have
Housatonic
N. Haven, N. London aniti Stou
New Haven and Northampton'.
New Loudon Northern
New York and New Haven
Norwich and Worcester
".

•

Delaware.

iS

j

....

J91,4S5
•

Georgia.
Atlanta and West Point
Atlantic and Gulf—M. Trunk

1,250.000
733,700

•

.

.

•

•

•

.

•

•

1,000,000
595,588
3,06S,400

72

.'

Savannah, Albany and Gulf

500,000

.

.

-■

South Western
Western and Atlantic,

...

997,S62
5,009,200
1,000.553
3.630,000

Illinois.

Chicago and^Atton
Chic., Burlington and. Quincy.
Chicago and Northwestern.....
Chicago audRogk Island -....,
Galena and Chicago Union....

5
6

4,205,939
5,738,040
3,731,316

...

5

5,603,000

6,028,400
1,648,561

.

.

.

5

*19,015,970

1,780,295
3,900,000

....

Great Western................
Illinois Central
Ohio and Mississippi
St. Louis, Alton & Terre Haute

93
10S

986,001

,

.

.

•

•

.

V6ll,050

.

Cincinnati and Chicago
Evansville and Crawfordsville..
Indiana Central

|

65^
j

100

Terre Haute and Richmond

159*

•

2,998,253

•

.

•

•

••

•

.

921,449
2,700,000

.

.

.

....

Burlington and Missouri
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska..
Dubuque and Sioux City
Keok., Ft., Desmoines & Minn.
Mississippi and Missouri.......
.

1,5S2,1G9
514,573
1,104,587

•

5,892,199

•

•

•

....

86k

V. 0. Opelousas and Gr. WesVn
N. O. Jackson & Gr. Northern.

1,340,213
'

104 i

61*1

Minnesota Transit

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

Mississippi Central
Mississippi and Tennessee
Southern Mississippi

«

a

•

....

•

•

«

.

30

Pacific

71,513
\"

South Western Branch
St. Ijouis and Iron Mountain.

1

10,379,554
6,246.950
1,906,736
2,697,090
84S,770
3,314,775

PREFERRED

.,

7
•

•

^

•

5
5
4

Cleveland and

3k

AND

Rate. Paid. Markc price

Am'nt standi

0

6
7
7
7
7

.

—




6

600,000

595,922

•

•

54*
21

95*

•

•

145

59*
H

•

•

•

•

N. Y., Providence, and Boston.
Providence, Warren & Bristol..

•

96

40
43

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

,

,

,

,

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

31*

Memphis and Charleston
Memphis and Ohio
Memphis, Clarkesv. & Louisv.
Mississippi and Tennessee
Mississippi Central and Tenn.

•

....

•

115

South Carolina.
Charleston and Savannah
Charlotte and South Carolina..
Greenville and Columbia
North-Eastern
South Carolina
Tennessee.
Central Southern (Tenn.)
East Tennessee and Georgia...
East Tennessee and Virginia..

....

McMinnville and Manchester..
Nashville and Chattanooga....
Nashville and Northwestern...
Tennessee and Alabama
Winchester and Alabama
Texas (all aided by State).

•

216,962

Galvest., Houet. & Henderson...

275,000
455,000

:

Houston and Brazoria

....

Houston and Texas Central....
San Antonio & Mexican Gulf...
v

■

Vermont.
Connect. & Paeeurnpic Rivers..
Rutland and Burlington

1,280,400

2,233,376

•

•

■

•

•

•••

•

•

•

•

•

.

-

.

•

•

•

•

i

Rutland and

332,000

Alex., Loudoun &

....

2,969,S61
1,500,124

r

f

....

•

•

10

Orange and Alexandria
Petersburg and Lynchburg
Petersburg and Roanoke

....

•

Hampshire..

Manassas Gap..
Norfold and Petersburg
Northwestern Virginia

»,» •

468,605

2,063,655
1,365,300

Washington

Vermont Central.
Vermont and Canada.
Vermont Valley.
Western Vermont
Virginia

516,164

;

1 06

•

883,200

....

1,981,197

Richm., Frederick & Potomac.

•

•

•

•

3,452,813

•

•

•

•

....

800,000

•

4,940,000
4,826,800
2,705,720

•

Wisconsin.
Kenosha and Rockford
Milwaukee and Minnesota
Milw'kee and Prairie du Chien
Racine and Mississippi

•

•

•

•

•

....

•

•

•

•

11,750,000

99

1,631,130
15,123,430

15

....

16,802,745
•

110

x

'

V

4,658,706
1,380,000

5,000,000

RAILROAD

15

European and North American.
•

•

t

.

-•

4,273,281

87

Canada.
Buffalo and Lake Hnron ()£ y.)
Montreal and Champlain......
Grand Trunk
Great Western...
Northern (O. S. & H.)
*
New Brunswick.

.67*

32

70

,

r

103

Pittsburg, Columbus and Cin..
Sandusky, Dayton and Cine
Sandusky, Mansfield & Newark.

;

60

Virginia Central.
Virginia and Tennessee

....

3,162,754
14

Richmond and Petersburg
Richmond and York River
Seaboard and Roanoke.

.•l,

657,812
844,200

„■
...

57
77

Richmond and Danville

1,041,880
835,750
.

•

•

•

70*
....

7

5*
•

7'
t 9 • •

Railroads.

i

S3
.S3

o a

5“

au

Rate. Paid. Maek t price.

Erie (preferred)
Hannibal and St. Jo.

and

Elmira & Wm.’eport (prof.),,.

59
80
56
241
56

•

•

5

•

-

•

New Brunswick and Canada
Nova Scotia.
Nova Scotia
New Granada.

...

Panama

1

250

STOCKS.
Divid’ds

shares out-

(guar.)... 2,494,900
Ohio, (pref.)
3,000,000
Boston, Con’d & Mout. (pref.) 1,354,000
Buffalo, N. Y. & Erie (pref.).. 850,000
Cheshire (preferred)
2.017,825
2,425,200
Chicago and Alton (pref.)
Chicago and Northw’n (pref.). 2,400,000
Detroit and Milwau. (pref.)... 1,500,000
Dubh’e and Sioux City (pref.) 1,987,014

•

....

2,056,544

1,403,018

Pittsburg

o *

Atlantic & St. Law.

Balt,

536,654
3,S09,949
*•
570,000
t
29S,721
!■ 798,285
317,447
144,894

■

©

Railroads.

Philadelphia and Reading.....
Philadelphia and Trenton.
5
Phila., Wilmington, and Balt,.
Pittsburg and Connellsville....
2K Pittsb’g, Ft. Wayne & Chicago
Shamokin Valley <fc Pottsville..
Tioga
•

1,378,500

GUARANTEED

20*

Phila., Germant'n & NorriBt’n..
Phila, and (Sunbury) Erie
•

5,000,000

Marietta & Cincinnati, reorg...
Ohio and Mississippi
...

•

•*

•

505,214

Dayton and Miehigan

•

•

•

1,097,000

Cleveland and Toledo

•

•

•

56

e

1,289,673

Columbus and Indianapolis....
Columbus and Xenia

•

•

;*

108*

Clev., Zanesville and Cincin...

•

•

♦

80

Buffalo, Baycu, Braz. & ColVdo

123
Cine., Hamilton and Dayton..
Cine., Wilmington and Zanesv.
Cleveland, Columbus and Cine. ^130
45
Cleveland arid Mahoning......
Clev., Painesville & Ashtabula.

5

•

•

•

••••••«••

109
40
93

Western North Carolina
Ohio.
Atlantic and Great Western
Bellefontaine and Indiana
Central Ohio

■■

•

•

‘

65.

North Carolina. ’
Atlantic and North Carolina...
North Carolina

■ fcp

O

| 9S5,743
•

Raleigh and Gaston
Wilmington and Manchester...
Wilmington and Weldon ....

•

•

•

706,365

1,201,000
1,429,00S

Syracuse, Binghamton & N. Y..
Troy arid Boston

•

•

150

Harrisburg and Lancaster
Hempfield
Huntingdon and Broad Top....
Lackawanna and Bloomsburg ..
Lehigh Valley
Little Schuylkill

»

-103

2 981 ‘>67

North Missouri
Platte County

1

89.

Staten Island

3,526,800
369,673
750,000
1,490,800
2,452,217

Missouri.
Hannibal and St. Joseph

3,486,916
1,971,127

.

290,212

S66,939
1,859,S13
1,628,350
2,155,800
2,441,176
5,000,000
1,036,065
3,300,000
3,832*712

Minneapolis and Cedar Valley.

....

12S

Saratoga and Schenectady
Saratoga and Whitehall

.

.

4,000,000
973,300
1,130,470

Mississippi.

2,000,961
798,285

500,000

.

1,545,225

80
60

Chic.,Detroit <fc Can. G.T. June.

fr

Jersey,.

Home, Watertown «fc Ogdens.b’g
.

«

•

....

437,917

129
6
175
116
150

Rensselaer and Saratoga
«

•

•

13|1

Lackawanna and West’n.

East Pennsylvania,
Elmira and Williamsport......
Erie and Northeast

Rhode Island.

Oswego and Syracuse.

1,200,130

35

Michigan.

7,153,836
2*459,207

....

•

•

110

!

New York Central
New York aud Harlem
Northern (Ogdensburg)

....

500,000
03-,10-2

Louisville and Nashville

Minnesota.
Minnesota and Pacific
Southern Minnesota

•

76*

0.00,911

Detroit and Milwaukee
2,950,000
Michigan Central
6,057,436 6
9,016,200 3% Mich., S’th’n <fe N’th’n Indiana

i

200

Vicsbnrgh, Sreveport <b Texas.

