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finanrial
amiiuTri
Quotation -Supplement (Monthly)Street RailwaySupplement
Investors Supplement (utr) State and City Supplement
Qey
al
r
[Entered aooordlng t o A ot o l C ongress, In the year 1902 by the W illiam B Dana Com pany , In the office o f the L ibrarian o f C on gress.]

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1902.

VOL. 74.

NO. 1908,
Week ending January 11.

U ttie

Clearing* at —

C h r o n ic le .

1902.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

1901.

Terms of Subscription—Payable in Advance:
For One Y ear____ ______ . . . . . . .................................. ....... .......$10 00
For Six Months................
6 00
European Subscription (Including postage)....
................. 13 00
European Subscription 81z Months (Including postage)......... 7 60
Annual Subscription In London (Including postage)....................42 14s.
Six Mob.
do.
do.
do.
................4 1 1 1 b.
Above subscription includes—

Boston.................
Providence..........
H artford.............
New Haven.........
Springfield............
Worcester.......
Portland..............
Fall River.............
Lowell..................
New Bedford.......
Holvoke................
Total New Eng..

150,603,840
7 288 100
3 ,376,799
3 053.450
1,697,700
8,028 007
1.9J 6,582
1076,209
649 822
401,718
455,001
171,676,264

U 8.648.778
7 228,000
8.039.827
1.875 279
1,884.846
1,850,619
1,860,886
1,0 ’. 0,836
093 3C 8
102,212
852,60;
167,441.898

Chicago............... .
Cincinnati.......... .
Detroit..................
Cleveland.............
Milwaukee...........
London Agents:
Columbus.... .....
Messrs. Edw ards A Smith , 1 Drapers’ Gardens, E. O., will take sub Indianapolis.........
Peoria..................
-sorlptlons and advertisements, and supply single copies of the paper Toledo..................
at Is. eaoh.
Grand Rapids.......
Darton ...............
W IL L IA M B . D A N A C O M P A N Y , P u b lis h e r * ,
Evansville...........
P i n e s t r e e t , C o r n e r o f P e a r l S tr e e t,
Youngstown.........
P ost office B ox 958.
N E W Y O R K . Springfield, 111......
Lexington.........
A kron..................
Kalamasoo...........
CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.
Rockford..............
Springfield, Ohio..
The following table, made up by telegraph, etc., indicates Canton................. .
that the total bank clearings of all the clearing houses of Jacksonvllle, 111....
Quincy.................
Bloomington........
the United States for the week ending to-day, Jan. 18, Jackson .................
have been $2,894,976,000, against $2,588,594,341 last week and Ann Arbor.............
Tot. Mid. West’ll.
$2,490,276,411 the corresponding week last year.

173 657,861
82,402,650
14,780,081
14,962 908
7,488 829
7 563 400
6 006.666
8,508 808
3 029 534
1 763 t 03
1,790,050
1.095.811
e 09,88)
647,476
083 440
601,200
049.105
384 8t 3
442.824
377,762
281,601
269,786
363.474
205,942
143 694
262 526.433

145.494,109
20 £49 2C 0
10,6-57 161
14,095 650
0,428,244
5 581 400
4.168 584
8.480 777
2,515.072
1.488 4?0
3,870 C 60
812 48.
‘
875 782
612,192
098 601
079 000
669 401
290 15
800 624
298.661
200,446
252,840
288,981
173,667

T hh Quotation Supplement
The investors ’ supplement

i Street R a ilw a y Supplement
|state and City supplement

Terms ol Advertising—(Per Inch Space.)
Transient matter................. $4 20 Three Months (13 times)..$29 00
STANDING BUSINESS OABDS.
Six Months
(26 “ ).. 60 00
Two Months
(8 times).. 22 00 Twelve Months(52 “ ).. 87 00

Clearing*—Return* by Telegraph.
Week Ending January 18.

1902.

1901.

Hew Y o rk .......................................... .
B oston................. ....................................
Philadelphia............................................
Baltim ore.................................................
Chloago............................. ....................
St. Louis..................................................
Hew Orleans............................................

11,868 314,089
125,614,008
103,182,934
83,782,503
146,720,818
46,074,003
13,984,748

$1,458,131,893
129,699 355
89,323.190
19,922,020
121,185 072
80,131,400
11,801,893

-13-1
- 3 ’2
+16-5
+19 1
+20-2
+26-4
+18-5

Seven cities, 6 days....................... .
Other cities, 6 days...............................

$1,721,174,888
873,937,461

$1,861,193,889
839,074,813

Total all d tles, 6 days.....................
AU d tles, 1 d a y .......................................

$1,995,161,764
309,814,238

$3,100 268,702
890 007,709

-7 -5
+ u -0
-5 0
+2-6

T ota l all oltles f o r w eek ................

$8,894,976,000

$8,490,276,411

-8 8

P.Oent

The full details for the week covered by the above will be
given next Saturday. We cannot furnish them to-day,
olearings being made up by the olearing houses at noon on
Saturday, and hence in the above the last day of the week
has to be in all cases estimated, as we go to press Friday
sight.
We present below our usual detailed figures for the pre­
vious week, covering the returns for the period ending with
Saturday noon, Jan. 11, and the results for the correspond­
in g week in 1901, 1900 and 1899 are also given. Contrasted
with the week of 1900 the total for the whole country shows
a loss of 2-5 per cent. Outside of New York the increase
over 1901 is 13-4 per cent.
Week ending January 11.

Clearing* at—
1909.
New Y o rk ................
Philadelphia...........
Pitt* ba r*...... ..........

A lb a n y .....................
H oot ester................
ttaranton..................
WU idluffton ............
Chester....................
•reensburg ...........
W heeling, W. Va..
Wilkes B arre..........
T otal M iddle........

1901.

1008.

1900.

1899.

P . Cent.
$
1.709,012,701 1380 9)7,717
-9 -5 1 097.028 402 1,861.904,990
114 517,503
44 507,689
84 200 470
88 911,802
7,154,882
6,840.11b
8,441,885
8,113 709
—10B
4,688,601
4 37-2
3,H 7,243
O
8,607 091
8 481 109
+5*1
1,701 IF2
1,558 927
1,547,765
-4-1"3
1.627 632
1,071,786
1,087 207
907 469
+8-3
427.000
64 3 300
49H,0(X
-81-4
405 800
406.000
330 214
+20-5
3)8 110
803,198
402,153
-0 -7
800,000
043 187 Not Include d In tot al.
001,704 Not Inolude d In tot al.
1,010,107.100 8.081 007 588
-8-0'1.254 808 418 1.408,468 01«

T ota l P ad flo.

Davenport™..........
Sioux City.............
Topeka.................
Wlohlta................
Fremont...............
Colorado Springs..
Tot. other West.

1900.

1903.

P . Cent.
+ 1-8
+ 0-8
+ 11-1

141.34 6 730
7,262 800
2.942.789
1,988 380
1 454.871
1,800.286
1, 281,048
990,788
073,792
547,868
868,168
160, 193,846

+6
-6
6’8

- 8-1
+290

+ 2’6
+194

+ 10-6

+ 37-9
+ 6 ’2

+ 10'2

140.781,600
7 C89 000
8,202 619
2 803 037
1 080,347
1,725 632
1,749 988
1,020 930
015 819
840 880
800,000
101,480,447

138,212,686
17,180.200
8 634 010
10 867 298
0 973 886

49-6
+28 6
+ 60-2
+ 40-6
-

1899.

124,400,588
18.557 350
8697,108
8.516.505
5,0)4.494
5.728 700
8,817,755
1.870,071
1.776.327
1,126,690
968 218
084,068
299 018
438 096
505 025
308 800
409.489
£68 247
288 993
225 071
150,000

B O C
.0O .O O

+ 8 6 *8
+ 44 6

8,348.665
2.125
2 283 222
1 074.752
1.294,389

409
+ 20’4
+189
+30

+2a-0
+62'8

9t0 001

+ 12-1
+186

100,000

+ 85*4
-4-184-7
+43-0

380 042
684 299
472 29)
447.700
528 809
803.308
308,260
274,809
176 721
£60,000

280 209.90S
?

+ 19-2

202.860,979

188.929,248

25.030 248
8 895 740
2.727186
4,523 052
2 960,610
1 619,121
1.216.119
044.812
<60 602
806 106
43,284,590

20.949 444
8 850 410
2.781.45*
2 931,148
2, 125,705
1,001,872
1,204,078
045.009
498,791
216.009
86 651 278

+ 19’5
+101
+ 54+
+ 89-1
+ 51*7
+ 0-9
+ 18*1
- 0-4
+ 41-8

17.693,483
2 241.174
1989.346
2,707,095
1 940.248
1,120,064
923,750
492.037
888,710
177,994

15 266.360
2.542 225
1 695,795
1,675 ( 00

-021-8

80,145.841

1,053,875
771,147
076,168
289 588
118.878
25,186 425

20 901,708
14 670 400
7 517,117
5,671 946
4 740 917
6,047 500
2 017 700
1,317,300
1,800,000
1,409 294
769,162
2 8 411
970 878
66 013,940

17.6X 9.103
11,188 528
6,079 009
6 ,612,401
4 477.230
3 644 001
1.689,116
964,149
1.847.824
1, 182,869
457 980
143,706
991,773
60.085,157

+180
+ 80'
+ 12-6
+ 1-1

18,770 294
10 284 948
0,688 819
5.154,058
5 802,708
8,680 071
1,608.036
820.968
1,143,686
603 087
460.000
134,081

11,271 388
9,759.012
7,158.078
4 842 498
8,5f 0 968
2.613454
1,855 079
691.088
917,717
887.108
428 982
188 463

48 204 050

48 994 767

34.605,715
10 051.278
9 423,185
3 479 000
8,879,278
8,984,088
8 b73,202
3 441 870
2 003.894
+ 22 +
1,574 9C4
+ 7-2
1010,193
-2 9
1,185,878
+ 18’7
648 304
1,870,880
—
20-1
860 000
+ 2U0
810 000
+1-6
481 725
+62-8
489 386
+24-8
293 329
+ 842
88.931614
+ 23 7
- 2 ’6 1.780.199,048

82,060,664
13 513 312
8.764 200
3,768 350
8 430 565
2 900 027
3,787 958
8.602 826
1,710.863
1,498,957
1,872,587
777,901
546 970
1,088 116
484 668
5g4,r>00
401 308
848 074
888 664
79.526,264
903,534,101

+ 26-4

-1 0 7

—11-6
+ 10-1

+12-8
+ 22-8
+ 2 »-e

-0-2

+0
-0

+ 8 8 ’o
+ 6-7
+ 38’0
+ 83*7
+ 29’7
+ 05’ 9
+ 62*
—278

+ 19-4

+40-8
40 284.011
18,775 609
+ 21-0
+ 18’7
9 863 014
4.102.000
- 5 ’2
6.000
000 + 32’8
5 815 350
- 29)
+404
8 624 008
- 8-7
4,867 241
2 000.000
+ 13’7

1,200 000

60 618,778
St. Louis..............
10.750 809
New Orleans........
11 1’ 0,882
Louisville.............
8 947.C 00
Galveston.............
0 015,879
Houston...............
8,T 08 709
Savannah.............
6 805.1*0
Richmond.............
8 895,637
Memphis...............
2 903 910
Atlanta.................
2,269 802
1.S 65 440
Nashville..............
1,753.844
1.635.886
Norfolk................
1 490 686
1,468,928
Augusta...............
778 864
051,686
Knoxville.............
1.867,883
1,492 695
Fort Worth..........
1,888.097
1,100,000
Birmingham.........
797,000
810,000
Maoon..................
774,907
1,179 500
Little Rook...........
622,819
060 000
Chattanooga.........
810 078
410 859
Jacksonville.........
99,419 882
Total Southern.. 128,027.016
Total all............. 2,583 694.841 2 660 565.646
Outside N.Tork. 873,681.040 770.837,080

+134

082.578.246

650,029.181

CANADA—
Montreal..............
Toronto...............
Winnipeg.............
Halifax...........
Hamilton..............
St. John................
Vlotorla................
Vancouver...........

16 774,555

988 408

+9*1
+ 0 ’4
+85-7
+ 20*6
+8 9
+18-6
+67-7
+18-8

708,859

16,823 203
9,767 031
1,885,503
1.423.020
720 080
588,160
078.104
016,976

41 205 079

+14-2

84,588 880

80,088,109

Ouebeo..................
Ottawa...................

Total Oanad«

20 897119
15 481 192
4 022 290
2,188 639
082,728
948 814
040 882
1,057 078
1,510,007
1340.779
47 088,741

19 149 171
14.502 230
2,489 898
1 809 108
887 076
884 034

000 000

Not Include d In tot al.
Not Include dIn tot at.

10,608 888
2,688 600
1,649,038
868,748

074 102
764 551

I HE CHRONICLE.

lit)

[Y o u LXXIV.

the lortigu trade report has been published by the
Bureau of Statistics the current week for December
The eventa of the week have not been of a char­ and for the whole year 1901. On the appearance of
acter to put life into theatock market. Reports of a fur­ each monthly statement, the figures have been closely
ther decline in copper ; railroad rate-cutting, particu­ scrutinized tojdiscover what, if any, evidence they dis­
larly in the West and Northwest; the published bond closed of a deorease in our exports of manufactures.
offering by the Atchison ; rumors of uncertainty It has been thought that this last statement has given
with reference to the relations of those interested in conspicuous evidence of a falling off in the par­
the Northern Securities Company and to the situation ticular mentioned. That is hardly so, even If
of the case against that company before the Supreme we make comparison with 1900 only; but mer­
Court ; reports of impending difficulties and embar­ chandise exports reached an uausual total in D ec­
rassments in trade and financial circles; together ember a year ago, and hence confining the examina­
with a growing disposition and hostility shown to­ tion to the last two years does not afford a wholly
wards corporations per se by severe taxation and un­ correct conclusion. For instance, the value of the mer­
reasonable proceedings to interfere wifh their prosper­ chandise exports in December 1901 are this week report­
ous working—all of these facts and conditions were ed by the Bureau of Statistics at $137,076,815, against
among those most prominently a work Monday lastjjad- $145,889,871 in December 1900, or a loss of $8,813,056,
verse to the market and which were influential in giv­ and the net balance (because merchandise imports
ing a reactionary condition to stocks. Tuesday the same were also larger, $79,914,743 against $68,697,207) is
facts and rumors remained in force, there being only $57,162,072, against $77,192,664 in 1900. These
a ided to them the failure at Chicago of Phillips, “ the results mark very wide changes, and for that reason
Com King,” disturbing speculative operations at that have attracted attention. On the surface the note­
centre, and a cut of 10 cents per 100 lbs. in refined sugar, worthy feature is smaller exports and larger imports,
being claimed as warranted by the decline in raw to be construed assumably as the result of the same
sugar. Altogether, however, the result on Tuesday cause—higher prices ruling in the United States— at­
proved to be a further and more decided setback in tracting an increasing amount of foreign goods and
values of almost all first-class as well as the less stable shutting out to an extent our productions from find­
classes of properties. Wednesday there was a turn ing consumers in the outside world. Those, we say,
for the better. The imagined perils (such as impend­ are the surface indications. They also receive s me
<
ing failures, differences between parties interested in support in the circumstances that obtain here, for our
the Northern Securities Company, etc.,) were appar­ markets have, as a rule, shown a general advance in
ently cleared away, at least to the satisfaction of the commodity prices.
public; besides that, the Nickel Plate increased its
Of course, where an advance is natural, caused by
dividend on the second preferred stock from 2 to 3 a demand in excess of the supply, it is a reasonable
per cent, and the New York Central announced that condition, limited in duration, and will work out its
the stockholders were to receive valuable rights by an own cure. But wherever prices are artificially sup­
increase of $35,000,000 in the capital stock of the ported it is not natural and must be harmful. The
company, mainly for the purpose of improving its ter­ course of the copper market has in every phase of it
minal facilities
Since then the transactions have been a strikingly instructive experience and lesson.
been very moderate and the changes in value unim ­ The people cannot study it too closely— it has proved
a serious loss to the stockholders, who were presumed
portant.
to be the benefited party if anybody was, more or
The sort of vague, half visionary peril which on Mon­ less of a detriment to all kinds of business using the
day and Tuesday was assumed to be impending, is the metal, and a shock to confidence which cannot be
kind of condition that often keeps an otherwise sound easily repaired. Still, the truth seems to be that the
situation unsettled for months. The truth of the matter December 1901 statement does not show any consider­
is, the present is a tryiog period for those promoters able loss in the exports of manufactured articles. In­
whose plans, to be successful and fructify, are ham­ deed, nearly all the loss in exports mentioned above
pered with a time limit of endurance. It is not at all ($8,813,056) is found in the movement of breadstuffs,
impossible, but rather a reasonable anticipation, that cotton, etc., the net decrease of those items being
now and then one or more of the great undertakings $7,254,119. Besides that, making the comparison
of the past year or two may come to a disastrous end. with 1899, the export statement is in all respects more
Many of them were organized upon a very inflated favorable than it then was. In that year the Decem­
basis of values, amid conditions of unlimited confi ber total was only $123,268,033, and the excess of ex­
dence. 0:hers have been made up of a series of con ports was only $52,534,170. The conclusion seems to
solidations, each succeeding one depending upon its be, that the exports of manufactures show no loss in
predecessor for flotation, until the original equity is December 1901 compared with either of the two pre­
supporting a vast superstructure of liabilities. We vious years, and that compared with 1899 there is
are not permitted to doubt that such creations are in presumably an increase. The annual figures we have
shape to go to pieces at any considerable continuance remarked upon iu a subsequent article.
of adverse influences. If, on the other hand, the
promoters are able to hang on by adopting a more
The monthly statistics of the ‘ 'Iron Age,” issued
conservative policy—perhaps lightening the load by this week, show that daring December there was a
liquidating in part— there is little doubt of a future. marked falling off in the production of pig iron. This
Industrial affairs are sound at the core. All the old is quite important as indicating one of the causes re­
and as a rule all the i ewer large corporations mver sponsible for the continued strength of the iron mar­
were in so strong and safe a condition as now. Busi­ ket and the further advances iu prices which are
ness, too, is active and the whole mercantile class is occurring. For a considerable time the iron-makers
also in good shape.
have been unable to supply the demand, and auy adTHE

F IN A N C IA L

S IT U A T IO N .

January 18, 1902.]

THE CHRONICLE

ditional disturbing circumstance therefore oper
ates to intensify the scarcity.
The reduction
in output is entirely the result of extraneous
causes. The “ A ge's” statistics show the number
o f furnaces in blast to have been reduced by only
two (from 266 to 264), but the production was cut
down from 324,761 tons per week to 298,460 tons per
week. The contraction is due largely to the difficulty
the farnaces have had in securing an adequate supply
of fuel, and also to the fact that the railroads were
not always able to furnish the necessary facilities for
the shipment of the iron. The “ Age” says quite
a number of stacks have been blown out, and
others were banked again and again during
December.
The Pittsburg and the Chicago dis­
tricts were the principal sufferers. Of course, when
the present disturbing conditions are removed, the out­
put will again increase. The position of furnace stocks,
sold and unsold, has not been greatly changed, though
showing a slight further decrease. The total of these
stocks (not including the holdings of the steel works
producing their own iron) is reported 216,137 tons
January 1, against 223,462 tons in December, 273,251
tons in November, 361,593 tons October 1, and still
larger amounts at previous dates. It is pointed out
that even the reduction in stocks here shown does not
reveal the true state of affairs, as in a number of cases
makers of iron were unable to ship their product. If
figures were available concerning consumers’ stocks, it
is believed a very considerable absorption of iron would
be shown. Altogether the situation is an interesting one.

117

position of the Bank of England and the easy tone
for discounts in the open market at London seem to
make it probable that the official rate will soon be re­
duced. The Bank of Bengal at Calcutta this week
raised its rate from 6 per cent to 7 per cent. The
Prussian syndicate which negotiated the previous
loans has taken the new 3 per cent German Govern­
ment loans of 300,000,000 marks, of which Prussia
issues 185,000,000 and the Empire 115,000,000 marks.
The price at which the loans have been taken is 89'20
per cent; they will be issued at 89f80 per cent. The
syndicate includes the Bleichroder, the Deutsche,
the Mendelssohn, the Dresdner, the Disconto, the
Schaaff hausen and some of theSeuth German banks.

The statement of the New York Associated Banks last
week showed a gain of $5,637,500 in cash. The loans
were reduced, however, by about the same amount, or
$5,309,800, and consequently deposits increased by
only $778,500. The small gain of $194,625 in reserve
requirements caused an increase in the surplus reserve
of $5,442,875, and this item now stands at $12,958,450. There was on Saturday of last week a shipment
of $525,000 American gold coin to Germany by the
National City Bank. During the week the Treasury
paid through the New Y ork office $763,031 60 in re­
demption of Hawaiian bonds which were owned by
Europeans. The disbursements by the Sub-Treasury
for purposes other than those pertaining to fiscal
operations have been only moderately large. [Pay­
ments for unmatured bonds during the week were
$1,174,964 24, making $1,556,262 82 since the begin­
The action of the New York Chicago & St. Louis
ning of the year.
HR. Company in increasing the dividend on its second
preferred shares is significant as showing that if there
Money on call representing bankers’ balances has
be no basis for the rumors so widely current a short loaned at the Stock Enchange during the week at 5|
time ago of a general consolidation of this and other per cent and at 3 per cent, averaging about 4| .per
“ junior” Vanderbilt properties, at least the securities cent. On Monday loans were at 5|- per cent and at
of these properties occupy a strong position by reason 4£ per cent, with the bulk of the business at 4 f per
of their intrinsic merits, which are constantly improving. cent. On Tuesday transactions were at 5 per cent
Prior to the 2 per cent paid in March 1901 (out o f the and at 3 per cent, with the majority at 4£ per cent.
earnings of 1900) the 2d preferred stock of the Nickel On Wednesday loans were at 5 per cent and at 4 per
Plate had never received anything, and even the pay­ cent, with the bulk of the business at 4£ per cent.
ments on the first preferred shares had been decidedly On Thursday transactions were at 4£ per cent and at
irregular. Now the company is able on the earnings 3 per cent,withTthe majority at 4 per cent. On Friday
of 1901 to increase the dividend on the 2d preferred loans were>t 4 per cent and at 3 per cent, with the
stock to 3 per cent, and to show a surplus on that basis bulk of the business at 3£ per cent.
Banks
for the year. The call for this 3 per cent dividend is and trust companies have loaned at 4| per cent as the
$330,000 (the stock being $11,000,000), and the 5 per minimum. The business in the time loan market has
cent on the first preferred calls for $250,000, making been chiefly confined to renewals for comparatively
$580,000 together. Over and above the requirements long periods of maturing contracts, and there has
for this purpose, a surplus of $39,000 is reported on the been no inquiry for short time money. Rates are 4$
operations of the twelve months. Quite the most in­ per cent on good mixed Stock Exchange collateral
teresting feature, however, in the income statement for three to six months and 4£ per cent on dividend­
furnished for the year is the segregation from the ordi­ paying railroad securities for the same period. The
nary expenses of the outlays for “ additions, better­ offerings of commercial paper are more liberal, but
ments and renewals.” In the printed annual re­ the demand locally and from the interior appears to
port these outlays are never separately stated. It be sufficient to prevent any accumulation of names.
appears that no less than $756,000 was spent in this Rates are 4^@5 per cent for sixty to ninety-day en­
way out of the earniDgs of 1901. In other words, the dorsed bills receivable, 4f@ 5| per cent for prime and
surplus of $39,000 (above dividends) reported for the 5^@6 per cent for good four to six months’ single
twelve months exists after this very liberal provision names.
for betterments and improvements. Another inter­
esting fact is that this allowance is shown to have
The Bank of England minimum rate of discount re­
been very much larger than in the previous years, mains unchanged at 4 per oent. The cable reports dis­
the similar expenditure out of earnings in 1900 hav­ counts of sixty to ninety day bank bills in London 3
ing been only $398,587 and In 1899 but $97,673.
per cent. The open market rate at Paris is 2£ per cent,
There was no change in the officialjrates of discount and at Berlin and Frankfort it is 2£ per cent. A ccord­
by any of the European banks this week. The strong ing to our special cable from London,the Bank of Eng­

THE CHRONICLE.

118

land gained £1,351,757 bullion daring the week and
held £34,977,030 at the close of the week. Oar cor­
respondent further advises as that the gain was due to
the import of £27,000 from Australia and receipts of
£1,325,000 net from the interior of Great Britain.
The foreign exchange market has been generally
heavy this week, though there was an improvement in
the tone after Wednesday. Among the chief influ­
ences operating early In the week were offerings of
long sterling through which new exohange loans had
been negotiated, the growing ease in discounts at
London encouraging borrowing of foreign money by
syndicates and other large holders of securities.
There were at the same time extensions of maturing
loans which, while they did not increase the supply of
bills on the market, lessened the demand for such
drafts as would have been required had the loans
been paid off at maturity instead of being extended.
There were some indications that in the previous
week brokers had accumulated
exchange in
the expectation of marketing it at a profit
when the demand should increase as the result of
the settlement of maturing loans. The above-noted
extension of such loans induoed these brokers to sell
their; accumulated exchange and hence the easy tone
of the market early in the week. After these drafts
had been absorbed a demand developed for remittance
by the Saturday steamers and, influenced by this in­
quiry, rates fractionally recovered.
Bankers report
that there are exceedingly few commercial bills
against grain, and those representing cotton which
have come forward this week have been on old con­
tracts. The drafts against spot movements of cotton
have been promptly absorbed. The Assay Office paid
$1,008,326 26 for domestic bullion. Gold received
at the Custom House during the week, $30,116.
Nominal rates for exchange are uniformly quoted
at 4 85 for sixty day and 4 88 for sight. Bates for
actual business on Saturday of last week were un­
changed compared with those on Friday, except for
long; the bid quotation of these bills was one-eighth
of a cent lower, at 4 84$. The market was dull and
easy on Monday at unchanged rates, and on Tuesday
the only alteration was a decline in the asking price
for long of one-eighth of a cent, to 4 84$. On Wed­
nesday the market reflected in lower rates the abovenoted negotiation of sterling loans and the offer­
ings of accumulated bills, and the tone was heavy
at a decline of one-eighth of a cent all around, to
4 84-$@4 84$ for long, to 4 87@4 87$ for short and to
4 87$ @ 4 87f for cables. On Thursday there was a
recovery in long and short of one-eighth of a cent, to
4 84$@4 84$ for the former and to 4 87$@4 87$ forjthe
latter, and the tone was firm; cables were unchanged.
On Friday the market was steady to firm. The follow­
ing shows daily posted rates for exchange by some of
the leading drawers.
FBI.,
M o n ., T in ts., WkD., T h u b ., FBI.,
Jan. 10. Jan. 13. Jan. 14. Jan. 15. Jan. 16 Jan. 17.
(6 0 day*. 7 s i T “
B row n B ro* ----- •1 S ig h t.... 468
(6 0 day*. 4 85
Baring,
,1 S ight,... 488
M a g on n & C o.,
Bank Britl»h
(6 0 day*. 4 85
N o. Am erloe,. . ( S ight.... 4 88
Bank o f
160 day*. 486
M ontreal......... .( S i g h t - .. 4 88
Canadian Bank (6 0 day*. 4 86
o f C om m erce.. (S ig h t.... 4 88
H eldelbaoh, Iok (6 0 day*. 486
elkelm er • Oo..(S ig h t .... 4 88
(6
Laxard F rere*... (S 0 day*. 4 86
ig h t,... 488
M erch a n t!’ Bk. (6 0 day*. 4 86
o f Canada....... (S ig h t.... 488

85
88
86
88
85
88
86
88
86
88
86
88
86
88
86
68

86
88
85
88
86
88
86
68
85
88
86
88
85
88
85
88

~85
88
85
88
86
88
85
88
85
88
85
88
86
88
66
88

86
88
86
88
86
88
85
88
85
88
86
88
85
88
86
88

86
88
86
88
86
88
86
88
86
88
to
88
86
88
85
88

[VOL. LXX1V.

The market doses at 4 84$@4 844 for long, 4 87$®
4 87$ for short and 4 87$@4 87$ for cables. Com­
mercial on banks 4 84@4 84$ and documents for pay­
ment 4 83$@4 84$. Cotton for payment 4 83$@4 83$,
ootton for acceptance 4 84 @ 4 84$ and grain for
payment 4 84@4 84$.
The following gives the week's movements of
money to and from the interior by the New York
banks.
Week Kudin* January 17, 1808.

ll*c*iti*d by SM rotd by
N . F . Bank*. N. T . Bank*.

N*t Interior
Movement.

Onrrenoy...................................................
B o ld ...........................................................

17.716,000
1.884,000

*6.711,000
884,000

(lain. *8.001,000
G ain.
670,000

T otal g old and legal tender*.......

59.108,000

*6,688,000

G ain. *2.671.000

With the Sub-Treasury operations the result is as
follows.
Week Kudin* J anuary 17,1002.

Inte
Bank*.

Out Of
Bank*.

Sfit Ohanoo M
Batik Boldin**.

Bank* interior m ovem ent, a* a b ov e
8nb-Trea»nry operations.......... .........

*0,108.000
28,800,000

*6,688.000
80,031,000

G ain. *2,671,800
G ain. 2,260 000

T ota l gold and legal tender*.......

182,800,000

*87.460.000

G ain. *4,840,00*

The following table Indicates the amount of bullion
in the principal European banks.
January 16. 1008.

Ja nuary 17,1001.

Bank of
Gold.
%
I n g la n d ........ 84.977,080
frail ............... 07.666,700
G erm a n y ....* 28,028 000
ftnanl a ..........
68.240.000
A u*.-H ung’ y. 46.708.000
S p a in ............. 14.020.000
Ita ly .......... . 16.100.000
5,734,000
N etherlands
Nat Belg’m.* 3.186,667

Silver.

Total.

Gold.

Silver.

S

4
84,077,080
141,457,847
43,888 000
74.433.000
*8,053,000
81.426.000
18,162,600
18.000,800
4,705 000

M
81,160,831
08,625,161
26,881,000
78.808.000
88.850.000
14.001.000
16.628.000
5,018,000
8,000,000

J

48,800,647
14.800.000
6,164,000
11.355.000
17.401.000
2,062,600
6,876,800
1,668,883

Total.

S
81.160,881
43,787,047 187.868,108
18.816.000 40.687.000
6.404.000 80.867.000
0,064,000 48.814.000
16,800,000 80.801.000
1.863.000 17.381.000
5.503.000 10.611.000
4,350,000
1.460.000

ToUthla week 315,504,007 103546680 410.050.677 801,176,402 00.107,047 400,878,480
T ot. nrev. w ’k B18.107.815 104003068 420.800.877 207,466.017 98,508.308 *96,059,816

* The division (between gold and silver) given In our table o f coin
and bullion In the Bank o f Germany and the Bank of Belgium la made
from the best estimate we are able to ob ta in ; in neither ease la 1$
claimed to be accurate, as those banka make no distinction In their
weekly returns, merely reporting the total gold and allver, but we
believe the division we make is a oloae approximation.

THE

R E V IV A L O N THE E N G L IS H
M A R K ET S.
The advance in prices on the London Stock Ex­
change, which began a little more than a month ago
and has since in some quarters of the market reached
considerable proportions, is interesting chiefly from
the cause which seems to have inspired it. The move­
ment has centered on South African mine shares and
has been directly evoked by resumption of mining at
Johannesburg. There was practically no gold pro­
duced in the Transvaal between October 1899, when
war broke out, and the middle of 1900. Even after
the capture of Johannesburg and Pretoria by Lord
Roberts nearly two years ago mining was long
impracticable for two reasons: impossibility of
obtaining native labor—the Kaffirs having been
widely dispersed from the seat of war— and unwillinguess to risk the gold in the long train passage
from Johannesburg to the sea. These obstacles
seemed to be partly overcome last May, when Rand
production was slowly resumed in one or two of the
better-equipped mines. But the ontput was for
months so small as to be almost negligible. From
May to December, inclusive, estimated total output
of Transvaal gold was 238,493 Jim ounces—an average
of 30,000 ounces monthly, valued at something like
$600,000. Two months before the war blockade
began in 1899, the distriot was producing at the rate

THE CHRONICLE

January 18, 1902.]

of 459,000 gross ounoeB per month, worth more than
eight million dollars. Resumption of mining on so
modest a scale as this was naturally enough ignored
on the general markets.
It was probably not ignored by people with a longer
view into the future. The point was that production
had been resumed and that, all other things remain­
ing equal, it would go on steadily increasing. The
fighting in Cape Colony continued; honors were ap­
parently easy in the contest, and the occasional cap­
ture of a British detachment by the Boers chilled all
the reviving spirit of the market. Bat the general
public failed to take account of the fact that while
the guerilla warfare further to the south was still in
progress, Lord Kitchener’s block-house plan was
steadily strengthening the cordon whloh guarded the
mining district from the roving bands of soldiers
across the Southern border. With this protection
fairly guaranteed, it became a matter of relative in­
difference whether the desultory warfare in Cape
Colony came to an end or not. The Witwatersrandt
could afford to go on working.
That some one had understood this phase of the
situation may be inferred from the fact that shares of
South African mines, after breaking violently at the
close of 1899 and in the early part of the ensuing year,
recovered the greater part of their decline in values
before even 1901 began. They held these values
pretty steadily throughout last year, but it was not
until December that the public really began to take
interest in the matter.
Two facts excited interest in the mine-share out­
look at that time. The Transvaal gold output sud­
denly began to increase over the year's previous small
output. In November it rose to 89,075 fine ounces,
against the 24,500 average of earlier months, and in
December came a further increase to 52,397 fine
ounces. This was still a small enough showing when
compared with the previous maximum of 459,709
gross ounces In August 1899. But it was a substan­
tial increase ; it was accompanied by predictions that
by February one-fourth of the full production of the
Rand would be coming forward, and this was enough
to excite financial imagination. Along with this
came a more general understanding of the real mili­
tary situation in South Africa, and a more hopeful
feeling in the investment markets as a whole. The
result last month was a series of advances running to
10 per cent in Rand Mines and from 10 to 20 per cent
in other Kaffir shares. As is usual under such cir­
cumstances, the mere sight of such rapid advance in
prices drew the horde of outside speculators to the
spot. Despite the already high level of values for the
mine stocks, their market has gone on expanding,
and in the last few weeks has occupied the stage of the
London Stock Exchange to the exclusion of almost
all other securities. Comparison of recent prices in
a few of the leading shares with their price at the
close of 1900, their low price during the war, and
their high price in the two years before the war be­
gan, will show how striking has been this movement.
Close, 1901.

Band Mines...............
Consolidated Gold Fields...
Robin* on Deep.........
New Jagersfonteln...
Jumpers.............
Bandfonteln............ .........

Close, 1900. Low. High, ’97-’99.
88%

8 5-16

3%

7 3-16
4
I 6 I9
4ia
2*e

27%
5 3-16
3%
Ilia
3%
2%

45
9 9-16
7
14i8
6 15-16
3 11-16

‘ Quoted prioe 11 for now shares Issued; 4 for 1 of old stock. Many
of these stocks, whloh are typical, have this month passed the highrecord price of years before the war.

119

There are three considerations of general interest
suggested by this movement. The first concerns the
effect of this speculative revival, such as it is, on the
European markets. The second regards the question,
what the result will be, if the hopes reflected in the
movement of mining stocks especially are realized.
There is then left the interesting question, how far
either or both of these influences will affect the
American situation. Each of these questions may be
discussed briefly; all are at present largely a matter
of conjecture.
There are a good many signs that the English
market has passed through the worst of its period of
discouragement. The war, to be sure, is not over,
and the war expenses are continuing. A new British
loan must be issued presently, and whether it be
consols or, as London report has occasionally had it,
in the form of a Transvaal loan with an imperial
guaranty, in either case a fresh drain on capital must
be impending. Transvaal gold shares, as we have
seen, are already selling relatively high, and as re­
gards many overinvestm ent securities, earnings have
lately shown such decrease as to discourage the
market. But it must not be forgotten to what extent
a stock marketf1
‘ discounts” the future. Whatever is bad
in the present situation is likely to have been thus re­
flected in advance in the prices of months ago. It is
also truejthat, in other directions than Kaffir gold pro­
duction, English trade prospects have lately shown signs
of mending. The $3,500,000 increase reported last
week in England's December export trade was the
first gain of any month of 1901. Nearly all of the
more important English railways, whose severe losses
in both gross and net earnings early lagt year caused
the heavy cut in July dividends, have in the last few
weeks shown substantial gains over a year ago. A ll
this may not be sufficient basis for a “ boom,”' but it
contains at least reasonable factors for encourage­
ment.
As regards the probable result, in case African gold
production is presently resumed in its full volume, it
is possible to draw too large conclusions. Certainly
all of Europe's distresses since the middle of 1899
were not caused by the blockade of the Transvaal
gold, and immediate restoration of the financial status
quo, when the stream of gold from Johannesburg
again sets forth, is hardly to be expected. But, on
the other hand, the gold embargo undoubtedly had
very considerable influence, if only because it upset
plans already under way. The Chronicle was among
the first to point out, when Wall Street itself was in­
credulous in the matter, the unpleasant bearing of
this occurrence on Europe’s financial markets. If the
cutting off of the gold supply had such influence in
1899 its resumption in 1902 can hardly occur without
any influence in the contrary direction.
The effects of renewed activity in England's finan­
cial markets upon our own is an interesting question.
Ip has been argued that such revival will call away
Borne foreign capital from our markets, and it has been
argued that recovery in foreign investment and specu­
lative confidence must affect the foreigner's attitude,
even towards our markets. On the whole, we are
disposed to lay more stress on the fact that for
two years past financial depression in Europe gen­
erally and in England particularly has served in
some measure as a drag on our finance. To that
extent America ought to be helped distinctly by Euro­
pean revival.

120

THE CHRONICLE

THE C U R R E N C Y O F THE P H IL IP P IN E S .
It is a matter of first importance that the currency
ayatem of the Philippine lalanda ahould be aettled
upon a permanent baaia. A country with a fluctuating
currency or with a currency whose future ia uncertain
ia not in a position to attract foreign investors, except
of the moat ventureaome sort, and at high rates of in­
terest. The experience of Russia and Japan after the
adoption of the gold standard, and the outburst of
prosperity in this country after the voters had rejeoted
the invitation to go to a silver basis, are demonstrations
of the influence of a sound currency in attracting out­
side capital and stimulating industrial activity at
home. Other measures for the development of the
Philippine Islands are necessary, like provision for the
grant of franchises, the allotment of the public lands,
the improvement of rivers and harbors, and the build­
ing of good highways and railroads; but all these mat­
ters are subsidiary in a degree, and depend more or
less for their success upon the fundamental requisites
of a sound monetary basis and a sufficient paper cur­
rency.
Secretary Root has done his share in preparing the
way for intelligent action on this subject. He sent a
special commissioner to the Philippines during the
summer to study monetary conditions there and pre­
pare a plan for the consideration of Congress. This
plan is embodied in the report of Mr. Charles A.
Conant, the Special Commissioner sent to the Islands,
and in the bill introduced by Senator Lodge of Massa
chusetts. The entire subject of monetary conditions
in the Orient is discussed in the report. It is recom­
mended that the United States adopt in the Philip­
pines a gold standard in effect, but that the chief
coinage be of silver. This plan is selected in order to
depart as little as possible from present conditions,
while bringing the currency up to a fixed relation
with gold standard countries. The 'present currency
of the Philippines consists of Mexican silver dollars,
with such scanty aid from paper credit as is afforded
by issues of the Spanish-Filipino Bank to a gold value
of about $1,000,000. Free coinage prevails after a
fashion in Mexico, but the Philippines are subject to
all the fluctuations in the value of Mexican dollars
arising not merely from the changes in the market
price of silver bullion, but from the accidents of the
supply of silver emanating from the Mexican mints
and the distribution of this supply in the Orient. A
worse basis for a currency system for a country hav­
ing intimate relations with gold-standard countries
could scarcely be devised.
The plan recommended by Mr. Conant, and em­
bodied in the bill introduced in the Senate by Mr.
Lodge, places the control of the amount of the new
coinage in the hands of the Government of the Phil­
ippine Islands. By restricting the quantity of coins
issued to the limits of commercial needs, will remove
them from the influence of fluctuations in the bullion
market, and of itself serve to keep them at the ex­
change value fixed by the Government. Mr. Conant
has in effect recommended that the new silver be
coined at the ratio of 32 to 1 instead of 16 to 1, as
under our present system in the United States. The
new coin, to be known as the peso, will have substan­
tially the size of the silver dollar; but will have the
value of only fifty cents in gold. The coins will not be
issued strictly at the ratio of 32 to 1, because they will
contain a little less silver and be of less fineness than

[V ol . LX X IV.

either the Mexican or the American silver dollarThey will be maintained at an exchange value of 32 to
1, however, by the provisions for a gold reserve and
for the maintenance of this legal parity. Tee pro­
visions for maintaining parity in case of emergency
are substantially the same in the bill introduced by
Senator Lodge as those adopted in the United States
by the gold-standard law of March 14 1900.
The essential merit of this plan, as already suggested,
is that it links the currency of the Philippines defi­
nitely to the American gold standard, but leaves the
natives in possession of a coin of substantially the
same character and value as they now use. Enough
has been said to indicate the unwisdom of adhering to
the silver standard, which has been abandoned in
Japan and in British India, and exists only in an in­
definite way in China. The only other alternative
worth considering is the immediate introduction of
American money in the Philippines. The reasons
against this are pointed out with much force in the
report of Mr. Conant. The most important of these
reasons, perhaps, is the fact that the natives are ac­
customed to extremely petty transactions, in which
they need a small unit of exchange. This uDit is pro­
vided by the hundredth part of the peso, which would
be worth half'of an American cent. The same divisi­
bility runs throngh the larger coins, from the proposed
piece of five centavos in nickel, worth two and a-half
cents in gold, to the proposed ten-centavo and twentycentavo pieces, worth respectively five and ten cents.
For the average native these coins would be much
more useful in his little dealings than the correspond­
ing American coins, even if he came to understand
perfectly that the American coins were of the same
exchange value as the pieces of twice the size to which
he is now accustomed.
There can be little question that a currency system
convertible into the American system at the ratio of
two for one will be advantageous to American export­
ers and investors. It will hardly be necessary to pre­
pare separate price lists or to go through elaborate cal­
culations for invoices and customs payments when the
unit of one currency is exactly twice the unit of the
other. With other gold-standard countries par of ex­
change will be fixed by its convertibility. Linked with
this feature is the creation of American banks. This
subject also is fully covered in the report made to Sec­
retary Root and in the bill introduced by Mr. Lodge.
Authority is given to national banks to establish
branches in the Philippine Islands and in other parts
of the world, and to issue a carefully restricted amount
of credit currency. The benefits of branch banking
and currency issues are limited to banks with a capital
of $500,000 or more. This seems to be a prudent
provision.
Banks of small capital would be of
little use in the development of large American en­
terprises, and even under the best conditions would
hardly impart to a branch system the credit and
confidence needed to make it of any value to the
country.
The system of credit currency which is recom­
mended is surrounded by many safeguards. One of
the chief of these, which differentiates the proposed
system for the Philippines from any system whioh
might be proposed in the United States, is the limit­
ation of note issues to large banks. lu the Philip­
pines it is provided that a bank shall not issue in
amount more than half its capital in currency, that it
shall put up the bonds required under the national

January 18, 1902.]

THE CHRONICLE

banking law for beginning business, that it shall hold
a cash reserve of 25 per cent against its circulation,
and that it shall contribute to a safety fund in the
custody of the Government.
Some such currency system as we’have outlined Beems
to be quite necessary for the development of the islands.
The only paper notes now available, aside from fleeting
sums in American money, consist of the issues of the
Spanish-Filipino Bank. These are in process of re­
duction under the mandate of the American Govern­
ment, but it has been found exceedingly difficult to
get the business community to surrender the notes
because of the constant demand for them. There is
thus a great dearth of paper, which will become more
acute with the expansion of business under American
authority. It need hardly be said to those familiar
with our system of bond-secured circulation that
United States bonds are not quoted on Eastern bourses,
and that they would not afford a profit which would
justify the issue of circulation upon them in view of
the high rates which can be earned by the direct loan
of money in the Orient.
It is to be hoped that the provisions of the bill of
Senator Lodge on the subject of coinage, currency
and banking will be accepted by Congress. It is de­
sirable to afford the people of the Philippines an op.
portunity for development as soon as possible. Secre­
tary Root and Governor Taft and his associates of the
Philippine Commission have done what they could
to hasten intelligent legislation. The Commission
endorsed unanimously the recommendations of Mr.
Conant and have embodied similar recommendations
in briefer form in their annual report. They are
able to speak with an authority derived from an ex­
perience of nearly two years and from intimate con­
tact with business conditions and business men
throughout the Philippine Archipelago.
Their
recommendations are entitled to careful consideration
and great weight.
OUR F O R E IG N COMMERCE I N 1901.
The figures of our foreign trade for the late calen­
dar year, furnished by the Bnreau of Statistics at
Washington, show that the year will rank as among
the best in the country's history. As far as the value
of the exports is concerned, the extraordinary total
of the previous year has been well maintained, which
is the more noteworthy as many of the conditions
were such as to cause a falling off. Stated in brief,
the merchandise exports in 1901 had a money value of
l,465i million dollars, or only about 12^ million^dollars less than the aggregate for the calendar year4
1900,
which was, roughly, 1,478 million dollars. The mag­
nitude of the amounts for these two years can be
judged when we say that for 1899 and 1898 the totals
were respectively 1,275 and 1,255 millions, for 1897
and 1896 1,099 and 1,005 millions, respectively, and
for 1895 but 824 millions. The increase between 1895
and 1901,it will be observed, has been full 80 per cent.
Hor did our merchandise exports ever aggregate
1,000 million dollars in any calendar year prior to
1896, as against the 1,465 millions for 1901.
What gives special significance to this result is that
it was reached, as already stated, in face of a number
of adverse circumstances and conditions. For in­
stance, the serious corn-crop shortage from which so
large a section of the United States suffered in 1901
naturally reduced very decidedly the shipments of

121

corn. Then the trade depression prevailing in many
of the Continental countries of Kuropocutoff directly
and indireotly a considerable portion of the foreign
markets for our iron and steel. We say indirectly as
well as directly because the iron and steel industry in
Germany was utterly prostrated, and the inability
to find a market at home for their surplus products
led the German makers to force their goods upon out­
side markets at a sacrifice—in some cases, it is asserted,
at below cost. On the other hand, there was little in­
ducement for our own producers to seek foreign out­
lets, as the iron and steel markets here were buoyant
and demand exceeded supplies. Besides this, the
fatuous policy pursued by the Amalgamated Copper
Company in maintaining an artificial price for copper
caused the copper exports to dwindle—leading at the
same time to large imports of copper.
That the grand aggregate of the merchandise ex­
ports underwent comparatively little shrinkage, not­
withstanding the conditions mentioned, is due in the
main to three principal elements. (1) The tremen­
dous exports of wheat and flour, far exceeding the
best of previous years; (2) the fact that prices for
agricultural products, owing to the corn failure, were
maintained at good figures, while agricultural condi­
tions abroad also favored a high level of values; (3)
the circumstance that excepting iron and steel and
copper our manufacturing exports fell off relatively
little.
The large volume of the wheat and flour shipments
was by all odds the most striking feature of the year's
exports. The wheat crop in the United States (spring
and winter combined) was the largest ever harvested.
Contemporaneously, the wheat crops abroad were de­
ficient. As a consequence, the demand upon us was
urgent and of unusual dimensions. Reducing flour
to wheat, we sent out during the twelve months of 1901
no less than 267,000,000 bushels of wheat. There
have been other years when the wheat shipments were
of exceptional dimensions, but this is about 40 million
bushels in excess of the best of them. In the previous
year (1900) the shipments were only 181,925,443
bushels, showing an increase therefore in 1901 of 85
million bushels. In 1899 the exports were 193,862,385 bushels, and in 1898, which was one of the largest
of the previous years, they were 223,810,253 bushels.
The extent of the foreign demand prevented any de­
cline in price, notwithstanding the size of the crop.
The exports of wheat averaged 72^ cents per bushel
in 1901 against 71f cents in 1900. It remains to be
said that notwithstanding this improvement, the aver­
age was much below that of either 1899, when 74
cents was realized, or 1898 when almost 88 cents was
realized. The comparisons are the same for flour, the
average export price per bbl. for 1901 having been
$3 69, as againBt $3 65 in 1900, but as against $3 74
and $4 32 respectively in 1899 and 1898.
In the [case of corn of course the average price was
very high, namely 49£ cents, against 44£, 40| and
37£ cents, respectively, in the three years preceding.
The amount of corn sent out was only about one-half
the amounts of the years immediately preceding,
namely 102,000,000 bushels, against 190,386,489 in
1900, 206,135,233 bushels in 1899 and 207,309,381
in 1898. In values, therefore, there was a heavy fall­
ing off, the amount for 1901 being only $50,700,000,
as compared with $84,284,733 for 1900, $82,728,589
for 1899 and $77,316,689 for 1898. There was also
a further shrinkage in the oats shipments, which ag-

122

THE CHRONICLE.

gregated only about 26 million bushels, aa againat 32
million,41 million and 50 million bushela,reapeotl?ely,
in the three yeara preceding.
For this lose, though,
there was compenaatlon In an average price'of 35 oenta
per buahel in 1901, contraated with 30£, 31$ and 32£
oenta in the three previou8 yeara. In value the oata
exporta were #9,100,000 in 1901 and #9,823,496 in
1900, ahowing no very great difference as between
theae two yeara. In 1899, however, thejamount waa
♦12,848,332 and in 1898 #16,046,888.
The foregoing makes It clear that large though the
loaa on the corn exports waa, the gain "on the wheat
shipments waa of much greater conaequenoe, and
that the total of the breadatuffs exports as a whole
consequently ran considerably higher than in the pre­
vious year. In truth the value of the breadatuffs ex­
ports for 1901 was over 25 million dollars larger than
for 1900, the figures being #276,539,672, againat #250,786,080. In 1899 the amount of the corresponding
item waa #269,955,771 and for 1898 it was $317,879,746. The difference againBt 1901 in this last instance
follows from the lower price for wheat and the re­
duced shipments of corn, and the comparison is in­
structive In bringing out the fact that notwithstand­
ing the increase in the late year, the breadstuffs ex­
porta for that period of twelve months were by no
means the largest on record.
Besides the gain on the breadstuffs exports, there
was also a gain on the exports of provisions and dairy
products, which amounted to $206,556,468 for 1901,
against $186,568,735 for 1900, and a gain on the ship­
ments of cattle, sheep and hogs, which had a value of
♦39,178,358, against $35,033,734. The increase in
both instances follows in part from higher prices and
in part from an augmentation in the quantity sent out.
On the other hand in the case alike of the petroleum
exports, and the cotton exports, there was a falling off.
The former were $72,715,064, against $74,493,707,
the loss being due entirely to a lower average price,
reflecting doubtless the effeots of the oil discoveries
in Texas and California; 1,050,000,000 gallons were ex­
ported in 1901, against 967,106,478 gallons in 1900,
these figures not including shipments of residuum.
The decrease in the value of the cotton exports was
also due to a smaller average price. And yet the price
remained relatively high, being 8 15-32 cents per
pound, which compares with 9$ cents for 1900, but
with 6-47 cents and 5‘57 cents in 1899 and 1898. We
sent out 6,955,000 bales in 1901, against 6,671,561
bales in 1900, and only 5,787,853 bales in 1899. In
1898, however, shipments were 8,169,380 bales, though,
as already stated, at an average price of but 5 *57 cents
per pound. In the following we show the exports of
ih e leading staples for the last six years and their re­
lation in each year to the total merchandise exports.
EXPORTS OF LEADING PRODUCTS FOR SIX CALENDAR TEARS.
E xp oris.

1901.

1900.

1899.

1898.

1897.

$
$
$
I
t
C o tto n ......... 800,990,381 314,252,580 191,167,342 232,708.204 212.746,570
Breadatuffs. 276,539,672 250,786,030 269,955,771 317,879,746 252,526,819
P ro y ’ns, &c. 200,656,468 186,6e8,786 182,440,184 174,978,013 140,962,298
Cattle,sheep
and hog s.. 39,178,358 85,033,784 81,910,407 34,651,779 40,862,058
P etr’lm , &o. 72,715,084 74,493,707 86,002,325 68,423,749 00,007.426

1890.
»
233.412,777
182,800,242
136,288,430
88,893,170
03,057,980

T o ta l......... 895,8*15,888 861,134,842 741,481,979 813,701,491 713,093,070 655,060,605
A ll oth . exp. 569,628,260 616,811,271 633,985,992 441,844,775 386,615,869 350,780,630
T o ta l......... 1465614139 1477940113 1275467971 1255646206 1099709045 1006837241

It will thus be seen that the aggregate of the ex­
ports of the leading staples increased 34$ million dol­
lars in 1901 over 1900, and at $895,885,883 is deci­
dedly the largest of any of the years given, comparing

[V ol . LXXIV.

with $655,066,605 for 1896 and with #535,169,458 for
1895. Obviously, therefore, the agricultural exports
still play an important part in the results, the staples
mentioned all being dependent (excepting only pe­
troleum) direotly or indirectly upon the situation as
to the crops. In the falling off of 47 million dollars
in the “ all other exports” — comprising everything
outside the leading staples— we see reflected the fall­
ing off in the iron and steel exports and in the cop­
per exports. More than the whole decrease is found
under these two heads, indicating that other classes
of manufacturing exports did not as a whole decline.
Details for the full year on this point are not yet
available, but for the eleven months to November 30
the value of the exports of Iron and steel was $94,091,967 in 1901, against $119,604,848 In 1900, and of
copper $30,279,548, against $54,184,645. The com ­
bined loss on the two items is almost 50 million
dollars.
In the oase of the merchandise imports, it is not sur­
prising to find further expansion. With business ex­
tremely active here the requirement for raw materials
and the other components entering into our manu­
facturing industries is necessarily increased, and the
fact that labor is fully employed at excellent wages and
that.business^men are netting good profits stimulates
imports of luxuries. The imports f or 1901 are much
the largest in the country's history, and at $880,405,346 are 51 million dollars in exoess of the imports for
1900. The following table shows the imports and the
exports for each year back to 1870.
MERCHANDISE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS (CALENDAR YEARS).
Calendar
Year.

E xp orts.

Im ports.

Excess.

1870.............
1871...............
1872...............
1873...............
1874...............
1875...............
1870...............
1877...............
1878...............
1879...............
1880................
1 8 8 1.............
1882................
1883...............
1 8 8 4 ....,.......
1885...............
1880................
1887...............
1888...............
1889...............
1890...............
1891................
1 8 9 2 .............
1893...............
1894 .............
1895................
1890...............
1807...............
1898................
1899................
1900..............
1901 ..............

403,580,010
400,352,088
408,837,918
507,757.867
509,872,653
510,947,422
590,606,629
620,302,412
737,091,973
765,159,825
889,683,423
833,549,127
707,981,940
795,209,310
749,306,428
688,249,798
713,347,290
715.212,840
691,620,852
827,055,760
855,899,202
970.265,925
638,020,941
875,831,848
825,102,248
824,800,130
1,005,837,241
1,099,709,045
1,255,540,260
1,276,407,971
1,477,940,118
M 0 5 ,514,139

401,132,058
578,111,099
055,904,099
505,248,048
502,115,907
503,162,930
427,347,105
480,446,300
431.612,383
513,002,790
090,807,170
070,209,448
752,843,507
087,000,210
029,261,800
587.808,673
000,893,686
704,670,343
719,484,080
702,884,881
814,909,575
818,304,521
830,490,141
700,239.840
070,312,941
801,060,347
681,579,550
742,596,229
634,964,448
798,967.410
829,149,714
88"',405,346

Im p. 57,546,048
Im p . 112,759,011
Im p. 187,126,751
Im p. 27,490,181
E x p . 7,750,640
E xp . 7,784,480
Eoep. 103,319,404
E xp . 189,856,112
E x p . 305,479,590
E xp . 251,557,029
E x p . 192,876,248
E xp . 163,339,079
E x p . 15,139,439
E xp . 108,143,100
E x p . 120,104,568
E xp . 100,381,125
E x p . 52,453,704
E xp . 10,630,497
Im p. 27,803,828
E xp . 04,170,869
E x p . 40,189,027
ilx p . 151,901,404
E xp . 107,630,800
E xp . 109,592,003
E xp . 148,789,307
E xp. 23,190,789
E xp . 324,357,685
E xp . 357,113,810
E xp . 020,581,818
E xp . 470,500,501
E xp . 048,790,399
E xp. 685,108,798

Total Foreign
Trade.
804,718,008
1,033,463,187
1,124,802,047
1,103,005,915
1,131,988,400
1,014,110,358
1,018,013,794
1,100,748,718
1,168,704,350
1,278,762,021
1.580,490.598
1,503,758,575
1,520,825,453
1,482,876,582
1,378,028,288
1,270,118,471
1,374,240,876
1,419,789,183
1,411,105,532
1,589,940,631
1,070,308,777
1,788.830,440
1.708.511,088
1,042.071,694
1,501,415,189
1,028,529,483
1,087,410,797
1,843,804.274
1,890,510,714
2,074,435.381
2,307,095,827
2,345,919,485

A word or two seems called for with reference to
the excess of merchandise exports over imports, or
trade balance. This was not as heavy as in the year
preceding, and yet amounted to over 585 million
dollars. Nevertheless we were obliged to send out
net 3£ million dollars gold, being the first time sinoe
1897 that the gold movement was against the United
States in a calendar year. Investors in this oountry
last April subscribed largely for the new British loan,
and in the contest for control of Northern Paoiflo
big blocks of the stock of that road were bought in
Europe and brought here, besides whioh the generally
high range of prioes ruling on our Stook Exohauge
attracted hither other foreign-owned American secur­
ities. Furthermore, Increasing amounts of American

THE

JANUARY 18, 1902.]

CHRONICLE.

capital are going into electrical and other enterprises
In Europe, and we are obliged to remit eaob. year a
large sum for freights, interest, etc. Hence if the
year 1901 stood alone in the extraordinary extent of the
trade balance, the feature of a coincident gold out­
flow would not be so hard to understand. As it is,
the 1901 balance is merely one of a series of successive
annual balances, all of notable proportions. T o give
prominence to this fact, we present the following
table, in which we have combined the merchandise
movement with the gold and silver movements, thus
showing the result for each year in its final form.
YE A R L Y TRADE BALANCE.
1901.

$

Excess of—

M erch a n . e x p o r t s ..595,108,798
S ilv e r e x p orts ....... 21,496,968

1900.

1899.

1898.

1897.

$

t

$

t

648,796.899
26,181,821

476.500,661 680,581,818 867,113,816
22,617,808 24,666,724
25,678,980

T o t a l..................... 606.604,745 674.917,720
• o ld Im ports.............. •3,348,007 12,614,461

499,118,369 646,247,542 382,692,806
5,965,653 141^968,998
*253,589

G rand t o t a l......... 609,952,752 662,803,259

493,162,816 503,278,544 382,946,395

* Exoess of exports.

In this way the exoess of exports to be accounted
for in 1901 is 610 million dollars, following 662
millions in 1900, 493 millions in 1899, 503 milllons^in
1898, and 383 and 311 millions respectively in 1897
and 1896. For the six years together merchandise
and specie exports have exceeded merchandise and
specie imports in the enormous sum of $2,963,204,083. To complete our record, we add the following
table of the yearly gold and silver exports and im ­
ports.

123

the annals of the country; (3) the issuance and ad­
mission to the list o f bonds representing new capital
outlay to an extraordinary total; (4) the listing of a
remarkable amount of railroad shares sold at or above
par; (5) the very small total of securities arising from
reorganization, but the unparalleled aggregate of
bonds issued to take up stocks acquired for purposes o f
oontrol and o f shares created to replace those of other
concerns merged by amalgamation or otherwise.
The first table embraces the record of aggregate
listings for each of the last ten years. From it we
learn that the volume of stocks and bonds listed was
more than double that in any previous year. If the
shares of the great Steel Corporation be deducted (the
bonds not having been listed), even so the year sur
passes all previous records. Securities representing
new capital outlay combine with those issued on ac­
count of amalgamation and for purposes of control
to raise the total additions to more than 2,500 m illions, the previous record being held practically in
common by 1898 and 1899, in each o f which years re­
organizations swelled the listing of stock and bonds
to about 1,229 millions.
LISTINGS ON NEW YO RK

Bonds,

lim es fo r new
capital, etc.

STOCK EXCHANGE.

Old issu ci
now listed.

Replacing
old securities

Total.

1901................ $220,171,700 $21,270,100 $681,568,800 $923,010,100
1900................ 147,678,597
6.287.000 289,747,403 443,713,000
1899................ 156,304,760
22.908.000 346,171,480 525,384,240
1898............... 245,219,480
26.248.000 428,602,200 700,064,680
1897................
15,718,800 253.981.900 857,415,902
87,720,502
1896...............
7.626.000 427,317,000 582.286.700
,-------------------G o ld .------------------- . .------------------S ilv e r .---------------- , 1895............... 147,343,790
15.587.000 75,162,100 257.275.400
166,526,300
Excess o f
Excess of
1894............... 184.785.000 32,237,600 92.782.000 309,804,600
Tear
Exports (+) or
Exports(+)or 1893............... 139.272.000
42.178.000 107,353,400 288.803.400
1892................ 175,125,600
12.352.000 130.383.900 317,861,500
Ending Exports. Imports. Imports {—). Exports. Imports,
lm p o r ts (-)
1891................ 191,397,700
16.187.000 80.061.000 287.645.700
Dec. 31—
$
»
$
$
l
$

.

.

.

.

.

.

1870
53,103,745 10,430,561 +42,673,184
1871 .........44,915,976
5,841,948 +39,074,027
1872
68,638,125 11,113,290 +57,524,835
1873 .......... 25,496,118 20,537,264
+4,958,864
1874 .......... 43,149,091
7,422,806 +35,726,285
1875 ....... 53,413,947 14,338,789 +39,075,158
1876 .......... 31,231,739 23,673,291 +7,558,448
1877
18,982,638 11,629,655 +7,352,983
1878
8,655,948 10,477,859 —1,821,911
1879 .......... 4,115,446 78,767,941 -7 4 ,6 5 2,4 95
1880 .......... 3,002,459 73,644,098 -7 0,582,239
1881
2,603,543 60,398,620 —57,795,077
1882 .......... 38,721,079 13,402,528 +25,318,551
1883 .......... 6,048,770 22,055,961 -16,007,191
1884 .......... 40,948,246 27,957,057 +12,990,589
1885
11,417,20723,645,311 -1 2,228,104
1886 .......... 41,283,222 41,309,835
—20,013
1887
9,144,426 44,903,327 -35,758,901
1888 .......... 84,526,447 11,034,074 +23.492,373
1889 .......... 50,935,412 12,001,620 +38,873,892
1890 .......... 24,063,108 20,379,466
+3,683,052
1891
77,093,005 45,203,377 +33,889,688
1892 ......... 70,545,328 18,105,050 +58,380,272
1893 ......... 79,083,726 73,280,575
+0,703,151
1894
1 01,849,735 21,350,607 +80,499,128
1 04,967,402 84,396,392 +70,671,010
1895
1890......... 58,258,990 104,731,259 -40,474,369
1897
34,276.40134,022,812
+258,589
1898 ......... 18,194,054 158,168,952 -141,968,998
1 8 9 9 ...... 45,379,411 61,384,964
-5 ,95 5 ,5 5 3
1900 ........ 54,134,623 66,749,034 -12,614,401
1901
67,789,889 54,331,882 +3,348,007

27,846,083 15,259,199 +12,686,881
32,524,495 10,962,467 +21,562,028
32,048,799 10,068,714 +21,980,085
38,076,207
9,212,185 +28,864,022
29,577,984
7,830,998 +21,746,986
25,889,667
8,547,357 +17,342,210
25,122.736 10,798,043 +14,324,693
29,336,929 12,141,560 +17,195,369
18,209,252 18,389,884
-1 8 0 ,6 3 2
21,701,652 14,425,017 +7,276,535
12,983,442 11,631,025 +1,352,417
17,063,274
8,595,045 +8,467,629
17.317,055
9,098,385 +8,218.670
25,794,670 14,158,357 +11,641,313
29,563,748 15,504,777 +14,058,971
33,280,542 17,772,718 +15,507,824
27,112,707 19,758,414 +7,354,293
27,733,192 21,000,721 +6,732,471
30,020,003 21,701,369 +8,259,244
40,742,875 20,799,458 +13,943,417
28,609,101 30,764,904 -2 ,15 6 ,8 0 8
27,930,116 27,915,906
+14,211
36,362,281 31,452,950 +4,909,325
40,357.748 27,705,696 +18,592,052
47,245,807 17,633,594 +29,012,218
64,211,080 24,373,347 +29,837,789
64,056,741 80,279,740 +38,777,001
58,601,292 33,082.302 +25,578,990
53,797,104 29,131,880 +24,066,724
58,461,737 80,843,929 +22,617,808
60,221,004 40,100,313 + 20,121,381
55,038,901 31,142,949 +24,496,932

S to ck s.

1901................ $429,537,450 $76,090,600 $1186385665 $1642013715
1900................ 296,550,572 130,205,000 194,179,428 620,935,000
1899................ 311,420,285
392.752.320 704,172,605
1898................
52,646,600 405,753,266 528,153,996
69,754,130
1897................
24,369,900 425.329.320 502,974,891
53,275.671
1896...............
514,158,643 590,782,215
76,578,572
1895...............
35,385,200 30,656,270 148,378,970
77,132,500
1894...............
4.800.000 209,776,750 251,193,003
36,616,258
1893...............
48,874,000 55,627,100 198,245,261
93,744,161
1892...............
99,905,900 48,364,850 88,765,355 237,036,105
1891................
96,540,754
1.650.000 90,724,200 188,914,954
N ote. —
Applications for the listing of Trust Company receipts and of
•eouritias marked “ assented” (if preparatory to reorganization), or of
securities stamped “ assumed” or “ assessment paid” —the securities
themselves having previously bsen listed—are not inoluded in this table

.

.

.

.

.

.

The 220 millions of bonds representing new cap­
ital outlays was once exceeded in amount in 1898,
but in the case of stocks the total of 429 millions
is far ahead o f the previous record, the 311 mil­
lions of 1899. Reorganizations being at a minimum,
the enormous amount (1,800 millions) of new securi­
ties replacing old securities reflects the process of
amalgamation (industrial as well as railway) whioh
has lately been so conspicuous.
The seoond table indicates the individual listings of
The numerous is­
Note.—For years 1886 to 1901, Inclusive, the figures embrace gold railroad and street lailway bonds.
and silver in ore; in the years preceding both were included in the sues of bonds for improvements and extensions are
merchandise movement.
apparent.
LISTINGS OF RAILRO AD BONDS.

Company and title o f loan—
Am ount.
P urpose o f issue.
L IS T IN G S O N T H E N E W Y O R K \ S T O C K
Atoh. Top. & S. Fe gen. gold 4s....$5,000,000.. Extensions, lmpts.,ete.
E X C H A N G E D U R IN G T H E Y E A R 1901..
Atlantic & Danville 1st g. 5s........
750,000.. Betlre pref. stock.

The securities listed on the New Y ork Stock E x­
change during the twelve months of 1901 disclose
clearly the striking features of this unusual year.
Indeed, what was said in reviewing the listings for the
first six months is even more emphatically true of the
year as a whole, it being characterized by the following
notable circumstances, viz.: (1) The largest aggregate
listings for a period of its length in the history of the
Exchange; (2) the listing of the shares of a company
whioh is at the same time the greatest industrial con­
solidation and the chief in point of capitalization in

Balt. & Ohio oonv. g. deb. 4s......... 12,143,000.. Oonstrao’n < lmpts.
fe
Beech Creek Ext. 1st g. 3»flS........ 4,500,000.. Construction of road.
Buffalo & Susq. 1st ref. g. 4s........ 2,510,000.. Acqu’ns, ext’ns, etc.
do
do
........
511,000. Exohange for old 5s.
Can. Southern 1st gold 5e.............
80,000.. Seoond traok, etc.
.............
900,000. .Improvements,
do
2d
do
Central Branch By. 1st guar. g. 4s 3,459,000. .E x.for seo’s of old oo's
Cen.of Ga.Ohat.Div. pur.mon.g.4s. 1,840,000.. Purohase of division.
Cen. Pao. 1st ref. guar, gold 4s_ 2,941,000...Improvements.
_
do
do
do
.. . .
352,500)
do
do
do 3 ^ 8 ...
15,5005 Exoh’ed for old bonds.
do
do g. 4a.................
52,500) Betlre old bonds.
do
do gold S ^ s.........
8,500 5
Chea.A O.—Gr’ nb’r By.1st gu.g,4s. 2,000,000. Construction of road.
Ohio. < Alton ref. 50-yr. g. 3s.......14,555,000. Ex. for old bds.A Imps.
fe
fc
Chio.&Eaat 111. gen, con. and 1st (
957,000- Extension < new equip.
gold 6s........................................)
34,000. Betlrement of old bds.

THE

124
Company and title of loan—

Amount.

0H E 0N 1CLE

Purpose of Pt*M.

OHf. & S'. W. geu. 3% a___________ $ 2 ,5 2 5 ,OOO..Exoh. fo r old bonds,
Chiu. tad. & L ouisv. ref. g. 5 a . . . . . .
3 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im provem ents.
Cldc. B. 1. A Pao. gen, g. 4 s ........... 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im provem ents,
Ob. Sc. P, Minn. A Om, consol. 6s.
1 2 2 ,0 0 0 .. Exoh, for underl’ g bde.
do
do
do
.
2 7 ,0 0 0 ..E xoh. fo r old bonds,
o m c. Toxin. Trana..50-yr. g old 4 s ..
1 8 5 ,0 0 0 ..Im pts , eqriipm’ t, eto.
do
do
1st g. 4 s . , . , , , . ,
5 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im provem ents.
Oboe. Okla. A Q q jf gen. g. 5 s ........
5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..C onstruction o f road,
2 5 0 ,0 0 0 .. E xeh . fo r old bonds,
do
do
do .........
01. Oiu. Ohio. & 8t.lt, gen. g. 4 s . , . . 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..E x o .fo r undexl’ g bonds■CL A Pitts, gen, ga. g. 3 L «, 8er. D.
8 2 8 ,0 0 0 ..Im p rovem en ts,
do
gen. g. 3 *4is, 8er. B . . . .
8 8 5 ,0 0 0 ..im ports, and a d d lt’ns.
Col. Mid. 50 yr. 1st gold 4s........ .
435,OOO..Pay’ t oar tr.,im pts.,etc.
Oolo. & Southern 1st gold 4 s ...........
550,000. .Im provem en ts, eto,
D e n v. A Southw. gen. g old 5 s ....... 4 ,9 2 3 ,0 0 0 ..E x ,fo r see.of eons’ t oos.
Dec. South. 1st g. 4s o f 1 9 5 1 ....... 2,750,000 ) A oqui’ n o f Oblo 8o. and
do
Ohio 8o. 1st g. 4s .. 4,000,000 j Det. A.L. N .railroads.
E rie R R . 1st con sol, gold 4 s ...........

5 4 8 ,0 0 0 ..Im provem ents.
A oquis’ n o f Pennsylv.

(

LXXIY,

[V ol.

Company and title o f loan—

Amount.

Purpose of issue.

c

$286,000..Acot.pur. Coahoo. ASo.
1,043,000..Imp’ts, extensions,eto.
200,000..Exob, for old bonds.
Wisconsin Con. 1st gen. gold 4 s ....
908,000..Extensions, impt’s,eto”

Wheel. A L. E. 1st. eon. g. 4 s ....I

{

Total............... .......... ............ $667,006,000
LISTINGS Ok STBKET SAILWAY BONDS.
Company and title oj loan—
Amount,
Purpose of issue.
B’klyn Union El. 1st 50-yr. g, 4-5s.$3,110,000.. Aoot. aoq. Kings Co. EL
Conn, Ry.&L.lst Aref.SO-yr.g.i^s 7,939,200..Part paym’t of prop’s,
do
do
do
415,800..Exo.for underl’g bonds.
Dot Tint’d R
xr Dai CiH7 A
nft>
5 4,335,000..Old bonds just listed.
Dot. uni dRy. Det.Citizens 5s. | i >160,ooo..Retire underl’g bonds.
Grand Rapids Ry. 1st gold 5s....... 2,500,000 j E |J ro ^ X r X dS’
:1
Mil.Eleo.Ry.A Lt. 30-yr.g. oon. 5s.
397,000..Imp’ts, extensions, eto.
Nassau Eleo. RR, gu. oon. gold 4s. 4,000,000..Aoq.of props.impts,eto.
do
do
do
do . 6,474,000..Retirem’t of old bonds.
Third Ave. RR. 1st oon. gu. g. 4 s ..35,000,000

W le ? ° B lL r a n t' 5 2 *
Val. A K ingston Ry]

Total........ .................................$65,321,000

H ooking Val. 1st con. g o ld 4 ^ 8 .... 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im p ’ts and equipm ’ t.
A
nf)f) < P a y ’ toartruats, Sunday
d0
d0
*--■
1 0 2 ,0 0 0 1 cre e k Coal stook, eto.

th e E r ie , th e S o u th e r n P a cific a n d th e

HN? W° DfvT lsta8g M d ^ 7 .W.a00. & \ 1.105.000. .P u re, o f dlv. aft. fo re o l

and th e jo in t b o n d s o f th e G r e a t N o r th e r n a n d N o r t h ­

t,,

E sp e c ia lly n o te w o r th y in th is lis t are th e b o n d s o f

-i
1,200,000 E xtensions a n d im p ’ ts.
Ind. 111. A Io w a 1st g. 4s o f 1 9 5 0 1 3,300,0 0 0 ..R etirem ent old 5 s ."

ern

Int. A Great N or. 1st gold 6 s .........
do
do
2d g old 5 s...........

chases o f sto c k in (1 ) th e

do

do

do

......... .

657,000 ? Kxtfinslfm ot roft(i
657>000 J E xtension o f road.
4 8 1 ,0 0 0 ..Issued und. re-or. plan.

P a cific , issu ed

(2 ) th e

P a cific

on a c c o u n t

M a il,

U n io n P a cific

r e sp e c tiv e ly o f

pu r­

P e n n s y lv a n ia G oal C o ., e t c .,

(3 ) th e

S o u th e r n

Io w a Central ref. 50-yr. g. 4 s ......... 2,000.000 J1™ * *

th e N o r t h e r n

K. C» Ft. 8. A M.J!-rt.oon,g,6s o f ’ 2 813,736,000. .O ld bonds ju s t listed.
C Pur. sees, o f K. C. F. S.
do
B y. gn. ref. g. 4s.. 1 1,650,000-? A M. MB. and K. C.
( M. A Birm. RR.
Lake 8b. A MIob. 80. g. S ^ s ...........
3 5 9 ,0 0 0 ..R efunding old bonds.
do
do
do ....... . 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..G en eral purposes.
Leh. Val. m ort. A ool. tr. g old 5 s .. 3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im provem ents, eto.
Lon. & Nash. 50-yr. trnlf. gold 4 s .l0 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..1 m p ts.re tlr’t.o f bds.,eto
M ex. Cent, oonsol. gold 4s.............. 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im p ’ ts & add. br. lines.
do
1st oonsol. g old in o ___ 3,439,0C 0.. P aym ent floating debt.
M .8 t.P .A 8 .S teM .lstoon .5 0 -y r.g .4 s 5,590,OOO..Exeh. fo r 'u n d e r l’g b d s.
do
do
do
9 ,6 4 9 ,0 0 0 ..E xtensions.
M .K .A T .—M .K .A T .o f T .l s t g .5 s ..
6 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..E xtension s.
do
1st ext. 50-yr. gold 5 s .. 1 7 0 ,0 0 0 ..A cct.p u r. M iss.M id.Ry.
Mo. Pao. l s t e o l. gold 5s o f ’ 2 0 .. .. 2 ,6 3 6 ,0 0 0 ..Im p rovem en ts, eto,
M ob. A O.—St. L. A Cal. ooll. g. 4s 3 3 3 ,0 0 0 ..Im provem ents.
do
do
do
.. 2 ,1 6 1 ,0 0 0 .-E x o .fo r St. L. & 0. stk.
Nash. Chat. & St.L. 1st con. g. 5 s - 1 ,1 3 4 ,0 0 0 ..Retire old bonds.
do
do
do
..
2 5 ,0 0 0 ..C onstruction o f road,
N. Y. Cent.A H udson R iver R R .— > .,Q« nnr) 5 E xchan ged fo r M iohiM iobigan Cent. ooll. 3 ^ 8 ...........5
-;5je'uuu ( gan C entral stook.
N, Y . Cent. A Hud. R lv. gen. 3 ^ 6 .. 1 ,1 5 3 ,0 0 0 ..E x c b . fo r old bonds.
N. Y . A L on g Br. gen. 50-yr. g. 4s.. 1 ,500,000. .R etire old 5s.
N. Y . Out. & W. ref. g o ld 4 s ___. . . 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im provem ents.
N or. A W est. 1st oonsol. g o ld 4 s ... 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..E xtension s and im pts.
N orth Pao. p rior lien A 1. gr. 4 s .. 5 ,8 3 7 ,0 0 0 ..C on str’ n, equip., eto.
do
do
do
.. 1 ,1 1 8 ,5 0 0 ..E x o h ’ g e d fo r old bonds,
do
St. P.-Dul. D iv. g old 4s.. 9 ,2 1 5 ,0 0 0 ..Pur. St. P. A Dul. R R .

to n & Q u in c y .

do
Gt. N jo in t g. 4s (0. )
5 E xchan ged fo r C. B. &
55, A Q. o o l l . ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2115,153,U00£ Q. stock.
Og. & L. Cham p. 1st gu. g o ld 4 s .. 3,7GO,OOO..Pur.of roa d u nd.foreol.
do
do
do
..
7 0 0 ,0 0 0 . .N ew prop erty.
Ore. & Cal. 1st gnar. ,g., 5 s . . . . . . . .
3 7 5 ,0 0 0 ..N ew road.
Ore. Short L ine 1st o o n sol., g ., 5s. 1 ,9 9 1 ,0 0 0 ..E quipm ’ t, im p ’ ts, eto.
Penn. Co. guar. tr. certs., Ser. B .. 1 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Im p ’ts to con tr’ ll’ d oos.
P eo. A E ast.—In d. B loom . A W .)
Qo-, Kr.n $ Old bon d s exten ded at
1st pref. 7s (e x t.).........................$
9 8 f,5 0 0 j 4 p< 0<
R ailroad Securities 50-yr. g. 3 ^ - -- 8 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Pur. 111. Cent, stook.
R io G. W est. 1st con . 50-yr. g. 4s. 4 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..E xten sion s, equip.,eto.
do
do
do
. 6 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Pur. o f Utah F uel stk.
R utland R R . 1st con sol, g. 4 ia s ... 1 ,9 9 9 ,1 0 0 ..O ld bonds jnst listed.
do
do
do
...
440,900 ..E x c b . fo r old bonds.
R u tian d-C an .Istgu ar. 50-yr. g. 4s. 1 ,3 5 0 ,0 0 0 ..C onstruction o f roads.
Sag. T asc. & H ur. 1st gu. g o ld 4s.. 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..E xoh. fo r o ld bonds.
St. L aw . & A dir. 1st g old 5 s . . . . . .
8 0 0 ,0 0 0 ) n ij,
lns+
do
do
2d gold 5 s . . - , . . . .
4 0 0 ,0 0 0 1
bonds ju s t Hsted,
St. L. A San Fran. ref. g. 4 s . . . .
4 0 ,5 1 4 ,0 0 0 .. R ef unding old bonds.
St. L ouis Southw. 2d g old in c. 4 s . . 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..E xten sion s and im p’ts.
So. Pao. Co. 2-5-yr. coll, g o ld 4 ^ 8 .. 1 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Pur. P ac.M ail stk., eto.
S .P ae.of C a l.ls t oon.gu.g.5s,im std.
233,000
do
do
do
stm pd. 1,252,000 \ co n stru ctio n o f road.

P a cific a n d

are sh o w n in th e fo llo w in g c o m p ila tio n .

C1n nnn eon 5 P urcb. o f Lou. E vans.
80. R y .—8t. L. D iv. 1st g old 4s.. 2 10>00t),0001 & stt
con s. RR.
(
750,000. Im p ’ ts on division.
do
1st con. g old 5 s . ...............
4 2 8 ,0 0 0 ..R etire Ch.Col. A A .b d s .
do
M. A O . ooll. tr. g. 4 s . . . . . 7 ,8 5 5 ,0 0 0 ..E x o . fo r M .& 0 .g e n .4 s.
T ex. A P ao. Louisiana D iv.B r.L . 5s. 2 ,4 2 4 ,0 0 0 ..C onstruction o f road.
do
do
1st g old 5s.
1 8 1 ,0 0 0 ..R etire East. D iv . 6s.
T ol. St, L. A W est. pr. lien g. 313s.. 9 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ) E xchan ged fo r old sedo
do
1st gold 4 s ------- 5,625,000 j ourities under plan.
do
do
pr, lien g, 3*as.. 1,000,000 ( Cash requirem ents o f
875,000 d plan.
do
do
1st gold 4 s.........
C 3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..Gen. oorpoE e purposes.
U nion P acific R R . A 1. grant 4s. <
AnA 5 E xob . fo r Or. Sb. Line
i
66,000 | lnoom e « A „ ponds.
do
1st lien con. g old 4 s . .4 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..P urob. 80. Pao. stook.
do
do
do
..6 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..“ Pres. A fu tu re p u rp .”
WarrAn t t> i
>
rA«
a r lfl
J
8 6 1 ,0 0 0 ..E x o b . fo r old bonds,
W arren R R . le t ref. gold 3 ^ 8 .. .. [
4 4 ,0 0 0 ..R e p ’ t a d v ’ s to D.L.A W.

P a c ific , a n d (4 ) th e
The

K an sas

C h ic a g o

B u r lin g ­

C ity F o r t S c o t t & M e m ­

phis issu es, a g g r e g a tin g 2 5 m illio n s , m a r k th e c h a n g e
in c o n tr o l a n d h e a d q u a rte rs o f th a t ro a d fr o m B o s to n
to N e w Y o r k a n d S t . L o u is , w h ile

th e

1 8 m illio n s o f

bon d s o f th e S o u th e r n R a ilw a y re ca lls th e p u rc h a se o f
th e

p rop erties

of

th e

fo r m e r

M o b ile

L o u is v ille E v a n s v ille & S t . L o u is .
in g op era tio n s a lso are c o v e re d

&

O h io

and

E x te n s iv e r e f u n d ­

b y th e

bonds

of

th e

S t . L o u is & S a n F r a n c is c o a n d th e L o u is v ille & N a s h ­
v ille .

0 ther la rg e a d d itio n s to th e lis t w ere a ffo r d e d

b y th e M in n . S t . P a u l & S a u lt S te M a rie , T o le d o S t .
L o u is

&

W e stern

W estern ,
O h io ,

(a

P e n n sy lv a n ia

th e

d e b e n tu re s

already h a v in g
sion in to s to c k .

been

r e o r g a n iz a t io n ),
C om pany and
of

th e

R io

G ra n d e

B a ltim o r e

la s t-n a m e d

&

com pany

p a r tia lly w ith d r a w n f o r c o n v e r ­

T h e gtreefc ra ilw a y b o n d s also in c lu d e

several issues o f im p o r ta n c e .
T h e o b je c ts on a c c o u n t o f w h ich

th e

o f railroad a n d str e e t railw ay sh ares

severa l issu e s

have

b e en m a d e

LISTINGS OF KAILBOAD STOCKS.

Company and, class o f stock,—

Amount.

Purpose o f Issue.

B, A O. com.stk. vot. tr. certs......$8,459,000..Exob. for oonv. debs.
Cent. RR. of N. J. stook.................
19,000..Exoh. for oonv, bonds.
Okie. Burl. A Quinoy, stock........ 9,922,700..New road, equip’t, etc.
do
do
do --------- 1,922,000..Ex. for convert, bonds.
Chic. A Eastern 111., oom.. . . . . . . . . . 1,000,000 5 Equipment and Un­
do
do
p ref.... — .. 1,000,000 { provements.
CMe. Gt Western, deb. stock......... 2.160,000 J
do
do

do
do

et£

common................
6,5 0 0 ..Exchange.
pref. B ........... .
2,000,000..Exo. for W. M.& P. stk.

CM„. M U .. * Bt. Paul, com............ W

W

do
do pref........... 4,053,900..Exchange for bonds.
Ohio. R. I. A P ., stock.....................10,000,000..Extens. and impts.
Denver A Rio Grande, pref........... 20,536,880..Exoh. for B. G. W, stk.
Denver A Southw., o o m ............ 3,000,000 ( Exchange for secur’s
do
do
pref............... . 2,000,000 ( of constituent eo’s.
Detroit Southern, com................... 7,000,000) Aoquis’n Det. A L. No.
do
do
p r e f...............
6,000,000) and O. So. railroads.
Erie RR., 1st pref..................... .
5,000,000..Aect.pur,Penn.OoalCo.
Great Northern, pref.................... .

600,675

do
do
.................25,000,000..Pur, sec. of var.prop’s.
Hooking Valley, p r e f....... ........
719,000.. Ad’s to Tol.AO.Con.Ry.
do
com................
1 1,300.. Ex. for Tol. A O.Oen. stk.
Illinois Central, stook.......... .........19,200,000..Equip’t, imp’ts, eto.
Ind. 111. A Iowa stook.......... .......... 1,302,200..Extensions.
do
do
........................ 3,697,800..Old stock Just listed.
do

pref...........................

R500 } ®kehange.

Kan. City Ft. Scott & Mem. Ry.
.
.
S
guar. st. tr. c e rts,.................... £18,510,000^

Bit

Louis. A Nashville, stock............... 2,200,000..Improvements, eto.
Mo. Kansas A Texas, com.......... .
99,300.. Acet-pur.Miss. Mid.Uv

THE CHRONICLE

J a n u a r y 18, 1902.]
C om p a n y a n d class o f sto ck —

A m o u n t.

P u r p o s e o f issue.

C o m p a n y a n d cla ss o f sto c k —

125
A m ou n t.

P u r p o s e o f Issu e.

M o . P a o l f i o , B . .t . o . o . .k. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2 , 9 8 3 , 0 0 0 . . E x . f o r K . O . N o . I t y . s t k .
. .
O ld s t o c k
ju s t lis te d .
D i a m o n d M a t c h , .s . .t. .o. .c. . k . . . .) . ^ I ’ o o o ’ o O I m p ’ t s a n d e x t e n s i o n s .
.
O
1 1 ,2 1 8 ,0 0 0 ..
d o
d o
({o ld d e b s .
d o
d o
e
.
.
. 4 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 . . P u r o h . D e n . & R .G G n. s e t rk a . l E l e c t r i c ,. . .o. .o. . .m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 , 4 1 9 , 3 0 E0 x . . f o r p r o f . s t k . & d e b s .
d o
d o
. .
0
9 .9 2 2 .5 0 0 ..
G e n e r a H pa un ro pv oe sr e N . a t . B a n k , . . .s. .t. .o. . c . k. . . 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0. M . e r g e r O o n t . B k . , e t c .
l
s
d o
d o
L
G s
.
4 8 5 , 6 .0E 0 x. t e n s i o n s a n d i m p ’ t s *
0 0 0 C A c q u i s i t i o n ao c f l es d oe c k a o f L i g h t ., . . .c . .o. . m. . . . . . . . . . .
t
N e w M e x . R y . & C o a . l. ., . . c. . .o. . m. 3 . 0 0 0 .
.
. .
w
r
0 0 0 )
N e w M e x . N Fe u e lY Co o .k D o c k , . . .o. . o . .m. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 E 0 x) o b . f o r o l d s e c u r i t i e s
d o
d o
. . . . . . . . . . p . . r1 e. 0f 0 0 .
.
d o
. . . . . p . . r. . e . .f. . . . . . . . . .9 , 6 2 5 , 0 0 0 u ] n d e r p l a n .
.
.
N . Y . N . H . & H a r t . R R . . . . .s. .t o c k1 2 , 5 0 0 . . F l o a t i n g d e b t , e t c . d o
d o
. . . . . . .d. . .o. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 7 5 , 0 0C 0a .s. h r e q u ’ t s u n d . p l a n .
5 0 , 5 0 0 , 8 0 0 . . I i n p t s . , e q u i p , & a o dq ou ’ s
P e n n s y l v a n i a , s. .t. .o. .c. .k . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . 1 , 2 6 5 , 8 5 0
.
E x o . f o r P . W . & P B o ps lt e ' s G a s L . & C o k e _ _f _ C 4h , l3o 0 0 , 3 0 E0 x. . t e n s ’ n s a n d I m p t s .
k
e .
o
P it t s . F t . W . & C liio .,g u . s p e c . s t k .
1 ,2 9 1 ,2 0 0 ..I m p t s . d u r in g 1 9 0 0 .
A
U . 8 . S t e e l C o r p o r a t i o n. . ., . . . 5 o0 m , 4 3 3 , 9 0 0 5c q u i s i t i o n o f s e c ’ s o f
c 8
.
R u t l a n d R R . , .p. . .r. .e. . f. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. , 2 8 5 , 0 0 0 . . E x o b . f o r c o i n , s t o cd k o .
d o
. . . . . . 5 1 0p , r e5 f 4 , 1 0 0 c o n s t i t u e n t c o m p ’ e s ,
.
2
j
w o r k in g
ca p ita l, e to .
d o
. . d . .o. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 , 4 8 2 , 6 0 0 . . O l d s t o c k j u s t l i s t e d .
.
V i r g i n i a - C a r o l i n a C h e m . . . ., . . o .2 o 7m, 9 8 4 , 4 0 0 jc q u i s i t i o n o f p r o p e r ­
.
A
S t . L a w & A d i r o n d a c k , . c. . o . .m. . 1 , 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 . . O l d s t o c k j u s t l i s t e d .d o
.
. .
d o
p r e f . . . . . . . . 1 t 2i e, s . 0 0 , 0 0 0 )
0
S t, L & S a n F r a n c is o o , o o m m o n ..
.
1 ,7 2 3 ,0 0 0 ..I m p r o v e m e n t s .
T

«

„

*

r a c Btook........................
lflo

T o t a . .l. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ . .1. . ,. 2 9 5 , 4 2 9 , 2 0 0
.
.

fo r o ld se T o le d o S t. L . & W e s t ., c o m 9 ,5 9 8 ,5 0 0 > E x c h a n g e d
LISTINGS OF MISCELLANEOUS BONDS.
9 ,8 6 6 ,2 5 0 $
c u r it le s
u n d e r p la n .
d o
p r e f.
d o
A m o u n t.
P u r p o s e o f issu e.
3 9 6 , 5 0 0 ) C a s h r e q u i r e m e n t C o m p a n y a n d HUe o f lo a n —
s
o f
d o
o o m .
d o
1 3 3 ,7 5 $
0
p la n .
d o
p r e f.
d o
.
.
A m e r . B i o y o l e , g o l d d. .e. . b . . . . 5.$. s. 9 , 2 4 3 , 0 0 0 . . A c q u l s ’ n o f p r o p e r t i e s .
8 , 0 9 5 , 6 G 0 . . M o s t l y e x . f o r c o n Av mb .d s i d e & L e a t h . , 1 s t s . f . g o l d 6 s 8 , 3 7 5 , 0 0 0 . . A c q u l s ’ n o f p r
.
U n io n P a o lfio , o o m
H
( E x . f o r O r . R R . & A m v e. r . T e l e p . & T e l e g . , o o l . t r . g . 4 s . l 5 , O 0 O , O C O . . E x t e n s . , I m p ’ t s
N a
1 0 5 ,7 0 0 (
p f . a n d O r . S h . m Le ir n. e T h r e a d l s t o o l l . t _r _. _ g . 4 2s 0 2 , 0 0 0 . . N e w p r o p , a n d i m p t s .
d o
p r e f.
A
(
“ B ” b o n d s .
B ’k ly n U n . G a s 1 s t o o n .S O -y r . g .5 s .
2 8 3 ,0 0 0 . E x c h . f o r o ld b
W h e e lin g & L a k e E r ie , c o m .
a
3 7 1 ,0 0 0 ..E x c h . f o r p r io
d o
2 d o p r _ _f _ 1 ’ 6 0 0 0 0 0 1 E x t e n s l o n o f r o C do .l o . F u e l & I r o n , g e n . s . f . g , 5 s . ,
d
e
4 0 0 , 0 0 0 . . A c c t . p u r . C o s h . C &o m Smo .e r c i a l C a b l e , 1 s t .g. . .o. .l. d 24 , s0 0 0 , 0 0 0 . . E x t e n s ’ n o f l a n d l i n e s
d o
d o o ___
d
2 d0 o , 0 0 0 ) E x c h a n g e
fo r
o ld
sed o
d o
___
o u r it ie s .
d o
d o
1 s t 4 p 0 r, 0e 0f .0 . . 5.
C o n s o l . T o b a c c o c o l l . . .g. ... .4 . .1s 2. .2 , 1 5 8 , 1 0 0 {
.
T o b .o o m .tt k .
W i s c o n s i n C e n t cr oa m , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
l
D e t r o it C it y G a s , 2 5 -y r . g o ld
5 s ..
5 ,0 0 0 ..E x c h . fo r o ld
d o
d p r e . f. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 000 5 Improvements.
o
l
4 ,0 8 0 ,0 0 0 ..W o r k in g c a p it
p u r c h aD s ie s t i l o . f C o . o f A m . , o o l l . t r . g . 5 s . . .
d o
d o
. . . . . . . . c . .o. .m. . . . . 3 3 7 , 5 0 0 ) A c c o u n t
.
.
M a r s h f . & S . E . F Rr a n k f o r t - o n - M a i n , G e r m . ,
y .
d o
d po r e . f. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 2 , 5 0 0 $
3 ^ s )
o - c n n o n 5 E x te n d in g w a
( l o a n o f 1 9 .0. . 1 . .) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . j. . . . . . c f , / Q U , u u o $
.
a n d im p r o v e m e n ts .
T o t a l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .$. . 2. .8. . 4 , 5 8 4 , 5 1 5
.
.
G r a m e r e y S u g a r , 1 s t g .o. . l. .d. . . . 6 s 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 . . I m p r o v e m e n t s .
While, on the one hand, the extensive purchases of N a t i o n a l S t a r c h , g o l d d. . .e. .b. . . . 5 3 s , 7 2 4 , 0 0 0 . . A c q u i s ’ n o f p r o p e r t i e s .
N e w a r k C o n s o l. G a s , e o n . g o ld 5 s . 5 ,2 7 4 ,0 0 0 ..A c q u is ’n o f p r
control have resulted the past year in the locking up N . Y . D o c k , 1 s t 5 0 - y r . . . g. . . . . . .4. . s. 1 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 . . C a s h r e q u i r ’ t s o f p l a n .
d o
d o
. . . . . . d . .o. . 1 . 0 , 0 8 0 , 0 0 0 . . E x . f o r o l d s e o . u n d . p l a n
.
.
of vast amounts offrailroad stooks as security for col­
5
0
lateral trust bonds,|the prosperity of the steam roads N l. eY a . s & n Qt . VE al el lce . y L, . & s tP 3. l0s - ty c r o. gn o. lg d . 5 ss .. 1 , 91 3 8 ,, 00 00 00 . . . AA cd qd ui ti is o’ n s o. f p r
P
a
1
5
n
and the high price commanded by the shares of many S t . J o s e p h S t o c k Y a r d s A1^ s..t g1 . , 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 . . I m p r o v e m e n t s .
1

of them have, on the other hand, led to the listing,
especially during the last six months, of an extremely
large amount of new shares, the greater part of which
was sold at or above par to stockholders. Excluding
the two companies recently reorganized (Toledo St.
Louis & Western and Detroit Southern) with their
33 millions of stock, ten companies have listed in the
aggregate over 200 millions of new stock, the number
of millions in each casepeing as follows: Pennsyl­
vania, 52; Missouri Pacific, 28; Great Northern, 25;
Denver & Rio Grande, 20; Illinois Central, 19; Kan
sas City Port Scott & Memphis Railway (guaranteed
trust certificates), 13£; Burlington & Quincy, 12;
Rock Island, 10; St. Paul, 13; Union Pacifie, 8, these
last two partly in exchange for convertible bonds.
It is too early for the shares of the $400,000,000
Northern Securities Company to figure in the com­
pilation, but another year we may.expectfto see them
on the official list. The shares of the Brooklyn Rapid
Transit Co. (previously in the unlisted department) and
the Detroit United Railway, together aggregating 57^
millions, are also among the accessions of the past year.
In the following tables we bring together the list­
ings of industrial and miscellaneous stocks and bonds:
LISTINGS OF STREET RAILWAY STOCKS.

U t r . ‘ ^ L M S e r t e s E ™ ! ! . ’ . *\ ! ! 1 .C °0 . !° ! 0 ' > ° { 0 e t i r e S e r i e s C b o n d s .
.>
.
0 R
T o t a . .l. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$. . 1 . 9 0 , 6 8 3 , 1 0 0
.

The shares of the great Steel company, aggregating
1,018 millions, may perhaps make the other issues of
stock seem small in amount, but as a matter of fact
highly important contributions to the number of
listed securities were made by the two Fertilzer com­
panies (American Agricultural and Virginia-Carolina),
the Bicycle company, the Bell Telephone, the Cruci­
ble Steel, the Match Company, and the reorganized
Brooklyn Wharf & Warehouse Company, now known
as the New York Dock Company, and other corpora­
tions. The concentration in the control of two of the
great tobacco companies (the American and the Con­
tinental) accounts for the presence of more than 122
millions of collateral trust bonds issued by the Con­
solidated Tobacco Company.
The stocks admitted to dealings on the “ unlisted”
department amount in all to 270 millions, and in­
clude the entire share capital issued by the locomotive,
snuff, distilling and rubber goods consolidations, as
well as additional shares, increasing the amounts pre­
viously listed, of the great sugar, silver and copper
companies. The several items are as follows:

STOCKS PLACED ON “ UNLISTED” DEPARTMENT.
Company and class of slock—
Amount.
Purpose of Issue.
B r o o k ly n R a p id T r a n s it , s t o c k ...$ 2 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..O ld s t o c k ju s t lis te d .
C om m on .
P r e fe r r e d .
Total.
g
.
d o
d o
95 o d oo n n o J P u r c h a s e o f p r o p As ,m a a n l d a m a t e d C o. . p. .p. . .e. .r $ 7 8 , 8 8 7 , 9 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 7 8 , 8 8 7 , 9 0 0
n
a o
a o
d 0
...2 5 .0 0 0 ,0 0 0 $
Im p ts . i n ’9 9 &
1 9 0 0 .
.
$ 2 4 , 1 0 0 , 04 09 0, 1 0 0 , 0 0 0
D e t r o i t U n i t e d R y . , o o m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 , 5 O 0 , 0 0 0 . . A c q u l s ’ n A o mf e pr ri c ap ne r Lt i oe cs o. m o t i v e . . 2 . .5. . ,. .0. . 0 0 , 0 0 0
o
A m e r io a n
S n u f t j . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . .1. . .. 0 . 0 1 . 7 0 0
.
.
2 3 ,
1 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 00 0 1 ,7 0 0
M i l . E l e c t . R y . & L i g h t , p r e f ........... 4 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 . . O l d s t o c k j u s t l i s t e d .
A m e r i c a n S u g a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7. . ,. .5. .0. 0 , 0 0 0
7 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 , 0 0 0
1 5
T o t a l .............................................. $ 6 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0
D i s t i l l i n g C o . o f A m e r i4 c 4a , .5 . 4 2 , 9 2 7
.
2 9 , 4 6 2 , 37 14 8, 0 0 5 , 2 4 5
I n t e r n a t i o n a l S .l. i. .v. . e . .r. . . . .
.
................
5 ,1 0 7 ,5 0 05 ,1 0 7 ,5 0 0
LISTINGS OF MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS.
R u b b e r G o o d s . .M . . . f. .g. . . . . . . . 1 6 . 9 4 1 . 7 0 0
.
8 , 0 5 1 , 2 4 ,0 9 9 3 , 1 0 0
4 0
C om p a n y an d class o f slock —
A m o u n t.
P u r p o s e o f issu e.

A m e r . A g r ic u lt . C h e m ic a l, c o m ...$ 1 6 ,7 1 5 ,6 0 0 ) P n r c h a s e o f p r o p e r t ie s
T
$ 8 6 ,2 2 1 ,2 1 8
d o
d o
f
_ _ _1 7 , 1 p5 r3 e, 0 0 0 5
a n d I m p r o v e m e n t s o. t a l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 8 3 , 8 7 4 , 2 2 7
A m e r i c a n B i c y c l e ., . . c . .o. .m. . . . . . . . .1. . 7 , 7 0 1 , 5 0 0 ) A c q u i s i t i o n
.
.
.
o f p r o p e rd o
d o
. . . . . .p. . .r. . e . .f. . . . . . 9 , 2 9 4 , 9 0 0 5
.
t ie s .
So many enterprises of one kind and another, amal­
A m e r . T e l e p h . & T . . e . .l . e. . .g. . . . . . . 5 . . 1. , 7 7 2 , 8 0 0 . . E x . f o r A m . B e l l T e l . s t k .
. .
.
gamations and extensions of existing plants and rail­
d o
. .d. .o. . . . . . . . . .,. . . 2 0 , 7 3 4 , 7 0 0 . . I m p t s . , e x t e n s i o n s , e t c .
C e n t r a l C o a l & C o k e. .,. . .o. .o. . m. . . . . .
.
3 7 5 , 0 0 0 > _ _ __
ways, as well as new projects, are on foot, that even
d o
d o
. . . . . . . .p. . r . .e. .f
.
3 7 5 ,0 0 0 j N e w p r o p e r t y , e tc.
C o l o r a d o F u e l <fe I r o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 , 0 0 0 , 0 ( ) O . . A c q u l ’ n s , I m p ’ t sthough the buoyancy and absorptive power of the
C o la r n . & H o e k . C o a l & I r o n , c o m .
3 0 0 , 0 0 0 . I m p r o v stockn market in 1901 should not meet its equal in the
e m e ts .
d o
d o
d o
. 1 ,9 0 3 ,6 0 0 ..E x o b . f o r p r e f. s to c k .
C o n s o lid a t e d G a s C o .o f N .Y .s t o c k .
9 0 0 ,0 0 0 ..N e w
p rcoming p t s . , e tthere is no question that the listing* on
o p . , I m year, o .
C r u c ib le S t e e l C o . o f A m e r ., c o m . . 2 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ) p
h the Newr Yorkl eStock Exchange in 1902 will reach a
f D o r .e r t e
d o
d o
d o
p r e\ f 1. .“ 2 r5 e , n 0 s e, 0 o0 r 0 p r o p e r t i e s .
0 a 0
considerable total.
D e t r o i t C i t y G a s , .s . .t. .o. . c. . k. . . . . . . . . . .
.
3 2 5 , 5 0 0 . . E x t e n ’ s , I m p 't s , e t o .

$ 2 7 0 ,0

THE CHRONICLE.

126

INCREASE OF NEGRO POPU LATIO N .
Several times, as the successive issues of bulletins
of the 1900 Census furnished data, we have presented
such lessons as could be drawn concerning the move­
ments of population in the United States at large and
in those of urban population particularly. A matter
of especial interest at present, in its bearing on the
racial problems which the events of the last three
years have made nearer and more practical, is the
movement of the colored population. Figures of this
during the last decade are now available, and below
are the totals from the beginning, contrasted with the
two components:
Total
Year. population.
1790. .. . 3,929,214
1800. .. . 5,308,483
1810. .. . 7,239,974
1820. .. . 9,633,822
1830. ...12,866,020
1840. ...17,069,453
1850. ...23,191,876
I860. ...31.448,321
1870. ...38.558,371
1880. ...50,395,919
1890. ...62,947,714
1900. ...76,303,387

White.
3,172,006
4,306,446
6,862,073
7,862,166
10,537,378
14,195,805
19,553,068
26,922,537
83,589,377
43,402,970
54,983,890
66,990,802

Negro.
757,208
1,002,037
1,377.808
1,771,056
2,328,642
2,873,648
3,638,808
4,441,830
4,880,009
6,580.793
7,470,040
8,840,789

,-----Decadal increase.— .
Negro.
White.
1,134,440
1,555,627
2,000,093
2,675,212
3,658,427
5,357,268
7,369,469
6,666.840
9,813,593
11,580,920
12,000,912

244,820
375,771
393,848
556,986
545,006
764,160
803,022
438,179
1,700,784
889,247
1,870,749

The term “ colored ” is used in recent censuses as
including all persons not white ; for this reason the
columns above do not quite accord with each other in
the later censuses; moreover, there are sometimes insig­
nificant variations in the same aggregates as repeated
in successive reports, the items included not being
continuously made up on quite the same plan. Thus
the first seven censuses classified the population as
white, slave and free negro ; the enumerations 1860 90
included Chinese, Japanese and civilized Indians
separately; those of 1890 and 1900 give Chinese and
Japanese separately for Indian Territory, Alaska and
Hawaii. But these disagreements are so small as to
be negligible.
The following shows the proportions of the two
races in their percentages of the total at each^Census
and their successive percentages of increase:
. ercentage of—
P
,
total.
Tear,

Percentage of—
,
increase.

White.

Negro.

White.

Negro.

1790 .. . . . . . ------- ------------------------8 0 7 3
1800.................. ............................8 1 12
1810.......................................... ...80-97
1820.................................. . . . . . . . . 8 1 61
1830.. . . ....
.........8 1 - 9 0
1840...........
........8 3 -1 6
1 8 5 0 .. . . ....
84-31
1860.. . . . . ............................ ......8 5 -6 2
1870...................................................87-11
1880..................
86-54
1890..............
....8 7 -5 0
1900.. . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
.....8 7 -8 0

19-27
18-88
19 03
18-39
18-10
16-84
15-89
1413
12-66
13-12
11-93
11-60

------35*76
36-12
34-12
34-03
34-72
37-74
37-69
24-76
29-22
26-68
21-40

......
32-33
3750
28-59
31-44
2 340
26-63
22-07
9-86
34-85
13-51
18-06

It appears that white preponderance has been on
the increase throughout the century, with some small
fluctuations, and that there has been no very large
relative increase in negro population since the slave
trade ceased (1808) during the second decade. The
Census of 1860, as above noted, introduced a change
in classification whereby the negro population may
have been somewhat under-estimated. The Census of
1870, for the first time dealing with the Southern
negro himself, was especially faulty as concerns him,
and so much so that its figures are worse than useless.
The under-statement then of course necessarily caused
an erroneous ratio of increase to be reported in 1880,
for, while the increase in 20 years may have been
nearly 50 per cent, it could not have been nearly 35
in ten. Hor did it drop to 13£ in the next ten, for
certain conditions at the time (among them a largely

[Vol. LXXIV.

increased and more inquisitorial set of queries) made
the work of the Census-taker especially hard and irk­
some among the negroes, and where they are thickest
and in many respects least accessible, the defects of
the work were greatest.
Here we may note that one trouble in comparative
statistics iB always the margin of doubt whether they
tell the whole truth, for their reach steadily tends to
become wider and more thorough, so that (in bank­
ruptcy returns, for instance,) an apparent increase be­
tween two quite separated dates may be in part be­
cause the later quest was more searching. It is easy
to credit the fluctuations in the rate of white increase
since 1860, for there was an obvious reason for decline
in the decade'ending with 1870; fluctuations in white
increase are also in part naturally accounted for by
those in one great factor, immigration; and, more­
over, the rate of increase in population should not be
expected to keep even pace with absolute increase.
Immigration does not apply to the negro, nor is it
reasonable to suppose that he was affected as unfavor­
ably as the white by the peculiar conditions 1860-70;
it is therefore impossible that his decadal ratio of in­
crease could really have dropped from 22 to under 10,
then have risen to nearly 35, then fallen to 13£, and
then risen to 18. There is no way of correcting the
older figures, and conjecture of what more accurate
search would have made them is of small value; so we
have only to accept the returns as they are, with
appropriate allowance, and make the best of them.
It was because such allowance was not made that the
rate of increase reported in 1880 attracted so much
attention. Only once before (in 1810) had the negro
been reported increasing at a more rapid rate than
the white, and then only slightly so; but in 1880 the
ratios showed an apparent unfavorable difference of
5-60, and there was considerable anxiety about an
imagined future black inundation.
There are reasons for believing that the returns for
1880 and 1900 are substantially correct; we mean ab­
solutely, for if the censuses of 1870 and 1890 were
inaccurate, their use by way of comparison is vitiated.
By the latest Census it appears that less than oneeighth of the total population is negro; . as the total
includes some of various shades of color, the black
ratio to the white alone is a little larger, being 13,197
per 100,000. There is nothing alarming in this, yet
of course a study of this feature must include a sep­
arate examination of the S bates which contain what is
known as the black belt. Thus we have the following:
Negro popu­
lation in
Va. N . Oar. S. Oar. Georgia. A la.
Miss.
La.
T ex a s.
1880......................031,616 531,277 604.SS3
725,133 600,103650,291483,655 893,884
1890..................... 635,438 561,018 088,934
858,815 078,489743,559559,193 488,171
1900................... 660,722 624,469 782,821
3,084,818827,807 907,630650,804 630,722
Decadal increase.
1880.. . ...... ....118,775 139.627 188,518 179,991 124,598 206,090 119,445 139,909
1800.....................
8,822 29,741 84,602
183,682 78,388 92,208 75,388
94,787
1900...................... 25,284 03,451 93,387
175,993 148,818 115,071 91,611 132,551
P e r cent o f de­
cadal increase.
1880. .................. 23-16
35-65
45-34
33'02
28-20 46-40 33-80
56-30
1890....................... 0-61
5-80
14-00
18M4
18-00 14*1-9 15-62
24-10
1900.. . . . .........
4-00 11-30
13-80
20*60
3L*90 32'gO 16'40
8730
No. per 100,000
o f white.
1880.................... 71,705 61,261 154,519
88.768 90,625 135,847 106,309 82,858
1890,.................. 62,290 53.158 149,117
87,78181,381130,387100, U S 37,060
1900..................... 55,890 40,420 140,249
87,60083,688 141,653S9,19025,579

The defects in Census work are again visible in this
detailed exhibit— in case of Virginia, for instance,
where the apparent fluctuations are absurd. Only
three States— South Carolina, Mississippi and Louis­
iana— have had a preponderance of blacks; in the
last this black majority now oeases, while in Missis­
sippi it increases, and in South Carolina is about

January 18, 1902.]

