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HUNT'S

MERCHANTS'
&

3 W e * fc tg

MAGAZINE,

p it tijr a p e » ,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES

VOL 4L

NEW

Ifitutucial.
•

A

M

B a n k
78

E

R

N o te
to

I C

A

1, 1887.

I fit t a t ijc ia lo

C o m p a n y ,

8 6 T R IN IT Y P LA CE ,

Buxine«« F ou nd ed 1 7 9 5 .
Incorporated under laws of State of New York, 1858.
R e o rg a n ize d 1 8 7 9 .
E ngravers and P rinters of

B O N D S, POSTA GE & REVENUE S T A M P S .
LEGAL TEN DER A N D N A TIO N AL BANK
NOTES o f th e UNITED S T A T E S ; a n d fo r
F oreig n G o v e rn m e n ts.
»
ENGRAVING AND PRINTING,
N O T E S, S H A R E C E R T IF IC A T E S , B O N D S

E £ ? t £ ? VE1££.MENT8 a n d c o r p o r a t i o n s ,
s t a m p s ’ A ?Hi :C£ 8’ f l B IL L 8 , OF EXCHANGE^
b i a .u p s , A c., In t h e finest a n d m o st artistic Style
FROM STEEL PLATES,
filth SFKCTAL SAFEGUARDS to PREVENT COUFTERFKITDNL
Special papers manufactured exclusively fur
dm of the Company*

SAFETY PAPERS*

W o r k E xecu ted In F ir e p r o o f B u ild in gs.

DIAMONDS.
^IMPORTERS,
182 Broadway, Cor. John Street,

SOLID SILVER.
G O R H A M M ’t’g C o.,
Broadway and Nineteenth Street,
AND 9 MAIDEN LANE.

LITH G A IC AN TYPE PR TIN .
O R PH
D
IN G

Maverick National Bank
BO STO N ,

MASS.

Floyd-J ones & Robison,
B A N K E R S AND B R O K E R S ,
N o . 2 E x c h a n g e C o u r t, N e w Y o r k .
Stocks, Bonds.and U. 8. Government Securities
Bought and Sold on Commission.
Wm. C. F l o y d -jo n e s ,
W il l ia m R obison
______ Members New York Stock Exchange.

J. A . Kohn & C o.,

C A P IT A L ,
SUR PLU S,

‘g i r m u t i n h

BANKERS AND BROKERS,
N o . 2 4 P in e S tree t, N e w Y o r k .

Transact a General Banking Business

Alfred H. Smith & C o.,

R A I L W A Y T IC K E T S O F IM P R O V E D 8 T V U L
S h ow C ards, L a b e ls, C alendar*.

BLANK BOOKS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
ALBERT G. GOODALL, President
VICE-PRESIDENTS J
L MACDONOUGH,
A. D. SHEPARD,
W . M. SMII.LIE,
TOURO ROBERTSON.
THEO. H. FREELAND, Sect’y and Treat,

N O . 1,123.

J. C. W alcott & C o.,

N

N E W YORK.

SAFETY C O LO R S.

YORK, JAN U AR Y

Stocks and Bonds bought and sold on Commission,
Orders received in Mining Stocks, and in Unlisted
Securities. Collections made and loans negotiated.
Dividends and interest collected.
Deposits received subject to Draft.
Interest allowed. Investment securities a specialty
W e issue a Financial Report weekly.
Jos. C. W alcott,
i Members of the New vn,k
frank f . Dickinson, i
a” k
Yor*

F. E. Trowbridge,
BANKER AND BROKER,
N o «, 8 Ac 5 B r o a d [or 2 9 W a l l S treets.
(B r a n c h

o f f ic e ,

290 B r o a d w a y .)

Member of the New York Stock Exchange. D1
rector of Merchants’ Exchange National Bank,
American Savings Bank, American Safe Deposit
Company. &c., &c.
Securities bought and sold on commission, for
cash or on margin. AU inquiries gratuitously res­
ponded to. Correspondence solicited.

H . B. Hollins & C o.,
BANKERS
18 W A L L a n d 3 N A S S A U S T R E E T S .
NEW YORK.
T ra n sa ct a G en era l B a n k in g B usin ess.
DEALERS IN GOVERNMENT, MUNICIPAL AND
RAILROAD SECURITIES.
DEMAND DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS RECEIVED
INTEREST ALLOWED ON DAILY B a t . a

$ 4 0 0 ,0 0 0
$ 4 0 0 ,0 0 0
B A N K E R S AND B R O K E R S ,
Accounts o f Banks, Bankers and Corporations (M il l s B u il d in g ), 19 B R O A D 8 T ., N , Y
solicited.
Members o f the New York Stock Exchange.
Execute orders on commission for B onds, S tock s
Our faculties for COLLECTIONS are exceUent
and F o re ig n E xch an ge.
and we re-dlscount for Ijanks when balances war
rant it.
D e a le rs in first-cla ss Investm ent S ecu rities
[ESTABLISHED 1802],
attention given to investments for Cap
Boston is a reserve city, and balances with us from italists. Trust Funds and Institutions.
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
banks (not located in other reserve cities) count as a
reserve.
S. M . R o b e r t s ,
51 & 58 New Street and 42 Broadway.
P a u l Sc h w a r z .
We draw our own exchange on London and the
B r a n c h Office , 91 L e o n a r d St r e e t *
Continent, and make Cable transfers and plaoe
money by telegraph throughout the United States
Edward L. Oppenheim.
Walter Del. Mar
and Canada.:
(M I L L S B U I L D I N G ,)
Government Bonds bought and sold, and exchanges
Alexander Campbell & Co.,
in Washington made for banks without extra charge.
IN V E S T M E N T S E C U R IT IE S .
We have a market for prime first-class Investment
bankers and brokers,
Securities, and invite proposals from States, Coun­
We make a specialty of the buying, selling and
ties and Cities, when issuing bonds.
placing o f first mortgage bonds of railroads, water 1 7 N A S S A U S T R E E T , N E W Y O R K .
We do a general banking business, and Invite cor.
respondence.
works, gas works and other first-class corporations.
Malcolm Campbell, Member of N. \ . stock Exch.
We solicit correspondence.
A S A P . P O T T E R , P r e s id e n t.
James W hitely ,
h . chugeb O
aklet .
Maynard C. e the ,
JO S. W . W O R K , C a s h ie r .
Hi n e i H. Dodge, Washington, D. 0.
WM. R. Travers, Special Partner.
48 W A L L S T R E E T ,
(Bank of New York BuUding).
12 B roadw ay,
Bonds and Stocks bought and sold at the New N o. 6 4 B R O A D W A Y , N S W Y O R K .
STOCK B R O K E R S;
York Stock Exchange.
branch 0 micbs i
f ^ h v,® N«w Yor*A
v
( Sow loth St., Washington, D. 0
Ä
Ä
Ä
? Ä
n
eoUS Securities bought BONDS AND INVESTMENT SECURITIES FOB
8Rd sell on commission all classes of Railroad
SALE
Securities: also Grain and Provisions,
M ^ N ^ .& E x c h .
i : Ì: S
ä
i
Private Telegraph wires to Philadelphia, Wilmlng.
i. C. L a t h r o p . Osc a r B. Sm it h . J, H.O l if h a n t . Mm, Baltimore, Washington, Bridgeport, New Haven
Boston and Pittsburg.
w »i..«B w niivM

E. L. Oppenheim & C o.,

Roberts & Schwarz,

William T . Meredith,

W . P. Wight & C o.,

STOCK

BROKER.

Lansdale Boardman,

Prince & Whitely,

Lathrop, Smith & Oliphant,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,

N E W Y O R K , 80 BR O A D W A Y A 5 ITEW 8T. 3 7 BROAD S T ., NEW Y O R K ,
« P A C IF IC A Y E ., C H IC A G O .
t r o y , n . y . , n o . 17 f i r s t s t r e e t .
Members New York Stock Exchange, New Yock
Stock Hxoh. membershlpiprivate wlre ; aU faculties • Cotton Exchange, and Board of Trade, Chicago,




W . H . Goadby & C o.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
W o . 24 B R O A D

S _T _R B .E [1 J ,

W ow Y o r k .

THE

il

|[VOL.

C H R O N IC L E .

XLlV.

Q nuKtxB atiÄ Q xnm txs o f ffoyeigtt jgscfrirege.
THE

Drexel, Morgan & C o., August Belmont & C o., I N V E S T M E N T CO.
RANKERS,
W ALL STREET, CORNER OF BROAD,
N o . 1 2 P in e Street,
NEW YORK.
o f Philadelphia.
ISSUE T R A V E L E R S ’ CREDITS, available In all
parts o f the W orld, through
Drexel,Harjes & Co Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Hons, London. 3 1 0

D rexel & Co.,

Dor. o f Btta & Chestnut Sts. 31 Boulevard Haussmann,

P A R IS .

P H IL A D E L P H IA _
_

DOM ES I 10 A N D FO R E IG N B A N K ER S.
Deposits received subject to Draft. Securities
bought and sold on commission. In t^ M t allowed on
DeDosits. Foreign Exchange. Commercial Credits,
ga&e^ Transfers.
Circular Letters for Travelers,
available In all parts o f the world.j

Attornktb and agents of
M e s s r s . J . S. M O R G A N & C O .,
Ho. 22 OLD BROAD STREET, LONDON.

“
•
•

de Rothschild Bros., Peris.
M . A . de Rothschild dc Sons, Frank­
fort o\m .
S. M . de Rothschild, Es«., Vienna.

Fhila.

NEW YORK.

Boston.

AND

A L E X A N D E R B R O W N & SONS
BALTIMORE.

Buy and Sell B ills o f Exchange
ON G R E AT BRITAIN AND IRELAN D, FRANCE
° GERMANY, BELGIUM, HOLLAND SW ITZ­
ERLAND. N OR W AY, DENMARK,
SWEDEN AND A U STR ALIA .

Issu e C o m m e rc ia l & T ra veler«* C redits

N o.

23

BROAD STREET,
N ew Y o r k ,

On SELIGMAN BROTHERS, London.
SELIGMAN FRERES & CIE, Paris.
SELIGMAN & STETTHEIMER, Frankfurt.
ALSBERG, GOLDBERG A CO., Amsterdam.
A LTM AN & STETTHEIMER Berlin,
Payable In any part o f Europe, Asia, Africa, Aus­
tralia and America.
„ ,
, .
Draw Bills o f Exchange and make Telegraphic
Transfers o f Money on Europe and California.
A l e x a n d e r B a r in g .
j . K e n n e d y T od .
Member N. Y. Stock E xch’ge
H. O. Northcotb .

J. Kennedy T od & C o.,

T. & J. Stuart & C o.,
38

J

N A S SA U

STREET.

BILLS OF EXCHANGE ON
S M IT H ,

PAYNE

&

SMITH»»,

A ct as Agents for Banks, Bankers and Railroad
Companies.
.

Buy and sell bonds, stocks and securities In all Am ­
erican, Canadian, British and Dutch markets on com­
mission. Collect dividends, coupons and foreign and
Inland Drafts.
Sell Bills o f Exchange on

M E L V IL L E . EVANS dt CO., I LONDON.
C. J . HAMBRO A SON,
1
MA RCUA R D , K R A U 8S <fe CO., I p A R IS .
HOTT1NGCKR A CO.,
I

John Paton & C o.,

&

COUNTY R A N K ,

“ LIMITED,”

HANKING

COM PANY,

BELFAST, IR E L A N D ;
AND ON THK

N A T IO N A L

RANK

EDINBURGH

OF

AND

SCOTLAND.

BRANCHES!

ALSO,

CABLE TRANSFERS AN D LETTERS OF CREDIT.

J ohn

M unroe

& C o.,

N o . 8 2 N assau S treet, N e w Y o l k .
N o . 4 P o s t Office S q u are , B o s to n .
Issue Circular Letters o f Credit for Travelers’ Use

W illia m

Cr e d it s

o pened a n d pay m en ts

Ma d e

Messrs. C. J. Hambro & Son. London.
J & p je t ia l

Accounts and Agency o f Blanks, Corporations
firms and individuals received upon favorable terms
Dividends and interest collected and remitted.
A ct as agents for corporations In paying coupons
and dividends ; also as transfer agents.
Bonds, stocks and securities bought and sold on
commission, at the Stock Exchange or elsewhere.
Sterling Exchange and Cable Transfers bought and
sold.
DRAW ON
TH E UNION BANK OF LONDON
BRITISH LINEN CO. BANK, LONDON AND
SCOTLAND.

& Ohio

Pensacola & Atlantic Railroad Stock.
BOUGHT AND SOLD B Y

T O B E Y

B

A

N

K

E

R

Commercial and Travelers’ Credits.
Bills o f Exchange.
Cable Transfers.

C O M M IS S IO N
22

M ERCH AN TS,

Sc 2 4 E x c h a n g e P la c e ,

NEW

RANKERS

AND

BROKERS,

Members o f the New York Stock Exchange^
De a l e r s in F o reign e x c h a n g e . G over n m en t
a n d o th er I nvestm en t Bonds .
STERLING LOANS A SPECIALTY.

4 4 W a l l S t. a n d 6 2 G reen e St.

N. Y .

Buy and sell on Commission, fa r investment or on
margin, all securities dealt In at the New York Stock
xchange.
:cn

C an adian B a n k o f C om m erce
Ca p i t a l , $6,000,000.

Su r p l u s , U.eoo.ooo.

J. H. G0ADBY & ALEX. LAIRD,
AGENTS,

1« EXCHANGE PLACE, N EW YORK
BUY AND SELL STERLING EXCHANGE, CABLE
TRANSFERS, ETC.
RSUE COMMERCIAL CREDITS, A V A IL A B L E
IN ALL PARTS OF TH E WORLD.




STREET,

YORK.

N o . 4 9 W A L L S T ., N E W Y O R K ,
AND'

GAS

Kidder, Peabody & C o.,

STOCKS
AND

GAS

ON M EXICO , CUBA. «fee., «fee.

S E C U R IT IE S ,

Street Railroad Stocks and Bonds

FOREIGN BANKERS,

a n d a l l k in d s of

1 Nassau Street, New York,
118 Devonshire Street, Boston.

BROOKLYN

S E C U R IT IE S

DEALT
SEE G AS

Messrs. BARING BROS. & CO., London
C O M M E R C IA L

,

3 0 8 M O N T A G U E S T ., B R O O K L Y N .

ATTORNEYS AND AGENTS OF

Unger, Smithers & C o.,

K I R K ,

Geo. H. Prehtiss & C o.,

S

Schulz & Ruckgaber,
I n te r n a tio n a l B a n k o f L o n d o n
(L im it e d ), L o n d o n .
M essrs. J o h n R e re n b e rg , G o ssle r A C o.
H a m b u rg .
M essrs. M a r c u a r d , K r a u s s A C o ., P a r is

A

4 AND 6 B R O A D

N e w Y ork .

BANKERS

& Pre­

Continental Construction Stock.

BILLS OF EXCHANGE, LETTERS OF CREDIT,
TELEGRAPHIC TRANSFERS OF MONEY

CORRESPONDENTS OF THE

Common

Maitland, Phelps & C o.,

P a r is H o u s e —M U N R O E A CO.

29 W IL L IA M S T R E E T , N E W Y O R K

I w x r jc B t m je w t s .

ferred Stocks.

AND

b y cable.

BAN K ERS.

BUY AND D R A W BILLS OF EXCHANGE,
MAKE CABLE TRANSFERS, ISSUE T R A V E L ­
ERS’ CREDITS.
ISSUE COMMERCIAL CREDITS, A V A IL A B L E
IN A L L PA RTS OF TH E W ORLD, ON

Kanawha

Street, N e w Y o r k .

Abroad against Cash or Satisfactory
Guaranty o f Re-payment,

E x c h a n g e o n L o n d o n . P a r is , B e r lin
a n d Z u r ic h .

FOREIGN

STREET,
NEW YORK.

Kanawha & Ohio Railroad First 6s.

JE& U P, P A T O N & CO.,
52

MANCHESTER, PA Y A B LE IN LONDON

ULSTER

Heidelbach,
Ickelheimer & Co.,

SUCCESSORS TO

BANKERS. LONDON

M ANCHESTER

W ILLIAM BROCKIE, President.
W H ARTON BAR K E R , V ice-P esident.
H ENRY M. H OYT. J r ., Treasurer.
ETH KLBERT W ATTS, Secretary.
Board o f Directors—William Brockie, George a.
Pepper, Morton McMichael, Wharton Barker, Henry
C. Gibson, T. Wistar Brown, William Potter.
Advisory Committee o f Stockholders.—George M.
Troutman, Gustavus English, Isaac H. Clothier,
W iiiiam Pepper, M. D., Thomas Dolan, John G.
Reading, Joseph E. Gillingham, John Wanamaker,
Henry E. Smith, Charles B. Wright, Henry Lewis.
Craige Lippincott,Hamilton Dtsston, Clayton French,
Francis Rawle.

29 W IL L IA M
Cor. Exchange Place,

No. 63 W ILLIAM STREET,
BAN KERS.

Issue commercial credits, also foreign and domestic
M a k e T e le g r a p h ic T r a n s fe r s o f M o n e y
travelers’ letters o f credit In pounds sterling & dollars.
R e t w e e n th is C o u n tr y a n d E u r o p e .
O ffer In v e s tm e n t S ecu rities.
R A K E C O L LE C T IO N S OF D R A F T S drawn

abroad on all points In United States and Canada,
and o f drafts drawn In the C nited States on
foreign countries: __
snd their London house, Messrs. BROWN, SHIPLEY
A CO., receive accounts o f American banks, firms
and Individuals, upon favorable termB.

Full paid.

J. & W . Seligman & Co.

IE STERLING,
Available n any part o f the world, In FRANCS for
use In Martinique and Guadaloupe, and In dollars for
use in this and adjacent countries.

STREET.

Buys and sells Bills o f Exchange, drawing on
Baring Bros. & Co., London, also on Paris and
Berlin.
AN D THEIR CORRESPONDENTS.
A cts as Financial A gent In the negotiating and
Draw Bills o f Exchange on, and make Cable Trans­ marketing o f Securities. Deals in Bonds—Corpora­
fers to, England, France and Germany.
_________ tion, Railroad, State, Municipal, &c Executes orders
on commission in Bonds, Stocks, &c Collects Interest
and dividends. Receives money on deposit, allow­
ing Interest. A s desirable investments offer, wiU
issue its Debenture Bonds, secured by Its capital and
assets.
— —
BANKERS

Issue Letters o f Credit for Travelers

Brown Brothers & C o.,

CHESTNUT

Capital, 9 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

Q U O T A T IO N S

IN .
IN

T H IS

PAPER,

G ko. H. P r e n t iss . W . d . P r e n t iss . W. W. W alsh
Member N.Y.Stock Exch.

C R E D IT S ,

First Mortgage 6 P er Cent Gold Bonds

C ir c u la r C red its fo r T r a v e le r s .

(8 1 2 ,0 0 0 PER M ILE),
Ca b l e T r a n s f e r s a n d B il l s o f E x c h a n g e
G r e a t B r it a in a n d t h e Co n t in e n t .

KOUNTZE

on

BR O TH ER S,

BANKERS,
120 B r o a d w a y , Equitable Building, New Y ork
L E T T E R S OF C R E D IT AND
C IR C U L A R NOTES

Issued fo r the use o f travelers in all parts o f the
world. Bills drawn on the Union Bank o f London.
Telegraphic transfers made to London and to various
places In the United States. Deposits received sub­
ject to check at sight, and interest allowed on bal­
ances. Government ana other bonds and investment

securities bought and sold on commission.

JACKSONVILLE TAMPA & KEY WEST
RAILWAY COMPANY.
Issue limited to »1,856,000. Principal due 1914.
Interest payable in New York January and July.
Completed Feb. 82, 1886. Standard gauge. Steel
rails. First-class equipment.
. »
.__
This road forms a part o f the through line from
New York to TamFa, Florida, over which t h e l u i an
mail is now carried. W e recommend these heads as
¿soured by a large and rapidly increasing through
and local business. Price, par and accrued Interest.,
pamphlets and copies o f mortgage furnished,

B .

A.

L A N C A S T E R Sc CO»
1 0 W a l l S treet.

THE

J anu ary 1, 1887.]

C H R O N IC L E ,

m

^Bankers aud ^Brokers in |jjeta “ ovli (Mttj.
U
Fred. H . Smith,

Taintor & Holt,

Geo. K. Sistare’s Sons,

BANKER & BROKER,

BANKERS,

N o . 2 0 B R O A D S T ., N E W Y O R K .

1 6 A 1 8 R r o a d S tree t, N e w Y o r k ,
1 2 1 S o u th T h ir d S tree t, P h ila d e lp h ia ,

N o . 11 W a l l S t., C o r. N e w , N e w Y o r k .

Twenty years’ experience In Railroad Bonds. Par
ties desiring to bay or sell Unourrent Bonds wi.l
please communicate.
Stocks bought in Fractional Lots or otherwise,
either fo r Cash or on Margin.
F. H. Sm it h , 1 Members Consolidated Stock and
8. W . Sm it h , < Petroleum Exchange. New York.

TRANSACT a GENERAL BANKING business.
DEPOSITS received and INTEREST allowed on
balances.
Buy and sell GOVERNMENT, MUNICIPAL and
RAILROAD Securities.
Private telegraph wires to Providence and Boston

Ch a s . J. T o w n se n d .
L a n s in g C. W a s h b u r n .
Member N.Y. Stock Exchange.
J n o . P. T o w n se n d , Special Partner.

G. E. TAINTOR.
GEO. H . HOLT.
_____ _________Q. D. L ’H U ILIER.________________

Townsend & Washburn,

H ir a m De w in g . Cl a r k De w in g . F. T. Bontbcoc
(Member o f New York Stock Exchange.)

BANKERS AND BROKERS,
N o . 6 W a l l S treet, N e w Y o r k .
Stocks and Bonds Bought and Sold on Commission
fo r cash or on margin.
Special attention given to Unlisted Securities.
Deposits received subject to Cheok at Sight.
____________ Correspondence Solicited.____________

H. Dewing 6c Son,
BANKERS

AND

Carolin 6c Cox,

Gorham, t urner 6c Co.,

B a n k e r s A C o m m is s io n S to c k B r o k e r *

F .C .H o l l in s ,

A u stin G . G o r h a m .
Ch a s . W. T u r n e r ,
C h a s C. N o b l e .______M em b er N. Y. Stock Exch

BANKERS AND

10 Years’ Membership in the N.Y. 8took Exchange)

BANKER

AND

BROKER,

A . Dutenhofer,
BROKER
AND

Dealer in Miscellaneous Securities,
MILLS BUILDING (3d Floor,)

John H. Davis 6c C o.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,

NO. 2 0 N ASSAU S T R E E T ,
NEW YORK.

Hamilton Sc Bishop,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,

N o. 35 P I N K S T R E E T , N E W Y O R K .

(Members New York Stock Exchange.)
Accounts of Banks, Bankers and others received.
Interest allowed on balances. A strictly Commission
Business in the purchase and sale o f stocks and bonds,
Private Telegraph Wire to Albany.Troy, Syracuse.
Rochester, Utica, Buffalo, Cleveland and Chicago.
Draw on City Bank o f London in amounts to suit.
Special attention given to Securities for investment.

No. 10

WALL

S T ., N E W Y O R K .

Orders for Stocks and Bonds executed at all
Exchanges.
Especial attention given to supplying high-class

John

Receive deposit-* and consignments o f Bullion.
Deal in Investment Securities and Foreign E x­
change and invite correspondence.
Particular attention given to information regarding
Investment Securities.

Dickinson 6c Ailing,
_ B u y and sell at N. Y. Stock Exchange, fo r IN­
VESTMENT or on MARGIN, all classes o f 8tocks
and Bonds, and allow Interest on deposits, subject to
check at sight.
____________________

A lbert Pearce,
16 &

18 B R O A D S T .,

BROKER IN A L L

KINDS

OF INVESTMENT

B

N o .

18

A

N

K

E

R

S

,

W A L L
S T R E E T ,
N ew Y o rk .

Transact a General Banking Business, Including
the purchase and sale o f STOCKS and BONDS for
cash or on margin.

B u y a n d S ell I n v e s tm e n t S ec u rities.
A. M. Kidder. W atland Trask . H. J. Morse.
W. C. Hill

BANKERS,
STREET.

J V ld b e lt a f t

& C on
B A N K E R S ,

_______________Reuben Leland.

In addition to a General Banking Business, Buy
and Sell Government Bonds and Investment Securi­
ties.___________________________________

Howard Lapsley & Co.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
74 B R O A D W A Y and 9 N E W S T R E E T ,
Now Y o r k .




SOLD,

Hu w a s d La t h a m , fuicdibuiok W.
Member o f N. Y. Stock Exchange.

iohn

perry

J. L. Robertson,
BOND AN D ST O C K B R O K E R ,
Dealer in Investment Securities,
No. 7

NASSAU STREET,

(Continental National Bank Building,
N ew Y o r k .

Rolston & Bass,

iB o o d iii*

_______ CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED,________

CEDAR

BOUGHT AND

See Quotations o f City Railroads in this paper,

Pity. County, State, Railroad,District o f Colombia
Honos and Foreign R* change, and all Securities
ltsted in N. Y. Stock Exchange.

5 8 Broadway, cor. Exchange Place, N. Y .
Branch GfHce, 2 41 L a Salle St., Chicago,

62

YORK.

UNITED BANK BUILDING,

TRANSACT A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS,
INCLUDING TH E PURCHASE AND 8A L E OF
8TOCK 8 AND BOND8 FOR CASH OR ON MAR­
GIN. BUY AND SELL INVESTMENT ¡-ECUR1TIE 8. INTEREST ALLOW ED ON DEPOSITS
SUBJECT TO CHECK A T SIGHT.
P. O. Box 447.
D. A . BOODY.
C. W . MoLELLAN.

No.

B R O A D W A Y ,

V o. 2 W A L L S T R E E T , N E W Y O R K .

BONDS, MISCELLANEOUS SECURITIES
AND DEFAULTED BONDS

Gilman, Son 8c C o.,

145

J, H. Latham 6c C o.,

N o s. 1 6 & 1 8 B r o a d S treet, N e w Y o r k .

B A N K E R S
AND
B R O K ER S,
N o . 3 0 P in e S treet, N e w Y o r k .

H. L. Grant,
N o.

Y o r k . CITY RAILROAD STOCKS & BONDS

BANKERS AN D BROKERS,

Member N. Y. Stock Exchange.

A SPECIALTY.
State, Municipal and Kaliway Bonds and Conpon
sought and sold at best market rates. Investors or
lealers wishing to buy or sell are Invited to communl
sate with us.
Member o f the New York Stock Exchange.

NEW

17 Years’ Membership New York Stock Exchange.
Members Philadelphia Stock Exchange.

R obert J. Kim ball .____ A lfred b . Lo un ab tenv
W. H. Dic k in so n ,
E d w a r d p . A l l in g

No. 1 4 W a l l S treet, N e w Y o r k C ity ,
S O U T H E R N S E C U R IT IE S

Chrystie & Janney,

R . J. Kimball 6c C o.,

Buy and sell on commission, for investment or on
margin, all securities dealt in at the N.Y. Stock Exch.

B . M a n n in g ,

BANKER AND BROKER.

I N V E S I 'M E N T S E C U R I T I E S .

BANKERS,
N o s. 2 3 & 2 5 N a ssau S t., N e w

33 W A L L S T R E E T .

STATE AND CITY BONDS OF GEORGIA. ALSO
SECURITIES OF TH E CENTRAL RR. & BANK­
ING CO. OF GEORGIA A SPECIALTY.
Investors wishing to buy or sell are invited to call
or correspond. Prompt and personal attention given
to all orders.

Transacts a general Banking bnsiness, including the
purchase and sale o f stocks and bonds for cash or or
margin.

W alston h . brown.
Fred. a . brown .
Herbert P. Brown.

BROKERS,

11 W A L L STREET, NEW Y O R K ,
AND
2 4 6 C L A R K STREET, CHICAGO, I L L .

16 A 18 BROAD 8T., NEW YORK.

Execute orders In all securities listed at the New
York Stock Exchange. For Sale:
F ir s t -C l a ss R a i l r o a d F i r s t M o r t g a g e Bonds
GEORGE C. WOOD. C. H. HUESTIS. L. M. SWAN.

I .if.W a g g o n e r

Members N. Y. Stook Exchange.

Rooms 25 & 20.

31 PINE STREET, NEW YORK,
BANKERS
AND
BROKERS.
SUCCESSORS TO

BANKERS,

. E m erson .

m i l s B u ild in g , 3 5 W a l l S t., N e w Y o r k

C. J. Turner,

Walston H . Brown & Bros

e. h

Frank C. Hollins & C o.,

BANKERS AND BROKERS,

W ood, Huestis & Co.,
&, D A V IS .

Buy and sell on Commission, fo r cash or on margin
all securities dealt in at the New York Stock Ex­
change.
Interest allowed on dally balances.
All deposits subject to check at sight.
Particular attention to orders by mall or telegram

N o . 18 W a ll S treet, N e w Y o r k .

W m . V. Carolin ,
chaules t . Cox
Member N. Y. Stock Exchange.

WOOD

F IR S T -C L A S S IN V E S T M E N T S .

BROKERS,

Stocks and Bonds Bought and Sold on Commission
Particular attention given to information regard­
ing investment securities.
Iowa Loan S Trust Co. 6 per cent Debenture*
t,
bought and sold.___________________________________

N o. 55 BROADW AY,
Branch Office,S15 Madison A v „ cor. 42d St., New York
Deposits received subject to check at sight, and
Interest allowed on dally balances. All Stocks am
Securities dealt In at the New York Stock Exohang*
bought and sold on Commission, for Cash or upon
Margin.
______________

Connected by Private Wire with main office. New
York.
DEALERS IN

NO. 20 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK,
STOCKS, BONDS
A N D M IS C E L L A N E O U S S E C U R I T I E S
Correspondence solicited.
Quotations cheerfully furnished.
W m . H . R o lsto n ,
W . A l e x . B a s s , Jr.
Member N. Y. Stock Exch ge.

Simons 6c Chew,
STOCK B R O K E R S ,
2 Exchange Court A 3 2 Broadway, N. Y 1
Stocks, Bonds and United States Governmeit
Securities Bought and Sold on Commission.
J a s . D. Sim o n s ,
B e v e r l y Ch e w .
Member N. Ÿ. 8tock Exchange.
Member N. Y. Produce Exchange.

Simon Borg 8c C o.,
BANKERS,

U N IT E D B A N K B U IL D IN G ,
W a l l S tree t, c o rn e r B r o a d w a y .
STOCKS, BONDS d COMMERCIAL P AP E R
k
Stocks and Bonds bought and sold on commission
at Mew York Stock Exchange. Advances made on
business paper and other securities.

N o. 1 7

N ASSAU

S T .,

NEW

YORK,

DEALERS IN A L L KIND 8 OF

Railroad and Investment Securities!
So u t h e r n Se c u r it ie s

a

Sp e c ia l t y .

THE

ly

s p e c i a l Itttyjestmettts.

E.

S. B a i l e y ,
DEALINGS IN

I N S U R A N C E
A

STO CK S

S P E C IA L T Y .

Cash paid at once for the above securities} or they
will be sold on commission at seller’s option.

Columbua Hocking Valley Sc Toledo.
Toledo Sc Ohio Central.
K anaw ha Sc Ohio.
East Tennessee Va. Sc Georgia.
American Speaking Telephone.
Southern Telegraph.
Bought

and

So l d

bt

J. S. Stanton,
16 a n d 18 B R O A D S T R E E T .

Trust Co.’s Stocks.
A L L OF TU B

AND

B r o o k ly n Com panies’
BOUGHT AND SOLD BY

W M . C. NOYES,
B roadw ay.

See my quotations o f Trust and Telegraph Stocks
n Dally Indicator and Saturday’s Evening Pott.

D E G H U EE ’S
TABLES

OF BOND

American Loan & Trust Co,
THIS COMPANY TRANSACTS A GEN ERAL
LOAN, TRUST AND FIN AN CIAL BUSINESS.
Receives Money on Deposit subject to check, and
allows Interest on balances.
A ll Checks pass through the Clearing-house.
MAKES INVESTMENTS OF MONEY.
ACTS AS EXECU TOR. ADM INISTRATOR,
GU ARD IAN , TRUSTEE, ETC.
ALSO, AS REG ISTRAR AND T RANSFER AGENT.
A n Authorised Depository fo r Court and
„unty Treasurers’ Fund.

VALVES,

Specialists in R a ilr o a d B o n d s.

STREET,

NEW

Toledo Ann Arbor & North Michigan 1st».
Southern Central lsts.
Middletown Unionville & W ater Gap os.
Indianapolis S Vinoennes lsts and 2as.
c
Scioto Valley Bonds, all issues.

A L B E R T E . H A C H F IE L D ,
N o . 5*9 P in e S treet.

Walsh & Floyd,

YORK.

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED

Cahoone & Wescott,
1 8 W a l l S treet, N e w Y o r k ,
Exeoute Orders In all Securities Listed on
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.
Special Attention given to

Government & other Investment Bonds

SOLD.

W ANTED}

Buttrick & Elliman,
W ALL

K a il-

Investment Securities
BOUGHT AND

S T O C K

County 5s.

B R O K E R S ,

No. 26 BROAD STREET, NEW YORK.
JAMES W . W A L S H , J r .,
NlCOLL FLOYD JR
M em b er N Y . Rto«k E xch an ge.__________________

R . T . Wilson & Co.,

T ow n 6s.

Decatur. Illin o is Municipal 7s,
Danville, Indiana—
School 10s.
Defiant e, <>hio—
School 6s.
Frankfort, Indiana—
School 10s.

8chool 6s.

Grant County, Indiana—
County 7s.
Gravel Road 7s.
Court H ouse 5s.
.
. _
Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad C o .First Mortgage 7a
Muskegon Division 5s.
Hamilton County, Indiana—
County 7s.
Hancock County, Indiana—
Gravel Road 6s.
Indianapolis, Indiana;—
Fire Department 7 3-10s.
Loan 7 3-10s.
Southern Park 7 3-10s.
Union Railroad 6s.
Lamar, Missouri—
Louisiana National Bank o f New O rleansSemi-annual dividend o f 4 per cent.
Marion County, Indiana—
County 6s.
Marion, Indiana—
Water Works 8s.
_ _
Massillon & Cleveland R. R. Company
First Mortgage 7s.
Muncie, Indiana.
Municipal 6s.
_
,
Northern Pacifio Term. Co. o f Oregon.
First Mortgage 6s.
Peru, Indiana—
Pittsburg Fort W ayne S Chicago Railway C o .c
First Mortgage 7s. series A.
Quarterly dividend o f 1M per cent, special guar
an teed stuck.
Scioto County,Ohio—
Bridge 8s.
Children’s Hom e 8s.
Turnpiko 8s.
_
_
Trav erse City Railroad Company.
First Mortgage 6s.
W heeling, W est Virginia—
Compromise 6s.
JA N U A R Y 4.
Pittsburg Fort W ayne S Chicago Railway Co. ___
c
Regular stock, quarterly dividend o f 1 * per cent.
JA N U A R Y 5.
Blackford County, Indiana—
Gravel Road 7s.
JAN U A RY 20.
Vermillion County, Indiana—
Gravel Road 7s.
Marion, In d ia n a Municipal 5s.

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
2 E x c h a n g e C o u rt, N e w Y o r k .

Correspondence Solicited

SIXTY-SEVENTH

fu n c tio n
Gas. Insurance. Banks. City Railroads.
Scc . Send for list published Mondays.
J . P. W IN T lt INGHAM , 3 6 Pine St. N .Y .

Railway Bonds.
A V A R IE T Y OF

FIRST-CLASS INVESTMENT BONDS,

A

t h e

STO CK S

AMD

BONDS

on
WEDNESDAYS AND SATU RDAYS.

NO. 12 PINE STREET, NEW YORK.
(EQUITABLE BUILDING.)

George

Eustis & Co.

C IN C IN N A T I. O H IO .

M. L. SCUDDER, Jr., Proprietor,)

hu

TH E

1 .A K E SH O R E

Sc

M IC H IG A N

^SO UTH ERN R AIL W A Y CO,
D
T r e a s u r e r ’ s o f f ic e ,
GRAND CENTRAL l>YPOT,
N e w Y o r k , Dec. 80,1886. ,
nvrnr HOARD OF DIRECTORS o f this company

transferbooksw ill be closed at 3 o’clock P.M
nn’ ^turdavV the I5th day o f January next, and wiU
SSknened on the morning o f Friday, the 18th day
o f February next. K. D. WORCESTER, Treasurer.

ANSWERS INQUIRIES CONCERNING

N e w Y o r k , Deo. 2 8 .188«.

THE
JL

ST. P A U L

M IN N E A P O L I S

M ANITOBA R A IL W A Y COMPANY,
No. 63 W il l ia m St r e e t ,
)
Large Library o f Railroad Documents.
Ne w Y o r k , Dec. 29,1886.5
Competent Experts.
The interest due Jan. 1, 1887, on the following,
Confidential Reports.
Moderate Charges named bonds will be paid on and after Jan. 3, 1887,
on presentation o f the proper coupons at this office
St. Paul S Pacific Railrpad Company, $700,000
c
I mortgage.
_•
■
St. Paul Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway Com.
pany first mortgage.
4 1 Sc 4 3 W A L L S T R E E T ,
St. Paul Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway Com
pany consolidated mortgage.
NEW YORK.
Minneapolis Union Railway Company first mort
gage.
JOHN S. KENNEDY, Vice-President.
IN V E S T M E N T S E C U R IT IE S .




BANK.

B A N K E R S,

2 3 4 L a S alle S t., C h ic a g o , 111.,

J o h n F. D o u g l a s ,

N A T IO N A L

1 rtt/pitbl IC. Ne w Y o r k , Dec. 31, X8po.
B o a r d ( 3) P B R ^ E N T f f r l e o f t a x , pay!
& S fJ d Ha ^ K P y l 0. 1p : until which date
the transfer books will be^ o | edp0LIjB N i Cashler_

A D R I A N I I . M U L L E R A SON

The Investors’ Agency,

A m e rica n Stocks a n d Securities

Ddc.3,. 1886,

The Undersigned hold REGULAR AUCTION
BALES of all olasses of

FEAGG,

D u n c a n B u ild in g , 11 P in e S treet.

Interest fo r the ^alf-y^ar

STOCKS and BONDS
A t Auction.

FOR SALE B Y

REED

S a le s .

CENT pe^annum w u fb e credited to depositors entiried th ” eto unuer the by-laws o f the bank and the
laws o f the State.
1RS„
Interest payable * a •g - _ gNEDEN, President.
w
G. N. Co n k l in , Secretary.

SUITABLE FOR

C A R E F U L IN V E S T O R S ,

D I V ID E N D S

Benton County, Indiana—
Gravel Road 6s.
.
_ _ _
Columbus & Hocking Valley R. R . C o.—
Second Mortgage 7s.
Columbus, Indiana—
Municipal 7 8-lOs.
Consolidat ed Funding.
Colfax, Indiana—

are hereby notified that, MORE TH A N A MA­
JORITY OF the bonds having been deposited here
und abroad, the success o f the refunding plan is
assured. Holders desirous o f enjoying early benefits
of the plan are requested to deposit their bonds at
once with the MERCANTILE TRUST CO., o f this
wty.
Detailed circulars can be obtained on application to
M ERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY, N. Y.
ST. LOUIS S SAN FRANCISCO B Y. CO., N. Y
c
or KIDDER, PEABODY & CO., BOSTON.

GEO. W . D O U G H ERTY,

18

i'a c iu c

AND

on the following bonds and stocks are payable at
the hanking house o f MESSRS. W INSLOW
LA N IE R & CO., com er o f Nassau and Cedar Streets
New York City, on and after Jan. 3, 1887:
Allegheny Valley Railroad Co.—
First Mortgage 7 3-lUs.
Allen County, Indiana—

road Co. First Mortgage Six P er
Cent Bonds

PUBLISHED AND FOB SALE B Y

R o o m D , M ills B u ild in g .

rp H E IN T E R E S T

ROWLAND N. H A ZA R D , President.
GEORGE 8. H A R T , Vice-President.
W IL L IA M O. »-NOW, Secretary.
JAMES 8.T H Ü K8TON, Treasurer.
DIRECTORS:
iEORGE H. POTTS,
WALLACE C. ANDREWS,
lOHNL. MACAULAY,
1RA DAVENPORT,
rAMES M. V a h n u m ,
W il l ia m d . Sn o w ,?
TOHN I. BLAIR,
JOHN D. KlMMEY,
E w a r d F. Br o w n in g , F kkbeh ic A . P otts ,
d
R w la n d N. H a z a r d , J ohn R o ss ,
o
1BORGE S. HART,
ALEXANDER G. BLACK,
VM. B. D in s m o r e ,
F r a n k C- H o l l in s ,
I l ia s L e w is , j e .,
T h o m a s L. W atso n ,
iu i .es A ld ig k ,
E l ia s C. B en edict ,
S
tev en son B u r k e .
W il l ia m P a w n m s n v .

H o ld e rs o f A tla n t ic X

N ew Y o r k

96

tttetrjesl, p in td e u d s , Sec.

ffitr a n c ia l.

113 B R O A D W AY, NEW Y O R K .
Capital, Fully P aid.......... ............8 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

5>j P I N E S T R E E T .

[V ol. XLIV.

C H R O N IC L E .

„
TH E

L O U IS V IL L E

Sc N A S H V I L L E

rat
L WAT T.ROAD COMPANY will pay at Its office,
No 50 Exchange Place, New York, on and after
Monday, Jan. 8,1887, the coupons maturing j aa. l ,
ijyjij An til© following mortgage bonds.
New Orleans Division, First Mortgage.
New Orleans Division, Second Mortgage.
Louisville S Frankfort S Lexington & Frankfort
c
c

(LNMhvilîe) & D e c a t u r ^ ' R . Co.. First Mortgage
South & North Alabama R y. Co., State Indorsed
B Mobile S Montgomery Ry. Ço., Incom e B onds .1
c
a «Tf HODDYCe

I J an u a r y 1, ;i8&7.|

gitriÄjetiÄs, Set. J u ti re st,

% vl\z x z $X ,
Q O F F IN

Sc

THE

STAN TO N,

BANKERS,

10, 11 and 12 Mortimer Building, Wall St., New
York, will pay interest on the follow ing bonds
JA N U A R Y Is
City o f Des Moines, Iowa- Second renewed 4)$ per cents.
City o f Jeffersonville, Indiana—
Refunding 5 per cents.
City o f Logans port, Indiana—
Refunding 5 per cents.
City o f 8penoer, Indiana—
Refunding 5 per cents.
City o f Muncie, Indiana—
Refunding 5 per cents.
City o f Martinsville, Indiana—
Refunding 5 per cents.
City o f Des Moines, Iowa—
Funding 7 per cents.
City o f Logansport, Indiana—
Funding 0 per cents.
City o f Jeffersonville, Indiana—
Municipal
per cents.
Citv o f Jeffersonville, Indiana—
Funding 6 per cents.
County o f Warren, Indiana—
Public Building 5 per cents.
County o f Mahaska, Iowa—
Refunding 5 per cents.

T H E n iC H IG A N
A

CENTRAL

RAIL

M A R I E T T A & N O R T H G E O R G IA R . R

" A Coupons maturing Jan. 1 , 1887, on mortgage
bonds issued by the Marietta and North Georg!
Railroad Company will be paid in BOSTON at tin
office o f the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Com
P?n7 ’ ,!n N e* York at
office o f Messrs. B ood j
McLellan & Co. 58 Broadway, or in AUGU STA, Ga.
at the office o f James W . Jackson.
____________ ______________M. E. Post, Treasurer.
f J 'H E
D E N V E R Sc R I O
GRAND]
R A ILR O A D COMPANY.
Coupon No. 1, due January 1st, 1887, o f th
First Consolidated Mortgage Bonds will be paid a
the office o f the company, 47 William Street, Nei
J. W . GILLU LY , Treasurer.
D e n v e r , Dec. 24,1886.
For any o f the above referred to coupons left fo
examination, checks will be mailed on the 31st inst.

Q O N T I N E N T A L N A T I O N A L R A N K .N e w Y o r k , Dec. 24,1886.
FIFTY -SIX TH DIVIDEND.
The directors o f this bank have to-day declare
a semi-annual dividend o f FOUR (4) P E R CEN'
payable Jan. 5 ,1887,‘to which date from Deo. 81 tl
transfer books will be closed.
A LFRE D H. TIMPSON, Cashier.

O F W E L L S , F A R G O Sc CO.

No. 65 B r o a d w a y , New Y o r k , Dec. 20,1886.The regular semi-annual dividend o f FOUR PE
CENT has been declared by the directors o f tk
company, payable Jan. 15, 1887, at our office, «
above. The transfer books will close Dec, 81,188
at 2 P. M., and reopen Jan. 17th, 1887.
H . B. PARSONS. Assistant Sec’y.

ATANHATTAN

S A V IN G S

IN S T IT U ­

TION. Ne w Y o r k , Dec. 24,1886.
SEVENTY-FIRST SEMI-ANNUAL DIVIDEND.
The Trustees o f this Institution have declared in­
terest on all sums remaining on deposit during the
three or six months ending 31st inst., at the rate
o f TH R EE AND ONE H A L F P E R CENT PE R
ANNUM on $1,000 and under, and TH R EE PE R
CENT PE R ANNUM on the excess o f $1,000, not ex­
ceeding $3,000, payable on and after the third Mon­
day in January next.
E D W AR D SCHELL, President.
C. F. ALVORD, Secretary.

T H E

M in e r a l R a n g e R a il r o a d Co m p a n y )
Ge n e r a l Offices ,
>
H an co ck , Mich., Dec. 27,1886. )

REGULAR

QUARTERLY

-I- DIVIDEND o f TW O AND ONE-HALF PER
CENT on the Capital Stock o f this Company is paya­
ble Jan. 5,1887, at the office o f the Company, Han­
cock, Mich., or at its transfer agency in the city o f
New York, to stockholders o f record Dec. 81,1888.
H. S. OGDEN, Treasurer.

TH E

C AN A D A SOUTHERN R A IL W A Y CO.
T r e a s u r e r ’ s Of fice ,
j
G r a n d Ce n t r a l Depo t ,
V
N e w Y o r k , Dec. 30,1886. S
TH E BOARD OF DIRECTORS o f this company
have this day declared a dividend o f ONE AND
ONE-QUARTER Per Cent, upon its capital stock,
payable on TUESDAY,’the fifteenth day o f February
next, at this office.
The transfer books will be closed at 8 P. M. on
Saturday, the 15th inst., and will be reopened on the
morning o f Friday, the 18th day o f February next.
HENRY P R A T T , Acting Treasurer.




ghrtilettds, Sec.

T H E I N T E R E S T ON T H E F O L L O W *
ing bonds is payable at the banking bouse o f
H EN RY S. IVES & CO., corner o f Nassau and
Cedar Sts., New York City, on and after Jan. 8, 1887,
Cincinnati Richmond & Chicago Railroad—
First Mortgage 7s.

▼

g itta u d a l.
Lake Erie & Western R’y Co.

N e w Y o r k , December, 1886.
T o the security holders o f the Lake Erie & W est­
ern Railway Company:
The purchaser, Gen. Samuel Thomas, has agreed
to sell the property to a new company to be form ed,
Cincinnati Richm ond & Chicago Railroad— t ■
called the Lake Erie & W estern Railroad Company,
Second Mortgage 7s.
whose line will extend from Sandusky, Ohio, to
Dayton & Michigan R a ilroa d Peoria, 111., 430 miles, and which will issue the fo l­
Consolidated Mortgage 5s.
lowing securities:
$4,300,000 first mortgage, gold, 5 p ercen t, 50-year
Cincinnati Hamilton & Indianapolis R ailroa d bonds, being at the rate o f $ 10,000 per mile.
First Mortgage 7s.
$8,600,000 preferred stock, being at the rate o f
Mineral Range R ailroa d $20,000 per mile.
First Mortgage Honghton Extension 5s.
$8.600,000 common stock, being at the rate o f
Mineral Range Railroad—
$20,000 per mile.
General Mortgage 4s._______________________
A ll old securities have been extinguished by the
Q F F IC E
OF T H E
M E M P H I S Sc sale and will receive their respective portions o f the
CHARLESTON R A ILR O A D CO., Ne w Y o r k , purchase money from the offloers o f the oourt. The
Dec. 28,1886.—Coupons o f this company maturing present car trusts will also be paid off, leaving the
Jan. 1,1887, will be paid on and after Jan. 2d at the property free from lien except as above.
Old security holders will be allowed to subscribe
office o f Messrs. WALSTON H. BROWN & BROS.
fo r certain portions o f the new securities as fo llo w s :
20 Nassau Street, N. Y.
INCOME BONDS.
(Signed)
H . C. W ILTON , Treasurer.
Holders o f incom e bonds, or certificates o f deposit
o f same with the Central Trust Company will be
TO BONDHOLDERS
allowed to deposit their bonds or certificates, as the
OF TH E
case may be. with the Central Trust Company and
reoelve a receipt whioh will entitle them to what,
overpaym ent is due from the sale o f the rail* ay,
Bondholders, to avail themselves o f the benefits o f when paid by the Master o f the Court.
the Matheson-Palmer reorganization agreement o f
In addition: Holders o f Lafayette Bloomington
Oct. 15, 1886, are required to deposit their bonds & Muncie Incomes, or certificates, depositing,
same on or before Jan. 15, 1887, will receive a cer­
without delay in the Union Trust Company, No. 78 tificate giving them the right to subscribe fo r 800
Broadway, New York, against its negotiable receipts per cent o f their holdings in preferred stock o f the
new company at 85 per cent. And they are hereby
therefor.
notified that to avail themselves o f the right to sub­
Messrs. Geo. S. Coe, Exstein Norton and Joseph scribe they must deposit said bonds or certificates
D. Potts have been agreed upon as the Purchasing on or before Jan. 15,1887, and in case o f subscribing
must pay 50 per cent o f the 85 per cent o f the
Committee, to whose order the bonds will be de­ amount subscribed fo r on or before Jan. 20,1887.
Holders o f Lake Erie & Western Incomes, or
posited.
have the same privilege
Only deposited bonds are entitled to participate certificates, o f their subscription, which except as to
the amount
in their case
in the subscription fo r new bonds or in the reorgan­ will be 250 per cent o f their holdings.
Holders o f Sandusky Division Incomes, or certifi­
ization plan. The custody o f m ore than a majority
cates, have the same privilege except as to the
o f the bonds has already been secured.
amount o f their subscription, which in their case
Bonds can be deposited until Jan. 27 without will be ICO per cent o f their holdings.
STOCKHOLDERS.
charge.
The old stockholders will be allowed to deposit
A copy o f the Agreement is filed with the Union their stock with the Central Trust Company o f New
Trust Company, and bondholders can receive copies York, and on payment o f $12 per share will receive
the par
o f the Trust Company and o f the .Secretary o f the a certificate forinto new o f their old stock, which will
be convertible
common stock when issued
Railway Company, 82 Nassau Street, and o f the by the railroad company. And they are hereby noti­
fied that they must do so on or before Jan. 15,1887.
members o f the committee.
Stockholders who have paid assessment will have
Dated Dec. 6,1886.
credit fo r same on authorizing a transfer o f the
amount so paid.
MATHESON & CO.,
For any further Information apply at No. 2 Wall
W m. J. PA LM E R.
Street, New York.
NELSON ROBINSON,
For the purchaser.
The undersigned have accepted the appointment
as members o f the Purchasing Committee under the
Matheson-Palmer Reorganization Agreem ent o f T> EORGANIZATION OF TH E P H IL A D B L -lA PH I A & READING R A IL R O A D COM­
Oct. 15, 1886, and bonds can he deposited to their P A N Y AND A F F IL IA T E D COMPANIES.
Creditors and shareholders are requested to de­
order as stated in the foregoing notice.
posit General Mortgage Bonds with Messrs. Drexel
Dated Dec. 6,1886.
& Co., and other securities with Messrs. Brown
GEORGE S. COE,
Brothers & Co., under the terms o f the agreement
EXSTEIN NORTON,
o f March 22, 1886, as modified by the plan o f re­
organization o f December 14,188«, copies o f which
JOSEPH D. POTTS.
can be had upon application at the respective bank­
ing houses o f the depositories, and at the Guaran­
tee Trust and Safe Deposit Company.
TO B0NDHLDERS
General Mortgage bondholders on depositing
their bonds will receive from Drexel & Co. en­
graved certificates now negotiable at the Stock
OF THE
Exchange and the interest now due under the
plan.
For all other securities Temporary receipts will
be issued by Brown Brothers & Co., exchangeable
fo r engraved certificates, (as soon as they can be
prepared), to be made negotiable at the Stock E x­
The agreement fo r the reorganization o f the Mex­ change, entitling the holder to the new securities
alter reorganization.
ican National Railway Company, executed between
The caBh subscription will be called fo r In instal­
Messrs. Matheson & Co., o f London, and General ments o f twenty-five per cent each and thirty days’
notice by advertisement will be given prior to each
William J. Palmer, o f New York, dated Oct. 15,1886, call.
Creditors and shareholders are given until March 1,
having beeen adopted by this committee, bondhold­
to accept the provisions of this plan.
ers are now notified that they should deposit their 1887, case a reorganization without foreclosure can­
In
bonds with as little delay as possible in the Union not be effected, then all parties who have failed to
Trust Company, subject to the order o f tho Purchas­ deposit under the plan by March 1, 1887, will be ex­
cluded from all participation vn the reorganization
ing Committee—George S. Coe, Eckstein Norton, by foreclosure, which (if there be sufficient deposits
and Joseph D. Potts.
to satisfy the Trustees), will then be brought about
A s the execution o f this plan involves many mat­ ■immediately, and for the benefit of those only who have
deposited.
ters wherein assenting bondholders have powers
JOHN B. GA R RE TT,
Chairman Reconstruction Trustees,
and rights other than those which are held or exer­
cised by the Purchasing Committee, this committee,
at the request o f a large number o f bondholders,
continues its organization and will represent bond­
holders collectively, in order to protect such powers
Notice to Holders o f 5 P er Cent
and rights and aid the execution o f the plan.
Bonds.
Bondholders, therefore, who desire to he so repre­
To meet the requirements o f the Stock Exchange,
sented are requested to sign a proxy or power to
this bond has been newly engraved and the new
that effect to this committee.
bond is ready fo r delivery. The holders are rt quest­
Bondholders represented by this committee will ed to send them to W inslow, Lanier & Co. New y ork.
J. H . P . H U G H A lt T, Secretary.
be notified at the proper time o f their pro rata rights
o f subscription to the new securities and o f any
UORFOLK
Sc W E S T E R N R A I L other privileges.
ROAD CO.—T r e a s u r e r ’ s Office , 388 w a l ­
Copies o f this power and any further information n u t St r e e t , P h i l a d e l p h i a , Nov. 20, 1886,
To holders o f bonds o f the Southside Railroad Com­
desired can be had by applying to the Secretary o f
January
the committee, W . W . NEVIN , 32 Nassau Street, pany, maturing f $100,0001st, 1887 :
The holders o
First Preferred 8 per cent
New York.
and $93,000 Second Preferred 6 per cent Consoli­
dated Mortgage Bonds o f the Southside Railroad
SPENCER TRASK,
SELAH CH AM BERLAIN, Company, maturing January 1,1887, are hereby no­
tified that the same, together with the six months’
JOHN D E R U YTE R, H ENRY AMY,
interest coupons thereon, then due, will be pur­
GEORGE BURN HAM , CHARLES J. CANDA,
chased and paid fo r at par at maturity, on the pre­
sentation o f the bonds and coupons at this office.
SAM UEL B. PARSONS, WM. E. D. STOKES,
Interest on said bonds will cease on that date.
AUGUST RUTTEN ,
Committee,. ROBERT W . SMITH* Treasurer.

Mexican National R/y Co.

ROAD COMPANY.
T r e a s u r e r ' s Of fic e ,
)
Gr a n d Ce n t r a l d e p o t .
>
_ . ______ N e w Y o r k , Dec. 80,1886. )
TH E BOARD OF DIRECTORS o f this company
have this day declared a dividend o f TW O per cenl
upon its capital stock, payable on TU ESDAY, the
15th day o f February next at this office.
The transfer books will be closed at ,3 P. M . on
Saturday, the 15th inst., and will be reopened on th€
morning o f Friday, the 18th day o f February . ext
H EN RY PR A T T , Treasurer.

Q F F IC E

C H R O N IC L E

Mexican National R ;y Oo.

Grand Rapids & Indiana RR.

[V ol. XLIV.

T H E C H R O N IC L E .''

ri

^financial.

fin a n c ia l.
S E R I E S A, $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 F I V E

B y N. W . BO W E ,
B e a l E sta te A u c tio n e e r .

PER

Commissioners’ Sale

CENT

Registered and Coupon Water W orks

SUCCESSOR TO

Trust Bonds,

Jarvis, Conklin & C o.,

ALL THE PROPERTY, FRANCHISES,
RIGHTS, &C.,

$ 1 ,0 0 0 , $ 5 0 0 A N D $ 1 0 0 E A C H ,

OF THE

S O U T H E R N T E L E G R A P H CO.
B y virtue o f the follow ing decrees entered In
the causes <f “ William Mahone, &c., vs. The
Southern Telegraph Company and others” and
« The Farmers’ Loan and Trust Company vs
Same” —viz.:
1. Decree entered in said causes in the United
States Circuit Court for the Eastern District o f
V irg nia, on the 21st day o f December 18e5;
2. Decree entered in said causes in the United
8tates Circuit Court for the Western D istrict
o f North Carolina, on the 4th d - y o f Febru
ary, 188 ;
3. Decree entered in said causes in the United
States Circuit Court for the District o f South
Carolina, on the 4th day of February, 1886;
4. Decree entered in said causes in the United
States Circuit Court fo r the Middle District of
Alabama, on the 5th day o f February, 1886;
5 Deere et t c e d in said causes in tbe United
States Circuit Court fo r the North, rn District
o f Georgia, on the 10th day of Fe ruary, 1886;
The uuoer igned, Special Commissioners
appointee tin r by, will sell at public auction,
iu tro n t of tlie office <f 'h e amttoneer, No. 4
N otth Eleventh Street, in the City o f Rich
mond, Va.
___ _ ____
FEBRU ARY 1. 1887,
at 12 o ’clock M., A LL THE RIGHT, TITLE.
AND IN T E iE sT , <>F EVERY KIND AND
NATURE. OK THE SOUTHERN TELEGRAPH
COMPANY in and to the line o f teW rap h to,
from , and i>etw< en the city o f Washing on and
the city ofS tlm a , A la , and the various tranches
thereof ( ihout 1.8»>0|nnlen of poles and about
5,0i '0 miles of w i n ), tog«' her with all the Lands,
Properties, Franchises, Telegt aph Lines, C bles,
Pol* s, Wires, Instruments, Tools, Apparatuses,
Offices, Fixture*, Pa e t-, Patent-Right-. Con­
tracts, Leases, Securities, Rights, Claims, In
t e re s t,» ml Denial (1s o f every kind, nature, and
descrip tion whatsoever, wherever the same may
he or 1 owev* r situated, now held, owned, or
possessed by tin said compai y,
The s id teh graph line is lit good condition,
and is now d iug a good bu iness.
The line will be sold subject to a. traffic arrniivent nt now existing between it and the
Mutual Uni n Teh graph Coin; any, which will
expire at the option o f the purchaser upon six y
days’ notice.
T erm s o f Sa l e : Ten per cent o f purchasem oney in cash and a sufficient sum in addition
to nn-k- such pa\ ment amount to $ 0.000;
the balance w Lin thirty days af er sale.
Auy m rlber information desiied wiii be given
b v A. L. B o u lw a k e , receiver, at Richmond, Va.
A. L BOULWAKE,
H. B. TURNER,
Commissioners.
N. W. B o w e , Auctioneer.

Indiana Bloom ington & Western
FIRSTS, SECONDS AND EASTERN DIVISION
BONUS,
assenting to the plan o f reorganization, meat be
deposited with the Central 'irust Company (for
which ENGR A VED C KRTl f IC ATES are now ready)
on or bettir* Jan. 15,1**7. A fter that date bonds
will not be received except on payment o f such
penalty as shall be imposed by the committee.
Only bonds actually deposited are entitled to par­
ticipate in the proposed purchase o f the property.
INCOME BONDS must be deposited on or before
March X, 1887.
B oldeta o f STOCK are required to pay to the
Central Truft Company TH R EE AND ONE-HALE
P E R CENT o f the par value o f th ,ir holdings on or
before Feb. 1. it-t>7, and the like amount on or before
March 2, It1
87.
Application has been made to list the Trust Com­
pany’s ceitltt cates on the New York Stock Exchange.
F . P. OLCOTI’,
J. L. KARWKLL,
F. O. FRENCH.
DC MONT CLARKE,
j . B , MAX IV ELL, Purchasing Committee.
J. D. Campbell, Secrt tary, 115 Broadway, N. Y.

Henry S. Ives & C o.,
NASSAU

S T ., N E W

YORK.

P. O. BOX 1,422.
Transact a general banking business. Including the
purchase and sale o f securities listed at the New
York Stock Exchange, or in the open market.
Receive deposits subject to check at sight and
allow Interest on daily balances.
Government, State. County, City and Railroad
bonds constantly on hand for sale or exchange, and
particular attention given to the subject o f invest­
ments fo r Institutions and trust funds.




OF TH E

KANSAS
C a p ita l P a id U p

C IT Y ,
-

-

MO.
$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

National Water Works
Investment Company,

H E N R I P . m o i t o . l i , 2 d Vlce-dPre»»*.
R O L A N D R . C O N K L IN , Sec’ ? .
W M . F . S H E L L E Y , T rea s’ r.

C A P IT A L ,,

$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

G E O . W . M c O B A B I , C o u n s e l.

The above Company negotiates m ortgages
on im proved Rt-al Estate worth from three to
five times the amount of the loans. The
Mortgages are for live years and draw six
and seven per cent interest.
D IRECTO RS:
It also offers its ten-year Debentures, draw­
George F. Baker, President First National Bank, ing six per cent interest, w hich are direct
New Ytnk.
obligations o f the Company. They are issned
C. C. Pomeroy, o f Messrs. Post, Martin & Co., New
in seri b o f $ 100,000 and secured by an equal
Y o k.
E. W. Clark, o f Messrs. E. W . Clark & Co., Phila­ amount o f First Mortgages ou im proved Real
Estate deposited in t> ust with the Mercantile
delphia, Pa.
H. C. Fahnes’ ock, Vice-President First National iru st Company of N e w Y o ik City. They are
Bank, New York.
further seeured by the entire paid up capital o f
F. M. Co st on, o f Messrs. W ilson, Colston & Co.» the Company amounting to $1,000,000.
Baltimore, Md.
terest and principal payable at Mercantile
T heodore C. W oodbury, o f Messrs. W oodbury &
Trust Co.
Moulton, Portland, Me.
Write for further information and reference
Archer N. Martin, o f Messrs. Post, Martin & Co.,
to our offices at Kansas City, Mo., or to
New York.