.1,283,05

102
140

!

Hudson River

24,209,000
5,717,100
4,571,900
390,340
010,000
1,499,100
300,000

Kentucky.

Covington and Lexington
(Lexington and Frankfort....
(Louisville and Frankfort

•

' Del.,

•

1,767,373
6,164,532
500,000
367,300

78

1,852,716

tun

Louisiana.
....

•

3,758,406

Indianapolis and Madison
Louisv., N. Albany & Chicago.

752,733
516,072

•

Beaver Meadow
Catawissa
Cumberland Valley

•

7,460,000

.

103*

5
4

20,105,200

72

Jeffersonville

...

-

m

44

Buffalo, New York and Erie...."

I 1,977,950

772S812 8
2,800,000
1,517,450 10

Iowa.

•

687,872
850,000

1,015,907
.

105

.57*

Northern New Jersev
*...
Raritan and Delaware Bay
Warren
West Jersey
N KW YGRK.
Atlantic and Great Western....

33

..

.

New

5

1,307,750
5S1,S93

128

Indianapolis and Cincinnati
Ind., Pittsburg and Cleveland.

.

hyz

150,850
1,203,553

•

Y689,900
>§35,971

.....

5

1,157,800
4,397,800

25
100

Indiana.

1,106,679

1,000,600

Cheshire
Concord (par $50)
Manchester and Lawrence
Merrimac and Conn. Rivers
Northern New Hampshire .....
Suliivan
New Jersey. *
Belvidere Delaware
Camden and Ambov.
Camden and Atlantic
Central of New Jersey
Morris itnd Essex

1,500,000

Atlantic and Great Western....

•

5

13.211,228
999,200

1

62*

Boston, Concord and Montreal.

2,0S5,9‘25

Muscogee

2,921,900
built and

i,soo,ooo

100

•

5,010,944

115^

•

1,508,000

Vermont and Massachusetts....
Western (incl. Alb. <fc W.S, etc.)
Worcester and Nashua........

5

•

1,983,900
3,500,000
956,900
96
5,698,250
.604,190
1,000,000
111
600,000
1.27
1,182,550
! 1,S09,565
■x 45
Li
622,345
100
710,000
i
no
2,297,250
120
2,646,100
120
4,132,985
3,147,750
60*
100
13,430,950
87
1,267,200

New Hampshire.

!
Bank).

Macon and Western.

•

.

5,150,000
1,141,000

125

$1.362,21S

Troy and Greenfield

2,214,2*25

j

Lowell and Lawrence
.
Nashua aud Lowell
L
New Bedford au4 Taunton...;.
N. York and Boston Air Lilies
Old Colony and Fall River....
Providence aud Worcester.....
Salem and Lowell
Taunton Branch

..

Georgia (and Bank)

•

.

609,950
1,275,901

|

]

Brunswick and Florida
Central of Georgia (and

151,887
4,300*800
4,15G,000
1,500,000

4

1

103*

.

250,000
923,942

Augusta and Savannah

•

•

....

243,305

l

j.
/
.

357,155
3,015.100
1,650,000
|

J.

Fitchburg

4

500,000

1

Florida
Florida and Alabama
Flo. Atlantic and Gulf Central
Pensacola and Georgia

-

Cape Cod Branch

000,0(H)

r 1

Florida.

.

Eastern

200,000
8

rj

Newcastle and Frenchtown

744,520

.

081,066
1,591,100
3.000,000
3,540,000

1

•

Atlantic and St. Lawrence
Kennebec and Portland
Maine Central
Portland, Saco aud Portsmouh.
Somerset and Kennebec
Maryland.
Baltimore and Ohio

Washington Branch

4,500.00(1

113

Delaware

...

.

j

i

..........

Pennsylvania.

-

Northern Central
Massachusetts.
Boston and Lowell
Boston aud Maine
Boston and Providence
Boston and Worcester

1,830,000
4.076,974
3,100,000

I

.

.

3

602,152
3,000,000 !...
2,122,000 i.,.

3,242,316

4
5

Connecticut.

Danbury and Norwalk

...

738,538
1,010,000 I

v

....

©

Xi ©

Companies.

'S

1

58
....

109,200

I-

©

"3

P.C.

Androscoggin

-1,500,000

..

©

Maine.

1,2S7,779

|

4

i

e.

1,050,860

1'

Sacramento Valley

...

l,O31,SO0

I

3

Arkansas.

307,010
1,936,740
2,350,000
2,000,000

*

cn

£

$15l,S33
2,494,900
|

Markei Price.

Companies.

'S

P.

Memphis and Little Rock

793,850

.

<3

1

Montgomery and West Point

...

351,524

\

'

c.

Alabama and Florida
Alabama and Mississipjrt
Ala. and Tenne&M River* —
Mobile and Girara.
Mobile and Ohio

id

f

.

*

2

sjr
or.

Alabama.

$877,953
335,01(1
l,067,00f

fit

*Eg

8,515,700 7
(pref.)... 5,253,85(5 7
Harrisburg and Lan’r (guar.). 1,182,100 7
Housatonic (preferred)
1,180,000 8
Marietta and Cinn. (1st pref.). 5,105,384
7
do
(2d pref.)... 3,424,169 7
Mich. S. & N. Indiana (guar.) 2,183,600 10
Mil. & Pr. du Chien (1st pref.) 2,773.500 8
do
(2d pref., 1,014,000 7
Milwaukee & St. Paul (pref.). 2,255,000 7

7
7
8

.......

44
95
54
....

3* 72

m

81*
50

•

ioi

3

40
30

3

10
8
7
—

140
93
75

82*

Railroads.

Amo’uft
I

Peoria & Bureau Val.

shares out|

standig.

(guar.). 1,200^000
Philadelphia & Read. (pref.).. 1,551.80C
Philadelphia & Trenton (guar) 1,000,000
Pitts. F’t W’ne & Chic, (pref.) 2,000.000

Pittsfield & N. Adams (guar.) 450,000
Port. Saco Portsmouth (guar) 1,500,000
St. L.v Alton & Ter. He (pref) 1,700,000
Toledo & Wabash (pref.)
984,700

Troy and Greenbush (guar.)..
White Mountains (guar.)

274,400

200,000J

3.

7
6
6

6
7
10
7
6
6

6
7
6

7
6

6

6

7
.

Paid. Market Iiprce.

-

•

...

4.

82
100
94
60

52*
t

♦ • •

28

THE CHRONICLE.
MINING

STOCKS—GOLD, SILVER, COPPER, IRON, LEAD, ETC.

Copper Stocks.

Copper Stocks.
©

X

CJ

15
*3

©

^ I
® I

■4^

© ©

Companies.

©

JP

Ml P.'

X

Iron, Coal, etc., Stocks.

•

^

0L

Si
O

Companies.

g
S 'E
a

£

•4J

tE

t-,

r\

*o

>

£ a
e3 g

Ph

3 *

£ t*r

e.

aa

2 g
<3 Jj

P

Number share. Parvalue ofshare. Market ppsrihce.

p.

Companies.

a-c

Action
Acton Fale

Ca .200.000
Ca 50,000
Adventure
L. S. 20,000
Albany and Boston do 20.000

do

Arazona
Ariz. T. 10.000 100
Ascot
Ca. 20,000: 20
Astor.
L. S. 20.000
Atlas
do
20,000
Aztec
do
20.000
Balt, and N. C
N. C. 20,000: 5
...

do
.L. S.

-

.

20.000
do
20,000
Ca. 125,000
do. 200,000
L. S. 20,000
.Ca. 200,000
L. S. 20,000

.

Beaver..
Bedford
Black River
Bohemian
Bolton
Boston

Corinth..'...Vt. 20,000
Brooklyn
‘.L. S. 20,000

10

Cambridge

Champlain

Ca. 200,000

Chatham

do 200.000;
do ioo.ooo!
do 200.000
30.000

Chaudiere
Chester

Cheticamp
Chippewa
Cleveland
Cliff
Clifton
Collin

L. S.

20.000
20.000

20.000

do 200.000'

Lyster
Madison
Malden
4i Mandan..
4
Manhattan
45c Marquette
215c Maryland
m Mass
Massachusetts
50c Mendota
10c Merrimac
m Meteor
t
1* Mesnard

j. do

....

Ca. 100,000
5
L. S. 20,000
do
20.000
do
20,000
Columbian..
do
20,000
Consolidated...... do 20,000;....
—

....

2

20,000j....
20,000

Deep River—...N. C.
Derby

do

20,000

20,000

do
do

20.000
20,000
'. do 20.000
\. .Ca. 200.000
...

Douglas
Dover

Dudley

do

El Dorado

(silver). do

Esco.t

3

20,000

Rockland
20c! Roscoe
121 Rudisell
St. Clair.
St. Flavien
12
St. Francis..
13
St. Mary’s (L. &
-1
Salem
Sharon Consol
32
Sheldon
50c Silver Creek
Silver Hill
85c Silver Lake
6
Silver Valley

Hilton

Stadecona
Star
Stark
Strafford

20,000
5
2
5

5

.Vt. 100,000
30,000

2
10

|L. S.

do

20*™'

do
do
do

20.

Victoria
Vulcan

20,
20,000!

Washington

do

20,000

Hungarian...

20,000

j

Hudson
Hulbert
Humboldt

20.000

100,000

20,000
20,000

West Minnesota
Wickham

40,000!
L. 20,0001

5

9*

10

j .Ca.

AND

Pa.