I HE CHRONICLE.

stationary; in the other five it is decreasing. There
seems, therefore, to be nothing in the figures to war­
rant any apprehension, nor is there in the governing
conditions. After thirty-five years of freedom, the
Southern negro has not yet found himself; he is
searching, with hopeful improvement in vigor and in­
telligence, but he is still handicapped,feven on the
line of comparative natural increase. He has the
fecundity of the lower social strata, but his mortality
rate is exoessive, both adult and juvenile; he is the
especial victim of several fell diseases, and has not yet
proved a desirable insurance risk. But he must have
more time.
R A IL R O A D

GROSS E A R N IN G S
DECEM BER.

FOR

We defer until another week our review and com ­
pilation of the gross earnings of United States rail­
roads for the late calendar year, so as to make a
fuller and more comprehensive exhibit, but present
to-day the results for the month of December con­
sidered by itself. The increase for December is
smaller than that recorded in previous monthly state­
ments, and yet is of good proportions, reaching
$3,266,063, or 5*05 per cent. Taking into account
the conditions prevailing, this must be considered a
very satisfactory showing.
In the first place the roads had extremely bad
weather to contend against. There were two distinct
disturbances of that kind during the month. The
first came about the middle of the month. The storm
was of wide area. Creeks and rivers overflowed, and
railroad operations were seriously interrupted. The
Middle States, the Southern States and the Western
States suffered alike, only in varying degrees. A n ­
other similar visitation came towards the close of the
month; this inflicted somewhat less damage and was
also somewhat more limited in its scope.
In addition, the grain movement in the West—
speaking of it as a whole— was smaller in December
1901 than in December 1900. Of wheat, indeed, the
receipts at the Western primary markets for the four
weeks ending December 28 were 21,303,889 bushels in
1901, against 18,812,235 bushels in 1900, but practi­
cally the whole of the gain occurred at Duluth and
Minneapolis, reflecting the large spring-wheat yield
in the Northwest, as against the poor yield of the pre­
vious year. At Duluth the deliveries were 6,598,348
bushels against 1,691,438 bushels, and at Minneapolis
7,968,980 bushels against 7,676,960 bushels. In two
of the other leading cereals, however, the receipts at
Western points underwent noteworthy contraction—
of corn for instance the deliveries were only 13,144,979 bushels, as against 22,159,749 bushels.
Taking
wheat, corn, oats, barley and rye together, the de­
liveries for the four weeks of 1901 foot up 50,906,152
bushels, as against 56,775,475 bushels in 1900.
The cotton movement in the South also in many
cases fell below that of the previous year. A t the
Southern outports, it is true, the receipts for D ecem ­
ber 1901 were 1,289,732 bales, aB against 1,112,866
bales for December 1900, but the increase was mainly
at the Atlantic ports. That the crop In the South­
west is much smaller than It was in 1900 is well
known, and the fact is reflected in the shipments
overland, which amounted to only 278,595 bales in
December 1901, as against 360,396 bales in December
1900 and 368,632 bales in December 1899.

127

Finally it is to be said that we are Comparing with
heavily increased earnings in previous years,our state­
ment for December 1900 having shown $5,173,371
increase, following $4,036,722 increase in 1899,
$3,461,366jincrease in 1898 and $5,757,109 increase in
1897, as may be seen by the following:
Earnings.

Mileage.
{

F ear
Given.

Year
Preceding.

,
December.
1800 (185 road a).
1807 (188 roads)
1808 (134 roads).
1800 (110 roa d s).
1000 (107 r o a d s ).
1001 (104 roads).

Miles.
07,883
108,072
100,630
103,277
101,850
108, U1

Miles.
00,440
102,841
00,445
101,360
07,778
106,207

Year
Given.

Increase
or
Decrease.

Year
Preceding.

t
48,803,331
62,200,677
68,222,188
68,862,814
62.334,196
67,074.610

$
48,607,280
46,042,408
48.700,832
6t.2ie.12vf
67,160,824
64,708,447

Dec.
Inc.
Inc.
Inc.
Inc.
Inc.

»
618.886
5,767,100
3,461,866
4,086.782
6,178,871
8,266,068

In the case of the separate roads, all those favored
by the spring wheat movement in the Northwest,
more particularly the Great Northern, the Northern
Pacific and the Canadian Pacific, report strikingly
large improvement. On the other hand, there are
also a few losses for goodly amounts, due to smaller
crops or other adverse circumstances. W e subjoin
a list of all the changes in excess of $30,000, whether
gains or losses.
PRINCIPAL CHANGES IN G R O S S EARNINGS IN D E C E M B E R .

In c re a s e s .
Gt. Northern System.
Northern Paoiflo.........
Canadian Pacific.........
Mexican Central.........
Ohio. Mil. & St. Paul..
Baltimore & Ohio.......
Illinois Central..........
Minn. St.P. & S.Ste M ..
Central of Georgia....
N. Y. Central...............
Rio Grande Western..
Choc. Oklah. & Gulf..
8t. Louis & San Fran..
Mexican National.......
Wabash.......... ...........
Chic. Great Western..
Mexican Railway.......
Burl. Ced. Rap. & Nor.

$764,400
693.260
472,089
291,242
208,320
133,549
126,412
109.586
106,164
88,7 <9
80,900
76,395
74,711
67,906
56,103
53,471
51,900
46,176

In crea ses.
Clev. Lor. & W heel...
Colorado & Southern.
Buff. Roch. & Pittsb’rg

$42,559
40,595
31,471

Total (representing
23 roads)........... $3,615,948
D e cre ase s.
St. Louis Southwest...
Yazoo & Miss. Valley.
Chesapeake & Ohio...
Grand Trunk System.
Clev. Cin. Chic. & St. L.
Mobile & Ohio..............

$138,701
107,352
89,838
69,985
49,270
31,000

Total (rep___ ___ ■ ■ .
8 roads)...............
$486,146

The foregoing shows only six roads with decreases
in excess of $30,000. It is proper, however, to say
there are a good many others for smaller amounts.
Indeed, 43 roads altogether out of the 104 reporting
have fallen behind, though most of them for very
small amounts— bad weather generally being respon­
sible. Our usual detailed table follows.
GROSS EARNINGS AND MILEAGE IN DECEMBER.
Mileage.

Gross Earnings.
Hame o f Road.
1901.
Alabama Gt.South’n.
Ala.N.O.&Tex.Pao.—
N. Orl.&No. East..
Ala. & Vicksb........
Vioksb. Shr.&Pac..
Ann Arbor....... .........
Atlanta Knoxv.&No.
Atlantic & Blrm’h’ m.
Atl. Valdosta & W ...
Ba timore &Ohio. >
Balt. & O. So’w n .)
Bellefonte Central..
duff. Rood. & Pittsb..
Burl. Ced. R. & No...
Canadian Paoiflo___
Ontral of Georgia.
Chattan. Southern...
iheaapeaKe & Ohio..
Chic. & East Illinois.
Chic. Great Western.
Ohio. Ind. & Louisv.
Ohio. Mil. < St. Paul.
fe
Ohio. Peoria & St.L...
Ohio. Term. Tr. RR..
Ohoo. Okla. < Gulft.
fe
Oln. N.O. & Tex.Pae.
dev. Oin.Ch.& St. L ..
Peoria & Eastern ..
Jlev. Lorain & Wheel.
Colorado & Southern.
Cot. Sand. & Hook’g..
Denv. & Rio Grande..
Detroit Southern___
Dul. So. Shore < Atl.
&
East St. L. & Caron..
Wvansv. * Indtanap
ffivansv. < T. Haute.
fe
>a. South. < Florida
fe
»r. Trunk of Can... )
Gr. Trunk West.. >
Det.G r.Hav.&M .)
*t. N o.-S .P . M. &M
Eastern of Minn..
Montana Central..
Hooking Valley.........

1900.

$
212,932

$
204,008

170,096
182,820
10?,097
106,241
112.109
102,087
162,175
159,770
45,508
39,517
11 873
6,318
21,198
18,985
4,209,575 4,076,026
4,808
4,422
471,382
439,911
460,810
414,634
3,461,< 00 2,988,911
740.942
634,778
6,941
7,236
1,23'’ ,293 1,327,131
543,052
522,427
610,13'
556,666
. 848,6i 7
344,293
3,991,252 3,782,932
119,334
132,161
122,061
115,882
446,3-5
369,990
429.393
412,368
1,614,789 1,664,059
228,291
230,662
141,217
183,776
428,500
387,905
85,370
81,374
971,900
943,100
101,065
110,357
203,801
181,410
12,192
13,948
25,222
26,827
109,366
124,354
106,814
109,396

Increase or
Decrease. 1901.

1900.

310

310

196
-12,724
143
—4 144
+10,022
188
292
+2,405
+ 5,991
228
71
+5.555
+2,213
118
+133,549 3,220
27
+386
472
+31,471
+46.176 1,324
+472,089 7,590
+ 106,164 1,845
-2 9 5
105
-8 9 ,8 3 8 1,607
727
+20,625
+ 53,471
929
+4,324
546
+208,320 6,746
292
—12,8 27
+6,179
107
702
+76,395
336
+ 17,025
—49.270 1,891
352
—2,371
192
+42,559
+40,595 1,145
+ 3,996
273
+2W
,800 1,722
42S
—9,292
589
+22,391
13
—1,756
146
—1,605
162
—14,998
-3 ,0 8 2
285

196
143
188
292
228
71
118
3,200
27
472
1.276
7,467
1,670
105
1,476
727
929
546
6,571
292
102
642
336
1,891
352
192
1,142
273
1,675
423
589
13
14S
162
285

+8,924

2,432,990

2,502,975

—69,985

2.752,577
368,987
110,708
385.115

2,013,804
251,061
203,007
398.882

+738,773
+ 117,926
—92,299
—13,76“

4,042 4,042
4,588
397
2tO
347

382
260
347

THE

128
UroMi learning*,
H am s o/ Hoad,

1901.

1900.

s

*
8,207,706
8,050
512,392
298,470
208,510

Increase o
>
Decrease.

O H EON1G LE

mileage.

1901

3 ,3 9 4 ,11 s

—The annual statement o f gold and silver production in

1900. the United States and M exico, which the late Mr. John J.

*
+ 120,412
+2,727
—15,80b
+27,330
—539
+2,297
+7,007
—13,935
—4,408
+27,677
+ 2,000
+ 1,723
+291,242
+67,906
+51,900
+9,648
+ 11,572
+ 109,586
+20,611
+29,000
—10,000
—10
—31,000
—9,058
—1,539
+88,739
—
29,698
+693,260
+ 18,773

4,265 4,241
90
96
11,277
493,586
885
820
555
665
328,800
643
610
207,977
20
20
6,621
173
76,322
178
69,315
90
25.441
90
39,376
166
58,484
166
54,070
8,313 3,161
2,452,700 3,425,028
97
12,027
9.361
97
64
64
4,801
3,078
1,655,456 1,364,214
2,186 2,054
1,323 1,323
573,311
041,217
321
821
375,000
323,100
260
1/54,054
260
1/44.408
043
283,870
272,298
64 3
1,355 1,278
500,329
390,643
1,383,994 1,368,363
2,480 2,222
2,975,000 2,940,000
5,310 5,181
86,000
90,000
388
388
12,131
50
12,141
50
584.700
553,700
874
874
631,636
1,195 1,195
622,578
9,679
11,218
180
130
5,690,120 5,601,381
3,223 3,223
1,675 1,660
i 1,278,525 1,308,223
Sforthern Pad llo.. . 3,845.294 2,652,034
6,302 5,494
709,111
690,338
1,821 1,8 A
Pare Marquette.....
Plttab. & Western..
266,318
293,645
352
—27,327
352
Pittsb.Cl. A Tol.
Plttsb. Pa. & Fair.
49,302
47,381
180
+ 1,921
180
440,100
366,200
+80,900
630
646
93,154
114,945
312
-21,791
312
12,948
Bt. L. Kenuett <
13 803
—855
68
68
1,689,51© 1,014,808
St. Louis < 8.1*
fe
+74,711 3,192 3,049
658,007
796,708 -138,701 1,293 1,258
St. Louis Southwes’n
164,191
159,068
St. L. Van. & T. H ..
+ 5,123
158
158
85,526
M Fran. * No. Pao
an
75,458
+10,068
165
165
912,327
899,864
Seaboard Air Line
+ 12,463 2,600 2,600
23,239
25,616
-2,327
182
182
4.115
3,848
+ 267
37
37
48,677
31,103
Southern Indiana
+ 17,574
154
154
Southern Railway.. \ 3,102,665 3,112,381
-9,716 6,740 6,727
8 1,Louis Division s
131,698
133,488
—1,790
80
80
50,412
48,521
174
+1,891
174
Texas Central.
87,133
64,081
—
23,052
225
225
1,298,321 1,284, L
19
+ 14,202 1,665 1,514
18,500
14,000
+4,500
40
40
213,386
209,084
+4,302
430
430
94,558
96,700
-2,142
248
248
211,052
207,988
+3.084
451
451
Toron. Ham. & Bud.
34,321
35,822
—1,001
88
88
Wabash......._____ 1,592,341 1,536,238
+56,103 2,367 2.358
251,682
249,468
-2,214
464
464
423,500
408,452
982
+15,048
982
630,607
737,950 —107,352 1,091 1,047
Total (104 roads).. 67,974,510 64,708,447 +3,266,063 108,141 106,207
* Boston and Albany Included In both years, t Earnings here given
are lor railroad only and do not cover mining operations, b Includes
Sherman Shreveport & Southern, Missouri Midland, and extension to
San Antonio from May 15,1901.
y Figures here given are for three
weeks only of themonth inboth years; the fourth week not yet reported.

Illinois Central.—
lliiuuln Southern__
inxel'tiac'l & Gt No..
XntbrooeaJjio (Mm .),.
4owu C e n t r a l . -...
Don Railway........
JC v iia, & MlbU.,.
ana v
l.otilRh. & Had. Elver
Loalsv.Henil.&Bti.L..
l . o l i ! - ) '. . & Nashville..
Maeon & BirmliiK’in,
Maniatlque........
Mexican Central, ...
Mexican National..
Mexican Railway__
Mexican Southern..
Minn, & m . Louis...
g
Mlun.8t.li A S.Ste.M
Mo, Can, &Tex. ays.i
Mo. Pan. & Iron Mt.
Central Branch...
Mobile Jacii, & K. C
Mobile A Ohio._____
Nash. Chat. Bt, L.
NovadarOal-Oregon.

[VoL, LXXIV.

ITEMS ABOUT BANKS, BANKERS AND T RU ST G O ’ S.
—The sales o f bank stocks this week aggregate 597 shares,
o f w hich 577 shares were sold at auction and 20 shares at the
Stock E xchange, The transactions in trust company stocks
reach a total o f 243 shares, and were all auction sales. Im port­
ers’ & Traders’ National Bank stock, w hich sold in N ovem ­
ber 1901 at 568*^, was sold at the Stock Exchange on Thurs­
day at 620, and 52 shares changed hands at the auction sale
on W ednesday at 605 to 625, the higher price being paid for
2 shares. A sale o f 25 shares o f Fifth Avenue Trust Co.
stock at 630-692 is compared in the table below with the last
previous sale, in June 1901, atflOOS, but it should be noted
that in the interval the capital stock has been increased from
$500,000 to $1,000,000. Stock o f the N. Y . Security & Trust
Co. sold as high as 1386, as against 1005 in May o f last year.
N o sales o f bank or trust company stocks have been re­
ported in the outside market,

Valentine of W ells, Fargo & Go. had issued for many years
past, is likely to be permanently discontinued. Indisposition
of some of the larger mine owners in three or four im port­
ant Pacific Coast States to furnish inform ation has interfered
with its issue in recent years, and greater opposition has
been encountered Jsince Mr. Valentine’s death. Under the
circumstances the officials o f the company consider it ad­
visable to cease issuing the statement. This decision w ill be
regretted, as the figures o f Messrs. W ells, Fargo & Co, have
always been looked forw ard to with much interest.
—The figures published by the M orton Trust Company for
the past year show an increase o f over $1,200,000 in its u ndi­
vided profits, making the total surplus and undivided profits
o f the company $4,562,108. The deposits have declined from
$57,382,229 June 30, 1901, to $52,880,931 December 31, 1901.
—
-The nomination by the President o f Hon. Conrad N. J o r ­
dan as United States Assistant Treasurer at N ew Y ork for a
third term, as announced in this department last week, was
confirmed by the Senate on Tuesday.
—As a result o f the new ruling o f the Chicago Clearing
House, providing that statements o f the condition o f non­
member banks which clear through members under its
jurisdiction shall, when called upon, be furnished the Asso­
ciation, quite a few private banking houses have, beginning
with the new year, given up their Clearing House con nec­
tions. The rates charged by the latter, as before noted by
us, are $150 per year for outside institutions with a capital of
$50,000 and $250 for banks having a capital above that
figure. Some o f the institutions clearing, it transpired, in­
cluded department stores and real-estate brokers,
—In referring last week to the increase in the dividend on
the stock o f the Union Trust Company o f this City, we spoke
o f the increase as applying to future dividends. A ctu ally,
the dividend was enlarged with the payment made on the
10th o f the present month, when stockholders received 10
per cent as against the previous quarterly distributions o f 8
per cent. In other words, the dividends now are on the
basis o f 40 per cent per annum as against the form er rate o f
82 per cent per annum,
—The Union Trust Company o f Pittsburg is sending out
quite a dainty souvenir called an A rt Calendar Blotter. It is
gotten up in very artistic style. The pad is o f three th ick ­
nesses, the under sheet o f blue blotting paper, the middle one
o f white blotting paper in the center o f w hich the calendar
appears, while the upper is o f stiff card board covered with
leatherette. This latter is embellished with the graceful
features o f a very pretty maiden.
The three sheets are
fastened by a white satin ribbon fashioned into a bow at the
upper left hand corner. This attractive g ift is intended to
take home. F or business purposes the company is also dis­
tributing, as in form er years, a desk calendar, neat and con­
cise in form , and giving likewise the Pennsylvania regu ­
lations as to taxes.
—A t the annual meeting o f stockholders o f the GermanAmerican Bank on Tuesday, A lbert Tag was elected a director
and Samuel M. Schafer was chosen V ice-President in place o f
Henry R ocholl, w ho declined re-election. Casimir Tag was
re-elected President.

—It is announced that Ladenburg, Thalm&nn & Co. have
been authorized by the banking house o f S. Bleichroeder o f
Shares.
Ba n k s —New York.
Price.
Past previous sale. Berlin to receive at 89'80 subscriptions for the Prussian and
1 American Exch. Nat. Bank.... 300%
Jam 1902— 286
3 Chemical National Bank___4,150
Deo. 1901—
4,155
the German Imperial 3 per cent loans which were taken by
4 City Bank, National........... . 620
Deo. 1901— eOUa
the banking syndicate in Germany this week. These loans
54 Commerce, Nat. Bank of...... 3544t-357% Deo. 1901— 862%
21 East River National Bank__ 163
Nov. 1901— 1 6 5 % are for 185,000,000 and fo r 115,000,000 marks fo r each of the
266 Gallatin National Bank....... . 420-431% June 1901- 420
*72 Importers’ &Traders’ Nat.Bk. 605-625
Nov. 1901— 568% issues named, respectively. The loans will be offered in G er­
116 Market & Fulton Nat. Bank.. 256%!
Deo. 1901— 260
many January 22, and applications lodged with Ladenburg,
10 Mechanics’ & Traders Bank.. 190%
Feb. 1901— 105
10 Mutual Bank........................ 215%
May 1901— 220
Thaimann & Co. before! January 21 w ill be transmitted
10 New Amsterdam Nat. Bank.. 1,350
Jan. 1902—
1,400
free of charge.
30 Shoe & Leather Bank, Nat__ 124
Deo. 1901— 135
T hust Co m p a n ie s — New York.
—Thompson & Mairs, 71 Broadway, will receive subscrip­
50 America, Trust Co. of............. 270
Jam 1902— 270
tions fo r the account o f Otis, W ilson & Co,, Chicago, for the
7 Central Trust Co...............1,S05%-1910 Jan. 1902—1,900
2 Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co....1,500
Jam 1902—1,500
N ew German 3 per cent loans o f 185,000,000 marks Prussian
25 Fifrh Avenue Trust C o........ 680-692
June 1901—1,005
5 Merchants’ Trust Co.............. 403
Deo. 1901— 355
R oyal State and 115,000,000 marks German Imperial G overn­
10 Morton Trust C o..............
1,196%
Jan. 1902-1,1961
8
*
5
4
3
2
ment bonds, at 89-80 and interest. Applications w ill be re.
Nov. 1901—
1,360
4 N. Y. Life Ins. & Trust Co__ 1,300
60 N Y. Security & Trust C°.... 1,375-1,386
.
May 1901—
1,005
ceived up to 8 o’clock p, m , on Tuesday, January 31.
50 North AmerloanTrust Co__ _ 265
Deo. 1901— 270
—la a circular to stockholders o f the Bank of the State of
T h ust C o m p a n y —B r o o k ly n .
30 Williamsburg Trust Co.......... 211
Jam 1902— 215
New York, dated December 81, the officers announce that
* Of this, 20 shares were sold at the Stook Exchange at 620.
the proposition w hich was accepted by the directors Decern-

J a n u a r y 18, 1902. j

THE CHRONICLE.

ber 24 1901 to liquidate the bank and consolidate w ith the
National Bank of North A m erica had been assonted to by a
m ajority o f the shareholders. The circular says that the
book value o f the stock has been fixed at $170 per share for
the purpose of immediate liquidation or exchange, it being
understood that any sum realized above $170 on final liqu i­
dation w ill accrue to the benefit o f stockholders. The actual
cost o f the shares of the National Bank o f N orth A m erica to
be given in exchange is $296 per share. The terms o f m erger
provide for the exchange of tw o shares o f the Bank o f the
State for one share o f the National Bank o f N orth A m erica,
making a difference o f $44 in actual value. On this basis
holders o f every tw o shares o f stock o f the form er bank are
entitled to receive $22 each share in cash and one share o f
the Bank of North A m erica. H olders o f single or odd
shares o f the Bank o f the State w ill, on application at the
bank, be enabled to buy or sell at $170 per share enough o f
said stock to effect exchanges. It is announced that assents
have, since the issue o f the circular, been received from
nearly all the stockholders, and that n o further action by
the bank w ill be necessary in.order to perfect the m erger.
A t the annual meeting o f stockholders o f the Bank o f the
State o f N ew Y ork, held on Tuesday, the follow in g were
elected directors: Henry Hentz, R , L . Edwards, A ugust
Belmont, James Swann, E, T, B edford, C. W . Morse; R obert
M. Thompson, Frank K , Sturgis and R . R , Moore. The
annual m eeting o f stockholders o f the Bank o f N orth A m erica
was adjourned until January 21 in order to perm it a suf­
ficient period of time to elapse to perfect arrangements fo r
the increase of the bank’s capital and surplus to double the
present amount, and also to provide fo r an increase in the
num ber o f directors; the above-named directors o f the Bank
o f the State of New Y ork w ill be added to the directorate of
the Bank of North A m erica.
The intended merger of the tw o banks has necessitated the
parting by the Bank of the State w ith m any old bankers’ and
brokers’ accounts, some o f which have been kept w ith this
institution for twenty-five or thirty years. These accounts
cannot be transferred to the Bank o f N orth A m erica because
that bank’s policy has been not to grant any over-certifica­
tions, and consequently the business o f about one hundred
and fifty brokers and bankers, am ounting to nearly $3,000,000 o f deposits, has been distributed am ong other dow n-tow n
banks.
—Interests connected w ith the Consolidated Exchange
contemplate the organization o f a new bank w ith a capital
o f $1,000,000. It is proposed that the new institution shall
be operated for the benefit o f and in harmony w ith the m em ­
bers o f the Consolidated Board.
— It was reported on Tuesday that Charles W . Morse had se­
cured a controlling interest in the Mercantile N ational Bank,
w hich report was denied by the officers o f the institution.
They admitted, however, that Mr. Morse had acquired an
Interest in the bank. A t the annual election on Tuesday the
old officers and directors were re-elected.
—Charles W . Morse, in connection w ith his associates, has
bought three small banks in Gardiner, Maine, w hich were
controlled by the Gardiner Savings institution. Mr. Morse
says that the three banks have only $43,009 in deposits.
— Am ong the changes at the elections on W ednesday for
directors and officers of trust companies were the follow in g:
Valentine P. Snyder, President o f the W estern National Bank,
succeeded the late Marcellus H artley as director o f the M er­
cantile Trust Co. Michael Colman was elected m em ber o f
the Executive Committee of the Central Realty Bond & Trust
Co. 8. D. Scudder was elected Treasurer o f the North
American Trust Co. o t t o H. Kahn, o f Kuhn Loeb & Co.,
was chosen director of the A m erican Deposit & Loan Co. in
place of the late Marcellus Hartley. R obert Goelet and
Henry W . R sighley were elected directors o f the Real
Estate Trust Co. Jesse Spalding was elected a director o f
the Trust Company of Am erica in place o f Edward F. Cragin
resigned, George C. Boldt, in place o f Charles F. Cutler, who
also resigned, and Edwin Gould was chosen to fill a vacancy.
Louis W. Hill, Richard A. McCurdy and Francis M. Bacon
were elected trustees of the A tlantic Trust Co.
— E, B. Judson, President o f the First National Bank o f
Syracuse, died on Wednesday, aged eighty-nine. In 1868,
when the national banking system was being carried into
execution, Mr. Judson was called by Secretary Chase to

129

W ashington for the purpose o f consultation. He was one of
the oldest active bank presidents in the country.
—John F. Carroll has been elected a director o f the F our,
teenth Street Bank. R . Ross Appleton has been chosen
President o f the bank in place o f G eorge F. Vail.
—A new trust com pany, to be known as the N ew Y ork New Jersey Trust C o., with a capital o f $100,000, was incor­
porated at Trenton on Tuesday. A m ong the incorporators
are A lvah T row bridge, A . B. Hepburn, W illiam F. King,
Frank Q. Barstow, David Bingham, Hon. John W . G riggs
and James B. Dill. The com pany is em pow ered to do busi­
ness outside the State o f New Jersey.
—Important changes were made in the directorate o f the
First National Bank at the annual election on Tuesday. In
addition to George F. Baker, H. C. Fahnestock, Francis L.
Hine and Fisher A . Baker, w h o were on the old board, J.
Plerpont M organ, James J. H ill, John A . M cCall, D. W illis
James, James]A. Blair, John J. M itchell and W illiam H.
Moore were chosen. Mr. H ill is President o f the Great
Northern Railroad Co. and a director in the Chase National
Bank. Mr. McCall is President o f the N ew Y ork L ife In­
surance Co. and a director in the Central National and the
National City banks. Mr. Blair is a m em ber o f the firm of
Blair & Co. Mr. Moore is best known as the organizer o f the
Tin Plate, the National Steel, the Sheet Steel and the A m er­
ican Can companies, and he is a large holder o f R ock Island
stock. Mr. M itchell is President o f the Illinois Trust & Sav­
ings Bank o f Chicago. This makes one o f the strongest and
most influential bank directorates in the city . It m ay be
noted that George F. Baker, the President o f the First Na­
tional, was on Tuesday elected a director o f the Chase
National Bank in place o f Edward Tuck. Mr. Baker thus
represents the large interest recently acquired by the First
National in the Chase.
—A m ong the changes in the directorates o f national banks
and other institutions in this city on Tuesday were the fo llo w ­
ing: George J. G ould and Louis Fitzgerald, President o f the
M ercantile Trust Co., were elected directors o f the W estern
National, the latter in place o f Marcellus Hartley, deceased;
Charles H. Marshall, form erly V ice-President o f the Conti­
nental, Cord M eyer and John S. Phipp3 w ere elected addi­
tional directors o f the H anover National. Charles R . Flint
retiredfrom th e b o a r d o f the Produce E xchange Bankfand he
was succeeded by John E. W eeks. G. P. M orosini, A dolph
Rusch and Harry F. Shoemaker were elected to fill vacan ­
cies in the Chatham National. Eugene G . B lackford was
added to the directorate o f the Market & Fulton. E. L.
Marston, o f Blair & Co., was chosen director o f the M echan­
ics’ National, in place o f H. T. Nesmith, deceased. L . Kohns
was elected director o f the N ew Y ork National E xchange
Bank. Henry A . Caesar and M arcus M. Marks were chosen
directors o f the Butchers’ & D rovers.’ James Stillman, A u ­
gustus F. Libbey, R obert B. Hirsch, W illiam Halls Jr., L ,
F. Dom m erich, Daniel A . Davis, Edw in S. Schenck and
Francis M. Bacon Jr. were elected directors o f the N ational
Citizens’ .
R obert H. Swayze, David F. Butcher, Cor­
nelius B. M itchell and N ew ton E, Stout were chosen di­
rectors o f the Shoe & Leather Bank. H enry P. Talmadge succeeded E. W . Moore as director o f the Phenix
Bank.
R obert Goelet was elected a director o f the
Chemical. A nton A . Raven, Henry Steers and H enry B .
Stokes w ere added to the directorate o f the Leather M anu­
facturers.’ W illiam Ziegler, Hampden E. Tener Jr., S am ­
uel Crooks and Samuel S. Conover, the new V ice-President,
were elected directors o f the Irving. Daniel Lam ont was
chosen director o f the Manhattan Trust Co. F ive new di­
rectors (G eorge M. Gillies, W alther Luttgen, James A . Deering, Isidor Straus and A rth ur B. W estervelt) succeed W m .
F. Clare, F. R. H utton, V incent Loeser, E P. S. W righ t and
Louis Lehmaier in the Century Bank o f this city. Charles R.
Gay, W . Vanderhof, R. D. W y ck o ff and W m . H . Z iegler,
succeeded David S. Jones, W . W . W ilson, R ichard S. Barnes
and S. S. W illiam son as directors o f the K ings County N a­
tional. President Danton stated that plans were in contem ­
plation for the enlargement o f the bank, but he was not p re­
pared to say whether this w ould be accomplished through an
increase o f capital or through m erger w ith another bank.
—The semi annual statement o f the Real Estate Trust Co.
o f New Y ork fo r Dec. 31, 1901, shows marked grow th during
the year. The deposits have Increased from $5,517,818 to

130

THE CHRONICLE

$8,649,087, while total resources have risen from $0,883,859 to
$9,780,730. This institution paid its stockholders since it be­
gan business in October 1890 up to Dec. 31 1901 (11 years)
$333,500 out of a total net earnings o f $089,041, leaving undi­
vided profits $310,541. The officials consist of Henry C.
Swords, President; H. H. Cammann, Vice President; and
Henry W , Keighley, Secretary.

[VOL. LXXIV.

mercial. In its statement to January 11, 1903, the bank re­
ports deposits o f $9,451,348.
— A sale o f 50 shares o f the stock o f the Scranton (Pa.)
Savings Bank was made recently at $500 per share. This is
an advance of $80 a share in the price of the stock, the last
previous sale having been at $430.

—The National Bank of Commerce o f Baltimore, whose
—Mtssrs. W illiam C. Heppenheimer and Henry Mehl, President, Eugene Levering, a few weeks ago purchased a
President and Secretary respectively o f the Trust Company block of shares in the Continental National Bank (see
of New Jersey of Hoboken, A. P. Hexamer and Mr. W illiam C hronicle of Dec. 7), has made an offer o f $100 per share
Peter, have been elected directors of the Second National for the balance of the stock o f the latter institution. The
Bank of Hoboken. The re elected directors are Rudolph F. proposition was accepted by the board o f directors of the
Kabe, W illiam Macbold, Lawrence Fagan, William Runklo Continental at a meeting held on Thursday of last week, and
and Dr. Frank Nichols.
the offer will be submitted to the stockholders on Feb. 13.
—The old board o f directors o f the First National Bank of In the event the shareholders accept the terms and sell their
Jersey City has been re-elected, except that Mr. J. E Huls- stock, the Continental will be liquidated as quickly as pos­
hizer, President of the New Jersey Title Guarantee & Trust sible. The National Bank o f Commerce, it is stated, does
Company, was ohosen to fill the vacancy due to the death of not intend, at least at present, to increase its capital stock of
$300,000. Later in the year it may be raised to $500,000. Its
A . O. Matthiessen.
surplus and undivided profits now amount to $319,404 and
—Three new directors, W illiam B. Jenkins, Clarence H.
its deposits aggregate $1,540,666. A ccording to a report o f
Kelsey and R obert H. M cCurdy, have been chosen to sue
Dec. 10, the Continental National Bank had a capital of
ceed Marcus Beach, James S. Auerbach and Luther Kountze
$200,000, undivided profits of $9,917 and deposits amounting
as members of the board o f the Commercial Trust Company
to $464,836. Mr. Thornton Rollins is President o f this in­
o f New Jersey, Jersey City.
stitution.
—Mr. Thomas J, Maloney, President o f the Lorillard T o­
—The Fourth Street National Bank o f Philadelphia has en­
bacco Co., has been elected a director o f the Hudson County larged its list o f directors b y the follow ing additions: E. C.
National Bank o f Jersey City, vice Henry S. W hite, de­ Converse, Rudulph Ellis, Clement A. Griscom and W illiam
ceased.
C. Bullitt, making a total o f 19 now on the board.
—Mr Dennis M cLaughlin, who retired as director of the
—The Real Estate Trust Company o f Philadelphia has
Third National Bank o f Jersey City, has been succeeded. by issued in a very attractive form a new statement for Decem ­
Mr. James G. Morgan, who is also a director in the Commer­ ber 31 last, which shows the resources to have now reached
cial Trust Company of Jersey City.
a total o f $8,011,420, as against $0,583,406 on Novem ber 19
—Several changes are noted in the directories of the N ew ­ 1900; the deposits are up from $4,810,138 to $5,273,194. The
ark, N. J., banks. A t the Second National Bank Mr. Thom as official staff is composed o f Frank K. Hippie, President;
N. McCarter succeeds Mr. Osceola Currier. Mr. John A. George tPhiller, Vice-President; W illiam F. N orth, Treas­
Hardin is Mr. Frank A. W ilkinson’s successor at the Essex urer, and W illiam R. Philler, Secretary.
County National Bank.
—The directors elected to serve on the board o f the Girard
The stockholders of the Fidelity Trust Company added to National Bank o f Philadelphia are Francis B. Reeves, R ich ­
their directors Mr. W illiam H. M cIntyre, Fourth V ice-P resi­ ard L. Austin, Redman E. Griscom , James M. Rhodes, W .
dent of the Equitable L ife Insurance Company. A t the same Frederick Snyder, John E. Catherwood, Simon B. Fleisher,
time they indorsed the action o f the directors in authorizing W illiam Gillespie, W illiam H. Lucas, R obert Toland, W il­
an increase in the capital from $1,000,000 to $1,500,000 re­ iam B. Scott, Charles B. Adamson, Harry F. West, M alconi
ferred to in our issue of January 4.
Lloyd, W illiam Newbold Ely, Theodore E. W iedersheim and
—In Elizabeth, N. J., Mr. George Seeber was elected to John Sailer. A ll the officers o f the bank have been re elected.
the board of the Elizabethport Banking Company, and Mr.
W . H. Corbin and P. J. Ryan to the Citizens’ Bank.
—The People’s National Bank o f Dover, N. J ., w hich has
been taken over by the new Dover Trust Company, went
into voluntary liquidation on December 31. The directors of
the bank have become directors o f the trust company. The
officials of the latter chosen this week are: Mr. James H.
Simpson, President; Isaac W . Searing, Vice-President; Harry
M. G eorge, Secretary and Treasurer, and E. W . Rosevear
Assistant Secretary and Treasurer.
—Mr. W illiam C. D ayton, whose health has not recently
been robust, has tendered his resignation as President o f the
Camden Safe Deposit & Trust Company o f Camden, N. J.
Vice-President Alexander C. W ood has assumed the Presi­
dency, the new Vice-President being Mr. Benjamin C. Reeve,
Trust Officer.
—A ccording to the Albany papers a deed has been re­
corded conveying to Mr. Grange Sard, Vice-President o f the
National Commercial Bank o f Albany, the property now
ocoupied by the Albany Trust Company, the previous owner
of which was the Merchants’ National Bank, now merged in
the Commercial. The lease o f the trust company has over
one year to run (until May 1903), but it is said to be seeking
a desirable site—the old Musenm Building on Broadway and
State Street appearing to be the most suitable, and for which
they are now negotiating. A t the meeting o f the directors
of the National Commercial this week, the resignation of
Cashier Edward A . Groesbeck was accepted with regret.
His successor is Mr. Edward J. Hussey, while the Assistant
Cashiers are Laurence H Hendricks and Hugh N. Kirkland.
As noted in these columns last week, Mr. Charles H. Sabin
has been elected a V ice President. The latter, together with
Frederick Tillinghast, George H. Thatcher, John E. Walker
and Gerrit Y . Lansing have been made directors of the Com­

—Dr. John S, W entz, President of the Virginia Coal & Iron
Company, was added to the board o f directors of the Corn
Exchange National Bank o f Philadelphia at this week’s
election.
—Mr. Edward H. Preston, form erly Cashier o f the Manayunk National Bank o f Philadelphia, has been elected P resi­
dent to succeed Mr. John J. Foulkrod. The Cashiership has
been assigned to Mr. R. B. W allace, The bank has a capital
of $200,000.
—To Mr. Philip Stockton has been given the Presidency
of the new City Trust Company o f Boston, organized through
Messrs. Lee, Higginson & Co. Mr. Charles F. Adams 32d
has been chosen Vice-President and Mr. George S. Mumford
Secretary. The banking rooms form erly occupied by the
State National Bank, at 40 State Street, have been secured
by the City Trust, which has a capital and surplus of $1,000,000 each.
—The Old Colony Trust Company o f Boston has purchased
property in the shopping district, 52 and 54 Temple Place
where, on the first floor, w ill be fitted up a branch bank.
This is solely fo r the convenience o f its patrons, for making
deposits and cashing checks.
—More than tw o thirds o f the stockholders o f the Suffolk
National Bank and Washington National Bank o f Boston,
Mass., have assented to the consolidation under the name o f
the National Suffolk Bank before referred to in this depart­
ment.
—As soon as the premises are ready for occupancy, the
Fourth National Bank o f Boston, now at 84 Blaokstone
Street, will locate in the new building o f the Board of trade
on State Street.
—The eight directors o f the National Hide A Leather
Bank of Boston are now members o f the board of the State
1 National, which recently took over the former.

January 18, 1902.]

THE CHRONICLE.

131

— Mr. Oliver Ames, Francis A . Foster and W illiam A. ant Cashier John Jay A bbott becomes Cashier in the line of
well-earned prom otion.
T ow er, form er directors o f the National- Bank o f the Com
monwealth o f Boston, and Henry B. Endicott, Joseph B.
—The Hibernian Banking Association o f Chicago on Tues­
Russell, Francis B. Soars and Moses W illiam s o f the Third day last added to its board o f directors Messrs. D. R. Lewis,
National, both o f w hich have been m erged in the National B. F. Rogers and Hempstead W ashburne. Mr. Lewis was at
Shawm ut Bank, have been added to the list o f directors o f the same time made Second Vice-President o f the bank and
the latter bank. The officials o f the National Shawmut Mr. Louis B. Clarke, Third Vice-President.
Bank, elected by the directors, are: President, James P.
—The stockholders o f the First National Bank o f M ilw au­
Stearns; Vice-Presidents, E. H ayw ard Ferry, Francis B. kee, W is., at their m eeting on the 14th inst. authorized an
Sears and Abram T. Collier; Cashier, Frank H. Barber, and increase in the’ stock from $1,000,000 to $1,500,000.
Assistant Cashiers, W allace S. Draper, Henry F. Smith and
—Mr. Charles A llis and Samuel M. Green, declining reA rthur P. Stone.
election as directors o f the National Exchange Bank o f M il­
—The National E xchange Bank o f Boston has created the waukee, Mr. Henry F. W h itco m b , President o f the W iscon ­
office o f V ice-President, to which Mr. L. P. Bartlett Jr. has sin Central Railw ay, and F rederick W . Singer, President o f
been appointed. M r. Edw ard J. Brown has retired from the the Northwestern M alleable Iron C o., were chosen as their
successors.
board of directors.
—The E liot National Bank o f Boston n ow has fifteen
directors on its board, Mr. Edw in Hale A bbott, W illiam F.
Russell and Edw in F . A tkins having this week been added.
—The Jefferson Bank o f St. Louis, M o., w hich, as before
noted in these columns, w ill increase the capital from the
present amount o f $100,000 to the authorized sum o f $200,000'
has called a stockholders’ m eeting for M onday next to ratify
the proposition.
—Rum ors o f a consolidation o f tw o o f the m ost prominent
o f St. Louis’s trust companies have been prevalent within the
last week or so. The tw o thus mentioned are the St. Louis
Trust and U nion Trust companies, the form er with a capital
o f $3,000,000 and the latter w ith $2,000,000 capitalization.
A ccordin g to the St. Louis “ G lobe-D em ocrat,” the only o b ­
stacle seems to be in the question as to whether a trust given
to either com pany individually cou ld be retained by the con ­
solidated companies united under the name o f the UnionSt. Louis Trust Company or the St. Louis Union Trust jCompany. Mr. Thom as H. W est is President o f the St. Louis
Trust Company. The vacancy in the Presidency o f the
Union Trust, arising through the death o f Mr. George A .
Madill, ha9 been filled by the election o f Mr. John F . Shepley, form erly Fourth V ice-President. Treasurer N. A, Mc­
Millan has been added to the Union’s board o f directors.
—The late Mr. George W . H ow e, First V ice-P resident o f
the Citizens’ Savings & Loan A ssociation o f Cleveland, has
been succeeded in that position by M r, David C. N orton. On
the board o f directors he is replaced by Mr. R obert L. Ire­
land.
—A t the directors’ m eeting o f the Caxton Savings & B ank­
in g Company of Cleveland, Ohio, held on the 8th inst., prac­
tically the old officials w ere elected, the only change being in
the number of Vice-Presidents, o f w hich there are n ow but
tw o (W orcester R. W arner and E dw ard S. P a ge), instead o f
three as heretofore. A lm ost an entirely new board will
serve for the com ing year, the directors elected^ being W . D.
B. Alexander' (the President), Luther A llen, Gen. James
Barnett, S. M. Bond, F. H. G off, W . H. Lam precht, Edw ard
S. Page, Benjamin Rose, Charles Schackleton, J. H .Sheadle,
Franklin G. Smith, Martin Snider, James C. W allace,
W orcester R . W arner and R . C. W hite. Mr. W m . F. K yle
is the Secretary and Treasurer, and Judd H. Clark, Assistant
Secretary and Treasurer.
—Messrs. W . G. T aylor and C. T. Denly have been elected
directors of the Cleveland Savings & Banking Company o f
Cleveland.
—There are tw o new ly projected banking schemes a foot in
Chicago. The one concerning whose consum m ation there
seems to be little doubt connects the name o f T. P. Phillips, of
the Dolese & Shepard Co., with the presidency. W hether it
will be organized as a bank purely or as a trust com pany
with banking facilities has not been fu lly decided, but the
plan contemplates a financial institution o f the first olass,
with a capital and surplus]of at least $1,000,000 each.
—The American Trust & Savings Bank o f Chicago has
added three very strong new directors to its board, viz.,
E, P. Ripley, President of the Santa F e; T. P. Shonts, P resi­
dent o f the Indiana Illinois & Iow a R R ., and Charles H.
Deere, the great plow m anufacturer o f Moline, 111. This bank
has also made some changes,in its officers. G ilbert B. Shaw
has retired from the V ice-Presidency and James R.Chapm an
was advanced from the cashiership to this position. Assist

—Mr. R. J. Bennett has been elected Second V ice-P resi­
dent and Mr. W illiam G . Cook Assistant Cashier o f the
W estern State Bank o f Chicago.
—The Am erican Trust & Savings Bank has been ad­
mitted to the C hicago Clearing House. H eretofore this great
and grow ing financial institution has cleared through the
M etropolitan National Bank.
—The People’s Savings Bank Company, o f P ainesville,
Ohio, capital $50,000, was, through the suspension o f the
Euclid Avenue Trust & Savings Bank o f Cleveland, one o f
its correspondents, obliged to close its doors on the 11th inst.
Mr. B. T. C rofoot, County Clerk, has been appointed receiver
o f the Painesville bank.
-E x -G o v e r n o r L . V . Stephens has been instrumental in
organizing a trust com pany for Jefferson City, M o., under
the name o f the Central Missouri Trust Company. It has
been capitalized at $250,000. A general trust and banking
business w ill be engaged in.
— The M etropolitan Bank o f V irginia, w ith a minimum
capital o f $125,000 and m axim um capital o f $300,000, has
been granted a charter in R ichm ond, Va., to take over the
business o f the M etropolitan Bank o f R ichm ond, organized
in 1894. The officers o f the new bank are : President, Mr,
W . Brydon T en n a n t; Vice-President, Henry L. Cabell (V icePresident o f the R ichm ond Trust & Safe Deposit C om p an y);
and Cashier, H. A . W illiam s, form erly Cashier o f the old
bank.
—V ice-President and Cashier M orris L. W illiam s has su c­
ceeded Mr. Hugh M cM illan as President o f the Com m ercial
National Bank, o f Detroit, M ich., the latter resigning in or­
der to look after the interests o f the Detroit & Cleveland
Steam Navigation Co., o f w hich he has becom e President.
Mr. Frederick A . Smith, Cashier o f the Delray Savings Bank,
o f Delray, M ich ., is M r. W illia m s’s successor as Cashier of
tha Commercial.
—The Old National Bank o f Grand Rapids, M ichigan, has
published and issued to its friends a year book or diary
which should prove very useful. It is bound in cloth and
contains not on ly a mem orandum page fo r every day in the
year, but on each page is printed a line or tw o descriptive of
the bank’s business or methods o f conducting its affairs. It
also contains several pages o f other inform ation, notably the
revenue stamp law , postal regulations, a “ handy interest
table,” and a synopsis o f the game and fish law s o f M ichigan.
On a card accom panying the diary appears the condition of
the institution each year from 1892 to 1901, w h ich shows a
grow th in the surplus account from $192,835 in 1892 and
$173,534 in 1893 to $289,027 at the close o f 1901. The deposits,
which were $2,488,230 in 1892, fell off to $1,350,515 in 1893,
but have grow n steadily since that year, and on Dec. 311901
amounted to $4,093,505. The capital o f the bank is $800,000.
The officers are: J. M. Barnett, President; W illard Barn­
hart, V ice President, and H. J. Hollister, Cashier.
—The First National Bank o f W oonsocket, capital $200,000)
w hich was organized in 1851, is to be purchased by the In­
dustrial Trust Company o f Providence and w ill be merged
into the W oonsocket branch o f the com pany.
The
price offered for the stock of the bank is $68 per share,
par value $50. The proposition has been approved by
the Board o f Directors o f the bank and w ill shortly be
submitted to a m eeting o f the stockholders. This makes the
tw elfth bank absorbed by the Industrial Trust Company, of
which Col. Samuel P. C olt is President.

THE

C H K 0N 1C LE

—Mr. Prank J. Lane has been elected to fill the vacancy in
the Presidency of the Union Savings Bank of Toledo, occa­
sioned by the death of Mr. James Secor. The latter is sue
ceeded on the board of direotors of the Union Savings and
Northern National banks by his son, Mr. Jay K. Secor,
—Mr. Edward P. Metcalf was this week elected President
of the Old National Bank of Providence, Julius Palmer de­
clining re election; Cashier Francis A, Cranston also declin­
ing re-election, Mr. Philip B. Ashley was appointed Acting
Cashier.
—The stockholders of the City Bank of Richmond elected
Mr, J ames EL Anderson as a director to replace the late
George W, Anderson,
—In the Chicago bank elections on the 14th inst., E. H,
Gary and Paul Morton were added to the board of directors
of the Commercial National; George M, Reynolds and P. A.
Valentine to the directorate of the Continental National; and
Charles T, Boynton to that of the Bankers' National.
—A new financial institution has been organized in Canada
to be known as the Sovereign Bank of Canada. It will have
an authorized capital of $2,000,000, a paid-up capital of
$1,000,000 and a reserve fuud of $350,000. The head office
will be in Toronto’and the executive offices in Montreal. The
institution has been incorporated by the Dominion Parlia­
ment. The President will be H. S. Holt of Montreal, and
among the directors are Henry R. Wilson of this city and
prominent business men of Canada. The Advisory Committee
in New York will be William C. Lane, President of the
Standard Trust Co.—which company will act as agents of the
bank—and Paul D. Cravath of Guthrie, Cravath & Hender.
son. The General Manager is Duncan M. Stewart, lately
inspector of the Royal Bank of Canada in Montreal and for
merly with the Canadian Bank of Commerce, The banker"
and correspondents of the institution are J. P. Morgan & Co*
and the Standard Trust Co. of New York, J. S.Morgan & C o’
of London and Morgan, Harjes& Co. of Paris, France. These
connections will enable the bank to conduct a sterling and
foreign exchange business on the most favorable terms.

D E B T ST A T E M E N T DECEM BER SI 1901.

[V ol.

LXXIV

and a net debt (gross debt less net cash in the Treasury) of
fl,O il,628,285.51.
P a c i f i c R a i l r o a d D e b t . —At present the only bonds not
paid or in some manner settled by the companies are the
Central Branch Union Pacific. We consequently omit the
others from our table. Any reader desiring the details with
reference to all the issues will find the facts in the Debt
Statements for March 81 1900 and previous dates.
u n l iq u id a t e d

bonds

is s u e d

to

p a c if ic r a il r o a d s - t h e ir

STATUS JAN. 1, 1902.

N am e o f Road.

Principal.

Interest.

Central Branch Union Paolfio....... $1,600,000 00

*2,187,01100

Total due V .S ,

$8,787.01100

The Government realized the sum of $2,122,841 24 from
the sale ou June 20, 1901, of its claim against the Sioux City
& Pacific Railroad Company, under authority of the Act of
Congress approved June 6, 1900.
T r e a s u r y C a s h a n d D e m a n d L i a b i l i t i e s .— The cash hold­
ings of the Government as the items stood Dec. 81 we take
from the Treasury statement of that date. The net cash
balance and the reserve fund of $150,000,000 have both been
deducted above in reaching the net debt.
CASH IN THE TREASURY.
Reserve fund—
Gold coin and bullion................ ................................... .
..$150,000,000 00
Trust funds—
Gold coin............................................................$310,785.089 00
Sliver dollars....................... .............................. 468,087,000 00
Silver dollars Of 1890......................... ................
62.00Q0O
Silver bullion of 1890........... .............................. 88,544,000 00
------------------ 811,408,089 00
General fund—
Gold coin and bullion............... $74,012,514 28
Gold certificates...............
58,788,020 00
Silver certificates....... ..........
6,694,108 00
1,405,631 00
Silver dollars.....................
Silver bullion.............................
080,183 22
United States notes...............
5,614,080 00
Treasury notes of 1890..............
166,263 00
National bank notes................. 10,488,449 57
Fractional silver coin................
6,914,287 11
Fractional currency...... ......... .
_ 132 58
Minor coin.......................... .
382,69113
Bonds and Interest paid,await­
ing reimbursement................
078,188 49
$145,510,098 36
In national bank depositaries—
To credit of Treasurer of the
United States........................ 100,390,368 18
To credit of United States dis­
bursing officers...................... 6,368,17181
112,658,534 49
268,163,632 85
1,219,63L721 85
Gold certificates............................ $316,785,089 00
Sllvercertifieates.......................... 466,087,000 00
Treasury notes of 1890........
88,590,000 00
National bank 5 per cent fund.... 14,362,62138
Outstanding checksand drafts....
5,488,IG 59
w
Disbursing officers’ balances — .. 55,851,939 69
Post Office Department account.. 7,588,604 61
Miscellaneous items. .. .. .....
8,319,219 05
------------------

$811,468,089 00

The following statements of the public debt and Treasury
88,560,354 22
$898,028,443 22
cash holdings of the United States are mads up from official
Reserve fund..........................................
ltO O .0O 00
.O O O
figures issued Dec, 31, 1901. F or statement o j Nov, 30, 1901, Available cash balance........ ............................... 171,608,278 63
821,603,278 68
see C h r o n i c l e Dee. 28, 1901, p q g e 1338; that o f Dec. 31, 1900,
Total................... ........................... ....................................... $1,219,681,721 86
see Jan. 26, 1901, pa ge 165.
INTEREST-BEARING BEST DECEMBER SI, 1901.
l i t l e o f L oa n —

In terest A m o u n t ----------- A m o u n t Outstanding.
payable,
issued.
Registered.
C oupon.
Total.

2s, Consols Of 1930,....Q.—J.
Ss, Loan o f 1908-1918..Q.—F.
*8, Funded loan, 1907..Q.-J.
4s Refund's eertiflc’s.Q.—J.
4S, Loan of 1925.......Q.—F.
faS.Loanof 1904.......Q .—
F.

$

$

$

416,940,750 435,290,600 10,644,150
198,792,040 48,366,900 49,397,200
740,923,100 188,450,100 51,613,200
40,012,750
........................ .
162,315,400 107,707,800 31,910,800
100,000,000 10,884,400
9,175,750

$

445,940,750
97,664,160
240,003,300
32,250
139,018,600
20,060,150

Agg’teln BearingDebt.1,687,984,640 790,705,800 152,541,160 943,279,210
Note.—The denominations of bonds are as follows: 4s of 1907, regis­
tered, $50. $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000,- $10,000, $20,000, $50 000, coupon, $60 $100,
$500,$1,000; 4s, refunding certificates, $10; 5s of 1904, registered, $50, $100,
$1,000, $10,000. coupon. $50. $100, $1,000; 4s o f 1925 registered, $50, $100. $500,
$1,000, $5,000, $10,000, coupon, $50, $100, $600, $1,000; Ss of 1908-1918 registered,
$20, $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000, coupon, $20, $100, $500, $1,000; 2s of 19001930, registered, $50, $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000,$50 000, coupon, $50, $100,
$500, $1,000.

Cash balance in the Treasury Nov. 30, 1901, exclusive of re­
serve and trust funds ............................................................. 167,010,684 94
Cash balance in the Treasury Dec 81, 1901, exclusive of re­
serve and trust funds....................... .......................... .
— $171,603,278 03
$4,692,613 69
Increase during the month.

IM PORTS A N D E X P O R T S FOR DECEMBER.
The Bureau of Statistics at Washington has issued
the statement of the country*® foreign trade for
December, and from it and from previous statements
we have prepared the following interesting summaries:
FOREIGN TRADE MOVEMENT OF THE UNITED STATES,
[In the following tables three ciphers (000s) are In all eases omittefi.]

DEBT ON WHICH INTEREST HAS CEASED SINCE MATURITY.
/-------------- - 1 9 0 1 . — ----------- Not). 80.
Dec. 31.
Funded Loan of 1891, continued at 2 per cent, called
E x p o rts.
Im p o r ts.
E xcess.
for redemption May 18, 1900; interest ceased
M e rc h ’ d lse.
$
$
$
August 18,1900..... .....................
....... .
$208,100 00
$208,100 00
Funded Loan of 1891, matured September 2 iS91..
66,300 00
06,300 00 Jan.-March. 373,757 309.685+164,062
Old debt matured prior and subsequent to Jan .1 ’61 1,066,540 26
1,065,390 26 April-June. 348,086 333.748+134,350
Debt on which interest has ceased................$1,840,940 26
$1,889,79026 July-Sept... 334,469 3 1 3,036 +111,430
81,447 +64,212
October...... 145,669
Bonds issued to Pacific railroads matured hut not yet pre­
sented : Union Pacific, $12,000 ; Kansas Pacific, $1,000; total.
$13,000 00 November.. 136,456
73,580 +64,015
DEBT BEARING NO INTEREST.
United States notes.... ................................................................$346,681,010 00
Old demand notes.......................................... ................ .............
58,847 50
National bank notes—Redemption account.
........... ............ 86,008,208 50
Fractional currency................................................ $15,250,425 88
Less amount estimated as lost or destroyed.......... 8,375,984 00
-----------------0,874,49188
Aggregate o f debt bearing no Interest

$888,612,663 88

RECAPITULATION.
Dec. 31,1901.
N ov. 30,1001.
In c . or Dec.
Classification o f D ebt—
$
$
$
Interest-bearing debt....... 9*3,279,210 00 949.062,330 00 Dec. 5,783,100 00
Debt, interest ceased........
1,339,790 26
1,840,040 26 Dee.
1,160 00
Debt bearing no interest...
388,612,56889 386,878,872 88 Ine.. 1,733,691 25
Total gross debt..........1,833,281,684 14 1.387,282,142 89 Deo. 4,050.578 76
Cash balance in Treasury*. 821,603,278 03 817.010,664 94 Inc. 4,592,018 69
Total net debt............. 1,011,628,285 61 1,020,271,477 95 Deo. 8,848,193 44
* Including $150,000,000 reserve fund.

The foregoing figures show a gross debt on Dec. 81, 1901,
Interest-bearing and non-interest-bearing) of $1,883,281,564 14

December..

Im p orts.

E xcess.

+57,168

$
371.181
310,852
319,981
1 63,300
136,702
145,890

*
331.263+139.928
308,160 +133,686
185,051 +134.SS0
70,631 +93,759
65.854 +71,348
6S.697 +77,103

880,405+585,109

1,477.948

839,160 +648,703

137,077

Total.. . 1,465.51*

- 1 9 0 0 ,—
E x p o r ts .

79.915

S

G o ld a n d G o ld In O r e .

Jan.-March.
April-June.
July-Sept...
October.,..
November..
December..

9,128
20,303
3,190
4.012
16,293
4,744

8.618
+ 516
7,316 +13,047
19,472 —10,282
9,189
—5,187
+8,861
7,433
+3,333
3,411

8,176
33,264
33,165
443
677
411

+3,353
5,824
10,803 +11,463
33,363
—1,198
10,781 -1 0 ,2 8 9
13,643 -1 1 ,9 6 5
-3 ,9 7 6
3,887

T otal......

57,730

51,332

+3,348

54.135

66,749

-1 3 ,6 1 4

+6,400
+6,890
+5,697
+1,668
+1.903
+1.990

15,004
13,860
17.183

8,164
10,685
11,481
3,083
3,680
3,118

+6,840
+4,681

S i l v e r a n d S i l v e r In O r e .

Jan.-March,
April-June.

July-Sept...
October.....
November..

December..
Total.......

14,520
13.914
13,063
4,788
4.690
4.734
55,689

-f Excessof exports.

.

8.111
7,024
7,366
3,080
3,787
3.785
31.143

+34,496

6,100
5,258
7,858
66,931

— Excess of imports.

40,100

+5.711
+ 3,071
+ l .578

+4,940
+30,19.1

THE CHRONICLE

J anuary 18, 1902.]

133

W e subjoiu the totals for merchandise, gold and derful indeed if al' preparations for resumption can be made
silver for the twelve months since Jan. 1 for six years. so quickly and so easily that half the amount w ill be mined.
Still, the great m ine-owners are rapidly pushing forw a rd their
preparations. They are filled with new courage aud new
Twelve
Excess heart, and everybody em ployed by them is likewise in better
Excess
E xcess
E x­
Im ­ o f E x ­
Im ­
E x­
of
Mot. E xports. Imports.
of
Exports ports. ports. E xports ports. ports. ports.
spirits.
Over and above this the disputes between A rgentina and
*
$
*
*
*
1
$
*
$
5.318 55,089 31.143 24,496
1 9 0 1 . 1,465,514 880,406 585109 57.730 54,982
Chili have been arranged. It is true that alarmist rumors
1 9 0 0 . 1,477,956 829.150 048790 54,135 60,749 *12,614 00,221 40,100 20,121
1 8 9 9 . 1,275468 798,967 470601 45,879 51,385 ♦5.95H 53,462 30.844 22,618 have been circulated during the week to the effect that the
1 8 9 8 . 1,255,616 634,961 020582 10,196 168,164 *141,969 53,797 29,181 24,666 settlement would not be maintained and that new troubles
256 58,661 33,082 25,679
1 8 9 7 1,099,709 742,595 357111 34,276 34,029
would arise. Here in London, however, the best-inform ed
1 8 9 6 . 1,005,837 081.580 324257 58.257 104,731 *46.474 04,066 30,279 33.777
are quite convinced that the tw o governments are in earnest
* Excess o f Imports.
and that all matters in dispute have been referred to the
Similar totals for the six months since July 1 arbitration o f the British Government, One last cause o f the
make the following exhibit.
improvement is the grow in g belief that the fall in copper has
now gone nearly as far as it is likely to go. W ith the end of
MEBCHANDISE.
GOLD.
Si l v e r .
the year money w ill becom e easier all over tbe Continent and
S ix
therefore there w ill be plentiful supplies in London. That
E xcess
Excsss
Mos. B sports. Im ports. E xcess
E x­
Im ­ o f E x ­ is, perhaps, a farther explanation o f the better feeling that
Im ­
E x­
of
of
E xports ports. ports. E xp orts p orts. ports. ports
now exists.
On the other hand, trade has received a great ch eck; but
t
t
%
*
1
$
*
t
$
1 9 0 1 . 743.661 446,964 296697 28.239 38,454 *10,216 27.206 16,008 11,197 in the present temper o f the city the check is looked upon as
1 9 0 0 . 765,912 389,781 376181 23,695 50.123 '*26,428 35,851 21,251 14,600 temporary,
The general impression is that as soon as the
1 8 9 9 6 8 2,449 410,522 271927 17.826 27,946 * 10,121 26,342 16,408 9,934 war is really over and G overnm ent borrow ings have ceased,
1 8 9 8 . 034.004 308,703 325301 9,989 65,56- *55,699 29,199 16,238 12,961 there w ill be a fresh outburst o f new enterprise and that trade
1 8 9 7 . 009,911 289,789 320122 9,180 27,794 *18,814 30,508 18.036 12,472 will rapidly recover. In the meanwhile m uch capital that a
1 8 9 6 . 561,226 311,924 250301 15,266 78,786 *63.620 33,793 15.486 I S , 307
little while ago was employed in trade is now available for
• E xcess o f Imports.
investment upon the Stock Exchange, and that may be a
farther explanation o the great im provem ent that has taken
In these tables of totals, gold and silver in ore for place during the past fcouple o f weeks.
all years are given under the heads respectively of
In Paris there is still no disposition to invest and all new
enterprise is avoided. M oney, indeed, has been in m uch
gold and silver.
stronger demand since the Governm ent loan than anybody
The following shows the merchandise balance for anticipated. It turns out that multitudes o f weak speculators
applied for immense quantities o f the loan and that b y so
each year back to 1875.
doing they have involved themselves in tem porary difficul­
EXCESS OF MERCHANDISE IMPORTS OB EXPOBT8.
ties. There has been such heavy selling o f rentes that the
premium on the loan has quite gone off; and although the
6 m on th s e n d in g B ee. 3 1 —
12 m o n th s e n d in g B ee. 3 1 —
1875
.... Exports.$S29,579,698 1875 .............................Experts.$7,784,486
loans made by the Bank o f Prance were on an enormous
1876
.... Exports.113,255,681 1876 .......... Exports. 163,319,464 scale, the demand fo r money in the open market still remains
1877
.... Exports.101,959,699 1877 ..........Exports. 139,856,112 strong. That, however, is a tem porary difficulty, and proba­
1878
.... Exports. 149,625,055 1878 .......... Exports.305,479,590
1879
.... Exports.136,520,418 1879 .......... Export8.251,557,029 bly there w ill be a revival on the Paris Bourse if the present
1880
.... Exports.161,712,752 1880 ......... .Exports.192,876,246 recovery in London lasts. A t all events, French and G er­
1881
.... Exports. 65,339,713 1881 ..........Exports. 163,339,679 man capitalists have been buying here on a considerable
1882
.... Exports. 54,575,469 1882 ............................ Exports.15,138,439
1883
.... Exports, 62,059,081 1883 ..........Exports.108,143,100 scale; and, what is m ore remarkable, Am erican purchases
1884
.... Exports. 109,348,733 1884 ............................. Exports120,104,568 on a very great scale even in the case o f South
have been
1885
.... Exports. 43,067,432 1885 .......... Exports. 100,381,125 A frica n gold shares.
1886
.... Exports. 50,953,570 1886.. .......................... Exports.49,974,832
In Germ any there is a m ore hopeful feeling at the begin­
1887
.... Exports. 33,572,693 1887 .............................Exports.6,482,566
1888
.... Exports. 27,924,979 1888 .........Imports, 33,650,321 ning o f the N esvY ear. The danger o f big failures is be­
1889
.... Exports. 87,239,638 1889 .............................Exports.56,584,382to have passed; though all w ell-inform ed people are
lieved
1890
.... Exports. 52,826,185 1890.. ... ... Exports. 34,104,822 aware that the liquidation o f bad business must g o on for a
.............................. .Exports.155,450,274
1891
1891 .......... Exports.142,188,703
long time
1892
.... Exports. 50,064,293 1892 ............................ Exports.97,489,705 yet. Still, the opinion o f the very best-inform ed
1893
.... Exports. 170,037,663 1893 .............................Exports.109,592,002
is that already signs are apparent o f some recovery. There
1894
.... Exports. 80,303,235 1894 ............................ Exports.148,789,307 a small advance lately in the prices of industrial
has been
1895
.... Exports. 27,925,824 1895 .............................Exports.23,190,789
1896
.... Exports.250,301,245 1896 .......... Exporte.324,257,685 securities, There is good buying o f G overnm ent securities;
1897....... . ..Exports.320,121,917 1897 ...... . ..Exports.357,113,816 and even in the iron trade it is said that things are not quite
1898...........Exports.325,301,059 1898 .......... Exports.620,581,818 so bad as they were. Still, trade is very bad and very large
1899
.... Exports.271,926,807 1899 .......... Exports.476,500,561 numbers o f people are out o f employment.
1900
.... Exports.376,181,308 1900 .............................Exports.648,796,399
Tbe borrow ings by tbe open market from the Bank of
1901
.... Exports.297,697,275 1901.. . . . ....Exports.585,108,793
England in the last week o f the Old Year were the largest
on record. They amounted to the enormous sum o f 12 m il­
lions sterling. Tw elve months ago, it is true, the b o rrow ­
ings were also large; but they were quite two-thirds o f what
[P r o m
o a r o w n c o r r e s p o n d e n t .]
they have been n ow , and before tbe war began five or six
millions were considered heavy. D aring the last three weeks,
L o n d o n , Saturday, January 4, 1902,
o f the year the borrow ings from the Bank o f England
The N ew Y ear has been ushered in upon the Stock E x­ reached 16 m illions sterling. Partly o f course this is due to
change b y a great increase in activity and a general advance the postponement by the Governm ent o f large payments.
in prices. Even on the Continental Bourses there is a better In tbe last day or tw o o f the year the Governm ent did pay
feeling than for a long tim e past has prevailed. Here in out immense sums; but tbe general market could not know
that this was intended; and as the Governm ent payments
London the main cause of the im provem ent is undoubtedly were delayed the borrowings from the Bank o f England had
the belief now widely held upon the Continent as well as to be on the unprecedented scale mentioned. Borrow ings in
here at home that the war is rapidly draw ing to a close. It Paris and Germ any on a very great scale are usual at the
is not very easy to see what good ground exists fo r the belief; end o f the year; but banking is m uch less developed in
France and Germany than in England, and the Bank of
but it do63 exist and is unquestionably influencing markets.
France and the Imperial Bank o f Germ any play a m uch
A second cause is the resumption o f gold-m ining in the greater part in the econom ic life o f those tw o countries than
Transvaal. The m ilitary authorities now feel that they have the Bank of England does here at home.
Just now the immense borrow ings from the Bank and the
hemmed in the Boers still in arms in rem ote districts and
large disbursements by the Government have made money
that consequently they can allow the railways to be used exceptionally plentiful in the open market; and the supply
for supplying everything requisite to the m ining population, will be increased on Monday by the payment o f the interest
which is rapidly returning to Johannesburg and its neighbor­ on the national d eb t; but the immense borrowings from the
hood, and preparations are being actively pushed forw ard for Bank w ill have to be repaid, and probably in a week or tw o
money w ill again be scarce. In tbe course o f a few weeks it
re-opening several new mines. Of course there w ill be a good almost certainly w ill be so, fo r the proportion o f the taxes
deal of trouble in getting a sufficiency o f native labor and collected in the next three months is very m uch greater
probably m uch will have to be done in pum ping ou t mines than in any other quarter o f tbe year. It is true that money
and repairing the damage done. It is quite possible, there­ will becom e now every day cheaper and m ore plentiful in
the great Continental cities, and the leading banks o f France
fore, that the output during the New Year w ill be quite and Germany w ill probably increase the balances they are
small compared with what it was just before the outbreak employing in London. That may keep rates fairly moderate.
o f hostilities. A t that time, it may be recollected, the Otherwise tbe Bank o f England in the course o f a few weeks
m onthly production of gold was at the rate o f about 20 m il­ w ill have com plete control o f the market and can make
rates pretty m uch what it likes.
lions sterling per annum. Possibly little more than a qu ar­
The India Council is selling its drafts well. It offered for
ter o f that will be mined in the New Year. It w ill be w on­ tender on Wednesday 60 lacs and the applications were very
M e r c h a n d is e .

GOLD.

Si l v e r .

(&ommzTzi&l%UQlisUM%w$

TH E

134

OHRONIOLE.

nearly B Olacs, at prices ranging from Is. 8 81-824, to is, 4 1- 16d.
O
per rupee. The whole am ount offered was allotted at prices
ranging from is. 4d. per rupee to Is, 4 l-16d. Later in the
day nearly 2 lacs were sold by special arrangement at Is.
4 l-10d. per rupee.
The following return shows the position of the B an k of
England, the Bank rate of discount, theprioe of consols, & e
1899.
1901.
1910.
180a.
Jan. 8
Jm . A
Jan. i .
j&n, a.
i
*
2
*
utroulatlon........ ..................... 30,287,810 80.230,810 28,827,820 27,761,046
9,717,866
8,744,086
8,784.823
Pablia deposit*................. .
10.H 083
86
Other deposit*...................... 60,898 512 46,048.226 44 627,290 39,487,728
Dovei-amem. aeouritle*,........ 17,426,480 20,081,690 10.OrO.818 14.8*4,408
11,106,094 85,718,0 26 84.619 183 82,917,063
Other securities............ .
Reserve of note* and ooin. .... 20.n0.870 16 211.080 80,698,160 19,808,878
28.007,300 82.125,970 30.340,823
I 'u m l balUoli,bOth d ep a rtm 'ts 32,698,219
89 8-10
29 8-10
88 9-10
Prop, reserve to lia b ilitie s ,. o, o.
88
4
0
*6
Sauk r u l e .................... p e r o e u t .
4
98 18-10
07 6-10
110%
Oouaola,3M per (sent__ 68%
29 8-100.
27 l-lad.
2714a.
iflra r— ......................... .
8654a.
IW rtiiu -H o u e e return* ......... . 815,143,000 200,187,000 252,181,000 232,987,000
* January 3.

[Tol. LXXIV

etUitllsH I f l i u u v l a l

The daily closing quotations for securities, etc,, at London
are reported by cable as follows for the week ending Jan. 17,
Sat.

Lo n d o n .

Sliver, per ounce____ < ,
1
Consols., new , 2 % p. cts.
For accou n t. . . . . . . . . .
Fr'oh rentes (in Paris) fr.
Spanish 4 s.................
Anaconda M i n i n g ......
Itch . Top. A Santa Fe..
Preferred, ................ ..
Baltimore & O h io ..........
Preferred..............
Canadian Paolflo...........
Chesapeake < Ohio___
fe
Ohioa. Great W estern,.
Ohio. Mil. & St. Paul. ..
Den. A Rio G r., oom ....
Do
do Preferred,
The Bank rate o f discount and open market rates at the Erie, co m m o n ___ . . . . . .
1st preferred______ _
chief Continental cities have been as follows:
2d p r e f e r r e d ..........
Illinois C en tral...............
LoulsvUle & Nashville..
Dec. 2 0 .
Dec. 1 3 .
Jan. 8 ,
Dec. 2 7 .
Mexican Central...........
Mexican National.........
Interest at
Bank Open Bank Open Bank Open Bank Open
Mo. Kan. & T ex., oom ..
Hate, Market Bate. Market Bate. Market Bate. Market
P r e f e r r e d ..............
N. Y . Oent’l A Hudson,.
8
8
3
3 m
8
.
P a n . s . . . . .. .. . . . . . . .
m
m
«T Y . Ontario & W est’n
.
4
4
3
4
8 %
i
8%
B e r l i n ... . . . . . . . . . . . .
m
Norfolk & W e s t e r n .....
8
4
4
4
8%
H a m b u r g . . . . . . . . . .4.
m
Do
do
pref.
m
Northern Pacific, pref..
3
4
4
4
F r a n k f o r t . . . . . .4 .
m
3M
8M
Pennsylvania.................
8
3
8
3
.
2M
A m s t e r d a. . .m . . .
m
m
■m
‘ Phlla. A R e a d ..............
3
3
3
2 %
2 %
B r u s s e l s . . . , . . , ,3 .
2 %
'Phlla. A Read.,1st pref
4
4
4
V i e n n . .a. . . . . ...
4
8 %
m
m
m
‘ Phlla. & Read. .2d pref.
n o m .
n o m . Jonthern Pacino.........
a 5 % .
o m
n o m .
6 %
5 %
8 t . P e t e r s b u r g ,.
6 %
-iouth’n Railway, com ..
4
4
4 4
4 4
4
M a d r i d . . . . . . . . .4 .
P r e f e r r e d ..............
8
5
5
6 5
5
5
C o p e n h a g e n , ..
6
Onion Paolflo.................
Preferred..___ ____ . . .
The rates for money have been as follows:
U. S. Steel Oorp., co m ..
Do
do
p ref..
A
>
Interest allows d
vSahash............... .
Open M arket B a tes for deposits by
Do
preferred.. . . . . .
Do
Deb. “ B ” _____
London.
2rade Bills. Joint D ie t H ’s
B ank B ills.

£
a 3 M on th s.
*
Dee. 7 4
3%
3 9-10
"
14 4
“ 21 4
SH
3%
“ 28 4
Jan.
44
m

4 M onths.

0 M on th s. 3 M os,

4 M os.

3%
8 9-10
3 7-10
3%

8%@3% 3%@4
4
3%@3 9-18
8
8%
3%
3M@A
8%
3%

Stock A t 7-14
Banks Oatt Dam

4
4
4

mu

4
8U

2U
8%
2%

m
m

2%
2%

—l* «r C uttle.

Mon.

lues.

Wed,

Sflllie
93%
9 3 U ie
100-40
77%
6%
79%
104
106
99
117%
48
23%
167%
46
94%
42%
75
61%
142%
108%
28%
16%
26
63%
169%
85
88%
94%
102
76%
28%
42%
32%
61%
34
95%
105
91%
44
96%
23
43%
69%

25%
93%
93%
100-52
77
6%
79%
105
100%
09%
117%
48%
23%
167%
45
9 4%
42
7 4%
61%
142%
107%
28
15%
26%
53%
170%
85
58%
94%
102
7 6%
28%
4 2%
32%
61
34
96%
105%
02%
44
96%
28%
43%
70

25%
93%
93%
100 35
77%
6%
70%
103
104%
97
116%
47
28
106%
45
93%
41%
75
60
142
107%
27%
16
25%
52%
108%
34%
57
94
102
70
28%
42
31%
61
3 3%
96%
1,04%
90%
43%
96%
22%
42%
69%

26010

Thurt.

25%
94&1Q
0 4 % fl
947la
100 60 0 0 47%
7 7%
77%
6%
6%
77%
78%
102
100%
104%
104%
99%
98%
116%
117
46%
46%
23%
23%
165%
166%
44%
45
93%
93%
40%
41%
73%
74
57%
68%
140%
142
106%
107%
27
27%
15
15
25%
25%
62%
58
166%
167
34%
34%
56%
67
95
96
102
102
75%
76
27%
28
41%
42%
30%
31%
60%
6 1%
33%
33%
94%
95%
103%
104
90%
90
43
44%
95%
97%
22%
22%
42%
43
60
70

Frt.
26% «
93%
84
00-42%
7 7%
6%
7 8%
100
105
98%
117%
47
23%
itt6%
44%
93%
41%
74%
5 8%
141%
107%
27%
15%
2 5%
6 2%
167%
34%
57%
95
102
76
28%
42%
31%
60%
34%
95%
103%
91
43%
97
22%
43
70

* P rice per share

®0mmjexjciaXatXJ&

2k
2k
2k

2%
2W

I m p o r t s a n d E x p o r t s f o r t h e W e e k .— The following are
che imports at New York for the week ending for dry goods
Messrs, Pixley & Abell write as follows under date of Jan. 9 and for the week ending for general merchandise
Jan. 10; also totals since beginning first week January.
January 2:
814

2U
2U

G o ld —'The a rriv a ls o f g old are sm a ll a n d are r e a d ily ta k en f o r sh ip ­
m en t t o V ie n n a an d Paris. T h e m o v e m e n ts a t th e B an k a re : O u t fo r
G e rm a n y , £ 2 0 1 ,0 0 0 ; in fr o m A u s tr a lia £ 1 7 ,0 0. A r r iv a ls : A u s t r a ­
lia , £ 9 4 ,0 0 0 ; V e ra C ruz, £ 3 5 ,0 0 0 ; N ew Z ea la n d , £ 1 3 ,0 0 0 ; R iv e r
P la te , £ 1 3 ,0 0 0 ; B o m b a y . A x 1 1 ,0 0 0 ; to t a l, £ 2 0 6 ,0 0 0 . S h ip m e n ts:
B o m b a y , £ 1 0 .0 0 0 ; M ad ras, £ 5 ,0 0 0 ; lo c a l, £ 1 5 ,0 0 0 .
S ilv e r —S ilv e r has risen s te a d ily d u rin g th e w eek , m a in ly o w in g to
th e d em a n d f o r C h in a in c o n n e c tio n w ith th e a p p r o a c h o f th e ir N ew
Y e a r ; b u t fo llo w in g o n this th e r e h a s b een som e d e m a n d f o r In d ia
a n d a ls o som e re-p u rch a ses b y s e lie r s w h o h a d a n tic ip a te d w e a k n e s s at
th e c lo s e o f th e y ea r. T h e In d ia n p r ic e is R s 6 6 p e r 1 0 0 to la h s.
A r r iv a ls : N ew Y o r k , £ 2 8 3 ,0 0 0 ; A u stra lia , £ 6 8 ,0 0 0 ; to t a l, £ 3 5 1 ,000.
S h ip m e n ts : B o m b a y , £ 7 7 ,5 0 0 ; M ad ras, £ 7 ,6 0 0 ; C a lcu tta ,
£ 7 .5 0 0 ; S h an gh ai, £ ^ 0 ,0 0 0 ; to ta l, £ 1 3 7 .5 0 0 .
M e x ic a n D o lla r s —T hese c o in a re n o m in a l, a n d th e n e a re st q u o ta tio n
is % d . u n d e r th e p r ic e o f silv e r.

The quotations for bullion are reported as follows:

FOREIGN

For week.

1902.

IM P O S T S .

1901.

Dry G o o d s....
9-en’l mer'dise

*2 ,7 5 3 ,2 1 7
9 ,0 8 6 ,5 8 4

$ 2 ,1 9 0 ,0 4 4
9,263 ,8 0 2

$ 3 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 4
5,210 .7 5 4

$ 1 ,6 3 7 ,5 5 5
7 ,2 8 1 ,5 3 6

T o t a l.......

811,839.801

$11,4 5 3 ,8 4 6

$8,8 1 0 ,7 5 8

*8 ,9 1 9 ,0 9 1

Dry Goods___
Gen’l mer’ dise

*5 ,4 5 2 ,7 0 9
16,583,717

* 4 ,3 0 6 ,0 5 9
1 7,080,181

* 5 ,9 6 8 ,0 8 0
13,101,591

*3 ,8 9 4 ,6 6 1
14,8 9 3 ,6 8 9

Total 2 weeks

» 22,03 6 ,4 8 6

*2 1 .3 8 6 .2 4 0

$19,0 6 9 ,6 7 1

$ 1 8 ,7 8 8 ,3 5 0

Since Jan. 1.

The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for the
week ending Jan, 18, and from January 1 to date.
EXPORTS FEOSS HEW Y O R K BOB

Go l d .

London Standard.
Bar gold, fln e .„..o z .
U. S, gold eoin...Q z.
Germ7n gold eoin.oz.
French gold eoin.oz.
Japanese y e n ....o z .
* Nominal.

Jan,
2.

Dec.
24.

Sil v e r .
London Standard.

Jan.

Dee.

2.

24.

8, d.
d.
d.
7 7 10% 77 10% B ar silver, fine.. .oz. 25%
Do 2 mo. delivery 2515le
7 6 4% 7 6 4%
Bar silver, contain’g
76 5
78 5
do 5 grs. gold.oz. 26%
76 5
78 5
do 4 grs. gold.oz. 2631fi
7 8 4% 7 6 4%
do 3 grs. gold.oz. 26
Cake silver.. . . . . . oz. 2 7%
M exican dollars .oz. 25%*

d.
2 5%
25%
26
251310
25%
27%
25%*

The following shows the imports of cereal produce into the
United Kingdom during the seventeen weeks of the season
compared with previous seasons:

1902
For the w eek..
?rev, reported
total

2

weeks

1 9 0 0 -0 1 .

$11,5 8 8 ,4 8 7
13,073,893

$ 1 3 ,7 4 2 ,6 8 7
11,80 2 ,7 0 5

$17,9 7 1 ,6 6 2

$ 2 1 ,4 2 6 ,7 0 3

$24,6 6 2 ,3 8 0

$ 2 5 ,5 4 5 ,3 9 2

The following table shows the exports and imports of
specie at the. port of New York for the week ending Jan. 11
And since Jan. 1, 1902, and for the corresponding periods in
1901 and 1Q00.
B X P O B T 8

Gold,

A N D

IM P O S T S

Supplies available for consumption (exclusive of stocks on
September 1):

Total 1 9 0 2 . . . . . .
Total 1 9 0 1 .........
Total 1 9 0 0 . . . . . .

$6 2 7 ,0 5 0
22 ,9 4 0
1,045 ,6 0 5

1 CtOO-011

1RfJQ.4IO

1 SCQR-QQ

2 1 ,0 8 8 ,1 0 0
7 ,4 8 3 ,0 0 0
11,696 079

20,031,300
7 ,0 8 5 ,4 3 0
11,5 6 3 ,3 8 1

Total...................... 3 9 ,6 6 4 ,8 2 5 4 0 ,962,668
Aver.prioewheat,week.27s, 7d.
26s. 7d.
Average price, season .26s. 6d.
27e. 9d.

4 0 ,2 6 5 ,1 7 9
25s. 6d.
26s. Id .

38,6 8 0 ,1 1 1
26s. 9a
27s. Id.

The following shows the quantities of wheat, flour and
maize afloat to the United Kingdom:
fh .it w eek.

W h eat........ .... .. q r s , ..2 ,4 5 6 ,0 0 0
Floor, equal to q r s ,.. 8 26,000
Maine...................q r s ... 9 3 0 ,0 0 0

L o t i w eek.

2,315 ,0 0 0
30 6 ,0 0 0
75 5 ,0 0 0

1900,
2 .0 4 5 .0 0 0
3 7 0 .0 0 0
7 6 0 .0 0 0

189 9 .
1,385,000
820,000
8 20,000

Silver,

S P E C IE

A T

H E W

Y O R K .

Import*.

Since Jan, 1.

600,000
27,050

1Q01-O7

O P

Export*.

dr ©at B r i t a i n .......
P r a n c e ....... . . . . . . .
Germany............. .
Vest I n d i e s . .. .. .. ..
M exico...........
South A m e r ic a .....
4.11 other countries.

Wheat im ported, ew t.2 1 ,5 0 2 ,7 0 0 2 4 ,7 9 7 ,3 0 0
to p ortflof f l o u r ...... 7 .6 3 4 ,4 0 0
7 ,3 7 8 ,0 0 0
Sales of home-grown. 10,527,725
8,787,S68

1889

$ 1 2 ,3 9 3 ,2 8 4
9 ,0 3 3 ,4 1 9

1898-99,
2 0 ,0 3 1 ,3 0 0
12,02 1 ,4 0 0
5 ,4 8 3 ,7 7 0
8 58.270
8 97,780
16,5 1 3 ,2 0 0
7 ,0 8 5 ,4 3 0

2 4 ,7 9 7 ,3 0 0
8 ,6 1 6 ,4 0 0
7 ,5 3 2 ,5 0 0
1 ,0 0 1 ,9 3 0
7 0 5 ,4 4 0
1 7 ,8 2 7 ,8 0 0
7 ,3 7 8 ,0 0 0

1900

1901.

Week,
1899-00.
2 1 ,0 8 6 .1 0 0
6 ,7 1 1 ,7 0 0
6 ,2 8 3 ,6 0 0
1 ,2 4 4 ,0 0 0
61 3 ,9 0 0
2 1 ,6 3 0 ,3 0 0
7 ,4 8 3 ,0 0 0

TH E W EBB.

$9,096,671
8,874,991

IMPORTS.
1901-G2.
im p’ts o f w heat, OW t.21,502,7 0 0
B a r l e y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 ,8 0 9 ,7 0 0
O a t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ,7 4 4 ,6 0 0
P e a s .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . .
6 84,500
Beans....... .
8 25,100
Indian c o r n ... . . . . . . , 1 3 , 7 2 1 , 0 0 0
F lo u r .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ,6 3 4 ,4 0 0

1889.

1900.

$142,250
666,000
27,050

Week.

Since Jan, i .

$ ......... .

$

Exports.
Week.

120

SS5
445
$76 9 ,3 0 0
22,940
3 ,945,605

120

SS5
445

$300
43 ,7 2 6
101 885

*9 0 0
179,198
111,647

Import*.

Since Jan. 1.

Great Britain. . . . . . „
France....................
le r m a n y .,,. . . . . . . .
Vest I n d i e s . .. .. .. ..
d e x l o o . . . . . . ............
louth A m erica........
til other countries.

$ 6 0 4 ,1 0 0

$998,350

6,459

500

Total 1 8 0 2 . . . . . .
Total i b c i ..........
Total 1900.........

*6 1 1 .0 5 9
1,003,396
927,591

$1,004,812
1,400 ,7 9 0
1,711,507

Since Jan. X,

” 5,9 6 2

‘ ‘ “'5 0 0

Week,
$ .............

$ ............

18,522

18,522

$18,522
08.039
60 872

*18,522
136,357
101.132

I'HE CHRONICLE.

J a n u a r y 18, 1903.]

F or e ig n T ra .d e of N e w Y o r k — M o n t h l y S t a t e m e n t .— In
addition to the other tables given in this department, made
up from weekly returns, we give the following figures for
the full months,also issued by our New York Custom House.
The first statement covers tne total imports and exports of
merchandise and the Customs receipts for the twelve months
of the last two seasons.

135

B A N K S .
uap<( 0 0 s o m i t t e d . ) ta l.

M O N TH .

T o t a l.,.

1900.

1
45,017,767
43,259,838
48,793.410
49,084,888
49,008,348
40,198,826
47,093,078
44.900,646
40,178,987
52,004,912
43,888,120
49,971,500

N e w Y o r k . O d sto m h R e c e ip t s
a t New Yo r k .

E x p o rts.

Im p o rts.

1901.

J a n u a r y .. .
F e b r u a r y ...
M a r c h ......
A p r i l .......... .*
M a y .............
J u n e .............
J u ly —
.
A u g u s t ........
S e p te m b e r.
O ctob er —
N o v e m b e r ..
D e c e m b e r ..

at

1900.

1901.

1901.

B orou gh o f
M a n h a tta n ,

$
14,890,300
12,604,292
12,897,843
12,604,788
18,288,207
11,280,302
14,152,847
13 100,786
18,001,053
15 711,474
12,847,233
14,578,228

,*
*
t
49,552,629 45,167,415 42,762,502
43,983,408 39.721,209 40,260,704
50,063,681 44,109,291 40,805,867
45,925,244 43,889,197 44,721,055
44,480,441 40,702,499 45,042,402
35,873,932 41,155,951 47,425,588
40,288,198 44,004,877 42,929,955
38,537,723 39,540,072 40,833,311
86,836,020 39,460.634 42,717,498
40,238,194 44,079,802 49,241,496
49,430,417 89,337,307 42,443,433
45,202,221 43,128,442 44,038,985

*
14,810,889
13,477,200
13,922,220
11,891,931
10,768,688
11,327,791
13,435,973
12,400,410
11,793,160
13,414,705
11,840,638
12,443,941

654.609,770 583,330,617 510,942,310 538,968,906 101,047.431 151,593,811

The imports and exports of gold and silver for the twelve
months have been as follows :
Gold M
M ONTH.

ovement at

Im p o rts.

T ota l .

Yo

rk

.

Si l v e r - N
Im p o rts.

E x p o r ts.

1900.

1901.

J a n u a ry ....
F e b r u a r y ..
M a r c h ..........
A p r i l .............
M a y ...............
J u n e .............
J u ly ...............
A u g u s t .......
S e p te m b e r ..
O c t o b e r ....
N o v e m b e r ..
D ecem ber.

New

1901.

1901.

1900.

$
814,747
290,628
314,548
175,579
201,439
216,147
500,063
711,568
638,744
1,389,422
548,843
333,635

$
020,398
318,911
212,525
219,964
144,752
222,338
105,953
180,248
162,263
4,200,887
4,719,031
141,458

8,174,609
284,995
455,930
4,893,395
10,080,137
6,019,157
1,480,015
473,825
88,475
3,104,781
15,760,030
4,091,960

$
5,105,072
1,192,669
1,025,382
1,706,312
10,352,807
7,908,998
2,240,382
17,513,591
101,541
208,280
53,070
247,546

5.70 i , 356

11,314,728

54,463,335

47,781,047

%

ew

Y

ore

E x p o rts.

1901.

t
$
3,090,838
4,692,008
879,805
4,438,315
1,519,892
4,700,742
1,403,112
4,347,693
1,324,087
3,107,698
687,404
3,931,804
1,020,058
3,403.329
1,299,021
3,412,078
010,700
3,687,810
1,243,947
3.704,569
1,381,888 , 3,904,239
334,424
3,301,031
13,099.850

40,635 016

•N
ew lo r k City Clearing House Banns.—Statement of
condition for the week ending Jan. 11, based on average of
daily results. W e omit two ciphers (0 0 ) in all cases,
B AN K S.

Oapital. Surplus.! Loans.

Specie.

1 —
*4
L e g a ls .

D ep o s its

serv s

Net

1 0 0 ,0
3 0 0 ,0
. 1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
2 5 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 0 ,0

1J . 4
2 2 8 ,1
1 3 0 ,7
8 2 ,0
2 7 ,0
1 0 2 ,5
7 0 ,5
1 0 7 ,8
1 5 1 ,0
2 1 0 ,7
120,1
8 1 8 ,0
5 5 ,0
7 0 ,6
3 0 0 ,2
2 3 1,1
8 2 ,0
0 4 ,0
6 0 ,8
6 5 ,8
0 1 ,8
0 8 ,2
2 0 0 ,0

I
1 9 2 7 .8
2 2 8 8 ,0
1 4 4 0 ,0
1 2 0 5 ,8
1 2 5 8 ,0
1 7 8 4 ,2
2 2 4 7 ,0
1 8 8 4 ,6
1 0 0 0 .2
2 6 7 8 .0
1 0 3 7 ,3
4 2 8 0 ,0
1 3 3 9 ,0
0 7 8 ,8
2 0 7 7 ,0
1 3 8 6 ,0
0 9 8 ,0
5 2 0 ,4
7 5 4 ,0
9 3 1 ,3
2 3 1 ,7
2 9 9 ,3
1 2 2 2 ,3

$
0 0 ,8
3 0 8 ,0
6 4 ,1
0 3 ,4
1 4 ,0
1 1 6 ,0
1 2 8 ,0
3 4 ,0
2 8 ,8
1 1 5 ,0
1 4 .0
8 5 1 ,0
53 ,0
3 0 ,3
4 5 ,0
4 1 ,0
15 ,2
1 1 ,0
5,5
19 ,2
8 ,8
9 ,7
0 9 ,9

1
18 0,2
1 2 0 .0
64 6
6 0 ,0
7 1 .2
1 0 8 ,0
90 ,0
1 2 7 ,2
1 0 8 .8
1 0 8,0
7 3 .8
1 0 0 ,0
1 1 6 ,0
1 1 5 ,0
2 9 7 ,0
1 4 7 ,0
3 7 ,8
8 0 .8
7 7 ,2
0 9 ,4
10 ,0
1M
8 2 ,6

2 * 0 ,1
1 4 2.0
2 3 8 ,2
2 3 0 .0
9 1 ,5
9 4 .1
1 8 9 .4
2 8 4 ,0
3 2 7 .3
2 5 8 .0
0 9 ,0
2 4 0 .0
7 2 ,0
6 5 .3
4 1 8 ,3
6 9 ,2
0 7 ,7
4 9 ,9
8 8 ,0
1 4 7 ,0
17,4
4 2 ,9
0 0 ,7

1 5 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
3 0 0 ,0
B r o o k ly n ........ ..
1 0 0 ,0
Eighth W ard..
1 0 0 ,0
Fifth Avenue,
1 5 0 ,0
Kings County,
Manufaot’rs’ N a t’l 2 5 2 ,0
5 0 0 ,0
M echanics.. .
1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
Merchants’ ............
3 0 0 ,0
Nassau National*
3 0 0 ,0
National City . . . .
1 0 0 ,0
North S id e .. . . . . . . .
1 0 0 ,0
Peoples...................
l 1 0 0 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
1 0 0 ,0
U n ion............. .
1 0 0 ,0
V a lla bo u t.o ...

1 2 7 ,0
1 8 0 ,2
1 6 0 ,5
3 8 ,2
7 7 ,4
0 2 ,2
4 6 5 ,7
3 5 9 ,8
1 8 7 ,0
27.1
0 4 7 ,5
5 8 2 ,4
1 4 4 ,8
1 2 0 ,1
7 8 f5
2 4 8 ,8
5 0 ,8
0 3 ,8
0 1 ,2

1 2 1 7 ,0
1 7 0 4 ,0
1 0 5 9 ,5
3 0 9 ,8
0 8 4 ,0
0 8 2 .4
2 7 0 9 ,5
3 7 1 1 ,0
9 0 2 ,2
0 7 0 ,0
3 8 3 9 ,0
292 3 ,0
9 7 7 ,2
9 0 7 ,0
5 2 7 ,5
1 1 3 8 ,4
4 9 0 ,0
04,8,5
7 0 7 ,3

1 9 ,3
2 2 ,8
0 1 ,7
1 4 ,7
4 0 ,8
S 5 ,0
8 5 2 ,2
1 9 4 ,8
1 7 ,9
10,1
1 9 8 ,0
1 4 9 ,0
1 2 ,0
4 4 ,7
8 ,8
0 1 ,0
1 3 ,3
3 2 ,1
2 8 ,8

8 0 ,0
1 3 6 ,8
3 4 ,6
2 8 ,2
2 6 ,4
2 2 ,9
2 1 0 .1
1 8 2 ,0
8 2 ,6
6 0 .8
3 1 9 ,0
2 0 0 ,0
4 9 ,0
7 9 ,8
4 3 ,0
6 ,3
2 5 ,6
0 4 ,2
2 5 ,6

1 3 8 ,2
1 7 0 ,7
1 0 7 ,4
3 9 ,7
7 5 ,2
7 9 ,8
3 9 8 ,0
2 4 0 ,3
1 0 4 .3
4 5 .0
4 0 0 ,0
6 9 4 .0
3 9 ,9
0 1 ,0
6 5 ,0
9 3 ,6
5 2 ,8
47 8
3 6 ,3

1 0 0 .7

2 5 ,0
1 0 0 ,0

0 8 ,4
8 8 ,4

6 8 2 .5
0 0 4 ,5

2 0 ,0
8 5 ,0

1 8 ,9
2 0 ,0

9 7 ,5
1 2 4 ,3

1 4 ,0

6 5 6 ,5
6 6 4 ,3

. 4 0 0 ,0
. 2 5 0 ,0
. 2 5 0 ,0
. 2 0 0 ,0
. 1 1 0 ,0
2d N at., H oboken.. 1 2 5 ,0

9 4 2 ,0
0 0 8 ,5
3 0 8 ,0
2 4 3 ,0
4 8 2 ,7
1 1 0 ,0

4 8 82 ,®
2 3 5 4 ,3
1 1 3 6 ,1
1 0 7 1 ,4
2 4 1 3 ,8
928,®

2 5 8 ,8
1 0 1 ,0
8 4 ,0
5 2 ,1
1 3 3 ,0
3 8 ,9

2 7 2 0 1 1 9 0 ,7
8 7 ,5 2 1 4 ,0
1 5 ,8 3 2 6 ,4
7 0 0 4 5 9 ,6
4 0 ,7 1 0 7 .0
3 4 ,0
7 4 .3

7 1 0 ,3
1 5 4 .3

6 2 0 6 ,5
2 1 8 4 .3
1 1 0 3 ,1
1 3 8 6 .4
2 1 8 1 ,0
9 4 6 ,2

JOionlaL... ••••'
J o l n m b . . i. .a. . . . . . . . .
R U e v e n th W a r d
H a m ilt o n ............

Mount M orris..,
Mutual...............

>1..............................
*
Riverside.................

1900

L oa n sA
L eg . T. D e p o s i t . w i t h
I n v e s t ­ S p e c i e . A I V k . OLcar'y Other
N o te s . A g e n t . B k s .A c
m e n ts .

rtiw y o u k u k

*an»evoort....... .
M i c r o i i a n Disiffi M o v e m e n t

S u rp lu s.

State......................... .
Twelfth W ard .......
Twenty-third W ’d.
a nion Hquare.........
forkvlile................. .
Washington............
F idelity....................
V a r ic k ......................
I offerso n ................. .
C en tu ry....................
S oro’ h o f B r o o k ly n .

Bedford............
Broadway........

Borough of
Richmond.

Sank of Staten I si
iat N at., Staten i
.

Other Cities.

$

I
2120,0

3 ,0
2 5 .0

2 5 0 4 .0
1 0 9 0 .6
1 3 7 7 ,4
12 26 H
1 7 9 6 .9
2 7 3 5 .3
1 4 2 1 ,2
1 9 7 9 .1

4 ,0
6,0
6 2 ,6
4 2 ,3
1 0 0 ,6

2711.0

4 3 3 ,0
4 8 ,6
1 0 ,0
18 .0
4
5 ,3
....

5 ,2
1.0
1 9 ,3
10 ,4
2 0 ,0
1 0 ,8
3 4 ,0
1 0 5 ,0
0
2 4 ,0
9 ,6
1 4 ,5
2 8
3 8 ,9
3 0 ,8

3 8 ,1
1 3 ,3
1 0 ,6

1< 8 0 ,6
5 1 9 2 .0
1 0 6 0 .0
1 1 3 8 .4
2814 7
1 2 4 4 .6
7 0 0 ,3
4 0 8 .0
7 8 4 .8
1 0 6 8 .9
1 2 5 .8
1 0 4 .7
6 8 0 .1
1 3 3 4 .6
1 8 9 2 .0
1 0 7 9 .0
8 3 0 .1
0 2 7 .8
0 8 1 ,0
3 3 4 6 .0
4 0 1 7 .0
9 4 3 .9
0 9 1 .0
4 1 0 1 .0
3 6 1 3 .0
8 1 8 .0
9 0 0 .2
4 5 3 .1
8 7 5 .9
4 9 3 .2
7 0 0 ,7
7 3 5 ,0

. 9 0 0 2 ,0 9 0 5 1 ,8 7 3 3 0 0 ,1 3 0 7 5 ,0 4 6 4 6 .5 8 7 8 0 ,7 2 1 3 3 ,6 7 9 6 8 7 ,3
. 8 0 6 2 ,0 0 0 5 1 ,8 7 3 0 5 4 ,1 3 5 0 2 ,1 4 5 8 0 ,9 9 5 3 4 ,3 2 4 9 3 4 8 1 0 5 5 ,6
. P 062.0 9 6 5 1 ,8 7 3 0 0 9 ,9 3 5 3 5 ,8 4 7 4 8 .8 9 6 8 1 ,5 2 1 5 9 .4 3 0 1 9 9 ,0

Totals Jan.
Totals Dec.

New York City, Boston & Philadelphia Banks.— Below
<ve furnish a summary of the weekly returns of the Clearing
Souse Banks of New York City, Boston and Philadelphia.
banks

N . li .*

.

Oapital <c
S
Surplus.
Loans.
$

Dec. 21.. 184.041.7
“
28.. 1 8 4 .0 4 1 .7
Jan. 4.. 183.241.7
“
11.. 184,588,4

$

857,005,4
857,960,2
869,540.6
804,280,8

Specie.

Legals.