S e c u r e d b y tlie p le d g e o f S i x P e r C e n t
W a t e r B o n d s d e p o s it e d w i t h th e
F a r m e r s ’ L o a n «& T r u s t C o ,

These bonds, the direct obligation o f the National
A . D . R . C R A W F O R D , Manager,
W ater W orks Inv. stme t Company, have the fo l­
4 1 1 W a l n u t S t., P h ila d e lp h ia .
lowing advantages to Investors:
First.—A s security, a direct charge against the
OR TO
capital o f The National W ater Works Investment
Company, amounti g to $500,000.
M e ssr s. M O R G A N Ac B R E N N A N ,
-econd.—The ben, fit of the trained talent, experi­
Managers,
ence and j idgm .nt o f the experts empl yed by The
National W a ei W oiks nvestment Company and
2 7 C u sto m R o u s e S treet,
the bu>in» ss Judgment o f its Directors.
P r o v id e n c e , R * I .
Third.—Constaniiy-.ncreasing security. The muni­
cipalities, either directly or otherwise, make such
contracts with the water works companies as to
give them practical y the exclusive right to supply
water. Every in rease in the population increases
S P R IN G F IE L D , M ASS.
the demand fo r wat r, and the consequent revenue
o f the company; as the city grows, therefore, the TH E BEST APPOINTED HOUSE IN WESTERN
NEVv ENGLAND.
revenue o f the water company and the security o f
Convenient fo r the tourist or business man. Near
these bonds correspondingly increase.
Union Depot.
W . H . CH APIN .
Fourth.—The company sees that, as greater securi­
ty to the bonds which it purchases, assignments are
made by the.llocal water com panyjdirectly to a trust
company o f the revenue der ved from the city for fire
protection, Ac., fo r the benefit o f the bondholders,
so that ihe investor will have the further security
o f the municipal obligation in addition to that o f
NEW YORK.
the local company and that o f The National Water M adison S qu are,
The Largest Best Appointed and Most Liberally
W orks Investment Company.
Managed H otel in the City, with the Most Central
These bonds will, therefore, com bine the adv <n
and Delightful L o ^ U o n . ^ ^ d a RLING A CO.
tages o f M u n ic ip a l O b lig a t io n , D ir e c t O b lig a ­
t io n o l t h e L o c a l W a t e r W o r k s C o m p a n y
a n d t h e A b s o lu t e O b lig a t io n o f T h e N a tio n a l
J o h n G. M oor e . W . K. K itch en . G. B. Sc h l e y
W a t e r w o r k s ln »e -tm e n t C om p an y.
It is believed that the»e bonds are an absolutely
safe investment, based on an element vital to the
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
existence o f every community, secured by most
2 6 B R O A D S T R E E T , N E W .Y O R K .
stringent provisions for the protection of.ttae invest
.¿R A N C H OFKICESS
_ _
_
or, and having the additional advantages o f ready
72 W all St., N. Y.
H i S o .T h ird S t„P h ila . I
convertibility.
Connected with
L A. E v a n s & Co., Bost-.n,
Co rson & Ma c a r t n e y , Washington, D.O.
F or Sale by
E. L. Br e w st k R A Co., Chicago.

Massasoit

House,

Fifth A venue
H OTEL,

Moore 6c Schley,

F O S T , M A R T I N & CO.,

3 4 P in e S t r e e t , N e w Y o r k .

H

ubba

hi) & FARMER, H artfo rd .

Private Wire Connections.
Buy and sell Stocks, Bonds and Miscellaneous
Securities on New York Exchanges; also Grain and
Provisions on Chicago Board o f Trade.

Coal and Coke Lands. Spencer Trask & Co.,
» 0 ,0 0 0 A« R E S IN O N E T R A C T , I N A
S T A T e. S O U T H O F O H IO .

BANKERS,
NO. 2 5

Jarvis-Conklin
Mortgage Trust Co.

Quality equal to Conn 1 sville. Three veins, 120
inches. Close proximity to rail ads, and furnaces
o f large capacity. A t a bargain.
Apply to
GEO. B. RIPLEY ,
C6 Broadway.

B A N K E R S <k BR O K E R S

16 and 18 Broad Street, N. V
Albany, N. Y .
Providence, R. I
Saratoga.

Transact a General Banking Business»

B ib le

H . -te l,

AM STERD AM .
Beautifully situated in th <centre o f the city, close
to the Railway Station and the Exchange. First
rate cooking. Excellent wines. Moderate prices.
W . P. W ERKER, Manager.

Direct Private Wires to each office and to
PHILADELPHIA.
BOSTON,
WORCESTER.

HUNT’ S MERCHANTS’ M AG AZIN E,’
S ltftfk iij

fjU M r s p a p « » ,

RBPRBSENTING- THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

VOL. 44

S A T U R D A Y , J A N U A R Y 1, 1 887.
C O N

r

E N

T

% h t

in the two ve s i ej resenting exchanges of other origin, or
a decrease this year of 3-7 per cent.

8 .

TH E CHRONICLE.
Clearing-House R efcnrns...
) Imports and E xports for NovThe Finanoiai Situar.iou...........
em ber aud fo r The Eleven
2
The Long and Short Haul
and Twelve Mouths ending
Clause ......................................
4
November 3 0 .............................
The Labe Suore and thè MiuliiMonetary aud Commercial
gan CentralV Statem elits...
5
English N ews..........................
Ratlroad R am ingo.....................
and M
7 Commercial. . . . . . . . .iscellaneous
N e w s ...
.............

Week Ending Dec. 25.
188«.

7
8
9

(Æ h r a u ic le .

T h e C o m m e r c i a l a n d F i n a n c i a l C h r o n i c l e ia published in
N ew Y o rk e v e r y S a tu rd a y m o r n in g .
IEntered at the P ost Oiiloe, Now York, N. Y., as second class m all matter. J

Terms o f Subscription—Payable In Advance :
For One Year (including p o s ta g e ).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10 20
For Six Months
do
............................... ...........
6 10
European Subscription (including postage)...................
11 28
Annual subscription lu Lennon (lno.udlng p o s ta g e ). . . . . . J ‘2 7s,
B
Six Mos.
do
do
■o
......... A t 8s.
T hese p rices in clu d e th e I n v e s t o r s ’ S u p p l e m e n t , Issued o n c e in t w o
m onths, an d fu rn ish ed w ith ou t e x t r a ch a rg e to su b scrib ers o f the
Ch r o n ic l e .

Subscriptions will be continued until definitely ordered stopped. The
publishers cannot be resp on sib le for remittances unless made by Drafts
or Post Ottioe Money O rders.
A neat tile cover is furnished at 50 cents; postage on the same is 18
cents. Volumes bound for subscribers at $1 00.
O lflces iu E n g la n d .
The office o f the C o m m e r c ia l a n d F in a n c ia l C h r o n ic l e in London
is with Messrs. E dw ard s < S m it h , l Drapers’ Gardens, E. C .. where sub­
te
scriptions and advertisements will be taken at the regular rates, and
single copies o f the p ip e r supplied at Is. each.
The office o f the Chronicle in M verpool is atB 15, Exchange Buildings.
WILLIAM B. DANA. \ W I L L I A M « . D A N A & C o ., P u b l i s h e r s ,
JOHN O. FLOYD.
I 7 J Ac 81 W i l l i a m s t r e e t , M E W Y O R K ,

Post o ff ic k B o x 958.

C L E A R IN G

HO US hi R E T U R N S .

N O . 1,123.

1885.

$604,703,528

Sales of—
{Stocks....shares.)
( Cotton.... bales.)
{Grain.. .bushels)
{Petroleum-.bbls.)
B oston .................
P rovidence...........
Hartford................
New H aven...........
W orcester ............
Springfield.............
L o w e ll..................
total N. England
Pittsburg...... .
Saltim o r é ...........

1636,731,152

(1,808,615
(473,900
(3 •4«»,One
,
(22,J8 i.OU i
O

(1,595.008)
(388,400)
(22.810.000)
(39.930.000)

*73,379.9 6
8,«76,8i)0
1,477,656
981.050
831,990
809.129
771,)29
453.538

*66,353,360
4,255,8oo
l,3i 3,285
857,884
810,025
716,i 01
«1-8,348
390.4/0

Per Ceni
—5 0
1+18-4

1+22 0
i+33 B)
1
—44 5>
+ 10-6
—5 Ö
413-4
+14 4
-t-i-9
+ 13 U

Week Binding Dec. 18.
1886.
1993,536,166

+22-4

(3.97S.205) (+15-8
i672,40ol (4-48-9
(40,6' 9.000)
(-6 -7 )
(39,951.000) i—12 ft)

+ 10-2

*96.912,468
5..3.1,600
1.028,685
1,157.152
8 «6,943
903.235
911,4(5
587.432

+12 1

Per C
’en*

+14-1
—3-6
+8-7
+18
4-1*4
+13-4
-9 -9
+48

*82,681,(07

(75,381,1.3

197

*108,210.930

+12-5

155,023,544
7,942,528
10,221.81)2

*46,125.089
6,511,812
9,245,190

+19-3
+29 0
4-106

$68,912,5:0
9,24.1,359
13,00) ,055

4 27-8
+23-S
+11-S
4848

*73.187,904

*61,882.091

-rlis 3

*91,215,944

*43.648,212
10,021,850
3,632,402
3,221.428
2,932.554
2,809.512
* 1,525,0= 0
983,222
4,510.41«
3,313,62 •
3,390,61«

+1-7
*42,910,812
7,602.100 + 31 8
-1 -o
3.633,737
+21-5
2,651,81
1.218,018 +140 8
1,813,173 ■fßv/ U
1-3-4
1,475,1*21
626,766 + 5«-9
+72-4
2,610,853
2.323.330 + ) 2 b
2,701,033 +25-7

*57.629,238
li,74n,2u0
4,130.167
8.501,000
8 399.304
3.279,551
1,700,330
1,040,015
4,908,212
4,141,124
3,306,010

Total W estern...

(79,994,732

*69,572/ 61

+15-0

*99,286,287

J 15-4

St Louis..............
St. Joseph...........
New Orleans........
L o u is v ille .........
Kansas City......
Memphis
........
Gal veston..............

*14,348,68.'
1,186,324
11,242.0 0
8,517,405
6,497.561
2,172,475
1,531,157

*14,010,562
690,666
10,188,387
3,401,086
4,132,052
1,607,603
1,625,588

+2 4
+-.1-8

»17,897,723
1,010,315
13.970,337
4,963,973
7,222,050
3.066,9’ 0
2,140,82-

+16-6
+ 66-4
+ 8-0
+105
+ 71 1
+ 66-6
- 1 -Ï

Total M id d le....
Chicago..............
Cincinnati. . . . . . . . .
Milwaukee...........
Detroit...........
Indianapolis.........
Cleveland.............
Columbus........... .
Peoria...................
Omaha...................
Minneapolis..........
Denver...................

+10 0
i 3 -4

+8 0
+278
+1*7
40-6
+1180

+22 8
+ 89
434-4
460 5
+23-5
+31-2

+ 57-2
Christmas having fallen on the closing day of the week
+35-1
under review, the returns of clearings +a here presented embrace
—5-8
only five business days. No fair comparison can, therefore, Total Southern.. *40,465,604 $35,655,904 4 1 3 5
$50,878.192
+ 21-2
be made with the fi -u^ef* for th+ preceding period, which cov. dan Francisco....... *13,741,999
*8.82«.041
-5 5 7
$15.804,62)
+85-7
6red a full we k’s tran actions. The exhibit is, however, a Total a l l ............. *894.840,275 *888,049.02.' + 0-8 *1,358,882,08) +21-2
pretty favorable one, su.ce, except at New York, the decline Ont-Kle New Vorn *¿90,071,74« i 251,317,870 +15-4 ~ (306,3.5,921 1 1 8 $
from last we^k is
but in excess of what the loss of one * Estua
W e have received by telegraph the rr turns of exchanges for
day’s business would a« count for. A t New York the larger
part
d
; ■from December 18, is o f course due to the the five days ending with this (Friday) eveniug. Lost year’s
s given below, embrace only four days, the New Year
comparât’vedulness iu Stock Exchange circles which followed res
holiday having fallen on Fridty. No fair comparison between
the panic.
Contrasted with the corresponding week of 1885, which also tue figures as they stand can, therefore, be made. If, how­
covered only five business days, the current returns record an ever, we make allowance for the missing d iy in 1885 there
excess in the aggregate of 0-8 per cent, while excluding New would appear to be a small decrease this year in the aggre­
York the gain reach s 15 4 per cent. In the increase all the gate, but outside of New Y >rk a fair grin is indicited.
cities except New Y >rk. Providence Milwaukee and Galveoton
Five Daus Bratino Dec. 31.
5 f>*v* A/nrf’o Dec. 24.
participate. As in previous weeks, Iudianapolis is most promi.
1886.
1885.
Per (Jem.
1880.
Per Cent
nent in the percentage of gain exhibited, it being now 140 8
New Vork............
*526,272.256 »441/77,693 419-2
+19*7
$604.768.528
per cent. Omaha follows with 72‘4 per cent, St. Joseph 718, Soles of Stock (shs..
Il.277.l32)
(1,337,127) (—44-9)
(1,729,661) (+ 81 2 )
Kansas City 57 2, Peoria 5 9 and San Francisco 5v7. Com­ Boston........... .
*1
5ii.47-.4 i 2 430 1
65,6j 1.924
+ 381
73,379.915
47.d12.438
33,5*1.158 +41 5
+ 47-8
65.023/44
pared with the similar p riod of 1884, the present figures re­ Philadelphia.. ...
Baltimore. ..... ..
10,184.927
6.642.863 4 48 1
437-9
10,221.832
cord an increase of nearly 50 per cent ; the gain over 1883 is Chicago................
41,531,0«
S'>,372,000 436-7
43.0)8,000
+288
8t. Louis.................
about 6 per cent, and over 1833 about 1 per cent.
13 6)9,5'2
10.291.758 +32 6
14.348 683
+300
New Orleans.......
8,466,345
9,083.244
+73
11.539. 95
+88-4
New York Su ck Exchange share transactions cover
Total............... *718,837,801 *581,709.299 +22-7
$812.930.396
+23-8
a market value of $91,372,000, against $99,268,000 for the
Balance, Country*
74.029.339
54,07 ,635 +36-9
80.i63.572
+34-C
corresponding perioi a year ago, and, pur.-u:ng our usual
Total all.......
$787,866,640 $635,78),934 + 2 3 9
$693,793,908
+94-7
method of deducting double these values from the New York 1
Outside ew v.ir
i2«1.5>*4,3'4 *194 108. Ml
34-8 ~
*269,025744)
38’«
totals, there remains $422,021,539 and $438,195,152 respectively
* natnua.ea tu tue bu&ia of the but weuiujr returns.




THE

2

C H R O N IC L E

T H E F IN A N C IA L S IT U A T IO N

fVOL XL1V.

premium upon its bars, and an advance in the minimum
rate o f interest is certain if there should be any further
shipments to New Y o rk at present. The arrivals this
week have been 5| million dollars. There have been no
shipments (except the one reported from Southampton
last Friday) from either Paris or London, and the amount

Money has been in abundant supply, with no special
demand for it this week. A s a consequence, bankers’
balances have loaned at the Stock Exchange at an average
o f about 5 per cent, the extremes being 3 and 6 per cent.
None o f the banks have loaned below the latter rate. still afloat is probably about 3 million dollars.
The trade report issued this week by the Bureau of
Early in the week it was reported that some o f them, and
Statistics is worth more than a passing notice. It is the
also some of the trust companies, would call in loans pre­
paratory to the disbursement o f the semi-annual interest record of the trade influences which have been at work
and dividends ; this has probably been done to an extent, in the foreign exchange market, and an indication of
what is and what will be at work there in future months.
F or in the present condition o f our currency, one must
in obtaining a forecast o f the future make the course of
trade the basis of his judgment. Prosperity and anxiety
are antagonistic. To-day there is no cause for anxiety •
im ports are moderate— exports are large— securities are
in demand— gold is coming in freely. But every careful
man looks ahead, and the question is h ow long will these
conditions last? W h at will check and what may reverse
the f oreign movement of our securities? Granting crops
y ield well and exports continue free, what may increase
imp orts so largely as to make our trade conditions unsafe?
Every one knows the danger. W e are living under a
protective tariff. A t every depression in trade which pro­
duces a decline in prices it works as intended— as prices
drop it shuts out by degrees foreign goods, and shuts up
in the same measure the home market to our own manu­
for commercial paper.
In the open market, London, there has been quite an im ­ facturers. W e are not discussing the wisdom of the
provement in money this week. This was incidental to the principle but its action. Thus supply from abroad being
close of the year, to the shipments of gold to the United shortened, domestic consumption the quicker overtakes
States, and to the large requirements in connection with home production. A t that point trade revives, and shortly
the Stock Exchange settlement. The latter has been an thereafter prices again begin to advance. Tnen occurs a
important feature in the market each settlement day for.some period of what is termed prosperity during which this rise
time. Our panic came in the midst of the last settlement^ in prices continues until protection no longer protects
and as much as 8 and 10 per cent was paid for fortnightly foreign goods flow in in large volume, exports fall off, and
loans. This week the cable reported money to the next our trade balance is reversed. These are very familiar
settlement as high as 10 to 12 per cent. Discounts of 60 facts, but as we have reached a special phase in this little
day to 3 months’ bank bills were firm at 4£ per cent, cycle, and as the course o f future events is still in a
but closed yesterday easier at 4^ per cent.
The measure within our own control, to recall them may be
gold in the Bank of England as reported this week was useful in more ways than one. It would no doubt be
reduced to £18,819,695. By special cable to us we learn wise if trade circles could be satisfied with present
F or instance iron, steel and their allied
that the loss o f bullion which was reported at £340,000 for profits.
industries are profitable now, and yet it is perhaps
the week was made up by a receipt mostly from France of
£38,000 and by shipments to the interior of £278,000 foolish to think o f a man taking less for his goods
than he can get, although the results of pushing up
and an export to Lisbon o f £100,000.
There has been an advance of one cent per pound prices further cannot be doubtful. ^Te must remember
sterling in our exchange market since our last, and the too that this country by reason of its queerness in coining
market has been firm at the advance, largely under the in­ silver dollars, is m a position which makes our people very
fluence of the usual demand for remittance at the end of timid under any export o f gold, and a marked change in
the year, the inquiry being chiefly for cable transfers and the foreign trade conditions would be a decidedly chilling
sight bills. It has been reported as a further reason for influence. W e speak of these things not because there is
the improvement in rates and tone, that some importers any present danger, but because the conditions are so very
o f gold have waited until their consignments arrived or favorable now that it is a good time to look ahead. The
were nearly due before covering them with sterling. This statement of our trade which we give further below, and
seems hardly probable under the conditions of the ex. which has been compiled from the figures issued this week
change market which have prevailed the past ten days. by Mr. Switzler o f the Bureau o f Statistics, presents the
The higher rates for money in London, and the profitable situation at a glance. There is a net trade balance for
employment to be found for balances there, is more likely to Novem ber (including silver which is a comm odity) of
have influenced sterling. So far as the gold movement about 19 million dollars. Exports of merchandise were
to New Y ork is concerned, a comparatively slight large notwithstanding the low values, being over 72| m il­
rise in exchange is sufficient to retard it, for the lion dollars, against 67£ millions last November, while the
managers of the European banks are disposed to place imports though a little larger than a year ago were moderate,
every obstacle in the way of withdrawals for that purpose. namely, 54 millions against 50£ millions in November,
The Bank of France, as reported by latest mail advices, in 1885. The net inflow of gold for the month, it will be
addition to the premium asked, exacted as a condition seen, was about nine million dollars, which added to the
upon which shippers obtained their gold, evidence that imports in the previous four months makes a total net im­
the export was for America, the managers fearing it was port fo r the five months ended with Novem ber of 23 mil­
for Germany. The Bank of England still maintains a lions, so ^that after exporting 34| millions net in the

but made no disturbance whatever, and the loans called
must have been
readily replaced.
This
unusual
ease at the close
of
a
year has undoubtedly
been aided b y the large liquidation o f speculative
accounts a fortnight ago. But the movement of funds
from the interior to this centre (some o f the bank returns
to us showing large amounts received), added to the im­
ports of gold, have so augmented the supply as entirely to
change the conditions of the market in that respect. The
street seems bare of commercial paper, but at the same
time there has been no demand for it from the city banks,
their own customers and the needs of W a ll street affording
better facilities for the employment o f money. Bankers
an d Trust Companies are offering loans on stock collateral
at 6 per cent for four to six months, and so long as they
can get this rate it is not likely that they will be urgent




J anuary

THE

1, 1887 J

C H R O N IC L E

first half o f 1886, at the end o f Novem ber we had recovered
all but 11£ millions of it. A s so much gold has come here
during December, when the figures for the full year are
compiled it will probably be found that a small balance re'
mains on the side of the imports. Following are the figures'
FOREIGN" TRADE MOVEMENT OF THE UNITED STATES—(0003 Omitted.)
GOLD.

Me r c h a n d is e .

Tear.

1886.
J a n ......
F e b ......
March..

Excess Im­
Exports. Imports. of Ex­
ports.
ports.
«
57,988
51,905
53.093

8

Si l v e r .

Excess
Ex­
E x­ Excess
Im­
of Ex­
of
ports. ports.
ports.
ports.
Imports.
t

2,345

1,023
1,147
1,760

f
1.884
854
585

7,253
1,824
2,068
1,854

3,930
1,128
1,257
1,176

3,323
696
811
678

5,746

3,561

2,246
1,880
2,492

1,406
1,478
1,464

2,185
840
402
1,028

$
+876
+4,668
+9,081

3,532 18,157 +14,625
351 4,812 +4,461
249 7,395 +7,146
263 8,380 +8,117
863 20,587 +19,724
+593
582 1,175
4,959
131
4,828
4.994
4.686
308

6,618
1,733
2,217

4,348
1,576
1,777

2,270

11 mos.. 627,917 607,107 2O,S10t29,652 40,977 +11,325 23,567 15,192
* Excess o f imports.
t Excess o f exports.

8,375

$
$
47,415 10,573
56,687 *4,782
60,038 *6,345

T ota l.. 163,586 164,140
A p ril...
M a y.. . .
J an e....

54,017

54,101
55,907

*554

57,366 *3,349
52,872 1,229
54,212 1,695

T o ta l.. 164,025 164,450
J u ly ....
August.
S ept.-..

52,799
51,184
54,068

*425
55,654 *2,855
58,676 *7,492
55.334 *1.266

t , 7oe
986
840

T ota l.. 158,051 169,664 *11613 10,535
O et......
N o v .. ..

69,636
72,619

54,805 14,831
54,048 18,571

5,413
9,309

2,582
5,654
9,921

1,614
264
855

8.921
5,149
8,954

$
2,907

2,001

157
440

The rapidity with which railroad construction is being
carried on in the United States is shown in the statement
prepared this week by the Chicago Railway Aqe with r e f­
erence to the new mileage built in 1886. The Age finds
that no less than 8,010 miles of new main track were laid
in the United States during the year just closed. This is
about a thousand miles above what was supposed would
be the limit only a short time ago. But we are laying
track much faster than in previous eras of railway expan­
sion. This is because of greater facilities, greater kn ow l­
edge, greater means, and greater experience. Some o*
the larger companies add a mile or a mile and a half a
day without any special effort. W ith so many companies
carrying on work at this rate, it is not surprising that the
total should reach very large proportions. It is this feature
that distinguishes the present era, namely that so much
o f the new mileage is being built by strong companies,
and it is the same feature that makes conservative people
feel less disturbed about possible adverse consequences.
The corporations doing the work are in most cases such as
have a large established net revenue to fall back on in case
the new mileage should not realize the expectations of
business entertained of it; and moreover there is this
other fact to be remembered that much o f the new road
runs through a section of country developing with great
rapidity. Of the 8,010 miles built in 1886, 1,520 miles,
or nearly one-fifth o f the whole, is in the State o f Kansas,
where the Atchison company is doing such active work.
In 1885, according to Poor, only 3,131 miles o f new track
were laid in the United States, and in 1884 3,973 miles,
so that in the last twelve months we have added con­
siderably more than in the preceding twenty-four. But
in 1881 and 1882 we built nearly 21-J thousand miles,
so that at least we are far from having reached
the very heavy figures o f that period.
Stockholders in the Vanderbilt roads have reason to
congratulate themselves upon the favorable results o f the
1886 operations, as disclosed in the statements submitted
this week. The New Y o rk Central for the quarter ended
December 31, shows 1-81 per cent earned on its stock
after full allowance for the increase o f charges produced
by the lease of the W est Shore, against not quite 1-| per
cent (1-43) in the corresponding quarter of 1885 without the
W est Shore. A s in the September quarter the" road had
earned
per cent, the result for the last half o f the
calendar year 1886 is a return o f nearly 4 per cent. In
other words, the New Y o rk Central which has been pay­




3

ing dividends o f 4 per cent a year, earned almost as much
as that in a single six months’ period— the best part of
the year, however, it is only fair to say. Certainly that
is a very gratifying showing.
In pursuance of a con ­
servative policy the rate o f distribution has not been
changed. Thè Lake Shore and the Michigan Central
statements we review in a separate article. W e may say,
though, that both companies declare dividends o f 2 per
cent, payable in February, 1887 (after having earned over
4£ per cent), and the Canada Southern 1£ per cent,
payable at the same time. On the Michigan Central and
the Canada Southern these will be the first dividends for
three years— since February, 1884— and on the Lake
Shore the first since November, 1884. The Cleveland
Columbus Cincinnati & Indianapolis road will distribute
nothing, but the ratio of improvement on that road is
really greater than on any o f the others. Against a defi­
ciency below the charges o f $557,444 in 1885, we have for
1886 a surplus above the charges o f $414,939. The per­
centage o f increase in the net, which on the Lake Shore
amounts to 26 per cent, and on the Michigan Central to
45 per cent, on the Cleveland road reaches the large
figure of 66 per cent, the total o f the net having increased
from $1,482,171 to $2,461,591. Below we bring together
the results on all the Vanderbilt lines for the last two
calendar years. The Central’s fiscal year ends with Sep­
tember, but as the company issues statements by quarters
we are able to makes up its figures for the same period as
the others. Of course in the case o f all the roads the
1886 figures are partly estimated.
Gross Earnings.
1886.
New York Central.
Lake Sh.&Mich.So.
Mioh.C’n.& Can.So.
♦Clev.Col. C.&Ind.

$
32,605,759
15,826,616
12,250,000
7,228,384

1885.

Increase.

Net Earnings.
1886.

1885.

Increase.

$
$
$
8
■ « j
24,493,873 8,109,888 12,729,592 7,974,377 4,755,215
14.133,506 1,693,110 6,117,481 4,845,969 1,271,512
10,707,394 1,542,608 3,900,000 2,692,791 1,207,209
6,411,445
816,939 2,461,591 1,482,171
979,420

T o t a l ............... 67,910,759 55,748,218 12,162,541 25,208,664 16,995,308 8,213,356

* Including the Indianapolis & St. Louis and the Cincinnati & Springfield.

Here we find strikingly favorable results. In the case
of the gross earnings we have an increase on the four
roads o f 12 million dollars. I f we take four millions as
the amount to be added to the 1885 figures, if the W est
Shore had been operated in that year as in 1886, even
then an increase o f over 8 million dollars is left, o f which
about one-half would belong to the Central and the other
half to the three Western lines. But it is not till we
reach the net that we find the real measure of gain. These
have increased almost 50 per cent, or $8,213,356. Here of
course the gain would be increased if the W est Shore
results for 1885 were included, fo r the road had no net
then, but a large deficit below operating expenses. Of
the 8£ million increase, the Central has 4 f millions and
the other three lines the remainder.
The stock market has shown a recovery o f tone and
increased activity this week. There are several circum ­
stances that have contributed to this result. In the first
place the returns made b y the Vanderbilt roads had a
stimulating effect, and so of course had the generally good
reports of earnings, weekly and monthly, by other
roads. Then the large arrivals o f gold and the ease ,in
money, the latter o f which became more and more pro­
nounced each succeeding day, tended to remove fears of
trouble from that source, and o f course induced buying
that would otherwise have been deferred. The favorable
statements with regard to the condition o f the coal
trade, both anthracite and bituminous, led to pur­
chases o f this class o f
properties.
The settle­
ment o f various labor troubles on the railroads,

THE

4

C H R O N IC L E .

notably those on. the Reading, also exercised a beneficial
effect. Finally, tbe revival o f rumors o f a great
combination
of
Southern
roads
sent
all
the
Southern properties upward, and these were
fu r­
ther benefitted by the publication o f various facts and
figures to show the wonderful development that the South
is experiencing. W ith all these favoring circumstances,
and operators for a fall apparently disinclined to make
any demonstration against the market— some of them
indeed, hurrying to cover their outstanding contracts— it>
is not surprising that strength and higher prices should
have been the characteristics o f the market. The year
thus closes with the outlook much more encouraging than
seemed possible only a short two weeks ago, and with the
temper o f operators again very sanguine.
The following statement, made up from returns c o l­
lected by us, shows the week’s receipts and shipments oi
gold and currency by the New Y ork banks.
Received by Shipped, bp
.
N. T. Bank». IV F. Banks.

Week ending December SI, 1886.

Bet Interior
Movement,.

M,400,100

$1,325,000

Gain..

«75,000

>1,400.000

»1.825.000

Gain..

»75,'» 0

¿ o l d . . . / . ...............................................

Total void and legal tenders. ..

The above shows the actual changes in the bank hold
ings o f gold and currency caused by this movement to and
from the interior. In addition to that movement the banks
have gained $2,000,000 through the operations o f the
Sub-Treasury and $3,100,000 by Assay Office payments for
gold imports. A iding these items to the above, we have the
following, which should indicate tbe total gain to the New
Y ork Clearing House oauics of gold and currency for tin
week covered bv the dan* statement issued yesterday.
Into Bank». Out oj Bank». Net Chance in
Bank Bol/Hnot

Week ending December 31, 1888
Banks’ Interior Movement, as above
Sub-Treasury ,»per.and gold import.

11.100,000

$1,325,000
6,000,000

Gain . $75.ooi
Gain.. 5,10 >,0 >
0

Total gold and legal tenders

*13,5 >OoV>

$7,325.''"

G ain.»5,175,000

$1,400,000

The Hank of England reports a loss o f £340,000 bullion
during the week.
This represents £62,000 net sent
abroad and £273,000 seut to the interior.
Tne
Bank o f France lost 12,473,000 francs gold and gained
125,000 fraucs silver, and the Bank of Germany, since
the last report, shows a d-»crease o f 3,040,000 mirks. Tue
following indicates the amount o f bullion iq the principal
European bauks this week and at the corresponding date
last year.
r
Dec 31 ■ ' ÎS

Dec. 3>,
Bout.

Silver.

Bold.

Suvtsr,

A
A
A
A
2 0 ,1 1 5 .2 2 8
Bank o f England . . . . . . . 1 3 ,8 19 695
Bank o f France . . . . . . . . . 49 t i l l 1 *4 4 5 .7 8 1 .18G 46,296,606 1 3 4 ’ 7 311
Bank o f Germ any............ Lb,t'7o 6 50 1 6 .0 29 ,3 5 0 13 9 1 0 4 0 o 17 0 0 1 6 JO
Total this w e e k ....... .
Total previous week .

3 6 .5 09 .f 2 » 6 1 .8 10 ,5 3 6
*7 .4 2 9 . L ¿7 6 1.8 7 6 ,0 7 6

0 3 2 2 .2 3 4 »0,418.911
»1 .2 5 7 .3 1 0 61 .Oi 9,0 4 7

fVoL. XLIV.

T H E L O N G A N D S H O R T H A U L CLAUSE.
Senator Cullom has written a letter to explain the
meaning of the long and short haul clause o f the Inter-State
Commerce bill, judging from which he appears to fall far
sh ortof appreciating the real nature and effect of the meas*
ure he is advocating. W e never supposed the provisions we
have taken exception to, were in any particul ar differen t
from what they really are, so that his citations from them
are nothing new. W e had the sections in question before
us when we first wrote two weeks since, and it struck us
then and strikes us still that it would be wise not only for
Senator Cullom but for all W estern Senators and Repre­
sentatives to study the bearing o f this long and short haul
clause closely, and see who it is likely ta hit hardest
before any action is taken on this measure. I f in its
operation it will really prove as we have charged a cruel
device for disorganizing the trade of the far W est and
depreciating the values o f farm lands there, most certainly
none o f our W estern legislators can wish to set it in
motion.
For it is not at all in the interest o f railroads that we
write. W e see that Mr. Reagan is reported in an Associ*
ated Press dispatch as saying that the railroad^ are going
to send to W ashington a naif million o f money to kill the
bill. I f the Congressman is depending upon that distri­
bution or any distribution by them in this matter he had
better dismiss the thought quickly. A s we look at it, the
railroads have nothing to fear from the clause in question
except so far as a disturbance of the carrying trade of
the country may derange all business. It is the W estern
farmer who produces wheat, corn, oats aud hog products,
and wants to get them to market, that is the party in
interest. Rsmember that these are the very same things
( iu the words o f the law “ like kind o f property” ) that are
produced and are seeking a market in every State from
Oregon to New Y o r s. under (as the law farther puts it)
‘ •substantially similar circumstances and conditions.” The
present rates for such freight through and local»
are not the result o f
an impulse or a whim,
out o f trade conditions.
They have been saddled
on the railroads under the operation o f natural
forces. A Liverpool market for grain, and an Oregon >
Colorado, Ktnsas or New Y o rk farm with the grain upon
it, are the factors, and the problem was to bring them
together.
H ow has this been accomplished ? ' Simply
through the roads (beginning with Oregon and ending
with New Y ork), charging for the wh-at, &c., they carry
from one centre o f trade to another centre o f trade
(as for iustance from Council B'uffs to Cuicago) very
muc i less (in many cases less than cost) than the rates
fo w uch they bring wheat, &c., shipped at way stations
withi i that distance, this principle being substantially
continued over the W estern route through each State in

The Assay Office paid $232,363 through the Sub-Treas­ the series.
Of course to the farmer in the centre o f Nebraska it
ury for domestic and $ 3 .116,147 for foreign bullion during
tf week, and the Assistant Treasurer received the follow ­ seems UDjust that Cheyenne wheat can get to Council Bluffs
hft
cheaper than his wheat can ; similarly to the fanner in the
ing from the Custom House.
centre o f Iowa, it looks like hardship that Council
Otmttslint) o f—
Bluffs wheat should get across his State cheaper than his
Duties.
Dal*.
Silver Oer
Bold
U. 8.
Bout.
owu wheat is carried ; so to the farmer in Ohio, it is almost
titt-cate»
Certifie’».
Notes.
unbearable that Chicago wheat should get across his State
$65,oo
$253,000
*79,000
$1 OOO
8398.497 19
Deo. 24
____Unli d av..............
cheaper thau his wheat does ; bat had not some such sy s­
77,->0
54,000
2 1,000
2.000
33 i ,2 18 b l
“ 27
o62 j j
O0
120,000 tem as this been put into operation, the Colorado and
87,000
7,000
777,3 »5 4
“ 28
10l.<K»i otner far W estern lands would not have been worth five
79.000
470,000
12,0<»<>
662.756 8.
“ 29.
41,000
161,000
21,000
O.OoO
232,65 » 3
“ 80.
dollars an acre, for their products could not have been
«4 *4,oo<
*3 iO.OOo $1 617.00.,
-31,0 «
405,514 •
Total
orougbt within reach o f a market. Tuese farmers and
Included in the above payments were $5,000 in silver their representatives in Congress overlook the fact that
each succeeding S.ate gets substantially the benefit o f the
coin, chiefly standaid aoliars.




January

1, 1887.]

THE

C H R O N IC L E .

ame principle, only of course in a less degree the nearer
to the Eastern or the European markets the farms are
situated. On account o f this latter fact the N ew Y ork
producer would be delighted to have the existing system or
arrangement abrogated and this bill put in force. Hts
land would be in some measure restored to its old position
when it almost monopolized the wheat-raising business,
before through rates bridged the distance between the
seaboard and the rich W estern prairies.
These suggestions, though general in their character,
ought to be sufficient to make plain the true working of
the Ion g-and-short haul provision. But there appears such
a strange and wide misunderstanding o f the effect of this
feature that a more particular reference may be desirable
to some of the statements made in support o f it, for in
this way perhaps we shall be able to make the operation
and results o f the measure clearer. Thus one o f our lead­
ing daily papers, in illustrating its opinion, says the clause
“ means, for instance, that if a carload of grain is taken
‘ from St. Paul to New Y o rk at a certain rate, a higher
“ rate shall not be charged from Chicago or from Buffalo
“ than for the whole distance from those points.” Tue
truth is, this statement has no relevancy whatever to the
subject. It would be utterly impossible under the law to
prevent what is here given in illustration of its working.
There is no single railroad running from Sc. Paul to New
Y ork , and there is no through rate between those points
except one resting wholly on the will or choice o f several
roads (which, the law cannot regulate or continue in
force a moment longer than the agreement of the con­
tracting roads lasts), and which is simply an aggregate
o f the charges o f t i e separate roads making up
the combination.
W hen this Inter-State measure is
passed, the New Y o rk Central, for instance, if it saw
fit to charge twice as much from Buffalo to New Y o rk as
the Lake Shore charged from Chicago to Buffalo, it co u li
do it. In other words the prohibition applies and can
only apply to each railroad— to the links which make up a
through route. The through route as a creature is wholly
artificial, a mere matter of comity between the roads for
the convenience o f the public. It is not a being— has no
existence— in the eye o f the law. Just the same ohj c.
tion holds to the illustration Senator Cullom makes in his
letter, and it is difficult to understand how he could so
misconceive the purport o f a measure his own name

5

for it is to the individual road the law speaks, virtually
directing that each must no longer favor the traffic o f
States further W est. In other words, the restriction in
the act alters the condition which ha3 hitherto prevailed o f
granting a lower cost for through freight o f a “ like
kind,” although it is carried the longer distance— a cus­
tom or rule Which, as we have seen, naturally grew up out
o f the situation— a necessity by virtue o f which alone, the
products o f the W estern prairies have been brought within

reach o f the market.
It is well to keep in mind also that no producer, at least
none west o f Chicago, suffers any loss through the
arrangements which this act will abrogate— that it
is mutually beneficial.
W e showed this last week.
Recall the fact that though there are markets at
Minneapolis and Chicago and other interior points,
prices at those points are all regulated substantially
by the quotation in Europe, less the ocean freight and
cost o f getting to seaboard. F or instance, if Am erican
railroads under this new law are required to put up charges
lu cents per bushel for wheat from Ouicago to New Y ork ,
and there was no other route, prices o f wheat at Chicago
would immediately drop 10 cents, and the value o f wheat
on the farms at Chicago and west o f that point w ould
decline to just the same extent. Again, if the rail­
road rates between Chicago and Council Bluffs, or
between Chicago and Minneapolis, are by the same means
put up 5 cents a bushel more than they now are, another
5 cents (or 15 cents in all) would be taken out o f the pro­
ducer’s price of wheat on all farms west of Council Bluffs
and Minneapolis. A n d so the burden for the wheat
grow er to bear would accumulate in about that rate with
each additional 500 miles further west the point o f ship­
ment is carried. Senator W ilson ’s constituents, therefore,
whom he refers to in his late speech as living at Red Oak,
Fairfield, &c., Iowa, might through the act get the same rate
to Chicago that the Council Bluffs shippers were charged,
but that rate would not be $40 a car -load (the price he names
as now ruling), but something higher to meet the new con­
ditions; and, furthermore, when their wheat reached Chica.
g o it would not command the present, but a lower price,
as much lower a3 the new conditions had added to the
cost o f m oving wheat to New Y ork .
There is one other point which calls for a few words,
for very strangely many are claiming that no such re-ad­
justment of long and short rates as we suggest will be found
bears.
W h a t act o f the railroads is it then that the provision n ecessary as a result o f this provision if it becomes a law.
we are discussing will prohibit ? It is simply this— it W e supposed that matter was too clear to require demon­
will break up an arrangement entered into by and be stration. Is it not notorious that our through railroads
tween the carriers o f the country for making neighbors of carry through freigh t even in times o f peace at rates
the far W est and East. Our area is so vast that unless which would not net them enough to pay operating e x ­
almost nothing was charged for carrying our great pro penses and fixed charges (and many at a price that would
ductions, »here could be no trade, no interchange o f com scarcely cover cost) if applied to all their business? Most cer­
modities between its extreme sections. This law comes in tainly there can be no denial o f that fact. Or look at it
and throws all these arrangements into confusioa by from the short haul point o f view. Profits come from
saying in substance that no railroad shall charge lor local traffic. Imagine then the short haul rates cut down
a like kind o f property more for a long haul than for a to meet the long haul rates on “ like kinds o f property”
short haul under substantially similar circumstances and shipped “ under similar cirsumstauces and conditions.”
Conditions. That means that the Northern Pacific cani,ot W ou ld it be possible to do it and retain the profits? O f
bring over its road to Minneapolis a car load o f wheat course on our EiStern trunk lines, wnere there is such a
shipped at Portland Oregon, for less money than diversity in shipments, the clause “ like kinds o f property”
it brings a car load o f wheat from an intermediate staiion uuder “ similar circumstances and conditions” would re­
to Minneapolis ; that the Chicago & St. Paul cannot bring strict in some measure the application of the provision in
over its road a car load o f wheat from Minneapolis to question; so that in the readjustment and equalization o f
Chicago cheaper than it brings it from Lisbon to Chicago ; rates up to the old standard o f profits, although the
that the Burlington & Quincy cannot bring over its road a through charges would have to be marked up materi.
ca r load of wheat from Council Bluffs to Chicago cheaper ally, the rise would not be so important as in farming
than it brings a car load from Bed Oak to Chicago. S > sections. But in the W est where nearly all the ship­
we might g o on and mention every railroad in the country,




ments East are o f “ like kind o f property,” the change

6

■THE C H R O N IC L E

would have to be very decided even to keep the roads
running, to say nothing o f keeping up profits.
To afford an approximate measure o f the extent to
which this change would become necessary let us take two
prominent roads. The first is the Cleveland Columbus &
Cincinnati which we have referred to in previous issues*
W e refer to it again for several reasons. One is that it is
a signal and convincing demonstration of the correctness
of our remarks ; then again it is one of the very few roads
which furnishes the necessary figures, and as we can go back
through ten years o f reports, by averaging the annual
results we reach something pretty substantial to base an
opinion upon ; finally the Cleveland road is an important
illustration because it occupies such a prominent position
as a through carrier. Here then are the results reached. In
a period of ten years this road received an average o f only
566 thousandths of a cent per ton mile on the east-bound
through freight, while 'o n the east-bound local business
the rate was 1161 thousandths. The average cost to the
road o f moving a ton of freight (all classes and kinds) in
the same period was 581 thousandths o f a cent, or more
than the local east-bound through rate. In view of these
facts, is there any room for question as to how an
equalization or adjustment o f rates would have to be
brought about in case of the passage of the Inter-State
Commerce bill ? Obviously it could be effected in no way
except by raising the through tariff very materially above

[V ol. X I !V .

appointed under it would have not only the railroads but
the trade o f the country at their will. W e have not that
confidence in man that we wish to lead him into any
such temptation.

TH E

L A K E SH O R E A N D
TH E M IC H IG A N
CENTRA L S T A TEMEN TS.

Both the Michigan Central and the Lake Shore state­
ments are very good documents, but the form er is rather
the better o f the two. The gain over the previous year is
not materially different for either company in the
case o f the gross or the net. Thus the gross of the
Lake Shore has increased $1,693,110, and that of the
Michigan Central $1,542,606, while the net o f the form er
has increased $1,271,512, and of the latter $1,207,209.
But the gain on the Michigan Central is on a smaller total
and hence is proportionately very much greater. In fact,
the increase in the net earnings o f the road is almost 45
per cent.
The features of the year of course have been the better
rates realized on trunk-line through traffic and the revival
of general business. From the former the Michigan Central
received relatively much greater benefits than the Lake
Shore.
In the first place, the average per ton per
mile for through traffic on the Michigan Central in
1885 had got down to the incredibly low figure of about
a third of a cent per ton per mile, and in the second
place the road has both relatively and absolutely a
much greater through tonnage mileage than the Lake
Shore. Part of the Central’s surplus above expenses and
charges, o f course goes to the Canada Southern. A llow ­
ing for that, however, we find that the Lake Shore and
the Michigan Central have earned substantially the same
percentage on their respective capital stocks, that o f the
Lake Shore being $4 85 per share, and that o f the M ichi­
gan Central $4 87 per share. Both companies will pay
two per cent semi annual dividends in February, and both
of course will have a large balance above the amount
needed for that purpose, as will also the Canada Southern
above its 1^ per cent dividend. Following is a sum­
mary of the yearly results on the Lake Shore since 1870.

existing figures.
The Cleveland & Columbus is called an eastern system.
Let us test one in the Northwest. Take for example
the Chicago & St. Paul, extending as it does through five
States and territories, and running from Chicago to Coun­
cil Bluffs, to Sioux City, to Fargo, and to St. Paul and M in.
neapolis. On this vast system the average through rate
in 1884-85 (later figures have not yet reached us) was 84
hundredths of a cent, and the average on the local freight
was 1-34 hundredths, or just half a cent a ton a mile more,
the total traffic, through and local, reaching 1,316,954,500
tons one mile.
Assume that 1,000,000,000 tons of this
was local traffic, since in the previous year out of a total
of 1,181,630,780 tons, 1,001,531,663 tons had been local.
LAKE SHORE & MICHIOAN SOUTHERN’S INCOME.
N ow suppose we imagine the local rate reduced to the
[
Dividends per Share
basis o f the through rate— that is, cut down half a
Fixed
Gross 1Operating
Net
of § 100.
Tears.
Earnings, j Expenses, Earnings. Charges.
cent a ton a mile ; in that case, net earnings on
and Taxes.
Paid.
Earned.
this 1,000,000,000 million tons would suffer a reduction
t
$
§
8
$
$
8 00
9 60
of no less than five million dollars. A s the total net earn­ 1870.............. 18,509,336 8,368,821 5,140,415 1,828,697
2,121,164
8.00
8 37
1871.............. 14,898,449 9,77P,806 5,118,643
ings in the same year were $9,351,206, this would cut 1872.............. 17,699,935 11,889,526 5,860,409 2,201,459
8 00
8 55
4 00
6 10
19,414,509! 13,746,598 5,667,911 2,654,560
them down to $4,351,206, while interest on the debt alone 1873..............
3 25
6 04
1874.............. 17,146,131 j 11,152,371 5,993,780 3,008,193
2 00
2 20
amounted to $6,096,812, leaving a deficit o f over $1,700,- 1875.............. 14,434,199 10,531,501 3,902,698 2,810,294
3 25
2,759,989
26
9,574,836 4,374,341
000. Thus we see that the company would in such a con­ 1878.............. 13,949,1771 8,963,866 4,541,193 2,775,657 3 57
2 C
O
3
1 87 7 ............ 13,505,159 i
4 00
5 61
tingency be unable to meet its charges, and be forced into 1878.............. 13,979,766 8,486,601 5,493,165 2,718,782
6 50
7 24
1879.............. 15,371,492! 8,934,524 6,336,968 2,754,988
8 00
bankruptcy.
Does this not prove conclusively that the 1880.............. 18,749,461 10,418,105 8,331,356 2,750,374 11 28
8 00
2,725,875
8 02
6,692,962
only way rates could be readjusted or equalized and the 1881.............. 17,971,39l! 11,278,429 7,167,832 3,027,000
8 00
8 37
11,057,807
1882.............. 18,225,639 i
8 00
8 11
roads kept in operation, would be to advance the tariff on 1883.............. 18,518,656 11,001,854 7,511,802 3,498,806
5 00
4 02
1884.............. 14,843,5841 9,133,522 5,710,062 3,720,670
the through business. W e do not claim that the through 1885.............. 14,133,506' 9,287,537 4,845,969 3,867,456
1 98
2 00
4 85
6,117,481 3,719,135
rate would have to equal the present local rate. The 188e ..» ........ 15,826,6161 9,709,135
It is needless to say that the result for^l886 is far from
extent o f the advance no one can determine before trial.
A ll we assert is that the rates would have to be revised being up to that of the best previous year. The Lake Shore
and the through rate raised, and that just to the extent for many years earned full 8 per cent, and in 1880 earned
that this was done the W estern farmer and the whole as much as 11^ per cent. In the late year not quite 5 per
cent was earned. But separating the figures so as to show
trade of the country would suffer.
W e have not referred to the portion o f the section in the results b y half-yearly periods, we find that the last half of
controversy which gives discretion to the Commissioners the year gives a very much better result than the first half,and
respecting these matters, because the prohibition is gen­ hence the promise held out by this half year’s exhibit is
eral and the discretion is in expressed terms confined to much more favorable than that based on the accounts for
special cases. Besides, we should object most decidedly the full year. On the 1st of July the gain over 1885
to the provision if after conferring this power the discre­ amounted to only $464,132 in gross and $570,151 in net.
tion as to its use was unlimited. Tne Czar of Russia ! !For the full year the gain reaches, as already said, $1,693,could not ask for a more autocratic position. The officers 110 in the gross and $1,271,512 in the net.




J an u a r y 1, 18&7.J

fH E

C H R O N IC L E

7

On the Michigan Central the distinction between the
For the
For the 11
For the 12
month o f Months ended Months ended
first half of the year and the second half is even more
November. * Nov. 30.
Nov. 30.
marked. A t the end o f June that road showed an increase 1885.—E xports—D om estio___ $68,448,103
$624,176,850 $715,549,321
Foreign.........
1.562,794
29,503,324
33,567,091
o f $463,000 in the gross and o f $397,000 in the net. Now
T otal............ ....... $70,000.903 $653,680,174
Im ports....................
Ä6t923tl 23 569,923.912
the increase is $1,542,000 in gross and $1,200,000 in net.
Excess o f exports over imports
In other words, in the last six months o f the year the Excess o f imports over exports $13,077,780 $83,756,262 $133,218,213
Michigan Central increased its gross earnings over a mil­
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS BY PRINCIPAL CUSTOMS DISTRICTS.
lion dollars and its net more than $800,000. In fact the
I m por ts .
Ex p o r t s .
road made almost as much net ($2,416,000) in these last
six months o f 1886 as in the whole o f 1885 ($2,692,791),
or the whole of 1884 ($2,699,945). It is these strikingly
good results in the closing half o f the year that give to
the prospect its most encouraging look. Below are the
yearly figures back to 1878. F or the years prior to the
consolidation (1883) we have combined the figures o f the
Canada Southern and the Michigan Central. It will be
noticed that the comparison here with the best previous
years is much better than in the case o f the Lake Shore.
Only 1880 a^d 1883 show larger net earnings than 1886.
COMBINED EARNINGS OF MICHIGAN CENTRAL AND CANADA SOUTHERN.

Tears.

Gross
Earnings.

1878...............
1879.............
1880.......
1881...............
1882...............
1883
.
1884
.
1885.............
1886...............

$9,472,631
10,410,795
12,791.428
12,303,591
12,457,991
14,009,767
11,659,077
10,707,394
12,250,000

Operating
Net
Expenses î Earnings.
and Taxes.
$6,437,497
7,147,683
8,215,092
9,404,443
9,268,906
9,741,639
8,939,182
8,014,603
8,350,000

{3,035,134
3,263,112
4,576,336
2,899,148
3,189 085
4,268,128
2,699,945
2,693,791
3,900,000

Interest and
Dentals.
$2,003,297
2,013,155
1,994,210
2,371,551
2.480.602
2,433,416
2.638.602
2,686,753
2,578,000

Surplus.
$1,031,837
1,249,957
2,582,126
527,597
708,483
1,834,712
61,343
26,038
1,822,000

Customs Di s ­ No v e m b e r , 1886.
tr ic t s a n d
Po rts.

Imports. I Exports.
§
$ ;'

11 months ending
November 30.

11 months ending
November 80.

1886.

1885.
1886.
1885.
$ ' :
: $
■
$
$
Baltimore,Md.
880,812 3,914.803 10,894.704 9,875,900 41.468,887 31,475,683
Boston, Mass. 4,120.851 4,589.592 56.362,522 49,264,634 53,066,790
50,085,879Buffalo Ck.N.Y
916,706
35.515 5,638,282 4,758.534
397,885
291,989
Champl’n, N.Y
304,863
149,603 2,969,420 2,364,448 1,581,10 t 1,370,887
Charlest’n, S.C
94,106 2,164,021
553,300
403,310 13,061,642 13,851,711
Chicago. 111....
652,130
42,837 10,215,459 9,227,053 1,950,354 1,681,170
Cincinnati, 0.*
208,549
1,978,881 1,540,064
Detroit, M ich.
215,446
596,641 2,302,385
1,909,511 4,608,603 4,880,383
Duluth, Minn.
5,587
59.198
65,058
185,007 9,435,694 2.168,073
Galvest’n, Tex
80,945 2,729,011
618,289
969,815 13,555,148 12,243,898
Mllw’kee.Wis.
65,840
459,472
588,360
72,447
Mlnn’s’a.Minn
128,710
80,763
1,118,482
897,917
806,161 1,226,359
Mobile, A la ...
4,416
22,936
42,810
,54,092 2,128,439 2,764,124
New Orl’ns.La
870,551 8,644,109 7,646,680 8.505.720 65.589,924 08,528,048
New York,N.Y 35,110,771 28,886.274 899.659,918 352,086,494 289,584,609
801,376,419
Niagara, N.Y..
526,464
9,050 2,756,414 2,964,2 >7
66,812
57,111
Norfolk, V a...
4,900 4,044,915
53,109
110,649 11,191,658 8,351,442
Oregon, Oreg..
980
102,755
167,968
182,946 1,414,310 1,318,521
Oswega’ie.N.Y
372,007
144,420 2,292,246 1,579,557 1,549,803 1,475,098
Oswego, N .Y .. 1,618,719
177,449 4,552,765 5,049,762 1,368,226 1,423,932
Philadel’a, Pa. 3,817.919 2,573,800 34,857,053 30,581,500 80,726,676 34,001,841
Portland, Me..
88,834
98,956 1,936,779 1.407.721 2,243,321 8,486,921
San Fran., Cal. 2,329,169 3,990,699 36,009,524 30,710,117 32,822,681 29,015,607
Savannah, Ga.
30,587 5,125,979
262,006
435,737 16,880,563 14,928,440
St. L ou is,M o/
214,977
2,751,284 1,899,427
Vermont, V t..
581,990
177,302 5,151,981 5,372,726 1.577,613 1,263,791
Willamette.Or
20.068
892,325
345,150
260,636 0,645,999 3,971,737
Wilml’g ’n, N.C
23,1801 1,124,253
168,501
96,063 4,402,257 3,853,801
Yorktown, Va.
10.047
441,741
74.655
110,803 4,816,825 1,341,087
Totals, (Ineluding all
oth’r Dists.) 54,048,815' 72,619,343 607,107,117 585.657,153 627.916,825 813,976,082

Remaining in warehouse November 30.1885 .
$25 549 186
Remaining in warehouse No ember 3 0 ,1 8 8 6.............. .".*. ".$ 3 0 ,0 4 0 ]6 4 9
* Interior ports to which merchandise can be transported without
appraisement, under act o f June 10,1880.

IM P O R T S A N D E X P O R T S FO R N O VE M BE R
A N D FO R TH E E L E V E N A N D T W E L V E
M O N TH S E N D IN G N O VE M BE R 30.

R A IL R O A D EARN IN GS.

Railro id earnings for the third week of December do not
The Bureau of Statistics has issued its detailed statement equal those of the second week of the month either in amount
o f the foreign commerce of the country for the month of or ratio of gain. The exhibit is a pretty good one, neverthe­
per cent.
November, and the eleven and twelve months ended with less, the increase reaching nearly $300,000, or about
There is quite a liberal sprinkling of roads, however, showing
November 30.
smaller earnings than a year ago, 19 out of the 60 roads re­
MERCHANDISE.
porting being so distinguished.
For the
month o f
November.
1886.—Exports—D om estic. . . .
F o re ig n .......
T otal........................
Im ports..........................
E xcess o f exports over imports
E xcess o f imports over exports
1885.—E xports—D om estic___
F o re ig n .......
T o t a l...................
Im ports...........................
Excess o f exports over imports
Excess o f im ports over exports

For the 11
For the 12
Months endec ’ Months ended
Nov. 30.
Nov. 30.

$71,361,13s)
1,258/201
$72.619,343
54,018,815
$18,570,528
...................
$66,644,082
803,208
$67,452,290
50,602,184
$16,850,10 j
...................

3d week o f Dece

$615.329,57C $683,396,807
12,587,255
13,793,731
$627,916,825 $702,190,541
607,107,117 659,318,637
$20,809,703 $42,871,904
$600,526,268
13,449,813
$613,976,082
535,657,153
$78,318,929

GOLD AND SILVER—COIN AND BULLION.
1886. — xport«—Gold—D om ...
E
$351,361 $32,088,992
Foreign
3.884
8,838,883
T ota l.........
$355,241 $40,977,875
Silver—Dom ___ $1,279,218 $14,475,796
Foreign.
937,458
9,091.754
T otal......... $2,216,676 $23,567,550
Total ex p orts.............. $2,571,921 $64,545,425
Im ports—G old............... $9,309.507 $29,652,274
S ilv e r............
1,777,159
15,191,997
T otal............................. $11,088,666' $44,844,271
E xcess o f exports over imports ................... $19,701,154
E xcess o f im ports over exports $8,514,7451
1885.—E xports—Gold—D om ...
$303,587
$3,519,209
Foreign
134,873
6,108,024
T otal.........
$433,460
$9,627,233
Silver—D om ... $1,500,440 $20,131,372
Foreign
609,713
9,945,487
T otal............
$30,076,859
Total exports.............. $2,548,613 $39,704,092
$5,096,355 $18,025,120
Silver.............
1,224,581
16,241,639
T otal............................. $6,320,939 $34,266,759
E xcess o f exports over Imports K
$5,437,333
E xcess o f im ports over exports) 3,772,326

Prev’ly rep’ted (10 roads)
Buff. N. Y. & Phil a ...........
Cairo Vin. & Clue..............
Canadian P acific..............
Central I o w a ..................
Chicago & A lton...............
Chicago & East. Illinois.
$690,633,945 Chicago & N orth w est....
14,686,292 Chic. St. P. Minn. < O ___
fe
$705,320,237 Chicago & West M ic h ___
Cin. Ind. St. L. & C..........
577,828,146
Cin. N. O. & Texas P a c ...
$127,492,091
Alabama Great S o........
New Orleans & N. E . . . .
Vicksburg & M eridian..
Vicksburg Shrev. & Pac.
$32,941,509 Cincinnati Rich. & Ft. W.
9,826,340 Cincinnati Wash. & Balt.
Cleveland Akron & C o l...
$42,767,849 Des Moines & Fort Dodge
$16,336,732 Det. Lansing & Northern.
10,434,481 East Tenn. va. & G a.......
$26,771,233 Evansville & Terre H ___
Flint & Pere Marquette..
$69,539,082 Grand Rapids < Ind.......
ft
$35,272,465 •Grand Trunk of Canada.
16,723,076 111. Cent. (111. & So. D .) ...
Cedar Falls & M ..........
$51,995,541
Dubuque & Sioux City.
$17,543 541
Iowa Falls & S. C ..........
Indiana Bloom. & W est..
$3,520,772 Lake Erie & Western.......
fe
6,327,018 ! Louisville < N ash ville. . .
$9,847,790 Louisv. New Alb. & Chic.
Marquette H. & O n t .......
$21,394,604 Mexican Central...............
12,553,781 Milwaukee Northern.......
$33,946,335 Minnesota & Northwest.
$43,796,175 N. Y. Ont. & W estern___
Norfolk & W estern...........
$20,256,919 Peoria Dec. < Evansville
fe
17,813,129 St. Jos. & Grand Island..
$38,070,048 St. L. Alt. & T. H., M. Line
B r a n c h e s....... ...............
$5.726,127
St. Louis Ark. & Texas ..

TOTAL MERCHANDISE AND COIN AND BULLION.

1886.—Exports—D om estic___f! 072,991,718
Foreign.........
2,199,546
T otal..................... 575,191,264
Im ports..........................
65,135,481
Excess o f exports over imports i 510,055,783
Excess o f imports over exports]




i5661,894,358(30737,675,068
30,567,892
34,054,555
S
i
>692,462,250 (771,729,623
651,951,388 711,314,178
$40,510,862 $ t 0 ,415,445

Minn. 8t. Croix & W ig ..
W isconsin & Minnesota
Total (80 r o a d s).........

1886.

1885.

$
1,082,802
42.400
15,614
198,000
33,255
194,746
44,712
475.500
132.500
21,661
50.751
56.090
30,803
19,369
15,245
19.090
8,131
40,988
9,111
9,615
20,093
97,258
16,072
40,586
41,351
360,831
302,900
3,100
22,200
15.400
51,731
24,711
302,930
32,508
6,020
105,420
13,476
15,213
21,410
64,453
16,308
34,117
21,555
22,650
55,115
102,774
20,301
269,703
30,133
8,208
11,895

$
1,025,118
48,600
13,010
161,000
35.278
188.431
45,035
477,800
106,300
23,677
47.960
55,370
25,931
18,732
17.945
17,756
7,041
35,031
8,429
10,297
21,686
97,064
14,610
39,444
31.279
315,819
322,775
3,401
23,681
17.960
62,638
26,618
273,7 iO
32,103
6,673
72,641
11,618
6,204
22,331
60,533
14,578
23,125
28,370
17,329
38,273
80,181
15,591
274,908
26,969
3,922
3,551

4,653,805

Week ending December 18.