40c Dorset (G.)...:
do 170,000
57c ,E1 Dorado (G.)....Nev. 100,000
25c Empire (S.)
do

Empress (S.)
Eureka (G.).
131 Excelsior (G.)
95c Frankfort (G.)
2
Garrison’s (G.)
15

3

Vandermark.

15
....

Col. 30,000 10

...

100,000
.Col. 100,000
100,000
100.000

14

2
5
5
5
5

1

2

50c

2
25
5

10
,55c

li

do 100,000
:. 50,000 10
50,000 10
100,000 3
Col. 300,000 10

N. S. 200,000
S.).Nev.
Col. i5o,66o
Hope (G)
do 80,000
Isaac’s Harbor (G.)N.S. 100,000

3i

i?

‘12,666

.

Quicksilver
Cal.
Renfrew (G.)
Ca.
Riviere du Loup (G.)do
Rocky Mt. (G.)
Col.
:Sacramento (SA.. .Nev.
San Antonio (S.).A. T.

Santa Clara (Q,.).. .Cal.
Santa Rita
Ariz. T.
Scottie (S.)
do
Sherbrooke (G.)..N. S.
Sierra Nevada (G.).Col.
'Silver Hill (S.)..,.Nev.

5

is

’‘5,066 ioo' i7
20,000 10

7?

6,000 50

2ii

16,000 50

93
'

‘46,066 1 ‘20‘

[;2o’,666
122,760

NAVIGATION

10
20
5
5

..Cal.

Gold..
Gold Field
Gold Hill
Gold River
Gunnell (G.).
Halifax (G.)
Harmon (G. &
Holman (G.)

iio

4,000 100

Sugar Loaf.......... Pa.
Summit
(.
do
20c Susq. Coal & C. Mt. do
51 Tamaqua
do

6
1

Hi
2*

li

2?
10c

21

ioi

Suffolk

i

21
10
100
20
10
25

do

58

10

90c
65c
25c
1
25

....

1

Stafford
15c

L. S. 20,000
do 20,000

CANAL

5

'Colorado (G.)
(Consol. Greg’y

171

5
5

....

R. I.

Shawmut
Short Mountain—Pa.

i. do 100,000

Winthrop
Wyandotte

—

Schuylkill Valley... do

20,000
200,000

Wickopee

!*

.Pa.
20c New Creek
1? North and Luzerne, do
75c Penn
100,000,
^... do [100,000 50
Penn. Cannel....... do I 6,000 50
"
Picton
do
4,000100
do
Pine Knot..
4,000 50
50c Port Hood
4,000100
4
;. XL. Md.
Potomac
40,000 10
Powell
.Pa.
85
2
Princess Alex—N S.
5,000100

do

J do

do
do

St. Clair—

L. S. 20,000

.

do

n Ridgeway.

20,000

20,000
20,000
do 20,000
i. Ca. 100,000

Waukegan

do
20,000'
do
20,000,
do 200,000;

do

Mahanoy
Metropolitan...

10c Mulgrave
Narragansett

J do

Waterloo

100,000
Col. 50,000
(G.) do 50,000
iCopalinshe (G.)
do 200,000
I jCorisannie (G.)
do 100,000
Corydon (G.).
do 100.000
Day & Bnshnell(G.).C. 300.000
(Denver (G.)
Ca. 50,000

”21

20,000

25,000

International
N. S.
Law rence
.v.
Pa.
Locust Mountain... do

Middle Coal Fields. do
30c Milford
*
Mill Creek
Pa.

20,000

.

Pa.

Henry Clay

Macan

3
16

20,000

Sutton...,.....! .(..Ca.
Jj. S.
Tremont
J do
Union (L. and M.).! do
Vernon.
j do

Pa.

1* Lorberry..:

20,000

Toltec

Pa.
—

..

20,000

! do

Grand Tunnel
Green Mountain

Pa.
do

Hazleton
75c
4

>

Sussex

100,000

....

Hampton & Balt...Md.

Ca. 1100.000
L. S. ' 20.000

Superior.

.N. S. 100.000

50c

50.000 20

Isabella (G.)
..Col.
Kennebec (G.)
Ca. 100,000 5
73? Kent (G.).-.
N. S. 200,000 1
42? Lake (G.)
Col.
Lake Major
5,000:100
50
.N. S.
Libertad (G. & S.)Mex.
20.000 25
Manhattan (G.)
Col. 100,000 10
5,000 100
20
Mariposa (G.). .•
Cal. 100,000 100
60.000
5
61 Massachusetts (GQ.Ca. 500,000 5
5,000 100
51 ;Mex.Pac.(G. & S.)Mex. 100,000 100
10,000
1021 Montague (G.)
N. S. 50,000 10
4,000 ioo 50 Montana (G.)
Col. 100,000 5
3 (Montezuma (G. & S.)N. 100,000
5
91
Mt. Alpine (G.)
Col. 250.000 5
32,300 50 65 ML Vista (G. & S.)Nev 50,000 10
New England (G.).Col. 50,000
3,000 100
5
New Gregory (G.).. do 50,000 10
20,000 50
2,000 100
61 New York (S.)..... do 100,000 10
N. Y. & N. S. (G.)N. S. 100,000
40
5
4,666 ioo 11 Nova Scotia (S.)... do 100.000 2
Oldham (G.)
2,000 100
do 100,000 2
Otate (S.)
1,000 20
Mex.
100
Palma (S.)
do
Peck (G.)
N.S. 100,000 5
50
Peninsular (S.).. L. Cal.
2,500
Picacho (S.) — ..A. T. 50,000 50
Pontiac (G.)
2,000
Col. .50,000 20
Prince Albert (G.). .Ca. 100,000
8,000 10
2
Quartz Hill (G.).. .Col. 40,000 25

.Pa.

George’s Creek

200,000

.

Chebucto...
110

50 105

200,000 25
100,000 10
200,000 2

(Central (G.)

1

45c

4.000 50
10.000 50
50.000100

Md.

Franklin
Fulton
Gilbertson

20,000

:. .Ca.
J. do

...

10,000

do
do
Ca.
..Col.

(Canadian (G.)
5
5
5

3
47

do
i do
do

.

’71

M)L S. 20,000
do
20,000

Springfield

000....

10
6*
35

"i

60,000

100,000
200,000
L. S. 20,000

(Bullion (G.)

Pa.!

Carbondale
Central

2
33

do 10,000 100

II Burroughs (G.)

.

56

.j.Md.

10c South Bedford
South Side....

Hope

Huron
Indiana
Inverness
Isle Haute
Isle Royale

20,000
20,000

do

.

2

do

[Brigge (G.)

N. J.

Clinton
Coal Brook.
2
Continental
Cumberland (pref.)
11
Daniel Webster
60
If East Mahanoy
Everhart

L. S. 20,000
i .Ca. 100.000
:. do 100,000

Southampton

20,000'

do

1

20,000

do
do
do
do

N. Y. [100,000;

N. S. 100,000

Atlantic (G.).-

!Boston (G.).,.

21

2
5

...Pa.!

Shaw’angunk

;

—

20.000
20,000

do

j

Jersey

...

20,000 25

do
Ca.

New

do [100,000
200,000

American..1
do
Am. & Mex. (S.).N.M
Am. Pioneer
A. T
Arizona (silver)... do

4

5
....

100,000;
80,000
do 200,000

i

5
2

81 'At. & Pac. (G. & S.)Nev 50,000 10
(Bay State (G.)
Col. 200,000 5
Beacon (G.)
N. S. 200,000 2
i 'Benton (G.)
Col. 100,000 5
(Black Hawk (G.)... do 50,000 100

3
Union
100,000 5
N. Y.
10c Wallkill
2
Coal and Anthracite:!
American
■:
Pa. 37.500
do I 50,000
75c Ashburton
8c Atlantic & G. C
Md.
do '
Baltimore
100
Bear Valley
do : 40.000 124
Pa. 100,000 50
Beaver Meadow
do 1 10,000 50
Belmont
25c Big Mountain
do
1
Blackhall.
N. S.
8,000; 25 ‘
33
Boston & Pictou:. do 100,000: 5
4
Bridgeport
Pa. 30,000, 10
5? Broad Mountain.... do 30.000; 10
2
Butler
do
23c Cape Briton.. ....N. S. 200,000
21.

L. S. 20,000

4

....

do

do

do
do
do
do

.|.

;Richford
Ridge

....

Highland

.j

I

Flint Steel
do
20,000
Forest City
do 20.000
Forest Shepherd., do
20.000
Franklin
do
20,000
French Creek...... Pa. 100,000
Gardner City
L. S. 20,000
Gardner Hill
do
20.000
Girard
do
20,000
Glade
do
20,000
Glencoe
..Ca. 200,000
, Globe
L. S. 20,000
Grand Portage .... do
20,000
Grand Trunk
Ca. 100.000
Great Western... .L. S. 20.000
Green Mountain
Vt 20.000: 10
Guilford
‘...L. S. 20.000:
Hamilton
do
.000
Hancock
do
.000
Hanover
20.000,
Hartford
;;.. do
20,000 25
Hazzard
do
20,000
.

Pennsylvania

J
H Petherick.
10c Pewabic
15
Phila. and Boston.
If Phoenix..

20,000

25,000 20
200,000
L. S. 20.000
do
20.000
do
20,000

Evergreen Bluff... do

20,000
i .Ca. 200,000
L. S. 20,000

2

Si-

I

.100,000

621 c Sussex

20,000

Pacific

25c
5

20

Pontiac.
do
20.000
Prince of Wales.. [ .Ca. 200,000
Providence
'..It. S 20,000
3 [Quincy
do
20,000
25c | Reid Hill
•. .1. Ca. 200,000
25c ! Reliance
..L. S. 20,000

Ca.