DepositsA CircfVn. Clearings

$

$
70.700.0
71.990.0
74,257,8
70,481,4

904,090,3
910,889,8
920,204.1
920,982,6

1010488
1630182
1648088
1682227

$

31,929.3
31.858.1
31.874.2
32,013,7

%

14531312
11875011
10250380
17089127

$
$
P. C
1.439.0 10.409.0 24*2
2.331.0 27.772.0 30*8
B ob ,*
1,388,8 10.590.0 24 6 Dec. 28.. 57.332.9 180.783.0 15.169.0
8.930.0 209.033.0 5.353.0 105,617,3
1.240.0 13.808.0 21 0 Jan. 4.. 57.632.9 185.512.0 14.831.0
9.300.0 215.018.0 5.081.0 140.721.7
2,801,5 22.419.4 26*0
“
11.. 57,032,0 185.820.0 15.020.0
0,380,0 215.200.0 5.078.0 150,003,2
302,0
4.048.0 20*2
P h ila ,*
7.358.0 120,473,0 25*5 Dec. 28.. 38.715.3 174.008.0
194.974.0 9.830.0 90,984,3
47.580.0
2.527.7 20.176.1 3 3 0
204.898.0 9.852.0 113.340.8
Jan. 4.. 38.715.3 173.547.0
58.682.0
589,1
0,018,0 30-2
205.263.0 9.836.0 114,517,6
174.372.0
54.704.0
• 11.. 38.715.3
•
934.5
0,250,8 26*3
89,9
1.509.2 25*3
* We omit two ciphers in all these figures.
340.0
3.570.0 21*9
* Including for Boston and Philadelphia the Item 6 due to other b an k s."
r
&
150.0
789,3 3 5 3
339,9
4.389.7 20*3
104.1
4.703.1 24*5
372.5
3.182.0 39-7
Breadstnffs Figures B rought from Page 165.—The
1.701.0 22,208,0 24*0
statements below are prepared by us from figures oollected
0,800,2 03.792.4 20-4
by the New York Produce Exchange. The reoeipts at
401.7
5.754.9 22*0
1.748.1 15.530.8 27*4
Western lake and river ports for the week ending Jan. 11,
4 2 9 .8
3.668.7 2 3 0
*nd since Aug. 1, for each of the last three years have besn:
8 5 0 .2
5.769.9 20*6
004.1
2.937.5 28 5
1.410.8 11.700.0 2 5 9
e c e ip te a t —
G<&£3.
'W h e a t.
J flm r.
C om .
R&rUi,'.
5.700.1 54.160.5 3 0 8
450.6
4.401.0 27*7
B b lo .W Q lb s B u sh .Q O lb * B u& h.66lbs B u a h .S Z lb t B n a h A S lU S'*,
325.1
0,347,9 20 2
452,825
212,030
902,300
267,275
h ia a g o ........ .
1,101,360
490.7
42,700
3.188.2 26*6
840.0
0,096,8 27*0
66,026
149,600
73,150
M ilw a u k ee .
150 800
323.960
67,200
299.1
3.832.5 23*4
257,425
n in t h . . . . . . .
7 ,4 )3
15.316
4,622
2, 210,0 20.«:JO,O 2 4 7
2,425.800
100,950
14S ,5'0
80.440
tfln n e a p o lie .
10,260
418.4
2.109.5 28*2
1.270.0 21.947.0 26*4
300
45 600
208,387
3C0
04.800
0,400
4.469.0 00,599,0 2 9 1
14,880
30,830
l e t r o l t ..........
3,900
4:8,659
•234 A
1.570.8 28*9
16,525
d e v e la n d ...
123,440
17 402
188,856
2.435.0 24>341,5 20*1
1.717.0 ] 4.000,0 29*0
000,000
i t . I io u is . . .
43,080
92,700
465.000
99,760
9,760.
848.0 10.265.0 23 l
05.000
’ e o r l a ............
20.460
507,000
220,310
0 8 .8 )0
2,100
2.401.4 08.158.0 25*0
124,000
021,000
f a n s a s C it y .
........
103,200
425.0
....
4.010.8 25*7
290.0
3.207.0 2 0 8
P o t.w k .1 9 0 2
303,303
3,043,481
3,348,003
850.130
2,443 827
148,982
859.2
4.329.7 2 4 8
277.8
404,984
3.305.0 22*9
3,816,898
6,884,860
974,824
la m e w k .’O l.
3 590,593
100,908
2.024.9 50.494.9 25*4
830.487
3 1 2 7 ,2 8 0
4,694,728
1,036.609
tarns w k .’ OO
2 ,9 3 0 ,8 4 1
123,881
254.5 10.032.3 25*9
lin e s A u f . 1 .
975.9
3.600.3 33 4
509.0
4.565.4 20*8
19C1-02........... 10,872,480 161,071,921 69,643,906 76,909,742 30,718,276 3,711,601
2.890.0 13.774.3 22 4
1900 .0 1............
9,487,268 140,109,618 100,704,310 81,195.253 29,862,810 2,900,800
311.7
7.422.7 23*0
1800-00...........
9,464,828 129,808,970 100,947.093 80,305 588 86.99^,780 3,770,488
282.3
2.320.9 23*7
018.8
9.325.6 24*0
The receipts of Hour and grain at the seaboard ports for
342.0
2.831.0 22*3
1.379.0 15.018.0 28*3
the week ended Jan. 11, 1902, follow:
2.888.4 48.173.9 25 4
O a to ,
B a r it
Flour
C orn ,
Rye.
450.0
4.189.0 21 2
R s u ip ts a t—
hbU.
bu sh.
bu sh.
bu sh .
bu sh .
bu sh .
0.231,7 23 0
425.0
<® w Y oyi,............
444,000
81,400
173,030
9,000
88,000
2 8 7 ,8 5 0
345.1
4.372.0 24*3
lo iit o n ...................
4 3 .4 7 6 6 8 4 ,6 8 0
115.610
9,770
48,776
992.4
8.463.2 25*9
6,520
M o n t r e a l .,............
8L,60O
. ...
7,860
1 4 ,7 0 0
310,0
4.286.0 2 6 0
P h ila d e lp h ia .,.,.,,,
2.518
103,070
4,000
48.317
70,398
1 8 4 ,4 0 3
110,7
2.010.3 22*9
86,220
0.368
54.000
..............
Baltim ore........ .
06,608
0 7 ,2 7 9
24,240
28,172
4,760
........ .
a ilo h m o n d ...............
10,080
T o ta l............ . 83,822,7 1007057:804,230,8 1082227 70,481,4 020,082,0 20-3
1 4 ,8 1 0
J e w O r le a n s . . . .
14.000
..............
17.000
0 9 .0 0 0
43,174
8 2 .0 0 0
N e w p o rt N o w s ...,
%

„

%

%

2 , 000,0 2,218,1 17,313,0 2.500.0
Bank of N . Y —
Manhattan C o ... 2.050.0 2.106.4 22,497,0 0,074,0
Merchants’ .......... 2,000,0 1.176.4 14,059,2 2.768.3
Mechanics’ ......... 2 , 000,0 2,394,8 13,537,0 1.743.0
1.500.0 3.177.5 19,750,5 3.044.0
A m erica .........
273.5
4,710,0
919.0
P henix.................. 1, 000,0
10,000,0 0,603,3 109,495,0 23.438.0
C ity .......................
300.0 7,047,7 24,514,8 0,129,1
Chemical..............
600.0
201.5
5,267,6 1.248.8
Merchants’ E x . .
8,276,2
050.9
Gallatin................ 1 , 000,0 2.004.6
308.9
300.0
08,8
1,332,7
Butch. < D rov’ s’
fc
130,4
2,971,0
4.00,0
M ech.& Traders
441.0
123.0
175,8
868,9
200.0
Greenwich......... .
600,0
517.3
4,438,8
810.1
Leather M ’ f’ra..
18,5
5,232,7 1,000,5
Seventh N ation’1 1.700.0
540.4
4,098,3
893.0
State of N . V . . . . 1 200.0
Amerioan Exoh. 5.000. 0 3.378.4 29,178,0 3.052.0
Commerce........... 10, 000,0 7.155.7 71,408,0 9.977.3
1 000
0
1,838,3
8,040,2
807.1
Broadway..........
M ercantile.......... 1, 000,0 1.380.5 14,205,6 2.518.0
519,0
2,700,0
422,7
Pacific--------- . . . .
393,
450.0
078.0
Chatham..............
997,2
5,793,1
353.6
2,118,0
200.0
234.3
People’s.................
North Am erica.. 1 , 000,0 1.105.7 11,491,9 1.034.3
5,041,2| 45,800,1 10,960,2
Hanover............... 3.000. 0
491,8! 4,057,0
779.0
500.0
I r v in g ............. .
800.7
Gitisen s’ ............... 1.550.0
5.924.1 1.343.2
313.2
2,091,8
289.4
500.0
N a s s a u .................
0,074,4 1,005
900.0 1.038.6
Market < Fulton
fc
699.2
0 228,2 3.534.0
3hoe < Leather. 1 000
fc
Corn Exchange.. 1.400.0 1.852.0 22.242.0 4.401.
415.4
195.9
2.101.7
300.0
O rien tal..........
Im p’t’ rs’ A T ra d . 1.600.0 3.224.9 23.089.0 4.305.0
2 , 000,0 4.080.0 47.255.0 13.210.0
P a rk .................
220
103.0
250.0
East R iv e r ...
1.300.0
2.015.5 21,364,7 3,927;8
Fourth.............
3.000. 0
C en tral...........
1 000
0 001.7 10.581.0 2.427.0
9.605.0 1.520.0
300.0 1.062.0
Second.............
First...................... 10,000,0 11,354,4 73,451,5 14,055,7
330.9
009.0
4.320.5
500.0
N .Y .N a t ’ lE x c h .
769.9
Bowery.................
880.0
3,000,0
250.0
698.4
200.0
N . Y . County—
718.6
3.800.5
416.8, 3.494.0
750.0
German A m e r i..
493.7
Chase..................... 1 000,0 <2,e88,0 41.993.0 10.800,9
Fifth A v e n u e ...
9 .4 9 1 .0 2.608.9
100.0 1,J24,1
German E x c h ...
217.
2.187.3
580.7
200,0
418.2
Germ ania............ | 200,0
836,3
2.949.8
L incoln................
300.0 1.037.9 12,2G8,5
200.8
Garfield................. 1, 000,0 1,204,8
7.310.0 1.444.0
F ifth ......................
320,1
200.0
2.234.6
375.7
Bank of Metrop.
7.940.2 1.083.3
800,0 1.163.7
W e s t Bide............
451.0
200,0
291.0
2.772.0
Bea board..........
500.0 1,037,4 12.590.0 3.045.0
W estern................ 2 , 100,0 2.648.6 30,878,2 8.694.0
1st N a t ., B’ kiyn.
425.0
300.0
4.187.0
640.7
L iberty................
0,602,2 1.048.9
600.0
773.7
N . Y. Prod. E x .. 1 , 000,0
720.0
420.8
4.460.0
N ew A msterdam
069.8
260,0
7.117.7 1.204.3
As tor......................
430.9
350.0
759.0
4.205.0
Hide A Leather.
2.822.4
382,6
346.4
500.0

.
.

.

.

.

. .

,

Jteporta or Non V ember Banks.— The following is the
ftatement of condition of the non-member banks for the
week ending Jan. 11, based on averages of the daily result,
We omit two dptuern f 00) in all canes.

N o r f o lk ................... .
• ortla n d . M e .........
P e n s a c o l a ..............
a t . J o h n , JN.B.......

Total week...........
W

e o k

0,785

4 8 /0 0
1 0 0 ,1 0 8

0,601

1 1 0 ,5 0 0

405,784

10,000

1 , 0 7 0 , 0 6 0 888,082
1 0. . 0 . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 7 1 , 6 8 71 , 7 8 > , 0 4 04,082,081
.

10,180

801,674
1.504,000

02.770

218,212

20,771
70,147

136

XH JB

[VOL. LXXIV,

O H RO JS1CLB

The foregoing does not include the bonds held in the New
Yor k Sub-Treasury against deposits in banks. There were so
1800.
1000.
1068.
1001.
ttsvcipta « /
held on Dec. 81 $11,293,000 bonds, making the whole
1 ,1 6 0 ,7 0 8
6 1 0 .6 0 8
8 6 0 ,6 1 8
0 7 0 ,8 0 7
t o u r. ., . . . . . ...
amount at that date in possession of the Government as se­
7 , 4 9 4 , 0 7 0 curity for deposits $122,136,650,
2 ,4 2 7 ,5 8 7
8 ,0 7 4 ,2 5 0
a
W h e a. . t. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . b 11 t h . 8 , 6 7 0 , 8 7 6
7 ,1 2 0 ,4 7 0
6 ,8 0 8 ,8 8 8
1 0 ,1 4 8 ,6 6 6
7 6 7 .6 4 6
O w n . . . . . ..
.
The following shows the amount of national bank notes
3 ,6 8 0 ,0 8 8
2 ,6 0 3 ,5 1 4
1 .0 3 8 ,8 7 8
8 ,0 8 0 ,1 6 4
O a t .s. . . . . .. —
. . . . . .
4 0 9 , 8 8 0 afloat and the amount of the legal-tender deposit December 1
0 5 8 ,4 0 6
4 1 8 ,7 0 4
1 6 6 ,6 7 0
i i a r l e y .....................
6 7 2 ,0 2 1
1 0 1 ,0 1 7
1 0 8 ,1 8 0
4 0 ,6 0 8
R y e. . . . . . .
and January 1, and their increase or decrease during the
1 8 , 1 8 8 , 6 8 6 month of December.
17
6 ,0 6 8 ,1 7 1 ,8 8 6 ,8 8 0 1 1 ,5 6 8 ,8 0 2
T o t a l g r a m . ,. . . . **
The exports from the several seaboard ports for the week
N ational B an k Notes - Total afloat—
ending Jan, 11,1903, are shown In the annexed statement :
Total receipts at porta from Jam 1 to Jan, 11 compare as

W h e a t,
B a r a r t t f r s m — buah,

Com,
but h
i.
« t , 8 9,658
8 0

flo w Y o r k —
200
a o * l u u ........ 166.714
P o r tla n d , M *
1 0 0 ,1 6 8
P h i l a d e l p h i a . . 2 1 8 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,4 2 4
flaltlm oi'e...... 103.848
S o w O rle a n * ..
8 2 0 . 01 08 0, 0 8 0
N o r f o _k _ _ _
l _
4 8 .0 0 0
N n w u 'r t N e W i
8 2 ,0 0 0
O a l r e s t o n . . 10,000
S it . J o h n . N . B .
1 1 9 ,5 0 0
T o t a l w e a k . .1 ,7 1 6 ,1 1 0
S a n a * t i m e ’ 0 1 . 8 .0 2 0 ,4 6 7

Oatii,

fio u r ,
bbu.

tty*.

ku»A.

bush.
4 4 .4 4 6
900
1 0 ,1 8 0

0 8 ,8 0 0
1 0 ,7 2 *
0 ,7 8 6
8 2 .8 0 6
7 0 ,1 7 8
8 ,C 9 4

A « r i * i A m ount afloat D ecem ber 1 , 1 9 0 1 .............. .
bunt)
A m ou nt issued d u rin g D e o e m b e r.................
97 , ,88 70 48 A m ount retired d u rin g D e c e m b e r .......___

P **t,
bunh

.................

•
-

2 9 ,8 8 8

000

8 ,8 7 0

4 8 ,1 7 4
1 ,0 7 1
0 ,5 8 4

amt® a Kingdom
C o n t i n e n . . t. .,. .. .
.
a. & O, A m erica .

West Indies......

8 ,8 3 7 ,0 8 5 3 ,0 2 0 ,4 6 7 7 0 ,5 9 1 ,0 5 7

T o t a l 1 8 0 1 - 0 3 811,006
,..,

036.000
601.000
81,000
277,0O
O

bath.

417,000

■' 1,000
77.000

170,668
6,000

70.00
44.000
l,104,00t

22,000

720;0()0
611,000

240,600

83,666

”

0,000

8,000

144,066

’ 26,001

790,o
66

148,001

74,000

SO ,000
S

972,00b
77.000

S85,00G

86.000

156,00!

164,000

448,660

2 6 6 ,0 0

801,000
1,340,000

226,666
60,000

70,666
112.000

111 , 00 :

740,666
819.000
108.000

178,000
62,000

3,001

212,666

19,666
2,000

3,000

113,000

37,000

eo,ooc

11.643.000
11.703.000
10.630.000
12.884.000
83.P62.0on

4.541.000
5.002.000
0 ,212,000
6.013.000
6.730.000

2.409.000
3.381.000
1.243.000
1.250.000
1.030 000

2.149.000
3.324.000
2,280,00;
2,032,00!

N o t e s — Ch a n g e s in T o t a l o f , a n d
E t c . - - We give below tables which

in

D

3 700.00

e p o s it e d

show all the
monthly changes in Bank Notes and in Bonds and Legal
Tenders on Deposit, The statement for November, 1901, will
he fou n d in the C h r o n i c l e o f December 21, 1901, pa ge 1295.

1901.

B onds and
Legal Tenders on Deposi t
fo r B an k Circulation.
L egaltenaers.

Bonds.
$
D ec. 3 1 ..
Nov, 30,.
Oct. 31..
S ept. 30..
Aug. 81..
J u ly 31..
J u n e 30..
M a y 31..
Apr. 30..

$

3 2 6 .2 8 0 .2 8 0
3 2 8 ,1 0 7 ,4 8 0
3 2 9 .8 3 3 .9 3 0
330,721,93-0
3 3 0 .2 7 9 .9 3 0
3 2 9 ,3 4 8 ,4 3 0
3 2 6 ,2 1 9 ,2 3 0
3 2 5 .9 2 8 .2 8 0
3 2 3 ,9 8 8 ,8 8 0

3 5 ,2 8 0 ,4 2 0
3 3 ,5 0 8 ,5 2 5
3 1 ,7 1 3 ,0 6 9
29,985',481
29,012,804:
2 9 ,1 1 3 ,5 3 0
2 9 ,8 5 1 ,5 0 3
2 8 ,0 4 4 ,3 7 3
2 8 ,7 0 8 ,8 3 4

C irculation A float Under
L egaltenders.

Bonds.

$

$
3 6 0 ,2 8 9 ,7 2 6
3 5 9 ,7 2 0 ,7 1 1
3 5 9 ,9 1 1 ,6 8 3
3 5 8 ,8 3 0 ,5 4 8
3 5 7 ,4 1 9 ,1 5 5
3 5 6 ,1 5 2 ,9 0 3
3 5 3 ,7 4 2 ,1 8 7
3 5 1 ,5 8 2 ,5 9 0
3 5 0 ,6 8 4 ,8 2 2

For full explanation o f the above table see C h r o n i c l e Dec,
14, 1901, page 1232, first item in Financial Situation.
The following shows the amount of each class of bonds
held against national bank circulation and to secure public
moneys in national bank depositories on December 31.
B onds on Deposit
Dec. 3 1 ,1 9 0 1 .

4 p er ots., fu n d ed 1907.
4 p. eta., 1895, due 192;
3 p. ots.,’ 98, due 1908-18
2 per o ts.,fu n d e d 1891*.
2 p. ots., 1900 due 1930
3*65s D ist. C ol., 1924..

Total......

............ .

O. S. Bonds R eid Dec. 8 1 ,1 9 0 1 , to Secure
Public Deposits
in B an ks.
$400,000
6,261,100
9,706,950
6,464,800
87,047,300
965,000
$110,844,650

B an k
1
Total H eld
C irculation.
$275,400
6,019,800
2,795,100
4,035,080
12,500
313,142,700
$326,280,280

Redeemable at option of the United States.

707,470
8,835,068

not o f 1874 20,614,616 20,758,866 22,055,998 28,993,883 25,737,882
T o ta l...

29,012,804 29,985,481 31,713,069 33,508,525 35,280,420

*A ot o f Ju ne 20, 1874, an d J u ly 1 2 .1 8 8 2 .

Auction Sales.—Among other securities the following, not
regularly dealt in at the Board, were recently sold at
auction.
By Messrs. Adrian H. Muller & Son:

$675,400
12,280,600
12,502,050
10,499,380
12,500
400,190,000
965,000

Shares.
1000 B rooklyn C ity RR. ©0.248*8
3 Central R ealty B ond &
Trust O o........................... 5714s
14 N. Y. R ealty O orpora’n.14234
25 Century R ealty C o..........100%
4 National City B an k ....... 320
80 Citizens’ Ins. Co............. 96
100 A nniston C ity Land Co.
of Alabam a..................... 1534
50 N orth Amer. Trust 0 0 ...2 6 5
Bonds.
$200 N .Y. A th letic Club deb.
6s, 1903, M&N....................
82%
$1,000 O ity o f Savannah,Ga.,
5s, 1918, Q-J . ___ 110% & int.
$ 16,000 New En. Gas & G oke
Co. 1st 5s, 1937, J& D .......
56S
4-57 & int.
$6,000 Cl. Ak. & Col. R R . 1st
5s, 1927, M & S ..115-115% & int.
$20,000 State o f Alabam a 5e,
Class A , 1 9 0 6 ......................107
$1,000 M innesota V alley 7s,
(gu.), 1908, A & O .................. 117%
$1,000 Plain view R R . 7s (gu.)
1908, M & S - ................ ...1 1 7 %
$1,000 Utiea Clin. & Bing.
RR. 5s (guar.), 1939, J & J .1 2 1
$1,100 W inona & St. P eter
R R . 7s (guar ), 1916, J & D .139%
$5,000 Judge Co.Class A pur.
mon. 4s, 1909, J & D -----. . . . 39
$10,000 Pitts. Shaw. & Nor.
R R . 1st 5s, 1 9 4 9 ................. 68%

54
25
30
50

Nat. B k.of Oom’ ee.354% -357%
F ifth A ve. T rust Co.680-692
Nat Shoe & Leather Bk.124
Tradesm en’ s Nat. Bank
(20% paid in liqu ida­
tio n )...........$40 e a c h ..$65 lot
50 Amer. Lithographic C o.. 20
52 Im p .& Trad.N at.B k.605-625
30 Wmbgh. Tr. O o.of B ’iyn.211
10 Niagara Fire Ins. O o___ 2L0
119 H am ilton F ire Ins. C o .. 1051a
21 East R iver Nat. B a n k .. .1 6 3
4 N. Y. L ife Ins.& Tr. 00.130©
2. Farm ers’ Loan & Tr.Co.15O0
210 Greenw ich Ins. C o........ 180
266 Gallatin Nat. B ank.420-431%
116 M arket Nat. B a n k ........ 256%
3 Chem ical Nat. B a n k ...4150
250 P laya de O ro M ining Co.
(trust ce rts.)....... . .,.$250 lot
10 Singer M fg. C o . . . . . . .. .. 2 4 5
20 N orth W ard Nat.Bank o f
Newark, N. J ..................251
10 Germania F ire Ins. C o ..321
7 Central Tr. C o .,190538-1910
160 New E. Gas & Coke O o.. 5
10 New Amst. Nat. B a n k .1 3 5 0
1 Am er. Exeh. Nat. B k ___ 3C‘0%
10 Meeh. & T raders’ B ank. 19034
10 Mutual B a n k . .......... ...2 1 5 3 s
5 M erchants’ Trust C o ....4 0 3
6 Continental Ins. O o.........682
50 Trust Co. o f A m e r ic a ....270
10 M orton Trust C o..........11963s
60 N. Y . Sec.& Tr. Co,1375-1386

Total.

3 5 ,2 8 0 ,4 2 0
3 3 ,5 0 8 ,5 2 5
3 1 ,7 1 3 ,0 6 9
2 9 ,9 8 5 ,4 8 1
2 9 ,0 1 2 ,8 0 4
2 9 ,1 1 3 ,5 3 0
2 9 ,8 5 1 ,5 0 3
2 8 ,0 4 4 ,3 7 3
2 8 ,7 0 8 ,8 3 4

'$
3 2 5 ,0 0 9 ,3 0 6
3 2 6 ,2 1 2 ,1 8 6
3 2 8 ,1 9 8 ,6 1 4
3 2 8 ,8 4 5 ,0 6 7
3 2 8 ,4 0 6 ,3 5 1
3 2 7 ,0 3 9 ,3 7 3
,3 2 3 ,8 9 0 ,6 8 4
3 2 3 ,5 3 8 ,2 1 7
3 2 1 ,9 7 5 ,9 8 8

766,744
8,747,948

761,245
8,895,826

837,172
8,389,44c

176,000

204,000

...........

On Lakes........................ .....
On canal and river...
46,000
Total Jan. 11,1902,. 68J)77,000
Total Jan. 4,1902., 68,929,000
Total Jan. 12,1801.. 61,846,000
Total Jan. 13, 1800.. 56,533,000
Total Jan. 14, w a a .. 37.7S5,oon
Bank

64.000

4,764,000

416,000

Do afloat.........
ft.WllI’m&Bt.Arthur 8,178,000
Duluth........ ........ 0 ,407,006
Do afloat,....,
611,000
Minneapolis......... 16,876,000
8t LOUIS............ .. 2,642,000
Do
afloat.......
....... .
Sanaa* C ity ...,...,,, 1,700,000
Peoria.,............... 695,000
lasSlsnapoll*.. .. .... .. 274,000
On Mississippi S ly e r.

.Harlai
beuh.

8,000

648.000
84,000
803.000

922,682
7,475,501

I n s o le n t bits

Mv *,
bm h.

12,000

10,000

Detroit........ ....... 6 8 6,00 0
Do afloat......................
Chicago.,, ............ 6,745,000
afloat......

89.000
71.000
129.000

bush.

Mew Y ork ,..,......... 4,100.000
Do alloat... ... ........
Son ton ....
1,839,000
Philadelphia........... 830,000
Baltimore.,... .......
711,000
Mew Orleans..,....,.- 478,000
Galveston ................ 680,000
Montreal......
44.000
Toronto....._ .....
_
42,000
Buffalo.,,............
0.080,000
Do afloat......... 598,000
Toledo ___ _ .......
233,000
do
afloat..................... .

M ilw a u k e e ............ .

Oats,
bush.
720.000

O ,
or-M

Wheat,

onds,

1,771,895
$35,280,420

bank n otes Jan. 1 ,1 9 0 2 ....... ......... .......

* 1 ,20 00 , 7 4 5 , 0 1 1 U qu id ’g bks.
3
4 , 8 0 3 , 6 0 5 6 1 0 , 2 0 7 Hed’c ’ gund.*
88,

The visible supply of grain, comprising the stocks it
granary at the principal points of accumulation at lake ano

B

$33,508,525
$3,132,065
1,360,160

The portion of legal tenders deposited (1) by banks becom­
-Wheat.-F lm r.~
t----- — Com .--------- W eek S in ce J u ly
Week Since July
Week Since July
ing insolvent, (2) by oanks going into voluntary liquidation,
1, 1901.
Jan. 1 1 ,
1 , 1 9 0 1 . J a n .ll
Jan., 11 , 1 ,1901.
and (8) by banks reducing or retiring their circulation,
bush,
bush.
buah.
bbls.
bush.
bids.
288,367 5 , 0 4 1 , 0 6 8 1 , 3 4 5 , 8 0 0 4 0 , 8 2 3 , 1 6 1
0 , 9 7 7 , 1 3 0 was as follows on the first of each of the last five months.
3 5 8 , 2 8 3 4 8 , 1 9 6 , 7 0 6 "iV 5 8 , 8 2 8 , 0 6 8
8 2 ,1 5 5 1 ,0 0 0 ,6 3 1
,H 8
5 7 7 ,0 4 0
3 ,6 4 6
6 2 8 ,4 4 5
1 5 ,3 3 7
6 0 ,0 6 0
Jan. 1.
Oct. 1.
Dec. 1.
Nov, 1.
0 2 2 ,6 0 8
2 0 ,0 6 4
50 8 2 , 2 4 0 5 9 5 8 8 3 L egal Tend’ s Sept. 1.
1 9 1 ,9 1 6
380
8 0 ,4 6 1
2,120
1 6 ,9 8 1
2 0 0 ,4 0 8 ,7 6 7
4
1 7 4 , 8 7 0 Deposits by—
1 7 9 ,0 8 5
$
$
5
388
$
$
$

ar.N.Am. Colo's
Other aountrxe*
Total..,._____ 803,892 8 , 7 1 7 , 4 6 8 1 , 7 1 6 , 1 1 0 8 9 , 2 7 4 , 4 8 6

Do

869,015

3 0 8 , 8 8 . .3. . . . . . . .6. .4. . , 1 9 4 5 , 8 3 0
.
5
9 .8 7 4
A ,6 0 8
f 3,
8 4 1 .0 8 5
9 4 2 ,0 0 6
1 0 0 ,4 8 0
4 1m ou nt o 1 0 d e8p0o9sit to red eem n ation al

The destination of these exports for the week and sine*
Jnly 1, 1901, is as below:
Mmporta fo r
wwl in d since
J u ly 1 to—

$359,720,711

$360,289,726

A m ou n t bank notes afloat Jan. 1 ,1 9 0 2 ..
L eg a l Tender N otes—
Am ount o f d ep osit t o redeem n a tion a lb a n k
n otes D ecem ber 1 ,1 9 0 1 ............. . .................
A m ount d ep osited d u rin g D ecem ber............
Am t. o f bank n o te s redeem ed in D eoem ber.

7,000

4 1 ,0 0 7
4 ,8 0 3 ,0 0 6

$4,871,540
4,302,526

1

Im x M tx g

Spencer

ffim tx jc ia l*

Trask

&

Co,,

B A N K E R S ,
27 & 29 P IN E S T R E E T ,

-

NEW

YORK

Transact a general banking business; act as Fiscal
Agents for corporations, and negotiate security
issues of railroads and other companies. Execute
commission orders and deal in
INVESTMENT SECURITIES.
Members N, Y Stock Exchange.

Branch Office, 67 State St,, Albany
A l e x a n d e r M. W h it s J r ,

Gkgbgb Barclay M ostat.

M

o

f

f

a

t

&

W

h

i

t

e

,

BANKERS,
Members New York Stock Rxehange,
N o. 1 N ASSAU S T R E E T ,

.

.

.

NEW

A O J iK .

INVESTMENT SECURITIES.

Tracy & Co., Bankers,
N o . 1 0 W a l l S tr e e t, N E W Y O R K .

CHICAGO.

Connected by private wire.

MlLWAtJKBtB.

D e a le r s In H ig h G r a d e H on d a ,
L ist o f Current Investm ent Oferinas sent on ApyHeaHsn.
4 New Y o rk Stock W xchange.
C e iu u il« * li> n Orrd e r *
(.’ O iuiulastun o d e
M em bers j oh ica go S tock BUdhange
E x e c u t e d lu a ll M a r k e t * ,

I T u m lu e r s ’
D l

137

THE CHRONICLE,

J a n u a r y 18, 1902.]

bank, par; com m ercia l, /50c. d iscou n t; C hicago, 10c. per
1,000 prem ium ; St. L ouis, par; San F rancisco, 10c. per §100
prem ium .
Posted rates o f lead ing bankers fo llo w :

O ffa x M le .

V I D E N D N .
B ooks Closed.
(D a ys Inclu sive.)

Per When
Cent Payable

Name o f Company.

S ixty Days

Janu ary 17
Prime bankers’ sterling bUls on London.

R a ilr o a d s (H tcain).
B oston & Maine, p ro f..............................
Hunt,. < Bil. Top M t. R E . & Coal, pref.
fc
Illinois Central..........................................
N . Y. Ohio. < St. Louis, 1st p re f..........
fc
do
do
2d pref............
N orfolk & W estern, adjust., pref..........
S tree t R a ilw a y s .
B rooklyn City UR. (quar.)......................
Cleve. E lyria < W est, (q u a r.)...............
fc
Grand Rapids (M ich.) Ry., pf. (quar.)..
M ilw. Elec. Ry. * Light, pref. (quar.).
Sacramento(Cal.) Ele.Gas & Ry. (m thly)
St. Charles St., N o w Orleans (q u a r.)...
T w in City Rap. Tr., M inneapolis, oom.
U nited Traction, Albany, N. Y . (quar.)
W orcester (M ass.) Rys. < Investm ent
fe
T ru st C o m p a n ie s.
M etropolitan.......................................
U n io n ...................................................
F ir e In s u r a n c e .
C ontinen tal........................................ .
H om e....................................................
m is ce lla n e o u s .
Am erican Glue, p re f........................
B utte Elec. & Pow er, pref. (quar.)
Cambria S teel.....................................
Consolidation Coal..............................
E dison Eleo. 111., B oston (q u a r.)..
E lectric Co. of A m erica...................
International Steam Pump, pf. (quar.)
M unicipal Gas, A lbany, N. Y . (quar.)..
N ational F ireprooling, pref. (quar.)___
P enn-A m erican P late Glass (quar.)___
R ailw ay E quip. Corp. (m onthly).
Susquehanna Iron & S teel............
T orrin gton Co., com., Class A ___
* Transfer books not closed,

3
24
3
5
3
2

1 Fob 16
to
Feb 19
M ar
Jan 2H
to
.1an 29 Jan 18
to
Feb 28
1 Feb 2
Mar
1 H olders of roc.Jan 8 1 “
Mar
Mar
1 Holders of reo. Jan 81 *
to
F ob 20
Feb 21 F eb 8

2 4 Jan
34 Jan
1 4 Fob
1 4 Feb
15 c. Feb
1 4 Jan
2 Feb
1 4 Feb
$2 25 Feb
5
lo t
1 2*91

7

Jan
Jan

to
16 Jan 10
Jail 16
16
1 H olders of roc.
to
1 Jan 22
1
15
to
15 Feb 6
to
1 Jan 22
1 H olders of reo.

Jan 15
Jan 18
Feb 2

On dem
On dem

1 H olders of reo. Jan
$4 Feb
1 H olders of rec. Jan
1 4 Feb
75o. Feb 15
E eb
to
1 Jan 26
2 Feb
1 H olders of reo. Jan
2 4 Feb
Jan
to
Jan 22
2oc. Jan 31
F eb
to
1 Jan 21
1 4 Feb
F eb
Jan 26
to
1
2 4 Feb
Jan
to
1*4 Jan 25 Jan 17
13
4
t
l 1 Jan 15
?,
3 Jan 27 H olders of rec.. Jan
Jan
to
1 Jan 18
4 F eb
to
1 F eb 9
1 M ar
to
Jan
1 Jan 16
2 4 Feb
t Correction, -t P ayable forthw ith.

22
25
2
20
31
2
1
25
15
31
31

P. M .

T h e M oney M ark et and F in a n c ia l S it u a t i o n .- Business
in W a ll Street has been ex cep tion a lly du ll th is w eek. Trans­
actions reported at the S tock E xch an ge on Thursday were
sm aller than on an y day since O ctob er and for the w eek
have been m u ch b elow the recen t average. V a riou s causes
are assigned fo r apathy on the part o f the p u b lic, in clu d ­
in g, am on g other less definite m atters, aggressive h ostility
in th e N orthw est against the N orthern Securities C om pany,
a n ew issue o f bonds put ou t b y th e A tch ison m anagem ent,
and rum ors o f im pending issues b y oth er corporations.
W h ile th e low quotations record ed du rin g th e early part
o f the w eek are said to have in d u ced som e in vestm ent b u y ­
in g, the fa ct rem ains th at there has been alm ost no dem and
fro m outside the Street fo r an y class o f secu rities; although
to- d a y ’s m arkets w ere m ore b u oy a n t in tone and som ew hat
m ore a ctiv e than on Thursday.
The suspension o f a fam ous grain dealer in C hicago m ay
have added to the cau tion h eretofore existin g, bu t it w ou ld
seem that the effect o f such in cid en ts should be m ore than
offset b y an easier m on ey m arket and less u rgen t dem and
fo r foreign exch ange. Funds are a ccu m u la tin g in lo ca l banks
as a result o f m ore liberal receipts fro m the in terior and
n eig h borin g States, and also on a cco u n t o f T reasury dis­
bursem ents.
The open m arket rates fo r call loans on the S tock E xchange
du rin g the w eek on stock and bon d collaterals have ranged
from 3 to 5% per cen t. T o-d ay’s rates on ca ll w ere 3 to 4
per cent. Prim e com m ercia l paper quoted at 4 % @ 5% per cen t
The B ank o f E ngland w eek ly statem ent on Thursday
show ed an increase in bullion o f £1,351,757, and the percent
age o f reserve to liabilities was 4P61, against 41'85 last
w eek; the d iscou n t rate rem ains u n ch a n ged at 4 per cent.
The B ank o f F rance show s a decrease o f 3,400,000 francs
in gold and 375,000 fran cs in silver.
The N ew Y ork C ity C learing-H ouse banks in th eir state­
m ent o f Jan. 11 show ed an increase in the reserve held o f
$5,637,500 and a surplus over the required reserve o f
1902
Jan . 11

Differences
fr o m
previous week
$

C apital...................
B u rp lu a.................
Loans & discounts
Circulation............
N e t d ep osits.........
S p e cie ....................
Legal tenders.......

$
83.822.700
100.765.700
864,236,800
32.013.700
926,982,600
168.222.700
76,481,400

R eserve held.........
Legal reserve.......

244,704,100 Ino
231,745,650 In c

Surplus reserve

12,958,450 In c

Deo 5,309,800
In o
139,500
Xno
779,500
In o 3,413,900
In o 2,223,600
5,637,500
194,625
5,442,8751

190 1
J a n . 12

U nited States B onds.— Sales o f G overn m en t bonds at the
Board in clude §17,.100 4s, co u p ., 192/5 (s. 2 0 f.), at 139%; $7,!500
4s, cou p ., 1907, at 111%; $4,500 3s, co u p ., at 108%, and $500
2s, reg., at 108%.
The fo llo w in g are the daily closin g q u o ­
tations ; fo r y ta rly range see third page fo llo w in g .

Feb 16
F eb 1
Jan 20

15
10

W A L L S T R E E T . F R ID A Y , J A N . 1 7 . 1 9 0 2 .-5

Documentary com m ercial...........................
Paris bankers’ (F ran cs)...............................
Amsterdam (guilders) bankers...................
Frankfort or ________________________
Bremen (reiobm ’ ks) bankers
Less >i«.

1900
Ja n . 13

$
74,222,700
92,267,500
808,032,400
30,970,900
885,336,200
178,157,500
70,574,600

$
59,422,700
80,980,200
676.238.100
16,316,400
749,287,400
145.266.100
58,763,100

243,732,100
221,334,050

204,029,200
187,321,850

22,398,050

16,707,350

F oreign E xchan ge.—The foreig n exch a n ge situation has
n ot m aterially ch anged. The m arket has been narrow and
excep tion ally dull on a lim ited dem and fo r bills.
T o-day’s actual rates o f exch ange w ere as fo llo w s: Bankers
six ty days’ sterling, 4 84% @ 4 84% ; dem and, 4 87% @ 4 87%,
cables, 4 87% @ 4 87% ; prim e com m ercia l, six ty days, 4 84@
4 84%; docum entary com m ercial, six ty days, 4 83% @ 4 84%
grain for paym ent, 4 84@4 84% ; cotton for paym en t
4 83%fe4 83%; cotton for a ccep ta n ce, 4 84@4 84%.
The follow in g were the rates o f d om estic ex ch a n g e on
N ew Y ork at th e under-m en tion ed cities to-da y: S avannah
b u yin g 75c. discount, selling 75o. prem iu m ; Charleston
bu yin g 1-16 discount, selling 1-16 p re m iu m ; N ew Orleans

Demand.

4 85
4 88
4 84
v®4 8 4 's
4 8 3 '4 '<*4 84 *4
6 1 8 V ® 5 1H'„ 5 1 6 V ® 6 16«„
4< F ie 'd 4 0 4
40
'(t> 40*16
96
H 9 5 ‘ ia
>
95:4 <® 96V«_

In te rest
P er io d s

2s, 1980............ registered
2s. 1930............ . . . coupon
2s, 1930 .sm aAreglatered
28, 1930 ,8mall ___coupon
3s, 1918............ registered
3s. 1918............
8s, 1918, small.registered
3s, 1918, small ___coupon
4s, 1907.......... registered
4s, 1907..........
4s, 1925.......... registered
is , 1925...........
6s, 1904.......... registered
5 8 ,190 4.......... . . . c o u jo n
‘ This is the p rice bid at

Ja n .
11

Jan.
13

Ja n .
14

Ja n .
13

Ja n .
If)

Jan.
17

Q —Jan n o s ^ *10 84 *10 84 *1 0 8 4 *108 4 * 1 0 8 4
Q —Jan * 108*8 *10 84 *10 84 *1 0 8 4 * 1 0 8 4 * 1 0 8 4
......... ...... ..... ...... ...... ...... . . . . . .
...... ___ ___ ___ ___ . . . . . .
Q —Feb *107*4 *107*4 *107*4 *1074 *1074 * 1 0 7 4
Q —Feb *1083 1087e * 1 0 8 4 *10 84 *1084 *108*4
4
___ . . . . . .
Q —Feb __ . . .
. . . . . . .........
Q —Feb *108 *108 *108 *108 *108
‘ 108
Q —J an *1113 *1113 *111*4 *11 14 *11 14 * 1 1 1 4
4
4
Q —Jan *1113 *111*4 ‘ 111*4 *11 14 1 1 1 4 ‘ 111*4
4
Q —Feb * 1 3 9 4 *13 94 * 1 3 9 4 *a:384 *13 84 * 1 3 8 4
Q —Feb *13 94 * 1 3 9 4 * 1 3 9 4 * 1 3 9 4 *13 94 * 1 3 9 4
Q —Feb *107*8 *107*8 *107*8 *a;064 * 1 0 6 4 * 1 0 6 4
Q —Feb *10 74 * 1 0 7 4 * 1 0 7 4 * 1 0 7 4 * 1 0 7 4 * 1 0 7 4
the m orning hoard; no sale was made.

State and R a ilr o a d B on d s.— Sales o f State bon ds at the
B oard in clude $2,000 Tennessee settlem en t 3s at 95%, $1,000
V irgin ia fu n d, debt 2-3s at 99% and $10,000 V irg in ia 6s
deferred trust receipts at 7% .
The m arket fo r ra ilw a y bonds, as n of ed a b ove, has been
less a ctiv e than fo r som e tim e past, but displayed less w eak ­
ness than the stock m arket, and in a considerable n u m ­
ber o f cases quotations are higher. T ransactions averaged
som ew hat over $3,000,000, par valu e, per day, and w ere w ell
distributed.
St. L ouis S outhw estern issues w ere am on g th e m ost
active bon ds and a d van ced 2 poin t?. Standard R ope &
T w ine 6s and in com e bonds m ade a sim ilar gain. W abash
debenture Bs w ere con sp icu ou sly strong.
In a d dition to th e above the active list in cludes U n ion
P a cific, A tch iso n , M exican C entral, B urlin gton & Q u in cy,
B altim ore & Ohio and C onsolidated T o b a cco b on ds, all o f
w h ich have been rela tiv ely steady.
S tock and B on d S ales.— The d a ily and w eek ly record o f
stock and bon d sales at the various stock E xchan ges, fo r ­
m erly giv en on this page, has been transferred to a place by
itself. It w ill be fou n d to-day on page 144.
R a ilr o a d and M isce lla n e o u s S tock s.—The stock m arket
was d e cid ed ly h eavy and prices steadily d eclined during, the
early part o f the w eek. T here w as a ch ange fo r th e better
on W ed n esd ay and the im provem en t has co n tin u ed , the
early losses h a vin g been recov ered in m a n y cases. There
was p ra ctica lly n o e x cep tion to the gen eral tren d o f the
m arket, N ew Y o rk C entral, P ennsylvania, L a ck aw an n a,
Delaware & H udson, N orth W estern and G reat N orthern
preferred d eclin in g on an average o f over 3 poin ts; and th is
was abou t the average fo r th e entire active list. L ack a­
wanna was n o ta b ly stron g to-da y an d closes 14 points above
the low est price on W ed n esd ay. R o ck Island recov ered
sharply on T hursday and closes w ith a n et gain. P en n syl­
vania also show ed stron g recu perative pow er and the “ S oo”
line issues w ere in dem and on the upw ard m ovem en t, w h ich
was m ost p ron ou n ced th rou gh ou t the list to-day.
A m erica n Sugar R efin in g has con tin u ed irregular, co v e r­
in g a range o f 5 points. The iron and steel stocks have been
relatively stron g— Col. F uel & Iron closin g w ith a n et gain.
O utside M a rk et.— The outside m arket has been rather
quiet and fo r m ost o f the w eek prices have been irregu lar.
T o-day, h ow ever, trad in g has been a little m ore a ctive and
prices stronger, resulting in a v ery fe w in stan ces in high er
closin g p rices than last w eek. S om ething o f a sensation
w as created on W ed n esd ay b y Snap H ook & E ye. This
stock was traded in on the day before, b etw een 39 and 40,
b u t w hen the brokers tried to" deliver the stock purchased
a cco rd in g to th eir orders, th e y fou n d no one to a ccep t.
T he stock , it was said, was offered all th e w ay dow n to 1,
bu t no transactions resulted, the dealers p referrin g to
aw ait fu rth er developm ents. A pecu liar flurry also occu rred
in A m erica n P ine F ibre stock . T he preferred stock o f this
com pan y sold on M onday at 56%, w h ile the com m on sold at
19%. On Thursday the preferred dropped suddenly to 50,
and later it was reported th at com b in ed com m on and pre­
ferred was offered at 40.
T o-day the preferred w as
offered at 50.
The fe w issues w h ich a d va n ced w ere
N orfolk & W e ste rn —P ocahon tas 4s, 92% to 93% ; H a ck en ­
sack M eadows, 48% to 51; D om in ion S ecurities, on rum ors
o f th e closin g o f a large deal in Canada, rose from 83% to
86. On the other hand, Standard Oil sold d ow n from 660 to
635 and closed at 640; N orthern Securities w en t dow n to
102% from 103%; A m erica n Can com m on ranged betw een
14% and 14% and preferred m oved from 57 to 54 and back
to 57. The n ew A tch ison 4s w ere offered on T hursday at
99%. Copper issues have been irregular and m ost o f them
close at low er prices than last w eek.

New York Stock Exchange—Stock Record, Daily, Weekly and Yearly
O C C U P Y IN G i

8 TOC MS—M fG H E B T A N D L O W E S T S A L E P R IC E S
Saturday
Ja n 11

Mo-nday
Jan- IS

|

Tuesday
Jan. i 1

Wednesday
Jan . 15

1

T hursday
Jan . 16

F rid a y
Jan. 1 7

TW O

PAGES

STOCKS
N E W Y O R K STO CK
EXCHANGE

Range for Previous
Sales ot\ S a n < e >or y e ar 1901
J
the }G/i basis of 100-share lots
Y e a r (1 0 0 0 )
Shares

Lowest

High eat

Lowest

Highest

K a il r o a da.
*32
35
A nn A r b o r ...........................
20
F eb2(
34
N ov25
1G Sep
25
Deo
*61
63
7A Do p r e f............................
50
Sep 25 6 6
D e o 27
D ec
4 0 % JTy 59
7 5 4 77
A toll. T op ek a < San ta F e 2 2 6 ,8 7 5 4 2 4 Jan 2 1 91
fo
J ’n e 5 18=a Jan 48*4 Dec
97 4 98 4
I>o p r e f............................ 43,171
70
M ay 9 108 M ay 3 5 8 % .Jan 89*8 D ec
10 2 4 10 3 ls |Baltim ore Jb O h i o ............ 87,901
81*4 Jan 4 114*2 M ay 3 55 % Jan
89% Apr
1,672 83*4 F eb 2 7 9 7
J ’ ne 5 72*4 Jan
90
Apr
9 6 4 9 6 4 * 1 Do p ref............................
64
65 4 Brooklyn lia p id T r a n sit
4 0 ,7 9 2 5 5 7e O ct 7 88 7« A p r 22
4 7 % Sep 88% D ec
*114
118
20 ( 7 7 M a r'll 122 Nov25 52 F eb 85 D ec
Buffalo Koch. So P itta b ’g
14 3
143
100 116 M a r 1 146 N o v 2 9 92 Jan 125 D ec
Do p re f............................
*1 2 5
12 9
rt Sep 24 1 19
Burl. Cedar Jtapids < N 01
fc
1 20
F e b 25 1H
Jan 1 S 0% OCt
6 ,7 5 6 87
1 1 3 4 1 1 1 4 1/ Canadian P a cific..............
M ay i 117 4 M ay 7 84*i Bep
99*4 Feb
86 4 8 6 4 * ainada S o u th e rn ____ ___ 3 ,8 0 0 54 *s Jan 4 8 9 N o v 2 5 4 7 % F eb 61 % D ec
*188*4 19 l
2 fi2 S 145*4 J an 4 196=8 D ec 30 115 Jan 150% Dec
Central of N e w .1 e r s e y ..
*46
4 6 4 Chesapeake < O h io ............ 1 5 , 111 2 9
M ay 1 52=8 M ay 3 24 J ’ni 42*.j D ec
fc
5,101 2 7
3 4 4 35 4 Chicago & A l t o n ..................
M »y < 5 0 1 A pr 30
.
-2
42
Dec
31
Oct
7 6 4 76 4
366 72 % J a n 4 82 *4 A p r 30
68*4 Nov 7 8 % 1)eo
Do p r e f............................
Mar
* .......... 1 3 5 4 Chicago db Eaat’ n Illin ois
Jan 2 140 N o v i 1 88 Jan 109
.......... 91
*1 3 8
140
2 06 1 20 % Jim : 136 A p r 18 119 h» Dec 125 A u g
D o p r e f............................
2 2 4 2 3 4 Chicago G reat W e s t e r n ..
6 ,9 6 5 16 .Ian : 27
N ovi 1
9 % Sep
18
D ec
*9 1
92
J'ne 9 4 % Dee
401 9 0
J T y 27 94*4 M a r l 5 81
Do 4 p. c. debentures
*8 3 4 8 4 4
4 00 7 5
M ay 11 9 0 J ’ ne24
1)8 % Aug 8 2 Deo
D o 5 x> c. pref. “ A ” ..
.
56
M a il 4
3 0 JT u 45 D ec
44 4 44 4
41
D ec
1,231
D o 4 p. c. pref. “ B ” ..
51
5 3 4 Chic, ln dianap. Sc L ou isv . 17,031
23
Jan 21 5 2 78 1)eo 31
14
.Ja 11 2 9
Apr
1 ,S 1 f, 58*4 Jail 21 77*4 Sep 1 6 4 5 % Jan 64 D ec
7 5 *8 7 6 4
Do p r e f............................
1614164
Chicago Itfilw. < St. Paul 1 1 9 ,5 4 5 134 M ay 1 188 M ay 6 1 0 8 % J Tit 148% D ec
&
188 188
>
1 ,3 2 5 175
M ay 1 2 0 0 M ay 3 169% Jan 187 h Dec
D o p r e f............................
2 0 5 4 2 0 8 4 Chicago '& N o r th W e ste r n
2 ,5 0 0 1 68 la J an 21 2 15
M ay 1 150% J ’ nt 172*4 D ec
...... ......
100 20 7 M a r J 2 4 8 A p r i l 1 9 5 % May 2 2 0 D ec
Do p r e f............................
155*4 157
8 ,4 0 0 1 1 6 7e J a n 4 1 7 5 1 J ’ ne 5 10 2 .Fin 1 2 2 % Dec
4
Chic. B o ck I s l ’d & Pacific
*138
145
100 1 25 M a r 2 146*4 N o v 2 2 11 0 Oct 126 N ov
Chic. St. P . M in n . Sc O m .
*185
19 5
Mar
A p r 1 1 172
F eb L75
180
M a r 29 201
Do p re f____
3 ,1 0 0 1 0 » .! Jan 19 31
A p r 16
17 4 1 7 4 Chicago T erm T T r a n sfe r .
*
8 % Oct 14*4 D ec
3 ,5 5 0 28*4 D o c 5 5 ?x> A p r 15 2 6 % Oct
39*4 A p r
3 2 4 32 4
D o p r e f............................
1 .5 0 0 73
N o v 8 5 5 JT u 7 6
D ec
M ay 9 101
9 5 4 9 5 4 Cleve. Cln. Chic. Sc St. L .
. . . . . . . .. .. . §120 120
•••
•••
*1 1 8
122
1 4 0 115*4 Jan 12 124 N o v 2 5 103 % J Tk 118 D ec
Do p r e f............................
*86
4U
*3 5
40
*3 5
40
30
N ov
*35
40
1 4 % Jan
Cleve. Lorain & W h e e l*g .
27=8 Jan 7 42 ^2 N o v 27
• 7 7 4 82
72
Apr
* 7 7 4 82
D ec 31
- 7 7 4 82
* 7 7 4 82
67
Aug 7 82
D o i)ref___
4 6 Jan
4 ,9 8 0
144 154
5 Sep
14*4 14*4
8*4 D ec
1 4 4 1 4 4 Colorado’ cfc So., v ot. trust
6=8 J an 21 18 A p r 29
144 144
60 4 60 4
5 ,3 0 0 4 0
4 7 % M ar
604 604
36
Sep
6 0 4 61*8
D e c 28
56*4 6 0 4
J an 31 6 0
Do l s t p f . v ot. tr. cfs.
29
29
20 % M ur
284 284
284 294
28
284
3 ,2 0 0 16 J an 4 28*4 A p r 29
14
Sep
D o 2d pf. v ot. tr. ctfs.
173*4 1 7 1 4 1 7 3
174
1 7 5 4 1 72
1734175
1 5 ,7 5 0 1 05
>
M av 9 185 H A])i* 3 1 0 6 % Sep 134 % D ec
T Y elaw are Sc H u d s o n ___
* 6 4 >a 2 5 4 ^ 2 5 4 4 258*4 2 5 3 4 2 5 5 4
258
268
7 ,6 0 0 I 88 I1 Jan 3 2 5 8
D e c 31 1 7 1 % Sep 194*4 D ie
A /© la w . L ack . < W e s t ’ ll.
fc
• 43
44
-4 2 *4 4 4
43
44
34 % Deo
-4 2 4 4 3 4 D en ver Sc B io G ra n d e___
4 0 0 29 hi J an 21 53k>M av 6 1 6 7s Jail
92
92
D ec
6 4 % J ’ne 8 7
4 ,3 6 0 8 0
4
914 914
914 914
Jan 21 1 0 3 1 J ’ n e l4
90 4 914
D o p r e f............................
• „ ........ 50
*........... 5 0
* ........... 5 0
* ........... 5 0
J ’ ne27
.... . ..... ....
49
N o v i 2 71
D en ver Sc S o u th w e s te r n .
60
50
*........... 5 0
*.......... 5 0
* .......... 50
Do pref
200 69 J ’ly 29 69 J T y 29
•38
40
*35
40
.T’ n e 5
12 F ile 21 D ec
18 Jan 30 45
15
15
14^2 14>a * 1 4 4 16
80 0 I 4 I4 D ec 11 17
D ec 5
14
1 4 4 Detroit. South vot tr r tfs
• 8 7 4 38 4 * 3 7 4 39
*36
38
200 3 6 D e c 12 4 0 7g D ec 5
3 7 4 38
Do pref vot. tr ctfs
104 104
10
10
10
10
6 % M ar
*10
10*4 D u lu th So. Shore Sc A t L .
720
4 J ’ne
4
F e b 5 l ‘2 1o j ,ne 5
*9*8
9 7e § 10 % 10*8
20% N ov
1 8 4 19
1 ,6 2 0 13=8 Jan 8 2 2 ^ Sep 30
19*4 19*4
19
194
19
194
194 194
19*4 19*4
12 JTy
D o p re f............................
2 7 % D ec
4 1 4 42
3 9 4 40
1 0 % Sep
394 404
3 9 4 40*4 l ? r i e ........................................... 1 7 3 ,2 2 0 2 4 1’2 M ay 9 4 5 ^2 J ’ne 4
4 0 4 41*8
394 404
7 2 % 73*8
71*8 7 2 4
73 4 7 3 4
7 0 4 73
714 7 2 4
72
7 3 4 b J D o 1 st p r e f....................
59*4 Jan 21 7 5 D e c 31 30*8 Sep 63 % D ec
4 3 % D ec
60
60 4
57
67*4
5 8 4 60
564 574
15
Sep
574 584
Do 2d p re f.................... 2 4 ,2 0 0 39 x J an 4 62*4 D e c 31
55*4 5 8 4
4
*57
59
*57
59
57
57
*57
58
*57
59
* 5 7 4 59
100 41 Jan 31 68 A p r 12 3 8 % Oct 5 4 % M ar
E v a n sv . & T err e H a u t e ..
*83
88
•82
88
94% Apr
*8 3
88
*82
88
*83
88
*8 2
88
A p r il
74
O ct
81
Jan 4 95
Do p r e f ...
♦80*4 30*4 * 3 1
31
31
33
* 3 0 4 33
12 1 17 J an 18 3 6 A p r 2 0 12*2 M ar 2 0 D ec
* 3 0 4 3 2 4 Ft. W orfthfcDen. C .,strap.
*314 324
4 ,2 0 0 1 6 7 h*May 9 20 8
1 8 5 4 183
1 85
184
1 8 4 4 1 8 4 4 1 8 5 4 G reat N o rth ern , p r e f........
1834184
M a r l5 144*4 J ’ ne 1 9 1 % D ec
1 8 6 4 1 8 6 4 185
70
72
71
71
5 3 % M a r 66 D ec
71
72
74
74
52 65
71
71
Jail 2 67*4 F e b 14
Green B . & W ., deb. ctf. A
i i
11
1 1 4 124
5 % Sop
8=8 D ec
12
124
11
11
11 9
7 Jan 28 1 1 *2 A pr 2 2
6 ,4 0 0 40^2 M ay 9 75*2 D e c 26
3 0 % Jan 4 2 % D ec
6 7 4 67 «8
66
674
684 684
6 8 4 69
674 684
i n ' 0ek in g V a lle y ................
664 674
82*4 8 3
3 ,1 5 0 69*4 Jan 21 88^2 D e c 2 6
•824 834
8 1 4 82*8
82
8 2 4 L i.D o p r e f............................
5 8 Jan 7 4 % D ec
8 1 4 82 4
814 824
6 ,5 6 2 124 M ay 9 154*4 J ’ne29 1 10 J ’ ne 132*4 D ec
189
1 3 9 4 1 3 8 4 1 3 8 *4 137
1 39
1 3 7 4 1 3 8 4 138
1 3 8 4 1 3 8 4 1 3 9 4 I llin o is’ C e n tra l..................
1 ,1 3 0 2 1
8 8 4 39
38
384
38
38
3 7 ^ 38>s
38*4 38*4
J an 21 43*4 J ’ ne21
1 1 % J an 27*8 D ec
3 8 4 3 8 4 I o w a C en tra l........................
•72
74
*72
74
* 7 0 4 72
200 4 8 J an 21 8 7 ^ J T y 1 39 Sep 5 8 M ar
71
73
*70*4 73
*72
724
D o p ref............................
♦ 86
87
37
200 21 Jan 8 4 1 J ’n e l5 1 0 Jan 25 D e c
*35 4 3 6 4 *35 4 3 6 4
anaw ha So M ic h ig a n ..
3311 3513 *3 5
7
81
81*4
82
824
82
824
8 2 4 8 3 4 J\_C F t S
tr cts nfd 1 3 ,1 6 0 7 7 X D ee 1 6 8 1l4 D e c 28
8 1 4 82*8 8 1 4 8 2 4
17 % A p r
• 19
20
19
19
19
19
7 Sep
*19
20
'3 0 0 1 3 ^ Jail 4 25 A p r 30
*19
194
K a n sa s C ity So. v o t. t r . . .
* . . . . . . 45
100
27b* Sep 43*s A p r
• 4 3 4 45
-4 1
45
49
A p r 30
44
44
*43
45
3 % M ay
6 ~ D ec
13
13
*12
14
200 5*4 Jan 3 1 8 ^ O ct 2
*1 4 ~ 16
• 14
16
*12
14
* 1 3 4 16
K eokuk Sc D e s M o i n e s ...
23
D ec
*40
45
*40
45
•40
45
>
*40 . 45
*40
45
*40
45
1 4 % Oct
24
Jan 2 45 k Sej> 30
D o pref
64
65
•69
70
69
69
2,000 39*4 Jan 21 7612 N o v 25 2 0 % M a r 5 2 D ec
66
66*4 6 6 4 67 T ake E rie So W e s t e r n .. .
65
67
D ec
♦126 1 8 0
125
127
125
1 25
1 ,3 6 0 lO S 1 J an 21 1 3 5 ^ Sep 27
*125
128
8 3 % F eb 11 5
*125
128
127
127
L / D o pref ...........................
^
L Shore & M ic h S ou th ’n
3 2 3 0 A n r l l § 3 5 5 N o v 22 § 1 9 7 Jan § 2 4 0 D ec
89
May
1 ,7 6 3 6 7
80
83
80
S3
78*4 8 0
*80
83
D e o 18 ~ 47% Jan
88
834
*78
84
L o n g I s l a n d . ........................
Jan 3 9 0
105
1 0 5 4 106
1 0 4 % 1 0 5 4 L ou isv ille Sc N a s h v i lle ... 3 0 ,8 0 2 7 6 M a y 9 111*4 J ’ n e l ?
68*4 S e p 8 9 % D ec
1 0 4 4 1 0 5 4 1 0 3 4 1 0 4 4 104
10441054
139
1 3 9 4 1374139*8 1 3 6 4 1 3 8 4
D e c 5 8 4 J ’ne 1 1 6 % D ec
1 3 6 4 1 3 7 * 4 134*4 137
135*4 1 3 7 4 TVI"anhattan E le v a t e d ... 1 3 4 ,6 2 5 8 3
M ay 9 14 5
F eb
1 1 ,4 9 0 1 50 M a y 9 1 7 7 J ’n e24 143*4 Sep 1 82
1 6 1 4 16 1
159*4 161*8 1 6 0
162*4
1 6 3 4 1 6 3 * 4 1 6 1 c8 1 6 2 4 16014162
etropolitan S tr e e t___
200 27 Jan 9 41 N o v 2 2 2 4 % Jan 3 7 % A p r
40
40
* 4 0 4 42
- 4 0 4 43
*394 424
- 3 8 4 43
* 3 9 4 4 2 4 M et. W e s t Side E l. (C hic.)
*90
92
♦90
92
100 79^2 Jan 15 9 3 Sep 18 7 6 F eb 8 4 % N o v
*90
91
*90
92
90
90
*894 914
Do. p r e f-..........................
25 4 2 6 4
27
274
27
2 7 % M exican’ C en tra l.................. 1 3 ,7 0 0 12*4 J an 21 3 0 M ay 2 1 0 % Jan
1 7 % 1)60
26=8 27*8
26
264
26*8 2 7 4
5 M ar
15
15
6 ,5 2 5
2 % Sep
14*4 14*4
144 144
15
15*8 M exican N a t ’l tr. receip ts
3 =8 Jan 24 15 x O ct 12
4
14*4 1 4 78
14*8 14*4
Mi eh i va n O pti tril l
113 l O T ^ M a r 4 1 8 0 N o v 2 5 § 1 0 4 J an 1 1 5 J ’ne
§156
160
4 5 % J ’ne 7 1 % D ec
1 07
•104
10 7
6 5 0 67*4 Jan 19 U l ^ J T y l O
1054106
M inneapolis So S t. L o n is.
i 0 7 4 1 0 7 4 106
1 0 6 4 * 1 0 5 4 1 0 7 4 * i0 5
-1 1 8
1 2 1 * 1 1 7 1 2 0 - 1 1 7 120
♦119
1 21
D o pref . .
101*4 J an 7 124^2 O ct 23 8 7 % J ’ne 1 0 4 % N o v
27 A p r
7 ,2 1 0 15
14
Sep
39
40
38
39
39
39*4
N ov2o
M ay 9
3 6 ^ 38*3
fe
3 9 4 4 0 4 M inn. S. P. < S. S. M arie.
374 384
2 ,0 3 0 4 9
47
N ov 69 A p r
90
92
90
91*4
92
934
92
92
D o p r e f ,..........................
9 2 4 92*4
A p r 9 94*4 N o v 2 o
914 914
17 % D ec
4 ,9 0 7 15
9 Sep
25
25
254 254
25
254
Jan 21 35*8 A p r 20
254 254
25
254
24*4 2 5 78 Mo. K a n sas So T e x a s .........
3 ,8 3 0 37
51
51
51
51*4
51*4 5 4
M ay 9 6S*s A p r 19
D o p re f. ......................
* 5 1 4 53
51
514
514 514
2 5 % &eP 4 7 % D ec
7 2 % D ec
1004101
3S*s Jan
J an 4 1 2 4 ^ J ’n e l 4
102 1 0 2 4 100 102
9 9 4 1 0 1 4 1 0 0 4 1 0 1 =s M issouri P a cific.................. 5 5 ,1 0 0 69
9941014
§191V>,Tnn 8 1 9 7 14 A p r 9 §183% Jan §189% M ay
M
’nrriSffc E sse x
1 6 3 4 161*4 163*4 1 6 2 4 1 6 3 * 8 XT Y . Central & H u d son . 6 0 ,0 1 5 139*8 J an 21 174^2 N o v 2 5 1 2 5 % J ’ne 1 4 5 % D ec
1 6 4 4 165*4 1 6 3 4 1 6 4 4 1 6 1 4 1 6 3 4 1 6 2
4 ,3 1 5 16 M ay 9 577s Sep 28
11
J ’ne 2 4 % D ec
47
48
60
504
504 504
464 484
47
474
J^l Y . Oilic. So St. L o u is ..
4 8 4 49
60 0 97
1 2 1 1 2 1 *120 1 2 1 * 1 1 9 1 2 1 *1 1 9 1 21 *120 1 2 1
Sep 18
7 5 J ’ne 1 1 0 D ec
D o 1 st p r e f....................
M a r 1 1 20
120*4 120*4
1 ,4 0 0 4 7
Sep 28
29 J ’ne 5 8 % D ec
*85
89
89
86
88
*85
89
D o 2d p r e f....................
M a r 1 95
87
87
8 9 4 8 9 4 *88
JTy
NTew Y o rk & H arlem
§ 4 0 9 N o v 7 42 0 A p r 1 4 0 0 May 4 2 0
3l 34h> J an 15 139 F e b 21 §130 Jaii §135 M a r
ST y . L ack . Sc W e s te r n
.
12 5 ^ O G ^ F e b S ? 2 17 J ’ne24 §207*4 Sep §215*4 Jan
*211 212
*210 2 12 §210 2 1 0 4 § 2 1 1 4 2 1 1 4 *210 212
T.
210*8 210*8 N Y . N . H a v e n & H a r tf.
3 3 4 33*4
3 3 4 34
33*4 34*8 S'. Y . Ontario & W e ste r n . 1 7 ,2 3 0 2 4 M ay 9 4 0 h* M ay 1 1 8 % J ’ne 3 2 % D ec
3 4 4 34*8
334 344
334 344
9 ,5 0 0 42
2 2 =s Jan 45*4 D ec
55
55*4
5 5 4 56
55
56
56*4 5 7 4
Jan 10 61*8 N o v 2 5
554 574
56
5 6 4 Norfolk Sc W e s t e r n ............
500 82
D ec
*92
94
*92
94
67
Jan 8 3
♦92
9 3 4 *92
934
93
93
D o adju stm en t, p ref.
F e b 15 9 2 i4 N o v 2 2
* 9 1 4 93
86 % D ec
NTorthern Pacifio B y __
7 7 14 Jan 21 7 0 0 M ay 9 45*4 Sep
100 5 2 F e b 1 7 8 D ec 2 4 6 M ay 62 N o v
*72
74
*70
75
74
*70
73
O a c ific C oast C o . .. '..........
7 3 4 7 3 4 -7 0
-7 1
74
>
9 0 % D ec
*98
104
*98
1 03
*96
1 03
*97
102
J D o 1 st p r e f..................
L
*98
10 3
*98
10 2
89
F e b 25 103 k D ec 2! 8 2 % Sep
5 7 M ay 6 9 % Got
*78
82
*7 6
81
*77
80
*76
80
*76
80
D o 2d p r e f . . . . ............
63 J an 8 83 N o v 29
*77
80
P
1484 14741484
1 4 8 4 1 4 8 * 4 1 4 8 4 1 4 9 4 J ennsylvania......................... 6 5 ,6 2 3 137 M ay 9 1 6 1 % A p r 22 1 2 4 % Sep 1 4 9 % D eo
148*4 1 4 9 4 1 4 8 1 4 9 4 1 4 7
D ec
S e p °7
5 J ’ ne 1 8
*35
40
1 4 7s Jan 22 5 0
*35
40
*35
40
*35
40
*33
40
*38
40
]Peoria & E a ste r n ..............
Pei>
*80
90
N o v l3
2 0 Jan 3 5
78
83
*75
80
9 0 0 83*4 Jan 9 9 4
*80
90
*75
80
*75
80
]Pere M a rq u e tte ....................
7 3 % Deo
5 5 % Jan
•80
95
*80
95
*80
90
72
J an 2 86 J ’n e l 7
*80
95
*80
85
*80
95
D o p r e f............ ...............
1,000 57 Jan 3 0 81 DeoSO 49*4 Sep 8 0 % J an
86
86
85
80
Pittsb. Cin. Chic. & St. L.
8 1 4 8 2 4 *81*4 85
8 6 4 86*4
*81*4 8 5
1
88 Jan 4 l1 3 Deo 80 7 8 J ’ ne 9 4 Jan
* 10 6 4 .......... * 1 0 6 4 ..........
.......... *1 0 6 L ........
D o p r e f............................
* 1 0 6 4 .......... *1 0 6
DeoSO
15
Sep
26
Deo
53*8 54*4
55*8 56*8
544 554
64*8 6 5 4
5 4 4 5 7 4 p eading, v o t’ g tr. c t fs .. > 91,745 2 4 ^ Jan 4 5 8
53*8 5 5 4
49
J an 7 1 % Deo
M ay 9 8 2 % D ec 80
♦81*4 82
81=8 8 2 4 LV> 1 st pref. v ot. tr. c t f s .. 1 9 ,7 4 0 65
81
814
804 814
8 0 4 814
8 14 8 14
2 d pref. v o t’g tr. c t f s . .. 8 4 ,2 4 5 3 8 Jan 3 6 4 % D e c 31 23=8 Sep 3 9 % Deo
60
62
6 3 4 63*4
6 1 4 63*4
6 0 4 61*4
614 634
61
614
1,000 97 N o v 4 H 12*4 N o v 7
1144115
Jutland, p r e f ............ ..........
•58
35
•33
35
•32
35
• 62
64
*62
04
-6 1
63
7 7 % 78%
76*4 7 6 %
7 5 4 77*4
0 8 % 0 9 'e
98 4 9 9 1
4
964 9 84
lu a '0 104% 101*4 108*4 l o l
1024
0 6 % 9 6%
954 964
9 6 4 96*4
66 % 67
65 % 66 4
t>34 6 5%
•115
12 1
115
1L5
M 14
117
•148
14 5
*143
145
-1 4 3
145
•131
139
-1 3 1
13 9
*125
139
114 4 114 % 1 1 3 4 1 1 4
112*4 H 3 4
66 4 66 % 8 5 4 86
80*4 85*4
*192
1 98
*192
19 6
190
19 2
4 6 % 46*4
46
46 4
454 464
35 4 35*4
3 4 4 35 4
33 4 31*4
•76
77
76 4 76 4
77
77
• .......... 1 3 5 4 * .......... 1 3 5 4 * .......... 1 3 5 4
187*4 13 7 4 *.......... 1 3 8
* .......... 1 3 8
2*24 “ 3
2 2 4 28
22 4 2 2 4
91*4 01 % A9d
9 2 4 *91
92
84
84
*84
65
*84
85
45
45
*44
46
454 464
61
61%
5 0 4 50*8
49 4 5 0 4
76
76
76
7 5 4 75*4 * 7 5
1634164
161*4 163 4 160*4 162*4
18 9
♦ 1 8 7 4 1 8 7 4 *1 8 7
186
188
209
20 9
204 4 2 0 5
207
207
*••••• «•«•••« 2 3 4 4 2 3 4 4
166
1 5 6 4 1 5 4 % 16 6
i .5 2 4 3.54%
•140
146
14 1
1 41
-1 4 0
142
#••••• *••••• *100 200
*180
195
17
17
17
17
1 7 4 174
32
33*4
3 2 4 33 | 3 1 4 31=8
05*4 9 6
96
96 \ 95 4 9 5 4

*32
35
*61
63
7 5 4 76*4
964
10 14 10 2
1 0 1 4 10 24
-9 6
97
96
96
63
641
4
63 4 0 4 4
*1U
122 S.. * 1 1 4 12 0
*1 4 1
1 45
-1 4 1 4 U 5
*125
139
*125
1 39
113
1134
1134 1U
8o 4 86
85 4 8614
190
190
1 8 9 4 189*4
4 5 4 45 4
4 5 4 454
34*8 3 4%
3 4 4 35
§ 7 6*b 76*a
- 7 6 4 77
-1 3 3
........... 1 38
13 8
*1 3 8
.......... * ...........1 3 8
2 2 4 23
2 2 4 22 4
*91
92 4
*91
024
84
84
*8 3 4 85
43 4 4 4 4
-4 3 4 444
49 4 50 4
404 514
75
75 4
7 5 4 75 4
1 6 1 4 162*4
16 1
1624
1 86
187
1 87
188
200 2 0 7 4 2 0 5 4 * 3 0 5 4
...... ......
...... ......
15 2
1 5 4 4 153 4 1 5 6
*1 3 8
14 2
-1 3 5
142
*1 8 5
197
-1 8 5
197
17
17
174 174
31*4 31*4
3 2 4 32*4
-9 5
96
95 4 9 5 4
*118
12 1 * 1 1 8 12 1
*35
40
-3 5
40
*774 814
*77 4 82
144 144
1 4 4 14*4
59 4 5 9 4
5 9 4 60 4
* 2 7 4 28
28
28
1734
1 7 2 4 1 7 3 4 1 72
253
255
255
257
-4 1
43
*424 434
90 4 9 1 4
914 914
*........... 5 0
* .......... 5 0
* .......... 5 0
- .......... 50
*36
40
*35
40
15
15
14^ 144
*374 384
*374 384
•32
*8 1
V0 4
97 4

35
63
7 0%
98

BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES—BROKERS* QUOTATIONS
Banks
NEW YORK
B id
CITY
A m e r ic a n . . . 525
A m e r E x c h .. 300%
A s t o r .............. 700
Bowery^__ 3 0 0
B roadw ay. . .
B u tc h ’s 6c Dr 140
C e n t r a l.......... 18 0
C e n tu ry 1]___ 1G5
C h a s e ............. 700
C h a t h a m ___ 3 2 5
C h e m ic a l___ 4 1 5 0

A sk
550
t
43 0

Banks
C itizen s’ .........
C ity ..................
C o lon ia li] . .
C olu m bian . .
C o m m e r c e .. .
Corn Exchn.
E a s t B i v e r ..
1 1

350
t

th Wardn.

E m p ’eS taten
F id e lit y n ___
Fifth A v e n ..

Fifth..............

F irst (n e w )..

B id

225
t620
310
350
354%
440
t 163
150
205
225
3250
300
760

A sk

Banks

B id

A sk

14 th Streetn. 165
F o u r t h .......... 235
_____ G a lla t in ........ 1420 4 3 1 %
G ansevoortn 140
t357*4 G a r fie ld ......... 500
G erm an A m f 140
460
G erm an E x i 340
Germ anial] .. 500
1G reen w ich ] 170
\
250
175
H am iltoun . . 160
..........

H a n o v e r ........
H id e clc L ’atli 150
Imp & T rad . t005

Banks
Ir v in g ..........
J effersonn
L eath er M fr .
L i b e r t y ........
L in c o ln . .
M a u b a tta n n .
M a rk et Sc Fill
M e ch a n ics’ .
M cell 6b Tran
M e r c i m ile
M oreh E x c h .
M erch an ts’ ..
M etropolis n

B id
205
175
2 55
6 00
950
310
2 5 6%
280
1190%
27 5
15 0
19 0
675

A sk

Banks

M t M o r r is l;..
M u tim in .........
.......... N a s s a u !1 ___
N e w A m ste r
N e w V ork Co
X \ x .u EX
N e w Y o r k ...
t
19th \\ a r d l .
N o rth A m e r .
t
O rien tal *1___
160 . P a e itio n ........
______ 1 D a r k ................
.......... 1 Poople’s r ___

| Bid
Banks
P l ie n i x .......... 115
215%
P la z a * ______ ! 525
t
190
Prod KxelO ; 1 65
liiv e isid e 1 .. 225
1850
t
1500
Seaboard ___ 4 5 0
210
1S e c o n d __ . . . 0 ", 5
8 20
...... S e v e n th ,i:i w 125
1 50
Shoe A LelU. * i - 1
20 5
S ta te' ............ M>0
175
Suite ot N Y * 175
l 2 th W a i d ' . tu>
20 5
2 3d W ard* .. H O
.......... I V nion s ^1 . . 8 2 3

B id

A sk

150

625
..........
-1 S ta te hanks
a F\ d iv nloiul and rights,
* Bui and asked prices; no sales were m ade on this day.
§ L ess t !i m id > s i u\*v
? i'J k r i g iid s .
1 Sale at S to ck E x c h a n g e or at auction th is w eek. | Stook '•ooruore l " sa les for " cash'* wore made as high as lOOd.
|
& tru st Oo. oortideates.

1
j
!
|
|

J anua ry

Stock Record— Concluded— Page 2

18, 1902]

S T O C K S -- H I G H E S T A M D
S a tu rd a y
J a n. l i

M on a a u
Jan.

15
*13
14 *2 *12
$ 6 5 % tift1 *
'*
64
*2 3% 27
*23% 27
120 *2126 H 1 2 0 % 126 %
i
61% 03 l.i
01 % 03
88
88
00
*80
7 < 7 75%
t .-,
26% 2 0 34
26% 20%
5734
67 *2 5 7 34
57
60 % OO3
.]
50% 60 %
33
33%
32% 33%
98*4 93°8
92% 93%
*3 9
39*2
38% 39
123
*122 123
122
19
19
L9
19
353
4
36
36
109% 109%
lio ^ n o ^
101
*1 50
i'0 2 % IO 31.1 100% 102%
8 9 % 8 9 7s
88% 89%
22% 223
4
22% 22%
41% 42%
42
423
4
17% 18%
♦18
18%
52
60
61
-5 0
29
29
28% 29%
20%
20
2 0 -a 20°8
40% 40%
40»4 4 0 7s

T u esd a y
Jan. Id
12
* .........
*23
120%
59 %
88
7334
25
57%
5 8%
32%
92
37%
*121

12
05
27%
120%
01%
88
75%
20
58%
59%
32%
92%
38%
123

LO W E S T S A K E r u n 'KS
W ed n esd a y
Jan. lb

t

huT 8d a y
J a n , 10

K r id a y
Jan. t ?

13
14
*1 0
11
14
14
755
64
* .......... 04
* .......... 04
*23
27
*1 8
20
*1 0
1 2 0 % 1 2 0 % '•1.20% L27
1 2 0 3i 120%
6 9 % 00 %
0 0 % 04 %
0 3% 01%
* 8 5 % 88
80
87
8 0 % H7%
74
71%
74% 70
7 5 % 70%
§ 2 5 % 25 %
2 0 % 20%
27 w 27%
58
69 %
60
61%
59
00
5 8% 59 %
58 % 5 9 %
59
59%
3 2 % 32%
3 2 % 3 2%
3 2 % 3 3%
9 2 % 93
92% 93%
93
9 3%
3 7 % 37 %
38
3 8%
3 8 % 38%
122 123
*12 2 % 123% 123% 123%
19 % 19%
19 % 19 % * 1 8 % 19%
35 " 35% *34
30 ’
3 5 % 35%
109 % 109% 1 0 9 % 110% 1 0 9 % 109%
*152 163
*1 5 3
101
9 9 % 101% 10038 101% 100% 10 2 %
88
88 %
88% 88%
8 8 3 89
4
2 1 % 22%
22% 22%
22% 22 %
4 1 34 42 %
41 % 42
4 1 % 42 %
1 7% 17%
1 7 % 17% * 1 7 % 18
*49
50
*49
51
*49
52
*28
29
*28
28%
*28
29
193e 1934
19 % 1 9%
19 % 20 %
40% 40%
4 0 % 40 %
4 0 % 40%

STOCKS
N E W YO RK STOCK
EXCHANGED

139

Jtanf/e fo r Year 1001
I Uanye fo r J+revioue
S a les o f
On ba sis of t o o sh a re laid
Y e a r ( 10 0 0 )
the
W eek,
S h a res
L ow est
Low est
H lfjh est
H ig h est

(J t. A. & G. I m1. v. tr. CtfH.
^ Do 1st prof. v. tr.otfH.
l) o 2d prof. v. tr. ctfs.
8 t. Daw. 4b A d ir o n d a c k ...
St. Louts Jfc San F r a n .......
D o 1hI-p r o f .................

900
IJj
500
02,000
1,550

7% fa n 2 J
55 O ct 1
17 D e c 'l l
57 Jan 211
2 1 % Jan 4
75 A ’ ly 15
5 3 % Jan 4
10 M ay 9
4 1 % J an 3
29 M ay 9
J 8 Aan 21
07% Aan 21
23% Jan 3
117 M ay 9
10% F e b 16
28 M ay 9
6 5 34 J a n 21
1.47 A p r li.
76 M ay 9
81% J a n 21
11% Jan 3
2 3 % Jan 4
11% Jan 31
45 M ay 9
24 M ay 9
1 4 % J a n 21
3 8 % J a n 17

5 May
16% J 'n o 8
8 % L ee
78 % A ’ uc25 38% May 04 % D ec
30 J ’ no 6
2 1 % D ee
i.'M
D e c 19
5 0 % D ec 19
8 % J ’ nc 24% D ec
88 M ar 12 64 Sep 78 JICO
70% A ’ / icl 9 3 J % J ’ m
39 % A p r 30
8% J ’ m 18% L ee
71 j 'n e l O
21% J ’ m 4 5 % L e o
03% A ' do 5 30% J ’ m 45•h L ee
35% J» 1 c 3
1
] 0 % j ’ m 23% D e c
94 % N ov 2 7
4 ‘A % J ’ m 73 % D e c
52% M ay 3 13% J ’ ne 20% L e o
L2 9 % J a n 9 45% M ar 135 % J a n
25 % A
39 % M ay22
109% D e c 31
01 % J ’ ly 70% L ee
100 N o v 3 0 ] 36 Ja/i 140 L ee
133 M ay 2 4 4 % Jan 81% L ee
9 9 % M a y J 7 0 % J ’ m 8 0 % D ec
20 J ’n e 3
6 % M ar J 4 D ee
D ec
4 0 % J ’ne21
16 Sep 27
8 J ’ ne 13% D ec
22 J ’n e 4
6 0 3 M a r28 4 4 % Sep 5 8 % M ar
4
38 M.ar28 2 1 % J ’ ne 3 3 % M ar
10 Sep 20% A p r
26 J ’ n e l7
49 % A p r 17 30 S ep 57 A p r

1>745
St. Dou Ih S o u th w e s te r n ..
D o p r o f.......................... 10,238
S ou th ern Paolito C o ......... 83 ,7 5 0
S o u th e rn v o tin g tr. otfH.. 35,830
D o p ro f. vot. tr. c tfs . L5,4 Li
5,0 0 0
rp e x a s
P a c ific ...............
625
L h ir d A v e n u e (N . Y .).-500
T o l. St. L. 60 W . v . tr. ctfs.
1,3 2 5
§34
34
D o p ro f. v o t. tr. c tfs .
2 ;il6
109 109%
T w in C ity R apid T r a n s it.
Do p ro f
*152 ICO
99% 101%
1 p n ion fca oiflo..................... 2 4 7 ,3 7 0
7,811
8 7 % 88%
LJ D o p r o f..........................
9 ,1 0 0
21% 22%
\ \ T a b a sli..............................
4 L % 41 %
VV D o p r o f , . . . ................. 19,000
1 ,8 1 0
17% 17%
W h e e lin g & Dake E r i e .. .
200
*50
62
I )o 1 st p r e f...................
800
28
28%
D o 2d p r e f...................
3,912
1 9 % 2 0%
W is c o n s in C ent. v . tr. cfs.
40
40 %
2,783
D o p re f. v o t. tr. c tfs .
M is c e l la n e o u s .
40 §145 J a n 8 §202 D e c 2 4 111 Jan §150 N o v
•S00 2 10
*195 2 1 0
*1 9 6 210
*1 9 5 2 1 0
*195 205
§205 205
A dam s E x p r e s s ...............
6 7 % 6 9 3q
69% 70% A m a lg a m a t e d C o p p e r ... 15 1 ,4 0 0 6 0 % D e o 17 130 J ’ n e l7
0 7 % 08%
6 8 % 0 9 30
89% D e c 9 9 % N o v
7 0 % 71*4
68% 70%
*2%
23
4
23
4
*2 %
23
4
1 % S ep 25
*2%
2%
*2%
2% A m erica n B ic y c le
*2%
23
4
8% A p r 23
*2%
-1 0
14 " *1 0
*1 0
14
10%
10
10
100 10 S ep 30 35 A p r 22
*9
13% *10
14
Do p r e f./
2 8 % 2 8 34
5,2 1 0 19 J a n 21 35 J ,n e l4
2 8 % 29
12% J:an 25% N o v
2 9 % 2 9% A m e r ic a n Car < F o u n d r y
2 9 >a 29 7g
2 9 % 29%
2 8 % 29%
&
8 5 % 8534
8 5 % 85%
85 % 8534
8 5 % 86 %
1,815 67 J a n 19 8 9 % J ’ly 8 57% J ’ ne 72 D e c
*8 6
87
87
D o p r e f ..........................
§86
1,100 24 M a r 8 3 5 % J ’ n e l7
30 J ’ ne 3 7 34 A p r
31
31 A m e r ic a n C o tto n O il........
* 8 0 34 31 la
3U3 31% * 3 0 % 31% * 3 0 % 3 1%
4
3 0 % 31
*87
89
100 85 A p r 10 9 1 % J a n 8 8 8 3 Sep 100 A p r
*88
89%
88
*86% 89
4
*8 0 % 88
D o p r e f ..........................
88
1,0 0 0 32 O ct 4 4 0 M ay 3 2 4 % Jan 37 N o v
32% 32%
3 3 % 3 3% *32
*34
40 A m e r ic a n D is tr ic t T e le g .
30
36%
40
34% 35%
*2 1 0 217
* 2 1 0 2 2 0 A m e r ic a n E x p r e s s .............
100 § 1 6 9 J a n 12 210 N o v i 9 §142 M ar 191 D e c
* 2 1 0 2 18
* 2 0 8 218
*210 220
210 210
4 0% §3 9 % 39% *3 9 % 40
* 3 9 % 40
150 3934 D e o 16 45 N ov 2 5
A m e r ic a n G ra ss T w in e
*3 9
40*8
3 9 % 39% *3 9
2 6 3 2 7%
4
2 6 34 2 7 %
2 7 % 27 % A m e r ic a n I c e . ..................... 1 1 ,3 3 0 253; O ct 2 41 »8 M a r 15 2 7 % J ’ ne 49 % A jir
28%
27
28
27®. 28%
28
*6 3
64
6 3 % 64
§ 6 5 % 65%
990 62 O ct 10 7 7 3 M ar22
64
64
64
04
05
6 0 % J ’ ne 7 8 % F e b
D o p r e f ..........................
4
64
*1 5
20
15
15
*1 5
20
*15
10 A m e r ic a n L in s e e d .............
100
18
*15
20
5% J a n 24 3 0 % J ’ly 9
6 N o v 16% F e b
*15
*42
45
*45
60
*42
45
100 31 J a n 24 66 J ’l y 9 3 4 % D e c 60 F e b
•43
40
43
*4 2
45
D o p r e f..........................
43
3 0 % 3 1%
3 0 % 31%
3 1 % 32
8 1 % 32%
31
3 1 34
20 ,9 8 5 2 2 % A u g l 3 3 3 % N o v i 9
A m e rica n Lnenmnt.ive
31% 32%
91% 92%
;
91
91%
9 0 % 92
7^802 8 3 % O ct 4 91 % N o v i 9
9 1 % 92 “
0 1 % 92
D o p r e f......................
91% 9 1 3
*534
0
7 34 J an
6
6 A m e r ic a n M a lt in g .............
230
4% F eb 4
6%
6
6
§5%
5%
*6
6%
8 J ’ n e20
3 J ’ ne
*6 ~
*23
24
*23
25
25
*23
25
*2 3
26
*23
25
2 2 % D e c 19 30 J ’ ne25
D o p r e f ......................
18% J ’ lie 3 1 % J a n
*23
4434 4 5%
46
46 A m e r. S m e lt’ g & R e fin ’ g . 1 6 ,9 7 5 3 8 % O ct 7 69 A p r 20 3 4 % J ’ ne 5 6 % D e c
4434 4 5 %
45^8 4 5 3
4
45% 46%
4 5 % 4534
9 6 % 9 6%
1,4 6 0 88 F e b 26 104% J ’ n e ‘20 85 J ’ ne 99 N o v
9 6 % 96%
1 9 7 % 97%
9 6 % 97
D o p r e f.....................
96% 96% § 9 7 % 9 7 %
11. T•1
26 M a r l 9 4 9 % J ’ n e 8
A m erica n S n u ff
100 73 A p r 17 90 ~ J ’n e l4
D o p r e f.
85
85
1 1 8 % 1 2 1 % 1 2 0 % 12 2 % m % 1 2 4 % A m e r ic a n S u g a r R e fin in g 1 7 5 ,0 7 0 1 0 3 % D e c 24 153 J ’ n e 3 95% M ar 149 D e c
i a i % 1 2 3 % 120 122
1 1 7 % 121
115 11534 1 1 6 116
1 1 6 1163s 1 1 6 116
1,4 2 0 111 D e c 24 130 J ’ ly 19 107 M ar 118 J ’ l y
*115 116
D o p r e f......................
1 1 0 110
§ 8 9 % 9 0% A m e r ic a n T e l’ g h & C able
150 §94 J a n 7 100 A p r 13 §87 Sep § 9 8 % J a n
*9 1
96
*91
96
*90
95
96
*90
95
*91
200 200
2 1 0 235
2 0 0 2 00
1,0 0 0 99 M ay 9 146% O ct 23 8 4 % J ’ ne 115 O ct
A m e rica n T o b a c c o ,
*190 205
16
16 A m e r ic a n W o o le n .............
*16
17
'6 0 0 1 3 % M a r 15 2 1 % J a n 2 21% D e c 22% *D ec
*16
it
16
16
16
*1 5 % 17
16
*7 8 % 79
4
79
79
100 70 M a r 2 2 82% J ’ly 1 76 D e c 7 6 3 D e c
*7 8
80% *7 7
* 7 8 % 79
79
*76
79
D o p r e f..........................
2934 30
3 0 % 3 0 3 A n a c o n d a C o p p e r...............
4
30%
2 9 % 30
4 ,0 5 0 28% D e c 23 5 4 % A p r 16 37% J ’ ne 54% A p r
30
30
30 %
S 0% 30%
*212 217
212 212
* 2 1 2 217
♦ 214 2 18
100 175 J a n 18 228 A p r 15 140 J an 183 D e c
* 2 1 0 215
O r o o k l y n U n io n G a s___
-2 1 4 218
*934 1 0 % -L>runsw . D o c k & C .Im p ’ t
10
§10
10
-9 % 10%
410
834 J a n 19 1 4 3 M a r l 9
10
10
6 % J ’ ne 16% J a n
10
4
8 6 % 87% /C o lo r a d o F u e l & I r o n ! . .
4 ,5 5 0 4 1 3 J a n 21 1 3 6 % J ’ n e l7
8 6 % 87
8 0 % 86
4
29% Sep 5 6 % D e e
* 8 5 % 86%
8 5 % 86
8 5 % 8 6%
*1 2 7 130
*1 2 5 130
*1 2 6 130
116 M a r l9 1 4 2 % A p r 29 117 O ct 1 3 1 % J a n '
* 1 2 6 % 130
\J D c p r e f............... .
*120% 13O
*125 130
1 4 % 1434 Col. & H o c k . C oal & Ir o n .
143s 15
1 4 % 14%
1 ,7 2 0 1 2 % O ct 23 2 5 % J ’ n e l7
1 4 % 14 %
11% J ’ n e 21 A p r
15
16
14% 1434
21338 2 1 5 % 2 1 3 217
3 ,9 0 0 187 J a n 18 2 3 8 A p r l 5 $164 Sep 201 N o v
S17 217% 2 16 210
2 1 5 2 1 5 % * 2 1 5 216% C o n so lid a te d G as (N . Y .) .
115
115
115 116
2 ,4 0 0 9 3 % J a n 2 124 J ’ n elO 70 M ay 95 N o v
115 115
1 1 6 115% 115 115
C o n tin e n ta l T o b a c c o , p r e f
13 0 % 13 0 % *1 3 0 135
1 3 1 % 131 % D ia m o n d M a tc h
* 1 3 2 136
130% 131
* 1 3 0 135
600 1 2 7 % O ct 10 1 52% A u g29
834
9 D is tillin g Co o f A m e r ic a
83;
9
8%
8 34
8,2 2 5
6% O ct 14 1 0 % J ’ n e l8
* 8 34
9
8%
8%
*8 %
8%
34
343
4
34
34%
3334 34%
34
34
3 3 3 34
4
5 ,2 o 0 2 3 % S ep 13 3 4 % N o v 9
D o p r e f.....................
3 s 4 34%
27934 280
2 7 6 3 277
4
277 278
2 7 8 % 280
1 ,6 0 0 1 8 3 % J a n 10 2 8 9 % D e c 6 1 20 J an 2 00 D e c
*2 7 6 % 278
G e n e ra l E le c t r ic .................
279^281
4534 46
4 1 % 4 5%
41% 41%
45
46%
4 1 % 41%
4 5 % 46%
G lu co se S u g a r R e fin in g .. 1 6 ,3 2 0 37 O ct 24 65 M ay 2 44 M ay 60 N o v
*92
98
*9 2
95
*9 5 100
110 9 3 3 M a r 5 1 07 A u g 5 92 D e c 103 N o v
4
98
D o p r e f..........................
98
§ 1 0 1 % 1 0 1 % *9 5 101
* 1 9 % 20
*20
2 0 34
20%
20
20
-1 9
20
19
19% *19
F n te rn a tio n a l P a p e r . . I " 1 1,8 0 0 1 8 % M a y lO 28 M a r 2 2 1 4 % M ar 2 6 % N o v
7 5 % 7534 1- D o p r e f..........................
§7534 7534
7 5 % 7 5% § 7 6
76
76%
76
1,0 6 0 69 J a n 21 81% S ep 10 58 M ar 75 N o v
75% 75%
87
87
87
87 In te r n a tio n a l P o w e r
87
87
1,100 54 % J a n 2 1 0 0 % M a y 3 1 24 J ’ne 5 5 34 D e c
88
*87
87
87
*6%
7 In te r n a tio n a l S i l v e r . . . .
*6 %
7
100
3% A u g 10% J a n
7
*6%
7
5 % F e b 7 11 J a n 5
*6 %
*6%
7
6%
0%
45
*45
46%
45
45
215 33 A p r 25 51 D e c 4
45% 45%
*41
45% *4 1
45% *4 1
D o p r e f .................
4 7 % 47 % I n te r n a t’l S team P u m p ..
47
47
* 4 6 % 4 7 % * 4 6 '2 4 7 %
*46% 4 7% *4 7
200 2 4 % J a n 22 49 N o v l 9
48
28 D e c 29% D e c
*8 7
90
87% 87%
90
87 3 8 7 3
4
4
90
90
D o p r e f...................
600 74 J a n 24 89 O ct 16 76 D e c 7 7 % D e c
87% 8734 *8 6
92
*90
95
*90
95
*9 0
94
95
* .......... 91 % *9 0
70 J a n 18 9 5 % J ’l y 8 65 May 80 J a n
*90
F a eled e G as (St. L o u is ).
*1 0 5 108
*102 1 06
108 108
-Li D o p r e f..........................
100 95 J a n 21 106% N o v l 2
* 1 0 8 .......... * 1 0 8 110
96 J an 100 J a n
*102 107
13
13 M a n h a tta n B e a c h .............
4
*10
13
*1 0
14
15
*11
13
100
8 O ct 12 22 A p r l 6
6% J an 1 8 3 M ay
*10
*10
13
4 4 % 45% V T a tion a l B is c u it .............
4 3 % 4434
45
45%
4 4 % 44 %
3,3 2 0 37 J a n 21 4 6 M ay 3 23 J ’ ne 4 0 % N o v
44% 44%
4 4 % 45
1 0 4 % 1 0 4 % 1^ D o p r e f ...................... .
$105 105
• 1 © 8% 107
*102 105
435 92 J a n 2 103% N o v l 8
7 9 % J ’ ne 96 F e b
105 105% *1 0 2 105
15% 153
4
1534 1 5 3
4 *15% 1-0% N a tio n a l L e a d .................
700 15 M a r l4 2 5 % J ’n e l2
1 5 % A u g 28% F e b
*1 5 % 17
16
16
* 1 5 % 16%
80
100 7 4 3 D e o 24 9 3 % J ’ n e l3
4
*7 8
80
*78
80
D o p r e f..........................
83 A u g 1 0 6 % F e b
*76
81
7 8 % 78 % * 7 8
*78
81
* 1 5 5 158 N e w Y o r k A ir B r a k e ........
1 5 7 167
1,2 1 0 133 J ’l y l o 175 A p r 26 112 S ep 175 N o v
157 158
1 5 7 % 157% *1 5 2 157
1 5 7 157
N ew Y ork D o c k ..
13 D e c 2 7 15 D e c 3
D o p r e f... .
45 D e c 2 0 4 7 % D e c 6
*86
90 N o r th A m e r ic a n Co., n e w
90
90
00% 90%
600 7 3 % F e b 14 109 ‘ J ’ n e l8
*8 5 % 90
90% 90%
*86
91
4 6 3 47% p a c i f i c M a il........................
4
* 4 7 % 4 7 3|
4 5 % 45 %
5,0 0 0 3 0 % M ay 9 4 9 % N o v i 1 25% J ’ n e 57 N o v
4 5 % 47
46
4 7% * 4 6 % 47
98 % 102%
1 0 2 % 103
101 102% 10033 101%
9 9 % 100% 100 10034 Y eop. G a s-L .& C. (G h t e j 55 ,5 7 3 9534 J a n 21 1 2 0 % J ’ ne21 8 1 % O ct 111% A p r
4
4 0 % 40% P re sse d S te e l C ar............. 1
39
40
41
41
2,2 0 0 30 M a r 7 52 J a n 2 3 2 % Sep 583 J a n
3 9 % 40
40
40
40% 40%
84
*83
84
84
D o p r e f...................... .
84
84
765 7 2 % M a r 5 89 A p r 29 7034 S ep 8 9 % N o v
83% 83% *83
84
84% *83
221 221
*215 217
2 1 6 218
222 222
P u llm a n C o m p a n y .............
2 2 0 221
1,102 195% J a n 21 225 O ct 17 176 J ’ ne 204 D e c
215 215
*33
4
4 Q u ic k s ilv e r M in i n g ..
*334
4
*33
4
4
*33
4
4
*334
1% A p r 22
% Aug
2% M ar
4
5% M ay31
*3%
4
-8 % 10
*9
li
*9
10
7 M ar20 12% M ay27
7 3 ; O ct
10% M a r
D o p r e f..........................
-8 % 10
*8 % 10
*9 " 11
16 % 1634 O © p u blic I r o n < S te e l..
1 0 % 16%
1 6 % 16%
8 3 J ’ ne 2 7 % F e b
4
1 6 % 16%
fe
16% 16%
16% 16%
6,3 0 0 1134 S ep 13 24 J ’ n e l7
68 % 6834 i t D o p r e f..........................
6 8% 68%
4
*09
69%
2,1 0 0 55% J a n 21 82 A p r 1 49 A u g 7 0 3 F e b
68% 69%
6 8 % 68%
68
68
* 1 8 % 20
17% 18% R u b b e r G ood s M f g . . .
2,0 0 0 18 D e c 2 6 3 8 % M ay 2
4
18
18%
18% 1 8 3 * 1 8 % 19% * 1 8 % 19%
*67
70
70
D o p r e f..........................
300 65 D e c l 3 90 M ay 2
*67 ' 70
67% 67% *6 7 % 70
6 7 % 68% * 6 8
*30
31
*8 0
31
30
30
100 1 9 % F e b 5 4 1 % A p r 2 1 7 % O ct 26 N o v
*30
31
* 3 0 % 31
*3 0
31
Q lo ss-S h e liie ld St. & Ir o n
*8 0
83
*80
83
C D o p r e f ......... .
j
65% J an 22 8 6 3 A p r 8 59% J ’ ne 71 N o v
-8 0
82
4
83
*81
*81
83
5%
5 3s Standard R o p e & T w i n e ..
'4 %
4%
434
3% M ar 6
*4 %
4%
4 % M ar 10% J a n
*4%
4%
4%
5
1,3 0 0
8% J ’ n e l3
*4%
6 3 % 64
62 % 63% T enn. C oal, I r o n & R R . . . 11,900 49 °8 M a r 7 7 6 % J ’ n e l8
6 2 3q 63 %
6 1 % 63%
62
62%
62% 64
49 O ct 104 F e b
*8 5
37
200 19 J a n 18 42 A p r 20 1 3 % J ’ ne 2 1 3 D e c
*35
37
T ex a s P a c ific L a n d T r u s t
4
*35
37
35
35
*33
37
* 1 3 % 14%
14
500 12 A p r 12 19% J ’ n e l7
B [ n io n B a g & P a p e r ........
10 J ’ ne 25 F e b
13% 13%
13 % 13% * 1 3
1 3%
1 3 % 13% *13
*72
74
*72
74
aJ D o
p r e f..........................
*72
74
200 65 A p r i l 7 5 3 l ) e c 4 56% M ay 7 7 34 F e b
*7 2
74
4
72
72
*1 0 4 106
104 101
982 §53 J a n 26 100 A p r 19 §45 M ar §593; D e c
U n ited S ta tes E x p r e s s ...
100 104
§103% 106
*101 103
1 0 3 103
734 M ay 9 16% M ay 2
4,6 5 0
7 34 J ’n e 19 J o a
1 1% 11% U n ited S ta tes L e a th e r ___
1 1% 1134
11 % 11%
1 1 % 11%
11% 11%
d 1
12
*0V a 82
81% 81%
D o p r e f..........................
2,275 69% M ay 9 83% A u g 2 8
80 % 81
81%
§ 8 1 % 81%
65 J ’ ne 79% N o v
81
81% 8 1 %
*14
15
15
840 12% O ct 4 34 J an 2 21 J ’ ly 44 J an
U n ited S ta tes R u b b e r ___
1 4 % 14%
14% 14%
14% 14%
1 4 % 1 4 % §15
*50
52
-5 0
52
D o p r e f..........................
52
5 0 % 50 % § 4 0 % 51
505 47 O ct 4 85 J a n 2 7 4 % D e c 10434 J an
§52
*50
52
43i< 43%
4 2 % 13% U nited S ta tes S te e l........... 153,220 24 M ay 9 55 A p r 30
4 2 % 43%
4 1 34 4 2 %
4 1 % 4 2%
42% 43%
9 4 % 95
D o p r e f.......................... 113,658 69 M ay 9
9 4 % 94%
9 3 % 03%
94
943
4
93%
93 w 9 4%
61% V irg in ia -C a ro lin a C hern ..
*6 1
62%
100 51 J ’ ly 12 72 M a r 30
6 i ~ 61 ' *60
61% -0 1
61% *6 0
61 % *60
12 0 % 12 0 %
D o p r e f..........................
* ..........123
* ..........123
100 116 A p r 26 125 A u g 3 0
•..........123
*1 2 0 123
*185 195
•180 200
W l ells, F a r g o & C o ........
§130 J a n 11 199% D e c 30 120 J ’ ne L40 D e c
*190 200
*185 195
*185 195
-1 8 5
195
91 % 91%
9 0 3 9 1%
4
91
91 %
90% 91
9 0 3 91%
4
e st’ n U n ion T e le ’ gph
3,275 81 J a n 21 100% M ay 6 7 7 % J ’ ne 8 8 % J an
91
91
1 7 5 177
W est’ g h ’ se E l & M l'g assen
170 172
171
174
174 174
1,624 145 N o v 2 6 ISO D e c 26
16 9 % 169% *169 173
;
•175 182
*175 182
D o 1 st p r e f...................
*175 182
*1 7 5 182
157 N ov 2 7 187 D e c 2 7
* 1 7 0 182
*175 182

BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES— BROKERS’ QUOTATIONS
Bank**
XKW YOKK

CITY

U n ited N a t’ i.
V a r ick 1,.......
W a n h in gt’ nT
VVarfdi.il/ljte1;
W en t B ideli..
W e s te r n ........
Y o r k v i ll e lj..

Jiunkrt
B id
225
200
150
625
620
240

BROOKLYN
1 e d fo r d lj___ 225
1
flroiu) w a y ll.. 250

Ante

B id

A sh

BROOKLYN
B rook ly n !) ..
8th W ardlj
5th A ven u e*
F ir s t............. '
K in g s C ol)..
Man u fa ctrs’
M echanicsli
M e r c h a n W ..
N a s s a u .........
N at <Jity____
N orth Sid cl)
P e o p le ’ s ! ) . . . .

B anks

B id

A sh

BROOKLYN
120
100
295
130
285
217%
100
350
290
180
200

85
110

17 th W ar dll.
S p ragu e.
2 0 tii W ard!)
U n io n !)..........
W a lla b o u t !).

130
200
140
140
105

213
160

T ru st C os.
n . y , orrY
A tla n tic T r . 2 7 5
B o w l’ gG reen 2 0 5

200
210

T ru st C o’s
C ’I R ’ ty B & T r
C en tra l T r ’ st
C ity T r u s t ...
C o lo n ia l........
C o n t in e n t a l.
F arm LodfcTr
F ift h A v e T r
G u a ra n ty T r
K n ic k T b ’ k ’ r
M a n h a tta n ..
M e r c a n t ile ..
M e r c h a n ts’ ..
M etrop olita n

• B id and ask ed p rice s; no sa les w ere m ade on thin flay. § L oss than LOO sh ares.
t B ale at S to c k E x c h a n g e o r at a u c tio n th is w eek .
8 T r u s t Go. c e r tific a te s .

B id
525
1905%
375 “
370
475
1500
1680
750
725
550
975
1355
625

% E x rig h ts.

A sh
650
11910
400
t
692
775

T ru st C o’s
M o r to n T ru s t
N Y Lifet& Tr
N Y S e c 6a T r
N o rth A m er.
R eal E s t T r ’t
S ta n d a rd T r’ t
T r (Jo o f Arn.
U n ion T r u s t
U S M tg & T r
U n it S tates .
W a sh in g to n .

B id
A sh
1190% t
\
1300
1375 11380
1265
400
405
1270
1390 1410
435
4 60
1080
425

T r u s t C o ’s

BROOKLYN
B r o o k ly n T r
FiatlniHli
F r a n k l in ___
I ia m ilto n ___
K in g s C o .
L Is*! L<fc T r .
M an u fa ct’ rs.
N a s s a u ..........
P e o iile ’ s .......
W illia m s b ’ g .