4,358,326

Increase, i Decrease.
$
83,992
2,604
37,000
6,315
25,200
" 2 ,7 9 Î
720
4,872
637
1,334
1,090
5,957
682
194
1,462
1,142
10,072
45,012

29,220
405
32,779
1,858
9,009
3,920
1,730
10,992
5,321
16,842
22,593
4,710
3,164
4,286
8,344
387,249
295,479

26,308
6,200
2,023
323
2,300
2,016

2,700

682
1,593

19,875
301
1,481
2,560
10,907
1,907
653

921

3,815

5,205

i91,770

THE

8

O H K O N TC LE

p&crnetargf ODom
merctal gualtsit B>eu b
f From our own correspondent.!

fVoi* XL1V,

rule tne markets; hence the strength of the position is called
in question and a good deal of timidity is felt as to the im*
mediate future. It is also contended that many of the stocks
marked in the official list are quoted much above their real
value. It is quite possible that there will^be another “ shake­
out” before affairs come round, the effect o f which can hardly
fail >o be beneficial, as it will place the markets in a much
Bounder condition.
After the result of the advices from New York reporting
the extraordinary financial stringency the rapid uecision of the
Bank of England directors to advance the rate from 4 per cent,
at wh'ch it was fixed on Oct. 21st last, to 5 per cent, created no
surprise. It was known of course to be a purely precautionary
measure taken to check an efflux of gold from here, and expe­
rience has shown that there was no time for hesitation. In
two days £886,000 was taken from us, besides some £ 200,000
from Paris,and we are still uncertain whether the drain will con*
tinue. But for this gold inquiry there is no reason why any
change should have been made in the rate. The commercial de­
mand for money is light and the number of lulls offering is far
rom large. There certainly was nothing in the Bat.k return to
suggest any necessity for advancing the rate. Tne loss in the
reserve is only £15,433, and if the proport on to labilities is
2 per cent less than last week, namely, 48‘47 against 45-57 per
cent, it is because of an increase of about £ 1,100,000 in the
deposits held. However, with a stock of bullion below £20,
000,000 we cannot afford to regard lightly the possibility of an
extended export of gold. The joint-stock banks are now allow­
ing 3% per cent for deposits at notice and the discount houses
31^ per C
ent for money at call and 3% per cent if with notice,
showing an advance of 1 per cent in each case.
The following shows the present position of the Bank o
England compared with October 21, when the last change in
the rate was made :
Increase +
Dec. 16,
Oct. 21,
or decrease.—
1-86.
I8se.
&
£
Circulation, excluding 7-day
£

L o n d o n , Saturday, December 18, 1886.
The publication of the financial results of the half-year
now closing is awaited with interest, and it is believed that in
the main they will prove satisfactory. Compared with the
closing half of 1885, the joint-stock banks and fina- cial
establishments generally have had a very fair time. There
has most unqu» stionably been more movement in money.
The bona fide trade demand has possibly not increased to any
great extent, nor has the number of bills seeking discount so
far swollen as to cause any stringency in rates, but the
inquiry for shott loans has been more active, and a very
profitable source of employment has been opened up for
surplus balances by the speculative demand for advances on
Stock Exchange account. This latter has certainly been appre­
ciably in exctss of what it was last year whilst the volume o
discounts has been quite on a par. But one inference can b
drawn from this, and that is, that larger profits have been
made out of money during the past six months than were
obtainable during the final half of 1885, and we may therefore
expect that the dividends to be announced at the commence­
ment of the new year will be somewhat better than those
declared for the correepouding period. No s e r i o u s commercia
troubles have been notified o f late and the sum to.be written
off for losses cannot exceed the average.
It would be more encouraging, as pointing to the consolida­
tion of the im ; roving tendency, if the bulk of the profits now
being secured from capital were due to its utilization for trad­
ing purposes. The effects of a continuance of a steady trade
inquiry are mo>e potent and lasting than a Stock Exchange
speculative demand, which must partake mere or less of an
evanescent character, and may culminate in inflation and
subsequent depression. But we are not disposed to cavil at
1,056,940—
21,0 SO,"7 0
the infusion of a speculative spirit into dealings whether
and oilier bills........................ 2 ^1^7,010
51,444 +
9.091,913
Public deposits..........................
commercial or financial provided of course it be kept within oth e r deposits........................... ,
192,006—
2?, >0 1,677
903,064—
l o . 13 2 .151
reasonable limits, though what may be regarded as “ reasonable Gover anient securities............ I t . ''¿ o . z i o
108,418—
19,6 9,955
.........
851,978 +
11,613,625
limits” must be open to question, as at the best it is an unde- Other securities and c o;in .. . . 10,.9i,bU 7
Keserve of notes
204,962—
1 >,9 »3,695
Coin a d bullion............ ......... 20,14.8. 57
finable term. However, it leads to a more hopeful view being Prop’ u of reserve to liabilities.
3 -47 p. 0. +
43-47 p. c.
4u p. c.
1 p. 0. -V
5 p. c.
taken of the future, and whilst creating a return of confi­ b u R rate. . . . . ............ ..
4 p . c.
dence stimulates to a certain extent trade generally.
The rates for money have been as follows :
The fresh capital creations to date approximate closely to
interest allowed
Open market ratet.
£100,000,000, being roughly some £30,01)0,000 more than last
for deposits by
year, whilst the incre <se i the total of the Bankers’ Clearh g
Trade Oil it.
Bank Bills.
Joint Disc't S ’se
Stock Return is £849,307,000 of which £242,010,000 is due to Corion
Stock At i7tO 14
Six
Three Tour
Six
Three Tour
House Exchange settling days. The turn-over of money has
Call. Days.
Months Months Months Months] MonthMonths Banks.
thus been much heavier than last year and profits may be said
236 ~2*6 2M-W
8*4» — 3!»®4 3*6@4 3 *@ 4
to have proportionately increased. The variation in the Bank of Nov. 13 4 3*f* - 3A® — 2J6»3 |
236 2H 234
236
8i4@8M S*i®83< 8l ®8?i
4
“
1» 4
2*6* - 2*6®9
236 234-2J4
236
England rate of discouut has been from %% Per ce,,t * ‘
— 3 a — 3 a — 3l4-!-8M 3*£»8M 3*4@3M
• 2(514 2
•
236 2U-2H
236
'A
present level of 5 per cent. In the final six months of 1885 the Dec. 8. 4 3*64 - 8*6» - 3 ® — H »3J4 3)4®3Ji HA
236 234-234
236
1 10| 4 1*6 « - 856» - 8 © — 354 -3M 3t4@3M 3*4
31 334 334
*
variation was ir< m 2 to 4 per cent, the rate being at the lower
3
1 171 5 4*6» —14 ® ¡316* —14*4»49414*4 »*9il4*4 «4%
figure up to the middle of November. The average discount
The following return shows the position of the Bank of
quotation has been higher this year than last and that must
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols, &c.
tell beneficially upon the profits of the banks.
The sudden development of financial stringency cabled to
1883.
1884.
1885.
1886.
us from your side has unquestionably exercised a very dis­
£
£
£
£
turbing influence here. Luckily for us the news arrived on Circulation, excluding 7-day and 24.050.070 •24.014.990 34.2U.830 24,858,870
other bills............................. ..........
the second day of the settlement, when the bulk of the specu­ Public deposits.................................. 3.094.913 2,962.420 7,816.443 8.401,996
lative account had been can ied over. Had it transpired the Other deposits.................................... 83,502.677 23.577.386 33,359.638 21,561,888
13,102.619 14,402,798
18.132,151 11.80'.91
pr6vious day the effect here could not have failed to be very Government securities.................... 19,659.955 20.236,445 32,852.191 20,314,148
other secu rities..,............................
disastrous; as it is we have now a clear week before us befoie Reserve o f notes and coin.............. 11,643.625 12,298,117 12.467.657 12,989.274
the next account comes round and we hope that in the interim Coin and bullion............................... 19.w43.6v5 •20.563 107 20,938,517 1 22,098,114
43 p. C
46 p. c
4036 P. c.
43'47 p. C.
affairs will in a great measure have righted themselves. At Reserve to liabilities...................... .
3 p.e.
5 p. c.
4 p. c.
5 p. c.
Bank r a t e ..................... ...................•
x9956d. |xl003-16cl.
x99361
100363 I
the time of writing the recovery from the lowest points has Consols..............................................
117,43^,00» 1133,061,000
been general, but there is still a wide margin of loss from the Oiftitring-House return........ ........ 146,991.U00112«,537,00
“ making-up prices” to be adjusted. Though opportunely
The Bank rate of discount and open market rates at the
late in arrival the news of the collapse in stocks resulted in chief Continental cities now and for the previous three weeks
sufficient diBOigamzation h- re to compel the suspension of nave been as follows:
four firms, two of whom, however, appear to have been deal'Nov. 26.
Dec. 3.
Dec. 10.
Dec. 17.
ing very recklessly and much beyond the limits of prudence.
Bates of
Meanwhile the stock markets have been left in a very sensitive
Interest at
Bank Open Bank Open Bank open Batik Open
condition, owing to the anxiety whether we have reached
Bate. Market Bate. Market Bate. Market Bate. Market
3
-¿ r
the worst. Theie is no doubt that a good deal of the “ bull ” t*arls....................... 3
~2A ~ S
2*6
3
3
4
8*6
4
4
8«
4
speculation indulged in of late has been of a very weak Berlin............ .
3
336
4
836
4
856
8*6
character. That the volume of business transacted has been “ ran kfort........ 4
S
836
4
836
4
4
SA
4
H am bu rg........ .
236
2A
336
2*6
large there is no denying—we have ample evidence of that in A m s t e r d a m ...... 2*6
2W
2*4
2A
234
23«
256
2%
216
2«
the Bankers’ Clearing House returns—but it does not seem that B r u sse ls... ....... 2*6
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Madrid ....... .
4
the old-esrablished houses have been doing much. The bulk of V ien na ..............
4
4
4
4
m
4
4
0
5
436
5
5
5
5
the operations have apparently been by new firms or at least - t . P etersb u rg .. 5
336
8«
336
SJ6
8*6
316
316
8*6
by firms not bo well established as those who are supposed to




January

THE

1, 1887. J

C H R O N IC L E ,

9

Messrs. Pixley & Abeil writ© as follows on the state of the
(io m m je r c ia la n d ip ts c e lX a a e o u s
bullion ma ket
Gold.— here h >s been a very strong demand fo r Am erica during the
week and the nm"un«s withdrawn fio iu the Bank have chiefly b e n
N ational B anks . —The following national banks have lately
taken fo r S ew Y rk. The Ban » h »s received £ 1 0 >,000 from Australia been organized:
«
and South Aiue io«. while the w ithdrawal- am ant r,o £7 2 ',000. The
arrivals a re : £50.00 *from Australia, £0.000 from W ’sr, Cadies, £ ¡,00 »
from Chili, £ j.00 from Bomb iy, £ U , ‘>00 from River Pia e, total,
£105,000. The Neva takes £ *6." 0 to South America.
bilver.—With improved Indij.n E < cli*ii«es t n C i i until were en tbled
to sell larg ly -t h glier rates at the berinn ng o f Hit week. T i « orioa
o f silver rose to 46%d , at which arrivals were placed. T ub rise in he
Bank rate t-* day h.ts sii litiy depressed the market, a i i l w i qu. >te
46 %d. per oz. standard. Tile arriv Is c imprise £$'«,•»00 from Vew
Y ork, £32,0 0 from Chil5 total, £ >8,000. T u e P . < 0 . steamers h iv e
;
&
taken £ . 0 > » 0 to the iiasr.
,
Mexican D liars.— H t.ve maintained their quotation o f 45% d., and the
few arrival-, com p risin ' £,0.<»>>0 from West Indies, and £ 1 0 0 0 )
from New Ym k. have t> en placed at this rate. The P. & O. steamer
,
takes £10,723 to China and the straits.
The quotations for m illio n are* reported as follow s:
GOLD.
London Standard.

Dec. 16.

SILVER.
London Standard.

Dec. 9

Dec. 16

d.
46%

4696
49% ,
45H

Bar s ilv er.......... os.
Bar sllver.oontalnln« 5 «rs. gold.ox.
Cake silver ...os*

77 10

Span, doubloons .oz.
8.ATD.doiihloi>n».or

Dec. 9.

46M

46%
49%
45%

d.

0.
d.
77 9

0. d.
B*r gold, fin e.. oz. 77 9
Bar Fold, contain’«
SOdwts. stiver.oz. 77 10

(1 1 . .oil
n (|

Amongst the financial events of the week may r»e mentioned
the issue by Messrs. Blake, Boissevain & Co. of ¡¡>1,916,000 5 per
cent , collateral trust bonds of $ 1,000 each of the Union
Pacific Riilway, the price being 103*^ per cent. Thu p ospectus has also appeared of the As tor Alliance mines, Limited,
of Colorado, with a capital of £285,000 m £1 snares. The
Rio de .Janeiro Flour Mi Is and Granaries, Limited, appears
with a capital of £250,000 in £10 shares, and the united River
Plate Telet hone Company, Limited, with a capital of £500,000
in £5 shares.
The growing firmness in the wheat trade has continued.
The business doing has not been a dive, and now that we are
on the eve of the holidays we may look for hand-to-mouth
operations. But for all that the chances of the improving
tendency bring maintained a»e strong. Home advances have
recently rather increased and have been somewhat in excess
of last year during the past week or two, but the aggregate
sales forjJni*5 weeks are about 175 000 qrs. less than in the
corresponding period. Imports of wheat have fallen ©ff
recently and since the commencement of the season they ex­
hibit a deficiency of about 1,613,000 cwts. The American
visible supply also is increasing much less rapidly thau here-,
tofore, and the difference compared with last year is gr du­
ally dit-appearing; consequently the statistical movements seem
to indicate that the belief in the ultimate establishment of a
firmer Tfi-irket is well grounded. With the more severe
weather the it quiry for wheat should expand, an© a- present
supplies are by no means excessive any appreciable increase
in the demand could hardly occur without influencing values
favorably. Apart from the necessity of satisfying our require­
ments from foreign sources, France has a deficiency to mnk>good; and as her purchases compete with ours the market
should naturally assume a healthier condition.
The following jshows the imports of cereal produce int^ the
United Kingdom during the first fifteen weeks of the season.
IMPOBT8.
_
1886.
W h e a t.....................CWt. 15,243,1.51

B arley........................... 8. 14,347
O a ts............................. 5,505.« 20
P eas..............................
697,7^7
Beans............................
722.817
Indian co rn ................. 7,16!',602
F lour............................ 4,721,oo9

188 5 .
1 6 ,8 60 ,1 5 1

4 ,6 0 '.0 9 4
3,867,301
711,258
1,0 62,2 .0
7,246,391
3,742,6^7

1884.
1 5 ,0 2 6 ,7 8 2

6,40s,390
3,576,719
738,6)8
1.147,962
5,174,4 4
4,435,544

1 88 3
1 9,3 92 .2 8 :)

7.112,42)
4,04 ,920
4e0.t&7
814, 38
8,326.317
4,234,934

Supplies available for consumption (exclusive of stocks on
September 1) :
1886.
Im p orts o f w heat.ew t.15,246.651
Im ports o f flour.......... 4,7 41.5<>9
Sales o f hom e-grown. .11,310.874

1885.
16,860.151
3,742,627
13,488,394

1884.
15,026,782
4 ,4 i5,54 4
1 4 ,9 l6 ,5 il

1883.
19,39° 283
4,234’,9 3 r
15,52»,260

3.597—

The Madison National Bank, Madison, Dak. Ca «ital, $50,000.
E . EL Jacobs, President; S. W. Ja cob -, Cashier.
3.598—The First National Bank o f West N wr«-n, Newton, Mass. Capi­
>
tal. *(0 0,00 0. James H. Nickerson, P ie i «»•.
3.599—The Steelton Nation 1 B ant. 8 to« lr.<m. P i. C apital. *75,000.
Luther 8. Bent, P re-idem ; William J. Simveb . C shier.
3.600—The Commercial National Bank or -hrevepi«-1, l.a. t’apital,
*10«»,00J. John G. McWilliams, P resident; JR.tlpli R. Doming,
«’ashler.
3.6 01—T h« F rs t National Bank o f Phillipsbursr, tcarson. Capital,
*50,<>00. H S. Granger, Pre-id>*iii ; F ault *1. ain, C i-hier.
3.602—
Tlie Citizens’ National B ink. f Fargo. D '- . Oamtal, *100,000.
H. F. M ill-r, President; C. 0. S clm yl-r, C slner.
3.603—1 he State N.ttiona' B ink o f Om ilu . s'. I*. Capital, *100,000.
T
Elijah L. Lyon, P residen t; TVil bun M. < nr-tn,. Ca-hier.
3.604—The Manayuuk National Hank o f Philadelphia, p. nu. Capital,
*300.« 00. David Wallace, P ieeidei.t; John J. Foulurod,
Cashier.
3,603—The National Pa«k Bank of Living-ton, 31 »nt.au t. Capital, $50,000. William R. Stelnaias. Preside,of.; Al > i I, l.'ive, 0 «siller.
o«”t
3.606—The Ohio Valiev National Bunk o f Cincinnati, (>luo. Caoital,
#5o<i,00 > James Espy, President; i lieodo •« B nr Cashier.
.
3.607—
The N o rh e ru National Bank o f Ashland. w is. O m it i $100,0 *'’. Eugene A. Shores, Pr« anient; Charles F. Latimer,
Cashier.
3.6 0 8 —The E l Paso National Bank o f T \as. C rpital, $150,000.
Edgar n. Bronson, Presld« u t ; W. II. Aim in, cashier.
3.609—
The First National B ink o f Harabo «, Wis Cioir.al, $50,000.
T. M. Warren. President; Char es L. 8ar >> Cashier.
t.
3.610—
The Clinton -atioual B t in o f C oin u > is, O. Ca »ital. $ )P 0 000.
M ilbii’-v vf. G>eene, President; Fr«ileriott W. Preuti.-s, Cashier*.
3.611—
The 8 uth Omaha National Bauk, Nebraska. Capita), * 3 o ,000.
A. U. Wyman, President.

Imports and E xports fob the W eek .—T he im ports o f last
week, compared with those o f the preceding week, show
an increase in both dry goods and general roeichandise
The total imports were $7 583,634, against, $6 972,974 the
preceding week and $9,499,732 tw o weeks previous. The ex­
ports for the week ended Deo. 23 amounted to (4,672,165,against
$6,398,913 last week, an 1 #6,723,333 tw o weeks previous. The
follow ing are the im ports at New York for the week ending
(for dry goods) Deo. 23 and for the week ending (for general
merchandise) Dec. 2 4 ; also, totals since the beginning o f the
ilrst week in Januarv:
f o r e ig n

im p o r t s

at

krw

For Week.

1883.

Dry G oods.........
a en ’l mer’d lse..

*1. 491.900
5.917,494

#1.440,528
3,41.6,751

to r e

1884.

T ota l............
47,443,394
*4,907,279
.Since Jan.-1,
dry Goods......... *119.162,671 *100,305.918
len ’l mer’d ise.. 333,516.393 308.124.118

.

1885.

1886.

#2,1 67,5*4 5
6 453,743

*1 906,580
5,657,104

*8.621,288

*7,563,684

*97,924.079 8113,106.880
2.-1 672,290 3 12,.23 ,234

To'.al 51 weeks. *452,679,t'70 i '4 17.430,036 *373,596.375 -425,330,114

In our report of the dry goods trade will be found the im
ports of dry goods for one week later.
~
»
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive o f
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for the
week ending Dec. 28, 1886, and from January 1, 1886, to date:
BXPOBTB FROM N S W YO R K FOB THU W B K K .

1883.
For the w e e k ...
Prev. reported..

1886

1884.

*5,4 32 .5! 5
343,580,323

*5,382.592
325,131,414

1886.

*4,765,899
*4.672,175
316,784,1)23 309,172,466

Total 51 weeks. *349,012,838 *330.514,006 *321,550,522 *313,844,641

The following table shows the exports and imports of spec».®
A the port of New York for the week ending Dec. 25, and
t
since Jan. 1, 1886, and for the corresponding periods in
1885 and 1884:
BXPORT8 AND IMFOBTS OF SPBGIB AT N B W T O R E .

Exports.
Bold.

Week.

Imports.

Since Jan. i.

Itees..

31,279,034 34,091,072 34,378,837 39,156.477
1886.
1885.
1881.
1 -8 t.
Aver, price w h eat..........week. 3 s. Id. 30s. 5d. SGs.lOd. 39«. 3d.
Aver, price wheat...... seasou. 31s. 2d. 31s. Od. 32s. 2d. 40s. 6d.

ire&t B r ita in ............
«‘ranee___ . . . . . . . . . . .
ie r m a n y ....................
¥est I n d ie s ......... .

*15.400 *12,572,865
11,680.539
5,473.012
6,684,907

*827,305
1,36», 145

The following shows the quantities of wheat, flour and
maize afloat to the United Kingdom.

ronth A m e r ic a .......
All other oon n tries...

651.103
75 8 .-18

2,830

T otal.....................

This week. Last week.
1,5 »2.000 1 ,5 1 9 ,0 0 0
218,000
22 3,000
243.000
206,000

Last year.
1,545,000
153.000
297.000

1884.
1,795,000
192,( OO
154,000

Tatal 18 86...........
Total 1 8 85..........
Total 1 8 8 4 ..........

The daily closing quotations for securities, &c., at London
are reported by cable as follows for the week ending Dec. 31:
Fri.

Silver.
treat Britain ............
F ra n ce... . . . . . . . . . . . .
Germany.....................
Vest I n d ie s . . . . . . . . . .
Mexico.......... ..............
♦oath A m erica...........
All other cou n tries...

46
46%
46%
io o < i6 10o3.6 IC07,o 10ot%
100% 100716 10091(. 1001%

Total 18 86...........
Total 1 8 8 5 ... ....
Total 1884...........

W h e a t ........q r s .

Flour,equal to qrs ]
M aize............. qrs.
E n s liK ii

P iiia u c ta l

L ondon.
Silvar, per o z ...............A.
Consols fo r m oney.........
Consols fo r a c c o u n t.....
Fr’ ch rentes (in Paris) fr
D. 8.41*8 o f 1891..........
D. 8. 4s o f 1907..............
Chic. Mil. & 8t. P a u l...
Erie, common s t o c k ___
Illinois C entral.............
P en n sylva n ia............. .
Philadelphia A Readim
YorV PATitr»!




Sat.

t K a n t e t n -P e r C a b le .

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thurs.

46

J
c8

w
;
j

_______

>.
S
O
H
•
c3

J
;

11278
131%
69
905s
3338
136%
58
16%
116%

113%
13 %
70%
92%
347
136%
58%
17%
1171%

82545

113% 113%
131 % 131%
fj'J %
r0 933a
9 «%
3»%
35%
137
137
5q
68%
!♦ *4
18%
118V (11«%

10,743

165,493

Since Jan. 1.
4.589,621
10,57 9,717
12,127,538
3,359.432
50,052
405,296
273,849

*26,143 ■37.623,731 *2,364.773 #31.384,505
8,019,206
6 16,727 15.111,280
128,77*
394,140 23,201,378
5 ,u i0 38,1 66 6. 8
*112.000
39,200
5S4

*8,856.121
505.977
103 650
248 908

2,250
2,850

102,403
111,702

*176 884 ♦9,328,761
296.492 15,692 892
3 6 9 .5 4 1 14.319.-82

$ .........
23,638
9 7 .9 -0
3,403

*1,092
68,760
31.238
1,154,852
331,604
481,859
61,613

*124.86! $2,131,018
2 .0 1 3 ,9 /6
14
4
:>8.7 6
3.463,487

Of the above imports tor trie week m 1886, $5,323 were
American gold coin and $315 American «diver coin.
Of
the exports during the same time $10,743 were American
gold coin and $584 were American silv« r c< in.
United States Sab-Treasury.—Trie following table show
the receipts and payments at the Sub-Treasury in this city, as
well as the balances in the same, for each day of the past week :

THE

10

C H R O N IC L E .

Balances.
Date.
Dec.
“
w
«
«
"

25
27
28
29
30
31

Total ..

Receipts.

Payments.

Coin.

Coin Oert’s.

Currency.

$
9
9
9
$
.. H oliday..
11,617.973 .11,497,358 127.898,162 26,176,635 19,480,446
2,664,399 128,230,593 24,984,434 19,575,295
1,889,534
2,657,199 128,609,689 24,752,712 18,546,148
1.775,376
2,288,425 128,987,159 23,363,540 18,447,206
1,177,780
1,370,848 129,134,295 23,232,380 17,886,123
805,741
17,276,404

20,478,724 ..................... I......................

“ 115th Call for U. 8. Bonds.—The Treasury Department
has issued this call under date of December 28, 1886, retiring
$10,000,000 of bonds on Feb. 1, 1887. These are three per cent
bonds issued under the act of Congress approved July 12, 1882,
andnumbered as follows:
$50—Original No. 47 to 49.
$100—Original No. 583 to 609, and original No. 9,940 to original No.
9,969, both inclusive.
„
,
.
$500—Original No. 246 to original No. 266, and original No. 4.230 to
original No. 4,234, both inclusive.
$1,000—Original No. 2,017 to original No. 2,175, both inclusive, and
original No. 23,749 to original No. 23,777, both inclusive.
$10,000—Original No. 5,316, to original No. 6,325, both inclusive.
Total, $10,000,000.

Des Moines Osceola & Southern.—At Des Moines, la., Judge
Love, of the United States Circuit Court, has filed a decree
ordering a sale of the Des Moines Osceola & Southern Railroad
to satisfy judgments against it held by bond and other lien
holders. The road has been operated by a receiver for the last
two years, and an effort will be made to clear up its indebted­
ness and reorganize it. E. R. Mason, the present receiver, is
appointed commissioner to conduct the sale. The road runs
from Des Moines to Gainsville, a distance of 113 miles.
Wabash St. Louis & Pacific.—In regard to the application
of the Purchasing Committee to Judge Gresham to have the
Chicago and St. Louis divisions turned over to them, the mat­
ter came up in Chicago on Thursday, Dec. 30, and the judge
said that no tenders had been made, and it was not proper to
act in so important a case unless tenders were formally made
in writing by the authorized parties. For these and other
reasons he should refuse to modify his decision, and Judge
Cooley, the new receiver, would take possession of the Chicago
Division on December 31. Judge Cooley has furnished a new
bond for the Chicago Division as receiver, and will take pos­
session of the Decatur & East St. Louis and all the lines East
of the Mississippi River on the same date.
— At St. Louis, Dec. 29, the Wabash Purchasing Committee,
consisting of Edgar T. Welles, O. D. Ashley, Thomas H. Hub­
bard and James F. Joy, appeared in the United States Circuit
Court. General Hubbard appeared for the Committee and ex­
plained its functions to the Court. The Committee, he said,
paid $625,000 for the paper title to the Wabash, but did not
make application for possession of the property, because, while
they had sufficient money to pay the receiver’s indebtedness,
they would not have any left toward the payment of the two
years’ accrued interest on the bonds of the lines east of the
Mississippi. It was not probable that the earnings of the lines
would be sufficient to meet these obligations, judging from
the earnings of 1884 and 1885. The interest was 7 per cent on
most of these bonds and they were shortly to expire. So it
had been proposed to fund the accrued interest and reduce
the future interest to 5 per cent, with an option to the bond
holders to take new sheets of coupons, extending the bonds
for forty years. Of the $27,000,000 bonds, holders of $10,000,'
000 consented. Four millions of those not consenting origi
nated the proceedings in Chicago in which Judge Gresham
rendered his decision.
After some preliminary remarks, Judge Treat read the fol
lowing order:

[YOL. XL1V,

under the order printed above, unless the receivers are guaran­
teed against loss, are the follow ing: Eel River Railroad,
Detroit Butler & St. Louis Railroad, Attica Covington &
Southern Railroad, Springfield & Northwestern Railroad,
Peoria Pekin & Jacksonville Railroad, Pike County Railroad,
Champaign & Southeastern Railroad and the Madison County
Railroad. The rolling stock ordered to be turned over to
Judge Cooley will not be sufficient to operate the roads of
which he will have control, as most of that covered by the
mortgages on the lines east of the river has long ago been
worn out or so diverted that it cannot be_recovered.
—Judge Trimble sold the Omaha Division of the Wabash
St. Louis & Pacific Railroad Dec. 28 for $1,400,000. It was
bid in by E. W . Sheldon, o f New York City, for the bond­
holders. The property extends from Elm Flats, Mo., to
Omaha, a distance of 143 miles.
-The attention of investors is called to the advertisement of
the American Investment Company of Emmetsburg, Iowa,
with offices at No. 150 Nassau Street, N. Y . This company has
large paid-up capital and a surplus now amounting to
$75,000, and is situated in one of the best sections of Iowa for
securing loans. They offer first mortgage farm loans paying
7 per cent interest. They also issue 6 per cent debenture
bonds running ten years, which have the security of their paidup capital and surplus, together with the mortgage loans
deposited with the Mercantile Trust Company of this city.
Investors can obtain, by writing to them, their explanatory
pamphlet and references.
—Attention is called to the card of Messrs. W . P. Wight &
Co., in the C hronicle this week. This firm has been recently
organized and is composed of energetic and well-known busi­
ness men. Mr. Wight, the head of the firm, has been for a
number of years a member of the New York Stock Exchange,
and Mr. Creighton, the office member, has been connected with
the well-known house of James T. Bates & Co,, while Mr. A;
B. Claflin, the special partner, is the son of the late Horace B.
Claflin of this city, and but recently a partner in the firm of
S. V . White & C J. The firm commences business under the
most favorable auspices.
—Messrs. Griswold & Gillett call the attention of careful
investors to their Fort Smith & Van Buren Bridge Company’s
first mortgage 6 per cent sinking fund gold coupon bonds, also
to the Grape Creek Coal Company’s bonds due 1916, and the
Knoxville & Ohio Railroad Company's 6 per cent gold bonds
due 1925. Investments at 6 per cent gold are getting scarce,
and as to the security of these bonds Messrs. Griswold &
Gillett will furnish all desired information.
—Messrs. N. W . Harris & Co., bankers, of Chicago, with an
Eastern office in Boston, give notice to-day of a striking list of
municipal bonds which they offer for sale. Their card will be
found at length on another page, under the head of “ Banking
and Financial.” The firm is one of some years’ standing, well
known in Chicago, and also known to readers of the C hronicle
as dealers in Western investments.
—Messrs. Post, Martin & Co. offer $500,000 of Series “ A ” 5
per cent bonds of the National Water Works Investment Com­
pany. This is a comparatively new and attractive form of
investment, and merits particularly the study of investors,
who can find many particulars in the advertisement else­
where, and can get further information if desired from the
firm above named.
—Attention is called to the notice of sale on Feb. 1, 1887, in
the city of Richmond, of the property and franchises of the
Southern Telegraph Company. Messrs. Turner, Lee & McClure
of 20 Nassau Street are the attorneys for the Farmers’ Loan &
Trust Company, plaintiff, and can give any information not
contained in the advertisement on anothsr page.
—The card of the American Loan & Trust Company of this
city appears in the C hronicle to-day. This institution is
managed by some of the best known and most responsible
citizens of New York, and parties having business in this line
will find all the facilities of a first class trust company.
Boston Banks.—Following are the totals of the Boston bank?:

The receivers will relinquish all roads east o f the Mississippi to
R eceiver Cooley, appointed to have charge o f them under the order of
the Seventh Circuit Court. We understand there are lines east of the
Mississippi that are not within the terms o f that order, roads that
begin nowhere and end nowhere. It also appears from the receivers’
report that every one o f such roads, with one exception, I think, has
been operated at a loss. It would be folly for these receivers, then, hav­
ing no control o f the main lines, to continue the operation of these
branches and incur still further losses. So the order will be that they
w iil cease to operate all lines east o f the Mississippi whose earnings
shall be less than expenses, unless within thirty days they are given a 1886.
Specie. L. T ’nders.1 Deposits.* Cireula’n Agg.Cl’ngs.
Loans.
guarantee against loss in the operation o f such lines. Further they
9
$
I
$
$
$
will deliver to Reoeiver Cooley all books o f account o f such roads,
3,508,200 111,566,700 13,257,800 88,122,431
They will, however, retain possession o f all general books of aocount, D ec.ll 146.107.600 10,453,200 3,610,000 110,534.500 13,183,200 96,912,468
“ 18 146,636,500 10.712.600
but will give Judge Cooley every facility for their examination.
“ 24 144,020,100 10.245.600 3,282,100 106,632,800 13,109,500 73,379,915
The receivers will retain possession o f all moneys now in their hands,
or that may hereafter come into their hands from the earnings o f the
Philadelphia Banks.—The totals have been as follows:
roads remaining undr their management or from the purchasing com
mittee, subject to the orders o f this Court. They will i --------J ‘ " Ml
Lawful Mon’y Deposits.* Circula’n Agg.Cl’ngs.
Loans.
1886.
R eceiver Cooley all the rolling stock covered by the mortj
S
r
$
lines surrendered, and they will report all disputes with s
$
$
85.782.700 4.029.750 63,348,547
22,906,600
respecting apportionments o f rolling stock to this court.
Dec. 11....... 87,780,900
84.642.700 4.023.750 68,912,529
21,795,200
87,888,100
“
18 ....
Tne operation of the lines remaining under the control
83,230,200 4.030.750 55,023,544
21,478,400
.
“
24...... 86,578.700
oeivers will be independent o f the ooeration o f lines east <
and they will make the best arrangements with Reoeiver Cooley aud all
* rHclndiTlff fchft torn “ dnP to othAT banka
other parties for transfer o f business that are possible.
The officers and employes o f the lines operated by these receivers will
g iW & iix g a n d J ft im a c ia X .
coniine themselves to their services. The object of this order is to make
the operations o f the lines east and west entirely separate and indepen­
dent.
C IT Y O F S C R A IT 03 J
There will be no dismissal in this case o f any parties, choses in action,
(»ju risd iction o f parties or property now in this court.
The receivers will report separately as heretofore the earnings and
4
P E R
CENT
B O W DS.
expenses o f lines in their charge up to Deoember 31.
It appears from the statement furnished us by the master that there
are now $750,000 outstanding receivers’ certificates. We think, there­
TERMS ON APPLICATION TO
fore, that the Purchasing Committee should be directed to pay into the
registry o f this court within sixty days, $1,000,000 in cash or receivers’
H A R V E Y
FISK & SONS;
certificates, and give bond to com ply with all the orders of this court.
Then to take the possession o f the road subject to all further orders o f
BANKERS,
this court.

The press dispatch reporting the above says that the lines
east of the river, the operation of which will be abandoned




28 N assau Street , Ne w Y ork .

THE

J a n u a r y 1, 18S7.J

g a u fe itx g
^

FORT

SMITH

a tix l
7

5

11
a tu l

^ ia a t u c ia l.

, 0

& TAN

C H R O N IC L E .

0

0

*

fin a n c ia l.

$ 8 0 ,0 0 0 C I T Y O F C L E V E L A N D , O.

BUREX

BRIDGE

CO.’S

FIRST MORTGAGE S IX PE R CENT SINKING FUND TW E N TY-

4*2% s. a. B oard of Education Bonds, $1,000 each. Due 1893.
Assessed valuation.............................................................. $89,000,000
Total debtyboth city and echo jl, less W. Wks. bonds

PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST. BY THE

and sinking f o r d s . . . ............ .........................................

$4,518,765

Population.............................................................................

F IV E Y E A R GOLD COUPON BONDS, GUARANTEED,

200,000

$ 1 2 ,5 0 0 P E R R Y C O E N T Y , O .

S T . L O U IS & SAM F R A N C IS C O R A I L R O A D CO.

6% s. a. C. H. Bonds, $500 and $1,000 eaob.

Due 1890-91.

Assessed v alua tion.............................................................
GUARANTEE INDORSED ON BONDS.
P R IC E !

.

.

.

.

.

106 and IN T E R E S T .
1 0 8 Is n o w R id fo r

$95,000

Population............ ............................................. ..................
$ 2 9 ,0 0 0 M E R C E R

P a y s I n v e s to r a b o u t 5 1 -2 P e r C e n t.

$9,900,000

Total debt................................

4«,C00

C O E N T Y , O.

6% s. a. Road Im p’ t Bonds, $500 and $1,000 ead i.

Due 1888-94.

th e F ir s t P re fe rre d S tock o f th e St. L o u is &

Assessed valuation.............................................................

$7,500,000

San F r a n c is c o R a i l w a y C o m p a n y .

Total d e b t....................................
Population...................... 1....................................................

$210,000
26,00

G R IS W O L D & G IL L E T T ,

$ 5 9 ,0 0 0 C I T Y

NO. 3 W ALL STREET, NEW YORK.

O F L I M A , O.

5% s. a. Water Bonds, $1,000 each. Due 1916.
Assessed valuation................................................... «,........

CR EEK

COAL

O f D a n v ille ,

$3,163,906

III.

$110,000
$356,000

Population, ov er..................................................................

COMPANY,

Total debt, except for Water W orks.......................
Total issue of Water Works B onds...................................

GRAPE

13,000

$ 2 8 ,0 0 0 S C O T T C O E N T Y , I O W A .
F IR S T

N O R TG 1G E

6

PER

RONDS,

CENT

DEE

S IN K IN G

FEND

1916.

5% s. a. 0. H. Bonds. $1,000 each.

Due 1890-91.

Assessed valuation............................................................... $10,000,000
Total d ebt................

IN T E R E S T
AT

PAYABLE

THE

A P R IL

FARM ERS’
C O .,

N.

Y .,

LOAN

AND

OCTORER,

AND

TREST

TRESTEES.

$120,000

P opu lation....................................................

41,956

$ 2 4 ,5 0 0 C I T Y O F M A R S H A L L T O W N , I O W A .
5% s. a. Funding Bonds. $500 each. Due 1906.
Assessed valuation.............................................................

The-e bonds are a first and only lien upon one o f the most valuable
and well-esraMished coal properties in tbe State o f Illinois, consisting
of over 2 , 0 0 0 acres o f coal land, 1 2 2 houses, a well-stocked sto re ,
ample farm buildings, and all the machinery, plant aud appliances—on
w hich there is no indebtedness w hatever except this issue o f bonds.
O f this issue $ 1 2 5 ,0 0 0 aye set aside and held in trust by the Farm ers’
Loan & Trust Company, o f New York, and cannot be used fo r any
other purpose than for buying more coal lands, bui’ ding more houses
and making additional permanent im provements to the property
$ 3 0 0 ,0 0 0 o f these bonds have already been sold, and are held for
investm ent b y some o f the most conservative investors in this city
State, and throughout New England, including many o f the leading
Savings Banks, Bank Presidents and Trustees.
A sinking fund is provided in the m ortgage fo r the paym ent to the
Farmers’ Loan & Trust Company o f $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 per annum, beginning

$1,857,840

Total d ebt..........................................................................

$34,921

Population............................................................ ................
$ 3 5 ,0 0 0 C I T Y O F

8,29 8

C L A R IN D A , IO W A .

5% s. a. Water B on is, $1,000 each. Due 1906.
Assessed valuation................................

$702,821

Total debt...................................

$35,000

Population.............................................................................
$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 P O W E S H I E K

3,343

C O E N T Y , IO W A .

5% s. a. Refunding Bonds, $1,000 each.

Due 1906.

Assessed valuation......................................

$5,655,086

Total d e b t.. . ...........

$30,000

Population..............................................................................

18,203

$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 C I T Y O F R E L O I T , K A N .
6% s. a. Refunding Water B m is, $L 000 each

Due 1906-16.
$442,790

A pril 1 ,1 8 9 1 , for the redem ption at par o f that amount o f bonds each

Assessed valuation.........................

year, until the entire issue is redeem ed and canceled.

Total d eb t.............................................................................

T lie r e n ta l f r o m th e h o u s e s a n d th e p ro fits f r o m th e sto re ,
s c r e e n in g s a n d th e fa r m s w i l l m o r e t h a n p a y th e In te re st
o n th e e n tire Issu e o f b o n d s w i t h o u t t o u c h in g th e p ro fits
f r o m th e sa le s o f c o a l.
F o r th e t w o ye a rs a n d e le v e n m o n t h s e n d in g A p r il 1 ,
1 8 8 6 , th e c o m p a n y e a r n e d $ 1 6 9 ,4 6 2 a n d 5 1 - 1 0 0 , o r n e a r ly
6 p e r c e n t o n $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 , a n d w i t h th e a d d itio n a l p la n t to
be p u t u p o n th is p r o p e rty It s h o u ld e a r n 6 p e r ce n t o n
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 , w h il e th e in te r e s t c h a r g e s a r e ’ o n ly $ 3 0 ,0 0 0
y e a r ly .
We offer a limited amount o f these bonds to investors that are seeking
safe securities for investment, and we look upon them, at the price
offered, as the m ost profitable investm ent in the market, paying the
investor about 6 1 - 2 per cent interest.
Price, 9 5 and accrued interest.

NO. 3 W ALL STREET, NEW YORK.

3,800

$ 2 0 ,0 0 0 C I T Y O F G R E E N V I L L E , M I C H ,
f % s. a. Water Bonds, $1,000 each.

Due 1891-1900.

Assessed v a lu a tio n ................................

$1,048 ,526

Total d ebt............................................................

$25,000

P opulation.............................................. ........... .....................

3 ,6 0 0

$ 8 ,0 0 0 C I T Y O F C H I L L I C O T H E , I L L .
6% Im provement Bonds, $1,000 each.

Due 1888-95.

Assessed valuation.................*..................................................$ 173,138'
Total debt.....................................................................................

$3,000

P opu lation.......................

1,127

$ 4 ,0 0 0 K A N K A K E E C O E N T Y , I L L .
10% Bonds, $1,000 each.

Due 1891.

Assessed v a lu a tio n ................................................................$5,445,641
Total d ebt..........................................

G R IS W O L D & G IL L E T T ,

$26,000

Population..............................................................................

$108,000

P opulation.................................................................................

28,000

$ 1 4 ,7 0 0 N E R R A S K A S C H O O L 7 ’ s.
Of selected Districts and various denom inatious and maturities. No
District can issue bonds in excess of 5 per cent taxable valuation»

K N O X V I L L E & O H IO R A I L R O A D CO.
FIRST MORTGAGE S IX P E R CENT GOLD BONDS DUE 1925

and school bonds aré all registered with State Auditor.
Where interest Is not payable In New York, we w ill collect coupons,
and remit in New Y ork exchange, freo o f charge.

Interest Payable'January and Ju ly,
A t Central Trust Company (Trustee) New Y ork.
For further particulars on all above Bonds call on, or address,

G R ISW O LD

Sc G ILLE TT,

N o . 3 W a l l S treet, N e w Y o r k .




mation desired furnished on application.

A n y additional infor­

Telegrams m ay be sent at our

expense.

-T . W . H ARR IS
V
Sc CO.,
Bankers,
1 1 5 -1 1 7 M o n r o e Street, C h ica g o.
5 6 D ev o n sh ire Street, B o sto n .

THE

1 2

[VOL. XL1V-

C H R O N IC L E .

To-day the rates on actual business were as follows, viz.
60 days’ sterling, 4 80@4 80^; demand, 4 84J@4 84$.
Cables, 4 84$@4 85.
Commercial bills were 4 78$@4 79;
Continental bills were: Francs, 5 26J@ i 26J and 5 23|@5 24fi
o • v i u B N as s .
reichmarks, 94|@94| and 95; guilders, 39|id>39f and 39|@40.
Tbe followlmr dividend« have recently neen announced:
The following were the rates of domestic exenange on .New
Bootee Vlogea,
When
Per
York at the under-mentioned cities to-day: 8avannah, buying
/fame o f Vompany.
(D ayt inclntive.)
Payable.
Cent
par, selling
premium; Charleston, buying i@ S-16 dis­
R a ilr o a d * .
count, selling par; N>*w Orleans, commercial. 150c. discount,
Beech Creek. pi* f ..........................
.Tan. 16 to Fen. 17 bank, par; at. Louis, 75c. discount; Chicago.50@60c.discount.
Canada S o u t h e r n . ..........
Dec. 30 to Jon. 26
The rates of leading bankers are as follows ;
Chicago R. I & I'a-ofl« (qnar.l...
to Jan. 20
t ia u k e r s 7

D elaw aie L
* Western.........
V
Duhnque & Sioux O L .y ................
H oiisok nio, prof
...................
Lake flu r.-. < .Mich. Southern ..
fe
Lnnir I-daii'l ( piar ) ......................
M ich u a • euiral .........................
Mineral R m u ' (q ar ) ..............
Nashville Ch <rt .v «jr.L ni“ (quar )
N. Y. C nt. *v Hud-* >n *q ia*.). .
P . Ff. W. & Clii«'. up. guar.(quar )
Do
do r. ir. (quar.).......
Verm ont Vailey o f 87 ............
W orcester NaHlPia & Rochester...
R ank*.
L ong Island (Br .okljn) ...............
National Bank o f ilie Republic.
North R iv e r.................. .................
St. Nleh »las.......................................
T h lid N ation al....
..........
U niteuStHi» s National (q u a r )....
In u it a n c e .
Niagara Ft « ..........................- ........ .
p r*r P*re
w a i . i.

tankers’

flS a x c ttc *

20 J »n.
15 Jau.
1 0 .1an.
I s Jau.
*
1 .lan.
1* Jan.
5 Jan.

6
1
2
Id
9
16
1

1 1 ..........
0

15 Jan.

to
to
to
to
to
to

Fell.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
-----

14
io
17
t
17

1 to Jan 16

3 .........
4 ...........

1885.
Dec. 26.

1884.
Dec. 27.

>
Loans and die. 3*343 484. 0< "*ec. $5,209,600 $336,939.300 $295
90,988,200
88
77 3 3,"Oi I i c . 2,917.000
S p e cie ..........
9,924,400
11
Circulation
1\100
7.9U3.00O Dec.
)t
3f 1.672.40** 1 0, 2.0î“9.2<)0 373,953,006 335
Net deposits.
27,212,700
S6
215.300
17.847,300 Deo
Legal tenders.
Legal reserve $87.91 9.100 ">ec *52 ’ ,300 $93,489.250 $93
95 ,150,3oo I u o . 2,701,700 118,200,9 »0 124
Reserve held.
Surplus___

874,20)
l7 o, O0
61*.6^0
272,10 i
592.300
819,0 5
762.600

*7,23‘2 .'!00 fnc. ►3,224,0‘W $24,712.650 $1*' 914.775

Exchange.—Sterling exchange has been moderately active
most of the week, though the'business was increased somewhat
at one time owing to the demand from arbitrage h uses in con­
nection with f reign sales of our stocks. The stringency of
money in Loudon aho stimulated the rates of sterling here, and
they have been a ate strong during all the latter p»rt of the
week. Posted rates are up to 4 81 and 4 85. The receipts of
gold since our last report bave amounted to about $5,500,009; -




4 85
4 81
Primebankerer'eterllng bills on L on d on ...
Prime c om m ercia l_________. . . . . -------- -— 4 7 0 % » 4 79%
4i
............ _
Documentary oo inm eroial. . . . . . ................. 4 78% « 4 791
P aris(franos)....... ............... .............. .......... 5 2< %<J>5 25%|5 2 3 % ® 5 2 3 %
3 9 % « 39l»i6 391516®40
im sterdam ( g u il d e r s ) ... ...... . . . — .......
94%<»94% | S )5 _ ® 9 5 %
PVanItfort or SromuTi (relchmarksl

United State» Bond».—Government bonds have been only
moderately active, and the changes in prices not important.
The 4s have improved a little, while the 4^s remain about as
Jan. 1 to Jan. 9 quoted last week. $10,001) of the 3s sold at 101. The one
Dec. 13 to Jau. 2
hundred a d forty-fifth call for bonds has been issued by the
Treasury D ep a rtm en t, retiiing $10,000,000 of the 3 per cents,
and maturing February 1.
The closing prices at the N. Y. Board have been as follow s;

The Money Market and Financial Situation.—The year
1886 closes with strong markets and a generally hopeful tone
perceptible in business circles. It may fairly be said that the
year has been, upon the whole, the best that we have had since
1830, as the course has been a crescendo, and the last quarter
has developed the strongest tone and the largest growth in
business that has been known for a long time past. This is
much better than to have the year open finely and then dwin­
dle down towards a dismal state of affairs at the close.
The Railway Age estimates now that the new railroads con­
structed- this year will foot up some 8,000 miles, of which a
large part has been constructed by a few of the leading railroad
companies that have been branching out and extending theirlines at a rapid rate.
*
—■
The imports of gold towards the close of the year have done
much to help our. financial situation, and these imports have
recently seemed mu-di more legitimate according to the natural
course of exchanges, bi-cmse the foreign trade balance has
been such as to warrant them. For the mouth of November
there was a large excess in the exports over the imports of mer­
chandise, and a handsome balance in favor of the United
States.
The Clearing House bank statement to-day is particularly
favorable, s h o v i n g an increase of $5.415,100 in specie, $1.523,100 in legal tenders and $7,596,200 in deposits, giving a result
of $5,039,150 increase in the surplus reserve, which is now
$13 271,350. This, together with the easy rates of money the
past ten days, gives the impression thit the stringency in money
at the time of the bite stock panic was in great part artificial.
The open market rates tor call loans during the week on
Stock and bond collaterals have ranged from 3 to 8 per cent,
and to-day the rates were 4® 8 per cent. Prime commercial
paper is q u o te d at 5 @ 6^ per cent.
The Bank of England weekly statement on Thursday showed
a loss in specie ->f £310.000, and the percentage of reserve to
liabilities was 35f, against 40 3-16 last week; the discount
rate remains unchanged at 5 per cent. The Bank of France lost
12,475,000 fr.ncs in gold and gained 125,000 francs in silver.
The New York Clearing House banks, in their statement of
December 21, showed an increase in surplus reserve of
$3,224,000, the total surplus being $7,232,200, against $4,008,300 the previous week.
Tne following table shows the changes from the previous
week and a comparison with the two preceding years in the
averages of the New York Clearing.House banks:
Infter'ncet fr ’vi
Previous Week.

Demand.

1 Dec. 29 to Jan. 2
10 Dec. 26 to J an. 9

!* i' it a * r, i*'KH>A t , D ecem ber 31» I S 8 B -5 P. 91.
»
4

1886
Dec. 24.

Sixty Dayt.

December 31.

Interest Dec.
Periods. 25.

Dec.

Dec.

Dec.

27.

28.

29

Dee.
3 J.

Dee.
¿1»

* 1 1 0 % * 1 1 0 % * 110 % * 110 % * 1 1 0 %
4%s. 1 8 9 1 ....... . ..reg Q.-Mar.
!
1 1 0 % U O k * 110 % * 1 1 0 9 1 1 0 %
4% s, 1 8 9 1 ........ .coup Q.-Mar.
•
127% 12 % *127% 128 *1 27 %
4s, 1907............ .. reg Q.-Jan.
•
* : 29 9» 128 > 129 *12 % 1 2 8 %
is. 1 9 0 7 .......... coup. Q.-Jan.
-10 % * 1 0 1 % 101 *1007 8 * 100 %
3s, option U. 8., . reg O.-Feo.
*12 17e *125% *125% *125 *125
68. cur’cy, ’95.. ..reg J. & J.
*127% * 127 ^4 *127% *127% *1 27 %
6s, cur’cy, ’ 96 . ..reg J. & J.
*12 % *129% *1 2-7 8 *1297 8 *12978
6s, cur’cy, ’97.. ..reg. J. & J
*131% *13S *1317 8 *131% *131%
6s, cur’cy, ’98.. ..reg. J. & J.
• *134 *134% *135 *134% *134%
68, onr’ey. ’99.. .. reg J. & J.
* This is the price bid at the morning hoard: no tale was made.

Stale and Railroad Bonds.— The business in State bonds
has been extremely limited, both as to the number of classes
dealt in ¡jnd to the amount of the transactions. There are no
changes in prices worthy of special mention.
The railroad bond market is largely influenced by the course
af-the stock market, hence in the early part of the week tl^e
dealings were quite light, though relatively more active than
stocks. Later the business improved in volume and prices
have been much firmer, though there was no special weakness
apparent at any time. With the increase in the volume of
business came considerable strength, and several classes were
advanced quite materially, including Atlantic & Pacific lsts
and incomes, St. Joseph & Grand Island incomes, Fort Worth
& Denver lsts, &c.
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.— The market opened
on Monday dull and rather weak, the coal stocks being
depressed by a strike of Reading employes and prices generally
were weak in consequence of the holiday at London. On Tues­
day, however, prices were stronger, though the market was
still quite dull, owing to the interruption to cable communi­
cation with England by a severe storm there. Since then the
market has been much more active and very strong, and, in
fact, a complete change has come over its tone and tendency,
the buoyancy having been quite noticeable in the past few
days, and the bulls again in the ascendant. The Southern
stocks have again come into some prominence in the market,
and the dealings in a few of them were heavy. Richmond
Terminal has been specially prominent and advanced sharply,
and other strong stocks of this c !a*s are Louisville & Nash­
ville, Chattanooga, the Norfolk & Westerns, East Tennessees,
*&o. In connection with this movement the rumors of an im­
portant large consolidation of Southern roa is has been revived,
though it is principally due to active manipulation.
Next in prominence have been the coal stocks, Reading
having been very active and advanced on the settlement of the
8'rike, Lackawanna actively bought on bull manioulation, and
Jersey Central boomed on the termination of the lease to Read­
ing and the hope of an advantageous traffic agreement with
that company.
m
There were few developments of anv importance during the
week, and little change in the general financial situation; money
is easy, sterling exchange is higher, gold is still arriving from
abroad, and the January disbursements for interest and divi­
dends are at hand; so there is no prospect oi any disturbance to
the money market for some time to come. A favorable feature
to the market, too, was the statements of the Vanderbilt roads,
and they had a simulating effect on those stocks and on the
gmeral market, though largely discounted beforehand.
In regard to other stocks there was nothing new of im­
portance, though the improvement in prices has been very
general and extended to the entire list. The change in the
market was somewhat of a surprise at this time, as a rather dull
and drooping market was generally looked for.
To-day, Friday, there was a firm and steady tone to the gen­
eral marxet and a satisfactory closing for the last day of the
year.

THE

J a n u a r y 1, 1887.]

(THRONTCLE.

13

PRICES OF STOCKS AT N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE FOR WEEK ENDING D E C . 3 1 , AND FOR YEAR 1886.
HIGHEST AND LOWEST PRICES.
STOCKS.
A c tiv e K K . S to c k s .
Atlantic & Pacino................
Canadian P a d tic..........
Canada Sonthern.................
Central o f New J e r s e y .......
Central Pacltlc.......................
Chesapeake A O hio..............
Do
1st pref.
Do
2d p r e f...
Chloago Burlington & (Quincy
Chicago Milwaukee A St. Paul
Do
pref
Chicago A Northwestern.......
Do
pref.
Chicago R ock Island & Pacific
Chicago St. Louis A Pittsburg
Do
pref
Chloago St. Paul Minn. A Otu
Do
pref
Cleveland Col.Cin.A Indiauap
Columbus Hocking Val. A Toi.
Delaware Lackawauna A West
Denver A R io G., assessui’t pci
Do
pref
East Tennessee Ya. A Git. R ’y
Do
1st p ief
Do
2d pref
Evansville A Terre Haute
Green Bay Winona A dt. Paul
Houston A Texas C e n tra l....
Illinois Central........................
Indiana Blooiuiugt’n A West’ n
Lake Erie A West., ass’t paid.
Lake Shore A Mich. Southern
Long Island.............. .............
Louisville A Nashville.......... .
Louis. New All). A C h icag o..
Manhattan E levated,consol.
Memphis A Charleston...........
Miohlgan Central................ .
Mil. Lake Shore A W e s t......
Do
pref
Minneapolis A St. Louis.........
Do
pref
Missouri Kansas A T exas___
Missouri Pacific......................
Mobile A Ohio...........................
Nash v. Chattanooga A8t. Louis
New York Central A Hudson
New York Chic. A St. L ou is..
Do
pref
New York Lake Erie A West’n
_
Do
pifef.
New York A New England_
_
New York Ontario A Western
New York Susq. A Western.
__
Do
pref.
Norfolk A W e ste rn .................
Do
p ref....... .
Northern P acific............ .
Do
p r e f .....___
Ohio A Mississippi..................
Ohio Southern........................ .
Oregon A 1'rans-« 'ontiuental .
Peoria Decatur A Evansville.
Philadelphia A R eading........
Richmond A A lieg., receipts..
Richm ond A Danville. .
Riohin’d A West P’ntTermlnal
Rome Watertown A Ogdeusb’g
St.Louis A San F ra n c is c o .....
Do
p ref........
Do
1st pref.
St. Paul A D uluth.....................
Do
p ref............
St. Paul Minneap. A Manitoba.
Southern Pacific Co.................
Texas A Pacific, trust c e r t ...
Union P acific.............................
Wab. St.L. A P ., P.Com.repts.
Do
pref.
R E ls c e lla n e o u a S t o c k s .
ColoradoCoai A ir o u .. . . . . . . . .
Consolidated Gas C o .............!
Delaware A Hudson C an al...
Oregon Im provement Co.......
Oregon Railway A N av . C o ...
Pacific M ail................................
Philadelphia Co., Nat Gas . . .
Pullman Palace Car Co___ _
_
Western Uui«>n T elegrap h ....
IS xp ress S to c k s .
Adams............ ...................... .
American . . ................. ..........
United States......... ............... .
Wells, Fargo A Co....................
I n a c tiv e s t o c k « .
Atchison Topeka A Santa Fe.
Cedar Falls a M in n e so ta ......
Central Iow a.............................
Cincin. Ind. St. Louis A Chic..
Cincinnati Wash. A Baitim’re.
Do
pref
Dubuque A Sioux C ity............
Joliet Steel C o ...........................
Morris A Essex ......................
New York Lack. A Western .
Quicksilver Mining Co..........
Do
p re f...
Rensselaer A Saratoga . . . . . .
St. Louis Alton A Terre Haute.
Toledo A Ohio C« ntral, p re i...
Virginia Midland....................
Cameron Coax..................
New Central Coal...................
Tennessee Coal .v iron ..
V a r io u s S t o c k « , & c . (Uni
Amer. Cotton Oil Trust.........
Pipe Line Certificat s ............
St. Louis Ajrk.. a T exas.........
Do
1st m ort..
Do
2d ni' rt 1

Saturday.
Deo. 25.

Tuesday,
Dec. 28.

Monday,
Dec. 27.

Wednesday, Thursday,
Dec. 29.
Dec. 30.

Sales
o f the
Week,
Shares.

Range for year 1886.
Lowest.

Highest.

H 7 „ 1 17 ,
6,105
11
11 % 11*2 11%
11% 12
7 May 4 13% Nov. 2 0
68
66*2 67% *67
67*2
61 Feo. 17 73 Oct. 18
62 , 63
63*4 64*8 63% 64%
34% May 4 71*2 Dec. 6
50*4 5258 52% 55
54% 56*2 55% 56%
42*4 Jan. 18 64 Sept. 24
1,665 38 Mar. 24 51 Deo. 2
41
41
42
43
43% 43%
43*4 43*4
575
83 q
9
838
9
8%
9
878 8 %
. *8 %
9
7 May 6 13*4 Jan. 8
615 13 Apr. 30 21 % Jan. 6
*15
16*2 1 5 % 16*4 *15
17 I *16
17
16*4 17*2
340
10
10
*9%
10*4 1078 *10*4 11*4 10
10
8*2 May 11 15% Feb. IS
605 128% May 15 141 Nov. 20
1355g 1305a 135*2 136
135% 135% 136*4 137%
'135*2 136
88
8 7 78 89%
89*4 89% 90*2 90
91*4 90*8 91*8 118,297 82% May 4 99 Sept. 20
450 116 May 3 125% Sept. 20
'117% 118*2 118 118
117*2 118*4 118*4 118% *117% 118*4
1125a 113
11230 113% 113*2 U 4 % 114 114% 114% 115% 21,735 104*4 May 4 120% Nov. 19
305 135 Jan. 18 144 Aug. 9
140 140*2 139% 140*2 139*2 139*2 140 140
140 140
Q
126% 126% 126% 126*4 x l2 5 12
"124*2 125*2 126*8 126*2
Feb. 17
1 b o o 12018 Mar. 24 131 Nov. 22
t
1578 I 5 7
16% 16%
*14*2 17
1578 16%
1,900
914. v,fty 14 19*2
16% 16%
1,675 26*2 Mar. 24 4 .1% Nov. 22
*35
38
38
38%
38% 39*4 39
39%
45
45*2 45*2 4 5 78 46
47%
47*4 47
47% 48% 16,955 35*4 Mar. 24 55 Nov. 1 9
1,950 97 Mar 24 116*2 Nov. 19
111 111*4 111*8 1 1 1 % 111*2 112*4 tl0 9
112*2
*63% 64%
64
64*2 64*2 65*4 64*4 65*2 • 63% 64*2 ' 2,660 43*2 Mar. 24 75*2 Nov. 1 9
34
34%
15,900 26% May 3 45*2 Nov. 2 0
34*2 35*2 35% 37*4 36% 38*8 87% 38*8
131*2 1333g 131% 133% 133*4 136*4 135% 137
136*4 137*4 179,491 115 Jan. 19 144 Deo. 4
*32
3238
1,510 21 *4 May 4 35% Deo. 6
25% 25%
26*2 27%
27% 28*2
6, 52 53% Dec. 21 63% Nov. 30
57% 58
57
57*4 57% 58*4 58% 60
60
61%
14% 14% *14*2 15
1478 15%
15*2 16*4 16% 16% 11,530 11 Oct. 9 18% Deo. 7
2,30« 67 Sept. 17 83% Dec. »
74*2 74*2 74% 74%
75
75*4 77% 79*2 79*4 79*2
28
28*4 *27% 28*2 28% 29*2 29% 30%
31
31% 10,670 24 Dec. 15 35% DeO. 6
905 67*2 .Jan. 29 91% Sept. 15
85
87
87
88
87% 87%
87*2 88
*11*4 12*4 12*a 13%
5,9M)
13*4 13%
13*2 13%
13% 13%
8 Jan. 16 14% DeO. 9
2,600 25 Mar. 23 44*4 Deo. 3 0
*43
43%
39*2 43
42% 44
44*4 44% *43
44*2
424 130 Dec. 16 143*2 Feb. 9
134 134
134 134
133 133
783 12 July 17 28% Jan. •
16
16
15*2 16
15% 15%
16*2 17
16% 17
144 Nov. 15 22*4 Oct. 19
”93% " 94*2 93% 95*8 95
96%
95*8 96%
95% 96% 68,420 76*8 May 3 100% Deo. 4
1,« 90 80 Jan. 20 100 June 21
93
94
94
94
92*2 93
61% 63
62*2 63*4 62% 64*4 63% 65*4 65*2 67*4 49,614 33% May 3 69 Deo. 9
200 32 Mar. 25 71 Dec. S
*58
64
62
63
1,200 120 Jan. 2 175 Oct. 16
156*2 157" 156*8 157
157% 157*4 158 158
158*4 158*4
10,300 29 May 19 69% Nov. 22
53
54%
47
52
55
60
93
93*2 92% 93
3,420 61*2 May 4 98% Deo. 6
95
93*2 94*2 94
93% 93%
70
*66
*66
69
69
*65
67
22 Jan. 28 7 1*2 June 3
100 101
2,602 50*4 Jan. 18 103 Deo. 9
98% 98%
x 97% 98
98
98%
98% 98%
18
18
630 16*4 Mar. 24 23% Nov. 19
*18
19
19
19% *19*2 20 I
18% 18%
41% 41% *41 .........
1,560 40 Dec. 15 62*8 Nov. 2 0
43*4 44%
43*2 43*2
44
44*2
30% 31
31% 33
30% 31*2 31% 32
32% 33*4 19,210 21 May 3 .18*4 Nov. 3 0
105 105*2 105*2 105 7e 106 l u 6 % 106*2 108*4 107*2 108*2
9,874 100% Mar. 24 119 Oot. 14
16
*15
1.800 l l
17*4
15% 16 I 16
17*4 18
May 2 . 21% Nov. 26
80
*78
78
78
80
84%) 84% 87%
87
88*2 11.100 43*4 Apr. 29 105*8 Dec. IO
112 1125s 112% 113% 113*2 114% 113% 114% tll3 * 4 114% 10,818 98% May 4 117% Dec. 3
12 % 13
9,600
13
13*4
13% 14*4 13% 14%
13% 14%
4*a Mar. 24 17% Oct. 18
25*2 26
3 ,9 9 0 11 May 4 31 Oct. 18
25% 25*4 26
27%
27*2 27
28
28*4
32*2 33*4 32% 3 o*8 32% 33%
41,395 22% May 3 38% Dec. 4
33% 31*2
34
34%
72 - 72
1,830 50*2 Jan. 18 81*2 Sept. 24
73
73
72% 74*2 73
73%
50% 51*2 50% 51%
51*2 52*4 51% 54*2
54
55% 45,66
30*2 Mar. 24 68% Oct. 5
*18*2 19
47
19
19
19% 19%
19*4 19*4 20
20
15 May 3 22% Deo. 14
11*4 1 1*2 11*2 11%
7,210
11 % 12
12
1 1 % 12
12 %
6 Feb. 1 12*2 Dec. 9
30% 31
32
32
31
31%
32%
7,898 17*8 Jan. 25 3 .1*2 Dec. 18
32*2 32% 33*4
22
*20
*20
22
2 2 % 23*2
22 %
22
6,4< 0
21% 23
8 Mar. 25 27% Dec. 6
49
48
48% 50%
47*2 49
49*2 51
50% 52% 31.910 25 Jan. 25 59% Deo. 6
2678 2678 27
2,120 22 May 4 31% Deo. 4
27%
27% 27%
27% 27%
27*2 27%
593a 5y%
8,34
60% 61%
59*2 60*4 60*2 61
61*8 61*2
53*2 Mar. 27 66*2 Deo. 2
2 7 78 277a 27*4 28
9,515 19% May 3 35% Nov. 2 2
27% 29
28% 29*4 28% 29%
13 2 Mar. 24 . 2% Nov. 4
31*4 31 % "31*8 31%
16.982 25 Mar. 24 38 Dec. 4
31% 32% ”32% 83% "33*8 "34
29
2d
4,700 16 Mar. 24 34% Nov. 22
29*4 29*2 29*2 3u*a 30*4 31%
31*2 32%
31% 32%
31% 34%
33% 36*4 35% 37*8 36*4 36% 285,345 18*2 Feb. 5 53% Nov. 3 0
500
10
10*2 10*2 10*2
2 May 3 15% Nov. 15
75 Mar. 1 200 Nov. 15
32
33
32
34
33% 39*8 39
43*2 42*4 43% 94,035 27% Sept. 1 77*4 Nov. 23
92
92
607 25 Jan. 18 96 Nov. 29
*91*2
*92*2 95
94
95
31
31
30
30%
2,125 17 May 5 36% Nov. 16
31% 31%
30*2 31%
31% 317f
62
62
3,400 37*2 May 5 72% Nov. 15
64*2 65
62*2 64
*61*2 62
64% 65
112 112
114 114
113% 113% 114*2 114% 114% 114%
688 97 May 5 118*2 Nov. 13
56*4 56*4 58
5»
900 37 Jan. 18 67 Apr. 12
58
58
58*2 5s*2 57*2 58
106*2 107
200 99% Jan. 26 114 June 16
'106*2 107*2 '106*2 107%
106*2 107*2
113 115
114 114
'114 115
550 106% Jan. 19 124% Oct. 14
115 115
115 116
37
37
37
*36
37
1,025 30*4 Mar. 17 41 *2 A pr. 24
37
37*4 37
36*2 36*2
20 % 21 % 20 % 21*2 21*2 22*4 22% 23% 23*4 24% 50,025 17*4 Oct. 1 28% Nov. 3 0
58% 60
59
60
59% 61%
61*8 62
61*2 62*8 46,380 44*4 Mar. 24 68*4 Deo. 2
18% 19
*18% 19
3,130 12 May 14 24% Dec. 6
19
19*4
19*4 19
19
19*2
34% 34*2 *33*4 36
35
35%
35% 36
2,500 23% M ay 20 41% Dec. 6
3‘5
35%

11
66*2
62%
50
41*e

11

673s

*6658

6 2 78
50%
41*2

36
36%
37*4
36
37%
77% 77*4 77*2 77*2 77%
100*2 101*4 100 % 101*2 101*2
39
100% 100% 100*4 101
101*2
48
48*4 48*4 48%
48*2
110 1 1 1
107 109
108*2
138*2 139% 137% 137% 138
6 8 % 69*4 68% 70%
70

102

137
109
62
128

140
109
63
132

94

140
109
62
132

'136
108
62
'128

94%
*13

91 91
*5*2
6*4
*5*2
*9*4 10
*9*4
10 1 10 1
100*2
125
140*2 140*2 138*2
104% 104% 104*2
6
*5*2 8
27*2 27*2 *26*2
170 170
*30
35
*29
*58
60
56%
37

37*2

45*2 46
61
66*4
*22*2
98%
54*2

62%
66%
23%
98%
54%

37
14%
43*4
61*4
66%
23*2
99
54*2

140
109
62
132

*136
109
*61
*129

38
78

38
39%
78*2 80*4

102*2 102 % 103

41%
39*4 40
102 102
49% 50*2
49%
110*2 110*2 110*2
139
138 139
73%
71*2 71
*137
*107
62
*128

140
109
63

39
80
103
43
101
50%
110
140
73

14,945 21 M ay
40
5,116 74% June
80*2
8,823 87*4 Jan.
103%
1,4S l 16 June
45
1,398 93 May
104%
51*2 12,925 45% Dec.
3,460 l “ !i % Oot.
110
177 128 May
140*4
75*4 93,595 60*8 June

*137’ 140
*107 109
*60
6‘it
*128

I 7 Ì3 1 7
13% 14*4 14*2 14*2
93*4 93*2
6*4
6
6
6
6
6%
6*2
10
9
9*2 10*4 10*4 10
10
lo i
100 101
100*2 101
125
128 128
129*2 131 *x l2 4
141
106
7
6*4
6*4
73
7*4
æ
27*2 2 7*2 27*2 28
28*4 28*4
170 170
32
*30
34
56%
58
59
60
60
61
61
40
42
42
43%
40*2 41*2 42*2 42*4 43*4 42 ^434)
14% ......
43*2 44
41*2 44*2 45*8 44*2 45*4

136*2 Dec.
.56 101*2 Jan.
317 51 May
119 Mar.