Essex
Etna
Eureka
Everett

20,000

H National........... do 20,000
Native.
20,000
,
. do
431 Naumkeag
do
jj.. .Ca. 20,000
15c Nelson
200,000
Nequaket
JL. S. 20,000
50c1 Nevada (silver).. .1 do 20,000
12c New’ England
do 20,000
If Newton
j. .Ca. 200.000
New York
.L. S. 20,000
N. Y. and Passaic.N. J. 100,000
North Cliff
_L. S. 20,000
North Silver Lake, do
20,000
North State
do
20.000
9
North Sutton.... .1 .Ca. 100,000
5c North Western:. .L. S. 20,000
Norwich
J do 20.000
18

do
J do

'100,000

(G.)

Alps (G.)

N. J. 20,000100
16
N. Y. & Boston..N. Y. 100,000
5
Ca. 100,000 5
n Oswegatchie ..;
Placentia Bay—N. F.
Ramsay
Ca. 20.000 25
Rossie.
do 100,000
5
11

Ca. 150,000

'

Ca.'100,000!

..Col. 50,000 10
..N. S. 100,000 3
do 100,000 3

Acadia(G.)

150,000 10

.N. Y.
Pa.

Lancaster
Macomb
N. Y. 12,000:
Mineral Point
(100,000:
Mount Hope;.. .N. Y. 100,000!
National
v
;
i

7

Ca. 200,000
do 200,000
.L. S. 20,000

Eagle River

20,000

41 Pittsburg h Bost. do

L. S. 20,000

Dunham
Durham

20,000

....

Middlesex.

Vt. 100,000

Devon
Dorchester

20,000
20,000
20,000
20,000

do

Cornwall
Dacotah
Dana

.L. S.

do
do
do
do

.

Gay’s River
Hampton
Keystone

....

do 20.000!....
do 20,000
Ogima
do 200,000; 1 175c Ontonagon.,
do 50.000; 10
Ottaw’a

Delaware

20.000

j. do 20,000
L Md.
.L. S. 20,000
do
20,000

n Michigan

Copper Falls
Copper Harbor....
Copper Hill
Copperas Hill

L. S.
do

Amenia
Bucks Counts
45c iCanoda.:..
21 iClute
3* Crvstal Lake.
- j.
45c Erie

20,000;

J. do

.Etna (G.).
Albion

Lead and Zinc:

.L. S. 20,000;
i. do
20.000:

Missisquoi.......

L. S. 20,000
do
do

Harewood
5
-...; 20,000
iKahtadin
Me.
3,000100
n Lake Superior
L. S. 20,000; 25
14c Massachusetts
25,000! 1
Mount Pleasant
Pa. 10,000 50
50c Teal Lake
L. S.
2
Tyson
.............
50,000 10

Montezuma. ..N. Mex. 300,000
Morrison
L. S. 20,000
80c Nashua
4
do 20.000

20,000
Vt. 100,000:

Carp Lake

25

Quicksilver:

3

1

6

6
20c

do

Cascade
Central

20,000:

Mineral Hill
MinnesotaL. S.

Ca. 100,000
L. S. 20,000
do
20,000

Canada

Ca. 200,000!
do 200,000;

...

B. and

Brome
Cabot
Caledonia

20,000'

...

j

of

Gold, Silver, and

George’s C’k C & I.Md 10,000 100 til8

20,000!

do i

PfA

6,000

of

|

50

East River.

Lake, .i
Lawrence
1‘. L. S. 20,000:
Lennoxville........ Ca. 100.0001
Logan
do 100,000

2i
...

BareHiHL
Bay State—..

21

....

Amygdaloid..—L. S. 20.000
Md. 50.000! 10

Copake ..........N, Y. 50,000

1

Lafayette

20,000:....
21

% Annapolis

20.000
,!.. do i 20.000

Knowlton

20

....

,.*5..L. S.

do
Kickapoo
King Phillip...... do

....

Ca. 200,000;
L. S. 20,000
Ca. 200.000;

Allouez
American

18c Jefferson
5c Keweenaw.

■

♦

5'

Iron

1

[

Aigomah
AliiSnce

Copper:

5

Number share. Parvalue shares. Market ppsrihce.

Companies.

of

I

Copper:

Gold, Silver, etc., Stocks.

•

S<

■

•m

[July 1, 1865.

*

*

4

‘50‘
50

*

40

[Sonora (S.)

Ariz. T.
N. S.
Stafford (G.)....
Ca.
[Star (G.):
Col.
Stew’art (G.)
Ca.
Tascher (G.)
do
Victoria (G.)....... do
Waverly (G.)
do
Windsor (G.)
Col,
United States (G.). do

jSoutham (G.)

....

14
5
52
50c

40,000 25

120,000 21
20,000 10
—J..
60,000

iii

50

100,000 10
....

ioo,666
100,000
100,000
100,000
50,000
100,000
50,000
100,000
75,000

5
5
25
5

21
75c

10
2

10
10
20

....

STOCKS.

-5=—

Companies.

O

2

Oh *

$

Chesapeake and Delaware.
Chesapeake and Ohio

Delaware Division

100
100
100

Delaware and Hudson

100




°MS
-u

©

TgS

®

©

©

X

2,1’C

Companies.

sa°

$
pc $
1,343,563
581
8,226,595
29
1,633,350
10,000,000 10144

of shares. Aion’ft Stock.

Par

$

Lehigh Navigation
Monongahela Navigation.'....
Morris

(consolidated)

Schuylkill Navigation (con.),.

50
50
100

50

’£

5

Market price.

©

iM ©
,

© o

Companies.

$
pc $
4,282,950 6 541 Susquehanna and Tidewater. 50
Union (preferred).
60
726,800 3
1,025,000 5 85 West Branch and Susqueh’a.. 100
21
1,932,457
60
Wyoming Valley

.

o

ss

*

P*

a

$
pc
2,048,260
•81
2,750,000
136
1,000,000
50
700,0001
-

July 1,1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

<ftf)c insurance Journal.

29

Fire Insurance

Home

;

Howard

A convention of the Insurance

Companies doing business in the
Accidental branch, was held at Cincinnati on the 15th of
June,
to take into consideration a
variety of topics interesting to them¬
selves. We trust that
they were enabled to establish a general sys¬
tem of rates for this
department of the business, and rates which
will approximate more
closely to the actual risk assumed, than any
which have hitherto
appeared. The accidental business requires
a
thorough overhauling. The risks of accidents in this country are
but
imperfectly known. Unless the various companies now in the
business do something towards making the rates fair to the
assured, wg^shall discuss this subject of accidental risks more at
length.
From the proof-sheet of Superintendent Barnes’
report we make
the following interesting extracts
concerning the first English stat¬
ute
relating to Marine Insurance:
'
The first English statute
relating to Marine insurance was passed
1601. Special Commissioners were
appointed to meet weekly “in the
office of .the Assurances,” to hear and decide
summarily all Marine in¬
surance litigation.
The act was entitled “An act concerninge all mat¬
ters of Assurances amongste
Merchentes,” the jpreamble to which is
worthy reciting as an epitome of the knowledge on this subject in
England at this early day :
“Whereas it ever hathe bene the
policie of this relme by all good
meanes to comforte and

encourage the merchante, therebi to advance
and increase the generall wealth of the relme, her
majestie’s customes
and the strength of shippinge, which consideracion is now
the more req¬
uisite because trade and traffique
is not at this presente soe open as at
other tymes it hathe bene. And whereas it hathe bene

Humboldt

.........

Indemnity

International....... 1,000,000
Importers* <fe Traders’ 200,000
Irving
200,000

.....

Long Island:
Lorillard.
Manhattan
Market
Mechanics’ <k Traders’
Mechanics’
Mercantile
Merchants’
.........

Metropolitan.......
000) ............
Nassau, L. I

500,000
150,000
200,000
200,000
200,000
210,000

National
New Amsterdam....
New World
New York Equitable
New York Fire <fe Mar.

an usage

50
60

25
25

....

-

'

Companies.'
Adriatic
AStna
American:
Arctic
Astor
Atlantic
American
.

200,000
200,000
600,000

...

Bowery
Brevoort

Broadway.;
Brooklyn, L. 1
.*

.....

Exchange

Commerce
Croton

Eagle
Empire City

Excelsior

Exchange
Firemen’s
Firemen’s Fund
Firemen’s Trust
Fulton.
Gebhard
Globe
Goodhue
Greenwich
*
Grocers’
Gallatin
Germania
Guardian ..........
Hamilton
Hanover
..

Harmony
Hoffinan




150,000
300,000 60
200,000 100
200,000
200,000 25
300,000 25
160,000 60
200,000 25

“

800,000 20
210,000 70
260,000 100
600,000 60
200,000 60
250,000 100

600,000 100
400,000 50
200,000 60
200,000 100
800,000 40
200,000 100
200,000 50
150,000 30
204,000 17
160,000 10
160,000 10
200,000 25
200,000 100
200,000- 60
200,000 100
200,000 26
200,000 60
150,000 50
500,000 50
200,000
150,000 16
400,000 50
800,000 e 60
200,000 60

85

6

3* & 30 Sc’p

May
May
May

6
6

j....., .6

March

Last
Sales.

Off.

January ..1

6

May..

...,

17
150,000 100

City

Corn

Dividend.

50
50
60
25

163,000.

Central Park
Citizens’
Clinton
Columbia
Commercial
Commonwealth
Continental

Last Semiannual

Val.