JHd
42 b
1 70
3 J5
302
4 50
276
305
21 L
350
f 211

A sh
330
310
3 20
220

!f B anka m ark ed w ith a p a ra g ra p h (11) a re S tate ban k a,

^Naw York Stock Exchange—Bond Record, Friday, Weekly and Yearly
O H V PV IN1-

UONI)ai
Y. STOCK E XC H A J^G K
W e e k E n d in g J a n . 17
I

u s

J$\
5 -

P r ic e
F r id a y
Jan. 17
b id

(mvtf ruiiieiii
ll
i

r e g is te r e d . <419301 4 ' ^
d 1930 Q-J
ill <U830 p j
1 reg
u
Q -J
€
;
U
3a ft g totered............A1918 Q -F
:
3a ct a pun...................A1918 Q F
1/
u 3a rt g a m all b o n d s .,/c l 9 l 8 Q F
U S 3d at o until b o n d s. . A-lO 18 Q -F
g lo tcL 'tid . . . . . . . . /llO O i Q-J
U S U
iii p u li.....................A. 1907 u J
gistered................ 1925 Q - F
g f
19.
upon
191
U S 6a regiaCored..
1904 Q- F
U
• cou p on .
a

A 8 k Low

|J|
j-

Range
Y ea r
1901

H ig h * o \ Low

H ig h

1 0 8 4 1 0 8 \ 1 0 8 4 D e o ’ 01 . . J 1 0 5 4 1 0 9 4
1 0 8 4 1 0 8 4 108 4 J a n *02 . . . . 1 0 5 4 109 4
. . . . 1 0 5 4 I 0534
1 0 7 4 1 0 8 4 1 0 7 4 O ct oi
10741114
4 108411*2
1084
1084 1094 1084
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . — .1]. . . . . . . . . . . .
10634 112
108 i o 9 |
108 D e c '0 J
1 1 1 4 11241 1 1 1 4 D e c ’ 01
11141144
7 112 1 1 5 4
1 1 1 4 11241 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 4
168 4 139 11 3 9 4 N o v ’ 01
137 1 3 9 4
1 3 9 4 1 4 0 11 3 9 4 D e c 'o i 3 17| 1 3 6 4 1 3 9 4
1 0 6 4 iu 6 Vi 110 M ay’ 01 . . . . n o
1114
IU7 4 1 0 7 V 107 4 D e c ’01
1074 1134

1*A G K *

HONRS
N. Y. STO C K E X C H A N G E
W e e k E nd in g J a n . 17

S I

P r ic e
F r id a y
Jan. 1 7

Week* 8
P a a ye or
La at s n ie

I'ss
v o

Pange
Yea r
190J

A sk Low
1lid
High A'ol Low High
C e n tra l o f N J —(C o n tin u e ilj
112
11634
A m D o ck & Im p gu 5 a .. 1921 J -J
112 4 .......... i 1 1 4 D e e ’01
...
L e & 11 ml U g e n g u g 5 » 1920 J -J
103 4 N ov ’01
L eh & W ilkw B C oa l 5a. 1 912 M-N
103 4 107
O-M * 102 4 104
10 24 10 2 4 10 102 105 4
MS
C en t P a c ilic See S o P a c ific t'n
C harley
S a v lt»t g 7a. .. 1936 J -J
1134
113 117
Chea ifc O h io g 6s ser A .7/1908 A 0 1 1 3 3 , ....... 1 1 3 4
G old 6 s ............................... a l 9 1 1 A -O 116 4 ....... 1 1 6 4 D / /• 01 .... 115 119
1 119
. . . . . . 121
12 1
122
l e t c o n so l g 5 s ...................19391 M-N 121
121 J ’ Jit’U 1
120 4 121
R e g is t e r e d ...................... 19891 M-N
G e n e ra l g o ld 4 4 3 ............. 19921 M-S 1 0 6 4 Sale 1 0 6 4 1 0 6 4 47 104 1 0 8 a4
103 A p r ’01
103
103
R e g is t e r e d ...................... 1992] M-S
.......... 103 N o v ’0 0 ....
C ra ig V a lle y l e t g o s .. . 1940 J J 106
1 103
104
R
A D iv 1st co n g 4 s . . 1989 J -J 104 Sale 1 04
1074
101 4 I h i*’01
99
103
2d c o n s o l g 4 s .................1989 J-J
••
••
W a rm S p r V a l 1st g 5 s . . 1941 M-S 106 .......... 1 0 1 4 A p r ’99 ....
1 100
1 0 1 4 .......... 1 0 1 4
1014
102 4
E liz L e x & B H gu g 5 s . 1902 M S
G r e e n b r ie r R y l s t g u g I s ’ 40 M-N
10 24 10534
C h ic
A lt l i l t s fu n d 6 s. . 1903 M-N 103 4 . . . . . . 1 0 3 4 Jan ’02
154 8 6
94
8 7 4 Sale
R e fu n d in g g 3 s .................1949 A O
874
88
M iss l l i v 11 1st s f g 6 s. .1912 A O
84
Sale
84
84*4 63 83 4 8 7 4
R a ilw a y 1 st lie n 3 4 s . .. 1950 J -J
.1 - J
1 1 0 0 % 109^8
C h ic B u r & Q c o n s o l 7 s . . . 1903 J J 10 14 bale 1 0 4 4 1 0 4 4
1 0 4 4 A p r ’Ou
OhiC/fc I o w a D iv 5tt......... 1905 F-A
1 101
102 4
*103 4
D e n v e r D iv 4 s ...................1922 F-A 103 4 Sale 103 4
6 IO I 34 1 0 4 4
1 0 2 4 Sale 102 4
102 4
Illin o is D iv 3 4 s ...............1949 J -J
J- J
114
115 4
l 1 5 4 A u g ’Ol
A -O 115 4 . .
.. 1 0 3 4 1 0 7
1 0 5 4 .......... 104*4 D e c ’01
S in k in g fu n d 4 s ............. 1919 A O
ill
111 ‘.i 11 110
113
112
N e b r a sk a E x te n s io n 4 s. 1927 M-N I l l
109 4 A u g ’01 .... 1 0 9 4 1 1 2 4
R e g is te r e d ...................... 1927 M-N
4
S o u th w e ste rn D iv 4 s ___ 1921 M-S 1 0 0 4 .......... L00;4 J ’n e’Ol .... 100 * 100*4
J oiu t bombs See U 1eat N orth
5 10 8 11234
109 4
D e b e n tu r e 5 s .....................1913 M-N 109 4 Sale 1 0 9 4
1 2 1 4 .......... 1 2 1 4 D ec ’01 .... 120 1 2 3 4
11till tv
J Oo COlliSOl u*S, . j «' 1 1
Chin & E ill 1 stS f c u r 6-s 1907 J -D 1 1 1 4 ........ l i 1 4 D e c ’01 .... 1 1 1 4 1 1 7
*1 3 8 ^ 1 ____ 13 8 4 D e c ’ 0) .... 136
140
1 st c o n s o l g 6 s
1934
5 115
127
1224
1224
G e n e ra l co n so l 1 st 5 s ___ 1937 M-N 1 2 2 ^ 123
115
A u g ’OO
R e g is t e r e d ...................... 1937 M-N
4
C h ic & I n d C R y 1st 5 s. 1936 J-J
1 2 0 4 — — 122 4 D e c ’01 — 1 1 2 3 125
C h ica g o & E r ie See E rie
.. 115 12 8
12 6 J a n ’ 02
C h ic I 11& L o u is v r e f 6 s . . . 1947 J -J 1 2 5 1 2 8
3 1067^11634
113
11 4
R e fu n d in g g o ld 5 s ........... 1947 J -J
1 1 3 4 11 113 117
1 1 3 4 .......... 1 1 3 4
L o u is v N A A Ch 1st 6s. 1910 J -J
182 4 J a n ’02 .... 180 19 4
C h ic M il & St P a u l co n 7s 1905 J -J
ill
D e c ’Oi .... 1 1 1 4 1 1 5 3 8
J 1 1 *4 1 1 2
T e rm in a l g o ld 5 s ............. 1914 J -J
G e n e ra l g 4 s se rie s A ../T 9 S 9 J -J 1 1 0 4 .......... L 1 0 4 110*4 34 110 1 1 4 4
105 4 F e b ’ 98
R e g is t e r e d .....................c l 989 Q-J
G e n e ra l g 3 V>s se rie s B cl s9 j - J
1164121
4
C h ic ifc L S u D iv g o s ___ 1921 j - j 1 1 6 1 ...... . 1 1 8 4 N o v ’ 01
1 i s r S ale 1 1 8 4 1 1 8 4
Chin ^ ATn R iv D iv 5s
19 l,6 j - j
118 1 2 2 4
b
116 119
s a le 1 1 4 4
115
115
C liic «fe P a c D iv 6 s ........... 1910 J -J
19 1 1 6 4 1 2 2
1L7 1 1 / r3. 1 1 7 4
117
C h ic <fc P W 1 s t g 5 s ........1921 J -J
D ak < G t S o g 5 s ............. 1!H 6 J - J 1 1 2 4 .......... 112 4 J a n ’ 02
fc
1114 1 1 0 4
1 3 1 4 ......... 137 4 J ’ ly ’ 9
F ar & S ou assn g 6 s ........1924 J -J
1204 1264
H a st & D D iv 1st 7 s ........1910 J -J 1 2 0 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 O ct ’ 01
1 0 7 4 .......... 1 0 9 4 P e e ’ 01
10941104
1 st 5 s................................. 1910 J-J
1185 1S8
185 O ct ’ 01
I & D E x te n 1 st 7 s ......... 1908 J -J
1174H 9
1 1 7 4 O ct ’ 01
L a C ro sse <fc D 1st 5 s ___ 1919 J - J
1144
108 1 1 0 4
1 1 0 4 N o v ’ 01
M in e r a l P o in t D iv 5 s ___ 1910 J -J
114 .......... 114 J a n ’ 02
III4 4 IIO 4
So M in n D iv 1st 6 s ......... 1910 J -J
1174
S o u th w e st D iv 1 st 6 s ___ 1 9 0 !! J -J
1 1 3 4 1 1 4 4 1 1 3 4 J a n ’ 02 . . . 1 1 3
1164120
W is iC lit inn D iv g os
t
19‘ '1 J -J
116 ......... 1 1 6 4 J a n ’ 01
116 1 1 9 4
M il & N o 1 st M L 6 s . . ! . 1910 J -D 1 1 4 4 .......... 116 J ’ l y ’ 01
1184 122
1 st c o n s o l 6 s ...................1913 J-D 119 .......... 1 1 8 4 S ep ’ 01
C h ica g o & N o r t h w e s te r n
140 J a n ’ 02
1394142 4
C o n so lid a te d 7 s . . _____ 1915 Q-F 1 3 9 4 1 4 1
1 0 2 4 108
1034
1034
G o ld 7 s..................................1902 J -D 103 104
102 108
R e g is te r e d ...................... 1902 J -D 1 0 3 4 ...... 102 D e c ’ 01
1084112
E x te n s io n 4 s ..........1886-1926 F -A 1 0 8 4 ....... 109 D e c ’ 01
107 M a r’ 00
R e g is te r e d ........... 188 6 -1 9 2 6 F -A 1 0 7 4 1 1 0
1094 H I
G e n e ra l g o ld 3 4 s ............. 1987 M-N 1 0 8 4 ____ 111 O ct ’ 01
103 N o v ’ 98
R e g i s t e r e d ...................p i 987 Q -F
S in k in g fu n d 6 s ...1879-1921) A -O 1 1 5 4 1 1 6 4 115 J a n ’ 02
11341164
111 O ct ’ 00
R e g is t e r e d ........... 1879 -1 9 2 9 A -O
S in k in g fu n d 5 s . . .1 8 7 9 -1 9 2 9 A -O *i08*’ i l o’ * 1 0 S 4 J a n ’ 0 ‘2
1064 1104
10741074
107 4 M a y ’ 01
R e g is te r e d ........... 1879-1929 A -O
108 1 1 0 4
Sale
D e b e n tu r e 5 s .....................1909 .M-N 1 0 9 .............. LOS4
109
108 O c t ’ 01
108 1 0 8 4
R e g is te r e d .......................1909 M-N .........110
115
11441174
D e b e n tu r e 5 s .....................1921 A-O 1 1 4 4 ....... 115
114 114
R e g is te r e d .......................1921 A-O 1 1 4 4 ....... 114 O ct ’ 01
12141254
S in k in g fu n d d eb 5 s ........1933 M-N 1 2 2 4 1 2 4 4 122 J a n ’ 02
122 123
123 M a y ’ 01
R e g is te r e d .......................1933 M-N
D e s M o < fe M in n 1 s t 7 s .. 1907 F-A
113 113
M ilw & M a d iso n 1 st 6 s . . 1905 M-S * 1 0 9 4 ......... 113 J an ’ 01
N o r th Illin o is 1st 5 s ___ 1910 M-S * 1 1 0 4 ........ 1 1 0 4 O ct ’ 01
IIO 4 I H
11041114
O tt C F & St P a u l 1st 5s 1909 M-S *110 ........ 1 1 0 4 A u g ’ 01
m
W in o n a & S t P e t 2 d 7 s . . 1907 | - n | 1 1 8 -8 ........ 1 2 0 4 N o v ’ 00
13541414
M il L S & W e s t 1st g 6s 1921 M-N 1 3 0 -8 ........ 137 4 J a n ’ 02
128
E x t & Im p s fu n d g 5s 1929 F-A 1 2 8 4 ......... 128
12341274
A sh la n d D iv 1 s t g 6 s .. 1925 M-S 1 4 1 4 ........ 1 4 3 4 A p r ’ 01
1434 1434
1 3 9 4 J a n ’ 02
M ic h D iv 1st g 6 s ..........1921 J -J
1384143
1394141
10741074
C o n v e r tib le d eb 5 s ___ 1907 F -A 1 0 7 4 ........ 1 0 7 4 E e l)’ 01
113 113
I n c o m e s .......................... 1911 M-N 1 1 0 4 ........ 113 A p r ’ 01
C h ic R o c k I s l & P ac 6 s . . . 1917 J -J 128 130
1284
1 2 8 4 10 1 2 7 4 1 3 2 4
126 1 3 2 4
R e g is te r e d ...................... 1 9 1 . J - J j 1 2 6 4 ........ 126 D e c ’ 01
G en era l g o ld 4 s ................. 19S8 J - J 1 1 0 5 4 Sale 1 0 5 4
1 0 5 4 163 1 0 5 4 H 0
R e g is te r e d .......................1988 J-J
1054 1074
1 0 6 4 N o v ’ 01
994 994
D e s M < F t D 1 s t 4 s . . . . 1905 J -J
fc
9 9 4 F e b ’ 01
S 6 4 A u g ’ 00
1 st 2 4 s ..............................1905 J-J
97 D e c ’ 00
E x te n s io n 4 s .................1905 J -J
1 1 0 4 J a n ’ 02
11041124
K eo k & D es M 1 st 5 s ___ 1923 A-O
C h ic & St L See A tc h T & Sa Fe
C h ic St L & N O See 111 C ent
C h ic St L & P itts See P e n n Co
1344142
1404
C h ic S t P M & O con 6 s . . . l 9 3 ( J -D 140 V Sale 140
140 J a n ’ 0 2 . . . . 134 1 4 0 4
Oil S t P & M in n 1st g 6s 191s M-N 140
140 140
N o r W is c o n s in 1st 6 s . . .1 9 3 / J -J
138 ......... 140 M a r’ 01
127 132
S t P & S C ity 1 st g 6 S ...191Y A-O
......... 11294 1 2 9 4
87
98
89
* 8 8 “ 89 I 89
C h ica g o T e r T ra n s g 4 s . . .1 9 4 J -J
......... 1 1 9 4 N o v ’ 01
117 1 1 9 4
C h ic & W e s t I n d g e n g 6s q\9 3 : Q -il
......... 1100 O c t ’ 99
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Claaa O 4 a ............................I9ut J - J
........ . . . . . . .
C u r r e n c y fu n d in g 4 a ___ 1921 J -J
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B e lle v & C ar See I llin o is C en
B k ly n <fe M o n ta u k See L o n g !
B r u n s & W e s t See S a v FI & V T
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B u ffa lo R & P g e n g 5 s . . . l 9 3 ‘ .M-S
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R o c k & P it t s 1 st g
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5 M-N
5 O ct
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7 J -J
6 J -J
2 M-N
G e n e ra l g o ld 5 s ................. 198" 7 J -J
7 Q -J
A tch T & S F e

B

97 S a le
1 0 3 4 Side
93 4 Sale
9 3 4 Sale
108

964
97
8 95 101
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1 0 4 4 346 1 0 1 4 1 0 5 4
103
1 0 3 4 67 1 0 1 4 1 0 4
924
95 4 660 8 6 34 99
9 4 4 J a n ’ 02
92
95
440 9 0
924
95
97

.......... 1 0 8 4 D e c ’ 01

108

109

95 4 Sale
96
9 5 4 75 9 4 4 9734
. . . . . 97 D e c ’ 01 . . . .
95
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1 0 3 4 Sale 1 0 2 4
1 0 3 4 131 99 105
6 1004104
1024
1024
1 0 5 4 161 1 0 0 4 1 1 0
1 0 4 4 Sale 104
2 S74 914
90 4
89
904 904
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9 0 4 233 8 8 4 9 2 4
9 0 4 J ’ n e ’ Ol
9 0 4 91
.......... 111 M a y ’ OO
112 N o v ’ 01
112 112

9 0 4 Sale
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1184119

1 1 8 4 J a n ’ 02 •••• 115

......................
127 131
1274130

103 A p r ’ 97
1 2 8 4 .......... 127 O ct ’ 01
1 2 7 4 ......... 1 2 7 4 D e c ’ 01
100

N o v ’ 99

99 3 02
101 N o v ’ 01
10441054 1044 1044
1 2 4 4 J a n ’ 02
1244126
117 N o v ’ Ot
117 .......... 1 1 3 4 D e c ’ OO
1 0 5 4 Sale
1094111

92

..........

IO534 106
IO 934 1 0 9 4
107 A u g ’ Ol

101 101
6 1034 10S4
11941274

10 i 0 5 4 1 0 9
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1064107

91

N o v ’ 01
N o v ’ 01

95

96
119

9 1 4 J a n ’ 02

..........1 0 5 ^ 103
1 2 0 4 ......... 122

1184

1034
122

1074
1 0 8 4 85 9 7 4 1 0 8 4
105 4 S ep ’ 01
105 4 1 0 5 4
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7 6 S ale
76
7 6 4 51 6 0
33
33
54 20
33 S a le
364
8
21
19
19 Sale
184
19
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92 N o v ’ 01
9 1 4 92
95 D e c ’ 9 f ___
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102 J ’ n e ’ 9C _
IO 534 10534
1 0 3 4 .......... IO 534 D e c ’ 01
102410S
1 0 3 1 s ......... 1 0 3 4 J a n ’ 0 134
1 3 3 S a le 133
198 127
1374
131 1 3 4 1 3 2 4
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133

1 0 8 4 Sale

M IS C E L L A N E O U S B O N D S-C on tinu ed 011 Next Page.
S tre e t R a ilw a y
B r o o k ly n R a p T r g 5 s ........1945
A t l A v B k ly n im p g 5 s .. 1 9 3 4
B k C it y 1st c o n 5 s .1 9 1 6 ,1 9 4 1
B k Q C o & S c o n g u g 5 s .1941
B k ly n U n E l 1 st g 4 -5 S .1 9 5 0
K in g s C o E l 1 st g 4 s ___ 1949
N a s s a u E le c g u g 4 s ___ 1951
C ity & S R y B a lt 1 st g 5 s. 1922
C on n Ry<fc L 1 st & r e f g 4 4 s ’ 51
D e n C on T r C o 1 st g 5 s . . . 1933
D e n T ra m Co co n g 6 s ..1 9 1 0
M e t R y C o 1 st g u g 6 s .. 1911
D o t C it S t R y 1 st co n g 5 s . 1005
G r R a p id s R y 1st g 5 s . . . a l 9 1 6
L o u is R y Co 1 st co n g 5 s ..1 9 3 0
M a r k e t S t C R y 1st g 6 s ..1 9 1 3
M e t S t R y g e n c o l tr g 5 s. 1997
Bway<fc 7th A v 1st e g 5 s 1943

A -C
J -J
J -J
M-N
F -A
F -A
j-j
J -D
J -J
A -O
J -J
J -J
J -J
J -D
J -J
J -J
F-A
J -D

1 0 8 4 ..........
.............. .
.....................
100 Sale
1 0134 Sale
9 1 4 Sale
.....................
......................
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.....................
.....................
.....................
.....................
..............

1084
1 0 8 4 10 1 0 3 4 H 0 4
110 J a n ’ 99
115 D e c ’ 01
111 115
100
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95
904
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ib o ^ N o v ’o i —

—

ib 0 4 io i”

S treet R a ilw a y
M e t St R y —( C o n tin u ed )
C ol tfe 9th A v 1 st g u g 5 s. 1993 M
L e x A v t& P F 1st g u g 5s 1993 M
T h ir d A v e R R c o n g u 4 s 2 0 0 0 1J •
T h ir d A v e R y 1 st g 5 s .. 1987 1J ■
.Met W S E l (C h ic) 1st g 4 s. 1938 F
Alii E l R y & L 3 0 -y r g 5 s .1926 F
M in n St R y 1st co n g 5 s . .1 9 1 9 J
St P a u l C ity C ab con g 5 s. 1937 J ■
G u a ra n teed g o ld 5 s ......... 1937 J
U n io n E l (C h ic) 1st g 5 s .. 1945 V
W C h ic St 4 0 -y r 1st c u r 5s.l92S|M
4 0 -y ea r c o n so l g o ld 5 s . . . 1936 M

122
122

1122 D e c ’ Oil
1
123 Jan ' 0 2 '
99V 499
99 G
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124 J an *02 --1 0 2 4 J an ’02
106 O ct 99
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1 0 9 4 ....... lll>
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G a s a n d E l e c t r ic L ig h t
109 M a r’ 9 8
AI lanttt G L Co 1 st g 5 s . .. 1947 J
.....................
0 111? 4 1*22 4 lies U G as tr ctl's s 1 g 5 s. 1939 J
91 Q O ct 98
1 2 0 4 Sale i 2 6 4 ” 120:9
0 ,118 1 2 2 4 B k ly n U G as 1st co n g 5 s .1945 M
117
11
117
1 1 8 4 ......... 1 1 8 4 1 1 8 4
N o prioe F rid ay ; la test price this w eek . a D u e Jan
d D u e A pr e D u e May y D u o J ’ ne h D u e J ’ly A D u e A u g p D u e Nov uOne D eo

126
123 4
105
126
1034

•••« « •
.........
12 Ih ft's >119 4
^Option sale

January 18, 15)2.1

Bond Record— Continued— Page

HON IDS

J'rice
F ri d a u
Jan. 17

K . Y . STOCK E X C H A N G E
WHJEK KNDINU JAN. 17
C h o c Ok & Q pen g 5 « . . -olO 10 J - J
C in II < 1) con sol h f 7 ft... 1995 A O
V
‘2 d g o ld 4 % S ....................... HIM7 J >J
O in 1) <fc 1 1st gu g 5 ft.. 194 1 M-N
C T St L
C See C 0 C < S t L
&
O in S & O f i w C O O S t h
C lea r Hold & M ali
B It < V
fc
C le v e la n d O in C ld c So S t H om s
’ D
G en era l g 4n..................... 199:'
C a iro D iv 1 st g old 4 s — 1939 J - J
C in W So M D iv 1 st g 4 b . 1991 J -J
S t L D iv 1 st co l tr g 4 s . .1 9 9 0 M-N
R e g is te r e d ....................... 1990 M-N
S p r So Col D iv 1 st g 4 s . .1 9 4 0 M-S
W W V a l D iv 1st g 4 s . . . 1940 J -J
C I S t L Sb C co n so l 6 s . .1 9 2 0 M-N
1 s t g old 4a..................... AT9M0 Q-F
R e g is t e r e d ................7 d 936 Q -F
C in S ifc Cl co n 1 st g 5 s .. 1928 J -J
C C C <fc I C0I180178.......... 1914 J -D
C on sol sin k fu n d 7 s -----1914 J -D
G en era l co n so l g o ld 6s. 1934 J -J
R e g is te r e d ................... 1934 J -J
Tnd B1 <fe W 1 st p r e f 4 s . 1 9 4 0 A -0
0 In d & W l s t p f 5 s . . . d l 9 3 8 Q -J
P e o & E ast 1 st con 4 s . . . 1940 A -0
In c o m e 4 s .........................1990 A p r
C l L o r So W li c o n 1 st g 5 s .1933 A -O
C le v So M a rietta See P e n n R R
C le v < M ah on V a l g 5 s . . . 1938 J -J
fc
R e g is te r e d ....................... 1988 Q-J
C le v & P itts See P e n n Co
C ol M id lan d 1 st g 3 -4 s ___ 1947 J - J
1 st g o ld 4 s ...........................1947 J -J
C olora d o So S ou 1 st g 4 s . ..1 9 2 9 F-A
C olu m So G r e e n v See So R y
C ol So H o c k V a l See H o c k V a l
ol C on n So T e rm See N So W
on n So P a s R iv s 1 s t g 4 s . 1943 A -0
ak So G t S o See C M So St P
alias So W a c o See M K & T
D e l L a c k So W e s te r n 7 s . . . 1907 M -S
M o r r is So E s s e x 1 st 7 s . . . 1914 M-N
1 s t c o n s o l g u a r 7 s ........1915 J -D
R e g is te r e d ................... 1915 J -D
N Y L a c k & W 1 st 6s . ..1 9 2 1 J -J
C o n s tru ctio n 5 s ........... 1923 F -A
T e rm So im p r o v e 4 s ___ 1923 M-N
S y r B in g & N Y 1 st 7 s ..1 9 0 6 A -O
W a r r e n 1 st r e f g u g 3 % s .2 0 0 0 F -A
D e l So H u d 1 s t P a D iv 7 s . 1917 M -S
R e g is te r e d ....................... 1917 M-S
A lh & S us 1 st c o n g u 7 s .l9 0 6 A -0
R e g is te r e d ....................... 1906 A -0
G u a r g o ld 6s ................... 1906 A -0
R e g is te r e d ................... 1906 A -0
R e n s So S aratoga 1 s t 7 s. 1921 M-N
R e g is t e r e d ....................... 1921 M-N
D e l R iv R R B rid g e See P a R R
D e n v So R G r i s t c o n g 4 s . 1936 J -J
C on sol g o ld 4 % s ................1936 J -J
Im p r o v e m e n t g o ld 5 s . . . 1928 J -D
R io G r S o g u S ee R io G r So
D e n So S W e s t g e n s f g 5s 1929 J -D
D e s M o i & F t D See C R & I P
D e s M & M i n n See C h & N W
D e s M o i U n R y 1 s t g 5 s . .1 9 1 7 M-N
D e t M So T o l See L S So M So
D e t So M a c k 1 st lie n g 4 s . 1995 J -D
G o ld 4 s .................................. 1995 J -D
D e t M & M l d g r 3 % s s e r A 1911 A -O
D e t S o u 1st g 4 s ................. 1951 J -D
O h io S o u D iv 1 s t g 4 s . . .1941 M -S
D u l & I r o n R a n g e l e t 5 s .. 1937 A -O
R e g is t e r e d ........................... 1937 A -O
2 d 6s ......................................1916 J -J
D u l S o S h ore So A t l g 5 s .. 1937 J -J
a st o f M in n S e e S t P M & M
a st T e n V a & G a See S o R y
E lg in J o l So E a st 1 st g 5 s . 1941 M-N
Elnz L e x So B San S ee C So 0
E lm C o rt So N o See L e h & N Y
E r ie 1 st e x t g o ld 4 s ............. 1947 M-N
2 d e x t g o ld 5 s ..................... 1919 M -S
3 d e x t g o ld 4 % s .................192 M-S
4 th e x t g o ld 5 s ................... 1920 A -O
$ th e x t g o ld 4 s ................... 1928 J -D
1 s t c o n s o l g o ld 78..............1920 M -S
1 s t c o n s o l g fu n d 7 s ........1920 M -S
E r ie 1 st co n g 4 s p r io r .. 1996 J -J
R e g is t e r e d ....................... 1996 J -J
1 s t c o n s o l g e n lie n g 4 s. .1 9 9 6 J -J
R e g is t e r e d ....................... 1996 J - J
P e n n c o ll tr g 4 s ............. 1951 F -A
B u ff N Y & E r ie 1 st 7 s ..1 9 1 6 J -D
B u ff & 8 W g o ld 6s ..........1908 J -J
S m a ll.................................. 1908 J -J
C h ic So E r ie 1 st g o ld 5 s .. 1982 M-N
J e ff R R 1 st g u g 5 s ___ a l9 0 9 A - 0
L o n g D o ck co n s o l g 6s . . 1935 A -O
C oal So R R 1 st c u r g u 6s . 1922 M-N
D o c k So Im p 1 st c u r 6 s . . 1913 J -J
N Y & G reen L gu g 5 s . 1946 M-N
M id R R o f 1 TJ 1 st g 6s . 1910 A -0
S
N Y S u s So W 1 st r e f 5 s. 1937 J -J
2 d g old 4%fl..................... 1937 F -A
G en era l g o ld 5 s ............. 1940 F -A
T e rm in a l 1st g o ld 5 s . . .1 9 4 3 M-N
R e g is 8 5 ,0 0 0 e a c h ... 1943 M-N
W lJk So E a 1 st g u g 5 s . 1942 J -D
E r ie So P itts See P e n n Co
E u r e k a S p rin g s 1 st g 6s . . 1933 F-A
E v a n s v ille So T e r r e H a u te
1st co n so l 6ft....................... 1921 J -J
1 st g en era l g old 5 b ......... 1942 A -0
M t V e r n o n 1 st g o ld 6s . . 1923 A -0
B ull Co B ra n ch 1 st g 5 s . 1930 A -0
Ev<fc In d 1 s t con g u g 6 s . . ! 9 2 6 J -J

W eeics
Mange o r
Last Sale

O ol
cq$!

M ange
) ’ea r
J 1)01

BONDS

N. Y . STO CK E X C H A N G E
WIGHR END INC* JAN. 17

/‘rice
F rid a a
Jan. 17

\/H(i
|JargO So Ho See ('h M So HI J
*
H igh No Low H ig h
1<li Low
v
I 1 lintttt- p croM See Peru Mar
105
1IO
6
t
I 1 1 % D e e ’01
iYi% il l % Flit Oen So Pen 1H g 5h . 19 18 J -J
1Ht land gr ext gold 5h. . 1930 J-J
no
O c .i’ o o
106
Consol gold 5k ...............1913 J -J
n 4 *2 i n %
iiv k iii
Fort Ht U l> Co Iftt g 4'v-ft 1.94 I J -J
FI W
Den <' 1ftt g 6 h
I 92 1 J D 100

ad
1 10
111 %
114

1 0 3 % 104

103
10 3 % or, 101
105%
99 J a n ’ 01
99
99
104*2 D e c ’ 01
98% 104 %
1.03% 103%
102 105%
99 MttV’ 99
100 J ’ n c 'o 1
i '()<>’ " i o o " '
83 N o v ’ 09

105

105

104

8
D

111

2

116
130

N o v ’ 01

104

.......... 11 5 % O c t ’ 01
133*2 1 3 4 % J a u ’ 02

1 06

11 3% 11 5 %
130 138

1 3 5 % D e c ’ 01

133

i0 4 % N o v ’0 i

1 3 4 1t

104 % 104 %

138%

09 Sale
15 95 100*.
98%
99
7 7 % S ale
76
77% 108 4 5 % 79%
1 1 6 * 2 ........- 115 N o v ’ 01
115 115
1 2 9 % M a y ’ 01
8 3 Sale
82
83
9 2 % S ale

12 9 % 130%

82
83% 45
83 J a n ’ 02
91%
9 2% 216

119*3
13 5 %
136%

11 8 %
138
139
140
133% 134*2 133%
119%
1 1 7 5e . . . .
104%
116
11 6 %

78
77
83

87 %
87 %
90 %

il5 %
i i 'i ’ *
i ’5 0 %

117% 123%
13 6 % 140
136% 140%

] 17% D e c ’ Ol
149 A u g ’ 01
1 1 4 % D e c ’ 01
122 J ’ n e ’ 99
11 0 % D e c ’ Ol
1 0 9 % N o v ’ 01
152 O ct ’ 01
151 J a n ’ 01

147%

N o v ’ 01
O ct ’ 01
N o v ’ 01
O c t ’ 98
J a n ’ 02
J ’ ly ’ 01
D e c ’ 01
D e c ’ Ol

14 5 % 147%
149 150
1 1 4 % 117

13 3 %
118%
104%
116

iio % m %
109% 11 2 %
150% 1 5 3 %
151 151

1 0 1 % Sale 101 % 101 % 37 100
7 108
1 1 0 1 1 1 % 111 % 111 %
107
110% 111% 110% D e c ’ Ol
89%

89%

89%

111

105

89%

F e b ’ 01

102 J ’l y ’ 01
90% 9 2 % 9 0 % D e c ’ 01
3 3 % J a n ’ 02
85** *8 6 % 8 6 % J a n ’ 02
94
94
9 4 S ale
113 D e c ’ Ol

137
119%
104%
117%

10 4 %
114%
113%
96

1 0 8 % 111

102
85
29
85
13 93%
110%

102
93
35%
87%
95
116

115

D e c ’ Ol

112

113

114

D e c ’ Ol

112% 113

116

E

114%
11 6 %

121%

11 6 %
1 21%
10 8 %
141 142
9 9 % S ale
8 9 ” S ale

11 5 % 11 5 %
121 J a n ’ 02
111 J ’l y ’ 01

121%

121%

10 8 % 109%
140% J a n ’ 02
137 N o v ’ 01
99%
99%
99 A u g ’01
88%
89%

115
119

11 9 %

121

111 118
1 123% 124
16 107 108
139 14 3 %
135% 137
103 95 % 101 %
99
90
164 82% 9 1 %

94% 95
132 ____

94%
95% ’ *79 92 % 9 6%
133 J a n ’ 02
1 3 6 % 13 6 %

123%
105%
130
113

123% 123%
106 J a n ’ 02
137 N o v ’ 01

116
105
137

11 8 %
109
116
11 5 %
94

A u g ’ 01
O c t ’ 98
J a n ’ 02
11 5 %
F e b ’ 01

11 8 % 121

112%

112%

1 1 6 117
..........119

1 1 0 % 1 1 1 % 110 % 110 %
11 5 % N o v ’ 01
116 . . . .
112 % Sale

65

115
111
94
100
115%

123%
108
140

118%
119
94
110%
115%

107% 112

N o v ’ 97

125% D e c ’ Ol
1 0 9 % J a n ’ 02

112

101

10 8 %

123
107

126
111

114

122%
109

108

114

A u g ’ 01

Ft \V X IC Or j H g 3 4 m. 1928 I J
ir>
i
i < I lia r So H A See. So Pac ( In
a
\ Hal 1 & 1 of 1882 1st 5 m. 1913 A Q
1
1
Ouife A ll Ry I hI con f>s..ol94 5 J - J
On Car So N o 1st gu g 5k . . 1029 J -J
Georgia Pacific See So Ry
Gila V G S- Nor See So Pan Co
Gouv
Oawcgat See N Y ( lent
Grand Rap A Ind See Penn Co
G ray’s P t Term See St L S W
Gt N or—C B & Q col 11 r 4 h 1921 J-J
Greenbrier R y See d ie s & O
an So Ht Jo See C B Sb Q
ousatonic See N Y N H So H
Ilo ck Val 1stconsolg4% s. 1999 J-J
R egistered......................1999 J-J
Col So II V 1st ex t g 4s.. 1948 A - O
1 oust E So W T e x See So Pac
1
11 oust So T e x Cen See So Pac Co
llinois Central 1st g 4 s .. 1.951 J -J
R egistered...................1951 J-J
1at gold 3 %s...................1951 J -J
R egistered...................1951 J -J
1st gold 3s sterlin g ........1951 r/i-s
R egistered...................1951 M-S
Coll Tru st gold 4s......... 1952 A - 0
R egistered...................1952 A - 0
L N O So T e x gold 4s___1953 M-N
R egistered...................1953 M-N
Cairo B ridge gold 4s___ 1950 J-D
Lou isville D iv gold 3%s.l953 J-J
R egistered...................1953 J -J
Midland D iv r e g 5s........1921 F-A
St Louis D iv gold 3s___ 1951 J-J
R egistered...................1951 J-J
Gold 3%s......................1951 J-J
R egistered............... 1951 J-J
Spring D iv 1st g 3 %s... 1951 J - J
W estern Lines 1st g 4s.. 1951 F-A
R egistered...... ............1951 F-A
B ellev & Car 1st 6s ...... 1923 J -D
Carl) & Shaw 1st g 4 s... 1932 M-S
Chic St L & N O g 5s.. .1951 J-D
R egistered...................1951 J-D
Gold 3 %s......................1951 J-D
R e gi ster ed................1951 J-D
Memph D iv 1st g 4s. ..1951 J - D
Re gister ed................1951 J-D
St L Sou 1st gu g 4s___1931 M-S
Ind B1 & W est See C C C & St L
In d Dec & W 1st g 5s...... 1935 J -J
1st guar gold os.............. 1935 J -J
In d 111 & l a 1st g 4s........1950 J -J
In t So Great N o r 1st g 6s.. 1919 M-N
2d gold os....................... 1909 M-S
3d gold 4s....................... 1921 M-S
Io w a Central 1st gold 5s.. 1938 J -D
Refunding g 4s.............. 1951 M-S
Jefferson R R See E rie
al A & G R See L S So M S,
an So M ich See T o l & O C
K C F t S & M See St L So S F
K C & M R So B 1st gu g 5s. 1929 A -O
Kan C So Pacific See M K So T
Kan City Sou 1st gold 3 s .. 1950 A -0
R egistered......................1950 A -0
Kansas M id See S t L So S F
Kentucky Cent See L So N
K eok & Des Mo See C R I So P
K n o x ville & Ohio See So R y
ake E rie & W 1st g 5 s .. 1937 J -J
2d gold 5s.................... 1941 J -J
N orth Ohio 1st g u g 5s.. 1945 A -O
L Sho So M ich S See N Y Cent
Lehigh V a l (Pa) coll g 5s. 1997 M-N
R egistered 5s................. 1997 M-N
Leh V a l N Y 1st gu g 4 % s.l9 4 0 J -J
R egistered......................1940 J -J
Leh V T e r R y 1st gu g 5s. 1941 A -O
R egistered......................1941 A -O
Leh V Coal Co 1st gu g 5s. 1933 J -J
R egistered......................1933 J - J
Leh So N Y 1st guar g 4 s .. 1945 AI-S
R egistered......................1945 M-S
E l C So N 1st g i s t p f 6s.1914 A-O
Gold guar 5s................1914 A -0
Leh & Hud R See Cent of N J
Leh So W ilkesb See Cent of N J
L eroy & Caney V a l See Mo P
L on g Dock See E rie
L on g Island 1st con g5s.7tl931 Q -J
1st consol gold 4s........7U931 Q -J
General gold 4s.............. 1938 J-D
F erry gold 4 %s.............. 1922 M-S
Gold 4s............................1932 J -D
U nified gold 4 s .............. 1949 M-S
Debenture gold 5s......... 1934 J-D
B klyn So M ont 1st g 6s.. 1911 M-S
1st 5s............................1911 M-S
N Y B & M B 1st con g 5s 1935 A -O
N Y So R B 1st g 5s...... 1927 M-S
N o r Sh B 1st con g gu5s ol 932 Q -J
Lou isv So N asliv gen g 6s.1930 J-D
Gold 5s.......................... .1937 M-N
Unified gold 4s.............. 1940 J -J
R egistered...................1940 J -J
Coll trust gold 5s........... 1931 M-N
Coll trust 5-20 g 4s .1903-1918 A -0
Cecilian Branch 7s........1907 M-S
E I I & Nash 1st g 6s ___ 1919 J -D
L Cin So L e x gold 4 % s... 1931 M-N
N C So M 1st gold 6 s___1930 J -J

H
I

A

Mange
>> r
'U
ra n t

Lanai- or
! La at Fait'
hIc

Low

H igh

No

100

Low

S op ’00 .

High,

____________

3 09

ib?*;

J05 M a r’08|
106%
106%
8 0 % D ec 'Oil
104

10 1

109

0

7 10!
<
109

104

9 8 % N o v ’ 00

109

109

90

7 0 ' Au x
67
02

Dee ’ 0 J

105
J09

90% 141

101

21

103 % 110

Hale

108

ib*4 ’ Oct ’01

i 0*4' * 100%

.......... 115%, A p r ’01
......... 113*2 M a r ’00

114
113

107%

106

107

90

115 % 115%

108

* ........107%

106 D e c ’Ol
1 0 2 % A p r ’98

1(M ' 10 7%

105% Sale

105% 105%
102 Oct ’ 01
105
105%.

104

106

102

106

i05% Sale

102

98

121 %

J a n ’ 00

101

101 %

102

100% 103

123 May’99
90% A p r ’ 01

90

91

101% A u g ’ 01
101% Oct ’99
100 N o v ’O
O
114% J a n ’ 02

i b l % 3 02%

124
90
130
124

M ay’ 01
N o v ’ 98
D e c ’Ol
S e p ’01
1 0 1 % Oct ’01

124

106

Oct ’01

106

107%

........104% 105

D e c ’ Ol

105

i ‘0 5”

109

N o v ’ 01

105

109

114%

128%

1 0 5 % .....

112*2115 %

124

126 130
123% 124

101% 101%

100 % D e c ’ Ol

125 V, 24 123 128
125% Sale 125
102% Sale 100 % 30 2 % 62 96 103
S 65
SO
75
76
73
75
116% ...... . 11 6 % 116%
2 11 5 .] I 19
95 Jan ’ 02
94
94

K

L

71% Sale

..........1 2 2 %
* ..........114

71%
72
113
6 3 % O ct ’ 00

120% J a n ’ 02 . . . . 118% 124*8
1 117 120
116
116
113 J a n ’ 02 . . . . 110 115%
109

J a n ’ 02 . . . .

100

97

110% 110%

. . . . 108% 111%
. . . . 108% 111
.. .. 114% 118%

109 110% 110% N o v ’ 01
1 0 6 % ......... L08% N o v ’ 01
116 .......... 1 1 8 % O ct ’ 01
109 V O ct ’ 99
1 0 6 % ......... 109 J ’ n e’ 01
9 6 % .........

66 •a

^ • 109

N o v ’ 01 ___

109

95

100

5 121

123

.. 1 1 8 %
.......... 101 *3 S ep ’ 99

1 2 1 % ......... 121%
101
103

......... 102
104
105
100
99%
9 9 % Sale
95

121%

J a n ’ 02 ..... 100 105
J ’ n e ’ Ol •« •• 102% 105
O ct ’ 00
99% 13 97 101
F e b ’ Ol
95
95

......... 1 1 0 %
- 1 1 4 117%
1 1 2 % .........
1 1 2 % .........
1 1 8 % .........
113 .........
101 % Sale

109% 110

109% J ’n e ’ Ol
107 J a n ’ 99
112% J a n ’ 02
113 D e c ’ 00
119
119
114 S ep ’ 01
1 01% 101 v,
100 J a n ’ 02
113 .......... 113 N o v ’ 01
1 0 0 % 101
101 J an ’ 02
106 D e c ’ ()()
1 1 3 " 116% 113 % D e c ’ Ol
103 J a n ’ 98
* ......... 3.29% 129% 129%

40 112 121
111 1 1 4 %
12 99% 104%
110% 114%
99 102
113
5 130

116
131 %

M IS C E L L A N E O U S BO ND S—Continued on Next Paige.

Gun and Electric Light
S ee P G & O C o
C o lu m b u s G as 1 st g 5 b ___ 1932
C on n Ry S L See S treet R y
o
Con Gas Oo See P G So C Co
D e tr o it C ity G as g 5 s ......... 1923
D e t G as Co eon 1 st g Oh. . . 1 9 18
E d EJ J J B kn See K Co K \,So P
J
E d E 111 See N Y G So K TjH So P
K g G L N Y 1 st con g 5 h. . j 932
E d G So Fuel See P 6 So (J Go
G a « So E le c B e rg Co c g 5 s. 1949
G t Jiao G L Go 1 st g 5 s . . .193 5
K 0 M o Gas Go Jst g 5 s . . J 9 22
K in g s Co El L So P g 5ft. ..7 937
ChGL&CCo

<j3ns a n d E le c t r ic Biiglit

J-J *

94

J-J
F-A * i b v r
M-S

119

93
105

12 2

Jan ’02 .... 94
102
Oct ’ 01

118% Oct ’ 01 .... 118% 118%

J-D ........ ........ 61 % Oct ’01 —
j 07 ^ im o ’O
O
F-A
AO
A O
P u rch ase m oney 6 s ..........1997i A O
124 124 % 124 % D e c ’ 01 ....
E d El II Bkn 1 ftt con g 4s 1939 J-J
97 Jan ’ 02
97
Jjhc G as Ijof S t L 1 st g 5 s .el 919 Q-F 108% 1 1 0
109% 109%
4'
M at F uel G as Go See P eop Gas|
• N o p rice F i

it c i t b ld

103
106

ed this w eek,

a D u e Jan

61% 102*2

123% 126%
96
97%
107 110
(f In to A p r

N ew ark Cons Gas con g 5s 1948 J-D
N Y G E L H So P g Oft... 1948 J - D
Purchase money g 4 s ... 194.9 F-A
Ed El III 1st conv g 5s.. 1910 M-S
1st consol gold 5s........1995 J-J
N Y & Q E l L SoP 1st con g 5s 1930 F - A
Paterson So P G So E g 5s. 1949 M-S
Peo Gas So 0 1st gu g 6s .. 190 1 M - N
2d guar gold 6s..............1904 J - D
1 st con gold 6s............... 1943 A-O
Refunding gold 5ft......... 194 7 M - S
Oh G -L & Cke 1stgu g5s 1937 J-J
Con G O oofCh 1Hr gu g 5s.’ 36 J - D
E(] G So !«' ( 'li 1 st gu g 6s. 1 905 J - J
M ii Fuel Gas Jst gu g 5s. J94 7 M N
Trenton G So El ls tg 5 s ..J 9 4 9 M - S
(itlea E L So P 1st ft f g 5s. I 950 J J
Western Gas Oo col tr g 5s 1933 M - N
e Du© M ay

h D u e t f’l y

k Due Aug

112 113
97% Sale
108 *2 Sale ‘
120 ........
105 Sale

112 % 11 2 %

5 108% 116
97% 140 94% 98%
108% 14 105 109%
121 1 2 1 %
1 2 1 % A p r ’01
lb 1.02 104%
105
105
97
108

107

J ’ ly ’00

1 0 1 % ........ 102*8 J’ ric’ Ol
121 ........ 1 2 2 % 1 2 2 %
100% Sail:
i 07 % 108%
102 % Sale
........1.06
...... ..........

Dee- ’OS
109 >
o 2
Dec- ’01
10 2 % 1 0 2 % J
105 Jan ’02
109 Feb ’Of . . . .

106
109
I 08

...................... 107 *2
o D u e O ct

102% 104
5 120 126

q D ue Deo

—
b

108 1 1 1 %
104% 119
102 105%
102 106
109 109
107% 197%

O p tio n sa le

Bond Record—Continued—Page 3

142
BONDS
N. Y. S T O C K E X C H A N G E
V fctifaL E&UINti J AN. 17
Y

si

Price
Friday
Jan. 17

Week'8
Range or
Lust Sale

is
? G
Q

Range
Year
1901

Adk\ Low
High 1A y I Low H igh
B id
120 N o v ’ Ol
119% 120
J - J 1JU
ivi • s 112
124 H D e o ’ 01
i
IV 8 124
I
124Hi 128*4
M- S
7 3 H A u g ’0 ’1
i
73 H 7 3 %
i
N ov*99 _____
• • • • • • 113
H e a d e r B d g e 1st a f g 06. 1931 M S
9 9 J a n ’ 02 ....1 96% 102
K e n tu c k y (Tent g o ld I s . . 1987 J J * 08
• • • • « • 110*2 M a r’ 01
1 1 0 % 1 19
Ldfc X A M A M 1st g 4 % « 1945 M S
111
A u g ’ 01 . . . . i l l
115
i
N F la So 8 1 st g u g 5 s . .. 1937 F A 114 H
114% N o v ’ Ul . . . . 111*2117
Perns So A tl 1st g u g 6s . 1 9 2 1 F A
112*4
115 D e o '01
110 115%
8 a N x\4a co n gu g o s . . 1936 F A 112*4
A-O
100 M a r 1
01
(V J
I- S
100 100
L N A & Oh See C f < L
&
' ajliL V jfc N a s h v —( Continued )
o

46 102 107
100
l u . a n hat tan tty c o n s o l 4 s . 1990 A-O 105% S ale 105%
105*4 M ay’ 01
A •O
105% 105*4
12 114 117*2
113
113
J - J 113
J -D
M c K ’p t dfc B V See N Y C en t
•
M e tro p o lita n E l See M an R y
226 8 0 % 90
83 Bale
82
83
M e x C e n t c o n s o l g o ld 4 s .. 1911 J J
32 Bale
31
82*4 557 2 6
38*4
J ’ ly
i
21
22 " 79 13
2d C onsol in c o m e g 3 s ..u 1939 J ’ ly * 21 H 22
27
A-O
A -O
a o i , 91 io
9 0 % J ’ lv ’ 01
MS
100
100*2 J a n *02
100 101 a4
nt.fu f% ilAn Od In ft da A / j, 1 91 7
t
100
9 9 3 D e o ’ 01
4
97 100%
3 4 " D e o ’ Ol
34
33*2 3 4%
J D *100
105 M a y ’ OO
M ich C en t See N Y C e n t
vfiii a / V r S t h’ rtA
iad
M il L 8 A W S ee Ohio & N W
MU < M ad See C h ic Sb N \V
fc
MU < N o r t h See C h M So St P
&
147*2 fa n *02 . . . . 147*2147*2
M in n So 8t L 1 st g o ld 7 s .. 1927 J -D 146%
1 119 122 * »
E x 1 s t g o ld 7 s
1909 J -l) 119
119*4 119*4
•
123*2 A p r ’ 01 . . . . 123H al23*2
P aottio E x 1 st g o id 6s . . . 1921 A-O 126
122*2 F e b ’ 01 . . . . 122*2 122*2
S ou th W e s t E x 1st g 7 s . 1910 J -D 119
120*2 J a n ’ 02 . . . . 116*2121%
1 st c o n s o l g o ld 5 s ...................... 1934 M-N 120*2122
19 97 105
1 st an d re fu n d g o ld 4 s .. 1949 M-S 1 0 3 % 105
103*2 104
M in n < S t L g u See B C R & N
fe
M < ? P 1 st 5s stp d 4 a in t g u 1936 J - J
$
1 0 1 % 103 N o v ’ Ol
M S S M So 4 1st g 4 in t g u 1926 j - J *
9 8 103*2
95
9 8 A p r ’ 01
M 8 tP < $ 8 S M eon g 4 in t g u ’ 38 J - J
98
98
M in n TTn Sam S t P M A A f
98*4 Sale
98
98*o 42 96% 1 0 0 %
M o Kan So T e x 1s t g 4 s
1990 J -D
83*a Sale
2 d g o ld 4 s .......................... # 1990 F -A
82*2
83*4 116 7 5 ' 87 ~
129 97 106
103*2 1 0 5
1 st e x t g o ld 5 s ...................... ...1 9 4 4 M-N *102
9 8 S ep ’ 01 . . . .
D a l So W a 1st g u g 5 s . . .1 9 4 0 jVl-N 101 *a
9 8 100
9 0 D e o ’ Ol
8 7 % 913,
1)3
K a n O & P a o 1s t g 4 s
1990 M-S * . . .
6 9 6 108
M K < T o f T 1 st g u g 5 8 .1 9 4 2 J -D i b s
&
1 0 7 % 10 7 %
6 9 9% 1 0 5 %
S h er Sh «fe S o 1st g u g 5 s. 1943 F -A
105Ha 105*2
T e b o So N e o s h o 1 s t 7 s
1903 J -I)
5 1 0 7 111*2
M o "K So E 1 st g u g 5 s _______ 1942 A-O
111
in
115
M is s o u ri P a c ific 3d 7 s _______ 1906 M-N 1 1 4
1 1 4 34 J a n ’ 02
114 117
6 11 9 % 1 2 5 %
1st c o n s o l g o ld 6 s ...................... 1920 M-N 123*2 Sale 123*2 123*2
T r u s t g o ld 5 s s ta m p e d .a l9 1 7 M-S 107*4 S ale 106%
107*4 63 100*2109*2
R e g i s t e r e d _________________ a 1917 M-S
4 103 110
S ale 10734 1 0 8
1 st c o ll g o ld 5 s ................................1920 F -A i 0 8
R e g is t e r e d ............. ....................1 9 2 0 F -A
92
91 N o v ’ Ol
C e n t B r R y 1 st g u g 4 s . 1919 F -A
89*2 91
102 105
1 0 0 M a y ’ 01 . . . . 100 100
L e r o y So C V A L 1 s t g 5 s 1 9 2 6 J -J
P a c R o f M o 1 s t e x g 4 8 .1 9 3 8 F-A 106*2107*2 106*4 D e c ’ 01 . . . . 105 10-7
113
2 d e x te n d e d g o ld 5 s . . . 1938 J -J
115*2 N o v ’ Ol . . . . 113 115*2
10 1 1 4 119
S t L I r M & S g e n c o n g 5 s l 9 3 1 A -O 1 1 7 % S ale 117*4 118
G e n c o n stam p g td g 5s 1931 A-O ‘ 1 1 6 1 1 8
115*2 D e c '0 1 . . . . 114*2116*2
92 H Sale
x
U n tfie d So r e f g o ld 4 s . . 1929 J - J
92Ha
93*4 12 84*4 9 6 %
R e g is t e r e d __ ________1929 J - J
98
V e r d i V I So W 1 s t g 5 s . 1926 M-S
M iss R iv B r id g e See (Tliic<fe A lt
3 09
M o b & B irm p r io r lie n g 5s 1945 J -J
110*4 J ’l y ’ 00
M o r tg a g e g o ld 4 s ............. 1945 J -J
M o b J a c k So K C 1 s t g 5 s .1946 J -D
4 1 2 7 % 132
M o b So O h io n e w g o ld fia 1927 J -D 129 130*2 1 8 0
130
1 st e x te n s io n g o ld 6 s ..7 il9 2 7 Q- J
125 N o v ’ Ol
121 130
G e n e ra l g o ld 4 s ................. 1938 M -S
97 D e c ’ 01
87*2 97
4 110 116%
M o n tg o m D iv 1 st g 5 s . .1 9 4 7 F-A 116*2 Sale 1 1 6
116*2
St T. & C a iro g u g <£s___ 1931 J -J
99 O c t ’ 01
99 1 0 1 %
C olla tera l g 49 ................... e l9 3 0 Q -F
95*4 N o v ’ Ol
9 5 % 95*4
M o h a w k So M a i S ee N Y C & H
M o n o n g a h e la R iv S ee B & O
M o n t C en t S$e S t P M So M
M o r g a n ’ s L a & T See S P Co
M o r r is & E s s e x See D e i L So W
XT ash Chat S St. L 1 st 7s 1913 J - J 326 1 9 7
r,
1 2 6 % J a n *02
1 2 6 % 130
lN 1 st c o n s o l g o ld 5 s ................ 1928 A-O 113*2 115
114 J a n ’ 02 ___ 111 1 1 6
J a s p e r B r a n c h 1 st g 6 s .. 1923 J -J
113 D e c ’ 99
M c M M W & A l 1 st 6 s ..1 9 1 7 J -J *
1163
4
T So P B r a n c h 1 st 6 s _____ 1917 J - J
1 1 1 D e c ’ 99
N a sh F lo r So S h e f See L So N
N e w H . & D See N Y N H & H
N J J u n e H R See X Y C en t
N e w So C m B d g e See P e n n Co
N O So N E p r io r lie n g 6 s p l 9 1 5 A -O
N Y B k ln & M a n B e k See L I
N Y C en t & H R 1 st 7 s . ..1 9 0 3 J -J 1 0 2 %
1 0 3 % 1 0 3 % 10 1 0 4 % 10S
R e g is t e r e d ..................................... 1903 J -J
1 023 D e c ’ 01
4
102% 10 7 %
Gnld m o r t g a g e 3 % s ____
1 9 9 7 J - J 109
3 167% iIo %
108
109
R e g is t e r e d ..................................... 1997 J - J
1 09 % 1 0 9 %
109 % M a y ’ 01
D e b e n tu r e 5s o f ____ 1 8 8 4 -1 9 0 4 M - S 1033,
1 0 3 % J a n ’ 02
101 ~ 106%
103*0
R e g is t e r e d ................... 1 8 8 4 -1 9 0 4 M - S
1 0 3 % J a n ’ 02
1 0 3 106%
R e g is t d e b 5s o f . . . 1 8 8 9 -1 9 0 4 M - S
109*o S ep ’ 97
D e b e n tu r e g 4 s _____ 1 8 9 0 -1 9 0 5 J -D 1 0 0 io
1 0 3 % A p r ’ 01
10 2 % 1 0 4 %
R e g is t e r e d ................... 1 8 9 0 -1 9 0 5 J -D
100*4 J a n ’ 02
9 9 % 102%
D e b t c e r ts e x t g 4 s ................ 1905 M-N 101 S ale 101
101
15 100 " 103%
R e g is t e r e d ..................................... 1905 M-N
1 0 0 % N o v ’ 01
1 0 0 % 10 0 %
L ak e"S h ore c o ll g 3 % s . . . 1998 F -A
98 S ale
99
115 95
97*2
98
R e g i s t e r e d .... T ...................... 1998 F -A
96
9 7%
96
96*4 1 ° 9 4
97
M ic h C en t c o ll g 3 % s . . . . 1998 F -A
97 S ale
96
97
140 9 3 % 9 7%
R e g is t e r e d ................................... 1998 F -A
3 96
96
96
97 ~
96
*
B e e c h C reek 1 st g u g 4 s . 1936 J -J
111 1 1 2 %
113*2 111*4 S ep ’ 01
R e g is t e r e d ___ T . . . T ______ 19 3 1 J -J
106 J ’ n e ’ 98
2 d g u g o ld 5 s ............................ 1936 J -J
1 1 7 * 0 ____
C a rt & A d 1 st g u g 4 s . . .1 9 8 1 J -D
C lea rfield B itu in C oal C orp —
1 s t s f in t g u g 4 s s e r A 1940 j - j
91
92% 92%
92
92*2 D e o ’ Ol
G o u v So Os w e 1 st g u g 5s 1942 J -D . . . . . .

BONDS
N. Y. ST O C K E X C H A N G E
W e e k E n d in g J a n . 17

[V

%k
*>A,
■

Price
Friday
Jan. 1 7

ol.

Week's
Range or
Last Sale

LXXIV.
O
'
Co
■C
CC

Range.
Yea r
1901

High A o Low High
Bid
A sk Low
N Y C e u t So H R — ( Continued)\
107% J ’ ly ’ 0 (.
M oll A. Alai 1 st g u g 4 s . 1991 M-S
1 10% D e c ’ 01
In c o m e 5a .............
99% 110%
..1 9 9 2 Sen
108 D e c ’ 01
108
108 ~
N J J u n e R g u lttt 4 a ... 19861 F-A
F-A
105 % N o v ’ Ol
N Y A P u 1st co n g u g 4s 199:i| A-O
104% 105%
. . . . . . . . . . . .
N o r So M o n t 1st gu g 5s. 1 9 16 A 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . .......................... ...
112% Sale 112% 112% 21 I l l
116%
W e s t S h o re 1st 4a g u ...2 3 6 l| J-J
1 1 2 % Sale 112% 1 1 2 % 20 116% 115%
R e g is t e r e d ...................... 2361 J -J
L a k e S h o re c o n so l 2 d 7a. 19031 J -D 1 0 7 % ......... 107% J an ’02 . . . . 107% 1 13
6 107% 111
R e g is te r e d ...................... 1903 J -D 1 0 7 % Sale 107%
io 7 %
1 1 0 7 % 111%
108%
108%
G o ld 3 % 8 .......................... 1997 J -I) 108 109
1 1 0 % M a r’ 00
R e g is te r e d
1997 J I)
117% M ay’ 01 . . . . 117 117%
D e t M on So T o l 1 st 7 b .1906 F A
J-J
128 J ’ n e ’ 01 . . . . 128 128
M ah on 0*1 R R lVt 5 b " 1934 J -J
146% 146%
139 ................ 146% A p r ’ 01
P itts M c K & Y l b t g u 6b. 1932 J -J
2d g u a r tts
1934 J -J
1 80 ................
125 ................
M c K e e s <fc H V 1 at g 6s 1918 J -J
Q 101 % 106%
M ich C en t 1st c o n s o l 7 b .1902 M-N 101% ................ 101% 1 0 1 %
100% 103%
1 st c o n s o l 6s ............................... 1902 M-N 100% ......... 100% N o v ’ Ol
1 1 8 % ................ 118% D e c ’ 01 . . . - 1 18% 119
6s ................................................................... 1909 M S
5 s .........................................1931 M-S 1 3 1 % ......... 131 A u g ’ 01 . . . . 127 131%
12 125 125
130
130
R e g is te r e d ...................1931 Q M * ........7 181
110 D e c ’ 01 .... 110 110
1940 J-J
4 s ............................
106% N o v ’ OO
R e g is te r e d
l ‘ »in J -J
93
J -D ♦
115% M a y ’ OO
M-N
R e g is te r e d
‘>600 M-N
121 1 2 2 %
121% J a n ’ 02
N Y So N o r th 1 st g 5s
1927 A -O
i 125% 129
127
127
R Wdfe () co n 1st e x t 5s h } 922 A-O 1 2 6 % 128
113 A p r ’ 99
O sw e & R 2d g u g 5 s . ..g l 9 1 5 F-A
R W A O 'I ’ Rlftt.ffH tr
161K M-Zi
1 0 8 % ............... 1 1 0 % N o v ’ Ol . . . . 110% 1 1 0 %
U tic a & B lk R iv gu g 4 s . 1922 J -J
1 0 7 % 18 106 109%
107 107% 107
N Y C h ic
St L 1st g 4 s . 1937 A O
107 D e c ’ 01 • • • • 105 107
R e g is te r e d ........................................... 1937 A O
N Y So G re e n w L a k e See E r ie
N Y So l i a r See N Y C So Hud.
N Y L a c k So W See D L So W
N Y L E So W See E rie
N Y <fc L o n g B r See C en t o f N J
N Y So N 10 See N Y N H So H
100 D e c ’ 01 —
100 102
N Y N H & l i a r 1 st r e g 4 s ,1 9 0 3 J-D
196 206
A-O *204 .......... 2 0 6 D e c ’ 01
C o n v e r t d eb c e r ts $ 1 ,0 0 0
2 03 D e c ’ 01
195 203
S m all ce r ts $ 1 0 0 .
2 134 136
H o u s a to m c R co n g 5s 1937 M-N 1 3 5 % ......... 1 3 5 % 1 3 5 %
M-N
114 J a n ’ 00
N Y So N K 1 s t 7 s . . .
1905 J - J
108 110
l s t 6s ....................................................... 1905 J -J 1 0 5 % ................ 1 0 6 % J a n ’ 02
N Y So N o r th See N Y C & H
104
1 0 4 % 39 1 0 1 % 108
N Y O & W r e f 1 st g 4 s . .0 1 9 9 2 M-S 1 0 4 % 105
101 % N o v ’ 98
R e g is $5 0 0 0 o n lv
f/1992 M-S
N Y So P u t See N Y C So PI
N Y So R B See L o n g Isla n d
N Y S So W See E r ie
N Y T e x So M See S o P a c Co
110% 112H
a
N o r So S o u th 1st g 5 s ................ 1941 M-N 1 1 4 ................ 112% J ’ l y ’ 01
132 136
N o r f So W e s t gen g 6s ............. 1931 M-N 134 ................ 134 D e c ’ 01
Im p r o v e r n ’ tT& e x t g 6s . . 1934 F-A 1 30 ................ 131 O ct ’ OJ . . . . 129% 1 3 3 %
131 134
N e w R iv e r 1 st g 6s
1932 A-O 132 ................ 1 3 L % O c t ’ 01
N So W R y 1 st co n g 4 8 .1 9 9 6 A -O 1 0 2 % S ale 1 0 2 % 102% 37 9 9 % 104
100% 100%
1 103 103
R e g is t e r e d .................................. 1996 A -O
1 0 7 % 107%
C C & T 1 s t g u g 5 8 ................1922 J -J 1 0 6 % ................ 1 0 7 % J ’l y ’ 01
2 99 104
S c io V So N E 1 st g u g 4 s 1989 M-N 1 0 1 % Sale 1 0 1 % 102
N o r th Illin o is See C hi So N W
N o r th O h io See L E r ie So W
N o r th e r n P a c ific —
P r io r lie n r y So 1 g r g 4 s . 1997 Q-J 1 04 1 0 4 % 104% 104% 95 103 106
1 0 4 % 104% 10 103% 1 0 5 %
R e g is t e r e d .......................1997 Q-J
7 4 % Sale
74
7 4 % 263 6 9 % 7 3 %
G en era l lie n g o ld 3 s ___ &2047 Q -F
69
72%
72 J a n ’ 02
R e g i s t e r e d ...................a 2047 Q -F
C B & Q c o lltr 4 s S e e G tN o r
5 99% 102
S t P a u l-D u l D iv g 4 s ___ 1996 J -D 1 0 0 % Sale 1 0 0 % 1 0 0 %
R e g is t e r e d ___ ."1............ 1996 J -D
1 3 0 % D e c ’ 01
128 131%
S t P & N P g e n g 6s ...1 9 2 3 F-A
132 J ’l y ’ 99
R e g is te r e d c e r r ifio ’ S 1923 Q- F
1 2 2 % i2 2 %
S t P a u l So D u l 1 st 5s
1931 I^-A 121 .......... 1 2 2 % F e b ’ 01
110% 117
2d 5 s ..................................1917 A -O 1 10 ................ 114 N o v ’ Ol
100
4 1(H) 106
1st c o n so l g o ld 4 s ..........1968 J-D 1 00 ............... 100
I 9 4 % 94%
9 4 % D e c ’ 01
W a s h C en t 1st g 4 s .. ..1 9 4 8 Q-M
93
95
4 115% 119
N o r P a c T e r Co 1 st g 6 s . . 1933 J -J 1 1 4 % ................ 115 ~ 115
N o r R y Cal See So P a c
N o r W is See St P M So 0
N o r Sb M o n t S ee N Y C ent
( \ I n d So W S e e C Q C S o S t L
112% J ’ n e ’ 01 .... 112 1 1 2 %
M /lu o R iv e r R R 1 st g 5 s .1936 J -D
G en era l g o ld 5s
.
. 1937 A-O
9b D e c ’ OO
1 06 110
O re
C al See S o P a c Co
O re R y & N a v S ee Un P a c
O re S h o rt L in e See U n P a c
O s w e g o So R o m e See N Y C
0 C F & S t P See C & N W
T ) a c C oa st Co 1 s t g 5 s _____ 1 946 J -D 1 1 2 % ................ 112
113% 11 108 113
X a c o f M is s o u r i See M o P a c
P an am a 1 s t s fu n d g 4 % s .. 1917 A -O 103 ................ 103% D e c ’ 01 .... 102 105
101 D e c ’ OO
S in k fo n d su b s id y g 6 s .. 1910 M-N
Ill
.......... 112 J a n ’ 02
112 115%
P e n n Co g u 1 st a 4*%s............. 1 9 ‘U J -J
*
R e g is t e r e d _____ 7 ............................ 1921 J - J *111 111% 111% J a n ’ 02 - « « • 1 1 0 % 1 1 4 %
G u a r 3 % s c o ll tr u s t reg '.1 9 3 7 M-S
102 N o v ’ 98
G u a r 3 %s c o ll tr se r B . 1941
9 8 % ................ 99 J a n ’ 02
121% 126%
C S t L & P 1 st c o n g 5 s .1932 A -O
123 D e c ’ 01
R e g is t e r e d ................... .1 ______ 1932 A -O
C l So P g e n g u g 4 % s s e r A . ’42 J -J 1 2 0 % ................ 121 O ct ’ 00
S e r i e s & . . . . .1 ............................ 1942 A -O 121 ’ ________
S e rie s C 3 % s ............................... 1948 M - N
104 ................
S e rie s D 3 % s ............................... 1950 F -A 105 ................
E r ie So P itt s g u g 3 %s B .1 9 4 0 J -J 1 02 ................ 102 N o v ’ OO
S e rie s C ................ T.........................1 940 J -J
N & C B d g e g e n gu g 4 % s 1945 J - J + 1 1 0 . . .
il4
118
P C C<fe S t L g u 4 % s A . . . 1 9 4 0 A -O 1 1 5 % ................ 115 D e c ’ 01
S e rie s B g u a r ............................ 1942 A-O 1 1 5 % ................ 1 1 5 % J a n ’ 02 . . . . 113 117%
i l l 6% 116%
S eries C g u a r ............................ 1942 M-N 115 ................ 1 1 6 % F e b ’ 01
106% N o v ’ Ol
106% 106%
S e rie s D 4s g u a r ................... 1945 M-N
97 'M a y ’ 01
97
99%
S eries E 3% gu a r g _____ 1949 F-A
P itt s F t W & C 1 st 7 s . . . 1912 J - J 1 3 0 ................ 130 J a n ’ 02
!l3 2 % 1 3 0 %
2d 7 s .......................................................... 1912 J - J 1 30 ................ 1 3 2 % D e c ’ 01
1 3 2 % 136%
1 30 A p r ’ 01
3d 7 s .................................................... M 9 1 2 A-O
128% 1 3 6 %
1 0 9 % N o v ’ Ol
1 0 9 % 109%
P en n R R 1st re a l e s t g 4 s . 1923 M-N 110% 113
....................................
C o n so l s te r lin g g 6 s ............. 1905 J - J
. . . . 1

M IS C E L L A N E O U S BO NU S—Continued on Next P aso
T e l e g r a p h a n d T e le p h o n e
A m T e le p & T e l c o ll t r 4 s 1929
C om m C able C o 1 st g 4 s . . 2 3 9 7
R e g is t e r e d .......................... 2397
E r ie T So T c o l t r g s f 5 s . . 1926
M e t T & T 1 st s f g 5 s ........1918
M n t U n T e l C o /S e e W e s t n U n
N Y & N J T e l g e n g 5 s ..1 9 2 0
N o W e s t n T e l e g See W e s t U n
W e s t U n io n c o l tr e n r 5 s . 1938
F d a n d rea l est g 4 % s . . . l 9 5 0
M n t U n T e l 8 fu n d 6 s . ..1 9 1 1
N o r t h w e s te r n T e l 7 s ___ 1904

J -J
Q -J
Q -J
J -J
M-N

100%
100%
109
114

M-N

1 1 3 % O ct ’ 01

J -J
M-N

M-N
J -J

M ay’ 01
O ct ’ 00
O ct ’ 99
N o v ’ Ol

1 1 2 % S a le 11 2 % 113
1 0 8 S ale 10S
108
113 ......... 113% J a n ’ 02

1 0 0 % 10 0 %
114

114

1 1 3 % 117
3 111 11 5 %
26 1 0 5 % 1 0 9 %
111 116

Coal and Iron
Cah C oal M in

See T O 1 & R
O learf B it C oal See N Y C & H
C o l C <fc I e x t 1 st c o n g 6 s. 1902 F -A
C o l C < I D e v C o g u g 6 8 .1 9 0 9 J - J
fe

C oa l and Iro n
C ol F u e l Co g e n g o ld 6 s . . . 1919
C ol F So I Co g e n s f g 5 s . . 1943
D e B a rd e l C So I See T C So 1
G r R iv C oal So C 1st g 6 s . . 1919
J e ff & C lea r C & 1 1st g 5s. 1926
2d g old o s ............................1926
P lea s V a l C oal 1st g s f 5 8 .1 9 2 8
K o c h t& P it C & I p u r m 5s. 1946
S u n C k C oal 1 st g 8 f 6 s . . . 1912
T e n n C oal T D i v 1 st g 6 s . a 1917
B ir m D iv 1st c o n s o l 6 s .. 1917
C ab C M Co 1 st g u g 08 .1 9 2 2
D e B a r C cfc I Co g u g 6 s. 1910
W h L K & P C Co 1st g o s .1 9 1 9

M-N
F-A

1 0 5 % ......... 106% F e b *01
1 0 6 % 1061#
105 .......... 106
106
96% 108
"a

A -O
J -D
J -D
J -J

1 0 6 % .......... 95 % J a u ’ 97
1 04 .......... 107 M ay *9 7
80 M a y’ 9 7 . . . .
105 O ct ’ 00

..................

M-N

J -D
A -O
J -J
J -D
F-A
J -J

1 0 7 % .........
109 ..........
1 0 0 % .........
1 0 3 % Sale

108
109
105
103
32

109
F e b *00
103%
J a n *00

A

50 Sale
......... 1 0 0 %

50
100

50
D e o ’ Ol

A

J a n ’ 02

J

104
105

n o ”
112

100

104%

Manufacturing & Industrial
101
55

• N o p r ic e F r id a y ; la te st b id an d a s k e d th is week*

S ep »01
N o v ’ OO
a D ue Jan

101

104%

e D u e M ay

A m e r B io y o le s f d e b eu 5s 1919 M-S
A m C ot Oil e x t 4 % s ........... 1915 Q -F
(jr D u e J ’ n e

A D u e J ’ ly

p Due N o?

s O p tion sale.

55
99

S3
102

B
ond R
ecord— Concluded— Page

J a n u a r y 18, 1002. J

■
=
9
|s

4

143

BONDS
Week* s
P r ice
JCange
u F r id a y
R an ye or
N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE
yea r
Lant Male A '/,■1
Jan. 17
m n
*k
*
WEEK ENDING J a n . 17
w kick
H id
Ante Law
H igh A'o I how J/lyh
Hid
A s k Sow
J1li/lt No i.oio H ig h Southern I’aeCo - ( C o n tin u ed )
Penn l l l i —(C o n tin u ed )
H
Ulla V G A. N Jstgu gOs.l 924 M-N 107 1J(i 106 Dc.c’Ol .... J05 JU
QV
-J l
Con currency Os rug...
IImis Ifi ,fc W T 1st g OS. 1033 M-N 101 ....... 106k Nov’01
\t.?5
106 106 k
Consol gold 5s............
1hLtru ix 5hredeemable.. 1933 M-N 102 .......
M
-N
2
ll A TO lstgO slntgn.. 1937 .1- J 110 110% 110% 110% 16 110 113 <
,
10*2 Nov’97
M8
Alio:
A O 111 k ....... 1.12 Dec’01
110 1)2
| .N
W
11‘2 34 Mftr’O
O
.
12 -S J 06
00
O4
Gun gold 4s Inf guar.. 1921 A-O 94 k ....... 94%
107 ........
h
’-A
1) R K l i * tlge Isl,
16 120 126
Waco (to N W dlv ls tg (is’30 M-N 125 127 12(1 k 127
J - J I l l ....... 112 Jan'01
i t ‘2 112 k
137
J 136 137k
J-J 106 .......
Morgan’H1j tfc T l«t 7h. J91 8 A-O 136 J38 137
A
123
6 123 J25
117 May’00
1st gold Os..................1920 j - j 123 ........ 123
D U J lilt < Can gen 4s. Id !■ M-S 1 18 k .......
fc
N Y T'V- Mftx P n 1«1.£f dH.l 91 2 A-O
Pensacola < Atl See L & A' asl
to
J-J 106 k ........
Peo ifc East (See O O C A SIC
113 113
Guaranteed gold 5s— J938 A-O 117 ........ 113 Jan’01
G-F 128kl30 138 k Jan’01
133 k 133 k
1or, % 107
1 1 Dot '99
(1
.1 *J 102 ....... J05 % Nov’0 1
M.N
Ore (to Cal 1st guar g 5s. 1927
87% Sale 87 k
88 k 143 77% 91%
1‘27 Fob’01
S A (to A Passlstgu g4s. 1943 J-J
126 127
AO
110 k 1J4 k
114
So P of Argu lstg Os c l909-10 J-J 111 113 113 Dec’Ol
2 108 114k
M-N 114 Salo 114
_
117
8 P of Cal 1st g Os...... 1905 A-O 107%....... 107 '4 Dec’Ol _ 107 11.1k
0 109 116%
A-O 117 Salo 117
106% J08k
1 st p 6s 8 eri08 15...... J905 A-O 108% 111 108 Dec’Ol
IJ. A
A-O 110%........ 110% 110% i 108 109
j .n
137 Nov’97
Pine Creek reg g!
A-O
Pitts Cln di SI I,
A-O 1,19%....... 120 Fob ’01
119 120
107 k Oct ’98
A-O
Pitts Clev * To 11
O
M
-N Ill) ....... 107 Nov’O
Pitts Ft W & Oh
Stamped...... 1905-1937 M-N 109%........ 109% 100% O 106 k 111
120 120
J-J 121 ........ 120 Oct ’01
114k Oct ’01
J-J
110 114k
A-O *114
J-J
lift .
110 A pr’01
110 110%
118k Sep ’01
TAV A N rn # ; 7s
1
. 1905 F-A
113% 118 k
M-S 113 k llO 106 k Nov’97
98 J’ly ’97
103% 111%
101
8 00 101 \
Con gold 5s
1943 J-J 106 k ........ 108k J’ly ’01
98*2 ...... 100
101k Deo’01
98 101 %
J-J 120 Sale 119k 120 k 54 111 % 124k
J P M & Co certls.
122 Jan ’02
116 120k
M
-N 118*2....... 121 k Mar’01
J-J
121 121*12
97% 07 k
97% 3 95
97 k
98k Sale 97k
98% 314 92k 100%
p eading Co gen g 4s......190" j - j
Mol) & Ohio coll tr g 4s.. 1938 M-S 97
92 A pr'01
92
92
XV Registered..................199"
>
.... 109 112
...... 112 Sep ’01
Mem Div 1st g 4k-5s... 1996 J-J 111.
Rensselaer & Sar See D < H
fc
100k 20 96 101
Rloli & Dan See Soutli Ry
St Louis div 1st g 4s__ 1951 J-J 100k Sale 100
120 120
Rich & Aleck See Southern
J-J 1 17 k ........ 120 Mar’01
97
93
95k 95k
95*4 5 93
Atl & Danv 1st g 4s...... 1948 J-J
j - j 100k100k 100% 101k 31 98k 103%
Q3l< 00 la
96 Dec’Ol
95
119%121
i)7 Jan ’02
A-O 95
1 1 9 k ........ 121 J’ne’01
97k
90
90
J-J
H 117kl20k
I
117
J-D 107 ........ 105 Feb’01
105 105
E T Va & Ga Div g 5 s..1930 j-J 117 Sale 117
M-N 120 ....... 120k 120k 4 117 121
80% 85
J-J
SOk....... 84 Nov’01
J-J
1 92 k 94k
M- S 115 ........ 114 Nov’01
92
92
111% 116k
. .
m . k I ........
i
Rook & Pitts See B R & P
_
Rome Wat & Og See N Y Cc
Ga Pac Ry 1st g 6s........1922 J-J 124 k ........ 128% Deo’01 _ 124k 128%
125% J an ’62 __ 124% 129
J-J
■T-J
_
i o i k Nov’01 .... 101k 101k
Rich & Dan con g 6s__ 1915 J-J 120 121k 123 k Dec’Ol _ 121 124k
t J-J
101*4 J’ly ’00
ag Tus & H See Pere Marq
109 111k
A-O Ll 2 ........ 111 Dec’Ol
J-J
2 89k 98
M-N
83 Dec’00
96
95
96
j-J * 94
100 110
M-N 109 111k 109% Jan’02
i j-j
102 Oct ’99
(V S
I5 A-O
114 114
St L & Cairo See Mob & Ohi 3
M-S i l 5 k ........ 114 Sep ’01
2 113 117
115
St L & Iron Mount See M P
M-N 116 k ........ 115
116k Dec’Ol
115 116k
S t L K C & N See Wabash
M-N
F-A
92
S tL M B r See T RR A of St 1
911 Sep =00
-*
3 M-N 110 111k 111k Jan’02 .... 110 114k
W estN C 1st con g 6s..1914 j - j 1 17 k ........ 120k Dec’Ol .... 116 120%
110 Dec’Ol .... 110 114k S & N Ala See L & N
3 M-N
,T- .1 131io_
195 130i*-.
J - .1
131*2 Jan’02
117 J’ly ’00
HG1 Jan ’02
®
11 2k> 119
J -T
)
*?
L J-J 116**11 7 <
1 91k 102
3 J-J
96*2...... 1 0 0
100
Sunb & Leiv See Penn RR
A-O 100 ........ 100 Jan ’02
iOOklOOk SyraB ing& N Y S e e H H & W
. J-J
97% Sale 97
fc
97k 114 97k 98k rrebO(feN See M K < T
114kNov’01
113k ilG
. J-J
A-O
3 M-N
123kD ec’01
123% 123%
F-A 116 ........ 116 Dec’Ol
115 116k
3 A-O 91k Sale 91
St L M Bge Ter gu g 5s.1930 A-O 113 ........ 113 k 113 k 1 113 115
91k 103 87
90%
3 A-O
Tex & N 0 See So Pac Co
Bt Louis So See Illinois Cent
104 Feb’01 .... 104 104
Tex & Pac E Div 1st g 6s . J 905 M-S
1303 05 k 101k
119k 51 115% 120%
1st gold 5s.....................2000 J-D 119k Sale 119
3 M-N
99 k Sale 97
99k
90 100
2d gold inc 5s............... <?2000 Mar * 98 100
3 J-J
79k Sale 77k
99 k
99 k
79k 1187 71
82 k
7 J-D
110k 1 11
La Div B L 1st g 5s......1931 J-J *107 ........ 111 J’ ne’01
107 ........ 114k 114k 1 113 117k
St Paul & Dul
0
Tol & O C 1st g 5s............ 1935 J-J
3 A-O 116
112k 115k
112% Nov’01
116*2 1163 15 115% 118%
4
A-O
107 NTov’Ol
i J-J 138 Sale 137% 138
13 139 142
General gold 5s..."1........1935 J-L
103 108k
3 J-J
137% Feb’99
95
99 k
A-O ........ 98 k 98k Jan’02
2 86
3 J-J 113% 114k 114k J an’02
91 ........ 91
92
95
113 116% Tol P & W 1st golcf 4s ...1917 J-J
_
3 J-J
88
93
116k A pr’01 _ 1 1 6 k ll6 k Tol St Ij(fe W prlien g3ks.l925 j - j
90
90k 90% Jan’02
8o%
) M-N 1 1 6 k ....... 116k 117
6 116 120k
50-year gold 4s..............1950 A-O 82k 83% 82%
83 k 30 73
Mout ext 1st gold 4s..
7 J-D 106 k ........ 106
93 100
97 k Jan’02
106*2 6 102% 107% Tor Ham & Buff 1st g 4s 7il946 J-D ........ 99
1 106k 109k
7 J-D
106 May’01
111
106 106
J Tlster& D ellstcongos 1928 J-D 111 Sale 111
3 A-O 107 ....... 106% 106% i 106 110
105 Sale 104% 105 291 103 k 107 k
U n Pac RR c 1 gr g 4s..1947 J-J
to
103k 106%
3 A-O
R egi stered.................. 1947 J-J
105 Jan’02
Nor Div 1st f
3 A-O
1st lien convert 4s........1911 M-N 106% Sale 105 k 106 k 2124 103 129
3 A-O
Registered..................1911 M-N
2 J-J 3.26 ........ 128 A pr’O
109 Jan ’02
O
i i ‘6 112%
Ore R y & N a v lstsf g6s 1909 J-J
7 J-J 138 ........ 140 O ct’01
Ore Ry cto Nav con g 4s.1946 J-D 103 Sale 102% 103% 171 1 01k 105%
132 140
7 J -J
16 125 130
Ore Short Line lstg 6 s.. 1922 F-A 128k 129 128k 129
7 J -J 12j34 ....... 124 Dec’Ol
121 124
1st consol e:5s...T...... 1946 J-J 1 1 7 k ....... 117k 117k 2 115 121
103 k 100
7 J-J
_
Non-cumiricA 5s_ A1946 Sep 104 ........ 103 k Oct, ’01
3 J-D 1243 .
117 119
117 k J’ne’01
4
124% Jan’02
Utah & Nor 1st 7s.
1908 J-J
3 J-D
113 113
113 Mar’01
Gold 5s........................ 1926 J-J
St P & Nor Pac See Nor Pac
Uni N J BE & C Co See Pa RR
J
Utah Central See Rio Gr Wes
2 M-S 109 ....... 111 Aug’01
Utah & North See Un Pacific
104 111
S A & A P See So Pac Co
Utica & Black R See N Y Cent
J J-J *109 ........ 113% Dec’ Ol
110k113% \7 er Val Ind & W See Mo P
1 A-O 128 k ........ 128 D ec’Ol
V irginia Mid See Soutli Ry
128 128
1 A-O 1 1 3 k ........ 123 Dec’99
\\7 abash 1st gold 5s...... 1939 M-N 118k Sale 118% 118% 102 117 120%
1 J-J
^ V 2d gold 5s............ 1939 F-A 114 k 115 ] 14 ^2 1143 26 107k 115
4
3 M-N
111 D ec’Ol
Debenture series A ...... 1939 j - j 99 ....... 100 D ec’Ol
106k 111
JBruns < W 1 st gu g4s..l9a 3 J-J
fe
1518 40
70
Series B ...................... 1939 j - j
87
87
3 J-J
Det & Ch Ext ls t g 5s. .1941 j - j 109 k ........ 111 O ct’01
91
110 111
16 91k 91%
91 Sale 90
/
95 ........ 95
Des Moin Div ls t g 4s.. 1939 j - j
10 95
98 k
95
i J-J 112
...... H O kD ec’O
110 112
St Chas Bridge 1st g 6s. 1908 A-O i n
I
104% Feb’98
J J-J
Warren See Del l.ac“(fe West
Sker Shr & So See M K & T
Wash Cent See Nor Pac
SU Sp Oca < G See Say F & \V
fc
Wash O (to W See Southern
4 J-J 103 ........ 100 Deo’01
West N Y(to Pa 1st g 5s.. 1937 J-J 120 Sale 119% 120
100 100
22 119 122
Ho Car < da See Southern
fe
Gen gold 3-4s................ 1943 A-O 99 k 100 k 100 Dec’Ol
95 100 k
Southern Pacific Co—
Income 5s................... (71943
35
31
40
40 Mar’01
7 J-D
99k 11 95% 101k West No Car See South Ry
99% Sale 99%
) J-D
93 k Sale 93k
95 k West Shore See N Y Cent
93% 162 83
Registered.
i .; - d
W Va Cent & P 1st g (is.. 1911 J-J n i
89
89
89 Oct ’01
113 *2 Mar’01
113 k H 3 k
j -j
Wheel’g & L E ls t g 5s...1926 A-O 114
111 J’ne’01
96 111
112 Oct ’01
112 117k
) F-A 103 k Sale 103k 103% 44 100 103k
Wheel Div 1st gold 5s..1928 J-J 115 ....... 113 May’01
111 k 116%
Registered.
> F-A
Exton & Imp gold 5S...193C F-A 114% 1 17 113 Dec’Ol
907s J’ne’O
O
112 113
1 J-D 87% Sale 87%
1st consol 4 s ................ 1949 M-S 92 k Sale 91k
94
87% 127 83k 89 k
92k 136 89
) J-D <........ 87
Wilkes & East See Erie
•
) F-A * n i k ....... 111 O ct’01
108k 113 k Wil & Sioux F See St P M & M
5 J-li 106 107k 106 Dec’Ol
1106 107% Winona & St P See (JA N W
M-N 1 07 k ....... 107 k Oct ’01 . . . . IlOO 107 k Wis Cent 50-yr 1st gen 4s. 1949 J-J
88 k Sale 8 8 % 8 8 % 58 85 k 9,2*5
IVIIfSCELLA NECUS BON DS—Concluded.
Manufacturing He Industrial
Miscellaneous
Am H id e* L 1st s f g (is.. 1919 M 8
Adams Kx col tr g4 s........1948
08
59 90
97% Salo 97
98
105 ........ 105
7 103 309
105
Am Spirits Mfg 1st g 6 s.. 19) 5 M S ........ 82
85
Am Ilk * Imp Os See Cent N J
75
81 Jan ’ 02
Am Thread 1st col tr 4 h. J919 J J
liklu Ferry Co 1st con g®sl948
1 83
91 k
85
85
Bar A 8 Oar <:<> 1st g Os .. 1942 J J
Rkin W & W ll Ist Os trctl's..
78
10 6 8
105
76
76
Consol Tobacco 50-yr g 4 s. j 951 F A 67% Sale 65 %
Chic, .Jc < St Yard col g 5s.1915
fc
4
111
111
1875 62 J 67
” 3 0 ” m in 111 Mar’01
Distilling of Americacollateral
Mack Wat Root lstg o s..19*26
trust, gold On............... J911 J J 8 6 k Hale 8 6 k
88
Hoboken L < s I gold 5s. ..1910
S
8 6 k 30 82
................. .................... .... .................
Gram* roy Sug Jst. gold (is. 1923 A O ........ 90
100
Mad S Garden 1st g Os.. 191 9
(|
00
99% Apr ’ 01
IJ! rOeel Co OeO 6 H............1010 j J
Man Bell 1 & L gen g 4 s.. 19 10
1
09 Jan ’ 00
Noii-conv deben 5s........19)3 A 0 1 0 0 k ....... look J’ne’01
Nowp Ne Ship & I) 1) os d 1990
100
ioo
1 h t Paper Co 1st eon g (is .1918 F A 112 Salo 112
.
N Y Jlock 50-yr Jst g 4s.. 19.11
112
2 105 1 1 2
4 93% 04 k
05 Sale 95
95
Knickerbocker fee (Chicago)
N Y < Out Land 1st g 6 s .. 1910
fc
is) gold Oh..................j ;')26 A 0
RR Scour Co 50-yr g 3 > ,,s 195 I
<.
93
.... 91k 91%
91% Dec’Ol
Nat Starch M fg Co lstg Os 1920 M N ........108% 108
in i...........
.S Joseph Stk Yds 1si 4 ks.l lifJO
t
108
2 105 1 1 0
Nat Starch Co s f deb 5«.. 1925 j J ....... 85
92 Nov’01
91
96
St L Ter Clippies Stnt’n (to Prop
Stan Rope * T Jut g fis... J946 » A 60 Bale 58
■
72
Co 1st g A ks 5-20 year..1917
60 k 70 47
Income gold 5x.......
1946
5 k 12
8 7 Bale
4
7
9 373
S Yulia Wal Co con g Os.. 1923
................. ib i Feb'97 .... ...... *......
U H lA;atti v o h I dob g(J,i .1913 M N 1 1 2 k ....... 1 12 '-2 Dec’ 01
1 12 k 115
113k J’ly ’00
Sp Val Wat Works 1st 6s.1906
•No price F
riday; latest b aw ask , a D J n bt)ueFeb d Due Apr g Due J’no h Hue J’ly k Due Aug n Hue Sep p Due Nov /Due Deo s Option sale
id l ed
ue a
N.

S
:

BONDS
EXCHANGE
ending J an. 17

y. STOCK

■ss
^J
k
s:

P r ice
F rid a y
dan. 17

W eek's
Iia n ye or
hast S ale

ita n g t
Y ea r
IDOL

THE CHRONICLE

144

[V ol . L X X IV

I n d u s t r i a l a m i iV liseel
G a s 8 e c iu a
ii:ie g
B id I A s k
B id
A sk
n & ia n a p oU s G a s s t o c k 50
-1»)
00
6 5 1 C h a te a u g a y O re A 1 6 s T 5
1 st 6 s 1 9 2 0 . . . ........ M -N
99 % LOOM d i e s A G G r a in E l i n c . . .
15
20
7 5 ! 4 s . . ........ .................................. § 8 8
;
a c k s o ii G a s O o .......... 50
mmmmL
4
72
.00
o s g 1 9 3 7 . . . . . . . . . . . A - o § 1 02
104 i| C n o s e b r o u g h M f g Go 1 0 0 4 4 0
T R A N S A C T IO N S A T T H E N E W Y O R K STO CK E X C H A N G E
30
C l ait in (, H B ) 1 s t p r e f 1 0 0 1 0 0
20
K a n s a s C ity G a s .......... 100
D A IL Y , W E E K L Y A N D Y E A R L Y
2 d p r e f e r r e d ............... 10 0 1 0 0
102
o s 1 9 2 2 - .........
A -O § 1 0 0
C o m m o n .......................1 0 0 1 0 0
L a c le d e G a s See N Y S tk E x c h
54
60
C ol A 11o e k C o a l A I p f 100
L a fa y ’ c G as 1 s 1 6 s ’ 2 4 . M - N
60
65
S to ck s
IVte- k tULil h tg
S tate
R a ilr o a d
86
60
1 s t g 5 s 1 9 1 7 . ............ J-J
o g A W a b V 1 s t 6 s ’2 5 .J - i > 5 4
93
Jmt 17
■
uts
B onds
B onds
C o m p r e s s e d A ir O O ...1 0 0
10% 12
M a d is o n ( W is ) G a s —
1902
S h a res
P a r v a lu e
50
1st 0 s 1 9 2 6 ......... . . . . A - 0 § 1 0 7 % 1 0 9 % C o n s o lid C a r H e a t in g 1 0 0
55
..
-10
N e w a r k G a s 6 s 1 9 4 4 .Q -J § 1 4 0 % 141% C o n s o l F i r e w ’ k l c o in . 100
20
$ 1 ,9 6 1 ,0 0 0
2 4 4 ,7 2 0 $ 2 3 ,5 0 4 ,5 0 0
S a tu r d a y
50
56
P r e fe r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
58
N e w a r k C o n s o l G a s . . 1 00
60
$ 4 ,5 0 0
$ 2*000
3 .0 9 4 .0 0 0
5 5 ,6 1 9 ,9 0 0
5 9 8 ,2 7 4
M o n d a y .......... ..
C o n s o l I I u b b e r T i r e . . ! 00
i
5
5 s 1 9 4 8 See S t o r k E x c h lis t
500
3 .6 5 1 .0 0 0
6 5 ,5 7 0 ,7 0 0
6 9 2 ,2 0 7
T u e s d a y . . . ___ _
C o n s T o b a c c o 4 s, See B tk E x c h 1st
N e w E n g G a s A 0 See B o s t o n 1 1st
10 ,6 6 6
3 .1 5 1 .0 0 0
5 7 ,9 7 6 ,0 9 0
6 1 4 ,1 9 5
W e d n e s d a y .. . .
i.d
107
22
O A I n d C on N a t A 111 100
C o n t in e n t a l T o b a c d o b 7 s 1 0 5
" 7 ,6 0 0
2 . 00 0
3 .4 4 2 .0 0 0
3 7 ,8 3 8 ,7 5 0
3 9 4 ,5 0 4
T h u rsday
50
C o r b in C a b in e t L o c k . 100 2 5 0
46
300
1 s t 6s 1 9 2 6 .
J-D
1 7 ,5 0 0
1.0 0 0
4 ,1 0 1 ,5 0 0
4 7 ,6 3 7 ,6 0 0
5 4 0 ,6 4 6
F r id a y . . . . _ _
_
97 % C o r b in ( P A F ) C o . . . . . 25 i 107
P r o v id e n c e G a s ........ ... .5 0 1 9 5
75
C r a m p s ’ 8 h A E n B ld g 100
78
97
S t J o s e p li G a s 5 s 1 9 3 7 .J J § 95
$ 3 0 ,0 0 0
1 5 ,0 0 0
T o t at
3 ,0 8 1 ,5 4 6 $ 2 8 8 ,1 4 7 ,4 5 0 $ 1 9 ,4 0 0 ,5 0 0
90
23% 23%
C r u c i b le S t e e l ............... 1 0 0
8 t P a u l G a s G e n d s ’ 4 4 M -8 i 8 8
85 % 8 5 %
18
P r e f e r r e d ............ .
100
S y r a c u s e G a s s t o c k . . . too
90
J a n u a r y i to J a n 1 7
95
D ia m o n d M a t c h C o See E x c h List
W eek e n d in g J a n 1 7
1 s t 5 s 1 9 4 6 . . ..............J-J
S a les at
86
86%
D o m in io n S e c u r i t i e s . 100
W e s t e r n G a s — 5 s See 8 t ’ fc E x c li lis t
H ew Y o r k S tock
E l e c t r i c B o a t . _____ . . . 1 0 0
26
27
1901
1902
E x ch a n g e
1901
1902
T e le g r A T e le p h o n e
48
50
P r e f e r r e d !........ ............ 10 0
E le c t r ic V e n ic le .. . . . . 100
A m e r D i s t T e l e g ( N Y ) See S tk Ex. lis t
1%
2*4
2 0 ,6 1 6 ,9 8 5
9 ,5 1 9 ,5 9 2
6 ,8 5 4 ,9 9 5
3 ,0 8 4 ,5 4 6
S t o c k s — N 0, s h a r e s
4
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
0
108
B e ll T e ie p h o f B u ffa lo 1 0 0 1 0 4
$ 8 8 7 ,2 3 7 ,3 0 0 $ 1 ,9 6 3 ,4 4 5 ,8 5 0
P a r v a l u e .......... $ 2 8 8 ,1 4 7 ,4 5 0 $ 6 6 3 ,2 1 6 ,2 0 0
80
E m p ir e S t a t e S u g a r . .1 0 0
108
C e n tra l A S o A m e r ... 100 106
$ 5 2 ,3 5 0
$ 12 ,4 0 0
$ 2 ,8 0 0
$ 1 2 ,4 0 0
B a n k sh ares, p a r ..
67
64
C ites A P o t o T e le p h . .1 0 0
1 s t 6 s 1 9 1 5 ...................J-J § .... 9 5 %
BONDS
105%
7
Era pi r e S t e e l ................. 100
8
5 s 1 9 0 9 - 2 9 . . . ........ .. . J - J
$ 2 1 3 ,4 5 0
$ 6 9 ,5 0 0
$ 1 7 ,0 0 0
$ 3 0 ,0 0 0
G overn m en t bonds
P r e fe r r e d ..................... 100
175
48
52
184
C o m m e r c ia l C a b le ___ 100
2 5 7 ,5 0 0 C o m m e r O n T e l ( N Y ) . 2 5 1 1 5
22,0 0 0
7 7 ,5 0 0
1 5 ,0 0 0
S t a t e b o n d s ___
1
G e n e r a l C a r r i a g e .. . . . 100
1%
4 7 ,6 6 7 ,8 0 0
4 8 ,3 0 8 ,5 0 0
1 5 ,2 1 7 ,3 0 0
1 9 ,4 0 0 ,5 0 0
60
E R . a n d m is. b o n d s
70
G e n e r a l Oh e m ie a l___ 100
78
E m p A B a y S ta te T e l 100
84
o s t o n lis t
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 100
98% 100
$ 4 8 ,1 3 8 ,7 5 0
$ 4 8 ,4 0 0 ,0 0 0
$ 1 9 ,4 4 5 ,5 0 0 $ -1 5 ,3 1 1 ,8 0 0
____
T o t a l b o n d s ___
47
G o r h a m M f g C o c o m .lO u 115
55
125
120
P r e f e r r e d ............ .........100
G o ld A Stoc
123
D A IL Y T R A N S A C T IO N S A T T H E B O ST O N A N D P H IL A D E L P H IA
50% 5 1 %
H a e k e n s a c k M e a d o w s l. 00
4% S , 1 905
12
H a v a n a C o m m e r c ia l. 100
107
14
102
EXCHANGES
B o s to n lis t
46
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 100
48
M e x ic a n T e le p h o n e
. 53
B o s t o n li s t H k r -J o n e s -J e w ’ l M ill .p t’d
N o w E n g T e le p h o n e
90
P h ila d e lp h ia
95
N o r t h w e s t e r n T eL eg
B o sto n
1 s t 6 s 1 9 2 2 ................. M -S
126
vm
W eek en d in g
2
1 7 0 % H e r r i n g - 1 1 a ll-M a r v in TOO
168
J a n 17
35
45
ill
5 s 1920.
114
1 s t p r e f e r r e d .............. 10 0
.......... M -N
U n listed
B ond
B ond
L isted
L isted U n listed
1902
5
10
2 d p r e f e r r e d ............... 10 0
78
83
sh a res
sa les
sa les
sh a res
sh a res
sh a res
H o b o k e n L a n d A Im p lO O n o
1 98*4
100
106
5 s 1 9 1 0 ....................... M -N
i ’0’3
S o u th e rn A A t la n t i c ..§
$ 1 7 3 ,4 0 0
9 ,9 1 0
2 2 ,8 5 0
$ 2 0 9 ,0 0 0
5 ,0 3 9
1 1 ,3 0 3
S a tu rd a y . . . . .
20
4
I e l T e l A C a b le o f A m . 1 t
25
I n t e r n a t i o n a l S a lt c e r t f s .
6
6 3 9 ,1 0 0
2 1 ,8 1 9
5 0 ,6 9 1
1 4 9 ,6 0 0
8 ,0 5 1
1 9 ,3 9 2
M onday . . . . . .
I n t e r n a t ’ L S il v e r See S tk E x c h lis t
3 1 7 ,8 0 0
4 ,8 9 1
4 0 ,4 4 9
1 6 3 ,5 1 5
1 2 ,8 0 5
2 5 ,5 5 7
T u e s d a y ..........
E lectric C om panies
97
100
6 s 1 9 4 8 ...........
J -D
1 2 0 ,4 6 0
9 ,3 4 1
5 3 ,5 7 9
1 2 9 ,5 1 0
1 0 ,3 5 7
2 6 ,0 8 5
W edn esday. .
___
3
I r o n S t earn b o a t ............. 2 5 f ....
9 3 ,0 0 0
7 ,5 4 5
2 0 ,2 1 8
1 1 8 ,4 6 5
7 ,3 9 0
2 1 ,4 9 7
T h u r s d a y ........
155
160
J o h n B S t e t s o n c o m . . 100 1 3 5
170
1 3 5 ,1 5 0
5 ,2 8 9
1 1 6 ,4 0 0
1 2 ,8 7 5
5 7 ,1 1 6
1 7 ,8 3 1
F T i d a y ___ . . . .
140
S tock E xcb
E d i s o n E l 111 C o B r k N
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 100 1 3 0
E le e t r o - P n e iu n ’ ie T r a n
1 % L a n stem M o n e t y p e ----- 2 0 1 1 0 % 1 0 %
t
1%
5 8 ,7 9 5 $ 1 ,4 7 8 ,9 1 0
$ 9 1 6 ,4 9 0
2 5 0 ,9 0 3
1 2 1 ,6 6 5
5 6 ,5 1 7
T o t a l ............
235
S t o c k E x c h L a w y e r s M o r t I n s u r .1 0 0 2 2 5
G e n e ra l E le c tr ic Co N
95
190
200
L a w y e r s ' S u r e t y . . . . . 100
340
182
L a w y e r s ’ T i t l e I n s . . . 101 3 2 5
187
120
t 92%
L o n l l a r d ( P ) p r e f ........ 100
10
39
M a d is o n S<] G a r d e n . . 1 0 0
37
55
65
70
71
2 d 6 s 1 9 1 9 .................M -N
125
F o r W e e k ly R e v ie w o f OutM de M a r k e t See 7 th R a g e P reced in g .
8*4
8%
M e x N a t C o n s t r u e . p f 100
14
M 'o n o n g a h e la R C o a l . . 50 r 1 2 % 1 3
16
4s 1929.
66
P r e f e r r e d ................. . . . 5 0 t 4 3 % 4 4
68
S tre e t R a ilw a y s
S tre e t R a ilw a y s
A sk
B id
3%
A sk
B id
See B a It list M o n t A B o s t o n C o p p e r . 5 t
3
NEW YORK CITY
32
30
G r a n d R a p id s R y ___ 1 0 0
100
M o s ie r S a fe C o ............
F e r r y C o m p a n ie s
88
+m Jmm 1 8 %
m
P r e f e r r e d ................... .1 0 0
8 9*2’
33
36
N a t io n a i C a r b o n .......... 100
B le e c k S t A F u l F s t k 1 0 0
19
101
20
I n d ia n a p o li s S t R y See P liila li s t
99
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 10 0
84%
1 s t m o r t 4 s 1 0 5 0 — J-J
32%
31
113
J C H o b A P a t e r s o n .. 1 0 0
251
115
N a t E n a o n ’ g A S ta m p 100
16*2 1 8
B ’w a y A 7 t h A v e s t k .lO O 2 4 8
82
81
84
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
1 01 % 102
4S g N o v 1 1 9 4 9 . . . M -N § 7 9
C o n 5 s 1 9 4 8 See S t o c l E x c h lis t
I s t m o r t 5s 1 9 0 4 ...J -D
110
110
L a k e S t (C h ic ) E l s t k .lO O
10*2 11
108
N a tio n a E S a .lt See N Y S tk E x c li lis t
M e t r o p o lit a n F e r r y 5 s . . .
2 d m o r t 5 s 1 9 1 4 ........ J -J 1 0 8
140
155
D e b 5 s 1 9 2 8 .................J -J 102*2
>
68*4
C o n o s 1 9 4 3 See S t o c k E x c h lis t
119
40
33 .
116
r § 94
95
L o u is v S t R y 5 s 1 9 3 0 J A J §1 1 8
1 st os 1922.
B ’ w h y S u it 1 st 5 s g u 1 924 §1 1 4
80 '
76
N Y L o a n A I m p ____ 100
102*2 L y n n A B o s 1 s t 5 s ’ 2 4 . J -D §112 113*2 N Y A K o b o k
78
2 d 5 s i n t a s r e n t a l 1 9 0 5 §101
114
§ 1 1 2 % 114
116
M in n e a p S t R y 5 s See S tk E x c h lis t
N y: B i s c u i t 6 s 1 9 1 1 .M -S
C e n t T C r o s s t o w n s t k .lO O 2 5 0
30
29
125
§ 90% 91% N Y D o ck C o
N e w O r le a n s C it y R y 1 0 0
See S to c k E x c h li s t
C on 5s 1946.
1 s t M 6 s 1 9 2 2 .........M - N §120
P r e fe r r e d
See S t o c k E x c h l i s t
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0 102 . 1 0 5
219
C en P k N A E R iv s tk 100 208
175
1051-2 107
103
1st 4 s 1951
See S to ok E x c h l i s t
N o r t h C h ic S t r s t o c k . 1 0 0 1 7 0
C o n s o l 7 s 1 9 0 2 . . . . . J - D 101
11% 1 2 %
80
75
N Y E l V T r ($ 2 0 pel) 1 0 0
1 s t 5 s 1 9 0 6 -1 6 .......... J -J
195
C h r is t ’r & lO t li S t s t k 1 0 0 1 8 5
30
§105
31
170
N o r t h J e r s e y S t s to c k lO O
1 s t r a o r t 5s 1 9 1 9 .. .J
108
N Y R e a l t y C o r p . . . . . 100 1 6 0
C o l A 9 t h A y e 5 s S ee S t o c k E x c h lis t
)
43
82
45
4 s 1 9 4 8 ....................... M -N
81
D r y D E E & B a t s t k 1 0 0 120 1 3 0
N i c h o ls o n F ile C o ___ 1 0 C 1 2 6 %
9
§ 97
8
P a t R y c o n 6 s 1 9 3 1 . . J -D § 1 2 9
116
98
1 s t g o l d o s 1 9 3 2 . . . J -D 1 1 4
O n ta r io S i l v e r .............. IOC
28
105
29
2 d 6 s 1 9 1 4 ............... . . A - O § 1 0 4
S c r i p 5 s 1 9 1 4 . . . . . . E -A 1 0 4
R a ilro a d
42
92 % 9 3 %
R o c h e s t e r R y ( n e w ) .1 0 0
43
410
E ig h t h A v e n u e s t o c k 1 0 0 4 0 0
93
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
109
)
9 % 1 0 % P itt s b u r g B r e w in g .
105
t 2 5 % 26
S c r ip 6 s 1 9 1 4 .......... F - A
94%
f 44% 4 5
405
C o n 5 s 1 9 3 0 . ............. A - 0 112
> §106
108.
P r e f e r r e d .............. ..
4 2 d A G r S t P e r r y s tk 100 395
113*2
10 0
25*.-i 2 5 %
75
10 2
104
C on m tg g 5s 1930.
65
42d S t M A S tN A v e 100
2 d 5 s 1 9 3 3 . . . . .......... J-I> 100
P i t t s b u r g C o a l........ ..
30
90
114
32%
90%
In co m e 5 s 1 9 3 0 ....
I s t m o r t 6 s 1 9 1 0 . . . M - s 112
S o S id e E l (C h ic ) s t k .lO O 1 0 5
99
a tk E x
151
152
101 % D e n v e r A S o u t h 5n ,
101 S y r a c u s e R a p T r 5 s 1 9 4 6
lis t
99
2 d in c o m e 6 s 1 9 1 5 . -J -J
c E x c h li s t
124% 126
U n it R y s (S t L T ra n s ) 100
L e x A y A P a y P 5 s See S t k E x c lis t
P o c a h o n t a s C o a l S u bs
32% 33%
8 5 % 86
v E xch
90
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
205
li s t
93
P r e fe r r e d
See I
N in th A v e n u e s to c k . 100 196
P r a tt A W h itn p r e f ..
i E x c h lis t
339
220
341
S e c o n d A v e n u e s to c k lO O 2 1 7
G e n 4 s 1 9 3 4 ................. J -J § 8 9*2 8 9 %
1 st 4s 1951
S ee S
P r o c te r A G a m b le .. . .
202
5 t k E x lis t
W e s t C h ic a g o S t .......... 1 0 0
90
205
I s t m o r t 5 s 1 9 0 9 . . M -N § 1 0 5 % 1 0 7
P r e fe r r e d . . . . . . . . . . .
90*2 K C F t S c A M e m p f
140
150
C o n g 5 s 1 9 3 6 ........ M -N § 99*2 99%
c E x c h li s t
119
R e f g g 4 s 1 9 3 6 S ee
C o n s o l 5 s 1 9 4 8 ____ F - A § 1 1 8
1 0 7 % 109
175
M e x N a t io n a i (w i) ..1 0 0
14%
S ix t h A v e n u e s t o c k .. 1 00
15 %
o c k E x lis t.
P r e f e r r e d ( w i ) ........ 1 0 0
38% 39% R u b b e r G ood s M b
S o u B o u l e v 5 s 1 9 4 5 . . J-J §ii‘6 112
G a s S e c u r itie s
S o F e r 1 s t 5 s 1 9 1 9 ...A - O § 1 0 8
110
P r i o r l i e n 4 % s 1 9 2 6 ( w i ) 101*2 101 % R u s s e l l A E r w i n .
t .......... 6 2
NEW YORK
145
T h i r d A v e n u e S ee S t o c k E x c h lis t
140
1st con 4s 1951 ( w i ) . . .
7 9 % SO *4
165
107
T a rry W P A M 5s 1928 104
170
C e n t U n i o n G a s 1 s t 5 s . . . § 110 *2- 111*2 N o r A W e s t -P o n a 4 s . 1 941
98*4 9 3 %
139
142
Y k e r s S t R R 5 s 1 9 4 6 A - 0 1 0 9 % 110*2 C o n G a s ( N Y ) s t o c k N Yr S t o c k E x e
N o r P a c n e w 4 s (w i ) ........ 110
143
113
E q u i t G a s c o n 5 s 1 9 3 2 See S t k E x lis t N o r ’ n S e c u r it i e s (w i) 1 0 0 102% i02%
138
2 8 t h A 2 9 t h S t s 1 s t 5 s >90 111
T w e n t y - T h i r d S t s t k .1 0 0 4 0 8
230
250
415
305
M u t u a l G a s ..................... 1 0 0 2 9 5
P it t s B e s s A L E . . . . . . 5 0 t 30
3 6 % S in g e r M f g C o .......... .
......
106
D e l) 5 s 1 9 0 6 .................J-J 1 0 3
P r e f e r r e d ........................ 50 t 7 4
N e w A m sterd a m G as—
Snap H o o k A E y e ....
5%
U n i o n R y 1 s t 5 s 1 9 4 2 F - A 1 1 5 % 1 1 6*2
1 s t c o n s o l 5 s 1 9 4 8 . . J -J 109*4 1 0 9 % S e a b o a r d A i r L i n e See P a lt lis t
6
S t a n d a r d M i l l i n g Oo,
25
23
W e s t c k e s t 1 s t 5 s 1 9 4 8 J -J 1 0 7
n o N Y E le c L t H e a t A P o w e r
P r e f e r r e d ....................
In d u s tr ia l a n d M is c e l
72
74
G o l d 5 s See N Y S t o c k E x c h lis t
5s
BROOKLYN
640
645
A b e r d e e n C o p p e r . . . . . . 25 j 3 0
N Y A E a s t R iv e r G as—
S t a n d a r d O il o f N J ..
31
.... 2 2 0
A tia n A v e 5 s 1 9 0 9 ..A -0 § 1 0 5 ' 107
101
1 s t 5 s 1 9 4 4 . . ...............J-J 112
113*2 A c k e r M e r A C o n d i t . . . 6 s 10 0
C o n 5 s g 1 9 8 1 ........... A - 0 1 1 4
115
A in a lg C o p p e r See S t o c k E x c h lis t
31
34
C o n s o l 5 s 1 9 4 5 .......... J -J 1 0 8
U 2
120
I r n p t 5 s S ee S t o c k E x e li l i s t
130
N o r U n 1 s t 5 s 1 9 2 7 . M -N 1 0 7
A m A g r i c C h e m See B o s t o n lis t
109
B B ( & W E 5 s 1 9 3 3 . . A - 0 102
100
135
A m e r B a n k N o t e C o . . . 5 0 j- 5 4 % 5 6
101%
S ta n d a rd G as c o m . . . . 10 0 130
B r o o k l y n C it y s t o c k . . . 1 0 2 4 2
102
P r e f e r r e d ............ ..
100 150
155
243
A m B i c y c l e See N Y S t k E x c h lis t
§10 1
1 s t 5 s 1 9 1 0 - 1 9 1 4 . .. .
C o n 5 s S ee S t o c k E x e k li s t
14*4 14%
A m e r ic a n C a n c o m . . .1 0 0
1 s t 5 s 1 9 3 0 ...............M -N § 1 1 6 - 1 1 7
f 13*4 1 3 %
B k l n C r o s s t n o s 1 9 0 8 . J -J 1 0 5
56
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 10 0
75
T e x a s A P a c if i c
57
107
OTHER CITIES
§106
B k n H g ts 1 s t 5s 1941 A -0 105
80
83
110
A m e r ic a n C h ic le C o . . 1 0 0
1 s t 6s 1 9 0 8 —
B k l n Q C o & S u l) S ee S tk E x c h lis t
525
T itle G u ar A T n
25*2 2 6 %
si
P r e f e r r e d ................. . . 1 0 0
S3
A m e r L ig h t A T r a c t. 100
B k l y u R a p T r a n S ee S tk E x c h lis t
5% 7
T r e n t o n P o t te r y
4
o
89
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
90% A m e r G r a p h o p h o n e .. . 10
>
68
C o n e y I s l a n d A B k ly n lO O 3 2 5
400
7
P r e f e r r e d .......................10
8
75
B a lt im o r e C o n s o lid a t S ee B a lt li s t
70
103
1 s t o s 1 9 0 3 ................... J -J io i
6%
B a y S t a t e G a s .......... . . . 5 0
7*4
% A m e r H id e A L e a th e r 100
o s c r t f s i n d b t 1 9 0 3 .. J -J 100 1 0 3
39% 41
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 10 0
B in g h a m t o n G a s t
3
8
ftii %
20
B r k C A N 5 s 1 9 3 9 .J -J 113*2 114*2
U n i o n S t e e l A C h a in ,
00
6 s See S t o c k E x c h lis t
o s 1 9 3 8 ....................... . A - 0 § 9 3
96
P r e f e r r e d ....................
40
50
G r S tA N e w 1 st 5s ’06 F -A 104
85
95
B o s t o n U n i t e d G a s b o n d s B o s t o n lis t A m e r P r e s s A s s o c ’n .lO O
G r ’ p t A L o r i m e r S t 1 s t 6s 1 0 6
9*o A m e r i c a n S c r e w ------- 1 0 0
109
t 76
7*2
B u ffa lo C it y G a s s to c k lO O
K i n g s C o. E le v a t e d —
35% 38
1 s t 5 s b o n d s . ..........
A m e r S h i p b u i l d i n g . .. 1 0 0
SO
81
1 1 .... 9 5
7*3 75
1 s t 4 s 1 9 4 9 See S t o c k E x c h lis t
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
C h ic a g o G a s S ee N Y S t k E x c h lis t
9 7 % U n io n
N a s s a u E l e c p r e f .........1 0 0
2
122
1 s t p:
99%
126
85
83
A m S od a F o u n c o m .. 100
C in c in n a t i G a s A E ie c lO O
5 s 1 9 4 4 ........
...A -0
50
1.18 121
2 d p:
55
112 1 1 4
1 s t p r e f e r r e d ............... 10 0
C o l G a s L A H e a t co m lO O
91
95
7
1 s t 4 s 1 9 5 1 . . . . . . . . . . J -J
12
10
P r e f e r r e d ................... .1 0 0 100 % 101 %
2 d p r e f e r r e d ............... 10 0
99
8
97
1 7 5 ,1 8 5
89
N e w W b ’g A F U s t © x4% s 106
108
40
1 s t 5 s 1 9 3 2 ...................J -J § 1 0 7
A m e r i c a n S u r e l y .......... 5 0
109
20
S t e in w a y 1 s t 6 s 1 9 2 2 . J -J §1 1 5 *2 116*2 C o n s o i G a s ( N J ) s t k .lO O
22
22
23% U S
A m e r S t r a w b o a r d ___ 1 0 0
12
14
.
100
B o n d s 6 s ...... .............. F -A
1 s t 5 s 1 9 3 6 ...................J -J
79
m
81
OTHER CITIES
48
52
U s E n v e l o p e c o m . ..
45
C o n s u m G a s (J C it y )—
A m T y p e fo T s s t o c k ..100
B u f fa lo S t r e e t R y —
P r e f e r r e d .................. .
88
80
A m e r W o o l e n See S t o c k E x c h l i s t
1 s t 6 s 1 9 0 4 ............ .M - N § 1 0 3
104
1 s t c o n s o l 5 s 1 9 3 1 . . F - A §116*2 1 1 8
84
88
A m e r W r it in g P a p e r . 100
D e t r o i t C it y G a s . . _____ 50
1%
73
1 % U S G la s s c o m m o n ..,
140
145
D e b 6s 1 9 1 7 . . . . . . . . A . O § 1 0 5
10
D e t r o it G a s S ee N Y S t l E x c h li s t
P r e f e r r e d .....................1 0 0
107
m
86*4 8 6%
C h ic a g o C it y R R s tk .lO O 1 8 5
,68
71
E sse x A H u d son G as 100
5 s 1 9 1 9 ...........................J -J
1S 9
31
35
70
1 0 % F o r t W a y n e (In d )—
6 1 % 62
80
C h ic U n i o n T r a c c o m . 1 0 0
A n t h r a c i t e C o a l .......... 1 0 0
10
I s t m o r t 6s . . .
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0
1 6 % 20
81% 8 5
1 s t 6 a 1 9 2 5 ...................J-J
B a r n e y A S m C a r ........ 1 0 0
47
51
48
48
C le v e la n d C it y R y „ . . .1 0 0
stuck E x c h
G a s A E le c B e r g e n Co 100
P r e f e r r e d _________ . . 1 0 0 120 1 2 5
23
30
140
15
C lo v e C it y 1 s t 5 s 1 9 0 9 . J -J
G r a n d R a p id s G a s —
B li s s C o m p a n y c o m ___ 5 0 ISO
48
C le v e la n d E l e c t r R y . 1 0 0
138
P r e f e r r e d ........................5 0 1 3 3
1 s t 5 s 1 9 1 5 .................F -A §1 0 4 % 1 0 5 *o
71
69
405
13% U
Y a. C o a l Ir o n A C o k e . 19
C o n 5 s 1 9 1 3 ...............M -S
B o n d A M o r t G u a r ... 100
H a r t f o r d (C t ) G a s L . . . 2 5 t 4 8
50
5 s 1 9 4 9 ___ _________ M ;
ee
C o lu m b u s (O ) S t R y . . 1 0 0
er
B r ib ’ ll C o lu m b ia C o p p e r 6 I
9%
9%
H u d s o n C o G a s ............ 100
23
48
‘ 60
26
P r e f e r r e d ..................... 1 0 0 101*2 1 0 3
W e s t i n g h A ir B r a k e . .0 U 7 4
U 6
100 1 0 1 *2 C e llu lo id O o .....................1 0 0 100 103
6 s g 1 9 4 9 . ..........................
W h i t e K n o b M in i n g . 19
15% 10 %
20
C o lu m R y c o n 5 s See F h tla lis t
25
C e n t F i r e w o r k s c o m . i 00
I n d ia n a N a t A 111 G a s —
120
68
C r o e s t ’ w n 1 s t 5 s *33. J -D §110
75
P r e f e r r e d .............. .. 1 0 0
1 s t 6 s 1 9 0 8 .............. M -N
50
113
54

Volume of Business at Stock Exchanges

Outside Securities

6

§ B u y er p ays acorued in t e r e s t .

t P r ic e p e r sh are.

t S a le p r ic e .