62%
69%
24
99%
55

63
68%
24 >
2
99*4
*54%

64%
70*2
25
99*2
54*2

63%
68*8
24*4
99%
54*2

64%
69%
25*2
99%
•5
■

62%
69%
25*4
99%
55

41*4 Dec. 4
111 Feb. 8
108*2 Feb. 13
51 Dec. 6
109% Sept. 14
67 Jan. 2
130*2 Nov. 1 7
147% Oct. 14
80*2 Nov. 3 0

21 150
28 111
151 66
26 130

5i>V,
764 60*1; A
-Id
400, 105 NOV. 1.
28l 132*4 Jan. 9
114 100*2 Jan. 20
658
4*2 June 2
600 20 May 17
155 Jan. 21
27 J uue 2
1,029 46*4 Oct. 15
1,200 15 Mar. 25
9 Jan. 13
14,078
9 May 4
200
2,550 1 17*2 Dec. 22

64
16,835
.O2 O
70% I2 7 OO
25%
1,550
99% 201.000
55 ^ 1 88,000

t Lower price ia ex-dividend.

4
3
18
8
4
15
14
3
9

Feb. 12
Aug. IO
Feb. 2 6
June 2 2

. d u g 1 8 1 99% Nov. 19
- Tdia j r l y 2 9
% ' *n. 5

14

These are the prices luu ano asked ; no saie was made at the Board.




Friday,
Dec. 31.

30 M ay
59% Auv.
17 June
93 June
40*2 July

J J-X-rights.

15
24
19
2
15

14%

109 June Ì
9 Dec. 2
29 Ju ly 16
170 Ju ly 29
46 Feb. 3
63*2 Dec. 6
.5 I *2 Nov. 22
43% Dec. 31
‘.0*4 Nov. 19
118 Dec. 8
70% Nov.
92*4 Jan.
27% Dec.
101 Oct.
5 'i% D ec.

30
26
3
28
10

THE

14)

fV ol. X U V .

C H R O N IC L E .

PRICES OF ACTIVE BONDS AT N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE ON FRIDAY, AND R ANGE FOR FULL YEAR 1888.
Closing.
Name o f Bond.

Oec.31.iDcc.24.

Range f o r Year.
Highest.

Glosin i.
Name o f Bond.

Dec.31.1 Dec .24.

Range fo r Year.
Lowest.

Highest.

Minn. & St. L —1st, 7s, 1 9 2 7 .... 132 b .jl3 0 b.
90% Dec.
Atl. & Pac., W. D.—1st, 6s, 1910 90*2
Imp. & Equip.—6s, 19 22......... 92 b
31*4 Oct.
W. D. inc., 6a, 1910............. - • 29
100 b. 100 b,
2d, 7s, 1 8 9 1 .;..........
108% June
Can. South.—1st guar., 5s, 1908 108
99%
98
Mo. K .& T ex.—Con., 6s, 1920.
95 Aug.
2d, 5a, 1 9 13.............................
.
87*2
86*2
Consol., 5s, 1 9 20...................
111 Apr.
Cen. Iow a—le t, 7a, ’99, coup, ofl 89
112
Consol., 7s, 1904-5-6.............. 111
114*2 Apr.
Central o f N. J.—1st, 7a, 18 90.. 108
110 b.
110
Mobile & Ohio—New, 6s, 1927
118 June
Consol. 7a, 1899, assent........... 10841
106 b.
1st, Extension, 6s, 1927.. ..
120 July
Convert. 7a, 1902, assent.........|l0 8 *
2p
May
63*4b. 62 b
1st pref. debentures, 7 s .......
112 Mar.
105 b.|105
May
Adjust. 7s, 1 9 03................
37 b. 32*sb
2d pref. debentures, ' 7s ......
92*s Oct.
83 78
Nov.
Convert, deb. 6s, 1908..
29 b. 25 b
3d pref. debentures, 7 s .......
114*2 J u 'y
& W.B.,eon.7s, 1909,as’nt 109 {*•108
Nov.
4th pref. debentures, 7s ... .
103 Aug.
June
Am . D o c k * Imp., 5s, 1921. .. 97
83*2
___u p Un. ___ _1____________
Mutual p m Tele.—S. f., 6s, 1911 85
Ches. & O.—Pur. m. fund 6s, 98 - - ---- -- 112*2b. 111*4 Dec. 117 Feb.
Nov.
105 b
N.Y.” Central—Extend., 5s. 18931J05 *4b.
103*4 Jan. 114 Feb.
6s, gold, series A , 1908. . . . . . . . 199 a.
N .Y .C .& H .—1st, cp., 7s,1 9 0 3 138*2a.|138*2a. 134 Jan.
60 May •88 Jan.
6s, gold, ser. B, 1908, coup, oft 77
107% Sept.
109
41*2 Feb..
25 May
6s, currency, 1 9 1 8 ................... 29_%p.
N. Y.& H a r —1st, cou., 7s. 1900 131*2b. 130 *sb 131 Deo.
97
b.| 94*2 May 103 Feb.
84 May
Mort. 6s, 1911.............vss'V
N.Y.Chio.&St.L.—1st, 6s, 1921.. 97
96%
88*2 Jan. 104 Dec.
102
Ches. O. & So. W —5-6s. 1911.
65*2b. 54 Jan.
July 121*4 June N .Y .C ity& N o.—G en .,6s, 1 9 1 0 . 67 b. 6 o b. 123 Nov.
Chicago & A lt o n -ls t , 7s, 1893. | l g b N.Y. Elevated—1st. 7s, 1906— 125 b. 125
105 Aug. 110*4 Apr.
Chic. Burl. & Q .-D e b . 5s, 1913.106*«
N. Y. Lack. & W —1st, 6s , 1921- }£ 7 b. 12a b. 125 Jan. 133 June
97*2 Sept. 101*4 July
Denver Dlvl*., 4s, 1922........... 98 b.
Construction, 5s, 1923............ 108*2b.| 109% 106*4 Jan. 113 June
92*2 Nov. 101 *s July
Plain 4s, 1921.......... ■ ■- •••••• - ■ ¿¿ v "
■
106*2b. 103 Mar. 109 June
N. Y. Ont. & W.—1st. 6 s. 19 14.. 107
92 Sept. 100 Dec.
94 Dec.
Chic. & Ind. Coal R., 1st, 5s, 36 99 4a.
93
76*2 Jan.
N.Y.Sus. &W.—1st, 6s, ’ ll.c p .o ft 90
- . 1122*2 Aug. 127*2 Apr.
Ch.Mil.& 8 t.P -lS t,I.& M .7 s , 97 123*20.
71*2 Dec.
71*2b. 52 Jan.
Debenture, 6s, 1897, coup, oft 70
136 June
110 b. 100 Jan. 110 Dee.
Consol. 7s, 1 9 0 5 . l “ i P 132 b. 128% Jan. 121 June
Midland of N. J.—1st, 6s. 1910 110
1st, So. Min. Div.—6 s,1 9 1 0 .... 118 b- I16*8b. 114*8 Jan.
85% Deo.
51 Jan.
81
N. O. Pacific—1st, 6s, 1920. . . . I 83
1st, Chi. & Pae.W .Div—5s, ’ 21 108% 108 %b. 103 Jan. 111 June North. Paciiic—1st, coup.,6s, ’ 21 118% 118*2 111*2 Jan. 120 June
Wis. & Min. D iv.—5s, 1 9 2 1 .... 107 b. 107 b.|l02 Jan. 109*2 June
91*2 Jan. 104 Deo.
Gen’l, 2d, coup., 1 9 3 3 ... ...- - . 103*2 103
105*2 July 109 June
Terminal 5s, 1 9 1 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
^ ‘ 105*4 101*4 Jan. 108*4 June
James R. Val. -1 st, 6s, 19 3 6 ..
139 b.|138% Nov. 143*2 June
Chic. & N. W.—Consol. 7s, 1915 141
102*2 Mar. 109% June
N. Pac. Ter.Co.—1st, 6s, 1933. - 107*sb. 108
140 May
.......... 130 Jan.
121
118 Sept. 125 Feb.
Ohio & Miss.—ConsoL, 7s, 1898. 122 %
121 Mar.
Sinking fund 6s, 1929.............. 1 ‘ 7 b. ...........115 Oct.
113*2 Jan. 120 Nov.
2d, consol., 7s. 1 9 1 1 ... .......... 119 b. 118
Sinking fund 5s, 1929....... . . . . 199 b. 108*2b.|108 Apr. 112 Jan.
91 Feb. 110*4 Nov.
109
Springfield D iv.—7s, 190a . . . . 109 b.
105 Jan. 110*2 July
Sinking fund debent. 5s, 1933 108*2 108
94% Mar.
87*2 Feb.
1st, general, 5s, 1 9 3 2 ..... —
107*sb. 104*2 Jan. 109 Apr
25-year debent. 5s, 1 9 0 9 .... .. 108
102*
8b. 97% Jan. 108 Nov.
Ohio Southern—1st, 6s, 1921. .. 103%
h St.P..M.&
49*2 Nov.
Ch. s t P..M.& O.—Consol. 6s. ’ 30 12-*2b. 121*2 118*2 Jan. 126*2 Sept.
39 b. 34 Jan.
2d, inc., 6s, 19 21........ -- - - - - - 41*2
92 Feb. 100 Apr.
32
91*gb 84 June 99 Mar.
Ch.8t.L.& Pitts.—1st, con. 5s, ’ 32 97 a.
Oregon Impr. Co.—1st, 6s, 1910 93
110 *2 Dec.
100 Mar. 1
C. C. C. & Ind.—Gen. 6s, 1934 .. lll* 2 b .
Ore. R .& N av. Co.—1st, 6s, 1909 110*2 110%b. 110 Oct. 114*4 June
98 1 90 May 101*2 Nov.
Col. Coal & I r o n - l s t , 6s, 1900.. 99
Consol., 5s, 1 9 2 5 ... .. -- - - - - - • 105% 104 b. 102 Jan. 108*2 Mar.
94 Feb.
81 Dec.
84
Col. H. Val. & Tol.—Con. 5s, ’31 8658
92*2 May 104*4 Oot.
99*8
Oregon & Transoon.—6s, 1922.. 101
97*4 Nov.
89 b. 92 i
88*2 Dec.
103 Jan. 119 June
Gen. gold. 6s, 1904
P eo.D ec. & E van9.—1st,.6s, ’ ¿0
119*2 114*4 Jan. 124 Oct.
82*2 Nov.
79 *2a. 43 Jan.
Denver & Rio Or.—1st, 7s, 1900 119
*80*"
Income, 6s, 1920.........
87*4 Jan. 115 Nov.
Consol. 7s, 1910, Trust r e o ....
100*8 Jan. 111*4 June
Evansv. Div— 1st, 6s, 1 9 2 0 ...
81% Nov.
79%
75*2 Dec.
82% Nov.
44 Jan.
1st con. 4s, 1936 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80*2
Incom e, 6s, 1920— .............
85% July
80 July
65 May
Den. & R. Gr. W .- 1st, 6s, 1911 78 b 76 b 72*2 Jan.
Rich & All.—1st, 7s, 1920. tr. rec 70*8b, 71
83*s July
May
■■■•• - 75 b 73 b 72 May
Assented................. ..
114*2b. 116 a. 111% Jan. 119*2 June
Richm . & Dan.—Cons., 6s, 1915
89 Mar.
80 b. 84 a 72
114 July
86 Jan
Den. So. Pa. & P ac.—1st, 7s, ’05
Debenture, 6s, 1927 ................ 107 b.
55 Feb. 100 Nov.
13*4 Nov.
Det. Mac. & Mar.—1st. 6s, 1921 I ----:--106*2 Oot.
Debenture, assented................
56 Deo.
50*2
20 Feb.
Land grant 3*2S, 1911.............. »2*2
Roch. & Pitts.—1st, 6s, 1 9 2 1 ... 115 b. 115 b. 113*2 Jan. 117 June
Aug. 43*2 Nov.
12
107*2b. 107 *sb. 105 June 112 Mar.
In com e7s, 1921. -------Consol., 6 s. 1922.. . . . . . . . . . . . .
94*8 Sept, I 99% Nov.
97*2
E. Ten.V. & G. R y .- C o n ..5 s ,’ 56 99
Rome W. & O g d —1st, 7s, 1891. ...........108 b. 108*2 Dee. 117 Mar.
Eliz. Lex. & B. Sandy—6s. 1902 107 a 107*2a. 99 Jan. 110 Aug.
87% Jan. 103 Sept.
1
102
Consol., extend., 5s, 1922....... 103
129 Jan. 139*2 July
E rie—1st. consol, gold, 7s, 1 9 20[l?3 b
43 Jan 102 Deo.
98*2b
Income, 7s. 1932.............
120
104 Jan. 110% Apr.
Long Dock, 7s, 1893 .......... • H3*2b. 112 b. 112*2 Dec. 124 Apr,
107*2 107
St Jo. A G d .Isl.—1st, 6 s, 1925 .
July
117 a, ............ 114*2 Apr.
77 Deo.
55*4 Jan.
73
Con. 6s, 1 9 35..........................1
76
2d, inoome, 5s. 1925 ............
76% Jan. 104*4 Nov
98%
N.Y.L.E.&W —2d con. 6s, e x o . 9978
115 Oct. 119% May
St. L. A lt.A T .H - 1 s t , 7s, 1894. 1Í 6 b.1115
96*4 Ma"
77*4 Feb.
114 Aug.
Funded coupon, 5s, 1969. ..
110*2 Oct.
2d, M., pref., 7s, 1 8 9 4 ,............ lll* s b . I l l
Ft. W. & D env. C. -1 s t, 6s, 19211 '90% * | 87*flb. 81 Jan. 95*2 Nov.
103*2 Jan. 108 Mar.
2d., M., inc., 7s, 1894............... 107 b . ----106*4 Deo. 116 June
Gal.Har.A S an.A nt.—1st, 6 s,’ 10
33 Sept. 50 Feb.
Dividend bds, 6s, 1 8 9 4 ............ 39*aa.
1 )8 Jan. 119*4 Mar
112 *gb 110 Aug. 118 Jan.
2d M., 7s, 1905 ....... •
•
St. L. & Ir. Mr.—1st, 7s, 1 8 9 2 ... 113*2
92 Jan. 103 Oot.
West. D ivision—1st, 5s, 1931.
111 Aug. 119 Mar.
2d mort., 7s, 1897.............................. —
i 80 Jan. 94 Nov
2d, 6s, 1 9 3 1 ................... --•• 94 b.l
Gen. R y. & land gr., 5s, 1931. 100 a, 97 *aa 90 Apr. 100 July
90 b.| 90 b. I 80 Jan. 107*2 July
Gr’n B .W .& S t.P .— 1st, 6s, 1911.
St L. & San F r.- 6 s., 01. A ,1906 113 b 113 b. 108 Jan. 118 July
42% Mar
40%
24*2 Feb.
38%
105% Jan. 118 July
2d incom e 8s, 1911 —
6s, Class B, 1 9 06........................ 113
Gulf Col.& Ssn.’Fe—lst,7 s, 1909 124 b. 124*4 | L6 % Jan 128*2 June
1
«a rilaaaC. 1906........................ | 2*
11 2b.
6s, C la s s 0 .1 9 0 6 ...,................ [1 !;*%*>. 112 b. 105*2 Jafi* 117 June
1
101%
6 % T„n
101% lim 3 * i 8a«a. Jan. 106*4 Sept.
Gold, 6s, 1923............. .
112*
2b. 99*4 Jan. 114 Nov.
Gen’lm ort., 6s, 1 9 3 1 ...............113
............ |l08% Deo. 112 July
Henderson Br.Co.—1st, 6s, 1931
So. Pac., M o —1st, 6s, 1 8 8 3 ... 105 b. 104 b. 103 Jan. 106 June
102 Jan. 114*2 Aug.
H .& Tex.C .—lstM . L. 7s, cou. oft 113% 11
St. Paul M. & M.—1st, 7s, 1909.
----- H3*2b. 112 July 116 Mar.
109
97 Apr. 109 Dec.
106
Feb.
1st, W est. D., 7s, 1891. cou. oft. j *
2d, 6s, 1909................................ ^ r ^ - 118*2 116*2 Dec. 122*2 June
2b.
100 Feb. 105 July
1st,W aco & N. 7s, 1903, cou. oft 108 *
l s t cous , fcs, 1 9 3 3 ..........
122 b. 121 %b. 115 Jan. 125
95*2 Deo.
91 b.| 76 May
100
2d, consol. M. L. 8s, 1912....... 95*2
70 Feb. 100 Deo.
Shenandoah V a l .- 1st, 7s, 1909 97
73*2 Dec.
50 May
49*2 Nov.
29 July
Gen. m ort. 6 s, 1921.................. 72*s
Gen’l mort., 6s, 1921............... 40 b. 43
116*4b. 116 July 120*2 Apr.
Ind.Bl. & W .—1st, pref.,7s, 1900
2b. 102 Oct. 113 Mar.
So. Carolina—1st. 6s, 1620......... 106*2b. 105 *
89*2 July 104*8 May
90 Feb.
81 Dec.
1st, 5-6s, 1 9 0 9 . . . . . . . . .......... . . . 92 1 91
2d. 6s, 1931..................
---- —
75 b. 66*2 July 90 Mar.
78
22*2 June 33 Nov.
2d, 5 -6s, 19 09...........................
Inc., 6s. 1 9 3 1 . . . . . . . . . . — •
29
90 b. 89 July 105*4 Mar.
110 %b 105% Jan. 114 Sept.
Eastern D ivision—6s, 1 9 2 1 ... 91
So. Pac., C a l—1st, 6s, 1905-12.. 110*2b.
28*2b. 21% July 41% Mar.
100*4 Jan. 112 Dec.
Incom e, 6 s, 1921...................... 31
So. Pac., Ari.—1st, os, 1809-10.. 112 b.
41 Oct.
37 b. 20 Feb.
Ind. D.& S p r —Inc. 1906, tr. reo.. 37*2
100 Jan. 109*8 Deo.
So. Pac.. N. M.—1st, 6s, 1911. .. 108*4b.
116*2b.|114 Jan. 119 Oct.
117
63% Nov.
Int. & Gt. Nor.—1st, 6s, g o ld ,’ 19
34 May
58*2
T ex. & Pac.—Inc. & Id gr, 7s. ’15 61*2
91 b. 84 Mar. 96 Feb.
78 Nov.
72*4b. 45% Jan.
Coupon, 6s, 1 9 09...................... 93
Rio Grande D iv.—6s, 1930 .. 73%
71 Mar.
59*2 Feb.
67
71 Nov.
Kent. Centr.—Stamped 4s, 1911 67
G en . m ort. & term., 6Sj 1 9 0 5 .. 67 b. 65 b 34*2 May
101
86*2 Jau. 105*2 June Tox. & N. O.—Sab. Div., 6s,1912 100 b. 104 a. 100*2 Jan. 107*4 July
K n oxv. & 0 .—1st, 6s, gold, 1925 99
92 Jan. 110 Dec.
107
Lake Erie & W.—1st, 6s, 1919 .. 110
Tol. A. A. & Gr.Tr.—1st, 6s, 1921 105 b. 100 b 101 May 107 Aug.
20 Aug. 40 Nov.
30
38
Incom e, 7 8 .1 8 9 9 ............... .
Tol. Peor. & West—1st, 7s, ’17 ,1104*8b. 103 %b 91 May 106 Oct.
108
91 Jan. 111 Dec.
L a fa y.B l. & M.—1st. 6s, 1919 .. 11
T ol & Ohio Cent,- 1 s t , 5s, 1935 101*2a. 100 b 92*4 Jan. 102% Deo.
70 Deo.
65
31 Jan.
Incom e, 7s, 1899...................... 50
Union P a cific-1 st, 6s, 1896-9.. 11 7*a 116% 114 Jan. 119% June
119 Oot. 130 Mar.
L ong Island—1st, 7s, 1898 — ..
102 b 101*2 Nov. 106*4 Feb.
102
Land grant, 7s, 1 8 9 7 -9 ....
115
108 Jan. 115*4 Deo.
1st, consol., 5s, 1931..............
118 b 116 Sept. 123 % Feb.
118
Sinking fund, 8s, 1893---117 May 125 Feb.
Lou. & Nash.—Consol., 7s, 1898 119*8 119
110*2 Oct. 114% Jan.
Kan. Pacific—1st, 6s, 1395
99 May 107% Dec.
N. O. & M obile—1st, 6s, 1930. 107 b.
Ï09 b. 110 Sept. 116 Apr.
109
1st, 6s, 1896.....................
97 Dec.
86 July
114 *
4b. H 3 Jan. 118 Oot,
2d, 6s, 19 30............................. 97 a.
D enver D iv.—6s. 1899
112 June 116*2 Apr.
E . H. & N.—1st, 6s, 1919......... 12%b.
i06*8b. 99% Jan. 109% Oot.
1st consol, 6s, 1919 . ......... 107
100*4 Jan. 109% Nov.
97% Feb. 109 July
General, 6 s, 1 9 30...................... 107 b.
Oregon Sh. Line 1st, 6s. ’ 22. 106% 106
Trust Bonds, 6s, 1922.............. 104*4 104 b. 9s Jan. 107 Nov.
95 b. 53% Jan. 100 Nov.
99
Virginia Mid.—Inc., 6s, 1927...
67 Deo.
10-40, 6s, 1924......................... 101 a. 96 b. 84 *2 M ay 100 Nov.
69 b. 44 Jau.
Wao. St.L & P ac. G e n .,6 s ,’ 20
4a I l l a. 100*2 Jan. 120 June
97 Dec.
85 Jan.
Lou. N. A. & Ch.—1st, 6s, 1910. 110*
95
Chicago Divison—5s, 1910 . . . 93
90*2a, 14*2 Oct. 100 June
92 Dec.
Consol., gold, 6s, 1916— ....
92*eb, 92 b. 78 Jan.
Detroit Division—6s. 19 ¿1 —
91 Mar.
Mem. & Cli’lston—6s, gold, 1924 Í05**Í> 105 a, 102 May 106*4 Nov.
85*4b. 70 May
Wabash—Mortgage, 7 s, 19 09.. 85*4
34 June 57 Deo.
52
M exican C en .-N ew ass.,7s.l91 1
Tol. & Wab.—1st, ext.. 7s, ’90 111 D I l l b. 110 June 115*2 Ja ».
M ich. Central—1st, con., 7s. ’02 127 %b 127*ib. 126% Nov. 133 Apr.
100 June I l l Deo.
1st, St. L .D iv.. 7s, 1889....... 110 b. 103 b.
109 a 107 Jan. 111*2 Mar.
97 May 105*4 Feb.
1st, consol., 5 8 ,1 9 0 2 ..............
2d, extended, 7s, 1 8 9 3 . . . . . . 99 b. 101
114*2b. 108 Jan. 117 Oct.
M iss’ri P a c .- 1st, cons., 6s,1920 114
92 b. 84*2 June 100 Feb.
Con., conv., 7s, i9 0 7 ............ 90%
116% Jan. 127*2 Aug.
3 d , 7s, 1 9 0 6 ...................- ........... 121
Great West.—1st, 7s, 1 8 8 8 .... 110*2 I l l b, 109*2 May 114 Jan.
104 b 103*4 Aug. 107 Jan.
P a c . o f Mo.—1st, 6s, 1888----- 104
99 b. 100 b 96 May 106 Feb.
2d, 7s. 1893.................... ...
109 Oct. 113 May
108% Jan. 116 Mar.
2d mort., 7s, 1891................ 110
St.L.K.C. & N.—R e& r.,7s,’95. 110 a.
112*2 Jan. Í21*s June
116
t00% Aug. ¡106 Nov.
Mil. Lk.Sh. & W.—1st, 6s, 1921 118
104%
Guar.. 4s . . . i ......... 105
106% Jan. 120*2 May West Shore—
114
Mi chigan D iv.—1st, 6s, 1924. —
IN A C T IV E BO N D S.
4a.r 99% Nov.
Ill.C eu .— (O ou.)—GTd,3*28,1951.1100 %a 10 0*
,106 Dee. 111 Mar.
Burl- C. Rap. < N. 1st, 5s, 1906.|106*ab. 106
fe
C. St L .& N .O .—Gold,58,1951 115*2 115 b .!ll2 Jan
98 Aus 110 Mar.
Consol. & col. tr., 5s. 1934 — '
130 b. 127 Jan.
118% June Lake S h .- Con.coup., l s, 7s,1900 10rt’ « 123%a 119% Jan.
117 - 112*2 Jan.
Central Pacific—gold 6s. 1895-8 117
Con. coup., 2d, 7s, 1903...........
San Joaquin Br. 6s, 1900......... 112 b. 112 b. 107% Jan 112 Jan.
Metro. Elevated.—1st, 6s, 1908.
Land grant 6s. 1890................. 102*sa. 101 b. 102*s Oct. 107*8 Mar.
„2 d , 6s. 1 8 9 9 ..............................
113 b. 115 Jan. L22 Mar.
Ohio. & E. 111.— 1st, s. f. 6s, 1907
Mil. & N or.—1st, M. L., 6s, 1910
Consol. 6s, 1934......................... 115 a. 116 a. 110 Jau. 119 Mar.
1st, on exten., 6s, 1913............
133 b. 128*4 Jan. 140 Oct.
Chi. R. I. & Pac.—6 s, coup. 1917.
Morgan’s L. & T.— 1st, 6s, 1920.
113 May
Exten. & col. 5s, i 9 3 4 .............. 112 a. 110 b. 109 Jan.
1st, 7s, 1 9 18...............................
jllO
Dee. 115*2 May
108 2b. 110
Del. & Hud. Can.—1st, 7s, 1891
Nash. Ch. & St. L.—1st, 7s, 1913
¡115*2 Oct, 121 Feb.
119
Coupon 7s. 1894........................
& W.—Gen’l,
19 3 1 ..
i
i l l l i c Jan. 120*8 June Norfolk iver—1st, 6s, 6s,32......|114*2h
118 b.
Evans. &T. H.—1st cons. 6 s, ’ 21
1
¡103 .lau. 112*4 Nov. l New R extension, 6s, 9 9 3 4 ...,|100 b
M ount Vernon—1st. 6 s, 1923 112 a.
im p. &
1
109 b. |iÖ9 b 106*2 Sept. 110 June
11 Central—1st, gold. 4s, 1951
No te —I he letter




b” indicates price bid, and “ a” price a sk ed ; all other prices and the range are from actual sales.

J an u a r y 1 1887. J

THE

C H R O N IC L E

New York City Banks.—The following statement shows the
condition of the Associated Banks of N ew York City for the
week ending December 24, 1886:

R oads ,

15
Latest Earnings Reported.

Week or Mo

1886.

1885.

Jan. 1 to Latest Date.
1886.

1885.

$
Col. & Cin. Mid. 2d wk Deo
6,623
6,199
303,787
200,438
CoL Hock.V.&T 2d w k Deo
52,300 2,345,970 2,226,788
65,600
Danbury & Nor. November
18,543
218,724
17,313
208,177
Denv. & R io Gr. 3d wk Deo 150,000 113,845 6,565,896 5,956,412
D en v.& R . G.W. November.
92,850
98,564
952,800
946,851
9
S
9
»
329,632
9,615
10,297
375,841
New Y o r k . . . . . . . . . 10,610.000 2.540.000
9.940.000
360.000
46,001 Dee. Mo. * Ft.D 3d wk D ec
Det.B.CityAAlp, O ctob er..
28,002
188,673
Manhattan O o . . . .
9.900.000
247.000
9.460.000 2.252.000
Det.Lans’gA N o 3d w k Deo
20,093
Merchants’ ...........
21,086 1,189,109 1,191,045
6.369.300
686,600
6.059.000 1.851.800
45,000
E.Tenn.Va.&Ga< 3d w k Deo
Mechanics’ . . . . . . .
6.916.000
309.000
97,258
97,064 4,129,391 3,991,274
8.065.000 1.733.000
America . . . . . . . . . . 10.497,400 1.453.600
8.711.900
376.200
Evans.&Jnd’plis 3d wk Deo
4,054
P hen ix.................
528.000
103.000 2.486.000
2.871.000
267,000 Evansv. & T. H 3d w k Dec
14,610
16,072
735,018
712,891
City .......................
211.000 10,663,100
8.473.800 4.546.700
Flint * P. Marq 3d wk D eo
40,586
39,444 2,086,114 1,886,816
148.000 2.049.500
Tradesmen’s . . . . . .
400.300
90,000 F la.R y.& Nav. Co 2 wits Dec
2.531.800
54,194
55,701
F u lton . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.738.500
114.300
671.200
1.280.500
Ft.W.&Den.City 2d wk Deo
12,253
8,464
425,060
449,060
Chemical.............. 19.037.000 8.588.300
597.800 23,093,800
651,964
69,005
88,267
522,043
Merchants’ Exch.
3.593.000
126.300
868.200
3.133.400
105,500 Georgia Pacific.. O ctob er.
Gr. Rap. & In d .. 3d wk D ec
41,351
31,279 2,016,162 1,898,723
490.900
Gallatin National..
4.699.500
6.099.300
608.600
573.300
Batchers’ & Drov..
83.600
456.200
1.908.900
1.825.200
229,600 Grand T ru n k . . . Wk Deo. 18 360,831 315,819 16,440,923 14,521,058
Gulf Col. A S .F e. November,
205.000
Mechanics’ A Tr..
1.531.000
292,631 243,064 2,053,339 1,648,697
1.746.000
130.000
Greenwich............
132.100
1.067.500
137.300
2,600 Hous. &Tex. Cent 2d wk Dec 113,138
1.049.700
90,087 2,905,450 2,580,901
118.900
537,200 □l.Cent. (HI. ASo) 3d wk Dec 302,900 322,775 10,494,648 10,712,877
Leather Mannf’rs.
562.400
2.449.600
3.188.400
38.600
Seventh W ard....
288.100
45,000
1.219.600
1.167.800
Cedar F. AMin. 3d wk Dec
3,100
3,401
166,037
134,472
209.600 4.042.100
State o f N. Y .......
3.392.700 1.308.300
Dub.&Sioux C. 3d wk Deo
22,200
925,210
23,681
888,319
733.000 13.169.000
Americ’n Exoh’ge. 16.047.000 2.516.000
Ia. Falls &S.C. 3d w k Deo
17,960
15,400
622,275
615,803
799.600 12.392.300
988.200
Commerce. . . . . . .. 18,589,800 2.396.600
Tot. Iow a lines 3d wk Deo
45,042 1,713,521 1,638,594
40,700
237.500 4.870.800
B roadw ay............
45.000
5.092.300 1,138,900
Total all lines. 3d wk Deo 343,600 367,817 12,208,170 12,351,472
361.400
6.578.000
45.000
M ercan tile....___
6.254.900 1.232.100
Ind. B loom .* W. 3 d w k Dec
Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . .
51,731
321.700
62,638 2,489,276 2,325,295
133.600 2.768.000
2.638.300
260.700 6.750.500
R epublic. . . . . . . . . .
817.200 Ind. Deo. & Spr. November.
6.937.300 1.341.200
39,549
40,107
388,300
337,245
282.500
4.688.100
Chatham. . . . . . . . .
873.700
4.444.500
45,010 Jack.Tam.&K.W O ctob er. ..
7,352
29.213
206,546
85,868
116.800 2.533.400
Peoples’.......... ..
2,004,100
222.300
K. C.Ft. 8 . & Gulf. 2d wk Dec
41,162 2,384,925 2,433,244
48,664
191.600 3.449.000
North America . . .
296.800
3.094.400
Kan. C. Sp. & M. 2d w k Dec
27,493 1,464,234 1,436,776
37,698
420.800 10.812.300
180,000 Kan. O.C1. A Bp. 2d wk Deo
H a n o v e r ..... . . . . .
9.409.700 2.950.800
4,061
226,558
2.916.000
214.500
188,600 Keokuk & West. O ctober. . .
571.700
I r v in g .. . . . . . . . . . . .
2.921.000
26,253
29,875
137.500 2.928.500
707.200
45,000 Lake E. & West.
2.527.700
Citizens1. . . . . . . . . .
3d w k Dec
24,711
26,618 1,239,833 1,146,358
309.500
320.300
2.996.500
Nassau.................
2.520.900
19,105
196,391
15,657
161,429
98,700
556.000
2.565.300
439,000 Lehigh&Hudson November.
M arket. . . . . . . . . . . .
3.105.400
L. Rk.& Ft.Smith O ctob er...
82,175
91,138
65.000
246.800
1.767.100
522,187
1.993.800
453,361
St. N icholas........
248.000 3.632.000
843.000
434,7« 0 L.Rk.M.R. A Tex O c to b e r...
3.203.000
Shoe & Leather..
44,792
43,558
286,738
256,406
719.100
214.000 4.887.600
Com E xchange...
5.912.800
Long Island....... 3d w k D ec
45,364 2,947,275 2,798,925
48,525
439.200
"49,500 L ou is.* Mo. Riv September
4.698.800
730.700
6.171.900
Continental...........
401,224
50,939
50,960
409,831
294.000
349.800 2.160.100
Oriental........ .......
2.033.200
Louis.Ev.&St.L, 1st wk Deo
15,600
16,200
801,486
667,889
868.000 21.499.500
982,400 Louis v.& Nasliv. 3d wk Deo 302,930 273,710 13,617,904
Importers’* 1 rad. 18,684,100 5.254.200
13,327,050
583.200 22,127,600
45.000 Lou.N.Al.AChic.
P a rk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,422,500 4.796.100
3d w k Deo
32,103 1,830,750 1,635,732
32,508
159.000
2.054.000
154.000
North River-____
1.981.000
210.000
224.000 Louisv.N.O. &T. November. 218,449 212,046 1,508,354 1,146,592
East R iv e r ........
1.059.600
136.300
1.210.300
633,994
93,199
62,789
662,619
578.400 18,869,400
360.000 Lykens Valley. O ctob er...
Fourth National.. 18,008,600 4.407.600
986.000
45.000 Maine Central.. O c to b e r... 302,857 272,012 2,583,978 2,412,448
8.554.000
8.388.000 1.015.000
Central National..
212.000
44.000 Manhattan E l ... November. 667,482 590,893
664.000
3.571.000
3.089.000
Second National..
45.000 Mar. & No. G a.. O ctob er. . .
308.100 5.855.700
5.367.300 1.269.600
Ninth National...
13,900
495.500 18.929.500
269,500 Mar.Hough.A O. 3d w k Dec
First National___ 19.768.000 3,587.400
6,020
"6 ,6 7 3
972,083
814,009
269.200 5,683,200
5.347.700 1.303.300
Third N ational. ..
Memphis &Chas. 2d w k Dec
44,775
44,767 1,355,173 1,271,467
200,700 ‘ Mexican Cent’l. 3d wk D ec
157.700
1.314.300
112.400
1.075.700
N. Y . Nat. E xch ..
72,641 3,696,688 3,436,428
105,420
225.000
382.000 2.608.800
2.404.600
389.700
Bowery*______ . ..
180.000 *Mex.N.,all lines November. 148,928 117,354 1,579,008 1,381,886
2.296.900
169.900 2,771.800
374.100
N. Y . County......
Mich. & O h io... November.
20,941
203.732
17,275
168,441
117.800 2.650.600
2.733.900
497,900
German-Americ’n.
37,360
26,385 2,261,408 1,333,999
46,000 Mil.L.Sh. A West. 3d wk Deo
154.900 4.757.900
3.737.500 1.032.700
Chase National...
Milwaukee * No 3d wk Dec
3.144.000
139.100 3.245.500
13.476
11,618
755.800
631,318
Fifth Avenue......
546,149
870.000
Minn’ap. A St.L. O ctob er..
2.398.000
3.001.600
260.000
German Exch’nge.
150,911 172,410 1,238,582 1,412,709
341.000 2.602.000
138.300
2.338.700
Germania.............
Minn.&No. West. 3d wk Dec
6,204
15.213
488.733
45.000 Miss. & Tenn. .. 2 wks Dec
4.520.000
36.000
4.607.300 1.0
’ 3,000
United States......
22,113
44,700 a Mobile & Ohio. November. 266,861 260, 132 1,779,800 1,900,422
2.503.500
661.800
130.000 3.001.300
L incoln. . . . . . . . . . . .
45.000
1.556.800
1,767,100
161.200
294.400
G arfield...............
135,000 Nash. Ch. & St.L. November. 213,769 181, 488 2,170,825 1,941,200
1.421.400
232,500
1.501.300
121.700
Fifth National_
_
1TN.Y.C.&H.R... November. ,885,832 ,320, 931 29,705,952 22,185,689
3.493.600 1.008.000
275.400 4.450.700
B’k of the Metrop..
N. Y. C it y * No. Wk.Dec.25
8 ,420
10,246
537,855
446,502
210.600
1.840.600
2.103.000
310.300
"West Side............
eN .Y.L.Erie*W . November. ,668,629 ,570, 693 17,129.830 14,539,488
45,000
2,000,300
346.000
131,0(10 1.924.300
Seaboard...............
N. Y . Pa. A O. November. 558,651 502, 696 5,716,952 4,627,468
192,600
180,000
1.901.400
1.789.600
244.000
Sixth National___
N.Y. A N ew E ng. November. 347,703 308, 210 3,636,812 3,1S6,914
T o ta l............. 343,484,100 77,303,000 17,847,300 351,672,400 7,903,000 6N.Y. Ont. A W. 3d wk Deo
22 , 331 1,298,361 1,221,619
21,410
N.Y.Susq.AWest November. 107,735
97, 344 1,016,895 1,005,950
* No reports ; same as last week.
Norfolk A West. 3d wk Dec
64,453
60, 533 3,173,988 2,700,650
The following are totals for several weeks past:
Northem Cent’l . November. 493,150 483, 594 5,016,808 4,983,223
Loan».
Specie. L. Tenders. Deposit». Circulation Agg. Clear’gs Northern Pacific 3<1 wk Dec 186,524 174, 575 12,060,097 11,161,754
1886.
Ohio A M iss....... 1st w k D ec
89, 493 3,645,176 3,464,604
83,348
9
9
Ohio Southern.. November.
9
9
$
9
59,982
425,951
475,919
48, ,875
Dec.11 352,413,500 76,082,800 18,091,200 360,174,000 7.931.000 860,751,302 Oregon Imp. Co. O ctob er. . .
303,983 309, ,358 2,448,724 2,418,459
“ 18 348,693,700 74.386.000 18,062,600 353,761,600 7,914,100 993.536,166 Oreg.R. A N . Co. 1st wk Deo
93,674 118, 005 5,023,955 4,728,293
« 24 843,484,100 77.303.000 17,847,300 351,672,400 7.903.000 604,768,528 Oreg. Short Line O c to b e r... 162,176 176, ,833 1,618,286 1,499,925
Pennsylvania... November „347,218 ,971, ,539 45,950,852 41,568,345
The Boston and Philadelphia banks will be found on p. 10,
Peoria Deo. AEv. 3d w k Dec
14, ,578
782,701
714,842
16,308
Phila. A E r ie .... November. 338,027 309, ,407 3,407,310 3,012,825
RAILROAD EARNINGS.
Phila. A Reading O ctober. . . :,011,482 ,878, 370 24,933,353 23,971,564
D o C. A Iron O ctober. . . ,735,217 ,837, ,566 12,613,692 13,009,820
The latest railroad earnings and the totals from Jan. 1 to
Riohm’d ADanv. November. 412,514 365, 998 3,720,040 3,623,498
latest date are given below.
Va.Midl’d Div. November. 136,243 132, 291 1,428,922 1,432,472
So. Car. D iv.. November.
712,031
77, 735
85,603
734,557
Latest Earning» Reported.
Jan. 1 to Latest Date.
C ol.A G r.D iv.. November.
545,461
78, ,023
620,919
63,318
ROADS.
West.No.C.Div November.
43, ,059
43,903
488,621
Week or Mo
437,076
1886.
1885.
1886.
1885.
Wash. O. A W .. November.
10,305
9,,318
tRoine W.A Ogd. O ctob er. . . 299,343 181, ,896 2,206,593 1,419,028
$
$
23, ,125 1,142,147 1,060,657
34,117
Atch. T. & S. F . . O cto b e r... ,687,348 1,676,075 12 ,740,023 12,714,611 St. Jo. A Gd. Isl. 3d w k Dec
28, ,370 1,231,165 1,235,224
24,555
‘ Sonora.......... September
26,172
204,239
24,708
222,302 St.L. Alton AT.H. 3d w k Deo
Branches......... 3d w k Dec
743,152
22,650
776,759
17, ,329
Balt. A Potom ac November. 117,393 115,831
,226,236 1,215,247
38, ,273 1,746,718 1,240,157
55,115
B uff.N .Y .* Phil. 3 d w k Dec
48,600
42,400
,500,380 2,351,242 St. L. Ark.ATex. 3d w k Dec
St.L. ASan. Fran. 3d wk Dec 102,774
80, ,181 4,699,846 4,270,904
Buff. Roch. &Pitt 3d w k Dec
30,256
27,855
,220,031 1,226,876
26, 533 1,485,475 1,341,411
27,193
Bur.Ced.R.ANo. 4th wkNov
,626,530 2,826,605 St. Paul A Duluth 3d w k Dec
84,560
84,967
Bt.P.Min.AMan. November. 805,662 859, ,607 6,706,854 6,834,288
Cairo Y. & Chic. 3d wk Dec
15,614
634,855
13,010
Scioto V a lle y ... O ctob er. . .
65,647
560,662
51, 655
Cal. S outhern... 2d wk Deo
22,462
691,800
71,053
686,340
57, ,765
636,779
tpamden A Atl November.
31,810
569,693
30,513
533,128 Shenandoah Yai November.
Canadian Pacific 3d wk Dec 198.000 161,000
,791,416 8,124,283 South Carolina.. November. 113,609 113, ,119 1,022,638 1,029,331
So.Pac.Comp’y —
November.
Cp. F ’r A Y ad. Y al
21,407
16,769
205,883
188,103
Gal.Har.AS.A. O c to b e r... 220,236 319,806 2,140,818 2,522,432
Catawissa.......... September
132.000 119,000
G .W .T ex.A P .. O ctob er. . .
5,413
3,283
37,805
Central Io w a ... 3d wk Dec
33,255
298,330 1,276.892
35.278
Louis’a West. O ctob er. . .
59,615
484,433
52,011
521,268
Central Pacific. September ,555,411 1,482,205
,798,251 10,817,344
Morgan’s LAT O c to b e r... 395,062 427,958 3,259,585 3,218,029
O ctob er...
Chesap. & Ohio.
372,031 307,436
,397,316 2,762,359
N. Y .T . A M ex. O ctober. . .
Elia. Lex.&B.8. O ctob er...
17,729
26,725
128,989
90,674
70,932
766,825
580,441
Tex. A N. Orl. O cto b e r...
800)242
86,785
91,665
181,437 163,107
801,097
Ches. O. & 8. W. O cto b e r...
,367,467 1,272,023
Tot. At.Sys tern O c to b e r... 775,106 931,184 6,889,535 7,223,274
C hicago A Alton 3d wk Dec 194,746 188,431
860,238 7,834,309
Tot. Pac. S y s.. O ctob er..
,116,230 ,113,219 19,242,555 17.915,610
Chic. A Atlantic 3 d w k Dec
41,904
596,870 L 304,577
29,251
Total o f all___ O cto b e r... ,891,335 ,044,402 26,132,088 25,138,881
Chic. Burl. & Q. O cto b e r... 1,776,774 2,858,258
103,637 21,908,399
50.300
754,929
44,738
627,987
44,712
Chio. A East. HI. 3d w k Deo
45,035
727,587 1,639,160 Staten Isl’d R .T r November.
118,560 119,326
511,651 1,175,112
Chic. M il.&St.P. 3d wk Dec 489.000 515,308
977,876 23,678,839 Summit Branch. O ctober...
Chic. & Northw. 3 d w k Dec 475.500 477,800
685,484 23,699,661 Texas A Pacific. November. 721,092 712,462 5,290,133 4,973,247
26,494
41.477
Ch.Bt.P.Min.AO. 3d w k Dec 132.500 106,300
984,835 5,684,199 Pol. A. A . A N . M. November.
20.301
15,591
Ohio. & W. Mich. 3d wk Dec
21,661
804,858
23,677
360,101 1,262,047 Tol. A Ohio Cent. 3d wk Deo
Union P a cific... O ctober... 1,755,154 2 ,714,608 21,908,823 20,989,351
Cin. A Eastern September
14,704
19,848
Valley o f O hio.. November.
51,880!
46,791
Cin. Ham. * D . 3d w k Dec
62,906
561,576
57,812
Cin.Ind.St.L.AO. 3d w k Dec
50,751
47,960
,508,017 2,311,641 Wab. St. L. A P . 3d w k Dec 269,703' 274,908 12,486,097 11,653,640
95,1541
85,382 1,268,891 1,199,14.8
Cin. J. A M ack.. November.
16,009
12,019
165,432
118,202 IW est J e r sey ... November.
30,133
26,969 1,489,529 1,424,951
Cin. N. O. & T.P. ¡3d wk Dec
56.090
55.370
,753,117 2,580,997 Wisconsin Cent’ l 3d wk Dec
Min. St.C.A W. 3d w k Dec
3,922
174,360
Ala. Gt. South. ¡3d wk Dec
8,208
30.803
25,931
283,584
,169,136 1,036,682
Wis. A M inn.. 3d w k Deo
N Ori. & N. E. 3d w k Dec
11,895
19,369
333,737
3,551
152,991
18,732
631,386
667,410
v leksb. & Mer. 3d wk Dec
15,245
17,945
499,548
460,166
a For purposes o f comparison, St. Louis A Cairo, now operated by
Ytcfc*. 8*h. & P. 3d w k Dec
19.090
17,756
494,379
425.702
& Ft.w. '3d wk Dec
8,131
7,041
372,149
363,296 the M obile A Ohio, is included in both years from and after July 1.
t\< ? i,n .A B a lt 3d wk Deo
b Figures of earnings for last year have been adjusted so as to make
40.988
35,031
,949,078 1,656,843
t * xron A Col 3d wk Dec
9.111
8,429
512,168
481,957 basis o f com parison tl>e same as this year.
< M A Canton. November.
-v
e Not including earnings o f New Y ork Pennsylvania A Ohio.
31,292
22,516
327,555
264,832
ITIncluding West Shore in 1886.
«ev .C o l.C .A In d O cto b e r... 379,780 362,084
,398,633 2,994,356
* M exican currency.
. & M arietta O ctob er...
24,897
t Including since April, in 1886, the Utica A Black River Road.
‘ M exican currency.
t A nd branches.
A nd branches.
Bank».

Loan» and
Discount«.




Average Amount of—
Net Deperiti
Legal
Specie.
other
Tender».
than Ü. S.

Circula.
tion.

16

THE
GENERAL

C H E O N IC L E .

[V ol . X L I V .

QUOTATIONS OF STOCKS AND BONDS.

Quotations In New York represent one per cent vat in, Whatever cue par .n vy o e ; ocner qu >tati >ns are frequently m a le per share.
The following abbreviations are often used, viz : “ i .w for m irtg ig e; “ g ,” f *r g ild: “ g’d ,” for guaranteed; “ end..” for endorsed;
fo r consolidated; “ coav.,” for convertible ; “ s. f.,” fo r sinking fu n d ; “ 1. sc..” for land grant.
Quotations in New York are to T h u rsd ay; from other cities, to late mail dates.

U n it e d S t a t e s B o n d s .

Bid. Ask.

C i t y S e c u r it ie s .

Bid.

Ask.

C i t y S e c u r it ie s .

21
07
15
L>
<7
07
L07
12
13

Bid.

Ask.

120
118
110
lit
125
103»*

L
22
,,j
Augusta, Me.—6s, 1905, Fund J&J
U N IT E D S T A T E S BONDS.
4i*s, 1891........................... r e g -.Q —M no»« 1103;
L20
M
*
4 »as,1891....................... co u p .. Q—M 1101 11034 Austin, Texas—10s..................
07»* M
4s, 1907............................ r e g ...Q —J 128M 128 % Baltimore—bs. consol., 1890. Q J*
07»*
6s, Balt. & O. loan, 1890— . Q - J
4s, 1907......................... co u p .. .Q—J 129% 1293s
07 4
6s, Park, 1890................... . Q -M
loO’e
3s, option U. 8 ..................reg ..Q .—F.
98
16
M
6s,b ou n ty, 1 8 9 3 .................... M & S
6 s, Currency, 1895........ reg — J&J 12*
100
....... M
6s,
do exem pt, 1 8 9 3 ... M & 8
6 s, Currency, 1896........ reg— J&J 127h)
108
.12
,s, 1896-1901.......................... Var.»
5s, water, 1894.................
6 s, Currency, 1897........ reg— J&J 1-9%
109
.17
6s, 1900................................... . J&J
6 s, Currency, 1898........re g ....J & J 131*8
100 %
...
\f
6s, West. Md. R R ., 1902 ... . J&J 23
6 s, Currency, 1899........rear------J&J 134%
___ Va i>insili »2% 115
L30
5s. 1916................................... .M&N 127
S T A T E S E C U R IT IE S .
....... Vu1
ion-11136 142
4a 1020___________________ ..J&J
112
8s. 1«*6- 90 ».
109*
Alabam a—Class “ A ,” 3 to 5 ,1 9 0 6 ... 10«
109
Bansror, Me.—6s. RR..1890-’94.Var. f 108 110
Class “ B,” 5s, 1906...................... 110
72
124 125
76
M
6s, water, 1905......................
Class “ C,” 4s, 1 9 0 6 ........................ i()4 106
85
M
6s. E.& N.A. Railroad, 1894 .J&Jf 109 111
105
6 s, 10-20, 1900...................... J & J
90
L14
5s, new ................................
6s. B. & Pisciatami!s RR.,’99.A&CM 111
Arkansas—
-6s, funded, 1899 . . J & J 11
L00»s N
6s, short
Bath, Me.—6s,railroad a id ... ..V ari 100
7s, L. R. & Ft. 8 . issue, 1900. A & O 2«)
. . . . 101»* 103
6s, long.............................................
5s, 1897. m unicipal..............
7s, Memphis & L. R., 1 8 9 9 ..A & O 20
106
N ewarfe—4s, lon g .................... ........... ito *
Belfast, Me.—6s, railroad aid. ’ 98.. 1 103 105
7s,L . R .P . B .& N .O ., 19 00..A & 0 20
107
41*8, l o n g ...........................................106
Boston, Mass.—6s,cur,long, 19. *5Va H 133 13«
7s,Miss. O. & R. R iv., 1 9 0 0 ..A & 0 20
111
..V ar. 11*'»* 117»*
5s. l o n g . . . . . . . . ......... .....................JJ®
6s, currency, 1894................
7
7s, Ark. Central RR., 1900.A & O
6s, long ......................................Var.1|ll7 120
123** 124
5s, gold, lon g ..........................
7s, Levee of 18 7 1 ,1 9 0 0 .......J & J
122
7s, long.................................... V a r .l'ljO
.A&O 1 14 116
4 »28, 1908...............................
California—6s, funded debt of 1873"
127
7s, water, lon g....................... Var. I 125
4s, currency, long................. ..J&J 106»s 108
Connecticut—5s. 1897............M & N 100
— -* ----‘ ■ ■'* 134 137
115 116
N
Brooklyn, N.Y.—7s, 1890----New, reg., 3»*8. 1904.........— J&J 103
112 114
5s, 1900, Water L oan.............A.&O 114 116
6s, Water, 1891....................
New, reg. or coup., 3s, 1 9 1 0 ......... (00
129 130
N Brunswick, P . J.—7s, various.. .t 104
6s, Water, 1899.....................
D istrict o f Columbia—
147 149
6s, Park, 1 9 2 4 ......................
6s......................................................... 1 100
*
Cons. 3-65s, 1924, cou p .......... F&A 1201
__ 155 160
N
few Orleans, La.— Premium bonds. U 0»a 111
7 b, Park, 1915.......................
Cons. 3-65s, 1924, reg................... 120%
7«. Rririirft. 1 902...................
140 142
Consolidated 6s, 1892..............Var. 108»* 110
Funding 5s, 1899.....................J&J 115
111 113
160
k
Perm. imp. 6s, guar., 18 91..-J&J1 112%
128 130
108 109
N
7s’, Kings Co., 1888..............
Perm. imp. 7s, 1891................ J&Ji 117
100
6s, 1887 .............................................. 103 104
Wash.—Fund, loan (Cong.) 6s,g.,’921 113»4
I 45
6s, 1896 .............................................. 125 127
Fund, loan (Leg.) 6s, g., 1902 Var 125
Va,r.t 435
6s. 1 9 0 1 ............................................ . 132 134
Market stock, 7s, 1*92................. 1171*
7s. 1 8 9 0 .............................................. 114 115
301*
6s, Park, 1 9 2 6 ...................... M& SI 115
W ater stock, 7s, 1901................... 1
131 132
103
7s, 1896
Cambridge, Mass.—5s, 18 89.. .A&OI 102
do
7 s, 1903.................... 131i*
147
*
7s, 1901
........................442
6s, 1894. water loan ........... ..J&J 1161 117
Florida—Consol, gold 6s........ J & Jt 110 _
lewton—6s, 1905, water l o a n . .J&J 152 134
120»* K
6s, 1896, water l o a n .......... . J&J 119**
112
G eorg a -7 * . gold bonds, 1890. Q—J i l l
5s, 1905, water loan................. J&J lrtì»* 120
6s, 1904, city b o n d s .......... .J&J * 131 133
4 V , 1915................................... J&J loti 407
----sTorfolk.Va.—6s,reg.stk,”78-85. .J & J .......
Charleston, 8.C.—6 s,st’k,*76-98..Q-J 89
Kansas—7s, long...........................J&.i 120
8s, coup., 18 90-93....................Var. ----7s, fire loan bonds, 1 8 9 0 ... .J & J 20
Louisiana—New con. 7s, 1914..J&J 93
105
8s, water, 1901...................... M &N 12»
82
«3
Stamped 4 per cent.......................
120
forwlch, C t —5s, 1907..............A&O' }¿ 7
«9
___ N
Baby bondB, 3s, 1 8 8 6 ............ F&A 40 »4 45
145
7 8 ,1 9 0 5 ...................................... J.&J
Maine—4s, 1888..........................F&A 101 i o n - Chelsea. Mass.—6s, 1897,water loan! 120»* 123
115 120
-7s, lout
*
War debts assumed, 6 s ,’ 89.A & C L06 106 »4 Chicago, 111.-78,1892-39 . . . . . . . . . . . 415 1 ........ O
P
►
I104
6s, 1 8 9 5 .................................. . . . . . . 1 3
....... 0
M aryland—6s, exem pt, 1 8 8 7 ...J&J
d las. 1 9 00_________________
-7s, lou g............. Vai 125 127
407 ......... p
6s, Hospital, 1887-91..............J&J LOO*
120 122
6s. long..
3-65s, 1902........................................ too
O
6 s, 1890......................................Q—J iO
113
116
Cook Co. 7s, 1 8 9 2 ............................
5s, lo u g ..
5s, 1890...................................... Q—.1 100
109 111
r*nnU Pn. fSfl. 1ftUQ _____________
108»*
4»*s, 1 > £
<U
8-658, 1897................................ J&J 1041*
107 109
p
105 »4 106
Massachusetts—5s, gold, 1891. A&O 1071* 108' - Cook Co. 4 »*s, 1900..............
.J&J 120
102%
8s......................................
5s, gold, 1894........................... J&JI Li 21* 1 U 1
107%
8s, special ta x ............................ — 120 Î25*
6 s, gold, 18 >7............................ M&S 117 118
’hiladelphia, Pa.—6s, old, reg.J&J
West Park 7s. 1890............
i0h»4 P
M ichigan—7s, 1890.................. M&> lo8
105 105 »*
6s, n ew ,reg.,d u e 1895 & over.J& J 134
South Park 6s, 1899............
M in n esota -A dj. 41*8,1911, 10-30.. 103 1051*
4s, new ...............................Var’s yrs.
Cincinnati, O.—6s, 1897------ M&NI 116
M sourl—6s, 1887.................... J & J 103
1 133 131»* P
105
trg, Pa.—4s, coup., 1913.J&J. 103
115
7-30s, 1902.............................
Funding bonds, 1894-95___J & J
117
5s, reg. and coup., 4913........J&J. 116
..J&Jt 100 l o i
Long bonds, ’ 8 9 -9 0 ............... J & J 108
121
6s, gold, r e g ... .................
Var. 120
112
Southern RR. 7-30s, 1906. -J&Jt 134 135
Asylum or University, 1892. J & J
7s, w ater, reg.& cp. ,’ 93 -’9 8 ... A&O. 127
•|
do
6s, g .,1 9 0 6 ....... M&N 1 122 124
Hannibal & 8t. Jo., 1887___ J & J 104
5s, Refunded, 1912.......................... 111
do
Cur. 6s, 1 9 0 9 ... .F&A t 122 124
107»* 108
N ew Hampshire—5s, 1892.......J"& J
110
4s,
do
1915 ................. . . . I 08
do
Skg. fd. 5s, 1910M&N t H 3 114
W ar loan, 6s, 1892-1894....... J&JI 111.1* 114
115
p __ id, Me.—6s, Mun., 1895. Var.) 112
Hamilton Co., 4s................. .........1 103 1 »4
W ar loan, 6s, 1901-1905.......J & J 1271* 130
125
6s, railroad aid, 1 9 0 7 ...........M&S 124
Cleveland,O.—7s, 1887 ......... Var. 1 101 »4 101%
N ew Jersey—6 s, 1897-1902... J&J* 125 132
111»* 112»*
p
..A & O 120 122
6s. exem pt, 1896....................J&J* 126
p
7s, 1896, canal...................... ..M &S 125 127
New York—6s, gold, reg., ’ 8 7 ...J&J io2*a
11*6»4
..V a r . 119 121
P
1021*
6s, 1898................................
6s, gold, coup., 1 8 8 7 ............J & J
127
100 »4 101
5s, 1887-89...........................
6 s gold, 1891.........................J & J 1 1 2
124
...V a r. L12 113. E
VlCUmUllU) * » .---uo, xoox:-iox-x.uw.u 6 s, gold, 1892.........................A& O I115
144
101 101
8s, 1886-1909.............................. J&J I 4“
6s, gold, 1893........................ A & 01118
114»* 116
5s, 1914-15................................. J&J 106
No.Oarolina—Os, old, 18 86-’98..J& J' iib
103
4 s ......................................................... 103»*
6 s N. C. RR.. 1 8 8 3 -5 .... J & J 170
110 ........
toohester, N.Y.—6 s .................. Var. 142»*
6s
do
7 coupons o l f ___A&O 140
7s, water, 1903......... .......... J & J t 142
6s, funding aot o f 1866.1900 J&J 12
lookland, Me.—6s, ’ 89-99, RR..F&A 100 LOI
110 115
ÏOs, Ì 8 9 3 -9 6 ...1 .................
6s, new bonds, 1892-8.1.......... J&J 22
100
It. Joseph, Mo.—Comp’nnse 4s, 190 i 85
Water, 6s, 1 9 0 0 ...................
6 s, Chatham R R .......................A&O 10
It.
. Detroit, Mich.—7s, long....... ..V ar.i 120 ......... S Louis, Mo.—68, short........... Var. LOO 100 %
6 s, special tax, class 1.1898-9A&U 13
..V ar.
6s, 18 92.. .'î .............................. Var. 110 111
4s, new, cons., 1910.............J & J
58, lon g .......................
...V a r. 110 111
Elizabeth, N. J.—New 4s, 19 12.J&J 80
125
6 s. 1 9 1 9 .................................A & O 122
5s. 1 0 -2 0 ....................................Var. 103»* 104»*
Ohio 6s, 1886............................ J & J 102
4s, 1905.......................
J&u.t 102»* 103»*
. Fall River, Mass.—6s, 1904. ,F& Al 129 131
Penna.—5s, new, reg., ’ 92-1902. F&A 1 -0
125
St. L. Co.—6s, gold, 1905..A&Olfj-®
5s, 1894, g old ...................... „F & A 1< 8 »4
4s, reg., 1912.......................... F & A l l « * s
Currency, 7s, 1887-’88------- Var. 10« 104
R hode Isi’d—6s, 1893-4, c o u p .. J &J 116 118
5a'. 1 9 0 9 .“ ........................... ..F&A1 120 123
Jt.
0 * 110»* 1 Paul, Minn.—Is, 1912.................. t |00 101
*s Fitchburg, Mass.—6s. ’ 91 ,W.L. .J&J
South Carolina—6s, Non-fund.,1888. 6*4
4»*8, 1916..........................................t f05 105»*
. Galveston, T ex.—8s. 1893-1909.M&S l o i
D 3
• Brown consols..................................110
115
fia. 1920_______ ______ _
9->
94
Tennessee—6s, unfunded................... 65»*
105
** Hartford, Ct.—City 6s, var. dates.. 105 115
Compromise bonds, 3-4-5-6s, 1912 76
106
122 125
7s, li-8 8 ............................................. 1
Settlement, 6s, 1913....................
109»4
102 104
138
8s, 1904...................................... t 1« 4
Settlement, os, 1913........................ 102
- .
— - • - -■
127
.. Haverhill, Mass.—6s, 1889.. . A&OI 104»* 105
Settlement, 3s, 1 9 1 3 ....................... 7958
5s, 1904, W. L ... . . . T . ............. J& Ji 147 120
.. iH.iboken, N. J.—5s, l o n g ... .
113 1 L5
Texas—6s, 1892................................. M&S1112
an Ci.oiu.iann—7s, school . . . . .Var.*
116 119
7s, gold, 1892-1910........................ M&S1125
102 io*3"
122 124
140
7s, gold, 1904....................................J&JI133
109»* 110»*
45 .........
Vermont—6s, 1890..................J & r> 107»* 109
as, 1905...................... .. ......... A&OI 117 119
Virginia—6s, old, 1886-’9 5 __ J & J 47
132 134
110 .........
6s, new bonds, 18 86-1 895 ...J & J 47
7s, 1903, water loan............. A&OI 141 143
Jersey City—6s, water, long 1895.. 108 109
56
6s, consols, 1905. ex-coup........J&J 54
123 123»*
___J&. 12;! 125
6s, consol., 2d series..........................J&J65
8s, 1893-94...............................Var. 118 120
»4 7a, im provement, 1891-’a4 ...V a r 110 113
6s, deferred bonus........... ................ 13
Washington, D.C.—See Dist. of Col.
118 120
7s, Bergen, lon g.................
Tax-receivable coups., from eons’ Is 35
Wilmington, N.C.—8s. gold, cou. on
HudsoiT County 5s, 19 05.. .. .M&S 118 120
Do
from 10-40g. 36
a orcester, Mass.—6s, 1 8 9 2 ...A&Ot 111% 112
Hudson County, 6s, 1905. ___J&. 126
Funding bonds, 3s, 1932......... J&J 05
Hudson County 78, 1894.. __J&D 114 116
5s. 1905.................................... A&O 118 120
10-40S, cp. & reg., 3 to 5.1919.J&T 4 2 s 44
*
Bayonne City, 7s, lo n g .... ....J & , 112
4s, 1905.................................... A&O lo6»a U S
C 1 T 1 S E C U R IT IE S .
R A lL h t fA D BONDS.
. Lawrence, Mass.—tis, 1894. .A & O 116»; 117
A lban y, N. Y .—6s, long_ VanousI 115
_
fia. 1900...............................
Bonds o f companies consotid’ied will
126 127»*
7 s lo n g .......... . ............................ • 135
be fou n d under the consol'd name.)
Long Island City, N.Y—Water.7s,’9£ ! 01
106
A llegheny, Pa.—5s.cp ., ’«3 -9 7 ..Var. l o o
Ala. Gt. Southern— 1st mort., 1008} 111 113
Louisville, Ky.—7s, long dates. Var. 122
123
4»*s, coup., 1 8 8 5 -1 9 0 1 ........ Var. 100 105
Debenture scrip, 6s. gold, 1 0t>.. J 104 106
ill
.
7s, short dates.................... . . . Var. 105
4s, coup., 1901............
. .. Var. 105
78
41a. N O. T. AO. 1 1 deb. o s .............t 76
Allegheny Co., 5s, cp., 1913.J&J§ 100 toi*
6s, lo n g ........ ...................... ...V a r. 112
65
-d d ib e u t be, 1 9 0 7 .......................t| 60
101 102»*
4s, riot loan, 5-1 Os....... .....................100 101
Alb’y & Susi).—1st M., 7s, ’88...J&J|lOti
...M & > 105
5s, 1890-1900..........
0'
4s, lio t lean, 1 0 -20s..........
100 101
S Consol, mort., 7s, l90ti,guar..A&O 130
5 b,
do
lo - 2 0 s ..........................loO 1 0 1 Low ell, Mass.—6s, 1890, W. .«.M&N 1 109».2 1 '<0 *
Lynchburg, Va.—6s . . . ......... ..J & M 14 i n » * ! Cpusol. mort., 6s, 1906, guar A & O '---.- 121
4s. re f1nded. 5-208, 1891-1906____ 102 103
..J & 1 124 124»* Ailegh. V a l—Gen. M .,73-10s..J& J 121
A tlanta, Ga.—7 s . . . ............................... 113
_
..F & A 100».a IO 3t|| Fast, f xten. M., 7s, 1910_ A&O 113
D o. 8s................................................. 113
24
..
Water loan, 6s, 1894......... ,...J & .1116
W aterw orks.................................
'114
i n %!l Inoon.e.7s. end., 1894........ A iU . . . . .
*'|Pnc6 nom inal; n o late transactions, t Purchaser also pays accrued interest,




t In L ondon. § Part being redeemed.,

1 Coupons on since ’ 69.
Î

THE

J an u a r y 1. 3887.]