$31)0,000 $25

Exchange.*

Baltic
Beekman

Par

Capital.

5

931 96

Companies.
G. West..

Capital.

February
January
•

•

•

•

January

Mercantile..

6
.......10
76

•••••••••

...

.$3 60

....

,..

...5

,80

......

January

...7

....

90

171*

..5

April

7*

....

January .,..j.,..‘..7
January ......••6

....

...

....

....

70
..

January
February
April

101
175
127
102
61
117

90*
90

80 100
..

112

4

L
..

5
6
6

..

90

..

..

April

5

..

May.............6
May....... 1.....6

112*

156*
92*

..

90

..

....

TRUST

Union Trust Co

.v

United States Trust Co...

New

.........6
.........5

100

.............

....

•

••«

180

.8*
6

New

100

.7
....8

105
165
140

....

....

95
80

,

150
125
110
100
100

....

Februry
January

6
6

April

4

....

October 10

3

....

....

....

...'.6

January
January
January..

125

5

90

•

......5

March

•

•

<

101

.10
6

January
January
January

....7
.3*
3*

February
February

130
101
98
112

8*
6
.

New

January
January

88
100

7*
6

Feb., 10 <fc

60

120
125

Scrip.

January

5

Telegraph Co..
Telegraph Co

Western Union

103*

..

124

100

Jan.July

Oi 4i

fTrtn
Citizens* Gas YIa
Co.,
Harlem Gas Go

$25

Paterson Gas

Atlantic Mail
«

...

198
100

10 165

100

170

February.. .5

100 ..4 quarterly

90
70

April25th..2

100
...

!

2,000,000
AAA AAA

1,000,000

119
117
140

AA

20
60
60
100
50

1 t fv

185
107
•

Steamship Co 2,000,000

100
100

4,000,000

•

•

127*

........

20
6

“

Last
Sales.

...

1,000,000
110,000

Light Co...

180
100

Off.

January... .4
February...5

100

stocks.

;..
400,000
Manhattan Gas Co.4,000,000
Metropolitan Gas Co
2,500,000

Williamsburgh
J’y City & Hoboken Gas Co

Last dividend.

100

Brooklyn 1,000,000

New York Gas Co

120

.

“

Par.
val

3,000,000

1

116

O. S.

100

DwaaLImh

sif

..;
Jan.July

COMPANIES.

“

Brooklyn Gas Co

Last
Offered. Sales.

STOCKS.

J
1,000,000

gas

Pacific

Payable.

TELEGRAPH STOCKS.

•

•

•

•••

•

•

•

,95
185
800

•

••A

EXPRESS STOCKS;

Adams.

January
January

.»..

98*

125

scp.

114

.

136

....

Companies.
Capital.
Farmers’ Loan <fc Trust Co. $1,000,000
New York L.I.<fcTrus^Co. 1,000.000

U. States
....

....
....

106
200

800,000 Jan., 10 and 60 scp
200,000 Jan. 8* Feb. ex. 3

MISCELLANEOUS

American

January

January

119*

......

January
April

161

200

Last dividend.
20 esh, 40 scp.

»

...5

6

107

....

January
10
January 10 <fc 60 Sep.

| j®
600,000 Jan., 7 esh, 20

80

105
95
120 131

.........

113

....

.4

.

3,600,000 March.

Metropoli’n
Washingt’n

219

........10

February
January

Columbian.

160 160
70

10

....

10

January
January
January;

$1,000,000 Jan.,

92

6

.

December

•

Yonkers <fc N. York.

100

February j,

'250,000 25
400,000 60
160,000 50
'600,000 100

Washington
Williamsburgh City.

104

MARINE COMPANIES.

86
90
111
90

New

#,# •

....

United States

....

....

200,000,100
150,000 20
surance made for their goodes,
merchandizes, ships and things adven¬ Phoenix............ 500,000 50
tured, or some parts thereof, at such rates aud in such sorte as the
160,000 60
par¬ People’s
ties assurers and the parties assured can
agree, whiche course of deal- Relief
200,000 60
iog is commoDlio termed a policie of assurance ; by means of which Republic
300,000.100
policies, if it commeth to passe upon the loss or perishinge of any
Resolute
200,000 100
shipee,
there foilowethe not the
undoinge of any man, but the loss lightethe Rutgers
200,000 26
rather easilie upon many than heavilie
1,000,000 60
upon fewe, and rather upon Security
them that adventure not than
upon those that doe adventure ; wherebi St. Mark’s
150,000 26
all merchantes
especiallie the younger sorte, are allured to venture St. Nicholas
150,000! 25
more yillinglie
andfreelie” (48 Eliz, Cap. 12.)
Stuyvesant
200,000 25
Sterling
200,000
Standard
200,000 50
INSURANCE STOCKS.
Tradesmen’s
160,000 25
Fire Insurance

February

26

150,000
200,000

.

....5
5
8

January
37* January

1,000,000
600,000
850,000

American....
River........

....

5

60

60

100
156

....

.10

January
January
January

176

....

...8

January
January

...
....

85
2 00,000 100

Niagara.

10
5
5

March.

800,000 100
150,000 60

Montauk...........
Morris (paid in $200,-

tyme out of
amongste merchantes, both of this relme and of for- Nor’-West’n(Oswego)
raine nacyons, when they make any greate
adventure (more especiallie Pacific
into remote parts) to give some consideracion of
money to other per¬ Park...
sons (which commonlie are in no small
number) to have from them as¬ Peter Cooper.......

mynde

50

....

....

May......... .*.. .8

40
20
50
800,000 100
150,000 25
200.000 50
500,000 26
600,000 100
200,000 50
200,000 25
150,000 60
200,000 50
200,000 50

Lamar
Lenox

Last
Off. Sales.
143
100

8
.5

New

1280,000
150,000
160,000

......

Kings County
Lafayette

North
North

January
January
January
January
February

60
25
80

150,000

Jersey City........

Last Semi-annual

Dividend.

100

200,000

Jefferson..

Knickerbocker

>

Capital.
Val.
2,000,000 100
200,000 60
800,000 50
200,000 100
160,000 100

.

Hope

ACCIDENTAL INSURANCE.—CONVENTION OF COMPANIES.

Par

-

Companies.

3,000,000
8,000,000
250,000

States.2,000,000

100
500
100
100

2,000,000

100

American
National
United

Wells, Fargo <& Co,

290
•

•

*

•

»»••»••

•

•

•

•

•««»
»

•

m

.

.jjj

Countries.

f5gr,ThB Asterisk (*) indicates that in cases where
it is prefixed, unless the letter be registered, prepay¬
•

C. Am. Pac.

.

•

*

£ o.

...

Aden, British Mail, via Southampton
Alexandria, Prussian closed mail (if

10

...

mail

*38

mail, via England,
by Am. pkt
open mail, via England,
by British pkt
open

de

Alge ia, French mail

33

39

Marseilles....

do

do

...

45

Arg«ntine Republic, via England

46

via France, in French

do

mail from-Bordeaux

Ascension, via

30

England...;

10

Australia, British mail via Sth’mpt’n
do
do
Marseilles

...

46

by private ship from New

do
do
do

Y ork or Boston
Fch. mail (<S7A Austria Co.)
by Beem. or Hamb’g mail
via Marseilles and Suez..

do

mail via Trieste..

*

J

do

by Brem.

or
mail.....

do (except

do

prp’d
Hamb’g

Italy)Fch.mail.

...•

...

28

do
do

open mail,
American

*21 *42

American

21

London, by
5

packet

...

Bey rout,

*21 *42

Prussian closed mail, (if
prepaid, 38cts)

Bogota, New

Bolivia.....

Granada

.

*33 *66

Bremen, Prussian closed mail,. ?
do
do
when prep’d
do
do
Bremen mail

do
do
do
exceeding 3,000 m.
Brunswick, Prussian mail.
do
do
when prep’d

by Brem. or
French mail

do
Buenos

Hamb’g ml.

...

*15

*30

...

...

Bremeu

Canary Islands, via
of Good

Hope, Brit, mail, via
Southampton

do

do

England

Brit, mail via
Marseilles,

33




.

60

.’
Hamburg mail

do

[•

Amn. pkb

...
...

*28
*15

by American pkt..
mail, via Brit, pkt

do
do

op.

*30
*21 *42
*15

....

'

French mail...

do
do

by Bremen

or

y*

.

do
do
do

*35

.do when

p’paid
(Strelitz and Schwerin,)
by Bremen or Hamburg

1

(Strelitz and Schwerin,)
French mail.

Montevideo, via England

Hanover, Prussian closed mail
do

do

do
do

by

Bremen

when

prepaid
Hamburg

do

„,;

‘.

*30

...

28
*15

*21 *42

45

mail
60

30

'28

...

Frenchmail.... *21 *42

do

/

do

by Bremen and

Hamburg mail.

•

^

22

...

from N. York

6

*21 *42

Netherlands, The, French mail
open

do1

by Amer. pkt.......
open mail, via Lon.,!
by British pkt

mail, via Lon.,
21
6
*10

Newfoundland

10

Granada, (except Aspinwall and
Panama,)
New South Wales, British mail, via

18

New

5

...

*10
* 15

do

.

33

...

British mail, via

do
do

89
45
Marseilles
French mail.... *30 *60

New

'

do
do

hampton

Nicaragu, Pacific slope, via Panama

.‘28

Norway, Prus. closed mail, (if p’paid,

...

45

open

.

♦ •

21

do

do
do

38

4...