THE CHRONICLE

J a n u a r y 18, 1902.1

115

Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore Sto ck E x chang es - A Dallv and Y e arly Record.
S ftia r t P r i c e * — N o t P e r C e n t u m
S a tu rd a y ,
J a n . 11.

209
107
•242
•191*
•155
1 QR
70*
54
145
37
95
99*
•27*

M onday,
J a n . 13.

W ed n esd a y
J a n . 15.

T uesd ay,
J a n . 14.

203
*201
202
107
100
107
245
♦242
245
192
192
192*
150
150
157
•132
138
70*
70
71
54
58* 58*
1 4 4 * 1 4 4 * 145
35* 30*
37
34
34
35
92* 98*
92
26* 20*
27*
•104
107
♦209
210
21 0
21 0
73* 74*
74
74*
27 5-1 0 2 7 * 2 0 * 2 7 9-10
40 * 4 0 *
4 0 * 11-10
80
31
80 11-10 1 *
•25
35*
♦.......... 20
43* 48*
48* 48*
9 9 * 101*
101
102*
89
88* 89*
88
38 * 34*
33* 34*
14* 14*
14* 14*
94
94
94
«4*

202
107
•842
192* 192*
157
157
1Qtt ■ 183
♦70*
70*
58*
54
144*
145
80*
37*
35
35
93
92*
ae*
26*

262*
107"

210
210
74* 74*
27 13 10 8 *
• 4 0 * 15-10
3 1 * 13-10
25* 25*
49
49
102* 102*
•89* 8 9 *
34
84*
14* 14*
94* 94*
70
♦81*
84
5 -1 0

71
28
84
5-10

08*
♦20*
88*

70*
22
84

07*
•21
82*
5-10

123*
117
101
60 0
25*
18*
24
7C *
59*
19*
77*

181*
110*
100*
580
25*
12*
03
24
70*
55*
19*
78
4

117*
115*
109
580
24*
11
♦03
2S*
09*
55*
18*
70
3*
*

l*
•89
90
14 0
140
• 2 2 * 23
8*
4*
14* 14*
117* 117*
•40
40*
89* 29*
•11
11*
28
28

13 9
22*
8* o
14
110*
40*
29
ii

i*
9 0 '"
14 0
S2*
11 -10
14*
lie *
46*
29*
a

88
89
90
• ,«• ,.. 90
• B id and a s k e d p r ic e s .

69*
22*
83

67*
21
81*
*

09*
21
82*
*

118*121*
11 5
11 6
158*100
50 0
57 0
2 4 * 25
11
12*
*03
04
2 3 * 23
09
69
55* 55*
1 8 * 19
76
76
3*
3*
*
*

12 1
115*
15 9
575
24*
11*
62*
23
09
55*
•18*
•70*

122^
116*
100
575
24*
12
63
23
70
55*
19*
70*

08
♦21
82

23*
08*
55*
19*
70*
3*
*
1*
89
89
88* 89*
89
89
*137
140
•138
140
139
139
22 * 22*
22*
22* 22*
A 3 7 2l*t
3 7-1 0 S3* 3 3-1 6 3 *
s*
18% U M
14* 14*
14* 14*
110
115
11 5
115
11 5
110
4 6 * 47
40* 40*
4 6 % 47
29
29
S9* 29*
29
29*
11
11
11
11
11
11*
....a t
...a ta
»aaaaa m t u
*.......... 88
88
88
90
90
90
***aaa* 90
a 27 7-10
n o s a le w as m a d e .

IN A C TIV E S T O C K S

Bid.

R A I L R O A D S .— P r i c e s
A m e r. R a ilw a y s (P h il) 50
AH A C h a rlo tte (B a lt) 100
2 0 1 A M a in e p f. (B o s t) 10C
B o s to n A P r o v ,
“
100
j o n n A P a a su m
4
4 100
C on n E l v e r . , . ,
4
4 100
O o n io lT r P it t s ? (P h il) 50
"
50
P r o f T.........
9 a S o u th A F la .(B a lt ) 100
l i t p r e f ..........
“
100
2d p r e f . . . . . .
“
100
fthrm ant’n P a s s (P h il) 50
H eston v M A T
“
50
P r e f.... . . . . . .
4
4
50
In d s S t r e e t ........
4
4 100
k it tle SchuyLk. 4
4
50
M aine C e n tr a l.( B oa t) 100
M inehiU A S H . ( P h i l ) 50
Sfesqu eh on ’ g V . 4
4
50
^ orth P e n n ....
4
1
50
Par© M a rq u ’ t©. (B o « t ) 100
P r e f. ...««•••• 4
4 100
P h il G e rm A N . (P h il) 50
P h ila . T r a c t io n
“
50
Rys C o G e n e r a li 4
4 ...
R u tla n d p r e l . . ( B o i t ) 1 0 0
U n ited N J ........ (P h il) 10 0
U n P o w A T ran e
435
W h it E n d p r e f.(B o s t ) 50
W a it J e r A S S .(P h ll) 50
W est N Y A P a .
4
4
50
W it C en t, n e w .( B o lt ) 100
P r o f .................
4
4 100
W ot N a ih A R .
4
4 100
M IS C E L L A N E O U S .
A llou ex M in ln g (B o it ) 35
A m er. C e m e n t .( P h i l) 10
A m G o ld D re d g f B o st) 10
A m e r. L A S . . . (P h il) 50
A m P n e a m S e rv t B o s t ) 50
50
P r e f .........
4
4
25
A r c a d ia n ...4
4
A rn o ld M in in g .
4
4
25
25
A tla n tic M ln ’ g .
4
4
25
B altic M in in g ..
4
4
Seth Steel . . . . . ( P h U ) 50
B oston m ie c L M B o a t) 100
C am bria I r o n ..( P h i l) 50
Cam b B D r e z e l r e c t 1
4
C anton C o..........(B a lt) 100
Central O il........(B o s t) 25
C on M ercu r g o ld 4
4
C am b T e l A T e l
4
4 100
D a ly -W e ft M in
“
20
D a n v B e s e e m e r( P h il) 1 *
Da L ong H & 2
“
10
D la m S ta te B t ..
4
4
10
P r e f .....................
4 ...
4
D o m ln C oa l p i (B ost)lO O
Dorn I r o n A B.tf 4 . . . .
4
B a rto n Con E L (P h il) 5 0
XdlaoTJ E l IU | „.(B o e t)1 0 0
d e e Co of A m
(P h il) 5 0
F r a * JrJin M in 'g .( B o s t ) 26
G en era l E le c t .,
4 100
4
P r e t .....................
4 10 0
4
G -B-8. B re w ln g (B a lt)
I n d J C r y p C om (B o a t) 100
X at B u t H I B M M 1 0
l a t B P & D y n a m fP h ll) 60
l e l y R o y a ir t | ..(B o e t) 25
M a a u fa o R u b . . ( P h i l ) 6 0

J a n . 17

44*
10 5
17 1
3C0
105
285
23
64
48
98*1
70
14 0

abe

.

170
*. . . ■
*«»««<

99

48
59
180
175
62*
108*
78
83
»»«■••
97*

111

*

80
85

112

28 0
114
06*
*80*
40*
8*
5*

80*
40*
3
2*
5*
80

•50
23
33*

•51
24
34

«»*«»« •. *.
4b
••••••
90
•••••

08
3*
1*
i . l * 180
39* 29*
J*

ni*
24*

85*

257
259*
e*
12*
13*
27 9
281

10 *

11*
3*

80*

F r id a y ,
J a n . 17.

262
*202
.......... 2 0 2
202
100
100
1 0 0 i 100
100
245
*24 2
24 5
•342
245
1 9 2 * 1 9 2 * 1 9 9 * • 19 2* 193
150
15 3
156
1 5 5 * 150
.......... 18 3
18 3
70*
72
• 70* 7 IX
74*
58*
58
53
0 8 % 54
9
145
14 5
14 5
140
80*
8 0 * 37
30% 3 7 *
35
84
84* 34*
85
92* 92*
92*
92*
20
27* 27*
37% 3 7 *
•104
105
2 1 0 * 810
210
2 1 0 * 210
21 0
74
7 4 * » 7 i * 11 -10
7 8 1 8 1 0 74
80 1 1 -1 6 7 * 27 3-1 0 2 7 *
a
4 0 * 40 9-16
4 0 * 4 0 * 41 1-10 4 1 %
8 0 * 18 -10
3 0 * 3 0 % 3 0 * 1 1 8 -1 0
25
ao
25
25*
25* »0*
48
48
47
48
47* 47*
1 0 0 * 1 0 1 * 1 0 0 * 102
100
101
88* 88*
89
89
88* 88*
33* 34*
8 8 % 31
3 3 % 34
14* 14*
14* 14*
X M *
94
94* 94*
94*
94* »4 «

120*
115*
100
580
25*
12*

33*
70
56*
18*
•76*

120*
110
100
08 0
24*
12*
83
23*
69*
55*
18*
•70*
4

T h u rsd a y,
J a n . 1U.

A C T IV E

262
♦105
•343
192
*154
•182
70
58*
144*
85*
♦83
93*
20

08*
22*
88*
5-10

i* 2 1 *
31 0
100
•580
25*
•18

P r ic e * .

81*

•20
♦82*
•*

70*
21*
83
%

1 2 1 X *23%
118*
110
159*100
57 0
57 5
3 4 % 25
13
13
• 0 2 * 03
23
23
0 9 * 09%
5 5 * 50 *
18* 18*
70
77*
4
♦3%
•*
*
2
♦1*
89
89
189
139
23*
3 5 -lb
3*
14
14*
11 5
115
47
48
29*
29
•11
•35
30
• m i 88
•.......... 90
28 9 1 0

B
id.

8 T O C K S -B O N D 8
M ISCE LL.—C on cluded.
M fd R u b b e rp fd (P h il) 50
Merg^enthaler ..(H ost) 100
M ex T eleph on e
“
1C
M tYer Co'.Duck (B alt) . . . .
tfew H n gG s& C ?(B ost). . . .
New H av I A 8. (P h il)
5
Old Col M ining. (B oat) 85
O sceola M ining. 4
4
35
P alm etto C o.. . . (P h il) 85
P arrott Sil&Cop (B ost) 10
P en n E lec V e h .(P h il) 50
P r e f................... 4
4 50
Penngyl S a lt ... 4
4
50
P ennsyl S t e e l. . “
...»
P r e f ..................
4 100
4
P h i i a C o .........
4
4
50
PlantersC om p?( B o lt) 100
Q uincy M ining.
4
4
25
R h od e Isl M in..
4
4
25
Santa Y sabel G 4
4
5
Seattle HIectrlo 4
4 100
P r e f .. . .. . . . . . 4
4 100
Susque I A 8 7 .. (P h il)
5
Tam arack M in .(B ost) 85
T idew ater S t .., (P h il) 10
T o r rin g to n i4A ,,(Boflt) 85
P r e f.................... 4
1 35
U n C o p L A M ’g 4
4
85
U n H IL A P ow p f (B a lt) 50
United Fruit (B ost) . 100
U S M i n i n g .... 4
4
25
Utah M in in g ..
4 4*85
4
W arw ick I A S . (P h il) 10
W e itm rel Coal 4
4
50
W inona M ining(B ost) 85
W olv erin e M in. 4
4
85
B o n d s —B o s t o n *
A m B ell T el 4 i . .1908 JAJ
A TAB F gen g 4s. *95 A AO
A d ju stm en t g i s . . 1995
B oston Term T 3 * » ..1 9 4 7
Bos U n G as 1st 5 s .’ 39 JAJ
2d M 5 s ...........1939 JAJ
Bur A M o R lv e x ’ pt 0s. JAJ
N on-exem pt 0 s .’ 18 JAJ
Sink fu n d 4 s .. 1910 JAJ
Cent Y t 1st 4 i 1 9 2 0 ..Q -F
Ch Bur A Q 4s. 1922 F A A
Iow a D lv 4 s .l9 1 9 A A O
Chicago Juno 5s. 1915 J AJ
Oh A No M g u 5 s .’ 31M AN
Chi A W M gen 5s.’ 21 J AD
Curr’ t R lv 1st 5s.’27 AAO
D G R A W 1st 4s.’ 40 AAO
D om ln Coal ls t6 s .’ 13MAS
TSast’n is t M 0s g .’ 06 MAS
Fr HlkAM Y 1st 0s ’ 33 end
Unst’ p ’d 1st 0s.’ 83 AAO
Illln Steel oonv 5s.’ 10 JAJ
D ebenture 5s. 1913 AAO
K C CA S 1st 5s g .’ 25 AAO
K C Ft SAG 1st 7s.’ 08 J AD
K O F SAMoon 0s.’ 28M AN
R O M A B 1 s t 4s..’ 84 MAS
Inoom e 5 s . .. •••»...*•
K CA M R yA B 6s.’ 20 AAO
K O St Jo A C B 7s.*07 JAJ
L RookA F S ls t 7 s .’ 06 JAa
Mar H A Ont 8s...’ 25 AAO
M ex C en t i s g ..l9 1 1 JAJ
1 st oon lno 8s g non-cam
3d oon lno 8s non-oura

7 I n d ic a te s u n lis te d .
1
R a ilr o a d N lo e k i.
B o s to n A A l b a n y .................... .( B o s t o n ) . . . . 1 0 0
<
«
....1 0 0
B o s to n E le v a te d , fu ll p a id .
i<
....1 0 0
B oston A L o w e ll m o m h i m i
(i
....1 0 0
B o s to n A M a in e .......................
....1 0 0
O hio. J u n o. A U n . S to o k Y d s .
4
4
i*
....1 0 0
P r e f e r r e d ........ .....................
C h oo. O kia. A G . tr u s t oerts. (P h lla D . . . . 50
it
. . . . 50
P r e fe r r e d T r. o e r t f s . . . . . . .
F itch b u rg , p r e f . . . . . . ............ (B o s t o n ) . . . , 1 0 0
L e h ig h V a lle y .......................... (P h lla .) . . . . 50
M a ss a ch u s etts E le c t . C o s . 7 .(B o s t o n ) . . , . 1 0 0
M
....1 0 0
P r e fe rr e d 7 ............................
It
....1 0 0
M e x ic a n C e n tr a l.. . ••............
N o r th e rn C e n t r a l . . ( B a l t . ) ,• •« 50
i (B o s t o n ) •. . . 1 0 0
O ld C o lo n y .................... .
. (P h lla .) . . . . 50
P e n n s y lv a n ia ..................
4
1
. . •. 50
R e a d in g C o m p a n y ..................
<
1
. . . . 50
1 st p r e fe r r e d ................
It
2d p r e fe r r e d ............ .
•.«. 60
S ea b oa rd A ir L in e . . . . . . . . . . (B a lt.) . . . . 1 0 0
n
.»• •100
P r e fe r r e d ..•••••••••••••••
U n ion P a o iflo ........ .................. .( B o s t o n ) . . . . 1 0 0
a
....1 0 0
P r e fe r r e d ........................ •. •
U n ion T r a o tlo n , 8 1 7 * p a id . (P h ila .) . . . . 50
o (B a lt.) •••• 50
U n ited R y A E le c . C o . . . . . .
W e s t E n d S t r e e t ...
•(B o s t o n ) . . . . 50
M le c e lla n e o u e S t o c k s .
A m a lg a m a te d C o p p e r ? . . . . .( B o s t o n ) . . . . 1 0 0
<
<
....1 0 0
A m e r. A g rio u l. C h e m ica l 7.
<
<
....1 0 0
P r e fe r r e d 7 ....................
. . . . 50
A m e rica n A l k a l i . .
n
P r e fe r r e d , 8 1 0 p a i d ........
. . . . 50
A m e rio a n S u g a r R e fin in g 7 . ( B o s t o n ) . . . . 100
a
P r e fe r r e d 7
.
,
....1 0 0
a
....1 0 0
A m e r. T e le p h o n e A T e l.C o . •
n
« * .. 25
C a lu m et A H e c l a . . . . . . . . . . .
C a m b .S te e l, 8 1 3 * paid r e c t a .(P h lla ,) • .«. 50
C en ten n ia l M i n i n g . .. ............ ( B o s t o n ) . . . . 25
C on so lid a te d G a e . . . . . 0. . . . , 0 (B a lt.) . . . . 1 0 0
C on sol. L a k e S u p e r io r .. . . . (P h ila .) . , . . 1 0 0
a
• «.,1 0 0
P r e f e r r e d . . . . . . ........ .
D o m in io n C oa l
.(B o s t o n ) . . . . 1 0 0
a
E r ie T e le p h o n e .
,,..1 0 0
L e h ig h C oa l A N a v ig a t io n .. . (P h ila .)
50
f*
M a rsd en C o ? ......................... .
....1 0 0
a
N a tion a l A s p h a lt 7
. . . . 50
it
P r e f e r r e d ? . ,
UH 50
N ew H ng. C o tto n Y a m , p r e f. (B o s to n ) . e..1 0 0
<
i
.o .o iq O j
N ew E n g la n d T e le p h o n e ...
O ld D o m in io n C op p er ? . . . . « •
«• o• 25
P h ila d e lp h ia H le o .? 5 p a id . o (P h ila .)
T r in ity M in in g
.( B o s t o n ) . « o * 25
U n ited G as I m p r o v e m e n t ?. . (P h ila .) e . . . 50
U n ite d S h o e M a c h in e r y ., •••(B o s t o n ) . . . . 25
Q
“
P r e fe r r e d
. . . . 25
II
U n ite d S tates O i l . .
Doit 25
W e ls h a c h O o . 4
. (P h ila .) . . . . 1 0 0
W e s tin g h . E le c t r ic A M f g . . . (B o s to n ) . . . . 50
it
P r e fe r r e d
.....
. . . . 50

A bE.

BONDS
B o s t o n — Concluded.

198
2

11*

.... a
170
2*

12*

5
.. •«* • ... .
3*9
2fc
80*
80

88*

29*

A

112

40*

11

133
138
2*
8*
*5 9
• i*
107
108
194
30 0
25 5
7
28
87
29
38
3*
*84* 85*
8 7 * 88
14
18*
3 2 * 23
6*
74*
1
1*
45* 40*
3

9 9 *

IlOM
S 93*

his
* 83
i 54
i 119

100
93^
117*
85
58

$ .........
| 87
§100*

87*

f 10*8* 1 0 9 *
109
3109
110
§106
3100
3110
§110
118
§135
§185
§ 1 0 0 * 101
* 101 * •«»««•
105
115

1* 8*
§ 90
93
§107
§115
§105
1118
§ 81
81
21

90*
94

82
88
28

H a le s
o f th e
W eek.
H h a res

8TO CK 8.

NewBng congen5s’45JAJ
N B CotYarn 5s 1929FAA
N H Gas A C i s t 5 s ..1937
New Hng Tele 5s.’ 10 AAO
0 s . ...................1907 AAO
N YAN Hng 1st 7s.5 J AJ
05
1st m ort6s.. ..1905 JAJ
Rutland 1 s t 8 s ..’ 02 MAN
Rut-Can 1st 4s 1949. JAJ
Seat Elec 1st 5sl9 3 0 F A A
Torrington l i t 5s 1 9 1 8 ...
W est Bnd St 5s. . ’ 02 MAN
4 * 8 ................. 1914 MAS
Deb 4s........... 1910 MAN
B o n d s—B a l t i m o r e .
Anacostia A P o t ........0«5s
A tl& C h 1st 7S.1907 JAJ
Atl Coast L ctfs 5s . . JAD
BaltCPaalst 5S.1911MAN
Balt Fundg 5S.1910 MAN
Exchange 3 * s . 1930JAJ
Funding, 3 * s , 1953JAJ
BaltAPlst0flml 1011AAO
1 st 6s tunnel 1911..JAJ
Bal Trac 1st 5o.l929M AN
NoBaltDiy 5a.l942JAD
Conv’rtible 5sl906M AN
Central Ry 0 s ...1912 JAJ
Consol 5 s ,. ,, 1932 MAN
Hxt A Imp 5s.l032M AS
Chas City Rylat 5s ’ 33 JAJ
Chao Ry G A HI 5s ’09 MAS
CharlCAA ext5s.l909JAJ
2d 7s 1 9 1 0 ....... m .A&O
CityASub 1st 5a.1922.IAD
CityASub(Wash) lst5 »’ 48
Col A G m vl st5-0.1917 JAJ
Consol Gas 0 s .. 1910 JAD
5s....... .. .. .. ,1 9 3 9 JAD
Ga A A lalstpf5sl945A A Q
GaCarANlot5s g. 1929JAJ
GeorgiaPlst5-0s 1922JAJ
GaSoAFla 1st 5S.1945JAJ
G-B-S Brewing 3-4s 1051.
Income..
KnoxvTrac lst5s ’ 28 A AO
Lake R HI lstgu5s’42MA8
Metflt( Wash) 1st 5s’25F A
MtVernonCotDuck 1st 5s
In com e............... .
New Orl Gas 1st 5s...V ar
NewpNAOPlst5s’38MAN
Norfolk St 1st 5 s ’ 44. JAJ
NorthCent 4 * s .l0 2 5 A A O
8s 1 9 0 4 ....................... JA J
Series A 5s 1 9 3 0 ....JAJ
Series B 5a 1 9 2 0 ....JA J
P it t U n T ra o 5s. 1 9 97 JA J
P o to m Y a l 1 st 5 s .l9 4 1 J A J
S e o A v T n lP itts ) 5 s’ 34J A D
Bav F la A W e s t 5s ’ 3 4 A A O
S ea b oa rd A L 4s I 9 6 0 , . . ,
Sea b A R o a n 5s. 1 9 20 JA J
S o .B o u n d l i t 5 s ’ 4 1 .A A O
U n H lL A P l s t 4 * s ’ 20M A N
U n R y A HI l s t 4 s ’ 4 0 .M A 0
I n c o m e 4s 1 9 4 0 . , , , J A D
Y lr g M ld 1st 0s. 1000 MAB
2d series 6 s . . 1011 MAB
8d series 6 s . . 19 10 MAB
4th ser 3 -4 -5 s .l0 2 1 M A 8
5th series 5 s.1 0 2 6 MAB

B i d . A b E.
0 a
i ........ • »O 1 1 0 3 * 10 4
57*
f 57

§
3109*
3107

0• . .
.

110

§101

5101
5 1 0 5 * 100
$•».»•« 1 0 8 *
3 . . . o. i 101 *

07
97*
1 1 8 * 114

1C8

11 0

110
11 4

111
114*

121 * 122 *
121
119
117

120

100*
118
105
90

92

120

1 1 4 * 118
94
05
121
120
114
112
113* 114*
...,« • >«»«•■

*

110
185

112 *

48*
38
96

120*

11 8
82*
45*

110*
40

88

*

09

88*
40*

100
105
105
110
104
128
123
115*
119
120
110
112

84*

••». i
85

110 * 111
85
95*
08
109
117*

121

119

110

87
05*
08*

R a n g e o f H a iti in 1901.

105 251
Jan.
191 1 5 9 * Jan.
388
J u ly
119 189
D eo.
286
254 13 6
Jan.
2
2 ,8 3 8 8 7 * J a n . 38
1 ,1 2 2 45
F eb . 30
172 189
Ja n.
0 ,0 9 5 2 8 * Ja n.
001 34
Jan.
705 7 7 * Jan.
82 0 1 8 * J a n .
8 8 * Jan.
87 !05 J a n .
1 ,0 17 0 9
M ay
1 0 7 ,8 8 9 1 3 * J a n .
2 ,8 0 7 3 3 3 -1 0 J a n .2 5
2 7 ,7 4 8
4
19 Ja n.
1,750
9 * Ja n. 81
2 ,4 1 0 2 4 * J a n . 81
3,100 7 8 * Ja n.
4
251 82
4
Ja n.
8 4 ,6 9 8 2 4 * J u n e 10
2 ,0 7 5 14
D e o . 19
232 9 2 * J a n .
8
14 ,0 8 9
50
186
1 ,1 9 0
2 2 ,0 0 0
415
2 ,5 0 8
188
1 7 ,5 0 9
2 ,1 0 8
225
!,7 1 S
2,381
2 ,2 8 0
1 ,0 7 4
911
970
300
318
58 0
191
1 ,0 85
4 9 ,8 3 7
1,450
1,003
021
1 ,3 4 3
145
100
130
28

Might tt

L o w es t.

00*
20
79*
*
*
108
113
151
58 5
15*
10 *
58
30*
40
83
15
63*
3*
*
1
88
137*
30*
4*
10
113
30*
28*
10*
38
54
00

D eo. 17
O ct.
8
D e o . 14
D eo. 0
A p r . 20
D e o . 24
D eo. 24
4
Jan.
D e o . 20
M ar. 27
D eo. 30
J a n . 30
D eo.
6
F e b . 11
M a y 15
D eo. 4
J a n . 21
D ec. 9
D e o . 30
D e c . 30
D ec. 7
Jan.
4
D e o . 17
D ec. 4
D e c. 7
S e p t. 13
F eb. 4
Jan.
4
D e o . 17
D e o . 12
J a n . 10
Jan.
4

305
A pr. I I
19 0
J u ly 17
348
A p r. 32
30 0
A p r. 34
03
J u n e 19
186
A p r. 8
8 2 * H o t . 18
5 9 * M a y 10
148
A p r . 38
8 9 * M ay
l
45
J u ly
1
90
J u n e 11
3 9 * M ay
3
1 0 0 * D eo. 3
3 1 3 * A p r. 39
81
A p r . 30
2 8 * D eo. 80
4 1 * D eo. 80
33 8 -1 0 D e o .8 1
8 0 * J u n e 31
5 4 * S e p t. 30
1 8 3 * M ay
X
99
M ay
1
87
Jan.
S
1 8 * M ar. 89
99
A p r . 38
1 2 9 * J u n e 18
J u n e 18
J u n e 18
J a n . 13
M ar. 4
152* Ju n e 8
18 0
J u ly 10
183
M a y 2S
800
M ar. 5
3 1 * J u n e 11
3 4 * M ay
2
0 5 * J u ly 10
3 8 * A p r, 12
70
Aug. 8
5 8 * D e o . 31
99
Jan.
3
7 9 * A p r . 12
3
7 * Ja n.
8 F e b . IS
16
F e b . 13
Jan.
3
99
A p r. 12
14 0
3 8 * M ar. 5
8 F e b . 13
41
J u n e 20
1 2 8 * Jan.
2
4 8 * N o t . 14
30
S e p t, 9
M ar. 80
17
A p r , 12
55
8 9 * D eo. 27
91
D e o . 31

BO ND 8
B a l t im o r e —Conolu’d.
Y a (State) 3s new.’ SSJAJ
Fund debt2-8a.I991JAJ
W est N C con 08.1914 JAJ
WestYaC A P l*t0g.’ 11 JAJ
W ll A W eld 5s,. 1935 JAJ
B o n d s — P h ila d e lp h ia
Alle V y H ext 7s 1910 A AO
Asphalt Co 5s tr c tfil9 4 0
A tl City 1st 5® g.c’ 10 MAN
Balls Ter 1st 5s. 1920 JAB'
Berg AHBrewlstBs’S l JAJ
Cambria Iron 6s. 1917 JAJ
ChesAD Canlst5s.’ 10 JAJ
ChocAMemist5sl949JAJ
ChocOkAG gen 5a’ 19JAJ
C itV St Ry(Ind)con 5 b. :S3
Colum St Ry 1st con 5s.’32
Con Trac of N J 1st 5s..’ 3.
Del A B Bk 1st 7s.’ 05 FAA
Hast&A 1st M 5s.’20 MAN
Edison M eo 5a stk tr ctfs
ElecA Paop’s Tr stk tr ctfs
ElmAWilm 1st 0s.1 JAJ
10
Income 5 s ....2882 AAO
Hq 111 Gas-L 1st g 5s. 1928
Hestonv M A F con 5s,’24
H A B Top con 5a.’25 A feO
Indianapolis Ry 4s. .1933
Lehigh Nav 4 * s . . ’ 14 Q-J
R R 4 3 g ,.,„ ,,1 0 1 4 Q-F
Gen M 4 * s g . . 1934 Q-F
Loh Y C’l 1st 5 s g .’83 J&J
Leh Yal ext 4s.. 1948 JAD
2d 7 s . , . 1910 MAS
Consol 6 fl..,,,1 9 2 3 JAD
Annuity 0s.............,JAD
Nat Asphalt 5s.1951.JAJ
New’kCon Gas 5s *48 JAD
Newark Pass con 5s.l0SO
N YPhllAN orlstis ’ 39JAJ
Income 4 s . . . 1939 MAN
No Penn 1st 4e..’S0 MAN
Gen M 7s......... 1903 JA j
Penn gen 0s r ..,1 9 1 0 Yai
Consol0s 0. . , , 1905 Yar
Consol 5s r*.. .1919 Y&r
Penn A Md Steel oon 0 s ..
Pa A N Y Can 7s..’O0 JAD
Cons 5 s .•••••1939 AAO
Cons 4s......... 1939 AAO
Penn Steel lst5s.’ 17 MAN
People’s Tr tr certs 4».’43
PhLa Elec gold trust ctfs
Trust oertfs 4 s ..,• • ....
PhAHr gen M 5g.’20 AAO
Gen M 4s g .. 1920 AAO
Ph A Read 2d 5s.’33 AAO
Consol M 7 s ..1911 JA B
Con M 0s g . . . 1911 J A D
H xtl mp M4s g.’47 AAO
Con M o f ’82 4s.’37
Terminal 5s g.1941 Q - 1
P W ilA B a lt4 s.l9 1 7 A & 0
Collattrust 4s.l921 JAJ
Read Co gen 4s, 1907 JAJ
Rochester Ryoon 5s. 1930
Soh RHSldelstSs g’SSJAD
Scran Trao 1st 0s^32M AN
UnTraoPitts gen5s’97JAJ
Welsbaohs l os 1980. JAD
KAnd Interest.
* Price includes overdue

8*
1

*

*

B
id.

A sh

.

100
100
114*
124
33*
•• • . 9 t

9» •0•0
52
1 1 5 * 116
110*
>ttn
i •* * >
H O * i• » •
H i*
*0 8 *

98*

107
108

• eov
a

110

11 2

80

111

86*

U IH

no

108* 109*
n ?
120
128
12 5
..««•*
U
14*

lie*
84**
103*
108**

l id
IIMH
109* u ni
96
IMtlt
105
0 6 * *I••«
00 . Iff*

122

108*
184
127
108*

121*

125
108
08*

08*

110 *

68*

04 *

eoupo ns.

THE CHRONICLE.

146
fm ie h tm e u t

a m i

R a ilr o a d

R A IL R O A D

LXXIV.

[V o l .

I n te llig e n c e .

E A R N INGS.

T h e tYd lowing table shows the gross earnings of every Steam railroad from which regular weekly or monthly returns
t-r
i c i The tir.st two columns of tigures give the gross earnings for the latest week or month* and the last two
niDs the* earnings for the period from J i l l y I to and including such latest week or month.

The returns of the street railways are brought together separately on a subsequent page.
\olU i

C lia ii^ e —Guy yearly totals now all date from J u l y 1 *
Latest Gross Earnings

ROADS

Week
\fonth

O c t o b e r . ..
A d i r o n d a c k .. .
A la G t S o u th e r n . 1 s t w k J a n
A la N O A l e x as P a c J uno.
N 0 A N o E a s t . 4 th w k D e c
A la A VickMYg 4 th w k D ec
V ic k s b Sh A P . 4th w k D e c
A n n A r b o r ____ . . . 2 d w k J am
A im W a s h A B aL N o v e m b e r
A to ll T o p A S F e . X 0 v e in b e r
A t la n t a A j l i a r . . O c t o b e r . . .
A tl K n o w A N o. D ecem ber.
A l l a n t ic A B irin . D e c e m b e r ,
A t l C o a s t L i n e . .. N o v e m b e r
A t l V a id A W e st. D e c e m b e r .
B a lt A A n n S L .. N ov em b er
B a lt A O h io ----- ) D e c e m b e r .
B A 0 S o iit h w . s
B a n g or A A roost N ovem ber
B a th A H a m m e n N o v e m b e r
B e lla Z a ires A C in O c t o b e r . . .
B e lie f o n t o C e n t’] D e c e m b e r .
B r id g t A S a c o R . N o v e m b e r
B u ff A t t i c a A A r e O c t o b e r . . .
B u ff R o c k A 2i cts 2 d w k J a n .
B u ffa lo A 3 user. . . N o v e m b e r
B u rl O R a p A No D ecem b er
C a n a d ia n P a cific 1st- w k J an
C e n t ’ ! o f G e o r g ia ts t w k J a n
C e n t ! N ew E n g .. * o r em ber
O e n t’ l o t N J e r s e y N O've m b e r
C e n t r a l -P a c ific .. O c t o b e r . ..
C h a tta n S o u th ’ n . 1 s t w k J a n
C h e s a p A O h i o . , . 1st w k J a n
C liic & A lt o n R y . N o v e m b e r
C h ic B a r i A Q uin N o v e m b e r
O h io A E I l l i n o i s . 1 s t w k J a n
C lii > G t W e s te r n . 1 s t w k J a n
C h ic I n d A L ’ v . . . 1 s t w k J a n
O h io M il w A S t P 4 th w k D e c
C liic A N o r t h W Ti N o v e m b e r
C h ic P e o A S t L > D e c e m b e r .
S tL C li A S tP >
C h ic R I A P a c . . . N o v e m b e r
C liic S t P M A O . N o v e m b e r
C h ic T e r m T r R R 1 st w k J a n
C h o c O k l A G u lf. 1 st w k J a n
C ln N O A T P a c . is t w k J a n
C l C m Oh A S t L . 1st w k J a n
P e o r ia A JEast’ n 1 s t w k J a n
C le v L o r A W heel D e c e m b e r ,
C o lo r a d o A S o u th 1 st w k J a n
C ol N ew b A Lau. N ovem ber
C o l S a n d A H o c k 4th w k D e c
C o r n w a ll A L e b . - N o v e m b e r
C u m h e r l d V a l .ey N o v e m b e r
D e n v e r A R io O r 1st w k J a n
D e t r o it S o u th e rn . 1 s t w k J a n
D e t A M a c k in a c . N o v e m b e r
D u l S o Sk. A A t l . . 1 st u k J a o
E St L A C a ron d . D ecem ber.
E r i e .......................... N o v e m b e r
E v a n s v A In d ia n 1 s t w k J a n
E v a n s v A T H . . . 1 st w k J a n
E arm v A P o w hat N ovem ber
F in d F t W A W _. S e p te m b e r
F t W A D e n y C ity N o v e m b e r
G e o r g ia R R -------- N o v e m b e r
G a S o u th A F l a . . D e c e m b e r .
G ila V a l G A N _. N o v e m b e r
G r T r u n k S y s te m I s t w k J a n
G r T r A TVestTi 4 th w k D e c
D e t G r H A M . . 4 th w k D e c
G r e a t N o r t h ’n —
S t P M in n A M . D e c e m b e r .
E a s f n o f M in n . D e c e m b e r ,
M o n t a n a C entT D e c e m b e r .
T o t a l s y s te m . D e c e m b e r .
H o c k in g V a l l e y .. 2 d w k J a n .
H o u s A T e x C ent O c t o b e r . . .
H iin o is C e n t r a l.. D e c e m b e r .
I llin o is S o u th e r n D e c e m b e r .
I n d D e c A \Vest?n J u ly ...........
I n d 111 A I o w a . . . O c t o o e r . . .
I n t A G t N orth* n 1 s t w k J an
I n t e r o c ( M e x ) .. . . W h D e c . 28
I o w a C e n t r a l . . . . 2 d w k J an.
D o n R a i l w a y ___ D e c e m b e r .
K a n a w h a A M ich 1 s t w k J a n
K a n C ity S o u th ’ ll N o v e m b e r
L ehigh. & H u d s o n D e c e m b e r .
L e h ig h V a i R R . . O c to b e r . ..
L e h V ai C o a l C o . O c t o b e r . ..
L e x in g A E a s t ’n . N o v e m b e r
N ovem ber
L o n g Is la n d .
L ou ^ H en A S t L . . D e c e m b e r .
L o u i s v & N a s h v . 1 st w k J a n
M a c o n A B ir in . . . D e c e m b e r .
M a n is A N o E a s t O c t o b e r .. .
M anistitjue.
D ecem ber.
M a r y la n d A P en n N o v e m b e r
^ M e x ica n C e n tr a l 1 s t w k J a n
M e x ic a n in t e r n ’l N o v e m b e r
lM e x ic a n N a t l . . I s t w k J a n
J M e x ic a n R y ........ W k D e c 2 8

Current
Year
$
1 7 ,4 9 0
4 4 ,0 7 9

-Previous
Year
$
1 6 ,1 6 9
4 3 ,3 3 3

J u ly 1 to Latest Date
C u rren t
Y ea r

$

7 6 ,6 1 2
1 ,2 9 7 ,0 5 9

5 8 ,0 0 0
9 9 8 ,9 1 5
4 1 ,0 0 0
5 3 0 ,3 8 5
3 9 ,0 0 0
4 7 ,0 0 0
3 7 ,0 0 0
5 1 6 .7 6 9
2 8 ,1 4 9 1 ,0 3 0 ,0 6 9
3 2 ,8 7 1
6 ,7 9 3
3 8 ,2 6 3
5 ,2 3 5
5 ,4 3 9 ,5 7 9 4 ,7 7 9 ,0 9 5 2 5 ,5 4 7 ,3 0 4
9 9 5 ,5 2 8
2 7 3 ,7 7 1
2 7 8 ,8 8 5
4 5 ,5 0 8
3 9 ,5 1 7
3 0 8 ,0 9 8
1 1 ,8 7 3
6 ,3 1 8
6 0 ,6 3 0
6 6 6 ,2 0 8
6 1 9 ,1 0 9 3 ,1 2 4 ,8 2 8
1 8 ,9 8 5
1 3 1 ,0 5 8
2 1 ,1 9 8
4 6 ,8 6 4
8 ,0 8 5
9 ,1 7 1
4 ,2 0 9 ,5 7 5 4 ,0 7 6 ,0 2 6 2 6 ,0 3 6 ,9 1 0
1 4 0 ,3 1 1
5 ,0 4 3
1
4 ,8 0 8
3 ,0 8 9
2 ,9 5 4
1 0 7 ,8 4 3
7 5 .8 2 3
4 6 0 ,8 1 0
5 9 7 ,0 0 0
1 5 5 ,4 6 0
4 9 ,1 8 9
1 ,5 1 3 ,0 4 7
1 ,9 3 5 ,4 5 5
1 ,6 1 9
2 6 9 ,6 0 4
8 1 3 ,5 6 2
4 ,5 9 6 ,2 6 5
1 4 3 ,5 0 1
1 3 5 ,8 3 7
7 0 ,3 8 1
1 ,3 5 3 ,3 7 7
4 ,0 4 6 ,3 2 8

1 1 3 ,6 7 3
5 ,9 9 7
1 9 ,4 9 9
4 ,4 2 2
3 ,9 2 4
3 ,4 7 8
1 0 4 ,7 1 5
6 8 .2 1 8
4 1 4 ,6 3 4
4 5 3 .0 0 0
1 3 2 ,9 4 0
5 8 ,8 9 4
1 ,3 8 0 ,2 0 7
1 ,8 7 2 ,6 3 8
1 ,4 5 3
2 4 1 ,7 3 1
7 2 1 ,0 3 6
3 ,9 6 5 ,7 8 6
129 ,5 3 4
1 0 8 ,5 3 "
6 5 ,1 D
1 ,2 4 7 ,2 9 9
3 ,4 8 3 ,1 8 9

3 ,5 5 9 ,5 1 0
3 6 4 ,0 5 5
2 ,8 8 2 ,8 9 2
2 0 ,4 5 7 ,8 1 7
4 ,2 0 2 ,4 1 0
2 6 8 ,8 3 7
7 ,4 8 0 ,1 0 6
7 ,6 7 5 ,5 9 2
4 9 ,2 7 7
8 ,7 3 3 ,3 2 5
4 ,1 4 2 ,3 3 2
2 4 ,2 2 3 ,6 6 4
3 ,2 6 6 ,1 9 9
4 ,1 3 9 ,2 7 3
2 ,4 3 1 ,4 7 9
2 4 ,3 8 6 ,2 4 8
2 1 ,0 5 2 ,2 2 9

1 1 9 ,3 3 4

1 3 2 ,1 6 1

7 3 0 ,3 5 8

6 9 3 ,0 9 0
1 9 ,5 7 6
2 9 ,5 0 8
2 0 ,3 0 3

2 ,4 8 9 ,1 8 8 2 ,1 3 6 ,2 6 6 1 3 ,9 2 4 ,5 4 6
9 2 5 ,4 0 4 5 ,3 9 1 ,6 4 7
1 ,0 7 9 ,8 7 8
2 4 ,7 7 2
2 9 ,4 2 9
8 2 2 ,4 2 8
* 9 6 ,9 1 8
* 7 2 ,3 7 4 * 3 ,2 2 2 ,9 4 7
8 8 ,6 7 5
8 0 ,6 8 7 2 ,8 4 5 ,7 3 7
2 8 3 ,6 4 0
3 0 0 ,1 8 7 1 0 ,2 8 7 ,1 9 1
4 2 ,8 1 9
4 8 ,8 3 3 1 ,3 6 6 ,2 7 9
1 8 3 ,7 7 6
1 4 1 ,2 1 7 1 ,3 4 8 ,2 1 9
9 3 ,1 4 0 . 8 5 ,4 7 5 2 ,8 9 9 ,6 2 7
7 2 ,0 2 3
1 4 ,9 2 1
1 4 ,9 2 8
29,5.78
6 3 1 ,5 6 3
2 0 ,8 4 6
2 8 ,7 0 0
1 3 .9 6 0
1 6 2 ,8 6 9
9 5 .8 2 3
9 0 ,2 3 1
5 1 8 ,9 6 7
1 7 5 ,9 0 0 6 ,5 1 7 ,6 6 8
2 0 0 ,7 0 0
2 4 ,0 3 4
6 6 4 ,9 8 7
2 2 ,8 9 8
6 3 ,1 6 0
5 5 ,3 3 4
3 3 1 ,3 1 0
3 8 ,0 5 5
2 8 ,5 2 8 1 ,4 1 8 ,4 9 7
1 2 ,1 9 2
8 2 ,8 0 9
1 3 ,9 4 8
3 ,5 4 5 ,2 2 0 3 ,1 6 9 ,5 2 4 1 8 ,2 1 7 .3 7 3
5 ,2 3 2
1 7 8 ,7 4 4
4 ,9 8 5
2 2 ,7 2 9
2 5 ,7 0 3
7 8 3 ,2 5 9
6 ,6 2 5
3 0 ,0 2 6
4 ,1 8 9
9 ,6 3 5
3 3 ,6 3 8
9 ,6 1 0
2 2 1 ,2 1 4
9 3 5 ,1 7 4
1 9 5 ,2 4 ’
1 8 7 ,6 6 4
1 6 3 ,3 6 1
8 3 6 ,8 6 2
1 0 6 ,3 1 4
6 2 9 ,5 8 9
1 0 9 ,3 9 6
3 6 ,0 8 1
1 5 2 ,8 8 7
3 2 ,6 7 9
4 7 7 ,4 0 9
5 0 4 ,8 9 1 1 5 ,7 5 5 ,6 9 1
1 3 0 ,3 7 1
1 3 5 ,3 0 1 2 ,1 6 4 ,5 9 3
4 4 ,3 6 9
6 1 4 ,2 8 8
3 0 ,4 4 1
2 ,7 5 2 ,5 7 7
3 6 8 ,9 8 7
1 1 0 ,7 0 8
3 ,2 3 2 ,2 7 2
8 8 ,0 8 5
6 0 1 ,4 7 7
3 ,3 9 4 ,1 1 8
1 1 ,2 7 7
5 9 ,6 9 8
1 4 7 ,0 9 0
8 6 .7 1 7
77* 5 00
5 7 ,4 6 9
6 ,6 2 1
1 8 ,5 1 3
4 6 8 ,9 4 4
2 5 ,4 4 1
2 ,8 9 4 ,0 5 8
2 ,1 3 8 ,4 1 5
2 9 .3 7 4
Jnc. 5 2
5 4 ,0 7 6
5 7 1 ,0 2 0
1 2 ,0 2 7
2 7 ,8 3 3
4 .8 0 1
2 1 .7 1 8
3 5 5 ,7 2 2
5 6 6 ,5 8 3
1 3 3 ,1 3 6
8 5 ,2 0 0

2 ,0 1 3 ,8 0 4 1 6 ,5 9 7 ,1 9 0
2 5 1 ,0 6 1 3 ,1 0 5 ,1 7 7
8 5 7 ,5 4 2
2 0 3 ,0 0 7
2 ,4 6 7 ,8 7 2 2 0 ,5 5 9 ,9 1 5
8 4 ,4 9 7 2 ,8 8 0 ,9 5 9
7 4 0 ,6 4 3 ' 1 ,9 2 7 ,3 6 7
3 ,2 6 7 ,7 0 6 2 0 ,6 1 6 ,0 2 2
7 0 ,6 9 0
8 ,5 5 0
5 5 ,9 2 8
5 9 ,6 9 8
1 0 S ,9 4 3
5 6 2 ,7 9 6
9 2 ,2 4 6 2 ,7 1 .7 ,7 9 0
7 3 ,2 7 0 1 ,9 0 3 ,2 0 0
4 9 ,2 1 2 1 ,3 7 6 ,0 4 7
3 9 ,6 0 6
4 ,3 2 4
1 5 ,5 6 6
5 6 0 ,4 7 5
3 8 0 ,0 3 8 2 ,1 5 1 ,7 3 6
1 9 0 ,7 1 9
3 9 ,3 7 6
1 ,6 4 5 ,1 2 3 1 0 ,0 8 7 ,5 5 3
6 7 9 .0 0 0 6 ,9 2 1 .1 0 0
1 6 8 ,4 7 4
2 3 ,8 2 5
J n c 36
,2 1 5
5 8 ,4 8 4
3 5 4 ,6 3 4
5 1 4 ,8 2 5 1 5 ,7 0 0 ,0 7 9
9 ,3 6 1
6 4 ,4 1 4
2 6 ,6 3 4
3 ,0 7 8
3 4 ,4 7 9
2 0 ,4 1 5
2 9 4 ,3 5 1 8 ,9(36,027
4 9 3 ,6 7 0 2 ,4 8 3 ,6 4 9
1 2 2 ,3 0 6 3 ,8 1 8 ,0 9 9
7 6 ,8 0 0 2 ,1 2 2 ,5 0 0

P r e v io u s
Y ea r

$
7 0 ,7 3 1
1 ,1 4 1 ,1 9 9

Latest Gross Darnings

ROADS

W eek
o r M o n th

M e x ic a n S o u th ’ n 3 d w k D e c
M ilie u A S o ’ wTi. N o v e m b e r
M in e r a l R a n g e .. N o v e m b e r
9 8 3 ,0 0 4 [ M tn n ea p A S t L . 2 d w k J an.
4 6 5 ,9 6 6
vi S t P A S S t M . i at w k J a n
4 5 5 ,1 8 1 ! M o K a n A T e x a s i at w k * an
J
9 4 3 ,1 8 7 M o P a o A I r o n M i 2 d w k J a n .
2 6 ,6 7 7 | C e n tr a l B r a n c h 2 d w k J a n .
2 2 ,1 8 9 ,9 8 7 1
T o t a l ................. 2 d w k J a n .
9 5 9 ,1 7 6 M o b J a c k A K 0 - W k J a n . 4
2 4 4 .5 9 2 M o b ile A O h io .. c D e c e m b e r .
3 2 ,7 3 7 i M o n t A M e x G u ll N o v e m b e r
3 ,6 0 4 ,2 0 5 1 N ash Oh A S t La. D e c e m b e r .
1 0 9 ,3 8 9 N e v -C a l-O r e
D ecem ber
4 0 ,7 5 4 N e v a d a C e n t r a l.. S e p te m b e r
2 3 ,5 5 6 ,3 7 7 N Y 0 A H u d R iv D e c e m b e r .
N Y O u t A W e s t. N o v e m b e r
5 9 6 ,0 8 7 ) N Y S u eq A W est N o v e m b e r
2 3 ,9 5 1 1 N o r fo lk A W e s t’ n Lst w k J a n
N orth ern C en tra l N o v e m b e r
1 9 ,9 8 1 N ortlP n P a c i f i c .a 1st w k J a n
1 9 ,2 9 3 O h io
A
L it t le
K a n a w h a .......... S e p te m b e r
3 ,1 4 4 ,9 6 9 P a c ific C o a s t C o . N o v e m b e r
3 0 2 ,9 9 9 P e n n —E a s tP A E . N o v e m b e r
2 ,6 1 0 ,5 8 7
W e s t P A E .... N o v e m b e r
1 6 ,7 3 8 ,0 4 2 P ere M a r q u e t t e .. I s t w k J a n
3 8 7 ,3 6 0 Phil a A E r i e ___ _ y o v e m b e r
3 0 3 ,8 8 9 1 Pliila W ilm A B . . N o v e m b e r
6 ,5 3 7 ,9 3 5 P in e S lf.A A r k .R . O c t o b e r . . .
7 ,2 4 8 ,7 6 4 P ittsb C C A S t L N o v e m b e r
5 4 ,1 1 0 P ittsb A W e s t’ ll. O c t o b e r . ..
8 ,1 9 8 ,6 9 7
P it t s b 01 A T o l O c t o b e r .. .
3 ,9 7 2 ,1 0 1
P itts b P a A F . . O c t o b e r . ..
2 2 ,3 5 5 ,0 4 3
T o t a l s y s t e m . .. i s t w k J a n
2 ,9 8 4 ,2 1 5 P la n t S y s t e m — )
3 ,7 1 3 ,0 7 3
A la M id la n d . 1
2 ,1 7 1 ,1 4 3
B r u n s A W ’ n. ; N o v e m b e r
2 2 ,3 9 3 ,2 5 4
C h as A S a v . . .
1 9 ,1 7 9 ,4 5 3
S a v F la A W .
SilSOc A G ..
7 0 9 ,4 6 1
R e a d in g C o .—
1 2 ,1 1 2 ,5 2 3
P h il A R e a d . . . N o v e m b e r
4 ,9 5 0 ,5 2 6
C o a l A I r C o ___ N o v e m b e r
7 4 0 ,1 8 7
T o t b o t h C o ’ s. N o v e m b e r
* 2 ,2 2 7 ,9 4 5 R ich F r ’k sb A P . O c to b e r . ..
2 ,5 4 8 ,2 3 9 | R io G r a n d e J e t . . O c t o b e r . . .
9 ,5 7 2 ,7 3 8 i R io G r a n d e S o . .. 1 st w k J a o
1 ,2 5 4 ,5 2 8 R io G r ’d e W e s t . . D e c e m b e r .
1 ,0 1 9 ,2 4 6 R u t l a n d ................ D e c emi her2 ,5 5 1 ,7 9 7 S t J o s A G r I ........ D e c e m b e r
7 0 ,8 1 7 S t L K e n ’ e t A S o . D e c e m b e r .
O c t o b e r ..
5 3 4 .7 5 3 S t L A N A r k ,
1 0 5 ,8 2 6 St L A S a n F r a n < l s t w k J an
7
4 7 4 ,5 6 0 S t L S o u t h w e s t /. i st w k J an
6 ,2 6 6 ,7 6 0 S t L V a n A T H . . D e c e m b e r
6 1 3 ,8 7 9 San A n t A A P . . N o v e m b e r
3 3 6 ,9 2 0 S an F r a n A N P . D e c e m b e r .
1 ,3 4 4 ,2 1 4 S a n P e d r o L o s A n ­
7 5 ,8 6 2
g e le s A S a it L . N o v e m b e r
1 6 ,1 4 6 ,0 4 3 S F e P res A P h . . . 2 d w k D ec
1 8 3 ,7 4 4 S a v F la A W e s t .. N o v e m b e r
7 6 9 ,1 8 3 S e a b o a r d A ir L . . i s t w k J a n
2 7 ,6 5 0 S o C A G a E x t . . . D e c e m b e r .
3 0 ,0 0 9 So H a v e n A E a s t . D e c e m b e r .
8 9 6 ,5 6 3 S o u th e r n I n d ___ D e c e m b e r
7 7 7 ,1 3 4 S o M iss A A r k . . . N o v e m b e r
6 1 3 ,0 3 2 So P a c ific C o 5 . . . N o v e m b e r
C en t P a c ific ___ O c t o b e r .. .
1 5 6 ,0 3 4 '
G a l H a r A S A . O ctob er. ..
1 5 ,0 4 1 ,1 7 4
2 ,1 1 2 ,8 9 2
G a l H o u s A N o S e p te m b e r
G u lf W . T . A P . O c t o b e r . . .
5 6 9 ,4 3 2
H o u s . E . A vV.T. O c t o b e r . . .
1 2 ,4 0 7 ,8 5 6
H ou s. A S h rev; O ctob er. w
H o u s A T e x O en O c to b e r . ..
2 ,2 7 4 ,5 5 3
L o u is ’ a W e s t . .. O c t o b e r , . .
1 ,0 7 7 ,8 6 0
1 5 ,7 6 0 ,2 6 9
M o r g a n ’ s L & T O c t o b e r . ..
N Y T A M e x .. 0 . to ber
2 ,6 1 6 .8 6 3
T e x A N O r l-. . . O c to b e r ...
1 ,8 8 5 ,2 3 6
I S ,4 5 6 ,7 0 0
So P a c o f C a l . . O c t o b e r ...
S o P a c o f A r iz . O c t o b e r .. .
5 9 ,9 8 5
So P a c o f N M . O c to b e r . .
5 5 ,9 2 8
4 0 0 ,3 9 2 S o u th e rn R a ilw ’ y 1s t w k J an
2 ,7 1 5 ,8 0 0 T e r r e H & I n d . . . D e c e m b e r ,
1 ,9 5 8 ,4 5 0 T e r r e H A P e o r . . D e c e m b e r
1 ,2 6 1 ,5 4 5 T e x a s C e n t r a l . . . 4 th w k D e c
2 6 ,4 8 6 T e x a s A P a c i f i c .. 1st w k J a n
4 6 6 ,5 1 6 ■TexS V A N W .. D e c e m b e r .
1 ,8 4 7 ,0 1 7 T o l A O h io C e n t . \s t w k J an
2 2 3 ,4 3 4 T o l P A W e s t . . . . I s t w k J an
8 ,0 2 3 ,6 3 3 T o l S t L A W ........ 1st w k J a n
6 ,1 5 3 ,7 1 8 T o r H a m A B u f f . it h w k D e c
1 4 5 ,8 6 7 U n ion P a c R R . )
O reg R R A N > N ov em b er
5 ,9 2 6
O r e g Sh L in e . )
3 3 9 ,0 9 7
1 4 ,3 7 1 ,6 4 0 W a b a s h .................. 2d w k J an.
5 5 ,3 6 8 W J e r s e y A S e a ’ e N o v e m b e r
W V C e n A P i t t .. S e p te m b e r
3 8 ,5 3 4 W h eel A L E ........ D e c e m b e r .
W ic h it a V a l l e y ... N o v e m b e r
8 ,5 3 0 ,2 4 2 W is co n s in O o n t .. 2 d w k J an.
2 ,2 3 2 ,1 2 0 W rightSY A T ’n . . N o v e m b e r
3 ,7 7 7 ,2 4 9 Y a z o o A M iss V ,. D e c e m b e r .
2 ,1 0 7 ,7 0 0

C u rren t
Y ea r

P r ev io u s
Y ea r

$
$
1 9 ,1 2 0
1 6 ,5 2 4
3 ,2 5 4
48,0-16
4 8 ,9 2 7
5 8 ,8 0 9
5 5 ,4 3 2
6 5 ,4 1 7
9 0 ,3 5 7
2 8 1 ,4 9 5
2 5 5 ,8 1 6
6 2 3 ,0 0 0
5 9 2 ,0 0 0
1 3 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,0 0 0
0 1 3 ,0 0 0
6 3 6 ,0 0 0
2 ,4 0 9
2 ,7 0 0
5 5 3 ,7 0 0
5 8 4 ,7 0 0
1 0 0 ,3 6 3
1 1 3 ,6 6 7
6 3 1 ,6 3 6
6 2 2 ,5 7 8
1 1 ,2 1 8
9 ,6 7 9
2 ,3 1 4
2 ,9 7 0
5 ,6 9 0 ,1 2 0 5 ,0 0 1 ,3 8 1
4 6 0 ,3 6 5
5 0 1 ,4 2 2
2 2 5 ,8 7 5
2 4 9 ,9 4 5
2 li4 ,8 7 0
2 9 3 ,6 6 6
7 7 2 ,5 3 7
7 4 2 ,9 3 7
4 7 3 ,4 7 2
5 7 5 ,9 3 9

Jnly I to

L a test D ate

C u rren t
Y ea r

P ie o io u s
Y ea r

£
3 8 4 ,9 1 0

it
3 5 3 ,2 0 6

2 6 0 ,4 8 7
1 ,9 6 6 ,1 7 2
3 ,4 7 2 ,7 5 7
9 ,2 3 2 ,4 7 8
2 0 ,4 8 9 ,0 0 0
7 4 7 ,0 0 0
2 1 ,3 6 8 ,2 9 1
81,21 1
3 ,1 2 2 ,8 0 0
6 0 1 ,4 8 8
3 ,9 1 3 ,2 1 8
8 8 ,5 6 9
9 ,0 9 1
3 7 ,8 6 4 ,6 8 8
2 ,6 2 8 ,9 3 2
1 ,2 4 8 ,6 1 1
8 ,8 8 3 ,6 5 3
3 ,6 7 3 ,2 1 4
2 3 ,4 6 2 ,2 2 0

2 7 4 ,1 2 9
1 ,7 6 3 ,7 5 8
2 ,3 7 9 ,4 5 0
8 2 i 9 .3
1 8 ,1 6 3 ,0 0 0
7 6 4 ,0 0 0
1 8 ,8 9 5 ,3 9 5
7 0 ,1 2 8
3 ,1 2 6 ,0 7 6
5 6 9 ,8 4 7
3 ,8 4 9 ,4 1 7
8 5 ,1 1 7
8 ,3 0 4
3 4 ,4 6 4 ,3 2 3
2 ,1 0 0 ,2 4 2
9 0 3 ,4 6 8
8 ,4 .0 1 ,3 9 2
3 ,2 8 8 ,7 1 4
1 8 ,5 8 6 ,2 3 9

,„
_

4 6 ,1 2 4
1 6 ,9 9 1
4 8 ,2 0 7
1 6 ,4 2 8
4 3 3 ,2 9 4
4 2 7 ,8 0 3 2 ,3 8 5 ,1 1 6 2 ,4 2 8 ,4 8 5
8 ,0 7 3 ,5 2 4 7 ,7 8 8 ,5 2 4 4 0 ,6 6 2 ,2 9 7 3 6 ,9 3 7 ,6 9 7
Luc. 4 ,2 2 0 ,3 0 0
J n c. 8 7 3 ,4 0 0
1 4 3 ,4 9 8
1 3 0 ,7 6 6 5 ,0 1 5 ,9 9 1 4 ,5 3 2 ,6 2 0
6 i 5,541 3 ,3 0 8 ,9 3 1 2 ,6 7 3 ,8 4 3
6 1 4 ,4 8 1
9 9 0 ,5 5 9
9 6 4 ,4 5 9 5 ,1 2 0 ,5 3 5 4 ,9 3 8 ,3 3 5
5 979
3 ,5 9 8
1 ,8 7 1 ,4 9 3 1 ,5 8 8 ,2 6 2 9 ,1 5 3 ,6 0 1 7 ,9 0 7 ,9 2 1
7 5 8 .2 5 0
9 1 0 ,3 8 4
2 1 4 ,4 6 3
2 4 4 ,7 3 8
5 6 5 ,2 7 5
1 0 9 ,7 0 6
1 3 5 ,3 0 0
4 1 4 ,6 6 8
2 0 5 ,2 6 2
1 9 6 ,6 4 1
3 6 ,9 1 2
3 8 ,1 4 0
5 3 ,3 0 4
6 2 ,2 0 4 2 ,2 8 4 ,4 3 1 2 ,0 3 0 ,7 2 8

7 4 4 ,1 8 4

6 7 8 ,4 1 9

3 ,1 7 3 ,1 3 2

3 ,0 2 2 ,3 7 0

2 ,6 6 6 ,2 6 5 2 ,4 7 6 ,4 7 6 1 2 ,8 3 2 ,9 8 4 1 1 ,4 2 4 ,1 7 6
3 ,0 3 4 ,5 4 5 2 ,5 3 0 ,1 4 8 1 2 ,8 2 1 ,3 8 1 1 0 ,8 2 6 ,3 4 4
5 ,7 0 0 ,8 1 0 5 ,0 0 6 ,6 2 4 2 5 ,6 5 4 ,3 6 5 2 2 ,2 5 0 ,5 2 0
3 4 0 ,0 9 5
3 0 8 ,7 6 1
8 9 ,8 2 7
8 2 ,6 9 4
6 1 ,4 6 2
2 2 2 ,0 6 7
6 2 ,9 7 9
2 2 2 ,1 9 3
3 0 9 ,5 4 2
o ,3 5 2
3 0 1 ,0 2 0
8 ,4 6 3
4 4 6 ,1 0 0
3 6 5 ,2 0 0 2 ,7 6 8 ,8 4 7 2 ,5 4 2 ,1 0 0
1 ,1 3 2 ,8 1 8
7 3 5 ,7 3 6
1 1 4 ,9 4 5
6 9 8 ,9 8 3
9 3 ,1 5 4
8 5 ,3 6 4
1 2 ,9 4 8
7 0 ,8 2 7
1 3 ,8 0 8
7 ,1 5 2
8 0 ,1 6 0
3 4 ,3 3 2
2 1 ,4 1 7
3 1 9 ,3 9 7 1 1 ,5 3 3 ,0 6 1 9 ,7 8 7 ,3 1 0
3 7 7 ,0 8 9
1 3 2 ,9 4 3 3 ,9 8 7 ,5 1 4 4 ,0 0 2 ,9 3 7
1 3 8 ,6 8 4
1 6 4 ,1 9 1
1 5 9 ,0 6 8 1 ,0 7 7 ,7 6 9 1 ,0 0 6 ,9 4 6
2 5 0 ,3 1 1
2 8 7 ,2 8 1 1 ,1 8 4 ,3 3 2 1 ,2 0 6 ,2 2 7
6 2 8 ,6 2 0
7 5 ,4 5 8
5 6 8 ,5 9 5
8 5 ,5 2 6
1 8 ,0 0 0
1 9 ,7 4 3
7 '7 4 4 ,1 8 4
2 0 9 ,5 3 7
2 3 ,2 8 9
4 ,1 1 5
4 8 .6 7 7
2 1 ,6 2 8
7 ,4 8 4 ,2 3 3
1 ,9 3 5 ,4 5 5
6 8 5 ,3 2 8
4 0 ,8 8 7
1 3 ,7 7 3
9 6 ,8 4 2
2 3 ,5 2 2
6 0 1 ,4 7 7
1 7 7 ,3 4 6
8 3 6 ,6 4 7
3 8 ,5 7 7
2 5 7 ,5 1 9
1 ,9 1 1 ,6 1 8
4 0 0 ,6 5 8
2 3 7 ,4 8 /
6 5 4 ,8 0 5
1 3 1 ,6 9 8
5 0 ,4 1 2
1 3 ,7 5 6
2 2 6 ,2 8 0
1 8 ,5 0 0
4 7 ,6 3 0
1 9 ,9 7 5
4 9 ,4 6 2
1 1 ,1 4 4

9 ,4 1 8
4 1 9 ,3 7 9
4 4 8 ,9 3 6
1 9 ,5 6 8
/6 7 8 , 4 1 9 1 3 ,1 7 3 ,1 3 2 / 3 , 0 2 2 ,3 7 0
2 2 7 ,7 2 2 5 ,8 2 8 ,2 3 7 5 ,4 3 3 ,1 3 3
1 3 6 ,0 4 0
1 4 1 ,5 5 5
2 5 ,6 1 6
4 2 ,2 5 1
3 ,8 4 8
4 7 ,9 7 1
3 1 7 ,3 7 3
3 1 ,1 0 3
1 9 2 ,6 3 1
9 8 ,9 7 6
1 6 ,1 1 0
8 8 ,6 1 0
6 ,7 2 7 ,7 9 9 3 6 ,3 2 2 ,4 9 7 3 2 ,1 3 0 ,7 9 4
1 ,8 7 2 ,6 3 8 7 ,6 7 5 ,5 9 2 7 ,2 4 8 ,7 6 4
6 5 0 ,2 1 1 2 ,4 1 4 ,6 9 0 2 ,1 3 5 ,4 5 8
1 0 6 ,6 3 4
7 4 ,1 7 7
1 9 ,8 7 5
5 9 ,5 8 1
1 7 ,6 9 4
5 1 ,0 3 7
3 0 0 ,1 5 2
9 2 ,0 2 8
2 5 7 ,0 6 5
7 2 ,2 8 2
5 5 ,7 8 5
2 0 ,5 8 9
7 4 0 ,6 4 3 1 ,9 2 7 ,3 6 7 1 ,8 8 5 ,2 3 6
5 1 4 ,7 5 2
6 0 6 ,0 3 6
1 5 8 ,3 1 7
6 0 9 ,0 9 9 2 ,7 8 7 ,7 1 8 2 ,4 5 5 ,6 9 1
1 3 1 ,7 9 6
3 0 ,5 2 8
9 0 ,6 9 7
9 8 1 ,6 9 5
8 1 7 ,4 3 7
2 4 4 ,1 7 1
1 ,7 2 3 ,1 4 5 7 ,2 9 4 ,3 3 0 6 ,2 7 1 ,8 9 4
3 3 2 ,2 6 4 1 ,3 8 8 ,1 2 2 1 ,1 4 6 ,4 1 0
8 2 4 ,9 8 7
1 7 9 ,0 0 9
6 - 6 ,9 9 9
6 1 8 ,8 1 6 1 9 ,6 0 9 ,8 8 5 lS,t> j o.t)0 3
8 4 6 .2 3 7
1 3 3 ,4 8 8
8 3 0 ,1 4 7
3 0 0 ,0 8 5
4 8 ,5 2 1
2 8 1 ,6 4 2
2 0 ,3 6 2
3 7 6 ,0 4 5
3 5 0 ,9 5 1
1 9 8 ,1 5 2 6 ,3 9 2 ,3 5 8 5 ,9 0 0 ,3 0 1
8 6 ,8 0 0
1 4 ,0 0 0
7 3 ,5 0 0
4 4 ,6 7 6 1 ,5 3 4 ,2 7 8 1 .3 5 2 ,0 1 5
6 2 4 ,1 0 0
2 0 ,2 6 8
6 2 6 ,4 ,1 0
4 6 ,4 9 l 1 ,3 6 8 ,8 1 4 1 ,1 8 2 .0 0 8
1 9 3 ,3 8 7
1 3 ,6 5 4
2 5 6 ,3 8 9

4 ,4 3 8 ,4 9 7 3 ,8 2 9 ,5 1 3 2 1 ,5 4 8 ,8 5 9 1 9 ,9 1 0 ,9 9 2
3 8 2 ,5 7 7
217,163
1 0 2 ,1 6 7
2 4 9 ,4 6 8
9 ,5 3 6
1 0 0 ,5 0 0 ;
1 5 ,0 4 9
6 3 0 ,6 0 7

3 4 6 ,3 4 6 1 0 ,6 6 9 ,2 7 5
2 0 6 ,5 6 3 1 .9 7 2 .9 3 2
8 0 9 ,5 8 8
9 5 ,8 3 8
2 5 1 ,6 8 2 1 ,7 8 4 .4 9 4
6 ,9 3 8
9 8 ,0 0 8 8 ,2 1 8 ,2 2 6
0 0 ,9 5 4
1 6 ,2 3 0
7 3 7 ,9 5 9

9 ,7 6 1 ,8 1 9
1 ,8 7 4 ,9 8 2
2 8 6 ,5 4 6
1 ,5 4 7 ,2 4 7
2 ,9 2 l . 185
7 3 .9 9 9
8 ,1 8 0 .: 52

§ C ov ers resu lts on lin es d ire ctly o p e ra te d east o f P ittsb u rg .
* F ig u re s fr o m D e ce m b e r 1 are fo r th e ra ilroa d on ly, \ M e x ica n cu rren cy .
a In clu d e s P a d u ca h A M em p h is D iv is io n fr o m J u ly 1 in b o th years.
b In clu d e s th e H o u s to n A T e x a s C en tra l an d its su b sid ia ry lines. E a rn in g s oi th e C ro m w e ll Steam sh ip Line, n ot p rev iou sly re p o rte d , are
n o w also in clu d e d .
c R e su lts on M o n tg o m e ry D iv isio n a re in clu d e d in b oth years.
d In clu d es St. P au l A Duluth tor hotU > ears.
e In clu d e s resu lts o n Slier. Shrev. A S ou th ern, M o. M idland and San A n to n io e x te n sio n fo r th is year, b u t not for last year.
T h ese figuvea
A re th e resu lts on th e A la . M idland, B r u n s w ic k A W estern , C h a rleston A S avann ah , Savann ah F la, A W eat’ n and S ilv e r S p r i n t O cala A GuU
//T h e s e tigures in olu d e, b esid es th e Sc, L ouis A San P ra a m s30 p r o p e r , the K a n , C ity Ft. S c o tt A M em p h is and Ft, W orth
Bio G ran d e,

THK

J a n u a r y lb, 1U02.J

U H K 0N 10L K

147

For the fourth week of December our flpal statement covers
01 roads, and shows 5*00 per cent increase in the aggregate
In the full page statement on the preceding page wo show
over the same week last year.
the gross earnings of all roads for the period from July 1,
4 l h w e e k o j D e c e m b e r . [ 1901.
1900.
In crea se.
D ecrea se.
that being now the beginning of the fiscal year of the great
jk
majority of the roads. There are, however, some roads that
$
P reviou sly rop’ d (5 2 r’ds) 14,481*,140 13,602,664 1,077,778
249,297
still have their own fiscal years. These with their dates are Ala. N. O. A T ex. P a o .—
58,000
New Orl. A No. E ast ..
61,000
brought together in the following.
3,000Totnln for Fiscal Year.

L a te s t Q ros * E a r n in g s .

Roads.

P e rio d .
O u rren t
Y ea r.

A tlan ta A Charlotte A ir Line. Apr. 1 to
B eliefonte C entral................... Jan. 1 to
B urlington Cedar Rap. & No. Jan. 1 to
C entral o f New J ersey............ Jan. 1 to
C hicago & N orth -W estern .... June I to
Ohioago Rook Island & P a o .. Apr. 1 to
Ohio. St. P. Minn. A O m aha.. Jan. 1 to
Ohootaw O klahom a A G u lf.. Nov. 1 to
Cum berland V alley .................. Jan. l to
East St L ouis A O arondelet. Jan. 1 to
Ft. W orth A D enver C ity....... Jan. 1 to
In tern ational A Gt. N orth ’ n. Man. 1 to
Lehigh V alley R R ..................... Deo. 1 to
Lehigh V aliev C oa l.................. Deo. 1 to
M anistee A N orth E a s te r n ... Man, 1 to
M anlstlque.................................. Jan , 1 to
M exican C en tra l....................... Jan. 1 to
M exican In tern a tion a l........... Jan. 1 to
M exican N ation al.................... Jan. 1 to
M exican R ailw ay ..................... Jan. 1 to
M exican Sou th ern ................ Apr. 1 to
M issouri Paoiflo......................... Jan. 1 to
C entral B ra n ch ...................... Jan. 1 to
T o ta l........................ ............. Jan. 1 to
M onterey A M exican G u lf.... Jan. 1 to
N orthern C entral...................... Jan. 1 to
Pennsylvania, East o f P. A E. Jan, 1 to
W est o f P. A E ..................... Jan. 1 to
Pere M arqu ette......................... Jan. 1 to
P hiladelphia A E rie ................ Jan. 1 to
Phlla. Wllm’g ’n A B altim ore. Nov. 1 to
Pitts. Clnoln. Ohio. A St. L . . . Jan. 1 to
B io G rande J u n c tio n .............. Deo. 1 to
St. L. V an d alla A T erre H .... Nov. 1 to
South H aven A E astern ......... Jan. 1 to
South. M issouri A Arkansas.. .Jan. 1 to
T erre H au te A Indianapolis.. N ov. 1 to
Terre H aute A P e o ria ............. Nov. 1 to
T exas A P aoiflo....................... Jan. 1 to
W est J ersey A S eashore......... Jan. 1 to

Oct.
Deo.
Dec.
N ov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Jan.
N ov.
Deo.
N ov.
Jan.
Nov.
Nov.
Oct.
Deo.
Jan.
N ov.
Jan.
Deo.
Deo.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Jan.
Nov.
N ov.
N ov.
Oct.
Deo.
Dec.
Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
N ov.

31
31
31
30
80
30
30
7
30
31
30
7
30
30
31
31

7
30
7
28

2l
14
14
14
30

SO

P r e v io u s
Y ea r.

$

$

1 ,6 4 0 ,8 2 0
5 2 .0 0 5
5 ,2 3 8 ,8 2 8
1 5 5 7 3 ,7 2 4
2 4 ,9 6 5 ,3 3 *
2 0 ,2 4 8 ,8 0 7
1 0 ,2 1 6 ,1 4 2
1 ,0 0 2 ,0 x 7
1 ,0 1 4 ,8 7 4
1 6 1 ,7 7 9
1 ,9 5 6 .0 0 6
8 6 ,7 1 7
2 6 ,6 8 3 .5 3 4
2 1 8 1 0 ,5 8 3
2 9 0 ,3 4 fc
9 3 ,3 1 2
3 5 5 ,7 2 1
5 ,4 1 3 ,7 8 6
1 3 3 ,l3 n
4 3 2 7 ,0 0 0
6 3 2 723
1 ,1 7 1 ,0 0 0
2 6 ,0 0 0
1 ,1 9 7 0 0 0
1 ,2 7 6 ,3 8 7
7 ,6 2 4 1 0 »
8 5 ,4 9 3 0 0 8

80
30
Ine. 5,1
7
1 4 3 .9 4 8
3 0 6 ,2 9 3 .6 4 8
30
9 9 0 ,5 5 9
3 0 18 9 0 4 658
31
5 2 2 ,2 5 7
3 4 0 ,9 3 2
31
31
6 6 ,7 7 2
2 0 2 .4 5 2
30
2 7 1 .1 6 5
31
9 7 .5 2 9
31
7
2 2 6 ,2 -0
3 0 3 ,4 6 5 ,5 8 4

1 ,4 7 2 .5 1 5
4 3 ,9 5 0
4 .8 4 8 ,2 8 1
1 3 ,9 2 7 ,5 2 5
2 2 .8 6 7 ,6 2 5
1 7 .6 6 9 8 0 3
9 ,4 5 2 ,2 4 6
8 5 5 ,2 1 6
9 4 1 ,4 6 6
1 5 7 ,1 8 4
1 ,6 2 4 ,9 5 6
9 2 .2 4 6
2 3 .0 4 9 ,2 8 2
1 8 ,2 7 9 ,5 5 9
2 7 9 ,3 8 7
1 0 2 ,7 2 7
2 9 4 ,3 5 1
4 ,9 0 4 ,1 4 5
1 2 2 ,3 6 8
4 , 4 0 8 ,6 0 0
6 0 1 ,8 8 9
1 ,1 2 0 ,0 0 0
4 1 ,0 0 0
1 ,1 6 1 ,0 0 0
1 ,2 6 7 ,5 4 9
7 .0 8 8 ,7 0 8
7 7 ,7 5 9 .0 0 8
9 6 ,1 0 0
1 0 ,7 6 6
5 ,3 0 8 ,3 5 2
964 459
1 7 ,2 9 1 ,4 3 6
5 0 6 ,4 5 0
3 1 8 ,1 4 5
6 8 ,4 9 0
169 759
2 6 6 ,9 7 6
9 7 ,0 4 2
1 9 8 ,1 5 2
3 ,2 7 6 ,0 8 4

Latest Gross Earnings by Weeks.—In the table which
follows we sum up separately the earnings for the latest
week. The table covers the first week of January and
shows 9'46 per cent increase in the aggregate over the same
week last year.
ls< ts e e k o f J a n u a r y .

1902.

1901.

$
44,079
34,451
94,674
597,000
155,460
1,619
2 69,604
143,561
135.S37
70,381
29,429
96,918
88,675
283,640
42,819
93,140
200,700
24,034
38,055
5,232
22,729

$
43,333
40,001
104,716
453,000
132.940
1,453
241,731
129,534
108,537
65,114
24,772
72,374
80,687
300,187
48,833
85,475
175,900
22,898
28,528
4,985
25,703

477,409

504,891

27,482

95,635
86,717
47,586
18,513
571,020
355,721
133,136
56,037
90,357
281,495
548,000
13,000
2,700
293,666
575,989
143,498
53,304
8,463
377,089
138,684
209,537
654,805
220,280
47,630
19,975
49,462
349,079
85,000

98 581
92,240
47,020
15,566
514,825
294,351
122,368
54,223
65,417
255,816
528,000
20,000
2.409
264 870
473,472
130, 66
62,204
8^52
319,397
132,943
227,722
618,816
198,152
44.670
20,208
40,494
311,658
82.485

2,946
5,529

T otal (52 roads)............ 8,481,824
N et in crease (9’46 p. o.).l
,J

7,748,688

A'ai'-ama. G t. S ou th ern ..
A nn A r b o r .........................
Buffalo Roeh. A P ittsb’ g.
Canadian P acific .............
C intrai o f G e o r g ia .........
C hattanooga S ou th ern...
Chesapeake & O h io.........
C hicago A East. Illin ois .
Ohioago G reat W estern.
Chic. Indlan’lisA L oulsv.
Chic. Term. T ra n sfer___
Choc. Okla. A G u lf.........
Cin. N. O. A T exas P a o ..
Olev. Tin. Ohio. A St. L . .
P eoria A E astern .........
C olorado A Southern___
D enver A Rio Grande . D etroit Southern..............
Duluth So. Shore A A tl..
Evansv. A Indianapolis.
E vansv. A Terre H aute.
Grand T r u n k .............)
Grand Trunk W e s t.. ^
Det.G d. H a v .A M ilw .)
H ocking V alley ..............
Int. A Great N orth ern ..
Iow a C en tral..... .............
Kanaw ha A M ich ig a n ...
Louisville A N ash ville..
M exican C entral..............
M exican N ational. .........
Minn. A St. L ou is............
M inn. 8t. P. A 8. Ste. M
Mo. Kansas A T e x a s ___
Mo. Pacific A Iron M t»..
Central Branch . ..
Mob. Jackson A K C ity ..
N orfolk A W estern ...
Nortnern P acific..............
Pere M arquette................
Pittsburg A W estern___
Rio Grande Southern___
St. L oals A San F rau ___
St.
ms S outhw estern..
Seaboard A ir Line...........
Southern R a ilw a y ___ _
T exas A P a cific.........
T oled o A Ohio C en tral..
T oledo Peoria A W est’ n .
T ol. St. L. A W est............
Wabash ....... .....................
W isconsin C entral...........

In crea se.

$

746

1 4 4 /0 0
22.520
106
27.873
14.027
27,300
5,267
4 657
24,544
7,988
7,665
24,800
1,136
9,527
247

566
2,947
50,195
61,370
10,768
1,814
24,940
25,679
20,000
291
28.796
102.517
12,732

D ecrea se.

$
5,550
10,041

16.547
6,014

2,974

7,000

8,900

111
57,692
5,741
18,185
35,989
28,128
2,954

293

2,908
37,4 21
2,515
844,597
733,136

111,461

A la. A V ick sb u rg .........
V icks. Sh. & l’ ao . . . .
Oln. N. O. A T exa s P ao..
• terooea n io <M ex.).......
n
M exican R a ilw a y ............
Pittsburgh A W e ste r n ...
T exas C entra]....................
T oron to H am . & B ...........

4 1,000
47,000
149.142
77,500
85, 00
92,499
13,756
11,144

39,000
37,000
147.933
73 270
70,800
90.362
20.362
13,654

2.000
10,000
1,209
4,280
8,400
2,14

T ota l (61 ro a d s)............. 15,006,381 14,162,035
Net luorea«e (5-96 p. o ).
...........
.............

1,105.759
844,346

6,606
2,510
261 ,4 1 3

.....

Net Earnings Monthly to Latest D ates.- The table follow­
ing shows the gross and net earnings of Steam railroads
reported this week. A full detailed statement, including all
roads from which monthly returns can be obtained, is given
onoe a month in these columns, and the latest statement of
this kind will be found in the Chronicle of Dec. 21.
1901. The next will appear in the issue of Jan. 25, 1902.
----- (Proas E a r n i n g s . -------- ,------ P e t R a r r x n t j t , -----C u rren t
Y ea r.
R oad s.

A n n ’ p .W ’ sh .A B a l.a N o v .
Ju ly X to N ov. S o . . . .
A tlan tio & B lrm g h .D e o .
Ju ly X to Deo. 31 . . .
B altim ore A A nn apolis
S h ort L in e .a .........N ov.
J u ly 1 to N ov. 3 0 ___
B a th A H a m m ’d s.b N o v .
Ju ly X to N ov. 30 ...
B ellefon teC eD tra lb D ec.
Jan. l to Deo. 3 i ___
B r id g e A S a eo R .b N o v .
J u ly 1 to N ov. 3 0 ----O h ic .T e r .T r a n sf.b .N o v .
Ju ly 1 to N ov. 3 0 ___
C hoctaw O k l.& G .b N ov.
O olum .N ew b.A L .b .N ov .
July X to N ov. 3 0 . . .
D etroit Southern. .N ov.
July l to N ov. 3 0 ___
F arm v. A P o w b a t’n.N ov.
Ju ly 1 to N ov. 3 0 . . . .
M anistee & No. E .a .O ct.
Jan. 1 to Oct. 3 1 . . . .
M ex ica n N a tio n a l..N o v .
Jan. 1 to N ov. 3 0 ___
M o .K a n .A T e x a s .a .N o v .
Ju ly l t o N ov. 3 0 ----Phila. A E r ie .b . . N ov
Jan. 1 to N ov. 30 . . .
S t.LonisA 8an p b. N ov.
July 1 to N ov. 30 . . .
T oL P eoria A W est.b D ec.
Ju ly l t o Dee. 31 ..
W ichita V alley.........N ov.
W rlgh tsv.A T e u n .b N o v .
Ju ly 1 to N ov. 3 0 ___

$

P rev io u a
Y ea r.

C u rren t
Y ea r,

P r e v io u a
Y ea r.

$
5,235
26,677
6,318
32,737

$
2,545
16.002
5,990
24,559

$
2,048
7 ,1 1 8
2,094
11,548

9,171
8,085
46,864
40,754
5,043
5,997
19,576
23,951
4,808
4,4 2 2
5 2 ,0 0 5
43 ,9 5 0
3,089
3,924
20,303
19,293
129,097
117,253
6 70,937
599,532
412,852
5 5 8 ,7 8 4
14,928
14,921
7 2,023
70,817
109,896
103,218
539,888
480,624
6,625
4,189
30,026
27,650
26,634
27,833
2 90,346
279,387
608,593
625,629
6,991,693 7,184,847
1,574,751 1,523,883
7 ,566,987 6,626,793
615,541
614,481
6,293,648 5,308,352
2 ,031,049 1,649,273
9 ,4 6 6 ,4 5 4 7,853,106
96,700
9 4,558
606,139
604,123
9,5 3 6
6,939
16,236
15,049
60,954
73.999

2,952
16,616
3,107
9,637
2,179
18,616
750
7,178
62,391
327,318
206,607
4,182
26,503
20,705
148,601
d ef.1,432
1,481
10,641
13s ,005
c2 2 8 ,4 8 0
■
e2,629,025
5 5 5 ,S47
2,511,390
276,296
2,601,374
940,926
4,279,334
17,396
160,099
5,911
6,834
23,061

3,724
14,416
3,999
14,431
1,6 5 9
15,504
1,854
5,782
57,469
304,811
187,495
5,064
27 ,5 4 9
30,999
114,379
d ef.4 ,4 9 2
def.7,387
11,716
119,756
290,251
3 ,3 8 1 ,3 9 4
571.604
2,396,837
309,268
1,943,304
732 ,0 2 5
3,4 4 5 ,6 6 4
10,406
158,050
3,585
7,859
32,241

6,7 9 3
38,263
1 1,873
6 0,630

a N et earn in gs h e re g iv e n a r e a ft e r d e d u c tin g t a x e s ,
b N et ea rn in gs here g iv e n a re b e fo r e d e d u c tin g ta x e s ,
c O f the balan ce here g iv en there w as oh arged o ff fo r repairs,,
replacem ents and general ex p en ses in N ov em b er *3 7 ,1 5 8 , le a v in g
$191,322 a p p lica b le to Interest on b on d s. F rom J a n u a ry 1 to N ov,
30 there w as charged o ff fo r th is p u rp ose $4 1 2 ,3 1 4 , lea v in g a
balance o f $2,216,711. T hese figures are in M exican c u rre n cy , and are
co n v e rtib le Into g o ld at the ourrent ra te o f exch a n g e.

Interest Charges and Surplus*—The following roads, it
addition to their gross and net earnings given in the fore
going, also report charges for interest, &o., with the surplus
above or deficit below those charges.
■ In t., r e n t a l s , e t c . ------. < - B a l . o f N c t J S a m ’ s . —
C u rren t
C u rren t
P r ev io u a
P r e v io u a
Y ea r.
Y ea r.
Y ea r.
Y ea r.

R oad s.
$
2,083
A tla n tio A Blrm ’ gh.D ec.
Ju ly 1 to Dec. 3 1 ___
12,600
50,807
Oboe. O kla. A G u lf.N o v .
26,500
D etroit Sou th ern . . . Nov.
July 1 to N ov. 3 o __ _
132,500
6,050
M anistee & No. E ... Oct.
60,505
Jan. X to Oct. 3 1 ___
280,481
Mo. K an . * T e x a s..N o v .
Ju ly 1 to N ov. 3 0 ___ 1,500,654
St. L. A San F ra n ...N o v .
488,138
Ju ly 1 to N ov. 3 0 ___ 2,147,280
23,051
Tol Peo. & W e s t...D e o .
188,303
Ju ly 1 to D ec. 3 1 ___

%
2,083
12,500
42,914

6,258
62,574
289,749
1,446,955
382,943
1,886,625
22,740
130,502

$ .
*
3,907
11
12,059
d ef.9 5 2
155,800
144,581
205
16,101
4,590
5,458
57,182
72,5 0 0
275,366
281,855
1,010.736
949,882
*458,921
*354,867
*2,157,463 *1,598,015def.5,055 d ef.6,334
21,796
21,548

STREET RAILWAYS AND TRACTION COMPANIES.
The following table shows the grosn earnings for the latest
period of all s t r e e t railways from which we are able to ob
tain weekly or monthly returns. The arrangement of the
table is the same as that for the steam roads—that is, the
first two columns of figures give the gross earnings for the

I'H K rHKONIOLfc.

118

la t e s t w e e k o r m o n t h , a n d t h e la s t t w o c o lu m n s t h e e a r n in g s
f o r t h e c a le n d a r y e a r f r o m J a n u a r y 1 t o a n d I n c lu d in g s n o b
la t e s t w e e k o r m o n t h .
STR E E T R A IL W A Y S AND TRA CTIO N COM PANIES.
Latest Gross Mannings.
Otiose
KiKNlNUt.

A lton By. Qaa & Eleo.
Am erican K'ys. *Jo.$
A ugusta (G a ) Ry. A
E lec....... .
Bingham ton R R .......
B r'klyn R a p .fi. C o,.
Chicago A M il, Eleo,.
Clu. Newp. A C ov ___
>
C ity Eleo. tEome.Ga.)
Olev. Chagrin E*s E l’ o
C leveland A Eastern.
Cleveland E lectric ..
Oleve. Ely <> W eet.-.
£
Oleve. Palnav, A E ...
Oonttol. Trao, (Pitta.)
Dart. A VV’p ort St. R y.
Denver Otfcy T ra m ,,..
D etroit U n it e d ,.,.,,.
Rapid R ailw ay.......
TotftL
Duluth-Sup. Tract. >
Duluth St, R y . .. , s
E lgin A urora A 8ou
Gal veston C ity . . . . . .
Harrlaburg Traction.
Internat’ l T raction —
(B uffalo)............. .
Lehigh T raction .,___
London 8t. Ry.(Oan.)
Mad, (Wia.) Traction.
Maas. Eleo. C o.'s.......
M ontreal Street R y ..
M uscatine St. R y . ,. .
New C astle Traction.
New L ondon St. R y ..
Northern Ohio T ract.
Olean St. R y ......... .
Philadelphia Com p’ y
P ottsv ’ e u n ion Trao.
R ailw ays Co. Gem —
R o a d s ......... .
li g h t Go’ s . , . , . . , , , .
R ichm ond T raction ..
Sacram ento E lectric
Gas A R v .................
St. Louis T ran sit___
S chuylkill T raction .
Scranton R a ilw a y ,.,
S iou x City T ract.......
Southern Ohio Tract.
Staten Island E le c ...
T acom a R y. & P ow er
T oledo R ys. & L ight.
T oronto K y . . . . . . . . . . .
Tw in City Rap. Tran.
U nion(N . B ed ford )..
U nited T raction — )
A lban y C ity 5
United Tract. (Pitta.)
United Tract. (Prov.)

Week or Mu (ju r'n i PrePus
Year.
Year.
Decem ber.
D ecem ber

$

12,507 *12,293
82,270 68,201

Jan. 1 to Latest Date
Current
Year.

Previous
Year.

$
878,566

796,108

O c to b e r ...
Decem ber.
November
Novem ber
September
Decem ber.
N ovem ber
Novem ber
Decem ber.
December.
Decem ber.
Novem ber
D ecem ber.
Decem ber.
Istw k Jam
la tw k Jan.
istw k Jan.
D ecem ber.
D ecem ber.
November
O c to b e r ...

169,950
18,031 15,772
203,847
18,240 16,683
907,813 942,018 11461759
159,454
9,782
12,041
610,642
41,251
3,581 "3,736
43,670
4,3 05
4.227
82,916
5,591
7,758
199,688 185,455 2,296,898
19,406 10,023 249,259
164,971
11,920
9,925
266,839 235,645 2,796,396
121,634
7,824
7,903
132,509 114,562 1,507.293
57 338
67,838 48,691
5,776
4,907
5,776
63,114
63,114 53,598
40.309 36,839 453,210
30,199 27,595 361,603

157,040
182,742
11008084
131 006
588,710
40.712
45,152
57,722
2,061,505
179,697
141,111
2,003,140
103,530
1,302,290
48,691
4,907
53,598

October, ..
Decem ber.
December,
Decem ber.
N ovem ber
Decem ber.
N ovem ber
N ovem ber
Decem ber,
Decem ber.
Decem ber.
Novem ber
D ecem ber.

580,501
10,721
12,947
5,599
131,036
156,712
6,531
9,474
4 673
53,485
4 638
283,971
18,995

Novem ber
N ovem ber
Septem ber

16,101
2,083
20,991

N ovem ber
Decem ber.
D ecem ber.
O c to b e r ...
D ecem ber
D ecem ber.
September
Novem ber
December.
Decem ber.
D ecem ber.
D ecem ber.
Decem ber.
(November
D ecem ber,

10,010
32,163

312,314

27,103
234,152 3,998,737
10,143 128,949
141,845
11,043
69,862
401,709 5,431,203
147,403 1,910,314
5,915
65,779
7,149
115,080
4,031
69,138
38,395 617,011
4,428
54,267
209,670 2,745,743
173,210
12,101
12.603
1,866
20,727

200,762
17,850
169,748

36,093 32,378 380,304
464,807 457,360 5,777,600
10,356 10,187
140,097
1 2,638 48,780
508,189
15.603 206,868
18,190
25.309 24,744 387,741
49,729
31,964 26,036
346,397
86,169 77,599 1,270,875
145,398 127,090 1,636,861
291,341 256 819 3.173,975
23,851 20,506
280,321
124,708 118,171 1,369,157
171,425 153,657
217,500 203,003 2,674,089

2,216,663
111,854
119,109
5,167,143
1,798,518
62,658
119,556
61,845
513,725
51,416
2,206,580
142,496

156,909
340,800
4,462,992
115,676
504,850
294,907
47,155
265,185
1,148,268
1,484,597
2,839,354
250,993
1,348,313

[VOL. L X X I V .

----- Cross N a m in gs.—— .-----Net N a m in gs,----- ,
Current
P reviou s
C urren t
P revious
Year.
F ear,
Year.
Y ear.
Roads.
$
$
$
$
Lehigh T ra ctio n ___Deo.
10,721
10,143
5,898
6,189
Jam 1 to Deo. 3 1 ___
128,949
111,854
69,231
57,687
Madison T ra ction ..D ec.
5,599
1,185
New London 8t. Ity.D ec.
1,005
4,673
4,031
780
July 1 to Deo, 31 ...
43.651
39,820
19,057
15,510
38,895
Northern O hioTrao.D eo.
63,485
27,517
16,306
Jam 1 to Dee. 3 1 ___
617,011
513,725
266,166
196,249
Olean Street R y ___Deo.
4,428
4,638
1,754
2,245
July 1 to Deo. 3 1 .. ..
28,265
16,554
30,514
15,077
Potts villa Un. T r a o .—
Jam 1 to Dee. 3 1 .. .,
142,466
173,210
79,444
64,979
R ochester R ailw ay t> July 1 to Deo. 3 i . . .
50L.629
517,578
235,346
201,528
Twin City R ap. Tr.toDec.
170,235
294,341
256,819
152,115
Jam 1 to Deo. 3 1 .. .. 3,173,975 2,839,354 1,748,524 1,534,666
t The earnings of the R apid R ailw ay are Included lu these figures
from J uly 1 only.
* Earnings fo r Decem ber, 1900, Included an unusual Item o f $1,591
whioh does n ot appear i n 1901.

Interest Charges and Surplus.-—
The following Street
railways, in addition to their gross and net earnings given in
the foregoing, also report charges for interest, &o., with the
surplus or defioit above or below those charges.
.— - I n t .,rentals, e t c . — \ —Bat. o f N e t M a m ’ s . —,
C urrent P reviou s
C u rren t
P r ev io u s
Year,
Year.
Year.
Year.
Roads.
*
$
$
$
C leveland E lectric.D ec.
21,704
19,475
70,214
64,543
786,714
258,483
Jam 1 to Dec. 31 . . .
244,231
681,985
6,042
6,042
def.803 d ef.3,200
Clev. P ain e8v. A E.Dec.
Jam 1 to Dec. 3 1___
5,369
d ef.980
72,500
72,500
Qenv’ r City Tram w .D cc.
32,430
31,071
32,600
25,047
Jam 1 to Dec. 3 1 ___
305,785
205,548
383,179
374,291
Detroit U n it e d Jam 1 to Dec. 31.a . .
734,378
*710,868
N orthern Ohio Trae.Deo.
10,117
5,889
12,400
10,417
51,051
136,248
Jan 1 to Dec. 3 1 ....
145,198
129,918
R och ester R y .—
*95,085
145,070
*61,057
July 1 to Dec. 3 1 ___
148,835
64,202
87,913
75,850
T win City Rap. Tr...D ec.
94,385
829,076
860,387
705,590
Jam 1 to Dec. 3 1 .. ..
888,137
a Results on R apid R a ilw a y are included from Ju ly 1 only,
* A lte r a llow in g fo r oth er in com e rece iv ed .

ANNUAL

R EPO RTS.

New York Chicago & St. Louis Railroad.
(<
Statement for the year ending Dec. 31, 1901.)
The results for 1901, compared with previous years, are
shown below, the dividends for 1901 being those declared
this week, payable March 1:
1901.
1900.
1899.
Gross earnings........... . ...................$ 7 ,4 8 5 ,4 8 4 $7,023,359 $6,919,985
Operating exp en ses..................... . 5,211,558
5,293,678
5,619,779

■2.377,332

Net e a r n in g s .........................$ 2 ,2 7 3 ,9 2 6 $1,729,631 $1,300,206
Other Ineom e..................... ..............
82,291
26,721
11,351

* Earnings fo r D ecem ber, 1900, include an unusual item o f $1,591
whieh does n ot appear in 1901.
§ These are results fo r p rop erties owned,
t Strike o f em ployes In O ctober, 1901.

T otal In com e___ ____ . . . . . ___ $2,306,217 $1,756,402 $1,311,557
97,673
A dditions,betterm ents & renewals
756,000
398,587
Interest on b o n d s.........................
777,000
777,000
777,000
104,092
108,242
E quipm ent trust ch arges. . . . _____
154,217
D ividend on 1st p r e f...................... (5)250,000 (5)250,000 (5)250,000
D ividen d on 24 p r e f ......................... (3)330,000 (2) 220,000

Street Railway Net Earnings.—The following table gives
$6,723
78,042
B alance, s u r p lu s ...................
$39,000
the returns of Street railway gross and net earnings received - V . 73, p. 1062.
this week. In reporting these net earnings for the street
Lehigh Valley Railroad.
railways, we adopt the same plan as that for the steam
(Report for the year ending Nov. SO, 1901.J
roads—that is, we print each week all the returns received
The annual report will be given at length another week,
that week, but once a month (on the third or the fourth The income account shows:
EARNINGS AND E XPE N SE S.
Saturday), we bring together all the roads furnishing re=
E arnings —
1899-00.
1898-99.
1900-01.
turns, and the latest statement of this kind will be found >
$9,413,472
$9,707,081
.$ 1 1 ,6 8 3 ,2 7 6
,rom co a l....... .
9,659,172
9,072,328
, 10,255,961
in the Chronicle of December 21,1901, The next will ap­ h-om m iscellaneous freig
2,959,378
. 3,635,061
'Tom passen gers...............
2,760,401
432,616
F rom express and m ail..
397,695
399,727
pear in the issue of January 25, 1902,
——Gross N a rm n g s.— > ——N et N a rm n gs.—=
:
C urren t P revious
C u rren t
P revious
Year.
Y ear.
Y ear.
Year.
Boads.
$
$
$
$
A lton R y. Gas & E l.D ec.
*12,293
*6,985
12,567
5,806
Ju ly 1 to Dec. 3 1 .. ,.
71,543
35,342
62,007
31,397
B ingham ton R R .b . Dec.
18,240
16,633
9,432
10,930
Ju ly 1 to Dec. 3 1 ..
100,222
112,658
56,727
50,771
B rook lyn Rap. T r.a N ov.
997,813
314,059
942,018
266,973
July 1 to N ov. 30 . 5,498,520 5,159,931 1,736,161 1,930,447
G ityB lec(R om e,G a)D ec.
3,581
1,231
3,736
681
Jam 1 to Dec. 3 1 —
41,251
40,712
5,656
8,581
C levelan d E le e .a ...D e c .
199,688
185,455
91,918
84,018
Jam 1 to Deo. 31 — 2,296,898 2,061,605 1,030,945
940,468
19,406
8,309
Olev. E lyria & W est.D ec.
16,023
6,622
249,259
179,697
112,395
Jam 1 to Dec. 3 1 ___
69,577
11,920
5.239
2,842
C lev.P ain esv.& E .aD ee.
9,926
141,112
164,971
77,869
71,520
Jam 1 to Dec. 3 1 ___
132,509
114,562
65,030
B env. City T r’ niw .bD ec.
56,118
688,964
Jam l to Dec. 3 i ___ 1,507,293 1,302,290
579,839
271,441
239,321
110,221
118,037
D etroit U n ited .a ...D eo .
Jam 1 to Deo. 3 1 . . . . 2,919,171 2,575,276 1,322,406 1,136,219
30,711
13,034
S a p id R ailw ay.a.D eo.
302,152
131,071
T o ta l.a __. . . . . Dec.
t l , 421,026
Jam 1 to Deo. 31 — t 3,134,818
Lake St. Elev. (Ohio.) —
397,663
786,462
757,955
379,294
Jam 1 to Doc. 3 1 ___

From other ite m s..............