GENERAL
F or

Q U O T A TIO N S

C H R O N IC L E

OF

E x p l a n a t i o n " S «e N o t « « a t

SPOOKS
H m id o f

A OD
E lr ii

HOODS— Oo-rrmvm.

Past© o f Q u o t a t i o n " .

R ailroad Bonds .
Bid.
R a il r o a d Bo n d s .
Bid. Ask.
R a il r o a d Bo n d s .
Bid. Ask.
Ateh. Top. & a. Fe­
C • *«. & Ohio—Pur. money fd .,1 « 0 ^ 113
•
ist,7s, gold, las*».................. JA.JÌM24
125
1»9
Series A, 1908 ............... . A&O
Cin. Leb. & Nor. —1st m. 5s___ JA J
102*g
124
Laud grant, 7s, g., 1 9 0 2 ___AmO 1122
Os, g.. ser. B, int. def .......... MAN II-5*„ 78
Cin. Rich. & Ohio.—1st, 7s. '95. J&.I
115
Sinking fuuii, Os, 1911..........Jml ' i,.0 a*4. lua %
29% 30% Cin. Rich. & F. W.—1st, 78, g .. . J&l >
6s, currency, int. def.. 1 9 1 8 ..J&J
Guaranteed 7s. 1909 . J&J&A&O i 1 ¿a 1 .4
97
6s, 1911 ........
Amo.
Cin. Sand’ky & Cl.—6s, 1 9 0 0 ..F&A
101 »4
6s, 1909 (1st inori.)..............AJtO f l o ¿*3 .01
Cheshire—6s. 1896-98 . . . . . ..I&.1 I 112*4 ì ì ;
78. 1887, e x t ............................M&9
102
i6
5s, plain bunds. 1920.............vintali yr>
..8 %
Ohio. A Alton—1st M., 7s, ’9 3 ..J&.I 118
Consol, mort., 7s, 1 8 9 0 .........J&D
103
4%s, 1920___. . . ....................Amu i 7
98
126
Sterling mort., 6s. g., 1903. .J&.I :i ¿ 4
Cin.&Sp.—7a, C.C.C. & I., 1901. A &O
Florence < El b o t ’do, lst.7s, A m o f 112
s
i2 4
Bds. Kan. C. line,6s,g..l903.M &N
7s, guar., L.S.& M.S., 1901.. A&O
K.C.XupekamW., 1st M.,7s,g.J&J f 423 l i ó "
Miss. Ri v. Bridge, 1st. ,s. f. ,6s, 1912 i o e "
Cin. Wash.&B.— lst,gu,4*4s-6sM& N
103%
do
liicutue 7»-A0¿U,t 1.4
117
Louia’a & Mo.R., 1st, 7s, 190<)F&A 122*4
2d mort., 5a. 1931................... j &j
86
N.M ex.&ao.Fao.,ist,78,1909 Amu 112t 125
do
2 d ,7s, 19<M) MAN
3d mort., gold. 3s-4s, 1 9 3 i..F & a
47%
Puebio m a ra . V., 1st, 7s, g .,1903.1112**4 124 %
St.L.Jaoks’ v.&C., lst,7s,’94.AAO 116 *4
Income 5s, 1 9 31........................... .
30
Sonora, ist, 7s. 19 to. g u a r.. Jm j 1 ,1
■9/1*4
do 1st gilar. (*64).7s,’94 A AO
Scioto & Hook. V, 1st, 7s,...M&N
V/iolUtamo.rt .,lst,7s,g.,gua..l902 H i5
lie
d o 2d M. (360), 7s, ’ 9 3 ..J A J i l i "
Balt. Short L., 1st, 7s, 1 9 0 0 ..J&J
122*2
Atlanta m (Jlianotte Air L.— lst,7s .2 0
do 2d guard 18S) 7s,’9 8 .J&.I U 5
Clev. Col. C. & I.—1st, 7s, ’ 99. M&N
Income, Os........................................ l , 3 * 104 ! Chio.A Atlautio— 1st. 6s. 1920 M&V 82
^
Consol, m ort., 7a. 1 9 1 4 .........J&D
Atlantic m Pao. - 1st Os, 1910. .JmJ
90
»1
43
35
2d. 6s, 1 *23 ........................... F&A
Cona. S. F., 7s. 1 9 14.. i ...........J&J
incom es, 1910........................ JmJ
py
2»% Chic. B. A Q.—Cons., 7s, 1903.JAJ 136
136%
I&J 1 1 %
Gen. con. 6s, 1934.........
Central i l i vision, old, Os. . . . ____
9a
1102
.03
Bonds, 5s, 1895.......................J&D
Belief. & Ind. M., 7s, 1 8 9 9 ...J&.I 112
do
new ns. . . . . . . . .
au
5s. 1901........
A&O 108*4 109
Clev. & Pitts.—4th M., 6s, 1892.J&J ilO
do Laud im oun s, 1901.
lo
160%
58, debenture, 1913...............M&N 1
Consol. 8. F., 7s, 1900.........M&N 126 128
Baltimore m U m o-N ow .s ___a m o ....... I o5
5s, 1919, Iowa Dtv................ A&O 109% 110
C lev .*M . Val.—1st, 7s, g., ’9 3 .F&A
Ss gold, 1 9 .0 ......................... FmA l-j.0%
99% Columbia & Gr.—I at, 6s, 1916. J&J i ’i Ö ’ li i a ’
48,1919,
do
................ A&O
Stenm g, 5s, 1927..................jm u |
.*
12*
4s, Denver Div., 19 22.......... F&A ' 9 "*4
2d mort., 6s. 1926..................A&O
89% 92
Sterling, Os, la o o ..................iM&alj
i 13
„
„ _________________ l
* * " Co*, m Cin. M id.—1 st,63,1 9 1 4 .J& l 102 103
91
4s, plain bonds, 1921............M &8 90
Sterling mort.. Os, g., 1 9 0 2 ..Mmti i i 2 o
122
Bur. & Mo. R., I’d M., 7s,’93.AAO 1116 118
Col. Hock. Val. & Tol.—
i20
do
Os, g., 1910. MmN i i 2 i
do
Couv. 8s.’ 94 ser.J&J 1 ...
85% 86
Consol. 8 * ......... ..........................
Parkersburg Br., os. 19 19...a m u
1 .5
l*2o"
Bur. A Mo.(Neb.), 1st,6s, 1918. J&J 1118
6 hd. «a gold, 1 9 0 1 ............. . JAD
90
B a it .* Fot’e—1st, o s ,g .,l 9 l l.J m J
123
do Cons, 6s, uon-ex..J& J 1108 I l o
Col. & Hook. V.—latM .,7a,’ 97.A&< 11 45
1st, tunnel, Os, g., g ’u, 1911. AmO 122*2
96
do 4s, (Neb.), 1 9 1 0 ... JAJ 19 i
do
2d M., 7s, 1892. J&J 1105
Bell’s Gap— 1st, s, i 0 9 3 .........jm j
113
do N eb.RR,lst,78,’ 96AAO 111
Col. & Toledo— 1st mort. bonds .. 1 116
1st, Os, 1905............................F & a
do Oiu.A 8 .W., 1st,8s.J&D 121 ¿2 i
do
2d m ort...................... 105
Consol. Os, l o U .....................am u
111. Grand Tr.. 1st. 8s. ’90 ..A&O 1109*4 l i O
Ohio<&W. V a., 1st.s.f. ,7s, 1910 M&N 1 110
Belvidere lie !.—1st,Os,o.,1902. J ml.“ 11 *4
10 6 % Col. 8pringf.&C.—1st. 7s,190l. M&s 109
Dixon Peo.& H„ lst,8s,1889.J& J too
LIO
3d m o r t , Os, 1887..................Fma I 02
Ott. Osw. & Fox R., 8s, 1900. J&J 124 1*6
Col. & Xenia—1st M., 7s,1390.M&s 1103
Boston m A lbany—7s, 10 92.. .1 ma •.I d
no
10 *4 Conn. & Pasaump.—M., 7 s ,’93.A&O t l 17 1*17*¿
Quiney& Wars’ w, 1st, 8s, ’90.J&J ¡ io s
Os, 1395......................................j m j •I l o
4*5
iu > *2
vtoh’n & Neb.—1st, 7s, 1907 M&S 1124%
Massawippi, g., 6s, gold, ’ 89 J&J 1103 104
Bust. Conc.& Mon. —S.F., Os,’39. J md i 10Z% 103
liie. Burl. & Nor.—58, 1926 ......... 1J o4*a 1<4 *4 Conn. West.—1st M., 7s, 1900. J&J
23
25
Consol, m ort., 7s, 1393.........am u 11.
34
113
Ohio. & Cau. 80.—1st, 7s, 1902 A&C
Connecting (Pliila.)—1st, 6s ..M&S
Consol m ud., o.-, 1393.........AmO tioO
*07
Ohio. Kan. City & West’ ll.— 1st, 5s. " 9 j% 100
Consol.RR.of Vt., 1st, 5s, 1913. J&.T 89*4 89%
B o s t.H a n .m F .—1st, 7s 1» o o .j m jj . . . .
ll5*4 C >r. Cow. & A nr.— ¡>eb.t s, ’98 M&N
Chic. & East III.— 1st mort. 6s, 1907
112
1st mort., 7s, guar................. JmJ . . . .
Income bonds, 190
Dumb. & Penn.—la t 6 s ,’ » l ___Mm- 1*0*2** 106
Bost.H. lun.&W. eb. 5s, 1913 M &3|___
93*2
1s t ,co'i.« 6s. gold. 1934 . . . . A&O 114 i 15
Cumberl. Val.—1st M.,8s,1904. A&(
Boston & Low ell— Vs, '92.........a m u 1113*2 114
9o
Chie. & Gr. Trunk—1st mort., 1900
Dayton & Mich.—Consol. 5s___ J&. HÖ6“ iÖ9*"
Os, 1 8 9 0 ... ..............................jmd t i i d
10 < Íu0*8
110*2 Ch & [nd.Coal R’ v ,lst 5s, 1936 Jm
3d mort., 7s, 1888, now 2d. A&u 1104
5s, 1899.................................... jm d t i l j H 1.2
Chic. Mil. & St. Paul—
120
B ayt. & West.—1st M.,6s, 1905.J&. t U 8
4s, 1 9 0 5 . . . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . m m3 Lu«i l o » *4
P. du C. Div., 1st, 8s, 1898. F&A 130%
1st mort., 7s, 1 9 0 5 ..................J&.i 1125
4*28, 1903...............................Mm.N luti
126
4 .8 1 P. D., 2d M., 7 3-lOs, 1898 .F&A
Delaware—Mort., 6s, guar.,’95 .J&J
Boston m Maine— 7s, 1893 ___dm.l i l l s
1 40*4
1st, $. gold, 7s, 1902 ............. J&J i ’a ò ii 135
Del.& Bound B’ k—1st, 7s,l905F& A Ì3Ó* *
7s, 1394................................... . J&J 420 121
La. C.,’ 1st M., 7s, 1893.......J & J U 8
Del.Lack.& W.—Couv.7s,1892 J&D
Boat, m Frovideiiee—7s, 1893.dmd 11. 9
120
I. & M., 1st M., 7s, 1897.........J&J 124
Mort. 7s. 1907....................... M&S
Bost.& Revere B’ n—ist,o s.’ 9 7 .J mj 1119
131
I’ a. & Dak., 1st M., 7s, 1899. J&J 120*4
Den. & R . G 1st 7s.go'd,190 > M&N 113 119%
.
Bradlord B old, m K. —isi, Os, 1932
00
65
56
Hast. & Dak., 1st M.,7s, 1910.J&J 127 131
Gen. mort., 5s, 1913,Tr. rec.AA
Bradf.Eld.m Cuba—lsi.0 s,i9 o 2 J m j
131
80% 80U
Chie. & Mil., 1st M .,7s, 1903.J&J 131
1st con. 4a, 1936 ........................
Brooklyn Fie.— isi, os, i o - o ..a m j lOO *4 106*4
73
1st mort., consol., 7s, 1905. .JA J 130 133
80
Denv.&R. G.W .—1st, 6s, 1911.MJ
2d m ortg, 3-ds. .91 j ..............J,*J
7/
80
7*
1st M., I. & D. Ext., 7s, 1908J&J .133
76
do
assented '
...
Butt. Brau.m F.—Ueu.M.7s,’90.o md 103
80
1st M.,0s, S’ thwcst Div. 1909.1 &J 118*4 Ü T
83%
Denv.S.P.&Pac.—1st,78,1905 M&N
Butt.N .y.m Fne—is i, 7s. 1910.Jm o I 06 136*4
97 101
1st M., 5s. La C. & Dav. 1919.J&J L08 I l o
Des M. & Ft. D.—1st. 6s, 1905. J&J
Butt.N.y.m Fn.—1st,Os,g., 192 i.Jmd
5>
So. Minn. 1st 6s. 1910............ J&J 118*4
do
inooiffes............
Pitts. Titusv.m Jti.— t s, 189 or ma 30
95
Chic. & Pac. Div. 6s, 1910 ...J & J 119
1st mort., 6s, on exten sion .. . .
Oil Creek, 1st lV Os, 1 9 12.am u
l.*,
108*4 Det.&B.C.l8t,8s,en.M .C.1902M &N 118%
do
West. Div., 5s,1921. JmJ
Union m Titusv., 1st, 7s,’9u.jmJ
.08
Mineral Pt. Div., 5s, 1 9 1 0 ...J&J
Dot. B. C & Alp. Is r ,6 s .l9 l3 J&J . . . . . 105
Warreum r r’kui,i8L,7s,'’90i;'ma i Oj
109*4 Det.G.Haven&Mil.—Equip. 6s, 1 9 1 1117 119
Chic. & L. Sup.-uiv., “ 1921J&J lo 7
is,
Bufl.m aoutnw esi.—os, i9 0 8 ..j.m j
»0
1
.O8
W is.&Miun. D iv.,5s. 192L...J&.I 107
116
Con. M., 5% t ill’ 84, a fte r 6 *.. 1918 U H
Bur. C. R.mN.—lst.5o,ne w, “06. J m o l o o
106%
Terminla 5s, 1911 ........
J&J 104% tu5
Det. L. & North.—1st, 7s, 1907.J&J tl2 3 % 124*4
C ons.ist mcoi. tr., 00.1031 am u
102
92
Du'mque Div., 1st, 6s, 1920. I&.Í 1 18 *4 120
Dot. Muck.& M.—1st. 68.1921.A&O
Minn, m 81. L , is . 7s, guar. JmL) 105
52% 53
Wi8. Val. Div., 1st, 6s, 1920.J&J 111 1 12
La d grant 3*48, 8. A., 1911.......
Iow a u. & W., ist, 7s, 19.*» M
Fargo & south.- 6s, ass. 1921 J&J
Income, 1 9 2 1 ................................
O. R ap .l. i?'• &*N
< .,
1j 2U. *±.¿60
110
Dak. & Gt. S i. 5 s. F 'lr » ..........J&J io ti
Dub. & Dak.—1st M., 6s, 1919. j&*'
C
IO
lttl, Oo, litZ l___ Aife >
.........
lu 5
Chic.& V.W. —
Consol., 7s, 1915.U—F 140*4
Dub.&S. City— lst,2 d Div.,’94.J&.i
Cali for. Pac.—1st xVl., 7s, g .,’87 .d mu
102 *i
Consol., gold, 7s, cp., 19 02..J&D 132
u tT
Dunk. A. V.& P.—l8t,7s,g..l900J4fel
2d M., Os, g .,en a u. Fac., “39.Jm«
1 »0*4
do
do
reg............. J&D 13.: *8
East Penn.—1st M .,7s, 1 8 8 8 ..M&'
S d M . (guar. U. P.), Os, lOuo.Jmu
111
Sinking fund, 6s, 1929 ....... A&O 117 117*4 E.Tenn. Va.& Ga.—1st, 7s,1900 J&. 123 ....... *
do
do
3s, 190o. J mo
.0
do
5s, 1929.................A&O l o 9 8 t 1
Divisional, 5s, 1930................J&J i o ; *4 .........
California Souuiei n —L.co uies.........
02*4 02%
do
debont., 5s,1933. Vf&V 108*4 . Ob *4 Ala. Cent., 1st, 6s, 1918.........J&J
Camden m a n .—1st, 7s, g .,“9 o ..jm j i l o
• l& E. Tenn. V. A G a .R ’y .—I.st,5s,19 i6
o
120
Exten. bds. 4s 18S*M926...F.vA
9 8 *4 *98%
2d mort., os, i.<u4............... .a m u 110
408
25-yrs. deb. 5s, 19 -9 .......M & N
East. & W. Ry., Ala. —1st, 6s, 1912 100% 101
Cons, os, 1911 ........................ jmd
Escan.&L.Sup., 1st, 6s, 1901.J&J 116
Eastern, Maas.—6s, g.,1906. .M&S il2 7 % il2 3
Cam.m Bui“. Uo.—1stM .»os, 9 i .Fma
Des M.& Minu’s,l8t,7s.l907.F& A
Sterling debs., 6s, g., 1 9 06..M&> JL25 130
Canada 80.—i s i 3i.,guur.,i90o,J md i0 7
107 3
Iowa Mid., 1st M., 8s, 1900. A&O
Eliz. City & Nor.—3.F. deb.,6s.A& 0
2d mort., 5s, Id t o ..................MmS
»4% 95
Peninsula, 1st, couv., 7s,’ 98. M&S
l8 tm o rt.,6 s, 1920.....
M&8 .........
Cape Fearm Y ad .V a i.,ist,.'S ,l»10..! i 4
97
Chic. & Mil., 1st M., 7s, ’9 8 ..J&J 125
Elizab. i.ex.& Big S.—6a, 1902.M&S
i.0 7 ”
Carolina Cent.—isi.,os,g.,l»2o..im d 1.8
110
MU. & Mad., 1st, 6s. 1905..M.&S. 118
Elmira& W.’ mspt—1st i>s,1910.J&. 12Ó *4
2d, m o., os, i e l o ...............a m u
cO
85
Madison Ext., 1st, 7s, 1911. A&O t 13 4
109
5s, perpetiial............................A&(
3d, m e., Os, 1 9 . 0 ................. ..........
2/
31
105
Menominee E xt.,lst.7 s,l¡) 11J&D tt3 4
Erie & Pittsb.—2d, now 1st___J&
Catawissa—iVlort., 7s, 1 9 o o .. .Fm a 129
Northwest.Uu., ls t ,7 -, 1917.M&s I i.85
Cons, m ort,, 7s,
1898 ...J&. 113 116
Cedar F .m M m .—is i , 7s, l9o7.Jm o to7 1 2
103%
Winona & St. Pet.— lst.7s,’87.,Jm.I
Equipment. 7s,
1900...A&< 100
Cedar R. m Mo.—is i, 7s, “y 1 ... 1 mo 1g o % 109*4
do
2d VL. 7s, 1907.M&V I 29 I 29% Evansv. & Crawf.—1st, 7s, ’ 87. J&. 100
1st mort., 7s, l y l o __. . . . . . .3imA Ì3 2% ! 133
Ott. C. F. & St. P., 5s, 190 !.. M&S 110
Evans.& lad.—1st,guar.,g.,6s, 192 4
iÖ5
2d mort., 7s, .o o 9 , quar....... Jm n
1 1 I2 l
_
North. Ills., i st, 5s 1910_ M&8!
1st, con., 14 26............
J&J . . .
109
Cent. Hr. U. Fae., isio, os, ’ 95. Aima 1JÔ
Chic.R.I.& Pac.—6s,19l7.cou p JmJ 137*
Evans.& T .H .,lst con.,6s,1921,J&J 118
Fund, coupon 7», toy j ....... MaN .04
131
6s, 1917, reg........ ............. ...J & J
Mr. Veruon—1st, Hs............. A&O 111 112
Atcil.m Flue'sF k, 1st, Os, g. Mma l d j
Exteu. & col. 5s. 19-14 ............I&.) 111* 112
Evansv.T. H.&Chi.—1st, 6s, g.M&N ! 00
Atctt.Uoi.mFac.,lsl,On, ly o o t^.—t .09
Chle.&S. W..1st,7s,guar.,’99. MAN 120
Fitchburg—5s, 1899.................AmO 1111% 112%
Atcil.d.Co.mW .,lst,os,19Uo.>^,—F' 194
Thic. & 8t.Louis— ist6s, 1 Hô.Mcfcd 111
5s, 1900-01-02.........................A&O 1112
114
Ceut, o f Ua.—1st, cuiio.,- <s, '93.d mo U 5
HO
96*4
Chic. Sc. L. & P.—1st, 5s, 1 >32. AmO
122
6s, 1897................................... A&O i 1 .8
Cent. Iow a—New isi., 7s , ’99.dm j
83
90
Chic. & Gt. East., 1st, 7s, 93-’ 95. lO i
7s, 1894....................
A&O 1120 121
Inc. bonds,““ deot certs.” , 7s,am u
C0I.& Ind. C., 1st M., 7s, 1904.J&.1 t 22
Flint & P. Marq.—M. 6 s,1920. A&O 119 121%
Eastern Lev., 1st, os, 1912. .am u
do
2d M.7s, Í904.M&N t L06
H olly W. & M., 1st, 88. 1901. J&J
Ills. Div., 1st, us. 1912.........am u
75
Ò
Un.& Logansp.,lst, 7s, 1905. A&u 1121
Ft. M ad ison * N. W., 1st 7s,g., 1905 1 L
C entra,R K . 01 N. j . —
Cin. & Chic. A. L., 1886-’ 9 0 ......... tlOO
88
Ft. Worth & Denv. C.—1st, 6a, 1921
88 %
1st m ,7s,1890...........: .............Fm a 108
Chlo.St.P.Miu.&Oiu.—Cou. 6s, 1930 122*4 122*4 Frem’t Elk’ u& Mo. V.—6s, 1933A&0 i L20 122
7e, OOUV, 1902, asseuied___ MmN l <8*4 10»
12s
Oh.St.P.& Minn. I s i ,6 s,1918M a N 12 »
do
do
Unstamped.. 1117
120
Consol. M.,7 s,1899, asseuled.i^—d 107 108
1 83
North Wise., 1st 6s, 1930 _ Í&.I
_
Gal. Har. & San A nt.—
Adjustment Oouds, .s, i9Uo.vima i U9
127
St. Paul&S.City, 1st 6s, 1919.A&U
1st,6s,g., 1 9 1 0 ....... . ~ ...........F&A 107%
Couv. debeu. os, i9 0 o . . . .umN 81
23
84% Ohio. & Toiuah.—6 s ......................... 1 119
115
2d mort.. 7s, 1905.................J tzu 410
Am. ilk •& im p. v>o., u cj,iyJ i.j ooj
»7 % 9s
115
Chic.& W. lad. -S .rd. 6s, 1919 M&N
100%
West. Div. 1st, 5s, 1931___M&V
.L6H.& VVliKc«l».Olilil,iUC.,
93
93
"Général m o r t . 6s, 1932 ....Q —M 109*’ 112
&£
do
2d, 68, 1 9 3 1 ...J&J
Ooimol., 7b^oulti^uc,(tesiS’u.v^-ji lOJ
I 10
Ohio. & W. Mich» 5s, 19 it . ..J&D iOO 409*4 Gal.Hous.& Hen.—1st,5 s.........AmO
77
9Ó
Cent. Olilu— lai i i ., ocj,
<Oo 107
Cin. Ham. & Dayt.—Cousol.ôs A& > 1 10 7*4 lOd
Georgia—7s, 1883-90................. J&J
Cent. P ac.—la i, o»,
j
1 1 0% l !o.7g
Consol, mort., 7s, 1905......... A m o 12 *4
6s, 1 -8 9 ......................................J&J 106 109
b, Joaquin, le t iYl.,oe>,5 .iyiA>.a.vk,0 i 12
120
do
6s, 1905......... A&O 118
Georgia Pacific—1st, 6s, 1922. J&J l 9 110%
Cal. & Oregon, list, 04, £., oo.Jotj iO i
113
Cin. H. & I., 1st M., 7s; 1903..I&J 1112
62
65
2d m o r t ............
;
do
ftcrieu ii, 04, a0^2 100
Cin. & Eastern—1st, 7s, 1896. J&J
Gr. Rap. & Ind.—1st, l.g., g ’d, 7s, g. T ¿2 -s 124
Cal.& Or. C.P.bOiiU4, oo,^ .,'yi J
lio
113
2d mort., 7s^ 1900 ............; ..........
1st M.,7s, l.g., gold,not guar. A&lo 116
Laud graut M., Os, ¿ .,¿ .8 9 0 .am u iO .
l0 2 7j
Consol., gold. 6s, 1 9 1 2 .................
100
E x laud grant, 1st 7s, '99 ..........
W est. F acif., rst, os, 2 ., ’9 » . .dmd!
1 13
Cin. I. St. L. & Chic.—Con. 6s. 1920 t i l o
85
Consol 5s, 1924................... MkS
Ckarl’te Col.ma. - u m o ,< s,’9.*.Jmj I 15 110
1st go d is, 1 9 3 1 ....................Q— I l '0
Gr.B’y W.&St.P.—lst,6s, 1911. F.& a 100
2d m o d ., 7s, i 9 i o . . . J .........A^U 112 115
Cin.m Indiana, 1st M.,7s,’92.jm D t i l l
40
2d, incomes, 1 9 1 1 ....................
40%
Che raw & i)ari.—1st M.,8s,’b8.am u 102
do
2d M.. 7s,’ 87-9 i.J&J 1 110
125
Gulf Coi. & S. Fe— 1st, 7s, 1909 J& J
2d mort., 7s................................ -V8j l o o
Indianapolis C. & L., 7s of ’9 7 .. . 1117 I t s
2d, 6s, gold. 1923 . . . . . . ...A & O 101
103
C hes.O. & S.W .—M. 5-os, 1 9 1 1 . f a a I 102
Ind'apolis& Cin., ls t,7 s ,’ 88. A&O 1 101 101*4 Han. & St. J o .- Con. 6s. 1911 u M&S 120 122
* Price nominal; iiu late trausaotioim.
1 Purchaser also pays accrued interest.
JIn .London,
UCoupon ott»
c In FrankfdFL




THE

18
GENERAL

R a il r o a d B o n d s .

Bid.

Q U O T A TIO N S

Ask.

OP

[V ol.

C H R O N IC L E
STOCKS

R a il r o a d B o n d s -.'

AND
Bid.

XLIV.

BONDS— C o n t i n u e d .
Ask. I

R a il r o a d B o n d s .

Bid. Ask.

N.Y.&N E .—1st M., 6s, 1 9 0 5 ..J&J 116 117
M•n.Beach Imp. ,lim.,7s, 1 909, M&S 92*ê ....... N
.
70
60
H o’st.E.&W. T e x —ls t,7 s,’98.M&N
2d m.,6s, 1902........................ F&A 105 105*8
13
M arq’tteH o.& O.—Mar.A O.,8a, ’ 92 112
90
93
2d 6s (scaled to 3s)............... F&A
2d, 6s. 1913.............................
01
100
os, 1908......................................
H.& Tex.Cen—1st m .,7s,guar.l891 f i ï i f 114
N.
99
N Y. N. H. & H .ls t r. 4s,1903.J&D 106*s
98
6s, 1923 (extension).............. J&D
11108 110
107
"West. D iv., 1st, 7s, g., 18 91.. J&J
97
N .Y.Ont.&W .—Ist.g., 68,1914. M&3
95
6s, 1925 (Mary. & W est.)— J&D
54
♦51
W aco & N. W.. 1st, 7s. g.,1903. J &J 11108
.10*8 N.Y. Pa. & O.—1st, inc.,aco.7s, 190 d 109 111
N
90% Memphis & L. R ock—1st, 8s, 1907 108
do
prior lien,inc.ac.,5-6s,’95
Cons, m ort., 8s, 1912............ A&Oi 90
Memph.& Chari.—1st,7s, 1915. J&J 126
74
71
16
♦15
Gen. mort. 6s, 1921 ............ A&O
2d mort. ino
125
2d m ort., 7s, extended...........J&J
{5*3 6*8
Hunt. & Br. T o p - 1 s t , 7s, ’ 9 0 .. A&O 110*3
3d mort. in c.J B I—
, „
1st consol. 7s, 1915........ ....J & J 120
.......
89
Leased L. rental trust, per deb. 4s 187
2d Jfiort., 7s, g., 1895............ F&A 117*3
1st. cons.. Tenn. lien ,7 s,1915 J&J
68
Cons, 3d M. 5s, 1 8 9 5 .......... .A&O ICO 100*8
West. ext. eertifs, 8s, 1 8 7 6 ..J&J {63
G old,6s, 1 9 2 4 ................
...J & J 105*4
119*2
68
do
do
7s, guar. Erie {63
111. C e n t—1st M.CMC.&Spr.’ 98J&J
120
M-vtrop’n Elev.—1st, 6s, 1908. J&J 119%
110
109
N.Y. Phil. & Nor.—1st, 1923 ..J& J
1st, gold ,4s, 1951...................■*&«
S
2d 6s, 1899...................-- --- M&N 109*9 110
60
98 101
54
Gold, 3*98,1951............. ......J & J
Income, 6s, 1933....................A&O
61
60
M exican Cent.—1st, 7s, 1 9 1 1 ..J&J
93
Middle Div. reg. 5s, 1 9 2 1 ... F&A 112 116
5638 56*3 N.Y.Susq. & W.—1st, 6s, 1911.J&Jiu----t
Scaled 4s, 1911................ ;....J & J
71*fl
Sterling, 8. F., 5s, g., 1 9 0 3 ..A&O {109 111
Debentures 6s 1897.............. F&A II---£6
56*s
Bond scrip ....... .....................
1114 116
Sterling, gen. M.,6s, g., 1895. A&O
Midl’d o f N. J.—1st,6s, 1910. A&O HO
18*8 19
Incomes...................... .— . „ _
109
12
N. Y . W ood.* R ock , 2d inc. 1912.
Sterling. 5s. 1 9 0 5 ..................J&D H07
80
>
Debenture 10s, 1 8 9 0 -9 5 ..... A&Q, 78
Chie.St.&N.O.—1st con. 7s, 1897. 119 125
Norf’k <feW
.—Gen’ l M. ,68,1931 M&N I 112 113*8
80
N
7?
Scrip 10s, 1889 ....................... J&J
New R iver 1st 6s, 19 32....... A&O 114 113
2d, 6s, 1907..........................J&D
41
42*9
Mexican Nat.—1st, 6s, 1912 ..A& O
Ten. lien, 7s, 1897............. M&N 117
Impr. & Exten., 6s, 1934— F&A 100 103
Mich. Cent.—Consol.,7s, 1902.M&N 127*9 127*3
98 103
Adjustment 7s, 1924.........Q.—M.
5s, 1951, g o ld .......................J&D 115 115*3
Consol. 5s, 19 02.........
M&N 109
89
N.O. J ack. &Gt.N. 2d8 s,otfs. A&O
Conv. deb., 6s, 1 8 9 4 . . . . . . . ..J& J
1st M. on Air Line, 8s, 1890. J&J 109*4 110
38
40
Illinois Midland, 1st, 7 s .......... 1905
N orf’ k & Petersb., 2d, 8s, ’ 93. J&J 110
Air Line, 1st M., 8s, guar.. .M&N 103 109
16*4
100
And. Bl. & W —1st, p f.,7 s, 1900J&J
South Side, Va..1st, 8s,’84-’90. J&J
6s, 1909.................................... M&S
92
93
1st mort., 5 -6 ,1 9 0 9 ..............A&O
do
2d M., ext.,1899.J&J 106
5s, coup., 1931........................ M&S 109*3
78
80
do
3d M.. 6s,’86-’90.J&J tlOO
2d mort., 5 -6 ,1 9 0 9 ................A&O
109*«
5s, reg., 1 9 3 1 .......................... M&S
29*a 3 *
Incom e, 1 9 2 1 ...........................----Ya.& Tenn., 4th M .,8s, 1900.J&J 124*8 128
Kalamazoo&S.H.,lst,8s,’90.M&N 103 105
90
91*3
East.Div., 1st mort. 6s,1921. J&D
do
extended 5s,1900. J&J 105
J.L. & Sag.North E xt., 8s, ’90.M&N
In d .D eo. & 8p.—1st, 7s, 1906.A&O 103
North Carolina—M.. 8s. 18 88.M&N
î
do
C ons.lst M.,8s,’ 91.M&S 115 117
123%
2d mort., 5s, 1911...................J&J
North Penn.—1st,7s, 1896-----M&N
]
do
6s,1 8 9 1 ................... M&S ......... 107
37
38
2d, income, 1906, Tr Co. cert.J&J
Gen. mort., 7s, 1903 .............. J&J 134
Joliet & N .In d .,lst,7s (guar.M.C.) 120
New 1st mort. 6s, funded ............
New loan, 6s, reg., 1905....... M&S
Mich. & Ohio—1st, 6s, 1923 ..M&N
io
s*
Ind’polis& St.L.—1st,7s, 1919. Var. 1112
Midd. Un. & Wat. Gap—1st m ort.. 100 ........ 1 Northeast.,S.C.—1st M.,8s,’ 99,M&S 127
Ind’apolis& Vin.—1st, 7s,1908. F&A 119
85
2d m ort., 8s, 1899..................M&9
79
2d mort. 5s. quar. N.Y. S. & W ...
122 123
2d mort.. 6s, g., guar., 1900.M&N 104*s
Mil.L.S.& W.—1st M.,6s,1921.M&N 117 ........ Northern, Cal.—1st, 6s, 1 9 0 7 .-J&J 107 108*a
Int. & Gt.North.—1st,6s,1919. M&N 117
.........! Northern Cent.—l*s per cent..J& J
Mich. Div., 1st, 68, 1924....... J&Jr H 6
93
12l*a 122*a
Coup. 6s, 1909........................ M&8 92
Ashland Div., 1st 6s, 1 9 2 5 ..M&S ......... 116 ! 3d m ort., 6s, 1900............ ....A & O 121 122
Ionia & Lansing—1st 8 s ,'8 9 . ..J&J 108*2 109*3
C on.m ort.,6s, g.,cou p ., 1900.J&J
102
1st, in c o m e s .................................
Iow a City & West.—1st,7s,1909M&8
reg.,
St. P. E. & Gr. T r’k, 1st, guar.. 6s 107% 10b*2l 6s, g., bds., 1900......................A&O
113
I ’a Falls & Sioux C.—1st, 7s,:99 A&O 130 132
’
Mort.
5s, 1926, seriesA J&J
Mil. & No.—1st, 6s, 1910-----J&Dj 103 L04*a
112
Jefferson—Hawl’y Br. 7s, '8 7 ..J&J
104
do
series B
1st, 6s, on extension 1 9 1 3 ..J&D
1st m ort.i 7 s, 1889................. J&J 104
Con. m ort, stg. 6s, g., 1 9 0 4 ... J&J 109
-> 130 133
Minn’ p. & St. L.—1st M., 1927.J&D
tlOO 102
H 14 115
Jeff. M ad.& Ind.—1st, 7s,1906. A&O
M .,6 s,’ 8
)
1st M., Iow a City& W., 1909 .J&D 118 122*8 Northern, N.J.—1st Div.—6s,8 .J&J 1102
2d m ort., 7s, 1910................... J&J t i l 7 118*3
North. Pac., P. D ’ O
M&S.
2d mort., 7s, 1891.................. J&Jr 100
Junotion (Phil.)—1st,4*38,1907 J&J
Mo. Div. 6s, 1 9 1 9 ................. M&N 1102
)
South west. E xt., 1st,7 s,1910. J&D 100
Ï1 5 "
2d m ort., 6s, 1900................. A&O
Gen’l 1. g., 1st, 6s. 1 9 2 1 .... .J&J 118 78 119
J ......... 109
Pacific Ext., 1st, 6s, 19 2 1 .. A&O
74
76
Kanawha & O.—1st tis, 1936 . J.&J
93
Gen’l 1. g., 1st, 6s, r e g ........... J&J
J 94
Imp. & Equip. 6s, 1 9 2 2 ..... ..J& J
Kan. O.Clint’n & Springfield—Is,5s 104 104*3
Gen. land gr., 2d, 6 b, 1933... A&O 103*4 103*8
T
Minn. & N. W.—1st, 5s, 1 9 3 4 ..J&J ....... 106
f 117
119
K.C.Ft.8cott& G.—1st,7s,1908 J&D
James Riv.Val.—lst,g..6s,’36J&J 109 110
Miss.&Tenn.—1st M., 8s,series “ A » 117
’’
Pleas. Hill & De Soto, 1st, 7s, 1907 1123 125
112
Spokane & Pal.,1st 6s,1936.M&N
8s, series “ B ” ........................ J&J J 104 111*9 North. Pac. Ter. Co. -ls t ,6 s ,’ 33. J & J iÖ7*a 108*8
1112 113
Kansas G. Lawr. & So. 1st, 6s. 1909
\
Mo.K. & T.—Cons. ass.. 1904-6.F&A 1 H
K.C.8t.Jos.&C.B.—M .78,1907. J&J i 125 126
)
99*< 99*8 Norw’h&Woro’r—1st M., 6s.’97. J&J 117 119
Consolidated 6s, 1 9 2 0 .......J & D
K . C.Spr.&Mem.—lst,6s,l923.M & N 110 110*4
Ogd’nsb’g&L.Ch.—1st M.6s,’97,J&J 1105 107
D 87 *( 88
>
Consolidated 5s, 1 9 2 0 .......J & D
Kentucky Central—6s, 1 9 1 1 ...J&J
Sinking fund. 8s, 1 8 9 0 ......... M&S 107 107*8
1st, 6s. g., 1899. (U. P. S. Br.)J&J
èï
99 100
67
Stamped 4s, 1911................... J&J
Consol, ,6s, 1920.................... A&O
N
Han. & C. Mo., 1st 7s, g.,’90.M&N ....... 110*3
44
40
Keokuk&Des M.—lst.Ss,guar. A&O - - ---- 110
Income, 3s & 6 s l9 2 0 .....................
A 103*.1 105
99 i 01*3
Knoxv. & Ohio 1st, 6s, 1925. ..J&J
Ohio Cen.—Riv. Div., 1st, 6 s.. 1922
N
Consol. 6s, 1920.................... M&N H4*.3 115
L. Erie & We8t’n—1st,6s,1919. F&A 108 i 09
. 1X3
Income, 6s, 1922, Tr. reo..............
2d mort., 7s, 1891................... J&J
30
39
Incom e, 7s, 1 8 9 9 ...........................
Ohio& Miss.—Cons. S .F .7 s,’98.J&J I21*a 123
Car. B., 1st m ort., 6s, g. ’93..A&O
90
10
Sandusky Div., 6s, l 9 l 9 — F&A
Cons, m ort., 7 s ,’98................. J&J 121*a 123
3d m ortgage, 7s, 1906......... M&N 121
119
do
income, 1920
2d m ort., 7s, 1911................. A&O1 H®
Income, 7s, 1892.................... M&S
L ai. B1.& M un.,lst, 6s,1919. M&N 109*3 LIÓ
1st gen , 5s, 1 9 3 2 .................J&D
#0
63
66*4
108
do
income, 7s, 1899
lstm ort.,S pringf.D iv.,1905 M&N 107
38*3
2d pref. debentures................
Lake Shore & Mich. So.—
SO
Ohio Southern—1st 6s, 19 21.. .J&D 103 103%
114
3d pref. debentures................
44
L15
30
2d incom e, 6s, 1921....................
4th pref. debentures..............
120
Old Colony—6s, 1897................ F&A tl20*a 121
New mortgage, 6s, 1927....... J&D 110 111
117
Buff. & State L., 7s, 1 8 8 6 ....J&.
6s, 1 8 9 5 ................................... J&D m e
Collateral trust 6s, 1892 — J&J
i26*¿
7s, 1 8 9 4 .................................. M&S 1120% 121
...... ......... 1st extension 6s, 1927...........Q—J 106 76
4*as, 1904.................................A&O 1109 111
St.L.& Cairo—4s, guar.. 1931.J&J
Bost.C.&Fitchb ,lst,7s,’89-90J&J 109 111
105 ......... Morg’n ’s La.& T ex.,lst,6s,1920J &J
B. C. F. & N. B., 58,1910 ..J&J 113 115
1st mort., 7s, 1 9 1 8 ................A&O
...... 124 Morris & Essex—1st, 7s, 1914 M&N 141 142
N. Bedford RR., 7s, 1894... J&J 118 120
130 131
Oreg. & Cal.—1st 6s, 1921.........J&J ♦105 107
2d m ort, 7s, 1891................... F&A 112*3 113
I ..... 128
1900...................... J&J
...... 123% Bonds, 7s, ort., 7s, 1901....... A&O 125 L28 C 2d m ort., 7 s ................................ .
9 9 78 i ö ö “
General m
1124
) ...... 123*8
Consol, m ort.,7s, 1915..........J&D 131*a .35 1 C
iïô "
......... 105
L10%| I•anama—Sterl’gM ., 7s. g. ’97.A&O {108
HO
Nashua & L ow .—6s, g., 1 8 93.F&A
......
Sinking fund sub., 6s, 1 9 10.M&N 91
108*3 110
5s 1900................. ........ .................. 133
) 123*3
Ï05*’
{102
Subsidy bonds, Eng. issue, 6s.
Nashv.Ch.&sib.L.—1st, 7s,1913 J&J
) 123*3
132
2d mort., 6s, 1901...................J&J LH*4 112*8
8 143
Gen’l mort., 6s, reg., 1 9 1 0 ..A&O 134
N ashv.& Decatur—1st,7s,1900. J&J
} 135
::::::
Cons, m ort., 6s, reg., 1905. .Q —M 130*4
Natchez Jack. & Col.—1st, 7s, 1910
* Hl
131
___j
L. Miami—Renewal 5s, 1912.
do
6s, coup.. 1 9 0 5 .-J&D
J 114^ 115
Newark & N. Y .—1st, 7s, 1887.J&J 102 10 L
Collateral trust, 4*is, 19 13.. J&D
New’kS’ set&S.—1st. 7s, g..’89.M&N
« ......
Consol. 5s, 1919 .................. J&D ......‘ 111*8
100
N’burgh&N.Y.—1st M. 7s,1888.J&J
J H5
......
Penn. Co., 6s, reg., 1 9 0 7 ....0 .—J 110
New Jersey & N. Y .—1st m o r t ----- 100
k 100
98
do
1st M., 4*a8,1921. J&J 107 1108
94
N. J.Southern—1st M .,new 6s. J&J
112*9 >enn.& N .Y .C an.- 1st. 7s, ’ 96. J&D 113 120
IN. O. & Northeast.—Prior 1.6s. 1915
1 105
{113 115 1 1st mort., 7 8 ,1 9 0 6 ................ J&D 123*8.........
N.Y. & Can.—£ M., 6s, g., 1904.M&N
90
J .........
N.Y.Cen.&H.-Debt cert. ex.5sM&N 105 105%!
112*4
5 .........
138*a| Peo. Dec. & E v.—1st, 6s, 1920. J&J
M ort., 7s, coup., 1903............ J&J
C 115*8 116
l
80
0 .................................
M ort., 7s, reg., 1903...............-J&J ......... 138*9 ! Incom es, 1 9 2iv.,1st 6s,1920.M&S
112*4
Evansville D
0 H S 116*8
......... 109
Debenture 5s, 1 9 0 1 .............. M&S
78
81
8 119 120
do
incom e, 1920—
Sterling m ort., 6s, g., 1 9 0 3 ...J& J {123 125
a ......... 111*9
Peo.& Pekin Un.—lst,6s,1921.Q—F HO
New Y ork Central—6s, 1887. J&D 100% 101
Q .........
80
2d m ort. 4*38, 1921..............Q—F
96% 97%
N.Y.Chio.& St.L.—lst,6 s,1 9 2 1.J&D
99
S .........
Perkiomen—1st M., 6s, 1 8 8 7 ..A&O
v ...... .........
2d 6s, 1923.............................. M&S ......... 70
92*
{88
Cons. m ort., 6s, 1913, sterlin g . . .
65*8 67
N .Y .C ity* No.—GenT,6s,1910M&N
D {H 6
119
65*s 67*8 Petersburg -Class A , 1926 ....J & J 107 106*8
Trust Co. receip ts.................. .
117
Class B , 1926.......................... A&O 105*a
N. Y. Elevated.—1st M., 1906. J&J ......... 126*s Phila. & E rie—1st M.,7s, 1888.J&J 108 109
J 107 108
35%
33
N. Y . & Greenw’d L.—1st M. ino. 6s
130
J ........ 97
do
Gen. M.. guar., 6s, g., i9 2 0 . .J&J {128
8
6
2d m ortgage incom e......................
a l o o 102
Consol. 5 8 .1 9 2 0 ..................... A&O 111*4
___ N.Y.&Harlem—7 s.ooup. .1900.M&N 131*4 133
sS 115
8unburv&Erie, lstM .,7 s,’ 97.A & 0
N.Y. Lack.& W.—1st, 6s, 1921. J&J 125 131
60
a
56
127*8
do
&
2nd, 5s, guar., 1923............... F&A 108 108*9 Phila.7s, ’Read’g— 1st, 6s, 1910.J&J 113
J 121 124
2d,
9 3 ...............
A&O
125*3
N.Y.L.E. &W.—lst,7 s,’97, ext.M&N
**50“
D ......... 115
D e b e n tu re 6s, 1893 ................J&J
î
2d mort, exten., 5s, 1919 ...M & S 113
D 106% 108*4
Consol.M.,7s,1911, reg.& op.J&D 122
3
3d mort. ex. 4*88,1923..........M&S 108% n o
0 ...... 106
Consol, m ort., 6s, 1911.........J&D 110
)
4th m ort., ext., 5s, 19 2 0 .. ..A & O 1124»
105
ls tm o r t,, sinking fund, 8s
Im p ro v e m e n t m o rt., 6s, ’ 9 7 .A&O
> 103
M 104% 104*8 ■ 5th m ort., 7s, 1 8 8 8 ................ J&D 134 135
Gen’l m o rt., 6s, 1 9 0 8 .. .... ...J & J 1003s 101
3
1st cons. M., 7s, g.,1920........M&S
100
N ....... 100
Gen’l m ort., 7s, 19 08.............J & J
New 2d cons. 6s, 1969........... J&D
95
40
A
Convertible, 7s, 1 8 9 3 ............ J&J
99%
do
ex June, ’ 86, coup .......
T 92*i
.A
68
Cons. 5s, 1st series................ M&N
107*9
ï
Collateral Tr. 6s, 19 22......... M&N .........
96*3
50
0 .....
Cons. 5s, 2d series..................F&A
)
Fund. 5s, 1 9 6 9 . . . . . . . ............J& D .........
eS 91
57*a
L o’isv.N.O. &Tex.Conv. adj. s c r ip .......................J&J
8 128 133*8
1st cons, fund coup.,7s,1920 M&S
[J 1123 124
{90 100
Scrip for 6 deferred *a coupons ..
D
2d con3. f ’d op., 5s,1969........ J&D .........
8*3
sO U 12 114
D e fe r re d in c o m e ........... - ...............
112
105
Reorganizat’n 1st lien, 6s, 1908
57
55
sO U 33 135
Incom e m ort., eons. 7s, ’96, J&D
80
Gold income bonds, 6s, 1 9 7 7 .... 1.......
50
Coal& I.. guar.,7s,’ 92,ex-op.M&S
D
Long D ock m ort., 7s, 1 8 9 3 ..J&D I13*s
112
109
S t ill
cJ
117 1 Phila. Wil. & Bait.—6s, 1892.. A&O,
[)
do
con. g., 6s, 1935 ..A & O 116
112
113
tO n i
124 1 tis. 1900................................... A A O iU ll
J
N. Y.& .N Eug.—1st M.. 7s. 1905J&J 122
. . 103 HO
Debenture, Cs. 10-20 —
y Coupon off.
{In London.
t Purchaser also pays aoorued interest.
* Price nom inal; no late transactions.




January l, 1887.1

THE
G E S E R A .L

Q U O T A T I O N 'S

C H R O N IC L E .
OF

STOCKS

A N "D

T 9
B O -Y D S — C o n t in u e d .