*

British mail, via Mars’ls 39 45
French mail.......... *30 *60

*21 *42
*30
....

3

...

Zealand, British mail, via South’

v

by mail to San
Francisco

*30

*21 *42
**•*....

...

.....

or
*15
mail.....................
*21 *42
French mail

mail, via London, by
American pkt...

10

do

do

do
do

...

H^’ti, via England
Holland, French mail
„

via Frauce, by Frn’h
from Bordeaux

do

21

...

‘2S‘

....

34 v

...

-

Southampton...

...

French mail.

45 4
60.,

39
30

mail

do

do

...

prepaid..
do

45
33

...

New Brunswick.....

...

Bremen mail
Prussian closed-mail
do when
do

...

do

*42

from New York

..

Prussian closed Aail...

'

do.
do

24
1

Hamburg, by Hamburg9 mail, direct

46

42

*30 *60

British pkt

21
5

...

places excepted above.......
Mecklenburg, (Strelitz and Schwerin,)

| open

do

33
42

•

to

*25

mail, via London, by
{ American pkt.
open mail, via London, by

do

•

21

>

*30 *60

and Pacific coast
do

*15

Hamburg,

mail

*22
37

Nassau, N. Prov.,' by direct steamer

pre¬

*

29

do
via Marseilles
French mail

do
do

...

pkt..

closed mail, (if
paid. 40c)

French mail

-

Martinique, via England
Mauritius, British mail, via South’pt’n

Naples, Kingdom of, Prus. clos’d mail

.

Greece, Prussian

*15

French mail..

do

,

mail, via London, byf/

do
open mail by British
Great Britain and Ireland...

*21 *42

mail

33

do

open

Duchy, French

Madeira, Island of, via England....
Majorca and Minorca, British mail...

*30

(except Luxemburgh)
Hamburg mail.... ...
Gibraltar, French mail
;^21

.

r,

do

*21 *42

prepaid, 28c)..

do

28

Grand Duchy, Bremen
mail
Grand Duchy, Hamburg

do

when

French mail
Bremen mail

*30

...

mail

10

45

Cape de Verde Islands, via England 29 37
,do
do
in Fch, mail, via
%Y...
Bord’x and Lisbon 30 60

30

.;

States, Prus. closed mail (if

do
do

*15
*21 *42

Mexico, (except Yucatan, Matamoras

Guatemala
German

60

53

or

*42

...

Duchy, Prussian
mail, when pre¬

Grand

;
f

45

*15

*10

*

64

do

83

paid

72

40

Gaudaloupe, via England

45

*

30

.

33

*21 *42
30

.

Gambia, via England.'

28

Ayres, via England
via France by French

Canada

Grand
closed

* 15 *30

prepaid...

do

mail from Bordeaux..

closed mail

68

..

.

*

do

60’

Malta, Island of, open mail, via Lond.

.

.

63

.

30

Luxumburg, Grand Duchy, Prussian

5

..

Islands, via England.....

do

*10

...

21

34

do

28
* 10

...

French mail.

France....

*21 *42

Brit. A. Am. Prov., except Canada and
New Brunsw’k not over 3,000 ra.

*27 *54

Frankfort, French mail
do I
Prussian closed mail

*15

Hamburg mail
French mail.......

mail
French mail.

do

49
45

...

Lombardy, Prussian closed mail, (if
prepaid, 40c)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg

*35
*20

via Trieste.*

*30
...

...

by Br'n or Hamb’g mail,

do*
Ecuador
Falkland

.....

..

»

Br’n or Hamb’g mail, via
Marseilles and Suez.,

\

do

18
SI
45

Brazils, via England,
do
France, in Fch mail from

do
do

*40

*30 *60
...

Bordeaux

Liberia, British mail

pre¬

closed mail, via Trieste..

by!|

.

...

45

(Eng. possessions,) Prus.

w

5

French mail

do

21

10

,

Trieste.... i......
do

London, by

by French mail,

do

5

...

mail, via Eng¬

via Marseilles...
do
French mail...

do

’

pack’t
open mail, via London, by
British packet
Prussian closed mail, via

do

r.

packet

open mail, via
British packet

21

British
land

*38

...

*30 *60

French mail.

35
"| 35
Japan, British mail, via Southampton Y • •

*

American

*27

Belgrade, open mail, via Loudon, by
do

*40
*30 *60
*32
.

Indies, open mail, via London, by

East

*21 *47
29 32

via London, by

open mail, via
British packet

do

-

do

England........

French mail

do

.

closed mail, via England,

3

C

paid, 33cts).
by Brem. or Hnib’g mail

...

do
do

60

do
do

r

45

39

(if prepaid, 36c).....

72

30

Denmark, Prus. closed mail (if

Baden, Prussian closed mail (if prep’d
28cts)
... *30
do Bremen or Hamburg mail
*15
do French mail
*21 *42
Bahamas, by direct st’r from N. Y. ...
5
Batavia, British mail via Southamt’n ... 45
do.
do
do
53
Marseilles,
30 60
do French mail
Bavaria, Prussian closed mail
*30
do
do
when prepaid ... 2S
do
by Bremen or Hamb'g mail ... *15
French mail
*21 *42
do

Belgium, French mail

40

*27*54

Marseilles......

55

mail, via

...

*15

Island, British mail via Por..

Azores

Islands, Prussian closed mail,

10

Curacoa via

in

prov.

60

53

Rica

*30

ml. when
do

,

35

Archipelago, French mail.... f 30
do
British mail, via %

do

Prussian closed

......;]... *25

Indian

Costa

55

*35

Honduras..

45

•

Cuba.,;
...

5

• •

Ionian

39

do

50 102

London, by

mail.....
French mail

do

..

„

mail

do

open mail, via
British pkt.

cts.

4* • • •
Holstein, Prussian closed mail, (if pre^
paid, 33c)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg;

Corsica, British mail by Am. packot ... 21
.do i
do
Brit.packet .,.
5
do i French mail,.
.•
*15 *30

Austria and its States, Prussian closed
do

Holland,

io.

cts.

S3
45

..

Corfu—see Ionoan Islands

by Bremen and Hamb’g

„

6

*30 *60

60

30

by Br'n or Hmb’g mail,'
open mail, via London; by
Am. packet.
open mail, via London, by
Brit.packet.

do

33

39

.

5

French mail

dd

45

Aspinwall

or Hmb’g
Marseilles and Suez
French mail

do
do

60

10
21

by mail to San Fran., thence
by private ship
Constantinople, Prus. closed mail, (if
prepaid, 38c)

*16 *30

Ara^a, British mail, via Southampton

,

packet

by Br’n,

do
do

6

•

Marseilles
do
do Br’n or Hrab’g ml.
via Trieste.... .4..

do

21

...

fo.

Y

34

do
do

*30 *60

«

i

...

China, Brit, mail via Southampton

*30

mail.

French

do
do

do
do
do
Chili.

33

...

prepaid 36c)
by Bremen or Hamburg

do

*

cts.

Countries.

cts.

open mail, via London, by
British packet
French mail
Brit, mail, via Southampton
Marseilles......-'
do

|o.

cts.

Acapulco

open
American

do

Exc. Exc.

j

J

Countries.

'

Sloop, via Panama

Exc. Exc.

i o.

mail, via Loudon, by

Ceylor i,

Not Not

N

Io.
cts.

■'

-

optional; in all other eases prepayment is re¬

quired.

(Not Not*

Not Not
Exc. Exc.

TABLE OF LETTER POSTAGES TO FOREIGN
COUNTRIES.

ment is

[July 1,1865.

THE CHRONICLE.

30

42c)
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail,

French mail.
Nova Scotia-—see Brit. N.
Provs..

10

...

Gulf Coast of.............

84

*

*46

*38

.

*88 *66

American

.. r.

••••••

Oldenburg, Prus. elosed mail, (if pre¬
paid, 28c)«•«•»•*• •••••

•

•

•

..«

•

•

•

*30

i

■"

July 1,1865.]
*o.

Oldenburg, by Bremen

or

*o.

cts.

Countries.

cts.

•

Countries.

herein mentioned:

*1S

2*

42

Panama

10

Turk’s Island...

45

Tuscany, Pr. cl’d mail (if prepaid, 40c.)

••••••*

Peru

do

|

do

Marseilles

Poland, Prussian closed mail (if pre¬
paid, 85c.)
•_
do
oy Bremen or Hamb’g mail.
do
by French mail.
Porto Rico,„British mail, via Havana.
Portugal, British mail, via England...
do
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail
do
by French mail, via Behobia
Prussia, Prussian closed mail
do
do
do

Rom.
do
do

•

......

60

...

do when prep.

do

by Bremen or Hamburg mail
French mail.

,

or

...

...

burg mail
•

(except Cuba)
Wurtemburg, Pr. cl’d mail

44

do
do

do
do

paid, 85c.)

by Bremen

or

Sandwich* Islands,

*42

do when pre.

...

do
do

by Bre. or Ham. mail

...

French mail

do
do
do

do

by Brem.

French mail

do
do

do
do

do

do

do

do

Frenchmail

w..
...

do
do

•

do Frenchmail
do by Bremen or Hamburg mail.
St Thomas, by UJS. pkt., to Kingston,
Jamaica
do
via Havana

Sweden, Prus. cl’d mail (if prep’d, 36c.)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg mail
do

Frenchmail

Smyrna, Prus. d’d mail (if prep’d,88c.)
do

French mail.

Switzeri’d,Pr.cl’d mail (if prep’d, 83c.)
do
do
do

French mail.......

by Bremen mail
by Hamburg mail
Syria, British mail, via Marseilles, by
do

*36

French
jacket
French mail

FRIDAYS.