676,618

617,531

721,711

.$26,683,534 $23,049,282 $22,659,161
E xpen ses—
$3,861,926
. $4,499,633
$3,354,804
4atntenance o f w a y, etc.
4,738,198
3,731,358
M aintenance o f equ ip m en t. . .. 4,806,130
9,909,899
0,907,200
Conducting tran sportation — . 10,046,410
717,703
732,398
568,080
G e n e r a l................. . . . . . . .
$19,242,421
(83*48)
$3,806,861
1,055,785

$17,560,942
(77*50)
$5,098,219
963,515

. $7,719,556
$4,862,646
Deduct ..
$625,937
$632,806
T a x e s . . . . . . .............. ......... .
298,120
254,883
Balanoe o f interest a cco u n t..
222,608
290,684
Loss on w ater lines, ete
Interest on bonds & oar trusts 7 5,172,578 ( 2,288,875
1£
8
1 2,647,995
R entals o f leased lin es...........
825,700
825,700
Interest on L. V al.C oal bonds
M is c e lla n e o u s ..................... .

$6,061,784

.$20,069,876
).
P er oent o f expenses to earns. (75*21)
Net earnings................................ $6,613,658
>
R eceipts from investm ’ ts, etc.. 1,105,898

$650,639
20,393
231,790
2,174,875
2,649,895
827,804
80.533

T otal c h a r g e s ................... $7,144,943
$8,940,443
$8,584,939
B alanoe............ .......................... sur.$574,612def.$2,077,797de(.$5 28.194
N o t e . — The above statem ent includes i n t e r e s t o n the first mortgage
guaranteed os o f the Lehigh Valley Coal Co., b u t n ot Its gross and n e t
earnings, the defioit under operating expenses (or the late year being
$45,222, against a detloit o f $840,171 in 1899-00, against net In 1898
99 o ( $58,480 and defioit In 1897-98 o f $119,709. A fter providing

THE CHRONICLE

January 18, 1903.]

also for colliery Improvements, eto., there was a deficit on auoount of
the Goal Company In 1900 01 of $491,677, In 1 899 00 of.$809,817; In
1898-99 of $269,270 and In 1897-8 of $1,142,807, these amounts be­
ing oarrled to debit of protit and loss.
T h e rep ort says in p a r t: .
The oompany shared largely In the Improved general business con­
ditions. marked increases being made In the revenue from all olasses
of traffic; the total earnings showing an Increase over the previous
llsoal year of $8,6:14,251, or 15'77 per cent. The output of coal from
the anthraolte regions was the largest In the history of the trade, and
the tonnage moved over your railroad exceeded by about 600,000
gross tons that moved in any previous year. It It especially gratify­
ing that the largely Increased volume of traffic was m .ved at practi­
cally the same expense as In the previous year, and that the percent­
age of conducting transportation expense to the gross earnings was
reduoed from 42-99 to 37-05, manifesting the good results obtained by
the greater oapaotty of your motive power and ear equipment. The
average number of tons of revenue freight in eaoh train was 467-62,
an lnorease of 40-11 over the previous year. The average revenue
per ton per mile on all revenue freight was -542 oent, the same as in
the previous llsoal year. A large lnorease Is to be noted In the earnings
from passenger traffic, which was exceptionally active during the p e­
riod of the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, N. Y .
T h e d irectors h av e v o ted to c h an g e th e fiscal y ear so th a t
it w ill end J u n e 80. T h e n e x t rep ort w ill th erefo re be for
th e seven m o n th s en d in g J u n e 30, 1903.— V . 73, p. 1207.
C h o c ta w O k la h o m a & G u l f R a il r o a d .

( Report for the year ending Oct. 31, 1901.)
T h e a n n u al rep ort w ill be p u b lish ed m o re a t le n g th a n ­
o th e r w eek . T h e in o o m e a c c o u n t fo r tw o y e a rs p a st fo llo w s :
1901.
1900.
In crea se.
Average miles operated...................
643
565
78
E a rn in g s—
Freight earnings...................................$3,356,945 $2,027,534 $1,329,411
Passenger earnings............................. 1,120,173
565.282
554,891
Mail, express, eto.................................
134,233
129,103
5,030
Total gross earnings.....................$4,611,351
Operat. E xpen ses, R a ilr o a d —
Maintenance of way & structures. $794,505
Maintenance of equipment...............
322,214
Conducting transportation............... 1,242,130
General expenses.................................
165,142

$2,722,019 $1,889,332
$497,225
203,407
739,363
121,863

$297,280
118,806
502,767
43,279

$2,523,991 $1,561,859
Ratio of expenses to earnings___
(54-73)
(57-38)
Net earnings..........................................$2,087,360 $1,160,160
68,578
Net earnings, mines............. ........... def. 62,316

$962,132
(*2-65)
$927,200
*130,894

Total net Income....................$ 2 ,0 2 5 ,0 4 4
Fixed charges and taxes.................. $607,419
Equipment renewals.........................
120,000
Dividend on pref. stock...................... (5)300,000
Dividend on common stock..........(4^ )3 2 0 ,0 0 0

$1,228,738
$ 497,835
75,000
(5)248,382
(4)184,745

$796,306
$109,584
45,000
51,618
135,255

$222,776

$454,849

Balance, surplus...........................

$677,625

* Decrease.
- Y . 73, p. 1356.
W e s t e r n N ew Y o r k & P e n n s y lv a n ia R a ilw a y .

( Report for the year ending June 30, 1901.)
P resid en t W . H , B a rn es s a y s :
“ I t w ill b e n oted there w a s a deficit o f $587,995 in th e net
in com e n ecessary to m e e t th e fixed o b lig a tio n s o f th e c o m ­
p an y. L a r g e ex p en d itu res w e re n ecessa ry to p u t the prop
erty in shape t o ren der s a tisfa c to r y and efficient service to
th e p u b lic ; and th e fu n d s fo r th is p urp ose w ere a d v a n ced by
th e P en n sylva n ia R R . C o. T h e co st o f steel g on d o la cars s u b ­
le t fr o m the P e n n sy lv a n ia R R . C o. under e x istin g series of
car tru sts w a s $497,500. T h e re w ere n o p a y m en ts m a d e on
a c c o u n t o f sam e d u rin g y ear en d in g J u n e 30, 1901.”
T h e e a rn in g s, expen ses, c h a rg e s, e t c ., w e re as bel w :

OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.
1900-01.
Miles of road o p e r..

632

1899-00.
646

1898-99.

1897-98.

633

633

Operations—
1 ,3 3 3 ,9 8 6
1 ,3 7 8 ,2 5 1
Passengers carried.
1 ,5 5 1 ,2 0 0
1 ,5 3 1 ,0 4 0
Pass, carried 1 mile. 4 1 ,7 9 3 ,6 1 5 3 7 ,1 7 7 ,5 6 9 3 3 ,0 1 2 ,0 4 4 3 2 ,9 5 9 ,3 2 7
Rate per pass. p. m. 2-031 cts.
2-5 0 9 ots.
2 -3 5 2 cts.
2 -4 7 0 Ots.
4 ,3 2 7 ,7 7 6
Freight (tons) car’d.
5 ,1 9 7 ,6 5 0
5 ,4 0 0 ,0 6 6
4 / 0 8 ,4 4 6
Fr’g h t(ton s)ear.lm 6 1 8 ,7 7 6 ,9 2 2 6 5 8 ,7 6 4 ,5 8 6 3 5 2 ,9 4 8 ,5 5 1 5 0 7 ,4 4 4 ,6 6 7
Rate per ton p. m ..
0-493 cts.
0 444 ots.
0 4 4 7 Ots.
0 '4 7 6 Cts.

Earnings—
Passengers...............
Freight........................
M ail, express, etc.

8 4 8 ,9 9 1
3 ,0 4 7 ,4 9 8
1 7 8 ,6 0 0

7 4 3 ,7 2 9
2 ,9 0 2 ,8 6 7
156,9 9 1

6 8 0 ,9 7 3
2 ,4 4 4 ,9 6 3
165,4 7 5

6 7 6,885
2 ,3 9 8 ,0 1 9
1 7 1,033

Total earn in gs..
Expenses—
Maint. ol w ay, e tc ..
Malnt. of equipm’t ..
Conducting tra n s...
G en eral...... ...............

4 ,0 7 5 ,0 8 9

3 ,8 0 3 ,5 8 7

3 ,2 9 1 ,4 1 1

6 8 4 ,9 1 3
702,1 9 1
1 ,3 8 5 ,0 0 3
1 1 7 ,4 0 7

4 9 1 ,6 4 8
5 6 2 ,9 2 4
1 ,1 0 6 ,6 8 6
1 1 1 ,6 8 8

4 9 0 ,4 7 5
4 6 6 ,4 8 0
1 ,0 7 9 ,1 7 5
106,674

T o ta l.....................
P .c . of exu. to earn.
N et earnings.............

3 ,6 4 5 ,9 6 6
89-47
4 2 9 ,1 2 3

2 ,8 8 9 ,5 1 5
75-97
9 1 4 ,0 7 2

2 ,2 7 2 ,9 4 5
6908
1 ,0 1 8 ,4 6 6

2 ,1 4 2 ,8 0 4
66-01
1 ,1 0 3 ,1 3 3

INCOME ACCOCNT.
1 8 9 9 00.
1 9 0 0-01.
$
$
9 1 4 ,0 7 2
4 2 9 ,1 2 3
7,091
2 4 ,2 6 5

1898 99.
$
1 ,0 1 8 .4 6 6
2 7 ,7 6 8

1 8 9 7 -9 8 .
$
1 ,1 0 3 ,1 3 3
9,391

4 3 6 ,2 1 4

9 3 8 ,3 3 7

1 ,0 4 6 ,2 3 4

1 ,1 1 1 ,5 2 4

8 2 3 ,3 0 7
17,8 0 1
12.397
9 0 ,3 3 6
7 3 ,8 4 4
6 ,5 2 0

7 9 3 ,5 3 7
15,7 3 0
4,4 1 8
1 0 7 ,1 9 0

7 9 7 ,1 1 5
15,423
2 0 ,5 6 3
1 1 5 ,1 1 7

7 9 9 ,5 0 0
1 5 ,5 5 6
5,8 9 0
1 0 0 ,0 7 0

9 2 0 ,8 7 5
17,4 6 2

9 4 8 ,2 1 8
9 8 ,0 1 6

9 2 1 ,0 1 6
1 9 0 ,5 0 8

uKNKRAL IIAf.ANCK HfiEKT .1IINE 3 0 .
1901.

1900.

1899.

$

Assets—

$

#

lt o a d a n d e q u i p m e n t ......................... 5 0 , 6 0 1 ,4 9 6 6 1 ,7 4 1 ,4 1 1
5 1 ,4 0 0 .3 2 1
6 2 7 ,2 6 0
6 8 6 ,2 4 4
6 8 6 ,4 7 6
H to c k s a n d b o n d s o w n e d .......
M a t e r ia ls a n d s u p p l i e s ................................................
3 7 4 ,8 9 2
1 8 5 ,2 5 0
D u e f r o m a g e n t s a n d c o n d u c t o r s ..........................
1 9 8 ,3 9 4
1 3 7 ,0 3 2
D u e f r o m I n d iv id u a ls , c o m p ’ s , & o ..
3 7 2 ,5 8 2
5 2 2 ,9 7 1
5 8 8 ,7 7 7
G a s h (ln o l. f o r c o u p o n s , e t o . ) ...........
2 6 0 ,2 3 5
3 9 1 ,8 3 4
3 7 1 ,9 4 7
M i s c e l l a n e o u s ...............................
2 0 ,5 2 8
3 2 ,8 0 1
4 ,6 3 1
T o t a l a s e e t s ........................................ 6 1 , 7 8 2 ,1 0 0

L ia b ilities—

5 3 ,9 4 8 ,1 0 7

5 3 ,3 7 4 ,4 3 4

S t o c k .............................................................2 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
B o n d s (s e e S u p p l e m e n t ) ....... 2 9 , 9 9 1 ,0 0 0
E q u i p , n o t e s ( I n c lu d in g I n t e r e s t ) .........................
I n t e r e s t o n b o n d s .......................
3 5 9 ,3 4 0
R e a l e s ta te m o r ts . a n d g r. r e n t s ..
3 1 7 ,1 9 9
W a g e s a n d s u p p l i e s ........................................................
5 0 7 ,1 7 0
P e n n s y l v a n i a R R . a d v a n c e s .............
M i s c e l l a n e o u s ...............................
1 6 ,0 8 2
P r o f it a n d l o s s ................................
5 9 1 ,3 0 9

2 0 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 2 0 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
2 9 , 9 9 0 ,0 0 0 2 9 ,9 9 0 ,0 0 0
2 5 8 ,1 9 5
.............
3 3 6 ,4 6 8
3 4 2 ,7 4 5
3 1 7 ,1 9 9
2 8 9 ,7 9 9
6 8 4 ,1 0 3
3 6 7 ,5 4 4
...............
...............
127
5 7 ,1 2 8
2 , 3 6 2 ,0 1 5
2 ,3 2 7 ,2 1 9

T ota l lia b ilitie s..................
- V . 72, p. 138.

5 3 ,9 4 8 ,1 0 7

.5 1 ,7 8 2 ,1 0 0

6 3 ,3 7 4 ,4 3 4

Richmond Fredericksbarg & Potomac Railroad.
( Report for the year ended June 30, 1901.)
The report of the directors says :
G e n e r a l R e s u l t s .— The p a ssen ger m ileage w as 16,118,895, a g a in st
14,844,100 last y e a r, an Increase o f 8-6 p er cen t. T he reven ue from
passen ger trains in crea sed $ 8 ,6 3 4 , or 1-9 p e r c e n t . T he ton m ileage
was 61,7 6 2 ,1 3 5 , again st 5 6 ,0 8 2 ,5 4 5 th e p rev iou s year, an in crease o f
5,679,290, o r 14-1 per cen t. T he reven u e from freig h t trains w as
$ 573,833, an in crea se o f $ 3 7 ,8 7 1 , or 7 p er cen t. T he rate p er
ton m ile w as red u oed fro m 9-56 m ills th e p reviou s year to 9-29 m ills.
T he roa d w a y Is in g o o d co n d itio n . There w ere p u rch ased during th e
year 608 tons o f 75-lb. steel rails, lea v in g 20-58 m iles o f 67-lb. rails In
the main track .
R e d u c t io n i n B o n d e d D e b t . —The large red u ction In th e d ebt
from $972,029 on Ju n e 30, 1900, to $ 5 1 3 ,5 9 0 on N ov. 1 8 ,1 9 0 1 , has
been a ccom p lish ed b y th e e x ch a n g e o f $ 5 1 ,3 0 0 con v ertib le bon d s fo r
com m on stock . In a cco rd a n ce w ith th e term s o f the bon ds, and th e
p a ym en t In cash o f the ba la n ce o u t o f th e fu n d s In hand, supplem en ted
by a tem pora ry loa n o f $ 1 7 5 ,0 0 0 , w ith ou t as y e t d isturbing th e in v e stm ente, w h ich w ere in creased during th e y ea r b y the sum o f $82,120.
These Investm ents co n sist o f r a ilr o a d bon ds o f the fa ce valu e o f $398,600. T h ey cost $ 4 1 1 ,7 4 7 and are w orth at p resen t m a ik e t rateB
a b ou t 3 4 2 5 ,0 0 0 .
R ic h m o n d -W a s h in g t o n U n io n L i n e .— T he W ash in gton Southern
R a ilw a y Co. has e le cte d as its P resid en t th e p resen t in cu m ben t o f th a t
office in the R ich m on d F re d erick sb u rg & P otom a c R R . Co., and the
subordinate officials o f this com p a n y h ave been ch osen o r ap p oin ted
to lik e p osition s on the W ash in gton Southern R y . B ut the a ccou n ts
are k ep t d istin ct. The resp on sibilities o f each com p a n y —co rp o ra te ly ,
i fin a n cia lly and p h y sic a lly —are Included w ith in th e sam e lim its as
h eretofore. T rain m ovem en t is co n tin u ou s, but the con sequ en t earn ­
ings and exp en ses are ca re fu lly ossorted to th e tw o com p an ies. T hese
arrangem ents h ave b een in effect sin ce O ct. 31, 1901. (See R iohm ondW ashington Co. Y . 7 3 , p. 843.)
This lin e, th e com m on se rv ito r o f all, has, in th e op in ion o f the
b oa rd , its cou rse n ow plain ly in d ica ted . T h at cou rse is to fit itse lf
w ith due d isp atch fo r the g re a tly in creased w o rk b e fo re it. In co n ­
stru ction and equ ip m en t it sh on ld o c cu p y a p la ce in th e fro n t rank.
Its alignm ent should b e Im proved, its grades m odified and th e c o n ­
stru ctions n ecessa ry to th ose ends should b e fo r a secon d track , w h ich
m u st th rou g h ou t its len gth , a t n o distant d ay, be added.

Statistics.—Results for the late fiscal year were as follows;
E A R N IN G S, E X P E N S E S A N D C H A R G E S .

1900-01. 1899-0. 1898-9.
$
$
$
384,485 354,613 361,256
5 73,833 535,961 432 ,3 0 3
1 08,547
99,422 104,700

1897-8.
$
287,132
382,480
101 ,1 1 4

9 8 9 ,9 9 6

8 9 8 ,2 5 9

7 7 0 ,7 2 6

M aintenance of w ay, etc...................................9 61 1 8 3 1 2
,6 2 ,5
8 9 .2 9 1
Maintenance of equipm ent........ 1 3 6 .2 9 6
T ra n sp o rta tio n ........... ................... 4 3 0 ,8 8 0 3 2 6 ,8 7 9
4 3 ,3 6 6
General, e tc .......................................
3 1 ,2 5 5

1 2 0 ,5 8 9
1 3 2 ,3 2 6
2 9 2 ,2 1 6
2 7 ,1 2 2

8 0 ,5 5 9
8 5 ,7 9 4
2 3 8 ,7 9 2
6 3 ,4 9 3

E a rn in g s—
P assen g er.............. ..........................
F reigh t..............................................
M ail, express, e t o .........................

T o ta l............................................... 1 ,0 6 6 ,8 6 5

Expenses -

T c ta l..............................................
Net earnings......................................
Add other incom e...........................

6 9 5 ,1 1 4
3 7 1 ,7 5 1
2 6 ,3 1 4

5 7 2 ,0 5 1
4 1 7 ,9 4 5
2 1 ,4 7 5

5 7 2 ,2 0 3
3 2 6 ,0 5 6
2 2 ,2 6 6

4 6 8 .6 7 9
3 0 2 ,0 4 7
9 ,0 2 5

T otal..............................................

3 9 8 ,0 6 5

4 3 9 ,4 2 0

3 4 8 ,3 2 2

3 1 1 ,0 7 2

In terest................................................
Dividends...........................
M iscellaneous....................................
New equipm ent, & c.......................

4 8 ,7 7 6
2 2 8 ,5 2 0
770
6 0 ,0 0 0

4 9 ,7 9 0
2 2 4 ,5 3 8

5 3 ,2 2 7
1 9 5 ,8 4 2
2 ,0 6 1

5 6 ,4 5 3
1 9 2 ,7 5 7
829

T o ta l..............................................
Balance, su rp lu s.............................

3 3 8 ,0 6 6
5 9 ,9 9 9

3 5 4 ,3 2 6
8 5 ,0 9 4

2 5 1 ,1 3 0
9 7 ,1 9 2

2 5 0 ,0 3 9
6 1 ,0 3 3

Deduct—

3 ,2 4 5 ,9 3 7

9 2 8 ,6 4 5
8 7 0 ,3 4 3
1 ,7 8 0 ,9 7 1
66,0 0 8

149

'8 0 ,0 0 0

B A L A N C E SH E E T JU N E 30.

Receipts—
N et earnings..............
Other incom e............
T o t a l.....................
Disbursements—
In terest on b on d s...
Tnt. on real est. mort.
Equipment interest..
T a x e s.............................
E xtraordinary..........
Other paym ents___
T o t a l . . . ...............
Surplus for y e a r ....

1901.
,5 e t S
s

1 ,0 2 4 ,2 0 9
5 8 7 ,9 9 5

$

1900.
«

Road and equipm’t.3,500,161 3,551,703
Investments.......... 411,747 329,027
Cash....................... 228,772 235,903
Potomae RR. loan. 121,712
121.712
127,061
Current assets....... 83,520
Supplies................. 64,027
34,412
Total............... ,4,408,540 4,401.018
- V. 78, p. 1101, 1113.

1901.
19C0.
Liabilities—
*
$
:,889.300 2.838,000
Stock (see I n. Sup .)2,
Funded debt.......... 910,849 972,029
93,504
94.984
Dividends..............
13,546
Interest........... ....... 12,465
09,506
92,343
Miscel. accounts__
80,000
Betterment account 00.000
Profit and loss....... 402,617 S34.434
Total

.4,408,540 4.401,018

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.
RAILROADS. INCLUDING STREET ROADS.
American Elevated RR. —Elevated Railroad in Philadel­
phia.—This company is preparing plana for an electric
railroad to be built on Market Street. Philadelphia, under
the Mack-Foerderer franchise (ace V. 73, p. 1314, also V. 72,
p. 1188, and V. 73, p. 338). President Congelton, of the
American Elevated RR., is quoted as saying :
For reasons that will be thoroughly understood by the public within
the n ext two weeks it has been deemed expedient to oonoeal for the
present the Identity of the capitalists who are backing the MackFoerderer syndicate. I am at liberty to say, however, that the A m erl-

THE

150

CHRONICLE

uan Elsvated Htt Go will not only construct the PlUladelpbla, road,
out will ii wn a large amount of its stook. The Philadelphia elevated
,
read will be the greatest system ol Its hind ever eonstruoted. A speed
ut 70 miles au hour will always be possible lor each ol Its trains. See
also V. 73, p. 337,
A t c h i s o n T o p e k a A S a n t a t '« l i y . — $30,000,000 D eben
u re B on d s -E x t e n s i o n s — N ew E q u i p m e n t — J P . M o r g a n &
G o o ffe r e d f o r s a le o n J a n . 11 a n is s u e o f $30,* 0 0 ,000 4 p e r
c e n t $1,000 s e r ia l d e b e n t u r e b o n d s , b e a r in g in t e r e s t fr o m
F e b . l, 1002, p r in c ip a l t o m a t u r e $2,600,000 F e b . 1, 1903, a n d
$2,503,000 a n n u a lly t h e r e a ft e r u n t il a n d i n c l u d i n g F e b . 1,
1914
E a c h s e r ie s is t o b e s u b j e c t t o r e d e m p t io n o n a n y in ­
te r e s t d a y , a lt e r p r io r n o t ic e , a t 105 a n d in t e r e s t . T h e d e b ­
e n t u r e s w i l l c o n t a in a c o v e n a n t b y th e c o m p a n y th a t it w i l l
n o t e x e c u t e a n y n e w m o r t g a g e u p o n a n y o f t h e lin e s o f r a i l ­
w a y n o w o w n e d b y it , e x c e p t b y w a y o f f u r t h e r s e c u r it y f o r
b o n d s is s u e d u n d e r e x is t in g m o r t g a g e s , u n le s s b y th e t e r m s
o f s u c h n e w m o r t g a g e it s h a ll b e p r o v id e d t h a t a ll o f th e
d e b e n t u r e s t h e n o u t s t a n d in g s h a ll b e in c l u d e d in t h e d e b t
s e c u r e d t h e r e b y . T h e G u a r a n t y T r u s t C o , is t r u s t e e f o r th e
d e b e n tu re bon ds.
P r e s id e n t E . P , R ip le y , in a le t t e r t o t h e b a n k e r s , s ta t e s as
f o l lo w s th e p u rp o s e s f o r w h i c h th e p r o c e e d s o f th e l o a n a r e
t o b e a p p lie d :

New E quipment Ordered Since J udy 1, 1901.—During
the past jear the motive power and ears have proved laadequate, and the result was unduly large transporta­
tion expenses, excessive cost of maintenance, and, in ad­
dition thereto, a loss of gross earnings by reason of In­
ability to handle the traffic offered. For this reason the
directors have authorized since July 1,1901, the pur­
chase of oars and engines of large capacity to the
amount of.................................................. .........................$13,000,000
[This Is In addition to the cars and engines chargeable to
operating expenses for maintenance and replacement of
the old equipment.]
.New lines and Extensions —Since Jane 30, 1901, the
company has purchased $2,663,000 of 5 per cent seoond
mortgage bonds and practically all of the oapttal stook
[amounting to $7,904,000) of the Santa Fe Presoott &
Phcenlx Ry. Oo., at an aggregate cost o f...... ................... 2 , 8 3 3 , 1 0
An extension of the Montgomery branch of the Gulf Colo­
rado & Santa Ry. to the timber lands of Eastern Texas
has been completed; the construction of a line about 225
miles in length through a fertile portion of Oklahoma
has been begun, and an extension of the line into the
lumber territory in Texas has been authorized. The ag­
gregate amount of these expenditures already made and
authorized to be made is about............... ......................... 5 , 0 0 0 , 0 0
R eduction op G rades, etc.. Since J uly 1,1901.—The
residue is to be used to complete projected reductions of
grades; to increase terminal facilities at various points;
to construct or purchase branches, and to acquire out­
standing branch line securities, and for other additions
and improvements of a similar character m de or to be
made after July 1, 1901. No part of the prooeeds of
these debentures is to be used to reimburse the treasury
in respect of $11,633,237 56 spent out of income for
similar purposes prior to July l, 1901...........................
R e s id u e .

[VoL. L X X I V .

m itte e t o p la c e th is r o a d in r e c e iv e r ’ s h a n d s . T h e n e t e a r n ­
in g s f o r la s t y e a r a r e r e p o r t e d as $116,9 7; in t e r e s t , r e n ta ls
a n d o t h e r c h a r g e s , $182,830; d e fic it , $85,903
T h e in t e r e s t
d u e N o v . 1 a n d t h e r e n t a l u n d e r th e le a se o f t h e S e a s h o r e
E l e c t r i c R R . C o . is in d e f a u l t ,— V , 73, p. 1312.
B a l t i m o r e & O h i o R R .— A p p lic a tio n to L ist. — A p p l i c a t i o n
h a s b e e n m a d e t o th e N e w Y o r k S t o c k E x c h a n g e t o list $ 2 2 ,537,200 a d d it io n a l common s t o c k . S e e Chronicle o f N o v .
30, 1901, p a g e 1159.— V . 73, p . 1356.
B a l t i m o r e & S o u t h e r n l U l .S e c i v r i t i e s o f P r o je c te d L in e .
— M, C . M e n g is , o f 17 B r o a d w a y ,i s o f f e r in g b y a d v e r t is e m e n t
in L o n d o n “ fir s t m o r t g a g e p r io r lie n 5 p e r c e n t 5 0 -y e a r
g o ld b o n d s ” o f t h is p r o je c t e d e n t e r p r is e , “ t o t a l iss u e
$1,600,000, lim it e d t o $20,000 p e r m i le .”
W i t h e a c h t w o $100
o f th e first $300,000 b o n d s o n e $100 s h a r e o f s t o c k w ill b e is ­
s u e d as a b o n u s ,
A c ir c u la r says :

T h e B a l t i m &> eS o u t h e r n R R . O o . I s o r g a n i z e d u n d e r a a p o d
o r
o f t h e L e g is t t t n ir e o f M a r y la n d , t o b u ild
a r a ilr o a d fr o m
B
D r u m
P o in t , M d ., a d i s t a n c e
o f
8 0
m ile s , w it h
th e
r i
b r a n c h e s n o t e x o e e d in e 5 0
m ile s In le n g t h .
It h a s th e r i
Its t e r m in a l t r a c k s
th r o u g h
a n y o f th e s tr e e ts o f B a lt im
o n ly to c o m p lia n c e
w ith
e x is t in g
m u n ic ip a l r e g u la t io n s
e le c t r ic it y o n th e w h o le o r a n y p o r tio n o f Its
lin e
1‘l i e c
Is $ l ,5 n 0 ,0 0 0 in s h a r e s o f $ 1 0 0 e a c h , w it h t h e
p r iv ile g e o f
th e s a m e
t o
$ 3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
T h e
r o u t e
is
fr o m
D r u m
P o
t h r o u g h C a lv e r t a n d
A n n e
A r u n d e l c o u n t ie s t o M ille r s v
n o r th e r ly
t h r o u g h
A n n e
A r u n d e l C o u n t y , v ia
S e v e r n R i
S t a t io n a n d C u r t is G r e e k , t o
t h e
c o u n t y lin e o f B a lt im o r e
t h e s o u th e r n s h o r e o f t h e
P a ta p s o o
R iv e r , n e a r t h e v illa g
ly n ; t h e n c e
t h r o u g h
B a lt im o r e
C o u n ty t o t h e
B a lt im o r
T h e o o m o a n y
o w n s , fo r
t e r m in a l fa c ilit ie s , d ir e c t ly
u
w a t e r o f D r u m P o in t H a r b o r , a b o u t 8 0 a c r e s o f la n d .

N o n a m e s o f o ffic e r s o r d ir e c t o r s a p p e a r in th e p r o s p e c t u s .
B a n g o r & A r o o s t o o k R R . — E x te n s io n . — T h e F is h R iv e r
R R . h a s b e e n lo c a t e d f r o m A s h la n d v ia P o r t a g e L a k e , E a g le
L a k e a n d W a ll a g r a s s , t o F o r t K e n t , M e ., 5 1 % m ile s . T h e
r o a d w i ll b e b u il t b y tn e A r o o s t o o k C o n s t r u c t io n G o ., a n d
w i ll b e p a r t o f t h e B a n g o r & A r o o s t o o k s y s t e m u n d e r le a s e .
P r e fe r r e d S t o c k — O f t h e $ 1 ,248,884 p r e fe r r e d s t o c k , a ll b u t
8 $68,300 h a s b e e n r e t ir e d b y t h e is s u e o f r e f u n d in g b o n d s .
— V . 74, p . 93, 41,
B a y o f (J ilin t o R y .— B o n d s O ffe r e d — N . W . H a r r is & C o .
a r e o ff e r in g a t 103 a n d in t e r e s t $650,000 o f t n is c o m p a n y ’s
fir s t m o r t g a g e 5 p e r c e n t s in k in g fu n d g o l d b o n d s o f $1,000
e a c h ; d a te d J a n . 2, 1902, d u e J a n , 2 ,1 9 2 7 , b u t s u b j e c t t o c a ll
0
a t 105 a n d in te r e s t , in w h o l e o r in p a r t , a ft e r J a n . 2, 1907.
C o u p o n s p a y a b le h a lf - y e a r ly o n 2 d J u l y a n d 2 d J a n u a r y a t th e
B a n k o f M o n t r e a l, T o r o n t o o r N e w Y o r k . T r u s t e e f o r th e
b o n d h o ld e r s , N a t io n a l T r u s t C o ., L im i t e d , T o r o n t o , M o n ­
t r e a l a n d W in n ip e g . A c ir c u l a r s a y s :

T h is is s u e o f b o n d s is t o p r o v id e p a r t o f t h e
c o s t
o f th e
p r e s e n t lin e s a r id t o p r o v i d e f o r p r o p o s e d e x t e n s i o n s „ o f s o
m ile s .
T h e
p r e s e n t lin e s
e x t e n d
fr o m
D e s e r o n io , o n
Q u in t e — a h ig h w a y
b e tw e e n
t h e U p p e r o r
G r e a t L a k e s
L a w r e n c e
R iv e r — t o
D e s e r o n t o
J u n c t io n , o n
th e
G r a n d
G r a n d T r u n k ,
t o
T w
A l l th is n e w e q u ip m e n t is t o b e r e c e iv e d p r io r t o J u l y 1, f r o m t h e t o w n o f N a p a n e e , o n t h e
Y a r k e r
J u n c t io n
t o
H a r r o w
1902, a n d c a r e f u l e s tim a te s h a v e b e e n m a d e s h o w i n g t h a t C a n a d i a n P a c i f i c R y . ; f r o m
t io n , o n t h e K in g s t o n & P e m b r o k e R y ., a n d t o
S y d e n h a m ,
w h e n in h a n d “ i t w i l l r e s u lt in a s a v in g o f m o r e t h a n $2,
in a ll o f 6 5 m ile s m a in
lin e s .
T h e
o o m p a n y
u s e s t h e
G
500,000 a n n u a lly in o p e r a t in g e x p e n s e s , o n th e b a s is o f t h e t r a c k s b e t w e e n D e s e r o n t o J u n c t i o n a n d N a p a n e e , s o m e 4 * 3
u n d e r
p e r p e tu a l
a g r e e m e n t
t h e
K in g s t o n
&
P e
g r o s s e a r n in g s o f t h e fis c a l y e a r e n d in g J u n e 30, 1901, b e s id e s a l s o
b e tw e e n
H a r r o w B m lt h
J u n c tio n
a n d
t h e
c it y
o f K in g s
e n a b lin g t h e c o m p a n y t o in c r e a s e it s t o n n a g e a n d g r o s s R i v e r S t . L a w r e n c e , a d i s t a n c e o f 1 9 m i l e s .
T h e
a g g r e g
r e v e n u e .”
o p e r a t e d a t p r e s e n t is s o m e 8 8 4 m ile s , v iz .: 6 5 m ile s o f t h
A s t o t h e c a p it a l o u t la y s p r i o r t o S e p t, 1, 1901, a n d t h e o f t h e c o m p a n y a n d a t r a c k a g e o f s o m e 2 3 4 } m i l e s , a s m e n
th e b r id g e s a r e c o n s t r u c t e d
o f
s t o n e
o r
c o n c r e t e
a n d
ir
g r o w t h o f t h e b u s in e s s s in c e 1896, P r e s id e n t R i p l e y s a y s :
t r a c k s
a r e
w e ll
b a lla s t e d
a n d
la id
w ith
5 6 -lb .,
6 0 -l
The present company since its organization on Jan. 1,1896, has de­ s t a n d a r d s t e e l r a i l s .
voted itself to the reconstruction and improvement of the railways;
T h e e a r n in g s fo r th e c a le n d a r y e a r s 1 8 9 9 a n d 1 9 0 0 w e r e a
for this reason heavy charges have been made annually to oper­
Year ,
Gross.
Net.
Interest.
Surplus.
ating expenses on account of maintenance, in addition to liberal ex- 1 9 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $
$ 3 2 ,5 0
peDdimres on capital account. The oash expenditures on capital ac­ 1 8 9 .9. . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 7 9 , 3 1 8 9 3 , 0 7 7 8 1 . 3 2 2$ 9 3 , 1 1 2
.
3 2 ,5 0 0
count from Jan. i, 1896, to Sept, 30,1901, aggregated $36,744,952, of
P r o v is io n is m a d e fo r a s in k in g fu n d
u n d e r w h ic h th e
r a
which there was provided from income (see detailed official statement p a n y i s t o p a y t h e t r u s t e e f o r t h e b o n d h o l d e r s t h e s u m o f $
in Chronicle of Dec. 21, 1901, page 1311) and working capital, a n n u m , w h i c h s u m , t o g e t h e r w i t h t h e i n t e r e s t t h e r e o n a
$17,613,207.
The company’s system (not including the Peeos Valley & Northeast­ d i t i o n a l a m o u n t t h a t m a y b e r e q u i s i t e , w h i i c h i s t o b e f u r n i s
ern Ry., the Santa Fe Prescott & Place.nix Ry. and the Gulf Beaumont r$ a5 i0l w0 a0 y0 o c fo tm h p a b no yn , d si s a t t o 1 0b 5e a un sd e da o oe ra uc eh d fi n v t ee r ey se t a. r s t o r e d
,
e
■ Kansas City Ry., aggregating about 750 miles) now comprises over
&
C a p it a liz a tio n : F ir s t m o r t g a g e
6 p e r c e n t g o ld
b o n d s
7,800 miles, exclusive o f second, tracks and sidings. The growth of ( $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 p e r m i l e ) , $ 6 5 0 , o O O o f a n a u t h o r i z e d i s s u e o f $ 1
its business is indicated by the following statement :
w h ic h $ 3 5 0 ,0 u 0 h e ld in e s c r o w f o r f u t u r e e x t e n s io n s a t n o
Gross income,
Gross earnings s a m e r a t e p e r m i l e , u n d e r c o n s e r v a t i v e r e s t r i c t i o n s ; 6 p e
Year.
Mileage.
all sources.
p er mile.
c u in u la t iv e )
p r e fe r e n c e
s t o o k , $ 3 2 5 ,0 0 0 ;
c o m m o n
s t o c
1 8 9 6 - 9 7 . ., . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 , 4 4 4
.
$ 3 0 ,8 7 5 ,7 2 9
[ A $m 4 o, 7u 5 n 2 t o f s t o o k
n o t y e t
d e fin it e ly a p p r o v e d b y D o m
1 9 0 0 - 0 1 . . . . . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . 7 , 8 0 7
5 4 ,8 0 7 ,3 7 9
6 .
m e n t, 9 ] 7 7
E
W
R . C . C a r te r , G e
T h e v e r y la r g e e x p a n s io n r e fle c t e d b y t h e fo r e g o in g
f O g f uf ir c e e s r s d: e m ,o n ­ . R a t h b u a , P r e s i d e n t ;
i
; e
s t r a te s
t h e
n e c e s s it y f o r
e n la r g e d
fa c ilit ie s
fo r
d oa i g eg r" t h H .b B s, i S h se sr . w o o d , S u p e r i n t e n d e n t ; C . A . M i l l e n e r , S e c
n
u
n e
F o r t h e fis c a l y e a r e n d in g J u n e 3 0 , 1 9 0 1 , t h e s u r p lu s
n e t o s t n n o & eA l b a n y R R .— R e fu n d in g B o n d s .— T h e M a s s a ­
io c m
a p
B
p lie a b le t o d iv id e n d s , a f t e r c h a r g in g o p e r a t in g e x p e n s e s w it h $ 9 0 0 ,0 0 0
c h u s e t t se R a ilr o a d sC o m m is s io n h a s a p p r o v e d t h e p r o p o s it io n
he fiv
c r e d it e d t o a b e tt e r m e n t fu n d , w a s $ 1 2 ,4 7 4 ,5 2 9 .
F o r t
m o n th
fr o m J u ly 1 ,1 9 0 1 , to. N o v
3 0 , 1 9 0 1 , t h e g r o s s e a r n i n g t o his s v e $3,858,000 d o f 5 0 -y e a r 3 % p e r c e n t b o n d s t o t a k e u p a
s
a ue i n c r e a s e
$ 3 , 3 5 7 , 3 1 6 a n d n e t e a r n i n g s h a v e i n c r e a s e d $ 2 , 2 3 0 , 8 7 lik e va mr o u t ht eo f c 5o p e r c e n t s m a t u r in g A p r i l 1, 1 9 0 2 — V . 73, p .
9 o
e
r ­
n
r e s p o n d in g fiv e m o n t h s o f t h e p r e c e d in g y e a r .

P r e s id e n t R i p l e y c o n c lu d e s b y s a y in g : “ I t is b e lie v e d t h a t
t h e e x p e n d it u r e _ o f t h e p r o c e e d s o f th e s e d e b e n t u r e s w i l l
r e s u lt in a la r g e in c r e a s e o f n e t e a r n in g s a n d t h a t , o n th e
b a s is o f th e g r o s s e a r n in g s o f th e fis c a l y e a r e n d in g J u n e 30,
1901, t h e s u r p lu s n e t in c o m e , a ft e r p a y m e n t o f th e d iv id e n d s
o n t h e c o m m o n s t o c k a n d p r e fe r r e d s t o c k , w i ll m o r e th a n
s u ffic e f o r th e p a y m e n t o f t h e s e r ie s o f t h e d e b e n t u r e s a n ­
n u a l ly m a t u r i n g , w i t h o u t d r a w i n g u p o n o t h e r c a p it a l r e ­
s o u r c e s f o r t h a t p u r p o s e .”
T h e b a n k e r s o ff e r e d t h e b o n d s a t 9 9 % a n d in t e r e s t f o r
s e r ie s A , d u e F e b 1, 1903, a n d a t 99 a n d in t e r e s t f o r th e
s e r ie s B a n d O , d u e F e b . 1 ,1 9 0 4 a n d 1905, r e s p e c t i v e ly , th e
p r i c e g r a d u a lly d e c r e a s in g t o 9 3 % a n d in t e r e s t f o r s e r ie s L ,
d u e F e b . 1, 1914. J . P . M o r g a n & G o. y e s t e r d a y n o t ifie d 'h e
u n d e r w r it e r s o f t h e is s u e t h a t n o c a l l w o u ld b e m a d e u p o n
t h e m t o p a y a n y p a r t o f t h e a m o u n t s u b s c r ib e d , as t h e e n t ir e
is s u e h a d o e e n t a k e n b y th e p u b l i c .—- V . 74, p , 93,
A tla n tic

C oast

E le c t r ic R R ., L o n g

B r a n c h , N . J . — JReC h a m b ers at
J e r s e y C it y , h a s b e e n r e q u e s te d b y t h e b o n d h o ld e r s ’ c o m m it -

c e iv r . — V ic e -C h a n c e l lo r P it n e y , in C h a n c e r y

1312.

Buffalo & Susquehanna R R , — E x te n s io n to B u ffa lo .—
E d w a r d H B u t le r , a t t h e m e e t in g o f t h e u n io n s t a t io n c o m ­
m is s io n in B u f fa lo o n J a n . 10, a n n o u n c e d t h a t “ w i t h in a f e w
m o n t h s w o r k w i l l b e g in o n t h e e x t e n s io n o f t h e B u f fa lo &
S u s q u e h a n n a R R . in t o th e c i t y o f B u f f a lo .” — V, 78, p . 899.
C a in d e n & T r e n t o n R y .— L is te d in P h ila d elp h ia .— T h e
P h ila d e lp h ia S t o c k E x c h a n g e h a s lis t e d $1 ,7 5 0 ,0 0 0 s t o c k a n d
$686,000 first m o r t g a g e 5 p e r c e n t g o l d b o n d s .— V . 73, p . 956.
C h i c a g o G r e e n v i l l e & S o u t h e r n R y .— fo r e c l o s u r e D ecree.
— A d e c r e e o f fo r e c l o s u r e in t h e s u m o f $84,700 w a s e n te r e d
b y J u d g e H u t r p h r e y in t h e U n i t e d S ta te s C ir c u it C o u r t a t
S p r in g fie ld , 111,, o n J a n . 11. T h e M e t r o p o lit a n T r u s t C o , is
m o r t g a g e t r u s t e e ,— V . 71, p . 697.
C i n c i n n a t i R i c h m o n d & M u n c i e R R . — B o n d s O ffered ,—
G e o , A . F e r n a ld & C o ., w h o a r e o f f e r in g $50 ,0 0 0 o f th e fir s t
m o r t g a g e 5s o n a b a sis t o y ie l d 5 p e r c e n t , say th a t o v e r f 1,600,000 o f th e $1,680,000 is s u e ($10,000 a m i le ) h a s r e c e n tly
b e e n s o ld t o b a n k s , in s u r a n c e c o m p a n ie s , tr u s te e s a n d p r i­
v a t e in v e s t o r s t h r o u g h o u t N e w E n g l a n d ,— V , 78. p , 1312.

THE CHRONICLE

J a n u a r y 18, 1902. |

Choctaw Oklahom a & Cult’ li lt .— Bonds O ffer e d .— Drcxel
& Co., Brown Brothers & Co. and W . H . Newbold’a Son &
C o., all of Philadelphia, offered this week at 1 0 7 the unsold
balance of $8,485,000 consolidated mortgage 6 p. c. $1,000 gold
bonds maturing May 1,1902; Girard Trust Co., Philadelphia,
trustee; interest payable in Philadelphia or New York
M ay 1 and Nov. 1. The $3,485,000 bonds will be issued
partly for the purchase of an additional 157 mjles of road
from the Western Oklahoma R R . Co., upon which this mort­
gage will be a first lien; it will also be a lien upon
the other property of the company, subject to the divisional
and underlying bonds. Upon the acquisition of this line the
authorized issue of the consolidated mortgage will be $12,460,000, to be used as follows: To be held by the trustee to
retire underlying and divisional bonds, $9,025,000; balance
just offered for sale, $3,435,000, This mortgage can be in­
creased from time to time for the acquisition or construction
of additional mileage, but the amount of bonds thus issued
shall not exceed $15,000 per mile. Temporary receipts will
be given pending the delivery of these bonds about May 1,
1902, on which date interest will be adjusted. The bonds, it
is announced, have all been sold,
Report.— See page 149 preceding.
Lease.— The lease of a portion of the Little Rock & Hot
Springs Western R R . was approved at the meeting on Mond a y . - V . 73, p. 1356.

151

c o n tr o lle d by th e E v e r e tt-M o o r e S y n d ica te , re c e n tly <-mi n
rassed (V . 74, p . 41).— V . 78, p. 1813.
Luke Street Elevated RR. o f C hicago.— Report.—'l l) r>
p o r t fo r the y e a r en d ed D e c. 81 ,1 9 0 1 , sh o w s gross oa m in g i;
o f $786,462, c o n tr a s tin g w ith $757,954 in 1900; net $397,668
ag a in st $379,298; to ta l a v era g e n u m b e r o f passengers carried
d a ily 42,175 a g a in st 40,048.— V . 73, p 188.
M a r y la n d E le c t r ic R y ., B a lt im o r e .— No Francium . —The
F ir s t B ra n ch of th e C ity C o u n cil on Jan. 18 adopted by a
v o te o f 20 to 4 th e rep ort o f the c o m m itte e on c it y passenger
r a ilw a y s a d v isin g a g a in st th e g r a n tin g o f a franchise to this
c o m p a n y .— V . 73, p. 784.
Metropolitan West Side Elevated Ry., C h ic a g o .— Tragic
— T h e g ro s s p assen ger reoeip ts fo r th e ca len d a r y ea r 1901 are
rep orted as $1,678,706, c o n tr a s tin g w ith $1,572,548 in 19C0.—
V. 72, p. 1134.
M is s o u r i K a n s a s & O k la h o m a R y .—See M issou ri K an sas
& T ex a s R y . b e lo w .
Missouri Kansas & Texas Ry.— Bonds.— A d ir e c t o r is
q u o te d as s a y in g :

T h e r e p o rt th a t o u r c o m p a n y c o n te m p la te s a n
is s u e o f $ 1
fir s t e x t e n s io n
b o n d s
Is m is le a d in g .
T h e f a c t is t h a t t h e r
o r g a n iz e d In th e I n d ia n T e r r it o r y a n I n d e p e n d e n t c o m p a n y ,
M i s s o u r i K a i i &a s O k l a h o m a
s
R R . C o ., t o
c o n s t r u c t a lin e fr o m
v e n s o n th e M is s o u r i K a n s a s &
T e x a s s o u th w e s t to O k la
G u th r ie .
T h is e n t e r p r is e Is b a c k e d b y im p o r t a n t l o c a l I n t e r e
p a r t ie s c o n n e c t e d w it h o u r r o a d .

Cincinnati Jackson & Mackinaw R y .— I M w f t o f MasessA p p lic a tio n has b een m a d e t o th e N e w Y o r k S to ck E x ­
ment — Holders of certificates of the Central Trust Co., rep­ ch a n g e to list $200,000 St. L o u is d iv isio n r e fu n d in g first

resenting capital stock of the railway company, are notified
that upon surrender of the above-named certificates, prop­
e r l/ endorsed, at the office of the Central Trust Co., New
Y ork , they will have returned to them "the assessments paid
thereon pursuant to the reorganization agreement. The road
is now known as the Cincinnati Northern, which see below.
— V . 73, p. 82.

Cincinnati Northern RR.— Manner o f Operation.— A press
dispatch from Toledo states that at a conference of Vander­
bilt officials held here on Jan. 8 it was decided that the Ohio
division, between Jackson, M ich ,, and Franklin, O ., 205
miles, should be controlled by the Cleveland Cincinnati Chi­
cago & St. Louis, but operated by the Cincinnati Northern.
The Michigan division [Detroit Toledo & Milwaukee R R .,
extending from Allegan to Detroit, M ich ., and branches, 200
miles in all] will be operated jointly by the Lake Shore and
the Michigan Central. The use of the tracks of the A n n
Arbor R R . from Dundee to Toledo will be discontinued.
Cincinnati Jackson & Mackinaw B y . — See that company
above.— V . 73, p. 1010.
Cleveland ( 0 . ) Electric Ry.— The annual report show s:
Tear.

Gross.

Net.

Interest.

Dividends. Surplus.

1901............. $2,29o,898 $1,030,715 $244,231 $520,000 $260,484
940,467 258,483
(?)
(?)
1900............. 2,(J61,504
—Y. 74. p. 93. 41.

Detroit United R y .— A ssen ts to Everett-Moore Extension.
— N in e ty p er c e n t o f a ll th e c r e d it o r s o f th e E v e r e tt-M o o r e
sy n d ica te, it is sta ted, h a v e sig n ifie d th eir w illin g n e s s to
sig n th e ex ten sion a g reem en t. A m e m b e r o f th e b a n k ers’
c o m m itte e on Jan . 13 sa id :

It may take two or three weeks to clean up the remaining 1 0 per
cent, they being harder to reaoh than all the rest put together. We
have enough of the consents, however, to Insure the success of the
plan to allow the Everett-Moore syndicate eighteen months in which
to liquidate its present indebtedness.—V. 74, p. 4l.
Elgin Joliet < Eastern Ry.— L istin g .— T h e N e w Y o r k
te
S tock E x c h a n g e has b een req u ested to list an a d d itio n a l
$500,000 o f the first m o rtg a g e 5 per ce n t g o ld b o n d s o f 1941.
— V . 72, p. 872.
Glenwood & Polytechnic Street Ry., Fort W orth, T ex .—
Foreclosure Sale.— Judge M. E. Smith, in the 17th District
Court, has ordered the foreclosure sale of this property. The
sale, it is said, will take place on March 3 .—V 73, p. 1160.

Hartford & Springfield Street Ry.— Formally Opened.—
T h e c o m p a n y ’s tr o lle y lin e b e tw e e n H a r t fo r d & S prin gfield,
a d ista n ce o f 28 m iles, w a s fo r m a lly op en ed on Jan. 13. T h e
fa re fo r th e th ro u g h trip is 30 cen ts. A ft e r le a v in g H a r tfo r d
th e lin e ru n s on th e east sid e o f th e C o n n e c tic u t R iv e r,
th r o u g h E ast H a r tfo r d , S ou th W in d s o r , E a st W in d so r and
E nfield, in C o n n e c tic u t, an d L o n g m e a d o w an d S p rin g field in
M a ssa ch u setts.—V . 73, p. 137.

Illinois C e n t r a l RR .— Conversion o f Fractional Lots.—
N o tic e is g iv e n th a t th e tim e fo r c o n v e r tin g th e re ce ip ts i s ­
su ed fo r fra ctio n s o f shares o f th e issue a u th o riz e d oy the
s to ck h o ld e rs O ct, 16, 1901, has b een e x ten d ed u n t il A p r il 30,
1902, See n o tice on p a g e v iii.
Omaha Bridge < Terminal R y .— S ee th a t co m p a n y b e lo w .
&
- V . 73, p. 1263
International & Great Northern R R .—New T ru stee, T h e B a w lin g G reen T ru s t C o. has b een a p p o in te d tru stee
u n d er the first m o rtg a g e to su c c e e d J o h n S. K e n n e d y and
S am u el S. Sloan, resign ed .
B onds. — T h e T exas R a ilroa d C om m ission has a p p ro v e d the
X>roposed b s u e o f $860,000 b on d s ou 18 m iles o f com p leted
tra ck sou th o f C olle g e , and o f $240,000 bonds on 12 m iles o f
c o m p le te d tra ck n orth o f S p r in g .— V . 78, p. 1856.
L a b e S h o r e E lectric R y .— Receiver.— A lb io n E . L a n g ,
P resid en t o f th e T o le d o R a ilw a y s & L ig h t C o ., has been a p ­
p oin ted re ce iv e r o f th is p ro p e r ty upon a p p lica tio n o f V a le n ­
tin e , C lark & C o. o f C h ica g o . T h e c o m p a n y is on e o f th ose

m o r tg a g e 4 p er c e n t g o ld b o n d s o f 2001.— V . 73, p. 1160.
Nashville & K noxville R R .— L ease or Sale .— T h e s t o c k ­
h old ers w ill v o te F e b . 18 to co n sid e r th e le a sin g o r s e llin g , as
m a y th en be d e te rm in e d , o f th e r a ilw a y , a p p u rte n a n ce s, e q u ip ­
m en t an d p rop erty o f th e co m p a n y t o th e T e n n e s-e e C en tra l
R y . C o., o r to a n y o th e r r a ilro a d c o n n e c tin g w it h th e N a s h ­
v ille & K n o x v ille .— V . 72, p. 480.
New York Central & Hudson River R R .—New Stock— T h e
d ir e c to r s o n W e d n e s d a y v o te d t o in crea se th e s to c k fr o m
$115,000,000 to $150,000,000, s u b je c t to th e a p p ro v a l o f th e
s to c k h o ld e r s at a m e e tin g t o be h eld o n A p r il 16. O f th e n e w
sh ares th e presen t issue w ill b e o n ly $17,250,000, an d to th is
a m ou n t sh a reh old ers o f r e c o r d M a rch 31 w ill h a v e th e p r iv ­
ile g e o f su b s c r ib in g till M ay 1 in c lu s iv e a t $125 a sh a re to
th e e x te n t o f 15 p er c e n t o f th eir h o ld in g s . A c ir c u la r s a y s :
“ It w as a lso r e s o lv e d th a t th e b o a rd o f d ire cto rs sh all h a v e
th e p o w e r to issue and sell o r d isp ose o f th e re m a in in g $17,750,000 o f s to c k at su ch tim e an d a t su ch p r ic e as th e b o a rd
m a y d eem d esira b le, b u t w h e n issued p riv ile g e sh a ll b e
o ffe re d t o s to ck h o ld e rs o f s u b s c r ib in g fo r sam e a t su ch p r ic e
as m a y b e fix ed b y th e b o a r d o f d ir e c t o r s .” P a y m e n t fo r
th e s to c k n o w o ffe re d m u st b e made b y M a y 12, an d c e r tifi­
cates o f s to ck f o r th e a m o u n ts so p a id w ill th en b e issu ed,
w h ic h s to c k w ill b e en titled to re c e iv e a ll d iv id e n d s p a y a b le
a fte r th e 15th day o f A p r il, 1902.
P lan .— In c o n n e c tio n w it h th e a n n o u n ce m e n t r e g a r d in g
th e n e w s to c k issue, th e c o m p a n y o u tlin e d its p la n f o r . su b ­
s titu tin g e le c t r ic p o w e r f o r steam in th e P a rk A v e n u e tu n n e l
fo r all lo c a l o r su b u rb a n tra in s an d th e c o n s tr u c tio n o f a lo o p
u n dern ea th th e G ra n d C en tra l S ta tion f o r th e use o f the s u b ­
u rban tra ffic e x c lu s iv e ly . A ft e r r e fe r r in g t o th e a c c id e n t o f
Jan . 8 and th e p re ca u tio n s lo n g in fo r c e in th e tu n n el t o p re ­
v e n t d isa ster, th e d ir e c to r s sa y :

T h e b e s t m e th o d o f im p r o v e m e n t w o u ld b e t h e a b o lit io n o
n e l a n d m a k in g in it s p la c e a n o p e n c u t s im ila r t o t h a t s o u
8 c ., h u t t h is , o n a c c o u n t o f t h e o p p o s i i i o n w h ic h h a s b e e n e n c
h a s b e e n im p o s s ib le o f a tt a in m e n t u p t o t h e p r e s e n t t im e ,
a ft e r a t h o r o u g h in v e s t ig a t io n , it w a s d e t e r m in e d t h a t t h e m
t ic a b le p la n fo r c a r in g fo r th e e n o r m o u s p a s s e n g e r tr a ffic c o n
i n t h e G r a n d C e n t r a l S t a t i o n w o u l d b e t h e c o nas lt or o pc t s ot n ­ o f
u
i a
tio n u n d e r th e
p r e s e n t t e r m in a l, s o t h a t t h e s u b u r b a n t r
b e o p e r a te d
b y
e le c tiic it y
th ro u g h th e e x is tin g
s id e t u n
e q u ip p e d w ith th e m o s t m o d e r n a p p lia n c e s f o r u n d e r g r o u n d
T o th e a c c o m p lis h m e n t o f t h is p la n th e e ffo r t s o f t h e c o m
fo r s o m e t im e p a s t t e e n d ir e c t e d .
I n tn is w a y t h e p a s s e n g e r f a c ilit ie s o f th e p r e s e n t s t a t io n
n e a r ly d o u b le d , a n d
w ith
t h e s u b u r b a n b u s in e s s th u s p r
th e th r o u g h p a s s e n g e r a n d m a ll b u s in e s s c a n
b e m o v e d
th
c e n tr e
t u n n e ls w it h p r o fit a n d r e g u la r it y .
B e fo r e d e te r m
e l e c t r i c a l o r s< m e o t h e r p o w e r s h o u l d b e s u b s t i t u t e d f o r s t e a
t r a in s e n t e r in g th e G r a n d C e n t r a l S t a t io n it m u s t b e d e m
t h a t t h e b u s in e s s c a n b e s a fe ly a n d p r o m p t ly h a n d le d
in
t h e r e fo r e it is c o n t e m p la t e d t o m a k e t h e e x p e r im e n t in t h e
n e ls a n d t h e u n d e r g r o u n d s t a t io n .
T o c a r r y o u t t h is p la n e i t w i l l b e n e c e s s a r y f o r t h e c o m p a n y
fr o m th e L e g is la tu r e a n d th e c ity a u th o r ity t o u s e p o w e r
s t e a m , t o w h ic h it is n o w e x p r e s s ly lim it e d b y s t a t u t e , a n d
c h a n g e s in P a rk A v e n u e s o a s to g iv e u s e o f th a t s tr e e t s o
t u n n e l, in o r d e r t o le n g t h e n t h e a p p r o a c h t o t h e s t a t io n ; a ls
to c o n s tr u c t a tu n n e l u n d e rn e a th p o r tio n s o f 4 3 d , 4 4 th
s tr e e ts a n d P a ik , V a n d e r b ilt a n d D e p e w A v e n u e s .
T h e ch a n
s it a te th e p u r c h a s e o f a la r g e a m o u n t o f p r o p e r t y in o r d e r
a n e w lo c a tio n fo r P a r k A v e n u e .
C o n s id e r a b le o f t h is p r o
a lr e a d y b e e n a c q u ir e d o r c o n t r a c t e d fo r , b u t m o r e r e m a in s
ch a se d .
T h e c o m p a n y is p r e p a r e d t o p r o c e e d w it h t h e w o r k
tia lly o n th e p la n o u tlin e d a b o v e w h e n
th e n e c e s s a r y le g is
b e o b t a i n e dV.—73, p . 1813.
.

N. Y. ( h ic a g o & St. L o u is R R . — Second Preferred Stock
Dividend Inertased. — T h e c o m p a n y has d ecla red a d iv id e n d
on its secon d p re fe rre d s to c k o f 3 p e r c e n t, p a y a b le M a rch 1.
T he first d iv id e n d on th is s to c k w a s 2 p er ce n t, p a id M a rch 1,
1901.
T h e usual 5 per c e n t o n first p re fe rre d s to ck w as a lso
d e cla re d pa ya b le M a r c h 1. T h e sta tem en t o f ea rn in g s fo r th e
yea r 1901 w ill be fo u n d on a p r e c e d in g p a g e .— V . 78, p. 1062.
N o r f o lk & W e s te r n R y .— L istin g .— T h e N e w Y o r k S to ck
E x c h a n g e has been req u ested to list $2,500,000 a d d itio n a l first
co n so lid a te d m o r t g a g e 4 p. c. g o ld b o n d s o f 1996.— V . 74 p. 41.
North Pacific Coast RR.— In Possession.— T h e “ San F r a n ­
c is c o C h r o n ic le ” says th e n e w o w n e r s h a ve d ecid ed , a ft e r all

THE

152

C H R O N IC LF.

[Vol .

LXX IV.

out to in corp orate a new com pan y, Joh n M artin, R, R , C o l­
ga te and E. J, de Sabla, h ow ever, have b ecom e directors,
A n toin e B orel, John G. C olem an, C, de Q-utgne and A . H .
Sm all, m em bers o f the old board, it is said, w ill con tin u e to
serve until the syn dicate com pletes its paym ent fo r the
stock, w hich w ill be som e tim e d a rin g the approachin g
spring, Mr. Martin succeeds M r, Stetson as President. The
plan o f the syndicate provides fo r th e con version o f the road
in to an electric line betw een Sausalito and M ill V alley , San
A use lino, San R a fa el and San Quentin. T h e rem ainder o f
the line w ill be operated w ith steam , as h eretofore.— V, 74,
p. 94
N o rth e rn P a c ific T e r m in a l C o.— Called Bonds. —T h e fo l­
low in g first m ortgage bon ds o f 1883, aggregatin g $38,000, have
been d raw n ; N os. 43, 75, 133, 303, 248, 257, 725, 783, 889,
1075, 1508, 1606, 1817, 1941, 2000, 2683, 3973, 8125, 8183, 3190,
3501, 3613 and 8726, and w ill be redeem ed b y the F arm ers’
L oan & Trust C o,, at 110 and a ccru ed interest, on Feb. 7,
19i)2, at w h ich date interest w ili cease. See advertisem ent,
page v ia .— V . 73, p. 287.
N orth ern S e c u r itie s Co. — Argum ent Jan. 27 . — C hief
J u -tic e F u ller in the U nited States Suprem e C ourt, at W a sh ­
in gton Jan. 13, announced that argum ent u pon the applica
tion o f the State o f M innesota fo r leave to file a b ill o f c o m ­
plaint in equ ity against the com pan y w ou ld be heard M on ­
day, Jan uary 37.—V . 74, p. 94.
N orth w estern E le v a te d R R .— Traffic. —T he n um ber o f
passengers carried du rin g the last h a lf o f 19ul is reported as
i 1,360,842, con trastin g w ith 8,937,485 in the sam e period o f
1903.— V . 73, p, 1308.
O m aha (N e b .) B rid g e & T e r m in a l C o.— New Bridge. — A
bill has been in trodu ced in C ongress b y Senator M illard o f
N ebraska asking perm ission, it is said, fo r this com pan y
to build a bridge over the M issouri R iv er at East Omaha.
T h e b rid g e w ill be 1,630 feet lon g, to in clude tw o spans, 520
and 580 feet respectively, in addition to 520 feet o f approaches.
See South Om aha R R & B ridge Co. below .
Change in C o n tro l— The Illin ois C entral R R ., w h ich has
been usiDg under lease this com p an y’* term inals and b rid ge,
’
has purchased, it is understood, all, or a co n tro llin g interest
in , th is com p a n y ’s *5,000,000 capital stock. T h e fo llo w in g
officers have been elected :

cen t in com e bonds fo r the sam e p eriod on the basis o f $3,000
per mile, and to increase tbe capital stock o f tb e Q u ebec
Southern C om pany, on th e con solidated line, to $4,000,000.
W e have n ow 144 m iles iu operation and propose to b u ild 85
m iles east w ithin tw elve m onths, g iv in g us th e short line b e ­
tw een M ontreal and Q uebec. W e also con tem plate the c o n ­
stru ction o f betw een 80 and 40 m iles from St. L a m b ert to
V alleyfield, w ith can al con n ection near th at point.
“ T he first m ortga ge w ill also have a p rovision co v e r in g
such portion o f the line as m ay be d ou ble-tracked. W e have
ju st purchased six passenger coach es and ex p ect soon to place
au order fo r 500 freig h t cars.”
A press dispatch says:

Directors.—
John C. Welling, J . T .Harahan, w . G. Bruen and J . F.
Titus of Chicago; John E, Webster, J . H. Daniels and William Baird
ofSOmaha. Officers.—
President, J. O. Welling; Vice-President and
General Manager, J, R . Webster; Secretary and Treasurer, J . H
Daniels.— 63, p. 969; V. 71, p. 547.
V.

charges of the Savannah Electric Co., which will amount to $115,000.
Dividends at the rate of 6 p. c. per annum on the preferred stock will
. call for $60,000 additional. p.The estimated net earnings for the year
1902 are $225,000.— 74, 42.
V.

P e n n s y lv a n ia R R .— Offer.—Sea P enn sylvania & N orth
W estern b e lo w .—V . 74, p . 43.
P e n n s y lv a n ia & N orth W e ste rn R R . —Exchange o f Stock.
— T he P ennsylvania R R . Co. has offered $1,000,000 o f its ow n
stock fo r the $2,250,000 stock o f the Penn sylvania & N o rth
W e s te rn .—V . 59, p. 1008.
P e o r ia & E a stern R j . —Sale.— T his com p an y has sold oneh a lf o f its $250,000 holdin gs in the stock ($1,000,000) o f the
P eoria & Pekin U n ion R y . “ for a g ood rou nd price ” to the
C h ica g o & N orth W estern .— V . 73, p. 554.
P e o r ia & P e k in U n io n R y .— New Interest — The C hicago
& N orth W estern has acqu ired an interest in the P eoria
& P ekin U n ion R y . th rou gh the purchase o f 1,350 shares o f
th e latter stock from the P eoria & E astern.— V . 70, p. 584.
P h ila d e lp h ia W ilm in g to n & B a ltim o r e R R .—Increase o f
Stock. —T he shareholders on M on day v oted to increase the
capital stock b y $8,000,000. P resident A . J. Cassatt, in his
annual report, says:

For the purpose of placing tie lino between Philadelphia and Wash­
ington on a strong basis, and in view of its financial requirements in
connection -with the rebuilding of tbe line through the national capi­
tal, the construction of a new passenger station in that city, the re­
newal of the bridge over the Potomac River and the elevation of your
tracks through Wilmington and Chester, it is deemed wise to consoli­
date the Baltimore & Potomac RR., whose main line extends from
Baltimore to Washington, with your railway. In this connection it
will be necessary to inorease the amount of your authorized capital
stock in the sum of £8 ,0 0 0 ,O O and for this purpose to accept the pro­
O,
visions of the constitution of ithe Commonwealth of Pennsylvania of
1874 and of the State of Delaware of 1897.
R eport. —T h e report fo r the year ending O ct. 31 sh ow s:
Year,

Gross.

N et

Other ine.

Charges.

S a l.,su r.

1900-01.$11,808,649 $3,748,807 $612,600 $2,072,065 $2,288,742
1899-00. 11,324,531 3,535,631 559,493 2,364,125 1,730,993

Prior to tbe meetings, tbe Atlantic & Lake Superior Railway
served a protest on both roads with reference to the amalgamation
and xbe issue of bonds on the portion of the line formerly owned by
the Great Eastern and Montreal & Atlantic railways. The Atlantic
& Lake Superior Railway claims that the South Shore Company has
no legal title to this property, and that it really belongs to the former
company, and until the question of ownership has been settled by the
courts, it will not permit any transfer to be made of the property, or
any mortgage to he placed upon it.
See R u tlan d R R . in V . 74, p. 95.—V . 74, p. 95,
R a p id T r a n s it in N ew Y o rk C ity . —Court Approves
Brooklyn Tunnel.— T h e A ppellate D ivision o f the Suprem e
C ourt yesterday approved the proposition to extend the
Rapid Transit tunnel fro m the C ity H a ll d ow n B roadw ay
and under the East R iv er to B ro o k ly n .—V . 74, p. 95.
R e a d in g C om pany. —New Secretary.— V ice-P residen t W .
R T a y lor Jr, has been re-elected also to his old position o f
Secretary to fill the v a ca n cy caused b y the death o f A lb ert
H. M o o re .— V. 74, p. 95.
Savannah (G a .) E le c t r ic Co.— Consolidation.—A circu la r
gives the facts.already reported in th is colu m n (V . 73, p. 1358)
and says:

The $2,500,000 new bondB will thus become a first mortgage on the
lighting plant, praotioally a first mortgage on some of the best railway
lines, ana a seoond mortgage on the remainder of the railway lines,
subj rot only to $1,000,000 old railway bonds. The mortgage will con­
tain provisions allowing the issue of $1,000,000 bonds in addition to
the $2,500,000 mentioned above,this additional $1,000,000 to be used
only for new equipment and construction at the rate of a $1,000 bond
for eaoh $l,‘25o cash spent. Trustee, American Loan & Trust Co. of
Boston. For the year ended" Sept. 30,1901, the gross earnings of the

S ou th O m aha R R . & B r id g e Co.— Incorporated .— This
com pan y has been in corp ora ted in N ebraska w ith $500,000
au th orized capital stock (w ith au th ority to inorease it to
$2,000,009) to bu ild a railroad brid ge across the M issouri
R iv er at South O m aha. In corp ora tors: A . O. F oster, C. S.
(Meed, F . H . Parsons, T. W . B lackbu rn and J. L . M cC ague.
S ou th S ide E lev a ted R R . o f C h ica g o.— Traffic. —F o r the
calen dar year 1991 the gross passenger receipts are reported
as $1,316,510, con trastin g w ith $1,249,544 in 1900.—V . 73,
p. 495.
S ou th ern P a c ific R R .— Favorable Decision.—The U nited
States Suprem e C ourt at W a sh in g ton on ,Jan. 6 handed
d ow n a decision con firm in g th e cla im o f th e com pan y to
abou t 3,000,000 acres com prised in the alternate sections
fro m T he N eedles to Lancaster, a point abou t n orth from
L os A ngeles, along the line o f the o ld A tla n tic & P acific R R .
Co. The ju d g m e n t o f th e C ourt o f A ppeals fo r the N inth
C ircu it, rendered in L os A ngeles in 1898, is reversed, and the
case rem anded w ith the fo llo w in g in stru ction s :

To enter a decree quitting the title of the United States to an equal
undivided moiety in all alternate sections within the place or granted
limits of tne Atlantic & Pacific in California, so far as those limits
conflict with the like limits of the Southern Pacific, excepting there­
from those lands in respect to whioh there has been some prior ad­
judication, and to dismiss the bill as to other lands.— 72, p. 628.
V.
S yracuse (N . Y .) R a p id T r a n s it Go.—Listed in Phila­
delphia .— T he P hiladelph ia S tock E xch a n g e has listed tb e
$2,500,000 first m ortga g e g o ld 5s due in 1946,— V. 68, p. 774,
T e r m in a l R a ilr o a d A s s o c ia tio n o f S t. L o u is .— Pennsyl­
vania RR. acquires One-Seventh Interest ,—T h e Pennsylvania
R R . Co. has acqu ired a one-seventh interest in this property.
T he proprietary ow n ersh ip is n o w vested in the M issouri
P acific, St. L ou is & Iron M ountain, W abash , B altim ore &
Ohio Southw estern, L ou isville & N ashville, C leveland C in ­
cin n ati C hicago & St. L ou is and Pennsylvania railroads.-— .
Y
72, p. 578.
T o le d o B o w lin g G reen & S ou th ern T r a c tio n Go.— Earnings ,— The results fo r the years 1901 and 1900 fo llo w s :

D ividen ds o f 7 per cen t y early ca ll fo r $837,354, leavin g
n et surplus fo r the year, $1,461,388, against $903,644 in 1899-0.
— V . 73, p. 1161.
P it t s b u r g & L a k e E r ie R R .— Increase o f Stock.— The
shareholders w ill vote J an . 23 on a proposition to increase
Year.
Gross.
N et
Fixed Charges. Surplus,
th e capital stock fr o m $4,000,000 to $ i,000,000 to p rov id e fo r
1901......................$179,222
$72,680
$45,000
$27,680
im provem ents, in clu d in g the fou r-tra ck in g o f th e line fro m 1900...................... 150,789
46,669
........
..........
Y ou n g stow n to M cK eesport, etc. L ak e Shore h olds $3,675,696
T he lin e is n o w open fo r th rou gh business fro m F in d la y
o f th e present stock. T h ein ten tion is said to be to issue $3,000,to T oledo, the gap o f 13)^ m iles betw een th e F in d la y divis­
000 o f th e new stock in J u ly and the rem ainder w hen o c c a ­
ion and the T oled o & B ow lin g Q-reen D ivision h avin g been
sion requires, prob a b ly late this year o r early in 1903,— V .
com pleted and put in operation on Jan, 12,1902. — Y . 72, p,878,
72, p. 1185.
T o le d o & O h io C en tra l R y .—Bonds Offered.—Spitzer <
&
Q u ebec S o a th e r a R y. —Consolidation.— A t a m eetin g C o., T oledo, O., are offerin g fo r sale $150,000 o f the St. M ary’ s
on Jan. 14 o f the stockh olders o f th e Q uebec Southern and
division 4 per cen t g old bonds due F eb, 1, 1951,— V . 78. p.
th e South Shore R a ilw a y com panies, tu e Q aebec Southern
ratified an agreem ent to purchase the property o f the South 1358.
Union Traction Co. of Philadelphia.— Opposition ElsS hore R a ilw a y C o., and th e stockh olders o f the latter c o m ­
pan y ratified the sale o f their p rop erty o f every description . vated R R P roject.—See A m erica n E lev a ted R R . a b o v e .—
V. 73, p, 1314.
P resident H , A . H od ge in rep ly to ou r in q u iry says:
“ The present plan is to issue first m ortga g e 4 per cen t 50Wabash RM.—
New Line. —T he new road from T oled o to
year g o ld bonds on th e basis o f $12,000 per m ile and 5 per M ontpelier, O ., and fro m N ew H aven, near F ort W a y n e, to

THE CHRONICLE

J a n u a r y 18, 1902.]

B u tle r, In d ., has b een op en ed fo r tra ffic, c o m p le tin g th e n ew
s h o rt lin e to C h ic a g o .— V . 78, p. 1814.
W a s h in g t o n (D . C .) T r a c t i o n & E l e c t r i c C o . —Cash P a y ­
m ent Called,.—P u rs u a n t t o th e re o rg a n iz a tio n plan d ated
A u g . 1, 1901, a ca ll is m a d e u p on th e d e p o sitin g s to c k h o ld e r s
f o r th e p a y m en t to th e U n ite d S ta tes M o rtg a g e & T r u s t C o .,
59 C edar S t., N e w Y o r k C ity, o n s to c k d ep o site d , o f $8 p er
sh a re on F eb . 8, $3 on M a rch 17 an d $8 on M ay 1, m a k in g a
tota l p a y m e n t o f $9 fo r ea ch sh are o f s to c k d e p osited , fo r
w h ic h the d ep ositin g s to c k h o ld e r s w ill b e e n title d to re c e iv e ,
w h en th e sam e are re a d y fo r d e liv e r y , v o tin g tru st c e r tifi­
cates f o r shares o f th e p re fe rre d an d c o m m o n s t o c k o f th e
n e w c o m p a n y , a t th e rate o f $9 in p r e fe r r e d s to c k a n d $30 in
c o m m o n s tock f o r e a ch $9 p a id .— Y . 73, p. 1161.
W e s te r n M a r y la n d R R .— Offer f o r R oa d .—C. H . W h it e &
C o ,, o f 17 B roa d w a y , N e w Y o r k , h a ve sent a le tte r to M a y or
H a y e s o f B a ltim o re , s a y in g :

153

M ortgage .— T h e c o m p a n y has m a d e ar m o r tg a g e to the
E q u ita b le T r u s t C o. o f C h ic a g o as tru stee to s e cu re $750,000
first m o r tg a g e 5 p o r c e n t $1,000 g o ld bon d s, d u e $50,000
y e a r ly fr o m J an . 1, 1903, to 1917, b o th in clu s iv e , b u t s u b je c t
to c a ll a t 105 in w h o le o r in p a rt at a n y tim e on th irty days ’
n otice. A ll th e s to c k an d th e e n tire issue o f b o n d s, it is sa id ,
are h eld b y frie n d s o f th e c o m p a n y ; n on e o f eith er, it is e x ­
p ected , w ill b e p la ce d on th e m a rk et. T h e ea rn in g s, it is
c la im e d , w ere su fficien t la st y e a r to m eet a ll th e p resen t fixed
ch argee, pay a 6 p er c e n t d iv id e n d u p o n th e s to c k an d lea v e
a su rplu s o f $50,000 f o r th e re tire m e n t o f b on d s.
A m e r ic a n S u g a r R e fin in g C o .— P rice o f S ugar.— T h e
com p a n y o n T u esd a y a ga in re d u c e d th e p r ic e o f h a rd su g a rs
fr o m 4 75 cen ts t o 4'65 ce n ts (se e V . 73, p. 1358), th e r e d u c ­
tion bein g m e t b y th e o th e r refin ers. R a w su g a r (c e n tr i­
fu g a l) o n th e sale o f a sm a ll lo t to u c h e d 9% ce n ts a p ou n d ,
th e lo w e s t p r ic e on r e c o r d an d c o n tr a s tin g w ith a p r ic e o f
4% ce n ts a y e a r a g o .
B eet su g a r w a s q u o te d in L o n d o n
th is w eek as lo w as 6s. 4 d ., a g a in st 7 s h illin g s in D e c ­
em b er an d 9% sh illin g s in J a n u a r y , 1901.— V . 74, p. 96.

Our Mr. O. H. White is a director in the Baltimore & Cumberland
Valley RR. Extension Co., apart of the Western Maryland RR. system,
and while attending the annual meeting a few days ago was informed
that oertain parties in New York were endeavoring to have the city
dispose of its interest through a local lawyer. We would like to state
A n t o m a t ic W e ig h in g M a c h in e C o .— Stock Offered.— S u b ­
that when you feel that you are in a position to sell your interest in the s crip tio n s are in v ite d till F e b . 15 to $300,000 o f th e p re fe rre d
Western Maryland, we represent railroad interests other than those
that would be antagonistic to your city, which interests would be more s to c k at $100 p er sh are, w ith a b on u s o f ah e q u a l a m o u n t o f
co m m o n sto ck . T h e a d v e rtis e m e n t o n a n oth er p a g e sa ys:
than pleased to make a proposition to your advantage.
The company, having acquired the entire weighing machine Interests
T h e firm says th ey d o n o t rep resen t th e P e n n sy lv a n ia R R .
Co. of
the many
L egisla tion .— A b ill w as in tr o d u c e d in th e M a ry la n d L e g is ­ of the Pratt & Whitney relative Hartford, Conn., Including for manu­
comprehensive patents
thereto and special plant
la tu re on W e d n e s d a y p r o v id in g th a t an y p r o p o s itio n fo r th e facturing weighing apparatus, and having also acquired the valuable
sale o f th e roa d b y th e c it y m u st b e s u b m itte d t o a v o t e o f patents, equipments and business of the New England Automatic
Weighing Machine Oo. of Boston, desires to secure additional capital
th e p e o p le .— V . 73, p . 1012.
to inorease its plant and extend Its business. The rentals of machines
W o r c e s t e r (M a s s .) R a ilw a y s & I n v e s t m e n t C o .—F irst now on lease and contracted for will yield more than $40,000 per an­
num. The company owns over 300 patents, whtch give it virtually
D ividend .— T h is c o m p a n y — an a ssocia tion fo r m e d in 1901 to control of the Held in which it operates. Until recently the putting up
c o n t r o l b y o w n e rsh ip o f s to c k s treet r a ilw a y s e tc ., in W o r ­ of various commodities In standard paokages has been accomplished
cester, M ass. —has d e c la r e d its first d iv id e n d , b e in g s e m i­ by hand or by Indifferent maohinery. The apparatus of this company
work automatically and accurately. The
weigh
a n n u a l, $2 25 p er sh a re, p a y a b le F e b . 1, to h o ld e rs o f r e c o r d does the from 2 ounces to 600 pounds, and handle machinesvariety ac­
curately
a great
of
J a n . 2 0 .- Y . 73, p. 446,
commodities. The oomoany’s apparatus has been adopted by such
well-known manufacturers as the American Sugar Refining Oo., the
Royal Baking Powder Co., United States Steel Corporation, Waehburn-Orosby Co. and American Cereal Co
The company Is organized under the laws of New York with a cap­
INDUSTRIAL. GAS AND MISCELLANEOUS.
ital of $3,600,000 In shares of the par value of $100, of which
$6 0 0 ,0 0 0 is 6 per cent preferred stock.
A lb in a L ig h t & Water Co., P o r t l a n d , O re.— P urchase by
Officers.—P. Lorillard Jr., President; Walter L. Clark, Vice-Presi­
C ity. — T h e W a te r C o m m itte e o f th e c it y r e c e n tly d e c id e d to dent, and C. A. Leonard, Secretary and Treasurer.
Directors.— Lorillard Jr., Walter L Clark, C. A. Leonard, William
P.
p u rch a s e th e c o m p a n y ’s e n tir e w a t e r -w o r k s p r o p e r ty f o r
Barbour, John H. Hanan, Robert C. McKinney, C. E. Halliwell and
$ 200, 060.
W. P. Homans, all of New York; S. W. Winslow, George W. Brown,
Amalgamated Copper Co.—P rice o f C opp er A g a in R e ­ Elmer P. Howe and C. S. Hill, all of Boston.
d u ce d — T h e c o m p a n y ’ s se llin g a g e n c y , th e U n ite d M eta ls
S ellin g C o., on M on d a y re d u c e d th e p r ic e o f la k e c o p p e r fr o m
12% to 11% cen ts per p o u n d , c o n tr a s tin g w ith 17 cen ts p r io r
t o D ec. 17, 1901, w h e n th e first c u t w as m ad e. O n W e d n e s ­
d a y th e p rice o f la k e co p p e r w a s c u t t o 11% c e n ts ; o n T h u r s ­
d a y sm all lots w e re r e p o rte d as se llin g at 10 % cen ts. Y e s ­
te rd a y th e p r ic e w a s 11% c e n ts .— V . 74, p. 42.

American Bridge Co.—P u r c h a s e .— T h e c o m p a n y has p u r ­
ch a s e d th e p rop erties h e r e to fo r e o w n e d b y th e D e tr o it B rid g e
& Ir o n C o ., D e tro it, M ich ., w h ic h w ill h e re a fte r b e k n o w n as
th e D e tro it pla n t. A n a d d ition to th e P itts b u r g p la n t a lso is
p rop osed , at a c o s t o f sev e ra l h u n d red th ou sa n d d o lla r s .— V.
72, p. 777.
American Cotton Co.— A greem ent E ffected . — T h e s t o c k ­
h o ld e rs’ co m m itte e (C orn eliu s N. B liss, C h a irm a n ) a n n ou n ces
th a t m o r e th an a m a jo r it y o f th e p r e fe r r e d an d co m m o n
s to c k h a v in g assen ted, th e s to c k h o ld e r s ’ a g re e m e n t o f D ec. 2
has b e c o m e b in d in g an d e ffe c tiv e , an d th a t fu r th e r deposits
w ill b e re ce iv e d b y th e C en tra l T r u s t C o as d e p o sita ry p r io r
to F e b . 1, o n ly ia th e d is cre tio n o f the co m m itte e an d u p on
s u ch term s as it m a y d e te rm in e . S ee Y . 73, p. 1266.

T h e office an d fa c t o r y are a t N o . 275 C on g ress S t., B o s to n ;
N e w Y o r k office , N o . I l l F ift h A v e . T h e A m e r ic a n A u t o ­
m a tic W e ig h in g M a ch in e C o. w a s d e s c r ib e d in V . 68, p . 471.
B a y C o u n tie s P o w e r C o.— D escrip tion . — “ H a r p e r ’s W e e k ­
l y ” on D ec. 28 p u b lish ed an illu stra te d a r tic le r e g a r d in g
th is c o m p a n y , w h ic h is tra n sm ittin g e le c t r ic it y fr o m a
p o w e r-h o u se at C olg a te, o n th e N o r th Y u b a R iv e r , n o t m e r e ­
ly to O ak lan d , a d ista n ce o f 142 m iles, b u t fu r th e r s o u th w a r d
again to San J ose, 42 m iles, an d ev en t o R e d w o o d an d B u r ­
lin ga m e, a to ta l d ista n ce o f 214 m iles fr o m th e g e n e ra to rs at
th e fo o t o f th e S ierra s.— V . 73, p. 1266.
B e a t r ic e C o a l & M in in g C o. ( S p r i n g C ity , T e n n . ) —
c o m p a n y has m a d e a m o r t g a g e to th e
N o r t a A m e r ic a n T ru s t C o. o f N e w Y o r k , as tru stee, c o v e r ­
in g , it is said, 5,000 a cres o f c o a l la n d s to se cu re $100,000
o f 5 per cen t $500 b on d s, d u e iu 1941, b u t s u b je c t t o c a ll a ft e r
fiv e years a t 105. T h e p ro ce e d s, it is sta ted, w ill b e u sed in
d e v e lo p in g th e c o a l p r o p e r ty , b u ild in g 4 m ile s o f r a ilr o a d
to th e m in es, e tc.

M ortgage .— T h is

B r id g e p o r t ( C o n n .) G a s L i g h t C o .— M ortgage .— T h is c o m
p a n y has m ad e a m o r t g a g e t o th e C e n tra l T r u s t C o. o f N e w
G o u ld a n n ou n ced th is w eek th a t in ca se th e a n n u al e le c t io n 1 Y o r k as tru stee to se cu re $1,000,000 o f 50-year 4 p er c e n t
is n o t ca rrie d b y his p a rty he w o u ld sell h is s to c k an d the bonds. O f th e issue a p o r tio n w a s u sed f o r th e p u r c h a s e o f
W e s te rn U n io n T e le g ra p h Co. w o u ld org a n ize an o p p o s i­ th e p r o p e r ty o f th e fo r m e r C itize n s’ G as C o .— S ee V . 73, p.
tio n m essen g er s e rv ice . C harles A . M issin g, on e o f th e le a d ­ 1013.
ers in the op p osition , is q u oted as s a y in g :
B u t t e E l e c t r i c & Power Co.—D ivid en d.— A q u a rte rly d iv i­
" I think this Is an effort to discourage stockholders from sending
nroxles to the committee which sighed the protest on Deo. 23 last. d en d o f 1)4 p er ce n t u p on th e p r e fe r r e d ca p ita l s to c k has
This committee, I wish It thoroughly understood, Is not and never has been d e cla re d , p a y a b le F e b . 1, 1902, o n s to c k o f r e c o r d J a n .
been antagonistic to the Western Union. We are fighting only against 25. C h arles A . S p o ffo r d is T re a su re r, 30 B ro a d S t. M r.
a reduction of the capital stook, and to obtain a representation on the
board for outside stockholders. When three-quarters of the stock Is S p offord is a d ir e c t o r o f th e N o r th A m e r ic a n C o. See f u ll
not represented on the board, we think It high time to obtain that sta tem en t in V . 73, p. 139.

American

District

Telegraph

Co. — Contest. — E d w in

representation.” — 74, p. 42.
V.
A m e r ic a n Hard Rubber Co.— Outside Interests. — See
D ia m o n d R u b b e r C o. b e lo w .— V . 66, p. 809.

A m e r ic a n S to v e C o .— C onsolidation. — T h is c o m p a n y w as
in co rp o ra te d in N ew J ersey on D ec. 26, 1901, w ith $5,000,000
a u th orized ca p ita l stock , an d on J a n . 6 to o k o v e r th e p ro p
e rty o f the fo llo w in g n in e co m p a n ie s, w h ich in c lu d e th e
m ost im p orta n t o f th ose en g a g ed in th e m a n u fa c tu r e o f ga s
ra n g es, g a solin e an d o il stov es in th e U n ite d S ta tes:

B n t t e r ic k C o m p a n y .— T h is c o m p a n y w a s in c o r p o r a te d a t
A lb a n y on J a n . 15, w ith $12,000,000 a u th o r iz e d c a p ita l s to e k ,
to p u b lish m a g a zin es, p attern s an d sta n d a rd s o f fa s h io n .
D ir e c t o r s :

W. A. Pablew, W. P. McClure, Henry E. Duke.JWlllis Clark, George
H. Blauvelt, and James H. Campbell, of New York City; M. W. Fran­
cis, of Brooklyn, and E. F. Taylor, of Jersey City.

C a m b r ia S t e e l C o .— F ir s t D ividend .— T h e c o m p a n y as
re o rg a n iz e d d e cla re d on W e d n e s d a y a first d iv id e n d o f 1% per
filngen Stove 'Jo., Quick Meal Stove Co., Twin Burner Stove Co., 8 t. ce n t, b e in g , it is u n d e r s to o d , a se m i-a n n u a l p a y m e n t o f 75
Boats; George M. Clark & Co., Chicago; Standard Lighting Co , Dang­ cen ts p er $50 sh a re o n th e $45,000,000 ca p ita l sto ck . T h e
ler Stove < 'lanafacturing Co., Schneider < Trenkamp Co.,Cleveland;
fc
fc
National Vapor Stove < Manufacturing Co , Lorain, O.; Monarch P e n n sy lv a n ia R R . Co. an d a llie d in terests are in c o n tr o l.
fc
New D irector. — R . F r a n c is W o o d has b een e le cte d a d ir e c to r
Stove < Manufacturing Co., Mansfield, O.
fc
to su cceed J. L o w b e r W e lsh , re s ig n e d .— V. 73, p. 901.
T h e officers are ; P resid en t, C. A . S to ck s tro m , St. L o u is ;
V ice P resid en ts, G e o rg e M . C la rk , C h ic a g o ; D . A . D a n g le r,
C e n t r a l U n io n ( B e l l ) T e le p h o n e C o .— P u rch a se.— A press
F. L A lc o t t , C lev ela n d ; H eoretary, H . J T rcn k a m p , C le v e ­ d isp a tch fr o m T o le lo says th is c o m p a n y has “ p u rch a se d the
la n d ; T rea su rer, G e o r g e F . F iake, C h ic a g o . N e w Jersey p rop erty o f th e n ew H a rrisa n T e le p h o n e C o ., the o n ly in d e ­
office , C orp ora tion T ru s t C o. B u ild in g , J ersey C ity . T h e p en den t c o m p a n y n o w i n o p e ra tio n in th is c i t y .” — V . 73, p.
m ain office w ill be in St. L o u is .
1209.

TH E

15 4

CM K O N H JLK

C h ic a g o J u n c t i o n R a ilw a y s & U n io n S t o c k Y a r d s C o .—
L ive Stock Receipts . — T h e fo llo w in g is a c o m p a r a tiv e s ta te ­
m en t o f liv e-a tock an d c a r re ce ip ts at th e C h ic a g o y a r d s fo r
e a ch o f the fast fo u r y e a r s :
OuL IV.
Gallic.
1901___ 3,< 31,928
l90ti ...2,729,040
1899 __2,514,440
1898
2,480,897

Calves.

181,767
130,110
130,670
132,733

Hogs.

8,889,038
8,240,07b
8,177,870
8,817,114

Sheep.

Morses,

4,040,391
3,548,888
3,08-,832
3,589,439

C h i l l i c o t h e ( M o . ) W a t e r C o.— F oreclosu re.— A fo r e c lo s u r e
su it has been b r o u g h t a g a in st th is c o m p a n y . B o n d s fo r
$267,500 are sa id to b e h e ld in th e E a st. N e w m a n E r b , 66
B r o a d w a y , th is c it y , is, or has b een , P resid en t.
C ity o f C h ic a g o B r e w in g 1 & M a lt in g C o. — R ed u ction o f
F ix ed C harges. — T h e b oa rd has op en ed n e g o tia tio n s w it h th e
A m e r ic a n b o n d h o ld e r s w ith r e fe r e n c e to a p o ssib le r e d u c tio n
in th e fix ed c h a r g e s .— Y . 78, p. 34.
C la flin (H . B .) C o .— E a rn in g s.— F o r th e h a lf-y e a r an d y e a r:

1901....... $347,456
$142,125 (4)$153,104
1900 .......
302,045 142,125 (4) 153,161
re a r-

1901 ... ..$650,554 $284,250 (8)$306,328
1900......... 914,353 284,250 (8 ) 306,328

B ala n ce,
surplus.

D i s t i l l i u g C o, o f A m e r ic a .— C om p etition .—S ee
p en d en t D istille rie s ” b e lo w .— V . 78, p. 1815.

“ In d e ­

D o w Composing-Machine Co.— R e in corp ora ted in this
304,000
277,205 S ta te. — T h is c o m p a n y w as in c o r p o r a te d at A lb a n y on J a n . 10,
269,406 w ith $8,000,000 a u th o riz e d ca p ita l s to c k to m a n u fa ctu re ty p e
270,043 an d ty p e -s e ttin g m a ch in e s u n d er paten ts o b ta in e d by A l e x ­

C h ic a g o E n e n in a t lc T o o l C o .— M o r tg a g e .-- T h e c o m p a n y
has filed a m o r t g a g e to th e C en tra l R e a lty B o n d & T r u s t C o.
o f N e w Y o r k , as tru stee,
to
se cu re
$2,500,000 first
m o r tg a g e s in k in g fu n d 5 per c e n t 20-yea r g o ld b o n d s, d u e
D e c . 8 1 , 1921. T h e p r o p e r ty c o v e r e d in clu d e s , it is sa id , b e­
sid es p lan ts o w n e d , 20,000 sh ares o f p r e fe r r e d an d 123,000
sh a res o f c o m m o n s to c k o f th e n e w T a ite H o w a r d T o o l C o.,
L o n d o n , E n g .; a lso in te re sts in p a ten ts, e t c .— See V . 74, p. 97,

D ividen ds D ivid en d s
o n p r e f.
on com.

P e o p le s ’ H a r d R u b b e r is a n e w c o n c e r n , w h ic h is b u ild in g a
p la n t at A k r o n .— V . 73, p. 1315.

Oars.

109,390
9 t.UlO
111,611
118,754

T h e a p p r o x im a te v a lu e o f th e c a ttle re ce ip t is sta ted as
$ .‘91,500,000 in 1901, $262,150,000 in 1900, $238,700,000 in 1899
•
an d $229,800,010 in 1898. O u t o f th e 16,200,000 h ead o f liv e
s to ck re c e iv e d at the C h ic a g o y a rd s in 1901 o v e r 18,000,000
h ead, it is sa id , w ere sla u g h te re d in th e C h ic a g o p a c k in g
houses. D a r in g the cu r r e n t y e a r th e la rg e p a c k in g p la n t o f
th e G . H . H a m m o n d C o. w ill be in o p e r a tio n , c a llin g lo r
a b o u t 1,500,000 a d d itio n a l head o f liv e -s to c k p e r a n n u m ,— V .
78, p. 140.

6 mos. to
Net
D ec. 31— earnings.

[V ol. LXXIY,

Total,
su rplu s.

$52,167 $1,193,072
6,756 1,133,097
$59,976 $1,193,072
323,775 1,133,097

P r o fits fo r e a r lie r c a le n d a r yea rs b e fo r e d e d u c t in g a n y
d iv id e n d s : In 1899, $809,322; in 1898, $182,903; 1897, $510,943;
in 1896, $261,518,
P re s id e n t C la flin s a y s :

a n d er D o w ; pa r v a lu e o f shares $100.

T h e d ir e c to r s a re:

Julian Floriau, Sidney K. Perry, Andrew D, Robertson, William
Seton Gordon, j Noah, H. Slee, Prank C. Germany, John A Eckert,
and William G. Peat of New York City; A, 1\ Latson, W. W. Wilson,
J. I. Bergen, and V. H. Emerson of Brooklyn.
A c o m p a n y w ith th e sam e n a m e an d c a p ita liz a tio n w a s
in c o r p o r a te d in N e w J e rse y in F e b ., I960. N e w Y o r k office
P a rk R o w B u ild in g .
T h e p resen t c o m p a n y is m e re ly a
r e -in co rp o ra tio n . T h e “ S cie n tific A m e r i c a n ” o n J u ly 20,
1901, p u b lish ed an illu s tr a te d a r tic le r e g a r d in g th e c o m p a n y ’s
ty p e -s e ttin g m a ch in es.
E r ie T e le g r a p h & T e le p h o n e C o.—-M eeting .— T h e sh a re­
h old ers w ill v o te J an . 80 on a p ro n o sitio n t o c o n fir m th e c o n ­
tra ct b y w h ic h th e A m e r ic a n T elep h on e & T e le g ra p h C o.
w ill c o n t r o l th e p r o p e r ty .— V . 74, p. 98, 42.
F li n t , E ddy & A m e r ic a n T r a d i n g C o .— C apital S tock ,—
T h e ca p ita l s to c k w a s r e c e n tly in cre a s e d $5u0,000 e a c h o f
c o m m o n and p r e fe r r e d , m a k in g th e p resen t ca p ita l $2,500,000
c o m m o n an d $2,500,000 p r e fe r r e d . See V . 71, p, 184; V . 74,
p, 98.
G e o r g ia E l e c t r i c L ig h t C o., A t la n t a , a & .—Earninga — F o r
th e n iu e m o n th s e n d ed S ep t. 80 th e g ross e a rn in g s w e r e
$218,158, c o n tr a s tin g w ith $175,798 in 1900; n et $103,905
ag a in st $81,696. I n te r e s t c h a r g e en tire y e a r, $64,350. S ee
V . 72, p. 244.
G r e g e r M a n u f a c t u r in g C o.— R edu ction o f S tock. — T h e
sh a reh old ers on J an . 9 v o te d t o r e d u ce th e c a p ita l s t o c k fr o m
$500,000 t o $50,000.— Y . 70, p . 897.
H a m m o n d D i s t i l l i n g C o.— In O peration ,— T h is c o m p a n y ,
in c o r p o r a te d u n d er th e la w s o f In d ia n a la st M a y w ith $1,000,000 a u th orized c a p it a l s to c k , r e c e n tly p u t in o p e ra tio n at
C h ic a g o its n e w p la n t w h ic h , it is sa id , has a c a p a c it y o f
5.000 bu sh els o f c o r n per d a y , e q u iv a le n t t o an o u tp u t o f
25.000 g a llo n s o f h ig h w in e s. G e o r g e D , W o o ls e y , th e P re si­
d en t, w as p r e v io u s ly in te re ste d in sev era l in d ep en d en t
h ou ses, w h ic h h e sold t o th e tru st. J o h n E F itz g e r a ld is
S ecre ta ry an d T rea su rer. S ee “ In d e p e n d e n t D istille rie s” b e ­
lo w .

Tbe season opened with an unexpected reduction in the price of
H a r g a d in e -M c K lt t r ic k D r y Goods Co., S t. Louis.—I n ­
woolen goods which tended to demoralize the whole dry goods mar­ crease o f Stock — T h is c o m p a n y r e c e n tly filed a c e r tific a te o f
ket. After the middle of the season a gradual improvement set in,
and conditions have now become favorable for fair profits—V. 73, p. in crea se o f ca p ita l s to c k fr o m $2,000,000 t o $4,000,(100, th e
1266
la tter co n sistin g o f $2,000,000 c o m m o n , $800,000 first p r e fe r r e d
and $1,200,000 s e c o n d p r e fe r r e d ;

p a r v a lu e o f sh ares $100.

Consolidated Railway, Lighting & Refrigerating Co.— T h e assets are stated as $5,622,437 an d lia b ilitie s $1,446,403.

C ontest .— Nines & J o h n s o n , a tto rn e y s, o n M o n d a y filed in ­
ju n c t io n p a p ers in J u s tic e B e a ch ’ s d e p a rtm e n t o f th e S u p rem e
C o u r t , a sk in g f o r an o r d e r t o re stra in Is a a c L . R ic e fr o m
a c t in g as P r e s id e n t o f th e c o m p a n y . M r. R ic e says th e
d ir e c to r s h a v e b een f o r s o m e tim e a tte m p tin g to g e t c o n tr o l
o f tb e assets o f th e c o m p a n y , an d t o p u t th e m t o an u n w is e
use. A n e w b o a rd , h e says, w ill b e ch osen in M a rch . Y e s te r ­
d a y M r, R ic e o b ta in e d a te m p o r a r y in ju n c t io n re stra in in g
th e c o m p a n y an d its d ir e c to r s fr o m w ith d r a w in g ce rta in
m o n e y fr o m th e M a n h a tta n T r u s t C o. a n d fr o m tra n s fe rrin g
14,00u sh ares o f tre a su ry s to ck .
New Officers .— A t a re c e n t m e e tin g o f th e b o a r d S. M arsh
Y o u n g (fo r m e r ly o f th e H a ll S ig n a l C o .) w a s e le c te d V ic e P re s id e n t an d G e n e ra l M a n a g er o f th e c o m p a n y an d a lso a
d ir e c t o r . G e o r g e D ix o n , id en tified w it h th e U n ite d F ru it
C o ., a n d th e C o lu m b u s & H o c k in g C o a l & I r o n C o ., w a s
e le c te d a d ir e c t o r .— V . 73, p. 1266.

T h e in crea se is p a id up,
H e le n a ( M o n t .) W a t e r W o r k s C o.— S u it ,— See “ S tate &;
C ity D e p a rtm e n t,” p a g e 166.
I n d e p e n d e n t D i s t i l l e r i e s .— C om p etition — J o sep h E, G .
Ryan,- f o r a co n s id e r a b le p e r io d c o n n e c te d w ith th e S h u fe ld t
D istille ry a t P e o ria , has c o n tr ib u te d t o t b e “ C h ica g o Ia te r O ce a n .” w ith w h ic h h e is n o w co n n e c te d , a lo n g a r tic le r e ­
g a r d in g th e in cre a se in th e n u m b e r a n d o u tp u t o f th e in d e ­
p en den t d istilleries. T h is a r tic le w a s p u b lish e d in th e “ la t e r O ce a n ” o f D e c e m b e r 15, 1901. A d ig e st o f a p o r tio n o f it f o l ­
lo w s :

Eighteen independent distilleries are already in operation, and tbe
nineteenth, with a daily capacity of 30,000 gallons of bigh wines, will
be started on Jan, 1. Six months ago the Distilling Co. of America
was manufacturing praotioally all the spirits in this country, dispos­
ing of about 250,000 gallons a day. Since then the demand has in­
creased, until 450,000 gallons of spirits are now being produced daily
The
Cumberland Talley Telephone Co.— S tatu s , — 'The m o r t ­ is asdaily output of the various plants of the Distilling Co. of America
follows:

g a g e r e c e n tly m a d e to th e C o m m o n w e a lth T ru s t C o. o f
H a rris b u rg , as tru ste e , secu res
$1,500,000 o f b o n d s, o f
w h ic h $1,000,000 is a u th o r iz e d t o b e u sed in p a y m e n t o f th e
p r o p e r tie s c o n s o lid a te d a n d f o r th e e r e c tio n an d c o n s tr u c tio n
o f th e D a u p h in C ou n ty p la n t, an d th e c o n n e c tio n o f th e e x ­
is tin g p lan ts, A n o ffic ia l sta tem en t sa y s:

In addition to the Dauphin County, Southern Pennsylvania, Cum­
berland Valley, Hanover and Adams County telephone companies, the
Cumberland Company has taken over by purchase the property
of the Juniata & Susquehanna Telephone Co. The entire capitaliza­
tion of $1,000,000 was issued in exchange for the shares of stocks of
the consolidated com panies, as approved in the merger Act. There
is no preferred stock, the par value of the shares is $100. There are
about 700,000 of bonds now placed.
T h e C u m b e rla n d Y a lle y T e le p h o n e C o m n a n y ’ s p r o p e r ty
h as b een lea sed b y th e U n ite d T e le p h o n e & T e le g ra p h C o, on
a basis to p a y a cu r r e n t d iv id e n d on th e C u m b e rla n d s to c k ,
in c r e a s in g fr o m 1 p e r c e n t th e first y e a r to 5 per ce n t in th e
fifth an d ea ch su b seq u en t y e a r o f th e le a se ,— V . 73, p . 1266.

Name.

Gallons.

Name.

Gallons.

Name.

Gallons.

Name.

Gallons .

Great Western, Peoria.,.. 60,000 Iler, O m aha................... 10,000
Monarob, Peoria............. 30.000 Majestic, Terre Haute...... 40,000
Atlas, Peoria.............
37,500
25,000
Globe, P ekin.............
T o t a ls ..................... 227,500
American, Pekin ............ 25,000
The policy of the trust has been to curtail production and turn out
just enough of spirits and highwines to supply the trade. In doing
this it has bought and leased many distilleries and dismantled them,
until now only 7 plants are in operation, and up to six months ago
these were sufiioient to meet the demand. The expiration of many of
these leases has developed the new competition. The owners found
their revenues from the trust cut off and naturally started up their
idle distilleries on an independent basis.
The nineteen independent distilleries, with daily capacity in gal­
lons, are as follows:

Hammond,Hammond,Ind. 25,000 Lakeside, Milwaukee, Wis. 10,000
Clarke, Peoria ................. 15,005 National, Milwaukee, Wls. 5,000
Inter State, Vieennes, Ind. 15,000 Louisiana, New Orleans. -. 2,500
Merchants’, Terre Haute. 25,500 Belleville, Belleville, XU... 2,000
Fleisolimau, Cincinnati... 10,000 Hoffhaimer, Louisv., Ky.. 3.000
Walab, Lawrenceburg.lnd. 20,000 Ola Kentucky, Louisville., 7,500
Diamond Rubber Co. (Akron, O.).— R o n d s P a id .— T h is Clifton Sprln gs, Cl neinuati 17,500 Canton, Canton, III_______ 5,000
O
Edgemont, Cincinnati...'. 8,000 Corning, Peoria, 111___ _ - SO,O O
co m p a n y , w h ic h m a n u fa c tu r e s a ll k in d s o f m e c h a n ic a l r u b ­ PleiRChmHn, New York .. 5,000
b e r g o o d s , in c lu d in g h a rd r u b b e r a rticle s, p a id o ff on J a n . 1 Cereal,Lawrenceb’g, Ind.. 2,750
Total daily capacity .218,750
a ll its o u ts ta n d in g b o n d s , an d a t th e sa m e tim e in crea sed its Treibein, Xenia, Ohio...... 10,000
Of these distilleries eighteen are now running at their full capacity,
c a p ita l s to c k fr o m $500,000 to $1,500,000 (a ll c o m m o n , n o pre
and the nineteenth theuew Corning plant nt Peoria, will be started
fe r r e d a u t h o r iz e d ). T h e c o m p a n y has c o m e in to p r o m i
on Jan. 1, 1902. The Hammond Distillery (see that company above)
n e n c e sin ce th e h ard r u b b e r co n s o lid a tio n u n d er th e title o f was put Into operation last week, while the Clarke establishment has
th e A m e r ic a n H a rd R u b b e r C o.
(S ee V. 66, p. 809.)
T h e been turning out Its quota of 15,000 gallons daily for some time.

J a n u a r y 18, 1902.]

THE CHRONICLE

155

These three plants will add a total ot 70,000 gallons a day to the inde­ “ T h e assets are la rg e ly in e x ce s s o f $3,000,000, and to keep
pendent produot; they are looated In the oentre of the grain and fuel
oountry, are equipped with modern outfits, and can put their produot the s tock a t $300,000 seem ed r e d ic u lo u s .” T h e P resid en t in
J erem ia h D w y e r ; V ic e -P r e s id e n t, G e o r g e II, B a rb ou r; Hecon the market at a lower price than the old-fashioned plants.
reta ry , C. A . D u c h a r m e , an d T rea su rer, M . B. M ills.

Jossop Steel Co. (Washington, Pa.)—In corp ora ted .— Thia

Monongahelu R iv e r C o n s o lid a t e d C o a l & C o k e C o.— Re­
c o m p a n y w as re c e n tly in c o r p o r a te d in P e n n sy lv a n ia w ith
$250,009 ca p ita l s to c k b y rep resen ta tiv es o f W in . Jessop & p o r t .—Tho e a rn in g s fo r th e y e a r e n d in g O ct. 31, 1901, were
Sons, th e w e ll-k n o w n B ritish m a n u fa c tu r e r s o f c r u c ib le $2,906 855; th e tota l d e d u c tio n s , In c lu d in g in terest, $579,060,
steel, t o c a rry o u t th e ir p la n fo r b u ild in g a c r u c ib le steel an d d iv id en d s ($690,605, b e in g 7 p er c e n t on p r e fe r r e d ), e tc .,
p la n t at W a sh in g to n , P a . T h e p la n t a t first w ill be la rg ely w ere $2,544,980; b a la n ce, su rp lu s. $361,875; to ta l su rp lu s
O ct. 31, 1901, $857,061 — V . 74, p. 99.
ex p erim en ta l. See V . 78, p. 902, 141.
La Crosse (W is.) Gas & Electric Co.— Bonds Offered.—
D e v itt, T r e m b le & C o ., M ason , L e w is & C o ., an d P arson ,
L e a o h & C o , a ll o f C h ic a g o , o ffe r f o r sa le, at 101 an d in te r ­
est, $125 000 o f the $600,000 5 p. c . $1,000 first m o r t. and re
fu n d in g g o ld b on d s, d a ted D e c. 2, 1901, an d d u e D ec. 1, 1921,
b u t red eem a b le a fte r D e c . 1, 1911, a t 105 an d in terest. In te r ­
est p a y a b le J u n e an d D e c e m b e r a t th e M e rch a n ts’ L o a n &
T r u s t C o. (th e t r u s t e e ), C h ic a g o . A c ir c u la r s a y s : .