Bid. Ask. I
R a il r o a d B o n d s .
R a il r o a d St o c k s ,
Bid. Ask.
R a i l r o a d St o c k s .
Bid. Ask
p WR Wil. & Balt., 5s, 1 9 1 0 ... J&D t .......
D
s Ohio Cent.—1st, 5s, gu.1935 101 102
Camden & Atlantic, p r e f............50 IV 40*i .........
Trust oerts., 4s, 1 9 2 1 ..........J&J J 101
Boria&W.—1st,7s,1917, tr.rec. 104“ 105
Canada Southern.........................100
64*1 64*4
J
S i ? 5 - 5 radi- * B.—ls t,6 s l9 1 1 A&O 90 : b i ;:
----- 1. L .& K .C .,lst,6s,1916.. .J&D
Canadian Paciflo.........................100, L 67
67*2
\
o î? b-C,<fe St.L.—1st, 7s, 1900.F&A 122*2
United Co’s N.J.—Cons.,6s,’94. A&O
115
C ataw issa.................................... 50 5 5
2 4 ....................
« « ir P S T 4-* 7% 1913................ A&O9 . . . . . .
do
gen. 4s, 1923....... F&A
do
i s t p ref.......................50 6
....................
Pittsb. d . & Tol.—1st, 6s, 1922. A&O 111
)
Sterling m ort., 6s, 1894....... M&S {111 113
do
2d p r e f....................... 50 &.......
54
Plttsb.&Con’llsv.—lstM .7s,’98.J&JI 124 124*2
„
do
6s, 1901....... M&S {118
122
Cedar Falls & M innesota...........100
I7*i 17*2
J
130
Twi.ïrvî® cons. M., 6s, g., guar. J&J {128
Cam. & A m b.,m ort.. 6s, ’89.M&N 106
Central of G eorgia....................... 100 130
Pittsb.Ft.W . & C.—lst,7 s,1 9 1 2 Var 140
r
J nion P acific—1st, 6s, g. ,’ 96-’99 J&J 116% 118
Central I o w a .................
100
14
2d mort., 7s, 1912................... J&J 138
14%
Land Grant, 7s, 1887-9.........A&O 102
do
is t p ref.................. 100
3dm ort., 7s, 1912................... A&O 133 137*2
)
Sink. F., 8s, 1893....................M&S 118
no
„
A do
2d p ref...................100
.........
S î î 8i>- McK.& Y.—lst,6a,1932.J&J
Reg. 8s, 1 8 9 3 .......................... M&S 116 io o
Central M assachusetts..............100
14% 14*2
Pitrab. & W est.—1st m ort...............
91
Om. Bridge, sterl. 8s, g., ’96.A&O {123
do
p r e f ... 100
39% 39%
nd&Ogb’g—lst6s,g.,1900J& J 100 105
Collateral trust, 6s, 1 9 0 8 ___ J&J 106 128
54% 5 4 %
Central o f New Jersey ...............100
30
» K ? iv *» 1st M., 6s, g.,1891.. M&N
Collateral trust, 5s, 1907___ J&D 100 101
Central Ohio....................................50
51*2 5 2%
Port R oyal & Aug.—1st, 6s, ’ 99. J&J 105
Kans. Pao., 1st, 6s, 1 8 9 5 ....F & A 110*2 112*2
do
P ref.............................. 50
54 *2
Incom e mort., 6s, 1899 .........J&J
38
do 1st M., 6s, 1896........J&D 109
Central P acific..............................100
42*2 43*2
"^^ • «S ’toga—1st 7s,1921 cou.M&N 142% 143
do Denv. Div., 6s ....... M&N 114
Charlotte Col. & A u g ............
100
* 5 } d & Allegh—1st, 7s, trust reo.
70*8
do 1st cons. M.,6s, 1919M&N 106*s Trtoi Chesapeake & Ohio, com m on ..1 0 0
2d naort., 6s, 1916................. M&N . . . . . .
9
8%
Oregon Short-L., 6s, 1922 .. F&A
do
1st p r e f ...100
16 1 1 7
......... XFtah Cen.—1st M.. 6s, g.,1890. J&J 106 i0t>1s
KIcb’d & Danv.—Con..6s,’9 0 ..M&N
80
I
do
2 d p r e f ....l0 0
10*4 11*4
General mort., 6s, 1 9 1 5 ....... J&J 115 116
Utah So., gen., 7s, 1909___ J&J
90
99
Cheshire, p re f...............................100 115
120
Debenture, 6s, 1927..............A&O 107 110
r,
do ext, 1st,7s, 1909 J&J
86*8 88
Chicago & A lton.......................... 100 143
144
_ . . do
assented...................
107
1idea & Bl’k R.—M ort.,7s, ’9 1 .J&J 107
Chicago & Atlantic B en eficia ry ....
8
11
„P led raon t Br., 8s, 1.388........ A&O 103 104
) _er. & Mass.—Guar. 5s, 1903 M&N 112*2 113
Chicago Burlington & N orth.. 100
82
......... ^
83
Rich. EYed. & Potom ac—6s,ext.J&J
Chicago Burlington & Q uincy.. 100 135 136*2
M ort, 7s, 1881-90.................... J&J
2d m ort......................................
Chioago & Canada Southern . . . . . .
......
Kloh. & Petersb., 8 s,’ 84 -’ 8 6 ...A & 0
8
3d m ort.,incom e..............!.." "
Chicago & East Illin ois................... 100 100*a
New mort., 7s, 1 9 1 5 ............ M&N
......... \ leksb. Sh. & Pao. -Prior lien, 6s . . { I l l
114
Chicago & Grand T ru n k ................
9
12
Richm ond York R iv. & Ches., 8 s ... 118 119
V a. Midland—1st ser.,6s,1 9 06.M&S 121
122
Chicago & Ind. Coal R ailw ay....... .
41*2 4 2 %
_ 2d ***°rt., 6s............................ M&N 101 103
2d series, 6s, 1911..................M&S 116*4 117
do
do
pref.
80
82
Booh. & Pitts.. 1st, 6 8 ,1 9 2 1 ...F&A 115
3d series, 5-6s, 1 9 1 6 ..............M&S 110
Chioago Milwaukee & St. Paul. 100
90
Consol. 1st, 6s, 1 9 2 2 ............ J&D 107*2
90*8
4th series, 3-4-5s, 1921.........M&S
69
^ .
do
pref., 7.1 00
do
Income, 1921.........
65
5th series, 5s, 1926............... M&S 106 106*2 Chioago & North W estern.........100 117 % 118*4,
114
Rom e & Carrollt.—1st, 6s. g., 1916
78
85
114*4
rncomes, cum ulative.........
97% 98
_ .
do
•
P ref., 7 ..1 0 0 140 140*2
65
Rom e & Dec.—1st., 6s, 1 9 2 6 .. .J&D
Wabash St. Louis & Pacific­
Chioago R ock Island & P a o___100 124*2 125*a
KomeWat’n&O.—S.F. ,7s,1891 .J&D 108 ÎÏÔ*
is t , ext., 7s, ’90, e x ...............F&A 111*4 113
Chio. St. Louis & P itts................100
13*2 16*2
2d mort., 7s, 1892................... J&J 107
Mort., 7s, 18 79-1909.............A&O
86*2
do
p ref....... 100
35
103
Consol., 1st ex. 5e, 1 9 2 2 ....A & O
38
2d m ort., 7s, ext. 1893, ex..M & N
100*2 Chio. St. P. Minn. & O m .,com ..100
Incom e Ts, 1932............................. 101 102
47
47%
Equipment 7s, 1883 ............ M&N
4
„ .
. do
p r e f ..100 111*2 112
Butlanu—1st M., 6s, 1 9 0 2 ....M&N 107*8 108
Gen., 6s, 1920, Tr. r e o .......J & D
59
63
Chicago & West M ichigan. ..... 1 0 0
56
95
a Equipment, 2d mort., 5 s ___F&A >94
57
Chio. Div., 5s, 1910 g old ....... J&J
93
94*2 Cin. Hamilton & D ayton.......... 100 1 4 0
St.Jo. & Gr. I8l’d—1st, guar.6s,1925. 107 107%
142*2
Havana Div., 6s, 1910...........J&J
_
do
P r e f ...... ....•• 97%,.
2d mort.. Incomes, 5s, 1925.........
71 . 73
Indianan. Div., 6s, 1 9 2 1 ___J&D
Cin. Indianap. St. Louis & Chio.100
91 *2 94
8t.L.Alt.&T.H.—is t M., 7s, ’94.J&J 113 118% Detroit Div., 6s, 1921....... ...J & J
96*2 Cincinnati & M ilford................
80
2d m ort., pref., 7s, 1 8 9 4 .... F&A 111
95
Cairo Div.. 5s, 1931............... J&J
Cincinnati N. O. & Tex. P ao___ 100
2d lnoom e, 7s, 1894..............M&N 107 110
46
90
95
Cons.mort..7s,1907,convert. Q—
F
Cin. Sandusky & Cleveland.........50
Div. bonds, 1 8 9 4 .........
37
22*4 2 2 * »
40
1st, St. L. div., 7s, 1 8 8 9 .___F&A 110*2 112
52
do
P ref., 6.50
54
B ellev.& 8.111.,1st,8.F.8s,’96."Â"&() 115
Gt. West., 111.,1st, 7s, ’8 8 ......F&A 110 111*2 Cin. m
Washington & B alt............ 100
Bellev.& Car., 1st 6s. 1 9 2 3 ..J&D 109 11*3
5*2
6%,
^
do
2d, 7 s ,’9 3 . . . . M&N 99 100
_
_
do
p r e f.. 100
10
8C. L. Ark. & Tex. 1st 6s,1936. M&N. 99% 99%
10*2
Q’ncy & Tol., 1st, 7s,’9 0 ___ M&N
Clev. Col. Cin. & Indianapolis.. 100
64
2d mort., 6s, 1936................. F&A.
54% 55
64%
111.& S .Ia.,lst, 6s, 1912....... F&A
Cleveland & C a n to n ......................
6*4
8 c--Louis & I. Mt.—1st, 78, ’ 92 ,F&A 113*8
7
8t.L.K.C. &N. (r.est.& R.),7s.M&8
110
„
do
do
P ref!
2d m ort., 7s, g., 1897........... M&N
27*s 28
93
do 0m .D iv.,lst7s,1919.A & 0
Clev. & Pittsburgh, guar., 7 ........50
" f * BF’ b g/ -’ M >7b’
’95. J&D 111*2
do Clar. Br., 6s, 19 19.. F&A
74
Columbus & X enia, guar., 8.........50
Cairo Ark. & T .,1st,7s,g.,’97. J&D 110
175"'
do No. Mo., 1st. 1 8 9 5 ...J&J 118
Col. H ock. Val. & T ol................. 100
Cairo & Ful., lst,l.g.,7s,g.,’91. J&J 109*2
36*4 36% .
do St. Cha’s Bridge 6s, 1908 102*2
Columbia & G reen v ille,p ref.... 100
Gen. eon. r»y & 1. g., 5s,1931A& 0
55
96
99
Wab. Fund. 1907—Var. 7s. F&A
Concord............................................gp 116*2 L17
8 Louts & 8an Fran.—2d,ol.AM&N 112*2 114
do
Various 6s........... F&A
2d M., class B, 1906.............. M&N 113
Concord & Portsmouth,guar!,*7 100i x 148 5 0
W.St. L. & P.—Iowa D. 6s, Tr. reo
Connecticut & Passum psio___ .100 106*4 07
do class 0 , 1906.......
M&N 112 %
Warren (N.J.)—2 d ,7s, 1900 ..A& O
Connecticut R iv er...................... 100 193
SouthPaciflo.—1st M. 1888'.J&J 104*4 104*2 W. Jersey & At. 1st M;.,6sl910M&8
194
Danbury & N orw alk.....................50
Kan. C. & 8w., 1st, 6s, g., 1916.. J&J 103
West Jersey—1st, 6s, 18 96....... J&J 115
Dayton & Michigan, guar., 3*2..50
Pierre C. & 0 . 1st, 6s............F&A
74%
1st mort., 7s, 1899................. A&O
Equipment 7s. 1895............... j &d
do
P ref., guar., 8.5 0 169
169*»
Consol, m
Delaware & Bound B rook.........100
General m ort.. 6s, 1931.........j & j 112*2 113*4 West Shore ort., 6s, 1 9 0 9 ......... A&O
guar. 4s................ j & j 104*2 104% Delaware Lack. & W estern.........50 148
135 % 135%Ft.8.& V .B .B d.,lst,6s, 1910.A&O
West’n Ala.—1st M., 8s, ’8 8 . . . A&O 107 109
Denv. & R io Gr. Trust receipts. 100
Trust bonds, 6s, 1 9 2 0 ......... f & a
26
109*2
2d m ort., 8s, guar., ’ 9 0 .........A&O 110 111
8t. L. W. & W., 6s, 1919.
M&S
59*4 60**
do
do
pref.100
110
Western Maryland—
Denver & Rio Grande Western___
20
8t.D.Vand.&T.H.—1stM.,7s,’97!.T&J 121
21
3d, end., 6s, 1900..................... j &j 125 127
Des Moines & Fort D od ge............
2d m ort., 7s, 1898............... M&N
12 ,
108
W’nNo.Carolina—lst,7s,1890.M &N
2d, 78,guar., ’ 98......................M&N 112 116
_ „ do
do
P ref..
18*2
Consol. 6s, 1911................... j &j
101
Det. Lansing & Northern, com .100
& Duluth—1st, 5s, 19 31.F&A 112*2
55
65
West’nPenn.—1st M., 6s, ’9 3 .. A&O 107 115
_ _do
do
P ref.100 1 04 106
^LP-M lou-* Man.—1st 7s,1909 J& J1
116
Pitts. Br., 1st M., 6s, ’9 6 ....... J&J 112 122
Dubuque * Sioux C ity..............100 100 101
A&O 117 119
2d 6s, 1909__ . . . . . . . . . .
Wheeling & L.Erie—1st,
East Tenn. Va. & Ga. R y ........... 100
Dak. E xt., 6s. 1 9 1 0 ....... M&N
15% 16*8
118 118% Wichita & Western—1st,6s, g., 1910
6s___ J&J
1st consol. 6s, 1 9 3 3 ___
j &j 120
do
do
1st p re f.. 100
76
122
78
Wilm.Columbia & Augusta, 6s ...
119
120
do
do
2d p r e f ...100
118
30*2 30%
lBt’ 6s>1922 ...'.J & J
Wil.& Weldon—S. F., 7s, g., ’ 96. J&J 122
East P enn............................*..........50 5 49 *e
St. P.& Nor. P ac.—lst,6s, 1923.F&A
Wisconsin Cent.—1st ser., 5s, 1909
92*2 *93’ East & West, A labam a___
SanduskyMansf.& N.—1st, 7s,1902 1115
25*2 26%
2d series, 7s, 1909, if earned . . . .
55*4 5 6
Eastern (Mass.)....................
i o o 1 125 126
J L -1 8 ® es> 1 9 3 4 ..A&O 104 108
’
Wis. Valley—1st, 7s, 1909___ J&J 125
126
Eastern in N. H ....................
100 X108 109
At. * Gulf, con. 7s, ’ 9 7 .......... J&J 117 119
Worc’r& Nashua—5s, ’93 -’9 5 .. Yar. 108 109
fcSo. Ga. & Fla —1st, 7s, 1899
Elizabeth Lex. & Big S a n d y ..!! 100
118 119
Nash. & Roeh., guar., 5 s ,’94. A&O 108
109
2d, 7s, 1899.........................m &N 111 113
Elmira & W illiam sport, 5 ...........50 S 4Í *
Scioto Yal.—1st, 7s, sink’g f d . . j & j
« . . „ d o
Pref., 7 .. 50 ) 64
93
96
R A I L R O A D S T O C K S . Par.
Erie & Pittsburg, guar., 7 .........50
2d m ort., 7s, sink’g fd .......... A&O
62
106
70
Ala. Gt. South.—Lim., A., 6s,prof
{9% 10*4 Evansville & Terre H aute........... 50
Consol. 7s, 1 9 1 0 ..........
j &j
87
90
Lim., B, com .................................
{4
4*2 Fitchburg...............
¿ o o x l3 8 139
Shenandoan Val. -1st.7s, 1909!J&J
90 100
Ala. N. O. & P ac., & c.t p r e f ....
3% Flint & Pere M arqu ette....... *
{3*4
General mort., 6s, 1921....... A&O
40
29
30
do
do
def!
{1% 1*2 „ ^ do
Shreve. & Hous.—1st, 6s, gu., 1914
do
P ref...........
94*2 95
73
Albany & Susqueh., Guar., 7 . . 100
Fort Worth & Denver C............ i o o
Sioux C. & P ac., 1st M., 6 s,’ 98. J&J 107*2 109
Allegheny V a lle y ........................ 50
Galv. Harrisb. & San Antonio
Sodus Bay& So.—lst,5s,g.,1924J& J
Atchison Col. & Paciflo................
Georgia P acific...................................
So. Carolina—1st M.,6s,1920 A&O 106%
26
30
Atchison Topeka & Santa F e ..i o o
95
95*4 Georgia Railroad & Bank’g Co i o o 190 192
2d m ort., 6s. 1931.............. ' j &j
75
81
Atlanta & Charlotte A ir L in e .........
93
95
lnoom e 6s, 1 9 3 1 .............................
Grand Rapids & In d ia n a ..............
26
10
15
29*2 Atlantic & P acific...................... i o o
11 % 12
Green B ay Winona & St. P au l.. 100
So. Cen. (N.Y.)—Consol, mort"., 5 s..
40
13% 14
46
Augusta & Savannah, le a s e d !!!l0 0 130 131
So. Pae.CaL—1st, 6s, g.,1905-12 A&O 110*2
Houston & T exas C e n tra l.... .. 100
43
43%
Baltimore & Ohio.........................100 166 170
Huntingdon & B road T op ............50
So. Pac..Ariz.—1st,6s,1909-10.J&J 112 113
16
17
do
1st p re f.,6 . !!.’ l 00 135
So. Pac., N. M.—1st, 6s, 1911 .J& J 108*4
m. ,
do
do
P r e f ...50
33
do
2d, n ref................... 130
Illinois C e n t r a l . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... io o 1 34 134
Soathwestem (Ga.)—Conv.,7s,188C
Washington B ranch................100
Staten Isl. Rapid Trans.—1st mort.
do
Leased line, 4 p*.*o."lOO
96
96
Parkersburg B ranch.............1 0 0
Steuben. & Ind., 1st 6s, 1 9 1 4 ..J&J 113
Indiana Bloom ington & West’n 100
15*2 16*»
Bell’s G ap.................................... ..5 0
50
Indian. Decatur & Sp., com __ __ _
_
Stock. & Cop.—1st, 5s. 1905. ..J& J Cl02*2
Boston & A lbany...................."."."."lOO 198 199
Summit Br.—1st, 7s, 1903..... J&J
, do
do
P r e f ... 100
Bost. Con. & M ontreal............. 100
Iowa Falls & Sioux C ity............ 100
72
S'mb.Haz.&W-B.—1.8t,5s,1928M&N 103
74
_ .
„d o
Pref., 5 ...1 0 0 103*2 104
Jeft v. Mad. & In d ’p ’s, lnnn.J ..100
lea sed 1 A/l 70
2d m ort., 6s, 1 9 3 8 ............... M&N
99
Boston H oosac Tun. & Western___
14
17
Joliet & Chicago, guar., 7 .........100
Susp.B.&ErieJunc.—1st M .,7s......... t ü ö
130
115
Boston & L ow ell.......................... i o o 129*a 130
Kanawha & Ohio...............................
Sjrr.Bing.&N.Y.—c o n so le s,’06Â&Ô 131
5
Boston & M aine................... . ! ! ! ! l 0 0 207*2 208
do
is t p r s f..! ! . ! ! ! ! !
Tex. Cent.—lst,8k.fd.,7s,1909M &N
75*4
21% 23
Boston & N. Y. A ir-lin e, p r e f .!___ 101 102
1st mort., 7s, 1911................M&N
ao
2d p re f.................
9*4 10
75*2
Boston & Providence..................i o o 215
Texas & New Orleans—1st,7s.F&A
100
70
80
Boston Revere Beach & L ynn 100 145
do
do
p_____ 100 132 135
Sabine Div., 1st, 6s, 1 9 1 2 ...M&S
104
Brooklyn E levated., n e w ................
44
50
Kans. City Springf.& Memphis.
le x .& P a o —1st M .,6s,g.,1905.M&S 108*2 110
67
70
Brooklyn & M ontauk..................i o o
10
Consol, m ort., 6s, gold, 1905. J&D
100
35
97 100
45
_ _
do
P re f..........100
30
do
trust receipts........
100
Buff. N. Y . & Erie, leased.........100
too. and land gr., reg., 1915. July
100
58
60
Buffalo N. Y. & -Phila.,aes.pd___50
10*4 10%
do
p ref.............. 100
R io Gr. Div., 6s, 1930, Trust reo
73
73% „
do
do
P r e f ...50
3%
9*4 Lake Erie & Western, ass. pd. 100
„
,, do
ex Aug. coup.
Buffalo Rochester & P ittsb___ 100
34
Gen’l mort.& term ’l 6s, 1905A&O
64
100
95% 95*a
Burlington C. Rapids & N orth .. 100
w do
. do
tr.receipts
} 56
66
69
56*ä
Cairo & Vincennes, p re f................
N.O. P ac., 1st, 6s, gold, 1920. J&J 1181% 82
IOO 47 _ _
_
California Paciflo.................. ...." !!!
11
15
Little Miami, leased, 8 guar___ 50 167% 168
lst,6s,1924.M&N
92
California S outhern..........!".!!! 1.00
29
31
Tol.A.A. & Gr.T., lst,6s,1921.J& J 104 106*2
Little Schuylkill, leased, 7 ..........5o'&
59*2
Camden & A tlantic .................*.,50 § 18
Long Islan d.....................................5o| 94
94
Price nom inal; no late transactions. ^Purchaser also pays accrued interest.
| In London. 0 Coupon o'L $ Price per share, c In Frankfort.




20

T H E

GEÎÎB RA .L
F or
R a il r o a d St o c k s .

Bid.

Ask.

QUOTATION'S

E tp la n a t lo a x

OF

STOOLS

AN'D

S ee N o t e t a t t l e a t <»r f f l w i

M is c e l l a n e o u s .

[ V o l . 2 LTV,

O H H O N T O L E .

BON"DS— C ontinubd.

P a 'ge o f ^ a '» u t l o < i < . _____

M im cella n eo u s .

Bid.

Ask

Mis c e l l a n e o u s .

Bid. Ask.
109 110
164 L67
l»M L10
108*2 n o
L
13 »*2 L O
139 L40
200
195
I
109 L 1
07
106*2 L
41
140 L
100 L02
100 102
57
54
75 80
100 102
52
50
120 123
18
110
183 185
31 ......
160 ......
70 _...
113 114
60
78*4 78*«
115 122
103 105
9 4*2 96
70
65
82*2
80
103
100
37% 38*a

B rookline, M a s s ... 1 00
e x p r e s s ST’CKS
Tol. Ann Arbor & N.M
fit t . STOCKS.
10c 14c Attains_____... ...lOO 137 140 C am b rid ge, M ass..lO O
t’oi. Cin. & St. Louis ..
COSTISUKD.
American......... .100 107 U>9 C helsea, M a s s ____ 100
36
38
Tol. & Ohio C entral...
17*2 18*3
La.& Mo:Riv,,comlOO.
D o r ch e s te i, M a s s .. 10()j
United Slates......10*! 6 t 62
58*2 60
do
Pref.
47
50
do
Pref.
J a m a ica P l’ 11,M asslOO
t ..IK Pargo A Co.U « 128
.
M
Tol. St. L. & K . C ity ...
<3®s 65
Louis v. & Nafthv..lO('
L aw ren ce, M a ss...lO O !
TUL’ PH STOCKS
do
p ref..
64
58
lAiui8v .il .A. A <'hie.100
L ow ell....................... 100
A N » BONDS.
0 . N .J.R R AC. Co. 100 215
Macon & Augusta-----L yn n, M ass., G. I,..10*»
61*8 6138 Am r. Dial. l e i . . . I •'>0
Maine Central — lot- 140” 145 ■ Union P acific___ .100
M ahl.A M e lro se ...1 0 < t
7o
American Tel. A C
able^
' ’ tan Central......... 100
Man. & Law F e .. . . 1OC
e
M ew ton A W at’n ..1 0 * ’
Am. -rican Rapid bonds
Utica & Black R i v .l 1 0 119 1 .0
*|
Man Bench C o..,10t- ” l 5 ” 15
Salem , M a s s .,. . . . . 10i
55
Atlantic A Pacific st’k
Vi.A Mass.,i’sed,6.1001 13-» 1 lO
158
Manli ttan, c o n ...10*
B rook lyn , L. 1.......... 25
4»*
6*4 Hank’s A Merch’ts. 100
Vicksb. & Meridian ...]
5t5
34
Marti. II. 61 O nt.. .10*
C itizen «’ , B r o o k ly n .2*»
1 mortgage........
si
do
p r e f... 1
do
P ref..lO t 103 105
M etropolitan, B’ k lyn
Reoei 1 <-erts......
-rs’
54
Virginia Midland.........: "4’ i " " 43"
MeTnnh.A Cliarl— 2!
Sassau, B rooklyn ..2 5
y -■
G.neral mortgage..
1913% 14*4 Vabash Pur. com.ceri
Mexican Ceniral ..10*
P eople’ s, B r o o k ly n .1 0
do
P rei. l*)*i 3r>% 3o s Baltnnoie A Ohio. ...
10*4 11*2
M exican national —
vViiliamsb’g. B’ klyu 50
I* nt. A So. Am. Cable 75 100
’3 1 .. Warr’u(N .J.),lVd,7.5o
27
do
pref.J
[Hiarlest’ n,S.C ..G as.25
Commercial Tel. Co..
>
«Vest Jersey............. 5< §00”
M lcbigau A O bio.......
C h ica go G .A C o k e . 10«
46*3 . . . . . j P re fe rre d ...................
Vest Jersey & Atlanta
do
P ref.
33
U ineinnati G . A C ok e .
13
14 ■ Franklin .......... 100 25
*
” 4 ” ” 94S Western Mar} land—
9
Michigan C e n t.... 10*
97
, t., G. L..25
Vil. Columbia & Aug. l i d ....... «¿old A S to c k ..........I t O 92*2 lo 2 1« H a rtford.ACH oKok’ u 20
25 . . . . .
Midland of New Jersej
Jersey C
96
Bonds ..................
. . . 123
«Vilm & Welriou, 7.lot
.
66
Mil. Lake S. A W .. 10*
P eop le’s, J e rse y 0 ........
22*8 2 -4 M hattan Telegraph
an
99
Wisconsin Central —
98
do
prei. 101
Mexican ... .....100 115 150” L ou isville G. L . . . ........
do
Pref. 3 5 1 06
Mine Hill & S .H ....5 0 §60
C entral o f N. Y-. ..'..5 *
1ntuai Union.......H
)«
Vnre'ter&Nasbua. K l b ö X 13 /
nJ
18*4 19
Mluneap. & St. L ..1 0 0
C onsolid ated . N .Y. 10»
V. V. Mutual Uu. Tel.
44
CAN AL B O N »*.
43
do
P r e f... 100
bkpiitalile. N. Y ...........
84*2 85
Mutual Union 6s...
31*2 31% 0 icsap. A Delaware—
M isso’i Kan.A T e x .100
Mutual o f N. Y ....1 0 *
N vsvs».. 7«. 190' .JAI lu o
’
I
1st m ort.,6 s,’ 8 6 .IA.1 90 100
106*4 10/
Missouri P acific... 100
S. O rleans G . L . .. 10*
H
12
Post al T e le g ra p h . . 1 oO
16*2 C les.AO.—68 .’70.Q.-.I
16
M obile & Ohio....... 100
6
P ortland. M e., G . L.5*
3
bonds, 1st 6 s .........
141
tel. A H.—'7 s.’ 91.JAJ lOSl
138
Morris A L F , gu.,7.5o
x
40
30
St. L ouis G as 1 r . - . 10
Po.-tal T. A C .,w h en iss.
«4*4
1st ext., 1 8 9 1 ..MAN 115
81
N aslivChat. A St. L.25
20
L a cled e, St. L ouis. 10*
121 80 T e l., 1st m ort b ’ds
Coup. 7s. 1894. AA*
Nashua & L ow ell..100 159% 160
6 > *7*5’ 8a» 1 F ra n cisco G . L ----S onth’n A A tla n tic .25
43
14 Î ’
1st Pa.D.ep.,7s,MAr
N’squelioning Vall’y50 §54 . . . . . .
71'
71
W asirton C ity G. L .2 0
W estern U nion — 100
Lehigh Navigution1%
New Jersey <» N. Y . . .
122
GOLD A M L V E «
7s. 9 «O M A N---. .
18
4*2«, 1 9 1 4 ------ Q—J 110
do
Pref.
T il N I N O S T O C K S
TELEPHONE
HR. 6s, r e g .,’ 97,Q-J 118
N. Lond.A Nortb’nlOO
(\ . Y. A SAN . F R A N .)
111
STOCKS.
N.Y.Cent.A H.Kiv.lOu 114** 114 »8 Conv 6s,g.rg.’y4M A' 1 .5
1*40 1-70
M ice.............................. ..
American Bell ....100 195 196
68,g.,cp.Arg..’97 J<si
i 0 3 14
4
N .Y .C h ic.A S t.L ... lt'O
350
Alta M on ta n a .........100
Amer. Speaking... 100
12:1
26
C ons.M .,19il 7sJAI
2o
do
Pref. 100
•03
•02
A m i e ............................H
Colombia A Pan...100
90
22
Penn.—6s, 00 up., 191*
18
N. Y . City A Nottbern.
•
16 •20
B a r c e lo n a ....................
Kasi Tennessee..........
Schuylkill N av.—
N. Y. A Hbrlexn___50 215
•16 •20
B a ssiok .. . . . . . . . . . . 1 0 »
27 -S
i
90
Erie ........................
1st M .,6s, 1897.Q-M
N.Y.I.ack.<si West...100 104*4 loO
1-13
B e c h te l...........................
64
55
Globe.................. .
2d M .,6s, 1 9 0 7 ..JA.J
33 O 33%
f
N .Y.L.ErieA West. 100
•42
•60
B elle I s le ......... ....1 < ‘
23
Hudson River......100
73
4
Mort. 6s, op., ’95 J A3
do
P ref.100 77 *
2*50 2-75
l 8! B o d i e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10»
1*4
Mexican .................
52*4
6s,im p .,cp.,’ 80 MAN
52
N.Y. &N.England.lOO
2
New Eug'and......... 4 3 > 44 B u lw er................... ..1 0 0 l 10 1 30
121
6s,bt A car, 1913 MAN
do
Pref. 100. 120*4
1-05 1-20
C aledonia B. H ___ 1 00
40
New Y «'k AN. Jersev
20
7s,bt A car,1915M AN
N .Y .N H .AH artf.lGO
2U
C onsol. C a lifo rn ia . 100
28 N. Y. State Overland.
Susq.—6s,op., 1918J AJ
N .Y. Ont. A W est.. 100
•58 **•*65
C h r y s o lit e ........... . 5«*
7s. coup.. 1902. .JAJ
N. Y . Penn. & o b io ..
7-00
C b o l l a r ............. . . . 1 0 0
Southern N. England.
CAN AL STOCKS.
do
Pref.
•35 *‘ *50
75c.
C ousol. P a c i f i c .. .. 10U
T ro id e a l....................... IO
11£R 117s Cuesapcake A Del. f>"
N.Y. Susq. < Western
fc
4-75
C row n P o in t ............10*
lu2*i | . I Tejegr. A Tele.10
W
324; 62 *s Del. A H u d s o n .... 100
do
Pref.
•45
D u nkin..........................
ELECTRIC
A j Del. D iv. leased, 8 ..5 0
1%
N.Y. West Shore & B.
450
E ureka C o n s o l.... 10*
fcIGHT STOCKS,
Lehigh N avigation..5* § 49
23
22
Norf.&Wes'tj, co m .10*'
•25 1 0 0
F ather De S r n e t . . 100
BO
'Brush...................1O 73
0
Morns, guar., 4 .. ..10*
40 h
do
pref. 100
•03, •05
100
90
G old S tr ip e .. .
B rush Illu m in at’g 100
200
do pf., guar.l0..10(
'74*4
No. P enn sylvania..5*
G taidshaw .............. 10»
Bdison...................... 150
Pennsylvania..........5o
Northern Central.. .5» § 7 8 " 80
Edison riluminatlng.. 85 lu o G ou ld A C urry 8 .. 100 ’ 5-0Ö
North'n N. Hamp.10» 4-5** 126Si Schuylkill N av.......50
•25
47
Green M o u n t a in .... 10
41
Sw„n Incandescent.
do
do pref .50 i 5r
27*4 27*2
N ortb’n Pao., co m . 100
550
H ale A N oroross. .10*
United States .............
do
P ref. 10*' 60% t>i*4 t llS C ’ L L A N K O C S
1-80 65
1United States 1 1 Co.. 92*2 1ÖÖ HLoi-u S ilv e r...................
1.
BON DS.
17-4X L76
Norw.<& Worcester, lot
•25
tu d e p «i“ * " u e e . . . . . 10»
IR C S T CO.’ S
10 !Canton(Balt.)— £ 6s,g.,
Is
Ogd. & L. C ham p.It»
«
240
Ir«m S ilv e r.................. 20
STOCKS, N.Y.
Mo rt. 6 «j g ., IOO4 J-AJ
28** 2 »
ObbrdrM ise______ 10c
•20
•12
Vm Loan A Trust. 100 127*2 130 i-xerosse................ 10
.
Un. R R ., 1st,-end.,6s. lit . I l 8
«0
do
- P ref. 10* IS 7
•75
Brooklyn Trust......25 310 325 1 e a d v ille C»»ns»)l — 10
Col.CoalA Iron— lst.6s
Ohio Southern....... 1o<
•25
L ittle C hief
..........50
100 425
79*2 Oov.ACin.Bge. 5s,3-5 y 1 0 1 * 2 ........ Central
Old C olony............10* i'7 9 ” l
•80
•25
Little P itts.....................
5s, 5 years .. ..M AS 102*2....... Farmers’ Loan A Tr.25 425
12
JIO
Oreg.ACai. ass. pd.lo<
5-50
M exican G. A S ilv .1 0 0
_____lO % Knickei lioeker.... 100 I 15
Heml’ u BiidgeGs, 9 *.
24
do Pref. ass.pit 10> {22
•86
Jiavaio ...................100
e2
92*2 Long Island....... 53O 159
o2-V 33
Or. Imp., 1st, 6s. 1910
Oregon Snort L lie ...
lloBg...... M ercantile......... ..KM) 185 200 O p h i r ........................10 10-50
« 0*2 33*2 Oreg.R. A N. lst.6s,J A.l •
Oregon Trans-Cont. . .
•8
P o t o s í ..................... 100
Metropolitan .. ..10<> 132*2
Debenture 7s, 1687.
Oswego < Syr., guar.
fc
•20
•18
R ap p aham m k ............ 1
106
N. Y. Guar. A lnd..lO<) lo 5
Con. 58 1925 J.A D .. lO o
Pennsylvania RU .5* §56'
Re»l E lep t a n t ..........10
:N. Y. Life A Trust. 100 5o5
2 Lia Pullm’n Palace Car—
16
Pensacola A Atlantic.
•50
420
R obinson C o n s o l.. 50 '**•40
4
30*4 30 * 1 3d series, 8s,’ 87F<&A .........
Peoria Dec. < Ev..lO<
fc
5 00
___ IO
S icrra N eva tla . . . . . 1 0 0
515
....... 1
8s,’92FAA . . . .
70*2! 4th do
P etersbu rg............ 10<
•27 ■**•*29
S ilv er C liff................. 50
Deb’nt’re,7s,’ 88AAO . . . . . . .........î
Ph.Ua, & E rie.......... 5* J . . . . 26*4
sprin g V a lle y ............. 1
HOUSE BUS.
8t. L. Bridge A Tun—
35% 36
Pbila. < R e a d in g ...5*
fc
S ta n d a rd ................. 100 ' ï ' b ë Ï* 20
39
ileoeker St A Fult.F’y 28
1st, 7s, g, 1 9 19.AAO ♦133 137
§
do
Pref. . . . 5 * 1 .............. .......
4 00
Union C o n so l..........1**0
1st mort., 78. 1900.. 112 I 16
101
Tenn C.Ai.,c»>n.6s......
Pbila. Wilm.A B alt.5* x64
U U N T O N T U N IN G
¡roadway A 7th Av. 200
South Pitts. 1st. 6 s.. 10-2 —
Pitts. Cin. < St. L..5(i
M
NT O C K S .§
101
1st mort., '8, 1904..
t tlS C ’ L L A N E O O S
22 .......
Pitts. & Con., l ’sed.50
2*4
2
105
A llouez........................25
2d m >rt.. 5s, 19i4...
STOCKS.
do
P r e f ....
12
11
10 •
U la u t io ......................25
__ Amer. Bank Note C o .. 34 ......... ¡’way Surf., gu. 5s,’2 1
Pitts. Ft. W.A C.,guar.7
6
4
S runsw ’k A n tim o n y .5
100
Guar., os. ld O u ......
Amer. Cotton Oil trusi s 04*4 64 «2
20
Pittsburg A W estern..
215
190
Oalm uet A H e o ia ...2 5 214
o*4| ¡r<M>klyu C ity............. 180
Aspiuwall Land— l o
4
Port.Saco APorts.lsd 6 131 * 133
3 »o 370.
O atalpa S ilv e r . . . . . 10
8^
1st mort., 5s, 1902.. 106 n o
8
Boston Land............ 10
5
Port Royal < August!
&
21
19
C en tra l...................... 25j
4 t= ¡rooklyn Crosstown.. 1>5 175
4%
Boston W aterP ow er..
Ports. Gt. P. < Con. 1*K 112 114
fe
1
1st mort.., 7s, I8s8.. 105 118 C opper F a lls ............. 5oj
4.3a
Brookline (Mass.)L’<15
130 x 133
P rov. & W oro’ster.100
12 x 12*4
¡ushwick Av. (Bklyn.) 1 0 155 F r a n k lin .................... 2_
. . . . . . 64
Canton Co. (Balt.). 100
Rons. < Saratoga.. 100 170 170
fc
3
2*3
Hurou ........................25
1 5 1 165
10*2 10*2 Cev. A Cin. Bridge, pi 2«*0 ......... îentral Crosstown ... 116 120
Rich. & Alleg., reo___
3
1*2
Mduuesota . . . . . . . . . . 2 5
1st moil;., 6s, 1922 .
Joliet Steel Co....... 10» 129 13Richm ond < Dauv.100
&
l*a
138
120
N a tion a l.....................25
lo
¡entrai Pk.N A E.Riv.
«
Rich. P. & P „ com . 100 . . . . . . . . . . . Keeley M otor..............
23*2 25
2%
2*2
Consol. M 7s, 1902. Ï20* 125 'J s » ie o la ................ . 2 5
.,
Maverick L a n d .... 10
do
Guar. 7.100
3
2
Jhrisioi»her A 10th 8t. 120 130 P«-w <b o . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5
N.E. Mtg.Secur. IBoat.. 100 40 do
do 6 ..........
56
Bonds, 78, 1898 .... 110 112*2 l^ 'iiu e y .........................25 55
toe 2t)Ct
N. Hampshire Land 25
Richm ond & P’ b’g.lOt' 103
2
1
160
R id g e........................... 25
ryDk.E.B.A Battery
laO
40% N.Y. A Tex.Ld.,Lim. 5o 1 «0
40*2
Rich. A West Point___
90
85
*
i ï 'V 1 0 2 1 Camarank . . . . . . . . . . 2 5
1st M , oonsol.78, ’93
L
Land soriD ...............
99 103
Richm ond York R.AC.
J 1A N Cl F A C T ’ I N G
41
Scrip 6s, 1914...... lu 5 I«i7
Oregon Improvement , 4L
Rochester A Pitts. 100
S rO O K S ,
Eighth Aveuue....... 190 ‘2 00
Oregon Ry.AN .Co.100 102 1 »2
92*2 95
Rom e W. & O g d ... 10*'
775
Scrip 6s, 1914....... 107 110 A m . Linen (FAU R iv.)
*48 »4 48%
Paeiflo Mail SB. Co. 100
8
R u tla n d ................. 10<>
7*2
225 i A iuory (N. H .)___..10*) 105*2 i c e
210
42d A Graud St. F’y.
36*2 Philadel. Co. Nat. Gas. 110
36
do P re f.,7 .. 10*
l8tinort., 7s, ls 9 3 . 112 117 A m osk ea g (N. H.) IOOO 2235 2255
i Pullm’n Palace Car 100 198 lb ö
27
Bt. Joseph < G ’d Isl’ d.
fc
35** A u ilro sco g’u (M e .).10** In O x 102
42dSt.Man.ASt.N.Av
iO i
34 1st. Louis B ’d ge.lst pret ;106
30
Bt.LouisAlt.A T. H.lOt
55
> mort.. 6s......... 107*2 10s *2 A p pleton (M a ss.). 100O 540 560
r«t
I 2d pref. certificates. ;31
,
do
P ref.100
ill
49
A tla n tic (M a s s.).. .1 0 0 UO
112
21 luo., 6 s ............
ISt. L»)uis Tun nel R R .. ¡108
St. L. Ark.<fc Texas
25*4
70
G<>ust.W.St.APav. F’y 12*0” 130 B arnaby (F all R i v .) . .. 100 105
(50
10% 12 1st. Louis Transfer Co.
St. L. Ft. Scott < Wich.
fc
B arnard M fg. (F. R .) ..
112
< -.
Ho. 12 *
1st mort., 7s, 1894.. 110
Stand. Water Meter..
32 1
31
Bt. Louis O «an Fr.lO<
i
B ates (M e.)
-.1 0 0 i ï é " 148*3
IOO
i
Union St’k Yds ATr.Co 145 15 - *2 V th Avenue........... '
65
63
do P ref___ 10«
Bo»*tt Cot. (M ass.) 1000 1380 1400
180
Second A v en u e .......... |
113*2 .14*4 C O A L & M I N I N G
do ls t p r e f.lO
1st mort., 58,1910..! 105 10 7 B irder C ity M fg. (F .R .) 117*2 122
S T O C K S , N .Y .
12
8
St. Ii. Van. & 1.
B oston C o.(M as8.)1000 1075 1100
Cousol. 7s, 1868...... 101
4^*4 42 \
59 i Cameron C .itl .......'0
56
St. Paul & Duinrh.lOi
20 J " Boston B e ltin g ___ 1 00 148 148*2
*
38 *4 Sixth Avenue.........
3S
IColorado Coal A I . l o t
do
Pref. 10* 106*2 lu7
Bost. D uck (M ass.)700 850 9u0
1 «5
•
*»| 1-t mort., 7s, 1890 . n o
95
Bt.P.Minn. < M an.10* 114 115 ¡Consol.Coal o f Md.10*
fc
90
Chatm (F a ll R iv.) .1 0 0
11*2 i 1 ^ Third Aveuue .............. 220 225
¡Homestake Min’g.10»
14
109
Scioto V alley...............
iciiic o p e e (M a ss .) ..10»* 108
1st umrt., 7s, 1890.. 105 1<)6
---- *-[
¡Maryland Coal-----K
>»
...
Beab’d A RoanokelO»
Twenty-Third S t ...... 235 2*0 JCooheoo (N .I I .)... .5 0 0 535 540
Id
15
New Central C o a l. 1O
t
16
20
7%
South Carolina___10«
7*4
61% I n - *41 1st mort., “ s, 1893.. 112 114 jC ollin s C o. (C o u n .)-.IO
36
37 !N Y. A P e r r y .... 10
So. Pacific Co.........lo t
64
63
[»loutiiieiital M e.). 100
tiAS STOCKS.
23
Ontario Sil. Mm’g.100
129
B’ west., Ga., g’d, 7.10* 128
70
Cres’ t M ills (F. R.) 100
56
55
I
j Balt. CoilsjI. Gas--- Pennsylvania C oal.5»
63
Syr. Bing. & N. Y.lO i
C rystal Spr. BI.(F.R -)
2
5*2 1 ’ 7 * Boston Gas light... 500 867 870
Summit Branch,Pa.5i
9*2 Quicksilver Min’g.10»
65
8*4
3 : 39 D avol M ills (F. R.) 100 j 60
2» 1 28 1 East Boston........ 25
!
do
pref. 10(
48
Sunbury & L «wist..5* § .. . . .
D ougl’ s A x e (Ma,«s)l<)OI
U*0 1 »1
o
2!
44A 1 4 1* R.xhu-y.............LO
Tenn.CoalATronCol '<
1 f>65 675
l ’erre H < I nd’nap.ot
v
'4
Tex, A Poe. TV i>p .< •4 ■ *0 >1 V Wvftminn V'.l.OoS*. 0
) ‘>’
§ i^uotadon per share.
- 1 In Loudon .
Pnoe uuimnal; no lato transaotieus.
t Farunaser also pays aoerue 1la^caesi.

L




J anuary i, ist-7 ]

THE

C H R O N IC L E .

Xu tues trajet* î
J ND

attvcrad

I n t t W ï Q t n e.
c

The I n v e s t o r s ’ S u p p l e m e n t contains a complete exhibit of
the Funded Debt of States and Cities and o f the Shocks and
Bonds o f Railroads and other Companies. It is published
on the last Saturday o f every other month—viz., February.
April, June, August, October and December, and is f u r ­
nished without extra charge to all regular subscribers o f the
C h r o n ic l e .
E xtra copies are sold to subscribers o f the
C h r o n i c l e at 50 cents each, and to others it #1 per copy.

GENERAL INVESTM ENT N E W S.
Allegheny V alley.—An order was made in the United
States Circuit Court at Pittsburg by Judge Acheson, author­
izing the receivers of the Allegheny Valley Railroad Company
to pay certain coupons. One of the amount« ordered paid is
the principal of $100,000, and interest, $57,000, on bonds due
on the $2,300,000 moitgage. The court authorized the pay­
ment of $144,000 interest due January 1 on the $4,000,000
mortgage.
— In the payment of the interest due Jan. 1, 1887, on the
7 3-10 per cent g«-ne>al mortgage bonds of the Allegheny Val
ley R. R. Co., the us~ of the certificate of residence furnished
by bondholders during the last two interest p riods, will be
continued, the questions which render the certificate desirable
and necessary not having yet been reached in the courts. In
the case of residents of Pennsylvania, this certificate is for the
sole purpose that the tax may be properly refunded in cas» its
collection in this manner shall be decided by the courts to
have been improper.
Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe—G n lf Colorado & Santa
Fe.—The Boston / rave'er says that the suit of C. H Venm r
against the A*chi-on Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Company,
to prevent the delivery of the Atchison stock for the Gulf
Colorado & Sant. Fe stock, in accordance with the term« of
the agreement entered into last spring, cam * up again this
week. A continuance of the injunction until after Jud^e
Brewer had rendered his decsion was asked for. Tins, if
granted, wou d have carried the injunction over January 1,
when the delivery of stock is du-% but Judge Wallace would
not grant the extension and dissolved the injunction. The
Atchison stock ($3 400,000 of it) will therefore be delivered on
Saturday next, subjec to the assessment of $3 per share re­
cently called for by President Seeley of the Gulf Colorado &
Santa Fe road. This stock will participite in the February
dividend, which, in accordance with the u«u 1 practice o f the
Atchison management, will be made a charge against the
earnings of this, the preceding, year. From the income of
1886 the com any will, therefore, pay four dividends on
$4,600,000 or thereabouts of stock exchanged for Gulf Colo­
rado & Santa Fe stock, and one dividend on $3.400,000, the
balance to be exehinged, o about $327,000 in all, in addition
to the dividend on the old stock.

21

Chicago & A tlantic.—A press dispatch from Chicago, De­
cember 29, says that the Chicago & Atlantic ha« consented
to become a me mb r of the Central Traffic Association and
Chicago east-bound pool after expiration of its contract with
the Wabash, February 1, 1887. The question of percentage to
be given the Chicago & Atlantic is to be fixed by arbitration,
arbitrators having been chosen to decide what the percentage
shall be. Thi«^ dispatch also says that the Cincinnati Indian­
apolis St. Louis & Chicago (Big Four), which has heretofore
received 5 per cent of Chicago east-bound traffic from the
Chic go pool for its Seneca traffic to Newport News, has con­
sented to accept hereifter 4 ^ per cent unon condition that
this percentage is not reduced when the Chicago & Atlantic
comes into the pool.
Chicago & Northwestern—Fremont Missouri T alley &
Elk horn.—Amendments to the articles o f incorporation o f
the Fremont Missouri Valley & Elkhorn R tilway, which be­
longs to the_ Northwestern system, were file l in Omaha
recently, providing for a material increase o f the lines of that
route in a manner that will touch the best counties in the
Stitc in every direction from the main line of the road. The
amendment provides that the main line shall run from Omaha,
and also authorizes the construction o f seven branches, as
follows:
1. From the main line at Norfolk in a northeasterly direction through
Pierce, Antelope and K nox co mties to the Missouri R iver at a p oin t
near the mouth of the Niobrara River.
2. From Dakota Junction through Dawes county to the northern
btmndaiy o f the State.
3. From S rib er. in a northwesterly direction, through Dodge. Col­
fa x. latte, Boone and A utelope counties, to the northern boun tarv o f
the Stme,
4. From Fremont, through Dodge and S winders counties, to Lincoln.
5. Prom a point on the Fourth bntuch in Saundets cou n ty west
til ough Butler, Seward, York, H imiltiin. Clay a id A in u « oouuties to
Hastings, and from Hastings to the western boundary of Adams cou n ty .
6. From i be Fifth branch, at a point in Bn ter com ity, through But­
ler. Saline and Fillmore counties, to the southern boundary of Fillm ore
county.
7 Fr an a point on the main line in Douglas county to the Union
stock yards in South Omaha.

The capital stock o f the com pany is increased to $30,000,000.

Cincinnati New Orleans & Texas Pacific.—Mr. Bind has
retired from the presidency and Mr. Cnarb*s Schiff, the VicePresident, has been elected President. This company leases
the Cincinnati S mthern road owned by the City of Cmcinna'i,
and has made a claim on the trustees of that road f.*r $500,,
000 damages suffered by the lessei company, by the failure of
the trustees to provide suitable terminal f acilities in Cincin­
nati as agreed upon in the lease. The claim seems to have
good foundation, and the company ought to be fairly dealt
with.
Cleveland Columbus Cincinnati & Indianapolis.—Judge
Stevenson Burk has been elected President of tne Cleveland
Columous Cincinnati & Indianapolis Railway. He is also
President of the Columbus Hocking Valley & T o l e d o , the
Toledo & Ohio Centr-il and the In 'ianapoiis & St, Louis.
Judge Burke is a prominent lawyer and of late years has
become one of the leading railroad men of the country.
This company reports a business which snows net earnings
1.0U0 greater than those of 1835 and a surplus after payment
of ‘ ‘first charges” and for betterments of $104,993, against a
Atlantic & P acific.—The circular of October 20 proposes to deficit of $863,826 for the year of 1885. Subjoined are the
exchange the fcr.«t mortgage 6 per cent bonds for a new 4 per comparisons for the two years, the figures embracing the oper­
cent bond absolutely guaranteed, and stated that the success ations of the whole system:
o f the plan was contingent upon the assent, on or before Dec.
/-Years ended Dee. 31—
.
27, 1886, of the holders o f a majority in interest. A very large
188*'
majority has already a«sented and the remaining bondhold­ Gross earnings........................
$6,111,445
Operating expenses.......................
ers will probably come in very soon.
4,929.274
Net earnings................... .
$1,482,171
, Canada Southern.— At a meeting of the directors o f the
First Charges.............................
$2,039.616
Canada Southern Railroad Co., held Dec. 30, at the Grand Equipments and betterm ents___
30 6,3s i
Central Depot, a dividend of
per cent was declared, pay­
able on Februaiy 15.
Total deductions....................... ......... . . . $2,35 ,599
$ ,345,997
A statement was received from the Michigan Central Rail­
D eficit...............................
road Company (De ember being partly estimated), which
Sur lu s ..........................
shows the following results from the business of the year:
Denver & R io Grande.—This reorganized railway company
_
,
.
1886.
1835.
pays its first coupon on the new bonds on Jan. 1, 1887, and
Surplus over charges................................................. $1,322 000
$2b,OoO
Division as p er tra ffic agreement, viz.:
has a handsome surplus ia its treasury. The gross earnings
To M ichigan Cen. R. R. Co......... .............................
912,000
17.400 for 1886 (estimating the last week of December) have been
$8,764,995, and the net earnings (partly estimating November
Canada Southern Railway C o..............f . ................ $ 110,0 0
$ «,6 >0
Equals per share ...................................................... ’
2 -73
0 0 5 7 and December) have been $2,506,930, while the total yearlyLess dividend l ^ per cent declared tills d ay .’."..".* 187, -> 0
•
charge for interest is now about $1,350,000. The old Denver
& Rto Grande Railway Company has been quickly and suc­
Balance....................................................................... $222,5 .,0
cessfully rehabilitated.
Central o f New Jersey.—The lease of the Central Railroad
Dubuque & Sioux City.—A committee of the directors of
lines of New Jersey to the Philadelphia & Reading terminated the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad on December 13
December 31.
appointed Drexel, Morgan & Co. trustees to recnve stock
Mr. John S. Kennedy and Joseph S. Harris, receivers of the that might be deposited with them for the purpose of enabling
Central Railroad of New Jersey, have issued a circular saying the directors to sell the property or to sell t ie stock at a price
that they will take pot-session and assume the operation of the not less than par, or to execute a new h»se on a bnsis that
company’s railroads and other property on January 1, 1887. should not yield less than 4 per cent on the stock, and to vote
All the piesent officers, agents and employees of the Reading for su h directors as they may select. In case these purposes
receivers on the former New Jersey Central, New Jersey o uld not be carried out, a meeting of the depositors was to be
Southern and Lehigh & Surquehanna Divisions of the Phila­ called, and any modifications which might be assented to by
delphia & Reaoing Railroad will he continued in their respec­ three-fourth« of the amount d-positeu should be binding
tive positions from January 1, 1887, at their présent rate o f upon all. Before the books closed on Dec. 81 more than a
compensation unies« otherwise notified. The two system« will majority of the stock had been deposited with this com­
continue on ihe test of terms under the new a rangement, mittee. The committee is comp >sed of the fplowing genupon the basis of the oi l agreem nt, under which they form ­ tl -men: M. K. Jesup, Jas. A Roosevelt, J. Pierpont Morgan
erly exchanged business a d managed joint traffic.
and Lorenzo BUckstone, and they were appointed to pro­
The directors al-o decided to pay the January interest on the tect stockholders’ in erests in view of the termmtt'on of the
New Jersey Sont era nonds and to default on the January in­ lease to the Illinois Central on October 1, 1887. A legal
terest on the American Docks.
opinion has been published that the deposits of stock can be




THE

22

[V ol. XLIV.

C H R O N IC L E .

revoked, while couneel for one of the committee states that
they are irrevocable. It is alleged that parties m the interest
o f Illinois Central desire to control a majority of the stock.
Grand Rapids & ln d ia n a .-T h e following is a statement of
the gross and net earnings of this road as specially obtained
■by the Chronicle,
,— Jan. 1 to Nov- 30.— >
— November.------ >
1886.
1885.
188«.
1885.
$1,891.124 $1,795,551
Gross earnings.................
J
$ 109,832
* ? '* - - 1,216,066
1,238,103
•Operating expenses—
121,4»4
$875,058
$057,448
Net earnings............ $37,963
$81,574
.
,

Michigan Central.—At a meeting of the directors of the
Michigan Central RR. Co., held Dec. 30, at the Grand Central
Depot, a dividend of 2 per cent was declared, payable on
February 15. The following statement by the Treasurer was
presented, December, 1886, being partly estimated :
1836.
^ ^ O .O O O
Gross earnings................................. .
8,350,»00
Operating expenses and tax es....................
b. sdu .< w
i
..........
bS' lo
Per cen t..... ...........
Net earnings...................................................
Interest and rentals.........................................

578*000
2,ova,uou

1885.
$10.707,000
8.015.000
7408
$2.692,000
2 .666.000
$26,000

Surplus earnings ................... . — ..........
322,000
Houston & Texas C ,entral.-It has b ’ en reported this week Proportion to Canada 8outliern Co ........... $ ^4 i» ,w w
8.600
that Mr C. P. Huntington has made a change in the proposi$17,400
$912,000
Do. to Michigan Centr.il C o......
tion to the bondholders of the Houston & Texas Central Rail­
0-093
4-37
road bv wliich the overdue coupons on the 1st mortgage main _ quais per share fo r Mich. Central.
75,000
line bonds and the coupons due on January 1_are to be paid in Expended for land, 13 86.................
$837,000
cash the mortgage to remain as it stands and to be paid off at
Leaves......... --------------------------- ................ ’
374,764
maturity. Under the plan the second mortgage bonds are to Dividend two per cent declared this d a y ..
have the interest reduced to 5 per cent, and the general mo t$462,236
B alance....... ............................. -.............
$1,543,000=14-4 per cent.
gage bonds 4 per cent, and debenture bonds are to be issued Increase in gross earn iu g s.......... ...........
3 3 5,00 0= 4-2 p ercent.
for the overdue coupons. These bonds and the interest on fill Increase in expenses.................................
the bonds are to be guaranteed by the Southern Pacific Rail­ Increase in net earnings................................ $1,208,OOC= 44 8 per cent.
way. [This report is not fully confirmed at the office, where
All expenditures this year have been charged to operating
it is said that any announcement is yet premature.J
—The Farmers’ Loan & Trust Company, by Turner, Lee & account, except the amount for land above noted.
New York Central & Hudson R iver.—The following is the
McClure, its attorneys, has begun an action to restrain the sale
o f 880 of the general mortgage bonds of the Houston & Texas statement of this company for the quarter ending December
Central Railway Company. These bonds are held by. or are 31st, December in 1886 being partly estimated :
1885.
1886
under the control of, Morgan s Louisiana & Texas Railroad &
$6,876,601
$8,976,000
,
Steamship Company, which claims that they have been Gross earnings.........................
(80T3% ) 4,133,208
5.401,000
pledged with them to secure indebtedness of the railway com Operating expenses...............(60-1. %)
$2,741,392
$3,575,009
pany. The Farmers’ Loan & Trust Company is the trustee of
Net earnings
1,467.000
1,957,200
the general mortgage, under which over 4,000 bonds have been First charges—
issued, and it claims that these 880 bonds in question could Profit........................................ (1-31%) $1,617,800 (1-43% ) 1,274,392
(1%) 894,283
never h ,ve been properly issued, inasmuch as th e, m0ro .a^ Dividend Jan. 1 5 ...................
^
(1%)
894,283
___________
does not authorize their bring issued in order to be used as
Surplus..$723,517
D e ficit..$380,109
collateral, but only authorizes their sale in order to pay off
New York Lake Erie & W estern —The gross earnings by
and discharge the indebtedness of the railroad or for the
improvement and equipment of the ra lroad. Judge Barrett months in 1885-6 and 1886-7 were as below: The gross earn­
ings include 68 per cent of the earnings of the New York
grantei a restraining order, returnable on Moud«y next.
Pennsylvania & Ohio, leased line, the other 32 per cent of the
N. Y. Tribune.
earnings of that line being paid as rental. The net earnings
Lake Erie & W estern.—Notice is published by Mr. Nelson are correct as showing the actual results to the New York
Robinson, No. 2 Wall Street, that the purchaser, General Like Erie & Western.
— Net Earnings.-----,
Samubl Thomas, has agreed to sell the property to a new com
r-— Oross earningt.----- ,
1886.
1885.
1886.
1885.
pany to be formed, called the Lake Erie & Western Railroad
$777,813
$ 574,410
Company, whose line will extend from Sandusky, Ohio, to Ootob r.....................$2.234,359 $1,9«0,64S
634,615
609,974
N ov em b er.... . . . . . . .. 2,048,512
1,912,526
Peoria 111., 430 miles, and which will issue the following
Total tw o m onths..$1.233,371 $3,893,174 $1,412.478 $1,284,384
securities : $4,300,000 firbt mortgage gold 5 percent 50year
.bonds, being at the rate of $10,W per mde. $ ^ 00,000 pre­
New York & New England.—The gross and. net earnings by
ferred stock, being at the rate of $20,000 per mile, $8,600,000 months for the fiscal years 1885-86 and 1886-87 are as below:
common stock, being at the rate of $20,000 per mile. All old
,—gross E a r n i n g s ,
> Net Earnings. >
—
1886.
1885.
1886
1885.
securities have been extinguished by the sale, and will receive
*381.180
$339,963
$158,509 $150,705
their respective portions of the purchase money from the
Novmnher.’.'.*.'.'...
347,703
308,210
139,730
122,689
officers of the court. The present car trusts will also be paid
off, leaving the property free from lien except as above. All
T o ta l tw o m o n th s.... $728,883
$648,173
$29^,239 $273,394
iurther particulars may be had on reference to Mr. Robinson.
New York Susquehanna & Western.—The following is a
Lake Shore & Michigan Sonthern—A t a meeting of the statement of the gross and net earnings of this road as spe­
directors of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway cially obtained by the Chronicle.
%
,----------- November.----------- , ^-11 Months to Nov. 30.—
Company, held Dec. 30 at the Grand Central Depot, a divi­
1886.
1885.
1886.'
1885.
dend of two per cent was declared, payable on Feb. 15. lhe
$97,344 $1,016,895 $1,005,950
following statement by the Treasurer was presented, Decem­ Gross earnings....... $107,735
537,146
582,075
47,654
Oper. expenses.......
55,493
ber, 1886, being partly estimated :
1385.
1886.

•Gross earnings............. ...................................... ^ 9 7 0 i 135
Operating expenses and taxes........................ 0,7 6 1-34
Per cent.
Net earnings............ - - - - - - - ....................... $6.117,481
Interest, rentals, and dividends on guaranteed stock...................................................... 3 ,7 1 »,i s o

$14,133,506
9,287,537
66 ’

$1,845,969

N et e a r n in g s ....

$ 5 2 ,2 4 2

$ 4 9 ,6 9 0

$434,820

$468,804

New York Stock Exchange.—The Governors of t he Stock
Exchange admitted to dealings at the board the following
86CUtltl6S *
U nion Pacifc R ailw ay .—An

•'

additional $900,000 of collateral
trust 5 per cent bonds, making the total now on list $4,567,000.
Chicago Milwaukee & Sr. P aul R ailw ay .—An additional
$978,513
Surplus earnings......................................... $2,398,346
$1-98 $585,000 of Hastings & Dakota first extension mortgage 5 per
Equals per sh are. ...................................... .
\ ? J = 1 2 per ct.
cent bonds ; also first mortgage 5 per cent bonds of Chicago «
Increase in gross earnings............................... 1 x o i U ft— 11-2 do
•1
Missouri River division, maturing July 1, 1926, to the amount
Increase in e x p e n se s.......................................
of $2,049,000.
_
.
:
do
St . P aul & Northern P acific R ailw ay .—General mortgage
Increase ip net earnings............ .............. $1,271,512—26
Expenses cover all improvements, including a new station 6 per cent gold bonds, due February 1, 1923, to the amount of
.at Toledo costing about $120,000. Nothing has been charged $6,000,000.
m
„ w .™
R ichmond & W est P oint T erminal R ailw ay & W are to construction or equipment since 1883.
house Company.—Application was made for the listing of an
L ittle Rock Mississippi R iver & T exas—A dispatch from additional $9,000,000 common stock and $5,000,000 preferred
Little Rock, Ark., Dec. 29, says that the Federal Court set aside stock. The committee admits $1,328,200 common stock and
the late sale of the Little Rock Mississippi River & Texas $885,500 preferred stock.
*
, ,
Railroad to Jay Gould, because o f a misunderstanding by the
A tlantic & P acific R ailroad .—Guaranteed trust 4 per
-purchaser of the State laws relative to redemption. The cent gold bonds, due January 1, 1937, to the amount of
property will be re-advertised for sale.
$17,610,000, issued for exchange for 6 per cent bonds upon its
Memphis & C harleston—The gross and net earnings for Western and Central division, now outstanding, and Central
November, and for five months of the fiscal year, have been division income bonds to the amount of $2,100,000.
Norfolk & Western.—The statement of earnings and
as follows:
,
,-------- November.---------> ,— July 1 to Nov. 30.— expenses for November and for the eleven months is as follows.
1886.
Gross earnings........... $184 571
Operating expenses—
100,048
Net earnings...........

$75,360

1885.
__
$66,390

3,867,456

188«.
$671,835
394,669

1885.
$569,591
378,730

$277,166

$190,861

_____ November.-------, r -W m o s .J a n .l to Nov.30—>
1886.
188 5 .
188 6 .
188 5 .
G ross earnings ............. $ 33 7 ,7 0 8
$ 2 7 0 ,6 3 6 $ 2 ,9 8 4 ,7 1 9
$ 2 ,5 2 1 ,6 9 2
ExpenfesinclUxei;;.. * 2 07 ,06 2
1 5 3 ,9 1 7 1 ,7 8 6 ,6 3 1
1 ,5 0 9 ,7 0 8

N et ea rn in g s........... .-..$ 1 3 0 ,6 4 5 $ 1 1 6 ,7 1 9 $ 1 ,1 9 3 ,0 8 3
$ 1 ,0 1 1 ,9 8 4
Mexican C en tral.-T h e gross and net earnings for No­
vember and for the eleven months from January 1 were as
Philadelphia & Reading.—Notice is published that cred­
itors and shareholders are requested to deposit general mort­
below given:
-----November.------- > ,-----Jan. I to Nov. 30.gage bonds with Messrs. Drexel & Co., Philadelphia, and other
1886.
1885.
1886.
1885.
$3,416,725
$3,212,863 securities with Messrs. Brown Brothers & Co , under the
Gross earnings.........$379,902
$312,481
2,244,024
1,859,889 terms of agreement of March 22, 1886, as modified by the plan
O perating expenses 200,373
157,748
o f reorganization of December 14, 1886, copies of which can be

Net earnin gs....$ 1 7 9 ,5 2 9




$154,733

$1,172,701

$1,352,974

T H E CHRONICLE-

J a n u a r y 1, 1& 7 .J

23

had upon application at the respective banking houses of the
depositories, and at the Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit
Company. The cash subscription will be called for in instal­
ments of 25 per cent each, and thirty days’ notice by adver­
tisement will be given prior to eaoh call. Creditors and share­
C O M M ER C IAL EPITOM E.
holders are given until March 1, 1887, to accept the provisions
of this plan. (See notice in full in advertising columns.)
F r id a y N igh t , Dec. 31,1886.
—The Reading receivers will default on January 1 on the
general mortgage bonds, debenture sixes and convertible
Strikes on a Brooklyn street railroad, on the Reading Rail­
sevens; also on three classes of scrip. The amount of the obli­ road and among Ohio coal miners, have been adjusted this
gations defaulted upon is about $37,000,000. The receivers will
pay the January interest on $2,500,000 first mortgage bonds, week, the operatives generally obtaining concessions. Other
labor troubles are pending or threatened, but it does not
on the receivers’ certificates and also all rentals earned.
St. Joseph & Grand Island.—Notice is given that a special seem to be apprehended that they will be so serious for the
meeting of the stockolders will be held at El wood, Kan., year to come as they were during that whioh closes to-day.
Wednesday, January 26, for the purpose of taking action in A better understanding of the relations of capital and labor has
regard to a proposed contract between the St. Jose > & Grand been reached ; in the case of the latter there is less dispositi n
h
Island and the Kansas City & Omaha R. R. Co. for aiding said
last named company in the construction of its railroad; and to make unreasonable demands, while the former is more
also on a proposed agreement between the St. Joseph & Grand ready for just concessions. The weather has been severely
Island Railroad Co. and the Union Pacific Railway Co. and wintry and general business is no better than it usually is at
the Kansas City & Omaha Railroad Co., providing for the the holiday season.
interchange of traffic between said roads, and for the man
Lard has made some further advance in prices, and specu­
agement and operation of the railroad o f the Kansas City &
Omaha Co., and the guarantee by the St. Joseph & Grand lation has at times been very active. Tfie smaller number of
Island R. R. Co. of the interest on bonds about to be issued swine slaughtered at the West, the increased exports and the
by the Kansas City & Omaha Co.
danger of a European war, have encouraged speculation
Shenandoah Yalley.—In regard to the item in last week’s for the rige. To-day an early advance was mostly lost
Chronicle, it turns out that the report of the Master has under free selling. Lard on the spot advanced in sympathy
not yet been filed in this case and the whole matter has been
postponed until the first day of M irch next, when it will be with speculative values, and latterly business has improved ;
decided at a Special Term of the Court to be held for that but to-day the close was quiet at 6’50o. for prime City, 6’85o.
purpose. In the meantime further testimony will be taken for prime Western and 7-15c. for refined to the Continent.
and any report of the probable findings of the Master is
unquestionably premature while the ca3e is yet unfinished.
DAILY CLOSING PRICES OF LARD FUTURES.
— Following is a statement of the gross and net earnings of
Saturd'y. Mond’y. Tuesd'y. Wedns’ y. Thursd'y. F riday.
the company as specially obtained by the Chronicle :
6 61
6-67
6-69
6-80
6-88
------------ Nov’r.------------,
,—Jan. 1 to N'ov. 3 0 .-, Jan. d e liv e r y .. £
„
.
I.8* 6Gross earnings..................$71,053
Oper. expen. and ta x e s.. 63,712
Net earn in g s............

$7,341

1385.
$37,765
57,807

-8 8 «.
$386,339
608,468

def. $42

$77,870

188«.
$636,7; 9
607,435

.. *
.. jg
.. 0
.. 8

670
6-79
6 ’89
6-38

6*77
6-85
6*93
7-03

6-78
6-88
6-96
7 ’04

6-89
6*97
7*07
7*15

6-91
7-00
7-08
7-17

$29,344

Southern Central, New York.—At a meeting of the stock­
holders of the Southern Central R lilroad, held in Auburn, a
vote was taken upon the question of executing a lease of the
road to the Lehigh Valley Railroad for 975 years from the 1st
of next January. All the stock owned in the towns situated
on the line was represented, and the vote taken was unan­
imously in favor of leasing. A t a meeti g of the directors
held immediately after the stockholders’ meeting the lease
was ordered executed forthwith by the proper offi ers of the
company.
South Pennsylvania.—The members of the syndicate met
in New York, and there was a full representation of the
majority and miniority factions. Mr. Garrett’s letter was
barely referred to. The Tribune reports:
“ After prolonged discussion a comm ittee was appointed to ascertain
the views of all syndicate members oa the question o f com pleting the
road or accepting the scheme o f Air. G>w«u fo r the transfer o f th>
majority rights to the m inority party headed by him and the HostetterBagaley people. Mr. tiowen offers a 4 per ceru- bond for 75 per cent of
the amount paid in by the subscribers, the bonds to be deposited wi h
some trust oompany, and the buyers o f the m ajority interest to reserve
the option to redeem the bonds within a certain time at a figure slightly
below par. The minority interest thinks that the road can be finished
with advantage to the original investors. The Vanderbilt or ma jority
interest is opposed to sinking m ore good m oney ia i he enterprise, but
is willing to let the m inority party buy out its rights at figures better
than those offered by the Pennsylvania Railroad. This m ajority interest
is not desirous o f antagonizing the Pennsylvania Railroad, which is wi’l
mg, providing the courts perm it it to do so, to issue 3 p e rce n t bonds
•ior the funds invested already. Mr. Gowen will sail for Europe in a
tew days, it is understood, with the intention o f seeking aid there to
arry out his desirocco co npLeoe the io ic h Peu liyivauia line.”

Union Pacific.—The Union Pacific Company, in its applica­
tion to tbe Stock Exchange regarding the collateral trust
bonds, says: “ Referring to former applications of this com­
pany for listing the collateral trust 5 per cent bonds, in
answer to which $6,000,000 of said bonds were listed, and
referring also to subsequent action taken January 21, 1886.
reducing the amount listed to $3,688,000, this company now
asks to have certain of the bonds so stricken off restored
thereto or relisted, so that all binds numbered from 1 to
6,000, except such as have been canceled by the sinking fund
may be included. On December 20, 1886, the amount on list
was further reduced to $3,667,000.”
—Messrs. Blake, Boissevain & Go. of London bought of the
Union Pacific Railway Company about three weeks ago nearly
$2,000,000, of these collateral trust five per cent bonds which
is the entire balance of the authorized issue of $6,000,000.
The firm has offered the bonds in London and Amsterdam!
The Boston Traveler says: “ The company has strengthened the
collateral behind these bonds by the substitution of $2,519,000
Omaha & Republican Valley 40 year 5 per cent consols for
$1,800,000 Denver South Park & Pacific bonds. The former
bonds are of a new issue, at the rate of $10,000 per mile on a
number of Union Pacific branch lines in Kansas and Nebraska,
and are intended as a substitute for old issues upon these
branches. This consolidation makes a division of the Omaha
& Republican Valley lines, which connects the Union Pacific
[division with the Kansas Pacific division. The connecting
mk has just Ixen finished, and the company is sending all
maha business destined for Kansas City over this line.