53

21

42

30

42
18
34

...
...

*40
*33

*33 *66
...

*40

*30 *60
...

33
30

•

..

...

...
...

*32
21
6

.

Friday throughout the

Cash Advances made

GOODS, in lots adapted to the city and
country retail trade.
Catalogues and Samples morning of sale.
LEOPOLD

LITHANER, Auctioneer*
By Lithaner & Cristalar.
Stores Nos. 131, 133 and 135 Duane Streep

OUR REGULAR SALES OF STAPLE AND
FANCY DRY GOODS will be held on
TUESDAY AND FRIDAY, AND OF
WOOLENS and TAILORING GOODS
each THURSDAY throughout the Season.
LIBERAL CASH ADVANCES MADE ON

TRADE SALES and AUG
TION ROOMS,
No. 55 BEEKMAN and 85 ANN Street
We will give our
personal attention to sales

and

TUESDAY,
o’clock, at the Auction Room,

BY CATALOGUE—FOR CASH—A
general
assortment of Foreign and Domestic DRY

HAZELL, Auctioneer.

MERCHANDISE.
Regular sales will be held

SALES IF REQUIRED.

At 10

CONSIGNMENTS,

without

additional

charge.
A.

Foreign and Domestic HARDWARE, CUT¬
LERY, GUNS, FANCY GOODS, and general
28

/

stairs,

By J. E. Halsey & Co.

of

Prussian dosed mail

By Bremen or Hamburg mad..
Open mail, via Lon., by Am.pkt
do
do
by Brit pkt

■

REGULAR SALES will be held on
TUESDAY and FRIDAY throughout
the Season.
CASH ADVANCES; MADE ON CONSIGNMENTS, and GOODS HELD for FUTURE

business,

HARDWARE

60

in Europe, and Turkish
Islands in the Mediterranean, ex¬
cept as herein mentioned:

•

Fixtures and lease of Lofts:

^ 45

Mark’s

164.

Our

r

...

AT PRIVATE SALE.
Pews in St.

SALE—Two

LOCKWOOD, Auctioneer.
By Lockwood Bros. & Underhill
Stores Nos. 29 Murray and 33 Warren Sts.

1034 o’clock.

&c., &c., and all Machines suitable for the
manufacture of Ladies’ Dress Trimmings.
ALSO,
SILK on Spools, Cotton and Mohair
Cords,
Beads, Ac., &c.
| .
ALSO,
R. T.

the morning of

D. D

MACHINERY,
Consisting of Ribbon Looms, with Jacquards,
Spinning Wheels, Braiding Machines, Fluting
Machines, Hand Looms, Warping Mills, Bind¬
ing and Gimp Machines, Chenille Machines,

*35

*21 *42
*19
*19

on

!

Churce, Nos. 163 and

season.

At his store, No. 42 Walker street,
up
HIS ENTIRE STOCK OF

60

'*

FOR

MONDAY,

from

*
.

Catalogues and samples

on

WEDNESDAY,
At 10 o’clock,
By order of A. Purdie, Esq., who is retiring

45

...

At

Bulmoral skirts.
Gents’ Mauds.

cases

sale.

REGULAR SALE OF BOOTS AND SHOES.

22

21
5

Every week during the
■'

5

Turkey

■',r



RIBBONS and MILLINERY GOODS

21

30

cases

THURSDAYS.

47
*21 *42
...

Chtnes,

ALSO, FOR CASH,
(for account of whom it may concern),
cases Woolen
Shirtings,

16

168 and 170 CHURCH Street, between Leon¬
ard and Franklin Streets.
Our regular sales of FOREIGN and DO¬
MESTIC DRY GOODS will be held on TUES¬
DAYS and FRIDAYS.
BOOTS and- SHOES on MODAYS and

by Bremen or Ham-

Spain, Brit mail, by Amer. packet
do
do
by British packet.

the morning of

2

*21 *42

...

on

CURTIS, Auctioneer.
By Curtis & Co.,

‘ 28

open m’l via Lon. by
Brit, packet

do
via Marseilles
Frenchmail

A. full line Italian Cloths and Satin de
in all widths and qualities.

$100.

A. L.

*15

...

•

—

..

credit of four months, for
approved in¬
dorsed notes, for all sums over

*30

...

open m’l via Lon. by
Amer. packet.,

burg mail
Singapore, Brit, m’l, via Southampton.

.

GOODS
*

*15

or Ham. mail
*25
French mail.
*27 *54
Prussian closed mail (if

prepaid, 83c.)..................
Sicilies, The Two, Prus. closed mail.

—

—

a

sale.

Schleswig, by Brem.
do
do

pieces 3-4 Satin Laine.
pieces 6-4 Satin Royale.
—..pieces 6-4 Tricot Sedan.
pieces 6-4 Tricot Reps.
pieces 6-4 Sussia Lustre Beaver.
pieces 6-4 Moscowas.
pieces 6-4 Sealskins.
ALSO,
—

AND IMPORTANT SALE

Catalogues and samples

do French mail.. *21 *42
m
when pre.
or Ham. m.

ALSO,
pieces Cloths, to close invoices,
Consisting of
pieces 6-4 Belgian Black Cloths.

—

28

...

—

o’clock, at the salesrooms,

RIBBONS, SILKS, AND MILLINEY
Of recent importation,

do Brem. or Ham¬
burg mail..

ALSO,
pieces English Shirting Flannels.

—

OP

28
*15

..

100

WEDNESDAY,

(LARGE

On

when pre.

Saxony, King, of, Prus. cl’d
do
do
do

An invoice of Jaconet and Book Muslins..

KOBBE & CORUES.

At 10

*30

...

ALSO,
Linens, Napkins, Towels, Drills, Ac.
ALSO,

4-4 White

Stores Nos. 87 and 89 LEONARD STREET.

*21 *42

Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Meiningen and
Weimar,Pr.cFdm.

do

5

...

j By

*42

do

do

Cambric Handkerchiefs.

EDWARD L. CORLIES, Auctioneer.

^
#

(if

...

ij do

21

...

French mail
*21 *42
Bremen or Hamb’g mail
*15

...

do

packet,

open mail, via Lon.,
in British packet.....

200

3

...

French mail
*21 *42
Brem. or Ham. mail
*23

do

.

Lon.,

AUCTION NOTICES.

by mail to San

Savoy, District of...
*15 *30
*30
Saxe-Altenburg, Prussian closed mail

do
do

when pre..

*29

prepaid, 40c.)

do

pieces 22 to 34 inch Black Gros de Rhines,
Taffetas, and Gros Grains.
ALSO,
2,000 dozen 3-4 and 5-8 New-Stitched Linan^
—

*37

*30 *60

Sardinian States, Prus. cl’d mail
do

do
do

*........

do
do

/' j

pre¬

Hamb’g mail

Francisco

by

do

open mail, via
in American

•

•

French mail

by

do

*28

Romagna, Prussian closed mail (if
prepaid, 40c.)....
Russia, Prussian closed mail (if

45

89

...

,

*30
28
*16

. ..

38

•

...

French mail.... *27 *54
Bremen or Ham¬

do
do

"

42

*21 *42

Pap. States Pros, closed mail

40 pieces 6-4 Toile du Nord.
44 pieces 6-4 Challies.
50 pieces 4-4 Poplins.
40 pieces 4-4 Poile de Chevre.
50 pieces 4-4 superfine new
style Lastings.
135 pieces 4-4 Neapolitans.
120 pieces 6-4
Neapolitans, ex fine.
50 pieces 5-4 Gros Grains.
50 pieces 4-4 Gros
Grains, ex fine and new

...

42

80

•

SEASON,

Frenchmail.... 30 60
Venetian States, Prus. closed mail (if
*30
prepaid, 2 8c.)....
do
'
Frenchmail....... *27 *54
do
by Bremen or Ham¬
style.
;! •
*15 50
burg mail.......
pieces 6-4 Florent a Soie.
Venezuela, British mail, via South¬
The above are new and fresh
goods, per late
ampton
*
arrivals.
West Indies, British.
ALSO,
do
" not British

45

21

.45

do

34

...

,83
80

•

Including

British mail, via
Marseilles

ble for the Spring Trade.
LAST SALE OF THE

60

30

Southampton..

do

|

*37

*29
*30 *60
...

do via Bord’x & Lis.

do

60

-

>

...

o’clock, at the salesroom, 279 Broadway.

PACKAGE SALE at four months’ credit for
approved endorsed notes—300 packages
Foreign and Domestic Dry Goods, suita¬

...

do

53
30

French,

do

19

*42
*21 *42
*28
mail

French mail

CURTIS, Auctioneer.
Haggerty A CO.
9 Broadway and 57 Reade Street.
TRESDAYf

At 10

...

from Bordeaux
British mail, via England..
Van Diemen’s Land, British mail, via

British mail, via

•

Salesrooms

21 *42

by Bremen or Hamburg
Uruguay, via France, by French mail

45

cts.

...

do

Philippine Islands, British mail, via
Southampton .

■

do

22

•••

do

i

By French mail, via Austria....

■

B

as

•••

mail
Freneh mail

J. A.

ic.

0.
cts.

♦

Turkey in Europe, cities of, except

Hamburg

31

Not Not
Exc. Exc.

Paraguay, British mail, via England....

'

7~mm.

THE CHRONICLE.
Not Not
Exc. Exc.

do

mm

i;/:.'•••

'.O.