Capital stock, $600,000. Bonds—
Total authorized Issue, $600,000 ’
reserved for refunding old 8 s, $75,000; reserved for extensions*
$100,000; total present Issue, $425,000. The $100,000 eeorow bonds
may only he Issued to defray part of the cost of future Improvements
under careful restrictions, hut in no ease can the last $50,000 be is­
sued until the net earnings equal twice the entire Interest charge.
The trust deed provides for an annual sinking fund, beginning with
1906 equal to 2 per cent of the whole amount of outstanding bonds.
The franchises of the various companies comprised In the consolida­
tion are favorable to the oompany and without burdensome restric­
tions. None Is for a shorter period than twenty-flve years, and the
gas franohise is perpetual and exclusive.
For the >ear ending Nov. 30, 1901, the gross earniDgs were $114,036; operating expenses,$72,856 ; net earnings, $i 1,180; Interest on
bonds now outstanding, $25,750; surplus earnings, $15,430.
W . W . C a rg ill is P r e s id e n t ; Q-eo. M a cM illa n , V ic e -P r e s i
d e n t ; J. B. T a y lo r , S e c r e t a r y ; Q-eo M a cM illa n , T re a su re r,
a ll o f L a C rosse, W is. See a lso Y . 73, p. 1816, 1163.

Leavenworth (Kansas) Light & Heating Co.— Change o f
C ontrol — Revised S tatem ent. — B ertron & S torrs o f th is c it y
h a v e p u rch a sed th is c o m p a n y an d h a v e re d u ce d th e b o n d e d
d eb t. T he n ew b on d s, $250,000 in a m o u n t, are d a te d J a n . 1,
1902, du e J a n . 1, 1917, s u b je c t to c a ll a t 105 in 1907. In terest
is p a y a b le J a n u a r y an d J u ly , at 5 p e r c e n t on $100,000 and 6
p e r c e n t o n $150,000, an d th e A m e r ic a n T ru s t & S avin gs
B ank o f C h ic a g o is tru stee. C a p ita l s to c k is $350,000 a u ­
th o riz e d , $250,000 o u tsta n d in g .
S hares $100 ea ch .
L a st
w e e k ’s ite m w as based on officia l d a ta w h ic h rea ch ed u s in
so m e w h a t fa u lt y fo r m . T h e p resen t r e v is e d sta tem en t a c ­
c o m p a n y in g th e p r o o f sen t o u t fo r c o r r e c t io n w a s re ce iv e d
to o late fo r e a rlier p u b lic a t io n .— Y . 74, p. 99.

Locomobile Co. of America.— P referred S tock.— The share­
h old ers w ill v o te a t th e office, 7 E a st 42d S t., on a p ro p o sitio n
to issu e $500,000 o f 7 p er c e n t p r e fe r r e d s to c k to take th e
p la c e o f th e sam e a m ou n t o f c o m m o n s to ck . T h e co m p a n y
w as in co rp o ra te d in W e s t V ir g in ia in J u n e , 1899, w ith
$5,000,000 ca p ita l s to c k in $100 sh ares to m a n u fa c tu r e a u to ­
m o b ile s . In M a rch , 1900, it h e ld p a ten t rig h ts an d c o n tr a c ts
v a lu ed a t $4,730,421; rea l estate an d m a c h in e r y , $143,135;
deb ts re c e iv a b le , $77,277; s to c k in p rocess, $304,397. P r e s i­
d en t, A m z i L. Barber.

M o n t r e a l L ig h t H e a t & P o w e r C o.— B ond s.— N . W . H a rris
& Co. h ave p u rch a sed $2,500,000
p er c e n t b on d s o f th e
M on treal L ig h t H ea t & P o w e r C o. T h is c o m p a n y has a
ca p ita l sto ck o f $17,000,000 in $100 shares, a n d co n tr o ls th e
p u b lic lig h tin g in th e C ity o f M on treal, both ga s and e le c t r ic ;
it also su pplies th e M on trea l S treet R a ilw a y w ith p o w e r . A
la rg e w ater p o w e r p lan t f o r th e d ev e lo p m e n t o f e le c tr ic ity is
o w n e d b y th e o om p a n y at C h a m b ly on th e R ic h e lie u R iv e r ,
th e o u tle t o f L a k e C h a m p la in .
A press d isp a tch fr o m M on trea l re p o rts th a t a m e e tin g o f
stock h old ers w as to b e h e ld th is w eek to v o te on a p r o p o s i­
tion t o a u th o rize an issue o f $7,000,000 b on d s, o f w h ic h a
b lo c k had been sold t o N e w Y o rk b an k ers, an d a p o r tio n is
to be reserv ed f o r th e retirem en t o f b on d s o f th e C h a m b ly
(V . 71, p.238), M on trea l Q a s an d R o y a l E le c tr ic (V . 71, p. 239,
1070) com p a n ies. A t last a c c o u n ts th e M on trea l Q a s C o. had
ou tsta n d in g $880,074 b o n d s an d th e R o y a l E le c t r ic C o. $563,580 d eben tu res. In th e a m a lg a m a tio n la st s p r in g b y w h ic h
the L ig h t H e a t & P o w e r C om p a n y w a s fo r m e d , th e h o ld e rs
o f th e stock ($2,998 640) o f the M on trea l Q a s C om p a n y an d
th e stock ($2,250,000) o f th e R o y a l E le c tr ic C o. w e re o ffe re d
$250 s tock o f th e n e w c o m p a n y fo r ea ch $100 o f th e ir h o ld ­
in g s; w h ile th e sh ares o f the M o n tr e a l & St. L a w r e n c e L ig h t
& P o w e r C o. (fo r m e r ly th e C h a m b ly M fg . C o .) w e re e x ­
ch a n g e d $ f o r $ — V. 72, p. 991.

Niagara Falls Gas & Electric Co.— B ond s.— G e o . A. F e r n a ld & Co. are o ffe r in g , a t 103 a n d in te re st, $29,0C0 o f th e
$150,000 first m o r t g a g e g o ld 5s., d a ted J u ly 1, 1901, d u e J u ly
1, 1921, b u t s u b je c t to c a ll a ft e r J u ly 1, 1911. T h e c o m p a n y
w as in co rp o ra te d in D e ce m b e r, 1899, an d a c q u ir e d th e p r o p ­
erty o f the N ia g a ra F a lls G a s C o. T h e ca p ita l s to c k a u th o riz e d
is $200,000; issu ed , $150,000.
Nicholson F i l e Co. of P r o v id e n c e .— P la n ts — P resid en t
and G en eral M anager^ S a m u e l M . N ic h o ls o n , r e p ly in g t o a
letter fr o m us, says:
The Nicholson File Co. purchased the Arcade File Works at Ander­
son, Indiana, in February, 1901. It is true that our American Works,
which for years have been one of the largest file plants in this country,
are now being moved to Anderson, and farther that the Arcade Plant
will be largely increased to take care of this additional business. We
have but one form of security, being $2,oOO,OoO stock outstanding.
We have no bonds, mortgages or liens —V. 7 3 , p. 290.
O g d e n G as Co. o f C h ic a g o .— See P e o p le ’s G a s L ig h t & C o k e
C o. b e lo w .— Y . 74, p. 99.

Oregon General Electric Co. (Portland, Ore.)—New E n ­
terp rise. — T h is c o m p a n y w a s r e c e n tly in c o r p o r a te d in O re ­

Manville Company.— Stock Offered.— R ic h a r d s o n & C la rk
of P r o v id e n c e r e c e n tly o ffered f o r sale at 107)^ an d a c c r u e d

g on w ith $2,000,000 a u th o riz e d ca p ita l s to c k . F . S. M o rris
o f M orris & W h ite h e a d , b a n k ers o f P o r tla n d , says:

d iv id en d s a b lo c k o f th e 6 p er c e n t cu m u la tiv e p re fe rre d
s to c k (d iv id e n d s q u a rte rly ). T h e y s a y :

We propose to go into the business of furnishing elctrio light and
power to the people of Portland on an adequate scale. Our financial
arrangements are fully made. We have acquired certain properties
on the Clackamas River thao include all riparian rights. There we
shall ereot our power plant and transmit the power about 25 miles to
the city. It will probably require two years after the initial work is
done before the plant can be In full operation. We contemplate the
expenditure of at least $2,000,000, and it may require 9>3,000,000‘. We
think there is room in Portland for the company, and look for no
trouble in getting permission to do business in the oity.

The oomblned property is modern and efficient in every respect,
having in operation 230,000 spindles and 7,700 looms, with all the
necessary finishing machinery. The net earnings have for many years
averaged several times the amount required for the dividends on the
preferred stock.— 72, p. 1037.
V.
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co. of America.— M r. M ar­
coni's Statem ent. — W illia m M a r c o n i, a t th e a n n u al d in n e r o f
th e A m e r ic a n In stitu te o f E le c tr ic a l E n g in e e r in g in th is c it y
o n M o n d a y , stated th a t a lre a d y m o re th an sev en ty ships
ca rry p erm a n en t in sta lla tion s o f his a p paratu s, a n d th a t th e
sy stem has been p u t t o c o m m e r c ia l use in Q re a t B rita in . He
a lso sa id :

M orris & W h ite h e a d c o n t r o l th e P o rtla n d C ity & O re g o n
R y . C o. (S ee p a g e 75 o f Street R ailw ay Supplement.)

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co.— C onsolidation. — T h is c o m ­
p a n y w as in c o r p o r a te d in N e w J e rse y on D e c. 24 w ith $10,000,There is a general belief that when a message Is once Intrusted to 000 o f a u th orized ca p ita l s to c k , c o n s is tin g o f $7,009,000 c o m ­
space by this system any one with a receiver may pick It up. This m o n and $3,009,000 6 per c e n t c u m u la tiv e p r e fe r r e d , a n d on
objection has recently been largely overcome. It has been found pos­ Jan . 1 c o n so lid a te d th e d is trib u tin g bu sin esses o f th e G e o . W .
sible so so attune one transmitter to one receiver as to make It prac­ G ib b s C o. and M ille r, S loss & S c o tt, both o f San F r a n c is c o .
tically impossible for any one not acquainted with the qualities of
those particular Instruments to read the message. The Installations C. E . M iller is P resid en t, D . H . K a n e , S e c r e ta r y , an d J .
on all ships are uniform, but on land we now use attuned installations. S loss, T rea su rer.
It was found possible by attuned Instruments to oroes 200 miles of
land, arid the power required for this was only such as is needed to
run a small Incandescent lamp. It was then determined to erect two
comparatively powerful Installations atCornwall and Cape Ood. Un­
fortunately aliurrlcane, partly destroyed the Installation at Cape Ood,
and rather than let an Interval of some months go by it was thought
well by a temporary Installation at St. John's to try to oross 2 .0 0 0
miles of ocean rather than 3,000 miles; so the attempt at Newfound­
land was made with kites and balloons. I think that a permanent
static* will be established In Nova Scotia and the one at Cape Cod be
repaired.
1 do not wish to be too confident, but I think that It will be possible
in a short time to transmit a message, or perhaps several messages at
the same time, across the ocean In a commercially practicable man­
ner at greatly reduced rates.—V. 7 3 , p. 1316.
M em phis (T e n n .) Telephone Co.—Increase, o f Stock. —
T h e co m p a n y has in creased its a u th orized ca p ita l s to ck fr o m
$400,000 to $600,000.

M ic h ig a n Stove Co.— Increase o f S tock. — T h is M ich iga n
c o m p a n y , o rig in a lly in co rp o ra te d in 1871, has ren ew ed its
corp ora *c ex isten ce for 80 y ea rs and in cre a se d its s to ck
from $800,000 t o $8,000,000. A n officer o f th e c o m p a n y sa y s:

Peninsula Pare Water Supply Co., Va.— M ortga ge .— T h is
c o m p a n y has filed at C a m d en , N. J ., a m o r tg a g e fo r $300,000
t o th e S e cu rity T r u s t C o .o f C a m d en , as tru stee. T h e c o m p a n y
w a s in c o r p o r a te d r e c e n tly w ith $200,000 a u th o riz e d ca p ita l
s to ck to b u ild w a te r w o r k s f o r H a m p to n , P h o e b u s , N e w p o r t
N ew s, O ld P o in t C o m fo r t an d F ortress M on roe. J u d g e
C harles C ollier is P resid en t an d E . A., C orb in T rea su rer, b o th
o f P h ila d elp h ia . See P en in su la r W a te r W o rk s C o ., V . 71, p.
867.
P e o p le ’ s G as L ig h t & C o k e C o m p a n y o f C h ic a g o — A dverse
R ulin g .— J u d g e G r o s s c u p in th e U n ited S tates C ircu it C o u rt
at C h ica g o on W ed n esd a y , w h en a llo w in g th e d em u rrer o f th e
c ity in th e su it o f th e c o m p a n y fo r an in ju n c tio n to preven t
th e e n fo r c in g o f th e 7 5 -cen t ga s o rd in a n ce , held th at th e
c it y has th e r ig h t to see th a t the rates ch a rg e d are
“ rea son a b le ” T h e a lle g e d c o n n e c tio n b e tw e e n th e P e o ­
p le’s an d O gd en com p a n ies, h e h old s, has a b earin g on
the case. T h e a ttorn ey s o f th e P e o p le ’s G a s L ig h t &

THB

OBHONICLR

C oke Co. are authorized to am end th eir b ill and to protest
againet the 75-cet. t rate as too low . T he am ended b ill, it is
said, w ill be filed next M onday. T he attorney fo r the P e o ­
p le’s C om pany says;

j adye Giodijeup’a decision was simply on the question oi whether the
Guy (Joauoii has tha right to hit the price ol gas of some of the com­
panies acquired m thee .nsolidatloo. We are confident that it has not.
and that we wul show this when the final issue is argued. No matter
what his decision may be after the arguments arc heard, the ease will
go to the Supreme Oourt, where we are confident our constitutional
rights will be observed. lathe meantime the 75-ceut ordinance can­
not be enforced.
Injunction. - J u d g e G rosscu p on T hu rsday also issued a
tem porary order restraining the c it y from en forcin g the o rd i­
nance passed Jan. 0, decla rin g forfeited the fran ch ise o f the
Ogden Gas Co. on the grou n d o f v irtu a l con solidation w ith
the People’ s C om p a n y .—V . 74, p. 99.
P h ila d e lp h ia E le c tr ic C o .—Assessment.— T he directors on
W edn esday ordered a ca ll o f $3 50 per share on the capital
stock, payable on e-h a lf on M arch 1 and the rem ainder Sept. 1.
P resident J. B, M cC all says :

[V ol. L X X IV .

T he new com pan y took o v e r the business o f Sim pson, C ra w ­
fo r d & Sim pson on T hu rsday. The 6th A ve. and 19th St.
addition to the store, it is expected, w ill be ready fo r o c c u ­
pancy by M ay 1. See particulars In V . 73, p. 1212, 964.
S nap H ook & E ye Co.—St a tus. —T h e in ability o f several
brokers w h o received orders to purchase snaad am ounts
o f the stock to find the person o r piersons fo r w h om the orders
w ere executed (said by som e to have been W in . A lex. E llis,
until recen tly th e T reasurer o f the com pan y) led on W edn es­
day to the shares being offered d ow n from 89% (against 48 a
short tim e ago) to $1 a share. The com pan y w as in corporated
in D elaw are last A u gu st w ith $3,000,000 au th orized capital
stock (on ly $1,500,000, it is said, Is outstanding) and pur­
chased all the property o f the Snap H ook & E ye M an u factu r­
in g C o., incorporated in N ew Jersey in January, 1901, w ith
$500,000 caxntal stock. T h e new fa cto ry at N orw alk , C onn.,
w as burned on D ec. 18, bu t arrangem ents fo r rebu ildin g are
said to have been m ade. Charles F. P hillips, P resident o f
the com pany, is also P resident o f the C orpora tion T rust Co.
o f D elaw are. T he oth er directors are reported as:

B,
of Connecticut; Gen. Patrick A. Collins,
The assessment will bring iHt$2„500,000. Of this, $750,000 will be Gen. O.Keefer, Lieut-Gov. Virdin,
Frank
used to cover tlm expense of the acquisition of the Kensington Electric Mitchell, F. Reeder, James and W. 8. Harrison Wagner, John Murray
W. Jobelmann
Alex. Ellis.
Light Co., which was a cash trausaotion. The balance.$1,750,000,
The office is in the B road E xch a n g e B uilding.
will all be needed in conneetlon with our new power plant which is to
be erected at Christian Street Wharf on the Schuylkill River.
S o u th e rn N ew E n g la n d ( B e l l ) T e le p h o n e Co.— New
D irector. — P. B. W id en er has resigned as director because
Stock.—T he shareholders w ill v ote Jan. 28 on a p rop osi­
o f the press o f oth er du ties.— V . 78, p. 680.
P it t s b u r g & A lle g h e n y T e le p h o n e C o .—New President.
— G eorg e R . W e b b o f B altim ore havin g resigned as Presi­
dent, E dw ard H . B outon has been elected to succeed him .
L on g distance lines to W h eelin g , W . V a ., v ia W ash in gton ,
P a ., and to B altim ore via H arrisb u rg are proposed.— V . 71,
p. 700.

tion to authorize th e d irectors to in crease th e capital fro m
$3,000,000 to $5,000,000, to p rovide fo r extensions and im ­
provem ents as from tim e to tim e n ecessary.— Y. 73, p. 856.

S teel S tea m sh ip Co .—Incorporated. — T his com p a n y has
been in corporated in O h io w ith $1,000,000 au th orized capital
stock. In corp ora tors: J. C. G ilch rist, F rank W . H art, A . J.
G ilch rist, M. O sborn and W . H . L am prech t. Office, M en ­
P it t s b u r g C oal Co.— Shaio Coal C o.— R e p ly in g to ou r in ­ tor, O.
q u iry relative to the Shaw C oal C o., A u d ito r J. B. H ornS u m m it B ra n ch C oal Co.— See S u m m it B ranch M in in g
b erger says , “ T he property o f the Shaw Coal Co. has been
leased to the Penn sylvania M in ing C o., a subsidiary c o r ­ Co. b e lo w .—V . 72, p. 725.
poration, th e lease co v e r in g a period o f fo rty years. This
S u m m it B r a n c h M in in g C o.— Successor Company.—This
fa c t is all the substance there is to the n ew spaper story to com pan y has been orga n ized as su ccessor o f the S um m it
w h ich y ou r e fe r.”
B ranch Coal C o., foreclosed . P residen t, Isaac D ay W ista r.—
Reported Acquisition.—A press despatch fro m C olum bus, V . 72, p. 725.
O., on Jan. 10 said :
XJnion B a g & P a p e r Co.— New Officers.— L . G . F ish er Jr.
The Pittsburg Coal Co. closed a deal to-day for the purchase of the has been m ade Second V ice-P resid en t and G eorge R . Sheldon
properties belonging to the New Pittsburg Coal Co., whose main offices Treasurer to succeed Messrs. W ash burn and P errin w h o w ere
are in this eity. Eight mines looated in the Hooking Valley and hav­
ing a combined output of 6,0 00 tons of bituminous coal daily are killed in the late tunnel a c c id e n t.—Y . 78, p. 794.

included in the sale. The purchase price approximated $1,000,000.
The management of the New Pittsburg Co. will remain unchanged for
the present at least. The Greendale Coal Co. of this city has also been
purchased, but all information regarding the deal is refused at the
local offices. Th© Pittsburg company is said to have options on vari
ous other properties in the Hocking and Sunday Creek valleys.—V. 74,
p. 99.
P o r t la n d (M e .) L ig h t in g & P o w e r Co.— B on ds Offered —
G eo. A . F ern a ld & Co. are offerin g at 103% and interest
$238,000 o f the com p a n y ’ s $400,000 first m o rtg a g e g old 4% s,
due A p ril 1, 1921.— Y . 72, p. 1087.
P ressed S teel Car Co.— Orders .— The com p a n y has orders
on its books fo r abou t 17,000 cars; these w ill keep th e w orks
fu lly occu p ied fo r several m onths. T h e J oliet plant has n ot
been sold n or has it been idle as rep orted .— Y . 74, p. 52,

C opp er C om p a n y .— M eeting—P ro­
posed Stock Dividend,—A m eetin g o f the stockh olders w a s
to be held a t the office, 10 W a ll St., recen tly, fo r th e fo llo w in g
purposes, as staled in an advertisem ent:
Q ueen

of

A riz o n a

To pass upon the desirability of distributing eertain stocks now
ownedby this'eompany as dividends among the stockholders of record,
with the exception of the stock held by this company in the Great
Belcher Golo Mine of Yavapai County, which stock this company desixes to hold as an asset. There is about $7,000,©00 of the par value
of the capital stock of other corporations held as assets, and it is
deemed advisable that this stock be placed in the hands of the stock­
holders themselves. Some of this stock is held in escrow under Pro­
tective Agreements, and it is the intention to deliver to the stockhold­
ers receipts calling for the delivery of this stock wlmn the agreements
have expired. Farther, it is determined to sell certain stocks now in
the Treasury and divide the proceeds]pro rata among the stockholders
of record. In the future It is the intention of the company to work
more as a distinct operative mining company rather than to accumu­
late stock interests in other organizations. It is further the ob­
ject of this meeting to discuss the purchase of a eertain copper mine in
Cananeas District, State of Sonora, which is believed to be very valu­
able.
Randfontein Estates Gold M in in g Co.—Annual R eport.
— A t the annual m eetin g in L on don on D ec. 23 v e ry fu ll r e ­
p orts w ere subm itted o f the actu al position at the present
tim e o f the R a n d fon tein Estates G o ld M in in g Co. and its
subsidiary com panies. A frica n g o ld m in in g "interests are
a ttractin g increasing attention , and the rep ort on th e R a n d ­
fon tein properties, w h ich w e publish on pages 157 to 159,
w ill be read w ith in terest.—Y , 73, p. 1317, 1318.

U n ited C ig a r M a n u fa ctu re rs’ Co.—Incorporated. —This
com pan y filed articles o f in corp ora tion at A lb a n y on W ed n es­
day; authorized capital stock. $7,000,000, o f w h ich $2,000,000
preferred. The com p a n y, it is stated, is a con solida tion o f
the lo ca l to b a cco firm s o f K erbs, W erth eim & S oh iffer Co.
and H irsch horn , M ack & C o. T he directors a re:

Edward A. Kerbs. Charles Hirsonhorn, Jacob Wertheim, Maro. H.
Maok, Walter A. Sohiffer and Fred Hireclihorii of New York City.
U n ited S ta tes C ast I r o n P ip e & F o u n d ry Co.—Dividend.—
A dividen d o f one per cen t on th e p referred stock has been
declared payable M arch 1. T he last previou s paym ent w as
\% per cen t on Ju n e 1, 1900.— V . 73, p. 336.
U n ited S tates S teel C o r p o r a tio n . — Acquisition. — See
A m erican B ridge Co. above,
Annual Meeting.— The annual m eeting w ill be held F eb. 17.
See n otice on page i x .—Y . 74, p. 101.
U n ited W ir e & S u p p ly C o.— Consolidation.— This c o m ­
pany has been in corporated in R h od e Island w ith $3TOO,O0O
authorized capital stock as a con solid a tion o f the B u rdon
W ire & Supply Co. o f P rov id en ce and the Standard Seamless
W ire Co. o f P a w tu ck et. T h e officers are : President, Chas.
Sidney S m ith; V ice-P residen t, W illia m P . G la d d in g o f the
B urdon C om pany; S ecretary and T reasurer, H en ry E. S m ith.
W ild w o o d W a te r Co.— M ortgage.— T he com p an y has filed
a m ortgage in the C oun ty C lerk’s office at Cape May in fa v o r
o f the D elaw are C ounty Trust, Safe D eposit & T itle In ­
surance C om pany to secure a b on d issue o f $150,000.

— The H om e Insurance Co, o f N ew Y o r k publishes on page
v i a sum m ary o f its ninety-seventh sem i-annual statem ent,
w h ich show s n et surplus o f over $600,000 m ore than last year,
the surplus as regards policy-h olders b ein g n ow nearly
$9,000,000. A sem i“annual dividen d o f 7 per cent has been
declared, as against 6 per cen t a year ago.

R o g e r s L o c o m o tiv e W o r k s Co —Enlargement o f Plant. —
The com p a n y has b eg u n b u ild in g an addition to its boiler
shop, and is preparing plans fo r a n ew erectin g shop, w h ich
it is expected w ill increase the ou tp u t o f 40 locom otiv es
m o n th ly .— V . 73, p. 1211.

— Spencer Trask & Co. announce the issuance o f tjje 1902
edition o f their ‘ •Statistical T a b les,” con tain ing a con cise
re co rd o f the principal railroads o f the U n ited States, a de­
scription o f industrial com panies and th eir securities, e tc.,
etc. The pu blication is in fo rm adapted to packet use; and is
designed fo r gratu itous distribu tion .

Simpson-Crawford C o.— Incorporated .— This com pan y w as
in corp ora ted at A lb a n y on Jan. 11, w ith $2,500,000 stock in
$1C0 shares. In corp orators:

— A tten tion is called to the advertisem ent o f unlisted ra il­
road stocks on page v iii. by F . J. L ism an & Co.

John F. Charlton.Francis Smyth.George Coggill,Edward H, Warren,
— S n tro & Co. advertise on page x. a selected list o f secu ri­
Edward 8 . Thurston, Francis S. MoGrath and Beverley R. Robinson
ties fo r investm ent.
of New York City.

January 18, 1003.

THE CHRONICLE

157

Im ports aw l ^Documents.
RANDFONTEIN E S T A T E S GOLD MINING COM PANY.
R E P O R T O F T H E D IR E C T O R S A T A N N U A L M E E T IN G D E C E M B E R 23, 1901.

(1 , B an k B u ild in g s ,
\
L o t h b u r y , E . C.,
(
23rd, December, 1901.
To the Shareholders o f the R an d fon tein E states Gold M ining
C om pany and Its Subsidiary C om panies , i. e.:

NORTH r a n d f o n t e in g o ld m in in g c o m p a n y .
PORGES RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY’.
ROBINSON RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
BLOCK “ A” RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
SOUTH RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
MYNPACHT RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
FERGUSON RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
EAST RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY-.
WEST RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
VAN HULSTEYN RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
STUBBS RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY-.
JOHNSON RANDFONTEIN GOLD MINING COMPANY.
G entlem en .— A s th e g o ld m in e s b e lo n g in g t o y o u r C o m ­
p a n y are n o w b e in g re -s ta r te d , I h a v e m u c h p lea su re in
p la c in g b e fo r e y o u th e a c tu a l p o s itio n o f th e C o m p a n ie s a t
th e p resen t tim e , as w e ll as th e a r r a n g e m e n ts th a t are n o w
b e in g m a d e to w o r k th e m in e s u n d e r th e m o s t fa v o u r a b le
c ir c u m s ta n c e s .
P .S in c e th e c o m m e n c e m e n t o f h o s tilitie s , as y o u are a w a re ,
th e m in e s h a v e b e e n clo s e d , a n d w e h a v e b e e n u n a b le to
c a r r y on o p e ra tio n s , b u t I a m g la d t o say th a t th e tim e is
n o w a p p r o a c h in g w h e n w e sh a ll b e a b le t o re su m e w o r k on
a m u c h la rg e r s ca le th a n has b e e n th e ca se in th e past.
I m a y m e n tio n th a t n o d a m a g e has b e e n d o n e t o a n y o f
th e m in e s d u r in g th e w a r . O n th e s u r fa c e v e r y tr iflin g in ­
ju r y w a s d on e, b u t e v e r th in g c o n n e c t e d w ith th e m in e s an d
th e s u r fa c e w o r k s w a s p u t in to th o r o u g h g o o d o rd e r
som e tim e a g o.
I t w a s d e c id e d b y y o u r B o a rd , ju s t a b o u t th e tim e w h e n
w a r w a s d e c la r e d , to in cre a s e th e s ta m p in g p o w e r o f a ll th e
m in es on th e R a n d fo n te in E sta tes G o ld M in in g C o m p a n y 's
p r o p e r ty fr o m s ix t y t o on e h u n d r e d sta m ps ea ch . T h e fo l­
lo w in g C om p a n ies, P o r g e s , S ou th , N o rth , R o b in s o n , B lo c k
“ A ” a n d M y n p a ch t R a n d fo n t e in , w ill, th e r e fo r e , w it h in a
v e r y sh o rt tim e h a v e , e a c h o f th e m , on e h u n d r e d stam ps
w o r k in g in ste a d o f s ix t y . A ll th e m a c h in e r y in c o n n e c tio n
w it h th is in cre a s e d s ta m p in g p o w e r h as b e e n m a d e d u rin g
th e w a r a n d fo r w a r d e d t o S o u th A fr ic a . In a d d itio n to
th ese e x tr a sta m p s w e h a v e a lso o r d e r e d a n d c o m p le te d a
la r g e q u a n t ity o f a d d itio n a l m a c h in e r y fo r th e p u rp ose o f
c a r r y in g o n th e w o r k in th e m in e s t o a v e r y g r e a t d e p th ,
a n d in o rd e r to d ea l w ith a v e r y la rg e o u tp u t.
T h is in cre a s e d m a c h in e r y w ill n o t o n ly fa c ilit a t e th e d e ­
v e lo p m e n t o f th e m in e s, a n d in c r e a s e th e o u tp u t o f g o ld ,
b u t w ill a t th e sa m e tim e en a b le us t o a d o p t a clo s e s o r tin g
o f a ll th e r o c k sen t to th e m ill.
It is th e in te n tio n o f th e B o a rd t o h a v e a la rg e reserv e
b o d y o f ore d e v e lo p e d , so as t o fa c ilit a t e th e o p e ra tio n s o f
th e co m p a n ie s , b y in c r e a s in g to a g r e a t e x t e n t th e o u tp u t
o f g o ld fr o m e a c h o f th ese co m p a n ie s , as w e ll as e n h a n c in g
th e p rofits to sh a reh old ers.
M r. J o h n H a y s H a m m o n d is, as y o n a re a w a r e , th e C o n ­
s u ltin g E n g in e e r o f th ese co m p a n ie s , a n d h e has a d v is e d
y o u r B o a rd in a r e p o r t, as fo llo w s :
“ F u rth e r, I r e c o m m e n d th a t in th e in te r im , u n d e r g r o u n d
“ d e v e lo p m e n t b e p u sh ed fo r w a r d e n e r g e tic a lly , a n d th a t
“ the n ecessa ry a d d itio n s t o th e h a u lin g , p u m p in g a n d ore
“ c o m p re s s o r p la n t, a n d th e re q u is ite c h a n g e s in c o n n e c t io n
“ w ith th e h e a d -g e a r, e t c . , b e m a d e in p u rsu a n ce o f th is
“ p o lic y . T h e r e c e n t d is c o v e r y o f th e w e s t r e e f, w h ic h is
“ e x c e p tio n a lly r ic h on c e r ta in p o r tio n s o f th e p r o p e r ty , w ill
“ g re a tly fa c ilit a te th e d e v e lo p m e n t o f th e ore reserves.
“ C om p a red w ith th e past e x p e r ie n c e o f y o u r C o m p a n y ,
“ th e resu lts a tte n d in g su ch a p o lic y s h o u ld b e m o s t g r a ti“ fy in g , an d th e re w o u ld be n o t o n ly a la rg e in cre a s e in
“ th e o u tp u t o f g o ld , b u t a lso a c o n s id e r a b le r e d u c tio n in
“ w o r k in g ex p en ses, w h e r e b y th e p ro fits w o u ld be co rre “ sp o n d in g ly a u g m e n te d , a n d th e v a lu e o f th e p r o p e r ty
“ th e r e fo r e e n h a n c e d .
“ I a lso r e c o m m e n d fu r th e r e x p lo r a tio n a n d d e v e lo p “ rnent u pon th e o th e r p ro p e tie s in w h ic h y o u r C o m p a n y is
“ in terested , C om p a n ies a t p resen t h a v in g n o b a tte r ie s , i.e.,
“ M y n p a c h t, B lo c k A , S tu b b s, E ast, W e s t, F e r g u s o n , V a n
“ H u ls te y n a n d J o h n s o n R a n d fo n t e in . T h e e x p lo r a tio n s
“ th u s fa r m ade ju s t ify the h op e o f th e d e v e lo p m e n t o f im “ p o r ta n t ore b od ies on som e o f th ese p rop erties. T h is is
“ e x c e p tio n a lly tru e w ith r e g a rd to F e rg u s o n R a n d fo n te in ,
“ w h ere th e d e v e lo p m e n ts are th e m o st a d v a n c e d , a n d th e
“ ore e x p o se d is o f e x c e p tio n a lly h ig h g ra d e . T h e m o n e y
“ r e q u ire d fo r th is w ork is in h a n d .
“ I c o n g r a tu la te y o u u p o n h a v in g s e c u r e d th e se rv ice s
“ o f M r. P op e Y e a tm a n as S u p e r in te n d in g E n g in e e r , as b y
“ t e c h n ic a l tr a in in g an d lo n g e x p e r ie n c e he is on e o f th e

“ b est q u a lifie d m e n in h is p r o fe s s io n . Y o u h a v e w isely
“ d e c id e d t o g iv e h im fu ll a u th o r ity , a n d I feel c o n fid e n t
* that, w ith h is in tim a te k n o w le d g e o f th e R a n d t he w ill be
“ able to s e cu re th e m o s t c o m p e t e n t s ta ff to assist h im in
“ c a r r y in g o u t th e p r o p o s e d w o r k .”

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M r. P op e Y e a tm a n , in h is r e p o r t to th e B o a r d , sta te s: —
“ I b e g to r e p o r t th a t th e a d d itio n a l sta m p s , as w e ll as
th e m a c h in e r y r e q u ire d fo r h a u lin g , p u m p in g , c y a n id in g ,
s o r tin g an d slim es t r e a t m e n t, are n o w b e in g o r d e r e d , an d
M r. H a y s H a m m o n d a n d I, w ith th e a ssista n ce o f M r.
P it c h fo r d , are g iv in g o u r p e rs o n a l s u p e rv is io n a n d a tte n tio n t o th e se m a tters.
“ I m a y m e n tio n th a t a ll th e a d d itio n a l m a c h in e r y w ill
be s u ffic ie n tly p o w e r fu l t o d e a l w it h th e w o r k r e q u ir e d
u n til a v e r y g r e a t d e p th has b e e n a tta in e d in th e v a rio u s
m in es. A il th e san d a n d slim e s p la n ts w ill b e e r e c t e d o n
th e la te s t p r in c ip le s w h ic h h a v e b e e n fo u n d to e c o n o m iz e
la r g e ly in th e c o s t o f w o r k , as w e ll as g iv in g h ig h resu lts.
“ T h e c o n s t r u c t io n o f th e m a c h in e r y w ill b e h u rr ie d on ,
a n d th e d e v e lo p m e n t o f th e m in e s w ill b e p u s h e d on e n e rg e t ic a lly , w it h th e re s u lt b y th e t im e th a t th e m a c h in e r y
is e r e c te d th e m in e s w ill h a v e a v e r y la rg e q u a n t it y o f ore
reserv es r e a d y fo r m illin g .
“ A s th e m illin g p o w e r w ill b e c o n s id e r a b ly in c r e a s e d ,
a n d as th e s o r tin g a r r a n g e m e n ts w ill be e x te n s iv e a n d
p e r fe c t in e v e r y r e s p e c t, I fe e l c o n fid e n t th a t th e r e tu r n s
fr o m th e m in e s w ill b e c o n s id e r a b ly in c r e a s e d , a n d th e
c o s t o f w o r k in g v e r y m u c h r e d u c e d .
“ W e are g iv in g o u r p erson a l a tt e n t io n to th ese m a tte r s ,
a n d w ill h a v e th e m a c h in e r y fo r w a r d e d w it h o u t d e la y
to th e sea coa st in S o u th A f r ic a fo r tr a n s p o r ta tio n a n d
e r e c tio n a t R a n d fo n te in im m e d ia te ly a ft e r th e ce s s a tio n
o f h o s tilitie s .
“ Y o u r s v e r y r e s p e c t fu lly ,
“ POPE Y E A TM A N ,
“ General Manager.”

M r. P o p e Y e a t m a n is th e G e n e ra l M a n a g e r a n d M r. P it c h fo r d th e E n g in e e r o f th e R a n d fo n t e in E sta tes a n d its s u b ­
s id ia ry co m p a n ie s.
W e are a lso m a k in g p ro v is io n fo r a n a m p le s u p p ly o f w a t e r
f o r a ll th ese co m p a n ie s , a n d it is th e d e te r m in a tio n o f th e
B o a rd to pu sh o n a ll th is w o r k w it h th e u tm o s t r a p id ity , so
as t o e n a b le th e c o m p a n ie s t o m in e a n d m ill t o th e g r e a te s t
a d v a n ta g e .
T h e d is c o v e r y o f th e s e c o n d o r w e s t r e e f, w h ic h ru n s
th r o u g h th e p r o p e r ty o f e a c h o f th e a b o v e c o m p a n ie s , as
w e ll as th r o u g h th e w h o le o f th e R a n d fo n t e in p r o p e r ty , is,
as y o u h a v e b e e n in fo r m e d , o f v e r y g r e a t v a lu e ; a n d , as th e
d is c o v e r y o f th is r e e f w a s m a d e b y d r iv in g fr o m th e lo w e r
le v e ls o f th e c o m p a n ie s ’ p resen t w o rk s o n N o. 1 r e e f, w e
sh a ll b e a b le t o op en u p th is s e c o n d or w e s t r e e f, a n d t o
m in e a n d m ill it a t a v e r y m u c h r e d u c e d co s t.
W e a lso d is c o v e r e d a th ir d r e e f, ju s t b e fo r e th e
w a r b r o k e o u t, a n d it is th e in t e n t io n o f y o u r B o a r d t o c o n ­
tin u e th e d e v e lo p m e n t o f th is r e e f.
E v e r y e ffo r t w ill b e m a d e t o p u sh on th e w o r k a n d t o
h a v e th ese r e e fs fu lly d e v e lo p e d . O n th e s e c o n d o r w e s t
r e e f a g o o d d ea l o f d e v e lo p m e n t has b e e n d o n e , a n d it has
b e e n o p e n e d u p th r o u g h a ll th e t w e lv e s u b s id ia r y c o m p a n ie s
t o a le n g t h o f a b o u t e ig h t m iles, a n d th e a ssays m a d e s h o w
c o n c lu s iv e ly th a t th is r e e f m a in ta in s its c h a r a c t e r as h ig h grade rock .
I m a y m e n tio n th a t fift y ton s o f th is s e c o n d o r w e s t r e e f
w e re ta k e n d ir e c t as t h e y c a m e fr o m th e d r iv e a t th e R o b ­
in son R a n d fo n t e in C o m p a n y , a n d w e r e p u t th r o u g h a fiv e sta m p m ill, y ie ld in g 16 d w t . on th e p la tes. T h e to t a l r e c o v ­
e r y w a s a b o u t 33 d w t. p er to n o f ore.
T h e fa v o r a b le fe a tu r e s w h ic h n o w p r e s e n t th e m s e lv e s in
c o n n e c t io n w ith m in in g w ill m a t e r ia lly assist th e d e v e lo p ­
m e n t a n d e x p a n s io n o f y o u r g r o u p o f m in es.
I t has n o w b e e n a r r a n g e d b e tw e e n th e B ritish a n d P o r t u ­
g u ese g o v e r n m e n ts th a t th e n a tiv e s r e s id in g in th e t e r r i­
to rie s o f th e la tte r o n th e E ast C oa st sh a ll b e a llo w e d to
c o m e to th e m in e s o f th e W it w a t e r s r a n d t fo r e m p lo y m e n t.
A p a r t fr o m th is s o u rce o f n a tiv e la b o r s u p p ly , th e n a ­
tiv es fr o m th e in te r io r w ill a lso h a v e d e p o ts a r r a n g e d
w h ere th e y w ill b e fe d , a n d w ill b e a b le to sleep
on th e jo u r n e y d o w n fr o m th e ir h o m e s t o th e m in e s . T h e
t o u t in g s y s te m , w h ic h has c o s t th e C o m p a n ie s so m u c h in
th e past, w ill b e d on e a w a y w it h ; a n d th a t a lo n e , as fa r
as c a lc u la tio n s h a v e b e e n m a d e , w ill in m a n y in s ta n ce s
a m o u n t in som e o f o u r C o m p a n ie s t o a d iv id e n d o f 10 per
c e n t, th e p r ic e th a t w e h a v e h ith e r to h ad t o p a y to th e tou ts
fo r b o y s , b e in g a t th e
o f £ 4 p e r h e a d . A p ro p e r su p p ly
o f la b o r w ill n o w b e k e p t t p , a n d e a c h o f th e M in es w ill be
su p p lied p r o ra ta . T h e n a tiv e s w ill r e c e iv e th eir w a g e s a n d
w ill b e p r o te c te d fr o m th e e v il e ffe c ts o f d rin k , w h ic h h a s e x ercise d su ch a b a n e fu l in flu e n ce u p on th e ir liv es d u r in g th e

158

ran

c h r o n ic l e ,

past fifteen years. T hey w ill also be p ro te cte d w h en th e y
retu rn to th eir ow n h om es w ith th eir earn in gs on th e Fields,
an d by th is m ean s we shall be a b le to keep up a con sta n t
supply o f n a tiv e labor, as those retu rn in g fro m th e Fields
w ill in fo rm th eir frien d s th at th ey have reoeived th eir
w ages in cash an d th at th ey have n ot been m olested on their
w ay to the Mines, or on th eir retu rn jo u rn e y b a ck to th eir
o w n hom es.
T h e D rink Q uestion w ill also be regu lated, and the terrible
scen es w ill n ow cease w h ich w ere en a cted on th e F ields on
Sundays, w h en the n atives in a state o f m ad in to x ica tio n ,
co m m itte d a m on gst them selves, an d upon the w hites,
seriou s crim es w h loh cou ld n ot be stopped on a cco u n t o f
th eir num bers, and the in efficien cy o f th e p olice regu lation s
u n d er th e old regime. These natives w ere unfit fo r w ork on
M on days, Tuesdays aud W ed n esd ay s an d th e C om panies
lost th eir services, becau se th ey w ere as a rule ly in g dru nk
an d in capable in the com p ou n d s.
A ll oth er g riev a n ces, su ch as d y n a m ite, and various oth er
m a tters, w ill also be pla ced upon a sa tisfa ctory basis, and
y o u r B oard is con fid en t th a t w ith these fa v ora b le ch an ges
th e en erg y th a t w ill be pu t in to the d ev elop m en t o f the
a b o v e com p a n ies w ill resu lt w ith in a v e ry sh ort period in a
rem ark able im p rovem en t in th e g en eral c o n d u c t and p rofit­
a b le w ork in g o f the properties b e lo n g in g to these com pan ies.
T he oth er six com pan ies w h ich w ere form ed ju s t b efore
th e w ar b eg a n , t, e., F erguson , East, W est, V a n H u lsteyn ,
S tu b b s and J oh n son R a n d fo n te in , and th rou g h w h ich the
first an d secon d reefs have been fo u n d to ru n , w ill be opened
u p w ith o u t d elay, an d m a ch in ery erected fo r th e ca rry in g
o u t o f th e w ork as ex p ed itiou sly as possible. N o tim e w ill
be lost, and ev ery e ffo rt w ill be m ade to b rin g th em to th e
p ro d u c in g stage w ith th e least d ela y possible. The assays
ob ta in ed from th e reefs in these six com pan ies are v e ry h igh
in d eed .
T he large area o f g rou n d b elo n g in g to R a n d fon tein
E states com prises, as y o u are aw are, 31,844 acres, an d on ly
a p ortion o f this e x ten siv e p rop erty has been form ed in to
com p a n ies and p rospected. There is a v e ry large tr a c t o f
la n d y e t w h ich w ill h ave to be exploited as soon as th e w ar
is over. This con sists o f five fa rm s, R ie tfo n te in , D roog h eu v el, M id d elvlei, G em sb ok fon tein an d P an vlak te.
T he area o f these five farm s is 16,331,038 acres, and
th e y are all freeh old . These farm s h ave n ot y e t been p ro­
cla im ed , b u t p rosp ectin g w ork has a lrea d y b een don e on
th em b y th e R a n d fon tein E states C om pany, and som e v a lu ­
a b le d iscov eries h ave been m ade w h ich w ill be dealt w ith
a t a later p eriod.
In a d d ition to these fa rm s, th e R a n d fo n te in E states G old
M in in g C om p an y h olds several m y n p a ch ts u pon its oth er
p rop erties, w h ich h ave n o t y e t been form ed in to com p a n ies,
as w e ll as 2,063 cla im s w h ich b elon g to it, and w h ich w ill be
fo rm e d in to com p a n ies a t som e fu tu re tim e.
T he R a n d fon tein E states G old M in ing C om p a n y also
h old s a b ou t fo u r m illio n shares, w h ic h are fu lly paid up, in
th e su b sid iary com pan ies w h ic h h ave alrea d y been form ed .
A p a r t, th erefore, fro m its g rea t valu e as a m in in g p rop erty ,
it is a large la n d ed estate, th e g rou n d o f w h ic h is on e o f th e
m ost valu a b le p roperties in th e T ransvaal C olon y. The
ra ilw a y o f th e T ransvaal runs th ro u g h th is ex ten siv e es­
tate, an d th ere is a station and a n u m b er o f sidin gs upon
th e prop erty, an d a n oth er station w ill v e ry sh ortly be fixed
a t th e township^ w h ic h has been laid o u t an d su rveyed upon
th e R a n d fo n te in E state. T his tow n sh ip b elon g s to the
R a n d fo n te in E states G old M in in g C om pan y, and a co n tr a c t
en tered in to w ith th e G ov ern m en t som e years a g o safe­
gu ards the interests th a t th e C om pan y h old s in th e lan d
b e lo n g in g to th e tow nship. The stands in th e tow n sh ip w ill
b e co m e v e ry va lu a b le, an d w ill be sold a t v ery h ig h p rices
as soon as hostilities cease and a b e tte r ord er o f th in gs is
established th rou g h ou t th e cou n try .
T he pla n ta tion o f trees, n u m b erin g a b ou t 500,000, is
n o w su ite d in e v e ry w a y fo r th e su p p ly in g o f all th e c o m ­
pan ies on th e R a n d fo n te in p rop erty w ith rou g h tim b e r fo r
m in in g purposes.
Y o u r B oard deem s it a d v isa b le to rem in d y o u th at th e
P org es R a n d fon tein G old M in in g C om p a n y is th e o w n e r o f
n e a rly on e-h a lf o f th e share ca p ita l o f th e S ou th R a n d fo n ­
te in G old M in in g C om pan y, th e R a n d fo n te in E states G old
M in ing C om pany h o ld in g th e oth er h a lf o f the ca p ita l. T he
S ou th R a n d fon tein G old M in in g C om pan y, as y o u are aw are,
is a v e ry v a lu a b le p rop erty , w ith h igh -gra d e reefs, and has
paid a d iv id en d fo r th e first yea r o f its operations,
besides h a v in g a large a m ou n t o f cash in h and, a m o u n t­
in g to £63,445 sterlin g.
It h ad to cease w ork on
a cco u n t o f th e w ar. This C om pan y w ill con sid era b ly in ­
crease its profits w h en the a d d ition a l fo r ty stam ps are added
to th e s ix ty n o w ex istin g at th e M ine, and w h en m in in g
op eration s b ecom e m ore fa v ou ra b le b y the red u ction o f
variou s ch arges. It is a n ticip a ted th a t th e South R a n d fo n ­
tein G old M in in g C om pan y w ill p a y fro m 40 per c e n t per
an n u m .
T h e p roportion w h ic h th e shares o f th e P orges R a n d fo n ­
tein G old M in ing C om pany bears to its h o ld in g in South
R a n d fo n te in is abou t one share o f th e latter to tw o shares
o f the form er. T h e d istrib u tion o f th e South R a n d fon tein
shares t o th e shareholders in P orges R a n d fo n te in w ill be
con sid ered b y y ou r B oard later on.
T he P orges R a n d fon tein is also d iv iden d p ayin g, and its
profits w ill be la rg ely au gm en ted b y th e in crease o f th e fo r t y
a d d ition a l stam ps n ow a w a itin g erection . T he C om p a n y ’s

[V ol. LXXIY.

cash balance in hand at the present tim e am ou n ts to a b ou t
£40,000.
All the n ew m a ch in ery th at has been ord ered fo r R and­
fo n te in Estates an d it* su bsidiary com pan ies has been paid
for, an d R a n d fon tein Estates, as w ell as its su b sid iary c o m ­
panies, has a con sid era b le sum o f m on ey still in hand.
Y o u r B oard th ou g h t it a d visable to co m m u n ica te th e
actu a l p osition o f the R a n d fon tein Estates, as w ell as its
su bsidiary com pan ies, to th e shareho ders w ith o u t delay,
an d to in fo rm y o i th at w ork w ill be re-com m en ced at on ce,
an d the properties developed in th e m ost e c o n o m ic a l m an ­
ner.
Y ou rs fa ith fu lly ,
G E O . B IN G H A M ,

Secretary.

Langlaagte Estate Gold Mining Company.
(1 , B ank B uildings ,
L othbury , S . C.
(
23rd December, 1901.
To the Shareholders of the Langlaagte Estate Gold Mining
Company.
G entlemen :—A s this M ine is n ow bein g re-started I h ave
m u ch pleasure in p la cin g b efore y o u th e a ctu a l p osition o f
th e C om pany at th e present tim e, as w e ll as the a rran ge­
m en ts th at are n o w b ein g m ade to w ork it in fu tu re u n d er
th e m ost fa v ora b le con d ition s.
I m ay state th a t L a n g la a g te E state has been k ept fre e
from w a ter d u rin g th e w h ole cou rse o f th e w ar, an d som e
m on th s a g o w e started d ev elop in g th e M ine. T h e reefs o f
this C om pany, as y o u are a w are, are v e ry w id e , and the
m ain sh aft, w h ich is a v e ry large on e, has b een tak en d ow n
v e ry deep on th e C om p a n y’s prop erty, and is n o w fu lly
equipped an d en tirely com p leted . T h is large sh a ft w ill en­
able us to ca rry on ou r m in in g in a m ost fa v o ra b le m anner.
W e shall be able to d ev elop th e large reefs on this p rop erty
v ery rap id ly an d at a red u ced cost. Y o u are, no d ou b t,
aw are th at w e had fo rm e rly th ree sm all sh afts w o rk in g on
th e M ine, w h ich en tailed a large ex p en d itu re in co n n e c tio n
w ith ou r m in in g operations. These sh afts w ill n o w be done
a w a y w ith , an d a ll the w o rk o f d ev elop m en t, m in in g , h a u l­
in g and p u m p in g w a ter w ill be carried on th ro u g h th e m a in
shaft.
W e have alrea d y open ed u p a v e ry large q u a n tity o f ore
b oth on th e sou th an d m ain reefs, and sh all con tin u e to
develop th e reefs as fa st as possible, so th a t th e reserve
bodies o f ore w ill a m ou n t to a very la rg e q u a n tity , and w ill
be fa r in ex cess o f th e requ irem en ts o f th e m ill. T he m ill,
as y o u are aw are, oonsists o f tw o h u n d red stam ps, a n d w ith
th is q u a n tity o f stam ps w e shall b e a b le to m ill a v ery large
am ou n t o f rook . T h ere is n o d o u b t th a t th is dev elop m en t
w ork has been v e r y im p orta n t, a n d w ill resu lt v e r y fa v o r ­
a b ly to th e C om p a n y ’s fu tu re op era tion s in th e large ou tp u t
o f g old , as w ell as th e profits th a t w ill a ccru e to th e sh a re­
holders.
W e in ten d to resu m e m illin g opera tion s as soon as possible,
and w e h ave a lrea d y applied fo r perm ission to start one
h un dred stam ps o u t o f th e tw o h u n d red , an d w e shall drop
all th e stam ps as soon as w e h ave su fficien t la bou r.
The arran gem en ts n o w m a d e b etw een th e B ritish an d th e
P ortu guese gov ern m en ts are v ery fa v ou ra b le to th e m in in g
in d u stry , an d n atives fro m th e P ortu g u ese territories w ill
n o w be a llow ed to com e to th e M ines fo r th e purpose o f
ob ta in in g em p loym en t. O ther a rran gem en ts w ill also be
m ade to a llow n a tiv es to com e d ow n fr o m th e In terior,
and th e fa c t th a t these n atives w ill be p ro te cte d an d fe d on
th eir w a y to th e gold field s, an d th a t th e y w ill be a llow ed
to retu rn w ith th e ir earn in gs u n m olested to th eir co u n try ,
w ill have a v ery fa v ou ra b le e ffe ct u pon th e n a tiv e trib es in
th e In terior, an d w ill be th e m eans o f en su rin g a con sta n t
and efficien t su pply o f n a tiv e la b ou r fo r th e M ines a ll th e
yea r rou n d.
T he g rea t w id th o f L a n g la a g te E states’ reefs enables th e
C om pany to m in e an d m ill at a v e ry lo w cost, an d th e opera­
tion s o f th is C om pany in th e fu tu re w ill be v e ry sa tisfa ctory
in deed. A ll th e su rfa ce m a ch in ery is in p e r fe c t order, and
n o dam age has been don e to e ith er th e M ine or the m a ch in ery
d u rin g th e w ar.
A p a rt from th e present M ine and its v alu able su rfa ce m a ­
ch in ery, th e L a n g la a g te E state G old M in in g C om p a n y is the
ow n er o f som e v alu able assets, w h ich are as fo llo w s :
(1) T he L an gla a gte E state C om pany h olds o n e-h a lf o f th e
Shares o f th e L an glaagte B u ild in g & E xp lora tion C o m ­
pany, i e., 235,000 Shares, an d as these shares are w orth at
least £2 per Share to-d a y , th is represents an asset o f
£470,000- e q u a l to £1 per Share on th e presen t ca p ita l o f
th e L an glaagte Estate G old M in in g C o m p a n y ; but as
these Shares w ill attain a v ery m u ch higher value, seeing
th at th e L a n gla a gte B u ild in g & E xp lora tion C om p a n y ’s
g rou n d a d join s Joh ann esbu rg, an d consists o f about
(6,000) six th ou san d stands or b u ild in g sites, and as the
latter C om pany has already been offered £3,000 per stand
fo r som e o f th e stands, it is n o t difficu lt to realise what an
im m en se valu e th e property w ill a tta in at a later date
and th e g rea t valu e con seq u en tly o f the 385,000 Shares be
lo n g in g to the L an glaagte E state,

THE CHRONICLE.

January 18, 1902.j

T h e B oard o f the L a n g la a g te B u ild in g & E xp lora tion
C om p a n y has d e cid e d to dispose o f th e stan ds b y a u c tio n
an d p riva te tre a ty , an d th ey fe e l c o n fid e n t th a t a v ery
la rg e a m ou n t o f m o n e y w ill be rea lized b y the disposal o f
these b u ild in g sites, situ ated , as th ey are, m su ch a h ea lth y
a n d im p orta n t lo c a lity , a n d a d jo in in g , as th e y d o, the
tow n s h ip o f J oh a n n esb u rg .
(2) In a d d itio n to th is v a lu a b le asset, L a n g la a g te E state is
a lso the o w n er o f so m e th in g lik e s e v e n ty -fo u r cla im s on
a n oth er p rop erty . T hese cla im s w ere leased fro m L a n g ­
la a g te Estate b y an oth er c o m p a n y , an d as th e lease has
ex p ired th e L a n g la a g te E state has b r o u g h t an a c tio n a t
la w to r e co v e r th e s e v e n ty -fo u r c la im s . A s th ese cla im s
are v irtu a lly in ta c t I n eed h a rd ly d r a w y o u r a tte n tio n to
the fa c t th at this asset is o f v e ry g re a t v a lu e. T h e
s e v e n ty -fo u r cla im s c o n ta in a series o f v e r y g o o d reefs,
a n d , as soon as th e la w -su it is d e c id e d , th e L a n g la a g te
E state w ill fo rm these s e v e n ty -fo u r ola im s in to a separate
co m p a n y , and w ill op en up th e reefs a n d e r e c t m a ch in e ry
fo r th e purpose o f b r in g in g th em to th e p r o d u c in g stage
w ith as little d ela y as possib le. T h e la w -su it to w h ic h I
re fe r in c o n n e c tio n w ith th is m a tte r w ill b e settled as
soon as th e w a r is o v e r, a n d fr o m th e d o cu m e n ts th a t
L a n g la a g te E state h old s, as w e ll as its a c tu a l p osition in
the m a tter, th ere is n o d o u b t th a t it w ill w in th e case,
and th a t th e se v e n ty -fo u r c la im s t o w h ic h I h a v e referred
w ill at o n c e re v e rt to L a n g la a g te E state.
Y o u r B oard w o u ld fu rth e r d ra w y o u r a tte n tio n to the fa c t
t h a t the L a n g la a g te G old M in in g C om p a n y has a lrea d y paid
t o its S h areholders in b on u ses an d d iv id e n d s an a m ou n t
e q u a l to £1,842,880, w h ic h a m o u n t rep resen ts o v e r fo u r
tim e s th e valu e o f its n o m in a l c a p ita l, a n d y o u r B oa rd feels
c o n fid e n t th a t in fu tu re th e op era tion s o f th e C om p a n y w ill
en a b le it, th ro u g h th e efforts in v a riou s depa rtm en ts, an d
grea ter e c o n o m y in w o rk in g , to p a y e v e n b e tte r d iv id e n d s
t o its Shareholders.
E v ery effort w ill be m ade b y th e B oa rd to secu re th e n e ce s­
sa ry la b or an d to re-sta rt th e w o r k o f the m in e as w e ll as
th e su rfa ce w ork u n d er fa v o ra b le circu m s ta n c e s, a n d w ith
th is o b je c t in v ie w m a n y o f th e o ld sta ff o f th e C o m p a n y ’s
em p loyes are a lrea d y u p on th e sp ot, a n d a ssistin g m c a r r y ­
in g ou t th e prep a ra tion s to en a b le th e C om p a n y to resu m e
its op era tion s w ith th e tw o h u n d re d stam ps w ith in a v e r y
sh o rt tim e.
T he w ater reserv oirs an d fo u n ta in s o f th is C om p a n y are
a m p le fo r its req u irem en ts, an d th is C om p a n y has n e v e r y e t
b een sh ort o f w a te r d u rin g th e w h o le tim e o f its opera tion s.
Y o u r B oard th o u g h t it a d v isa b le to c o m m u n ic a te the
a c tu a l p osition o f th e C o m p a n y w ith o u t d ela y to th e S h a re­
h old ers an d to in fo r m y o u th a t w o r k w ill b e re -c o m m e n c e d at
o n c e , an d also to d ra w y o u r a tte n tio n to th e v a lu a b le assets
c o n s is tin g o f th e s e v e n ty -fo u r cla im s re fe rre d to a b o v e , an d
th e 235,000 L a n g la a g te B u ild in g a n d E x p lo ra tio n C o m p a n y ’s
shares, w h ic h th is C om p a n y h old s o u tsid e o f its fre e h o ld
esta te, an d th e large M ine w h ic h it is n o w w o r k in g as w e ll
as th e m y n p a oh t o f 100 m o r g e n b e lo n g in g to th e L a n g la a g te
E sta te.
* A n n e x e d is a c ir c u la r w h ic h has b een sen t to th e S h a re­
h old ers o f th e L a n g la a g te B u ild in g & E x p lo r a tio n C om p a n y ,
a n d fro m w h ic h y o u w ill be a b le to a sce rta in fu r th e r p a r­
ticu la rs as to the va lu e o f th e assets h eld b y th e C om p a n y .
Y o u r s fa ith fu lly ,
G E O . B IN G H A M ,

Secretary.

Langlaagte Block B Gold Mining Company.
( 1 ,
\

(

a n k
B

Bu

i l d i n g s
,
o t h L b u r E.
, y

C.
23rd, December, 1901.

To the Shareholders o f the Langlaagte Block B Gold Mining
Company.
G e n t l e m :e — A s it is in te n d e d to re-sta rt w o rk a t this
n
M in e as soon as p ossible, I h ave m u c h pleasu re in p la c in g
b efore y o u th e a ctu a l p osition o f the C om p a n y a t th e presen t
tim e , as w e ll as th e a rra n g em en ts th a t are n o w b e in g m ade
t o w o rk it in fu tu re u n d er th e m ost fa v o u ra b le c o n d itio n s .
T he reefs in th is C o m p a n y ’s p ro p e r ty are v e ry w id e , a n d a
v e ry large m ain sh a ft w as c o m p le te d th ere ju s t b e fo r e th e
w a r brok e ou t. T his large sh a ft w ill e c o n o m iz e to a v e r y
g rea t e x te n t, an d the th ree sh a fts w h ic h h ave b een u sed in
h a u lin g ore an d p u m p in g w a ter fro m th e M in e w ill n o w be
d on e a w a y w ith , an d th e w h ole o f th e w o rk in th is M in e w ill
n o w be co n ce n tra te d and ca rried on th ro u g h the m ain sh a ft.
D ev elop m en t also w ill b e pushed on as r a p id ly as p ossible,
a n d the reefs open ed u p at the lo w e r levels.
T h e m a ch in ery has been kep t in p e r fe c t ord e r d u r in g th e
w a r, an d large an d efficien t m a ch in e ry has a lso been e r e c te d
fo r so rtin g all the ro c k w h ich co m e s fr o m th e M in e. T his
w ill im p rove the y ie ld o f g o ld v ery c o n s id e ra b ly .
B lock B L an glaagte h old s an e x te n s iv e fre e h o ld , an d a
m y n p a ch t o f 100 m org en . A ll its m a c h in e r y is o f th e la test
d esig n , an d is in e x c e lle n t ord er.
In a d d ition to these assets tin's C om p a n y h old s 125,000
•hares in the L anglaagte B u ild in g & E x p lo ra tio n C o m ­
p an y. T his I need h ardly in fo r m y o u is a v e ry v a lu a b le
asset in deed, an d, as these shares are w orth a t least £ 2 ea ch
to -d a y , th ey represen t a su m o f £250,000, equ al to 10a. per
•hare on the present ca p ita l o f th e B lo c k B L a n g la a g te

159

C om p a n y. B ut y o u r B oard feels c o n v in c e d th at th ey w ill
atta in a very m u ch h ig h er valu e, as th e stan ds or
b u ild in g sites n u m b er a b o u t six th ou sa n d (0,000), an d are
ly in g a d ja c e n t to the T ow n sh ip o f J oh a n n esb u rg , and, as
the Board o f the L a n g la a g te B u ild in g & E x p lora tion C o m ­
pany has a lrea d y rece iv e d an o ffe r o f £2,000 e a ch fo r som e o f
the stan ds, it is n ot d ifficu lt to rea lize w h at th e value o f
the 128,000 shares w ill b e a ft e r the s ix th ou sa n d stan d s o r
b u ild in g sites have been disposed of.
T h e n a tiv e la b ou r d ifficu lty w ill be o v e r c o m e , as th e
arra n gem en ts ju s t m ade b e tw e e n th e B ritish an d P ortu g u ese
gov ern m en ts w ill n ow en su re a co n s ta n t su p p ly o f la bou r.
M ining and M illin g w ill be don e th e r e fo r e a t a v ery m u oh
low er cost, an d th e op era tion s o f the C om p a n y w ill be p la ced
on a v ery s a tis fa c to r y basis.
Y o u r B oard th o u g h t it a d v isa b le to in fo r m y o u o f th e
a ctu a l position o f th e C om p a n y , an d op era tion s w ill be c o m ­
m e n ce d th ere as soon as possib le, an d ca rried on u n d e r th e
m ost fa v o u ra b le c o n d itio n s.
* A n n e x e d is a c ir c u la r w h ic h has been sen t to th e sh are­
holders o f the L a n g la a g te B u ild in g & E x p lo ra tio n C o m ­
p an y, an d fr o m w h ic h y o u w ill be a b le to a scerta in fu r th e r
particu la rs as to th e va lu e o f th e assets h eld b y th e C o m p a n y .
Y o u r s fa ith fu lly ,
G E O . B IN G H A M ,

Secretary.

^Circular.
( 1 ,

a n k
B

L

(

Bu

i l d i n g s
,

o t h b u r y
, E.

C.
2 3rd, December, 1901.

To the Shareholders o f the Langlaagte Building & Explora­
tion Company.
G e n t l e m :e —n A s y o u are n o d o u b t a w a re th a t th is C o m ­
p a n y h olds a c o n s id e ra b le area o f la n d a d io in in g t o th e
tow n sh ip o f J oh a n n esb u rg , an d th a t a to w n s n ip has b e e n
fo rm e d u p on a p o rtio n o f th e la n d , w h ic h has b een p ro p e rly
su rveyed in to a b o u t (6,000) s ix th ou sa n d stan d s or b u ild in g
sites, an d as th ese stan d s are n o w b e c o m in g o f g re a t v a lu e ,
m y B oard deem s it a d v isa b le th a t y o u sh ou ld b e m a d e a c ­
q u a in ted w ith th e a c tu a l p o sitio n o f th is C om p a n y a t th e
p resen t tim e, a n d as t o its fu tu r e p ro sp e cts.
Y o u r B oa rd has r e c e iv e d a g r e a t m a n y offers la te ly fo r th e
pu rchase o f th e leases o f stan d s in th e to w n s h ip b e lo n g in g
to y o u r C om p a n y at; £2,000 ea ch , w ith a g ro u n d r e n t o f £13
p er a n n u m fo r e a ch sta n d ; b u t y o u r B oa rd con sid ers th a t it
w ou ld b e b est to sell th e lease fo r a o e rta in n u m b e r o f yea rs
o f these stan ds, s u b je c t to a g r o u n d re n t o f £12 p er a n n u m
fo r each stan d, b y p u b lic a u c tio n as w e ll as b y p riv a te tr e a ty ;
an d th e y are n o w m a k in g a rra n g em en ts to c a r r y o u t th is
plan a t the ea rliest possible m o m e n t.
Y o u r B oard feels assured th a t m a n y o f th e stan ds, a c c o r d ­
in g to the presen t p rice s o f la n d ed p ro p e rty in J o h a n n e s­
b u rg , w ill rea lize som e th ou sa n ds « f p ou n d s ea ch . A c a b le
has ju s t been r e c e iv e d t o th e e ffe c t th a t th e su m o f F iv e
th ou san d p ou n d s (£5,000) has ju s t b een o ffe re d fo r a v a ca n t
sta n d in close p r o x im ity to th is C o m p a n y ’s sta n d s.
A p a rt fr o m th e p resen t to w n s h ip , w ith its la rg e n u m b e r o f
stan ds or b u ild in g sites, y o u r C om p a n y is th e o w n e r o f
som e v a lu a b le assets, w h ic h are as fo llo w s ;
(1.) Y o u r C om p a n y h old s the m in era l rig h ts o v e r th e fa r m
o f M id d e lfo n te in , w h ic h has n o t y e t been p rosp ected . I t is
th e in te n tio n o f y o u r B oa rd to start op era tion s fo r th e p u r­
pose o f th o ro u g h ly e x p lo r in g th e la rg e tr a c t o f la n d w h ic h
is o w n e d b y y o u r C om p a n y d ir e c t ly th e w a r is o v er.
T h e fa rm o f M id d e lfo n te in lies oh th e lin e o f th e D ep ree's
re e f, an d th ere is e v e r y p o ssib ility o f som e v a lu a b le d is­
c o v e r y b e in g m a d e u p on th e p rop erty .
(2 .) Y o u r C om p a n y is also th e o w n e r o f som e v a lu a b le p ro p ­
erty situ a ted in th e m ost im p o rta n t c e n tr e o f th e t o w n o f
J oh a n n esb u rg , a n d th is p ro p e r ty is a lre a d y o f c o n s id e r­
a ble v a lu e, b u t w ill b e c o m e m ore so in a v e r y sh ort tim e .
T h e B oa rd w ill d ea l w ith th is p ro p e rty a t th e p rop er tim e
an d to th e b est p ossible a d v a n ta g e ,
(3 .) Y o u r C om p a n y also h old s a ce r ta in su m in ca sh , w h ic h
has a c c r u e d fr o m th e sale o f a fe w o f th e stan ds som e
m on th s b e fo r e w a r b rok e o u t.
T here is n o d o u b t th a t th e p rop erty b e lo n g in g to y o u r
C om p a n y is a v e r y v a lu a b le on e, a n d y o u r B oa rd fe e l c o n ­
fid en t th a t th e y w ill b e a b le to d eal w ith th e v a riou s assets
b e lo n g in g to y o u r C om p a n y in a v e r y fa v o r a b le a n d sa tis­
fa c t o r y m an n er, w h ic h w ill be o f g re a t a d v a n ta g e and.
b e n e fit to e v e ry in d iv id u a l sh a reh old er.
Y o u r s fa ith fu lly ,
G E O . B IN G H A M ,

Secretary.
— The H a n d -B ook o f R a ilroa d S ecu rities, co m p ile d b y the
pu blish ers o f the F i n a n c i a l Ch r o n i c ,l e
is n o w rea d y.
T h e b ook oon tain s in sm all com pass a vast a m ou n t o f
in form a tion co n ce rn in g the v a riou s railroad s and a n u m b er
o f the indu strials w h ose secu rities are d ealt in on the leadin g
S tock E xch an ges. It sh ow s th eir earnings, dividen ds, e tc .,
fo r a series o f years, th eir present fixed ch arges, an d also the
am ounts o f the d ifferen t issues o f bonds ou tstan din g, th eir
rates o f in terest, etc. T h ere is a lso g iv en th e m on th ly ran ge
o f stocks and bon ds fo r 1900 and 1901 an d a yea rly ran ge fo r
the past fo u r years. P r ic e on e d olla r, or to C h r o n i c l seu b ­
scrib ers, seven ty-five cents.

2

JIu

CHBON1GLE

THE

160

[Y o u L X X IV .

©onxmjcrdal ^ptxxje*.

C O T T O N .

N i g h ,t J a n u a r y 17, 1902.
as in d ic a t e d b y o u te le g r a m s
r
COMME RCI A L
EPITOME.
fr o m th e S o u th t o - n i g h t , is g i v e n b e lo w . F o r th e w e e k e n d in g
this e v e n in g th e t o t a l r e c e ip t s h a v e r e a c h e d 228,486 ba les,
F r i d a y N i g h t , J a n , 17, 1902.
S ev era l d e v e lo p m en ta o f an u n fa v o r a b le ch a r a c te r h a v e a g a in st 278,868 b a le s la s t w e e k a n d 291,314 b a le s th e p re v io u s
w eek, m a k in g th e t o t a l r e c e ip t s s in o e th e 1st o f S e p t., 1901,
b e e n e x p e r ie n c e d d u r in g th e w eek u n d er r e v ie w in th e c o m ­
5,398,847 b a le s , a g a in s t 5,007,632 b a le s f o r th e sa m e p e rio d o f
m e r c ia l m arkets, P r ic e s f o r th e v a rio u s g ra in s h a v e su ffe re d
a sh arp d e clin e , th e resu lt o f fo r c e d liq u id a t io n b y sp e c u ­
M ttm ipu a t—
Bat.
M on.
F u es.
W ed. F k u r s .
F r i.
fttta i
la tiv e h old ers, a lth o u g h at th e lo w e r valu es e x p o r t e r s jh a v e
G a l v e s t o n . . . .1 . 0 ., 0 1 3 9 , 3 7 6 9 , 5 3 2 9 , 5 3 1 7 , 1 9 2
.
7 ,4 9 4 ,1 3 7
5 3
c o m e in to th e w h ea t m a rk et as free b u y ers. P rice s f o r su g a r
S a b . P a ss, A c.
...... ...... • w
...a
3 4 2
3 4 2
h a v e c o n tin u e d to d e clin e , m a k in g n ew lo w r e c o r d figu res, w ith N e w O r l e a n s 1. .1 , 3 6 3
1 1 , 8 22 80 , 3 2 3
1 0 , 5 12 22 , 5 0 0
1 3 ,7 7 9 ,3 0 7
8 3
refin ers h o ld in g o ff, o w in g to the ex ce ssiv e su p p lies to be tak en M o b i l. .e. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4 . 4
7 1 07 6 4
3 0 8
1 2 7
2 , 6 4 84 , 9 0 1
...... ......
...... 4 , 9 9 4 4 , 9 9 4
c a r e o f, and a w a itin g d e v e lo p m e n t at W a s h in g t o n r e la tiv e to P e n s a c o l a , A c .
.
th e r e c ip r o c ity tre a ty w ith C uba. C o ffe e p rice s also^ h ave S a v a n n a h . . . . . . 6 . ., 5 3 2 6 , 8 8 6 5 , 9 6 9 4 , 6 4 5 5 , 8 1 9 4 , 4 6 3 3 3 , 3 1 9
B r u n s w ’ k . A c......
.
...... ...... ...... ...... 3 , 1 0 8 3 , 1 0 8
b e e n w e a k an d lo w e r u n d e r d is a p p o in tin g tra d e c o n d itio n s C h a r l e s t _o _n_
6 9 9
1 ,3 7 1 ,9 0 3
5
3 3 0
6 5 8
8 0 9
6 ,7 7 4
a n d a g g ressiv e s p e cu la tiv e sellin g . In o t h e r lines o f trade,
P t . R o y a l , A d......
.
...... ..... ...... ......
11
11
h o w e v e r , n o esp ecia l c o m p la in ts h a v e been heard. In a fe w W i l m i n g t_ o_ n
_
8 4 2
6 9 3
7 6 95 5 5
9 0 9
5 9 0
4 ,4 3 8
W a s h ’ t o n , A o o....
__
a
......
......
1 2
12
in sta n ces, perh aps, th e ru n o f n e w ord e rs has n o t b een fu lly
N o r f o l_ k _ . . . . 2 , 0 8 8
_
3 ,5 3 7
3 1, 2, 99 39 4 1 , 8 0 2
2 , 1 81 24 , 8 4 2
u p to e x p e cta tio n s , b u t as a g e n e ra l r a le the b u sin ess s itu a ­
N ’ p ’ t N e w s , A ......
o.
>>>■
*•■
......
5 9 8
5 9 8
tio n has b een co n s id e r e d h e a lth y a n d th e g e n e ra l o u t lo o k N e w Y o _r _k_ _
1 ,0 1 04 0 9
2 0 0 1 ,2 1 6
7 6 5
9 3 2
p r o m is in g , w ith p rice s h o ld in g stea d y to fir m .
B o s t o .n. . . . . . .
1 ,1 0 3
1 ,0 9 48 4 4 3 ,7 6 7
1 , 7 7 11 , 1 1 0 9 , 0 8 9
L a rd on th e sp ot h a d a m o d e r a te sale e a r ly in th e w e e k , B a l t i m o . .r. .e. . . .
...... 2 , 8 3 4 2 , 8 3 4
b u t th e d e m a n d d id n o t c o n tin u e , an d d a r in g th e p a st f e w
P h i l a d e l ’ a , A o . . 50 1 , 9 0 0
1 4 8
2 3 8
1 22 5, 5 8 8
d a y s o n ly a sm a ll v o lu m e o f bu sin ess h a s been tr a n s a c te d ;
T o t . t h i s w e 3e 3k , 2 3 4 3 7 , 6 0 6 4 7 , 5 8 1 3 2 , 2 9 9
3 1 , 5 40 60 , 2 6 62 2 8 , 4 8 6
p r ic e s h a v e b een easier, T h e c lo s e w a s stea d ier a t 9'9 0 c. fo r
p r im e W e s te r n an d 9 ’2 5 @ 9 ‘45c. f o r p rim e C ity .
R e fin e d
T h e f o ll o w ln g s h o w s th e w e e k ’s t o t a l r e c e ip t s , th e t o t a l s in c e
la r d h as b een easier an d th e clo s e w a s q u ie t at 10'05e. f o r r e ­ 8epfc,1,1901, a n d th e s t o c k t o - n i g h t , c o m p a r e d w i t h la s t y e a r .
fin ed fo r th e C on tin en t, S p e c u la tio n in la rd fo r fu tu r e d e ­
1 9 0 1 -0 2
1 9 0 0 -0 1 .
S lo c k .
liv e r y has been m o d e r a te ly a c tiv e an d u n d e r liq u id a tio n b y
R eceip ts to
FMti Since Sep. T M i Since Sep .
la r g e s p e cu la tiv e h o ld e rs , an d in s y m p a th y w it h th e w e a k ­
J a n . 17 .
1 9 0 2 .
1 9 0 1 .
w eek,
ness o f th e g ra in m a rk e ts, p r ic e s h a v e d e c lin e d . T h e clo se
1 , 1 9 0 1 . week.
1 , 1 9 0 0 .
w a s steadier,
Salve 8ton...
F

T

DAItiT CLOSING PRICES OP LA ED FUTURES.
Sat.
M o n . Tuet. Wed Thur*.

h e

M

o v e m

e n ot p t h

5 3 , 1 3 71
3 4 2
89 3* ,9 35 0 71
4 ,9 0 1
4 ,9 9 4
3 3 ,3 1 9
3 ,1 0 8
5 ,7 7 4
11
4 ,4 3 8
1 2
1 4 ,8 4 2
5 9 8
4 ,5 9 2
9 ,6 8 9
2 ,8 3 4
P M l a S e l , A o .2 , 5 8 8

Sab.P.,Ao.
F ri
Stew9Orleans
J a n u a _ _ _a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
r y
9 -9 7
9 *8 7
9*97
9*90
8 7
Mobile____
L o c a lly th e d e m a n d fo r p o r k has b een lig h t an d th e
P’saoola, Ao.
ft o n e o f th e m a rk et has b een easier, c lo s in g at $L6 50@ 17 50
savannah...
c o r m 8ss. $17 5r;@ L7 75 f o r fa m ily a n d $18 50@ 20 50 f o r sh o rt
B r 'w ic k , Ac.
h lea r. C ut m eats h a v e h a d o n ly a sm a ll sale, bu t p r ic e s h a v e
h e ld fa ir ly stea d y , w ith p ic k le d s h o u ld e rs at 7 c ., p ic k le d Charleston..
P.Koyal.&o.
h a m s at 10@10^jC. an d p ic k le d b ellies at 8 % @ 9 c . f o r 14@ 10
lb s. a v era g e. T n e d em a n d f o r b e e f has b een lim ite d to j o b ­ Wilmington,
Waah’n, Ac.
b in g o r d e r s ; p rice s q u o te d have b een u n c h a n g e d a t $3 50@
9 00 fo r m ess, $10 5 0 @ ll 50 f o r p a ck e t, $12 00@13 00 f o r fa m ­ Horfolh
N’portN.,Ae
ily an d $18 50@ 19 00 f o r e x tr a In d ia m ess in tierces. T a llo w
h as b een firm e r on lig h t o ffe rin g s , c lo s in g at 6 J ^ @ 6 % c . New York...
S tea rin es h a v e b een q u ie t b u t fa ir ly stea d y at 11c. f o r la rd Boston..,. . .
stea rin e an d l l j ^ c . f o r ole o stea rin e. C o tto n -s e e d o il has a d ­ Baltimore. .
v a n ce d , c lo s in g at 4 4 @ 4 4 ^ c . f o r p r im s y e llo w . B u tte r has
b e e n q u ie t an d easier, c lo s in g at 15@233^e. f o r c r e a m e r y .
C h eese has b een stea d y a t u n c h a n g e d p rice s , c lo s in g a t 7 @
l l j ^ e , f o r S tate fa c t o r y , fu ll c r e a m , F re sh eg g s h a v e d e ­
c lin e d , c lo s in g a t 30c, f o r c h o ic e W e ste rn .
B r a z il g ra d es o f c o ffe e h a v e b een u n settled . T h e d is t r ib u t­
in g b u sin ess has c o n tin u e d o n ly v e r y m o d e r a te , a n d u n d er
c o n tin u e d p ressu re to sell, p a r tic u la r ly in th e s p e c u la tiv e
m a r k e t, p rices h a v e d e clin e d . T h e m o v e m e n t o f th e S antos
c r o p has been in e x cess o f g en era l e x p e cta tio n s , an d th is has
b e e n an im p o r ta n t fa c t o r a g a in st th e m a rk et, T h e clo s e w a s
q u ie t a t IJ jp . f o r R io N o . 7. W e s t In d ia g r o w t h s h a v e b een
q u ie t an d easier, c lo s in g at 8 % c . f o r g o o d C u cu ta . E a st I n ­
d ia g r o w t h s h a v e b een d u ll. S p e c u la tio n in th e m a rk e t fo r
c o n tr a o ts has b een fa ir ly a c tiv e . T h e re has b een a g g re s s iv e
b e a r se llin g , an d th is, c o u p le d w it h liq u id a tio n by tire d
s p e c u la tiv e h o ld e r s , has r e s u lte d in lo w e r p rices. T h e clo s e
w a s stea d y . F o llo w in g are th e c lo s in g a sk ed p rices :

6’OOe. June_ ........ 6*0e, S e p t.
_

M arch.. .. . . . . 6 * 1 5 e . j J u l y
. . . 6 . - .5 . 0. o. . O c t
.
M a y .....,,,.... 6 ' 3 5 c , I A -u- - g - - - - - - .- -. . . 6 * 6 0 e . D e e . . . . . . . _ _ _ .
-

r i d a y

eC r

o

p
,

In o r d e r t h a t c o m p a r is o n m a y be m a d e w it h o t h e r y e a r s ,
we g iv e b e lo w th e t o t a ls a t le a d i n g p o r t s f o r s ix s e a s o n s .
1 9 0 2 ,

1 2 7

,5 2 9 ,4 6 3
4 7 1 6, 2 4 8 , 3 7 7 2 1 7 , 3 2 9 1 8 1 , 4 4 5
, 3 6
4 3 ,0 7 3 1 ,8 2 6
.....
2 5 ,6 1 5
, 5 3 9 , 7 2 35 9 , 9 5 31 , 6 5 3 , 0 0 9 3 5 2 , 0 1 8
3 5 7 ,7 0 6
1 3 0 ,2 7 3 1 ,8 6 2
9 7 ,1 2 3
3 5 ,2 4 1
8 2 8
1 3 4 ,8 1 0 7 ,1 5 3
9 8 ,1 2 9
8 9 7 ,6 4 42 4 ,4 3 2 7 4 0 ,0 5 9 1 4 5 ,0 4 9 1 1 2 ,4 0 7
1 1 0 ,4 3 6 3 ,0 8 5
7 1 , 6 0 24 , 5 4 8
8 ,5 3 7
2 1 7 ,3 0 7 2 ,6 7 5 1 9 0 ,1 2 5 1 4 ,0 3 5
1 6 ,0 8 1
1 ,3 6 4
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»
5 8 4
2 2 8 ,8 0 9
5 ,8 8 3
2 1 51 , 50 , 33 43 2 1 3 , 9 9 9
3 6 2
8
5 0 2
$»***»*.•
3 3 1 ,8 8 5 5 ,8 4 6 2 7 8 ,8 3 8
4 5 ,9 6 9
3 1 ,3
1 3 ,3 7 4
2 3 1
2 9 ,4 6 31 ,6 0 0
1 ,7 5 9
8 0 ,5 3 8 4 ,4 5 0
5 7 ,8 0 7
1 2 9 , 5 19 08 2 , 9 1 2
6 7 ,8 9 1 5 ,0 7 1
7 2 ,0 0 0
1 3 3 , 8 5 55 2 , 0 0 0
5 1 ,7 8 7 2 ,6 0 8
3 7 , 9 41 23 , 4 7 4 1 3 , 7 7 2
2 0 , 1 1 ,03 0 1 '
1 3 , 6 1 37 , 5 5 1
6 ,2 3 1

Totals..... 2 2 8 , 4 8 5 , 3 9 8 , 8 . 4 17 7 4 , 0 6 4 5 , 0 0 7 ,16 , 80 23 3 , 7 4 4 9 5 1 , 0 3 4
6

R eceipts a t—

4 ,

1 9 0 1 .

a - s l v e a ’ U j A © .5 3 , 4 7 9 4 9 , 4 5 0
N e w O r l e a n s8 3 , 3 0 7 5 9 , 9 5 3
M o b il® . .
4 ,9 0 1
1 ,8 6 2
S a v a n n a h . . .3 3 , 3 1 9
2 4 ,4
5 ,7 8 5
O h a s ’ t o n&,q,
2 ,6 7 5
W i l m 't o n , A t 4 ,4 5 0
5 ,8 9 1
N o r f o l_ k_ _ __
1 4 ,8 4 2
5 ,8 4 6
N . N e w s , A c.
5 2 8 1
9
4 1 1 o t h e r s . . .2 7 , 8 0 5
2 3 ,6

1 9 0 0 .
3 8 ,9 8 3
5 3 ,0 5 9
8 ,0 6 0
3 2 ,5 5 6
2 7
5 ,3 7 3
5 ,5 9 1
8 ,7 8 6
2 ,4 0 2
71 4 , 3 6 5
3

11 88 99 98 .

4 4 ,7 8 0 5 7 ,7 2 3
6 7 ,8 1 2 9 9 ,4 1 6
8 ,6 1 1 1 1 ,7 1 2
2
2 1 ,6 6 3 ,0 0 4
4 ,2 9 3
2 ,0 3 4
3 ,6
1 2 , 2 51 70 , 1 6 6
2 1 46 7 5
4 5 ,9 3 1 ,5 7 1
2 9

1 8 9 7 .
2 4 ,2 6 6
5 1 ,2 8 4
6 ,4 5 6
1 8 ,3 3 0
7 4 , ,02 06 59
6 3 ,5 0 5
8
7 ,0 4 4
2 9 4
1 4 ,7 1 2

f o t . t h l s w k2 .2 8 , 4 8 61 7 4 , 0 6 4 1 6 6 1 7 5
2 0 7 , 52 93 53 , 9 4 0 1 3 0 , 1 6 0
6 '6 5 o . S i n c e S e p t . 1
5 3 9 8 , 8 4 7 5 0 0 7 ,46 38 72 6 , 9 3 69 5 0 0 , 4 3 62 3 7 9 , 1 * 59 4 0 1 , 7 9 1
6 -7 0 C .
6 -8 5 0 .
T h e e x p o r t s f o r th e w e e k e n d in g th is e v e n in g r e a o h a t o t a l

R a w su g a rs h a v e b e e n d iffic u lt to s e ll a n d p r ic e s h a v e d e ­ of 268,027 b a le s, o f w h i c h 144,698 w e r e to G r e a t B r ita in , 55,839
c lin e d , c lo s in g at 3 % c . fo r c e n tr ifu g a ls , 96-deg. test, an d 3 % o . to F r a n c e a n d 67,942 t o th e r e s t o f th e C o n tin e n t.. B e lo w
f o r m u s c o v a d o , 89-deg. test. R e fin e d su g a r has b een d u ll and &re th e e x p o r t s f o r t h e w e e k a n d s in c e S e t t , 1, 1901.
ea sier, d e c lin in g t o 4*85c. fo r g ra n u la te d .
O th e r s ta p le
From Sesc 1,1901. to Jan. 1?, 1802
W etk Mr.riirn Jan. 17.1903.
g ro ce rie s h a v e b een w ith o u t im p o rta n t ch a n g es.
S ibp o rted to —
___
^iw ortsd to —
Sssporti
K e n t u c k y t o b a c c o has b een in fa ir ly a c tiv e d em a n d , b u t
from —
Greet
Grift/
O o n ti - I ~
OontU 'Jetal
Preiws
F ra n ce
o w in g t o lim ite d o ffe r in g s o n ly a s m a ll v o lu m e o f b u s in e s s
Brit’n.
n m t. W eek . Brils in.
h as b een tra n s a cte d ; p rice s h a v e b een firm S e e d -le a f t o ­
S a lv a ston ..,.. 86,881 22,878 19,948 70,704 630,133 241,459 836,708 1,203,305
b a c c o h as h a d o n ly a sm a ll sale, n o tra n sa ctio n s o f im p o r t ­
.......
11,505
Sab. Pass, Ac.- .......a .........
17,6671 89,202
a n ce b e in g r e p o r te d d u r in g th e w e e k ; p rice s h a v e b e e n ste a d y . Sew Orleans.. 48.458 26,863 1,776 76,691 562,955 204,010
356,230 1,123,30©
C a b le a d v ice s on S tra its tin has been fir m e r , a n d th is ,
......... 7,587
15,787
0 8 find
7,587
47.242
c o u p le d w ith a m o d e ra te a m ou n t o f a c t iv it y to th e d e m a n d , P ansaeola..... 2.800
67,484 7,874
53,780 118,894
2,853 4,660
h as a d v a n ced p rice s lo c a lly , c lo s in g at 23'63>£@23'873^c. T h e Savannah......
4,560 0,938 14.408 174,631 35,051 352.117 862,410
d e m a n d f o r c o p p e r has b een lim ite d , a n d p rice s h a v e W e a k ­ a m n sw lo k ...
4,802
4,802
50.076 6,048
30,183; 84,307
3,988
9,914 18,902
47,846 4a%%
.a • 67,430, 115,085
en ed t o l l l ^ c . fo r L a k e . L ea d has been q u ie t an d u n c h a n g e d C harleston...
**••**
......
?o rt R oyal. ■
.
a t 4c. S p e lte r has h e ld fa ir ly stea d y , c lo s in g a t 4 35c. P ig
......... 14,269 109,896
08,840 W,8,346
ir o n h as h a d a fa ir ly la r g e sale a t firm p rice s , c lo s in g at W ilm ington,.. 14,259
4,600
15,801 ******
4,069 ........
1.800
17,721
N orfolk.. . . . . . .
$18@ 16.
........
...... .
19,578
........ ! 10,578
R e fin e d p e tr o le u m has b een u n c h a n g e d , c lo s in g ste a d y at S ’p ort N., An.5,026 1,604 8,364 0,084 195,061 13,579 181,768 330.408
7 ‘20c. in b b le ., 8'30e. in cases an d 4*65c. in bu lk . N a p h th a New Y o r k ....
7,161
94,335
7,981
2,570
07,111
Boston-..........
has b een u n ch a n g e d a t 9 '05c. C red it b a la n ces h a v e b e e n u n ­ Baltim ore___ 3,317
$3,300
,4,M 1
S.098 6,400
31,000
450
c h a n g e d a t $1 15,
S p irits tu rp e n tin e has been firm a n d Philadelphia.. 5,600
6,800
0,510
3,101
!
11,017
h ig h e r , fo llo w in g th e S ou th , c lo s in g a t4 1 % @ 4 2 c . R o s in s h a v e aanEran.. Ao..
452 ........
07.348
07,70©
........ 17,501 17,661
been q u ie t bu t stea a y a t $1 52J^@1 55 f o r c o m m o n a n d g o o d
T o t a l,. . . — 144,606 65,889 67,948 238.027 8,088,813 500 877 1,500,024 4,140,415
stra in ed . W o o l has h a d a fa ir sa le a t fu ll v a lu es. H o p s
Total. 1000-01. 68.011
40.901 18B.8&7 1,877 774 434.884 l 37*234 8 38-4,20!
h a v e been q u ie t b u t stea d y .

THE

January 18. 1902. |

CHRONIOLR

In a d d itio n to a b o v e e x p o r ts , o u r te le g r a m s to -n ig h t t o w
g iv e ua th e fo llo w in g a m o u n ts o f o o tt o n on ch ip b o a rd , not
olea red , a t th e porta n a m e d .
W e add- sim ilar fig u re s for
lf e w Y o r k , w h loh arejp rep ared fo r o u r sp eoia l uso b y Measrs.
L a m b e rt dC B arrow a, P r o d u c e E x c h a n g e B u ild in g ,

F utures .- HtgiieMfc,ioweHt>»iicioAo0 lng prices atNuv Y <>ru,

Jan.

17

a t—

G er­
Other CoastG rea t
B r it a in F r ’ n ce m a n y . F o r ’f/n ulino.

Total.

813 63,142
New Orleans 12,385 5.906 17,625 26,333
Galveston_
_ 38,189 24,177 23,929 2,630 10.224 99,149
600 2,000 35,850
7,300 5,750 20,200
Savannah —
500 6,500
Charleston... 6,000
10,000
5.000
5.000
Mobile..........
lsjooo 15.000
Norfolk.......
7,000
7.000
New York —
18.000
8.000
Other ports. 10,000
Total 1902 . 85,874 35,913 74,754 29,563 28,537 254 641

288,070
118,180
109,190

Total 1901.. 4 1 , 4 8 429.754 66,032 19,251 27,261 183,782
Total 1900. 52.669 27,763 '---- 68, 980---- ' 13.957 163.369

767,252
866,233

7,f>35
25,241
3<>,969

1. 2,698
76,505

779,103

Speculation in co tto n tor fu tu r e delivery has been on a
m oderate scale on ly , and fo r the w eek prices sh ow no im ­
portan t changes. T h e u n d e rto n e has con tin u ed unsettled.
T here appears to be a con sid era b le interest in the m arket w h ich
con fiden tly believes in a com p a ra tiv ely sm all cro p and is an­
ticip a tin g a sharp fa llin g off in the crop m ov em en t in the
near fu tu re. F or th e present, h o w ev er, the receipts are ru n ­
n in g fa irly h eavy, bein g in excess o f those fo r the sam e tim e
last year. B elievers in the m arket explain that the present
rela tiv ely larg e m ov em e n t o f th e cro p is due to planters
tak in g advan tage o f the lo w fr e ig h t rates to h u rry th eir sup­
plies fo rw a rd . T h e ex p ort m ov em en t o f c o tto n is in excess
o f last season, and this to o , it is claim ed, is responsible fo r the
present fu ll cro p m ovem en t. E a r ly in the w eek th ere w as a
slig h t u p tu rn to p rices on b u y in g in d u ced b y a sm a ll-ciop
estim ate issued b y a w ell-k n o w n firm . F rid a y the m arket
tu rn ed easier. A w e ll-k n o w n cro p estim ator reiteia ted his
b e lie f in a la rg e cro p , based on th e con tin u ed fu ll cro p m o v e ­
m en t; th is h ad a w eak en in g in flu ence u p on the L iv e rp o o l
m arket, and p rices in th e lo ca l m a rk et also d eclined. T he
close w as q u iet at a n et loss fo r the day o f 5@8 points. Cot
to n on the sp ot has been qu iet, clo sin g at 8J^c. fo r m id dlin g
uplands,
T he rates o n a n d o ff m id d lin g , as esta b lish e d N o v , 20,1901,
b y th e R e v isio n C o m m itte e , a t w h ic h g r a d e s o th e r than
m id d lin g m a y be d e liv e r e d o n c o n t r a c t , a re as fo llo w s ,

Fair................................o. 1-14 on
Middling Fair....................0*80 on
Strict Good Middling....... 0-50 on
Good Middling...............0 32 on
Strict Low Middling........0-14 off
Low Middling.................... 0'38 off
Strict Good Ordinary...... 0 72 off
Good Ordinary.................. LOG off

Even
Good Middling Tinged__
Strict Good Mid. Tinged.c. 0'20 on
Strict Middling Tinged ... 0-06 off
Middling T in ged ........... 0T2 oil
Strict Low Mid. Tinged... O'34 off
Middling Stained ............ 0'50 off
Strict Low Mid. Stained... 1'06 off
Low Middling Stained..... X'50 off

On th is basis th e o ffic ia l p r ic e s fo r a fe w o l th e g r a d e s for
th e p a st w e e k — Jan, 11 to Jan . 17— w o u ld b e as fo llo w s ,

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L e a v in g
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T h e 'Vis ib l e s u p p l y o f C otton to -n ig h t , as m a d e u p b y
cable and teleg ra p h , is as fo llo w s , F oreign sto ck s, as w ell
as th e afloat, are th is w e e k ’s returns, and con seq u en tly ail
foreign figures are. b r o u g h t d o w n to T h u rsd a y ev en in g .
But to m ake th e to t a l th e co m p le te figures fo r to -n ig h t
■Jan, 17), we add th e ite m o f e x p o rts fr o m the U n ited States,
In clu din g in it th e e x p o r ts o f F rid a y on ly .

1901.
1900.
1902
1899
Stock at Liverpool.^.. .bales.. 900,000 668,000 713,000 1,618,000
Stock at L o n d o n .......
4,000
5,00© 12,000
2,000
Good Ordinary---------- ------7-25 7'25 7'25 7'25 7-B1 7'25
Total Great Britain stock . 905,000 680,000 715,000 1,622,000
Low Middling.......... ........... 7-87 7-87 7'87 7-87 7-93 7'87
11,000
18,000
13,000
16,00©
Middling....... .
8h
8h
BM
8h
85J6 8h
211,000 192,000 237,000 416,000
Good Middling...._ . . . . . . . . . . 8-57 8'57 8'57 8'57 8'63 8'57
_
Stock at Amsterdam.
2.000
3,000
Middling F a ir ............ ...... 905 9 05 905 9'05 9 11 9-05
Stock at Kotterdam
.
200
200
200
3,000
4.000
5 000
GULF.
8a.i, M o n T s e s W « « 3 T t e .
F r I Stock at Antwerp....
.
6,000
180,000 120.000 253,000 295,000
2,000
3.000
4,000
Good Ordinary...... ................ 7-50 7*50 7'50 7'50 7-56 7'50 Stock at Marseilles.
4,000
74,000
49,000
Low Middling................... 8T2 8T2 8'12 S'12 8T8 8 12
69,000
57,000
Middling,._____ . . . . . . . . . ____
34,000
41,000
37,000
49,000
8h
803
89ie 80s
8%
8h
3,000
2,000
6,000
Good Middling....... ... .. . . . . . 8'82 8'82 8'82 8'82 8‘88 8'82 Stock at Trieste.................. .
11,000
Middling F a ir....................... 9-30 9-30 9'30 9'30 9'36 9'30
Total Continental stocks. 517,050 425,200 631,200 857,200
Tetal European stocks....1,422,000 1,105,200 1,346,200 2,479,20©
W
T kFrI.
.
STAINED.
T u e s e d
S a t . M o n
India ootton afloat for Europe 43,000 104.000
19,000
59,000
Amer. cotton afloat for E’rope. 672,000 612.000 467,000 750,000
6
6 -7 5 7 5 6 -7 5 6 -8 1 6 7 5
Low Middling.™.................. 6 ' 7 5
56,000
83,000
63,000
41,000
7 - 7 5 7 - 8 1 7 - 7 5 Egypt. Brazil,&o., aflt.for E’pe
7 '7 5
Middling....................... ......... 7 ' 7 5 7 ' 7 5
7
7 '9 1
77 9' 9 7 1 Stock In Alexandria, Egypt... 2 29,000 187.000 200,000 260,000
7 '9 1 - 9 1
Strict Low Middling Tinged... 7 ' 9 1
8 3 8 ' 2 5 Stock In Bombay, India......... 281,000 331.000 300,000 280,000
1
Good Middling Tinged............ 8 ' 2 5 8 - 2 5 8 ' 2 5 8 - 2 5
Stock in United States ports.. 1,033,744 951,034 1,028,602 1,149,209
The q u ota tion s fo r m id d lin g u p la n d a t N ew Y o r k on Stook in U. 8. interior towns.. 667,341 788,989 755,849 673,768
United States exports to-day.. 70,653
23,492
37.663
37,078
Jan. 17 for e a ch o f th e p ast 82 y ea rs h a v e been as fo llo w s ,
Total visible supply.........4.474,738 4,135,715 4,217,314 5,729,255
1 8 7 8 .. . . o .l IH
1 9 0 2 . . . . o8 . h
1 8 9 4 . .. .o .
S it e
. . . 0 8 89 6 .1 8
1 .
5
Of the above, totals of American and other descriptions are as follows:
1 9 0 .1. . . . . . . . 9 7e
1 8 8 5 . . . . . . I 10 1877....... .13*8
1 8 9 3 ........... 9 h
.
H
A m erica n —
....13
1 9 0 .0. . . . . . . . 7 1 h 0 1 8 9 2 . . . . . 7 ® i a 1 8 8 4 ........... l O i i i a 1876..
.
Liverpool stook.........bales. 803,000 691.000 580,000 1,507,000
1 8 9 .9. . . . . . . . 6
1 8 9 1 . . . . . . . . 9 7 1 6 1 8 8 3 . . . . . . .1. 0 3 1 6 1 875 .........15ia
Continental s to ck s ......... ... 483,000 398.000 599,000 817,000
1874.........16ie
1 8 9 .8. . . . . . . . 5 7s
.
1 8 9 0
. . . . . l O h 1 a 8 8 2 . . . . . . .1 2
American afloat for Europe... 672,000 612.000 467,000 750,000
1 8 9 7. . . . . . . . 7 h
.
1 8 8 9
. . . . . . .1. 1 U8 8 11 6. 1873.........20»s
3
United States stock...... ..
1,033,744 951,034 1,028,602 1,149,209
1872.........21%
1 8 9 6. . . . . . . . 8 3 i a 1 8 8 8
.
.
1 8 8 0 . . . . . . .1 2 %
United States interior stocks. 667,341 788,989 755,849 673,768
1 8 9 .5. . . . . . . . 6 %
1871.........158a
1 8 8 7 . . . . . .
9 7 1l a8 7 9 .
United States exports to-day.. 70,653
23,492
87,663
37,078
Noth.— Oct. 1,1874, grades of ootton as quoted were changed.
On
Total American......... ..... .3,729,738 3,364,515
8,468,1144,934,055
Ac lording to the new classification Middling was on that day quoted
Mast I n d i a n . B r a s il , A c .—
8^0 lower than Middling of the old classification.
Liverpool stock...........
97,000
77,000 133,000 111,000
MARKET AND HALES.
London sto ck ........... ....
5,000
12,000
2,000
4,000.
T h e t o t a l sa les o f c o t t o n o n th e s p o t e a c h d a y d u r in g th e Continental stocks____....
34000
27,200
32,200
40,200
India afloat for Europe... . . . .
43,000 104,000
43.000
19,000
59,000
w e e k are in d ica te d in th e fo l lo w in g s ta t e m e n t.
F o r th e
56,000
33,000
63,000
Egypt.
41,000
co n v e n ie n ce o f th e re a d e r w e a ls o a d d c o lu m n s w h ic h sh o w Stock mBrazil, &c., afloat....................... 56,000
Alexandria, Egypt... 229,000 187,000 200,000 260,000
a t a g la n ce h ow th e m a rk e t fo r s p o ts a n d fu t u r e s c lo s e d on Stock in Bombay, India_ ... 281,000 331,000 300,000 280,000
_
281,000
sa m e days.
Total East India, did....... 745,030 771,200
749,200795,200
3,468,1144,934,055
Total Amerioan.............. .3,729,738 8,364,515
SALES OF 8PO t & CONTRACT.
FOT0Rm
Total visible BUpply....__ 4,474,738 4,185,715 4,217.314 5,729,255
Sp o t M a r k e t
Market
Middling Upland, Llverpool..
40iad.
33j«d.
'Sis’. d.
4U^32d.
C on­
Ex­
OonOLOHBD,
Closed .
Middling Upland, New York..
8ho.
Oho.
7!3ieo.
s u m p . tract. Totat.
’80 .
p o r t.
8®8d,
tigypt Good Brown, Liverpool
6d.
7hed.
Perav. Bough Good, Liverpool
7d.
7hd.
....
7%L
....
B’rly steady.
40i«d.
5%d.
1,300 1,300 Broach Fine, Liverpool...... .
Monday..
....
Quiet (fcst'dy
4^d.
Shd.
686 Tinnevelly Good, Liverpool...
600
Hceady........
"80
UPLANDS.

S a t .

M

T ne e s W ® « £
o

F r i .

X

Firm............
Thursday.. Quiet at he adv. Very steady
Friday..... Quiet at lie
Quiet...........
Total......L.

— .....

....
....

828
105
345

200 1,028
105
345
....

1,364 2,100

8,464

H T C ontin ental im p orts pa8t w eek have been 128,000 bales.
T he a bove figures in d ica te an inoreane in 1902 o f 339,028
bales as com p a red w ith same date o f 1901, a ga in o f 257,424
bales from 1900 and a declin e o f 1,254,517 bales from 1819

THE

162

CHRONICLE

IV o l .

LXXIV.

A t tux Interior Towns the movement—that Is the reoelpts
Q u o t a t i o n f s o r M i d d u n oC o t t o n a t O t h e r M a r k e t. —
s
(or the week and since September 1, the shipments for the Below are closing quotations o f m iddling cotton at Southern
week and the stocks to-night, and the same Items for the and other principal cotton markets for each day o f the week.
aorreepondlng period of 1900-01 —1s set out In detail below.
O O G Q O TIO S N B M D G C T O O —
L SIN U TA N O ID LIN O T N N
J a n . 17.
Batur.
Mon.
Tuet.
Wednee. Thun.
Fri.

v

ill mtigttiH Y* •' i ? f &
*F

-■

S

: : : ! I Sfii i S: : : : : :
co

to

Galveston...
New Orleans
Mobile..... .
Savannah...
Charleston..
Wilmington.
Norfolk___
Boston.......
Baltimore . .
Philadelphia
Augusta__
Memphis__
8t. Louis__
Houston__
Olnolnnatl..
Loulsvllie. .

n * ■'
&
^

: : : : : T: P: : f

to

ta *-* wis -j
ta
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PFFS 9
Vasts( X H ‘ Q O C X «t^ r ^»J Mta i O < CV(3 w * tia Dc l -“( » l - i oowwWoaets
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ao < tiO # .^ -^ (xiw o < < s, t a * ' ^ ® ® ' j a o w i » o i < o ® ^ a t ) a s O a " W ® y < r -

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■a<io^m o5»ft. owe^ii^coetcWtiuxaittHBciHMM
The aoove totals show that the Interior stocks have de­
creased during the week 15,386 bales, and are to-night 121,658
bales less than at same period last year. The receipts at all
tow ns have been 218,606 bales less than same week last year.
Ov e b l a n d Mo vem ent

fob the

W

eek and

S in c e S e p t . 1.—

W e give below a statement show ing the overland m ovem ent
for the week and since Sept. 1, as made np fro m telegraphic
reports Friday night. The results fo r the w eek ending
Jan. 17 and since Sept. 1 in the last tw o years are as follow s.
1901-1902.
January 17.

Nines
Week. Bept. 1.

1900-1901.
Week.

Shipped—
Via St. L ou ie.___ _________
_
29,247 600,372 22,706
Via C a ir o ......
. .....
3,121
76,730 8,329
Via PaAnflfth.. . . . . . . . . . . r____ 168
24
765
2,819
Via Book Island....... —. . . . . . . . . .
24,550
8,376 114,385 4,724
Via L o u l s v l l i e . ______
3,609
61,685 3,106
Via Cluolunatl...........................
VI* other routes, Ao__________ 20,607 223,575 10,021

Since
Bept. 1.
621,438
159,602
5,145
44,686
87,737
49,847
172,222

Total gross overland._______ 67,679 1,000,821 49,819 1,140,677
Deduct shipments—
Overland to H. Y .,B oston , &c.. 19,703 220,324 13,436 243,217
79,856
38,932 1,175
986
Between interior tow n s.______
26,819
1,062
25,343 2,955
Inland, Ac., from South.............
21,751

284,599 17,566

349,892

Leaving total net overland*.. 46,928
* Including movement by rail to Canada.

715,722 32,253

790,785

Total to he d edu cted....

The foregoing shows the week’s net overland movement
this year has been 45,928 bales, against 32,253 bales fo r the
week in 1901, and that fo r the season to date the aggregate net
overland exhibits a decrease from a year ago o f 75,068 bales.
I n Sight and Spinners•
Takings.

1901-1902.
Week.

Nines
Bept. 1.

1900-1901.
Week.

Nines
Bept. 1.

Receipts at ports to Jan. 17......... 228,486 5,398,847 174,064 5,007,682
Net overland to Jan. 17................ 46,928 715,722 82,253 790,785
Southern consumption to Jan. 17. 37,000 694,000 32,000 606,000
311,414 6,808,669 238,317 6,404,467
*15,386 538,036 *5,108 744,362

Total marketed...........
interior stooks In exoess.