F ebruary“
March
April
May
“

Pork is decidedly higher, keeping the volume of business
within comparatively narrow limits, and the close is quiet at
$12 55@$12 75 for new mess, $10 75@ $ll for extra prime and
$14 75@$15 50 for clear. Cutmeits have been more active
and are dearer; pickled bellies
hams 8^ @ 9^ c . and
shoulders 5@5)^c.; smoked hams lOSlO^o. and shoulders 6@
6^ c . Beef is dull at $7 50@$8 for extra mess and $8 50@$9
for packet per bbl. and $15@$17 for India mess per tierce;
beef hams are steady at $19@$19 50 per bbl. Tallow sells
fairly at 4J^c. Stearine is firm at 7^@7J^c. and oleomargar­
ine is quoted at 6@ 6J^c. Butter is in moderate demand at
21@33c. for creamery. Cleese is firm at l l l ^13c. for State
^
factory full cream and 6^ 11^ 3. for skims. The following is
a comparative summary of aggregate expo ts from November
1 to December 25:
„ .
1886.
P o r k ......................lbs. 7,140.000
Bacon, &e
............... 79.674,542
t * « d ................................. 72,239,882

1885.
7,660>(>I
83,105, »62
48,442,038

Deo.
520.800
Dec. 3,430,920
Ino. 23,797,845

There has been an extremely feverish market for Rio
Coffee, especidly in its specula'ive features. Prices show
some advance, but to-day the speculation was quiet, closing
with sellers at 12’90@ 13c. for the active months. The quotation
for fair cargoes Rio was to-day advanced to 14%c., but buy­
ers withdrew. R iw sugars are dull and heavy at 4%c. for
fair refining Cuba and 5)^c. for centrifugal 96 deg. test.
Molasses closes dull at 20c. for 50 deg. test. Teas are quiet.
Kentucky tobacco has been more active at firm prices; sales
for the week are 800 hhds. of which 650 for export. Seed leaf
has been in fair demand, the sab s for the week aggregating970 cases as follows: 125 cases 1881 crop, Pennsylvania, 13@.
14c ; 150 cases ’82-’83 crops Pennsylvania, 11(9) 13c.; 250 cases
1885 crop, Pennsylvania, 9@ 15c.; 120 cases 1885 crop, Ohio,
4%@6>£c.; 100 cases 1384 crop, State Havana, 11c., and 200cases sundries, 6@25c.; also 250 bales Havana, 60c.@$l 05,
and 150 bales Sumatra, $1 20(®$i 50.
Prices of crude petroleum certificates have taken a higherrange, but the close is quiet at 6 9 69%c. Reports from the
wjlls are somewhat contradictory. Spirits turpentine has
been improving latterly, and to-day advanced to 37c,, but
rosins are quiet. On the Metal Exchange tbe Speculation in
block tin was strongly toward lower figures; yesterday the
price dropped to 21’75c. on the spot and for early delivery, but
to*day there was a firmer market and Fob. sold at 23@22<
05c.
Ocean freights were active in the matter of grain shipments]
until to-day, when there was little done ; late engagements are
at 4%d. to Liverpool, 5%d. to Newcastle and
1% l.@ 43. 3d,
to Cork for orders.

THE

24

C O T T O N .
F r i d a y , P. M., Dec. 31, 1886.
T h e M o v e m e n t o f t h e C r o p , as indicated by our teiegran e
fr o m the South to -nigh t, is given below . For the week endinu
th is evening <
Deo. 81), the total receipts have reached 23ft,618
bales, against 283,043 bales last w eek 260,659 bales the previo. s
w eek ana 227,886 bales three weeks s in c e ; m aking the total
receipts since the 1st o f Septem ber, 1886, 3,755,798 bales,agains*
3,607,243 bales for the sam e period of 1885, show ing an increase

Receipt* ai—

Sat.

Mon. I Tue».

Wed.

Thurt.

I x addition to above exports, our telegrams co-night also give
as the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not cleared,
»t the ports named. W e add similar figures for New York,
vhich are prepared for our special use by Messrs. Carey, Yale
* Lambert. 24 Beaver S t r e e t . _______________________ .

F ri. 1 Total.
4,664

On Shipboard, not cleared—for
Dee. 31, AT—

m o lu u v w m i s

27,893

--- ---------

Since Sep.
Thit 1
Week. 1, 1886.

G a lv e s to n ... 27.893 530,281
.........
ln d ’nola,Ao
New Orleans. 104,312 1,119.369
M obile........... 11,513 15s 097
15,122
745
F lo r id a .........
28,«15 65 >,771
Savannah.
22,681
i 50
B r’sw ’ k. Ao
Charleston .. 12.019 3-4 .1 8 9
13,4 >3
P t.R oyul.A o
318
Wilmington .
3,838 115,564
3,283
147
M’head C.,Ao
N orfolk......... 17 ,70 '1 399,51»
W .Poiut, Ac. 14 874 227 4*0
47,239
b 092
New Y o r k ...
33.3 4
5.320
B o s t o n .........
21,305
1,426
B a ltim ore. . .
19,1 6
442
Phlladel’a,Ao

This Since Sep.
Week. 1 ,1 8 8 5 .

N >rfolk.............
N w Y o r k ... . . .
Otber p o r t a .....

—

1885

1886.

92.067
17.201 541,626 127,957
.........
781
76 713 1.145,379 434,720 391 915
56.184
41.0c>8
16.768 159,980
2
...
35,743
3,116
22,774 592,780 130,774 127 487
12,328
680
49,45» 104,357
11,102 38**,207
30
359
8,778
396
ll,4 i7
21,395
77,143
1,527
4,189
165
53,282
52,683
15.498 368 616
7,33»
9 .tO 4
12.961 1 8 0 ,7 .9
32,52 > 215,483 233 4»3
3,954
e ,3 l0
ll,O i 0
38,516
4,991
35,290
11,837
13,434
1.028
12.355
10,155
14,498
670

18.-6.

17.201
76,713
16,768
22,774
11,798
1.6*2
15,498
12,969
14,439

10,972
61,876
12,110
18,1 .*7
9,873
1,410
19,073
8,759
11,895

14,916
52,227
6,255
11,615
6,662
3,233
14,910
9,667
21,057

89,5 4
78.4 >7
10,474
20,822
15,961
3,543
28, 08
5,362
22,849

236.618

189,852

154,075

140,612

224.897

21,079

296,074

60,691
34,516

26,448
12,6o3

245,569 1 885.969
253,695 1 762,072

The speculation in cotton for future delivery at this market
has been quiet for the week under review, as is usually the
case at the holiday season. The L verpool Exchange remained
closed on Monday, and business here was very dull, prices
showing very little change, and yet rather firm. On Tuesday
morning there was a sharp decline, in sympathy with Euro­
pean advices, but on Wednesday a full recovery took place,
the Liverpool report coming unexp ctedly strong, and the
stocks in leading American markets footing up smaller than
last year, notwithstanding the freer movement of the crop.
Yesterday there was a further advance, in response to a better
L-verpool report, which alarmed the bears «nd caused an
active buying to cover c ontracts. The best prices of the day
were not sustained, however. To- lay there was a weak
opening, under the duli foreign advices, but an advance fol.
lowed, when the smaller interior movement became apparent,
an i the close was dearer. Coiton on the spot remained dull
and nominally unchanged until yesterday, when quotations
were advanced l-16c., and the close to-day was quiet at 9 ^ c.
for middling uplands.
The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 832,900
oales. For immediate delivery the total sales toot up this week
1,813 bales, including — for export, 1,01)8 for consumption,
220 tor speculation and — in transit. Of the above, — bales
vnre to arrive. The following are the official quotations for
each day of the past week.

152,429

2 , 1*86

12,»30
3 ,’’ 46
32,626

the exports for the week and since September 1, 1886.

•Galveston. . . .
Hew Orleans.

M obile.........
Florida..........

Conti

Örtf’n. VraruA tieni

1,61 O 4,916 18.83»
'
87.191 84.147 14,503 65.7 D
4,122
4,182
4,934
4, 88
1,843
83 571

8,100
5,4.13

50 808.4
8,113 17,914
12423 571

11,930
7.5 a
4 81
B altim ore.......
998
•Phlladelt’a , fc
<

1,844

4,960 18.78«
80 7.551,173 5.534
994

Savannah.......
Charleston
W ilm in g t o n ..

Norfolk.........
W est Homt,
New York......

Boston. ......

Total.........
qvte’ 1«**

........

96,580 36,116 33,753 166,391
54 49 100-6 19 191 ' * 7 7 «




From Sept. 1« 1DB6, to Dec. 31,1886,
Exportée to

ContiTotal Creai 1
Week. Britain jFran- > nsni

G
O

Export*
from—

»1

4

188.043 21.690
818.-03 177,481
10,5*4

43 651
151,884

Tota.

10,575
84.194
2,8 0

126,71
81. u 4
0,418

S a t. illo u T u e « S a t.

Ordin’y.tflb
I tr ic tO r d ..
iood O rd..
Str. G’d Ord
jow Mldd’g
Snr.L’ w Mid
diddling.
Good Mid
Sir. G’d Mid
Mtdd’g Fair
Fair ...

61*16 «**1«
71«
’<*8
8 -1 81,«
16

e3

•
d

8ia
8 i&
is
»*4 I
9**6

81«
8 lol6
9*4
» 71«
9»iis 91*18
91*1., 9 ,Bi«
10*«« 105,,
1016,« IO1
»

U e d I m.
O r d in y .F h
Strict O ra..
4ot«d O rd..
4tr. G’ d Ord
'»«w Midd’g
S r.L'w Mid
«fiddling...
G »od M id..
Srr G’d Mid
Mldd’g Fair

611 is'
71« , 7»16

8*16

8*9
» l 5lö

9*8
9

914

97 6
91116 9*h
916x8 10

1 66
*1 1

1 38
11

STAINED.

TEXAS.

NKV» ORLEANS.

U P L A N D S.

Dee. 25 to
Dee. 31

Fri.

Itlon T u e « S a t. i M o n T ttM

6 78
ft7«
76,«
76 a
6*4
8*4
8 **1«
8 D 16 8*ll« >1
flS
9*8
91«
» 1«
97,«
97ie 9 m
0
96«
9»8
9«8
H
9 78
9 78
97e
10*8
101 «
101«
101«
D ‘i« 1 1«
11*8
111« 111«
U ed Th. Fri. Wed Th.
6 78
7Bis
8*4

6 78
76X
a
8*4
8 **1«
9*8
97i6
96b
978
10*8
101«
11*8
Fri.

6*6,6 6^ 1«
616,6 6 7s
7%
738
73a
76,6
86,6
8*4
86,6
|»ie
8\
8%
8*1,6
9s 16 9*1«
93,6 9*8
9*16
91«
9*9
97 t„
to 1*
9*9
969
9**16 9**1«
9**1« 911,6 »8g
»15,6 9 l6 ia
»*¡>1« 9 78
»7
8 9*6,6
103,« 103ia
10*8 103 ,« 1 0 » ,„ 10*8
ie
IO * 11**« 10»x« l ‘ *«ie 10** l"9 lo ?xe
*«
1 13|g
11*8
113,6 11*1« 11*8
11
8*«
8»X6
9
96,6
9*4
9%
10

6 78
7 6,«
8*4
8 1,6
9*8
9 7 i„

61&16
738
86,6

Nut.

6%
7»,«

(.flou T u e » W e d

G «od Ordinary ................... f i t .
B .rtot Good Ordinary................... H oli­
L *w Middling...................... ......... day.
Middling.........................................

6*«
78X8
8
8 78

6*4
73x6
8
8 7a

6*«
73,6
8
8 78

Th.

Fri.

69xe
7*4
7*4
8*16 8*t«
8*®16 8*6x6

MARKET AND BALES.

The total sales and future deliveries each day during the
«reek are indicated m the following statement. For the con­
venience of the reader we also add a column which shows at a
glance how the market closed on same days.____________ ___ _
sales op spot and tr a n s it .

£64,387
051.1-8
1 ,554

82'.867
197.41»
79.1.15
191.543
"
49611
4,206
2,150
£5.836 115.815 .382.480
69,385
1
1,095
7ufW
<7
13.102
3,030
23,31.8
1.234
.... I
1,466,957 382,8*8 ' 847,9*9 2«29*«034
S' O« n •r >.(H
1#toi.og< 9 * 40
>
184,573
80.871
6a,867
191.543
43,2ai|
240.887
68,890
5 ,795
28,104

822.810

69.301

36,760
42,899

Since Sept. 1. 375=1.79- 3607,242 3691,516 3556,962 3686,45»
Galveston Include» Indiaiioia; ( Charleston includes Port Royal, A«
Wilmington includes Moieli’d City, Ao.; West Point includes City Point.*©
The «xnorts for the week ending this evening reach a total
Of 166,391 bales, of which 96,520 were to Great Britain. 86,116
to France and 83,755 to the rest of the Continent. Beh.w are

W
eek Ending Dec. 31.
Exporten to—_____

302,204
28,558
35,059
89,974
87,246
16,236
205,783
57,750

76,815

14 2P5
47,7.1
7,127
22,91»
8,*<77

T ot, this w ’ k.

3,097 132,516
5 ,i0 0
12,w 0
1,000
14,400
40,800
300
41 ',711
9,701
36,447
1,981
9,700
None.
9,000
None.

14,666
None.
11,300
28,0« 0
7,3Q6
89»
5.7.>0
1,000

121,667
163,617

Tarai 1885 . . .
Total 1884 . . .

1881

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

27,893
Galvest’ n.Ao.
New Orleans. 104,822
11,513
M obile...........
Savannah . . .
28.815
12,536
Charl’ st’u, Ao
3,985
W llm ’gt’u, Ao
IT ,705
N orfolk.........
14,874
W. Point, Ao.
14,975
A ll others . . .

Leaving
Stock.

Total.

Total 1886....... 128 879

T o ta l............ 236,618 3,755,798 1 8 »,-52 3,607,212 1,118,3-4 1,131,538
In order that comparison m ay oe m ade w ith other years, v* e
giv e below the totals at leading ports for six seasons.

Receipts at—

43,527 71,226
None.
7.500
3 0
1.500
3.300
9.200
1,239
22,385
None.
33,567
756
3.200
None.
8,o00

8 .v a n n a h . . . . . .
G il v e s t o n .. . . . .

total receipts, the total since Sept. 1,1886, and the stock to-mgb
and O'«
;
________ _
Receipts to
Dec. 31.

Other Coast­
(treat
Britain. France. Foreign wise,

N w Orleans___
M «bile...............
C larleston .......

7,367 4,801 3,053 3,656 4,352
•Galveston.........
In dianola, Ac.
N ew O rleans... 12,481 23,035 22.701 17,182 12,851 16,072 104,322
903 1,437 11,513
877 5,527 1,570 1,199
M òbile...............
745
745
....
.... .........
....
F lorid a ..............
Savannah.......... 3,200 5,369 6,029 5,449 4,687 4,081 28.815
950
»5 0
....
....
•••• .........
••
•
Brunsw’k, A c.
2,027 3,451 2,000 1,214 1,175 2,151 12.018
Charleston.......
518
518
•
•
....
....
..
....
P t Royal. A c.
3,838
341
520
712
486
550 1,229
Wilmington —
147
147
....
....
.... . . . . .
...
Moreh dO .Ao.
17,70b
N orfolk.............. 4,607 2,117 8,309 2,612 2,2r 3 2,807
909 1,618 1,813 1 ,-9 7 7,317 1 4 .-7 *
West. Point, Ao 1,820
« .092
727 8,059
761
641
323
681
New Y ork .......
757 . 5.320
373
107 1,662 1,533
8b8
B oston ...............
....
...
.... 1 ,4 ’ ft 1,426
....
B altim ore.........
44'2
13 I
35
130
74
190
Pliiladelp’ a, Ac.
....
29,773 4 6 ,4 -5 236 61«
Totals this week 3 1,640! 47,37ft 43,083 36,261
r OrOOlUimriHUU, w e

XULV.

I VOL.

C H R O N IC L E .

SPOT MARKET
CLOSED.
ta t.
«ton
Cue»
Veil
Cuir»
F ri.

Quiet and firm
E-tsy.................
D u l l .................
Firm * *x« adv.
Firm ...................

futures .

Ex- *Oort- ! Spec- Tranport. swmplul’t’n tit. Total.
..............Holi d a y.
1 «
...
175 . . .
153
..
144 . . .
4 3 9 , 220

1.313 332.9 >0
. . . . 1,093 220'
Total,
The dally deliveries given above are actually delivered th e day
P «TWO» T O mat on wbion r.Uev are reported.
T h e H it.It» a n d F r ic k s o f F u t u r e s a r e s h o w n b y t h e f o l l o w '
l o g c o m p r e h e n s iv e t a b le .

J a n u a r y 1, 18^7, J

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* In o M e a HMitw iii Hupleui'inr, 18*6. tor i-U-preiintit-r.
8*pi*-inber-Ootober, for October, 287,200.; September-November, fo r November.
441,700.
We have taoladed in the above table, and shall continue e»< h
Week to g ive, tbe average price o f futures each day fo r each month. It
Will be found under each aav follow in g the abbreviation “ A ver.” T ie
average fo r each month for tbe week Is also given at bottom o f tai le.
Transferable Orders—S aturday,------- j Monday 9*4<»o.; Tuesday.
9‘40e.; Wednesday. » ‘40c.; Thursday, b'-iOc.; Friday, 9*o5o.

The following exchanges have been made during the week
*11 pd. to exch. 100 Mar. for Apr.
*44 pd. to exeb. H,90< J.*n. for ¡Way.
*20 pd. toexeh . 5 ' i » A pr. for June.
Even 400 December for January.
*34 od. to exeb. 1, hih' Jan. for Apr.
*22 pd. to exch. 100 Jan. for Mar.
*33 pd. to exch. ■00 Jau. for Apr.
*11 Pd. to exch. 400 Jan. fo r Feb.

1886.
s gooft at. Liverpool ......b a le s . 672,«»00
i.
Stock at Londonv i . . . . . . . . .
14,000

1R85.
541,000
1 i ,000

1884.
604,000
47,000

1893.
679,0( 0
56,000

Total Great Britain s t o c k .. 636.000
Stock at H a m b u r g . ......... .. .
1.6 :o
Stock at B r e m e n ........ ...... .
15,400
4took at Amsterdam . . . . . . . . .
16.UG0
4took at Rotterdam . . . . . . . . . .
400
4tock at A n t w e r p . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,100
4tock at H a v r e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17*,o00
4took at M a r s e ille s ............
1,000
Stock at B a r c e lo n a ......... . .
39,000
Atook at G e n o a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.000
Stock at T rieste................ .
9,000

554,000
3.600
34 0 >0
32.000
800
2,700
135.000
4.000
46.000
8,000
4,000

651,000
-6,000
36.500
38,000
700
3 ,0 (0
137,000
4.000
38.000
6.000
5.000

735,000
2,000
59,500
46,000
800
3.500
125,000
7,000
45.000
10,000
8,000

270,100

324.200

306,800

261,500

Total European s t o c k s .. , 947,500
828,100 975,200 ]1,041,800
Tndla ootton afloat fo r Europe.
50,000
5O.000
67,000
129,000
A mer’u oott’n afloat fo r Eur’pei 6 /8 .0 0 0
479,000 653,000
566,000
SKypt,Brazll,&c.,afltfor E’r’pe* f 3,000
wv,» « v
1WVW
-,«>,uw
35.O00
45,000
43,000
Stock In United StateB ports . 1 , 1 18>84 1,131,538 1,015,767 l,2 e 9 ,0 7 0
Stock In U. 8. interior tow n s.. 390,593 4 9 1,449 326,286
370,801
united States exports to -d a y ..
3 6 ,-8 1
4o,639
12,000
25,000
Total visible su pp ly............ 3,224,861 3,058.72« 3,034,253 3.444,671
Of tbe ahove.the totals o f Am erican and other description » are as f olio v s:
American—
Liverpool s t o c k ......... .b a l e s 487.000
s
409.000 417.000
443,000
outlnental s t o c k s . . . . . . . . . . . .. 165,000
lo l,0 < 0 2» 5.OoO 2 20.0C 0
Vmen can afloat for E u rop e... 628.000 479,000 653 000 566 000
Jnited States stock ______ ____.1,118,884 1,131,538 ]L,015.767 1
'
1,269 070
United States interior stock s.. 3 9 0 ,-9 3
..
49 I,4 a9 326.286 370,801
United States exports to -d a y ..
36,864
<,0 6 j 9
12,000
25,000
Total A m e r i c a n , .2,826,361 I5,745,6^6 5
5,629.053 !2,893,871
Mast Ind ian, B rasil, tic.—
Liverpool s t o c k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185,000
132.000
187,000 236.000
uundon stock___. . . . . . . . ... .
14.000
17.000
47.000
56.000
Continental stocks_____. . . . . .
96 500
79,100
11‘»,200
86,900
India afloat fo r E u r o p e .......^.
50,000
50.U00
67.000
1 -9 ,0 0 0
Egypt, Brazil, A c., afloat..........
53,000
35,000
45,000
43,000
313,100 465.200 550.800
.2,82o,361 £
5,745,626 2,629,053 2,893,871

P

1 1

to i'huradsy evening. But to make the totals the oomplets
figures for to-night (Deo. 31), we add the item of exports from
the United States, including in it the exports of Friday only,

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Total Continental s t o c k s ... . . .

00M M
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sc O N g p a tog
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OHRONTCILE,

41 pd to exch 200 Jan. fo r May.
*3 * pd. to exch. f>0u Mar. fo r 4 p r.
-21 pd. to exch. 200 Mar. for J line.
*24 pd. to exsh. 700 Jan. for Mar.
*12 pd. to exch. 5 0 Jan. for Feb
1 0 pd, to exeb. 500 Apr. tor May.
*32 pd. to exch. 100 Mar. for June.

Price Mid. Upl,, L iv e rp o o l... .
Prloo Mid. Upl., New Y ork___

3,224,861 5
J,058.726 3.0 94,2 -3 3,444.671
oMd.
4'& i,d.
6d,
515,, d.
\ _
_ iv
<
_ »so.
__
9i*o.
931(jO.
11 __
ItOflC.

tw ~ The imports into Continental ports this week have been
78,000 bales.
The above figure« indicate an increase in the cotton in sight
so-iiight of 166,185 bales as compared with the same date of
l*i85, an increase of 130,608 bales as compared with the corres­
ponding date of 1884 and a decrease of 219,810 bales as
compared with 1883.

A r t h e I n t e r i o r T o w n s the movement—that is the receipts
to the week and since Sept. 1, the shipments for the week, and
the stocks to-night, and the same items for the corresponding
period of 1885—is set out in detail in the following statement.
3

3

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The above totals sh >w that the o*d interior stocks have
increased during the week 6,574 Dales and are to night 103,855
TdK V181BUC ¡ s u r r i i f o f C o t t o n to-night, as made up by cable hales l>ss uia,n at Che same period 1«a y«-ar. t he receipts at
Rhd telegraph, is as follows. The Continental stocks, as well f t die sam e towns have been 2,719 oales less than the same
those for Great Britain and the afloat, are this week’s return», week last year, and since September 1 the receipts at all the
and consequently all the European figures are brought down towns are 9,472 bales less than for the same time in 188S-86,



THE

26

[V oi. XLIY.

C H R O N IC L E .

Vicksburg, M ississippi—It has been showery on two days
Q u o t a t i o n s f o r M i d d l in g C o t t o n a t O t h e r M a r k e t s .—
week, the rainfall reaching forty hundredths of an
In the table below we give the closing quotations of middling of the About ninetv per cent o f the crop haa been marketed.
cotton at Southern and other principal cotton markets for each inch.
Contracts with labor for the coming year are now being
day of the past week.
made at about last year’s rates. The emigration from the
hills to the delta is heavy. The thermometer has averaged 56,
MIDDLING COTTON ON—
CLOSING QUOTATIONS POB
Week ending
the highest being 74 and the lowest 40.
Dee. 3 1 .
Fri.
Qloster, M ississippi.—Rain has. fallen during the week to
Wednes. T hu n.
Tuet.
Mon.
8a tur.
the extent of fifty-three hundredths of an inch. The ther­
815.6
816,6
S « ,«
« 8 iB16
G a lv e s t o n . . .
8 i6 is
mometer has averaged 55, ranging from 32 to 69.
9 1 ,«
9
91i6
9
9
N ew O rleans.
Helena, A rk a n sa s—It has rained constantly on three days
816.6
8*8
8*8
816le
81&16
M o b ile ............
816,6
816,6
816,6
of the week, the rainfall reching seventy-two hundredths of
81616
Savannah. . .
9>e
9ie
9
9
9 1 ,6
C h a rle sto n . .
an inch. Picking has been interrupted by the holidays and
s im
9ie
9116
9*16
9116
W ilm in g to n ..
►
rain. The thermometer has averaged 35'8, the highest being
c1
a
» ie
9 ie
9ie
9ie
9 ie
9 9 ,6
9 9 ,«
9 9,6
52 and the lowest 28. Rain fell on eleven days in December
9 » i«
9*18
9 l4 ® 3 8
914
c
914 ® ®
8 9 I4 ® 38
93s
B a ltim o re.. . .
to the extent of two inches and forty-two hundredths.
»69
96s
» 6«
B
»«e
9«e
Philadelphia.
Memphis, Tennessee.—W e have had rain on five days of
8*8
813.6
8*6
8 131 »« *6 8 1 8 ,»®7g
A u g u s t a . . .. .
816,6
the week, on two of which also sleet and snow. The
816,6
816.6
81616
816.6
M e m p h is . . . .
9
9
9
9
9
rainfall reached one inch and thirty-four hundredths. No
S t. L o u i s . . . . .
9 ’s
9>e
9 le
Oie
» ie
C in c in n a t i...
picking has been done and marketing has been interfered
9
9
9
9
9
L o u isville___
with. The thermometer has averaged 33, ranging from 24 to 61.
Nashville, Tennessee.—W e have had rain on four days of
R e c e i p t s f r o m t h e P l a n t a t io n s .— The following table
Indicates the actual movement each week from the plan­ the week, the rainfall reaching forty-seven hundredths o fa n
tations. The figures do not include overland receipts nor inch. The thermometer has ranged from 26 to 47, averaging
Southern consumption; they are simply a statement of the 86. During the month of December the rainfall reached one
£
weekly movement from the plantations o f that part of the crop inch and thirty-one hundredths.
Mobile, Alabama.—It has been showery on two days of the
which finally reaches the market through the outports.
week, the rainfall reaching twenty-seven hundredths of an
inch. Showery to day. Average themometer 53, highest
i
St’k at Interior Towns. Rec’pte from Plani ne
Receipt« at the Porte.
Week
67, lowest 37.
Rnding—
Montgomery, Alabama.—W e have had ram on two days
1884. 1885. I 1886. 1884. I 1885. 1886, 1881. I 1885. I 1886.
and the balance of the week has been pleasant. The rainfall
Nov. 28...... 284,692 259,925|280,202 207,133 840,405 300,078 322,286 291,069,309,162
reached forty-two hundredths of an inch. The thermometer
Deo. 3...... 276,300 212,797 275.710 310 019 882,027 390.832 825,186 285,019 300,47
“ 10..... 289,457 218,184 227,886 335,451 434,343 402,085 808.889 299,850 239,139 has averaged 50, the highest being 67 and the lowest 83.
Selma, Alabam a.—It has rained lightly on one day of the
7| 0 ,527
' « 17..... 258.840 238,011260.059 363,606 481,239 410,953 286,755 281,9O 2 9
,100I
45I
« 24..... 207,893 24O ,283,O 303,52O521,319,433,534 207,547 280,240 3u5.620 week, the rainfall reaching twelve hundredths of an inch.
349,488]543,557 443,505:140,013:212,090,240,049 The thermometer has averaged 49 5* ranging from 33 to 63.
“ 81...., 154,075!189,852 236,018I
Auburn, Alabama.—Telegram not received.
The above statement shows—1. That the total receipts from
Birm ingham , Alabama.—There has been rain on two days
the plantations since September 1, 1886, were 4,151,803 bales; the remainder of the week being clear and pleasant.
in 1885 were 4,134,949 bales; in 1884 were 4,023,789 bales.
Madison, Florida.— Telegram not received.
2. That, although the receipts at the outports the past week
Macon, Georgia.—It has rained lightly on one day and the
were 286,618 bales, the actual movement from plantations was remainder of the week has been pleasant.
246,649 bales, the balance going to increase the stocks at
Columbus, Georgia.—W e have had no rain all the week.
the interior towns. Last year the receipts from the plantations The thermometer has ranged from 31 to 58, averaging 46.
for the same week were 212,090 bales and for 1884 they were
Savannah, Georgia.—It has rained on two days of the
140,048 bales.
week, the rainfall reaching forty-four hundredths of an inch.
A m o u n t o f C o t t o n in Sight Deo. 81.—In the table below Average thermometer 52, highest 68 and lowest 39.
Augusta, Georgia.—The early part of the week was clear
we give the receipts from plantations in another form, and add
to tnem the net overland movement to Dec. 1, and also the and pleasant, but during the latter portion there has been rain
takings by Southern spinners to the same date, so as to give on three days. Cotton continues to come in freely. The
thermometer has averaged 48, the highest being 65 and the
substantially the amount of cotton now in sight.
' iwest 16.
, ,
_
,
1886.
1884.
1885.
1883.
Albany, G eorgia— The early part of the week was clear
nd pleasant but there has been rain on two days during the
Receipts at the ports to Dee. 31 3,755,798 3,607,242 3,691,516 3.556,962
itter portion. The rainfall reached eighty-seven hundredths
Interior stocks on Deo. 3 1 In
395,505 527,707 332,273 358,818
excess o l Septem ber 1 ..........
f an inch. The crop is about all marketed. The thermomeB has ranged from 39 to 66, averaging 52.
r
Tot. receipts from planta’tns 4,151,303 4,134,949 4,023,789 3,915,780
Charleston, South Carolina.—There has been rain on two
Net overland to Dec. 1 ............ 321,366 341,137 227,855 261,252
Southern oonsum pt’n to Deo. 1
Total in sight Deo. 31. .

105,000

89,000

78,000

87,000

4,577,669 4,565,086 4,329,644 4,264,032
817,629

914,110

683,161

908,913

It w ill be seen by tne above tnac uie increase in amount m sign i
to-night, as compared with last year, is 12,583 bales, tbe increase
as compared w itb 1884 is 218,025 bales and the increase over 1883
Is 313,637 bales.

W eather R eporis b y T elegrarh .—The weather has been
fairly favorable at the South during the week. Rain has
fallen in most sections, but in general the rainfall has been
light. Marketing continues to make good progress, but has
been interfered with to some extent by the holidays.
Galveston, Texas.—W e have had showers on four days of
the week,the rainfall reaching fifty-four hundredths of an inch.
"The thermometer has averaged 58, the highest bt-ing 66 and
the lowest 48. During month of December the rainfall
reached two inches and one hundredth.
Palestine, Texas.—It has been showery on four days of the
week, the rainfall reaching twenty-eight hundredths of an
*inch. About all the crop has now been secured. The ther­
mometer has averaged 45, ranging from 28 to 65. December
rainfall forty-five hundredths of an inch.
New Orleans, Louisiana.—W e have had rain on three
days of the week, the rainfall reaching nineteen hundredths
of an inoh, The thermometer has averaged 56.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—Rainfall for the week seventyfive hundredths of an inch. The thermometer has ranged from
- 35 to 66, averaging 45.
Columbus, M ississippi.—W e have had rain on one day of
the week, the rainfall reaching thirty hundredths of an inch.
The thermometer has averaged 46, the highest being 58 and
'lowest 24.
Leland, M ississippi.—Rainfall for the week fifty hundredths
of an inch. The thermometer has averaged 43, ranging from
30 to 66.
Greenville, M ississippi.—Telegram not received.
Clarksdale, M ississippi.—Telegram not received.
M eridian, M ississippi.—The early part of the week was
clear and pleasant, but during the latter portion we have had
rain. From seventy-five to ninety per cent of the crop has
been marketed. The thermometer has ranged from 42 to 64.



L

I ilu W vC »j t v

lU v UAvviiw v*

vvv**

v

icb. Average thermometer 53, highest 66, lowest 43.
Stateburg, South Carolina.—It has rained on two days of
he week, and threatens more. The rainfall reached sixtyThe thermometer has averaged
•», m e BIKUWIi u eiu g wt a u u u n w n w . „«/.

Wilson, North Carolina.—W e have had ram on two days of
the week, the rainfall reaching one inch and forty-one hun­
dredths. The thermometer has averaged 43, ranging from 26
to 67.
. aiL
_
The following statement we have also received by telegraph,
showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3 o’clock
Dec. 30, 1886, and Dec. 30, 1885.
Dee. 30, ’ 86. Dee. 30, ’ 85.
Feet. Inch.
2
7
New Orleans_. ....A b o v e low-water m ark.
4
Memphis___ . . . . . ....A b o v e low-water m ark. 15
0
12
N ash v ille............................ ..A b o v e low -w ater m ark.
0
4
S h rev eport.............................A bove low-water m ark.
2
12
Vicksburg................ ..A b o v e low-water m ark.

F u t.
5
13
7
4
20

Inch.
5
0
4
4
0

I n d i a C o t t o n M o v e m e n t f r o m a l l P o r t s . —The receipts
and shipments of cotton at Bombay have been as follows for
the week and year, bringing the figures down to Deo. 80.
BOMBAY BBOBIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOB FOUB YBABS.

Shipments Since Jan. 1.
Shipments this week
Year Great Conti­ Total. Great I Oontir
Total.
Britainl nent.
Bril'n. nent.
341.000 719,OOC 1,060,000
L886 2,000 7.000 9.000
1885 7.000 10,000 17.000 233.000 500,000 733,000
1884 2.000 6.000 8.000 525.000 706,000 1.231.000
1883 7,000 16,000 23.000 500.000 835,000 1.335.000

Receipts.
This
Week.

Year.

32.000
18.000
17.000
30.000

1.617.000
1.141.000
1.673.000
1.786.000

According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to snow an
increase compared with last year in the week s receipts o
14,006 bales, and a decrease in shipments of 8,000 bates, ana
the shipments since Jan. 1 show an increase of 327,000 bales.
The movement at Calcutta, Madras and other India ports for
the last reported week and since the 1st o f January, for two
years, has been as follows. “ Other ports” cover Ceylon,
ruticorin. Kurrachee and Coconada,

1, 13S7.J

January

THE

Shipment» fo r the week.
Oreat
ContiBritain, nent.

5,000

Shipment» tinee January 1.

_ . ,
Total.

continent.

66,000

60,000

37.000
17.000

103.000
77.000

1,000

46.000
14.000

7.000
5.000

53.000
19.000

6,000

73.000
65.000

59.000
72.000

132.000
137.000

8,000

3,000

Oreat
B ritain,

1,000

Calcutta—
1,000
1886........
1886........
Madras—
1886........
1,000
1885
..................
All others—
4,000
1886
.................. 2,000
1885........
Total a ll1886........
1885........

C H R O N IC L E ,

185.000
139.000

103,000
94,000

288,000
233,000

Total

The above totals for the week show that the movement from
the ports other than Bombay is 8,000 bales more than same
week last year. For the whole of India, therefore, the total
shipments since January 1, 1886, and for the corresponding
periods of the two previous years, are as follows:
EXPORTS TO EUROPE FROM ALL INDIA.
Shipments
to a ll Europe
from —

1886.
This
week.

1885.

Since
J a n . 1.

This
week.

27

„
_
_
Total baits.
N ew O rleans —T o Liverpool, per steamers Caribbean, 2.393___
City o f Lincoln, 6,905___ Cuban, 2,000___ Emiliano, 4,150
-----Haytien, 4 ,2 8 3 ....Navigator, 6 ,3 2 0 ....SoawfeU, 5,653
_ ..--T opaze, 4,250........................................................................... 35,959
To Havre, per steamers Camellia, 3,6 37....M arseille, 4,829
-----Rydal Water, 4,900................................................................ 13,366
To Bremen, p e r steamers Briscoe, 6,434___Driffield, 2,800
— Glenoehii, 6,4 00___Lord Lanedorone, 7 ,1 00.................... 22,734
To Reval, per steamer Royal Prince, 4,6 0 0 ................................
4,600
To Pasages, per bark Osanna, 1.200....... ....................................
1,200
Savannah —To Liverpool, per steamer Kate, 5,109........................ 5,109
1,500
To Havre, per bark Triton, 1,500.................................................
To Bremen, per steamers Barcelona, 5,000___Enfield, 5,549
Timor, 6,127................................................................................... 16,676
Charleston —To Liverpool, per steamers Border Chieftain,
3,469— Canonbury, 4 10 7___Gloamin, 3,937___ Neto,
4,200.....................................................................
15,713
To Havre, per steamer Nawortli Castle, 4,216___ per bark
Monte Ban Angelo, 1,300..........................................................
5.516
To Bremen, per steamers Addington, 3,9 02___Hilda, 4,444.
8,346
G alveston —To Liverpool, per steamers Dunholme, 4,333___
Princess, 4 ,9 5 0 ....W alter Thomas, 5 ,7 2 0 ....W ashington
City, 6,216— per bark A. O. Vipje, 1,055............................... 22,274
To Havre, per bark Victoria, 2,3 60........................... 2,360
To Bremen, per steamer Marchioness, 5,184..................... .
5,184

1884.

Since
Jan. 1.

This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

Bombay...........
All other ports.

9.000 1,060,000 17,000
8.000 288,000

733.000
233.000

8.000 1,231,000
........ 1 311,010

Total.........

17,000 1,348,000 17,000

966,000

8 .OOO'1,542,000

A l e x a n d r i a R e c e i p t s a n d S h ip m e n t s . —Through

Casoapedia, 2,597___V ictory, 8,236......................................... 16,168
Ne w po r t N e w s —To Liverpool, per steamers

11,101........................................................................ ......... 11,101

Baltim ore —To Liverpool, per steamer Nessmore, 2 ,1 63.......
To London, per steamer Chiltagong, 50 0...................................
To Bremen, per steamer America, 815.........................
B o s t o n —To Liverpool, per steamers Kansas, 3 ,2 53
Samaria,
606___ Virginian, 1,475.................
To Yarmouth, per steamer Dom inion, 3 0 ..................................
P h il a d e l ph ia —To Liverpool, per steamer Lord Clive, 1,200___

2,163
500
815

5,334

30
arrange­
1,200
ments we have made with Messrs. Davies, Benachi & Co., of
Liverpool and Alexandria, we now receive a weekly cable of
T
o
t
a
l
.
.
.
.
.
..............
226.984
the movements of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt. The following
The particulars of these shipments, arranged in our usual
are the receipts and shipments for the past week and for th<
form, are as follow s:
corresponding week of the previous two years.
A lexan dria. Egypt,
Dec. 29.

1886.

Reoelpts (cantars*)—
This week....
Since Sept. 1

180,000
2,027,000
This
S ince
week. Sept. 1.

Exports (bales)—
Fo Liverpool...... . . . 9,000 154,000
To Continent. . . . . . . . 13,000 64,000
Total Europe____ 22,000 218,000
* A oantar Is 98 lbs.

1885.

1884.

120,000
2,003,000

170,000
2.183,000

T hit
S ince
w eek. Sept. 1.

This
Sin
week. Sept. 1.

4.000 129,000 13,000 180,000
4.000 66,000 7,000 70,000
8,000 195,000 20,000 250,000

This statement shows that the receipts for the week ending
Dec. 29 were 180,000 cantars and the shipments to all Europe
22,000 bales.

New Y ork.
N. Orleans.
Savannah..
Charleston.
G alveston.
Wilmlngt’ n
Norfolfc___
Newport N.
B altim ore.
Boston . . . .
Philadel’ia.

L iver­
Brem- Rotterpool,
en
dam
Paand
and
and
sages
L on­
Ham­ A nt­
and
don. Havre. burg. werp. Reval. Genoa,
9,945 1,846 4,257
4 11
312
35,959 13,366 22,734
4,'¿ 1 0 1 ,2 0 0
5,109 1,500 16,676 ...................... .........
15,713 5,516 8.346 ....................................
22,274 2,360 5,184 ...................... .........
9,180
16,168 ........ ........ • - ............
........
11,101
2,663
5,334 .......
.................. ............... ........
1,200

Vera
Crus
and
Tarmouth.

;;;;;;

.... .
..
.
1,170

Total.

18,786
77,859

23,285

.........

29,575
30,988
9,180
16,168

30

3,478
5,364

11,101

1,200

T ota l...134,646 24,588 58,012
411 4,600 1,512 1,200 226,934
Included In the above total from New Y ork are 2,015 bales to Hull.

Below we add the clearances this week of vessels carrying
cotton from United States ports, bringing data down to the
latest dates:

Jute B utts, B agging, & c.— There is but little doing in
bagging, as buyers are not placing any orders, preferring to G a l v e st o n —F o r L iv e r p o o l—D ec. 28— B ark M oorh ill, 1,454.
F or H a v re-D ee. 27—Bark Nore, 1,610.
wait until after the turn of the year. Only trifling parcels are
For Bremen—Dec. 25—Barks Abel, 1,398; Emma, 918___ Dec. 2 8 Marco Polo, 2,600.
being taken, but no change is noted in prices, sellers quoting N e w Bark a n s —For L iverpool—Dec. 24—Steamers Counsellor, 3,3 98;
Orle
Knight Errant, 7,825
Dec. 29—Steamer Gallego, 5,772.
6 ^ c. for 1% lb., 7c. for \% lb., 7%c. for 2 lb. and 8 }£ c . for
For 4avre—Dec. 2 4 —
Steamer City o f Manchester, S ,7 o 6 ....D e c . 23
standard grades. Butts are also quiet, only a few small lots
—Bark Zebina Goudey, 3,612.
F o r B rem en—D eo. 2 9 —S team er K ingsd ale, 3 ,6 7 6.
finding takers. The market is easy with prices quoted at
F o r A n tw e rp —Deo. 2 4 —S team er B osK enna B ay, 3 ,4 5 0 ___ D e c. 2 8 B ark L ou isian a, 1 ,940.
t% @ l 13-16c. for paper grades and 2@2%c. for bagging
M o b il e — For L iverpool- Deo. 27---- Steamer Deak, 4,122.
quality.
Sa v a n n a h —F o r L iv e r p o o l—Dec. 2 4 —S team er C e rv iu , 4,933.
M a n c h e s t e r M a r k e t . —Our report received bv cable from
Manchester to-night states that the market for both yarns
and shirtings is easy. W e give the prices for to-day below,
and leave those for previous weeks of this and last year for
comparison:
1886.
32« Cop.
Itcist.
Oot.29
Nov. 5
» 12
“ 19
« 26
Deo. 3
“ 10
“ 17
** 24
“ 31

d.
d. a.
7 I8 ®7®8 5
7316-7111« 5
73x6-711x6 5
73a ®8
5
738 ®8
5
75X6-715X6 5
73s 9 8
5
738 ®S
5
75l6-715l6 5
7& 6—7 i5xe 5
x

8 I4 lb».
Shirting».
d. s. d.
7ifl®6 71«
7ia® 6 T'a
7ia® 6 719
7*396 713
7 !s® 6 7*3
8 «6 8
8 ®6 9
8 »6 9
8 ® 6 10
8 ® 6 10

1885.
Cott’ n
Mid.
Upldt
d.
58|6
Öls
51s
5316
53,e
51s
514
514

5*4
514

32« Cop.
lw iti.
d.
d.
778 ® 8 1
3
7 \ ® 838
.758 « S 'ô

1.
5
5
5
5
73t ®8*4 ft
75a ® 8 1 5
8
713 ® 8
5
738 9 7 78 5
7 1 4 ® 7% 9
718 ® 7*8 5

8 1 lb».
*
Shirting».
d.

8
8
8
8
8
8

«. d.

®7
®7
«7
®7
®7
«7

7!a® 7
7ia® 7

l^a
lia
l'a
l'a
l'a
Ha

1
1

7ia ®7 1
7ia »7 1

Oott’n
Mid
Upldt
d
514
5316
5ifl

53le
514

f l 18
o lia

5
5

41516

¡Sh i p p i n g N e w s .— The exports of cotton from the United
8tates the past week, as per latest m ail returns, have reached
226,984 bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these
are the same exports reported by telegraph, and published in
the C h r o n i c l e last Friday. With regard to New York we
include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Thursday.

Ch a r l e s t o n — For Liverpool—Deo. 2 7 - Steamer Crete, 4,388.

F or Havre—Deo. 24—Bark Finn, 1,2 50___Dec. 27—Bark Kalstad,
1,550 .. Dae. 29—Baik Conte Oscar L, 2,613.
For A ntw erp—Deo. 28—Steamer Libelle, 3,125.
For Barcelona—Dec. 24—Bark Anibal, 1,009.
W il m in g t o n —For Liverpool—Dee. 27—Bark Ernst, 1,213.
No r f o l k —For L iverpool—Dec. 24—Steamer Monarch, -------- ; Ship
K a m b ir a ,-------- — Dee. 30—Steamers Caru Brea, 5 ,1 0 0 ; R obert

D ick in son , 4 ,9 ' 2.
W e st P o in t —For Liverpool—Deo. 24—3teamer Etna.
B o st o n —For Liverpool—Dec. 23—Steamers Catalonia, 3 7 7 ;

P ales­
tine, 2,291___Dec. 24—Steamer Bulgarian, 2.178.
For Yarmouth -Dee. 28—Steamer Dominion, 20.
Ba l t im o r e —For Liverpool— Dee. 23—Steamer St. Fillans, 1.133_ Dec.
_
27—SteamerThanemore, 1,2 12
Dec. 28—Steamer NovaScotlan,
500.
For Rotterdam —Deo. 2 3 —
Steamer Naples, 50.
P h il a d e l p h i a —For Liverpool—Dec. 29—Steamer British P rin ce ,------- .

Below we give all news received to date of disasters to ves­
sels carrying cotton from United States ports, «fee.:
B e n e v o l e n t , steamer (B r.)—A t a final survey held on steamer Benevo

lent, at Savannah, the repairs made were found to r>e so thorough
and com plete that it was recom m ended that she reload her
original cargo and proceed to Liverpool.
Oo n in g s b y , steamer (Br.), from Savannah for Barcelona, with a cargo o f
cotton, arrived at Grassy Bay, Bermuda, Dec. 12, w ith main, shaft
disabled. It is expected that a portion of her cargo will have to be
discharged In order to effect repairs.
C o r m o r a n t , steamer (Br.), from New Orleans for Bremen, which went
ashore at the Isle of Wight, is breaking up, and there seems to be
no hope of saving her. 1,043 bales of cotton have been salved.
J o h n G. F l e t c h e b , steamboat, engaged in the Red River trade, on
Deo. 22 struck a hidden obstruction when near Shady Grove,
seven miles above Shreveport, La., and sunk. She is a total loss.
Boat valued at $6,000, and insured for $3,000. Her cargo con­
sisted of 300 bales cotton and 800 sacks seed. The cotton, which
is damaged by water, will be saved.
M ah a r a ja h , steamer (Br.),-A inslee, from Savannah for Bremen, put
into St. Michaels, Dec. 15, with shaft broken, and must repair.
D o t t e r e l , steamer (Br.)—Three hundred bales o f cotton from steamer
Dotterel, at Genoa from Savannah, while lying on the wharf, w ere
badly damaged by Are.

„
_ _.
.
Total bale».
N e w Y o r k —T o Liverpool, per steamers Aurania, 1,770___City
o f Berlin, 2,011— England, 2,551___ Herschel, 1,176___
Italia, 1,537___ Wyoming, 9 0 0 ................................. . . .
9,945
T o Hull, per steamer Buffalo, 2,015................................ . 2,015
To Havre, per steamers Draeona, 5 0 ___La Champagne,
1.796................- ..................... a.....................................................
1,846
T o Bremen, per steamer Aller, 95 0................................ .............
950
To Hamburg, per steamers California, 835
Moravia,*!",772
___ Wieland, 7 0 0 .............. ........................................... ........
3 307
.To Rotterdam, per steamer P. Caland, 1 8 5 . . . . . . . '" . ” **'1
*185 I GLENRATHr Bteamer (B r.), at L iv e r p o o l fr o m N o rfo lk , t o o k Are D eo. 3 0
in the h o ld an d se v e ra l b ales o f co tto n w ere b urn ed.
T o Antwerp, per steamer Rhynland, 2 2 6 .......................... *"*
226
To Genoa, per steamer Fum essia, 31 2..........................
312 } Oottou freights tae past week have been as follows:




28

THE

C H R O N IC L E .

Satur.

Mon.

Tuts.

Weane*

Tour*

\

he
....
7ie

316
....
716

81S
....
71S

8ia
....
71S

ht

;

Continent. A quieter market ou Wednesday, witn some de­
cline, was followed by a sharp advance in t e later dealings of
Thursday, when prices touche i the highest figures of the sea­
son ; and it was reported that the purchases at the Atlantic
ports for export aggregated nearly half a million bushels.
To-day a dull opening was followed by a slightly firmer, clos­
ing.

Fri

Liverpool, steam d.
Do
sall...<f.
H avre, s te a m . . . c.
D o sail........ e
Bremen, steam . e.
Do
s a i l . . . . c.
Hamburg, steam, e.
Do
sa il....e .
Amst’ d’m , steam e.
Do
sa il... e.
B eva l, steam ___d.
D o s a i l . . . . ’, d
Barcelona,steam d.
Genoa, steam . . . . d.
Trieste, steam .. -d.
Antw erp, steam.d.

;

—
71«

«
716®*# t i e ® 1
« 7lfi®% 716®% ’ is ® 1
....
...
....
....
•••a
7ia
71S
7ie
71S
7ie
DAILY CLOSING FRIGES OF NO. 2 RED WINTER WHEAT.
....
....
...
.
Sat. Mon.
T»es. Wed. Thurt. #V<.
50*
50*
50*
* 50*
50*
January d e l i v e r y ..........
J
9 »%
91%
9 13 s
92%
93%
...
....
....
¡j>
92%
93%
91
94%
9 i%
February d e liv e ry ......... .
-3
9 »%
994%
9.*.%
96%
9a2 ®6i 6 932®516 932®516 932®518 V32®°1S March d e l i v e r y . . . . . .. . . . . .
A p ill d e li v e r y ...............
3
9 %
9638
....
97%
....
....
....
....
....
May d e liv e r y .... . . . . . . . . . .
<3
96%
98
97%
98%
98%
%
%
%
%
%
June 'teiiverv,
.........
,
9 %
98%
....
9 i%
....
August d e liv e r y .......... .
:
9a%
100
99% 100% 101
%
%
%
%
%
» ,2
9sa
*32
*32
Indian Com shows some advance, although the export de­

j
a
o
H
j
J
;
•
j
•

»32® »16 % 2 ® 316

0 3 2 ® 3 1S

e 8 8 ® S 1fl

* Per 100 lbs.
L i v e r p o o l .— By o a b le f r o m L iv e r p o o l w e h a v e t h e f o l l o w i n g
s ta te m e n t o f th e w e e k ’ s sa les, s to c k s , See., a t th a t p o r t. W e
add p r e v io u s w e e k s f o r c o m p a r is o n .

Dee. 1 0

Dee. 17

Dee. 24.

Dee. 3 1.

59.0 00
3 7 .0 0 0
63.000
7 1 .0 00
Bales o f th e w e e k ........b a le s *
5.000
6.000
5 .0 0 0
3000
O f which exporters took . . . .
2,000
5.000
3.0 0 0
4 .0 0 0
O f whloh speculators took..
45.0 00
2 7.0 00
4 8,000
4 5.0 00
Bales American . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8,000
9.0 0 0
10.000
10 00
A.otnal e x p o r t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.000
22.000
21,00«
2 7 .0 0 0
F o r w a r d e d ........ . . . . . . . . . . . .
6 7 2 .0 0 0
57 1,000
»21,000
5 84 ,00 0
Total stock—E s tim a te d .......
O f whloh American—Estlm’d 34.5.000 3 9 0 0 0 0 403.00(1 4 8 7 .0 0 0
1 32.000
9 5,00» • 148 .00 0
1 13.000
Total Import of the w e e k .....
7 8 .0 0 0
127 .00 0
88.000 108.000
O f whloh A m erioa n . . . . . . . . .
3 2 6 ,O d
2 72 .00 0
S2 (.000
286,00».
A m ount afloat.......... .
2 85 , 00
2 5 1,OOQ 2 51 .00 0
251,00»'
Of whloh American ..............
T h e co n e ot th e Laver p ool oiaru.ee f o r sp o t» a n d fu t u r e » ea ou
d a y o f th e w e e k e n d in g D e c . 81, a n d th e d a ily c lo s in g p r ice s
o f s p o t c o t t o n , h a v e been as f o l l o w s !

Spot.
Market, 1
12:ì>0p .m .£
Upl’ds
Mid. Orl’ns.
Mid. Sales .
Bpeo.dc exp.

Futures.
Market, /
12:30 p .m . j

Saturday Monaay. Tuesday
;
:

;

Wednes Thursd’y.

In buyers’ In buyers’
favor.
favor.

J

1

;

5 *4

5%
6
%

8.000
1,000

5%
7 ,0 0 0
500

Steady.

Fruta .
Moderate
demand.

10,000
1,000

5%
5%
8,000
1,000

5%
5%

W

¡
K
»
3
&
o
w

j

;

Quiet.

Steady.

Firm.

8teady.

j

j

Dull.

Quiet.

Firm.

Quiet.

e?
•
3
O

Market, (
4 P. M. \

The opening, highest, lowest, and closing prices of futures for
Liverpool for each day of the week are given below. These
prices are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause, unless
otherwise stated.
D * The prices are ffiven in penes and 64 the, thus:
P

4 S s-644., ana 5 Ot wen ns 5 > -64 4 .
Mr s ., D ee. 2 5 .

M o n .. D ec, 2 7 .

4 63 meat.s

Tuen., D ec. 2 8 .
Open Bini. Low. Clot

Deoem ber..
D eo.-Jan....

Jan.-Feb..
Feb.-M&rcb

k
d
a

Mar ..April..

n

4
d.
612 512
5 10 5 10
5 10 5 10
6 11 511
B 12 512
5 15 5 i5
B 17 5 17
5 19 5 9
5 21 521

eg
»3
a

Apr 11-May..

i
!

M ay-tune .
J udo-J uly..
July- A u k . . .

1
V* od n ea .. D e c . 2 9 .

ppen Ht»< Loto. Clot
D ecem ber..
Dec.-Jan....
jan -F eb....
Feb.-Maroh
Mar.-Apr ..
A p r .-May ..
M ay-June..
June-July.
July-A ug ..

4.
512
ft 11
511
512
513
6 15
5 17
19
5 21

4
5 12
511
511
5 12
ft 13
5 IB
517
5 19
5 21

[V o L . X L 1 V ,

i

X

512
511
Bin
511
5 13
5 1ft
5 17
5 19
b 21

512
6 11
510
511
513
5 .5
517
6 19
5 21

Ttanrs., D ec, 3 0 .

It.
5 11
5 10
5 10
5 to
511
518
5 Id
5 1"
5 20

*.
5 11
6 10
5 10
5 10
5 11
5 13
5 16
51*
5 20

4.
514
5 12
512
513
5 14
516
5 18
621
5 23

d.

d.

5 14
5 12
5 12
513
514
5 16
5 18
5 20
522

514
5 12
512
513
5 14
5 16
518
5 21
5 23

4.
513
5 12
511
5 12
5 14
5 16
5 18
5 20
5 22

d.

*

513
5 12
5 12
512
5 14
6 16
5 18
52>
5 22

613
5 12
511
512
514
5 16
518
520
5 .2

DAILY CLOSING PRICES OF NO 2 MIXED CORN.

i
5 >8
5 12
5 12
512
5 14
616
5 iS
62
6 22

BRE A D S T U F F S .
F r id a y . P. H ., December 3 1 ,188 6.

Mon.

Sat.
Tinnary delivery................ — ¡J
February delivery............ « 3
May delivery.......................51%

47%
48%

Tue.s.

Wed.

Thurt.

47%
40%
52

48%
4W%
52%

48%
49%
52%

fti.
48
49%
52%

Oats have been dull, but prices are well sustained, prime
white grades showing some advance. To-day the market was
very dull.
Rye meets with rather more inquiry, and prices are harden­
ing. Buckwheat has advanced from scarcity. Barley shows
rather more animation, and prices are steadier,
DAILY CLOSING PRICES OP NO. 2 OAT8.

Sat.

Mon.

January d e liv e r y ............... F*
F tb ju a ry «leilvery.......... .
M arch »lèlivery................... *
May d e liv e r y ..................... M

34%
3o%
37%

Tue.s.

Wed. T h u n .

35
35
35%
85%
....................
37%
3 ;%

35
35%
86*«
37%

F r i.
35%
S6%
36%
37%

The following are the closing quotations:
FLOOR
F i n e . . . . . . . . . . . . # b b l. $ 2 0 0 a $ ! 9 0 Southern b a k er»’ «»«'1
fam ily br ds $ bbl $3 75 r $5 00
superfine_______ . . . . . 2 3 >£ 3 20
»
Spring wheat extras. 2 3 5 4 a 3o Rye flour, supernue.. 3 10 • à 25
F i n e ......................... 2 30® 2 65
ftflun. clear and stra’t. 3 50 4 4 70
v inter shipp’g extras. 3 uO« 3 50 lorn m eal—
V
4e . . . . . . . 2 3 0 9 2 85
O
Vinter X X & X X X .. 3 6 0 9 4 75
2 85** 2 90
B randyw ine.. . .
Patents............... . . . . . 4 35 4 5 25
S *<itbecw «w ip ers...... 2 8S o 3 30 B’kw n’ tflour,$ lOOlbs 1 85® 2 00
soiu n 'n com . e x tr a s .. 3 4 0 9 3 6 >
GRAIN.
Oats—M ix e d ....... ...... 33 9 37
Wheat—
82 ® 97
W hite........................ 38 » 41
Spring,per bu sh.
No. 2 m ixed ___ . . . . . 34% » £6
91 'c 93
8pringN o. 2 . new
No. 2 w h it e .......... ot) » 40
93%
Red winter, JSio. 2
92% »
B arley - C anada__ _ 68 ® 78
_
SI 9 96
Red w in te r .........
W esre rn ................... « 0 ft 68
82 9 95
W h ite ..................
Two-rowed Stale___ 61 ® 63
45 9 49%
Corn—West, m ixed
Six-rowetl S ta te .... 65 tf 69
47% * 49
West. mix. No. 2.
M ali—
46 9 M
West, w hite.........
45 ® 50
b are. 6-ro <e d — . . . PO ® 85
West, y ellow .......
Stale, 2-rowed......... 68 a 73
w bite Ron’■bern. .
50 9 54
w s t e m . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 a 85
47 O 60
Vallow Pouthern.
Peas—vsri.:jml;*.............. 67 ® 68
R ye—
B u c k w h e a t ............ 52
53
State & Pa., $ bush. 56 9 59
T h e m o v e m e n t o f breailstutta to m a r k e t is in d ic a te ci in th®

icatements below, prepared by us from the figures of the New
fork Produce Exchange. We first give the receipts at Western
take and river ports, arranged so as to pmiHQt the compara­
tive movement for the week ending Dec. 25, 1886, and since
fulv 24 for each of the last three vears:
ÜCIIÿU
Chicago........
Milwaukee...
Toledo..........

F r l„ D ec. 31.

open High Low. Clot. Open Hit' Low. d o »
4.
5 11
5 12
512
513
614
516
5 18
5 20
5 22

mand has been quite moderate, the local trade slow, and the
speculation sluggish, depending for whatever spirit it may at
times have shown on sympathy with wheat. To-day the
market was very dull, and prices were easier.

Cleveland...
St. Louis.
Peoria..........
T ot. wfc. »8«.
Same wk.’85.
Sa ue wk.’84.
'O
nce. Jviy 24
1886....
lauft..........
1884....

Barley.
Com.
Oat*.
Rye.
Flour.
Wheat.
BbL.imih* Bwh.fWllht Bueh.Srt Uo Bu*h.22 lb. Bush AHlb. Bxuh.se Vte
173,060
34,380
6.933
2.275
3.726
13.844
4,542

557,715
206.275
130.327
150.574
35 980
92.256
6,000
am.úm
—

718.308
6.24»
71,596
84,082
20,500
343.100
132,600
......

544.893
44.550
20,638
11.552
31,900
1O0.UOO
100.500

237.498
89,660
7,13«
29.187
16,000
78,684
16,800

8,800
5,003

238.859
125.-50
133,552

1,546.370
850,137
1,861, 37

1.371.P26
1,804.042
1.632,433

862,136
904 780
405,498

604.965
491,344
845,618

27,688
46,805
87,471

4,577.688 57.43 >.943 41,390,007 33.371 845 13.726.725
3,774.732 39.510.502 41,826.982 29.748,942 11,941.871
4,743,625 71,149.374 38.351.424 20,670,886 9,550,368

1,269,094
1,976,410
3,290,305

8,71#
2,900
5,27«

The receipts of flour and gram at the seaboard ports for the
week ended Dec. 25, 1886, follow:
A t-

Flour,
obis.

Wheat,
bush.

54n,150
33.436

Corn,
hush.

170.600
157,064

Barley,
bush.

Rye,
bush.

20O,4->0 131,250
7,325
128.018

Oats,
bush.

7.250
1.26«

The market for flour and meal opened the week somewhat New Fork . . . . . 1 2 ’ ,711
4 6 ,2 ,0
B o s t o n .. . . . . . . .
......
depressed, but afterwar»is became firmer. The improvement P o r tla n d . . . . . .
3.350
15.350
7.012
M ontreal___. . . .
was, however, due mainly to sympathy with the grain mar­ P h ila d e lp h ia ... 23,446 192,775 192,9‘.<1 10ft.200 53,100 1,200
5 323
3 ,3 j 2
41 0 0
ket, for trade is at best slow in the holiday week, and in the B a l t i m o r e ...... 73,145 2o4,087 310.6G1
30
3 9»
40,072
7,031
4 ,„ « 0
R ic h m o n d ......
present instance h »s been impeded by a fall of sno w, whi*h has Slew O r le a n s ... 7,925
1 4 ,4 .0
15 147
22,230
added to the cost and diffi mines of transportation.
855,217 453 917 19 ft,3'35 13,072
Total w e e k ... 285,1391,104 072
6,917
The wheat m irket opened the week under a feeling o f de­ 0 >r. w eek ’ 85. 159,072 128,9012,183,536 393,731 96,138
pression, but on Tuesday showed renewed activity and uuo*The total receipts at the same ports for the period from Deo,
_ooy on the more warlike character of the reports from the 21, 1885, to Dec, 25, 1886, compare as follows for four y e a « :




J anuary

1, 1887.]

THE
18*5.
1 3,576,822

1*84
14,027,521

-MS
14,276,038

W h eat......... bush. 72 567,529
45,7*1,356
C om 77,*65.927
8«,849 010
Oats.
3*,492,1 L6
41,8*8,6.14
6,698. *61
6,380.846
B arley..................
B ye.......................
626,73 L 1,146.9 >1

70.265.809
49.31 1 .I l l
32,497 100
6.553.0*2
5,531,938

60,882,917
84,^58.647
31,585.170
6,2*6,322
5,723,310

164,099,000

189.396,867

.

1Hj6
*
Flour.............bbla. 13,695,688

C H R O N IC L E .

Total g r a in ... .

195,350,764 182,036,857

The destination of the exports is as below. W e add the
corresponding period o f last year for comparison.
Flour.
Exports
for week
to—

1886.

Week,
Dec. 25.

Un.King.
Contin’nt
8. A C.Aui
W. Indies
Brit, c o l’s
Otli.o’n’ tc
Total.

1886.

Week,
Dec. 26.

BbU

Week.
Dee. 26.

Bush.

Bu*h.

50,525
3,218
12,658
15.007
5,¿02
661

61 i, 189
370,138

87.261

149.86b

1885.

Week.
Dec. 25.