JOtJRNEAY, Auctioneer.
By A. Journeay,
No. 8 PINE Street.

on

each

REAL

Tnesday

ESTATE, STOCKS, BONDS, Ac., at
public or private sale.
Out-door sales and

season.

upon

without any additional charge.

sales of Furniture at residences attended
to#
I Houses and stores rented.

consignments
-

t

THE CHRONICLE.

32

United States

7.30 LOAN.
-

THIRD

SERIES,

Agency, and Designated Deposi¬

Government

tory of the
JOSEPH C. OR VIS,

are

are

U. S. 6^20 Six per cent.
GOLD
BONDS.
BEARING
These bonds are now worth a handsome pre¬
mium, and are exempt, as are all the Govern¬
ment Bonds, from State, County, and Munici¬

Issued from the office of

NINTH NATIONAL BANK HUNT’S MERCHANTS’ MAGAZINE,
of the

363

City of New York,

A

BROADWAY.
-

-

■

ery. U. S.
and sold.

OF

NEWSPAPER

WEEKLY

THIRTY-TWO FOLIO PAGES,

$1,000,000

Modelled after the

Celebrated London ECONOMIST.

Accounts of Banks, Bankers, and Business
Men solicited. Government bonds for sales 7
3-10th U.S. Notes on hand, for immediate deliv¬

I

is

published

every

‘

Saturday morning, and con¬

tains the latest Commercial and Financial

Certificates of indebtedness bought

news

from all

parts of the world, by mail and tele¬
graph, up to midnight on Friday.
A very large and efficient corps of reporters
and editors are engaged on each department;

£

OFFICE OF THE

•

issued under date of July
payable three years from that
date in currency, or are convertable at the opoption of thR. holder into
These notes

15,1865, and

CHRONICLE,

JOHN T. HILL, Cash’r.

Pres’t.

Capital Paid in

7.30 LOAN

THE COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL

United States.

THE

$230,000,000.
By authority of the Secretary of the Treas¬
ury, the undersigned, the General Subscription
Agent for the sale of United States Securities,
offers to the pubtic the third series of Treasury
Notes, bearing seven and three-tenths per cent,
interest per annum, known as the

[July 1,1865.

(fnlimbiint fflax’m Srarnto <fn.,

that the most mature

opinions, as well as
intelligence, will always be com¬
bined in the columns of this journal.
The Chronicle is accompanied by a Daily
Bulletin, published every; morning, containing
so

Corner of Wall and Nassau Streets.

the freshest

CASH

CAPITAL,

$3,500,000.

Dealers with this Company will be allowed
the option (to be signified at the time of appli¬
cation for insurance) of receiving in lieu of

all the Commercial and Financial

news

of each

scrip, at the end of each year, returns in cash, day up to the hour of publication.
The commercial classes, bankers, under¬
pal taxation, lohich adds from one to three per (guaranteed by certificate) of premiums paid
aod earned during the year, whether losses ac¬
cent, per annum to their valud, according to the
writers, shareholders, manufacturers, mer¬
rate levied upon other property.
The interest crues or not, upon all new risks under the New
chants, jobbers, brokers and shippers, will
is paid semi-annually by coupons attached to York form of Pqlioy, as follows:
'
1st. Upon all voyage risks upon Cargo, a possess in The Chronicle and its Daily Bul¬
each note, which may be cut off and sold to
return of twenty-five per cent.
letin the best and most reliable sources of the
any bank or banker.
2dl Upon vorAGE risks upon Freight, a re¬
The interest at 7 3-10 per cent amounts to
information needed in their daily pursuits.
turn of twenty per cent.
One cent per day on a $50 note.
3d. Upon time risks upon Freight, and upon , The Chronicle will in no manner enter up¬
Two cents per day on a $100 note.
voyage and time risks
upon Hulls, a return of on the domain of partisian politics, nor admit
Ten cents per day on a $500 note.
ten per cent.
/
anything in its columns having a partisan bias,
Twenty Cents per day on a $1000 note.
Such privilege, however, ^being confined to
but will, nevertheless, endeavor carefully to
One dollar per day on a $5000 note.
persons and firms, the aggregate of whose
Notes of all the denominations named will premiums upon such policies earned and paid elucidate the effects of political events and
be promptly furnished upon receipt of sub¬ during the year, shall amount to the sum of legislation upon commercial and financial af¬
one hundred dollars.
fairs.
scription.
Premiums paid in Gold will be entitled to
The Notes of this Third Series are precisely
similar in form and privileges to the Seven- the above returns in gold.
Thirties already sold, except that the Govern¬
DIRECTORS.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
ment reserves to itself the option of paying
Daniel W. Teller,
Edward Rowe,
To city subscribers for The Commercial
interest in gold coin at 6 per cent., instead of 7
John D. Bates,
Daniel W. Lord,
and Financial Chronicle,
(weekly,
8-10ths in currency. Subscribers will deduct George Mile,
Charles Hickox,
of thirty-two folio pages), with The
the interest in currency up to July 15th, at the John Atkinson,
Robert Bowne,
Daily Bulletin, (daily, of two quarto
time when they subscribe.
Thos. A. C Cochrane, Lawrence Myers,
leaves), delivered by carriers
$12.00
The delivery of the notes of this Third Se¬ William H. Halsey,
S. N. Derrick,
To all others without The Daily Bul¬
ries of Seven-Thirties will commence on the 1st Thomas Barron,
Moses Merick,
letin.
10.00
of June, and will be made promptly and con¬
David J. Ely,
Roland G. Mitchell,
Albert G. Lee,
tinuously after that date.
Joseph Morrison,
WM. B. DANA &
The slight change made in the condition of George P. Deshon,
William H. Popham,
this THIRD SERIES affects only the matter O. L. Nims,
B. C. Morris, Jr.,
Publishers,
of interest. The payment in gold, if made, will M. F. Merick,
Ezra Nye,
60 WILLIAM STREET, N, Y.
be equivalent to the currency interest of the William B. Ogden,
Henry J. Cammann,
7
'
—
Thomas Lord,5
John Armstrong,
higher rate.
The return to specie payments, in the event B. C. Morris,
Preston H. Hodges,
OFFICE OF THE
of which only will the option to pay interest in Andrew J. Rich,
J. B. Griffin.
B. C. MORRIS,
THOS. LORD,
gold be availed of, would so reduce and equal¬
3Knrns fin k Sttlnnii ^rarnttre <£n.,
ize prices that purchases made with 6 per cent,
Yice-Pres’t
Pres’t.
in gold would oe folly equal to those made M. M. WWHITNEY, 2d Vice-Pres’t <fc Sec’y.
COLUMBIAN BUILDING,
with seven and three-tenths per cent, in cur¬
Cor. Wall and Nassau Streets.
rency. This is
THE NEW YORK SOCIAL SCIENCE REVIEW:
The Only Losg} in
A Quarterly Journal of Political Economy
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL,
<
and Statistics;
$5,000,000
Now offered by the Government, and its su¬
perior advantages make it the
CASH CAPITAL, PAID IN, ... 200,000
.

:

'

•

Market

Popular Loan of the
People.

Less than $280,000,000 of the Loan author¬
ized by. Congress are now on the market: This

amount, at the rate which it is being absorbed,
will all be subscribed for within sixty days,
when the notes will undoubtedly command a
premium, as has uniformly been the case on

closing the subscription to

other Loans.

In order that citizens of every town and sec¬
tion of the country may be afforded facilities
for taking the Loan, the National Banks, State

Banks, and Private^ Bankers throughout the
country have generally agreed to receive sub¬
scriptions at par. Subscribers will select
their own agents, in whom they have confi¬
dence, and who only are to be responsible for
the delivery
ceive orders.

Max IS, 1866,




’

•

"

.

„

Simon Steen-, !

This Company issues on Ithe most favobable
terms, policies of insurance, WITH OR
WITHOUT PARTICIPATION IN PROFITS,

\Edllor>-

Subscription $4 Per Year.

againstjLoss or damage by fire, on dwelling
This jReview is projected as a standard work houses, stores, and all kinds of buildings, and
on all Social
topics, particularly those em¬ on household furniture and other property,
braced under the head of Political economy; and and on vessels and their cargoes while lying
its pages will be filled with the choicest produc¬ in port.
'
I
tions of such eminent Economists as Herbert-

Spencer, John Stuart Mill, Schulze Delitszch, Prof. Rau, <fcc.
To publicists^egislators, editors, teachers, students, bankers and
merchants, such a work must .prove invalua¬

Losses will be Promptly Adjusted and Paid,
DIRECTORS.

'

6.

.

it will, critical reviews of all Edward Rowe,
theories of government, social relations, legis¬ Albert G. Lee,
George Miln,
lation, finance, and commerce.
!To all friends of humanity and science this J. C. Morris,
wlork commends itself; and as the charms of Robert Bowne,
style and illustration will not be wanting to Ezra Nye,

ble, affording,

s

‘

**

William Mackay, ^

as

Benjamin E. Bates,
R. O. Morris, Jr.,
Joseph Morrison,

^Daniel W. Teller,
’ Henry J. Cammann,
S. N. Derrick,
make it attractive to the general reader, it is John D. Bates, '
JA7 COOKE,
confidently believed that it will attain a wide Frederick H. Bradlee, Charles Hickox,
Subscription Agent,
N. O. Nims.
circulation, and-lead to more correct views on Edward G Bates,
WM. M. WHITNEY, B. 0. MORRIS,
South Third Street,
Social Science and Political economy than those
Sec’y *
‘
Pres’t:
.
PHILADELPHIA. which now prevail

of the notes for which they re¬

No. 114

PUBLISHED AT 82 NASSAU ST., N. Y.

I

Great

-