233,209
Came Into sight during week. 296,028
7,346,605
7,148,829
Total In sight Jan. 17....
North’n spinners tak’gs to Jan. 17 64,486 1,149,802 63,008 1,222,254
* Decrease during week.

Movement into sight in previous years.
Week—

1900—Jan.
1899—Jan.
1898—Jan.
1897—Jan.

19................
20................
21.................
22................

Bales.

194,371
263,968
273,243
138,361

Since Sept. 1—
Bales.
1898-99—
Jan. 20...... 8,499,143
1897-98—
Jan. 21...... 8,190,862

1899-00—Jan. 19......... 6,371,457
1896-97-Jan.

22....... 6,799,759

7i6ia
77
S
7\
7l*i«
71*18
77
s
8
8>
S
83ie
8*«
8lia
77
s
77
s
7i*ie
8ie
8hi

71*18
71*18
77
e
77
s
7S
i
7%
71*18
71*18
7%
71*18
77
s
77
S
8
8
81*
8*4
sq
81
*
8»*
8*8
8 <>8^16 81lfl® *
t
8
77
s
7^8
77
s
71*18
71*18
71*18
8hj
H
ie
8
8

8
71*i«
7\
77
e
71*18
74i
8
8>*
8i*
8hi
8i*
71*16
71*18
71*18
8ie
8

8
71*18
7i*ie
77
s
7i*ta
7%
8
8>*
8>*
8yie
8V»Sla
71*18
71*18
71*16
8i*
She

8
71*ie
71*16
77
s
71*16
7\
8
86,6
8»*
8i-i
8i*
71*18
71*16
71*18
81*
She

The closing quotations to-day (Friday) at other im portant
Southern markets were as follows.

Athens...........
Atlanta........
Charlotte.......
Columbus, Q a.

8iia I Columbus, Miss
7i*i6 Eufaula........
77
8
Little Rook....
7*a |Montgomery...

7>o
7i*i8
7»s
7Hxg

I N a s h v i l. .l .e. . . . . .
I
|Natohea..........

R a l e i g . .h. . . . . . . . .
[ S h r e v e p o_ r _
_t
I

7 7*

7^i

7 78
7 i 3 19

W e a t h e rR e p o r t s y T e l e g r a .p —h Our telegraphic ad­
b
vices this evening indicate that the weather has, on the
whole, been very favorable for the movement o f cotton the
past week, little or no rain having fallen. In consequence
marketing has continued on a liberal scale.
Galveston, Texas.—A bout all sections o f the State are suf­
fering from a severe winter drought. Good rains are badly
needed generally. W e have had rain on two days during the
week, to the extent o f ninety-four hundredths o f an inch.
The thermometer has averaged 56, the highest being 66 and
the lowest 46.
Corpus Christi, Texas.—There has been raiD on tw o days
o f the week, the precipitation reaching one inch and eightyeight hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 57, rang­
ing from 46 to 68.
San Antonio, Texas.—It has been showery on fou r days of
the week, the precipitation being fifty-eight hundredths of
an inch. The thermometer has ranged from 36 to 72, aver­
aging 59.
Fort Worth, Texas.—There has been no rain the past
week. Average thermometer 49, highest 70, lowest 28.
Palestine, Texas.—Dry weather has prevailed all the week.
The thermometer has averaged 53, the highest being 70 and
the lowest 36.
New Orleans, Louisiana.—There has been no rain during
the week. The thermometer has averaged 52.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—There has been no rain during the
week. The thermometer has ranged from 29 to 67, aver­
aging 47.
Columbus, Mississippi.—W e have had no rain the past
week. Average thermometer 36, highest 52, lowest 20.
Leland, Mississippi.—It has been dry all the week. Ther­
mometer has averaged 42 7, the highest being 69 and the low ­
est 20.
Vicksburg, Mississippi.—There hes been no rain daring the
week. The thermometer has averaged 45, ranging from 28
to 64.
Meridian, Mississippi.— The weather has been clear all the
week and favorable for plowing.
Planters are making
good progress in preparing land fo r the next crop.
Greenville, Mississippi.—The weather has been clear and
moderate the past week.
Little Rock, Arkansas.—W e have had no rain during the
week. The thermometer has averaged 44, the highest being
68 and the lowest 23.
Helena, Arkansas.—Plow ing has commenced. The weather
has been clear all the week. The thermometer has averaged
40, ranging from 19 to 61
Memphis, Tennessee.—The weather has been dry all the
week. Thermometer ranged from 21‘3 to 65*6, averaging 41*9.
Mobile, Alabama.— Rain has fallen to an inappreciable ex­
tent during the week. The thermometer has averaged 47,
the highest being 63 and the lowest 27.
Montgomery, Alabama.—It has been dry all the week. The
thermometer has averaged 42, ranging from 23 to 64.
Selma, Alabama.—W e have had no rain the past week.
The thermometer has ranged from 28 to 67, averaging 45.
Madison, Florida.—W e have had rain on one day of the
week, the rainfall being seventy hundredths o f an inch.
Average thermometer 47, highest 70; lowest 24.
Augusta, Georgia. —It has rained on one day o f the week,
the precipitation being seven hundredths o f an inch. Ther­
mometer has averaged 40,^the highest being 68 and the low ­
est 23.
Savannah, Georgia.— T
here has been no rain daring the
week. The thermometer has averaged 46, ranging from 26
to 70.
Charleston, South Carolina.—It has rained on one day of
the week, to an inappreciable extent. The thermometer has
ranged from 25 to 68, averaging 44.
Stateburg, South Carolina,—W e have had no rain the past
week, but the weather is threatening to-day. Average ther­
mometer 42, highest 71, lowest 21.
Greenwood, 8 >uth Carolina.—There has been uo rain dur­
ing the week. The thermometer has averaged 39. ranging
frorn 27 to 51.

THE CHRONICLE

J a n u a r y 18, 1902.]

Charlotte, North Carolina.—There has been rain on one
day daring the week, to the extent of eight hundredths* of
an inch. The thermometer has ranged from 20 to *4, aver­
aging 42.
The following statement we have also received by telegraph,
showing the height of the rivers at the points named, at
8 o’clock Jan. 16, 1902, and Jan. 17, 1901.
J a n . 16, '02. J a n . 1 7 /0 1 .

Feet.

*1
97
26'8
6-7
12-7

reoelpte
of cotton at Bombay and the shipments from all India ports
for the woek ending Jan. 16, and for the season from Sept. 1
to Jan. 16 for three years have been as follows:
I n d ia C otto n M o v e m e n t

from a l l

1901,-02
Receipts at—

Bombay........... 101,000

Bombay—
1901 0 2 ..
1900-01..
1899 0 0 ..
Calcutta—
1901 0 2 ..
1900-01..
1893-00..
M a d ras1901-02 .
1900-01..
1899-00..
All others—
1901-02..
1900-01..
1899 0 0 ..
Total all—
1901 0 2 ..
1900-01..
1899-00..

Great
Britain.

668,000 86,000

Conti­
nent.

21,000
19,000

......

2,000

1,000

Total.

Great
Britain .

Conti­
nent.

90,000
167,000
16,000

90,000
193,000
16,000

1,000

1,000
1,000
1,000

4,000
7,000
5,000

5,000
8,000
6,000

7,000

3,000
9,000
1,000

3,000
16,000
1,000

7,000

31,000
26,000
10,000

31,000
33,000
10,000

1,000
41,000
1,000

128,000
209,000
82,000

129,000
250,000
33,000

2,000

.........
23,000
19,000
1,000

----------

Total.

26,000

......

3,000

457,000

21,000
21,000

1,000
2,000

Sept. 1,

508,000 41,000

......

______

Since

Fee*.

Since September 1.

......

1,000

1899 1900.

Sines
Sept. 1.

Fee*.

For the Week.
Mssports
fro m —

P o r t s . —The

1900 01.

JSinet
Sept. 1.

Fee*.

23.000
22,000
1,000

Exports of C otton G oods from G reat B ritain .— below
we give the exports of cotton yarn, goody, See., from Great
Britain for the month of December and since January 1 in
1901 and 1900, as compiled by us from the British Board
of Trade returns. It will be noticed that we have reduced
_____
the movement all to pounds.
Yarnd. Thread.

According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show an
with last year in the week’s receipts of
15.000 bales. Exports from all India ports reoord a gain of
1.000 bales during the week and sinoe September 1 show a
decrease of 121,000 bales.

1001.

A

l e x a n d r ia

R

e c e ip t s

and

S h ip m e n t s

of

C o t t o n .—

Alexandria, E g yp t,
January 15.
Receipts (oantars*). . .
This week...... ...........
Sinoe Sept. 1 .............

1901-02.

1900-01.

180,000
4,650,000

190,000
3,517,000

This
week.

Since
Sept. 1.

S n o r t s (bales)—
To Liverpool..—. . . . 11,000 185.000
To Continent t ......... 14,000 241.000

This
week.

Sinee
Sept. 1.

1899-1900.
240,000
4,913,000
This
vouk.

Since
Sept. 1.

0,000 178.000 8,000 252.000
4,000 181.000 19,000 232.000

Total B urope........ 25,000 426,000 10,000 309,000 27,000 484,000
* Aoantarls 98 pounds.
t Of which to America In 1901-02, S I,088 bales; In 1900-01, 26,409
bales; in 1899-1900, 53,076 bales.

This statement shows that the receipts for the week
ending Jan. 15 were 180,000 oantars and the shipments to
all Europe 25,000 bales.
Manchester Ma r k e t . —Our report received by cable
to-night from Manchester states that the market is firm for
yarns and quiet for shirtings. The demand for both yarns
and cloth is improving. We give the prices for to-day
below and leave those tor previous weekB of this and last
year for comparison.

1000.

Total o f M l.

19OL 1900.

1001.

L b t.
Yds.
Yds.
Lbs.
4 0 4 ,0 4 7
0
J a n u a r y . . . . .1. 7 , 1 9 3 1 9 , 8 0 3 4 8 2 , 8 3 8
.
4 2 0 ,4 1 0
4 3 8 18, 0 0 8
0, 12
F e b r u a r y . .1. 6 , 8 7 6 1 7 , 1 4 0
.
4
4 0 0 , 7 77 92 , 6 9 4
1 9 ,8 4 7 2 0 ,8 9 2
M a r c .h . . . . . . . . 1 6 , 0 4 6
.
Lbs.

1 91 0 0 1 .
0 .

Lbs.

Lbs.

1900.
Lbs.

1 ,87 , 5 6 6 1 0 8 , 9 4 8 1 0 8 , 0 2 8
8 22
8 3 ,6 1 0
9 0 ,7 4 4 0 ,0 5 9
10
8 8 ,2 6 0
0 5 ,6 1 0 8 ,0 9 7
80

T o t - l s t q u a 4r 8 , 8 1 4 6 0 , 7 9 0 1 , 8 2 9 . 0 4 41 , 8 7 0 , 1 8 12 6 2 , 4 1 72 6 9 , 9 9 4 8 0 1 , 2 3 1 8 1 0 , 7 8 4
.
1 8 ,7 8 4 1 7 ,4 8 0 4 0 7 ,5 7 6
7
7 9 ,5 6 9
7 7 ,4 8 6
0 174
9 4 ,2 5 8
A p r i. .l . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 , 0 1 6
M a y. . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 , 1 1 b 1 8 , 0 8 0 4 2 0 , 6 0 8 4 2 9 , 2 6 6 7 9 , 9 0 2 8 1 , 6 1 0 9 6 , 0 8 0 0 8 . 2 4 0
.
1 3 ,0 4 4 2 4 ,1 8 3 8 8 0 ,6 9 6 8 0 ,6 4 8
2
7 3 ,4 9 7
9 4 ,8571 , 4 8 9
1
J u n .e. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 , 0 0 1
T o t . 2 d q u a 4r 6 , 6 8 4 4 7 , 0 3 91 , 2 0 2 , 1 0 11 , 2 2 3 , 4 8 6
.

2 4 0 ,1 6 4

2 3 2 ,6 0 8 ,7 9 8 8 7 9 ,6 8 2
285

J u l y. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 , 4 4 2 1 6 , 4 7 1 4 7 7 , 8 1 9 4 5 2 , 9 9 9 9 0 , 8 1 0 8 6 , 1 2 1 1 0 9 , 2 8 2 1 0 1 , 6 9 2
.
4 7 5 ,2 8 9
3 8 9 0 6, 8 55 0 7 4 , 0 6 0 1 0 7 , 7 1 0 8 8 , 2 0 9
, 3
A u g u s. . t. . . . . . . 1 7 , 3 6 1 1 4 , 1 6 8
S e p t e m b e r . 1. .0 , 2 8 8 1 4 , 8 2 3 4 4 2 . 8 G 0 3 8 0 ( 3 7 4 8 4 , 0 8 7 7 8 , 4 6 5 1 0 0 , 8 8 6 8 7 , 7 7 8
1
T o t . 8 d q u a 6r 2 , 0 9 1 4 3 , 9 1 71 , 3 9 6 , 4 0 8 , 2 2 8 , 9 0 82 0 6 , 2 8 62 3 3 , 0 3 2 3 1 7 , 3 7 7 2 7 7 , 6 7 0
.
1 4 ,8 2 4 4 2 ,1 7 1 8 8 6 ,4 3 0 8 4 ,0 6 3 7 8 ,8 8 6
1
1 0 2 ,7 5 4
8 8 ,1 0 7
O c t o b e. . r . . . 1 8 , 0 9 1
.
4 3 2 ,4 7 5
4 1 8 20, 2 2 0 7 9 , 2 0 8 9 9 , 6 8 1 9 3 3 4 3
0, 3
N o v e m b e r . 1. .7 , 4 8 1 1 4 , 0 3 5
6 0 2 ,4 6 6
4 0 7 , 1 8 6 7 70 ,64 , 0 8 4
52
1 1 3 , 0 4 08 2 , 9 4 8
D e c e m b e r . 1. 7 , 5 2 4 1 5 , 6 4 6
.
T o t . l t h q u a 6r 8. , 6 7 6

4 6 , 0 10 ,28 7 0 , 0 0 2

1 , 2 0 9 , 2 5 8 , 8 0 78 2 9 , 8 9 8 0 1 6 , 4 8 8 2 7 4 , 8 9 8
201
*
9 5 0 , 1 1 61 , 2 1 9 , 8 8 1 , 1 4 8 , 8 0 3
9

6
T o t a l y e a r2 .0 .0. , 2 1 51 9 2 , 7 7 85 , 3 0 4 , 0 1 5 , 0 3 1 , 7 2 7

1 ,0 3 1
2 9 ,2 4 8

1 ,0 2 1
3 0 ,0 3 $

T o t a l e x p o r t s o f c o t t o n m a n u f a c t u r e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . ,. 2 . 6 . 0 . .. 1. .6. .l8., 1 7 0 , e 5 8
. . . .
* 1 ,0 1 9 ,8 7 1

The foregoing shows that there has been exported from the
United Kingdom during the twelve months 1,250,168,000 lbs.
of manufactured cotton, against 1,179,953,000 lbs. last year, or
an increase of 70,215,000 lbs.
A further matter of interest is the destination of these
exports, and we have therefore prepared the following
statements, showing the amounts taken by the principal
countries during December and since January 1 in each of
the last three years.
exports of

p ie c e

goods and

y a r n s t o p r in c ip a l

o o w t r ie b

m

DECEMBER AND FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31.

increase compared

Through arrangements we made with Messrs. Davis,
Benaohi & Co., of Liverpool and Alexandria, we now
receive a weekly cable of the movements of cotton at
Alexandria, Egypt. The following are the reoeipts and
shipments for the past week and for the corresponding
week of the previous two years.

Oloth.

0 0 0 * omitted.

Feet.

7-1
15-3
60
06
252

Hew Orleans—
M e m p h is .........
Nashville.............
Shreveport..........
Vicksburg............ ......... Above sero of gauge.

163

P iece Goods—Y ards.
(000s om itted .)

December.

1901.

1000.

Jan. 1 to Dec 8 1 .

1 8 9 9 .1 9 0 1 .

B a s t I n d i e. . s. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4 0 , 614840 , 7 0 5 1 7 0 . 0 2 ,76 1 5 , 9 4 1
5
2
T u r k e y , E g y p t a n d A f r i8c 3a, 7. 9 . 3 6 5 , 0 2 3
.
0 1 ,3 8 9 4 0 ,3 1 6
1
2 8 , 4 3047 , 0 0 0 6 6 4 , 3 9 4
C h i n a a n d J a p. . a . .n. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4 , 4 6 4
. .
.
2 1 ,9 1 2 8 1 ,3 8 8
6
E u r o p e ( e x c e p t T u r k e y 2) 2 ...0. .2. .6. 2 1 , 8 0 9
.
4 4 ,1 4 4 1 1 3 6 5
9
S o u t h A m e r. .i . c. . a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. 6 . 7 4 0 4 6 , 9 6 6
.
2. 6 , 4 2 1 2 9 , 4 8 3 3 0 , 8 4 0 2 8 2 , 8 1 4
N o r t h A m e r i..c. .a. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 7 2 ,4
A l l o t h e r o o u n t. .r. .i . e. . s . . . . . . . . 2 8 , 8 7 0 2 9 , 1 8 9 3 1 , 1 2 9
.

1900.

1899.

. 2 1 2 . 9 3 72 , 4 8 3 , 1 4 4
7 4 9 ,6 2 3 7 8 2 .6 0 2
6 7 6 ,0 0 0 6 ,1 8 1
4
2 9 2 ,6 0 0
2 9 2 ,2 8 1
4 0 0 ,2 6 0 5 ,9 8 7
6
3 3 1 ,4 9 6 8 ,6 9 8
32
68
4 0 9 ,1 6 9
4 0 1 ,1 9

T o t a l y a r. .d. . s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. .0. 2 , 4 5 04 0 7 . 0 5 84 2 0 , 4 8 76 . 8 0 4 , 0 1 5 , 0 3 1 , 7 2 7 5 , 4 8 8 , 0 4 4
.
2 4 , 4 9£ 2 , 1 8 1 £ 5 0 , 4 9 9 £ 6 2 , 8 8 6 £ 6 0 , 8 0 2
4
T o t a l v a l . u . . e. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. 5 , 1 0 2
.
Y arn s—Lbs.

H
G
O
B
C
T
A

( 0 0 0 * om itted .)
o l l a n . .d. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 ,28 ,02 04 0 2 , 1 3 ! 2 6 , 0 0 8 2 0 , 4 2 3
2 0 ,3 8 8
e r m a n. . .y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. , 7 4 3 1 , 9 7 5 2 , 9 0 8 2 4 , 7 8 3
2 8 ,3 6 2
4 0 ,3 4 9
2 ,0 9 4 ,0 8 e
2
2 7 .8 0 3 4 ,7 2 1 8 7 ,3 1 6
8
t h . B u r o p e ( e x c e p t T u r2 k, 1e 1 y0
3 ,1 4 1
8 7 ,9 0 9
4 81 8 4. 6 26 0
, 0
a s t I n d i e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. ,. 2 . 2 0 3 , 0 6 9
. . .
1 4 .4 3 4
1 8 ,5 4 8
2 3 .8
h i n a a n d J a p a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 .,.1. .6. 8 1 , 0 4 0 1 , 8 9 1
.
23,
1 ,1 * 1
1 , 7 0 70 9 2 1 5 , 2 8 7
2 6 ,6 1 6
u r k e y a n d E g. . .y. .p. . .t . . . . . . . . 2 , 8 0 7
1 6 ,8 2 0 1 0 ,8 2 2 1 8 ,8 3 1
l l o t h e r o o n n t. r . .l .e. . s. . . . . . . . . 1 , 3 0 6 1 , 1 1 7 1 , 0 0 8
.
T o t a l l b. . .s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . 4 , 6 6 8 1 2 , 0 0 2 1 5 , 5 8 6 1 0 9 , 7 9 4
.
£ 0 4 5£ 7 , 9 7 7
1048 £604
T o t a l v a lu e ..

1 6 8 ,2 7 3 3 ,1 2 6
21
£ 7 ,7 4 3
£ 8 ,0 6 9

M emphis Cotton E xchange E lection .— The Memphis Cot­
ton Exchange held its annual election for officers on the 8th
inst., and the following were elected to serve daring the en­
suing year: N. C. Richards, President; W. E, McGehee, M.
H. Gunther and C. H. Crisman, Vice-Presidents; J. S. Patteson, C. B. Russell, K. Hester, H. B. Darning, Battle M.
Brown, W. F. Taylor and F. M. Crump, board of directors,
and John Armistead, Treasurer. Mr. Henry Hotter was
unanimously re-elected Secretary by the board of directors
on the following day. This position lie has held continuously
since March 15, 1881.
S h i p p i n g j n b w s .— A s shown on a previous page, the
•sports of ootton from the United States the past week have
reached 268,027 Dales. The shipments In detail, as made up
from mall and telegraphlo returns, are as follows:
Total Sales.

Ne w Y o r k —T o L iv erp ool, per steam ers G eorgian, 1,455___
Saxonia, 3 ,0 11......................................................... ....................
To Manchester, per steam er Raphael, 5 6 0 ................................
1901-02
1900-01.
To H avre, per steam ers John Sanderson, 6 3 ___La Gas­
cogne, 1,309 upland and 222 Sea Islan d_________________
8 1 lbs. Shirt­ Oott’n
*
8 > lbs. Bhirtr Oott’n
4
To Bremen, per steamer Karlsruhe, 1 0 4 ...................................
3 2 * Oop. inf/s, common Mid. 32* C o p . in g s , common Mid,
To Antw erp, per steam er St. Outhbert. 10 0 ............................
Twist.
Twist.
U p ld s
to finest.
to finest.
U p ld s
To Copenhagen, per steam er Louisiana. 5 0 ..............................
To Genoa, per steamers K aiserin Maria Theresa, 3 9 2 ___
.d
d.
d. s. d.
s. d.
(1.
s. d.
s. d.
d.
d.
Lom bardia, 65 4 ___Perugia, 1 ,9 1 4 ...........................................
D o .1 3
7
©7% 5 2 ©7 11
55b
To Piraeus, per steamer Lom bardia, 1 0 0 ..................................
4 1932 8*4 ©9*8 5 5 © 7 11
“ 20 7
m \ 5 2 ©7 11
5*«
838 ©93a 5 6 © 8 0
To Naples, per steam er Perugia. 150.............................. ..........
4 1032
“ 27 7tie©7t2j0 5 2 9 7 11
42132 838 ©9*8 5 5 © 8 0
5 1532 Ne w Orleans —T o L iv e rp o o l-J a n . 13—Steamer T actician,
Jan. 3 7
m \
6 H «© 7 10)« 4)7aa b'a ©9Hi 5 5 i « © 8 l 1 51733
^
20,602 .Jan. 15—Steamer Louisianian, 5 ,1 2 5 ....J a n . 16
“ 10 6i6J(r7 i iia 5 1 © 7 9
—Steamer D iotator, 9 ,1 00....... Jan. 17—Steamer Costa
4 17sa 8bi ©93s 5 6 ©8 lb i 5 1 0 3 2
“ 17 7
5 li* © 7 10
Rloan, 6 ,8 0 0 ....................................................................................
4 »,« H»* ©93g 5 0 © 8 l i « 511*32
To B elfast—Jan. 13—Steamer Carrlgan Head, 6,8 26............
G alveston Cotton E xchange E lection.—At the annual
To H avre—Jan. 14—8team er Holsatia, 7 ,9 99___Jan. 1 7 Steamers Andonl, 7,752; Inverlc, 10,612...............................
election of the Galveston Cotton Exchange and Board of
To Bremen—Jan. 15—Steamer Nordkap, 1,775....... ..............
Trade, held Jan. 7, the following officers to serve during 1902 G alveston —T o L iverpool—Jan. 16—Steamer Lake Champlain,
were elected: President, Julius Runge; Vice-President, I. H.
17.618...............................................................................................
To M anchester—Jan. 1 6 —Steamer Anselm a de Larrlnaga,
Kempner; Treasurer, John Sealy; board of directors, Jno. D.
12,362...............................................................................................
Rogers, Eustace Taylor, W. A . McVitle, W. F. Ladd, Jens
To B elfast—J an. 11—8tr. Inlshowen Head, 6,9 04..................
Moller, M. Muller and J, G. Currie. Mr. 8. O. Young con­
To H avre Jan. 10—Steamer Hem isphere, 11,853— Jan.
tinues as Secretary.
11 - Steamer M attewan, l l , O i 9 . . „ . ....... .................................

4,466
560
1,594
104

100

50

2,860
100
150

41,627
6,826
26,863
1,775
17,618
12,862
6,904
22,872

THE CHRONICLE

161

New Ouleaks— C on clu d ed )^
(
Total bale*.
To a.uutmi < •
Jan. XI-Steamer Lame, 2,758. ...Jan. 13—
dteamer Lord Iveagli, 1,898..........*_________ *
... 4,656
To Antwerp Jau, 10—
Steamer Middleham Castle, 7,322,.. 7,322
To Barcelona ian. 10—
Steamer Sollabe, 3 ,00 0.,..,.... ... 3,000
To Genoa—
Jau, 10—
Steamer Sollube, 4,970.
........... 4 ,9 7 0
MoeiLB—To Liverpool—
Jan. 10—
steamer Horsley. 7,837 ..... 7,537
f i c o l a - To Manebester-Jan. 17—
Steamer Velleda, 2,200. 2,200
rtHiJiA-suiN i To Antwerp—
Jau. 15—steamer Staff, 2.350....... 2,350
ojlv acmm- To Havre— Jan, LI—Steamer Bablostola, 4,542
—
upland and 18 Sea Inland. . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ..................... 4,580
9,938
To Bremen—
Jan. 10 Steamer Oyutlila, 9,938............ .
Brunswick- To Liverpool—
Jan, 10—
Steamer Sidra, 3,403.—
3,408
To Manchester—
Jan. 10—
Steamer Sidra, 1,394.. ...
..... 1,894
Charleston— Liverpool—
To
Jan. 10—Steamer Nether Holme,
3.248 upland and 7o8 Sea Island...................... . . . ... .... 8,988
To Bremen—
Jan. 15—
Steamer Bailor, 9,914__ . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9,914
Wilmington—To Liverpool—
Jan. 35—Steamer G> merle, 14,259 14,259
Non polk— Liverpool—
To
Jan. 14 Steamers Basil, 3,116; Gae­
tano, 1 ,5 5 3 ............................................. .................. 4,669
Boston—To Liverpool Jan. 9—
-Steamer Oeatrian, 986.....
Jau. 11—
Steamer Norseman 6,875........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,881
100
To London-Jan. 13—
Steamer Gambrtan, 100............ . ...
baltimoke— Liverpool—
To
Jan. 10 -str. Rowanmore, 3,317.. 3,317
To Bremen—
Jan. 11—
Steamer Gera, 8,092 ............. .— ..
3,092
Philadelphia— Liverpool - Jan. 10—8 tr. Waesland, 500. ..
To
500
To Manchester—
Jan. 10—Steamer Planet Neptnne, 2,100
.. Jau. 14—
Steamer Manchester Corporation, 3,000. ... 5,100
Sam Francisco— o Japan—Jan. 10-Steamer City of Peking,
T
l.rOO......... . . . . ... .... ..................... ........................
1 ,0 0 0
Seattle To Japan-Jan. 15—
Steamer Kaga Mara, 11,313.... 11,313
Tacoma— Japan—
'To
Jan, 13—
Steamers Duke of File, 3,567;
Glengarry, 1 ,6 8 1 ................. ................................. .
5,248
T o ta l.............__ . . . . . . . . ------. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268,027
Cotton freigh ts at N ew Y ork the past w eek have beets
as follow s,
S a tu r,

M on.

Tues.

W ed n es. Thurs.

12%
15
18
17%
17%
19
13
26
32

D ec.

Sales of the week.......bales.
Of which exporters took...
Of which speculators took.
Sales American,..............
Actual exp ort............ .
Forwarded....... . . . . . _ ....
_
Total stock—Estimated.......
Of which American—Est’d.
Total Import of the week.....
Of which American.........
Amount a flo a t................
Of which American..........

12%
15
18
17%
17%
19
13
26
32

F ri.

12%
Liverpool....... c.
1 5
15
Manchester...... c.
18
18
H a vre...,,........ e.
17%
17%
Bremen....
17%
17%
Hamburg.... ....c.
19
19
Ghent....... .. ...,c.
13
IS
Antwerp............c.
26
26
Beval, via Hull, .e.
32
Rev&l, via CanaLe.
32
8t. Petersburg..,c.
28
Barcelona. . . . . ..e .
28
28
28
28
28
Genoa...... ......... e. 18®21 17%-20 17%-20 17%-20 17%-20 17%-20
28
28
28
Trieste.........
28
28
28
Quotations are cents per 100 lbs.
LiYHBiPOOL.—
-By cable from L iverpool we have the folio® ,
ing statem ent o f the w eek’s sales, stocks, dfco., at th at port.
12%
16
18
17%
17%
19
13
26
32

12%
15
18
17%
17%
19
13
26
32

20.

59.000
2,100
3.000
50.000
8.000
83.000
620,000
555.000
116.000
116,000
404.000
853.000

Jan.

3

66,000
2,600
300
60,000
14,000
116,000
828,000
741.000
338.000
285.000
317.000
281.000

Jan.

12%

10. Jan, 17

54.000
2,900
1,400
49.000
15.000
79.000
943.000
840.000
209.000
176.000
815.000
278.000

53.000
1,200
1,000
47.000
8,000
93.000
900.000
803.000
58.000
42.000
334.000
822.000

[V ol . l x x i v .

J ute B utts, Bagging , & o,—The market for bagging has
been very quiet the past week, but prices are nominally un­
changed ut §%'\ for 1% lbs. and %%<s, for 2 lbs., standard
grades. Car lots of standard brands are quoted at 5%@8o,,
f. o. b,, according to quality. Jute butts also very quiet at
for paper quality and 2%@2%,g. for bagging
quality.

BREADS TUFFS.
F r id a y , Jan. 17, 1902
Only a small volume of business has been transacted the
past week in the market for wheat flour, and prices have been
weak and lower, reflecting the decline in values for the
grain. Buyers generally have withdrawn, preferring to hold
off awaiting more settled conditions. Advices received from
the Northwest report that prices have been reduced 10 to
20c. per barrel, and that nine mills have been idle the past
week; mills are reported holding off for lower prices for
wheat. City mills have been dull and lower. The demand
for rye flour has been dull, and the tone o f the market has
been easier. Buckwheat flour has had only a limited sale.
Corn meal has sold slow ly, and prices have been easier.
Speculation in wheat for future delivery has been fairly
active but at a sharp decline in prices. The depressing feat­
ure has been free selling for the account o f speculative hold­
ers to liquidate contracts. The embarrassment of a prominent
Western operator who was heavily long of wheat, rye and
other grains Had a demoralizing influence early in the week,
and the free selling to liquidate this account, coupled with
aggressive operations by the bear interests, resulted in a
sharp break in prices. A t the decline shorts came into the
market and bought freely to cover their contracts, and this
had a steadying influence, Another development favorable
to the market was a revival o f the export demand. The
break in the market brought prices down to exporters’ limits
and they became free buyers at both the seaboard and in­
terior points, their reported purchases for the week amount­
ing close to 3,000,000 bushels. The movement of the winterwheat crop has continued comparatively limited. Crop re­
ports from the winter-wheat belt have continued unfavora­
ble, complaints o f absence of snow protection and dry
weather being received. One authority states that the
weather has been somewhat unfavorable for growing wheat
but that not much injury is apparent. Country still firmly
holding wheat.
To-day there was a steadier market on
better foreign advices. Business in the spot market was less
active.
D A IL Y CLO SIN G P R IC E S O P N O . 2 B E D W IN T E R W H E A T EN N E W Y O R K ,
Cash wheat 1. o. b__ ..„»
March delivery in. ©lev...
May delivery in elev_ _
_
July delivery in elev._
_

Sat.

90%
88%
87%
87%

D A I L Y CLO SIN G P R IC K S O P N O.

Sat.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs,

F ri,

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs,

Fri.

88%
89%
88%
87%
88
87%
88
86%
85%
86%
85%
86%
85%
85%
86%
86%
85%
85%
85
85%
2 SP R IN G W H E A T IN OHIOAOO.

77%
77%
76%
76%
76%
J an. delivery in ©lev..... 78%
May delivery in ©lev..... 82%
81%
81%
80%
80%
80%
81%
80
80
80%
July delivery in elev..... 82%
80*4
Indian corn futures have been moderately active, but at
The tone o f the Liverpool m arket for spots and futures lower prices. The pressure to sell from speculative holders
each day of the week ending Jan. 17 and the daily closing to liquidate their contracts has increased, and in the absence
of important buying prices have steadily weakened. The re­
prices o f spot cotton , have been as follow s,
ports from the interior have been o f a fairly full crop move­
ment, considering the short crop, and with only a moderate
Tuesday. Wed’ day. Thwrsd’y Friday
Spot.
Safday. Monday.
distributing demand the market has been quick to feel the
influence of an increase in the offerings of actual supplies,
Market, J Quiet.
Steady. Firmer. Moderate Harden’g. Moderate with prices on the high basis that has been ruling for the
demand.
12:80 P, h , $
business
past few months. Business in the spot market at the sea­
4i%2 , 4916
4%
Mid. upi’ds.
4%
49i6
41932
board bas been quiet; prices have declined with futures, but
exporters have continued indifferent buyers, even on the lower
8,000
8,000
Sales... .... 5,000 11,000 10,000
8,000
500
€peo. &exp.
500
500
500
500
500
basis. To-day there was less pressure to sell and prices ad­
vanced slightly.
Futures.
D ALL Y CLO SIN G P R IC E S O P N O . 2 M IX E D CO RN IN N 1 W
Y O R K ..
Market ) Steady at Steady at Steady at Steady at Steady at Quiet at
Tues.
Wed. Thurs.
F ri,
Sat.
Mon.
opened. ) 2-64 de­ 1-64 de= 1-64 @ 3-64 partially 1-84 @2-64 1-64 de­
cline.
cline.
decline. 1-64 adv. advance.
cline.
69%
70
68
Cash corn f. o. b......... 70%
68%
67%
69%
67%
69%
May delivery in ©lev...„. 7 0 %
67%
67%
Br’ly gt’dy Quiet at Steady at Q’t&st’dy Quiet at Easy at
Market, | 1% pts. i@l% pt. 1@1% pts. l@i% pts. %@1 pt. 2%@3%pts July delivery in elev..... 6 9 %
68%
67%
67%
69%
07%
IP. M J decline. advance. advance. advance. advance. decline.
,
D A I L Y C L O SIN G P R IC E S O P NO. 2 M IX E D C O R N IN C H I C A G O V
Wed. Thurs,
Mon.
Tues,
Sat.
F ri,
The prices o f futures at Liverpool for each day are given
62%
61%
60%
59%
60%
below , Prices are on the basis o f U plands, G ood Ordinary Jan, delivery in elev..,.. 6 2 %
65%
63%
65%
63%
63%
May delivery In elev...... 6 5 %
clause, unless otherw ise stated,
65%
64%
63%
63%
63%
July delivery in elev...... 6 6 %
64%
63%
62%
62%
02%
The p r ic e s a r e given, in p e n ce a n d 6 4 th e. T h u s : 8 6 8 m em is Sept, delivery in elev,... 6 4 %
S 63-64<L, and 4 01 m ean s 4 l-04d.
Oats for future delivery at the Western market have been
moderately active but at lower prices. As in the other
Sat.
l« n .
T u es.
W ed . T h u rs.
FrL
speculative grain markets, liquidation by speculative holders
Jan. 11 Jan. 13. Jan 14. Jan. 15. J an . 16. Jan. 17. has been the feature, and under the increased pressure to sell
prices have gradually yielded. A t the decline there has been
12% 1 12% 4 12% 4 12% 4 12% 4 12% 4
P. M P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P. M P.M. fair buying by shorts to cover contracts. Locally the spot
.
.
market has been lower and only a limited amount o f busi­
d
d.
d.
d.
d.
d.
< d. d. d. d.
f.
d.
ness has been transacted at the decline. To-day there was
January_ 4 28 4 28 4 29 4 29 4 30 4 31 4 33 4 32 4 35 4 33 4 32 4 29 a fairly active and firmer market on renewed speculative
_
Jan.-Feb.... 4 27 4 27 4 28 4 29 4 29 4 30 4 32 4 32 4 34 4 32 4 31 4 29
Feb.-Moh.... 4 27 4 27 4 28 4 28 4 29 4 80 4 31 4 81 4 S3 4 32 4 31 4 28 buying.
D A IL Y C L O SIN G P R IC K S O P O A TS IN N E W
1TO K K .
Meh.-Apr... 4 27 4 27 4 28 4 28 4 29 4 SO 4 31 4 31 4 33 4 32 4 31 4 28
Sat.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed. Thurs,
Fri.
April-May... 4 28 4 28 4 28 4 23 4 29 4 30 4 31 4 31 4 33 4 32 4 31 4 28
4 30 4 31 4 31 4 84 4 32 4 81 4 28 do. 3 mixed in elev......
53 51%
51
51
50
50%
M ay- June... 4 28 4 28 4 29 4 29 4 29
55 54%
54
53%
58
53%
June-July... 4 28 4 28 4 29 4 29 4 29 4 30 4 SI 4 31 4 34 4 82 4 31 4 28 Sfo. 3 white in elev...—.
July-Aug... 4 28 4 28 4 29 4 29 4 29 4 30 4 31 4 31 4 23 4 32 4 81 4 28
D A IL Y CLOSIN G P R IC E S O P N O . 2 M IX E S ! O A T S IN 0 1 1 1 6 1 6 0 .
4 26 4 29 4 27 4 26 4 24
Aug.-Sept... 4 24 4 24 4 25 4 25 4 25 4 26 4 26
Sat
Mon.
P s*. W*i. Thurs. Fri.
m
Sept.-Oct... 4 16 416 4 17 4 17 4 17 4 17 4 17 4 18 4 20 4 28 4 17 4 16 M a y d e l i v e r y i n e l e v . . . .
4 5 %
4 5 %
4 5 %
4 4 %
Oet-.Nov__
J u ly d e liv e r y in e l e v ... .
4 0 %
4 0 39%
%
8 49 0% %
40
Nov.-Dee...
Sept, d e l i v e r In e l e v , . . . 38% 33%
y
38% 33
33%
3S%

THE CHRONICLE.

J anuary 18, 1902.

165

o f the m arket was considered firm, and other factors were
in favor o f seller.’. The A m erican goods are reported to
t r
© 4 2 f t have sold freely, but in other directions business has not
‘
N o m i n a l . P a t e n t , w i n_ _ _eMil 8 5
4 2 0
©shown any a ctivity.
4 7 ft
N o m in a l. C it y m il Is, p a t e n t .
A quiet re order demand has com e to
K y e llo a r .n u p e r t ln ©
8 2 ft
© 8 7 ft
0 0 ® 3 10
B u c k w h e a t t lo n r ..
2 2 0
©hand 5fo r spring-w eights, chiefly in staple varieties, a-id for
2 2
2 0 « 3 30
quick deliveries the m arket is decidedly firm. There has
(lo r n m e a l—
35 © 8 60
W e s t e r n , e_ _t _c _ H 5 0
© 3 6 0been no new feature in the overcoatings or cloakings division,
70 © 4 00
® 3
8 0
B r a n d y w i n_ _e _ 3 6 f t
9 0 © 4 75
a quiet business passing at previous prices.
c .Hells sa t p r i o e B b e l o w t h e m e f o r h a r r e l B . )
..)h
d o m e b t i o o t t o n G o o d . s — T h e e x p o r t s o f cotton goous
C
ORAIH
C o r n , p e r b u s h —
o . from this p o rt f o r the w eek en d in g Jan. 18 w ere 10,526o
o
o.
W e s t e r n m i .x. . .e. . d . . . . 0. f t 3 | © 6 8
.
.
87qn>89
packages, valu ed at J447,888, th e ir d e stin a tio n being to the
N o . 2 m i x_ e _d _ _ _ _ _ _C_ B q w O S
_
85 © 8 7
. .
W e s te r n
y e l. .l . o . .w . . .7. 0 % ® 7 2 14 points sp ecified In th e ta b le s b e l o w :
86qw 88

F ollo w in g are the cloning q u o m u o u r:
pi >o it
P i n ©_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
S u p e r f i n e .. . . . . . . . . . .
E x tr a , H '
i
........ 3
E x tr a , N o T
.. 3
»
O leare.................
B tra ig h te ...
.. 8
P a te n t, sp rin g
3
( W h e a t flo u t- i u

W h e a t, p e r bu si:
H ard M a n .. 1, J J ..
N ’ thern D u l., N u .t
B e d w in te r ,N o . 2
H a rd N. Y. N o. 2. 64 ©SftHi
K
O ats—M ix’ d ,p .b u s h . 4 9 V « 5 l k i
W h i t . .e. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3
© 5 8
N o . 2 m i x . .e. . d . . . . . . . 5 0 1f l © 5 1 1i i
.
B
N o. 2 w h ite .........
*s

e s te r n
w h i t e . . . . . . . . 7 0 ih ® 7 2 14
1902.
1 9 0 1 .
e , p e r b a s h N e w Y o r k t o J a n . 13
e s t e r. . .n. . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. .3
© 6 7
W ee k . M in ce J a n . 1
W eek. S in c e J a n . 1 ,
t a t e a n d J e r. . s . .e. . y . .6. 4 © 6 5
.
.
r l e y — W e s .t . e . .r. .n . . . . 6 . 5 © 7 2
.
.
.
G re a t B r it a in ...........................
33
45
4 3
9 0
e e d i n. . .g. . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . 6. o © 6 5
.
O th er E u r o p e a n ....................
82
21
88
2 6
A gricultural D epartment' s R eport on Cereals for C h i n a . . ................ ..................... 6,8 0 4
6,8 04
2 7 1
2 7 1
J an u ar y . —The follow in g was issued by the U. S. Depart
1,034
I n d ia ................................... .......
276
425
A r a b ia .........................................
1 ,7 5 0
ment o f Agriculture under date o f Jan. 10 :
443
5 3
826
A fr io a ................. ........................
6 7
T h e S t a tis tic ia n
o f t h e
D e p a r tm e n t o f
A g r i o u l t u r e ests Itn d ieas t.............................
e
im
e s
th e
913
4 4 8
529
1 ,1 4 3
W
a v e r a g e y ie ld p e r a o r e o f w h e a t In
t h e U n ite d
S t a t e s In 1 9 0 1 a t 1 4 -8
6
55
54
3 9
M e x ic o ..................... ...........
b u s h e ls , a s c o m p a r e d w ith
1 2 -3 b u s h e ls la 1 9 0 0 , 1 2 ‘ 3 b u s h e ls lu 1 8 9 9
5 7 3
29
175
2 8 5
ne l g e
1 5 * 3 b u s h e l s I n 1 8 9 8 , a n d 1 3 3 b u s h e l s t h e m e a n o f t h e Cae v trra a A m se roic a ..................
f th e
1,6 25
9 7 5
4 ,2 6 6
2,1 2 6
S o u th A m e r i c a . . . .............. .
la s t te n y e a r s .
323
2 7 7
seo
2 0 5
T h e n e w l y s e e d e d a r e a o f w i n t e r w h e a t i s p r o v i s i o n a lO yth e r C iom nat r i eds ..................
l ,es t u
t e
a t
3 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 a c r e s , a n in c r e a s e o f 5 -6
p e r c e n t u p o n t h e a r e a e s t im a t e d
10 ,525
6 7 6 7
2 ,3 4 0
1 4 ,3 7 6
T o t a l ............................. .
t o h a v e b e e n s o w n In t h e fa ll o f
1 9 0 0 .
T h e n e w ly s e e d e d a r e a
o f
w in t e r r y e is p r o v is io n a l ly e s t im a t e d a t
1 ,2 6 0 ,0 0 0
a c r e s , a n in c r e a s e o f 2 -9 p e r c e n t u p o n
t h e The e valu e i m f a th e N e w Y o rk e x p o rts since Jan, 1 to date
a r a e s t o
te d
t o h a v e b e e n s o w n in t h e f a ll o f 1 9 0 0 .
hasw been e fr614,936 tin 1902, again st $242,720 in 1901.
T h e D e p a r tm e n t h a s n o r e p o r ts a s t o t h e
c o n d it io n o f
in t
w h e a
la t e r th a n D e c e m b e r 1 .
A t th a t
d a te
i t w a s 8 6 - 7 p e r cSmallo purchasesr o f heavy b row n cottons have been m ade
e n t
f t h e n o
m a l , a s c o m p a r e d w i t h 9 7 - 1 i n 1 9 0 0 , 9 7 1 I n 1 8 9 9 , a n d fo 2 export 8 9 8 . week at previous prices, w ith bids for fair
9 r 6 l a 1 this
T h e D e p a r t m e n t w ill n o t is s u e a n y fu r t h e r e s t im a t e o f t h e t o t a l p r o ­
d u c t i o n o f a n y p r o d u c t o f t h e s o i l , n o r o f t h e n u m b e r oquantities turned s d ow n at slight differences between bid and
f fa r m
a n im a l ,
askingh prices. t tH om e b u yin g o f b oth brow n sheetings and
u n til it h a s m a a e s u c h a d ju s tm e n ts o f it s
e s t im a t e s
f o r
t e
la s
w o
y e a r s a s m a y s e e m t o b e r e q u ir e d
b y th e
r e p o r t s o f t h e C e continues sindifferent, w ith prices steady.
n s u s ,, b a e d
drills
Denims con ­
o n a n a c t u a l fa r m -to fa r m v is it a t io n , n o w in c o u r s e o f p u b lic a t io n

E xpo rts

W
v
w
S
a
F

P r o v is io n s , C otton and
P etroleum . —The exports of these articles durin g the month
o f Dacem bsr, and the tw elve m on th s, f o r the p ast three
years have oeen as fo llo w s :
E x p a r ts
f r o m U. S.

of

h h ead stu ffs ,

1901.
D ecem ber.

12 M on th s.

1900.
D ecem ber.

12 M on th s.

1899.
D ecem ber.

12 M on th s.

Q u a n tities.

Wheat.bush. 10,297,630 178.317.354 10.870,298 88,9)4 426 6,720.359 108,672,047
Flour...bbls. 1.821,9 5 19,23!,779 1,620.888 18,470,154 1,503,221 '18,476,444
Wheat...bu. 17.51-6,818 264,673,859 18,164,294 182,060,119 13,490,854 101818,045
1,215,645 100,8c. 8,916 21,110,63. 189,095,435 18 041 456 204,474,115
Com...bush
Tot. bush.. 18,812,258 385,543,775 39,274,825 371,165 554 32,182,310 393,290,100
V a lu es.
*
1
i
*
Wh’t & flour. 13,289.810 200,220,893 13,430,803 138,318,178
Corn & meal.
952,290 51.056,181 9,831,547 85,722,843
51,771 1,443,078
29,422 1,186,525
R ye.............
930,130 11,820,212
698,105 10,9.’6.145
Oats & meal.
463.160 3,698,391
98,000 5,888,178
Barley.......
Br’dstuffs.... 16,863,142 26 7,925,188 24,324,506 242,733,930
Provisions *. 19,813,564 224,327,219 18,203 212 202,251,899
Cotton........ 43,003 469 300,069.352 44,153,793 314,103,238
Petrol’m.&c. 6,329,16j 71,179 124 5,127,893 73,270.282
Tot. value. 84,604,34* 868,800,883 91,808,463 832,306,155
* In eluding cattle and hoes In all months and years.

tinue very scarce and very firm in price. T icks, plaids,
cheviots, etc., are in lim ited supply. T he dem and fo r these
is m oderate, but prices are firm. Business in bleached co t­
tons shows a m oderate increase and a steady m arket in all
grades. W id e sheetings bring lu ll prices fo r lim ited quan­
tities. There has been no business o f any m om ent in cotton
flannels or blankets. Orders fo r staple prints have increased
in num ber, but buyers are n ot taking ’any liberal quantity.
Stocks are in good con d ition and prices firm . F an cy prints
and fine printed fa b iics are quiet bu t firm. Buyers find it
difficult to place orders fo r either staple or dress-style giDghams for any near d elivery, ow in g to the over-sold condition
o f the m arket, and the tone is strong. R egular print cloth s
are unchanged at 3c., w ith m oderate sales. A fair business
has been done in odd goods at firm prices.
F o r e i g n D r y G o o d s ,— The m arket fo r foreign silks con ­
tinues very firm, but there has been a quieter demand
than o f late. R ibbons are quiet but firm. Fine grades o f
dress goods are firm, w ith a fair dem and. Linens are firm
w ith an increasing dem and. Burlaps con tin u e quiet, prices
steady.

$
*
9,974,791 149,842,673
7,439,380 84,017,251
28.460 3,098,528
570,786 14,270,611
1,155,095 8,220,008
19,168,418 ■259.447,471 Im p o r t a tio n s a n d W a r e h o u s e W it h d r a w a ls o t D ry €Jo*>de
17,445,824 197,704 310
g
s
& a
W
,
25,831,110 191.001,916 H) EH
-‘ a
q— S
j»
6,476,027 64,932,219 © « = i © s S g S J S Q *10 « » t s S - o
«*■
e * Q b cr
0p I
J
07,921,879 713,285,940 & Me 8*
M»
c r > k--’
o
to”
*
& • ’
is ;
ti ■ 5
-5
s
a\ • B S
«
s s

S i
w ; ; t {
9;
*
p
f i g u r e s a r e b a s e d o n t h e m o n t h l y& p Q e« l i m • n0* a f r y92 hi
r>
Q i
O
a
B u r e a u o f S t a t i s t i c s , a n d c o v e r a © b o ©u i t 9 g8 : p e : r c: e n t ®Pi © p - a * • 9 ; J
\
P • ( # i i s »: ® &
►
8
® ' !> i
.
ei a
e B iu 1 » M efr
S
&
e 0 s « t Jli. o
• «a 5 * > » 9 , O & 1 1
le s u s u a l ly g iv e n
h e r e s e e p a g « e 1 3 6 0.
a » 9t i
Pt < ii <
o
6
• » » * •
i
I j
•
I. St> e s * i
r
M
t o CO t o M
© C P to
T H E D R Y GOODS T R A D E .
CP
t o < 2 * o i CP t>0 H* t o
CO < J © c o ifw t a e p t ^ .
t o t o W X ) 0 3 t > 5 t O w <1 t o if* - © t o © © t o
©
N e w Y o r k . F r id a y , P , ML, Jan, 17, 19(2.
< J <1 <J © ^2 H < 1 © < J IP- © t o t o M
© if*
00 t o t o
The general conditions in the cotton goods division o f the t o t o
M M M
ts
t o 'C P
©
m arket have not undergone any im portan t change during CO w Mt ot o
|P. © t o - 1 CP
s
© © t o Hi 0 0 t o © <0 t o t o - l ©
the past week. There has been an im provem ent in the vo l­ 0 0 t o CP O
CO b o o bt> L a t o <J a 0 0
t
um e o f dem and during the past few days, but n ot o f a char­ CP It* o C O C O C O O - 4 w CP CP ©o I p t o c o t o t o
iSa
0
a r-*
<1 t o t o t o t o0 X
o
v ( i f * m ip- t o <x c o
acter to indicate any greater disposition than b efore on the
o

N o t e. — A l l t h e a b o v e
r e t u r n s is s u e d b y t h e
o f t h e t o t a l e x D o r t s
H T F o r o t h e r t a b

part o f buyers to g o ahead o f accru in g requirem ents in tbe
general run o f m erchandise.
R eports from the jo b b in g
trade show distribution on a more liberal scale, and replen­
ishing orders are therefore m ore numerous. Sellers in both
staple and fan cy cotton goods have as a rule maintained
prices. Stocks have not increased, and are still in unusually
good shape for the tim e o f year, w h ile the course o f tbe
m arket for raw cotton has been a supporting influence. It
w ould seem as though m anufacturers in the South believed
in a short cotton crop, as they show no anxiety to sell ahead
on the prevailing prices for cotton goods, and som e o f them
have intim ated to their agents that they are likely to bold
fo r even higher prices iD the near future, A g o x l business is
reported to have been done in new lines of staple worsteds
fo r men’s wear fo r fall, these opening this week on a low er
price level than had been looked for.
W o olen G o o d s . The A m erican W oolen C o m p a n y ’s Fall
lines o f clay worsted and serges for m en’s wear w ere opened
at the beginning o f the week, the range o f p rice s showing
considerable irregularity, but on an average r u lin g a b o u t 5
per cent low er than a year ago for standard g ra d es, These
are the only lines upon which coraparisous can be m ade.
There have been a num ber of new num bers introduced, m ak­
ing the com parison with a year ago less valuable than it
m ight otherw ise be. In high-grade serges new prices show
an advance of ~ per cent. The trade generally had counted
>
upon an opening not any low er than a year ago, as the tone

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166

THE

< H R O N IC L E

ST/ite m d C ity
News Items.
Duluth, Mluu,—Bands Valid, --A friendly salt was re­
cently instituted to test tlie validity of the proposed issue of
$00,000 bonds roextend the water and gas system of the city
to Woodland Park. The only question involved, it is said,
was whether or not the city had a right under the charter
revisions to issue bonds for such a purpose. The State
upreme Court on January 18 decided that such an issue of
bonds would be a valid obligation.
Helena, Mont.—Litigation.-^A temporary injunction was
recently rendered in the suit of the Helena Water Works
Company to restrain the city from embarking in municipal
ownership of a water system, because, as the company al­
leges, it has a franchise from the city and the city cannot,
therefore, go into the business. As was stated in the Chron­
icle at the time, this city in January, 1900, voted to extend
its limit of indebtedness for water purposes to 5$ over and
and above the 3# of the assessed valuation, as provided for
by law. When the city last spring was about to submit the
qaeation of issuing $014,000 bonds for water purposes to a
vote of the people, the suit above referred to was instituted
and has bean in the courts since that time. On Dec. 28,1901,
the United States Circuit Court issued a temporary injunc­
tion against the city, giving the plaint iff (the Helena Water
Works Co.) ten days in which to file a $25,000 bond, which
time was subsequently extended to twenty days. Imme­
diately upon the filing of the bond the injunction will become
effective, and the city will as quickly as possible take an ap­
peal to the United States Circuit Court of Appeals at San
Francisco, where the case will probably come up for a hear­
ing in May, Our correspondent expresses “ absolute confi­
dence ” in ultimate victory for the city,
Milwaukee County, Mis.—Bonds Illegal.—The State Su­
preme Court has declared invalid the law passed by the State
Legislature authorizing this county to issue $275,000 bonds
for the construction of a viaduct across the Menomee Valley,
This decision was based on the grounds that the law was
special legislation within the meaning of the Constitution
and that it attempts to give to the county of Milwaukee pow­
ers of local government not possessed by any other county in
the State. See C h r o n i c l e July 13, June 15 and June 1,1901,
Minnesota,—(Special Session of the Legislature.—Governor
8. R, Van Sant has issued a call for an extraordinary session
o f the State Legislature to assemble Tuesday, February 4.
The session is called to consider the report of the Tax Com
mission appointed at the last session of the Legislature to
revise the laws relative to taxation and also to enact such tax
laws as may be deemed advisable.
Oneida County, N. Y.—Mandamus Confirmed,— The Appel­
late Division of the Supreme Court, sitting at Rochester, nas
affirmed the peremptory writ of mandamus granted by Jus­
tice Andrews directing the Board of Supervisors of Oneida
County to issue bonds to the amount of $350,000 for the erec­
tion of a new court house. The issuance of these bonds is
opposed by the Supervisors on the ground that the statute
creating the Court House Commission is unconstitutional.
The case, it is said, will be taken to the Court of Appeals.

B on d C a l l s and R e d e m p t io n s .
Chicago (South Park), 111.—Bond Call,—E. G, Shumay,
Secretary of the South Park Commissioners, calls for pay­
ment the following bonds : Nos. 19, 22, 26, 62, 102, 109, 111,
130, 143, 166, 207, 278, 319, 328, 381, 398, 406, 414,422, 424,457,
465, 475, 476 and 477, all of the issue of 1891. Interest will
cease on the above-numbered bonds on and after the falling
dne of the annual interest coupon at the Chicago National
Bank of Chicago.
The offlcial notice o f this bond call will be found among
the advertisements elsewhere in this Department.
Costilla County, Colorado.—Bond Call.—Frederick Vigil,
County Treasurer, called for payment January 1 at his office
in San Luis or at the banking house of E. H. Rollins & Sons,
Denver, Colo., or Boston, Mass., 1% funding bonds Nos. 1 to
15, inclusive, for $1,000 each; Nos. 1 to 20, inclusive, of $500
each, and Nos. 1 to 10, inclusive, of $100 each. Bonds were
issued in January, 1891, See sale of refunding bonds else­
where in this Department.
Mason County, Wash.—Bond Call.—T. W. McDonald,
County Treasurer, called for payment Dec. 8J, 1901, $12,000
bonds, Nos. 7 to 19, inclusive, optional after August 1, 1901,
and $11,000 bonds, Nos. 1 to 11, inclusive, optional after
Nov. 1, 1901. The above securities were issued in 1891,

[V ol. LXX IV.

$3,900 6)6 W est Market Street sewer bonds, maturing two bonds of $600 In one
year, two bonds of $600 and one of $40o in two years, and three of $600
in three years.
8,000 6* Miller Avenue sewer bonds, maturing two $600 bonds in one, in two
and in three years.
4.800 5% Bowery Street sewer bonds, maturing ihree bonds of $6C0 in one, two
and three years and one bond of $3u0, also In three years.
4,700 6)6 Falor Street improvement bonds, maturing one bund of $200and one
fox- $600 in one year and two *60u bonds each year thereafter.
4,400 6# Franklin Street improvement bonds, maturing one $400 bond in one
year and two $60u bonds yearly thereafter.
400 5* Allyn Street widening bonds, maturing two $100 bonds in one year
and two $iOd bonds in two years.

All the above bonda are dated Jan. 25, 1902 Interest will
be payable semi annually at the National Park Bank, New
York City.
Belview, Redwood County, Mlun.—Bond Offering.—Pro­
posals will ba received until 8 P. M ., February 1, by Otto
Goetze, Village Recorder, for $1,500 5% 10-year bonds. Secu­
rities are in denomination of $300, dated Feb. 1, 1902, In­
terest will be payable annually.
Beverly, Mass.—Loan Authorized.—A temporary loan of
$250,000 has been authorized.
B iloxi, Miss.—Bond Sale.—The $8,500 6$ 5-20-year (op­
tional) street improvement bonds, all bids for which were
rejected at the advertised sale on Dec. 3,1901, have been since
awarded to J. F. Stuard of Handeboroat 104.
Burlington, Yt.—Loan Authorized.—The City Treasurer
has been authorized to borrow $20,000 to meet accruing lia­
bilities.
Chicago (ill.), West Park.—Bonds Authorized.—The
West Park Board on January 14 voted to issue $1,000,000 4#
5-20-year (optional) bonds for the purpose of acquiring land
for small parks.
Chickasha, I. T.-—Bonds Voted.—It is stated that this town
has voted to issue bonds for a school house.
Cleveland, Ohio.—Bond Sale.—On January 13 the $000,000 4# water-works bonds maturing Oct. 1, 1926, were
awarded to R. L. Day & Co. andEstabrook & Co., New York
and Boston, at 113*09—an interest basis of about 3-227$. Fol­
lowing are the b id s :
R. L. Day & Co. and Estabrook
A Co., Now York..................... ..113 09
Denison, Prior & Co., Clove. ,...1 1 2 -60
Blodget, Merritt A CO., Boston. 112'49

I Allen, Sand & Co.. New Y ork .. .112-£6
I Lamprecht Bros. Co., Clove........Ii2"0l
I N W . Harris A Co., New York..111 89
|New 1st Nat, B’k. Columbus___11P06

For description of bonds see Chronicle Dec, 21, p. 1826.
Bonds Proposed. —It is stated in local papers that bills will

be introduced in the State Legislature now in session pro­
viding for the issuance of the following bonds : $2,000,000
for intercepting sewers, $1,500,000 for parks, $500,000 for
schools, $400,000 for streets, $25,000 for public baths and
$10,000 for public park concerts.
Costilla County, Colo.—Rond Sale.—An issue of $36,000
10- 20-year (optional) refunding bonds has been sold to
E, H. Rollins & Sons, Boston, at par. Securities are in de­
nomination of $500 and were authorized at the election held
last November. See call for payment of old bonds elsewhere
in this Department.
Dayton, Ohio.—Bonds A uthorized—Bond Sale.—The issu­
ance of $9,000 sewer and $20,000 paving bonds has been
authorized. The sewer bonds, it is said, will be purchased,
by the Sinking Fund as an investment.
Delta County, Colo.—Bond Sale.— On January 6 the $15,000 5% 10 20-year (optional) refunding bonds were awarded to
Duke M. Farson & Co., Chicago, at 106*60 and other consid­
erations. Following are the bids :
Duke M.Farson A Co.. Chic.*$16,990 00
Seasongood A Mayer, Cincin. 10,093 90
Thompson, Tenney A Crawford Co„ Chicago................... 13,005 00
MaoDonald.McCoyACo„Chlo 16,960 00
S. G McMullen, Grand June. 15 800 00
r.
Colorado Inv. A Realty C o ... 15,78100

I J. M. Holmes, Chicago........... $15,763 00
1 S. H. Rollins & Sons, Denver 16,750 00
New IstNat. B’k,Columbus . 16,750 C
O
|Rand’ph Willtamson.Paonia. 16,786 60
|Fred. N. Dickerson, D elta .... 15,700 00
Pulslfer A Young, D enver... 16,640 00
|S. A . Kean, C h ic a g o ........... 16,288 00

* And other considerations.

For description of bonds see Chronicle Dec. 28, p. 1372.
Dubuque, Iowa.—Bond Sale.—On January 9 $15,400 4$ 20year refunding bonds were awarded to MacDonald, McCoy
& Co., Chicago, at 109 60—an interest basis of about 3*339$.
Following are the bids :
MacDonald, McCoyA Co.,Chlc,.,109-60 |Denison, Prior & Co.. Cleve.......106-00
W . J. Hayes A Sons, Cleveland. 108-46 R. KleyboRe A Co., Cincinnati..105'00
Parkinson A Burr, Boston.. . . . . 10812 i

Securities ake dated Feb. 1,1902, and the interest will be
payable semi-annually.
Fitchburg, Mass.—Rond Sale.— The City Sinking Fund has
taken as an investment $20,000 school, $5,000 street, $3,000
sewer and $3,000 sidewalk bonds.
Fort Worth, Texas.—Refunding Bonds Issued.—W e are
advised by H. M. Noel, financial agent for the city of Fort
Worth, Texas, that he has refunded $42,000 of the Fort
Worth Water-works Company 7s and $234,000 of the city of
Fort Worth bonds, making $276,000 of such bonds issued in
all, an increase of $28,000 over our last report, published in
the Chronicle Nov. 30, 1901. Mr. Noel also writes us that
he will probably refund $200,000 more bonds in the near
future.
Brand Rapids, Minn.—Bond Sale.—W e are advised that
this place has sold an issue of $25,000 5% electric-light bonds
to a party not named.
B o n d Proposals and N e g o t i a t i o n s this Greenville, Texas.—Bonds Ilegistered.— The State Comp­
troller has registered an issue of $4,000 refunding bonds.
week have been as follows :
Gnilderland (N. Y.) Union Free School District No. 7,—
Asheville, N. C.—Bonds Voted.—This city on January 14, Bond Bill Passes Senate.—An A ct legalizing the bonds of
by a vote of 1,565 to 19, autnorized the issuance of $200,000 this district dated Nov. 1,1901, has passed the Senate.
4% 30-year water bonds.
Hempstead School D istrict No. IS, Nassau County, N. Y.
Akron, Ohio.—Bond Offering.—Chas. H. Isbell, City Clerk, —Bona Sale.— On January 13 $22,000 840 gold registered
will sell at auction at 10 a . m ., January 25, the following bonds were awarded to Geo. M. Hahn, New York, at 100*07—
bonds:
an interest basis of about 8*492%. Following are the bids :

January 18, 1902.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Geo. M. Hahn, New York.......... 106-07 I I.. liarnum A d o.. Now Y *rk
Edmund Seymour A Co., N. Y . .100-05
Walter Stanton A Co., N. Y
M. A . Stein, New York................100-086 I

100-025
KH O
TO

Securities are in denomination o f $1,100, dated Feb. 1,1902.
Interest will be payable semi-annually at the W ashington
Trust Co., New York City. P rincipal w ill mature $1,100
yearly on August 1 from 1902 to 1921, Inclusive.
H u n tsville, A la .—Bond Sale.— T h e $40,000 5% gold school
bonds offered for sale on January 7 have been awarded to
John D. W eakley, representing the N ew First National Bank
o f Columbus, at 106*375. F or description o f bonds see C hron ­
icle Dec. 21, p. 1327.
Hyde P ark, Ohio.— Bond Offering.— Proposals w ill be re­
ceived until 12 M., February 11, by Frank Lewis, Village
Clerk, at the office o f F. H. K inney, R oom 110, 519 Main
Street, Cincinnati, for $1,165 21 5^ 1-10-year Stettinus A ve­
nue im provem ent bonds. Securities are dated Jan. 28, 1902.
Interest w ill be payable annually at the Franklin Bank o f
Cincinnati. A ccrued interest is to be paid by purchaser. A
certified check for 2% o f bonds must accom pany proposals.
The amount of bonds to be issued may be reduced if any as­
sessments are paid in cash.
Bond Sale.—It is reported in local papers that the eight
issues of 5$ 1-10-year (serial) street-improvement bonds, agregating $10,889 42, were awarded on January 10 to the
rovident Savings Bank & Trust Co. o f Cincinnati. For de­
scription of these bonds see C hronicle D ec. 14, p. 1270.
H yrum S ch ool D istrict, Cache County, U tah.—Bond
Offering.—Proposals w ill be received until 1 p . m , February
15, by Christen Thom pson, Clerk, fo r $8,000 6% 5-20-year
(optional) bonds bearing date Jan. 2, 1902. Securities are in
denomination o f $500. Interest on these bonds w ill be pay­
able semi-annually. A certified check fo r $100 must accom ­
pany bids.
L aw rence, Mass.— Tem porary Loan.— The Treasurer has
borrow ed $100,000 from F. S. M oseley & Co., Boston, at
8-54*.
L ew iston , M ont.—Bond Sale.—On Jan. 9 the $50,000 5% 1020-year (optional) gold w ater and sewer bonds dated Mar. 1,
1902, were awarded to the Bank o f Fergus County, Lewiston,
at 100,3225. T w o other bids were received, neither o f which
was accom panied by a certified check as required. One of
these was from S. A. Kean o f Chicago, w h o offered par less
three-fourths o f one per cent to cover expenses, and the
other from Chas. H. Coffin o f Chicago, w h o offered par less
$500 for commissions. For description o f bonds se6s hronicle
C
Dec. 7, p. 1228.
L ittle F a lls, M in n .— Bond Offering.—Proposals w ill be
received until February 10 fo r not m ore than $45,000 fund­
ing and not more than $35,000 bridge bonds. Securities were
authorized at an election held January 7. Interest must not
exceed 5g, and the principal w ill mature in thirty years or
less.
L ubbock C oun ty,'T exas.—Bonds Registered and Sold.— The
State Comptroller has registered $18,000 refunding bonds
and the entire issue has been purchased by the School Board
fo r the Permanent School Fund.
L yn ch bu rg, Y a.—Bond Sale.— On Jan. 6 the $50,000 3 ^
30-year bonds were awarded to local investors, among which
were the fo llo w in g :

¥

Mrs. Ellen M. W a ll......... $3,000@100-375 R. 0 . 'Horton and J. V.
James T . Bowman.......... 1.00o@100’ 125
Domphan, Executors.$20,00C@lr0’00
8.H . Franklin................... 3,000@ lW m 5 W. C. Ivey......................... e,<'00@100-00
William Hurt...................10,000@lC0’0O
James T. Bowman.......... 2,000@100 00

These securities are part o f an issne o f $100,000 bonds,
$50,000 of w hich was recently disposed o f at par. See
Chronicle Jan. 4, 1902, and Dec. 28, 1901.
Lynu, Mass.—Loan A u th o r iz e d — The Alderm en have au­
thorized a loan o f $400,000 in anticipation o f the collection of
taxes.
M adlgon ville, O hio.—Bond Sale.— On January 11 the $25,000 4% 20- 30-year (optional) electric-light and water bonds
dated Jan. 2, 1902, were awarded to SeasoDgood & Mayer,
Cincinnati, at 103 536. F ollow in g are the bids :
Seaeongood A Mayer, Cln___$26,884 00 I P. 8. Briggs A Co.. Clncin... .$25.250 00
W. R. Todd A Co., Cincinnati. 25.06100|
Denison, Prior A Co., Cleve.. 26,188 00
Feder, HolsmanA Co.. C ln ... 25,031001
Fifth Nat. Bank, Cincinnati. 25,115 00
Atlas Nat. Bank, Cincinnati.. 25,60000 8. Kuhn A 8ons, Cincinnati.. 25,087 00
K. Kleybolte A Co.. Clncin... 26,28000|
New 1st Nat. B’k, Columbus. 26,076 00

F or description of bonds see C hronicle Dec. 14, p. 1276.
M ansfield O hio.— Bonds Defeated.—The election held Jan­
uary 8 to vote on the question o f issuing $25,000 water bonds
resulted against their issuance.
M attoon (111.) S ch ool D istrict.— Bond Election.—An elec­
tion will be held February 18 to vote on the question o f issu­
ing $20,000 high-school addition bonds.
M idland, M ich.— Bids R ejected — Only one bid was re­
ceived on January 6 for the $19,507 81 4% paving and sewer
bondB, and this bid was rejected by the Council. These bonds
were described in the Chronicle Dec. 14, page 1276.
M ilwaukee, W is.—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be re­
ceived until 10 A. M , January 30, by the Commissioners of
the Public Debt, at the office of the City Comptroller, for the
follow ing bonds :
* 0 0 ,ooo
100,000
60.000
60.000

1-20-year (serial) coupon school bond*, In denomination of $ 1 ,0 0 0 .
1-JO-year (serial) coupon street-improvement bonds, in denomination of $ 1 ,0 0 0 .
3‘/i% l-2o-year (serial) coupon fire-department bonds, in denomination
Of $1,000.
1-20-year^serial) coupon police department. bonds. In denomina1-20-year (serial) coupon pubile-bath and library bonds, forty of
$ 1 ,0 0 0 each and twenty of $60o each.

Securities are ail dated Jan. 1, 1902, and the interest w ill
tie payable semi annually at the office o f the City Treasurer
or at the Morton Trust Co., New Y ork Citv. A li bonds are
issued under the authority of Chapter 40b, Laws o f 1898.

167

M inneapolis, M inn.—Bond Election P rop osa l.—A reso­
lution is before the City Council providing 'that at the N o­
vem ber (1902) election the question o f issuing $825,000
80-year electric-light plant bonds, to be dated Jan. 1, 1908,
be submitted to the voters o f the city.
Bond Offering.—Proposals w ill be received until 12 M.,
February 1, by J. A. R idgew ay, Secretary o f the Board of
Park Commissioners, for $70,000 8%% park bonds. Securities
are in denomination o f $1,000, dated Jan. 1, 1902. Interest
w ill be payable semi-annually and the principal will mature
Jan. 1, 1982. A certified check for 1% o f the amount offered,
payable to C. S. H ulbert, City Treasurer, must accom pan y
proposals.
M onrovia, C al.—Bond* Proposed.—A n ordinance has been
introduced in the City Council providing fo r an issue of
$15,000 water-im provem ent bonds.
Nashville, Tenn.—Bonds Offered.—John L . W illiam s <fc
Sons o f R iobm ond advertise for sale at 104 and interest
$200,000 4% 25 year street and sewer bonds o f the city o f Nash­
ville, Tenn. These bonds are in denomination o f $1,000,
dated July 1, 1901. A financial statement o f the city w ill bo
found in the advertisement.
New B edford , Mass.—Loan A uthorized.—The usual loan
order, providing for tem porary loans to aggregate $800,000,
has been passed by the Councils.
New London, C onn. —Bond Sale.—On Jan. 15 the $35,(XM>
3%$ 30 year school bonds, dated Dec. 1, 1901, were awarded to
Lee, Higginson & Co., Boston, at 105*753 and interest— a
basis of abont 3 20£. F ollow in g are the bids :
Lee, Higginson A Co., Boston.. 106-768 Adams A Co., Boston.................. 104*32
Slodget, Merritt A Co., Boston.. 106’28 N. W . Harris A Co.. Boston.......104 126
R. L. Day A Co.. B o s to n ............106-197 W . J. Hayes A Song, B o s to n ....104-00
Kstabrook A Co., Boston........... 108"82
Denison, Prior A Co., Boston...10A91

F or description o f bonds see C hronicle Jan. 4, p. 59.
New O rleans, L a.—B ond Sale. - On January 14 the $18,000
4% 50-year bonds, dated July 1, 1892, were awarded to W . H.
Buckler o f Baltim ore at 107*25. F ollow in g are the bids :
W . H. Buckler, Baltimore.......... 107-26 1
f $6,000..105-76
G. A . Blatter.................... *18,000.. 106‘85 Geo. W . Smith............... ( 8,000.. 105’80
( 5,000..106-77 I
( 6,000..105-90
W . A. Mysing............... ( 6,000. .106-69 I S. A . Kean........................... 18,000. .103-00
l 8 ,f00..106-43 R, De Gray........................ 1 8 ,000.. 102-00
M. W . Newman............... 18,000.. 108-25 I

F or description o f bonds see Chronicle Dec. 21, p. 1327.
New P h ila d elp h ia , Ohio.—Bond Offering.— Proposals w ill
be received until 12 M , February 8, by R. J. W . D odd, City
Clerk, fo r $8,000 6$ sewer bonds. Securities are part o f an
issue o f $50,000 bonds, o f which $47,000 have already been
sold. They are ia denomination o f $1,000 and w ill mature$1,000 on Oct. 1, 1911, and $2,000 on O ct 1, 1912. Interest
will be payable semi-annually on A pril 1 and October 1. A
certified check fo r $200 required w ith bids.
Proposals w ill also be received at the same time and p lace
for $8,100 H sew er-im provem ent bonds, as follow s :
$1,0006$ East Avenne bond, maturing Jan. 1,1908.
1.000 6$ Ray Street bond, maturing Jan. 1, 1908.
1.000 6% North Broadway bond, maturing Jan. 1 ,191L
1,010 6* East Avenne bond, maturing Jan. 1,1913.
1,( 00 6$ Kay Street bond, maturing Jan. 1,1913.
750 8$ Bast Avesaue bond, mai urlng Jan. 1, 1918.
1.000 6* Ray Street bond, maturing Jan. I. 1918.
1.000
North Broadway bond, maturing Jan. 1,1918.
860 6$ Beaver Avenue bond, maturing Jan. 1,1918.

Interest on the above bonds w ill oe payable sem i-annually
on January 1 and July 1 at the office o f the City Treasurer.
A certified check fo r $200 required w i'h bids.
Bids fo r all the above issues must be unconditional and thfr
certified check must be drawn on some bank in New Phila­
delphia. A ccrued interest is to be paid by purchasers.
New York City.— Temporary L oan.— In the course o f the
year the Com ptroller o f the City o f New Y ork is com pelled
to borrow large sums in anticipation o f the collection o f
taxes w hich fall due in October o f each year. City Comp­
troller G rout, therefore, follow in g the usual custom , b o r­
rowed early this m onth the sum o f $2,931,000. By September
o f the present year, ju d gin g from past experience, the sum *
so borrow ed w ill probably aggregate upwards o f fifty m il­
lions o f dollars These borrow ings being o f such ordinary
occurrence from now on, w e do not make a practice o f refer­
ring to the placing o f the various amounts from time to time.
N iagara F alls, N. Y.— Bond Sale.— The highest hid re­
ceived January 10 fo r $4,000 4% sewer-redemption bonds wasthat o f Geo. M. Hahn, New Y ork , at 110*29—an interest basis
o f abont 3-293$. The bids follow :
Geo. M. Hahn, New Y ork.........llO-?9 i Niagara County Savings Bank,
M. A. Stein, New York............... 108"07 | Niagara Falls.............................105"00

Securities are in denomination o f $1,000 and will mature
Jan. 1, 1922. Interest w ill fce payable semi-annually at the
Hanover National Bank, New Y ork City.
Norm an C o a n t y ( P 0 . A da), M inn.—Bond Sale.— On Jan­
uary 8 the $3,< 00 5% 10-year ditch bonds, dated Feb. 1, 1902,
were awarded to Thompson, Tenney & C raw ford C o., Chi­
cago, at 102 50. F ollow in g are the bids :
Thompson, Tenney A CrawI Kane A Co.. Minneapolis........ $3,000 0©
ford Co.. Chicago ................... $3,0'; 6 00 W . H . Matthews, A da ................ 3,000 00
S. A. Kean, Chicago................. 3,030 00 I

For description o f bonds see C h r o n i c lJan. 4, p. 59.
e
North Adams, Mass.—Loan A uthorized.—The City Coun­
cil has authorized the Treasurer to borrow $65,000 in antici­
pation of the collection o f taxes.
P alatk a, F la .—Bonds Voted.— A t the election held Jan­
uary 7 it was voted to ifsae $175,000 5% 20-40-year (optional)
bonds, as fo llo w s : $60,000 for water purposes, $35,000 fo r
sewers, $30,000 for street improvements and $50,000 for re­
funding purposes. Securities will be issued in denominations
of $500 and $1,000. Interest will be payable semi-annually
at the office o f the City Treasurer. The date for the sale of
these bonds has not yet been fixed.

THE CHRONICLE

168

lJertb, Q u l .— Debenture* D efea ted , —The by-law providing
for the lifcuance of $15,000 \% aewer debentures was submitted
to the voters of this town on January 0 and defeated.
Pike County (l\ 0. Petersburg), lu d .—B id s R ejected.—
The County Commissioners on Jan. 7 rejected all bid* received
for $61,000 4
Washi ngton Township gravel road bonds,
the highest bid being an offer of $970 premium. Sixty-four
bonds are in denomination of $1,000 and one for $600, all
dated May 15, 1902. Interest will be payable s^mi-annually.
Principal will mature $3,000 each six months from Nov. 15,
1902, to May 15, 1917, and $2,600 on Nov. 15, 1917. C. D.
Houchin is County Treasurer and may be addressed in the
matter.
Pittsburg, Pa .— T em p o ra ry L.oan,— This city has bor­
rowed $50,000 in anticipation of the collection of taxes.
Pittsffeld, Mass.—L o a n A u th o riz ed .—The City Courcil
baa authorized a loan of $200,000 in anticipation of the collec­
tion of taxes.
Pleasantville, Westchester County, N. Y .— B on d s to he
Offered. — We are advised by W. 8. Moore. Village Clerk, that
this village will offer for stle some time afttr April 1 an issue
of $9,000 water-extension bonds.
Pocahontas (Io w a ) School D istrict.—B o n d E lection — An
election will be held to day (January 18) to vote on the ques­
tion of issuing $9,000 school-house bonds.
Pocomoke, Md.—B o n d s P ro p o sed . —A bill has been intro­
duced in the Stat^ Legislature providing for the issuance of
$13,000 fire apparatus bonds.
Portland, Me.— Loan A u th o r iz e d .— The City Treasurer has
been authorized to borrow $500,000 temporarily, the same to
be payable on or before Nov. 1, 1902,
Providence, 8 . 1.— D escription o f B o n d s— B on d S a le , —
The $150,000 8# highway bonds mentioned in the C h r o n ic l e
of last week as having been authorized will be dated Jan. 1.
1902, and will mature Jan. 1, 1912. Interest will be payable
semi annually in gold. The authority for the issuance of
these bonds will be found in Chapter 876, Laws of 1901.
Under the ordinance providing for these bonds the City
Treasurer is directed to i^sue the same to the Board of
CommLeioners of Sinking Fands at par.
Revere, Redwood County, Minn.— B on d O fferin g,— Pro
posaJs will be received until 8 p m , January 19 (this date

N E W LOANS,

County of Dutchess, N. Y.
$ 1 7 5 ,0 0 0
COURT HOLSE AND JAIL BONDS

$ 6 5 ,0 0 0
COUNTY HOUSE BONDS.

f ills upon Sunday, but is so given in the advertisement), by
Ed. 8. Folhom, Village Recorder, for $2,000 6# 10-year bonds.
Securities are in denomination o f $1,0U0, dated Feb. 1, 1902.
Interest will be payable annually. Successful bidder will
be required to furnish blank bonds.
Roberts County, S. Dak.— B on d S a le,— On January 8 the
$40,000
5 20-year (optional) court house and jail bonds
were awarded to the Minnesota Loan & Trust Co., Minne­
apolis, at par.
Rochester, N. Y.— B o n d O ffering,— Proposals will be re­
ceived until 11 a . M ., January 22, by James Johnston, City
Comptroller, for $150,000 8^% registered high school bonds.
Securities are in denomination of $10,000, dated Jan. 1, 1902.
Interest will be payable semi-annually at the Union Trust
Co., New York City. Principal will mature Jan. 1, 1912,
subject to call after Jan 1, 1997. A certified check for
$3,000, payable to the City Comptroller, must accompany
proposals. Bonds will be certified to as to genuineness by the
United States Mortgage & Trust Co.. New York City.
Salem, Mass.— L oa n A u th o rized .—The Council has given
authority to the City Treasurer to borrow $250,000 in antici­
pation of the collection of taxes.
Salem, Ohio.— Rond S ate.— The highest bid received on
January 11 for the following bonds was that of Seasongood
& Mayer, Cincinnati, at the prices named below :
$5,100 6% 1-10-year East High Street paving bonds at 102*186.
750 5* 1-6-year Rose Street sewer bonds at luo*387.
1,000 5# 1-10-year Alley paving bonds at i 02'186.

The bids were as follows :
East. I Huh St.

Seasontrood & Mayer. Cincinnati.......... $5,21148
farmers’ National BaDk......................... 6.175 00
Lamprecht Bros. Co., Cleveland............ 6,16100

N E W LOANS.

$ 3 5 ,0 0 0
WESTFIELD, N. Y.,
3M P e r C e n t W a t e r B o n ds .
Sealed bids will be received by the Board of Water
Commissioners of the Village of Westfield. N. Y.
until 3 o’clock P. M. of JANUARY 24tb, 1902. for
the purchase of the whole or any part o f $36,000 of
Registered Water Bonds, dated February 1st, ’ 902,
denomination of $1,000 each, payable as follows:
•$7,o00 per year on and after February 1st, 1915. with
interest ar the rate of 3^ per cent per annum, pay­
able semi annually on the 1st of February and Au­
gust of each year. Principal and interest payable in
cur ency or New York exchange at the option of tbe
holder of the bonds, at tbe office of the Treasurer of
tbe H ard at Westfield, N. Y. Each bid mu*t be ac
eompanied by a certified check, payable to R. G.
Wright, Treasurer of the Board of Water Commis­
sioners of Westfield, N. Y., to the amount of 5 per
cent o f the face value o f the bonds. Accrued inter­
est, if any, to be paid by the purchaser. The B>ard
reserves the right to reject any and all bids.
The money from this loan is io be used for the
purpose of payments in completing the wate sys­
tem, and redeeming $13,00 » or bonds which have al­
ready been issued by the said Water Commissioners.
The Village nas a’oonded inremedness of $80,000;
assessed valuation of property. $1,3<32,140 50; popu
7
lat ion. i,50o
Bids should be enclosed in sealed envelopes, ad
dressed to Mr. H. C. Kingsbury. President o f the
Board of Water Commissioners of the Village of
Westfield, X. Y.

Oity of Montgomery, Ala.,

MASON, L E W IS & CO.

FERGUS 00., MONT.
Notice Is hereby given that the County Treasurer
of Fergus County, State of Montana, will, within
thirty days of this date, redeem all outstanding
bonds of said county of the issue of 1892. Interest
on said bonds will cease at the expiration of said
period.
Dated this 18th day of December, 1901.
By order o f the Board of County Commissioners.
C. M. KELLY.
County Clerk of Fergus Co., State of Montana.

BANKERS,
C H IC A G O ,
llo n a d n o c k B u ild in g,
m u n ic ip a l

RAILROAD
CORPORATION

R ose St,

$762 00
' ......
762 50

A lley P a v ’ o.

$1,02^.86
........
1,007 60

We are Advised that the bonds will be awarded to the
Cincinnati firm wilhrut doubt.
Sarat* ga Springs (N. Y.) Union Free School District.—
B on d s P ro p o sed .— A bill providing for a loan of $30,000 is
before the Legislature.
Savannah, Ga. N o te Issu e.— This city has issued $10,884 70 52 4 and 5-year notes in favor <f the Twelfth Street
Land Company in payment for the tract of land conveyed
by < company to the city for the purpoee of opening streets.
lie
Schenectady, N. Y .— B o n d O fferin g. — Proposals will be re­
ceived until It a . M , January 28, by J. H. Bernardi, City

Sealed proposals will be received by the Chairman
o f the Board of Supervisors on or before the 29TH
DAY OF JANUARY, 1902, at one o’clock P.M., at
which time the bids will be opened at the Court
House in Poughkeepsie. N. Y.. for the purchase of
$210,000 o f the bonds o f said County, to be issued in
any denomination desired by the bidder, and to bear
Interest irom January 2. 1902, at 3H per annum,
J6
payable semi-annually, the principa* to come due as
follows: Of tbe Court House and Jail Bonds in an­
nual instalments of $6,000 each year for twenty-nine
years, and $1,0 * in thirty Years: the County House
0
Bonds in annual Instalments of $2,500 each ye^r lor
twenty-six years. The purchase price to be paid and
the bonds delivered on the 18th day o f February.
1902, at the Banking House of the Poughkeepsie
Trust Company, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., at 1 o ’clock
P. M. on that day.
Such bonds are to be registered Yvith the County
Clerk of toe County or Dutchess,
Each proposal must be acc mpanied by a denosit
o f o% of the bid either in cash or certified check, to
the order or James H. Kipp, Chairman, for which his
receipt will be given.
Purchasers will be required to pay in addition to
the amount of the bid accrued interest from Janu­
ary 2,1902, to da'e of payment.
The right is resei ved to reject any or all bids and
no conditional bid will be received.
§ 7 5 ,0 0 0
Proposals should be addressed to James H. Kipp,
Chairman, Poughkeepsie, N. Y , care of C. W. H.
Arnold, Counsel of Building Committee, and marked
“ Proposals for Bonds.’1
If further information is desired address Com­
mittee s Counsel.
4 0 -Y E A R BONDS.
Dated, January 7,1902.
Sealed bids will be received by the Ctty Treasurer
JAMES H. KIPP,
until 12 o ’ c lo c k n oon , J h iiu n ry *-20. 11*02* lor
REGINALD W. RIVES,
the purchase of seventy five thousand dollars City
J. W. DeLAMATEH.
of Montgomery, Ala.. ’40-year,
bonds, author
MILES K. LEWIS,
Red by Act or Legislature J901; denomination of
E. L. WINANS,
$1,000 each. lntere*t to be paid semi-annually, Jan
Committee Court House and Jail.
uarv and July, at the American Exchange National
JAMES H. KIPP
Bank, New York. All bids to be accompanied by a
STEPHEN ROBINSON,
certified obeck for one thousand dollars. Coupons
H FREMONT VAN DE WATER,
receivable for taxes and licenses. The City reserves
GEORGE A KINNEY,
the right to reject auy and all bids.
FRANK FOWLER,
R . S. WILLIAMS,
Committee on County House.
City Treasurer.
C. W. H. ARNOLD, Counsel,
Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

N O T IC E T O B O N D H O LD E R S .

[V ol. LXXIV

BOSTON,
OO D e v o n s h i r e 8 l ,

BONDS*

C h oice Issue*.

Street Railway and Gas Companies.
1.1HT ON A P P L I C A T I O N .

N E W LOANS
BOND CALL.

City of Minneapolis, Minn.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to resolution
duly adopted by tbe City Council of the City of Min­
neapolis, on the 13th day of December, A. D. 1901,
the said City o f Minneapolis will, on the first d ay
o L A p ril, A , I). 1 9 0 2 , exercise its right and op­
tion to pay, and will pay, all those certain outstand­
ing bonds of tbe City of Minneapolis, issued and
sold pursuant to a resolution adopted by the City
Council on February 16, 1882, approved February 20,
1882, to the amount of $366,000, numbered consecu­
tively from 6 0 4 to Ot>9» both Nos. inclusive, bear­
ing date A p rll 1, 1 8 8 2 . in denominations of $1,000
each, bearing interest at 4}4 per cent per annum, aud
payable at the option of the City of Minneapolis at
any time n ite r 2 0 y e a r s a u d n ot lo n g e r th an
BO y e a r* fro m th e d a te o f i h e ir i»*ue* which
said bonds are hereby called in, and the holders
thereof are hereby notified aud required to present
the said -muds lor i ayment to the United States
Mortgage & Trust Co., 59 Oeoar Street, in the City of
New York, N. Y., on the said 1st day of April. A i D.
902, at which time said bonds and each thereof will
cease to bear interest.
JOSHUA ROGERS.
City Comptroller.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

SOUTH PARK BONDS.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Take notice that the following numbers of South
Park Bonds have been selected and retired by the
South Park Commissioners, in conformity with
law, for tbe annual sinkir g fund, viz.: 19, 22, *26,
62,102,109, 111, 130, U S , 166,207, 273, 319,328, SSI, 398.
406, 414, 422, 424, 457, 465, 475, 476, 477 Of the issue
of )891.
Interest will cease on the above-numbered bonds
on and alter the tailing due of iheir annual interest
coupon at the Chicago National Bauk, Chicago, 111.
SOUTH PARK COMMISSIONERS*
E. G. SHUMWAY, Secretary.
January 10th, 1902.

Blodget, Merritt & C o .,
B A N K E R S ,

16 Congress Street, Boston.
15 W a l l H creet, N e w Y o r k *

STATE. CITY A RAILROAD BONDS.

B O N D S .
Wo have several issues of gilt edge MunloUvU
Buuds, yielding f r o m 3 to 4V * uet. N rite for list.
*1
Y
I I A K K Y 1*. P O W E L L A
W o o i U t o o k , VtumuuC,

C O ..

THE

January 18, 1902.]

CHRONICLE

Securities are all dated Jan, 1, 1902, and tbe interest will
be payable flemi-smroally at the office of the County Treas­
urer. A deposit of $200 in earn ncy must be made with ft. B,
Dill, County Auditor, by all bidders.
Sioux Falls (S. Dali.) School District.—B onds lit fu sed .—
MacDonald, McCoy & Co., Chicago, who on Nov. 13,1901,
were awarded $50,000 4% beru's, have refused to take the
same, claiming that the law under which it was proposed to
issue the securities is unconstitutional. We are advised that
tbe Finance Committee has made 1 0 recommendations for
further action.
S om erville, Mass.— L oan A u th orized .— A temporary loan
of $250,000 for current expemes has been anti oriz<d.
T a rcn tu m , Pa.— B ond E lection .—A t tbe spring election to
b eh eld February 18 ihe question of issuing the following
bonds w ill be submitted to the voters : $12,000 grading, curb­
ing and paving bonds; $5,500 sewer boi ds, $2,600 bonds for
widening and opening streets and $13,(00 bonds for funding
outstanding floating debt.
Terry, M iss.— Bond Offering.— Proposals will be received
at any time for $10,000 6# 20-year water bonds, voted at an
election held Oct. 7, 1901. Interest on these bonds will be
paid annually.
Thief River Falls School District No. 18. Red Lake
Connly, Minn.— Bonds V oted. —This district on December 28
voted to issue $18,000 5# 15 year high-school building bonds.
Tne date for the sale of these bonds has not yet been fixed.
Toledo, Ohio.—Bonds A u th orized . —The Common Council
has authorized the is uance of $3,556 90 4% Maumee Ave. No.
1 improvement bonds, to be dated Jan. 18. 1902
Two Rivers, W is.— B ond Bate.—This city has sold $20,000
water-works and electric-light bonds to Linstedt & Hoffman.
U n iou C oun ty ( P. O. E lizabeth), N. J .—B onds P rop osed .—
W e are advised by the County Collector that this county
expects to issue $250,000 bonds within the n i xt twelve
months for the purpose of building a new court house.
Yelasco School D istrict, B razoria Connty, T e x a s .-D e .•■criptionofBonds.— W e a r e advised that the $6,000 rchoolhoase bonds which we referred to in the Chronicle Decem­
ber 14 as having been voted w ill be dat*d Jan. 1, 1902, and
will mature in twenty years, subject to call after five years,
Interest w ill be at the rate o f 5# and will be payable in Y e

Treasurer, for $20,000 4% registered assessment and deficiency
bonds. Securities are in denom ination o f $1,000, dated Feb.
1,1902. Interest w ill be payable semi annually at the office
o f the City Treasurer. Principal w ill m ature $5,00(1 on F ob.
1 in each o f the years 1923, 1924, 1925 and 1926.
A
certified check for 5# o f the am ount o f bonds bid for, payable
to the City Treasurer, m ust accom pany proposals.
Bonds P roposed.—A bill p rovidin g for the issuance o f
$75,000 high-school bonds is be fore the Legislature.
S eattle S ch ool D istrict No. 1, K in g C ounty, W ash .—
Bond
On January 10 the $275,000 4% 20-year bonds
described in the Chronicle Dec. 28, 1901, w ere awarded to
Thom pson, Tenney & C raw ford C o., C hicago, at 102,263—an
interest basis o f about 3-837^. F ollow in g are the bids :
Thompson, Tenney A CrawI N. W . Harris & Co., Chic. . )
torn,Go., Chicago..........
$281,225 00 1 . II. Rollins & Sons, San •1275,467 50
C
Ifarson, Leach A Co., Clue.. 275,01)0 00 I Francisco............................ )

Shandaken (Toyyn), U lster C ounty, N. Y.— Bond Oflering.
— H enry B. H udler, T ow n Supervisor, w ill sell at p u b lic a u c­
tion at 12 M , January 21, at the C ourt H ouse in the city o f
K ingston, the fo llo w in g bonds :
f3,0C0 4% 1 and 2-year bonds, to pay the town's? proportion of constructing
State road.
21.000 4% l-21-year (serial) bonds, to pay indebtedness incurred by the town in
the construction of a State road, pursuant to a contract with the State
of New York.
16.000 4% 1-16 year (serial) bonds, for the purpose e f paying indebtedness in­
curred by the town in repairs of highways damaged by floods and
repairs and erection of bridges in town destroyed and damaged by
floods.

A ll th9 above bonds are in denom ination o f $1,000 and the
interest w i 1 be payable annually. A deposit of 10# o f the
purchase m oney w ill be required o f all purcbaeeis. The
post office address o f the T ow n Supervisor is The Corner,
U lster County.
Shelby County (P . O. S id n ey), Ohio.— B ond O ffering.—
Proposals w ill be recsived u n td 12 m , January 20, by the
County Com m issioners, lo r the fo llo w in g bonds :
$e ,500 4% road improvement bonds, maturing one bond of $700 yearly on July 1
from 1902 to 1906, inclusive, and one bond of $600 yearly on January 1
from 1903 to 1907. inclusive.
8,900 4% ditch bonds. Seven bonds are in denomination of $500, eleven of
$400, four of $20 ’ and two of $100 each. Principal will mature as fo l­
lows : $1,2-00 yearly on Juiy 1 from 1902 to 1904, inclusive; $900 on
July 1,1905, and $4o0 on July 1, 1906. On Januaryl bonds mature as
follow s: $1,010 in 1603, $90u in 1904 and in 1905, $800 in 1606 and $400
in 1957.

IN V E S T M E N TS.

$50,000
McLEAN COUNTY, ILLINOIS,
4% C o u rt H o u s e R e b u ild in g B on ds.
Dated November 1,1901. Denomination, $1,000 each.
$7,000 due November 1, 1904.
26.000 due November 1, 1905.
17.000 due November 1,1906.
Price yielding 3)4 per cent.
Assessed valuation........................................ $19,309,778
Actual valuation
..................................... 96,548,890
Indebtedness, including this issue...........
328,000
Population, Census 1900, 67,843.
City o f Bloomington is the county seat.
The entire bonded debt o f this county was created
to rebuild the Court House destroyed by Are about
two years since. McLean County is n ot only the
largest in the state, 1,166 square miles, but is one
o f the m ost fertile and wealthy.
Legality o f issue approved by Storey,Thorndike A
Palmer, Boston, Mass.

J. F . W I L D

&

CO., B a n k ers,

I n d ia n a p o lis .

MUNICIPAL and
CO RPO RA TIO N
L IS T

ON

2 3 8 -2 4 0 La Salle Street,

C H IC A G O .
N. Y. Office. 1442 Broad-Exchange Bldg.

3 1 N A S S A U S T ., N E W Y O K K .
CHICAGO.

BOSTON.

H eal
ex clu siv ely
In M u n ic ip a l,
R ailroad, a n d oth er b o n d s adapted
for tru st fu n d s a n d sa v in g s.
1 8 8 UE TBA VE LE B 8’ LET T ER S OF CREDIT
A V A IL A B L E I N A L L P A B T 8 OF T H E WORLD.
Quotations furnished for purchase, sale or

exchange.

8END FOR LIST

MUNICIPAL

J a n u a ry Investments.
MUNICIPAL, R A IL R O A D AND CORPORATION
BONDS.

LEACH

& C O .,

AND

Public

Service Corporation

BONDS.

NEW YO R K .

E. H. R O L LIN S & S O N S

s am n c

BO STO N .
-

Perry, Coffin & Burr,

-

Denver.

San Fran cisco.

SLLfe.

IN V E ST M E N T BONDS

W e ow n and offer

6o State Street,

A P P L IC A T IO N .

MUNICIPAL and
CO RPO RATIO N

B A N K E R S ,

IN V E S T M E N T SECURITIES .

C H IC A G O .

172 Washington Street,
C H IC A G O ,

IN V E S T M E N T S .
INVESTMENTS.
Geo. D n C o o k Company, N. W. HARRIS & CO.,

FARSON ,

T . B. P O T T E R ,

109

SO CO RRO CO U N TY, N. M.,

DU1N

Netting from 3}^ to 6#always on hand,

BOSTON.

D U K E M. F A R S O N & C O .

$ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0
F u n d in g 5w, due tiO -3 0 y e a r s .
D e scr ip tiv e C ir c u la r Upon A p p lic a tio n ..

T R O W B R ID G E

116 Dearborn St., CHICAGO.

5%

BONDS

F irst

N a tio n a l

Bank

&

N IY E R
B u ild in g ,

CO.,
C h ic a g o .

Send for our In vestment Circulars.

A S P E C IA L T Y .

INVESTM EN T BONDS.
SEND

FOR

L IS T .

EDW. C. JO N ES & CO.,
NEW YO RK ,

.

P H IL A D E L P H IA ,

D E N IS O N , P R IO R &
CLEVELAND.

CO.

BO STO N .

.
-

.

.
-

1 N A S S A U STREET
1 1 2 SO . F O U R T H S T R E E T

AND

CORPORATION

1 5 3 L a Mnlle S tree t,
C H IC A G O .

M

ayer,

M UNICIPAL BONDS.

High-Grade City, County, Town and School Bond*
•sued in leading prosperous States o f the Union,
sspeolally adapted for safe and permanent Invest­
ment for Bstat.es and Trust Funds.

BONDS.

M u n ic ip a l B o n d s ,
171 LA S A L L E S T R E E T ,

171 La Salle Street, Chicago.

CH ICAG O .

BANKERS and
D e a le r * In I n v e s t m e n t S e c u r i t i e s ,

&

MacDonald, McCoy & C
o., F. R. FULTON & CO.,

C . D . K N A P P , J R ., & C O . , M UNICIPAL
31 N assau S tree t,
NKW Y O R K C IT V .

Seasongo od

8 . W , C o rn er T h ird and W a l n u t S tre e ts.
C IN C IN N A T I, O H IO .

170

THE

C H R O N IC L E

lasco or in Austin. E. P. Hoefle la Secretary of the School
Board.
Verona, Pa,—Bond Election.—At the February election
this borough will vote upon the question of issuing $13,000
street and $33,000 aewer bonds.
Want ink, it, 1.—Bond Sale.—Following are the bids re­
ceived January 15 for the $400,000 % % % 30-year gold bonds,
dated Jan. 1, 1903 :
P rov id en ce B’ fc'g C o. an d P rovilienee lu s t. t o e
Prov .I03H
82

I P a rk in s o n * Burr, B oston ....... ,10277
Jose, Parker * Co., B o sto n ........ 101*56

Blodtset, MerntL * Co,. Boston,, 103*34 |N. W, Harris A Co., B oston.... ,101*876

It ia stated that the bonds were awarded to the Providence
Banking Go, and the Providence Institution for Savings at
their joint bid of 103*33. For description of bonds see Chron­
icle Jan. 4, p. 60.
Westfield, N. Y.—Bond Offering.—Proposals will be re­
ceived until 3 p, m., January 24, by H. C. Kingsbury, Presi­
dent of the Board of Water Commissioners, for $35,000
registered water bonds. Securities are in denomination of
$1,000, dated Feb. 1, 1903, Interest will be payable semi-an­
nually. Principal will mature $7,000 yearly on February 1
from 1915 to 1919, inclusive. A certified check for 5% of the
face value of the bonds, payable to R. G. Wright, Treasurer
of the Board, must accompany proposals. Accrued interest
is to be paid by purchaser. The village has a bonded debt of
$80,000. The assessed valuation is $t,883,740 50.

l V L LXXIV.
O.

Proposals for these bonds will be received until 4 p . m .,
January 20, by W. J. Turner, Secretary of Councils, 349 West
Eighth Avenue, Homestead. They are all dated Jan, 1,1902.
Interest will be payable semi-annually at the office of the
Borough Treasurer. Securities are exempt from all taxation
except for State purposes.
White County, Ind.—Bonds Sold Last June.—Some of the
papers recently reported the sale of $80,000 Monon Township
gravel-road bonds. These bonds, we are advised by the
County Treasurer, were disposed of last June.
Williamsport, Pa .—Bond Election Proposed.—The ques­
tion of submitting a proposition to issue $50,000 sewer bond®
to the voters at the February election is being agitated,
Woburn, Mass. —Loan Authorized —The City Treasurer
has been authorized to borrow $120,000 in anticipation o f
the collection of taxes.
Yonkers, N, Y.—Bond Sale.—On January 10 Michael J,
Walsh, Mayor, awarded $16,000
assessment bonds to the
Yonkers Savings Bank at 101’27—an interest basis of about
3‘851*. Following are the bids :
Yonkers Savings Bank..........1 0 1 *2 7 I Allen, Sand * Co., New Y ork.. .10O*12&
Geo. M. Uahn, New York...........101*07 W . J. Hayes & Sons, Cleveland.l0G*02
M. A. Stein, New York..............100*37 I

Securities are dated Jan. 15, 1902, and will mature Feb. E
1904.
Youngstown, Ohio.—Bond Offering,—Proposals will be re­
ceived until 2 p , M ., February 10, by Wm. I. Davies, City
Clerk, for the folllowing 5# bonds, bearing date of Feb. 17,
1902:

The official notice o f this bond offering will be fo u n d among
the advertisements elsewhere in this Department.
W est Homestead, Pa.—Bond Offering.—The $38,000 sewer

and $12,000 town-hall bonds mentioned i n the
Dec, 14, 1901, as having been authorized answer
lowing description:

$11,870 Myrtle Avenue and Hillman Street sewer bonds, maturing one bond of
$1,187 yearly on Oct. 1 from 1008 to 1912, inclusive.
1,360 East Wood Street sewer No. 8 bonds, maturing one bond of $270 yearly
on Oct. 1 from 1903 to 1907, Inclusive.
1,480 Sugar Grove Street sewer bonds, maturing one bond of $290 yearly obi
Oct. 1 from 1908 to 1907, Inclusive.
C h r o n ic l e
460 West Cherry Street grading bonds, maturing one bond of $90 yearly on.
Oct. 1 from 1908 to 1907, inclusive.
to the fol­

$88,000 4j6 sewer bonds, in d enom ination o f *1,000. P rincip al will m ature on
January 1 as f o llo w s : *1,000 each year from )P01 to UtU5. in clu sive;
$1,000 In each o f th e years 1818, l92i\ 1922 and 1 9 ;6 ; $3,000 In each of
the years 1017, 1919, 1921, 1023, 1924,1926, 1927,1928 and 1929 and
$3,000 in 1930.
12,000 i% town hall bonds, in denom ination o f $600, Principal will m ature on
January 1 as fo llo w s : $600 yearly fvom 1004 to 1912, Inclusive, and
*600 in each o f th e years 1914, 1916,1917, 1918 and 1921; $1,000 In each
o f the years 1918, 1916, 1919,1920 and 1922.

IN V E S T M E N T S .

IN V E S T M E N T S .
W E OFFER,

Interest on all the above bonds will be payable semi-annu­
ally at the office of the City Treasurer. Purchasers must be
prepared to take the bonds not later than February 17, the
money to be delivered at one of the city banks or at the office
of the City Treasurer. A certified check for 2# of the amount
of bonds bid for must accompany proposals. Bids must be
made separately for each issue.

THE

GRAND

IN V E S T M E N T S .

PRXX.

8UBJECT TO PRIOR SALE

CHOICE OKLAHOMA
FIRST MORTGAGES
• n

T H E A U D IT C O M P A N Y
OF N E W YORK.

I m p r o v e d f a r m s , w o r t h f r o m timet t o 5
2 ^
the a m o u n t l o a n e d t h e r e o n ,

W A S A W A B D K D A T T U B P A R I S 1 X P O S IT IQ N TO

Netting the investor

6 per cent Interest.
■ach of the securities has been personally ex
amined by one of oar salaried examiners.
Write for onr latest offering.

WHITING’S STANDARD

PAPERS,

They are the only American papers which have
ever received this—
-the highest nonor that can be
conferred. It means they are the most perfect
made. Insist on having them for your fine corres­
pondence and your office stationery. Are you using
Whiting’s Ledger Papers in you Blank-Book
Samples and booklet free.

P h y sica l a n d A cco u n tin g

WHITING PAPER COMPANY,

Audits and Appraisals wttb
Certifloates.

H O L Y O K E , M A S S .,

W IN N E & W IN N E ,
Winns Building, Wichita, Kansas.

And 150 D uane Street , N ew Y

E xam in ation s.

ork.

SECURE BANK VAULTS.

Queen Building,

N. Y. Life Building»

HEW YORK.

M ention this paper.

CHICAGO.

W E O F F E R ., T O Y I E L D A B O U T 5%,

8 3 0 0 ,0 0 0
(T otal I s s u e , $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 )

Butte Electric 8b P o w e r Go.
B u t t e , M o n t ,,
3

per cent 1 st M o r t g a g e S in k in g Fund
Gold B o n d s .
Denomination, $1,000. Maturing 1 to SO years.

GENUINE
WELDED CHBOME STEEL AND IROK
Round and Flat Bars and 6-mly Plates and Angie*
FOB SAFES, VAULTS, Ac,
Cannot be Sawed, Cut, or drilled, and positively
Burglar Proof.

CHROME STEEL WORKS,

Kent A re. Keap and Hooper Sts.,
8 lie Man’f ’ers in the U. S. B R O O K L Y N . N .Y

TBM §IBI$SIOM ROPE,

Rudolph Kleyholte 8b Go,
1 N A S S A U S T ., N E W Y O R K C I T Y .

M U N IC IPA L BONDS.
E . O . S TA N W O O D 8b C o .
BAN KERS,

<21 Devonshire Street*

ASSETS
RE AL I ZAT I ON CO.,

| C O R D A G E § Ashland Block, Chicago,
a s rot
118 Walnut St., Philadelphia,
I | ft? SPECIALTIES. o Will buy the assets of estates
a
H
3 I*
in process of liquidation,
s

h

a

b

________ BOSTON.________ THE AMERICAN
MANUFACTURING
Outside Securities a Specialty
COMPANY,
0 3 W A L L 8TR JB B T, W W W Y O R K .
DAVID PFEIFFER, 18 Wall St.

A n y ­

where lu the United States.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102