Bbls.

82,069
31,739
9,970
14,4 8
11,194
409

Corn.

Wheat.

1885.

981.327

53.159
94,600

147,659

1886

1885

Week,
Dee. 25.

Week,
Dee. 26.

Bhsh

Bush

471.742 1.137.129
386,642 391,465
5,767 106,609
3 ,3 3 1
4,639
200
100
2,242
873,122 1.638,634

By adding this week’s movement to our previous totals w e
have the following statement of exports this season and lat-t
season:

29

o f dry goods are, upon the whole, well pleased with the results
of the year’s business.
D o m e s t i c C o t t o n G o o d s . —The exports o f cotton goods
from this port for the week ending Deo. 28 were 4,402 pack­
ages, of which 950 were shipped to China, 876 to Argentine
Republic, 844 to Great Britain, 389 to Brazil, 837 to
Hamburg, 30(1 to Aden, 228 to Uruguay, 212 to Bremen, 174 to
U. S. of Colombia, &c. The demand for staple cotton goods
at first hands was comparatively light, but prices ruled steady
on all descriptions, and some makes of low-grade brown sheet­
ings (adapted for conversion purposes) have been slightly ad
vanefd by agents. Print cloths were in moderate demand,
and the market closed firm on the basis of 3% 5 for 64x64s
.
and 3c. for 56x60s, at which figures manufacturers declined to
make contracts beyond January. Stocks last Saturday and
for the three previous years were as follows :
Dec. 25,
Stock of Print Cloths—
1886.
Held by Providence m anuf’rs. 67.000
Fall Kiver m anufacturers... 12^,000
Providence speculators......... 37.000
Outside speculators (est)....... 30.01*0
Total stock, (pieces)............ 260,000

Dec. 26,
1885.
J91.000
89.000
240,000
50.000

Dec. 27, Dec. 29.
1884.
1883.
430.000
117.000
349.0'>0 398.000
32O,0<>0 256.000
275.000
75,000

470,000 1,374,0 0

846,000

For fancy cotton goods and patterned fabrics the demand
by package buyers was quite moderate, but large deliveries
Flour.
of shirting prints, ginghams, seersuckers, white goods, wash
Oben.
Wheat.
dress fabrics, & c., were made on account of former orders.
Sept. 1,’36, Sept.l, ’85. Sept. 1, ’88, Sept. 1, '85,'Sept. 1. ’86, Sept. 1/85,
mmv
o
D o m e s t ic W o o l e n G o o d s .—
-The market for clothing
to Dec.
to Dec.
to Dee.
to Dec.
to Dec.
to Dec.
35, 1886.
26,1885. 25, 1886
26, 1885. 25, 1886. 26, 1885
wooiens was devoid of animation and its mtin features are
unehtitged. Transactions in spring casdmeres, suitings and
Bii h.
Busn
BbU.
Bush.
tylM
?-.
Un.Kinpdom
1.905,529 1,483,00 12,122,341 4,178.237 6.874,609 11,038,787 worsteds were comparatively light, an 1 h e a v y woolens were
C ontin ent...
205.963
45.735 9,314,922 2,137.689 3, lt-6,518 3,352,451 tn limited demand, thougn fair orders for low-grade over­
S. A C. A m ...
375,961
280.910
15,863
2,706
30.3.6 9
753,156 coatings were placed with some of the mill agents for later
W est Indies.
249.803
816, IU0
8,071
4,107
161.469
116,408 delivery. Cloakings ruled quiet in first hands, aud Jersey
Brit. Col'nies
287 8«<0
246,5»f
13
5,966
30,6.8 cloths and stockinets were in light request by the manufac­
Olh. countr’s
18.061
11,414
66.711
16,320
19,317
24,034 turing trade. Flannels and blankets were taken in small parcels
T otal.........
2,993,206 2,341,704 21,501,908 6,339,072 10,551,523 15,105,494 for the renewal o f assortments and prices remain firm. Ken­
tucky jeans and satinets were sluggish but scea ty in price.
The visible supply of grain, comprising the stocks in granary All-wool and worsted dress fabrics were quiet in demand, but
at the principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard leading makes are sold ahead and prices continue firm. Car­
ports, and in transit by rail and water. Deo. 25, 1886 :
pets were in fair request, with most relative activity in tapes­
Wheat,
Corn,
Oats,
B ye,
Barle , try Bru'-sel-t makes, which are selling at relatively low prices.

bltth
I n store at—
bush.
bush.
New Y o r k ............ 11 .’ 66 199 3,882.043 1,321,390
D o afloat......... 1,184,000
74,700
A lbany..................
11,070
40.500 104,800
B o fla lo ............. . 3,44:6,,20
375,258
5,311
Chicago____. . . . 12,771,973 4,219.816 985,711
Do a flo a t......
270,049
Milwaukee........... 2,971,247
D o afloat.........
Duluth.................. 8,943.378
Do afloat.____
11 000
T oledo............. .
4,188,139
225,662
35,062
Do afloat.........
22,500
Detroit.................. 2,282,9c 9
154.322
25,030
Oswego.................
108,000
95,1*00
St* Louis................ 4,4 l o , 008 1,245,958 577,927
Cincinnati...........
83,000
10,000 138,000
B o sto n ............ .
365,668
247,594 393,090
T oronto.................
113,655
9,944
M ontreal..............
204,641
61,606
52,731
P hiladelphia. . . . . 1,054,213
562,553
58,100
P e o r i a ..... . . . . . . .
Î0.479
148,079 932,572
Indian apolis. . . . .
130,630
163,970 338,600
Kansas C ity. . . . . .
328,445
282,272
17,617
B a ltim ore. . . . . . . .
903,168
525,223
D o afloat.^ ....
M inneapolis. . . . . . 6,579.441
Bt. Paul.................
695, OoO
On M ississippi...
On lakes...............
94,000
On canal & river.
5 4,2oO
Tot. De .
Tot. Dee.
Tot. Dec.
Tot. Dee.
Tot. D eo.

25, ’86.
1 8 ,’86.
2« , ’85.
7, ’84*
2 9 ,’83*

62,264,343
61.469,8*4
58,431,813
43,382,190
35,607,4 00

bush
50,630

7 ,r0 »
40.253
150,476
7,931

bush.
299,177
2.42,300
124,4 0
219,708
322,852

313^800

Im p o r ta tio n « o f D ry G o o d « .

52,728
17.300
23,971
2 « , 000
1,143
4,249
21,382
12,089
950
6.897
1.386

21,3 3
906,9 28
102.97 i
3 5,0» *0
7 ■ 92
,
193,260
51,917
452

......

12.584.605 4.996.485 426,995 2,9‘ 0,261
12,064,( 0 < 5,098,639 420,46 >2,950,969
8,320,695 2.380.968 810,075 2,327.152
4,124.812 2.319 974 624,343 1 935.587
9,696,044 6,229,342 2.673,349 3,292,196

* Minneapolis and St. Paul n ot included.

T HE

DRY GOODS TRADE.
N e w Y o r k , Friday, P. M., Deo. 31, 1886.

The jobbing trade in dry goods was quite active in the fore
psrt of the paBt week, most of the leading houses having made
relatively low prices in domestics, prints, ginghams, American
dress goods, &c., in order to close out their open stocks and
thus facilitate their semi-annual “ stock-taking.” At first
hands the demand was strictly moderate, as usual at this time
o f year, but there was a good steady movement in various
spring and turamer fabrics on account o f former transactions,
large shipments of shirting prints, lawns, white good#, seerBuckeis, dress fabrics, cotton hosiery, «fee., having been made in
this connection by agents for the principal mills. Prices remain
steady all along the line, and leading makes of fancy calicoes
have been opened by the mill-agents at a slight advance upon
last season’s quotations, discounts having been reduced about
per cent. The year just closed has been rather more
profitable to manufacturers than its immediate predecessors
in spite of labor troubles and other drawbacks, and distributers




F o r e ig n D r y G o o d s w e re f o r th e m o s t p i r t q u ie t in fir s t
h a u o s , a n d th e jo u b t n g tr a d e w a s o f s tr ic tly m o d e r a te p r o ­
p o r tio n s. P u c e s a te g e n e r a lly s te a d y in th is m a rk r, h * r e g a r d s
th e m o s t s ta p le fa b r ic s , b u t s o m e d e s c r ip tio n s are r e la t iv e ly
lo w e r h e re ch a n a t th e s o u r c e s o f s u p p ly in E u r o p e . T h e
m o t io n sea so n h as c lo s e d , a n d p u b lic sa les o f fo r e ig n g o o d s
a re n o t lik e ly t o be r e s u m e d b e fo r e th e e a r ly p a r t o f F e b r u a r y

The importations of dry goods at this port for the week
ending Dec. 30,1886, and since Jan. 1, and the same facts for
the corresponding oertods are as follows:

iV ol.

K TH E C H R O N IC L E

301
g a tx fc s >

g a t ik je v s

a n il

xrf

j^ je a x

Lamprecht Bros. & C o.,
BANKERS,
N o. 1 3 ? S U P E R IO R S T R E E T ,

Members o f the Philadelphia and New York Stock
Exchanges.
Cable Transfers, Bills o f Exchange and Letters o f
Credit.

Transact a general banking business, and D E A L
IN TOWN, COUNTY AND C IT Y BONDS. Lists
and prices furnished on application. W rite ns if you
wish to buy or sell. R efer, by permission, to Society
for Savings, Savings 4 Trust Co. and National Banks
o f Cleveland, Ohio.
____________ ______

C H IC A G O , IL L IN O IS .
S u r p lu s , $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 .

This Bank holds in addition «1,000,000 U . 8 .4 per
cent Bonds at par .¡pledged by its stockholders for
the protection o f its customers. Said bonds are
pledged as above, Instead o f being held by the Bank
as a part o f its legal surplus, to avoid what we think
unjust and excessive local taxation.

W ESTERN.

Narr & Ger lach,

N orth-W estern N a t l Bank,

JOB. M. SHOEMAKER.

CLEVELAND, OHIO.

ROBERT M. JANNEY,

Bh x r m a n S .J e w e t t , Pres. J o s i a h J e w e t t , V . Pres.
W il l ia m C. Co u n w e l l . Cashier.

Jos. M. Shoemaker & Co.

Bank o f Buffalo,

ESTABLISHED 1871.

BANKERS AN D STOCK BROKERS.

C A P IT A L ,

- - - - - - BUFFALO, N. Y .

$ 3 0 0 ,0 0 0

This bank has superior facilities for making collec­
tions on all accessible points in the United States,
Canada and Europe. Liberal terms extended to ac*
oounts o f bankers and merchats.
Co r r e sp o n d e n t s .—New York, National Shoe &
Leather Bank; Union Bank o f London.
W . T . B l a c k w e l l , Pres’t.

P. A . W il e y , Cashier.

The Bank o f Durham,
DURHAM ,

N . € .,

FIRST-CLASS FACILITIES.
New York Correspondents.—The Ni tlonal Park Bank
and Seventh Ward Natlot IBank.
President.

No.

184

SOUTH

T H IR D

E. P. H il l ,
K .A . G ir a u d ,
Ylce-Pres’t.
Cashier.

Commercial National Bank,

305 OLIVE STREET, ST. LOUIS,
Defaulted Bonds o f Missouri, Kansas and Illinois
a specialty. Good Investment Securities, paying
from four to eight per cent, fo r sale.

P H IL A D E L P H IA .

N. W . Harris &

Rea Bros. & C o.,
BAN KERS AND BROKERS,
AND DEALERS IN FOREIGN EXCHANGE,

MEMBERS
New York and Philadelphia Stock Exchanges.
Pittsburg Petroleum, Stock and Metal Exchange.
Private wires to New York, Boston, Philadelphia,
Baltimore and Washington.

P ITTSB U R G ,

PA.

ESTABLISHED 1871.

C a p i t a l,
$ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0
Collections receive our special attention and are
Bgomptly remitted for._____________________________ ,
J. G. Fletcher, j STATE BANK, ) C. T. Walker,
President. ( Incorporated 1875. >
Cashier.

Whitney & Stephenson,

German National Bank,

Oldest Pittsburg members N. Y . Stock Exchange.

L IT T L E R O C K , A R K A N SA S.
C a p ita l (P a id In ) - - - - - $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0
Prom pt attention given to all business in our line.
N. Y . C o r r e s p o n d e n t s .— Importers’ 4 Traders’
National Bank and National Bank o f the Republic.
A . K . W a l k e r , Cashier.

First National Bank,
W I L M I N G T O N , N . C.
QHcotlons made on all parts o f the United States.

MERCHANTS’ NATIONAL

D e a le rs In W e s t e r n S e c u ritie s.

STREET,

HOUSTON, T E X A S.

E. E. BURRtrss, Pres’t.

p. p. Keleher & C o.,

BAN KERS AND BROKERS,

N o. 57 F O U R T H

AVENUE.

E. W . Clark & C o.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,

N o . 3 5 So n th T h ir d S t ., P h ila d e lp h ia .
Railroad, Municipal and other desirable Invest­
ment Securities for sale.
Transact a general banking business. Allow inter­
est on deposits.
_
Members o f the Philadelphia and New York Stock
Exchanges, and connected b y private wire with New
York.

Humphreys Castleman,
BROKER AND D E A LER IN A L L KINDS OF
SECURITIES.
Bonds and Stocks bought or sold on commission
Georgia and Alabama Securities specially dealt in.
Correspondents: Tobey & Kirk and A . Dutenhofer,
New York.
_
■ ■ . _
R eference : Atlanta National Bank, Atlanta, Gaand S m it h National Bank, New York.

W.

H.

Patterson,

A TLA N TA , GA.
State, City, Railroad and other Corporate Securi­
ties o f Southern States wanted and fo r sale a ta ll
times. Mortgage Loans on city and farm property,
two to ten years, paying six to eight per cent, fur­
nished. Prompt replies to correspondence, mail o r

THOM AS
BANKERS AND

B R A N C H & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS

R IC H M O N D , V IR G IN IA .

B A L T IM O R E .

Wilson, Colston & C o.,

C. W . Branch & C o.,

BANKERS AND BROKERS,
(Members o f Baltimore Stock Exchange),
B A L T IM O R E .

BANKERS AND BROKERS,

R IC H M O N D , V IR G IN IA .
Collections made on all Southern points on best

Brewster, Cobb
& Estabrook,

ATLANTA.

Circulars and information on funding the debts o f
Virginia and North Carolina free o f cost; one-eighth
per cent charged fo r funding. Southern Railroad
and State and City Bonds bought and sold.

terms; prompt returns.

N E W ENGLAND.

SOUTHERN.

BOND AND STOCK BROKER,

BANK,

JOHN P. BRANC*.. President.
J o h n F. G le n n , Cash. F r e d . R. Scott , Vice-Pres’t

C o.,

C H IC A G O a n d B O S T O N .
D f! M n O o f Counties, Cities, 4 c., o f high grade a
pUlMU J specialty. S e w d f o r D e s c r ip t iv e L i s t s .

4 2 5 W o o d Street, Pittsburg, P a .

Fay Special Attention to Collections.

H. Ga r d e s ,

I fo r lx .

B A N K E R S AND B R O K E R S ,
No. 437 CHESTNUT STREET,
P H IL A D E L P H IA .

F. W . GOOKIN, Asst. Cash.

C a p it a l, $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

© a t

P E N N S Y L V A N IA .

BANKS.
(jho . BTUKGK8. Pres’t.

'ftx o k tx s

XL1V.

(INVESTMENT and SOUTHERN SECURITIES a
specialty.)
.
.
.
Correspondence solicited and Information furnished.
N. Y . Correspondents—McKim Brothers 4 Co.

St a t e

bank

B u il d in g ,

R IC H M O N D ,

V A.

Private wires connecting with Washington, Balti­
more, Philadelphia and New York.
,
' New Y ork correspondents, Prince 4 W hitely.

HANKERS,
iN o,

35

C O N G R E SS

STREET, .

Robert Garrett & Sons,

BO STON .

BANKERS,

MEMBERS OF THE NEW Y O R K AND
BOSTON STOCK EXCHANGES.

No.

J o s h u a W il b o u r ,
Ch a r l e s h . Sh e l d o n , J r
B e n j a m in A . J a c k s o n , W il l ia m B in n e y , J r .

W ilbour, Jackson & C o.,
BAN KERSIAN DIBROKERS,

N o. 52

W EYBOSSET

STREET,

P R O V ID E N C E , R . I.
Dealers in Commercial Paper, Government and
other first-class Bonds and Securities and Foreign
Exchange.
_
Private Telegraph W ire to New York and Boston.

Swan & Barrett,
BANKERS

AND B R O K E R S ,

1 8 6 M id d le S tree t,
P O R T L A N D , M A IN E .
Dealers in Government, State, County, City and Rail
road Bonds, Bank Stocks, Ac.
Desirable Investment Securities constantly on hand

Joseph G. Martin,
STOCK

BROKER,

a n d d e a l e r i n i n v e s t m e n t s e c u r it i e s

N o . 1 0 State S tree t, B o s t o n .




SOUTH

STR EE T,

Crenshaw & Wisner,

B A L T IM O R E ,

ALSO,

D e a le r s In M u n ic ip a l, S ta te, R a ilr o a d
a n d U n it e d S tates R o n d s .

7

transact

a

general

d o m e s t ic

7 1 W A L L S T ., N E W Y O R K ,
and

C O M M ISSIO N

FOREIGN BAN KIN G BUSINESS.

W m . Fisher & Sons,
BANKERS,
A n d D e a le rs In G o v e r n m e n ts , S to c k s
a n d I n v e s tm e n t S e c u ritie s,
Opposite Second St .,
3 2 SOUTH STREET,
B A L T IM O R E ,
M D ,,

M ER CH AN TS,

Members o f the Cotton, Coffee and Produce Exoh’s
agency o r

THE HAXALL

CRENSHAW CO.,

R IC H M O N D , V A .
Standard Brands o f Flour fo r Shipment to W a r n
Climates always on hand.

ORIENT GUANO MANUFACT’G CO.,

H ave W estern Union wires in their offices, by
means o f which immediate com m unication can be
had with all commercial points in the country. Es­
pecial attention given to purchase and sale o f V ir­
ginia Consols, Ten-forties, Deferred and all issues
o f the State, and to all classes o f Southern State,
Cttv and Railway Securities. Correspondence so­
licited.

W ESTERN.

O R IE N T , L . I.
Standard Superphosphates.

SULPHUR MINES COMPANY
O F V IR G IN IA .
H igh Grade Pyrites free from Arsenic.
ESTABLISHED 1855.

Eugene
L T A T IO N E R
S

R . C ole,
AND P R IN T E R ,

Chas. H . Potter & C o.,

Supplies Banks, Bankers, Stock Brokers and Corpo­
rations with complete outfits o f Account Books ana

INVESTMENT BANKERS,
C L E V E L A N D ,
O H I O .

Station®^? eoncerng organising will have their orders
promptly executed.

SPIPCT A T.TT1EQ •

TOWN, COUNTY AND CITY BONDS,
’LA K E SUPERIOR IRON MINING STOCKS,
I
AND STREET R A IL R O A D SECURITIES

N o. 1 W IL L IA M

STREET,

(HAN OVERZSQU A RE .)

J a n u a r y 1,

THE

1887.J

C H R O N IC L E .

Canadian and Woxxign JBaufes and Bankers.
Bank o f Montreal.
C A P I T A L , - - ~ ^ 1 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 G o ld .
SUR PLU S, . . . .
$ 6 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 « o l d .
0 . F. 8MITHER9, President.
W. ,J. BUCHANAN, General Manager.
N EW
£9

&

T0R K
61

OFFIC E :

W ALL

STREET,

W a l t e r W a ts o n ,)
A l k x ’r L a n g ,
j

L o n d o n Office. N o . 2 2 A bcliu rclk L a n e .

Imperial Bank o f Canada
C A P I T A L (p a id u p ), - • $ 1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
SUR PLU S, . . . . . . .
$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0
HEAD

D. R. W ILK IE , Cashier.

O F F IC E ,

TORONTO.

BRANCHES IN ONTARIO.

Essex Centre.
Fergus.
Galt.
lngersoll.
Winnipeg,

Niagara Falls.
Port Colborne.
st. Catharines.
St. Thomas.

Toronto.
Toronto, Yonge St,
Welland,
W oodstock.

BRANCHES IN NORTHWEST.

Brandon.

E Q U ITA B LE

Hong Kong & Shanghai M o r t g a g e C o m p a n y .
R A N K IN G

C O R P O R A T IO N .

Paid-up Capital................................................$7,500,000
Reserve Fund.................................................. 4.500,000
500,000
Reserve for Equalisation o f Dividends___
Reserve Liability o f Proprietors.................. 7,500.000
The Corporation grant Drafts, Issue Letters o f
Creuit for use o f Travelers, and neuot ate or collect
Bids {•¡»••able at Bombay, Calcutta, Singapore.
Saioroa, Manite, H ong K ocg, Foochow, Amoy,
N il.«’'-* Shanghai, Hankow, Yokohama, H iogo, Sain
Ircaciauo anc London.
5 . M . T O W N »K N D , A g e n t, 4 7 W illia m S t.

Calgary.

UoycTa, Barnett^S^Bos-l b a n k ^¿opû M o n t r e a l
anquet’s Bank, limited, |
Mo ntreal,
Promptest attention paid to collections payable in
any part o f Canada.
Approved Canadian business paper discounted at
the H ead Office on reasonable terms, and proceeds
remitted by draft on New York.
Dealers in American Cur’y and Sterling Exchange.

Blake, Boissevain & C o.,
LONDON,

N e g o t ia t e Railway, State and City loans.
E xecu te orders fo r Bonds, Shares, etc., on Com­
mission, and transact a general Banking and
Commission Business.
S p ecial atten tion given to the execution o f
orders fo r Securities on the New York, Lon­
don and Amsterdam Exchanges in correspond
ence with

BLAKE
18
28

BROTHERS

W a l l S treet, N e w

&

CO.,

Y ork,

S tate S treet, B o s t o n , M a s s ,
AND

A D O L P H B O IS S E V A IN & CO.
A m s t e r d a m , H o ll a n d .

President, A N D RE W A LLAN , Esq.
Vice-President, ROBERT ANDERSON, Esq.

O F F IC E , M O N T R E A L .

GEORGE HAGUE, General Manager.
W .N . ANDEUSON, Assistant Gen’l Manager.
B AN KERS:
LONDON, ENG.—The Clydesdale Bank (Limited.)
NEW YORK—The Bank o f New York, N. B. A .
The New York Agency buys and sells Sterling Ex.
change, Cable Transfers, issues credits available ii
all parts o f the world ; makes collections in Canadi
and elsewnere and issues drafts payable at any o:
the offices o f the bank In Canada. Every descrip
tion o f foreign banking business undertaken.

N e w ï o r k A g e n c y , N o . 6 1 W a l l Street,

chase and sale o f Bonds, Shares, Ac., Ac. on
the Stock Exchange.

Interest allowed on Deposits, subject to 00-days
sight drafts, at Bank o f England rate, and
one-percent below that rate subject to
demand drafts.
Negotiate Railway. State and City Loans.

C. B. Wilkinson, Man’ger. J. C. Avery, Gen. Man.

AND

WESTERN FARM MORTGAGE CO.,
LAW REN CE. KAN.

F. M. P e r k i n s , Pres’t.

Pnid Up C ap ita l,

.

.

L . H . P e r k t v ®, pee.

.

.

8 2 5 0 ,0 0 0

The choicest First Mortgage Farm Loans, also the
Company’s Ten Tear Debentures, based upon its
paid up capital and assets o f over $650,000. No losses.
Eleven years’ experience, with absolute satisfaction
to over 1.500 investors. Send for circulars, form s and
full Information, Branch offices in N. Y. City and
Albany. New York Office 137 Broad wav,
C. C. H IN B A SON. Agents.

6%

8%

7%

T h e A m erican Investm ent Com pany, o f Wmmetsbnrg, Towa, with s nald-nn capital or 8 6 0 6 , .
0 0 0 , su rp lu s 8 7 5 ,0 0 0 , offers first Mortgage
Loans drawing seven per cent., both P rin cip al and
Interest fu lly G u aranteed. Also « p e r c e n t 10year Debenture Bond*,secured bv 105 per cent o f first
Mortgage loans held in trust by the M ercantile
T r u s t C o ., N. Y . Five per cent certificates o f
deposit fo r periods under one vear. Write for full
information and references to the company at 1 5 0
A. L . ORM SBY,

Vice-President and General Manager.
Real Estate Mortgages on City
NORTHand Farm Property, worth two
to four times amounts o f mort­
WESTERN gages, In terest 6 p e r c e n t to
7
GUARANTY estp e rc e n t, principal and Inter­
absolutely guaranteed. Se­
guaranty held
LOAN C0„ curities fo r Loan A Trust by the
American
Com-

MINNEAPOLIS. pany, o f Boston, Mass.
Send fo r circulars to
Paid-Up Capital,
NEHER A C ARPEN TER,
8 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 .
B a n k e rs , T ro y , N. Y .
Authoris'd Capital
Eastern Managers fo r Company
< ,000.000.
2

Farm Mortgages
[n Sums of $100 and Upwards on In*
diana and Ohio Lands.
JON. A . M O O R E ,

Railway Share Trust Co.

¿ i j

(LIM ITE D ).

B A N K

B U IL D IN G S

LONDON, ENGLAND.

OÏ

N o r t h A m e r ic a ,

K a n s a s Oitv, M o.,

8 4 F a s t M a r k e t k t .. T n d la n a n o lfu .I n d

THE

B a n k

B o s t o n . 2.1 C o u r t S t.
H . H . Fitch, Man'ger.

P lilla .. 1 1 2 8 . 4tli St.,

NOTHING SAFER. A L W A Y S PROM PTLY PA ID
SEND FOR PA M PH LE T.

N o. 4

N o. 52 W A L L

Principal and Interest guaranteed and payable at
any o f the offices o f the Company.

THE

H EN RY H A G U E,
>.
.
JOHN B. H A R R IS, J r ., {A gen ts.

B r it is h

CENT

GUARANTEED FARM MORTGAGES,

Nassau » t ., N. 1 .

LONDON.
OF CANADA.
Solicit accounts and agencies o f Banks, Railways
Capital, • . - $5,799,200 Paid Up.
Corporations, Firms and Individuals upon
favorable term s; also orders fo r the pur­
R e s e r v e ,............................ $1,500,000

OF

6 AND 7 P E R

Heinemann & C o.,

M e rch a n ts’ Bank

AGENCY

$ 6 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

INVEST T H R O U G H TFIK SOUND
R E L IA B L E

ENGLAND.

62 Gresham House, £. C.,

HEAD

C A P IT A L

X r w Y o r k , 2 0 8 H’ w a y ,
Chas. N. Fowler, V . P.

Buy and Sell Sterling Exchange, Francs and Cable
Transfers; grant Commercial and Travelers’ Credits
available in any part o f the W orld; issue drafts on,
and make Collections in, Chicago and throughout the
Dominion o f Canada.

H . 8. HOW LAND, Pres’t.

If axm gtotrt gagts.

F O R E IG N .

C A N A D IA N .

N o s.

v i'

C a p ita l P a id U p , £ 9 7 1 , 3 6 0

S te r lin e .

FARMS.

T tr tn o
LENDING M ONEY ON ILLINOI8
N O LO SSES. S e n d for Lis t .

C. E. & C. M. ANTHONY,
• ankers.

P e o r i a , il l .

Important Notice.
SOHOLDERS OF KANSAS REAL ESTATE
MORTGAGES:

STREBT.

Buy and sell Sterling Exchange and Cable Trans­
This Company undertakes the business o f Trustee
fers. Issue demand drafts on Scotland and Ireland,
also on Canada, British Columbia and San Francisco.
C IR C U L A R N O T E » Issued in Pounds Sterling to Loans o f approved Railways, negotiates and
available in all parts o f the world. C O M M E R ­
C I A L C R E D I T » ISSU ED for use in Europe, Issues Loans on the London Market, acts as Agent fo r
China, Japan, East and W est Indies and the Brazils.
River Plate, Ac.
Railways and other Corporations, either in the
Bills collected and other banking business trans­
acted.
ter o f payments o f Interest on Loans, Dividends on
D. A . M cTAVISH , ) .
H . 8TIKEMAN.
{ Agents.
or Registration o f Stocks in London, or otherwise.

Bend to HODGES A KNOX, TOPEKA, KANSAS,
tor Free Pamphlet containing the complied Lam
« f Kansas relating to Real Estate Mortgages.

'&XVLSX ( C o m p a t î t e s .

The Union Trust C o.,
011 AND 013 CHESTNUT STREET,

F O R E IG N .
THE

Anglo-Californian Bank
(LIMITED).

L O N D O N , Head Office, 3 Ang el Court.
SAN F R A N C IS C O Offloe, 422"California St.
N E W Y O R K Agents, J. & W. Seligman & Co.
BO STO N Correspond’ts, Massachusetts N. Bk.
A u th o r iz e d C a p ita l, - - - $ 6 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
P a id -u p C a p ita l, . . . .
1 ,5 0 0 ,0 0 0
R e se r v e F u n d , . . . . . .
4 0 0 ,0 0 0
Transact a general banking 'business. Issue Cc
mercial credits and Bills o f Exchange, available in
parts o f the world. Collections and orders fo r Bon
Stocks, etc., executed r------ M
------------F R E D ’L.
IGNATZ D im n i:
P. N. LILIENTHALJCashier




Cable Address—Pa v y , L o n d o n .

Bank of Australasia,
(Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1835.)

4 T h r e a d n e e d le S t., L o n d o n , E n g la n d

Paid-up Capital, . . . . . . £i,m (fcooo
Reserve Fund,
£790,000
Letters o f Credit and Drafts issued on any o f the
numerous branches o f the Bank throughout Aus­
tralia and New Zealand.
Bills negotiated or sent fo r collection.
Telegraphic transfers made.
Deposits received in London at interest fo r fixed
eriods, or for transfer to the colonies on terms
vhich may be ascertained on application.
P R ID E AU X SELBY. Secretary.

Ste w a r t
STO CK

B r o w n ’s

Sons

BROKERS,

6 4 B r o a d w a y 4c 1 » N o w 8 $ ., N o w Y o r l

P H IL A D E L P H IA .
Authorized C ap ita l.......... . . . . . . . ................ $1,000,000
Paid-up Capital............................................ .
500,000
Acts as Executor, Administrator, Assignee, etc.
and executes trusts o f every description known to
the law.
All trust assets kept separate from tho*e o f the
Company.
Burglar-Proof Safes to rent at $5 to $60 per annum.
Wills kept In vaults without charge.
Bonds, Stocks and other valuables taken under
guarantee.
Paintings, Statuary, Bronzes, etc., kept in FireProof Vaults.
Money received on deposit at interest.
I AS, LONG. Pres’t. JOHN G. READING, V .-P res’t.
MAHLON S. STO K MS, Treasurer & Secretary.
D. R. PATTERSON, Trust Officer.
D i r e c t o r s .—James Long, Alfred S.Gillett, Joseph
Wright, Dr. Charles P. Turner, William 8. Price,
John T. Monroe, W. J. Nead, Thomas R. Patton,John
JGReading, Wm. H . Lucas, D. Hayes Agnew, M. D.
Jos. I. K eefe, Robert Patterson, Theodor C. Engel,
Jacob Nayler, Thos. G. H ood, Edward L. Perkins.
William Watson, P h i l a d e l p h i a ; Samuel Riddle.
G l e n R i d d l e , Pa.; Dr. George W. Reily, H a r r is ­
b u r g , Pa.; J. Simpson Africa, H u n t i n g d o n ; Henry
8. Eckert, R e a d i n g ; Edpaund s. Doty, m i p f l i n t o w n ; w . W . H . Davis. D oY l k s t o w n ; R . E. M on­
aghan, W est Ch e s t e r .

THE

▼Ill

Txxxsi C oiupanics.
í

[VOL. XLIY.

C H R O N IC L E .

Txxxst ©cmxpatiies.

J t t f c t t r a t x c je .

United States Trust Co, The Brooklyn Trust C o.,
OF N EW YORK.
N o. 4 9 W A L L ST R E E T *
C a p ita l a n d S u r p lu s , •

$ 6 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

This com pan. Is a legal depository for moneys paid
Into court, and is authorized to act as guardian oj
*rU8lNTER.BST ALLOW ED ON DKP08IT8, *
which may be made at any time:and withdrawn awei
five days’ notice, and will be entitled to interest foi
the whole time they may remain with the <x>mpany
Executors, administrators, or trustees o f estates
and females unaccustomed to the transaction o f busi­
ness, as well as religious and benevolent institutions
will find this company a convenient depository foi
money.
JOHN A . S T E W A R T , President.
„
W ILLIAM H. MACY, Vice-President
*
JAMES 8. CLARK, Second Vice-Pres*
T IW ¿¡TEES:
Dan. H. Arnold, D. Willis James, Robt.B. Mlnturn,
Geo. H . Warren,
Thos. Slocomb, John J. Astor,
Charles K. Bill, John A. Stewart, George Bliss,
Wilson G. Hunt, S.M.Bucki’ghana. William Libbey,
H .E . Lawrence, John C. Brown,
Wni. 11. Mac?,
Clinton Gilbert, Isaac N. l ’helps, Edward Cooper,
Daniel I). Lord, Erast u s Corning, W.Bay’rdCutting
___ _____ _______ Chan. S. Smith,
S. B. Chittenden,
Samuel Hloan,
John li.lthi >udes, jW m. Rockefeller,
James Low,
Wm. W. PhelpB, 'Anson P. Htokes.'Alex. E. Orr.
HENRY L. THORN KLL, Secretary.
LOU lb G . HAMPTON. Assistant Secretary.

Union Trust Company
OF N E W

YORK,

C or.of Montague and Clinton Sts.,Brooklyn, N.Y.
This company Is authorized by special charter to
act as receiver, trustee, guardian, executor or admin­
istrator.
.
, .
It can act as agent in the sale or management o f
real estate, collect Interest or dividends, receive re­
gistry and transfer books, or make purchase and sale
Of Government and other securities.
Religious and charitable institutions, and persons
unaccustomed to the transaction o f business, will
And this Company a safe and convenient depository
for money. RIPLEY ROPES, President.
EDMUND W .CORLIES, Vice-Pres’t.
TRUSTEES:
Josiah 0 . Low, iE. F. Knowlton, H ’v K. Sheldon,
Alex. M. White, John T. Martin, C. D. W ood,
A. A. Low,
Fred. Cromwell, W m.H. Male,
Alex. McCue,
John P. R olfe,
Ripley Hopes,
Mich’ l Cbauncey. E. W . Corlies.
Abram B. Baylis,
Wm. B, Kendall.III. E. Pierrepont, H. W . Maxwell,
J am kb Robb Cit r k a n . Secretary.
F r e d k r ic k C. Colton , Asst. Sec’y.

T H E

Provident Life &Trust Co
OF

P H IL A D E L P H IA .

Incorporated Third Mo., 22d, 1865.
(CH ARTER PE RPETU AL.)

$ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0
$ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator
Guardian, Receiver, or Trustee, and is
A LEGAL DEPOSITORY FOR MONEY
Accepts the transfer agency and registry o f stocks,
and acts as Trust ee o f mortgages o f corporations.
Allows interest on deposits, which may be made at
any time, and withdrawn on live days’ notice, with
Interest for the whole time they remain with the
company.
For the convenience o f depositors this oompany
also opens current accounts subject, in accordance
with its rules, to check at sight, and allows interest
upon the resulting dally balances. Such checks pass
through the Clearing House.
TRUSTEES:
James M. McLean,
Wm. Whitewrlght,
Ambrose C . Kingsland,
Henry A. Kent,
James H. Ogilvie,
R. T. Wilson,
8. T. Fairchild.
Wm. F. Russell,
I. H. Frothingham,
C. 1). W ood,
George A. Jarvis,
James N. Platt,
C. Vanderbilt,
D. C. Hays,
A . A. Low,
James Forsyth,
G. G. Williams,
George Cabot Ward,
R. G. Renisen,
Edward King,
J. B. Johnston,
E. B. Wesley,
Edward Schell,
D. H. Mc Alpin,
Amasa J. Parker,
Georve B Carhart,
Samuel F. Barger,
Henry Stokes,
Robert Lenox Kennedy, Geo. C. Magoun
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:
Wm. Whitewrlght,
G. G. Williams,
James M. McLean,
E. B. Wesley,
J. B. Johnston,
C. D. Wood,
D. C . Hays,
A . U. Kingsland.
EDW ARD KING, President,
JAMES M. MCLEAN, First Vice-Pres’t.
J AMES H. OGILVIE, Seoond V ice-Pres’t.
A . O. RON ALDSON. Secretary.

COMPANY, OF

C a p it a l,
.
A u t h o r i z e d C a p it a i,

9 5 0 0 ,0 0 0

Authorized to act as Executor; Administrator,
Guardian, Receiver, or Trustee, n n j Is
A LEGAL DEPOSITORY FOR MONEY.
Accepts the transfer agency and registry o f stocks
and act s as Trust ee of mortgages or corporations.
Takes charge o f property, collects and remits in­
terest and income promptly, and discharges faith­
fully the duties of every trust known to the law.
Money rec- ived on deposit. All Trust Assets kept
separate from those o f the Company.
Burglar-proof Safes and Boxes (having chrome
steel doors) to rent at$lO to$iu0 per annum in tfceir
new and elegant chrome steel FIRE AND BURGLA lt-PR O O F VAU LTS, protected by improved
Time Locks.
Wills kept in vaults without charge. Bonds and
Stocks, Plate and all Valuables securely kept under
guarantee at moderate charges. Paintings, Statu­
ary, Bronzes, etc., kept in flre-proof vaults.
JOHN GILL, W . W . SPENCE,
L. C. FISCHER
President.
V ice-Pres’t.
Treas. & Sec.
W . W . Spence,
Christian Devries
C.Mort’n Stewart
Robert Garrett,
Chas. D. Fisher,
Geo. P. Thomas,
O. U. Williams,
Andrew Reid,

DIRECTORS:
Louis MoLane, John E. Hurst,
Robert Lehr,
Stewart Brown,
W . A. Tucker,
W . H. Blackford,
Jas. Carey Coale, E. A. Jenkins,
Oliver A. Parker, Bernard Cahn,
W. H.Whitridge, J. Will cox Brown
J. A.Hambleton, A lex. Frank,
Thos. Deford.
IJohn Gill.

Metropolitan Trust C o,,
Mi lie Building, 35 Wall St., New York
P A I D U P C A P I T A L , $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 .

Designated as a legal Depository by order o f Su
preme Court. Receive deposits jf money on interest,
act as fiscal or transfer agent, or trustee for corporations, and accept and execute any legal trusts from
persons or corporations on as favorable terms as
Other similar companies.
THOMAS H1LLHOUSE,President.
FREDERIC D. TAPPEN , Vice-President.
W A L T E R J. BRITTIN, Secretary.




NEW YO R K , January 23, 1886.
The Trustees, In conform ity to the Charter of
the Company, submit the follow ing Statement
o f its affairs on the 31st December, 1885:
Premiums on Marine Risks from
1st January, 1885, to 31st
$3,856,618 66
Deoember, 1 8 8 5 ............... .
Premiums on Policies not marked
off 1st January, 1885................ 1,339,525 10
Total Marine Prem ium s....... $5.196,143 76

INSURES LIVES, GRANT8 ANNUITIES, RE­
CEIVES MONEY ON DEPOSIT, returnable on de-

Premiums marked off from 1st
January, 1885, to 31st Decem­
ber, 1885..................................... $3,770,094 30

fnl performance o f which its capital and surplus
fund furnish ample security.
All trust funds and investments are kept separate
*nd apart from the assets o f the company.
The Income o f parties residing, abroad carefully
oollected and duly remitted.
SAM’L R. SH IPLEY, President.
T. W ISTAR BROWN, Vice-President.
ASA S. WING. Vice-President and Actuary.

Losses paid during the same
p e r i o d . . . . . . . . . . . . ....................... $1,915>020 67

Financial (Campantes.
F I D E L I T Y Ad C A S U A L T Y CO.
Nos. 214 A 216 B R O A D W A Y , NEW YORK
Cash Capital, $250,000, invested in U. 8. Gov’t Bonds.
$200,000 deposited with the N. Y. Ins. Dep’t, for
the protection o f Policy-holders.
Assets, January 1st, 1&86, $520,500 42.
Officials o f Banks, Railroads and Express Compa
dies, Managers,Secretaries, and Clerks of Public Com
panles, Institutions and Commercial tlrms, can obtain

Returns o f Premiums and E x­
p e n s e s .............. . . . . . . . . . . . .

CASUALTY

DEPARTM ENT.

Policies issued against accidents causing death or
totally disabling injuries.
Full information as to details, rates, &c., can be
obtained at head office, or o f Company’s Agents.
W m . M. K xcharj b, Prest. J ohn M. Ch a n s , Seo’y
R ob ’t J. H il l a s , Ass’t Secretary.
DIRECTORS:
G. G. Williams, David Dows,
W . G. Low,
J.8.T. Stranahan, A . S. Barnes,
Charles Dennis,
A. B. Hull,
H. A. Hurlbut,
A lex. Mitchell,
J. L. Riker,
J. D. Vermi’ ve. 8. B. Chittenden.
Geo. 8. Coe.
W m. M. Richards,

OTHER BUSINESS.

The Guarantee Co.
OF NORTH AMERICA.

Am ount...................................$12,740,326 46
SIX PER CENT INTEREST on the outstaud
lng certificates o f profits will be paid to the
holders thereof, or their legal representatives,
on and after Tuesday, the 2d of February next.
THE OUTSTANDING CERTIFICATES of
the issue of 1881 will be redeem ed and paid to
the holders thereof, or their legal representa­
tives, on and after Tuesday, the 2d of February
next, from which date all interest thereon will
cease. The certificates to he produced at the
time of payment and canceled.
A DIVIDEND OF FORTY PER CENT Is
declared on the net earned premiums o f the
Company, for the year ending 31st Deoember,
1885, for which certificates will be issued on
and after Tuesday, the 4th o f May next.
B y order o f the Board,

Cash C a p ita l............. ........................................$800,000
Assets and R esources....................................... §30,000
Deposit with insurance Departm ent............. 240,000
President:
Vice-President:
Si b a l k x . t . Ga l t .
H on . Ja b . F k r r ik r .
Managing Director: E d w a r d R a w l in g s .
NEW YORK OFFICE:

NO. I l l

$776,712 42

The Company has the follow ing Assets, viz.:
United States and State o f New
York Stock, City, Bank and
other S t o c k s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,034,685
Loans secured by Stocks and
otherwise..................................... 1,438,60
Real Estate and Claims due the
530,000 00
Company, estimated a t............
Premium Notes and Bills Re­
c e iv a b le .............. ...................
1,508,143 53
ash in B a n k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
228,897 88

BON ON O F S U R E T Y S H I P

from this Company at moderate charges.
The bonds o f this Company are accepted by the
courts o f the various States

NO

$ 2 , 0 0 0 .0 0 0

Mutual Insurance C o.,

ASSETS § 1 5 ,6 2 1 ,5 8 0 68.

Mercantile Trust & Deposit B o n d s o f S u r e t y s h i p .
B A L T IM O R E .

A T L A N T I C

C A P I T A L ..................................... $ 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

78 Broadway, cor. Rector St., N. Y.
C A P I T A I., - - - - - - SURPLU S, - - - - - - -

OFFICE OF THE

BROADW AY.

J , H . C H A P M A N , Secretary.

T R U S T E E S :

D. J . TOMPKINS, Secretary.
N»w Y o r k Directors—
Joseph w. Drexel, A . L.
Hopkins, H. V ictor Newcomb, John Paton, Daniel
Torrance. Edw. F. W inslow, Erastus Wiman, F. P.
Oioottand J. E. Pulsford.

Adolph Lemoyne,
J. D. Jones,
Robert B. Mintum,
Charles Dennis,
Charles H, Marshall,
W. H. H. Moore,
Frederick H. Cossitt,
James Low,
William Bryce,
A. A. Raven,
John Elliott,
Wm. Sturgis,
I tt s u r a iK je .
James G. De Forest,
Benjamin H. Field,
Charles D Leverich,
Josiah O. Low,
Thomas B Coddington, John L. Riker,
N. Denton Smith,
William Degroot,
George Bliss,
L I F E A S SU R A N C E S O C IE T Y , Horace Gray,
Henry E. Hawley,
William E. Dodge,
120 BROADW AY, NEW YORK.
William D. Morgan,
William H. Macy,
H E N R Y B . H Y D E , P r e sid e n t.
Isaac Bell,
0. A. Hand,
ASSETS. JANUARY 1st, 1888.............. $66,558,387 50 John D. Hewlett,
Edward Floyd-Jones,
LIA BILITIE S, 4 per cent Valuation .. 52,691,148 87
Anson W. Hard,
William H. Webb,
SURPLUS.......................................................$13,862,28918 Charles P. Burdett,
Thomas Maitland.
(S u r p lu s o n N . Y . S ta n d a rd 4*2 p er e en t Edmund W. Corlies,
In terest, $ 1 7 ,4 9 5 .2 2 9 ,4 0 .)
Surplus over Viabilities, on every standard of valua­
JOHN D. JONES, President.

EQUITABLE

tion larger than that of any other L ife Assurance Com­
pany.
» W ASSURANCE in 1885.................... $96,011,878 00
O u t s t a n d i n g a s s u r a n c e .......................857,338,246oo
Total paid Policy-H olders in 1885 ........ 7,188,689 60
Paid Policy-H olders since Organization 88,211,175 88
1NUOME in ISSÒ............................................. 16,590,05331

¡.CHARLES DENNIS, Vice-President.
(W . H. H . MOORE, 2d Vice-Pres’ t.
A . A. RAVEN. 3d Vioe-President

THE

January 1, 1&7.

R E A D Y FEB., 1887.

The United States Life
Insurance Co.
C IT Y O F N E W

fXltsccUau cents.

fShthticaticms.

In su ra n ce*

IN T H E

ix

C H R O N IC L E .

SECURE B A N K V A U L T S .

T H E

Financial Review.

YORK.

(ANNUAL.)

(ORGANIZED IN 1860.)

188 7.

261, 262 & 263 Broadway, New York.
G. H . BURFOHD, President,
O. P. F r a l k i g h , Sec’y. A . W h e e l w r i g h t , A n t Bee.
War. T. St a n d e n , Actuary.
All the pro tits belong to the Policy -holders exclu­
sively.
All Policies Issued by this Company are i n d i s p u t ­
a b l e after three years.
All Death Claims paid WITHOUT DISCOUNT as soon
as satisfactory proofs have been received.
This Company issues all form s o f Insurance, In­
cluding Tontine and Limited (Non-Forfeiting) Ton
tine.
One month’s grace allowed In the payment o f
Premiums on Tontine Policies, and ten days’ grace
on all others, the Insurance remaining in full force
during the grace.
Absolute-security, combined with the largest liber­
ality, assures the popularity and success o f this com
pany.
GOOD AGENTS, desiring to represent the Com­
pany* are Invited to address J. 8. GAFFNEY, Superinten lent o f Agencies, at Home Offlne.

A

YEAR

BOOH

OF

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

WELDED CHROME STEEL AND IRON
Iri Round and Flat Bars, and 5 ply Plates and Angles
F O R S A F E S , V A U L T S , A c.
Cannot he Sawed, Cut or Drilled, and practically
Burglar-Proof.

C IIR O M F

FOR

J3teamsftips.

MANHATTAN

gtXiscclIaumxs.

BAGGING.

GENERAL TRANSATLANTIC CO.

B e tw e e n N E W

C O T T O N SA ILD U C K

Price of the Review, bound in cloth, - Sit 0 0
To Chronicle Subscribers, - - - - - 1 5 0
Postage (when sent by Mail) - - - 10

W IL L IA M

S p ecia l T r a in fr o m

W illia m

L O U IS D E B E B I A N , A g e n t,
N o . 3 R o w lin a r'G re en .

Œottxrn.
Jd h n L . Bu l l a r d .

U N IT E D S T A T E S H U N T IN G CO.
A full supply, all Widths and Colors, always In stock
N o . 1 0 9 D u a n e S treet.

H

enry h

. W

heeler.

Bullard & Wheeler,
CCTT0N COMMISSION MERCHANTS
N EW YORK.
ALSO

R A G G IN G

AND

IR O N

T IE S ,

(FOR BALING COTTON).
Advances made on Cotton Consignments and Special
Attention given to purchase and sale o f FUTURE
CONTRACTS OF COTTON.

Alexander & Cargill,
COTTON BROKERS,
AU G U ST A, G E O R G IA .
Entire attention given to purchase o f COTTON
TO ORDER for SPINNERS and EXPORTERS.
C o r r e s p o n d e n c e So l i c i t e d .
R e v e r e n c e s .— National Bank o f Augusta, Ga
Henry H enti A Co., Commission Merchants, New
Y o rk ; William B. Dana A Co., Proprietors C o u m i d .
c l a l & F i n a n c i a l Ch r o n i c l e , and other New York
House!.________________________ ___________________

Dennis Perkins & C o.,
COTTON BROKERS,
1 2 5 P e a r l htreet, N e w Y o r k .
Orders fo r Spot Cotton and Futures promptly
executed,

W

S treet. N e w Y o r k .

A nd all kind! o f
COTTON CANVAS, FELTING DUCK, CAB
COVERING, BAGGING, RAVENS DUCK, SAIL
TW INES, &C„ “ ONTARIO” SEAMLESS
BAGS, “ AW NING STRIPES.
AUo, A gent!

H a v r e to P a r le .

The Compagnle Generale Transatlanttque delivers
at its office in New York special train tickets from
Havre to Paris. Baggage checked through to Paris
without examination at Havre, provided passengers
have the same delivered at the Company’s dock in
New York, Pier 42 North River, foot o f Morton St.,
at least two hours before the departure o f a steamer.

B . D ANA & CO.,

PUBLISHERS,
i !) Ac SI

Y O R K and H A V R E .

From Pier (new) 42, North River, fo o t o f Morion St.
LA BRETAGNE, de Jousselin, Sat., Jan. 1.10 À. M.
LA NORM AN DIE, de Kersabiec.Sat.. Jan. 8. 2 P. M.
L A GASCOGNE, Santelli.........Sat., Jan. 13, 0 A .M .
Travelers by m is line avoid both transit oy i.ugusu
railway and the discomforts o f orossing the Channel
in a small boat.
P r i c k o r PASSAGE (Including wine):—T o H a v r e First cabin, $100 and ISO; second cabin, $80; steer­
age, $22—including wine, bedding and utensils. Re­
turn tickets at very reduced rates. Checks on Banque
Transatlantique, Havre and Paris.ln amounts to suit.

Bliss, F a b y a n & Co.,

Manufacturer! and Dealer! in

W ORKS,

n n n O K t V M , TV. Y .

Bankers,
ONLY
Stock Brokers,
Merchants,
Direct Line to France.
Investors.

C O N T E N T S »
R e tro s p e c t o f 1 8 8 6 .
M erca n tile F a ilu r e s .
B a n k in g a n d (flu a u c la l—
United State»—National Bank Figures and
Currency Movement».
New York Citv—Bank Return», <fco.
London—Money Market and Bank Return,«.
C o m m e rc ia l—
L IF E
IN SI R A S C E C O M P A N Y
United States—Foreign Commerce, Trade
156 & 158 BROADWAY. NEW YORK.
Balance, U. S. E xports and Im port» of
HENRY STOKES, President.
Leading Articles. London—R eview o f
From Philadelphia Inquirer, Jan. 80.1884.
year, Bank Returns, &c.
The new plan o f the Manhattan L ife Insurance
Company continues to meet the popular favor. It T h e M o n e y M a r k e t combines the protective feature or life insurance
Influences, and Prices o f Call Loans and
with the investment feature o f the endowment
policy, while it avoids the expense attending the
Commercial Paper since 1879.
latter by the ordinary method. An improvement has
also been added to this new form or p llcy within G o ld a n d S ilver—
the year, which wives the assured the option at the
Production, Consumption, E xports and Im ­
end o f the period o f taking the endowment in cash
or o f continuing trie insurance for a much larger
ports o f Gold and Silver In the United
amount without any further payment o f premium
States and abroad.
independent o f the condition o f health at the time
ESTABLISHED IV ISV»
F o r e ig n E x c h a n g e —
Market and Prices In New York, 1871T886.
I n v e s t m e n t ! a n d s p e c u la tio n —
Compound Interest Table, Showing A ccu ­
mulations of Money in a Series o f Years.
Table Showing the Rate Per Cent Realized
on Securities Purchased at different prices
(without regard to date of maturity.)
W A R R E N , JONES Ac G R A T Z
Stock Speculation in New York.
S T . L O U IS , H o .
U n ited S tates D eb t a u d S ecu rities—
Debt o f the United States, 1791-1886.
Manufacturers of Pure Jute Bagging.
Prices o f U. S. Bonds, 1860-1886.
IM PO RTERS OP
State D e b ts a n d S ecu rities—
IRON C O TT O N T IE S.
State Debts and Immunity from Prosecution.
Prices o f State Securities. 1860-1886.
R a ilr o a d s a n d th e ir S ecu rities—
Railroad Statistics of the United States
New York, Boston, Philadelphia,
Railroad Earnings.
Prices o f Railroad Bonds, 1882-1886.
SELLING AGENTS FOR LEADING BRANDS
The New York Stock M arket,T881-1886.
B R O W N & B L E A C H E R S H IR T IN G S
Stock Quotations N. Y. E xch., 1882-1886.
A N D S H E E T IN G S ,
“
Boston “
1886.
PRINTS, DENIMS, TICKS, DUCKS, *0.
*>
Phila. “
1886.
T o w e ls ,Q u ilt s , W liite G o o d s A H o s ie r y
Balt.
”
1886.
Drills, Sheetings, <tc, for Expor tir a d e.

Brinckerhoff, Turner
& C o.,

STEEL

f lr o n i a r a F V ««

a l t e r

COTTON

&

F

a t m a n

,

BROKERS,

53 B E A V E R S T R E E T , N E W Y O R K .
NOW R E A D Y.

H

A N

D

- B O

O

K

OF

C H A R L E S B. T A I N T E R ,
COTTON MERCHANT,
COTTON E X C H A N G E B U IL D IN G .
SPEC IAL ATTENTION TO COTTON FUTURES

Railroad Securities.

F. Hoffmann,
COTTON BROKER AND AGENT,

JOSEPH Cl LLOTTS

STEEL PENS

J U L Y , 1886.
Price in Bed Leather Covers, - • $1 00
To Subscribers of the Chronicle,
75

GOLD MEDAL PARIS E X P O S m O N - 1078.

THE MOST PER FEC T OF PENS




38 R U E

DE LA BOURSE, H A V R E .

Geo. Copeland & C o.,
COTTON BROKERS,

W IL L IA M
j 7 9 & d*

B . D A N A &. CO

ILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK.

134 P E A R L S T R E E T , N E W Y O R K .

T H E "C H R O N IC L E ,

X

M o tio n .

^ is ttlX n n z o n s .

(C o tto n .

Walter T. Hatch,
Nath’l W. I . Hatch.

Woodward & Stillman,
Post Building, 16 & 18 Exchange Place,

for

IN M A N , SW A N N & Co

YORK.

LOANS MADE ON ACCEPTABLE SECURITIES.
Sp e c ia l A t t e n t io n

to o r d e r s fo r

F u tu r e D e l iv e r y

of

Co n t r a c t s

Co t t o n .

Mew Y ork.

OF SPINNERS
B rn
ut

Robert Tannahill & C o.,

Williams, Black & C o.,
1

C o tto n E x c h a n g e B u ild in g , N e w Y o r k ,

1 0 S o u th W i l l i a m S t. & 51 S ton e S t.,
NEW YORK.

W IL L IA M

STOCKS, P E T R O L E U M ,
ORDERS EXECUTED

S e lm a , M o n tg o m e r y a n d N e w Y o r k .

R . Macready & C o.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

IN

NEW YORK, CHICAGO, NEW OR­
LEANS, ST. LOUIS, LIVERPOOL,
HAVRE, &c.
Ste r n & Co.,
New Orleans, La.

BUYERS FOR AMERICAN MILLS.

STREET,

C O TT O N , G R A IN ,
P R O V IS IO N S , C O F F E E ,

Le h m a n ,

COTTON.

L e h m a n , D u r r A Co
Montgomery, Ala.

L E H M A N B R O ’S,
C otton

F actors

AND
C©OTMISSION M E R C H A N T S ,
No. 40 EXCHANGE PLACE,
MEMBERS OF THE COTTON, COFFEE AND
PRODUCE EXCHANGES.
U p -to w n O ffice , No . 204 Ch u r c h St r e e t ,

B U IL D IN G ,

NEW YORK.
Cotton, Coffee, Grain and Petroleum Bought and
Bold for Cash, or carried on Margin, on the various
Exchanges in New York City.

Henry Hentz & C o.,
MERCHANTS,

N ew Y o r k .
Orders executed at the Cotton Exchanges in New
fork and Liverpool, and advances made on Cotton
tnd other produce consigned to us, or to our corres­
pondents in Liverpool: Messrs. L. Rosenheim A
sons and A. Stern A Co.; in London, Messrs. B.
Mewgass & Co.

Mohr, Hanemannôc C o.,
COTTON

EXCHANGE

B U IL D IN G ,

New York,

C O F F £ £

Sp e c ia l A t t e n t io n G iv e n

to the

E x e c u t io n

OF ORDERS FOR FUTURE CONTRACTS.

A N D P R O V IS IO N S

at the NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE and

Hubbard, Price & Co.,

the CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE.

C otto n E x c h a n g e , N e w Y o r k ,

Co r r e s p o n d e n t s :

AND

Messrs. Smith, Edwards & Co., Cotton Brokers
Liverpool.
Jas. Lea McLean, New Orleans.

G.

Schroeder &

C o.,

Snooessors to W a RB A SCHROEDER,

C O M M IS S IO N

MERCHANTS,

Cotton Exchange Building,
NEW

YORK.

0rler8 for future delivery of Cotton executed in
Hew York and Liverpool; also for Grain and Pro­
visions in New York and Chicago.

Rountree & C o.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
tO T T O N E XCH AN GE, NEW Y O R K , and
N O R FO LK , VA.
COTTON, G R AIN. PROVISIONS.
Stocks and Petroleum.
Orders executed in New York, Chicago and Llvrpool. All grades of cotton suitable to spinners’
suits offered on favorable terms.

Geo. H . McFadden& Bro.
COTTON

[MERCHANTS,

P H IL A D E L P H IA .
( L i v e r p o o l Co r r e s p o n d e n t s ,




S treet,

L IV E R P O O L ,

Bethlehem Iron Com p’y
40 and 42 W a ll Street,
M a n h a t ta n B u il d in g ,

N ew Y o r k .

Phénix Insurance Co.
OF

BROOKLYN,

Office, 195 Broadway, New York City
Statement o f Company 1et Day o f Jan., 1886.
CASH C A P I T A L .................................... $1,000,000 05
Reserve for unearned premiums.......... 2.845,048 84
Reserve fo r unpaid losses................... .
344,473 63
714,167 42
Net surplus................................... ............
$4,910,483 36

C R O W E L L , P r e sid e n t.

WM. R. CROWELL, Vice-President.
PH ILA N D ER SH AW , Secretary.
GEO. H . FISKE, Assistant Secretary.
FRANCIS P. BURKE, Seo’y Local Dep’t.

N orth British
OF

LO N D O N AMD E D IN B U R G H .

Price, Reid & C o.,
NORFOLK, YA .

Cotton Brokers & Commission Merchants,
Liberal advances made on Cotton consignments.
Special attention given to the sale o f cotton to ar­
rive or in transit for both foreign and domestic mar­
kets. Orders fo r Future Contracts executed in New
York and Liverpool.

Gwathmey & Bloss,
COM M ISSION

MERCHANTS,

No. 123 PE A R L ST., NEW YORK.
Orders fo r future delivery o f Cotton executed in

New York and Liverpool ; also fo r Grain and P ro

II.

C L IS B Y

&

C O .,

Pu r ch ase

o n l t on

Æ TNA
Insurance C o m p a n y
OF

HARTFORD.

Capital.........................................
Liabilities fo r unpaid losses
and re-insuranoe fu n d ...
Net S u r p lu s ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$4,000,000 00
2,057,776 24
3,202,320 41

ALA.

Or d e r s Fo r

a

No. 3 Cortlandt St., New York
J A S . A . A L E X A N D E R , A g e n t.

COTTON BUYERS,
M ONTGOM ERY,

$3,421,870 76

Losses paid in U. S. in 19 years . .8 1 0 ,* * 0 ,1 3 8 0 3
U. 8. B r a n c h O f f i c e , 54 W i l l i a m 8 t ., N. Y .
CHAU. E. W HITE, BAM. P. BLAGDEN,
Managers.
JAS. F. DU DLEY, Deputy Manager.

A sse ts J a n . 1 , 1 8 8 6 ....... $ 9 ,2 6 0 ,0 9 6 6 5

visions is New York and Chicago.

JO H N

Invested and Cash Fire Assets..................$3,421,870 76
LIABILITIES.
$1,199,247 42
Reserve fo r Unearned Premiums. .
150,887 77
Reserve for Unpaid Losses........... .
56,150 39
Other Liabilities.............................. .

Net Surplus................................ .* ,0 1 5 ,5 8 5 I S

Co m m i s s i o n

FELLOWES, JOHNSON & TILESTON,
C O T T O N , S T O C K S , B O N D S , A c .,

F R E D E R IC XEREGA [ft GO.

W a te r

Receive consignments o f Cotton and other Produce,
and execute orders at the Exchanges in Liverpool.
Represented in New York at the office o f
SAM’L D. BABCOCK,
32 Nassau Street, New York.

U. S. Branch Statement Jan. 1 ,1 8 8 6 .

■t the NEW YORK COFFEE EXCHANGE, and

G R A IN

COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
IT

& Mercantile Ins. Co.

C O T T O N
LEANS COTTON EXCHANGES. Also orders for

B. F. B A B C O C K & CO.

STEPH EN

8 S o u th W i l l i a m S t., N e w Y o r k .
EXECUTE ORDERS FOR FUTURE DELIVERY
•t the NEW YORK, LIVERPOOL AND NEW OR­

NO. 116 CHESTNUT STREET,
P H IL A D E L P H IA .
No. 49 MAIN STREET,
NORFOLK, VA.
SPINNERS’ ORDERS SOLICITED.

NEW YORK.

Special attention given to the parchase and sale of
FUTURE CONTRACTS
In New York and Liverpool.

J. C. Graham & C o.,

Cotton Commission Merchants,

BANKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

Cotton Commission Merchants,

COMMISSION

Street, N.a Ye n
.,
N ew H v

Personal attention given at the EXCHANGES to
the purchase and sale o f STOCKS and BONDS for
cash or on margin.
DEPOSITS RECEIVED—subject to check at sight
—with interest upon balances.
Special attention paid to INVESTMENTS and
accounts o f COUNTRY BANKERS.

Edward H.Coates & C o.,

OFFERED ON TERMS TO SUIT.

EXCHANGE

BANKERS,
14 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK.
Rravptt n m ™ 5 1 3 * Church
uRANCH OFFICES { S 0 8 C h a p e i

COTTON MERCHANTS,

COTTON, ALL GRADES, SUITABLE TO WANTS

COTTON

H enry P. Hatch.
A rthur M. Hatch.

W . T . Hatch & Sons,

MERCHANTS,

NEW

[J a n u a r y 1 ,1887,

25 W ILLIAM 81 B EET, N EW YORK.

Orders is “ Futures” executed at N. Y Cotton Exo

Co m

m e r c ia l

U

n io n

A ssurance Co., l im it e d ,
OF LONDON,
;
Qflet, G *. Pine é William Strut», New Jerk,
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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102